Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual statement of the trade and commerce of Saint Louis .."

See other formats


This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 
to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 
publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 

We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 



at |http : //books . google . com/ 



i 



lCI#l>5TANf^Dj?| 

UNIVCRSITV 



i^'^:mjJuJm^Jk ^aytJf^a^ ; 




Digitized by ' 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



ANNUAL STATEMENT 



OF THE 



Trade and Commerce 



OF 



SAINT LOUIS, 

FOR THE YEAR 1915, 



SBPOSTED TO THE 



ImM Mm Hi t lout 



KT. 



EUGENE SMITH, Secretary. 



ST. LOUIS. MO. 

Pbiss of B. p. Studiat & Oo. 

1916. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



OPRCBRS OP THB 

MERCHANTS* BXCHANQE OF ST. LOUIS 

SINCB ITS OR0ANIZATION. 

Year. President. Yice-PretldenU. 

IMS Henry J. Moore. 0.8. Greeley. A.W. Fagin. 

1808 George Partridge. C. 8. Greeley. A. W. Fagin. 

1864 Thomas Rioheton. Barton Able. O. L. Tuoker. 

1865 Barton Able. E. 0. 8tanard. H. A. Homeyer. 

1866 E. 0.8tanard. Alex. H. Smith. D.G.Taylor. 

1867 C. L. Tuoker. Edgar Amet. D. G. Taylor. 

1868 John J. Roe. Geo. P. Plant. H. A. Homeyer. 
1860 Geo. P. Plant. H. A. Homeyer. Nathan Cole. 

1870 Wm. J. Lewis. G. G. Waggaman. H. C. Yaeger. 

1871 Gerard B. Allen. R. P. Tansey. Geo. Bain. 

1872 R. P. Tansey. Wm. H. Soudder. C. H. Teiohmann. 
1878 Wm. H. Soudder. 8. M. Edgell. Web M. SamueL 
1874 Web M. SamueL L. L. Ashbrook. John F. Tolle. 
1876 D. P. Rowland. John P. Meyer. Wm. M. Senter. 

1876 Nathan Cole. John Wahl. F. B. Darldson. 

1877 John A. Soudder. N. Sohaeffer. Geo. Bain. 

1878 Geo. Bain. H. C. Haarstiok. OraU Alexander. 
1870 John WahL Michael MoEnnis. W. J. Lemp. 

1880 Alex. H. Smith. Chas. B. Slaybaok. J. O. Ewald. 

1881 Miohael MoEnnis. John Jackson. A. T. Harlow. 
1888 Chas. E. Slaybaok. Chas. F. Orthwein. Frank Gaiennie. 
1888 J. C. Ewald. D. R. Francis. D. P. Grier. 
1884 D. R. Francis. John P. Keiser. C. W. Barstow. 
1886 Henry C. Haarstiok. S. W. Cobb. D. P. Slattery. 

1886 S. W. Cobb. Chas. H. Teiohmann. J. Will Boyd. 

1887 Frank Gaiennie. Louis Fusx. Thomas Booth. 

1888 Chas. F. Orthwein. J. H. Teasdale. Chas. A. Cox. 
1880 Chas. A. Cox. Hugh Rogers. Alex. Euston. 

1800 John W. Kauffman. Marcus Bemheimer. G. M. Flanigan. 

1801 Marcus Bemheimer. Geo. H. Plant. S. R. Francis. 
1803 Isaac M. Mason. Wm. T. Anderson. Wallace Delafleld. 
1808 W. T. Anderson. Roger P. Annan. L. C. Doggett. 

«»*{^J:?.'& {^:i:i& }E.A.Pom«oy. 

1806 Thos. Booth. 0. Marquard Forster. Geo. D. Barnard. 

1806 C. H. Spencer. Amedee B. Cole. Clark H. Sampson. 

1807 H. F. Langenberg. Chris. Sharp. Wm. P. Kennett. 
1806 Chris. Sharp. Henry H. Wemse. Oscar L. Whitelaw. 
1800 Wm. P. Kennett. Oscar L. Whitelaw. Daniel E. Smith. 
1000 XMcftr Lc_WlU)telait* Wm.T. Haarstiok. . FroQ^k B. Kauffman« 
^Otti:%9nTlHa^|ick} ''la^.^i'&iiA:^./. - :t. a. Ballard. 

im •SeSVv"5wj> • ' t. R; BaJlaNl;V : ;/. .Win. A. Gardner. 

1908* T.' R.'^BallaiK^ ' " • tTfti: AVGafdhet'.' • *ChkYles H. Huttlg. 

1904 H. H. Wemse. Otto L. Teiohmann. M. G. Richmond. 

1005 Otto L. Teiohmann. Manley G. Richmond. John E. Geraghty. 

1906 Manley G. Richmond. William H. Danforth. Edward DcToy. 

1907 George H. Plant. Edward DeToy. Edward E. Scharff. 
1008 Edward Deyoy. Edward E. Scharff. ManningW.Cochrane 
1900 Edward B. Scharff. Manning W. Cochrane. Nat. L. Moflltt. 

1010 Manning W. Cochrane. Nat. L. Moflltt. C. Bemet. 

1011 James W. Gameau. C. Bemet. John L. Messmore. 

1012 Christian Bemet . John L. Messmore. Marshall Hall. 
1018 John L. Messmore. Marshall Hall. Roger P. Annan, Jr. 
1014 Marshall Hall. Roger P. Annan, Jr. Geo. C. Martin, Jr. 

1915 Roger P. Annan, Jr. Thos. K. Martin. Cary H. Bacon. 

1916 Jacob Sohreiner. John O. Ballard. Edw. C. Andrews. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

1862 Clinton B Fisk. 

1868-64 J. H. Alexander. 

1865-1911 Geo. H. Morgan. 

1913-1916 Eugene Smith. 



282402 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MERCHANTS* EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS. 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1916. 

PRBSIDSNT. 

JACOB 8CHREINBR. 
F1B8T Yicb-Prxsident, JOHN O. BALLARD. 

8xcoin> Vicb-Prssidbnt, EDWARD C. ANDREWS. 

DIRSCTORS. 
1916. 1916-1917. 

MARSHALL HALL, ROGER P. ANNAN, Jr. 

CARL H. LANGENBER6, ALBERT J. ROGERS, 

WM. M. LOUDBRMAN, FREDERICK KREY, 

MARTIN J. MULLALLY, LOUIS A. VALIER, 

HARRY E. PAPIN, J. PRANK VINCENT. 

EUGENE SMITH, Sbcrbtart and Trsasurbr. 
PERCY WERNER, Attornby. 

COMMITTBB OF APPBALS. 

J. ORAN ALLEN, JOHN H. LOUDERMAN, 

J. C. BBOCKMEIER, R. H. LEONHARDT, 

BEN. P. CORNELI, PARKER SAUNDERS, 

L. RAY CARTER, W. C. 8EELE, 

GEORGE HARSH, CHARLES G. SIMON, 

WM. C. McCOY, W. K. STANARD. 

OOMMITTBK OF ARBITRATIOK. 
FIRST SIX MONTHS. BBOOHD SIX MONTHS. 

SAMUEL PLANT, TRAVE ELMORE, 

LOUIS F. SCHULTZ, M. J. CONNOR, 

FRED. DBIBEL, ZEB. P. OWENS, 

JAMES M. GETTYS, LOUIS A. ENGBL, 

ARTHUR C. BERNET, WM. T. BROOKING. 

RXAL B8TATB. 

JACOB SCHRBINER, Chairman. 
JOHN O. BALLARD, ROGER P. ANNAN, Jr., 

EDWARD C. ANDREWS, MARSHALL HALL. 

HONORARY MBMBBRSHIP. 

EDWARD DEVOY, Chairman. 
CHAS. A. COX, GEORGE J. TANSBY, 

HENRY C. HAARSTICK, OTTO L. TEICHMANN, 

ALEXANDER H. SMITH, OSCAR L. WHITELAW. 

FINANCB. 

ROGER P. ANNAN, Jr., Chairman. 
MARSHALL HALL, Yioe-Chairman. 
JOHN L. MESSMORE, L. RAY CARTER, 

WM. M. LOUDERICAN. 

IfSMBBRSHIP. 

LOUIS A. VALIER, Chairman. 
ALBERT J. ROGERS, J. FRANK VINCBNT. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



COMMITTEES AND INSPECTORS FOR 1916. 



TRAPnC DKPAIITMCNT. 
Board of Maaagen. 
JOHN O. BALLABD, Obalrman. 
LOUIS A. VALIBB, Yloe-Ofaairman. 0HA8. RIPPIN. OomBlMioner. 

EDWABD a ANDREWS, MAXWELL KENNEDY, W. T. BBOOEINO, 
0HA8. F. BBARDSLET, A. E. BEBNET, FRED. W. LANGENBBRG. 

JOHN D. MULLALLY, R. P. ATWOOD, OEO. F. POWELL, 

ADERTON SAMUEL, A. J. HEZEL, A. F. EATON. 

DKPAIITMCNT OP WCIOHTS. 

J. FRANK YINOENT, Cbalpman. 

ROBEBT a YALIER, Yice-Ohairmaii. JOHN DOWER, BnperrlMr. 

W. J. EDWARDS, GEORGE HARSH, CARL H. LANGENBBRG, 

GEO. O. MARTIN, Jb., HERMAN A. yon RUMP, JOHN L. WRIGHT, 

WALTER H. TOBERMAN. 

COMPLAINTS. 
ALBERT J. ROGERS, Chairman. 
WILBUR B. CHRISTIAN, GARY H. BACON, N. L. MOFFITT. 

V. M. JONES. 

RULES. 
ROGER P. ANNAN. Jr., Chairman. 
JOHN L. MESSMORE. FRED. W. 8EELE, CLAUDB A. MORTON, 

THOS. B. TEA8DALE, THOS. K. MARTIN. 

CONTRACTS FOR FUTURE DELIVERY. 
MARTIN J. MULLALLY, Chairman. 
M. J. CONNOR, HARRY W. DAUB. G. A. YENINGA, 

W. C. 8EELB. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEE OP APPEALS. 
WM. M. LOUDERMAN, Chairman. 
C. L. CARTER. ED. F. OATLIN, TRAYB ELMORB, 

THOS. H. FRANCIS, A. C. ROBINSON, & A. WHITEHEAD. 

MARKET REPORTS. 
CARL H. LANGENBBRG, Chairman, 
WALLACE B. STEWART, JOHN LOUDERMAN. NAT. L. MOFFITT, 

B. B. IMMER. GEO. a MARTIN, Jb. 

GRAIN. 
EDWARD C. ANDREWS, Chairman. 
HENRY C. SCHULTZ, WM. T. HILL. J. B. DIXON, 

SAMUEL PLANT. GILBERT SEARS, C. F. BEABDSLEY. 

BARLEY. 
FRED. C. ORTHWBIN, Chairman. 
F. W. FEUBBBACHBR, EDWIN J. GREVE, WM. J. LEMP. 

FLOUR INSPECTION. 
HENRY BURG. Chairman. VICTOR ALBRECHT, VIce-Chairman. 

CHRISTIAN BERNET, AL. Y. IMB8, FRBD. HATTERSLEY, 

ROBERT H. LEONHARDT. 
FLOUR INSPECTOR. 
AUGUST BUMP. 
PROVISIONS. 
FREDERICK KREY, Chairman. 
HUGH FERGUSON, JAMES M. GBTTY8. J. J. P. LANGTON. 

GUSTAV BI8CHOFF, Jr., 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



COMMnrTEES AND INSPECTORS, 1916— Continued. 



PROVISION INSPECTOR. 
JOHN RING. 
SEEDS AND CASTOR BEANS. , 
ADOLPH OOKNELI, Ohalrman. 
J. PAUL BEBGEB, A. J. BABNIDGE, B. W. POMMEB. 

SEED AND CASTOR BEAN INSPECTOR. 

0HABLE8 A. WILSON. 

HAY. 

WALTEB H. TOBEBMAN, Chairman. D. W. CLIFTON, Secretary. 

HBNBT W. MACK. O. H. MEYER, DAN. 8. MULLALLY. 

JOHN J. SOHULTB, F. M. McOLELLAND. 

THE COMMITTEE ARC INSPECTORS OP HAY AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. 
LOUIS AND PLACES CONTIOUOUS THERETO. 

PRODUCE. 
MANLEY G. BICHMOND, Chalrmaa, 
F. G. HAUEI8EN, LOUIS A. JASPEB, W. J. TEMPLBMAN. 

FLOOR. 

EDWABD M. FLESH, Chairman. 

W. E. 8TEWABT, Vice Chairman. 

WM, M. CONNOB. THOS. P. LAHEY. JULIUS J. ALBBBCHT. 

TUBNEB B. MOBTON. C. L. CABTEB, J. P. BEBGEB. 

H. B. LOUDEBMAN, 8r. 

POSTAL AFFAIRS. 
J. J. P. LANGTON. Chairman. 
EDWABD DEVOY, K B. HANNIGAN, F. B. CHAMBEBLAIN, 

JAMES W. GAENEAU. 

LEGISLATIVE. 
LOUIS A. VALIEB. Chairman. 
L. BAY CARTER, W. H. DANFORTH, CHAS. ESPEN8CHIBD, 

JOS. W. STEELE. 

INSURANCE. 
HARRY E. PAPIN, Chairman. 
LOUIS A. ENGEL, JOHN R. GOODALL, ALFRED C. CARR, 

NICHOLAS R. WALL. 

RECEPTION AND ENTERTAINMENT. 
E. D. TILTON. Chairman. 
EDWARD M. FLESH, Vice Chairman. 
P. P. CONNOR. CHARLES A. COX, WM. H. DANFORTH, 

HUGH FERGUSON, D. R. FRANCIS, FRANK GAIENNIE, 

JAMES W. GARNBAU, J. D. GOLDMAN. WALKER HILL, 

FRANK E. KAUFFMAN, S. A. WHITEHEAD, ALBERT J. ROGERS, 

FRED. C. ORTHWEIN, RALPH J. PENDLETON. MANLEY G. RICHMOND. 
CHARLES P. SENTER, W. K. STANARD. THOS. B. TEASDALE, 

O. L. TEICHMANN, E. L. WAGGONER. 

MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 

JOHN L. MESSMORE. Chairman. 
CLAUDE A. MORTON, EDWARD C. ANDREWS, H. W. DAUB, 

GEO. F. POWELL. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MERCHANTS* EXCHANQR OF ST. LOUIS. 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1915* 

PBXSmXNT. 

ROGER P. ANNAN, Jr. 
FIB8T Yicx-Pbbsidxnt, THOS. K. MARTIN. 

SsooND Yicb-Prbsidxnt, GARY H. BACON. 

DIRBCTOB8. 

1915. 1915-1916. 

JOHN L. ME88MORE, MARSHALL HALL, 

L. RAY CARTER, CARL H. LANOENBERO, 

BEN. 8. LANO, WM. M. LOUDERMAN, 

GEORGE HARSH, MARTIN J. MULLALLY, 

EDWARD C. ANDREWS, HARRY B. PAPIN. 

EUGENE SMITH, Sbcrbtart and Trxaburbb. 
PERCY WERNER, Attornbt. 

COMMITTBK OF APPSAL8. 

W. J. EDWARDS, C. F. BEARD8LEY, 

ALFRED C. CARR, H. W. DAUB, 

J. J. P. LANGTON, WM. T. BROOKING, 

SAMUEL PLANT, LOUIS A. VALIER, 

ADOLPH CORNELI, J. PAUL BERGER, 

FRED. W. LANGENBERG, LOUIS F. SCHULTZ. 

COMMITTBB OF ARBITRATION. 
VIB8T SIX MONTHS. BBOOHD SIX MOUTHS. 

ALBERT J. ROGERS, W. C. SEELE, 

J. ORAN ALLEN, HORACE F. KETCHUM, 

JOHN J. O'ROURKE, LUDWIG HESSE, 

HENRY HUNTER, AUG. J. BARNIDGE, 

WALLACE £. STEWART, J. C. BROCKMEIER. 

RXAL B8TATB OOMMITTBB. 

ROGER P. ANNAN, Jr., Chairman. 
THOMAS K. BfARTIN, BfARSHALL HALL, 

CARY H. BACON, JOHN L. MESSMORE. 

HONORARY MBMBBRSHIP COMMITTBB. 

H. F. LANGENBERG, Chairman. 
CHARLES A. COX, GEORGE J. TANSEY, 

HENRY C. HAARSTICK, OTTO L. TBICHMANN, 

ALEXANDER H. SMITH, OSCAR L. WHITBLAW. 

FINANCB COMMITTBB. 

MARSHALL HALL, Chairman. 
JOHN L. MESSMORE, Vioe-Chairman. 
CHRISTIAN BERNET, L. RAY CARTER, 

WM. M. LOUDERMAN. 

MBMBBRSHIP COMMITTBB. 

BEN. S. LANG, Chairman. 
CARY H. BACON, L. RAY CARTER. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



COMMITTEES AND INSPECTORS FOR 1915. 



TRAFFIC BUREAU. 
Board of Managers. 
OLAUDB A. MORTON, Ohalrman. 
LOUIS A. YALIEB, Vice-Ohairmaii. OHA& BIPPIN, Oommlisioner. 

EDWARD O. ANDRBW8, J. O. BALLABD. A. B. BBRNET, 

R. P. ATWOOD. CHA8. F. BBARD8LBY. B. T. HBZBL, 

MAXWELL KENNEDY, JOHN D MULLALLY, FRED. W. LANGENBERG 
GEORGE F. POWELL, ADERTON SAMUEL, FRED. L. WALLACE. 

DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS. 
GEORGE HARSH, Chairman. 
ROBERT C YALIBR, Yice-Ch airman. JOHN DOWER, Saperrlior. 

W. J. EDWARDS, ERICH PIOKER. GEO. C. MARTIN, Jb. 

HERMAN A. YON RUMP, JOHN L. WRIGHT. 

COMPLAINTS. 
OARY H. BACON, Chairman. 
WILBUB B. CHRISTIAN. G. A. YBNINGA, N. L. MOFFITT, 

Y. M. JONES. 

RULES. 
THOS. K. MARTIN, Chairman. 
JAMES M. GETTYS. FRED W. SEELE, CLAUDE A. MORTON, 

THOMAS B. TEASDALE. 

CONTRACTS FOR FUTURE DELIVERY. 
MARTIN J. MULLALLY, Chairman. 
M. J. CONNOR, HARRY W. DAUB, J. O BALLARD, 

W. C. SEELE. 

SPECIAL APPEALS. 
WM. M. LOUDERMAN, Chairman. 
C. L. CARTER, ED. F. CATLIN, TRAYE ELMORE, 

THOS. H. FRANCIS, A. C. ROBINSON, S. A. WHITEHEAD. 

MARKET REPORTS. 
CAItL H. LANGENBERG, Chairman. 
WALLACE B. STEWART, JOHN LOUDERMAN, NAT. L. MOFFITT, 
JACOB SCHREINER. 

GRAIN. 
EDWARD C. ANDREWS, Chairman. 
HENRY C. SCHULTZ, WM. T. HILL, E. L. WAGGONER, 

SAMUEL PLANT, GILBERT SEARS, C. F. BEARDSLEY. 

BARLEY. 
FRED. C. ORTHWEIN, Chairman. 
F. W. FEUERBACHER, HENRY GREYE, WM. J. LEMP, 

FLOUR INSPECTION. 

HENRY BURG, Chairman. 

YICTOR ALBRECHT, Yice-Chairman. 

CHRISTIAN BBRNET, C. J. HANEBRINK, FRED. HATTBRSLSY. 

ROBT. H. LEONHARDT. 

FLOUR INSPECTOR. 
AUGUST RUMP. 

PROVISIONS. 
J. J. P. LANGTON, Chairman. 
HUGH FERGUSON, JAMES M. GETTYS, SAMUEL GORDON, 

J. C. C. WALDECK. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



COMMIHEES AND INSPECTORS FOR 1915-Coiitinued. 



PROVISION IN8KCTOR. 
J. O. HINOHMAN. 



8CCD8 AND CASTOR SCANS. 

FBED. S. PLANT, Ohairman. 
J. PAUL BBBGEB. CHARLES E. PBUNTY, ABTHUB W 80HI8LBB. 

SCCD AND CASTOR SCAN INSPCCTOR. 

OHABLBB A. WILSON. 

HAY. 

WALTEB H. TOBBBMAN, Ohairman. 

D. W. CLIFTON, SecreUry. 

HENBY W. MACK. DAN. 8. MULLALLY, a fl. MEYEB. 

JOHN J. SCHULTE. F. M. MoCLBLLAND. 

The Committee are Inspectors of Hay at St. Louis and Bast St. Louis and places 
contiguous thereto. 

PRODUCE. 
MANLEY O. BICHMOND, Ohairman. 
F. S. HAUEISSEN, LOUIS A. JASPEB. W. J. TEMPLEMAN. 

FLOOR. 

BDWABD M. FLESH, Chairman. 

0. L. WEIGHT, Vice-chairman. 

WM. M. CONNOB. THOS. P. LAHEY, JULIUS J. ALBBEOHT. 

TUBNEB B. MOBTON, PABKEB SAUNDEB8, A. O. AUFDEBHEIDB. 

H. B. LOUDEBMAN, Sr. 

POSTAL AFFAIRS. 
FBED. B. CHAMBEBLAIN, Chairman. 
EDWABD DEVOY, K. B. HANNIGAN. J. J. P. LANGTON, 

JAMES W. GABNEAU. 

LCOISLATIVC. 
L. BAY CABTEB. Chairman. 
SAM. D. CAPIN, W. H. DANFOBTH. CHAS. ESPENSCHIED, 

JOS. W. STEELE. 

INSURANCE. 
HENBY E. PAPIN. Chairman. 
LOUIS A. ENGEL. JOHN B. GOODALL, ALFBED C. CABB, 

NICHOLAS B. WALL. 

RECEPTION AND ENTERTAINMENT. 

E. D. TILTON, Chairman. 
EDWABD M. FLESH, Vice-Chairman. 
P. P. CONNOB, CHABLES A. COX, WM. H. DANFOBTH, 

HUGH FEBGUSON. D. B. FBANCIS, FBANK GAIENNIE, 

JAMES W. GABNEAU, J. D. GOLDMAN, WALKEB HILL, 

FBANK E. EAUFFMAN, H. F. LANGENBEBG, A. J. BOGEBS, 
BALPH J. PENDLETON, FBED. C. OBTHWEIN, MANLEY G. RICHMOND, 
CHABLES P. SENTEB, W. K, STANABD, THOS. B. TEASDALE, 

O. L. TEICHMANN, E. L. WAGGONEB. 

MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 
JOHN L. MES8MOBE, Chairman. 
JAMES P. BUBDEAU, JACOB SCHBEINEB, JOHN E. MASSENGALE. 

ALEX. H. SMITH. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECtOtfS^ 



MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE, 

St. Louis, January 4th, 1916. 
To the Members of the Merchants* Exchange: 

Gentlemen: Your officers and directors for the year 1915 have 
concluded the work to which they were intrusted and submit herewith, 
for your consideration, a brief report of the business of the Exchange to 
which we have been called upon to give our time and attention during 
the past twelve months. There is also transmitted for your consideration 
and deliberation a detailed report of the Secretary showing the pecimiary 
condition of our organization at the close of the year just past and for 
what purposes the revenues of the Exchange and the Building have been 
expended. 

From a study of the reports of the Exchange and its respective 
bureaus it will readily be seen that an Association like the Merchants' 
Exchange has a large amount of fixed expenses that each twelve months 
must be met to properly provide for its members in the transaction of 
their business, that they may be accorded the needed facilities to compete 
with other terminal markets; likewise for the proper providing of office 
facilities for our tenants, the majority of whom are also the members of 
our Exchange. The furnishings of the Board of Directors' Room, which 
have been in use for more than a decade, were replaced with new furniture, 
etc., affording a meeting place for your Officers and Directors which is in 
keeping with the organization and one of the handsomest of its kind in 
the City. 

In many respects the year 1915 has been a very eventful one. The 
conflict between the European powers has waged unceasingly and has 
caused much uncertainty in the general business conditions throughout 
* the United States. The grain trade has been confronted with the most 
I>eculiar crop conditions in many years, with the result that trade has 
been much disturbed. Taking it ail in all, however, it will no doubt be 
found that the aggregate business of the St. Louis market has been 
quite satisfactory and well in keeping with that of previous years. 

FINANCIAL. 

The receipts from all sources for the past year aggregated $149,588 
of which amoimt $103,340 was to the credit of the Exchange account 
from membership dues, transfer fees, etc., the Department of Weights, and 
from the Real Estate interests a total of $46,247. The expenditures 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



10 TV9Ui*AND COMMSRCB OV 

for the £xohang;er^ Cunent Aooount, amounted to $108,421 and for 
the mamten^nccrbf 'the Building, or Real Estate Account $40,834, a 
total of 1149^2^.' The amount reoeived from asseeaments each year 
skoTtujf.fk (fiyjrease owing to redemption of certificates under the death 
bt»nfiffit 'a&d forfeitures for non-payment of dues. The revenues from the 
Btu!ding continue to hold up well, and are not only ample for the proper 
care and the upkeep of the property but provide a surplus which is used 
to meet expenditures of the Chirrent Account. As will be seen by the 
detailed report of the Secreatry and Treasurer, we have on hand a fund of 
$50,000 invested in United States Qovemment Bonds, non-taxable, pay- 
ing 3%, and a cash balance in bank of $2,308.04 to the credit of the 
Current Account, and $983.08 to the credit of the Real Estate Account, 
or $3,292.02 in total. 

A88B88MENT. 

As required by the Rules, the fixing of dues to be paid by the member- 
ship for each succeeding year falls upon the retiring Board of Directors. 
After fully deliberating as to the expense of the Exchange and the Traffic 
and Weighing Departments for 1916, your Board, at a meeting held 
December 21st, concluded that in view of the surplus funds on hand that 
no change be made, and that the assessment again be fixed at $40. For 
the transfer of a certificate of membership it was likewise voted that no 
change in the fee be made and the same was put at $25. 

MBMBBB8HIP. 

The number of members now on the books of the Exchange is 1,108, 
a loss in total the past year of 32, which is accounted for as follows: 
By redemption of certificates of deceased members, as provided by the 
Rules, 20; resigned, 2; expelled, 1; and forfeitures for non-payment of 
dues for the past year, 9. 

MARKET REPORTS. 

Telegraphic reports of all the leading domestic Exchanges in which 
our members are interested directly or indirectly are received by direct 
wire. Advices from the principal foreign markets are also provided by 
special telegraphic service. The tolls for such reports is one of the chief 
items of expense annually incurred by the Exchange, but your Board 
believes that the expenditure is necessary and of unquestioned benefit 
to the Market. 

RULES AND BY-LAWS. 

A number of amendments and additions to the Rules and By-Laws, 
approved by the Board of Directors and submitted to a vote of the 
Members, were adopted during the past year. 

WEIGHING BUREAU. 

In the conduct of the Department of Weights the past twelve months 
there has been no material change from previous years. Its work has 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 11 

been of marked benefit to the members and the £xchang:e at hurge. The 
revenues for all services performed by the Bureau aggregate $39,991.48, 
and the expenditures footed $41,722.08, leaving a deficit of $1,730.60, an 
amount about equal to that of the preceding year. Although the Bureau 
continues to show a loss annually, your Board of Directors feel that 
the results accomplished for the good 6f the St. Louis market as a whole 
more than justify the deficit the Exchange is called upon to meet. The 
attention of the Members is called to the report of the Department by 
the Chairman and the Supervisor in another part of the report which we 
trust you will read with care believing you will find it of genei^ 
interest. 

TRAFFIC DBPARTMBNT. 

The interests of St. Louis as a terminal grain market has again been 
well served by the Traffic Department of the Exchange the past year. 
At all times the Commissioner of the Department has been watchful of 
rates going into effect that would be inimical to either the receiving or 
shipping interests. Y^enever necessary to establish the claims of St. 
Louis for readjustment of rates your Commissioner, if unable to induce 
the railroad officials to make same, has taken the matter up with the 
Public Service Commissioners or the Interstate Commerce Commisison 
and has been most successful in securing adjustments of rates that have 
been of material benefit to the market at large. The total expense of 
the Department the past year amounted to $12,583.22. That the work 
of the Department might not be confounded with outside interests the 
Traffic Committee, the past year, changed the name from that of Traffic 
Bureau to that of Traffic Department of the Merchants' Exchange. 
The Department report by the Chairman, in the following pages gives 
in detail the work accomplished the past year. We ask that you read it. 

CONVENTIONS AND CONFERBNCES. 

The position of the Merchants' Exchange has been fully maintained 
the year past as in former years. Delegates have been appointed to 
represent our interests at all the important conferences or conventions 
of a commercial character, either State or National. 

LEGISLATION. 

Whenever legislative matters, either State or National, have come up 
adverse to the members of our Exchange, or inimical to the grain trade 
at large, your Board, by the adoption of resolutions, which are sent to 
our State Representatives, or by the appointment of Committees to go 
before the Legislature, have endeavored to watch and work in behalf of 
the St. Louis market. An attack has again been made on the Exchange 
during the past year by the Attorney General of the State account of 
the Department of Weights maintained by the Exchange. Your Board 
at once directed our Attorney to defend same. The case has twice been 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



12 TBADB AND COMMBBCB OF 

postponed and it is problematical as to when a hearing will be had. 
Matters of interest to our City or State have at all times received the 
attention and endorsement of your Board of Directors. 

A8SI8TANCB. 

The custom of providing assistance for those in need or distress has 
long been an established one amongst the members of the Exchange. 
Whenever called upon, no matter what the cause, they have re8i>onded 
readily and liberally. 

IN MEMORIAM. 

With each passing year your Board is called upon to record the death 
of numerous of its members. In 1915 those of our members who died 
numbered 25, amongst whom were Michael McEnnis, a former President 
of the Exchange, serving in 1881, and Henry F. Langenberg, who was 
President of the Exchange in 1897. In each instance the Board has 
expressed the regrets of the Exchange to the bereaved families and set 
aside a page of the records to the memory of the deceased. 

CONCLUSION. 

We have endeavored at all times to carry out the wishes and directions 
of our members. The generous support accorded, has materially assisted 
us in the performance of our duty, and in closing we desire to express 
our appreciation to the members of the many Committees who have 
responded to the demands made upon their time, and to the membership 
at large. The realty interests of your Exchange, as well as the executive 
affairs of our organizations, have been ably handled by your Secretary; 
his assistants have been considerate and faithful in the discharge of their 
respective duties. We trust that our administration has met with your 
approbation. Respectfully submitted. 

For the BOARD OF DIRECTORS, 
Roger P. Annan, Jr., 

PrenderU. 



The Exchange was closed on the following days during 1915: 
January Ist — ^New Year's day. 
February 12th — Lincoln's birthday. 
February 22nd — ^Washington's birthday. 
April 2nd — Good Friday. 
April 6th — City election. 
May 31st — ^Account Memorial day. 
July 5th — ^Account Independence day. 
September 6th — Labor day. 
October 12th — Columbus day. 
November 25th — Thanksgiving day. 
December 25th — Christmas day. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



TBB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 13 



TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT. 



St. Louis, December 21st, 1915. 
To the President and Board of Directors of the Merchants* Exchange: 

Gentlemen: Following is the report of Traffic Department for 1915: 

GENERAL INCREASES IN FREIOHT RATES. 

During the jSrst part of the year the Interstate Commerce Commission 
allowed general increases of about 5 per ceat ir rates on most classes and 
commodities, between points in Central Freight Association and Trunk 
line territories, which is generally that portion of the United States 
east of the Mississippi and north of the Ohio and Potomac Rivers. 

The carriers in the territories west of the Mississippi River likewise 
applied for general increases in rates on Grain, Grain Products, Hay, 
Packing House Products, live Stock and a half dozen other commodities, 
but after a lengthy hearing these increases were denied, except on Hay 
and a small part of the Packing House Product movement. The Com- 
mission held that the Western carriers had not shown that they were 
entitled to the general increase in their revenues. 

There is now filed for^approval of the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion an entirely new set of tariffs changing the basis of rates on Grain, 
Grain Products and all Classes and Commodities, between St. Louis, 
Mo., and Southeastern and Mississippi Valley territories, which covers 
roughly that section of the country east of the Mississippi River and south 
of the Ohio River. The latter tariffs were filed to comply with orders of 
the Interstate Commerce Commission, issued over two years ago, cor- 
recting many hundreds of violations of the Long and Short Haul principle 
of the Act to Regulate Commerce in the territories mentioned. There 
are many changes of a radical character involved in these tariffs, but it 
is not known at this time whether the Commission will allow them to 
become effective or suspend them for general investigation on complaint 
of interested parties and communities. The Exchange is preparing to 
make protest against some of the things that are proposed to be done in 
these tariffs, but has not raised any objection to the general plan of adjust- 
ment or to the purpose sought tp be accomplished, which is that the 
intermediate local territory between the big basing points in the South 
will be accorded the same rates as the next more distant jobbing point, 
or a relatively better basis compared with the next more distant jobbing 
point. The effect of this shoidd be to enable the St. Louis market to get 
into many local stations in the South by direct shipment where business 
has heretofore been tributary to the basing point. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



14 TRADB AND COICMSBCB OF 

GENERAL CONDITION OF BAILBOAD8. 

The past few months have witnessed a gratifying improvement in the 
earnings of the United States Railroads in general, so that their earnings 
are now not only ahead of 1914, but even show a good increase over 
1913. It is to be hoped that there will be a little period of quiet now in 
the matter of general increases of rates so that business can settle down 
and accommodate itself to a stable rate basis. 

MIB80UBI GRAIN AND FLOUR RATBB. 

After many conferences between the Traffic Department, Committees 
of the Exchange and the Interstate as well as Missouri State Commissions, 
the settlement of the Missouri rate trouble was reached the latter part 
of September, by establishment of single rates of freight, from Missouri 
stations to St. Louis, Mo. and East St. Louis, 111. 

The Missouri Grain Dealers' Association in conjunction with the 
Traffic Department of the Exchange advocated the establishment oi 
certain rates to comply with the Interstate Commerce Commission's 
decision in the State of Missouri. The Missouri Public Service Com- 
mission refused to adopt the rates and allowed higher rates than proposed 
by us, but somewhat lower than the old rates that had been in effect 
before the State rates became effective. There was considerable dis- 
satisfaction on the part of the country shippers, owing to the action of 
the State Commission in allowing such heavy increases in rates, the 
increase in some cases reaching 40 per cent and there is still agitation in 
the Missouri Association to bring the matter before the Legislature at 
its next term. The many difficulties arising because of two sets of rates 
being effective between Missouri points and St. Louis have, however, 
been happily removed by the establishment of the single set of %ure8 
applying on all traffic. 

ILLINOIS GRAIN RATES. 

The situation in Illinois remains as it was a year ago, the State rates 
still being less to East St. Louis than the Interstate rates to East St. 
Louis or St. Loiiis. This Exchange intervened in the complaint of the 
Memphis Merchants' Exchange concerning discrimination in favor of 
Cairo as against Memphis in Illinois grain rates, because of the advance 
in the Interstate without an advance in the State figures. We suggested 
to the Interstate Commerce Commission that there should be a uniform 
advance in the State rates corresponding to the advance that was made 
in the Interstate rates in order to equalize all the markets and prevent 
the conflict between the two rates that now exists. 

TRACK CONSIGNMENTS. 

As result of complaint prosecuted by this department before the 
Interstate Commerce Commission, a very important right was settled in 
favor of the track consignor, during this year; namely, that after payment 
of the State rate from an lUinois point of origin to East St. Louis, the 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THK CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 15 

inbound frdglit charges being: Pftid by the first consignee, a new shipment 
may be made off track either by the original consignee or by his purchaser, 
upon local rates to new destinations outside of the state of origin and 
without any nght on the part of the first carrier to set up the charge fof 
the inbound haul to a higher basis than the local rate authorized for the 
haid within the state. This department had insisted upon that principle 
being recognized from the beginning of the troubles brought about by the 
variance between State and Interstate rates in Missouri in July, 1913, 
notwithstanding the most persistent opposition and efforts on the part of 
the carriers to force the members to pay on the higher or Interstate rate 
basis for the State part of the haul involved in such consignments. 
By maintaining this position and making it good before the Interstate 
Commerce Commission many thousands of dollars in freight charges 
have been saved to the members and through them to their constitu- 
ents in the country. 

SWITCHING ABSORPTIONS. 

During this year all old switching absorptions previously in effect on 
Missouri grain were reestablished. The Exchange and Missouri Grain 
Dealers' Association endeavored to have the Missouri Public Service 
Commission require the Missouri carriers to absorb switching on all 
grain at St. Louis coming from Missouri, even from the short hauls, but 
notwithstanding the fact that the Missouri Commission granted the 
increase of rates with a clearly expressed purpose in mind of requiring 
all terminal absorptions to be taken care of, the Commission refused to 
issue an order to make that promise good. 

All Illinois absorptions have remained as heretofore, and in addition 
the Illinois Central joined the ranks of the carriers who absorb switching 
on grain delivered at East St. Louis when coining from Illinois and Iowa 
points on its line or its connections. This leaves only the Chicago & 
Alton R. R. and Wabash R. R. as non-absorbing lines on Illinois grain 
delivered in East St. Louis. 

COMPLAINT or THE MEBCHANTS' EXCHANGE AGAINST THE C. & A. R. R. 

During this year the complaint as above was decided entirely in favor 
of our Exchange and the C. & A. R. R. ordered to correct the illegal 
discrimination brought about by publication of their tariff, naming lower 
rates on wheat from their Missouri stations to Chicago than to St. Louis. 
This railroad has never expressed any shame for this act of injustice, and 
apparently is content to let the. business of St. Louis move over other 
lines. 

COMPLAINT OF THE KANSAS CITY BOARD OF TRADE, CONCERNING 
GRAIN RATES TO MEMPHIS AND BEYOND. 

The above named complaint, which was prosecuted last year, was 
decided in the Spring of this year and the system of rates in effect was 
maintained, without any change, by the Interstate Commerce Commis- 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



16 TRADB Ain> COMMSBCB OF 

sion. This Exchange took an active part in the case to show that any 
disturbance in the relationship would seriously injure this market and 
the result was highly satisfactory. 

ILLINOIS CENTRAL TRANSIT PRIVILBGB8. 

The Illinois Central R. R. during this year established transit on 
through rates published on grain from Illinois Central stations in Illinois 
north and east of St. Louis to destinations in North and South Carolina, 
permitting the grain to be handled either at St. Louis, Mo. or East St. 
Louis, m. and the grain or its product reshipped on basis of through 
rates, which is important recognition of the market on their part, and 
we trust will be the forerunner of further action showing a general dis- 
position to recognize St. Louis as an Illinois Central market. 

UNIFORM BILL OF LADING AS AFFECTED BT CUMMINS* BILL. 

In March of this year the socalled Cummins' Amendment to the 
Interstate Commerce Act, prohibiting common carriers from liTniting 
their liability for loss and damage either by provisions in bills of lading 
or in tariff, became law. This has the effect of wiping out the section in 
the bill of lading, which declares that railroads will not be responsible 
for losses of grain occurring because of natural shrinkage, variation in 
elevator weights or discrepancies in elevator weights. This provision 
has always been a troublesome one to claimants, because of the disposition 
of Freight Claim Agents to take refuge behind same when claims were 
presented for loss of grain in transit. The effect of this amendment is 
to require the railroad to pay for all bona fide losses. They can no longer 
require shrinkage allowances to be made on the presumption that some 
of the weight evaporated while the grain was in transit. A period has, 
therefore, been put to this troublesome matter. 

NASHVILLE RSSHIPPING RATES DECISION. 

This case, after being many years before the Commission and in the 
courts was decided finally in such a manner as is believed will materially 
benefit St. Louis as a shipping point to Southeastern territory. The 
reshipping privilege at Nashville upon basis of through rates on grain 
for Southeastern destinations will no longer be allowed in less than car- 
load lots, but only when carloads are shipped in and out; furthermore, 
the same privilege has been ordered to be extended to many other South- 
eastern points who have applied for it, so that the business heretofore 
controlled in Nashville will now be diffused over a wide destination 
territory in the Southeast and Carolinas. 

RAILWAY SECURITIES BILL. 

This bill failed of passage in the last congress and it is not known 
whether it will come up for consideration in the present congress or not. 
It provides that the Interstate Commerce Commission shall be required 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OV ST. LOUUU 17 

to pass upon the propriety of issoanoe of additional stocks, bonds or other 
obligations by a common carrier before new debts can be incurred, and 
it is generally looked npon as healthy legislation. 

DISCONTINUANCB OF BAILBOAD OWNBB8HIP OB CONTBOL OF 
BTBAHBOAT8 ON THE GBBAT LAKB8. 

Porsoant to the prohibition contained in the Panama Canal am^id« 
ment to the Interstate Commerce Act, the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission during this year ordered the raiboads to discontinue ownership 
and control of some 50 great lake steamers, which they have heretofore 
owned and operated. The purpose of tMs legislation was to encourage 
free competition by boats on waters of the United States without 
having them hampered and restricted by the ownership of railroads 
who have an interest in diminishing the movement of freight by water 
and increasing the movement by rail. The Exchange was represented 
when the ease came up for rehearing in Washington. 

BUSINSSS MSN's LBAQUB COMPLAINT CONCBBNINQ ILLINOIS 
FBBIQHT BATES. 

The Traffic Commissioner was called as a witness by the League in 
the above mentioned case, which involved rates on classes and com- 
modities other than grain, between Illinois points and St. Louis compared 
with the rates between East St. Louis, Chicago and Illinois points. 
This was anothw case where rates were thrown out of joint by con- 
dieting action of the State and National authorities. The Interstate 
Commerce Commission authorized the Interstate rates between St. Louis 
and Illinois points to be increased, while the IlUnois Commission 
refused to allow a similar increase between Illinois points and Chicago, 
and between Illinois points and East St. Louis, so that the relative 
adjustment heretofore prevailing between the three places was disturbed. 
The Exchange expressed itself as being in favor of the Business Men's 
League petition praying that the former equality of rates should be 
re-established. 

WSIGHINQ OF QBAIN AND HAT ON TEAM TBACKS AND PAYMENT FOB 
MXBCHANTS' EXCHANGE CEBTIFICATE8 FUBNISHBD CABBIBB8. 

The Exchange has for some time been anxious to have a reliable 
supervision of grain and hay unloaded at team tracks, and weighed upon 
wagon scales. We had a conference in November with Superintendent 
Dodge of the Western Weighing & Inspection Bureau and proposed to 
him that his Association take over the supervision of this wagon scale 
weighing, in return for which the Exchange agreed to continue paying 
the same basis for certificates as is now paid. We requested that the 
market at St. Louis without further delay be equalized with Chicago, by 
payment being made for the weight certificates on the basis of a nominal 
fee per car covering that grain which is weighed in elevators, mills and 
Warehouses under the supervision of the Merchants' Exchange, because 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



18 TBADB AND OOMMSBCB OF 

this service while primarily for the purpose of securing aoourate weic^ts 
for settlement between buyer and seller nevertheless inures to the 
benefit of the carriers in assuring them of payment of freight money on 
all the weight contained in the oar and eliminating all chance for friction 
between the carrier and the freight payer. Many undercharges in 
freight rates are recovered by carriers through the furnishing of these 
Merchants' Exchange weight certificates giving actual out-turn wdghts 
of cars. It is hoped this matter will be adjusted in the near future. 

ELEVATION ALLOWANCES. 

During this year the Interstate Commerce Commission authorized 
the carriers, operating at Missouri and Mississippi River markets, to 
cancel allowances made to elevators for elevation of grain shipments 
forwarded from such market points to destination territory west of the 
Mississippi River. The Exchange has expressed itself on several occa- 
sions in favor of equalizing transportation conditions on grain by the 
total elimination of elevation allowances wherever made and the can- 
cellation mentioned above was a step in that direction. 

OTHBB COMPLAINTS BEFORE THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE 
COMMISSION. 

The Exchange was represented at hearings held by the Interstate 
Commerce Commission in the complaint of the Peoria Board of Trade, 
concerning the adjustment of rates on grain from Illinois points to 
Peoria and from Peoria to the east comi>ared with the rates applicable 
from the points of origin in the vicinity of Peoria through Chicago to 
the East. It seems likely that there will be an adjustment of these 
rates that will give Peoria the benefit of its geographical location instead 
of neutralizing the same by making through rates via Chicago as low as 
via Peoria to Eastern territory. 

Individual complaints of several members of the Exchange were 
handled by the Traffic Commissioner before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission and are awaiting decision. These complaints involve traffic 
questions which did not affect the membership at large. 

Complaint of several wheat bag shippers as to unreasonable rates 
charged on empty wheat bags, returned, was filed by the Traffic Com- 
missioner with the Missouri Public Service Commission and has been 
decided in their favor. 

RATE QUOTATIONS. 

The department has been kept very busy during the year answering 
requests for rates and routes, as well as furnishing information and 
opinions as to the settlement of overcharge, loss and damage claims. 
Many mambers have been assisted in securing settlement of claims which 
had been improperly dechned by the carriers owing to a misapprehension 
as to the shippers' legal rights. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 19 

LIABILITY OF COMMISSION MERCHANT FOB FREIGHT CHARGES. 

By a deoision of an Alabama Court during the year, followed by 
other courts throughout the country, it was settled that a commission 
merchant who pays freight charges to the railroad without disclosing the 
fact at the time of payment that he is acting merely as Agent for the 
shipper at the point of origin, will be held responsible for any balance of 
freight charges that may subsequently appear to be due owing to 
erroneous rate having been charged in the first instance. Accordingly 
our members were notified, after consultation with the attorney for the 
Exchange, to serve notice on the carriers with whom they do business, 
that they act merely as Agents for the coimtry shippers as to grain 
received by them on consignment and will not be responsible for any 
additional freight money which may be shown to be due after they 
have made the first payment of freight, and settlement has been con- 
eluded with the country shipper on the basis of such first payment. 

GENERAL RATE ADJUSTMENT AFFECTING MARKET REMAINS UNDISTURBED. 

There has been no change in the general rate adjustment during this 
year that has been detrimental to the market, but the general relationship 
of rates existing between the competing markets and St. Louis has been 
maintained. 

Generally speaking where the new tariffs filed to become effective Jan- 
uary 1st, affecting rates in Southeastern and Mississippi Valley territories, 
change the relationship between competing markets and St. Louis, the 
adjustment is substantially better for this city and we look forward 
with confidence to an increased business whenever there may be any de- 
mand there. 

Yours very truly, 

C. A. MORTON, Chairman, 
Board of Managers, Traflfto Department. 

CHARLES RIPPIN, 

Traffic Comtnis8ioner. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



20 TBADB AND COMMBBCB OF 



DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS. 



DEPARTMENT OP WEIGHTS. 
St. Louis, December 2l8t, 1915. 
To the PruiderU and Board of Director9 of the MerchanU* Exchange: 

Gbntlbmbn: In ^ubmittmg the Fourteenth Annual Report of the 
Department of Weights, it is gratifying to note that with each suooeeding 
year the Department has shown a continued improvement in its work, 
and to such an extent that it is recognized by the carriers and shippen 
to and from our market as among the leading weight departments of the 
country. This recognition we feel is deserved inasmuch as it has been 
won by the well directed efforts of those in charge in co-operation with 
the committees who, during its existence, have supervised the work. 
During the year our service generally has been kept up to the high 
standard set some yeac^ ago, and it will be necessary to mention briefly 
in this report only the practical or most salient features of our work. 

It will interest the trade to know that we are being called on to weigh 
commodities other than grain, such as oil, spelter, tobacco, fertilizer, etc. 
This service is performed for members only and in conformity with rules 
and regulations governing the Department of Weights. 

In a former report we commented to some extent unfavorably on the 
use of paper in coopering cars for bulk grain loading. We are still of 
the same opinion as our recent experience bears us out. Our objection 
in the main is to its use on grain doors, as we find that entirely too much 
dei>endence is placed on the paper to prevent leakage where the doors 
are of uneven boards roughly thrown together, and while there has been 
an appreciable reduction in leaky cars, we are satisfied there is room for 
further improvement on this particular part of the car and with little 
additional expense. In this connection, will suggest that burlap be used 
at least on the grain doors as the benefits accruing will more than com- 
pensate its use. A considerable portion of the improvement apparent 
during the past year has been more especially on cars originating at 
country points where heretofore we have had a great many leaky cars. 
This improved condition has been brought about by a process of elimina- 
tion begun by the carriers about two years ago and which still continues, 
many of the old and dilapidated cars are being thrown on the scrap pile 
or stenciled ''Use for rough freight only," and also by rigid inspection of 
cars for grain loading; this, coupled with the improved coopering and 
the addition of some new cars has elevated the standard of the 
equipment far above what it was a few years ago* 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB crrr or st. louib. 21 

Our Soale Inspection Department has been efficient as heretofore, 
the efficiency, of which is verified by the out-turn weights of many cars 
handled in cross town movement. During the year we have tested and 
inspected upwards of 200 scales at Elevators and Industries under our 
supervision. As the proper testing of scales is a matter of vital importance 
and a large factor in results attained, we find it necessary to mention to 
the trade the necessity of making ample provision in the way of facilities 
and room to accommodate a sufficient amount of standard weights to 
make what is considered an accurate test. This should be done when 
building plans are drawn so that the scales will be located in such manner 
to give enough room all around. As this convenience is of mutual 
benefit and has been overiooked by some in the past, we request that it 
be considered in any new work to be done in the future; and in this 
connection will suggest that the Department of Weights be conferred 
with pMiminary to work being started. 

The policing of railroad yards by the carriers has not been altogether 
satisfactory as from time to time our supervisors report the pilfering of 
cars. This hazard is not confined solely to one place, but is more pre- 
valent on the East Side in the outlying district. As an evidence of some 
irregularity, if not of actual stealage of grain from cars in movement, we 
note frequently the absence of seals from cars and many with seals other 
than those applied at hold track or i>oint of loading. The carriers in 
most instances contend that this seal condition is a result of Samplers 
and Grain Inspectors breaking seals before entering cars, leaving them 
unsealed and without making proper record or taking exceptions when 
car is found unsealed. We, however, feel satisfied that a large i>ortion 
of the pilfering generally has beien due to inadequate policing of yards, 
especially the outer districts, and to lack of persistent effort in this direc- 
tion on the part of the carriers. As this condition has caused some 
embarrassment in the collection of claims, we have suggested to the local 
agents that some effort be made to find the actual cause so that the 
accuracy of the seal cannot be questioned. 

That there is considerable interest taken by the Federal Government 
in matters pertaining to scales in a general way and to the accuracy of 
weights in particular, was manifest at the meeting of sealers held at 
Washington, D. C, in May of this year, which was attended by the 
Merchants' Exchange Supervisor of Weights as an invited guest. This 
conference was composed of those State, City and County sealers who are 
eligible to membership, practically all of whom were from the New 
England States. The absence of Western and Mississippi Valley delegates 
was partially due to the long distance to travel, and also to the fact that 
the influence of this movement radiates from Washington, D. C, and thus 
far has only penetrated the nearby states. These circumstances, how- 
ever, did not keep St. Louis away as our City Inspector of Weights and 
Measures realizing the importance of a meeting of this character was in 
attendance. The primary purpose of this organization of sealers is to 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



22 TBADB AND COMMSBCB OF 

oo-operate with the Bureau of Standards in its efforts to have remedial 
legidation enacted by Con£:re88 rehitive to the proper standardization of 
scales and whatever pertains thereto. With this in view, a bill will be 
introduced during the present Congress which is similar to one of several 
measures that failed of passage in the last session. Its failure to pass, 
however, was due to a congestion of legislation towards the windup of 
the session. This proposed law which has the joint endorsement of the 
Bureau of Standards and the organization of sealers, was known in the 
Sixty-third Congress as House Bill No. 16876. This conference was also 
interested in corrective legislation for States, Cities and Towns, to the 
extent that there shoidd exist some uniformity in the laws governing 
weights and measures as a whole. Along this line a model law has been 
suggested as a substitute for the present laws governing weights and 
measures in many cities. This law is now in operation at Washington, 
D. C, and no doubt will be considered by many who are contemplating 
a change in their city ordinances as they relate to weights and measures. 

Considering the lateness of the present wheat crop which was retarded 
in its early movement by weather conditions, our financial showing is 
good and has improved during the recent months to such an extent that 
it compares favorably with the preceding year. 

In conclusion, we desire to thank the Board of Directors for its kind 
co-operation in our work during the year, and likewise the trade generally 
which has manifested at all times a desire to work with us to the end that 
our market continue to maintain a high standard of weights. 

Yours truly, 

JOHN DOWER, 

SupendMor. 
GEO. HARSH, 

Chairman, Committee on Weights. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THS CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 23 

REPORT OF TREASURER FOR 1915. 



CURRENT ACCOUNT. 

BECBIPTS. 

Balance on hand January Ist, 1915 $ 1 ,888 .51 

Received from Assessments 44,960.00 

Received from Department of Weights 39,991 .48 

Received from Sale of Bonds 10,100.00 

Received from Real Estate Accoimt 5,500,00 

Received from Telegraph Coimters 3,700.00 

Received from Transfer Fees 1 ,500 .00 

Received from Drawer Rents 894 .25 

Received from Non-Resident Tickets 550 .00 

Received from Samples, Etc 508 .80 

Received from Interest 429.73 

Received from Long Distance Booths 396 .00 

Received from Private Booths 168 .00 

Received from Messenger Tickets 142.50 

Total Receipts $110,729 .27 

BXPBNDITT7BB8. 

Department of Weights $ 41,722.08 

Salaries 16,506.65 

Telegraph Account 15,944.51 

Traffic Department 12 ,583 .22 

Demand Note— Mech.-Am.Nat'l Bank 4 ,000 .00 

Redemptions 3 .000 .00 

Telephone Service 2,167.37 

Contribution — Crop Improvement Work. ... 2 ,000 .00 

Furniture and Fixtures 1 ,610 .77 

Dele^tes to Conferences and Conventions. . 1 , 357 . 55 

Printing and Stationery 952 .47 

Flour Inspector 871 .64 

Annual Report 855 .50 

Attorney 750.00 

Supplies, LavatOTv, and Porters 647.96 

Samtary Cups, Water and Ice 334 .35 

RepMrs 320.79 

Provision Inspector 300.00 

Postage 282.79 

Attorney Fees, Etc., acct. Dept. of Weights 275.93 

Chamber of Commerce, U. S. A.— Dues 250 .00 

Seed Ing)ector 216 .15 

Books, lepers, Price Currents, Etc 200.10 

Coimcil of Grain Exchanges — Dues 200 .00 

Board of Directors 106 .80 

Nat'l Rivers & Harbors Congress— Dues 100 .00 

Upper Mississippi River Imp. Ass'n — ^Dues. . 100 . 00 

Taxes 96.12 

Liberty Bell Committee — Contribution. 50 .00 

In Memorium — ^Michael McEnnis 50 .00 

Judges of Election. 48 .00 

Natl One Cent Postage Ass'n— Dues 10 .00 

Sundries 510.48 

Total Expenditures $108,421.23 

Balance on hand December 31st, 1915 $ 2,308.04 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



24 TSADB AND OOMMSBCB OF 



REAL ESTATE ACCOUNT TOR 1916. 



BBCBIPTS: 



BalftDoe on hand January let, 1915 $ 1 .070.55 

Received from Rents 44,449.35 

Received from Interest 1 ,606 .40 

Received from Waste Paper, Etc 191 .89 



Total Receipts $ 47,318.19 

BXPBNDITDBBS: 

Salaries $ 7,117.25 

Taxes 7,109.16 

Repairs and Roiovations 6,820.80 

Janitor Service 6,300 .00 

Demand Note— MeclL-Am. Nat'l Bank. 6 ,000 .00 

Transferred to Current Accoimt 5,500.00 

Coal 2,735.74 

Power for Elevators and Electric light 2,220.52 

Fire Insurance 622 .73 

Water License 567 .35 

Supi>lies, Lavatory, Porters, Etc 430.86 

Liability Insurance 243.17 

Removmj: Ashes, Etc 186 .00 

Automatic and Night Signal Service 134 .80 

Boiler Insiuranoe 108.00 

Sprinkler Insiurance 62.50 

Inspecting Boilers 15.00 

Inspecting Elevators 12.00 

Sundries 148.33 



Total Expenditures 46,334.21 

Balance on hand, December 3l8t, 1915 $ 983 .98 

EUGENE SMITH, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 



25 



DBPARTMSNT OP W8IGHT8 — 1915. 

Misoellaneoufl 

Month. Salariee. Expense. Total. Earnings. Deficit. 

January, $ 3,288.40 $ 174.28 $ 3,462.68 $ 3,689.64 $* 226.96 

February. 3,328.20 282.10 3,610.30 3,509.65 100.66 

March, 3,295.80 227.06 3,522.86 3,587.51 ♦ 64.66 

April, 3,206.75 133.56 3,340.31 2,667.93 672.38 

May, 3,163.00 146.18 3,309.18 2,564.19 744.99 

June. 3,134.00 272.73 3,406.73 2,633.79 772.94 

Jtdy. 3,259.05 160.73 3,419.78 2,332.65 1,087.13 

Angust, 3,297.75 111.26 3,409.01 2,831.49 577.52 

September. 3,335.75 200.65 3,536.40 3,627.31 ♦ 90.91 

October, 3,327.25 149.14 3,476.39 3,912.03 •435.64 

November, 3,401.00 217.51 3,618.51 3,798.79 * 180.28 

December, 3,360.75 249.18 3,609.93 4,836.50 ♦1,226.67 

Totals, 139,397.70 $2,324.38 $41,722.08 $39,991.48 $1,730.60 
♦Increase. 

MARKST BEPORTS — 1915. 

From Chicago $ 3 ,600 .00 

To Chicago (one-half expense) 2,004.41 

Fron Kansas City. 1 ,874 .42 

From Minneapolis^ 1 ,450 .48 

From Toledo 514.99 

From Winnipeg 77.58 

FromDuluth 119.62 

From Omaha, including Receipts and Shipments 302.30 

New York Stock Ticker 1 , 180 .00 

Printing Tdegraph News 260 .00 

Government Crop RepcHrt « 423 .22 

Visible Supply 188.02 

Receipts and Shipments 663 .42 

DuhithFlax « , 134.92 

livestock. 354.42 

To Omaha. 117.00 

Operators „ „ 2 , 100 . 14 

London Tallow 62.00 

New York Cotton Seed Oil „ 65 .20 

St. Louis Cash Quotations 200 .00 

Miscellaneous 262.37 

Total. $ 15,944.61 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



26 



TRADB AND COMMSBCB OV 



TRAFFIC DBPABTHMNT — 1915. 



Month. Salariee. 

January $ 810.60 

February 815 .00 

March 827 .80 

April 812 .00 

May 815.00 

June 815 .00 

July 815.00 

August 865 .00 

September. 865 .00 

October 865 .00 

November 865 .00 

December 865 .00 

Totals $10,035.40 



Traveling Miscellaneous 




Expenses. 


Expenses. 


TotaL 


$ 179.19 


$ 115.10 


$ 1,104.89 


148.08 


64.71 


1,027.79 


86.00 


52.77 


966.57 


98.50 


144.33 


1,054.83 


86.45 


137.13 


1,038.58 


184.00 


271.51 


1,270.51 


126.10 


84.06 


1,025.16 


19.00 


39.37 


923.37 


78.00 


64.91 


1,007.91 


123.25 


48.20 


1,036.45 


82.75 


54.61 


1,002.36 


133.50 


126.30 


1,124.80 


1 1,344.82 


$1,203.00 


$12,583.22 



To the Credit of the Real Estate Account — 

In Safe Deposit Vault: 

U. S. Panama 38, par value $ 50,000.00 

Balance in Bank and On Hand 983 .98 

To the Credit of the Current Accoimt — 

Balance in Bank and On Hand 2,306.04 

TotaL 



$ 53,292.02 



We have audited the accounts of the Merchants Exchange of St. 
Louis for the year ended December 31st, 1915, and certify that the 
foregoing statements correctly set forth the cash receipts and disburse- 
ments of the Exchange for that year. All receipts as recorded have 
been duly accounted for, and the disbursements have been supported by 
properly approved vouchers. The balance in bank at December 31st, 
1915, has been verified by a certificate from the depositary, and the 
securities for investments have been produced for our inspection. 

MARWICK, MITCHELL, PEAT & CO., 
Chartered Accountants. 

St. Louis, Missouri, January 3rd, 1916. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 27 



RESOLUTIONS 

ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OP DIRECTORS DURING I9I5« 



CONVBNTION COUNCIL OF GRAIN EXCHANGES. 

January 12th. The Exohancre appointed Messrs. John L. Messmore, 
Edward M. Flesh and Nat. L. Moffitt as delegates to the Sixth Annual 
Convention of the Counoil of Grain Exchanges, Chioago, January 21st 
and 22nd. 

DELEGATES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Januart 12th. The Board of Directors appointed Mr. John L. 
Messmore as Councillor and Delegate, and Mr. J. J. P. Langton, as 
Delegate to the Third Annual Meeting of the Chamber of Commerce of 
the United States, which convened in Washington, D. C, February 
3rd to 5th. 

INDIANA GRAIN DEALERS* ASSOCIATION. 

Januart 12th. The Mid-Winter meeting of the Indiana Grain 
Dealers' Association, held at Indianapolis, January 26th to 28th, was 
attended by Messrs. G^. C. Martin, Jr., T. A. Bryant, and E. L. 
Waggoner. 

GRAIN GRADES MEASURE. 

Januart 26th. Resolutions were adopted urging the commission 
houses of the St. Louis Market to write Senator James A. Reed urging 
his support in favor of the Moss Grain BilL 

MISSOURI CODE COMMISSION. 

Januart 27th. The Directors endorsed the resolutions of the 
Springfield, Missouri, Club favoring the passage of the Bill before the 
Legislature, as recommended by the Missouri Code Commission. Copies 
of resolution were sent to Senator Frank G. Harris, Chairman Senate 
Committee on Code Revision; to Hon. Joshua Barbee, Chairman House 
Committee on Civil and Criminal Procedure, and to the Senators and 
Representatives from the St. Louis District. 

BILLS INIMICAL TO DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS OPPOSED. 

February 1st. Messrs. John L. Wright, C. F. Beardsley and G^eo. 
C. Martin, Jr., were appointed by the Board of Directors to represent 
the interest of the Exchange at tiie hearing before the Judiciary Com- 
mittee, Jefferson City, February 2nd, in opposition to the passage of 
House Bill No. 523 considered as detrimental to the grain shippers of 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



28 TRADS AiTD cx>innmcB OF 

the State aa it prohibited the Department of Weights of the Exchange 
from supervising the weighing of grain consigned to the St. Louis 
market. 

uncolk's bibthdat. 

Fbbruabt 9th. The Board of Directors voted to dose the Exchange 
on February 12th, Linoohi's Birthday. 

ANNUAL MBBTING KANSAS GRAIN DEALBRS' ASSOCIATION. 

Fbbruart 9th. Messrs. Roger P. Annan, Jr., and John O. Ballard 
were appointed by the Directors to attend the Eighteenth Annual 
Meeting of the Kansas Grain Dealers' Association, Kansas City, Missouri, 
February 10th to 12th. 

AMBNDMBNTS TO WARBHOUSB BILL 0PPO8BD. 

Fbbruart 9th. Resolutions iwotesiing against the adoption of 
amendments to Warehouse Bill No. S-6266, which would include the 
storage of grain, were adopted by the Board of Directors. Our Repre- 
sentatives in the Senate were asked to oppose such amendments as grain 
is graded and satisfactorily warehoused. 

ONB CENT DROP LBTTBR POSTAGB FAVORBO. 

Fbbruart 23rd. The Board of Directors endorsed resolutions of 
the National One Cent Letter Postage Association in favor of a higher 
rate of postage on periodical literature and a one cent rate for drop 
letters. 

RANKBN TRACT HEARING. 

March 15th. Messrs. Claude A. Morton and Charles Rippin were 
appointed delegates to represent the interest oi the Exchange at a public 
hearing before the Board of Public Service, March 16th, relative to 
permitting the Terminal Railway Company to occupy the Ranken Tract. 

GOOD FRIDAY. 

March 23rd. The Board iA DireeUHrs voted to cAiom the Exchange 
Friday, April 2nd, "Good Friday," in aecordanoe with the general custom. 

WBSTBRN GRAIN DBALBRS' ASSOCIATION. 

April 13th. Representatives app<Mnted by the Exchange to the 
Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the Western Grain Dealers' Association, 
Omaha, April 16th and 17th, were Messrs. Roger P. Annan, Jr., John 
Dower and Charles Rippin. 

APPROPRIATION FOR CROP IMPROVBMBNT. 

April 13th. The Directors voted to submit to a voto oi the mranbers 
of the Exchange the question of appropriating the sum of $2,000 for 
Crop Improvement Work as contemplated by the Council of Grain 
Exchanges. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 29 

CHAMBBR OF COMMBBCS OF THS U. S. A. 

Mat 4th. Preddent AnnAn appointed Mr. John L. Meflsmore as 
Connoillor and Delegate, and Mr. J. J. P. Langton as Deleg^ate, from the 
Merohants' Ezchancre in the Chamber of Commerce of the U. 6. A. 

OKLAHOMA GRAIN DBALBBS' AHD MILLSRS' ASSOCIATION. 

Mat 4th. Meisrs. Henry C. Craft and G^. C. Martin, Jr., repre- 
sented the Exchange at the Eighteenth Annual Meeting of the Oklahoma 
Grain Dealers' and Millers' Assodataon at Oklahoma City, May 18th 
and 19th. 

NATIONAL HAT ASSOCIATION CONYSNTION. 

Mat 11th. Messrs. Walter H. Toberman, V. C. Tice, Dan S. 
Mnllally, D. W. Oiifton, C. H. Meyer, Frank M. MoClelland, Martin 
MuUally, George Wittich, S. P. Steed, H. A. Johns, H. L. Boudreau, 
Fred. Deibel and J. R. Lacy were delegates to the convention of the 
National Hay Aseooiation, Niagara Falls, July 6th to $th. 

UPPEB MISSISSIPPI mYBR IHPBOVBMBNT ASSOCIATION. 

Mat 25th. President Annan appointed Messrs. Claude A. Morton, 
Chas. Rippin and Fred. L. Wallace as delegates from the Exchange to a 
conference held by the Upper Mississippi River Improvement Association, 
at Dubuque, Iowa, June 9th. 

RBFBRBNBUM NO. 0. 

Mat 25th. Resolutions were adopted favoring Ballots No. I and 
No. 2 of Referendimi No. 9 as submitted by the Chamber of Commerce 
of the U. S. A. on the Report of the SpecisI Committee of the Chamber 
on the Upbuilding of the Merchant Marine. 

GRAIN JUDOINO CONTEST — UNIVBBSITT OP MISSOURI. 

JuNB 8th. The Board of Directors voted to appropriate the sum of 
$15.00 to be used to purchase a medal to be awarded at the Annual 
Grain Judging Contest of the Argicultural College of the University of 
Missouri. 

CANAL SONS TRANSPORT LINE. 

June 8th. Resolutions were adopted by the Board of Directors and 
sent to our representatives in Congress favoring the i>etition of New 
Orleans, asking that the proposed transport line be established between 
the Caual Zone and New Orleans as that City is the logical port of 
entry. 

GRAIN dealers' NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, 

September 14th. Messrs, Marshall Hall, John L. Messmore and 
C. F. Beardsley were appointed by President Annan to represent the 
Exchange at the Annual Meeting of the Grain Dealers' National Associa- 
tion, Peoria, October 11th to Idth. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



30 TBADB AND COMMBBCB OF 

J. D. MANN. 

Beptxmber 2l8T. The Board of Directors adopted resolutioiis on 
the death of J. D. Mann, President of the Missouri Grain Dealers' 
Association, who died at Springfield, Missouri, September 20th. 

TABITF COMMITTEE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE U. S. A. 

October 14th. President Annan appointed Messrs. John L. Mess- 
more, J. J. P. Langton and Fred C. Orthwein as a Special Committee to 
represent the Exchange to cooperate with the Special Ck>mmittee of the 
Chamber of Commerce of the U. S. A. regarding a permanent Tariff 
Commission. 

NATIONAL ONE CENT LETTER POSTACM ASSOCIATION. 

November 9th. The Board of Directors voted to renew the Member- 
ship of the Exchange in the National One Cent Letter Postage Asso- 
ciation. 

NATIONAL RIVERS AND HARBORS CONGRESS. 

November 9th. Messrs. John L. Messmore, Thos. B. Teasdale and 
Harry H. Langenberg were appointed by President Annan as delegates 
to the Twelfth Annual Convention of the National Rivers and Harbors 
Congress, Washington, December 8th to 10th. 

UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION. 

NovEBiBBR 9th. President Annan appointed Messrs. Claude A. 
Morton and Charles Rippin as delegates to the Annual Convention of 
the Upper Mississippi River Improvement Association, Quincy, Illinois, 
December 1st and 2nd. 

MISSOURI PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION. 

November 9th. Resolutions were adopted by the Board of Directors 
urging the Missouri Public Service Commission to favor the establishing 
of a Passenger Station in North St. Louis, as petitioned by the Citizens' 
and Taxpayers' League. 

ILLINOIS WATERWAYS. 

November 16th. The Board of Directors adopted resolutions 
approving the plans for the construction of the Illinois Waterways as 
authorized by an Act of the Illinois Legislature, approved May 27th, 1915. 

MICHAEL MC ENNI8. 

November 22nd. A meeting of the former Presidents and the Board 
of Directors of the Exchange was held this day to take action on the death 
of Michael MoEnnis, President of the Exchange in 1881, who died 
November 21st. The Rostrum was ordered draped thirty days and a 
floral tribute in the form of an American Flag was sent in the name of 
the former Presidents, Board of Directors and Members of the Exchange. 
Committee appointed to draft resolutions were Messrs. Alex. H. Smith, 
O. L. Whitelaw, and Henry C. Haarstick. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 31 

RBFSRBNDA NO. 10 AND NO. 11. 

Dbobmbbr 14th. The Board of Directors adopted resolutions voting 
in favor of Referendum No. 10 — Report of the Special Committee of the 
Chamber of Commerce of the United States on the Department of 
Commerce concerning the business of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
and the Consular Service; and Referendum No. 11 — On the report of the 
Special Conmiittee on the Economic Results of the War and American 
Business. 

INTBRNAL RBVBNUB MBASURB. 

Dbcembbr 14th. Mr. Nat. L. Moffitt was appointed delegate from 
the Exchange to attend the meeting of the Council of Grain Exchanges 
December 15th for the purpose of considering the Internal Revenue Bill 
before Congress. 

HBNRT F. LANGBNBBRG. 

Dbcbmbbr 20th. The former Presidents and Board of Directors 
met this day to take action on the death of Henry F. Langenberg, who 
was President of the Merchants' Exchange in 1897, and who died Decem- 
ber 19th. Resolutions were adopted appointing Messrs. Alex. H. Smith, 
David R. Francis and O. L. Whitelaw a Committee to draft resolutions 
of respect. It was ordered that a floral offering be sent in the name of 
the Ex-Presidents and Board of Directors, and that the Rostrum be 
draped for thirty days. 

MOSS GRAIN bill. 

Dbcbmbbr 21bt. Resolutions were adopted by the Directors urging 
the passage of the Moss Grain Bill now before Congress, and Hon. 
Champ Clark, Speaker of the House, and Hon. Thomas P. Gk>re, Chairman 
Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, were written urging 
their support in favor of the proposed bill. 

ANNUAL MBBTING COUNCIL OF GRAIN BXCHANGES. 

Dbcbmbbr 218t. Messrs. John L. Messmore, Edward M. Flesh, 
Roger P. Annan, Jr., and Eugene Smith were appointed delegates from 
the Exchange to the Seventh Annual Meeting of the Council of Grain 
Exchanges, Chicago, January 20th and 21st, 1916. 

ROGBR p. ANNAN, JR. 

January 11th, 1916. At a meeting of the Retiring and Incoming 
Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange, held this day, the 
foUowing resolution was unanimously adopted: 

"Be it resolved that on behalf of the Members and Board of Directors 
of the Merchants' Exchange that a vote of thanks and appreciation be 
tendered the retiring President, Mr. Roger P. Annan, Jr., for the able 
and efficient service rendered the Exchange during his administra- 
tion." 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



22 TBADB AHD OOMMBRCB OV 

ST. LOUIS. 



The fourth city of the United 8tate« in popnlfttion. 

Forty million people within a nuUni of 500 miles. 

The largest and most important oity in the Louisiana pnrohase. 

The largest manufacturer of tobacco in the worid. 

Has the largest drug house in the United States. 

Has the largest woodenware house in America. 

Has the largest hardware house in the country. 

Is the best dry goods market west of the AUegbenies. 

Has the largest shoe house in the world. 

The largest shoe distributing city in the Union. 

Is the second largest millinery market in America. 

The largest inland coifee distributing center. 

One of the great railroad centers. 

The principal city on the longest river in North America. 

The largest hardwood lumber market in America. 

Makes more street and railroad cars than any other point. 

The largest horse and mule market in the worid. 

Leads in manufacture of stoves and ranges. 

Third largest live stock market. 

One of the great primary grain markets. 

Holds fourth place as a manufacturing center. 

Leads in output of American made chemicals. 

Prominent in manufacture of proprietary medidnes. 

Receipts of grain in 1915, 77,077,939 bushes. 

Receipts of flour in 1915, 3,952,190 barrels. 

Flour manufactured in 1915, 1,678,463 barrels. 

Flour shipped in 1915, 4,905,490 barrels. 

Tonnage received and forwarded in 1915, 52,937,116. 

Largest brewery in the United States, and first in output of beer. 

Has 120 public schools, with 122,397 scholars. 

Largest and most complete railway station in America. 

Has 51 public parks and squares, containing 2,764 acres. 

St. Louis Post Office ranks first in ratio of expenses to receipts. 

Pieces of mail matter originating in St. Louis in 1915, 318,512,287. 

Is renowned for beautiful residence districts. 

Has 19 miles of river front. 

Real estate transfers in 1915, $12,895,381. 

Value of buildings erected in 1915, $11,437,606. 

Personal property assessed, $532,316,320. 

Value of manufactured products in 1914, $359,797,000. 

Shipments of grain in 1915, 52,962,820 bushels. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THX CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 33 

ST. LOUIS IN 1915. 



Area, square mfles 62H 

Population (estimated) 800,000 

Real Estate and Personal, assessed value, 1915 S630, 364,840 

Bonded Debt , $24,387,000 

Bunding: permits during 1916, 9,052; cost $11,437,606 

River Front, miles 19 

Public Parks and Squares, number 51; acres 2,764 

Paved Streets, miles, January 1, 1916. 665.66 

Paved All^s, miles, January 1, 1916. 240.61 

Public Sewers, miles, to January, 1915, 830; cost $28,956,374 

Conduits for Underground Wires, miles, January 1, 1916.. 335 

Water Supply, capacity gallons per day 140,000,000 

Water Supply, average daily consumption, 1915 88,600,000 

Receipts for Water Licenses $2,094,459 

Public Schools, 1914-15: 

Number. 120 

Teachers 2,367 

Day Scholars 99,446 

Evening Scholars 22,951 

Cost, 1914-15 $566,025 

Total Cost $17,808,198 

Union Station, 32 tracks, covers acres 11 

Railroad lines Terminating in St. Louis 26 

Street Railroads, miles single track, city, 344.89; county, 

112.65 457.54 

Passengers carried 356,814,595 

Municipal Revenue, year ending April 7, 1915 $11 ,073 , 142 

Death Rate per thousand, 1915, basis 788,000 population.. 13 . 03 

Post Offtoe, Cash Receipts $5,309,829 

Post Office, pounds of Mail handled 77,575,958 

Tonnage, Total Tons Received 30,684,935 

Tonnage, Total Tons Shipped 22,252,181 

Bankaearings $4,153,529,336 

Banks and Trust Companies, capital, surplus and profits.. $72 , 388 , 744 

Tobacco Manufactured 1914, pounds 72,083,095 

Receipts of Wheat, bushels 35,056,396 

Flour Manufactured, barrels 1,678,463 

Flour Received, barrels 3,952,190 

Public Elevators, 9; capacity bushels 4,920,000 

Private Elevators, 39; capacity bushels 4,878,500 

Lead Received, pigs 3,801,190 

Zinc and Spelter Received, slabs 4,581,085 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



84 TBADB AJTD OOlfMBBCB OF 

ST. LOUIS IN 1915— CoNCLUDBD. 



Cattle Received, number 1,045,660 

U. S. Internal Revenue Collection $12,542,756 

HofiTB Received, number 2,965,144 

Sheep Received, number 690,180 

Horses and Mules Received, number 321 ,450 

Cotton Receipts, bales 776,603 

Coal (all kinds) Received, tons. 7.972,055 

Wool Receipts, pounds 30,914,120 

Hides Receipts, pounds 64,443,010 

Dry Goods, Silks, Notions, etc Sales $ 75,000,000 

Millinery " $ 10,000,000 

Vehicles, Implements and Automobfles. ** $ 20,000,000 

Plumbers* and Steamfitters* Supplies ** $ 7,000,000 

Groceries and kindred lines " $ 72,000,000 

Boots and Shoes. " $ 65,000,000 

Tobacco and Cigars. " % 55,000,000 

Hardware, Shelf and Heavy " % 50,000,000 

Woodenware " $ 20,000,000 

Lumber " $ 40,000,000 

Candies " $ 5,500,000 

Clothing, Men's and Women's " % 19,800,000 

Furniture and kindred lines " $ 15,000,000 

Stoves, Ranges and Furnaces •* % 6,750,000 

Electric Industries " % 18,000,000 

Paints, Paint Oils and White Lead " $ 14,500,000 

Saddlery and Harness " $ 3,000,000 

Hats, Caps and Gloves " $ 5,000,000 

Drugs and kindred lines, including proprietary goods, 

druggist sundries and chemicals. " % 25,000,000 

Glass, Plate and Window, Ornamental " $ 6,000,000 

Clay Products " % 3,750,000 

Furs " $ 5,000,000 

Railway Supplies " $ 12,100,000 

Trunks and Bags, etc " $ 4,500,000 

Steel Castings and Foundry and Machine Shop 

Products " % 16,000,000 

Carpets and kindred lines " $ 6,750,000 

Railroad and Street Cars Manufactured, value *' $ 18,000,000 

Paper, Stationery and Envelopes " $ 12,500,000 

Dry Plates " $ 2,800,000 

Queensware and Glassware " % 1,800,000 

Bakery Products " $ 10,000,000 

Tin, Enameled and Galvanized Ware " $ 15,000,000 

Soap and Candles " % 16,600,000 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB Cmr OF ST. LOUIS. 35 



REVIEW, 1915. 



There was a marked contrast between the forepart of the year and 
the closing months, as will be noted from the resume of the many lines 
given herewith in the following pages. In practically all lines of trade 
and industry there was a general revival of conditions the last quarter 
of the year and the prospects for 1916 bespeak for unprecedented pros- 
perity. 

The year opened with trade conditions generally gloomy, owing to 
the foreign situation and but poor progress was recorded for many 
months. The last quarter of the year, however, found that a general 
revival had set in and with but few exceptions not only were the early 
losses recovered but the increases made for the year as a whole a very 
substantial gain. The general revival of business conditions in St. 
Louis has compared most favorably with that of any city. There were 
but few failures during the year, and none of importance. Practically 
all the leading manufactiuing and mercantile lines maintained their 
same rate of dividend as in previous years, or made increases. 

The receipts and shipments of grain during 1915 were of very fair 
volume and showed but little change from that of the previous twelve 
months. The total arrivals of the principal cereals amounted to 
75,529,077 bushels as compared with 78,399,102 bushels in 1914, and the 
shipments were 52,381,360 bushels as against 57,130,890 bushels the twelve 
months prior. Wheat receipts were 35,250,404 bushels as compared 
with 33,569,047 bushels in 1914; com, 18,917,185 bushels, as against 
17,105,825 bushels, and oats, 19,402,855 bushels, as against 24,944,650 
bushels the year prior. The shipments were: Wheat, 28,179,270 
bushels, against 25,626,870 bushels; com, 9,921,320 bushels, against 
10,739,410 bushels, and oats, 20,116,250 bushels, against 13,702,300 
bushels. The amount of wheat shipped on through bill of lading for 
export aggregated 551,830 bushels, as contrasted with 6,715,029 bushels 
the year previous; com exportations aggregated 1,559,536 bushels, as 
compared with 1,061,443 bushels in 1914, and oats, 649,253 bushels and 
617,010 bushels respectively. 

The production of flour by St. Louis Mills aggregated 1,678,463 
barrels, as against 1,579,079 barrels in 1914. The output of mills outside 
of St. Louis, but owned or controlled by members of the Exchange, 
amounted to 2,389,885 barrels, as compared with 2,140,201 barrels the 
previous twelve months. The exports were of good volume, approxi- 
mating 932,485 barrels against 906,881 barrels the year previous. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



36 TRADS AND COMMBRCB OF 

Although the movement of freight to and from our oity the eaiiy 
months of the year was largely below normal, the closing months showed 
suoh marked gains that all decrease was overcome and the receipts and 
shipments both recorded very satisfactory gains. The inbound move- 
ment footed 30,684,935 tons against 30,334,057 tons in 1914, and the 
outgoing freight was figured at 22,252,181 tons and 21,922,765 tons 
respectively, or a total tonnage of 52,937,116 tons as contrasted with 
52,256,822 tons in 1914, a gain of 680,294 tons. Of the total freight 
received, that of coal approximated 7,972,055 tons as compared with 
8,051,088 tons the year before. 

The banks and trust companies of St. Louis, members of the St. 
Louis Clearing House Association, number forty-four. The statement 
issued on December 31, 1915, at the call of the ComptroUer of the 
Currency of the United States, show total resources of $417,061,768. 
as against $375,036,780 at the close of business in 1914. The deposits 
amounted to $326,353,303, as compared with $274,400,691 a year ago. 
Loans and discounts aggregated $218,265,858, as contrasted with $214,- 
956,806 the preceding period. Capital stock, $38,950,000, as against 
$40,500,000 in 1914 and surplus and profits amounted to $33,438,744, as 
against $37,254,676 the previous twelve months. The bank clearings 
for the year were $4,153,529,336, as compared with $3,888,851,608 in 
1914, a gain of $264,677,728, or 6.8 per cent. 

The business of the St. Louis Post Office in 1915 totalled $5,309,829, 
as compared with $5,223,437 in 1914, a gain in receipts of $86,391. The 
expenditures of the Department were reported at $2,091,343, as against 
$2,087,332 the twelve months prior. The distribution and despatch of 
mail originating in St. Louis totalled 77,575,958 pounds as against 
72,243,485 pounds in 1914. Pounds of maU received 17,373,429 as 
against 16,088,737 the year previous. The total nimiber of pieces of 
outgoing mail were 318,512,287, as compared with 313,610,102 pieces in 
1914. Pounds of Parcels Post mail received, 4,365,118 against 4,372,927 
in 1914, and the amount despatched aggregated 17,796,585, as compared 
with 15,314,853 in the twelve months preceding. 

Dry Goods. — St. Louis continues to maintain its position as one of 
the most important wholesale and jobbing markets in the country for 
dry goods, silks, notions and kindred lines. In 1915 the trade in these 
lines showed an increase of between 20 and 25 per cent above the normal. 
This increase, however, was due almost entirely to the phenominal 
business in the last few months of the year, as business in the early 
months of the year was light and by midsummer the volume was con- 
siderably below the corresponding pekiod for the preceding year. This 
decrease was due largely to the business depression in the southern 
states on account of the low price of cotton. When the price of that 
staple advanced however, it brought a flood of prosperity in its wake 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB crrr of bt. louis. 37 

which caused merchants in all parts of St. Louis trade terirtory to 
replenish their depleted stocks. This brought such a flood of orders 
that the volume of business in the latter part of the year was sufficiently 
large to make up for the loss in the early part of the year, and to show 
not only a gain over the total for 1914, but a substantial increase over 
the volume of business for a normal year. On accoxmt of the general 
business revival, the year 1916 has started out in a most encouraging 
manner, and there is every indication that all records will be broken in 
the coming year. 

Millinery. — This City continues to maintain its position as the 
leading market in the West for millinery and kindred lines, and the 
volume of business in these lines for the year 1915 was the largest on 
record; sales amounting to over $10,000,000. There was a gradual 
improvement throughout the entire year, and while in the early months 
of the year, business was far from satisfactory, each month showed a 
gain over its predecessor, and in December, the various houses reported 
gains of from 40 to 100 per cent over the business for December, 1914. 
This phenominal improvement was attributed to the prosperous condition 
in the southern states, due to the increased price of cotton and the 
diversification of crops in that section. Some of the largest manufac- 
turing, importing and wholesale millinery houses in the countryaare 
located in St. Louis, and this market is second only to New York es a 
jobbing center for these lines, having outstripped Chicago several y ars 
ago. Collections are xmusually good, and prospects for the coming year 
are remarkably bright. 

Boots and Shoes. — After a most discouraging beginning, the year 
1915 proved to be one of the best years on record in the boot and shoe 
trade of St. Louis. This City continues to maintain its position as the 
largest shoe manufacturing and distributing center in the country. 
Practically the entire output of about two score of plants which are 
owned and controlled by St. Louis manufacturers, is handled in St. 
Louis, and in addition to this nearly every shoe manufacturing and 
distributing house in the country has a jobbing agent in this City. All 
kinds of footwear are manufactured and distributed by St. Louis houses. 
On account of the business stagnation in the early part of the year, the 
volume of sales in the first half showed a heavy falUng off, as compared 
with the business of normal years. With the improved conditions in the 
South in the latter part of the year, and improved export conditions result- 
ing from the war, there was a remarkable increase in the latter part of 
the year, which not only made up for the deficiency in the early part of 
the year, but caused a gratifying gain for the entire year. It is estimated 
that the total volume of business in these lines for the year reached the 
enormous total of $65,000,000, as there were numerous war orders 
received and a gratifying export trade was develoi>ed in the Philipines, 
China and the Orient. Prospects for 1916 indicate that all records will 
be broken. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



38 TRADE AND COMMSRCS OF 

Carpets, Rugs and Linoleums. — The effect of the war in Europe 
was severely felt in the carpet, rug and linoleum trade of St. Louis, as 
heretofore the quarter part of the dyes, wools, jute and other raw materials 
were imported. Owing to the scarcity of ocean vessel room, and the 
restrictions placed upon commerce by the belligerents, it was almost 
impossible to secure the raw materials in the early part of the year, 
causing a scarcity of goods and consequent higher prices. Later, however, 
this diffictdty was overcome to some extent and there was a steady 
improvement in business in the latter part of the year, and at the opening 
of the present year prospects are so bright that it is more difficult to get 
goods than to sell them. In addition to the largest exclusive carpet 
house in the world, St. Louis also has three of the largest jobbing houses 
in the country, as well as a number of manufacturers' agencies, which 
do an enormous volume of business. 

Electrical Supplies. — Owing to the depression in the building 
trades in the early part of the year, business in electrical supplies showed 
a heavy falling off. The high cost of materials due to the phenominal 
advances in the price of metals of all kinds caused the cancellation of 
many orders, and much work that otherwise would have been done was 
postponed. The advanced prices of materials was due principally to 
the conflict in Europe, but aside from this the war had little effect on the 
electrical industry. With the advent of the New Year, there has been a 
material improvement in the building outlook, and prospects for business 
in these lines in 1916 are exceedingly bright. Although the sales of 
electrical supplies for the building trades were small, there was a noticeable 
increase in the use of electrical household -and labor saving devices 
bringing the total volume of business in this line up to about the same as 
that for 1915, although it was below the normal. 

Saddlery and Harness. — Business depression in the South and 
Southwest caused a heavy falling off in the volume of business in the 
saddlery and harness lines in the early part of the year, and while there 
was a steady improvement in the last six months, the gain in the closing 
months was barely sufficient to offset the loss, making the total volume 
of business for the year 1915 about equal to that of the preceding year. 
There were a few war orders received, but the greater part of the business 
was in the Southwest, where the low price of cotton was keenly felt. 
As a manufacturing and distributing center for these lines of goods, St. 
Louis continues to occupy the front rank, being the largest market of 
the kind in the United States. The total volume of business for the 
year amounted to nearly $3,000,000. St. Louis trade in these lines 
extends from Canada to Mexico, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 

Vehicles and Wagons. — The buggy trade of St. Louis showed a 
heavy falling off for the year 1915, as compared with that of previous 
years, and was only about 80 per cent as large as the business in 1914, 
although the latter was below the average. This loss, which was caused 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THIS CITT OF 8T. LOUIS. 39 

partly by the general budness depression in St. Louis trade territory, 
and partly by the increasing popularity of the automobile, occurred 
early in the year. In the latter part of the year there was a steady 
improvement, and some of the loss was recovered, but the net decrease 
for the year was fully 20 per cent. Pro8i)ect8 for 1916 are very en- 
couraging. The wagon trade of St. Louis, like the buggy business, 
showed a heavy falling off in 1915, as compared with 1914, and the 
output in this line was only about four-fifths as large as that of 1914, 
and much smaller than that of a normal year. As St. Louis is the gateway 
to the great Southwest, the greater part of the business of the City in 
this line is in the Southern territory, where many orders were cancelled 
on accoxmt of the low price of cotton, which prevailed in the early part 
of the year. This with the increased use of automobile trucks for hauling 
caused the heavy falling off, while the higher prices of raw material 
caused by the war, was also a factor. It is estimated that the total 
value of horse-drawn vehicles manufactured and sold in St. Louis last 
year approximated $12,000,000. Prospects for the coming year are 
only fair. 

Automobiles and Trucks. — The automobile business of St. Louis 
for the year 1915 showed a gain of over 25 per cent over the record 
breaking business of 1914, and indications point to a still larger business 
in 1916. As was the case in most other lines of business, the sales in 
the early part of the year were comparatively light, but the war shut 
off the importation of foreign cars, and as one after another of the Eastern 
plants were given over to the manufacture of war supplies, more orders 
were driven to St. Louis. There was a particularly good demand for 
automobile trucks, as they are steadily growing in popularity for all 
kinds of hauling. In addition to the large number of cars manufactured 
in St. Louis, nearly every large company in the coimtry is represented 
in this City and the local business was the best on record, as the number 
of automobile licenses issued in 1915 was fifty per cent larger than in 
1914. On account of the wide difference in the prices of different cars, 
it is impossible to form an intelligent estimate of the amount of sales for 
the year. 

Paper. — St. Louis continues to maintain her lead as the foremost 
distributing market in the country for all kinds of paper, and although 
the business was affected to some extent by the war, which made coloring 
matter and chemicals difficult to obtain, and caused increased prices, 
the total volimie of business for the year showed approximately 20 per 
cent over the sales of the preceding year. Sales were pretty well distrib- 
buted throughout the year, but there was a gradual increase until the 
close of the year. This was particularly true of the manufacturing and 
jobbing business in all kinds of blank books, stationery, envelopes, tags 
and other office supplies, which is steadily growing in the South and 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



40 TBADB AND COMMBRCB OF 

West. St. Louis houses are gradually extending their field oi operations, 
and now command an extensive trade in Mexico and in the Pacific Coast 
States. The trade outlook for 1916 is very encouraging. 

Paints, Oils and Varnishes. — Ab a manufacturing and distributing 
center for paints, oils and yamishes, as well as for white lead and other 
paint and varnish materials, St. Louis is rapidly distancing her com- 
petitors, and is steadily gaining in prominence and trade. Owing to 
the serious effects of the European War, however, the gain in these lines 
was smaller than usual. Prices of all kinds of metals and oils went 
skyward, and the paralysis of the building industry in the early part of 
the year also had a marked effect. With the revival of building opera- 
tions, the shortage of supplies caused a heavy advance in the prices of 
linseed oil, white lead, zinc white, and mixed paints. This tended to 
offset the loss in the early part of the year, and conditions improved 
steadily until the close of the year. There were several combinations 
among the compam'es manufacturing mixed paints, and business in this 
line was particularly good. It is estimated that the total sales in these 
lines for the year amounted to nearly $14,500,000. 

Glass. — This City continues to hold its own as one of the greatest 
manufacturing and distributing points in the country for all kinds of 
glass, and business in this line showed an increase for the year of between 
20 and 25 i>er cent. On account of the depressed condition of the buflding 
trades, in the first seven months of the year, there was a heavy falling 
off in the volume of sales. Merchants allowed their stocks to run down 
about to the vanishing point, and manufacturers also slowed down in 
their operations. The curtailment of European production caused by 
the war, caused increased demands on American manufacturers and this, 
with the rush of domestic orders when prices began to advance, caused 
the most severe shortage of glass ever experienced in this country. At 
first the production was inadequate to supply the demand, but later, 
American manufacturers were able to meet the situation, and the im- 
provement in the last five months of the year was sufficient to not only 
make up for the deficiency in the first seven months, but to show a 
total gain of nearly 25 per cent. The outlook for the coming year is 
good in all lines. 

Plumbers* and Gas Fitters* Supplies. — Manufacturers and jobbers 
in plumbers* and gas fitters' supplies report that business in their lines 
for the year 1915 showed a decrease of fully 20 per cent as compared 
with the volume of business for the preceding year. In addition to the 
stagnation in the building trades in the early part of the year, the high 
prices of raw materials, which was brought about by the war, caused 
many cancellations of orders, and a very unsatisfactory condition in 
these lines. Collections were poor, and practically every line showed a 
decrease, but the plumbers* supply business was particularly i>oor. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOXHS. 41 

In the latter part of the year an improvement set in, but it was not 
sufficiently marked to offset the early loss. Prospects for 1916 are very 
favorable. 

Glass and Quebnswarb. — ^While maintaining her position as one of 
the leading distributing centers of the country for glass and queensware, 
St. Louis business in these lines in 1915 was fully 10 per cent less than 
in 1914. This falling off was caused not so mucn by the lack of demand, 
as it was the inability of the jobbers to get a number of lines of goods 
from Austria and Germany, which were formerly the sources of supply. 
In the first six months of the year business was very poor, but later 
American manufacturers were able to meet the demand and business 
improved steadily. Prospects for 1916 are unusually bright and business 
in these lines in January was fully 33 }i per cent better than in January, 
1915. 

Drt Plates and Photographic Supplies. — Manufacturers of and 
jobbers in photographic supplies report that the year 1915 was one of 
the most peculiar in the history of the trade, as while the war had a 
favorable outlook insofar as the volume of business was concerned, it 
caused serious trouble in procurring enough raw materials to supply 
their needs. Prices of glass, chemicals and other raw materials advanced 
rapidly and reached unheiu^ of levels, and it is difficult, even at the 
record-breaking prices, to secure enough to maintain their output. As 
one of the first cities in the country to produce dry plates, St. Louis 
enjoys an enviable reputation in this line throughout the civilized world. 
There are several large concerns in this market who devote their entire 
attention to the manufacture and sale of photographic dry plates, and 
their output for the year was valued at over $2,800,000, showing an 
increase of about 20 i>er cent over the business of 1914. 

Stoves and Ranges. — ^Although St. Louis continues to hold its 
X>osition as the greatest manufacturtng and jobbing point in the world 
for stoves and ranges, business in these lines was fully 15 per cent less 
than in 1914. This loss was well distributed throughout the year, but 
in the closing quarter a noticeable improvement began which makes the 
prospects very good for the coming year. General business depression 
is given as the cause of this loss, and the Eurbpean war had no effect, 
beyond causing higher prices for iron, steel and other raw materials. 
St. Louis Made stoves, ranges, furnaces and vapor stoves are sold through- 
out the entire continent and the export trade is of considerable propor- 
tions. There are about twenty-two manufacturing plants in this line in 
the St. Louis District, which, when in full operation, employ in the 
neighborhood of 6,000 persons. Over $8,000,000 of capital is employed 
in this industry, and the output last year was valued at approximately 
$6,750,000. 

Drugs and Chemicals. — St. Louis enjoys the reputation of being 
the largest manufacturing point and wholesale market in the woild for 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



42 TRADB AND COMIUBBCB OP 

drugs and ohemioals. Her manofaoturmg plants turn out over two 
thousand different kinds of dhemical products, but they specialize in 
medicinal lines. Because of the abnormal conditions caused by the war, 
which completely cut off German competition, there has been a phenominal 
demand for chemicals of all kinds for export, as well as the urgent require- 
ments of the domestic trade. Largely on account of the increased cost 
of raw materials abnormal prices have ruled for all kinds of chemical 
products, and for this reiison it is impossible to make an intelligent 
comparison of the volume of business with that of normal years. St. 
Louis chemists have paid little attention to the demand for chemicals 
for war purposes, but have devoted their energies mainly to supplying 
the wants of the regular trade. Some of the smaller concerns have 
reaped a harvest making dye stuffs, explosives and technical lines. The 
largest wholesale drug house in the world is located in St. Louis, and 
some of the largest manufacturing plants in the country are operated by 
chemists who reside here. 

PiBB Clay Products. — As a manufacturing center for sewer-pipe, 
terra cotta, gas retorts, zinc smelting retorts, fire bricks, tiling and other 
fire-clay products, St. Louis has an enviable reputation which extends 
throughout the entire country, and even in foreign countries wherever 
zinc ore is smeltered St. Louis made zinc retorts are held in high esteem. 
Her terra cotta products are known all over the world, and the reputation 
of this City for these lines is steadily growing. On account of the 
depressed condition of the building industry, however, and the uncertain 
financial condition as a result of the war, improvements of various kinds 
were held up and the volume of business in these lines in 1915 was lees 
than was promised at the beginning of the year, and was only about 
equal to that of 1914, as export sales were practically cut off. The various 
lines, fire-brick, paving-brick, building brick, sewer-pipe, terra-cotta and 
retorts each about held its own, and the total volume of business is 
estimated at $3,750,000. 

Cast Iron and Poundrt Products. — ^Business in cast iron and 
foundry products in 1915 was fully 15 per cent better than in 1914, but 
the increase was due entirely to the marked improvement which occurred 
in the last quarter of the year. In the early part of the year orders were 
few and far between and the output was reduced to the minimum, but 
later there was a renewal of activity in all lines and a steady improvement 
up to the close of the year, which not only made up the early loss, but 
brought the total for the twelve months up to 15 per cent more than in 
1914. Owing to the higher prices for raw materials prices were higher, 
but the war had no direct effect upon this line of trade. The demand 
for car wheels and railroad castings shows the greatest improvement, 
but orders for all kinds of castings are now coming in freely, and the 
outlook for the present year is very promising. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 43 

Habdwarb. — As the largest wholesale hardware market in the world, 
St. Louis continues to maintain her lead, and the volume of business 
for 1915 shows an increase of fully 8 per cent over that of the preceding 
year. In the first half of the year orders were slow about coming in, 
but merchants in the country allowed their stocks to get so low that in 
the latter part of the year they were compelled to buy and there was a 
marked improvement in the demand for all kinds of hardware. Iron 
and steel sporting goods are particularly active. Automobile supplies 
and accessories also are in excellent demand. The increased business is 
attributed partly to the good crops in certain parts of St. Louis trade 
territory, and partly to the natural growth of the business of the City. 
It is estimated that the total volimie of business in the wholesale hardware 
line for the year amounted to approximately $50,000,000. For the 
present year the outlook is unusually bright. 

WooDENWARE. — In the manufacture and distribution of woodenware 
St. Louis easily maintains her leading position, and the volume of business 
for the year showed an increase of about 5 per cent. This increase was 
made in the first and last quarter of the year, as in the Summer months, 
as usual in this line, business was dull. There was a slight increase in 
the extent of territory covered, and it is estimated that over one-half of 
the woodenware business of the entire country is handled by St. Louis 
houses. St. Louis has the largest woodenware house in the world, and 
it is estimated that the business in woodenware and kindred lines handled 
by St. Louis houses amounted to over $20,000,000 for the year. Prospects 
for 1916 are said to be very good. 

Tobacco and Cigars. — St. Louis continues to be the greatest manu- 
facturing point in the world for tobacco, and while business in this line 
in the first eight months of the year was below the normal, there was 
such a marked improvement in the last four months that the total 
volume of business for the year was slightly in excess of that of the 
preceding year. In addition to its being a great manufacturing point, 
St. Louis is a great distributing point for smoking tobacco, cigars and 
cigarettes. A number of new selling agencies were established here in 
1915, and the business is steadily increasing. Prospects for the coming 
year are said to be very bright. 

Railroad and Street Cars. — While St. Louis continues to be one 
of the leading manufacturing centers of the country for railway and 
street cars, business in these lines for the year 1915 was light. Railway, 
street railway and trolley companies in all parts of the coimtry kept 
their expenditures down to the minimum, and there were few new lines 
exploited. In the manufacture of street cars, the volume of business 
was only about two-thirds as large as that of 1914, but in the output of 
railway cars, the falling off was less pronounced. In the closing months 
of the year there was a decided improvement in the number and size of 
the orders received, but the business was hampered by the advanced 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



44 TBADB AND COMMIBCB OF 

prices of all kinds of iron, steel and other materials, and the ddayed 
deliveries of raw materials. The outlook for 1916 is very poor for street 
railway cars, but the output of steam railway cars promises to break 
the record. 

Soaps and Candles. — St. Louis continues to forge to the front as a 
manufacturing and distributing point for soaps and candles, and business 
in these lines for 1915 showed an increase of about 15 i>er cent over the 
volume of the preceding year. In the eariy part of the year, the business 
was hampered to some extent by the difficulty in securing cocoanut oil, 
potash and other raw materials, but later this difficulty was overcome 
and the trade was greatly enlarged, bringing the total volume of business 
up to approximately $16,600,000. 

Meat Packing. — Probably no other line of business was more 
directly affected by the European war than the meat packing industry 
of St. Louis, as through the difficulty of making exports and the high 
price of hogs, the business was almost at a standstill for the first quarter 
of the year. Later the trade was affected adversely by the scarcity of 
storage room, and the effective blockade maintained by En^^and. These 
conditions were finally overcome however, and business in the last 
quarter of the year was the best on record, bringing the total volume for 
the year up to about the same as in 1914, or approximately $27,500,000. 
Stocks are now accumulating, but there is considerable speculation, and 
the prospects are bright. 

Bakery Qoods. — St. Louis is one of the most important trade centers 
of the country for the manufacture and sale of all kinds of bakery goods, 
but the volume of business in these lines was slightly below that of the 
record-breaking year of 1914, the loss amounting to about 5 per cent. 
One of the chief causes of the falling off was the unusually cheap supply 
of vegetables throughout the year, which with the smaller loaf, due to 
the high price of flour, caused a falling off in the consumption of bread 
and other bakery goods. Prices of sugar, lard and cooking oils were about 
the same as in the preceding year, but raisins and all other raw materials 
were higher on account of the war. Although the consumption showed 
a decrease, the quality of the output is being steadily improved, as the 
business is gradually drifting into the hands of the larger companies. 

Qroceries. — ^Although St. Louis is the greatest inland coffee market 
in the country, and one of the largest wholesale grocery centers, business 
in these lines in 1915 was decidedly unsatisfactory. Poor crops in the 
greater part of the territory tributary to St. Louis, and particularly in 
Southern Illinois, is given as the chief cause for the falling off in the 
volume of sales, but the unusually cheap potatoes and other vegetaUes 
caused a decreased consumption of staples, and this helped to cause a 
decrease in the amount of business done. The business was irregular, 
however, as the increased demand for coal and metals stimulated the 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT or ST. LOXTIS. 45 

mining industry, and there was an increased demand from the mining 
districts. The higher prices of tin, caused by the war increased the cost 
of canned goods, and rest^cted sales in this line. In the first nine 
months of the year there was a heavy loss as compared with the cor- 
responding period in 1914, but in the last quarter, there was a marked 
improvement, and by the close of the year business in this line was 
almost up to the normal, the total sales for the year amounting to over 
$72,000,000. 

Clothing. — St. Louis continues to grow in importance as a manu- 
facturing center for men's clothing, and some of the largest makers of 
medixmi priced clothing are located in this city. In addition to its 
manufacturing output, some very large jobbing houses are located here, 
making this one of the largest distributing markets in the country. 
Manufacturers and jobbers report that their spring business was 
usually poor, but there was a steady gain in the latter part of the year, 
and business in the last quarter broke all records in this line. The gain 
in the latter part of the year was not sufficient to make up for the loss 
in the Spring, and the total volume for the year was less than that of 
1914, amounting to less than $15,000,000. Sales of ladies' clothing 
showed a proportional decrease and both manufacturers and jobbers 
complain of the loss of business. Owing to the war and the scarcity of 
dyes, woolen goods are scarce and high priced, but conditions are begin- 
ning to adjust themselves, and prospects for the coming year are very 
good. Although the volume of business was smaller, St. Louis houses 
report that they have invaded new territory, and while the total sales 
of women's clothing amounted to only about $4,800,000 for the year, 
the business so far this year has been the largest on record. 

Enamslwarb, Etc. — In the manufacture of enamelware, stamped 
ware and tinware, St. Louis ranks well to the front, and some of the 
largest manufacturing plants in the country are operated by St. Louis 
capitalists. In the first nine months of the year, the war had a depressing 
effect, and while the St. Louis plants were kept in operation, business 
was only fair and only about equalled in volxmie the business for the 
corresponding period in 1914. In the last quarter of the year, however, 
there was a tremendous boom, account of the war, some of the Eastern 
plants manufacturing war materials only, and this forced a large amount 
of business to St. Louis companies, resulting in sufficient increase in the 
volume of business to bring the total for the year up to about 33 H P^ 
cent larger than that of the preceding year. Prices of all kinds of raw 
materials were higher, but aside from this, the war had no direct effect. 
It is estimated that the total volume of business in these lines for the 
year amounted to over $15,000,000, and manufacturers report that the 
outlook for 1916 is the best they ever had. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



46 TRADB AND COMMIBCB OF 

Trunks, Valises, Etc. — As a manafactarinc: and distribatinc: point 
for trunks, traveling h&gs, etc., St. Louis easily takes the lead, and 
notwithstanding the depression in business in the eariy part of the year, 
the total volume for 1915 was fully equal to that of 1914. St. Louis 
manufacturers and jobbers in this line have a trade which extends from 
Ohio to the Pacific and from Canada to the Gulf. Business in North 
and South Dakota, and in Montana showed a gratifying increase for the 
year, and local trunk men are steadily enlarging their trade territory. 
Advance orders for 1916 are coming in freely and a record breaking 
business is promised for this year. 

Hat and Caps. — As a distributing point for hats and caps, St* 
Louis is one of the foremost markets in the country, but business in this 
line was seriously handicapped by the war, which prevented importations 
from the countries which formerly supplied these lines. In the first 
half of the year business was almost at a standstill on this account, but 
later American manufacturers were able to meet the situation and the 
trade was supplied with domestic goods. With the revival of business 
in other lines, there was a rush of orders and in the last three months of 
the year, St. Louis houses did such a rushing business that the deficiency 
in the early part of the year was made up, and the total for the twelve 
months of 1915 showed a slight increase over the volume of business for 
1914. On account of the difficulty of securing foreign goods, St. Louis 
manufacturers received so many orders that their output has been 
greatly increased, and St. Louis trade territory considerably enlarged. 
The business with Central and South America shows a particulariy 
gratifying improvement. 

Candies. — St. Louis is one of the leading cities of the country for the 
manufacture and sale of candies, and not only are some of the largest 
candy manufacturing plants of the United States in this City, but SU 
Louis made candies have a nation wide reputation. Owing to the 
advanced prices of several kinds of raw materials, prices were slightly 
higher, but the volume of business for the year showed very little increase 
over that of 1914. There are twenty-ox large factories in this City, 
and these were kept in operation throughout the year, distributing their 
output throughout the entire country, while a number of smaller factories, 
which cater mainly to the local and nearby trade, did a thriving business. 
This City is noted not only as a candy manufacturing center, but also is 
one of the largest distributing markets in the United States. It is 
estimated that the total volume of the candy manufacturing and jobbing 
business of St. Louis for 1915 amounted to over $5,500,000. 

Railway Supplies. — In the manufacture and distribution of railway 
supplies, St. Louis continues to be one of the most important centers in 
the country, and the total volume of business for the year was fully 10 
per cent larger than that of 1914. The abnormal conditions caused by 
the war tended to restrict business in the early part of the year, but there 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF 8T. LOUIS. 



47 



was a steady improvement as the year progressed, and business in the 
closing months of the year was exceptionally good. From August on, 
each month showed an increase over the corresponding month of 1914, 
and the outlook for 1916 is unusually bright. St. Louis supply men 
predict that the jealousy and ill feeling among the different nations 
abroad, will cause many orders to come here which formerly went to 
Europe, and that we will do a good business with both Europe and South 
America. It is estimated that the business in this line, transacted by 
St. Louis houses, for the year amounted to approximately $12,100,000. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



48 



nUDB AMD COMMBBOB OP 



BANES AND TRUST COMPANIES. 
Statbmbnt op Dbcbmbbb 81, 1914, and Dbcbmbbb 31, 1915. 





1016. 


191A 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Aosn*- 

TjOahs ftnd Dlacoimtft 


8318,386,888 80 |314,fM,868 71 
64,086,806 44 85,000,481 00 
U,080,919 06 9,837,060 13 
138,030,081 30 85,343,588 73 


$ 8,800.063 18 

'i)36i',06i'84 
87.778,147 48 






8 834,171 9 


BealSttate. 




OftCh ftDd Bzcliuif6s« • . • . • 








Totals 


1417,061,708 40 


8876,006,780 34 


i43,«k;8ars 




LiABtumo— 

OapitaL 


6 88.060,000 00 

88.488.744 86 

16,048.380 00 

838.868,808 64 

3,166,480 00 

UO.OOOOO 


1 40,600.000 00 

87,354,070 63 

18,543,187 50 

374,400,001 05 

3,000,400 00 

1,900,784 37 




• 1,060,000 00 


SnfpiuAand Profits 




^ 0,815,881 or 


OircnUttioii* ••••••••• 


IBilonioii'oo 


3,488,867 68 


Deposits 




Bond Account 


300,000 00 


Bills Payable, etc 




1,880,784 37 






Totals 


^417,061. 708 40 


8875,086.780 34 


043,034.008 35 





0lbabino8 fob baoh tbab 8in0b oboanization op thb 
olbabino house, showing rate per osnt op 

INOBEASB OB DBORBASB. 



Amouwt. 
803,106.74ft 

887.407.739+88 Porc 
711.460.489 + 80.08 
883.681.880+17.16 
8.00 



Tbab. 

1869 

1870 ^ 

1880 « 

1881 

1888 „ 808 , 189 . 387 + 

1888 870.961 .04ft + 0.98 

1884 786.803.177— 9.87 

1885 769.180.486- 8.81 

1886 810.796.068+ 6.8ft 

1887 894.ft87.781 + 10.86 

1888 900,474.878+ 0.66 

1889 987.638.689+ 9.78 

1890 ^ „ 1 . 1 18 . 673 . 810 + 1 1 . 70 

1891 1.130.590.676+ 1.88 

1898 1 . 88 1 . ft71 ,963 + 8 . 07 

1898 1.189.014.891- 7.ftft 

1894 « 1,187.708.906— 0.97 

189ft „ 1.844.888,604 + 10.88 

1896 1 .188.608.869- 6.88 

1897 1.866.708.956+17.94 

1898 1.455.468.068+ 6.44 

1899 1.688.884.808 + 18.88 

1900 1.688.849.494+ 8.11 

1901 8.870.680.816 + 84.54 

1903 8.506.804.888+10.89 

1908 8.510.479.845+ 0.18 

1904 3 . 703 . 833 , 918 + 1 1 . 87 

1905 8.899.798.979+ 3.79 

1906 8.978.663.307+ 8.88 

1907 8. 165.610.387+ 6. 10 

1908 8.074.806.759— 8.87 

1909 8.443.439.008 + 11.98 

1910 8,787.949.379+ 8.86 

1911 3 . 859 . 681 . 136 + 3 . ftfi 

1918 4.087.680.808+ 4.8 

1913 4 . 136 . 994 . 869 + 3 . 68 

1014 3.888.861.608— ft. 9 

191ft _ 4 . Iftd . ft39 . 886+ 6 . 8 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 49 

THE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY. 

By BOB8BT E. Lbb, Editor The Auto Review. 



The State of Missouri has made remarkable strides in the use of the 
automobile since 1911. Specifically the increase has been 366%. The 
registration of automobiles in the state for 191 1 was 16,387. The registra- 
tion for 1915 was 76,462 oars. The increased use of automobiles in the 
City of St. Louis has been equally as marked. In 1912 there were 
7,762 cars, both pleasure and commercial, operated in the City of St. 
Louis. Li 1915 the number was 16,421. The increase in Missouri for 
a single year was also great. The registration of motor cars for the 
1914 period was 50,998, the increase shown at the end of the 1915 period 
was therefore about 26,000 cars for the whole state. 

The important feature of these figures is that a large percentage of 
these cars were sold by St. Louis dealers and manufacturers. The 
automobile territory of St. Louis dealers is usually the eastern half of 
Missouri and the southern half of Illinois. A few dealers have larger 
territories than this and some of the branch houses oi>erating here, 
having factories located elsewhere, cover the entire Southwest. 

It is very interesting to note that Missouri has finally passed the 
automobile record of the State of Kansas. Kansas for a long time was 
held up as a remarkable example of automobile usage, and it was the 
boast of manufacturers that Kansas was the best automobile territory 
in the country particiilarly in the farming communities. Kansas' 
registration for 1915, however, showed 73,000 automobiles in use and the 
Missouri record as indicated .elsewhere was about 76,462. 

St. Louis is rapidly coming to the front as a manufacturing center in 
automobiles and automobile accessories and parts. There are located 
here at this time five plants which manufacture passenger or pleasure 
automobiles. Six other plants build commercial cars or motor trucks. 
One considerable plant builds motor fire apparatus. Most of the plants 
are strictly local concerns. During the year a big plant for assembling 
oars was established in St. Louis which promised to turn out about 
10,000 automobiles per annum. The car is a low-priced model. One 
of the St. Louis factories builds both pleasure cars and trucks which have 
extensive national sale. Another builds only pleasure cars and has 
national sales for its products. Of the truck builders, foxir ship their 
truckiB to all parts of the country. The product of the fii^ apparatus 
concern is also shipped to all parts of the United States. 

For comparative purposes it will be interesting to note that there are 
about 2,200 motor trucks and commercial vehicles of various capacities 
in use in the City of St. Louis. It is the prediction of automobile sellers 
here that St. Louis will be thoroughly commercialized within the next 
five years and the horse as a means of traction abolished from our 
streets. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



50 TBAOB AND COMIUBBCB OP 

There is a wide range in the selling price of the oars built or assembled 
in St. Louis. The lowest priced car sells for $390 and they range from 
that through the figures $440, $550, $1,100, $1,600 and $2,475. The 
range of truck prices is nearly as wide. Both four and six cylinder cars 
are built in St. Louis for pleasure use. One company builds the largest 
sized trucks for lumber hauling. 

There are five immense distributing branches in St. Louis for the five 
largest manufacturers of tires in the United States and several of the 
smaller concerns also have distributing depots here. These depots 
supply automobile tires to the entire Southwest terirtory included in 
the St. Louis trade district. 

An important factor in the automobile industry of St. Louis which 
is new is the establishment here of a large plant during the year which 
has closed for the building of bodies for commercial cars. This plant 
has already established its sale of standard bodies for various makes of 
chasses in all parts of the country, shipping standard bodies as far away 
as Oregon and California and to the Atlantic coast. Several of the 
smaller concerns here have idso increased their factory equipment so as 
to turn out standardized bodies for light and medium weight commercial 
chasses. 

It is interesting to not that several of the larger concerns manufacturing 
automobiles have found it necessary to establish distributing branches 
in St. Louis. These branch houses reship cars to dealers to points as 
far away as Texas, Louisiana, and Colorado. 

There are four large and well-established houses in St. Louis selling 
automobile accessories and supplies. The three big hardware houses 
located here also handle immense quantities of accessories and supplies 
and one of the electric houses has installed a large tine of these 
goods. 

A conservative estimate of the sales of automobiles, motor trucks, 
automobile accessories and supplies from the St. Louis market for 1915 
was $15,000,000. There are some who say that this figure is too low by 
at least five million dollars. 

In order to get a correct figure for the number of license plates needed 
for the year 1916, inquiry was made by the Secretary of State as to the 
approximate nimiber of sales for the year to come. The Secretary is 
prepared to license 100,000 automobiles during 1916. Figures which 
have been issued by the National Automobile Chamber of Commerce 
indicate the number of automobiles manufactured in the United States 
for 1916 will be about 1,200,000, which would seem to justify the expected 
increase of 25,000 in the State of Missouri. 

It may be interesting to note that the average price paid for an 
automobile in Missouri at this time is $850. Three years ago the average 
price was $1,250. This change is due to the fact that a number of 
manufacturers are building cars ranging in price from $600 to $900 and 
that the car at $2,400 is now taking the place with the wealthier class of 
the car which in past years sold for $5,000. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 51 

It is the strong belief of dealers and manufacturers in St. Louis that 
1916 is to be the largest year in volume of sales of automobiles in the St. 
Louis trade territory that has ever been experienced. 



THE LUMBER INDUSTRY OF ST. LOUIS. 

By OBYiiiLa Alfred Pub, Secretary The Lambermen's Exchange of St. Louis. 



The lumber industry passed through one of its most trying experiences 
during the year 1915. Owing to the European war the export trade in 
hardwoods was practically cut off on accoimt of foreign buyers going 
out of the market and also because of a scarcity of bottoms. This threw 
the entire product on the home market for consumption until August. 
In view of these circumstances a large number of hardwood mills shut 
down because of lack of demand and, even then, the stocks of hardwoods 
at the mills were small. 

A sudden revival of business in August brought the buyers into the 
market and then it was found that dry stock was extremely scarce. 
This, of course, was followed by steady advances in prices. Another 
factor that contributed to this situation was the unsatisfactory logging 
conditions at the hardwood mills. Buyers who formeriy placed their 
orders at the mills were obliged to look to the hardwood yards in St. 
Louis as they alone were able to furnish the material demanded. These 
yards enjoyed a very favorable trade, particulaiiy the last four or five 
months of the year and the fact was emphasized that the lumbermen in 
St. Louis were equal to the emergency as usual, and were able to supply 
a very large portion of the demand for dry stock that could not be 
furnished at the mills as is usually customary. The yards in St. Louis 
are in a position to take care of a larger variety of these requirements 
than any other hardwood market in the coxmtry as many of the yards 
carry complete stocks of all kinds of hardwoods. 

During the early months of 1915 there was very little local lumber 
business in St. Louis. This was due to the fact that building operations 
were at a low ebb and had been for several months which in part might 
be attributed to a scarcity of money, as loans were being made very 
reluctantly. 

Li August an improvement was noted. The money market became 
more elastic, loans were made more readily and yet during the year 1915 
the permits were lower than they had been for many years in St. Louis. 
Even at that, the prices did not attain the same level as in 1906 and 1907, 
because, in the interim, lumber had been manufactured at a loss in many 
cases, and the base line was at a very low ebb. 

The retailers fared badly throughout the year; at no time was there 
enough local consumption to yield fixed charges. The only real profit 
derived was from quick shipments from local stocks by the larger yards 
which carry full stocks and are capable of catering to out of town orders. 
Because of the upward turn of prices, some sagacious dealers took a 
chance and bought stocks in anticipation of demand, but the local 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



52 



TRADB AND COMliXRCS OF 



situation, it may be stated, was unfriendly to the local dealer and the trade 
in the city utterly failed to realise even the modest improvement pre- 
dicted in the annual statement of 1914. 

The situation with regard to yellow pine manufacturers may be 
briefly simimarized in the statement that 1915 was to them a year of 
three months of profit and nine months of swapping dollars; the tormet 
condition prevailing at the dose of the year. Overproduction had been 
a feature prior to the outbreak of the war and continued -more or less 
intense until practically the latter part of the year. Then came foreign 
orders calling for large quantities of dimension, boards, timbers, etc. 

Before there could be any satisfactory increase in production, it was 
soon found that the mill stocks were badly broken. This further con- 
tributed to the larger yards of the city receiving orders for quick ship- 
ments in carloads which augmented that trade as above referred to. 

St. Louis, without question, is a great lumber center with natural 
advantages not possessed by any of its competitors. 

The concentrating yards in St. Louis, both yellow pine and hardwood, 
are greater than in any other city. It is estimated that they carry in the 
aggregate 145,000,000 feet of lumber, from which the purchaser may make 
his selection. This stock is estimated at a value approximately $5,100,000. 
St. Louis enjoys exceptional railroad facilities permitting quick shipments 
and prompt deliveries of this splendid stock to nearby states. It is 
estimated that the total stocks carried by all the hardwood and pine yards 
in the city aggregate in excess of 250,000,000 feet board measure. 

St. Louis is represented in a wholesale and jobbing way in the lumber 
industry, by about 145 concerns making headquarters in this city, rep- 
resenting a capital stock of approximately $38,000,000. 

During the year 1915 lumber shipments received in St. Louis approx- 
imated 199,209 cars. Allowing 16,500 feet to the car, this makes a total 
in board feet of 3,286,948,500. Added to this is 792.000 board feet 
received by river, makes a grand total of receipts, 3,287,740,500 board 
feet. Compared with the year 1914, there was an increase of 10,853 car- 
loads, or an increase of 179,074,500 board feet. 

The following is a comparative statement of receipts of lumber at St. 
Louis during the years 1915 and 1914 expressed in carloads and in board 
feet by rail and by water, as compiled by the Merchants' Exchange. 





1915. 


1914. 




#RaiL 
Can. 


RiTer. 
Feet. 


RaiL 
Oan. 


River. 
Feet. 


JftDUUT 


15.236 
16.020 
17,655 
19,065 
15,961 
15.746 
16.410 
15.946 
16.206 
16.269 
17,230 
19,467 




14.480 
14.878 
16.735 
16,770 
15.418 
16,488 
17,440 
17,270 
16.417 
14.890 
14.503 
14.558 




Pebnitfy"** 


"i52'.'6od" 

142,000 
71,000 

114.000 

112,000 
45.000 

105,000 
27,000 




MftTch 




Juiie..» « „ 

July.............. » 

NoTemberr..." .«! *..'.'. "Z !i." !!!! [." "Z .". !!." 


120.000 

9.000 

25.000 

67.000 

315.000 

74,000 

2.000 


Dectfnber......„«..». « 


24.000 








Totals.. 


199,209 


792.000 


188.356 


612.000 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



53 



Reducing the carloads by rail to feet, calling 16,500 feet a carload, 
the real shipments would be 2,118,072,000 feet against 2,182,917,000 
feet in 1914, adding the shipments by river, the total would be 
2,119,578,000 feet in 1915, as against 2,184,504,000 feet in 1914: 

Shipments were as follows: 



1915. 



1914. 



RaU. 
Can. 



River. 
Feet. 



RalL 
Can. 



Rirer. 
Feet. 



Janxiary 

February..^. 

March 

April. 

June..« 

July 

Augusts 

September.., 

October 

NoTember... 
December.... 

Totato. 



8,771 
8.911 
10,565 
11 ,087 
10,495 
11,097 
10.534 
10,970 
11,326 
11,223 
11,675 
11,714 



208,000 
80,000 
193,000 
179.000 
142.000 
143,000 
234,000 
149,000 
178,000 



10.^^77 

9.S13 

11:^40 

1] ,346 

1] .7fJ8 

12,:i47 

11,1K*9 

11 M)5 

11.2^ 

11,148 

9,702 

9,:z«55 



80,000 
144,000 
239,000 
171,000 
144.000 
177,000 
189,000 
294,000 
117,000 

32,000 



128,368 



1,506,000 



132,298 



1.587,000 



The lumber movement in and out was: 

1915. 1914. 

Receipts, feet „ 3,287,740,000 3,013,696.000 

Shipments, feet 2 , 184 , 504 , 000 2 , 1 18 , 355 , 000 



RBAL ESTATE. 

From the Annual Report of W. W. Butts, Secretary 
St. Louis Real Estate Exchange. 



Real estate is steadily becoming more active. When the unsettled 
conditions throughout the coimtry for the past year are taken into 
consideration real estate conditions have been as satisfactory as could be 
expected. Property values reached their lowest point and are now 
climbing upward. 

At the beginning of the year money was scarce and interest rates 
high, the end of the year finds an abundance of money to loan on real 
estate, and at lower rates than have been offered for the'last 18 months, 
and the number of investors in real estate are increasing daily. 

Bank clearings for the year are more than $200,000,000 greater than 
1914, and there have been many other indications of increased business 
activity during the latter months of 1915. Manufacturing establishments 
are working full time, and general business conditions seem to be picking 
up, with a bright outlook for the coming year. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



54 TBADB AND OOmOBBCB OF 

Aooording to a statement made by the State LAbor Commiisioner, 
there are only about 40 per cent of the persons out of employment, at 
compared with the number of persons not employed during the winter 
of 1914. 

The Real Estate Exchange took an active interest in matters of State 
legislation during the session of the last General Assembly, held in January 
of this year. Many bills were introduced which were inimical to the 
property owners and real estate agents of this city and were opposed by 
a delegation from the exchange; the principal objection being centered 
upon a bill requiring licensed engineers for all steam-heated apartments 
using boilers with a steam pressure of eight pounds to the square inch 
and over. The Exchange believed this bill would simply require addi- 
tional maintenance cost and expense for the management of apartment 
buildings, and thereby work a hardship on the property owners, without 
any substantial benefit. 

The exchange supported Senate bill No. 448, which contained many 
salutary provisions for the protection of real estate securities, which 
would make it virtually impossible to make an improper release, or a 
partial release, of deeds of trust, and required also before a deed of trust 
could be foreclosed that the deed of trust and notes should be produced 
and exhibited to the trustee, and before a trustee's deed could be recorded 
it was necessary to produce the deed of trust and notes to the Recorder 
of Deeds, who should certify thereon that the deed of trust had been 
foreclosed. 

The Real Estate Exchange has always taken an active interest in 
local legislative affairs, keeping close scrutiny on all bills introduced in 
the Board of Aldermen. 

A bill requiring owners of moving vans to report changes of address 
when they move persons from one address to another in St. Louis was 
enacted. This bill was necessary to prevent the innumerable frauds 
perpetrated upon property owners and retail merchants. It was esti- 
mated that $500,000 annually was lost to the business interests of this 
city because of the inability to trace **dead beats,*' as such information 
could not be obtained through the postal authorities or elsewhere. After 
a hard fight the Exchange succeeded in having the bill passed by a 
unanimous vote and in securing the Mayor's approval. 

Notices of the removal are filed with the City Registrar and will be 
printed in The Daily Record as a matter of general information. The 
Exchange has also assisted in procuring the submission of the segregation 
ordinances under the initiative provision of the new Charter. These 
bills provide that colored persons shall not occupy as places of residence 
buildings in blocks occupied as residences by white, and vice-versa. 

During the past year the exchange has had many standing and 
special committees at work in the interest of the city, among these being 
the committee appointed to investigate the advisability of changing the 
Lindell entrance to Forest Park, and securing a municipal loop for 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 55 

intemrbaii lines to come in over the free bridge and terminate at a 
passenger station on the site of the old City Hall at Eleventh and Chestnut 
streets; a oommittee appointed to prepare the table of depreciations to 
estimate the value of the income derived from the various sorts of property, 
in order to make the necessary report to the Government under the 
Federal income tax laws; the committee working in the interest of 
extending the city limits to take in a large area of St. Louis County, 
when this can be done under our State Constitution, in order to make 
the next Federal census, to be taken in 1920, show that St. Louis retains 
its position as the fourth city in population. 

Realizing that the progress of a city is determined by the number of 
its factories, the Exchange, through its members, has accomplished a 
great deal in bringing factories to St. Louis. Several have been located 
diiring the past year, and from reports 1916 will find a great many more 
Eastern concerns located in St. Louis which are not at present represented. 

On account of its geographical location, cheap coal and water, St. 
Louis is becoming one of the most desirable manufacturing cities of the 
country. 

The Exchange has taken the matter up with the Water Commissioner 
of the City of St. Louis to ascertain under what circumstances water 
may be taken from the river free of charge, and was advised that all 
concerns located upon the Mississippi River, or which could gain access 
thereto without being required to cross public alleys or streets, may draw 
water from the river without any interference from the Water Depart- 
ment of the City. There are many valuable sites along the river for 
such establishments, and their saving on water in this r^ard would make 
St. Louis an extremely desirable place for such concerns to locate. 

The Salesmen's Association and the Rent Collectors' League have 
been valuable adjuncts to the Exchange. 

When called upon to produce revenue to finance worthy projects the 
Exchange and its members are never wanting. 

The total assessed valuation of real and personal property for the 
last six years in St. Louis is shown in the following table: 

Real Personal 

Year. Estate. Property. Total. 

1909 $411,833,860 S 92,729,670 $504,563,530 

1910 427,332,600 105,729,530 533,062,130 

1911 441,854,410 96,657,070 538,511,480 

1912 463,207,070 99,462,730 562,669,800 

1913 470,765,270 94,213,460 564,981,730 

1914 485,558,700 94,390,990. 579,949,690 

1915 532,316,320 98,048,520 630,364,840 

Rate of taxation on the $100 valuation: State, 19 cents; school, 60 
cents; city, $1.56; total, $2.35. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



56 



TBADB AKD COMliXBCS OF 



TRAN8FBBS. 

1914 

Month: No. Amount. No. 

January 1,089 $ 1,447,455 791 

February 1,053 2,160,429 829 

March 1,087 1,678,023 1,157 

April 1,297 1,883,512 1,076 

May 1,266 2,550,038 1,015 

June 1,105 1.235,011 1,030 

July 1,229 2,108,859 979 

Au^st 724 564,534 853 

September 984 934,835 951 

October 1,177 1,050,923 1,040 

November 1,026 982,771 982 

December 780 931,255 983 

Total 12,817 $17,527,645 11,686 

DEEDS OF TRUST. 

1914 

Month: No. Amount. No. 

January 929 $ 2,654,713 777 

February 996 2,413,363 768 

March 988 53,613,946 1,093 

April 1,182 3,902.891 1,087 

May 1,271 4,091,226 1,089 

June 1,244 7,233,905 961 

July 1,140 3,648,065 1,000 

August 678 1,565,966 871 

September 888 2,069,314 952 

October 1,051 23,002,408 1,038 

November 896 3,663,344 854 

December 804 2,231,824 910 

Total 13,063 $109,081,756 11,400 

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Transfers. Deeds of Trust. 

1902 $45,123,135 $ 28,349,628 

1903 51,165,625 36,117,878 

1904 42,289,256 27,703,576 

1905 79,498,331 57,179,898 

1906 65,663,880 52,650,088 

1907 58,268,969 45,793,259 

1908 39,866,644 43,651,718 

1909 39,017,802 53,275,635 

1910 37,441,994 44,093,318 

1911 30,906,700 167,857,512 

1912 25,207,455 48,986,233 

1913 22,803,561 42,732,003 

1914 17,527,645 109,081,756 

1915 12,895,381 35,128,045 



1016 

Amount. 

$ 838,715 

783,347 

1,315,359 

1,115,105 

1,744,278 

1,749,918 

810,420 

526,243 

932.580 

1,211,200 

892,240 

975,976 

$12,895,381 

1016 

Amount. 

$ 2,230,159 

2,006,061 

3,029,685 

4,559.617 

3,201,498 

3,780,630 

2,405,283 

2,539,508 

2,483,307 

2,677,251 

2,859,679 

3,355.367 

$35,128,045 



Building Permits. 
$12,854,035 
14,544,430 
14,075,794 
23,434,564 
29,938,693 
21,893,137 
21,190,369 
23,656,467 
17,845,648 
18,607,556 
20,675,804 
15,340,012 
12,885,398 
11,437,606 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 67 

FURNITURE. 

By Gbo. T. Pabksb, President Scarrltt-Oomstock Furniture Corporation. 



For a decade no year has outrivaled 1915 in its chamelion-like con- 
ditions at the opening of the year, the chaos wrought by the greatest 
of European wars was reflected in the Furniture and kindred lines of 
the business of St. Louis. Some few lines reported business fully equal 
to normal, others feU far behind. 

Uncertainty was a marked feature, nearly all lines of the business 
being conducted with caution. As is the custom , manufacturers of leading 
lines prepare and submit designs intended for the year's run. However, 
those who in normal years order liberally placed few orders. 

Optimism was to be found everywhere, stocks were low but the 
buying was only as wants demanded. There was a disposition of 
cheerfulness pervading the market with a better condition looked for, 
which gradually improved. 

Prospects brightened with the change in cotton conditions and 
again biisiness improved with the Reserve Bank assurances. Demand 
for goods was moderate, but there was plenty of goods in the market 
and factories waiting to supply more. 

St. Louis factories employ about 4,000 hands, and total wages about 
$1,250,000. 

Eastern and Northern markets recovered their business activity and 
maintained it during the year to a far greater extent than did St. Louis. 
A fairly active demand was shown in wholesale buying, but normal trade 
of former years was not reached. 

The February and August Trade Seasons for merchants from the 
country were fairly well attended — possibly there was more looking than 
buying. There have been decided changes in downtown sample rooms, 
each of which is maintained as an oi>en exposition all the year around. 

A feature adding to the volume of the St. Louis furniture sales are 
the sample lines of manufacturers from other cities who seek this as 
an advantageous selling market and maintain salesrooms here. 

Including manufacturing, jobbing and retailing, the total business of 
the year approximates $15,000,000. 

After the July meetings the result of the advances in metals was 
shown in increased prices in which they were used, all woods entering 
into the construction of furniture also took on an increased price, so that 
by the end of the year all lines were increased more or less with prospects 
of still further advances. 

The St. Louis Furniture Board of Trade, now in its twenty-seventh 
year, continues as the medium through which the furniture manu- 
facturers and supply houses act for the building up of St. Louis as a 
furniture market. 

Foreign trade inquiries have been numerous and some factories are 
securing good orders, the needed granting of special terms and changes 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



58 TRADB AND COMMSBCB OF 

in styles to suit the inquiries have not tended to win for St. Louis mueh 
of this business; that from Mexico which we formerly enjoyed has been 
entirely cut off by disturbed conditions. The present inquiries are 
mostly from below the Equator and the result of a Commissioner's visit 
eighteen months ago in behalf of the St. Louis furniture interests. 

Car furniture making promises a revival, now that the nulroad 
conditions are improved and that for several years no new equipment 
has been ordered by the railroads. 

The Coffin and Casket business has been normal, reaching the usual 
output of about $3,000,000. 

The tendency to a further west location continues, leaving few in 
the retail district of several years ago. Period styles prevail, showing 
excellent taste and good workmanship extending to a larger extent to 
the demand of the dealers from the country whose customers, throu^ 
magazine and newspaper literature, have educated those living in the 
country towns to the city vogue. 

Adam, Jacobean, Charles II, William and Mary and Chippendale 
designs have been popular and variations along these lines have been 
numerous. 

Woods employed have changed some, the American Walnut taking 
a prominent position. Mahogany and Quartered Oak are most largely 
used. New wood finishes continue to interest buyers, who demand from 
the whitest of Oak to Ebonized Mahogany, with high lights in repousse. 

The building of homes and institutions were less in 1915 than for 
many years and this had a reflex in the business done in the city. 

St. Louis, with her 50 furniture and kindred line factories, has shown 
herself able in variety and quality to cope with any market. The 
factory output of this market has been about $3,250,000. One factory 
specializing in Dining and Bed Room pieces have been encouraged to 
increase their line and have launched into more ambitious productions. 

Prospects for increasing business were never more encouraging. 



ST. LOUIS DRY QOODS MARKET FOR 1915. 

By Alsz. C. Smith, Merchandise Editor, The Drygoodsman. 



The changed balance of trade is responsible for the prosperity of dry 
goods men during the year 1915 just closed, of course aided by bountiful, 
if not extraordinary crops and other important elements in the manu- 
facturing and distribution of merchandise. Almost every promise of 
January, 1915 has been fulfilled in neaiiy every division of the dry goods 
trade, which, as a whole, started out on a far more substantial basis 
than it did at the beginning of 1914, and it found itself ready to go ahead, 
not only with its service of the United States, but with a service of 
praotioidly the entire world, with all sorts of merchandise. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 59 

The problems of the year have been many and more difficult of 
solution than usual, but they have all been handled intelligently and 
worked to a satisfactory conclusion. That all problems connected with 
a most unusual year are solved is not the case and that mei'chants are 
wary indicates that in spite of abnormal demand and every indication 
of a boom in trade, they are still filling their needs in a conserva- 
tive way. 

With war time on his hands, no man knows what changed conditions 
may be instantly brought about, bringing in their wake problems quite 
as trying and quite as dtogerous as those from which he has been seeking 
release during 1915. 

As things stand, there is plenty of cheap money, there is a gradually 
increasing purchasing power on the part of the masses and, barring a 
sudden ending of hostilities in Europe, the prospect of a demand for 
goods in excess of anything that the factories of America can produce. 

The shortage of dyestuffs, occasioned by the closing of German ports, 
was the thing that carried most of menace to the trade last year, influenc- 
ing distribution to such an extent that prices on standard colored fabrics 
advanced as much as 30 per cent, and throwing completely out of the 
market many of the best known fast color brands. Towards the close 
of the year, manufacturers were compelled to withdraw their usual 
guarantee of fast colors in nearly all cases where substitutes for German 
dyes were emx>loyed. At present prices the color in many staple lines of 
fabrics costs more than the total cost of other materials, labor and general 
expense combined. There is left at this date no dyestuffs in original 
packages and small packages are eagerly sought at exorbitant prices. 
Substitute dyes have undergone enormous advances during the last six 
months. Logwood extract went from 5 cents to $1.00 and an advance 
of 500 per cent is noted on fustic, hypemic and cutch. Simple pigment 
colors, although they are not fast, met an average advance of 50 per 
' cent. 

The year 1915 will not soon be forgotten by linenmen, because of its 
exceeding difficulties. The prices on raw materials and on finished goods 
practically doubled before the end of the year. German, Austrian and, 
to a large extent, French, Belgian and Russian linens were out of the 
market and practically the only sources of supply for this country were 
Scotland and Ireland. Scotch and Irish flax jumped skyhigh on account 
of the requirements of the British Government, and supplies of manu- 
factured linens from these countries were curtailed because the regular 
linen machinery was diverted to the making of materials for strictly 
military uses. 

Notwithstanding all this, business done by commission houses for 
the year was better than anticipated and the retail trade on linens was 
better than the previous year, largely on goods, however, which had 
come through before March, 1915, from Gerinany, Austria and other 
mid-European sources. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



60 TRADB AKD COMMXRCB OF 

Over against these and many other adverse conditions growing out 
of the great war were many conditions playing to the advantage of this 
country. 

Purchases of military supplies of various kinds by foreign nations 
have turned a stream of wealth in our direction. Exports of merchandise 
of an ordinary character have vastly increased, and the increase in our 
shipments of textiles abroad, in particular, is almost startling. 

The opportunities presented for the development of our export trade 
had been recognized, indeed, from the beginning of the war. There is 
still much to be done in this direction if the United States is to win its 
due share of export trade and is to retain it after that much desired 
event, the restoration of peace. But, during the last twelve months 
efforts have been as never before to extend our commerce and, in par- 
ticular, to establish closer relations with our great neighbors at the south. 
The Latin-American republics, it is gratifying to state, have shown a 
warm-hearted reciprocation of this desire for greater friendliness and 
union. 



MANUFACTURES IN ST. LOUIS. 



CBNSnS BUBBAU'S SUMMABT OONCBBNIMO THB CITT VOB 1914. 

A preliminaiV statement of the general results of the census of 
manufactures for St. Louis, Mo., has been issued by Director Sam. L. 
Rogers, of the Biireau of the Census, Department of Commerce. It 
consists of a summary comparing the figures for 1909 and 1914, by totals, 
prepared under the direction of Mr. William M. Steuart, chief statistician 
for manufactures. 

The figures are preliminary and subject to such change and correction 
as may be found necessary from a further examination of the original 
reports. 

The census of 1914, like that of 1909, with reference to manufactures, 
excluded the hand trades, the building trades, and the neighborhood 
industries, and took account only of establishments conducted under the 
factory system. In the last census, also, as in that for 1909, statistics 
were not collected for establishments having products for the census year 
valued at less than $500, except that reports were taken for establish- 
ment^ idle during a portion of the census year, or which began operation 
during that year, and whose products for such reason were valued at less 
than $500. 

The word "establishment" as used in the census reports may mean 
more than one mill or plant, provided they are owned or controlled and 
operated by a single individual, partnership, corporation, or other owner 
or operator, and are located in the same town or city. 

The reports were taken for the calendar year ending December 31, 
1914, wherever the system of bookkeeping permitted figures for that 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THK CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 61 

period to be secured, but when the fiscal year of an establishment differed 
from the calendar year a report was obtained for the operations of that 
establishment for its fiscal year falling most largely within the calendar 
year 1914. 

PBRCBNTAGE8 OP INCRBA8B. 

The population of St. Louis at the census of 1910 was 687,029, and it 
is estimated that it was 734,700 on July 1, 1914. 

The statistics represent the estabUshments located within the cor- 
porate limits of the city. 

With the exception of a slight decrease in the number of wage earners, 
the summary shows an increase in the manufacturing activities of the 
city during 1914, as compared with 1909. In the order of their impor- 
tance, from a percentage standpoint, the increases for the several items 
rank as follows: Salaries, 21.9 per cent; capital, 17.3 per cent; salaried 
employes, 12.2 per cent; value added by manufacture, 11.5 per cent; 
value of products, 9.5 per cent; cost of materials, 8 per cent; number of 
e^blishments, 4.5 per cent; primary horse-power, 3.9 per cent; and 
proprietors and firm members, 1.6 per cent. 

CAPITAL INVESTED. 

The capital invested, as reported in 1914, was $315,950,000, a gain 
of $46,558,000, or 17.3 per cent, over $269,392,000 in 1909. The average 
capital per establishment was approximately $113,000 in 1914 and 
$101,000 in 1909. In this connection it should be stated that the inquiry 
contained in the census schedule calls for the total amount of capital, 
both owned and borrowed, invested in the business, but excludes the value 
of rented property, plant, or equipment which was employed in the 
conduct of manufacturing enterprises. In the final bulletins and reports 
the rental paid for such property will be shown separately. 

COST OF MATREIALS. 

The cost of materials used was $203,292,000 in 1914 as against 
$188,189,000 in 1909, an increase of $15,103,000, or 8 per cent. The 
average cost of materials per establishment was approximately $73,000 
in 1914 and $71,000 in 1909. In addition to the component materials 
which enter into the products of the establishment for the census year 
there are included the cost of fuel, mill supplies, and rent of power and 
heat. The cost of materials, however, does not include unused materials 
and supplies bought either for speculation or for use during a subsequent 
period. 

The census inqiiiry does not include amounts paid for miscellaneous 
expenses, such as rent of offices, royalties, insurance, ordinary repairs, 
advertising, traveling exi>enses, or allowance for depreciation. 

VALUE OF PRODUCTS. 

The value of products was $359,797,000 in 1914 and $328,495,000 in 
1909, the increase being $31,302,000, or 9.5 per cent. The average per 
establishment was approximately $129,000 in 1914 and $123,000 in 1909. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



62 



TBADB AND COMMBBCB OF 



The value of products repreoents the lelliii^ value or prioe at the planta 
as actually turned out by the factories during the census year and does 
not necessarily have any relation to the amount of sales for that year. 
The values under this head also include amounts received for work done 
on materials furnished by others. 

VALUB ADDED BT MANUrACTURB. 

The value added by manufacture represents the difference between 
the cost of materials used and the value of the products manufactured 
from them. The value added by manufacture was $156,505,000 in 1914 
and $140,306,000 in 1909, the increase being $16,199,000, or 11.5 per cent. 
The value added by manufacture formed 43.5 per cent of the total value 
of products in 1914 and 42.7 per cent in 1909. 

8ALARIB8 AND WAOBS. 

The salaries and wages amounted to $75,108,000 in 1914 and to 
$68,206,000 in 1909, the increase being $6,902,000, or 10.1 per cent. 

The number of salaried employes was 17,215 in 1914, as compared 
with 15,347 in 1909, making an increase of 1,868, or 12.2 per cent. 

The average number of wage earners was 84,816 in 1914 and 87,371 
in 1909. 

SUMMARY FOR THE CITT. 

A comparative summary for the city for 1909 and 1914 follows: 





Obiisus. 


Percenter 
Increase. 




1914. 


1909. 


1909-1914. • 


Number of establiahmentf 


3,786 

108,030 

1.809 

17,216 

84,816 

160,018 

$316,060,000 

76,108.000 

23,971,000 

61,187,000 

208,292,000 

369,797,000 

166,606,000 


2,667 

104,687 

1,869 

16.347 

87,871 

163,616 

$269,392,000 

68.206,000 

19.671,000 

48,636,000 

188,189.000 

328,496,000 

140.306,000 


4.6 


Parsons engaged in manufactures. 


-0.6 


Proprietors' sAd firm members 


1.6 


Balaried ©mploires aa 


12.2 


Wage earners (average number) 


-2.9 


Primary horse-DowerT. 


3.9 


Oapi5Z."!.!Tr.^.T™^ 


17.3 


Services „ 

«alarlfl# 


10.1 
21.9 


Wages 


6.4 


Mat^als 


8.0 


Value of products 


9.6 


Value added by manuflacture (value of 
products less cost of materials) 


11.6 



* A minus sign (— ) denotes decrease. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 63 



ST. LOUIS MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS. 



For the fiscal year ending April 13th, 1915. From the report 
of Jaiob Y. PitATSB, Oomptroller. 



CONDITION or THB TREASURY. 

As shown by the oonsolidated statement, the cash balance in the 
treasury on April 12th, 1915, was $8,193,173.40. Adding: to this balance 
$458,845.52, representing uncollected special tax bills for the opening 
and sprinkling of streets, etc., gives a total of $8,652,018.92. Against 
this amount must be charged the balance standing to the credit of the 
special funds and accounts, which is $6,732,262.50, leaving the unappro- 
priated surplus of $1,919,756.42, as shown in the following statement of 
Receipts and Appropriations and Transfers. 

RKCBIPT8. 

Interest and Public Debt Revenue $ 2,979,475.02 

Municipal Revenue 11,073,142.80 

Water Works Revenue 2,844,837.00 

Harbor Fund $16,897,454.82 



APPROPRIATIONS AND TRANSFERS. 

From Interest and Public Debt Rev $ 2,417,115.00 

Prom Municipal Revenue 10,655,573.91 

Prom Water Works Revenue 1 ,905,009.49 

Prom Harbor Fund $14,977,698.40 

Unappropriated Balance $ 1,919,756.42 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE DEBT. 

The bonded debt of the city at the end of the fiscal year 1913-14, 
was $22,438,000. During the present year, $2,000,000 of bonds dated 
June 1st, 1894 matured; $800,000 of this issue were Water bonds, and were 
redeemed and canceled out of Water Works Sinking Fund. The remainder 
of the issue were reissued and were sold to the Sinking FundCommission 
as an investment for the Public Building and Public Improvement Sinking 
Fund. The Fund Commissioners also purchased and canceled one $1,000 
bond maturing May Ist, 1915. 

Bonds amounting to $2,750,000 for the completion of the East side 
approaches of the Municipal Bridge were issued under date of April 1st, 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



64 TBADK AND OOMMSRCa OF 

1915 bearing 4H per cent, and were sold to various purchasers at an 
average price of $1,042.87 per $1,000 bond, realizing $117,885.34 
premium. 

DKBT AND DBBT LIMIT. 

From the foregoing it will be seen that the net increase in the bonded 
debt during the year amounted to $1,949,000, leaving outstanding at 
this date $24,387,000. The interest on t^ds simi for the coming year 
amounts to $935,765.50. As provided in Article X, Section 12 of the 
Constitution, the City of St. Louis may, at this date issue $14,582,786.73 
additional bonds and be within the authorized debt limit. 

SINKING FUNDS. 

During the year 1914-15 the sum of $1,670,970.34 was placed to the 
credit of the Sinking Fund accounts, $1,553,085 being out of the current 
revenue receipts and $117,885.34 from premium received at sale of 
$2,750,000 Municipal Bridge Bonds; $801,000 was drawn therefrom to 
pay for bonds matured during the year and for bonds purchased prior 
to maturity; $1,200,000 of the Sinking Fund was also withdrawn and 
invested in that amount of 4 per cent revenue bonds, dated May 3l8t, 
1914, issued to redeem that part of City's obligations matured June let, 
1914. The cash balance remaining to credit of the sinking funds at this 
date is $1,747,926.73. 

TAXATION. 

The assessed valuation of real and personal property for the taxes of 
1915 will be approximately $592,231,730, exclusive of the assessment by 
the State Board of Equalization on railroads, bridges, telegraph, express 
and street railway property, which is estimated at $37,000,000. 

VALUATIONS. 

The valuation for the years 1914-15 and 1915-16, are as follows. 

1914-15 1915-16 

Land and Improvements $485,558,700 $494,342,890 

Personal Property 94,390,990 97,888,840 

Property of Raih^ads, etc 35,967,492 a37 ,000,000 

Total $615,917,182 $629,231,730 

(a) Estimated. 

TAX RATES. 

The tax rates for State, Schools and City, amounting to $2.35, are as 
follows: State, revenue 15 cents; interest 2 cents; Capitol Bonds 2 cents; 
total, 19 cents. School, 60 cents. City, municipal purposes, $1.15; 
interest on valid indebtedness (existing prior to April 7th, 1890), 13 cents; 
interest and sinking funds World's Fair bonds, 6 cents; interest and 
sinking fund Public Buildings and Public Improvement bonds, 16 cents; 
Public Library, 4 cents; and Art Museum, 2 cents; total, $1.56. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE Cnr OF ST. LOUIS. 



65 



1838. 
ISSO. 



POPULATION OF ST. LOUIS. 

ABEA 62X SQUABB MILES. 
1886. 



1887. 
1810. 
1844. 
1880. 
1808. 
1886. 
1808. 



5,000 

5,888 

6,807 

8,816 

12,040 

16,460 

84,140 

74,480 

84,000 

195,800 

185,067 



1870-nnited State* Censiu 810,887 

1880-United States Census. 860,522 

1880— United States Oensns. 451,779 

1800— United States Oensos 575,288 

1910-Unlted States Census 687,039 

mi-Estlmated 700.000 

1913-E8timated 760,000 

mB-Estlmated 750.000 

1916-Estlmated 800.000 



AMOUNT OP REAL ESTATE AND PERSONAL PROPERTY 
ASSESSED IN THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS, f 



TKAH. 


OITT OF8T.LOni8. 

Real Estate. 


OITT 8T. LOmO. 

RealAPer8*nal. 


BATB OF TAXATION. 




Old Limite. 


NewLlmite. 


1879 


tm.^^^jm 


1102. fteS, 570 


2.78 




1878 


14^,144,400 


lSO,i78,*ifiO 


8.76 




1874 


14h041,4SO 


r/i,im,T,o 


2.88.5 




1875 


iSlAilM<i 


]6e,9B0,e60 


8 48.5 




1876 


ISi 7e->,450 


1««,441J10 


8.42.5 




1877 


l4a,0l2,7M 


181,345,&«0 


2.80 




1878 


J40, 976,540 


n2,S2»,fk80 


2.00 


1.85 


1879 


1 36,(171. €70 


16a,813,5*-iD 


260 


1.85 


1880 


186p82+.9St(J 


lfJ0,4l»3.E)00 


2.60 


1*85 


1881 


UO,8S7,47D 


ie7,JJti4,2H0 


2.60 


1.85 


1888 


lfll,67fl 260 


I91,ft4s{,450 


2.58 


1.88 


1888 


l«3.47Q,06f» 


19'|,5€5,tr4{> 


256 


1.80 


1884 


17a,5^Je.6&0 


310,124,870 


255 


1.80 


1885 


in,&57,24{} 


S(I7,910,3W> 


2.55 


1.80 




187.2&1.&40 


2ia,S71.2lV0 


2.55 


1.80 


188? 


184,815.660 


217,142,5taO 


2.50 


1.80 


1888 


1B5,97S,2,W 


2f7,7fl9.!)S0 


2.80 


1.70 


1888 


im.m.fm 


S30, 338,810 


2.20 


1 60 


1890 


214,t7l.MO 


^48, 827, 830 


2.20 


160 


1891 


fi£,Sil3,^0 


266,U^.ii90 


2.20 


180 


1808 


l&/i^,UO 


2^.51g 650 


2.05 


1.60 


1898. 


§42.737*430 


S87.82e.430 


2.05 


1.67 


1894 


m,m,m 


31fi,a9«,fie0 


2.06 


1.67 


1896 


^m,^m,mQ 


am;,4B€,6IO 


2.05 


1.67 


1886 


296,4I»,G90 


846,940.160 


2.05 


1.67 


1897 


390,639,220 


^44, 749, 700 


2.05 


1.67 


1898 


Sli,^16y&4Q 


|60,516,GIW 


2.05 


1.67 


1889 


mti.m^j.m} 


974,&8^,49i> 


1.95 


1.57 


1900 


ssi^miMfi 


880,779.280 


1.95 


1.57 


1901 


U2,252,UQ 


m,T32.7(K) 


1.90 


1.90 


1903 


mi, 101, m 


41S,(H6.HO0 


1.95 


1.95 


1908 


■!5,6a3.25a 


443.865.B60 


2.15 


2.15 


1904 


672,410,940 


45S,913,610 


2.19 


2.19 


1905 


SSlJ75.a3(} 


468,90.^700 


2.19 


2.19 


1906 


4(»9,ft3ft,700 


4117.2^7,300 


2.10 


2.10 


1907 


m.Tri.rm 


■. - •: . ''(I) 


2.17 


2.17 


1906 


436,yftl.<e«> 


jn 


2.22 


2.22 


1909 


446J.'>I,930 


o«o,w^,U>U 


2.22 


2.22 


1910 


iS8,762,,'l90 


665,725.820 


2.22 


2.22 


1911 


441,g,'>4,410 


673,888,210 


2.22 


2.22 


1913 


4ft2.^^*0,ft7O 


507,888,680 


2.22 


2.22 


1918 


470.4fia.^O 


600,788.618 


2.22 


2.22 


1914 


|B&,Ei5§,70U 


615,918,182 


2.85 


2.85 


1915 


mM^^^m 


629,281,780 


2.« 


2.85 



City Assewraient uv/'v •;;:!. i,-; w« .8592,281,780 

Board of Bquallaatlon for Bailroads, Bridges, Telegraph, Express and 

Street Ballroad Property 87,000,000 

Total 8629,281.780 

OltjTax.fl^jBtate, 19c; School, 60c 0M 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



66 TRADB AND COMMBBCB OF 



BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS. 



By J. N. MoEsLTBT, Bulldinc OommlnSoner. 



The total estimated cost of all buflding operations (both new building 
and alterations and repairs) daring the calendar year of 1915, was $11,- 
437,606.00, a decrease of $1,447,792.00 from the previous year (1914) 
which total was $12,885,398.00. 

The building department issued during the past year 9,052 permits, 
as against 8,837 issued during 1914. 

A large per cent of the alterations and repairs during 1915 were made 
necessary through orders of this department, due to the fact that we 
were taking every precaution to safeguard the public of this dty. 

In my opinion, the decrease in building activities is not merely a 
local condition (as this city is on a par with other large cities in the 
percentage of its building business), but is due in a general way to business 
conditions nationally. 

I look for a very material gain in the building business during the 
year 1916. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



67 



BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS 

Statxhimt Showinq thb Value of Building Impbovsments in the 
Crrr of St. Louis dubinq the Tsabs 1914 and 1915. 



Prepared by J. N. MoKslyet, Oommlssioner of Pabllc Balldings. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 



1914. 


1915. 


Months. 


Number 

of 
Permlte. 


Value of 
Improvements. 


Months. 


Number 

of 
Permits. 


Value of 
Ihiprovements. 


January 

February.... 

March 

April 

May 


486 
415 
910 
1,090 
1,017 
884 
826 
729 
768 
788 
606 
888 


$ 864,122.00 

908,088.00 

1,450,084.00 

1,784,412.00 

1,496,608.00 

1,548,626.00 

1,287,869.00 

797,166.00 

669,082.00 

1,116,643.00 

660,029.00 

378,791.00 


January 

February 

March 

April 


863 
661 
1014 
1110 
886 
868 
721 
808 
799 
889 
678 
476 


$1,094,678.00 
701,062.00 

1,268,878.00 
986,719.00 
987,676.00 

1,466,696.00 
616,148.00 


May 


WW J 

Jun6 . . 


June 


July 


July 


August .... 
September . . 

Ootober 

NoYember .. 
December . . . 


August 

September. . . . 

October 

November .... 
December .... 

Totals 


982,446.00 
800,186.00 
1,214,618.00 
782,629.00 
637,977.00 


Totals 


8,887 


$12,886,898.00 


9,062 


$11,487,606.00 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED FOR TWENTY-FIVE YEARS. 





BBIGK AND FRAME AND 
STONE BUIIiDINOS. OTHER BUIIiDINGS. 


TOTAL BniIJ>ING8. 


COST. 


1915 


6,053 


3,650 


9.053 


$11,487,606 


1914 


6,166 


2,691 


8,837 


12.885,898 


1913 


5,412 


2,890 


8,803 


- , ' '■'' .""■■- 


1912 


5,948 


3,645 


8,508 


kL.,-;.:.,t^Mi 


1911 


5,871 


3,281 


8,153 


IS 0u7,2&5 


1910 


4,886 


5,088 


9,419 


]9,eo0,{i«3 


1909 


4,886 


4,898 


9,379 


33,733,3:2 


1908 


4,370 


4.849 


9,119 


■ 21jLKf,;-i()9 


1907 


8,943 


4,613 


8,558 


2l,b'^Jf?1 


1900 


4,143 


4,846 


8,968 


29,&BS.^ 


1906 


8,971 


4.814 


8,285 


28,484,784 


1904 


3,654 


8,806 


5,960 


14,075,794 


MX» 


3,177 


3,625 


4,802 


14,544.480 


1902 


3,366 


3,236 


4,502 


12.854,035 


1901 


1,896 


1,834 


8.723 


18,307,901 


1900 


1,800 


1,188 


3,518 


5,016.984 


1809 


1,589 


961 


3,500 


8,349.565 


1898 


1,861 


796 


3,657 


7.888.889 


1897 


3,048 


771 


8,830 


9,4n,640 


1806 


3,848 


686 


8,039 


10,084,908 


1895 


3,863 


780 


0,643 


14.881,060 


1804 


1,077 


876 


8.858 


11,844,700 


1896 


S.748 


1,089 


8.887 


18,857,667 


1802 


8,496 


1,386 


4,782 


16,076.978 


1891 J 


3,970 


1,469 


4.485 


18.259.950 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



68 



TRADK AND COMMKRCB OF 



FIBB RBCOBD FOR 1916. 



As Reported by the St. Loolt Fire Deyartaoaent. 



Mouths. 



ON BUILDINGS. 



Insuraiice. 



LoMes to 
Oompanles. 



ON CONTENTS. 



Inturance. 



Losaesto 
Oompanlee. 



January .. 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June ... — 

July 

Auffutt..... 
September. 
October... 
NoTember. 
December.. 

TotaL . 



I 747,646 00 
719,116 00 
1,036,066 00 
1,423,880 00 
311,636 00 
301,364 00 
801,100 00 
f01,470 00 
383,140 00 
488,066 00 
880.600 00 
847,886 00 



161,643 00 
48,977 00 
71,886 00 
86,666 00 
33,619 00 
16.147 00 
38,196 00 
11,660 00 
17,684 00 
83,963 00 
36,003 00 
66,167 00 



I 6,788,814 00 



1491,464 06 



6 863,413 66 
644.066 00 

1,006,616 00 
831,336 00 
174,046 00 
146,336 00 
189,860 00 
86,960 00 
368,036 00 
3S0,378 00 
886,360 00 
894,336 00 



64.160,147 00 



$114,167 06 

63,768 66 

316,606 00 

117,634 00 

16,831 00 

63,070 00 

60,969 00 

18,470 00 

46.177 00 

86,646 60 

44,861 60 

167.36160 



1887.749 60 



Box Alarms. 3.601; SUU Alarms, 3,014-Total, 4.616. 
Alarms, 16; Fourth Alarms, 0; False Alarms, 690. 



Second Alarms. S3; Third 



INSURANOB L06SB8 AND PBBCBNTAOB8 ON BUILDINGS AND CONTENTS 
DURING A NUMBER OF YBAR& 



Vbab. 1 


!te.Ofef«* 
and 

Alarms. 


Amount of 
iiiAQninec 


Amottniol 
LOflHt to ta- Pfercen tsfft 
•arMMBOo%. 


Iflflft „ „„ _ ..., 


1640 
1960 
1969 
90M 

3I7S 

3048 
'imi 
3076 

m& 

3643 

81G« 
816^ 

mm 
Em 
m^ 
mi 

41l« 
4696 
4706 
i<i74 
4616 


16,191,017 00 
6,464,B6l 69 
ll,B80,a*l 11 
9,377p960 09 
S.0l7,90i 91 
tO,3S6,996 3S 
33«9«0,343 M 

io,ea6,y39 ar 

9,Mi,771 50 

lo.no.m 73 

«,'I31,5«90 79 
&,i7€,38S 00 
9.963,364 00 
ll,7i9.30ROO 
I9,«43.ieB 00 
ll,i36.907 00 
]3,6£ia.973 00 
IS.OIU JM 00 

16,»76t73S 00 
10,93@,4B1 00 


J:?2:S5 

998.130 64 
] .656,031 10 
3,706.437 57 

l,a01,7M50 
1,173,10168 

971,476 67 

9«».9«101 

966.969 00 

l.affi.TOOO 

l,3i§,IAlOO 

#74.3&? 00 

9&4,0CI6 00 

3.306,SeSf10 

l.303,»7H 00 

1,719.946 00 

3, 460, OSS 00 

i,si»,3oaoo 


31. 3S 


J8M,.., ...,,.,,.. » . ...... 


16.06 


1*97.. .*•,...•.•*,*,.♦**,.* ,1 


ia.€6 


1898, ........ .•........-,„.--,. »..,... 


19.40 


189B ,.,.,.— ....,*- 


13.13 


1900... ,......, **...,..*.,. 


10, 30 


1901....... ......»..,,. ...,,... 


17 94 


1@03.....« „.„ .„.. 


ll<fO 


1906. „. ., 


11. le 


1«M, ,.,. . 


u.ia 


1906 ..,., ................... 

1900*. „ , ,. 


9.07 
11 96 


SS::;;::;:::::::::::::-.::::-.:::::.:::. 


10.90 
U,61 


1909.... »...♦. 


Jt!w 


1916 ... . 


4.06 


1911...... ,.. 


9.00 


1912..*., 

191*.. .,.,. 


17.0 

9.97 


1914 


U.96 


191B .... ..., 


L3.il 



I906*>-Not Including losses for which no alarms were given, which amounted to 
$134,061.00. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



69 



STATEMENT OP BUSEOSSS TRANSACTED AT THE 

POSTOFFICE. 

Colin M. Sblph, Postmaster. 

REVENUES. 

Receipts. 

1916 $6,800,829.66 

1914 6,228,487.78 

1918 6,331,298,11 

1912 4,828,e78.47 

1911 4,689,469.07 

1910 4,689,186.10 

1909 4,294,134.04 

1908 8,974,884.34 

1907 8,989,176.00 

Inorease in receipts, 1916 

Increase in net revenue, 1916... 



ST. LOUIS 



Bxpendltiires. 
$2,091,343.76 
2,067,832.71 
2,076,979.28 
1,906,882.64 
1,866,668.61 
1,841,268.00 
1,787,818.85 
1,711,964.20 
1,676,640.00 

$ 86,891.78 
82,380.78 

DISTRIBUTION AND DISPATCH OF MAILS ORIGINATING IN 

ST. LOUIS. 

Total pounds handled In 1916 77,676,968 

Total pounds handled in 1914 72,248,486 

Total pounds handled In 1918 78,068,066 

Total pounds handled in 1912 68,266,868 

Total pounds handled in 1911 48,166,048 

Total pounds handled in 1910 60,794,467 

Total pounds handled in 1909 46,989,884 

Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1916 318,612,287 

Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1914 813,610,102 

Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1918 880,982,678 

Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1912 816,061,798 

Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1911 806,616,893 

Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1910 307,066,068 

Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1909 278,436^17 

1914. 1916. 

Domestic money orders issued $ 2,786,192.79 $ 2,669,989.80 

Foreign money orders issued 663,246.06 291,017.37 

Amount of money orders paid 8,604,680.28 8,028,823.62 

Money order funds received for deposit 11,049,884.39 10,226,163.64 

Registered pieces received 618,808 482,769 

Registered pieces dispatched 498,478 474,680 

Registered pieces handled in transit 898,260 887,978 

Special delivery letters delivered 876,641 884,812 

Pounds of mail dispatched 72,243,486 77,676,968 

Poundsof maUreceived 16,088,787 17,873,429 

Total number of insured parcels received.... 278,711 878,778 

Total number of insured parcels dispatched. . 228,160 804,601 

Total number of C. O. D. parcels received 9,611 18,366 

Total number of C. O. D. parcels dispatched . . 69,674 118,409 

Total pounds parcel post received 4,372,927 4,366,118 

Total pounds parcel post dispatched (outgoing) 16,814,868 17,796,686 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OP POSTAL SAVINGS TRANSACTIONS. 

1914. 1916. 

Certificates of deposit issued $616,806.00 $692,677.00 

Certificates of deposit paid 460,992.00 498,748.00 

Bonds purchased by depositors 20,800.00 20,600.00 

Number of accounts opened 4,287 8,638 

Number of accounts remaining open December 81, 1916 — 4,916 6,261 

Amount on deposit December 81, 1916 $641,266.00 740,200.00 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



70 TRADB AND COMMXRCB OF 



ST. LOUIS WEATHER FOR THE YEAR 1915. 



By MOHTBOSi W. HATB8, DlstHct Forecaster, U. 8. Weather Bareau. 



A GENERAL SUMMARY OF THE WEATHER DURING THE TEAR. 

The weather of the year was remarkable for the oool, wet period that 
began in the late spring and continued until late in the summer. 

The January conditions were not unusual, except, perhaps, there was 
a rather large number of days with precipitation. From the 19th to 
the 30th, inclusive, the ground was covered with snow; the greatest 
depth was 7.3 inches on the 22nd. 

February was unusually mild; the lowest temperature was 21^. The 
snowfall was very light; it amounted to only 1.6 inches. There was, 
however, almost enough rain to bring the total amount of precipitation 
up to the normal. 

March was cool and cloudy. There were fifteen days with a trace or 
more of rain or snow; however, the total precipitation was only 13 per 
cent of the normal amount. 

The first five days and the 12th, 13th and 14th of April were cool. 
The other days were quite warm. Precipitation was well distributed 
through the month, but the total amount was much loss than the normal. 
The last frost of the spring, which was a killing frost, occurred on April 3rd. 

May, June and Jidy were rainy and cool. On July 5th the minimum 
temperature was 55**, which equals the Weather Bureau record for low 
temperature in St. Louis in July; the same temperature occurred once 
before— on July 9, 1891. 

In August the wet period came to an end, but the temperature con- 
tinued unseasonably low. The ending of the wet period was coincident 
with the passage of a West Indian storm, on the 20th, which caused 
considerable damage in and around St. Louis. Low places were flooded, 
all small streams were out of their banks and rain, driven by the wind, 
permeated the walls of numerous brick buildings. The wind was not 
particularly strong, and the rain was not excessive for any given hour, 
but the long duration of both the wind and the rain made the storm one 
of the notable events in the meteorological history of St. Loms. The 
rainfall for 24 consecutive hours was heavier than ever before recorded 
at the St. Louis station in the same length of time. The total rainfall 
for the month was also, on account of this storm, the heaviest August 
fall shown by any of the available precipitation tabulations, which cover 
the period from 1837 to 1915, inclusive. Another noteworthy feature of 
August, 1915, was the temperature; the minimum on the 31st, which 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



TBB OITT OF 0T. LOUIS. 71 

was 52^, equaled the Weather Bureau record for low temperature in 
August; 52° has ooourred but twice before in Aug:ust — on the 24th in 
1887 and on the 30th in 1911. The mean temperature for the months 
70.4°, was the lowest August mean of which there is a Weather Bureau 
record in St. Louis. 

September had several cool days, but the greater part of the month 
was warm. The precipitation was a little less than half the normal 
amount. 

October was quite dry. The first half of the month was cool and the 
latter half was warm. The first frost of the fall, which was light, occurred 
on the 5th. There were also light frosts on the 6th and 8th, and a killing 
frost occurred on the 9th. 

In November the temperature was higher than usual, and the precipi- 
tation was deficient. Snow, all of which melted upon striking the ground, 
feU on the 19th, 28th and 29th. 

December had somewhat more precipitation than is usual during the 
last month of the year, but the temperature was quite seasonable. During 
the last eight days of the month the ground was covered with snow. 

There were do extremely high river stages, but throughout almost 
the entire year the water level was considerably above the normaL 

There was an exceptional rise of 6.4 feet in 24 hours on August 
20th — ^21 st, caused by the rain accompanying the West Indian storm. 

MISCELLANEOUS PHENOMENA. 

Frost: 

Last killing in spring, April 3rd. 

Last heavy in spriug, April 3rd. 

Last light in spring, April 3rd. 

First light in autumn, October 5th. 

First heavy in autumn, October 9th. 

First killing in autumn, October 9th. 
Thunderstorms occurred in every month except January, February, 
March and December. 

Snow (0.1 inch or more): 

Last in spring, March 21st. 

First in autumn, December 12th. 
Greatest depth on ground at 7 p. m., 9.0 inches on December 27th. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



72 



TBAOB AND COMMBSCa OT 



o 



i| 

2 

ii 



1^ 

\m 
»^ 

OP 

o 

I 

S3 



'SSf^ 






38 




155 


_8S_ 

"Sir 

"88" 


38 
8? 

in 
"ss" 


{:8 

S3' 

f:9 

^9 

88 


or* 

-44- 


-•• 


88 38 


8 


S8 




88 


•: 38 




8X 




88 

~8sr 




88 
88 


88 


^8 


88 88 




PS 

r:8 


r:s 


99 38 




2^ 


iis 


38 


83 


88 


88 
?S8~ 


^8 
758" 


88 8S 


R* 


S8 


^8 


89 8S 




5S 


8S 


8S 


88 


?8 


83 


8S 


?S 


88 83 


8S 


88 


28 


88 


38 


88 


sc 


t^S 


88 


^9 


89 83 


s- 


;98 


S3 


83 


1:8 


fS8 


88 


r:8 


IS8 


fSS 


39 38 




2-^ 


8SS 


^3 


88 


^3 


88 


89 


83 


fSS 


SS8 


83 83 


«• 


88 


88 


88 


ISS 


88 


83 


88 


88 


PS 


88 88 


sa 


R2 


88 


&8 


fss 


{:3 


88 


88 


S8 


89 


89 


83 88 


s 

s 

9 
S 

9 

m 
<• 


S9 


8;t 


8S 


88 


^3 


88 


^8 


38 


f58 


^8 


PS 88 


3R 


28 


38 


88 


89 


83 


8;: 


88 


89 


SS8 


33 88 


sa 


S3 


33 


M 


88 


88 


88 


fSS 


81: 


rt% 


83 88 


8X 


S3 


88 


M 


89 


88 


8S 


s.^; 


8P 


88 


88 99 


8S3 


38 


88 


8& 


88 


88 


sse 


Sis 


8^ 


83 


88 88 


2Se 


8S 


:38 


{^S 


St: 


89 


^tz 


98 


8^ 


PS 


88 89 


as 


88 


s;s 


88 


sse 


;S8 


8? 


88 


8tS 


88 


89 38 


S8 


&8 


88 


38 


88 


88 


sn 


88 


8S 


PS 


98 88 


8S 


83 


28 


88 


38 


88 


38 


88 


srs 


i^s 


88 88 


S8 


S8 


88 


39 


?8 


88 


88 


^8 


8^ 


r!8 


?!8 88 


;;& 


88 


88 


88 


?8 


39 


88 


;:9 


8^ 


R9 


?S 88 


$R 


98 


$8 


S:8 


98 


^8 


88 


8^ 


88 


99 


88 88 


s»» 


SeR 


83 


:ss 


88 


?3 


{:3 


88 


88 


88 


?8 88 


9S 


as; 


88 


t:g 


82 


t:9 


88 


88 


88 


98 


83 88 


^« 


88 


88 


t:8 


83 


89 


88 


S3 


89 


38 


^^ 88 


i 


9R 


8S 


88 


?3 


89 


98 


»:3 


?8 


83 


83 


PS 98 


8R 


88 


88 


88 


88 


38 


^8 


98 


88 


88 


PS 98 


iSS 


88 


38 


38 


38 


88 


^8 


?!S 


88 


88 


89 88 


sa 


&8 


83 


88 


88 


S58 


83 


8g 


88 


s:s 


82 88 


9S 


S3 


88 


83 


?!3 


r!8 


P3 


ss: 


ses 


PS 


E:S 88 




i' 


^1 

J3^ 




ii 

* : 

r 


¥: 


* • 

r" 


1^ 
i 




^ 




iUi 

tf 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OT 8T. LOUIS. 



73 



CUSTOMS WABBHOUSB TRANSACTIONS. 



DiSTBiCT or St. Loins, No. 45, During 1915. 

FOUNTAIN ROTHWELL, 

Collector of Customs. 





WABSHOTT8SD 


Withdrawn. 


MOXTHtf. 


Value. 


Value. 


Duty. 


In Warehonie Deo. 81, 1914 


$276,470 00 
88,368 00 
180,684 00 
140,682 00 
281,906 00 
176,488 00 
626,404 00 
862,180 00 
486,290 00 
972,799 00 
476,120 00] 
867,679 00 
661,706 00 






JftDQaiTf 1916 .'. , . , 


i 69,06166 
169,166 00 
149,822 00 
72,628 10 
170,822 00 
288,179 00 
262,612 00 
848,866 00 

1,011,701 00 
268,808 00 
488,274 00 
461,600 00 


i 20,882 26 


FftbTOftiTf •• 


89,886 97 


wSSu^ « ............ 


80,862 69 


amSt •• ::::.:. 


17,064 07 


a^ •• .:......;::;:::;;;;:;.;..::! 


28,196 81 


Jime, •* 


88,284 17 


July/ *' 


14,074 16 


jSSiugL " ............!......... 


26,679 82 


Smember,*' 


22,680 80 


o!5ober, " 

Norember, " 


14,660 88 
20,212 18 




21,129 61 






TOTALfl 


$4,881,629 00 


18,684,918 eo 
1,196,616 00 


$296,290 77 


InWarehooMDoo. 31, 1016 


The above inclades; 

Zinc Xm'Dorted ... ...•.■•. 


$8,911,809 00 






Spelter Exported 


$2,269,412 00 







Statement of Commodities, exported in bond from the District of St. 
Louis, No. 45, during the year ending December 31, 1915. 

FOUNTAIN ROTHWELL, 

Collector of CoBtoms. 



COMMODITIES. 



Gallons. 



Pounds. 



Value. 



Beer 

Wire Bope 

Photo Dry Plates 

Tobacco 

Medicinal and Chemical Preparations 

M annf actnres of M et al 

Machinery 

TOTAIi 



209,896 



209,890 



668,068 
28,600 
607,661 
165,917 
288,844 
40,620 



1,624,180 



1197,804 
46,646 
4.696 
180,860 
400,768 
81,787 
8,800 



|8n,097 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



74 



TBADB AND COMMXBCB OF 



CUSTOM HOUSE TRANSACTIONS, 1915. 
Condensed ClMslficatlon of CommodiUet imported into the District of 
St LooiS; No. 46, during the year ending Deceml>er 81, 1916, showing 
foreign value and dutj paid. Fountaiii Rothwkll, 

Collector of Customs. 



OOMMODITIB8. 



Value. 



I Pa^» 



Acids 

Books, Papers, etc . . . 

Olncbona 

Santonin 

Coffee 

Bnrlaps 

Fish 

Meat 

Miscellaneoos (Pree). 

Oils 

Seeds 

Tea 



Frui Goods. 



l>i7TiABLa Goods. 

Art Works 

Books and Printed Matter 

Brashes 

Burlaps 

Ohemlcais and briiffs .'! il..." '.'.'. 

Ohlnaand Earthenware 

Ootton Hose 

Cutlery 

Fire Arms 

Firecrackers 

Fish. 



Fruits and Nuts 

Glassware 

Glass, Window and Plate 

Bats, Trimmings, Feathers and Artificial Flowers . 
Hops. 



Jewelry, Diamonds, etc..... 

Lead Ore 

Lemonade. Ginger Ale, etc. 

Malt Liquors 

Manufactures, Cork 

" Cotton....*... 

Flax 

•' Leather 

Metal 



Paper . 
Ilk..., 



811k 
" Wood 

Wool 

Marble and Stone 

Miscellaneous— (Dutiable) 

Oil Cloths and Linoleum 

OUve Oil 

Paints and Colors 

Pencils. Lead 

Seeds and Plants 

Spices 

Spirituous Liquors 

Straw Matting 

Tea Waste 

Tobacco and Cigars , 

Toysand Dolls 

Waters, Mineral 

Wines, Sparkling 

Wines, Still 

Wire, Steel 

Zinc Ore 

Collections from all other sources.. 



Total, 1916. 
Total. 1914 



ilO,7S4 00 

17,911 00 

9,018 00 

t,Q94 00 

S,804 00 

06,786 00 

63,147 00 

416,067 00 

384,986 00 

14 00 

36,198 00 

Ul,736 00 



881 00 

81,417 00 

6,048 00 

8.803 00 

40,849 00 

893,676 00 

168,161 00 

46,190 00 

89,903 00 

806 00 

6.686 00 
18,666 00 
68,739 00 
17,688 00 
68,873 00 

386,36100 

138,986 00 

37,364 00 

84,064 00 

8.687 00 
1,563 00 
6,680 00 

836,068 00 

873.969 00 
78,433 00 
61,479 00 
67,963 00 
46.804 00 
63,507 00 
47,181 00 
7,967 00 
64,788 00 
34,446 00 
84,988 00 
6,894 00 
3,111 00 
48,004 00 
ll,6i7 00 
88,788 00 

168,806 00 
76,068 00 
78,890 00 

137,099 00 

4.688 00 
166 00 

19,887 00 

88,183 00 

616,687 00 



14,838,843 00 
8,866,688 00 



I 13486 

4,880 71 

3,116 80 

880 30 

8,069 00 

188,818 68 

80,704 60 

18,388 60 

16,047 86 

96 60 

6,371 Oi 

4.380 00 

14,564 61 

6.038 06 

6,400 00 

60,380 70 

70,918 7e 

11,033 63 

6,813 79 

888 81 

66 80 

830 60 

160,686 68 

181,939 86 

33,746 34 

13,006 00 

14,614 86 

33,694 98 

13.417 74 

14,670 60 

3,613 53 

18,787 66 

8,666 76 

17,109 18 

967 18 

639 10 

10,970 84 

1,067 88 

67,647 47 

66,800 90 

31,994 94 

56,308 88 

44,484 66 

800 81 

189 30 

11,666 87 

14,719 80 

61,668 16 

49,794 86 



91,866,303 11 
1,969,839 81 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 75 

STATE OF MISSOURI. 

PiNANCIAL STATBHSMT PRBPABED BT MR. JnO. P. (GORDON, 

State Auditor, January 1, 1915. 

Total yaluation of real estate and personal property as fixed 

by the State Board of Bquallzation for 1915 taxes $1,658,587,414 00 

Railroad, Bridge, Telegraph and Telephone property, inclnd- 

ing street railway property for 1915 taxes 196,982,455 47 

Total ..$1,857,519,869 47 

Balance in Treasury, Deoember 81, 1915 $ 8,988,177 50 

Receipts into the State Treasury from all sources, for all pur- 
poses, for the year ending December 81, 1915 8,761,110 51 

Disbursements during the year 1915, for all purposes 9,719,948 05 

Balance in Treasury December 81, 1915 8,988,177 50 



State Debt, January l, 1916. 

School and Seminary Certifigates of Indebtedness. 

1 School certificate, 6 per cent $2,909,000 00 

6 School certificates, 5 per cent 260,000 00 

$8,159,000 00 

1 Seminary certificate, 6 per cent $ 122,000 00 

81 Seminary certificates, 5 per cent 1,117,889 42 

$1,289,889 42 

Total School and Seminary fund certificates $4,898,889 42 

Capitol Building refunding bonds, 8^ percent 2,624,000 00 

$7,022,889 42 

Seminary Fund Investments. 

4 $1,000 twenty-year Kansas City School District bonds, 
dated July 1st, 1905, and bearing 8>^ percent interest, pay- 
able semi-annually $ 4,000 00 

12 $500 ten-twenty-year Brookfield Waterworks bonds, dated 
NoTember 1st 1907, bearing 5 percent interest payable 
annually 6,000 00 

8 $500 fiye-twenty-year Fayette School bonds, dated July 

1st, 1909, bearing 5 percent payable annually 4,000 00 

12 $500 Maiden, Mo., Waterworks bonds, dated March 1st, 
1910, bearing 5 percent interest, payable semi-annually, 
twenty-year, optional 1920 6,000 00 

2 $1,000 Carthage School bonds, Spercent. 2,000 00 

20 $600 Pemiscot County Drainage bonds, 6 percent 10,000 00 

2 $1,000 Mississippi County Drainage bonds, 6 percent 2,000 00 

4 $1,000 Little River Drainage District bonds, 5>^ percent. . . 4,000 00 

Total invested Seminary Fund $ 88,000 00 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



76 



TRADE AND COMUKSCB OT 



RAIL AND BIVEB TONNAGE. 
STATEMENT 

8H0WIKQ THl AMOUNT OF FBIIOHT, IN TONS, RICEITBD AT 8T. 
BT KAOH RAILROAD AND RITIR, FOR THRIC TEARS. 



LOUIS 



EOUTB. 



1915. 



in4. 



19U. 



Chicago ft Alton B B.(Mo DIt.) < 

Missouri Paciac B. E 

BULoalsftSan Francisco R.B 

Wabash Railway (West) 

Chicago, Bock Island ft Paciac B. B. 

Mlssoart, Kansas ft Texas B. B 

St. Louis-Southwestern By 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain ft Southern B. B 

IlllnoU Central B. B 

LoulsTllle ft NashrUle B. B 

MobUe ft Ohio B. B 

Southern B.B. 

Baltimore ft Ohio Southwestern B. B 

Chicago, Alton ft St. Louis B. B. (Main Line)... 
Clereland, Cincinnati, Chicago ft St. Louis B. B 

YandaliaB-R 

Wabash Ballroad (East) 

Toledo, St. Louis ft Western B. B 

Chicago, Peoria ft St. LouUB. B 

Chicago, Burlington ft Quincy B. B. (East).... 

Chicago, Burlington ft Quincy R. B. (West) 

Chicago ft Eastern Illinois B. B 

St. Louis. Troy ft Eastern B. B 

Lltchileld ft Madison B. B 

St. Louis ft BelleTlUe Electric By 

St. Louis ft O'FallonBy 

East St. Louis ft Suburban By. Co 

lUlnois Traction System 

Upper Mississippi Birer 

Lower Mississippi Blyer 

IlllnoU River 

Missouri Blrer 

Ohio BlTer 

Cumberland and Tennessee Blrers 

Total in Tons 

Total by Ball 

Total by Blrer 



ia.OM 

1,184.867 

1,911.985 

«6,a67 

185,657 

881,790 

8,816,668 

1,740,987 

1,017,908 

1,818,811 

1,018300 

1,188,908 

810.868 

879,101 

1,189,887 

1,844,680 

58U84 

470,111 

777,088 

997,698 

815,441 

711.774 

584,848 

»1,548 

885.188 

11,805 

69.199 

11,545 

17,445 

18,1 

5470 

17, 

1,860 



80,684,986 



88,970 



181,096J 
1.104.885 
1.990,0U 
1,808,9B: 

8i7.ni! 

8B8.70l| 

810, 76& 
1,988,871 
1.867,768 

884,868 
1,888,811 
1.189,114 
1,166.086 
1.119,874 

875,066 
1,440, 
1,400,966 

541, 

5:»,440 

681,118 

i,ui,9a 

811,770 

865,807 

618,181 

199,960 

564,878 

181,041 

70,899 

15,816 

41.615 

10,780 

7,100 

18,: 

1,588 



80,695,985 80, »9,101lSl 



104,866| 



17I0J66 



1,880.449 

1.0413U 

508,161 

518;B60 

748,8n 

8418,181 

1,806,818 

8»,a5 

1,149,986 

M14.569 

1.084,457 

1,108,098 

781,489 

1,888.801 

1,090.188 

881,088 

514.905 

861,471 

1.848,861 

1.011,440 

764,108 

600.141 

485,141 

814,098 

587.810 

81.918 

17.786 

u.m 

5,670 

5,880 

161480 

8,915 



80,8N,067 81,481.801 



1,111.678 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



TBB CITT or BT. LOUIS, 



77 



BAIL AND BIVBB TONNAGE. 
STATEMENT 

SHOWnrO THS A.H0UNT of VRBIGHT, in TOKS, SHIPPSD FBOM 8T. LOUI8 BT 
BACH RAILBOAD AND BITBR VOB THRBB TBABS. 



RODTB. 



193S. 



1914. 



lOlB. 



OhicagoJE Alton B. B. (Mo. DlT.) 

Missouri Pacific B.B 

St. Louis ft San Francisco B. B 

Wabash Bailway (West) 

Chicago, Bock Island ft Padflc B. B 

Missouri, Kansas ft Texas B^B 

St. Louis Sonthwestem By 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain ft Southern B. B 

niinois Central B. B 

LonisirUle ft Nashville R. B 

Mobile ft Ohio B. B 

Southern B. B 

Baltimore ft Ohio Southwestern R. R , 

Chicago, Alton ft St. Louis R. R. (Main Line) 

Clereland, Cincinnati, Chicago ft St. Louis R. R.. 

VandaliaR.R 

Wabash Railway (East) 

Toledo, St. Louis ft Western R. R 

Chicago, Peoria ft St. Louis R. R 

Chicago, Burlington ft (^uincy R. R. (East) .., 

Chicago, Burlington ft Quincy R. R. (West) 

Chlcagoft Eastern Illinois R.R 

St. liouis, Troy ft Eastern R. R 

Litchfield ft Madison R,R 

Illinois Traction System 

St. liOUis ft Belleville Electric 

East St. Louis ft Suburban Ry 

Upper Mississippi River 

Lower Mississippi River 

Illinois River , 

Missouri River 

Ohio, Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers 



Total in Tons 



93,094 

1,484,066 

1,236,887 

506,094 

666,639 

849,061 

1.674,684 

1,676,260 

468,899 

1,016,283 

897,066 

762,877 

1,462,200 

1,025,170 

1,388,022 

2,806,600 

1,008,166 

491,704 

880,640 

679,880 

781,796 

60,668 

28,052 

67,108 

16,930 



11,870 
26,460 

2,990 
10,020 

8,400 



99,007 

1,618,787 

1,669,828 

1,114,960 

577,962 

686,896 

829,786 

1,948,728 

1,612,618 

490,782 

1,028,801 

1,066,279 

660,676 

1,260,628 

840,871 

1,100,004 

1,938,671 

800,866 

688,796 

934,139 

1,113,878 

618,816 



86,280 

1,606,679 

1,686,687 

1,881,803 

637,446 

646,048 

880,036 

1,897,489 

1,580,383 

606,691 

1,040.908 

1,844,088 

607,747 

1,136,600 

011,869 

1,061,636 

1,938,481 

837,876 

487,811 

1,088,768 

1,864,896 

638,305 



34,678 
87,998 
17,480 
80 
11,646 
38,176 
4,766 
6,690 
3,(i60 



88,082 
44,776 
39,840 



8,880 
30,000 
6,710 
7,384 
4,760 



33,363,181 



31,933,766 



33,176,760 



Total by Bail... 
Total by River. 



33,196,941 
68,340 



21,878,880 
48,966 



33,139,176 
47,684 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



78 



TBAOB AND COMMXBCB OT 



BUSINESS OP THE ST. LOUIS BRIDGES AND PERRIES 
POR 1915, 

▲ND COMPABIBON WITH PBBYIOUS TBAB8. 



AMOUNT or FBBIGHT IN TONB TBANBFBBBBD ACB088 THB BIYBR AT 

BT. LOaiB DUBINQ 1915. 

FBOM BT. LOUIB TO XABT BT. LOUIB, VBNICB, MADIBON AND CABONDBLBT. 



BY 



Caba. 



Tons, 



Total 
Toirs. 



The EadB and Merchants' Bridges 

The Eads Bridge by Wagon (estimated) 

The Wiggins Perry 

The Wiggins Perry by Wagon 

The Ivory Ferry 

St. Clair Perry ft Transfer Co 

Illtnois Traction System, Rail and Wagon... 



206.170 



86.646 



4.848.256 

600.000 

1.529.764 

19.466 



5.448.266 

.649.210 

963.473 

8.833 

96.480 



Total tons 
Total tons 
Total tons 
Total tons 
Total tons 
Total tons 
Total tons 
Total tons 
Total tons 
Total tons 
Total tons 



West to 
West to 
West to 
West to 
West to 
West to 
West to 
West to 
West to 
West to 
West to 



East during 
East during 
Bast during 
Bast during 
East during 
Bast during 
Bast during 
East during 
East during 
Bast during 
Bast during 



1916.. 
1914.. 
1913.. 
1912.. 
1911.. 
1910.. 
1900.. 
1908.. 
1907.. 
1906.. 
1906.. 



8.066.262 
7.667.189 
7.896.939 
7,676,978 
6.640.934 
6.263.286 
6.019.684 
6.808.332 
7.241.198 
7 ,324 .424 
6.608,884 



PBOM BAST BT. LOUIB, GABONDBDBT, IfADIBON AND YBNICB TO BT. LOUIS. 



BY 



Cars. 



Tons, 



TOKSi. 



Th« EdmIb and Mercbaats' Bridgtw. ., 

Thci EiLcLii Bridge \>y Wiiigan (estimated)... .h 

The Wiggins Ferry , ..v......„. ...,i 

Ttio Wiggins Ferry by Wagon..*,,...,,.,., , 

The Ivory Ferry ..,,*,►>..*,.„..,.....„. h 

St. Clftir Ftirry & Transffer Co. ,....,. 

IUIdoIs TractJon System, Rail and Wagon,, 



311 ,998 



7fl.«96 



7 ,624 ,205 

800, OCX) 

1 ,941 ,949 

21 .470 



1 ,^3,419 

1 ,i^3 .731 

8,024 

82,640 



Totft] 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Totoi 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 



ton a 
tons 
iniiM 
tons 
tons 
tons 

toaa 
toris 

tons. 



East to 
East to 
East to 
East to 
East to 
East to 
Kmt t^ 
E&at Ui 
Esfit to 
East to 
EftAt to 



WOBt 

Weal 

Wost 

Wt^st 
W6«f. 
Woflt 
Wt^fit 
Wtitst 
W^l 
West 



d urine 
dudtig 
during 
4liurlit^ 

during 
duriag 
during 
durlniif 
during 
during 



1914.. 
iai3.. 
1912,. 
lOM.. 
1910.. 
1901).. 
190S.. 
1007.. 
lOOG., 
1905.. 



13, SO 2 ,01 9 
12,731 .914 
14,2fi7,SU4 
14,77S,32^ 
la . 103 ,07a 
1^,410,941 
11,908,301 
10,016,601 
13.06^3,138 

9.053,893 



Total 
Totsl 
Tot^l 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 



both 
both 
both 
both 
lyoth 
hoth 
iwth 
hoth 
both 
both 
both 



WayB, 
Ways, 
Ways, 
Ways, 

Ways, 
Ways, 
Waya, 
Waya, 
W^ays, 
Ways, 
W^aya, 



1915,- 
1914.. 
1013,, 
1912.. 
1911,. 
1910.. 
10€9,. 
lOOS . 
1IH)7.. 

1905.. 



,307,371 
■20,^9^,103 
a2,l&4,S03 
23 ,45S ,S03 
19,044,000 
10,074,226 
17»92S,045 
10,424,933 
20,304,320 
13,253,043 
10,162,776 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



79 



LOCAL AND THBOUGH TONNAGE. 



Total tona freight recelyed, local . 



1914. 
Tons. Percent. 
.30,383,617 66.70 



Total tons freight received, through 10,101.440 88.80 

Tona freight recelred by rail, local 30481,680 66.60 

Tons freight reeeWed by rail, through 10.097,599 88.40 

Tons freight, excluding coal, recelred by 

rail, local 18,676,896 61.61 

Tons freight, excluding coal, received by 

raU, through 8.618,919 88.89 

Tons freight received by rail on east side, 

local/: 18.879,791 66.06 

Tons freight received by rail on east side, 

throuA 74*1.839 83.97 

Tons freurht, excluding coal, received by 

raU on east side, local 7.671,494 67.66 

Tons freight, excluding coal, received by 

raU on east side, through 6,663,649 43.86 

Tons freight received by rail on west side, 

local :. 6,361,813 67.89 

Tons freight received by rail on west side, 

through 3,966,370 83.U 

AMOUNT OP COAL RBCBIVBD IN ST. 



1916. 
Tons. Percent. 
19,697,617 68.87 
11.087,418 
19.606.647 
11,087.418 



86.18 
68.76 
86.34 



18,880,818 
9,811,193 

13,981,586 
7,896,917 
6,918.861 
6,130,691 
6,634,013 
8,190,601 

LOUIS. 



68.88 
41.13 
63.18 
87.83 
68.04 
46.96 
67.16 
83.86 



BOUTB. 


1916. 
Tons. 


1914. 
Tons. 


1918. 
Tons. 


1013. 
Tons. 


Baltimore & Ohio S.W.B.R 

Chicago & Alton ** 


767,636 


604,496 


685,383 


649.463 
6,000 


0.. 0.. 0. & St. Louis " 


118,848 
460,993 
1,646,806 
373,436 
678,666 
687,477 
177,660 

87,684 
686,188 
648,176 
661,488 
380,746 
476,867 

76,948 

664,816 

9,868 

89,893 

17,600 


98,987 
611,856 
1,618,310 
386,806 
890,713 
791,833 
191,078 

60,830 
664,878 
618,429 
704,061 
178,710 
416,708 
106,969 
610,774 
380,150 

88,630 

16,300 


107,669 
893,863 
1,489,483 
376,827 
389,608 
960,848 
166,138 
110,768 
814,098 
639,066 
609,743 
884,841 
450,426 


193,873 


Yandalia *• 


838,369 


lUinois Central '* 

Wabash •• 


1.397,113 
188,083 


Louisville & Nashville •• 


567,484 


Southern " 


946,981 


Mobile ft Ohio •* 


98,864 


Toledo. St. L. ft Western ** 


370.967 


St. Louis A O'Fallon " 


816,084 


Bt. L., L M. ft So. " (ni.Dlv.). 
St. L.. TroT ft Eastern •• 


611.164 
786.688 


StwL.. ft Bellev. Electric ** 


398,468 


Ohic^o ft Eastern Ills. *• 


860,976 


St. Louis ft San Francisco ** 




Litchfield ft Madison " 


687,988 

686,700 

44,784 

163,160 


646,691 


East St. Lh ft Suburban " 


687,667 


Illinois Traction System 

From Ohio River 




186.000 






Total Tons »t». .tt..t. 


7,973,066 


8,061,068 


8,936,679 


9,330.656 







BSOBIPTS or AirTHRAOITB GOAL IKOLUDKD IN ABOVB BB0KIPT8. 



1901 300,797 tons. 

1903 60,944 '• 

1908 166,930 " 

1904 156,097 " 

1906 168,848 " 



1906 l74.336$tons. 

1907 366,761 •• 

1908 386,036 " 

1909 386.040 '* 

1910 389,468 " 



1911 487.080 tons. 

1913 377.688 *• 

1918 374.428 •• 

1914 174,694 " 

1916 189,478 " 



Beoeipts of Anthracite Ck>al in 1908; 307,764 tons local; 38,373 tons through. 



Beceipts of Ooke, 1908, 

•• 1909, 

" •* 1910, 

•• " 1911, 



1909: 


318.189 


(t «( 


33361 •• 


1910; 


369,770 


•* ** 


19,698 " 


T911: 


450.398 


K M 


86.787 " 


1913: 


364.060 


•( •« 


38.683 " 


1918: 


361.464 


(( t« 


33,969 " 


1914: 


166,683 


«( (I 


18,013 " 


1916: 


177,006 




13,473 •• 


163,380 tons. 
171.670 •* 




Receipts of Ooke, 1913, 
•'^ •* 1918. 


193,436 " 




»« 


" 1914, 


193,435 «• 




•* 


" 1916, 



190,870 tons. 
190,867 " 
189,396 •* 
131,889 ** 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



80 TBADB AND COMMBBCB OF 



COAL. 



By J. 8. KuHv, Presldeni Devoy St Kohn Ooftl A Ooke Co. 



While the tonnage of ooal received in St. Louis during 1915 was less 
than the tonnage of the previous year, the decrease in receipts was most 
heavily noticed during the first six months of the jrear. Beginning 
July 1st there was quite a noticeable improvement in coal tonnages and 
the shipments of the last three months of the year 1915 were of saUsfying 
proportions. 

On February 2, 1915 an increase of 5^ cents per ton in the frdght 
rates on coal from mines in Illinois to St. Louis, Missouri became effective, 
raising the rate on shipments from the Inner Qroup of mines from 52 
cents to 57^ cents per ton; from the Outer Qroup of mines from 67 
cents to 72H cents per ton. 

The average prices paid during 1915 by steam plants using Bituminous 
coal in carload lots were as follows, f. o. b. St. Louis switches: 

Per ton. 

Clean Shaker Screened Lump S1.62H 

Steam Lump 1.57H 

Mine Run 1.47H 

Nut 1.40 

Screenings 1.18 

Bituminous coal delivered to residence consumers ranged as follows 
during the year: 

Standard Lump $2.25 to $2.75 

High Grade 2.75 to 3.50 

Anthracite coal delivered to private residences sold as follows: 

Large Egg or Grate $7.75 to $8.25 

Egg and Stove 8.00 to 8.50 

Chestnut 8.25 to 8.75 

Gas house coke of very superior quality, made from Elkhom Kentucky 
coal, sold to residence consumers during the year at from $5.75 to $6.00 
per ton delivered. 

Gas house coke was contracted to factory users at an average price 
of $4.35 per ton f. o. b. factory switches for carload deliveries and at an 
average price of $5.35 per ton for wagonload deliveries. 

A new coke product of St. Louis manufacture entered the field during 
the year 1915, and another company completed the construction of and 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 81 

started the operation of a large Bi-produot ooke plant in the southern 
part of St. Lotds. This plant has an output of about 300,000 tons of 
Bi-produot ooke per annum. A mixture of Elkhom Kentucky coal and 
Pocahontas West Virginia coal is used, resulting in a ooke of excellent 
structure, low sulphur and low ash. About one-half of the output of 
this plant is metallurgical ooke, which is giving most excellent satisfaction 
and is considered by its users to be the equal of the best foundry cokes 
of eastern production. The other half of this coke product is prepared 
for domestic and light manufacturing consumption and has proven a 
product of exceptional value. 

This new coke plant has already attracted capital into the organization 
of a company to operate iron furnaces upon a large scale. With cheap 
coal and cheap coke and a certain and regular supply of each, it is to be 
hoped that other industries of like character will be attracted to St. 
Louis. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



82 



TRAOa AMD COMIOBCB Or 



ALL RAIL RATES OP F REI QHT. IN CENTS, FROM ST. LOUIS 
TO SOUTHERN CITIES DURING 1915. 



AVnOLBfl. 


M«MUs» 
Tmii. 


TleUbui, 


gewOriiwi, 
La. 


Flour Mr tNurrtl. C Li 


St 
8 
6 

11 
91 
13 
8 


m 

18 
11 
88 
88 
SO 
IS 


to 


wSeiraL!!^. .!^... .....;:: :::;^ 


18 


other Grain. O.L 

Meat, packed, per 100 lbs., a L. 

Meat. loose, per 100 Ibe.. a L. 

Hay, per 100 lbs.. 0. L 


IS 

88 
81 
SO 


Feed.O.L 


IS 



Except MottaerwlMpcoTid«d*bor«8t.Iioiitoai>dSwtm.UmliMtM mi* tha 



PUBLISHED RATES OF FREIGHT BT RAIL FROM ST. LOUIS 
TO NEW YORK DURING 1916. 



Datb. 


*Meats. 

Per 
180 lbs. 


tOprn. 
Kaflr 
Com, 

Wheat. 


tBarley, 

Oats, 

Bye. 

Speltk. 


^raln 
Prodncts. 


tFlonr, 
Per 
bbl. 


Compressed 
Per 180 lbs. 


Jan. 1st to Deo. 81st 


481/10 


198/10 


19 8/10 


SOH 


41 


081H 



* AboTe rates became effectlre January Iftth, 1915. 

t Above rates became effectlTe January SOth, 1818. 

GBast St. Louis. 

Grain and Grain Products to Boston S cents higher than New York; to Phila- 
delphia S cents lower than New York; to Baltimore 8 oents lower than New York. 

Cotton to Boston 8 cents higher; to Philadelphia S oents, and Baltimore 8 oents 
lower than New York rates. 

Meats to Boston 4 cents higher; to Philadelphia S cents, and Baltimore 8 cents 
lower than New York rates. 

CLASS BATES FBOM ST. LOUIS. 
(Prom January 16th to December Slat. 1015.) 





1 


S 


8 


4 


5 6 


To New York 


93.a 

S;! 

89.1 


79.9 
86.9 
77.9 
76.9 


61.4 
86.4 
69.4 
66.4 


48.1 

47.1 
41.1 
40.1 


86.91 80.8 


To Boston 

1\) Philadelnhla. 


89.9 8S.8 
84.9 S6.8 


To Baltimore 


88,9 S7.8 



PUBLISHED AVERAGE RATE OF FREIGHT BT RAIL ON GRAIN FROM 
EAST ST. LOUIS TO NEW YORK (Dommtic). 



PerlOOlbs. 

•1916 19.8 cts. 

•1914 19 •* 

•1918 19 •• 

•191S 19 " 

♦1911 19 " 

•1910 19 " 

•1909. 19.50 •• 

•1908 19.68 " 

1907 ao.60" 

1906 S0.60 •• 

1906 S0.71 " 

1904 S1.W " 

1903. S1.S6 •• 

•And from St Louis. 



PsrMOlbs. 

190S saoocts. 

1901 18.81 " 

1900 18.81 - 

18B9 On Grain (except Com) SL96 *" 

1889 On Com SO 7-18 ** 

1888 On Com S0)4 ** 

1887 On Com f or Kxport 17)4 " 

1887 On Grain 18-18 '* 

1896 18 *• 

1886 88.87 ** 

1884. KTI- 

1898 S8.80' 

18880nQfain 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



83 



STAGES OP THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER AT ST. LOUIS DURING 

1915. AND LEAST DEPTHS IN STEAMER CHANNEL, 

ST. LOUIS TO CAIRO. 

As reported by BI4JOB Wildubb Wiluno, Corps of Eniineers, U. 8, Army. 



The highest and lowest gauge readings and least navigable depths on 
bars, by months, are as follows: 



MONTHS. 


ST, IX»UIS « AITO B H E AD I ^ GS, 


CtpUi OS lui. 




D&te. 


Hlghesl. iDftte. 


Lowesir. 


January , ,.,„ .„„. 

February . * ^ *-*....*,........ . 


32 

27 
I 

15, le 

31 
24 
28 
22 

18 

8 

80 

1 


Peet. 

7.1 
23.4 
22.tt 
20. » 
29.0 
81.6 
81.8 
80.4 
24.8 
22.2 
16.6 
14.9 


90 
1 
29 
30 
19 
19 
10 
31 
10 
81 
14 
29 


Feet. 

1.7 

4.3 

13.2 

13,fj 

10.7 

27.6 

22.0 

19.6 

12.6 

11.0 

7.4 

8.2 


Feet. 

See Note 

do 


March ,....„. 

April 


do 
do 


May 


6rMl<rtliii8(eet 


June 


do 


July 


do 


August 


do 


Sei^ember 

October 


8.0 
8.0 


November 


6.6 


December 


6.0 







The zero of the St. Louis river gauge (Market street) is approximately 
379.8 feet above mean Qulf level at Biloxi, Miss. ; 33.7 feet below the 
St. Louis city directrix; 41.3 feet below the h^hest known stage (June 
27th, 1844); 2.5 feet above the lowest known nver stage (January 2nd, 
1900) at this locality. 

The river stage throughout the year was unusually high, the mean 
stage being nearly 17 feet, or 4}/iteet above the mean stage of river (12 J^ 
feet) for more than 50 years record at St. Louis. Throughout more than 
two-thirds of the year the stages were above the mean daily stages, and 
from July 18th to August 29th, inclusive— 43 days — new records were 
established for extreme high stages during practically that entire period. 

Five distinct rises within three months — two in June, one in July and 
two in Au^st — slightly exceeded the flood or '*bank fuU" staee (30 feet} 
at St. Loms, and the interval elapsing between the dates of the first and 
last 30-foot stage — June 1st to August 23rd — 84 days, is the longest 
known duration of high water. 

The highest stage of the year, June 24th, was 31.6 feet, or 4H '^t 
above the stage of mean annual hiffh water (27 feet) ; the lowest stage, 
January 30th, was 1.7 feet, or one-half foot below the mean annual low 
water (2^ feet). 

Navi|:ation was obstructed and practically abandoned because of 
running ice throughout January, and again from December 28th to the 
end of the year. 

Note. — ^The steamers of the U. S. Bhigineer Office, St. Louis, were 
not in commission from January to April, and accurate sounding during 
these months were not obtained. "Least Navigable Depths" below the 
8 feet required by Congress in improvement of the river, existed for a 
few days only in the months of November and December, but were 
quickly corrected by the action of the river itself, or were promptly 
dredged under tibe direction of this office, to 8 feet or more, without 
delay to navigation. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



84 TRADE AND COMMSSCB OF 



For the past fifty-one seasons navigation southward has been 8aq>€n- 

ded by ice as follows: 

Winter lBa&-e«, tram DeceDit>er i&ih to Jmnttuy 12th ^ STcUti. 

1 80 »*«7 » • Decomb«r 2©th to Ft^bniary 8d S8 ^' 

imi-m. " JiLDUAry Sth t<? Februuy IStb 40 " 

isea^tt^. open yi winf^r. 

18flft-70, from D«Coniber 3 1st to Dec«mber 28til. 7 • 

18T0-71. " DecetnlM^ 2lat to JftTiutfy 23d S2 " 

1871-73. " PecembfiT iRt to I bib. and from Jaauanr SOth to 

Feb. 24th„ . 42 " 

1872-73. from November 2flth lo J«IIUMT 20tll 61 " 

187S-74« open all wiai^r. 

Ig74-7i. from DecemNsr SOtli tci February 2nh 68 " 

1 87 6-7 <y, opeD aJl winter, 

JS76-77, from December Stb to Febrij«rj 6tb 68 " 

187 7-7 a op«Q ftU iriiit«r. 

I67&^79t from December 16th to January 29th and Ftobmary 14th 

to l7Uv . ,. 46 • 

iSTfl^fiO. from December 17th to December Slat, tnclvatTe. 16 " 

I880-S1 rFom Noi^ember if^th to December 6th. and from Decem- 
ber 7th lo 14th. t.Eid from Doi^ember 24th to February 18th....78 " 
1881-82, opeji all winter. 

188283, from Dec. 7 t^ 23, and troxtk Jan. 1 to Feb. 13... 60 " 

18S3'S4. from D<*c. 18 to F<»b. 6 48 " 

]as4'S5. from Dec. i«th to 3Uth, ^d 36 days in January and Feb..47 * 

188^1-86. from Dec. lU to Dec. 23, &nd from Jan. 7 to Feb. 16 66 * 

lgSthS7, ttom Dec. i to Dec. 14 aiid from Dec. 24 to Jan. 27 49 * 

1887-88 from Doc. IQ to mi, 31.,.. „ 43 " 

1 888*8 1 open aH winter* 
1880-00, opfttt ft]] winter. 
189t>*«l, oppn nXi winter. 

1801-02. from JanuAfi' &th to February 1st....... „-.... ....23 " 

lS02-t3. from D^r SlPth to Feb. 1 5th, 67 " 

1803-04, otxsn &1I wlnt4?r. 

1894*05. from J&uimry ist to March 1st ..69 " 

1805-^^6. oueti ikll winter. 
]SO0-(I7. opeu nU winter. 
18*^7-08. open mil winter, but iKjme Ice running. 

l898-»o. from Dec 7 to 2%., Jikn 1 to 10. Jan 30 to March 1 64 " 

1809*1000. from Dec. 30th to Jan 1 3th and 24 days between Jan- 
uary 2Bth «ji4 M«tb 4th. .- 37 • 

10OO-1OO1. during February „ 28 " 

1901-1002, fromllec, 15ih to Jan. 16th. and from Jan. 26th to 

Feb. 2Sth.., 66 • 



1903-1903, from Dec. 27th to Jan. Iti and from Feb. ISth to 23rd.. 18 

February L 

1004-tDOa. ftt>m Dwe^mbiT ifltb to liarch 8rd 76 



1003*1904, from December !^th to February 24th 77 



1905-1906, ^fom KHbrurtfy 5th to (Oth 14 

1 9110*1 tH>7, December 20lh lo :^9th.. „ 9 

10D7<100)^, Hot entinKi V rioned by lee, but navigation practically 
suspended durinif tebrunry, account running ice 28 

1908-1009^ Not entirely cloaetl. but heavy ice suspended naviga- 
tion from J&nuary tst to February 4th. 

1900-1910, Jan. I a to le: D*?*,^ 21* to 31: Jan. 1 to 29 37 

1010-1911. NotcloitM byl^e; but navigation practically suspended 
durinif Jan. ai^d Fifb. Account running ice and low water. 

1011-1912. from January Olh to February 27th. 47 

1912-1013, open all winter. 

1913-1^14, opt^n all wl[it<.<r. but fK^me ice running. 

1014-1015. practically closed to navigation account of running Ice 
durltkg winter miinthfi. 

1016<101Q navii^atiot) or^ttc^llv abandoned fW>m December 28tlu 
1016^ to opening or Spring, b{?cauae of running ice. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



85 



HIGHEST AND LOWEST STAGES OF WATER. 
The record of the highest and lowest staees of water noted by the 
U. S. Weather Bureau Office since its establi^ment is as follows: Zero 
of the gauge is 379.786 feet above mean Gulf level. 



HI6HSST. 



TfiftTJ 



D«t«. 



Stage. 



LOWEST. 



Tear. 



Date. 



St«g«. 



1887.. 

1888. 

1889. 

1890. 

1891.. 

18BS.. 

18BS.. 

1894.. 

1886.. 

1896.. 

1897.. 

1896.. 

1899.. 

1900.. 

1901.. 

1903.. 

1906.. 

1904.. 

1906.. 

1906.. 

1907.. 

1906.. 

1900.. 

1910. . 

1911.. 

1912.. 

1918 

1914.. 

1915.. 



Aprils 

June 8 and 4. . . 

June 1 

June 80 

July4 

May 19 

Mays 

May 13 

December 22... 

May 36 

May 1 

May 28 

AprU27 

January 2 

April 18 and 19. 

July 26 

June 10 

April 80. 

September 21 . . 

April 16 

July 25 and 26.. 
June 20 and 21., 
July 15 and 16. . 

January 14 

February 28.... 

Aprils 

April 16and 17.. 

June 21 

June 24. 



20 5 feet. 
29.8 feet. 
24.4 feet. 
20.7 feet 

15.7 feet. 
86.0 feet. 

81.6 feet. 

28.8 feet. 

28.8 feet. 

27.7 feet. 
81.0 feet. 
27.2 feet. 
26.6 feet. 
28.4 feet. 

22.4 feet. 

26.9 feet. 
88.0 feet. 
83.6 feet. 
80.2 feet. 
26.2 feet. 
28.0 feet. 
84.9 feet. 

35.5 feet. 
81.9 feet. 

19.8 feet. 
30.8 feet. 
27.2 feet. 

20.5 feet. 

81.6 feet. 



1887.. 
1888.. 
1889.. 
1890., 
1801.. 
1892.. 
1898.. 
1694.. 
1895.. 
1896.. 
1897.. 
1896.. 
1899.. 
1900.. 
1901.. 
1903.. 
1908.. 
1904.. 
1905.. 
1906.. 
1907. 
1906.. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1913. 
1918. 
1914. 
1915., 



December 86 and 27. . . 

January 1 

October 18 

December 80 and 81 . . . 

December 6 

December 7 

December 9 

February 8 

January 37 

December 11 

December 24 

December 11 

February 1 

January 3 

December 19..... 

January 80 

December 18 

December 81 

January 1. .• 

December 38 

December 80 

February 4 

January 12 

December 17 

January 5 

Dec. 28, 24,25. Jan. 8... 

January 14 

February 15 

January 80, 81 



0.8 feet. 
8.5 feet. 
8.0 feet. 
2.8 feet. 
2.8 feet. 
0.2 feet. 
0.0 feet. 
0.2 feet. 
0.7 feet. 
8.8 feet. 
-0.4 feet. 
0.8 feet. 
-0.7 feet. 
-2.6 feet. 
-1.8 feet. 
1.2 feet. 
0.6 feet. 
0.0 feet.* 
-0.8 feet. 
8.0 feet. 

4.8 feet. 

1.7 feet. 
-1.8 feet. 

1.4 feet. 
2.0 feet. 

1.9 feet. 
-1.4 feet. 

2.8 feet. 
1.7 feet. 



( - ) Indicates reading below the zero of the gauge. 



* At 6 p. M. 



SUMMAKY OP THE RIVER GAUGE READINGS AT ST. LOUIS, 
MO. FOR THE YEAR 1916. 
Highest and Lowest Staees of Water In the Mississippi River at 
St. Louis, Mo.y for each mon& of the year 1915, as determined from the 
records of the U. S. Weather Bnreau Office. 



Month. 



Highest. 



Date. 



Lowest. 



Date. 



January ... 
February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November.. 
December.. 



/t,tfUh$. 
7 8 



28 
22 



20 9 

29 6 

81 6 

81 8 

80 6 

24 8 

22 2 

15 5 

14 9 



22 

27 

1 

15 

81 

24 

22, 28 

21 
17, 18 

8 
80 

1 



ft. teniht, 
1 7 



4 
18 
18 
11 
27 
22 
18 
12 
11 
7 
8 



80. 81 

1 

29 

80 
18, 19, 20 
11, 19 
10 
81 
10 
81 
14 
29 



Highest stage during the year 81.6 feet, on June 24. 



Lowest stage during the year 1.7 

Absolute range 29.9 

Greatest monthly range 19.4 

Least monthly range » 4.1 

Mean range 9.6 



on January 80, 81. 

in February, 
in June. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



TBADB AND COMHSBCS QF 



RITSB QAUOB BSADmOS AT ST. LOUIS, MO., FOB 1916. 

Fbom U. S. Wkathbk Bursau Bsoorm. 
OlMerratioiiB made »t 7 ▲. m . 
Zero of the gauge is 8S.74 feel below St. Louis city dlrectrtz plane and f79.7l6 



feet abore mean Oulf lereL 




















IMS. 


9 


iS 


S 


1 


1 


1 


^ 

•n 


1 

< 


1 
a 

1 


1 


1 


i 


1 




4.1 


tt.f 


15.3 


18.8 


80.3 


39.4 


37.5 


18.3 


30.1 


10.8 


14.8 


1 




9.1 


».6 


15.3 


18.8 


80.8 


36.1 


37.7 


16.S 


31.3 


18.6 


18.6 


t 




aa.6 


».a 


16.3 


18.9 


81.3 


36.5 


36.7 


15.9 


22.2 


M.5 


13.8 


4 




14.1 


81.8 


15.8 


14.1 


81.8 


36.0 


39.7 


15.5 


31.9 


10.8 


13.1 


6 




16.8 


11.4 


16.8 


18.9 


80.8 


36.8 


80.3 


15.3 


31.3 


10.0 


11.5 


6 




16.4 


81.0 


15.3 


18.8 


80.3 


36.9 


80.3 


14.5 


30.5 


8.6 


U.I 


7 




16.5 


80.8 


14.9 


18.8 


38.8 


34.8 


39.7 


18.9 


19.8 


8.5 


M.7 


8 




16.1 


19.6 


14.6 


18.8 


39.8 


34.1 


39.1 


18.4 


19.0 


8.1 


18.4 


• 




16.0 


19.0 


14.8 


18.8 


38.8 


38.1 


38.9 


13.7 


17.8 


8.8 


8.8 


10 




18.9 


18.8 


14.0 


18.6 


38.1 


t22.1 


36.8 


12.8 


16.8 


8.5 


86 


11 




16.8 


17.8 


18.5 


18.4 


27.5 


22.1 


38.8 


15.4 


163 


8.4 


8.8 


n 




i6.a 


16.6 


18.4 


18.1 


37.6 


38.0 


38.7 


19.5 


15.6 


8.3 


8.6 


If 




16.8 


15.9 


18.8 


13.7 


38.5 


34.6 


38.1 


33.3 


14.6 


7.7 


9.5 


14 




ia.9 


15.6 


30.8 


13.1 


36.6 


36.7 


36.8 


33.7 


18.7 


7.4 


8.3 


16 




U.7 


16.1 


20.8 


11.9 


38.6 


37.4 


35.8 


31.7 


18.0 


76 


8.7 


16 




11.0 


14.7 


28.8 


13.8 


38.6 


38.8 


38.4 


31.9 


13.5 


7.6 


8.4 


17 




11.7 


14.4 


30.5 


13.1 


38.4 


38.8 


33.8 


34.0 


13.4 


7.8 


8.3 


18 




ia.9 


14.6 


30.4 


U.i 


38.0 


39.1 


33.0 


24.8 


13.8 


8.4 


7.9 


19 




14.8 


14.7 


30.1 


11.0 


27.5 


39.5 


38.3 


38.8 


13.7 


9.6 


7.8 


ao 




16.4 


14.7 


18.7 


11.0 


37.7 


39.9 


38.6 


38.5 


13.4 


10.0 


6.9 


91 




16.0 


14.8 


17.8 


n.5 


38.7 


80.6 


tao.o 


38.7 


13.0 


10.1 


6.8 


n 


•7.1 


16.1 


14.8 


16.8 


13.5 


80.4 


81.3 


80.4 


34.3 


13.8 


9.9 


5.9 


S 




16.6 


14.5 


16.1 


18.6 


81.8 


81.8 


80.8 


38.9 


U.O 


8.8 


5.6 


aZ 




18.4 


14.8 


15.8 


15.6 


81.6 


81.3 


39.4 


38.3 


18.0 


9.5 


5.0 


a6 




21.0 


14.1 


15.8 


16.7 


81.5 


81.0 


38.3 


33.3 


13.7 


9.5 


4.6 


a6 




aa.6 


18.8 


14.8 


17.1 


81.3 


80.8 


36.8 


31.3 


13.4 


10.0 


4.8 


a7 




•88.4 


16.6 


14.5 


17.9 


00.6 


80.7 


36.8 


30.4 


13.1 


U.8 


8.6 


38 




21.4 


13.4 


14.3 


31.6 


80.5 


80.3 


31.4 


19.5 


13.0 


18.4 


8.4 


3v...». ..•••••. 


A*n 




18.2 


18.8 


34.1 


80.8 


39.6 


30.0 


19.1 


11.7 


14.9 


8.2 


10 






18.6 


18.6 


37.1 


80.4 


38.9 


19.9 


19.4 


U.8 


15.8 


8.6 


61 






14.8 




20.0 




36.0 


118.5 




11.1 




8.7 


Mean 


8.6 


16.0 


16.7 


16.5 


14.9 


39.6 


r.7 


36.6 


19.5 


15.3 


9.3 


8.1 



* January 33nd, 3 p. m., 7.8 feet. 

t July 10th, 7 P. M., 33.0 feet. 

a February 87th, 7 p. m., 38,5 feet. 

X August 31st, 8 p. M., 80.6 feet. 

§ August 8l8t, 7 P. M., 18.8 feet. 

NOTB.— Highest stage during year, 81.6 feet on June 34th. 

NOTB.— Lowest stage during year, 1.7 feet, January 80-81. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THs crnr of bt. louis. 



87 



ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES OF STEAMBOATS AND BARGES, 1015. 

ABRIYALS. 



1915. 


S!£T 


^ 


note. 


JSS. 


Oklo. 
Tmb. 


SSS^ 


sur: 


B£ 


Jaaiisry ..,,... ««^ ^xx.^. ...... 


















Febnuurr ......JIxx [...l.^^.V^ 




6 
39 

21 
38 
18 
21 
19 
34 
34 
19 
14 


"Y 

9 

7 
10 
16 
14 
37 
43 
96 

8 


1 
3 
S 
5 
5 
T 




'i' 

66 

64 
85 
91 
105 
91 
116 
1B3 
96 
83 


u 


340 


itaSh?^;///;;;//.^ "^^ 


34 
29 
40 
64 
57 
66 
61 
63 
46 
9 


6.900 


▲uru :;:::::::;:;::;::: 


6,046 


mS^....::..;:.:;:::;:: :::::: 

June 


6,685 
6.806 


July 

AwMt 


18,000 
10,660 




8,690 


oSG^r!?:;.';!;;"!: '..';:;::::;:;:;!*. 


16.546 


HOTCBiber 


8,790 


DtMHilMr...... 


8,870 






Tvtid 


467 


330 


166 


38 


83 


817 


63 


89,760 







DSPABTUBB8. 



ins. 


as? 


^ 


a 


4ISK. 


T^. 


Ohto 


S^ 


TODfl 

Sllip'd 


ftSSf:::::::::::::::::;::::::::::: 




...... 

38 
30 
31 
19 
18 
19 
18 
17 
36 
17 










65 

69 
83 
93 

103 
96 
98 

109 
91 
85 





lUafoh./LJ..JlJ..i.....l........ 


35 
34 
40 
53 
57 
64 
64 
53 
44 
7 


8 
9 
9 
11 
16 
17 
38 
86 
19 
9 





3 


! '.; 


4,575 
5,340 
6,660 
8,860 
8,006 
8,945 
4,365 
5,806 
6,800 
1,605 


iMtr 

H«T«mb«r 

DimmlMfcr- , .r^.... 




... 


Ttm 


409 


201 


167 


38 86 




880 


58,340 



ABBIYALS AND DEPABTUBSS FOB TWENTY-TWO YEARS. 



ABRITAI^ 



_L 



I>EPAJiLTUKK», 



TeAf«- 



Buxea. 



Tons of 

Freight 
BcceiTcd* 



TonK of 
bj BmSI resell. 



Te««. 



Tom of 
FrelEbt 



1915. 
ISU. 
1911. 

19tf. 

mi 

lito. 
1909. 
190S. 
1907. 
IB06. 
t9Pi. 
19Di., 

leoi. 

1901. 

mi. 

itoa. 

1899. 

laoi. 

1897.. 
IBM. 
ii9&. 



B77 


m 


m 


88 


am 


l»l 


864 


306 


i08 


809 


B59 


W9 


m 


m 


908 


441 


mi 


868 


1039 


417 


1074 


885 


1333 


41» 


mi 


619 


1466 


461 


1541 


691 


1623 


696 


IfiTO 


080 


U^ 


793 


im 


m 


mm 


14M 


vm 


!»« 


9061 


l»i& 



m,7m 

8S,6Sfi 
311,135 

333.436 
60] ,830 
143,540 
3Cil,CeO 

389,575 
826,900 
28StM) 
J91,i25 
B^,710 
i86«046 
411,906 
188,670 
S94,ifiO 
449.5^ 
607,106 
607,705 

410, m 

466,176 



1,770 
1,310 
a, 946 
4, TOO 

60,060 
73,340 
71,960 
67,060 

84,010 
98,^6 

138,6W 



1914. , 
191S.. 
1811. 
1911. 
191 D. , 
1909. 
1908.. 
1907.. 
1906,, 
190S. 
1904., 

iBoa,. 

1903.. 
1501. , 
1900.. 

if9a,. 

1898., 
1896., 

urn,, 

1804., 



696 

7BS 

786 

6S7 

712 

008 

961 

1018 

1067 

ilB3 

1306 

1448 

1619 

1806 

1683 

1614 

1678 

1»46 

1904 

1»B« 



»,3I^ 

48,935 

40,600 

43,196 

67,166 

48,426 

4«$,€0& 

73,740 

78,600 

894S6 

80,576 

83,667 

313,303 

334,361 

1(^,170 

34A,68G 

£03,205 

ton, 681 

4€9.360 

671,416 

808,150 

608,060 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



88 



TBADI AND COMMIBCB OF 



5 

o 



« 



IS 8 



I §- 

s el 






^ Si 



o 

i3 



g 



QQ 



IP 



ilSS§£§§§M§§§l 



III 



•as 






jOiatQ^Ovir^taa 






ii <? 









§§§§§!§§§§ 



SxrO 



s§§§s§§§§§§ 









iisf§ii§§§ii§§s 



§§1 






Ill 
"as: 



9 9SI' O ^ ^1^ 9. n S S S » S Op 



ll Hn 


:: I ::::!: ia 


It m 


i i i i n n hi 


j^^i : : : : 
2g : : : : 
S&» i : : : 




ll Hi! 


iiiiil ;§iis 

BSa-— S :555g 


It iiii 




I^SlI 


§§§§§§§§§§§ 


H IHI 


;§§ i§ : i :§§S 
:S« :- : : jagg 


II jpsj 


!§§§§§§§§§§ 




§§§ ; ;§§§§§§ 


ijl list 


gs§m§§§§§ 


;| asa: 


il§§l§§§§§§ 


is4 !i^§ 

ill : i i= 


§§§ -:§§ ;§§§§ 

S3» :|S :Sa*jJ 




§iisi§§§ii§ 

lS3g§ISiS8§8 


S iiii 

1" • - ' 





Digtti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



COTTON. 



The Cotton movement at St. Louis the past year, ending July 31, 
1915, was of fair volume, the total receipts for the period amounted to 
749,547 bales as against 578,832 bales in season previous. Of the amount 
reported 644,948 bales were on through bills of lading and 104,599 bales 
local. Local consumption aggregated 22,969 bales as compared with 
19,772 bales the previous year. The bulk of the arrivals were again 
from Arkansas, that state being credited with 432,273 bales; Mississippi 
shipped in 65,461 bales; Oklahoma, 140,103 bales; Texas, 26,724 bales; 
Louisiana, 27,043 bales and Missouri, 27,461 bales. A large part of the 
business done by St. Louis Cotton factors does not come through St. 
Louis, shipments being made from point of origin via Southern ports 
for export. The range of prices showed a marked decline from previous 
years, the top on Middling Cotton being quoted at 9 }^ cents in April 
and May, 1915, while the low was 6^ cents in October, 1914. 

The Missouri Cotton crop for the past year was approximately 
46,957 bales as compared with 53,695 bales the previous year. The 
value was placed at $2,512,199 as contrasted with $1,610,842 the year 
before. 

Prom the report of Henry G. Hester, Secreatry New Orieans Cotton 
Exchange: 

The Commercial Cotton crop of the United States for the year ending 
with the close of July, 1915, amoimted to 15,108,011 bales, showing an 
increase over that of 1913-14 of 225,518 bales, an increase over that of 
1912-13 of 1,001,895, and a decrease under that of 1911-12 of 1,000,078 
bales. 

The entire increase in the deliveries over last year was in Texas, 
which showed a gain of 12 per cent, while the "Other Gulf" and Atlantic 
States decreased, respectively, one and three-tenths and three and three- 
tenths i>er cent. 

The figures (in round numbers) are: Texas over last year, 501,000; 
Other Gulf States (embracing Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, 
Oklahoma, Missouri, California, Kansas, New Mexico) under last year, 
56,000; the group of Atlantic States (including Alabama,NorthCarolina, 
South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky and Virginia), under last 
year, 219,000 bales. 

The crop, which averaged Middling, was largely of the medium 
grades; that is, without a superabundance of either higher or lower 
qualities. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



90 TRADB AMD OOMMBBCB OF 

The averagre price for Middling Cotton for the year was 7.94 cents 
per pound, comparing with 13.49 last year, 12.20 the year before, and 
10.16 in 1911-12; and the average commercial value per bale was $41.04, 
against $68.06 last year, $63.59 the year before, and $51.45 in 
1911-12. 

In view of the war conditions which prevailed, the foDowing com- 
pamtives of the average values per bale by months will prove of interest, 
via: 

This Year. Last Year. 

August $49.75 $63.51 

September 43.97 68.95 

October 37.49 70.95 

November 38.88 68.66 

December 37.59 66.26 

January 41.13 66.00 

February 41.95 66.05 

March 43.83 66.25 

April 49.00 66.90 

May 47.31 67.70 

June 47.18 69.59 

July 45.05 67.07 

The August valuation above is nominal, though based on actual sales 
of the remnants of eld crop. 

It was not until the new lorop began to;move more freely that the 
force of the panic brought about by the European war scare was realised; 
and, while the reopening of the Exchanges, which were closed from July 
3lBt to November 16th, brought about a steadier feeling, it was some 
time after that before the demoralisation was overcome. It was in 
October that the lowest figure ot6}4 cents was recorded, but there were 
many sales made in the interior, in Texas especially, on the basis ot Syi 
and 5 H cents i>er pound for Middling. 

In fact, while the Exchanges were closed, there was no regular market, 
and cotton was selling in the interior of the Texas and Gtilf States at 
one price and in the States of the Atlantic Seaboard at another. Con- 
ditions were intensified by "calamity howlers," who predicted aD sorts 
of disasters. 

It is hardly to be wondered at, therefore, that there was a sheer 
drop from an average value per bale of $67 in July, 1914, to $37 in 
October, or say, about $30 per bale. By tl^e time the Exchange opened, 
the trade b^g:an to realize that we were facing a bumper crop, which 
promised to exceed all previous yields, but the worst had been witnessed, 
and, a9 reflected in the figures appended, while the outcome has been the 
reverse of favorable, it has proved better than anticipated. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



TBM cm OF ST. LOUIS. 91 

The total value of the orop oorapared with the previous three years 
ended July 3l8t has been as follows: 

1914-16 16,108,011 $693,432,978 

1913-14 14,882,493 977,844,114 

1912-13 14,106,116 866,185,562 

1911-12 16,108,089 808,723,957 

These values, which embrace the commercial crop, are for cotton 
only, and do not, of course, include the value of the cotton seed, which 
constitutes an important item. For example, the value of the crop for 
the p«tst year, as stated, was $593,432,978, to which, if the value of the 
cotton seed be added, we shoiild have a total of $749,384,978. Last year, 
the total value, including seed, was $1,134,444,114. The seed crop of 
this year brought about the same as that of last year, so that the loss in 
total value was practically all in the cotton. 

The quantity of old cotton remaining in the Cotton Belt at the close 
of this season is many times larger than ever before, though not much 
greater than has been generally expected, owing to the enormous pro- 
duction and the unfavorable influences of the European war. 

The change of the cotton year closing from August 31st to July 3l8t, 
eliminates the necessity for statements of receipts of new cotton, as 
there Is rarely more than a trifling amount of new ready for market 
in July. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



92 



TBADI AND COMnBCI OF 



TABLl SHOWDIO THS QB088 AMD MKT BB0BXPT8 OW OOTTOH AT 8T. LOUIB. 


Sbaboh. 


Gross 

Bccelpts, 

bales. 


Through 

BecelpU 

bales. 


Loeal 

BecelpU. 

bales. 


1914-1915 


749^7 
578,882 
595,428 
668,579 
588,276 
457,822 
688,018 
481,742 
815,871 
551,091 
677,658 
521,881 
742,618 
841,258 
978,497 


644,948 
495,287 
514,175 
527,195 
449,654 
872,256 
554,028 
404,756 
707,791 
482,215 
574,115 
465,677 
679,971 
619.578 
783,869 


104,599 
88,545 


1918-1914 


1912-1918 


8L258 


1911-1912. 


1411884 


1910-1911 


88,622 
85,066 


1909-1910 


1908-1909 


188,990 
76,986 


1907-1908 


1906-1907 


108,080 


1905-1906 


68,876 


1904-1905 


108,5tt 
56!204 


1908-1904 


1902-1908 


62,647 


1901-1902 


221,680 


1900-1901 


289,628 



MONTHLT BEOBIPTS AND SHIPMENTS BOB SEASON 1914-1915. 



MOHTBS. 



Rbobiptb. 



LooaL Through. TotaL 



Shlpmsots. 



*AagUBt,1914.... 

September 

October 

Norember 

December , 

January, 1910. . . , 

Febraary 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Total Bales 



912 

1,148 

14,067 

23,488 

18,974 

14,710 

13.072 

10,054 

7,548 

5,606 

1,805 

738 



2,909 
8,478 
01,819 
99,437 
79,410 
88,191 
94,303 
76,187 
71,806 
47,601 
16,701 
18,060 



3,911 

4,616 

60,880 

131,910 

96,884 

103,901 

106,834 

86,341 

78,906 

08,159 

18,006 

14,806 



104,069 



644,948 



749,047 



0,080 
0,130 
87,930 
78,174 
88,114 
71,760 
67,090 
67,037 
68,784 
46,078 
33,007 
19,000 



007,749 



* Cotton crop year changed In 1914— August to July, inclusive. 
BEOBIPTS OF OOrrON BY BAOH BOUTB FOB THRBB OOTTOM 



BOUTBS. 



1914-10. 



1918-14. 



1913-18. 



Ohlcago & Eastern Illinois B. B. 

Chicago. Burlington A Qulney R. B. (Bast) 

Wabash B. R. (West) 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain A Southern B. B. 

St. Louis. Iron Mountain A Southern B. B. (IlL Dly.) 

Missouri Pacific B. B 

Mobile & Ohio B. B 

St. Louis & San Francisco B. B 

St. Louis Southwestern B. B 

Illinois Central B. R 

Missouri. Kansas ft Texas B. R 

Chicago. Rock Island A Pacific Ry 

LouisYiUe A Nashville R. R. and L. H. ft St. U 

Chicago A Alton (Mo. Div.) 

Southern Railway * 

Lower MlBslssippl River Boats 

Upper Mississippi River Boats 

Illinois Biver Boats 

Ohio, Cumberland and Tennessee River Boats 

Total Bales 



4,341 

30,404 
814,073 

6,440 
86,901 
87.387 
106,168 

8,365 
68,883 
83,690 

1,043 

"*i;887 
3,408 



18 



1,789 

9,464 

833,403 

8,891 

68,443 

80,906 

104,408 

8,007 

38,380 

8,370 

436 

ioo 

1,700 
123 
100 

1,037 



86 

100 

3,898 

8,154 

288,700 

3,688 

46,680 

97,408 

83,880 

8,101 

47,876 

8,789 

008 

358 

996 

1,010 



753 



787,180 



078,883 



090,438 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



STATBMKl^ SHOWING THE SOURCES OF SUPPLY OF 
COTTON FOR FOUR YEARS. 



FROM 


1914-16. 
Bales. 


1918-14. 
Bales. 


1913-18. 
Bales. 


1911-13. 
Bales. 


Arlxona 


1,180 

"483,378 
36,734 
37 461 
17,907 
66,461 
11,087 

139 
37,048 

339 
140,106 


314 

wiiw" 

16,448 

34,400 

10,306 

49,670 

10,679 

686 

38,847 

40 

44,610 

98 


800 

869,013 

38,889 

87,091 

6,896 

87,004 

11,344 

885 

30,873 

181 

89,303 




Virginia. 




ArlcansaB : 


488,786 




13,936 


Mi<My^^Tf 


60,811 


Tennessee 

Mlwlmlppi 


16,908 
68,766 


Al abftinaT ........... r ... . . , 


14,914 


Kentucky 

Louisiana 


3,384 
33,681 


Georgia 




Olclanoma. 


66,669 


Illinois 










Total receipts 


749,647 


678,883 


095,438 


668,679 



8HIPMBNT8 OF COTTON BT BACH BOUTS FOB THRRB OOTTON TBAB8. 



KOUTB, 



CbieagQ A Alton R. B.» Mo. Div.. ..>....... ......... 

MJBaonjflPaclflc R. R .,, .., 

Wftbaah Railway (West) ..,. ... . 

Chlcago,Bock Islan<J & Pftcific Ey ».. 

&t- Louis & San Franctscc^ R, E....*..,..... - .*, 

Iron Mountain & Southern Ry. , **.,►.. 

IllinokBOeutral RiiiLroad.... 

LouLsvllle, e**D(lt^n*on & St. Louis B. R ... 

LouiiTille *Xft(ihTlllifa*R 

Mobile 4k Ohio R R...... ..,. 

Sodtbera B. R., ...,,... ..,*.. 

Baltimore A Ohto S.- W, R. B. .* 

OhtcaffoJk Alton E.R. (Main Lin©)............ 

CleTeUnd, Cln., Chloaao A ^t, Louis R. R. ..... ^ .. ^ 

OhlcaMo ^ Easbern minaisR. E.. 

Vuiilalla R. R ..*. 

Wftbash R. R. (Eftst> ,*..-. 

Toledo, St. Lonlt A Weatfira B.K. ^ ... ... 

Ohloaga, PearJA A St. Loali R. R 

CtdcagfQ, BurHnRt<:fn A Qutncy R. R. (East) 

Cliicago, BarllngftiMi Sl Qulncf R. R. ( Weat DIf.) . 

OtberRo&ds 

Ri^er..... 



Total ba^fts. ...^- ............... mjl? 



lUil-l& . 
BALEB. 



m 



i,iaa 
3,e®i 

31,960 
41,793 

€S,915 

a&,344 
9a, 55a 

10,6(tt 



198 



iviai4. 

BALSS. 



1,477 
41 



3,176 

Ifl.ffTP 

S&t 

'74;6ii 
ai.iia 

50,lBi) 
61.563 
83,180 
19, 183 
SI, 958 
gO,32t 
10,928 



30,418 



ITr,l7l 



luia-M. 

BALE8. 



«0 
44 

3,2sa 

780 
660 



4p(m 

i,fm 

56,035 

l,l.'SD 

ao,m 

T4,6'Jl 

66,960 

16,400 

flf2,031 

eti,94i 

39,5Jig 

403 

IS 



467,3 



TABLE SHOWING THB HIGHEST AND LOWEST PBIGES OF 

Middling Cotton at St. Louis bach Month por Four Tears. 



MONTHS. 



September 
October.... 
November 
December.. 
January .., 
February . 

March , 

April 

ySy 

June 

July 

August.... 



1914-16. 



Lowett. mghMt 



1918-14. 



Lowest ni^uft 



1912-18. 



Lowett. Hlfhart. 



P5J 

18M 
1814 

12|< 

12^ 

12H 

I2M 

12 6/16 

12 6/16 

1214 



19U-1912. 



LowMt Hlghart. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



94 



TRADB AlfD OOMMSBCB OF 



SHIPMBNTS TO UKITBD 8TATKS PORTB AS BXPOBTED 
BY ST. LOUIS COTTON XXCHAK6S. 



ToBotton 

" ProYidenoe.... 
"New York..... 
" PhiladelpbU.. 

" Baltimore 

" LoaisTiUe .... 
** Interior pointt.. 
" New Hampshire 



19U-14. 
BAles. 

90^70 
»^ 
17,841 

4,78t 
1,090 

<no 

S4S,806 

M86 



1914-lft. 
BAles. 



81,888 

81,061 

6,608 

MS 

4S8 

488,896 

1,600 



19U-14. 1814-16. 

Bales. Bales. 
To Norfolk and 

Newport News 10,868 681 

" Portland, llaine. ... 11,647 6,867 

«• Pacillo Coast. 4,886 86174 

"Canada 40,181 18,186 

"City 18,771 11,868 

"Otherpoints 1,714 868 

" Conneotiont 1,006 1,1» 



Totol Bales 1811-18. . . .684,116. 1818-U. . . .680,681. 1814-16. . . .747^)70. 



UBPOBT OP OOTTOW OOMPBB88KD AT 6T. LOUD. 

Tsar sndliif Beeslpta. 8lilpm«itk 

Sept. 80. bales. bales. 

1816 106,807 108,786 

1814 84,006 86,081 

1818 77,868 76,708 

1811 187,610 111,878 

1811 70,168 68,168 

1810 64,880 14,811 

1808 106,786 104,814 

1808 68,688 64,061 

1907 111,611 111,798 

1806 71,174 68,648 

1906 81,818 67|688 

OOXMBBOIAL CBOP BT 6TATB8, Dl THOI78AKD6 OP BALIS, A6 
BT THB HBW ORLBAV8 OOTTOK BZOHABGB. 



Stoek. 

bales. 

17487 

14,111 
6,198 
8,887 

^^ 
668 

10,681 

8,776 

4411 

18,601 

10,776 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

Florida 

Georgia 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma. 

Mississippi 

North Carolina, eto. 

South Carolina 

Tennessee, eto 

Texas 



1814^191S. 

1,600 

881 

80 

1,440 

411 

1,186 

1,181 

878 

^« 

4,618 



1816-1914. 

1,640 

1,080 

70 

1,466 

460 

884 

1,880 

1,476 

618 

4,118 



19U1811. 
WW 

810 

61 

1,816 

890 
1,061 
1,041 

874 
1,181 

876 
4,861 



Total orops— bales. 



16,706 14,881 



14,167 



1914-1916.. 
1918-19U.. 
1813-1918. 
1911-1913.. 
1910-1911.. 
1900-1910 . 
X906-1908.. 
1907-1906., 
1906-1907.. 
1906-1906. 



TALUE OP COMMBBCIAL OBOP. 
Bales. 

16,106,OU 

14,883.498 

14,106,116 

16,106,008 

13,130,006 

10.600,668 

, 18,836,457 

11,571,966 

11,510,963 

11,846,966 



Valne. 
6506,433,978 
877,844.114 
806,186,663 
806,186,063 
817.055,169 
778,884,006 
680,784,464 
673,385,060 
T16,00B,3« 
641,710,40| 



WSIGHT8 AND TALUE PEE BALE. 



1814.16. 1818-14. 1813-U. 1911-13. 1816-11. 1808-10. 
Arentfe weight per bale— lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. 

United States standard bales.. 617.37 514,84 517.98 518.73 618.13 560.63 
St. Loois BeceipU ** •• .. 518 500 517 513 614 613 

Average ralue per bale St. Louis Beceipts. 1914-15, 641.04; 1818-14, 68<J4: 1813-10, 663.6i* 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT or BT. LOUIS. 



95 



THI OBOP OF THE UNITED STATES, IN BALES, FOB 65 YBAB8. 



im-S%, S.3S7,3S9 
1TO-«,B0 record 



l»T£U6^ao record 
laNHaJ.iic^ recoftl 

imt-m, a.5««t24i 
ISTft-TI, *.«i7,ooa 

lfH-71, 1^71,361 
1971^73, Ift^MW 
im^ll, 4.17038 
lg7*-75, S,S'17,J*« 
IS1^-7B, 4*633,313 



1876-77, 
IS7i-*\ 
ia83-S3, 

ifiae j?7, 

1937^85, 



4.474>Oe« 
4,T7a,W6 
s,07i.i:»ft 
5.7flLESl 
6,505 730 
G,4H,04fi 

5.706,1«G 
6.50(S,Q87 






lSrtU-90, 7,319,736 
1890 91, 8,a55«&iS 
li9l-93. 9.036.a7» 

i8&-i-&s, e,7oo,aM 

1804-06, 9J01,SS1 

I89ft-ee, Ua734« 

lfl«-fT, B,757,»54 

18a§.?9, 11,374 840 
I99&^, I»,4I«,4L« 
I90(M)1, 10,!f8l,433 
190lH?3,lfl,680J90 



l>i^ ■-.. i'',7^T.sftfi 

l9^|^-LU.U^l.ljI,^4 

lTO7-0§,Htl57i,96fi 
l9O3-0i»,lS,82fi,4A7 
1909-10,10,609.068 
leiO-U, 11^130,090 

1912-l3,t4J(J6,11fl 
mi^ 14J43§'i,4ia 
l9H'm.lS,im,Qll 



AMERICAN COTTON CROP FOR THREE YEARS. 
From New.Orleans Ootton Exchange Beport. 

1914-10. 1918-14. 1911-18. 

Bales. Bales. Bales. 

Port receipts 10,896,063 10,792,710 10,183,896 

Orerland'to miUs 1,198,468 1,186,445 1,114,460 

Boatbem ConBompUoii 8,168,888 8,068,386 3,955,344 

16,356,938 15,043,441 14,308.100 

Lm8 taken by Southern mUls from ports 148,913 189,948 95,984 

Total Obops 15,108,011 14,863,196 14,106,116 

EZPOBT6— 

OreatBritain 8,805,834 8,468,669 8,600,048 

France 6n,014 1,086,833 1,014,796 

•Oontinent and Channel 8,874,885 4,483,415 3,975,415 

Canada 184,685 146,984 146,ni 

TOTAI. EXPOBTS. 8,541,908 9,184,840 6,787,080 

Stock cloee of year 744,557 335,838 161,117 

Northern mills takings 3,888,306 3,561,570 3,485,574 

Average gross weight Of crop per hale— pounds. 517.37 514.84 517.99 
_ * Including to Mexico, Japan and China, details of which are given in Export 
Table. 

SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION OP AMERICAN COTTON. 
(In thousands.) 

SUPPLY. 

1914-15 1918-14 1913-18 

VlsiUe supply August Ist 1,671 1,835 1,617 

Brought into slghC 15,483 14,870 14,140 

TotalSupply 17,188 16,196 15,757 

DISTBIBUnON. 

Taking*- 1914-15 1918-14 1913-18 

American miUs, North 3,888 3,663 3,486 

American mills. South •8,168 8,068 3,955 

CanadUn mUls 185 147 147 

Mexicanmills 41 81 38 

Japanese, Chinese and East Indian mills t480 849 408 

European mills 7,057 8,860 8,418 

Total mill takings 18,819 14,513 14,483 

Burnt 3 13 

Visible supply, close July: 

In America 1,313 888 395 

In Great Britian 1,818 686 606 

Incontinent 753 687 434 

Total distribution ,. 17,108 16,195 15,757 

* Includes consumption only. Actual takings of Southern mills. 8,471.000 bales: 

the dilTerence between consumption and takings remaining in the Cotton Belt and 
is counted as part of the old cotton carried over. 

t Including American Cotton taken from Liverpool for Japan. China and East 
India. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



96 



TRADB AND COICMBBCB OF 



I 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE ENTIRE 

RK0BIPT8. 



Bt Railboad ahd Biyul 


nour. 
Barrels. 


Wheat. 
Bnah. 


Com. 
Bosh. 


Oats. 
Bosh. 


Bye. 
Bosh. 


Barley 
Bush. 


OhloAfO A Alton R.B. (Mo. DIt.) 

MlMoari PMlflo B. B.. 

St. Loais and ten Pnnoitco R. B 
WabMh R. R.( West) 


16S,M0 
802.970 
253,000 
274,810 
708,870 
48,440 


1,027,877 

5,894.081 

2,208,200 

5,616,400 

1,812,000 

1,726,834 

101,120 

444,000 

881,6n 

886,767 

9.600 

148,800 

180,800 

67.200 

285,200 

1,844,780 

831,200 

808,600 

1,280,400 

160,600 

1,746.000 

8,062,800 

5,680,400 

244,800 

26,400 

96,000 


48.200 

2,666,800 

817.200 

1,190,600 

175,200 

78,760 

288,280 

111,200 

188,200 

1.654,000 

'**' 8;406 

14,400 

8.600 

262,000 

1,286,400 

129 600 

216,800 

2,966,000 

88 600 

763,200 

1,708,600 

8,400,800 

196,000 

2,400 

886,000 


800,900 
1,900,200 

288,000 
2,874.900 

685,800 

281.200 
17,000 
67,800 
89,100 

569,900 


6,500 
77,800 
8.800 
104,110 
14,400 
4,400 
2,200 
7,700 


16,000 
142,640 

13,800 
186,000 


Chicago, B. I. & Pacific By 

M 0.J Kantat 4b Texas R. R 

St. Lools Sonthweatam R. R 


34,000 
88,800 


St. L» Tmrt Mnirrt. .t So. E E . 
St, r^. 1. M. A: i'u. K, R, tin. DiT.J 


4,820 

680 

8,150 

""i,MO 

150 

81,790 

85,210 

470,150 

"TSiwo 
149,810 

760 
868,820 
150,060 
800.890 
41,950 




JlUnota Centml E. U 

I^ u 1 d V ni 6, 1 1 ade reon^ dt.i^ E. E 
LouiATtUt' AN^bTlUe B.B 


1,100 




Mobile A Ohio R. IL ............ 


5,07S 

1,700 

266,200 

1,541.980 

69,500 

217,600 

8.201,100 

22,100 

707,200 

1,189,000 

5,241,100 

102,000 






Boutiiiorii RuUwnvK .. ......... 






BaltiiKiore A OhloH^W, R H 

OliicRffoAAltonH II (Main Une) 
daFelund, Clu.. ChL ASt. L. H.R 

VamiaUii R. H. . . .*..... 

WiibMh lt.E (Kaat)...,, ,.. 

Toledo, St. Louia & W^steni R.B. 
Ohiiuffo, P«ar J« & 8t. I^onts R. R, . 
Cblcai?o,B.AQ B.B,{BaStDlT.> 
C, B. Sl y. li, ll.. (West. Dly >... 
Chicago & Eftfiti^ro IlLInola B>R* 
SI Loula. Tmv & Eastern Ey , . . 
iHIboIi Tract loll fivst^m .... 


1,100 

7,700 

3,200 

1,100 

18,700 

1,100 

11,000 

71,800 

158,500 

6,600 


"ifii'.ioo 
■"*i*,8o4 

16,000 

"omImo 

83,000 

437,800 

19,300 


214,200 






Lit^'hflfld A MadlHon R R . . . 







Cpp^r Hlsflls»ippi Elvef 

Lower ** " 
Illinois ** 


40 

160 

"iiioeo 


n,128 

78,782 

44,241 

2,570 

1,287 

800,000 


820 
7.765 
2,420 




420 
288 




700 


180 


Mluotirl ■■ 








Ohia. Cumb. & Tetiii. RlTsrs. ... 


■'266.666 








By WaKoo .... .., e, 




200,000 






Total River and Rail 


8,962,190 


85,250,404 


18,917,185 


19.402,855 


496,468 


1,468,170 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



97 



MOVEMENT IN FLOUR AND GRAIN FOR 1915. 



BT RAliaOAB Aim EtVl£&. 


Floor, 

BbU, 




Cora, 
Busti, 


OftU, 

Busti, 


Bush^ 


Bl&rlQ7 
Btisb, 


Obicftgo & Alton BR, (Mo. Xllr) 
Missouri P&gI13c9 Bit . . 


i.iio 
31,560 
63,790 


"i38!9^ 
^,740 

ei.ijio 

413,8))0 

li,l90 

S,450 

3,IJ1S,660 

417.^0 

5.703,970 

2,7ei»,46U 

2,7ii,eeo 

6,119.710 

1,S9fJ,4&Q 

1.66I,@I0 

994, »30 

17§,000 

ioa,5io 

1, 149,040 
613,010 
167,BiO 


eio 

111,710 

1,5W 

AS, 700 

1,103,9^ 

^,130 

56,170 

1,378,510 

£ril,l30 

69,210 

660,530 

3,05e,580 

747,280 

fil6,9«0 

is.sao 

3^8,930 
39,090 
151,410 
109,S40 
lSe,530i 
33,140 








381,340 

l,7fiO 

l,6do 

943,17a 

13,B50 

89,9SD 

469,900 

317.1(00 

4,S0l,a50 

2^7,260 

735,170 

3,0S9.79O 

1,881,330 

»7a,940 

! 37,310 

46,510 
»U,609 
I41,6§0 
S6S,580 

94,070 






Wabash E.E. tWeat}.*"!""^]!^ 






CliL€&gL\ R. L Sc Paciflc Hy. 


■"'3;3M 




St. Louis and SfLiiFYaiiolSOOB.B 


95,090 
5,410 

40 J 60 
»30,400 
112,300 
7«0,6^J0 

45,010 
173,010 
734,400 
309,2^0 
257.230 
343.800 
224.910 
320,560 
K83,QtO 
310,100 

16,500 


11, no 


St. Lokitfl 8iMathw<'it«rti E. Ft. ... 






St.LDiiiiii Iron Mount. A So.B.B^ 
St. L., I. M. & So, R. B* (in, DIv.) 

Illinoii O^niTifl R. B- . , - , 

X^iil&TUKesiidersoa A StltB^B, 
LouiP-riLlt A Na^bTUlo B. B.. , . , . . 

Mobii(^AOhioE.B, 

Sou th erii HaVI way ■>>,..,.< 


7,040 

3,060 

69,370 

44,510 

10,410 

■i9i;i96 

11,610 
7,530 
1,540 
1,000 

41,2 10 
5,7@0 


4,510 
8.830 

ss,e§o 

16,370 

7,900 
9,960 

39,870 


Balttijaor© A Ohio S, W, E- B.,.. 
Chicago A Alton B.K-( W aln Lin©) 
Clere,. CLn.« (jhtcs^i) A St.L.E. B. 
ChJci^fTo ^ Eiistf^m IlllDola B^ E. 

TAndalla Rii[ Iroad .../.. 

W&baah E» E. (Easl) «.>...,.... 


1^360 

8,680 

16,440 
3»,B60 
38,380 


Tnlmlf) St. T^fvlitA Jk '^tm.tAfn Tt< R 




Chicago, Peoria A St LoaUB.B 
Ghl «4iro. B arl . AQa lti« j E, B. lEasl} 
C R. .% O R. R.. f Went Dlv > 




S,10Q 














IlllnaLs Trartlon System**..,,,, 
LJU:h field & Mndbon Ej........ 

6t* Louis. Tfoy ^ Kasteni Ry . ,,, 


3,760 
44KI 












8,600 


7.SO0 
4>070 
14.090 


4.900 
S.OOO 
39.260 
24,SS0 
3,030 






,,,.. , 




Upper Mlsiisslppi Rirer .- , 

Lower " ** 


1 .810 




TJlinotfl ** 








Missouri 

T^iiQ,* Cnmb* it Ohio Biv^ors. . . 










3,740 




i.no 


4,380 






Tots] Sliipixi€^at0. ., **.^ 


4,905,490 


3§. 179, 170 


9,931,8311 


lfl,703,aCO 


a86,l«0 


i9s,aio 







Digiti 



ized by Google 



9S 



TEAOB AMD OOMliaaCB OF 



BECBIPTS OF LEADING ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF EACH 
WEEK FOR THE TEAR 1915. 



dfOUiO 



Flour, 
bbU. 



Wheat, 



Oonw 



bush- 



buAb, 



bosta. 



MUlfeed. 



B*«a. Ami 



CiHtoiL 



Bmw, 



LoeaU ^kzo. 



JftO, 



Feb. 



2 
10 
30 



13 

20 

27 

M&reh 6 

2<J 
27 

3 
10 
17 
24 
31 

7 
1^ 
2^ 
2(r 

5 
12 
ig 
3a 

3 
10 
17 
34 
31 

7 
14 
31 



April 



Umr 



June 



Jtil^ 



Aug. 



15.810 
90,500! 
180. 7S0 
28^,000 
359 JQO 
411, 2»> 
4M.8AO; 
5M,t80' 

TOI.230 
7ftl,SS0 
8I4,fiOO 

l,D4B,04O 

1. 1^3,010 

1.310,780 
lj^,250 
l,*66,5O0 
1 

1.730,a50, 
1,^406,000 

i.afls.eao 

l.flS.TBO 

i,«7«,«eo 



SePti' 



Oct. 



23 
.HO 

13 
20 

27 
4 
11 
18 
25 
31 



Nov. 



Dec, 



3,Oflt,3rt} 
2,140,090 
a,210.0SO 
a,285,4!0 
2.37|},S60 
1,491,090 

2,706,220 
2V79SJ.DSO 
1033,3^, 88ft 
2,ff73,filQ 
3,084,230 

3,206,170 
3, aw, 210 
3.497,140 

3,687,740 
i*7S7,aotJ 

a, 052,160 



ZM2jm 



101,300 lU.SOO 
475.200 71&,a00 

i.imjn i,M5,300 

l,il32.22tt 1^.292.100 
2,40:i.J^2tJ 3.229,atlO 
2,«tl7,221l l,S3{),40D 

2,4m^s2^ «,s#r.30o 

3.&3»»,4^g 4,731,0D0 

4,1^,985 fi.0».3O0 

4.&SI.2I5 5,101,460 

4,8»r«0t5 fi»S3ft«fi00 

A.Ma^flas fi,Bfl7,ioa 

5.e».ll3 0,313.900 

£.Bi0,lSS fl,flSll,500 

6,105,729 7,303Jii6 

6,428,104 7,70O,7tt5 

a.Taa.eiM 8,2ri,iw>5 
7,om,m s,6«&jo5 
7.3io,Aa3 s^taa.ot^ 

7,fll(»,71S «,1W.S85 
li.004.357 9.5t9,«5 
N, 273,30s 9,851.835 

8,5^,asaiojn,4S3 

a,i27,35310.a85,R35 
0,OJ«.^S311,O^,OS5 
0,215.81911,447,835 
0,eia, 752 11,750,235 
9,980.93312.053,^35 
tO,|(8«,703L2,SS6.l85 



m,500 
l.OM.SOO 

.Toa 



3,£l»,7Q<» 44 



2. ma. 400 
s.3«>,aoo 



$,mi,rT& ri.aio 



t.soa 

S3;9CM} 

r,odo 



4U,40O 
f«,>00 



Mi.010 
»7,im 

»4,0JO 

»4«oia 

99,510 



3,0SO,120 1 1, 977, &9T 12, 924, 98^1 



300, 0C» 



13,112,«6112,SG3.985 
1?,W5.4S213,0W.58S 
]3,97l,0e7ll.234,Sffil 
14, 83A, 1:^13,434,900 
15, 788,43113. 7fU,3S0 
10,684,570 13. STff.. 180 
17.007,65214,141,790 
18,004,210 14, 554, fSWt 
19, 730, 97514,9150/260 
31, 155, 059 15,2*13, Oft) 
32474,71)0 IS. 4^, &m 
^.553. 095(15. 63S. 260 
24,095. »«1 15,989.800 
20,322, 150 lit, 905. 8IS0 
27.765,73113,444.500 
20,215, 303 Itl, 4^7, 440 
aa, 270,24710. Ofl0,34f> 
3l,aS0. 162 17.119, 4«0 
33,389.807 17,^l,ftS0 
S3, 410, 2C}9 18,163,080 
M, 230* 121 lg,372,78<l 
$4.960,408 18,717,185 



35,250,404 



300,000 



18.917,185 



4,»4,775 
4,«4S,t75: 
4.93a,S7« 
5,111,171 
5,017(1,(^75 
i,llS,775 
ft, 5311,474 
6,J«J7j:!M01,nO 
7,J&4,M75l£W,OlO 
7,019,075 »^^,f)10 
7.915,775,109.610 
Jt,laltl.il75t 13,010 
H.452, 975 114,010 
8,723,275 tl«,[ 10 
9,06g,gr75!( 10,310 
9,331,575117,310 
9.405. «73|im. 410 
9,042,973 lt0,5ld 
9,904,175 lt0,5LO 
10,297,475,128,1^ 
10,5«3,075'13L09I1 
10,847,27^^1134,903 
11,tMil,375 Ml, 693 
11,353.875 tM\.m 
875.775 ifilJ. 1 13 
12,330,475 104,413 
13,147,375 a»i.8ia 
13^404,975,230.713 
]S.7§a,«75ai«,2t3 
13.085.J75l243,9l3 
14,309,S75:34e,4l3 
14,7^^9,275:253,813 
15,179,n5i201,513 
15,520,575^378,013 
15,970,275 280,813 
1*5,439.I7S;32(>,U3 
10,046,076 351,253 
I7,41«, 075.3,18, 053 
17,7l4,475;S82,4ft3 
17,830,076 38.*, 703 
18,070,575 !422, 003 
18,525,375 439,«03 
18,833,075 463.503 
I9,2(J2,g5S;495.463|t 

aoo.oco! 



t5,0M> 
€0,aQO 
110,200 

i50,ao& 

l«[,ai> 

270,400 

a»4.a)o 

305, SD 
307,200 
332, MH 
I7«,000 
377,000 
417,000 
443,200 
462,400 
481,000 

555,000 

sss.sm 

503.000 

504. «no 

572. «X> 
575,000 
5S2,300 

5a3,»n 

M7.000 
6^,000 
5»9.0Q0 
004,000; 

eofi.ino; 

W7.8WI: 
61^,000 
614,^1 
627,000 
03*, 200 
057,800 
070,000 
flgift.flOO 
730,300 
749.000i 
782,1*0 
848,840 
909.770 
097,770 
053,7701 
103.370 
160.570 
300,970 
35t.770 
317,370 
378,570 
463,170 



,1: 



10,«}2,855 495,463 1,4^,170 



i5,eio 

41,730 

9t.&30 
119 
I«3,7i0 

171,759 
301,490 
237.400 
250.400 
3«0.2J<0 

3m,5.iu 

330,771* 
341, 73A 
359,040 
3901,430 
111,710 
431,8701 
4^,090 
47«,li0 
306,820 
f4|,3iO 
5M,330 
610,180 
038,440 
d*i9,230 
7fJ8,770 
740,93X1 
77D,4fO 
i0t,550 
835,530 
«73,ntJ 
930,S7ft 
M2,7ao 
990,540 
,071,330 
,16*2,070 
,158.320 
.30^.000 
,343,500 
,3{I8,4B0; 
,B4ii,730 
.4Q2J40| 
p 452. 300 
>504,5eO 
,550.05(5 
,692,570 
.037.880 
,061.540 
700,040 
743,260 
,770,820 
.808,440 



1,806,440 



io^tii ti^om 

^ 13,(^4 m,m 

u.oiti ir.tn; 

i7,m]it,' 



30 

37 
n 

27 
*7 

u 
43 

1^! 



m 



it 
n 
im 

117' 

'^ 

110 
141 
15f» 
1^1 
190 
301 
109 
217 

m 

341 

251 
3fil 
2S8 

tm 

3Q8 
321 
S3g 
355 
379 
405 

in 

447 

4«3 
481 

406 



10,151 Ifij 
2l,«tt)lf&,Q$0j 



>.tl0 

lt,tlS 
IT.7U 

a,sf 



»,483IX7j 

37,734 i». , 

30.035 iM^ttO 

S2,4tl 3S9,«U 

33,742 274 

30.101 294, eW. 

37,l7rSU,10l 

>«,S1S 120,Qif 

40.ftl3l39.iSr 

._ 42,M0M<I,473 1II,7M 
5«| 42. «B« 131,671 " — 

41,130 ast.iM 

41,043 301^710 
44.$^30i^4St 
44,*72'j72.30» 
44,998 174,iil 
45.398 379,304 
45,S7ji Mt.iSS 
47,890 »»,2«9 
a,«d9 280,490 
50,140 JM,^5 
51.250100,117 
51.335 

51,724 390,3T4 
51,753 4D1, 541 
51,8^ 403, 102^^1 U,nS 
53,141 404 ,««K12i,IOi 
^,8$5 406.M6 127.44$ 
A3.4M 406,3S3 lauOSl 
52,4£l «09,947fiaa^7ti 



i0.i|£ 

i3,a4» 



12,1 

n.«o 

85,SI« 



ti,oici 

ioo,«» 
idi««e 

Liiff 



490, 



52,89S 413.067 
53, Ml 4lO,6Q0i 
54.«M4S3,060 
50,354 432.0M 
sa,5M445^f« 

eo.»a4«4,3n 

04,074 4»ft,ilf 
0«,40l 510, tm 163,705 
73,035 531,4871 16«, 500 
75,401 553,4071 168,0^ 
77,250 5S0, 341 i 172,500 
70,441 032,-543 ; 176,790 
80, 440; 009, 506 rn,99fi 
81,Q«3 0ft4,724 121*210 




31,M3 



m,iu 



m,9m 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CTFT OF 8T. LOCTIS. 



99 



RECBIPTB OP LEADING ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OP EACH 
WEEK POR THE YEAR 1915-Concluded. 



Haj, 

toni. 
Tbro 



pigs. 



HOG PRODUOTS. 



lbs. 



Lard, 
lbs. 



Wool, 

lbs. 



Calile, 
bead. 



bead. 



Hogs, 
bead. 






Flti 



Zinc 

and 

Speltert 



3,0A5 



13«0Ofi 
IflJftS 

2S,fWQ 

n,m 

S3 SIO 

SIJ6D 
S6.306 

»7,*70 

40,730 
41,530 

4^,€eo 

44. m 
4T.32i 
4S,«S0 
50,006 

fti,0IO 
5S*5^ 

&7,^Sj3 
62, 70S 3 

w.eia- 
ce,2iol3 
9&,m 



44,730 
§7,370 
I5&,e70 
810. 7«0 

m.iao 

395. 790 
460, 3dO 
533.560 

»i3.4ia 
T30J30 
804,^0 
«7i.B50 
«»^3I0 
,&l4,0fi0 
,063,0fiO 
139. 4S0 
.307.700 
^fl.070 
IdO.TTO 
4M.6^ 
538^471) 
A40.870 
,74l,3a0 
.8P5.8T0 
923,660 
e&S,3O0 
Ofi3,gO0 

a37,9«0 

,3S5,ffTO 
,104 J70 

.72i,e» 

,S0IJ10 
.854,290 

.820, na^ 

015, aOO 
0S7.i6O 
tSA.5flO 
211, S30 
39IS,230 

,43ft, 770| 
,514,060 

737,310 



is,9mMi*tm 



1,871, 

3.0S1, 

4.425, 

5,S56, 

7.103, 

8.391, 

lO.Ufl 

n,0S2 

13.333, 

lAa^l, 

17,8SI, 

18.830. 

19.(^ 

21,^53, 

22,S3€, 

23,7B1, 

£6,417, 

20,630, 

2a.oa7, 

30,033, 
ai,47l>, 
33,040, 
34,471, 
30.3«@, 
37,MS, 
39J11, 
41 .450, 
*3,570, 
4.^,0137, 
40.722, 
48,fiM, 
51. 165 
52,615, 
53.55f^, 
55,190, 
5a.fiS3, 
5H,5fll, 
fi0,733, 
02,3-50, 
64,107, 
i^,5Q0, 

70.632, 
71,617, 
72.971, 
74,321, 
75,331, 
7e.fi03, 
7a.301, 
&0,02e, 
80,723, 
81. 698 , 



90O 
100 
200 
200 
100 
600 

.Gm 

060 

7m 

&60 

,o&n 

.360 
,350 
560 

mi 

560 

oeo 
wto 

«fl0 
060 
flOO 
260 
460 
460 
£60 
360 

seo 

460 
560 
J60 
060 
160 

2m 

30O__ 

smu 

150 IS 
500 16 
OflO 17 
360 a 8 
760 20 
26021 
7«022 
160 23 
760-^ 
300^4 
OfiG!24 

nmm 

46o!26 
960] 25 
S60 26 



57,500 

101.200 

158, lOO 

254,100 

374,100^ 

013,500 

813,500 
,324,0OU 
,355.700 
,M5,60C) 
,269, SOO 
,7B2,CKK5 
,J08.700 
,672,700 
,S60,10ti 
,019,600 
,4BQ,O0O 
,780,800 
,003,000 
,166,700 
,681,400 
,l7iJ,4€0 
,237,400 
,732. &00' 
,569,400 
,990,200 
,972.400 

211. mi 

7fl7,f^l 

,ia'j.7oci 

,711,700 
,433,300 
,123,900 
.731,200 

,mj7,800 

,112,800 
,7lH, 100 24 
.570, 100 '24 

,§54.9(X>i24 



gl,AgS,860 



25.039.300 



S65,90(J 

058.200 
496,100 
£87.5ti0 2$ 
§20,300"' 
240,800 

oim,ioo 

261.000 
565,600. 
035,500 
410,600 
677,100 
(39,300 



30 



29.300 
73.tiO0 
91,900 
1U2.50W 
1&T,000 
174,600 
188,500 
199,100 
S^JOO 
a2ft,7O0 
229.300 
249,50ri 
249,500 
,873,ft00 
,874,200 
,066,940 
,070,440 
.405,740 
,103,740 
,329,440 
,790,640 
,537,240 
,SOfi,7-»0 
,304,040 
.585,840 
,561,740 
,720,040 
,461.^0 
,245.24fl 
,788,140 
.011,640 
,620,340 
,930,340 
,722,B40 
.055,S40 
,521,340 
,*)3,020 
,744,820 
,^^6,020 
,950,220 
,0U,120 
.049.500 
,007,000 
,301.600 
.611,600 
,S41,000 
,M8,S20 
,849,620 
,0»l,fl20 
,128,120 
,353,720 1 
,743,520 1 
,914,120 1 



17,SS4| 

«iD,934| 
79.620! 
96.3541 
130,417 
]3S,60« 
H7,80l 
IJi4.336 
166,897 
183,103 

m,no 

209,388 
219,411 
232,235 
24S,7S2 
253,850 
263,513 
275.67a 
288,475 
302.388 
315,690 
330,586 
344,681 
359.239 
375,269 
389.Sfi7 
409,150 
427,005 
441,535 
461,015 
457,047 
508,^93 
533,730 
553,412 
5M,2i04 
512,714 
fl43,107 

098,178 
7^,945 
776, 062 1 
7fifi,g&8 
a2$,6lfi 
854,532 
882,260 
007,366 
928,308 
958,517 
985,032 
013,857 
030, 133 
045,600 



30.014,120 1,045,600 



7.072 
17,640 
23,995 
45,109 
50,103 

eo,fl5c 

77,535 
S7.32S 
95,237 
109.303 
112,545 
127,755 
137,410 
U5,m 
157.304 
164,600 
m.587 
185,451 
185.317 

220,001 
237,915 
253,844 
273,301 
296,540 
300,034 
328,716 
344,152 
3^3 J78 
371,998 
3S5.37t> 
407,920 
428,745 
441,475 
449,75!!i 
468,575 
4«a,55« 
498, 7B2 
515,858 
526,400 
542,700 
655, S2B 
5#9,flH 
579,376 
591,423 
010,570 
622,797 
631,043 
649,255 
054,051 
075,357 
682,555 
590,180 



45,270 

128.082 

1S4,879 

232,349 

2iri,«47 

407.472 

4iJ7,14S 

57S,OS3 

620,801 

709,053 

771, 7« I 

852,462 

916,012 

972,368 
1.043,363 
IJO'2.384 
1,152,531 
1,301,923 
1,253,381 
1.308,O4& 
1,364,034 
1,417,396 
1,473,148 
1,526,548 
l,57O,0(»2 
1,017, IBS, . 
1, 554,1421183,805 
1,687,215 tttt,90S 
I, 729, 8fl0 205,245 



5,015 
11.717 
15«832 
22,832 
32,«S7 
45,936 
54,380 
62,S4S 
72,960 
80,397 
88,547 
97,077 
1)M,634 
109. 171 
115,858 
122,228 
139,420 
m,5flO 
141,514 
!48,209 
155.810 
161.833 
lt3£,239 
175.712 
180,322 
85,285 



1,772,855 
1,811,511 
L,S49,013 
1,881,835 
1,924,^10 
,6tt2,1153 
2,003.122 
2,041,044 
2,082,431 
2,120,429 
2,1M,379 
2,214.109 
2,270,633 
2,330,522 
2.370,355 
2,435,889 
2,507,714 
2.555,883 
2,616,339 
2,586,196 
2,775,001 
2,850,334 ,„„,- 
2,932,165 317,318 
2,985, 144 |32!. 450 



311.015 
214,360 
218, UO 
223,33a 
227,829 
232,080; 
235,615 
230,295 
244,270, 
247,183 
251,403 
258.120 
254,179 
271,720 
280,413 
287,550 
391,894 
295,117 
298,298 
303,334 
306,. '>68 
312,542 



090,180 2,985,144 321,450 



620 
620 



620 
620 
620 
620 
630 
620 
630 
620 
020 
620 
630 
6^ 



74,4«5 

163,495 
232,995 
305,715 
375,985 
418,445 
488,715 
590, 0S5 
567,325 
m,155 
865,445 
928,115 

es8,s5a 

ia38,7SS 
1,103.606 
1,254,435 
1,333,575 
1,428,01S 
1,493,715 
1,565,625 
1,620.485 
1.712.535 
1,770.985 
1,877,705 
1,958.805 
2,050,325 
2,127,515 
2,186,320 
2.251,520 
2,330.105 
2,415,215 
2,504,205 
2,583.175 
2,080,9^ 
2. £21, HO 
2,925,500 
3.035,830 
3.143,830 
3,2S7,580 
3,385.010 
3,495,370 
3,594.000 
3,714,910 
3,838,020 
3.921,630 
4,008,460 
4,096,480 
4,242.400 
4,358,700 
4,450,330 
4,517,720 
4,581,085 






6^ 14,581,085 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



100 



TRAD! AND COMMSBCB OF 



SHIPMENTS OP LEADING ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF EACH 
WEEK FOB THE TEAR 1015. 



Wl 


nao 


bbto. 


l^nmh. 


Oom» 

biuh. 


Oftto, 

bPAh. 






Ormn. 


bbl& 


MH. 


Ejrc 


gftcks. 


P-. 


mm. 


JftO. 


2__. 


fi.Qon 


51,440 


»9,4«0 


46.410 


7..500 




2.070 


I 




t,4ii 




ft..™. 


131,740 


on. 400 


Si3,3&0' 


161, &aO 


20,340 


8.M1 


34,630 


1 


sao 


iS'S 




ifi _. 


^,^ 


1,33a. .'500 


707, (SO 


6ty^,070 


30,790 


13,000 


40,640 


J 


470 


ss 




23_...-. 


an;iao 


a,0fi0«41N) 


1.071 .930 


966.M0 


44.S90 


18,330, 


06,930 


4 


:w 


S'S 




30 


m.m 


1,4fla,2fiO 


1,360. MO 


I,M2«440 


U,730 


20.5att 


MS,Tm 


J 


Loa 


2"!!? 


Feb. 


fl._ 


567.090 


2.77fl.720 


l,&54.600 


t,3t3.tiO 


&*,aio 


21.A»» 


107,690 





liise 


iS-S! 




13 


mi ,m) 


3,3S5.W0 


1,S^,930 


1 ,679,2110 


eo.iro 


sft.Tao 


iM,9m 


!! 


}*!!! 


iS.*S 




20.^.. 


782,740 


4.1(29,440 


2.249.140 


t.94«.«90 


6T.2W 


Sa«740 
M.OOO 


146,«l 


10 


1.130 


lat^Mfr 




27 


»7S,610 


4,45^,4^ 


2,&1US§0 


a,l£6.ft50 


m.m 


I4«,000 


30 


i.SiO 


IH'S 


Mareu 6...... 


971.330 


4,i7!!,710 


2,S«»,2P(» 


3.474,000 


7»,380 


35,100 


I56.S0Q 


m 


I.SIO 


iJt-2! 




1 3, .-...- 


IMl.mQ 


6,534.300 


3.161.9iO 


3,K1»,0W 


73,160 


a5.300 


204,100 


fi 


l,3tO 


w.»i 




20 


1,133.1)10 


6,075.900 


a,41«,4S0 


3.040.630 


73,160 


2s,tm 


326,6m 


31 


3,310 


S0§p^^ 




27.._, 


1,306,780 


e.47J».ltO 


3.ffl3.»80 


3,m,««o 


74,710 


43,360 


345.409 


ti 


2.600 


2S»SS 


April 


3 


l,2QS.3ai) 


0.743,310 


3.7tSfl,750 


3.536,130 


76.740 


47,470 


sse.iio 


tt 


2.410 


H!-HI 




IC...... 


1.3M,«60 


T.im.OW) 


4.047. liKJ 


3.916,030 


75,740 


61.240 


379,0tO 


fi 


%,*m 


iE*S 




17.^,. 


1,424.620 


7,m^72Q 


4.302.450 


4.266.91») 


74.S70 


66,010 


204,650 


21 


3.160 


«*SI 




24....... 


1.4d7.»3ll 


7.tHl.2mi 


4,5(^,000 


l.037,^T 


S^,S90 


6i,6lO 


1^.430: 


SI 


3,910 


^*»?g* 


May 


!.._. 


l,591.)!efl 


7,fi2l.fMVi 


4,11^7.010 


5,iai.WSfl 


?<5,0tt") 


01.400 


342,490 


21 


4.190 


25'H! 




8..... 


1.0S0.400 


7.8»l.(W» 


8.SM,OftO 


1 5, WW. mi 


K5,[M1 


71.730 


344. MO 


23 


4,0» 


S-S 




15.,,.... 


;l.74e,7*WS 


8,M4,570 


6,439. S3Q 


6,9l7,0f» 


^^.090 


76.SflO 


3X7,510 


2 


4.130 


S-!S 




22.__, 


l,8ia,rt.3n 


i!t,^4iJ,2JWI 


5, 037, HO 


%,m,m 


84,090 


a4,B60 


407,300 


23 


6.080 


3M.m 




2U..„.., 


Ui*«*ft,(Viti 


9,ii7f^JAU 


.'i,sm*,<i;io 


4,646, »«) 


J*6,W0 


m,mi 


427,160 


23 


7,190 


341 tie* 


June 


6 


M?07,45tJ 


9,421,*m^ 


fl,0*fV,!S.¥l 


«.750.fl<W 


W.OBO 


m,fi3Si 


446.370 


23 


s.tao 


iS'SSi 




12. 


3,0^4,^9 


9,541,420 


4,21^.140 


4,966.990 


M6,090 


l«,630 


4lt3,2lO 


U 


9,030 


333^344 




Ifl. _ 


a,U7.370 


S»,*i33,3K0 


fi.57l,4TO 


7,137*650 


a6,090 


90J70 


179,390 


« 


9.150 


I5ft,a0i 




2fl_„. 


9,^7,34(1 


0,7!tT.S9a 


7.271,0(70 


R7,040 


»t,9^ 


im.ssa 


36 


111.130 


301. i«r 


J11I7 


S.. 


:r. 2^,160 


iw. I IS, 540 


6,»fte,6io 


7,3Sl.eW 


S7,W» 


01,170 


Ml. 160 


1 30 


U.260 


is^ss 




10.,... 


2,32^,540 


10,399,190 


7,216,080 


7.408,270 


§7,040 


H.420 


6a,4?0 


M 


12,490 


IS'S 




17....... 


3.380,501 


10,526,1^0 


7.ajti,a6o 


7,79l,3rTO 


s7,oea 


104,0?0 


s«i.iao 


io 


14, 0« 


STl.Tf* 




24.. 


2,444,560 


UJ,M7J70 


7,553,910 


9,002,100 


S&,Q^ 


100,070 


373.400 


if 


14.100 


I7««ai 




3I.,.„.. 


a.505.0«0 


11.607.700 


7.709 „WJ 


9,157,930 


m,my 


107.790 


603,411^ 


40 


17, 040 


3^.701 


Am- 


7_.. 


2,S71,(UCl 


12,222,040 


7,910.910 


S. 266. 480 


»9.130 


110, ISO 


^,490 


41 


17,«?0 


!2'5!l 




14 ..... 


2,6*7,400 


ia,T40.B40 


a, 001, 310 


8,374,a66 


00,060 


110, 180 


671. 6tf) 


44 


17,ft40 


Sf'SS 




21 .. . 


2jm,m\ 


13,406.2*50 


8,138,500 


a,5S7,3ao 


m,miQ 


MOjai* 


711,990 


44 


17, HO 


M1««S0 




3M..„ 


g.83«,S70 


14. 15)^1. 4JS0 


S.302.770 


8,aa7.«»o 


112,330 


112,420 


737,490 


46 


18. fW 


SM.ni 


Sopt. 


4 


2,041,4410 


14.777,0SO 


8,318,130 


9,229,900 


122. ISO 


112.430 


m,m 


4^4 


li.vao 


55*S 




11.. 


4,UH.eoo 


l.'l.i0fl.410 


S,4S7.lHf 


9,019,000 


127,770 


lia,670 


i£2,4») 


44 


H'SS 


SS:^ 




18..., 


3,lii9,12tJ 


J6.lft,^.K(10 


»,5H2.730 


9.927,30Ct 


146.A0O 


124.6^0 


840,370 


44 


22,390 




25. 


tS.Jt^fi.aao 


lO.StW.Qin 


$.727.Zm 


10.t»9,ft70 


167,710 


131,490 


947,990 


44 


^.740 


JS-2S 


Ocl. 


2...,., 


3,Mfl,S»[ 


J7,713,04(^ 


H. 025. 310 


I0,35a,12<i 


101,8.10 


1.^9.020 


1.0116,770 


44 


22.901) 


*fm,mi 




10..., 


i,4S6,6ao 


13,523. fiflO 


9.1H4,5(KI 


10, 030. 6Aa 11^,090 


139, (^ 


1.018.630 


44 


2t,itm 


iiumm 




111..... 


3.5^ ,2.V 


19,276,f]9n 


9,3tK!l,150 


10,S97.5lo'l72,lflO 


143.750 


1,106.400 


47 


a. 140 


4ii,iwt 




2^..._ 


3,7lO,*20 


iO, isa.3i*(> 


9.3tt.^,06O 


11,219,440 1177.340 


141.77ft 


1,170,060 


48 


^.410 


434.10S 




ao ,. 


3,&17^;*4< 


21.011,200 


9.34^,1110 


H,4,W,d00 1«.^,810 


157,900 


1.2^,770 


4X 


13.^0 


HI**"' 


Nov. 


fl.,.,., 


3.937,571 


,^I,9tK>.«K) 


9,43J$,a5C» 


11, 7-10, 700 210.220 


176,^30 


i,27i.S5i:( 


4S 


HJ70 


si'Sf 




13... 


4.(Hti,l9C 


23,083,230 


9,314,g^l 


ia,o8o,no 2X3,100 


179.141} 


1.337.510 


40 


S"2! 


wKiii 




20 .„. 


4.m.25( 


34.009.440 


9.5«9.fl70 


12,500,390 266. 450 


1S0.300 


1.374.710 


4S 


t3.SI0 


SMS 




27. 


4,278,500 


24,733,510 


9,541,^10 


12,702,500 2iO,070 


180,300 


1,402.660 


4$ 


16,010 


!S-IS 


Dec 


4. 


4,432,020 


25,413,610 


9,677.440 


12,9.^7,110 m,o«o 


182, sao 


1,432,390 


43 


27.090 


S-SH 




11 „ 


4.5fi2,0^ 


26,132,800 


9,721,75(i 


13,115,5^ 3Sfl,9fiO 


106,560 


1,444.990 


44 


37. SOD 


musm 




18._ 


4,703J4<; 


20.97fl.l30 


9.763.760 


13.290,570 1343,^30 


187,«T0 


1.434.h70 


4g 


17,340 


iS*fS 




24...., 


4,gOO,8D0 


27,4^,010 


9,840,930 


13,.U5.810 


3fi2,g30 


191,000 


1,603,000 


44 


»,O00 


Ml.4i9 




31 

tal 


i,mA^ 


2^.179,370 


9,Wt.330 


13,702,300 


3S5,lfiO 


196.310 


1.633.760 


44 


30.480 


m^,n^ 


To 


4,W5.41W 


28,179,270 


9,»2t,320 


1 13. 703, 300 


335.140 


196,310 


t.633J60 


4S 


^.4S0 


iaa.»i 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB GITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



101 



SHIPMENTS OP LEADING ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF EACH 
WEEK FOR THE YEAR 1915— Concluded. 



Hay, 

totis. 



Lead, 
pigs. 



HOG PRODCrCTe. 



Ha mi. 



Meats, 



Lard, 

lbs. 



Wool, 
lbs. 






Hogs, 



Ior«M 

Hi 



Zlno 
and 

Spelter, 
Hlab6, 



1,W 
7,4S5 

|8,m 



m,4m 

M.S25 

lM,5ft5|l 

IOg,32A|t 

ne.4ioji 

121, Hall 

128,2302, 
1^.540 2. 



5,700 

t3d.340 
177, S20 
HO, 300 
257,260 

aeejoo 

S4«JW 
4S7,440 

4a7,5ao 

fi2£,740 
fiai,2D0 

Ba,5ao 

063p2&0 
fi87,9SO 
727.M0 
7&7.2<KJ 
7S5,mO 
145,630 

iM,440 
,<Wi.420 
.009.^0 
l|i4,230 
1D«,700 
237*fl70 
285.fV«0 
337,gl0 
386,040 
42^630 
442,240 
.503*6r^ 
543,870 

044,710 

73^,960 

sog,aio 
a£o,S3o 

,945,190 
,9W,0SO 

,tJ35.iKiO 

,131,300 
,175.310 
,218,240 
253.690 
2S3,S30 



15 

713, 
1.02B 
U302 
1,538 
2,171 
2.5B7, 
2,!»35, 
t,0fi7, 
3,309, 
3,590, 
4J0O, 
4,2§0, 

4,7B0, 
5,241, 
S,550, 
B.7&0. 
6.263, 

713:4! 

7,742, 
8,167 

Mjm 

0,21ft 
ftAM 
9,737 
lO.OlS 
10,1S7 

to.sei 

lO.fiSO 

10,700 

I2.32ti 

i2.7CrtJ 
13,162 
13,550 
14,015 
14,304 
14,659 
14,SS6 
15,086 
15,2fift 
15.GS3 
l.i.fifrt 
16,074 
;lfl.3§0 



000 
300 
500 
300 
400 
500 
iOO 
000 
,400 
500 
600 
7O0 
3O0 
200 
900 
900 
500 
400 
800 

mi 

fHlrl. 

IKjO 

ioo 

POO 
,200 

,soo 

,100 
800 
.100 
^00 

.eoo 
,mi 

,?«0 

.L>IHI 

.1,1.1 

,L'I.III 
,200,: 

,fW' 

„™ 

,4* JO 
,lOfi 
,00(1 
,800 

200 
t50Q 

300 
,600 

300 

ooo 

4Q0 



543,500 
4,560,500 
8,946,900 
13,290,000 
17,770,300 
S3,20S,9Q0 
36,309,700 
31,571,400 
36,521,000 
41,858,200 
47,t2O,SO0 
52,392,400 
57.724,400 
62,107.300 
68,247,800 



73,703,500 33 
7§,122,SD0'" 
14,581.300 
90.0S3.I^ 
95.777.500 
liil.233,4fiO 
] "7,716,700 

iu,os9.&ck;> 

118,412,000 
m. 512, 000 
130,058.800 
138,714,000 
143,087.500 
l5O.HB,2O0 
159,907, (XIO 
162,494,800 
157,995,100 
174,754,000 
181,830,700 
ISS.OSiJOD 
r.*4.:i'l7.0o0' 
■:ii|..4:M,flOO 
L'|^^,i*^ll,70t> 
217,025,105 
2iS,062.10O 
232,763,400 
240.535.S0O 
247,397,000 
25,t.439.flOO 
250,557.500 
285,675,600 
271,812,000 
37fi,7;{: 



34, 
30, 
38, 
4i\ 
41, 
43, 
45, 
47, 
49, 
51, 
63, 
55, 
56. 
S«, 
80, 

m, 

63 
tl5, 

m 

67 
68 
70 
71 
72 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
70 
81 

2SK':4.-,HHi.M 
287.LNi4,rMHi ^*i 
2e£.CIfi,400 
200,319,100 
29Q,459.]00 



130.715 2.283. B30 ie,3BB,4nO 299.459,100 92,744,100 25,968,200 



74,900 
089,800 
503.500 
809,40r» 
370,200 
555,500 
5B«,20O 
212,800 
864,600 
300,600 
430. 3D0 
834,900 
739,700 
008,000 
ai9,900 
17ft,40tJ 
KM, 000 
280,400 
626,200 
043.2t»0 
733,700 
708,400 
308,400 
534.100 
601,300 
642.300 
4»5,000 
399.700 
816,100 
SOl.ftOO 

144, aw 

W3.800 
384,200 
0ft4,3O0 

,366,100 

.530,300 

,857,100 

,3ft5,8O0 

,406,900 

,728.500 

,083,000 

,532,000, 

,362.900 
3S8.100 
546,600 
59.-1.000 

,255,700 
(KU?,500 
riO2.4O0 
4ii2,400 __ 
164.000 34 
712,200 
744,100 



212,500 
726.900 
5S5.5I0O 
S17,fH]0 
.532.800 
826,000 
176,000 
302.000 
500,600 
578.COCJ 
654,000 
7S2,SO0 
790,600 
098,400 
,250,000 
,405,200 
,635,000 
,228.500 
,184. goo 
,536,900 
,640.400 
,449.1G0 
, Mi. 300 
,488.900 
,987,000 
,O24i,70O 
,700.800 
,C66.500 
,734,300 
,410,200 
,SO7.8O0 
,2*5, 4(X! 
,713,000 
,385,500 
,687.700 
,559,700 
,670,300 
,(^,500 
,257.200 
,640,200 
,942,900' 
.123,100 
,239, SCO 
519.3^J0 
060,700 
30^.aX) 
715,000 
875.600 
.150.000 
.ai7,T00 
,202.400 
,707,800 
.068,200 



487 
4,670 
8.070 
11,250 
15,470 
UAOR 
27,371 
2H,624 
29.444 
31,422 
36.632 
30,174 
41 ,6711 
43,282 
46,743 
40,620 
51,877 
53,574 
66,372; 
59,380! 
63,078 
86.432 
70.749 
75. .50*1 
80,374 
84,720 
88.080 

60.335 
105. 150 
111,431 
119.839 
129,787 
140,017 
14g,174 
1GI.191 
m.725 
135,033 
194,838 
205,314 
210,478 
230,431 
240,922 
250.928 
237,381 
265,231 
270, Hao 
276.502 
280,007 
287.509 
202,789 
298.188 
208,873 



269 
519 

519 
772 
1.: 
l.SOS 
2,263 
3.0&3 
7,40i 
»,609 
9,511 
12,014 
13,274 
13,604 
15,155 
16, m 
18,901 
18,170 
30,126 
20,521 
20,903 
21,300 
21.733 
22,0S7 
22.760 
23,542 

34,teo 

26.207 
28.587 
31 ,ai6 
33.H10 
36.244 
39,15S 
49,219 
52,76,-1 
62.^}6» 
61,877 
74,016 
76,Pa6 
83,500 
86,53^1 
81,573 
g9.9S2 
9tl,fl3B 
91.896 
93,3S(1 
94,626 
95,928 
96,725 
97,108 



3,742 
30,807 
50,912 
78.404 
109,722 
149,126 
l«4,i57 
197. 27S 
208,354 
233. e«4 
285,834 
300,321 



1,197 
7,0*1 
I0.8i9 
18,421 
27,312| 
37,527 
48.234 
53,462 
^.465 
71,723 
78,738 
S7,00a 



344.452> 94.737 
379.2711 90,302 
423. I7?t 107,800 
455, 826 113, 744 



478.411 
407,323 
518.062 
541,336 
558,245 
569,50* 
582.144 
501,068 
605,493 
613,510 
622,440 
630.535 
642,078 



121.508] 1 
128.8891 1, 
133.60211. 
140,30211 
148.433' 1 
153,366: 1 
158,458; 1 
163,B43'1 
lT0,6iHl|l 



177, MO 
1S5,3I7 
190,354 

191, sga 



653,ll3l2O0,3.5.'^l2, 
6E^, 253:206, 249; 2, 



676,131 ill ,941 
683, IM, 215, 902 
flg3.4«l 1220,442 
703,9501224,981 
715.440:^3,188 
727,683 330,48! 
736, 834! 233. 967 
75l,506|237,4iW 
771,3081241 ,312 
780.S47 347.651 
eOH, 261 253,144:3, 
819.732 2.58,006,3 



S36, 0461265. 974 
WIO. 501 '274. 187 
890.520 279,108 
915. 0661283. 010 
030,955 1285, 745 
6.-13, 151288,1© 
973,407ia02,2B6 
08S, OSS 205,706 
. 00(1.014 300,517 
.019, 247305,308 



208.673 



10,720 
91,900 
155,100 
222.800 
321,110 
372,150 
444,340 
538,270 
617,670 
€81.880 
768,^0 
844,030 
021,110 
069,350 
092,490 
.174,440 
.266,970 
.325,440 
.427.780 
.497,700 
.573,420 
,646,690 
.732,700 
,813,960 
.902,940 
.968,140 
, 061,850 
,167,570 
.228,200 
,200,110 
.369,300 
,448,000 
.535,270 
.631.660 
,704,100 
.837,050 
.945,030 
,iH9,760 
,141,730 
,364.570 
,382.040 
,5m.210 
.618,100 
,724,0(10 

,S2«.4ea 

,021,020 
,012,240 
,099,760 
,219.120 
,344,600 
,137.090 
,808,180 
.573.500 



07.108 1.019.247 305.309^4,6^.500 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



102 



TRAOB AND OOMMBBCB OT 



PUBLIC ELEVATORS, 1»16. 



Dbsiqhatioii. 



Capacity 

for 

Bulk Grain. 



Central B— The Illinois Oratai DeT. Co.. 

Exchanffe— Geo. Harsh & Co 

§5iJ,^5^}o.H.AibersOoinmissk>n Co.] ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;•;;;;;;;; 

M ississinpl Vallcgr—St. Loois Elerator &*Grain Co. . . 

BnrliBgtoii— Barlinnrton Grain A EleTator Co 

Bogers— Langenben; Bros. & Co 

Becorlty— Security W. H. A BleT. Co 

Western-Elmore-Schults Grain Co 

Total, Jan. 1st, 1916 

IVlw ■■■•••••■•■••••••••■•■•>••■ ■« •••••••••••••.■•• 

«• •• «« 1910 

«« •• M 1913,,,,,,,,. , , ,..*,*.*," *1'* " * 

- •' 1910 

.< .4 19Q9 

•• •• 1906 

" " 1907 

•• •* •• 1906 

M •. 19Q5 

" " 1904 

PRIVATE ELEVATORS, 1915 



600,000 bosh. 

m.coo 

900,000 •< 

600,000 « 

1,800,000 •* 

1,000,000 •■ 

000,000 

00,000 " 

40,000 •* 



4,030,000 borti. 

4,975,000 •* 

6,68ft,O0O ^ 

5,836,000 *• 

5,835,000 •* 

5,800,000 •* 
6,400,000 

6,900,000 •* 

6,900,000 ** 

8,600,000 «• 

6,600,000 - 

6,600,000 " 



QpnULTOR. 



Name. 



Bush. 



LOOATID. 



He»elMllUii(?Co ..,. 

m. Lottls Victoria P, M, Co 

Powi^ll ft 0*Rij»urkt^. 

Geo. R Plant Milling Co 

fC^lor rimir Mills Co 

Frsd. N. YouRff*. 

PurlfiaMlll Co 

AQuan, Bunr Jt Co.**.. 

B. W. Beck.*., ......„*, 

H. W, Beck & Hons 8e**d k Peed Co. 

C. B. Albei-8 Caen. Oa,» Operator.. 

K. & E, Neumond , 

Clark Bros., 

Kt*r»bet^ Bros. A Co , 

, Qulnlfvan & Bro 

hw Octmo MUIb Co, 

Tl>«? V*ill*y MiniiiirCo 

8clmlU A Nk^iin^k^r , 

Wm. J= l>*rji p lliT w! nf? Oo , 

Com Prod 11 iitis lif^fin I n n Co 

AntaeuRei^BuM'h Itrcnvlog Ass'n ... 

Bui^ka Mills Co 

Aiev. Bamh A. Co.. 

D. L Busline] I ib C<i, 

Altneoda Mrilliifi Co , 

Ho. Roller Mini Co 

E. W. Rllker.... , 

l>trl^ Mill* Co 

John C, Roev«p..... 

Saxony MlUlogOo 

VallOT & Spiisii M HUtis Co 

Qolden Grain MmidgCo. 

Purina Mil H Co.. , 

Alfocorn MlUli^g Co 

E«rf kft MU Is Co .„*,.. 

Comm on w ea 1 tli Feef? M Ills 

F. B. Chamberlain Co. 

C. E. Prunty ..*-* 

Tbeiss Bros, Feed Co. 



Heael 

Vlctorta . 
Brooklyn St. 

Plant's 

Kehlor..... 
Mound City. 
Purina...... 

Buss. 

Beck 

Beck 

Terminal ^ . . 
Goeke....... 

Clark 

Export 

QuInllTan ^^ 

Onrno 

Valley 

OnsitiClty.llh 
Lem p .... 
«rul6€tty,llL 
A.-B. B. A . 

Eureka 

Acme -^ 

Bushnell 

Allneeda. , 
Empire. . . . 

Bilker 

Dixie 

Roerer ..... 
Saxony.. ... 
Valler. 



iMirlty Wlm. 
Alfocom. . , 

Eureka 

0»BHrawMlth. 



fiO.tiOO East ^L UiUls. 111. 
360, nw Main aud Moqiid «ts. 

40^W^i Hrtwklyn aud Mftln sts. 
Uii.WQ Main sit. & CI)Oui«aa are. 
160, EiOOi East St.. Loul^. IlL 

M,0O0;iirancli and FlTtitsW, 
lOO.OOOiKltthth ^ Grailof sis. 

80,00017502 N. Bro»cJ*ay. 

40pOl)o|TwefiUtah and PlnestB. 

40,0006701 Maoehtsster are. 
100,000 I ktnTt-ralde, UK 

90,0001 Levee aiiii SWn^y St. 

t>ri.00O'E*4StSt Loul*. 111. 

4S.tMK) East St. LoyJs. HI. 

iD.OOajTliv^rc^a htc. and Papin St. 

10,OoolEa«t?l. Louii, Ili. 

10 .000 1 tax Desoto are. 

50,000 Grail lie City, 111- 
TSO.OOOiChi'roktc and I3tb sts. 
250,000:OriiJilrc City. UL 
<,ririO,CH»;South nii and lith sts. 

S'hono Tli€^rfsa ave. A Mo,Pae.tck 

40,000'Esi!Jt ^t. Loij1^» lU. 

2npO«i0 7l5l=!r>uth Main, 

lo,(KM> EiLfit St. Loals, tlU 

»n*CKJO Elliot St. Ltniis. 111. 

Iti/XiO'f Granite City, Ili 

25pCHlK}'Eftst St. Loiils. 11 L 

13, noo 5*501 Natural Bridge road. 
TOO. (WO Tlilrd and Iw^jmbard its. 
2fHi,D0C! Tf-rmlnftl, West Bolt By. 

50.000 East St. Loula. 111. 

!^,^m East 9t, Ivouts, 111. 

n.tWOiEaat St. Loula, III. 

lO.flOotTU 9. Theresa *ve- 

2.50n|Biirond and OeSota ave. 

2ffl,flO013i8 North Commercial. 

50,000 S Poulh lx*vee, 

7,000 Kftsl St. Louis, IlL 



Total capacity U,k76>500 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB dTT or 0C LOUIB. 103 



BATES OF STOBAOS AND BULSS GOVBBNING HANDLING OP 

GBAIN ADOPTED BY ST. LOUIS PUBLIC BLEVATOBS 

TO APPLY DUBING 1916. 

Storage on Wheat, Corn, Oats, Bje and Barley, 1 cent per bnahel for 
lint ten days or part thereof, and ^^oil oent per bushel, for each sabse- 
qnent day or part thereof. 

Special bin, }i cent per bnshel additional. 

All grain must be inspected and graded in accordance with the roles 
of the Missoori or Illinois State Inspection Departments. 

Elevator reserve the right to refuse any grain which in its opinion is 
unmerchantable or in an onflt condition for storage, transfer or handling. 

Transfer charges, for the first five days or fraction thereof, }i cent 
per bushel ; for each soccecding five days or fraction thereof, 5^ to 3^ cent 
per bushel. 

When grain in sacks is unloaded from cars or boats a charge of }i cent 
per busbel will be made for dumping. 

Drying, from 1 to 5 cents per bushel according to condition of grain. 

For running grain a charge of }i oent per bushel will be made for 
each running, 



FEES FOB INSPECTING AND WEIGHING GBAIN, AND FOB 

MOISTUBE TESTS, ADOPTED BY THE MISSOUBI STATE 

INSPECTION DEPABTMENT. IN FOBCS 

JANUABY 1, 1916. 

Inspeotion of Grain. In 66 oents per oar. 

Inspection of Grain. Out 40 cents per oar. 

Inspeotion from Boat, Barge or Wagons 60 oents per 1,000 bushels. 

Inspeotion of Grain in Saoks One-half cent per saok. 

Moisture test per oar S6 cents. 

WEIGHING DEPABTMENT. 

Weighing In (Grain) 10 oents per oar 

Weighing Out fGrain) 86 oents per car. 

W^hing Saoks at Elevator no charge. 

Weighing, "Transfer" Cars 60 cents. 



FEES ADOPTED BY ILLINOIS STATE INSPECTION 
DEPABTMENT. IN FOBCE JANUABY 1, 1916. 

Inspection of Grain. In and Out 60 oents per oar load. 

Inspeotion of Grain, from Wagon. In and Out.. 10 oents per wagon load. 
Inspeotion of Grain, from Boats. In and Out One-half oent per bag. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



104 TBADB AND COMMSBCS OP 



FLOUR REVIEW. 



By Wm. O. Ellis. 



The year 1915 had its difficulties for the floor trade in St. Louis but 
the tabiilar statements elsewhere in this report of flour manufactured — 
received and shipped — show that the general result was a large gain in 
the volume of business. 

In every item a substantial increase appears — the product of city 
mills gained 99,384 barrels over 1914. 

Outside mills financed here manufactured 249,684 barrels exoeai 
over 1914. 

The receipts by commission merchants exceeded last year's by 437,440, 
making an aggregate increase of 786,508 barrels in the year's transactions. 

Export shipments for 1915 were 932,485 barrels against 906,881 for 
1914, an apparent increase of 25,604 barrels. But as we have frequently 
explained, a great deal of business ultimately destined for foreign ports 
is included in the reports for New York, Boston or other Atlantic or Gulf 
cities, and therefore, does not appear in the export shipments. It is 
well known among millers that the volume of foreign trade during 1915 
has exceeded anything known in the trade in previous years. 

An unprecedented succession of wet weather about the usual time 
of harvest in the winter wheat belt seriously threatened widespread 
injury to the crop but resulted, eventually in nothing more important 
than very vexatious delay of deliveries of new wheat which occasioned 
considerable trouble in the execution of contracts for July and August 
shipment but did not effect the general welfare of the trade due to the 
record-breaking crop of high quality. In the foreign trade the demand 
was often much larger than the capacity of the mills to supply. The 
hazards in this business were multiplied as the season advanced. Cable 
messages and mail confirmations were censored and frequently suppressed 
entirely. Bills of exchange against invoices would vary in value more 
than ten or fifteen cents per pound sterling between date of saiUng and 
actual shipment — ^freight contracts were nullified by the commandeering 
of the vessel by some government between western shipment and arrival 
at seaport — compelling the shipper to make a new freight engagement at 
perhaps fifty cents per barrel higher freight; the cost of war risk insurance 
fluctuated enormously from day to day and sometimes was unobtainable — 
and with all these hazards and uncertainties the miller was constantly 
urged to make a price one day for delivery of anywhere from twenty to 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OP BT. LOUIS. 105 

one hundred thousand sacks of flour two or three months later. Naturally 
the business greatly took the form of shipment against reimbursement 
by payment in New York only. However, with a large section of United 
Kingdom trade, sales have been made for payment by short time draft 
on buyers and the efforts of English and French bankers to stabilise the 
exchange market have at length made this form of reimbursement less 
risky than it was early in the year. 

Values for soft and hard wheat patents fluctuated during the year 
from $4.90 to $7.50 but this mere statement of the figures conveys no 
idea of the instability of prices, which varied almost from one moment 
to another with the changed aspect of war news. 

In the table of monthly stocks of flour on hand in St. Louis on the 
first of each month, the figures of 1915, in comparison with last year's, 
is shown very clearly the activity of the demand upon the manufacturing 
capacity of the mills. As a rule, every mill in the district was hard 
pressed throughout the season to keep pace with orders. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



106 



TBADB AND OOMMSBCB OV 



wumm HAvuvAcnnoD a it. loau ms 



ItftfJ.— ^. 


HaoMOfMin. 


5^5 


Barrels 

Mamtf. 

1916. 


BaiTtls 

ManQf. 

1914. 


IMS. ' 


Geo. P.PlantMllllnjrGo 


PltfriMlMr.AAl 
Kehlor Mills... 

Hesel Mills 

Sazoay 

Vallerft Spies.. 


3,00Qf 

800 
1,100 
1,600 


Ill ,940 
746.960 
110.860 
74.640 
816.678 


418,700 
800.000 
1U,411 
91,161 
148,716 


•0,811 


KehlorFlonr MlllsOo 


601.611 


Hezel Milling Oo 


Ul,806 


Saxony MlllCo 


77.411 


Yallerft Spies MlUlngCo 






Total 




8,100 


l.W8,888 


1,679,879 


1,086, W 









PLOUB MANUFAGTUEBD IN 1916 BY MILLS OUTSIDE OF THB GHT OF 8T. LOUIS 

BUT OWKBD, OB THB FBODUOT COMTBOLLBD BT MKMBBB8 

OF THB MBBCHAWT8' BXGHAHGB. 



OWRnL 


Name. 


Location. 


Capacity 

in bbls.per 

14 hours. 


Manufac- 
tured 1916. 


Bt&nsrd-Tllton Mining Oo.. 
Btau a. wd- Tl Itoii M ill Lng X3o. . 

Jno. l'\ Mt-yer* ^^onj 

Johrj V* M«j<5r A Suns 

John F. M*>yc r Ai Sens 

Hernial, Craft & Kj^offman 
Milllmf tio 


Alton City 

Empire. ••••.... 


Alton. Ul 

Dallas, Tez 

Springfield. Mo.. 
Springfield, Mo.. 
NashTille. 111... 

Mt.Carmel,IU.. 

Alton. Ill 

TerreHaute.Ind. 
Belleville, ni.... 
Washington. Mo. 

Marine, Ul 

St. Jacobs, m... 


1.600 

1,100 
800 

700 
1.100 

700 
800 
400 
600 
800 


618.711 
176,801 


Model 


66,966 


Queen OltT 

Camp Spring... 
President 

Sparks' MlU.... 
Sparks' Mill.... 

ImbeMlll 

Washington.... 

Marine^: 

St. Jacobs 


76 080 
47,979 

816.786 


gSparks MHlin^ Co 

tSpfirkiiMininpOo 

J. F. Irri!>a MlJlhiuMJo 

Ee gill a l' lo (1 f M 1 n - Oo 

Vttller ^k ff pK^s M i I U iig Oa . . 
Taller & Spies MUliag Co... 


600,977 
181,006 
160,687 
16,168 
116.168 
162,696 


Total 






11,900 


1,880,886 
1,140,»1 


Total 1914 






Total 1918 








1.176.119 











Digiti 



ized by Google 



TBI CTTT OF ST. LOVIB. 



107 



EEOBIPTS, MANUFACTURES AND SHIPMENTS OF FLOUR 
FOB FORTY TEARS. 



Year. 




Bbla, 


Bills. 


1 Tear» 


BblA. 


MatioAet. 3talpinttiit», 


19T9 


1,071,494 


l.UI^4 


^U^7« 


iBea 


l.MS.flOf 


i,iafl,9ei 


i,m^,mi 


i«n 


i.lfl7,9»S 


I,5l7.fl11 


%m,m 


I§87 


i,v^i9.<m 


i,oeo,9i« 


1 ^oii^eea 


iste 


lj€fl33« 


1.0T«,W» 


3,970,740 


18»^ 


l,a5S.0§B 


l,0M.S7a 


1,594,111 


W9 


\Mlf'm 


2,I4i,»49 


a,o4rt.os& 


itj^ 


1,514, aiA 


1,166,409 


2.027,MI 


iim 


1,703,874 


».a77ya45 


3,^ea,tm 


isoiJ 


l,l«9,O70 


1 , 349, 058 


2,515, 30e 


mi 


l,6m,U»i 


IJUA^ 


2.@0e.34A 


1901 


:i.l70,54§ 


1,50G,2^4 


/,y6i,5ea 


H5 


1,IK1IS.4^ 


1,S50.£1» 


MoOvTes 


1903 


3,217 ,esfi 


1.3-^.6^ 


2,684,461 


!^ 


t,tM&^0 


1^^,833 


sjsia&i 


190.1 


i,H4D,fl0a 


l,U3,Sie 


8,127.096 


18M 


i,45ajss 


1,950*737 


ipUl4406 


1^1 


2,350,540 


1,103.980 


K,»oe,l9e 


isss 


L.as2,6oe 


US41>29 


%MlAn 


l^OS 


i. 529,780 


1,2!5<0.5S7 


3,472,609 


im 


#48,417 


l,S07,flM 


%M^Ml 


im* 


i, 404, 745 


1,010,130 


2,677,Ma 


imtt 


l«Mft.8(» 


l,ftS5,Tl7 


i.a&4.Sii 


li07 


3,g^.Qlfi 


1,1^1^9 


a,30l,S41 


IBM 


887.175 


«,Oia,819 


2,«»a,40tt 


1998 


%,'mjm 


965,803 


I,1B3,790 


1S8» 


Mas,«03 


S,€fle,442 


I,39ll,aS9 


idoe 


2.S96.560 


9W,0^ 


a, 004,210 


ii«o 


I,«2&,97fi 


l<87ajJOft 


S.a8Q,3J4 


I9t0 


3,^.040 


960,515 


3, HSR, 448 


imi 


[,553, Ma 


1. 748. 100 


2.767,»0« 


ISll 


%,imjl& 


1,055,416 


«,842,5ao 


wn 


I, 15ft* 34^ 


1.023.371 


2,II8.TS8 


1913 


s,Qa%,^m 


l,OaO,704 


8,079,670 


l£ft3 


l,m,02i 


t«6fld.<H8 


S,t>44J27 


19IS 


H.i€«,m 


l.03«,7«l 


lJ9ft,9B0 


l«&4 


l.i€l,SOtt 


1,050,1141 


sjfis.ssa 


19U 


ii,Sl4,7S0 


1,679,079 , 


4,909,046 


IS&& 


t,0La,i44 


1,740,§M 


2,l45,Sft9 


1915 


a, 963, 130 


M78,46a 


4,905,4)10 



BBOEIPTB OF FLOUR BT CROP YEAR. 



YearendingJimeSO, '94. 


l,H3,4B6bbl8. 


Year ending June 80. 1906, 




:?'rM00bbli 




•♦ 60. ^, 


l.ir.^,398 " ' 




" 80.190B, 




7 86 " 


M 


** », W, 


i.ii'.t.'^ai •• 


*< 


" 80. 1907, 




66 •« 


«< 


•• 80 '97 


1,^7^,771 « 


M 


•• 80. 1908, 




E88 " 


«• 


« 60, '98, 


l,S6l,:^86 ** 


'• 


•* aO. 1909. 




66 " 


•* 


•• 90, W, 


1,340,^48 •• 


M 


" 80. 1900. 




66 " 


•• 


•• 90: ifloo. 


1,W.:^J76 " 


•< 


" 80.19U. 




60 •• 


M 


•* 90, 1901, 


2, 26 " 


•• 


•• 80, 1912. 




m " 


(■ 


" 80. 1902. 


2, 18 " 


•* 


" 80, 1918, 




10 •• 


k» 


" 80. 1908. 


2, 20 •* 


*• 


•• 80, 1914. 




..176 " 


U 


«• 80, 1906. 


2,433,700 " 


** 


•' 80,1916. 




::y.:ll0 •« 



MONTHLY STOCK OF FL0X7R IN STORE FOR THREE YEARS. 



January l8t 64.440 67,675 80.860 

Febramrylsi. 89.800 76,400 69,400 

March 1st 68.800 81.874 76,960 

ApiilUt « 60,600 66,000 81,200 

Maylst 64,200 61,800 68.6(10 

Jimetet 46,050 67,100 67,770 



1916. 
bbls. 



1914. 
bbls. 



1918. 
bbls. 



Month. 



Joly lit 

Angnat Ist. . . . 
September lit 
October lat. .. 
November 1st. 
December lat. 



1916. 
bbls. 



1914. 
bbU. 



86,700 66.800 
86.000 48,100 
81.900 52.000 



44,490 
60.160 
69,400 



49,461 
69,700 
68.966 



1918. 
bbls. 



66,900 
58,800 
58,600 
60,600 
68,200 
67,100 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



108 



TBADB AKD COMMXHCB OP 



FOREIGN SHIPMENTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN 

On Thbouoh Bills of Lading from St. Louis bt Railroads 
Fob thb Ybab 1915. 



Dbstikation. 


Flour, 
barrels 


Wheat, 
busheli. 


Com, 
bushels. 


Oats, 
bushels. 


Rye, 
bushelf 


To ICnfflftnd. 


S4,S58 
7,478 
67,786 
49,068 
10,106 
58,627 
87,885 

406 
14,094 

500 
83,505 
10,848 
856,861 
81,594 
34,460 
13,489 
48,968 

850 

9,877 

49,695 

804,798 










" France 










<« flnntlanrl .. . 








«< Ireland . . . 










«• TlAnrn Ark 










" Norway 

" Holland 


















•* Belgium 










•• Snain 










t^^JfmMMM 

" Portugal 










* Sweden 










" Newfoundland 










** Cuba 


48,081 


1,884,785 


194,047 




" Porto Rioo 




** Central America 


94,459 








" South America 








" Mexico 




149,951 






*' South Wales 








" Jamaica 




5,500 






" Greece 








'' Seaboard for Export 


5,890,850 


69,860 


455,806 


88,418 


Total for Export, 1915. . . . 
Total for Export, 1914.... 
Total for Export, 1918.... 
Total for Export, 1912 


988,485 
906,881 
786,848 
881,480 


5,517,880 

6,715,029 

4,187,995 

171,887 


1,559,586 

1,061,448 

1,510,958 

994,407 


649,858 

617,010 

68,888 

48,081 


88,418 
87.806 
91,880 
96,866 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



109 



FOREIGN GRAIN AND FLOUR TRADE. 



Foreign shipments of Flour and Grain ^m the United States oom- 

I>are with previous years as follows: 

Wheat. Ck>ni. Oats, Floor, 

ba. bu. bu. bbls. 

1910 306.839,820 48,346,628 104,649,304 16,680.801 

1914 178,861,944 16,626,149 86,086.867 13,769.078 

1918 99,608,968 46,386.788 S.374,638 13.378,306 

1913 60,439,494 80.186.713 80.118.868 10,603,679 

1911 81,663,650 60.807.877 3.063.838 11.337.848 

1910 33.667.106 87.293.127 1,873.460 8,841.181 

1909 46.901,996 84.708.9U 1,331,164 9,689,368 

1908. 91,904,129 87.068,746 1,137,048 13.947.975 

1909 89,897,600 83.184.165 1.641,604 15,191.851 

1906 61,847,789 101,646,479 888,983 14,359.353 

1906 20,566,817 110,999.365 38,641.668 11.381.987 

1904 18.015,894 46,890,637 1,193.888 11,868.608 

1906 78,146,378 91,354,690 1,461,836 19.374.413 

1903 128.861.712 18.484.368 6.864.043 17,986.681 

1901 179^)1.418 103,850,089 35,93a.048 19,853,880 

Total value of principal breadstuff exported in 1915 was 1527,882,389; 
in 1914 was $310,280,873; in 1913 was $203,391,856; in 1912 was 
$149314,877; in 1911 was $122,837,787; in 1910 was $95,703,988; 
in 1909 was $129,191,920; in 1908 was $186,832,204; in 1907 was 
$204,456,014; in 1906 was $178,658,474; in 1905 was $146,110,962; in 
1904 was $92,311,812. 

Value of Exports of Flour and Grain from the United States. 

1915 1914 1918 1912 

Flour $ 96,201,284 $ 62,881,608 $66,866,444 $49,186,766 

Wheat 282,457,092 187,184,100 95,098,888 58,968,160 

Com 88,481,849 12,246,293 26,515,146 21,707,490 

Oats 50,229,068 19,026,302 2,106,846 11,991,099 

Rye 15,350,880 7,791,125 1,876,249 326,289 

Barley 19,812,498 11,183,882 7,882,842 5,740,265 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



110 



TBADB AND COMMSmCB OF 



RECEIPTS OP FLOUR AT VARIOUS CITIBS. 

ma. 1918. mi. 

BblB. BbU. BbU. 

St. Loulf 8»<M,8aO 8,S66,819 8^014,780 

New York 8,870,484 9,481,447 11,»7,171 

Boeton ^010,WI 2,181,118 1,791,7» 

Bammore 1,928,0S1 3,008,681 1,808,872 

ClnoinnatL ],487,»7 1,807,047 l,84S,ttW 

Milwaukee 3,488,769 8,181,387 8,348,930 

MinneapollB 688,768 770,181 818,413 

Buffalo 7,664,768 9,481,181 9,100,763 

Chicago 7,070,898 10,388,000 9,709,000 

PhUadeXphia 3«887,689 3,388,064 3,414,790 

New Orleans 1,898,887 3,048,073 3,631,000 

Detroit 887,900 864,710 460,640 

Peoria 3,878,636 3,334,976 3.898,900 

San Franoiaoo 1,187,881 1,806,884 

Montreal 3,383,909 1,683,196 3,688,817 

Duluth and Superior 6,888,160 6,138,396 6,368,660 

Cleveland 718,689 600,779 689,918 

Indianapolis 806,986 

Kansas City 398,760 150,760 180,000 

Portland 860,860 876,900 847,300 



Bbls. 
6^968,190 
18,846,688 
8,016,741 
1.668,ia 
1,644,871 
8,601,887 

766,688 
8,489,136 
9,068,000 
8,391,ia 
8,094,000 

860,000 
3,698,900 
l,8tt,890 



6,880,980 

789,848 



179,000 
496,680 



BECEIPTS OF FLOUE AND WHfiAT AT ST. LOUIS BT CBOPS; FLOUB BBDUCSD 
TO WHEAT AT FOUB AND ONB-HALP BUSHELS TO THE BABBEL. 



Year 

finding 

JiUKlSO. 


rioor, 
bbU. 


bUSlL* 


WlouT and Wheftt 


Total Whiul Crop 
of the U. 8., 
inbiMlk«U. 


PerMDt.«rTBtiM 

Oop marketed 

at8«.Leal9. 


1894 


Ij4.r 86 


la 104 


17.809,061 


460.9f7.418 


8.80 


1896 


1,11''. 98 


IC (18 


18,168,687 


467,108.947 


8.78 


1896 


l,lili,':;81 


IS : « 


17,436.819 


427.684.848 


4.81 


1897 


l.STH.rZl 


11,M4,494 


18.019,968 


080.149.168 


8.88 


1898 


l.^wi,.i65 


12.T1'^*.836 


18.846.967 


676,148,706 


8.03 


1899 


l..i^,..^98 


14 /J 491 


30,156.609 


647.808.846 


8.48 


1900 


76 


IC 08 


18.956.916 


633.339.606 


8.08 


1901 


36 


2B 146 


83.814.656 


748.460.318 


8.98 


1903 


18 


IS 140 


39.766.704 


670.068.006 


6.16 


1908 


16 


n 171 


84^670.186 


687,831.866 


6.63 


1904 


: 00 


M 69 


86.348,6it9 


663,899,617 


6.74 


1906 


I 00 


89 98 


81.786.846 


693.979,489 


4.78 


1906 


'J,K. . 00 


31 170 


83.786.430 


786,360.970 


8.78 


1907 


U^:'-. 66 


U M 


37,806.676 


684.067,000 


4.86 


1906 


'ij.i';. S8 


IS. ^ i96 


80.776.898 


•64,603.000 


4.5t 


1909 


'J,TH7.v96 


17/«^v.i^ 


80.094,686 


888.360.600 


4.40 


1910 


2,7Hy.!«6 


33,^>^-^l,S83 


86.136.766 


685,131.000 


6.68 


1911 


2.iV^:Km 


K.Vi^^jM 


81.981.766 


631,888,000 


6.18 


1912 


2, 83:1. '76 


16,;i.:'H'*.S16 


38.086.903 


780.367.000 


8.84 


1918 


i^JHJ.TlO 


88,:'J'i,460 


68.138.646 


768,880,000 


6.96 


1914 


H.2'Ji,l75 


7n,iu,2ii 


43,068,081 


891.017.000 


4.73 


1916 


SJ7i,940 


8i,l>;,B93 


61.179.133 


1,011.606.000 


5.06 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



TBI OCR OV BT.. LOUIS* 



111 



Aifomrr op flour hanufactubbd in vabious cmKa. 



1915. 1914 

Bbls. BbU. 

BfinneapoUB 18,069,196 17,769,880 

8I.IiOiii8 1,«78,468 1,579,079 

PhUadelphia 766,119 •848,000 

miwaiikee 640,426 727,688 

BjOMo 6,669,794 6,464,869 

Toledo 1,428,760 1,491,600 

Detroit 887,000 698,600 

Chicago l,li;j,000 1,088,000 

Dnlntti and Superior 1,884,686 1,212,626 

KansasCity ^866,460 2,876,840 

Peoria 120,000 120,000 

Oinoiimati< 867,088 891,061 

Cleveland 880,000 880,000 

Indianapolis 618,900 668,489 

Kashrille, Tenn 900,000 862,860 

Galveston 888.000 

8t Josepli 268,888 

New York •2,000,000 ^OOO^OOO 

Omaha 479,876 

*Ertiinated. 



19U. 


1913. 


BhU. 


Bbls. 


19,000,000 


17,081,986 


1,086,761 


1,080,704 


841,510 


466,697 


788,786 


1,020,801 


4,671,662 


4,674,089 


1,818,700 


1,886,200 


690,009 


788,600 


1,028,000 


1,108,000 


1,116,690 


996,686 


2,881,617 


8,080,268 


120,000 


120,000 


486,696 


488,800 




800,000 


468,000 


448,000 


691,440 


768,621 


880,000 


866,000 


2,600,000 


8^800^000 


424,626 


880,000 



FLOUR INSPECTION. 
Report of Flour Inspected by the Herohants' Exchange Flour Inspectors. 

1915. 1914. 1918. 1913. 

Bbls. Bbls. Bbls. Bbls. 

January 81,799 11,966 16,618 9,860 

February 17,270 10,826 16,864 12,804 

March 7,498 12,764 14,266 11,668 

April 8,619 18,120 16,770 18,406 

May 7,006 11,424 18,871 18,668 

June 4,876 8,264 11,294 8,860 

July 8,076 10,771 18,268 8,464 

August 18,209 12,861 14,888 18,640 

8q>tember 11,828 16,892 18,164 12,669 

Ootober 14,636 11,679 14,224 19,076 

November 16,002 17,287 11,206 20,104 

December....^ 22,916 16,998 16,071 16,880 

Total bbls 168,221 162,887 178,826 168,414 

AUGUST RUMP, Inspector. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



112 






n 



i 

8 






s 



§ 
I 

EH 

i 



5z; 



I 

.a 

o 

o 

o 
o 

H 



I 



I 



I 



» 

•^ 



t 



.4 

t 



i 



*4 



.9 



TBASB AND COlOaRCB OF 



§§§§§§§§§§ 

»R88*8»98S 



§§§§§§§§§§ 

«as8'-a*8g| 



§§§§§§§§§§ 



i§§§§§§§§§ 



sass*-s*a88 



§§§§§§§§§§ 



8238*S°°8S{S 



§§§§§§§§§§ 



8958-°8«>5t;S 



§§§§§§§§§§ 



fSS39°°3»3S§ 



§§§§§§§§!§ 



SS8Z»83i££3 



§§§§§§§§§§ 



§§§§§§§§§§ 



§9SS'-9S888 



§§§§§§§§§§ 

ssea^sssRs 



§§§§§§§§§§ 

aSSS»538"S8 



ilS^llllaS 






ISSiSS8SiS38SSSss 



S3SSSSS3S§2§§§§§ 



Si§S8g§!$S3S 



jj8aSS«» -"'3 



51 












§g 



s5 



ouot 



S£a:«s<^aS£i 



l3SISilSSg§§§SI 



gS§g§SiSS3S§ 






3 



i3S£llS»Sl&S<S^£g 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST, LOUIS. 



118 



WEEKLY PRICES OF WINTER WHEAT AND HARD 
WHEAT FLOURS AT ST. LOUIS DURING 1915. 

(PBB BARBBL IN JXTTB.) 









HARD WIHTaB 


191o 


Patents. Straights. 


Extra 
Fancy. 


Patents. 


Straights. 


First 
Clears. 


Jannary 


2 

9 

16 

23 

80 


16.60^.76 
6.00 6.10 
6.20 6.40 
6.36 6.40 
6.60 6.76 


I6.26#6.40 
6.76 6.86 
6.06 6.16 
6.06 6.20 
6.40 6.60 


16.00^.16 
6.60 6.70 
6.86 6.00 
6.86 6.00 
6.20 6.80 


16.60^.76 
6.00 6.25 
6.20 6.46 
6.26 6.60 
6.46 6.60 


I6.S6#6.60 
6.86 6.96 
6.00 6.10 
6.10 6.20 
6.26 6.40 


•4.90^.10 
6.20 6.80 
6.86 6.60 
6.36 6.66 
6.86 6.00 


Febmarjf 


6 

18 

20 

27 


7.26 
6.86 
6.76 
6.60 


7.60 
7.10 
7.00 
0.76 


7.10 
6.60 
6.66 
6.40 


7.20 
6.76 
6.70 
6.60 


6.66 
6.50 
6.60 
6.20 


6.90 
6.60 
6.60 
6.26 


7.40 
7.00 
7.10 
6.70 


7.60 
7.20 
7.20 
6.80 


7.10 
6.76 
6.90 
6.40 


7.25 
6.90 
7.00 
6.66 


6.60 6.76 
6.26 6.60 
6.00 0.80 
6.80 6.00 


March 


6 

18 

20 

27 


6.86 
6.60 
6.60 
6.40 


6.60 
6.76 
6.86 
6.60 


6.26 
6.30 
6.40 
6.30 


6.30 
6.46 
6.50 
6.26 


6.00 
6.16 
6.26 
6.06 


6.16 
6.26 
6.30 
6.16 


6.46 
6.66 
6.76 
6.46 


6.66 
6.80 
7.00 
6.70 


6.10 
6.80 
6.60 
6.26 


6.26 
6.50 
6.70 
6.86 


6.60 6.76 
6.00 6.26 
6.00 6.26 
6.76 6.00 


AihH 


8 

J?:::::::: 

24 


6.40 
6.60 
6.66 
6.75 


6.60 
6.66 
6.85 
6.90 


6.26 
6.80 
6.40 
6.60 


6.80 
6.85 
6.50 
6.60 


6.10 
6.16 
6.20 
6.80 


6.20 
6.26 
6.80 
6.40 


6.60 
6.60 
6.66 
6.76 


6.76 
6.80 
6.86 
6.90 


6.30 
6.40 
6.46 
6.66 


6.40 
6.60 
6.66 
6.66 


6.76 6.00 
6.76 6.00 
6.76 6.10 
6.00 6.10 


May 


1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


6.76 
6.70 
0.60 
6.60 
6.36 


6.90 
6.86 
6.76 
6.76 
6.60 


6.60 
6.46 
6.30 
6.80 
6.16 


6.60 
6.66 
6.46 
6.40 
6.26 


6.80 
6.26 
6.20 
6.20 
6.00 


6.40 
6.36 
6.26 
6.26 
6.10 


6.76 
6.70 
6.66 
6.66 
6.56 


6.90 
6.86 
6.76 
6.75 
6.66 


6.66 
6.60 
6.60 
6.60 
6.36 


6.66 
6.60 
6.60 
6.60 
6.60 


6.00 6.10 
6.00 6.10 
6.86 6.00 
6.86 6.00 
6.66 6.90 


June 


6 

12 

19 

26 


6.00 
6.60 
6.10 
6.26 


6.26 
6.66 
6.26 
6.60 


6.76 
6.20 
4.90 
6.10 


6.90 
6.85 
5.00 
6.20 


6.60 
6.00 
4.76 
4.86 


6.75 
6.10 
4.85 
6.00 


6.26 
6.26 
5.00 
6.26 


6.86 
5.40 
5.16 
6.60 


6.00 
6.10 
4.90 
6.06 


6.10 
6.20 
5.00 
5.16 


5.60 6.76 
4.76 6.00 
4.60 4.76 
4.30 4.50 


July 


3 

J?:::::::: 

24 

81 


6.60 6.66 
6.60 6.80 
6.76 6.90 
6.60 6.86 
14.90 16.10 


6.26 6.36 
6.30 6.60 
6.60 6.60 
6.40 6.50 
t4.60 t4.80 


6.00 6.10 
6.10 5.26 
6.10 6.26 
6.20 5.80 
(4.30 t4.60 


6.86 6.10 
6.90 6.10 
6.00 6.16 
6.10 6.26 
}6.85 t6.60 


6.60 6.76 
6.66 6.80 
6.76 5.90 
6.86 6.00 
t4.90 }6.10 


4.60 4.70 
4.60 4.76 

4.25 4.76 

4.26 4.76 
14.26 t4.60 


Aug. 


7 

14 

21 

2S 


t4.66 
4.90 
4.80 

{4.60 


16.00 
6.10 
6.00 
4.90 


14.60 1 
4.76 ; 
4.60; 

{4.46 ; 


t4.60 
4.86 

4.70 
4.56 


14.40 
4.60 
4.60 

{4.80 


14.50 
4.60 
4.66 

4.40 


16.25 
6.76 
6.26 

{4.80 


16.56 
6.00 
6.60 
6.10 


14.90 
6.50 
6.00 

{4.66 


16.10 
6.66 
6.16 
4.76 


14.86 14.60 
4t86 4.60 
{4.40 4.80 
U.80 {4.60 


is:;:::::: 
26 


14.66 
4.70 
4.76 

14.76 


14.90 
4.90 
6.00 

{6.00 


14.46 1 
4.60 
{4.66 
(4.55 


(4.56 
4.66 


14.80 
4.80 
4.86 

{4.86 


14.40 
4.40 
4.46 
4.46 


14.70 
4.76 
4.76 

{4.76 


16.00 
6.00 
6.00 
6.00 


14.40 
4.60 
4.60 

{4.60 


4.60 
4.70 
4.70 
4.70 


•3.76 4.26 
•3.60 3.76 
•3.60 4.00 
•3.60 4.10 


October 


2 

9 

16 

28 

80 


4.80 
6.00 
6.16 
4.90 
6.00 


6.00 
6.26 
6.40 
6.16 
<6.20 


4.60 
4.76 
4.90 
4.75 
4.80 


4.70 
4.90 
5.00 
4.86 

4.90 


4.40 
4.60 
4.66 
4.66 
4.60 


4.60 
4.66 
4.75 
4.66 
4.66 


4.90 
5.00 
6.20 
4.86 
4.86 


6.00 
5.16 
5.40 
5.00 
6.00 


4.60 
4.75 
5.00 
4.70 
4.60 


4.80 
4.90 
6.10 
4.80 
4.76 


8.76 8.90 
4.00 4.26 
4.16 4.36 
4.10 4.30 
4.10 4.30 


Koyember 6 

fc::: 

27 


6.10 
6.10 
6.10 
6.10 


6.25 
6.26 
6.26 
6.26 


4.86 

4.76 
4.76 
4.76 


6.00 
4.90 
4.90 
4.90 


4.66 

4.60 
4.56 
4.66 


4.76 
4.70 
4.70 
4.70 


4.90 
4.90 
4.90 
4.86 


6.26 
6.16 
5.15 
6.10 


4.76 
4.70 
4.70 
4.70 


4.85 
4.80 
4.80 
4.80 


4.26 4.40 
4.26 4.40 
4.26 4.40 
4.16 4.30 


December 4 

is;::::::: 
26 


6.80 
6.20 
6.26 
6.40 


6.60 
6.40 
6.60 
6.60 


6.00 
4.80 
4.90 
6.10 


6.10 
6.00 
6.00 
6.20 


4.75 
4.60 
4.70 
4.90 


4.85 
4.80 
4.80 
6.06 


6.10 
6.10 
5.10 
6.80 


6.80 
5.30 
6.30 
6.50 


4.85 
4.90 
4.90 
6.10 


4.96 
6.00 
6.00 
6.25 


4.26 4.40 
4.26 4.40 
4.26 4.40 
4.36 4.60 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



114 



TRADE AND OOMMXBCB OP 



GRAIN. 



Record crops of srain were again produoed the past year. The 
total yields of the principal cereal crops for which the United States is 
famous not only far exceeded that of the year prior, but footed up several 
hundred millions of bushels over that of the banner year of 1912. 

The harvest of wheat, com, oats, rye and barley aggregated the 
enormous sum of 5,892,601,000 bpshels as compared with 4,942,613,000 
bushels in 1914, and 5,532,838,000 bushels, the former high reoord 
of 1912. 

The values realized by the producers of the above named cereals 
were likewise in excess of Uie returns of the year previous, approximating 
$3,405,524,000, as contrasted with $3,243,102,000 in 1914. The total 
volume of business in grain at St. Louis for the period was 75,529,077 
bushels, as against 78,399,102 bushels the preceding year. The ship- 
ments amounted to 52,384,360 bushels, against 5,713,890 bushds 
in 1914. 

The exi>orts of wheat, com and oats for the year totalled 358,524,702 
bushels, as contrasted with 224,554,960 bushels in 1914, a gain of 133,- 
969,742 bushels. The total value of the principal breadstuffs exported 
during the year aggregated $527,882,389, as compared with $310,1^,873 
the preceding year. 

RBCSIPT8 OF ALL GRAINS AT ST. LOUIS. 

1915. 1914. 1918. 191S. 1911. 

Wheat, bushels 85,860,404 88,569,047 81,858,471 80,541,678 17,076,606 

Cora, «< 18,917,185 17,106,825 88,180,046 86,979,080 88,621,410 

Oats, «< 19,402,855 84.944,660 84,868,480 81,689,690 80,848,860 

Rye, " 495,468 889,000 488,784 186,668 887,816 

Barley •* 1,468,170 8,890,580 8,264,964 1,760,864 8,808,917 

Total, bushels.... 76,689,077 78,899,108 80,496,694 79,997,810 68,581,907 



iDcluding flour reduced to wheat, the receipts would be as fdlows: 



Buihels. 

1916 58,085,860 

1914 94,816,477 

1918 96,197,881 

1918 98,648,795 

1911 76,258,984 

1910 79,800,808 



Bushels. 

1909 77,944,786 

1906 88,404,890 

1907 99,888,157 

1906 91.098,061 

1905 78,828,021 

1904 72,940,958 



Bushels. 

1908 79,488,118 

1908 80,416,664 

1901 69,817,894 

1900 69,666,619 

1899 66,068,144 

1898 60.884,608 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 



115 



The relative position of the ten principal primary receiving points is 
shown by the following table: 

RBCSIPTS OF QRAIN FOB FOUB TBARS. 

1916— busb. 1914— bush. 19ia— bush. 1912— bush. 

Chicago 880,851,000 878,182,000 887,288,000 290,249,000 

St. Louis 76,529,077 78,399,102 80,498,694 79,997,810 

Minneapolis 229,822,920 184,178,450 111,267,660 164,729,400 

Peoria 89,296,800 88,116,596 84,574,098 82,851,870 

Kansas City 87,924,800 108,868,150 66,795,950 70,258,400 

MUwaukee 70,148,510 76,654,800 59,964,680 50,959,820 

Toledo 20,285,000 14,897,000 14,788,800 14,678,800 

Duluth and Superior... 122,861,882 87,749,844 112,560,717 109,951,700 

Detroit. 11,884,000 10,167,000 7,629,000 8,860,720 

Cincinnati 28,814,675 19,836,029 21,168,812 21,748,228 

Omaha 68,555,800 66,983,800 68,674,700 61,685,100 

IndianapoUs 29,184,000 22,698,200 24,066,000 24,290,600 

WHEAT. 

With a record production of more than a billion bushels of wheat 
the i>a8t year, all preceding records for big crops were completely over- 
shadowed. Of winter wheat, however, the total yield was only 655,- 
045,000 bushels, as compared with 684,990,000 bushels in 1914, but of 
spring wheat 356,460,000 bushels, as contrasted with 206,027,000 bushels 
in 1914, or a total production of 1,011,505,000 bushels, as against 891,- 
017,000 bushels the year before, and 763,380,000 bushels in 1913. The 
estimated value on December 1st, as reported by the Department of 
Agriculture, Washington, D. C, was likewise a banner one, amounting 
to $930,302,000, as compared with $878,680,000 the previous year. 
The wheat crop of Missouri the past year, which is wholly a winter one, 
totaUed 34,108,000 bushels, as compared with 43,333,000 bushels in 1915, 
according to the U. S. Department of Agriculture figures. The Missouri 
State Board of Agriculture places the 3deld of marketable wheat at only 
26,475,337 bushels, as against 36,933,501 bushels in 1914. St. Louis, 
the past twelve months, received 35,250,404 bushels, as compared with 
33,569,047 bushels in 1914 and 31,258,471 bushels in 1913. The bulk of 
the arrivals were again winter wheat amounting to 16,486,524 bushels; 
hard wheat 6,969,600 bushels. The shipments for the year approximated 
28,179,270 bushels, as compared with 25,626,870 bushels the previous 
twelve months. St. Louis mills used upward of 7,553,100 bushels in 
the production of flour. Prices covered a wide and much higher range; 
No. 2 Red from $1.06 to $1.64 and No. 2 Hard from $1.03 to $1.65. 
The low on No. 2 Red was recorded in September and the high in February. 
The low on No. 2 hard was registered in October and the high in Feb- 
ruary. The May option on the new crop was as low as $.96}^ in 
August and up to $1.24 in December; the old crop ranged from $1.27^ 
in January to $1.62^ in February. July delivery from $1.01 % in July 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



iia 



TRADB AND COMMSBCS OF 



up to $1.39^ in February; September at $.95 to $1.26, the low in Sep- 
tember and the high in April. December oovo^ a range ot $0.90 am 
low in September, with $1.18^ top in December. 

The grades of reoeipts for the past three years were as follows: 

Wheal. 

Soft Winter Cars 

Hard Winter " 

Spring " 

Mixed " 

Durum and Macaroni. '* 

Other Grades " 

Soft Winter Sacks 

Other Grades <' 

Receipts of wheat at the principal 
years, compare as follows: 

1916-Bll. 

Minneapolis 148,069,870 

Chicago 70,704,000 

Kansas City 68,608,t00 

Duluth and Superior M,in,447 

St. Louis 8ft,SS0,4O4 

MUwaukee 6,728,176 

Toledo 9,661,000 

Omaha 16,667,600 

The crop of the surplus wheat Sti 

1916-Bu. 

Kansas 106,688,000 

Minnesota 78,490,000 

Nebraska 73,164,000 

Iowa 16,667,000 

South Dakota 68,76SU000 

Missouri 84,108,000 

niinoit 68,900,000 

Wisconsin 4,662,000 

North Dakota 161,970,000 

CORN. 

The com crop of the country last year was the largest ever harvested, 
with the exception of the year 1912. The total yield was plaoed at 
3,054,535,000 bushels, as against 2,672,804,000 bushels in 1914 and 
3,124,746,000 bushels in 1912. The value to producers is plaoed at 
$1,755,859,000, as compared with $1,722,070,000 last year, and $1,520,- 
454,000 in 1912. The U. S. Department of Agriculture plaoed the 
Missouri crop at 209,450,000 bushels, as against 158,400,000 bushels in 
1914. The Missouri State Board of Agriculture estimated the crop at 
220,235,191 bushels. The value to farmers, according to the Government 
estimate, was $119,386,000, as compared with $107,712,000 in 1914. 
Receipts at St. Louis figured at 18,917,185 bushels, as contrasted with 



191S. 


1914. 


1918. 


18,419 


14,419 


9,861 


6,806 


6494 


9486 


766 


986 


696 


»4 


461 


948 


60 


809 


767 


8,068 


660 


689 


170,644 


919,848 914,998 


40,047 


6,886 ] 


14,979 


I primary markets for the past four 


1914-Bu. 


lOlS-Bu. 


19l»-Ba* 


116,880,900 


111,967,660 


118,686,980 


99,890,000 


60,879,000 


86,914,000 


70,767,660 


88,870,000 


48,719,600 


68,608,080 


81,168409 


86,777,900 


88,660,047 


81,968,471 


80,641,678 


9,880,760 


7,879,660 


9,697,490 


6,867,000 


6,667,000 


6,688,000 


18,996,900 


90,818,600 


16,868,800 




1914-Ba. 


191S-Ba. 


1911-Bil. 


177,900,000 


86,988,000 


99,990,000 


49,976,000 


68,040,000 


67,088,000 


68,116,000 


69,896,000 


66,069,000 


16,066,000 


16,896,000 


19,860,000 


81,666,000 


88,976,000 


69,186/)00 


48,888,000 


89,686,000 


98,760,000 


48,960,000 


41,888,000 


9,819,000 


8,611,000 


8,666,000 


8,664,000 


81,609,000 


78,866,000 


148,890,000 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THIB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



117 



17,105,825 bushels the year prior. The shipments were 9,921,320 bushels 
and 10,739,410 bushels for the two years respectively. The range on 
No. 2 Com for the year was from 5Sii cents low to 813^ cents high, the 
former being recorded in October and the latter in July. The May 
option covered a range of 53^ cents reported to October up to 84^ 
cents in February. July sold at 69^ cents in June to 85 ^ cents in 
February. September at 68J^ cents to 80 Ji cents, the low in September 
and the high in May. December at 51 ^ cents to 653^ cents, low in 
October and high in May. 

Receipts at the principal primary markets were as follows: 

BX0BIFT8 OV CORN. 

1915. 1914. 1918. 1912. 

Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. 

Chicago 95,867,000 106,600,000 127,778,000 112,600,000 

St. Louis 18,917,185 17,105,826 22.189,045 26,979,080 

Peoria. 20,479,876 14,520,478 17,782,868 18,788,008 

Kansas City 20,808,750 28,172,500 21,928,750 10,522,500 

Toledo 4,182,600 4,810,200 4,448,400 4,145,800 

Detroit 8,797,000 8,849,000 2,712,000 2,775,780 

MUwaukee 14,117,585 18,887,855 18,140,280 10,150,290 

Cincinnati 7,818,414 8,468,404 7,797,910 9,806,068 

Indianapolis 16,114,000 14,487,200 16,888,000 15,516,000 

Omaha 24,295,200 80,004,800 81,111,200 20,586,800 

The crops of the com surplus States for four years, as reported by 
the Department of Agriculture, are as follows: 

1915— Bush. 1914— Bush. 1918— Bush. 1912— Bush. 

Ohio 156,040,000 142,715,000 146,260,000 174,410,000 

Indiana 190,950,000 168,817,000 176,400,000 199,864,000 

Illinois 876,164,000 800,084,000 282,160,000 426,820,000 

Iowa 808,000,000 889,424,000 888,300,000 482,021,000 

Missouri 209,450,000 158,400,000 129,062,000 248,904,000 

Kansas 176,050,000 108,225,000 284,240,000 174,226,000 

Nebraska 218,000,000 178,950,000 114,160,000 182,616,000 

Total 1,624,664,000 1,486,066,000 1,820,552,000 1,882,860,000 

OATS. 
The production of oats in 1915 was the largest ever produced, being 
estimated at 1,540,362,000 bushels, as against 1,141,060,000 bushels in 
1914 and 1,418,337,000 bushels in 1912, the previous high record. The 
value of the crops as reported was $555,569,000, against $499,431,000 
and $452^469,000 respectively. The Missouri crop was figured at 
31,850,000 bushels by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, as against 
25,800,000 bushels in 1914 with an estimated value of $12,103,000 and 
$11,352,000 in 1914. The receipts at St. Louis amoimted to 19,402,855 
bushels, as compared with 24,944,650 bushels in 1914. The range on 
No. 3 White Oats was from 34 cents to 66 cents, the low being rei>orted 
in October and the high in August. May delivery was low at 36 H cents 
in October and high at 61 )4 cents in February. July covered a range of 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



118 



TRADS AND COMMBBCB OF 



40 H <^^^ ^ Jiu^e to 58^ cents in January. September at 33 cents in 
September to 46^ cents in May. December at 34}^ cents in August 
and October to 40^ cents in Aug^ust. 

Receipts of Oats at the principal markets were as follows: 

Chicago 188,470,000 

St. Louis 19,402,866 

MinneapoUs 88,644,960 

Peoria. 11,279,800 

Kansas City 6,247,600 

MUwaukee 28,687,780 

Toledo 6,841,700 

Duluthand Superior 6,482,846 

Cincinnati 6,816,890 

Cleveland. 6,470,006 

IndianapoUs 8,889,000 

Omaha 11,042,000 

The Oat crops of the Western { 
lows: 

1916. 
bosh. 

Iowa 198,000,000 

Minnesoto 184,876,000 

Wisconsin 99,976,000 

niinois 196,486,000 

Indiana 66,620,000 

Ohio 69,008,000 

Missouri 81,860,000 

Kansas 48,726,000 

Nebraska 70,400,000 

Michigan 64,260,000 

RYE, 

The crop of rye produced in the United States last year likewise made 
a new record, being estimated at 49,1M>000 bushels, against 42,779,000 
bushels in 1914. The Missouri crop amounted to 338,000 bushels as 
compared with 238,000 bushels the year prior. The total value was 
phiced at $41,295,000 against $37,018,000 a year ago. Receipts at St. 
Louis were 495,463 bushels against 389,000 bushels last year, and the 
shipments 385,160 bushels, against 288,515 bushels. The range on No. 
2 Rye was from 92 cents to $1.30, being recorded in September and 
February respectively. 

The principal producing States and the yield in 1915 was as follows: 



1914-biish. 


1918-lKuh. 


1912— bnsb 


188,400,000 


124,406,000 


118,49M00 


24,944,660 


24,868,480 


21,029,690 


22,216,060 


24,662,090 


16,804,680 


12,926,660 


10,978,496 


9,707,902 


9,266,200 


10,174,600 


6,682,700 


26,791,900 


16,972,900 


14,846,860 


8,686,600 


4,604,400 


4,721,000 


7,826,807 


14,207,926 


10,828,940 


6,968,804 


8,218,819 


7,621,681 


6,449,842 


6,164,026 


4,906,629 


6,666,000 


6,816,000 


6,269,600 


16,960,700 


16,884,200 


12,908,000 


States for four years compare as fol- 


1914. 


1918. 


1912. 


bush. 


bush. 


bush. 


166,000,000 


168,860,000 


217,818,000 


86,120,000 


112,644,000 


122,982,000 


62,100,000 


88,088,000 


84,746,000 


126,990,000 


104,126,000 


182,726,000 


44,888,000 


86,880,000 


79,799,000 


60,826,000 


64,860,000 


98,280,000 


26,800,000 


26,606,000 


87,126,000 


68,960,000 


84,890,000 


66,040,000 


69,600,000 


69,626,000 


66,610,000 


60,762,000 


46,000,000 


61,826,000 



Bushels. 

Wisconsin 7,770,000 

Minnesota 5,850,000 

Pennsylvania 4,932,000 

Indiana 2,400,000 

Ohio 1,750,000 

Iowa 1,110,000 



Bushels. 

Michigan 6,045,000 

New York 2,805,000 

New Jersey 1,420,000 

Nebraska 3,500,000 

North Dakota 2,700,000 

South Dakota 1,755.000 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF 8T. LOUIS. 119 

BARLEY. 

The barley crop in 1915 totaled 237,009,000 bushels, the largest on 
record, as compared with 194,953,000 bushels in 1914 and 223,824,000 
bushels in 1912. The value was placed at 1122,499,000, as compared 
with $105,903,000 in 1914 and $112,957,000 in 1912. Receipts at St. 
Louis aggregated 1,463,170 bushels, as compared with 2,390,580 bushels 
a year ago. 

The yield of the principal barley producing States in 1915 was as 
follows: 

Bushels. Bushels. 

North Dakota. 44,800.000 South Dakota 24,000,000 

California 39,440,000 Minnesota 41,175,000 

Wisconsin. 23,288,000 Kansas 8,370,000 

Washington 7,263,000 Idaho 7,736,000 

Colorado 4,680,000 Nebraska 3,255,000 

•Michigan 2,508,000 New York 2,720,000 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



120 



TBADS AND COMMXBCS OF 



MOMTHLT BBCUFTS OF VLOUB AMD GRAIN FOB 1915. 



Homnu. 


Floor. 
Bbls. 


Wheat. 
Bush 


Com. 
Buah. 


Oats. 
Buah. 


Bye. 
Both. 


Bjrtey. 


January 

February 

March..: 

April 


869.100 
366,810 
288.760 
363.780 
384.630 
837.370 
346.880 
391.410 
886,870 
406.880 
455.500 
413.410 


1. 39 

l.f 00 
1.- i «7 
l.r; 08 
1,J.> » 
l.li Al 
3,n:.v;,38 
8.Vi: t88 
4.-.''^.-..l« 

4.^r:i,:89 

6, 85 

4, 58 

00 


3. 00 
3. 00 
1. 00 
3. 96 

1. 40 
1. 00 
1. 50 

.. OO 
1,J 80 
1. 00 
1. 80 
1. 90 
00 


3, 80 
1. 75 
1, 00 
1, 00 
1. 00 
1. 00 
1, 00 
1, 00 
1. 00 
1. 00 
1, 00 
1. 00 
00 


44,960 
80,060 
30,100 

9,900 
10,100 

5,500 
14,888 
70,430 
43,900 
89,600 
118,460 
89,100 


166,800 

118.800 

H6,400 

137,300 


Miy 

JUDB.... 


70,300 
30,800 


July 


30,800 


August ......... 


34,000 


September 

October 


83,000 
11^,570 


NoTember 

December 

By Waffon 


800,400 
358,300 












Total 


8.963,190 


85,350,404 


18,917,186 il9.403,865 1 486,468 


1,468,170 



MONTHLT SHIPiaBNTS OF FLOUB AND GRAIN FOB 1915. 



Months. 


Floor. 
Bbla. 


Wheat. 
Bush. 


Com. 
Bush. 


Oats. 
Bosh 


Bya. 
Biuh. 


Bariey. 
Bosh. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


469,430 
406,190 
871,540 
880,800 
817,060 
843,860 
367,670 
860,570 
476,010 
475,600 
514,680 
578,570 


3,405,380 

i.058,170 

3,388,850 

895,480 

i,i«t,*^;o 

l,4:iMwi 
3,ri'j/k,W 
8,^|.^:^.r.t£> 
8,:v.:,-JKl 

8,'f'iH "i"io 

8, 


1,880,840 

1,180,540 

1,303,830 

1.068,610 

1.073.830 

1.083,690 

807,880 

538,680 

509,910 

504.870 

811,730 

366,600 


1,»3,440 

984,410 

1,356,190 

1,649,830 

1,558,600 

693,870 

819,090 

733.330 

1.865,580 

1.168.990 

1,893,860 

854,780 


58.780 

15,490 

6,5S0 

9,8S0 

1,000 

970 

970 

34,390 

50,690 

35,800 

103.060 

94,800 


30,380 
18.770 
10,47D 
17,030 


May ...:.....:::: 


34,710 


June 


5,730 


July 


15,870 


August 


4,680 


September 

October 

November 

December 


38,030 
33,460 
33,490 
15,930 


Total 


4,905,490 


38,179,370 


9,931,830 


18,703,800 


886,160 


196,810 



TOTAL BE0EIPT8 AND SHIPMENTS OF GBAIN, INCLUDING FLOUB BEDUCED 
TO WHEAT, FOB TWBNTT-THBBE TBABS. 



1898.. 
1894 . 
1895.. 
1896.. 
1897.. 
1898.. 
1889.. 
1900.. 
1901.. 
1903.. 
1908.. 
1904.. 

1905 . 

1906 . 
1907.. 
1908.. 
1909., 
1910. 
1911. 
1913. 
1918 
1914. 
1915.. 



Beoeipts. 



66,848,786 
51,64M05 
87,410480 
57,308349 
•8,581,864 
60,S84,608 
56,058,154 
69,566.619 
69,817,364 
80,416,654 
79.438,118 
92.940.966 
98,338,031 
71.098,061 
79.833,167 
88.404,890 
77.944.484 
79.300.808 
75.658.985 
98,642,795 
95.197,881 
94,315.477 
98,818,983 



Shipments. 



61,487,000 
85,170,487 

41,300,613 
46,987,018 
58,733,679 
41.038,588 
64,606,480 
59,163.871 
60,684.366 
68,977,006 
69,880,300 
66,361,184 
73,451,134 
77,700,588 
67,190.686 
65,354.887 
68.851,4«6 
51,485,670 
64,636,878 
70,778.560 
76,534,398 
74,459,066 



Flour is reduced to wheat at four and one-half boshels to the barrel. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 



Il». 









«f 9> «« ^" tm ^ '3^1^^ p 



,n^c<i*^eq«tiq.nn»^^aii«^r4^n^ 






M Oiw ^T 



l|isSS3|8|,;ri^|^| 









^raTi^ f^ *w * w ■* lo ko lo ffl 1-= c ^ ■* cJ' K3 ^' ^d^^'i tQ s^I -fT -^ d" » 



ilpjpSHp|||gpp_||||||||| 



Is 8^a"a as '^gaft's a s's g s s ss s ss sf s = s »' 



II 








a 




p 


<d 




1 


t 


^ 


.i 


1 


3 




,S! 



eitiM obt^ <^ i2 d CO f^ O CC JS d4«sa IS en S E^ i^fS t^tnttt wTe^? 'rTtn'.-a? 



ffl lP5^ ^ S !B «« ■■ #^ J»l -* ►-- .-^ T-. Ei"- <«4 r- _n' ^"^ _r.r^.— " .^ iU — TiiJ . '^ ''^^ ^ 



liliiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiliSissS 



SI 



121 










Q I ^ , «5 e*' wa «' e^' aaw 44 mt* 

r 






■«" 'SS'S 



5:«J 










Digiti 



ized by Google 



122 



TRADS AND COMMBBCS OF 



MONTHLY BB0XIFT8 AND 8HIFMKNT8 OF FLOUB AND GBAIN FOB TWO 

FLOUR. 



RBOUFTS. 


SHiFiairaB. 


Months. 


1914. 


1915. 


Months. 


1914. 


ms. 


Jftonary 


377.170 
349.860 
376.660 
355.060 
280.730 
385.330 
350.540 
877.530 
885.880 
849,570 
811,800 
815,840 


889,100 
366,810 
388,760 
363,780 
384,630 
837,370 
946.880 
391,410 
856,870 
406,880 
455,500 
413,410 


January 

February 


835,060 
813,000 
865,780 
839,060 
383,900 
390,890 
394,700 
385,006 
445,870 
488.670 
873.880 
406,MO 


469»tf0 


February 


406,198 
871,848 

817,088 


March. 


March.... 


April 


April 


May.:"...:: ::::.: 


May..::::: :::: 


Jane 


June 


843,880 


July 


July 


367,678 
860,178 
476,018 
470,600 


August. 


August. 

September 


Seplember 


October 


October 


November 


November 


614,688 


December 


December. .......... 


878,810 






Total bbls 


8.014.700 


8,953,190 


Total bbls 


4,809.645 


4,906,688 



WHEAT. 



RnOBiPTS. 


Shxphbhtb. 


Months. 


1914. 


1915. 


Months. 


1914. 


1915. 


January 


1, ^ 80 
1.1 88 
l.r- MS 
1,- 06 

1,1 39 
l.r; 98 
6.JJ .67 

4,24i,'«7 

8,lEW/m 
4,V^M07 

8,<>y.^63 
.'OO 


1, t39 
1. M) 
1, «7 
1, 08 
1. i88 
1, 151 
3. 38 
8.H sa 
4.^ 133 
4,'-:, 89 
5.N 00 
4.r 58 
00 


ji 


3, .:«) 

l,>'d/.«0 
1,>4I 190 
l,4-^:r,l30 
l,7iH,470 
t>1 3,430 
3,y42,S40 
8,21H,<I90 
3,U>*<.780 
1,9^.170 

8,5;k.,*60 


3,400.380 


February 


F 


3,068,170 


Ma^";:;:::;;;: 


M 


2,388,868 
685,480 
1,464,010 
060,840 
1,470,180 
3,893,960 
s,068.640 


April 


A 

M :.. . 


May.:.:;;:::::::::: 


June 


Ji ... 


July 


ji , 


August 


A ' t.' u^t . + ......... 


September 


84 1 1 1* m ttfdT 


October.. ..;:::::;; 

November 

December 


O .i*pr 

N r 

X) p 


8,S7«,800 
8,966.700 
8,309,810 


By Wagon 








Total bushels.. 


88,069,047 


85.350.404 


Total bushels.. 


36,636,870 


38.179.370 



CORN. 



BaouPTS. 1 


SHIPMUm. 


Months. 


1914. 


1»16. 


Months. 


1918. 


1015. 


January 


3.r DO 
1. DO 

1,1 75 

l,M-r,iBO 

l,*ir^H,.K)0 

1,114^.: 50 

l.a.Vj.'.OO 

1,1 90 

1.1 15 

1.1 DO 

DO 


3, OO 
3, OO 

1, BO 
3,r^,i»95 
l,a3»i,^30 

1,107,100 
1,377, »50 

»44.400 

1.2^^H» 

1, DO 
1, BO 


Ji 


l,7^'.S.iV90 

l.N't-V^IO 

1,V 1^.400 
1, J 3-5. 310 

l,'2i^..^^M 
VhiN.,%B0 
0*53.270 
(Kf.^.lBO 
4JJ.r>90 
;irj^,370 
41>T,k90 


1,880.840 


February 


F( f 


1.180.848 


March 


M ::.::::::: 


1.303.838 


April 


A 


1,068.610 


May :;::;;;;:::;; ; 


M 

jLi 

JuU 


1.073,830 

1,083,600 

807,880 

538,688 


June 

July 


August. 


Aujrufit 


September 


SeiiNimbiar 


099,910 


October 


0( 


604,870 


November 


N ir 


811,738 


December 


D r 


306,690 


By Wagon 










Total bushels.. 


17.106,835 


18,917.186 


Total bushels.. 


11,008.860 


9.931,830 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIB. 



123 



MOMTHLT BBCBIPT8 AHD SHIPMSNTS FOB TWO TSAB8. 

OATS. 



saoviPTi. 




aHIPUBMTB. 




HontttB. 


1914. 


1915, 


Months, 


mi. 


19IA. 


JftnUBJT* 

FialirtiJLrT ... * , . 


a, 705, 700 
1,657,600 
2,878,100 
liiW.aw 
1,870,000 
l,9T8,b00 
2,m,850 
2,4i7,i50 
2,Afi5,BSO 
1,^,900 
3,017,900 
1,660.900 
200,000 


3,318,7»a 

|.Aa«,600 
l,Hirj,50O 1 

1377,§00 
1,816,500 
1»817,800 
1,»:,200 
l.Tii&.SOO 
1,830,9C0 


Ja^nnary.....^,.^., 

February ., 

\ March......,.,,*.-, 

ApHL. 

May...... 

June , 

July... ,,,- ... 

Auf^ust .,....„,... 

BepUtniiser 

DctoKmr... ..,...,.. 
NovomlfrBP 


2«aog,&Bo 

1, 503*040 
2,204.070 

i,ri6,oio 

l,fi4W,270 
l,5'B,S0O 
UJfi8,790 
2.310,960 

i,6iB,eao 

1.39K110 
1,636,180 
1,B^,41Q 


1,353,440 
934,410 


SlrX^ ::::::;:::: 

Jnlr^... 

AHiiiat... ,,... 


i,*M,ieo 

l,649,!ria 

I,5fl3,e00 

693,870 

819,090 

! n3,a30 

1,865,680 


October............. 

Nf] veiiili€*r. * M. 


l,168,eB0 

1,193,860 
8&4,T«iO 


JJ«Ct^Tiit)e r. . . . . i . . - . . 


l,fl90,€00 

aoo^Qoo 


Deeemlif^r ' * ^ . . . , p ' 


By Wagoa ..,,. ,,. 


Total biifiheli... 




Total bUBh^lA ,,. 


34,^,650 


iB,m,m 


30,110,360 


18JD2,800 



rtTe. 



BBOaiPTB. 


SHiPinnTS. 


Months. 


1914. 


1915.- 


Months. 


1914. 


1915. 


Jitnnftry , 


20,400 

2,200 

2,950 

9,900 

6,600 

15,100 

80,000 

91,500 

82,150 

84,100 

44,000 

45,100 


44,960 
80,060 
20,100 

9,900 
10,100 

5,600 
14,888 
70,420 
42,900 
89,600 
118,450 
89.100 


Januanr 


10.880 

18.710 

2.870 

7490 

12.050 

9,160 

29.280 

68,470 

44,740 

18,920 

40,%0 

44,770 


68.780 
15.490 
6,520 
9.850 


February 

March..; 


February 


March 


April 


April 


May............:.:: 


May 


970 


June 


June 


July 

Angnst 

September 


July 


970 


August 

September 

October 


24,290 
50,600 


October 


25,800 


NoTember 

December 


NoTember 

December 


102,050 
94,800 






Total bushels.. 


889,000 


490,468 


Total bushels.. 


288,180 


886,160 



BARLEY. 



BB0UPT8. 


SHXPIODITS. 


Months. 


1914. 


1915. 


Months. 


1914. 


1915. 


January 


225,840 

212,800 

166,790 

96,000 

86,400 

102,400 

84,800 

67,750 

290,800 

851,200 

421,600 

804,200 


166,800 
118,800 
86,400 
127,200 
70,200 
20,800 
20,800 
24,000 
82,000 
197,570 
800,400 
258,200 


JfLnuary 


27.720 
22.180 
80,960 
28,680 
68,180 
62 190 
22,870 
11,060 
12,260 
65,520 
18,660 
10,690 


20,280 


Febru^y 


F^bruaVy 


18,770 


Maroh 


Mnrob 

April 


10,470 


iS^ .:::•:::: 


17.020 
24.710 


U^ky 


June .......rr'TT-r-^^ 


Juno . . 


5,720 


July 


Julv- 

AuifUht 

8^-r-'^""!ier 


15,870 


August 


4.680 


!SK*' :::::::. 


28,020 
22,460 





NovAmbAP ...... 


Ij «r 


22.490 
15,920 


December .... .r .. ■, 


D er 






Total bushels.. 


2,890,580 


1,468.170 


Total bushels.. 


860,280 


196.810 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



124 



TEADE AND COMMSBCE OF 



RBCBIPTS OP WHEAT AT ST. LOUIS. 



TSAB. 



IMS,.,,......... 




Iflli .......^.,„.„ .,., 




xma „„ .„,. 




19U. .,. 




lyii ..., ,. 




l&iO,, ....,.„ „ 




won ., ..... 




imt ,.. ...„„,,..-.. 




liC>7.„ .............. 




iw»....... .,..,, 




i»»., ....• » 




1»M ,.,♦*.,. 




i&OB.... 




i»ia.....,, ,„,., 




1^1 ..................... 




IWO.... ..•*.*.... 




ItfW.. ^ 




im 




l«T........ 




l«9fi ,.»* 




1886.., .,..,.,^.,,. 




liM ,.,..,..,.,.. 





Jn^T— Emm. 



0,V44.131 
l,tlA,liO 



tOTAU 



i,4H.acM 



RECEIPTS or WHEAT BT OBOP YEARS. 



BubImIs. 

M IT* u 19011 83,809,671 

•« •• <' 1904 34,398,969 

•« •• •• 1906 30,968.896 

•• " •• 1906 31,607,870 

•• « 1907 16,899,688 

•• •« •< 1908 19,048,896 



Boaheli. 

T«ur«idi]igJinM80,1900 l7,an,6B8 

" 1910 13,661,880 

- 1911 30,136,686 

" 1913 16,886,816 

" 1918 88,793.460 

•• " 1914 37.344,344 

" 1916 84,196,843 



EXTREME MONTHLY RANGE of cash track prices of No. S Red Wheat, Na 3 
Hard Wheat, No. 3 Com, No. 8 White Oats and No. 3 Rye, daring 1916: 



No. 3 Red 
Wheat. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

NoTember 

December 

•New. 

EXTREME RANGE for the year: 

Highest 1 64 

Lowest 1 06 



16S 

I 64 
1 46 
167K 
168)^ 
160 
149 
159H 
1 87 
1 83 
1 10 
138 
106 
130X 
1 07 
1 33 
106 
1 39 
109 
136 
1 11 
1 39 
1 16 



No. 3 Hard 
Wheat. 
161 
137H 
1 66 
1 48 
1604 
1 89 
166 
160 
163 
1 44 
141 
1 17 
143H 

no9 

146 

1 07 
1 17 
1 06 
1 18 
1 08 
1 06 
108H 
1 30 
106H 



166 

1 08 



No. 3 

Oom. 

77 



No. 8 White Net 



Oats. 



78 


6^ 


68V, 


66 


76V 


61 


70 


66 


78H 


66K 


74K 


66 


78H 


66K 


2;^ 


5i« 


76 


63 


l^ 


46 


88 


75H 


H8 


81 


66 


72H 


88 


78 


88 


66 


s;^ 


68 


68!^ 


84 


66 


aoK 


60 


86 


76H 


45 


66 


40 



81X 



66 
84 



Rye. 

IHH 
1 10 
1 80 
1 15 
1 18 
1 15 

ri 

1 13n 

1 14n 

1 13n 

1 14 

1 00 

106 

97 

96 

93 

108 

96 

100 

96 

97 

96 



ISO 
93 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THS CITT OF ST. LOXHS. 



125 



MILLSTUFFS. 

BXOXIFTS AND 8HIFMSNT8 OP BBAN AND MILL FBBD FOB 
TWBNTTHSBYBN YEAB8. 





Bboeiptb. 


Ybar. 


Shipmshts. 


Tmar. 


InSMki. 


In Bulk, 
Curt. 


InSAokt. 


In Bulk, 


1916 


1,806,440 

836,070 

1,184,990 

1,146,670 

973,880 

1,894,846 

1,388,810 

1,460,330 

1,497.786 

907,170 

1,009,160 

1,668,410 

1,838,740 

1,360,360 

740.068 

848.060 

1,086.843 

676,911 

806,796 

687,988 

484 868 

800,111 

878,841 

888 161 

130,668 

140,488 

146,010 


486 
398 

873 
1,730 
1363 
1,001 
761 
664 
967 
900 
1,066 
669 
486 
358 
488 
400 
469 
683 
464 
471 
167 
460 
688 
842 
941 
906 
940 


1916 


1,638,760 

1,489,646 

6,337,466 

8,334,986 

8,104,976 

8.148,960 

3,843,870 

3,878,960 

1,947,880 

1.393,940 

1,133,146 

1,874,070 

1,961,608 

1,306,460 

841,666 

1,078.887 

986,686 

679,600 

661,800 

707,787 
761,488 
748,098 
746,646 
866,611 
891,639 
814,474 


48 


1914 


1914 


360 


1918 

1912 

1911 


1918 

1913 

1911 


4,866 
7,819 
6,397 
8,714 
8,193 
4,077 
4)434 
1,861 
1,086 


1910 


1910 


1909 


1909 


1906 


1908 


1907 


1907 


1906 


1906 


1906 


1906 


1904 

1908 


1904 

1908 


1,813 
600 


1903 


1903 


831 


1901 


1901 


1,663 


1000 


1900 


606 


1880 ....r..'.'.' 


1809 


1,360 


1806 


1886 


800 


1807 


1897 


663 


1806 


1896 


446 


1806 


1896 


840 


18N 


1804 


863 


1808 


1898 

1891 


1.011 


1801 


766 


1801 


1891 


908 


1800 


1800 


786 


1880....:: 


1880 


830 



HIGHEST AND LOWEST MONTHLY PBIGES OF BBAN, MIXED FEED, 
MIDDLINGS AND SHIPSTUFFS FOB 1915. 



Momrmm, 


BKAJf, 

niK 100 liVi. 


PER100L.B8. 


MlDDIiIFOd. 

PXB 1€0 LBS. 


SHIP8TUTT8 

AKD Shorts. 

Pin too 1MB. 


JwnuMy , ^ . . 


tl.ll 

1.06 

1.06 

1.30 

1.00 

1.00 

1.03 

.97 

.90 

.96 

.96 

.94 


dl.38 

1.86 
1.38 
1.07 
1.18 
1.13 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.03 


$1.18 
1.13 
1.07 
1.35 
1.36 
1.08 
1.10 
1.10 
1.00 
1.00 
.97 


dl.84 
1.80 
1.80 
1.86 

1.28 
1.18 
1.07 


11.36 
1.14 
1.16 
1.80 
1.30 
1.30 
1.36 
1.36 
1.16 
1.10 
1.06 
1.06 


®1.60 
1.60 
1.60 
1.70 
1.60 
1.66 
1.60 
1.60 
•1.40 
1.83 
1.40 
1.40 


$1.37 
1.16 
1.82 
1.44 
1.31 
1.33 
1.36 
1.18 
1.08 
1.06 
1.00 
.06 


®1.80 


FebmaW 


1.80 


MMch....:::;;:;;;::;;;. 


1.86 


AprU 


1.46 


Miy ::..:... 

Jane 


1.33 
1.28 


July 


1.82 


August 


1.80 


September 


1.19 


Oictober 


1.12 


NoTember 


1.08 


December 


1.11 







• Car Fancy White $L60. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



126 



TRAOB AND COMIIBBCB OF 



O 






9 



I 



^ 



^§ 






<9 

I 

OD 

I 



5 

s 

Q 

s 
3 






a 






l» 



SSS933SSS5SSSSSSSSSSS3&S8 



ssssS 






.:«» 



S 3S8S SSS 

(9 






sssssssssassssssssssss^^^^ 







I 






i 



§§a§S 



§ia§§§§aBSSSSSSSSSSSsS§Sa 

XX X XX XX 

§SS3SSgSgSS232§5S2322fS3g 



;s?x X XX X xxxxxxxx xxx _ 
§§§ SgB§§Sa2SS222S2222aaS 

XXX xxx ^ XX 
§§a§aaa§2S§S2S2S32s222S§§ 



! I I I ! 

jMii 

i : : : : 



! : : ! ! 

MM 

! i M ! 



lllll 

i I 



: ! 

1 i 



ass'^sssisi^ 



3 



CO 



s 

X 



3 

CO 



^ 






I 



6 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



127 



e 

tf 



o 






o 



6h 
P 



O 












5?; 












pa 



5m 






I 









a o « to ts Tf ^ ^ re c* rt e* ^ ■?■ 






:j^:rjs: 



»^ A 19 op 



sss 









S a' ffl 3:':a S3 si si s S =;' s? s; s'^^^^^t! ^ i?^ s: 



® 



o^ c^ (fl 1^ tS to w 'O e tCi us i<? *e ?9 ro [4 m 1-^ 1^ O go C 



t$« t^ ^ nS ^1&^ m 9 Oi <M Q ^ -tfs P> ^ c<9 1^ tiA 
■^pi^,^'\f«y^'|,A^rf\.tvr* "» ^e« V*--8* '^\-* '^'j? 












; t 



niiiiini 



!1 






h U M 

hnil 



^^^■''^""SSSS^SSSS*!?^?! 



k 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



128 



TRADB AND COMMSmCB OF 









SSSSSSSSS£s£l£lSSS*SS'^*^*''SS*''*^*''** 



< 
o 



p 



S8 



^ 



s 



8S 






iss^sHsls^slss^s^; 



X X :stj; XX XX 

S53SS SSSSS 3 8888S8S3SSS&!SS3 

isssiisslgsf8fsiifs88sli!siu 



8 



>4 

5 






2 



^rxx X xxxxxxxx:, - 



f^Ki^iS^Rf! 



XX 

^^X^XXX XX X X XX xxxxxxx 






H 

00 






►< 

^ 



X XX ist istX 
8 S ||SS|SSS|SS§S8 

xx^xx :5!x^ _xx XX x 



BSSSSS^S^^^S^^SSSS^^ 



XXXXXX ^^XXX XX XX . 

« ^ CO CO g .M lOao «o <o r^ t^ O Q 00 OkO OkOkoook t« M9 ^ M»aoao 



xxi^xxxx-"*;:?^«"*xxxx x xxxxxxxxx 



6 



XX X XX 



S 



o 
as 



9^9 S5:;9S 3 3§S;33^3 sffssfs9 



*^e4ee^tO«>a6oto^'Meoib«Jt«'a6ok 



ss5:s:3S^'S3Silsja^;^ss;S8s 



Digiti 



ized by Google 









THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



129 



3£3 SI 









4 14 kQ ■% <»□ M9 iq to lO lO lA to US m W3 10 *o us 4 iC 4 4 U9 SS 












:? :? ^ i? ^ ;!? 151!* ?■ :* ? :5? t- ^ t* « fe^* 06 tifi i^RfWp 









a PI P4 Oi C4 n 















i ! i 
' " ' i 



Ml 



{f 



n i ■; • 



n 



1 1 

I . 

: ] 






I 

to 






S 

S 

a 






9 



I 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



128 



TRADB AND COMMSmCB 07 






ri 

<5 



SSSSSSSSS^ts£l*^*^SSS*'^*^*^**S^***^S 



3 



p 



S8 



s 



8SS3S SS 

S8SSSSSSS5SS8S88S33S8S35383 



rssS^sHs^s^^slss^s^s 



&SSS SSSSS 3 S888S8333§S&^S3 

isssffssl:ssf8f3iiissisfigf& 



as 

8 



p 



6 















H 

00 



►< 
«< 

a 



i 



8 i 



^sslssiisssss 



fesssifsiifssifssffsf 



g 2 eo CO ^ -• to o^to «o r|^ r^ Q O 00 Ok O Ok Ok 00 Ok t^2 "^ "^ * ^ 



C3) 



^^^sssilsisl^si^iiiigfliiff 



SSSSS2S s SSI s sississs 

S322§3gSSg|IS§sS§5SgSSgg2§8 



a 



s 



'" " ~~ " "" X 



«H ca «o ^ ae «>' 00 Ok o -^ M 



s;:ss:3s;:ss883^s;ss«S8S 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CrCT OF BT. LOUIS. 



129 



s 



I 



o 



>3 



CO 



2S 
(4 

8 






§. 






5 



1 



o 

2S 



I 



II 



S|3S 



8 88 SS 






^ssi i^' 



aassasssssassssSssssaasa 



ass 



Solssi 



h" r» ?* t* «o f^e* »• t» t* »• «^ 3 



s 
assa 





SgeeRRSSefeffSsi&fSrrEi^fiKRrii^ii 



:s! 








§sa|ssagSogsasass8Ssaaaas 



SSgg§g§g§|g|g|§g|g§§SS§gi 



•NOOaOK^OO 



Ml 

!!!..,. 



H 



I 






f 



I 



I 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MO 



TBADB AND COMMBBCB OV 



i 



I 



ti 







8SSSS8»S9^ 






Issssaalasss^mallllllli 



S SSSSSSS 8SS3SS 383S383 

3S3SS83S222SSSSSSSSSaSS8S 



i 

I 



>» 

« 



o 



I 









n 
ntztztz 






SSSSSS2S5S5§IISS2sSSifaS§ 



§S§§g§§ng§SSgSs§2S55Sg§§^ 






I SS 









s§ll§§2S22slS2S2222232222 



s^ss^oSs^ssssSg 2322222 2S 
Sgggggg2iSs222ii222si2225 



MM 



I 



ii 






S 

n 

as 
tt 



2 



a 



Si 

S 



Digit! 



zed by Google 



i 


& 

s 


THE CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 

1^ 


hm^mmMmsi^m^iM^i 


i 






1 




i 

s 


i 


X x ;^^. j-j: i^'j? -x s:j's:^ x-f^ 


t 

s 












ts 


i 


,^l i 


1 fsiiiisifisi 






^; 


siiiiisifffiiiifisfssiiii 

In Is SI ii §1 11^ ^"S'i i ^ s s § S si §■ § 


C 

n 






ggj; g?5^^ig;::s:2t2:s:22222S2lg22 


3 


i 
! 




JJJJJJJ= 


H n i n i y u J n 



131 



I 



83 



a 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



132 



g;5 



< 
o 



K 
tf 



n 



p 



6 

2 



c5 

H 
Q 



& 






I 



I 



i 



TBADB AND COMMBBCS OF 

HI llsss^i sii Isl sf 

9;c 4:9999 9;;: 

(8) 
;;g99g99999999;?«;^ip9SSSSSgS 

9SS55 S2S3S3 S S SSUSS^SS 

I i f 

S!Sl5S^?S?SgggRgg?2?2fSgSSSSSg8SR 



■§ 






S3SSSSsSsS8S3SSSSSS33Si8SS 



SSSS8SS5SS82S=2S&S82§2S2g8S 



Sssa:sa^;;$ss 9 99 



o ck *o<o 



g§S§SSggSsg2S§S§SS5S5555§g 



1 

s 

O 

o 



Ok 

3 



s&2sasia22235S;§aasss=si§sii8 



i j I I 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



gs 



s 
t 



013 

S 






THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



133 



Eh 






^ 
-< 









6 
55 









i: 



aj 

6 
2; 



o 






— — — — — — — ^ 9O^09e9<r«3 «s 



F9n^««qpae 



WW A TO 





















w S ^ OB 



nn P 



J 















. r^. . - - _ .-■•.^.,r>-.rf;^.i^.t..^w.,rt'-. 

•-' ' - -^ — 1 - ■ — .^Ti Q t- '-o <» t~ *o ■*; «g -— 
- z - ^ - :;ii i:: o ss Qi o OB c4 -S SP ^ 






e *=* S 2» =" "=■ M 'O O <?* « *0 ^"'^^^ = •& «> uf* to Ci ^ Q 

t» 3» fia ffl O kft •« WS t~ fi» O O M ;«? »0 lO c^ CT W O O » « Cr t^ 



-^*t7 fi«S 



1^ ao QO ^""O Sj ^ rt 22^ S t2 ^' 



»is«i?i0ooai 






u j n i Mi n I M 



««^«.«'r^a,a^«c2;S2^?SS?^^«l3a^g^i5g 



2 
o 

u 

a 

o 

I 



■c 

§ 



s 

o 



s 



>» 

tf 



o 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



184 



OD 

< 

o 



i 






TRADB AMD COMMBBCB OF 






H 

CD 



m 
6 



>« 
«< 

s 



S 



I 






s 



S 



o 
2 



^ 












;s;tsssssssl^s 









8S2 SloS&!oSSSSSSSS:S:SS ssss 






sssssssflfsss 



SU&SS:S2S:S222S2S2SSSSSSS83 









i:R 



I sis8 






SS&3S3SS;838SS8S&SSSkSS8SSS 



:st:s:?is«r:s!a^^;j?3r:f;f:r:j!^X5; 






SS;SSSS3SSS;SS:S:SS:SSSS:£ 



(9) 



S8SS» S8S53SS3S3gSSSSSSSS 
'XX. ^X X X X X2 



(3) 
88528S&2223Sa2S2S2aaaa2S85 



828S8 S gS 2S §§§S$SSS 
XX XX X 



^'MftfVto' 



•^'c«^«dc(t«>'a6o«-ie«' 



a 
8 

1 



1! 
I 



"a 




3 
g 

a 
I 

e 

9 



o 



SS88S»S;8^S 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



s 
I 



H 
a) 



o 



(4 



o 



o 

Q 



i 




o 






•2 



o 



THB CITT OF 8T. LOUIS. 



sSoS S » S 



it 



# 



8S 



^«l8l^^^lss:il^^ 






— S~^ — 

SS8 SS8« 



f^Mt 



88889^ 



3r35 — 

888 8S8S8 

8S8888888S83 



RiBffiSi 



§§ 



S S S 3 l§5S 1st 



§8§35555555S3Sa5§5§S§S§§§ 



3333 S3SS3S SS3S3SSS9SB3S 

S3SS!::2SSa2(§§§88as;SSS£:SSSS 



I I M I 



f : t ! 

M i i 1 I j 1 
i i 1 1 M i 



i! 

: : 

I 



1 1 1 1 1 i I 



Mil; 



iili 



i I 



185 





le 
I 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



136 



TBADB AND COIOfBRai OF 



^ 5 



Ei 

(H 
tf 



t 



H 

•^ 



ii 



S 



o 



i 






o 



5 

a 



g 



■z 

m 



O 

is 



888888888SS;SS33333S33SS3S 









:?; :^ :$! 

s s :s s 






^ CO ^6 to CO 40 '' 
•O CO CQ €0 CO CO 






?^^s?^«^ :sr:r:sT;sfX:?:j; »5?:5;:f:nt:« 



SS!S!oS:o!oS:o!S!oSSSSSSSS838888 



2SS 



5«o!oSieS«eS!o!o>o>OMSSSSS8SSSS 



888S8888 Z SSS58 



if 



88885SS8SSSSS88S5SS822828 



~- -^ «A m^% e^ h^ik ^A MA 1^ .W^^j>it, .A, j>^H j>^H ««^ »^Jfc ^A ^- .^*.^ 



SSS3S33SSSS3SS33SSSSSSSSS 






g 3SSS| 



S3 






*^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^4 «^ v^ v« «^ V4 V4 »^ Wi4 ^ *« Wi4 Vi^ Vi^ «« «H «^ *«*4 



: } i 

t t : 

i \ \ 

\ I : 

i i i 

1 i i 



^««^-i«>o6oiosasa:^s:odosgagJ35j55:g|sg 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OP BT. LOUIS. 



137 



i 

o 
it 

O 
O O 



,-» o © 

HOW 









S S 



is 



s 



^ 



3 

I 



P3 


1 


S 
aw: « 

3SSSSSSSSSSSSSS3SSSSSS3SSS 


g 

g 


< 


ill! ,Sf,|g^ill, iH^ 


6 


3: ^ 


6 




1 


<1 

3 








i 




f4 


i 










I 




i 


III §2 25 a i Is! 

s S &fe n ^1' :: g 2 2 2 2 !2 ^^^'is 13 1: ^ :2 s ^? 


1 

S 

em 

1 


S SSS — 2 S?S ^§ S5^ S'I2 2E2 22 JSS 2SS ^Is * 2 


1 




1 


1 




* 


J , ^ i n M U M M M i 1 M H 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



138 



TBADB AND COMMBBCB OF 



HIGHEST AND LOWEST CASH PRICES ON No. 2 WHEAT, CORN 
AND OATS AT ST. LOUIS FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 





WHEAT. 1 


CX)RK. 


O.-^I^ 




Tr»w. 


Bigbm. 


Lomil. 


HiflM. 


Lofwtol, 


i Biibart. j 


i4««* 


isift 


F«b. t > 64 


a.pt 


1.06 


J«iy .81 H 


0*t. .68^1 


rtb. .60 


*A«. 


-li 


]»U 


B». i.2m 


JUB* 


,76H 


Aui. ,87 


D«. .63 


S.»t, ,51 


A«g. 


*H 


1913 


Jmm. 1,15 ' 


Mir 


.63 


I^m. .81 


Jpa. .45 


J^ .51 


J-^ 


-**. 


1S13 


lOr. l.t&>4 


N^r. 


.94 


liv. .&& 


Vm.. .45 


Apr«. .99 


4iC^ 


Jtii 


t»n 


J&n, 1.08 


July 


80H 


Nov. .77 


Jan. .48 H 


p«, 4»M 


■Feb.. 


i« 


1910 


Jka. LSS 


JlUW 


.» 


^J^ .as 


D««. .44 


Jaa. .50 


Ool. 


*tiH 


1S09 


June, l.fi5 


Atiir.. 


1.03 


May, .77 


iJan.. .88 


May. .«0H 


Aug., 


rJJJ 


10 OB 


D«c., 1.10 


Juiy. 


.fi9 


&"pt.. .*tlH 


<lJan.. .5411 


July. .57 


Oe*. 


1&07 


Oct.. l.ftBM 
May. .mU 


Jut],, 


:j;ii? 


<^V., .6€ 


Jan., .Ift 


I>n.. .54 


Jan.* 


,U 


isoa 


Aujs., 


Jqly, .54 H 


Dee., J9H 


Jua0, .40 H 


^F*fe.. 


.» 


laoa 


JiJ.. 1.20 


Sept.. 


M ] 


July. .58 H 


D«., .4m 


July. J4H 


%iiC.. 


«i»H 


lt04 


XSepi.. l.tl 


Jftn,. 
April. 


.84 H 


Nuv., .57 


fe; :Jm 


^Feb., .44 


D«Q., 


.B«S 


ifias 


I>eo., .94 ! 


.«o*l 


June. .55 


June, .54 


SMar., 


*itS 


IBD9 


Jao,, .03H 


Au«,, 


.63^ 


jATi., ,6914 


D*e.. .40H 


July, .59 


Aog., 


.n - 


100] 


Dcd., .88 ^ 


July. 


61k 


Dee.. .70 


Jan,, .15 J 


Dee., .50 


Jan., 


.tifi 


1&0{) 


Junv, .80 H 


Jan.. 


July. .45 


JtJi.. Jl i 


April, ,36 H 


Aug.. 


.10 


le^a 


Mny. -f^iH 


rNsa., 


.66 H 


Jan.. ,37 H 


Dm , .80 i 


*fe: :ISh 


rjuiy, 


.31 


lS»i 


May. lift 
+April 1.01 


Aiic.. 


.64 


Dl^., .37 k 


J»n., .16 B 


MAur, 


.n 


1807 


June, 


,74 


Sept,. .39 H 


Jan., .ItS 


De«., a^H 


^let.. 


.16H 


lS0g 


D^,. .9IH 


p^June, 


MH 


April. .17^4 
&l^y. .51114 
Ati«., .56 H 


Hppt., .1714 


Di«.. ,20 


0Jiili«« 


.It 


less 


June. .8&V 


J&o., 


A^H 


D»o., .38 U 


Mar., .81 


Di«., 




IfiBi 


jAn., .60H 


July, 


.47 ri 


Jan,. .llO 


June. .50 


July, 


.iflQ 


isas 


M.y. .7114 


July, 


.52 H 


BMay. .41 ^ 


N*)T,. .81 if 


#Jan, .11 H 


Auc,, 


,'!fj|^g, 


isn 


Feb,, ,91 H 
April, 1,14 


iJfe,. 


.6*H| 


May. .50 H 
April .78 S 


Mar.. .i4H 


Aug.. .85 

AprU, .67 
SSv„ .47 


Di?*.. 


«-^Hb 


1S»1 


July. 


.82 Hi 


Dm.. .35U 


B*pt„ 


3C9v 


i%n 


AUA.. 1.01 H 


Feb.. 


.74 hI 


Nnv.. .55 H 


F«b., ,14 ii 


J*o., 


*llin 


1889 


Feb.. ,98 


July. 


.7114 


1 July, .40 


Dm., >28H 


Jail., .26 


Oet., 


,13 


iB^g 


Q€i„ LIB 


July, 


.78 


May, .56 


Dm.. .10 H 


M»y, ,»7H90<rt'. 


.13 


lft87 


M»y, .89 H 


Sept. 


.87^1 


* D«K3., Am 


July, .33 


l>c.. .53 « -July. 


j&n 


lgEg6 


J*ii., .94 


Oct.. 


.12H 


Aiitf.. .41 


June. ,30H 


July, .64 
8 Ai>ra. M 


Aug., 


ISS5 


May, 1.07 M 


Feb., 


.80 h 


May, .48 


Deo.< ,319^ 


Aug.. 


.13 


list 


May, 1.19 


N<.v., 


.73*i( 
.96 H 


Sept., .58 H 
Fek, .57 H 


Ckst.. .42 S 


Feb., .SfiH 


Wqi»-. 


.ItilC 


18@a 


June, L21H 


Jan., 


H»r.. ,44 ; 


Auk,, 


*14M 


1882 


Jan., 1.45 H 


Sept., 


.90 H 


July. .83 


De6.. .41 k 


May. .57 K 
Dr^.; .48 S 


Sept.. 


,]|gf2 


1881 


Oct., i.ao 


Jiin., 


.m ^ 


Au|[.. .67 M 


April .80 y 


Jaa., 


^Kl^g 


18S0 


Jul., l.S6^ 


Sept, 


,S8H' 


No*.. .45 


Jan., .17 M 


Aug., 


>9i^B 


l8Tt 


Dm.. 1.87 >4 


Ji^n.. 


;?S5J 


< Oct.. .41 M 


Jan.. .3SM 
Nov., .18 


D«0,. .iSM 


Jan.. 


*1^^B 


1878 


Feb., 1.28 
A4jril, 3.73 


<3ot,. 


Jmi., .45 


Jajj,. .2SM 


ta>4.. 


.iflfV 


1877 


1>0.. 


131 


Hmy. .58 


Mar., .15 


May, .46^ 


Ofti,. 


*'^4K 


1876 


Jan., L60 


Bcpt 
Feb.. 


1.13H 


' April. .48 H 
April, ,758 


J«tk.. .87 


Aug.. .40 
Apri MH 
July, .6511 


July. 


wV 


1879 


Oct., l.»5 


1.05 


Dec.. .87^ 


Not., 


,19 


1874 


Jul., 1.73 


Nov.. 


1.03 


O^U .83 


Jan,. .03 


JftB.; 


.it 


187 a 


Krb., a,09 


''^July, 


1.35 


Dec,. .fiO 


Fob., .8314 


Dee., .46 


Jaa^ 


MH 


1873 


May, 3.30 


Jan. 


1.64 


Jan.. ,43 M 


Dm., .28 


May. .46 


8ep«., 


M 


1871 


Jane. 1.70 


Jwly. 


1,30 


July. .53 


Aug.. .42 


July, .55 


Nov.. 


,tt 


1870 


eMjiy, LSO 


-*JiLn., 


.95 


Mny. 1.03 


D«e., .43 


May. .61 


1 |^^)>l.. 


.•1 


18^9 


Jan.. 3.10 


Dec.. 


.85 


July. ,94 


May, .50 


July, .68 


^ D«., 


.40 


iSfiS 


Aprifp 8.85 


Nov.. 


1.60 


Oet.. 1.03 


+Noy.. .15 


May. ,Bl 


hOcu, 


.a 


ise? 


Auff.. 


1.95 


May. 1.14 


Jan., .70 


July. 1.0O 


Am. 


.iT 


lS4fi 


June. 3,50 


DJim., 


3.00 


Qflt.. 1.13 


Mw., .55 


D«., ,U 


Aug.. 


.14 


18fi5 


Odt., 3.80 


♦ June. 


L45 


Jan., 1.43 H 


Nov., 60 


Jan., .96 


Ckt,, 


.411 


1864 


July. 3.40 


A Feb., 
VJ»n,, 


1.38 


Dtft.. 1.60 


B4ar.. .94 


D««„ 1.0S 


Aug.. 


*TS 


isea 


M&r.p 1.46 


l.OO 


Dec.. 1.30 


OJitn., .50 1 


Dec., OS 


Atig-, 


.50^ 


1863 


Oct.. t.l7 


Jan., 


.68 


D««.. .53 


Fi?b.. .27 


Dec,, .€7 


Feb,. 


>TH 


1861 


May, 1.4 a 


iJee. 


.68 


Jan., .44 


June, .18 


^ May, .84 


June, 


.Ift 


18«0 


ESApril. L55 
May, 1.15 


IpScrpi. 


.^5 


May, ,71 


De*.. .35 


|Feb„ .60 


D«i., 


.16 


18ff» 


Aug., 


,68 


t^May, 1.00 


Nov.. .46 


Feb.. .80 


Aug., 


.10 


1858 


4+a<?pt.. I.3S 


Nw.. 


.55 


D«., .87 


ijMar., .80 


De«„ .80 


May. 


.19 


1BS7 


Mtiy, 1.83 


013I.. 


.6ft 


May, 1.00 


Dec., .88 


BCay. .81 


B^ffei,. 


.18 


iBse 


C!J«&„ 1.50 


Auji,, 


.75 


RJan.._.5(l_ 


Mar., .33 


Dee,. ,55 


Mar.. 


.10 


XA 


lw> in Oflt. 


j'i 


ibo ia Auir. 


WAbtj io Nov. 





Alio tn April. 
i Mir, , 


1 


AJeoinSepl. 


9 Alao ill Auc. 




" Aug, 


-i 


'* Feb. 


i> - ^ Sept. 

^ 1 Aug. 




3 


*' A^. 


h " Nor- 


^ 


"* July. 


a 


*- April. 


# 


r 


*' Auff. 


B '• Feb. 


B 


" M*y. 


5tt 


■ July. 




K 


*' Sept. 

*■ July, 


* i^ 


kUg. 


^ 


*• Dm. 


A 


'* U^T. 


G •* F#b, 


* 


'* AprlL © 


>*fe. 


fi 


" July. 


• 


** Aug. 


44 '^ D«. 
*' M»y. 


# 


iS£: 


a 




* " ss- 














1 


" May, 






# ** Anc 














" Mht. 






■ ** Maf«k 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THS cnr OF ST. Loms. 



139 



M019THLT RANGE OP PRICES OP OPTIONS NAMED ON WHEAT, 

CORN AND OATS POR EACH MONTH 

DURING THE YEAR 1915. 



MOSTH. 



OMBmAlM 



BlAT. 
191S. 



July. 
1915. 



SSPTBMBBB, 
1916. 



DsomtBVB, 
1915. 



January... 
Vobroary.. 

March. 

April. 

BUy 

June 

July 

Angnal 

B6pi6nib6r< 
October.. . 
Hovember.... 
December. 



Wheat $1 

Oom.... 
Oato.... 



Wheat. 
Oom... 
Oato... 



Wheat. 
Oom... 
Oato... 



Wheat. 
Oom... 
Oato .. 



Wheat. 
Oom... 
Oato... 



Wheat 

Oom 

Oato 

Wheat... . 

Com 

Oato 



Wheat. 
Oom... 
Oato... 



Wheat.. 

Oom 

Oato 

Wheat.... 

Oom 

Oato 



Wheat. 
Oom... 
Oato. . 

Wheat. 
Oom... 
Oato... 



68X 



4SH 

Sit 



L46 II 

52H 
1 40 1 



84» 
61H 



MX 



96H 1 
tOM 



14 
65X 



Sfl'SS 



(OH 1 
106H 1 

mi 



mi 

34 
46Ji 



I 17 ^1 82 
5lK 06 



.06 
60X 



1301C 
77H 



\f^ 1?*^- 



52 



S« 



17H 1 II 
74H 9tH 
46H 68 

^119 



I 01|i 
78i 
41fl 



64H 



104 



11«!^ 



$104^j(^09K 



106>i 126 



i l«H 
42M 



85 

88H 
96 



l»H 



41H 

107H 
T4H 



1 12 
114 



64H^ 



«X 



•S^^J^ 



90 99 

62H 66)i 
MH 86 



Si^ SI 

100^106 



lOlJ 
67>1 



e2H 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



140 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



HIGHEST AND LOWEST CASH PRICES OF No. 2 RED WHEAT 
AT ST. LOUIS FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 


JanmuT. 


Febmary, 


March, 


Apdi. 


M*y, 


J««. 


l»l6„.-„. 


l.Aa m^27H 


l.H ^1,45 1 


l,67W®1.3flH 


l.QO ^1.49 


1.59H#1.3T 


L33 et.iO 


ItU..„.. 


MH 


fis 


«^ 


«l 


fl«i| 


93 


96 


93 


98^ 


m 


f7 


75*£ 


1013 


i.n 


1.09 


l.II 


1.00 


l.U 


97 


1A3K 


1,04 


1.13 


m 


LOT 


91 


loia .^. 


IM 


«H 


l.OJIC 


Vti 


1.0& 


l.Ol 


1.21 


IM 


1.3SVi 


Klft 


L19 


L0« 


1!HL_. 


IM 


IMH 


l.(HH 


ttl 


fl7 


«4 


fljt 


^ 


m 


90 i 9SH 


ss>i 


1»I0..«.., 


1.35 


1.Z3 


1,30 


1.^4 


L37Hi 


i.itfH 


).3a 


l.OS 


1.33 


t.oo !m6 


il 


190ft._.. 


UU 


l.<^ 


L30 


hH 


Laa^ 


1.3fl 


1.53H 


1. 34 


i.eo 


1.4a ii.oe 


i.» 


ieoi_. 


I MM 


00 


UOAH 


m 


l,fkV 


m 


i.oir 


M 


i,m 


i.uo ii.oiM 


80 


IflCf?.-... 


mi 


7iH 


m 


7m 


71» 


7&H 


ilH 


75^11 m ^ 


mi 


LOO 


s^ 


1906^.... 


M 


n 


&fiH 


^ 


M 


80 


W 


BO fl9^f 


Si 


95 


91 


I90i_„- 


i.ao 


tA* 


1J9H 


1.16H 


iJ7 


LU 


Lt2^ 


od 'i.UH 


m 


L07 


St 


1904., 


ff7 


MH 


H2H 


H 


K0S4 


WK 


um 


m 


MO 


SB 


tAdH 


i.m 


lMfl..»». 


rm 


im 


nit 


73h 


7JIU 


70 


7V^ 


rmi 


7«4 


73 


54 


T« 




WH 


mi 


m 


S3H 


iC^ 


7«H 


mu 


71^A 


a4i; 


7tt|4 


!?. 


It 


77 


n 


75H 


31? 


7&'^ 


74 


7fil% 


71 


7* 


Till 


7»^ 


l^l'C 


19M„„,„. 


n 


ti^H 


7I»^ 


7fe(^ 


M 


73|2 


7D 


11^ 


79tn 


; "^^' 


4n|f 


l<S8tl.M»>> 


sow 


72 


7S?iJ 


7^4 


7T 


0H4 


80 


73H 


Tljhf 


i5i 


TVfc 


IIM..^. 


i.mu 


nn 


l.ftl 


wjt 


LOO 


»*7 


IMH 


07 


tJO 


t,i^ 


1.00 3 


m 


litT.. 


osH 


m 


7fiH 


wti 


MVi 


M^ 


IM 


90 


97 


|i 


M^ 


74 


lS9fl 

im ... 


73 


mH 

-S 


71 
50 


73^1 




^ 


S3 


s«< 


00 


S13! 


ISM 


^.S^ 

MH 


MH 


wS 


A3lj 


ta 


iS3H 


Mf 


fiO 


fin 


*L 


i«a . 


71 
ftlK 


s^ 




93$ 


«3 


s» 


ni 


}& 


s^ 


jj« 


;% 


leoL.^. 


1.00 


ftlH 


1.01 


wtVi.o* 


i;u 


l.Oi 


tMH 


1*01 <L01H 


•» 



HIGHEST AND LOWEST CASH PRICES OF No. 2 RED WHEAT 
AT ST. LOUIS FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 




Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



141 



HIGHEST AND LOWEST CASH PRICES OF No. 2 HARD WHEAT 
AT ST. LOUIS FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 


January. 


February. 


March. 


AprU. 


May. 


June. 


1915. 


1.51 @1.27H 


1.55 ®1.48 


1.60H@1.39 


1.65 ®1.50 


1.62 ^1.44 


1.41 ^1.17 


1M4 


94 


87 


94H 


88H 


95H 


89H 


96 


88H 


98 


91 


98k 


76H 


1913 


97 


88 


94 


80 


92 


88 


96H 


90 


97H 


88H 


97 


88 


1912 


1.12 


98 


1.08H 


1.00 


1.05 


1.01 


1.18 


1.00 


1.19H 


1.13 


1.17M 


1.05 


1911 


1.05 


94 


1.01 


89 


1.00 


85 


1.00 


82 


I.OIH 


90 


1.00 


87 


19ia . 


1.19 


1.09H 


1.18 


1.08 


1.16H 


1.08 


1.17 


1.03 


1.18H 


1.00 


1.10 


96 


1909 .. 


1.08H 


1.02 


1.17H 


1.04 


1.21 


l.llH 


1.36 


1.17H 


1.40 


1.30 


1.50 


1.20 


1906 


1.05H 


94H 


1.05 


93 


1.04H 


96 


1.04H 


98H 


1.07 


96 


1.03 


93 


1907 


79 


70 


78 


73 


77 


72 


79H 


72H 


99 


78H 


1.00 


89H 


190& — 


mi 


72H 


85H 


78 


80 


76 


90 


76 


89 


79 


84H 


79 


1900. . 


1.15 


1.10 


1.17H 


1.12 


1.14 


1.05 


1.07 


89 


1.09 


89 


1.66H 


1.00 


1901 


u 


74H 


1.00 


83 


97 


85 


95 


90 


1.01 


92 


95 


87 


1909.. 


75 


05 


75 


68 


74 


66 


74H 


69 


75 


aoH 


82 


74 


1902 


8«H 


77 


81 


75 


TSH 


71 


80 


70H 


79H 


73 


76H 


73 



HIGHEST AND LOWEST CASH PRICES OF No. 2 HARD WHEAT 
AT. ST. LOUIS FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Tear. 


July. 


August. 


September. 


October. 


November. 


December. 


1915i 


1.42Hdl.09 


1.45 ®1.07 


1.17 @1.05 


1.18 @1.03 


1.08 @1.03H 


1.20 ®1.06H 


1914 


96 


7<W 


1.14 


79H 


1.20 


1.02 


1.14H 


1.01 


1.15 


1.10 


1.27 


1.14 


1913 


08H 


83 


92H 


84 


95H 


85K 


94H 


82 


98H 


83Ji 


94H 


85 


1912 .. 


1.15 


91K 


1.00 


89H 


97 


89 


97H 


89H 


93 


84 


98H 


85H 


1911 


97 


81H 


1.02H 


85 


l.llH 


92 


1.14H 


98H 


1.11 


96 


1.09 


94H 


1910 


1.14H 


97 


1.08H 


97 


1.07H 


97H 


1.06H 


90 


1.02 


87H 


1.02H 


91H 


1909. 


1.30 


1.05H 


1.13H 


98 


1.12 


1.01 


1.14H 


1.05H 


1.14H 


1.02H 


1.21 


1.07H 


1908. — 


1.06H 


90 


1.00 


91H 


1.08 


96 


1.03 


97 


1.05 


99 


1.09H 


l.OlH 


1907.-.. 


96H 


88H 


95 


79 


1.02 


91 


1.09 


93 


1.02H 


93 


1.06H 


96 


1906^..... 


82 


70H 


73H 


67H 


73 


67H 


76H 


70 


76^ 


71 


75H 


70H 


1905. 


1.06 


83 


90H 


79 


86H 


•mi 


89 


81H 


88H 


81H 


87H 


82 


1901 


WH 


89 


1.11 


90H 


1.14 


1.04 


1.15 


1.07 


1.13 


1.07 


1.12H 


1.09 


1908.^ 


80M 


70 


81 


74 


81H 


75 


82 


75 


82 


73 


80 


73 


1902. 


78H 


65 


n 


64 


71H 


65 


74 


67 


72H 


65 


72H 


65 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



142 



TBADB AND COmCBBCB OF 



MONTHLY RANGE OP PRICES OP No. 2 WHEAT POR MAY 
DELIVERY POR A SERIES OP YEARS. 



Yev, 



nu. 

1914 

IflU 

1911 

ID 10 

iim 
im 

1906 
1906 
1901, 
190S 
1902 
1901 
1900 
1809 

um 
im 
ie«e 
liM 
1894 



Juuuar. 






mi 
mi 

M 

mi 

ml 

7m 

mn 

BO 

so 
«0K 



1.01 It 
tM 

i.o»H 

1.07K 
1.205? 

n^ 

914 

S3 
1.01 
93 
^H 



Fofapuftry. Mftreli, 



sr' 



91 h 

9«K 



S9Vi 

,M 1 

.0^ 1 

« 1 




H 90U 

971^1 i$U 
.NNL.tWW 1 

Ai ILJOH I 
,01lJ 9ill 1 
7»' 74H 

SS*i! 7*U 








MONTHLY RANGE OP PRICES OP No. 2 WHEAT POR MAY 
DELIVERY POR A SERIES OP YEARS. 




Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 



143 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OF No. 2 WHEAT FOR JULY 
DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 



Jaamary. 




JllBC, 



IfiU 






Ifl0ft_ 

line.- 




mi «OJi 

S3 mu 

ml 86K 

77H S« 

7Bi 87 

eSVi 73 

mM 72H 

67 »7J^ 

73.?^ 81H 

a«H so 

66Ii 7lH 

mi «M 

£3 sell 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OF No. 2 WHEAT FOR JULY 
DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Yew. 



July. 



August, 



September. 



Octol«3r- 



November^ December, 



litl.. 

liiu 



1903.^ 











mi mi 




KM ©I.lfiH 





Digiti 



ized by Google 



144 



TBADS AND COMliSBCB OF 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OP No. 2 WHEAT FOR SEPTEM- 
BER DEUVERY FOR A SERIES OP YEARS. 




MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OP No. 2 WHEAT FOR SEPTEM- 
BER DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 



Jaly* 



AuffUiit. September. 



October, 



Navembar. December- 



IMS.. 

1901... 
!««.., 



mi 1.07 




M 1 




4SH 



U« 1.18 

^ si 




Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



145 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OP No. 2 WHEAT FOR DECEM- 
BER DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Jftauary. 



February* 



March. 



ApriL 



May. 



June. 



1913^ 



77 



1912... 



1911 

1910. 

1809. 

i9oa 



91 ^I.OIK 
1.02 I.IOX 



1907... 



1906... 



97 I.OIK 



1905... 
1901. 



1908 

1908 

1901 

1900 

1899 



82 82X 



76H® 83 



1896.. 



70« 80^ 




189ft... 






MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OF No. 2 WHEAT FOR DBCBM- 
BER DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 




Digiti 



ized by Google 



144 



TBADll AND COMMXBCK OF 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OP No. 2 WHEAT FOR SEPTEM- 
BER DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 




MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OP No. 2 WHEAT FOR SEPTEM- 
BER DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 



July. 



August. 




1915.. 
1914.. 
1018.. 
1013.. 
1911.. 
1910.. 
1909. 
1908. 
1907.. 
190e. 
1905.. 
1904., 
1903.. 
1902. 
1901.. 
1900.. 
1899. 
1898. 
1897.. 
1896.. 
1805. 
1894. 



75^ 


'95 j| 




83K 


1.04^ 


sl\ 


9VA 
83H 


'>M"l 


89Hi 


M] 


95H 


1.07 


''7 


1 OOI4 


1.09^ 


■H,'^ 


84H 
88 


97^ 


■'■' ' ' h 


71K 


79 


i,.i,' ," 


79K 


87K 


■I-'.'* 


55U 
61K 


90 


7 Mi 


71H 


81 
76TK 


«iS ' i 


63 


70^ 


(,2 ■ i 


U^ 


79^ 


T'J 'S 


599^ 


,'i.'i' b 


63 
48X 


72H 





n.i3 

1.13 
89H 
95H 
90H 
1.02H 
1.021^ 
05H 
90H 
71H 



82^ 
.12H 
82H 
67H 
73K 
73X 
73H 
69H 
1.05 
62K 
70 
58H 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



145 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OP No. 2 WHEAT FOR DECEM- 
BER DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Jftauary. 



February. 



March. 



AprU. 



May. 



June. 



1915^ 



1913 

1913. 



77 



191U 
1910^ 



1909^ 



1907. 

19M.. 
1906.. 
1904. 



91 dl.OlK 
1.02 I.IOK 



97 I.OIK 



1906.. 
1909... 

190U 
1900.. 
1809. 
1896. 



82 



82K 




1897. 
189(L. 
1896. 
1801. 



75H® 83 



7DM 80^ 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OF No. 2 WHEAT FOR DECEM- 
BER DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 




Digiti 



ized by Google 



144 



TBADll AND COMMKBCK OF 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OP No. 2 WHEAT FOR SBPTEM- 
BER DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Jiiuuary. F£t>rukiry 




MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OF No. 2 WHEAT FOR SEPTEM- 
BER DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



Year. 


July. 


AugUfit. 


September, 


October. 


NoTember- 


Oeeember- 


1*15 , . 


75H ml 

mi mi 

Q&H 1.07 

i.oa^i i.oflH 

88 07*J 
711^ 70 

rm mi 

n^ mi 

mJi n 
nn SI 

63 70H 
<HH 70H 
fi3H soli 

m ml 

48K WN 


84 1,12 

m m% 

07 1 .02%i 

m mh 

Wi KIH 

mn 1.1 aM 
im mu 
eiM 67^ 

mi HK 
m% n% 
mH mM 
78H 1.05 

mi 70 
4«?^ mi 


«S #1.14 
m v.U 

98!-? im 

6Wi 72U 
7iH ^H 
1.06 1.10 

??^ ?? 
e7H 73l< 

say floS^ 

93^1 1.01 4 








1»14 , 








1»13.„.. 








1912 








mi.. ,. 


™-^*-«— H 






JftlO , 






1900 








i9oa, ,„,. 








1907 ., 








1900... 






Ii05 








190*. ., 








ieo3 








1902 






190L .„. . 








I MO 








18ft3 .^. 








18M 

1897 , . 


.. ,., , 






ISM 

1S05 


68 mH 








lg94 

















Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



145 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OP No. 2 WHEAT FOR DECEM- 
BER DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 



January. 



February. 



March. 



ApriL 



May. 



June. 



19UL. 

1913^ 
1912^ 
191U 



09Hdl.l89< 
77 



1910... 
1909... 



1906l..~~. 

1907. 

IflOO 

1905 

1901. 



91 ^I.OIK 
1.02 I.IOK 



97 



82 



I.OIK 



1902... 
1901... 
1900... 
1899... 




1898.. 
1897.. 
1898... 
189ft.„ 
1891. 



76Hd 83 



•m, 80« 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OF No. 2 WHEAT FOR DBCEM- 
BER DELIVERY FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 




Digiti 



ized by Google 



146 



TRADB AND COMMXBCB OF 



WEEKLY RANGE OP PRICES, PER 100 POUNDS. 



Datb 
1915. 


MILO MAIZE. 


KAFFIB OOBN. 


Sfttardfty 


No. 2 


No 


8 


No. 4 


Sample 
Grade. 


No. 2 W. 


N0.8W. 


Jan. 2«« 










81.81 


$1.80 


Sz 




$1.29#1.81 
1.84 1.85 






1 .29 #1 .80 


16.... 






1.82 
1.86 
1.48#1.45 




2S^. 








1.88 


80.... 








1.871 1.48 


Peb. 6.... 




1.58 
1.48 
1.45 
1.84 

1.28 
1.80 
1.88 
1.88 

1.27 
1.19 


1.52 
1.46 
1.86 

1.88 

1.28 
1.21 






1.68 1.59 


iS:.: 










1.55 1.56 


20.... 











1.40 


27.... 


$1.85 






1 .82 1 .85 


Mirch 6.... 








1 .28 1 .82 


18.... 




1.25 






1.81 1.85 


20.... 


:::::::::: 




1.87 


1.85 


27.... 


1.25 

1.27 
1.18^1.21 




1.84 


April 8.... 






1.81 


10.L 


$i".'20 






1 .21 1 .25 


17.... 




1.28 


1.19 1.27 


24.... 










May 1.... 










1.28 




s:::: 




1.28 
1.28 
1.10 
1.17 

1.21 
1.23 
1.23 


1.22 

1.25 
1.26 








15.... 










1.22 


22.... 




1.10 








29.... 










June 5.... 











1.S4 


12.... 










19.... 




1.21 

1.18 1.28 


$1.20 




1.28 


26.... 






1 .21 1 .28 


July 8.... 




1.20 
1.17 
1.16 
1.21 
1.19 

1.14 
1.12 
1.11 
1.02i 

1.00 
.98 
.99 

1.02 


1.28 
1.18 
1.17 

1.20 

1.18 

1.12 
1.03 

1.02 
1.00 


1.12 






iS::;: 




1.15 

1.12 1.14 
1.16 1.17 
1.16 

1.12 


1.18 
1.20 


1.19 


17.... 






1.19 


24.... 








81.... 






Aug. 7.... 






1.21 


1.17 1.19 


14:.:: 






1.181 1.15 


21.... 










1.12 


28.... 






.98 






Sept. 4.... 






.98 1.08 


11.::. 




.98 








18.... 










25:;.. 












Oct. 2.... 












9.... 














16.... 






1.04 

1.10 


1.00 


1.12 




28.... 




1.10 


1.14 




80«.. 












Nov. 6.... 




::::: i 


1.00 


.94^ .95 




1.10 


18.... 




1.04 
1.01 
1.00 

.98 
1.02 
1.04 
1.00 


1.08 
1.03 
1.03 

1.03 
1.08 
1.05 
1.02 




1 .04 1 .08 


20.... 










1 .01 1 .02 


27.... 










1.00 


Deo. 4.... 










.98 1.04 


il:::: 




1.02 

1 .01 1 .05 
.961 






1.08 


18.... 






1.07 
1.04 


1.04 


25.... 







1.01 1.02 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



147 



OP MILO MAIZE, KAFFIR CORN AND FETBRITA. 



KAFFIR CORN. 


FBTBRITA. 


No. 4 W. 


Sample 
Grade. 


2 Red. 


3 Red. 


No. 3. 


No. 4 


4Mxd. 


No. 3 


No. 4 




(White) 


































$1.28 




































1.85 























































1.28 












































$1 .28® 1 .29 






























































































































































































$1.06 










$1.05 






































1.24 






$1.25 












l.l© 


1.13 


































$1.24 












$1.20 


















1.16 


















1.16 










1.20 
1.20 












































1.10 
















1.12 






1.11 


$1.08 


























































































$1.02 
















































1.08 




















































1.06 








.08 
















.98 




















.... 












1.02 


1.01 












.90 








. 










1.08 


















1.07 





i.oo 















1.00 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



148 



O 
GQ 

GQ 

s 

GQ 



S3 

O 
6 

o 

GQ 
H 
O 

M 

3 



g 



S 



n 
o 



► 

o 

SIS 



g 

< 



i 



S 






i 



I 



TBADB AMD COMMBSCll OF 



3? 3f»5Cia»acc« xcseacccn 



» te «o lo '«'<«■'« ^ ^ c« •• M •• e« e« e« ^ M •• '<«i « 






:«i:«: 



x:j3I! XX :<x« »c« 






X xxcf :< x«x«:«»«5« x 



aio^c»«»e»«oc»e 



XX XX 



3CC 



9 






XX X XXa? X XXX XXX 



:ft xx«x X x^t;:? xx x 
XX xxxx xxxxxx 



x:«:<:xx 



xxxx X 



xxxxxxx 



XX 



X X XX XX X xxxx 



X x:*;52X XX X XX xxxx x x| 



xa: xxxxx XXX X X XX xxxx 

iHK*»r>cor>^^io^aor«e«t*oioie 

oDt»wt»gtpt^aoieiQioioio<p<o<<ito 



io«eio«»'<«iooK**4< 






x^ic x:x:«:«:^x x x xxixxxxxxx 

•HaorrC««»9i-*P'9aoofQoe««4ooe«o«4<««»ieio*M^^ 



SS^^S^ 



;ss 






xxxxxxxxxxx 



x:<i 

X 



XX X XX XX XX 



X XX X XXX XXXXX X 



x*: 



XX XX XXXXXXXXX X 



x:^xxxxx xxxxxxxx xxxx x xx 

oo^e«*t«^-«t«e^A«4c««o«o«M(D^e«c»t«ooc-AMO 



X *xx XXX xxxx X XX 

ooAco^a'«aD«»o<0'<#ooaaao'«««teoie»i4c««e'<«ic«io 
K* «"«■«'« lO «0 » '^'^ '<«i ^ M iO «••••• c« c« c« •««•••« le c« 

(31 

X xx:? XXX X XX xxxxxxxx 

lO e« '<«i lO t« ff C»«^ O '<«i a 0» « M M 00 «» A ^ t« •• -« 00 K* CO t0 



X XXX XXX X xxxxxx X X XI 

(31 
XXXX XX XXX xxxxxxxxxxx 



»goc<c<c<^w^— loet 



X xxxx XXXXXXXXX X 
X XX X XXXXXXXXXXXXX35X 

K*oo^aot»ep«^t««<oioio-«Ac*e«t<*^o(0»»coe»K*A«e 

iA^««c«^OAoor>(Oio^«»c««MOAoot*teiO'<««»c«»40 
«^*H«4^^^Soooooooooe»aaae»ae»e»Aa 
wAAwAAOkOknoknotOknAOkooooooooaoaoooaoQOQO 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



149 



o 

H 






> 
o 



5<:s?x 






o 
o 






:»f;s:^ 



SSSSS^Isii;;98S8S8S 



x»:«!x 



1^1^ 












??, 



g^!oS3:sS!SS9 IS 






:99 



"ill 



ia;sssis«8 



Ix XX 



8 18!5 



iixi 



I? 



IS 



; I 



I* 






Hi 



% 



TX XX*» » XXX 



XT 

xxxx X :); xxxxx X xxxxx 
tS&SSS&C8%$3$8SSSSSSS3S 



S 
53 






gs'S^ijisil^sless^'ss: 



a 



ill^s«^llle«gifl^ii 



<9. 



Iii^»gt>llllullil^ll 






3SSf:^8899939SSSsSS;S9S 



§ 

•^ 






i 



iiiiii^i^iiiiiiiiiidfl 



IJ iJ iJ i iJJ 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



150 



TRADB AND COMMXBCB OF 



O 
M 

Q 






f 



> 
o 



h 






o 

o 



S8 
9S 



OQ 



o 

5 



S 



? X ^XXX XX XX ^ xxxx 
pSSeSsr!«S3StS3SS8988S3f9 



5 



XK« jsrx XX xxjps! xxxx 
|2Ses388S!:3SS93S99888S89 

if:fx»;xx»xxx srx »Epr xx 



a 



;(i!^ :f;xxxxxx;:s;;fx xx:«x xx 



M 

2! 









pxx;srxxxx:j; XX XX 
C3993S9S;883S;88 



5 
a 



t;rx X X jxrxxxL, 

g»SSS8^39398:$33 



i^ii 



:ifx:s^»^ ^ xxxx xg» XXX 

g2ioSS$8SS3;;9t8!S838S3S;33 






^^ X X XXX IxxxxX 

|S38Sg83999^;i:883 |82(898 



S 

>* 



: = uJ M U 1 1 i i I i !j J Ij 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THX CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



O 
H 
P 



6 



o 
o 






O 



P 






< 






S 



m 

s 



I 



n 



^ I 



j!^j'm:R 3?^ a^ae ^a; j 3!3c « 



® 
























SS^^ 









!S 



I ' E i ' ! 



ISS i i 



i if' 



is f 



i||||iii||ii|i| 



sill 



151 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



150 



TBADB AND COMMSBCK OF 



Q 






S5 


^ 
■^ 






i 


















« 1 










D 
O 


1 


II 






















Si 

i 


] 

: I 
t ] 






























I 1 

* ] 
' 1 1 


































i 
























mi 




1 


Ml 
iiii 


i 






1 


1 


1 


1 




§ 


11 


i 
11 


iii 


u 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



M GQ 



THX CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



A 



O 



O 
P 






o 

< 



p 



4^ 
t-l 

% 






n 
» 
^ 






i 



i \ 



i 



W 



:r:ir^if;r ^^ 3::t xa; I ;faf 3f 


















SSKSSS 









at 3;a: ;s?3^xj:x:« 



afX:*J ar i?!;!*3:jfX 



iat 



$ jS 






i ^ 1 

1:3 IS I 

E E I 

[ [ 1 



i 



r 



1 <SI3 



ilH! 

iiili 



MM 
i i " 

11-. 
MM 



S£3Ti2 — ® — 



1: 



3C i 



iigii^iiipigiii 



151 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



150 



TBADS AND COMMXBCB OF 






m 






% 



> 

o 



o 
o 






8 192 






o 
p 







p 





















03 





















i 

>* 






Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 



D 



o 



O 

q 












p 



S 



p^ 

Oi 

^ 



1^ 









hi 



! i ! 

Mi 



3F af3J 3;ac a xip 


















5 313; 









3f ar3!--':?:r:,*;Kxx 






Xi, 



IS 









.gs;ssss 






h 






M M I i i 






3 

s 






siiSiiSiiiii. 



la; 
IK 



I I 



151 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



153 



TBADK AND COMnKCB OW 



ei 

















it i| ! 


-^ * i 


MAB. 


ID f 

e 1 


^. 1 ' 


* mummuummi 



Digit! 



ized by Google 



m 
o 

GQ 
H 

» 

GQ 
-^ 
(^ 



s 

H 
OQ 

5i 

02 
H 

6 

I 

GQ 



s' 



s 



i 



I 

cj 



s 



il 



i 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS 



•0 <« «• 1-1 «• <0 tt t* fH 1 

- e«c«Mc««-« 1-1 «<«««••••'« 

^ e «-• <« A M le e« <« CO es <<« 00 lo e <« le 00 «• e 00 1-i o» <e <e lo 



;ss 



* xs»XJ! :« 



;j! ;« x^f^ 



IQ3dli-iC0eOt«'««OOO<0QOC»«»^<0O»ffC»<OOOOO'« 



:i^x:«: x« x« 



^- . .«'«iot»«Hdioo«-4ooc«<et< 



^e«e»e««»oo«eo»Moooioc»t*««Mc«ooc0<ooo<OK»<0t* 

00 ^ M «» 9 M M <« M <e <<« 00 00 MM e« e« e« 1-i «-« 1-i M n M M «» 



^i^Xf 



X X x«ccc »»Gr 



<e ^ ^ 00 ^ 00 ^ ^ lo «• «o 00 00 00 «o CO CO CO eo »4 vH <e CO <o • 



"S~5SSS5^"^^^"^ S ^ 



»:«::«!« »»»xs x«c 



<oeo^^<ooocooo»^e»^e»flOQo<oM»^^fe»eiHoo^O( 



s 



"X^""^^ 5"5^ST5 



^c»e»aoe'^(0oeoioc<oco<o4Do«-4e«t»t»aoooe«aK*« 



^sssss 






eoeoiQoe»«o^fe»^<oc<oAc<«iHc>oK»io«oK»flOi 






:« x« 



«-i<ot.c»^^oe»ooco«-40t»'4Qee«'«<eooiooofe«t»ooot» 



:j^ s; :f »! :«;a: x«» 



« x« X 



-«c«oO'«^aoQO<ettocooo'«i-ioioaoeo0kooe»ooooqoc» 
a-^'^iO'^ootoio-^'^oo-^iQiooogoeogOfHTHeoiooooo^w 



0kooaooo^ooiec»Mc<oo»«-4oo^dic<««Ofc«e»fc«oo<eoc»«o« 



8^Q t* ^co ooo t-ie eo -« coie ^lo o»oo «Hc»ac»oo '^loe 
■^^ieoO'^»iQ-^«ow<'oo'^ooeocoooeoi-iRooo»fOioo» 



ioooeoioe'^eeaoo^oo«-4ooMf «eoo<0oofe«c»«He»aogM 



:*! 



»! s; :«:« ae » 



«• ^ la e» Of eo lo 1-1 M «• CO -« <0 <0 c» <o o C0 1-1 a o <« CO o fe* <0 
io^gio«i^ioiQ^<ooo^<o^cogooo<i>eoy«iio<o<i>ooiow 



>oa$«oc«ooo«-40oeoofOMco'«ao<eK»ooo»e»ooo«o 
ioS<eiooo^ioiO'^«OM'«oo'«Mcoeofo«-««Hcoc««»e«^co 



:«:«»! 



:f »« ^ :« 



d 



•^ p^ p^ p^ p^ «^j9\^^,p4\#^ 



:iwww» ;« aoccjwaocfaw: 



to-^SiiOoo-^ioio-^ootO'^«0'^goweow*i*»^oocooooo-^co 



AQOoeao^ioooiei-iv-ie-^iooo'^aoflowooK-octeoA 



laU 



35 :«;a: 



»e :c:«ww»; :« 



e»tte|e»Aa|AO»o»o»o»c»o»d»c»c»ooooooooooaoaooooooo 



153 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



163 



TBASB AMD COMiaBCX OW 



p 
8 










i 

6 

p 




»3; »3aa5S »»»» asa** 
|eRS8SSa3t3«3Sxtt:SS88 


s 


paii.fi*i5iiii,ii;i 




III 


X ' 1 


31 : 

l: : 

3 


i: 






s 

5i 








I I ' 


s 




















i 


1 








i 


Urn 


giiii 


nil 


liiiillii 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



> 



I 



■3 



S 



>4 

i 



% 



i 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



:f :f!:«»?:R:i; 5t 



;« :« xiw; 



io^c»^<0OC»f<««ooo<0QO0kM'«<0e»ffC»<ooogo<« 



» <e CO <e e« «o e« e« e« 






(31 



:*:»«» :*! 



x«»: i« »cc 



fao«o^eoe«ee»M'««-4(oe»MO»-«io<oot»Gooooo0kie 






^ 



»:«::«!« xj»»xs x«c 















^ X :f »: :«»! x«» 



« XR X 



lO'^'^^'^tOglO-^'^W^lOlQWWWW^^WlQW 



— iOM«^eo5eif«c«0k«-«e^aM<0t»e»fc«oo«ooe»M4D 



9SS 



ss^ 



ss^ 



«^o «• ^M OM f lo M -« (0 ao «-«io o»ae «H e» a e»«o -^le o 



s:;^ 



ss 



ioaoMioe«^a»ooe«Hao*HMMt»ieao<oaot*0ii-ie»oo«9e« 
«e9Me«oM«-40ooooe«M<0'«eo<et<-aoc»e»ooo«o 



iOtt«»e«eio «He»aoo^*Hio 00 co-^ 00-^(0 00 Aoo^ttiAc 



e»ooMopi>4iQOAio«-4*-it»^ioa»-«aoM(0<0ooK»oc»c«o 



tte»ae»e»ao»o»o» dko»c»o» die»e»ooS 0000 0000 0000 0000 






153 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



153 



TBADK AMD COIUnBCB Or 



i 

o 


@ i 






i 

6 






s 

m \ 

I 




>|if 
1 i{ 




c 1 af 'x 1 




11 


tll 

'af 


















s 


























1 i 










1 


3 


si 


iilil 


nikm 


lllli^. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 












I 



Si 



5 



I 



THE CTTT OF ST. LOUIS. 



X :«:x*«x< »?:r X X »! 



:«; 









<« m o» n « a 00 10 c» •• 00 o le o» fc« evfo c« 00 «D <e 00 <0 e- « t* 
K» 00 <e <« 00 e« eoM •« f^ CO c»c«c»'« to <oot» 000000010 



«»io«-i«-4MOc« aooao««iooo(0^«He«e»«oooo<ea«Dc« 



x:a»5 aa«x«:c x«c 






ce^^oO'<»<0'^K>-»iowa»«ococowwe<w».«wo»w<o«»o 



flo^e»o»ooe^(0Moiec<«c«<o4Do^c«t<-t*ooooc<«e»»*m 



•^V P^IP^ •^ P^ P^ ^^^^ 



:*! X 



fe*ioe«e«eoiOOAco'«t<-'«<oc«a»e««^e«c«iocoK»coo»aooo 
<« 00 <-< «-< A M <e t* 00 o» •« 1-1 1-1 e» «:« 10 K» CO e» o» <o CO o 1-1 a fe« 

IOIO^iO^'^IOIQ^iOW^'^IO'»Wg<C<»H>^W^<5<og«» 



^<0c«ei^^oococo*^Ofe»^ooc<«^aeooio«ot*foaefe» 

X X *»X Xfa: X«« « »! X 

^c«M'«^ooootoaoe«<e'^«HOioooooo»ooe»ooMQOO» 

»0^^lO^«»lOlO-^^09^lOlOIOWC<W>HTHe»IOCO«»^W 



:r:i^ :«: :« x« :«:«» :r :«; ;« x< 



«««c«e«»4«-«Mfloaef0^c« 



S«40K»'«c«oeot<>iQe«'«coie^aoo»eo*Hc»die»«»'«ieo 



goofoiOQiHaeooov^ooiH<eMt*ioaoc0aot*o»iHe»oo«9r« 
MasioM^iO'^'^asM'^ce'^fOMMfOi-i^nMMniOfO 

t<-i-iioe»«»f«ioi-iMo»c«'«<0«OA«ooc«iHao'«e«ot*c0 

lO'^^glOW'^iOIO'^WOO-^CO-^gOWOOCOWfHW OOO OtOlOW 



:«:«:« 



:f :s««< :f :« 



ioo«oe«oio«-4aaoo*Hfi4io<o<0'^oo-«(0Qoe»oo>^o»ioo 



(d 



:<:i;»»5 » aoccjwaocfaw: 



ooeiQe-e«aQ^a9K>^m^c*oofe*^at*fe»o»oe»m*^fe»^ 



99f*95!^>$$9>9^^c^^ioeo^oo«a«0<ooot*oc»c«c» 



lO'^—iooowioiooooatO'^— >o»ic*«o«fHiHo»c<<ow^^ 



153 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



154 



TRADB AND COMMXRCB OF 



a 






o 
z 



o 
o 



00 



o 

D 



IN 

p 















1 1 
r \ 






kn 

[mm 









I I 















^^ X^ as XSf »:S3r 3^3* 5?^ xa; 












g|^»||iiii|iiiiiS§|i 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



155 



o« 



QQ 



o 






o 



O 



o 
o 



00 



O 



5 



h3 

21 



« 

I 






I 



is 



: i 






lacfsiss 






yxxxxxx:|! XX XX XXX 
s|9S9SSS$$8SSo98«sEsiS88 

!XX XX XXX X^X^ 




Xxxxxx LXx x:j; X»xx xx 

gl^sasS |$s«ss8^«sscscss;38 

^s^ xxxx lxxxxxxx:i;xxxxxx 
9t^^St9 j§§s;S88statststs; 



f^x x:f* xxxx^x^XXxxxx 
"Xaexxxxx^rx xxxx xxxx 

3S89SI8998^SS(»aSS;StsS 



III! 



rxx 



*5S9 

X i«X 

SSS9 



lllll 

XX X 



:fxxxx 



X 
XX 

99 



xxxX*x*XX 
;«xx x:j;x X 



XX 

88 

li 



l« 



s I& 



iiii^iligliiilgiiiiiii 



3^1 

XX 

S8 



»x 

S8 

X 
8S^ 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



156 



TRAOB AND COIUnRCK Or 



gl 



NoQ 



i 


i : : 
i : i 

IN 

i 1 i 




i i 
i 1 

• : 

ii 


i 


IN 

iii 




:r:rxx xx xx:c XXX xxxx 


1 




g 




H 




5 

a 


1 i i^«g«i If iigi f 

1 i il^il. II i.11 1 


c3 


illP' i§» 

1 i 13$ S « 8 R 


i 


IIP' • 
1 ll{l £ 




ii f 


5 


i ! j > 

i i 

1 1 1 


1 


iisiyis^i^gJisgisiiiii 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THK CITT OF ST. LOUIB. 



157 



o 

H 


^Ii|«lii«l8l sl«ls;l h 


i 


|^SIIII«^lll9sl»l ;; 
slsl^ll^lsfsllllll ^ 


i 


^x X xxxxxiLX x;i; X x 

|S9e9l399SSSsSSS8ts»S S 

Illllil9«l^l8§lllll i 


OQ 


|S^lfll|:.lfll8il II f 
I^l«li«f»ll8^» II 1 ^ 


1 


filllfll^flsl^ 

I&3i9ll«fsi8li 


^ 
g 


: 

; 

i 




S S8 S 


i 


i 

i 
I 

i 


X 

1 ^ 






j 
i 






HJ 

§ 


: 
: 

1 






S 

s 


j 
: 

i 








1 

i 
1 






5 


1 






1 


: 




liddiiiiiiiiii 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



168 



O 

S 

I 

O ft 



••womox 






*|aoj«o«ic 
pmi mnjniq 



*Oia '■9lITtI9M3S 



•peas 



-pOg MO!>99M C 






Sl4 

p 



I 



•a>WM« 



•o^WM I 



'tpUP^tdBtl 



O 



TRADB AND COMMSRCB 



OF 



Mf««<««0«« 



5P8aS6Bj5f2gg 



«fi4 •«« •c<«ooai«e» 



te^ttiof** .«i«P4fi4'«^ 



•- i^'^-saass 



OMiHAWlOaDW-VI^^^ 



^t*« •*-!«>«««<««<« 0000*3 



sss; 



S285 



S8SS5 



fl&SS 



-;35«» 



:^l( 



--^88 



*2SS 









g§8SiSSSSt:§S| 



-' .-S' 



8SSB«Sg|gg|e 



SSS5SS||g8|S 



a 






iSi 



syislllllll 



8 - 






So • 1 o 



1 



sit 1 5 
5a'- 1 a 



M3: 

St -as f, 



M§§S8SS§SS 



55 r t I- 5 

•2 a- • ^- 



666666666 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



H 

H 
H 

M 
g 

OQ 

B 

H 

QD 
00 

00 

.1 
S^ 

Si 

a 

H 

S 

s 

OQ 

o 

A 

§ 
S 



^ 



juriHYa 



wu 



im*x 



••PWD'B 



tifljimtx 






*pe0TJ(nj 



P><ftnO'A8 









t|dm8 



•nwA 



••yt*e'8 



••yMP'8 



•two 




THE CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 



S3 1'-s^ :• I'-as:: 



8sa« 



^sstss; 



•r«^c««»oo I 



:'"ssa;2« 



:S53SSS* 



eooiiococo •M^oooftaoo 



l§§i§§S§§ggi 



ss^sa^sssass 



SSS" 



ss« 



•■«t«coioie 



-4l«t«^IOCO 



a* :-* :^ 



s$:ssa'^!issi5ss 



ss;S9SS9SSs;sss 



sssssis^sss^ ;:;?'' 



SSSSRSR^-'S^S 



I^AfnS 



s;e?ggs;^§||2§ 



§§3Si§§SgigSS 



8585*28**-^ : : 



SSSaSS£3S3SSSJ 



|||pl|g§gi2 






^^OOfiC^*^ •'-•<' 



• «o ••iHoo I- ' 



<«c«ua<ecet>ce^«' 



•SSS8- 



a> 00 a 00 lo '*• o c« o> lo o> 



a 



^SSSS^assc;^!;::^ 



83^8^^^^*^^^^ 






<oa9 cecvMio^ ..hmpm 



o « c« GO e« t^ r« 4D eo c« <D CO 



SS^S^S-'S t'^'-S 



||8sas;;s=3{:s 



UlillSsSaS^ 



s93SSg|2S5SS 



jeooooo^c^iOiO I 



D^oooio^coiOfotH^r* I 



SSiSS^S88a<»8S |S 



|SggSSS8^!o3S g 



sagessssssig 



*« h 

ll 



OQ 



i3 

6 d d I d 



CO S •" 



s 

15 



IS 



I iiilll 

o 2 * <5 d d d 6 
O 

GQ 

OQ 



flSSSllll 

en's n^!^^^ 



dddddddd 



159 



Hi ill 







..8- • - 






Digiti 



ized by Google 



160 



TRADE AKD COlfMSBCB OF 



STOCK OP WHEAT IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. 

LOUIS IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS, BY GRADES, AT THE 

CLOSE OP EACH WEEK DURING 1915- 



Satvbpat 
Btbwiiio. 








Jannarj 2.. 

16.. 
28.. 
80.. 



February 



BCmroh 



April 



May 



June 



July 



Aofiift 



6... 
18... 
20... 
27... 

6... 
18... 
20... 
27... 

8... 
10... 
17... 
24... 

1... 

8... 
15... 
22... 
29... 

5... 
12... 
19... 
26... 

8... 
10... 
17... 
24... 
81... 

7... 
14... 
21... 

28... 



September 4.. 
11.. 
18.. 
25.. 



October 



2.. 

9.. 
16.. 
23.. 
80.. 



Norember 6.. 
18.. 
20.. 
27.. 

December 4.. 
11.. 
18.. 
25.. 



25,210 
25,211 
19.169 
19,169 
17,080 

16.753 
16.758 
16.269 
16,207 

19.242 
15,517 
13 .422 
13,808 

12,802 
9.096 
9,704 
1,106 

608 
608 
608 
608 



902 
902 
902 



2.075.083 
2.038.237 
1,816,655 
1.649.129 
1.567,421 

1.866.685 

1.816.078 

1.029.548 

986,454 

790,278 
482.987 
381.365 
359,268 

872.155 
237.833 
265.282 
874,904 

892.258 
409.980 
432.648 
462.772 
102.743 

91 .021 
73.382 
65.288 
81.713 

20.458 

16.073 

9.631 

21.692 

140.760 

56.847 
37 ,723 
88.246 
31.889 

82.840 
87.906 
43.511 
41,244 

36.578 
39.026 
39.402 
42.068 
45.868 

58.473 
59.001 
59.281 
64.243 

68,397 
59.897 
66.308 
69.578 



610.290 
571 .756 
465.809 
407.920 
349.646 

201 ,627 
143,728 
133,107 
107,544 

87.434 
41,798 
42,776 
53,442 

75,489 
31,095 
57.800 
97,683 

29.223 
42.098 
50.916 
48.058 
18,839 

8.921 
2.260 
1.899 
1.709 

1,482 

3.842 

6.656 

47.261 

50.789 

63.941 
29.342 
57.621 
48.648 

45.433 
80.127 
65.252 
81.714 

76.375 

83.841 

83.043 

101.840 

129.065 

191,717 
224.311 
252 , 132 
286.268 

278.985 
268.542 
312.303 
298.335 



84,081 
28,511 
15,918 
10,685 
9,690 

4,121 

5.587 

5.826 

10,974 

6,829 
1,655 
5,590 
1,831 

8,686 



4,964 
22,447 

8.121 

10.673 

16.560 

8.117 

2,008 

4.424 



8,847 

8,847 

1,147 

1,446 

42.738 

42,997 

72 .239 
60.685 
96.721 
78.661 

84.156 
62,666 
27,753 
54,639 

102.817 
125 . 142 
108.063 
123.654 
137.469 

178.126 
214.489 
280,210 
163.462 

162.804 
141 .053 
151 .802 
165.272 



4.413 
4,413 
1,234 



519 
1,971 
3,002 
1,971 
1,971 



150 



269 
627 
629 



7,708 
7,134 
7,107 
4,780 

5,879 
3,502 
6,448 
846 
1,925 



1,023 
1.640 
4.414 

8,020 

2,104 

24,386 

9,898 



355 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIB. 



161 



STOCK OF WHEAT IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND BAST ST. 

LOUIS IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS, BY GRADES, AT THE 

CLOSE OF EACH WEEK DURING 1915. 



White 
Whiter 
Wheat. 


No. 8 
White 
Winter 
Wheat. 


No. 4 
White 
Winter 
Wheat. 


No Grade 
White 
Winter 
Wheat. 


»4S 


No. 2 

Hard 
Winter 
Wheat. • 


'41 


1.137 








4,129 
4,129 


64.077 
84.060 
84,594 
82 .932 
25.178 

24.948 
26.979 
25,419 
21.706 

18.443 
13.071 
13.280 
12.000 

6.468 
4.018 
3,614 
1,594 


42,860 


1.187 








27 .214 










29.909 










1.000 
1,000 

1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 

1.000 
2,097 
2,097 
2,017 

2,097 
2,097 
2,097 
2.705 

2.177 
2.177 


17,694 










10.229 










6.660 











4.662 










6.008 










6.616 










7.120 








































402 










828 










328 










423 






















.... 














.........«.....'• 




























2.714 


























' 


































































































249 






1.816 
1.316 
1.316 
1.316 


















968 
968 
887 


1.100 










9.086 










6.864 










18.883 














12.668 




^ 










5.647 








1.222 


3.689 


9.317 

71.688 
17.869 
86.807 
85.682 
67.726 

97.094 
223 ,862 
885.013 
584.279 

674.846 
682.810 
734.480 
762,208 


2,176 








4.099 










8.476 


2.348 










12.288 












19 ,396 










1.378 

1,873 

2.169 

796 

796 

796 

796 

2.186 

2.136 


70.722 










121 .671 










124.046 










128 .827 










194 .910 










381.888 




43 


3.257 




887 .856 






447.098 






3.834 




542.088 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



162 



TRADB AND COICMSBCS OF 



STOCK OP WHEAT IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. 

LOUIS IN PUBUC ELEVATORS. BY GRADES, AT THE 

CLOSE OF EACH WEEK DURING 1915. 



Satubdat 
BTBiniio. 


ii 


Sample 
Grade 
Hard 
Winter 
Wheat. 




M 


M 


M 


Janoarj 2 

9 


9.186 
5.666 
1,184 
1,098 
1.215 

2,294 
2,252 
2,254 
1.226 

2,577 










1,772 












16 












28:::::::: 










2.016 


30 










2.016 


FebroMT 6 










2.016 










2.016 


20 








1.395 
12.812 

6.080 
6,030 
6.080 
6.080 

6.030 
6.080 
6.030 


2.016 


27 








7.827 


Maroh 6 








5,417 


18 








5.418 


20 










5,419 


27 










6,442 


AmU 8 










6.446 


10 











6,447 


17 










6,442 


24 


45 

1,896 
8.448 
1.078 








5.416 


May 1 










5.417 










5.417 


15.::::::: 










5.417 


22 










2.202 


29:::::::: 














June 5 


719 












12 












29..:::::: 












2,827 


26 














July 8 














lo:::::: 














17 














24 














81 














AUffUlt 7 














^^ 14:::::::: 


3,946 
11,245 
11.675 

22.117 
5.132 
9.810 

10.908 

11.575 
21.886 
45.259 
58.433 
104.841 

106.420 
146,742 
131 .782 
185.850 

166.699 
178,032 
205.167 
211.164 












21 












28 


974 

7,171 
3.381 
8.379 
8.379 

4.602 
2,197 
2.162 
1.228 
2.211 










September 4 










*^ u:::::::: 








. 


18 










25 










October 2 




1.059 
1.059 
8,206 
5,147 
7,930 

9.396 

6.881 

11.120 

10.590 

11 .675 
5,340 
7.688 
9,084 











1.045 




15 


1.454 
2.541 
2.541 

2.541 
2.541 
3.555 
1.014 

1.014 
1,014 
2,484 
2.484 




23 


1,987 
1.984 

1.984 
7.707 
9,917 
8.100 

7,089 
11.090 

9,652 
12.045 




80 




>ToTember 6 




13....:..: 







20 

27 

December 4 

18:::::::: 
25 


77 

77 

77 
77 

77 


1.385 
2.459 

8.294 
19.505 
16.601 
24.846 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



163 



STOCK OF WHEAT IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. 

LOUIS IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS, BY GRADES, AT THE 

CLOSE OF EACH WEEK DURING 1915. 



ii 


*!^|| 








ill 






23.846 
22.596 
15.780 
16,247 
16.247 

15,247 
16,247 
15.247 
15,247 

16,092 
16.247 
16 ,247 
11.066 

11,060 
11,064 
11,066 
11,066 

11.064 
11.064 
11,060 
11.062 
11,060 

7,473 
1,396 
1.263 




14,173 
14,182 
14.720 
14,391 
13.956 

13.324 
14,361 
11,464 
12.672 

12.672 
11 ,026 
12,708 
11 ,376 

12,390 

11.442 

11.442 

2.861 

2.861 
2.861 
2.861 
2.861 


10.983 
8.646 
8.303 
8,303 
9.124 

9.766 
9.760 
7,168 
7.168 

8.316 
7,168 
7.168 
7,168 

7.168 
7,168 
7.168 


1.818 
66 


2.396 






2,396 






2,396 




3.419 
3.417 

3,411 
3.411 
3.411 
3.418 

3.418 
3.411 
3.416 
3.411 

3.411 
3.411 
3.411 
3.411 

1,214 
1,214 
1,214 




2,396 






2,396 






2.396 






2.396 






2.396 




642 

642 

642 

642 

1,992 

1,996 
642 
642 


3.797 




2.396 




2.396 




2.396 




2,396 




2.396 




2.396 




2,396 




2 396 








2.396 




1.317 
1,317 




1.218 






1,218 






1,218 










1,218 








148 
148 




1,218 










1 .218 










1,266 












1,264 














35 














36 














86 








* 






36 












165 

1,496 

166 

1,370 

1,422 

6,861 
2,824 
4.189 
6,770 

6.772 

7.639 

8.168 

12.180 

15.101 

16.106 
8.996 

14,000 
7,175 

7,441 
8.976 
6.238 
7,247 


35 












36 










707 
2.071 
3.075 

2,083 
2,086 
2,084 
2,084 

2,084 
2.084 
5.962 
7.579 
8.192 

12.640 
12 .509 
14.451 
13.336 

16.706 
18.047 
20,898 
28.771 


36 










36 










35 










85 










35 










36 










36 










36 










85 








1,667 
1,567 
2,137 

6.961 

9,338 

12,579 

9,756 

9.766 
10.436 
10 .435 
11 .868 


8.146 








1.411 








2,406 








3.764 


8,198 






8,764 


10.746 


6.872 

6,872 

6,872 
5,872 
6,872 
6.872 




2,768 


10.746 
12,135 




2,768 




4,176 


12,136 




4,175 


18,400 




4,175 


13.400 


. i ,287 


4.175 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



164 



TBADS AND COMICSRCB OF 



STOCK OF WHEAT IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND BAST ST. 

LOUIS IN PUBUC ELEVATORS, BY GRADES. AT THE 

CLOSE OP EACH WEEK DURING 1915. 



Satubdat 
STamMo. 


Ȥ1 

4 




II 


III 


• 


^f« 


JamiAry 2 




1,027 
1,027 
1,027 
1.027 
1,027 

1,027 
1.027 
1,027 
1.027 

2,363 
1,027 
1,027 
1,027 

1,027 
1,027 
1,027 
1,027 

1,027 
1.027 
1,027 
1,027 




2.163 
2.032 
7,619 
6,933 
2,138 

1,261 
3,103 
1.261 
1.477 

5,805 

5,805 

9.124 

10.825 

14.808 
5.825 
7.142 
4,986 

7.010 
8.291 
5.772 
5,772 
4.911 

7,207 
7,590 
5,024 
5.995 

5.784 
5,361 
1,619 
6.107 
11.949 

24.052 
22,454 
31.923 
46.340 

73 ,917 

110,965 

81 ,378 

94,042 

151 ,950 
165.215 
156,924 
147,771 
159.901 

177.107 
196,693 
162 ,795 
151 .926 

160,329 

123.034 

128.790 

81 ,986 


11.815 

10,065 

8,899 

4.620 

827 

2,664 

6.269 

8,357 

80.176 

82,180 
45.114 
49.276 
46.453 

46.749 
46.522 
46.960 
88.078 

80.709 
29.810 
27,038 
24.621 
22.626 

22.242 

15.794 

7.248 

7.031 

8.128 
8.488 
7.489 
6.262 
6.265 

6.027 
4.782 
4.782 
4,651 

5.386 
4.652 
4.650 
4.652 

4,541 
4.541 
4,541 
4,537 
8,945 

8.945 
8.945 
8.945 
5.129 

8.045 

3.945 

7.941 

12.751 


2.928.594 


juiwry ^g........ 






2.781.179 


16 






2.435.217 


23 






2.192.254 


80 






2 ,080 .775 


TftbnimrT »..«.. ,. 






1.671.511 


M^urumrj ^o........ 






1,568.846 


20 






1.264,311 


27:::::::: 






1.217.714 


March 






995,474 


MVOO j5 • 






615.195 


Jo:::::::: 






521.606 


27 






503.677 


April 3 






544.821 


lo:::::::: 






889.314 


17 






400,454 


24 






582,060 


Mat 1 






460.781 


^ s:::::::: 






503.849 


15 






534.688 


22:::::::: 






545.658 


29 






187 .750 


Jtnit 5 








123.845 


12:::::::: 








85.944 


19 








77.057 


26 








44.018 


July 3 








81.106 


10:::::::: 








27.860 


17 






682 


21.122 


24 






118.735 


31 








246.958 


Ausust 7 








220.194 


AU^Wl ^^........ 








159 ,067 


21 








251.230 


28 








229.726 


September 4 








295,694 










324 .819 


li:::::::: 








250.145 


25 








815.848 


October 2 








474 .518 


19 








481,863 


16 








517.-904 


23:::::::: 


8,111 
10,665 

11.920 
13 ,355 
13,366 
13,360 

14,769 
14,770 
14,769 
13,131 






571 .791 


80 






763,957 


November 6 






996.188 


13 






1.265,615 


20 






1 .452 ,290 


27 






1.716,888 


December 4 






1 .946 .785 


11:::::::: 






1 .958 .860 


18 






2.184,759 


25 






2,265.649 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 



165 



STOCK OP CORN IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. LOUIS 

IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS, BY GRADES. AT THE CLOSE 

OF EACH WEEK DURING 1915. 



Satvboat 

ETSXIMtt. 


« 


1 


1 


10 

1 


6 








Jft?!. % 


84,273 

93,618 

101 ,980 

111,666 

109,661 

101.060 
97.780 
94,878 
81,309 

68,121 
68,126 
37,293 
22,917 


7,008 

7,118 

14,206 

24,431 

26,683 

23,630 
23,182 
13,182 
24.244 

21,490 
9,664 
6,209 
6,209 

426 

416 

3,442 

616 

2,676 

2,663 

839 

1,178 

678 








18,286 
22,261 
24,686 
26,926 
28,899 

27,319 
27,319 
30.308 
32,326 

31 .692 
31 ,692 
31,684 
31,684 

31,603 
27,707 
27 .223 
29.829 

43.043 
68.473 
68,126 
26,668 
17,318 

16,068 
17,402 
19,164 
21 ,996 

12,884 

19,316 

9,878 

1,240 

3.478 

6.694 

9.296 

13,666 

13 ,367 

11,443 
7.036 
4,472 

14,644 

26,004 
31,400 
31 ,934 
26.218 
26,660 

26.660 
27,100 
30,683 
40,880 

78,619 
122,418 
140,099 
141,319 


8,802 

6,169 

10,606 

13,909 

34.287 

86.663 
123 .606 
167,016 
160.612 

104,164 

106,895 

71 ,436 

69,169 

48.930 
26,176 
15.813 
16.424 

29,008 
14,213 
14,272 
12,111 
4,422 

6,666 
3,948 
4,276 
6.324 

67 
1,631 
67 




ID 


470 








16 








23 








1 ,646 


30. 


1,171 






6,991 


Feb. 6 






32,675 


18 








42,694 


20 








58,910 


27 


4,614 

6,403 
1,060 
1,060 


1,376 
1.376 


3,003 
3,003 


58,910 


Mch. 6. 


31 ,307 


13 


31 ,462 


20 






16,964 


27 






5,689 


Apl. 3 








2,677 


10 










1,463 


17 










2,250 


24 










785 


May 1 


16,478 
69,910 
43,942 
13,616 
3,178 

2,230 
4,426 
6.948 
8.204 

6,948 
16,182 
38.632 
47 ,226 
26,768 

30,686 
30,160 
32,664 
29,489 

36,737 
38.436 
29.331 
43,496 

71,424 
76,511 
76,918 
76 ,086 
76,076 

76,076 
76,323 
76 ,289 
76,290 

76,289 
101 ,010 
117,202 
111,668 






886 




s:::::::::::::::: 








16 








3,148 


22 








4,568 


29 






1,069 


766 


June fi X. 


1.963 






12 


4,287 
6.004 
6,330 

6.880 
8.301 
3,369 




1,686 
629 




19 








26 








July 3 






1,067 




10 ::::::.:::::: 


637 






17 








24 








426 


31 












76 


Aug. 7 










1.458 


1,414 


14 ::.:::::.::::: 










795 


21 




1,121 












28 










77 


Sept. 4 












1,002 


11 














18 


2,961 












26 


1,286 








3,068 


Oct. 2 








2,313 
627 
625 




9 












16 












23 












30 


716 
264 








236 

237 
287 




Nov. 6 






4,417 




13 








20 












27 














Dec. 4. 










2,491 
6.681 
7,219 




11 


2.300 
2,901 








1,484 


18 








3,060 


26" 











Digiti 



ized by Google 



166 



TBADS AND COMMBBCB OF 



STOCK OF CORN IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. LOUIS 

IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS, BY GRADES, AT THE CLOSE 

OP EACH WEEK DURING 1915. 



Satubdat 
BTimMo. 




4 


h 
P 


il 


it 


•ole 


a 


"1 
SI 


JMI. ? 










14,055 
18.396 
19.248 
25,218 
30.181 

32.179 
34.046 
34,046 
35.568 

32,349 
29,414 
29.414 
21 .370 

12,752 
3,038 
3,035 
6.602 

45 ,826 
54,544 
62,294 
45.944 
43,184 

26.781 
19.562 
20.515 
15.655 

12.904 
32.366 
27.674 
22,791 
17,314 

17,306 

13.370 

12.713 

6.014 

5.014 
5.014 
5.014 
6.072 

7.364 
6.447 

10,818 
6,073 

13 .979 

15.702 
16.135 
16.179 
13,193 

7,183 
13.468 
13 .461 

6.008 


28.231 

52,005 

70.686 

110.602 

129,262 

151 ,932 
189,979 
185.505 
185.767 

155,869 
79,928 
41,049 
26.099 

8,001 
15,714 
26,239 
36.861 

24.037 

23.474 

6.246 

2.428 

5,457 

672 

673 

7.546 

51 

8.728 
1.891 
1.605 
1.604 
51 

1.163 

128 

1,372 

51 

51 
51 
51 
51 

51 
1,839 
2.201 
1.038 
3.899 

5.543 
1.107 
1,109 
1.110 

1,110 
1.134 
1.038 
1.038 


2.313 
2.943 




10 












16 












28 










3.437 
7.842 

6.364 

4.537 

11.501 

12.579 

6,133 
4,151 
2.464 


1.093 


3o:.:...:.::...: 


2,428 
1.428 










Feb. © 




/ 




1,140 


18 










20 












27 




1,104 

1.104 
1,857 
1.806 








March 6 










13 










20 










27 










April 8 














lo::::::::::.::: 














17 














24 














May 1 










2.648 




s:::::::::;:::: 




2.888 
1.622 








15 












22 












29 














Jane i^,, 














12 










1.548 
2.515 


1,495 


19 




2.139 






1.495 


26 










July 8 


1,127 
1,127 










601 


lo:::::: :::::: 




1.195 








17 










24 




1,157 


1,163 






695 


31 










Aug. 7 






659 
1,437 








14::::::;::::::: 






51 







21 










28 














Sept. 4 


189 




684 








ii:::::::::::::: 











18 












3.232 


25 


1,168 












Oct. 2 












9 















16 












788 


23:::::::::::::: 














80 














Nov. 6 














13 














20 




502 










27 








1.412 
173 




Dec 4 


1,025 










11 










is:::::::::::::: 










2.367 


498 


25 













Digiti 



ized by Google 



THX CITT OF ST. LOT7IS. 



167 



STOCK OF CORN IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. LOUIS 

IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS. BY GRADES. AT THE CLOSE 

OF EACH WEEK DURING 1915. 





1* 


«|5 


«|5 


|i 


u 


If 


11 










10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

10 
10 
10 
10 

10 
10 
10 
10 

10 
10 
10 
10 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

10 
10 




167,086 
202,000 
241,231 
318,736 
376,224 

463,000 
643,161 
606 ,364 
601 ,331 

462,030 
363 .247 
241.306 
184.400 

104.308 
76,663 
84,214 
06,616 

168,221 
240,301 
104,330 
100,263 
76,001 

64,030 
62,177 
76,861 
63,160 

40,803 
86,307 
82,466 
78,660 
48.402 

60.741 
66.680 
62.800 
48.000 

64.121 
60,636 
46.420 
72,213 

100,028 
116,724 
124,460 
110,310 
126.561 

130.866 
121,880 
126,740 
134,008 

167,013 
240,410 
203,248 
264,160 


60,211 












76,448 













86,100 












10,066 












06,232 












03,348 












117,300 












161 ,673 












172,207 












180,700 












186 ,803 








1,080 
1,005 


i ,028 
440 


182,310 








181,003 








170,670 








1,021 
4,480 
4,231 

1,240 
1,240 
1.240 
1,240 




165,077 








1,704 


160,517 






2.240 

2.351 
2.361 
2.361 
2.351 


146.768 








120.200 






607 
232 


112.162 






78.362 


231 




66.076 









62.200 










1.661 
3.640 


46.438 


3.683 








42.260 


5.631 








36,671 


3.679 
1.400 










2.012 

4,108 
018 

1.178 
806 

1,815 

361 
362 


33.326 










34,406 




1.844 

162 

1.463 








36.380 










31 ,076 










26,778 










26.008 












27.626 





* 








26.311 




1.474 








26.311 










1 

1 

1 

1.378 


26.676 












16.460 












11.840 













4.280 




2.628 








6.138 




1.360 






1.522 


3,131 












3,161 


* 1,978 










348 


2,457 


1 976 


026 
2.010 










l|978 











2,417 


1.978 
1 078 










2.417 












2.417 


1,078 


* ** 










2,417 


1,078 










145 

146 

46 

44 

1,078 


2,417 


1 078 










2,417 


1,078 











33,078 


1 078 




1.632 
1.632 


1,763 
627 




68,602 








101 ,850 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



168 



TRADB AKD COMMBBCS OF 



STOCK OF OATS IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. LOUIS 

IN PUBUC ELEVATORS, BY GRADES. AT THE 

CLOSE OP BACH WEEK DURING 1915. 



Satvboat 
BrairiMa. 


1 


e 


1 






«5 


No. 4 
White. 


Jan. 2 


41.910 
88.760 
28.260 
21 ,748 
28.774 

38.425 
40.156 
41.131 
40.833 

41,641 
41,641 
40.619 
41 .929 

39.408 
39,408 
45,473 
52.658 

62.391 

51 ,374 

17.675 

7,523 

281 

7.676 


22.450 
22.412 
50.095 
18.386 
18,381 

28,941 
30 .022 
33.773 
33.774 

28.311 
28,884 
35.401 
37,271 

32.413 
36.186 
29.588 
26.189 

16.629 
8.496 
3.938 
1.399 
2.724 

2,246 
8.315 
3.396 
4.456 


15,340 
15.341 
23.266 
14.181 
13.186 

13.715 

13.777 

9.868 

8.622 

8.228 

7,876 
7,872 
7,876 

5.562 
5.563 
5.562 
5.563 

4.114 

1.680 

1,680 

182 




5,767 
15,732 
15.732 
18.652 
40.699 

52.915 
64.485 
72.964 
72.963 

72,965 
72.963 
73.335 
75,407 

83,872 
80,411 
68.709 
48.700 

26.861 

11.513 

4.703 

2.726 


294.648 
331.286 
328.267 
550.634 
710.079 

804.619 
865,916 
969.383 
976.040 

810.589 
786.633 
788.003 
751.782 

685.203 
616.443 
551.309 
398.448 

313.239 

213.268 

158.858 

96,741 

58,153 

14,846 

17.773 

17.902 

9.198 

8,598 
1.588 


12,414 


^ ...... 




17.503 


16 




15.798 


23 




56.890 


80 




69,487 


Feb. 6 

13i 




81 ,721 




114.458 


20 




124.349 


27 




126.218 


March 6 

13 .. 




76.021 
72.171 




20 




75.694 


27 




66,492 


*»* i§:::::::: 




61.426 




56.716 


17 




41,689 


24 




27,517 


>*" 1:::::::: 




5,568 




1,654 


15 




1.5S2 


22 




5.126 


29 




11.905 


Juha 5,......, 


16,245 








12:::::::: 




8.778 
3.773 
1,225 


22 .581 


19 








23.358 


26 


751 


3,034 




21.242 


July 3 




5 871 


^^ 10::::;:;: 


2.793 

5.668 

606 


1.716 








3,187 


17 








287 


24 








702 
702 

704 
702 


1.435 
1,626 

1,673 

3.930 

9,976 

10,367 

70,472 
140,017 
156,095 
148,059 

128,332 
129,074 
166,043 
183.373 
207.984 

220.345 
229.033 
242.041 
275,508 

283.098 
278.025 
308.406 
331.358 


2.971 


81 


1.246 


965 
1,278 




2,454 


*'*• il:::::::: 


988 






583 
8.622 
9.629 

14,528 
19,621 
26,766 
27,217 

25,751 
21,946 
22,615 
18,539 
22,148 

22,695 
24,282 
23.991 
26.079 

29.782 
31 .522 
34.282 
36,094 






21 




1,051 
786 

7,167 
13,124 
13,122 
11,374 

15.478 
11.614 
15.196 
10 ,676 
17.742 

14.946 
15,306 
26.009 
28,370 

25,850 
27,948 
26,221 
27,938 




19.736 


28 


600 

4,194 
4,194 
4,194 
4,194 

2.694 
2,367 
6,740 
4,373 






23.651 


8«pt. 4 

11 






128 .474 






131 .006 


18 






116.080 


25 






93.650 


Oct. 2 


2.109 




81 ,370 


9 




79.286 


16 






67.687 


23 






09.734 


30 






74,388 


Nov. 6 


4,000 

8,417 

10,467 

12.090 

12,095 
12.090 
12.090 
12.090 






88,578 


13 






72.225 


20 






70 638 


27 






71.200 


Dec 4 






55.635 


11:::::::: 






55.848 


18 






52.486 


25 







53.590 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



169 



STOCK OF OATS IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. LOUIS 

IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS, BY GRADES, AT THE 

CLOSE OP EACH WEEK DURING 1915. 



Saturday 
Btbnxng. 


i 


o'o 
550 


a 




£ 


II 


Total 
Bushels. 


Jan. 


2.... 






12,876 
12,876 
12 ,876 
12,876 
12,876 

18,493 
28,282 
29,828 
26,481 

16,386 
16,391 
12,649 
12.641 

12,173 

12.173 

12.177 

8.392 

4.202 

4,201 

2,701 

360 

360 

1.986 
38 




17,126 
14,196 
17,880 
36,737 
49,617 

61 ,419 
79,311 
82,632 
86,043 

84,642 
87,639 
97,341 
94.344 

91 ,767 

99 ,462 

114.327 

100,403 

79,378 

17,107 

12,034 

6.400 

6.401 

6.401 




422,680 
469 642 




9.... 








1,638 
1,637 
1,637 
1,637 

3.813 
1.637 
1,637 
1.637 




16.... 








493,710 




23.... 








731 640 




30.... 








944^636 


Feb. 


6.... 








1.104.061 
1 239 536 




13.... 




1,696 
1,696 
1,696 

1,696 
2,726 
1.696 
1,696 

1.696 
1,696 
1,696 
1.696 

1.696 
1,696 
1,696 
3,036 
1.696 






20.... 




130 
1.130 

1,130 


1.368,191 




27 




1 372 237 


March 6... 




1.140,408 
1 116 824 




13.... 








20.... 




2,996 
1.130 

2,996 
2,996 
1,867 
1,866 

1,866 


2,133 
2,133 

2,133 
3,006 
3,006 
2,228 

2,228 
7,743 
7,662 
1.923 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 


1,137.639 
1,092,600 

1 018.539 




27.... 




April 


3.... 




10.... 




952 ,949 
875,303 
673.669 

618,071 
318 632 




17.... 






24.... 




May 


1.... 




8.... 






16.... 






212,369 
124 406 




22.... 








29.... 






80,413 

48.401 
47,483 
49,679 


June 


6.... 








12.... 










19.... 








1.247 




26.... 










39,908 
14 404 


July 


3.... 














10.... 














9,284 




17.... 














6.956 




24.... 












664 
4.094 


6,377 




31.... 
7.... 


1,072 










12,167 


Aug. 










4,643 
7.483 




14.... 
21.... 


1,170 










1,098 

10,283 

1,098 

10,891 
14,428 
20,033 
31.830 

32,720 
31,604 
20.401 
19.916 
29.689 

21 .083 

6.736 

13 .203 

16.108 

9,162 
6,611 
4,606 
4,961 








406 
37 




60,073 
49.481 

236 112 




28.... 






3.413 

6,386 
3.891 
2,394 




Sept. 


4.... 








11.... 










326*181 




18.... 










338 634 




26.... 
2.... 


2,461 








318*685 


Oet. 










288 464 




9.... 
16.... 
23.... 
80.... 

6.... 


1,642 
8,102 
7,013 
6.031 










277 333 










2.368 


304 *, 152 










313 624 






1.346 

1.846 
1.346 
1.845 
1.346 

1.890 
1.346 
?»706 
8,918 






358 .'327 

374,386 
358 805 


Nov. 




1.444 
1.444 






13 










20.... 






1.440 
1.440 

1.440 
1,440 
1,440 
1,440 


889,124 




27.... 






46 


431 ,185 


Dec 


4.... 






418,447 




11.... 
18.... 


786 




46 
49 
46 


414 560 






442 .284 




26.... 






471 .424 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



170 



TRAOl AND COMMBBCS OF 



STOCK OF RYE AND BARLEY IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND 

EAST ST. LOUIS IN PUBUC ELEVATORS, BY GRADES, 

AT THE CLOSE OF EACH WEEK DURING 1915. 



Satubdat 

STaMlMO. 


'^ 


"1 


^ 

»« 


i| 


l¥ 


^«« 


Jan. 


2:::::::: 

16 

28 

80. 

6 

18 

20 

27 

M:::::::: 

20 

27 

8 

J?:::::::: 

24, 


414 

414 

669 

1.860 

1.864 

1.662 
2.138 
8.148 
6.162 

1.692 

1.607 
1.607 
1.607 

1.607 

1.607 

747 


1.668 
1.668 
1.441 
1.626 
1.420 

46 
200 
409 
946 

1.647 
1.296 
2.412 
1.936 

1.906 

2.817 

1.877 

981 

849 
849 
849 
849 
866 

849 
870 






1.982 
1.982 
2.064 
2.876 
2.784 

1.708 
2.883 
8.662 
6.107 

8.239 
2.902 
4.019 
8.642 

8.618 

8.924 

2.124 

981 

1.268 
1.268 
1.166 
646 
1.886 

1.818 
1.406 


6 








6 




64 




5 






11.120 








16.428 


Feb. 






17.424 








17.424 








17.424 








17.424 


MftTC 






19.887 








19.887 








19.887 








18.889 


AmrU 






22.766 






86.903 








83.622 








87.668 


M»jr 


1 

i!:::::::: 

22 

29 

6 

12 

19 


898 
896 
297 
297 
460 

460 
460 




609 
609 
609 


80.641 




86.102 






29.863 






80.862 






609 

609 
676 


14.862 


June 




14.862 






14.862 






11.967 




26 












12 .876 


July 


8 










14.464 
9.284 


7.662 




10 










6.214 




17 










6.214 




24 












4.181 




81 












4.181 


Aug. 


7 




261 
260 
261 


26 

27 

26 

1.964 

8.612 
8.917 
2.484 

847 

8.409 
4.146 
1.987 

2.698 
7.200 
2,190 
2.870 

2.288 

1.671 

1.742 

672 




287 

287 

287 

2.141 

12.996 
7.938 
4.410 
4.231 

6.804 
2.019 
4.824 
7.046 
8.769 

6.621 

11.408 

4.410 

4.696 

6.618 

8.021 

10.167 

9.602 


6 


14. 






6 




21 






6 




28 




177 

621 
2.860 

298 
1.702 

8.626 
621 
694 
694 

644 

1.424 

122 

188 

188 
447 
710 
128 


6 


Sept. 
Oct. 


4 





8.862 
816 
816 
816 


1.248 


11 

18 

26 

2 

9 

16 

28 

80 

6 

18 

20 

27 

4. 

11 

18 

26 


1.866 
1.367 
1.867 

689 

689 

689 

1.421 

1.421 

1.491 
1.491 
1.678 
1.678 

1.664 
4.781 
6.242 
6.081 


497 
6 
6 

2.498 


Not. 
Dee. 


182 
132 
886 
401 

788 

1.288 

620 

660 

1.878 
1.272 
1,473 
2.626 


2.498 

1.264 

1.264 

22.660 

28.186 
22.018 
80.382 
80.970 

42.969 
47.917 
66.818 
66.410 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



171 



STOCK OF GRAIN AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. LOUIS IN 

PUBLIC ELEVATORS 

Each Satubdat Evening Dubing 1915. 



1015. 



Wheat, 
bushels. 



Corn, 
bushels. 



Oats, 
bushels. 



Bye. 
bushels. 



Barley, 
busheliB. 



January 



February 



March 



Ai»rU 



May 



June 



July 



August 



2.. 

9.. 
IC. 
23.. 
80.. 

6.. 
13.. 
20.. 
27.. 

6.. 
18.. 
20.. 
27.. 



10.. 
17.. 
24.. 

1.. 

8.. 
15.. 
22.. 
29.. 

6.. 
12.. 
19.. 
26.. 

3.. 
10.. 
17.. 
24.. 
81.. 

7.. 
14.. 
21.. 
28.. 



September 4.. 
11.. 
18.. 
25.. 



October 



2.. 

9.. 
16.. 
23.. 



November 6.. 
13.. 
20.. 
27.. 

December 4.. 
11.. 
18.. 
25.. 



2,928.594 
2,781,179 
2.435.217 
2.192,254 
2,030,775 

1,671,611 
1,568,346 
1,264.311 
1.217.714 

995,474 
615,195 
521 ,606 
503,677 

544,821 
339,314 
400.454 
532,060 

460,781 
503,349 
534,683 
545,658 
137,750 

123 ,845 
85,994 
77,057 
44,018 

31,106 

27,360 

21,122 

118,735 

246,953 

220.194 
159,067 
251 ,230 
229,726 

295,694 
324,819 
250,145 
315,848 

474,513 
481 .363 
517,904 
571 ,791 
763,957 

996,183 
1,265.615 
1 .452 ,290 
1.716,388 

1,946.735 
1.958.360 
2.184.759 
2.265,649 



157.986 
202 .999 
241.231 
318,736 
375 ,224 

463,099 
543.161 
595,364 
591,331 

462 ,030 
353.247 
241 .305 
184,490 

104.308 
75.553 
84,214 
96,516 

168,221 
240,391 
194.339 
109,263 
75.991 

54.939 
62.177 
75.861 
63,150 

49,893 
85.307 
82 .455 
78,660 
48.492 

59,741 
55,589 
62,890 
48,099 

54,121 
50.536 
45 .429 
72.213 

109 .028 
115,724 
124 ,460 
110,319 
126,651 

130 ,866 
121 .880 
125,740 
134,008 

167 .913 
249 .419 
293.248 
264.160 



422 .530 
469.642 
493.710 
731 ,640 
944.635 

1,104.061 
1,239.535 
1.368,191 
1.372.237 

1.140.408 
1.116,824 
1,137,639 
1 ,092 ,600 

1.018,539 
962,949 
875.303 
673,659 

618,071 
318,632 
212,869 
124.405 
80,413 

48,401 
47.483 
49,679 
39.908 

14.464 
9.284 
5.965 
6,377 

12,157 

4,643 

7,483 

50,073 

49.481 

236.112 
326,181 
338.634 
318,685 

288,454 
277 ,333 
304.152 
313,624 
358,327 

374,386 
358.805 
389.124 
431.185 

418 .-147 
414.660 
442.284 
471 .424 



1.982 
1.982 
2.064 
2,876 
2.784 

1,708 
2,338 
3.552 
6,107 

3.239 
2.902 
4,019 
3,542 

3,513 

3,924 

2,124 

981 

1,263 
1,253 
1.155 
646 
1,335 

1,318 
1,406 



287 

287 

287 

2,141 

12.995 
7,938 
4.410 
4,231 

6.804 
2,019 
4,824 
7,046 
3.759 

5,621 

11 ,403 

4.410 

4,696 

5,618 

8.021 

10.167 

9.502 



5 
5 
5 

11,120 
16.423 

17,424 
17 ,424 
17,424 
17,424 

19,387 
19.387 
19.387 
18.389 

22.756 
36.903 
33.622 
37.558 

30.541 
36.102 
29,853 
30,362 
14.852 

14,852 
14 .852 
11 ,967 
12 ,376 

7,662 
6,214 
6,214 
4.131 
4.131 

5 
5 
5 
5 

1.248 

497 

5 

5 

2.498 
2.498 
1.264 
1.254 
22.650 

23.135 
22 .018 
36.332 
30.970 

42 ,969 
47,917 
55,818 
66,410 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



172 



TRADl AKD COMMBRCB OF 



VISIBLE SUPPLY OP GRAIN FOR 1»15 

AT THI DDVERENT POINTS OF AOCUICULATION IN THS UNITSD 8TATB8 

AND IN TRANSIT DUBINO 1915, AS BBPOBTSD BT THS 

CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE. 



1015. 



WhMt, 
bushels. 



Ck>m. 
bushels. 



Data, 
bushels. 



Rye, 
bushels. 



Barley, 
bushels. 



January 



February 



March 



April 



May 



June 



2.. 

9.. 
16.. 
23.. 
80.. 

6.. 
13.. 
20.. 
27.. 

6.. 
13.. 
20.. 
27.. 

8.. 
10.. 
17.. 
24.. 

1.. 

8.. 
16.. 
22.. 
20.. 

6.. 
12.. 
10.. 
26.. 



10.. 
17.. 
24.. 
31.. 

7.. 
14.. 
21.. 
28.. 



September 4.. 
11.. 
18.. 
25.. 

October 2.. 

0.. 

16.. 

23.. 

80.. 

November 6.. 
18.. 
20.. 
27.. 

December 4.. 
11.. 
18.. 
25.. 



July 



August 



72.861.000 
70.184.000 
66.337,000 
63.456.000 
60.252.000 

56.044.000 
53 .572 .000 
51.759.000 
40,686.000 

47.661.000 
45.326.000 
43.328,000 
42.315.000 

30.323.000 
38.200.000 
38.850.000 
30.153.000 

26 .430 ,000 
25.330.000 
24.174.000 
21.327.000 
10,082,000 

18.185.000 
14,858,000 
12.805.000 
10,104,000 

7,048,000 
7,186,000 
5,761,000 
5,332.000 
6.582,000 

7,376.000 
7.517.000 
8.002.000 
7.111,000 

7,767,000 

8,553,000 

10.402,000 

11.350,000 

15,000.000 
18,246.000 
18.888,000 
20.613,000 
22,630,000 

20.622,000 
34,503.000 
40.644.000 
46.820,000 

48,707,000 
46.024.000 
57,215.000 
61.478.000 



10.703.000 
22 .752 .000 
25.842.000 
30.143,000 
34,156.000 

36,601.000 
40,110,000 
41.246,000 
41.238.000 

80.047.000 
30.400.000 
37.800.000 
35.320.000 

32 .877 .000 
20.451.000 
26.000.000 
21.065.000 

20,203.000 
18,601,000 
17.201,000 
14,876.000 
12.705,000 

11.053.000 
0,462.000 
8.482,000 
6,473,000 

5,225,000 
4.150.000 
3,313,000 
2,755.000 
2.306.000 

2.620.000 
3.241.000 
2,822.000 
2,382,000 

1.850,000 
1,710.000 
1,766,000 
1.076.000 

3.444.000 
5.026.000 
4.820.000 
3 .075 ,000 
3.288.000 

3.150.000 
3.423.000 
3,752,000 
4,167,000 

4,380.000 
5.181,000 
6.121.000 
7.426.000 



32.056.000 
32 .520 .000 
32.167.000 
32.203.000 
33.173.000 

32,665.000 
32.066.000 
83.001.000 
33.258.000 

30,252.000 
28.588.000 
27,466.000 
27.202.000 

27.284,000 
26.357,000 
25.704.000 
24.752.000 

23.022.000 
10,865.000 
17.051.000 
14.225.000 
12.623.000 

11.361.000 
8,758,000 
7,370,000 
5,003,000 

4,345,000 
8.207,000 
2,540.000 
2,033,000 
1,300.000 

806,000 
1.206.000 
2.231.000 
2.024.000 

5.706.000 

8.147.000 

11.721,000 

13.354.000 

14.381.000 
14.753.000 
15.177.000 
15.260,000 
15.730.000 

17.067.000 
18.505,000 
10,757,000 
20,028,000 

10.508.000 
20.054,000 
21,208,000 
20.712.000 



1,448.000 
1.305.000 
1.187.000 
|1. 312.000 
:l.445.000 

,1.455.000 
,1.510.000 
!l .372 .000 
1.363.000 

1.320.000 

1.247.000 

1.035.000 

757.000 



5,116.000 
5.024.000 
4.822.000 
4.481.000 
4.480.000 

4.105.000 
8.888.000 
3.733.000 
3.763.000 

3.588.000 
3.631.000 
3.531.000 
3.002.000 



770.000 2.050,000 

680.000 !2 .060 .000 

662.000 12.072.000 

058.000 2.764.000 



045.000 
512.000 
364.000 
310.000 
286.000 

280.000 
308.000 
308.000 
341,000 

210.000 

226.000 

206.000 

85.000 

05.000 

74,000 

07,000 

185,000 

327,000 

530.000 

772,000 

1,078,000 

1,270,000 



2 .304 .000 
2.115.000 
1.855.000 
1.526,000 
1.234.000 

1.166.000 

1.016.000 

1.053,000 

043.000 

708,000 
532.000 
407.000 
300.000 
253.000 

280.000 
283,000 
185.000 
551.000 

774.000 

031.000 

1.601.000 

2.037.000 



1.230.000 2,046.000 
1.413.000 13.343 .000 
1.401,000 ,3,605,000 
1,150.000 3.476.000 
1.304.000 3.465.000 



1 .701 .000 
1.857.000 
2.045.000 
2.408.000 



4.100.000 
4,658.000 
4,850.000 
5.250.000 



2.686.000 5.016.000 
2.527.000 iS.lSS.OOO 
2.017.000 13.547,000 
3,105,000 3,086,000 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 



173 



VISIBLE SUPPLY OP GRAIN FOR 1814 

AT THE DIFFERENT POINTS OF AOOUlCUIiATION IN THE UNITED STATES 

AND IN TRANSIT DURING 1914, AS REPORTED BT THE 

OHTOAOO BOARD OF TRADE. 



1014. 



WhMt. 
boihels. 



Com, 
biuhels. 



Oats, 
bncbels. 



Rye, 
bushels. 



Barley, 
bushels. 



January 



Ftobmary 



March 



Aprfl 



May 



June 



8.. 
10.. 
17.. 
24.. 
81.. 

7.. 
14.. 
21.. 
28.. 

7.. 
14.. 
21.. 
28.. 

4.. 
11.. 
18.. 
26.. 

2.. 

9.. 
1«.. 
23.. 
80.. 

6.. 
13.. 
20.. 
27.. 

4.. 
11.. 
18.. 
26.. 

1.. 

8.. 
16.. 
22.. 
29.. 



September 6.. 
12.. 
19.. 
26.. 



July 



August 



October 



8.. 
10.. 
17.. 
24.. 
31.. 



November 7.. 
14.. 
21.. 



December 6.. 

12.. 

19.. 
26.. 



63,743,000 
63,881,000 
62.490,000 
61,663,000 
60,806,000 

69,349,000 
69,198,000 
67,806.000 
67,021.000 

66,879,000 
66.348,000 
64.707,000 
63,636,000 

61,862.000 
60,801,000 
49.224.000 
46,698,000 

43.378,000 
88.107.000 
33,094 000 
31,662,000 
29,776,000 

27.637,000 
23.412,000 
18.934.000 
14,999.000 

13.248.000 
16.269.000 
18.706.000 
24.184.000 

29,744,000 
34.324.000 
33.886.000 
33,027.000 
31,634.000 

80,019,000 
31,766,000 
36,821.000 
46,382,000 

61,686,000 
67.121,000 
60.166,000 
63.149.000 
66,922,000 

67,941,000 
73,476,000 
76.388.000 
74.086.000 

72.374.000 
76,240.000 
76,106.000 
73,746,000 



12,126.000 
14.212.000 
16,280.000 
16.692,000 
16.606.000 

16.802.000 
17.696.000 
17.637,000 
18.374.000 

19.126.000 
20.268.000 
20.081.000 
19,766,000 

18,812,000 
17,646,000 
16.614,000 
12,623,000 

9,380,000 
7,271.000 
6 490 000 
4.086.000 
4.409.000 

6 669 000 

7 641 000 
7.921.000 
7.689.000 

6.912,000 
6,723.000 
4,404.000 
8,629.000 

8.208.000 
2.718.000 
2.070.000 
2.196.000 
3,923,000 

6.008.000 
6.664.000 
6.620.000 
6,866,000 

6.461.000 
4,727.000 
4.066.000 
3 ,074 ,000 
8.114.000 

2.901.000 
2.774.000 
2.989.000 
3,382,000 

6,063.000 
10.226.000 
13,326,000 
16.864.000 



26.909.000 
26.242.000 
26.236.000 
24,722.000 
24.460,000 

23,418;000 
22,640,000 
22,077,000 
21,489,000 

21,677,000 
20,816.000 
20.670.000 
19,797,000 

19.222.000 
18.748.000 
16.136.000 
14.893.000 

13,262,000 
9,962.000 
9 311 000 
8,240,000 
8,144,000 

7 720 000 
7,624.000 
7.407.000 
7,326.000 

7.210.000 
6.634.000 
6.627.000 
6.446,000 

6.482.000 
10.111.000 
16.593,000 
18.890.000 
20.124.000 

21.466.000 
23.766.000 
24.778.000 
26.088.000 

27.286.000 
29.226.000 
31.369.000 
32.016.000 
31.866.000 

33.063.000 
32.103.000 
82.304.000 
82.471,000 

81,463,000 
32,184.000 
31,683.000 
32.848.000 



2.226.000 
2.262.000 
2.261.000 
2.229.000 
2.086.000 

1.983.000 
1.964.000 
1,833.000 
1,822,000 

1,746.000 
1,643.000 
1.604.000 
1.439.000 

1 .447 .000 
1,462.000 
1,287,000 
1,217,000 

1,166,000 
944.000 
693 000 
689.000 
613 000 

417 000 
603.000 
492.000 
430.000 

369.000 
296.000 
261.000 
222,000 

168,000 
208,000 
183,000 
180,000 
290,000 

427.000 

666,000 

1,029,000 

1,210,000 

1,246.000 
1 .923 .000 
2.071.000 
1.940.000 
1.897.000 

1.762.000 
1.998.000 
1.669,000 
1 ,941 .000 

1.683.000 
1 ,397 .000 
1,791,000 
1.644.000 



6.712,000 
6.631,000 
6.147,000 
6,213,000 
4,762,000 

6,096,000 
4,837,000 
4,816,000 
4,973,000 

4,826,000 
4,326.000 
4.872,000 
4,888,000 

4.206,000 
4,226,000 
3,036,000 
2,666,000 

2,487,000 
2,676 000 
2 200 000 
1,932,000 
1 761 000 

1 644 000 
1 ,471 ,000 
1,386,000 
1,410,000 

1,197,000 

1,104,000 

969,000 

940,000 

902,000 
971,000 
880,000 
801,000 
1.198,000 

1,714,000 
2.673.000 
3.026.000 
3,663,000 

3,966,000 
4,167.000 
6,102,000 
6.033.000 
6,091,000 

6,384.000 
6,726.000 
6.162,000 
6.984.000 

6.077.000 
4,958.000 
4.984.000 
6.336,000 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



174 



TRADE AND COMlffSRCE OF 



RECEIPTS OF GRAIN AT VARIOUS CITIES IN 1915. 



crriEB. 






( 



Corn. 
bmlielB. 






biulielii, 



BftrleFi 
bnatiei** 



Tota 



St. Liiulfi 

Cblija^o 

N^w York .... 
Baffalo . . , . . , 
MiiineapiilU , . 
PeorlB .„..., 
Ballimore .... 
Kansa* City .. 
Fhilfulolpma . 
Milwaukee . .. 
Toledo -..,..., 

Boatf>n 

DuUitli and 

Superior 
Clncfnnaii .... 
New Orl@(iui , 

Montreal . 

Detroit . ,.,.. 
Clevehind . , . , 
IndlaDapollft, . 
Qalreat^in .... 
San Frauctftco 

Oniahii. ,. 

Portlftiid» Ore, 
Wiiinlpifg ^ 



35,260,404 
70.704,000 
M9,342,7M 

6jS3.1Tfi 

9,m,oou 
ia,6SO,i4d 

w,mj47 

7,3«rl,386 

3,53fl,&l*7 
4,t»2dJ)00 

I 18,418,175 
!220.48l),12& 



ia,M7J86 
96,3n^7,CJCKI 
14,3»i3.l*Hft 
I7,i'«l,413 

4,i3'i,eool 



I 

2,«57,657i 

7,81S.4l4; 
6,7«S*,O00. 
827,^8; 
8,797,000 
3,048,169 
le, 114,000 

e7s,ooo, 

368,843, 

24,20fi,2O*)' 

233,750 



i:i3,475,0O0 
HS, 382, 1*22 

:^^&44,!)50 
n,27l»,i«)0' 

a,24T,WJ0i 

18,744,6^7 

2a, 637, 780 

6,341,70<> 

3,387,800 

6,482,344 
0,816,800 

14.6^,411 
4,77fi,0O0 
6,470, OOfi 
8,830,000] 



4,648,000 20, m,dgff830,3&l,0aCl 
2jm,mi. G,e71«7g&tilO,80S,0«t 
a.7«7,8BS'ia,6lS«789lSli«SSl,B73 
fI,S37.400 96,e&3.78O^,^a,0aQ 

371,800 S,S»4,^00< 39,^6,800 
10,218,611 «,l03,mfv 07,lOa;ft34 

Ml.iiOO L8n,S«X^ ?4TJ>24*300 
U2S4,BWi mi Ml &i^,46l,743 
3,67W,iliO I7,ll»0,T».i] TO. 14^,610 

118,000| Ul,70q SO,tBG,O0O 

400.Tn| er74,$3SJ tg,9ia«M| 



702,483, 901,602? 



5S£l,00O 9«GO0t. 

206,0001 



826,062 IhSao: 7,696,6 

11,042,000 1,076,000 fi66,r 

8,286, 4CJ0 22,800 3,efT7J 

63,844,5001 110,000 7,lMa,i 



,M1,^ 

23,311 ,67(i 
42,a'il,000 

lt,@S4,000 

i4,iao«ii9 

34,7M,0(» 
11,763,410 
63,556,800 
S3,63**;773 
297,276 



AGGREGATE RECEIPTS OF GRAIN AT THE CITIES NAMED 
FOR FOUR YEARS. 



CITIS8. 



St. Louis 

Chioago 

Toledo 

Detroit 

Kansas City 

Milwaukee , 

Minneapolis , 

Duluth and Superior 
Peoria , 



1918. 



79,997,310 
290,249,000 

14,678,000 
8,860,000 

70,258,400 

50,969,820 
164,729,400 
109,951,700 

82,851,870 



1918. 



80,496,694 
887,288,000 

14,738,800 
7,629,000 

66,795,950 

59,464,680 
185,250,840 
112,560,717 

84,574,098 



1914. 



78,899,102 

878,182,000 

14,897,000 

10,167,000 

108,868,150 

76,664,800 

184,176,450 

87,749,844 

88,116,596 



1915. 



75,529,077 

880,851,000 

20,286,000 

11,884,000 

87,924,800 

70,148,610 

829,882,920 

122,861,882 

89,296,800 



RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN AT 7 ATLANTIC FORTS. 

Viz., New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans, 
Newport News and Montreal. 



Flour Barrels. 

Wheat Bushels. 

Com " 

Oats •• 

Rye " 

Barley '* 



1912. 



18,690,088 

187,665,924 

80,275,860 

79,268,809 

1,200,571 

9,972,778 



1913. 



19,449,506 
181,402,782 
44,160,044 
54,474,842 
2,988,760 
18,027,461 



1914. 



22,649,026 
210,721,679 
27,619,089 
89,501,655 
9,685,787 
14,059,801 



1915. 



28,180,640 
872,790,219 

48,787,406 
800,875,887 

14,890,071 

16,850,478 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 175 



MISSOURI CROP REVIEW FOR 1915. 



By W. L. Nelson, Aasistant Secretary Mlseoori State Board of Agriculture. 



CROP RETURNS FOR 1915. 

Aocording to the annual crop report issued from the office of the 
Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture on December 11, 1915, the 
estimated value of Missouri crops for the year is $219,313,845. 

These figures — ^and it is worthy of note that they are not boom figures, 
for large deductions have been made for losses — include only the ordinary 
field crops. The millions of barrels of apples and hundreds of carloads 
of peaches, strawberries and other fruits that the State has this year 
produced are not included. Nor are poultry products, valued at perhaps 
$50,000,000, made a part of the estimate. Dairy, apiary and timber 
products are likewise omitted, as is bluegrass, of which Missouri has 
millions of acres. Nor is the value of Missouri live stock incorporated 
in this report. 

This year's crop returns are some eighteen millions of dollars in excess 
of the showing made by Missouri last year when the value of corresponding 
crops was placed at $201,455,275. 

CORN. 

The largest single item in Missouri field crops is represented by com, 
of which the State this year grew 220,235,191 bushels, valued at $123,- 
640,144 — considerably more than a million dollars to the coimtry. This 
is at an average State price of 56 cents per bushel. In 1914 the State 
com yield was 175,158,000 bushels, which at 66 cents per bushel repr^ 
sented a value of $115,257,869. 

The original acreage of the 1915 crop was 7,458,763 acres, but almost 
a quarter million acres (240,197 acres, according to the estimates of cor- 
respondents) was lost by overflows or had to be abandoned because of 
continued rains which made cultivation impossible. The final figures 
show 7,218,566 acres In com, the average yield for the State being 30.5 
bushels per acre. 

In the northeast sedtion the yield from 1,352,262 acres was 38,074,322 
bushels, an average of 28.1 bushels as compared with the 1914 acre 3deld 
of 23 bushels. At 60 cents per bushel this represents a value of $22,- 
978,510. 

In the northwest section, which last year reported the largest acreage 
and heaviest yield, very decided decreases are this year recorded. This 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



176 TRADB AND COlOiSBCS OF 

condition is due to loss from overflowed streams and from ezoessiye 
rainfall, which made necessary the abandonment of many acres. Of 
1,984,405 acres planted in this section only 1,901,510 acres were harvested. 
The yield was 63,719,285 bushels, an avera^re of 33.5 bushels per acre. 
This at 57 cents per bushel represents $36,462,324. 

In the central section the yield from 1,231,801 acres was 42,111,708 
bushels as compared with but 28,955,712 bushels, or an average of 23 
bushels per acre in 1914. The 1915 yield at the averas:e price of slightly 
more than 55 cents per bushel represents a value of $23,359,943. 

In the southwest section the com crop was grown on 1,657,554 acres. 
The average yield was 24.2 bushels, or a total of 40,210,289 bushels. 
At 52 cents per bushel this represents $21,019,547. The big com gain 
comes in the southeast section, which last year suffered most severely 
from drouth, but which was this year favored by a season that was 
abnost ideal. The acreage for this section was 1,075,439; the total yield 
36,119,587 bushels, an acre yield of 33.5 bushels. At slightly less than 
55 cents per bushel the value is $19,819,820. In 1914 the southeast 
section harvested 12,123,351 bushels, an average of 13.5 bushels per acre. 
While the total yield of some of the heaviest corn-producing countries 
was this year reduced by flood, eight counties in the State each show a 
com crop of more thui 4,000,000 bushels. Saline leads with 5,199,285 
bushels. 

The quality of the com crop is 87 for the State, being lowest in the 
northwest section. Except in replanted fields com generally matured 
before frost. Fine fall weather has favored harvesting, so that it is 
estimated that about 83 per cent of the crop has been gathered. 

WHEAT. 

The 1915 wheat crop, consisting of 26,475,337 bushels of marketable 
wheat, is practically 10,000,000 bushels less than the 1914 crop. Of 
2,366,847 acres seeded in the fall of 1914, 2,278,949 acres were harvested, 
much of it with great difficulty owing to excessive rainfall. Almost 
100,000 acres (87,898, as estimated by correspondents) was lost by 
overflows or coidd not be cut. In addition to the marketable wheat, 
correspondents estimate almost 1,000,000 bushels (977,401) that was 
harvested and threshed but which could not be sold. This wheat fed 
on the farms had an estimated value of a little less than half a million 
dollars. 

The acre yields and values of marketable wheat by sections were as 
follows: 

Northeast, 375,803 acres, 16.1 bushels, yield 5,715,401 bushels, 
valued at $5,717,267; northwest, 358,405 acres, 12.8 bushels average 
yield, 4,253,430 total production, valued at $4,102,964; central section, 
509,961 bushels, 11.5 bushels acre yield, 5,822,177 total production, 
valued at $5,649, 171 ;southwe8t section, 497,391 acres, 8.8 bushels acre 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 177 

yield, 4,278,595 total production, valued at $4,145,958; southeast section, 
537,389 acres, 12.1 acre yield, 6,405,734 total production, valued at 
$6,054,274. The acre yield for the State is 12 bushels as compared with 
17.1 bushels in 1914. 

Acreage seeded for the 1916 wheat crop is greatly reduced. It is 
estimated that but 1,959,207 acres have bcin sown to wheat. This is 

82.7 per cent of the fall of 1915 seeding, which consisted of 2,366,847 
acres. By sections, per cent and acreage is as follows: Northeast, 79.5 
per cent, 308,780 acres; northwest, 74.5 per cent, 289,185 acres; central, 

82.8 per cent, 431,294 acres; southwest, 84.1 per cent, 438,207 acres; 
southeast, 89.4 per cent, 491,741 acres. 

Condition of growing crop is 82.6 for the State. By section it is: 
Northeast, 82; northwest, 81; central, 90; southwest, 82; southeast, 78. 
There is considerable complaint of Hessian fly. Owing to the open fall, 
late seeding has apparently been less efifective in the fight against 
the fly. 

OATS. 

The original oat acreage for the year 1915 consisted of 1,063,640 
acres; however, owing principally to flood losses, the harvest acreage was 
but 933,422 acres. The state yield was 24,148,035 bushels. This at 
37.7 cents per bushel represents a value of $9,096,452. The acre and 
aggregate oat jdelds by sections show northeast, 7,190,200 bushels, 25.8 
average; northwest, 5,197,737 bushels, 26.9 bushels average; central, 
4,196,388 bushels, 27.8 average; southwest, 5,406,311 bushels, 23.5 
average; southeast, 2,157,399 bushels, 26.3 average yield. The State 
yield per acre was 25.8 bushels. 

TAME HAT. 

Following the very short hay crop of 1914 the 1915 tame hay crop 
makes a splendid showing. This year the harvest from 2,844,302 acres 
was 4,223,461 tons, the value of which is estimated at $37,979,893. 
The clover crop was especially good, but in many instances was saved 
with great difficulty owing to the rainy harvest season. 

OTHEB CROP YIELDS AND VALUES. 

In the following summary, in which are included crops not above 
enumerated, many gratifying gains are shown. One of the largest 
increases in value comes from the better prices which cotton is now 
commanding. The 1914 cotton crop was valued at but $1,610,842. 
Clover seed shows a reduction both in yield and in aggregate value of 
crop. While not a record-breaking year in point of production or values, 
1915 was, as is shown by the following figures, a year of satisfactory 
crop returns for the Missouri farmer: 

Com— Acreage. 7,218,566; yield, 220,235,191 bushels; value, $123,- 
640,144. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



178 TBADB AND COlOiBBCB OF 

Wheat (marketable)— Acreage, 2,278,949; yield, 26,475,337 bushels; 
value, $25,669,634. 

Oats— Acreage, 933,422; yield, 24,148,035 bushels; value, $9,096,452. 

Tame hay— Acreage, 2,844,302; yield, 4,223,461 tons; value, $37,- 
979,893. 

Flax— Acreage, 7,464; yield, 66,430 bushels; value, $112,930. 

Rye— Acreage, 14,347; yield, 192,250 bushels; value, $171,102. 

Buckwheat— Acreage, 813; yield, 13,171 bushels; value, $13,302. 

Bariey — ^Acreage, 701; jrield, 11,917 bushels; value, $10,129. 

Broom com — ^Acreage, 1,455; yield, 1,066,515 pounds; value, $53,858. 

Cotton— Acreage, 70,932; yield, 23,478,492; value, $2,512,199. 

Potatoes— Acreage, 58,000; yield, 5,104,000 bushels; value, $2,960,320. 

Tobacco— Acreage, 3,958; yield, 3,087,240 pounds; value, $385,905. 

Sorghum seed — Acreage, 11,312; yield, 260,176 bushels; value, 
$252,371. 

Sorghum syrup — ^Aci'eage, 13,346; yield, 1,067,680 gallons; value, 
$651,285. 

Clover seed— Acreage, 6,982; yield, 12,568 bushels; value, $120,653. 

Timothy seed— Acreage, 4,428; yield, 14,170 bushels; value, $46,053. 

Forage, cowpeas, kaffir, soy beans, sunflower seed, unmarketable 
wheat, miscellaneous vegetables, etc., $14,500,000. 

Prairie hay— Acreage, 138,330; yield, 162,924 tons; value, $1,137,615. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OP BT. LOUIS. 



179 



CROPS OF MISSOURI BY COUNTIES IN 1915. 



COUNTT. 



Wheat. 
Bushels. 



Com, 
Bushels. 



Oats, 
Bushels. 



Hay, Tame. 
Tons. 



Adair 

Audrain.... 
Andrew.... 
Atchison.. 



Barry 

Barton... 

Bates 

Benton... 



Bollinger.... 

Boone 

Buchanan.. 
Butler. 



CaldwelL 

Callaway 

Camden 

Cape Girardeau.. 



Carroa.. 
Carter.... 

Cass 

Cedar..... 



Chariton... 
Christian- 
Clark 

Clay 



Clinton 

Cole 

Cooper 

Crawford.. 



Dade 

Dallas 

Daviess.. 
DeKalb.. 



Dent 

Doufflas.... 
Dunklin.... 
Franklin... 



Oasconada.. 

Gentry 

Greena 

Grundy 



Harrison... 

Henry « 

Hickory.... 
Holt 



Howard.. 
HowelL... 

Iron 

Jackson.. 



Jasper 

Jefferson... 
Johnson.... 
Knox. 



Laclede 

Lafayette- 
Lawrence... 
Lewis 



18,202 
176,081 
152,041 
166,596 

249,979 
121 .669 
220,493 
180,485 

121,195 

333.546 

393,614 

27,972 

36,296 
583,045 

69,764 
641 ,698 

711,847 

12.172 

119.601 

145.880 

395.340 
205.647 
168,867 
124.807 

70.241 
370.499 
524,591 
125.681 

220.791 
95,777 

114,769 
81 ,279 

114.317 
63,326 
27,768 

892 ,930 

347,268 
49 .538 

340 ,053 
43 ,977 

96.982 
139,917 

84,254 
200,109 

268.283 
42 ,822 
26.849 

280,023 

573.335 

283 .867 

279,639 

27 ,490 

78,289 
513 ,896 
506,663 
157 ,020 



1,681,375 
3,448,588 
4.370.641 
4.182.210 

1,139.334 
2,129.946 
2,986.900 
1,814,722 

1 ,065 ,472 
3,838,323 
2,393,742 
1.147,896 

2.466,604 
4.336.588 
1,009.728 
1,837,836 

3.500,640 

222,288 

2,743,312 

1,377.286 

3,089,240 
1.311.206 
2.070.150 
2.502.108 

2.911,020 
968,715 

3.135.440 
934.824 

1.777.360 
1,068.548 
3 .085 ,470 
2.331.252 

407.330 

892 .272 

2.962.947 

2,103.536 

882 .422 
2,549,100 
2.679.355 
2.441.268 

4,033,155 

3.586,800 

658,224 

3.377,249 

1 ,927 ,892 
882 .422 
369 ,850 

2 ,401 ,074 

2.474.550 

648,570 

3.252,525 

1.721.175 

1.007.110 
3.063,655 
1 ,804 .544 
1.628,325 



295,152 
800,000 
116,334 
293 ,774 

269 .808 
179.910 
299.736 
256.800 

73,392 
392,563 
125.879 

73,392 

236,424 

430.350 

25.740 

233,793 

360.000 

16.760 

283,917 

141 .312 

371 ,385 
147,650 
522 ,435 
160.950 

426.688 

160.920 

868.130 

48.100 

255.216 
116.000 
262.668 
199.848 

45.252 

42.620 

64.625 

185.136 

100.347 
133,170 
492 ,870 
173.120 

389.610 

577 .536 

97.929 

164.795 

106.882 
53,020 
40.146 

350.790 

383.284 

97 .992 

416.088 

446.280 

73,008 
305,910 
876,250 
355.416 



56.626 
34.345 
50.438 
37 .466 

26.717 

9.391 

107 .620 

24.440 

14,040 
48,878 
78,512 
11,088 

42.363 
67,878 
23 ,976 
35.100 

51.167 

3.664 

87 .456 

20.676 

66.404 
22.750 
54.520 
32 .995 

29.462 
24.172 
48 ,427 
24.261 

23.319 

26 .423 
67,944 
42.123 

22,980 
24.231 
14.280 
43.746 

28,166 
50,835 
41.244 
65.098 

101 .099 
63.862 
17.621 
27.786 

39.376 

26.825 

8,284 

65,267 

25.614 
32.835 
86.633 
56.661 

24 .297 

61 .424 
21,680 
66,970 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



180 



TBADB AND COMICBRCB OF 



CROPS OP MISSOURI BY COUNTIES IN 1915. 



Wheat. 
Bushels. 



OOUKTT. 



Com. 
BusheU. 



Oata, 
BoshMt. 



Hay. Tame. 



Uncoln 

Linn 

Livingston- 
McDonald.. 



Macon 

Madison... 

Maries 

Marion 



Mercer 

MiUer 

MississippL.. 
Moniteau. 



Monroe 

Montgomery... 

Morgan 

New Madrid... 



Newton 

Nodaway.. 

Oregon 

Osage. 



Osark. 

Pemiscot.. 

Perry 

Pettis. 



Phelps.. 

Pike 

Platte... 
Polk 



Pulaski 

Putnam 

Ralls. 

Randolph.. 



Ray 

Reynolds 

Ripley 

St. Cnarles.. 



St. Clair 

Ste. Genevieve.. 

St. Francois 

St. Louis 



Saline 

Schuyler.. 
Scotland.. 
Scott 



Shannon... 

Shelby 

Stoddard.. 
Stone 



Sullivan.. 

Taney 

Texas 

Vernon.... 



Warren 

Washington.. 

Wayne 

Webster 

Worth. 

Wright 



1.209.384 

44.429 

142.243 

76.346 

69.048 

83.160 

99,550 

385.544 

64.044 
296,338 
621.330 
377 .824 

102.057 
403,147 
292 .373 
263.700 

274 .040 
320.298 
125.922 
474.520 

62,754 

73.905 

375,792 

313,816 

92,577 
628 , 196 
471.662 
189 ,074 

44 ,462 

29,897 

258.034 

117.394 

179.610 

13,550 

40,296 

1,220.937 

82,053 
222 ,085 
117,659 
526,910 

629.450 
66,196 
41,278 

545.138 

26,147 
122.418 
295,580 

36.950 

14 .896 

59,464 

210,826 

125.052 

572,280 

163.338 

35,858 

121,277 

39,558 

64,593 



Total.. 



36,933,501 



1,816,480 

1.882,010 

4,089,552 

711.552 

2.483.275 
535.080 
818.790 

1.583.934 

2,144.802 
1,163,968 
2.857.126 
1.900.404 

3.315.060 
1.757.868 
1,303,178 
2 .388 .639 

1,449.598 

4.570.800 

874,094 

1.177,644 

524.986 
1 ,551 .320 
1.202,285 
4,235,770 

791 .556 
2.667,164 
2,351,920 
2.078.310 

831.424 
1,349,225 
1 ,527 ,750 
1,836,160 

3,603,655 
509,886 
607,500 

1.614.960 

1.899.317 
752.144 
006.151 

1.169,100 

5.199,285 

938 ,200 

1.766,604 

2,978.469 

607,905 
2,039,550 
3.499,158 

685.512 

772 .489 

555.275 

680,600 

2.660.361 

772 .489 
775.890 
1.044,700 
2.660.361 
3.693.655 
1,151.358 



175,159,072 



401,460 
401,460 
285,984 
118.296 

280,340 
51,000 
89,991 

217.036 

116,829 
90.624 
25.575 

327,960 

591,800 

505,650 

162,750 

20,625 

261 ,912 

518,589 

90,454 

78,432 

60,122 

11,268 

143 ,450 

617,470 

51,080 
359. lOQ 
150.722 
264.768 

27.900 
317.564 
414 .369 
240.534 

284.364 
12,160 
45,168 

189.000 

213 .444 

110.280 

85.098 

48,160 

210,000 

188,700 

189,000 

37.950 

18,900 
433,664 
285,000 
112,996 

216.810 
33,740 
55,671 

236,736 

167,648 

58,500 

43,578 

175,604 

141 ,289 

62.496 



41,656 

114.167 

70,859 

13,808 

110.022 
12.272 
15.000 
30.152 

52.800 

31.845 

6.229 

32.618 

56.733 

26.619 

26 .018 

7.950 

14.881 
86.201 
38.941 
33.381 

11.882 

7.564 

20.218 

26.048 

27,763 
38,855 
25,844 
41 ,826 

19,150 
85,470 
54,450 
49.949 

36,232 
11.882 



37.939 

31 .320 
13.446 
22.208 
20.120 

71 .799 
38.191 
^44.944 
11.478 

11.345 
48.312 
27.086 
10,771 

94,803 

9,108 

25,152 

54,695 

12,611 
14 ,707 
11.072 
26,040 
29,939 
22,428 



18,534.533 



1 ,877 ,402 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 



181 



SUMMARY OF TOTAL YIELD AND VALUE OP FARM CROPS 
PRODUCED BY MISSOURI FARMERS IN THE YEAR 1915. 



Acreage. 



Yield. 



Value. 



Com. 

Wheat (marketable).. 

Oats 

Tame hay 

Prairie hay 

Flax 

Rya 

Buckwheat 

Barley 

Broom com 

Cotton 

Potatoes. 

Tobacco 

Sorghum seed 

Sorghum syrup 

Clover seed 

Timothy seed 



Forage, cowpeas. kaiir. soy 
beans, sunflower seed, un- 
marketable wheat, miscella- 
neous vegetables, etc 



7,218,566 

2.278,949 

933,422 

2,844,302 

138,380 

7,464 

14 ,347 

813 

701 

1,456 

70 ,932 

68,000 

3.968 

11.312 

13.346 

6.982 

4.428 



220,236.191 

26.476.337 

24,148,036 

4,223,461 

162 ,924 

66 .430 

192 .260 

13.171 

11.917 

1.066.516 

23.478.492 

6.104.000 

3,087,240 

260,176 

1.067,680 

12,568 

14.170 



$123,640,144 

25,669,634 

9 ,096 .462 

37,979,893 

1,137,615 

112,930 

171,102 

13,302 

10,129 

68,868 

2,612,199 

2,960,320 

386,906 

262.371 

661 ,286 

120,663 

46,063 

14.600,000 



Total value of all crops... 



$219,313,846 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



182 



TRADB AND COlOiBBCK OF 



FINAL REVISED ESTIMATES OP THE ACREAGE. PRODUCTION 
AND VALUE OP THE CROPS FOR 1914 AND 1915 BY DE- 
PARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE, WASHINGTON. 



Crop and Tew. 



(000 



AcTMce. 
X)oinllt4 



Productioii.* 



;ted) }Pqr acre, ^qqq omjued) twiihei. 



Farm T>|qa, Dec l7 



ToUl 
(OOP omitted) 



Com: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13. 
Winter wheat: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13. 
Spring wheat: 

19ll 

1914 

Average 1909-13. 
All Wheat: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13.. 
OaU: 

1916 

1914 

Average 1909-13. 
Barley: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13 
Bye: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13. 
Buckwheat: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13.. 
Flaxseed: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13.. 
Bice: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13.. 
Potatoes: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13. 
Sweet Potatoes: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13.. 
Hay: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13.. 
Tobacco: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13.. 
Ootton: 

1915 

1914 

Average 1909-13. 
Sugar Beets: 

1915 preliminary 

1914 

Average 1910-13.. 



Acre*. 
108.821 
103.435 
104 .229 

40,453 
35.008 
28.855 

19.445 
17.586 
18.741 

59.898 
53.541 
47.097 

40.780 
38.442 
87 .357 

7.395 
7,565 
7.619 

2.856 
2.541 
2.236 

860 
792 
848 

1.367 
1.645 
2.490 

803 
694 
716 

8.761 
8.711 
8.677 

719 
603 
619 

50.872 
49.145 
49.756 

1.368 
1.224 
1.223 

30.957 
36.832 
84.152 

624 
483 
501 



Bu»h€U. 
28.2 
25.8 
26.0 

16.2 
19.0 
15.6 

18.8 
11.8 
13.1 

16.9 
16.6 
14.6 

87.8 
29.7 
30.8 

82.0 
25.8 
23.9 

17.2 
16.8 
15.6 

19.6 
21.3 
19.7 

10.1 
8.4 
7.8 

86.1 
34.1 
33.5 

95.5 

110.5 

97.0 

103.8 
93.8 
93.1 

•1.68 
•1.43 
•1.33 

«775.1 
*845.7 
«814.5 

«172.5 
«209.2 
«182 .5 

•10.4 
•11.6 
•10.6 



B%iMh€U. 

8.054.585 
2.672,804 
2.706.384 

655.045 
684.990 
441.212 

856.460 
206.027 
245.479 

1.011.505 
891 .017 
686.691 

1.540.862 
1.141.060 
1.131.175 

237.009 
194.953 
181 .878 

49.190 
42.779 
34.911 

15.769 
16.881 
16.597 

13.845 
13.749 
19.501 

28.947 
23.649 
24 .016 

359.103 
409.921 
356.627 

74,295 
56.574 
57.628 

•85.225 
•70,071 
•65.987 

«1 .060.587 

«1 .034 .679 

•996.087 

•11.161 
•16.135 
•13 .033 

•6.462 
•5.585 
•5.342 



CefOt. 
57.5 
64.4 
56.4 

95.0 
98.6 
88.8 

86.5 
98.6 
81.2 

92.0 
98.6 
85.7 

86.1 
43.8 
87.5 

51.7 
54.8 
59.6 

83.9 
86.5 
70.8 

78.7 
76.4 
69.7 

$1.74 
$1.26 
$1.52 

90.6 
92.4 
81.4 

61.6 
48.7 
60.5 

62.0 
73.0 
71.4 

•$10.70 
•$11.12 
•$12.13 

•9.1 

•9.8 

•10.5 

•11.2 

•6.8 

•11.9 

•$5.54 
•$5.45 



1.755.859 
1.722.070 
1.527.960 

622.012 
675.623 
889.383 

308.290 
203.057 
199.253 

930.302 
878.680 
588.685 

555.569 
499 .431 
424 .047 

122.499 
105.908 
108.864 

41.295 
37 .018 
24.706 

12.408 
12.892 
11.576 

24.080 
17.318 
29.628 

26.212 
21.849 
19,559 

221.104 
199.460 
215.898 

46.081 
41.294 
41.124 

912.320 
779.068 
800,670 

96.041 
101.411 
104.099 

602.393 
525.324 
743.428 

85.800 
30.438 



*BusheU of weight. 
•Tons (2.000 lbs.). 



•Per ton. 
^Pounds. 



•Per pound. 

•Bales of 500 lbs., groas wt., ez<dading Unten. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



183 



ACREAGE, PRODUCTION AND VALUE OP THE WINTER 

WHEAT CROP OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1914 AND 

1915, AS REPORTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF 

AGRICULTURE. WASHINGTON. 



Statb. 



Acreftgo 
(000 omitted) 



1915 1914 



Yield 
per acre. 



1916 1914 



Total production 
(000 omitted). 



1916 1914 



Price per 

bushel. 

Dec. l,io 

produoera. 



1916 1914 



Value baaed on 

prioei, Dec. 1, to 

producer! 

(000 omitted). 



1916 



1914 



New York........... 

New Jersey 

PennsylYania..... 

Delaware.... 

Maryland. 

Virginia. 

West Virginia..... 
North OaroUna... 
South Oarolina... 
(ieorgia. 

OMo.. 

Indiana. 

Illinois. 

Michigan.^ 

WIsoonain 

Minnesota... 

Iowa. 

MissourL 

South Dakota..... 
Nebraska....- 

ir ^^aAa 

Kentucky.. 

Tennessee. 

Alabama. 

MissisipspL 

Texas. 

Oklahoma 

Arkansas. 

Montana. 

Wyoming..^. 

Colorado.. 

New Mexico 

Ariaona. 

Utah. 

Nevada. 

Idaho 

Washington......... 

Oregon — 

Oalliomia...... 

United States. 



Acres 

S90 

78 

1.880 

125 

838 



1,980 

2,750 

2,800 

MO 

100 

80 
510 

2,773 
125 

8,801 

8,475 

900 

880 

100 

5 

1.475 

8,150 

220 

875 

80 

810 
52 
39 

245 
22 

890 

1,110 

875 

440 



Acres 

880 

79 

1,312 

114 

812 



1,280 


779 


800 


288 


060 


811 


225 


80 


825 


140 



1.975 

2,485 

2,500 

870 

85 



510 

2.549 

89 

8.825 

8.800 

780 

720 

81 

1 

1,062 

2.525 

125 

481 

46 

250 
46 
81 

223 
18 

839 
980 
822 
400 



Bu. 

25.0 
20.0 
18.5 
15.0 
18.1 

13.8 
15.0 
10.9 
10.8 
11.0 

20.3 
17.2 
19.0 
21.8 
28.0 

19.5 
21.5 
12.3 
20.5 
18.5 

12.5 
11.0 
10.5 
12.0 
20.0 

15.5 
11.8 
12.5 
27.0 
28.0 

28.0 
22.0 
28.0 
25.0 
28.0 

29.0 
27.8 
24.0 
18.0 



Bu. 

22.5 
18.0 
18.1 
20.5 
21.6 

14.5 
15.0 
12.0 
11.5 
12.1 

18.5 
17.4 
18.5 
19.7 
21.5 

19.5 
21.8 
17.0 
14.0 
19.3 

20.5 
18.5 
15.5 
13.0 
18.0 

13.0 
19.0 
18.0 
23.0 
24.0 

25.0 
25.0 
28.0 
25.0 
29.0 

27.5 
28.5 
22.0 
17.0 



Btuhels 
9,750 
1,580 
24,805 
1,875 
10,272 

18,974 
4,500 

10.855 
2,480 
8,575 

40.104 
47,800 
53,200 
20.448 
2.800 

1.170 
10,085 
84,108 

2,582 
88,818 

106,088 

9,900 

9.030 

1.200 

100 

22,882 
88,540 

2,750 
18,225 

1,580 

8,080 
1,144 
1,092 
8,125 
572 

11,810 
80,838 
18,200 
7,040 



Bushels 

8.100 
1,422 

28.747 
2.387 

18.158 

11.298 

8.540 

7,832 

020 

1,804 

88.588 
43,239 
48,250 
17.818 
1,828 

975 
11,018 
43,838 

988 

84,172 

178,300 

12,540 

11,180 

408 

13 

14.088 
47.975 

1,825 
11,083 

1.060 

8,250 
1,125 

888 
5.575 

522 

9,322 
25.440 
13.884 

8,800 



Cts. 

101 
108 
104 
109 
105 

108 
108 
120 
138 
129 

104 
102 
100 
101 
95 

90 
87 
08 
88 
84 

89 
105 
108 
125 
105 

107 
89 

101 
78 
78 

80 
90 
115 
88 
05 

80 
82 
84 
05 



Cts. 

106 
109 
104 
109 
108 

108 
108 
117 
145 
184 

105 
108 
101 
103 
100 

102 
98 
98 
04 
95 

95 
103 
106 
128 
125 

09 

92 
09 

91 



87 
90 
125 
88 
95 

87 
100 
102 
104 



Dollars 
9.848 
1.864 
25,589 
2,044 
10.788 

18.882 
4.880 

12.428 
8.858 
4.812 

41.802 
48.248 
58.200 
20.852 
2,185 

1,068 
9,540 

88,428 
2,203 

56.959 

04.285 
10.895 
9,752 
1,500 
105 

24,482 
82,521 

2,778 
14,218 

1,217 

8,448 
1,080 
1.258 
5,288 
543 

9,048 
25.122 
13,808 

8,888 



40,458 



88,006 



18.2 



19.0 



855,045 



884,990 



05.0 



08,8 



1,012 



DcUars 

8,748 
1,550 

24,897 
2,547 

13,047 

12.200 
8,828 
8,578 
1,884 
2,270 

88.885 

44.538 

48,712 

17.885 

1.828 

994 

10.575 

42.488 

906 

80,988 

187.485 

12,910 

ll,n8 

506 

10 

13,925 

44,137 

1,800 

10.087 

981 

6.48» 
1.017 
l.OSd^ 
4.794 
496 

8.110 
25.440 
18.968 

7.072 



875,828 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



184 



TBADB AND COlOiBBCa OF 



ACREAGE, PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF THE SPRING WHEAT 

CROP OP THE UNITED STATES IN 1914 AND 1915. AS 

REPORTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OP 

AGRICULTURE, WASHINGTON. 



8TATB. 


Acreage 
(000 omitted). 


Yield 
per acre. 


Total prodoctlon 
(000 omitted). 


Price per 

Dec 1. to 
prodoove. 


prices, Dec I. to 

producers 

(000 omitted). 




1916 


1914 


1916 


1914 


1916 


1V14 


1916 


1914 


1916 


1914 


Maine. 


AereM 
4 

1 

106 

4.350 

376 

8.850 
8.600 

846 
60 

600 

66 
350 
46 
76 
84 

380 
890 
336 


Acr$$ 

8 

1 

99 

4.000 
800 

7.385 
8.400 

843 
60 

439 

66 

336 
81 
68 

37 

310 
830 
177 


38.0 
80.0 
33.5 
17.0 
16.7 

18.3 
17.0 
16.0 
12.0 
26.0 

37.0 
31.0 
33.6 
38.0 
83.0 

36.6 
32.2 
17.0 


Bu, 

37.0 
39.0 
17.0 
10.6 
18.6 

11.3 
9.0 
11.6 
16.0 
17.0 

33.0 
33.5 
28.0 
86.0 
80.0 

34.0 
30.0 
16.6 


BuMhelM 

113 

80 

3.863 

73.360 

4.693 

161.970 

61.300 

6.686 

600 

16.600 

1.766 
6.350 
1.013 
3.100 
1.088 

7.430 
19.768 
8.836 


Bu^uU 

81 

39 

1.688 

43.000 

4.060 

81.603 

80.600 

8.944 

900 

7.398 

1.310 
6.063 

718 
1.700 

810 

6.040 
16.400 
3.930 


Cts. 

m 

107 
96 
90 
87 

87 
86 
84 

89 
78 

78 
80 
90 
86 
96 

80 
83 

84 


Cto. 

109 
100 
100 
108 
96 

101 
94 

96 
96 
91 

89 
87 
90 
86 
96 

87 
100 
103 


DoOcrf 

136 

83 

3.344 

66.026 

8.996 

183.314 

63.633 

4.660 

684 

13.168 

1.860 
4.30O 

911 
1.808 
1.084 

6.986 
16.303 
8,318 


DoOan 
88 


wSa^:::::::::::::: 


89 

1.688 


Mfnne>0<^T r 


a.840 


lowa...^ 

North Dakota. 

iP^gJiS:!^^:::::: 

Ifunfai 

Montana 


8.888 

82.408 

38.784 

8,747 

866 

6,687 




i.on 

4.404 




641 


UtalL^...» 

No^SdalT. 


1,483 
770 


Idaho. 


4.888 


Washington. — 

Oregon 


16.400 
3,078 






United States.... 


19,446 


17.688 


18.8 


11.8 


866.460 


306.027 


86.6 


08.6 


806.390 


303.067 



AVERAGE PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF THE COTTON CROP IN 

THE UNITED STATES IN 1914 AND 1915, AS REPORTED BY 

THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, WASHINGTON, 



Stats. 



AfiTfiatfi 
(000 omitted). 



Yield 
per acre. 



1916 



1914 



1916 



1914 



Total production 
(000 omitted). 



1916 



1914 



Price per 
_ponnd, 
Dec 1, to 
prodooers. 



Value based on 

prices, Dec 1, to 

producers 

(000 omitted). 



1916 



1914 



1916 



1914 



Virginia. 

North OaroUna... 
South Carolina.... 

Oeorsia 

' krida. 



Florid 



Alabama. 

MississlppL. 
IiOi]iBtana....« 

Texas. 

Arkansas 



Tenne 

MIssourL.. 
Oklahoma.., 
Oallfomla... 
AU other 



ACTM 

80 
1,250 
2,400 
4,700 

IM 

8.400 
2,050 
1.000 
10,200 
2,150 

780 

102 

1.060 

84 

17 



Aer$$ 
45 

1.527 

2,801 

5.488 

221 

4.007 
8.054 
1.200 
11.081 
2.480 

015 
146 

2.847 
47 
20 



L6«. 
212 
270 
281 
108 
121 

148 
170 
158 
140 
175 

181 
244 
155 
470 



L6«. 
205 

200 
255 
280 
175 

200 

106 
105 
184 
100 

200 
270 
212 
500 
200 



United States.... 



80.057 



80,882 



172.5 



200.2 



10 

706 

1.100 

1.000 

50 

1.060 
040 
800 

8.175 
786 

206 
52 

080 
84 





25 

081 

1.534 

2.718 

81 

1.751 
1.240 
440 
4.502 
1.010 

884 

82 

1.202 

60 

14 



Clf. 

11.4 
11.2 
11.8 
11.4 
14.8 

11.1 
11.5 
11.2 
11.1 
11.0 

11.8 
11.0 
11.8 
11.2 



Clf. 

7.8 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
12.2 

0.7 
0.8 
0.0 
0.8 
0.0 

0.4 
0.6 
0.5 
7.0 
0.8 



DoUan 

870 

87.800 

02.678 

108.5U 

8.560 

56.784 
61.768 
19.280 
108.812 
48.500 

15.067 
2,740 

84.060 

1.822 

821 



DoOsfS 

8B0 

80.884 

60.668 

80.«74 

4,7«8 

50.118 
40.6M 
14.820 
1^.874 
12.094 

11.740 
2,646 

88.277 

1.070 

4ST 



11.101 



10,185 



11.2 



0.8 



002,888 



626,884 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



185 



ACREAGE PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF THE WINTER AND 

SPRING WHEAT CROP OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1914 

AND 1915, AS REPORTED BY THE DEPARTMENT 

OF AGRICULTURE, WASHINGTON. 



Statb. 



Acreage 
(000 omitted). 



1916 1914 



Yield 
per acre. 



1915 1914 



Total production 
(000 omitted). 



1916 1914 



Price per 

bushel, 

Dec. 1. to 

producers. 



1915 1914 



Value based on 

prices. Dec. 1, to 

produce* 

(000 omitted). 



1916 



1914 



Maine. 

Vermont 

New York. 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

D^aware. 

MarylancL 

VIrgbiia. 

West Virginia..... 
North Oarolina... 

South Carolina... 

Georgia 

OWo 

Indiana. 

Illinois. 

Michigan.^ 

Wtsoonsin 

Minnesota. 

Iowa.... 

Missouri 

North Dakota...., 
South Dakota..... 

Nebraska..... 

Kansas. 

Kentucky.. 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Texas. 

Oklahoma 

Arkansas 

Montana 

Wyoming...... 

0<Morado 

New Mezi<x> 

Arizona 

Utah- 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washingtoo......... 

Oregon. 

Oallfomla. 

United States. 



Acres 

4 

1 

390 

78 

1.330 

135 
638 
1,230 
800 
050 

225 

335 

1.980 

2,750 

2,800 

060 
205 

4.310 
785 

3,773 

8.350 
3,725 
3,947 
8,525 
900 

860 

100 

5 

1,475 

3,150 

220 

1.275 

125 

560 

97 

39 
320 

56 

670 

2,000 

900 
440 

59,898 



Acres 

3 

1 

360 

79 

1.812 

114 
612 
779 
236 
611 

80 

140 

1,975 

2.485 

2.500 

879 
184 

4.050 
810 

2.549 

7.285 
3.469 
3.668 
8.660 
760 

720 

31 

1 

1,082 

2.525 

125 
910 
100 
475 
76 

31 
291 

45 

549 

1,780 

799 
400 

53.541 



Bti. 

28.0 
30.0 
25.0 
20.0 
18.5 

15.0 
16.1 
13.8 
15.0 
10.9 

10.8 
11.0 
20.3 
17.2 
19.0 

21.3 
22.7 
17.0 
19.8 
12.3 

18.2 
17.1 
18.3 
12.5 
11.0 

10.5 
12.0 
20.0 
15.5 
11.6 

12.5 
26.5 
26.5 
23.8 
22.2 

28.0 
25.7 
29.6 
28.0 
25.2 

22.2 
16.0 



Btl. 

27.0 
29.0 
22.5 
18.0 
18.1 

20.5 
21.5 
14.5 
15.0 
12.0 

11.5 
12.1 
18.5 
17.4 
18.5 

19.7 
19.1 
10.6 
18.6 
17.0 

11.2 
9.1 
18.6 
20.5 
16.5 

15.5 
13.0 
13.0 
13.0 
19.0 

13.0 
20.2 
22.9 
23.8 
34.3 

28.0 
25.0 
29.6 
26.2 
23.5 

20.8 
17.0 

16.6 



Btuhels 

112 

30 

9.750 

1.560 

24.605 

1.875 
10.272 
16.974 

4.500 
10,355 

2.430 
3,575 
40.194 
47.800 
53,200 

20.448 
4.662 
73,420 
16.557 
34.108 

151.970 
63.762 
72.154 

106.538 
9.900 

9.080 

1,200 

100 

22,862 

36,540 

2,750 
33.825 

8.315 
13.310 

2.156 

1,092 

8,225 

1.660 

18.730 

50.304 

30,035 
7,040 

1,011,605 



Bushels Cts, 



81 

29 

8.100 

1.422 

23,747 

2.337 
13.158 
11.206 
3,540 
7,332 

920 

1,694 

36.538 

43.239 

46.250 

17.316 
3.511 
42.975 
15,066 
43,333 

81,592 
31.566 
68.116 
177.200 
12.540 

11,160 

403 

13 

14,066 

47,976 

1.625 
18,356 

2,290 
11.312 

1,838 



7,275 

1.332 

14,362 

41,840 

16,604 
6,800 

891,017 



112 
107 
101 
106 
104 

109 
105 
108 
108 
120 

138 
129 
104 
102 
100 

101 
95 
90 
87 
98 

87 
86 
84 
89 
105 

108 
125 
105 
107 



101 
78 
78 
80 
90 

115 
86 
95 
80 



92.0 



Cts. 

109 
100 
108 
109 
104 

109 
106 
108 
108 
117 

145 
134 
105 
103 
101 

103 
100 
102 
96 
98 

101 
94 
95 
95 

103 

105 
126 
125 
99 
92 

99 

91 
89 
87 
90 

125 
86 
95 
87 

100 

102 
104 



Dollars 

125 

32 

9,848 

1.654 

25.589 

2.044 
10.786 
18.332 

4.860 
12.426 

8.353 
4.612 
41,802 
48.246 
53,300 

20,662 
4.429 
66.078 
13.535 
38.426 

132,214 
54.835 
60.609 
94.819 
10,396 

9.752 

1.500 

106 

24.462 

32,521 

2,778 
26.384 

2.586 
10.648 

1,941 

1,256 

7,074 

1,577 

14.984 

41,324 

16,831 
6,688 

930,303 



Dollars 



29 

8.748 

1.550 

24.697 

2.547 
13.947 
12.200 
3.823 
8,578 

1.834 

2.270 

38.866 

44.536 

46.712 

17.885 
3,511 
43.834 
14.463 
42.466 

82.408 
29,672 
64.710 
168,840 
12.916 

11,718 

508 

16 

13.925 

44.187 

1,609 
16.704 
2,088 
9,842 
1,654 

1,086 

6,256 

1,266 

12,495 

41,840 

16,936 
7,072 

878.680 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



186 



TRADB AND COMMXBCB OF 



ACREAGE, PRODUCTION AND VALUE OP THE CORN CROP OP 

THE UNITED STATES IN 1914 AND 1915, AS REPORTED 

BY THE DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE, 

WASHINGTON. 



Statb. 



(OOOomifted) 



1916 1914 



TMd 
per acre. 



TotAl production 
(000 omitted). 



1915 1914 1915 



1914 



Prfceper 

bMbel. 

Dec 1, to 

prodooen. 



Vftlue based on 

pcloee. Dee. 1. to 

prodocen 

(000 ommed). 



1915 1914 1915 



1914 



Maine.. 

New Hampehire.. 

Vermont. 

ManachuMtU 

Bhode Island 



Oonneetlcut 

New York. 

New Jer»y. 

PenntylTanla.. 
Delaware... 



Maryland. 

Vlrgmla. 

West Virginia. 

North OaroUna... 
South OaroUna... 



Georgia.. 
Florida.... 

Ohio 

Indiana.. 
nilnoU.... 



Michigan..... 
Wltooniln... 
Minnesota... 

Iowa.«..^ 

MlMOorL 



North Dakota... 
South Dakota..., 

Nebraska. 

Kansas. 

Kentucky 

Tenne 
Alabama... 
Mississippi.. 
Louisiana...... 

Texas. 



Oklahoma 

Arkansas 

Montana. 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico.. 
Arlsona.... — ... 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho. 



Washington... 

Oregon 

OaUromla 



Act— 
16 
S3 

47 
48 
13 

66 

606 

385 

1.630 

310 

710 

3.136 

800 

S.060 
3.166 

4.830 
800 
3.700 
6.036 
10.440 

1.750 
1,776 
3.700 
10.100 
7,100 

700 
8,350 
7.100 
6,650 
3.800 

8.500 
8,900 
8.050 
3,300 
7.450 

4.300 

3.700 

70 

36 

470 

105 
30 
18 
1 
33 

89 
88 
04 



Acrtt 
10 
31 
46 
48 
11 

01 

650 

373 

1.408 

197 

003 
1.931 

783 
3.836 
1.975 

4.000 
700 
8.050 
4.949 
10.840 

1.750 
1.735 
3.000 
10.348 
7.300 

500 
8.000 
7,100 
5.850 
8.050 

8.850 
8.304 
8.150 
3,000 
0.400 

4.000 

3.400 

60 

31 

403 

93 
18 
13 

1 
19 

89 
33 
00 



Btt. 

41.0 
46.0 
40.0 
47.0 
43.0 

60.0 
40.0 
88.0 
38.6 
31.5 

86.0 
38.6 
31.6 
31.0 
10.5 

U.O 
16.0 
41.6 
88.0 
30.0 

83.0 
33.0 
33.0 
80.0 
39.6 

14.0 
89.0 
80.0 
81.0 
80.0 

37.0 
17.0 
19.0 
30.6 
38.5 

39.6 
38.0 
38.0 
35.0 
34.0 

30.0 
80.0 
84.0 
85.0 
86.0 

37.0 
85.0 
41.0 



Btt. 

40.0 
40.0 
47.0 
47.0 
43.0 

40.0 
41.0 
38.6 

43.6 
80.0 

87.0 
30.6 
31.0 
30.8 
18.5 

14.0 
10.0 
89.1 
83.0 
39.0 

30.0 
40.6 
85.0 
88.0 
33.0 

38.0 
30.0 
34.6 
18.6 
36.0 

34.0 
17.0 
18.6 
19.8 
19.6 

13.6 
17.5 
38.0 
35.0 
33.0 

38.0 
33.0 
86.0 
80.0 
31.0 

37.0 
80.0 
30.0 



066 

990 
3.360 
3,804 

610 

3.350 
34.300 
10.880 
68.630 

0.016 

34.850 
00.603 
36.300 
04.050 
86.668 

04.960 

13.000 

160.040 

190.960 

870.104 

60.000 

40.835 

03.100 

803.000 

309,450 

9.800 
94.350 
313.000 
173.050 
114,000 

94.500 
00.800 
09,860 
46.100 
175.075 

133,900 

03,100 

1.900 

036 

11.380 

3.730 

000 

443 

86 

770 

1.063 
1.165 
3.834 



United States.... 



108,331 



108,436 



38.3 



26.8 



8,054,536 



BuMetff 

780 

900 

3,1U 

3,360 

403 

3,800 
83.660 
10.473 
03.178 

7.093 

34.581 
89.880 
33.003 
67.560 
80,688 

60.000 
11.300 
143,7U 
103.317 
800.084 

08.000 
00.803 
91.000 
880.434 
158.400 

14.000 
78.000 
178.960 
108.336 
91,350 

80.400 
66.488 
68.376 
88.000 
134,800 

60.000 

43.000 

1.400 

635 

10,030 

3,670 

670 

430 

80 

689 

973 

000 

3.100 



3,073,804 



Cto. 
86 

70 
84 
80 
100 

86 

78 
76 
70 
03 

01 

n 

74 
77 
87 

78 
78 
60 
61 
64 

08 
08 
03 
61 
67 

07 
49 

47 
61 
60 

68 
09 
05 
04 
68 

40 
04 
00 
07 
66 

73 
116 
80 
93 



Of. 
88 

83 
81 
86 
98 

89 
88 

70 
78 
03 

08 
81 
88 
80 
93 

86 
80 
01 
68 

01 



80 
78 
75 
74 

04 
80 
70 
70 
00 

80 
130 

76 
110 

73 

78 
83 
87 



DoOert 
668 

763 
1.896 
l,8tt 

610 

3.703 
18.870 

8.133 
40.004 

4.101 

16.168 
43.999 
18.048 
49,318 
80,986 

60.001 
8.700 
87.883 
97.884 
303.139 

88.060 
37.701 
88.503 
154.530 
119.880 

0.660 

40.183 
100.110 
87.740 
03,840 

64.810 
46.747 
46.078 
38.804 
101.644 

60,994 

89.744 
1.863 
419 
0,304 

1.993 
090 
864 
83 
600 

811 

947 

3.800 



67.5 



04.4 1.766.850 l,7!33.07O 



DoO&rs 

MS 

788 

1.7U 

i.ng 

461 

3.497 

i8.ne 

7,968 

46.800 

4.897 

10.081 
81.886 
18,884 
40.40i 
S8.0U 

47.000 
8.900 
87.068 
94.7M 
183.031 

43.310 
45.410 
47,830 
314.188 
107,7U 

8.130 
89.000 
93.184 
08.188 
68,400 

64.073 
44.880 
43,641 
88.960 
93.858 

83,000 
88,800 

1.084 
88B 

6.878 

3.001 

001 

81S 

40 

484 

710 
6U 

1,879 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



187 



ACREAGE, PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF THE OAT CROP OP 

THE UNITED STATES IN 1914 AND 1915, AS REPORTED 

BY THE DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE. 

WASHINGTON. 



Statb. 



AcreAffe 
(000 omiued). 



1915 1914 



Yield 
per acre. 



1915 1914 



Total productloD 
(000 omitted). 



1915 



1914 



Price per 

bushel, 

Dec. 1, to 

producers. 



1915 1914 



Value based on 

prices, Dec. 1. to 

producers 

(000 omitted). 



1915 



1914 



Maine 

New Hampshire.., 

Vermont. 

Massachusetts 

Bhode Island. 

Connecticut. ... 

New York. 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Delaware.... 

Maryland 

Virg&ia. 

West Virginia. 

North Carolina..... 
South Carolina..... 

QeoTKia 

Florida.. 

Ohio 

Indiana. 

Illinois. 

Michigan. 

Wisconsin. 

Minnesota... 

Iowa..„ 

Missouri 

North Dakota. 

South Dakota. 

Nebraska. 

Kansas. 

Kentucky...... 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

MisBiaBippL.» 

Louisiana... 

Texas. 

Oklahoma 

Arkansas 

Montana. 

Wyoming 

Omorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona.^. » 

Utah. 

Nevada 

Idaho.. 

Washington..„..»... 

Oregon. 

OaUfornia. 

United States... 



Aer$$ 
152 
12 
81 
9 
2 

13 
1,840 

70 
1,140 

4 

45 
225 
120 
850 
525 

905 

61 

1,583 

1,538 

4,348 

1,530 
2,150 
8.125 
4.950 
1,225 

2.450 
1.725 
2,200 
1,660 
210 

857 
600 
250 
120 
1,250 

1.400 
375 
600 
227 
800 

60 

9 

100 

13 
835 

275 
865 
211 



Aere9 
141 
12 
79 
9 
2 

11 
1.275 

67 
1,073 

4 

43 
191 
105 
250 
375 

450 

50 

1,650 

1,575 

4,300 

1.515 
2,300 
8.040 
5.000 
1,200 

2.318 
1.606 
2.175 
1.760 
175 



890 
160 
70 
900 

1.100 
260 
530 
225 
325 

52 
8 
95 
13 
332 

297 
864 
220 



Bu, 

40.0 
38.0 
43.0 
86.0 
33.0 

32.5 
40.5 
82.5 
88.0 
33.5 

84.0 
25.0 
29.0 
23.0 
19.0 

19.5 
20.0 
41.0 
40.0 
45.0 

42.0 
46.5 
43.0 
40.0 
26.0 

40.0 
42.0 
32.0 
26.5 
26.0 

24.5 
19.0 
21.5 
25.0 
35.5 

27.0 
27.0 
52.0 
42.0 
39.0 

36.0 
87.0 
47.0 
45.0 
47.0 

50.0 
44.0 
83.0 



Bu, 

41.0 
88.0 
42.5 
37.0 
27.5 

29.0 
31.5 
29.0 
30.0 
27.0 

27.0 
15.5 
20.0 
17.5 
20.0 

20.0 
18.0 
30.5 
28.5 
29.8 

88.5 
27.0 
28.0 
83.0 
21.5 

28.0 
27.5 
32.0 
83.5 
21.0 

23.0 
22.0 
23.0 
23.0 
25.0 

27.5 
24.0 
35.0 
35.0 
40.0 

38.0 
42.0 
50.0 
52.0 
44.0 

47.0 
85.0 
85.0 



Bushels 

6.080 
456 

8.483 

324 

66 

422 

54.270 

2.275 

43.820' 

134 

1.530 
5.625 
8.480 
8.050 
9.975 

17.648 

1.220 

69.003 

65.520 

195.435 

64.260 
99.975 
184,875 
198.000 
31.850 

98.000 
72,450 
70,400 
43.725 
5,460 

8.746 
11.400 
5.375 
8,000 
44,375 

87,800 
10,125 
31.200 
9.534 
11,700 

2.160 
833 

4,700 

585 

15.745 

13.750 
16,060 
6,963 



Bushels 

6,781 

456 

8.358 

333 

55 

819 

40.162 

1.948 

82,190 

108 

1,161 
2.960 
2,100 
4.375 
7.500 

9.000 

900 

50.325 

44.888 

125,990 

50.752 
62,100 
85.120 
166.000 
25,800 

64.904 
44.165 
69.600 
58.960 
8.675 

8.060 
8,580 
3.680 
1.610 
22,500 

30.250 
6.240 

18,550 
7,875 

13,000 

1,976 
336 

4.750 

676 

14.608 

18.959 
12.740 
7.700 



Cts. 
45 
54 
58 

51 
50 

55 
45 
48 
44 
51 

49 
55 
51 
62 
67 

66 
70 
36 
34 



Cts, 
57 
58 
55 

56 

58 

55 

51 
54 

51 
50 

52 
58 
55 

65 
71 

70 
70 
45 
43 
44 

46 
48 
40 
41 
44 

87 
38 
40 
42 
53 

53 
60 
65 
63 
48 

41 
53 
89 
48 
45 

45 
70 
43 
55 
88 

42 
45 
58 



Dollars 

2.786 

246 

1.846 

166 

83 

232 

24.422 

1.092 

19.061 

68 

750 
3.094 
1.775 
4,991 
6.683 



26.460 
20.286 
21.824 
16.178 
2.621 



1.080 
213 

2,115 
322 

5,353 

5,088 
5.942 
3.482 



DoUars 

3.295 

264 

1,847 

186 

32 

175 

20.483 

1.049 

16.417 

54 

604 
1.717 
1.155 
2.844 
5,825 



11.648 
854 

24.841 
22.277 
68.402 


6.300 

630 

22.646 

19.802 

55.486 


22,491 
85,991 
43.000 
63.360 
12,103 


22.888 
26.703 
34.048 
67.650 
11.352 



24,014 
16.783 
27.840 
24,763 
1,948 



4.878 


4.266 


7.182 


5.920 


8.225 


2.892 


1.650 


1.014 


18.688 


10,800 


18,280 


12.402 


5.265 


3,307 


9.984 


7,284 


4,100 


8.780 


4.797 


5,860 



235 
2,042 

372 
5.551 

5,868 
5,783 
4.081 



40.780 



88.442 



87.8 



29.7 



,540.862 



1.141.060 



86.1 



43,8 



555,669 



499,431 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



188 



TRADB AND COUMXRCB OW 



ACREAGE PRODUCTION AND VALUE OP THE BARLEY CROP OP 

THE UNITED STATES IN 1914 AND 1915. AS REPORTED 

BY THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

WASHINGTON. 



Statb. 


Acreage 
(000 omitted). 


Yield 
per acre. 


Total productton 
(000 omitted). 


Price per 

bo^Ml, 

Dec 1, to 

producers. 


prices. Dec. I. to 

producers 

(000 omitted). 




1916 


1914 


1915 


1914 


1916 


1914 


1916 


1914 


1916 


1914 


Mftine 


Acrtt 
6 
1 

IS 
85 
8 

5 
U 
SO 

8 
64 

85 

666 

1.860 

858 

6 

1.400 

760 

105 

870 

6 

6 
8 
8 
80 
17 

180 

8 

86 

84 

18 

191 

175 

180 

1.860 


Acres 
6 
1 

ts 

76 

7 

6 
11 
86 

8 
66 

90 

675 

1.878 

860 

5 

1.450 

850 

118 

840 

6 

5 
8 
7 
70 
16 

108 

6 

86 

88 

18 

186 

182 

122 

1.402 


Bu. 

26.6 
80.0 
86.0 
82.0 
29.6 

84.0 
29.0 
81.0 
28.0 
84.0 

29.6 
86.6 
80.6 
81.0 
26.0 

82.0 
82.0 
81.0 
.1.0 
80.0 

24.0 
28.0 
26.6 
84.0 
86.0 

86.0 
88.0 
87.0 
42.5 
48.0 

40.5 
41.6 
86.0 
29.0 


Bu. 

80.0 
82.0 
84.5 
28.0 
28.0 

88.0 
26.0 
85.0 
26.0 
29.6 

26.0 
27.8 
28.0 
86.0 
84.0 

19.6 
28.0 
28.6 
24.6 
28.5 

27.0 
85.0 
25.0 
80.5 
88.0 

88.6 
84.0 
86.0 
45.0 
47.0 

88.0 
89.0 
80.0 
80.0 


BvMste 
182 
80 
480 
8.780 
886 

170 
848 
980 
224 
1.886 

2.506 
28,288 
41,175 
10.948 
126 

44.800 
84.000 
8.355 
8.870 
180 

144 
352 
313 
3.730 
6U 

4.680 

364 

1.396 

1.445 

676 

7.786 
7.368 
4.680 
89,440 


Butk$U 

150 
83 
414 
3.100 
196 

166 
386 
875 
300 
1.623 

3.840 
18.438 
81.694 

9.860 
130 

38.375 

19.660 

2.666 

6.880 

142 

185 
300 

175 

2.185 

628 

8.966 

170 

1.260 

1.440 

611 

7.080 

7.096 

8.660 

42.060 


CIS, 

76 
79 
76 
75 
76 

70 
75 
64 
65 

67 

62 
56 
49 
49 
68 

44 
46 
42 
42 

n 

75 
66 
60 
48 
56 

48 
70 
66 
62 
70 

52 

56 
62 
62 


as. 

81 
83 
75 
71 
70 

66 
80 
68 
67 
61 

65 
62 
68 
66 

65 

46 

50 
47 
47 
77 

82 
70 
68 

68 

64 

66 

76 
60 
60 
66 

50 
62 
61 
59 


DoOors 
99 
84 

815 
3.040 

in 

119 
361 
602 
146 
1.047 

1.556 
18.041 
30.176 

6.868 
79 

19.713 

11.040 

1.867 

8.6U 

189 

106 
171 
106 
1.806 
887 

3.346 
186 
736 
761 
408 

4,088 
4.067 
3.903 
34.468 


DoOan 
122 


New Hampshire.... 
VwinA**^ 


26 
810 


New York. 


1.481 


Penntylyania 


187 
109 


Virgin*^ 


228 


Ohio. 


516 


Indiana 


114 


lUlnoU. 


881 


iwrifvftltf&n 


1.881 


WliOOn»ll*rr,rr 


11.435 


l^ltlTlfMOt^ 


16,796 


Iowa. 


5.148 


MlMOuri 

North Dakota. — 

South Dakota. 

NAhrfMka .,. 


78 

12.734 
9.77S 
1.348 


Kansas 


3.7tf 


Kentucky «.... 

TonnosffPO 


108 
111 




140 


Oklahoma 


98 


Montana..... 


1.181 


Wyoming 

Colorado 


818 

3.181 


New Mexico 


188 


Arixona. 

TTtah 


756 
730 


Nevada. 


897 


Idaho 


8.5U 




8.691 


Oregon.^ 


s.sn 


OaSdmla. 


34.815 


United States.... 


7.886 


7.666 


82.0 


85.8 


387.009 


194,968 


51.7 


64.8 


133.tf9 


106.908 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT or ST. LOUIS. 



189 



ACREAGE, PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF THE RYE CROP 
THE UNITED STATES IN 1915 AND 1914, AS REPORTED 
BY THE DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE. 
WASHINGTON. 



OF 



Statb. 



Acreage 
(000 omitted). 



1915 1914 



Yield 
per acre. 



1915 1914 



Total production 
(000 omitted). 



1915 1914 



Price per 

bushel, 

Dec 1. to 

producers. 



1916 1914 



Value based on 

prices. Dec 1, to 

producers 

(000 omitted). 



1916 1914 



Vermont. 

Massachusetts. . . . 

Connecticut ,... 

New York. 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Delaware. 

Maryland 

Virginia. 

West Virginia. 

North Carolina... 
South OaroUna.... 

Georgia 

Ohio 

Indiana, 

Illinois. 

Michigan. 

Wisconsin. 

Minnesota... 

Iowa. 

Missouri 

North Dakota..... 

South Dakota. 

Nebraska. 

Kansas. ■ 

Kentucky. 

Tennessee 

Alabama. 

Texas. 

Oklahoma 

Aikansas. 

Montana 

Wyoming. 

Colorado 

Utah 

Idaho. 

Washington. 

OrMon. 

Caufomia. 

United States. 



Aerei 

1 

8 

7 

160 

71 

274 
1 

24 
70 
16 

50 

8 

18 

100 

150 

40 
390 
420 
800 

60 

25 
180 

00 
200 

50 

24 

18 
4 
2 
6 



2,866 



Acre$ 

1 

3 

7 

129 

70 

280 

1 

25 

58 

17 

46 
3 
13 
95 
99 

49 
371 
412 
279 

59 

17 
131 

60 
122 

50 

22 

22 

2 

2 

6 

1 
10 

5 
21 
18 

8 
8 
21 

8 



2,541 



Bu, 

17.0 
20.0 
21.5 
18.7 
20.0 

18.0 
15.5 
16.5 
14.5 
14.0 

11.5 
10.0 
9.2 
17.5 
16.0 

18.5 
15.5 
18.5 
19.5 
18.5 

13.5 
16.0 
19.5 
17.5 
16.0 

12.0 
10.5 
10.0 
17.0 
13.5 

10.5 
22.5 
20.0 
17.5 
15.5 

20.0 
18.2 
18.0 
14.0 



17.2 



Bu. 

20.0 
19.0 
19.0 
17.7 
18.5 

18.0 
17.5 
17.0 
13.0 
14.5 

10.0 
11.5 
9.3 
17.0 
16.3 

16.0 
16.0 
16.5 
18.8 
19.0 

14.0 
17.1 
17.0 
16.0 
20.0 

18.7 
13.0 
13.0 
14.8 
16.0 

10.5 
21.0 
17.0 
17.5 
17.5 

20.0 
19.7 
16.0 
17.0 



16.8 



Bushels 

17 

60 

150 

2.806 

1.420 

4.932 
16 

396 
1,015 

224 

576 
30 

120 
1,750 
2,400 

906 
6.046 
7,770 
5,850 
1,110 

338 
2.700 
1,756 
8.500 

800 



189 
40 
34 
81 

10 
225 
180 
525 



60 
146 
414 
112 



49.190 



Bushels 

20 

57 

133 

2.283 

1.296 

5.040 

18 

425 

764 

216 

460 
34 

121 
1,616 
1.614 

784 
6.936 
6,798 
5.245 
1.121 



2.240 
1.020 
1.952 
1.000 



301 

286 

26 

30 

96 

10 
210 

86 
368 
228 

60 
168 
336 
136 



42.779 



Cts. 

85 
102 
102 
93 
92 

84 
90 



106 
161 
140 
83 
82 



79 
76 
73 
76 

04 
103 
136 
103 

77 

100 
66 
90 
70 
66 



83.9 



Cts. 

80 
101 
98 
89 
82 



92 
86 
90 
90 

106 
150 
160 
81 



86 
91 
91 
89 

77 

87 
84 
78 
74 
80 

06 
98 
110 
99 
96 

105 
70 
81 
66 
60 

67 
86 
100 
85 



86.5 



Dollars 

14 

61 

163 

2.609 

1,306 

4,143 

16 

348 

944 

208 

604 
46 

168 
1.452 
1,968 

762 
6.138 
6.760 
4.738 



291 
2.133 
1.334 
2,666 

608 

271 
196 
54 
36 
62 

10 
146 
162 
368 
131 

41 
110 
373 
101 



41.205 



Dollars 

16 

58 

130 

2.032 

1,062 

4,183 

17 

366 

670 

221 

483 
51 

182 
1.308 
1.372 

666 
5.402 
6.186 
4.668 



207 
1.882 

796 
1.444 

800 



280 
29 
30 
91 

10 
147 

69 
239 
137 

40 
134 
336 
116 



37.018 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



100 



TRAOB AND COlOiBBCB OF 



ACREAGE, PRODUCTION AND VALUE OP THE HAY CROP OF 

THE UNITED STATES IN 1915 AND 1914, AS REPORTED 

BY THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

WASHINGTON. 



Statb. 


(000 omitted). 


Yield 
per acre. 


Total production 
(000 omitted). 


Price per 

toii« 
Dec. 1. to 
producers. 


Yatae based oa 
prices. Dec 1. to 

(oJorailttad). 




1916 


1914 


1916 


1914 


1916 


1914 


1916 1914 


1916 


1914 


Mft1n4^ 


Aer$M 

1.215 
504 
•70 
470 
57 

865 

4.500 

Ml 

S.IOO 

70 

SOO 
700 
7S0 
S50 
230 

800 

51 

2.812 

2.020 

2.400 

2.470 
2.575 
1.680 
3.098 
8.050 

440 

610 

1.650 

1,766 

875 

050 
250 
250 
250 
450 

460 
850 

n5 

550 
070 

201 
147 
804 
225 

on 

812 

850 

2,511 


Aerts 

1.280 

520 

090 

480 

58 

875 
4.658 

861 


Ton9 
1.15 
1.00 
1.85 
1.50 
1.24 

1.35 
1.80 
1.4A 


Ton» 

l.lf 

1.15 

1.20 

1.82 

1.17 

1.25 
1.20 
1.85 
1.28 
1.10 

1.15 

.72 

.92 

1.15 

1.15 

1.85 
1.35 
l.U 
1.00 
.85 

1.28 
1.75 
1.89 
1.88 
.70 

1.45 
1.70 
1.69 
1.51 
.95 

1.20 
1.81 
1.45 
1.90 
1.75 

1.18 
1.06 
2.50 
2.80 
2.40 

2.50 
8.20 
2.75 
8.25 
2.65 

2.20 
2.00 
1.95 


Tons 

1.207 
604 

1.810 
705 
71 

498 

5.860 

528 

4.840 

84 

468 

945 
1.096 
. 648 

286 

845 

61 
4.049 
8.000 
8,606 

8.458 
4.508 
8.209 
5.576 
4.686 

660 
1.220 
4.290 
4.002 
1.225 

1.896 
862 
850 
488 

765 

1.058 
560 
1.550 
1.210 
2,134 

442 

470 

985 

675 

1,828 

1,868 
1.870 
4,520 


TonM 

1.814 

596 

1.188 

684 

68 

469 
5.584 

487 

4.0» 

79 

448 
468 
640 
868 
242 

888 

65 

8,178 
1.764 
1.912 

8.011 
4.462 

8;294 
4.071 
1.820 

580 

850 

2.585 

2.492 

7U 

960 
288 

804 
880 

788 

508 
886 

1.750 
1,150 
2,828 

515 
454 

1.116 

808 

1.868 

1.751 
1.716 
6.265 


DotU 
14.90 


DoUm 
la.io 


DoOmn 
20.8U 

8.770 
20.806 
U.510 

1.508 

9.880 
91.845 

9.987 
67.704 

1.428 

7.582 
14.886 
16.«» 
10.602 

4.403 

5.210 
976 
51.422 
88.830 
89.917 

42.188 
44.620 
80.588 
48.511 
80.406 

8,768 
6.466 
24,882 
22.747 
15.812 

19.404 
4.489 
8.850 
4.511 
6.044 

5.925 
5,768 

11.625 
9.488 

16.218 

8.890 
4,512 
7.880 
6.003 
14.076 

20.174 
17.765 
50.624 


DoOmn 

18.6B8 


New Hampshire^.. 
Veraioiit. 


17.40 ;i7.oo 
15.50 14.60 


10.106 
17,846 


MMnchosetta 

Bhode ItUnd. 

Oonnacticat.... 

New York. 


23.00 
22.50 

20.00 
15.70 
19.00 
15.60 
17.00 

16.20 
15.70 
15.00 
16.50 
15.60 

15.10 
16.00 
12.70 
11.00 
10.80 

12.20 
9.90 
6.40 
8.70 
8.50 

5.70 
5.80 
5.80 
5.60 
12.50 

18.90 
12.40 
11.00 
10.80 
7.90 

5.60 
10.80 
7.50 
7.80 
7.60 

8.80 
9.60 
8.00 
7.50 
7.70 

10.80 
9.50 
11.20 


21.50 
20.20 

19.50 
14.60 
19.50 
14.50 
17.00 

15.80 
17.20 
17.20 
17.10 
17.00 

16.20 
17.20 
U.40 
14.10 
14.40 

12.00 
9.80 
6.10 
10.10 
U.60 

5.20 
5.70 
6.90 
7.40 
16.00 

17.00 
U.80 
12.00 
12.00 
9.80 

7.90 
12.90 
8.70 
7.50 
7.40 

9.80 
8.80 
7.70 
8.80 
7.80 

11.00 
9.20 
8.20 


U.6I1 
1.S74 

9.146 
81. 5M 


New Jersey 


0;4M 


Peoncylvaola. 

jytHMkWwtft 


8.141 \ 1.40 

72 1.20 

890 1 1.20 
650 1 1.85 


58.200 
1.848 


MMTlftnd 


6.864 


Virginia 


8,090 


West Vlrgliila. 

North Carolina. 

South Carolina. 

Georcia. 


696 
820 
210 

250 

48 

2.812 

1.764 

2.250 

2.852 
2.550 
1.743 
2.950 
2,600 

400 

500 

1,500 

1.650 

750 

800 
220 
210 
200 
450 

450 
820 
700 
500 
970 

206 
142 
406 
247 
705 

796 

858 

2.700 


1.50 
1.85 
1.80 

1.15 
1.20 
1.44 
1.50 
1.54 

■ 1.40 
1.75 
1.91 
1.80 
1.52 

1.50 
2.00 
2.60 
2.80 
1.40 

1.47 
1.45 
1.40 
1.75 
1.70 

2.80 
1.60 
2.00 
2.20 
2.20 

2.20 
3.20 
2.50 
3.00 
2.70 

2.80 
2.20 
1.80 


11.006 
6.2S0 
4.114 

6.476 


Florida. 


1.118 


Ohio 


43.686 


Indlanax. 


24;878 


lUlPoif 


17.533 


MI'^f'fgAn . 


86.1S8 


Wieconain 


41.407 


Minnesota. 


20.008 


Iowa. 


41,117 


Missouri 

North Dakota. .- 

South Dakota. 

N«brft#ka 


24.7S2 

8.016 
4.845 
17.492 


Kansas m ,, i ...... 


18.441 


Kentucky 


11.882 


Tennessee 


16.830 


Alabama 


8.974 


MlsslsslppL.. 

T/OuMf^a.. ............ 


8.648 

4.660 


Texas. . . s.... 


7.723 


Oklahoma........ 


4.018 


Arkansas...... .. ...... 


4.884 


Montana 


15 236 


Wyoming 


8.086 


Colorado^ 


17.337 


New Mezioo 


4,700 


Arizona. 


8.006 


XTtah 


8.508 


Nevada 


6.066 


Idaho 


U.686 




10.361 


Oregon 


15.787 


Oamornl* XT 


48.178 






United States.... 


50,872 


49.145 


1.68 


1.43 


85,225 


70.071 


10.70 


11.12 


912,820 


779,068 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT or 8T. LOUIS. 



191 



ACREAGE, PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF THE POTATO CROP 
THE UNITED STATES IN 1914 AND 1915, AS REPORTED 
BY THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 
WASHINGTON. 



OF 



Statb. 



AcreAffe 
(000 omlued). 



1916 1914 



Yield 
per acre. 



1916 1914 



Total production 
(000 omitted). 



1916 1914 



Price per 

bushel, 

Dec 1, to 

producers. 



1916 1914 



Value based on 

prices, Dec 1, to 

producers 

(000 omitted). 



1916 



1914 



Malne^ 

New Hampshire.. 

Vermont. 

Massachusetts.... 
Bhode Island 

Connecticut. 

New York. 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Delaware. 

Maryland 

Vlrgbila. 

West Virginia. 

North Carolina.... 
Sooth Carolina.... 

Georgia. 

Florida. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

lUinois 

Bilchigan.... 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota. 

Iowa. 

Missouri. 

North Dakota. 

South Dakota...... 

Nebraskaw 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

T4>nlBiana 

Texas. 

Oklahoma 

Aricansas 

Montana. 

Wyoming. 

Colorado 

New Mezioo 

Arizona. 

Utah, 

Nevada. 

Idaho 

Washington. 

Or^on 

Caufomla 

United States.. 



Acres 
142 
16 
34 
26 
5 

24 
866 

280 

11 

44 

140 
50 
85 
11 

16 
12 

158 
75 

126 

855 
206 
285 
148 
90 

80 
68 
110 
71 
51 

86 
20 
13 
28 
42 

85 
28 
80 
16 
63 

8 
1 

20 
13 



Acres 

180 

17 

25 

27 

5 

24 
867 
02 



112 
48 
88 
11 

18 
13 

150 
76 

124 

364 
304 
270 
147 
87 

70 
68 
118 
72 
50 

85 
18 
12 
24 
44 

82 
26 
37 
16 
73 



1 

20 

12 

34 

60 
49 
76 



Bu. 

166 
96 
108 
120 
110 

06 
62 
180 
72 
06 

07 
126 
117 
00 
80 

66 
80 
82 
06 
110 

60 
87 
106 
106 
08 

00 
115 
105 

88 

126 



00 
155 
160 
136 

100 
06 
125 
172 
126 

186 
116 
130 



Bu, 

260 
160 
168 
165 
165 

140 
145 
108 
105 
80 

78 
66 
64 
52 
70 

60 
80 
06 
80 
60 

121 
124 
114 
86 
45 

100 
00 
80 
62 
46 

43 

70 
80 
70 
61 

70 
60 
140 
108 
120 

100 
110 
140 
130 
166 

128 
07 
188 



Bushels 

22,010 

1.520 

2,502 

8.120 

550 

2,280 
22.010 
12,000 
20,160 

1,046 

4,268 
17,600 
6.850 
8.160 



1.040 

060 

12,546 

7,126 
13.860 

20,046 
25,026 
80.210 
15,640 
8,820 

7,200 
7.820 
11.650 
5.803 
6,426 

3.168 
1,600 
1,170 
1,428 
2,730 

2.076 
2.620 
6,045 
2.400 
7.155 

800 

06 

2,600 

2.236 

3,600 

8,236 
5.520 
10,140 



Bushels 
83.800 
2.703 
4,200 
4.185 



3.360 
63.215 

0.036 

28.140 

880 

8.432 
7.280 
2.502 
1.716 
770 

780 

1,040 

14.250 

6.000 

7.440 

44,044 
37.606 
30.780 
12,642 
3.016 

7,630 
5,670 
0,440 
4,464 
2.250 

1.506 
1,422 
060 
1.680 
2.684 

2.240 
1,600 
6.180 
1.620 
8,760 

000 

110 

2.800 

1.660 

6.270 

7.552 
4.758 
10.350 



Cts. 

70 
05 
81 
04 
02 

06 
82 
75 
75 
75 

62 
61 
66 

73 
115 

00 
116 
70 
66 
60 

66 
46 
30 
64 
60 

41 
36 
42 
74 
66 

63 
00 
84 
05 
106 

84 
76 
50 
60 
55 

06 
100 
63 
70 
66 

53 
60 
75 



Cts, 
33 
60 

47 
71 
70 



44 

61 

58 
70 

60 
77 
81 
02 
126 

105 
113 
63 
66 
61 

80 
80 
32 
60 
73 

42 
47 
64 

77 
84 

01 
101 
06 
07 
104 

00 
07 
64 
70 
60 

06 
120 
60 
70 
48 

55 

60 
70 



Dollars 
15.407 
1.444 

2.100 

2.033 

606 

2.180 
18.048 

0.068 

15.120 

784 

2.646 
10,675 
3.802 
2.300 
1.012 

1,030 
1.104 
8.782 
8.000 
8,177 

11,720 
11,667 
11.782 
8,302 
6.202 

2.062 
2.737 
4,861 
4.361 
3,634 

1,006 
1.440 
083 
1.367 
2.866 

2.400 
1.015 
3,022 
1.440 
3,036 

760 

05 

1,675 

1,665 

1.060 

4,866 
8,312 
7.605 



DoUars 

11.164 

1,622 

1.074 

2.071 

678 

2,184 
23.415 

6.061 

16.821 

616 

2.060 
5.606 
2,100 
1,670 
062 

810 
1.176 
7.652 
3.360 
4,588 

13.218 
11.300 
0.850 
7.460 
2,868 

8,206 
2.666 
5.008 
3.437 
1.800 

1.870 
1,436 
012 
1,630 
2,701 

2.016 
1,455 
3,816 
1,134 
4,380 

866 

132 
1,680 
1.002 
2,630 

4,154 
2,862 
7,246 



3,761 



8,706 



06.6 



100.5 



350.103 



405.021 



61.6 



48.0 



221,104 



108.600 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



192 



TRADB AND COlOiBRCB OF 



ACREAGE. PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF THE TOBACCO, FLAX 

SEED AND RICE CROPS OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1914 

AND 1915, AS REPORTED BY THE DEPARTMENT 

OF AGRICULTURE, WASHINGTON. 



Statb. 


(OOOoSltted). 


Yield 
per acre. 


Total production 
(000 omitted). 


Price per 

Dec. 1. to 
producers. 


Tatae based od 

prices, Dec. 1. to 

producers 

(000 omitted). 




1915 


1914 


1915 


1914 


1915 


1914 


1915 


1914 


1915 


1914 


New Hampchire.... 
Vermoiit 


Acres 

100 
100 

7,300 
22,200 

4.400 

81.400 
22.000 

192.500 
11,300 

320.000 

65.000 
1,700 
3,900 
93,700 
13.500 

700 

41.000 

3.500 

440.000 

92.900 

200 
300 
200 
500 


Acres 

100 
100 

6.600 
20.200 

4.600 

33.100 
22.000 

175,000 
10.800 

265.000 

50.000 
1.900 
4.300 
86.800 
13.500 

600 

45.600 

4.100 

400.000 

77.400 

200 
700 
200 
700 


Lbs. 1 Lbs. 
1.400 1.770 
1.300 1.700 
1,100 11,750 
1,350 1.770 
1.200 {1,300 

1,350 1.450 
740 800 
750 650 
870 j 820 
620 660 

580 730 
880 1.000 
910 il.OOO 
900 900 


Lbs. 

140 

130 

8,030 

29.970 

5.280 

42.390 
16.280 

144.375 
9.831 

198.400 

37,700 

1,496 

3,549 

84.330 

11,340 

696 

36.900 

3.150 

356.400 

69,676 

100 
126 
100 
300 


Lbs. 

177 

170 

11.550 

35.754 

6,080 

47,996 
17,600 

113,750 
8,856 

172.250 

36,500 

1,900 

4.300 

78.120 

12,150 

468 

68,806 

4,920 

364.000 

68.468 

140 
280 
116 
427 


Cts. 

u.o 

11.0 
14.5 
17.0 
9.5 

9.2 
8.5 
9.4 
10.0 
11.2 

7.0 

23.0 

28.0 

9.0 

7.3 

9.0 
6.0 
12.0 
7.8 
6.3 

22.0 
30.0 
27.0 
17.0 


as. 

18.0 
18.0 
17.7 
18.5 
12.0 

8.6 
8.0 
9.0 
11.0 
11.5 

9.7 

26.0 

30.0 

8.8 

9.0 

12.0 
11.0 
13.0 
8.4 
7.5 

28.0 
35.0 
21.0 
18.0 


DoUars 

14 

1.164 

6,095 

502 

3,900 
1.384 

13,6n 
98S 

22.221 

2.6S9 
344 

816 

7.500 

828 

54 

2,214 

378 

27.799 

4.390 

22 
38 
27 
61 


DoUars 
S2 
31 


MMtachusetta 

Connecticut....^ 

New York. 


2.044 

6.614 

718 


Pennsylvania 

Maryland 


4.080 
1.406 


VirgiQia 


10.338 


West Virginia. 

North Carolina. 

South Carolina. 

Oeorgia 


974 
19.801 

3.540 

4n 


Florida. 


i.»a 


owo. .„....:::::.:::..::.: 


6.S7S 


Indiana ua...... 


840 
850 


900 

780 


l.OM 


Iltinoff 


6ft 


Wisconsin 


900 1.180 
900 1.200 
810 910 


6,919 


Missouri 


640 


Kentucky 


I0.576 


Tennessee 

Alabama 


750 

500 
420 
500 
600 


820 

700 
400 
580 
610 


4.700 
89 


Louisiana .,>,.,. ... 


98 




24 


Arkanftas 


77 






United States... 


1868.40Q 


I223.50(] 


775.1 


1845.7 


1,060.587 


1.034,679 


9.1 


9.8 


96.041 


101.411 



FLAXSEED. 



Wisconsin 


Acres 

7 

300 

18 

6 
660 
150 

7 

36 
180 

2 

1 


Acres 

8 

815 

20 

8 

840 

320 

7 

45 

320 


Bu. 
13.5 
10.6 
9.0 
8.0 
9.9 
11.0 
U.O 
5.7 
10.5 
13.0 
9.4 


Bu. 

13.6 
9.3 
9.5 
8.0 
8.3 
7.5 
7.0 
6.0 
8.0 


Bushels 

94 

3.150 

162 

48 

6.534 

1.650 

77 

205 

1,890 

26 

9 


Bushels 

108 

2,930 

190 

64 

6,972 

2,400 

49 

270 

2.560 

16' 


CU. 

1.80 
1.76 
1.50 
1.35 
1.78 
1.67 
1.47 
1.45 
1.70 
1.45 
1.20 


CU. 
1.25 
1.28 
1.20 
1.04 
1.28 
1.23 
1.19 
1.25 
1.20 


Dollars 

169 

5,544 

243 

66 

11.631 

2.756 

113 

297 

3.213 

38 

11 


LMlars 
135 


Minnesota. 


3.750 


Iowa. 


228 


Missouri 


67 


North Dakota. 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 


8.924 

2.9S2 

58 


Kansas 


338 


Montana 


3.073 


Wyoming 




Colorado 


2 


8.0 


1.00 


16 






United States.... 


1,367 


1,885 


10.1 


8.3 


13,845 


15.559 


1.74 


1.26 


24.080 


19.540 



RICE. 



North Carolina. 

South Carolina. 

Georgia 


200 

3,700 

900 

500 

200 

300 

1,800 

401,000 

260,000 

100,000 

34,000 


150 
6,900 
1,100 

400 


21.0 
24.3 
29.3 
25.0 
50.0 
25.0 
25.0 
34.2 
30.5 
48.4 
66.7 


26.3 
26.0 
28.0 
25.0 


4 

90 

26 

12 

10 

8 

45 

13,714 

7,930 

4.840 

2.268 


4 

179 

31 

10 


Is 

90 
88 
75 
100 
75 
88 
90 
89 
95 
90 


92 

70 


3 

9 
10 
6 

40 
12.343 
7.058 
4.598 
2.041 


3 

165 
28 


Florida 


7 


Missouri 




Alabama 


200 

1,000 

336.500 

239,700 

92.580 

15,000 


28.0 
30.0 
32.1 
33.8 
39.8 
53.3 


6 

30 

10.802 

8,102 

3,685 

800 


70 
85 
93 
92 
90 
100 


4 


MississippL 


26 


LfOuisiana 


10.046 


Texas 


7.454 


Arkansas 


3,316 


California. 


800 






United States.... 


802.600 


693,530 


36.1 


34.1 


28,947 


23.649 


90.6 


92.4 


26.212 


21.849 



t Price per bushel December 1. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 



193 



COMPARATIVE GRAIN CROPS OF UNITED STATES FOR A 
SERIES OF YEARS. 



OfiOP QW 


WlneAt, buiji. 


Com, bunb. 


Oftte, biub. 


Bitptonili. 


BRn«7,biuii 


1SS7 .**....., 


4fie,aa9,ooo 

4U,B«s3,OflO 
400,500,000 
^9,25^2, (100 
flll,7t«>,000 
aiS, 1^49,000 
*90J31.725 
460.MT,4ia 
4e7,l02,9l7 
427,684,346 
B80,U9,lftS 
675,1 Is, 7M 
B47,30S,?^6 
fta3,239,&0S 
74JS,4flO/il3 

e7o,o6a,otie 

637,821,835 
552.399,517 
692.979,4^9 
735,260,&70 
6»4.0«7,000 
664,602,000 
683,3B0,t»0O 
63ft,ni.OClO 

flai.aas.ooo 

730,2«7,0UO 

763,380.000 

891,017,000 

1,011,505,000 


1, 45^.101,000 
I, »d7, 700,000 

i,ivz,8sa,ooo 

l,4«9,f7O,0O0 
«,(]»}, 154, 000 
l,ff2»,404,*N>0 
l,eiiJ, 490,131 
1,213,770.062 
2,151,138,6S0 
2,283.«75,l6a 

i,sxva,907,o«a 

1,924, ]e4,fl60 
a,073,14»,9Sa 
2.lfi5,10Z.6l6 
1,5^2, 519, ?=yi 
2,523,&IS,ai3 
2.244,176,925 
2,467,4^0,934 
3.707,908,640 
2,927,H6.(»1 
2.&M,S2fJ,000 
2,(5^8,651,000 
3,552,190,0(10 

2.&ai.4ai,ooo 

3,121,746,000 
2,448,^,000 

a,o;2,soi.ooo 

3.054.5^3,000 


650,518,000 
701,7a5.000 
7fll,Si;i,CXl0 
538,621,000 
T3Ji,g94,rXK> 
66l,0;v,,00n 
6.1S,3,H,t'60 

8-^4 ,443,^37 

7CJ7,34«.la4 

89^.767,800 

780,906.643 

706,177,713 

»ie, 135,969 

7Sa,iW,724 

987,843,713 

7«4.094,199 

894,51*5,653 

»5S,aie,l97 

964,904,523 

754,443,000 

807.156,000 

1 007,129,000 

1,1^,341.000 

9a3,29t,000 

1.418,8^7,000 

l,l3l,7«a»000 

1,141,060,000 

1,540,881.000 


30.691.000 
tS, 415, 000 
2i!i.500,000 
2», 000, 000 

as, 000,000 

26;6fl5;44fl 
a«t7i7,6l5 
37,310,070 
34,368.047 
7,8GS,S-i4 
25,657,5*2 
23,961,741 
23.995,937 
30,344,830 
Ha, 630,5^2 
29,8fla,4ia 
27,334,565 
37,616,045 
a3,a74,WB3 

&i,s<se,ocHj 

ai, 851, 000 
39,530,000 

a4.rii,ooo 

33,119,000 
35,6^1,000 
41,381,000 
42,779.000 
49,imi,0OQ 


5e,sis,ooo 

ea,S84,000 
00,000,000 


1^8,..,**,... 


1S8&.. 


1S90.. ».....,. 


58,800,000 
77,400,000 


ISHl ,. 


iaaa.„,. 

UM.,--*- 


0o;8eo;4i5 

•1,400,406 
87,073,744 


i$m ,.. 


I89fi 

imn ..„ 


6@,e95,33« 
00,686,137 


i«ia..,.„.... 


55,71*2,357 


iffl® 

1900..... 


70,081, 56» 
09,925,858 


IWI 


109,933,934 
134,954,038 
l31,J^t.39t 


1909 


1S04 ........ 


1^^748,950 


lat^.... 

MOtt 


136,651.020 
178,91R,4S4 
l53,!iP7.00i 


IMl., 


1908 ...... 


160,756,000 


1909 * . . ... 


m.^3t,ooo 


WIO... ,..,... 


17S,^IS3»000 


liu ... 


100,340,01)0 


1911.. 


223,834,000 


IBW,. ....... 

itu ... . ,. 


i78.ie&.00O 
104,953,000 


islfi.. ....... 


287.009,000 



HARVEST TIME OF THE WORLD. 

The following shows the months of the wheat harvest in the different 
wheat^growing sections of the world : 

January— Australia^ New Zealand, Chili and Argentine Republic. 

February and March— East India and Upper Egypt. 

April— Lower Egypt, Syria, Cyprus, Persia, Asia Minor, India, Mexico 
and Cuba. 
May— Algeria, Central Asia, China, Japan, Morocco, Texas and Florida. 
June— Turkey, Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, South of France, Cali- 
fornia, Oregon, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Carolina, Ten- 
nessee, Virginia, Kentuclr^, Kansas, Arkansas, Utah, Colorado and Mis- 
souri. 

July — ^Roumania, Bulgaria, Austro-Hungary, South of Russia, Ger- 
many, Switzerland, France, South of England, Nebraska,. Minnesota, 
THsconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New 
York, New England and Upper Canada. 

August— Belgium, Holland, Great Britain, Denmark, Poland, Lower 
Canada, Columbia, Manitoba and Dakota. 

September and October— Scotland, Sweden, Norway and North of 
Russia. 

November— Peru and South Africa. 

December— Burmah . 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



194 



TBADB AND COMICBRCS OF 



TOTAL VISIBLE SUPPLIES OF GBAIN AVAILABLE IN THE 
UNITED STATES AND CANADA AT THE DATES GIVEN, 

▲8 BXPOBTXD BT BBADSTBXXT^S. 

Th% followlof flfOTM represent stocks of Grain avalUble at 7t of the prindpa 
points of aocnmnlatlon east of the Bockj M oontains, stocks In Manitoba elerators 
and stocks afloat on lakes and eanals. 

Pactflo Ooast stocks are' shown only In the case of wheat. 



DATEB. 



QBJUJI STCICXB nABT QT SOCKT MOITRTAlJtt. 



Wheat. Oofn, Oats, Batl^y, 



FAcmo 

CCIABT 



WbMt, 



IW, F*3i>ruirj I Jioi ,m,ooo 

March 1........ 8d,2l«»0C« 

A pill 1 .., .J 67,880,000 

Miy 1 .J a.dl9,000 

Jujie !..,..„.. I ii^aji»,ooo 

Jsilj 1 ...„.., i6,B»i,oqo 

Auguiti., ...,. u.ipes^ooo 

Bvptembor L H,mt,om 

OctobHP 1..... ...,J 40,110,000 

Nov«mbBr I „l f».oa.iMM> 

Dec«mtM^Fi ,.,... \im,m,im 

Mlfl, January 1........... ,.. 'iTls.ifte.WW 

F&hruaj-y 1 ief7,«tt,000 



HuAh^lt^ 

B7.40I.OOO 
IA,i4«,000 

3S«001,000 

u,»t,aoo 

«,l»0,l»9 
I.l8t,000 

$,iTT,eoo 

io.«0i,oao 



a*»M,OD0 

i»,ffii«oeo 
l.ieifOOQ 

lIl.MT.OOO 
31.^0,000 

M.BI^.OOO 

4i,6i«,oao 
4i,sa0.ooo 



Etiahetft. 

s.afi4,ooo 

Tjtt&.OOO 
i,9l§.000 

i.iit,eoo 
i,4e«,ooo 

Lin.ooo 

8,»3{»«000 
^.036.000 



BOAheli. 
4,881,000 

2«%09,000 

a,»»,oQo 

IJJS.OOO 
1.473. 000 

3,903,000 
4.»1,OOQ 
t,4«iip000 
1,^1,000 



ESTIMATE OF CBOPS OF THE WOELD. 



TBA.&. 






Huibeb, 



Otits, 
Uusheb. 



Iiar]ey« 
Bushels. 



Bnshelft* 



i.dsdp«09,ooo 

t.eii, 791,000 

].341,Oi9.0Qo 
1, Bill, 017,000 
].fi04,4O(J,0O0 
1,&1 6,843,000 
Uf^pS^^OOO 
l,748.a7l,ll» 

Ufifto,a&i,oDi 



1915.. 
t@U.. 

ISli.. 

1911. 

1910. . 

16K»,. 

1909.. 

IflOI-. 

]90«.. 

1900.. 

1904 . 

1901.. 

1902.. 

1901.. 

1900.. 

1999 

199S.. 

im.. 

I90e... 



4,451, S&OroOd 
1,799,133,000 
1,009,^1.000, 

l,ftl3,79e,0Cn! 

a, 0^,199,000: 

«,ffl|*33O,0OO' 
a,6bO,33»,fjO0' 

i,ne,47^,ooii; 

9,116,96&,4^, 

a,3k0,Tao,O€o' 
s,3itt7M,oao 

S,W1,938,000 
8,3B£,§S4,O0O 
a, 1:^1,390,000 
3,7Ha,794,000 
3, 469,440,000 

3,fiJ7,ete,ooD 

3,99S,B13,000 
2 p'iJ^l, 160.000 
3.38T,4&^T,O0O 



l,J5a.75S,fMJ0 
A.7lfS.Tt94,OO0 
», 4^. 176, 000 
4.333,560,000 
9,1^,000,000 
&,75S,900,000 
8,4S7,70O,000 
H,E»rjJ]ifi7fO0O 
ft,ao7/iOO,000 

s,*ai,4<)o.wjo 

9,385,714.000 
a, 037. M 4, 000 
B.Qa^,SS7,000 



4,li«9,4tf7,0ODiU«17.^0.a00 
4 ,I3«,40i. 0O0rlJ9M19,0Oa 
4.i(dfi,4€8,OO0 l.All,Oi8,Q09 
4,764,941,000 1,990,174,000 

i,«7ii,eiie«oooi i,0Oi;.Mo.ooo 

1,840.048,000 |,SSO,S93,000 
fi,9ia,l39,000 t,8fr.^l,onry' 

d,«ieo,e5«,ooo i,m.oifi,ooo 

9,909,443,000 1,191.517.000 
S.3flG,8O4.00O l,J0l,€7e,O00| 
9,8911, 700, O0O|],909,4tiO.0O0| 
B ,fia6 , 1 79 ,000 1 , l@7.0fi9,00D 
l,Mt,6Gl,009l.3»3.3Q9.O(» 

a.ttoi ,279,000 i,3iii^»a.oao 

3.800,198,000 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



195 



i 



5 



OQ O 



CQ 



Mil 



SI 

< 



II 
II 



IM 



< 

m 

g 
5 



J3 






PS 

It 



|a 



3 

/3 












22 ^ !2 E2 2 2 'S 2 «** 1^ '* *' *^ "* "^^ ■* *3 ^ e^' »^ 






^ *-* 3* * =S s -5" 3 ^ o ?§ ^ S5 1- C ■5- 5 1? » '5 H S 2 




^ BQ BO <3 ^ O ^^ t- It- O SD t* t- 94 51 fiO O ^ ffl O « « 







§§§iiii§aiigiii0Siis§§ii 



ISiliSailllSllliiiilllll 

« 3 t* oc ?» ci ^^ cc ic ''i ■*'< «'': "i 5 '^ tr ^ S !a 5? "^ * ^ ^ 
S t^ is -S 3c o CO ?S c^i ?5 ^ r^ ?! 5i t^ O -r* « D* (rf CI ■* ic ■^ 



;t O O ^ V-« 4 



p ^^m" lO W a* 5«* ^ *£J ^' ■* «5 <1 ^'«0 » Si !» 



is§s§g§ii§iil^iiili§l|§l 

i¥sss¥'i"s§i¥i¥fsiSHfi¥i¥ 



^^iCl Q 



mm^Ul 



smf^m^'inMMM^i^^^^dti 






Digiti 



ized by Google 



196 



TBADE AND COMMERCB OF 



STOCKS OF GRAIN IN FARMERS' HANDS. 

AS BBPOBTED BT THE DEPABTMENT OF AORIOnLTUBE, WA8HINOTOK, D.O. 

OORN. 



Ybab. 


Cbop. 


P«r o«t Qo luuid 
Novmberlof 
f oUowiac ymr. 


Amount on kud 
NoT«mlMrlof 
f oDowinc yw. 


1911 


Bu9)UU, 
8.681.488.000 
8,134.746.000 
8.446.988.000 
3.673.804.000 
8.054.635.000 


8.6 

4.4 

8.3 
8.6 


64,764,000 


1913 


137.073.000 


1918 


80,069.000 


1914 


46.009.000 


1916 





WHEAT. 



Tbja. 


' Ciof* 


P«r o*tit on biuid 


Julv 1 of 


ISflg .»,... 


Buthd*. 

604,603,4300 

esa, 850,000 

635. tai.DflO 
611,138,000 

78o.3rflnoo<> 

7ii3.aH0,llO 

W»l.O!T.O(KJ 

1.011,505,000 


i] 


15, 063,000 
88,718.000 


1009... 


1910 

1911... ,^, 


3i,3^S,D:)0 
3»,3T«.(J00 
15,515.000 
83.336,000 
3^ 971,000 


1911 

1913*,.,... ...... 

1914 


lOlfi, 





CATS, 



YlA«. 


Caopp 


Per (M*Dt ofi hand 

August 1 of 

folio wine ^«Br. 


AJBcmnt cm band 

AtlflMt 1 of 

folloirfD«7»r. 


I90S. ..«,.. . 


BumUIm. 

80T.15<;,000 
1,007,139.000 
i, lift, 341,000 

J, 4IM, 131.000 
1I3.7*:8.000 
1,141.U§0.000 i 
1,540,363,000 


8.8 
6.S 
6,7 

7.3 

s.e 


BliMkd9. 

36 333 000 


1009 , 11 


S3, 349,000 


llli:v:::::r::: 


34,343,^00 
14 874,000 


loii. ....,«..'... 


101.900,000 
G3,4T6«700 


iflia,.. 


1914..,., 


».60l,000 


1815 ,.. 



QUANTITIES OF OORN, WHEAT AND OAT8 IN FABMERfi 


' HANDS KARPH L 


YEARS. 


CORN. 


WHEAT. 


OATB. 


1884. 


ButheU 

58S3La,37r> 
475,565,43^1 

1,072, 273, 7 no 

l,164,4^i:i,Ss4 
782,87<>.fi.M 
SOO.&SJjuil 
773,72y.:.J8 
770,166,^50 
443,455,515 

1,050.662,810 
830,053,875 
854.26S.217 

l,lft7.!Vr^0,358 

l.Sirb.OOO.UOU 
963,439,000 

1.047.763.000 
977,661,000 

1,165,878,000 
884,069,000 

1.389,666.000 
866,392.000 
910.894,000 
910.894.000 

1,138,773.000 


BuM*, 
114.060.660 

74,009,790 
123.046,290 

88,149,072 
121,820,600 
108.066,406 
168.746.606 
128.008.074 
178,702,683 
164,047,106 
132,608,882 
111,064.960 
168.403,000 
306.644.000 
148,731,000 
143.693.000 
160,314,000 
163,705,000 
133.036.000 
166.483.000 
161.809.000 
153.903.000 
153.903.000 
341,717.000 


BMMt. 


1806 




1896 

1807 

1808 

1800 

1900 

1901 


271,730,032 
3S3,a(lS,«40 

200.03T«335 
292 , 8a^ , 430 


1002 


227.5U2.343 


1908 

1904 

1006 

1906 


,^64.926.483 
273,707,637 
317,165.641 

3T9 805,000 


1907 

1908 


3S4, 461,000 
;jitT,47€ 000 


1909 


27S,S47 0€0 


1910 


3()5. 432,000 


1911 

1913 


443.665.000 
3Hii dSS.DOO 


1913 


604,300,000 


1014 

1916 

1916 


419,476^,000 
379.»fTgf.000 


1916, 


696,600,000 







Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 



197 



W 
O 

o 

GQ 



o a 



o 
n 



GQ 









4,*** 



t ^^ ^- o 



s 









§i;ii§;§§§ii§'g§§§|§§ 



iiiiiiii|i||iri|i| 
ii§i§§§l§§i§i§i§§i 



|§|§§§§§§§|i§§||§| 



II 






|ii|il§il§§§§§ 



§§§§§§§§i§l§§§§§i§ 
i§§i;§i§ll§'i§'§§§§§§i 






•So a 

CO 






|ijjjip§§§§^|ii|§l 






gWB 



§ii§§§§i§§§i§§iii 
iiiilillililiiiii. 



un|3 



§l§.il§iiii§.i§.§§i§l 



l&slSilsigiiiiiggs 







|||§||i§§§§|§§§i§i 



Sg 




Digit! 



zed by Google 



198 



i 
I 

i 



I 

o 



8 



o pj 

i 

i 



8 



& 



TBADS AND COMMERCS OF 
-I3i|liia)d*9 



. 


itntn^ 


^ 


^Xpif 




'Atmt 




'JSROWO 


Jj 


-jaqiit»|d*e 


'^ 


-}«ii9ay 




■Xfur 




-ivqan^fl^g 


1 


^tBTLdnY 


9 


•ii.r 


X' 


toor 


^ 


ipiF 


1 


wini^ 


5 

1 


■iwK 


ifidT 


,1S 

'i 


'J9qmafd»a 















^E^iss^sssi^^iiiti^^rsRis®!!^ 



^SeiSllSf!238S^SSStSl^f£|^^S€PI= 



sisesiiESifesi^s^f^igsrz^st^^^ 






« : 









gSS8iSSiSSSSi$^£^28S?'tf^Si« 






^r-ff'Oixs spir^tB'aK dc:r*r>te«e 9-4'ieK«iS'-4^ 



si^s^f^i^sg££^spssi=ssisi!sse 



9^ Ar> f>IMI^O»'4^q?iaiB OtSAn^MfASSI 



Sr»3B5&f^£«t-Sp.^r*er-5siS«S^^'S8»S'Sffi 



•0 f^-#«r^c- ?»«qe oi^- 



sis^fl 



SSS»«Sb€?'^S^^S^^^^^-»^^^a 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THX CITT OF ST. LOmS. 



199 



CORN CROPS OP THE WORLD. 1913-1915. 
As Reported by the United States Department of Agricoltore. 



COUNTRY. 



1913. 



1914. 



1915. 



NOBTH AmSBZOA. 

United States 

Canada: 

Ontario 

Quebec. 

Other 

Total Canada....... 



Mexico 

Total — 

SOTTTB AiisaiCA. 

Argentina. 

Chua„ 

Uruguay 

Total. 



BUBOPB. 

Austria-Hungary: 
Austria... 



HungaryjDroper. 

Croatia-SIiavonia. 

Bosnia-HeraegOTina. 

Total Aubtbxa-Huho.. 



Bulgaria.. 

France 

Italy 

Portugal. 

Boumania... 
Bussia: 



Bussia proper. 

Northern Caucasia... 



Total Russia... 

Seryia. 

Spain 

Total. 



Asia. 
India: 

British 

Native States.... 
Total..... 



Japan 

Pmlippine Islands.. 



Total... 



§9^f- 



ArBiCA. 
Algeria... 

I of South Africa... 
Total. 



AUBTBALASIA. 

Ausiaalia: 

Queensland 

New South Wales(/).. 

Victoria 

Western Australia 

South Australia(a) 

Total Austbalxa.. 



New Zealand 

Total Aubtbalasxa.. 

Oband Total. 



Bushels. 
2,446,988,000 



Bushels. 
2.672.804,000 



Bushels. 
3.054,535.000 



16,182.000 

586,000 

5,000 



13,410,000 
514,000 



14,149,000 
445,000 



16,773,000 



13.924.000 



14,594.000 



(5)82,519,000 



78,443.000 



60,000,000 



2,546,280,000 



2,765.171.000 



3.129,129,000 



106,642.000 
1,647,000 
5.343.000 



263,135,000 
1,505,000 
7.142.000 



338,235,000 

1.822.000 

11,495,000 



203,632.000 



271.782.000 



351,552.000 



13.286.000 

176.694.000 

28.953.000 

7,559,000 



12.000.000 

172,308,000 

25,000,000 

7.000,000 



12,000.000 
180.550,000 



\^ 



226,492,000 



216,308.000 



(c) 



33,200,000 
21 ,078 ,000 

108.388.000 
15,000,000 

114,662,000 



30.901.000 
22,530.000 

105.006.000 
15,000,000 

105,552.000 



35.000.000 
14,000,000 

118.103,000 
15,000,000 

110,230,000 



59,798,000 
12,995,000 



72.793,000 



80.608.000 



74,806,000 



23 .621 .000 
25.140.000 



20,000.000 
30.325,000 



(c) 
25,327.000 



640,374,000 



626.230.000 



87,240.000 

(c) 



64,800,000 

(c) 



\^ 



87,240,000 



64,800,000 



3,559,000 
9 .235 ,000 



3,753.000 
13.336.000 



3,749,000 
(c) 



100,034,000 



81,889.000 



394,000 

57 ,044 ,000 

(d)30,830,000 



350.000 

78,253,000 

(d)30.830.000 



(d)30.880.000 



88,268,000 



109.433.000 



2.604.000 

5,273.000 

738,000 



4,000 



4,039.000 

4 .593 ,000 

826,000 

1.000 

3.000 




8,619,000 



9,462,000 



222,000 



312.000 



(C) 



8.841,000 



9,774,000 



3,587,429,000 



3,864,279,000 



b Area and production, 1912. c No official statistics, d Census of 1911. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



200 



TBADB AND COMMSBCB OF 



WHEAT CROPS OP THE WORLD. 1913-1915. 
Ab Reported by the United SUtes Department of Agriculture. 



OOUNTBY. 


1913. 


1914. 


1915. 


NOBTH AmBBICA. 

United State* 


BuMheU. 
763.380.000 


BusheU. 
891.017.000 


Bushels, 
1.011.505.000 


Oanada: 


269.000 

19.861.000 

53.331.000 

121.659.000 

34.372.000 

2.335.000 


234.000 
17.658.000 
38.605.000 
73.494.000 
28.859.000 
2.430.000 


301.000 


Ontario 


28.797.000 


Manitoba. 


84.282.000 


Saskatchewan »... 

Alberta. 


171.146.000 
48.772.000 


Other 


2.960.000 






Total Oakaoa 


231.717.000 


161.280.000 


336.258.000 


Mexico 


4.000.000 


4.389.000 


4.000.000 






Total. 


999.097.000 


1.056.686,000 


1.351.763.000 


South Ambbica. 
Anrentina. 


187.391,000 

23.675,000 

5.461.000 


113.904.000 

16.403.000 

5.887.000 


178 221 000 


Oule 


19 002.000 


Uruguay 


3.417.000 






Total. 


216.427.000 


136.194.000 


200.640.000 


BUBOPB. 

Auitria-Hungary: 

Austria 


60.109.000 

151.348.000 

16.899.000 

8.837.000 


55.000.000 

105.237.000 

7.716.000 

2.500.000 


60.000.000 


Hung*J*y proper 


162 934 000 


CroMi^S&vonla. 


15 000 OOO 


Bosnia-Herzesovinia. 


3.000.000 




Total Austbia-Huno... 


232.193.000 


170.453.000 


230.934.000 


Belgium. 


14.769.000 

61.256.000 

6 .692 .000 

130.000 

321.000.000 

171.075.000 

7.000.000 

214.405.000 

200.000 

5.164.000 

325.000 

9.186.000 

83.236.000 


13.973.000 

29.654.000 

5.786.000 

130.000 

282.689.000 

146.944.000 

7.000.000 

169.442.000 

200.000 

5.779,000 

269.000 

10.000.000 

49.270.000 


8.000.000 
46 212 000 


Bulgaria. 


Denmark ...x, x. x 


7,975.000 
130 000 


Pinland -, 


France 


258.102.000 

160.000.000 

6.000.000 

170 541 000 


OArmanT 


Greece 


Italy 


Montenegro 


200 000 


'Nnthnriandii 






269 000 


Portugal ,..,,,.,.,-.. 


6 571 000 


Boumania 


89.241.000 


Buaaia: 

Russia Droner 


656.324.000 

24,011.000 

157.642,000 






Poland,. 






Northern Oaucasia. 













Total Bumia (Bur'pn) 


837,977.000 


(d)746.873.000 


(d)833,965,000 


Servla 


10.524.000 

112.401.000 

9.330.000 

3.546^^000 

18.000,000 


9.000.000 

116.089.000 

8.472.000 

3.277.000 

18.000.000 


10.000.000 


Spain 


139.298.000 


Sweden 


9.000.000 


Switzerland 


3.880.000 




18,000.000 


United Kingdom: 
Bngland 


53.736.000 
1.075.000 
2.335.000 
1.295.000 


59.217.000 
1.082.000 
2.642.000 
1,415.000 


68.652.000 


Wues 


1,415,000 


Scotland. ................ r..r,x,,xx, - 


3.053.000 


Ireland. 


3.238.000 


Total Uhitbo Kinod'm 


58.441.000 


64.356.000 


76.358.000 


Total. 


2.166.850.000 


1.856.655,000 


2.080.819.000 











Concluded on following page, 
d 51 OoTemments of European and 10 of Asiatlo Butsia. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOtTIS. 



201 



WHEAT CROPS OF THE WORLD. 1913-1915. 
Ab Beported by the United States Department of Agriculture. 



COUNTRY. 


1913. 


1914. 


1916. 


Asia. 
India: 

Britl8h(f) 


Bushels, 

362,603.000 

(a) 


Bushels, 

312,032,000 

(a) 


Bushels. 
383,376.000 


Native S'tatM 


(a) 






Total. 


362,693.000 


312,032,000 


383,376,000 


Cyprus. 


2,779,000 


2.500,000 


2.000.000 


Japanese Empire: 
Japan. 


26.767,000 
164,000 


22.976.000 
196.000 


23.669.000 


Formosa 


200.000 






Total. 


26,917,000 


23.170.000 


23.869.000 


Persia. 


16,000,000 


14.000,000 


16.000.000 


Russia: 

Central Asia (4 Oov*mts.) 


39,216.000 

76.297,000 

116,000 






Siberia (4 Governments).... 






Transcaucasia (1 Oov'Tnt.) 












Total. 


114.628.000 


(f) 


(f) 


Turkey (Asia Minor only).... 


36.000.000 


36.000.000 


36.000.000 


Total. 


668.017,000 


386.702.000 


460.246.000 


Afbica. 
Algeria,- - 


36.848.000 

38,426,000 

6,611,000 

(a)6,034.000 


30.000.000 

32.831.000 

2.206.000 

(a)6.034.000 


34.664,000 
30 148 000 




Tunis ,r,r,,.- 


11,023,000 
(a)6,034,000 


Unlon of South Africa. 




Total. 


86,819,000 


71.070.000 


90.869,000 


AUSTBALABIA. 

Australia: 


2,038.000 
33.611.000 
27.060,000 
22,174,000 

9,467.000 
660.000 


1,826.000 
39,219,000 
33 ,974 ,000 
17,470,000 
13.761.000 
361.000 


1,636,000 


Sew South Wales. 


13 187 000 


Victoria. 


4,066,000 


South Australia 


3,639,000 


Western Australia 


2,704.000 


Tasmania. 


396.000 






Total Austbalia 


94.880,000 
6.343,000 


106.600.000 
6.669.000 


26.626.000 


New Zealand...... 


6.864.000 






Total Austbalabia 


100,223,000 


112.169.000 


32.480.000 


Qband Total. 


4,127,433.000 


3,619,466,000 


4.216.806.000 







a No official statistics. e Including certain Feudatory States. 

/ Included In Total Russia (European). g Yield of 1911 Census. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



202 



TBADB AND CGMMSBOI OV 

OATS CROP OP THB WORLD. 191^-1916, 

Ab Repofied hy the United NtAKfg Depi^rtmeDt of Agriculturfl, 



COUNTRY, 


1913. 


1014. 


lOlS. 


Vvdteti 8t»t«i 


1,121,768,000 


fiusJIeli 
1,141.060,000 


1,540,362,000 


Qftaadft: 

N«Tr Bnuuirlck:... ............ 


6,946,000 
39,0^5,000 

105,169,000 
56,759,000 

114,112,000 
71,642.000 
12,126,000 


6,488,000 
42,110.000 
99 ,400 ,000 
31,951,000 
61,816,000 
57,076,000 
14 ,226 .000 


6 378 000 


QtK^bc^.. ,,.."- ,„,.,,^,„.,..„ 




Ontario ,...,.,..„.„.- 

Manitoba. ..-.,..«.„,.........„„ 

Ba«ka.t<:hffwaii 


ltO.996,000 
65,263,000 
142 121 000 


Alberta.... ., ...™.„„,,... 


98,296,000 


Otbcr,. ..,..,..,....,..... ......,.,..,„* 


14,147,000 


ToTAi. Oahaoa... ****.. 


404 ,669 ,000 
17,000 


313,078,000 


1 481 ,035 ,000 


Me«leo ....._.„....„_._....„„ 


IT .000 


17,000 


Totaum,. - .....,_„.« 


1,6^6,454.000 


1.464,155,000 


3.031,414,000 


Arwenta .„,..., ..„.*...«,..,. 

oiaie -. «,....... „- 


75,7S3,000 

4.443,000 

»72,000 


50,981.000 

I 4,437,000 
1,850,000 


63,392,000 
7,165,000 


Uruguay , ,...,.,, ..,.„- 


1,040.000 


T0T4I-..., ...„«,,.. ..,«.. .*,...«.. 


si.o9&,ooa 


67,368.000 


-" 71,53^,000- 


EUBOTX. 

Auitria- H imganr : 

Auitrla ., ....„,„... 


160,068,000 

. 99,SO7,000 

6,163 ,01Mt 

4.7\NS,00(1 

270,»:i4,oorj 


150,000,000 

86,537,000 

4.000,000 

3,000.000 




Hungary proper „,..,,.... 

Croatia^ 8iay onla. 


80,926.000 
5 .000 ,000 
4,000,000 


Bo«nl ar e enogo vlna,^ ,„,.„ , , 


Tot* I. A^RTBiA-Huna... 


243,637,000 


134. 93$ ,000 


BbIsIucd ... h - * ,.....*... 


47,957 ,mK» 

io,rj6.ooo 

[ 46,755,000 
22.924 JWKJ 
3ll,l57,tKlfi 
669, 'i3 1 ,0t*0 
43,460 ,0CJ0 
21.117,000 
11,7^4,000 
35.13^,000 


49,742:6ti0 

S, 623 ,000 

38.553,000 

lS,67g,0CJ0 

261,196,000 

0^2,674,000 

26, S:^. 000 

10.957,000 

9,325,000 

^.016,000 


40,000,060 

0,54A»O00 

42,874,000 

22,000,000 

243 .631 ,00O 

650 .000 .000 


Bulgaria ..».,., 

Donm&rlt.,...„.,...»,..,...„... 

France r........J.™........, 

Qcrniaiiy 


iS?^^.::::;::.:;;::::;:.;;;:::;::.. 

Norway , , „,, , , rr , , rr-- 


31.443,000 

19.644,000 

9,336,000 


Boumanla...,,,. „,,....,..„„., 


99;oM;do6 


RuMla: 

RuHBia proper .^h.^........... 


090,957.000 

»4, 412, 000 

1 30,222,000 






Poland 

Northeni C a ucasla ... 


•"■-■ ■ L. ........ .... 


— — 


Total Russia (Eilr'pn) 


1,106,591,000 

6.512.(KMJ 
25,3S:5,tK.»0 
09,S16,ntMJ 


(<r)866;i43,0aQ 


1.006,083,000 


Servla, .„....,....„„,..,..,,„.,... 

Spain. .,„„„.....,.,„,,...,.,„,.. ..,..„. 

SWWIOIL., ..,.-. .,„ H. , ..... 


5.000.000 
31,227.000 
52,667,000 


4.000,0te 

?S:SSS:8SS 


VnH^d Kingdom: 

Walf^a .,. 


70.404.000 

6.902.0CK) 

37. H.^. 000 

66 . lOCl .OOO 

180,647,000 


71,408.000 

7,431,000 

38,115,000 

4)3,287,000 


78.938,000 
7,314^000 


Scotland 

IroUod .,,.,,,.....►.,,,*..... 


40,313,000 
68,6&4,000 


Total Uxitid KiEra'M. 


180,241,000 
2,459.395,000 


196a«».0fl0 


Total..... ,. j 


2,007,S39.()CiO 


s,m,4^,^6o 


CypniB 


400.000 


400,000 


400,000 


Ruasia; 

Cmt. Asia (4 Ciov'mt* ) .. 
f^SJn^rla U GavPfnm*nts> . 


16.9^5,000 

102,681,000 

75,000 


SI 


8 


Total Kuhha (Asiatic) 


110,741.000 
120,141.000 


(ej 


(f 


Total. 


400.000 


4m, m 


Araicr*. 
Algeria...... ,.. ■ ^ 

Tunis... '■ 

Union of South Africa 


17,073,000 

4,l.*Kt.OOO 

(nO,061.0<X> 

111,767,000 


10,000,000 

680,000 

(/>9, 661,000 


15,083.000 

3.446,000 

^9,661,000 


Total,...,.,,,,..... .... 


20.360,000 


38,189.000" 


AttBtSALAHIA, 

Australia! 


85,000 
1,725,000 
8,586,000 
1,726.000 
2,175 ,00t^ 
2,328,000 


68,000 
1 ,893 ,000 
0,170,000 
1 ,230 ,000 
1 ,708,000 
1.044.000 


B 

iilS;SSS 


N^^w Hnuth WaiCfl 


Victoria.. 

8oulh Australia , 

We«t-c?fn AuntraUa,,... ,... 


Tasmania 


<a) 


Total AusTaAHA.......... 

New Zealand...... ..,.,... 


i6.625.mK) : 

14,013,000 


15,712,000 
16.206,000 


5.000.000 
11. TOT .000 


Total AusTRALAeiA 


30,638,000 
4,607,437,000 


30,918,000 ■ 


lfi.-7StAM0 


Oa^ND Tol'Ai... -. .J 


4,022,4«6,0drf3P,%a,VV...»0t. 



d No omdlal statlatlcs. 
t Oenauiof 1911. 



e IncluiJecl In Total Russia £uropeaii. 



THB CITT OV ST. LOX7I6. 



203 



RYE CROPS OP THE WORLD. 1913-1915. 
As Reported by the United States Department of Agriculture. 



COUNTRY. 


1913. 


1914. 


1915. 


NOBTH AmBBICA. 

United States 


Bushels. 
41 .381 ,000 


Bushels. 
42.779.000 


Bushels. 
49,190.000 


Canada: 

Quebec. 

Ontario 


156.000 

1.507.000 

103.000 

68.000 

398.000 

8.000 


156.000 

1,341.000 

100.000 

54.000 

360,000 

6.000 


169,000 
1 ,602 ,000 


Manitoba. 


129.000 


Saskatchewan 


72,000 


Alb^ta. 


500.000 


Othar 


6.000 


Total Canada. 


2.300.000 


2.017.000 


2.478.000 


Mexico 


70.000 


70.000 


70.000 


Total.-- 


43.751.000 


44.866,000 


61.738.000 




1.417.000 

147.000 

1.000 


3.346.000 

151.000 

5.000 


1,811.000 


Gmle. 


150.000 


Uruguay 


1.000 


Total. 


1.565.000 


8,502.000 


1.962.000 


EUBOPS. 

Austria-Hungary: 
Austria. 


109.093.000 

52.256.000 

2.553.000 

627.000 


95.000,000 

42,410,000 

2,000,000 

500.000 


105.000.000 


Hungary ...r,. 


45.975.000 


Croatia^Siayonia. 

Bosnia-Herzegovina 


2.500.000 
600.000 


Total Aubtbia-Humo... 


164.529,000 


139.910.000 


154,076.000 


Belgium ,.........rr..TtT 


22.463.000 

9.401,000 

16.637.000 

10.289.000 

49.452.000 

481.169.000 

5.589.000 

16.895,000 

973.000 

3.711,000 


21.000.000 

6.976.000 

10,905.000 

10.806.000 

43.884.000 

410.478.000 

5.260.000 

13 .471 .000 

1.046.000 

1.959.000 


18.000.000 


Bulgaria ..,r 


7 .622 ,000 


T>enmark 


12 .989 .000 


Ilnland. 


10.000.000 


Prance 


40 .307 .000 


Ofrmany 


475.000.000 


ItJiy 


4,401,000 


Netherlands. 

Norway.. 

Roumanta 


13,727.000 
1.045.000 
2,911,000 


Russia: 
Russia proDflT 


872.711.000 

91.653.000 

7.596.000 






Poland' ," 






NOTthem Caucasia 






Total Russia (Burop.) 


971.960.000 


(e)806.000.000 


(e)861 .097 ,000 


Senria. 


937.000 

27.916.000 

22.266.000 

1.750.000 


1.000.000 
23.950.000 
27.599.000 

1.800.000 


800.000 


Spain 


28.664.000 


Sweden... 


25,000.000 


United Kingdom 


1.700.000 


Total. 


1.805.937.000 


1.526.044.000 


1.657.338.000 


Russia: 
Siberia (4 Governments).... 


792.000 

28.148.000 

8.000 










Transcaucasia (1 Gov.) 






Total Russia (Asiatic) 


28.948.000 


(/) 


0) 


AUSTBALASIA. 

Australia: 

Queensland 

New South Wales. 


2.000 
42.000 
18.000 
10.000 

4.000 
20.000 


20.000 
13.000 

18 


^\ 


Victoria ..T^.T. ..;;!. 

South Australia 


6,000 


Western Australia 


(b) 


Tasmania 


lb) 


Total Aubtbalia. 


96.000 


100.000 


30.000 


New Zealand. 


90,000 


90,000 


90.000 


Total Austbalasia 


186.000 


190,000 


120,000 


Gbamd Total. 


1.880.387.000 


1.574,602.000 


1.711,158.000 







b No official statistics. e 51 

/ Included in "Total Russia, Buropean.'* 



GoTemments. 

Digitized by 



Google 



204 



TBADB AND COiniBRCE OV 



BARLEY CROPS OF THE WORLD. 1913-1915. 
As Reported by tho United Statei Department of Agricnltoie. 



COUNTRY. 


1913. 


1914. 


1915. 


NOBTH AmBBICA. 

United Statef 


BuMhelM. 
178,189,000 


Bushels, 
194.953.000 


Bushels. 
237.009.000 


Oanada: , ^ 

Vcfw nmnvwick 


74.000 

2.263.000 

14.689.000 

14.306,000 

10.421.000 

6.334.000 

333.000 


64.000 
2.261.000 
18.987.000 
9.828.000 
4.901.000 
4.806.000 
854.000 


57.000 


Quebec 


2.312.000 


Ontftrlo ••. ••• 


15.109.000 


M'A.filtnhA 


16.543.000 


C|maVtttl*llA1Vlin ...t. 


9.945.000 


Alberta. 


6.542.000 


Other 


360.000 


Total Oahada. 


48.319.000 


36.201.000 


50.868.000 


Mexico 


7.000,000 


10.839.000 


10.000.000 


Total. 


233.508.000 


241.993.000 


297 .877 .000 


South Amsbica. 
ArKei]tiDft.....<t • 


4.455.000 

4.696.000 

38.000 


8.037.000 

5,567.000 

165.000 


8.000.000 


Ql^le 


3,750.000 


Uruguay 


37.000 


Total. 


9.089.000 


13,769.000 


11.787.000 


BUBOPB. 

Austria-Hungary: 

AiiatrlA. 


75.917.000 

79.826.000 

2.966.000 

3.904.000 


76.000.000 

66.265.000 

1.940.000 

3.000.000 


75.000.000 


Hungary proper-tt 


56.186.000 


npnikti&-Siavonia. 


2.000.000 




8.000.000 


Total Austbia-Humo... 


162,602.000 


145.205.000 


186.186.000 


Belgium t 


4.217.000 
13,891.000 
24.997.000 

5.414.000 

46.116.000 

168.709,000 

10,803,000 

3.132.000 

3.202.000 
27.339.000 


4.232.000 

10.319.000 

20.780.000 

4.047.000 

44.818.000 

144.126.000 

6.917.000 

3.019.000 

2.591.000 

26.505.000 


4.000.000 


Bulgaria 


17.670.000 


Denmark t,,r-,,, 


25.898.000 




5.000.000 


Vptt||^*^ 


86.248.000 


Q«r]Timiiv 


150.000.000 


Italy 


11,050.000 


l^At.ri'Art*.ti«1a 


3 .233 .000 


Ii^orway 


2 .591 .000 


Boumanla 


28.688.000 


Bussla: 


437.634.000 
29.859.000 
90.100.000 






Kussia projior. 






Northern Caucasia. 






Total Russia (Bnrop*n).. 


667.593.000 


(d)398.068.000 


(4)475.109.000 


Servia. 


2.866.000 
68.772.000 
16.912.000 


3.000.000 
72 ,272 .000 
12.195.000 


2,250,000 


Rpain 


82.763.000 


Sweden 


14.000.000 


United Kingdom: 


49.384.000 
2.792.000 
7.698.000 
8.004.000 


48.205.000 
2.743.000 
7.616.000 
8.073.000 


85,184.000 


Wuefl. 


2.479.000 


flnntlftnd! 


6.184,000 


Ireland 


5.886.000 


Total Ukxtbd Kingdom.. 


67.778.000 


66.637.000 


48.682.000 


Total. 


1.184,343.000 


963.730,000 


1,044,868,000 







d Production of 51 goremments of European and Asiatic Bussla. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 206 



DRESSED BEEF. 



By PHUiip H. Halb, Editor National Farmer and Stock Grower, St. Louis, Mo. 



The dress d beef trade of St. Louis for the year 1915 was equal to 
opportunities and shows favorably as compared with other centers and 
existing conditions. The shortage of beef cattle is a National condition 
and receipts of cattle amounting locally to 375,000 head less than the 
largest yearly receipts at this market, placed limitations upon the output 
of St. Louis dressed beef that no amount of business enterprise could 
overcome; yet there was not any reduction of consequence as compared 
with two years past, and the dressed beef interiests of St. Louis had a 
profitable and satisfactory year 1915. The demand for the product as 
a rule exceeding the supply. 

The slaughter of dressed beef cattle at St. Louis and East St. Louis 
in the year 1915 amoimted to 637,815 head, against 659,247 head slaugh- 
tered during the previous year, and 802,219 head in 1909, the largest 
number slaughtered any year in this market center. A six year average, 
including the best years of the trade, is 719,547 head of grown cattle 
slaughtered each year at St. Louis and East St. Louis for dressed beef 
purposes. The calf trade of 1915 shows neither loss or gain of sufficient 
importance to mention. In the year 1915 the slaughter of calves 
amounted to 109,172 head, against 106,394 head in 1914, and 152,404 
head in 1913. The average slaughter of calves for six years is 114,823 
head. Packing houses did not run at their full capacity by about one- 
third in 1915, because the market could not provide supplies commen- 
surate with the demand. 

After satisfying the population of the cities of St. Louis and East St. 
Louis with dressed beef and veal the outbound trade represents a normal 
year. There is a small decrease in quantity of as compared with the 
year 1914, yet the volume of trade was considered fair. The outward 
shipments in 1915 amounted to 318,375,000 pounds, all going eastward 
or southbound, as compared with 338,453,300 pounds in 1914 and 
301,675,800 pounds in 1913. When fat cattle were abundant and 
marketed freely the high mark of dressed beef shipment from this center 
was 551,875,200 pounds in the year 1909, and which is by no means the 
full capacity of St. Louis and East St. Louis dressed beef houses. 

Dressed beef continues to arrive in modest quantities from other 
packing centers and is disposed of in the beef market coolers of the city. 
It is gratifying to notice that this is a diminishing trade, displaced by 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



206 



TRADB AND COMMBRCB OF 



local enterprise. In th'e year 1909 the arrivalB amounted to 225,711,400 
pounds and in the year 1915 the arrivals were 96,474,190 pounds, against 
101,842,000 pounds in 1914. St. Louis citizens visiting other cities can 
speak of the dressed beef trade as a splendid feature of commercial 
activity. 

The following statement gives the cattle and calves slaughtefed at 
8t. Louis and East 8t. Louis by dressed beef houses, also the receipts 
and shipments of dressed beef: 

Cattle OalTM Drewed Beef Drewed Beet 

slan^htered, slaushtered, shipped, recelvodt 

Year. Bead. head. pounds. pounds. 

1916 687,816 100,171 S18,876,000 96,474490 

1914 666,947 106,894 888,458,800 101,842,6)0 

1918 688,7M 1M,406 801,675,800 91,705,870 

1918 777,181 118,1U 438,560,060 115,768,400 

1911 675,090 104,187 474,970,800 187,680,900 

1910 764,871 98,7S1 474,482,400 158,880,800 

1909 80M10 140,600 551,876,900 915,711,400 

1908 761,006 94,606 897,984,100 169,968400 

1907 760,005 88,600 979,860,760 158,061,000 

1906 766,796 197,959 868,190,090 140,806,800 

1906 769,706 105,791 488,168,900 189,749,400 

1904 760,967 86,999 499,887,980 916,614,800 

1908 789,879 196,786 878,840^36 65,818,800 

1909 688,897 108,898 818,887,466 81,968,900 

1901 607,788 60,774 848,448,080 110,707300 

1900 484,664 60,U6 996,807,810 86,460400 

1899 466,604 45,918 990,470,460 44,969,660 

1898 459,051 49,794 977,766,790 48,986,860 

1897 489,698 47,890 959,009,550 90,889,600 

1896 640,980 58,880 948,746^00 17,847,900 

1896 450,806 40,8S8 988,966,600 49,806,970 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THS CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



207 



BBCSIPT8 OV DBBSSKD BSSV IH POUNDS. 

1914. 

827,400 

72,900 



Toledo, St. Louis ft Western R. B 

yandaliaR.B 

Louisville A; NashTiUeB.B 

San Franoisoo R. R 

Chicago ft Alton B. B. (Mo. Diy) 

MiSBOuri PaolfloB. B 

Ghioago, Book Island ft Paciflo By 

Wabash R. B. rWest) 

Missouri, Kansas ft Texas B. B 

St. XiOuis, Iron Mountain ft Southern By 

Chioago ft Alton B. B 

Chicago ft Eastern Illinois B. B 

Chioago, Burlington ft Quinoy B. B. (West) . . . 

(Hiioago, Burlington ft Quinoy B. B. (East) 

C, C, C ft St. L R. R« •..•.••«•••■ 

Iron Mountain ft Southern R. R. (Illinois Diy.). 

Wabash R. R. (East) 

River 



20,474,000 

17,870,900 

76.040 

881,600 

16,207,200 

18,089,400 

749,600 

8,806,800 

16,880 



28,240,800 
1,068,800 



8HIPMBMT8 OF DBB88BD BBBF IN POUNDS. 

1914. 

Chioago, Burlington ft Quinoy R. R. (West) 

Illinois Traotion System 82,000 

St. Louis Southwestern 

Chicago ft Eastern Illinois R. R. 8,811,800 

Chioago ft Alton R. R. (Mo. Div.) 2,902,000 

Missouri Paciflo R. R 668,000 

St. Louis ft San Francieco R. R 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain ft Southern Ry 261,400 

Chioago, Rook Island ft Paciflo R. R 169,700 

Missouri, Kansas ft Texas R. R 189,000 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain ft South. Ry. (111. Div.) 82,600 

Illinois Central R.R 19,422,900 

Louisville, Henderson ft St. Louis R. R. 6,091,600 

Louisville ft NashviUe R. R 10,997,200 

Mobile ft Ohio R.R. 6,162,600 

Southern Ry. Co 8,662,200 

Baltimore ft Ohio Southwestern R. R 6,880,000 

Chicago ft Alton R. K 62,821,000 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago ft St. Louis R. R.. 69,160,100 

YandaliaR. R 42,767,400 

WabashR. R. (Bast) 66,678,400 

Toledo, St. Louis ft Western Ry 68,227,800 

Chicago, Burlington ft Quinoy R. R. (East) 

Upper MiBsissippi River 28,600 

Lower " " 

Illinois " 2,000 



1915. 

67,600 

26,700 



26,201,800 

21,626,400 

902,960 

127,800 

18,676,000 

6,884,400 

96,800 

10,066,400 

197,900 



16,674,840 
278,600 



Total pounds 101,842,620 96,474,190 



1915. 



746,700 

222,800 

6,809,900 

6,076,400 

684,900 

88,600 
62,000 

1,179,600 

22,661,900 

8,467,700 

10,499,400 

6,824,100 

2,728,400 

6,460,000 

49,720,600 

61,068,000 

81,686,700 

64,266,800 

61,186,800 

20,400 

6,600 



Total pounds 888,468,800 818,876,000 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



208 TBADK AND COMIOBBCB OF 

PROVISIONS AND PACKING. 



PORK PRODUCT. 

The amount of packing house product handled in St. Louis and East 
St Louis during the past year was 616,310,760 pounds as compared with 
461,881,850 pounds in 1914. 

The receiptslof hogs were 3,986,144 head as compared with 2,871,668 
the previous year. 

The packing on both sides of the river for the winter season of 1914-16 
was 771,990 head, and for the twelve months, ending March Ist, 1916, 
1,914,698 head. The summer^s packing of 1916 was 1,316,763 head, as 
compared with 1,142,708 in the summer of 1914. 

The movement in this market during the past four years compares as 
follows: 

1912. 1918. 19U. 1916. 

Received, pounds 181,487,700 160,844,680 94,077,060 107,788,160 

Shipped, pounds 461,968,870 447,648,870 867,804,800 408,672,600 

Totals, pounds 688,461,670 697,968,100 461,881,860 616,810,760 

TOTAL TKABLT PAOKIMO AT PBOMIKSMT PLACKS. 

This city holds fourth place among the prominent packing points. 

Total number of hogs packed in the West for twelve months ending 
March 1st, at fifteen places mentioned, with comparisons for previous 
years, as reported by Cincinnati Price Current: 

1914-16. 1918-14. 1912-18. 1911-12. 

Chicago 6,079,478 6,164,982 7,816,626 6,294,261 

Kansas City 2,476,880 2,768,400 2,668,668 8,660,696 

Omaha 1,996,716 2,178,811 2,862,727 2,418,964 

St Louis 1,914,696 2,071,688 2,102,829 2,691,888 

St. Joseph 1,666,718 1,784,206 1,668,642 1,977,6a 

Indianapolis 1,870,646 1,412,649 1,804,968 1,691,942 

MUwaukee and Cudahy 1,266,488 1,074,946 987,276 1,291,186 

Sioux City 666,727 1,069,668 1,106,460 1,189,884 

Cinoinnati 683,002 620,620 610,022 668,629 

St. Paul 496,480 1,068,868 784,649 789,008 

Cedar Rapids 918,628 600,191 468,864 481,108 

Cleveland 111,863 762,188 711,088 866,164 

Louisville 1,110,262 144,248 169,017 194,886 

Ottumwa 1,163,486 682,682 492,170 686,621 

Nebraska City 189,719 121,809 41,982 114,788 

Wichita 426,748 466,662 818,796 629,126 

Detroit 847,086 814,278 668,606 640,864 

Fort Worth 449,040 424,189 887,872 466,886 

Nineteen places 28,466,636 23,894469 24,418,979 26,401,816 

Another 8,919,926 8,727,402 1,169,866 8,616,682 

Aggregate 27,386,462 27,621,661 26,688,884 29,918,498 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THK CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



209 







Digiti 



ized by Google 



210 



TRADB AND COMlfSBCB OF 



BB0KFT8 AND SHIPnNTS OF HOG PRODUCT AT ST. LOUIS 
AND BAST ST. LOUIS. 



mmcmirTM. | 


OHIPHMHTi. 


Yo»n 


Pork, 


H«ms, 
Lb»r 


Lud, 
Lbft. 


Y»ftr. 


iSSJr 


"Lb?* ^• 


ml T, ....; 

IHH....*.,,.... 




79.8W,7O0 

120,645,60^ 
ta4,TT8,«W 

aO§.«96.80O 
IW0,075.600 
3afl,2S6»90a 
S3 J .006.101^ 


1.416.386 
I3,ni.A00 

10^943,100 

T4t,*)0 

9.y5M.lD0 

13,691 «oa 

I3.e06.l00 
«&77.7W 


1916 *.- .,. 

19U *.* *. .* 




jm^OQO, 91,70,000 

384.teMflo| 7S,Z|1,I60 
Wasi^TlO S7,€7l^t 
IliG^l,^^ 8Q»0»J00 


1018 




]9ti.......>.*.. 




Ifl*.. ,_. 


m 


itu 


'* * ' 


IHJ,,,,, 


1911 

ItlO ...... .... 


19^004 


1*10 .. 


Ifl^iSO S48'38ttJ00v illmJlM 


wa9. ........... 


1 IflOO., .......... 


3,170 MO^l4,iO» 
|,l^8S7.«&IOt 
5,671 ii7,»&.fiao 




W09.., 




leoi ... 


1,945 
«,050 


' 1907 ... ... 


iJT,ie^oo 


1906. 

1806 .......... 


!90« ...„ _,.. 
1806 


1904 


3:fr,ffii,3oo 


515,^13,^1X1 


IS^ 


4.96a 


196^09,746 



WINTBB PACKINO IN ST. LOUIS AND BAST ST. LOUIS. 
November let to March Ut. 


Seasons. 


Number 
Hon. 


▲Terafo 
Gross Weight. 


Average 7l«M 
LardaUklnda 


▲▼e'se cost per 
100(bs.Groes. 


1914—1916 


771,990 
730,868 
890.650 
1,031,196 
730,606 
706,888 
884,967 
706,031 
666,686 
680,133 
761,963 
637,660 


304.74 
3M.74 
300.73 
190.70 
230 84 

1S« 

316.50 
300.89 
197.80 
303.60 
307.30 


37.91 
27.91 
36.96 
38.00 
88.60 
37.60 

80 

81. 

27.41 

80. 

39. 


17.91 
7.90 


1918—1914 


Itll— 1918 


7.63 


I911.1tl3 


6 14 


191(^1911 


7.70 


1000—1910 


8.86 


1906-1900 

1007—1906 


6.94 
4 04 


1906-1907... 

1906—1906 


6.47 
6.30 


1904-1906 

1908-1904 


4.78 
4.80 



SUMMBB PAOKING AT ST. 


LOUIS AND BAST ST. LOUIS. 


SXASOW, 


Number of 
Hogs. 


AyerageTleld 
Lard. 


gross weight. 


Ave. cost per 
100 lbs. gross. 


1916 

1914 


1,815,768 
1.143,706 
1,851,170 
1,311,479 
1,770.190 
1.176.460 
1,878,493 
1,869,934 
1,147,360 
l,ln8,966 
1,007.636 
1,146,610 


36.74 

34.84 

31.68 

80.00 

80.13 

87.84 

81.48 

84.86 

38. 

88.00 

88.00 

86.11 


338.86 
341.81 
318.68 
303.00 
906.84 
310.96 
197.04 
199.66 
336.66 
307.46 
304.01 
310.86 


87.84 
8.30 


1918 


8.61 


1913 


7.86 


1911 


6.67 


1910 


9.87 


1900 


7.61 


1906 

1907 


6.86 
6.36 


1906 


6.40 


1906 


6.43 


1904 


6.46 



PACKING AT ST. LOUIS AND BAST ST. LOUIS FOB TWBLVB MONTHS. 

March 1 to March 1,1914-1916 1,914,666 

1918-1914 3,071,688 

•* 1913-1918 3,103,839 

♦• 1911-1913 3,791,888 

1910-1911 1.806.076 

•• «• 1900-1910 1,978,860 

1906-1909 3,944,861 

•• «• 1907-1908 1,858,379 

" " 1906-1907 1,766,693 

•• •• 1906-1906 l,7n,667 

" " 1904-1906 1,906,508 

1908-1904 1,679,744 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 



211 



SUMMARY OF PACKING. 

Packing In the West according to compilations by the 
Price OurrentrGrain Reporter: 

8UMMBB SEASON. 

March 1 to November 1— 1916. 1911. 

Number of hogs packed 17,127,540 14,827,000 

Decrease 2,800,490 

Average live weight, lbs 228.21 286.85 

Increase 8.14 

Arerage yield of lard,lbs 26.82 29.20 

Decrease 2.88 

Percentage yield of lard 11.75 12.86 

Decrease 0.61 

Gostof hogs,100 lbs., alive $7.38 $8.29 

Decrease SO 96 

Aggregate 11 vewelght,' ibs .* '.'.'.'. !.'.*;!;.*!!!!;;! 3,908,676,000 8,504,373,000 

iTecrease 404,808,000 

Qreen meats made, lbs 2,276,484,000 2,012,519,000 

Increase 268,965,000 

Lardmade, lbs 459,861,000 482,950,000 

Decrease 26,411,000 

Total meats and lard, lbs 2,785.845,000 2,445,469,000 

Increase 290,876,000 

Aggregate cost of hogs $286,506,000 $290,558,000 

Decrease $4,047,000 

aneroes of lard, 880 lbs 1,892,000 1,812,000 

Decrease 80,000 

Mess pork made, barrels 4,700 22,500 

increase ^ 17,800 

Other pork, barrels 207,800 214,407 

Increase 6,600 

Pork of all kinds, barrels. 212,500 286,900 

Increase 24,400 

WINTEB SEASON. 

November 1 to March 1^ 1914-15. 1918-14. 

Numberof hogs packed 12,559,412 10,744,002 

Increase 1,815,410 125,147 

Average lire weight, lbs 210.42 215.19 

Increase 1.28 8,81 

Arerageyield of lard,lbs 26.44 27.409 

Decrease 0.969 1.811 

Percentage yield of lard 12.21 12.84 

Decrease 0.18 0.80 

Gostof hogs, 100 lbs., aUve $6.74 $7.fi6 

Decrease $1.24 $0,43 

Aggregate live weight, lbs 2,718,108,000 2,312,002,000 

Increase 406,106.000 Sl,3n,000 

Qreen meats made, lbs 1,545,244,000 L320.ifja,tiOO 

Increase 225.091,000 4ti,H7.\ooo 

Lardmade, lbs 882,071,000 2SM,4>2,000 

Increase 87,589,000 17,a7i,0OO 

Total meats and lard, lbs 1,877,815,000 l,m,63&,000 

Increase 262,680,000 64,2M,000 

Aggregate cost of hogs $188,208,000 |l84,Gti7,000 

Decrease $7,864,000 *l,24l,O0O 

Tierces of lard, 840 lbs , 907,000 8a3,o00 

Increase.. 111,000 b&,Qm 

Mess pork made, barrels 88,900 16,800 

Kcrease.... 22,600 4,^>0 

Other pork, barrels 161,500 18<MM>0 

Decrease 19,500 36,T0O 

Pork of all kinds, barrels 200,400 lin,000 

Increase 8,400 31,600 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



212 



THADK AND COMMSRCK OF 



TOTAL TKABLT PACKDfO AKD BCABKXTDIO OF HO€M. 

Tot«l Western and Eattera packlnf , and reoelpU of bogs si New York, PhllA- 
delphift and Baltimore, for years ending March 1, according to rotnms to the 
Price Oorrent-Orain Reporter. 





1014-10. 


1018-14. 


1013-18. 


1911-13. 


Packed In the West 

Packed at Boston 

Other New Kngland packing .... 
Packed at Buffalo 


r,886,463 
1,071,416 

003,160 
1,008.830 

888.747 

8,863,087 


37.631,061 

1,173.708 

000,780 

839,440 

610,708 

3,887,110 


30,068,884 

1,387,003 

067,008 

760,000 

488.834 

3,801,088 


39,018.000 
897,000 


Other Eastern packing 


Ott,000 


Receipts. New York, Phila- 
delnhia. Baltimore 


3,773,000 






Total 


84.344.607 


88,718,003 


81,718,000 


86,088,000 







WINTSB PAOKINQ IK THS WB8T FOB TWINTT-NIME SEASONS. 
As reported by the Price Ourrent-Orain Reporter. 



SBA80V8. 


Number of 
Hogs. 


dross Weight 
per Hog. 


tieldofLanl 


Cost per 
180 lbs. 
gross. 


1886-87 


6.480.000 
0^81,181 
0.488^ 
6,66M8S 
8.178486 
7,761,316 
4^68^ 

7.101,690 

8,440,780 
0,730.140 
8,670,878 
8377,760 
10,840,106 
8,468,606 
0,499,038 
10,466,608 
10,496.066 
9,694.480 
11.176.484 
11,640,139 
8,730,334 
8,741,309 
13,180,809 
10.618,800 
10.744,003 
13,660,413 


881.81 
843 80 
868.46 
808.03 

380.70 
•47.64 
317 .78 
348.30 
983 78 
M0.71 
344.80 
380.80 
383 60 
380.67 
380.81 
306.88 
334.00 
338.46 
331.78 
333.37 
323.88 
331.04 
306.88 
813.88 
380.70 
311.97 
338.60 
316.10 
316.43 


88.04 

81.06 
84.76 

86 87 
88 40 
84 64 

8166 
86.07 
88.63 
80.08 

86.94 
84.78 
80.08 

80.97 
84.16 
81.80 
81.93 
83.18 
81.77 
83.88 
83.81 
81.93 
30.87 
38.46 
81.83 
39.01 
39.33 
37.40 
36.44 


4.10 


1887-88 .- 

1886-80 r! 


0.04 
4.80 


1880—80 


8.66 


1088 81 


8.04 


1801-08 


8.0L 


lf83-06 

1808-04 


6.54 
0.36 


1894—80 


4.38 


1890—06 


8.68 


1806-07 


8.80 


1807—08 


8.08 


1898—00 


8.83 


1880—1900 


4.30 


1900—1901 


0.03 


1901—1003 


0.07 


1903-^908 


6.44 


1908—1904 


4.74 


1904—1906 

1900—1906 


4.67 
037 


1906—1907 


6.46 


1907—1908 


4.47 


1908—1900 


0.87 


1909—1910 


8.80 


1910—1911 


7.08 


1911— 1913 


6.18 


1913—1918 


7.47 


1918—1914. 


7.98 


1914-1915 


6.74 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



213 



SUliMSB PACKING IN THB WEfiTT FROM ICABOH Ist TO NOYEMBEB Ist. 
As reported by the Price Ourrent-Oratn Reporter. 

Seuon. HumbarHogi. At. ffro. wt. At. Tlcld lAtd. 

1896 9,979,888 240.76 40.61 

1897 11,760,476 269.12 86.41 

1898 18,981,660 381.26 88.24 

1899 18,642,948 281.46 86.66 

1900 14,822,924 228.74 84.12 

1901 16,071,480 219.48 81.81 

1902 12,146,966 228.11 81.84 

1908 i 12,876.668 281.08 82.68 

1904 13,461,920 222.09 82.89 

1906 16,078,694 221.72 88.26 

1906 16,736,126 228.14 82.18 

1907 17,806,618 280.24 82.89 

1908 17,280,000 212.00 80.00 

1909 16,407.091 211.61 29.49 

1910 18,014,807 229.76 84.20 

1911 17,732,689 226.61 81.79 

1912 14.964,979 218.49 81.48 

1918 16,877,669 22186 29.44 

1914 14,827,060 236.35 29.20 

1916 17.127,640 228.21 26.82 

TBABLT COMPiJEUSONS — NUMBBB OF HOQS PACKED IN THE WEST FOB THB 
12 MONTHS ENDING M ABCH 1. 



Y«Ai«. 



ISIM^IS,..., 

1913^1914 

1012-1918 .... 
1911-1913,,,.. 
I»i0*l911..... 

1909-1910 

1900*1909... . 

1907-1908 

1906*1907..... 
1906-1906 ... 



Summer. Winter, TotoU 



H,S27,050 
l«,S77,flfi9 
ll,961,tfrJ 
17,73:^.&^ 
13.014,31071 
16,437,071 
17 466,506 
16.805, 51 » 
16,7ae,l2S 
15,078,694 F 



13,569,41!* 
10,744,0ta 
10,01^,836 
13.185.S09 

B.725,Ii4 
11,610, 13£^ 
11,175,484. 

3,0»4,IS0 
10,496,0661 



26,583,834 

2U755.KSt 

2a,tBfl,a3S 
27,i«USW7 
25, 430,605 
26,fi74,760 



Te»rt 



IM4-1B0S. . . . - 
1903-1^04..... 

i!Jo2-iyoa..,. 

1901^1902 

tyoo-1901 

|B»0-1900..... 



l8&7-t« 

*1S90^97 

!Llt95 96 



Stimmer, Wlntsr. Tota], 



l3,4fll,Sao 
13,S76.S6ft 
13.146, W65 
15,071,180 
]4,323,tl24 
I3,634,&4a 

is,gsi,i56o 

11,760,476 
0,979,SS8 
6,194,BSB 



10,4Sfl,60a 
9,4»»,0^^ 
8,4^,600 

10,K40,196 
9,277,760 
8,678.878 
9,720,145 
8,440,TS6 
0,949,090 
63lfl,B0O 



28,918,438 
321,876.686 
20^606 J71 
36,41Ufl7« 
26,600,674 
33,^00,831 
33,651.696 
'J)0,301,360 
16,9^,978 



POBK PACKING IN THB BAST. 

The aggregate number of hogs packed during the year ending March 
1, at Eastern points from which returns and estimates have been obtained 
by the Price Current-Grain Reporter, embracing Boston, New Haven, Provi- 
dence, Worcester, Brightwood, Fall River, Bridgeport, etc., in New 
England States; Buffalo, Albany, Troy, Hudson, etc., in New York State, 
and Pottsville, Harrisburg, etc., in Pennsylvania, is shown in the fol- 
luwiiij^, lur -n'jini'jr Ltnd winter seasons, and fur the jf-u- 



YEAR. 


Sumniep. 


WlntoF. 


13 Months. 


1914-1915... - .,.,...,,,., 

1U18-1914 -■- 

1914- 1913 . - ,......., ........ ^ ,......., 


3.046,587 
1,819.000 
1,870,000 
2,037,000 
1,001,000 
1,780,W10 
a, 057,000 
1,98J,000 
1,694,000 
1,647,000 
1,746,000 
l,6fll,000 
1,703,000 
1,728,000 
1,080,000 
1,990,000 
1,B95,000 
1,688,600 


1,391,000 
l,M8,0OO 
l,d06,000 

i,oe8,ooo 

1,0»,000 
l,34l*,000 
1,218,000 
l,09fi,000 
1,108,000 
1,30,000 
1,120.000 
1,090,000 
1,031,000 
1,077,000 
1,090,000 
1,168,000 
1,188,500 


a,605,648 
8,310,000 

a,39a,ooo 


1911 1912 ,,,,,,,^ ,, s .......... ..,-.* 


s.asQ.ooo 


IdlO^JBll,... *,,......►.. 


3,Bay,ooo 


1909-1910 = .....^ * - -■■' 

ISOS-l&C^i* * ^ 

19(W-i908.-.. ..,,.......,.„,.,,.,,, 

1906-1907 . ........ ^. .L...... 


a.8O9,O0O 
fl,S«,000 
B, 200,000 

a,7§o,ooo 


1906-1901$ . . ...,.........,.,,,..-.,... 


3,7^.000 


19(U«lQflfi ..-.. 


3,9t5S,00O 


IflOB-lSOA ,,,*,*...,. ^ .............. . 


2,7Sl,OO0 


IU03'190A ..........».,,,.,*.- i-«*.. 


3,7PO,0Oa 


1901-1903 '" " ■ "^ ' ,,,,,,„,,„,,,,„. ^ ,, ^ ^ ,., ^ 


3,749,000 


I.9O0-19O1 ..«.,..,* ><^*.. 


2,760.000 


1890-1900 .^..,,, ,.,.....* 


a, 09^,000 


1896-99 . ..^..,.,., - 


S, 101, 000 


1897-96'!.!^' - *■- ^"-. 


i, 073, 100 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



214 



nUDB AHD COMMXRCS OF 



WEEKLY PRICES OP PROVISIONS FOR 1915. 



1916 



Poms 



D. 8. 
ObBAm Bias 



Bacow, 
CLBAm Bibs 



Datb. 



bBl 



Per 



Ohdoe Steam. 
P» 100 LbB. 



Bozad. 
P» 100 Lbs. 



PBdced. 
Per 100 Lbs. 



jMiiMrj 



Pebmmry 



March 



Aprfl 



Masr 



June 



July 



Augufft 



2.. 

0.. 
Ifl.. 
23.. 
80.. 

0.. 
13.. 
20.. 
27.. 

0.. 
18.. 
20.. 
27.. 

3.. 
10.. 
17.. 
24.. 

1.. 

8.. 
15.. 
22,. 
29.. 

6.. 
12.. 
19.. 
20.. 

3.. 
10.. 
17.. 
24.. 
31.. 

7.. 
14.. 
21.. 



September 4.. 
11.. 
18.. 
25.. 



October 



2.. 

9.. 
16.. 
23.. 
30.. 

November 6.. 

13.. 

20.. 

. 27.. 

December 4.. 

11.. 

18.. 
25.. 

t-OId. 



$17.00 
17.00 
10.50 
10.50 
17.00 

16.50 
17.00 
16.50 
16.50 

tl7.SS 
tl7.50 

m.M 

tl7.06 

tia.TJ 
tl7.W 
tl7.l6 
tl7.65 

m.65Hll7.70 
15.40 17.50 
15.40 17.66 
16.60 17.70 
16.96 17.85 

tl6.80 tl7.80 

16.00 17.00 

14.86 16.86 

M.66 16.66 



tl4.65 
13.S6 
18.66 
13.00 
18.20 



116.56 
16.80 
14.06 
13.86 
18.46 



tl8.80 118.66 

18.66 18.90 

18.70 

18.00 

13.70 
12.10 
12.17H 
12.76 

18.80 

14.70 

14.92H 

18.85 

14.12M 

tl4.40dtl7.00 
tl4.26 17.66 
tl4.40 17.60 
tl6.66 18.00 

16.46 18.20 

16.60 18.00 

16.00 18.00 

tl6.0Q 19.00 



|10.22H#10.»H 

10.80 10.40 

10.17M 10.27H 

10.42H 10.62H 

10.72H 10.8IH 

10.40 10.50 

10.16 10.25 
9.77H 9.87H 
t.70 9.80 



10.76 



10.76 



t— New. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOITIS. 215 



LIVE STOCK. 



From the Annual Review of the Daily Live Stock Reporter. 



CATTLB. 

The native beef steer trade for the year 1915, just closing, has been 
featured by a scarcity of ripe, finished cattle and a super-abundance 
of common to medium fleshed kinds. Average beef ste^ prices for the 
year ranged from S6.04@9.18, against S7.37@9.62 in 1914. 

From the fore part of January to the latter part of March the beef 
steer market deviated very little. Trading was done on a quiet, un- 
eventful market. It is significant that during the first three months of 
the year the daily top on beef steers fluctuated in the very narrow range 
of 75 cents, the lowest top going to $8.50 with an extreme high top of 
$9.25, made shortly after the first ot the year. The bulk of the steers at 
that time consisted of intermediate and fair finished cattle. The rank 
and file of the cattle the first quarter sold in a range of $6.50®8.00. 
Prices held to a rather narrow range, due to the fact that very few choice 
and prime steers were being marketed. 

The second quarter of 1915 was also devoid of radical fiuctuations 
and nothing remarkable featured the trade. The early part of April, 
however, the low ebb of the year came. It was at this period that 
practically no choice fat stock was being shipped. The top was $7.35 
for the week ending April 10th, which was the extreme low week of the 
year, but there was a gradual improvement as the trade drifted on until 
right in the early days of July $9.60 was reached, which was the highest 
price paid for cattle during the entire first six months of the year 1915. 
The bulk of the steers offered the second quarter sold from $7.25@8.50. 

The last half of the year brought to light new developments in eom- 
fed beeves. The demand strengthened and all weights of steers were in 
demand. At no time did the top in 1915 reach such a high pinnacle as 
it did the previous year when $11.10 was paid, thereby breaking all 
previous records for steers on this market. The top in 1915, was $10.40, 
given for a string of Christmas beeves. 

The bulk of the steers during the third quarter of the 3rear went in a 
range of $7.50@8.25, including a large proportion of grassers. The 
market was on a comparatively even basis throughout the months of 
July, August and September. 

At this late autumn period the bulk of the steers dropped down to 
$6.75 and $7.75. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



216 TRADK AND COlflfSBCB OF 

The beef steer trade daring: the month of Deoember was someidiat 
of a disappointment. The quality of the choice beeves offered fell far 
below last year's avera^. However, daring: December, the top for the 
year was reg^istered. Heavy declines were experienced on the genaoas 
runs of medium steers, but at that they hardly dropped to as low a level 
as they did the previous month. The sale of the $10.40 cattle was a 
very fitting climax to the year, although it was below local men's expec- 
tations. 

Kansas steer men are fastly waking up to the fact that St. Louis is 
the logical marketing center for their product. Prices on steers from the 
Southwest have been attractive here and it is no wonder that this market 
has received a larger volume of stock from that state. 

The bulk of the steers from that section early in the year Bold in a 
range of $6.50@7.50 but later the quality began to improve and more 
fed cattle were available. The highest price ever paid for Kansas cattle 
on this market was received this year when a string sold at $10.00 
per cwt. 

Oklahoma came to the front this year with a fair showing of steer 
cattle, although receipts from that state were slightly below those of the 
previous year. Like the Kansas cattle trade, there was an even tone to 
the market for Oklahomas, and at all times the desirable steers sold 
readily. The bulk of Oklahoma steers cleared in a range of $6.75@7.50, 
although many droves sold well above that range. Texas contributed 
freely to the native division the past year. Like the Oklahoma steer 
trade the Texas cattle disposed of went at highly satisfactory prices. 
The record for Texas cattle in the native division was made this year, 
when $8.90 was paid. 

Quarantine (Southern cattle) receipts at the St. Louis National 
Stock Yards during the year 1915, just closed, proved the lightest in the 
history of the yards. Approximate run for the year in this division 
amounted to 263,231 head, which shows a decrease of 96,494 from 1914. 

During the first two months of the year there was a light movement 
of steers from Oklahoma and Texas, mostly from the latter state. These 
were for the big part *'oil-mill" cattle and continued to come until the 
latter part of March. During that period the bulk of the best grades 
cleared from $7.00@7.65 with a top for the first three months of $7.75. 
The bulk of all sold from $6.30@6.90. These "oil-mill" cattle came 
dribbling in up until the first of May. 

A string of Texas cake-fed steers sold at $8.60, thereby outselling any 
Texas cattle ever sold on this market prior to that time and it might be 
well to note that these outsold the previous record Texas steers by 
20 cents per cwt. 

Prices ranged high all during the months of May and June and 
reached a very fitting climax the first week in July when a string of cake- 
fed Texans smashed all previous records when they sold at $8.85. A 
bunch of native Texas feds sold at $8.90 the first week in June. Fed 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 217 

steers not only soared during this period, but grassers as well attained a 
high summit and the high point of the year oame the second week in 
July when there was sold a string of grassers at S8.85, a price equaling 
that of fed steers and one above all other prices paid on this market for 
grassers. The grass Texans sold in a range of $6.00@8.50 with the bulk 
going from $6.50@7.75. Cake steers sold in a range of $7.00@8.75 with 
the bulk moving from $7.50@8.25. The previous year's range on steers 
at this period ran from $7.00@8.40, against $7.00@8.85 the past year. 

The Oklahoma grassers began to run in August and continued until 
late autumn. With the coming of common grade cattle, mostly all of 
which were grassers, the market began to decline and showed a drop of 
50@75 cents from the fore part of the year. Although Texas was a 
light contributor for the latter part of the season, it may be well to 
mention that the first part of December a load of fed Texans went at 
$8.60 with the majority of them selling from S8.25@8.50. Oklahoma 
grassers the latter part of the year sold in a range of $5.50@7.60 with 
the bulk of them moving in a range of $6.50@7.00. 

The steer offering from Arkansas during the past year has been light 
by no means, but a great many steers that were formerly yarded on the 
southern side have been disposed of in the native division of the market 
this year and Arkansas cattlemen have gotten some attractive prices 
for their stuff. 

The first half of the year there was very little fluctuation in values 
and prices ranged generally high. The top for the year on a few head 
was $7.50, although the best full load went at $7.00. 

The bulk of the steers from this state the first six months of the year 
went in a range of $5.75@6.50. Steers from August until the first of 
October sold in a range of $4.10@6.50, while the last few months of the 
year the range dropped to $4.00@6.00, with a few sales up to $6.70. 

The Southeastern states, including Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, 
Georgia and Florida furnished the market with a right fair supply of 
steers during the past year. During the first four months of the year 
when the largest runs were coming, Mississippi received very satisfactory 
prices for their cattle. Steers during the period sold in a range of 
$5.00@8.25, the latter price being the top for the year on Mississippi 
steers. 

From the first of May until the forepart of August the runs from 
these Southeastern states decreased and the market traveled along on a 
quiet, steady basis. After that time, however, runs began to get heavy 
and steers, like all other classes, began to decline in price. The range 
the last five months of the year was from $4.00@7.00, with the bulk 
moving from $4.40@6.25. The last week of October a bunch of Louisiana 
steers went at $8.25, the best price paid during the year. Alabama 
steers reached $7.70 during April, while the bulk of the steers from 
Louisiana, Alabama and Georgia went from $5.50@6.75. Georgia 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



218 TBAOK AMD COMMSBCB OF 

fomidied tome tteen the last week in April that told at $7.40, the best 
prioe of the year. Some steen from Guatemala sold up to $6^ but tiie 
bulk of them went from $4.90®6.6a 

HOGS. 

The hog trade was again in good shape in 1915. but like all pfeviouB 
yean the supply was not sufficient to meet the growing demand. Receipts 
total slightly more than during the year 1914 and the second largest in 
the history of the market. The run falls short of 1911, the banner year, 
by around 400,000 head. 

This market continues to hold third plaoe as a hog market, the receipts 
being quite a bit above the number received in Kansas City, which 
market for many years stood ahead of St. Louis. 

There was a slight shoortage of hogs in local territory marketed last 
year but shippers farther away realizing that this was by far the best 
market they could reach, patronized the market to a much greater extent 
than in former years. Whole train loads of hogs were received from 
Iowa, while Kansas and Nebraska sent in a reasonable number and quite 
a few were received from as far away as the state of Minnesota. Southern 
states also contributed materially to the supply. Mississippi, Louisiana 
and Tennessee sending in increased numbers over previous years. 

Prices were at all times on a good high basis when compared with 
other Western markets. A good strong demand eadsted throughout the 
entire year from Eastern slaughters, and this was the cause of the good 
high prices. 

The only record broken in point of receipts was on February 1st, 
when 33,157 head were received, which is the largest supply ever received 
at this market in a single day. This year March proved to be the best 
month when 301,364 head was received. The largest week's supply in 
1915 was the 6-day period ending February 6th, when 93,389 head 
arrived and the next week was the second largest when 92,245 head 
were received. 

Values were not as high as in some previous srears, yet at all times 
during the year prices were on a comparatively Idgh basis. The top of 
the market at no time falling as low as $6.50 and reached as high as 
$8.90. The favorite front figure during the year was seven, the top 
starting with that figure more than three-fourths of the time. Prices 
showed a wider range than usual, owing to the good demand for heavy 
hogs and the scarcity of such kinds. 

The year opened with the top of the market ranging from $7.25@7.50 
and the bulk of the hogs, during the month of January, sold at $6.75@7.25. 
The next two months prices were slightly lower, as the top ranged between 
$6.75 and $7.30, while the bulk of the hogs went at $6.50@7.00. There 
was quite an improvement during the early part of the spring and in 
April the top went up until it reached $7.85, while the bulk went at 
$7.25 ©7.50. In May, $8.00 was reached on several occasions and during 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THS CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 219 

June values were much the same as in May. In July the top of the 
market ranged between S7.85 and $8.25, while the bulk of the hogs sold 
at S7.50@8.00. Little change was shown during August, although 
prices were slightly lower than in July. 

With the coming of fall there was a let up in the number of hogs 
received and as the demand was still good, prices took another upward 
turn and in September the top ranged from S8.00@8.40, while the bulk 
went at $7.65 @8. 15. In October, which was the high month of the year, 
the top almost reached $9.00, being $8.90 on several occasions, while the 
bulk sold during the month at $8.00@8.65. The next two months saw 
increased supplies and lower values, the lowest point of the year being 
reached in this closing period. 

The top in November and December ranged between $6.50 and $7.70, 
but few hogs selling during December above $7.00 

SHBSP. 

The receipts of sheep for the year amounted to about 650,000 head, 
which shows a loss when compared with 1914 of around 100,000, and 
when compared with 1912, which was the largest year in the history of 
the market, there was a loss of a little more than 350,000 head. The 
past year was the smallest since 1907. 

The falling off seemed to be due to the number of spring lambs 
received. Native sheep were also received in smaller numbers than in 
preceding years. 

Annually this market receives a liberal number of lambs from Tenn- 
essee, but the past year the number received was not more than two- 
thirds as large as in previous years. Colorado and other Western states 
furnished a good supply of fed lambs and yearlings during the year. 
This branch of the tntde has materially grown in recent years and is 
still growing. 

There was a good strong demand throughout the entire year and with 
the exception of but few times the supply was insufficient. 

No receipt records were broken during the year, although prices were 
on the highest basis during the past several years. The month of June 
continues to be the banner month, the receipts last June being 78,141 
head. The spring lamb trade is at its height during June. 

The year opened with the best lambs selling at $8.75@8.95, and they 
continued on that basis during the month of January, while mutton 
sheep sold during the month at $5.50@6.00. 

During the months of February and March lambs found ready sale 
at $8.75@10.00, the greater proportion of them selling at $9.50 and 
higher, while mutton sheep were bringing, during these months, $6.50 
@7.90 with buyers complaining loudly about the small number on sale. 
The months of April and May saw lambs selling at $9.75@10.75 and 
mutton sheep at $7.00@8.50. Spring lambs began to arrive about that 
time and sold at $11.50@14.00. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



220 TBADK AND COMlfCBCB OF 

There was little change during the month of June on fed lambs, but 
spring lambs and sheep were on the decline owing to the increase in the 
number received, and the same is true of July, taken as a whole. By 
the middle of August lambs were bringing $8.50@9.25, while the sheep 
were selling at $5.25@5.50 and breeding ewes $6.75@7.50, and at time a 
little higher. Stockers were going largely at $5.75@6.50. 

During September and October, lambs found sale at $8.50 @9. 10 and 
the sheep to killers brought S5.25@5.85. From then to the doee of the 
year there was not much change, but prices were slightly higher, as 
lambs brought $9.00@9.50 and sheep $5.75@6.00. The lambs the last 
two months of the year were largely westerns fed in nearby states. It 
will be noticed that prices were slightly better at the dose of the year 
than they were at the beginning. 

HORSES AND MULB8. 

The year 1915 has gone down into history as a record-breaker for the 
horse and mule market at the St. Louis National Stock Yards. Total 
receipts of horses and mules at this center for the year are in excess of 
270,000 head, the greatest ever known at this point and the largest run 
of horses and mules that has ever been recorded at any market in the 
world. 

Prior to 1915 the record for horse and mule receipts at this point was 
for the year 1904, when the total supply of horses and mules amounted 
to 181,341 head. The 1915 run, therefore, showed a gain of 90,000 head 
over the previous record of 1904. 

The bulk of the receipts at this market the past year consisted of 
horses. Total supply of horses alone for the year ran above 200,000 
head. As a matter of fact the run of horses alone in 1915 was greater 
than the combined receipts of horses and mules at this market in any 
previous year, not even excepting the former record run of 1904. 

The tremendous business in horses at this point last year was brought 
about mainly by the demand from foreign governments for cavalry and 
artillery animals. St. Louis is ideally located in the center of the surplus 
horse and mule producing states. Facilities here for handling large 
numbers of equines are such as to attract foreign buyers from the outset 
and assure liberal contracts for the local market. 

The domestic horse trade at this market during the year just closed 
has not been up to the high-water standard. During the close of the 
past year, however, the domestic horse trade showed material improve- 
ment. The East bought fairly well, considering the season, and it is 
expected that the Eastern demand will steadily improve and reach its 
climax in the spring of 1916. 

The best domestic demand for horses the past few weeks has been 
from the South, particularly the Carolinas and (Georgia. While the 
South has not had as large a cotton crop this year as it did in 1914, the 
crop of 1915 brought high prices, both as regards the staple and seed. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



221 



Owing to the pressure of foreign demand utilizing all available facilities 
for handling domestic horses at this market during the past year the 
usual summer auctions of range horses were discontinued. 

The past year's mule trade at the St. Louis National Stock Yards 
has been a more profitable one to both the shipper and dealer than was 
that of 1914. While receipts fell a little under those of the previous 
year, there was at all times a good assortment of mules offered and 
prices held well under the circumstances. St. Loids is imiversally termed 
the hub of the mule industry, and its supremacy over all other markets 
is readily conceded by all persons in any way familiar with the mule 
situation. 

BBOEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OF OATTLE. SHEEP, HOGS. HORSES AND 
MULES FOB FORTY-THREE TEARS. 



TMAR* 



1914- , 
1911,. 
1^3.. 

inu 

1909,. 
190S, 
1907, 
1900. 
1909. 
1904., 

ma. 

1903 
ISOl. 

1900. 
1889. 

leoT 

IBM. 

JflSo. 
IBM. 
149S. 
ISfri 

imi 

1800 

lase. 

1S83 
l«g7 

]»« 

]se4. 
liss. 

ISSI. 

isao. 

if7a. 

1878 

1877, 

M7a. 

1879 
1974, 

isra 



Hi6cmrr», 



cattle. 



Bhe«p. 



UOIS,6«0 
l,07S,38g 
1k1B1,301 
1,29B,295 

i,9o«,m 

1,866.233 

U418.00S 

'1,331,108 

l,3&4,2d6 
Ip2€l,533 
1,209,U1 

9ft9,a8J 
799,E)00 

7€6»osa 

796JI1 
9dD,Tfi3 

851,375 
773, B71 
803,257 
801,111 
7Ta.l9S 
e3S,0!l 
003,100 
540,875 

a77,fi50 
386,S30 
45<»,7!7l 
405»01W 
443,160 
503.894 
4S4JB0 
420,6541 
4(W,SM 
411,060 

S35J42 



Hogs. 



Jioraes 

AMulea 



690,180 3,9eSJ44 
n7,776 3,87l,B5S; 
976,123 3, 1(» J 421 

,024,402 a, S34, 851 
T76,665a,fH8,4.^ 
fti{5,&7a3,07B,06S 
714, 7dl 3,111^,^32 

e50,Ti4 2,111,101 

74^,1091,361.6:^1 

566,836 i,7Wi, era 

540,143 1,4^,396 
534, il& 2, 258,945 
434,133 2, L'W,Vr73 
433,500 2,147.14* 
477,CBl 2,136,3«8 
e«0,3SOit,06&,S!^ 
fl»a^§7a 1,097, §95 
5lO,eeO UI40,34S 
S59,i96!l,4g9,Sfi« 
397,7^'l.l06.l0fi 
376,B1S2 LaiO,Sll 
4<t3,Ba'J 1.380.6^ 
S5S,496 1 ,369,7S9| 
3{kl,495 1,120,1^ 

417,43»|l,052,l40f 
33S,aS5.l, 264*471 1 
302,a,'J8 1,455,53, 
SiO.S'^ 1,474,475 
808,012 l,151,7a^ 
445, lao a46.2«i5 
3M, 42^1,072, 153 
20(V, 96^ 1,940,0^4 
18i, 648 1,763,724 
168 ,005 1 1.451, 034 
200,5021 Kie,ai9 
167*831] 677. 100 
125,079 628. &G9 
114,9]!$ 1,110,586 
8S,4S4| 973,511 



^21,450 
102,360 
I67.a0fl 
171,133 
177,338 
136,724 



171, S81 
I90f]91 

19I,68» 
ia7,7ll 
122,697 
149,716 

lS0,S3a 
118,542 
105.570 
121,712 
77,620 
59,32^ 
46,834 
46,759 
5fl,Sf76 
B2,071 
78,104 
58,458 
57,048 
4a,0S9 
38,306 
41,670 
44,ai3 
42,716 
42,36& 
46,0tl 
S3.299 
37,878 
?2,65S 
2*,271 
27,516 
37,175 



tHTPMBNTi. 



CAttle. 



198,67« 
317,745 
S8L,4S3 
S35,77^4 
Mlpfie^ 
452,111 
494,235 
436,9M 
420,565 
d£f2,@72 
377,071 
340,434 
H36,4^ 
342,191 
251,749 
307,y98 
Ti24,m 
154,619 
367,fl't4 
350,037 
274,738 
1281,260 
473,966 
465,3^28 
464,704 
361,706 
2B7.9^<tt 
3^,200 
277,406 
Sl3,9fijj 
233,219 
615,433 
219,523 
183,466 
398.002 
13iJ,a79 
l-i6,*M 
Ml, 723 
251. n64 
290,430 
216,701 
226,678 
180,602 



Sheepw 



97,106 

46,724 

71,822 

96,999 

UO,737 

81,522 

lis, 523 

130,630 

97,199 

llrt,«7a 

92,361 

102,900 

83.978 

74,141 

77,476 

65,199 

tr7.7l2 

117.184 

m.799 

2M,60i 

119.7fla 

90,526 

S31,476 

34^,035 

277, 8S« 

ara,728 

255,375 

I ;ilG.67fi 

' 287.013 

aJ2,728 

2^3,391 

' 24S.545 

] 217,370 

' 245,071 

170.395 

9:{.6J!a 

««,0ti3 

74,4,^J 

87,660 

67,866 

37,7ri4 

3a ,67 7 

llil.902 



Hog«. 



HorMi 



1,019,247 
1,016,172 
054,330 
67^ .844 
905,444 
689,239 
985,210 
838, B90 
817,627; 
627,613 
523,0781, 
412,778 

:^7,ooa 

162.394 
406.014 
513,561 
57S,0«7| 
5TS,951 
838,319 
865,462 
605,319 
642,699 
575,846 
715,989! 
704,378 
666,471 
420,3 m 
294,869^ 
8-24.735 
520, 36i 
789,467 
678.874 
600,388 
264,564, 
Si^,9O0 
770.7611' 
666,099 
628, Si7 
S14,2a7 
233,876 
126, 72U 
453, 710 I 



305,308 
147,205 
1M,456 
156,a;56 
167,906 
113,069 
116,044 
I05,M9 
114,671 
159,498 
170,480 
171,076 
117,135 
96,425 
119,938 
147.463 
103,773 
117,606 
97,548 
121,301 
8K926 
67,664 
06,931 
49,077 
66,391 
79,038 
05,399 
61,191 
59,248 
39,7S« 
85,610 
39,544 
44,54S 
40,266 
43.704 
41,416 
S6,M7 
30,807 
25,157 
26,301 
28,675 
I0,10S 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



222 



TRADB AND COMMBBCB OF 



a 



o 

H 

3 
o 

OQ 

n 

OQ 



OQ 

H 
09 



14 









"8 «-Sa«g*IJ»«»' -••*■•: : :j2 



SIsS 






:S83 : ; : 



I; 



B%n 



s 









;JI5B ;3 



ad 









>e23 



"1 S 






Mm 






^M :^£ 






SI 



is: 
> 

5 

Q 
as 

< 

< 
O 

OS 



Em 



o 






^^ ^ +^ «^ 






:9« 






^1 



I 



c * s c^sS 



b fa 







i 

a 

9 

H 

-n 




^"^xi* 



^^i;:5iofi 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



223 



BBOSIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OF LIYB STOCK AT THB ST. LOUIS NATIONAL 
STOCK YARDS FOB THE YEAR 1916. 



l»t& 




Ekceiptb. 








BaiPM£NTS^ 




Mosdi. 


CAtUe, 


Hog», 


Sheep. 


and 
Mules. 


Oun. 


1 


Hoga. 


eiieep. 


Mules. 


(JftW. 


JaiiuiLry , . 

February 

Marob..:.. 

Aprtl 

my,. 

Jtjls« ...... 

July.. 

AUffQSt .. 

aeptember 
October. , , 
Nor«tnbef 
D«oeiDber 


77,aS8 
8«,726 
60,W9 
43,449 
M,24l 

fl6,eo7i 

S7,6O0| 
106,436 
112,002 
ll»,i572 
10&,910 

B9,065 


m.i93 

3&4,S76 
801,864 
2D4,96S 

lM,60e 
144,460 
141,803 
178, 2io 
332,425 
•-®2t5«8 


51,f30 
86,84* 
46,209 
89,40e 

8c,6ea 
ea.BOS 

58,8*8 
50,678 


26,fi54 

2fl,fl79 
28,794 
28,849 
25,^4 
36,617 
21,460 
I6,fi4a 
14,426 
27.488, 

n,os« 

16,873 


6,64© 
fl,ff72 
6,1^ 
5,198, 
6,879! 

fl;4ioi 

©,103, 
6,sr73' 


15,664 
12,827 
12,39ft 
9,a70 
18,449 
19,JS7 
29,b64 
40,4«B 

4i;fie7 
es.ieo 
2a,m 

19,549 


114,796 
91,413 
189,208 
118,4^7 

m,m 

43,96{1 
44,706 
41,812 
58,347 
H4,91S 
108,S12 
83,905 


819 
1,4S4 
6,S44 
a,766 
5,436 
1,»I3 
4,122 
10,649 
22,001 
7,fl22 
4,231 
5.169 


28,277 

ao,8as 

33,914 
38,ft40 
21,8S1 
27,331 
19,851 
16.425 
11,S98 
aS,S76 
10,470 
ie,838 


2^394 
2, SOB 
2,737 
2,419 
2,018 
2,391 
2,118 
2.889 
2,367 
2,768 
3,179 
1,940 


TotlUb. ' 


991,709 

1 


2,501.761* 


643,141 


370,612j77,754 


m,m 


991,395 


71,966 


309, 0&4 


28,092 



BBOBIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OF LIVE STOCK AT INDEPENDENT STOCK 
YARDS FOR THE YEAR 1916. 



391S. 


Rkckipth, 


1 

Shipments. 


month. 


1 


Sheep. 


Horsea 1 

*iid .Oara-I 


Oattle. 


Hogs. 


aheep 


Hotsei 

Rod 

Mulea. 


Cars, 


JftBiiary.. 
February. 
March ,,.. 
April ..... 

May 

Jtmcj 

Jaly,....- 
Auffuflt .., 
September 
October... 
November 
December 


784 
082 
l,9tl3 
1,867 
1,349 
1,712 
3,lBfi 
1,961 
5,100 
6,403 
4,9n8 
8,849 


32,036 20,488 
34.724 27,021 
M,843, 82, 4M 
26,824 ia.7il 
22,3«B 3,a5a 
81,399 1,904 
19,308 1,721 
14,871: 2,936 
23,823! 9,27S 
26,87fl 19,422 
34,607 9,173 
49,517 11,861 


! "i 

71 ' 466 , 
261 507 
206 402 
175 373 

52 1B7 
lOO 278 
218 . 206 

9€ 171 
1,191 1 442 

680 m 

111 478 
1150 fi05 


.•>27 

1,114 

eso 

096 
275 

©67 
1.4S3 
1.073 
2.553 
5,092 
3,698 

a,oea 


ll,g34 
19,588 
6.247 
4,817 
6,461 
8,803 
4,926 

4,7Ba 

3,495 
6,023 
8,24 L 


20,tl04 

28.218 
3.9§8 

16,860 
»,842 
1.282 
l.sfisi 
2,39ti 
7,104 

19,423 
6,773 
9,616 


71 
356 
126 
116 

35 

24 
314 

74 

m 

1,359 
84 

27a 


168 

258 
28:9 
161 
75 
109 
115 

ua 

193 

sei 

306 
316 


TotAU,. 


Sl,e3« ifi0,102 159,438 


S,B7T 4,477 


20,079 


75,878 


115,664 


2,t37 


2,218 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



224 



TBADB AND COMMXRCX OF 



WEEKLY PRICES OP LIVB STOCK FOB 1916. 





From Dally Neikniel Lire Stoek Reporter. 








OATTLB. 


HOGS. 


SHEEP. 


Week Ending. 




























Beet NetlTe Beet South- 


Top. 


Balk. 


Beet 


Beet 




Bteere. 


em Steers. 


Lambe. 


Sheep. 


Jeanerj 9 


19 S5 


f7W 


$7 48 


87 10^7 86 


18 96 


15 96 


le 


860 


766 


7 36 




886 


650 


» 


9S5 


775 


796 


666 7 16 


860 


690 


M 


9S5 


735 


740 


676 730 


866 


600 


Febniery 6 


886 


766 


736 


6 80 7 16 


940 


660 


IS 


860 


740 


TS6 


600 7 16 


896 


650 


10 


740 


690 


706 


666 700 


870 


666 


17 


850 




700 


666 690 


960 


666 


Kereh 6 


900 


750 


696 


666 690 


10 00 


740 


11 


875 


766 


746 


696 736 


10 00 


760 


SO 


850 


7 16 


786 


690 736 


10 00 


790 


S7 


875 


786 


7 80 


690 736 


986 


766 


April S 


886 


796 


780 


690 730 


•14 00 


776 


10 


786 


786 


746 


700 786 


M4 00 


836 


17 


8 10 


750 


776 


7 36 766 


♦1100 


860 


34 


885 


760 


786 


750 780 


nsoo 


836 


MMf 1 


980 


800 


786 


750 790 


•13 60 
•11 60 


7S6 


8 


800 


786 


776 


740 770 


700 


If 


900 


830 


790 


760 787 


•13 00 


760 


SS 


696 


860 


790 


760 780 


•13 36 


766 


S9 


900 


860 


800 


760 796 


•13 36 


700 


Jane 6 


900 


840 


780 


766 776 


•U60 


636 


IS 


9S6 


.... 


790 


760 776 


•1160 


660 


19 


986 


. • • • 


786 


740 786 


•U 00 


600 


S6 


940 


866 


800 


760 797 


•10 00 


640 


Jnly • 


960 


886 


800 


7 70 7 96 


•10 60 


636 


10 


10 00 


8 76 


800 


766 790 


990 


636 


17 


10 86 


876 


836 


7 90 8 10 


760 


636 


s« 


10 S6 


836 


786 


676 776 


836 


036 


tl 


10 16 


836 


786 


676 776 


886 


660 


Aoffoet 7 


10 00 


836 


786 


676 776 


886 


060 


14 


980 


8 16 


780 


690 766 


900 


676 


SI 


965 


885 


775 


650 760 


840 


660 


se 


936 


750 


800 


736 776 


936 


650 


•eptembMr 4 


10 00 


.... 


880 


775 815 


876 


636 


11. .... 


10 00 


.... 


816 


8 00 8 36 


866 


636 


18 


10 00 


.... 


840 


750 836 


850 


636 


SS 


10 00 


..•• 


840 


796 880 


860 


636 


Oelober S 


10 00 




866 


7X 800 


900 


660 


9 


10 16 


.... 


876 


750 860 


9 10 


676 


16 


10 16 




690 


850 876 


900 


676 


SS .... 


10 86 




870 


750 800 


900 


686 


80 


10 86 


.... 


780 


686 7 36 


9 10 


650 




10 80 




770 


6 76 7 10 


900 


650 


U 


10 00 


.... 


736 


6 76 7 10 


9 16 


660 


SO 


10 00 


.... 


690 


650 676 


886 


636 


S7 


9 76 




690 


6 40 666 


9 10 


636 


Deeember 4 


950 




700 


660 676 


9 10 


676 


11 


10 40 


8.60 


700 


660 686 


936 


600 


18 


10 10 




700 


660 676 


986 


600 


S5 


950 


.... 


686 


6 16 6 60 


936 


600 


81 


880 


.... 


7 10 


640 676 


960 


600 



*6priDg lambs. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



TBI CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 225 



HAY, 



By D. W. Glutoh, Secretary Hay Ooinmlttee. 



Owing to the faflure of the crop tributary to St. Lonis in 1914 and 
the active demand from nearby points, the prices for the first half of 
1915 ruled strong, especially for the best grades, which were always 
scarce, these grades selling up to $22.00. 

On account of the heavy rains before and during harvest, the entire 
crop, although an unusually heavy one, was badly damaged, so that good 
sound hay has been very scarce, while the market has been overstocked 
with stained and damaged hay, which at times has been difficult to dispose 
of, even at very low prices. Owing to this fact, the best grades have 
been in active demand and prices have ruled high all season. 

The damaged condition of the crop undoubtedly caused shippers 
to lose money and prevented them from shipping as freely as they would 
have done, had the crop been in good condition. This no doubt was the 
cause of the market filling off in our receipts for the year. 

The trade for the year has been an unsatisfactory one, not only for 
the shipper but for the receiver as well. Our local consumption shows 
an increase of 2,300 tons over 1914. Our total receipts were 247,825 
tons and our shipments 130,715 tons. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



220 



TftADB AND COMimCB OF 



RB0BIPT8 AND SHIPMENTS OF HAY DURINO 1914 AND 1916. 



BY 



HAT 



Cliltmgoll Alton R, R,, Mo. DIt.. 

MiMouH Pftciflo R*B.,, ,. 

at. L. & Wttti Friinetsco R, H.. , , . . . 

Wabti^U K, R, ( W«?!it J 

Cbiuii^u* HtJL'lt Iiiiaija at Pa.olflc 

Mo.j KiiuBa« & Tftjioji ti. K. 

St* Loub 9awtbwr*>i>tern R, R. ,.... 
St, L., Iroa M*iit*n& S'ib'u R»R.., 
St. L.. I. M. * S. Ry, iUL 1Hf.> 
llliuoU C«i3tral IL H 



I^Ville, lleiiderjitinaBi.L.R* R.,. 

Loul8vill(»& H&tibvUleR. R 

Mobiltt&OhloE. R 

Soutberti Rallwiiy Co. ..,...»,... . 

BAttimor6& Uhki8*-W. R.R 

Chieago* Alton H. R............. 

CU^F^li^nd, LJo., Cfel.A 9t.L. H,RJ 

V ttiidiiJ ia u. H , . , . 

Wabaih H. R. (East) 

Tol., at,Loui«t & W^it^m fi. R. , . 
Ghioago, Peoria A t4t. Louli R. R. 
Chi., BurLIc Quiucy R R. (Ea»t). 
Chl.jBiirU & Quitiry R. U. (West) 
Chit-ago & Eaiiteru Illinois ...... 

St. LouIb, Troj & Eaitem Rj 

IlUnoJH Traetfotj BTAtem ...,.,,. ^ . 
LitohtlPlfl & MaillMiii Ry ......... . 

Upp«r Mitiifialppl River, ,.,,,„.., 
Lower M!piS»»ippl River .......... 

minolB River....* ..,.,,.,♦..,. 

Miasourl River. „._..... 

UhiOf Cumb. and Tenn. RIt^fb.,. 



tioral 
Totts._ 
67616 

9»1I0 
d80 

760 
1B6 

90 

sia 



1«0 
f,186 

10,900 

5,3«0 
8,400 
0,010 

16,810 
4,036 

18,T3& 

1,5*0 

36 



86 

30 



16 



Total, toot . ............ ...,.,.. Ifll ,010 g&,Sl& ISO, 716 liaOO, &7S »l ,a06J ITTtOW 



Tbro* 
Tofia. 



HAT. 

ffiST 

TOOB^ 



HAY. 



I ThT&' 

Tons. I TbDft. 



HAT. 



11114. 



4,300 
9,660 

sjid 

13,000 

4,H0 
a.045 
l,l@6 
1,1110 



33 

m 

1,406 
3,310 
4,6^ 



8,860 

850 

5,t7& 



15 

6,480 

5;»75 

£t,230 

750 

w 

300 
9,630 
4,885 

3,470 
7,070 
10,640 
7,405 
ej80 
1,005 
8,tl5 
9,015 
6tS00 
S,6»0 
735 



i.iio 

190 



115 

860 

355! 

85 



70 



a,400;10pOSD( 

30,145 IS JliO 

3,390^ 3,070 

13,7m 2e, 136 

'2,420 1,G0D 

4,365: 4,055 

60 3§0 

515 IiHSiCli 



85 
30,655 



145 



7,^ 
10,555 



15,9eia 
a;706 



40 
385 



10 



1. 
36,550 3,535 



40 
430 
2,9^* 



8,tn^ 1,^0 



515 
14,1)50 



5fl,r.(>ft' a,rj4p 

47^1 6,645 
' 80 



55 

S,945 

11,910 

6,015 

305 

5*15 

1,305 

19,FT0 

5,710 

S|,9I5 

itB5 

ll,0i9 

I5,«0 

6,«05 

s.sso 

lt,880 
L»,615 

e,oia 

3.885 
855 



i,tta 
sso 



lio 
m 



40 



MONTHLY RANGB OF PRICES OF HAT DURING 1015. 



MONTHS. 


No. 1 Alfalfa, 
per ton. 


No. 1 Timothy, 
per ton. 


Na I Prairie, 
per ton. 


January 


$15.00 ^ 18.50 

15.00 17.50 

15.00 20.00 

15.60 30.50 

nS.OO 19.00 

•18.00 18.00 

nS.OO 16.50 

•18.00 16.00 

14.00 16.50 

15.00 18.00 

15.00 17.50 

15.50 18.00 


$17.00 « 19.50 

16.00 81.00 

17.60 88.00 

18.00 81.00 

18.50 88.00 

17.00 80.50 

•13.50 84.00 

•18.00 88.00 

•18.00 19.50 

18.00 18.00 

18.00 18.00 

14.00 19.00 


$14.00 < 
18.00 
18.00 
14.00 
18.50 
18.00 
•18.00 
•9.00 
10.50 
10.00 
11.50 
10.00 


M8 50 


February 


16.00 


March 


15.60 


April 


16.00 


May 


16.50 


June 


17.00 


July 


17.00 




18.50 


September ^ 


18.50 


Oovober 


16.00 


NoTember. 


16.00 


December 


14.50 







•New. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OF ST. LOXTZ8 



227 



BSCBIPT8 AND BHIPMINT8 OF HAT FOB A 8SBISS OF TSAB8. 



YlAB. 


RBOSIPTS. 


BHIPlOElfTg. 


1915 


TOBA. 

347.835 
391.780 
350.635 
246,448 
268.872 
343,481 
188.565 
388.605 
390 646 
343.980 
346,945 
369,560 
398.346 
318.334 
361483 
984,366 
175,890 
160.860 
178^16 
S80.863 
196,583 
169,960 


Tom. 

180.716 


Utt4 


177.080 


1918 


138.660 


1913 

1911 


183425 
126 890 


1910 


87.456 


1900 


660)16 


1908.... 

1997 


169,266 
149,042 
101,886 
90.180 


I90Q 


1906 


1904 


119,984 


1908 ., 


114,441 


1903 , 


89,028 
117,667 
140,777 


1901 

1900 

1899 


1896.... 


46.^ 


1897 


64.067 


1896 

1896 


lOTtoSO 
69,046 


iK ::;::;:::::: ;:::;;::;;;;;;;:;:::::;::::: 


«I,2S8 







Reodpte of Hay during 1913, 191S| 1914 and 1915 at Uie principal pri- 
mary markets, were as follows: 

ITons. 

I 1912. 

et. Louis » 346,448 

Oindonati 151,388 

InaianapoUs. 85.860 

CleTeiand 58,818 

Chicago 843,617 

KansM Olty 864,464 

PeoHa 88,880 

Minneapolis 60.660 

Milwankee 47,389 



Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


1918. 


1914. 


1916. 


3BS.936 


301.780 


347,835 


318,897 


389,727 


180,117 


1,636 


3,190 


3,085 


64,969 


80,370 


44,560 


389,048 


878.166 


804,843 


808.183 


816.008 


433,960 


40,671 


48.786 


83,886 


87,870 


41,710 


46,539 


89,416 


43.834 


40.745 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



228 TBADB AKD COMmBCB OF 



LEAD AND SPELTER. 



By HnmT Qumrm, Prtildfent John Wahl Oommlailon Ckx 



LEAD. 



ProduotionB of lead in the United States again showed an increase 
for the year 1915, the ontpnt of the refiners both from domestic and 
foreign sources attaining an unparalleled total of more than 600,000 
tons. The Missouri smelters turned out about 20,000 tons more than in 
1914 which means the output of the Missouri mines increased in about 
the same ratio, inasmuch as this group <^ smelters obtains but little ore 
from elsewhere than Missouri. 

Prices of lead during the past year fluctuated frequently and on many 
occasions violently. The price of lead around the first of January was 
$3.60, St. Louis. The highest point was reached during June when lead 
sold as high as $6.75. On the last d«y of the year lead was $5.32 H* 

The monthly average prices of lead in St. Louis for the year 1915 
were as follows: January, $3.57; February, $3.72; March, $3.98; April, 
$4.11; May, $4.16; June, $5.76; July, $5.52; August, $4.59; September, 
$4.53; October, $4.51 H; November, $5.08; December, $5.26 H* 

SPELTER. 

The production of spelter for the year 1915 was nominally 493,000 
tons, compared with 362,000 tons in 1914. This includes the spelter 
derived both from domestic and foreign ores and also a small tonnage 
obtained from dross, etc., by smelters whose chief business is the reduction 
of ore. It is to be noted that there is also a rather large production fd 
spelter by dross smelters, pure and simple. Their production is not 
included in the present report. The total reported for 1915 is the 
aggregate <^ the reports of 32 smelters operating 42 works. 

At the beginning of the year the price of spelter was around the 
$5.60 mark. The publication of statistics showing the domestic stock 
had been reduced to about 20,000 tons started good buying and an 
upward movement in the market. A large export business in high grade, 
intermediate and brass special spelters had been going on right along, 
owing to the need for those kinds in the making of ammunition. As 
early as the first week of January, high grade spelter was selling for about 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



TH» CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 



229 



10 cents per pound. Spelter sold as high as 27 cents per pound during 
the month of June. On the last day of the year spelter was selling at 
nominally 17 H cents per pound. 

The monthly average prices of spelter in St. Louis for the year 1915 
were as follows: January, $6.33; February, $8.62; March, $9.80; April, 
$11.22; May, $15.52 H; June, $22.14; July, $20.53; August, $14.19; 
September, $14.10 H; October, $13.89; November, $16.87 H; December, 
$16.72. 

LEAD AND SPELTER 

MONTHLY BANGS OF PRICES FOB TWO TBABS. 



MONTH. 


LEAD. 


SPELTER. 




191A. 


1914. 


1915. 


1914. 


JftDQftry . . . . . --TTT. 


I860 eB» 
8 62H 8 86 
886 416 
4 10 4 17K 
4 10 iV!H 
4 82H 8 00 
6)6 675 
430 626 
430 486 
iilH 4 83H 
4 77>tf 6 36 
6 17M 6 42K 


8 66 tnh 
866 880 
880 886 

inn 8 83>tf 

8 73>i 8 80 
8 70 876 
8 66 8 76 
8 82H 8 60 
886 880 
860 870 


$660^726 

7 16 10 00 
760 U26 

8 76 18 00 
10 00 32 00 
16 00 80 00 
16 00 22 00 
10 00 17 00 
12 00 16 00 
12 00 15 00 
14 00 19 00 
1800 1860 


IS" 

490 
486 

480 
4 70 
600 
456 
486 
6 17M 


a5 26 


PebmArr . . ... 


6W 


Mi^!^:.:::;:;:;.;;::::;:...: 


6 20 


^5":::::::;::::.:::.:::.:::::: 


6 00 


June 


6 00 


July 


496 
6 00 


SoDtember 


690 


October 


6 00 


NoTember 


6 15 


December 


6 70 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



230 



TIUDB AND COMMBBCB OF 



UEAD. 

RB0KIPT8 AMD BHIPMKMTS OF LXAD U FI€M OF 80 LBS. B4CH. 



V**f. 



m&. ,..„,... 

nn .,,,..,......,* 

ioti,»,,,.,. •.,*•** 

I9lrt-,. ,,„.... 

HKiW-**.t,.. 

ttO* . 

isdfi...... 

I9t»l,„. ,.*,„ 

leos. .., 

m^ 



Ei?«fipl*^M]i|sm*tB. 



Ytfmt, 



l.aii.^V a.iiio,0j{» liw ......It.,,. 






I t£«^tp«>^Stlipifi*ti. 



1.9W,170 L4Bft.*fi-J ,„,_„,_,„.._. 

i.ge&^STSj t*4i4.M£|iiwft .*..... 

aaai.SRS I,&S8,7«]IM).-. ..,.., .,...*.. 

apiTa,54Q 1. 1^*043 law „*..• .,. 

i,407,oufi, utmiiAM isai... 

%,wi,-m i,a54,ug[i«?, >■■„-» 



i.an,u3t 

U7a>,i77 
l,4a>iiB*j 



.3e»,4ai 

4011,^07 

90t^ ill 
,O70«6i8 



BOUBOM OF SUPPLY OF PIO LBAD FOB THBBB TBAB8. 



BSOaiTBD BT 



minolg i%ntr»l ». a........ 

Clik*F->, Bo^k roaviul & P»eiflr Ry 

Loo1ivuk\ M^Mid.vr...ii A St. ix»uU li B 

G^t Louti truutJiiM ^tcrn Ef, 

Ml«i?url ruetOr By-.* *..**,.. 

Pt- IjtJU I* A B*ti Franclino It. R,**, 

W»b»sh IL n, tWotitJ ,,,., 

MlmutiirL Rikn»Ma£ Tftxaif R.IL., 

St. LcmUj Iron Mlouiitala A f^utbe^rn B. B... 

Ohleago li Eialern MUtuH^ H. H 

Obkftg(>& Altai! e. a (Mfttn Um^) 

TftodAtlA H, B ..,,,..... 

WftbftsliR, ILfRatflK...... , 

Tolc^o^St. Loulfl^ Wi*»tcfn R. tt 

Chlcwfti* Peoria .V Bt. Umlm E. K-. 

Cblriiifo. HtirJlDgtfJti h i^ulnry It (t. (West) 
Ch]r;vi,>, RiiHJnBtorj ^fc Qulncy R U. (East).. 

M-Mjr A ni)k> K. H-. . 

Chii:i*.^o .t AHon R. R, (Mo. niv.) 



TOTAL 8.801,190 8,611,610 1,814,390 



1915. 



3,400 
8,000 



U5,6B0 
17,890 
43,810 



8,088,310 



40,800 
835,840 



168,810 



90 
1,390 



1914. 



4.500 
154,980 
300,140 
187,830 

3i7i7,'686 

360,630 
4,000 

68,000 

600 

6,060 



mo. 



90,UO 

304,700 

61.860 

miiio 

8,680 

30.030 

957,170 

610 

13.390 
86,030 



MONTHLY PBIOBS OF LBAD ABD 8PBLTBB FOB TWO YBAB8. 



MONTH. 



January... 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August.... 
September. 
October.... 
NoTember. 
December. 



Lkad. 



1916. 



8 50 ^65 

8 63i^ 8 85 

886 

4 10 

4 10 

4 83K 

635 

430 

480 

4 43K 

sn5i 



4 15 

4 17H 

4 67H 
8 00 

5 76 

6 36 
4 85 

4 83H 

5 35 

6 43V< 



1914. 



8 974#4 10 
8 87H 4 10 
866 
8 66 
8 80 
8 77>i 
8 73H 
8 70 
866 

8 85 
860 



8 98K 

880 

886 

8 83)< 
8 80 
8 76 
8 76 
8 60 
8 80 
8 70 



Bpbltbb. 



1915. 



1914. 



560 
735 
750 
8 75 
10 00 
16 00 
16 00 
10 00 
13 00 

13 00 

14 00 
18 00 



^735 
10 00 
1150 

18 00 
33 00 
80 00 
33 00 

17 00 
16 00 
16 00 

19 00 

18 60 



6 10 
6 30 
;6 13>tf 
4 90 
490 
485 
480 

4 70 
500 
466 
485 

5 17X 



06 36 
586 

630 

6 13)4 

500 

500 

496 

600 

590 

500 

5 15 

570 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



231 



FURS. 

By Ponften Bros, /k Co. 



The fur seaaon of 1915 has truly been a remarkable one. Some kinds 
of furs brought the highest prices in the history of the fur business. 
The season opened up ^th extremely high prices. Prices were forced 
too high and then the drop in the market came and over night prices 
dedined on some kinds fuUy 50 per cent. Following the decline ther^ 
was a sharp reaction and prices readily advanced again. 

While St. Louis interests have -been selling the U. 8. Government's 
furs at public auction for several years past, they really did not begin 
the Public Auction Sales of American furs until in 1915. These sales 
have proved so successful that the permanency of them is assured. 

In addition to this the volume of business handled by the St. Louis 
houses direct from the trapper and fur shipper has been enormous. The 
extremely high prices at which the season opened up brought out a very 
large catch, and the trappers and fur shippers to the St. Louis market 
have received very high prices for their shipments. It is the general 
opinion that St. Louis has handled a larger volume of the furs trapped 
in North America this year than ever before. 

Through the efforts of St. Louis interests, the London process of 
dressing and dyeing sealskins has been established in St. Louis, and 
they are now dressing and dyeing the United States catch of Alaska 
sealskins for account of the U. S. Government. These skins are sold by 
a St. Louis house at one of their public auction sales. 

While St. Louis has always been a market for the trapper and original 
collector of furs trapped in North America, it has now become, through 
its auction sale business, a great Dealers' market as weU, and at the 
present time is undoubtedly the greatest raw fur market in the world. 

BBCBIPT8 ANn SHIPMENTS FOB TWBNTT-ONB TBAB8. 





Wool, 


Hid IS. 


Y«AB. 


Beceipts. 
Pounds. 


SbJpments. 
Pounds. 


Receipts. 
Pounds. 


Shipments. 
Pounds. 


1916 

1914 


30.914,120 
21.147.900 
14,671,660 
23.390.160 
26,773.770 
21.044,440 
22.649,110 
23.123.340 
14.712.660 
16.776,330 
24.296.130 
18.761.770 
18.766.260 
26.378,080 
26,877.110 
17,000,790 
28.491.626 
23.710,716 
30,866.410 
16,139.840 
21 .693 ,780 


26.968.200 
32.743.800 
18.647,200 
89,819,200 
38.039.000 
20.648,260 
30,028,360 
27,829,200 
17.097,760 
17,749,420 
22,887,270 
27.640,776 
21 .031 ,610 
80,072,360 
27.811.376 
16.067.290 
32.617,076 
21,266.999 
34.303.700 
16,939,679 
20.626.100 


64.443.010 
64.698.200 
62.609.800 
69.227,800 
64,329,940 
71,007.770 
63.671.660 
70,687,900 
49,394.760 
69,116.810 
63,644.860 
66,228,200 
60,910,600 
66,237,220 
66,006,030 
60,631.640 
68.933,720 
68,716,130 
69,372.110 
46,606,880 
44.169.790 


97.246.300 
128,228.000 


1913 


132,092,470 
124.271.660 


1912 


1911 


186,124.800 


1910 

1909 


146,692.030 
136,706,100 


1908 

1907 

1906 „ 

1906. 

1904... 

1903. 


127,162,860 

93.858,110 

97,782,300 

118,864,600 

109,480.946 

112.680.030 

99.367.210 

116.723,696 

106,496.640 

92,692,028 


1902. 

1901 

1900 

1899 


1898 


78.706.786 


1897 


88.908.100 


1896 

1896. 


81,681,130 
78.039.400 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



232 TBADB AKD OOMMXECB OF 

TIMOTHY SEED. 
Monthly range of prices during 1915. 



Mourn. 


PSBlOOLBt. 


Moans. 


PnlOOLBS. 


Janoary 


64 60^ rOO 
860 660 
860 686 
800 600 
800 636 
800 700 


jujj 


16 36 A |7 00 


Ftobm%rT 


Aofoct 


in 7 00 


Mitfch!^.;.;;;.:;;; ::::;: 




600 7 46 


April 


oSktber 


8 76 743H 


t&j.y/::,i.iy/////////... 


NoTAmbAF 


800 7 40 


JllD4.... ---T rT.,.f'^t-.... 


December 


400 780 







CLOVER SEED. 
Monthly range oi prices daring 1915. 



Mouths. 


PnlOOLBS. 


MOHTHS. 


PnlOOLBS. 


Jftimftry 


HO 00 ^ $16 76 
7 60 16 10 
9 60 14 60 
600 1880 
6 00 13 60 
6 00 13 00 


Jnlj 


i 6 00 • $14 00 


Psbm&TT 


Aoffiiat 

SopMobei'. 


6 00 14 36 


mmX:.. :;; v...::::.::: 


8 00 16 86 




October 

NoTember ••••••.... 

December ^ 


1100 30 00 


IffLT 


6 00 18 60 


Jane 


8 00 19 00 









TDiOTHT SEED. 
Monthly range ot prices daring 1914. 



MOVTU. 


PbbIOOLbs. 


MOMTHS. 


PnlOOLBS. 


JfcHD>TT 


$B00#$6 88 
836 476 
360 446 
300 437 

836 600 
400 686 


July 

Aaffast 

Beiiieinber 


$5 00#$6 00 


FebroftTT ..••.«..« 


836 676 


March 


8 76 606 


Anrll 


October. 


4 16 670 


MiSr :;;;:....;.. .... 


^oTember. 


8 60 6 36 


Jane.,,. ..,. .,,, 


December 


436 700 







CLOVER SEED. 
Monthly range of prices daring 1914. 



Months. 


PnlOOLBS. 


MOHTHS. 


PnlOOLBS. 


Jm.nna.rw 


$8 00^$16 36 
10 00 TI 86 
9 00 14 10 
760 .1300 
8 00 13 10 
8 60 18 00 


Jaly 


$ 9 00 ^ $14 60 


i»'^E::::.'::::::: 


Anffvii^ . ... .»--- ..... 


10 00 18 10 


September.....' 

October...., 

NoTember 

December 


«7 00 18 60 


Anrll 


«6 60 16 10 


M»5^..... ...;; 


10 00 16 61 


juoe.::.;. :.;;:;....::::;: 


900 1676 









•HesTlly mixed buddiom. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 



233 



EGGS. 

BBCKIPT8 AVD FBICB8 OF BOOS DUBINO 1916. 



lfO]ITRB-19J6. 



By 
Railroad, 
Packages. 



By Riyer, 
Packages. 



Express, 
Packages. 



Monthly 
Receipts. 
Packages. 



Monthly 

Range of 

Prices. 



January. . . 
February . 
March..:.. 

April 

»7 

Jane 

July 

August .... 
September 
October... 
November. 
December. 

Total.. 



30,046 
45,740 
171,834 
300,169 
199,839 
186,094 
94,199 
53,668 
66,073 
61,467 
86.681 
37.304 



8 

8,104 

4,895 

8,695 

8,806 

3,034 

1,356 

737 

1.013 

631 

890 



36,167 
49,860 
66,389 
88,061 
84.643 
80.778 
83,906 
38,100 
38,883 
19,807 
16,608 
16,708 



46,318 

95,108 

380,817 

348,106 

388,066 

170,180 

139,138 

81,096 

79,191 

83,376 

68,760 

44,803 




1,100,906 



30,934 



871,897 



1,493,739 



REOKIPTS AND RANOE OF PRIOSS FOR SBRIBS OF YEARS. 



Total, 1915 

*» WU 

" igy 

" 1913 

•* 1911 
IDIO 

" 1909 

" 1908 

*• 1907 

'* iwa 

** 10«S 

•* 1904 

•* 1908 

« 1903 

" tS01 



i,too«9oe 


M,934 


Ba6,0eo 


16,833 


1*012,009 


16,887 


i,(KW,Oll 


31.TS9 


MH4,I53 


3a.4a6 


utmjn 


31.961 


1,204,B50 


n,m 


i,m,im 


38,869 


990,^ 


aa,4«i 


Tm^^m 


SS,7T1 


770,488 


m,(m 


963,914 


4&,mi 


mi,9m 


*0,a50 


ilSjoS 


S5,&73 


S17.S71 


3^,669 





871 ,9W 
ilOpilO 
870,183 
814,781 
280,017 
178,306 
167,106 
371,189 
309,640 
303,066 
171,674 
311, 3&S 
226, P^ 
ni.illl 
16«,0yfl 



1,49^,T3{» 
1,474.213 
1,393,066 
1,1^,634 

ip7a6,»i5 

1,876,69^ 
1,896,987 

I , woU flSbO 

l,»ii*f,9T7 

1,033, m 

9eo,3AT 

1,116,124 

909,648 

635,9^ 

I, 022, £49 



l^H^^H 


12 


85 


u^^, 


m 


UH 


m 


14H' 


66 


16 


i& 


nn 


29 


13 


36K 


12 


3ft 


10>i 


81 


I23i 


29itf 


U 


38)i 


UM 


B2 





W 



BUTTER. 

MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OF BUTTER FOR 1951. 



1916 


Creamery, 
Extra. 


Creamery, 
Firsts. 


Creamery, 
Seconds, 


Ladle, 
Packed. 


Country 
Store 

Packing 
8toclc7 


January 


r T 

35K 37 

h r 

38 84 
84 84H 


36 ®39 

37 39 
36 37 
35 39 

38 35 

P P 

33 38 

38 38H 
38H 36^ 
3?^ 80 

39 80 


34 ®37 
33 34K 
33 34 
38 37 
31 38 
33 33 
31 33 
31 31>i 

38 36 

35 36 


38 ®38 

33 35 
19H 31H 

30 30 

30 31 

31 31 
31 31H 
31 31 
31 33 
33 33 


19 O 19H 
17 30 


February 


March..:.. 


16 17 


June----*i- »•••••- 


1614 17 


July ............ 


m r 


August ,..-... 


Sei^ember. 


inj 18W 


OckSer ..;.......!.! 


18 18 


NoTember ••••.. 


18 18 


TWw^ATntwip 


18 18 







Digiti 



ized by Google 



234 TBADB AHD COmtaBCB OF 



FRUITS AND PRODUCE. 



By UAMhMt G. BiOBifOirD, Pr«sldeni Shaw Sl Blchmond Produce Go. 



In the froit and produoe trade the year 1915 will be remembered as 
one of the most unsatisfactory in the history of St. Louis; as, on aooount 
of the unseasonable weather which prevailed the gfreater part of the time, 
the market was so glutted with offerings that prices were demoralised. 

Potatoes were so plentiful that there was no outlet, and prices of all 
varieties in October were unusually low. As nearly every state in the 
Union had a tremendous crop of this leading staple there was practically 
no shipping outlet. To make bad matters worse for the trade, the 
potato crop in nearly every state was more or less damaged as to appear- 
ance and keeping qualities. This made it necessary to market the 
greater part of the crop soon after it was harvested. The potatoes were 
not fit for storage purposes and the losses to those who attempted to 
hold their surplus over Winter were serious. 

Instead of the usual imports of potatoes from Germany and the 
British Isles, on account of the war, there was nothing to be had from 
these countries, while the lack of ocean vessel room prevented the exporta- 
tion of potatoes to other countries where food shortages existed. On 
account of the poor quality of the crop, which caused a large part of the 
holdings to decay in storage, the carry over potatoes was smaller than 
was expected. 

Onions were damaged in a like manner, and the quality of the crop 
has not been so poor, or fancy onions so scarce, in nearly a quarter of a 
century, as was the case in the latter part of the year 1915. 

As the bulk of the crop was <^ poor quality, and the damage was 
practically universal the poorer grades were over plentiful, and difficult 
to dispose of at any price. 

In the cabbage market the situation was somewhat different, as the 
crop was not damaged to any serious extent, and offerings were plentiful 
and cheap. This permitted a fair shipping trade, and helped to prevent 
disaster to the local produce trade. 

At the close of the season conditicma were further improved by the 
fact that the new ci^p was never before so slow in getting onto the 
market. This permitted dealers to clean up their stocks of old cabbage 
more completely than usual, and at satisfactory prices. 

Tomatoes were scarce in the early part of .the season, and shiimients 
from southern points brought good prices, but later when the home grown 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THJD CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 235 

crop was ripe, the yield was so larg:e that prices were greatly depressed. 
The crop at other points was larg:e, however, and shipments from this 
market were smaller than usual. 

Owing to the excessive moisture, green vegetables of all kinds were 
plentiful and cheap. 

With a record-breaking crop in nearly every part of the coimtry and 
a yield in Calhoun Coimty, Illinois, and other apple growing districts in 
this territory, which far exceeded all other years, apple dealers in this 
market were unable to find enough outlet for their apples, and a large 
part of the crop went into cold storage. 

On account of the peculiar weather conditions, the keeping qualities 
of most of the different varieties were damaged, and the fruit showed a 
large percentage of decay when taken out of cold storage, causing a 
heavy loss to speculators, and making the year 1915 the most disastrous 
that the apple trade has experienced in many years. 

Because of the wet season, the shipments of berries from St. Louis 
were light and the loss was heavy. 

Plums were so plentiful that prices were unsatisfactory. 

Home grown peaches were so plentiful that they were a drug on the 
market and the shipping outlet was poor. 

Melons were plentiful and cheap, as both home grown and Southern 
crops were large. 

Florida oranges were so plentiful and cheap that for a time Calif omia 
fruit was practically crowded out of the market. 

Receipt of Apples at St. Louis for the year were 477,525 barrels and 
223,240 boxes, as compared with 335,900 barrels and 231,650 boxes in 
1914, and the shipments were 367,875 barrels and 152,845 boxes, against 
shipments of 208,730 barrels and 225,220 boxes for the preceding year. 

Stocks of apples in cold storage in St. Louis January 1, 1916 were 
175,380 barrels and 55,087 boxes as compared with 145,470 barrels and 
78,688 boxes January 1, 1915. 

Receipts of potatoes at St. Louis by river and rail were 3,622,765 
bushels, as compared with 4,100,080 bushels in 1914, and the shipments 
were 4,034,290 bushels against 4,138,110 bushels in 1914. Receipts by 
wagon were estimated at 75 per cent of the rail receipts. 

The rail and river receipts of onions were 1,577,100 bushels, against 
1,055,924 bushels in 1914, and the shipments were 1,201,280 bushels 
against 1,153,120 bushels for the preceding year. Wagon receipts are 
estimated at about one-half as large as the river and rail receipts. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



236 



THADK AXfD COMMKRCK OF 



POTATOES AND ONIONS. 

RBCKIPTB AND BHIPMBNTB FOB TWBNTT-ONB TBAB8. 



1915. 

mi. 
mil. 

1000. 



1901. 
l»00. 

1807. 
I9M. 
lifiis. 



FOTATOIS. 



KiCKIfTt, 



Bbti, 



1,047.105 

€3^,2 J ft 
717, IKS 

780,10^ 

i,CR»7.ac« 

5A7,124 

miii.9ai$ 

331,306 
fi€7,43f» 



In 
Bulk 



481, tm 

2, !#*.'•. S<«J 
I.S7fl,i)00 
1,71»,&00 
l.lStt.QOO 
l,m,DOO 

1,1I7,S«0 
1,170»QOO 
l,i€4,fiOO 

I, 761,800 

l,fti7pCKXJ 
1*196,100 
I.ISSJOO 



Id 

BDAh. 

IJ(Klp089 

*.*<ia,iiw 

4,474,4^ 

a.Taijie 

3^e41,6«T3 

a«f4l.90» 

S,468,S€0 

£«56e,05a 

i,4Wj71 



BHirRfWlTS. 



BbU. 



1,368,180 

i*4i3,rjo 

l,4ig.»^ 

»WJ40 

6ie,i9s 

5I4p8Kl 

n^,8oo 

ie3,«3l3 

m7,ssa 

ft4«.&7» 
8»T ,89ft 

ii«,aoi 

M7.#n 

4Sa,14] 

498,ilfi 
435,701 

484, }as 

400,747 



Baali. 

In 



5101, 



©OT,J 

i.mpi 

871,1 
»I7, 

9S8,ff7Sjf, 

iW,T7aa, 
«ee.40oa, 






4ii: 

707,1 

888 '' 



1.4151 



Mat; 



060,4103, 



'.47S^, 
i,l»30l 



BasjMP, 






,406,1» 

jisaio 

>IS3,1»0 

l,S43,SQa 
^,•84,071 

,wa,745 

t,Ol7,fi77 
,777;6M 

^991,M« 

,030,!«i 



2iQS;0¥7,ft77 
,«Wl,777;6tf 



99,101 3 «t4ft.00d 
I 4*§,. 
638, 



U«14,0?7 

i,oai,40t 



(14.600 

809.934 

44a,ni 

179,41fl 
Bift,8CK> 



0]aO!r& 



S«qJes 
Bbls 



iW,B7& 



101 .s^ 

7l,eia 



in 



747,9a(^ 
750.000 
510,500 

]QS,O0O 



354,«KI 
ii4,000 

IKI.OOO 
3»,SO0 
19S,600 

IHpOOO 
150,010 

ioo,soo 

166,0W 



fibH 




1S4.« 
I14,TI1 

160,401 
I43,ft?t 
04.547 
03,441 

70.110 

04 ,m 



No account 1b taken of Potatoes hauled In wagons, which would probably 
well the receipts one-half. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



B 

1 
I 

H 

§ 

M 

g 

M 

I 

I 



I 

1 



hi 



TBI CITT or BT. LOXnS. 



237 



I a 1 8 2 1 s s i s i I 



I 



i§§§§§i§§ii§ 

i 1 1 1 1 i i I g; s s i 



i 



i 



s 






S 5 i I i I i I S i i S 



i 



e^ «H rH «H iH 






§ 






liiiiiiiiiii 

I S 8 g g 8 8 S s i I § 



i i I § 1 1 i s 

^ »0 "^ « rH of 1^ 



§ § i 

S S 8" 



n s 



I I B i I i 

of «» ■* lo" eo 



i i § i i 
a 3 § 8 s 



i 



& 

OD 

a 

OP 

S3 





§ 






2 i 



I s ^S I 




I 



I 3 g ^ ! 
^ ^ (2 s S 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THADB Am OOmiBBCB OP 



1 



a 






i 



oq 

OQ 









3 i i i i i i i i i i i 



2 9 



I 



S A 



I 



g 



5] 



9 ST g g g § 8 8 S 8 K 8 



8 8 f£ ft 8 8 8 9 8 8 8 8 



5 



i 5 

8 S 



6 



§§§§g|iSgi§§§ 



00 00 t* 



s s 5: 



^1 



8 af 8 B 5 s a *-* • « § |g 



s a • •-'■ • "* • a • 



I 



8 



i 8 

8 -^ 



III 



§§§§§§§§§§s§ 

8 i P 8 8 s a g 8 s 8 s 



. i 

§ I 

5 I 

n 






§§§ii§§§i§§§§ 
s s s i i i i i i i i § § 



§ § § 
i a I 

a" 



I I § 

^ £ » 



1^ 



• « I I a 






u 



ill 



Digiti 



ized by Google 















THl 


CITT 


OF 


BT. 


Loms. 






239 






& 




•SSP22»is 


\ ^ 


\ g g 






. 


S 


a 














1 


t3 


s 


iiiiss^iiiii 


ill 






•^ 

f} 


h) 


sssasssassas 


^ ill 




















w 




ill 


s 9 3' 8 » a a s £; s s a 


■ i 1 g B g 

■ Mi •" 






i 








^ 


SSg§ilS§iS§i 


' i S § § g 


1 


> 

•-< 


sS 


2S99S??S@SS!g 


■ i i i " - 


5 


1 


IS§i§i§§illi 


' ; 1 § i i 


«< 
^ 


I-J 


iiSiglSSSIil 


1 : 1 S S •» 


Oh 


•^ 


liSSSiSSSiSI 


; 1 i § 1 


g' 




IS 


8 B S" 5 S » 8 8 2 S 1 S 


1 ; s § • • 


H 


'i & 


§§§iiigli§§i 


; i 1 § 






OQ 


1 s 


i S S S 1 S" g S g 1 8 g 


' ': § § 






0? 






. «o eo 






04 


« ^ 


§l§ll§§§§l§l 


Mill 






S £ 


i i s i i s i i i i g i 


i 1 3 i 3 




p4 


»0'^'<r'^.0'»«0»0««0'^«C 


: 3 3 




s 




■s 


igii§§ii§§ii 


; 1 § 






ft 

< 


n 


oToTi^iooocf'^aDioeocoffi 


: 8 8 






s 


iiiiisaiiisi 


ills 




3 




aassisssaasss 


: S S 




>H 
































0) 


4 


























i 






1 




» 


'^ 


'1 


p 


Ha 






i 




\ 




1 


k 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



240 



TRADB AND COMMSBCS Of 



I 

s 



o 
a 

n 



H 
H 



^ 
I 



!§§§§§§§§§§§ 

s i i s s a s i s f i i 



§i§§§§§§§§§§ 
s 8 § s s 8 I I I s £ e 



§ § 
i " 



i § 






i§§§8l§§SI3§ 
s s i 9 8 s s s s;* s; s « 



8 S a 1^ ^ ll 8 



a s 



s 



i 



h 

00 



ll 

n 



a s 8 sf 2 5 " a s s a s 



§ § 

3 " 



^§§§§§§§§§§§1 
§ I § § S g § S § g § § § 



§ I § 



i 



OQ 



I 



s§§§§assis§§ 

« 8 S 8 8 S 8 8 S;" a' 8 8 



ii§§s§i§§8§i 
i s I s i i i s i i i i 



s 



S 2 



^ 



I 



I 



a § 3 g 



•n In 



I 

^ 00 O 



ill 



I 

1 
i 

I 






Digit! 



zed by Google 



THE CITY OF ST. LOXHS. 



241 



§ 

I 



m 

I 

o 

H 

OQ 
H 






ii§iii§iiiii 
s s i s I g i i i I i 5 



s 



s 



13 



s s s s s s s 

g ^ JJ 2 g § g 

s 8 a I § I I 



§ § § I 



04 C0 «D O 



8 



if A 



§l§i§§§S§gii 



l§S§li§lii§i 



»H »H »H »H d 



•^ iO •♦ 



§ iS § 

3 



« I 



iiiiiisaiiii 

i 8 8 • s •»- S g 9 8 a 8" 



S S 9 3 



g :s « s 



OQ 



00 M q5 00 
^ »H iH 



I i § I § 

S S S S8 5; 



ill 



<B w 9 






I 



QQ 






s 
^ 



^ 



2 
I 



I 



9 

a 



It 

^ CO 



I 



3 






Digiti 



ized by Google 



942 



TBADB AND OOMMSBCB OV 



II 



S S 2 S S S S I 2 i i g 



i 8 

t5 P 



IN 

I 

9 



g 






S 8 i 8 S § 8 8 9' S S i 



i i 

8 8 



9 9 



n 8 8 8 g. I § § I 8 I 8 



g § 8 
2 S • 



^ 



c8 

n 



§S§88§8.8I8§8 

I i 8 s' § § § a i i i i 

X a S a 8 S :S S S Sf S S 



§ § 8 

§ I « 



8g§8i8i8ill8 
a s s s; jf * a '•'' a a* a* s 



s 1 



I 



§88i§8§88§ag 
j3 a a' s s • " - ^ a a jf 



IS 



§8II888S§88I 
a a s s &* S3 



t* « o» 



i § 
§8 



I 



s 






"2 b § 



4 I 






OQ 









►» 
« 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT or ST. LOUI8. 



243 



h 



§§§§§§§§§i§§ 

I s if §; g I i i 1 1 1 i 



§ § 

S 5 



5 



OQ 
H 



QQ 



s 



04 



S' 






ill 



i § I g I i 



s 5 a s 



00 b- r» 



I I § I ^. i 

e£ oT lo o «e 



S S g 



iii§i§i§i§§i 
f I 5 i s s § i s i I g 



III 
i i • 



§S§ii§§§i§§§ 

5 88 I I I S g g 8 3 5« 8 



i s 



c S5 B 8 58 a a a a a s* a 



g g 



§gg§|g§li§§§ 



S § § 



a s; 



Ml 

? sn 



§iig§i§§iiii 

Sf S; 8 S 9 si 8 S" ^ 8' {: § 






.rl 



ii§i§§ii§§i 
i i I i i I i i i i i 

1H i-T « »H iH 



ill 

i s s 



"§ 



I 



1^ 
i i 






1 i 

a t 

I a 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



244 



TRADS AND COMMEBCS OV 



I 

a 






^ 



hi 



OQ 

H 

» 

CQ 

m 



n 






l§ 



§§§s§§§i§§ 

8 3 t; & 8 8 « 9 9 9 



I 

4 



S S § S I § § § § 



§ 



S" X' S S 8 X 8 3 8 8" 



Si|gi§Slg§§ 



•♦ ^ ^ Q 



S 8 8 



I 8" I g e S8 5 S 9 9 I 8 



a a a s a s 8 8 s s a a 



S8SgS9S3S 



gg§§§§3§SSi^ 



Qb 00 o ^ 






i S S 8 s s S I s s s s 



3 3 

I I 



i i 



§ tl S 

2 i - 



§ 3 

8" 



i 



g i § 



§ § 



§ i § 



i 



^ 



^^ 



s ^• 



3 I 






Digiti 



ized by Google 



THII CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



245 



I 

s 



Q 



O 



1 



I 



03 

o 



08 



S2| 



P 
Jz; 

I 

QQ 
H 

Jz; 

H 

g 

W 

QQ 

n 

Eh 
5z; 
O 

a 



§ I I i § 



I i 1 1 



illHIi^giSis 



aor«Oftt*<0iO'^«eo» 



g i" i 1 i i i 

5 s ss a a i a" 



III 



§111 

U S S 8 



III 



1% % 



III 



I g g 



I § I § I § § 

i i i s s s I 



i I i i I § 

S3 a s S 9 a 



a s 21 a s 



TO ^ r-t 



8 8 



I 



P4 



s ;s IS s 



•- s 



s a s I p « ss 8 6 a" s 



ill 






I 



iisiiiiiii 



§ s g i I i i 



III 

i i e 



08 



08 

I 



■a _; 

g ^ I 5 4 



: : "S S I 

S i^ I 1 1 

•^ QQ O 



a '3 ^ > 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



246 



TBADB AND COMMBBCS OF 



Hi 



I 
I 

a 






I 



II 



s 9^ s s 8 s s e 1 1 i i 



i§gi§§gii§§§ 
s s s s 8 § I i g s I i 



8gi8ii§§§iig 

I I 8 8 t S I S 8 i 8 I 



§ § 

11 



« 8 



8 8' 






5 



OQ 



S 

n 

GQ 



o 






5 



I 



^ 



g8l8§§§§l§§8 
8 s • • - jf g «" § af 



8 8 



siiissiisiii 

8" a R • • » a a 8" »' x 



§ § 
5 5 



§il§8|88l§ig 
§* § § S <^^ s ^* s* ^ ^ ^ * 



8 I § 
S S ^ 



t^ 



M I 4 8 ii I ^ « ^ 



6 « 






1 : 

I ' 
& s 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THS CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 



247 




Digiti 



ized by Google 



248 



TRADS AND COMMBRCB OF 









OooeoMO co^ 



■s 






if 



CO 



Issii^sii 



QOCOM 






3 



§ 

(^ 



I 



n 

P-i 



n 



COOfDQQO 



^11 

•S8 



' I 



SSe«SSh 









f-i M f-iec 










'It 




Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 



249 



u 



sssss 



93 



w 

o 

s 

CO 

s 
s 



a 
o 



^ 



§ 

^ 






Q 

n 

o 

S 






^ i 



sssssssssssss 

» iH f^ « 00 CO »o r>i « o> N h- CO 

iHOaOiOOt^f^^t^f^QO 0000 

i^^r«t^h.t^^eo«H,H 09 

»ooo»^eoNio»^r*o»N ih 



IS 

oot* 

^00 

ooo 



OOP 

§§2 



^o»eoeow*N^^ 



35 



iOiOiOQ>0000>OiOOO 

o<ot^>oiH^(Oi«iH$ eo 



OOigOO 
'•J'OOO-^t^ 



10 

s 



iQiOOiQiO 

oo»eo©^©'^'«!<coN'^Nei 
f^^N«eo^oooot*»o N 



o 

0» 



oooooo 
N^oeooo-^ij^ 

iOC«C4^»00 

©©•ot^o-* 
iHoooc4r« 



OOQOO 
«Dk09«HiO 



coeo-^r^oooeoo* 

»a)«D eooof^ 

1-1 eo«Hco 



:0 

IS 



5 OSAJ 
»4 f> n 3 



O 



S^t^O»0O'^N00f^ 
r^o»c4^oot^ioa) 
w «o © o> o » N aot^co 

cof^eo'^ot^ eoeo 

C40t^«D0 iH 

woo ^ 



8S 

-*o 






8-j 



eoio»eai0^eoa)oooc4t*K 
eo 10 0» 10 0000)00 ooc40»a 
r*«oo>o^eo co w-^-^t 



00-^ 
900 



OOOO 



00 



H 

► 

Q 

•4 
O 
M 



















i«| 







Digiti 



ized by Google 



250 



TBADB AND COMMBBCS OF 



'4 

as 

■ 

s 



I 















ssssgss 






-4 00060 



eQ«oe4>4r*eor*a»i09^0QOMc9iHQ«40<o»ioioe« 



•S "828'- -S 



•n 






M»ooco^ie f^ «o 



^ r>i © • 00 w lO « «> » r* ^•.»* w 2 b •*«-<« 35 »i^p^ 
o»«Djogo'-^^oo«» gO»aO«DOW^«^iO-<J 



2§ 



fi^OO^ 



mm 



^ 

^n 



o<o CO «H oooeo 1^0000*4 00 ieu$.H 09 io»ot^Maoa»d»«^ 

S|ss"s2s?ss ;sss;22a8»gs5«- 






5SS82S2S8S2 SS^S8*2^«*22 



8 

■ 



o 

•4 

s 

'4 

m 

M 

A 







M 



II 



s«Wfc« 



M 



IE 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT or ST. I.OtIIS. 



251 



3 



^1 



eooootOC 









sss 



IIS 



00 

2 
3 






ssg 



SoioeooiooioiooK 



09 00 






I 



i 



n 



O 
S 

o 



8 

H 
iT 

M 
► 

a* 

M 

M 

n 



|S||SSS|S| 

&e«o$ooc40oo«^c 






SSS 



tOiHooiH :eie«) 



gs||s§ss§iSi 

«'*»0^O«OC0^O 

fH eo iHio 



IS 








Digiti 



ized by Google 



252 






I 



! 



8 i 



< 9 

cq S 



OQO 

eoc40 



TRADS AND COMMEBCS OF 

7^ 



2§ 






S8 



t^OOOQeO 0401^ CDSppOOeeQQOQOQO OOP 

eopw^p_N-^o«^-©««NNt»«e^e 
t«^A«Deio^^w«Da»QOPt^>o^f^rap»« 

89P*^«HCIO'^C0Q0 '^eooco^cop^io^ 



DM 



CO 



«i«iee^io«i«^ 




^o e^ 



o' 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



253 



10 

H 



g 



09 



§ 



I 

OD 



OD 



1^ 



OOQOOiOOiOQiOOOiOO 
5 CO 00 ®^^ 00 i^o »o i^ « 

04 01 01 to CO C4 »0 

eoioM ^iH eo 



ggo 



?5 

< 



1^ 

on 



StHcoiOeo^ : 
iHco iH : 



OOOOOOOQ 



« ■* 00 »>- 1^ CO CO ^ CD t* ^ » 00 CO ^ © 
«-<«OCOCOCOOOO«0»-ieO'Hr-iO N 



C4O00 
OOC^kO 






eoio5o>t*^^^^0»oo$t<^ooco :i^ 

e9Qfi»f-it<-»^C0OOC00»«0iQ«0 :«o 

c4aor«otQac4C4ioc4<DOQO«oo :^ 

M »-i«"*^cot^^t*0€Oo«^ :r* 






OOOOOQC 
v^COOOt^QOOO 

loeoooe^QOAc 



OQOOOOOO 

^oot<-eot^«»o^ 
f-ioooa»o» iHO 



II 



oo 

C4iO 



OOOOOO O O lit o o c o c »o O O O lO 
(0^e0toC0QQXOOcDC4(0000t^0000QO 
•O O to CO 00 3 CO »« «^»o 00 «.® ^* *^*^*^«^ ^ 
4<oo«-««ooo ^•e9C0fHC4•o «oiq*h e^ 



O 






d 



il 
13. 

if 












1 
J 



S £ 2 S d 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



254 



TRADB AND COMMBBCB OF 



s 



II 



^« r* o» « ei 8 « © ^^o d # -^^oa oD q « S t* 
>9 lo ai<«^mt^ot>>«D'«aO'^o<oe9 



iisi§|siiiiiii§§i§ii 



0OC 



sss 

eeao<« 



s 



II 



SI 









J%^ 



al 






i 



CO 



gs§s 

OeOMM 



sss 



I 



m 



I 



QQ 



II 



10(000 



rSSt<-| 



S$S§SSSSSSSSSSSSSSS3SS 

oot^ »o f-.q* «-< »o «-< «-< c^« "O w 00 eoo» q^eo "O -^ 

^Mioe4QO«DaOf-i^O»Q«Dt^««C9ai«-<aiOCQ 

iH cQcoidNC4M(0«io^«N^aoc4iooa»M 






o 

(A 



PQ 




||||j|3j4 




oS^Qi 



QCDQQaDlHl 



33«s-a5|1l|||l|f 



Pi 

>«, — 



I 



.1 

5^ .ill 

O ij CJ 5 #% 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



THB CITT OF 8T. LOUIS. 



256 



I 



S 
^ 



I 



O 



m 
o 



P 
00 

Q 

as 

s 



leioto 

ooo 



^!SSS!SS^:St!^^fi^*''9®*^°^'^^S'*'^^^ ^^ 



SS33 
-5V 



^c4e9i6*-«e^«-<f-iM 



is 






oo«o 















< 

I 

O 
O 

► 
00 

H 



03 












(00904 :0«04e9 
eo :tQ 



eo«o 



00 a» 
r*09 



CO 00 



«0C4 
00 lO 



01^04 



•^ ^ o» US 00 oo to o 0() ^ P 10 O >0 to «0 ^ to 
lO^toeo «-<p$«ot*e<dSppe4t^iQeo^^ 



QQ 




Digiti 



ized by Google 



256 



TBAOB AND COMMBBCB OF 



1 

§ 
9 



23 



I 



5 

O 






fa 

OQ 




Digiti 



ized by Google 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



257 




Digiti 



ized by Google 



IN MEMORIAM. 



Members ef the Mercluuito' Eickange wkm Died d vlaf If 15. 

Allen, Jas. H., August 29th. 

Barnard, Geo. D., May Slst. 

Bell, Jab. S., April 5th. 

Chamberlain, W. F., January 4th. 

Dean, Murrt, July 11th. 

Delafield, Wallace, August 8th. 

EisENMATER, P. H., Ootober 22nd. 

Fischer, John C, April 10th. 

GivENS, Jos. W., June 27th. 

Gloor, Edwin, March 23rd. 

Graham, Robert, Noyember 4th. 

Hudson, Wm. A., April 20th. 

Langenbero, Henrt F Deoember 18th. 

Lanitk, Geo., June 12th. 

LiLLiB, J. B., July 10th. 

Mtbrson, G. S., Maroh 14th. 

McEnnis, Michael, November 21st. 

Parrott, Jas. D., July 28th. 

PosTBL, George, June 5th. 

Pupp, Fred, November 1st. 

QuESNEL, Chas. J January 20th. 

ScHULTZ, Chas. O., Ootober 28th. 

Swift, W. H., Maroh 17th. 

Trimble, C. H Maroh 20th. 

Wanglbr, Jos. F., January 9th. 

Woodlock, Frank D., June Ist. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



ISA ENIBKRS 

or THl 

Merchants' Exchang:e of St* Louis. 

FEBRUARY 15th, 1916- 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Jbssb H. Holmbs, Albx. H. Smith, 

Frakk Gaibnnib, John B. Gandolfo, 

Robert C. Grbbb, E. S. Walton. 



NUMBER OF MEMBERS, 1,101. 



Name. Firm. BuBinesB. Location. 

Abraham, W. D W. D. Abraham & Co., Haj and Gram, 

236 St. Clair ave.. East St. Louis, 111. 

Adam, Harry A Reed- Adam Co., Feed, etc 841 Pierce Bldg. 

Adams, C. M. 4427 l^organ st. 

Adams, Geo. A Board of Trade, Kansas CitV, Mo. 

Adkins, James United Railways Co., Treasurer 8869 Park ave. 

Aff, .T. George F. W. Clemens Feed Co 8867 Gravois ave. 

Aid, Francis A... W. H. Wright Grain Co., Grain 1586 Pierce Bldg. 

Akin, Thomas Commission. .607 Bank, of Com. Bldg. 

Albers, Clifford H C. H. Albers Com. Co 626 Pierce Bldg. 

Albrecht, H. S Sohoellhom-Albreoht Machine Company 416 N. Main st. 

Albreoht, J. F Grain Broker 409 Cham, of Com. 

Albrecht, Julius J . .Eberle- Albrecht Flour Co 218 S. Main st. 

Albrecht, Victor. . . .Eberle- Albrecht Flour Co 218 S. Main st. 

Alcorn, J. W McLain-Alcom Com. Co 701 N. Third st. 

Alexander, F. J , 

Allen, Geo.L 904 LaSalle Bldg. 

Allen, Henry H Bemis Bros. Bag Co 601 S. Fourth st. 

Allen, J. Oran . Morton & Co., Commission 610 Cham, of Com. 

Allhoff, F. A Allhoff Bros., Feed and Building Mat., 

6660 Easton Ave. 

Allison, James W. . . Reliance Window Glass Mfg. Co 411 Olive st. 

Altenbernd, Wm Dreyer Com. Co., Commission 418 Cham, of Com. 

Altheimer, Benj.. . . Altheimer & Itawlings, Bonds and Stocks. . .207 N. Broadway 

Ames, Henry Deceased 

Anderson, John Farmer Rhineland. Mo. 

Anderson, Lorenzo E Bonds and Stocks 810 N. 8ih st. 

Anderson, W.'B Nanson Com. Co., 202 Chamber of Commerce. 

Anderson, Wm. P W. P. Anderson & Co., Grain 827 S. LaSalle st., Chicago 

Anderson, W. T. . . .Boone County Mlg. Co., Milling and Grain Columbia, Mo. 

Andrews, Edward C Kehlor Flour Mills Co 400 Chamber of Commerce. 

Andrews, Edw. Charles, Jr Kehlor Flour Mills Co. 400 Cham, of Com. 

Andrews. Ralph E Davton Com. Co. . .611 Cham, of Com. 

Annan, Roger P Annan, Burg Grain & Miflinfl: Co., 

Commission 119 Cham, of Com. 

Annan, Roger P., Jr. .Annan, Burg Grain & Milling Co., 

Commission 119 Cham, of Com. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



2 MnCBBBS OP THB 

Name. Firm. BosinaM. Looation. 

Arbuokle, Jameft. . . Arbuokle Export Amd., President S14 N. 4th §t . 

Archer, w. B R. B. Punsten D. F. & N. Co IWl Morgan «t. 

Armerding, Lud wig Berend . . Parker k Graff 914 8. Commercial st. 

Armstrong, H. L L. H. ft St. L. R. R 1816 Boatmens Bank Bldg. 

Arthur, J. T Marshall Hall- Waggoner Grain Co., 

Commission 906 Cham, of Com. 

Atwood, R. P R. P. AtwoodftCo lOM Pierce Bldg. 

Aufderhelde, A. G F. W. Aufderheide Commission Co.. .29 8. Commercial st. 

Aufderheide, Walter.. . .F. W. Aufderheide Commission Co.. .99 8. Commercial st. 

Aydelott, J. C Smith -Hippen Co., Com^ 100 St. Bfary st, Pekin, lU. 

Aylsworth, Geo. A. Aylsworth-Neal-Tomlin Gr. Co., 941 Board of Trade, 

Kansas City, Mo. 



Baboock, Orrille B, Baboook Rushton k Co. Brokers The Rookery, Chicago 

Backer, George H. .St. Louis Rail & Equipment Co 8rd Nat'l Bank Bldg. 

Bacon. Cary H Armour Grain Co 918 Cham, of Com. 

Bagnell, Wm. . . .The Bagnell Timber Co 496 Title Guaranty Trust Bldg. 

Bafiey^.C Elmore-fckhultz Gr. Co 438 Pierce Bldg. 

Bain. Walter Burlington Grain Elevator Co Foot of E. Grand ave. 

Baird, W. J St. Charles, Mo. 

Ballard, J. O . . Ballard, Messmore Grain Co , Commission 417 Cham, of Com. 

Ballard, G. Breaux '. Ballard k Ballard Co.. Millers. 

vl9 E. Broadway, LouisTille, Ky. 

Baltz, Henry J A. C. Harsh ft Co., Grain 506 Cham, of Com. 

Baltz, W. N Millstadt Mlg. Co Flour MUUtadt, HI. 

Barclay, Shepard... Barclay, Orthwein ft Wallace, 

Attorneys 914 K. SUthst. 

Bargery, Edw. D 

Barues, Seth 8 Grain Marston, Mo. 

Bam hart, Wm. R. . . .Barnhart Mer. Co., Fancy Groceries. .900 8. Commercial st. 

Bamidge, Aug.J Chas. E. Prunty, 9 8. Main st. 

Barrel!, Fiuley Finley Barrell ft Co., Stocks and Grain Com., 

908 8. LaSalie st., Chicago 

Barret, Arthur B 800 Wainwright Bldg. 

Barrett, John F B. Lowitz ... .60 Board of Trade Bldg., Chicago. 

Barron. Chas. B Barron ft Wilson, Grain Samplers. . .120 Cham, of Com. 

Bartholomew, W. O Traffic Manager. 990 Pierce Bldg. 

Bartseh, Kurt Julius Langenberg Bros. Grain Co 518 Cham, of Com. 

Batchelor, Prentiss J Accountant 9011 James st. 

Batdorf , W. L W. L. Batdorf ft Co., Flour and Feed Belleville, 111. 

Baur, Andrew Baur Flour Co., Secy 807 N. Second st. 

Baxter, Logan M Langenberg Bro. Grain Co 518 Cham, of Com. 

Beals. M. S Illinois Central R. R., Com'l Agent 707 Olive st. 

Beardsley, C. F Picker ft Beardsley Commission Co 118 N. Main st. 

Beauvais, E. A. Brosseau ft Co., Com 55 Board of Trade, Chicago. 

Beck, J. W H. W. Beck ft Sons F. ft Seed Co Ji701 Manchester ave. 

Beck, Harry G. . H. W. Beck ft Sons Feed ft Seed Co 9001 Pine st. 

Beck, Henry W H. W. Beck ft Sons, Feed and Seed Store . . .20th and Pine. 

Beck, Louis L 

Becker, Bon tie A Payne ft Becker, Brokers 100 Chemical Bldg. 

Becker, Conrad C. Becker, Miller Red Bud, Ifl. 

Becker, Edward C 100 Chemical Bldg. 

Beckmann, Harry F T. W. Carter ft Co., Com 815 Pierce Bldg. 

Beckmann, W. E Bakers' and Confectioners' Supplies.. 10 N.Seoond. 

Begg8,JohnV Central 111. Grain Co. Grain Ashland, HI. 

Bell, James 8 Deceased. 

Belz. J. B J. H. Belz Provision Co., Pork Dealers 8601 8. Broadway 

Bemis, Judson 8 Bemis Bros. Bag Co 601 8. Fourth st. 

Bemis, Stephen A Ben»is Bros. Bag Co., 601 8. Fourth st. 

Bendick, John H Grocer 6089 Scanlan ave. 

Bennett, James E. J^ames E. Bennett ft Co., Com Postal Bldg., Chicago, III. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MBBGHANTS' EXOHAKOA OP ST. liOUIS. 3 

Kame. Firm. Business. Location. 

Benton, C.G Benton Grain Co 206Bd.of Tr., Kansas City, Mo. 

Berger, J. Paul. . . .J. H. Teasdale Com. Co 103 Cham, of Com. 

Bergmann Edward C . . C. Bergmann Feed Co 2718 Chouteau ave. 

Bergmann, Robt. J C. Bergmann Feed Co 2718 Chouteau ave. 

Bergmann, Wm. C. .C. Bergmann Feed Co 2718 Chouteau ave. 

Bemet, A. C Bemet, Craft & Kauffman Milling Co 1036 Pierce Bldg. 

Bemet, A. E. . . . Bemet, Craft & Kauffman Milling Co 1086 Pierce Bldg. 

Bemet, Christian . . . .Bemet, Craft & Kauffman Muling Co 1036 Pierce Bldg. 

Bemet^red Huttig.... Bemet, Craft & Kauffman. Millers ....1036 Pierce Bldg. 

Berry, Harry J Nat'l Elev. Co., Fletcher American Bank Bldg., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Biedenstein, Henry 1208 S.Broadway 

Bieger, Adolph Bremen Bank, Vice-President. 8600 N. Broadway 

Bischoff, Frank H F. H. Bischoff, Feed 202 8. Theresa ave. 

Bisohoff, Gustav Independent Packing Co., Prest 3866 Chouteau ave. 

Bischoff, Gustav Jr Independent Packing Co 3866 Chouteau avs. 

Bittner, Jacob Real Estate 4419 Washington ave. 

Blake, T. F The Blake Mlg. Co., Flour Edwardsville, 111. 

Blanke, Albert G Real Estate 803 Chestnut st. 

Blanke, Detlef J Insurance Agent Granite Bldg. 

Blaufuss, Wm 8700 Utah place 

Bledsoe. Wm.T 8. & 8. Flour Mills Co., Prcs't 7020 8. Broadway. 

Block, David. Jr 6741 Mcpherson Ave. 

Block, Wm. A 610 International Life Bldg. 

Blossom, H. M H. M. Blossom & Co., Insurance 1426 Pierce Bldg. 

Boisselier, R. W Certified Public A ccoun tant 1988 Railway Exchange 

Bollin, A A. Bollin & Co., Insurance 4661 Laclede ave. 

Bolz, Paul T. . Bolz-McBride Cooperage Co 704 Bank of Commerce Bldg. 

Bonsaek,F.G Architect 816 Pierce Bldg. 

Bosohert, Roman 

Boudreau, H. L . . Ballard, Messmore Grain Co 417 Cham, of Com. 

Bourne, C^ Jr Lackawanna R. R., Commercial Agent. . .482 Pierce Bldg. 

Bowman, Lvman R. . .8cott Co. Milling Co Sikeston, Mo. 

Bowman, Theo. G 1414 8t. Andrews PL, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Brady^Hugn J Brady 8ales Agency, Unclaimed Freight 1817 Pine st. 

Bray, Wm Wm. Bray & Co., Commission 226 Market st. 

Brecht, G. A. V The Brecht Co, Twelfth and Cass ave. 

Breed, L.C 

Brendecke, Bdwin T Chouteau Ave. Crystal Ice & Cold Storage Plant, 

2100 Chouteau ave. 

Brewer, E. H Bemis Bro. Bag Co Bags 601 8. Fourth st. 

Brinkmeyer, E. H Brinkmeyer-Meyer Hay and Grain Co 8627 N. 26th st. 

Brockman, Arthur. . . Arthur Brockman Com. Co 727 Pierce Bldg. 

Brockman, H. H Physician and Surgeon Eldon, Mo. 

Brockmeier, Edwin Brockmeier & Co., Grain and Flour 623 N. Second st. 

Brockmeier, F. C Eugelke & Feiner Milling Co 816 8. Broadway. 

Brockmeier, Hy. C Brockmeier & Co., Flour and Grain 628 N. Second st. 

Brockmeier, J. Brockmeier & Co., Commission 628 N. Second st. 

Breeder, Geo. H Hy. Breeder & Sons, Commission 216 Morgan st. 

Bronson, E. P H. C. Cole MillingCo., Chester, HI. 

Brooking, Wm. T Marshall Hall-Waggoner Grain Co 206 Cham, of Com. 

Brown, E. A B. A. Brown & Co., Grain Luveme. Minn. 

Brown, Frank W C, P. A St. L. R. R. General Agent 611 Chestnut st. 

Brown, Russell 8 Grain Brighton, 111. 

Brown, Josiah Flour and Sugar. . .601 Granite Bldg. 

Brown, Paul Paul Brown & Co., Brokers Pierce Bldg. 

Bruenemann, Ernst. Real Estate and Insurance.. . .3768 8. Jefferson av. 

Bryan, Jiio. w Neola Elevator Co 218 Cham, of Com. 

Bryant, Tilghman A John Wahl Com. Co 863 Pierce Bldg. 

Buchman^hos Buchman Feed Co 1109 N. Seventh si. 

Buck, W. T Grain, etc Vleits, Kas. 

Buehler, Henry Atlas Leather Co 8626 Castleman ave. 

Bullitt, CM Henderson El. Co Henderson. Ky. 

Burdeau, Jas. P Geo. D. Capen & Co., Insurance 1406 Pierce Bldg. 

Burg, Henry. Annan, Burg Grain s Milling Co., 

Commission 119 Cham, of Com. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



4 SnCMBXBS OP THS 

Name. Firm. Buiineta. Location. 

Burke, W.H Grand Trunk Ry., Commercial Agent.. 806 Laclede Bldg. 

Burkholder, George B Whitaker & Co aoo N. Fourth sL 

Burllngame. L L..... Terminal R. R. Amu., Gen'l Mgr 108 Union Station. 

Bumis«.D.N insecurity Bldg. 

Busoh, Aug. A..Anheuier-Butch B. Amu., President ..Ninth and Peatalozzi sts. 

BuBhfleld, J.A 

Bushnell.D. I D. L Bufhnell & Co., Grain and Seeds 106 N. Second st. 

Byoroft, Henry F H. F. Byorof t k Son, Millers Gillespie, HI. 

Byrne, Frank T Perre Marquette R. R 786 Pierce Bldg. 



Caesar, Louis 414 Pine si. 

Cahill, James G Bond and Stock Broker, Third Nat'l Bank Bids. 

Campbell, James R. . . Campbell Milling Co McLeansboro, 111. 

Cameron, Bruce United Rys. Co., Supt. Transp 8869 Park ave. 

Canby, Caleb H C. H. Canby A Co., Gr. Brokers.812 S. LaSalle st.Chicago 

Canole, R. L J. H. Teasdale Com. Co., Commission 108 N. Third sU 

Canty, D.J Wooley Electric Co Ill Cham, of Com. 

Capen, Geo. H Geo. D. Capen & Co., Insurance 1406 Pierce Bldg. 

Capen, Sam. D Geo. D. Capen k Co., Insurance 1406 Pierce Bldg. 

Carkener, George S Goffe k Carkeuer, Grain. . .101 Bd. Tr., Kansas City, Mo. 

Carr, AlfredC Carr Bros., Insurance 204 N. Third st. 

Carr, Charles Y Carr Bros., Fire Insurance 204 N. Third st. 

Carr, Peyton T Kehlor Flour Mills Co., President 401 Cham, of Com. 

Carruthers, W. W Eureka Mills Co 711 S. Theresa ave. 

Carry, Edward F American Car k Foundry Co 916 Olive st. 

Carter, C. L T. W. Carter A Co., Broker 814 Pierce Bldg. 

Carter, G.E Randolph Milling Co Baldwin. 111. 

Carter, L. Ray T. W. Carter k Co., Broker 814 Pierce Bldg. 

Carter, Thos. A 211 Victoria Bldg. 

Carter, T W T. W. Carter k Co., Com'u 814 Pierce Bldg* 

Carter, Thos. W., Jr. . . .T. W. Carter k Co., Broker 814 Pierce Bldsc* 

Case, Chas 2nd k Lynch ave., East St. Louis, III* 

Case, B.S 208Cham.of Com* 

Cash, Leslie A St. Louis Elevator Co 1668 Pierce Bldg. 

Catlin, E. F 408 Cham, of Com. 

Chamberlain, F. B F. B. Chamberlain Co 118 Vine st* 

Chamberlain, Will T. . .F. B. Chamberlain Co., Feed and Cereals 118 Vine st. 

Chambers, Jas. H Dies Chemical Co., Chemists 2940 Locust st. 

Chandler, Reuben G. .Hulburd, Warren k Chandler 180 S. LaSalle st., Chicago 

Chandler, Whately L. . .The General Accident Ass'n 411 Olive st. 

Charters, Herbert A 

Child. Chas. J A. J. Child k Son MercantUe Co 616 X. Main st 

Christian, Wilbur B . . . . E. W. Wagner k Co. Broker 216 Cham, of Com. 

Christopher, Benj. C. . .B. C. Christopher k Co., Grain, 818 Board of Trade, 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Clark, Angus A St. Louis Grain Clearing Co 814 Cham, of Com. 

Clark, Chas.C The VaUey Milling Co 422 DeSoto ave. 

Clark, J. A Clark Bros. Warning k Co., Feed, 

St. Clair and Belt, East St. Louis, 111. 

Claus, F. C Westcott-Claus Commission Co 827 N. Third st. 

Cleary, T. F Cleary Investment Co 608 Cham, of Com. 

Clemens, F. W F. W. Cflemens Feed Co., Feed 8867 Gravois ave. 

Cleveland, Henry D Deceased. 

Clifton, Daniel W Nanson Com. Co 202 Cham of Com. 

Cline, Frederick A Attorney 907 Security Bldg. 

Clinton, George W Geo. D. Capen k Co., , Pierce Bldfl[. 

Cockrell, Elias Grain JerseyviUe, lU. 

Coerver, Killian. . . .Sohoening-Koenigsmark Mlg. Co Prairie du Rocher, IlL 

Cohn, J. W National Feed Co., Bianager 420 Cham, of Com. 

Cohn, Sam Empire Hay & Grain, 812 8. Third st. 

Cole, Amedee B. . . . Jno. Jackson Inv't. Co., President 2028 Railway Ex. Bldg» 

Cole, Charles B H. C. Cole Milling Co., Miller Chester, Ifi. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MBB0HAMT8' KXOUANQB OP ST. liOUIS. 5 

Name. Firm. BusineM. Looation. 

Cole, Geo. W Geo. W. Cole k Co., Grain Bushnell, 111. 

Cole,H.C. H. C. Cole Milling Co., Chescer, 111. 

Coleman, H. C Deceased 

Collins, H. B Whitaker&Co., Brokers SOON. Fourth st. 

Connor, James A Friwer-Connor Grain Co 606 Cham, of Com. 

Connor, M. J M. J. Connor & Son, Commission 948 Pieroe Bldg. 

Connor, P. P 808 Cham, of Com. 

Connor, Wm. P Fuller- Wooldridge Com. Co 808 Cham, of Com. 

Connor, Wm. M M. J. Connor & Son, Commission 948 Pierce Bldg. 

Conover, E. B Grain. .604 Ferguson Bldg., Springfield, Ills. 

Oonrades, Edwin H .... St. Louis, Troy & Eastern R. R 814 N. Fourth st. 

Conzelman, Theophilus. . .Crunden-Martin Woodenware Co. .2nd and Gratiot sts. 

Cook, Douglas G American Wine Co., 8016 Cass aye. 

-Cook8ey,L.A Pendleton Grain Co 1668 Pieroe Bldg. 

Cooper, O. A O. A. Cooper & Son, Milling Humboldt, Neb. 

Corbett, C. H. . . St. Louis Bag k Burlap Co., Bag Mf rs 00 Dock st. 

Cordes, J. H D. Cordes & Co., Flour and Feed 1926 S. Twelfth st. 

Cordes. W. H D. Cordes & Co., Flour and Feed 1926 S. Twelfth st. 

Cornelius. John W. .Cornelius Mill Furnishing Co 1119 N. Sixth st. 

Cornell, Adolph Schisler-Comell Seed Co 818 N. Fourth st. 

Cornell, Ben . P Schisler-Comell Seed Co 818 N. Fourth st. 

Cornell, Clifford Schisler-Comell Seed Co 818 N. Fourth st. 

Cottrill, Geo. F. . . .Green's Car Wheel Mfg. Co 8018 N. Broadway. 

Coulter, Joseph Feed Kirkwood, Mo. 

Cowan. Robt. Edwin. .. Ralston Purina Co., Feed Eighth and Gratiot sts. 

Cowgill, Frank S. .Trans-Mississippi Grain Co Grain Exchange, Omaha, Neb. 

Cox, Charles A Cox & Gordon Packing Co 1019 S. Third st. 

Coyle,B.H Wabash R. R., G en '1 Agent 824 Pierce Bldg. 

Craft, Henry G . . . . Beraet, Craft & Kauffman Milling Co 1036 Pieroe Bldg. 

Creveling, James G Clayton, Mo. 

Crittenden, Chas. G. .Central Granaries Co 128 N. Elerenth st., Lincoln. Neb. 

CrotherSjJohn C The McPheeters Warehouse Co 1104 N. Levee. 

Crouch, Thos. W., Jr Grain 816 Pierce Bldg. 

Crowell, Frank G. . , .Hall-Baker Grain Co. .608 Exchange Bldg., Kan. City, Mo. 

Cummins, D. D American Linseed Co. Manager 1600 Clark av e. 

Cummiskey, Jas Commission 921 N. Fourth st. 

Curran, Con. P Con. P. Curran Prtg. Co Eighth and Walnut sts. 

Curdie, J. F Michigan Central R. R., Con't Agent 626 Pierce Bldg. 

Currie, Frank Farmers' Elevator Co ClarksvlUe, Mo. 



Daly, E. F W.H.Wright Grain Co 1686 Pierce Bldg. 

Danf orth, W. H Ralston Purina Co., Eighth and Gratiot sts. 

Daub, H. W Schreiner Grain Co., Commission 116 Cham, of Com. 

Davis, Geo. H Emst-Davis Grain Co 846 Bd. of Trade, Kansas City, Mo. 

Davis, S. V Vice-Pres. Independent Stock Yards Co., Foot of Bremen ave. 

Day, B. G nilnoss Central R. R., Con. Frt. Agent 707 Olive st. 

Dayton, C. S Dayton Com. Co 611 Cham, of Com. 

Dean, Chas. L 1827 Longfellow boulv. 

Dean, H. K Dean Mill Co., Flour Milling Co Ava, 111. 

DeArmoud, R. R Russell Grain Co., Grain and Hay 317 Pierce Bldg. 

Deffaa, Edw. H Southern Feed Co 909 S. Seventh st. 

Deibel, Chas. B Dixie Mills Co 10th st. and Walnut ave.. 

East St. Louis, 111. 

Deibel, Fred — Anchor Hay and Grain Co 22nd and Morgan sts. 

Deibel, Geo. M Anchor H. & G. Co., Grain k Hay 22nd and Morgan sis. 

Deibel, Louis P Anchor Hay and Grain Co 22nd and Morgan sts. 

Deibel, Robt. Fred Dixie Mills Co Tenth st. and Walnut ave.. 

East St. Louis. 111. 

Delaney, John O'F Capitalist 16 N. Eighth st. 

DePew, Ray L Mobile & Ohio R. R.. Cent. Agt Fullerton Bldg, 

Desloge, F Desloge Consolidated Lead Co 422 Rial to Bldg. 

Devoy, Edward Edward Devoy, Coal & Coke 604 Equitable Bldg 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MnCBBBS OP THB 

Name. Firm. BuslneM. Looation. 

Diamant, Henry A ... St. LouU Commiition Co 906 N. Main at. 

Diolc, Joseph B J. B. Dick & Co Wi Cham, of Com. 

Dioklnion, w. C F. W. Goeke & Co., Commiation 02 Gay Bldg. 

Dicklnion, Chas A. Dickinson & Co., Seeds seo W. Taylor st, Cfnioago. 

Diokmann, Joseph F Jos. F. Dickmann R. E. Co 088 Chestnut st. 

Diffenbaagh, H.J Grain Commission, 

604 Board of Trade, Kansas City Mo. 

Dimmitt, Pope Dimmitt-Caudle-Smith Com. Co Nata Stock Yards 111. 

Dixon, J. £ Schreiner Grain Co., Grain Com'n 115 Cham, of Com. 

Donaldson. Wm. R Attorney. .818 New Bank of Com. Bldg. 

Donnewald, G. H . . .Donnewald loe & Coal Co 002 Times Bldg. 

Donzelot, E. F E. Donzelot& Son, Commission 16 S. First st. 

Dore, R. L Tol., St. L. & W. R. R., A. G. F. A 028 Pierce Bldg. 

Dormitzer, Jos Real Estate 104 N. Ninth st. 

Dower, John Department of Weights, Supervisor 104 Cham, of Com. 

Drescher, Edw Alfooom Milling Co., Feed East St. Louis, IlL 

Drew, Geo. I F. D. Hirschberg & Co., Insurance 128 Cham, of Com. 

Dreyer, Eugene C Dreyer Com* Co. Feed 418 Cham, of Com. 

Dull, Edwin A Duff Grain Co Nebraska City, Neb. 

Duing, Herman Duing & Shomaker, Hay and Grain 814 Clark are. 

Duncan, M. K 1801 N. Broadway. 

Dunlop, Jo. P Dunlop Milling Co Clarksyille, Tenn. 



Eaton, A. F Eaton, McClellan Commission Co 214 Chami of Com. 

Eaton, Chas. D Insurance 1449 Pierce Bldg. 

Edwards, Geo. L A. G. Edwards & Son 410 Olive si. 

Edwards, W. J Bert. H. Lang & Co., 504 Cham, of Com. 

Ehlermann, Chas 170 W. 78rd St., New York City. 

Einstein, Wm Mining Operator. . .504 Security Bldg. 

Eisenmayer, A. J Eisenmayer Milling Co Springfield, Mo. 

Eisenmayer, C. W Eisenmayer Gr. Co Trenton, 111. 

Elam, W. A Valier and Spies Mlg. Co., Millers 913 Pierce Bldg. 

Ellis, Wm. C Kehlor Flour Mills Co., 401 Cham, of Com. 

Elmore, Trave Elmore-Schultz Gr. Co 438 Pierce Bldg. 

Elmore V. C V. C. &T. Elmore, Grain Ashland, 111. 

Ely, Arch F Schreiner Grain Co 115 Cham, of Com. 

Engel. Louis A F. D. Hirschberg & Co., Insurance 123 Cham, of Com. 

Engelke, Fred New Baden Milling Co New Baden, 111. 

Eppelsheimer, Frank Fischer Flour Co 214 8. 1st st. 

Essmueller, Fred Essmueller M. F. Co., Millwrights 1222 S. Eighth st. 

Espenschied, Chas 8500 Washing^n ave. 

Evans, Edgar H Acme- Evans Co^ Flour Millers, 

852 w. Washington ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Ewart, James S Ewart Grain Co., Grain . First Nat. Bank, Lincoln, Neb. 

Ewing, W. K Kirkwood, Mo. 



Farley, J. H Commission 855 Pierce Bldg. 

Farrell, F. P Frisco R. R., Con't Freight Agent 900 Olive st. 

Faust, Edward A St. Louis Refrigerator Car Co. .Gen. Mgr., 

004 Bank of Commerce Bldg. 

Fehr, Henry J Seele Bro. Grain Co., Grain Com'n 817 Cham, ot Com. 

Felner, Eugene J Engelke & Feiner Milling Co 816 8. Broadway. 

Felkel, J. B Hlllsboro, 111. 

Ferguson, Hugh Hugh Ferguson & Co., Provision Brokers. .117 Cham, of Com. 

Ferguson, Wm. H Grain, 

1069 Corby-Forsee Bldg., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Feuerbacher, F. W F. W. Feuerbacher & Co., Malster ^7201 S. Broadway. 

FlUey, Chauncey I 

Fischer, Edw. A Fischer Flour Co. Flour 214S. Istst. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MBB0HANT8' BXOHAKQB OP ST. LOUIS. 7 

Name. Firm. Business. Looation. 

Fisoher, Jos. J C. H. Albers Com. Co 626 Pierce Bldff. 

Fitzgerald, John L. & K. R. R., Supt. Terminals 812 N. Eighth si. 

Flebbe, Hermann. .United Bakers' Supply Co 109 8. Eleventh st. 

Fleming, Thos. H. B O'Connor & Co., Market Reporter 216 Market st. 

Flesh, £dw.M C. H. Albers Com. Co., 626 Pierce Bldg. 

Foell, Edwin L Foell & Co., Grain Commission 128 Market st. 

Foell, Henry Foell & Co., Commission 128 Market st. 

Foerstel, Joseph A J. H. Teasdale Commission Co.. . .108 Cham, of Com. 

Forester, Berton Logan & Bryan Commission 210 Cham, of Com. 

Fowler, Frank. . Nye-8ohneider-Fowler Co., Grain, Etc Fremont, Keb. 

Francis, David R D. R. Francis & Bro. Com. Co 214 N. Fourth st. 

Francis, D. R., Jr Francis Bro. & Co., Stocks and Grain 214 N. Fourth st. 

Francis, T. H D. R. Francis & Bro. Com. Co 214 N. Fourth st. 

Frank, John F Grain and Lumber Okawville. 111. 

Frank, Nathan Attorney Century Bldg. 

Friedman, B Friedman R. £. Co 9 N. 7th st. 

Fry. James F Rabok Mfg. Co., Paint 102 So. Commercial st. 

Fuller, J. M. . . Fuller- Wooldridge Com. Co 806 Cham, of Com. 

Fuller, L. A Thresher-Fuller Grain Co 814 Bd. of Trade, Kansas City 

Funk, Joseph P J. P. Funk & Co., Tallow, eto 1024 N. Main st. 

Funsten, R. £ R. B. Funsten D. F. & Nut Co 1621 Morgan st. 

Fusz, Eugene A Regina Flour Mill Co 601 S. Main st. 

Fusz, F. D Regina Flour Mill Co 601 S. Main st. 

Fusz, Louis. . . . , Regina Flour Mill Co 601 S. Main st. 



Gamble, CO A. G. Edwards & Son, Brokers 410 Olive st. 

Gamble, Geo. A Lehigh Valley R. R., Com'l A^ent 919 Pierce Bldg. 

Gardner, Wm. A W. A. Gardner & Co., Commission, 

66 Board of Trade, Chioagq, 111. 

Garmon, Ed. M Eaton, McClellan & Co., 214 Cham, of Com. 

Gameau, James W Mound City I. & S . Co Ninth and Branch sts. 

Garrison, O. L BigMuddy Coal & Iron Co 908 Wainwright Bldgf. 

Gary, Alfred C. . .Shearson, Hammill & Co 200 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, lU. 

GaupeL Henry J 1724 Longfellow blv. 

Gaus, H Henry Gaus & Sons, Box Factory 2100^. Main st. 

Geisel, Joseph S . . Valier & Spies Milling Co., Millers 918 Pierce Bldg. 

Geissmann, Otto. . . Aviston Milling Co., Flour and Grain. .410 8rd Nat'l Bk. Bldg. 

Gerdes, Charles B . . . . W. D. Abraham & Co. Hay & Grain East St. Louis, III. 

Gerhart, Frank H. . . .F. H. & C. B. Gerhart Real Estate Co. . . .Wainwright Bldg. 

Gessler, E. A Gessler & Kraussnick, Broker 411 Olive st. 

Gettys, James M W. P. Gettys & Son Provision Co 118 N. Main st. 

Gettys, Thos. B W. P. Gettys & Son Provision Co 118 N. Main st. 

Gierer, George. .W. D. Orthwein Grain Co., 808 Chamber of Commerce. 

Giesecke, Otto . . .Chas. Ehlerman Hop and Malt Co 100 S. Second st. 

Giessing, Henry W Farmington Mlg. Co., Treasurer Farmington, Mo. 

Glossing, Peter Giessing Milling Co Farmington, Mo. 

Giesler, John F 

Gillette, P. W Gillette & Co., Grain MoKittriok, Mo. 

Gilmartin, P. J E. W. Wagner & Co., Solicitor 216 Cham, of Com. 

Glister, Albert H . . . . Steeleville Milling Co Steelevllle, 111. 

Gissler, Eugene J Hubbard & Moffltt Com. Co 208 Cham, of Com. 

Givens, Jos. W Deceased 

Glaser, Carl S Jos. Glaser & Son, Brokers 817 Olive st. 

Glaser, Joseph Joseph Glaser & Son, Brokers 817 Olive st. 

Glosemeyer, Vincent H Flour and Mill Feed . 809 Cham.of Com. 

Glover, John I John I. Glover, Grain, 

880 Glover Bldg., Kansas City. Mo. 

Goeke, Fred'k W F. W. Goeke k Co., Commission 62 Gay Bldg. 

Goldman. J. D Lesser, Goldman Cotton Co^ Cotton Factors 114 S. Main st. 

Goldsmith, Jacob Wool and Furs 204 N. Main st. 

Goldsmith, Maurice W. .Jacob Goldsmith & Co., 

Commission 204 N. Main st. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



8 MBMBEmU OP THB 

Name. Firm. BmlnaM. Looatlon. 

Goodall, John R. . . . W. H. iCarkhmm k Son, Insormnoe 1SS6 Pieroe Bide. 

Gordon, SamueL. . .Cox & Gordon Paokinff Co 1019 8. Third n. 

Gordan, Thos. P Grain. .Corby -For»ee Bldg^ 8tJ^O0ept^ Mo. 

Gorx, A. J....Grain, R. R. Ties and Lumber 740 FriBoo Bldf* 

Grareman, Wm Grafeman Dairj Co .9101 Morgan n, 

Graff, Henry G . Parlcer k Graff, Grain . .908 Produoe Ex., New York City 

Graham, G. L Cham, of Com. 

Graham, Bobt. 8 

GratE, Benj., Jr. . . . Warren, Jonet k Grata, Bagging 109 Rial to Building. 

Graves, Oswald. .Sheareon, Ham mill k Co 907 Cham, of Com. 

Graves, W. W Natl Bisouit Co 110 N. Morgan st, Chioago, m. 

Gray,G.H CB.&O.R. R., Com 1 Agent.. New Bank Com. Bldg. 

Green. A. H Bell Oil Co 1998a Marcus are. 

Greenleaf, M. E Jacksonville Grain & Com. Co Jacksonville, IlL 

Gregg, Norris B . . Mound City Pt. & Col. Co., PainU and Oils 1681 N. 11th st. 

Gregg, W. H., Jr.Mound City Pt & Col. Co., PainU and Oils 1681 N. 11th st. 

Greve, Bdwin J John WalU Com. Co 868 Pieroe Bldg. 

Greve, Henry John Wahl Com. Co., President. 868 Pieroe Bldg. 

Greve, Robt. F Jolin WalU Com. Co., Secretary 868 Pieroe Bldg. 

Grier, J. P 

Griesedieck, Paul H. . .H. Griesedieck Malting Co 1184 8. Twelfth st. 

Griesedieok, Joseph.. .Griesedieck Bros. Brew'g Co 19th k Shenandoah sts. 

Griesedieck, H. L. . . .H. L. Griesedieck DUtillery Co 406 N. Fourth st. 

GrifBUf Jas. W Bartlett-Frazier Co., Grain Com^ 910 Cham, of Com. 

Grone, Herman.. . .St. Louis Brewing Assn 9919 Clark ave. 

Grone, John G St. Louis Brewing Assn 9919 Clark ave. 

Gronemeyer. C. L 94 Tiffin ave« Ferguson. Mo. 

Grundman, H. F John Kissner Feed Co., Hay and Grain. . . .4896 N. Broadway 

Guerdan, N Guerdan Hat Co 18 8. Broadway 

Gummersbach, Bdw. J Eberle- Albrecht Flour Co 918 S. Main st. 



Haarstick, Hy.C. .StLouis-Union Trust Co., Vice Prest Fourth and Locust. 

Haeussler, Herman A Down Town Realty Co., President. 

808 MerchanU'-Laclede Bldg. 

Hagar, Wm. G 6899 Cates ave. 

Hahn, C. J Carlyle Mill & Grain Co., Secretory Carlyle, HI. 

Hale, W. T., Jr J. R. Hale & Sons, Cotton & Grain Nashville, Tenn. 

Haley. Claude £ D. 1. Bushnell k Co., Seeds 106 N. Second st. 

HalljDuane H. & L. Chase Bag Co 18 N. Main st. 

Hall, Geo. H Nanson Commission Co 909 Cham, of Com. 

Hall, John B 614 Cham, of Com. 

Hall, Louis T Nanson Commission Co 909 Cham, of Com. 

Hall, Marshall Marshall Hall- Waggoner Grain Co 906 Cham, of Com. 

Hallet, F. A. .Hallet k Carey Co., Grain.. 119 Cham, of Com. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Halliday, H. E Halliday Elevator Co Cairo, 111. 

Hammel, A. B Trenton Milling Co Trenton, III. 

Hammer, L. F Hammer Dry Plate Co., Ohio ave. and Miami st. 

Handlan, A. H.. . .Handlan Buck Mfg. Co., Railroad Supplies 919 N. Third st. 

Hanebrink, C J Broker 407 Cham, of Com. 

Hannigan, K. B Southern Ry., A. G. F. A 918 Pieroe Bldg. 

Hanson, P. M. .Nat'l Bnam. k Stamp'g Co., Traffic Mngr Granite City, 111. 

Hargis, B. F B. F. Hargis Gr. Co Bd. of Trade, Kansas City, Mo. 

Harrington, Charles M The van Dusen-Harrington Co., 

718 Cham, of Commerce, Minneapolis. Minn. 

Harris, BenJ B. Harris k Co., Wool Second and Walnut st. 

Harsh, Alex. C Alex. C. Harsh k Co., Grain 606 Cham, of Com. 

Harsh, George George Harsh k Co., Grain 691 Cham of Com. 

Harsh, H Harsh Grain Co Nashville, Tenn. 

Harsh, P. W P. W. Harsh k Co., Grain 691 Cham, of Com. 

Hart, Edward 8 R. P. Studley k Co., Printing 618 Market st. 

Hartman, John 4817 Forest Park boulv. 

Harvey, Geo. Jr Harvey-Burden Construction Co 1608 Chemical Bldg. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MBBOHANTS' BXOHAMGB OP ST. I<OUI6. 9 

Name. Firm. Business. Location. 

Hastedt, Culver L 

Hatler, C. L Bamett Elev. Co., Grain, Hay and Seeds. ..Barnett; Mo. 

Hatterslej, F F. Hatterslej Brokers & Com. Co 20& Pine st. 

Hattersley, J J. Hattersley & Co., Flour Broker 44 Gay Bldg. 

Haueisen, F. G Haueisen Bros., Froduoe 1017 K. Third st. 

Haupt, Peter Flour Miller .New Athens, Ills. 

Hawiey . G. F Roger's Blevator, Supt Foot of Bremen ave. 

Haynes, Delos R fiaynes Bros., Real Estate 705 Olive st. 

Heath, A. J A. J. Heath &Co., Commission 2815 N. Twelfth st. 

Heffer. Frederick Poultry 417 Franklin are. 

HeU. Geo.L Heil Packing Co 2216 LaSallest. 

Heili^enstein, C FreeburgMillinK Co Freeburg, 111. 

Heinnohsmeyer, Henry H. Heinriohsmeyer Feed Co 6830 8. Broadway 

Helm, liouis • 

Heman, G. A Contractor. .DeMenil Bldg., 7th and Pine st. 

Heman, John C Heman Construction Co Title Guarantee Trust Bldg. 

Hendershot, R. B. .R. B. Hendershot & Co., Grain and Live Stock. .Monroe. Iowa 

Henson, Mark First National Bank, Banker Granite City, 111. 

Herf, O Herf & Freriohs Chemical Co 929 Pierce Bldg. 

Hesse. Ludwig Keillor Flour Mills Co., Sec'y and Treas...401 Cham, of Com. 

HeydtjJohnB Heydt Bakery Co 4586 Forest Park bird. 

Hezel, Adolph J Hezel Milling Co., Flour Millers. .15th and Sou. Ry., 

East St. Louio, 111. 

Hezel, Charles J Hezel Milling Co., 15th st. and So. Ry., East St. Louis, 111. 

Hezel, £. T Hezel Milling Co., 15th st. and So. Ry., East St. Louis, 111. 

Hickman, Bernard B . .Terminal R. R. Assn 600 S. Twelfth st. 

Hiemenz, Arthur. . . .D. R. Francis & Bro. Com. Co 214 N. 4th st. 

Hilke, Christoph. . .Hilke Feed & Flour Co 8747 N. Broadway. 

Hill, C. A Ridgeway,ni. 

Hill, Wm. T J. H. Teasdale Commission Co 108 Cham, of Com. 

Hill. Walker. . .Mechanics'- American Nat'l Bank, President. .Broadway & Locust 

Hilliard, Hy. P 

Hilmer, Wm. C. . . . Raymond, Pynchon & Co 212 Cham, of Com. 

Hinchman, J. G Prov'n Inspector 402 N. 2nd st. 

Hindman, James H Farmer Rockwood, 111. 

Hodapp, Glenn S. .Mound Citv Elev. & Gr. Co., Grain 2nd and Branch sts. 

Hofmann, F. W. ..Hofmann Bros. Pro. Co., Prod. Com 700 N. Second st. 

Hoffman. Geo. £. .Merchants'-Laolede Nat. Bk., Cashier Fourth and Olive sts. 

Hogenmiller, John A Hogenmiller Com. Co 707 N. Third st. 

Holt, Lowell 8 Lowell Hoit k Co., Com 141 Jackson boulv., Chicago 

Holland, James F. . . Jas. Holland Flour Co 15th st. and Sou. R. R., 

East St. Louis. 111. 

HoUiday, Joseph G Attomey-at-Law 906 LaSalle Bldg. 

Holliday, Omar. . .Fulton Bag & Cotton Mills Co 612 S. Seventh st. 

Hollmann, Julius G . .Longview Orchard Co Weuatchee, Wash. 

Holmquist, James W. . .Holmquist Elevator Brandeis Bldg., Omaha, Neb. 

Hooss. Louis P 8461 Park ave. 

Hopkins, James 17 Battery place, New York City 

Hopkins,Samn G Vandalia R. R. Co 226 Pierce Bldg. 

Homer, E. P Allen-West Com. Co., 104 S. Main st. 

Horstmann, H. H..H.H.Hor8tmann&Son, Grain Alma, Mo. 

Houston, Frank K. . Third National Bank, Vice-President. .Olive and Broadway 

Hoy t, E. R 

Huobard, Robt. M Hubbard & Moffltt Commission Co.. . .208 Cham, of Com. 

Huber, Martin Highland Milling Co Highland, III. 

Hudson, Wm. E Bartlett Frazier Co., Ill W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago. 

Huegely, Julius Huegely Milling Co Nashville, III. 

Hull, Wm. L Cham, of Com. 

Hunn, Eugene F W. H. Perrine & Co 206 Cham, of Com. 

Hunter, Edward H Hunter Grain Co 855 Pierce Bldg. 

Hunter, E. O Hunter-Robinson- Weuz Milling Co 921 Pierce Bldg. 

Hunter, Henry Hunter Grain Co 855 Pierce Bldg. 

Hussey, T. C Advance Mill & Elevator Co Carrollton, In. 

Hutchinson, Jas. . .Jas. Hutchinson & Sons, Sugar Brokers 712 Spruce st. 

Hynes, W. j Hynes Elevator Co., Omaha Nat'l Bk. Bldg., Omaha, Neb. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



10 MBMBBB8 OW THB 

Name. Firm. BusineM. Looation. 

lohtertz, Geo. J CommiBsion 727 Pierce Bld^. 

Igletieart, J. L .Igrleheart Bros.,Floiir Milling ETansrille, Ina. 

Imbe, Joseph F J. F. Imbs Milling Co 409 Cham, of Com. 

Imbs, Al.y J. F.Imbi Milling Co 409 Cham, of Com. 

Imbs, B.F J. F. Imbs MiUing Co., Flonr BeUriUe, Dl. 

ImMasche^ George 

Immer, Eaw. B 409 Cham, of Com. 

Inman, Bruoe 115 Cham, of Com. 

Isaacs, Chas. W 218 Cham, of Com. 

Ismert« Joseph. . .PinoknejTille Milling Co FinoknejTille, III. 



Jackson, Howard B. . .Jackson Bros, k Co.. 818 Postal Tel. Bldg., Chicago. 

James, Edward A — Yioe-Prest., Neola Elevator Co 206 LaSalle St., Chicago 

Jannopoulo. D Mo. Tent k Awning Co., Tents 210 Chestnut st. 

Jasper, Louis A Jasper k Sellmeyer, Commission 886 N. Third st. 

Jinkins, B. C Broker. .606 Merchants'-Ladede Bldg. 

Johns, H. A Picker k Beardsley Commission Co 118 N. Main «L 

Johns, Thomas J Charleston Milling Co Charleston, Mo. 

Johnson, Charles T. . Home Mill k Grain Co Mount Vernon, Ind. 

Johnson, M. B T. E. Price k Co., Commission Ill Cham, of Com. 

Jones, C. Norman. .St Louis Brewing Assn 702 Wainwrif ht Building. 

Jones, Geo. W Evens k Howard Fire Brick Co 920 Market st. 

Jones, Louis J.. .Fulton Bag k Cotton Mills 612 S. Seventh st. 

Jones, Vincent M Jones- Wise Com. Co 616 Chamber of Commerce 

Judd,W. D 818 West 44th St., New York City 



Kaeroher, Ed. M Kaercher-Schisler, Seedmen 706 N. Fourth st. 

Kaeshoef er, G. L Wabash R. R., East-bound Agent. . .824 Pierce Bldg. 

KaufTman, F. E. . . .Bemet, Craft k KaufTman Milling Co 1088 Pierce Bldg. 

Kavanauffh, W. K.... So. Coal, Coke & Mining Co 700 Security Bldg. 

Keeble, W. B 8enter Commission Co., Commission 26 S. Third st. 

Eehoe, C. J F. D. Hirschberg k Co., Insurance 128 Cham, of Com. 

Kehlor, J. B. M Deceased. 

Keiser, A. J A.J. Keiser Flour Mills, Flour MiUer Mt. Olive, lU. 

Keleher, P. F Broker 6164 Plymouth ave. 

Kelly, E.M Liberty Mills, Nashville, Tenn. 

Kemper, Wm. T Wm. T. Kemper Elevator Co., 

601 Postal Tel. Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 
Kennard,Sam.M.,J.Kennard& Sons Carpet Co., Carpets.. Fourth and Washington 

Kennedy, Maxwell Kennedy Grain Co 107 Cham, of Com. 

Kerekhoff, D. C Pevely Dairy Co., Dairy 8301 Park ave. 

Ketohum, Horace F C. H. AlbersCom. Co 626 Pierce Bldg. 

Keyes, 8. P 

Kilz, Arthur. .Schultz k Niemeier Com. Co., 806 Cham, of Com. 

King, Chas. E Erie Despatch, Con. Freight Agent . .428 Pierce Bldg. 

King, M. D M. D. King Milling Co., Pittsfleld, m. 

Kissner, John John Kissner Feed Co., Feed 4826 N. Broadway. 

Klauber, John A. Klauber k Sons Iron k Metal Co 609 S. Fourth st. 

Klosterman, Will J Morton k Co., Commission 609 Cham, of Com. 

Knapp, W. E 117 Cham, of Com. 

Koechig, Wm Jos. A. Buckland k Co., Hay and Grain 108 S. Third st. 

Koenigsmark, A. J Koenigsmark Mill Co Waterloo, Dl. 

Koenigsmark, C. H . . Koenigsmark Mill Co. Flour Waterloo, Dl. 

Koenigsmark, Jacob J . . Koenigsmark Mill Co Waterloo, Dl. 

Kohn, R; D 806 Seen tv Bldg. 

Kotany, M Stock and Bond Broker. .810 N. 4th st. 

Krausse, E. B., Jr. .Nulsen, Klein k KrausseMfg. k Mining Co Levee k Sidney 

Krausnick, E. C Gessler k Krausnick, Brokers 411 Olive st. 

Kreismann, Frederick H . . .F. H.Kreismann Ins. Agency 1468 Pierce Bldg. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



XSB0HAKT8' IXOHAKGI OW ST. I<OUI8. 11 

Kame. Firm. BuBinesB. Looatlon. 

Krenning, H. B. Dorris Motor Car Co 4100 Laclede ave. 

Krey, Fred Krey Packing Co., Pork Packers. . .2l8t and Bremen ave* 

Kri£B,F. H ^... Bezel MilUng Co., MiUers, 

Fifteenth st. and Southern By., East St. Louis, m. 

Kron, August A. Kron Livery & U. Co 2194N. 10th At. 

Kronsbein, Herman Holstein Com. Co., Produce Com'n 1000 N. Broadway 

Kuhlman, Ernst H Feed 2804 Bremen ave. 

Kuhn, Robert C Paul Kuhn & Co., Grain and Hay .... Evansville, Ind. 

Kuhs, Edw. L 

Kupf erle, E Kupf erle Bros. Mfg. Co 600 N. Second st. 



Lacy, J. R J. R. Lacy k Co., Hay and Grain 2917 N. Broadway 

LaheyjThos. P T. B. Price & Co., Commission Ill Cham, of Com. 

Lake, Wm. H A. O. Slaughter & Co., Broker.. .68 Board of Trade, Chicago 

Lamy, Chas. O. . . . J. H. Teasdale Com. Co., 108 Cham, of Com. 

Lamy, Joseph F J. F. Lamy k Co., Com 208 S. LaSalle st., Chicago 

Lanoaster, H. Vest Dreyer Com. Co., Commission 418 Cham, of Com. 

Landry, H.D St. Louis S. W. Ry., Coml Agt 211 N. 8th st. 

Lang, George Braun-Lang Com. Co., Flour and Commission Gay Bldg. 

Lang, B. H B. H. Lang & Co., Commission 504 Cham, of Com. 

Lang, Ben S B. H.Lang & Co 504 Cham, of Com. 

Lange. Alfred T Cham, of Com. 

Lange, C. F. George. .Luehrmann Hay & Grain Co., Hay and Grain. 101 Monroe st. 
Langenberg, C. BlT. Langenberg Bros. Grain Co., 

Commission 618 Cham, of Com. 

Langenberg, Fred. W. . . .Langenberg Bros. Grain Co., 

Commission 618 Cham, of Com. 

Langenberg, H. F 

Langenberg, H. H Langenberg Bros. Grain Co., 

Commission 618 Cham, of Com. 

Langenberg, Geo.F.,Haynes-Langenberg Mfg. Co. furnaces. 4067 Forest Park blv 

Langton, J. J. P. .Langton Brokerage Co., Mdse. Broker 602 S. 7th st. 

Lansing, E. W James E. Bennett & Co., Brokers 211 Cham, of Com. 

Lanyon, Wm Capitalist 828 Pierce Bldg. 

Lathrop, Wm. B Pierson-Lathrop Grain Co., 

Board of Trade, Kansas City, Mo. 

Latta, H. J Maxwell & Crouch Mule Co National Stock Yards, III . 

Lawless, C. W — Moore-Lawless Grain Co. . . .826 Bd. of Trade, Kansas Citv, Mo. 

Lawrence, Frank E Security Elev. Co 107 Cham, of Com. 

LeCompte, Jos Lexington Roller Mills Co Lexington, Ky. 

Lee, W. H. . .Merchants'-Laclede Natl Bk., Pres Fourth and Olive sts. 

Lemmon, Isaac L Elmore & Lemmon, Grain Roodhouse. 111. 

Lemp, Carl A W. J. Lemp Brewing Co., Treas Thirteenth and Cherokee. 

Lemp, Edwin A. . . W. J. Lemp Brewing Co Thirteenth and Cherokee. 

Lemp, Louis F W. J. Lemp Brewing Co., Supt Thirteenth and Cherokee. 

Lemp, Wm. J W. J. Lemp Brewing Co., Pres't Thirteenth and Cherokee. 

Leonnardt, Arthur T Saxony Mills, Flour 818 Lombard st. 

Leonhardt, R. H Saxony Mills, Flour 818 Lombard st. 

Lepp, Henry Flour Mill DeSoto, Mo. 

Leschen, Henry. . . . A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co 920 N. Main st. 

LeFifl) George H Lawrenceburg Roller Mills Co Lawrenceburg, Ind. 

Lewis, Chas. E Chas. E. Lewis & Co., Brokers. .C. of C, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Liermann, John C Hay and Grain . .8228 8. Thirteenth st. 

Liesch, Christian Box 176, Greenville, Ills. 

Lillie, J. P J. P. LUlie Co., Grain Products 406 Pierce Bldg. 

Linn, CM Grain and Stock Humboldt, Neb. 

Little, H. J .Little & Hays Inv. Co., 808 N. Fourth st. 

Lloyd, John H CO. Matheny & Co., Grain, 

708 Ferguson Bldg., Springfield, 111. 

Lockwood, B. A B. A. Lockwood Grain Co DesMoines, Iowa 

Logan, Howard H Logan & Bryan Grain and Stocks, 

2 Board of Trade, Chicago. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



12 MBMBBB8 OW THB 

Name. Firm. BusineM. Looation. 

Logan, T. M Tate, Logan h Co., Grain and Hay. . . .404 Cham, of Com. 

Lonergan, T. J T. J. Lonergan h Co 611 Cham, of Com. 

Lorenz, Henry Farmer St. Marys, Mo. 

Lothman, Wm Lothman Cypress Co Foot of An^gelioa st. 

Louderman, Henry B Boe Bldg. 

Louderman, H. B.^Jr Roe Bldg. 

Louderman, Jno. H Broker Roe Bldg. 

Louderman, Wm. M Stook Broker Roe Bldg. 

Lowe, £lliott Lincoln Grain Co 601 First Nata Bank Bldg., 

Lincoln, Neb. 

Ludington, Elliot K H. It L. Chase Bag Co 18 N. Mainst. 

Luehrmann, Aug.F. W..Luehrmann Bros. Hay & Grain Co.. Com. 

First and Monroe sts. 

Lueking. H. A Transfer Business 1546 N. Fourteenth st. 

Lumagbi^oseph D Lumaghi Coal Co 606 Equitable Bldg. 

Lund, F. W., Jr Louisrille Milling Co., Flour. 

Floyd and H sts., Louisville, Ky. 
Lutzi, Arthur M . . Commonwealth F. M. Co., Feed 6040 N. 2nd st. 



Maok, Henry W Commission Gay Bldg. 

Magee, J. B Deceased 

Magill, 8. E Georgia R.R., G. W. Agent. 1827 Pierce Bldg. 

Maguire Chas. J Maguire Coal Co 411 Oliyest. 

Masuire, Louis T Oriel Glass Co 212 International Life Bldg. 

MalkemuB, Wm. Louis. .Newman & Malkemus, Brewers' Supplies.. 214 Rial to B\& 

Malone, F. J AUneeda Milling Co East St. Louis, m. 

Maltby, Ernest V. .Hulburd, Warren & Chandler, Com. .180 S. LaSalle st.. Chicago 

Mann. A. E L. & N. R. R., General Agent 812 N. Eighth st. 

Manning, Herbert N. .Smith, Vincent & Co., Commission 72 Gay Bldg. 

MaroT, Geo. E Armour Grain Co 208 S. La Salle st., Chicago. 

Markbara, G. D W. H. Markham ASon, Insurance 1226 Pierce Bldg. 

Marks, David A Continental Portland Cement Co Wright Bldg. 

Marshall, Ben F. . . .Blodgett Elev. & Grain Co Blodgett, Mo. 

Marshall, Jno. E . . . . Sikes-MoMullen Grain Co Sikeston, Mo. 

Marshall, 8. T Nanson Commission Co 202 Cham, of Com. 

Marten, Louis F Grain St. Charles, Mo. 

Martin, Geo. Cj, Jr. . .Qotte & Carkener Co^ Com'n .107 Cham, of Com. 

Martin, Thos. King Graham h Martin Grain Co 600 Cham, of Com. 

Martin, Thos. L .. Annan, Burg Grain & Milling Co., 

Commission 119 Cham, of Com. 

Marx, Fritz K. db E. Neumond, Grain and Feed 1026 Pierce Bldg. 

Mason, Sam'l Parker. . .Nye-Sohneider-Fowler Grain Co., Grain Omaha, Neb. 

Massengale, John E. .St Louis & Tenn. Riv. Pack. Co., Sec Foot of Pine st. 

Matthews, Joseph R... The Come Mills Co., President. 

1020 International Life Bldg. 

Maune, Aug. . . .Aug. Maune R. E. & F. Co., Real Estate 224*^ University st. 

Meek, A. J Meek Milling Co., Millers Marissa, 111. 

Meek. William E Meek Milling Co Marissa, m. 

MegginsoD. L. M L. 8. & M. S., Agent 627 Pierce Bldg. 

Meier, Louis J Brockmeier k Co., Commission 628 N. Second st. 

MeisemaniK Harry N Mo. Pao. Ry. Solicitor Railway Exchange Bldg. 

Merriam, Nathan Merriam & Millard Co., Grain, 

790 Brandeis Bldg., Omaha, Neb. 

Messmore, John L Ballard, Messmore Grain Co., Com 417 Cham, of Com. 

Meuser, Charles.. .Klngshlgh way Feed Co., Grain and Hay. .1962 8. Klngshighway 

Meuser, Herman Meuser-Scnake Merc. Co., Feed 4128 Gravols ave. 

Meyer, Edw. J Peter H. Meyer & Sons Hay and Grain Co. . .1308 N. Ninth st. 

Meyer, Edwin J German Mut. Life Ins. Co 1102 8rd Nat'l Bank Bldg. 

Meyer, Ferd P John F. Meyer & Sons, Miller. .728 Merchants'-Laclede Bldg. 

Meyer, C H Meyer Bros. Hay & Grain Co., Hay and Gram 1109 Cass ave. 

Meyer, Theo. F Meyer Bros. Drug Co., Druggists Fourth st. & Clark ave. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MIBOHANTS' BXCHANGB OF ST. liOUIS. IS 

Name. Firm. BuBiness. Looation. 

Meyer, John F John F. Mejer & Son, Millers. .728 Merohants'-Laolede Bldg. 

Midlam, Wm. T Anchor Line, Freight Solicitor 226 Pierce Bldg. 

BiUler, Aug MiUer Grain Co 616 Pierce Bldg. 

Bliller, J. T. . W. A. Miller Hay & Grain Co., Feed 1417 N. Broadway 

Miller, W. A W. A. MUler Hay & Grain Co 1417 N. Broadway 

MUleson, C. D 419 Brighton pL, East St. Louis, 111. 

Milliken, B. H Milliken-Helm Com. Co 121 Cham, of Com. 

Milliken, Horace MilliisLen-Helm Com. Co 121 Cham, of Com. 

Milliken, John T Jno. T. Milliken & Co 121 Cham, of Com. 

Milnor, Geo. S Sparks Milling Co. Millers Alton, HL 

Moffatt, Edwin O Moffatt Com. Co 219 Postal Bldg., Kansas City, Mo, 

Moffltt, Charles S Hubbard & Moffltt Com. Co 203 Cham, of Com. 

Moffltt, N. L Hubbard & Moffltt Com. Co 203 Cham, of Com. 

Mohlenbrock, Malte. . Mohlenbrock Milling Co Campbell Hill, 111. 

Moore, E. W Accountant Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Moore, Roy D 

Morrissey, John F Flour and Feed Comm'n., 

310 Chamber of Commerce. 

Morrison, Robert W., Jr. .J. F. Lamy & Co Cham, of Com. 

Morrison, Fred Morrison Bros., Live Stock, etc Ramsey, Ills. 

Morse, J. W Eureka Mills Co Theresa ar. and Mo. Pac. track 

Morton, Claude A Morton & Co., Commission 610 Cham, of Com. 

Morton, Turner B., Jr Morton &; Co., Commission 610 Cham, of Com. 

Mueller, A Mueller- Dillon Chem. Co 1100 Armstrong ave. 

MuUally, Dian'l. S Langenberg Bros. Grain Co., 

Commission 618 Cham, of Com. 

Mullally, Martin J. . .Martin Mullally Com. Co 406 Chamber of Commerce. 

Mullally, Jno. D. .Graham & Martin Gr. Co 600 Cham, of Com. 

Murdoch, Wm H. & L. Chase Bag Co 18 N. Main st. 

Murphy, Joseph F B. & O. 8.-W. R. R., Commercial Agent.. .723 Pierce Bldg. 

Murphy, J. L 



MacMUlaUj^alker Kehlor F. M. Co., Millers 400 Cham, of Com. 

MoAdam, wm. S 

McCauley, B. J Neola Elevator Co 213 Cham, of Com. 

McCaull, J. L.. .The McCaull-Dinsmore Co. . .917 Ch. of Com., Minneapolis, Minn. 

McCarty, Jno. V N., C. &; St. L. R. R., Cent. Agent 406 Bk. Com. Bldg. 

McChesney, W. S Terminal R. R. Assn., P. and G. M Union Station. 

MoClellan, Frank P Cham, of Com., Minneapolis, Minn* 

McClellan, J. 8 

McClellan, Thos. G N., C. & St. L. Ry 406 Bank of Commerce Bldg. 

McClelland, Frank M...F.M. McClelland & Co., Grain, etc 727 Pierce Bldg. 

McCluney, John H Deceased 

McCombs, R. M. . .Cape County Milling Co Jackson, Mo. 

McConaughy. Chas. W..Bodman-McConaughy Co., Grain Holdredge, Web, 

McConnell, E. J International Merc. Marine Co 1101 Locust st, 

McCoy, Wm. C W. D. Orthwein Grain Co 303 Cham, of Com. 

McCracken, Robt. H 

McCreery, J. A J. A. McCreery & Son, Grain Mason City, Ills, 

McCulloch, Richard. .United Railways Co., Vice-President 3869 Park ave. 

McFadden, Bruce H McFadden & Co., Grain Havana, 111. 

McGehee, Jas. Stewart Laurel Hill, La. 

McGrath, James F Cumberland Gap Despatch, Agent, 

1817 Boatmens Bank Bldg. 



MoGroarty, Edw. J St. Louis Weighing Co Second and Tyler sts. 

McKenzie, Alexander. .Kaw Grain &Blev. Co., 827 Bd. of Trade, Kansas City, Mo. 
MoLain, J. T McLain-Alcom Com, Co 706 N. Third st. 



MoMahan, J. H 6644 Bartmer ave. 

McMorrow, P. J A. Geisel Mfg. Co 219 S. Second st. 

MoKair, L. G. . .MoKair-Harris Realty Co., President Fourth and Olive sts. 

McSorley, B.J Broker Cham, of Com. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



14 MIMBBBS or THI 

Name. Firm. Businetf. Location. 

Nagel Chariot Attorney 918 Security Bld^- 

Napier, Robert C Hubbard k Moflitt CommiMion Ck>.. . .209 Cbam. of Com- 

Naate, August Wholesale Grocer 10 N. Second st* 

Nelll, W. K Grain New Sharon, Iowa. 

Nelson, L. C..L. C. Nelson It J. M. Nelson, Jr 928 Security Bldg. 

Nelson, J. M., Jr. .L. C. Nelson & J. M. Nelson, Jr 9)8 Security Bldg. 

Newell, James P. . .James P. Newell k Co., Stocks and Bonds, 

906 Commonwealth Trust Bldg. 

Newell, Joseph T Geo. P. Plant Milling Co 608 Cham, of Com. 

Newman, H. S Fisher Bids.. Chicago, UL 

Newman, W. B. . . .Newman k Malkemus, Brokers 214 Rialto Bldg. 

Nickel, H. L Third and Convent sts. 

NiokersoD, John Bonds and Stock s... 800 N. Broadway 

Nicolai, Edffar S . . W. P. Howard Com. Co 408 N. LoYee 

Nicolaus, Henry St. Louis Brew. Assn 702 Wainwright Bldg. 

NiedrinKbau8,Tnos. K . Nat. Enam. k Stmp. Co., Mfrs. New Bk. Com. Bldg. 

Niedringhaus, F. G.... Nat. Enam. A Stmp. Co., Mfrs. New Bk. Com. Bldg. 

Niemeier, Chas. L Sohultz k Niemeier Com. Co 805 Cham, of Com. 

Niergarth, W. J Marshall Hall- Waggoner Grain Co 206 Cham, of Com. 

Nobbe, Chas. H Nobbe Bros., Grain Farmersville, Dl. 

Noel. Henry M H. M. Noel k Co., Banker 500 LaSaUe Bldg. 

Norris, James NorrisA Co 40 Board of Trade, Chicago 



Oakes, Harry Farming Bluffs, HI. 

Oakley, C. B Western Maryland Ry ., Agent 562 Pierce Bldg. 

O'Connell, Dennis B Broker Cham, of Com. 

O'Uonnell, Hugh Napoleon HUl Cotton Co., 116 S. Main st 

O'Donnell, John. . . . Jno. O'Donnell k Bro., Contractors 1480 N. Union aye. 

O'Donnell, Patr'k. . .Jno. O'Donnell k Bro., Contractors 1429 N. Euclid are. 

Oechsner, Frank J Commission 1109 N. Third st. 

O'Neill, Edw. J Chic. R. L * P. Ry. Gen'l Agent 706 Olive st, 

O'Nell, Joseph M Jackson Bros. 201 Cham, of Com. 

O'Rourke, Jno. J Powell & O'Rourke 886 Pierce Bldg. 

Orthwein, W. D W. D. Orthwein Grain Co 808 Cham, of Com. 

Orthwein, F. C W. D. Orthwein Grain Co 808 Cham, of Com. 

Orthwein. W. B Stocks k Bonds 204 Rialto Bldg. 

Orvis, Otto A The OrvU Grain Co 606 Cham, of Com. 

Ostermayer, Geo 8024 N. Broadway. 

Orroole, Wm Martin Mullally Com. Co 406 Cham, of Com. 

Owings, Zebulon P. . .Toberman, Mackey It Co 486 Pierce Bldg. 



Paddock, Fred. O The Paddock-Hodge Co., Grain, 

1010 Second National Bank Bldg., Toledo, Ohio 

Panhorst, J. C Staunton, DL 

Papendiok, Fredk. C F. C. Papendick k Co., Commission 822 N. 8rd st. 

Papin, H. E Insurance Agency Co 1426 Pierce Bldg. 

Parrott, M. R Parrott. Day Co., Commission 819 Cham, of Com. 

Patton, Max M Taylor k Patton Co. . .700 Hubbel Bldg., DesMoines, Iowa 

Paule, Edwin J Paule Grain k Milling Co 7980 Ivory ave, 

Paule, Herman Paule k Meyer, Hay and Grain 117 Blow st. 

Payne, Peter H . . Elmore-Sohultz G. Co., Grain Com'n Pierce Bldg. 

Peak, L. L Shelton Mills Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Peohmann, Julius F..Dorr k Zeller C. Co., Confectioners,.. 8924 Washington ave. 

Peck, Edward P Omaha Elevator Co 621 Brandeis Bldg., Omaha, Neb. 

Pendleton, R. J Pendleton Grain Co 1668 Pierce Bldg. 

Penney, Joseph L. . . .Terminal R. R. Assn., Ind. Comm'r 120'Rialto Bldg. 

Perrine, Wilison H W. H. Perrine k Co. Grain. .814 Postal Tel. Bldg^ Chicago 

Petersen, Julius Jul. Petersen Com. Co 709 Carroll st. 

Petersen, Julius J . . .Julius Petersen Com. Co 709 Carroll st. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MIBOHAKTS' BXOHAMQI OF ST. I<OUIS. 16 

Name. Firm. Busmess. iiooation. 

Petri, Arthur C Pinley, Bsrrell * Co 211-B Cham, of Com. 

Petri, T, F Thos. Akin, Com 607 Bank of Commerce Bldg. 

Petring, Geo. H H. P. Coffee Co 725 Spruoe at. 

Pfeffer, E. 8 PfefTer Milling Co Lebanon, HI. 

Pf enninger, John J Pf enninirer Pretzel & B. Co 1409 8. Eighth st. 

PhiUip8, C. J C. J. PhUlips & Co., Mdse. Brokers 447 Pierce Bldg. 

Pioker, Erich Picker 9t Beardslej Commission Co 118 N. Main st. 

Pierce, H. C 25 Broad st., N. Y. 

Plant, F. 8 Plant 8eed Co., 8eed8 802 N. M.ain st. 

Plant, George H. . . .Geo. P. Plant Mill. Co., President 508 Chamber of Com. 

Plant, 8amuel Geo. P. Plant Mill Co. V.-P 503 Chamber of Commerce. 

Pollock, W. W Wm. Pollock Milling k Blevator Co Mexico, Mo. 

Pollock, Wm .... Wm. Pollock Milling k Elevator Co Mexico, Mo. 

Polk, James K A. C. Harsh & Co., Grain 506 Cham, of Com. 

Pommer, Robert W...D. I. Bushnell&Co., 105 N. 8econd st. 

Porteous, W. M Can. Pac. Despatch, Agent 428 Pierce Bldg. 

Porter, F. J Empire Line, Agent 418 Pierce Bldg. 

Porter, John C 408 Olive st. 

Postel, JuUus P. H. Postel Mill. Co Mascoutah, ni. 

Potter, Henry. 408 Olive st. 

Powell, Geo.i.F Powell & O'Rourke 886 Pierce Bldg. 

Powell, WUlis J., Jr 

Powers, Wm. F 1709 N. Grand ave. 

Prange, A. F H. Prange &; 8on, Millers New Douglas, 111. 

Prante, C. F C. P. Prante & Co., 214 Lesperenoe st. 

Price, Thos. E T. E. Price &; Co., Commission Ill Cham, of Com. 

Price, Thos. E., Jr T. E. Price & Co., Commission Ill Cham, of Com. 

Priwer, Leon Priwer-Connor Grain Co JM6 Cham, of Com. 

Prough, Peter D. Prough & 8on, Feed Kirkwood, Mo. 

Prunty Chas. E Grain and Grass 8eed. ... 9 8. Main st 

Putnam, Lyman W. . .Terminal R. R. Assn., Coml Agent 118 Rialto Bldg. 



Quinlivan, James F J. F. Quinlivan So Bro. Feed Co., 

flav and Grain. . . .800 8. Theresa ave. 

Quinlivan, Sol. J J. F. Quinlivan & Bro. Peed Co 800 8. Theresa ave. 

Quinlivan, Jno. R J. F. Quinlivan &; Bro. Feed Co 800 8. Theresa ave. 



Bailsbach, G. J Railsbach Grain Co., Grain Ashland, Neb. 

Rail, E. G B. G. Rail Grain Co., 512 F. & M. Bk. Bldg., Ft. Worth, Tex. 

Randolph, Tom. .Nat'l Bank of Commerce, President Broadway and Olive 

Rankin, Joseph N. Y. Central Lines, Com'l Agent 523 Pierce Bldg. 

Rassieur, Leo Rassieur, Kammerer & Rassieur, Attorney 406 Market st. 

Rassmussen, B. M 1984 Morgan st. 

Ravold, W. J Marshall Hall- Waggoner Grain Co 206 Cham, of Com. 

Reber, u. Linton Kinloch Telephone Co., Secretary and G. M Kinloch Bldg. 

Reed, Chas. J Reed-Adam Co., 841 Pierce Bldg. 

Reeves, Edw. E . .Jos. Wangler B. & 8. 1. Co 9th and Mullanphy sts. 

Reichert, W. J Reichert Milling Co Freeburg, 111. 

Reid, J. C Como Mills Co 1020 International Life Bldg. 

Reuter,H. D Renter Milling Co Flat River, Mo. 

Rhein, Walter Rhein Feed Co., Hay, Grain and Feed. .Belleville, Ills. 

Rich, C. M Purity Oats Co. Oats and Com Products, 

^Teokuk lo^^a 

Richmond, Manley G.. . .8haw & Richmond Produce Co 829 N. Third st. 

•Richter, Gustav Sachs, Richter Realty & Lumber Co 200 Rialto Bldg. 

Riohter, H. Edward Richter Grain Co., Grain and Hay, 

2505 union Central Tower, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Riddle, D. 8 Middle Tennessee Mlg. Co Tullahoma, Tenn. 

Biederer, John Slater Biilllt Elevator Co Slater, Mo. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



16 MBMBBBS or THB 

Name. Finn. Business. Location. 

Hlng, John Proyision Broker.. 606 Cham, of Com. 

Roberts, Henry Grain Tekamah, Neb. 

Robinson, A. C. . . . Hunter- Robinson -Wenz Milling Co 921 Pierce Bldg. 

Rock, Chas. F 

Roev er, J. C J. C. Roeyer k Co., Hay k Grain . .5601 Natural Bridge rd. 

Rogers, Albert Jackson . . Goffe & Carkener Co 107 Cham, of Com. 

Rooke. Wm. A Broker. . .210 Chamber of Commerce. 

Roos. Sol American Metal Co.. Limited Boatmens Bank Bldg. 

Rosskopf , Fred. W . . .Toberman, Mackey k Co., Grain 48« Pierce Bldg. 

Ruemeli, R. A Broker 511 Cham, of Com. 

Rump, Aug Merchants' Exchange Flour Inspector 4 N. Second st. 

Rump, Herman A. Yon... Seele Bros. Grain Co 817 Cham. of Com. 

Rumsey, Israel P Rumser k Co Com 80 Bd. of Trade Chicago. 

Russell, James N Russell Grain Co. Hay and Grain, 

1118 W. 8th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Ryan, M. J Deceased 

Ryan, Wm. F W. F. Ryan It Co., Brokers HI Cham, of Com. 



Sale, S. B Columbia Theater Bldg. 

Samuel, Aderton....W. D. Orthwein Grain Co 808 Cham, of Conu 

Samuel, £d. M E. M. Samuel k Co. Com. . . .88 Bd. of Trade bldg., Chicago 

Sartorlus, Henry Sartorius Prov. Co 2784 Arsenal st. 

Sauer, George Nicholas . . Sauer Milling Co Evansville, 111. 

Sauer, Philip E Sauer Milling Co Evansville, m. 

Saunders, Lancelot P. Saunders, Broker 211 Pierce Bldg. 

Saunders, Parker Broker 211 Pierce Bldg. 

Savage, H. H Marshall Hall -Waggoner Grain Co 206 Cham, of Com. 

Scbaaf , Edward St. Marys Mill Co St. Marys, Mo. 

Schaoht, Chas Union Roller Milling Co Pocahontas, Ills. 

Schaeffer, Geo. .Schaeffer Bros. & Powell Mfg. Co., Soap and Candles, 

Barton and Kosciusko sts. 
Schaeffer, Jacob.. Schaeffer Bros. It Powell Mfg. Co., Soap and Candles, 

Barton and Kosciusko sts. 

Schaeperkoetter, Kdw Schaeperkoetter Cooperage Co 1221 Montgomery st. 

Soharir, Edward B Nicholas Scharff & Sons Grocer Co 801 Spruce st. 

Scharff , Nicholas 

Schawaoker, C Livery 414 S. Third st. 

Scheitlln, Chas Scheitlin k Hoffman, 820 N. Third st. 

Sohisler, Arthur W Kaercher-Schisler, Seedmen 710 N. Fourth st. 

Sohlafly, Fred Banker and Miller Carlyle, 111. 

Sohloemer, Bernard. . .C. Hilke H. k G. Co. Grain and Hay. . . 8747 N. Broadway. 

Schnell, J. R HarrisonvlUej, Mo. 

Schoen, Isaac A 100 N. Main st 

Schoenlng, Edw. F. .Columbia Star Milling Co Columbia, 111. 

Sohreiner, Francis L 

Schreiner, Jacob Sohreiner Grain Co., Commission 115 Cham, of Com. 

Schuermann, Julius. .O'Connor Market Reporter Co., Reporter — 216 Market st. 

Schuessler, Adolph Hunter Grain Co., Commission 854 Pierce Bldg. 

Schuler, John G. . . .German Mutual Life Ins. Co 1102 Third Nat'l Bank Bldg. 

Schulte, A. J Langenberg Bros. Grain Co., 

Commission 518 Cham, of Com. 

Schulte, John J Geo. J. Schulte k Co., Commission 511 Cham, of Com. 

Schultz, Arthur W Sohultz k Niemeier Com. Co 805 Cham, of Com. 

Schultz, Henry C Deceased 

Schultz, John Schultz, Bau jan k Co., Millers Beardstown, Dl. 

Schultz, Louis F. .Schultz k Niemeier Com. Co 805 Cham, of Com. 

Schulz, Henry Henry Schulz Feed Co Webster Groves, Mo. 

Schluz, John John Schulz Feed Co., Feed 6585 Manchester ave. 

Schulz, Otto J 25elle Bros. P. * C. Co., 702 N. Third st, 

Schurmann, Bd Hanover Star Milling Co Germantown, 111. 

Schurmann, Henry Hanover-Star Milling Co Germantown, Dl. 

Schwaebe, B. F. W. . . . Wm. J. Lemp Brew. Co 8822 S. Thirteenth st. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MBB0HANT8' EXOHANQB OF ST. liOUIS. 17 

Name. Firm. Business. Location. 

Sohwartz, Irring M — M. Schwartz Bo Sons Feed Co., Haj and Grain, 

8540 Missouri are. 

Scott, Robt. F. . . .Picker & Beardsley Com. Co 118 N. Main st. 

Scott, T. Maurice Picker & Beardsley Com. Co 118 N. Main st. 

Scott, W. 8 Mo. and lU. Coal Co 806 Mermod-Jaccard Bldg. 

Scullin, John Scullin Steel Co 818 Security Building. 

Sears, Clarence. .Langenberg Bros. Grain Co., Grain 518 Cham, of Com. 

Sears, W. H St. Louis-Union Trust Co. 

Sears, Gilbert C. H. Albers Com. Co 626 Pierce Bldg. 

Seaver. James E Moore-Seaver Gr. Co. . . .620 Bd. of Trade, Kansas City, Mo. 

Sebastian, Henry W 202 Houser Bldg. 

Seele, £dw. C Seele Bros. Grain Co 317 Cham, of Com. 

Seele, Eugene W Parrott-Day Co 819 Cham, of Com. 

Seele, F. W Seele Bros. Grain Co 817 Cham, of Com. 

Seele, W. C Seele Bros. Grain Co 317 Cham, of Com. 

Segraye, John K C B. Munday & Co Litchfield, III. 

Sehlinger. Anton Sehlinger Grain Co., Belleville, n. 

Seipp, Philip W A. O. Slaughter & Co., Brokers. . .110 W. Monroe st., Chicago 

Seldomridge, Chas. B...C. B. Seldomridge. Grain, 

108 S. Tejon st., Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Senter, Charles Parsons Senter Com. Co 27 S. Third st. 

Sesslnghaus, Wm 1444 St. Louis ave. 

Seybt, Charles H . . . . Highland Milling Co., 612 Merchants'-Laclede Bldg. 

Shapleigh, A. L . . Shapleigh Hardware Co 4th & Washington avc. 

Shields, Edwin W.. .Simonds-Shields Grain Co B. of T., Kansas City, Mo. 

Shields, George H Shields & Shields 926 Title Guaranty Bldg. 

Shirmer, Philip F 408 Commonwealth Trust Bldg. 

Siddons, Geo. S. . .Atlanta, Birmingham & Atlantic R. R 821 Pierce Bldg 

Siemers, Geo. F Commission 117 Cham, of Com. 

Sieving, F. A. . . . W. D. Orthwein Grain Co 803 Cham, of Com. 

Simon. Chas. G. . . .Great Western Feed Co 8911 Chouteau ave. 

Simonin, Frank Simonin Bros. Hay and Grain, 

228 N. 7th St., East St. Louis, HI. 

Slack, B. L Ballard, Messmore Gr. Co., .417 Cham, of Com. 

Slade, Chas Purcell B. & T. Co., Purcell, Okla. 

Sloan, William P Golconda, III. 

Smith, Eugene Merchants' Exchange, Secretary Cham, of Com. 

Smith, H. H Golden Grain Millhig Go., Ass't Sec'y and Pur. Agent, 

East St. Louis, Ills. 

Smith, J. Allen J. Allen Smith & Co., Millers KnoxviUe, Tenn. 

Smith, Robt. £ 

Smith, S. Jenks Broker Cham, of Com. 

Smith, Wm.E Plant Seed Co 802 N. Main st. 

Smith, W. P Southern Ry. Con't Agent 218 Pierce Bldg. 

Sparks, Charles F Sparks Milling Co Alton, in. 

Sparks, Hosea B Sparks MUling Co Alton,ni. 

Sparks, H. J 

Spelbrink, Louis... Louis Spelbrink L. & U. Co., Livery Stable.. 1821 Franklin ave. 

SpellmanfJohn W Spellman & Co., Grain Lincoln, III. 

Stanard, Edwin Stanard-Tilton Milling Co 1685 Pierce Bldg. 

Stanard, W. K. Stanard-Tilton Milling Co., President 1685 Pierce Bldg. 

Steele, Joseph W Jos. W. Steele & Co., Printers 18 N. Third st. 

Steed, Sylvester P. . . .Jones- Wise Com. Co., Grain 616 Cham, of Com. 

Steigers, D. H St. Louis Hide and Tallow Co 6146 N. Second st. 

Steinmesch, Harry J.... Steinmesch Feed & P. S. Co ION. 4th st. 

Steinmesch, Henry *Steinmesch Feed So P. S. Co 10 N. 4th st. 

Stephens, Philip A St. Louis Grain Co 810 Cham, of Com. 

Stewart, A. C. Stewart, Bryan & Williams 1605 Pierce Bldg. 

Stewart, A. W 6261 Washington ave. 

Stewart, H. B G. J . Stewart 9t Co., Lumber and Grain Chariton, Ja. 

Stewart, Wallace E Ware & Leland, 209 Cham, of Com. 

Stickney, Stuart G . . . A. G. Edwards So Son, Stocks and Bonds 412 Olive st. 

Stiers, Frank A Contractor 4612 Morgan st. 

Stifel, H. C Stifel, Nicholaus Bo Parsons Inv. Co. . . .207 N. Broadway. 

Stifel, Otto Fred'k Union Brewing Co., Brewing 8146 Gravels ave. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



18 MBXBKBS OF THB 

Name. Firm. Business* Location. 

Stlth, W. C* Terminal R. R. Ass'n, Traffic Manager 118 Rial to Bldg. 

Stone. R.C Stone&Watts 820 Cham, of Com. 

Stonebraker, Edw. O Springfield, Mo. 

Stott, David David Stott Flour MiU Detroit, Mich. 

Stover, W. D Star Union Line, Agent 228 Pierce Bldg. 

Strain, Arthur R. . . .Union Seed & Fertilizer Co 2745 Papin st. 

Stream, John J Shaffer & Stream 284 S. LaSalle St., Chicago. 

Struttmanu, John Grain Rhineland, Mo. 

Stuever, Anton C . . Highland Fire Clay Co Mackllnd and Berthold aves. 

Sullivan, Patrick 8440 Keokuk st. 

Summa, Emll Cuba Roller Mills Co Cuba, Mo. 

Sutherland, William H Cairo Milling Co Cairo, 111. 

Swartz, Frederick C Broker 117 Cham, of C-om. 

Sweeney, John P. . . .Miss. Valley Trust Co., Banking 201 N. Fourth St. 

Swygard,W. B Broker 304 Cham, of Com. 

Sykes.G. A St. Louis Com. Co 208 N. Main st. 



Talbott, O. A O. A. Talbott & Co., Grain and Seed Keokuk, Iowa 

Tansey, Geo. J St. Louis Transfer Co., President 400 S. Broadway. 

Tate, Wm. R Tate, Logan & Co., Grain and Hay Nashville, Tenn. 

Taylor, E. M Commission 009 Cham, of Com. 

Taylor, J. B J. B. Taylor Grain Co 1028 Pierce Bldg. 

Taylor, T. C Seele Bros. Grain Co., Commission 817 Cham, of Com. 

Teasdale, Geo. W J. W. Teasdale & Co., Dried Fruits 806 Spruce st. 

Teasdale, J. W J. W. Teasdale & Co., Dried Fruits 806 Spruce st- 

Teasdale, J. Waller. . . .J. H. Teasdale Com. Co 108 Cham, of Com. 

Teasdale, J. W., Jr. . .J. W. Teasdale & Co., Dried Fruits 806 Spruce st. 

Teasdale, Thos. B J. H. Teasdale Com. Co 108 Cham, of Com. 

Teichmann, Chas. H 1610 Mississippi ave. 

Telchmann, Otto L. . .German -American Bank, President. .4th and Franklin ave. 

Telthorst, Herman Flour and Feed 7601 S. Broadway. 

Temple, Joseph 410 N. Fourth st. 

Tenipleman, W. J Templeman & Co., Produce 808 N. Third st. 

TenBroek, Gerrlt H Attorney 717 Locust st. 

Tesson, George B Nanson Com. Co 202 Chamber of Commerce. 

Theiss, Harry E Theiss Bros. Feed Co., Hay and Grain. 

217 St. Clair ave.. East St. Louis 

Thompson, C. McClung. .C. L. Thompson & Son, Insurance 1348 Pierce Bldg. 

Thompson, Joseph B 4615 Westminster place 

Thompson, R. P 1844 Pierce Bldg. 

Thompson, 8. A W. H. Thompson In v. Co 408 Bank of Commerce Bldg. 

Thomson, Wm. A W. A.Thomson & Co., Grain Louisville, Ky. 

Thumau, Arnold A. .Arnold A. Thumau Grain & Feed Co 514 Cham, of Com. 

Tice, Vilray C Goffe & Carkener Co., Commission 107 Cham, of Com. 

Tiedemann, G eo. W Chas. Tiedemann Milling Co O'Fallon, 111. 

Tiffany, Geo. S Geo. S. Tiffany & Co., Cotton Merchant 106 S. First st, 

Tilton, Edgar D..Stanard-Tllton Milling Co. Flour 1585 Pierce Bldg. 

Tilton, 0.8 Stanard-TlltonMilHngCo., Flour 1585 Pierce Bldg. 

Toberman, M. E Toberraan, Mackey & Co., Hay and Grain.. . .436 Pierce Bldg. 

Toberman, Walter H Toberman, Mackey & Co 436 Pierce Bldg. 

Tontrup, Louis H Papin & Tontrup, Real Estate 626 Chestnut st. 

Townsend, F. C Townsend Com. Co., 827 N. Third st. 

Trimble. C. H Deceased 

Tumbach, J. C . . . McCullough & Tumbach, Commission 112 N. Main st. 

Tune, Lewis T The Bradstreet Co 219 Security Building. 

Tunsiall, R. B J. H. Kracke Com. Co., Commission 901 Pierce Bldg. 

Turner, G. A Turner Grain Co., Grain Commission..421 Cham, of Com. 

Turner, V. P Tumer-Hudnut Co., Grain 101 8. Mary st,, Pekin, His. 

Twamley, J. F J . F. Twamley Son & Co., Grain, 

Fourteenth and Izard sts., Omaha, Neb. 
Twidale, E. A. . . . Koehler-Twidale Elevator Co Hastings, Neb. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



MEBOHANTS' BXCHANOE OF ST. LOUIS. 19 

Name. Firm. Business. Location. 

UdeU, C. B C. E. Udell & Co., Cheese 410 N. Second st. 

Updike, N. B Updike Grain Co 618 Grain Exchange Bldg., 

Omaha, Neb. 



Vahlkamp, Henry . .W. J. Lemp Brew. Co., Secretary 18th and Cherokee sts. 

"Valier, Chas. E Valier & Spies Milling Co 918 Pierce Bidg. 

Valier, Louis A Valier & Spies MUling Co 913 Pierce Bldg. 

Valier, Robt. C Valier & Spies Mlg. Co 918 Pierce Bldg. 

Van Nuys, John M Parker & Graff 17 Cham, of Com., Peoria, Ills. 

Vaughan, Wm. L Attorney Chamois, Mo. 

Veninga, George A. . . .G. A. Veninga & Co 827 Pierce Bldg. 

Veninga, Milton E G. A. Veninga & Co 827 Pierce Bldg. 

Vincent, J. F Smith, Vincent & Co., Commission 72 Gay Building. 

Vogel, Charles F Real Estate. . 624 Chestnut st. 

Voll, Edgar P. . . Bolz-McBrlde Cooperage Co 704 Bank of Commerce Bid 

Voris, George W Grain and Hay Stewardson "^ 



Jldg. 

, in. 



Wachter, Gustaye W 

Waddook, Frank B O'Connor Market Reporter Co 216 Market st. 

Waddock, Frank G O'Connor Market Reporter Co 216 Market st. 

Wade, Festus J Mercantile Trust Co., E^resident Eighth and Locust sts. 

Waggoner, E. L. . . . Marshall Hall- Waggoner Grain Co 206 Cham, of Com. 

Waggoner, Wm. H Waggoner-Gates Milling Co Independence, Mo. 

Wagner, C. Corwith. . . Prudential Life Ins. Co 512 Chemical Bldg. 

Wagner, E. W E. W. Wagner & Co., Grain 99 Bd. of Trade, Chicago 

Wagoner, Geo. C. R. . . .Wagoner Undertaking Co 8621 Olive st. 

Wagoner, Harry E 8621 Olive st. 

Wahl, J. B John Wahl Com. Co Pierce Bldg. 

Waldeck, Jacob C. C Waldeck Pkg. Co Montrose and LaSalle st. 

Walker, Robert N. . . . Kehlor Flour MUl Co 401 Cham, of Com. 

Wall, Nicholas R N. R. Wall & E. T. Campbell Agency Co 104 N. 4th st. 

Wallace, Mahlon B . . . .Samuel Cupples W. W. Co 401 8. Seventh st. 

Wallace, Fred. L F. L. Wallace & Co 107 Cham, of Com. 

Walsh, Edward J Mississippi Glass Co 4070 N. Main st. 

Walsh, J ulius S 

Waltke, Louis Alvin .... Wm. Waltke & Co., Soap E. Grand ave. and 2nd st. 

Waltke, Louis H Wm. Waltke & Co., Soap E. Grand ave. and 2nd st. 

Wangles Joseph A. . .J. F. Wangler B. & S. W. Co., President. . . .1547 N. Ninth st. 

Ward, w . E Harper & Ward, Grain Commission, 

807 Fleming Bldg., DesMoines, la. 

Ware, J . H Ware & Leland, Com. .160 W. Jackson boulv., Chicago 

Warterfleld, W. M. . . .Neil & Shafner Grain Co Nashville, Tenn. 

Wasserfall, O.J 

Washburn, John Washburn, Crosby Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Washer, S. R..TheS. R. Washer Grain Co., Atchison, Kas. 

Wasson, H. D Broker Cham, of Com. 

Watson, John H St. Louis Grain Clearing Co 814 Cham, of Com. 

Watts, T. G T. G. Watts & Son, Real Estate 631 Chestnut st. 

Weiler, Charles G J. H. Teasdale Com. Co 108 Cham, of Com. 

Weinberg, Frank J. E. Bennett & Co 211 Cham, of Com. 

Weissenbom, S. A S. A. Weissenbom & Son, Coal 818 Olive st. 

Weissman, Sam'l Priwer Feed Co., Hay and Grain, 

1601 Missouri ave.. East St. Louis 

Wenz, Charles A. .. Hunter-Robinson- Wenz Milling Co 921 Pierce Bldg. 

Werner, Percy Attorney at Law 720 Rialto Bldg. 

Worth, G. L J. E. Worth &; Bro., Insurance 102 Cham, of Com. 

Werthan, Morris. . . .St. Louis Bag & Burlap Co 60 Dock st. 

Whitaker, Edwards Whitaker & Co. Brokers 800 N. Fourth st. 

White, Chas. E Fulton Bag &; Cotton Mills Co 612 8. Seventh st. 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



20 MBUBEB8 OF THE MBRCHANT8* EXCHANGE OP ST. LOUIS. 

Name Firm. Businesf. Locatioii. 

White, Edward W.. Central of Ga.Ry. Co., G. A 1024 Pieroe Bids* 

Whitehead, 8. A Nanson Commiision Co 202 Chamber of Commerce. 

Whitehill, Thomas H Citizens' Ins. Co., Insurance 815 Pierce Bld|^. 

Whitelaw, Oscar L Whitelaw Bros., Paints and Oils 409 N. Second st. 

Whittemore, P. C. . . .P. Churchill Whittemore Co., Insurance. . .120 N. Pourth st. 

Wiedmer, John Wiedmer Chemical Co 680 Pierce Bld|^. 

Wiener,!. M 206 Wainwright BuUding. 

Wiener, Adolph Wainwright Building. 

Wilder, C. A Wilder & Shotwell, Grain Laddonia, Mo. 

Wilson, Allan B 

Wilson, Chas. A Barron k Wilson, Grain Samplers.. .120 Cham, of Com. 

Wmter. Chas. A Goffe & Carkener Co. Commission 107 Cham, of Com. 

Wise, Henry M Jones- Wise Cora. Co., Grain and Hay 616 Cham, of Com. 

Witt, Jesse Oliver Acme Milling Co. (Inc.) Talbott, Tenn. 

Wltte,OttoH Wltte Hardware Co 704 N. Third st. 

Wittloh, Geo. P. R John C. Roever Peed & Mlg. Co., 

Hay and Gram, 6601 Natural Bridge Road 

Woelfle, Albert 2018 Harris ave. 

Woelfle, Matt Baur Plour Co., V. P 807 N. Second st- 

Wolf , Wm. G Picker k Beardsley Com. Co 118 N. Main st, 

Woodlock, Prank D Deceased 

Woods, W. K Ralston Purina Co., Eighth and Gratiot sts. 

Woodward, CM Western Grain Co., Grain, 

667 Gibraltar Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

Woodworth, E. 8. . .E. S. Woodworth &; Co., Commission Minneapolis, Minn. 

Wooldrldge, O. J. . . .Puller- Wooldrldge Com. Co., Grain 808 Cham, of Com. 

Wrape, Henry. . . .American Carbon & Battery Co East St. Louis, 111. 

Wright, C. L W. H. Wright Gr. Co 1686 Pierce Bldg. 

Wright, J. H., Jr.. .Nebraska -Iowa Grain Co., Grain., 

421 Grain Exchange Bldg., Omaha, Neb. 

Wright, J.L J. L. Wright & Co. Grain 1686 Pierce Bldg. 

Wunderiich, Chas 



Yore, J. Hanley. Chase Bag Co. Bags 118 N. Main st. 

Young, Albert B Bemls Bros. Bag Co Pourth and Poplar sts. 

Young, P. N.' Mound City Elevator k Grain Co Second and Branch sts. 



Zenk, Philip John Wermeler h Zenk, 108 Missouri av., E. St. Louis, HI. 

Zerse, Hiram O B. H. Lang & Co., Commission 604 Cham, of Com. 

Zlebold,Geo. W Waterloo Milling Co Waterloo, lUs. 

Zimmermann. Phil. L. . P. L. Zlmmermann Co., Brokerage 116 Cham, of Com. 

Zingre, Albert J. . . .Independent Grain & Lumber Co Mason City, la. 

Zlmheld, E. J Zlmheld Plour Co 1482 N. Broadway 

Zlmheld, Joseph Zlmheld Plour Co 1482 N. Broadway 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



INDEX. 



▲utomobUas 30-40 

Bakeries....^ 44 

Bank Statement 48 

Barley 110 

Barley Crop 188 

Barley, Stocks in Public Ela- 

vators. 171 

Beef. DreflMd. 205-207 

Board of Directors: 

Report of. 

Resolutions. 27 

Boots and Shoes. 37 

Bradstreet's...^ 104 

Bran 125 

Bridge Traffic. 78 

BuUdinffStatistics 66-67 

Butter, Range of Prices ^ 233 

Candles 46 

Carpets, etc. 38 

Carriages 38 

Cars, Street and Railway. 43 

Cattia 215 

Chemicals 41 

Cigars 43 

Clay Products 42 

Clearlng-House Statement 48 

Climate 72 

Clothing 45 

Clover Seed. 232 

Coal and Coke 70-80 

Committees for 1015 6, 8 

Committees for 1016 4, 5 

Com 116. 122 

Crop 186 

Extreme Range 124 

Highest and Lowest Prices for 

a series of years 138 

Monthly Range of Futures for 

a series of years 160, 153 

Monthly Cash Prices for a 

series of years. 140 

Monthly Receipts and Ship- 
ments. 122 

Stocks in Public Elevators 171 

Kaffir. Weekly Range 146-147 

Cotton. 80 

Crop.. 184 

Crops: 

Of the World 100, 204 

Estimates for several years 104 

Wheat, series of years 102 

For 1015 182-102 

Average Condition. 108 

Of Missouri 175-181 

-Custom-House Transactions 73, 74 

Department of Weights, R^Dort.. 20 

Drugs and Chemicals.... 41 

Dry Goods.... 36-58 

Dry PlatesL..... 41 

E^tric industjrtei"!!."!!'!!!!!!!.!!!!!!*. 38 

Elevators, capacity and rate&.102, 103 

Enameled and Tinware. 45 

Exchange dosed. 12 

Ferries 78 

Fire Record. 68 

Flax Seed....... 192 



Flour and Grain: 

Total Movement 06, 07 

Monthly Receipts and Ship- 
ments. 120 

Total Rec^pts and Shipments 

for 23 years 120 

Flour and Wheat by Crop Years.. 110 
Flour: 

Review 104 

Amount Manufactured 106 

Amount Manufactured in Yari- 

oui* Cities Ill 

Foreign Shipments 108-112 

Monthly Receipts and Ship- 
ments 120 

Receipts and Shipments for 40 

years 107 

Receipts by Crop Years 107 

Receipts at Various Cities 110 

Report of Flour Inspector Ill 

Stocks in Store 107-112 

Weekly Prices. 113 

Foreign Grain and Flour Trade.... 100 

Foreign Shipments 108, 100 

Freights: 

To New Orleans by River 82 

Memphis and Vicksburg by 

River 82 

AU-RaU Eastward 82 

To Southern Cities by Rail 82 

Fruits 234 

Furniture. 57 

Furs 231 

Glass 40 

Grain: 

Inspection. 158, 150 

Bartey 110-123 

Cash and Future Prices 130-157 

Comparative Crops for Series 

of years 103 

Com 116, 122 

Kaffir Com. Weekly Range.146-147 

DaUy Prices 126. 137 

Extreme Range 124 

Highest and Lowest Prices for 

a series of years 188 

Highest and Lowest Futures.... 130 
Monthly Receipts and Ship- 
ments. 120 

Missouri Crops. 175 

Oats 117 

Receipts at 7 Atlantic Ports.... 174 
Receipts and Shipments by 

Months 122, 123 

Receipts and Shipments for a 

Series of Years 121 

Stocks in Store at close of each 

Week 160-171 

Stocks in Store at dose of Year 121 
Receipts at Prindpal Markets.. 174 

Receipts by Crop, Year'a 124 

Review. 114 

Rye 118, 123 

Stocks in Farmers' Hands 106 

Stocks in Public Elevators. 160 

Visible Supply 172, 173, 104 

Wheat. 115 

Wheat, Monthly Range 143, 146 

Groceries. 44 

Hardware. 43 

Harvest Time of the World. 103 

Hats and Gloves. 46 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



INDCX-^CoacliMled. 



Hay Crop 190 

Hay 235-227 

Hides 231 

Hofs. 218 

Hones and Males 220 

Implements 38 

Inspectors. 1016. 4. 5 

Inspectors. 1015 7. 8 

Lead 228 

Live Stock. 21ft 

Weekly Prices 224 

RecelpU and Shipments. 221-223 

Lumber ftl 

Machine Shops Products. 42 

Manufacturing Industries 00 

Members of the Exchange. 101ft 

(Appendix) 
Members of Exchange Deceased, 

191ft 2ft8 

MOUnery 87 

MlUstuifs 12ft 

Missouri Crop Review 17ft 

Municipal Affairs 63 

Oats 117 

Crop 187 

Extreme Ranee 124 

Highest and Lowest Prices for 

a Series of Years 138 

Monthly Cash Prices for a 

Series of Years Ift3 

Monthly Range of Futures for 

a Series of Years Ift4. Ift7 

Stock in PubUc Elevators 171 

Officers of the Exchange since its 

organisation 2 

Officers of the Exchange for 1016 3 
Officers of the Exchange for 101ft 6 
Onions 236 

Packing House Products. 44 

Paints and Oils 40 

Paper, etc 30 

Plumbers' Supplies 40 

Population of St. Louis. Oft 

Post-office Statistics 60 

Potatoes 101 

Produce 234 

Provisions and Packing 208-213 

Provisions. Weekly IMces 214 

Queenswaro 41 

Railway Supplies 46 

RalnfaU 70 

Real Estate ft3 

Real Estate and Personal Prop- 
erty 6ft 

Receipts: 

By each Ralhx>ad and River.... 247 
Or leading articles to close of 

each week. 08, 00 

Monthly Totals 237-241 

Review. 191ft 3ft 

Rice 192 



Blver: 
Arrivals and Departures of 

Steamers. 87 

Closed by Ice. S4 

Depth or Chann^ Southward.. 8S 

Gauge Readings. 85 

Harbor and wharf Commis- 
sioner's Report 88 

Highest and Lowest Stages 88 

Rye 118, 128 

Crop 188 

Extreme Range. 124 

Stocks In PuUic Elevators. ^ 171 

Saddlery and Harness. 38 

Seeds. „ „ 232 

Sheep 210 

Shipments: 

By each RaUroad and River.... 2ftS 

Monthly Totabi 242-246 

Of leading articles to close of 

each week..... 100. 101 

ShipstulTs. 12ft 

Soaps and Candles. „ 44 

Spelter 228 

St. Louis in 101ft 82-34 

State Finances 7ft 

Stock Yards. 222 

Stoves and Ranges. 41 

Tax Levy 64 

Temperature 72 

Timothy Seed. 232 

Tobacco 43, 102 

Tonnage. Total by each Road 

and River 76, 70 

Traffic Department. Report of....„ 18 

Treasurer, Report of. 28 

Trunks, etc 46 

Trust Companies. 48 

Yehides. 38 

Visible Supply 172-173, 104 

Wagons 38 

Weather 70 

Wheat lift 

Crop 183-18ft 

Crop cf U. S. for series of years 105 

Crop of the World 200 

Distribution of Crop tat series 

of years 107 

Highest and Lowest Prices tat 

series of years 180 

Extreme Range 124 

Range of Futures 130 

HlKhest and Lowest Cash Prices 

for a series of years. 140, 141 

In Public Elevators 171 

Monthly Receipts and Ship- 
ments 122 

Monthly Range of Futures for 

series of years 142-148 

Receipts by Crop Years 124 

Receipts. July and August 124 

Woodenware 43 

Wool 281 



Digiti 



ized by Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



STANFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



^To troid fine, this book should be renimed on 
or before the date last stamped below.