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Full text of "Annual statement of the trade and commerce of Saint Louis .."

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I 




.S 2. 



ANNUAL STATEMENT 



OF THE 



Trade and Commerce 



OF ' 






SAINT LOUIS, 



REPORTED TO THE 



MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS, 



BY 



OEO. H. MORGAN. Secretary. 



^^^^» 



•T. LOUIS, MO.: 
"»«•• or R. p, STUDLBV « CO. 

t»oa. 



OFFICERS OF THE 

MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS 

SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION. 



Year. President. 

Henry J. Moore. 
Oeorge Partridge. 
Thomas RioheBon 
Barton Able. 
E. O. Stanard. 

C. L. Tucker. 
John J. Roe. 
Oeo. P. Plant 
Wm. J. LewiB. 
Gerard B. Allen. 
R. P. Tansey. 
Wm. H. Scudder. 
Web M. Samuel. 

D. P. Rowland. 

876 Nathan Cole. 

877 John A. Soudder. 

Geo. Bain. 

John Wahl. 

Alex. H. Smith. 

Michael McEnnis. 

Chas. E. Slaybaok. 

J. 0. Ewald. 

D. R. Francis. 

Henry C. Haarstiok. 

S. W. Cobb. 

Frank Gaiennie. 

Chas. F. Orthwein. 

Chas. A. Cox. 

John W. Kauffman. 

Marcus Bemheimer. 

Isaac M. Mason. 

W. T. Anderson. 

QQ^ /A. T. Harlow. 
'^tWm. G.Boyd. 

806 Thos. Booth. 

C. H. Spencer. 

H. F. Langenberg.' 

Chris. Sharp. 

Wm. P. Kennett. 

Oscar L. Whitelaw. 

Wm. T. Haarstick. 

Geo. J. Tansey. 



868 
864 

865 

867 
868 
860 
870 
871 
872 
878 
874 
876 



.878 
870 
880 
881 
882 
888 
884 
886 
886 
887 
888 
880 
800 
801 
802 
808 



Vice - Presidents. 
C. S. Greeley. A. W. Fagin. 



No. 
Members. 

676 



C. S. Greeley. 
Barton Able. 
E. O. Stanard. 
Alex. H. Smith. 
Edgar Ames. 
Geo. P. Plant. 
H. A. Homeyer. 
G. G. Waggaman. 
R. P. Tansey. 
Wm. H. Soudder. 
S. M. Edgell. 

L. L. Ashbrook. 
John P. Meyer. 
John Wahl. 
N. Schaeffer. 
H. C. Haarstick. 
Michael McEnnis. 
Chas. E. Slaybaok. 
John Jackson. 
Chas. F. Orthwein. 

D. R. Francis. 
John P. Keiser. 
S. W. Cobb. 



A. W. Fagin. 

C. L. Tucker. 
H. A. Homeyer. 

D. G. Taylor. 
D. G. Taylor. 
H. A. Homeyer. 
Nathan Cole. 
H. C. Yaeger. 
Geo. Bain. 

C. H. Teichman. 
Web M. Samuel. 
John F. Telle. 
Wm. M. Senter. 
F. B. Davidson. 
Geo. Bain. 
Craig Alexander. 
W. J. Lemp. 

J. C. Ewald. 
A. T. Harlow. 
Frank Gaiennie. 

D. P. Grier. 

C. W. Barstow. 

D. P. Slattery. 



Chas. H. Teichmann. J. Will Boyd. 



Louis Fusz. 

J. H. Teasdale. 

Hugh Rogers. 

Marcus Bemheimer. 

Geo. H. Plant. 

Wm. T. Anderson. 

Roger P. Annan. 

rWm. G.Boyd. 
\ Geo. H. Small. 



Thomas Booth. 
Chas. A. Cox. 
Alex. Euston. 
G. M. Flanigan. 
S. R. Francis. 
Wallace Delafleld. 
L. C. Doggett. 

j E. A. Pomeroy. 



618 
726 
000 
1110 
1068 
1268 
1332 
1280 
1282 
1860 
1363 
1807 
1442 
1307 
1827 
1200 
1260 
1303 
3683 
8665 
8666 
8565 
3605 
3364 
3312 
3206 
3261 
3100 
3116 
3001 
2012 

2807 



C. Marquard Forster. Geo. D. Barnard. 



886 
807 

808 



000 
001 
002 



Amedee B. Cole. 
Chris. Sharp. 
Henry H. Wemse, 
Oscar L. Whitelaw, 
Wm. T. Haarstick. 
Geo. J. Tansey. 
T. R. Ballard. 



Clark H. Sampson. 
Wm. P. Kennett. 
Oscar L. Whitelaw. 
Daniel E. Smith. 
Frank E. Kauffman. 1076 
T. R. Ballard. 1872 

Wm. A. Gkirdner. 1832 



2647 
2618 
2306 
2220 
2070 



Secretary and Treasurer. 

1862 Clinton B Fisk. 

1868-64 J. H. Alexander. 

1866-1002 Geo. H. Morgan. 



^JtK£^i-dL^ 



MERCHANTS^ EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS. 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1901. 

PRJSSIDEirT. 

WM. T. HAJLRSTICK, 

First Vicb-Prbsedicnt, GEO. J. TAN8EY. 
SscOKD Yicb-Pbiesldknt, T. R. BALLARD. 

DIRKGTORS. 

1901. 1901-1902. 

WM. P. KBNNETT, OSCAR L. WHITBLAW, 

BERT. H. LANG, HENRY WOLLBRINCK, 

ERICH PICKER, J. 8. McGEHEE, 

JESSE H. HOLMES, 8. A. WHITEHEAD, 

P. M. KIELT, CHRISTOPH HILKE. 

GEO. H. MORGAN, Sbcrbtart and Tbbasuber. 

H. R. WHITMORE, First Assistant Secbbtary. 

D. R. WHITMORE, Second Assistant Secretary. 

R. P. WALKER, Attorney. 

COMMITTSS OF APPEALS. 

B. A. FAUST, E. L. WAGGONER, 

A. C. PETRI, H. B. GRUBBS, 

HUOH FERGUSON, FERD. P. MEYER, 

H. 1¥. BECK, EMIL SUMMA, 

GILBERT SEARS, R. L. FORRESTER, 

T. J. BARRY, T. H. FRANCIS. 

COMMITTEE OF ARBITRATION. 
FIRST BIX MOSTH8. SSOOIVD SIX MONTHS. 

A. P. RICHARDSON, GEO. F. POWELL, 

CHAS. E. PRUNTY, WALTER E. ORTHWBIN, 

MATT. WOLFLB, W. J. TEMPLEMAN, 

G. DOUGLAS BRADLEY, ISAAC P. LUSK, 

FRANK GRIESEDIECK, T. J. SULLIVAN. 

DOORKEEPER. 
FRANK T. BnTDGE. 

amWKOAls MABKST REPORTER. TBUEORAPH CUBRK. 

MARC. J. GAUTIBR. CHAS. H. WHITMORE. 

RIVER CLERK. STENOGRAPHER. MESSENGER. 

E. T. WALTON. MISS M. G. JOHNS. EDDIE LOESCH. 



MERCHAP4TS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS. 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR ipoa. 

PRBSIDBNT. 

GEO. J. TANSEY. 
First Vicb-Prbsidbnt, T. R. BALLARD. 
Second Vicb-Prbsidbnt, WM. A. GARDNER. 

DIRBCTOR8. 
1902. 1902-1908. 

OSCAR L. WHITBLAW, WM. T. HAAR8TICK, 

HENRY WOLLBRINCK, L. B. BRIN80N, 

JA8. 8. McGEHEE, T. H. FRANCIS, 

CHRI8TOPH HILKE, OTTO L. TEICHMANN, 

S. A. WHITEHEAD, JOHN H. DIECKMAN. 

GEO. H. MORGAN, Secrbtary and Trbasurbr. 
D. R. WHITMORE, First Assistant Sbcrbtary. 
H. R. WHITMORE, Sbcond Assistant Secrbtart. 
R. F. WALKER, Attorney. 

committee of appeals. 

CHRISTIAN BERNBT, THOS. B. TEASDALE, 

SAMUEL GORDON, CHAS. E. FLACK, 

W. C. DICKINSON, DAN'L P. BYRNE, 

GEO. F. LANGENBERG, R. H. LEONHARDT, 

JNO. L. MESSMORE, JNO. WIEDMER, 

B. L. SLACK, B. J ROWE. 

COMMITTEE OF ARBITRATION. 
FIRST BIX MONTHS. BSOOHD BIX MONTHS. 

J. C. BROCKMEIER, R. J. PENDLETON, 

THOS. H. WHITEHHiL, B. H. COYLE, 

JOHN E. GERAGHTY, EDW. M. FLESH, 

W. H. DANFORTH, SAMUEL PLANT, 

J. BOGY TAYLOR, ROBT. S. YOUNG. 

TELEGRAPH CLERK. OFFICIAL MARKET REPORTER. DOORKEEPER. 

CHAS. H. WHITMORE. MARC. J. GAUTIER. FRANK T. MUDGB. 

RIVER CLBRK. STENOGRAPHER. MBSSBNGER. 

E. T. WALTON. MISS M. G. JOHNS. EDDIE LOESCH. 

HONORARY MEMBERSHIP COMMTTTEB. 

E. O. STANARD, Chairman. 
ALEX. H. SMITH, S. W. COBB, CHAS. A. COX, 

ISAAC M. MASON, C. H. SPENCER, OSCAR L. WHITBLAW. 



COMMITTEES AND INSPECTORS FOR 1901 



REAL ESTATE. 
W. T. HAAR8TI0K« Ohalrman. 
GEO. J. TANSEY, O. L. WHITELAW, T. B. BALLARD, 

W. P. KENNBTT. 

ST. LOUIS TRAFFIC BUREAU. 

.Managers from Merchants* Exchange. 
W. P. KENNKTT, H. P. LANGENBBEG, GEO. J. TAN8BY. 

MEMBERSHIP. 
T. B. BALLABD, Ohalrman. 8. A. WHITEHEAD, B. H. LANG. 

RULES. 
J. S. MoGEHBE, Chairman. E. D. TILTON, J. P. WOODS. 

CONTRACTS 
BBICH PICKES, Ohalrman. LOUIS FUSZ. JAMES P. NEWELL. 

MARKET REPORTS. 
BERT B. LANG, Chairman. WM. A. 6ARDNEB, OH AS. E. FLAOH. 

GRAIN. 
a A. WHITEHEAD, Chairman. 
T. B. BALLARD. T. B. TEA8DALE, R. P. ANNAN, 

H. F. LAN6ENBEBG, L. B. BRINSON, O. W. ISAACS, 

E. L. BABTIjirrT, JOHN MULLALLY, J. S. MoCLELLAN. 

BARLEY. 
0. MARQUARD FORSTER, Chairman. 
JULIUS H. KOEHLER, HENRY GREVE, CHA8. H. TEIOHMANN. 

F. C. ORTHWEIN. 

POSTAL AFFAIRS. 
F. D. HIRSCHBERG, Chairman. 
0HA8. F. WENNEKER. JAMES F. EWING. JACOB PURTH, 

D. R. HAYNES, ADRIAN DbYONG, R B. DULA, 

H. L DBUMHOND, WILLIAM BULL, OHAS. L. DEAN, 

FRANK C. CASE. 

FLOUR. 
C. H. SIEVING, Chairman. H. G. CRAFT, Secretary. 

HENRY BURG, F. W. EGGERS, CHAS. T. NEALE, 

SAIinEL* PLANT, F. HATTER8LEY. 

BOARD OF FLOUR INSPECTORS. 
VIOTOR GOETZ, President. AUGUST RUMP, Secretary. 

PROVISIONS. 
HENRY WOLLBRINCK, Chairman. 
JOHN RING, J. C. C. WALDECK, CHAS. WISSMATH, Jr„ 

J. J. P. LANGTON. 

PROVISION INSPECTOR. 
J. G. HINCHMAN. 

SEEDS AND CASTOR BEANS. 

D. I. BUSHNELL, Chairman. 
«EO. F. SIEMBRi^, GEO. URQUHART, BEN.''P. CORNELL 

A. R. STRAIN, N. B. GREGG, FRED. S. PLANT. 

SEED AND CASTOR BEAN INSPECTOR AND WEIGHER. 

W. P. CHAMBERLAIN. 

WEIGHING. 
ERICH PICKER, Chairman. 
THOB. K. MABTIN, GEO. L. GRAHAM, GEO. F. POWELL, 

W. B. HABRISON, HUGH S. MURRAY, Supervisor. 



COMMITTEES, 1901— Continued. 



WM. FUBLONG. 
H. W. BEOK, 



JACOB SGHOPP, 
M. G. BICHMOND, 



J. O. FI8HEB, 
A. O. PBTBI, 
T. H. FBANOIS. 



H. G. HAABSTIOK, 
JAB. Y. LOOKWOOD, 
WEB. M. SAMUEL, 
GEO. B. SHIELDS. 



HAY. 

D. W. OLIFTON, Ohalrman. 

H. W. MACE, GHBISTOPH HILKB, 

BOBT. J. BEBGMANN. 

PRODUCE. 

P. M. KIELY Ohalrman. 
F. E. ZELLE, F. W. HOFFMANN, 

M. M. MoEEEN. 

FLOOR. 
E. M. FLESH, Ohalrman. 
H. B. EGGEBS, Jr., P. J. MoMOBBOW, 

B. J. PENDLETON. E. H. BABNE8, 

BEN. S. LANG. 

MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 

WM. P. KENNETT, Ohalrman. 
J. E. MASSENGALE, H. 8, POTTEB, 

TUBNEB T. LEWIS. ISAAO P. LUSK, 

I6AA0 M. MASON, MABCU8 BBBNHEIMBB. 



NATIONAL BOARD OF TRADE. 

080AB L. WHITELAW. Ohalrman. 
E. O. BTANABD, HENBY H. WEBNSE, 0HBI8. SHABP, 

S. W. OOBB, O. H. SPENOEB, 0HABLE8 PABSONS. 

CLINTON BOWELL, GEO. W. BBOWN. F. E. KAUFFMAN. 

H. F. LANGENBEBG, 8. M. EENNABD. 



WM. J. LEMP, Jb., 
J. J. WEBTHEIMBB, 
F. C. WHITTEMOBE, 
GEO. D. BABNABD, 



GEOBGE MINCH, 
E. H. CONBADES, 
ED. S. OBB, 
HENBY NIOOLAUS. 
WM. M. SENTEB. 



P. P. OONNOB, 
H. S. MEBBELL. 
WM. STUBDB, 
WM. 0. ELLIS. 



LEGISLATIVE. 

JESSE H. HOLMES, Ohalrman, 

GEO. M. WBIGHT. L. G. McNAIB. 

AUG. MANEWAL, GEO. D. DANA, 

H. E. WHITMOBE. D. B. POWELL, 

THEO. F. MBYEB, H. M. BLOSSOM. 

TRANSPORTATION. 

GBO. J. TANSBY, Chairman. 
T. S. MoPHEETEBS, L. D. KINGSLAND, 

H. V. KENT, PHILIP STOCK. 

8. A. BEMIS, L. D. DOZIEB, 

FRANK GAIENNIE. W. A. 8CUDDEB. 

FOREION TRADE. 

A. L. SHAPLEIGH, Chairman. 

JAMES ABBUCKLE, A. A. BOSCH, 

B. H. WHITBLAW. M. KOTANY, 

WM. F. FUNSTEN, A. DaFIGUEIBBDO. 

METEOROLOOY. 



OTTO L. TEIOHMANN, Chairman. 
J. H. FABLEY, D. P. BYBNB. 80L. J. QUINLIVAN, 

B. M. TAYLOB, JOHN P. MEYEB, H. J. BBADY, 

JOHN B. SLAUGHTEB, A. M. EDDY, HUNTEE BEN JENKINS. 

BOBEBT BANKEN, LEWIS E. SNOW. 



COMMITTEES AND INSPECTORS FOR 1903 



L. B. B&mSON, 



T. B. BALLiAJU). 
O. L. WHITEIiAW. 



WIL P. KENNETT, 



W. B. HABRI90N, 
TSO. MULLALLY. 
J. 8. McOEHEE. 
O. A. ORVIS. 



MEMBERSHIP. 
WM. A. 6ABDNEB» Ohatrman. 

T. H. FRANCIS. 
REAL ESTATE. 
6. J. TANSEY, Chairman. 
WM. A. OARDNEB, WM. T. HAAR8TICK, 

ST. LOUIS TRAFFIC BUREAU. 
Managers from Merchants' Exchange. 

H. F. LANGENBERG, A. DiFIGUEIREDO. 

WEiaHINS. 
T. R. BALIjARD, Chairman. 
W. E. 3TANARD, THOS. B, TEA8DALE, 

F. B. ZEIiLE. MAXWELL KENNEDY, 

FEED. C. ORTHWEIN, GEO. L. GRAHAM, 



INSURANCE. 
F. D. HIRSCHBEUG. Chairman. 
WALLACE DELAFIELD. JNO. B. SLAUGHTER, JAS. A. WATERWORTH, 



WILLIAM BULL, 
8. D. CAPEN, 
ASHLEY CABELL, 



E, W. GE88LBR, 
R. C. GBIER. 



H. M. BLOSSOM, 
B. L. SLACK* 



S. A. WHITEHEAD, 
PEYTON T. CARR, 



RULES. 
OTTO L. TEICHMANN Chairman. 

J. P. WOODS, THOS. AKIN. 



R. J. PENDLETON. 
E. C. CHAMBERLIN, 



H. F. LANGENBERG, 

C. S. DAYTON, 
R. L. FORRESTER, 
C. W. SMITH, 



CONTRACTS. 
S. A. WHITEHEAD, Chairman. 

JNO. E. GERAGHTY. 
MARKET REPORTS. 
T. H. FRANCIS, Chairman, 

N. L. MOFFITT, 
ORAIN. 
L. B. BRINSON, Chairman. 
T. B. MORTON, JNO. E. HALL. 

CHAS. J. QUESNEL, J. D. PARROTT, 

P. P. CONNOR. ELBERT HODGKIN8. 

H. C. COLEMAN. 

BARLEY. 
FRED. C. ORTHWEIN, Chairman. 
R A. FAUST, HENRY GREVE» PHILIP STOCK. 

FRANK 6RIESEDIECK. 

FLOUR. 
VICTOR ALBRECHT, Chairman. JOS. HATTERSLY, Secretary. 

CHRIS. BERNET, JNO. C. FISCHER, SAMUEL PLANT, 

E. D. TILTON. C. J. HANEBRINK. 

BOARD OF FLOUR INSPECTORS. 
VICTOR GOETZ, President. AUGUST RUMP, Secretary. 

PROVISION INSPECTOR. 
HENRY WOLLBRINOK, Chairman. 

JAS. M. GETTYS, GEO. C. DANIELS. 



HUGH FERGUSON, 
CHAS. A. COX. 



C W. BLOW, 

JNO. L. MESSMORK, 

C. & PRUNTY. 



PROVISION INSPECTOR. 
J. 6. HINCHMAN. 

SEEDS AND CASTOR BEANS. 

FRED 8. PLANT, Chairman. 

D. P. BYRNE, W. H. GREGG, Jb.. 

ROBT. POMMER. A. R. STRAIN, 



COMMITTEES, 1902— Continued. 



SEED AND CASTOR BEAN INSPECTOR AND WEIOHER. 

W. F. OHAMBEBLAIN. 



JAS. W. DYE, 
BOBT. S. YOUNG. 



M. O. BIOHMOND, 
W. O. MUEUiEB. 



E. H. BABNES, 
L. B. OABTEB, 
GEO. LANITZ, 
HENBY J. BULTE. 



GEO. D. BABNABD, 
GEO. D. MABKHAM, 



OHAS. A. COX, 
WEB. M. SAMUEL, 
8. W. COBB, 
H. F. LANGENBEBG. 



HAY. 

D. W. CLIFTON, Chairman. 
H. W. MACK, HENBY HUNTEB, 

PRODUCE* 

GHBIS. HILEE. Chairman, 
HENBY BBOEDEB, OONBAD BOHOPP, 

FLOOR. 

J. 8. MoGEHEE, Chairman. 

D. E. SMITH, G. DOUGLAS BBADLEY, 

E. 8. CASE, D. R. HAYNES. 
B. J. MoSOBLEY, J. W. STEELE, 

POSTAL AFFAIRS. 
FBANE GAIENNIE, Chairman. 

BEN. B. GBAHAM, W. C. LITTLE, 

THEO. G. MEIEB, L. A. MOFFITT. 

THOS. K. NEEDBINGHAUa 

RECEPTION AND ENTERTAINMENT. 

E. O. STANABD, Chairman. 
WM. G. BOYD, WM. P. KENNETT. 
JOHN WAHL. H, C. HAABSTICK, 
FRANK GAIENNIE, COBWIN H. SPENCER, 
MABCUS BEBNHEIMEB. 



ALONZO C. CHUBCH, 
ISAAC P. LUSK. 
WEB. M. SAMUEL, 
FESTUS J. WADE. 



E. O. STANABD. 
C. H. SPENCEB, 
C. F. WENNEKEB, 



R. E. GARDNER, 
WM. G. BOYD, 
GEO. L. EDWABDS, 
GOODMAN KING, 
MOSES BUMSEY. 



Mississippi RIVER. 
WM. T. HAABSTICK, Chairman. 

ISAAC M. MASON, JNO. E. MASSENGALE. 

H. 8. POTTEB, JNO. N. BOFINGEB, 

P. S. DBOWN, HENBY HITCHCOCK, 

NATIONAL BOARD OF TRADE. 
OSCAR L. WHITELAW, Chairman. 

8. W. COBB, CHABLES PABSONS, 

H. H. WEBNSE, CLINTON BOWELL, 

C. MABQUABD FOBSTEB. 

LEGISLATIVE. 
JOHN H. DIECKMAN, Chairman. 

S. A. BEMiS, MABCUS BEBNHEIMEB, 

GEO. O. CABPBNTEB. GEO. D. DANA, 
NATHAN FRANK, BBECKINRIDGE JONES. 

W. J. KINSELLA, GAIU8 PADDOCK, 



F. E. KAUFFMAN. 
HENRY SAYERS, 
W. 8. MOCHESNEY, 
E. 8. ORR 



TRANSPORTATION. 

WM. C. ELLIS, Chairman. 

E. O. HUNTEB, WM. P. KENNETT, 

K. B. HANNIGAN, A. L. SHAPLEIGH, 

Jr., W. a. SCUDDEB, A. DbFIGUEIBEDO, 



L. D. KING8LAND, 
HENRY STANLEY, 



FOREIGN TRADE. 

WM. F. FUNSTEN, Chairman. 
JOHN RING, GEO. F. POWELL. 

JAMES ARBUCKLE. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



MEBCHANTS' EXCHANGE, 

St. Louis, Mo., Januaiy 7th, 1902. 
To the MembeTE of the Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis : 

Gemtlkmkn — The rules of the Exchange require that the Board shall, 
preTious to the Annual Meeting, fix the assessment to be paid by each 
member for the coming year, and at the Annual Meeting report to the 
Exchange the amount so assessed, and the pecu|;4ary condition of the 
Exchange. 

Your Board, at a meeting held on the 10th of December last, after a 
careful consideration of the matter fixed the assessment for the year 1902 
at $25.00 for each member. 

The property of the Exchange is in good condition and the building 
well rented, there being but one office unoccupied. 

The receipts of the year on real estate account were: From rentals 
$43,673.20, from current account $3,000.00, and from interest $26.86, a total 
of $46,700.05. 

The expenditures, including $12,500 paid for bonds redeemed and can- 
celed and $1,578.96 overdraft of previous year repaid, were $46,494.49, 
leaving a balance on hand of $205.11. 

The bonded debt, originally $150,000, has been reduced to $92,500. 

The rentals for the past year amounted to $43,673.20. The expenditures, 
eliminating the items of bonds and interest on same and overdraft paid, 
were $28,571.78, leaving a balance of $15,101.42 over the usual current ex- 
penses. If to this is added the sum of $25,000 for rent of the Exchange 
ball and offices, which it is legitimate to include when ascertaining the 
rental value of the property, the net revenue would be $40,000.00, or 5J^ % 
on the cost of $750,000.00. 

The income from rentals for 1902 will approximate $48,000. On the 
same basis the net income would be increased to $45,000, or 6 % on the cost 
of the property. But if the revenue from the property merely paid all 
expenses, leaving to the Exchange the free use of the hall and offices, it 
would stil] be a good investment, as under other circumstances, if the 
Exchange had to rent quarters at all equal to the present in size and 
appointments^ the rental would probably largely exceed $25,000. 

The ownership of the property fixes permanently for many years the 
location of the Exchange, which, all things considered, is as desirable as a 
location farther west, and provides offices for many of our members at a 
low cost. 



10 TRADE AND OOHMEBOE OF 

The receipts and expenditures for current account remain about as 
usual^ except that the revenue decreases slightly from year to year on ac- 
count of forfeitures and redemptions. The membership at the begininng 
of 1901 was 1873. This has been reduced by the redemption of 33 certifi- 
cates of deceased members, six forfeitures and one expulsion, making tlie 
number on the rolls at the beginning of the present year 1832. 

The total revenue for the year, including a balance on hand January 1st 
of $1,475.56, was $61,074.98, and expenditures, including amount transferred 
to Real Estate Account, $48,438.89, leaving a balance of $2,636.09. 

The primary object of the Merchants' Exchange is to provide a place 
and furnish facilities for the daily transaction of business, and to publish 
an annual statement of the trade and commerce of the city. Probably 
there is no organization in the country where these requirements are more 
fuUy met. But, in addition to this, the Exchange through its official 
Board keeps in touch with all movements affecting the business interests of 
the city and country, t'or many years it was the only organized body in 
the city, and all measures originated with or were brought before the 
Exchange for consideration and action and had prompt and effective atten- 
tion. But with the growth and development of business other organiza- 
tions were formed to look after special interests, and the Exchange was 
able to confine its work to subjects of a strictly commercial nature, or 
affecting commercial interests. 

During the past year your Board gave especial attention to transporta- 
tion matters, and, in conjunction with other commercial bodies, made 
efforts to have the interstate commerce law amended by Congress so as to 
confer greater power upon the Commissioners. This was not accom- 
plished, but it is hoped that the present Congress will grant the relief so 
much needed. 

An effort was also made to have the war revenue tax on sales made on 
the Exchanges of the country repealed, but it was only successful to the 
extent of eliminating the tax on sales of property actually in course of 
transportation. 

An attempt was made early in the year to have the headquarters of the 
Mississippi River Commission removed to another city, but the prompt 
action of your Board in protesting against such a movement effectually 
prevented it. 

In April last the Committee on Postal Affairs, in connection with Post- 
master Baumhoff, petitioned the Postoffice Department for increased mail 
facilities on the Wabash train arriving at 2 p. m., and also for the establish- 
ment of a railway postoffice service on the Missouri, Kansas & Texas train 
leaving St. Louis at 8 : 16 a. m. The request has been granted, and an addi- 
tional mail car put on the Wabash train, and the mail \s now made ready 
for instant delivery upon its arrival. On January 1st, 1902, the new service 
was established on the Missouri, Kansas & Texas train, thus securing a 
better mail service to the Southwest. 

In August last an effort was made to have the monthly Government 
Crop Report issued at 12 M. instead of 4 P. M. Eastern time. From past 



THE OITY OF ST. LOUIS. 11 

ejq>erienee your Board were of the opinion that a midday report unsettled 
and disturbed buginesB, and sucoessfuUy protested agahist a change in the 
hour of its issuance. 

Your Board endorsed the efforts of the St. Louis Manufacturers' Asso- 
dation looking to the establishment of a line of steamboats between 
St. Louis and New Orleans^ and joined with other organizations in an effort 
to secure for St. Louis the location of one of the permanent camps for the 
anny and national guard. - 

Tour association has been ably represented at the following gatherings : 

National Board of Trade, Washington, January 2and. 

Southern industrial Convention, Philadelphia, June 11th. 

Illinois Grain Dealers' Association, Decatur, June 11th. 

Trans-Misslsslppi Comn Congress, Cripple Creek, July 16th. 

Iowa Grain Dealers' Association, Creston, September 3rd. 

National Hay Association, Indianapolis, September 10th. 

Grain Dealers' National Association, DesMoines, October 2nd. 

National Rivers and Harbors Congress, Baltimore, October 8th. 

Early in the year a Committee on Weighing was appointed for the pur- 
pose of formulating and putting in operation a plan for securing the 
accurate weighing and methods of weighing of grain and other property 
handled by members of the Exchange and others desiring the service. In 
September last tliis action was endorsed, by the adoption of an amendment 
to the Rules, authorizing the Board of Directors to establish and maintain 
a Department of Weights. A supervisor of weighing was appointed, and 
eteps taken to ascertain wherein the present system was defective and what 
remedies could be applied to correct same. The committee has had the 
cordial co-operation of the local officials of the various railroads, with the 
result that the system has been materially improved and complaints are 
much less frequent than formerly. It is the purpose of the Board, in con- 
nection with the proper authorities, to establish scales for weighing gnAn 
and other farm products under the direct control of the Committee of 
Weighing, with the view of having a system that will provide every safe- 
guard for the proper weighing and delivery of contents of cars. 

The Traffic Bureau has been active during the year in looking after 
transportation interests, affecting not only the business transacted on the 
Exchange, but the general trade of the city. The Managers and Commis- 
sioner have been met with courtesy by all railroad officials, and when it 
was possible their requests have been cheerfully granted. The result has 
been that concessions have been made in a number of cases and discrimina- 
tions corrected in others, and while all that has been hoped for has not 
been accomplished, much good has resulted, and the usefulness of the 
Bureau fully demonstrated. Attention is called to the report issued by the 
Commissioner, giving a detailed statement of the work of the year. 

We have taken pleasure in extending to distinguished vistors the courte- 
sies of the Exchange, and have been honored with the presence of Hon. 
Charles Denby, ex-United States Minister to China; Mr. Wn Ting Fang, 



12 TBADS AND OOIOCERGS OF 

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of China; the delegates 
to the Intematlonal Congress held at the City of Mexico, a party of dis- 
tinguished Porto Rican business men, and Governor Durbin of Indiana. 

Death has taken from us forty -three members, whose loss is deeply de- 
plored and for whom the Board has placed on record the regrets of the 
members at their demise and a tribute to their worth. 

When the sad news was received, September 14th, that President 
McKinley had passed away, your Board ordered the Exchange closed and 
the hall draped in mourning. The Exchange closed also on the day of the 
funeral; and the members joined with the people of the city in expressing 
their sorrow at the loss of a great and good man and the honored executive 
of the nation. 

The Exchange was also closed on February 2nd; the day of the funeral 
of the Queen of England; as a token of respect to the memory of an illus- 
trious monarch and a noble woman. 

Your Board wishes to express its appreciation of the valued assistance of 
the various conmiittees in promoting the interests of the Exchange; also 
of the faithful and efficient service rendered by the Secretary and other 
employes. 

Our yearns work is done and gone into history; and in returning thanks 
to the members for the honor bestowed upon us, we bespeak for our suc- 
cessors the same united support that has been accorded us, and the con- 
tinued efforts of all the membership in building up the New St. Louis and 
the Merchants* Exchange, which is one of the prominent factors in its 
development. 

FOR TIffl BOARD OF DIRECTORS, 

WM. T. HAARSTICK; 

President. 



ffHB OITT OV 8T. I<Oin8. 13 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER FOR 1901. 

CURR ENT ACC OUNT, 

KBCSIPT8. 

Cssb OD hand January Ist.... — ^..-.m.-.- $ 1^475 66 

Reoeiyed for Transfer Fees 1,120 00 

" Assessments - 46,450 00 

" Bent ol Drawers 611 76 

" Rent of Telegraph Counters - ^ 690 00 

" Bent of Transportation Desks 30 00 

" Non-ResidentB Tickets 175 00 

*^ Sale Samples and Sweepings 146 29 

" Interest on Account 377 38 

EXFENDITUBB8. $51,074 98 

Sahuies $17,959 25 

Telegraph Account ^ 10,045 50 

St. Louis Traffic Bureau 3,645 59 

Redemption of Memberships 3,300 00 

Transferred to Real Estate Account 3,000 00 

Weighing Committee and Supervisor 994 25 

Rent of Telephones 993 70 

Annual Report 905 50 

Attorney's Fees and Costs in Court 851 76 

Board Flour Inspectors ....- - 787 64 

Printing and Stationery 730 01 

Soap and Towels 525 67 

Attorney of the Exchange... 500 00 

RepairB. 387 10 

Delegates to National Board of Trade. 366 80 

Taxes 321 94 

PoBtage 314 16 

Delegates to Riyers & Harbors Congress, Baltimore.. 280 65 

Public Welfare Committee 250 00 

Delegates to Trans-Miss.Com'l Congress,CTipple Crk. 202 00 

Power for Electric Fans 199 05 

Assessment, National Board of Trade 195 00 

Ice 189 21 

New Curtains and Chahis 164 84 

Books, Papers and Price Currents 131 10 

Belcher Water 120 00 

Tin Pans 116 49 

Brooms, Dusters, etc Ill 35 

Delegates to South'n Industrial Conv'n, Philadelphia 107 85 

Delegates to National Hay Conyention, Indianapolis 100 00 

Gnrin Dial 85 00 

Bond of Assistant Secretaiy 76 00 

Delegates to National Gram Assn., DesMoines 55 40 

Judges of Election 52 00 

Memorials, ex-President Cliris. Sharp 61 00 

Plants for Fountain 60 00 

Board of Directors 85 80 

Telephone Cabinet 80 00 

Delegates to Grain Dealers Conyention. Creston, la... 16 65 

Delegates to Freight Meethig, Louisville 12 60 

Del^ate to Illinois Grain Dealers Assn., Decatur. 11 00 

8iiii£ies —- ~.. ...^. . 169 65 $48,438 89 

Balance on hand December Slst, 1901 $ 2,686 09 



14 TBADB AND OOMXEBOB OF 



REAL ESTATE ACCOUNT FOR 1901. 

BBCBIPT8. 

Received fromBentals ^ $ 43^678 20 

" ^« Current Account 3,000 00 

" " Interest 26 86 

$ 46,700 05 

EXPENDITURES. 

Bonds Paid $ 12,500 00 

Employes 7,538 00 

Taxes 6,615 56 

Bepairs and Renovations 4,448 22 

Insurance ..- 4,150 72 

Interest on Bonds 3,843 75 

Coal 3,090 66 

Water License 1,164 00 

Supplies for Engineer and Janitor 667 17 

Bemovinsr Aslies and Sweepings ~ 266 50 

CleaninffStreets 153 00 

Bent of Telephones 151 94 

Elevator Insurance 130 40 

Electric Light 79 00 

Night Signal Service 39 00 

Inspecting Boilers and Elevators 31 50 

Sprinkling Tax 19 81 

Uniform for Elevator Boy 16 75 

Printing 9 50 

Revenue Stamps 50 

Paid Overdraft of January 1st 1,578 96 46,494 94 

Balance on hand December 3l8t, 1901 $ 205 11 

Paid OB Bonded Debtdnrlng 1901 $ 13^600 00 

Bonded Bebt Unpaid (not due) $ 92,600 OO 

GEO. H. MORGAN, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



We, the undersigned, a Committee appointed by the President, do hereby 
certify that we have examined the accounts of the Secretary and Treasurer 
for 1901 and find the same to be correct, with the proper vouchers on file 
for expenditures and balances in bank as follows, viz : 

To the Credit of Real Estate Account $ 205 11 

To the credit of Current Account $2,636 09 

T. R. BALLABD, 1 

BERT. H. LANG, V Committee. 

S. A. WHITEHEAD, J 

St. Louis, January 4th, 1902. 



TKB OITT OV or. LOUIB. 15 



RESOLUTIONS 

ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OP DIRECTORS DURING 1901. 



GALVESTON HARBOR. 

Januabt 8th. Besolved, By the Board of Directors ol the Merchants' 
Exchange of St. Lonis^ that the Honorable Senators and Bepresentatives 
from KiBSOiiri, in Congress be requested to co-operate with the Texas dele- 
gation in secoring at the present session of Congress appropriations in 
Birer and Harbor Bill for improvement of the channel of Galveston 
Harbor. 

B. F. HUDSON. 

January 10th. Resolutions of respect to the memoiy of B. F. Hudson; 
prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. F. W. Hofmann, M. M. 
McEeen and C. E. Udell, were adopted by the Board. 

FRANK SHAPLEIOH. 

January 16th. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Frank Shap- 
leigh, prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. Wallace Delafleld, 
G. J. Tansey^ Frank N. Johnson, Clark H. Sampson and Frank Gaiennie, 
were adopted by the Board. 

CULLOH BILL AND WAR REVENUE TAXES. 

January 16th. The delegation api)ointed to represent the Merchants^ 
Exchange of St. Louis, at the meeting of the National Board of Trade, 
to be held at Washington on the 22nd Inst.,. are requested to confer with 
the representatives of other cities and take such action as may be deemed 
advisable towards endeavoring to secure the passage of the Cullom Bill, 
being an amendment to the Interstate Commerce Law^ and also to secure 
If possible the elimination from the Revenue Tax Law of the tax on sales 
made on the commercial exchanges of the country. 

INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF NAVIGATION. 

January 16th. The President was requested to write to the Senators 
and Representatives from Missouri, asking them to favor a bill introduced 
in Congress authorizing the President of the United States to Invite the 
International Congress of Navigation to hold its next session in Washington. 

HON. R. S. TAYLOR. 

January 26th. The President was requested to write to President 
MeKlnley in the name of the Board of Directors, requesting him to retain 
Hon R. S. Taylor as a member of the Mississippi River Commission. 



16 TBADE AND OOMMBBOB OV 

MABQUABD FOB8TBB. 

Jamuaby a6TH. Resolutions of respect to the memory of MaFquard 
Forster^ prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. Wm. F. Nolker, 
Wm. D. Orthwein, Ohas. H. Teichmann, Adolphus Busch and Wm. J. 
Lemp; were adopted by the Board. 

FUNSBAL OF QUEEN YICTOBIA. 

Febbuaby 1st. The Board ordered that the Exchange rooms be closed 
on Saturday February 2ndy the day of the funeral of the Queen of England, 
as a token of respect to the memory of an illustrious monarch and a noble 
woman. 

WM. M. SENTEB. 

Febbuaby 1st. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Wm. M. Senter, 
prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. Chris Sharp, John Wahl, 
Nathan Cole, Chas. A. Cox and Hugh O'Donnell, were adopted by the 
Board. 

J AS. F. AGLAB. 

Febbuaby 1st. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Jas. F. Aglar, 
prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. G. J. Tansey, G. S. Free- 
bom, Wallace Delafield, Ed. S. Orr and Jno. J. Baulch, were adopted by 
the Board. 

CHBIS SHABP. 

[ Febbuaby 9th. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Chris Sharp, 
prepared by the Ex-Presidents of the Exchange, were adopted by the 
Board, and it was ordered that the rostrum be draped in mourning for 
thirty days. 

WM. H. IfABKHAH. 

Febbuaby 12th. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Wm. H. 

Markham^ prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. E. 0. Stanard, 

Thos. Akin^ H. M. Blossom and W. L. Green, Jr., were adopted by the 

Board. 

public welfabe committee. 

Febbuaby 12th. The sum of $260.00 was appropriated towards the 
expenses of the Public Welfare Committee. 

MISSISSIPPI BIVEB COMMISSION. 

Febbuaby 23bi>. The President was requested to write to the Hon. 
Secretary of War, protesting against the possible remoyal of the offices of 
the Mississippi Riyer Commission from St. Louis. 

OKLAHOMA. 

Febbuaby 28bd. The Board memorialized the Honorable Senators 
from Missouri and Representatives from St. Louis^ to further the admission 
of Oklahoma to statehood, either separatively or in connection with the 
Indian Territory, as the people of Oklahoma might prefer. 



THB GITT OF ST. LOUIS. 17 

BAKING POWDEB LEGISLATION. 

Fkbeuaby 33bd. The Board ooncarred in the action of the St. Louis 
Mannfactnrers' Association, requesting the General Assembly of Missouri, 
to repeal Sections one and two of the law passed by the 40th General 
Aasembly of Missouri^ in relation to Baking Powders and other prepara- 
tlons containing alum. 

FOBEIGN BILLS OF LADING. 

Mabch I2th. The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange of 
St. Louis join with the Chamber of Commerce of Minneapolis, the Board 
of Trade of the city of Chicago and other commercial associations^ in pro- 
testing against the action of ship owners in inserting special clauses in 
bills of lading for goods shipped to London^ whereby charges are imposed 
in oontrayention of acts of Parliament, in which acts we understand free 
deUvery was safeguarded on all goods entering that port. We believe that 
bills of lading on shipments to London should not carry any conditions not 
imposed on bills of lading to Liverpool and other points. 

And the Board of Directors respectfully petitions the Senators and 
Repreeetatives In Congress to pass an amendment to the Barter Act of 
1888; reatruning ship owners from inserting in bills of lading clauses in 
contravention of the laws of countries into which American products are 
shipped, and further, that a copy of these resolutions be sent to other 
commercial associations, and to the Honorable Senators and Representa- 
tives from Missouri in Congress. 

CHAS. A. EBEBLB. 

Mabch 12th. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Chas. A. 
Eberle, prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. H. G. Craft, W. C. 
Dickinson, Henry Burg, Matt. Woelfle and C. J. Hanebrink, were adopted 
by the Board. 

NATIONAL IBBIGATION ASSOCIATION. 

Mabch 12th. The President was authorized to appoint a delegate to 
represent this Exchange at the meeting of the National Advisory Board of 
the National Irrigation Association, to be held at Buiffalo in October next. 

COMMEBCIAL TBEATT WITH FBANCE. 

Afbil 9th. The Board endorsed the resolutions adopted by the 
Chamber of Conmierce of the State of New York, urging upon the Senate 
of the United States the wisdom and necessity of the early ratification of 
the commercial treaty with the Republic of France. 

MAIL FACILITIES. 

Apbil 9th. The Board endorsed the action of the President and the 
Cliairman of the Committee on Postal Affairs, calling upon the Postoffice 
Department to place a St. Louis city distributor on Wabash trains arriving 



18 TRADB AKD OOMICBROB OV 

in St Louis at 2 o'clock p. m. ; and also to establish a railway postoffice 
service on the Missouri, Kansas & Texas train leaving St. Louis at 8 :16 a.m. 

WEIGHING DBPARTHENT. 

April 18th. The Board appointed a Committee on Weighing consist- 
ing of Messrs. Erich Picker,' Thos. K. Martin^ Greo. L. Graham, Qeo. F. 
Powell and W. B. Harrison. 

CHICAGO QUOTATIONS. 

April 27th. The Exchange resumed the posting ol Chicago quota- 
tions at 11 A. M.^ April 27th. 

FRED. G. COCHRAN. 

May 2nd. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Fred. G. Cochran, 
prepared hy a committee consisting of Messrs. Hugh Ferguson, John Ring 
and Chas. E. Flacky were adopted by the Board. 

RIVERS AND HARBORS CONGRESS. 

May 2nd. The Board appointed Messrs. H. C. Haarstick, Web. M. 
Samuel and W. P. Kennett a preliminary committee to co-operate in. 
arrangements for a proposed River and Harbor Congress to be held during^ 
the summer. 

SOUTHERN INDUSTRIAL CONVENTION. 

May 2nd. The Board appointed Mr. Web. M. Samuel to represent the 
Merchants' Exchange at the meeting of the Southern Industrial Convention 
to meet in Philadelphia^ June 11th. 

MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 

JVNE llTH. The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange of 
St. Louis is in full accord with the St. Louis Manufacturers' Association in 
the effort now being made to place a line of steamers on the Mississippi 
River, to ply between St. Louis and New Orleans, and recommends to the 
members of the Exchange, interested in the coast trade particularly and in 
the commerce of the city generally, to give support and assistance to the 
enterprise, which cannot fail, if properly maintained, to be of great bene At 
to the trade of the city, as well as to all river towns. 

ILLINOIS GRAIN DEALERS' ASSOCIATION. 

June 11th. The Board appointed Mr. H. R. Whitmore, Assistant Sec- 
retary, as a delegate to the meeting of the Dlinois Grain Dealers' Association 
to be held at Decatur, 111., June 11th and 12th. 

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI COMMERCIAL CONGRESS. 

June 11th. The Board appointed Messrs. Wm. P. Kennett, John W. 
Noble and H. R. Whitmore to represent the Merchants' Exchange at the 
Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress, to be held at Cripple Creek, Colo., 
July 16th. 



THS OITT OF ST. LOUIS. 19 

ARMT AND NATIONAL GUARD CAMP. 

August 7th. The President appointed Messrs. Geo. J. Tansey, T. R. 
Ballard, O. L. Whitelaw, S. W. Cobb, W. P. Kennett and Fred. C. Orthwein 
a committee to represent the Merchants' Exchange at a meeting to be held 
at the Mercantile Club, on the 8th inst., to co-operate with the committees 
of the Mercantile Club and other organizations in securing for St. Louis the 
location of one of the large permanent camps for the Army and National 
Guard. 

JOHN p. KEISES. 

August 13th. Resolutions of respect to the memory of John P. 
Keiser, prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. E. 0. Stanard, A. R. 
Moore, S. W. Cobb, Web. M. Samuel and Isaac M. Mason, were adopted by 
the Board. 

DAVID BLOCK. 

August 13th. Resolutions of respect to the memory of David Block, 
prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. Web. M. Samuel, H. F. 
Langenberg, Alex. H. Smith, W. B. Dean and P. C. Taylor, were adopted 
by the Board. 

ADOLPH BANG. 

August 13th. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Adolph Bang, 
prepared by a conunittee consisting of Messrs. Alex. H. Smith, H. C. Haar- 
stick, John Wahl, Geo. H. Braun and C. H. Sieving, were adopted by the 
Board. 

THOS. E. QUINLIVAN. 

August 13th. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Thos. E. 
Quinlivan, prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. D. W. Clifton, 
Martin J. Mullally, Vincent M. Jones, C. P. Daly and M. J. Connor, were 
adopted by the Board. 

GOVERNMENT CROP REPORT. 

August 13th. The Board disapproved the movement, inaugurated in 
Xew York, looking to a change in the time of issuing the monthly govern- 
ment crop report from 4 p. m. to 12 m., eastern time. 

NATIONAL HAY ASSOCIATION. 

August 13th. The Board appointed Messrs. D. W. Clifton, Jas. W. 
Dye, Chris. Hilke, Chas. G. Simon, Martin J. Mullally, J. O. Ballard, John 
Mackey, Henry W. Mack, Louis P. Deibel, D. P. Byrne and W. J. Rae dele- 
gates to the meeting of the National Hay Association, to be held at Indian- 
apolis, September 10th. 

grain DEALERS' NATIONAL ASSOCIATION. 

August 13th. The Board appointed Messrs. Erich Picker, George L. 
Graham, J, L. Messmore, H. R. Whitmore and R. S. Young delegates to 
the meeting of the Grain Dealers' National Association, to be held at 
DesMoines, Iowa, October 2nd. 



20 TBADB AKD OOMiaaftOB OF 

IOWA ORAIN DBALBB8' ASSOCIATION. 

August 29th. The Board appointed Assigtant Secretary H. R. Whit- 
more to represent the Exchange at the Grain Dealers' Convention, to be 
held at Creston, Iowa, September 8rd. 

PBESIDSNT WILLIAM M^KINLEF. 
SSPTEMBER 7th. 

Qto, B» Oortelyau, Secretary to the PreHdent, Buffalo y N, T.: 

The Merchants^ Exchange of St. Louis, representing this business com- 
munity, desires to express its sincere sorrow and grief at the calamity which 
has so suddenly come to the nation, in the attack upon its honored Presi- 
dent. We hope and pray that an overruling Providence will preserve the 
life of our beloved Executive, and restore him to his devoted wife and to 
the people, who hold him hi the highest esteem. Please convey to Mrs. 
McKinley our most profound sympathy hi this hour of grief and anxiety. 

JOHN BIRD. 

Sdptembbb IOth. Resolutions of respect to the memory of John Bird, 
prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. Jos. W. Steele, James P. 
Burdean and W. T. Hickman, were adopted by the Board. 

NATIONAL BIYBR8 AND HABBORS OONOBESS. 

Ssptbmbbb IOth. The Board appointed Messrs. Isaac M. Mason, Jno. 
A. Ockerson, Henry P. Wyman, T. B. Ballard and J. Y. Lockwood dele- 
gates to the meeting of the National Congress on Rivers and Harbors to be 
held at Baltimore, October 8th. 

DEATH OF PBESIDENT MCKINLEY. 

Septembeb 14th. The Board ordered the Exchange closed for the 
day, and appointed Messrs. David R. Francis, C. H. Spencer, John W. 
Noble, Frank Gaiennie, S. M. Kennard, Chas. Parsons, J. C. Van Blarcom, 
H. C. Haarstick and O. L. Whitelaw a committee to prepare resolutions on 
the death of President'William McKinley. On September 18th the follow- 
ing resolutions were adopted : 

The President is dead. One of the noblest of men has passed away. 
The nation is bowed in sadness and sorrow. Words are inadequate to 
express the grief of the people at the loss of their Chief Executive, so 
highly esteemed and so sincerely beloved. 

William McKinley was a man among men; his life was pure and unsel- 
fish ; his honesty of purpose was never questioned ; on the field or in the 
forum he manfully did his whole duty, earnestly striving for the right and 
for the welfare of his country. As the head of this great nation during a 
period requiring the highest wisdom and statesmanship, he won the admi- 
ration of the world by his wise administration of affairs, and his policy has 
come to be accepted by his countrymen as wise and just, and productive of 
the best results. 



THS Omr OF 8T. IiOUZS. 21 

In privrnte Uf e he wu kind, affable and gradons; a devoted husband, 
a idnd neighbor, a sincere friend, a Christian gentleman. 

His loss is a personal sorrow and a national bereavement. 

T6 the affectionate^ devoted wife, so lovingly and tenderly cared for, 
whose comfort and happiness was his first thought, and to wtiom his loss 
is irreparable, our hearts go out in tenderest sympathy and affection. 

As an evidence of love and esteem to this great and good man, and as a 
mark of respect to the high position he occupied, it is ordered that the 
Merchants* Exchange be closed on the day of the funeral, and that the hall 
be draped in mourning for thirty days. 

OBO. B. ROBINSON. 

NovEJiBEB 12th. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Greorge R. 
Robinson, prepared by a conmiittee oonslBting of Messrs. ;R. P. Annan, 
Walker Hill^ Michael McEnnis, L. F. Jones and Western Bascome, were 
adopted by the Board. 

BITEBS AMD HABBOBS CONGRESS. 

NovBMBEB 12th. The Board of Directors of the Merchants* Exchange 
of St. Louis heartily endorse and approve the resolutions adopted by the 
Xationai Congress on Rivers and Harbors, convened at Baltimore, October 
dth and 9th, 1901, urging upon the Congress of the United States a liberal 
policy in the improvement, through systematic and adequate appropria- 
tions, of the waterways and harbors of the country. 

The Board respectfully urges upon the honorable Senators and Repre- 
sentatives from Missouri to favor the passage of such a bill during the 
coming Congress, in the interest of the increasing internal and foreign 
commerce of the country. 

NATIONAL BOARD OF TRADE. 

November SOth. Subjects presented by the Merchants' Exchange of 
Sl Louis, for the consideration of the National Board of Trade at the 
Annual Meeting, to be held in Washington in January, 1902. 

FINANCE AND CURRENCY. 

Besolved, That the bullion in the Treasury be hereafter used for the 
coinage of subsidaiy silver coin, as needed by the public, and not into 
lUver dollars. 

WhereaSf The people and the banks of the United States are veiy large 
losers each year by the wear of small gold coins, which might be avoided 
by issuing gold certificates in their place by the government, and which 
are not now allowed of less than $20.00; 

JieBoiwd, That Congress be requested to allow the issue of $5.00 and 
tlO.00 gold certificates on deposits of gold bullion or gold coin of equal 
value in the Treasury. 

Whereat, It is desirable to eliminate the issues of United States notes, 
which are only flat money and originally issued under the stress of the 
war demands; 



22 TBADB AND OOMMBBOB OF 

Thtr^orty We recommend to CongreBS the passage of such laws as 
shall gradually retire them, and that they he replaced hy gold notes from 
the reserve funds in the Treasury , thus leaving the currency undiminished, 
the gold remaining in the Treasury against such issues for their redemp- 
tion. 

Besolved^ That we request Congress to consider the propriety of amend- 
ing the national banking laws so as to allow banks having a capital of such 
large amount as to insure safety in so doing, to establish branches in 
foreign countries for the promotion of export and import trade, that we 
may be thus on a footing with our great European competitors. 

BesolfMd^ That we recommend to Congress the propriety of considering 
amendments to the national bank acts to allow the issue of currency by 
banks based on their assets and secured by a safety fund to be raised by a 
tax on the issues sufficient to make the currency entirely safe^ and to be 
under absolute government control. 

Whereas, Much loss occurs to innocent holders of damaged^ clipped, 
mutilated or abraded silver coin minted by the United States, on account 
of the Treasury Department paying for such coins only their bullion value ^ 
and thus the loss to the citizen is a gain to the government; therefore, 

Beaolved^ That Congress be asked to provide by law that the Secretary 
of the Treasury be authorized to redeem such coins, giving for them by 
weight the proportionate value remaining to them compared with original 
amount received for them by the government. 

WAR REVENUE TAX. 

Whereas^ Since the reduction made by the last Congress in war revenue 
taxation has not decreased the receipts from that source as much as had 
been expected and a further reduction may safely be made without 
detriment to the financial interests of the government, the National Board 
urges the further repeal of such taxation as has proved a burden to the 
commerce of the country, and especially of the tax on sales of agricultural 
products on commercial exchanges and stamps on stock certificates, and 
also the repeal of the entire act as soon as practicable. 

ISTHMIAN CANAL. 

The National Board of Trade urges upon Congress the importance of 
early action looking to the construction of an Isthmian Canal, as demanded 
by the increasing commerce between the West and the Far East. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRIES. 

The National Board of Trade has repeatedly advocated the establish- 
ment of a Department of Commerce and Industries, and believes that 
action by Congress establishing such a department would meet with the 
hearty endorsement and approval of the people. 

RIVERS AND HARBORS. 

The National Board of Trade urges upon Congress the passage at the 
present session of a rivers and harbors bill for the improvement of naviga- 



THB OITT OF ST. IiOUIB. 23 

ble waterways and of the harbors of the coast lines. Sach expenditures 
hy the goyemment are needed to develop and increase our internal and 
foreign commerce^ and will be approved and endorsed by the commercial 
interests of the country. It is the judgment of this board that appropria- 
tions should be made only for the improvement of waterways and harbors 
for the purpose of water-borne commerce. 

INTBRNAL WATBBWATS. 

In the appropriations to be made by Congress for rivers and harbors 
the continued improvement of the navigable rivers of the West should 
receive special attention^ and while the system of permanent improvement 
is being carried on it is of the utmost importance that an adequate 
navigable channel be maintained in the Mississippi Biver by the use 
of dredges and portable jetties in order that present river commerce may 
be facilitated, especially between the Missouri and Ohio rivers. The 
Board further urges requisite appropriations for the improvement of the 
Southwest Pass, in order to afford adequate facilities for ships of the 
largest class. 

The Board also favors the construction of a ship canal between the 
Mississippi Biver and Lake Michigan, and that the Mississippi Biver 
Commission be authorized to investigate the practicability of such canal 
tnd the probable cost thereof. 

FORESTBT. 

The attention of the Congress is again called to the importance of the 
preservation of forests as necessary to the continued prosperity of agricul- 
tural, lumbering, mining and transportation interests, and urges legisla- 
tion looking to the perpetuation of our forests and to the establishment of 
additional national parks and forest reserves. 

POSTAL AFFAIRS. 

The Kational Board of Trade heartily approves the action of the Post- 
master- General in his efforts to purge the malls of second-class matter not 
entitled to transmission as such, and calls upon Congress for such legisla- 
tion as will amend the laws relating to second-class mail matter and 
prevent the same being carried at a loss to the government. 

CONSULAR SERTICB. 

That the reorganization of the consular service in the interest of the 
constantly expanding foreign commerce of the country should have early 
and earnest consideration by Congress, and all appointments should be 
based upon business qualifications and not political preferment. 

BANKRUPT LAW. 

That the provision of the National Bankruptcy law, which provides 
against preferences and prevents a creditor who may have innocently 
received payments within four months prior to bankruptcy from proving 



24 TBADS AND OOMMBBOK OP 

mny claim he may have against tlie estate without Burrendering such pay- 
ments is a serious menace to the credit system^ and the business interests 
of the country, and should be promptly repealed by Congress. 

INTERSTATE COHXERCE LAW. 

The National Board of Trade, in session assembled, urges Congress to 
pass such amendments to the Interstate Commerce Commission laws as 
will give force and effect to the findings and rulings of the commission and 
at the same time fully safeguard, protect and promote both the public and 
the transportation interests and welfare. 

ADJOURNlfEMT SINE DIB OF THE NATIONAL BOARD OF TRADE. 

The organization of the National Board of Trade in 1868, was an event 
of much importance to the commercial world; and its deliberations from 
year to year have demonstrated the benefit of co-operation and united 
action among business men. 

It opened the way to the organization of national trade organizations, 
looking to the development of individual industrial lines, so that at the 
present time there are over seventy such bodies in the United States, each 
one devoted to the particular interest it represents. 

The wide scope of subjects submitted annually for the consideration of 
the National Board of Trade renders it absolutely impossible to give to 
each the time and attention required for a thorough discussion and under- 
standing of important measures, and probably for this reason the recom- 
mendations of the board have not commanded the attention of legislative 
bodies or secured such results as might have been expected from the 
deliberations of such a representative body of business men. 

In view of these facts the Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis submits the 
following resolution for the consideration of the National Board : 

Besolved^ That at the close of the present session the National Board 
of Trade adjourn sine die. 

Besolved^ That the Executive Council, as now constituted, be author- 
ized and instructed to close up all the business affairs of the board and to 
assess the constituent members, in accordance with the usual pro rata, for 
such an amount as may be required to pay all the obligations of the board. 

WILLIAM M'MILLAN. 

NOYEMBER 26th. Resolutions of respect to the memory of William 
McMillan, prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. Sam M. Eennard, 
L. B. Tebbetts, H. M. Blossom, Thos. H. West and Wm. C. Little, were 
adopted by the Board. 

JURISDICTION OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER COMMISSION. 

December 10th. Whereas, The City of St. Louis, as the commercial 
metropolis of the Mississippi valley, is vitally interested in such adequate 
improvement of the Mississippi Biver as will fully meet the demands of 
commerce; and, 



THB OITT OF ST. IiOITIB. 26 

WhereoM^ The shipping Interests ol this city have suffered severe losses 
during the past years, through lailnre of appropriations and consequent 
failure to maintain adequate depth ol channel between this city and Cairo^ 
while ample depths below the latter point have been maintained by means 
of an efficient dredg^g system inaugurated by the Mississippi River Com- 
mission; and^ 

Wharea9j This said dredging plant is idle for long periods of time each 
year when there are good navigable depths below the mouth of the Ohio^ 
while the channel in the Mississippi River above that stream is altogether 
inadequate for the requirements of navigation, at which time the said 
dredging plant could be advantageously employed in deepening and main- 
taining this channel ; and, 

Wkereas, In the improvement of the Mississippi River, we believe that, 
both on the score of economy and for the earlier realization of the required 
channel depths^ the best results will be obtained by treating the stream as 
a systematic whole, and by the vigorous prosecution of the work in such 
order as will best satisfy the demands of commerce ; and, 

Whereat, The organic act creating the Mississippi River Commission, 
entitled '^An Act to provide for the appointment of a Mississippi River 
Commission for the improvement of said river from the Head of Passes^ 
near its mouth, to its headwaters,*' manifestly assigns the improvement of 
the river to said Commission, which is held in the highest esteem by the 
people of the Mississippi valley ; therefore, be it 

Be»olvedf That the Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange of 
the City of St. Louis respectfully request and urge at the hands of Congress 
liberal continuing appropriations for the general improvement of the Mis- 
sissippi River, and such legislation as may be deemed essential to enable 
the Mississippi River Commission to comply with the expressed terms of 
the organic act, and extend its improvement work from Cairo northward, 
at least as far as the mouth of the Illinois River. 

Besolved, That our Senators and Representatives in Congress be requested 
to use tiieir best efforts to secure favorable action from Congress on the 
above petition. 

BUFUS J. DELANO. 

DscsMBEB 19th. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Rufus J. 
Delano, prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. R. F. Walker, L. B. 
Brinson, Edward M. Flesh, John Thyson and T. H. Francis, were adopted 
by the Board. 

OEO. A. HADILL. 

Decembeb lihTH. Resolutions of respect to the memory of (}eo. A. 
Madill, prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. E. O. Stanard, B. B. 
Graham, Walker Hill, Breckinridge Jones and L. D. Dozier, were adopted 
by the Board. 

DELEGATES NATIONAL BOABD OF TBADE. 

Dbceicbeb 19th. The Board appointed the following delegates to 
represent the Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis at the meeting of the 



26 



TRADB AND OOUCBSOB OF 



National Board of Trade, to be held in Washington on January 21sty next: 
Messrs. £. O. Stanard, Oliarles Parsons, O. L. Whitelaw, Wm. P. Kennett 
and S. W. Cobb. 



The Exchange was closed 
January 1st, 
February 2nd, 
February 12th, 
February 22nd, 
April 2nd, 
April 5th, 
May 30th, 
July 4th, 
August 3l8t, 
September 2nd,l 
September 14th, 
September 19th, 
October 10th, 
November 28th, 
December 24th, 
December 25th, 



on the following days : 
New Year's Day. 
Funeral of Queen Victoria. 
Lincoln^s Birthday. 
Washington's Birthday. 
City Election. 
Gk)od Friday. 
Memorial Day. 
Independence Day. 

Labor Day. 

Death of President McKinley. 

Fumeral of President McKinley. 

St. Louis Fair Day. 

Thanksgiving Day. 

Day before Christmas. 

Christmas Day. 



THE CITY OF ST. IiOUIB. 27 



REPORT OF ST. LOUIS TRAFFIC BUREAU. 



Bt E. S. THOMPKHfS, Commissioner. 

January 4th, 1902. 
Board of Managers ^ St, Louis Traffic Bureau. 

Gentlemen — Under jonr able direction, the work of the lYaffic 

Bureau for 1901 has brought beneficial results, in the removal of many 

discriminatioiis and a more favorable adjustment of rates for this market, 

which have proven profitable to our members. 

The reduction in rates which was made on classes and commodities to 

points on the St. Louis & San Francisco and St. Louis, Iron Mountain & 

Southern Railroads, in Missouri and Arkansas; the reduction in the 

St. Louis-Memphis differential on Grain and Grain Products to certain 

Mississippi Valley Territory, as well as changes in the classifieation, with 

other changes of interest, have all been given to the members by circulars 

issued from this office. 

The time of one person has been taken up the past year in giving 

information to members, such as the quotation of comparative rates on 

Grain and Merchandise; the compilation of comparative rates for our 

manufacturers of Soap, Coffins, Paint, etc. The increase in the number of 

requests of this nature shows that many of our members are acquainted 

with the value of this feature of the Bureau^ in helping them to extend 

their trade. 

The Traffic Bureau has been represented at a number of important 

conferences of railroad officials, and the changes which were needed for the 

Grain trade and the merchants explained to them in detail. In addition to 

this, the various lines have been made acquainted with the difficulties our 

members find in extending their trade into territory reached by their 

individual roads. 

A number of investigations of poor freight service from St. Louis have 

been made, with beneficial results, but much more could be accomplished 

if members wonld give specific reference to the shipments complained of. 

I attach hereto a list of circulars issued by this office, showing the 

results of our work and other information of value to our members. 

LIST OF CIRCULARS ISSUED IN 1901. 

Xew merchandise rates to points on the Cairo division of the C, C, C. 
& St. L. Ry. 

Bates on merchandise to new towns on the B., £. & S. W. and St. L. & 
S. F. Rvs. 



28 TBADl AND OOMMSBOl OF 

BuBiness to Santiago and CienfuegoB^ Cuba, and the rate conditions 
goyeming them. 

Rates to landings on the Tennessee River, to and including Chattanooga. 

New rates on merchandise from St. Louis, Oairo^ Mempliis, New Orleans 
and Kansas City to Arkansas common points. 

New rates to points on the C, O & G. Ry. in Arkansas. 

Notice of meeting of Western Classification Committee on May 14th, 
1901. 

Rates to new towns on the St. Louis <& Northern Arkansas Railroad. 

List of petitions for changes in the Western Classification. 

Reductions in rates on iron articles to points on the St. L. & S. F. R. R. 
in Arkansas. 

Supplementary list of petitions for changes in the Western Classification. 

Rates on merchandise to new towns on the St. L., K^ C. & Colo. R. R. 

Reductions in rates on boots and shoes, saddletrees, material, etc., be- 
tween East St. Louis and Chicago. 

Changes authorized at meeting of Western Classification Committee. 

Reduction in rates to local points on the Frisco in the Indian Territory. 

Merchandise rates to points on the Frisco System between Springfield 
and Memphis. 

Merchandise rates to points on the St. L., L M. & S. Ry. in Arkansas. 

Comparate Rate Sheet showing class rates from St. Louis, East St. Louis, 
Chicago, New York and interior jobbing towns to all points in Illinois. 

Notice of meeting, Western Classification Committee, in St. Louis, 
January 14th, 1902. 

New rates to points in Oklahoma and Indian Territory, with advances 
made. 

Comparative Rate Sheet showing rates from St. Louis, Memphis, Louis- 
ville, Cincinnati and New York to principal points in Tennessee. 

List of petitions for changes in the Western Classification. 

Rates on grain and grain products to points on the Mobile & Ohio R. R. 

Rates on grain and grain products to points on the Illinois Central in 
Tennessee and Mississippi. 

Reconsignment of grain, grain products and hay to the Southeast. 

Advance in rates on grain and grain products to points south of Cairo 
on the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. 

Rates on grain and grain products to junction points in Mississippi. 

Rates on grain and grain products to local points on the Illinois Central 
Railroad south of Cairo. 

Change in rates on grain and grain products to local points on the 
Illinois Central Railroad south of Grenada, Miss. 

New East-bound rates on grain and grain products. 

Rates on grain from all points in Oklahoma and Indian Territories to 
St. Louis, Galveston, Kansas City and Memphis. 

Reductions in rates on wheat from points on the Frisco in Oklahoma. 

Reductions in rates on wheat from points on the C, O. & G. R. R. in 
Oklahoma. 



VHM Cnr OF 8T. I.OUI0. 

Proportional rates on grain and grain products to common points in 
Arkansas and Liouisiana. 

Proportional rates on grain from points on the O.^ B. I. A P. By. to 
Ft. Worth, Tex. 

Rates on grain from all points in Iowa to St. Louis, Chicago, St. Paul 
and Kansas City. 

East-bound rates on grain and grain products. 

Bates on grain from all points in Kansas to St. Louis, (Galveston, Kansas 
City and Memphis. 

New proportional rates on grain and feed to points in Texas. 
Beoonaignment of grain and grain products to points in Texas. 
Advance in rates on grain and grain products to Tennessee and Missis- 
sippi junctions. 

Reduction In rates on oom and oats from Illinois and Iowa to points in 



30 



TBADB AND OOMKBBOB OF 



ST. LOUIS IN 1900 AND 1901 



Area, square miles 

Population 

Beal Estate and personal, assessed value 

Bonded debt 

Houses erected, number, 3,0&9 in 1900 ; 8,722 in 1901 ; cost. 

River front, miles .- 

Public parks, number, 18. acres 

Paved streets, miles, 446H ; cost 

Paved allevs, miles 

Sewers, miles, 507>i ; cost 

Oondults for under-nound wires, miles 

Water supply, capacity gallons per day , 

"Water supply, average daily consumption 

Receipts from water licenses 

Public Schools, number, 1H8; Teachers, 1,761; Scholars, 

1901.82.712; cost 

New Union Station, covers acres 

Railroad lines terminating in St. Louis 

Street Railroads, miles single track 

Passengers carried 

Revenue of the City from taxation 

Death rate per thousand 

Post Office, cash receipts 

Post Office, Pieces of Mail originating in St. Louis 

Tonnage, Total tons received 

Tonnage, Total tons shipped , 

Manufactures, product, estimated 

Bank clearings 

Bank and Trust Companies, capital and surplus 

Tobacco, manufactured, pounds 

Breweries, output, gallons 

Grain, receipts, bushels 

Flour manufactured, barrels 

Public Elevators, 8 ; capacity. busheLs 

Private Elevators, 14 ; capacity, bushels 

Lead received, pigs 

Zinc and Spelter, slabs 

Cattle received, number 

Hc^^ received, number 

Sheep received, number 

Horses and Mules received, number 

Cotton, receipts, bales 

Coal (all kinds) received, tons 

Dry GkKMls, Notions, and kindred linos Sales 

Groceries and kindred lln^i " .... 

Boots and Shoes " 

Tobacco and Cigars ** 

Hardware, shell and heavy " 

Woodenware •* 

Lumber 

Candles , 

Beer 

Clothing 

Furniture and kindred lines *' 

Stoves and Ranges •* 

Agricultural Machinery and Vehicles *' 

Iron and Steel and Wagon Material " 

Electrical Machinery, Goods and Supplies '* 

Paints and Paint Oils " .... 

Saddlery and Harness " 

Hats, Caps and Gloves *' .... 

Drugs and kindred lines, including proprietarv goods, 

druggist sundries and chemicals , Sales 

Glass, Glassware and Queensware ** 

Brick, Terra Cotta and Clay products " .... 

Wool, receipts, 17,000,790 Iba 1900; 25377,110 lbs. 1901 ; 

value 



16,567 



•« 



•t 



• • « • 



1900. 

62H 

676,238 

$880,779,280 

$18,916,278 

$7,760,000 

•19 

2,126 

$26,260,000 

110 

$11,392,800 

186 

100,000,000 

'$i,*69i,'662 

$6,600,000 
11 
24 
466 
106,968,411 
401 
16.6 
664 
670 
461 
889 
000 
494 
637 
n60 
693 
804 
069 
OOO 
000 
443 
08U 
800 
972 
138 
082 
687 
299 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 



$2,081 

226,086 

16,887 

9,426 

$840,000 

$1,688,849 

$42,786 

76,170 

70,791 

61,144 

1,346 

8,700 

1,966 

1,677 

979 

796 

2,166 

434 

169 

1,011 

4,360 

$80,000 

$70,000 

$87,500 

$40,000 

$81,600 

$8,600 

$22,000 

$3,750 

$16,000 

$8,600 

$86,000 

$>Z,600 

$18,000 

$12,600 

$23,000 

S6,000 

S6.000 

$4,600 



$86,000 
$6,600 
$4,000 



000 
000 
000 



$7,000,000 



1901. 

62)i 

600,000 

$394,722,700 

$18,916,278 

$18,207,991 

19 

2,136 

$27,000,000 

116 

11,661,076 

141 

100,000,000 

66,891,066 

$1,712,986 

$6,887,860 

11 

28 

461 

182,943,261 

$5,706,811 

17.66 

$2,340,429 

246,784,171 

17,896,328 

10,862,836 

$860,000,000 

$2,270,680,216 

$69,837,970 

80,766,883 

78,060,402 

60,069,796 

1,506,284 

7,000,000 

2,906,000 

1,800,236 

2,028,386 

969,881 

2,236,946 

684,115 

149,716 

913,328 

4,902,713 

$100,000,000 

$86,000,000 

$43,500,000 

$45,000,000 

$87,600,000 

10,000,000 

$26,000,000 

$4,600,000 

$17,624, :»6 

$7,000,000 

$33,000,000 

$6,000,000 

$21,600,000 

$15,000,000 

$26,000,000 

$7,000,000 

$5,600,000 

$7,600,000 

$40,000,000 
$5,500,000 
$4,000,000 

$10,600,000 



THX OITT OF ST. LOUIS. 31 



REVIEW. 



Th« City of Stu Loots during 1901, received its full share of the 
industrial prosperity of the country. In every line of business and manu- 
bctore the reports show decided gains with bright prospects for the 
eomiiig year. 

Business prosperity is reflected in the increase of buildings erected 
both for business and manufacturing as well as residence purposes. The 
Talueof building permits issued in 1901, aggregated $13,207,991^ while 
those for the previous year were $5,916,984. During the last half of the 
year few dwellings were for rent and parties seeldng a home found great 
difficulty in securing a desirable residence, indicating an increase in 
population greater than the increase in building. 

Hie same was true as regards business structures. Although a large 
number of commodious warehouses and stores were erected, they were 
occupied as soon as completed and new firms coming to the city had 
difficulty in finding suitable accomodations. 

The fact that a great World's Fair is to be held in St. Louis in 1903, 
drew the attention of the country to this city and numerous inquiries were 
received in regard to the facilities for manufacturing plants and for 
wholesale business. A number of establishments removed to St. Louis 
from other cities, among which were a new department store from 
Ridmiondy Lid., a clothing house from Nashville, Tenn., a furnishing 
goods establishment from Cincinnati, a woolen mills firm from Kentucky, 
while a galvanized iron wire factory was erected in North St. Louis and 
plans were made for a Portland cement plant, and steps were taken late in 
the year looking to the establishment of a large underwear factory now 
located in the East. 

The manufacturing industries were very active during the year and 
many factories enlarged and others projected. While there is no report 
upon wlu'ch to base an estimate of the product it is safe to say that the 
amount of output will be between $360,000,000 and $400,000,000. With 
plenty of the raw material at hand, with cheap coal and unsurpassed facilities 
tor disQihution in all directions, St. Louis offers many inducements for 
*MitfoMJ manufacturing establishments. 
ProbtLbly there wa^ ^^ ^^® factor indicating more forcibly the condition 
oftnde t hf^n the el^^^^^ ^' ^^® banks. These show a most satisfactory 
mmige being for tHe year $2,270,680,216 as against $1,688,849,494 in 1900, 
JD ih/tJaip eanal to xie^rly 36%. 
'wT^irf ^»i>i*»^ lias beenfaicreased during the year by the establish- 
Hie ^'^'^^^ r^V,,^ trust companies, making the banking caplUl and 
BieDt of s«v^«VJ^% tbe year $59,387,970. 
sarplna at the cloee ox > 



32 TBADB AJXD OOMMBROB OF 

There was great activity in local stocks and bonds, the high prices realized 
showing the strength and prosperity of all our financial institutions. 

The post office returns reflect also with great accuracy the yolume of 
business transacted. The cash receipts of the St. Louis Post Office for the 
year were ^,240^429.72, being an increase of $208,764.96 over the previous 
year. 

The intemai revenue receipts also give a clear indication of manufactur- 
ing activity. The revenue for the year ending June SOtli was about 
$16,000,000; making this the 4th city in volume of revenue collections. 

The large increase in volume of business is very forcibly illustrated 
in the amount of tonnage received and forwarded which includes all 
kinds of freight, both local and through. 

The total tonnage handled in and out during the year was 28,758,664 
tons as compared with 25,313,340 tons in 1900, an increase of 13^ %. The 
local tonnage received, exclusive of coal which is practically all local, was 
7,970,262 tons agitinst 6,573,975 tons last year, a gain of over 20%, showing 
the increased business of the city. The receipts of coal were 4,902,713 
tons as compared with 4,360,299 tons the previous year. 

In the lines of business transacted on the floor of the Merchants^ 
Exchange the year was most satisfactory. Although there was a decrease 
of 18 % or nearly five million bushels in receipts of com, owing to the 
drought of the past summer, the aggregate receipts of grain show a loss of 
only 1,085;007 bushels, the receipts of other grains having exceeded the 
previous year. If the receipts of flour reduced to wheat, are included the 
receipts of 1901 would be 69,827,264 bushels as against 69,555,619 bushels 
in 1900, a most satisfactory showing. The flour trade also made a good 
record, there being an increase in both the amount manufactured by 
city mills and the receipts from country points. In many other articles, 
notably in provisions, hay, tobacco, lead, live stock and wool, the amount 
handled was greater than heretofore. 

In speculative lines there was a larger and more satisfactory business 
than for several years, there being an active market most of the year. 

In the various jobbing lines comes the same unanimity of reports — 
enlarged business and satisfactory results. 

A review of the dry goods trade in the City of St. Louis for the year 
1901, would be a in large measure to repeat the record for the year 1900 and 
the previous years. The extraordinary increase of this branch of commerce 
of the City of St. Louis in the past decade has been fully maintained the 
past year. The dry goods trade of St. Louis not only retained the 
increases recorded in previous years but largely added thereto, eveiy 
establishment finding it necessary to add to its capacity for handling the 
business offered. 

The increase in the sales of dry goods, fnmishing goods, notions, silks, 
millinery and kindred lines for the year 1901, is between 25% and 80% over 
that of 1900, making the sum total well over $100,000,000, notwithstanding 
that values for 1901 were on a slightiy lower level than for the year 1900. 



THB CTTT OF ST. IiOUIS. 33 

This remarkable growth of the wholesale dry goods trade of St. Louis is 
ttt^ed without adding thereto the yolume of the smaller retail distributors 
of diy goods, except in so far as their purchases swell the sales of the 
wholesale establishments. 

The new territory gained during the past years has not only been 
retained, but the yolume of trade has also been increased. 

The remarisable growth of the dry goods trade of St. Louis has become 
its best argument for retaining the old business and securing new trade in 
sections that have been doing business in other jobbing centers. 

In no line has there been more marked adyance than in the manufacture 
and distribution of shoes. St. Louis now holds at least second place in the 
manufacture of shoes and Is the largest jobber west of the Alleghenys. 

During the past year new factories haye been erected^ and old ones 
enlarged and the output is at least 30% greater than last year, while the 
total sales haye increased from $37,500,000 in 1900, to $43,500,000 in 1901. 
A more detailed statement of the shoe trade will be found on another page. 

The remarkable growth of the hardware business for seyeral years has 
continued during the past year, and there has been a yery considerable 
increase in the yolume of sales. The business of the year of shelf hardware 
and kindred goods was fully $25,000,000 and if to this is added heayy hard- 
ware, and the larger retail houses are included, the total hardware sales 
may be fixed at $37,000,000. 

The jobbing hat interests haye kept pace with other lines and reports 
show an increase of nearly or quite 26% with sales aggregating $7,600,000 
for the year. 

St. Louis has made rapid progress in the clothing trade and nearly all 
sold is made in St. Louis; the business is growing year by year. Reliable 
reports giye the output for the year at $7,000,000. 

In groceries, reports show an increase of 20% to 26%. This was not 
on account of adyance in yalue as some of the staple goods were sold at 
lower prices than the preyious year, but was a legitimate increase in busi- 
ness. The yolume of sales may be stated at $86,000,000. A more compre- 
hensiye statement of the grocery trade will be found on another page. 

St. Louis has always been prominent in the saddlery trade, and the past 
year was no exception. The business increased yery largely the first half 
of the year, but fell off the latter part, but for the whole season the increase 
was perhaps 10%, making the total output $6,500,000. 

A decided increase is reported in the trade in iron, steel and kindred 
material, including architectural iron, bridge material and other forms of 
iron used in construction— the total output would reach $15,000,000. 

In stoyes and ranges the position of this city as the leading stoye market 
in the country has been well maintained. The adyance made in produc- 
tion was at least 12>^% with total sales at $6,000,000. 

Reports from the paint oil trade giye the total output at $7,000,000, an 
increase ot 16^ % oyer 1900. Tills city is becoming more and more of a 
paint center every year. 



34 TRADE AND OOHICEBOE OF 

In drugs and proprietary medicines^ St. Louis still holds the first plaoe 
in the west. The business is increasing yearly and a larger territory is 
being covered. The sales for 1901 of drugs, chemicals^ proprietary medi- 
cines and kindred lines are given at $40,000^000. 

The business in glassware, queensware and goods pertaining to that line 
is making great progress^ and it is stated that American-made goods are 
taking the place of imported wares very rapidly. A new feature of the 
trade was the establishment during the year of a plant for the production 
of fine cut glass^ an industry heretofore unknown in St. Louis. The sales 
of queensware houses approximated $2;500;000, and if to this is added the 
sales of plate and window glass and other glass productions, the total 
would reach $5^500^000. 

It is a well-known fact that in the manufacture of tobacco St. Louis 
leads the world, manufacturing at least 25% of the output of the country. 
The amount increases year by year and for 1901 was 80,766,883 pounds 
against 76^170,850 pounds in 1900. The sales of tobacco and cigars were 
$40,000,000. 

St. Louis is the largest manufacturer of both railroad and street cars in 
the countiy. All the plants were fully engaged during the entire year. 
Street cars are shipped to all points of the world and it is estimated that 
3,000 cars are made annually, valued at $12,000,000 to $15,000,00. 

The brewery interests is one of the most prominent of St. Louis indus- 
tries. It is estimated that $35,000,000 capital is invested in the business and 
the product is sold in every country on the globe. The amount manufac- 
tured during the past year was 78,050,402 gallons, valued at $17,624,285. 

The cotton trade of St. Louis is an important one and adds much to the 
business of the city. During the cotton year, ending August 31, 1901, the 
gross receipts were 973,497 bales, of which the local receipts handled by 
our factors were 239,628 bales, representing a value of over $10,000,000. 

In many additional lines and in fact in every line of trade in the city 
there was an increased and satisfactory business, and the future is bright 
and hopeful. Our people are energetic, active and progressive and are 
making every effort to increase the trade and commerce of the city, to 
re-construct its streets, perfect its sanitary condition, beautify its surround- 
ings and to make the city an object lesson to the millions of people who 
will visit it and its great Fair in 1903. 



THx ocrr or sr. x4>oi8. 36 



THE WORLD'S FAIR, ST. LOUIS. 



CELEBRATINQ THE CENTENNIAL OF THE PURCHASE OF THE 

UHJISIANA TERRITORY, 1803. 



By WAiiTKB B. Stetbks, Secretary Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company. 



One year ago the Louisiana Purchase Exposition was in the realm of 
suggestion. National authority for it waited upon Congress. Legislation 
by State and Municipal Assembly to make effectiye Constitutional Amend- 
ments, authorizing flnancial support was prospective. At the beginning of 
1901 subscriptions to the capital stock were not complete. There was no 
World's Fair Company, only a provisional committee. The whole enter- 
prise was in the preliminary organization stage. 

It seems hardly credible that a twelve month has covered the necessary 
enactments by Congress, the State Legislature, and the Municipal Assem- 
bly; has brought to pass the organization of the company; has accom- 
plished the selection and grading of the site; the appointment of the 
executive heads, the completion of plans for exhibit palaces, the letting 
of many contracts and the performance of much physical work. 

Less than nine months ago controversy was waging on the question of 
location. Public sentiment was divided. Partisans argued long and well 
for their respective choices. In the light of progress it does not now seem 
as if any other place Uian Forest Park could have been seriously considered. 
One element of doubt, if not of positive antagonism, regarding the occu- 
pation of the park, was based on apprehension that Washiogton University 
in its new environment might suffer from this close proximity to the Expo- 
sition. But with the hearty concurrence of the university trustees the 
g^reat stretch of campus and all the model buildings have become a part of 
the World's Fair. By the stroke of the pen the 110 acres of the university 
have been added to the 668 acres of the park site. The great granite front 
of the university quadrangle, overlooking eastward the park, has become 
tlie Administration Building for the Fair, and is being occupied by the 
official stalb. The calendar of successive steps toward realization is with- 
out precedent in Exposition evoluticm. 

In January the raising of five millions of doUars in popular subscrip- 
tions was completed. 

February brought the Legislative enactments by State and City, con- 
tributing one million of dollars by the former and five million of dollars by 
the latter to the Exposition. 



36 TRADB AH D OOMKBBOa OF 

March placed the seal of National approval and authority bj Act of 
Congress appropriating five millions of dollars and providing for the 
National Commission, which the President of the United States promptly 
appointed. 

Thus the first quarter of the year carried the enterprise to the assurance 
of financial success, and to official recognition by the Nation. 

In April the local company was incorporated with the election of 93 
directors. 

May witnessed the organization tlirough the selection of officers, and 
the beginning of work along many lines through committees of directors. 
Public interest culminated in the tender by the city of any of the parks for 
the site. 

In June, after an exhaustive investigation and protracted hearings, the 
western half of Forest Park, heavily wooded, diversified in topography, 
situated in the western part of this oval-shaped city, was chosen as the 
location, contiguous territory to be added as found necessary. 

The second quarter of the year brought the project through the stage 
of organization and to the initiation of physical work. 

In July a commission of nine firms of architects, the most eminent in 
the land, representing half a dozen cities, was organized. To this com- 
mission was given the task of planning the exhibit palaces and their 
arrangement on the grounds. 

August produced results in the adoption of the comprehensive designs 
for the improvement of the site and for the group of main exhibit palaces. 
The Board of Directors appropriated five millions of dollars for the com- 
mencement of construction. 

In September, the President of the United States, upon the progress 
certified by the National Commission, issued a proclamation officially 
declaring the Exposition fully provided for, and inviting all the nations of 
the earth to participate. Official notices went forth to every capital on the 
globe. 

The third quarter advanced the Exposition to its international position. 

October brought development of the executive forces, with provision for 
four grand divisions, to be presided over by officials designated as Director 
of Exhibits, Director of Works, Director of Exploitation and Director of 
Concessions and Admissions. Two of tliese places were at once formally 
filled. 

With November came the fruition of carefully conducted negotiations 
in the addition of the 110 acres of Washington University campus and of the 
one million, five hundred thousand dollars in practically completed build- 
ings to the World^s Fair site. Upon the perfected plans for the eight main 
exhibit palaces the Directors and the National Commission placed 
approval. 

December found the wilderness of forest transformed into building sites 
•with grading underway; the contract for enclosure let; the plan for an 
elaborate sewer system completed and the contract given. On the 90th of 



THK CTTT OV ST. LOUIS. 37 

the month, Oie anniversary of the trmnsfer of the Purchase to American 
eo^crei^ty, gronnd -was broken on the site with formal and impressiye 
wfemomes. 

Coimt\e8B minor details have been put behind. 

Dvy \fj day the progress of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition might 
V noted. The twenty-three thousand subscribers have paid two assess- 
mcgita, 30%, on the $6,000,000 stock. The City of St. Louis has prepared 
the isme of $5,000,000 of bonds. Chiefs of Departments, under the four 
IHreetorB of Diyisions, have been named. The best Exposition talent of 
the whole conntry has been drawn upon. The classification divided into 
fifteen departments, 144 groups, and 807 classes, has receiyed final approval 
Hid has been sent out to thousands of intending exhibitors. Rules and 
Teguladons, abounding in details of official information, have been promul- 
gated. Acceptances to the invitation of the President of the United States 
luiYe been received from fully one-half the nations of the earth, with indi- 
cations justifying the hope of a Universal Exposition. 

But it takes more than money, more than organization, more than con- 
stmction to make an Exposition. More than all these, the Louisiana Pur- 
chase Exposition will have. Its distinctive character is already casting 
flbadowB before. 

By the Centennial, at Philadelphia, manufacturing industry in the 
United States was given a tremendous impetus, which has had far-reaching 
and continuing effect upon the National development. 

Through the World^s Columbian Exposition, at Chicago, the artistic 
sense of the American people was aroused and encouraged mightily. 

What shall be the genius of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition? Ten 
years ago an independent department of education had no place in a 
Worid'^9 Fair. Educational exhibits were classed in a group and were dis- 
played in a gallery comer of a main exhibit building. 

In the classification adopted and promulgated for the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition, education is Department A on an alphabetical list which ends 
widi P — Physical Culture. 

" Sound mind in healthy body !^^ The Latin sequence is observed in the 
scope of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 

Eight groups and twenty-six classes go to make up this foremost of the 
departments of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. At Paris the educa- 
tSonal exhibits made by the United States in 1900 were the wonder of all 
other nations. At St. Louis, American educational methods will be elabo- 
rated on a much more impressive plan. The chief of this department was 
nominated by twenty-five of the foremost educators of the land, a com- 
mittee of college presidents and teachers chosen by the National Educa- 
tioiial Aoociation. Education will have its own palace of exhibits — one 
<rf the most imposing of the main buildings, most centrally located, and 
Bering eeveTsd acres of floor space for display. 
A second building, designed in its interior arrangements for the purpose, 
^ bouse B series of international congresses upon science, literature and 



/ 



38 TRADE AXD COMMSBCE OF 

art. These congresses will constitute an independent department with its 
own organization, but supplementary to the general motive which ranks 
education as broadest of the Exposition's purposes. 

Art is Department B in the classification^ to be housed in a building for 
which one million of dollars has been set apart. And art will mean some- 
thing more than wall space with pictures. The inspiration of the educa- 
tional plan again finds its expression in this department. For the first time 
in an intertemational exposition special galleries will be provided for 
models of buildingS; sculptural decorations, mural paintings, wood carvings 
and decorative details. The classification of this department is upon a plan 
much more comprehensive than heretofore. The Exposition buildings and 
their decorations will be recognized as exhibits of the Art Department, 
entered for such awards as may be conferred. 

One more feature, as indicative of this dominating characteristic of the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition, educational in the best sense, may be men- 
tioned. For the first time in exposition history, social economy is magni- 
fied into one of the great departments. In this department twentieth 
century reform ideas and suggestions will be given full opportunity. 
Thirteen groups and fifty -seven classes are comprised under social economy. 
Among the groups are municipal improvement, public health, charities 
and corrections, general betterment movements, the liquor question, the 
housing of the working classes, provident institutions, methods of indus- 
trial remuneration, organization of industrial workers. State regulation of 
industry and labor. 

Liberal arts and manufactures are not combined as heretofore, but are 
made separate and distinct departments, each with its chief. Three build- 
ings will be provided. One of the three buildings will cover fourteen and 
another seven acres of space. Under liberal arts the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition will classify appliances and general processes which belong to 
literature, science and art. Under manufactures will be grouped the 
articles of necessity, utility and luxury. Textiles will constitute a section 
in a separate building. Machinery will be a department independent of 
liberal arts and manufactures. In four great groups will be shown steam 
engines, motors, general machinery and machine tools. The department 
of electricity will present the approved types of dynamos and motors, the 
newest ideas in telegraphy and telephony, the systems of electric lighting, 
the uses of the current in all of the latest forms. 

In the department of transportation this Exposition will do more than 
include exhibits of vehicles past and present. It will explore the future. 
It will endeavor to stimulate, by holding out great inducements, practical 
results in aerial navigation far beyond anything the world has yet known. 
There will be a small fortune for the inventor who presents a solution of 
the great problem in aerostatics. A tournament with from $100,000 to 
$200,000 in prizes will bring together, in competition, the aeronauts of the 
world. 

Agriculture will be housed in the greatest of the exhibit buildings, 
perhaps the largest exposition building ever erected. In this department, 



TRB OITr OF ST. IiOITIB. 39 

live stocky bee culture, dairying and special crop growing, farm engineering^ 
fum buildings and farm transportation, will constitute important groups. 
Food and food products and all the appliances pertaining to them will 
receive exliaustive attention. 

Horticulture, often classed as part of agriculture by experts Iq expos!- 
don work, is made a department of itself in the Louisiana Purchase classi- 
fication. Under this head will be classed viticulture, pomology, aboriculture 
and floriculture. 

Forestry is also a distinct department. Forest products, an industry 
which stood for nine hundred millions of dollars in the United States in 
1900, will be given such an opportunity as never before conceded. 

In mines and metallurgy it is the purpose to show not only the minerals 
but the successive steps which make those minerals useful. Processes from 
mining the ore through the metallurgical stages to the finished product 
will be in operation. 

In the department of fish and game are comprised groups of hunting 
and fishing equipment and products. 

For the department of anthropolgy, to illustrate prehistoric man, there 
is in contemplation a reproduction of the famous ruins of Mitla of Southern 
Mexico. 

Social Economy will be distinguished as one of the great departments 
of this £xi>08ition. Social economic exhibits have been receiving increas- 
ing recognition in Expositions, but have never before been accorded a 
separate department and building. 

A Washington University structure, containing a number of halls, will 
be erected and specially adapted to International Congresses. 

In an amphitheatre and upon an athletic field will be conducted, under 
a chief of physical culture, games, tournaments and sports, the series of 
programmes occupying the Exposition period. 

The Louisiana Purchase Exposition was not actually assured until Con- 
gress, on the 3rd of March, 1901, passed the Act conferring government 
sanction, and making the government a third partner in the capital of 
$15,000,000 to be expended. 

States and Territorial Legislatures, then in session^ followed with sur- 
prising promptness, making appropriations and providing for commissions 
10 represent their interests at the Exposition. Missouri leads in the list of 
States with $1,000,000, Illinois is second with $250,000. In some States 
where Legislatures have not been in session since the Exposition was made 
a certainty, commissions have been named by the governors, and move- 
ments to insure participation through voluntary contributions have been 
inaugurated. In the ten months which have elapsed since action at Wash- 
mgton favorable steps have been taken formally in more than half of the 
Sutes. 

A feature which will be among the most interesting, and which will 
distinguish the Louisiana Purchase Exposition from all former Expositions, 
will be participation by the Islands of the United States. Hawaii, Porto 



40 TBADB AND OOKICBBOB OF 

Rico and the Philippines^ not to mention those smaller islands, Guam 
and Tutuila, over which the American flag now floats, will occupy no 
inconsiderable space. 

Such progress in preparations as has characterized 1901 could have been 
achieved only with zealous co-operation of a united community. An 
antagonistic, aggressive minority might have caused delay. How thor- 
oughly and heartily the City of St. Louis is committed to the success of 
this great enterprise was shown in an election, held in October, to amend 
the city charter. The amendments, if not vital, had a most important 
relation to the Fair. They were framed to give boulevards, sewer exten- 
sion, street pavement and other municipal betterments on such a scale as 
to make a new St. Louis. They were designed to warrant the expenditure 
of ten millions of ^dollars in improvements. They were adopted by a 
marvelous majority. Almost five-sixths of the votes cast were affirmative. 

This record of twelve months' progress toward a World's Fair made by 
the Company, by the City of St. Louis, by the fourteen States and Territo- 
ries of the Louiriana Purchase, by the Nation, by the world, has no parallel 
precedent in the history of Expositions. 



THS CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 41 



FINANCIAL REVIEW. 



By T. A. Stoddabt, Manager of the St. Louis Clearing House. 



Upon an examination of the snbjoined statement^ it will be seen that 
the year 1901 has broken all previoos records of transactions in local 
financial circles, the increase in capitalization is a remarkable feature, 
tdded to which is a large increase of deposits. 

The banks and trust companies distribution of liberal dividends to 
share holders is evidence tliat the business of the year has proven profit- 
able. 

The daily clearings for the year show a steady gain over corresponding 
dates of all previous years. 

In comparison with the total for the year 1900, which was the former 
record year, when the aggregate was $1,688,849,494, the year 1901 foots up 
$2,270,680,216, an excess of ^1,830,722 nearly 85%. 

Between the years 1872 and 1901 a large increase in the volume of 
business is shown. 

In 1872 there were 58 banks with capital and surplus of $20,196,098. 
Clearings for the year $494,585,276. In 1901 there were 80 banks and 
trust companies with capital and surplus of $59,337,970. Clearings for the 
year $2,270,680,216. 

The comparative figures of the nineteen banks and eight trust com- 
panies between December, 1900, and December, 1901, is as follows : 

Dec., 1900. Dec., 1901. Increase. 

Capital and Surplus $ 27,222,878 $ 30,059,968 $ 2,887,086 

DepoflitB 120,947,982 189,749,918 18,801,986 

Loans 85,960,688 106,474,624 20,514,091 

Caah 47,270,654 48,622, 746 1,8 62,191 

Total Resources $166,698,408 $180,877,716 $ 24,179,306 

Sight Trust Companibs— 

Capital and Surplus 16,062,660 29,278,007 14,216,847 

Deposits 85,106,680 64,122,878 19,016,298 

Loans 29,766,486 50,201,026 20,444,591 

Caah 10,878,521 18,468,696 8,095,174 

Total Besources $ 60,168,240 $ 88,400,880 $ 88,281,640 

Combination of Banks and 

Trust Compandbs— _ 

Capital and Surplus $ 42,286,589 $ 69,887,970 $ 17,052,482 

OepOBitB, 166,054.612 198,872,791 87,818,279 

Loans 116,716,968 166,675,660 40,958,682 

Caah..;; 57,644,076 62,091,440 4,447,865 

1V>tal Besourees $206,867,648 $264,278,696 $67,410,948 



42 



TBADS AMD CM>1IM H&Ofl OF 



Comparative Condensed Statements of National and State 

Banks of the Citt of St. Louis. 





December 
1900. 


December 
1901. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


BnsouacKs— 

LoaDs 

Bonds and Stocks. . . . 


$ 80.960,088 88 

31,803.710 41 

3,114,610 31 

47.370,004 80 


$106,474,638 67 

34.371,310 81 

1,009,187 G!i 

48,633,744 78 


$ 30,014.090 34 
3,918,499 90 


$ 


Beal Estate 


600,473 06 


Cash and Exchange. . 


i,363,i96 48 




Total 19 Banks . . . 


$106,696,408 80 


$180,877,716 31 


$ 34,784,780 07 


$ 606,473 06 


LZABHilTIBfi— 

Capital 


1 16,900.000 00 

10,833,878 48 

8,037,097 00 

130,947.933 83 


$ 17,900.000 00 

13,109.963 04 

11,067,880 00 

189,749,1118 27 


$ 1,000,000 00 

1,887,084 06 

3,040,387 00 

18,801,980 90 




Slicpluff 




Oirciilation 




Deposits 






Total 19 Banks... 


9106,688.406 80 


$180,877,716 81 


$ 34,179,008 01 





COMPABATIVB CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF ElGHT TRUST COMPANIES. 



Loans 

Bonds and Stocks 

Beal Estate and Fixtures. 
Oasn and Exchange 



December 
1900. 



December 
1901. 



Increase. 



Total 



39.706,486 01 

9,046,074 14 

996,309 98 

10,878 031 40 



$ 00,169,340 03 



$ 00,201,020 91 

17,809,170 31 

1,931,989 80 

18,468,694 93 



30,444,860 96 

8,768,096 07 

938,779 87 

8,096,178 63 



$ 88,400,880 89$ 88,^1,689 86 



LtlABIUTIKS— 

Capital 

Surplus 

Deposits, etc. 



Total 



$ 



8,300,000 00$ 
6,813.660 00 
80,106,080 08 



14,630,000 00 
14.608,007 87 
04,132,878 02 



6,870,000 00 

7,840.846 87 

19,016,393 99 



$ 60.169,340 08$ 88,400,880 89$ 88,331.689 86 



Banks and Trust Companies Combined. 



December, 

1900. 



RB80URGB»^ 

Loans |$ 110,716,968 84 



December, 
1901. 



Increase. 



Bonds and Stocks 

Beal Esi ate 

Cash and Exchange 



80,898,784 00 

3,107.830 19 

07,644,070 70 



Total $306,867,648 83 $364,378,096 70$ 07,410,947 87 



$ 106,675,649 48!$ M.9.<« 661 14 
43.080,380 02| 11,681,000 97 



8,481,137 00 
63,091,489 70 



838,8116 81 
4,447,868 96 



Liabilities— 

Capital 

Surplus 

Circulation , 
Deposits.... 



Total. 



$ 30,100,000 00 

17,18^,0^ 96 

8.037,097 ftO 

106,004,013 30 



$ 306,867,648 83 



82,030.000 00$ 
36.813.{)70 41 
11.067.880 00 
193,873,791 39 



$ 364,378,006 70 



7,870,000 00 

9.677,481 48 

3,04(1,387 50 

87,818,378 94 



« 07,410.947 87 



Statement of Capital and Surplus of Nineteen Banks and 

Twelve Trust Companies. 



Total. 



Banks, statements appearing on proceeding pag^es : 

Capital 

Surplus 

Trust Co.'s. statements appearing on preceding pages: 

Capital 

Surplus 

Title Guarantee Trust Co., does not do a banking business : 

Capital 

Surplus 

Colonial, commenced business January 6, 1903: 

('apital 

Surplus 

In process of organization, two companies: 

Capital 

Surplus 

Total 



$ 17,900,000 
13,109,963 

14,630,000 
14,608,007 

1,000,000 
700,000 

1,000,000 
1,000,000 

8,000,000 
3,000,000 



$ 30,000,968 

39,278,007 

3,300.600 

8,000,000 

0,000,000 



$ 70,087,970 



THE dry OT BT. IiOmB, 

Dttidenps Pais SHARKHOLDSBa 1900 and 1901. 
isoD. isoi. 

anks t],Me,oaaoo ii.tu.ooo « 



CLEAIUX6-H0USE STATISTIOS. 

ANiniAL CLEAKlNOS SINCE C 



..t »2,1», 
387,407, 
tn,S88, 
MH.SSS, 

.. 5*9,577. 

sae.KB, 

... 5TB,443, 

. .. sat.oM, 
. .. 5aD,«e, 



COMPABISON OF THE TEARS 1873 AND 1901. 





„sssu 


Clearings. 


Id tbeyskT im. there oen 1 


1%. 196.096 




In tfaeTMT IflOl, there were: 

IS BiiDl^knd Trust Co. ■» cleftiiDE throDgb mem- 
MToManmnber of Banks 


3,370,880,316 




t8»,141,«n 


1.776, 114. MO 





CLEABIKG-HOUSB 8TATEUENT. 



Bcsunss 


FOB 


THE TEAHfl 1897 


1898, 189S, 1900 and 


901. 


XORTHe. 


OLBAktnaB. 


1867. 


i« 


1899, 1 1900. 


1901. 




t llSGRairM 


• ■sags 
SI 

ig.T4S.04« 

M.ODT.XX 
Sl.MM.Me 

40,856,710 


$ 14B MS MB 


> in,m.i7| 




is 
s 

1 


IS 

on 

701 

S 

0« 


III 

s 

043 

1 


Si 

119.768 

!S:S 

180|64J 


a4u 

Ml 
636 

m 

il 




ito'^.«w 
























gej^er". 


iVc^y^ 














AigregMe.... 


*i,MS.fw,m 


|1,4M1,463.0«3 


|l,e38,S«S,308||l,eee,84S,4S4 


P,3T0,680.318 



44 TBADB AND OOMMKBCS OF 

STOCKS AND INVESTMENT SECURITIES. 

By J. H. DiKGKHAN, President St. Louis Stock Exchange. 



Transactions on the St. Louis Stock Exchange during the year 1901 far 
exceed any preyious yearly record, in number of shares and bonds handled 
and amount involved. 

The Stock Exchange Records show the following totals of each class of 

securities traded in : 

Shares. Value. 

Bank stocks 28,906 $ 6,814,154 60 

Trust Go.Btooks 06,057 17,077,786 50 

Traotion stocks 179,796 8,490,131 50 

Gas&Eleotrio Go 10,581 582,996 60 

Insurance stocks 2,266 225,028 00 

Mining Co. stocks 111,885 298,211 12 

Sundry stocks , 5^ 168,107 25 

Total 899,727 $32,601,869 37 

Bonds. Value. 

UnitedRy.48 $2,536,000 00 $2,284,916 70 

St. Louis Brew. Assn 248,500 00 240,867 75 

Mo. Edison 58 186,000 00 127,698 60 

Kinloch Tel. Os 25,000 00 26,162 50 

Various other bonds 114,150 00 119,221 76 

Total. $8,066,65000 $ 2,798,367 20 

A total valuation of both stocks and bonds of. . $85,899,716 67 

The market throughout the year was very active, with advancing prices 
from the early part of the year to its close, the closing on the last business 
day of the year being active and at prices almost equal to the highest of 
the year. 

Transactions during the year were especially heavy in bank stocks, trust 
company stocks, and traction securities. 

That St. Louis is fast growing in wealth is clearly shown In the large 
investment demand for municipal bonds, the underlying bonds of the 
United Bailways Co., bank stocks, and the established trust company 
stocks. The first two securities named have found their way into strong 
boxes, and have practically disappeared from the market — the same thing 
is true, but not to the same extent, of bank stocks and the older trust com- 
pany stocks. 

Money has been in good supply at reasonable rates, enabling brokers to 
carry their trades with ease. 

St. Louis to-day has a very much larger banking and trust company 
capital than Chicago, and such capital is constantly being increased by the 
formation of new trust companies. 

Considering that the St. Louis Stock Exchange is a young institution, 
and that only local securities are traded in on its floor, the record made the 
past year is most gratifying, and will compare favorably in point of local 
business done with any other stock exchange in the country. 



TBI OIVT OV ST. liOmS. 46 



MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES. 



By Tom L. Ganhoh, Secretary St. Louis Manufacturers' Association. 



Pwenty years ago railroads, considering the question of making 8t. Louis 
basing point for shipments to and from the city^ decided that the manu- 
actoring industries of the city were not of sufficient importance to include 
that class of freight from this point as a point of distributien, and instead 
gaTe to New York, Boston and Philadelphia advantageous freight rates on 
manufactured products over this city, and gave to this city advantageous 
rates over those cities for the distribution of agricultural products. 

The growth of the manufacturing interests of the City of St. Louis since 
1880 has been phenomenal, and has thrown St. Louis from the seventh rank 
to at least the third in point of manufacturing output. 

The story is best told by figures in tabulated form as follows: 

1880. 1890. 1900. 

Number of factories 2,924 6,148 8,827 

Number of employes 41,827 98,610 142,604 

Amount of wages paid $ 17,743,682 $ 58,166,242 $ 87,088,064 

Value of products at factories 114,888,876 228,714 817 412,716,884 

This shows a tremendous growth, marvelous in every particular and 
profitable in every respect. These figures are made largely from statistics 
taken from national reports. 

The City of St. Louis depends upon the territory surrounding it. That 
territory constitutes the Mississippi Valley. That territory is practically 
the garden spot of the world. Again some statistics are as follows : 

In that section in 1860 the farms numbered 370,820; in 1890, 2,670,617. 
In 1860 the acreage of these farms was 90,018,000 ; in 1900 it was 870,164,321. 

The improved acreage of these farms in 1860 was 26,404,000. In 1900 
the improved acres had increased to 380,416,000. 

In 1850 the value of those farms was $789,482,000; in 1900, (8,764,648,660. 

In 1860 the railroad mileage was 344; in 1900, 78,648. 

The manufacturing situation in this section cannot be estimated back of 
1870. For that year, as compared with 1900, the following table is given : 

1870. ISOO. 

Number of establishments 61,910 96,482 

Capital invested $281,126,900 $2,118,690,460 

Material used $866,161,000 $2,841,169,400 

Average number of employes .... 280,948 864,910 

Wagespaid $96^822,000 $ 602,940,000 

Value of products $618,188,000 $8,024,070,000 



46 TBADB AXD OOMXBBOB OF 

The figures of the Mississippi Valley^ the natural territory of St. Louis, 
has caused the substantial prosperity of St. Louis. Based upon the prog- 
ress of that section, relying upon its resources, men have invested in the 
City of St. Louis with the same care that they would buy bank stocks or 
take mortgages upon land. 

There are no tremendous fortunes that have been made in manufacturing. 
The percentages of failures has been less than any other city, and the 
margin of profit upon an average has been greater. 

The majority of the concerns are practically out of debt. They not 
only own their machinery, but they own their buildings and their land, and 
few of them have bonds placed upon their institutions. 

The commercial paper of St. Louis always commands a premium in the 
market, and money at the lowest possible rate can be had upon St. Louis 
property. 

T}^e city is seldom convulsed by great strikes. Discontent among the 
workmen of the city is less in proportion to number than any other city. 

There are a number of lines of industry in which St. Louis leads, not 
only the United States but the w^orld — steel ranges, chemical preparations, 
patent medicines, shoes, street cars, beer, and various other lines that need 
not be enumerated. 

There are a number of lines of manufactures that would pay well in 
St. Louis that are in their infancy, or in some instances not represented — 
cotton mills, plows, reapers, binders, mowers and other lines. 

There is room here for several large hardware concerns, dry goods, 
millinery, clothing. Nearly any lines of manufactured products can be 
increased, and when more of any one line are established it is profitable to 
the new-comers, because of the constant increase of trade. 

There are discriminations in this city against manufacturers that should 
be removed, and in time will be. There are some discriminations here that 
do not exist in any other city. There are also discriminations in other 
cities that do not exist here. 

This market is growing greater every day as a distributing point. The 
territory surrounding it is becoming more accessible and the demands are 
increasing. What was formerly the great American desert is now being 
populated by thrifty farmers. Small towns and small cities are growing 
up, all to be fed from this metropolis. 

One dry goods house here will take the output of an ordinary print 
mill ; the same house will take the output of an ordinary cotton mill for 
sheetings and domestics. 

These illustrations are but given to indicate the advisability of seeking 
St. Louis as a place to establish manufacturing industries. 



THX am OF 8T. UOVJB. 47 



REAL ESTATE. 



Fran the Anniial Keport of Sidvmy Scbiklb, Assistant Becaretary St. Louis 

Real Estate Exchange. 



The year IdOl, from the Tiew of the real estate agent, has been a notable 
one, for it has ushered in the new St. Lonis era, a period which may be 
expected to reach its climax during the Louisiana Purchase World ^s Fair, 
two years hence. It noarks the passage of the charter amendments, which, 
by Tote of the people loosened the legislatiye fetters that have long bound 
the dty and restricted its unprecedented^ though not abnormal growth. It 
ushered in a building movement which vdll regenerate much of the central 
districL It has given to this city a new Washington University, an institu- 
tion of learning ranked as the center of educational iniluence in the 
Mississippi Valley. 

The largest realty transaction, financially, yet recorded, involving 
unimproved property was consummated late in the year in the merging of 
interests by which the property immediately north of Forest Park and west 
of De Balivier avenue is preserved perpetually as a residence subdivision. 

Ground has finally been broken for the great Fair to commemorate the 
purchase of the vast territory out of which was carved the common- 
wealths of the Central West and South. 

The aggregate list of transfers of real estate, that infallible barometer 
of business conditions, amounted to $84,265,480, showing an increase 
gratifying in extent, though somewhat below the anticipations of the men 
identified with the handling of property. Exceeding the thirty million 
mark, they show indisputably the confidence which investors have in 
Sc Louis really and the ever-present desire to own one-s home, inherent 
in all Americans. 

St. Louis is receiving more attention at the hands of the transportation 
interests. Switching facilities are being enlarged, yards laid out, terminals 
amplified and belt lines constructed and under way to meet the need for 
eoncentration and rapid handling of freight so necessary to the manu- 
faeturer^ merchant and shipper. The wholesale and jobbing interests have 
during the year turned their attention even more assiduously to future 
needs. Studjong local conditions, these immense interests have, with 
steel, stone, brick and mortar gone westward or in other directions beyond 
the limits set by prophets. Washington avenue and the parallel thorough- 
fares have been built up west of Twelfth street. Factories have spread 
north of Jefferson avenue. The east end has seen grand old buildings 
wrecked to make room for modem ones. Enterprising manufacturers have 
reared plants along the Mill Creek Valley and dotted the Cupples district 
with establishments of industry, and warehouses for their products as far 
iresi as the city limits.. Along the Mississippi Biver, from Baden to 
(^wmdeht, new /Victories, mills and plants have been put up, railroads and 
Aippen working hand in hand. As newer manufacturing districts were 
opened up an J older ones enlarged there has been a corresponding growth 



48 TBADB AND OOMMBBOE OF 

in the residential qnartera. Stores^ homes for workmen and palatial 
residences follow in due course, all indicating a systematic and thorough 
movement pointing to the development of a city of one million people. 
St. Louis is the gateway of the southwest, and that is daily becoming more 
apparent. 

TRANSFERS. 

The transfers for the year 1900 aggregated $19,211,943; those of 1901 
show a splendid increase^ as follows : 

Number. Amount. 

January 680 $2 014 176 

February 628 1,443,887 

March 642 1 ,877,604 

April 696 3,186,797 

May 718 4,960,718 

June 714 3,701,686 

July 686 4,006,672 

August 640 1,317,187 

September 707 1,679,206^ 

October 747 2,429,784 

November 601 2,798,134 

December 482 5,717,064 

Totals 7,629 $36,021,096 

The years totals in transfers show interesting fluctations from month to 
month. December, the last month of the year, has to its credit deals 
aggregating nearly $6,000,000. July also passed $4,000,000. During two 
other months in the first half of the year there was a recorded business in 
excess of $3,000,000. Three other months foot up over $2,000,000 each. In 
the preceding year only one month had over $2,000,000 of recorded 
transfers. Such facts as these are eloquent of a greater revival, generally 
foreseen. 

RENTING. 

Renting has been unusually good. With the prosperity of recent years 
came a desire among the army of new tenants to occupy better and larger 
quarters, and removals, consequently, were many. New-comers promptly 
filled up the vacated houses. Where dwellings were in good repair no 
trouble was experienced in keeping them tenanted. The members of the 
Real Estate Exchange generally have depreciated raising rents except in a 
few cases where they were manifestly below normal prices, on the theory 
that it would be bad policy to let impressions get abroad that rents were 
being advanced because of the near proximity of the World's Fair. Rentals 
are governed by the law of supply and demand, and its decree have not 
borne harshly on any class of tenants, and they are at a figure where own- 
ing property is profitable to the investor who risks his capital for the sake 
of fair returns. Nevertheless, so scarce have moderate-sized dwellings 
become in the past three months, that hundreds of building permits have 



TBM OMTY OF 8T. LOUZB. 



49 



l)een iasiied for that class of new stractures. Industrial construction work 
is in keeping with the general actlTlty, doubtless brought about by a wider 
knowledge of the adyaotages of St. Louis from a distributing and fuel point. 

BUILDING. 

Large increases are shown in the yearns building permits^ viz : 

No. Brick. No. Frame. Total Value. 

January 75 92 $1,296,218 

February 67 96 686,614 

March 120 126 911,988 

April 119 126 727,622 

May 122 186 1,296,864 

June 117 146 1,842,104 

July 104 189 1,498,288 

August 106 182 786,171 

September 88 126 642,291 

October 147 160 1,012,819 

Kovember 99 148 759,801 

December 92 88 2,860,801 

Totals 1,266 1,608 $18,207,991 

The figures from the Building Commissioner's office show that permits 
for new structures the past year numbered oyer double those of the previous 
twelve months, the permits last year amounting to $5,916,984. The 
advance is unprecedented in recent years. Taking the monthly totals for 
1901, the top notch was reached in December, when they nearly attained 
the $2,000,000 mark. In 1892, the banner year for building, the total was 
$16,000,000. Ttiat year the grand total was swelled owing to the era of new 
office buildings which developed at that time, and which apparently has 
now been reinaugurated on a greater scale. 

Prices for materials are higher than during the past few years, but no 
higher than those which prevailed in 1901, when all building records were 
broken, and conservative men predict that they will not be prohibitive 
even during the unprecedented activity which the Fair of 1908 will bring 
about. 

ASSESSMENTS. 

Property in St. Louis is usually assessed at about 60 per cent of its valu- 
ation. The comparative growth is shown by these tabulated items from 
the Assessor's records: 

1877 $160,496,000 

1880 181,846,000 

1886 207,910,000 

1800 284,827,000 

1896 826,688,000 

1897 888,862,000 

1898 361,616,660 

1899 874,608,490 

1900 880,779,280 

1901 894,796,700 

4 



50 TBADB AHD OOKBODUni OF 

The rate of taxation for 1901; as established by the Municipal Assembly 
was $1.90 on the $100 valuation^ which is a reduction of 5 cents from the 
rate of the preceding year. The city in 1867, had over 27,000 taxpayers; 
in 1901, there were over 76,000. These "joint partners" in the municipality 
pay all-told taxes on a valuation of $894,795,700, an increase in assessment 
over the prior year of over $14,000,000. 

DEEDS OF TRUST. 

In the year just closing the deeds of trust amounted to: 

January $1,565,075 

February 1,451,607 

March 1,704,048 

April 2,889,070 

May 8,870,681 

June 2,357,809 

•July 87,742,777 

August 1,480,266 

September 8,960,556 

October 2,627,861 

November 2,662,277 

December (to December 27) 1,888,498 

*In this month the bond mortgage in a railroad company deal was filed 
for record. 

The Supreme Court of Missouri on June 22, decided the test case 
adverse to the Third Constitutional Amendment relating to the taxation of 
mortgages. This amendment, immediately after its passage, had the effect 
of deterring moneyed men, for a time, from investing in Missouri mort- 
gages, and the loan business was thereby seriously interfered with, but the 
judicial decree has wiped out this troublesome feature. 



THE SHOE TRADE. 

From the Shoe and Leather Gazette. 



THE YEAB IN ST. LOUIS — THE GREATEST JLKD BEST OF ALL TEARS 

IN THE SHOE BUSINESS. 

The year 1901 certainly did well by the St. Louis wholesale shoe market, 
and the local shoe manufacturing interests. Not one institution has made 
a backward step ; not one has failed to make good progress forward, and to 
establish itself still more solidly, to extend its territory more widely, and 
to add to its facilities for coming business. 

There has been an increase in the capital employed ; in the number of 
firms; in the number of salesmen on the road; in the number of factories; 
in the number of men employed in them ; in the quantity of goods turned 
out; in the number of new customers added; and in the grand total of 



1*HB OXTT OF m. LOUU. 51 

sales and shipments. No one year in the history of St. Louis has ever 
witnessed so general an advance, all along the line^ and prospects for the 
fature were never better. 

A noticeable and most gratifying feature of the St. Louis shoe trade of 
1901 was the increase in average price per pair. That is to say^ there has 
been a general demand for better shoes, and local firms have not fallen 
behind the demand in their ability to supply it. The finer grades in jobbing 
lines have been well kept up, and local factories have turned out an unusual 
amount of fine goods, both men^s and women^s. '^St. Louis made shoes'* 
are specially advertised by a number of firms as among their best $2.60, 
$3.00 and $3.50 goods. 

The increases in the average price per pair reported by the various 
houses in St. Louis run from eight cents to twenty-six cents, as compared 
with the same averages of 1900. The percent of increase for the entire 
market, in price per pair, is about 12%. 

In quantity the total receipts of shoes manufactured at points outside 
the city ^rere practically the same as in 1900, as shown by the records of 
the Merchants' Exchange, but the big advance in local manufacturing, 
together with the increase in average price, increased largely the value of 
shipments. The total manufactured locally is estimated at over $14,000,000, 
while the total shoe business of the city was in excess of $43,500,000. 

The capital invested in the shoe trade is about $10,000,000, an increase 
of $3,000,000 over 1900. 

EXTENDED TBRRITOBT. 

The year 1901 witnessed an extension of St. Louis territory in all direc- 
tions. The South, Ohio and Pennsylvania, the Pacific Coast, the far 
Northwest, have all become of greater importance to the market, and fpr- 
eign shipments have also largely increased. A number of firms have good 
businesB in Mexico, and are preparing for a more complete campaign in 
that direction, as well as in the West Indies and Europe. A good founda- 
tion has been laid in these localities and the trade there will be pushed. 

FBOSFBCTS FOB 1902. 

The prospects for 1902 are indeed flattering. That the city held its own 
and made large gains in spite of the drought last summer, is a matter for 
congratulation, and with a good crop prospect for the Middle West and 
South for 1902, there is certainly every reason to expect great things. 

More capital stands ready to go into the business, audit is current 
report that at least t^o large new firms are to start this spring, although 
negotiations have not reached a point that would justify definite statements. 

The facilities for trade are to be bettered, in the matter of freight 
arrangements and shipping points, for transportation by rail, and much is 
pTomiBed through government improvement of that greatest of waterways, 
the Mississippi. Ocean shipments via Kew Orleans are contemplated with 
the development of foreign trade. 



52 TBADB AND OOMXBBOX OV 



BOSTON 8HIPMBNTS. 



Shipments from Boston to St. Louis do not have the relative importance 
they onoe had, with reference to the total receipts, for there are not only 
more shoes manufactured in St. Louis than formerly^ but there are more 
shoes shipped in from points other than Boston. The great Lestershire 
works send a large quantity to the wholesale market, and Jefferson City, 
Jeffersonyille, Hannibal, Alton, Chicago, Cincinnati, and other shoe manu- 
facturing points have contributed an increasing quantity to the total receipts 
of the St. Louis market. However, the shipments from Boston, as for 
many years past, have a long lead over the shipments from that city to any 
other shoe market, as is indicated by the following table : 

SHIPMENTS OF SHOES FROM BOSTON. 

To 1901. 1900. 1899. 

St.Louis 701,988 669,086 661,714 

Chicago 486,668 360,702 82,979 

NewYork 416,187 409,660 848,686 

Cincinnati 110,872 127,627 108,488 

Baltimore 206,677 206,180 192,284 

Philadelphia 176,820 186,112 178,818 

KashvUle 88,264 121,902 108.262 



ST. LOUIS IMPLEMENT AND VBHICLE TRADE IN 1901. 

From Farm Machinery. 



During the year which closes to-day, the'St. Louis houses, operating in 
agricultural implements and vehicles and articles associated with those 
industries, have, as a rule, enjoyed a prosperous and satisfactory business. 
Very few and very mild are the expressions of disappointment to be heard 
here and there. It is evident that in the aggregate, a pleasing and increased 
volume of trade has come to this city. 

It was apparent early in the year that the farmers in the territory sup- 
plied by St. Louis would put in heavy crops, and when their operations 
actually commenced, the demand for all kinds of implements used in a 
preparatory way, exceeded all precedents, making the spring trade proba- 
bly the most active ever experienced at this point of distribution. 

Crops were making excellent progress, and there was every indication 
of an unprecedented yield of everything cultivated, until toward the end of 
June when a widespread and persistent drouth set in which involved, in a 
more or less damaging manner, the entire region tributary to St. Louis. 
Its blight fell chiefly upon the com crop, which, in many localities, was 
totally ruined, while in most others it suffered severely. 

The drouth had the effect of lessening the demand for those tools and 
machines specially used in the cultivation of com, but on the other hand, 
owing to the shortage of hay, feed grinders and similar goods, as well as 



THX GXTT OV 8T. LOITIB. 53 

oom harvestera for cutting and binding, were in remarkable demand for 
oonyerting the com plant and the stmited com into food for stock. At one 
time, BO great was the call for these machines that all buyers could not be 
accommodated. Owing to the dry and hot weather, and the consequent 
damage in the fields, the total inquiry for binder twine diminished materi- 
ally. 

Wagons and buggies were particularly active in the spring months, and 
Tirtually every dealer accumulated more orders than could be promptiy 
Bhippedy and after the drouth scare died out the demand revived again, 
very perceptibly. A notable feature of the vehicle business in 1901 was 
the tendency on the part of buyers to select goods of the highest class, a 
fact which is Tiewed with much satisfaction by manufacturers and dealers, 
as it evinces a change of taste for the better on the part of consumers as 
well as an indication of their improved financial circumstances. 

There was also a marked preference shown for the best quality of agri- 
cultural tools and machinery — a condition which has been rapidly devel- 
oping for the past two or three years. 

As to prices on implements, vehicles and accessory merchandise, the 
tendency was strongly upward, due to the increased cost of nearly every- 
thing entering into their composition, and advances were made and easily 
maintained on many articles. Viewed in entirety, therefore, the business 
year 1901 passes into history with a highly creditable record. 



PAINTS, OILS AND DRUOS. 

By BOBBBT W. Samflb. Secretary St. Louis Paint, Oil and Drug Club. 



In reviewing the year 1901 in connection with the lines in which our 
association is interested, I find that the conditions have been almost invari- 
ably of the most flattering nature, and the rei>orts received indicate a very 
healthy condition of trade. 

In tiie drug line, the wholesale business has as a general rule been quite 
active, and we can consistentiy claim a slight advance in the general output, 
as compared with the sales of 1900. Prices generally have been uniform 
and firm throughout the whole year. At the beginning, an unusual activity 
occurred, which served to strengthen the prices on a number of articles, 
but they later receded, and on those particular items, there has oonse- 
quentiy existed a tendency toward lower figures. Our local jobbers have 
all extended their operations and have been quite active throughout the 



In linseed oil the year brought forth an unusual output. Manufac- 
toren and dealers also found a large demand for that product, which has 
at times, greatiy taxed the capacity of the local as well as the foreign 
emshers. Present conditions, considering also the rapid growth in the 
territory covered from St. Louis, bid fair to command a still greater 
increase hi 1902. 



54 TSADS AHD OOMMSBOB OV 

The paint business, as far as local manufacturers are concerned, has 
been unprecedented, during the entire year. The late winter and early 
spring months witnessed a growth and increase not anticipated, and the 
succeeding months were productive of large and numerous current orders. 
These conditions obtained up to the extremely hot weather, but the drouth 
which then prevailed had a depressing effect,* and the early fall business 
did not show the same proportion of gain as the early months of the year. 
There was an improvement later, however, and the remainder of the 
season, from the point of sales, was very satisfactory. 



THE LUMBER TRADE OP ST. LOUIS DURING 1901. 

By Gao. E. Watson, Secretary Hardwood and Lumber Manufacturer's Ezobange. 



Nineteen hundred and one is ended, and St. Louis has made anothier 
record for herself in that there has been such a volume to the lumber 
business as has never before been equalled. The actual receipts of the 
city almost amounted to a billion and a half feet, which are figures difficult 
for the ordinary mind to grasp. One railroad, the St. Louis, Iron Mountain 
& Southern, brought into the city 68,414 cars of lumber, which easily 
places it at the top of the list of lumber carrying roads. Altogether it has 
been a year to be proud of, but the growth of the market has been so 
rapid during recent years, that it can be claimed vrlth perfect assurance, 
that St. Louis has not yet reached the height of her glory as a lumber 
market. The following figures show only eight years of this growth, being 
the rail receipts : 

Oars. 

1901 111,897 

1900 102,576 

1899 88,177 

1898 78,821 

1897 82,804 

1896 56,478 

1895 58,621 

1894 45,764 

As it is more pronounced than ever that the trend of the lumber pro- 
ducer is toward the South, every indication points to a more rapid growth 
for this market than duriiig former years. The geography of the situation 
has much to do with the prospects of the market, as the production of the 
Central South can find a ready market through this gateway to the North , 
Bast and West, and all sections of the country are now using Southern 
lumber. Realizing this, nineteen new offices for the disposal of Southern 
lumber were opened in St. Louis during the year, and there was not a 
single failure, which speaks well for the prosperity of the year. It has 
been a year, also, of heavy investment in the Southern country. The 



THB OSTY or ffT. LOVXi. 



55 



St. Louis dealers have materially extended their holdings of timber lands, 
flieir millB liaye been improved and new ones built, their logging roads 
have Btretcbed further into the timber, and they have expanded in various 
ways which will tend to place them in a better position than ever to extend 
the buainess of the market. 

BXGXIPT8 AHD SHIPMEITTS. 



BeeeiptB by rail of this market during the past twelve months, com- 
pared vdth the same period of the two preceding years, were as follows : 

Oars. 

1901. 

January 8,888 

February 9,118 

Maroh 10,987 

April 10,847 

May 9,686 

June 9,286 

July 9,228 

August 9,191 

September 9,264 

October 9,804 

Nevember 8,476 

December 7,788 

Total 111,897 108,676 88,177 

This shows a gain over the preceding year of 9,321 cars, and a gain 
over 1889 of 23,720 cars. The receipts over each railroad were as follows: 



Oars. 


Oars. 


1900. 


1890. 


8,819 


6,166 


8,647 


6,122 


10,226 


7,066 


8,601 


7,771 


9,447 


7,T19 


8,671 


7,827 


8,868 


7,278 


8,804 


8,606 


7,880 


8,804 


8,168 


7,881 


7,126 


7,781 


8,079 


7,782 



NAMB OF BOAD. 



Oars. 
1901. 



Oars. 
1900. 



Oars. 
1899. 



Ohlcago ft Alton, (Mo. Dlv.) 

lUasonui Paciflc 

SkLoalsft Ban Franolsoo 

Wabash (West) 

St. Louis, Kansas Oity A Oolorado 

MlflBOurl, Kansas ft Texas 

Bt. JLoais» Southwestern 

St. Lools Iron Hountahi ft Southem 

Illinois Oentral 

lonlsTiUc), Henderson & St. Louis 

Boathem Kj 

Mobile ft (mo 

LoulsTiUeft NashTille 

Baltimore ft Oliio Southwestern 

OUcago ft Alton 

(nereiand, Oindnnati, CHiicago ft St. Louis. 

Yandalia 

Wabash (Bast) 

Toledo, St. Louis ft Western 

Chicago, Peoria ft St. Louis 

COUcago, Burlington ft Quinsy 

BL Louis, Keokuk ft Northwestern 

St. Lou is, Ohlcago ft St. Paul 

St. Louis, Peoria ft Northern 

TOKAX. 



>•.•«. I 



62 

a,S88 

934 

674 

9 

187 

7,786 

08,414 

18,246 

82 

1,068 

18,924 

2,020 

106 

888 

160 

226 

1,294 

124 

1,164 

601 

2,060 

.• • . a • 

111,897 



8 

2.521 

1,297 

427 

11 

418 

6,388 

64,819 

12,422 

17 

476 

17,808 

1,911 

46 

206 

201 

216 

911 

117 

624 

546 

1,748 



102,578 



26 

2,865 

1,726 

418 

26 

482 

6,680 

48,759 

6,497 

12 

297 

11,808 

2,488 

881 

184 

86 

810 

1,188 

648 

741 



2,067 

18 

264 

88,177 



56 TBADB AKD OOMMIBOB OT 

The report of the Harbor CommlBsioner, shows the following as the 

receipts of lumber by river, being a loss of ^,654,694 feet when compared 

with the preceding year: 

Feet-1901. Feet— 1900. 

White Pine 22,481,466 88,702,760 

film 280,200 887,000 

Poplar 6,206,400 6.866.700 

Cottonwood 16.179,000 24,287,100 

Cypress 7,061,800 8,029,700 

Sycamore 128,000 189,000 

Aflh 768,600 1,961,270 

Oak 4,801,800 9,667,100 

Walnut 82,200 66,880 

Gum 4,672,000 6,976,000 

Maple 60,180 1,000 

Hickory 2,900 48,600 

Cherry 161,200 100 

Cedar 809,240 861.100 

Mahogany 82,000 

Chestnut 79,000 198,000 

Pecan 16,000 

Total 62,602,966 92,267,660 

This report shows also the receipt of the following lumber commodities : 

1901. 1900. 

Logs, feet 9,881,800 18,288,694 

Shingles, pieces 11,198,260 17,109,260 

Lath, pieces 12,886,660 18,608,960 

Pickets, pieces 147,960 146,000 

Figuring that an ayerage car of lumber amounts to 12,000 feet, we have 
the following as the total lumber receipts of the St. Louis market: 

Feet— 1901. Fee —1900. 

ByRaU 1,842,764,000 1,280,912.000 

By River 62,602,966 92,267,000 

Logsby River 9,881,800 18,288,664 

Total 1,414,698,766 1,886,402,664 

This shows a gain, over the proceeding year of 78,296,202 feet, and, ajs 
the receipts during 1899 aggregated 1,148,124,000 feet, a gain over that year 
of 276,676,466 feet. 

The shipments by rail during the year were as follows : 

Oars. Oars, Oars. 

1901. 1900. 1809. 

January 4,718 . 4,482 8,288 

February 4,900 4,887 2,668 

March 6,296 6,648 4,112 

April 6,662 4,964 4,667 

May 6.482 6,187 4,688 

June 6,296. 6,766 6,009 

July 6,141 6,277 6,129 

August 6,790 6.780 6,446 

September 6,780 6.816 6,028 

October 6,966 6,244 4,446 

November 6,020 4,848 8,998 

December 4,409 4,822 4,002 

Total 68,889 61,060 62,466 

This demonstrates a gain over the preceding year of 7,279 cars. 



THH GITY OT ST. IiOUIB. 



57 



Hie Bhipments over each of the raUroads were: 



NAME OF BOAD. 




Oars. 
1890. 



Ghieago & Alton (Mo. Dlr.) 

Mlaaonrl Pacific 

Bi. Ixrals & San FranclBOO 

Walmsb (West) 

8t^ Lonis, Kansas Citr ft Colorado 

Missouri Kansas & Texas 

St. liouls Southwestern 

St. Lools, Iron Mountain A Southern 

Illinois Oentral 

LoQlsTille. Henderson ft St. Louis 

LDuisvllle ft MasbvUle 

MobUeftOhio 

Southern Rv 

Baltimore A Ohio Southwestern 

Ghlcaso ft Alton 

Qeveland, Cineinnati, Chicago & St. Louis. 

Yandalla 

Wabash (llast) 

Toledo, St. Louis ft Western 

Chiea«o» Peoria ft St. Louis 

Chicago, Burlington ft Quincy 

St. Louis, KeokulE ft Northwestern 

St. Louis, Chicago ft St. Paul 

St. Louis, Peoria ft Northern 



TOTAI. 



866 


167 


U,199 


"»28i 


478 


539 


4,808 


4,9» 


631 


817 


1,129 


486 


7 


15 


326 


199 


1,87S 


^'°S 


14 


33 


101 


39 


10 


37 


881 


1,177 


1,406 


2,480 


4,007 


'•iSi 


3,667 


3,796 


5,946 


6,437 


12,899 


8,197 


8,047 


8,044 


8,757 


4,869 


4,663 


*'^ 


5,396 


4.169 


68,889 


61,060 



187 

11,680 

517 

4,580 

88 



878 

1,339 

13 

87 

96 

565 
1,480 
1,680 
1,890 
5,109 
6,486 
1,979 
8,915 
8,846 
4,596 

648 
1,547 



53,465 



On a hasis ol 12^000 feet to the car this gives the loUowing as the total 
shipments : 

Feet— 190L Feet-1900. 

ByraU 890,068,000 782,720,000 

By river 8,188,000 2,722,000 

Totals 824,201,000 786,442,000 

The gain in shipments of 1901 over 1900 was, therefore, 88,759,000 feet, 
or^abont 12%. 

The difference between the receipts and shipments gives 590,497,766 
feet as the local consumption of lumber during the year, being a loss of 
10,463,888 feet as compared with the preceding year. These figures give a 
false impression, as the consumption was undoubtedly heavier than during 
1900, and the difference was probably caused by the fact that the year 
started in with very large stocks in the hands of all yards and factories and 
ended with these stocks exhausted. In the way of building, also, there 
was a great gain — ^the value of the permits exceeding those of 1900 by 
17,291,007. The coming year should be a record breaker in the building 
line, as the World's Fair work will begin to make a showing. 



QROCERIBS. 

By BOBT. B. lAOf Editor Interstate Grocer. 



The year 1901 in grocery circles was peculiar. It started in with nor- 
mal conditions, the expectation being that there would be about as much 
business handled as during the previous year. About the first of the May 



58 



TBAjm AMD ooMMmmam or 



aad from that time on until th« latter part of August there was much 
uneasiness in the trade. The drouth, which had effected the growing 
crops, promised to bring disaster. It was feared that collections might go 
awry and that buying would be at a low ebb. This drouth was, however, 
the salvation of the grocery trade. It served to practically destroy all the 
small crops snch as garden truck and those fruits which are largely used 
for preserving by the country house wives. 

The result of this was that the farmer not only had nothing in the 
vegetable and fruit line to offer in his adjacent town, but he also found 
himjself short of some provisions for his own use. The result also of this 
was that he was obliged to purchase heavily from his grocer. From the 
middle of August on to the first of January, 1902, it was not a case of 
''where can we sell groceries,*' but '^where can we get groceries to sell." 

In spite of this, however, grocery prices have not been high. With the 
exception of canned tomatoes and canned apples all other canned goods 
have been at about their normal figure. 

For St. Louis hereself it may be said that as a groceiy market she has 
grown with a bound during the year just closed. A process of consolida- 
tion has been going on and three large houses were during the year, 
merged into others. This meant the handling of almost double the 
amount of business with half the force in all three of these cases. One 
new wholesale groceiy house has just began business in St. Louis, and on 
the whole the volume of sales is larger and the territory covered is greater 
than it has been in any previous year. 

The statistics of receipts and shipments upon which this review is based 
are taken from the records of the St. I^uis Merchants' Bxchange. 

SUOABS. 

Beoeiptft— Hhds. Bbls. Bags. Shipments— Hhds. Bbls. Bags. 

1901 268 466,246 684,616 818 288,787 824,008 

1900 671 498,879 490.190 ... 861,217 466,780 

1889 697 488,786 668,406 80 848,764 666,886 

1898 728 472,990 670,940 667 842,828 699,917 

It will be noticed that there was a decrease in the number of hogshead 
and the number of barrels received and a g^reat increase in the number of 
bags coming into the market. This is due to the fact that shipments of 
sugar in bags is growing more and more usual each year. The total num- 
ber of pounds of sugar shipped into the market during the year was 
greater to a considerable extent than during the year 1900. The increased 
consumption in sugar in St. Louis city and the immediate territory and the 
fact that packages are changed in size accounts for the apparent decrease 
in shipments in sugar. 

COFFEES. 

Receipts— Bags. Pkgs. Shipments— Bags and Pkgs. 

1901 874,676 183,840 608,866 

1900 880,871 72,912 664.440 

1809 290,700 406,808 

1888 274,228 866,168 



TBM dTT OT 8T. LOUIS. 



50 



St. Louis has taken a long step forward toward becoming the principle 
ooifee distributing market of the United States daring the year 1901. 
Coffee no longer comes to St. Louis from or through New York. Arrange- 
ments which have been made by a number of large importing houses in 
this city permit of the shipment of coffees direct from the plantations in 
Rio and Santos to St. Louis via New Orleans and the Mississippi River. In 
this way the St. Louis importers save considerably on their freight charges 
and they get specific coffees from planters whom they know, rather than 
the graded goods through the New York market. St. Louis is, therefore, 
now shipping large quantities of green coffee to the West in a jobbing way 
and to Sonne extent to points East of here. The receipt in St. Louis of 
whole train loads of green coffee direct from ship at New Orleans has 
become a regular feature of the business. 

The increased receipts are shown by figures here given. It is impossi- 
ble to make an estimate of the percentage of increase in shipments for the 
reason that St. Louis is a great coffee roasting market and the packages 
which go out are irregular in size. 

KOLASSES Ain> STBUF8. 

Receipts— Bbls. Kegs. Shipments— Bbls. Kegs. 

1901 M,990 1,W0 188,1T7 48,882 

1900 80,970 680 160,406 48,726 

1899 40,608 2,606 178,666 114,862 

1896 28,640 1,148 121,868 118,266 

It is impossible to draw deductions from the Exchange figures on 
receipts and shipments of molasses and syrups for the reason that St. Louis 
is one of the large centers in which these goods are prepared for the table^ 
and the blending of glucose and alterations in the sizes of packages are 
misleading. A great change^ however, has been noted in this business dur- 
mg the year, in that smaller packages have been given the preference over 
goods packed in wood. This refers to the extensive trkde which has 
grown up for syrups in tin cans. This style of package is claimed by the 
large St. Louis syrup refiners to have^ through its convenience and cleanli- 
ness, increased the aggregate consumption of syrups about 20%. 

RICS. 

BeoelivtB- Bags and Bbls. Shipments-^ Bags and Bbls. 

1901 178,680 142,947 

1900 119,618 102,684 

1899 168,106 112,497 

1808 127,276 87,477 

This great staple was handled more extensively in St. Louis during the 
past year than for a long time previous, as will be seen by the increase in 
receipts and shipments. The receipts were greater for the year by more 
than 60% than during 1900, and the shipments show an increase in packages, 
which includes both sacks and barrels, of about 40>000 packages. 



00 TRABB AHD GOKMBBOB OF 

TEA. 

There baa been a considerable falling off^ about S^OOO packages, in the 
receipts of tea during the year. This is due to the well recognized fact 
that the consumption of this article has dropped off. The duty on tea of 
10 cents a pound has had much to do with this. 

GENERAL LINES. 

An estimate made from a general observation of the market and the 
conditions which have existed, would show that the average increase 
of business on general lines of groceries for the year^ has been about 16^. 
Much of this gain, as has been heretofore stated, was made during the last 
half of the year. A close estimate is however impossible as no figures on 
the subject are available. 



I C7ITT or n. lAOn. 



OBOCERDES. 

ITS OF SUOAK rOK TWMMTI TIASS. 













[IPM. 








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nwa. 


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ass 

«71 


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■■■»« 

"'k7 

'■is 

'S 

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"io 

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1,431 

!;!!! 

1,601 

!;1S 
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114 
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BaOMIFTO, Ouioofli. 



> 



TMADM AXB OOlOamOB OF 

FURNITURE. 

By Obo. T. Parkbb, Secretary St. Louis Famlture Board of Trade. 



The ezpectatioDB at the dose of last year of a busy 1901 were fully 
realized. It is seldom that factories do not shut down for a few weeks at 
the beginning of the year lor repairs and improvements in the plant; but 
this year has favored the manufacturing institutions as an exception^ in as 
much as needed repairs, changes and improvements were made while the 
works continued in operation. 

A decrease in volume of output was observed during the drouth and by 
several destructive fires which diminished the year's production, which 
about equaled that of 1900. 

The estimate of the furniture and kindred lines is about $83,000,000; in 
this is Included coffins, bedding, rattanware, picture mouldings, etc., 
which manufactures go to complete the stock carried by the country store. 

Nearly all the factories have undergone improvement, either by the 
addition of space or new and modem machinery. An entire new factory 
has been built; but none of its product was delivered during 1901. Great 
improvements in buildings and products have taken place in the metal bed 
factories. St. Louis is a recognized center for this class of manufacture, 
as it is for that of many of the medium grades of wood furniture. 

More capital is now employed than ever before in our factories, the 
estimate being above $3,000,000 in the fifty factories which have employed 
upward of 6,500 employes, who have received approximately $3,760,000 for 
their services. 

Prices have advanced, this having become necessary by reason of the 
increased cost of raw materials, principally good cabinet lumber, the 
general demand for which brought about an advance early in the year. 

Better and more artistic styles are now required to suit the demands of 
the trade, as well as a superior class of workmanship ; these features all 
tend to a higher cost. 

There have been completed many expensive residences in the city which 
have required furnishing, as well as the replenishing in a modem way, 
many of the old ones. New hotels, trust companies, banks, office buildings, 
educational and public institutions have added a large quota to the general 
business. 

In the general prosperity of the West and South, the building of 
churches, schools, opera houses and buildings of a public character, has 
become the rule in nearly all communities. St. Louis has lost an enormous 
trade in this line by having no factories equipped for this class of work, 
which has gone entirely to cities east of us, whose purchases for lumber 
have largely to be made in this market. 

Principal among the woods used are oak, poplar, gum and ash, while 
for the higher grades of cabinet work mahogany, birch and maple are 
used. Walnut is having a greater demand, more especially for the export 
trade, which has found new markets and has materially increased; this city 



XBS omr OF ar. i/oun. es 

hamg become more favormbly known In ooantries where it was formerly 
thoogfat St. Lonis could not reach. Upholstery and rattan goods are among 
the lines which have grown in popularity. 

St. Louis steam and street car furniture may now be found in all parts 
of the world. 

No strikes among employes have interferred with work in the factories^ 
but s strike affecting the deliyery and receipt of goods by the Transfer 
Company^ urged the necessity for action to prevent its re-occurence. In 
eoDEequence the railroad shipping ftu;ilities are receiving added attention^ 
and will undoubtedly be improved. The new belt lines now building, 
encircling the cHy^ will g^reatly assist in the prompt movement of ship- 
ments. 

A number of the most enterprising of the factories have placed samples 
ol their product in the exposition sample rooms of Eastern cities. This 
has resulted in a revival of the permanent or semi-annual exposition 
effort, which would seem important as a measure to attract buyers to this 
important market. 



FOReiON COMMERCE OP ST. LOUIS. 

By Jambs Ajibitgki.e» Manager Latin- American Olub and Foreign Trade Ass'n. 



The prosperous conditions that have prevailed generally throughout 
the United States during 1901 has been shared by St. Louis in no inconsid- 
erable manner, Indeed the domestic trade has been so good that nuuiy lines 
have not felt the inclination or necessity of going beyond our own borders 
to dispose of their products, although there are inviting fields in numy 
eountries for the sale of much of our manufactured goods. 

The agricultural products which have reached this market have found a 
ready and active sale abroad. 

QBAIK. 

The shipments of wheat by river and rail to the seaboard has been 
8,122,973 bushels, as against 1,039,922 bushels in 1900, or increase in export 
of 7,083,051 bushels. 

Com to the seaboard, including to Cuba 661,994 bushels, Mexico 77,246 
bfushels, Belgium 1,076 bushels, amounted to 2,162,798 bushels, as against 
8,642,891 bushels in 1900, or a decrease of 6,380,093 bushels. 

This decrease in com exi>orts may be attributed largely to the compara- 
tire^jr high price prevailing almost the entire year. Importers on the other 
nde preferring to buy our wheat at the relative cheaper price to that of 
eom. 

The shipments of oats were 216,268 bushels, as against 617,666 bushels 
hi 1900, or a foiling off of 302,388 bushels, largely caused by like reasons 
V those concemin^ com. 



64 TBADB AMD OOMMBBOS OF 

FLOUB. 

The exports of flour show a larger aggregate : 

Barrels. 

Great Britain 684,810 

The Continent 208,018 

West Indies 182,248 

Soandlnavla 48,479 

Mediterranean 12,870 

Central Amerioa 11,260 

South Amerioa 6,904 

Canada 4,726 

Seaboard 186,626 

1 189 921 
As against 1900 of .l',06l'961 

Anlnorease of 187,870 

In this connection It may be well to state that the importance of our 
river; as a means for cheap transportation, is not yet fully enough Impressed 
on our legislators at Washington^ and it is to be hoped that efforts in that 
direction will be more successful in the f uture^ and thus conduce to making 
St. Louis a greater market for staple products. 

COTTON. 

The popular estimate for the cotton crop of 1900 and 1901 proved, after 
September Ist^ 1901^ to be 947,006 bales in excess of 1899 and 1900. 

Total gross receipts of cotton through St. Louis, year ending September 
1st, 1801; 978,400 bales, previous year 802,769 bales. Local net receipts 
handled by St. Louis 239,628 bales, previous year 164,074 bales. 
Foreign shipments were as follows : 

Bales. 

England 190,807 

Continent 112,407 

Italy 42,819 

Canada 82,186 

Japan 7,677 

Spain 876 

Sweden 600 

Switzerland 286 

Russia 102 

East India 100 

Seaboard for export 1,738 

889,046 
Aj against in 1899 and 1900 288,068 

Or an increase of 160,908 

The receipts represent an approximate value of $16,660,000. As the 
Cotton that is handled in St. Louis represents largely remittance for goods 
purchased in this market by the Southern merchants, it is an important 
element in the wealth-producing features of the city. 



THX OJTY or 8T. IiOUIS. 65 

BEBB. 

ThiB important product of St. Lonig continues to merit fayor in many 
countriea. 

There waa exported in bond to yarioua countries to the yalue of 
1737,112.00, a total of 1,032,245 gallons. Our beer goes to all points in Latin 
America, Philippines, Japan, China, Australia and occasionally to France 
and England. St. Louis beer is looked upon throughout the world as the 
par excellence of toothsome drinks. 

AGBICXTLTUBAL IMFUEIOBNTS AND MACHINSBT. 

Tile exports in this line have been considerably increased, although 
with Mexico, on account of the severe drouth conditions in the northern 
part of that ootmtry, the trade has not been so good. 

More has been done this past year, however, with Cuba, Puerto Rico, 
Hawaii, British Columbia, etc. 

The adverse conditions prevailing in Mexico, with the stringency in 
monetary afEairs, as well as the heavy decline in silver, has militated very 
much against all operations there. Some extension has been made in 
Central America, a new field for St Louis work in this line. 

IBOM, 8TBBL, HARDWARE, BTO. 

These lines show considerable expansion; although the large compa- 
mes— Carnegie and others — ^have established branches in Mexico and other 
foreign countries, and necessarily compete there successfully with our 
St Louis concerns in that lines. In hardware St Louis enterprise con- 
tfaines to place goods throughut Mexico, West Indies and South America. 
This Une is also placed in many parts of Asia. There has been considera- 
ble extension tills past year. 

Our stove manufacturers are now doing some business in Mexico and 
Central America. This American article is growing in favor. 

BOOTS AND 8HOB8. 

St Louis continues to find ready sale in foreign countries and all the 
houses who have cultivated foreign trade have done well. 

Trade with Mexico has been larger, also West Indies and Central and 
South America, British Columbia and Germany. 

There is a large field in South America for this line, but the time occu- 
pied in delivering goods has so far been an obstacle to placing many 
orders. With better shipping facilities to the principal ports of South 
America, however, there will be a great trade awaiting the St Louis man- 
ufacturers of shoes, much larger than any yet opened to them. The in- 
crease in exports for 1901 has approximately been 80% . 

BLBCTBICAL SUPPLIES. 

niere has been considerable awakening of interest in electrical matters 
bx our neighbors of the South America, and St. Louis has shared in fur- 



66 TBADB AHD OOMMXBOB OF 

niflhing supplies required, although the past few months it has been some- 
what restricted for reasons already given. 

Considerable supplies have been furnished to Canada, but the shipments 
to Japan and South America have fallen off in 1901. The exports to 
Canada^ however, have increased over 100%. 

It may be stated that the foreign trade in this line has not been quite as 
large as it was in 1900 with Europe and Asia. 

FUBNITUBE. 

There has been, as usual, considerable furniture exported to Mexico, 
also to the West Lidies. Some new markets have also been reached — 
South Africa, Manila and Corea — ^but the aggregate does not exceed the 
year of 1900. The poor conditions prevailing in Mexico and West Indies 
already alluded to is the main reason for this. 

MACHIKSBT AND PLUMBINO GOODS. 

The exports in this line has been about the same in volume as the pre- 
vious year. The sales have been to Mexico, Cuba, Porto Bico, Hawaiian 
Islands and British Columbia. 

There are strong houses in the line of manufacture and with the great 
needs of Latin America for improved hygienic conditions, there ought to 
be a large extension of this line of trade in these countries. 

The sales of vitrified pipe have been about the same as last year, but 
distributed at more points foreign, 

Notions, glassware, woodenware, paper, etc. There is a steady trade 
done in these lines with Mexico, and it only requires close attention to 
develope into larger proportions. There are active salesmen in the field, 
and a propaganda by mail is bringing good returns. 

BAILBOAD AND STBBBT CABS. 

The sales in both those branches shows an increase. In railroad cars 
the gain has been about 26%, and the shipments have been to England, 
France, Spain, New Zealand, Australia, New South Wales, South America 
and Mexico. This is an important industry for St. Louis. In street cars 
the growth lias been greater, being given by our largest factories as 60%. 
Orders were filled by one factory alone for over $300,000 to Mexico, Brazil, 
Portugal and Argentine. The material for construction of both railroads 
and street cars being so much cheaper here, gives this market an advantage 
for this industry. 

SUNDBIES. 

There are a number of other industries in this city and vicinity which 
are making headway. The sale of butchers' supplies have increased 40%, 
and these are exported principally to Germany, France, Argentine Bepublic, 
Australia, South Africa, England, Austria, Bussia, Sweden, Spain, Italy 

and Mexico. 

Cooperage is an important article of export and increases yearly. 
Large shipments are made to Europe and Latin America. . 



THB ornr ot 8t. louis. 67 

Condenfled miUc 1b exported to Canada^ Mezioo, Central America, West 
Indies, South Africa, India, China, East Siberia, Japan and Australia, and 
increasing mnch in use in those countries. 

St. Louis dry plates for photographic pnrposes have become celebrated 
for their excellence, and sales are made in Central and South America, 
Canada, Cuba, British Columbia, Hawaiian Islands, Philippines, Porto 
Bico, Mexico, Japan and England. 

Shipments of malt in considerable quantities made to the breweries in 
Mexico. 

Chemical products have been exported to about the same extent as 
pre^ous year, and includes shipments to Canada, Mexico, West Indies, 
Australia and Gfermany. 

Hats and gloves from St. Louis have large sale both in Mexico and West 
Indies. 

Shipments of horses and mules to foreign countries from East St. Louis 
were : 14,000 mules and 48,000 horses. The most of these went to South 
Africa. 

PACKING HOUSE PBODUCTS. 

1901. 

Dreased Hogs $ 2,260,000 

Fresh Hams 75,000 

Other Fresh Pork Cuts 2,200,000 

Dry Salt Meat and Sweet Piokled Meat. . . . 17,600,000 

OleoOil 7,260,000 

Tallow 106,000 

liard 9,600,000 

Dressed Beef 760,000 

Fancy Meats, Beef and Calf Livers, Kid- 
neys, Oxtails, etc 600,000 

Fresh meats and most of cured meats to England and Cuba. Oloe oil 
to Holland, Denmark, Germany and Sweden. Lard to (Engiand,^WeBt 
Indies and South America. Tallow to England. 

There are many other articles exported which show distinct gains. 
13iere were exported in bond — 

Burlap Bags to the value of $106,066 

Dry Plates 46,888 

Steel Wire Ropes 26,868 

Canned Meats 12,866 

Malt 0,119 



TBADB AHD OOMMBROB OW 



IMPOBTATION8. 



The importatioDB, as per BtatUtics, in Onstom House show a total of 
$4^844^433^ as compared with $4,100,543 in 1900, or an increase of $743,889. 
The principal items were — 

Bagging and Burlap $706,487 

Manufactured Cottons 612,458 

Ghemioalsand Drugs 458,945 

Free Ooods 452,758 

Window Glass 231,578 

Manufactured Linen 212,327 

Straw Matting 167,662 

Tobacco and Cigars 154,821 

Steel Wires 165,049 

Hops 116,458 

China and Barthenware 107,549 

Manufactured Cork 108,016 

and miscellaneous other articles. 

COFFEE. 

1901. 1900. 

Receipts of Coffee Sacks 874,676 860,870 

Packages 188,840 72,912 

It is estimated that of the above 125,000 bags of coffee were imported 
direct from points south, mostly, of course from Brazil. 

FBUIT, 

About the usual quantify of tropical fruits have been brought to this 
market. Two hundred cars Mexican oranges were received, a falling off 
of about 200 cars from previous year. 



THB OITT OF ffT. IiOUIB. 



ST. LOUIS MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS. 



Ttom the xeport of Mr. Jajos Y. Flatxb. Oomptroller, for the flBCftl year 

ending April 10th. 190L 



CONDITIONS OF THE TBBA8UBT. 

The bahmce in the treasuy at the end of the fiscal year^ April 8, 1901^ 
wasy as is shown above, $4,442,631.78. Adding the amounts of nncoUeeted 
special tax bills in the matter of opening, sprinlding and changing grades 
of streets and maintaining boulevards ($454,902.72), gives the total 
lesDiirces of the treasury $4,897,434.45. Against this amount are charge- 
able the balance as standing to the credit of special funds and accounts, 
amounting in the aggregate to $2,868,585.00. Deducting this amount from 
the resources of the treasury there remains an imappropriated surplus of 

,074,593.08 belonging to the respective revenue funds as follows : 



Interest and Public Debt Revenue $1,008,228. 

Munioipal Revenue 28^.85 

Water Works Revenue 995,898.91 

Harbor Fund 44,079.21 

$2,074,692.06 
KBVlENinB: AND APFSOPBIATIONS. 

The resources of the revenue funds income and unappropriated balances 
April 10, 1900, were as follows : 

Interest and public debt revenue $ 2,208,886.69 

Munioipal revenue 6.976,814.18 

Water works revenue 2,660.911.26 

Harbor fund 108,649 J(4 

$10,887,180.61 

BONDED DEBT. 

The gross debt at the beginning of the fiscal year 1900-1901, including 
the $189,316.59 advanced out of the treasury in anticipation of the revenue 
of ttie sinking fund of the year 1900-1901 was $19,105,593.89. The amount 
advanced out of the treasury was written off, leaving the bonded debt, out- 
standing April 8, 1901, $18,916,278.30. 

The annual interest charge on the bonded debt amounts to $778,409.28 
or an average of $4,115 per cent interest per annum. 



70 TBADB AND OOMMBBOB OF 

SINKING FUND. 

The resources of the sinking fund for the fiscal year amounted to 
9421,690.72. After converting back into the treasniy the 9189^15.59 
advanced during the year 1899-1900 there remained a balance of $282,275.13 
to the credit of the fund at the end of the fiscal year. 

TAXATION. 

The assessed valuation for the taxes of 1901 is $868,611,850 exclusive of 
railroad, bridge, telegraph, express and street railroad property, which is 
assessed by the State Board of Equalization, and this is estimated on the 
basis of last year, namely, $26,211,360. 

The rate of taxation as established for the current year differs from the 
rates for the taxes of last year in the following respects, namely : Pursuant 
to the result of the election the rate for Public Library tax was increased 
one-fifth of a mill, or two cents on the $100 valuation, and therefore, the 
rate for general municipal purposes was reduced to the same extent. 
Heretofore the property in a portion of the territory annexed to the city 
under the Scheme and Charter was assessed at a lower rate than the prop- 
erty in the old limits of the city. This year the rate is uniform over both 
old and new limits. 

The rate of taxation for the pajrment of the debt and the interest thereon 
was reduced five cents^ that is, from thirty cents to twenty-five cents on the 
$100 valuation. The amount of taxes that will be realized from this rate, 
together with the unappropriated surplus now to the credit of this fund 
will be sufficient to meet the requirements of the law. 

The rates for 1901, on the $100 valuation are as follows : 

New Ldinits 
Old subject to in- 
Liimlts. creased rates. 

For payment of debt and interest $ .25 $ .26 

For general municipal purposes .96 .96 

Total City $1.21 $1.21 

For Public Library M .04 

Total $1.26 $1.26 



THB COTT 07 8T. XiOUlB. 71 



STATE OF IHSSOUBI. 

FlHAHOIAI. STATBKSNT FBBPABXD BT MB. ALBBXT O. Al«I.BNy 

STATB AUDITOBy JAVUABT 10, 1902. 

Total Talaation of real estate and personal property as fixed 

by the State Board of Equalization for 1901 taxes $1,008,948,768 00 

fiallroad. Bridge and Telegraph property, inoluding street 

railroad property for 1901 taxes 118,428,966 02 

Merchants and Manuf aoturers, yalnation for 1901 taxes (Esti- 
mated) 07,082,811 00 

Total ..$1,189,485,060 02 

Balance in Treasury, December 81, 1900 $1,078,981 68 

Receipts into the State Treasury from all sources, for all pur- 
poses, for the year ending December 81, 1901 6,127,414 87 

Disbursements during the year 1901, for all purposes 4,968,216 28 

Balance in Treasury December 81, 1901 1,248,180 97 

Statx Bonbxd Dbbt, Jakuabt 1, 1902. 

1287 8K per cent. 5-20 refunding bonds, due January 1, 1908 . . .$ 1,287,000 00 
T6tal bonded debt $ 1,287,000 00 

SCHOOI. AND SbMINABT CbBTIFIGATBS OF INDBBTXDNXSS. 

School oertiHoates, 6 per cent $2,909,000 00 

School oertiJloates, 6 per cent 249,000 00 

$8,168,000 00 

Seminary oertlllcates, 6 per cent $ 122,000 00 

Semlnarj certlfloates, 6 per cent .1,118,889 42 

$1,285,880 42 



72 TRAJ>B AND OOIOaBOB OT 



MINING INDUSTRIES OP MISSOURI. 



By J. W. Mabstbllbb, Secretary and AMtstant Inspector, Bureau of Mines. 

Mining and Mining Inspection. 



We are sony that saffloient retoms have not as yet been received to give 
you the actoal figures relating to our mineral production, yalues, etc. The 
information already received, however, warrants the statement, that the 
mining industry of the State for the year ending December 81, 1901, shows 
a more prosperous condition of affairs than has heretofore been experi- 
enced. The production of zinc, coal and lead each show a decided in- 
crease over any previous year, due largely to the exploitation of new and 
extended mineral fields, the erection of extensive plants and the advances 
made in the treatment and handling of the ores. 

Lead ore shows a large increase in production and also in value. Prices 
were well maintained throughout the year with the exception of the month 
of December, when a rapid decline tn price occurred. The cause of this 
rapid decline is traced to the same selfish purpose that caused disaster to 
two large corporations, one of which manipulated the lead market and the 
other the copper market. 

Vast improvements are now being made in the mining and cleaning of 
lead ore, and no where in the world can plants be found that will compare 
with the National and Federal located in St. Francois County, one of which 
was completed last year and the other now almost completed. The min- 
ing field of Southeast Missouri is expanding rapidly, with Madison and 
Washington Counties added to the disseminated lead district. Prospect- 
ing with the diamond drill never ceases in this region and each successive 
year will add new mines and increased product. Missouri Is classed as the 
soft lead region, and shows an increased production, while the desilverized 
region shows a decrease. 

The production of zinc ore for the year will show an increase over any 
former year. The year opened with a depressed market price and so con- 
tinued until the last few months of the year; In the meantime the produc- 
tion was not restricted, our operators evidently anticipating the time when 
the export point would be reached. The export point was reached, and 
before the end of the year an advance of $6.00 per ton was realized, and a 
general feeling of confidence in the maintenance of prices prevails 
throughout the mining district. The ficticious prices which obtained in 
1899 were taken advantage of by designing men, and many worthless and 
worked-out properties were disposed of at outrageous prices— overstocked 
companies played a conspicuous part with the usual result. The effect o 



THB cm or ST. LOUIS. 73 

all this is about past, and the improyements now being made are justified. 
Legitimate progress backed by scientific methods are goveming very 
largely in all the new plants erected, and this fact will add greatly to the 
SQCoess and prosperity of the industry. The zinc fields like the lead fields 
SK also expanding, and Central Missouri is rapidly developing into a fine 
lead and zinc region. 

COAL. 

The last year has been a record-breaker in the coal mining industry of 
the State. Not only has the production of coal greatly exceeded that of 
aO other years, but the yalue of the output is much greater as well. 

It has been a year of progress, development, better prices for the out- 
put, better prices paid for mining and better feeling between employer 
and employee. There have been no strikes or lockouts lasting over a few 
days, and the mines never were in a safer or better sanitary condition. 
The mining field is widening and expanding, and some of the best equipped 
Bdnes in our State have been opened up in this new territory during the 
last year. 

New mines with plants equipped with the most modem appliances 
have been oi^ened up in all our mining counties, and many of the older 
mines have not only enlarged their capacity, but have been supplied with 
tiie fsdlides which will enable them to handle the product more economi- 
cally and expeditiously. 

Taken altogether, the mining industry of the State has never before 
presented a more satisfactory condition, nor has the promise for the 
future ever been brighter. The fact is, the mining industry is on a far 
more substantial basis than ever before; it is backed by a progressive in- 
telligent management, an abundance of means and immense territory 
splendidly tested. 



74 



T&ADB AHD OOMMamOB 07 



POPULATION OP ST. LOUIS. 

ABBA 62K 8QUABB MILES. 



1897 
1840 
UU 
1850 



4,918 

6.000 

5,881 

6,807 

8,816 

12,040 

16,469 

84,140 

74«488 

•4,000 



18B6 116J0O 

1800 185,067 

1086 104.8M 

1870— United StatM Gearas. 810,861 

1880— '* " '* 860,0n 

1885-BBtlmftt«d 400»000 

1088— " 450,000 

1890— United StateoOenovs. 451,771 

1900— United States OensQO 575,288 

1901-E8timated 600M> 



AMOUNT OF BBAL ESTATE AND PERSONAL PROPERTY 

ASSE8SBD IN THE GITT OF ST. LOUIS. 





CITT OV ST. LOUIS 


OITT 8T. LOUIS. 


BATB OF TAXATIOH. 


TBAB. 


Beal Estate. 


RealAPers'naL 








Old Limite. 


NewLlmlto. 


1881 


I 40,940,450 




2.67 




1868 


48.409,080 




2.42 




1864 


58,905,890 


I 68,060,078 


2.00 


• • • • 


1865 


78.900,700 


87,625.584 


2.76X 


• • • • 


1886 


81,961,610 


105,245,210 


8.00 




1867 


88,685,600 


112,007,060 


296 


• • « • 


1888 


94,862,870 


116,683,140 


285 


• • • • 


1868« • . . . • 


118,626,410 


188,038,480 


2.85 


■ • ■ • 


1870 


119,080,800 


147,960,660 


• • • • 


• ■ • • 


1871 


128,888,900 


168,273,480 


2.80 


• • • • 


187« 


129,285,180 


162,680,670 


2.78 


• • • • 


1878 


148,144,400 


180,278,950 


2.76 


• • • • 


1874 


141,041,480 


172,100,870 


2.88.6 


« • • • 


1876 


181,141,020 


166,999,660 


8 48.6 


• ■ • • 


1876 


182 785,460 


106,441,110 


8 42.5 


• • • » 


1877 


148,012,750 


181,846,660 


2.80 


• • • • 


1878 


140,970,540 


172,820,960 


2.00 


1.85 


1879 


186,071,670 


168,818,920 


260 


1.85 


1880 


185,884,980 


160,496,000 


2.60 


1*85 


1881 


189 807,470 


167,864,280 


260 


1.86 


1889 


161,670 260 


191,948,460 


2.68 


1.88 


1888 


163,479,000 


192,668.640 


265 


1.80 


1884 


178,606,660 


210,124,870 


855 


1.80 


1885 


177,857,240 


807.010,860 


8.66 


1.80 


1886 


187 891.540 


218.271,260 


865 


1.80 


1887 


184,815,660 


817,142,820 


8.60 


1.80 


1888 


106)978,260 


227,760,960 


880 


1 70 


1889 


106.186,840 


280.888,810 


8.80 


1 60 


1890 


214,971,000 


248,887,830 


8.20 


160 


1891 


216,888.080 


256.118,690 


8.8Q 


100 


1899 


348,288,140 


284,618 660 


8.06 


1.00 


1898 


242,787,480 


287.8M.420 


8.05 


1.67 


1894 


270,288.800 


816.302,660 


2.06 


1.67 


1896 


386.096,900 


880,486.640 


3.06 


1.67 


1886 


396,419.090 


846,940.160 


3.06 


1.67 


1897 


399,686,330 


844,749,700 


3.06 


1.67 


1898 


814,076,640 


860,616,660 


3.06 


1.67 


1899, 


880,019,980 


874.688.400 


1.96 


1.67 


1900 


887.301,940 


880,779,380 


1.95 


1.67 


1901 


842,353,640 


884,733,700 


1.90 


1.00 



City ABseoBment 1866,611,800 

Board of EqnallEatton for Railroads, Bridges, Telegraph. BxiHraas and 

Street Railroad Property 86,311,860 

Total $894,733,700 

City Tax, 81.95; State, 36c; School, 40c H 90 



I oiTT OF m.voxns. 



FtKE BBCOBD FOB IBOl. 
Am BepoiMd fey Oapt. Ohas. BvAas, Dndetwrttot'i Balvase Oorpa. 



FIBES FOB WHIOH NO AXABHB WEBB GIVEN. 



MONTHS. 


ON BUILDINGB. 


ON OONTBNT8. 




Ummm. 




LOBHM. 




nonnno 


U8S0 

aai IB 








m 

a 

M 

i 


is 

ii 

moo 

OS 00 

ssooo 
DM m 


si 
1 

1 


aoToo 

E 

OMOO 
600 00 

87BM 
(WMX) 




jMCh 












































|IS,KSM 


1 MB.UO M 






' 








' 





un 

1 

i 




nx. 








'tsf. 

i.ws;i»t 10 






i 
i 


■not 

II 

Ml W 












B.:::::::::::::::::::::;-:::-;:::: 


!!!! 














£:;:iE;;;;;;i;;;;;;:;E:;;;;;;;i 


U.IB 



76 



TRADM AMD OOKinBOB 07 



BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS. 

Statbmbmt SeowiNa thb Valuk of Buildino Ijcproybmbnts nr 
CiTT OF St. Louis dubiko thb tbab 1900 ahd 1901. 



Prepared by O. 7. IjONGFa]:iix>w, Commissioner of Public Bnildiiiffs. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 



1900. 


1901. 


Months. 


Nomber 

of 
Permits. 


Value of 
Improvements. 


Months. 


Nnmoer 

of 
Permits. 


Value of 
Improvements. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


169 
158 
216 
289 
171 
178 
210 
262 
220 
284 
212 
210 


$ 421,988 
684,478 
424,996 
579,868 
411,281 
296,910 
441,727 
628,866 
276,096 
688,029 
660,278 
804,682 


January 

February.... 

March 

April 

M^y 


824 

202 
812 
888 
869 
846 
882 
847 
828 
887 
888 
224 


$ 1,296,818 

686,644 

911,988 

727,528 

1,296,854 

1,842,104 

1,498,288 

786,171 

542,291 

1,012,819 

769,801 

2,860,801 


May 


June 


June 


July 


July 


August 

September 

October 

November 

Deoember 


August .... 
September . . 

October 

November .. 
Deoember . . . 


Totals 


2,618 


$6,916,984 


Totals 


8,782 


$ 18,207,991 



BUILDING PEEtMITS ISSUED FOB TWENTY TEABS. 





BIUCK AKD 










STOKS BUILDINGS. 


FBAXB BOiLonros. 


TOTAL BuiiiDnros. 


OOBT. 


1901 


« ■ • • • 


• • ■ • • 


8,722 


818,207,991 


1900. . . . 


1,880 


1,188 


2,618 


5,916,984 


1889 


1,689 


961 


2,600 


8,249,566 


1896 


1,861 


796 


2,657 


7,888,889 


1897 


2,648 


771 


8.820 


9.471,640 


1896 


2.848 


686 


8.029 


10 084,906 


1896 


2,863 


780 


8,642 


14,881,060 


18M4 


2,977 


876 


8,858 


11,844,700 


in» 


2,748 


1,069 


8,887 


12,857,067 


1892 


8,496 


1,886 


4,782 


16,97rt,H78 


1891 


2,978 


1,469 


4,485 


18,259,950 


1890 


2,666 


1,889 


8,994 


13,662,700 


IWf 


2,4M 


1,091 


8,644 


9,765,700 


1888 


2,145 


841 


2,966 


8,029,501 


1887 


1,842 


648 


8,490 


8 162,914 


18t)6 


1,788 


491 


2,224 


7,060,818 


1885 


2.1H0 


610 


2,670 


7,876,619 


1884 


1,969 


620 


2,609 


7,816,685 


1888 


1,881 


020 


2,401 


7,128,878 


1882 


1,646 


716 


2,.W1 


6,010,554 


1881 




• • • ■ 


1,966 


4,448,602 



TBM art or sr. u>uis. 77 



ST. LOUIS WEATHER FOR THE YEAR 1901. 



By Db. B. J. Htatt, Local Forecast Official, United States 

Weather Bureau St. Louis. 



Jaxraaiy temperatiiTe was above the normal except on the Ist to 3rd, 
11th, 35thy dOth and Slst, and the precipitation was deficient. The highest 
temperatUTe was 09° on the 15th and the lowest was 8° on the Ist. The 
average temperature was 87.2®. The total precipitation was 1.12 Inches, 
a defldencj of 1.12 inches. The maximnm wind velocity was 37 miles 
from the west on the 24th. There was light snow on the 11th, 12th 
and 18th. 

Febmary temperature was deficient for the month, being above the 
normal on the 1st to 4th, 8th, 14th, 16th, 17th, 18th and 26th. The precipi- 
tation was below the normal. The highest temperature was 00" on the 
17th, and the lowest was 12° on the 6th. The average temperature was 
31 .(P. The total precipitation was 1.86 inches, a deficiency of 1.13 inches. 
The maximnm wind velocity was 46 miles from the west on the 3rd. Snow 
fell on the 2nd, 7th, 8th, 9th, 11th and 20th to 26th. The total snow- 
fall for the month was 8.6 inches. 

March temperature was above the normal except on the 4th to 6th, 14th, 
16h, 20th, 21st and from the 26th to 3l8t. The precipitation was below the 
normal. The higeest temperature was 71° on the 18th, and the lowest was 
16° on the 6th. The average temperature was 44.8®. The total precipita- 
tion was 2.94 inches, a deficiency of 0.36 of an inch. The maximum wind 
velocity was 63 miles from the southwest on the 10th. Light snow fell on 
the followhig dates: 4th, 6th, 10th, 14th, 16th, 20th, 21st and 29th. The 
total amount of snow for the month was 2.1 inches, two inches, two inches 
of which fell on the 29th. 

April temperature was below the normal, except on the following days : 
lOth, 11th, 16th, 16th and 24th to SOth. The precipitation was deficient. 
The highest temperature was 89'' the 80th and the lowest was 33° on 
the 1st. The average temperature was 64.4°. The total precipitation 
was 2.36 inches, a deficiency of 1.13 inches. The maximum wind velocity 
was 43 miles from the southwest on the 6th. Snow fell on the 1st, 2nd and 
18th. Total amount of snowfall for the month was 4.6 inches, two inches 
of which fell on the 18th, 2}4 inches on the 2nd and trace on the 1st. 

May temperature was slightly above the normal for the month. The 
precipitation was below the average. The highest temperature was 90° on 



78 TBADB AHD OOlOCBBOfl OF 

the 2nd and the lowest was 46° on the 26th. The average temperature was 
66.2°. The total precipitation was 2.69 inches^ a deflcienpy of 1.77 inches. 
The maximum wind velocity was 89 miles from the west on the 28rd. 

June temperature was considerable above the normal except on the 1st 
and from the 6th to the 9th. The precipitation was below the average. 
The highest temperature was 102° on the 29th and the lowest was 64° 
on the 8th. The average temperature 80.6^. The total precipitation was 
3.92 inches^ a deficiency of 0.66 of an inch. The maximum wind velocity 
was 46 miles from the west on the 6th. The maximum temperature 102°^ 
which was the highest of record for June since the Weather Bureau was 
established^ the previous record being 99^ in 1881. The temperature was 
also 100 on the 23rd and 30th. 

July temperature was considerably above the normal, being the warmest 
month of the year^ and the hottest July of record, the temperature below 
the normal on but two days, the 7th and 8th. The precipitation was 
deficient. The highest temperatures were 107° on the 24th and 22nd; 106° 
on the 2lBt and 23rd; 104° on the 10th and 11th; 102^ on the 12th' 101° on 
the 6th and 20th, and 100° on the 1st and 17th. The lowest temperature 
63° on the 8th. The average temperature was 87.4°. The total precipita- 
tion was 1.47 inches^ a deficiency of 2.18 inches. The maximum wind 
velocity was 38 miles from the northwest on the 17th. While this month 
was the hottest of record, there were very few prostrations from heat in 
St. Louis, as compared with other large cities throughout the country 
where the humidity was higher. The minimum temperature was above 80° 
only six days during the month, showing comparatively cool and pleasant 
nights during the month. 

August temperature was above the normal except the 4th to 6th, 17th, 
18th and 31st. The precipitation was very deficient. The highest temi>e]> 
ature was 106° degrees on the 2nd, and the lowest was 63° on the 31st. The 
average temperature was 80^. The total precipitation 0.76 of an inch, a 
deficiency of 1.46 inches. The maximum wind velocity was 30 miles from 
the east on the 26th. 

September was above the normal except on the 1st, 2nd and 16th to the 
22nd. The precipation was considerably deficient. The highest tempera- 
ture was 96° on the 9th, and the lowest was 43° on the 18th. The average 
temperature was 71.8^. The total precipitation was 0.64 of an inch^ a 
deficiency of 2.23 inches. The maximum wind velocity was 46 miles from 
the south on the 11th. 

October, the temperature was above the normal except the 2nd to 6th, 
12th to 14th, 16th and 17th, and the precipitation was deficient. The 
highest temperature was 89° on the 1st, and the lowest was 42® on the 4th. 
The average temperature was 61.8°. The total precipitation was 2.12 
inches, a deficiency of 0.22 of an inch. The maximum wind velocity was 
27 miles from the west on the 13th. 

November temperature was above the normal except the 3rd to 6th, 7th, 
8th, 12th and 16th to 19th. The precipitation was below the average. The 



THE CITT OV ST. LOUIS. 



79 



lilghest temperature was 76^ on the 11th, and the lowest was 23° on the 
17th. The average temperature was 44°. The total precipitation was 1.21 
inches, a deficiency of 1.77 inches. The maximum wind velocity was 36 
miles from the northwest on the 3rd. 

December temperature was the coldest of record for that month since 
ihe establislunent of the Weather Bureau, except the year 1870. The mini- 
mum of 10° below zero on the 20th is the lowest, except in 1879, when it 
was 17° below on the 24th. The temperature also below zero during the 
month as follows: 5° below on the 15th, 3° below on the 19th and 2° below 
on the 14th. The highest temperature was 62° on the 12th, and lowest 10° 
below zero on the 20th. The average temperature was 30.2®. The precip- 
itation was above the average for the month. The total amount of precipi- 
tation was 3.72 inches, an excess of 1.45 inches. This was the only month 
in the year with an excess of precipitation. The river also was frozen 
during a portion of the months sufl9cient for persons to cross over on the 
ice. The maximum wind velocity was 27 miles from the north on the 29th . 

The average temperature for the year was 1° above normal 67°, and the 
total precipitation was 24.80 inches, a deficiency of 12.47 inches. 

The year was one of marked excess in temperature and deficiency in 
precipitation^ the drought being considered one of the most severe on 
record for this locality. The minimum wind velocity was 63 miles per 
hour. 

A new glass weather map was installed by the Weather Bureau on the 
floor of the Exchange in December. 

Bxtreme an& average climatic condition for each month of the year, 
compiled from the Weather Bureau records of the last 31 years : 





TXMPUUTUBB 


PXBO'TOa. 




NUMBSB OF DATS. 




MONTH. 


a 

i 

a 

1 


• 

f 

s 


1 




1 


6 


0-3 



O 

3 


4 

1 


fee . 




74 

78 

86 

89 

94 

94 

107 

106 

102 

91 

82 

74 


-22 

—16 

8 

22 

82 

44 

56 

52 

87 

24 

6 

-17 


82 
86 

44 

67 
66 
76 
79 
78 
70 
69 
44 
86 


78 

72 

68 

68 

66. 

69 

67 

66 

67 

64 

68 

78 


62 

68 
62 
60 
49 
48 
48 
88 
88 
87 
61 
67 


s.24 
2.99 
8.29 
8.48 
4.46 
4.48 
8.65 
2.22 
2.87 
2.84 
2.96 
2.27 


11 

9 

9 
10 
11 

9 
12 
15 
16 
16 
10 

9 


10 
9 
12 
11 
12 
15 
14 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 


10 

10 

10 

9 

10 
12 


9 

10 

11 

10 

IS 

12 

10 

7 

7 

7 

9 

10 


N.W. 


Vebmuy 


N.W. 


Muoh..."... 


N.W. 


April 


8. B 


May. . a . . . T 


8. 


Jane 


8. 


July 


B. 


Avifnfft. r ......... 


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Mlnhnqip temperature 22 
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Maxlmnm temperature 107 degrees July 24th, 1901. 
degrees below lero January 6th, 1884. Absolute range 



80 



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THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



81 



DAILY PRKCIFITATION AT ST. LOUIS, MO., FOB THE YEAR 1901. 

TAXMBf FBOM THS KBCOKD8 OF THB WXATHXB BUREAU STATION. 



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82 



TRADE AND COMMBBOB OF 



CUSTOM HOUSE TRANSACTIONS, 1901. 



Condensed Classification of Commodities imported into St Louis dur- 
ing the year ending December 81, 1901, showing foreign value and duty 
paid. CHAS. H. SMITH, Surveyor of Customs. 



OOMMODITIB8. 



Artworks 

Books and Printed Matter 

Brushes 

Ohemlcals and Drags 

Ohlna and Earthenware 

Outlery 

Jewelry and Precious Stones 

Toys 

Fire Arms 

Pish 

Free Goods. 

Glassware 

Glass, Window 

Hops 

Marble 

Manufactured Oork 

Ootton 

Linen 

Leather 

Metal 

Paper 

811k 

• Wood 

Miscellaneous 

Paints and Colors 

Bice. Granulated 

Bpirltuous Liquors 

Straw Matting. 

Tobacco and Cigars 

Wines, Sparkling 

WineSiStill 

Steel Wire 

Buriapand Bagging 

Oil Cloths 

Collections from all other sources. 












II 



Value. 



Duty. 



Total. 1901 
Total. 1900 



24,474 00 

6,685 00 

6,682 00 

458,94A 00 

107,649 00 

95,682 00 

67,639 00 

19,861 00 

75,196 00 

80,846 00 

463,758 00 

28,546 00 

281,678 00 

116,468 00 

5,874 00 

108,016 00 

612,468 00 

212,827 00 

64,066 00 

51,258 00 

67,194 00 

94,694 00 

8,189 00 

291,868 00 

10,401 00 

81,546 00 

89,158 00 

167,662 00 

154,821 00 

47,686 00 

88,776 00 

166,049 00 

60,206 00 

706,487 00 

25,371 00 

25.806 00 



$4,844,488 00 
4,100,544 00 



8,708 65 

1.666 26 

2.682 80 

128,726 68 

60,666 66 

66,287 18 

7,947 20 

6,947 65 

86,014 80 

18,090 94 



18,621 65 
69,825 27 
41,896 96 

2,sei 70 

26,929 85 

852,242 88 
96,079 48 
28,511 64 
28,066 10 
18,906 66 
62,813 12 
8,020 65 

124,978 09 

8,068 15 

11,744 75 

40,706 19 

68,277 26 

161,622 60 
27,618 60 
82,694 64 
67,140 66 
66,682 60 

188,904 22 
12,996 09 
28,027 49 
49,600 48 



11,908,898 96 
1,668,781 44 



THE CITY OP ST. L0X7IS. 



83 



CUSTOMS WABBHOUSE TRANSACTIONS. 



POST OF 8T. LOUIS— DURING 1901. — 0HA8. H. SMITH^ 8UBTETOB. 



MOXTHB. 



Wabbhousxd, 



Value. 



Duty. 



WiTHDHAWN. 



Value. 



Duty. 



«i 

M 
M 
U 
U 
• I 
« 
M 



IB Warehoiue Dee. 81, 1900. 
Janoaxy, 1901. 

Marali, 

June, 
July. 

oSober, • 
Komabtfrt " 

_ - ii 



TOTAIA , 

In WiajreluraM Dec. 31, 1901*. 



$188,ai4 00 
M,882 00 
M,988 00 

44.688 00 
88,204 00 
39,188 00 
*i0,489 00 
18,796 00 
21,957 00 
26,978 00 
60,886 00 

48.689 00 
88,884 00 



$676,104 00 



$121,262 47 
20,716 76 
24,080 79 
21,844 89 
64,916 93 
24,882 46 
8,a'(2 48 
17,868 76 
14,427 68 
27,469 62 
81,666 28 
81,182 91 
96,628 96 



H24,779 09 



$20,890 00 
22,640 00 
27,668 00 
28,694 80 
20.618 00 
24,806 00 
48,829 00 
22,174 00 
40,164 00 
27,618 00 
80,846 00 
67,189 00 



$882,426 00 
198,679 00 



21,008 72 
17,780 78 
28,684 81 
28,882 60 
28,28Q3M 
18,661 22 
81,901 70 
16,288 67 
24,973 40 
22,107 42 
20,097170 
48,466 07 



$286,991 78 
187,787 81 



Statement of Commodities, exported in bond from St. Louis during the 
year ending December 81, 1901. 

CHARLES H. SMITH, Sorreyor of Customs. 



OOMMODITIES. 



Oallons. 



Number. 



Pounds. 



Value. 



Beer.... 
Burlap 

Dry Plates 

Steel Wire Bope 

Ammonta. 

Drugs 

Canned Meats 

Calendars 

Manufactored Metal. 
Malt 



TOTAI*. 



1,082,246 



1,082,246 



2,709,824 

886,342 

272,128 

61,884 



481,716 



8,800,898 



787,112 00 

196,066 00 

46,888 00 

26,868 00 

8,991 00 

U,822 00 

12,866 00 

1,000 00 

466 00 

9,119 00 



91,047,616^ 



EXPORTS. 

1897 1 118,802 00 

18B8 677,802 00 

1899 968,28900 

1900 1,163,186 00 



M TRADE AND OOMMSBOB OF 

STATEMENT OP BUSINESS TRANSACTED AT THE ST. LOUIS 
POSTOFFICE DURING 18d9, 1900 AND 1901. 

F. W. Baumhoff, Postmaster. 

BEYENUES. 

Receipts. Expenltures. 

1901 $2,240,429.72 $1,241,282.07 

1900 2,081,664.77 1,211,642.34 

1899 1,867,006.26 1,154,904.75 

Increase in receipts $ 206,764.96 

Increase in net revenue 79,578.45 

DISTRIBUTION AND DISPATCH OF MAILS ORIGINATING IN 

ST. LOUIS. 

I T\ ^ V* AAA A 

Total pounds handled in 1901 80,521,550 

Total pounds handled in 1900 30,064,921 

Total pounds handled in 1899 28,918,840 456,629 

Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1901 . . 246,784,171 
Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1900. . . 225,085,670 
Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1899. . . 218,175,633 20,748,501 

RECEIVED PROM POSTAL ROUTES AND OTHER P08TOFFICE8. 

Total pounds, 1901 6,561,386 Total pieces handled, 1901. 94,506,880 

Total pounds, 1900 6,170,720 Total pieces handled, 1900. .89,721,778 

Total pounds, 1899 5,611,977 Total pieces handled, 1899. .84,627,876 

MAIL MATTER COLLECTED AND DELIVERED BY CITT 

DELIVERY. 

Total pounds, 1901 18,437,827 Total pieces, 1901 378,194,367 

Total pounds, 1900 14,327,056 Total pieces, 1900 301,034,920 

Total pounds, 1899 10,946,669 Total pieces, 1899 280,058,600 

LOCAL DROP MAIL. 

1901. 1901. 1900. 1900. 1898. 1899. 

Pounds. Pieces. Pounds. Pieces. Pounds. Pieces. 

Letters 904,961 54,297,660 779,336 46,760,160 536,494 32,189,640 

Cards 36,968 5,545,200 35,899 5,309,850 34,013 5,101,950 

Circulars 148,780 5,951.200 103,440 4,137,600 102,177 4,087,080 

Second Class.... 273,549 3,009,039 230,142 2,531,562 226,984 2,496,824 

Third Class 289,788 5,795,760 272,006 5,440,120 264,999 5,299,980 

RECEIPTS AND DISPATCH OF REGISTERED MAIL. 

Total number, 1901 2,843.506 

Total number, 1900 2,458,257 

Total number, 1899 2,067,650 

ISSUING AND PAYMENT OF MONEY ORDERS. 

Number. Amount. 

1901 1,157,718 $8,895,089.82 

1900 1,126,759 7,783,364.60 

1899 968,509 6,827,852.06 



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TEUDB AND OOHUBRCB OF 



IMPOBTS AND EXPOKTS OF THK UNTTBD STATES. 
From the BnreaiU of StaUitloa, W&ablngton, D. O. 





rsABa. 


(—) twelve 

monthB 1900 




im. mo. iMi. 


KMBCB^MTn^ 


t BGo.gar.nai mi,»b,7«i BSi.sii.itt 

MS.OTO.ISO 4Se,eS0,9((3 t98, 888,101 




^ '*"'*^Ihitl«ble....' 




Total 


1 7Be,967,«<JI 829,1*9,71*1 BS0,«ti,3*6 


• -!- l>l,U8e,6Sl 


■"— tett:;.:;::::;;;;:: 


|1,%3,9S1,S14 11, US, 010,113 tl,4SS,23S,«H 

•^' w;5st,;ffin m;9«8;ooi k;™;*** 


+ Slasaiwj 


Total 


n.gn, 4«7, 97111,177 ,916. 113 tl,4«S,SU,ls9 


»- l!,43l,9T< 


ExcBMofEiporta 


■ 47B.Kn.MI| el8,79e,B99| 6B5,108,793 


t- 6)(,6B7.S06 


Gold. 


1 iii,sM,%4i m,7*9,oe4| n.tai.m 

U,8T9,111 G4,lU,eia 97,739,ai9 


1- 12.M7,WB 

+ 8;S9B;Me 


bSK:::;;;::;;:;:::::;;:::::::: 




t a.9u,u3i ii.eu,46ii s,u8,oa-- 














SlLTSB. 


1 80,848,9391 tO.!m,Ma| tl,lll,a49 

SB, 461,737 ee,2ii,6e* «i,g3s,9oi 




B^ST::::::::::;::::::::::::::: 






1 n,Bi7,saei x,m,B3it 24,4a6,K2 









IMPORTS AND EXPORTS O 



' UE&OHANDISE. 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 87 



RAIL TRANSPORTATION. 



By E. 8. Tompkins, Oommissioner, St. Louis TrafBc Bureau. 



The importance of St. Louis as the great central market of the Missis- 
sippi Valley has heen materially strengthened during the past year hy the 
development, construction and operation of the railroads reaching this city. 
The trade territory directly trihutary to this market has been largely 
increased by the buying up of completed roads^ and the building of new 
lines. 

When the Frisco System acquired the Kansas City, Fort Scott A Mem- 
phis and Kansas City, Memphis A Birmingham Railroads, they secured 
control of a line aggregating about 1,258 miles in the States of Kansas, 
Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama and the Indian Territory. They 
haye alBO purchased the Fort Worth & Bio Grande, extending from Fort 
Worth to Brownwood, Texas, 141 miles, and, in addition to the absorption 
of these two properties, they have completed their line from Sapulpa, I. T., 
to Fort Worth, Texas, a distance of 290 miles. 

The Missouri Pacific have secured control of the Denver & Bio Grande 
and the Bio Grande Western Bailways, having 2,140 miles of track in Col- 
orado« Utah and New Mexico. They have also acquired the New Orleans 
& Northwestern Bailway, with 101 miles of road in Louisiana, as well as a 
number of smaller roads in other States. 

The Wabash Bailway have purchased the Omaha & St. Louis Bailroad, 
Pattonsburg, Mo., to Omaha, Neb., 148 miles, which gives them their own 
rails into Omaha, as well as the short line between St. Louis and that 
point. They have also secured control of the Wheeling & Lake Erie Bail- 
road, and they are now extending this line to Pittsburg, Pa. 

The St. Louis, Kansas City & Colorado Bailroad have completed their 
road, which is known as the ^^St. Louis Line,^^ to Bell, Mo., 105 miles west 
of St. Louis, and they are now working on the road west of that point, and 
they expect to have their rails into Kansas City the latter part of 1902. 

These changes have been the most important during the year, and the 
new territory opened to this market will prove valuable to the merchants 
of St. Louis, who are making every effort to extend their trade. 

The acquisition of the Mobile A Ohio Bailroad, with 860 miles, by the 
Southern Bailway, gives that Company entrance into St. Louis over two 
Hues, as they purchased the L., E. & St. L. Bailway in 1900. 

The Burlington, with over 8,000 miles of road, has passed to the control 
of the Great Northern and Northern Pacific Boads, and in turn, the North - 
em Securities Company has been organized with a capital of $400,000,000 
to take over all three proi>erties. The change in ownership of the two 
roads mentioned, should not prove injurious to this market, but on the 



8B TBADB AND OOKMSBCE 01* 

other band should improTe their traffic arrangements with the Companies 
with which they have been merged^ and in that way enable them to 
increase their service out of St. Louis to a larger territory. 

The passenger service of the St. Louis lines is constantly being im- 
proved by the addition of finer equipment and the establiBhment of faster 
trains between St. Louis and other cities. 

The St. Louis Union Station is the largest and one of the finest passen- 
ger stations in the world, and it has proven an important factor in the 
increase of passenger business tlirough this gateway. 

The construction and equipment of the St. Louis & O'Fallon and the 
St. Louis, Belleville & Suburban Boads, has aroused a great deal of inter- 
est, as both lines will be operated with electric motors, and their tonnage 
will consist almost entirely of soft coal. The steam lines have been de- 
feated in competition with electric lines for suburban passenger service^ 
but it remains for these two lines to demonstrate their ability to success- 
fully compete with the steam roads for freight business. 

A road known as the St. Louis Valley Line is now being constructed 
between East St. Louis and East Cape Girardeau. Track laying is now in 
progress, and it is reported that this line will pass into the hands of the 
St. Louis Southwestern Railway, as soon as it is completed, which will 
give that road an entrance into this city over their own rails. 

The St. Louis, Memphis & Southeastern Railroad will be completed in 
1902. It will connect the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad Company's 
subsidiary lines with the main road, and will give St. Louis a new line to 
the Southeast. They will use the Frisco terminals in this city, and their 
tracks leading out of this city to a point this side of Pacific Junction, from 
which point they will construct about 170 miles of road, through Crystal 
City and Cape Girardeau to Luxora, from which point they now have a 
line which reaches the Frisco System at Deckerville, Ark., 28 miles west 
of Memphis, Tenn. 

The construction of these new lines is no doubt due to the rapid develop- 
ment of the South and the West, and the increased volume of business 
which is seeking this market. 

The railroads, realizing the importance of ftust and economical trans- 
portation of freight, have, in the last year, spent large sums in improving 

their roadways leading from this city, and In the purchase of new equip- 
ment of increased capacity to handle our rapidly growing business. 

A few years ago, the rule was freight cars of thirty to forty thousand 
pounds capacity, but now they are building cars of sixty, eighty and one 
hundred thousand pounds capacity. 

With larger engines, cars of greater carrying capacity, and improve- 
ment of the& track, by the elimination of many of the grades and curves, 
the railroads can handle a much larger volume of business at a lower 
average cost. 

The strength of all great trade centers is in their facilities for fast and 
cheap transportation 'm the most direct and shortest routes, and the im- 
provements made by the St. Louis lines in the past year, with those 
glanned for the condng year are such as to encourage everyone interested 
1 the growth and expansion of the trade of this city. 



THK om 01* 8T. Loms. ad 

Busimss or the st. louis bridges, asd the fbrbies 

FOB 1901. 

AHD OOXPXBnOH WITH PBBTIOXFB THABS. 



AMOUXT OP 



watm ST. LOOn to sasi r. louis, vnnax, xadiiom and oabohdilbt. 

















3,au,«u 






«»,MB 






1.1».UI 






























" " 






























« H 










" T. 


■ - a;::.::;:::::::..:::: 





























ROM BAST ST. UIDIS, CABONDKLKT, KADISOM AND TBMIOB TO ST. LOUIS. 



BY 


Cau. 


TOBS. 


^.f 


Tlwbds Bridge.....^. 


1SI,«M 


no.Doo 


B.«1,(W7 




S'S! 


WT,9W 








U« 


Tie.ne 














T»»IToMto«tOWj.t<loriBgI|01 






•SiS^Sf 


:: !! " !! 


iSI:::;::;;;::::::::;; 






:: ;: :: :: 


18W 

iS-;:::-: 




;mi;i76 


Z Z Z " 
































.MS.Ml 























90 



TRADE AND OOMKSRCB OF 



STATEMENT 



8HOWIKG AMOUNT OF FBBIOHT, IN TONS, RBOBIYBD AT ST. LOUIS BT 

BAILBOAD AND BIYBB, FOB FOUB TBAB8. 



ROUTE. 



Chicago & Alton B B.(Mo DIt.) 

Miaaoarl Pacific B. B 

St. L011IS& San Francisco B. B 

Wabash Railway (West)... 

St. Louis, Kansas Olty A Oolorado R. R 

Missouri, Kansas & Texas R. R 

St. Louis-Southwestern Ry 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain A Southern R. R 

Illinois Central &. R 

LouisvlUe & Nashville R. R 

MobUe & Ohio R. R 

Southern R. R 

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern R. R 

Chicago, Alton A St. Louis R. R. (Main Line) • . 
Oleyeland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. L. R. R. . . 

Terre Haute & Ind. R. R. (Vandalla Line) 

Wabash Railroad (East) 

Toledo, St. Louis & Western R.R 

Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis R. R 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R 

St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern R. B 

St. Louis. Chicago & St. Paul R. R 

St. Louis, Peoria & Northern Ry 

St. Louis, Troy & Eastern R. R 

St. Louis, Belleville & Suburban Ry 

Upper Mississippi River 

Lower Mississippi River 

Illinois River 

Missouri River 

Ohio River 

Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers 

Upper Mississippi River by Rafts 



1901. 



1900. 



Total in Tons 



Total by Rail... 
Total by River. 



176,678 

1,290,648 

680,084 

676,297 

80,617 

862,909 

111,678 

2,060,912 

1,881,506 

892,473 

966,186 

1.269,6A6 

1,034,683 

608,027 

734,021 

879.470 

926,816 

847,248 

911858 

501,161 

766.678 



106 610 
1,27.'>,087 
617,608 
440,982 
88,658 
448,440 



440,018 

1,472 

68.470 

S38,885 

27,896 

8,860 

67,816 

21,330 

60.560 



17,896.828 



17,438.628 
462,805 



1,987,087 
1,670,889 
800,698 
951,888 
915,870 
967,830 
434,346 
546,449 
827,467 
789,914 
254,448 
834,456 
468,867 
871,994 



114,113 



50,070 
274,445 

20,905 
2,725 
2,700 

87,825 

73,340 



16,887,461 



16,376,441 
612,010 



1880. 



109.907 
1,106478 
662,778 
888,924 
40,990 
287,600 



1,812,990 
1,426.876 
881,905 
783,874 
768,670 
1,069,881 
861,609 
676,069 
878,026 
885,354 
410,660 
666,410 
897,748 
845,976 
164,109 
624,614 



45,410 

238,140 

82,686 

665 

89,440 
38,610 
71,960 



16,272,482 



14,806.872 
466,610 



121,196 
1,068,161 
491,818 
440,667 
28,868 
267,141 



1,278,964 
1,400,678 
001,679 
661,040 
774,414 
779,629 
336,049 
678,935 
780,628 
648,248 
392,866 
484,458 
262,945 
986,606 
168,648 
685,135 



88,910 
811,916 
20,416 
790 
87,180 
46,865 
57,060 



18,460,485 



12,962,860 
606,685 



THB CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



91 



STATEMENT 

WBOWIXQ THS ▲MOUNT OF FREIOHT, IK TONS, SHIPPED FBOM ST. LOITIS BT 
SACH BAILBOAD AND RIYBB FOB FOUB TBABS. 



ROUTE. 



Chicago & Alton B. B. (Mo. Diy.) 

Mlflsouri Padflc B. B 

St. Louis & San Francisco B.B 

Wabash Bailway (West) 

St. Loals, Kansas City A Colorado B. B 

Mlssoari, Kansas^ Texas B. K 

St. Lools Sonthwestem By ■ 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern B. B 

Illinois Central B. B 

LoulsvUle & NashvlUe B. B 

MobUe & Ohio B. B 

Southern B. B 

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern B. R 

Chicago, Alton A St. Louis B. B. (Main Line) . . 
Clereland, Cincinnati, Chicago A St. Louis. . . . 

Terre Haute & Ind. B. B. (V andalia) 

Wabash Bailway (East) 

Toledo, St. Louis & Western B. B 

Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis B. B 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy B. B 

St. Louis, Keokuk A Northwestern B, B 

St. Louis, Chicago & St. Paul B. B 

St. Louis, Peoria A Northern Railway 

Ui^per Mississippi Riyer 

Lower Mississippi Bi ver 

niinois Biyer 

Missouri Blyer 

Ohio Biyer 

Cumberland and Tenaessee Biyers 



Total in Tons. 



Total by Rail... 
Total by Rlyer. 



1901. 



81,648 
900,820 
906,877 
496,613 

89,6()6 
843,086 

43,160 
1,661,009 
706,244 
406,224 
437,406 
668,403 
296,071 
484,692 
443,818 
461,130 
622,326 
607,014 
818,973 
441,778 
488,486 



23,392 

168,493 

9,090 

7,186 



11,111 



10,862,836 



10,658,066 
209,271 



1900. 



78,061 
782,979 
096,702 
461,460 

18,877 
268,698 



1,187,429 
680,681 
488,906 
438,880 
818,698 
826,287 
428,666 
447,712 
409,627 
618,668 
810,886 
872,662 
449,748 
470,113 



86,676 

187,386 

6,020 

1,226 



16,276 



1889. 



80,709 
702,688 
726,941 
466,806 

22,980 
262,197 



941,164 
668,084 

634,428 
186,160 
288,199 
296,861 
433,946 
446,666 
666,746 
210.470 
226,040 
869,612 
489,908 

78,836 
100,246 

88,676 

151,186 

9,090 



9,806 



9,426,889 8,469,698 



9,180,309 
246.680 



8,266,893 
208,206 



1898. 



62,096 
601,868 
688,608 
628,746 

12,679 
246,948 



681,602 

437,160 

802,168 

386,710 

162,887 

442,512 

263,866 

453,862 

444,673 

414,137 

349,396 

146,014 

286,664 

463,746 

76,190 

63,088 

88,806 

839,486 

8,828 

800 



17,216 



7,476,902 



7,079,319 
39U,683 



92 



TRADE Ain> OOMHSBCS OF 



LOCAL AND THROUGH TONNAGE. 



1901. 

ToDB, Percent. 

ToUl toiw freight reoelTeO, local 1S,0BI,U6 7a.8S 

Total tons freight receired, through 4»8S4^12 S7 18 

Tons flight receired by raU, local 12,609311 72.10 

Tons freight reeelTed by rail, through 4364,212 27.90 

Tons freight, excluding coal, receired by 

rail, local 7370,262 68.60 

Tons freight, excluding coal, receired by 

ran, through 43003^8 96.40 



1900. 




Tons. Pereent. 


U396,894 


71.78 


4,491367 


26.27 


10386384 


70.79 


4,491357 


29.21 


6304.200 


61.77 


4.210388 


88.28 



AMOUNT OP COAL BSCEIVED IN ST. LOUIS. 



BOUTB. 



1901. 
Tons. 



1900. 
Tons, 



1808. 
Tons. 



Baltimore ft Ohio 8. W. B. B. 

Chicago, Alton A St. L. 

0.. O., O. & Bt. Louis 

St. Louis &. Iron M'tn 

Vandalia 

Illinois Centra 

Wabash 

LouisTille ft Nashville 

Southern 

Mobile ft Ohio 

Toledo, St. L. ft Western 

Chicago, Peoria ft St. L. 

Missouri Pacific 

St. L., Peoria ft North'n 

St. L.. Ohl. ft St. Paul 

St. L., BelleTille ft So. 

St. L.. Troy ft Eastern 

St. li.. BelleTille ft Sub. 

St. Ii. ft San Francisco 

From Ohio Birer 



M 



« 



l< 



M 



<i 



l( 



l« 



tl 



i( 



<( 



(< 



tt 



M 



• < 



Total Tons. 



606,486 
100,692 
268.914 



421,648 
922,279 
100.862 
664,752 
731.223 
293,672 
40318 
406338 



37,068 

486,053 

1,472 



52,515 



4,955,228 



608.967 

86,062 

164347 



406312 
961,854 
196.849 
474,176 
609387 
265,125 
94.787 

«HIO, fvD 



36,864 
114,113 



4,860309 



044,488 

84,838 

188,006 



414,804 

861,282 

221,072 

378,046 

450,788 

228317 

167,472 

295,861 

463 

426.172 

50,874 

70314 



84 

36,850 



4.362.714 



BB0BIFT8 or ARTHBAOITB OOAIj INOLUDSD IN ABOYS BBOHIPTS. 



121380 tons. 

1890 1«4385 <• 

1801 189,050 «< 

1892 187387 " 

178358 •« 



1894 186,484 tons. 

1895 207.784 ** 

1896 218,965 

1897 172,988 

1898 225.606 



«< 
« 



«( 



1880 292418ton8 

1900 180350 " 

1901 200,797 " 



Beceipts of Anthracite Coal in 1899: 261,471 tons local; 80,647 tons through. 
" •• •• 1900: 159,208 •• " 21,842 " " 

M I. u iQQij 198^578 •• •• 7,124 •* " 

Beceipts of Coke, 1901, 212,606 tons. 
" " 1900, 158,858 •* 



THl CITY OF ST. LOTTIS. 



FDBMSHED BATES OF FBEIGHT BT BAIL FROM EAST 
ST. LOUIS TO NBV TOBE, DUSmG 1901. 



dat>. 


HaatB. 




'■s- 


FerlOOllw. 


J Ut to M «st 


M 








SSa-irsSSSim-.::::::::: 


S 



enla and Qnln Prodncta to BoalOD 1 ceota hixher than New York 



dtlphla 1 ceatfl lover tbati New Toik ; to Baltimore B oenta lower tban New York. 

Cotton to BoetoD ft eenu boiler, to f hllodelpbla a oenia anil Baltimore t oenta 
tover than New York rates. 

Meats to Bostoo > ceata higher, t 
knro than New York. 



o Philadelphia 1 centa and Baltimore » coita 



CLASS KATES. 



'1 


.|.|.|. 




M 


BID 

nx 

nn 


I 


1 


38 










s 





t Louis BlSTatora 1 ocnt per 100 Ibe. more than I 
Ba t es on other heaT7 Irai(ht from St. LonU 1} to S osnts per 100 lb*, more t 



AIX RAIL BATES OF FBEIGHT IN CENTS FBOM ST. LODIB 
TO SOUTHEBN CITIES DURING 1901. 



AsnoLxa. 


"s:r* 


Vlokihuc, 


""sr* 




w 

1 


i 
















lUatftoae,lMrl00 1bs 

Barp^MAlb. 


so 



FUBUSHSD ATEBAOE BATE OF FREiaHT BT BAIL ON GRAIN 
FBOM BAST ST. LOUIS TO NEW TOBK. 

rerlOOlb*. 

ISMOaVlMal 3>ct«, 

IWlOnOon tta ■■ 

inoon Wheat *7K " 

IMOOnOom SIM" 

UK Bzoept Oom Kii " 



Un Od GrAln (except Oom ). . 
UWOnOora 



MOD Com. . 



...tlit- 



USl MS-IB • 



94 TRADE AND OOMMXBGS OF 



THE RIVERS. 



Biyer traffic daring 1901 shows a slight falling off as compared with the 
preyions year^ hut a small increase over 1899. 

The total tons handled for the three years compare as follows: 

1901. 1900. 1899. 

Tons received by steamboats and barges 412,355 488,070 394,660 

Tons receiyed by rafts 60,660 78,8^ 72,96o 

Tons shipped by steamboats and barges 200,371 346,680 308,305 

Total 673,076 767,690 669,816 

The business in the lower river was lights there being but a small move- 
ment of grain for export. In the upper river business was fairly satifactory^ 
although low water came early in August on account of the drouth. The 
passenger business was good^ and shows a steady increase each year. There 
was quite an increase in the business of both the Illinois and Missouri 
Bivers. 

There was a fairly good stage of water out to Cairo during the first half 
of the year^ but in July the stage fell to six feet^ to five feet in August and 
four to four and one-half during October and November. Navigation 
closed about December 15th, on account ice and low water. 

It is probable that during the coming year a new element will be intro- 
duced into the commerce of the lower river, namely^ the transportation of 
Texas oil to St. Louis. It is reported that arrangements are now being 
perfected to place a boat and two barges in the trade as soon as plans are 
completed for the delivery of the oil at New Orleans. 



STEAMERS PLYINQ BETWEEN ST. LOUIS AND OTHER 

PORTS DURING 1901. 



** DIAMOND JO'* LINE. 

Steamer Sidney, Upper Mississippi Biver. 



" St. Paul, 
»* Quincy, 



(4 (( (4 

(4 44 44 

" Dubuque, " ** " 

EAGLE PACKET COMPANY. 

Steamer Spread Eagle, Upper Mississippi River. 

«< Bald Eagle, Illinois Biver. 

*^ Grey Eagle, Lower Mississippi Biver. 

" Josle, " " " 

" Cape Girardeau, " " •» 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



96 



ST. LOUIS A TENNESSEE BTVEB PACKET COMPANY. 



Steamer City of Memphis, 
" City of Clifton, 



Steamer Peters Lee, 
** Bees Lee, 
*'*' G^rgia Lee, 



Temiessee Biver. 
Temiessee Biver. 



LEE LINE. 



Lower Mississippi Biver. 

CC «4 (( 



(( 



(4 



i( 



ST. LOUIS A laSSISSIPPI YALLEY TBANSPOBTATION COMPANY. 



Steamer S. H. H. Clark, 
** H. M. Hoxie, 
** Hemy Lomrey, 



Lower Mississippi Biver. 

i4 44 



44 



44 



44 



44 



STEEL BABGE LINE. 

Steamer J. H. McDougall, Lower Mississippi Biver. 

INDEPENDENT PACKETS AND TOWBOATS. 



Steamer Chester, 


Lower Mississippi Biver. 




* City of Peoria, 


Upper " " 




City of St. Louis, 


Lower Mississippi Biver. 




*■ Colambia, 


44 44 44 




' B. C. Umiter, 


TIHnois Biver. 




*• Jacob Bichtman, 


Upper Mississippi Biver. 




*• J. M. Bichtman, 


44 44 44 




' Polar Wave, 


44 44 44 




' John K. Speed, 


Lower *' " 




*• Jack Frost, 


Illinois Biver, 




^ Charlotta Boeckeler, 


<4 44 




' Saturn. 


Upper Mississippi Biver. 




* Satellite, 


44 44 44 




' Pathfinder, 


44 44 44 




' W. H. Grapevine; 


Lower *' " 




*• Seawing, 


Upper '^ '« 




' Phil Davis, 


44 44 44 




' Pearlie Davis, 


44 44 44 




*• Mayflower, 


Tennessee Biver. 




^ Kit Carson, 


Upper Mississippi Biver. 




' Lumberboy, 


44 44 44 




' New Haven, 


Illinois Biver. 




* John Barrett, 


Lower Mississippi Biver. 




' Wash Honshell, 


44 44 44 




' J. Y. Lockwood, 


44 44 44 




' Fred Nellis, 


Upper " " 




* Parker, 


44 44 44 




^ Ida Mac, 


^4 44 44 




* Beaver, 


Lower '* " 



96 



TRADS AND COMMCRCE OF 



Steamer H. F. Friable, 


Lower Mississippi Biyer. 


4( 


Bnssell Lord, 


(( ii it 


H 


Dolphin, 


it it it 


ii 


Maiy M. Michael, 


Lower Mississippi Blyer. 


U 


Flying Eagle, 


Upper *' " 


u 


Little Clyde, 


nUnols Blyer. 


4< 


Lizzie Gardner, 


Upper Mississippi Blyer. 


(( 


Polly, 


it tt ti 


<i 


Fritz, 


Ohio Blyer. 


i( 


T. H. Davis, 


Lower Mississippi Blyer. 


<( 


India Glyens, 


Upper " " 


i( 


City of St. Sheffield, 


4i it ti 


ii 


Meglddo, 


ti ii it 


<t 


Herman Paepeke, 


Ohio Biyer. 


tt 


Fordyce, 


Upper Mississippi Biyer. 


i( 


Kennedy, 


Lower " *' 


t( 


Jnlia, 


Upper " " 


u 


Estella Groyer, 


Illinois Biyer. 


n 


Speed, 


it ti 


ii 


Clymax, 


Upper Mississippi Blyer. 


U 


Keptnne, 


ii ii it 


it 


Jack Babbit, 


it tt it 


ii 


Mascot, 


i. i^ it 


C( 


Pilot, 


it (i ti 


<i 


Tenbroeck, 


ti tt tt 


it 


Woodruff, 


ii it it 


ii 


Eagle, 


Lower " " 


ii 


Wanderer, 


Upper " «' 


ik 


Vera, 


Illinois Blyer. 


n 


Bart. E. Llnehan, 


Upper Mississippi Biyer. 


iC 


J. B. Wheeler, 


(i ^i ti 


it 


J. E. Graves, 


Lower *' *' 


ct 


Tarpln, 


Illinois Blyer. 


Ii 


G. N. Slvely, 


Upper Mississippi Blyer. 


(i 


Golden Gate, 


Missouri Blyer. 


ii 


City of St. Joseph, 


it ti 




PLEASUBB 


BOATS. 


Steamer Alice-Edna^ 


Steamer George S, 


^i 


Annie Bussell, 


" Hill City, 


u 


Bonnie Lewis, 


" Mary "B," 


a 


By-Jo, 


" Lotus, 


u 


Lulu G, 


" Lola, 


it 


Druid, 


« Duke, 


it 


Diana, 


" La Tosca, 


tt 


Eloise, 


'* Midia, 


it 


Elizabeth Hyde, 


'' Midway, 





THK CITY OF ST. LOUIS 


• 


Steamer Fannie M, 


Steamer 


Monarch, 


(4 


Gypeey, 


ii 


Altonian, 


U 


Glad Tidings, 


ki 


City of Providence, 


t€ 


Gazel, 








UNITED 8TATB8 BOATS. 




Steamer 


Sachem, 


Steamer 


Lily, 


te 


Choctaw, 


a 


General Barnard, 


It 


Wynoka, 


u 


John N. Maoomb, 


\ *< 


Kakomis, 


u 


Missisdppi, 


i< 


Leota, 


u 


Vixen, 


1 '* 


General GUlmore, 


it 


A. L. Abbott, 


u 


Search, 


(i 


General Casey, 


u 


General John Newton, 


« 


C. R. Snter, 


\ « 


Minnetonka, 


u 


Titan, 


u 


H. G. Wright, 


i< 


Colonel Patterson, 


(( 


Ck>lonel A. W. Mackenzie, 


It 


A. J. Whitney, 


K 


C. W. Howell, 


(( 


T. B. Florence. 


ft 

1 


No. 9. 







97 



DEPTH OP CHANNEL SOITTHWARD IN ipoi. 



The navagable stage of the river below St. Lonis as reported by Mr. 
P. S. Drown, Secretary of the Mississippi and Ohio Biyer PUots' Society, 
was as follows : 



ST. LOUIS TO OAIBO. 



JaniiarylStoSS, arerage 6i<ft. 

Febniaiy S8, '* 6^ " 

March S 6 •< 

•• IS, average 11 " 

ApiflaodMaj, •' lOi^ " 

Jane 7, " 8« •• 

•• 15 «• 12 «• 



July 



Ito 6 8 



July 

Aaonst 

8e^. 



i( 



Oct. 
Not. 



(C 



Dec 



iStoBl 6 

lto29 6 

ItolS i)i 

18 to 18 4 

IStoSO A)i 

Ito 10 4 

7toll 4H 

llt6 36 h% 

7toao S 



ft 
•( 

i< 

«( 

ft 

i( 

i< 

•« 



CAIBO TO NBW OSLBAKS. 



12 to 90 ft. 

16 to 86" 

Match ..'. 22 to 24 " 

April 20 to 20 

May 1 to 19, ayerage 10 

** 19to2^ " 10 



« 

it 



July 8Ktol6 ft. 

Angost 7Kto 9K 

September 6 tol4 

October 8 tol2 

NoTember 10 tolOX 

December 10 tolO 



«• 

« 



The city directrix is 33.74 aboTe the zero of river gauge^ and is located 
opposite Ko. 4 Soath Levee. It is the high water mark of 1826^ and is 
41171 feet above mean Gulf level. 



d8 TRABS AND OOMHBROB OF 

For the past thirty-four seasons iiayigation southward has been sus- 
pended by ice as follows: 

Winter 1805-M, firam December 10th to Jaanary ISth STdaTS. 

•' 1809-67, «* December 26th to FebroAnrSd 88 •* 

" 1867-68, «< Jaanery 8th to Febnuwy ISth M '• 

" 1888-68, open All winter. 

« 186»-70,fh>m December 8Ut to December S8th 7 <* 

•* 1870-71, ♦• December Slst to JamuurT 88d SS " 

« Isn-TS, « December Ut to 18th, and firom January 80th to FM). 84th.... tt •' 

*« 1878-78, f^om NoTember 89th to January 90th 61 " 

" 1878-74, open all winter. 

«< 1874-76, firom December 80th to Febraary 87th 68 *' 

** 1876-76, open all winter. 

" 1876-77, fh>m December 8th to February 6th 68 '« 

** 1877-78, open all winter. 

^ 1878-79, firom December 16th to Janoary 90th and Febmary 14th to 17th. ... 46 ' * 

« 1879-80, firom December 17th to December 8Ut inoioslTe 16 *< 

*< 1880-81, ftom Nov. 18 to Deo. 6, and from Deo, 7 to 14, and from Deo. 94 to 

Feb.18 78 " 

** 1881-89, open all winter. 

•* 1889-88, from Deo. 7 to 98, and firom Jan. 1 to Feb. 18 60 " 

" 1888-84, from Dec 18 to Feb. 6, 48 ** 

** 1884 86 . from Dec. 19th to 80th, and 86 days in Janaary and Febmary .... 47 " 

'• 188&-86, firom Dec 10 to Deo. 98, and firom Jan. 7th to Feb. lOth 66 •• 

1886-87, from Dec 1 to Dec 14. and firom Dec 24 to Jan. 97 48 ^ 

*< 1887-86, firom Dec 19 to Jan. 81 48 " 

'* 1888-89, open all winter. 

** 1889-90, open all winter. 

<* 1890-91, open all winter. 

** 1881-99, from January 9tii to Febmary iBt 28 ** 

" 1899-96, from Dec 90th to Feb. 16 67 « 

** 1896-94, open all winter. 

« 1894-96, from JannaiT l8t to March l8t 60 '* 

** 1896-96, open all winter. 

•* 1896-97, open all winter. 

** 1897-98, open all winter, but some ice running. 

'* 1898-99, from Dec. 7th to 22nd, Jan. Ist to 10th, Jan. 30th to March Ist. 64 *' 

** 1899-1900, from Deo. 80th to Jan. 18th and 24 days between Janaary 28tn 

and march 4th 87 

1900-1901, during February 98 

1901-1902, from Dec. 16th to Jan. 16th, and from Jan. 26th to 



*< 






STEAMERS AND BABGES. 

Number of vessels^ and their tonnage, permanently and temporarily 
enrolled and licensed at the Port of St. Louis^ Mo., December Slst^ 1901 : 

Vo. c( YmmIi. 8raiToi86|«. VttT«Ba«|e. 

Permanent Enrolled Wood Steamers 80 96,807 28,678 

*• *• Iron and Steel Steamers... 8 2,990 2,826 

" «* Gasoline Vessels 1 27 26 

«< *« Barges(wood) 49 81374 87,806 

** Barges(8teeD 2 2,824 2,824 

M <• Wood Steam Yachts 8 244 179 

«« *' Gasoline Yachts (steel) .... 1 60 82 

«• " Sailing Yachts 1 80 26 

Licensed Steamers under 20 tons (wood) 6 66 48 

« " "20 •• (iron) 1 28 18 

<« Gasoline Vessels under 20 tons (wood) .8 89 74 

«* Barges under 20 tons (wood) 2 21 91 

Temporary licensed Barges under 20 tons (wood) 1 12 12 

Licensed Sailing Yachts 19 8 

SteamYachts 2 94 20 

•• Gasoline Yachts 1 9 9 

Total 167 70410 66,680 



THE CITY OF 8T. LOUIS. 



99 



HIGHEST AND LOWEST STAGES OF WATER. 

The record of the highest and lowest water noted at the St. Louis 
Weather Bureau Office since its establishment is as follows: Zero of 
gauge being low water mark in 1868, which indicates about 12 feet of 
water in the channel in the harbor of St. Louis, and 4 feet of water in 
shoal places between here and Cairo : 



HIGHEST. 



Tear. 



Date. 



Stage. 



187S. 
1876. 
1877. 
1S78. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 



U. 



1884. 



1887.. 

1868. 

1888. 

1860.. 

1801. 



I89S.. 



1896. 
ft. 



1900. 
1801. 



.lAugastS. 
.iMay 10 and 

.Jane 14 

.|Janel6 

.iJnlyS 

July 10, U and IS. 

May ft 

Julys 

Jane 35 

April 9 

June 17 

May 18 

April 8 

Jane 8 and 4 

Jnnel 

Jane 80 , 

Jaly4 

May 19 

Mays 

May 12 

December 22 

May 26 

May 2 

May 28 

Aprn37 

March 16 

April 18 and 19. . . . 



28 ft.-ll in. 
88 ft.« 6 in. 

86 ft - 6 in. 
2Bft.-8 in. 
91 ft.- 2 In. 
25 ft- 6 in. 

83 ft.- 7 in. 
82 ft.- 4 In. 

84 ft.- 8 in. 
28 ft.- 2 in. 

87 feet. 

27 feet. 
20.5 feet. 
29.8 feet. 
^4 feet. 
90.7 feet. 

28.7 feet. 
86.0 feet. 

81.5 feet. 
2S.8feet. 

28.8 feet. 
27.7 feet. 
81.0 feet. 
27.2 feet. 

25.6 feet. 

28 ft. - 4 In. 
22.4 feet. 



LOWEST. 



Year. 



Date. 



Stage. 



1875.. 

1876.. 

1877.. 

1878.. 

1879. 

1880.. 

1881.. 

1882.. 

1888.. 

1884.. 

1885.. 

1886 . 

1887.. 

1888.. 

1889.. 

1890.. 

1881.. 

1892.. 

1898.. 

1894.. 

1895.. 

1896.. 

1897.. 

1896.. 

1898.. 

1900.. 

1901.. 



Januarys 

February 7 

October 4 

December 27 

December 26 

Noyember 29 

February 4, 5 and 6 . . . . 

December 18 

January 12 

January 4 

December 16 and 17. . . . 

Deoember 4 and 5 

December 26 and 27. . . . 

January 1 

February 27 

I >eoember 80 and 81 

December 6 

December 27 

December 9 

February 8 

January 2 

December 11 

December 34 

December 11 

February 1 

IJanuary 2 

December 19 



2 ft.- 9 in. 
6 feet. 

6 ft.-10 in. 
5 ft.-ll in. 
8 ft.- 6 In. 
2 ft.-10 In. 

7 ft.- 7 in. 
2 ft.-10 in. 
4 ft.- 5 In. 

8 ft.- 4 in. 
2 ft.- 1 In. 
ft.- in. 
0.8 feet. 
8.5 feet. 

2.7 feet. 

2.8 feet. 
9.8 feet. 
0.2 feet. 
0.0 feet. 
0.2 feet. 
-0.5 feet. 
8.8 feet. 
0.4 feet. 
0.8 feet. 
0.7 feet. 

2 ft.- 6 In. 
-1.8 feet. 



SUMMABY OP TEffi St. LOUIS WBATHER BUREAU RIVER 
GAUGE READINGS FOR THE YEAR 1901. 

Eigheat and Lowest Staees of Water in the Mississippi River at 
St. Lonis, Mo.; for each month of the year 1901 as determined from the 
records of the United States Weather Borean. 



MOHTH. 



Highest. 



Date. 



Lowest. 



Date. 



January .. 
February . 
March..... 
April 

June 

July 

A.niust — 
September. 
October.... 
Norember. 
December. 



ft. 10«k$, 

5 

5 
18 8 



22 

15 

15 

14 

8 

5 

4 

4 

7 



4 

2 
8 
1 
4 

2 
4 

1 
5 



16-18 

27 

26 

18-19 

1 

28 

1 

2-8 

22 

21-22 

1 

27 



/l.lOMf. 
6 



1 
8 

15 
9 
9 
8 
8 
2 
2 
2 

-1 



7 
8 
4 
4 
6 
2 
7 
2 
8 
9 
8 



7 
10 

8 

29-M 

25 

2 

80,81 

81 

17 

4 
80 
19 



Highest stage during the year. 
Lowest stage during the year . . 

Absolute range 

Greatest moothly range 

Least monthly range 

Mean range 

(- Indicated below sero of gauge.) 



22.4 feet, April 18th and 19th. 
-1.8 " December 19th. 



28.7 


(« 


15.0 


•• In March. 


2.2 


*' in Norember. 


5.6 


•< 



100 



TRADE AND OOMMEBCE OF 



RIVER GAUGB READINGS AT ST. LOUIS, MO., FOR 1901 

Fbom Weathbb Bubeau Records. 



1900. 



• 



s 


• 

1 


• 

1 

HA 


m 

I 

< 


m 


■ 

1 


• 




1 

s 


1 


1 

O 



a 

I 



1 

2 

8 

i 

6 

o* • ■ ■••• •••••• 

4* •••••••*••«• 

8 

9 

10 

11 

IS 

18 

U 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

30 

31 

33 

34 

36 

37 

39. 

80 

Sums 

Means 



3.0 


4.4 


4.6 


18.1 


16.3 


9.6 


14.1 


8.8 


8.6 


8.8 


4.1 


3.7 


4.1 


4.1 


18.3 


14.9 


9.6 


18.6 


8.4 


8.4 


8.1 


4.0 


3.8 


40 


8.8 


18.8 


14.6 


10.4 


18.0 


8.4 


8.8 


8.0 


8.9 


1.8 


4.3 


8.9 


18 6 


14.8 


13.1 


13.4 


8.8 


3.2 


3.8 


8.8 


1.4 


4.0 


4.4 


18.7 


14.0 


13.4 


11.6 


8.2 


8.1 


3.9 


8.6 


1.0 


8.8 


6.0 


19.3 


18.9 


13.6 


11.8 


7.9 


8.0 


8.0 


8.6 


0.6 


8.6 


6.8 


19.8 


18.6 


13.8 


11.0 


7.4 


2.8 


8.1 


8.4 


0.9 


3.9 


6.9 


19.6 


18.4 


18.3 


10.8 


7.0 


2.7 


8.2 


8.4 


1.8 


3.8 


6.8 


30.0 


18.1 


18.8 


10.9 


6.7 


3.6 


8.8 


8.3 


3.1 


1.7 


8.4 


31.3 


18.0 


18.0 


13.0 


6.6 


3.6 


8.4 


8.6 


2.7 


1.9 


13.3 


31.6 


13.7 


13.8 


13.3 


6.8 


3.6 


8.8 


3.6 


4.6 


3.4 


16.0 


21.6 


13.4 


13.6 


11 6 


6.3 


3.6 


8.4 


8.6 


6.3 


3.6 


17.1 


31.9 


12.3 


13.6 


11.0 


6.1 


3.6 


8.6 


8.6 


6.3 


3.6 


17.3 


33.0 


13.0 


13.9 


10.7 


6.0 


3.6 


8.6 


8.6 


6.7 


3.6 


16.9 


21.9 


11.8 


13.7 


10.4 


6.9 


3.4 


8.8 


8.6 


6.6 


3.7 


16.6 


31.4 


11.6 


14.1 


10.4 


6.7 


3.8 


8.8 


8.6 


6.4 


3.8 


16.4 


31.9 


U.3 


18.9 


10.4 


6.6 


3.3 


8.6 


8.4 


6.7 


8.0 


16.8 


33.4 


11.1 


13.6 


10 4 


6.6 


2.4 


8.8 


8.8 


6.6 


8.4 


16.1 


33.4 


10.9 


18.0 


10.8 


6.8 


3.6 


4.1 


8.8 


6.4 


3.7 


16.8 


31.6 


10.6 


13.8 


10.6 


6.3 


8.1 


4.2 


8.8 


6.1 


8.6 


16.1 


30.8 


10.8 


13.9 


11.0 


6.1 


4.4 


4.4 


8.8 


6.0 


3.1 


16.8 


19.6 


10.0 


12.9 


11.3 


6.0 


6.3 


4.4 


8.8 


6.2 


8.0 


17.6 


18.9 


9.8 


18.8 


10.6 


4.9 


6.1 


4.8 


8.8 


6.8 


8.6 


18 1 


18.4 


9.7 


14.0 


10.0 


4.8 


4.7 


4.8 


8.4 


6.1 


8.8 


18.7 


17.6 


9.4 


14.6 


9.6 


4.7 


4.6 


4.1 


8.3 


4.9 


4.6 


18.8 


17.0 


10.0 


14.7 


9.1 


4.6 


4.0 


4.0 


8.2 


4.9 


6.3 


18.7 


16.4 


10.8 


149 


8.8 


4.3 


8.8 


4.0 


8.1 


4.9 


4.9 


18.8 


16.9 


10.6 


16.8 


8.6 


4.2 


3.6 


4.0 


3.0 


4.8 




18.0 


16.4 


10.3 


16.2 


8.4 


4.0 


8.6 


4.1 


3.0 


4.9 




17.8 


16.4 


10.0 


14.7 


8.2 


8.9 


8.4 


4.1 


2.9 


4.8 




17.9 


...... 


9.7 




8.2 


8.7 




4.1 




122.9 


94.0 


410.0 


684.4 


867.0 


898.2 


882.3 


184.0 


97.5 


112.9 


10.39 


4.0 


8.4 


18.2 


19.6 


11.8 


18.1 


10.7 


6.9 


3.3 


8.6 


8.4 



2.9 
3 8 
3.7 
3.5 
3.4 

3.4 
3.3 

2.1 
3.0 
3.6 

3.4 
3.8 
8.3 

3.8 
3.0 

1.6 
0.9 
0.1 
1.8 
FrntM 

Fraea 

FrMtt 
3.2 
3.9 
8.4 

7.0 
7.6 
7.1 
7.4 
6.8 
6.8 

88.6 



THi crr7 or st. i>oms. 101 

ABBtV AIiS AND DBPABTUBB8 OF STEAMBOATS AND BABGES,1901. 



mn. 


SET 


^ 


^-. 


MBrt. 


OUO. 


S 


iSS 


!^ 


Sa 


^I 






i 
:; 

a 

M 










i 

181 
1« 


1 
s 

u 


'S 

K,TeB 
U.e46 
91, Kit 

aim 

1 




















i 

IS 

s 

17 


a 

n 

1 


S 

i 


' "i 


•I 

T 

! 


















































«I 


m 


m 


" 


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«s 


l.ftU 


m 


41),J55 









IMl. 


BE' 


k; 


".ffi- 


M^. 


».. 


Obl* 


^t 


K?l 


.%V 






a 
u 
w 












i 

las 

IM 

iS 

41 


10. 4M 

If 


















M 

g 

n 

s 
s 


7 

> 

S 


1 


8 

1 

1 














fc::::::::::::::::-::::::: 




































•!;S 














low 


sm 


ew 


111 


a 


ei 






1,B1I 


Me, in 



ABRITAL8 AND DSPABTUBES FOB TWXNTV YEARS. 



102 



TRADB AND OOMHERCB OF 



SHIPMENTS BY SOUTHERN BOATS DURING 1901. 



ARTICLES. 



By 

New Orleans 
Boats. 



BvMemphls 

A way Point 

Boats. 



By Tennessee 
Rirer 
Boats. 



Apples, Bbls 

Ale and Beer, Pkgs 

Bagging, Pieces 

Barley, Sacks 

Barley, Ba 

Barbed Wire, Lbs 

Butter, Lbs 

Bran, Sacks 

Cattle, Head 

Com. Sacks 

Com in Bnlk, Bu, 

Com Meal, Bbls 

Cotton, Bales 

Cotton Seed Meal, Tons. . 

Bggs,Pkgs 

Flonr,Bbls 

Hay, Tons 

Horses and Moles, Head. 

Hogs, Head 

Hominy and Grits, Bbls . 

Pork, Bbls 

Hams, Lbs 

Meats, Lbs 

Lard, Lbs 

Malt, Sacks 

Oats, Sacks 

Oats in Bulk, Bu 

Onions, Pkgs 

Potatoes, Pkgs 

Rye, Sacks 

Rye in Bulk, Ba 

Sheep, Head 

Tallow, Lbs 

Tobacco, Hhds 

Tobacco, Manfd. Lbs , 

Wheat, Sacks 

Wheat in Bulk, Bu 

Whiskey, Bbls 

White Lead, Lbs 

Mdse. and Sundries, Pkgs, 



Total Tons. 



646 
609 



1,480 

100 

82,008 



16,010 

686,706 

26,647 



49,095 

867 

88 



6,022 

499 

46,740 

246,000 

118,636 



680 

23,677 

2,769 

102 



466,616 

11,646 

2,290 

86 

7,627 



12,021 



20,711 
2,660 
1,460 



72,080 



16 
266 



8j800 



1,828,244 

76 

28,400 

67,678 



94,018 



296 

62 

892,690 

1,881,980 

486,876 

8,042 

26,640 



621 

4,889 

587 



706 



1 
106,236 
6 



1,717 
266,646 
789,849 



64,475 



81 
2,666 
1,117 



42,990 

700 

600 

60 

10,461 



11,066 



9,028 
478 
188 



16 



78,078 
606,684 
117,196 



2,946 



67 
376 
190 



26,463 

85 



28 

88,290 

117,486 



11,711 



TH» onr o» ST. Loms. 



SUIPMEIfTS BY BABGE LDTES TO NEW ORLEA2H8 DUBIN6 1901. 



104 TRADE AKD COMMIftOB OF 



RIVER ACaOENTS, 1901. 



April 19. The steamer Will J. Cnmmings sunk in the Tennessee Hiver. 

Loss, 110^000. 

Mat 12. The steamer City of Paduch struck a snag and snnk near Grand 

Tower. Loss to boat and cargo, $26,000. Four lives lost. 

August 20. The steamer City of Gtolconda was wrecked by the high 

winds in the Ohio Biver. Loss to boat and cargo $4,000. 
Sixteen lives lost. 

Sbptbmbkr 4. The steamer Gk>ld Dnat was destroyed by Are in the Ohio 

Biver. Loss $30,000. 

November 22. The steamer Bees Pritchard struck a snag and sunk in the 

Lower Mississippi Biver. Loss $10,000. 

November 22. The steamer Fritz struck and sunk in the Lower IDssis- 

sippi Biver. Loss $20,000. 

Deoembbr 19. The steamer Kanawha Bell was carried over the locks in 

Kanawha Biver by the high winds and wrecked. Loss 
$6,000. Bight colored deck-hands were drowned. 

Dbobmbbr 26. The steamer Sun was destroyed by Are at Memphis. 

Four lives lost. Value of boat and cargo $10,000. 



THX dTT OF ST. LOUIS. 



105 



FRSIGHT BATB8 TO NBW ORLEANS BY BADGES DUBINQ 

1808, 1899, 1900 AKD 1901. 

noiir and Meal, Pork, ^^d^iSte"* ^U\ 

perbbl. per 100 lbs. ^,iSr^.' periofibe. 

10 10 10 nn 

ao 10 10 15 

1«0 ID 10 10 15 

1901 ao 10 10 16 



MONTHLY BATE OF FREIGHT ON BULK GBAIN BY BARGES 
FROM ST. LOmS TO NEW ORLEANS FOR SEVEN YEARS. 

ON CORN; FEB BUSHEL. 



Mouth. 



1896. 


1886. 


1897. 


1896. 


1899. 


i9oa 


OU. 


OtB. 


0t6. 


Ote. 


OtB. 


Ota. 


7 




6 








6 












6 












5 












^H 












4K 












5 












5H 




4H 








53i 












• 




« 








« 




• 








7 


5 






41 





1901. 



March 

^rtl 

W 

Jane 

Jaly 

Ailfliat . . . . 
Beptomber. 
October.... 
Not ember • 
December.. 



Ota. 



Wheat. JK to K cent per buahel more than Corn. *F. O. B. New OrleanB. 

During September, October and November, 1804, and October and Norember, 
1196^ narlgatlon by barftetf was suspended on acoount of extreme low water, also 
daring October, Norember and December, 1897, and 14 days In December, 1888, and 10 
days in Jannary, 1890, and closed again January 80th till March 1st, closed from 
December 80th. 1890, to January 18th, 1900, and 34 days between January aoth and 
March 4th, 1900; 1901, during February; 1901-1903, December 16th to January 15th. 

AVERAGE RATE OF FREIGHT ON GRAIN BY RIVER FROM 

ST. LOUIS TO NEW ORLEANS. 





TAAm. 


In Backs by Steamboat. 


Wheat in Bulk by Barges. 




Cents per 100 lbs. 


Cents per bushel. 


IM 


10 

10 

10 

10 

15 

14.65 

13.60 

17.14 

17.64 

16.87 

16.38 


4.96 F.O.B..N. O. 


UM. 


4.36 


rmV. '„'..'.'.],... 


4.60 


1898^ , 


4.60 


1817 


4.96 


1898 , 


6 


UK. 


5.96 


UN 


6.89 


1118 


6.66 


1899 


6.60 


1891 ^ 


6.88 



RATES ON FRSIGHT TO MEMPHIS AND VICKSBURG 

DURING 1901. 



Meat, 
per 100 lbs. 

lb Nemphlfl; O. L 8 

To Memphis. L. C. L* 10 

To Yicksburg, O. L. and L. O. L. 15 



Grain, 
per 100 lbs. 

8 
10 
15 



Flour, 
per bbl. 

16 
38 
80 



Heal, in Backs, 
per 100 lbs. 

8 
10 
17X 



106 



TRADB AND OOMMEBOB OF 



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4 « <■ « « « 

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■ <• « 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 107 



FOREIGN GRAIN AND FLOUR TRADE. 



Foreign shipments of Flour and Grain from the United States compare 
with preyions years as follows : 

Wheat, Ck)m, Oats, Flour, 

bu. bn. biL bbls. 

1901 179.301,418 103,809,080 36,939. .048 19,8S3,880 

1900 99,079,168 190,886,489 83,180,643 18,683,609 

1899 109,636,161 306,186,388 41,066,083 18,717,161 

1898 148,068,894 305,894,389 49,888,913 16,616,405 

Shipments from Galveston and New Orleans for the past three years 
compare as follows : 

WHEAT— Bu. CORN— Bu. 

New Orleans. GalTeston. New Orleans. Oalveston. 

1901 34,410,979 16,714,465 13,883,139 

1900 8,069,677 11,188.066 33,408,468 8,078,686 

1890 11,662,813 16,718,400 21,989,686 7,049,697 

1898 13,796,648 11,288,378 30,785,668 5,665,600 

Exports of grain from St. Louis were 8,122^973 bushels wheat, 2,162,798 
bushels com, 215^268 bushels oats and 5,060 bushels rye, of which 
1,828,244 bushels wheat and 535,705 com went by riyer yia New Orleans, 
the balance going by rail to Atlantic and Gulf Ports. The bulk of the 
wheat by rail went to the Seaboard for export, destination not given. Of 
the com 561,994 bushels went to Cuba and 67,245 bushels to Mexico. In 
addition to the amount exported yia St. Louis 10,158,000 bushels were 
shipped by St. Louis exporters, direct from country points to the Seaboard, 
making the total export of grain for the year 20,664,099 bushels. 

Exports of flour show quit€ an increase being 1,189,321 bbls. against 
1,061,951 bbls. the previous year. Cuba took 181,318 bbls., Central America 
11,250 bbls. and Porto Bico 925 bbls., while the larger part went to 
European countries, as will be seen by reference to the table of exports on 
next page. 

All export flour is shipped in sacks and is reduced to barrels for con- 
venience of comparison. 

SHIFMSNTS OF BUI<K GRAIN. BT RIVEB, FROM ST. LOUIS TO N£W OBLBANS 

FOB FOUBTBBX TBAB8. 

Tmk. WlMttttbiM. Conutafl. Bja,ba0. 0«to,biu. Totalf. 

1901 1,838,344 586,706 3,868,949 

1900 169.341 3,871,870 «78,d49 8,814,160 

18B9 384,720 1,748.617 249,996 2,388,386 

UM 8,747,904 8,0(i6,488 S1S,780 683,506 6,600,707 

1897 1,191,083 8,827,968 190,968 266,879 6,476,842 

18B6 1,7SS,66S 8,868,087 486,668 10,527,206 

1896 488,614 1,261,808 1,690,417 

1,042,198 1,268,810 40,000 2.346,606 

8,710,860 8,2U8,80S 75,480 7.079.808 

6,149,708 8,228.646 86,687 8,414,940 

Ml 6,940,216 1,482,781 46,600 8,468 646 

Un 1,409,440 8.n7,848 80,960 10,217,244 

im 1,661,960 12,898,966 17,482 89,707 14,168,046 

UBB 1,947,908 6,844,048 160,684 7268,678 



106 



TBADK AKD OOMMIBOB OF 



FOBEIGN SHIPMENTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN 



Ok Through Bills or Ladiho pbom St. Locs bt Eailboax>8 

▲MB BlYBB 

Fob thb Ybab 1901. 



Dbstinatiok. 


Flour, 
barrels 


Wheat, 
bushels. 


Corn, 
bushels. 


Oats, 
bushels. 


bushes 


To England 


819,888 

62,961 

276 

172,222 

96,266 

8,299 

6,880 

26,867 

126,420 

24,682 

4,172 

4,619 

911 

6,680 

8,707 

8,866 

460 

181,818 

11,260 










** Germ&nT 










" Russia 










*• Scotland 










" Ireland 










** Torkey 










" Denmark 










** Norway 








* * 


''Holland 










" Belgium 




1,076 






«* Italy 








" Spain 










" Nova Sootia 










" Sweden 










" Finland 










" Newfoundland 










" Canada 










" Cuba 




661,994 


208,727 




** Central Amenoa 






«• Mexico 




67,246 


6,291 




'' South America 


•• 

6,904 
280 
926 
220 

186,626 






" South Africa 








" Porto Rico 


••••••••• 








** Iceland 


i 






• • • • • • 


** Seaboard for Export 


6,294,729 


1,006,779 


1,260 


.5,060 


Total for Export by Rail 

Total for Export by Riyer. . . . 


1,189,821 

• • • • • ■ • 


6,294,729 
1,828,244 


1,627,098 
686,706 


216,268 


6,060 


Totals 


1,189,821 


8,122,978 


2,162,798 


216.268 


RIM\ 







TH« OITY OP 8T. LOtTIS. 



■XFOBTB or WHBAT WROX THH 1TinTU> B 
Am t«ported by the Bnreftn ot SUtlMlCB. WuhlDgton. 



KXPOBIS or OOBK ntOM 1 



IXrOBT8 or OATS rBOH THE DMITXD STATU. 





2S,864,»M 
4,H>e.8M 

fi,Tr2,M4 

i,«a.s«s6 




a,81&,444 

m 

6^743,988 
l,68e,lM 


IS 


Bal'imore 








^.Im 




SStei::':::;::;:::::::: 




S,ZTfl,42e 


B,08*;8oe 


4,368,871 


bIIom 






Total buibela 


M.8SS.919 


41,08S,D83 


2G,B2e.018 



TRADE AMD COUUERCS OF 



Ab Reported by Chief Oraln InsimctoT. 



TO 


UDl. 
Wliert. 


Coral 


Oata: 


BarleT. 




1, to 

l. i 

s 


;: 1 




i.iM.iil 












gw^:;;:;::::::::::::::::::::::::::;; 






















K 












Total biuhe 

Total boahe 


fclBOl 

».l^ 


s 

S.Bti 


1 

i 


IS 


1,BM,400 
1,12S,17T 
a08US 
I.SIO.IM 


iiiiaoi 




















sSSs 


iM-EE-^-iE 





Aa Reported by Ohlef Qrtda Iiupector. 



TO 


whSit. 


Oom'. 


_ 


11 






































|gS-..-: 






SI 




T^b^^ 






8.0«,W7 





THI OITX or 8T. LODIB. 



iVIRAOB FDBUSHED BATES OF FREIGHT OB WHEAT IM CENTS, 

FKS BtraHBL BY STBAHBB FBOH ST. LOITIS TO LITEBFOOL 

VIA NEW 0BLBAN8, 1901 AMD 1900. 



ATBBaQB FDBLISHBD BATES OF FBEIQHT CM WHEAT IN CENTS, 

FEB BDSHEL FBOH ST. LODIS TO UYEBPOOL TIA BAIL 

TO NEW TOBE DDBINQ 1901 AND 1000. 





fei-iiS.. 


"■^l-^'-l 


TobUlit.L.10 




11 

3.80 
3 to 


It.SO 

il 

10.60 

W.su 

10.60 
IS.W 


1 


1 

r 


i 

i 

i 
i 
























't^^- 






IIS** 




ruMiiii 





BoMSLMT BnujmB nOM Hmw OBUjU» 


ATBKMI a&ra OF ruiSBT OH Whut 

PIB BdIBBL BT BTBAJOn FUM NlW 

TomKioLiTBBPOOL DDUra 1901 akdUOO. 


MiMk. 


BatolaCaulB. 


BMtinOmta. 


Month. 


ItaMlDOoili. 


KMeinCuiti. 












M. 


'1 


Si"'"' 

ID toll 


s^ 


K 

1 


1 



112 



TRADE AND OOHICBBOS OF 



AVERAGE PUBLISHED BATES OF FREIGHT ON GRAIN IN 

CENTS. 

FBOM St. LOUI9 TO LiTVBPOOL TIA RlYEB TO NbW ORLEANS AND VIA 

Rail to New York. 





To New Orleant by Biyer. 


On Wheat 
to New York 

by rail, 
per lOOlba. 


To liyerpool. 


Tsar. 


OnOnln 

Id aks. 

per 100 lbs. 


On Wheat 

in bulk 
per buBhel. 


ViaNewOrleana, 

On Wheat 

per bo. 


Via New York, 

On Wheat 

perba. 


1881 


20 
90 


6 

6 5-lS 


82 






1888 


22 2-8 


28X 


1888 


17X 


6K 


88 


10 7-12 


27 


1884 


14 


65-« 


26 


14 7-12 


«13^ 


1885 


15 


62-5 


221.7 


15 1-0 


20K 


1886 


16 


«K 


20 


16 1-6 


24 


1887 


18X 


6 


82 2-15 


16 


24H 


1888 


15 


6>^ 


20K 


15 1-6 


22.05 


1880 


17.08 


5.06 


2SK 


17 1-8 


24jr7 


1890 


15.66 


6.68 


«7K 


14 1-8 


21.48 


1881 


16J8 


6.87K 


20 


15 8-4 


28^ 


1802 


16.87 


6.60 


26.62 


14 


21 


1888 


17.54 


6.56 


28.60 


14.71 


21.72 


1804 


17.14 


5.80 


24.78 


11.60 


18.71 


1806 


18.00 


5.05 


28.57 


12 1-8 


18.88 


1896 


14.54 


5.00 


28.00 


18.50 


10-67K 


1807 


10.88 


4.88 


28.64 


12.80 


20.88 


1886 


10.00 


4.50 


22.26 


14.24 


20.82 


1800 


10.00 


4.60 


21.06 


12.88 


17.88 


1900 


10.00 


•4.26 


10.88 


14.64 


18.41 


1001 


10.00 


•4.26 


19.88 


9.48 


14.08 



•P. O. B. New Orleans. 



THB OITY' OV R. I.01IIB. 113 



COTTON. 



St. Louis, September Ist, 1901. 

The cotton crop of the United States for the cotton year, ending August 
3l6t, 1901 y was 10,383,422 bales, an increase over the preyious year of 
about 10%. 

The gross receipts at St. Louis were 973,497 bales, an Increase of over 
21%. Net receipts were 239,628 bales, an increase of oyer 55%. 

This statement shows a gratifying increase in the cotton business of 
St. Louis, especially in the net receipts, which show the amount handled 
in this city. A notable feature of the year was the continued increase in 
the amount of round-bale cotton handled, which amounted to 5,723 large 
and 280,057 small bales, all of which was handled here and was therefore 
net receiptB. 

Mr. Henry G. Hester, Secretary New Orleans Cotton Exchange, makes 
Uie following statement as to yalue of this and preyious crops : 

^'On the basis of middling, which represents the ayerage of the crop, a 
fair ayerage of price for the United States is 9.83 cents per pound, which 
compares with 7.65 cents for last year and 4.88 for 1898-99, the highest 
price touched during the season haying been 11.12 and the lowest 7.56. 

^^The ayerage commercial yalue of the crop is $47.63 per bale, against 
$38.65 last year, $25.08 the year before and $28.62 in 1898-99. 

*The total yalue of the crop compares with the preyious flye years, as 
follows: 

YALUE OF COMMBRCIAL CHOP. 

1900-1901 10,883,422 J|494,667i»49 

1889-1900 9,486,416 868,784,820 

1898-99 11,274,840 282,772,987 

1897-98 11,199,994 820,662,606 

1896-97 8,767,964 821,924,884 

1896-96 7,167,846 294,096,847 

1894-96 9,901,261 297,087,630 

^^This shows an increase in yalues oyer last year of $130,782,729, and oyer 
the crop of 1898-99 (which was 891,418 bales greater), of $211,794,562. 
When it is considered that the two past crops sold in the cotton States for 
$858,352,369, their importance in bringing prosperity to the South may be 
fully appreciated." 

The ayerage weight of St. Louis standard bales was 511 pounds, and 
ayeraffe yalue per bale $42.78. The lowest quotations for middling was 
7 11-16 in May and June, and the highest 10^ in September. The largest 
receipts were from Arkansas, but tne largest increase was from Texas, 
being 383,940 bales as compared with 185,961 the preyious year; Oklahoma 
contributed 35,963 bales. 

The amount exported was larger than usual. England took 190,307 
bales, Germany 102,205 bales, nearly three times as much as preyious year, 
wliile the shipments to Japan were 7,677 bales, as against 1,476 bales the 
year before. About 5,000 bales were consumed in the city mills in the 
manufacture of cloth and batting. 

The stock in warehouse at the end of the year was 34,378 standard bales. 



114 



TBADS AKD OOlOaBOK OF 



TABLE SHOWINO THE OB08S AND NET RECEIPTS Or OOTTOK AT ST. LOUIS. 



BlASON. 



Grou 


Through 


Receipts, 
bales. 


Shipments* 
Dales. 


987.487 


788,869 


803,769 


648,696 


969,969 


814,880 


899,229 


771,712 


670,418 


466,616 


666,688 


474,796 


926^286 


781,694 


635,421 


462,082 


474,024 


801,186 


728,628 


426,787 


706,469 


400,464 


688,910 


811,828 


684,572 


828,619 



Net 

Receipts, 

bales. 



1900-1901. 

1899-1900. 

1896-99.... 

1897-98... 

1896-97.... 

1896-96.... 

1894-96.... 

1898-94.... 

1892-98.... 

1891-92.... 

1890-91.... 

1889-90.... 

1888-89.... 



289,628 
164,074 
176,629 
127,617 
114,897 
90,887 
144,691 
168,889 
172,888 
297,891 
806,016 
227,087 
260,968 



Note.— Since season 1886-99 light weight round bales hare been counted as 
equlralent to half -bales, and the total giren as standard bales. 

MONTHLY RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS FOR SEASON 1900-1901. 



Months. 



LooaL 



Through. 



TotaL 



Shipments. 



September, 1900 ^ 

Ootobsr. 

NoTember 

Deeember < 

January, 1901 

February 

Maroh 

^::::::::::;::::;::::;::::::: 

Jone. 

July. 

August 

Total bales 

Deduct tor H round bales 

Net total, standard bales.. 



87 

U6 

88 

64 

27 

16 

14 

7 

ft 

8 

8 



879 
140 



.768 
,060 

,971 
.021 
,001 
,991 

,918 
,069 

_???_ 

,666 

,028 



289,628 



20.816 

U9,10S 

171,701 

168,974 

66,418 

45,160 

86,688 

24,386 

26,945 

84,889 

26,601 

_10^408^ 

788,868 



738,869 



67,960 

286,870 

354,781 

218,442 

94,889 

60,171 

60,689 

83,826 

81,468 

88,367 

28,680 

10,641 



1,118,625 
140,028 



973,497 



16,274 

188,919 

189 790 

178.488 

158,766 

65.475 

68,662 

41,162 

44,594 

88.277 

59,931 

36,300 



1,081.898 
140,038 



991,870 



BBCEEPTS OF COTTON BT BACH BOUTB FOE THREE COTTON TBABS. 



Routes. 



1900-01. 



1899-1900. 



l998~9v. 



St. LouiStlron Mountain & Southern R. R 

Missouri Pacific R. R 

Mobile & Ohio R. R 

St. Louis & San Francisco R.R 

St. Louis & Southwestern R. R 

Illinois Centra] R. R 

Missouri, Kansas ft Texas R. R 

Chicago A Alton R. R. ) West) 

Wabash R.R. (West) 

Keokuk A Northwestern R. R. and C. B. ft Q. R. R 

Louisville ft Nashville R. R 

Lower Mississippi River Boats 

Cumberland and Tennessee River Boats 

Total Bales 

Deduct tor light bales 

Net total 



465,634 

■*58i876 

118,102 

71,408 

68,364 

809,683 



16,696 
5,261 
8,491 
1,216 



1,113,626 
140,028 



973,497 



896,589 
1,682 

108,664 

113,972 
79,294 
40,533 

137,949 

487 

1,699 

6,431 

6,933 

260 



880,361 
77,488 



803,769 



607,780 

iooisTi 

118,106 

4ii,833 

86,771 

313,865 

60 

999 

1,438 

8,439 

10,337 

1,254 



1,038,873 
88,414 



THB OtTT a 



STATEMENT SHOWINQ THE SOURCES OP MPPLY OF 
COTTON FOR FOUR YKABS. 



a fanUoTj.. 



weii 

WMl 

ie,7BS 

BIS 

et,Tii 



JBatf. 

371,681 
38,SH 



S.SU 



Total Bal#a azpoitcd 

Btalpped to points Id United States... 
Total etalpiii«nta, Bala*.. . 

Dednetfor h&lf round bales 

Net sblpmenta standsfd bales 

SmPHEKTfl OF COTTON BT BACH SODTK FOB TBBBB COTTON TEARS. 



I'.m 


l.tTB 


U,977 


tij.m 


•79.087 


S:S 


'•JSlS 




M 









116 



TRADE AVD OOMMSROB OF 



SHIPMENTS TO UNITED STATES PORTS AS REPORTED 
BY ST. LOUIS COTTON EXCHANGE. 



Bales. 

To Boston 131,269 

Providence 5,228 

New York 91,187 

Philadelphia 8,946 

Baltimore 6,996 

Pensaoola 12,T71 

Since 1886-99 half round bales hare been reduced to the equivalent of Standard 
bales. 



(t 
u 



Bales, 

To Newport News 17,922 

" Louisville 948 

" New Orleans 4,794 

<* Portland, Mahie 5,886 

" Paoiflo Coast 4,801 



BBPORT OF OOTTOK OOMFBE88KD AT 8T. LOUI8. 



Year ending Receipts. 

Aug. 81. bales. 

1901 92,281 

1900 67,597 

1899 124,906 

1898 12i»,605 

1897 109,297 

1896 111,617 

1895 161,219 



Shipments. 


Stock. 


bales. 


bales. 


66,666 


84,878 


111,668 


8,808 


97,219 


46,962 


108,205 


25,077 


119,493 


7,677 


100,888 


17,878 


171,451 


7,549 



OOMMEROIAL OROP BT STATES, Df THOUSANDS OF BALES, AS REPORTED 
BY THE NEW ORLEAITS COTTON EXCHANGE. 



1000-190L 1899-1900. 



1897-8. 



Alabama 1,000 

Arkansas . 762 

Florida 45 

Georgia 1,295 

Louisiana 719 

Mississippi 960 

North Carolina, eto 542 

South Carolina 911 

Tennessee, eto 850 

Texas and Indian Territory 8,809 

Total crops— bales 10,888 



1,044 


1,159 


750 


884 


50 


70 


1,809 


1,586 


625 


590 


1,280 


1,622 


561 


688 


921 


1,012 


856 


414 


2,951 


8,656 



9,486 



11,275 



VALUE OF COMMERCIAL CROP. 

Bales. 

1900-1901 10,888,4M 

1899-1900 9,486.416 

1896-99 11,274,840 

1897-981 11,199,994 

1896-97 8,757,964 



Value. 

494,867,5^ 
88.1,784,820 
1382,772,987 
820,652,806 
821,924,884 



THX om OF ST. Loms. 117 

TABLE SHOWING THE HIGHEST AND LOWEST PBICES OF 
Htoduhq Oomm each uoena vob four tkabs. 



1900-01. i8BS-isoa. isa 

Aveiue weight per bale lbs. lbs. II 

United States standard bales BIO.K B04.U SI. 

St. LoQla Becelpta " " fill 608 t1 

" roond " SOO (IS K 

•• •• half ■' 2Mia3TO »)@1TD 17 

ATeraKeTBlDeperbaleSt.LonlBBecelpts, I8B»-190(I,SIS.U; I90O-O1. UMt. 

THK CHOP or THB CNITED STATES, IM BALIS, rOB 66 TXABS. 



GENEEAL CHOP MOVEMENT, SEASONS 1900-01 AND 1899-1900. 

From ' New Orleaoi Ootion Exchange Baport. 

CONSimPTIOi!! UNITBO STATES. 

isoo-oi. isM'imo. 

Bale*. Balei. 

Total Crop United Statu 10,B8S,U1 l.tUMt 

atoehatPortr-— '— ' * 



. >ortabegtniiliig at year bs,U3 

Tcitu, Som,t~ lOitTlitU - 

IxpOTted dnriDK rear fl,(M8,TG8 i 



»BMto(^ada '"^'^ 



It at EMllTeij Porta ., 



Total takliun for oonaumplioD, U. 8... 

Of wbiob— Taken by aplimen In Bon 

State*, Total I.eXl.Ml 

Tak«D by Koitliera (pinner* l,9eT,eiO 



y ooioaRGi or 



STATEMXirr SHOWING THE ENTIBE 



By- 


£2Si. 


i!.r 


^Sl 


1 


5Si. 


■SSK- 




S4S,§3t 
4ST,5« 

SSI 

B.SIO 

■'!:: 

i,"aw; 

SO.VTD 
16;0M 

Bil 

t»7,TM) 

'IS 


s.<>ei,6« 

i.wi.tie 

IS'** 

Ma;i9(i 

«;«« 

earn 

W,SM 
MO.SM 

2aa884 

'i!M.'B33 


1,668.190 
tat, WO 


1, n 


28.500 

"u.m 


2.m 


r^LSS'SutS"" "-!.■■.::::: 




7M 

'"iiiJso 

760 

"id^Mo 

17, 61.3 

'ffi 

s 

I46,»0 

'•iff, 

1,006 














BU.MI 


LS 


IJ7,0W 


KKl»i-:a,«,i''r":> 




1,60( 

IM.W 

SI 

CI,I»S,WD 

11 

li'.SU 

"iia'.m 


1. M 

x 

I. x 
w 

l| N 

■■«6:ooo 




SrASSike" 


'mM 


Bt. LlfSeokuk & N. w/rb:!;: 

Obi!trc^b.*TBiin.SlVBn 

DrlTsn and Eipress. 


ZS7,7W 
S7»,S00 


ToUl Beoeiptt 




u.aeo.Bu 


M.9«,080 


it,T»,i3a 


B8e,8IO 


1,1H9.9BS 


IiiSMire,Jan[iUTltt,19tl 


s,en.u« 


-MaiiflB 


19,MI 


1],68> 


76, IM 




«,7«.W0 


i8,8n,iei 


U.lSll.llH 


1B.7«,«1 


m.tK 









THB OITT OF ST. IiOUIB. 



119 



MOVEMEIirr IN FLOUB AND GRAIN FOB 1901. 



smpiaBNTS. 



By- 


Flour, 
Bbls. 


Wheat, 
Bush. 


Com, 
Bush. 


Oats, 
Bush. 


Bush. 


Bariey 
Bush. 


Obiomgo A Alton R B. (Mo. DlT) 
Missouri Paoiflo B R. 


969 

19,020 

7,280 

2,660 

820 

16,006 

81,-269 

890,644 

406,794 

812,128 

83,142 

206,882 

871,116 

66.880 

164,4*27 

804,846 

81,062 

70,880 

896,148 

66,814 

2.660 

2,897 

8,776 

69,806 

8i$2 

66 

9,028 


1,000 
6,400 

"'ii',m 

146 

76,823 

2,199,491 

622,446 

1,708,562 

682,860 

1,717.485 

1,702,184 

108,666 

2,818,270 

1,609,866 

188,150 

1,480,806 

8:i7,0l6 

124,966 

87.690 

684 

1,828,869 

28 


6,^90 

168,880 

738,090 

114,818 

19,600 

928,881 

678,872 

1,877,480 

«,7B7,521 

3,086,824 

1.638.622 

8,466,609 

1,601,416 

899,880 

8,860 

279,795 

276,695 

29,466 

168,920 

6.276 

4,980 

88,080 

800 

608,316 


"888*,026 

210,760 

48,805 

68.240 

1,106,686 

806,436 

1,629,676 

2,047,895 

106,290 

1 110,860 

2,146.240 

267,666 

20,960 

4,886 

14,710 

25.870 

11,060 

6.076 

1,060 

986 

1,826 

2,890 

488.860 

1,746 

l,-260 

14,726 


8.805 


880 


St Louis and San Franoisoo B.B 


21,610 
14,184 




Wabash B.B. (West) 




St. LoaiH, Kanne City A Col. R. B 




M Iflflonrl. Kaiis 19 A T^-xf^ R. R, 


87,681 

1,107 

8,019 

84,920 

171.602 

80,116 

1,210 

114.726 

1A,768 




St I/onis Stinthwestvro B. B . . . . 
St Louis, Iron Mount.A 8o.BJft. 

niinois Central R, K 

Loul8Tllle.Hendeison & 8t.L.B.B 

LouisTiUe A NashrUle B. B. 

Mobile A Ohio B B 


43,986 
2,986 


Southern R. B 


84,296 


Baltimore A Ohio S. W. B. B.... 
Chloa^ A Alton B.B. 


6,642 


Cl4*ye.''Cin., (;hics«o A 8t.L.B. B. 
Vandalla A Terre aaute R. B. . . . 


24,766 

6,362 

46 






Wabash R. B. East) 




T»lsdo. 8'> LonU A Western R. R 




Chicago, Peoria A St. Louis R.R. 

Chieago. Burl. A Qalnoy R. R. 

St. Louis, Keokuk ft N. W. R. R. 

Upper Mississippi Rlyer 

liower " 
Illinois <* 


• • • ■ • ■ ■ ■ 

2,686 

6,967 

66 

1,208 

23 

662 

428 




261 

238 


Missouri « 




12 


Ohio, (yumb A Tenn. RiTors 


191 


31,368 




Driven and EIzDresB 


















Total Shipments 


2,961,668 

• •••••> 

718,096 
00,782 


17,012,659 
6.160,268 
3.'666i244 


17,718.666 

1,097,492 
1,864,026 
1,010,046 


10,611,306 

800,000 

4,897,196 

88,971 


490,617 

18,760 

79,896 

114,888 


92.201 


Ground in City Mills 




City consumption 


1.919,608 


Stoek on hand Deo. 81, 1901 


3,429 


Total niov*w»«n*t, , .,r, .. ,, ... 


8,740,880 


26,888,161 


21,180,219 


16.747,471 


606,486 


2,016,188 





TXADB ABS OOHUBOB Of 



BECEIPT8 OF LEADING ABTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF EACH 
WEEK FOR THE YEAB 1901. 



THE OITT or BT. IiOUlB. 



BBCEIFTS OF LEADINO ABTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF EACH 
WEEK FOB THE YEAR 1901— Continued. 



TBASB AHD OOKWtBOB Of 



SHIPHENTS or LEADma ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF 
EACH WEEK FOB THE TEAfi IBOl. 



TK> OITT or 8T. LOUU. 



SUIPUENTS or LEADING ABTICLES TO THE CLO&R OF EACH 
WEEK FOB THE YEAJt 1901— Continaed. 



m 



TRADE AND OOMHBBOS OF 



COMPARATIVE BUSINESS IN LEADING ARTICLES AT 
ST, LOUIS FOR PAST FOUR YEARS. 



ABTI0LS8. 



« 



« 



mour, reoeiptB bbls. 

Hour, amount manniketarvd bbls. 

Wbeaty total receipta buih. 

Corn, «* " " 

Oata, '• '* " 

Bya, " *' '* 

Barley, ** " 

All Grain reeelyed (including 

flour reduced to wheat) 

Cotton, reoeipta balea. 

Bagging, manufketured yards. 

Hay, receipu tons. 

Tobacoo, receipts hhda. 

Lead, receipts in pigs 80 lb. . .pigs. 
Hog Product, total shipm'ts. .lbs. 

Cattle, receipts. head. 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Horses and Mules, receipts 

Lumber & Logs, '< ... feet . 

Shingles, ** ...pes. 

Lath, " ... " 

Wool, total receipts lbs. 

Hides, " « 

Sugar, received '< 

Molasses dacliilif filicMt) rec*d, galls . 

ColTee, received bags. 

« " pkgfl. 

Bice, receipts pl<g>- 

Coal, " tons. 

Kails, " kegs. 

Potatoes, receipts bush. 

Salt, " bbls. 

sacks. 



1896. 






it 



<c 



« 



« 



(» 



u 



... bush, in bulk. 

Butter lbs. 

Tons of freight of all kinds received 
and shipped ■ . 



1,868,088 

1,064,875 

14,240.262 

26,788.962 

10,726,880 

671,707 

2,001,911 

60,884,608 

986.193 

12,600,000 

127,263 

48,618 

2,188,012 

305,746.800 

796,611 

477,091 

2,136,828 

128,542 

964,468,110 

90,376,000 

9,547,860 

28,710,716 

58,716,130 

223,514,100 

8,838,830 

274,228 



127,275 

3,637,809 

572,847 

8,108,696 

388,120 

48,280 

451 640 

14,906,745 

20,948,887 



1889. 



1,614,815 

1,166,439 

10.428,168 

28,844,475 

12,606,835 

454,790 

1,409,474 

65,068,154 

1,028,192 

12,273,600 

176,820 

66,302 

1,611,112 

385,463,945 

766,032 

482,666 

2,147,144 

130,236 

l,148a24/)00 

58,621,000 

11,362,160 

28,491,625 

68,933,720 

204,322,225 

6,884,033 

290,700 



163,105 

4,362,714 

689,980 

8,463,660 

427,020 

73,765 

581,280 

13,729,188 

28,742,080 



1900. 



1,869,070 

1,846,069 

19,786,614 

25,618,410 

18,257,926 

475,866 

2,011,600 

69,665,619 

1,011,587 

9,975,655 

234,256 

44,914 

1,577,448 

389,946,456 

796,800 

434,133 

2,166,972 

169,082 

1,336^3.254 

81,119,250 

13,503,950 

17,000,790 

60,531,540 

216,982,465 

5,244,060 

860,871 

72,912 

119,616 

4,860,299 

560,110 

2,564,668 

238,105 

27,576 

776,160 

12,901,690 

26,813,840 



1901. 



2,170,648 

1,605.284 

20,860,805 

20,834,060 

15,728.180 

686,810 

1,989,998 

69.827.264 

918,828 

12,600.000 

261.182 

52,127 

1,800.285 

396,183,886 

969,881 

584,115 

2,236,946 

149,716 

1414,698,766 

158,601,260 

12,385,550 

25,877.110 

66,005,080 

209.688,510 

5,396,887 

874,675 

133,840 

173,580 

4,956,228 

688,200 

2,896,069 

315,285 

85,280 

772,800 

18,476,929 

28,758,664 



THX OITT 07 ST. LOUISi 



PUBLIC ELBVATOES. 





Oapcurlt; 


Addltloaal 






0»iM«dty 




Bulk Qraln. 


lor Packofcas. 


Oentnl B 


1, MO, ODD boah. 


105,000 Mcka. 


S4«8t.Loiito 


'mo 


000 




Adrance 


flOO 


000 " 




Union 


1,001 


000 




Venice 








UerchkntA' 


wc 


KM ■* 




Mtatalppl Villej 


1,S00 


000 




BorllnBton 


l.BOO 






Total, Jan. lat, KQ 


T,OOU 


000 Duhtl 


160,000 aacks. 


" - ■■ »1 


STDO 


000 


WO.* 




;; ;; ;; soo 


8,TO0 


000 


MI.OOO 






0.100 


■00 


Kt.OOO 






a.iwo 




MtOOO 






9.V 


000 


■60 000 




- ;; ;; ese 


1,160 


000 


lES.OOO 






1,100 


w 


Mt.OOO 




mm"."^ '-"1" I^"' 1* !,".*." ^^^!"',! 


1,59« 




MOOUO 






ilsoo 


000 


Kt.000 






11.800 


DUO 


t6t,D0a 




i»i;."'. :;;■;". ;."!'"":".:;; 


UISJO 




mooo 





PRIVATE KLEVATOBS. 



Toui MpKitr, iMS-ooo. 



126 TBADB AlffD OOKMttBOB OF 

SATES OF STORAGE ADOPTED BY ST. LOUIS PUBLIC 
ELEVATORS TO APPLY DURING 1902. 

On Wheats Com and Rye, 1 cent per bushel for first ten days or part 
thereof, and ^ of 1 cent per bushel, for each additional ten days or part 
thereof. • 

On Oats, >i^ of 1 cent per bushel for first ten days, or part thereof, and 
no charge for special bin, and ^ of 1 cent per bushel for each subsequent 
ten days or part thereof. 

On Barley, 1 cent per bushel for first thirty days, or part thereof, and 
1 cent per bushel for each subsequent thirty days, or part thereof. 

Special bin, )ii of 1 cent per bushel, except Oats. 

Dumping sacks from riyer )i of 1 cent per bushel. 

Dumping sacks from rail }iot 1 cent per bushel. 

Sack charges from river on Com, Wheat and Rye, 2}i cents per sack 
for the first five days, and 1 cent per sack for each subsequent ten days or 
part thereof. 

Oats from riyer, 4 cents per sack for first five days, and 1 cent per sack 
for each subsequent ten days, or part thereof. 

Wheat, Com and Rye from rail, 3 cents per sack for first five days, and 
1 cent per sack for each subsequent ten days, or part thereof. 

Oats, from rail, 5 cents per sack for first ten days, and 1 cent per sack 
for each subsequent ten days, or part thereof. 



FEES FOR DSrSPECTING AND WEIGHING GRAIN, ADOPTED 

BY THE MISSOURI STATE INSPECTION DEPARTldENT, 

AND IN FORCE JANUARY 1, 1902. 

Inspection and Weighing on arrival at Public Warehouse. .50 cents per car. 

Inspection and Weighing out of Public Warehouse 60 cents per car. 

Inspection at places other than a Public Warehouse 50 cents per oar. 

Inspection and Weighing into Public Warehouse from Boat, 

Barge or Wagon 50 cents per 1,000 bushels. 

Inspection and Weighing out of Public Warehouse into Boat, 

Barge or Wagon 60 cents per 1,000 bushels. 

Inspection and Weighing Grain in sacks Hot one cent per sack. 

Reinspection of Grain from Bins in Public Warehouses. .45 ots. per 1,000 bu. 
On all Grain inspected at places other than a Public Warehouse and 
unloaded at a Public Warehouse after the expiration of five [5] days from 
date of first inspection, there will be an additional fee of 50 cents per car. 



FEES ADOPTED BY ILLINOIS STATE INSPECTION 
DEPARTMENT AND IN FORCE JANUARY 1, 1902. 

For In-Inspbction.— 50 cents per oar load; 15 cents per wagon or cart 
load; 60 cents per 1,000 bushels from vessels; H oent per bag. 

For Out-Inspection.-- 50 cents per 1,000 bushels to vessels; 60 cents per 
car load to cars; 15 cents per wagon load to teams. 



THa OITT or ST. JMVIM. 127 



FLOUR. 



The millers of the winter wheat belt enjoyed during 1901 the advantage 
of working upon two exceptionally fine crops. The winter wheat of 1900, 
both hard and soft, was as nearly perfect as has ever been handled in this 
market, while competing spring wheat sections in the North and Northwest 
labored under the misfortune of a crop deficient in both quantity and qual- 
ity. The winter wheat of 1901 was ripened and harvested under the most 
favorable conditions possible; and no better grain has ever been ground. 
The spring wheat crop of 1901 was of similar high quality and the compe- 
tition between the two sections has been close and probably to some extent 
restricted profits. But there has been a substantial increase in the output 
of St. Louis mills, as well as in their export shipments and the financial 
results, if not exceptionally satisfactory, have been above the average of 
recent years. 

The figures of fiour manufactured by mills located at St. Louis and East 
St. Louis show a total of 1,606,234 for 1901 against 1,346,069 for 1900, and 
1,166,489 for 1899, an increase for the past year of 12% over 1900 and nearly 
30% over 1899. 

The receipts were the largest in the history of theExchange, while the 
sliipments were greater than any year, except 1882 and 1884. The total 
shipments were 2,961,663 and total receipts 2,170,648 barrels, an increase of 
17% and 16% respectively over the figures of 1900. 

The total shipments of fiour for export show an increase over 1900 of 
about 13%, and over 1899 of nearly 60%, the exact figures being as follows : 

Barrels. 

1901 1,189,321 

1900 1,061,961 

1899 748,878 

Upon classifying the details of different countries in groups the result 
shows that there has been a decrease as compared with 1900, of 7 % to U. K. 
ports, while to all other foreign destinations there has been a large increase 
within the year, varying from 13 % , which is the rate of increase of exports to 
Cuba, to an increase of nearly ten fold in the case of Mediterranean ports, the 
figures for 1900 being 776 barrels, while in 1901 there were shipped from 
this market for these ports 7,471 barrels. In the case of the West Indies, 
Central America and South America the shipments for 1901 aggregated 
17,164 barrels, while for 1900 they were only 6,922, the past year showing 
nearly three the times the business of 1900. 

The item of shipments to ** seaboard for export ^' includes a large pro- 
portion of sales which are made to points where the railroad companies 



128 TRADI AHD OOMiantOB OF 

are not authorized to iBsae through blllB of lading from the weBtem mills. 
The flour must be shipped to New York or some other seaboard point upon 
local bills of ladings and when loaded upon vessel the ocean bill of lading 
is taken. On this account the statistics here do not show the ultimate des- 
tination of 186,626 barrels which were shipped to the seaboard in this way 
during the year. These flgures show 14% more than double the aggregate 
of the preceding year, indicating a yery important increase in business to 
the markets referred to above requiring transshipment at the seaboard. 

In the domestic trade the conditions have been such that St. Louis 
millers have sold increased quantities in Southeastern markets and that 
they also have a fair trade once more in the Southwest. The shipments 
Southward for consumption were 993,538 barrels, as against 823,471 barrels 
the previous year. This is partly due to freight conditions, and in some 
measure to the exhaustion of the wheat supply in these two sections. 
During the latter part of the year 1901 the trade in both directions was of 
considerable volume and promised to be permanent, at least for the fljrst half 
of 1902, until the new crop in the Southern States is available to their local 
millers. Shipments to the Eastern States were also larger, amounting to 
over 100,000 barrels more than in 1900. 

St. Louis millers continue the manufacture of soft wheat flour under 
their old and well established brands, and at the same time are steadily in- 
creasing their output of hard wheat flour which is now accepted in the 
markets of the world as being In no way inferior to the best spring wheat 
brands from the Northwest. 

New lines of steamers from our Gulf ports to the West Indies, and 
South and Central American ports are being established. There have also 
been additions to the European lines of steamers from New Orleans. 

The shipments during the year by river and railroad Southward for ex- 
port and domestic trade were 1,794,154 barrels, while the Eastward move- 
ment was 1,128,388 barrels. During the first half of the year patents were 
quoted at $8.55@3.75, declining after harvest $3.40@3.55, and closing in 
December at $8.90@4.10. Extra Fancy ranged from $3.20@3.55 in January, 
to $2.90@8.15 in July and at the close was quoted at $3.50^93.65. 

Stocks held in store during the year were light, ranging from 50,000 to 
60,000 barrels, the amount on hand December 81st being 62,354 barrels. 



THK Cnr OF ST. LOUIS. 



FLOmt KANUTACTUBBD D( ST. LOCIS FOB THBKE TXABS. 





Name otHlll. 


111 


Bunli 
Uaoof. 
IWI. 


BairelB 


Burelt 
Manof. 

urn. 




Ptftnl's Roller A 


2,6I» 

1000 
i.'MO 

900 
600 

soa 

92& 


mi97 








3S0 


IH7 
298 

9tf 


■ss 

1 

n 


i 


lag 

1 












giS^sl'ibute: 














Se.';;;; 






























...» 




1M6 0B8 





















TLOCB ILUniFA<7nJBED BT HILLS OITTSIDE OP THE dTT OF ST. LODU 

HOT OVMXD OB TBB PBODUOT COHTBOU.ED BT CITI- 

ZBN8 OF ST. LOmS, HEUBBBS OF THB 



TBADE AND OOHKBBCE OF 



Te«r. 




ShlpmeuU. 
BbU. 


T8»r. 1 B^^^- 


Bbll. 


njT"- 












































































K I 






'■SS'Si 




,SI0JI65 




188» 1 




































































































































































.«MJ>Bt 













STOCK OF IXOUK IK STOBB DEC. SlST, FOR TVEHTT TXASB. 



TMt. 


Bbla. 


Tear. 


Bbll. 






1881 

r 
1 

1881 






i 
i 


SOD 

Me 
me 

z 


fa 

1 

100 

iS 
















iSS 


ss 















XONTHLT STOCK OF FLOUB IN STORE FOR IBRES TEARS. 



HODtb. 

JuiiUTy 1st 

FebnutTT lit.. 

KkrOhUt. 

April lit 

Stij bt 



bblB. bbis bbb. 



HOQlh. 

Jnlrlit 

AlUQBt UL 

ScpUmber lat.. 
October lit . . . . 
HovclBbeT 111.. 



THI CITY OP ST. LODIS. 



HOmHLT BSOBIPTS ASD BHtPlOIITS OT VLODB fOS TWO VMAMB. 







Month*. 


1901. 


1900. 


UoDthi. 


1901. 


1900. 




181,BW 

lu.no 

IM.Mt 

iTilom 
iie.iu 

SI;SS 


1M.470 
im.TK 

116,770 

loeloes 
iw.aait 
iis.aio 
iBerao 

lOTJlJO 
ISB.OUO 


Juiurr 


X1.U7 

II 

IMisSO 

Mi.iao 




^ 




1S2 
183 

ii 

lai 

181 










^"^ 






















Saii;;-:;;;;;;; 
































Total bbla 


J,1T0,5« 


i.au,om 


Total bbiB 


1.981 JBl 


i.saii.a(» 



KECEIPTB or TLODB BT CBOP TBAB. 



SO, '90, l.Mo. 
•0,'n, • ■>" 



SOOBOBS or SDPPLT, AND DmECTIOK Or SHIPICSNTS rOB TWO TIAB8. 







BT 


IBOl. 


1»I0. 


DiMoUon. 


1901. 


»00. 




61 

1,198 
10« 

778 


1 


•as 


SXKSSS::;::;: 
1?^?: :::::: 


■■a;| 


11.817 


ISSSrSSSiii.:: 
















Tout] bbla 


a,170,M8 


1,880.070 


Total bbU 


Z. 961.50 


1,US,1M 



132 TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



EXPORTS OF FLOUR FROM THE UNITED STATES. 



As reported byO. P. Austin, Ohief of Bareau of Statistics, Washington. 

New York 4,838,2U 

Boston and Charlestown 1,579,687 

PbUadelphia 1,614,426 

Baltimore 2,818,166 

I<ew Orleans 295,472 

San Francisco 818,724 

Ohicago 

Duluth and Superior 597,474 

Portland 111,984 

Paget Soon d 672 , 80O 

Portsmouth and Norfolk 85,948 

Willamette 820,684 

NewPortNewB 1,817,882 

Galveston. 174,981 

Mobile 58,956 

Other Points 226,297 

Total 16,515,405 18,717,161 18,682,509 19,852,880 



18B9. 


1900. 


1901. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


4,741,085 


4,487,806 


4.092,711 


l,6g,257 


1,606,175 


1,496,168 


2,101,435 


2,174,567 


2,237,527 


8,867,485 


8,003,787 


3,824,958 


462,464 


878,306 


688,222 


967,055 


1,180,145 


1,091,790 

13,675 

337,977 


860,869 


296,488 


698,816 


1,194*197 


l',i85i476 


847,998 


412,736 


478,529 


655.579 


838,610 


643,826 


1,726,128 


2,209,502 


2,757,889 


171.674 


191,468 


148,673 


129,127 


212,128 


2U0,909 


969,786 


502,099 


669,626 



RECEIPTS OP FLOUR AT VARIOUS CITIES. 

1898. 1889. 1900. 1901. 

St LoulB 1,858,088 1,514,815 1,869,070 2.170,548 

New York 7,265,161 6,728,062 6,895,487 6,868,242 

Boston 2,556,245 2,821,588 2,594,858 2,477,072 

Baltimore 8,828,776 8,854,828 3,941,388 8,862,482 

Cincinnati 2,818,410 2,154,874 2,561,977 8,081,743 

Milwaukee 2,579,905 3,165,105 3,012,625 2,919,800 

Minneapolis 166,885 223,102 240,779 

Toledo:. 1,704,523 915,281 1,195,364 680,416 

Buffalo 10,371,658 9,088,878 11,463,079 11,1*58,489 

Chicago 5,816,195 5,890,189 9,813,591 10,282.286 

Philadelphia 8,771,764 8,247,879 8,712,177 8,486,022 

NewOrfcans 747,879 784,027 647,796 585,871 

Detroit 270,870 203,610 285,500 887,560 

Peoria. 480,110 511,120 887,170 910,197 

San Francisco 1,818,494 1,606,160 1,221,443 1,675,007 

Montreal 1,516,237 1,575,060 838,182 1,081,825 

Duluth and Superior 8,789,955 4,573,980 4,619,540 4.785,300 

Cleveland 700,817 990,610 1,182,720 1,060.850 

Indianapolis 858,539 216,726 220,880 246,065 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



133 



AMOUNT OF FLOUB MAI^UFACTUBED IN VARIOUS CITIES. 



1901. 
Bbls. 

Minneapolia 16,921,880 

8t.Loai8 1,606,284 

Baltimore 849,786 

Philadelphia 686,000 

Milwaukee 1,989,966 

Buffalo and Tioinity 896,060 

Toledo 

Detroit 668,400 

Chicago 1,280,000 

Doluth and Saperior 860,606 

KanBasCity 1,480,684 

Peoria 112,000 

Cincinnati 416,806 

Cleyeland 180,000 

Indianapolifl 696,604 

Naahrille 877,481 

Galreston 200,000 



1900. 


1899. 


1896. 


Bbla. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


16,062,726 


14,291,780 


14,282,696 


1,846,060 


1,166,489 


1,064 876 


816,940 


410,936 


892,180 


661,000 


686,000 


400,000 


1,866,601 


1,787,826 


1,741,847 


962,678 


1,068,944 


869,897 


1,092,000 


1,160,000 


1,144,000 


626,000 


694,700 


682,000 


1,274,776 


1,126,746 


1,087,442 


846,460 


1,768,920 




1,291,684 


1,094,846 


1,102,000 


160,000 


67,600 


116,000 


866,718 


464,000 


861,642 


190,000 


200,000 


170,100 


489,491 


642,701 


680,674 


261,068 


680,808 


886,097 




208,000 


• • • • • • 



FLOUR mSPBCTION. 

Report of Flour Inspected by the Merchants' Exchange Board 

of Flour Inspectors. 



1901. 

Bbls. 

January 14,190 

February 11,468 

March 17,147 

April 14,672 

May 12,669 

June 14,201 

July 9,810 

August 16,446 

September 11,840 

October 18,466 

Noyember 16,086 

December 8,600 

Total bbls 169,678 



1900. 


1899. 


1898. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


16,667 


14,477 


9,227 


16,608 


9,776 


10,897 


18,870 


14,792 


10,681 


17,827 


16,829 


12,401 


16,960 


20,464 


49,662 


18,461 


16,704 


20,874 


18,881 


16,880 


18 707 


16,494 


14,876 


17,986 


11,948 


14,886 


18,268 


14,426 


19,681 


21,866 


14,868 


17,002 


16,616 


14,804 


20,918 


16,108 



184,148 



194,184 



216,082 



VICTOR GOETZ, President. 



iKI-l-l|| 




I iiiii! 

I 

il 









M 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



135 



WEEKLY PRICES OF ST. LOUIS WINTER WHEAT FLOUR 

FOR 1901. 



1901. 



Patents. 



Extra 
Fancy. 



Clear. 



Low to 
Medium. 



Jannary 6 

12. 

•* 19 

February 2 

9 

** 16 

28 

March 2 

9, 

16, 

•• 28 

80 

April 6. 

13. 

20. 

27. 

May 4 

11. 

18. 

26. 

June 1. 

8. 

15. 

•* 22 

29. 

July 6. 

13. 

20. 

27. 

Aufnist S. 

10. 

17. 

24. 

31 

September 7. 

14. 

" 21. 

28. 

October 5. 

" 12. 

19. 

26. 

NoTember 2. 

9. 

- 16. 

23. 

•« 30. 

December 7. 

14. 

21. 

28. 



8.6008.75 
8.60 8.75 



8.50 
8.60 
8.56 
8.66 
8.56 
8.56 
8.56 
8.66 
8.66 
8.55 
8.56 
8.60 
8.46 
8.46 
8.66 
8.56 
8.56 
8.56 
3.56 
8.56 
8.50 
8.50 
3.46 
3.45 
3.80 
3.35 
3.40 
3.40 
8.40 
3.45 
8.6U 
8.50 
8.46 
8 46 
8.40 
3.40 
3.40 
3.40 
8.40 
8.40 
8.40 
8.40 
3.46 
8.46 
3.60 
3.60 
8.85 
3.86 
3.75 
3.90 



8.60 
8 76 
8.76 
8.76 
8.75 
8.76 
8.76 
8 76 
3.75 
8.75 
3.75 
3.66 
3.60 
3.60 
3.80 
3.76 
3.76 
8.76 
3.76 
8.76 
3.70 
3.70 
3.60 
3.60 
8.60 
3.60 
3.60 
3.65 
8.50 
8.60 
3.66 
8.66 
3.56 
8.56 
3.55 
3.56 
3.65 
3.65 
3.66 
3.56 
3.56 
3.55 
3.60 
3.60 
3.66 
8.75 
4.00 
4 00 
3.90 
4.10 



3.20O8.85 
8.25 8.36 



3.16 
8.26 
8.20 
3.20 
8.20 
3.20 
8.16 
8.16 
8.16 
3.16 
8.15 
8.10 
3.10 
8.10 
3.20 
3.15 
8.16 
3.16 
8.15 
3.15 
3.10 
8.10 
8.00 
3.00 
2.90 
2.90 
8.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.05 
3.10 
8.10 
8.06 
8.05 
3.00 
3.0O 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
8 00 
3.00 
8.00 
3.10 
3.10 
3.10 
8.15 
3.45 
8.46 
3.35 
3.50 



3.26 
8.86 
8-40 
8.40 
8.40 
8.40 
8.86 
8.36 
8.36 
3 86 
8.36 
8.26 
8.25 
8.26 
8.35 
3.30 
8.30 
8.80 
3.30 
8.30 
3 25 
3.25 
3.15 
8.15 
3.15 
3.00 
8.20 
8.15 
3.10 
3.25 
8.25 
8.25 
3.15 
3.15 
8.16 
8.15 
3.15 
3.16 
3.15 
3.16 
3.15 
3.15 
3.25 
3.25 
3.25 
3.30 
3.60 
8.65 
3.50 
3.65 



2.7002.90 
2.70 2.90 



2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.80 
2.80 
2.80 
2.80 
2.80 
2.80 
2.80 
2.80 
2.66 
2.66 
2.65 
2.50 
2.60 
2.66 
2.66 
2.60 
2.70 
2.70 
2.65 
2.65 
2.65 
2.66 
2.65 
2.66 
2.66 
2.66 
265 
2.70 
2.75 
2.75 
2 75 
2.80 
3.10 
3.10 
3.10 
3.10 



2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
8.00 
8.0O 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3 00 
8.0O 
3.00 
2.80 
2.80 
2.80 
2.80 
2.86 
2.90 
2.90 
2.96 
3.00 
3.00 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2 90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 
3.00 
3.26 
3.25 
8.25 
8.26 



2.2002.50 
2.20 2.50 



2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2 20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.20 

^.20 
2.20 
2.20 
2.16 
2.16 
2.15 
2.00 
2.00 
1.85 
2.26 
2.25 
2.80 
2.30 
2.30 
2.30 
2.30 
2.30 
2.80 
2.30 
2.30 
2.80 
2.80 
2 40 
2.50 
2.50 
2.60 
2.50 
2.70 
2.80 
2.80 
2.80 



2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.60 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.60 
2.60 
2.60 
2.60 
2.50 
2.60 
2.60 
2.80 
2.30 
2.30 
2.30 
2.30 
2.80 
2.30 
2.30 
2.40 
2 40 
2.40 
2.26 
2.26 
2.00 
2.40 
2.40 
2.60 
2.60 
2.50 
2.60 
2.50 
2.60 
2.60 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.60 
2.66 
2.66 
2.65 
2.66 
2.85 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 



136 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



QRAIN. 



The fact that the Department of Agriculture has not made public the 
final estimate of yield of the crops of 1901 renders official comparison with 
previous years impossible. It is known, however^ that the wheat crop of 
1901 was the largest of record, while the com crop was the smallest since 
1881, with the exception of 1894. The oat crop was also shorty but not in 
as large a degree as com, while the yield of rye and barley was up to the 
average. 

Taking the estimates of the Cincinnati Price Current, as approximately- 
correct, we find the yield of 1901 as follows: Wheat 715,000,000 bushels, 
com 1,400,000,000 bushels, oats 675,000,000 bushels, rye 25,000,000 bushels^ 
barley 75,000,000 bushels, a total of 2,890,000,000 bushels. 

The crops of the previous five years, as given by the Department of 
Agriculture, were as follows : 



YEAR. 


Whvat. 

Bushels* 


OOBN. 
Bushels. 


Oats. 
Bushels. 


Rub. 
Bushels. 


BARTiST. 

Bushels. 


TOTAI.. 

Bushels. 


1900 

1899 

1896 

1897 

1896 


629,229,606 
647,808,846 
676,148,706 
680,149,168 
427,684,846 


2,106,102,616 
2,078,148,988 
1,924,184,660 
1,902,967,988 
2,288,876,166 


809,126,989 
796,177,718 
780,906,648 
696,767,809 
707,846,404 


28,996,927 
28,961,741 
26,667,622 
27,868,324 
24,869,047 


68,926,888 
78,881,668 
66,792,267 
66,686,127 
60,686,228 


8,619,879,770 
8,618,968,796 
8,411,689,787 
8,226,988,861 
8,612,970,186 



The farm values for the year 1901 are not available, but it may be esti- 
mated that total values will approximate the previous year, on account of 
the large crop of wheat and the increased values of com and oats. 

The farm values of the principal crops, for the previous four years, are 
given by the Department of Agriculture as follows : 



1897. 

Cora $601,072,952 

Wheat 428,547,121 

Oats 147,974,719 

Rye 12,289,647 

Barley 26,142,189 

Hay 401,890,728 

Potatoes 89,648,069 



1896. 

$552,028,428 

892,770,820 

186,405,864 

11,875,860 

28,064,859 

398,060,647 

79,574,772 



1899. 

$629,210,110 

319,545,269 

198,167,975 

12,214,118 

29,594,254 

411,926,187 

89,828,832 



1900. 

$751,220,084 

823,515,177 

208,669,288 

12,295,417 

24,075,271 

445,688,870 

90,811,187 



It will be noticed that com is the most valuable product of agriculture 
and that hay and wheat alternate as the next. 

The exports of Grain from the United States for the past three years 
compare as follows : 



TEAB. 


Wheat. 
Bushels. 


Ck>RN. 
Bushels. 


Oats. 
Bushels. 


Rtb. 
Bushels. 


BARTjKT. 

Bushels. 


Totai.. 
Bushels. 


1901 

1900 

1899 


179,201,418 

99,079,168 

109,686,161 


102,869,069 
190,886,489 
206,186,288 


26,929,048 
82,188,242 
41,066,122 


2,617,670 
1,996,786 
4,868,840 


8,694,110 
12,819,162 
16,949,846 


818,701,285 
886,964,881 
878,667,702 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 137 

The Bureau of Statistics at Washington gives the amount of wheat and 
wheat flour exported, of the crop for the year ending June SOth^ 1901^ as 
41.36%^ and of com and com product for the same period as 8.62%. 

The grain trade of St. Louis for 1901 was veiy satisfactory. ^N'otwith- 
standing a loss of 18%^ or about 5^000,000 bushels in the receipts of com^ 
as compared with 1900^ there was an increase in wheat and oats, so that the 
total receipts were 60,049^798 bushels^ as against 61^144,805 bushels the 
previous year. 

If flour reduced to wheat be included the total received would be 
69,817,264 bushels of all grain, as compared with 69^555,619 tlie previous 
year, a most favorable showing. 

The amount of grain handled at St. Louis during the past five years 
compare as follows : 

SXGBIPT8. 





1901. 


1900. 


1899. 


1898. 


1897. 


Wheat, bushels 

Com, •* 

Oato, 

Bye, " .... 

Barley, " .... 


. 20.860,805 

. 20,884,060 

15,728,180 

686,810 

. 1,989,998 


19,786,610 

25,618,410 

18,257,925 

475.865 

2,011,500 


10 428,168 

28,844,475 

12,606,885 

< 454,790 

1,409,474 


14,240,252 

26,788.962 

10,725,880 

571,707 

2,001,911 


12.057,765 

81,077,440 

12 147,225 

712428 

1,605,811 



Total, " 60,048,798 61,144,805 48,248,787 54,278,212 67,600,689 

Including flour reduced to wheat, the receipts would be as follows : 

Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. 

1901 69,817,294 1895 87,410,880 1890 77,795,822 

1900 60,656,619 1894 51,646,405 1889 68,466,696 

1899 65,058,U4 1898 66,848,786 1888 51,105,121 

1896 60,884,608 1892 80,548,186 1887 48,848,562 

1897 68,581,864 1891 68,885,754 1886 42,918,800 

1806 67,208,249 

The relative position of the ten principal primary receiving points is 
shown by the following table : 

BBOBIFTS OF GRAIN FOB FOUR TXAB8. 

1901— bush. 1900— bush. 1899— bush. 1808— bush* 

Chicago 245,207,658 807,726,185 298,901,815 296,518,479 

St. Louis 60,049,798 61,144,804 48,248,787 64,278,215 

Minneapolis 114,817,400 105,718.596 109,864,480 95,254,900 

Peoria 86,609,466 82.588,6*0 19,961,800 80,825,280 

Kansas City 46,768,600 46,688,250 81,745,650 45,685,900 

Milwaukee 88,710,800 41,046,180 46,221,926 60,846,151 

Toledo 26,824,886 41.840.418 87,889,184 88,818,028 

Boluth and Superior 51,217,696 40,869.596 69,524,484 79,020 088 

Detroit 12,887,116 11,008,717 8,712,280 10,9 8,814 

Cmeinnati 26,667,871 26,885,828 18,164,179 25,820,819 

WHEAT, 

The receipts of wheat at St. Louis during the year 1901 were 20^860,805 
bushels, being over a million bushels greater than in 1900, and double those 
of 1899. The crops of both 1900 and 1901 were of exceptional quality^ and 
were harvested under unusually favorable conditions^ and this city being 
the center of the winter wheat belt drew liberal receipts. There was a 



138 TRADB AND OOMMERCE OF 

good domestic demand all the year, and 8,122,973 bushels were exported via 
Atlantic and Gulf ports, the city mills taking 6,160^258 bushels in the man- 
ufacture of 1,605^234 barrels of flour. 

Prices of No. 2 red were 72 to 76 during the first half of the year, 
declining to 70 to 72 in August and September, ranging from 71 to 73 in 
October, advancing as high as 78^ in November, and closing at 87>^ to 88 
in December. 

Beceipts of wheat at the principal primary markets for the past three 
years compare as follows : 

1901— Bu. 1900— Bu. 1899— Bu. 

Minneapolis 90,888,670 88,312,320 87,961,680 

Chicago 61,197,870 48,048,298 80,971,647 

Kansas City 26,962,804 84,776,460 20,868,860 

Duluth and Superior 47,000,966 31,964,824 64,981,949 

St. Louis 20,860,806 19,786,614 10,428,168 

Milwaukee 18,060,860 9,631,880 11,618,168 

Toledo 8,216,206 9,228,047 16,927,827 

The crop of the surplus wheat States for the three years previous to 1901 
were as follows : 

1900— Bu. 1889— Bu. 189&-Bu. 

Kansas 82,488,666 86,468,044 64,939,412 

Minnesota 61,609,000 68,228,681 78,417,912 

Nebraska 24,801,900 20,791,776 34,679,809 

Iowa 21.798,223 18,196,489 22,189,624 

South Dakota.... 20,149,684 87,728,889 42,040,928 

Missouri 18,846,718 11,398,702 14,104,464 

nilnols 17,982,068 12,666,410 19,884,343 

Wisconsin 13,166,599 11,773,882 13,689,972 

North Dakota . . . 13,176,218 61,768,680 66,664,446 

CORN. 

The drouth of the summer of 1901 was most disastrous to the com crop 
of the great producing States, resulting in a smaller yield than for many 
years. It was particularly severe in the States west of the Mississippi from 
which St. Louis usually draws its supplies, and brought distress and suffer- 
ing to man and beast in many places. In the later fall and winter com was 
shipped from St. Louis and other points to the Western States for feed, a 
condition which seldom, if ever, prevails. Being the nearest large market 
to the devastated districts there was a demand for com which was supplied 
largely by St. Louis from points east of the river, so that the total amount 
of this cereal handled was only 18^ less than the previous year, conse- 
quently receipts from west of the river were only half as large as the pre- 
vious year, while the amount received from east of the river increased over 
five million bushels. 

On account of the increased value exports were light, amounting to 
only 2,162,798 bushels via Atlantic and Gulf ports. The larger part went 
southward for consumption, while the shipments westward to the corn 
producing districts was over one million bushels. 



THB CTTY OP ST. LOUIS. 139 

No. 2 sold at aboat 37 cents in January^ advancing to 40 cents in Feb- 
rnaxy and to 45 in May. In July when the drouth came on values rapidly 
increased, going to 60 and remaining at b7}i to 60 cents until November^ 
when sales were made at 66>^^ advancing still further in December to 69 
and closing at 66>^ to 67 cents. 

Beeeipts at the principal primary markets were as follows: 

BJBCBIFTS OF COBN. 

1901. 1900. 1899. 1898. 

Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. 

Chicago 84,136,687 184,668,466 188,776,860 127,426,874 

StliOUia 20,884,060 26,618 410 28,844,476 26,788,962 

Peoria 19.604,666 18,696,800 17,061,2(i0 17.994,470 

Kansas City 18,488,880 8,884,260 8,769,260 18,077,760 

Toledo^ 10,969,628 24,828,879 16,498,089 18,882,868 

Detroit 8,266,974 8,878,984 8,208,946 8,034,942 

Milwaukee 8,425,300 6,780,400 7,288,290 9,614,004 

Cincinnati 11,698,426 14,4*20,798 6,607,090 16,028,679 

Indianapolis 6,698,060 7,498,200 8,204,700 6,609,400 

The crops of the com surplus States for the previous three years, as 
reported by the Department of Agriculture^ are as follows : 

1900—Bu8h. 1899-Bu8h. 1898— Bush. 

Ohio 106,880.188 99,048,816 102.828,439 

Indiana 163,200,800 141,862,694 129,164,672 

nUnoia 264.176,226 247,160,332 199,959.810 

Iowa 806,869,948 242,249,841 254.999,860 

Missouri 180,710,404 162,916,064 164,781,486 

Kansas 163,870,680 287,621,222 182,842.048 

Nebraska. 210,480,064 224,378,268 168,764.666 

Total 1.386,138,266 1,366,211,127 1.183,270,866 

OATS. 

The drouth of the summer affected oats as well as com, and there was a 
lighter crop than for several years. There was, however, a large demand 
from the South, resulting in larger receipts, so that the amoimt handled 
wss 15,728,130 bushels, against 13,257,925 the previous year. Over 200,000 
bushels were exported to Cuba and Mexico. The bulk of the shipments, 
amounting to over 9,000,000, going to the South. 

Xo. 2 oatB were quoted at 24 to 25 cents in January and ranged from 26 
to 30 up to July, when the prices advanced to 40 cents, ruling at about 38 
in August, September and October, and reaching as high as 47 in November 
and 60 cents in December. 

The crops of the Western States for the four years previous to 1901 
compare as follows : 

1900. 1899. 1896. 1897' 

bnsb. busb. bush. bush. 

Iowa 130,672,138 126,986,749 123,428,126 103,721,110 

Mhinesota 41,907,046 62,688,416 66,298,678 41,147,002 

Wi»consm 61,971,662 67,687,380 64,643,223 62,126,310 

piinois 133,642,884 127,278,948 88,808,679 92,798,496 

Indiana 44,866,086 34,301,248 31,988.668 83,706,682 

Ohio 40,340,634 32,946,976 27,724,180 29,907,892 

Missouri 24,695,373 20,299 .360 16,866,163 22,078,166 

^nsas 48,063,943 39,129,410 26,689,248 88,680,080 



140 TRADE AND COMMBROE OF 

RYE. 

Receipts of Rye were 686^810 bushels, against 476,356 the previous 
year, the balk of the receipts coming from the East and Norths only a 
small amomit, about 6^000 bushels^ were exported^ the balance going into 
domestic consumption. 

BARLEY. 

Receipts were 1^939,993 bushels^ a slight falling off from 1900, but an 
increase over 1899. Of the receipts 5,000 bushels came from Canada, the 
balance being from Minnesota and Wisconsin. Practically all the receipts 
were taken for home consumption in the manufacture of beer. 

AMOUNT OF BKBB MANUFACTURED IN ST. LOUIS. 

1877....: 471,282 bblfl., or 14,608,192 galls. 

1878 521,684 " 16,172,204 " 

1879 618,667 " 19,028,677 " 

1880 828,072 " 26,670,282 " 

1881 969,286 " 29,789,818 «* 

1882 1,069,716 " 88,661,166 " 

1888 1,100,000 " 84,100,000 " 

1884 1,122,266 " 84,790,216 " 

1886 1,086,082 " 88,666,992 «* 

1886 1,280,091 " 89,682,821 " 

1887 1,388,861 " 48,676,872 «' 

1888 1,482,888 " 46,710,816 " 

1889 1,646,687 " 48,717,490 " 

1800 1,866,888 " 68,498,114 " 

1891 1,810,812 " 66,186,172 " 

1892 1,961,449 " 60,814,919 " 

1898 2,092,908 " 64,879,998 " 

1894 1,981,666 " 69,881,646 " 

1896 1,962,059 '* 60,828,844 " 

1896 2,198,786 " 68,007,868 " 

1897 2,124,607 " 65,869,744 " 

1898 2,040,168 " 68,204.898 *' 

1899 2,100,411 •* 66,112,741 " 

1900 2,283,608 " 70,791,698 " 

1901 2,617,765 " 78,060,402 " 



THB OITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



KORTHLT BXOEITTS Or thOVH AMD OSAIM fOB 1901. 



Manm. 


•S: 


^r- 


a 


gst 


a. 


^gr. 


^^^^^^^ 


i'i 

I54,MC 

ii-i 

197|6IB 

3)1 ;oM 


1.3M 

B.S91 

I'm 


733 
445 

160 

349 

ni 


3;!84 
i;088 
'!B6 


IBS 
315 

WO 

>30 
46G 

M 

ees 

OOtt 


1.4M 

ileot 


oso 

9lffi 

so 
*« 

ii 
a 

000 


s 

62 
187 

BS 
43 


SO 
M 

87 

«S 

76S 
060 
500 
800 


168,600 






^;e;;;;:; 


I'wo 




Ss^'--"- 


3W,K» 


SSSK:::::; 

By Wagon 


a7T;608 






To*«l 


1,1W.5« 


10,MO.SOfi 


20,884.060 


iB,7W.iao 


686.810 


1.9iB,99B 



MOMTHLT BHIFiraMTS OF FLOUR AXD GBAEK FOE 1901. 



HOXTHB. 


Bbl».' 


Wbeat. 
Buab. 


Bo^.' 


B°S!- 


^h 1 ^^^' 






'. ^ 

SO 

40 

I 1 

' J68 

698,288 
771,918 




"is 

l.Ul.OH 
773,870 
77J',OBO 
T3a.010 

eM,wo 


18,7» 


^^v:;;;:; 


3S9 
80G 

33E 

1 

281 

3St 

331 


>8S 

i 
1 


1,S16 


s 

on 

905 






W-= 


B,000 
688 




J«7 
0.666 


Total 


3.981 


SOB 


17.013,«S8 


17 .ns 


6fiS 


lo.sii.aoG 


490,817 1 W,301 



TOTAl SXOBIFTfl J 





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THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



143 



WHEAT. 



MONTHLY BBCBIFT8 AND 8HIPMXNTS FOB TWO TBAB8. 



RBCXIPT8. 



Honths. 



Jane 

July 

Angart.... 
fleptemtMr. 
Ootobcr.... 

NQiTOBbCF. 

Deoember . 
BylfVagoB. 

fotmk 



1900. 



813,687 

836,990 

448,011 

S89.386 

469,788 

6</7,539 

4,tS6 881 

4,780,084 

8,106,083 

3,178,715 

l,110,i43 

1,408,134 

086,800 



1901. 



1,868,738 

893,445 

1,&56,670 

643,437 

860,360 

841,843 

0.091,149 

8,888,249 

3,098,094 

1,111,196 

1,067,047 

763,271 

400,480 



19,786,614 30,860,800 



Shipmxhts. 



Months. 



Janaaiy . . , 
Febniary . 
March . . . . , 

April 

May. 

Jane 

July 

Angiut . . . , 
September. 
October..., 
Noyember. 
December 



Total bnahelB. . . 



1900. 



697,190 

463,120 

607,710 

084,171 

803,360 

414,720 

1,884,140 

3,303 000 

1,884,700 

1,617,960 

1,284,840 

1,181,400 



13,478,866 



1901. 



1,409,790 

1,456,080 

3,408,880 

1,150,740 

1,305,815 

689,445 

3,266,608 

2,026,284 

1,761,137 

969,268 

608,288 

771,928 



17,012.608 



SOUBCES OF SUPPLY FOB THBXB YEABS. 



From 

The West by rail and Missouri River 

nie Sooth by rail ftom west of Mississippi rlTcr 

Ihe Sooth by Mississippi riTer boats , 

The South by rail firom east of Mississippi rirer.. 

The Bant by rail and by Illinois river. 

The North and Northwest by rail and rlTer. 

Wsffonsfipom near the city 

Total Beeelpts, bushels 



1901. 



11,614,246 
1,606,278 
1,298,128 

080.821 
1,167,723 
4,194,184 

400,480 



20,860,805 



1900. 



10,468,947 
8,078,608 
1,286,116 
1,620,070 

801,481 
1,948,097 

065,800 



19,786,614 



1899. 



4,447,978 
942,908 
777,616 

1,007,840 
971.040 

1.872,004 
407,673 



10,428,168 



DXBBCnON OF 8HIFMBNTS FOB THBBB YBAB8. 



Sbippkd to 

Snrope direct via Atlantic seaboard 

Europe direct Tla New Orleans 

East Dy rail (not exported) 

8oathD7rall (not exported) 

To local points by rail and river 

Total flhipmentB, bushels 



1901. 



1900. 



6,394,729 
1,838,344 
4,496,602 
4,143,380 
348,808 


870.680 

169,241 

8,016,972 

8,199,007 

217,466 


17,012,668 


12,478,866 



1809. 



772.100 
284,720 

8,798,886 

106,221 



4,906,437 



} OOIOIERCE OF 



KOXTHLT BEOBIPTS AKD SHIFimm FOB TWO TKAB8. 







HodOu. 


1901. 


190O. 


HODth.. 


UOl. 


WOO. 


J««r7 


2. 75 
1, 00 


1, SO 

1, u 

a, !5 
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14 
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ToUlboahels... 


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J0.M1,S3« 



SODttOKS OF SQPFLT FOB THBEB TEAB8. 



Fbom 


las. 


IfiOO. 


IBM 




•«;SS 
S:SS 

■ ,D0O,0U 
11,501, lOS 

Wlooo 


soIbti 






404, t7G 




..SS 


ThalloTtti and Horthweat bf nU and rlr«t 


••a« 








J8.B«,*75 


»,«U,410 









DIBECTION OF SHXFHBNTfl FOB THKBS TEABS. 



s™„™ 


1896. 


M.. 


IMO. 




ll,m,5EQ 

s,ooe.iEa 

13,985,508 
IllllBS 
48,804 


10,586,998 
i:t18:617 

7,u2,5§a 

52,818 
61,010 




Eocope.dUrectTlaRtvertoNewOrletina 

South and Eut by rail (not tot emoit) 


«;™:jg 












»T ,889,091 


,.>.,.«. 


Sa,5««.T88 





DIBBCTION OF SBIPlfENTS, 1901. 

Exported tIb Gulf nnd Atl&Dtlc imrts 

Exportod via New Orleans. 

South by rail lor coos □mptlon 



1 by n , 

Tolocu points... 

Total shipments, bashels... 



THK cm OF ST. LOUIS. 

OATS. 

IfOMTHLT RECEIPTS AND SHiniBirra FOB TWO TEABB. 



Baoi 


«™. 






aWPKWITS. 






Months. 


IMO. 


1901. 


MODths. 


1900. 


1901. 




1,«S,1M 
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I 19 

1,1 m 

' w 

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41 :::::::: 

S ;:;■;;; 

Total bOBhels... 








1,374 

:| 

IS 
J.ois 


9» 
220 

1 

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800 
BOO 
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Toul bnslMls ... 


i3,»7,nt 


U,718.130 


T,Ba,70« 


10,G11.3>» 



80UBCE8 OF BDPFLT FOB THBEE TBAB8. 



FBOH 


lew. 


19D0. 


IBOI. 






2,ST7,Oe« 

wD,oao 


l.tlG.IU 

"•S 

e,3>l|M0 

400,000 


?SKi; stt^itissss-'r'.'.-.- 








12,006.SSS 


1».2S7.9» 


10,T3S,1B0 





DIBBCTIOK or SHIPMEHTB. 



TO 


1899. 


1900. 


IWI. 


Th we«. 


92,188 
S,096 


-ii 

4;99G 
7,088,708 




SS?S':;;;;:iEiEr^^:^^^^^^-^^^^^^ 






Total Shlpmeutti. busbels 


S,I81.M8 


10,611.808 



In 1W7, 418.000 bosfaels were eiporMd vU Atlantic norta and 891,438 bOHhels viA 
In UW. 4Ji34 buBhela were exported via Atlantic «e«porU and 881,117 bnshels tIb 
e eiporWd yla Atlantic porta and 110,899 bushels via 
e exported via Atlantic porta and 667,004 bosbels vis 



146 



TRADE AND OOIOCSBOK OF 



RYE. 



HONTHLT BEOEIPTS AMD SHIPMKBrrS FOB TWO TBAB8« 



Bbcvxpts. 


SHmOEHTS. 


Month!. 


1901. 


1000. 


Months. 


1901. 


U60. 


Jtimnrj r . t , r 


47,260 
78,750 
80,064 
21,880 
62,687 
24,070 
78,666 
187,885 
61,768 
85,665 
81,500 
42,800 


48,750 
88,000 
87,500 
85,-260 
83,279 
8,250 
85,214 
85,189 
22,479 
100,578 
20,576 
65,290 


Jbujuoj 


50,770 
78,060 
65,190 
17,600 
56,640 
22,968 
20,ri6 
112,846 
21,518 
8,274 
16,380 
25,076 


41,450 

ie.84o 


Febnuury#. 


Febnuuy 


March..'.!.......... 


March . .'. 


ao,84o 

•4,850 


April 


April 


jUmj 


Miy , 


47,460 
84.970 


jime. 


Jnn«,. ...,,,,„,,-, 


joly 


July 


15.810 




AagoBt 


27,140 

14,070 


Septomber 


September 

October 


October 


06,268 
25,610 


Movember 


November 


December 


December 


57,570 


Total buBheli... 


686,810 


476,855 


Total bUBbela... 


490,617 481,778 



80UBGBS OF SUPPLY FOB THBBB TBABS. 



Fbox 



1901. 



Tbe West by rail 

The Soath by rail from west of MlMisBlppi rlyer 

The Soath by MiasiMippi riTer boats 

The South by raU from east of Mississippi riyer 

The Bast by rail and Illinois river 

The North by rail and river 

Total Beoeipts, bushels 



88,222 

750 

600 

12,000 

228,297 

861,961 



180a 



686,810 



180,760 

12,860 

158 

S,260 

»,04S 

808,410 



475,866 



1890. 



108,482 

16,780 

286 

1,400 

7,086 

821,927 



464,799 



Tss ctm or BT. Loms. 



BARLEY. 

RKOum AND Bmpuxtrm fob two i 



— "■ 


8«t»».T.. 




IWl. 


two. 


UODtlU. 


WOl. 


1300. 










19 .TM 

t'.tio 

lis 

■■"■»«' 

l.B» 
l.fMS 
9,08T 
8,668 






a 

i 

IK 


3U 

i 

wo 


31 
3« 


DOO 

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i 
























































^ -6^;;:;;::;: 


















Total biMlMU.. 


1.9B9,8M 


S,011.600 


TOM bubal*.... 


81,201 


"■■" 



BOUBCBB OF SDPPLT FOR TBBZS TKAB8. 



no. 


IttOl. 


1900. 


W98L 




U,8U 

£47,110 


ie,TM 
9n;7fia 

9M.00O 






i:S 








i.oee,iso 




T0lalBM«lIiM boilirii 


1,989,B9» 


a,ou,MO 


!,«•,«( 





No Oanmds BbfIet received In ISK. 

11,000 boBbeU CU1U3& Bsrle; received in 1997. 

Ko Oaiud» Barlej received In U9e. 

K.tBt bnshels OftDBdft Barlej received Id ISSS. 

<7,U7 tnubela Osiuula Barley received in 1900. 

t.000 bushels Ouwdk Buley received In IWl. 



148 



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2i 

S 


S;IS 

N't .on 

Ifll.WT 

siis 
is 


i 

bib'bm 

SM.ISI 

KSO.US 


000 

000 

000 

ooo 

i 

lis 

M 

leg 

S 


S.Ol 

i:S 

I. a 

it 

il 

i.n 



I>OICESTtC KXPOBTS OF FLOUK AMD QBAIN FBOK THE CHITBD STATES 

FOR THE CALENDAR TEAR 1901, 
As Toiiorted bj O. P. AoBTiti, Chief of Bareaa of SUtlstlcs, WtublDKton, D. C. 



THE CITY OF ST, LOUIS. 



161 



BECEIFTS OF WHEAT AT ST. LOUIS. 



AuouBT— Bush. 



July— Bush. 



Total. 

Two Months. 

Bush. 



ISCH... 
]9»... 
U»... 
3888... 
Itt?... 
1886... 
106... 
18M... 
IflK... 
IflM... 
18B1... 
UBO... 

lan.. 

18B7.. 
1«6.. 

lan.. 

IflBft . 
IflSS . 
1082.. 

18S1.. 



8,883,249 
4,780,064 
2,107,170 
1,094,862 
2,689,971 
8,098,790 
2,868,692 
2,881,038 
8,488,228 
8,610,977 
5,194,508 
2,169,492 
8.080,888 
4,021,192 
8,094,627 
2,728,037 
2,167,175 
8,463,6^ 
8,290,267 
8,787,080 
1.828,189 
8,878,201 



,601,140 
,180,881 
,829,118 
,110,280 
,261,628 
,266,192 
,902,860 
,848,803 
,207,104 
,276,424 
,627,926 
,476,860 
,880,065 
,111,886 
,419,464 
,476,270 
964,868 
,976,184 
,899,448 
,022,118 
,602,428 
,076,181 



9,424,889 

o,ooO| vdO 

4,086,988 

2,706,182 

8,901,490 

6,868,962 

4,266,042 

5,679,841 

4,698,88ft 

9,887,401 

8,822,481 

4,645,86t 

5,410,957 

6,188,687 

7,514,091 

7,199,8ar 

8,162,088 

5,4S9,66ft 

4,689,7ia 

7,760,148 

8,480,612 

7,448,882 



BBOSIPTS OF WHEAT BT OBOP TBAB8. 



«« 

M 



Bnshele. 

ending JimeSO, 1890 U,206,124 

" •• 1801 12,812,260 

'« *• 1892 28,906,228 

'• 1888 86,018,688 

1894 12,668,604 

1886 10,126,818 



■« 



« 



BnshelB* 

Tear ending June 80, 1996 12,886,756 

" " 1897 11,814,494 

" «* 1896 12,719,826 

** 1890 14,822,491 

" " 1900 10,211,628 

" « 1901 28,2U,246 



«4 t 






« « 






<< 






f ^ 






it 







£XTBEMB MONTHLY BANOE of cash track prices of No. 2 Red Wheat, No. 2 
Com, No. 2 Oats and No. 2 Bye, daring 1901 : 



January 



Febraary 
March .... 



April 



May 



June 



Jnly. 



Aogust. 



September. 



October, 



NoTember , 
December . 



No. 2 Red 


No. 2 


No. 2 


No. 2 


Wheat. 


Oorn. 


Oats. 


Rye. 


3 !! 


87X 


28K 


51K 


J 72 


86X 


28K 


49 


j 75X 


40 


27X 


68 


1 73H 


87K 


26 


51 


J 75X 


48 


28X 


58 


1 74 


88K 


26 


aiH 


3 76Ji 


46M 


29K 


KH 


i 71 


41 


27 


68 


J 76 


45X 


81 


57 


* 723tf 


42 


29 


56 


j 75X 


44 


80« 


66K 


1 68X 


411^ 


2851^ 


42 nom 


. 70X 
61X 


60H 


41>tf 


64 


4BIC 


2dH 


60 


74 


68 


89 


64 


66K 


?^ 


88>tf 


58 


) 70X 


60 


88K 


5931^ 


56X 


mn 


56M 


. 783tf 


61 


89>tf 


57 


70>tf 


57 


87 


66 


80 
72K 


ee^i 


47 


66Ji 


W^ 


89 


66 


\ r 


70 


60 


87H 


653i 


46H 


65 



FIRST NEW WHBAT.-<hie car received June 17th, from Tulsa, I. T.; two 
carsreceired Jane 20 from Union City, Tenn.; one car, June 27, from Scott Go., Mo. 

FIRST NEW HAY.— One car prairie, June Ist, from Indian Territory. 



11 



TRADE AMD OOHUKBOK Ot 



OOBK UAL, HOIDHT, 9RITS, AMD BTK fLODB IUKDTA<7nntlD Of 1901. 



BMmFTS AKD BHtPmaTM OF OOBM tOUL, HOMIMT AMD OKIT8. 



-Au. 


»^ 


^SP 


er«s. 


SS::::::::::::::::::::;:::;::::::;:;::::" 


1 

i 

Me 


i 

BIO 


if 
ill 


ii'i 

■'g;i 










SS"::;:::::":;:;"::::;::::::;:::::;:::: 


SS 










wm;;:;::::;;:::::::::::::::;::::;:::::::" 


l!:.1f 



t BBL., DUSINQ 1901 AHD 1900. 





1900. 


1901. 




1900. 


UOl. 






1.01 1.10 
1.10 l.K) 

IS'-" 






l-S^ 














S^-': 

































OAT lOUL, MANDVAOTDRBD. 



atobie OarMl Wlls, 18*1., . 



THB OTTY or ST. LOTHS. 



MILLSTUFFS. 



BBOBIPTB ASS amPinNTS OF BBUf iXD KILL FZKD TOB 
TWERTT-rOUB TXABS. 





■J 

1 

us 

!S 

i 




S41.S6B 

'■i,i 

Tn,us 

5sa 

SMsn 

£:£ 
If 

li 


■■<£?• 












wo 

MD 
SSI 
4« 

1 

i 

i 










l.M 










s 
















i,<m 




















3 






































































l.W 



r AMD ixnnsT HOitTm-T pbiobs or bbam and shifstuits 
roB 1901. 





BRut, pm 


bIOOlbi. 


BBiMnm 




BMkedBMt 


SMkad WMt 


™ «».-,. 




w a te 

.1" !:i 


n * 74 
TB 78 

71 7S 
U 7! 

M 8fi 

1 i" 

BS l.OS 
1.06 1.17 








mEE==l 


S g 




s s 


^::;;:;;::::::::::::.;:::::::::- 


BO l.W 
1.00 I.IS 







164 



TRADE AND OOMMEROE OF 



GRAIN INSPECTION. 

BXPOBT OF WHEAT KBOBrnBD AND IH8PBCTKD IH ST. LOUIS AMD BA^T 

BT* LOUIB DUBIKO THE TEAR 1901, 



1901. 



0AB8 BT KAIL. 









R WHSAT. 


SFRnrO WHBAT. 




WJLHTBJ 


Bed. 


Hard Winter. 


White 
Winter. 


2 


8 


4 


Mixed. 


2 


8 


4 


Rei'cted 
Wheat. 


No 
Grade. 


S 


8 


4 


2 


8 


2 


8 



§ 

3 

o 



January .. 
Febrnary. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August .... 
Bepiember ... 
October. . . . 
NoTember.... 
December.... 

Totals... 



N)7 


891 


120 


18 


48 


607 


264 


10 






21 


28 


80 


16 


19 


416 


284 


64 


10 


84 


259 


141 


4 




• • ■ 


14 


88 


9 


8 


17 


886 


268 


91 


14 


10 


096 


254 


8 




1 


18 


25 


11 


16 


86 


296 
216 


95 
110 


46 
69 


4 
6 


7 
18 


261 
896 


81 
122 


8 

7 






10 
6 


6 

8 


1 


• . • • 
1 


2 
6 




• • • • 


2?3 


186 


76 


6 


86 


264 


78 


6 


1 


1 


10 


41 


6 


4 


8 


S,018 


429 


60 


7 


88 


1.214 


66 


8 


6 


2 


4 


71 


14 


82 


2 


776 


84 


62 


8 


46 


1,687 


898 


22 


1 


• • • • 


8 


18 


8 


63 


8 


810 


88 


4 


12 


24 


1.048 


808 


14 


• • • • 


2 


14 


86 


« • • 


16 


IS 


268 


12 


11 


9 


9 


648 


107 


9 


• • • • 


• • • • 


8 


82 


• • • 


8 


8 


966 


19 


12 


6 


6 


547 


182 


2 


• • • • 


• • • • 


6 


88 


4 


18 


1 


107 


11 
1.871 


11 
626 


2 
96 


6 
"276 


710 


181 


87 


1 
8 


• « • • 

6 


2 

104 


26 

861 


8 


2 

167 


7 
120 


6,8tt» 


8,212 


2.061 



2,078 

1.242 

1.808 

812 

988 
4.944 
8.144 
1.827 
1.014 
1.019 
1,019 

20,888 



SACK WHEAT INSPECTED. 

Sacks. 

No. 2 Red Wheat 690,761 

No. 8 " 111,822 

No. 4 •« 17,986 

Rejected Wheat 1,008 

No Grade 1.641 

Total Sacks 828,157 

Oars. Sacks. 

Inspections— West Bide 15,741 412,422 

EastSide 6,142 410,786 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



IWrilllH 



II H- 



•J'^l 



ii 



TOASI AlTD OOUHBBOC OT 



STOCK or WHKAT IN STtffiE AT ST. LOUIS AND EABT 
CLOSE or EACH 



* Bt. Louis Blentor destroyed bj flra Aprtl Ttb and reduction bom stock made April IStb- 



THB C^T OF ST. LOIJIB. 



8T. LOniB IN PUBUC XLEVATORS, BT GBASIB. AT THS 
VXEK, DUBUfO 1901. 



TRADE AND OOMUEKOE OF 



STOCK OF COBN IN STOBE AT ST. LOITIS AND EAST ST. 
OF EACH ' 



BataidBT Et«ii1iik. 


No.]. 


No-S. 


Na*. 


^L 


wSto. 








1 

1 1 

1 ' 
1 ..~J 

Bl! 

1W,4S1 

1S,8U 

m 

11,4TS 

iloes 

lis 
!:S 

If 

aoloM 

1:1 
li 

S 

11.T61 


ie.eu 

Sis 

le.su 

IB, BIS 

.,s 

S.TSO 

""rai 

■■■'889 

■■;.B 

■■8;J85 

ss 

B.lSl 

liTsa 
■■i;mi 

S|l79 

bItot 










1 
i 

i 
1 

i 

1 

ISl 

1 

id 
i« 

MO 
2S8 

US 

1 
1 

138 

i 


i 
i 

i 

1 
ii 

S 
E 

sea 

179 
8U 

1 
i 
i 

3TB 


i 

■n 

1 

i 

le 

11 
s 

» 
H 

I 

It 

le 

is 


sou 

1 

»0 

wo 

1 

i 

is 

OBI 

1 
1 

TO 
9B9 

SIS 

1 


I] 
K 

i 

e 
















Fob. 


















































AjjrU 






















"S» 




13 




















J 

! 

K 

i 


































July 






















Ajie- 




























flept. 


































;; 


^ 


r 











































































THE OITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



109 



LOUIS IN PUBLIG SLEYATOBS BT GRADES AT THE CLOSE 
DURING 1901. 



Sfttorday Evening. 



No. 4 
White. 



No. 2 
Yellow. 



No. 8 
Yellow 



No 
Grade. 



Total 

Oorn. 

bUBhels. 



Jan. 

«« 


5 

13 


6,124 
62 


M 


19 




M 


26 




Felx 


2 




M 


9 


672 


•t 


16 


672 


•4 


» 


1,411 


Maicb ~5------"-l--''''"'/.'"I""' 


u 


9 


2,740 
2,740 


H 


16 


M 


33 


M 


90 




Agrtl 


6 




18 




M 


20 




M 


37 




"5' 


4 




11 




M 


18 




M 


26 




June 


1 




M 


8 


946 


M 


15 


1,684 
1,684 
1.684 


ii 


22 


M 


29 


Jnly 

•4 


6 




18 




M 


20 




M 


27 


6,170 
788 


Aug. 


8 


10 


788 


4i 


17 


788 


U 


24 




M 


81 




Sept. 


7 




14 




M 


21 


606 


•t 


28 


606 


Oct. 


5 


606 


M 


12 




M 


19 




«i 


36 




Not. 


3 




«4 


9 




•< 


16 




<i 


30 




M 


80 




Dee. 

M 


7 

14 


. • • ■ • • 


M 


21 




•< 


28 





8,687 

4,644 

6,241 

7.907 

12,446 

14,992 

14,808 

16,900 

26,689 

81,606 

86,966 

83,067 

42,688 

21,840 

4,620 

4,620 

6,202 

1,606 

8,487 

8,487 

4,664 

6,667 

6,462 

8,272 

8,966 

14,017 

14,017 

14,017 

14,017 

19,826 

82,154 

40,060 

62,622 

121,468 

166,871 

166,018 

167,340 

181,766 

207,766 

207,060 

208,942 

206,086 

207,664 

197,184 

194,204 

186,611 

174,766 

181,086 

2S7,880 

288,062 

108,728 

107,166 



2,461 

2,461 

2,461 

2,629 

2,629 

2,629 

8,898 

4,790 

19,786 

48,848 

46,228 

46,889 

86,684 

16,788 

4,077 

4.077 

8,898 

3,898 

8,893 

8,898 

8,898 

4,286 

4,418 

1,767 

1,767 

"41902 



2,884 
1,680 
1,630 
6,897 
1,060 
1,060 
1,764 
3,692 
2,068 
1,266 
1,266 
1,006 
810 
1,668 

98 

10,006 
2,910 
8,762 
10,672 
22,786 
41,239 



1,070 
1,070 



9,696 



407,788 
896,808 
286,247 
284,698 
868,788 
468,764 
427,688 
489,041 
647,662 
786,684 
814,928 
746,188 
680,919 
610,798 
876,641 
868,786 
826,668 
818,190 
892,614 
821,497 
880,871 
276,708 
806,317 
816,881 
811,046 
324,006 
800,778 
270,704 
190,886 
185,111 
190.886 
166.098 
189.488 
382,779 
461,661 
471,149 
484,897 
666,880 
607,962 
689,824 
619.699 
620,080 
681,881 
648,846 
680,766 
466,168 
877,316 
416.110 
497,968 
600.672 
672.487 
911,689 



TKADB Ajre ooKmsoc or 



8T00K or OATS, BTK AND BASLBT IN STOBE IK PUBLIC 
AT CLOSX or BACH 



TRE onr OF BT. Loun. 



ILKTATOBS IN ST. LOUIS AJUD EAST ST. LOUIS BY eRADK 
WKEK DURING 1901. 



- 


BABLEY. 


liSSK 


i 


d 
^ 




oSs. 


'« 


Total 
Barley. 




■s 
i 

aai 








13.100 

i:i 
ii 

l|898 




'^J;:::::;::-::::;:::::;:;::: 


■■«■ 


































Tp^^^lil 








:::::■: 


























i 
Si 






:::;::: 








^g.:;:::: :::::■::::::::::::: 




































i 

7,718 

» 
!!:S 

!■" 

HIBH 

1 








7 :Bifl 


























































'=-*;;;;:;;;■;;••;:;;;:;;;; 










en 


»1 














'"7*6 

ew 






1 




'?'&;::;;;;;:;;::::;:;;:;;;; 


3408 










^', 


si 






I 


!'S 


C ";::.:■:■;:::"":::::::::: 




::::.:.. 


1l;!g 


T »:••";::"•■••:;:::;: 































172 TEABK AND COUUESOE OP 

STOCK OF GRAIN AT ST. LOUIB AND EAST ST. LODIB IS 
PDBUC ELEVATOES 

ElOH SAT0RDAT EvXNINQ DDXIHQ 1901. 









s.tni 




i6> 


































































































.« 




l,8B8 






























n 




























































































•ffi 


s-a 


s 








































a.gu 


» 



i.tas 

l.lTft 



December 7. • . 



STOCK OF WHEAT IN HILLS AND FBIYATB ELEVATOB8, NOT INCLUDED 
IN ABOVE. 

Bnibels. Bushel*. Baaheli. 

jmn.i SU.ooD xa * 1 ,..a«.ooo Sept.1 ne.ooo 

Feb.1 BIT.OOO Jnoe 1 iW.BOO Oct 1 87«,00» 

Hftreh 1 711,000 Jnly 1 m.SOO Hoi.l 811,000 

Aprill BSS,O0O Aaput 1 4n,00D Dae. 1 Ill.SW 



THB OITY OF ST. IXIUIS. 



VISIBLE SUPPLY OF GRAIN FOB 1901. 

IT TBI DirrSBXKT POOnS OF AOCnMni^TIOK IK THB amrSD STATES 

AXD OAITADA i3{0 IN TKAX8IT DCRDIS 1901, AS BXPOSTED 

BT THX OBIOAOO BOARD OF TOADE. 



i,7».oao 

l,fle9.IM0 
1,BK>,DOO 
l.UO.OOO 

1,387,000 
1,214.(100 

i.iii,<)oo 

SIK),I)00 

iiiaoo 
e8fi,ooo 
sscooo 

710,000 
B18.0Da 
1,061,000 

sn,ooo 



iUfiOO 

«8a.ooo 
ijjs.ooo 

1,110,000 



1,S10,I»0 
1.38B.000 
l,S89,att) 
3.638,000 



T&ADK AHD OOUTEBOK OP 

BECEIFT8 OF GRAIN AT TABIOUS CITIES DT 1901. 





sa 


^sa. 


^^^. 


.a.. 


sa 


»Jffli. 


SST-vt::;:; 


B1,1K,8TO 

1,716,790 

22,086,876 
36,962,800 
12,686,449 
13,060,860 


84 

IS 

20 
7 
19 
27 
18 
16 
8 


W6,m 

11 

48e'86( 
699,747 
426,300 


31 «64B 

!l 1;SS 

1! »,400 

< S,6S8 
{ 9,600 

( 7,080 
i 18,900 


1,366,284 
686,810 

1,203,040 
231,200 

1,094,817 
466,160 
118,930 

1,668,600 


7,887,289 

1980 998 

4999,160 

8,877 660 

100,664 

62,200 

489,800 

11,911,860 


246,307,668 
99,289,000 


St-Lonii 

MinnupolU.... 


iX- - 


BBltlmowi 

KuisuatT.... 


6^ 
4f 
8t 
S( 


NewOrleuu... 
dnoitm&ti ... 
HoDtreil 


34,796,841 
4,109,948 

'Fi 

i;789,86( 


11 
4 
11 
11 
4 
8 
9 
6 


94S;688 
904,616 
698,436 
168,410 
266,974 
671224 


!:S!:q 

4,902,106 
9,267,366 
8,023,182 
8,687,848 

9,o»7,en 

2,428,480 


124,838 

1,081,267 

"mi'.soe 

782,600 
866,760 
30,934 
61,600 


70,808 
3,936,667 

618,487 

1,638,117 

'2i;«84 

42,400 


89,902,781 
W817(»6 
41,603,662 
28,667,871 
24,674,787 
13,887, US 


Cleveland.... 




10,020,360 


SanFranouoD.. 


192,692 
3,214,684 


2,616,816 

748 
3,^4,666 


866,886 


13,881,838 


88,006,368 


Newport News. 



















RECEIPTS OF FLOUR Am> GRAIN AT 7 ATLANTIC PORTS. 





lase. 


1899. 


1900. 


1801. 


5& 


Bamls. 


20,^2,099 
136,689,962 

180,687,892 
90,600,246 
16,026,774 
6,296,766 


19,896,413 

96,707,890 
184,862,179 
88,161,622 
0,792,128 
14,761,091 


19,304,640 
81,681,319 
179,700,883 
76,424,089 
2,794,837 
10,294,918 


19,464,280 






a 


70,129,648 
8,eU,003 

t,aoo,-m 



BXPOBTO FROH THE UNITED STATES BT CLASSES DUBEfa 

THE CALENDAR TEARS 18W, 18», 1900 AND 1901. 

Aa leported b; Bnreau ot SUillsUcs, WsdilnfftoD. 



ARrloultnre (e61,S1^76t 

HanufaotureB .... 807,924,994 

Mining 36,861,092 

Porert! 89,080.818 

FlBherie« 6,819,306 

MlHoellansoua 8,016,771 

TotalB. tl,2S8,668,140 

Foreign 21,988,128 

Grand totals. 11,366,646,266 



1B89. 
9768,188,406 

880,787,891 
88,279,187 
47382,131 
6,687,077 
8,688,868 



64,481,148 
8,074,684 
6,189,027 



1901. 
1940,846,488 
896,144,080 
40,416,697 
60,491,366 
7,436,684 
4,868,986 



$1,376,487,971 $1,477,949,686 (1,486,880,919 



THB 0IT7 OF ST. LOUIS. 



175 



MISSOURI CROP REVIEW. 



By Oso. B. EiJiiB, Secretary State Board of AgrlciUtare. 



The season of 1901 was unfavorable from the opening^ the whiter hayhig 
been mild and the early spring wet^ put the ground in poor condition for a 
crop. The following is a summaiy of crop yields and conditions for the 
year. 

CORN. 

The planting was considerable later than usual^ there being only about 
one fifth of the crop planted May Ist^ and only 90% planted June Ist. The 
cool weather also retarded germination and was favorable to cut worms, 
wire worms^ com lice and moles^ which did considerable damage. The 
cool weather continued until the middle of June, and being very dry after 
April 18th, the com made slow growth. The condition on June 1st was 77, 
on July 1st 68, and the high temi>erature, withering winds and lack of 
moisture for July cut the condition to 21 on August 1st, the lowest of the 
season. ' 

The final estimate made up in November showed an average yield fbr 
the State 9.9 bushels per acre, which very closely agrees with the govern- 
ment report, that being 10 bushels per acre. This indicates a total yield 
for the State of 61,667,000 bushels. The quality, however, is very inferior 
on account of being worm eaten, chaffy and much rotten com. The 
average quality is only 46. This would bring the total yield down to a 
feeding value of only 27,760,000 bushels. A comparison of 3rields and 
acreage for the State is given in the following table for the years 1894 to 
1901 inclusive: 



TEAS. 



Acreage. 



Yield 

per Acre, 

Doshels. 



Total Yield, 
bushels. 



1»6 

law 

vm 

1808 
UB9 
1900 
1901 



6»(N9,000 
6,677,000 
6,260,000 
6,700,000 
6,436,000 
6,880,000 
6,418,000 
6,229,000 



88 
82 
26 
80 
80 
80 
9.9 



140,277,000 
249,926,000 
200,000,000 
167,600,000 
192,760,000 
189,900,000 
192,890,000 
61,667,000 



176 



TRADE AND OOMMEROB OF 



The following table shows the total acreaffe^ average yield and total 
production of com by sections for 1900 and 1901 : 



SECTION. 



Acres. 



Bushels 
per Acre. 



Total 
Prodactlon. 



Northeast. 1900. 
Northeast, 1901. 

Northwest, 1900 
Northwest, 1901 

Central, 1900.... 
Central. 1901.... 

Soathwest. 1900. 
Southwest. 1901. 

Soatheast, 1900. 
Southeast, 1901. 



936,000 
986,000 

1,987,000 
1,906,000 

1,068,000 
949,000 

1,677,000 
1,626,000 

820,000 
768,000 



80 
11 



16 

80 

7 

28 
6 

28 
8 



37,780,000 
10,286,000 

68,921,000 
29,880,000 

81,690,000 
6,008,000 

46,966,000 
9,756,000 

32,960,000 
6,104,000 



WHEAT. 

The estimated acreage of wheat sown in 1900 for the harvest of 1901 was 
1^040,000 beinff an increase of 4% over the previous year. The cool dry- 
weather the Imer part of April and in May which was so unfavorable to 
com proved advantageous to wheat. Some sections were damaged by 
Hessian fly and a few fields in the Southwestern part of the State were 
almost destroyed by plant lice. The wheat filled exceedingly well and 
ripened almost perfectly, the quality of the whole crop being estimated at 
98. A number of samples are reported testing as high as 64 pounds and a 
few 66 pounds. The following table shows the acreage, yield per acre and 
total yield for the past eight years : 



YEAR. 



Acreage. 



Yield 

per Acre, 

Dushels. 



Total Yield, 
bushels. 



1894 
1886 
1896 
1897 
1896 
1899 
1900 
1901 



1,689,000 
1,650,000 
1,271,000 

940,000 
1,084,000 

900,000 
1,000,000 
1,040,000 



16 
11 
10 
10 
12 
9 
16 
16 



28,066,000 
17,060,000 
12,710,000 

9,400,000 
12,408,000 

8,100,000 
16,000,000 
16,640,000 



The acreage sown this year for harvest of 1902 has been largely 
increased, the estimate for the State compared with the previous year m 
164% . The average condition of the plant November 1st was 91 compared 
with 96 for 1900. 

OATS. 

There was a decreased acreage of oats compared with the previous 
year of 19%. Only about 24% of the crop sown was threshed, the 
remaindef being pastured or put up for hay. The average yield per acre 
for the part of me crop threshed was 18.9 bushels, making a total yield of 
gnAn only 2,898,000 bushels compared with 30,000,000 bushels for 1900. 
The quality of the grain is placed at 61 % . 

HAY. 

The hay crop of Missouri is second only to the com crop in value. 
The crop of 1900 was estimated to be worth $20,000,000. The drouth of 
this year cut the pastures short and many farmers were compelled to 



THB CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 177 

pasture the meadows. Only 63% of the timothy meadows were cut for 
hay with an average 3rleld of .84 tons per acre. The yield of clover was 1 
ton per acre. The total yield of hay for the State is estimated at 1,242,000 
tons which at the average farm value November Ist^ $10.66 per ton, makes 
a total valuation of $13,240,000. 

PORAQE CROPS. 

A very large acreage of forage crops, includihg sorghum, kaflSr com, 

millet, cow peas, rape and other crops were sown in July and August with 

the hoi>e of producing feed to take the stock through the winter. While 

the yield was very good in a few counties, on account of the continued 

drouth in most places a great deal of that sown did not mature any crop 

ataU. 

FRUITS. 

The prospect early in the season was exceUent for all kinds of fruit. 
The canker worm appeared in several counties in large numbers in May 
completely defoliating a great qfiany orchards. Aside from this there was 
less damage to the fruit crop from insects and fungus diseases than for 
sereral years past. The strawberry crop, while not large, was of good 
quality and the growers generally report good profits. The high tempera- 
ture of July dried the blackberries on the vines, killed many of the young 
orchard trees and sunburned many of the apples. The intelligent oroh- 
ardist, however, did not lose hope but gave greater attention to cultivating 

his trees thinning and otherwise caring for his orchard with the result 
that his profits were burger at the end of the season than ever before. 
Many farmers have made small fortunes off their orchards this year, some 
of them receiving as much as $200 per acre this year for their apple crop. 

LIVE STOCK. 

The worst feature following the drouth is a general decrease in the 
number of all kinds of live stock in this State. The greatest source of 
revenue for the Missouri farmer is the live stock. In time, no doubt, one 
benefit from the decrease in stock will be in the improvement of the 
quality of the live stock in the State, as the poorer class of stock has been 
shipped out. Our reports show a decrease in the number of horses of 13% : 
of cattle, including all classes, 80% of fattening cattle, 70%; hogs, all 
classes, 36% ; fattening hogs, 58% ; sheep, 21%. 



SPECIAL REPORT ON FRUIT CROP. 

By HOH. N. F. MuBiLiT, Pieaident State Hortioultiiral Society, Oregon. 



'< In a good fruit year in Missouri I estimate the total value of the fruit 
sold at $^.000,000. This would not include the value of the fruit con- 
sumed by tne aprowers. The loss on apples and peaches alone on account 
of the drouth, I would place at $4,000,000. This of course does not include 
the damage to the trees which has been very great in newly planted 
OTctiards. Now that we have had rains followed by cloudy weather I look 
for our apples and late x>eaches to be good.^' 



ia 



TBADK AND OOUHXBCI OF 



PRODUCT, IMPORTS, EXPORTS, ETC., OP CORN. 

QCANTITIKS OF CORN PKODIICED, AND OF CORN AND COKN MTCAT. 

Imported, Expostkd and Retained for 
CONauMPTiON, 1867 to 1801. 

From Bnrenu ot Statistics. WashlngtoD. 



•The proauctloo ia ot tbe calendar years preceding the fiscal year. 



THK cm OF ST. LOUIS. 



PEODUCT, IMPOBTS, EXPORTS, ETC., OF WHEAT. 

QuAKTiTiES or WHEAT Pboddced, and of WHEAT and WHEAT 

FLOUB Impobtkd, Expobtkd and Bktained pob 

CoNSOUPTiON, 1867 TO 1901. 

Ptom Bnrean ot Statistics, Washington. 



* The piodncClon Is ot tbe calendar jeax preceding the flacal year. 



180 



TRADE AND OOHMSRCB OF 



FOREIGN IMPORT DUTIES ON WHEAT. 

Oomplled by Fbsdebio Bmobt, Chief Bareaa of Foreign Oommerce, 
Department of State, Washington, D. O. 

As in force January 2nd, 1902. 



COUITTBIBS. 



Tariff Batbs of DuTifts. 



VvrruD States Equiyalsntb. 



Bnssla 

Sweden 

Norway: 
Conventional duty, 
applicable to 
countries having 
oommerclal treat- 
ies with Norway . . 
Gteneral, applicable 
to non-treaty 

countries 

Denmark 

Germany: 
Conventional duty 

General 

France 

Spain 

•Italy 

Austria-Hungary. . . . 

Switserlaod 

Greece: 
Conventional duty 

General 

Netherlands. 

Belgium 

Boumania 

Turkey 

Portugal 



United Kingdom 

Servia 

Bulgaria 

Cuba 

Porto Bico 

Philippines 



Free 

Per 100 kilograms, 8.70 kronor. 



Per 100 kUograms* 0.60 kronor. 



Per 100 kilograms, 0.80 kronor. 
Free... 



Per 100 kilograms, 8.60 marks. 
Per 100 kilograms. 6 marks. . . . 
Per 100 icilograms. 7 francs. ... 
Per 100 kilograms, 6 pesetas. . . 
Per 100 kilograms, 7.60 llras. . . 
Per 100 kilograms, 1.60 florins. 
Per 100 kilograms, 80 francs... 

Per 100 okes. 

4.11 drachmas 

Per 100 okes. 

7.86 drachmas 

Free 

Free 

Free. 

8 per cent, ad valorem 

Prohibited, except under cer- 
tain conditions and restric- 
tions. Where importation 
is allowed the import duty 
charged is at the rate of two 
milreis per 100 kilograms 
(68.70 cenu per bushel of 60 
pounds.) 

Free 

Per 100 kilograms, two dinars. 

Per 100 kilograms, 80 levs 

Per 100 kilograms, $1.00 

Per 100 kilograms, 60 cts 

Per 100 x)esos, .60 «... 



Free. 

Per bushel of 60 lbs., 26.90 cts. 



Per bushel of 60 lbs., 4.89 ots. 



Per bushel of 60 lbs., 5.78 cts. 
Free. 

Per bushel of 60 lbs., 22.67 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs.. 82.88 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 86.77 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 81.02 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 89.89 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 16.67 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 1.68 cts. 



Per bushel of 60 lbs., 16.86 cts. 

Per bushel of 60 lbs., 80.16 cts. 

Free. 

Free. 

f ree. 

Eight per cent, ad valorem. 



Free. 

Per bushel of 60 lbs., 10.61 ots. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 4.20 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 27.18 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 16.82 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 28.08 ots. 



* Subject to two cents surtax. 



THS CTTT OP ST, LOUIS. 



COHPABATIVX GBAIN CROPS OS* TJNITBD STATES FOB A 
SERIES OP YEARS. 



HABVEST TIME OF THE WORLD. 

Tbe tolIowlDg shows the months of the whe&t horreBt in the different 
wheat-growing sections of the world : 

January— Anstralla, New Zealand, Chili and Argentine Republic. 

Febmary and March— East India and Upper Egypt. 

April— Lower Egypt, Syria, Cyprus, Persia, Asia Minor, India, Mexico 
and Cuba. 
May— Algeria, Central Asia, China, Japan, Morocco, Texas and Florida. 
June— Turkey, Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, South of France, Cali- 
fornia, Oregon, LoolBiana, Ulselsslppi, Alabama, Georgia, Carolina, Ten- 
nessee, Virginia, Kentncky, Kansas, Arkansas, Utah, Colorado and Mis- 
tonri. 

July- Ronmania, Bulgaria, Anstro -Hungary, South of Russia, Ger- 
many, Switzerland, France, Sontta of England, ffebraaka, Minnesota, 
Wisoonsin, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New 
Tork, New England and Upper Canada. 

Angust^Belgium, Holland, Great Britain, Denmark, Poland, Lower 
Canada, Colambla, Manitoba and Dakota. 

September and October— Scotland, Sweden, Norway and North of 
Bnssla. 

November — Fern and South Africa. 

December — Bnrm ah . 



TRADE AND COUUEBCB OF 



TOTAL VISIBLE SUPPLIES OF GRAIN AVAILABLB IN THB 
UNITKD STATES AND CANADA AT THE DATES GIVEN, 

AB BBPOBTBD TO BBADSTKBBTe. 



The foUowliiK figures represeat stocks of Grain available at 82 of the prtDclpal 
polntcol aceomnlatloneastol the Bocky Hoaut&las, stocks In Uanltoba eleTators 
and stocks afloat od lakes and canals. 

Fadflc Ooset stocks are shown only In the case of wheat. 





aRAiB flTOOM UBT OI- BOOKI MOOBTAIHS. 


PAoino 

BIOOKB. 




Wheat. 


Oorn. 


Oabl. 


Barley. 


aye. 


Wheat. 


^.FBbmaiyi.. 

Beptemberi! 
October l. . . . 

19M,Janaftry 1... 


■1 S 

Bl DO 
81 W 

88 DO 

1 i 
i i 

1 E 


M 

Kl 
» 

1 W 


1 DO 

I m 

20 00 
1 00 
1 00 
U 00 
1 00 

1 00 

IE 00 

00 

1 00 
1 00 

00 




i 


?."?!!?!aL. 








fl.M1.000 



BROOMHALL'S ESTIMATE OF CROPS OF THE WORLD. 



Tbar. 


SSi. 1 bSGu [ 


Bashels. 


BushefiL 


bX-1. 


K:;;::::::::;:::::::: 3 
ffi:::::::::::::;::::: l 


1 

421 

m 


000.000 2,*8B 
400,000 1 611 

Z^:.:::: 


ooolooo 3 


«a,ooc 

BT6;ooc 


E 

OK 


en 

7« 


i 


JOO 1 


W8 

0S8 
287 


000,00" 
800,000 




■■■■■■ 




... 










isso,m' 











THB OITY or ST. LOTHB. 



184 



QQ 



I 



i 






a 



S 





s 



• 

1 


TRADE AND 


COMHSROS OF 


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ioeoao^««ee<«i aoa»«ooft^eeo 


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tooseoi-ifH«ceotoetiiHa)<aaoeor«ao 


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8S^38£i88£S3^o5SSSS88SeSS 


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Qo9ic*9waDoSooSQOr^wOot>aDwt^ao9) 


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THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



185 



ESTIMATED WHEAT CROP OF THE WORLD. 

From the Government Orop Reporter of October, 1901. 

In the fbUowlng table the three estimates above mentioned are presented side by 
side, the Hungarian estimate beine given both in bushels of measure and bushels of 
weight so as to make it oomparable on the one hand with the estimate of the Bulle- 
tin des Halles and on the other with that of Beerbohm*s Evening Oom Trade List: 

Three estimates of the world's wheat crop in 1901. in thousands of bushels, (a) 



Countries. 


Hungarian Estimate. 


Estimate of 

Beerbohm's 

List. 


Estimate of 

Bulletin dee 

Halles. 




By Weight, b I By measure, c 


By Weight, b By Measure, c 


United States 

Canada 

Mexico 


642,280 to664,406 

90.941 to 98,e96 

No estimate. 


662,671to666,869 

93,644 to 96,482 

No estimate. 


696,000 
80,000 
14,000 


737,8W 
79,466 
No estimate. 


North America 


78d,221to748,101 


746,816 to76a,341 


790,000 


817,258 


ChUe 

Argentina 

Uruguay 


9,076 

79,918 

6,614 


9,364 

77,469 

7,094 


8,800 

80,000 

8,000 


14,188 
76,618 
No estimate. 


South America 


96,608 


93,927 


96,800 


90,806 


Great Britain A Ireland 
Norway 


66,116 


56,886 


64,000 

No estimate. 

8,200 

2,000 

6,200 

12,000 

296,000 

108,000 

5,600 

124,000 

3,600 

112,000 

42,400 

136,000 

64,000 

80,000 

10,000 

40,000 

6,200 

868,000 


68,173 
e 2,664 


Sweden 

Denmark 


d 8,748 

772 

5,612 

16,432 

279,262 

108,394 

6,981 

124,929 

3,197 

93,696 

48,368 

138,1^ 

68,417 

36,744 

11,942 

h 68,894 

4,960 

410,601 


d 8,881 
796 

6,676 

16,607 

283,770 

110,670 

7,094 

122,021 

3,263 

96,068 

43,984 

138,698 

69,624 

38,809 

12,770 

h 70,948 

6,108 

417,142 


3,973 
8,406 


Netherlands 


4,266 


Belgium 

France 

Spain 


14,188 
801,864 
120,602 


I^rtugal 


10,783 


Italy.. ....:::::::::::.:: 

Switzerland 

Germany 

Austria 

Hungary 


124,809 

8,406 

96,482 

40,012 

f 129,116 


Bonmania 

Bulgaria 


66,267 

g 49,660 

11,635 

86,471 


Servia 

Turkey 


Greece 

Russia 


6,969 
411,466 






Europe 


h 1,480,087 


h 1,499,497 


1,421,200 


1,492,629 


Asia Minor 


i No estimate. 
] No estimate. 
No estimate. 
241,884 


i No estimate. 
J No estimate. 
No estim ite. 
249,484 


40,000 

16,000 

16,000 

240,000 


33,486 


Syria 


10,783 


Persia 


20,4rfl 


India 


229,854 


Asia 


k 241,884 


k 249,434 


812,000 


294,663 


Algeria 


27,926 

9,186 

4,042 

9,568 

No estimate. 


28,377 

9,081 

4,267 

9,982 

No estimate. 


26,000 

6,000 

No estimate. 

9,600 

2,000 


24,688 


Tunis 


6,627 


TrlpoU 

Egypt 


No estimate. 
12,770 


Cape Colony 


No estimate. 


Africa ...-. 


60,706 


61,647 


48,600 


43,986 


Australasia 


62,464 


69,876 


48,000 


51,079 


Grand total 


2,668,920 

to 
2,678,800 


2,700,696 

to 
2,717,722 


2,711,600 


2,790,310 







a By adding three ciphers to the figures given in the table the quantities will be 
expressed in bushels. b Thousands of bushels of 60 pounds. 

c Thousands of Winchester bushels.' d Sweden and Norway. 

e Norway and other countries. 

f This estimate appears to be for Hungary proper, while the other two are for 
the entire Hungarian kingdom, including Croatia-Slavonia. 

f Including Eastern Koumelia. h Including Turkey in Asia. 

Including a part of Asiatic Russia, 
i Asia Minor and Syria, as parts of Asiatic Turkey, are Included in the estimate 
tor Turkey given above. See note h. k India only. 



186 TRADE AND COMMBROS OF 

Three estimates of the world's wheat crop ot 1901 have already 
appeared, namely^ the estimate of the Hungarian Ministry of Agricultural, 
that of Beerbohm's Evening Com Trade List, published in London, and 
that of the Bulletin des Halles, published in Paris. The estimate first 
named is given in both metric centners and hectoliters. The second is 
given in quarters of 480 pounds^ and the third in hectoliters. Hectoliters 
have been reduced to Winchester bushels^ while metric centners and 
quarters of 480 pounds have been reduced to bushels of 60 pounds. The 
estimates were made in round numbers, often in millions of hectoliters, of 
metric centners, or of quarters, as one or another of these denominations 
was used. The quantities obtained by reducing either hectoliters or metric 
centners to bushels run into considerably lower orders of figures than were 
used in the original estimates, and thus tend to give an aggregated 
impression of the degree of exactness to which the estimates lay claim. 
Such an impression is guarded against to some extent by giving the 
results in thousands of bushels, but it needs to be borne in mind that in no 
case was an attempt made to estimate the crop of any country to within so 
small a quantity as 1,000 bushels. 



rHE CITY OF ST. LOUIS.. 187 



PROVISIONS AND PACKING. 



PORK PRODUCT. 

In all lines of proYisions the business of 1901 exceeded any previouB 
year. The receipts of cattle, sheep and hogs are increasing each year, and 
the supply is only limited by the demand. A new plant for both beef and 
pork packing is being erected at the National Yards, and two new plants 
have recently been started on the West side. 

The amount of pork products handled as shown by the receipts and 
shipments amounted to 789,538,496 pounds. 

The packing on both sides of the river for the winter season of 1900-1901 
was 667,000 head, and for the twelve months ending March 1st, 1901, 
1,566,550 head. The summer packing of 1901 aggregated about 105,000 
head as compared with 939,500 the previous season. The amoimt of 
product handled in this market for past four years was as follows : 

1898. 1899. 1900. 1901. 

BMeived, pounds 288.105,490 824,837,690 854,004,110 898,864,600 

Shipped, pounds ...805,669,6:N) 885,825,145 389,946,465 896,188,896 

Totals, pounds 093,675,110 710,162,885 748,960,666 789,588,496 

TOTAL TSABLT PACKING AT PROMINENT PLACES. 

This city still holds fourth place among the prominent packing points. 

Total number of hogs packed in the West for twelve months ending 
March 1st, at fifteen places mentioned, with comparisons for previous 
years, as reported by Cincinnati Price Current : 

1900-1901. 1899-90. 1898-99. 1807-98. 

CUeago 7,268,615 7,119,440 8,016,675 6,747,265 

KaoMsGlty 2,981,288 2,621,727 3,107,058 8,184,886 

Onuhm 2,241,599 2,192,496 1,977,922 1,570,060 

St. Louis 1,666,660 1,607,951 1,580,286 1.288,810 

Indianapolis 1,185,600 1,146,262 1,098,656 988,669 

XUwaukee ^ Cudahy 911,266 864,690 1,098.408 1,002,084 

aioazCity 783,754 614,286 897,893 292,177 

Clneinnaa 617,032 666,244 696,059 685,148 

8t.Faul 514,385 894,098 864,485 178,110 

CedarBaplds 496,806 427,687 488,625 467,792 

develand. 600,786 489,282 496,624 540,003 

LoulsTille 360,425 897,976 459,521 884,288 

Ottnmwm 653,786 688,989 702,173 627,049 

NebrMkaCity 114,962 236,928 288,816 216,460 

BUJoMph 1,723,377 1,346,733 1,120,449 428,600 

Fifteeo plaoes 21,869,621 20,602,517 21,878,545 18,480,575 

Another...; 1,731,083 1,596,304 1,778,160 1,720,685 

Aggregate 28,600,674 22,200,821 28,661,695 20,201,260 



i 



188 TRADE AND OOMHSBCB OF 



DRESSED BEEF. 



By Philip H. Halb, Publisher National Farmer and Stock Reporter. 



The year 1901 was a record breaker in the dressed beef trade of St. Loais. 
Having remained in a stationary condition for six yearS; after becoming an 
industry of considerable proportions^ a gain in slaughter of 123^224 cattle 
and 10,6S8 calves over the previous year was gratifying to all concerned ; 
especially so as the increased dressed beef shipments made a ^ain for the 
year of 56^635,720 pounds over and above the shipping record of the best 
former year. 

The principal houses in this trade report considerable increase in both 
local and shipping orders^ and assert that there need be no limit in this 
branch of commerce, provided a larger number of cattle and calves are 
available on the market. 

The dressed beef trade handled 607,788 cattle and 60,774 calves in the 
year 1901, against a total of 484,564 cattle and 50,116 calves, receiving and 
slaughtering during the previous year and against 540^230 cattle and 58,330 
calves the highest record in previous vears. 

The outward shipments satisfactorily account for the increased slaughter. 
The quantity of refrigerated dressed beef exported from the city in the 
year 1901 was 348,443,030 pounds, and represents an enormous output for an 
industry which is only in the thirteenth year. The gain is extraordinary 
onder existing circumstances. The previous largest total was 293,807,310 
pounds during the year 1900, and the average of me best six previous years 
was 268,000,000 pounds. 

It appears as a remarkable coincidence that the arrivals of dressed beef 
from other cities, for consumption in St. Louis, in 1901 was multiplied by 
three ; this can only be accounted for by the ezilarged requirements of the 
increased population of the city. 

The refrigerated dressed beef arrivals for consumption in St. Louis 
during the year in review amounted to 110,707,200 pounds, an increase of 
75,247,110 pounds over the year 1900, and an increase of 46,094,860 pounds 
over the greatest quantity received during any previous year. It is regarded 
as a most favorable feature that receipts and shipments could increase in 
the same year. 

The brevity of this report is due to highly satisfactory conditions. It 
is a simple record of St. Louis enlargement and progress. 

The following statement gives the cattle and calves slaughtered at 
St. Louis and East St. Louis by dressed beef houses, also the receipts and 
shipments of dressed beef : 

Cattle Oalves Dressed Beef Dressed Beef 

slauzhtered, slaughtered, shipped, received. 

Year. head. head. pounds. pounds. 

1901 607,788 60,774 348,443,030 110,707,200 

1900 484,564 50,116 293,807,310 36,460,100 

1899 456,604 45,913 290,470,460 44,982,660 

1898 459,061 49,794 277,766,720 48,286,860 

1897 482,628 47,890 269,002,560 20,880,600 

1896 640,280 68,380 248,746,200 17,847,900 

1896 460,306 40,328 238,966,600 42,895,270 

1894 366,677 82,609 196,069,376 64,612,840 

1893 274,679 29,672 108,837,622 26,167,902 

1892 180,790 8,531 68,071,698 26,584,464 

1891 138,153 2,862 72,683,266 17,741,474 

1890 131,184 2,786 66,987,368 22,790,102 

1889 66,684 1,899 19,893,630 10,749,877 



THB dTT or ST. LOUIS. 



189 



BBCSIPT8 OV DBXSSBD BBBP IN POUHPS. 



1900. 

Bj Chicago & Alton (Mo. Div.) B. B 6,754,600 

B J lliatoorl Paciflo R. B 10,445,900 

By Wabash fWost) R. R 8,107,200 

By Chicago 6o Alton (Main Line) R. R 107,200 

By St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern R. R. . . . 8,667,100 

By Wahash (£ast ) R. R 6,290,100 

ByYandaliaR. R 

By St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern R. R . . 48,000 

By Cleyeland, C^cinnati, Chicago & St. L. R,R. 40,000 

Total pounds 85.460,100 



1901. 

29,286,800 

10,882,800 

56,767,400 

602,800 

9,278,400 

4,582,900 

12,100 



110,707,200 



8HIPMBNT OF DRS88BD BEEF IN POUNDS. 



1900. 

Missouri Paoiiio R. R 

Chicago ft Alton Mo. Div 

Missouri, Kansas & Texas R. R 

St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern R. R 

Toledo, St. Iiouis & Western Ry 42,000 

(Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R 26,000 

St. Louis ft San Francisco R. R 24,000 

St. Louis Soathwestem R. R 29,400 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain ft Southern R. R 1,454,800 

minois Central R. R 6,807,180 

LonisTiUe ft NashyUle R. R 716,670 

Southern Railway 40,000 

Baltimore ft; Ohio Southwestern R. R 9,017,870 

Chicago ft Alton R. K 118,609,680 

(^eveland, Cincinnati, Chicago ft St. Louis R. R. 48,917,600 

VandaUa B. R 84,967,600 

Wabash R. R. (Bast) 79,445,940 

MohUe ft Oliio R. R 1,558,760 

LoQisTille, Henderson ft St. Louis R. R 2,852,460 

River 802,910 

Total pounds 208,807,810 



1901. 

41,700 

80,000 

508,650 

195,260 

70,787,980 

28,700 

49,960 

2,614,465 

18,026,870 

6,048,715 

29,250 

10,926,225 

76,864,460 

58,720,700 

42,054,520 

09,678,420 

804,666 

6,068,690 

278,860 

848,448,080 



Shipments of Canned Beef in 1897 were 8,046,600 pounds. 
" " " " 1898 " 1,485,726 " 

•* *• *• " 1899 " 8,588,860 " 

'* " " " 1900 " 1,762,560 " 



1901 



m 






H 



if!r»'iNir 









\r liSiSiiMSiiin 

WMmml 

i 



THE cm OP ST. LOCIS. 



AND SHIPHCKTSOV HOQ PBODUOT AT BT. L0UI8. 



rrOGK or fbotisioks at st. louis oh datbs hauxd. 





Hmhl, 
IMO. 


Uarobl, 


Hu^l, 


Manhl, 

isn. 


-SS.'' 




IS 












!8;i 


i 


4,7B3 


lis 


!:i 


MO 


l.TBI 

e.ms 
t),m 






i,9K.6aD 


e.iji 


j% 


4,»S 


4M 


2,B9i 


MM 









192 



TRADB AND OOMMIBCI OF 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF PAOKIXG FOB THE YEAS. 

Paoking in the West during 1900-1901, compared with the preceding 
year in leading exhibits; according to compilationB by the Cincinnati 
Price Current: 



WIMTBB SBASOM. 



November 1 to March 1— 
Number of hogs packed 

Increase 

Average lire weight, lbs 

Decrease 

Average yield of lard, lbs 

Decrease 

Percentage yield of lard 

Decrease 

Cost of hogs, 100 lbs., aUre 

Increase 

Aggregate lire weight, lbs 2,186,854,000 

In crease 92, 1 76,000 

Green meats made, lbs 1,196,688,000 

Increase 61,618,000 

Lard made, lbs 816,928,000 

Increase 4,880,000 

Total meats and lard, lbs 1,618,661,000 

Increase 66,457,000 

Aggregate cost of hogs $107,248,000 

Increase $19,585,000 



1900-01. 

9,277,760 

601,872 

280.81 

5.36 

84.16 

1.81 

14.88 

.48 

$6.02 

.78 



Tierces of lard, 880 lbs 

Increase 

Mess i>ork made, barrels. . 
Decrease 

Other pork, barrels 

Increase 

Pork of all kinds, barrels 



966,400 

14,760 

60.885 

8,026 

168,840 
82,875 

219,226 



189»-1900. 
8,676,878 

286.6{ 

86.97 

16.26 

$4.29 

2,044,678,000 

1,146,020,000 

812,084,000 

1,467,104,000 

$87,718,000 

946,700 

68,910 

125,966 

189,876 



THB OUT OF ST. L0UI8. 



IfiS 



SXnCMBB 8SA80H. 

Much 1 to Noyeml)er 1- 1900. 

Number of hogs paoked U,822,da4 

Increase 797,961 

ATeraee lire weight, lbs 828.74 

Decrease 2.72 

ATsrage yield of lard, lbs 84.tt 

Decrease 1.54 

Psroentage yield of lard 14.02 

Decrease .48 

Cost of hogs, 100 Ibs.^ alive $5.12 

Increase $1.12 

Aggregate live weight, lbs 8,276,222.000 

Increase 146,647,000 

Qreen meats made, lbs 1,884,684,000 

Increase 81,562,000 

Urdmade, lbs 488,780,000 

Increase 6,411,000 

Total meats and lard, lbs 8,828,464,000 

Increase 87,978,000 

Aggregate cost of hogs $167,484,000 

Increase $42,289,000 

Tierces of lard, 880 lbs 1,481,100 

Increase 19,400 

Mess pork made, barrels 14,290 

increase 8,860 

Other pork, barrels 188,660 

Increase 20,010 

Pork of all kinds, barrels 202,960 

TOTAL FOB TWBLYX MOUTHS. 

Tear ending March 1— 1900-1901. 

Number of hogs packed 28,600,674 

Increase 1,899,808 

Arerage lire weight, lbs. 229.86 

Decrease 8.76 

Arerage yield of lard, lbs 84.14 

Decrease 1.64 

Percentage yield of lard 14.88 

Decrease .47 

Cost of hogs, 100 lbs., alire $5.07 

Increase .96 

Aggregate liveweight, lbs 5,418,076,000 

Increase 287,828,000 

Green meats made, lbs 8,081,822,000 

Increase 188,180,000 

Lard made, lbs 805,708,000 

Increase 11,260,000 

T6tal meats and lard, lbs 8,887,025,000 

Increase 144,480,000 

Aggregate cost of hogs $274,682,000 

Increase $61,824,000 

Tierces of lard, 880 lbs 2,441.500 

Increase 8^000 

Mess pork made, barrels 75,175 

Increase 825 

Other pork, barrels 847,000 

Increase 52,885 

Pork of all kinds, barrels 422,175 

IS 



18,524,948 

281.46 

85.66 

15.40 

$4.00 

8,180,575,000 

1,758,182,000 

482,869,000 

3,885,491,000 

$185,146,000 

1^,700 

10,940 

168,650 

179,590 

1899-00 
82,200,821 

288.11 

85.78 

15.85 

$4.11 

5,175,268,000 

2,898442,000 

794,458,000 

8,692,696,000 

$212,868,000 

2,407,400 

74,860 

294,615 
869,466 



194 



TRADB AND OOMMBRCB OF 



WINTBB PACKDrO AT ST. LOUU FOB THIBTT SBA80N8. 

November 1st to March let. 



Season*. 



1900—1901 
1880-1900 
1898-99.. 
lB97-«8.. 
1898-87.. 
1896-06.. 
1894-06.. 
1888-^.. 
1898-«8.. 
1891-HI8.. 
1890-01.. 
1880-00.. 
1888—80.. 
1887-88.. 
1886-87.. 
1886—86.. 
1884-86.. 
1888-«4.. 

1881-88.. 
1880-81.. 
1870-80.. 
1878-70.. 
1877-78 . 
1876—77.. 
1876—76 . 
1874—75.. 
1878-74.. 
1878-78.. 
1871—78.. 



Number 
Hogs. 


Avenu 
Wel^ 


S 


ATenuro yield 
Lard aU kinds 


ATe*ge cost per 
100 lbs. Gross. 


....667|000...« 
... .818,868. • • • 

• . • • t AI,UfO .... 

• • . .inR,v4U .... 

• • • .RSfiQifl • a • • 

••• .878,168. .. • 

... .awO y^KM .... 

• • • sSdOf^^S. ... 

... .<MB,oEv. ... 

• • • •886,176 .... 

• • • .ooviTvU. • • • 
... •870,886* • • • 
... .860,100. ... 

... .44v]^^9f .... 

... .0o8,8B. ... 
... .oSbi ,004. ... 
... .818|o79. ... 
... .vf v,AOV. ... 

....677,708.... 
. ... 080,881... • 
... 609,640.... 

... .sX#,/vf .... 
... .BS9,896 .... 
... •«wS,MO. ... 
... . vOw, ■ Ml .... 
....688,000.... 
....410,088.. . 


210 gross. 
210 

208 *< 
206 " 
214.86 '* 
284.78 *' 
828.61 •• 
884J8 ** 
819.04 ** 
884.80 
241.01 •■ 
241.48 ** 
868.48 <' 
888.06 •« 
246.48 '< 
257.81 « 
260.74 " 
840.70 ** 
890.81 " 
868.97 « 
860.80 '< 
868.18 ** 
884 «« 
870 

866 •* 
868.47 <' 
840 " 
861J» « 
860 " 
888.15 ** 


* • . «Ov. .... 
... .oO.XO .... 

... .«mI. • . . • 
.... ot).4i .... 

• • • • o9b*0s .... 
. • • *ol.0o . • • • 
... .8S.<tt .... 
... .81.80...* 

... 1 oJl.os .... 
... .8oL41 ... * 
. . . .88.16 .... 

... .cW.XX. ... 

• • • .911. a1 . . • • 

.... 86.48. ..• 

... .Oft.Mr. ... 

. • « •84.00* • • • 
... .Sw.4w. ... 
... .8ft.0o. ... 

• • . .OO.XO. ... 

.... 86*66.. .. 

... .OW»WJ. ... 

.... wp.#o .... 
... .WS Jv. ... 

. . . .88.66. . . . 
... .86.60. ... 

... .OTI. .... 
... .Os.lo. ... 

... .OVaUU . ... 

....86.17.... 


15.08 


4.80 


3.48 


8.64 


,,, 8.80 


8.68 


4.88 


5.86 


6 47 


4.08 


8.66 


8.60 

4.06 

fiuU 


4.80 


8.74 


4.86 


6.80 

6.88 


6.81 


4.88 


4.06 


2.88 


8.98 

6.70 


7.17 


7.00 











Beuon. 



SUHMBB PACKING AT ST. LOUIS. 
Namber of Hogs. 



Avenge Gross Weight. 



1901 1,085,000 190 

1900 939,600 206 

1899 894,298 807 

1896 851,200 207.60 

1897 712,870 812.77 

1896 676,976 808.66 

1896 449,680 880 

1894. 496.298 28840 

1888. 888,789 818 

1898 804,488 888 

1891. 818.705 818.74 

1890 366.768 888.24 

1688 890,792 288.14 

1888. 846,881 285 

1887 818,681 246 

1886. 851,048 245 

1886 SU,004 848 

1884. 860,814 280.80 

1888. 826,000 886 

1888 815,178 217J8 

1881 860,000 885 

1880. 410,000 840 

1879 850,000 260 

1878 148,000 855 

ISn 148,8n 847 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS 



195 



PACKINO AT ST. LOUIS FOB TWELYB MONTHS. 

lUnbl to MazQh 1,1900-1901 1,666, 660 hogs. 

1899-1900 1,607,961 " 

" 1896-99 1,680,286 ** 

1897-98 1,288,810 " 

*' " 1896-97 1,089,688 •« 

" 1896-96. 887,8n ** 

*• " 1884-06 869,468 ** 

" 1883-94 678,878 •» 

« " 1892-98 680,684 •* 

" " 1891-92 664,188 " 

« " 1800-91 648,100 " 

" " 1889-90. 789,602 « 

" " 1888-89 682,467 " 

" •* 1887-88 688,881 " 

" •« 1886-87 721,914 " 

" •* 1886-86 618,134 ** 

" 1884-86 711,901 " 

" " 1888-84. 687482 " 

*« 1883-88 682.180 " 



iriNTBB PACKING IN THE WEST FOB TWENTT-THBEE SEASONS. 



As reported by the Cinciimati Price Current. 



8SA80K8. 



Number of 
Hogs. 



Gross Weight 
per Hog. 



Yield of Lard 
per Hog, 
all kincEs. 



Cost per 
100 lbs. 
gross. 



U7S-79.. 
1881—82.. 

loDBi— "SB. • 

1888-^84 . 
ll84-"85.. 
1886-80.. 
1888-87.. 
1 881—88 .. 

1889-00.. 
1890-91.. 
1891-^02.. 
1882-^86.. 
1888-94.. 
1894-06.. 
18Bfr-06.. 
1896-97.. 
18871-08.. 
1888-00.. 
1899-1900 
1900-1901 



7,480,648 
8,960,461 
6,919,466 
6,747,760 
6,138,212 
8,402,r 



6,206,996 
6,489,009 
6,921,181 
6,488,862 
6,663,802 
8,178,126 
7,761,216 
4,668,020 
4,884,082 
7,191,620 
6316,800 
6,949,090 
8,440,786 
9,720,146 
8,676378 
9,277,750 



217 14 
212.94 
207.71 
210.16 
218.62 
901.16 
266.61 
268.98 
261.81 
242 80 
288.46 
260.92 
289.76 
247.64 
227.78 
248.20 
282 78 
240.71 
244.80 
286.86 
282 66 
286.67 
230.31 



89.40 
86 82 
86.66 
86.44 
85.48 
88.25 
86.02 
86.22 
88.64 
81.06 
84.76 
86.87 
88.46 
84.64 
81 66 
86.07 
88.62 
86.68 
86.94 
84.73 
86.68 
86.97 
84,16 



2.86 

4.18 
4.64 

0.06 
6.88 
6 18 
4.29 
8.08 
4,19 
5.04 
4.99 
8 66 
8.54 
3.91 
6.64 
6.26 
4.28 
8.68 
8.80 
8.63 
3.52 
4 29 
5.02 



TK&SB AMD OOMUBOI OF 
mnODEB FAOKIMO DC THI Wmaft rBOH lUB. Ut TO HOT. tit, 










































































































TBABLT OOIIPABISON8 — HUHBBB Or BOOa PAOKKD IM THE VIST FOB THI 



FOBK FAOKIMO DT THE EAST. 

Tbe aggregate number of hoga packed during tbe year ending March 
1 at Eaatem polntg trom whlcb retunB and eBtlmates have been obtained 
by the Clnolnnatl Price Cnrrent, embratdng Boston, New Haven, Provl' 
dence, Worcester, Brightwood, Fall Blver, Bridgeport, eto^ in New 
England States; Buflalo, Albanr, Troy, Hudson, etc., m New York State, 

anaPottavUle, " " ' . . - .- — ._ --- 

following, for 



198 



TBADB AND COMMERCE OF 



WEEKLY PRICES OF PROVISIONS FOR 1901. 



SATB. 



jADiunry 5. 

12. 

19. 

36. 
Vebmary 2. 

9. 

16. 

98. 

Mm«1i 2. 

9. 

16. 

S8. 

80. 
▲prU 6. 

18. 

SO. 

87. 
Itoy 4. 

11. 

18. 

S6. 

Jam 1. 

8. 

15. 

S2. 

39. 
July 6. 

13. 

SO. 

37. 
▲agMt 8. 

10. 
17. 
24. 
81. 

21. 

28. 
October S. 

13. 

19. 

36. 

KoTimbttr 2. 

9. 

16. 

28. 

80. 
DMcmber 7. 

14. 

31. 

38. 



Po: 



$ 

18 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

15 

15 

16 

16 

14 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

16 

16 

16 

16 

16 

15 

15 

15 

15 

14 

14 

15 

16 

16 

16 

16 

16 



e. $ e. 

75 
50 
50 
60 
60 
50 
50 
60 
60 
00 

40 

50 ®16 00 

B7H 16 00 



76 
60 
75 
75 
50 
50 
76 
76 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
60 
75 
75 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
75 
50 
50 
00 
50 
66 
86 
00 
50 
30 
10 
40 



15 87)^ 

15 75 

16 00 
15 76 
15 76 



15 75 
15 75 
15 75 
15 76 
15 76 
15 75 



16 35 
16 35 

16 00 



16 36 



Prime Steam. 



$ e. 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



00 
15 
15 
15 

25 
35 
83 
25 

43H 
65 

mi 

8 15 
885 
8 35 
8 07H 
8 15 
795 

7 80 

8 00 

8 03H 
807H 
8 27M 
8 40 
855 
850 
8 42M 
8 50 
845 
8 42M 
8 62M 
8 66M 
8 66 
8 75 

8 80 

9 10 

9 22M 
985 
9 97>tf 
9 76 
9 82)^ 
9 37^ 

8 87M 
850 

8 42H 
8 87^ 

8 67H 

9 45H 
9 67X 
9 72M 
9 57H 
986 



$ c. 

&! SO 



7 37>i 



780 



8 77H 



9 36 



D. S. 



Bulk. 



6 87>^^7 00 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



00 
36 
36 
36 
36 



786 



36 
36 
50 

87H 
835 

8 87K 

850 
850 
8«7>tf 
650 
850 
850 
850 
8 87^ 
8 87X 
8 873< 
8 87K 
8 87)^ 
8 87>i 
8 87K 
8 87)^ 
8 35 
8 87K 
8 87X 

8 87X 
8 ei2}i 
8 75 

8 62>i 

9 00 
9l3>i 
9l2)tf 
900 

se2H 

8 62^ 

850 

8 25 

8 25 

825 

887H 

850 

850 

850 

8 50 

8 76 



8 75 



Baoov. 



PiMked. 


1 c. $ c. 

7 87X 


800 


8 12>tf 


8 12)tf 


8 12>tf 


8 12X 


Bl2)i 


8 12H 


8 12>i 


835 


B&}i 


900 


9 13>i 


935 


935 


9 133^ 


936 


936 


925 


925 


9 123i 


9 12K 


9 12)^ 


9 87>^ 


9 87>< 


9 87>^ 


9 87X 


9 87K 


926 


9 87>tf 


9 87)tf 


9 87>< 


9 62)^ 


9 76 


9 62>i(^ 75 


9GSK 


9 87)tf 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


9 623^ 


9 62K 


950 


9 123i 


9 12K 


9 12)^ 


925 


9 87X 


9 87K 


9 87H 


9S7)i 


9 62H 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 199 



LIVE STOCK. 



By E. 8. McIhttbs, Assistant Editor of the Dally National Live Stock Reporter. 



The year 1901 was a record breaker in the Live Stock market at 
St. Louis. The receipts of cattle and hogs were the largestj^on record, 
while the sheep and the horse and mule arrivals were the second largest 
ever received. Cattle arrivals were almost 200,000 head larger than ever 
before, hog arrivals 80,000 head larger, sheep a few thousand below the 
record but over 100,000 larger than in 1900, while the horse and mule 
figures are about 20,000 less than last year. The grand total of stock 
recelTed during the year shows an increase of over 300,000 head compared 
with 1900. While the receipts have been increasing the demand has also 
grown, and the Live Stock market at St. Louis at the close of the year 1901 
holds a much stronger position compared with other markets than ever 
before. The demand during the year was not only larger but more uniform 
than ever before, and the arrivals each day, as a rule, were well cleaned 
up, and many times the demand was not satisfied. Not only has the 
demand at this market from the great packing houses grown, but local 
butchers, which is a larger figure in the trade here than an3rwhere else 
in the United States, bought more stock than any year in the past. In 
former years a liberal number of stock were forwarded to other markets, 
because either they did not receive any bids or else those received were too 
low to accept, but during the year 1901 the per cent, of stock forwarded 
was the smallest ever known, in fact hardly worthy of mention, while the 
number received from other markets and sold here was larger than any 
previous year. Not only was the number of head received and sold larger 
than during 1900, but values in every branch of the trade were on a higher 
basis, making the volume of business done in dollars and cents much 
larger than ever in the history of the trade. One of the greatest achieve- 
ments of the year and which bespeaks well for the future was the erection 
of a new plant here for the slaughter of all kinds of live stock, to cost over 
a million dollars, which will be in operation during the early part of 1902. 
This, of course, will necessitate an increase in the receipts in all depart- 
ments in order to meet the demand. 

NATIVE CATTLE, 

The native cattle trade during the past year was the most satisfactory 
ever known at this market from every standpoint. All classes of cattle 
were received in larger numbers and prices realized were the highest for 
many years, especially on good quality fat butcher and export steers. 



200 TBADI AND COMMSBOB OF 

The highest price realized during 1900 was 96.60 per 100 ponnds, while 
98.00 was paid for a load of 1,848 i>oimds Christmas steers on December 
11th, 1901, and nine different weeks steers sold at $6.75 or better, and of 
course other butcher cattle in proi>ortion. The volume of business done 
in the stocker and feeder line also showed great improvement over former 
years, and feeders from Illinois and Bastem states have realized more 
strongly during the past year the advantages of this market. Another 
noticeable feature'of the trade was the improvement in quality of the stock 
marketed over those coming a few years ago, fanners being more 
thoroughly convinced that ''good blood will tell.'* 

SOUTHERN CATTLE. 

In the southern or quarantine department the arrivals show a gain over 
1900 of 2,000 cars or about 60,000 head. This increase came principally 
from the Indian Territory and Texas. A total of 17,804 oars of southern 
cattle were received, which is more tlian received by all other markets 
combined. Values were also higher than in 1900, the best fed steers 
selling up to $6.40, grass steers up to $4.90, and the general range averaging 
better. Like their brethren from the North, the ranch owners and stock 
men in the southern states are fast realizing the necessity of better cattle, 
and the improvement in the offerings during the past year was more 
marked than ever before. All things considered there is but one market 
for southern cattle and that one Is located at St. Louis. 

HOGS. 

Again the record was broken in the number of hogs received, the total 
being about 80,000 head larger than in 1900, which was the previous best 
year, and bringing the total for 1901 up to 2,286,946 head. A noticeable 
feature of the trade was that the general average weight of the hogs was 
much below former years, caused by the drouth in the great com belt. 
Fanners having made only a small proportion of what would be called a 
good crop, were forced to market their hogs much earlier than they 
intended and before they were mature. During the closing months of the 
year good com fed hogs 260 pounds average and above were very scarce, 
the number arriving not being more than one tenth as large as in former 
years, while the proportion of lights was much larger and never were so 
nuuay pigs on the market. This condition caused a wide range in values 
and at the close of the year, while good to choice hogs were selling at 
$6.70 per 100 pounds, lots of pigs were being bought at $8.00 to $4.60, with 
the very best at $6.00, which is almost $2.00 per 100 pounds less than the best 
hogs were bringing. During 1900 the range in values was not half this 
large. Butchers were more active in the trade than former years, which 
caused the competition for the good hogs to be keen and this fact had its 
influence to make them sell at a premium over the medium grades, and the 
city butchers bought almost twice as many hogs as ever before, and the 
fact that this trade was the largest at the close of the year is a good 



THE OITT OF ST. LOUIS. 201 

Indicatioii for 1903. Local packers ot oonne bought the greater proportion 
of the arrivalit and at all times were complaixiing that the supply of good 
hogs was not snffioient to allow them to kill as many as they would like 
sad on several different occasions they were forced to get supplies from 
other i>oints to fill urgent orders. Eastern concerns bought their usual 
number of lights and would have taken more good ones had they been 
available. At no time during the entire year was the receipts of good hogs 
of any weight sufficient to meet the demand^ while the common kinds 
could not be sold without considerable trouble. In many parts of the 
territory tributary to St. Louis farmers have improved the quality of their 
hogs considerable during the past few years, but sections are stUl producing 
the old ''razor back^' and it appears Uiat to them a hog is a hog or rather 
that a common pig is a hog. The year opened with the best hogs selling 
around 15.26 per 100 pounds. Values gradually increased and $6.00 was 
reached in March and $7.00 by the first of September. On the 29rd of 
September the top was $7.37>^, the highest figure reached since early in 
1883. During this time and the close of the year there was but little 
change and at the close $6.70 waa the top of the market, while the years 
1900 and 1901 were both record breakers in this branch of the trade. 
Indications for the future are very promising as the demand will be much 
larger than ever before and this, of course, will cause values to be on a 
stronger basis compared with other markets. If shippers will keep them- 
selves posted as to the condition of the market and ship good strictly com 
fed hogs they will find the St. Louis market the place to get the largest 
net returns. 

SHBEP. 

No branch of the live stock trade in St. Louis has made so much 
improvement during the past few years as the sheep department. The 
receipts during 1901 were 100,000 head larger than 1900 and the third 
largest on record, but the greatest improvement has been in the demand. 
A few years ago a large per cent, of the receipts could not be sold at 
satisfactory prices^ and had to be forwarded to other markets, but now 
supplies have to be got from other markets to fill urgent orders of local 
slaughters, consequently prices were at all times fully as high or often 
higher than at other points. Almost twice the number of good lambs and 
mutton sheep could be used at this market as have been received in former 
years. Of course, like all other branches of the trade, common and only 
fair grade stock do not meet with as strong demand as the better kinds; 
however, each year more sheep are bought here by countrymen for 
stocker and feeding purposes and all that cannot be used for mutton are 
disposed of in this manner. 

If farmers, tributary to this market, would give the sheep industry a 
little more attention they would find it to their advantage. At no time in 
the liistory of the St. Louis market was the demand for all grades of sheep 
and lambs as large as at present, and future prospects are very encouraging. 
The year 1901 opened with the good lambs selling at $6.60 to $6.00 per 100 



202 TRADE AND OOMMFRCE OF 

pounds, and the best sheep at $4.00 to $4.60. During the spring and early 
summer the best sheep sold up to $5.10^ but^ of course, declined rapidly 
during the summer, and lots of good mutton sheep sold at $3.00 to $3.60 
per 100 pounds. But little improvement was made daring the latter part 
of the year, and at the close good mutton sheep were worth only $3.60 to 
$4.00, and the best lambs were selling at $6.00 to $6.76. 

HORSES AND MULES. 

The horse and mule market at St. Louis continues to be the largest in 
in the world, although the volume of business during the past year was 
not quite so large as in 1900, but the same was also true in regard to other 
markets in the United States. One cause for the falling off in business was 
the high price of feed caused by the drouth. Nobody cared to buy a horse 
unless compelled to, and those that were forced to make purchases got 
along with just as few horses as possible, and put off obtaining them until 
forced to in order to carry on their business. The British government 
again bought liberal numbers of cavalry horses and pack mules for use in 
the South African war. During the first half of the year draft horses 
experienced a better demand than ever before, and good coach and driving 
animals were also ready sale. Foreign buyers were at all times on hand 
ready to take all the good chunks and other horses suitable to their trade. 

The mule trade was in much the same condition as the horse business. 
During the early part of the year prices advanced, and good mules were 
$25 to $40 per head higher than any time during 1900, and on the highest 
basis for many years, dealers often remarking that it put them in mind of 
the '' good old days." During the last half of the year values were on a 
slightly lower basis, but the principal trouble was the light demand. This 
is, however, expected to increase to a large extent during the first two or 
three months of the new year, and there is no question whatever that 
when the business in the horse and mule line becomes more active but that 
it will first be felt in the St. Louis market, and well it should, as it is here 
where the largest amount of business is done. All grades of horses can be 
secured quickly at this market, and several train loads of mules could be 
shipped out in a single day and not be missed, as frequently the number in 
dealers hands ranges from 20,000 to 26,000 head, including all grades, and 
affording purchasers a large assortment to make selections from. 



THE CITS OF ST. LOmS. 



i 


111 


8i|e>l»|l§8||||||S.iSi.| 1 


1 


II 


ai«!:S;i.3.:S.iSSIiSi.S8,6l 5 




a 
IP 


;Miniir'?|^p- 1 


1 

1 






f 




Slips ISIisB^BIpiril 


a 
i 


it 




1 


5g§|-j!-es ;ss— ""— a — a 






1 


mM\ ! i 


: li -J i I i is ; 


j 



Tm OITT or ST. LOUU. 



> soipicBns OF un stock at ths n. Lstns matiomai. 

STOOK TAMO* rOB THK TXAB IWl. 



BwnoFn AMD aHiPMnrs or im btook at uinox stook tasos 

TOB TBI TBAB 1901. 



206 



TBABB AKD OOMMEBOB OF 



WEEKLY PRICES OP LIVE STOCK FOB 1901. 



From Daily National lAve Stock Reporter. 









OATTLB. 




NATIVE 














Good to choice 


. 


SHIBEP. 




HOGS. 




DATS— 1901. 








Good to 
choice. 

Average. 










NatlYC 

Steers, 

1,100 to 1,600. 


Texas 
Steers. 


Batchers. 


Mixed 
Packers. 


Lights. 




6 


6.00 ® 6.60 


8.75 & 4.60 


4.00®4.60 


5.00(^.20 


4.90@6.10 


4.76^.90 




12 


4.76 


6.40 


8.75 


4.75 


4 00 


4.85 


6.20 


6.42* 


5.00 


5.25 


4.80 


5.10 




19 


6.00 


6.60 


8.40 


4.75 


3.75 


4.25 


6.20 


5.45 


5.00 


5.80 


4.90 


5.16 




86 


4.76 


6.60 


8.50 


4.60 


4.00 


4.60 


5.20 


5.45 


5.05 


5.80 


5.00 


6.1i 


Febnuury 


2 


4.76 


6.60 


8.60 


4.75 


4.10 


4.60 


5.26 


6.45 


5.05 


6.80 


5.00 


5.16 




9 


6.00 


5.65 


8.76 


4.60 


4.10 


4.60 


5.80 


5.50 


5.20 


5.40 


6.10 


5.26 




16 


6.00 


6.66 


3.75 


4.75 


4.00 


4.60 


5.86 


6.524 


5.95 


5.46 


5.10 


5.36 




98 


4.76 


6.60 


8.70 


4.65 


4.00 


4.50 


5.40 


665 


5.20 


6.40 


5.10 


5.80 


Maroh 


9 


4.90 


6.60 


8.60 


4.66 


4.00 


4.60 


5.40 


6.65 


5.25 


5.50 


5.15 


6.86 




9 


6.00 


6.60 


8.60 


4.66 


4.20 


4.66 


5.60 


5.85 


5.40 


6.60 


5.25 


6.50 




16 


4.75 


5.45 


3.75 


4.60 


4.25 


4.76 


6.80 


6.16 


5.76 


5.90 


6.66 


6.80 




28 


4.80 


6.40 


8.80 


4.80 


4.50 


6.00 


6.00 


6.20 


5.80 


6.00 


5.60 


5.85 




80 


4.80 


5.60 


3.90 


4.96 


4.76 


6.10 


6.00 


6.25 


5.80 


6.10 


5.70 


5.90 


April 


6 


4.76 


5.45 


8.80 


6.20 


4.75 


6.10 


6.00 


6.25 


5.90 


6.15 


5.80 


6.00 




18 


490 


5.66 


8.95 


5.15 


4.76 


5.1U 


6.00 


6.26 


5.95 


6.15 


6.85 


6.00 




90 


6.00 


5.85 


4.95 


5.15 


4.25 


4.75 


5.80 


6.10 


5.76 


6.00 


5.65 


6.85 




27 


6.00 


6.85 


4.00 


5.26 


4.25 


4.75 


5.70 


6.96 


5.60 


5.80 


5.60 


5.70 


May 


4 


4.90 


5.70 


4.26 


5.26 


4.00 


4.50 


5.60 


6.85 


5.60 


5.75 


5.40 


6.60 




11 


4.90 


6.75 


4.60 


5.20 


4.25 


4.75 


5.70 


5.96 


5.60 


6.86 


5.45 


6.65 




18 


4.80 


5.60 


4.25 


5.40 


4.25 


4.75 


5.76 


6.00 


6.60 


5.60 


5.50 


6.70 




26 


5.00 


6.00 


4.75 


5.20 


4.25 


4.76 


5.75 


6.05 


5.70 


5.90 


5.60 


6.70 


June 


1 


6.00 


6.80 


4.70 


5.00 


4.16 


4.60 


5.75 


6.00 


5.70 


5.00 


6.56 


5.75 




8 


6.00 


6.00 


4.65 


5.20 


4.00 


4.60 


5.75 


6.05 


5.70 


5.95 


5.60 


6.80 




16 


6.10 


6.96 


4.70 


5.40 


8.75 


4.25- 


6.00 


6.80 


5.85 


6.10 


5.75 


6.00 




99 


6.00 


6.75 


4.15 


5.00 


8.25 


3.86 


5.80 


6.16 


5.75 


6.00 


5.65 


5.86 




29 


6.00 


5.75 


4.25 


4.85 


3.26 


3.85 


6.15 


6.40 


6.00 


6.25 


5.90 


6.10 


jBly 


6 


6.00 


6.80 


4.00 


4.60 


8.00 


3.25 


6.00 


6.27i 


6.00 


6.20 


5.90 


6.10 




18 


4.76 


5.50 


8.75 


4.60 


8.25 


3.75 


6.00 


6.20 


5.96 


6.15 


5.80 


6.00 




20 


6.00 


5.80 


8.75 


4.26 


8.00 


3.25 


5.90 


6.10 


5.80 


6.00 


6.70 


5.00 




97 


6.26 


6.85 


8.25 


4.00 


3.25 


8.75 


6.00 


6.25 


5.90 


6.15 


5.75 


6.00 


Aagoflt 


8 


6.60 


6.25 


8.25 


4.20 


3.00 


8.40 


5.90 


6.15 


5.80 


6.05 


5.70 


6.ro 




10 


5.50 


6.85 


8.26 


8.95 


3.00 


3.35 


5.80 


6.10 


5.75 


6.00 


5.66 


5.85 




17 


6.50 


6.86 


3.80 


4.20 


3.20 


8.50 


5.90 


6.20 


5.80 


6.06 


5.70 


6.90 




94 


5.00 


6.80 


3.50 


4.10 


3.10 


3.40 


6.00 


6.86 


5.90 


6.20 


6.80 


6.00 




81 


5.00 


5.70 


3.60 


4.85 


3.25 


8.75 


6.50 


6.75 


6.30 


6.60 


6.15 


6.40 


September 7 


6.00 


6.76 


8.60 


4.10 


8.00 


3.25 


6.76 


7.00 


6.60 


6.80 


6.50 


6.70 




i#» • • • • 


5.20 


6.00 


8.25 


8.76 


3.25 


3.66 


6.70 


6.95 


6.60 


6.80 


6.60 


6.70 




91 


5.00 


6.76 


8.50 


4.20 


3.00 


8.25 


7.00 


7.224 


6.75 


7.00 


6.60 


6.85 




98 


6.50 


6.40 


3.26 


4.15 


3.00 


8.25 


7.00 


7.874 


6.85 


7.10 


6.75 


7.00 


Oetober 


5 


6.60 


6.66 


8.15 


4.00 


3.10 


8.85 


6.90 


7.10 


6.80 


7.00 


6.70 


6.90 




12. 


5.75 


6.70 


8.40 


4.50 


3.10 


3.40 


6.35 


6.55 


6.20 


6.40 


6.00 


6.20 




19. 


6.50 


6.65 


3.40 


4.80 


3 15 


8.40 


6.40 


6.70 


6.20 


6.50 


6.10 


6.80 




26 


6.60 


6.76 


8.30 


4.10 


3.15 


8.50 


6.00 


6.25 


5.90 


6.15 


5.85 


6.00 


NoTember S 


5.76 


6.75 


8.50 


4.25 


8.20 


8.60 


5.60 


6.20 


5.80 


6.10 


5.75 


5.^ 




9 


6.75 


6.85 


8.75 


4.66 


3.25 


8.75 


5.75 


6.00 


5.60 


5.80 


5.50 


5.70 




16 


5.60 


6.76 


4.25 


5.40 


3.15 


3.60 


6.60 


6.85 


5.46 


5.76 


5.80 


5.50 




88 


6.76 


7.00 


4.00 


4.76 


3.25 


8.75 


6.75 


6.00 


6.70 


5.90 


5.60 


5.70 




80 


5.50 


6.75 


4.80 


5.85 


3.20 


8.60 


6.00 


6.80 


5.75 


6.00 


5.60 


5.80 


December 7 


5.60 


7.25 


4.00 


5.30 


8.25 


8.75 


6.10 


6.40 


6.00 


6.25 


6.80 


6.00 




14 


6.00 


8.00 


4.00 


5.25 


8.25 


3.75 


6.25 


6.60 


6.25 


6.40 


6.00 


6.25 




21 


6.00 


8.25 


8.90 


5.00 


3.50 


4.00 


6.40 


6.70 


6.25 


6.50 


6.00 


6.25 




28 


6.50 


6.80 


4.00 


5.05 


3.50 


4.00 


6.50 


6.75 


6.26 


6.50 


6.00 


6.25 



THB CTTT OT ST. LOUIB. 

TOBACCO. 



LEAF. 

The raoeiptB and shipmentB of lekf tobttcco for the past seven ^eara 
compare as IoUowb : 

Vm,, BeMlpta. Receipts, Bblnmenta, 

WOl M,07 9,6B8 1,7TB 

UOO »JIU 13,997 »,*»« 

an 9SM ufiK neea 

mt 48.eis u,8a4 tfita 

1897 UJW 9,0M 7,709 

am BB,9«7 10,138 tse» 

IBM iS,ea B,478 S,BS« 

Ifearlj all Oie leaf tobacco waa bronght trom polnta outside the State, 

largely from Kentackj, and used by the local factories In tlie manufacture 

of tobacco, snuff, cigars and clg&reCtes. Some recelpW were from Cuba 

and Porto Klco for tbe manufacture of cigars. 

MANUFACTURED. 

St. Lools maintained its posltioii as the place where more tobacco Is 
mannfavtored annaally than any other place in the world. The total 
amount mannfaotnred in 1001 In the flraC UIsBourl district, of which 
nearly the entire amount Is the output of St. Louis factories, was 82.010,863 
pounds, against 79,394,957 pounds In 1900 and 60,873,197 pounds lo 1S99, 
and. If BQuff Is included, the amount would be 32,036,371 pounds. In 
addition to the amount manufactured in St. Louie, there was received 
14,892,940 ponnds from other points, makinir the total business of the year 
96,918,311 pounds. Shipments were 90,932,879 pounds. 

The output of cieare was 46,325,000, a. falling off from previous years. 
The total number of cigare sold in this market during the year is placed at 
260,000,000. The value of tobacco and cigars manufactured wag fully 
$46,000,000. 

The Commissioner of Internal Revenue reports the total amount of 
tobacco mannfactnred in the United States in 1900 as 300,707,189 pounds, 
of which the flrst Missouri district produced 78,067,750 ponnds, equal to 
nearly 26$. 

The figures for 1901 are not now available, but as the St. Lonls output 
of 1901 was considerably Increased, doubtless the percentage for 1901 will 
correspondingly increase. 

TOBACCO uanhfactdred in the dnited states dubino 1900, 

And Totals for Previous Tears. 

From thereportot the Oommlsaloner of Inleraal BeveDae. 



TBUA HID oomnBoi or 



Tbab. 


rTotMOOODUBn- 
iMtarad. Lba 


AntMxpaU. 


Hm). 


W7I 


B,4U,8n 


■KM^ 






4,TM,8W 








t.m,4M 








1,M8,UT 




CllBDdl 


ur.wn 








1878 








UTS 








1880 








1881 
















1881 


n,m.im 


PVg 




WU 


11,881,101 




IBBB 


18.0II,«1 




1888 








isn 


witstlen 






1S8B 


«,oD0,nf 






188B 


4^ Mr 






1880 


61.T«,101 






U»l 


e»,88«,4B8 








B.B7T8B1 






Ut8 


M,*8B,MT 








n,o»7,us 






MS 


0T.MT.810 






1888 


St,U4,Ut 






lan 


81,B88,n9 


VUUjoS 1 






M,Bee,en» 


ifitnf^ 




168* 


88 878 197" 






1800 


■a.»i,m 


9;ftia;BB6 


" 




81.OI0.B6B 


B.8»,81S 



The manntectareB of the paat five jean owi be olaaalfled u follows : 





mi. 

Ponsda. 


Ponnd*. 


1889. 

Poondi. 


Poondi. 




Ssar^.^'T".:.:; 




'■■•SiS! 

S, 898, 889 


0,987 ,&U 
18,888 


•m.oti 


"•"S'S 












8J,0»,«71 


e7.»9,991J 


SS,»,88S 


U,4ia,6Bi 


ai,807.TM 





THB dTT 0¥ BT. LOUm. 



CKUBfl KAXCrlCnJBZD DT ST. LOtm. 



Tmu. 


ll».&ctM. 


Amoont of 

Ux pkld. 


Km>i, in« 


^;«iS9o~ 


• 17«,Me4B 


" law 


Mon^ 




niM 


.^" "" 


n,Mi,sTa 


■1« 


QSI3B 


j^naa>BUn 


n,aM,7n 


lOB 


BMW 


OkhndKT UTS 


MSWBOO 


UB 




U7» 


tsouots 


»( 


MM 


ino 


S)),IM,6TI> 


IM 


tnii 


im 




W 


MTM 


" un 




HE 




- ]» 




in 


674 M 


UM 




in 


0M4» 


' un 




la 


no ST 


■ un 




tSi 


7HW 


« 1M7 




14C 


inn 








BBIU 






IS 


n7n 












'"ii 


wis 






170 


set IS 


un 




IS] 


BietT 


un 




IM 


806 W 


un 




1« 


mae 


un 




Ul 


nsn 


- WT 




IH 


MTU 






IN 


ni« 






IM 


seen 


;; urn 




MM 


us 17 






158 


S7>00 





UOl. 


ino. 


iBie. 


in. 


U>7. 


ms. 


sun- 


.n*. 


"1 


n.m,m 


U,ll80.0eT 

sia 


"■•S:g 


lis 


•^•B 


S"^*- 


jn: 


"»S? 







210 



TRADE AND OOMMEBOS OF 



BAOOINQ AND COTTON TIES. 



Notwithstanding the short cotton crop, the business in bagging and 
ties has shown a large increase oyer 1900^ both in the amount of bagging 
manufactured and the amount of bagging and ties distributed from this 
city. 

Local manufacturers have operated their plants on full time making 
about 2;500;000 yards more than in the year 1900, and the end of the year 
finds them actively at work preparing a supply for the next cotton crop. 

BECEIPTS OF JT7TE FOB SIX YEABS 



BBOSIPTB. 


1901. 


1900. 


1808. 


18d8. 


1887. 


1896. 


jate. bales 


51,888 


87,818 


42,206 


28,86J 


28,898 


7,102 





8HIP1IENT8 OF 1 


BAGGING FOB NINE TEAB8. 






SHIPMSKTS. 


1901. 


1900. 


1899. 


1888. 


1887. 


1896. 


1886. 


189i. 


1896. 


Bagging, poa 


881,113 


212,619 


266,812 


278,661 


806,870 


181,811 


209.071 


286,069 


267,008 



BAGGING ICANUFACTUBBD. 

1901 12,600,000 yards. 

1900 9,976,666 " 

1899 12,278,600 

1898 12,600,000 

1897 9.000,000 

1896 8,000,000 

1896 11,700,000 

1894 18,000,000 

1888 12,000,000 

1892 18,000,000 

STOGRIS OF BAGGING ON HAND. 

Dec. 8lBt , 1901 2,600,000 yards. 

" 1900 8,781,246 « 

1899 



u 
a 
t« 
(( 

CI 

it 



t( 
«( 
i( 
i( 
i< 
a 
it 
i( 



6,181,200 

1808 721.600 

1897 200,000 

1896 . 1,000,000 

1896 1,200,000 

1894 l,Oii0.000 

1898 200,000 

1892 800.000 



BBCEIFTS BAGGING. 



1901. 



Pieces. 
. 6.708 



1900 12,788 

1899 10,760 

1898 98,646 

1897 86,878 

1896 42.129 

1806 8,020 

1894 1,677 

1898 18,880 

1892 12,488 



Tarda. 

886,400 

689,400 

687,600 

4.682,260 

1.798,900 

2,106.460 

161,000 

78,860 

669,000 

621,660 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



2U 



HIGHWINES AND WHISKIES. 



RcMlpti Hli^wlnes and WbiBkiea. 



BarrelB. 



ShipmentB Whlaky. 



Barrela. 



1901. 
1900. 



1807. 
1806. 
1896. 
1894. 
18B6. 



1801 



146 
148 
184 

96 
106 
100 

86 
118 
113 
123 
109 



,226 
,566 
,280 
,480 
,878 
,660 
,064 
,110 
,116 
,076 
,040 



1901. 
1900. 
1899. 
1898. 
1897. 
1896. 
1886. 
1894. 
1898. 
1892. 
1891. 



148,729 
166,906 
147,664 
116,608 
141,426 
107,176 
114,806 
188,716 
122,066 
152,904 
117,210' 



The following is a statement of the amount of grain used, product of 
spirits and tax paid; etc., in St. Louis during 1899 and 1900: 





1901. 


1900. 


Sniritii nmil'DiMM]. sail.— >llOfirbon • 


32,688.2 
000.0 
000.0 
000.0 
000.0 

2,775.0 


84,854.8 
000.0 
000.0 


Gin 


Hlgbwines 


000 


Pnre neatral or oologne 

spirits and whisky sp'ts 

Rye Whisky 


000.0 
8.686.2 






Total 


86,406.2 

{n29,076.6tZ:nls. 
{ $141,9^.6 
000.0 gals. 
18,266.1 ** 


88,689.6 

( *168,6i8.0tx.nl4 
( $165,866.18 

179.0 gals. 
18,168.0 •• 


AflMnmt of tax naid. at tl.10 nor nllon. 


Alcohol withdrawn ibr sdantific purposes ftee of tax 
Whisl^ allowed by reason ofleakage and oTaporafb 



*Big distillers closed in this district by trust. 

BBKAINING ON HAND IN BISTILLBBT WAREHOUSBS. 



Bourbon 
Aleohol.. 
Gin. 



Pore nentnJ or oologne spirits and whisky spirits, 
life Whisky 



Tdtal. 



Dec. 81, 190L 



47,888.6 gals. 

None. 

None. 
19,060.4 " 
9,171.7 



(< 



76,619.6 



Dec. 81, 1900. 



62,886.1 gals. 

None. 

None. 
97,683.8 '< 
9,169.4 *• 



169,687.6 



(( 



8PIB1T8 BBOnFIBD OB COMPOUNDBD. 



2,298,447.86 gaU. 

, 2,608,186.18 '• 

1807 2,412,279.60 

1806 2,882,874.17 

1806 2,282,166.18 

1801 2,932,860.23 






1698 8,182,027.00 gals. 

1892 3,867,411.72 •• 

1881 8,282,462.87 '* 

1890 3,168,466.96 •« 

1889 3,267,984.18 " 

1888 2,184,646.82 



(< 



July Ist, 1899, to June SOth, 1900^ 2,098^824.81 proof galls, or 2,798,428.08 
wine galls. 

Ju& 1st, 1900, to June 30th, 1901, 2,433,069.29 proof galls, or 2,761,720.18 
wine galls. 

Total number of gallons gauged in three years by U. S. Gangers : 

1800 4,939,880.48 gals. 1900 4,728,817.40 gals. 1901 6,284,616.21 gals. 

Total number of wholesale liquor dealers' stamps issued on change of 
package: 

1809 26,068 1900 29,169 1901 84,670 



212 TAADB AND OOMKBRGB OF 



NAVAL STORES. 



Bbla. 
Torpentine. 

1901 26,077 

1900 18,000 

1899 16,000 

1898 21,084 

1897 18,019 

1896 16,981 

1896 14,762 

1894 17,814 

1898 16,679 

1892 • 19,890 

1891 19,470 

1890 16,686 

1889 18,900 

1888 17,622 

1887 18,262 

1886 18,912 

1886 18,126 

1884 9,846 

1883 12,286 

1882 18,994 

1881 6,046 

1880 8,076 



PkgB. 
Bottn. 




Gommeroial 
Bbls. of 


Bbli. rtter 




SSOlbB. 


andPitoli 


90,961 




138,066 


4,696 


78,197 


= 


104,000 


10,120 


69,620 


= 


89,430 


6,878 


87,846 


= 


134,606 


7,028 


76,881 


=s 


109,768 


7,100 


49,902 


s= 


76,098 


8,476 


49,860 


ss 


73,144 


12,240 


67,466 


« 


82,080 


8,170 


44,870 


=s 


61,376 


12,048 


68,738 


ses 


76,947 


10,213 


66,822 


= 


76,322 


6,679 


48,900 


SE 


68,699 


6,167 


49,397 


SS 


69,300 


4,167 


47,062 


=s 


68,260 


6»616 


46,231 


= 


66,200 


8,676 


33,742 


ss 


72,000 


6,096 


48,273 


= 


66,860 


7,343 


36,367 






6,818 


40,010 






6,779 


36,882 






8,796 


41,717 






6,293 


48,148 






4,644 



The receipts of naval stores, as indicated by the above table, show a 
very marked increase during 1901, demonstrating that the business is 
increasing on account of the natural growth of the city and territory west 
of the river. There is an increased demand for rosin from sources entirely 
new to the trade. St. Louis continues to be the largest distributing point 
in the West in this ine. 

Die largest part of the receipts of turpentine came in tank cars which 
are reduced to barrels for comparison. 



THS dTT OF ST. IX>UI8. 213 

LEAD AND SP ELTER, 

PIQ LEAD. 

Bj John Wahl Gommlflslon Oo. 

Little caa l>e said about the lead market daring the year 1901. Prices of 
lead remj^ned UBsnally steady around (4.27 jii to 94.32>(^ baslB in St. LouJb, 
notwithatandiju^ the heavy supply of lead ores; larger than ever before in 
tlie hiatoiy of t£ie country. 

The year opened with prices of Missouri lead, in St. Louis. $4.26 to 
94*27>^, and Argentiferous i4.82>(t, and only during the last month of the 
year, when the London market declined to something like LIO 5s^ the 
stronfl^ poll(7 of the Smelting Company was abandoned, and the drop to 
S3.86 Dasis St. Louis for Argentiferous occurred ; Missouri brands selling 
down to |3.87>^. Lead productions in the United States reached the 
highest point on record. 

The output for the year shows something like 275,000 short tons, of 
wliich 221,000 tons or 80% were classed as aesilyeriaed lead; somethinff 
like 48,000 tone or 17% were soft lead, carrying no silver, and about 7,000 
tons or a little over 2% hard or antimonial lead. The mines of the Coeur 
d*Alenes in Idaho produced about one-third of the ores from which the 
desilTerized lead was smelted. The soft lead, as heretofore, came chiefly 
from Missouri, by far the larger part from the Southeast Missouri district, 
where lead ores only are mined, and the rest from the Joplin district, 
where lead is obtained in connection with zinc ores, which are the chief 
product of that region. 

WHITE LEAD. 

The manufacture of white lead is one of the most important industries 
in 8t. Louis, as it is advantageously situated for the manufacture of this 
eonunodity, owing to geographical position, and being centrally located 
can distribute the manufactured product to advantage to all parts of the 
oountry. The principal brands manufactured in St. Louis of strictly pure 
lead are the QoUler. Southern and Bed Seal, some of which have been on 
the market for half a century, and have an established reputation for 
purity and general excellence from one end of the United States to the other. 
Probably one-third of the white lead manufactured in the United States 
is made in St. Louis, and its factories give employment to hundreds of men, 
and are equipped with the most modem machinery, and have been kept in 
constant operation during the year. All of the lead manufactured in 
St. Louis is made by the ^'old Dutch process^' of corrosion, which gives 
the product a superiority over so-called quick process leads. Experiments 
of all kind are being constantly made, but as yet nothing has been found 
that lias the durablBty and covering capacity of lead manufactured by this 

Srocess of slow corrosion. The shipments were 59,670,720 lbs., as against 
),645,780 lbs. in 1900 and 48,460,250 lbs. in 1899. 

SPELTER. 

Notwithstanding a large volume of export business was handled through 
agencies stationed at points of production and which ordinarily would 
have come to St. Louis by virtue of this being the principal primary 
market, the year 1901 was a favorable one both in point of business trans- 
acted and prices paid for the commodity. Bequirements for consumption 
were in excess of any former year, so that th^ much larger movement to 
this center did not permit of an accumulation of supplies at any time. The 
range of prices was limited to 42>^ cents per 100 lbs , showing an entire 
absence of any manipulation. 

Becelyts— SlabB. Siiipments— Slabs. 

1901 2,028,896 2,186,647 

1900 979,080 1,496,162 

1899 1,608,696 1,789,088 

1888 1,626,688 1,667,049 



\ TBADB AND OOUUEKCE OF 

LEAD. 

KEOBIPTS AKD SHIPKBMTS Or LBAD IK PIOB OF 80 LBS. BAOH. 



V ODPPLT OF PIG LBAD FOB THSKK TSABS. 



SHIPniTTB or WHITE LEAD. 






"^j™; 




IHiI?«£ 


SS;:::""" m'M'm 














g5::;:;;:::;:::::g.'S;S 


IBK M,9e8,eu 


1»1 


.•.:::::S:SS;SS 



HONTHLT PRICES OP LEAD AHD SPELTSB POB TWO TXABS. 



» nsi 4 J7« 8 M 



Jkniiary.- >•>'.-•■' 

Vebniarr 

Mfcrch 

April. 

Ift7- 

July.; ;'."!. I! !Xir.*"."";^ 

Angost 

Bgpumber. 

HoTsmbei 

Deoember 

QnoMtioiu ftte for Boft Missouri aad Chenilcal HkcO. DeallTeriied rQflnod held 
at •<.n3< antll Tlecember, when the price tell to VM. 

DurlQg sammeT months Oherolcal Hard told roach higher than Soft Hlwmrl 
right along, bo scarce was It and so orgeDt the demand. Extreme highest prices 
glrsD (from May to Aogost) were (or Obemlcal. 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 215 



WOOL. 



By FUIVSTON Bbos. & Oo. 

The wool business for the year 1901 has been a most satisfactory one to 
the St. Lonis merchants. The trade here laid in their stocks at shearing 
time intelligently^ and bought in large quantities at prices that proved to 
bo the lowest of the season. Manufacturers have fayored the St. Louis 
market more than ever during the past year, many mills coming here for 
supplies that have not bought here for many years. This was brought 
aboat largely by the enterprising, progressive and fair business methods of 
the St. Louis merchants. 

The stocks of wool on hand in St. Louis, January 1st, 1902^ were the 
smallest known here in years^ which reflects credit upon the trade^ as by 
being free sellers^ the merchants are well sold out, and have thereby placed 
Hiemselyes in excellent condition to handle the clip of 1902 from the West- 
em States and Territories to better advantage than ever. 

The wool trade is in a general healthy condition, and the year 1902 bids 
fair to be another good year. Manufacturers are now using a smaller per- 
centage of cotton and cheaper materials in woolen goods which increases 
the consumption of wool and creates a steadier movement, and more stable 
values. St. Louis is conceded to be the second largest wool market in the 
United States, and is a strong competitor for both territory and domestic 
wools. 

Pulled and scoured wools have sold well from this market, and the 
amount scoured during the i>ast year has been much larger than previous 
years, and the process of scouring has been much improved. A conserva- 
tive estimate of the value of wool handled in St. Louis during 1901 amounts 

to about $10,600,000.00. 

FURS. 

St Louis for years conceded to be the largest primary fur market in the 
world^ continues to grow in importance as a great fur center, and in recent 
years has reached out into even the most remote parts of Canada and 
Alaska where the fur bearing animals of the rarest and most costly furs 
abound. 

The acquisition of the handling of these fine and costly furs from the 

far North in the St. Louis market has been a great success^ and has done 

much to make the already great fur center even more important in the 

world^s fur trade. The prompt, fair and altogether splendid methods of 

handling and selling furs in this market will ever keep it the most i>opular 
market m America. 

The active fur season only lasts about four months in the year, during 
which time something over $4,000^000.00 worth of raw furs are received 
and sold in this market. 

The fur season of 1901 and 1902 will go down in the annals of the fur 
trade as one of the greatest and most successful ever known. The volume 
ever known. The volume has been larger this season than ever^ and 
values higher and steadier than for many years. 



TRADE ASD OOHHEROE OF 



mOUFTS AMD SmPHKHTfl «» SIXTBIH TEABS. 



BBOBIPTS OF PBLTBIB8 AKD FDSS. 



.. lU.WT 

. m,K6 
. tu,ws 

.. ITi,900 

.. IID.UI 

.. 19fi,40e 
.. S7,0SS 

. 9e,su 

.. 101,14s 



n,Bn 

«,«u 

a,at 

a,<Mi 

18,88) 

w,*» 

U,<E8 

1M81 

18.088 

U.1U 

u,m 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



217 



HAY. 



By the St. Louis Hay Bzchmnge. 

We find the Hay market, at the close of 1901, in a most satisfactoiy 
condition; shippers and commission men alike have enjoyed a rather 
phenomenal season. While receipts were in excess of 1900, by 16,800 tons, 
file market at all times absorbed the receipts (except when the railroads 
were nnable to famish facilities to handle cars out). 

Two conditions have come about since December, 1900, to contribute to 
this increased trade : First, that St. Louis is made the distributing point 
for a greater part of the drought stricken section, and the rapid, almost 
unparalleled development of the country, southwest of St. Louis. 

The average prices on timothy hay and wild grass (prairie hay), has 
ruled much higher than 1900, with quality much reduced. There was 
scarcely a week through October, November and December of 1901 that 
tbere was not orders for 26, 50 and 100 car lots; the condition being one of 
cars, and not of price, at any time 

We find on December 31, 1901, a stock of 1600 tons; much of this sold 
and held for cars to load out. 

Much credit should be given the St. Louis merchants, when yon con- 
sider that they had to go to Michigan, Indiana and Iowa, and in some 
instances, Nebraska, to get hay, that they, might meet the requirements of 
the enlarged trade. Seven-eighths of the hay received on this market in 
December came from Michigan and Indiana. 

KBGBIFTS AKD SHIPMKNTfl OF HAY FOB A 8BBIB8 OF YBAB8. 



Tbab. 







U97. 



]»1 



im. 



Tons. 
884,356 

m,8ao 

160,860 

178,616 

380,863 

196,683 

169,969 

141,888 

181,148 

141,898 

114,098 

116,846 

107,884 

86,894 

86,078 

97,976 



Tom. 

117,667 

180,777 
64,888 
46,488 
64,067 

107*960 
69,046 
41,288 
80,096 
88,078 
88,868 
40,847 
68,682 
84,666 
88,861 
80,008 
88,886 



Stock in store December Slat, 1886, about 7,600 tons. 



*. 


«« 


«4 


«( 


81st, 1896,. 


4« 


8,360 


i« 


M 


tc 


4< 


«« 


81st, 1897, 


i< 


8,800 


« 


•• 


(« 


CI 


«« 


8l8t, 1898, 


«< 


3.600 


It 


•« 


«< 


« 


tt 


Slst, 1899, 


«* 


8,600 


«i 


C« 


•« 


•< 


• 1 


8Ut, 1900, 


t< 


3.040 


<i 


«« 


«• 


tt 


(t 


Slst, 1901. 


It 


1,600 


«i 



TBADE AND OOHIfESCB OF 



RBCBIPTS AND SHIPHBKT8 OF HAY DURINa 1900 AND 1901. 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRIC£S OF HAY DURING 1901. 



MONTHB. 


No. 1 Tlmothj, 
per ton. 


No. 1 Pr&lrle. 
per ton. 




$11.60 @ 18.60 
11.60 13.76 
11.60 4.00 
3.60 1.60 
2.00 l.GO 
12.00 16.60 
2.60 17.60 
8.00 18.00 
2.60 16.60 
13.60 U.60 
18.00 M.60 
18.60 16.00 


$8.60 a 
».60 
B.60 
10.00 
10.60 
10.60 
10.80 
13.60 
10.60 

Hloo 

IS.OO 





















































THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



219 



SALT. 

BBCBIPT8 AMD 8HXPMBNTS FOB TWSNTT-FOUB TSAB8. 



Tbax. 


Raoaim. 


Shumshts. 




Bairelo. 


SaokB. 


Bulk in Bus. 


BanelB. 


Sacks. 


Balk in Bob. 


1901 

1900 

1890 

1968 

1897 

1898 

1895 

1894 

1898 

189S 

lan 

1899 

1899 

1888 

1887 

1886 

1889 

1884 

1889 

1889 

1881 

1888 

1819 

1879 


316,285 
988,106 
427,020 
888,120 
861,685 
899.666 
804,204 
248,880 
241,189 
290,487 
881,671 
886,189 
298,668 
880.110 
894.676 
400,868 
887,787 
486,440 
886,175 
297,425 
282,848 
818,879 
244.066 
271,621 


85,280 
27,675 
28,266 
48,280 
88,046 
80.168 
72,798 
60.787 
80,198 
48,068 
49,478 
88,840 
81,816 
24,640 
82,060 
61,902 
48,881 
68,287 
57,081 
48,760 
78,880 
61,848 
78,846 
178.781 


772.800 
776,160 
661,280 
461,540 
410,460 
454,160 
804,080 
620,600 
864,020 
478,900 
888,440 
168,080 
804,080 
854,700 
890,400 
847,160 
548.700 
496,800 
696,720 
868,200 
814,720 
888,868 
488,788 


288,'760 
870,406 
819,911 
220,079 
267,106 
388,641 
288,404 
106,481 
280,280 
816,679 
846,691 
280,869 
268,410 
297,126 
896,487 
800,671 
818,988 
986,287 
801,188 
818,185 
289,168 
221,966 
218,997 


•••••• 

20,846 
40,201 
29,826 
18,867 

9,840 
17,048 

8,628 
16,769 
88,266 
26,808 
96,678 

8,223 
22,821 

9,474 
11,668 

8,861 
18,246 
14,647 
16,619 
25,187 
21,688 
21,001 
88,049 


'10,086 

16,680 

44,800 

17,840 

23,086 

64,820 

22,960 

200,680 

140,028 

68,015 

70,020 

144,800 

187,680 

92,810 

66,924 

846,828 

228,020 

467,888 

246,071 

182,882 



BB0BIFT8 Aia> 8HIPME1ITS OF 8AJLT FOB 1901. 



Bt 



Gblcogo ft Alton B.B. (Mo. DiT.) . . 

idaiioariPaeilleBatlroAd 

9LIu4k San FnmciBOo Ballzoad . . 

WabaehBaflroad (Wast) 

St. T,^ K.O. ftCMondo B.B..... 

]Io..&ni8asftTazaBR. B 

St Loaia Bouthwefltern BJB 

St lj.«Iraii Ubimtatn ft So. B. B. .. 

nUnaiu Oentral B.B 

WisTlIle, Hend'son ft St. L. B. B. 

Loalarflle ft NasbTille B.B 

l[6blleftOhioB.B 

Bonthem Railway 

BattliiiOTeftObioB.-W.B. B 

Ghioaso * Alton B.B. 

0., C. C. ft St. Louis B.B 

YMklalia B. B. 

WalMsh lUilioad(BaBt) 

Toledo^ St. Lools ft Western B. B. 
Ghiosgo, Pwnrla ft St. Loids B.B. . . 
Chlosso,BnrlingtDa AQoiney B.B. 

8t.L.,Keokn]cftK.-W.B.B 

BiTor. 



TolBl 



BxoniPTS. 



Saoks. 



200 
18,020 



86 



2,810 



1,860 
860 
1,700 
8,960 
4,600 
7,886 



85,280 



Bbls. 



1,686 



200 
120,720 



620 

6,290 

1,886 

11,020 

76,646 

82,786 

6^,400 

726 



816,285 



Gars, 
InBolk. 



1 
617 



802 



1 

21 

6 

147 

66 

89 

180 



1,880 



SHIFMBBT8. 



Sacks. 



260 



20 



8,866 

6,740 

8,080 

10,290 

60 

SO 

616 



160 

'io 



10 



200 
886 
864 

40,800 



Bbls. 



1,186 

68,872 

69,460 

16,196 

790 

64,474 

17,586 

26,126 

88,865 

110 

160 

6,410 

920 

606 

1,540 

200 

1,680 

9,030 



260 

100 

2,886 

12,962 



922,883 



Oars. 
LiBidk. 



18 
8 
1 
1 
6 
6 



2 

1 



2 



44 



TftADB AHD OOMMSROK OF 



CANDIES. 



St Louis continues to be one of the greatest candy markets in the 
United States. 

The volume of business in 1901 has been about 25% larger than in 1900, 
and the class of goods purchased during the year would show an increasing 
appreciation of the higher grades of confectionery by consumers generally. 

There are seven large factories in St. Louis, employing about 2,000 
hands and pa3ring in wages nearly three-quarters of a million dollars per 
annum. 

All grades of candies are manufactured, from the cheapest to the most 
expensive, thus offering to the purchaser, whether he be wholesaler or 
retailer, facilities for selection unsurpassed by any other market in the 
country. 

The trade extends over nearly the entire United States, reaching on the 
east to the New England and the Atlantic Coast States, and on the west to 
the Pacific Slope. 

St. Louis is geographically the center of the Mississippi Valley, and 
enjoys exceptional advantages as a distributing point. This gives St. Louis 
oonfectioners a predominating position with the Central, Western and 
Southern States. 

The confectionery manufacturers of St. Louis are progressive, alert and 
maintain a pre-eminent reputation for integrity and fairness, and their 
business constitutes a very important element in the city's manufacturing 
industry, and aggregates between tliree and four million dollars per 
annum or about 60,000,000 pounds per year. 



THX OITT OF ST. liOXnS. 221 



DRIED FRUIT. 



Bt HonfAxnr Bbothxbs Pboduob Go. 



Ab a dried tndt market St. Louis 1b of considerable importance, being 
the recelying and distribntlng center for tlie products of the surrounding 
states. Missouri and Illinois are gaining fast in fruit producing capacity; 
northwest Arkansas is also getting to be a great fruit section. Apples are 
the principal fruit raised^ and this part of the country is particularly well 
adapted for this the most staple of all fruits. The writer considers that 
the apple is entitled to this rank in the fruit line because it is used more 
extensively than any other, this is undoubtedly due to its good keeping 
qualities in the fresh state, and dried or evaporated it keeps longer than 
any other fruit Apples on that account are extensively exported in large 
qoantities green, evaporated and sun dried. 

St. Louis is also a great market for California dried fruits of all kinds. 
Pnmes, peaches, apricots^ pears and raisins are handled by our dealers in 
large quantities. 



BECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OF DRIED FBUTT. 

BB0BIFT8. SHIFMBIITB 

Ska. and BUb. Bks. and Bblf . 

1901 229.814 860,288 

1900 168,981 818,275 

1899 810,064 848,821 

1898 908,817 285,189 

18W 267,489 441,706 

1899 80,406 140,000 

1899 180,908 189,888 

1894 99,406 210,088 

Wl 100,016 200,888 

18M 160,786 118,488 

1881 is8»982 vaijm 

1899 180,917 212,888 

1898 120,788 «8,8W 



222 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



SEEDS. 



HBCBIPTS FOR FOITR TEARS. 





1901. 


1900. 


1890. 


1898. 


BBIDB 


8Mk8 


Biuli. 


Tom. 


Sacks 


BoBb. 


Tons. 


Sacks 


Bosh. 


Tons. 


Sacks 


Bosh. 


Tons. 


Flax.... 
Oth6r . . 


188 
69,556 


196,500 


•••••• 

2,990 


146 
09.968 


549,600 




990 
88,216 


504,600 


'8,ii5 


1.012 
70,776 


661.400 




Cotton. 




4,940 


8,640 













Shipment of Flaxseed for 1888, 6,154 sacks and 46,976 bushels. 

'• " •• 1889, 9,686 " •* 840,888 

1890, 518 

1891, 718 
1898, ... 



ti 
« 
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1894, 
1896, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 



.< 
•< 
11 
«« 
•( 

M 
<l 
CI 

<l 
«• 
11 
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700,160 
190,011 
161,248 



« 
tt 
it 

** 156;557 
*• 825,806 
•• 885,845 
" 606,879 
445,668 
294,045 
248,871 
•' 457,154 
88,967 






«f 



H 
<< 
tl 
f 

14 
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tt 
• « 
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M 
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FLAXSEED. 



Monthly range in price of prime in oar lots (small lots sold at 2 and 6 
cents less) for three years. 





1901. 


1900. 


1899. 


•TannaiTT ....*.....«.... 


160 0178 
168 178 
150 1 60 

149 152 
166 1 67 
1 67 168 

150 1 66 
1 87 166 
1 87 1 88 
1 88 1 48 


146 dl60 
1 92 1 58 
167 162 
1 63 170 
162 1 65 
156 1 58 
1 86 160 
1 25 1 46 
142 166H 
146 1 75 
150 1 78 
168 


106 

1 11 

1 10 

1 10 

98 

95 

98 

98 

102 

1 18 

126 

184 


dl 18)^ 


Febmary 

March.: 


112X 
117 


Auril 


1 16 


fiSy:!!!:::::::::;;;:.;;:::::;;;.:;::..:; 


1 12>^ 


Jane .i.t ........«........t-t 


100 


July 


96 


W lAA/ •■..••••.•.•.•.*.••..■.•••...«.*•... 

Aiisast-..t...tr«..- wT TTi 


1 143^ 


ft4n>teinb4r.......«.mTT^ -TTT , 


1 15 


Occober • 


1 28)4 


November. ........r.T..t...Tr-T 


1 80 


December 




146 



THE OTTY or 8T. LOUIS. 



BSOKPTS AMD flmPKBHTS OV BUTTBB AMD OHSBSB FOB 1901. 





.nm. 


0->». 




■»&"■ 


««■■ 


•^r*" 


ffllipm't 








i,iS 






'•ffi« 


88,400 


S,U4 


W»b««h KUlwiy, (Wfnt) 

i5Sffl.eT5.Vrr.":.?:::::::::::::::;: 


S:!S! 
■■■■8:iBb' 1 


81, BOO 

as 

878, gM 


318 
3SB 


18,483 

Si 768 






.... ..... .. 

S:a 
g:!S 

1,360 


7,»1 

.is 

269,80(1 
S8;800 






14S 

18,308 

8,860 

1,340 

79o;»40 


^si^^::*.;-^^;;;;;;;;;:;;:;:;;; 








\'!m 












IBS1IS^?";;ee;; 


..ffiS 

■SSI 

""m,8a" 


30,000 
18,100 

81.808 


3;*B0 


8,11? 








































IS,4T8,9» a 


903,114 


813,780 










13,901,90 B 

i::a!S i 
III 1 

iiBTSige i 

li:ffl:S i 

U,aSl,K4 4 

9.aM:«a 1 




88 ) 

S i 

I i 

) 


S'ffi 


^•g:::::::;:::::::::;::::-::;::.:?' 




248, ua 








iS-ffi 




: ^ErEiEE:;;;:;;;;: 


lis 








106,104 





RSOEXFTS Ain> SHIPIQKirTS OF BOGS. 



IW, PaokBgH . 



SEIPMBjnS. 

TT0,4]3 
in,434 



796,490 
«M,»88 
806,77* 



K3J6B 
174,041 
ni,T41 



224 TBU>E AND OOmaiBOX OF 

FRUIT AND PRODUCE. 

By Masubt O. Bighmohi). 



St. Louis in 11X^1 not only maintained lier record as a ffreat distribatins 
oenteT; bat surpassed the fi;ood record made in 1900 by m>m 15% to ^%. 
Tlie sections tliat look to m. Louis for the marketing of their products are 
not confined to any particular locality, but take in the entire LouislaDa 
Purchase. 

Ilie 1901 crop of apples for the United States was ocmsidered lirht; hut 
being scattered and a few in most of the apple belts, was probab^ under 
estimated. While the West had only about 40% of a crop, it proved to be 
the center of attraction for the laree Eastern buyers^ and the prices paid 
rewarded the growers very handsomely. The receipts for St. Louis, 
691^404 barrels, does not include the local crop, which was moved to 
market by wa«^ns, and can oonservately be estimated at 100,000 barrels. 

While the local crop of potatoes was only about 60% of that of 1900', our 
receipts from idl sources exceeded those of 1900 nearly 26%, total 
receipts for 1901 being 8,085,659 bushels. These figures do not include the 
wagon receipts, which can safely be estimated at 600,000 bushels, nor do 
the receipts take into account the immense movement from the American 
Bottoms, where 8,000 carloads were handled by our St. Louis firms, repre- 
senting 1,500,000 bushels. Owing to the shortage in the crop, values were 
much Detter than have existed for several years, netting the growers more 
money than their previous lar^e crop. The importation of foreign 
potatoes to this market was indulged in to some extent, but was not found 
to be profitable, the quality not being as good as those grown in the 
northern states. 

The general onion crop of the United States for 1901 was below the 
average ; and taking into consideration that our local crop was considered 
a failure, the receipts of 55,782 packages and 280.000 bushels should be 
con^dered as a good showing. Prices have ruled high throughout the 
season. 

The cabbage crop was not considered as large as usual ; but owinff to 
the fact that E& Louis manufactures more kraut than any citv in the Umon. 
the receipts of cabbage was veiy large, figuring up from all sources 8,800 
cars. The South ana the Southwest look to St. Ltouis as their distributing 
market when their crops is on, and when exhausted come to this market 
for their supply for both cabbage and kraut. 

The melon crop was cut short by the long continued drouth, which 
accounts for the receipts being under those of past favorable seasons. The 
receipts for 1901 from all pomts (including cantaloupes) were 3,240 cars. 
St. Louis is the largest melon market in the united States. 

St. Louis as a distributing market for tomatoes is by far the largest in 
the United States. The immense crops which are grown in the South are 
mostly all forwarded here and then distributed to the other large markets. 
While but a few years ago tomatoes were shipped in a small way, now it is 
not an uncommon tUng to see solid train loads coming to thu market. 
Our local crop in 1901 was cut short by the continued dry weather; conse- 
quently added very little to the receipts. 

The receipts of oranges were 746,970 boxes, coming^largely from 
California; the receipts includes perhaps 50.000 boxes from jPlonda, which 
is the most received from there since their disastrous freeze. 

The receipts of lemons were 158,660 boxes. There were 1,002 cars of 
bananas received in 1901. 

The receipts of grapes was not as large as in 1900, but the 450 cars 
received should be considered as a good showing. 



THS cutt of bt. Lonis. 
BEAKS. 

BIOWFTB AMD SHIPmNTfl FOB TWBMTr-On TKAB8. 









~- 


s 


..IS!. 

Biuh. 


WUtfl 


H 


In Bulk. 
Bn»h. 


8m.*bta 


wo;:::;:;;;;::;;: 


1 


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■si 

UI/OO 

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sss 
li 

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CASTOR BEANS. 

MtOTTHLT BAMGB Dt PKIOI OF FBDfS, Dt OAR LOTS, 1901. 
II July $1 M 



^::: 



POTATOES AND ONIONS. 

BB0SIPT8 AMD HUlFmNTS FOR I'WKM'i'I-OXI TSABS. 



3 taken oC FoWbwi lualcd In wacona, « 



ih woold piobabl; iwell the 



TBU>X AHD OOVKKRCE OF 



BECEIFTS AND SHIPMENTS OF SUNDRY ABTICLB8 
FOB 190X. 





^^ 




Apples 




Sai,4M 


62»,M2 

4.667,869 

1.863 

68,980.780 

8.180 

348,443,080 

2,419,140 

1,070,900 






^OT 


1.002 
«,199,600 








... barreltaadtltroei 
....pounds 


FreihBerf 


110,707.200 

1,190,9M 
92,065 

i.»rj,9eB 

i7o,aoft 




Cordage ana Bope... 








„ 











13,906 
179,780 
770,472 




bOXM 


Egg* 


....paokagM 


1,022,646 
98,060 






44,898 


HopB 


....balM 


6,843 
371,030 
168,660 
182,270 
178,986 
688,200 
44,026 

6,428 










boxsi 


124,047 
189.518 
684^6 






















....tons 


1,881 

678,688 

2,006 

42,138 

180,686 




746,870 
78,086 
40,178 
106,942 
129,986 
1,066 
6,751 






"Zinc 


„ 


Pig Iron " 




M 








8oftD 


bOZM 


988,113 
8,289,220 




pounds 


u,i44,i0a 

89,680 

28,760 

96,988 

2,023.896 


Tin 




WiDSB and Liquors. . . 
Bno »nd Spelter 


.. barrels 

. boxes and eases... 
...slabs 


2,18ei6i7 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



227 



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Aglab^ Jambs F., January a4th. 

Bano^ Ai>olphx7S, July 24th. 

Bbbg, NiCHOLASy March 10th. 

BiBD, JoHK, Angast 2nd. 

Block, David, July 23rd. 

OoCHBLAKy Fbkd G., April 8th. 

Cotton, Wm. C, July 2l8t, 

Cbbyblino, H. 0., February 11th. 

Dacet, Patbick, July 18th. 

Damhobst, Oaspeb, August 29th. 

Dblaito, Bufus J., December 10th. 

Douglass, John H., July 20th. 

Ebeble, Ohables a., February 12th. 

FoBSTEB, Mabquabd, Januaiy 11th. 

FuBLOHG, Wk., September 8th. 

Hauseb, G. a., February 26th. 

Hudson, B.F., January 6th. 

Kaisbb, John H., September Uth. 

Kalb, G. O., April 8th. 

Ebisbb, John P., July 27th. 

Lainb, Michael, April 26th. 

Labkin, THOBfAS H., July 29th. 

Madill, Gbobob a., December 11th. 

Mabkham, Wm. H., January 8th. 

Meinbcke, William, May 10th. 

Metsbnbubg, T. a., March 29th. 

MiNCH, Gbobgb, February 26th. 

McMillan, Wm., Noyember 16th. 

Nichols, Wm., May 18th. 

O^Nbil, Petbb a., Noyember 27th. 

O'Beillt, Thomas, February 24th. 

Pfeifeb, Wm., Noyember 18th. 

Phinnet, H. B., December 26th. 

QuiNLTVAN, Thomas £., July 29th. 

Bobinson, Gbobgb B., October 6th. 

Bothschild, Julius, January 6th. 

Schlossstbin, Louis, September 19th. 

Schmidt, Budolph, August 2nd. 

Sbntbb, Wm. M., January 29th. 

Shapleioh, Fbank, Januaiy 1st. 

Shabp, Ohbis, . February 8th. 

Shaw, Wm. J., April 12th. 

Walsh, Bdw., Jb., June 30th. 

TouNG, Chables a., June 7th. 



-Mi BMBBRS 



.OF THE- 



Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis. 

JANUARY 14th, 1903. 



NUMBER OF MEMBERS. 1.832. 



A^Members are requested to examine with reference to their own name^and 
address^ and report to the Secretary If incorrect^ also to inform him of any 
changes that occor in style of Arm or business location. 

Name. Firm. Business. Location. 

Abadie, E. 8 St. L. S. W. Ry., Com'l Agent 909 Olive St. 

Abeles. Robt Abeles & Taussig, Lumber 618 Rialto Buildine. 

Able, Sam. T R. G. Dun & Co., Mercantile Agency 314 Pine st. 

Abraham, W. D W. D. Abraham & Co., Hay and Grain East St. Louis, 111. 

Adams, C. M Waters Pierce Oil Co., Sec'y and Treas 816 Olive st. 

Adams, R. M R. M. Adams, 182 Chamber of Commerce. 

Adams, W. H Chas. A. Sweet Prov. Co., Butter, Cheese, etc. .401 N. Second st. 

Adrianoe, K. R Wabash 8c Lackawana Despatch, Agt 800 R. R. Exchange. 

Aff, J. Geo., Jr F. W. Clemens Feed Co 8858 Gravios ave. 

Ahem, Albert M Funsten Bros. & Co., Commission 109 N. Main st. 

Akin, Thomas Commission 208 Cham, of Com. 

Albers, Clifford H C. H. Albers Com. Co 400 Cham, of Com. 

Albers, C. H C. H. Albers Com. Co., Commission .400 Cham, of Com. 

Albrecht, Victor Eberle-Albrecht Flour Co 218 S. Second st. 

Albrecht, H. S Sohoellbom- Albrecht Machine Company 416 N. Main st. 

Allaway, Jas. W Armour Packine Co., 2080 Clark ave. 

Allen, Geo. L Fulton Iron Works, Second and Carr sts. 

Allen, George W Southern Hotel Co., . . Fourth and Walnut sts. 

Allen, Edmund T E. T. & C. B. Allen, Lawyers Wainwright Building. 

Allen, James H Allen-West Com. Co., 104 S. Main st. 

Allen, J. Gran Morton & Co., 609 Cham, of Commerce. 

Allison, James W Glass Manf . . . 006 Security Building. 

Alt. Henry Harbor Commissioner, City HaU. 

Altheimer, Benj.. . . Altheimer & Rawlings, Bonds and Stocks. . . .217 N. Fourth st. 

4inbs, Joseph B 8228 Caroline st. 

Ames, Henry Hotel Beers. 

Anderson, w. B Nanson Com. Co., 202 Chamber of Commerce. 

Anderson, J. F Georgia Railway. G. W. Agent 808 Cham, of Com. 

Anderson, Lorenzo E Mercantile Trust Co Columbia Bldg. 

Andrews, Wm. O Andrews & McClellan, 4060 Easton ave. 

Annan, R. P Annan, Burg & Co., Commission 117 Cham, of Com. 

•Annan, Roger P., Jr Annan, Burg & Co 117 Cham, of Com. 

Arbuokle, James Foreini Trade Assn., Manager 110 N. Fourth st. 

Armstrong, L. A T. J. Moss Tie Co., Railroad Ties 720 Security Bldg. 



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XBMBBBB OF THB 



Name. Firm. 

Archer, W.B 

Arena, Henry G 

Arnold, Henry Jno. G. Haas Soap Co., 

Arp, Egbert EgKert Arp & Co., 

Asnoraft, E. B Blue Ridge Despatoh. 

Atkinson, Robt Robt. Atkinson & Co., 

Aufderbeide, A. O F. W. Aufderheide, 

Aufderbeide, Walter. . .F. W. Aufderheide, 
Axtell, W. C Union Storage Co., 



Business. Location. 

Broker 2811 Washington are. 

Commission 8M N. Commercial at. 

Soap 5020 Benedict at. 

812 8. Third St. 

706 chemical Bldg. 

Commission 808 N. Main st. 

Commission 22 S. Commercial st. 

Commission 22 S. Commercial at. 

Manager Levee and Mullanphy. 



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Backer, Henry 1808 S. Fourteenth at. 

Backer, Mathias U13 S. Tenth at. 

Backer^eorge H 921 Rutger st. 

Bacon, Williamson Tyler Estate, President 406 Market st. 

Baer, Bernard Bernard Baer & Co., Produce and Proy.1418 K. Broadway. 

BagnelL Wm The Bagnell Timber Co., Equitable Bld^. 

Bam. waiter Chas. L. Crane & Co., Insurance lo8 X. Third st. 

Baird, W. J St. Charles, Mo. 

Baker, Allen Allen Baker & Co., Brokers 708 Security Building. 

Baker, George A Continental Nat'l Bk., President Fourth and Olive. 

Baker, F. M The Greenleaf-Baker Grain Co Atchison, £a«. 

Baker, Holland W Colby & Baker, Civil Engineers. .708 Lincoln Trust B. 

Baker, J no. F 4300 St. Louis ave. 

Baker, I. G 411 Olive st. 

Baker, E Paton, Bell & Co., Cotton Cotton Exchange. 

Baker, Geo St. Louis Milling Co., Carlinville. 111. 

Ballard, T. R Ballard. Messmore & Co., Commission 520 Chamb. of Com. 

Ballard. J. O., Jr Ballard. M. & Go , Commission 520 Cham of Com. 

Baltz,FredL MUlstadt ^filling Co., MiUsadt. 111. 

Bannerman, Jas. .Meyer,Bannerman& Co., Saddlery 616 K. Slxtn st. 

Baroo, Thomas Barcoville, III. 

Bardenheier, John Jno. Bardenheie'r Wine & Liq. Co 212 Market st. 

Barklage, Louis Wemse & Dieckman, Brokers 817 N. Fourth st. 

Barnard, Geo. D Geo. D. Barnard & Co., Stationers. . .Yandeventer & Laclede. 

Barnes, £. H Hotel Beers, Grand ave. & Olive. 

Barnes, Chas. W. Real Estate., 216 Wainwright Bldg. 

Bamhart, Wm. R Bamhart Mer. Co., Fancy Groceries. . . .518 N. Second st. 

Bamidge, Aug. J Chas. E. Prunty, Clerk IS. Main st. 

Barret, Arthur B Barret Com. Co., 707 N. Third st. 

Barrett, John F 609 Rlalto Bldg., Chicago. 

Barron, Chas. B Barron & Wilson, Grain Samplers 422 Kialto Blag. 

Barrv, Thos. J . Barry- Wehmiller Mach.Co., Mill Builders 21st and Walnut. 

Barstow, Chas. W .515 Locust st. 

Bartlett, Edwin L Bartlett Com. Co., 606 Chamber of Commeroe. 

Bartlett, John B J. B. Bartlett Grain Grain Gay Building. 

Bartlett, Oscar Z L. Bartlett & Son Co., Com 28 Cham. Com., Milwaukee. 

Barutio, B., Jr B. Barutio, Commission 125 N. Main at. 

Bascom, Jos. D Broderick & Bascom Rope Co 809 N. Main st. 

Bascome,Westem. . West'n Basoome & Co., Insurance Agent 118 N. Third st. 

Batdorf , W. L W. L. Batdorf & Co., Flour and Feed Belleville, 111. 

Bates. A. C Mississippi Valley Elevator, Foot of Madison st. 

Battaile, L. A American Ex. Bank, Cashier 207 N. Broadway. 

Bauer, A. H Bauer Bros., Brokers 812 K. Fourth st. 

Baur, Andrew Baur Flour Co., 807 N. Second st. 

Baulch, John J . . Interstate Transf . Co. Trf . Manager Security Building. 

Bayha, George Sausage Maker 8001 Carolina ave. 

Bayrd, E. A Matthew Addy & Co., Iron Commission.407Bank Com. Bldg. 

Baxter. Theo. P Parrott-Baxter Grain Co 106 Cham. Com. 

Beardsley, 0. F Picker & Beardsley, Commission 118 N. Main at. 

Beck, Henry W Feed and Seed Store... 20th and Pine. 

Beck, Harry G. .H. W. Beck & Sons Feed & Seed Co 6701 Manchester rd. 



MBBOHANTB' EXOHANQE of ST, LOUIS. 3 

Name. Firm. Business. Looation. 

Becker, Edward C 8112 Cass ave. 

Becker, Aug. H Aug. H. Becker, Fresco Painter. 4216 Page are. 

Becker, Conrad C. Becker, Miller Red Bud, 111. 

Becker, Hugo J. O. Haas Soap Co., Soap 6020 Benedict are. 

Becker, Herman C. Becker, Millm^ Red Bud, 111. 

Beokmann, Adoiph G . .£}. Beckmann A Co., Commission 1023 N. Tiiird st. 

Beokmann, Geo. H Eggers Milling Co., Teamster Eighth and Clark aye. 

Beokmann, W. E Bakers' and Confectioners' Supplies. .10 S. Second. 

Beer, H. M Broker 60i Security Building. 

Beimes. Frederick H 8126 N. Twenty-third st. 

BeU, Nioh. M Peper Tobacco Warehouse Co 1112 Market st. 

Bell, James G J. G. Bell & Co., Commission 804 N. Commercial st. 

Bell, James W St. L. Safe Deposit Co. & Saving Bank 618 Locust st. 

Belz^ J. H J. H. Belz & Co., Pork Dealers 8601 8. Broadway. 

Bemis, Stephen A Bemis Bros. Bag Co., Bags 601 8. Fourth st. 

BemiB, Judson 8 Bemis Bros. Bag Co., 601 8. Foujth st. 

Bendick, John H Grocer 6089 Scanlan ave. 

Berg, Nicholas Deceased 

Bergmann, Conrad C. Bergmann Feed Co 2718 Chouteau aye. 

Bergmann, B. C C. Bergmann Feed Co 2718 Chouteau ave. 

Bergmann, Robt. J C. Bergmann Feed Co 2718 Chouteau ave* 

Bemet, Christian Bemet & Craft, Millers and Exporters. 

1440 N. Broadway. 

Bernheimer, Marcus Marcus Bemheimer Milling and Mercantile Co^ 

208 N. Fourth st. 

Berry, H. J W. L. Green Commission Go 62 Laclede Bldg. 

Bethmann, Robt St. Louis Brew. Assn., East St. Louis, 111. 

Betts, John Drummond, Betts & Co., Stock & Bond Brokers. 18 Laclede Bid. 

Betts, R. A R. A. & C. T. Betts, 1005 Pine st. 

Beyis, Alfred Bevis Rock Salt Co., 607 Bank Com. Bldg. 

Biebinger. F. W 1421 So. Uth st. 

Biedenstein, Henry Grocery 1208 S. Broadway. 

Bi^er, Adoiph Curled Hair, etc 27 Ferry st. 

Biekert, John M J. M. Biekert & Co., Commission 980 N. Third st. 

Bieser, Fred 2200 N. Second st. 

Bilbro, H. B Burlington Elevator Co., 62 Laclede Bldg. 

Billon, Guy P Bonds, etc., 807Olivest. 

Birch, James T 1616 Missouri ave. 

Bittner, Jacob Real Estate 6226 Ridge ave. 

Bixbj, W. K Mo. Car & Foundry Co., Lincoln Trust Building. 

Blakely, John W.. .Blakely-Sanders-Mann Co., Live Stock Union Stock. Yds. 

Blakely, Walter J. . .St. Louis Sanitary Co., 3968 Missouri ave. 

Blanke, Detlef J Insurance Agent 416 Locust st. 

Blankenship, H Baird & Blankenship, Grain MoKittrick, Mo. 

Blaufuss, Wm 2844 Henrietta st. 

Block, David. Jr Feed 8856Pinest. 

Block, Wm. A 1804 Warren st. 

Bloeeom, C. D 829 Union Boul. 

Blossom, H. M H. M. Blossom & Co., Insurance Century Bldg. 

Blossom, H. A H. M. Blossom & Co., Insurance Century Building. 

Blow, C. W American Linseed Co., Sixteenth and Clark ave. 

Blut bardt, Rob t . B 

Boeok, Geo. H Adam Boeck & Co., Real Estate 622 Chestnut st. 

Botlnger, John N 116 N. Third st. 

B^^ard, John J Real Estate 8682 8. Broadway. 

Bonle, Frank G Haase & Bohle Carriage Co 1800 Pine st. 

Bohle, Louis C Louis C. Bohle Livery Co., 1118 Chestnut st. 

Bohnenkamp, John Hoffman Hdg. & Stave Co Dexter, Mo. 

Boisselier, Onas. L Farmer 6umbo,Mo. 

B<risseller, B. W Accountant 810 Chestnut st. 

Boland, J. I« J. L. Boland Book and Stationery Co. . .Fourth and Vine sts. 

Bollin, A. A. BoUin & Co. Insurance 606 Marion st. 

BoUman, O. H BoUman Bros. Co., 1100 Olive st. 

Bonsack, F. Architect 602 Columbia Bulding. 

Boschert, Roman 8711 Casa ave. 



MEMBERS OF THE 



Name. 



Finn. 



BuBinew. 



Location. 



- 1 



#- ^ 

^^^3 




'r , 



J- 






•'• virm 

■ - -W' 

, '♦' J* - *- 

- *t : '' 

* • ; > i ■ 1 ■ 

• . f - . •?• ../ 



Bosler. SebastiaD 

Bostick, R. H Jas. M. Houston 

Bowman, Theo, G 

Bowman, Chas. G National Enam. & 

Boyd, W. G 

Boyer, Julius A 

Boyle, W. F Boyle, Priest & Lehmann, 

Bradley, G. Douglas Cobb & Gardner, 

Bradley, Geo. J Southern Railway, 

Bradner, H. T Crescent Powder Co. 

Bradshaw, Thos. J 

Brady, Hugn J... Mercantile Delivery Co., 

Bramblett, J. W Carondelet Milling Co. 

Braun, Geo. H Braun-Lang Com. Co., 

Braun, Joseph L. . . .Daniel P. Byrne & Co., 

Bray, Joseph W Campbell Glass and 

Bray, Wm Wm. Bray & Co., 

Brazill, J. P Lackawanna Line, 

Breoht, G. A. V Gus. V. Brecht 

Bredenkamp, F. W G. H. Kemper & 

Breen, J. H Rosedale Hay & Gram Co. 

Brendeeke, Edwin T. .Chouteau Ave. Ice & 

Brendeoke, H. C 

Brennan, J. Wallace D. B. Brennan 

Brennau, Martin J. ..United Elev. & Grain 

Briokey, S. H 

Brinokwirth, Louis . . .Brinokwirth-Nolker 
Brinckmeyer, E. H... Brinckmeyer-Meyer 

Brinson, H. L Brinson-Judd 

Brinson, L. B Brinson-Judd Grain 

Broadbent, Samuel 

Brookman, F. W F. W. Brockman 

Brockmann, FredP F. P. Brockmann 

Brockman, Arthur . . .Brinson-Judd Grain 

Brockmann, H. H 

Brockmeier, F. C Engelke & Feiner 

Broekmeier, J. G Brockmeier & Co,, 

Brockmeyer, H. G 

Broderiek, John J Broderick-Bascom 

Brodhack, JosephH 

Breeder, Henry 

Brooder. Geo. H Hy. Breeder & Sons, 

Broeg, Louis Siemers & Chisholm, 

Brolaski, Harry W N. O. Steamers, 

Bronson, E. P Cumberland Mills, 

Brookings, Robt. S. .Sam'lCupples Wooden 

Brookes. John F 

Brooks, Charles 

Brown, CM Lehigh & Wabash 

Brown G. W The Brown Shoe Co., 

Brown, L. W Jno. Wahl Commission 

Brown, James N American Cent. Ins. 

Brown, BenJ Brown-Clark Paper Co., 

Brown, Alex. H Brown Stock & Bona 

Bruck, Henry New Era Gro. Co., 

Brueckmann, Jno. G. . .Picker & Beardsley, 

Bruenemann, Ernst 

Brundage. S. P 

Bryden. Alex. A Bryden & Co., 

Buck, Thos. B 

Buck, M. M. . . .Continental National Bank, 

Buck, W. T Grain, etc. 

Buckland. Jos. A. .Jos. A. Buckland & Co., 

Buckmaster, W. P 

Buehler, Henry, Jr. .Buehler-Phelen Paint 



Real Estate Clayton, Mo. 

Grocer Co., 800 Spruce st. 

lU N. Fourth St. 

Stamping Co . . .Second and Cass ave. 
Ill Cham, of Com. 



Attorneys Laclede Building?. 

817 Chamber of Commerce. 

Chemical Bldff. 

124 Rialto Bldg. 

Chamber of Commerce. 

817 N. 12th St. 

7020 S. Broadway. 

204 N, Third at. 

Commission 318 Cham. Com. 

Paint Co Main and Gratiot sts. 

Commission 226 Market st. 

Agent 219 N. Fourth st- 

Butohers' Supply Co. 12th & Cass ave. 

Co., Feed East St. Louis, HI. 

Delmar and Cates ave. 

Cold Storage . . . .2100 Chouteau ave. 

Brewer 5147 Wells ave. 

Real Estate Co 816 Chestnut st. 

Co., 616 Chamber of Commerce. 

801 Chamber of Commerce. 

Brewing Co 1714 Cass ave. 

Hay and Grain Co. .1111 N. Broadway. 

Grain Co 208 Cham, of Com. 

Co 208 Chamber of Commerce. 



Com Co 806 N. Third st. 

Grain Co 816 Chestnut st. 

Co 208 Chamber of Commerce. 

Drugs Eldon, Mo. 

Milling Co 806 S. Broadway. 

Commission 118 S. Main st. 

1622 Hogan st. 

Rope Co 809 N. Bfain st. 

Merchant 2880 S. Broadway. 

Produce and Com 928 N. Third st. 

Commission 926 N. Third st. 

Commission 800 Cham, of Com. 

Agent 114 N. Eighth st. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

& Wll'ware Co. .Seventh and Spruce. 

8588 Lake ave.. Chicago, 111. 

2211 Sullian ave. 

Desp 809 RaUway Ex. 

Eleventh and Washington ave. 

Co 2 S. Main st. 

Co 416 Locust St. 

Second and St. Charles sts. 

Co Fourth and Locust sts. 

Produce 1709 8. Second st. 

Commission 118 N. Main st. 

Flour and Feed. .8758 S. Jefferson ave. 



Coke and Coal . . . 6th and Locust sts. 

Physician 2610 S. Jefferson ave. 

Fourth and Olive sts. 

Vleits. Kas. 

Commission 108 8. Third st. 

Broker 800 Pine st. 

Mfg. Co 828 Locust st. 



MBBOHANTS' BXOUANaS OF BT. liOUIS. 6 

Name. Finn. Business. Looation. 

Bull, Wm Fire InsuraDoe 117 N. Third st. 

Bulte, Henry J Bulte Com. Co., Flour 17 B. Main st. 

Bnnton. CM. . . .Green River Asphelt Co., 400 Railway Ezohanse. 

Burbridge, C. T Keller <fc Tamm Manufot'ing Co Victor and Main. 

Bnrdeau, J. P St. L. & Miss. Yal. Tr. Co., Freight Agent. .Main and Walnut sts. 

Bumann, £. F Grain Bunker Hill, Ills. 

Burg, Benry Annan, Burg & Co., Flour Commission 117 Cham. Com. 

Burg, William Iron and Steel 117 Cham. Com. 

Burg, Philip Philip Burg Grocer Co., 1250 S. Broadway. 

Burnet, Halsted Plows Candy Co., Twentieth and Market sts. 

Burr. Chas. P Chas. P. Burr & Co., Commission 824 Rialto Building. 

BuBch, Adolphus. . .Anheuser-Busch Brew. Assn Ninth and Pestalozzi. 

Busob, Aug. A. .Anheuser-Busch B. Assn., V. P Ninth and Pestalozzi sts. 

Buschman, E. L Modem Mfg. Co 102 W. Adams St., Chicago. 

BuBchman, A. H. .Buschman-Mueller Com. Co 414 Cham, of Com. 

Bushnell, D I D. I. Bushnel) & Co., Grain and Seeds 109 N. Second st. 

Buss, John B J. B. Buss, Mills 1444 N. Broadway. 

Butler, W. C W. C. Butler & Son, Insurance 844 Century Building. 

Butler, Edward Ed. Butler & Son, Horseshoer 15 8. Tenth st. 

Butler. John R Excelsior H. & T. Co., Pres't. Yandeyenter & Forest Pk. Bl. 

Bycrof t. Henry F Miller Gillespie, 111. 

Byrne, l>anie1 P Dan'l P. Byrne & Co 818 Chamber of Commerce. 

Byrne, Frank T Grand Trunk Railway, Agent 15 Laclede Building. 



Cabell, Ashley Attomey-at-Law 506 Olive st. 

Cady, L. Bertram L. Bertram Cady Co., Tailors 421 Olive st. 

Caffrey, Frank B 1121 N. Compton ave. 

Cahill, James G Bond and Stock Broker. .411 Olive st. 

Cain, P. R Gilmore & Ruhl, Clothiers Eighth and Lucas. 

Campbell, Geo. A Bemis Bros. Bag Co., .601 S. Fourth st. 

Camopell, Given Lawyer 658 Century Bldg. 

Campbell, James Bonds and Stock 218 N. Fourth st. 

Campfield. Chas. H Insurance 115 N. Third st. 

Cantrell, James G Seaboard Air Line, 407 Chamber of Com merce. 

Can tw ell, Harry J Columbia Lead Co., President 510 Pine st. 

Capen, Sam. D Geo. D. Capen & Co., Insurance 949 Century Building. 

Capen, Geo. H Geo. D. Capen & Co., Insurance 949 Century Building. 

Capen, Wallace C Capen Belting & Rubber Co 415 N. Main st. 

Carleton, Murray Carleton Dry Goods Co 900 Washington ave. 

Carlisle, David Feed and Grain 114 Chestnut st. 

Carlisle, Sam 8 . . Parrott- Baxter Grain Co 105 Cham, of Com. 

Carpenter, W. M Bryant & Stratton Com. Col. (Pres.) Century Bldg. 

Carpenter, Geo. O National Lead Co., Manager Tenth st. and Clark ave. 

Carpenter, Jas. M. . .J. M. Carpenter & Co., Real Estate Agents. . .811 Chestnut st. 

Carr, Alfred C Carr Bros., Insurance 204 N. Third st. 

Carr, Charles Y Carr Bros., Fire Insurance 204 N. Third st. 

Carr, Peyton T.. .United Elev. & Grain Co., President 516 Cham, of Com. 

Carreras, Ev. E Printer and Binder. .8d & St. Charles. 

Carroll, O. C. . . Carroll & Powell Insurance Agency Co 115 N. Third st. 

Carroll, Chas. E Hall & Carroll, Fire Loss Adjuster. .709 Carleton Bldg. 

Carroll, John F. Carroll & Edwards, Liquors 525 N. Second st. 

Carroll, James F Grain Greenville, 111. 

Carruthers, T. B 8217 Washington ave. 

Carruthers, Geo. F Mound City Hay Warehouse Co Ninth and Palm sts. 

Carruthers, W. W Eureka Mills, Gratiot st. and Theresa ave. 

Cartan, L. Y L. V. Cartan & Co., Real Estate 1006 Chestnut st. 

Carter, C. L Broker 114 N. Fourth st. 

Carter, Lemuel Ray Broker 114 N. Fourth st. 

Carter, T. W T. W. Carter 8^ Co., Commission 114 N. Fourth st. 



I 



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jfi 



i!' 



r 



1 
i 



J?T 



r ! 



XBMBKBS OF THB 



Name. 



Firm. 



BuBineM. 



Looation. 



Garter. UlyBsea B CoUinsville. 111. 

Case, Frank G Insnranoe SMt Gentury Building. 

GaBe. £.8 G. H. Albers Gom. Go., GommisBion 400 Gham. of Gom. 

Gaaeidy, Abner G GaBBidv BroB., Live Stock Gom .Go., Nat. Yds., B 8t.I«., HI. 

GasBidy, John W. . . .The GaBBidy Gom. Go 105 N. Fourth st., Quinoy, 111. 

Gatlin, B. F Forrester BroB., 611 Gham. Gom. 

Gaulfleld, James F Parrott* Baxter Grain Go 105 Gham. of Gom. 

Gave, Blmore. . .BuBohman-Gave Gom. Go Railway Bxohange Bids:. 

Gavender, John H . . Gavender & Thompson, Real Bstate 716 Ghestnut st. 

Ghadboume, G. W 900 Security Buildine. 

Ghaffraix, D. A Gapitalist St. Gharles ave^ N. O. 

Ghamberlain, Will F Seed Inspector 900 N. Bfain st. 

Ghamberiain, F. B F. B. Ghamberlain Gom. Go dOO N. Main st. 

Ghamberlin, £. G. .B. G. Ghamberlin & Go., Gommission 515 Gham. of Gomi. 

GhamberliiK G. R St. Louis Ice Mfg. & Storage Go 718 S. Main st. 

Ghambers, j as. H . . Jas. H. Ghambers & Co., Publishers 2940 Locust Rt. 

Ghandler, DeLaoy . . . Miss-yalley Trust Go Fourth andPine sts. 

Ghandler, James N L. & N. R. R., General Agent 206 N. Broadway. 

''"'"'^iirf i:lt&««ou'1si'*'.^^:{ ^-^'^--^ ^'- «i ou^e st. 

Ghapman, B. H 

Ghisholm, J. A. H Siemers & Ghisholm, Gommission 800 Gham. of Gom. 

Ghristian, Wilbur B Isaacs & Sherry Grain Go 213 Gham. Gom. 

Ghristie, James H. F. Kirk & Go., Kansas Gitv, Mo. 

Ghristy, H. W Wiggins Ferry Co., Security BuUding. 

Ghuroh, Alonzo G Wiggins Ferry Go 910 Security Building. 

Glaas, Fred Bock Spring Mills, 814 Manchester road. 

Glapp, Ozro W Broker U. L. Glub. Ghicago, III. 

Glark, Gharles 182 Laclede Buildine. 

Glark, Ghas. C Ghas. G. Clark & Co., Wholesale Grocers 25 8. Main st. 

Glark, Warren L. . .Benj. W. Glark Grocer Co 807 N. Second st. 

Glark, Benj. W Benj. W. Glark Grocer Co 807 N. Second st. 

Clark, James £ Mining 414 Fullerton Bldg. 

Glark, Hinman H . . . . Waters Pierce Oil Go Odd Fellows' Building. 

Glark, G. W TuUy & Glark, Architect & Bngn'r 415 Locust st. 

Clark, J. A Clark Bros., Feed Bast St. Louis. HI. 

Cleary, Michael 110 N. Twelfth st. 

Gleary, T. F R. Cleary Com. Co., 508 Chamber of Commerce. 

Clemens, F. W F. W. Clemens Feed Co., Feed 8867 Gravels ave. 

Cleveland, Henry D 5015 Fairmount ave. 

Clifford, Alfred 619 Security BuUding. 

Clifton, Daniel W Nanson Com. Co 202 Chamber of Commerce. 

Cobb, Seth W Cobb & Gardner. Commission 817 Gham. of Com. 

Cobb, C. W. S Glencoe Lime & Cemenc Go 1400-A Old Manchester Road. 

Gockrell, J. H 116 N. Fourth st. 

Cockrell, Ellas Grain Jerseyville, III. 

Cockrell, W. A Broker Merchants' Bxohange. 

Cohn, J. W Hunter Bros., Flour and Feed 61 Gay Bldg. 

Colby, W. A . . .F. W. Brockman Com. Co., 805 N. Third st. 

Cole, Geo The Prinz & Rau Mfg. Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Cole, Nathan . . . Nathan Cole Inv'stnrt Co., President 722 Jaccard Bldg. 

Cole, Amedee B. . . . Jno. Jackson Inv*t. Co., President 51 Gay Bldg. 

Cole, Charles B H. C. Cole Milling Co., Miller Chester, ifl. 

Cole, H. C H. G. Cole Milling Co., Chester, 111. 

Coleman H. C. . . .H. 0. Coleman Com. Co., 506 Gham. of Commerce. 

Colladay, Wm. R Whltaker & Co., Brokers 800 N. Fourth st. 

Collins, H. B Whitaker& Co., Brokers 800 N. Fourth st. 

Collins, Thos. R Martin Collins, Son & Co., Insurance 955 Gentury Bldg. 

Collins, Martin Martin Collins, Son & Co., Insurance 955 Century Bldg. 

Connor, James A Connor Bros. & Co., Commission Gay Building. 

Connor, P. P Connor Bros. &; Co., Commission Gay Building. 

Connor, M. J Connor Bros. & Co., Commission Gay Building. 

Connors, Denis M Lee Line Steamers, Superintendent Foot of Olive st. 

Conrades, Bdwln H Donk Bros. Coal Sc Coke Co 814 N. Fourth st. 

Gonzelman, Theophilus. . .Grunden -Martin Woodenware Go 801 S. Main st. 



lOEBOHAim SXOHANaS OF ST. IiOTJIB. 7 

Kftme. Firm. Business. Location. 

Cook, Douglas G Amerioan Wine Co., 8021 Cass are. 

Cooke, Miohael 4218 Cook ave. 

Goon, D. F Fort Soott, Kas. 

Cooper, A. D Graham Paper Co., 219 N. Main st. 

Coquara, I«. A Banker and Broker. .802 RIalto Bldg. 

Cordee,I> D. Cordes&Co., Flour and Feed 1928 8. Twelfth st. 

Cordes. W. H D. Cordes & Co., Flour and Feed 1926 8. Twelfth st. 

Cornelius. N.B..Comelius Mill Furnishing Co 1119 N. Sixth st. 

Cornell, Adolph Sohisler-Comeli Seed Co 818 N. Fourth st. 

Cornell, Ben P Sohisler-Comeli Seed Co 818 N. Fourth st. 

Comet, Edward Comet Bros., Grooers 18th and O'Fallon sts. 

Comet, HenryA Comet Bros., Grooers 1289 N. Thirteenth st. 

Cotirili, Geo. F*. . . .Green's Car Wheel Mfg. Co 8018 N. Broadway. 

Coadrey, Harry M H. M. Coudrey & Co., Insurance 964 Century Bidg. 

Cox, Albert Brinson-Judd Grain Co., 206 Cham. Com. 

Cox, Charles A Cox & Gordon, Pork Packers 1019 S. Third st. 

Coyle, B. H Hoosao Tunnel Line, Asent 204 Railway Exchange. 

Coyle, James F Coyle So Sargent, wholesale Silks. 1121 Wasnington ave. 

Craft, Henry G Bemet So Craft, Millers & Exporters,1440 N. Broadway. 

Craig, Willis G» Jr. . . W, L. Green Com. Co 02 Laclede Building. 

Cramer, G Q, Cramer Dry Plate Works, Shenandoah and Lemp are. 

Crawford, G. L J. E. Crawford So Son, Stocks and Bonds. .Bk. of Com. Bldg. 

Crawford, 8. W S. W. Crawford So Co., Lumber DeSoto, Mo. 

Crews, Thos.B Lawyer 816 N. Sixth st. 

Crothers, John C The McPheeters Warehouse Co 1104 N. Levee. 

Crone, C- C Real Estate 8602 N. Broadway. 

Collen, Allen H St. Louis Hay Exchange 720 S. Theresa are. 

Cnllen^ Michael J Cullen So Kelly, Livery 2785 Cass ave. 

Cummiskey, Jas Commission 921 N. Fourth st. 

Cunningham, C. A., St. L. Steel Barge Line, 710 Rialto Bldg. 

Cunningham, Dickson 417 Chamber of Com. 

Cunningham, P. J Cunningham Bros. Woolen Co Tenth and Locust sts. 

Cnpples, Sam'l SamU Cuppies Wood So Willowware Co . . .7th and Spruce sts. 

Civrie, W. I Robt. Breck, Insurance 985 Century Bldg. 

Cutliff, R. J Broker Chamber of Commerce. 



Daly, C. L Swift So Co., Packers. . . .National Stock Yards, III. 

Daly, £. F Dayton- Wooster Grain Co., 416 Chamber of Commerce. 

Dameron, Ed C Clarksvilie, Mo. 

Damhorst. Henry Insurance Agent 709 Chestnut st. 

Damke, Henry Teamster 8819 Lempave. 

Damon, Charles P Farmer 146 Laclede JSldg. 

Dana, Geo^e D Charter Oak Stove So Range Co., Sec'ry 1440 N. Main st. 

Danforth, w. H.. . .Robinson-Danforth Co., Eighth and Gratiot sts. 

Daniels, Geo. C Nelson, Morris So Co., Packers 1008 S. Fourth st. 

Daub. H. W Sohreiner- Flack Grain Co., Commission 116 N. Fourth st. 

Daugnerty, John W Laclede Mutual Fire Ins. Co Rialto Bldg. 

Davidson. J. K. . .J. K. Davidson Com. Co., Grain Kansas City, Mo. 

Davidson. J. M Broker Merchants' Exchange. 

Davia, Jolm David Lawyer 421 Olive st. 

DaviB, Thos. W St. L. Market Rep'r Co., Reporter 112 Chestnut st. 

Davis, C. R. H C. R. H. Davis So Co., Real Estate Lincoln Trust Bldg. 

Dayton, C. S. . . Dayton -Wooster Grain Co., 416 Cham, of Commerce. 

Dean, Chas. L Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co., 120 S. Fourth st. 

Dean, Wm. B 417 Cham, of Commerce. 

Dean, Murry Dean, Mill Co., Flour Ava, 111. 

Dehner, Adolph Retired 2010 Victor st. 

Deibel, Albert L St. Louis Hav So Grain Co 815 Cham, of Com. 

Deibel, Fred Anchor Flour and Feed Co 22nd So Morgan sts. 

Deibel, Louis P Anchor Flour and Feed Co 22nd So Morgan sts. 

Delafleld, Wallace Delafleld So Snow, Insurance 860 Century Bldg. 

Delaney.John O'F Real Estate 811 Chestnut st. 

Delano, Ilufus J Deceased 



MEHIBBBS OF TBR 

Name. Elrm. Biulneu. Location. 

mnliiC. C C. J. Dennis & Co., CommlsBlon lOU N. Third st. 

innlB, John M LouU Mueller ft Co., Exporters BalUmore, Ud. 

intOD, W Denton Bros., Grain LeaTenwortb, Kas. 

iPew, Ray L Mobile & Ohio B. K., Cont. Agt Fullerton BIdg. 

laloge, F Desloge Lead Co., 108 N. Fourth at. 

invtr, John B Hayden Sad'y H. W. Co 613 N. Main at. 

iTOy, Edward Devoy b Feuerboru, Coal Jfc ColceCo 81SN. Seventh st. 

I Yong, Adrian Webiter Groves, Mo. 

amout, Henry A... fit. LouiB CommlBBlon Co UN. Main at. 

ck, Joseph B Hy. Sayera k Co., Commlaaion *I2 Cham. Com. 

okson, Joseph Lawyer UnionTrustBuilding. 

ckinaon, Albert The Al. Dickinson Co., Seeaa.W.TaylorftRiverats., Chicago. 

cklQson, W. C F. W. Ooeke Sc Co., Commission 32 N.Second et. 

cklnson, Chas Seeds. W.Taylor b River sts., Chicago. 

ckmann.Joaeph F....Dlokmatin-Du8ard Seeds Co 1110 N. Third st. 

eckman, John H...WemBe ft Dleckman, B'nk'rs and Brokers., SlIN.Fourth at. 

eokman, Henry Flour and Feed 1611 8. Ninth at, 

ekmann, Joseph. Job. H. Diekmann ft Co., Flour and Feed lilO Biddle at. 

nea, W. C W. C. Dinea ft Co., Plrelna BIO Pine St. 

ppold, Martin The Farmers Milling Co Edwardsville, til. 

ian,Oeo.P., Jr Fordft Doan, MerchandiBeBroker.506S. Seventhat. 

ibsoq. David Brinaon-Judd Grain Co SOS Chamber of Commerce. 

Kid, SamlM Mo. Bdison Co., President 4K> Locust at. 

idBou, Joseph Grain D^er Sblpmon, 111. 

■daon, J. W TheDodson BraunMfg. Co Third and Cedar sts. 

lerr, Oscar Peerleat MillinB Co., 3506 Grattot 8t. 

iggett, Lewis C N. K. Falrbank ft Co., Lard Refiners Chicago. 

■naldsoD, A. B Donaldson Bond and Stoolc Co Third and Olive ata. 

inaidson, Jolin W... Donaldson Bond and Stock Co Third and Olive sta. 

inaldBon, Wm. R Attorney 207 Temple BIdg. 

ink, E.C....Donk Bros. Coal & Coif e Co., Coal Dealers SUN. Fourth at. 

innewBid, G. H Donnewald- Kerens Coal and Coke Co 421 Olive at. 

movan, Frank X D. E. Smith ft Co., Commission 114 N. Fourth at. 

mzelot, Eugene E. Donzelotft Son, Commission IH S. Main si. 

inzelot, E. F E. Donzelotft Son, Commission 16 S. Main at. 

irmitzer, Jos Real Eatate 104 N. Ninth St. 

>ug]ass, John H Deceased 

>wer,John Peed 2809 N. Grand ave. 

>zler, L. D Dozier Cracker Co., Bakere Sixteenth and Morgan sta. 

■own, P. 8 MisB. ft O. Rlv. Pllota' So., Secretary 110 N. Fourth st. 

■ummoud, Chas. R 393B Olive at. 

■ummond, H. I Drummond R. ft I. Co Carleton Bldg. 

■ummoud, James T Drummond R. ft I. Co 404 Carleton Bldg. 

rummona, John N., Jr Drummond Betts ft Co 10 La<;lede Bids. 

ryden, John Mining 110 N. Fourth at. 

idley. S. 8 Kau aw ha Dispatch, Agent SOB Rial to Bldg. 

iffy, Jos. A J. A. DulTy ftCo., Real Estate e06 Chestnut at. 

ila, R. B Continental Tobacco Co TcwerGrove ft Foiaom ave. 

iPont, A.B St. Louis Transit Co., 2nd Vice-President ....3860 Park ave, 

mhara, John S Dunham Mfg. Co., Desslcated Cocoanut 9 Locust St. 

inmire, Carroll E Swift ft Co., Pork Packers Nat'l St-k Y'ds, Hi. 

inn, Tboe Thos. Dunn Loan, Storage andMer. Co 612 Franklin ave. 

itcher, C. O Chamber ol Commerce, 

re, James Wm St. Ix)uiB Hay ft Grain Co 315 Chamber of Commerce. 

?er, E. H Mound City Paint ft Color Co 811 N. Slith st. 



tkln, Chas Grain Broker 4IICham.of Com. 

iton, A. F Eaton, McClellan ft Co., Commission 19 N. Main st. 

iton, Chas. D. .Springfield Fire ft Marine Ins. Co., Insurance. .049 Century Bldg. 

Idy, A. M Eddy ft Eddy, Manufacturing. 600 N. MalnsL 

lenbomtWm U.S. Steel Corporation 71 Broadway, Sew York. 

iwards, B. F Nat'lBank of Com., Cashier Broadway and Olive. 



MSBOHAKTS' BXCHANaB OP ST. LOUIS. 9 

Name. Firm. Business. Location. 

EdwardB, Geo. Ij A. G. Edwards & Son Brokerage Co 412 Olive st. 

Bdwards, W. J N., C. & St. L. Ry 309 Cham. Com. 

Eggers, M. B Eggers Milling Co., Millers Eighth and Clark are. 

Bggers, F. W Eggers Milling Co., Millers EUghth and Clark are. 

Eggers, Henry B., Jr. . .Eggers Milling Co., Eighth and Clark aye. 

Ehlermann, Chas . . ..Chas. Ehlermann Hop and Malt Co 22d st. and Soott aye. 

Ehrengart, Chas., Jr Chas. Ehrengart k Co., Commission 710 N. Third st. 

Eiohler, Frank E 

Einstein, Wm Mining Operator. . .820 Security Bldg. 

Biseman, B Rice, Stix & Co., Dry Goods . .Tenth & Washington aye. 

Eisenmayer, P. H., Jr So. HI. Elevator Milling Co Murphysooro. 111. 

Elliman, T. L D. R. Francis & Bro. Commission Co 214 N. Fourth st 

Elliott, 8. Lee Missouri Commission Co., 22 N. Fourth st. 

BUis, Wm. C Keillor Bros., Milling 401 Chamber of Commerce. 

EUifl Thos "H. 

EUio't, H. . .'. . .*.'. "...Elliot i^g& Switch Co. V. ..".*.'.'..*........". ...East St." 'Loui'sj'm. 

Elmore, Traye. . , Parrott-Baxter Grain Co 105 Cham. Com. 

Ely, Arch F Grain Jerseyville, 111. 

Engel, li. F 4328 Forest Park Bly. 

Engel. Wm Teamster 2901 Wisconsin aye. 

Engeike, Fred New Baden Milling Co., New Baden, 111. 

Eno, E. Bates 118 N. Third st. 

Eppelsheimer, Frank Fischer Flour Co 200 Market st. 

Essmueller, Fred Essmueller M. F. Co., Millwrights 605 S. Sixth st. 

Espensohied, Chas 8500 Washington ave. 

Boston, Alex Collier Shot Tower Works, Security Building. 

Evans, CO Evans Bros., Tobacco & W. H. Co . . 16th & Poplar st. 

Evans, Jos. N Evans Bros., Tobacco Co Sixteenth & Poplar sts. 

Evans, J. W N. Y. Life Ins. Co., Agent Seventh and Olive sts. 

Evill, Burton K Hay and Grain 421 S. Theresa ave. 

Evil!, Jno. H. .Missouri Forage Supply Co., Hay and Grain 426 S. Theresa ave. 

Ewald, L. P Ewald Iron Co., Iron, etc 941 N. Second st. 

Ewing, James F J. F. Ewing Salt Co., 814 Chamber of Commerce. 

Ewing, W. K Morton Sc Co., 609 Chamber of Commerce. 

Eyster, W. C W. C. Eyster, Commission 811 Chestnut st. 



Farley, J. H Commission 108 N. Fourth st. 

Farrelly, Thos. F Real Estate 812 Chestnut st. 

Faulkner, Wm. R« Jr 4367 Laclede ave. 

Faust, A. E Faust & Sons Oyster Co.. President Broadway and Elm st. 

Faust, Edward A.. .Anheuser-Busch Brew. Assn Ninth and Pestalozzi sts. 

Fay, Emory F. C. Taylor & Co.. Commission 204 N. Main st. 

Fears, John C Hlinois Central Elevators New Orleans, La. 

Feickert. Louis Wm. J. Lemp, Clerk. . Thirteenth and Cherokee sts. 

Feiner, Eugene J Engeike & Feiner Milling Co 808 S. Broadway. 

Feiner, Frank Engeike & Feiner, Milling Co 808 S. Broadway. 

Feldbuseh, Herman Teamster 2108 Blair ave. 

Felkel, E. fe Missouri Commission Co., 22 N. Fourth st. 

Ferguson, Hugh Hugh Ferguson & Co., Provision Brokers 118 N. Third st. 

Ferguson. D. K Mechanics Bank, Fourth and Pine sts. 

Feuerbacner. F. W F. W. Feuerbacher & Co., Malster 2706 S. Broadway. 

Field, John T 182 Laclede Building. 

Figueiredo, A. de St. L. Transfer Co., Ass't Manager 400 S. Broadway. 

Filley, Chauncey 1 2700 Lnwton ave. 

Fillev, John D St. Louis Trust Co Fourth and Locust sts. 

Finck, J. C, Jr. .J. C. Finck Min'l Mfg. Co., Barytes, etc 101 Barton st. 

Fiukenbiner, J. S Green River Asphalt Co 3684 Washington ave. 

Finty, Thos Grain Xenia, 111. 

Fischer, John C Fischer Flour Co 202 Market st. 

Fischer, Louis F. . Chas. Tiedeman Mill. Co O'Fallon, III. 

Fisher, Geo. K Altheimer & Rawlings, Brokers 217 N. Fourth st. 



10 macBXBS of the 

Name. Firm. BuBiness. Location. 

Fisher, C. V Forrester Bros 511 Cham, of Ck>iii. 

Fisher, John A J. A. Fisher & Co., Hay Fourth and Chestnut ate. 

Fisher, John J 112 Laclede BuiliUn^. 

Fisher, S. J Fisher 9o Co., Real Estate 714 Chestnut at. 

Fisher^Geo. D G. D. Fisher 8^ Co., Real Estate. . . .216 Walnwright Bia^. 

Fisse, Wm. E Attorney 820 Rialto BuildiiiA;. 

Flaoh, Joseph New Athens Milling Co New Athens, 111. 

Flaok, Chas. D 

Flack, Chas. E. .Schreiner-Flack Grain Co., Commission 116 N. Fourtli at. 

Flanagan, George M 

Flebbe, Hermann Western Candy and Bakers' Supply Co. . . .216 8. Third at. 

Fleminir, Thos. H. B O'Connor k Co., Market Reporter 112 Chestnut at. 

Flesh, M.M Flesh & Mook Painting Co 417 N. Third at. 

Flesh, Edw. M C. H. Albers Com. Co., 400 Chamber of Commeroe . 

Flitcraft, P. R 

Foell, Christian 8106 Illinois ave. 

Foell, Henry Foell & Co., Commission 128 Market at. 

Foley, Daniel J . . . Ohio Valley Milling Co., Hawesville, Ky. 

Foote, E. L 800 N. Fourth at. 

Forrester, R. L Forrester Bros., 611 Cham, of Com. 

Forrester. Thos. H Forrester Bros., Commission 611 Cham, of Com. 

Forster, Otto E Physician 620 N. Garrison ave. 

Forster, C. August. . .Hyde Park Brew. Co., Salisbury st. and Florissant are. 

Forster, C. Marquard. . .St. L. Brew's Assn 809 S. Sixth at. 

Foskett, Hosea Foskett & Kissner, Feed 4827 K. Broadway. 

Fouke, Phil. B Funsten Bros. & Co., Commission 109 K. Main at. 

Powler, Edwin Insuranoe Odd Fellows' Building. 

Fox, Johu W C, P. & St. L. R. R., Com'l Agent Houser Building. 

Fraley, M Moses Fraley & Co., Insuranoe 910 Century Bldg. 

Francis, Oavid R D. R. Francis & Bro. Com. Co 214 N. Fourth at. 

Francis, T. H D. R. Francis & Bro. Com. Co 214N. Fourth st. 

Francis, J. D. Perry Francis Bro. & Co., Stocks and Bonds 214 K. Fourth st. 

FranciscuB, J. M., Jr. . MofiAtt &; Franciscus, Real Estate 708 Chestnut st. 

Frank, Henry B. Baer & Co., Produce and Prov. . 1418 N. Broadway. 

Frank, John F Grain Okawrille, III. 

Frank, Max Frank & Wohlgemuth, Horses and Mules. . .1616 N. Broadway 

Frank. Nathan, Attorney Century Bldg. 

Franklin, Jos Wm. Barr Dry Goods Co., Dry Goods Sixth and Olive st. 

Franklin, Spencer Broker 709 N. Second st. 

Frederick, A. H Missouri Trust Co., Secretary Seventh and Locust 

Freeborn, Charles S Star Union Line, Freight Agent 809 Olive st. 

Fresch, Chas. M St. Louis Trust Co Fourth and Locust 

Freund, L L. Freund & Bro., Bakers 918 Soulard st. 

Frey. Gus Woodward & Tieman Ptg. Co 309 N- Third st. 

Friedman, B 8202 Harper st. 

Fritschle, Robert Grocer 6000 Gravou ave. 

Fruin, Jeremiah Fruin-Colnon Con. Co., Contractors 721 Olive st. 

Fuohs, Arnold Peycke Bros. & Co. Grain Co 826 N. Third st. 

Funk, Joseph P j . P Funk & Co., Tallow, etc 914 N. Main st. 

Funsten, R. E R. E. Funsten & Co., Wool 800 N. Commercial. 

Funsten, Wm. F Funsten Bros, k Co., Commission 109 N. Main st. 

Fusz, P. D Regina Flour Mill Co., 601 S. Main st. 

Fusz, Louis .Regina Flour Mills 601 S. Main st. 

Fusz, Eugene A Regina Flour Mill Co., 601 S. Main st. 

Fusz, Paul A Bi-Metallic Mining Co., President 820 Security Building. 



Gaertner, Chas Lumber 807 N. Fourth st. 

Gaiennie. Frank. . . .The Ludlow Automatic Fire Alarm Co., 611 Union Trust Blgd. 

Galbreath, G. W Third National Bank, Cashier 417 Olive st. 

Gandolfo, John B Gandolfo-Ghio Mfg. Co 104 S. Eighth st. 



MBBOHANTS' BXOHANOS OF ST. LOXnS. 11 

Name. Firm. BusineBs. Location. 

GaBnett, Jno. M 4175 Morgan at. 

Gaidner, R. B Banner Buggy Co., Third and Chouteau ave. 

Gardner, Wm. A Cobb & Gardner, Commission 817 Chamber of Com. 

Gameau, James W Krey Packing Co., Twenty -first and Bremen ave. 

Gamean, Pierre A Krey Packing Co., Pork Packers 2100 Bremen ave. 

Garrels, G. W Franklin Bank, Banking Fourth and Morgan sts. 

Garrett, Walter L Commission Kansas City, Mo. 

Garrison, O. L Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co 912 Wainwrigbt Bldg. 

Garvey, Lawrence L. Garrey & Co., Produce and Com. .1412 N. Broadway. 

Gaseer, Emil M. M. McKeen & Co.. 6 N. Second st. 

Gatoh, Eliae 8 Granby Mining and 8. Co 406 N. 8ixth st. 

Ganpel, Henry J Gelsel Mfg. Co., 219 S. Second st. 

Gaus, H., Jr Henry Gaus & Sons, Box Factory . . . Main and Madison sts. 

Gebhardt, Geo. E Geo. E. Gebhardt & Bro., Grocer 7880 Ivory ave. 

Geissmann, Otto Highland Milling Co., Flour Highland. 111. 

Geraghty. John E Chapin k Co., Mill Feed 805 Chamber of Com. 

Gerber, Cnarles Gerber Fruit Co., 910 N. Third st. 

Gerdes, I. F Gardes Bros., East St. Louis, 111. 

Gerhart, P. G 8640 Washington ave. 

Gerhart, Frank H. . . .F. H. & C. B. Gerhart Real Estate Co. . . . Wainwright Bldg. 

Gerlach, W Insurance 6N. Third st. 

Geasler, Emil W E. W. Gessler & Co.^ Commission HI N. Third st. 

G^esfller, E. A Gessler & Kraussnick, Broker 411 Olive st. 

Gettys, James M W. P. Gettys & Son Provision Co 118 N. Main st. 

Gettys, Thos. B W. P. Gettys Bt, Son Provision Co 113 N. Main st. 

Gfeller, Alfred Lawyer 426 Roe Bldg. 

Ghiselin, Horace United Elev. & Grain Co 616 Cham, of Commerce. 

Ghio, JamesC Real Estate 1001 Chestnut st. 

Gieeecke, Otto . . .Chas. Ehlerman Hop and Malt Co Twenty-second and Scott. 

Gieselman, F. H Chris. Sharp Com. Co., 202 K. Main st. 

Gieeler, John F John F. Giesler & Bro., Feed 1881 Franklin ave. 

GiUham, F. C Alton Packine Co., Pork Packers Alton. Ills. 

Gillis, John G . Picker & Bearasley, Commission 118 N. Main st. 

GUmartin, P. J Broker Merchants' Exchange. 

6intz,Adam St. Clair Vinegar Co Belleville, 111. 

Ginocohio, D Ginocchio Bros. & Co., Fruits 718 N. Third st. 

Giraldin, Chas. E . . . Giraldin Bros. & Cates, Real Estate 110 N. Eighth st. 

Givens, Jos. W 415 Locust st. 

Glaser, Carl 8 Jos. Glaser k Son, Brokers 817 Olive st. 

Glaser, Joseph Joseph Glaser & Son, Brokers 817 Olive st. 

Goddard, G. F E. Gtoddard Flour Co., Second and Rutger sts. 

Goddard, J. H £. G^dard Flour Co., Second and Rutger sts. 

Godlove, L Strauss Studio 8614 Franklm ave. 

Goebel, Fritz F. Goebel k Sons, Wholesale Grocers. .27-29 8. Second st. 

Goeke, Fred^k W F. W. Goeke & Co., Commission 22 N. Second st. 

Goerger, G. A... Wm.Goerger Malting Co., 1701 Singleton ave. 

Goertb, August Germania Life Ins. Co., 208 Am. Central Building. 

Goetz, Victor. . . .Merchants' Exchange Bd. of Flour Insp 129 Market st. 

Goldman, J. D Lesser Cotton Co., Cotton Factors 112 S. Main st. 

Goodall, John R W. H. Markham & Son, Insurance 906 Centurv Building. 

Goodnow. Frank Miss. Valley Elev. &; Grain Co Levee and Madisou st. 

Gordon, Samuel Cox & Gordon Provisions 1019 S. Third st. 

Qordan, Thos. P Grain. .Bd. of T. Bldg., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Gorman, John I .6896 Easton ave. 

Gnfeman. Wm Grafeman Dairy Co 2020 Franklin ave. 

Graham, Ben B Graham Paper Co., 219 N. Main st. 

Graham, G. L G. L. Graham & Co., Com 801 Chamber of Commerce. 

Graham, Robt. 8 G. L. Graham & Co., Commission 801 Cham, of Com. 

Grant, w. D W. D. Grant Pkg. Co., Pork Packer \«i«a cuLrnaM airA 

Grant, Chas. A W. D. Grant Pkg. Co., Pork Packer /^"**" warneia ave. 

Grant, Alex D A. G. Edwards & Son, Brokerage Co 412 Olive st. 

Grant, John St. Louis Transit Co., Gen'l Superintendent .8869 Park ave. 

Grassmnek, Wm Wabash Elevator, Grain Second and Biddle sts. 

Gratz, Anderson. . .Warren, Jones & Gratz, Bagging 106 Rialto Building. 

Gratz, Benj., Jr. . . .Warren, Jones & Gratz, Bagging 106 Rialto Building. 



12 



MBKBEBS OF THB 



Name. 



Firm. 



BusineBS. 



Looataon. 



1^ 






Graves, Oswald Sidney C. Love & Co., 

Graves, W. W National Biscuit Co., 

Gray, Melvin L 

Green, Francis X The Chas. Green Real 

Green, H. H Green Car- Wheel Mfg. Co., 

Green, Chas Chas. Green Real Est. Co,, 

Green, James Helmbacher Steam Forge 

Green, W. Lm Jr W. L. Green Com. Co., 

Greene, O. H National Lead Co., 

Greer, Robert C Greer- Anderson 

Gregg, Noms B . . Mound City Pt. & Col. Co., 
Gregg, W. H^^ Jr .Monnd City Pt. & Col. Co., 

Gregory, H. R 

Gregory, James A 

Greve, Henry John Wahl Com. Co., 

Grler, J. P Schwartz, Dupee & Co., 

Giier, R. C 

Griesedieek, Paul H. .H. Griesedieck & Co., 

Griesedieck, Bernard Nat'l. Brew'y Co., 

Griesedieck, Joseph Nat'l. Brew'y Co., 

Griesedieck, Henry C. .Consumers Brewing 
Griesedieck, Henry ^Jr. .Nat'l. Brew'y Co., 
Griesedieck, H. L. .H. L. Griesedieck & Co., 
Griesedieck, Frank. ..H. Griesedieck & Co., 

Griffin, T 

Grimm, Henry J 

Grone, Ed Grone & Co., 

Grone, Henry Grone & Co., 

Grone, John G H. Grone Brewing Co., 

Gronemeyer. C. L 

Grossheider, Aug. F 

Grover, Hiram J 

Grubbs, H. B Union Biscuit Co. 

Gruensfelder, Louis 

Gruet, John P Waters Pierce Oil Co. 

Gruiier, A. A 

Guerdan, N Guerdan Hat Co. 

Gunnison, Geo. W Inland Oil Co., 



a07 Chamber of Commerce. 

205 LaSalle St., Chicago, Hi. 

Lawyer 609 Chestnut st. 

Estate Co 720 Chestnut st. 

President 3018 N. Broadway. 

720 Chestnut st. 

& Rolling Mill Co.. Barton & DeKalb. 

Commission 62 Laclede Bldg. 

Comptroller Tenth and Clark ave. 

Realty Co 719 Chestnut st. 

Paints and OUs 811 N. Sixth st. 

Pahits and Oils 811 N. Sixth st. 

Fire Insurance 101 Cham. Com. 

6408 Maple ave. 

2 8. Main st. 

10 Wall st.,N. Y. 

Attorney 926 Rialto Bldg. 

1184 8. Twelfth st- 

Eighteenth and Gratiot sta. 

Eighteenth and Gratiot sts. 

Co 1900 Shenandoah st. 

Br'wrs. . . Eighteenth and Gratiot sts. 

Liquors 716 N. Sixth st. 

Malster 1110 Park ave. 

812 S. Fourth st. 

lOOK N. Fourth st. 

Soda 18 S. Eleventh st. 

Soda 18 S. Eleventh st. 

Brewery 2219 Clark ave. 

2964 Clark ave. 

Hay and Grain 2817 Easton ave. 

Lawyer Carleton Building. 

Sixth and Carr sts. 

Pork Packer 2029 Shenandoah ave. 

Odd Fellows' Building. 

Lumber.. Chouteau and Compton av. 

Broadway and Walnut st. 

Oils 211 Commercial Bldg. 






' r-:- 



' I, 

- t • 



.... -^-u 






iv?:- 



' *."■<■'■ 'I' »J 

..; ' >r. J 



I' 



fc* .- 



vJ^iJ ' 






Haarstick, Hy. C . . St. L. & Miss. Val. Tr. Co., 
Haarstick, Wm.T. .St. L. & Miss. Val. Tr. Co., 

Haddaway, W. S Consolidated Coal Co., 

Haering, John 

Haering, John Jacob 

Haeussler, Herman A 

Hagerman, James 

Hamswortb, Jonas 

Haley, Claude E D. 1. Bushnell & Co., 

Hall, Charles A Hall Bros., 

Hall, Chas. E Langenberg Bros., 

Hall, Duane H. & L. Chase Bag Co., 

Hall, Geo. H Nanson Commission Co. 

Hall, John E John E. Hall Com. Co. 

Hall, Louis T Nanson Commission Co. 

Hall, Marshall W. L. Green Com. Co 

Hall, Thrasher Hall & Carroll, 

Halliday, H. E.. .H. L. Halliday Mllg. Co., 

Hamilton, Alexander Gartside Coal Co., 

Hammer, L. F Hammer Dry Plate Co., 

Hancock, D. J 



President Main and Walnut sts. 

Vice-President. Main and Walnut sts. 

Laclede Building. 

Teamster 2016 S. Ninth st. 

Teamster 2016 S. Ninth st. 

Lawyer 84 Laclede Building. 

Attorney... 606 Wain wright Building. 

1620 Morgan st . 

Seeds 109 N. Second st. 

Stave Mfrs. . . . 1102 Union Trust Bldg. 

Commission 417 Cham, of Com. 

8 N. Main St. 

202 Chamber of Commerce. 

418 Chamber of Commerce. 

202 Chamber of Commerce. 

62 Laclede Building. 

Ins. Adjuster 10 Republic Bldg. 

Cairo, lU. 

Coal 1121 Pine st. 

Ohio ave. and Miami st. 

Insurance 906 Century Bldg. 



MBB0HANT8' EXOHANQB OF ST. LOUIS. 18 

I^ame. Firm. Business. Looaiion. 

Handlan, A. H.. . .Handlan Buok Mfg. Co., Railroad Supplies 210 N. Third st. 

Hanebrink, C. J. . .Sessinghaus Milling Co., President Ninth & N. Market st. 

Hannigau, K. B Southern Ry., 705 Chemical Bldg. 

Hanson, C- T P. B. Mathiason Mfg. Co 6810 N. Second st. 

Hanson, P. M. .Nat'l Enam. & Stamp'g Co., TrafiKo Mngr 2nd st. and Cass ave. 

Hanson, A. T Stanton ^ Lvons, Grain 182 Cham, of Com. 

Hardie, Andrew D Hunter Bros., Flour and Feed 60 Gay Building. 

Harig, Albert J Annan, Burg & Co 117 N. Third st 

Harris, BenJ B. Harris & Co., Wool Second and Walnut st. 

Harrison, w. B W. B. Harrison & Co. Hay and Grain 52 Gay Building. 

Harroun, A. M Harroun Elevator Co., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Harstick, J. C Teamster 5 S. Seventeenth st. 

Hart, Edward S R. P. Studley & Co., Printing 518 Market st. 

Hartmann, Ernst E. Hartmann Hide & Leather Co 1906 Shenandoah are. 

Hartmann, Rudolph. . R. Hartmann & Co., Commission 14 S. Second st. 

Hartman, John Merchant Tailor 612 N. Broadway. 

Hartnett, Jos. P L. M. Rumsey Mfg. Co., 810 N. Second st. 

Hartzell, 8. S Hartzell Light &; Milling Co Poplar Bluff, Mo. 

Harvey, Geo. H., Jr P. M. Brunner Granitoid Co. .211 Odd Fellows' Bldg. 

Harvey, R. 8 Franklin & Harvey, Railroad Ties Eldon, Mo. 

Hattersiey, F . . . . F. Hattersley Bro. & Co 205 Pine st. 

Hattersley, Jos. . . .F. Hattersley Bro. & Co 205 Pine st. 

Hauptmann, Peter Peter Hauptmann & Co., Tobacco 518 N. Third st. 

Hauser, G- A Deceased 

Havlin, John W. B. Harrison & Co., Commission 52 Gay Building. 

Hawes, Harry B Lawyer Lincoln Trust Bldg. 

Hawken^W'm. H . . Jno. Jackson Investment Co 51 Gay Building. 

Haynes, iDelos R Haynes Bros.. Real Estate, 408 Union Trust Building. 

Haynes, VT, J Front Rank Steel Furnace Co 28rd &; Lucas ave. 

Hazard, VTm. P Monarch Rubber Co. Vice-Pres't Bittner & Kenrick sts. 

Healey, E. S. . .Glencoe Lime & Cement Co 1400- A Old Manchester rd. 

Heath, A. J A. J. Heath & Co., Commission 804 N. Commercial st. 

Heed, R. B Erie Despatch, 12 Laclede Building. 

Heege, Alt>ert Grocer Clayton, Mo. 

Heege, Theodore Grocer Kirkwood; Mo. 

He^er, Frederick Heger & Self erth. Game, etc 122 N. Mam st. 

Heidbreder, John H 

HeinriBohsmeyer, Henry Feed .6880 S. Broadway. 

Heintz. Emil Franklin Mut. Ins. Co 720 N. Fourth st. 

Heitzeoerg, Chas. L. . .Heitzeberg Pkg. Co., Ninth st. and Cass ave. 

Heitzeberg, Geo. C Heitzeberg Pkg. Co., Ninth st. and Cass ave. 

Helein, Geo. A Cooperage 419 S. Fourteenth st. 

Helery, M. F Retail Liquors 112 N. Third st. 

Hellman, A. M A. M. Hellman & Co., Wholesale Liquors. . .508 N. Second st. 

Hellman, Chas Hellman-Godlove Mer. Co 120 N. Main st. 

Heltzell, D. S H. C. Coleman Com. Co., 508 Cham. Com. 

Heltzell, Harry Dallas. . . A. J. Child & Son, Commission 211 Market st. 

Heman, Fred 1817 LefBuflrwell ave. 

Heman, G. A Hay and Grain. .1221 N. Jefferson av. 

Heman, John C Heman X^onstruction Co 108>^ N. Eighth st. 

flemenway, Wm. D Peugnet& Hemenway, Ins 902 Century Bldg. 

Hendee, 8. A S. A. Hendee & Co., Grain Bushneli, 111. 

Henry. Frank R St. Louis Transit Co., Auaitor 8869 Park ave. 

Henseler, F. F Drayage Transfer Co., 10 Bridge Approach. 

Benson, Mark County Supt. of Schools, Granite City, 111. 

Henze, F. W Old Rook Bakery Co., Baker 417 Lucas ave. 

Herf, O Herf & Freriohs Chemical Co 4628 S. Broadway. 

Hewit, O Commission 1828 Cora Place. 

Heydt, John B Heydt Bakery Co 1607 Biddlest. 

Heyman. Wm Laokawana Line, Agent 106 Ry. Exchange. 

Bezel, Charles Hezel Milling Co., Millers East St. Louis, 111. 

Bezel, Charles, Jr Hezel Milling Co., East St. Louis, HI. 

Hezel, Moris 2937 Lafayette ave. 

Hickey, Dewey A The N. K. Fairbanks Co Third and Convent sts. 

Hickman, W. T Wiggins Ferry Co., Contracting Agt . . .920 Security Bldg. 



14 MMMBVBB OF THB 

Name. Firm. Baainesg. Looatioii. 

Hilke, Ghristpph Flour and Feed. . . .8749 N. Broadway. 

Alike, ChrUt H Christ Hilke, Feed 8747 N. Broadway. 

Hill, Bwing. Weatem Advertising Co 806 Century Building;. 

Hill, Wm. T J. H. Teasdale Commission Co 100 N. Fourth st. 

Hill, G. W 1748 Preston pi. 

Hill, Walker American Ex. Bank, President 207 N. Broadway. 

Hillar, W. T Erie Dispatch, ... . 12 Laclede Bldk. 

Hlnohman, J. G Prov'n Inspector. .22 8. Commercial st. 

Hindman, James H Farmer Bookwood, 111. 

Hirsch. I. C Cal. Hirsch & Sons Iron & Bail Co 212 Clark ave. 

Hirschberg^. D. .F. D. Hirschberg & Bro., Insurance 128 N. Third st. 

Hitchcock, Henry Attorney . .709 Walnwright Bulldlns. 

Hitchcock, £. A . . Secretary of the Interior, Washington, D. C. 

Hoagland, Wm. Y Police Officer, 4406 N. Nineteenth st. 

Hobart, B. F Kansas & Texas Coal Co., President 195 Laclede Bulldlne- 

Hodgklns, Daniel Eldred, 111. 

Hodgkins, Elbert Kehlor Bros., Flour 402 Chamber of Commeroe. 

Hoffmann, August Hoffman Stave Co., Coopers Dexter, Mo. 

Hoffman, Geo. E. .Merchants'-Laolede Nat. Bk.. Cashier Fourth and Olive sts. 

Hoffman, S. H Builder Globe-Dem. Building. 

Hofman, Louis Mound City Ice & Cold Storage Co 8019 N. Broadway. 

Hofmann, F. W. ..Hofmann Bros. Pro. Co., Prod. Com 700 N. Second st. 

Hof mann, E. G. . . .Hofmann Bros. Pro. Co., Prod. Com 700 K. Second st. 

Hogan, C. C McBeynolds & Co., Grain 820 Security Bldg. 

Holbrook^alter J.,Blackwelder-Holbrook Realty Co 107 K. Seventh st. 

Holland, Frank. . Mound City Coupe. Mess. & Livery Co 8420 Lindell ave. 

Holland, Geo. H. .Bridge ^ Beach Mfg. Co., Stoves Main and Almond sts. 

HoUiday, Omar. . . Fulton Bag & Burlap Co 612 S. Seventh st. 

HoUiday, Sam'l N Attorney 52 Laclede Bldg. 

Hoilmann, Julius Fischer Flour Co., 202 Market st. 

Holmes, Jesse H H. & L. Chase Bag Co., 18 N. Main st. 

Holtzclaw, Frank. . . The Jeffras Cloak Co., Hannibal, Mo. 

Hopkins, James Security Bids. 

Hoppius, Herman F Mullen & Hoppius Painting Co 114 Olive st. 

Horn, Benjamin F Cooperage E. St. Louis, 111. 

Horn, Ben]. F., Jr Beni. F. Horn, Cooperage. .Mo. ave. .E. St. Louis, 111. 

Horn, Chas. W Benj. F. Horn, Cooperage. .Mo. ave. .E. St. Louis, 111. 

Homer, E. P Allen- West Com. Co., 104 S. Main st. 

Hornhardt, Curt Baltimore, Md. 

Homsby, Joseph L Attorney 520 Rialto Bids. 

Horstman, Julius C. . Jas. W. Scudder & Co., Whol. Grocers. 425 S. Seventh st. 

Hospes, Richard Ger. Sav. Institution, Cashier Fourth and Pine sts. 

Houghtlin, D. M., Jr Wiggins Ferry Co 928 Security Bldg. 

House, Richard J Hay and Grain 85 Gay Bldg. 

Howard, F. F W. P. Howard & Co., Commission 414 N. Commercial st. 

Howard, J. J W. P. Howard & Co., Commission 408 N. Levee. 

Howard, L. J Evans & Howard Fire Brick Co 980 Market st. 

Howard, John W Liquors 807 N. Garrison ave. 

floyt, E. R Hoyt Metal Co., Secretary 4148 Clayton ave. 

Hubbard JRobt. M Hubbard & Moffltt, Commission Co 822 Pine st. 

Hudson, Wm. A Hudson Bros. Com. Co., Commission 212 N. Second st. 

Hudson, John Cotton Barry and Koscluskl sts. 

Huff, C. H Machinery Levee and Morgan st. 

Hug, Henry Laclede Hay & Grain Co., 110 So. Jefferson ave. 

Hull, Wm. li Wm. L. Hull & Co., Commission 520 Cham, of Com. 

Hundley, J. H W. L. Green Com. Co 82 Laclede Bldg. 

Hunn, Eugene F C. H. Cauby & Co., Chamber of Commerce. 

Hunter, R. D Hunter-Phelan 8. &T. Co., Fort Worth,Tex. 

Hunter, E. O Hunter Bros., Grain and Feed 00 Gay Bids. 

Hunter, Henry Chris. Sharp Com. Co., SOSN.MatnS. 

Huppert. W. fi Klausman Brewery Co.. Book-keeper 8689 S. Broadway. 

Hussmann, Henry Red Bud, 111, 

Husted, Edward C St. Joe Lead Co., 186 Laclede BuUding. 

Hutchinson, R. R Mechanics' Bank, President Fourth and Pine sta. 



MBB0HAMT8' BXOHAMGB OF ST. LOUIS. 16 

Name. Firm. Business. Location. 

Hutchinson, Jas . . . Jas. Hntohinson & Sons, Sugar Brokers 712 Spruce st. 

Hattig, C. H Huttig Sash & Door Co., 8800 Chouteau are. 



Imbs, Joseph F J. F. Imbs Milling Co 122 S. Main st. 

Imbs, A1. Y J. F. Imbs Milling Co 120 S. Main st. 

Inman, B D. R. Francis & Bro. Com. Co., 214 N. Fourth st. 

Isaacs, Chas. W. .Isaacs & Sherry Grain Co 218 Chamber of Commerce* 

Ismert, Jno Pinckneyrille Milling Co., Pinckneyyille, 111. 



Janes, J. M Chamber of Commerce. 

Jannopoulo, D Mo. Tent & Awning Co., Tents 102 N. Second st. 

Jasper, Louts A Jasper & Sellmeyer, Commission 885 N. Third st. 

Jenkins, Hunter Ben Columbia Pkt. Co Foot of Vine. 

Jennhigs, A. M Printing Telegraph News Co 807 Cham. Com. 

JInkins, B. C Broker Bank of Commerce Bldg. 

Joerger, 6. A Wainwright Brewery, Teamster Tenth and Gratiot sts. 

Johnson, F. N Simmons Hdw. Co Ninth & Spruce st. 

Johnson, M. B 202 N . Third st. 

Johnson, Chas R. W. Weighing Ass'n., Agent 704 Houser Building. 

Johnson, J ames Lucas 4244 Washington ave. 

Johnston, George S. .Johnston T. F. & Met. Co.,Tin Foil Manuf..6020 S. Broadway. 

Johnston, Wm. C Donk Bros., Coal & Coke Co 814 N. Fourth st. 

Jones, Breck Miss. Valley Trust Co., 2d V.-P & Counsel. . . .201 N. Fourth st. 

Jones, Charles, Jr 62 Laclede Bldg. 

Jones, C. Norman. . St. Louis Brewing Assn 702 Wainwright Building. 

Jones, Ezekiel Jones-Pope Produce Co., Commission 917 rf. Fourth st. 

Jones, Geo. P Geo.P. Jones & Co., Oil 704 N. Main st. 

Jones, li. F Warren, Jones & Gratz, Bagging Rial to Building. 

Jones, Vincent M. .John MuUally Com. Co., 406 Chamber of Commerce. 

Jordan, Wm. £ Florist Union and Spauldine aves. 

JudsoDj, F. N Judson & Green, Lawyers 600 Bialto Building. 

Judd. w. D Grain 606 Chamber of Commerce. 



Kaehler, £ Interstate Despatch, Agent 805 Houser Building. 

Kahle, Otto 914 N. Grand ave. 

Kahn, Joeeph Insurance 306 Olive st. 

Kaiser, Henry John G. Kaiser & Co., Grocers 901 Franklin ave. 

Kaiser, Jacob Jacob Kaiser & Co., Manufacturers Third ^nd Elm sts. 

Kaiser, Jno. H Kaiser & Lindeman Grocer Co Eighth & Wash sts. 

Kalb, C. R G. O. Kalb & Son, Insurance 957 Century Bldg. 

Kalbfleiscli, J. H Miss. Valley Elev. & Grain Co Foot of Madison st. 

Kams, W. H Dan'l P. Byrne & Co., 818 Chamber of Commerce. 

Karst, Eugene Mut. Life Ins. Co. of Ky 864 Century Bldg. 

KaufTman, H. M G. H. Walker ^ Co., Broker 810 N. Fourth st. 

Kaolfman, John W Kings Highway and Lindell Bly. 

KaulTman, F. E Kanffman Milling Co., 614 Chamber of Com. 

Kaune, Wm. G Wonderly Coal Co., Worden. III. 

KaTanaugta, W. K. .Interstate Car Transfer Co 818 Security Bldg. 

Keeble, w. B Senter & Co., Commission 26 S. Third st. 

Keheler, P. F Investments 0154 Plymouth ave. 

Kehoe, C. J F.D. Hinohberg ^ Bro., Insurance 128 N. Third st. 

Kehlor,D.H ...8000 Finest. 

Kflhlor, J. B. H Kehlor Bros., Milling. . .401 Chamber of Commerce. 



16 XEMBEBB OF THE 

Name. Firm. Basiness. Location. 

Keiflein, John M Consolidated Coal Co., Superintendent Foot of Locust at. 

Keirsey, W. H C. H. Alben Com. Co., 4M Chamber of Commerce. 

Keiser, C. J Keiser Bros. Milling Co., Flour Mt. Olive, ni. 

Keiser, Robert H Real Estate 417 Pine at. 

Kennard, Sam. M. .Kennard & Sons Carpet Co., Carpets. .Fourth and Washington 

Kennedy, Maxwell Kennedy Com. Co., Grain and Hay 418 Cham, of Com. 

Kennedy, Samuel G Insurance. . . . 956 Century Building. 

Kennedy, T. D Jeremiah Murphy, Pork Packer 2315 Morgan st. 

Kennedy, John H Broker. .511 Bd. of T., Kan. City. Mo. 

Kennett, Wm. P D. B. Francis & Bro. Com. Co 214 N. Fourth st. 

Kent, H. V Kent & Purdy Paint Co 701 N. Second at. 

Kerens, R. C Railroads, Third Nat'l Bank Building. 

Kerls, Charles T Flour and Feed 2081 Salisbury at. 

Ketchum, Horace F Langenberg Bros. & Co 417 Chamber of Commerce. 

Keyes, S. P Livery 1100 St. Ange ave. 

Kiader, Edward M Broker Bank of Commerce Bldg. 

Kiely, P. M P. M. Kiely & Co.. Commission 914 N. Third at. 

King, Goodman Mermod & Jaccard Jewelry Co. .Broadway and Locust at. 

King, Lawrence L Fire Insurance 835 Century Bldg. 

King, Wm. J. 2nd Mass. Mutual Life, Manager Century Bldg. 

Kingsland, L. D Kinesland Mfg. Co 1521 N. Eleventh at. 

Kingsland, Geo Central Union Brass Co 828 N. Second at. 

Kinney, Horace E Mattoon Elev. Co., Mattoon, 111. 

Kinsella, James Kinsella & Co., Citv Weighers 22 S. Commercial at. 

Kinsella, Wm. J. .Hanley & Kinsella Coffee and Spice Co 715 Spruce at. 

Kirk, H.F., Jr Waggoner-Gates Milling Co Independence, Mo. 

Kissner, John TFoskett & Kissner, Feed 4823 li. Broadway. 

Klasing, Aug. F Groceries and Feed. .5034 N. Broadw'y 

Klauber, John A. Klauber & Sons Iron & Metal Co 511 S. Fourth at. 

Klauber, Daniel A. Klauber & Sons Iron & Metal Co 511 S. Fourth st. 

Klein, Jacob Klein & Hough, Attorneys 902 Rialto Bld^. 

Klein, Jno. S Geo. S. Mepham & Klein, Dry Paints Sidney st. and Levee. 

Klenk, Charles A. Laux & Son Pork Packing Co. . .Russell and DeKalb at. 

Knebel, L L. Knebel & Co., Grain and Lumber Pierron, III. 

Knehans. H. W^ Jr . .H. W. Knehans & Sons, Commission 1022 N. Third at. 

Knight, Geo. W. J.. .Meyer Bros. Drug Co., Salesman.. .Fourth st. and Clark ave. 

Knight, Harry F A. G. Edwards & Son, Brokerage Co 412 Olive at. 

Knoblauch, C. O Boneblack 8218 Russell ave. 

Knox, C. G National Stock Yards, Y.-Pres. . . .National Stock Yards. 111. 

Koch, Arthur 1811 8. Fourteenth at. 

Koechig, Wm Jos. A. Buckland & Co., Hay and Grain 108 S. Thbrd at. 

Koehler, C Columbia Brewing Co Twentieth and Madison ata. 

Koehler, Henry, Jr. .American Brewing Co 2818 S. Seventh at. 

Koehler, Hugo A. .The American Bw'g.Co., 2825 S. Broadway. 

Koehler, Julius H . . Columbia Br'wing Co., Twentieth and Madison st. 

Koenigsmark, Jacob J Flour Mill Waterloo, lU. 

Koeingsmark, T Milling Waterloo, 111. 

Koenig, William Wm. Koenig & Co., Farm Machinery 120 S. Eighth at. 

Kohlbry, Louis Feed 8254 S. Jefferson ave. 

Kohlbry* Louis, Jr Louis C. Kohlbry & Bro.. Feed 8107 Missouri ave. 

Kohl, F Kohl & Niemann, Feed Venice, 111. 

Kohn, R. D Kohn & Co 815 N. Fourtn st. 

Kolb, Adolph Feed 911 S. Seventh at. 

Kotany, M Stock and Bond Broker. ..409 Olive at. 

Kracke, J. H J. H. Kracke Grain Co 208 N. Fourth at. 

Krausse, E. B., Jr Paee & Krausse Mfg. & Mining Co 410 Valentine at. 

Kraussnick, E. C Gessler & Kraussnick, Brokers 411 Olive at. 

Krenning, H. B F. H. Krenning & Sons, Grocers 818 N. Third at. 

Kretschmar, Ernest Provisions 2700 Cherokee at. 

Krey, Fred Krey Packing Co., Pork Packers. . .2l8t and Bremen ave. 

Krieckhaus, A A. Krieckhaus & Co., Hides and Commission. .410 S. Main at. 

Krieckhaus, Arthur 2411 Lemp ave. 

Krite, F. H Hezel Milling Co., Millers East St Louis, m. 

Kroeger, Mathias Henry Sayers & Co., Commission 412 Cham. Com. 

Kron, A Livery Stable 2122 N. Tenth st 



MBB0HANT8' EXOHANOB OF ST. LOUIS. 17 

Name. Firm. BuslnesB. Looation. 

Kuenke, Henry Flour and Feed 2668 Grayois aye. 

Knlilmaxi, Henry W Kuhlman & Bros., Grocers and Feed. . .2804 Bremen ave. 

Kubn, Francis St. Louis Distilling Co., Twenty -tliird and Madison sts. 

Kuhn, Robert C Bartlett, Kuhn & Co., Grain and Hay 54 Gay Bldg. 

Rahs, Aug. H Louis Obert Brewery, Twelfth and Lynch sts. 

KuhSjH. w H. W. Kuhs &Co., Grocers and Com 28 S. Third st. 

Kuns, Henry Malster 1818 Ann aye. 

Kupferle, £ Kupferle Bros. Mfg. Co 000 N. Second st. 



Lackland, R. J Boatmens' Bank, President. . .4th and Washington aye. 

Lackland, E^gar C 68 Laclede Building. 

Lahey. Thos. P Speculator 206 N*. Third st. 

Lamping, W. C Broker 212 Cham, of Com. 

Lamy, Cnaa. O J. H. Teasdale Com. Co., 100 N. Fourth st. 

LamV, Joseph F Cobb & Gardner, Commission 817 Cham, of Com. 

lAnoau, Louis Landau & Co., Grocers 817 N. Second st. 

Lang, George Braun-Lanx Com. Co., Flour and Commission. .Gay Building. 

Lang, B. H B. H. Lang & Co., Commission 415 Cham, of Com. 

Laog, Ben 8 B. H. Lang & Co 415 Cham, of Com. 

Langenberg, Geo. F Langenberg Bro. & Co., Commission. . .417 Cham, of Com. 

lAugenberg, H. F Langenberg Bio. & Co., Commission. . .417 Cham, of Com. 

Langenberg, H. H Langenberg Bros. & Co., Commission . . 417 Cham, of Com. 

Langenberg, C. H Front Rank Steel Furnace 28rd and Lucas aye. 

Langton, J. J. P Langton & McCall, Proy. Broker 802 Spruce st. 

Lanltz, George Grain 822 Pine st. 

Lansing, E. w Thos. Bennett & Co., Brokers.. 220 Chamber of Commerce. 

Larimore, K. G £lk Valley Farming Co Larimore, N. Dakota. 

lATimore. Jameson Farmer Larimore, N. Dakota. 

Lassen, Cnas. F Fisher & Co., Real Estate 714 Chestnut st. 

Latal, John J J. J. Latal Roofing Co 1618 N. Tenth st. 

LaTourette, James. .Columbia Zinc Works, MarioU; Ind. 

Latta, H. J Maxwell & Crouch Mule Co., National Stock Yards. 

Laughlin, J. R Real Estate 006 Fullerton Bldg. 

Laux, Anton J Anton Iaux & Son, Pork Packer. .Russell & DeKalb ayes. 

Lawnin, Jos. D Lumber 807 N. Leyee. 

Lee, W. H Merohants'-Laclede Kati Bk., Pres Fourth and Oliye sts. 

Lee, Wm. H W. H. Lee & Co., Wholesale Liquors. . .811 N. Second st. 

Leftwich,W. M 418 Cham, of Com. 

Lehman, 8. M Lehman Bros., Commission 16 William st., N. Y. 

i^long, A. A Citizens' Bank, Cashier New Orleans. 

LemckeuL L. Lemcke & Co., Commission 822 Pine st. 

Lemp, Wm. J W. J. Lemp Brewing Co., Pres't Thirteenth and Cherokee. 

Lemp, Louis F W. J. Lemp Brewing Co., Supt Thirteenth and Cherokee. 

Lemp, Wm. J., Jr. . W. J. Lemp Brewing Co., V-Pres't. . .Thirteenth and Cherokee. 

|«onip, Carl A W. J. Lemp Brewing Co., Treas Thirteenth and Cherokee. 

Leonhardt, R. H Saxony Mills, Flour 812 Lombard st. 

J^p, Henry Flour Mill DeSoto, Mo. 

L«yy,Falk Mdse. Broker 709 Lucas aye. 

fora, Arnold C Kehlor Bros., Millers ... 401 Chamber of Commerce. 

Jewis, Turner T 805 Wainwrignt Building. 

l«wi8,J. R J. R. Lewis, Broker 120 N. Third st. 

Llennann, John Feed 8228 8. Thirteenth st. 

UghtholderyW.P..Phmbert&Lightholder, Real Estate 17 N. Eighth st. 

Lightner, Frank 1408 Union bomeyard. 

undsay, John W B. & 0. 8.-W. R. R Broadway and Locust. 

Undsay, W. C L., H. ^ St. L. Ry., Coml. Agent 206 K. Broadway. 

l^PpeltiLewisA. J... RealEst. & Loans ....824 Chestnut st. 

Lippelt,G. H G.H.Lippelt ^Co., Dry Qoods 805 Lucas aye. 

Lisman, Anthony A A A. Lisman, Bonds 25 Broad *it.. New York. 

Utchfleld, Parker H.... The Modem Miller Co 57 Gay Bldg. 

Little, Wm. C W. C. Little at Bro. Iny. Co 218 K. Fourth st. 



Name. Eirm. BnatneH. IiOcaUoii. 

Uttlo, H. J W. C. Uttle * Bro. lov. Co Ml N. Fourth t 

LcKkwood, JamM Y luterstate Car TniuferCo 818 Security Bid, 

Loeb, C. JI...Amertcan Metal Co. ,Ll[nlt«<L W4 Saoarlty Buildin, 

Loewen, David Iioeweo BnMm Corns I. Co 6U N. Main i 

LoKeman, C. A...P. H. Logeman Chair Co MUO N. Main i 

LohmaDD, Wm. H Hay andGr^n 614 Ann at 

LoDergBQ, T. J T. J. Iionergan fc Co BOI Chamber of Commeix 

Lotbman, Wm Hatner-LotbnutD Mfg. Co Dock and Haln i 

Lou derm an, John H 610 Pine i 

Loudermau, Juo- H., Jr. BIO Pine i 

Loudermau, Henry B ilO Pine i 

Louderroan, H. B., Jr Swift Is Co., Paokeri Nata. Block Tarda. I 

Lots, John B Love & Soni, BealBstate.. aU! Chestnut i 

Love, Sidney C Sidney C. Lore k Co., Groin, etc. . . .Rookeir Bldg., Chicaj 

Luoas, JamM R J. K. LucaiA Co., fit Gay Buildin 

Lucas, John B. C Hiller & Falrbault, Real Estate T09 Chestnut i 

Ludington, Elliot K H.ftL. Cbase Bag Co 18 N. Main i 

Ludlogton, F. H H. &L. Chase Bag Co., le N. Main i 

Luehrmann, Aug.F. W. .Lnelirmanii Bros. Hay & Grain Co, Com.. .3300 K. Snd i 

Lueklng, A. C Drayman... 8th and Washington av 

Lueklng. H. A Tenth and St. Charles bI 

Lukeni, John A. , , . Brinson-Judd Grain Co 106 Cham, ot Coi 

LumBKhl, Joseph D Lumaghi Coal Co. 411 Olive i 

Lungatras, Eugene Luagstros Dyeing & Cleaning Co 1300 Park av 

Lnsk, Isaac P Diamond Joe Line, 8teamt>^t Agt.. Foot of Wash'n av 

Luth, Fred L St. L U. B. k ProT. Co., ProTlstoni 8B19 Papin i 

Lyie, Huf-"- " — '— ""~ "'' "" — '"- " — "- — ^ "' 

Lyon, Jol 



Macbeth, Malcolm BealBstate 108 N. Eighth i 

Maok, Henry W Connor Bros, b Co., Commission 46 GayBuildin 

Maokey, John W.B. Harrison &Co 62 Gay Bulildin 

Macy.E. F....8tarEgg JEColdBtorageCo., Sec'y and Treas 609 N. Uaia i 

Madlll, G Borge A Deceased 

HafBtt, Wm Mercantile TrnsC Co Eighth and Locust st 

MaiBtt, Wm. C 918 Security BuUdin 

Haginn, James P Lawyer 421 GllTe i 

Maguire Chas. J Magulre Coal Co., 210 Mermod ft Jaooard Bid 

Haguire, Louis T 106 N. Eighth > 

Hahony, M. P Trad era Elevator, East Bt. Louis, III 

MalUnokrodt, Edw Malllnokrodt Chem. Wks., Hfg. Chem..Mallinckrodt&2 

Mann,T.L H.GrlesedieukftCc, Malsters 1134 S. Twelfth i 

UanewaL Aug Ma newal-lAuge Cracker Co Seventh st. and Cass av 

Harbes, C Eau Clalra-Bt Louis Lumb. Co 3606 8. Broadwa 

Uarkham, Q. D W. H. Markham k Son, lusuranoe. 906 Century Bid 

Markle, C. K Markle Lead Works, 730 Rlalto BuUdin, 

Marki.l^Tld A Stoble Cereal Mills, Maoaionlft Verm. ...Til N. Beoonde 

Harks, John J Stoble Cereal Mills TllN.Seooads 

Marauls, P. 8 B. E. Barrett Mfg. Co., Gravel Roofing 100 N. Ninth i 

Uarsha1l,BenF....Ben F. Marahall £Co., Grain Blodgett, M 

Marshall, F. B Continental Natl Bank, Fourth and Olive st 

Marshall, J. D J. D. Marshall Livery Co 1038 N. Vandeventer av 

Marshall, W. J Ware & Leland, 211 Cham. Coi 

Martin, C.T iOSCham. ot Commerc 

MartiQ, M.,Jr 8116 Bads av 

Martin.ThoB. King... W.L. Green Com. Co. (B Laclede BuLldin, 

Uarx, Henry 

Ua«on, Geo. H 87*3 Pine f 

Ua«on, Isaac M " " •«..-.. _..... . »,,__. _.-,«... 

Masaengale, Jol 
UasBon, W. V . . 



M£BCHANTS' BXCHANGB OF ST. LOUIS. 19 

^ame. Firm. Business. Location. 

Matthews, Wm Insurance 118 N. Third st. 

Mattliewfl, Geo. T Geo. T. Matthews & Co., Oils, etc 806 N. Fourth st. 

Maime, Ijeonard 

Mazon, John H 4886 Westminster pi. 

Mayer, Fred A. B. Mayer Mfg. Co., Fertilizers 1020 N. Twelfth st. 

Maynard.J. F Ice Machines, 820 S. Third st. 

MaTo,T. R Merchant Clifton HUl, Mo. 

Hedanich, Thos ice 1811 8. Fourteenth st. 

Meek, A. J Meek Milline Co., Millers Marissa, 111. 

Me^gmaon, L. M Red Line, Agent Fourth and Chestnut ste. 

Meier, Theo. G Heine Safety Boiler Co., 707 Bank of Commerce Bldg. 

Meier, Louis J Brockmeier & Sieying, Commission 118 8. Main^ 

Meinecke, Wm Flour 1717 8. Broadway. 

Menke, Geo. C Nelson Distilline Co., 812 N. Fourth st. 

Mepham, Geo. 8 G. 8. Mepham & Klein, Colors, etc Levee and Sidney sta. 

Mepham, Hampden D., Jr Exporter 519 Lincoln Trust Bldg. 

MerrelLH. S J. S.Merrell Drug Co 620 Washington ave. 

Mertz, Jacob W 208 Market st. 

Messerly, S. A Live Stock Union Stock Yards. 

Messmore, John L Ballard. Messmore & Co., Commission.. .620 Cham, of Com. 

Meyer, Edwin J Wash'n Mut. Fire Ins. Co 421 Olive at. 

Meyer, Ferd P John F. Meyer & Sons, Miller 172 Laclede Building. 

Meyer, George F. . .St. Louis Cooperage Co., Main and Arsenal sts. 

Meyer, John P John P. MTeyer & Co., Brokers 411 Olive st. 

Meyer, Herman J Jno. F. Meyer & Son, Flour 172 Laclede Bldg. 

Meyer, C H C. H. Meyer k, Co., Hay and Grain 1109 Cass ave. 

Meyer, Theo. F Meyer Bros. Drug Co., Druggists Fourth st. & Clark ave. 

Meyer, F. Heinrich Brinckmeyer-Meyer Hay & Grain Co 1109 N. Broadway. 

Meyer, John F John F. Meyer & Son, Millers 172 Laclede Building. 

Meyer, Peter H Peter H. Meyer & Son, Feed 1808 N. Ninth st. 

Meyer, J. H. Aug Meyer Supply Co., Brewers' Supplies 22 S. Main st. 

Meyer, Chas. W St. Louis Brewing Ass'n 1724 Lafayette ave. 

Meyer, Wm. A — Jno. P. Meyer & Co., Brokers 411 Olive st. 

Michael. Martin. .Michael Transportation Co., Transportation.. 2451 Kosciusko st. 

MichaeliBjBmst Stocks and Bonds 804 N. Fourth st. 

Midlam, w.T Empire Line, Fourth and Chestnut sts. 

Miller, Aug. . . .Miller Grain & Elevator Co., Lincoln Trust Bldg. 

Miller, D.C 4541 Maryland ave. 

Miller, W. A Sullivan & Miller, Feed 1417 N. Broadway 

Millesoo, CD C. D. MilLeson & Co., Hay and Grain. . . . East St. Louis, Ills. 

Mllliken, B. H 822 Pine st. 

Milliken, John T John T. Milliken & Co., Mfg. Chemists 948 Chouteau ave. 

Miner, F. J Cella Com. Co., Broker Fourth and Pine st. 

Mitchell, John E. .Mitchell-Parks Mfg. Co., 1284 8. Seventh st. 

Mitchell, W. B. Broker 118 N. Fourth st. 

Mittler. J ohn G John Wahl Com. Co., Commission Main and Market sts. 

Moerschel, Jacob Spring Brewing Co St. Charles, Mo. 

Moffett, L. A Moifett & Franciscus, Real Estate 708 Chestnut st. 

Moflitt, Charles 8 Hubbard & Moffltt Com. Co 822 Pine st. 

Moflitt, N. L Hubbard & Moffltt Com. Co 822 Finest. 

MohlenbroQk, Malto Bank of Campbell Hill Campbell Hill, 111. 

Monteith, Geo. F T. W. Carter ^ Co., Commission lU N. Fourth st. 

Moore, Austin R. .St. L. fc Miss. Val. Tr. Co., Treasurer Main and Walnut sts. 

Morgan, Geo. H. . . .Merchants' Exchange, Secretary Merchants' Exchange. 

Morgan, Arthur R Broker Utf N. Fourth st. 

Morns, H. E Cumberland Gap Desp 206 N. Broadway. 

Morrison, Chas. . j Attorney Waterloo, 111. 

MorriBon, Thomas.. .Morrison Tent & Awnine Co 115 Olive st. 

Morrison, Robt. W. . .R. W. Morrison Const. Co., Builders 406 N. Eleventh st. 

Morrison, Fred Morrison Bros., Live Stock, etc Ramsey, Ills. 

Morrissey* John F J. B. Buss Mills, 1444 N. Broadway. 

Morse, Samuel 8 Morse Bros., Commission 400 N. Second st. 

Morton, Claude A Morton 9l Co., Commission 609 Cham, of Com. 

Morton, T. B Morton ^ Co., Commission 609 Cham, of Com. 

Mo0er,Leo Hotel ,..809 Finest. 



I 

f 

1 



XEKBBB8 OF THB 



Name. 



Firm. 



BttflinesB. 



Looation. 



Mudd, John H 

Mudflre, Geo D. R. Franoifl & Bro. Com. Co 2U N. Fourth st. 

Mueller, Henry Mueller C. H H. & Transfer Co 2620 Bismarck st. 

Mueller, William G Wm. G. Mueller Produce Co. . .2nd & Washington ave. 

Mulcahey, Morris Teamster 19 N. Main st. 

Muloahv, Patrick Builder 804 N. Eighth st. 

Mulford, W W. Mulf ord & Co., Brokers 811 J?ine st. 

MuUally, Dan'l. 8 Langenberg Bros. 8d Co., Commission. . .417 Cham, of Com. 

MuUally, John Jno. Mullally Com. Co 406 Chamber of Commeroe. 

MuUally, Martin J . .Jno. MuUally Com. Co 406 Chamber of Commeroe. 

Mullally, Jno. D Ballard, Messmore & Co., Commission . . .620 Cham, of Com. 

MuUally, Joseph J J. R.LewisfcCo., Broker 120 N. Third st. 

Munday, C. B., Jr . .Munday-Settlemire Co., Grain Litchfield, Ills. 

Muuson, TraoY The N. k. Fairbanks Co Third and Convent ets. 

Murphy, Daniel J I. H. Woodbury 9o Co., Grain, etc 240 LaSalle St.. Chicago. 

Murphy, Jeremiah Pork Packer 2816 Morgan st. 

Murphy, P. C P.C. Murphy Trunk Co., Trunks 604 N. Third st. 

Murphy, J. L Grain PinckneYrille, HI. 

Myers, E. M Geo. Taylor Commission Co 100 S. Main st. 

Myerson, Samuel F Printing Third and Vine sts. 

Myerson, G. 8 1820 Victor st. 

Mynders, Arnold H Rogers 8alt Co., Salt 220 Pine st. 



McAllister, R. 8 American Refrigerator Transit Co Century Building. 

McAllister, John 6004 Von versen ave. 

MoBlair, Wm Manfs. Agent 1006 Chemical Bldg. 

McCann, James V McCann & Dowling, 1140 Chestnut st. 

McCarthy, H. T General Chem. Co., Chemicals 14th and Gratiot sts. 

McChesney, W. 8., Jr Terminal B. R. Assn., V. P. and G. M. . . .Union Station. 

McClellan, C. W. . .Eaton, McClellan & Co., Commission 19 N*. Main st. 

McClellan, Frank P Eaton, McClellan & Co., Commission 19 N. Main st. 

McClellan, J. 8 Eaton, McClellan & Co., Commission 19 N. Main st. 

McClellan, Thos. G N., C. & St. L. Ry., 810 Chamber of Commerce. 

McCloskey, Hugh McCloskey Bros., Commission. . .487 Poydras ave., N. O. 

McCluney, John H. .State Nat'l Bk. of St. L., 2nd V.-P Fourth and Locust sts. 

McClung, James Vandalla Line, Contracting Agt. . .802 Century Bldg. 

McClure, C. E Lake Shore F. F. Line, Agent 414 Rialto BuUding. 

McCormack, Edw Gay Bldg. 

McCormick, Wm. H Bemis Bros. Bag Co 001 8. Fourth st. 

McCoy, Joseph St. Louis Printing Co 220 Pine st. 

McCully . Wm 

McDonald. John Contractor Fort Scott, Kan. 

McGehee, Jas. Stewart. . .W. L. Green Com. Co 02 Laclede Bldg. 

McGowan, W. A Red Line Transit Co., Sixth and Oliye sts. 

McGrew, Geo. 8 Geo. D. Barnard & Co., Blank Books. Laclede &Vandey enter. 

McGroarty, Edw. J . . . . Mercantile Delivery Co 817 N. Twelfth st. 

Mclntyre, Geo Insurance, Agent 220 Union Trust BuUding. 

McKeen, M. M M. M. MoKeen & Co., Butter and Cheese 6 N. Second st. 

McLain, J. T McLain- Alcorn Com. Co 701 N. Third st. 

McMahan, J. H J. H. McMahan & Co., Brokers 201 N. Second st. 

McManama, M. G 

McMUlan, Wm Deoeased 

McMorrow, P. J P. J. McMorrow & Co.. Brokers. .216 Chamber of Commerce. 

McKair, L. G McNair. Harris Real Estate Co 722 Chestnut st. 

McNeiley, J. A J. A. McNeiley & Son, Live Stock Union Stook Yards. 

McPheeters, T. 8. .McPheeters' Wareh. Co., 1104 N. Levee. 

McRee, W. G Union Trust Building. 

McReynolds, Geo. 8 McReynolds ^ Co., Grain Security BuUding. 

McSorley, B. J Broker. . .216 Chamber of Commeroe. 



MSBOHAMT8' EXOHANQB OF BT. IiOITIS. 21 

Name. Firm. BugineBs. Location. 

Na; el, Charles Nagel & Kirby, Lawyer Security Building. 

Kagle, JEUctaard Teamgter 206 Finest. 

Kaiuon, Joseph 8 Nanson Commission Co 202 Chamber of Commeroe. 

Kspier, Robert G Hubbard & Moffltt, Commission 822 Pine st. 

Nash, George. .Kash-Smith Tea and Coffee Co 918 N. Sixth st. 

KsBse, August Wholesale Grooer 209 N. Second st. 

Keale, Charles T Victoria Flour Ifills, Millers Main and Mound sts. 

Nedderhuty A 8008 Lafayette ave. 

Nedderhut, C. Otto 8003 Lafayette ave. 

Nedderhut, Bmil A 8008 Lafayette ave. 

Keilson, H. W Campbell Paint & Glass Co Main and Gratiot sts. 

Nelson, J. M., Jr L. C. Nelson & J. M. Nelson, Jr. .Bquitable Building. 

Kelflon, L. G L. C. Nelson & J. M. Nelson, Jr Equitable Bldg. 

Keoboff, Hector Lawyer 62 Laclede BIT. 

Kewell, James P Orthwein Iny. Co., Stocks & Grain Security Bldg. 

Kewell, Joseph T Victoria Flour Mills, Main and Mound sts. 

Kichols, R. M Lawyer Bank of Commerce Bldg. 

Nichols, Walter. .White. West Shore & Nickel Plate F. F. Lines. . . .414 Rialto Bldg. 

Nicbolls, Chas. G. . . .Nioholls-Ritter Realty Co 718 Chestnut n. 

Nicholson, John Washburn -Crosby Co., Flour 222 Granite Bldg. 

NickersonjJohn... .Nat'l Bk of Commerce, 2d V-Pres't Broadway and Olive. 

Nicolaus, Henry. .Green Tree Brewery Co., Superintendent Ninth and Sidney. 

Niedringhaus, Alex. . . St. Louis Press Brick Co Equitable Bldg. 

NiedringhauSyThos. K .Nat. Enam. & Stmp. Co., Manufs 2nd and Cass aye. 

Niedringhaus, F. G Nat. Enam. & Stmp. Co., Manufs 2nd and Cass ave. 

Niedringhaus, Wm. F. .Nat. Enam. & Stmp. Co., Manufs 2nd and Cass ave. 

Niedringhaus, 6eo.W. . Nat. Enam. & Stmp. Co., Manufs 2nd and Cass ave. 

Niemann, 6. A Kohl & Niemann, Grocer Venice, 111. 

Niemeyer, Ghas. L Schultz & Niemeyer, Commission. . Levee and Madison sts. 

Niese, Julius Niese Grocer Co., Grocer 27 S. Main st. 

Nobbe, Fred Geo. Henseler Oil Co 8 S. Main st. 

NoblejJohn W Noble & Shields, Lawyer 614 Rialto Building. 

Noel, Henry G. .Noel- Young Bond & Stock Co., Bankers 804 N. Fourth st. 

Noel, Henry M. .Noel-Young Bond k, Stock Co., Banker 804 N. Fourth st. 

Nolan, W. T C. P. Burr & Co., Commission 824 Rialto Building. 

Nolker, W. F Brinkworth & Nolker Brew. Co 802 Walnwright Bldg. 

North, Frank M Labadie, Mo. 

Northrop, Reid Am. Ref . Trans. Co., President Century Bldg. 

Northrop, Sanford Am. Ref. Trans. Co., Century Building. 

Noyes, Wm. A Insurance 954 Century Bldg. 

Nurre, Frank F. Nurre & Bro., Feed 1615 Market st. 



Obert, Louis Louis Obert Brewery, Brewers Twelfth and Lynch sts. 

Obert, Louis, Jr Louis Obert Brewery, Brewers Twelfth and Lynch sts. 

O'Brien, John John O'Brien Boiler Works Co. . . . 11th and Mullanphy sts. 

Ocker, Henry W Insurance Century Bldg. 

O'Connor, P. J. J O'Connor & Co., Market Reporter 112 Chestnut st. 

OXJonnor, P. J. J., Jr. 



'Donnell, Patr'k. . . Jno. O'Donnell k, Bro., Contractors 6015 Raymond. 

Oehler, Emil . . 111. Hydraul. Press Brick Co., Gen. Mgr Union Trust Building. 

Oetgen, Fred E. O. Stanard Milling Co., Teamster Main and Dickson sts. 



UAuurKc, J no. «i e»iianix>n « ijvons, isz unam. oi uom. 

On, Sd. 8 Missouri Trust Co., President Seventh and Locust sts. 



22 HEKBBBS OF THS 

Name. Firm. BuBinesB. Location. 

Orthwein, W.J C. F. Orthwein '8 Sodb, OommiBsion 107 N. Third st. 

Orthwein, Chas. C. . .0. F. Orthwein's Sons, Commission 107 N. Third at. 

Orthwein, Ralph H Sempire Clock Co., 1806 N. Sixteenth st. 

Orthwem, W. D W. D. Orthwein Grain Co 908 Chamber of Commerce. 

Orthwein, F. C W. D. Orthwein Grain Co 808 Chamber of Commerce. 

Orthwein, Edgar T. . W. D. Orthwein Grain Co 803 Chamber of Commerce. 

Orthwein, W. £ Orthwem Iny. Co., Stocks 9o Grain Security Bldg. 

Orris, Frank E Orthwein Inrestment Co Security Bldg. 

Orris, Otto A Bartlett Com. Co. 505 Chamber of Commerce. 

Ostermayer, Philip General Store. . .4419 Washingrton ave. 

Ostermayer, Geo 8022 N. Broadway. 

Ott, Wm. F 

CToole, Wm John MuUally Com. Co., 406 Chamber of Commerce. 

Overall, John H Lawyer 122 Laclede Building. 

Overstolz. Herman Foreign Banker 106 N. Broadway. 

O wings, Zebulon P O'Connor & Co., Market Reporter 112 Chestnut st. 



Paddock. Gains Paddock-Hawley Iron Co Tenth and Spruce sts. 

Panhorst, J. C Staunton Milling Co., Staunton, III. 

Parker, Wm. F W. F. Parker R. E. Co 617 Chestnut st. 

Parkhurst, W. A. S. . .The N. K. Fairbanks Co 1114 S Third st. 

Parle, John J Rose & Parle, Brokers 807 Pine st. 

Parrott, James D Parrott-Baxter Grain Co 105 Cham. Com. 

Parry, Geo. F 4840 Olive st. 

Pa^quier, A. G A, G. Pasquier & Co., Insurance 949 Century Bldg. 

Parsons, Charles. .State Nat'l Bk. of St. L., President Fourth and Locust sts. 

Pasohedag, William Teamster 8623 St. Louis ave. 

Paule, Edwin J. . .D. Paule Mercantile Co., 7700 Ivory ave. 

Paule, Herman Feed 117 Blow st. 

Pechmauu. Julius Pechmann Bros., Confectioners 8201 Lucas ave. 

Peck, Stephen Stephen Peck & Bro., 228 Lincoln Trust Bldg. 

Peck. John A Stephen Peck & Bro., Real Estate. . .228 Lincoln Trust Bldg. 

Pecknam, O. H O. H. Peckham Candy Mfg. Co Seventh and Spruce sts. 

Penaloza, Henri De Broker 204 Security Bldg. 

Pendleton, R. J McReynolds & Co., Elevator 920 Security Bldg. 

Penningroth, Henry G South St. Louis Nursery 5600 Wravois ave. 

Penny. Joseph L Terminal R. R. Assn.. Com'l Agent 120 Rialto Bldg. 

Peper, Christian Tobacco 727 N. Main st. 

Perrln, John D Fyffe Bros. & Co., Grain 68 Gay Building. 

Peters, F. W Peters Dry Goods Co., 2604 N. Fourteenth st. 

Petri, T, F Thos. Akin, Com 208 Chamber of Commerce. 

Petri, Arthur C 211 Chamber of Commerce. 

Petring, Geo. H. .Henry Petring Groc. Co., Wholesale Grocers 721 Spruce st. 

Pettker. Henry Grocer 2800 Cass ave. 

Peugnei, Ernest Peugnet & Hemenway, Insurance Agent. . .902 Century Bldg. 

Pf offer, E. 8 Pf offer Milling Co Lebanon, 111. 

Phelps, H. W 3758 Westminster Place. 

Phillips, R. F R. F. Phillips k, Co., Cotton Brokers H5 Walnut st. 

Phinney. H. R Chas. Phinney Co., Whol.Grocers. .805 W. 2d st^ Alton, 111. 

Pioher, O. H Picher Lead Co., Joplin, Mo. 

Pioher, W. H Picher Lead Co., Joplin. Mo. 

Picker, Erich Picker & Beardsley, Commission 118 N. Mam st. 

Piokel, W Pickel Marble & Granite Co., 1901N. Broadway. 

Pierce, H. C Waters Pierce Oil Co., Oils Odd Fellows Building. 

Pierce, Wm. B. . . .Alton Roller Milling Co., Alton, lu. 

Pindell, Wm. H Pindell Bros. & Co., Millers Hannibal, Mo. 

Pingree, Samuel S F. C. Taylor & Co., Commission 204 N. Main st. 

Pittman, Trabue Solicitor 809 N. Third st 

Plant, Alfred Plant Seed Co., Seeds 814 N. Fourth st 

Plant, F.S Plant Seed Co., Seeds 814 N. Fourth st. 

Plant, George H. . . .Geo. P. Plant Mill. Co., President 502 Chamber of Com. 



MBBCHANTS' EXOHAKGB OF ST. LOUIS. 28 

Name. Firm. Business. Location. 

Plant, Samuel Geo. P. Plant Mill Co.. 002 Chamber of Commerce* 

Piatt, P. C Piatt & Thomburgh Paint Co Seyenth and Franklm aye. 

Piatt, Chas. R Piatt & Thomburgh Paint Co 620 Franklin aye. 

Poland, A. A Ontario Despaton. Agent 102 N. Fourth st. 

Pomeroy, E. A 4022 Castleman ave. 

Pommer, Robert D. I. Bushnell & Co., 109 N. Seoond st. 

Poole, Henry 8 Calumet Grain & Eley. Co 116 N. Fourth st. 

Pope, Edmund O Jones-Pope Produce Co 917 N^. Fourth st. 

Pope, Wm. 8 Lawyer 8626 Lindell ave. 

Pope, John J Siemers & Chisholm, 300 Chamber of Commerce. 

Pope, Chas Chas. Pope Glucose Co., Chicago, 111. 

Porteons, W. M Can. Fac. Despatch, Agent 125 Chamber of Commerce. 

Porter, John C Hope Mining Co., President 77 Laclede Building. 

Post, Lewis W Blackmer & Post, Sewer-Pipe Co Sixth & Locust sts. 

Postel, Julius Postel Milling Co., Mascoutah, 111. 

Pofitel, George P. H. Postel Mill. Co., Mascoutah, 111. 

Poetel, Philip H.,Jr 

Potter, Henry S St. Louis Hay Exch., President 720 8. Theresa ave. 

PoweU, D. R. . .Carroll & Powell Insurance Co 116 N. Third st. 

Powell, George F Connor Bros., Commission Gay Building. 

Powell, Willis. J Shaeffer Bro. & Powell, Mfrs. Soap, Candles, etc. .826 N. 2nd st. 

Powell, Willis J., Jr 8108 Morgan st. 

Powell, W. W Hubbard & Moffltt Com. Co 822 Pine st. 

Powers, Wm. F Geo. P. Plant Mill Co., Main st. and Chouteau ave. 

Prante, C. F Prante & Meyer, Hay and Grain 214 Lesperence st. 

Price, J. Boyle St. Louis Transit Co 8869 Park ave. 

Price, Thos, E T. E. Price & Co., Commission 206 N. Third st. 

Price, Burtis Commission 206 N. Third st. 

Priesmeyer, W. H Salt 1008 Carr st. 

Pritchet[ John West St. Louis Feed Co 6760 Manchester ave. 

Prunty Chas. E Grain and Grass Seed 18. Main st. 

Puff, Fred Brosseau & Co., Ill N. Third st. 

Putnam, Lyman W Terminal R. R. Assn 120 Rialto Building. 



Qnesnel, Chas. J Chris. Sharp Com. Co., 202 N. Main st. 

Quinlivan, Sol. J.. Sol. J. Quinlivan & Sons, Grain and Produce. .4469 W. Belle PI. 

Quinlivan, Jno. R Sol J. Quinlivan & Son 800 Theresa ave. 

Quinette, Oliver Sam'l Cupples Wood en ware Co 7th & Spruce sts. 



Rae, Wm. J Jno. E. Hall Com. Co 418 Chamber of Commerce- 
Ramsay, W. A Union Stock Yards, Sec'y & Treas. . .Foot of Breman ave* 

Randall, B. F Cotton 811 Chestnut st. 

Banken. Robert Real Estate 1516 Locust st. 

ELassfela, A A. Rassf eld 8o Co., Wholesale Liquors 222 Market st. 

Rassieur, Leo Attorney 406 Market st. 

Rauh, Chas. H Rice. Stix & Co., Dry Goods. .10th st. & Washington av. 

Rawlmgs, E. W — Altheimer s Rawlings, Bonds and Stocks 216 N. Fourth st. 

Reardon, James A 

Rebstook, Charles. . .Chas. Rebstock & Co., Wholesale Liquors 200 8. Main st. 

Redemeyer, W. H. Jr Redemeyer & Hollister Com. Co 1107 N. Third st. 

R^el, Charles Regel Flour Co 833 N. Third st. 

Rehbein, Albert A. . . .H. A. Rehbein & Co., Commission 105 N. Main st. 

Reller, August F A. F. Roller & Son, Groceries and Feed. .8638 K. Broadw'y 

Reno, John B Peerless Milling Co 3505 Gratiot st. 

Reynolds, Alfred C Commission 610 Houser Bldg. 

Rhodes, ueorge S Teamster 602 K. Fourth si. 



21 HEJCBBB8 OF THB 

Name. Firm. Buiiness. Location. 

Bioe,ThomasA Bioe-Dwyer Real Est. Co 822 Chestnut st. 

Rice, £. P Andrews, Rice & Co., Real Estate 906 Chestnut st. 

Rich, Morris Rich Construction Co Roe Building^. 

Richardson. Arthur P Richardson Com. Co 62 Gay Building. 

Rioheson, Thomas Erans & Howard Fire Brick Co 920 Market st. 

Richmond, Manley G.. . .Shaw & Richmond Produce Co 829 N. Third st. 

Richmond, Robt. G R. G. Dun & Co 814 Pine st. 

Richter, Gustav Piggott Store Co., Piggott, Ark., and Rialto Bldg. 

Ring, John Prorision Broker. . .106 Gay Building. 

Ring, John, Jr John Ring, Prorisions 106 Gay Building. 

Ring, Vincent P Christy Fire Clay Co 8 Laclede Building. 

Rippe, Charles. . .Chas. Rippe Tent 9o Duck Co 19 S. Fourth st. 

Robbins, James Monroe Farmer New Madrid, Mo. 

Roberts, Geo. N Bemis Bros. Bag Co 601 S. Fourth st. 

Robertson, J. K Farmer 2028 Olive st. 

Robinson, Geo Marcus Bemheimer Milling & Merc. Co 206 N. Fourth st. 

Robinson, George R Deceased 

Robinson, Francis Lee Missouri Forage Supply Co 426 So. Theresa ave ' 

Robinson, Geo. R., Jr. .Robinson, Danforth & Co., Milling 8th and Gratiot sta* 

Robyn, Paul Roeslein & Robyn, Insurance 801 Century Bldg* 

Roeder, Fred'k J Miller Bros. & Co., Commission 982 N. Third st- 

Roeder, Charles Chas. Roeder & Co., Butter and Cheese 821 N. Third st- 

Roederer, E. L Nickel Plate F. F. Line, Cont. Agent 414 Rialto Building- 

Roederer, F. X Terminal R. R. Assn., Agent Eleyenth and Poplar sts- 

Roemheld, Wm 1181 Morrison ave- 

Roennigke, Fred Parrott-Baxter Grain Co 106 Chamber of Commerce- 

Roever, John C Jno. C. Roever^ Co., Feed 4101 Natural Bridge Road. 

Rogers, Albert Jackson Rogers Salt Co 220 Pine st. 

Rooke, Wm. A Logan & Brvao, Broker. . .210 Chamber of Commerce. 

Rocs, Sol American Metal Co., Limited. 904 Security Building. 

Roper^John S Grafton Quarry Co 4ll> Locust st. 

Rose, Hugh C Rose & Parle, Brokers 807 Pine st. 

Rosenberg. G Cotton 26 S. Commercial st. 

Ross, Jacob Mound City Distilling Co 2116 S. Second st. 

Rotet, W. H. . .Fulton Bag and Burlap Co 612 S. Seventh st. 

Rotty, E. J E. J. Rotty k, Co., Feed Seventh st. and Russell ave. 

Rowe, B. J Illinois Central R. B., Commercial Agt 808 N. Broadway. 

Rowell, Clinton Lawyer 814 Rialto Building. 

Rowland, D. P 4400 W. Bell place 

Bump, Aug Mer. Ex. Bd. Flour Insp., Flour Inspector. 129 Market st. 

Rump, Herman A P. P. Williams Grain Co 408 Cham, of Com. 

Rumsey, Moses L. M. Rumsey Mfg. Co., 810 N. Second st. 

Ruprecht, Jos Missouri Express Co., Exp. and Mess 218 Morgan st. 

Ruprecht, W W. & F. Ruprecht, G en'l Contractors * * * 6781 S. Broadway 

Rutter, Bernard Rutter Bros St. Libory, His. 

Ruxton, Robert Ruxton & Co., Grain Miami. Mo. 

Ryan, M. J Silver Creek Mining Co., Pres. &Treas. . .419 Commercial Bldg. 

Ryan, John F 418 Cham, of Com. 

Ryan, Frank K Lawyer 606 Olive st. 

Ryan, Wm. H Gallaher, Limited, Leaf Tobacco Henderson, Ky. 

Ryan, Wm. F Chamber of Commerce. 



Saeger, Wm Feed Store 2919 N. Broadway. 

Sale, S. B Sale Commission Co 2610 Park ave. 

Sampson, C. H Nonotuck Silk Co Tenth and St. Charles sta. 

Samuel, Aderton. . . . W. D. Orthwein Grain Co 802 Cham, of Com. 

Samuel, Web. M United Elev. & Grain Co., Supt 616 Cham, of Conoi. 

Samuel, Ed. M Adams & Samuel, Com 100 Rialto Bldg., Chicago. 

Samuel, Wm. P City Hall. 

Sander, Enno Enno Sander Mineral Water Co 126 S. Eleventh st. 



HBBOHAKTB' BZOHAKQB OF ST. I«OITI8« 26 

Name. Firm. BuBinesi. Looation. 

Sander, Alliert £ Grocer and Feed. . .8772 8. Broadway. 

Sands, James T 610 Pine St. 

Sanfbrd, J. W Jno. H. Wren & Co., 218 Chamber of Commerce. 

Sartorius, Peter Sartorius Proy. Co., 2784 Arsenal st. 

Saner, Niotiolas Sauer Bfilling Co BTansrille, 111. 

Sauer. Philip £ Sauer Milling Co EyansTille. 111. 

Sannaers, Parker Broker Gay Builcung. 

Sayers, Geo. N Provisions 116 N. Fourth st. 

Sayers, Henry Henry Sayers 9l Co., 412 Cham. Com. 

Baylor, H. N . . H. N. Saylor Cooperage Co., Stares and Heading 107 S. 16th st. 

Scfaaeffer, Geo. . . .Schaeifer Bros. So Powell, Soap and Candles. . . .826 N. Second st. 

Sohaeffer. Jacob. .Schaeifer Bros. & Powell, Soap and Candles 826 K. Second st. 

Scharff, L L. 8d A. ScharfP, Liquor 16 S. Second st. 

Scharir, M Flour 1440 N. Broadway. 

Scharff, Nicholas Nicholas Scharff & Sons Grocer Co 704 N. Second st. 

Soharff, Adolph L. & A. Scharff. Liquors 16 S. Second st. 

Scharff, Sdward £ Nicholas Scharff s Sons Gk>cer Co 704 N. Second st. 

Scharff, Sidney M Nicholas Scharff & Sons Grocer Co 704 N. Second st. 

Scharringhausen, W. C Fred. Diekmann Feed Co., Feed 2818 S. Broadway. 

Schawacker, C Livery 414 S. Third st. 

ScheitliB, Chas Hilmer, Soheitlin Com. Co 824 N. Third st. 

Schenkel, Henry. . .John G. Haas Soap Co., Soap Manufactory, 6020 Benedict ave. 

Schlaflv, August. . .State Bank of Carlyle, Cashier Carlyle, 111. 

Scliluefer, Fritz Teamster 816 Montoomery st. 

Schmidt, O. M O. M. Schmidt & Co., Groc. and Com 117 N. Second st. 

Schmidt, £. H 1211 Morrison ave. 

Schmitt, Henry Hope Mut. Ins. Co., Secretary Granite Bldg. 

Schmith, Albert L Kehlor Milling Co Kansas City, M!o. 

Schnell, J. R Harrisonville, Mo. 

Schoen. Isaac A 120 N. Main st. 

Schoeniiard, Louis P Charter Oak Stove 9o Range Co., 1440 N. Main st. 

Schoening, £dw. F. . Columbia Star Milling Co Columbia, 111. 

Schollmeyer, Christian .Hassendeubel Bro., 6^ Co., Commission . . .2nd & Chestnut. 

Schopp, Jacob Jacob Schopp & Bro., Produce Co 721 N. Third st. 

Schopp, Conrad Conrad Schopp & Co., Third and Wash st. 

Schoppe, Henry C H. C. Schoppe & Son, Commission 118 Vine st. 

Schorr, Jacob B C. G. Stif el Brew. Co., 1911 N. Fourteenth st. 

Scbreiner, Francis L Schreiner-Flack Grain Co 116 N. Fourth st. 

Schreiner, Jacob. . . .Schreiner-Flaok Grain Co., Commission 116 N. Fourth st. 

Schroth, Peter A Insurance 944 Century Bldg. 

Schuetz, John G Wine Grower Stratmann, Mo. 

Scbnelte, Henry £ G. J. Schuelte & Co., Commission 607 Cham, of Com. 

Sohuelte^ohn J Geo. J. Schuelte & Co., Commission 607 Cham, of Com. 

Schultz, Henry Schultz & Nlemeyer, Commission. . Levee and Madison sts. 

Schultz, Chas. O C. F. Orthweln's Sons, Commission 107 N. Third st. 

Setaulz, John, Jr Sohulz Bros., Feed Webster Groves, Mo. 

Schulz, Otto J ZeUe Bros. P. & C. Co., 702 N. Third st. 

Sofanlze, Chas. H Schulze Bros., 116 N. Main st. 

Schurmann, Henry Hanover- Star Milling Co German town, 111. 

Schweickardt, Chas. .Schweickart & Halle, Caterers Forest Park. 

Schwidde Henry Feed 2616 N. Fourteenth st. 

Scott, Bobt.£ Broker 322 Pine st. 

Scott, W. S Mo. and 111. Coal Co 806 Mermod- Jaccard Bldg. 

Scruggs, CO Scruggs-McClure Coal Co 606 Union Trust Building. 

Scmns, R. M Scruggs, V andervoort & Barney D. G. Co . . Broadway & Locust. 

Scudder, Charles 8624 Washington ave. 

Seudder, John A 604 Security BuUdlns. 

Scudder, W. A Scudder-Gale Grocer Co 714 Spruce st. 

ScullinjrJohn Wiggins Ferry Co., President 916 Security Building. 

Sears, w.H Jno. Jackson Inv. Co., Secretary 61 Gay Bldg. 

Sears, Gilbert Advance £levator, Superintendent 400 Cham, of Com. 

Sebastian, Henry W Miss. Val. £lev. & Grain Co Madison st. and Levee. 

Seele, F. W P. P. Williams Grain Co., Commission 408 Cham, of Com. 

Sehlinger, Anton Sehllnger Grain Co., Belleville, 111. 

Sellen^ John M Roofer 817 Wainwright Bulldmg. 



26 XEKBBBS OF THB 

Name. Firm. Busmeas. Location. 

Sellner, A. G Steinwender & Sellner, Liquors 117 8. Broadway • 

Senter, Charles Parsons Senter Com. Go 25 8. Third st- 

Senter, John A Senter Commission Co., Third and Walnut sts* 

8essinghau8, T. W Union Refrigerator Transit Co Century Bldg. 

Sessinghaus, Wm 1444 St. Louis ave. 

Sexton, Henry D H. D. Sexton k Bro., Real Estate. Seztou Bldg.,E. St.L.. 111. 

Seybt, Charles H . . . . Highland Milling Co., 162 Laclede Bldg. 

Shapleigh, A. L Norrell-Shapleigh Hardware Co 4th & Washington are. 

SharpjJames Provision 4678 Page ave. 

Shea, Thos. F Plant System 206 Houser Bldg. 

Shedd, O. C Creve Cceur Lake Ice Co., Fourteenth and Gratiot sts. 

Sheehan, Robt. D Rombotis-Sharp Tailoring Co 612 Pine st. 

Sherry, josiah E Isaacs & Sherry Grain Co 218 Cham, of Com. 

Shields, George H Noble & Shields, Lawyer Rialto Building. 

Shirmer, Philip P 1107 Tyler st. 

Shotwell, E. O 

Sickel, John T Sickel Bros., 8. S. & Ins. Agents. . .284 LaSalle st., Chicago, 111. 

Siegel, Emil Belleville Dist. Co., D&tiller BellevUle, 111. 

Siemers, Geo. F Siemers & Chisholm, Commission 800 Cham, of Com. 

Sieving, Fred A L. Lemcke & Co., Commission 822 Pine st. 

Sieving, C. H 8611 Ohio ave. 

Simon, Chas. G Great Western Feed Co 818 Manchester ave. 

Simmons, E. C Simmons Hardware Co., Ninth and Spruce sts. 

Simmons, Wayne G St. L. Ref . Co Lewis and O'Pallon sts. 

Simpkins, Allen T Renault Lead Co 428 Roe Bldg. 

Simpson, J. C Consolidated Coal Co., President Laclede Buildins;. 

Sin(jlair, Ed. W Broker 108^ N. Eighth st. 

Singer, Richard Eohn & Co., Brokers Security Building. 

Sisson, Wm. A R. G. Dun & Co., Merct. Agency Cham, of Com. 

Skidmore, T. J Erie Despatch, Agt Laclede Bldg. 

Skrainka, Fred ;... .Skrainka Con. Co., Contractors, . . .806 Security Building. 

Slack, B. L Burlington Elevator Co., Secretary 64 Laclede Building. 

Slade, Chas Real Estate Brunswick, Mo. 

Slaughter, John B Insurance Ill N. Third st. 

Slevin, Eugene C Lawyer Lincoln Trust Bldg. 

Sloan, William P Hamilton Bank, McLeansboro, Ills. 

Smith, Chas. Hamlin Ry. Mail Service, 4544 Morgan st. 

Smith, 8. Jenks Broker Chamber of Com. 

Smith, Alex. H 411 Chamber of Com. 

Smith, John Van Merchants' Dispatch Trans. Co., Agent Laclede Bldg. 

Smith, F. W F. W. Smith Grain Co., 411 Cham, of Com. 

Smith, Geo .- 3666 Cleveland ave. 

Smith, Wm. J. . . .Geo. P. Plant Milling Co., Millers 602 Chamber of Commerce. 

Smith, Daniel E D. E. Smith & Co., Commission 114 N. Fourth st. 

Smith, Chas. H Surveyor of Customs, Custom House. 

Smith, Breedlove The Benton 9th and Pine. 

Smith, C. B R. G. Dun & Co., Mercantile Agency Cham, of Com. 

Smith, James A. Jr Coal & Feed Grand & Easton aves. 

Smith, James Orr Smith & Payne, Brokers 112 N. Fourth st. 

Smith, E. B Blue Line 202 Railway Exchange. 

Smith, Eug. F E. F. Smith Grain Co., Eighteenth and Olive sts. 

Smith, C. W Smith, Vincent & Co., Commission 72 Gay Building. 

Smith, Wm. E Plant Seed Co., 814 N. Fourth st. 

Smithers, John A., Jr Smithers & Co., Undertakers. 1416 Olive st. 

Smithers, M. L Smithers & Block, Hay and Grain 8015 Olive st. 

Snow, Lewis E Delafield & Snow, Insurance 860 Century Bldg. 

Snow, W. E The N. K. Fairbank Co., Third and Convent sts. 

Snover, W A W. A. Snover Com. Co., 600 Roe Building. 

Sparks, H. J Gus V. Brecht B. 8. Co., Twelfth st. and Cass ave. 

Sparks, Hosea B Sparks Milling Co Alton, HI. 

Sparks, Charles F Sparks Milling Co Alton, 111. 

Sparks, Chas Simmons Hardware Co., Broadway and St. Charles st. 

Speckart, Charles Grain Pierron, His. 

Spelbrink, Louis Livery Stable 1317 Franklin ave. 



XKB0HA.NT8' EXOHANGB OF ST. LOUIS. 27 

Name. Firm. Business. Looation. 

Spencer, A. D Farmer Sulphur Springrs, Mo. 

Spencer, Ck>rwin H .". 2i08 Cham, of Com. 

Spencer, Harlow B 208 Cham, of Com. 

Spieler, George Malster 1642 8. Seventh at. 

Spra^e, R. C 500 N. Commercial st. 

Stahl, F Teamster 2414 Menard st. 

Stanard, £. O. . . .£. O. Stanard Milling Co., President 420 Cham, of Com. 

Stanard, W. K. . .E. O. Stanard Milling Co., Vice-President. . . .420 Cham, of Com. 

Stanley, Henry Mill Furnishings Co 919 N. 2nd st. 

Stanton, Chas. W Stanton & Lyons, Commission 182 Cham. Com. 

Starr, £. £ Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Scales, etc 902 Washington ave. 

Stebbin8,L. W 

Steele, John Gale J. G. Steele & Co., Sackers, etc 418 Cham, of Com. 

Steele, Joseph W Jos. W. Steele & Co., Printers 18 N. Third st. 

Steffan, Louis Teamster 8604 Grace ave. 

Stegall, J. N Allen West Com. Co., Commission 104 S. Main st. 

Steigers, D. H St. Louis Hide and Tallow Co 6146 N. Second st. 

Steinmesch, Henry Wabash R. B Lincoln Trust Building. 

Steinwender, Herman A Steinwender 9o Sellner, Liquors 117 S. Broadway. 

Steinwender, G. A. .Steinwender & Sellner. Whiskies 117 S. Broadway. 

Stephens, Jefferson Grain Hotel St. Louis. 

Stephens, W. Speed.. . .Central Nat'l Bank, Cashier Boonville, Mo. 

Stevener, John J. Stevener & Brc, Feed 1706 Cass ave. 

Stewart, Alcee Alcee Stewart & Co., Lumber 410 Cham, of Com. 

Stewart, A. W A. W. Stewart & Co., Commission 410 Cham, of Com. 

Stewart, A. C Stewart, Cunningham 

& Elliott, Lawyers Rialto Building. 

Stewart, A. M Jas. Stewart & Co., Grain El. Contrs 802 Lincoln Trust. 

Stewart, James C Jas. Stewart & Co., Grain El. Contrs. . ..802 Lincoln Trust. 

StickneV; Wm, A W. A. Stickney Cigar Co 209 N. Fourth st. 

Stifel, £l. C Altheimer &; Rawlings Investment Co 217 N. Fourth st. 

Stifel, Otto Fred'k. . .C. G. Stifel Brew. Co., Brewing 14th and Howard sts. 

Stock, Philip St. Louis Brewing Assn., Secretary 702 Wainwright Bldg. 

Stockton, F. W Traders' Despatch, 506 Houser Building. 

Stoewener, F. F 710 Julia st. 

Stone, Leander P. Hauptman & Co., 618 N, Third st. 

Stover, W. D Star Union Line, 809 Olive st. 

Strain, Arthur R.. .Robt. B. Brown Oil Co., Oil Manuf'rs Rialto Building. 

Stratton, Wm. . .Lawrenceburg Roller Mills Co Lawrenceburg, Ina. 

Staokmann, Emil Drayman 1720 Elliott ave. 

Studniczka, H 2012 St. Louis ave. 

Stuever, Anton C Home Brewing Co., Miami and Salena sts. 

Snblett, Edwin H Fuel Oil Distributing Co., Preset 618 Union Trust Bldg. 

Sudborough, J. A Waters Pierce Oil Co Odd Fellows' Building. 

Sullivan, T. J Sullivan & Miller, 1417 N. Broadway. 

Sullivan, Patrick 701 Washington ave. 

SalUvan, F. R Korth Shore Despatch, Agent Sixth and Olive sts. 

Snmma, Emil Sessinghaus Milling Co Ninth and North Market st. 

8ummerfleld« Moses. .M.Summerfleld&Cc, Hides and Wool 218 N. Main st. 

Sutherland, G. G Grain 102 N. Fourth st. 

Swingley, W. S Hovt Metal Co 4143 Clayton rd. 

Swift, w. H Fruin, Bambriok Con. Co., Contractors 721 Olive st. 

Sykes, G. A St. Louis Commission Co., UN. Main st. 



Taalfe, B. P Contractor 4187 Manchester ave. 

Tansey, Geo. J St. Louis Transfer Co., President 400 8. Broadway. 

Taussig, John J J. & J. Taussig, Brokers 627 Security Bldg. 

Taussig,Jo8. S J. & J. Taussig, Brokers 627 Security Bldg. 

Taylor, Wm. H Insurance 117 N. Third st. 

Taylor, T. Carroll 114 N. Fourth st. 



28 HEMBBB8 OF THB 

Name. Firm. Business. Looation. 

Taylor, Phil. G P. C. Taylor fc Son, Commission 609 Roe Bldg. 

Taylor, E. M Commission 606 Cham, of Com. 

Taylor, C. H F. W. Brookman Commission Co 806 N. Third st. 

Taylor, J. B P. C. Taylor & Son, Commission 609 Roe Bide. 

Taylor, Joseph C Geo. Taylor Com. Co 24 8. Main si. 

Teasdale, Thos. B J. H. Teasdale Com. Co 102 N. Fourth st. 

Teasdale, J. Waller. . . .J. H. Teasdale Com. Co 102 N. Fourth st. 

Teasdale, J. W J. W. Teasdale ^ Co., Dried Fruits ^ Com.. 7th So Poplar sts. 

Teasdale, A. 8 825 N. Fourth st. 

Teasdale, Geo. W J. W. Teasdale & Co., Dried Fruits 7th & Poplar sts. 

Teasdale, C. H J. H. Teasdale Com. Co 102 N. Fourth st. 

Teasdale, J. W., Jr. . . J. W. Teasdale 9o Co., Dried Fruit 7th & Poplar sts. 

Teasdale, J. £ Century Hay & Grain Co 415 Railway Exchange Bldg. 

Teasdale, Everett P. .Miller &TeasdaleCo., Commission 825 N. Fourth st. 

Tebbetts, L. B. .Mansur-Tebbetts Imp. Co., Farm Machinery. . .10th & Spruce sts. 

Teichmann, Wm. C City Chemist 1141 Market st. 

Teiohmann, Chas. H. .Teichmann Com. Co., Commission 62 Gay Building. 

Teiohmann, Otto L. . .Teichmann Com. Co., Commission 62 Gay Building. 

Telthorst, Herman Flour and Feed 7501 8. Broadway. 

Temple, Harry Bookkeeper 412 Washington aire. 

Temple, Joseph Adams Express Co., Agent 407 N. Fourth st. 

Temjbleman, W. J Templemau & Co.. Produce 960 N. Third st. 

TenBroek, Gerrit H. .TenBroek, Spooner & Walsh, Attys 218 N. Seventh st. 

Tepe, Carl H. A Wm. Tepe Feed Co., 2723 Laclede ave. 

repe« William Feed 2725 Laclede ave. 

Terry, Albert T John H. Terry & Sons, Real Estate 621 Chestnut st. 

Tesson, George B Nanson Com. Co 202 Chamber of Commerce. 

Teuscher, T. 8 T. 8. Teuscher Com. Co., Liquors 320 N. Third st. 

Tevis. Hupp Tevis Com. Co 116 N. Main st. 

Thacner. Arthur Central Lead Co., 610 Pine st. 

Thaw, Charlie C. Thaw & Co., Life Ins. Agent Bk. Com. Bldg. 

Thompson, A. L Cavender & Thompson, Real Estate 716 Chestnut st. 

Thompson, Wm. H Kat. Bank of Com., President Broadway and Olive st. 

Thompson, E. F G. A. Benton & Co., Grain 829 N. Third st. 

Thompson, C. McClung. .C. L. Thompson & Son, Insurance 222 Pine st. 

Thompson, Joseph B 4226 McPherson ave. 

Thomson, A Western Iron & Supply Co., 938 K. Second st. 

Thomson, Lewis W Commission 417 Olive st. 

Thomson, Wm. H. . . .Boatmen's Sav. Bank, Cashier. .Fourth and Washington av. 

Thomson, M. D Thomson & Cooke Cheese Co 818 N. Second st. 

Thy son. John Venice Elevator, 215 Chamber of Commerce. 

Tioe, Vilray Forrester Bros., Commission 70 Gay Bldg. 

Tiedemann, Geo. W Chas. Tiedemann Mfg. Co O'Fallon, 111. 

Tilton, Edgar D E. O. Stanard Milling Co 420 Chamber of Commerce. 

Timmerman^ G. H. . . .St. L. Iron & Machine Works Second and Chouteau ave. 

Tinker, Z. W. Columbia Brewing Co IVentieth and Madison sts. 

Tittmann, Harold H St. L. Cooperage Co Main and Arsenal sts. 

Todd, Henry R Burlington Route, Genl. Agent 502 Olive st. 

Tontrup, Louis H Papin & Tontrup, Real Estate 626 Chestnut st. 

Townsend, F. C Townsend Com. Co., 827 N. Third st. 

Tower, George F., Jr Goodwin Mfg. Co., Candles and Soap. .8832 Chouteau ave. 

Tracv, John H David Nicholson, Grocer 16 N. Sixth st. 

Trask, Isaac R Trask Fish Co., President 610 N. Second st. 

Trask, Walter B Trask Fish Co., 610 N. Second st. 

Traunmiller, Joseph . . .Excelsior Brew. Co., 5 8. Seventeenth st. 

Trauemicht, F. C . . .Trauemicht & Shanks Com. Co 826 N. Third st. 

Triplett, John R Insurance 944 Century Building. 

Tucker, Chas. T Grain 324 Lincoln Trust Bldg. 

Tumbaoh, C McCullough & Tumbach, Commission 719 N. Third st. 

Tune, Lewis T The Bradstreet Co Security Building. 

Tunstall, R. C St. Louis Hay Exch., Vice-Pres 602 Theresa ave. 

Tunstall, R. B St. Louis Hay Exch., Secretary 602 Theresa ave. 

Turner, Chas. H Chas. H. Turner & Co., Real Estate Wainwright Bldg. 

Tutt, DentG 807 Chestnut st. 



MBBOHANTS' BXOHANQE OF ST. LOUIS. 29 

Name. Firm. Business. Looation. 

Tirininc, C. O Hay Gay Bldg« 

Tjler, George Robert Atkinson & Co., Commission 806 K. Main st* 



Udell, C. B C. B. Udell & Co., Cheese 410 N. Seoond st. 

Underwood. Geo. A D. B. Smith & Co., Flour, eto 114 N. Fourth st. 



Yahlkamp, Henry. . W. J. Lemp Brew. Co., Secretary 18th and Cherokee sts. 

Valle, John F Desloge Con. Lead Co., Secretary 110 N. Fourth st. 

Valier, Charles. .Valier & Spies Milling Co., 818 Chamber of Commerce. 

Yalier, Bobt. C Valier & Spies Mlgr Co., 818 Chamber of Commerce. 

Van Arsdale, B. 8 

Tan Blaroom, J. C Nat. Bank of Com., Vice-Prest.. .Broadway and Olive st. 

Taoghan, Wm. L Vaughan & Cames, Real Bstate Linn, Mo. 

Yeninga, George A. .F. W. Smith Grain Co 411 Chamber of Commerce. 

Yinoent, J. F Smith, Vincent & Co., Commission 72 Gay Building. 

Yogeler, Julius Grocer and Com 14 N. Third st. 

Yogel, Charles F Real Bstate 624 Chestnut st. 

Yogelsang, L. B 822 Finest. 

Yogelsang, Henry. Hubbard & Moffltt Com. Co 322 Pine st. 

Yogelsang, Wm. H 2218 Sullivan ave. 

Yon Wedelstaedt, R. Park Real Bstate. . . Wainwrigbl Building. 

Yordtriede, B. Henry Mining 2019 Sidney st. 

Yoris, F. D Grain and Hay Neoga, 111. 

Yorls, George W Grain and Hay Stewardson, 111. 



Waddook, Frank G O'Connor & Co., Market Reporter 112 Chestnut st. 

Wade, Festus J Mercantile Trust Co Columbia Building. 

Wagenmann, Alfred J Clerk Court of Criminal Correction Four Courts. 

Waggoner. B. L. . .Brinson-Judd Grain Co., Commission 208 Cham, of Com. 

Wagner, Charles Pig Lead & Spelter. .174 Laclede Bldg. 

Wagoner, Geo. C. R. .Smithers & Wagoner, Undertakers 1127 Olive st. 

Wagoner. Henry H . .Smithers & Wagoner, Undertakers 1127 Olive st. 

Wanl, John John Wahl Com. Co 2 8. Main st. 

Wahl, J. B John Wahl Com. Co 2 8. Main st. 

Wahl, £dwin L John Wahl Com. Co., Commission 2 8. Main st. 

Wainwright, BUis St. L. Brewers' Ass'n Wainwright Building. 

Waldeok, Jacob C. C. . .. Jac. C. C. Waldeck Prov. Co» Provisions, 

Montrose ave. and LaSalle st. 

Walker, G. H G. H. Walker & Co., Brokers 810 N. Fourth st. 

Walker, R. F Attorney at Law 926 Rialto Bldg. 

Walker, W. C Real Bstate 606 Fullerton Bldg. 

Wall, Nicholas R Wall & Whittemore, Insurance 208 N. Fourth st. 

Walsh, Austin Catholic Orphan Board, 1808 Locust st. 

Walsh, Julius 8 Miss. Valley Trust Co., President 201 N. Fourth st. 

WalBh, Peter Teamster 8129 N. Twelfth st. 

Walsh, Edward Jr Miss. Glass Co., President 4100 N. Main st. 

Walsh, C. K. D Kehlor Bros., 401 Chamber of Commerce. 

Waltke, Louis H Wm. Waltke & Co., Soap 2nd and Grand ave. 

Walton, S. 8 Commission 908 Cham, of Com. 

Walton, Farwell 4121 N. Grand ave. 

Wangler, Joseph F. . . . J. F. Wangler B. & 8. W. Co., President 1&47 N. Ninth st. 

Wangler, Joseph A. . . J. F. Wangler B. & 8. W. Co., Secretary 1M7 N. Ninth st. 

WardropiRichard Bemet & Craft, 1440 N. Broadway. 

Warren, Thomas. . . .Warren Com. & Investment Co 200 N. Second st. 

Warren, John A J. W.Warren & Co., Bureka Springs, Ark. 

Wanriok, R.F 



30 MEMBBB8 OF THE 

Name. Firm. Business. Location. 

Washer, S. R. .The S. R. Washer Grain Co., Atchison, Kas. 

Wasserman, Bennett. .B.Wasserman & Co., Stocks and Bonds.. . .212 N. Fourth st. 

Wasson, H. D Broker 107 Cham, of Commerce. 

Waterworth, Jas. A St. Louis Insurance Surreys, President. . .Rialto Buildine. 

Watts, T. G T. G. Watts&Son, Real Estate 1000 Chestnut st. 

Weaver, Henry Planters Hotel Co., Fourth and Pine sts. 

Weber, JSdward Weber Drayage & Warehouse Co 106 N. Second st. 

Weber. Henry C 4472 Lindell ave. 

Weil, Jacob P Bernard, Baer & Co., Produce & Prov 1418 N. Broadway, 

Weil, Aug. J 11 Broadway, N. Y. 

Weil, Henry G 86 New St., N. T. 

Weinberg, Louis Funsten Bros. & Co., Commission 109 N. Main st. 

Weissenbom, S.A S. A. Weissenbom & Son, Coal 818 Olive st. 

Welch, Ira Insurance 812 Century Bldjr. 

Wells, Rolla Mayor, City Hall. 

Wenneker, Chas. F Wenneker- Morris Candy Co 12 S. Third st. 

Wemse, Wm. F The Wm. F. Wemse Co., Bonds & Stocks Bk of Com. Bldg. 

Wemse, H. H Wemse & Dieckman, Brokers 817 N. Fourth st. 

Worth, John £ Worth's Insurance Agency 815 Chestnut st. 

Worth, G. L Werth's Insurance Agency 815 Chestnut st. 

Wertheimer, J. J Wertheimer-Swarts Shoe Co 10th and Washington ave. 

Westcott, w. B Westcott Com. Co., Commission 827 N. Third st. 

Westoott, W. F Westcott Com. Co., 827 N. Third st. 

West, Courtney^H Moffltt-West Drug Co 617 N. Fourth st. 

West, Thomas U St. Louis Trust Co., President Fourth and Locust sts. 

Wetzel, Frederick L Dozier Bakery Sixteenth and Morgan sts. 

Wheeler, Jas. L 

Whitaker, Edwards Whitaker & Co., Brokers 800 N. Fourth st. 

White, Chas. E Fulton Bag & Burlap Co 612 S. Seventh st. 

White. Edward W . .Central of Ga. Ry. Co., Agent 402 Houser Bldg. 

Whitenead^. A Nanson Commission Co 202 Chamber of Commerce. 

Whitehill, Thomas H Citizens' Ins. Co., Insurance Rialto Building. 

Whitelaw, Geo. P 718 Security Building. 

Whitelaw, Oscar L Whitelaw Bros., Paints and Oils 400 N. Second st. 

Whitelaw, Robt. H Whitelaw Bros., Paints and OUs 409 N. Second st 

Whitelaw, Chas. W Huse & Loomis I. & T. Co Security Building. 

Whitmore, Daniel R Merchants' Exch., Ass't Secretary. . . .Third and Pine sts. 

Whitmore, H. R Merchants' Exchange, Asst. Secretary Third and Pine sts. 

Whittemore, F. C Wall & Whittemore, Insurance 208 N. Fourth st. 

Wiekham, E. F Universal Acct. Co., 2019 Lucas ave. 

Wieder, Moses L Wieder Paint Co., 1601 N. Broadway. 

Wiedmer, W. H Gratiot St. Warehouse Co 214 Chamber of Commerce. 

Wiedmer, Fred. .Gratiot Street Warehouse Co 214 Chamber of Commerce. 

Wiedmer, John Gratiot St. Warehouse, 214 Chamber of Commerce. 

Wiener, I. M Wiener Bros., Brokers Wainwright Building. 

Wiener, Adolph Real Estate Wainwright Building. 

Wilkinson, WT R. .Wilkinson, Hogenmiller Com. Co 212 N. Main st. 

Wilkins, W. T Senter Comniission Co Third and Walnut sts. 

Willard C. A. 

WillardJ Wm.' G.* .' .' .* ] .* .' ." .' .' .* .' .' ! .' .* .' .* .' . .' .' . .* .* . Manufacturer. .' .' . .' '. '. ieioN. Fourth it. 

Williams, Elmer V. . . Wm. Johnston & Co., Ship Agents 208 Railway Ex. Bldg. 

Williams, P. P. . . .P. P. Williams Grain Co., Commission 408 Cham, of Com. 

Williamson, W. H. . . .Staunton Milling Co Staunton, HI. 

Willock, R. S L. & N. R. R., Contracting Agt. . . .206 N. Broadway. 

Wilson, Chas. A Barron & Wilson, Grain Samplers 422 Rialto Bldg. 

Winkelmeyer, Christoph'r . .Interna. Bank, President 4th & Chestnut sts. 

Wirthlin, R. L Southern Coop. Co., 110 Victor st. 

Wiseman, Arthur A M. F. Hughes & Co., Broker 225 4th ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Wissmath, Chas., Jr C. Wissmath & Son Pork Packing Co 1118 N. 12tn st. 

Witte, OttoH Witte Hardware Co 704 N. Third st. 

Witter, Ernest A Chapin&Co., Mill Feed 805 Chamber of Com. 

Woelfle. Matt Baur Flour Co., Salesman 807 N. Second st. 

Woerheide, A. A. B Lincoln Trust Co., Sec'y and Treas 710 Chestnut st. 

Wolf, John Hay and Grain. . 507 8. Fourteenth st 

Wolfenden, C. F A. A. Paton ft Co., Cotton 215 Elm st, Dallas. Tex. 



hxsohantb' bxohanox of bt. imvib. 81 

Home. Firm. BiuIdmb. Loofttlon. 

Iff, JnlituR Petonon Com. Co., 709 CRrroll at. 

IgMt, Loula Peed aST GraTOis ave' 

Ubrinok, Henry, .at. I.. D. Be«f and Pro. Co S9I9 Papln at. 



Itman, O 908 Security BuildinK. 

nderly, Peter Coal 1716 Carr at 

odlock, Frank D..F.D.Woodlook Jt Co., Commlaalon Ill N. Third al 



od, F.k A.'iT.'KelloKBNBWBpapB'r Co .'.'.'.'.','.'.'.'.','.'.224 Walnut at. 

od, H UnToa Dairy Co., DalrymM)...Jeff. ft Waahlneton avea 

ads, W. K Robinson. Dan tortti Co BlKhtb aad Qratiotata 

■ ' " " '■ ■^'■- .324 F'-" ■ 



odson, Aahby Cliaa. F. Urthwein'a Sons KanaaaCity, Mo. 

odward, W. H.... Woodward STieman Ptg.Co 809 N. Tblrdat 

olley, EdsarH Conn. Mut. Ufe Ina. Co Chemical Building. 

oater, R. L.. .Dayton-Wooater Grain Co 416 Chamber of Commeroe. 

ullt, F. J LehiKh Valley R. R., Agent f 0* Houaer Bldg, 

ipe, Henry The Hy. Wrape Co., Staves and Headings.. IMWCbeatnut at. 

i£bt, Joseph P...Jaa. A. Wright & Sons, Carriage Manufrs 19th fe Wash'n. 

Lgbt, Prank L. . . Jas. A. WriRht & Sons, Carriage Manufrs 19tb tt Waah'n. 

ght, Geo. M...Wm.Barr Dry Goods Co Sixth and Olive ata. 

ight, J. L Wright Qraln Co 418 Chamber of Commeroe. - 

ight, Wm. H Wriebt Grain Co 418 Cham. Com. 

iaberg, Wm. C Mining 411 Olive at. 

tze, Wm. H Camp Spring Hill Co., Millera....G08 Chamber of Commeroe. 

nderlloh, Chaa., Jr. ..Chaa. Wunderlloh Cooperage Co 814 Monroe at. 

man, Henry P BtL.bMlas.Vsl.Tr. Co., Seoretary... Main and Walnut at. 



ger, Wm Grooer 2800 Manchester ave. 

iQg, EdiT. H Eaton, UoClellan & Co 19 N. Main at 

ing, Kobert 8 Puniten Bros. & Co. Commlaaion 109 N. Main at 

ing, D. W Standard Commlaaion Co lOS Cbam. of Com. 



Xi 



e, F. E....ZelleBroa. ProT. fcCnm. Co., Prov. andCom 702 N. Tblrdat. 

k, FhlUp John. . .Bemet, Craft & Zenk., Mlllera Troy, HI. 

lold, Geo. W Waterloo Milling Co Waterloo, Dla. 

ISDhetn, Henry Lafayette Bank, Prealdent. ...Broadway and Park av. 

iheld,Josepb Zlrnheld-Gloaemeyer Flour Co Booond and Walnut ata. 



v« 



'r 



■'?■ 



'^ 



■■i¥ 



i'- 



*» S 



■' [ 



INDEX. 



Apples 236 

AcTicultaral Implements 02 

Ale 226 

Barley 147 

Bank Statement 41 

Bran 16« 

Bridge Traffic 89 

Beans 226 

Bntter 228 

Building Statistics 76 

Bagging 210 

Board of Directors, Beport of 9 

*' ** Resolutions... 15 

Beer 84 and 140-226 

Breweries 84 

Beef, Dressed 188 

Beef, Canned 189 

Boots and Shoes 88 and 226 

Barbed Wire 236 

Bradstreet's 182 

Biomhall 182 

Boats and Barges 94 

Cheese .•••••••«•*..••••••••«•• ■• 228 

Coal and Coke ........ .' 78 and 92 

Clearing- House Statement 48 

Custom-House Transactions 82 

Corn 188 and 144-178 

Corn Meal 162-178 

Comparative Business 124 

Crop Conditions 184 

(Jrop Wheat 188 

Crop Reports for several years 181 

Crop of the World —Wheat 186 

Crops of Missouri 175 

Crops, Average Condition 184 

Cotton 118 

Committees for 1902 7 

Committees for 1901 5 

Cattle 199 

Coffee 68 

Candles 226 

Cement * 226 

Cordage and Rope 226 

Castor Beans 225 

Climate 80 

Candies 220 

Cotton Seed Meal 226 

Chemicals 84 

Clothing 88 

Cigars 209 

Cars— Railroad and Street 84 

Cotton Ties « 210 

Dried Fruit 221 

Drugs 84 

Dry Goods 82 

Elevators, capacity and rates. . .126-126 

Eggs 228 

Exports from U. S. by Classes 174 

Flour and Grain, total movement. 119 
Flour and Grain, monthly receipts 

and shipments 141 

Foreign Commerce 68 

Foreign Grain and Flour Trade ... 107 
Flour and Grain, total receipts and 

shipments for 20 years 142 



Flour, Review 127 

'* receipts by crop years 181 

" monthly rec'ts and ship 181 

" exports from the U. S 132 

" receipts at various cities... 182 

** weekly prices 185 

" amount manufactured 189 

" amount manufactured in 

various cities 183 

" sources of supply and direc- 
tion of shipments 181 

" stocks in store 180 

" report of Board of Flour 

Inspectors 188 

** foreign shipments 184 

Fire Record. 76 

Fish 226 

Foreign Trade 107 

Flaxseed 222 

Fertilizers 236 

Financial Review 41 

Foreign Shipments 106 

FreiKhts to New Orleans by river. . 106 
" Memphis and Vicksburg 

by river 106 

*' allrail eastward 98 

" from St. L. to Liverpool 

via New Orleans Ill 

" from St. L. to LiveriMX)! 

via New York. ... lU and 112 
" to Southern cities by rail. 98 

Furniture 62 

Ferries 89 

Fruits. 224 

Glassware 84 

Glucose 69 

General Trade and Progress 81 

Groceries 07 

Grain inspection 164-165 

** receipts and shipments for a 

series of years 143 

" stocks in store at close of 

each week 166-172 

" shipments by barges to N. O. 106 
" foreign shipments from N. O. 110 
" foreign shpm'ts Tm Galv'tn. 110 
" monthly rec*ts and shlpm'ts. 141 

«• Review 186 

" receipts by crop, years 160 

" exports from IT. S 109-160 

<* daily prices 148-159 

" visible supply 178 

'* receipts at various cities.... 174 

•• Wheat 187-161 

" Com 188 

** Oats 189 

" Barley 141 

" Rye. 140 

** stocks in public elevators. ... 172 
" stocks in private elevators. . 172 
" receipts at 7 Atlantic ports. . 174 
" highest and lowest futures.. 161 

'* earliest crop receipts 161 

" Missouri Crops 175 

Hatsand Caps 83 

Highwinesand Whiskey 2U 

Hominy and Grits 162 

Hides 216 



IHDEX. 



Hogs ; 200 

Hay ai7 

Horses and Moles 203 

Hops 336 

Hardware 88 

Harvest time of the world 181 

Import Duties on Wheat 180 

Imports and exports of the United 

%tate&,Yalae 86 

Internal KeTenue, collections 86 

Iron and Steel 88-836 

Inspectors, 1003 7 

Inspectors, 1901 S 

Latin-American Trade 68 

Livestock 19»-306 

Live Stock, weekly prices 306 

Lumber 64 

Lead 78-318 

Leather 316 

Louisiana Purchase Oentennial . . 86 

Molasses 6B 

Malt 336 

Members of the Exchange, 1901. 

(Appendix. 
Members of Exchange dec*d 1901. . . 364 

Meteorological tables 80-81 

MUlstuffs 168 

Municipal Affairs 69 

Mining Industries of Missouri 73 

Manufacturing Industries 46 

NaUs 328 

Naval Stores 313 

OiBcersof the Exchange since Its 

organization 3 

Officers of the Exchange for 1901.. 8 
Officers of the Exchange for 1903.. 4 

Onions 338 

Oils 336 

Oranges and Lemons 336 

Ore, Iron 236 

Ore, Zinc 336 

Oat Meal 162 

Oil Oake 336 

Oats 189-146 

Paints and Oils 88-68 

Potatoes 326 

Population of St. Louis 74 

Provisions and Packing 187 to 196 

Provisions, Exports from U. S 197 

Provisions, Weekly Prices 196 

Post-Office Statistics 84 

Pig Iron 236 

Peltries and Furs 316 

Produce 324 

Bevlew 81 

Receipts from January 1 to close of 

each week 130 

Beal Estate 47 

Bye 140-146 

Receipts, monthly totals 337-387 

Rec*8 by each river and railroad.345-366 
Rainfall 81 



Rye Flour 168 

Real Estate and Personal Property 74 

Rosin 312 

Railroad Iron 226 

Rail Transportation 87 



Rice. 



89 



River Statistics 94 

River commerce of St. Louis 94 

Accidents on Western Rivers.... 104 
Arrivals and departures of 

steamers 101 

List of Steamers 96 

Shipments by Southern boats.... 102 

Gauge Readings 100 

Depth of channel, southward.... 97 

Shipments by barge lines 108 

Harbor and wharf Oommlssion- 

er's report 106 

Olosedbyice 96 

Stocks and Investment Securities . . 46 

Seeds 222 

Salt 219 

Sheep 201 

Shipments, monthly, totals 288-244 

Shipments by each R. R. & River 266-263 

Shipstuffs 168 

Sugar 68 

Staves 236 

Soap 226 

Shipments of leading articles to 

close of each week 122 

Stock Yards 206 

State Finances 71 

St. Louis in 1900 and 1901 SO 

Saddlery Hardware 88 

Spelter 218 

Stoves and Ranges 88 

Tea 60 

Transfer Statistics 89 

Treasurer, report of 18-14 

Tobacco 84-207 

Tonnage, total by each river and 

read 90 

Tar and Pitch 212 

Turpentine 212 

Tin 226 

TransiK>rtation— Rail 87 

Temi>erature 80 

Tallow 226 

Tax Levy 74 

Trust Oompanies 41 

Traffic Bureau, Reportof 27 

Vehicles 62 

Wheat Import Duties 180 

Wheat 137-148-161-179 

Wines and Liquors 226 

Wool 216 

Whiskies 2U 

White Lead 218 

Wheat Orop of the World. 188-186 

Weather 71 

World's Fair, 1908 85 

Zinc and Spelter. 72 and 212 



ANNTUAL STATEMENT 



OF THE 



Trade and Commerce 



OF 



mif 




SAINT LOUIS, 



FOR THK YEAR 1902, 



REPORTED TO THE 



Merchants' Exchange of Stlouis 



BY 



GEO. H. MORGAN, Secretary. 



ST. LOUIS, MO.: 

Prbss of R. p. Studlby A Co. 

>903. 



OFFICERS OF THE 

MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS 

SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION. 



Year. President. 

862 Henry J. Moore. 
868 George Partridge. 
864 Thomas Rioheson 

866 Barton Able. 
l866 £. O. StauanL 

867 C. L. Tnoker. 

868 John J. Roe. 

869 Geo. P. Plant. 

870 Wm. J. Lewis. 

871 Gerard B. Allen. 

872 R. P. Tansey. 
878 Wm. H. Scudder. 
.874 Web M. Samuel. 

875 D.P.Rowland. 

876 Nathan Cole. 
John A. Soudder. 
Geo. Bain. 
John Wahl. 
Alex. H. Smith. 
Michael MoEnnis. 
Chas. £. Slaybaok. 
J. C. Ewald. 
D. R. Francis. 



No. 
Vice-Presidents. Members. 

0. S. Greeley. A. W. Fagin. 675 



877 
878 
879 
880 
881 
882 
888 
884 
885 
886 
887 
888 
889 
890 
891 
892 
898 

894 

895 
896 
897 
898 
899 
900 
901 
902 
903 



C. S. Greeley. 
Barton Able. 
£. O. Stanard. 
Alex. H. Smith. 
Xidgar Ames. 
Geo. P. Plant. 
H. A. Homeyer. 
G. G. Waggaman. 
R. P. Tansey. 
Wm. H. Scudder. 
8. M. Edgell. 

L. L. Ashbrook. 
John P. Meyer. 
John Wahl. 
K. Schaeffer. 
H. C. Haarstiok. 
Michael McEnnls. 
Chas. £. Slayback. 
John Jackson. 
Cbas. F. Orthwein. 

D. R. Francis. 
John P. Keiser. 



Henry C. Haarstiok. S. W. Cobb. 



A. W. Fagin. 

C. L. Tucker. 
H. A. Homeyer. 

D. G. Taylor. 
D. G. Taylor. 
H. A. Homeyer. 
Nathan Cole. 
H. C. Yaeger. 
Geo. Bain. 

C. H. Teichman. 
Web M. Samuel. 
John F. Telle. 
Wm. M. Senter. 
F. B. Davidson. 
Geo. Bain. 
Craig Alexander. 
W. J. Lemp. 

J. C. Ewald. 
A. T. Harlow. 
Frank Gaiennie. 

D. P. Grier. 

C. W. Barstow. 

D. P. Slattery. 



{ 



S. W. Cobb. 

Frank Gaiennie. 

Chas. F. Orthwein. 

Chas. A. Cox. 

John W. Kauffman. 

Marcus Bemheimer. 

Isaac M. Mason. 

W. T. Anderson. 

A. T. Harlow. 
Wm. G. Boyd. 

Thos. Booth. 

C. H. Spencer. 

H. F. Langenberg. 

Chris. Sharp. 

Wm. P. Kennett. 

Oscar L. Whitelaw. 

Wm. T. Haarstiok. 

Geo. J. Tansey. 

T. R. Ballard. 



Chas. H. Teichmann. J. Will Boyd. 



Louis Fusz. 

J. H. Teaedale. 

Hugh Rogers. 

Marcus Bemheimer. 

Geo. H. Plant. 

Wm. T. Anderson. 

Roger P. Annan. 

rWm. G. Boyd. 
\Geo. H. Small. 



Thomas Booth. 
Chas. A. Cox. 
Alex. Euston. 
G. M. Flanigan. 
S. R. Francis. 
Wallace Delafleld. 
L. C. Doggett. 

I E. A. Pomeroy. 



C. Marquard Forster. Geo. D. Barnard. 



Amedee B. Cole. 
Chris. Sharp. 
Henry H. Wemse, 
Oscar L. Whitelaw, 
Wm. T. Haarstiok. 
Geo. J. Tansey. 
T. R. Ballard. 
Wm. A. Gardner. 



518 
725 
990 
1110 
1068 
1268 
1882 
1289 
1282 
1869 
1868 
1307 
1442 
1897 
J827 
1290 
1260 
1808 
8588 
8565 
3566 
8565 
8505 
8864 
8812 
8296 
8261 
3190 
8116 
3001 
2912 

2807 



2647 
2518 
2895 
2229 
2079 



Clark H. Sampson. 
Wm. P. Kennett. 
Oscar L. Whitelaw. 
Daniel E. Smith. 
Frank E. Kauff man. 1975 
T. R. Ballard. 1872 

Wm. A. Gardner. 1882 
Charles H. Huttig. 1881 



Secretary and Treasurer. 

1862 Clinton B Fisk. 

1863-64 J. H. Alexander. 

1865-1903 Geo. H. Morgan. 



MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS. 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 190a. 

PRXSIDSNT. 

GEO. J. TANSEY. 
First Vicb-Prxsidbkt, T. R. BALLARD. 

Second Vigb-Prbsidbnt, WM. A. GARDNER. 

DIBBCTOBS. 
1903. 19Q2-190S. 

OSCAR L. WHTTBLAW, WM. T. HAAR8TICK, 

ffENRY WOLLBRINCK, L. B. BRINSON, 

JAS. S. McGEHEE, T. H. FRANCIS, 

CHRISTOPH HILKE, OTTO L. TEICHMANN, 

S. A. WHITEHEAD, JOHN H. DIECKBiAN. 

GEO. H. MORGAN, Sbcrbtakt and Trbasukbb. 
D. R. WHITMORE, First Assistant Sbgretart. 
H. R. WHITMORE, Second Assistant Sbcrbtart. 
R. F. WALKER, Attobnxt. 

commtttbb of apfbals. 

CHRISTIAN BERNET, THOS. B. TEA8DALE, 

SAMUEL GORDON, CHAS. E. FLACK, 

W. C. DICKINSON, DAN'L P. BYRNE, 

GEO. F. LANGENBERG, R. H. LEONHARDT, 

JNO. L. MESSMORE, JNO. WIEDMER, 

B. L. SLACK, B. J ROWE. 

comjcittbb of arbitration, 
first biz months. ssooitd six months. 

J. C. BROCKMEIER, R. J. PENDLETON, 

THOS. H. WHITEHILL, B. H. COYLE, 

JOHN E. GERAGHTY, EDW. M. FLESH, 

W. H. DANFORTH, SAMUEL PLANT, 

J. BOGY TAYLOR, ROBT. 8. YOUNG. 

TKLBQRAFH CLERK. OFFICIAL MARKET REPORTER. DOORKEEPER. 

CHAS. H. WHITMORE. MARC. J. GAUTIER. FRANK T. ICUBGS. 

RIVER CLERK. STENOGRAPHER. UESSENQER. 

B. T. WALTON. A. H. SMITH. EDDIE LOESCH. 

HONORARY BfEMBERSHIF COMMTTTBE. 

E. O. STANARD, Chairman. 
ALEX. H. SMITH, S. W. COBB, CHAS. A. COX, 

ISAAC M. MASON, C H. SPENCER, OSCAR L. WHITELAW. 



flMITTEES AND INSPECTORS FOR looa. 



WM. A. OABDNEB, Oboltman. 

T. H. FKANCI8. 
REAL KSTATE. 

G. J. TANSEY. Chairmui. 
WH. A. QABDNEB, WH. T. HAABSTIOE, 

ST. LOUIS TflAFFIC sunuiu. 
Hanagers from HercbaDts' Exchange. 

H. F. LAMOENBEBO, A. DlFIOTIEIBEDO. 
WEIOHINO. 
T. R. BALLARD, Cbalnnan. 
W. K. 8TANARD, THOS. B. TEASDALE, 

O, A. OBVIS, MAXWELL KENNEDY, 

FBED. O. OBTHWEIN, GEO. L. QBAHAM. 
INSUHANCE. 
P. D. BIE8CHBEKO, Chairman. 
,ACE DELAFIBLD, JNO. B. 9LAUQBTER, JAB. A. WATEBWOBTH, 
[AH BULL, H. H. BLOSSOM, 8. A. WHITEHEAD, 

:APEN, B. L. SLACI£, PEfTON T. CARB, 

EY CABELL, 



S. A. WHITEHEAD, Obalrmao. 

>BNDLBTON, JNO. E. GERAQHTY. 

MARKET KEPORTS. 

T. H. FRANCIS, Chalrmao, 
3BAUBERLIN, N. L. MOPPITT, 

L. B. BRINBON,'obalrmaQ. 
T. B. MOBTON, 
GHA9. J. QUESNBL, 
P. P. OONNOE, 
H. O. COLEMAN. 
■ARLEV. 
FRED. C. ORTHWEIN, Chairman. 

HENBY GREVE, PHILIP BTOCE. 

K OBIEBEDIECK. 

FLOUR. 
'ICTOB ALBBEOHT, Ohalrmao. JOS. HATTER9LY, BecreUrj. 

I. BERNET, JNO. C FISCHER, SAHOBL PLANT, 

riLTON, O. J. HANEBBINE. 



LANOBNBEBO, 
(AYTON, 
FORRESTER, 
BHITB, 



FAD8T, 



JNO. E. HALL, 
J. D. PABROTT, 
ELBEBT BODOEINS. 



PROVISIONS. 
BEN BY WOLLBRINCE, Ohatrmaa. 

JAS. U. QBTTYS. GEO. C. DANIELS, 



SEEDS ANO CASTOR SEANS. 

FBED S. PLANT, Chalnoka. 
D. P. BYRNE, W. B. OBEOO, Jb., 

BOBT. POUHER, A. R. BTBAIN, 



COMMITTEES, i903-<:ontinued. 



SKKD AND CASTOR BEAN INSPECTOR AND WKIQHKR. 

W. F. OHAMBEBLAIN. 



JAS. W. DYE, 
BOBT. 8. YOUNG. 



M. G. SIOHMOND, 
W. G. MUELLER 



B. H. BABNES, 
L. B. OABTBB, 
GEO. LANITZ, 
HENBT J. BULTE. 



GEO. D. BABNABD, 
GEO. D. MABKHAM, 



HAY. 
D. W. OLIPTON, Chairman. 



H. W. MAOE, 



HENBY HUNTEB, 



PRODUCE* 
CHBI8. HILKK, Chairman, 
HENBY BBOEDEB, 



CONBAD 80HOPP, 



FLOOR. 
J. 8. MoGEHEE, Chairman. 



D. E. SMITH, 

S. 8. CASE, 

B. J. MoSOBLEY, 



G. DOUGLAS BBADLBY. 
D. B. HAYNES. 
J. W. STEELE, 



GHA8. A. COX, 
WEB. M. SAMUEL, 
8. W. COBB, 
H. F. LANGENBBBG. 



ALONZO 0. CHUBOH, 
ISAAC P. LUSE. 
WEB. M. SAMUEL, 



POSTAL AFFAIRS. 
FBANE GAIENNIE. Chairman. 

BEN. B. OBAHAM, W. C. LITTLE, 

THEO. G. MEIEB, L. A. MOFFITT. 

THOS. E. NEIDBINGHAUa 

RECEPTION AND ENTERTAINMENT. 
B. O. STANABD. Chairman. 
WM. G. BOYD, WM. P. EENNETT, 

JOHN WAHL, H, C. HAABSTICE, 

FBANE GAIENNIE, COBWIN H. SPENOEB, 

MABOUS BEBNHEIMEB. 

MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 
WM. T. HAABSTICE, Chairman. 

ISAAC M. MASON, JNO. E. MASSENGALE. 

H. 8. POTTEB, JNO. N. BOFINGEB, 

P. 8. DBOWN, FE8TU8 J. WADE. 



E. O. STANABD, 
C. H. SPENCEB, 
C. F. WENNEEEB, 



B. E. GABDNEB, 
WM. G. BOYD. 
GEO. L. EDWABDS, 
GOODMAN EING, 
MOSES BUMSEY. 



F. E. EAUFFMAN. 
HENBY SAYEBS, 
W. 8. MCCHESNEY, Jb., 
E. 8. OBB. 



L. D. EINGSLAND, 
HENBY STANLEY, 



NATIONAL BOARD OF TRADE. 
OSCAB L. WHITELAW, Chairman. 

8. W. COBB. CHABLES PABSON8, 

H. H. WEBN8E, CLINTON BOWELL, 

C. MABQUABD FOBSTEB. 

LEGISLATIVE. 
JOHN H. DIECEMAN, Chairman, 



8. A. BEMiS, 
GEO. O. CABPENTEE. 
NATHAN FBANE, 
W. J. EINSELLA, 

TRANSPORTATION. 
WM. C. ELLIS, Chairman. 
E. O. HUNTEB, 
E. B. HANNIGAN, 
W. A. BCUDDEB, 



MABCUS BEBNHEIMEB, 
GEO. D. DANA, 
BBECEINBIDGB JONES. 
GAIUS PADDOCE, 



WM. P. EENNETT, 
A.L.8HAPLEIGH, 
A. DbFIGUEIBEDO, 



FOREIGN TRADE. 
WM. F. FUNSTEN. Chairman. 
JOHN BING, GEO. F. POWELL, 

JAMES ABBUCELE. 



MERCHANTS* EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS. 

OPPICBRS FOR THE YEAR 1903. 

PRESmXNT. 

T. R. BALLARD, 

First Vicb-Prxsidbnt, WM. A. GARDKBR. 
Second Vigb-Pbesidbnt, CHARLES H. HUTTIG. 

DIRXCTOBS. 
1908. 1906-1904. 

WM. T. HAARSTICK, G. J. TAN8EY, 

L. B. BRIN80N, JOHN E. GBRAGHTY, 

T. H. FRANCIS, HENRY R. TODD, 

OTTO L. TBICHMANN, EDWARD A. FAUST, 

JOHN H. DIECKMAN, BDWARD DBVOY. 

GEO. H. MORGAN, Sxcretary and Trbasurxr. 

D. R. WHrrkORE, first Assistant Sbcrstary. 

H. R. WHITMORE, Second Assistant Sxcrbtart. 

C. H. WHITMORE, Third Assistant Secretary. 

R. F. WALKER, Attorney. 

COMHITTEB OF APPEAU9. 

JAMES M. GETTYS, JOHN M. GANNETT, 

HUGH J. BRADY, M. J. CONNOR, 

JOHN B. SLAUGHTER, JOSEPH L. PENNY, 

HENRY SCHULTZ, CHARLES J. QUBSNEL, 

SAMUEL PLANT, W. H. KARNS, 

C. W. BLOW, RICHARD WARDROP. 

COMMITTEE OF ARBITRATION. 
FIRST SIX MONTRS. SSOOND SIX MONTRS. 

CHARLES p. SENTBR, OTTO A. ORVIS, 

R. C. NAPIER, M. L. SMITHERS, 

C. L. CARTER, FRED. A. SIEVING, 

ROBERT POMMBR, WM. C. McCOY, 

PARKER SAIJNDERS. JULIUS VOGELER. 

OFFICIAL MARKET REPORTER. DOORKEEPER. 

MARC. J. GAUTIER. FRANK T. MUDGE. 

RIVER CLERK. STENOGRAPHER. MBSSBNOEB. 

BDWARD LOBSCH. A. HBRR SBilTH. PETBR L0B8CH. 

HONORARY MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEB. 

B. O. 8TANARD, Chairman. 
ALEX. H. SMITH, S. W. COBB, CHAS. A. COX, 

ISAAC M. MASON, C. H. SPENCBR, OSCAR L. WHITELAW. 



COMMITTEES AND INSPECTORS FOR 1903. 



WM. A. HARDNEB, 



nUIL tSTATE. 
T. B. BAIiLARD, OhKlnnan. 

a. J. TANBKY, OBAB. H. HUTTIQ. 

WH. T. HAAKBTtCS. 



W. P. KBNNBTT, 



rr. LOUIS TiuFFic bureau. 
HADtkEera from Heichuits' ExchAnie. 

H. F. LANOENBEBO, EDWARD DBVOT. 



WIiaMINO. 
mo. E. GBBAOHTT, 
W. B. HABBISON, P. H. QIESELUAN. 

M. J. MDLLALLY, EDWARD DEVOY. 



EDWABD DBVOT. ChUrmui. 



nuLU. 
ALEX. H. SMITH, 
J, P. WOODB, 



B. W. QEBSLEB, 



T. W. CABTEB. 



B. H. LANG, OfaalTman. B. J. PENDLETON. 

MARKET RIPORTa. 
O. L. TBICHMANN, Chatrm&D. 
THOS. ASIM, E. M. FLX8H. 

L. B. BBINSON, ObalniMQ, 
0. J. QUEBNBL, JNO. Q. MITTLEE. E. B. VODHG, 

GEO. P. POWBIX, JNO. L. MESaUOBB, T. B UORTON, 

J. a. MCCLELLAM, O. W. SMITH. 

■ARLIV. 
EDWABD A. FAOBT, ChKlrmao. 
OHAB. H. TEIOBHANN, BERN. eBIBSEDIBOE. 

FBED. C. OfiTHWBIN, OTTO F. BTIFEL. 

rLOUB. 
QEO. H. PLANT, Ohktmiaii. F. E. KADPFHAN. SeoroUrj- 

E. S. 80HABPF, O. J. HANNEBBINE; 

HATT. WOELFLE, P. HATTEBSLEY. 



AUanST BDMP. 

PROvimioNS. 
OHABLES A. OOX. Oh&lrman. 
HENBT WOLLBBINOC, FBED. KBEY, HUQH FBBGUSON. 

DANIELS. 



COMMITTEES, 1903— Continued. 



▲DOLPH OORNELI, 



SEKDS AND CASTOR BKANS. 
O. F. BEABDSLET, Chairman. 

D. I. BUSHNELL, H. JLi. BBINSON, 

P. W. HOFMANN. 



SEED AND CASTOR BEAN INSPECTOR AND WEIGHER. 

W. F. OHAMBEBLAIN. 



OHBIS. HHiKE, 
HENBY W. MAOE, 



OONBAD SOHOPP, 
BEBNABD BAEB, 



B. P. ANNAN, Jr., 
H. W. DAUB, 



HAY. 
D. W. OLIFTON, Chairman. 

JNO. H. BVILL, JAB. W. DYE, 

B. J. BEBGMANN. 

PRODUCE. 

M. O. BICHMOND, Chairman. 

B. HABTMANN, HENBY BBOEDBB, 

W. B. WE8TOOTT, F. G. HAUEISEN. 

FLOOR. 

DOUGLAS BBADLEY, Chairman. 

OHAS. A. GBANT, W. E. OBTHWEIN, 

A. C. PETBI, WM. GBASSMUCK, 

JOSEPH HATTEBSLBY. 

POSTAL AFFAIRS. 
CHAS. H. HUTTIG, Chairman. 



GEO. D. BABNABD, 
W. K. BIXBY, 



JAS. F. COYLE, 
BEN. B. GBAHAM, 



WALEEB HHiL. 
H. 8. MEBRILL. 



D. R. FBANCIS. 
WEB. M. SAMUEL. 
JOHN WAHL. 



RECEPTION AND ENTERTAINMENT. 

E. O. STANABD, Chairman. 

CHAS. A. COX, a W. COBB, 

FBANK GAIENNIE, G. J. TANSEY, 

C. H. BPENCEB, H. C. HAABSTICE, 



H. F. LANGENBEBG, 



MABCUS BEBNHEIMEB. 



B. E. GABDNEB, 
A. C. CHUBCH, 



O. L. WHITELAW, 
C. H. BPENCEB, 
B. W. COBB, 



A. DbFIGUEIBEDO, 
GOODMAN KING, 



WM. C. ELLIS, 
W. E. STANABD, 



MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 
WM. T. HAABSTIOE, Chairman. 

J. E. MASSENGALE, ISAAC M. MASON. 
HENBY S. POTTEB, ISAAC P. LUBE, 
P. S. DBOWN. 

NATIONAL BOARD OF TRADE. 
G. J. TANSEY, Chairman. 

CHABLES PABSONS. WM. P. EENNETT, 
B. O. STANABD, H. H. WEBNSE, 

CLINTON BOWELL, J. H. DIECEMAN. 

LEGISLATIVE. 

J. H. DIECEMAN, Chairman, 

D. A. MABES, BBECEINBIDGE JONES. 

B. C. GBIEB. L. D. EING8LAND, 

C. MABQUABD FOBSTEB. 

TRANSPORTATION. 
HENBY B. TODD. Chairman. 

A. P. BICHABDSON, HENBY BAYERS, 
JOSIAH E. SHEBBY, THOMAS B. TEASDALE. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE, 

St. LouiS; Mo., January 6th, 1903. 
To the Members of the Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis : 

Gentlbmen — ^In surrendering the trust you placed in their hands one 
year ago, your Board of Directors take pleasure in being able to state that 
the afiCairs of our Association are in excellent condition; that the year just 
past has been one of prosperity, both to the Exchange as a body, and to 
the indiTidual members; and the prospects for the future of our Associa- 
tion as the leading commercial organization of the Mississippi Valley, are 
most flattering. 

The property of the Exchange has been kept in good condition, but in 
another year the building should be painted, inside and out, the Grand 
Hall painted and decorated, a new floor laid, the elevator facilities im- 
proved, and, at the same time, the debt on the property reduced. 

At a meeting held on the 9th of December last, after a careful consider- 
ation of the needs of the Exchange, both as relates to the business of 
the floor, and the care of the building, your Board decided that it would 
be wise to make all needed improvements to place the property in first-class 
condition during the coming year in preparation for the World's Fair, 
and that the revenue might be sufQcient for all prospective needs, the 
Board fixed the assessment to be paid by each member for the coming 
year at thirty-seven and 60-100 dollars, and increased the transfer fee to 
twenty dollars from January 1st. 

The building is well rented, every room being occupied, and in some 
instances the rent has been advanced considerably, showing an increase 
over preceeding year of $5,315.88. 

The Total Revenue from Rentals was $ 48,989.08 

Transferred from Current Account $ 2,000.00 

From other sources 242.88 2,242.88 

Total $ 61 ,231 .46 

Total Expenditures (including $17,600.00 on 
the Bonded Debt, reducing same to 
$75,000.00) $ 61,064.28 

Leaving Balance of $ 167.18 

In considering the rental revenue, it must be remembered that the 
^Exchange occupies the Grand Hall and offices, for which no consideration 



10 TRADB AMD OOIOCKRCB OF 

is made in the rental as ^yen. In estimating tlie comparison of revenue 
on the cost of the property^ the snm of $25,000.00 should be added as the 
rental value for that part occupied by the Association. 

The current income and expenditures do not yary very much from year 
to year. Our membership is now fixed^ and cannot, under the new rule, 
be increased, and it is not likely that it will be decreased by forfeiture 
or redemption. The roll at the beginning of 1902 showed 1832 members; 
one certificate of a member, deceased in 1901, was redeemed^ making the 
present number 1881. 

The Total Reoelpts on Current Account were $ 58,218.09 

The Expenditures (including $2,000.00 carried to Real 
Estate Account) were 49,194.42 

Leaying a Balance on hand of $ 4,028.87 

The Bonded Debt is being reduced year by year, $75,000.00 remaining 
not yet due, and all but $8,000.00 of the Bonds of 1908 h»ye been paid. 
When the indebtedness is entirely paid, the revenue of the property will 
not only pay all expenses, but leave a surplus to be utilized in current 
account. 

The following statement shows total receipts and expenditures for the 
year, both for current and real estate accounts : 

Current Account Receipts $ 68,218.09 

Real Estate Account Receipts 49,281.46 

Total $102,449JJ5 

Current Account Expenses 47,194.42 

Real Estate Account Expenses 88,664.28 

Bonds Paid 17,600.00 

Total $98,268.70 

Balance on hand January 1st, 1908. . 4,190.86 

The detailed statement of receipts and expenditures presented by the 
Secretary and Treasurer, are given on anotlter page, to which your atten- 
tion is invited. 

Your Board has given special attention to the revision of the Rules and 
Regulations of the Exchange, adapting same to the present needs, and 
defining more closely the rights and privileges of membership. One of 
the new rules eliminated the initiation fee, so that hereafter new members 
can be received only by the transfer of an existing membership, thereby 
limiting the membership to the present number — 1831. All the amend- 
ments submitted by the Board of Directors, from time to time, have met 
the approval of, and been adopted, by vote of the members. 

The Department of Weights has been in successful operation, and the 
benefit accruing from the supervision, by the Merchants^ Exchange, of the 
weighing of grain and other farm products, has been demonstrated. 
Supervisors are now located in most of the elevators, warehouses and mills, 
and their certificates are accepted by the transportation companies, as well 

by buyers and sellers, as the correct weights of the property. Arrange- 



mm oiTT OF ST. Lotns. 11 

iJoentB liATe alao been made for the sapervliion of weighing on a number of 
priyate dty scales, and it Is believed that hereafter there will be little, if 
any, complaints of weights from this market. The department is now 
nearly s^-sastalning. Prior to June Ist^ a supervisor was employed to 
investigate complaints, look after scales and correct any existing errors 
Chat could be ascertained^ and for this service no charge was made. The 
expense incurred up to that date was $682.00. On June 1st the Weighing 
Department was organized, and since that date, a charge has been made 
lor supervision. The Treasurer's report shows that the expenditures since 
June 1st exceed the receipts by $1,826.07. This includes December expen- 
ses. The December revenue, when collected, will, in a large measure, make 
good the apparent deficit. The total deficit for the year is $2,466.07. 

Another important measure has had the most careful consideration of 
the Board, viz: The regulation of Elevators whose receipts are made 
regular for deliveries. Section 10, of Rule 8, makes it ^' The duty of the 
Board to classify as Begular, such public elevators and warehouses as 
make application therefor, and conform to the rules and regulations of the 
Exchange, and the reguladons and requirements of the Board of Direc- 
tors;" and also requires Begular elevators to file bonds subject to the 
approval of the Board. 

The Board has adopted and promulgated regulations governing Begular 
elevators and the proprietors of Merchants' Elevator ^^A," Central Ele- 
vator '^B," East St. Louis Elevator, Roger's Elevator, Advance Elevator, 
Yenice Elevator, Burlington Elevator, Mississippi Valley (Farmers') 
Elevator and Union Elevator, have filed their bonds as required by the 
rules, and said elevators have been classified as Regular by your Board. 

The Traffic Bureau has continued to guard carefully the transportation 
interests of the city, and has been effective in correcting some discrimina- 
tion and preventing others. The Board believes the Bureau Is a valuable 
^junct to the working force of the Exchange, and should be sustained and 
enforced by co-operation of the members. 

Your Board has not been unmindful pf the various calls made upon It 
lor representation at meetings and conventions. In which matters of Interest 
to the conmierce of the city have been considered, and has been ably repre- 
sented by delegates at the following gatherings : 

The National Board of Trade, Washington, D. G. . . .January 21. 
Rivers and Harbors Committee, Washington, D. C. .February 18. 

Iowa Grain Dealers' Association, Des Moines, la April 24. 

Illinois Grain Dealers' Association, Decatur, 111 June 10. 

National Hay Convention, Put-in-Bay, Ohio July 10. 

Grain Dealers' National Association, Peoria, 111 .October 1. 

Mississippi River Convention, Quincy, 111 November 12. 

Your Board has also given its support to the Public Welfare Committee, 
and to the Good Roads Convention to be held In St. Louis, In April next, 
and has taken action on and given Its approval to matters of National Import- 
ance—such as the Tariff Commission; amendments to Interstate Commerce 



12 TRADE AND COMKBRGB OF 

law; postal refonns; ConBular service; bankraptoy law; improyement of 
Western waterways; foreign bills-of -lading; preservation of forests^ and 
other objects. 

The Merchants^ Exchange has always been the almoner throogh whom, 
the benevolences of the city have been extended in great calamities that 
have befallen our own city and other localities. In February last a calamity 
fell upon our city, by the fire on Chestnut street^ whereby seven brave 
members of the Fire Department lost their lives. The Exchange immedi- 
ately issued a call for help for the stricken families^ and in a short time the 
sum of $26,014.86 was raised and distributed according to the needs of each 
family. • 

Again, in March, a call for help came from Southwestern Missoiui, 
where, on account of the drouth of the preceding summer, many farmers 
were left without food for their families, or for their cattle, and without 
seed to put in their crops. A committee was appointed, and seed and food 
to the value of $4,771.26 was collected and shipped to those needing assist- 
ance, bringing great present relief and giving hope for the future. 

A number of members of the Exchange, respected and honored, have 
passed away during the year; among them one of your most highly 
esteemed ex-Presidents, Thomas Richeson. Your Board has, in each 
instance, expressed to the bereaved families their sympathy and condo- 
lence. 

During the year the Exchange has had great pleasure in extending its 
courtesies to, and been honored with the presence of. Honorable James 
Wilson, Secretary of Agriculture ; Samuel L. Clemens, popularly and affec- 
tionately known as "Mark Twain;'* and Ho Yow, Consul General of 
China at San Francisco. 

Your Board desires to express its appreciation for the valuable assistance 

rendered by the various standing committees, and the special committees 

appointed during the year, to all of whom it tenders thanks for their 
fidelity to the duties imposed upon them, and to the Secretary and his 
assistants, and the employes of the Exchange for the faithful and efficient 
services rendered by them throughout the year. 

The work of 1902 is closed, and whatever measure of success has 
attended the efforts of the present Board has been due to concentrated, 
harmonious action, and the treatment of the affairs of the Exchange from 
a conmion-sense business standpoint. Something has been accomplished 
this year towards the betterment of the Exchange, but much remains to be 
done. Your body is the most important factor in the development of the 
commercial life of St. Louis, and the influence which the Exchange is to 
have in bending the energies of St. Louis towards what is best and right, 
depends entire^ on the members themselves, and with how much energy 
and harmony they express the judgment of the Exchange. Your Board 
has been supported in every movement it has undertaken by practically the 
unanimous vote of the members, and we feel sure that our successors in 
office will receive that same loyal support in any movement which goes 
towards the upbuilding of the Exchange, and thereby of necessity, the 
upbuilding of St. Louis. 

FOR THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS, 

G. J. TAJ^SEY, 

President. 



THE cnr or st. louis. 



DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS. 



St. Louis, Mo., December a3nd, 1903. 
• the Board of Directors ol the Merchants' Escbange: 

Under authorily of fonr honorable body, as per resolution adopted 
iril 17th. 1903, the Weighing Committee Inaugurated a plan for weighing 
un in public elevators, mills and warehousei, which 1:>ecaine effective 
me Ist. Deputy Superrlsora have been and are now supervising the 
sighing of ail grain in all public elevators, and in nearly alt the mills and 
ivMe elevators and warehouses In 8t. Louis, Mo, On June 2nd, Deputy 
ip«rvlsor8 were placed in all the public elevators, and three of the private 
^vators, in Bast St. Louis, HI. Since which time the Illinois Railroad and 
irehouae Commlssiouers have assumed authority under the taws of the 
lie of Illinois, and now control the weighing in all the public elevators 
d one private elevator; leaving the Merchants' Exchange Department of 
eights in control Of three private elevators and one mill on the East side. 

In addition to the above your committee has within the past month 
inmed control, and now has Deputy Supervisors at five ol the most im- 
irtant wagon scales in St. Louis, Mo., and one In East St, Louis, 111. The 
tter protection of grain in railroad yards was aiso given considerable 
tention by this committee, with results that cars are now resealed after 
spectlon and sampling. Watchmen have been placed In different yards 
lere formerly there were none, and the general watching bas been given 
eclat attention by al! roads. Now the protection is fairly good. 

The result of our work and efforts have been very heneBclal t^ the grain 
»de of St. Louis, as evidenced by the strong endorsements of the shippers 

this marlcet. Letters are received dally by commission merchants and 
aters requesting, and in some histances demanding, that their grain be 
sighed only tmder the supervision of our department, and many buyers 

grain are requesting Merchants' Excliange cerUflcates for grain bought 

8t. Louia. 

The odium of bad weights Is being rapidly overcome, and the much 
sired conHdence of the country shipper is bclug, and in many instances 

completely restored. 

Your committee has met with many obstacles, the most of which have 
en overcome, and the department being now on a practically self-sostain- 
f basis, we recommend that it be oondnued and encouraged. 

Since the inauguration of the Weighing Department the following cars 
ive been supervised : 

ToUl Cars unloaded 16,84* 

Total Cars loaded out 6,968 

Number of Socks 2Se,lH 

Loadedout is Barges, bushels 7Bfi,6M 

THEO, R. BALLARD, 

Chairman. 



14 TRADE AlfD OOMMBROB OF 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER FOR 1903. 



CURRENT ACCOUNT. 



BBCBIPT8. 

Cash on hand January lat $ 2,838 09 

Beoeiyed from Transfer Fees 1,910 00 

" " AflsessmentB ~ 45,750 00 

« " Bent Telegraph Counters ^ 1,300 00 

" " Drawer Bent — 640 76 

•* " Non-BesidentB Tickets 415 00 

" " Interest on Account ^ 351 06 

'^ '' Sale of Samples and Sweephigs 149 25 

" " Committee on Cleaner Streets (returned) 35 94 

" " Bent of Transportation Desks 30 00 

953,218.09 

EXFBNDITUBX8. 

Salaries $19,191 50 

Telegraph Account 11,999 43 

St. Louis Traflac Bureau 3,988 85 

Department of Weights 2,458 07 

Transferred to Real Estate Account 2,000 00 

Flour Inspectors 1,310 34 

Bent of Telephones 1,000 00 

Printing and Stationery 873 54 

Annual Beport 859 50 

Attorney of the Exchange....^ 500 00 

Soap and Towels 484 96 

Assessment Nationnl Board of Trade 440 00 

Taxes 389 78 

Attorney's Fees and Costs in Court 369 30 

Postage 365 90 

Delegates to National Board of Trade- 344 50 

Benovating Portraits 326 50 

Public WeUare Committee 250 00 

Delegates to Washington, Bivers and Harbors 178 25 

Bepairs- ^ -.... 176 96 

Brooms, Dusters, etc 166 80 

Belcher Water.. - 150 00 

Ice 144 65 

Power for Electric Fans 138 36 

Books, Papers and Price Currents 129 27 

Insurance on Furniture 127 50 

Chairs 102 17 

Judges of Election 101 00 

Bedemption of Membership Cfirtlficates 100 00 

Delegates to National Hay Convention 100 00 

Board of Directors 92 42 

Delegates and Assessment, Biver Convention, Quincy 53 90 

Plants for Fountain 50 00 

Delegates to Grain Conventions 49 06 

Sundries 181 92 <49,194 42 

Balance on hand December 31st, 1902 $ 4,023 67 



THX OITY OF ST. LOUIS. 15 

REAL ESTATE ACCOUNT FOR 1902. 

BBCBIPT8. 

Balance on hand January Ist $ 205 11 

Beoeived from Bentalfl 48,^89 08 

" " Current Account...- ~ 2,000 00 

" " Interest 82 22 

»' " Electric Light 6 06 

$ 51,^1 46 

ICXFENDITUBBS. 

Bonds Paid... _ J$ 17,500 00 

Employes ~ 7,971 45 

Taxes 6,742 30 

Insurance 4,329 00 

Interest on Bonds 3,139 00 

Coal ^ 3,486 03 

Bepairs and Benovations « 3,786 38 

Water License 1,419 60 

Supplies for Engineer and Janitor.. 684 60 

Tornado Insurance — 300 00 

Two Water Meters 718 11 

Bent of Telephones 206 00 

BemoYing Ashes and Sweepings 386 00 

Premium on Bonds Bought 120 00 

Elevator Insurance 

Sprinkling Tax 

Kight Signal Service 

Inspecting Elevators and Boilers 

Uniforms for Elevator Boys 

Cleaning Streets 

Printing 

Balance on hand December 3l8t, 1902.. 

Paid OB Bonded Debt during 1908 $ 17,500 00 

Bonded Bebt Unpaid (not dne) $ 75,000 00 

GEO. H. MOBGAN, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

We, the undersigned, a Committee appointed by the President, do hereby 
certify that we have examined the accounts of the Secretary and Treasurer 
for 1902, the Current Account having been examined by Henry P. Wyman 
and Douglas Bradley, and the Beal Estate Account by J. H. Dieckman and 
and O. L. Teichmann, and find the same to be correct, with the proper 
vouchers on file for expenditures and balances in bank as follows, viz : 

To the Credit of Beal Estate Account- $ 167 18 

To the credit of Current Account ~ $4,023 67 

J. H. DIECKMAN, ^ 

DOUGLAS BBADLliY, ^ Committee. 
HENBY P. WYMAN, J 
St. Louis, January 3rd, 1903. 



86 96 




36 36 




36 00 




27 00 




40 00 




26 00 




24 60 




400 


61,064 28 


^ 


167 18 



16 TRADE AND OOMMEBOB OF 

RESOLUTIONS 

ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS DURING 190a. 



FOBEIGN BILLS-OF-LADING. 

February 11th. The following re];K>rt of the Legislative Committee 
was adopted: 

"The Legislatiye Ck>mmittee, to whom was referred the communl- 
cation of the Merchants' Exchange of Memphis, Tenn., enclosing Senate 
Bill No. 1791, introduced December 16th, 1901, by Mr. Nelson, being a 
bill relating to the transportation of merchandise between the United 
States and foreign ports, etc., would respectfully report that after an 
examination of the whole matter, the committee find that it has been, 
the custom for vessels plying between the United States and lyuropean 
ports to charge and collect various sums in addition to the contract 
rate of freight, <to cover cost of unloading cargoes at the point of desti- 
nation, even though such act is in contravention of the laws of some of 
the countries. 

"Your committee believes that this is an unjust charge against the 
shipper, and that the cost of delivering the property on dock where 
it can be received and hauled away by the consignees, is the duty of the 
carrier. 

Senate Bill No. 1791 referred to, makes it unlawful for the carrier 
to insert in any biU-of-lading, any clause or agreement by which it shall 
be at liberty to impose on the propenty, any unloading or other charges 
additional to the rate of freight inserted in the biH-of-lading. 

"Your committee, therefore, recommend that the Board of Directors 
endorse said bill and request the Senators from Missouri and Repre- 
sentatives from St. Louis to further its passage." 

BANKRUPTCY LAW. 

February 11th. The following report of the Legislative Committee 
was adopted: 

"The Legislative Committee, to whom was referred by the President 
a communication of the St Louis Credit Men's Association, asking the 
endorsement of the Exchange to H. R. No. 4310, introduced by Mr. Bay. 
being a bill to amend the Bankrupt Act, would respectfully report: 

"That they have conferred with the attorney of the Exchange and 
given the matter full consideration, and are of the opinion that the 
Merchants' Exchange should endorse said bill, and that the President 
and Secretary should request the Senators from Missouri, and the Rep- 
resentatives from St. Louis to favor the passage of the same. 



TBI arps or sr. louib. 17 

'Tonr committee Aiao liad vnder couBldecsllaD anotber amendment 
to the same act, presented by Mr. Powen of Masaachmette, ivoviding 
That If a credMor receive payment on account in the ordinal? course 
of business, and had no reason to bcilleve tbat the bankruirt intended to 
giye Um the preference, such payments, when made within foor months 
irlor to the Allns of a petition In bMikmptcr, may be retabiad by the 
creditor witlwat prejudice to hla rights, to prove the balance of his 

"Yonr committee beUere that this amesidment also Is equitable and 
Just and that the Benators and Bepreaentatires In OtKigreBe be regneated 
to favor the passage of the same." 



PEHSBBVATION OF FOHB8T8. 

Febmarr 11th. The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Bz- 
change of St. Louis, would respectfollr call to the attention of the 
HonoraUe Senatns from Mlssoiirl, and SepresentaUvee from St. IxHils, 
the Importance of the preservation ot forests, as necessary to the con- 
tinned prosperity of agrlcultare, mining and transportation Interests, 
and urge legtslsthm looking to the perpetuartlon of our forests, the 
ntabllshmrat ot additional Nattonsl Parka and forest reserves, and 
iroold respectfully ask that our Senators and B^resentatlves would 
Qot Hvor the Morris Bill, or any other measure which contemplates 
tbe destmctioQ of the timber at the headquarters of the Mississippi 
RlTer. 

BBDtJCnON OF CUBAN TAEIFP DTTTIES. 

February 11th. Tbe Secretary was Instructed to send a memwial 
to Congress In the name ot tbe. Board, to both Houses, and to tite Sea- 
itois and Representatives from this State, recommending a reduction of 
tariff duties -on Cuban Sngar and Tobacco, to be f<Mowed by reciprocal 
tarlfl arrangements with the Island, upon the establishment of an Inde- 
pendent Cubaji government. 

NEW POST OFFICB BmLDINQ, 

February 18th The following report of tbe Legislative Committee 
was adopted: 

The LeglslsUve Oommlbtee and the Committee on Postal Affairs, to 

whom was referred the communication of Hon. Bichard Bartholdt in 

reference to the erection of a new Post Office btUlding in St. Louis, 

would respectfully report that at a meeting of tbe Joint committees, tbe 

following resolntlous were unanimously adopted: 

"Besolved. That we heartily approve of the bill Introduced in Con- 
gress by Hon. Blcbard Bartholdt of Missouri, to provide for tbe erection 
ot an additional public building in St. Louis for postal purposes ex- 
clusively, which will give quicker delivery and easier distribution of 



18 TBADS AND OOMMBROS Of 

the mall. The Increase of the business Justlfles the additional building, 
and it Is absolutely necessary. For the past eighteen years, notwith- 
standing the large Increase of business, the space of the post ofQce has 
remained the same. 

"Besolved, That we recommend that the Board of Directors adopt 
a resolution endorsing an additional postal building In St Louis, and 
send a copy to each Senator and member of Congress from Missouri, 
requesting fthem to vote for said additional public postal building.'* 

Postmaster BaumhofP was present at the meeting and brought to 
the attention of the Joint commiittees the necessity of a fast mall train 
from St Louis to the Southwest, and the following resolution was unanl- 
mously adopted: 

"Resolved, That we are informed that the Frisco System is about 
to put on a fast mail train from St Louis to the Southwest, and we 
heartily recommend that every encouragement be given the Frisco road 
for the establishment of this fast mall train. St. Louis would be great- 
ly benefited by being brought into closer relations with that region, 
giving our newspapers a chance to get before the public, and our mer- 
chants to sell more goods to them in conseauence thereof. 

"Therefore, we recommend that the Board of Directors write to the 
Assistant Postmaster General, urging him to assist the Frisco railroad in 
making a contract with the Government" 

INDIAN SUPPLY WABBHOUSB. 

February 18th. The Board heartily endorse resolutions adopted by 
the St Louis Manufacturers* Association, calling upon the Federal 
Government to remove the warehouse for Indian Supplies to St Louis. 

IMPROVEMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 

February 18th. The Board commissioned Hon. S. W. Cobb to visit 
Washington to urge upon the Rivers and Harbors Committee to make a 
liberal appropriation for the improvemenit of the Mississippi river be- 
tween the mouth of the Missouri and the mouth of the Ohio rivers. 

VISIT OF PRINCE HENRY OF GERMANY. 

February 18th. The President was Instructed to send an invita- 
tion (through the Mayor, to Prince Henry of Germany to visit the Ex- 
change on the morning of his arrival in St Louis. 

SUPPRESSION OF TRAIN ROBBERIES. 

March 21st. The Board of Dhrectors endorsed H. R. No. 11412, 
being a bill for the suppression of train robberies in the territory of 
the United States and other places, and for other purposes. 



THB OTTY OF 8T. LODIB. 19 

INCBBASED MAIL SBBTICE. 

March 21M. The Board adopted the IoUdwIdk report of the Com- 
mittee on Postal Affairs: 

"The letter of Postmaster F W. BaomhofC In regard to fast mall 
and sabnrban trains for St Lonla, which was referred to the Postal 
Affairs Committee bf your honorable bodr- 

"The Committee on Postal Affairs after carefully constderlDg the 
matter, are fnlly agreed that an aftemooa train on the Mlssonrl Pa- 
dflc, lenvlUK St. Lonla at 2:30 p. m. everj day, is needed and desirable. 
It iroDld prove a great benefit and accommodation to the people living 
within WO miles of onr city, and It would add a large enbnrban popnla- 
tlon, which, by the facility offered by this afternoon trahi of safe 
trauBportaUoD of reaching the city and retnminghome same day, wonld 
odd to the business of the general public. It would be a paying pas- 
senger tralu for the railway. Both the wholesale and retail trade woyld 
be aagmeuted. 

"We ta&e this occasion to again renew our recommendation for a 
fast mail train on the Frisco railroad to the Sonthwest, and to urge our 
Semators and members of Congress to impress upon the Second As- 
sistant Postmaster General the absolute necessity for said fast train, 
and secure his order for same. St Louis lacks and is sadly In need 
of fast mail trains, morning and evening trains; and In comparison 
with other dtlee has not bad her share. We unhesitatingly say, and 
we believe, we can only get them by hard and constant worK. 



March 21st. Hereafter, on the death of a member of the Exchange, 

the President will announce the same to the Board of Directors, and 

a page of the records will be devoted to hla memory, noting the date of 

his decease, and the date and number of his certificate of membership. 

DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS. 

April 16th. Bescdved, That the Weighing Committee of the Mer- 
chants' Exchange, be and Is hereby authorized to Inanfn^'ate the plan 
of weighing grain in elevators, mills and warehonses set forth In their 
report presented this day; and that the Treasurer of the Exchange, be 
and is hereby antborked to honor warrants drawn by the Chairman of 
said Committee and countenslgned by the supervisor, for expenses as In- 
curred; untit December Slat. 1902, for Tea Thousand Dollars In the 
astgregate It being understood that all receipts from thia service ahall 
be deposited with the Treasurer of the Exchange for credit of weighing 
acconnt The revenue under the resolution to be a charge of not to 
exceed thhrty-flve cetrts per ear for weighing, ont of all public elevators, 
and that ao charge shall exceed One Dollar per car on scales other 
than those of Pnbllc ZQevatorg. Under this resolution, grain In barges 



a carload. 
1 04) of a 
text Tbe 
> Board of 
:>f tbe pre- 



bould give 
n- that tba 
reloped as 
trom UU- 
3b of Alas- 
as -will se- 



Presideot 
iroposlfloD, 
J pcditlcal 
ieaa. Oom- 
tiarge thdi 



Imperative 
aw as-ffUl 
: to afford 
:ion -wblcb 



Postmaster 
r, the fake 
the postal 
>R)mlK of 



THX OTTY or ST. I.OTnS. 21 

CONSULAR BBRTIOB. 

Besolved, That we reiterate onr demaiid for the prompt reorgaulEa- 
tJoa of tlie Conanlar Service od a geaulne busloesa basis, by making 
personal gnallQcationa the only basis of appointment, by the aboIlUon 
ot tlie pemldons fee STStem, and the readjustment of salaries In sccofd- 
ance with existing conditions, and by providing for a more secure tenure 
of office. 

BANKRUPTCY LAW, 

Bes<^ved, That we again urge the necessity of amending t^e Bank- 
ruptcy Law along the lines embodied in what Is known as the Ray 
BlU. 

WATER WATS. 

Reaolred, That we fully appreciate and heartily endorse the ac- 
tion of Congress in making liberal appropriations for the continuous 
improvement of the Mlsslsalppi river below St Loots, for the deepening 
of tlie Sonth.west Pass, and fH>r preliminary survej^ for a deep water- 
way betweoi the Great Lakes and the Mississippi river via the Chicago 
sanitary canal aad the Des Plaines and Illinois rivers, and we recotu- 
mend that such continuous a^iroprlationa be made as may be necessary 
to secure a minimum depth of at least six feet throughout the full 
loigth of the navigable portion of the Upper Mississippi river In order 
that the fuU benefit of water transportation through the entire Uiss- 
Is^ppi valley, may be secured. 

FINANCE. 

Resolved, That Congress be urged to pass a law authorizing the 
Isstie ot one hundred mllltons or more of dollars ot emergency currency 
notes, solely for use during time of financial panic; such notes to be 
printed and prepared r<» use by the United States Treasury Depart- 
ment, countersigned by the Treasurer and registered by the Register. 
Tbey shell be delivered to such Clearing Houses of the country as are 
acting under charters from the United Slates, such charters to be pro- 
vided for by law of Congress. They shall be delivered to such Clear- 
ing Houses In ench proportions ot the whole Issue as the capital and 
sorplns of the banks constituting such Clearing Houses in the various 
places warrunt. In all cases such banking capital shall represent a 
sum sufficient to guarantee a prompt redemption ot said nortes. The 
law to be made by Congress for chartering these Clearing Houses shall 
empower them to receive and loon this money to the various banks 
connected with them, on such securities as may be authorized by the 
act providing tor their Isane; not, however, to exceed la amount over 
tbree-tonrtbs of the cash value of such securities. The act shall pro- 
vide tor the prompt redemption ot such currency at New York or Wash- 
ington and its final liquidation; said notes shall be signed by the Presi- 
dent and Manager of each Clearing House. 



22 TRADB AND OOMMEROB OF 

A rate of interest shall be charged to the banks borrowing the notes 
of each Clearing House, which will insure the retiring of same as soon 
as the emergency ceases. The amount received for interest shall be 
disposed of as Congress may see proper in the bill. 

All expenses of the issue shall be made and paid but of the interest 
to be charged for the same, with such taxes as is thought proper for 
the benefit of the United States Treasury. The issue of these notes 
shall be made when the Secretary of the Treasury deems the emergency 
requires it to save the business of the country from very serious em- 
barrassment 

Resolved, That Congress be urged to take such action as will give 
the Secretary of the Treasury discretionary power to refuse requests 
for silver shipments at the Government expense from any corporation 
or persons that may be, in his Judgment, violating the intent of the pro- 
visions of the said law. 

LANDS IN THE INDIAN TERRITORY. 

The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange of St Louis 
heartily endorse the action of the Muskogee Chamber of Commerce, 
calling upon ithe Congress of the United States to remove all restrictions 
upon the rights of alienation (except homesteads) of aU lands in the 
Indian Territory, believing that the development of this important 
part of our country will be greatly facilitated by such legislation, and 
therefore earnestly request the Honorable Senators and Representatives 
from Missouri to favor such changes in the laws as will give the relief 
desired and so much needed. 

APPROPRIATIONS FOR NATIONAL GtTARD. 

December 27th. The President appointed Messrs. Wm. Bull, J. F. 
Coyle, Breckenridge Jones, S. M. Kennard and George S. McGrew, a 
committee to attend a meeting to be held at the Mercantile Club on the 
30th to urge larger appropriations by the Legislature for the support of 
the State National Guard. 



The Exchange was closed on the following days: 
January 1st, New Year's Day. 
February 12th, Lincoln's Birthday. 
February 22d, Washington's Birthday. 
March 28tfa, Good Friday. 
May 30th, Memorial Day. 
July 4th, Independence Day. 

July 5th, 

September 1st, Labor Day. 
October 0th, St. Louis Fair Day. 
November 4th, Election Day. 
November 27th, Thanksgiving Day. 
December 25th, Christmas Day. 



TBI OITY OF 8T. LOTHS. 



REPORT OF ST. LOUIS TRAFFIC BUREAU. 



B; E. S. THOMPKnra, OommlBllon«r. 

To secure tbe tall boiefit from the natrmil advantages of lo<:at]<tii 
poeeessed tj St. LoaLs, It ia necessary to see that competing markets do 
not secnre nndne sdyantage In tbe general adjustment of rates, end 
that nnjnst discrlmlnstloiis In rates are brought to the attention of rail- 
road offlclBls for correction. 

The linea leading from St. Lonla are divided Into a. number of 
gronps, according to the territorr which thejr reach, and these different 
groups or associations aie governed, so tar as their rates are concerned, - 
br dllterent rules and classifications, as well as In the method of con- 
structing their rates. A caiefol snpervlsloD has been kept Of the 
changes made br these different associations, and requests hare been 
made for necessarr cbangea In the St. Louis rates. Manjr changes In 
rates on merchandise, grain and other commoditleB were secured, which 
bare beeu shown in our circulars for the Informstlon of members. 

Comparatlre rates on merchandise and commodities have been 
issued, showing rates to and from St Louis with the rates to and from 
competing markets, and the qnotlng and compiling of freight rates for 
Individual members has called Cor a large amount of work, and we be- 
lieve that this work has materlallr assisted oar members to Increase 
thtir trade to the best advantage. 

Members have been advised In many cases of pr<^K>sed changes In 
classification, so that they could favor or oppose their adoption as best 
suited their Interests. 

Early In the year a meeting was held with the reivesentatlves of 
the Afferent railroads and terminal companies, to consider the necessary 
Improvements needed In our terminals to take care of the Increased 
business ot this gateway. We believe that the ^orts of the officials 
of the railroads and terminal properUes since that time have brought 
about Improvements which hare materially Improved the conditions In 
tbia city, and at the present time we are in better shape than any oth^ 
targe terminal in this country. 

We have been represented at many important meetings ot the 
railroads and also at bearings held by the State and National Oom- 
mlsslons. 

Our merchants and manufacturers recognise that any concesdon 
in rates for St. Louts as a whole proves bMieadal to every business man 
in the city, and that good results are secured from organized eftort to 
foster snd increase the trade and commerce of our city. 



ai 



TRADB JkXTD OOIOCSBOS Ol* 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OP THE UNITBD STATES. 



From the Bureau of Statlstios, Washington, D. O. 





YEAB8. 


Increase (+) 
or decrease 


IMFUflXB Anil MX^Oblti. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


( — ) twelve 

months 1901 

and 1902. 


Mkbchandibs. 

TmTWVPtA— Ftaa of Dntv 


1 80»a88jei 

486.860,963 


$ 38t,aa,618 

498.907,292 

i 880,419,910 


$ «)6,(MS,902 
560,^6.107 


i+ 27.181 JBi 


Dutiable 


+ 61.718,815 


Total 


« 829,149,714 


1 969,270,009 


S+ 88,860,099 


1i!%iirtvtii^— Domestic 


|1,45B,010,U2 
24,986,001 


91,438,078,661 
27,297,209 


$1,883,289,183 
27,407,172 

SI .360,696,356 


^-104.789.468 


Foreign:! 


+ 109,9@ 


Total 


Sl,477,946,118 


11,465,875,860 


$-104,679,505 


Excess of Exports 


$ 648,796,399 


$ 684,955,960 


« 391,426,346 

i 44,162,767 
36,080,676 


$—193,529,604 


Gold. 

Tmnorts. ...■••••■■■•••• 


$ 66,749,084 
M, 134,623 


$ 64,761,880 
57,788,939 


$— 10,099.113 


Exports. 


— 21,768,368 


Ehrcess of Imnorta 


S 12,614,461 


$ 8,022,059 


$ 8,182,191 




Excess of Exiwrts 




SlIiTXB. 

Imnorts. ,- ■■, «.«.,..., 


$ 40.100,343 
66,221,664 


$ 81,146,782 


t %.4<n.t«l 


$— 4,743,847 


Exports 


55,638.359 49,272,964 
S 24.491 JS76 A 22.H7Q.019 


— 6,365,404 


Excess of ExnortSf.vvti-**..***. 


$ 26,121,321 


$— 1,621,567 






V ——,<_'. -^ y— 





IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 



Imports. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals— 18 moBtti tUSng Stotmbtr. 

Exports. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals— U aotttiiBdlng DtOMAtr. 

Total Imports and Exports. . . 

MmonthiinaiBfPto.; fcotn of «parla. 



1899. 

68,289,771 
60,268,452 
72,820,746 
66,208,228 
70,160,.h73 
61,757,809 
60,101,744 
66,643,810 
70,711,965 
72,232,238 
70,098,931 
70,733,843 



$ 798,967,410 



115,691,446 

98,837,151 

104,559,689 

88,794,873 

93,841,247 

96,394,227 

94,926,170 

104,646,020 

109,886,677 

125,966,627 

123,755,911 

123.268.033 



$1,275,467,971 



$2,074,436,381 



$ 470,^0,561 



1900. 

76,897,102$ 
68,883,941j 
86,522,456 
75,510,262 
71,663,526 
61,001,367 
68,669,692 
61,820,488 
69,568,600 
70,631,034 
65,364,040 
68,697,207 



$ 829,149,714 



$ 117.597,148 
119.426,985 
134.157,225 
118,772,580 
113,427,849 
106,661.957 
100,4f)2,807 
108,575,965 
115.901,722 
163,389,680 
136,702,324 
145,889,871 

$1, '477,946, 113 



$2,807. 096.827 
$"648,7987399 



1901. 

69,807,090 
64.501,699 
75,886.834 
76,698.131 
78,642,703 
68,404,657 
73,082,435 
78,127,217 
66,826,813 
81,446,763 
72,566,307 
79,929.271 

$ 880,419,910 



186,825,601 
112,967,014 
124.478,643 
120,764,190 
124,667,911 
102,774.263 
109,452,510 
108,024,209 
106,989,926 
145,659,415 
136,455,639 
186,941,639 



$1,465,875,860 



$2,345,796,770 



1902. 

79.138,192 
68,350,459 
84,V27,062 
75,822,268 
75.689,087 
73,115,064 
79,147,874 
78,923,281 
87,736,346 
87,419,138 
85,394,024 
94,307,204 



$ 969,270,008 



145,180 
669,695 
749,401 
169,878 
321,031 
240,483 
790,627 
942,810 
232,384 
327,428 
200.620 
006,823 

$1,360,696,356 



129, 
101, 
106. 
109, 
102, 

S' 
88, 

94, 

m, 

144, 
126, 
148, 



$ 684,955,950 



$2,329,966,364 



$ 891,426.346 



VHX OITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



25 



PROGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES IN ITS AREA, POPULA- 
TION AND MATERIAL INDUSTRIES, 

As reported by the Bureau of Statistics, Washington. 



Abba, PopntiATioir Aim IimtmTBiifl. 



1800 



18B0 



1900 



827,844 

6,806,488 

6.41 



16.68 



817,760 
234,296 



Area* square miles 

Popalatfon 

Popn lation per square mile. 

We&ltht $ 

Wealth _per capita $ 

Public debt, less cash In Treasury § S 82,976,294.86 

Debt per capita, less cash In Treasury f 

Interest-bearing debt S 

Annual Inteicst charge S 

Interest per capita $ 

Oold coined $ 

Silver coined I 

Oold In circulation $ 

Oold certificates In circulation I 

Silver In circulation I 

Silver certificates in circulation | 

U. 8. notes (greenbacks) outstanding $ 

Nat'l bank notes outstanding (October 81).. ..f 

Clrcmlatlon of money $ 

Circulation per capita S 

Rational banks in operation January 1. . . . No. 

National banks— capital $ 

Bank clearings, New York $ 

Bank clearings, total. United States. $ 

I>epo8lts In national banks $ 

Deposits in savings banks $ 

Depositors in savings banks No. 

Farms and farm property, value of I 

Farm nroducts, value of I 

Xanufacturing establishments : . Na 

Hanufacturesln United States, value of t 

Importsof merchandise I 

Imports of merchandise per capita $ 

Bzports of merchandise I 

Exports of merchandise per capita. $ 

Production of gold $ 

silver i 

coal tons 

petroleum gallons 

pig iron tons 

steel tons 

tin plates pounds 

copper tons 

wool pounds 

wheat bushels 

com busnels 

cotton bales 

sugar tons 

Sugar consumed tons 

Cotton taken by mills bales 

Cotton ex ported pounds 

Railways In operation. miles 

Passengers carried No. 

Freight carried 1 mile tons 

Freight rates per ton per mile cents 

Pahsenger cars No. 

^ Frelghtcars No. 

VaBsels passing through the Sault Ste. Marie 

Canal tonnage 

Freight rates on wheat, Chicago to New York, 
per bushel : 

Lake and canal cents 

Lake and raU cents 

All rail cents 



2,980,900 

28,191,876 

7.78 

7,186,780.000 

807.69 

68,460,778.66 

2.74 



91,262,768 
17.19 

70,971,780 
18.87 



166,666 



81,961,789 
1,866,100 



48,481,130 
261,364 
8,967,848,680 



128,026 
1,019,106,616 
178,609,626 
7 48 
144,876,726 
6.28 
60,000,000 
60,000 
8,368,899 



668,766 



660 

62,616,969 

100,486,944 

692,071,104 

2,33»,718 

110,626 



696,000 
1,006,602,269 
9,021 



8,026,600 

76,80.1,387 

26.22 

194,800,000,000 

1,236.86 

1,1(17,711,267.89 

14.52 

1,028,478,860 

88,645,130 

.44 

99,272,948 

36,296,321 

610,806,473 

200,733,019 

142,060,334 

406,466,674 

846,681,016 

881,680,188 

2,066,150,996 

26.98 

3,606 

608,668,046 

61,964,688,664 

84,682,450,081 

2,628,997,622 

2,449,647,886 

6,107,088 

20,614,001,838 

8,764,177,706 

612,734 

18,039,279,666 

849,941,184 

10.88 

1,894,483,082 

17.96 

79,171.000 

74,633,496 

240,9i>B,9l7 

2,661,233.568 

13,789,242 

10,188,329 

677,969,600 

270,688 

288,636,621 

622,229,506 

2, 106, 102, .M6 

9,436,416 

149,229 

2,219,847 

8,644,000 

8,100,683.188 

194,321 

684,696,936 

141,162,109,413 

.76 

26,788 

1,868,467 

22,816,834 



4.42 

6.06 
$9.98 



* Exclusive of Alaska and Islands belonging to the United States. 
tTrue valuation of real and personal property. 
1 Estimated. I Total debt prior to 1860. 



26 



TRADE AND OOMHEROE OF 



GLEANINGS FROM THE CENSUS OF 1900. 



Textile Industries (not Incl. Flax, Hemp and Jute). . . .value of products 

Cotton manufacture *' 

Ck>tton, Raw Cotton, produced pounds 

exported " 

*' *' domestic consumption " 

Wool, manufactures of. value of products 

Silk, manufactures of 

Flour and Qrlst Mill products 

Slaughtering and Meatpacking 

Cheese, Butter and Condensed Milk— factory product. 

Oleomargarine 

Beet Sugar 

Cleaned Kloe 

Starch 

Cotton Seed products. 

Alcoholic Liquors 

Tobacco 

Manufactured Ice 

Leather—tanned, curried and finished 

Boots and Shoes 

Rubber Boots and Shoes 

Leather Gloves and Mittens 

Lumber 

Clay products 

Olass 

Turpentine and Rosin 

Paper and Pulp 

Printing and Publishing 

Dairy products 

Poultry raised In 1899 

liiOiK, Butter and Cheese— farm product 

Wool :. 

Orchard Fruits 

Potatoes 

Iron and Steelproducts 

Tin Plate and Teme Dipping and BlackPlate Industries 

Lead Smelting 

Copper Smeltmg 

Zinc Smelting 

Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 

Ship building. 

Locomot I ve works 

Steam Railroad Car works. 

Carriages and Wagons 

Bicycles and Tricycles 

Agricultural Implements 

Metal Working Machinery 

Motive Power Appliances 

Sewing Machines 

Typewriters, 

Musical Instruments 

Watches and Watch Cases 

Pens and Pencils 

Chemicals 

Dyestuffs 

Essential Oils 

Explosives 

Fertilizers 

Paints and Varnishes 

Total Chemical products 

Petroleum Refining 

Coke 

Gas manufactured 



(« 
fi 
•« 
•« 
(( 

4< 
II 
li 
11 
*t 



l« 
.1 
l« 
*• 
14 
«l 
II 
«4 
II 
IC 
<l 
<l 

tc 

14 
t« 
l« 
<( 
14 
« 
II 
4< 
• ( 
14 
If 
II 
•4 
44 
If 
fl 
II 
CI 
<l 
II 
tl 
«» 
11 
fl 
CI 
14 
41 
If 
If 
If 
If 
II 
•f 



$888 

$839 

4,757 

8,100 

1,656 

$296 

107 

660 

786 

181 

12 

7 

8 

9 

42 

840 

283 

18 

629 

261 

41 

17 

666 

95 

66 

20 

127 

847 

600 

186 

144 

472 

45 

88 

98 

804 

61 

175 

166 

18 

91 

74 

85 

806 

121 

81 

101 

44 

85 

21 

6 

44 

14 

4 

62 

7 

17 
44 

69 

202 

128 

85 

75 



,892,969 
,200,320 
,062,942 
,583,188 
,479,754 
,990,484 
,256,268 
,719,063 
,662,488 
,199,277 
,499,812 
,323,857 
,723,726 
,232,984 
,411,836 
,615,466 
,076,546 
,874,518 
,811,269 
,028,680 
,089,819 
,048,666 
,832,964 
,548,862 
,689,712 
,844,888 
,826,162 
,066,060 
,000,000 
,891,877 
,286,158 
,869,255 
,723,709 
,761,840 
,387,614 
,034,918 
,912,619 
,466,804 
,181,670 
,168,498 
,848,889 
,578,168 
,209,048 
,748,467 
,537,276 
,915,906 
,207,428 
,886,229 
,1*20,218 
,129,661 
,982,629 
,514,463 
,606,671 
,222,148 
,676,780 
,860,748 
860,098 
,126,418 
,657,885 
,922,022 
,682,896 
,929,884 
,586,445 
,716,698 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIB. 



MAHTJFACTUBING INDUSTRIES OF ST. LOUIS, CENSUS OP 1900. 



££i£ EmXj 



Babbitt HeUl and Bolder, . 

Boots and Shoes 

Bottltne 

Boxes -Wooden Packing... 



^astiDsauidBnusFliilsliinB... 
and oinei P-' -* — •- 

fB and Wa 
allroad.. 



e and Wagon n: 



Carrii 

Oara — Cteneral ^op, constTDCtlon and repairs. . . 

Cam— Street. 

ChemtcalB 

Clothing— Men's factory product , 

Clottatni;— Women's tact<w; prodncL 

Ooffae and Spice— roastlns and grinding... 

Oontoclionerj , 

Oooperage , 

Dmgolst PreoaratlonB . 

nonflng andGrlst Mill products , 

Pood Preparations... 



ironwork— A rcbtt«ctuial and Ornamental... 

Liquors— Mult 

Lnmbei^ Planing Hill products 

Musoory- Brick and Stone 

Millinery— Custom work 

Paints 

Patent Medicines and Compounds 

Pottery. Terra Ootta and fire Clay producla. 

Printing and Publlahlng- book and Job 

Printing and Publishing— newspapers and period- 
Saddlery and Hami 
SlangbterlDR and Mi 
Soap and Candles,. 



t Packing— wholesale... 



I,381,» 

l,S67.Tt 



Tin Smithing, Copper Smlthlnig and Sheet Iron 

Working 

Tobacco — Cnening, Smoking and Snuff. 

Tobacco — Clgara and Cigarettes 

Wlrework. Wire Hope and Cables 

All other Indnstrtea 

Total 8,7« pea.r 



28 TRADE AND OOHHXBCB OF 



THE WORLD'S FAIR OF 1904 AT ST. LOUIS. 



WHEREIN IT WILL DIFFER FROM AND SURPASS 

ALL OTHER EXPOSITIONS. 



By WAiiTER B. SraysNS, Secretary Louisluia Purchase Exposition. 



The greatness of the World's Fair is casting Its shadows before. 
On the lower plateau of Foresrt Park four of the eight exhibition palaces 
are nearing completion. The remaining four are rapidly taking form 
and shape. Upon the upper plateau the $1,000,000 Art Building of steel 
and stone is rising from its foundations. Across Skinker Road four of 
the Washington University buildings are filled with (the Exposition 
official forces. Six other University buildings are beln^ pushed to finish 
for occupation. The site for Agricultural Hall, largest of the exhibit 
buildings, is ready; as also is that for Horticultural Hall, adjacent. 

At this mid-winter writing the day of formal opening Is sixteen 
months away. Yet the work of construction is being pushed at a cost 
of over a half a million dollars a month. Dedication day, the 30th of 
April, 1903, the Centennial Anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of 
Purchase, wiU find the physical approaching the finishing stages. Some 
of the great structures will be in readiness for the uses they are to 
serve. All of them will be so near completion that plans for installa- 
tion of exhibits can be made definitely. Grounds and buildings for the 
World's Fair of 1904 will be farther advanced at the dedleatlon in 1903 
than has been the case with similar undertakings six months before 
the opening. 

Such is the present c<Hidition that those who see fdr the first time 
the site and growing construction express amazement at the materializ- 
ing plans. From Art Hill the visitor who has known only what he has 
read, looks upon a scene which in grandeur of conception and in magni- 
tude of accomplishment prompts him to wonder. This is of daily ex- 
perience. 

The World's Fair has passed through the problematical period. 
Questions of finance, of site, of plans, of construction are "water which 
has passed over the dam." Matters of detail, and not itoo many of 
them, only remain for execution. Well assured in character and num- 
ber are the exhibits which will fill these great palaces, in which linear 
distance Is measured by miles, square space by acres. It Is no ionger 



THE dlTT OF ST. LOITIS. 29 

a qneetloii of filling the (two bondr ed and more acres under roof, bat 
of Beleotlng the best from the excess of applications. The Division of 
Bxbibits has come out victorious with its policy. This is to be the 
most perfect of World's Fairs. Scieivtiflc classification is to rule-not 
geographical interest or local pride. States and Territories will provide 
buildings for the comfort and convenience of their people, not for the 
conglomerate housing of their products, raw and manufactured. So, 
too, nations will place their exhibits where they belong in the palaces, 
side by side, in groups and classes with the exhibits of the whole world. 
When the visitor has seen the exhibits in the group space allotted he will 
have seen all there is of that group represented at <the Fair. This 
result may be called in a sense a surr^der of locality to the science of 
classification. It is the evolution of the W<Hrld's Fair in the highest 
sense. It was not brought about without more than one struggle be- 
tween the Exposition management and local influences. Here and there 
a State or section was not ready to admit without argument that classi- 
fictttlon should prevail as against geographical consideration. At the 
Chicago World's Fair, it will be remembered, several States insisted 
upon having in their buildings a heterogeneous collection of exhibits. 
At St Louis the oompetition wiU be by class and group, and the award 
of the juiy will possess a value and a disUnotion which it could not 
obtain with exhibits of the same kind scattered in many places. 

Ttie plan and scope of this World's Fair dedared in the very begin- 
ning for processes. The purpose to insist upon operating exhibits was 
proclaimed. The fruition is assured. The wheels will go round in 
greater numbw and in more ways than at any previous World's Fair. 
There will be operation and manuCactuce instead of endless array of 
things made. ESxhibitors have taken kindly to the opportunity to show 
how products are produced. The live exhibits will be everywhere. 
They will require more space and more people than the still Installation. 
They will give to this World's Fair above all its predecessors, educa- 
tional value. Some of the most intricate and interesting mechanical 
processes will be shown. So far has this Idea of actual operation been 
carried that many of the utilities of the World's Fair will be established 
as exhibtts and thus entered for the consideration of the Jury of award. 
Portions of the power plant, pumps, lighting devices, fire-fighting in- 
ventions, lamps, sanitary appliances, cranes, road-making machinery and 
a hundred other things of use in the maintenance of the World's Fair 
will be contributions from the makers to show by actual accomplish- 
ment their merits. 

Farticipati<m by the world In this World's Fair is determined. 
Acceptances by the leading nations and by many colonies, more than 
thirty in an, have been received. These have been followed by visits 
of foreign commissioners to select sites for buildings, to file formally 



•:* 



30 TRADE AND COHHEBCS OF 

their requests for exhibit space and to familiarize themselves with the 
pSans and policies of the Exposition. The unanimity of action upon the 
Western Hemisphere is particularly gratifying and impressive. From 
the British Dominion to the Argentine Republic the responses have 
come jyromptly and heartily until the presence of every nation Is prom- 
ised. Of similar character has been the action by the Orient The 
leading nations of Europe have entered energetically upon their prepara- 
tions to build and to exhibit 

A Chicago editor came to commend mildly and returned to proclaim 
in his nev7spaper '*the national surprise in store at St Louis." This 
Louisiana Purchase Exx)Osition in its formative stages amazes for its 
unlikeness to all predecessors. The two plateaus with the roHing slope 
of one hundred feet descent between them, present exposition topo- 
graphy which is novel to begin with. When was there a World's Fair 
built with this marked difference in elevations? The Commission of 
Architects grasped the opportunity in the conception of their plans. It 
|i is apparent now that one great charm is to be found in the view down- 

pi ward upon the exhibit palaces, the lagoons and plazas, while another 

H equal, if not even stronger impression in lingering Effect, wHl be made 

by the upward view embracing the terraces, the cascades, the colon- 
nades, the domes and towers in a wealth of emeraUd setting supplied by 
lawn and forest The range of hills, amphitheatre-like, curving and 
jutting, from west to east, across the site, has afforded conditions 
which the makers have utilized to produce a World's Fair picture with- 
out counterpart. This good fortune of the site in its original topo- 
graphy impresses more and more as the uses of the slope and the rela- 
tions of construction on the two plateaus are made plain. 

No other World's Fair has enjoyed the opportunities the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition will have to impress its magnitude and distin- 
guishing characteristics before the formal opening. For several months 
of 1903 this World's Fair will have place in the public eye second only 
to that it will possess in 1904. The last week of April, 1903, will bring 
to St Louis to dedicate the grounds and buildings a most distinguished 
body of men. The ceremonies occupying three days and celebrating 
the centennial of the signing of the Louisiana Purchase treaty as well 
as dedicating the location of the Exposition will draw to the city 150,000 
strangers. These visitors will carry away the impression of profound 
and pleasing surprise at the preparations being made for 1904. 

In June of 1903 the National Saengerfest will be celebrated upon 
the World's Fair grounds with a promise of 50,000 attendance. 

In September of 1903 will be assembled in St Louis the first inter- 
national press congress ever held on this hemisphere. The attendance 
of 500 newspaper editors and writers from European countries is made 
certain by the action of the last congress held at Berne, Switzerland. 
From Mexico, Central America, South America, Cuba and Canada news- 



THE OITT OF ST. LOUIS. 31 

paper representatiyes will he present. All organized bodies of news- 
paper men in the United States will send delegates. The initerest al- 
ready manifested in this Ck)ngress marks It as one of the most notable 
gatherings of the year 190B. 

If there is a State, Territory or possession of the United States 
which wlU not be represented by exhibits at this World's Fair, such 
absence cannot be forecasted now. On the contrary the indications 
point to participation by every subdivision of this country. States and 
Territories have responded with a degree of promptness and on a scale 
not shown for the World's Ck)lumbian Exposition. In this winter of 
1903 more than twenty Legislatures are sitting and legislation for the 
World's Fair is in progress where it has not been already enacted. The 
State and Territorial expenditures at St. Louis will be fifty per cent, 
larger than they were at Chicago. 

"Our aim will be to make it fairly representatlYe of the work 
the Government is doing for the people." So admirably expresses the 
head of the Board of Managers the purposes of the display which the 
National Government wSll make at the World's Fair. Congress has 
been liberal in the financial support Upon the Government Building 
and exhibits will be expended $1,500,000 with the wisdom acquired by 
much Exposition experience. The capital of the nation with its great 
official machinery, its numberless bureaus, its vast museums, its varied 
fields of effort to benefit the people, is situated nearly one thousand 
miles from the center of population. It has never been seen; it never 
will be seen by millions of people who will visit the World's Fair at St. 
Louis. The Exposition offers the opportunity to make accessible the 
best and most instructive features of government work to these people 
for a x)eriod of seven months. The expenditure needs no argument 
of Justification. Government funds never were applied more directly or 
with greater profit to the benefirt of the people than they will be upon 
this government exhibit 

The work of the Post Office Department in the actual performance 
of handling the mails will be carried on in full view of visitors. A 
railway mail car with one side of plsate glass exposing all that is going 
on inside will be oimrated. Every method of mail transportation will 
be shown. 

In an Immense cage, larger tiian any in Washington or in Central 
Park, New York, with trees, and bushes and rocks to simulate the forest, 
will be thousands of birds of all sizes and colors of plumage. 

In the geological division, among other strange things, will be a 
restoration of the stegasaur, one of the largest of the extinct monsters 
, of this continent, beside which the restored mastodon will appear small 

I indeed. 

In biology rthere wHl be the model of a whale with casts of ana- 
condas and animals of extraordinary size. 



32 TSABX AXD OOMICEBQK OF 

The afltiopbysteal obaerratioii will show Its bolometer, the wonder- 
ful instniiiieBt Invented to record changes of temperature so slight as a 
millionth of a degree. The collection of meteoiities will come mider 
this division. 

The open aJr ezliibits of the Departmittit of Agriculture wJU occupy 
ten acres of ground. They will show grasses and grains, seed investi- 
gation, poisonous plants, hearing vines. The experimental work of the 
department in many directions will be carried on before the World's 
Fair visitors. 

Indoors the chemical laboratories will conduct experiments in foods, 
in sugar and in water. The apparatus and instruments of the weather 
bureau wHl be tn service. 

Out of doors roads will be made and tested by hauling under the 
direction of officers of the government 

In entomology, in forestry, in the experimental sta/tiofi field, in the 
animal industry division, in other branches of its work the Department 
of Agriculture will have exhibits far more elaborate than ever before. 

The spirit of life and motion, of actual operation, will enter into 
the government exhibits. Thus the Treasury Department will show 
the presses at work upon paper money and upon coins. 

A special building will contain the exhibit of the Fish Commission. 
It will show in great aquariums the largest collection of fish ever made 
in this country, if not in the world. The Oommission has recently 
added to the collection many new specimens from the Philippines and 
the other waters of the Orient Among these is a sea monster which 
is called the electric light fi^, having a sac of phosphorous on its head 
which gives out a glow like a headlight 

Chiefs of the Exhibit Departments Bjse vieing with each other to 
introduce in their respective buildhigs the greatest number and extait 
of living exhibits. In Manufactures, in Liberal Arts, In Machinery and 
in Electricity there will be motion and processes everywhere. It was 
to be expected that in 'these departments exhibitors might be induced 
to take the new departure in installation. But visitors wiSl be sur- 
prised surely at the extent of activity which will prevail in some of the 
other Departments. In Transportation theie will be provision for test 
in speed and power of locomotives. Automobiles will have a speedway. 
In Mines and Metallurgy, smelting and stamping wiU be shown in 
actual operation. Mining machinery will be in operation and the pro- 
cesses of producing from the ores zinc and lead especially will be shown. 
Cold storage and ice-making will be illustrated by a plant in operation 
with a capacity of over 1,000 tons a day. The garbage of the entire 
Exposition will be treated by a model plant which will be conducted 
for inspection by visitors. And in this connection will be other features 
of model city making, the architectural and artistic, the latest devices 
and appliances dear to the advocate of civic improvement 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 33 

The very highest development of flre-flghttog and life-saving skill 
v^ill be shown by a picked and trained company of pompiermen and 
firemen. Daily exhibitions will be given in answering alarms, in climb- 
ing five-story buildings on fire, and in suppressing the flames. In edu- 
cation there will be actual instruction of classes of the deaf and dumb 
and the blind. A printing establishment vrill show the methods of pre- 
paring plates and getting out an edition of a magazine. A model 
theatre will be equipped with all the latest devices and the operation of 
them will be shown. Briquettes, smokeless and efficient as hardcoal, 
wiU be manufactured from the cheapest of soft coal and coal dust. 
There will be almost no end to the variety of manufacturing which 
will be performed in the presence of visitors. 

The evolution of the concession will distinguish (the Louisiana Pur- 
chase Exposition. From the status of the sideshow, tolerated in the 
past on a percentage, the privileged amusements are to be advanced at 
St liOUls to a more prominent place. Architectural picture, exhibits 
and concessions here become co-ordinate attractions. In the theory of 
organization the Director of Concessions takes his place on equal foot- 
ing with the Director of Works and the Director of Bxhibits. The 
Gommiittee on Concessions has been made one of the most important of 
the subdivisions of the Board of Directors. 

Never before have the possibQitles of the concession been recognized 
and encouraged as at St. Louis. Fruits of this policy are seen in the 
maturing and contemplated expenditure of the concessionaires. The 
investment will be in the millions of dollars, several times greater than 
at any former universal Bxposition. From more than 2,500 applica- 
tions and suggestions, the Director of Concessions and his Committee 
have made their selections and concluded negotiations. The globe lias 
been searched for amusements and reproduction of life of other coun- 
(tries, the presentation of which will add to the interest of the World's 
Fair. 

This evolution of the concessions is natural and legitimate. Con- 
struction on the World's Fair grounds will present the architecture 
of an nations. The exhibit palaces will show by classes and groups 
the raw products and the processes of manufacture. Why should not 
the concession satisfy curiosity and interest In the vocations, the recrea- 
tions, in brief, the daily life of the peoples of the earth? And that they 
will do in magnitude and in variety which no previous Bxposition has 
attempted. The highway of concessions will be a tour of the world. 
Jerusalem with wall and gates and those places of sacred historic in- 
terest will be reproduced and populated by several hundred persons of 
various crafts and callings brought from the Holy City to represent its 
every-day life of the present As much as the space of a dozen city 
blocks will be embraced in fthis reproduction. The topography even 



34 TRADE AND OOMMEROE OF 

Will be sheeted to conform to those portions of Jerusalem which are to 
be copied. Several hundred thousand dollars wiH b^ expended upon 
the Jerusalem concession before the gates of the World's Fair open. 

Another ambitious and assured featm-e will be an extensive repro- 
duction of a famous locality of Switzerland where Tyrolese will give to 
the scenery the animate representations of life among the Alps. Here 
again money will be expended upon a scale not dreamed of in the days 
of the Columbian Midway. A street from Japan will be constructed 
true to that country and will be lined with shops and places of enter- 
tainment conducted by Japanese. 

China for the first time in her history will participate as a govern- 
ment, and will have exhibits under the auspices of an Imperial com- 
mission, occupying many thousand square feet of space in the palaces. 
The preparaition of these exhibits especially in the form of curios has 
been going on for months. But perhaps of more interest to the visitor 
will be the Chinese street, upon which the Chinese people will have 
their home Industries, their theatre, their joss house, (their shops and 
their restaurant. From Ceylon will come the swarthy East Indians to 
serve and entertain in a tea garden typical of (that country. 

In the presentations of life in the Orient the Filipinos will be espe- 
cially strong. They will occupy a reservation as large as that of an 
American town of a thousand people. They will come from a dozen dif- 
ferent itribes. They will live in the same kind of homes on water, on 
plain and in tree tops thait they do in the Philippines. They wfll carry 
on the industries, engage in the recreations and live the lives that they 
do in the archipelago. Besides the settlement of Filipinos will be 
camped a battalion of the native soldiers presenting a i^emi-daily drill. 
A Filipino orchestra of one hundred players will illustrate the musical 
talent of the islands. 

Africa, Europe and South America will have streets and villages 
in (the group of concessions. The South Seas will be represented in 
this polyglot city of the world. Mexico will send a troop of her famous 
and picturesque mountain cavalry, the Rurales, as well as a full military 
band. These communities, reproducing life from all of the continents, 
will number several thousand people, and will occupy more space <£an 
was given to the emthre Paris Exposition of 1900. 

Processes instead of products will give the exhibits in the palaces 
distinguishing character in this Exposition. So, too, living illustration 
will enter into other feaitures of the Fair. A Company of Artillery wfll 
camp upon the groimd to man the seacoast battery and to handle daily 
the great gun weighing 115,000 pounds. A government life-saving 
crew from the coast will occupy a station by the lake and give daily 
exhibitions of the uses of life-saving appliances. A battalion of marines 
will be located on the grounds to show by regular drills the efficiency 
and importance of a branch of the military service scarcely known to 



THB CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 36 

the interior of the United States until the late war with Spain. The 
Marine Corps, composed of a few men and almost unknown, is now, 
with the rapid growth of the navy, enlarged to an army of several 
thousand men trained for sea and land service. The sea soldiers will 
be strongly represented at the World's Fair. 

With the assurances of government support and <the incorporation 
of the Exposition Company, a movement was inaugurated early in 1901 
to insure a certain basis of organized attendance. As the result of 
this steady effort of many months, there will be held in St Louis dur- 
ing the World's Fair year, 140 national and international conventions. 
It seems probable that ithis number will be increased by bodies meet- 
ing in 1903 to 100 conventions to be held in St Louis during 1904. This 
does not take into account the. series of International Congresses now 
being arranged as a department of the World's Fair organization to be 
held under the auspices of the Exposition management. The 140 con- 
ventions are bodies which meet annually, biennially, or quadrlenal- 
ly. They will number from 250 to 2,500 delegates and each of these 
conventions will bring to St. Louis from 500 to 5.000 people with the 
World's Fair incentive added. These conventions will be well distri- 
buted through the period of the Fair from April to December. 

International Congresses, apart from these convenitions, will be ar- 
ranged by a Director of Congresses and an Advisory Council composed 
of heads of great educational institutions. Possibly a better descrip- 
tion would be one great International Congress of Arts and Sciences with 
more than one hundred sections. In this Congress the leaders of the 
World of Art and Science are to be brought together, adding to the 
material and to the amusing features an exhibit of the best thought of 
all nations. 

The proposed flying ship tournament with its capital prize of $100,- 
000 has prompted such extensive preparation that a contest of great 
interest is assured. To this have been added athletic contests to be 
given in a great stadium; an international contest of carrier pigeons, and 
an international horseshow. 

The World's Fair of 1904 is growing beyond all anticipations. 



36 TRABI AND COMHERGB OF 



ST. LOUIS. 



The fourth city of the United States in population. 
The largest and most important city in the Louisiana Purchase. 
The largest manufacturer of tobacco in the world. 
Has the largest drug house in the UnHed States. 
Has the largest woodenware house in America. 
Has the largest hardware house in the country. 
Is the largest dry goods market west of the Alleghanies. 1 

Has the largest shoe house in the world. 
The largest shoe distributing city in the Union. 
Is the largest millinery market in America. 
The largest inland coffee distributing center. 
One of the great railroad centers. 

The principal city on the longest river in North America. 
The largest hardwood lumber market in America. 
Makes more street and railroad cars than any .other point 
The largest horse and mule market in the world. 
A prominent manufacturing center. 
Has the best rapid transit system known. 
Will have the greatest World's Fair in history in' 1904. 
Leads in output of American-made chemicals. 
Prominent in the manufacture of proprietary medicines. 
Receipts of grain in 1902, 70,437,072 bushels. 
Receipts of flour in 1902, 2,217,685 barrels. 
Flour manufactured in 1902, 1,322,530 barrels. 
Banking capital and surplus, 1902, $84,940,578. 
Bank clearings In 1902, $2,506,804,320. 
Leads in manufacture of stoves and ranges. 
Tonnage receives and forwarded in 1902, 29,737,577 tons. 
Death rate per thousand in 1902, 16.66. 
Largest brewery in the United States. 
Has 92 public schools, with 84,774 scholars. 
Largest and most complete railway station in America. 
Has 18 public Parks containing 2,125 acres. 
St. Louis post office ranks first in raitio of expenses to receipts. 
Receipts at St Louis post office in 1902, $2,735,674. 
Pieces of mail matter originating in St. Louis in 1902, 282,321,446. 
Is renowned for beautiful residence districts. 
Has 19 miles of river front. 
Real estate transfers in 1902, $45,123,135. 
Value of buildings erected in 1902, $12,854,035. 



THE dTT OF ST. LOCIS. 

ST. LOUIS IN ipoi AND 1902. 



ax: 



Reftl Eatcte &ii<] peraonal, aBBessed T&lae t3H,Tn,T00 

Bonded debt '■° "" ■"" 

Bouses erected, namber. *fiol la ISOI; i,n3 In 19D1 

Bl Ter froDt, nmes 

Public patkB, number, IB, sores 

Paved streets, miles 



Oondi^tH tor nnder-KTOUDd wires, ml lea lU 

Wster snpplr, cspsclty Kaltmia per dsy , 100.000,000 

Water sDpplf, aTersse dally consumption " "" ~" 

BecelptsiTom water licenses 

Public Sebools, number. B3; Teacbers, 1.83S; Scbolar 



New Union Station, si tracks, covers acres 

Baflroad lines termlnatlnR In St. Louis 

H, — .. Ballroads, mltea single track 

■ — ^rs carried 

of the City from taiatlon 

Beveoue at the City from Special Taxes and Licenses. 

Death ral« per thousand 

PostOmce, cash recelple 

PostOfBce. Pieces ot Hall originating In St. LoDla 

Tonnage, Total tons received: 

Tonnage, Total tons shipped ,.... 

Hanulactnres, product, census 1900 

Bank clearings S 

Bank and Tnut Companies, capital and surplus 



ezK 


«,» 


















i.m 


iiil 
























gl.ITO,MJ 


la,SST,8M 


|6,aH,sei 





































Bank and Tnut Companies, capita 
Tobacco, manulactured, ponnos... 

Breweries, output, gallons 

Oraln, receipts, bnshels 

Flour manuiactured, barrels 

Public ElevatotB, 9 ; capacity, busbels 

PrlTBte Elevators. 19; capacity, busbels... 
Lead received, pigs 



Horses and Mules recelTed, number 

Coal (all kinds) received, ions 

Dry Goods, Notions, and kindred lines Bales.... 



Wood en war 

Lumber . . . . 
Candles 



Clothing 
Fumltun 

Agricultural Macblnerr and V^clee 

Iran and Steel and Waeon Ualerlal " 

Electrical Hacblnerr. Qoods and Supplies " 

Paints and Paint Oils " .... 

Saddlery and Harness " 

Bats. Caps and Gloves " 

Drugs and kindred lines, Inclndlng ptoprletarj goods, 

OTDgalst sundries and chemic^ gales,... (40,000,000 

Glass, Olassware and Queenswate " fS.GOO.OOa 

■'-'-'- ■" <■_..- ._j j-i roducls " 14,000,000 

1B02; 19,877^10 lbs. 1901; 

(10.600,000 



Brick, Terra Cotta and Clay prodiicis! 
™.., , — «««.o iSs 



Hides, receipts ISO], 00,187, 130 lbs... 

Carpets and kindred lines 

Balboad and Streetcars 

Paper, Stationery and Envelopes. . . 



38 TRADE AKD COMMERCE OF 



REVIEW. 



St. Louis^ the commercial capital of Missouri, the largest and most im- 
portant city in the Louisiana Purchase, has shared plentifully in the general 
prosperity of the past year. This is evidenced by increased business of the 
Clearing House, a larger volume of tonnage handled, additional rail lines 
seeking entrance, enlarged terminal facilities, a decided increase in the 
amount of mail matter handled, an extension of trade territory and conse- 
quent larger sales by jobbers and manufacturers, larger banking capital 
and surplus, a marked increase in the grain trade, and by the general satis- 
faction as to the year's business and the bright prospects for the future. 

The trade territory of St. Louis now extends over the entire country, 
some lines selling goods in every State in the Union, and a number doing 
considerable foreign business. 

The rapid development of the great Southwest, and the special induce- 
ments offered to homeseekers by the various railroads traversing that terri- 
tory, will further develop the commerce of St. Louis in the very near 
future, by opening up a trade which will be naturally tributary by nearness 
of location, and accessible by direct rail lines. The fact that there are no 
large jobbinjg houses between this gateway and the Southwest, gives to 
St. Louis and her sister city on the Kaw special advantages for controlling 
the trade of this vast, and as yet, undeveloped territory. That our mer- 
chants and manufacturers will improve this opportunity is evidenced by 
the fact that already the trade of that section is largely controlled by 
St. Louis. 

The increased and increasing importance of St. Louis as a great com- 
mercial center is also emphasized by the fact that during the last year one 
of the great trunk lines of the West has secured entrance to the city, and 
others are contemplating extending their rails to St. Louis when terminal 
facilities can be obtained. Established roads have increased their mileage 
by the absorbtion of connecting lines, and the Terminal Association has 
entered upon a most extensive addition to the facilities for handling both 
freight and passenger business ; the present terminals being entirely inade- 
quate for the rapidly increasing traffic. One of the most important of the 
TerminaPs projected improvements is the erection of an additional shore 
pier to the Eads Bridge, by which passenger trains may be diverted to the 
elevated track on the river front, and thus reach the Union Station without 
passing through the tunnel. On another page, under the head of Trans- 
portation, will be found a review in detail of the increase in rail facilities 
during the year. 

The bank clearings of a city indicate, perhaps, more forcibly than any 
other statistics, the condition of trade. During the past year the clearings 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUTS. 39 

of St. Louis banks and trust companies amounted to $2,506y804;320, an in- 
crease of 10 4-10% oyer 1901, and the largest in the history of the Clearing 
House. Banking capital has been increased, and the combined capital and 
surplus of the banks and trust companies is now $87^267,173, with deposits 
amounting to $209,522,208. 

In financial circles there was an abundance of money for the business of 
the community. The enormous crops required vast sums to move them, 
and the money was at hand when needed. This city handled considerable 
outside paper, and important sums were loaned in the East. A number of 
large transactions were financed exclusively by local houses, proving that 
this metropolis can bank for its customers, as well as sell them goods. 
Among the important transactions of this character was the handling of a 
ten million dollar bond issue of a Mexican railway, the organization and 
re-organization of a number of steam and street railways, electric light 
and power companies, and the financing of a number of industrial combi- 
nations. The local banks and trust companies have become financial 
powers of the country. During the year there were two consolidations of 
financial institutions, and three new banks and one new trust company 
entered the field. 

The statements of tonnage received and handled is a good index as to 
the volume of business. Carefully compiled reports from the various rail 
and water lines show that during the past year 29,737,577 tons of freight 
were received and forwarded from St. Louis, being an increase over 1901 of 
978,913 tons. 

The postoffice returns also refiect with great accuracy the business 
activity of a city. It appears that during the past twelve months the cash 
receipts of the St. Louis postoffice were $2,735,674, as against $2,240,429 in 
1901, while the total number of pieces of mail matter originating at St.Louis 
increased from 246,784,171 in 1901 to 282,321,446 in 1902. 

The harvests of 1902 .were the most bountiful ever produced, and the 
State of Missouri was among the first in yield per acre. St. Louis being the 
natural market for the surplus of the great Western States, received her full 
share; the aggregate receipts of cereals being 70,437,072 bushels, the largest 
in many years. If to the grain receipts is added fiour, in its equivalent in 
wheat, the receipts would be equal to 80,416,654 bushels. The business of 
the year was profitable and eminently satisfactory. In speculative lines 
the business was more than up to the average, and was steady and profitable. 
In the many other lines of business transacted on the fioor of the Exchange, 
both the volume of business and results were gratifying, so that it can be 
recorded that 1902 was a prosperous year for the members of the Mer- 
chants* Exchange. 

The growth of St. Louis is demonstrated by the erection during the past 
year of many large commodious buildings for the wholesale trade, notably 
in the Washington avenue district, and many large office buildings. The 
older houses have moved into the larger and more modem structures, while 
the vacated premises have been quickly taken by new houses. The same 



40 TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 

condition has prevailed in the resident district. The increase in population 
has created a demand for dwelling houses which has been difficult to fllL 
Many new residences of modem size^ as well as others of superior excel- 
lence; also a number of large apartment houses^ have been erected, all of 
which have readily found tenants. 

Large sums have been expended in remodeling and refitting a number of 
down-town hotels. In the West End the residence hotels find use for all 
their rooms^ and a numbef of new hostelries have been contracted for there 
and in the center of the city. The business of public entertaining is well 
provided for. Many new buildings are arranged for^ to be completed in 
time to provide entertainment for the thousands who will visit the city 
during the World's Fair in 1904. 

The announcement that St. Louis will hold in 1904 the Greatest World's 
Fair in history, has drawn the attention of the world to this city, and the 
advertisement thus given has been one of the causes of increased volume of 
trade. A number of new houses in various lines have located here, and 
the general business has been largely augmented. 

Li dry goods and kindred lines St. Louis has made great progress in 
recent years^ and is now the largest distributor in this line in the West 
Notwithstanding the fact that the years 1900 and 1901 witnessed very large 
gains in this line, the business of 1^2 shows still further progress. The 
capital invested in dry goods, cloths, notions, silks, furnishings and similar 
lines, was increased largely, while the amount of sales are estimated to have 
increased 10 to 15%, making the total volume of business in this line at 
least $120,000,000. All the dry goods houses report an increase in skies; 
not only in territory heretofore occupied, but in new fields in the Central 
States east of the Mississippi River, and in the far away States in the North 
and Northwest. A number of houses are now manufacturing many articles, 
such as skirts, neckwear, suspenders and ready-made garments, and the 
growth of this department is more rapid and noteworthy than any other 
feature of the business. Prices were slightly advanced during the year in 
cotton products, but in other lines were practically unchanged. 

Li no line has there been a more rapid development than in the shoe 
trade. St. Louis now holds first place as a jobber of shoes. It may be as- 
serted that Boston is the largest shoe market in the world. This is true if 
in the Boston business is included the output of New England manufac- 
turers, who from their Boston offices make sales of goods that are shipped 
direct from the factories to the wholesale dealers throughout the country. 
But if the business of the Boston shoe houses, as jobbers to the retail 
dealers is considered, St. Louis easily leads. As a manufacturer of shoes^ 
St. Louis has made rapid progress. Fully one-half of the goods sold are 
the output of St. Louis factories, and are of the better grades ; the cheaper 
lines being purchased in the East. This city is also the largest buyer of 
Eastern-made shoes. During the past year all the large shoe houses have 
Increased their manufacturing facilities. A number of new factories have 
been erected and sites for others purchased. On another page will be found 
a statement giving in detail the statistics of the business. 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 41 

In the line of hats^ caps and gloves St. Louis has retained its position as 
the largest market for soft hats in the United States. The yearns business 
shows an increase throughout the line on an average of 12^ % . In the 
glove department, however, remarkable progress has been made, and sales 
have increased fully 40% . The increase is most marked in the gloves made 
In this city, which are principally working and driving gloves and riding 
gauntlets. At the close of the year, orders were being booked for next 
spring, and they indicate still further increase in this business for the 
coming year. No hats or caps are made here, and the supply still comes 
from the East. The local jobbers have held their own in the South and 
Southwest, and made their principal gains in the Central West. The gross 
volume of the local business in hats, caps and gloves was in the neighbor- 
hood of $5,000,000. 

In wholesale clothing circles sales for the year are reported to have been 
about 15% greater in money value than those of 1901, but as it is also stated 
that prices were higher to a smaller or greater degree, the actual volume of 
business done is about the same as during the preceding year. Practically 
the entire output of the city is manufactured here. House stocks are lower 
than at any time within the experience of the trade, and good prices and 
sales are expected for the ensuing year. Important gains have been made 
in the sales to the far Northern States. 

The wholesale millinery trade did a business during the year that foots 
up fully $6,000,000. This is about 12^% higher than the sales of the year 
before. Prices were unchanged. The most important gains in sales were 
made in the Southeastern States, Georgia and Florida being particularly 
prominent. This district is being won from rival markets in the East 
despite most discouraging freight differences. A new millinery jobbing 
house began business at the close of the year. St. Louis has become one 
of the greatest millinery markets of the country. 

The jobbing silk business is growing rapidly in this city. In spool silk 
the sales for 1902 were more than 26% greater than those of 1901. The 
business of the past year almost reached $2,000,000 in value. The local 
houses are all agents of outside concerns. The broad silk business is a new 
industry locally, being only about four years old ; but in that limited time 
it has grown to the dignity of one of the recognized silk centers of the 
country. The sales of 1902 were one-third larger than those of 1901, and 
twice those of 1900. They approximate $5,000,000. The local importations 
of 1902 were three times as great as those of any previous year. The 
heavy foreign buying of St. Louis jobbers has brought to the city every 
advantage possessed by New York — ^the American silk center par excel- 
lence. 

In hardware St. Louis still maintains its striking pre-eminence. No 
other city in the world does one-half the business handled by the local 
jobbers in shelf hardware. Sales reached very close to $35,000,000, and 
were fully 20% above those of 1901. The year was notable for the large 
number of new stocks sold to all parts of the country by St. Louis houses. 



42 TRADE AND OOMMEBCB OP 

The export trade was satisfactory, and the only complaints were the usual 
ones about the falling off in Texas. Prices were practically unchanged. 

In clay products, inclusive of building^ paving and fire brick, pipingi 
tiling and terre cotta, the business of the past year is said to have been 25% 
greater than that of the previous year, with sales in excess of $5^000,000. 
St. Louis is a prominent producer and distributor of the higher grades of 
clay products. A healthy and growing demand is reported from Cuba and 
Mexico. 

The money invested in the agricultural implement business in St Louis 
was increased 12}^ to 15 9$ during 1902. The volume of business was not 
quite as large as that of 1901, principally because the drouth prevailing in 
1901 throughout the St. Louis tributary country, which curtailed spring 
purchases. Towards the close of the year, however, business improved 
considerably, and the indications for the coming year are very bright. The 
export trade with Southern countries is growing steadily, but is not in a 
satisfactory condition in those communities that are operating on a silver 
basis. Prices are somewhat higher on account of advances in iron and 
steel. 

Similar conditions were experienced by the dealers in buggies and 
yehicles, and the saddle and harness concerns. These lines are more closely 
in touch with the farming community than any other, and they unanimously 
report that the business of the past twelve months is below that of 1901. 
In every instance the spring trade fell off and showed a loss of at least 20% 
on the average. From August on business improved all along the line, and 
the year closed with enough orders on the books of local houses to insure 
substantial gains next year. St. Louis is the largest moderate-priced 
vehicle and buggy market in the country. Prices were about 7J^% higher 
on the average. The bulk of the city's business is manufactured here. 
The city is not prominent in the high grade carriage business, but the local 
houses in that line were uniformly prosperous, and pronounce 1902 the best 
year in their experience, and 10 to 25% better than 1901. The saddle and 
harness business of St. Louis is a solid and substantial part of the local 
commerce. The sales of 1902 amounted to about $6,000,000. Besides the 
manufacturing of harness, all the local houses are extensively engaged in 
the jobbing of material, supplies and saddlery hardware. 

The position of St. Louis as a lumber market remains unexcelled. The 
woods of the South have grown in consumption considerably in excess of 
those of the North, and this city is the center of the Southern Lumber 
World. During the past year twenty new firms opened general sales offices 
here, and almost all the big operators of the country are operating in this 
market. Receipts of 1902 are in excess of a billion and a half feet; the 
St. Louis business made up of direct shipments, which never touched this 
point, are reported to have been at least 750,000,000 feet. 

St. Louis is the largest drag market in the West. The trade of 1902 was 
in the main satisfactory. The value of business in the drug trade proper is 
placed at $7,000,000. The field of operations for the wholesale dealer is 



PHB OITY OP ST. LOUIS. 43 

gradually being curtailed by the disposition of the manufacturer to deal 
direct with the retail trade. This condition prevails throughout the country, 
and has compelled the wholesale dealers to enter the field of the manufac- 
turer and put out their own pharmaceutical and proprietary goods. The 
local proprietary medicine houses added largely to their business during the 
year^ and several of these establishments have attained the very foremost 
place in their respective lines. As a manufacturer of heavy chemicals 
St. Louis occupies front rank, and the output is shipped to all parts of the 
United States and to many foreign countries. Take the^rade as a whole 
the aggregate of sales during the past year was fully $40,000,000. 

In paints and oils the volume of trade was practically the same as for 
the previous year. There was a falling oft in the spring trade, but an im- 
provement in the fall business which made good the earlier loss. Sales 
were estimated at $6,000,000. St. Louis is recognized as the best market in 
this line in Trans-Mississippi territory. 

In the distribution of iron, heavy hardware and wagon material St.Louis 
maintained its position as one of the most important points in the country. 
The business of 1902 was 15 to 20% greater than in 1901, and totaled in the 
neighborhood of $15,000,000. The dealers did all the business within their 
power, as the mills have for some time been several months behind their 
orders. The demands on the local market were far in excess of the ability 
of the mills to supply them. Prices ruled higher. The prospects for 190S 
are exceedingly bright. 

So firmly established is this city in the position of the leading wooden- 
ware market, that there is really only one large house in this line outside 
this city. St. Louis markets more than one-half the woodenware 
of the country. The business of the past year showed a decided increase 
over the preceding. Sales approximated $10,000,000, and the trade terri- 
tory covered the entire United States. 

The paper business of St. Louis for 1902, including stationery and envel- 
opes, was in excess of $6,000,000. The year's gain is estimated at 33>^ % in 
money value ; partially explained by the fact that prices ruled between 20 
and 25% higher on the average. The paper mills of the East were con- 
stantly behind their orders. The local factories devoted to the manufacture 
of envelopes showed gratifying gains. 

This city is in the first rank as a trunk manufacturing point. A new 
f^tory, said to be unequaled in size in the United States, went into oper- 
ation at the close of the year. The business of 1902 approximated 
$1^500,000; practically the same as 1901. 

The year in groceries was marked by an unique condition. The jobbers 
consider the business an improvement on 1901, although sales in that year 
were greater than in the one just closed. The paradox is caused by the 
fact that the drought of 1901 was an important benefit to the trade of that 
year. Droughts always benefit the grocery business, because food producers 
are compelled to resort to the stocks of the grocery houses for their own 
subftistance. So the business of 1901 had an unnatural infiation, and that 



44 TRADE AND OOMMXBOE OF 

of 1902 showed a healthy increase of normal sales. The straight job- 
bing business amounts to about $56,000,000, and when this added to the 
operations of coffee houses, vinegar, spices, and other kindred lines, the 
resulting figures will exceed $75,000,000. St. Louis is considered the lead- 
ing market in the West for green and roasted coffee. Its advantages for 
receiving green coffee from Brazil accounts for the enviable position. 
Some of the largest and most prominent coffee roasting houses in the 
country are located here. 

The glassware and crockery trade of 1903 shows marked improvement, 
justifying the statement that St. Louis has taken a prominent place in this 
line. The cut glass industry, started in 1901 has made rapid progress, and 
sales have increased ten-fold, extending principally through the West, 
South and Southeast, and a new factory is projected for the coming year. 
The crockeryware trade has also expanded, and sales have been large 
enough to control certain pottery factories in advantageous shipping loca- 
tions. It is stated that sales were fully $5,000,000. 

In plate and sheet glass the year shows an increase in volume of 25% 
with prices somewhat lower. Impossibility to fill orders without serious 
delay was the only trouble with the trade. The World's Fair construction 
created a big local demand for window glass. Mirror glass sales made a 
large increase, The glass factories in this vicinity made decided gains, 
altthough the bulk of the goods still come from Indiana and Pennsylvania. 
An enormous plant, just outside the city, was nearing completion at the 
end of the year. It will be a force in the business of 1903. In ornamental 
or art glass, authorities estimate the increase of business at not less than 
50%. St. Louis has the largest general art glass house in the country. 
Increased demands from planing mills for ornamental glass for stock pur- 
poses was an important factor in the prosperity. Bevelled plate glass, 
with metallic sash, is shipped from here all over the West and South. In 
bottles the volume of shipments were about the same as that of 1901, a 
condition extremely satisfactory to the trade, as 1901 was 35 to 40% over 
1900. In this line, both as a manufacturing and distributing point, St. Louis 
occupies an enviable position. In beer bottles It is one of the two largest 
markets in the United States. 

From *' time out of mind '* St. Louis has been the largest primary fur 
market in the world, and there is little danger of her pre-eminence being 
disputed. The season closing in 1902 was double that of 1901 in volume 
of business, and the season beginning in December, 1902, indicated an 
intention to at least equal the high water mark of the trade. The catch 
was unprecedently large, and at the same time prices were never better. 
The furs were sold to manufacturers from all parts of the United States 
and Canada, and large shipments were made to London, the greatest fin- 
ished fur market in the world. The wave of prosperity is considered due 
solely to the enormous consumptive demand from fur-wearing regions, 
and no speculative holdings have affected the market. 

In wool this city ranks second to Boston ; 1902 was the best year In the 
history of the business. Sales were above $12,000,000, an increase of 20 to 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS, 45 

95%. Shipments were made to all parts of the oountry, and demands far 
heavier than usual from mills in the Mississippi Valley helped to swell the 
increase of local sales. Values were higher. 

In hides there was a gain of about the same amount. The city ranlm 
second in the marketing of domestic hides. The business of the year is 
conseryatiyely estimated at $10,000,000. Most shipments were made to 
tanners in Pennsylyania, NewYork^ Wisconsin and Michigan; but the 
local demand was very heavy, because of the increased business of the 
several large tanneries located here. 

In the way of electrical supplies St. Louis is fast coming to the front as 
a leading market. Jobbing sales in 1902 increased about 25%. The South 
and Southwest is the principal trade territory. The Mexican business is 
heavy, and branch houses of St. Louis concerns are located in that country. 
Shipments from local factories to Japan and the Orient are by no means 
small. In the way of electrical machinery business was very heavy with 
railroads and lighting plants. The World's Fair swelled the local de- 
mand. 

The Mound City is very prominent in the jobbing and manufacturing 
of railway supplies. No city in the world enjoys a larger volume of busi- 
ness in this line; the reason being that many railway purchasing 
headquarters are located here. Another important cause is the un- 
disputed fact that the development of railroad possibilities in the South- 
west is easily twice as great as in any other district. Sales in 1902 were 
20% over 1901, and the latter year was fully 40% over 1900. Local manu- 
facturing interests are growing, and the products of St. Louis plants are 
used all over the American Continent, and on the railways of Europe. So 
widespread is the trade territory that business with Mexico and Canada is 
not considered export trade at all. 

The furniture trade enjoyed a business as large, if not larger, than 
that of the preceding year. The city has attained a most prominent posi- 
tion in this line. Local factory interests are exceedingly large, and in the 
manufacture of cheap and medium grade furniture this city probably 
ranks first in this country. Shipments are made into every State, and the 
export trade is decidedly heavy. 

In the manufacture and distribution of candies St. Louis is the most 
important point west of the Atlantic seaboard, and ranks second or third 
In the country. The business of 1902 was practically the same as that of 
1901^ with unchanged prices. The trade territory of the city extends from 
the Bookies to the Alleghenies, including the most northern tier of States, 
as well as the most southern. 

Local carpet houses report a gain of 10% for the year. Sales were 
around $4,000,000, and the entire country, with the exception of the Atlan- 
tic seaboard, was covered by shipments. New residents in the city coming 
from other quarters made a heavy increase in the local consumption. In 
carpets this is a most important jobbing center, and the business is increas- 
ing annually. 



46 TRADE AND OOMHEBCE OF 

The cold sUrage facilities of the city are ample for its needs. The in- 
yestment in these plants amount to $1^600 000. Although in cubic capacity 
St. Louis is not the largest in the West, it unquestionably has the most 
complete facilities, because of its extensive system of pipes for the distri- 
bution of cold for the purpose of storing in any part of the business 
section. It is the only system of the kind in the West^ and at the present 
time employs oyer three miles of piping. The amount of property stored 
during the year was far above former years. 

Local manufacturers of stoves and ranges suffered during the past year 
from the effects of the drought of 1901. Sales for the first six months 
were very slow, and although the later months showed an increase over 
the same months of 1901, the whole year showed a falling off. The sales 
of the year are reported at $3,000,000, and shipments were made through- 
out the country, with the exception of the New England States. Prices 
were higher because of advanced cost of every element of manufacture. 

In the extent of Its prominence in the manufacture of passenger and 
freight cars St. Louis enjoys a world-wide pre-eminence. More street 
cars are built here than in any other city^ and one of the local street car 
factories is the largest in the world. During the past year 2,000 cars were 
shipped from this point, representing a value of $4,000,000. The foreign 
shipments of the year amounted to 350 cars, and the largest invoices were 
to Germany, Argentina, Mexico and Brazil. Prosperous conditions for the 
future are indicated by the fact that orders are now on the books that will 
employ a 1 the factories^ resources until May. Prices have been higher, 
because of increased cost of manufacture. Sales were $15,872,108, and 
increase of $4,199,193.93. The principal gains were made in the South 
and West. Important exports were made to Costa Rica, South America, 
Mexico and the Hawaiian Islands. One-tenth of the entire business of the 
country was done in St. Louis. 

St. Louis has so long held the position of the leading tobacco market of 
the world, that the mammoth operations of the tobacco interests are an 
old story. The trade made an increase over the enormous sales of 1901, 
making the gross volume of business 82,593,541 pounds. In money value 
these sales figure in the neighborhood of $26,000,000. The product of 
St. Louis plants (mostly plug tobacco) was shipped all over the United 
States, and exported to foreign countries. Prices were about the same as 
in 1901. In addition to the amount manufactured, there were 17,963,410 
pounds of tobacco (mostly smoking) received from other points. 

While not prominent in the manufacture, St. Louis is a large distributor 
of cigars, and sales increased the past year to some 123^ to 15%. The 
sales for the year are estimated at 275,000,000, at an average value of $40 
per thousand. 

In the brewery line the year settled the fact that St. Louis has the 
largest beer brewery in the world. This point has been contested for some 
time, but Is generally considered settled. The business in general in- 
creased 15%, making the total volume in the neighborhood of $18,000,000. 



THE Omr OF ST. LOUIS. 47 

The beer is sold in all parts of the country, and exports are very heavy. 
The new American possessions have become large handlers of the product, 
and the widespread distribution is attested by not an unimportant ship- 
ment into Germany^ the birth place of lager beer. 

In retail merchandising the volume of business was highly satisfactory 
in extent and prices. An nnusual number of notable expansions and new 
enterprises distinguished the year. One of the department stores practic- 
ally doubled its capacity for business, and at the same time added a hand- 
some building to the retail section of the city. A new department store 
of first importance entered the field, and a large clothing and furnishing 
house opened its doors for the first time this year. A number of smaller 
concerns engaged In extensive lines began operations. Some of these 
were newcomers in the commercial field, and others recognized the advan- 
tages of the Mound City by moving here from other places. Throughout 
the year the retail district has worn an air of prosperity and substance 
that went to prove the general flourishing condition of the community. 

In summing up the records of the year we find that the good old city 
of St. Louis has not merely held her own commercially, but has made a 
decided advance in the development of her trade and commerce. 

With an unsurpassed location in the business center of this great 
country, with an unexcelled system of rail and river transportation, with a 
financial standing second to no other community, her future is bright and 
promising, and her position firmly established as the great metropolis of 
tlie great Mississippi Valley. 



48 TRADE AND OOMHEROX OF 



THE COMMERCIAL FUTURE OF ST. LOUIS. 



By WiiiLiAjf FiiEWBLLTM 8Auin>BBS, Secretary and General Manager of 

The Business Men's League of St^ Louis. 



Considering the time of its incorporation as an American city as its 
birtliday, St. Louis is tlie youngest of the four great cities of the United 
States, but it is the lustiest. Its percentage of commercial growth during 
the past ten years was greater than that of either one of the four. In 1890 
its commercial position was somewhat vague and uncertain. At the end 
of 1902 it is plain that there is a great city here, and that it is one of the 
commercial powers of the country. It is the fourth city of the United 
States in population, and the fourth in point of manufacturing product^ 
and it is one of the two cities that stand highest as to credit in home and 
foreign money markets, New York being the other. 

If one will trace the history of the great cities of the world, beginning^ 
with the older countries and proceeding then to the new world, one will 
come to believe that the development of the settlement into the metropolis 
is just as much a matter of natural advantages as it is a matter of enter- 
prise on the part of the people who found the town and live in it. The 
most active and industrious people have never been able to build into im- 
portance a town which was situated ill as to tributary commercial terri- 
tory. Any one can recall examples of pathetic struggles of this sor 
There would be years of hopeful efforts without result, and then the town 
would stop growing and relapse into existence as a village, while the most 
vigorous of its people went to places better situated. On the other hand a 
town founded well, as to tributary commercial territory, will not grow 
unless it has the energetic and sagacious people in it to use their opportu- 
nities and take advantage of the natural situation. It will attract this kind 
of inhabitants as its promise becomes known, and they will come to it 
from other cities that promise less. 

The founder of St. Louis builded better than he knew when he estab- 
lished his trading station on the banks of the Mississippi. He founded a 
town which had all the natural qualities needed to make it a great city, 
and, appreciating its well chosen site, to it came people with the American 
temperament, muscle, and brain that had to be added to make the town 
grow into the city. St. Louis did not grow away from its surroundings, 
but grew with them. As the forests and prairies of the Mississippi Valley 
and the Southwestern country gave place to villages, towns and cities, and 
productive farms, they gave of their prosperity to St. Louis, and so made 
it stronger and greater year by year, while the city in return supported 
them. The bonds between the city and its dependent territory grew close 



THE CITY OF ST. LOmS. 49 

as they both became stronger. Now St. Loals is indisputably the supply 
point of a dozen States, including nearly a million square miles, where 
it has no rival, and it is sharing with other large cities in the commerce 
of at least six more States. 

One may see with a much clearer eye the future of St. Louis in 1902 
than it was possible to do ten years ago, when not only was the city itself 
in straits for the money needed for public works^ but its trade future was 
still dependent upon conditions to be made. The improvement of the city 
itself has begun now on a very large scale, assisted by the work directly 
dependent upon the World's Fair and, more potent than this, forced on by 
the World's Fair spirit of progress. The most strikiog example of this is 
the remarkable amount of building going on in this city. This year 
$13,000,000 were spent in the city upon hotels, dwellings, and buildings of 
other sort. There is strong evidence that $20,000,000 will be spent in this 
way in 1903. The people of the State and city have decided that it is not 
fair to the city to make it pay as it goes. Posterity must pay for some of 
the benefits posterity will enjoy, and so it has been decided to issue bonds, 
and with the $8,000,000 or $10,000,000 thus secured, to add to the city'g 
streets, sewers and the public buildings that are needed. A new charter is 
being made which will modernize the methods by which the city will be 
governed, and will moreover extend invitations to mercantile and manu- 
facturing capital. When the World's Fair is oyer the net result will be a 
substantial gain in population and financial resources. 

The extension of the trade of the city will be as marked during the 
next few years as the improvement within. This is an epoch of railway 
building in the South, the West and the Southwest, and every spike driven 
is building up St. Louis. The great Mississippi River, the natural freight 
carrier between St. Paul and New Orleans, is coming at last into its own. 
To solTe the immense problem of freight transportation the river must be 
used. It is wasteful to let it fiow on without an adequate burden of freight 
boats, its gigantic power unused. The railways which are the most prac- 
tical students of economic problems in this country, are just beginniDg to 
understand that the river is not a rival but an ally, and that they must in 
the future handle freight by river as well as by rail. It will not be long 
before the north and south railway lines will enter upon the river trans- 
portation business systematically, re-enforcing their land lines, and will 
combine to secure from Congress the money to make the river navigable 
for heavy freight boats for its whole length. . The development of territory 
bordering the river and tributary to St. Louis which will follow this, will 
be great, and St. Louis will control the trade ef both the upper and lower 
river. 

The foreign trade of St. Louis will not be any considerable factor of its 
commerce for sometime to come, because the domestic territory in the im- 
mediate vicinity of St. Louis promises more profitably at present. By 
foreign is meant trade with countries across the ocean. St. Louis already 
has a very large and fast growing trade in Mexico, and will undoubtedly 



50 TRADE AND OOMHSROS OF 

control that whole market wheneyer its mannf actnrere and wholesale men 
have their domestic territory under such control that they are willing to 
relax their efforts there and put out their whole strength on the Mexican 
trade. 

In the matter of population New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and 
St. Louis are too far apart, and their growth is too nearly equal, year by 
year, for them to change their relatiye positions, at least within an ordinary 
lifetime. St. Louis moreoTer is too large now, and growing too fast to be 
approached by any smaller city in the future. The reasonable expectation 
of the city may be — 

J^rtt.— That it will be one of the largest and most productive manufac- 
turing cities of the world, considering the Missouri, Mississippi and 
Meramec as sources of electric power, and the unlimited fuel lying in the 
Missouri and Illinois mining districts nearby. 

/Second.— That it will be the selling and distributing city for a larger 
part of the United States than is supplied by any other city in the country, 
considering the commercial conditions of the West, the South and the 
Southwest^ the situation of the city with respect to productive territory, 
the railway building now going on, and the river improvement probable. 



.^ 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



51 



FINANCIAL REVIEW. 



By T. A. Stoddabt, Manager of St. Louis Clearing House. 



The following statements of the banks and trast companies are con- 
densed from the latest reports published, and furnished the Clearing House 
Association : 

Trust Companies under date October 81, 1902. 
Banks under date I'i'oyember 25, 1902. 

With this information only at command the results of the full year could 
not be obtained, yet the figures for this fraction of the year show such gains 
in all lines that conditions cannot fail to be entirely satisfactory. 

A notable feature of the«year 1902 is the large increase of the capitali- 
zation and surplus of the banks and trust companies, for details of which 
refer to statements. 

The dividends paid to shareholders during the year amount to : 

From Banks $1,978,000 

From Trust Companies 1,690,000 

$8,608,000 

The year 1901 excelled all former years in the amount of clearings, and 
now 1902 is in excess of 1901 by (236,124.10. 

The monthly and annual clearings for a series of years will be found in 
the following tables, as also information relative to matters pertaining to 
financial interests : 

Statement of Capital and Subplus of Tvtenty Banks and 

Ten Trust Companies, 1902. 



Oapitau 



Surplus. 



Total. 



Banks 

Nine Trust Gk>mpanies 

Title Guarantee Tru^ Ck>., does not do bank- 
ing business 



(20,460,000 
30,365,800 

1,500,000 



142,816,800 



SaO, 019,948 
24,104,880 

826,596 



$44,961,378 



9*v, SW7, «Mo 

44,470,680 
2,826,696 



$87,267,178 



»,, 



f 



•I 










t '■ I 






:i 



; g 



» 



I ft 

I: 



62 trade and commebgx of 

Comparative Condensed Statements of National and State 

Banks of the City of St. Louis. 



December 
1901. 


December 
1902. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Bbsources— 

TjO&DS 


|106,474»628 67 

24,271,310 81 

1.609.187 6.% 


$121,864,479 06 $ 16,289,856 49 
27.270.306 89 2 999 (»R OR 




Bonds and Stocks. . . . 




Real Estate 


1.110 RT7 1R 


' 


S 68.460 47 


Cash and Exchange. . 


48,622,744 78' 60,628,921 96 


2,006,177 18 




Total 


S180,877J16 81 $201,204,883 59! $ 20,396,127 76 


$ 68,460 47 


lilABILITIBS— 

Capital 


$ 17,900,000 00 

12,109.968 04 

11,067,886 00 

139,749,918 27 


$ 20,460,000 00' $ 2,660,000 00 

20,019,948 04; 7,859,985 00 

12,849,740 00 1,281,906 00 

148,384,696 66| 8,634,777 28 




Surplus 




Circulation 




Deposits 








Total 


$180,877,716 81 


1201,204,388 69 $ 20,326,667 28 





Comparative Condensed Statements of Trust Companies. 





December 
1901. 


December 
1902. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


RSSOURCBS— 

Loans 


$ 60,201,026 91 

17,809,170 21 

1,921,989 36 

13,468,694 92 


$ 66,999,499 29 

23,867,832 10 

8,336,663 09 

12,404,148 81 

$ 106,608,143 29 


S 16,796,478 88 
6,068,661 89 
1,414,678 74 




Bonds and Stocks. 




Real Est. and Fixtures. 
Casn and Exchange. . . 


2 i. 064.646' ii 






Total 


$ 83,400,880 89 


$ 28,271,809 01 


$ 1,064,646 11 


lilABILITIES— 

Canital 


8 14.626.000 00 t 20.365.800 00 


$ 6,740,800 00 
9,461, b28 67 
7,014,639 83 




Sumlus 


14,663,007 37 
64,122,878 02 


24,104,880 94 
61,137,612 36 




DcDoslts. etc. 








Total 


$ 83,400,880 39 


$ 106,608,148 29 


S 22,207,262 90 





Banks and Trust Companies Combined. 



Bksources— 

Loans 

Bonds and Stocks. . . 

Real Estate 

Cash and Exchange. 



Total 



LlABIIilTIBS— 

Capital 

Surplus 

Circulation... 
Deposits, etc. 



Total. 



December, 
1901. 



December, 
1902. 



Increase. 



$ 166,675,649 48 

42,080,380 62 

8,431,127 00 

62,091,439 70 



$ 264,278,696 70 



$ 187,863,978 86$ 
61,138,187 49 
4,777.840 27 
68,083,070 77 



$ 806,812,626 88 



81,188,828 87 

9,067,766 97 

1,846,218 27 

941,631 07 



$ 42,688,980 18 



$ 82,626,000 00 

26,812,970 41 

11,067,836 00 

198,872,791 29 



$ 264,278,696 70 



$ 40,816,800 001$ 8,290,800 00 
44,124,778 98 17,311,808 67 



12,849,740 00 
209,622,207 90 



$ 1(06,812,626 88 



1,281,906 00 
16,649,416 61 



$ 42,638,980 18 



Dividends Paid Shareholders 1901 and 1902. 



1901. 

Banks $1,624,000 00 

Trust Companies 1,080,000 00 



1902. 
$1,978,000 00 
1,680,000 00 



$2,604,000 00 



$8,608,000 00 



THE OFFT OF 8T. L00I8. 



CLEARING-HOUSE STATISTICS. 



ANMTTAI, CLEABINOB SINCE 



Tear. 


AiDomt. 


T«^. 


Amoniit. 


Yeu. AiDODtit. 




: S S 

i 1 

: n « 

. M OB 


in 


■ ■* 1 


80 

1 


ISffl 








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... a 


1998 




ISS9 

E::::::. 


;;;i;i 

















COHPABISOH OF THE YXABS 1673 AND 1903. 



In the year Itm, Cberewere: 

ti Hemben ot the Clesrtng 1 
IT Banks, clearing throuRb I 
5S Total number of Banks . . 



Capital 

and Hurptus. 



In the year 19D1, there were : 

U Hembeis of the Clearing House, and 

n Banks and Tragi Co.'s clearing through n. 



W Total nnmberofBanlis and Trust Oo.'b. 



CLEAEING-H0U8E STATEMENT. 
Bdsihxss fob ths Yeabs 1898, 1899, ISOO, 1901 axd 190a. 



Janoary..., 
Fabmarr . . 
KarehL..... 

April 

J^^. 

Jnlj '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

SepeamliiBr . 

October 

Kovember . 



,4M t],na,«sii,ai« c,«e.8M,s3o 



M TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES, 190a. 



By Ohas. E. Ware. Secretary St. Louis Manaf actorers AssoclatLon. 



The growth of St. Louis manufacturing for the past year has been much 
more than normal. All of the plants in existence prior to the year have 
increased their capacity, and many of them almost doubled it. As nearly 
as it is possible to obtain figures without an accurate census^ St. Louis 
proper at present has about 6,959 factories; large and small; and employs 
100,000 persons. The annual pajrroU amounting to very nearly $15^000,000. 
The value of the product of these factories will approximate $325,000,000. 
There should be added to this the factories on the opposite side of the 
river, in Venice, Madison and Granite City, by reason of the capital invested 
in them and the interlocking with manufacturing interests in St. Louis. 
These factories employ over 5,000 workmen; and pay $3,000,000 per year in 
wages; and produce nearly $20,000,000. The same can also be claimed in 
regard to East St. Louis factories, which employ nearly 10,000 persons, and 
pay out in salaries about $6,000,000, producing between $30,000,000 and 
$40,000,000 worth of product. 

Several very extensive new lines of manufacturing have been established 
in St. Louis, during the year; notably one of the most complete and 
modem cement plants in the United States, fully equipped with the latest 
improved machinery, and with a capacity of over 1,500 barrels of the finest 
Portland cement per day. The mill is constructed with a view of doubling 
the capacity of the plant at relatively small cost. The erection of this 
plant in St. Louis has added over $1,000,000 to the industrial investments, 
and the fact that in close proximity the very finest limestone and shale for 
the manufacture of Portland cement is found in the suburbs of St. Louis, 
makes it possible to produce the most excellent quality of cement at the 
very lowest cost of production. In connection with the plant great storage 
houses have been constructed, capable of storing 160,000 barrels at a time, 
and as Portland cement is improved by ageing, this will be of great 
advantage. 

Another immense industrial plant established in St. Louis, or rather In 
its suburbs, is located at Valley Park, and is for the production of fine plate 
glass. The plant is one of the largest in the world. The necessary material 
for manufacturing glass is found in the immediate vicinity. Tliis plant will 
produce the largest sizes of fine plate glass at an expense of about one -half 
of the former cost of producing such plates. It will employ over 1,000 
persons, and a model industrial town is being built around it. Over 
$1,500^000 capital is invested in the glass plant and the other industries 
connected with it. 



THX OITT 07 ST. LOUIS. 56 

These; with the other great industries, are the direct result of the supe- 
rior railroad facilities that are now being arranged or constructed for 
St Louis. The inner railroad belt entirely around the city within the city 
limits, has opened up new territory that can be obtained at reasonable 
prices, and with every city convenience possible for manufacturing pur- 
poses. And the outer belt around the city, and about three or four miles 
west of the limits, offers the finest facilities for immense plants similar to 
the glass plant above mentioned. These railroad improvements will all be 
completed within the next year or eighteen months, and will give the 
manufacturing industries cheap and ample shipping and receiving facilities. 

Many new manufacturing companies have been organized within the 
past few months, and plants are being constructed, or will be finished 
during the next year. A new steel company has commenced operations at 
Granite City, with an investment of $1,000,000^ and employing over 800 
men^ and the plant is to be doubled during the year. 

New packing houses are being erected in East St. Louis, and are very 
nearly completed, representing an investment of (S^OOO^OOO, and requiring 
the services of 2,000 additional men. 

It is proposed to build an enormous boiler and locomotive works at 
Granite City^ and the plans are almost completed^ which will add over 
$1^000,000 to the capital already invested there in manufacturing industries^ 
and will employ 1,000 mechanics. 

It is impossible to give statistical figures that are entirely accurate; but 
the following may be taken as a close approximate of the present industrial 
condition of St. Louis and its immediate suburbs : 

In St. Louis- 
Factories in operation January Ist, 1908 6,969 

Employes 98,914 

Wages paid $ 68,715,826.00 

Value of product, estimated 887,689,000.00 

In Yenioe, Madison and Granite City— 

Factories in operation January 1st, 1908. ... 11 

Employes 6,200 

Wages paid $ 2,200,000.00 

Value of product, estimated 17,000,000.00 

In East St. Louis- 
Factories in operation January Ist, 1908 186 

Employes 9,625 

Wages paid $ 6,876,000.00 

Value of product, estimated 86,000,000.00 

Total- 
Number of Factories 7,166 

Employes 118,789 

Wages paid $61,280,826.00 

Value of product, estimated 889,689,000.00 

The rapid growth of agricultural industries in territory surrounding 
St. Louis, particularly in Arkansas, Indian Territory and Oklahoma, should 



56 TBADB AND OOHMBBOB OF 

suggest to the manufacturers of all classes of agricultural machinery, the 
advantages of this point for the location of immense plants. St. Louis will 
be the greatest distributing center in the United States within a few years 
for every class of manufactured goods^ and can offer the greatest advantages 
to manufacturers to locate their plants here. 

Every line of business was greater during 1902 than any year in the 
history of St. Louis^ and the outlook for 1903 promises still more expansion 
and success. 



REAL ESTATE. 

From the Annual Beport of Sidsst Bghiblb, Assistant Secretary 

St. Louis Beal Estate Exchange. 



The record of the real estate business of St Louis, during the year just 
closed, is one which can be contemplated with much satisfaction. The 
year has, all things considered, been better than that of 1901, as the sta- 
tistics accompanying this report will verify. Transfers were greater in 
number and the aggregate value recorded was about ten million dollars 
more in 1902 than was recorded in the year previous. The character of 
the property sold also affords food for study. The home buyer, the pur- 
chaser of small lots for improvement, as well as investors for permanant 
investment or speculation were much in evidence, and although the real 
estate business was not equal to the expectations of some of the members of 
the Exchange, it is admitted that the increase in transfers and general 
inquiry shows a healthy growth and a much larger business and a more 
active market is predicted by all for the coming year. 

BAILBOADS AS REALTT BUYERS. 

The feature of the year from a real estate standpoint was the entrance 
of railroad companies into the real estate market, who, seeing the future of 
the city and the advantages of St. Louis as a terminal point, have been 
large buyers of property. Quoting from the last annual real estate review 
in these columns : '* St. Louis is receiving more attention at the hands of 
the transportation interests. Switching facilities are being enlarged, yards 
laid out, terminals amplified and belt lines constructed and under way to 
meet the needs for the concentration of and rapid handling of freight, so 
necessary to the manufacturer, merchant and shipper. The wholesale 
jobbing interests have during the past year turned their attention more 
assiduously to these needs. ^^ 

It is not an idle phrophecy, judging from the buying that has already 

been done, to say that the railroads will have invested in St. Louis realty, 

several million dollars within the next twelve or eighteen months — and 

money paid to property owners by railroad companies ffeneally stays in tliis 
class of investment. It is reinvested in real estate, tnereby admng tilat 

much more capital to the building up and beautifying of the city. 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 67 

The Bock Island; Wabash, Btirlingtoii; Keokuk, Termmal Railroad 
Association and other railroad companies have been liberal purchasers. 

With the entry of the railroads into the St. Louis real estate market the 
advent of a formidable group of buyers has put new life into this class of 
proi>erty. A new inquiry has been started on the East, Korth and South 
sides, for enlarged yards near Union Station, for wider facilities along the 
right of way of the Belt Line and for properties along the river front, from 
the Ctiain of Bocks to Jefferson Barracks. 

Millions of dollars are being expended by the railroads, and their 
schemes of enlargement in St. Louis and the appropriations announced 
have already had a material effect in enhancing values of real estate and 
causing a westward trend among the business houses east of Second street 
now obliged to seek new quarters. 

One of the first noticeable effects of the movement from the river is the 
demand for sites for wholesale houses and manufactories between the river 
and Twelfth street, from Chouteau to Cass avenues, and for renting 
hitherto unused structures, which from lack of repairs or for other reasons 
have been allowed to remain vacant until the new and sudden demand 
sprung up. The-late-in-the-year revival, due to the railroads buying, is 
indeed one of the striking features of the closing days of 1902. 

Studying local conditions, prospectively, these immense interests with 
steel, stone, brick and mortar have planned to secure yard room, switching 
facilities, office room and freight stations beyond the limits set by the 
prophets. The East end will see grand old buildings wrecked to make 
room for the needs and requirements of these railroads, anxious to secure 
an entrance to St. Louis. As newer districts are opened up, the older ones 
will be rebuilt, following in due course, the general expansion. These 
changes necessitate the acquirement of much additional property, all 
indicating a systematic and thorough movement pointing to the develop- 
ment of a city of over a million people; St. Louis is the gate-way to the 
great Southwest, and its strides are daily becoming more apparent. 

TRAN9FSB8. 

The transfers for the year 1902 aggregate $45,123,136; those of 1901 
show an aggregate of $34,265,480, the increase over last year being 

$10,857,655. 

Namber. Value. 

January 672 $ 8,224,870 

February 696 4,361,141 

March 697 3,046,018 

April 863 2,817,826 

May 922 4,162,860 

June 849 8,002,286 

July 946 8,698,496 

August 719 8,572,472 

September 812 2,008,218 

October 903 4,829,381 

November 886 2,681,709 

December 767 8,224,668 

Totals 9,671 $46,123,186 



T&ADS JlKD COHmBCE OP 



The renUl muket has eioelled Ita record of ihe prerions year. Renting 
has been unuenally good and ttaoagh tenants found more dwellings and 
flaU to suit Uietr needs tban in the year previous (as a great number of 
such Btractures were erected during the year), the demand still exceeds the 
supply. When dwellings were In good rep^ no trouble was exi)erlenced 
in keeping them tenanted. Hoderate -sized dwellings are still scarce, but 
building permits for this class of houses are being issued in numbers that 
will no doubt supply the demand during the coming year. 

Noteworthy as showing with what sturdy strides has been the advance 
In business property, has been the orgajiization of several companies 
expressly for the purpose of buying or leasing and Improving comers In 
the business district. Men known for their sagacity as Investors have 
taken freely of stock in close corporations formed with the idea of control- 
ling eligible comers and Improying them with modern structures, to be 
leased out at rentals based on Increasing worth, year by year. 

Tenants have been found for most of these structures before completion. 
They have kept apace with the builders, anxious to add to the permanent 
improvement of the business center of St. Louis — the section between 
Eighteenth, Franklin and Chouteau avenues and the river. The avidity 
with which all vacant property In this area has been taken up of late, 
especially that close to the railroads and on the main avenues of commerce, 
shows the confidence that abides in those who find real estate the surest of 
investments. 

BDILDDIQ OFBBATIOMS. 

Over 1,400 brick and over 1,600 frame houses were erected in 1903. 
That they represent a listed cost of over $12,000,000 gives an approxlmatf on 
of the amount of building rolled ap to the credit of St. Louis. As is well 
known, permits are based on first estimates and represent much short of the 
EtctUBl value of the premises which they are designed to cover. 

THK NEW F08T0FFICK. 

One of the big enterprises projected is one in which the United States 
Government will be the buyer of really. A new postofflce structure, repre- 
senting an investment of $500,000 will be reared in the vicinity of the Union 
Station. Several sites have been offered and as soon as the preliminaries 
have been completed, this important addition to the city's public buildings, 
and one showing Indisputably the growth of St Louis, will lend additional 
dlgnll^ to that busy section of the city. 

NEED FOB HOTELS. 

One of the greatest problems of the year— and one which has been 
emphasized in oral and printed speeches— has been the planning and con- 
straction of hotels. 

Favored for hotel sites are the districts near Forest Park, the main center 
thoroughfares like Grand avenue and Elngshfghway, the districts near the 



THE OTTY OP ST. LOUIS. 50 

retail, wbolesale and jobbing center. A dozen eligible downtown comers 
haye been discussed for hotel purposes, some with theatre enterprises 
joined. The dlfiQculty In getting steel, has, the promoters say, retarded 
many plans, though the advices Indicating enlargement of steel plants to 
meet the extraordinary growth of orders, give hope that steel contracts can 
be carried out In a way to encourage builders who wish to get quick action 
on their enterprises. 

The demand for hotels Is not essentially a World^s Fair necessity. A 
local growing need for more rooms has existed for seyeral years, due to the 
eyer-increaslng visits of traveling men, merchants and buyers, tourists and 
the tendency among some classes to prefer hotels and apartment houses for 
resldental purposes. 

In the past St. Louis has been known as the city of homes, which, like 
Philadelphia, takes pride In Its thousands of dwellings, modest or preten- 
tious, with none of the cramped, yardless street fronts so characteristic of 
many Eastern cities. 

The demand will, however, from all Indications be met promptly and 
efficiently since St. Loulsans have come out boldly and announced their 
intention of erecting a number of hostelries. 

A88B8SM3ENTS. 

The assessed values of all real estate this year is much larger than any 
previous year in the city^s history. As a matter of course, therefore, the 
revenue from taxation for all purposes will be greater in the next twelve 
months than ever before. 

Assessed values of all properties, as determined by the local and State 
Boards of Equalization, aggregate nearly $500,000,000; that is $418,044,475, 
as compared to $394,722,704, the aggregate of a year ago, or an increase of 
$23,321,771 for 1902. 

At the rate of $1.95 on the $100 valuation the State, public schools and 
municipality will derive an income on the newly-established values of 
$8,131,085. The following table shows the assessments since 1877 : 

1877 $160,498,000 

1880 181,345,000 

1886 207,910,000 

1890 284,827,000 

1895 326,533,000 

1897 338,882,000 

1898 361,616,660 

1899 874,608,490 

1900 380,772,280 

1901 394,796,700 

1902 418,044,476 

THE WORliD^S FAIR. 

As month by month the World^s Fair draws nearer, the immensity of 
the undertaking and its importance to St. Louis becomes more apparent, 
and calls for renewed efforts on the part of St. Loulsans in the work of 



00 TKADS AKD COUMEBGE OF 

prepuednesB. The work so far accompliebed has bees prodlg^oas and baf 
called for favorable comment from all parts of the conntrr. Yet the taak it 
only well underway, and nnlted and effective endeavor is needed to pnt the 
olty In ehspe for the reception of the hundredB of thousands of visitors 
who will come here during the next two years. 

Hnch has been done in the way of civic improvement; the enlarge- 
ment of city invtitutions, the general planting of trees and the regulation 
of emoke baa called for the best thought on the part of those who have the 
public welfare in band. 

The Fair has so far brought much outside capital to St. Louis and a 
large Influx of foreign visitors. It has created new views and new judg- 
ment on Oie trend of improvement, because each heavy investmeni 
represents a stated amount of confidence and has induced others to pledge 
their judgment for profit on the outlook. In reality the force of example 
is strong and whenever a new structure la put up history shows that It has 
been followed in rapid succession by others, as though money wanted such 
encouragement. Co-operation Is a prime factor in really investments. 

To all Inquiries, and they have come from home and abroad — the 
officials of the Exchange have sent prompt and explicit data, and on file 
are many letters showing how widespread has the fame of St. IiOuis lieoome 
through the Influence of the Fair. 

INFLCEMCK OF THB BXCHANSB. 

The hold which the St. Louis Beal Estate Exchange has upon the com- 
munity and upon the membership has been strengthened by the manifest 
value to the city of the organized interests represented therein. One of the 
most effective steps taken to improve the interests which the Exchange 
stands over as a conservator, is the practice of having sales of realty, hith- 
erto held at the Court House door, held on the floor of the Exchange. The 
custom has been found so much of an improvement over the old way that 
It is believed It will be the vogue entirely tiefore long. Buyers and selleis 
have at their disposal, free of charge, the Exchange, with rostrum and 
telephone facllitiee and the advantage of nearness to the heart of the real 
eetat« district. It has been noted that this in iUelf adds to the number of 
bidders and the keenness of the competition. 



THE SHOE TRADE. 

From the Shoe and JJeather Qaiebw. 

The year's business In the St. Louis wholesale shoe district has been 
highly satisfactory, and In spite of the untoward prospects of a year ago, 
shipments were almost 8^ above the former high water mark, which was 
set by the trade in 1901. 

The great Impetus given to local shoe manufacturing can be judged 
from the fact that while receipts of shoes In St. Iiouls from outside points 



THE OITY OF ST. LOUIS. 61 

fell off about 260^000 cases In 1902^ as compared with 1901, the outgoing 
shipments were 80^281 cases ahead of the record of 1901. The trade was 
supplied with a much larger proportion of St. Louis made shoes. 

The records of the Merchants' Exchange show the following figures of 
shipments for each month of the two years last past : 

OASBS. 

1901. 1902. 

January 84,881 98,986 

February 86,144 84,686 

March 96,482 94,680 

April 89,063 92,446 

May 89,524 96,186 

June 88,670 97,616 

July 82,629 99,204 

August 87,662 102,996 

September 89,466 103,744 

October 96,940 103,494 

November. 89,290 86,646 

December 93,010 95,904 

Total 1,070,960 1,161,231 

Increase 80,281 

Only three months in the year failed to show a gain in shipments com- 
pared with 1901. 

That shipments for the year have made such a gain is particularly a mat- 
ter of felicitation with the St. Louis houses when it is considered that the 
effects of extreme drought of 1901 naturally projected themselves into the 
early part of 1902^ and were reflected in business conditions in a portion of 
the country in which St. Louis is almost centrally located^ and where her 
shoe trade is especially strong. Many retail merchants were very much 
" down in the mouth " a year ago, and the big crops of this year were 
needed to restore the equilibrium of retail trade. 

That the rapid increase in local manufacturing facilities has had a pow- 
erful influence on the receipts department of the Merchants' Exchange 
records of shoes, is apparent from a comparison of the differences between 
1901 and 1902. It is of course impossible to get an exact comparison, 
because the comparative state of stocks held in the wholesale houses cannot 
be gotten at. 

However, the gap between a shortage of 250,000 cases in receipts from 
outside, and an increase of 80,000 cases in total shipments out of St. Louis, 
is big enough to cover all probable decrease in stocks (if there is any) and 
to still leave thousands of cases — several millions of pairs, — that can be 
credited to increased local manufacture. 

This decrease in receipts from outside has a direct connection with the 
decrease in shipments from Boston, of which shoe supplying center 
St. Louis has been the largest individual customer. 

Not all the shoes which reach St. Louis from outside sources come from 
the Boston district. Several new manufacturing centers have become 



02 TRADB AND COMMSBOS 07 

prominent in furnishing a supply of those shoes which comprise the job- 
bing shipments. 

The shipments to points outside the United States continue to increase^ 
although they cannot be presented in tabulated form. Especially in Mex- 
ico and the West Indies have local firms pushed American shoes. Condi- 
tions of exchange are an impediment, to some degree, but this trouble is 
likely to be diminished in time. 



ST. LOUIS IMPLEMENT AND VEHICLE TRADE IN 190a. 

From Farm Machinery and Vehicle Trade. 



The year now closing will be memorable for the large volume of business 
transacted by St. Louis houses engaged in the manufacture and sale of 
implements and vehicles. They havC; as a rule, participated to the fullest 
extent in the general prosperity and trade activity with which the country 
has been blessed and though they encountered a few factors, as is the case 
every year, that militated against perfect results, the outcome of business 
for 1902 is considered eminently satisfactory. 

Owing to the prolonged drouth during the summer of 1901 in Missouri 
and other sections tributary to this market, a large number of dealers in 
the St. Louis territory last year curtailed seriously their purchases of 
implements and vehicles— especially the latter, and the advent of 1902 found 
their stocks extremely depleted. With the opening of the present year, 
favorable weather conditions encouraged the planting of heavy crops in the 
regions that had suffered from lack of rain in the previous summer. The 
farmers, notwithstanding losses and disappointment resulting from the 
drouth alluded to, commenced early and vigorous preparations this year to 
recover lost ground. This stimulated the demand for such farming tools 
as are required in the preliminary stages of agricultural operations — ^such 
as plows, seeders and harrows. As the season advanced and the growing 
crops gave promise of a boimtiful yield, there arose an exceptionally grati- 
fying call for other kinds of implements needed in cultivating and in 
preparing the crops for harvesting. This was succeeded by heavy orders 
for machines that handle the crops in the last stages and finally ^e local 
establishments were called upon for extensive shipments of grinding and 
feed mills, com buskers, fodder shredders and goods of a similar character. 

In the meanwhile there was unusual animation in the movement of farm 
wagons, threshing outfits, gasoline and traction engines and heavy agri- 
cultural machinery in general. In the latter class of merchandise some 
houses report gains of 30 to 40% over the business of any preceding year. 

As a market for implements and vehicles, St. Louis continues to advance 
in importance and there are many indications that increasing patronage in 
these lines will flow here with each succeeding year. The annual St. Louis 



THS 0IT7 07 ST. LOXHS. 63 

Fair^ held last October, served to attract an unusual number of prominent 
exhibitorB of farming appliances, and many vebicle and implement dealers 
likewise displayed their interest in St. Louis and the Fair by attending in 
large numbers. The closing week of the year is marked by a large influx 
of dealers, who are visiting this city in response to invitations extended to 
them by the local houses. Their presence and the courtesies shown them 
will result in lasting benefit in a business way. 



PAINTS, OILS AND DRUGS. 

By Abthub Davis, Secretary St. Louis Paint, Oil and Drug Olub. 



Regarding the year just closed, the general prosperity of the industries 
of the country has been participated in by those engaged in manufacturing 
and jobbing paints, oils and drugs. The business may be summed up as 
generally satisfactory. Demand has not been extraordinarily heavy, but 
prices have remahied firm and the entire tone of the trade healthy. Taking 
all things into consideration it is really surprising how great a volume of 
business has been done in the staples like white lead, zinc, oils, etc., and 
all at top prices. In some lines there has been actual difficulty in filling 
orders, owing to the fact that stocks were heavily drawn upon during the 
summer months, and the problem of transportation has been uncertain. 
Strikes among the painters in St. Louis effected trade for weeks during the 
active paint season in St. Louis in the spring. There has been littie or no 
complaints as to orders, profits or collections, though the amount of money 
hi circulation seems to be less than the legitimate need of business 
requirements. 

The demand for the higher grades of paints during the past year has 
been unprecedented, showing conclusively that the inferior grades of paint 
are not considered profitable or desirable by the general public. Prices for 
higher grade have been $1.26 to $1.35 per gallon to the dealer. 

The volume of business for the year in white lead has been large, and 
the manufacturers have had all they could do to supply the demand. Since 
December 1901, the price has remained without change, namely, 6 cents 
per pound for 600 pound lots, and J4 cent rebate to buyers of 12 tons or 
over. The steadiness of the market is largely accounted for by the price 
of crude material, pig lead. 

Pure Linseed Oil, which is an important factor in the paint business 
remained steady from June to July, viz : From 69 to 61 cents per gallon, 
but declined since August 1st, ruling in August about 67 to 60 cents; 
September, 60 to 66 cents; October, 43 to 46 cents; November, 43 to 46 
cents ; December, 46 to 46 cents. These quotations are in barrels and are 
higher than in previous years. Less adulterated oil has been used the past 



64 TRADE AND OOMMEBCE OF 

year than prevloasly, and the vice of adulteration in this article has been 
fought earnestly. The volume of business in drugs has been of good pro- 
portion, the market prices have been firm and there has been a very fair 
consuming outlet throughout the year. 



STOVES AND HARDWARE. 

From Stores and Hardware Reporter. 



STOTBS AND RANGES. 

The stove business of the past year cannot be said by even the most 
pessimistic to have been othar than good. Some of the stove men of the 
great center of western trade — St. Louis — declare that it is the best that 
has ever been known. This is probably true as to volume, though one of 
the highest authorities among stove manufacturers, possessing keenest 
judgment and forsight, but with a strong leaning to the conservative side, 
characterizes it by the happy expression : **A normal year among good 
years.'' Taking the general run of the retail trade the stove business has 
been more profitable to the dealer than to the manufacturer or jobber. 
The advance in prices during the year, aggregating about 15%, has not 
been equal to the advance in cost of materials and labor. 

Novelties of any account there were none. In fact American ranges, 
BtoveS; heaters and furnaces have reached a stage so near perfection that 
only very minor changes and improvements can be expected. 

There was a considerable increase in the exportation of stoves and 
ranges. The conclusion of the war in South Africa brought a large 
demand from that country. There was too an increase in the export to 
England and also to Germany, which latter could hardly have been 
expected, remembering the trade depression existing in that country, but 
the American range and heater have taken a firm hold upon the regard of 
Germans. Three winters ago we visited the G^rmania Museum at Nuer- 
emberg, this contains a unique and most extensive collection of the famous 
German tile stoves, but the only stoves we saw in use to warm the place, 
were some American cast iron heaters, with the name of a well known 
American manufacturer prominently displayed on the castings. 

HARDWARE. 

The hardware trade shared fully in the prosperity of the country, up to 
the very last week of the year. In point of fact the business in December, 
which is usually weak, on account of holidays, was greater than in Novem- 
ber. The volume of business has been greater in 1902 than in any preced- 
ing year. This applies to all the subdivlBions, such as wire, nails, etc., 
and prices have been very firm with the exception of some lines that have 
been ^^ controlled '' and reductions were made, presumably for the pur- 
pose of crushing competition. There was an increased demand from 
foreign markets for many of our specialties, such as ornamental metal 
work, locks, candlesticks, wire cloth, etc. 



< THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 65 

DRY GOODS AND KINDRED LINES. 

From the Drygoodsman and General Merchant. 



DBT GOODS. 

The wholesale dry goods trade of 8t. Louis has f ally retained the in- 
crease recorded in previous years, and added a good percentage in the year 
1902, the increase being estimated from 20 to 25% over that of 1901, making 
a total output somewhere between $120^000,000 and $126,000,000. 

A number of establishments found It necessary to increase their selling 
space and warehouse accommodations^ new buildings have been completed, 
and others are now under construction to accommodate the growing needs^ 
thus showing in a most substantial manner the growth of the trade and 
the confidence in its ability to maintain and increase previous business. 

The supremacy of the market in the territory now covered by the 
wholesale dry goods trade of St. Louis has been, if anything, more firmly 
established. 

The advance orders already booked by the wholesale dry goods trade 
for delivery during the spring months for 1903, are the largest in volume 
ever recorded, thus indicating a healthy demand that will no doubt con- 
tinue well into the year, when the prospects of another harvest will become 
a factor for future operations. A larger volume of business for the first 
half of 1903 may with confidence be looked for than was had in the first 
half of 1902, which was to some extend affected by the drought of 1901. 

HATS AND OAFS. 

Reviewing the trade during the past twelve months, its chief and pecu- 
liar feature has been a tendency to the introduction of marked and odd 
styles in head-wear, which has rendered necessary exceeding caution upon 
the part of all users of hats from the factory to the consumer. These 
styles are rapidly developing other ** freak '^ ideas, to the end that it is 
almost impossible to anticipate the tendency of fashion. 

The demand for high-grade goods is constantly growing, and a stan- 
dard of quality is insisted upon as a result of healthy trade conditions and 
an abundance of money. The Panama hat was a sort of barometer 
explaining these conditions, and the demand for these hats at unheard-of 
prices illustrated the tendency of the times. 

All conditions have been fully satisfied as a result of the yearns work in 
the hat and cap trade. Progress is being rapidly made in the development 
of local factories, and the production of silk hats, opera hatS; novelties in 
caps, etc., has been a feature of the year's business. 

MILLINEBT. 

Reviewing the wholesale millinery trade of St. Louis for the year 1902, 
I take pleasure in making the statement that 1902 has been a prosperous 
year with the millinery jobbers, and that the volume of business^ aggre- 
gating many millions, was largely augmented during the past year. 



TBADI AKD OOlOaBOl QT 

The trend of the wholesale millineiy bnainess dniing the year 1903 was 
favorable to St. Louis market, its enlargement, territorial extenBion, and 
the friendly dispoBition on the part of the trade towards St. Louis. The 
St. Louis millinery jobbers affiliated harmoniously for the advanoement of 
their marlcet, and having wisely eliminated the oosUy evils and abuses of 
the days gone by, have placed the wholesale millinery business squarely 
on a modem basis, '^the best value for the least money,'^ and with enlarged 
stocks and greater facilities to quickly distribute the choicest articles of 
fashion over the vast territories have made it possible for St. Louis to 
become so great a factor in the distribution of millinery, second to none 
among the leading markets of our country. 

CLOAKS. 

With the close of the past year the St. Louis cloak market wound up a 
season of unprecedented activity, which placed it in the front rank of 
manufacturing and distributing centers. Styles were closely studied and 
no market in the country showed a wider range. Quality was the first 
consideration, and the highest standard possible for popular priced gar- 
ments was attained. 

The trade that flowed into the city through natural channels was greatly 
increased by the number of new buyers that visited this market. The sum 
total of the year's business was augmented in no small way by the success- 
ful invasion of territory formerly not considered commercially ours. 

The extremely satisfactory condition in which we find ourselves at the 
close of the year's business stimulates our every effort for the season that 
is to come. Preparations for the spring business are on a greater scale 
than ever attempted heretofore, and with last year as a criterion the trade 
can look to this market for a fulfillment of its future wants with assurance 
and confidence. 



GROCERIES. 

By BOBBBT B. ham. Editor Interstate Qrooer. 



St. Louis has had an unusually successful year in groceries. This is 
due to two conditions, one of which is common to all interests located in 
this market. That one is the general prosperity that has been felt to a 
larger degree in the West than in any other section of the United States. 
It is a patent fact that the necessaries of life are the first to feel the effects 
of depressions and prosperous periods as well. That is to say, people 
never stop eating hog and hominy, and in times of depression they eat 
largely of these staples so famed in prose and poetry. But, in such times, 
they do not eat of olives and pate de foie gras with truffles. The year 1902 
was a year of olives and pate de foie gras with truffles. There were more 



«Hi ennr ot or. Loms. 87 

flue groosilefl sold Is ihe jear jnit olocied than slnoe ld9d, w&ieii wa« a 
year of pro«perltf . 

Tife otlier reaaoii for the biereaM of sale* of food j^odtrcti from the 
St. Louis market during 190d» was the fact that the wholesalers have been 
pirtttng rtrenneus efforts forth to make this the leading grocery market of 
the world. 

It is a well known fact that St. Louis still has too many wholesale 
houses in the groeery line for the volume of business transacted from here. 
This condition contributes to make St. Louis the cheapest grocery market 
in the world. The more than fierce competition for trade leads the com- 
batants to put prices at the lowest possible figure, and the retailers in the 
sorronnding territory get the benefit. 

These conditions are, in a measure, beginning to right themselves. On 
the last of the year two of the largest wholesale grocery houses in the city 
were merged into one, the combined capitalization being put into the new 
business. Within a few weeks there will be another combination that will 
merge two or three of the well known German houses into one. There 
have within four years treen a dozen consolidations of this kind which 
Ittve reduced the number of wholesale grocery houses from fifty to a bare 
twenty-nine. 

The volume of business handled by the St. Louis grocery market is 
much greater than during 1901, and the prospects for the coming year are 
that a still greater amount of business wiU come to the World's Fair dty. 
The statistics that are given are taken from the records of the St. Louis 
Merchants' Exchange. 

SUGABS. 

Receipts— Hhds. Bbls. Bags. Shipment»— Hhds. Bbls. Bags. 

IfiOS 196 468,910 611,900 118 966,919 816,768 

UNn 968 466,246 684,616 818 288,787 824,006 

1900 671 498,879 490.190 ... 861,217 466,780 

1899 697 488,786 668,406 80 848,764 666,886 

1898 728 472,990 670,940 667 842,828 699,917 

Sugars are not shipped in hogsheads in these days, hence the decrease. 
There was also a slight falling off, due to the fact that there was little 
home canning of fruits during the year, owing to the scarcity of small 
fruits. The heavily increased city business in St. Louis has taken up a 
considerable quanti^ of sugar. 

COFFBBS. 

Beceipts— Bags. Pkgs. Shipments— Bags and Pkgs. 

1902 882,266 120,868 628,816 

1901 874,676 188,840 608,366 

190^ 860,871 72,919 664.440 

1899 990,700 406,808 

1896 974,928 866,168 

St Louis has become a great distributing point for coffee, and houses 
here are now shipping green coffee to the East and to the West of here. 



68 



TRADE AND OOlfMEBOE OF 



There has be«ii a slight falling off in receipts of coffee, due to the large 
oarry-oyer from the previous year, which was due in turn to the very un- 
settled state of the coffee market at primaiy points. Coffees have shown 
a bear tendency throughout the year, with prospects ahead for still lower 
prices for the coming year. The shipments of coffee show a marked 
increase. 

MOLA88ES AND STRUPS. 

Receipts— Bbls. 

1902 61,604 

1901 54,990 

1900 80,970 

1899 40,098 

1898 28,640 

The year showed an increase of 10,000 barrels in receipts of syrups and 
molasses. These goods are not shipped to primary markets in kegs, but 
are so divided here, hence the falling off in kegs. The shipments show a 
satisfactory increase, and no account is taken in them of the immense 
quantity of these goods that are shipped out^ after repacking, in small 
cans packed in cases of two dozen each, and which are reported to the 
Merchants* Exchange as *' canned goods.*' 



Kegs. 


Shipments— 


Bbls. 


Kegs. 


825 




134,046 


88,800 


1,940 




138,177 


48,832 


680 




150,406 


48,726 


2,505 




178,655 


114,862 


1,148 




121,853 


118,255 



RICE. 



Receipts— Bags and Bbls. 

1902 196,575 

1901 178,580 

1900 119,618 

1899 163,105 

1898 127,275 



Shipments-^ 



Bags and Bbls. 
228,498 
142,947 
102,634 
112,497 
87,477 



There was a considerable carry-over of rice from 1900, but the figures 
here given show an increase. The shipments, it will be seen, are largely 
increased. This is owing to the campaign of education that the rice 
growers are pursuing, which is wonderfully increasing the consumption of 
this staple. St. Louis is feeling the effects of this as much as any city in 
the country. The figures show it. 

TEA. 

Receipts— Chests. 

1902 16,990 

1901 21,246 

1900 29,645 

1899 15,400 

There have been peculiar conditions in the tea , market this year. In 
July Congress removed the war tax of 10 cents a pound to take effect on 
January 1st. Owing to this buyers of tea were as close in their purchases 
as possible. In fact, at times, there was such a scarcity of tea as to en- 
danger a famine. Great quantities of tea were, however, stored in gov- 
ernment warehouses, and on January 1st, when the tax was removed, this 
was taken out and the 1903 report will show a remarkable increase in 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. GO 

receipts and in shipments as well. Tea prices are not much lower than 
before the remoTal of the tax, because prices have been put up in the 
primary markets and better grades are being imported. 

OEKKRAL LINES. 

There are no available figures on which a close estimate of the average 
percentage of increase can be based, but the estimate of well posted 
wholesalers is timely. They say that St. Louis during 1902 did from 20 to 
X% more business in groceries than during the previous year. The 
coming year should show better than this, for if there was ever a time 
-when the wholesale grocers of St. Louis have '^ hustled '* for old business 
in old territories and for new business in new territories it will be during 
the year 1903. 



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THB OITT OP ST. L0T7IS. 71 

FURNITURE. 

By Gsa T. Pabkbb, Secretery St. Louis Farnltare Board of Trade. 



The opening of the permanent Furniture Exposition in St. Louis, marks 
an era of progress in the business and is the most distinguishing feature of 
the year. Installed in a fine eight story buildings erected especially for the 
purpose at Thirteenth and Locust, St. Louis furniture interests take rank 
with New York, Chicago and Grand Bapids, magnifying more than ever 
before, the importance of St. Louis as the furniture market for the great 
Southwest. 

There has been a great development of business in new territory^ made 
tributary to St. Louis by the completion of new railroad systems, which 
has resulted in business having been transacted in a greater number of 
cities and over a greater area than ever before, although there are parts of 
this new territory which are almost unsettled, the introduction of St. Louis 
furniture there has been made, and the business will grow with the localities. 

The year of 1902 has been one of great activity in manufacturing, there 
has been no cessation. It has been a repetition of previous recent years, 
with improved machinery, bettered system resulting in enlarged production 
at a minimizing of expense. The building of new factories and extensions 
to old, have increased the facilities 20%, and these have all been of a per- 
manent character and not provided for a mere temporary use ; and the trade 
of the year develops that the output of many other large factories could 
find purchasers here, which now have to seek it in other localities. 

The quality at St. Louis made furniture, as shown by the Exposition 
Bxhibits, is a notable advance over the product of even a few years back, 
as are also the designs, crudities in both having been eliminated to supply 
the demands of the increased education of taste in the users. This citj 
should have more factories, the need of lines of the highest grades is 
apparent, though these are not the makers of great quantities, they are 
needed to perfect an otherwise almost complete assortment supplied by the 
St. Louis factories. The market is deficient in school, church and opera 
house furniture factories, for which there is an unusual opportunity for 
capital, with assured business. 

The sales through this market, including those of retail houses, goods 
sold here though manufactured at other points, are estimated at $33,000,000. 

All retail houses report an increasing demand for the better grades of 
both cabinet and upholstered furniture, a reflex of the prosperous condition 
of the surroaading country and in the city ; in consequence there never has 
been shown in St. Louis such an expensive stocks of goods as may to-day be 
found, nor are they excelled for variety and value in any United States city. 

The woods used in furniture manufacture are not changed from last 
year, mahogany having gained in popularity, bird's eye maple, curly 
birch and oak being the woods uAed in the best grades. Ash and poplar 
are used here in extensive quantities for cheaper grades. Metal beds have 



72 TRADE AND OOMMIBOE OF 

gained favor and are having a large sale. St LouIb continaes ttie great 
hardwood lumber market and supplies the cabinet woods — excepting 
mahogany — ^for not only this, but other furniture manufacturing centers. 
Prices have remained uniformly firm throughout the year, small advances 
being necessary on accoimt of the increased costs of lumber^ labor and 
materials entering into furniture construction. 

The completion of several fine trust office buildings has resulted in the 
installation of furnishings^ whose elegance is not excelled in this or other 
countries ; these expenditures have been very large and have inculcated a 
desire on the part of office men to abandon decrepit office outfits for those 
of modem convenience. Numerous new churches^ schools^ institutions and 
small hotels have, within the year been fitted up^ adding considerably to 
the aggregate of St. Louis business. 

The number of our factories are about 60, employing a capital of about 
$4,000^000. There have been no strikes among the 7,000 workmen whose 
wages it is estimated equals nearly $4,000,000. The export business shows 
a great expansion as to the localities reached, a large demand being from 
South Africa, Sweden, Japan, besides to the countries which have become 
a regular field for St. Louis trade. 



FORBIQN COMMERCE OP ST. LOUIS. 

BylJAMBS ABBUOKiiK, Manager Lathi- American Olub and Foreign Trade Assn. 



In compiling information regarding the foreign exports and imports of 
this city, it is difficult to procure statistics on many lines, and in present- 
ing this report we have to state that where we can furnish the figures we 
have done so, and in other cases given the best information obtainable. 

Shipments of our fiour to foreign countries, amounted in the aggregate 
in 1902, to 906,205 barrels. Of these were shipped to— 

Bariela. 

Great Britain 416,826 

TheContinent 166,807 

Seandlvania 48,609 

Mediterranean Ports 2,870 

Canada 9,870 

West Indies 180,664 

Central America 11,166 

South America 8,146 

South Africa 1,613 

Seaboard, for export 69,848 

Of wheat, St. Louis shipped by rail to the seaboard for export 3,672,860 
bushels. Com to the seaboard, including to Cuba, 269,912 bushels, 
amounting in all to 1,868,672 bushels, and of oats 207,603 bushels, by river 
to New Orleans 2,308,714 bushels wheat, 226,400 bushels com, 28,409 bushels 
oats, and rye 28,212 bushels. 



THE OITT OF ST. LOUIS. 73 

The following were the shipments of cotton to the nndemoted countries 
from this city, 264^376 hales in the aggregate : 

Bales. 

England 186,624 

Continent 66,684 

Canada 29,049 

Japan 88,110 

China 287 

Seahoard, for export 4,722 

There was exported in hond to various countries to the value of $489^486, 
a total of 660,296 gallons. Our heer goes to all countries in Latin- America, 
Philippines, Japan, China, Australia and South Africa, East Indies, and 
occasionally to France and England. St. Louis heer is highly appreciated 
everywhere that it is consumed, and will continue to he an important factor 
in cementing kind relations with all nations. One St. Louis hrewery alone 
made sales for the fiscal year ending September 30th, of 1,069,001 barrels, 
three-eighths of which, 279,801 barrels, was sold in bottles, which is equiva- 
lent to 83,790,300 bottles. 

LATIN-AMEBICAN TRADE. 

Our trade with the southern countries, except Mexico, has not come up 
to our sanguine expectations of a year ago. There are forcible reasons for 
this. Cuba has had adverse political conditions and low prices for her 
sugar, her main article of export, hence her buying power was curtailed. 
With Porto Rico and the other West Lidies we are largely increasing our 
trade. 

Mexico has had a low and declining price for her silver, the main pro- 
duct of her mountains and the basis of her monetary system, until an 
importer of goods into that country finds an almost prohibitory rate for 
gold exchange, and hence is virtually forced to stop ordering goods and 
the serious question arises how he is to pay his debts. With a reasonable 
rate of exchange that country would be a large buyer of our goods. We 
need hardly state that should silver acquire its old relative value, say 
approximately 200, there will be a much increased and active business with 
that republic immediately. Mexico within itself is prosperous, and the 
country is developing fast to higher conditions, and with more of the 
Anglo-Saxon element to push it along, we may look for great and phenom- 
enal development. Mexico, being our nearest neighbor, we naturally are 
more interested in that trade than any other country. 

We have steadily made headway, and from 1881, when the exports of 
the United States were only $11,000,000, they have increased up to 1902, 
nearly thirty millions. This has been largely at the expense of European 
countries, who have steadily lost ground, with the exception of Germany 
and Spain, and their increase has been very small, as compared with ours. 

There is an immense amount of American capital now invested in Mex- 
ico, some estimate as high as $400,000,000. This naturally influences con- 



74 TRAD! AlfD COMMSBOB OF 

stantly greater trade -with the United States. 6t. Louis keeps active in 
getting its share of the increasing business, and our commercial trayellers 
are conspicuous in all the main cides of Mexico. The fact that we have 
rapid rail communication with that country will always be a great advan- 
tage for this city. 

Further south we have had most wretched conditions in Guatemala with 
a government in bankruptcy^ their fiscal condition deplorable, and the 
mercantile classes taxed to death by officials, and all aggravated by the 
frequent and most destructive earthquakes, destroying territories of coffee 
plantations and utterly ruining cities and burying their inhabitants. We 
stand aghast at the relation of horrors! but the world does not pause for 
sentiment! 

The conditions in Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Blca 
are somewhat better, but still the factor of a depreciated government 
currency is still in evidence and hinders trade, especially with the world 
outside. Some two years ago, the President of Costa Rica, made some 
arrangement in London, whereby this little country put itself on a gold 
basis, and business therefore with this Republic, seems easy to effect. 

Colombia has been in the throes of civil strife for nearly three years. 
Hence the business has been limited to the coast cities, and in these it has 
almost been paralyzed. The government paper money which is based on 
silver has gone to a veiy low rate. Shipments of coffee and other of its 
products have been very small during that period. Our exports there have 
also been very small. 

Venezuela has been in a like condition, and although the country is 
nominally on a gold basis, the government has issued paper currency, 
which has now a very reduced value. Business is almost at a standstill, 
and no confidence exists either in commercial or banking circles. Consid- 
erable St. Louis flour and other articles were formerly shipped to many 
points of this country, but now exports there, are a mere bagatelle. 

Brazil, to whom we formerly shipped large quantities of flour, has de- 
creased her purchases from us, and buys now largely from Argentine, and 
although occasionally a round lot is bought in our market, it is done in 
competition with the River Platte product. There is a wonderful field to 
sell our products in this country, which our manufacturers are slow yet to 
enter. The expected steamship line, that we bad tried to inaugurate be- 
tween a Mexican gulf port and Brazil, did not materialize for some reason, 
to our fiour exporters and our coffee importers are both disappointed, but 
we will promise them that we shall ''try, try again." 

Our trade with Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentine is small, so is also 
oar trade with the countries on the Pacific coast of South America. It is 
to be hoped, that the Panama canal, so long and exasperathigly delayed, 
will yet be opened up to our traffic from a gulf port. The enormous 
amount of trade, which the European countries derive from there, ought 
to be an especial incentive for us to make heroic efforts to that end. 



THE GITT OF ST. I^OUIS. 75 

flOUTH AFRICA. 

Trade with SoDth Africa is springing up. In lines of agricultural 
machinery, shoes^ wagons, hardware, and many other lines this offers a 
promising field, that will grow to immense proportions. Some bnsiness is 
also being done in these lines with Australia. 

China and Japan are also beginning to afford a field, both for our ex- 
porters and importers, and to a limited extent the East Indies. 

Shipments of live stock still continue to South Africa, althoagh the war 
is oyer. These are for agricultural purposes. 

The increase in our foreign trade has been most marked in the line ef 
exports of agricultural implements, iron and hardware, shoes, machinery, 
glasS; electrical supplies, wire rope, paper, etc., mostly to l^exico, and in 
a moderate degree to Australia, Seuth America, Cuba and South Africa, 
although there have been large sales made to other parts of Latin- America 
and Europe. ' 

There have also been large shipments of fruit to Europe. 

The following are the estimates for packing house export shipments : 

Pounds. 

Dressed hogs 750,000 

Fresh hams 60,000 

Other fresh pork outs 750,000 

Dry salt and sweet pickled meat 15,000,000 

Oleo oU 6,600,000 

Tallow 275,000 

Lard 2,600,000 

Dressed beef. 460,000 

Fancy meat, beef and calf Uymv, etc 1,000,000 

Hides 1,000,000 

Barreled pork 80,000 

IMPOBT8. 

The receipts of coffee have been as follows : 332,255 sacks and 120,855 
packages. 

Fruit imports from Mexico, Cuba and Porto Rico have largely in- 
creased, and the usually heavy importations of bananas from Colombia, 
yia New Orleans and Mobile. 



THE LUMBER TRADE OP ST. LOUIS DURING 190a. 

By Oso. E. Watson, of the American Lumberman. 



St. Louis is prepared to tell a story of progress toward supremacy in the 
lumber world, which is unequalled by any other of the great lumber mar- 
kets of the coimtiy and which, in the vastness of the business transacted, 
will be difficult of comprehension by those not in touch with the situation. 
The business of the city has grown at an amazing rate, until it now stands 



76 TRADK AND OOMMEBOB OF 

in flist place as a market for Southern lumber, and, in this connection, it 

must be stated that the marketing of the Southern lumber product is now 

the most important of the various branches of the trade. To this growth 

of the market in actual comparative form, the following receipts by rail 

during the past nine years show a progress, such as would make any 

market proud : 

Oars. 

1894 45,764 

1896 68,621 

1896 66,478 

1897 62,804 

1898 76,821 

1899 88,177 

1900 102,676 

1901 Ill ,897 

1902 181,676 

The reason for this marked growth is very apparent. With the gradual 
disintegration of the Northern forests, the lumber manufacturers^ who 
formerly operated plants in Michigan^ Wisconsin and other of the Northern 
States, are removing their mills to Arkansas, Louisiana and other Southern 
sections and are marketing their product, through St. Louis^ in the same 
territory as before. The extreme Northern country is depending more and 
more upon the Southern forests and^ because of the central location of 
St. Louis, this market is reaping the harvest. St. Louis lumber is reaching 
points hitherto not considered as possible markets for Southern lumber, 
and the export trade of the city is no small item. In addition to the 
business shown by the tables, which follow, the St. Louis people have 
transacted a wonderful business, which formed no part of the receipts and 
shipments of the market^ business in the way of direct shipments from the 
mills to points of consumption in the far East or West^ and which did not 
pass through the city. This business amounted to almost 1,000,000,000 
feet, but it is impossible to give the figures with any degree of accuracy, 
nor is it possible to place a monetary valuation upon the business of the 
market. 

BBCBIPTS AND SHIPMENTS. 

The following is a comparative statement or the receipts during each 
month of the past three years : 

Oars. Oars. Oars. 

1902. 1901. 1900. 

January 8,840 8,888 8,819 

February 7,760 9,118 8,647 

March 12,991 10,987 10,226 

April 13,869 10,847 8,601 

Mav 12,060 9,686 9,447 

June 10,698 9,236 8,671 

July 11,241 9,228 8,868 

August 10,806 9,191 8,804 

September 11,669 9,264 7,880 

October 11,766 9,804 8,158 

November 9,702 8,476 7.126 

December 10,286 7,788 8,079 

Total 181,676 111,897 102,676 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



77 



This shows a gain over the preceding year of 19^679 cars^ and a gain 
over 1900 of 29^000 cars. The receipts for the three years over each rail- 
road were as follows : 



NAME OF ROAD. 




Gars. 
1900. 



Chicago A Alton , ( Mo. Di v.) 

Missouri Pacific 

St. Louis & San Francisco 

Wabash (West) 

St. Louis, Kansas Git7 & Colorado 

Mlasouri, Kansas ftTexas 

fit. Louis, Southwestern 

fit. Louis Iron Mountain & Southern 

Illinois Central 

LoulsTille, Henderson & St. Louis 

Southern By 

Mobile & dhio 

LouisTiUeft Nashville 

Baltimore ft Ohio Southwestern 

Chicago & Alton 

Oleyeland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 

Vandalia 

Wabash (East) 

Toledo, St. Louis & Western 

Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis 

Chicago, Burlington & Quinsy 

St. Louis, Keokuk ft Northwestern 

St. Louis Valley By 

TOTAIi 



116 


62 


8,662 


2,688 


1,734 


924 


212 


674 


26 


9 


811 


187 


10,988 


7,786 


65,199 


68,414 


16,706 


18,246 


76 


82 


776 


1,088 


24,674 


18,924 


2,800 


2,020 


20 


106 


620 


888 


79 


169 


152 


226 


1,284 


1,294 


869 


124 


1,021 


1,164 


408 


601 


1,119 
6 


2,060 


181,676 


111,897 



8 

2,621 

1,297 

4S7 

11 

418 

0,888 

64,810 

12,422 

17 

476 

17,868 

1,911 

46 

206 

201 

216 

911 

117 

624 

646 

1,749 



102,576 



In addition to this rail moTement of lumber the report of the harbor 
master shows the following receipts by river: 

Feet-1902. Feet-1901. 

White Pine 11,660,000 22,481,456 

Elm 266,000 230,200 

Poplar 3,666,400 6,206,400 

Cottonwood 18,620,800 16.179,000 

Cypress 10,813,000 7,061,300 

Syoamore 6,000 128,000 

Ash 1,172,800 768,600 

Oak 8,616,500 4,301,300 

Walnut 82,950 82,200 

Gum 2,880,000 4,572,000 

Maple 20,860 60,180 

Hickory 3,000 2,900 

Cherry 6,600 161,200 

Cedar 111.500 309,240 

Chestnut 12,000 79,000 

Yellow pine 41,000 

Total 61,957,800 62,602,966 

Showing a loss of 10,646,166 feet. This report, however, is very inaccu- 
rate as it does not show the total receipts^ it being Imown that a greater 
amount of lumber than this came in by river. The report also shows the 
following receipts of lumber commodities : 

1902. 1901. 

Logs, feet 16,618,300 9,881,800 

Shingles, pieces 6,456,000 11,198,250 

Lath, pieces 7,067,000 12,385,550 

Pickets, pieces 216,000 147,960 



7B 



TRADI ASD OOUHBBOS OF 



To reduce tble smonDt of Inmber to faet is a problem wbldi Ota not be 
solved wltti any degree of toearwuj, but St. Louis U soffldently modest to 
wish to onder rather than over estimate the bnalneaa of the year. For tMa 
reason the same basis ol 13,000 feet to the car, the figures used for several 
jemn past, Is taken, although It la believed that this la too lov. Tbts gives 
the following as tbe total lumber receipts of the St. Louis market : 
Feat— IWl Pee — IWI. 

By Ball l,678,91i.0« l,»ta,7M,000 

By River 81,967,800 e2,6M,0e6 

Logs by River 16,618,800 9,83i,aOQ 

Total 1,616,188,100 l,«4,eB8,78e 

Tbli Bhows a gtia over IMl of 231,780,834 feet. Beceipts during 1900 
were 1,336,403,604 feet, and dorlog 1899 were 1,148,1^,000 feet. 

Tbe shipments by rail each month during the past three years were u 
follows : 

Osn. Oaia, 0»ra. 



















































Total 


71,727 



4,900 


1,887 














K, 




6,277 


s 




B.8I6 






^«!S 


*'m 



68,889 61,060 

Showing a gain over 1001 of S,S8S cars and, over 1900, of 10,667 oare. 
The shipments over each of the rsilroMU were : 



NAME OF BOAD. 


Can. 
ma. 


Cu>. 


1900. 




a 

elmo 

Il.OlH 

i;S 

7,9H 
11 


1,SH 

"2 

'■"51 

idi 

881 
1,4I» 

!:» 

i 

1,K1 






"■S! 












1? 




1S> 










Moblle*Oblo 


17 












B.IST 








tS&iEE;E:::E£ 


!:S 










71,T« 


K.m 


61,080 





THE OITY 09 ST. LOUIS 79 

On a basis of 12^000 feet to the car this gives the following as the total 
shipments : 

Feet— 1902. Feet— 1901. 

By rail 8SO,724,000 820,068,000 

By river 2,086,000 8,133,000 

Totals 862,810,000 824,201,000 

This shows a gain in the shipments over the preceding year of 38^609^000 
feet. It is firmly believed that there was a greater gain in the shipments 
than this and the difference is accounted for by the fact that out-bound 
business is loaded heavier and in greater capacity cars than the average in- 
bound business and this would malce a great difference. 

The local consumption of lumber, as arrived at by taking the difference 
between the receipts and the shipments, gives the following: 

Feet— 1902. Feet^l901. 

Beoeipts 1,646,488,100 1,414,698,766 

Shipments 862,810,000 824,201,000 

Local consumption 783,678,100 090,497,766 

This shows a gahi for 1902 over 1901 of 198,180^334 feet^ which proves 
conclusively that the past year was the most aggressively prosperous year 
St. Louis lumbermen have ever known as to both local and country business. 
The outlook for St. Louis as a lumber market is wonderful. The limit 
of progress has by no means been reached and the World's Fair City 
should show as great gains during 1903 as during the past year^ and this 
will place it at the top as a market for lumber even if it be not already at 
the top. 



80 TBADB AND OOUHSBOB OF 



ST. LOUIS MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS 



From the report of Mk. James Y. Pi<atsb, Ck>mptro]ler, for the fiscal 

year ending April 10th, 1902* 



CONDITION OP THE TREASURY. 

The balance in the treasury at the end of the fiscal year, April 7th^ 
1902, was S5^388,361.31. To this amount is to be added for uncollected 
special tax bills for the openings sprinkling and changing grades of 
streets and maintaining boulevards, $298^528.49^ making the total resources 
of the treasury $5^686,889.80. To be charged against this amount is the 
balance standing to the credit of special funds and accounts aggregating 
$2,821,557.94. After deducting this amount from the resources of the 
treasury, an unappropriated surplus of $2,866,331.86 remains, as against 
$2,074,592.30 for the preceding year. 

Interest and public debt revenue $ 966,903.62 

Municipal revenue 906,655.98 

Water works revenue 1,641,491.15 

Harbor fund 52,040.46 

$2,866,881.86 

REYENUE AND APPROPRIATIONS. 

The resources of the revenue funds, income and unappropriated balances, 
April 8, 1901, were as follows : 

Interest and public debt revenue $ 2,167,162.91 

Municipal revenue 6,289,228.96 

Water works revenue 2,769,869.27 

Harbor fund 110,069.61 

$11,986,810.64 
BONDED DEBT. 

There was no reduction of the bonded debt during the fiscal year ending 
April 7th, 1902. The total debt remains at $18,916,278.30. 

The annual interest charges on the bonded debt remains unchanged at 
$778,409.28, an average rate of 4.11%. 

With the issue of the $5,000,000 of 3.25% twenty-year bonds in aid of 
the St. Louis World's Fair celebrating the Louisiana Purchase Centennial, 
as authorized by an amendment to the State Constitution ratified at a gen- 
eral election held November 6th, 1900, the bonded debt of the city will be 
increased to $23,916,278.30. 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 81 

A special tax will be levied, sufficient to provide for the payment of the 
annual interest on the World's Fair bonds, and sufficient also to provide a 
sinking fund to meet the principal of these bonds, as required by the pro- 
visions of Section 1, of Article Y of the charter of the city. 

SINKING FUND. 

The balance in the sinking fund at the close of the year 1901 was 
$232,275.13. To this must be added the sum of $421,590.72, s et apart for 
sinking fund purposes for the year just closed, making the balance to the 
credit of the sinking fund account, April 7th, 1902, $663,868.85. 

Section 2, of Article XIV, of the charter, requires that $1,200^000 be set 
aside annually, to be used exclusively for interest and public debt revenue 
purposes. The portion of each annual appropriation not required for the 
payment of the interest coupons maturing during the respective years 
must be credited to and constitute the sinking fund, and held sacred for the 
redemption and purchase of bonds outstanding on the 7th day of April, 
1890. A special sinking fund is established by law for the redemption and 
purchase of the bonds issued in aid of the World's Fair. 

TAXATION. 

The assessed valuation of property, real and personal, for the taxes of 
1902, is $389,953,730, of which $329,659,090 is assessed as the valaation of 
real estate, and $60,294,640 as the value of personal property. 

The assessment of railroad, bridge, telegraph, express and street rail- 
road property by the State Board of Equalization for the year 1902, will, in 
all probability, exceed the assessment of last year, namely; $26,211,354. 

The rate of taxation for the current year has been increased five cents on 
the $100 valuation, due to the necessity of making provision for the interest 
on the Worlds' Fair bonds and establishing a sinking fund, as required by 
law^ for the redemption and purchase of those bonds. 

The rates for 1901, on the $100 valuation are as follows: 

For payment of debt and interest (bounds outstanding 

April 7th, 1890) $ .20 

For interest and sinking fund, World's Fair bonds 10 

For general municipal purposes .96 

Total City $1.26 

For Public Library .04 

Total $1.80 



82 



TRADE AND OOMMEROE OF 



STATE OP MISSOURI. 

Financial Statement Prepared bt Mr. Albert O. Allen, 

State Attditor, January 10, 1903. 



Total valuation of real estate and personal property as fixed 

by the State Board of Equalization for 1902 taxes $l,046,i09,14i 00 

Railroad, Bridge and Telegraph property, including street 

railroad property for 1902 taxes 129,809,196 00 

Merchants and Manufacturers, valuation for 1902 taxes (Esti- 
mated) 08,486,014 60 

Total ..$1,286,828,866 60 



Balance in Treasury, December 81, 1901 $ 1,217,640 61 

Receipts into the State Treasury from all sources, for all pur- 
poses, for the year ending December 91, 1902 6,428,446 00 

Disbursements during the year 1902, for all purposes 4,668,178 86 

Balance in Treasury December 81, 1902 1,998,402 71 



State Bonded Debt, January l, 1908. 

487 8>^ per cent. 6-20 refunding bonds, due January 1, 1908 . . .$ 487,000 00 
Total bonded debt $ 487,000 00 



School and Seminary Certificates of Indebtedness. 



School certificates, 6 per cent. . . . 
School certificates, 6 per cent 



$2,909,000 00 

250,000 00 

$3,169,000 00 

Seminary certificates, 6 per cent $ 122,000 00 

Seminary certificates, 6 per cent 1,117,889 42 

$1,289,889 42 



THE OITT or ST. IjOUIS. 83 



MINING INDUSTRIES OF MISSOURI. 



By J. W. Mab8tbli«bb, Secretary Bureau of Mines, Mining and 

Mining Inspection. 



Onr mining industries for the year 1902 evidence a very flourishing 
condition throughout the entire State^ and but for a shortage in transporta- 
tion facilities^ our lead, zinc and coal production would have been much 
greater than our flnal report will show. Enough is already shown to 
indicate a very decided increase in the lead output^ a very satisfactoiy 
increase in zinc ores^ with a shortage In the output of coal compared with 
1901. While the coal product will show less^ yet the increased price 
received for the same will about equal the value of the output for the 
former year. Our coal trade suffered not only on account of a shortage in 
the cars furnished by the railways, but because of a great scarcity in miners. 
The lack of miners is due largely to the unnecessarily prolonged meeting 
of the convention formed of representatives of mine operators and miners, 
at which the scale of prices to govern for the ensuing year is agreed upon. 
So much time was taken up that it was feared an agreement would not be 
reached and many hundred miners left the State for sections where the 
scale had been decided upon and a year's work assured. Our coal product 
for the year will closely approximate 3,600,000 tons, valued at $4,700,000. 
The demand for coal has been very good and the price paid for mining and 
the price received for the coal have both made good increases. Our 
present developed work, splendid equipment, excellentfacilities for handling 
the product, together with the new mines opened out during the year, will 
enable our operators to double the output should the trade demand it. No 
period in the mining history of the State has witnessed the progress made 
during the last year in new mines opened or the vast preparations made in 
increasing the capacity of our older mines, along the line of the Iowa A 
St Louis Railway, now being rapidly constructed and of which we hear so 
little — although one of its terminals is at St. Louis, while the other is at 
Sioux City. It appears that the prime object in building this new railroad 
was to secure the trade from the great Chariton Valley coal field. The 
Keokuk & Western, Wabash R. R. and the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City, 
each cross through a portion of this field; but the Iowa A St. Louis passes 
right through the entire field from north to south, opening up a new field 
of most excellent coal of an average tliickness of 42 inches. We visited 
ten new mines opened in this section last month, finding several of them 
already making a large output, while the others were nearing completion. 
Many other mines are contemplated on this line and when all are in opera- 



84 TRADS AND OOIOCBBCB QF 

tion, this section of our State will show a wonderful increase in its coal 
product. The Manufacturers Coal A Coke Company, is responsible for this 
new enterprise and as the same gentlemen, officer the coal company and 
the railroad as well, doubtless transportation facilities will be promptly 
furnished. The coal company has secured control of oyer 60^000 acres of 
this coal property, embracing land in Putnam, Schuyler, Adair and Macon 
counties. Adair county appears to be more highly favored in the number 
of new mines opened, and promises for the coming year to exceed all other 
counties, if we except Macon county, which has an output of more than 
1^000,000 tons annually. 

There is at present a better feeling existing between employer and em- 
ploye in our coal field than has existed for years. Strikes we have had^ but 
they were local, and at no time of a serious nature. Our mines were never 
more safe, or their sanitary condition better; in fact Missouri is credited 
with having proven a more favorable condition in her mines, relative to 
mine accidents, than any other mining section in all North America. The 
current year gives promise of more harmony between operator and miner, 
and a greater output than we have ever before experienced. 

The growth and progress in our lead and zinc industries is simply won* 
derful, especially is this true of our lead industry; 1899 and 1900 were 
banner years in the output of lead ores, with 151,307 tons to their credit; 
but 1901 and 1902 show that there were mined 237,519 tons, an increase of 
86,212 tons^ or 57 % . The value of the product increased during the same 
period from $6,872,439 to $10,625,497, showing the increase in favor of 1901 
and 1902 to be $3,752,968. St. Francois county alone mined 174,122^700 
pounds of lead ore during the year 1902, valued at $3,733,808, an increase 
over 1901 of $614,419. The lead ore production for the year 1902 for the 
entire State was 245^354,000 pounds, an increase over the previous year c^ 
35,670,000 pounds. The value of the product for the year will be about 
$5,700,000. New plants in our lead ore districts are without doubt not only 
the largest of their Idnd to be found anywhere, but they embrace every 
modem appliance for the speedy handling and cleaning the ore. Our soft 
Missouri ores are in better demand than the desilverized ores, and increased 
production has been met with a steady advance in the price for the last six 
months of the year. The future is very promising in every feature con- 
nected with the industry. 

Zinc ores of this State like our lead ores, are the best to be found in any 
country, they are the purest and of necessity bring the better prices and are 
always in greater demand. The year 1901 whUe it showed an increased 
production, yet the price compared with the two former years was very 
low; this year however shows a very satisfactory increase in production 
and a most gratifying increase in price. The average price received for 
zinc ores during the year 1902, was $6.63 per ton better than for the former 
year. An average increase in price of 28%, has had its influence in still 
further increasing prospect work and widening the mineral field. Attempts 
to unjustly infiuence the price of ore are promptly met by our operators in 



THE 0IT7 OF ST. LOUIS. 85 

several ways and the viadom thej have displayed in their methods for 
maintaining prices, has undoubtedly sustained the fair prices which have 
obtained for some months past. Our zinc ore output for the year will 
reach 240;000 tons, compared with 324,074 tons for the preyious year, an 
Increase of 15,996 tons. Tlie value of the product for 1902 amoimts to 
97,290,780 as against $6,308,671 for 1901, showing an increased value of 
(1,982,109 or 37.83%. The future promise of our zinc fields could not be 
better forecast than by reference to the activity displayed of late in the 
purchase of mineral lands, mines and plants and the extra good prices 
secured for such property; there has been nothing approaching a boom 
condition nor has fictions value played a part, but it is simply due to the 
strong and healthy conditions existing in the zinc district. Jasper County 
of course continues to lead all others in the production of zinc ores and the 
value of its lead and zinc ores. 

The product of our mines for the year 1902, from the data at hand, 
indicates that it will reach $17,670,780, of which $4,700,000 was received 
from our coal product, $6,700,000 from lead ore and $7,290,780 is derived 
from the sale of our zinc ores. This shows an increase over 1901 in the 
value of our mineral production of $2,761,650, the increase being due 
almost wholly to lead and zinc for the reasons above mentioned. 



86 



TRADE AND COMMEBOB OF 



POPULATION OF ST. LOUIS. 

AREA 623^ SQUARE MILES. 



18S0 
1888 
1886 
1887 
1840 
18U 
1800 
18M 



4,988 

6,000 

5,882 

6,897 

8,816 

12,040 

16,468 

84,140 

74,489 

94,000 



1866 126,200 



1899 186,687 

1806 204,884 

1870— United States Genraa 81 0.867 

1880— " ** " 860,021 

1886-Bstim»ted 400,000 

1868— « 460,0(10 

1890— United States Census. 461.772 

1900— United States Oensus 676,388 

1901— Estimated 600,000 

1902— Estimated 621,000 



AMOUNT OF REAL ESTATE AND PERSONAL PROPERTY 

ASSESSED IN TEDE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



YEAR. 


OITT or 8T. LOUI8 

Real Estate. 


OITX 8T. LOUIS. 

RealAPer8*nal. 


BATB or TAXATION. 




Old Limits. 


New Umits. 


1868 


1 49,409,080 




2.42 




1864 


63,206,820 


i 68,669,078 


8.60 




1866 


78,900,700 


87,026,684 


2.76X 




1866 


81,961,610 


106,246,210 


8.00 




1867 


88,026,600 


112,907,660 


896 




1868 


94,862,870 


116,682,140 


286 




1860. . . .... 


118,026,410 


188,628,480 


.2.86 




1870 


119,080,800 


147,969,660 


• ■ ■ • 




1871 


188,888,960 


168,272,480 


2.80 




1872 


129,286,180 


162,689,670 


2.78 




1878 


149,144,400 


180,278,960 


2.76 




1874 


141,041,480 


178,109,270 


2.88.6 




1876 


181,141,020 


166,999,060 


8 48.6 




1876 


182 786,460 


166.441,110 


8 42.6 




1877 


148,012,760 


181,846,660 


2.80 




1878 


140,976,640 


172,829,980 


8.60 


i.86 


1879 


186,071.670 


168,818,920 


260 


1.85 


1880 


186,824,980 


160,488,000 


2.60 


1*86 


1881 


189 897,470 


167.364,280 


260 


1.86 


1882 


161,679 260 


191,948,450 


2.58 


1.88 


1888 


168,479,060 


192,663,640 


266 


1.80 


1884 


178,686,660 


210,124,870 


2.66 


1.80 


1886 


177,867,240 


207,910.850 


2.66 


1.80 


1886 


187 291,640 


218.271,260 


266 


1.80 


1887 


184,816,660 


217,142.820 


2.60 


1.80 


1888 


196,978,260 


227,769,980 


280 


170 


1889 


196,186,840 


280,838.810 


2.20 


1 60 


1890 


314,971,060 


248,827,830 


8.20 


160 


1891 


216,838.960 


266,113,690 


2.20 


180 


1892 


24S,:i39,140 


284,518 660 


2.06 


1.60 


1898 


242,787,480 


287.8:26 430 


2.06 


1.67 


1894 


270,288.800 


316,292,560 


2.06 


1.67 


1896 


266,096.900 


880,486.640 


2.06 


1.67 


1896 


296,419,680 


845,940,160 


3.06 


1.67 


1897 


299,686,220 


844,749,700 


2.06 


1.67 


1898 


814,976,640 


860,616,660 


2.06 


1.67 


1699 


880,019,930 


874,688.490 


1.96 


1.67 


1900 


887.201,940 


880,779,280 


1.96 


1.67 


1901 


842,262,640 


894,722,700 


1.90 


1.90 


1902 


857,701,410 


418,046,300 


1.95 


1.95 



Oity Assessment 1890,026,92(1 

Board of Equalization for Railroads, Bridges, Telegraph. Express and 

Street Railroad Property 28,019,38tt 

Total $418,0«6,80a 

Oity Tax, 11.80; State, 26c; School, 40c n » 



THI OITT or 8T. LOUIS. 



87 



BUILDING IMPBOYEMENTS. 

Statbicbmt SaowrNO thb Yaluk op Boildino Ikpboysicbkts in thk 
Crrv OF St. Louis dubiko thb ybab 1901 akd 1902. 



Prepared by O. F. LONOFBLiiOW, OommUsioner of Public Buildings. 



BUILDING PBBMIT8 ISSUED. 



1903. 


1901. 


Months. 


Number 

of 
Permits. 


Value of 
Improvements. 


Months. 


Numoer 

of 
Permits. 


Value of 
Improvements. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


268 
194 
368 
484 
409 
488 
446 
449 
480 
436 
819 
282 


$ 736,468 

671,511 

1,087,703 

1,368,788 

1,068,082 

1,614,902 

1,178,233 

1,207,416 

776,036 

1,176,600 

969,824 

1,026,488 


January 

February 

March 

April 

May 


224 

202 
812 
838 
369 
346 
822 
347 
328 
887 
838 
224 


$ 1,296,218 

686,644 

911,988 

727,522 

1,296,864 

1,342,104 

1,498,288 

786,171 

642,291 

1,012,819 

769,301 

2,360,301 


May 


June 


June 


July 


July 


August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


August .... 
September .. 

October 

November .. 
Djgoember . . . 


Totals 


4,602 


$12,864,086 


Totals 


8,722 


$ 18,207,991 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED FOB TWENTY-TWO YEARS. 





BRXOK AKD 










STOITB BUU.DIHOS. 


raAm BuiLoncw. 


TOTAL BUIIJ>Dr08. 


OOBT. 


1902 


2,286 


2,266 


4,502 


812.854,085 


19ul 


1,898 


1,824 


8,722 


18,207,901 


1900 


1,880 


1,188 


2.618 


5.016,964 


1890 


1,689 


961 


2,500 


8,249,565 


1808 


1,861 


796 


2,667 


7,888,880 


1807 


2,649 


771 


8.820 


0.471,640 


180S 


2,848 


686 


8,029 


10.084.906 


1896 


2,882 


780 


8,642 


14,881,060 


1804 


2,077 


876 


8,858 


11,844,700 


1808 


2,748 


1,080 


8.837 


12,857.667 


1802 


8,486 


1,286 


4.782 


16,07rt,»78 


1801 


2,978 


1,469 


4,486 


18,8.'»,060 


1800 


2,865 


1,829 


8,904 


13.662.700 


1880 


2,408 


1,001 


8,5U 


9,765,700 


1888 


8,146 


841 


2,086 


8.020.501 


1887 


1,848 


648 


2,400 


8 182.814 


UM 


1788 


481 


2,284 


7,060,810 


1808 


2,160 


610 


2.870 


7,876,510 


IMM . ■ ■ ■ > 


1,080 


620 


8,600 


7.816,685 


1888 


1,881 


010 


2,401 


7,128,878 


1888 


1,646 


715 


2,881 


5,010,564 


1881 




• • ■• 


1.966 


4,448,558 



8B TBADs AMD ooaaasiam or 



ST. LOUIS WEATHER FOR THE YEAR 190a. 



By Db. B. J. Htatt, Local Forecast Official, United States 

Weather Boreau. 



From the view point of the normal, the meteorological record for the 
year 1902 showed a moderate excess in temperature, which was veiy favor- 
ably distributed. The months of May and Noyember were characterized 
by an unusually high temperature, the departure for the latter month show- 
ing an excess of 291°. February and September were the cold months, 
especially the former, which had a deficiency of 239^. The Mlfisissippi 
riyer at this station was frozen from February 8rd to 26th inclasive. The 
temperature during April, June, August and December averaged slightly 
below the normal for each day, while during January, March, July and 
October a moderate excess was noted. On June 11th, the highest temper- 
ature for the year, 98°, was observed. The coldest day was February 4th, 
with minimum temperature 1^ below zero. The summer months, June, 
July and August, were delightfully cool and pleasant; the average tem- 
perature being 74, 80 and 76 respectively. 

Precipitation was in excess of the normal in March, June, August and 
December, and normal or below during all other months. An exception- 
ally heavy rain storm on June 28th, when 4.80 inches fell in 24 hours, made 
the total for the month 7.86 inches. The total precipitation for the year 
was 88.48 inches, which varied only slightly from the annual normal. 

The total number of clear days was 189; partly cloudy 110; cloudy 116; 
days with .01 inch or more precipitation 126 ; with more than trace of snow 
fall 8; with hail 4; fog 7; thunderstorms 58. 

The prevailing direction of wind for the year was south; mATrimnffi 
velocity 64 miles per hour from the north on June 28th. 

RECORD BY MONTHS — JANUARY. 

In January the temperature was above the normal, except on the 8rd to 
6th, the 12th and 18th, and from the 24th to 81st; the accumulated excess 
at the end of the month being 69^. The average for the month was 82.4^. 
The highest was 63° on the 9th, and the lowest ^'0^* or zero on the 27th ; 
monthly range 63^. The total precipitation was 1.18 inches, which was 1.00 
less than the normal. There was snow on the 20th, 2l8t, 24th, 25th, 2dth, 
28th, 29th and 81st. Total snowfall 6.6. Prevailing vdnd direction north- 
west; maximum velocity 81 miles from the west on the 8th. Number of 
clear days 19 ; partly cloudy 4 ; cloudy 8, and rainy 7. 



THl OITT or ST. LOUIS. 89 

FBBSUASY. 

Febniary was a yery cold month. Hie temperatiiTe was below the 
normal from the let to the 22nd, and though the last six days were slightly 
warmer than normal, the month closed with the large deficiency of 239®. 
The highest temperature was 56^ on the 27th, and the lowest I*' below zero 
on the 4th. The mean for the month was 26.4*^. Precipitation was light, 
the total for the month being only 0.8S Inches, which was 1.95 Inches less 
than normal. It was In form of rain on the Ist^ 27th and 28th, and of snow 
on the 2nd, 6th, dth, lOth^ 11th, 17th, 20th and 2l8t. Total snowfall 1.7 
Inches. Prevailing wind direction west; maximum wind velocity 35 miles 
from the southwest on the 28th. Kumber of clear days 8; partly cloudy 9; 
cloudy lly and with .01 or more precipitation 6. 

MABCH. 

March was warmer than normal; the excess amounting to 116°. The 
cold periods were from the Ist ,to 5th, 17th to 19th, and 80th and 31st. 
Monthly mean 46.8'' ; highest 74'' on the 25th ; lowest 17® on the 18th ; range 
57°. The total precipitation was 4.60 Inches, which was 1.01 Inches In 
excess of the normal. Heavy rain occurred on the 26th and 28th. There 
was light snow on the 1st, 2nd and 17th ; the total for the entire month 
being less than .01. Number or days clear 8; partly cloudy 9; cloudy 14, 
and with .01 or more precipitation 11. Prevailing wind direction south; 
maximum velocity 47 miles from the southwest on the 12th. 

APRIL. 

April should be classed among the cool months of the year, though the 
aocnmalated deficiency was only 25®. The temperature was almost uni- 
formly below the normal during the first half, and moderately above during 
the latter half of the month, except the 23rd, 24th, 26th and 27th. The 
monthly mean was 65.4®; highest 89® on the 21st; lowest 31® on the 8th; 
range f^. The precipitation was deficient by 1.30 inches; the total for the 
month being 2.49 inches, which was well distributed throughout the month. 
The number of days with .01 Inch or more of rainfall was 10; number of 
clear days 15; partly cloudy 11; cloudy 4. Prevailing direction of wind 
was west; maximum velocity 38 miles from the west on the 26th. Thun- 
derstorms occurred on the 5th, 8th, 20th, 25th and 28th. 

MAY. 

May was unusually warm. The temperature was above the normal, 
except on the 7th and 9th and from the 26th to 30th; the accumulated 
excess being 185°. The monthly mean was 71.8° ; highest 93° on the 20th, 
lowest 52° on the 27th; range 41. Total precipitation was 3.04, or 1.54 
inches less than the normal. Very heavy rain fell od afternoon of the 4th 
when 1.14 Inches fell in the brl^ period of 21 minutes. The storm was 
accompanied with hall and high winds, a maximum velocity of 52 miles 



00 TRADE AND COlOfERCB OF 

per hour from the southwest being recorded. Preyailing direction of wind 
for month south. Number of days clear 10 ; partly cloudy 13 ; cloudy 8, and 
with .01 inch or more of precipitation 11. 

JUNE. 

During the first 16 days of June, except the 8th and 9th ^ the temperature 
was constantly above the normal, while during the latter half of the month 
it continued below the seasonable line; the accumulated deficiency being 
20°. The monthly mean was 74.2^ ; highest 98'' on the 11th; lowest SS"" on 
the 22nd; range 45. The total precipitation was 7.86 inches, which was 
2.78 inches in excess of the normal. Though showers occurred at close 
intervals during the month, the total precipitation resulted in the main from 
one exceptionally heavy rain storm on the 28th, when 4.80 inches fell in 24 
hours, and 1 inch in 55 minutes. This storm was also attended by hail and 
high winds; a maximum velocity of 54 miles per hour from the north 
being recorded. Number of days with .01 or more inches of rain 14 ; clear 
10; partly cloudy 12 ; cloudy 8. Prevailing wind direction south. Thunder- 
storms occurred on the 3rd, 7th, 13th, 15th, 20th, 2dth, 27th, 28th and 29th. 

JULY. 

There were no warm or cold periods in July, with marked departure 
from normal temperature conditions — ^the month closing with excess of 44^. 
The temperature was below the normal on the 1st, 10th, 11th, 12th, 20th to 
23rd. The monthly mean was 80.3^ ; highest 96^ on the 17th ; lowest 61° on 
the Ist; range 35. The total precipitation was 2.34 inches, or 1.42 less 
than normal. Number of rainy days 11; clear 13; partly cloudy 15 and 
cloudy 3. Thunderstorms occurred on the 1st, 7th, 8th, 9th, 18th, 19th, 24th, 
27th, 28th and 31st. Prevailing direction of wind south ; maximum velocity 
35 miles per hour from the west on 9th. 

AUGUST. 

August was cooler than usual. The accumulated deficiency was only 
11° , but the month was regarded cool because there were only a few days 
when the daily mean temperature exceeded the normal by more than 4°. 
The temperature was below the normal on the 6th, 7th, 10th to 12th, 16th 
to 19th, 22nd to 27th. The mean temperature for August was 76.4° ; highest 
97^ on the 13th; lowest 58° on the 23rd; range 39. The precipitation for 
the month also contributed to its coolness, as showers and thunderstorms 
were very frequent, and heavy rains occurred on the 18th and 26th. The 
total precipitation was 5.20 inches, which was 1.70 in excess of the normal. 
Thunderstorms occurred on the 3rd, 4th 5th, 10th, 17th, 18th, 20th, 22nd 
26th and 31st. Number of clear days 7; partly cloudy 12; cloudy 12; rainy 
10. Prevailing direction of wind south ; maximum velocity 36 miles from 
southeast on the 18th. 

SEPTEMBER. 

There were less than 5 warm days in September. The first 3 weeks were 
exceptionally cool, the departure from normal temperature on the 9th and 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 91 

I3th being 16^. At the close of the month the accumulated deficiency was 
90°. The monthly mean was 66.4° ; highest 86° on the 7th; lowest 46° on 
the 13th ; range 41. Showers occurred at regular intervals, but as a rule 
they were light, the total precipitation being 1.98 inches, which was 1.14 
inches below the normal. Thunderstorms occurred on the 6th, 17th and 
24th. Number of days clear 13; partly cloudy 6; cloudy 12; rainy 11. 
Prevailing direction of wind south ; maximum velocity 43 miles from the 
north on the 8th. 

OCTOBER. 

October was warmer than usual, except from the 1st to 5th and the 13th. 
The mean daily temperature was considerably above normal, the excess for 
the month amounting to 147°. The monthly mean was 62.2° ; highest 82° 
on the 24th ; lowest 38° on the 14th ; range 44. Heavy rain occurred on th 
3rd. Aside from this the precipitation was very light, the total for the 
month being 2.00 inches, or .89 inch less than normal. Thunderstorms 
occurred on the 10th, 12th, 17th and 18th. Number of clear days 17 ; partly 
cloudy 8; cloudy 6; rainy 7. Prevailing wind direction south; maximum 
velocity 29 miles from the west on the 13th. 

NOVEMBER. 

There were only four cool days in November. These were the 6th, 7th, 

26th and 27th. On all other days the mean temperature ranged from 3° to 

24° above the normal; the accumulated excess at the end of the month 

being 291° . The monthly mean was 53.3°, which was 3° higher than record 

for any November in the past 32 years. The highest temperature was 79° 

on the 10th ; and the lowest 29° on the 27th ; monthly range 50°. Precipita- 
tion was about normal ; the total being 3.20 inches. Thunderstorm occurred 

on the 1st. Number of days clear 8 ; partly cloudy 8 : cloudy 14; rainy 14. 

Prevailing direction of wind south ; maximum velocity 45 miles per hour 

from the southwest on the 29th. 

DECEMBER. 

December averaged slightly cooler than usual. The deficiency amounted 
to 52°. The mean for the month was 34°; highest 56° on the 1st; lowest 5° 
on the 26th; range 51°. Precipitation exceeded the normal by 1.00 inch; 
the total for the month being 3.81 inches. Total snowfall 1.7 inches. 
Number of clear days 11; partly cloudy 4; cloudy 16, and days with .01 or 
more precipitation 14. Thunderstorms occurred on the 12th and 20th. 
Prevailing wind direction south; maximum velocity 38 miles from the 
southwest on the 2nd. Light frost occurred on the 19th, heavy frost on the 
23rd, and killing frost on the 28th. 



lor each 
eompfled fioiB the Weather Bareui mordi of the last 



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TRADE AND OOMMSBCB OF 



DAILY PRECIPITATION AT ST. LOUIS, MO., FOB THE YEAR 1902 

TAKXN FEOM THK RBGORDS OF THK U. 8. WXATHKR BUBBAU, 

LOCAL OFKICS. 



DAT 

OF 

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T 

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16 


T 

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.06 




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T 


T 






T 

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.06 
.08 
.09 

T 


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.86 
T 


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T 






18 


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T 
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.89 
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T 

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20 


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24 


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.23 
.06 






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T 
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4.70 
.69 
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7.86 
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25 








26 

27 


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Total. 
Dtp'rtw* 


0.88 
—1.95 


4.60 
+1.01 


2.49 
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1.96 
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3.00 
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8.20 
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8.81 
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+£xcess. —Deficiency. T Indicates precipitation too small to measure. 



THl OITT OF ST. LOmS. 



05 



CUSTOM HOUSE TRANSACTIONS, 1902. 

Condensed Classification of Commodities Imported into St. Louis dur- 
ing the year ending December 31, 1902, showing foreign value and duty 
paid. Chas. F. Gallenkamp, 

Surveyor of Customs. 



COMMODITIES. 



Value. 



Duty. 



Artworks 

Books and Printed Matter. 
Brushes 



Burlaps and Bagging 

Chemicals and Drugs 

China and Earthenware 

Cutlery 

Jewelry and Precious Stones 

Toys 

Fire Arms 

Pish 

Free Goods. 

Glassware 

Glass, Window 

Hops < 

Marble and Stone 

Manufactured Cork 

Cotton 

Flax 

Leather 

Metal 

Paper 

SllkT 

Wood 

Miscellaneous 

Oilcloths 

Faints and Colors 

Bice, Granulated 

Spirituous Liquors 

Straw Matting. 

Tobacco and Cigars 



«< 

•« 



ft 
(f 



<« 



<t 



Wines, Sparkling 

Wlnestjlttll 

Steel Wire 

Tea 

Woolens 

Collections from all other sources. 



Total, 1902 
Total, 1901 



6,062 00 

10,896 00 

8,866 00 

666,805 00 

882,886 00 

68,689 00 

67,864 00 

6,160 00 

18,097 00 

11,044 00 

85,248 00 

494,888 00 

20,378 00 

464,264 00 

108,418 00 

10,011 00 

85,164 00 

617,410 00 

200,224 00 

41,681 00 

47,971 00 

66,891 00 

92,486 00 

4,880 00 

886,706 00 

41.194 00 

5,148 00 

182,810 00 

54,696 00 

168,797 00 

189,894 00 

86,980 00 

66,994 00 

196,986 00 

86,665 00 

88,26100 



14,712,662 00 
4,844,488 00 



997 00 

2,699 00 

1,546 40 

160,841 95 

99,129 14 

88,442 85 

88,804 78 

1,538 70 

4,688 96 

8,476 80 

10,579 99 



12,520 51 

188,752 72 

40,223 88 

6,247 60 

21,974 20 

247,141 25 
90,514 88 
19,406 96 
21,686 96 
16,989 66 
62,598 88 
1,766 40 

291,110 28 
21,211 14 
1,414 89 
20,575 75 
60,887 64 
69,540 87 

166,177 66 
22,688 67 
28,579 18 
79,704 74 
81,648 60 
82,669 88 
70,994 28 



11,906,151 48 
1,908,898 96 



98 



TBADB AND OOMMBROB OF 



CUSTOMS WAREHOUSE TRANSACTIONS. 



PORT OF ST. LOUIS— DURING 1902. — CHA8. F. GALLENKAMP^ SURYEYOB' 



MOXTHB. 



In Warehouse Dec. n, 1901. 

January, 1902. 

Febmarj, 

March, 

AprU, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

Augnist. 

September, ** 
October, *« 
November, " 
December, '* 



«< 
(I 
«« 
«< 
«< 
«« 



Totals 

In Warehouse Deo. 31, 1902. 



Wasbhousbd. 



Value. 



Duty. 



$196,679 00 
16,271 00 
18,798 00 
23,196 00 
13,796 00 
88,080 00 
16,297 00 
80,660 00 
61,696 00 
48,002 00 
83,890 00 
64,941 00 
71,888 00 



$610,187 00 



$187,787 81 
15,496 66 
11,176 61 
18,677 88 
12,781 32 
86.406 04 
18,509 52 
26,168 70 
70.036 46 
40,960 79 
96,882 20 
86,372 17 
47,908 09 



$487,248 54 



WiTHDBAWir. 



Talue. 



27,868 00 
88.400 00 
23,490 00 
26,081 00 
28,744 00 
19,617 00 
26,109 00 
23,209 00 
88,010 00 
27,868 00 
33,260 00 
89,248 00 



$396,824 00 
218,8^ 00 



Duty. 



$28,238 38 
28,390 82 
18.8U 62 
20,080 06 
28,671 00 
16.352 94 
22,708 24 
20,216 36 
41,106 S2 
81,010 61 
22,666 00 
62,268 04 



$314,411 79 
172,835 76 



Statement of CommoditieB, exported in bond from the Port of St. Louis 
daring the year ending December 31, 1902. 

CHAS. F. GALLENKAMP, 

Surveyor of Customs. 



OOMMODITIES. 



Gallons. 



Number. 



Pounds. 



Value. 



Ammonia 

Beer 

Burlaps 

Calendars 

Drugs 

Dry Plates 

Salt 

Steel Wire Bope. 
Tobacco 



Total. 



660,295 



660,896 



18,476 



2,447,661 
65,374 
88,280 
883,111 
491,660 
887,912 
106,624 



4,029,088 



3,236 00 

489.486 00 

162,265 00 

1,H05 00 

16.468 00 

64,569 00 

1,464 00 

41,750 00 

37,413 00 

f 767,446 00 



During the first three months of 1902, drawback to the Philippine 
Islands was not allowed. Shipments made to these Islands during that 
time did not go in bond, therefore are not included in this report. 



THE OTTY OF ST. LOmS. 97 

STATEMENT OF BUSINESS TRANSACTEDJAT THE ST. LOUIS 
POSTOFFICE DURING 1900, 1901 AND 1902. 

F. W. Baumhoff, Postmaster. 

REVENUES. 

Receipts. Ezpenitures. 

1902 $2,786,768.06 $1,880,674.82 

1901 2,240,429.72 1,241,282.07 

1900 2,081,664.77 1,211,642.84 

Increase in receipts $ 496,888.88 

Increase in net revenue 867,040.68 

DISTRIBUTION AND DISPATCH OF MAILS ORIGINATING IN 

ST. LOUIS. 

Incpe^de 
Total pounds handled in 1902 84,788,882 

Total pounds handled in 1901 80,621,660 

Total pounds handled in 1900 80,064,921 4,211,882 

Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1902. . . 282,321,446 

Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1901 . . 246,784,171 

Total number pieces outgoing handled in 1900. . . 226,086,670 86,687,276 

RECEIVED FROM POSTAL ROUTES AND OTHER POSTOFFICES. 

Total pounds, 1902 7,181,621 Total pieces handled, 1902.101,680,609 

Total pounds, 1901 6,661,386 Total pieces handled, 1901. 94,606,880 

Total pounds, 1900 6,170,720 Total pieces handled, 1900. 89,721,778 

MAIL MATTER COLLECTED AND DELIVERED BY CITY 

DELIVERY. 

Total pounds, 1902 28,816,178 Total pieces, 1902 462,607,287 

Total pounds, 1901 18,437,827 Total pieces, 1901 878,194,867 

Total pounds, 1900 14,827,066 Total pieces, 1900 801,084,920 

LOCAL DROP MAIL. 

1902. 
Pounds. 

Letters 907,101 

Cards 87,636 

Circulars 162,110 

Second Class.... 276,710 

Third Class 820,944 

RECEIPTS AND DISPATCH OF REGISTERED MAIL. 

Total number, 1902 3,620,990 

Total number, 1901 2,843,606 

Total number, 1900 2,468,257 

ISSUING AND PAYMENT OF MONEY ORDERS. 

Number. Amount. 

1902 1,212,491 $9,603,690.21 

1901 1,167,718 8,896,089.32 

1900 1,126,769 7,783,364.69 



1903. 


1901. 


1901. 


1900. 


1900. 


Pieces. 


Pounds. 


Pieces. 


Pounds. 


Pieces. 


64,626,060 


904,961 


64,297,660 


779,386 


46,760,160 


6,691,900 


36,968 


6,546,200 


36,399 


6,309,860 


6,084,400 


148,780 


6,951,200 


103,440 


4,137,600 


3,043,810 


273,649 


3,009,039 


230,142 


2,631,662 


6,418,880 


289,788 


5,796,760 


272,006 


6,440,120 



s 



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THE (JITT OF 9T. l^ijnff. 99 



RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION. 



By B. 8. ToMFKiKS, Commissioner, St. Louis Traffic Bureau. 



Tbe Great Trunk Lines leading in alj directions from this city indicate 
the (mportaDce of tlie trade and commerce of St. Louis, and new roads 
are being biiilt to take care of the increased traffic to the South and West, 
brought about by the rapid deyeloipment oi that part of the United States. 

The year 1902 has brought the greatest improvements in rail transpor- 
tation facilities In the histx>ry of tlfe city. The construction of niew roads 
in Soutbem Missouri opens up much n^w local territery, which will prove 
valuable to this market. 

The St. Louis-Kansas City line of the Bock Bland lies midway between 
the Missouri Pacific and the Frisco, and gives a new short line to Union, 
Tersailles, Windsor and other points in Western Missouri. 

The Frisco has purchased the St. Louis. Memphis & Southeastern and 
tlie St. Louis A Gulf Bailways, and is building a new road from St. Louis 
along the west bank of tbe Mississippi Blver, connecting with their line 
just west of Memphis, and giving direct rail connection via Cape Girar- 
deau with the network of their small roads in Southeastern Missouri; as 
well as opening 9p a new route to the Southeast. 

The White Biver YaUey line of the Missouri Padfle, now under oon- 
structlon, eztepdlng from Batesville, Arkansas, northwest, along the 
valley of the White Kiver to Carthage, Mo., reaches a territory which has 
long beien in need of rail facilities. 

In Oklahoma and the Indian Territory, there is the Arkansas Ss Ghoctiaw 
line <^ the Fi iseo on the north bank of the Bed Biver, now completed, 
130 mUes west from the Arkansas-Indian Territory line, and their Oakla- 
lioma City and Western branch in operation from Oklahoma City to Chiok- 
asha, and under construotion to Qntoah, Texas. 

Also the new line of the Missenrl, Kansas 4b Texas under oonstruotion 
from Coffeyville, Kans., to Guthrie, 0. T., all reaching new territory 
tributary to this market. 

The St Louis Valley $oad, recentiy completed between East St. Louis 
and Gale, 111., 120 miles, and the river division of the Missouri Padfle, 
Jefferson City to Boonvllle, which was completed last February, are good 
examples of new railroad construction, which is along lines providing 
road beds, with a minimum curyature and grade for the economical hand- 
ling of heavy tonnage. 

'the extension ot the Illinois Central to Golconda, 111., should bring 
some new trade to this market, as the only entrance into that city in the 
past has been by the Ohio Biver boats. 



1 



100 TRADK AND OOMMEKCE OF 

Another through line will soon be opened from St Louis to the Atlantic 
Seaboard the Wabash or Gtoold interests having porchased a number of 
small lines^ and haye under construction new connecting lines, which will 
glTC them an outlet to tidewater at Baltimore. 

The control of the Chicago & Sastem Illinois has passed to the Frisco, 
and they are now building some new track west from Findley, m.^ which, 
with a joint trackage arrangement with the Big Four, will give them an 
entrance to this city, and open up a new line to Chicago. 

The Louisville A Nashyille is now controlled by the Atlantic Coast 
Line, which will bring about improTed traffic arrangements and service 
by that company on shipments from this market, destined to points on the 
South Atlantic Coast. 

Many improvements have been made in the passenger service of the 
St. Louis lines, by increasing the number of trains; adding new equipment 
and cutting down the running time of many of their fast trains, which has 
resulted in an increased travel via this gateway. Improvements have also 
been made in the fast mail service from the East. 

The Southwestern lines have established a bureau in this city to 
advertise the advantages of the great Southwest, and have made low rates 
for home-seekers to push the settlement and development of that section, 
which will prove advantageous to St. Louis, the great trade center for 
that section. 

I The terminal improvements which have been made, and those now 

under way, should give this city facilities second to none in this country. 
The completion of belt tracks around St. Louis and East St. Louis by the 
Terminal Association, will enable them to handle all through freight 
without bringing it through the Mill Creek Valley. This will take 
\ 40% of the business which is now handled through the city and will give 

additional facilities for handling city freight and the passenger business. 
The Terminal Association has acquired control of the Wiggins Ferry and 
Interstate Car Transfer Companies, which, it it claimed, will give improved 
terminal service by a division of the business and the handling of the fast 
freight over the bridges and the slow freight on the ferries. 

One of the most Important improvements by the Terminal Association 
will be the construction of elevated tracks from the Eads Bridge to the 
Union Station, permitting the hand ing of passenger trains to the Union 
Station without passing through the tunnel. This will remove a long- 
standing objection the traveling public has had against this gateway. 
They will also construct a new depot near the foot of Olive street, which 
will permit passengers on trains from the East to stop down town^ and not 
have to make the trip to the Union Station. 

The Taylor City Belt Railway has recently been completed, which 
connects with and gives the Missouri Pacific and Frisco an entrance into 
the World's Fair Grounds. 



THE OITT or ST. LOUIS. 101 

The terminal yards of all lines have been improyed and enlarge by the 
purchase of property for new train yards, which will present blockades in 
the future, and proTide for the prompt settinji; of cars after arriyal. 

Many new lines have been projected, which will increase the trade of 
this city, and some are now under construction — the Iowa & St. Louis has 
46 miles of its road completed^ which will extend 530 miles northwest 
from tbis city via Des Moines to Sioux City. The Rock Island has sur- 
▼eyed a route and proposes to build a short line between St. Louis and 
Chicago. 

A new terminal company seeks right of way over about 10 miles of city 
streets, principally along Main street and Clark avenue, and they propose 
to build a third bridge and extensive terminals. 

All of these improvements speak in no uncertain terms for the future 
of the trade and commerce of New St. Louis. 



103 



TftADE AND OOMMSBCfS OF 



BUSINESS OF THS ST. LOUIS BKroOSS, AND THB FER&DfiS 

FOR 1908. 

AHD OOXFABIBOH WITH FBSVI017B TXAB8. 



▲XO01IT OF FBXXOHT QT TOK8 TRAN8FBBBBD AOBOU THK KITXIl AT 

8T. LOUn DUBIHO 1908, 

FBOX 8T. LOtm TO BA8T 8T. LOUn, TSHIOX, MADISON AND OABOKDKLST. 



BY 



Oaba. T0V8. 



TOTAZ. 
Tons. 



Tho Bads Bridge 

" •• By Wagon... .< 

Merohanti' Brldff* 

The WUrgina Ferry 

*^ •• By Wagon. 

The Oarondalet Ferry 

The Interstate Oar Transfer..... 
The Madison Comity Ferry 



II6,W0 



88,608 
42,089 



27.661 

15,440 



l,8n.W4 
7W,000 

BTslliS 



2,489.204 

880,740 

1,217.165 

121,880 

288,661 

60.200 



Total tons West to Bast during 1902. 

" " *• " UN)1. 

(« «i M •( 1900. 

«( «i «< it 1890. 

M «< « M 1996,' 

«t u «« •• iftiT 

<« « t< 4t igoo! 

f< « « «« I99Q, 

u •« <f M 1904. 

«( •• tt H IflOs! 

M f« •! « 1999. 

«« •« u u 1991. 



6.680.766 
5,877,208 
6.426.044 
4,614.186 
4,100,800 
8,648,187 
2 964,460 
2,826.077 
2.600.822 
2,818,860 
2,041,886 
8,007,880 



FBOIC BAST ST. LOUIS, OABONDBLBT, 1CADI80N AMD YBNICB TO ST. LOUIS. 



BY 



Cass. 



Tom. 



TOTAI. 
TONS. 



The Bads Bridge 

'* ** By Wagon 

Merchants' Bridge 

The Wiggins Ferry 

•♦ •* By Wagon. 

The Oarondelet Ferry 

The Interstate Oar Transfer 

The Madison Coonty Ferry 

The St. Clair Ferry Co 



174,900 



66,718 
60,448 



26.606 
24,206 



8,896,906 
400,000 

11426^682 
617,702 



4,286,906 

1,202,871 

1,944,884 

767.800 

688,648 

»,100 

20,000 



Total Tons East to West daring 1902. 

" •• *• •• 1901. 

•« " " •* 1900 

" " " ** 1809. 

I. K «« fi jggg 

fl( M «* i« 1897^ 

" " " ** 18U6. 

(« «< •« *« 1895. 

«i (« « « 1894. 

« •« *• " isosi 

« <• M i« 1892, 

« M U tt 13QJ^ 



8,948,160 
7,988,860 
6,416,096 
6,669,621 
6,964.688 
6,446,074 
6,096,966 
6.627,882 
4,878,742 
6,201,176 
6,289 810 
6.820,766 



Total both Ways 



I * 
tt 

I I 
tt 
1 1 
tt 
1 1 
tt 
tt 
tt 



« « 
(« 
tt 
it 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



1902 

1901. 

1900 

1890 

1898 

1897 



1896 
1804 
1898 
1802 
1801 



14,678.924 

18,810.768 

U, 840, 140 

11,478,757 

10.144,848 

9,088,261 

8,081.416 

8,462.960 

7,668,964 

8,100,844 

8,232,188 

8,828,116 



THE CSTT OF ST. IiOUlS. 



lie 



LOCAL AND THROUGH TONKAGB. 

1901. 
Tons. Percent. 

T6tel tons freight reoeired, local 18.083,116 73.89 

Total tons freight recelredi throng 4.864,313 17 18 

Tons freight received by ran, loeal 13,669311 73.10 

Tons freight reoeiyed bj rail, through 4364,313 37.90 

Tons freight, ezclnding ooal, received by 

rall,local 7370.363 68.60 

Tons freight, excluding coal, received by 

raU, tbrongb iJStOJUS 36.40 



1903. 




Tons. Percent 


18,164,896 


71.36 


8313384 


38.74 


13,747376 


70.68 


6313,884 


39.43 


7389,417 


63.08 


4,718398 


87.97 



AMOUNT OF COAL BECBIVSD IN ST. LOUIS. 



BOtJTK. 


1903. 
Tons. 


108L 

Tons, 


1980. 
Tons. 


Baltimore 4^ Ohio R. W. R.lfe 


682,370 

38,643 
160,638 
609,61 
1,061,686 
188,196 
694,746 
646,996 
886,884 

49,014 
413,316 

66,364 
8,480 

89,787 
756,840 
160,300 

08,600 


808,486 
100,603 
368.014 
431349 

833378 
100,863 
664,763 
731.338 
398373 
40318 
406^089 


688,987 


Chicago, Alton A St. L. " 


86368 


C C, 0. 4^ Bt. Louis •• 


164347 


▼andalia - 

ti^Ib^Ih Oentral •• 


406313 
961354 


Wabash •* 


196,849 


Louisville 4^ NashvlUe •• 


474,170 


ttouthem ** 


699337 


Mobile&Ofalo •' 


366436 


Toledo, St. L. 4^ Western •• 


94,787 


Chicago, Peoria & St. L. ** 


868^786 


St. Louis 4^ 0*Fallon " 


St. Louis Valley " 






St. L., Belleville & So. ** 


37368 

486,063 

1,473 

68316 


88384 


St. L., Trov & Eastern •* 


114,118 


St. H, BeUeville 4k Sub. " 


ftom Ohio River ......^ 








Total Tons- 1 . t r 


6,706,794 


4366,328 


4,860399 





187387 
178308 



u 
«f 



«« 



BBOUPTS OF AUTHBAOITI goal INOLUDBD is ABOya BBOBXPTS. 

.. 121389 tons. ( 1894 186,494tons. 

1890 124396 '* 1886 307,784 «' 

ttOl 189,060 •< 1896 318,066 *< 

1897 172388 " 

1898 336.606 



393,118 tons. 

1900 180360 " 

1001 300,797 " 

1903 60344 



«« 



Beeeipts of Anthracite Ooia in UOO: 361.471 tons local; 80,647 tons through. 

1800: 169,306 " " 31343 «* " 

1901: 198,678 •• •• 7,134 •* •• 

1903: 68,840 " " 3396 " ** 

Receipts of Ooke, 1900, 166,868 tons. Receipts of Ooke, 1903, 168,600 tons. 

1901, 313,608 



u 



(< 
If 
«« 



(< 
(1 
f« 



t« 



«• 



*• 



]fOirrHi.T BaoaiFTS of amthbaoitb ooai. nr 1903. 



MONTH. 



Local, Thro., 



Tons. 



Tons. 



MONTH. 



Local, 
Tons. 



Thro., 
Tons. 



January.. 
February. 
March..... 

AprU 

Hay 

June 



10,461 


47 


6,734 


las 


6,986 


383 


8,810 


188 


0,308 


886 


3,806 


136 



July 

August..... 
September. 
October. . . . 
November . 
December . 



811 

938 

961 

4,401 

6,144 

3,603 



867 
189 
144 
816 
310 
388 



TRADE AXD OOUMXBCK Of 



OUe*Io JC Alton B B. (Ho DIt.) 

Hisaonr) Faclflc B. R •-. 

Bt. LoQlB&Ban Francisco B. B 

Wabuh Ballwaj (Weat) 

St. LoolB, EaDBU Olty A Ooloredo B. B 

HlBaouri, Kansas A TeXaa S. B 

Bt. LonlE-SoathweBtem By. 

Bt. Lionla, Iron Moon tain ft Sontbem K.B 

lUinoiH Oentral S. B 

LoulBTlUe ft MaahTllle B. B 

Hoblle ft Ohio B. B 

Southern B. B 

Baltimore ft Ohio Bontbweeteni B. B 

OhlcoKO, Alton ft Bt. Louis B. B. (Main Line)... 

Cleveland, Otaclnnatl, Ohlcaso * Bt. Lools B. B 

Terra HanM ft Indianapolis K. B. (Vandalla Lloe)... 

Wabaib Ballroad (East) 

Toledo, St. Ijoulsft Western B.B 

Ohlcaso, Peorta ft St. Louis B. B 

Oblcago. BarUogton ft Qulnc; B. B 

Bt. LoniB, Keoknk ft Northwestero B. B 

St. Louis, Tio; ft Eastern B. B 

St. LonlB, BeUerllle ft Suburban Bj 

St. Loulsft O'Fallon BB 

St. Lonls, BelleTllle ft BouUtem B. B 

St. Lonls Valley By 

tipper UIsBlssIppI Blrer 

Lower Mississippi Blver 

lUlDolsBlTer 

Hlssoarl BItbt 

Oblo Blver 

Oamberland aud Tenaeasee Blven 

Upper Ulaslsslppl Blver by Bafla 

Total In Tons 



m.Bn 


loafli 








B1T,« 






80,Br 


8S^ 


«CT,9« 


ia,it 






3,m.an 


1,987,01 


i.mta 


1.670,8 


W3,t!l 




9».1S( 


BBi.eP 


l,a69.(UJ 




i,ott;ai 


066,8 


isoMflr 


tlUfi 


7atfl3i 


5ie.(: 


tna.vii 


an.n 


936.811 


788,8 


siiM 


as*.* 


man 


SM,( 


Mi.is: 


4B63 


7«.8TI 


871.9 






1,471 


U4,U 


S8,*T0 


tOfil 


tarn 


lM,i 


37,881 


M,» 






tr^u 


i.f 


n,s» 




GO.aEft 


7B,M 



« 






ji 



^* 



•^Jl 



i 



iS; 



iIn' 



*v» 



ll 






,? 






i 



f . 






r I g 






fi 



' ^' » 






\ -'^ t »^ •♦Ji. 



.'« •■■. r«- . ••»* < • I. ■ * 






J !>. 



1, . iri 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



105 



STATEMENT 

SHOWnrG THB AMOUNT OF FREIGHT, IN TONS, SHIPPED FROM ST. LOUIS BT 
lAOH RAILBOAD AND BIYBB FOB THBEE TBABS. 



EOUTB. 



1903. 



1901. 



1900. 



Ohlca«o& Alton B. B. (Mo. DiY.) 

MlflBOori Pacific B. B 

St. Louis & San Francisco B.B 

Wabash Bailway (West) 

St. Lonls, Kansas Oity & Colorado B. B 

Missouri, Kansas & Texas B. B 

St. Louis Southwestern By 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern B. B..... 

niinois Central B. B 

Louisville A; Nashville B. B , 

Mobile & Ohio B. B 

Southern B. B , 

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern B. B 

Chicago, Alton & St. Louis B. B. (Main Line) . 
Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis. . . . 
Terre Haute A Indianapolis B. B. fVandalla) 

Wabash Bailway (East). 

Toledo, St. Louis & Western B. B 

Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis B. B , 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy B. B 

St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern B. B 

St. Louis & 0*Fallon B. B. 

St. Louis Valley By 

Upper Mississippi Biver 

Lower Mississippi Biver 

Illinois Biver 

Missouri Biver 

Ohio Biver , 

Cumberland and Tennessee Blvers 



Total in Tons. 



Total by BaU... 
Total by Biver. 



161,166 

,020,184 

,00S,011 

688,866 

82,747 
869,984 

74,199 
796,126 
776,188 
442,206 
648,617 
872,661 
889,696 
678,446 
899,674 
427,798 
908,602 
470,136 
422,060 
660,686 
617,662 
100 
8,729 

28,180 
174,617 

10,446 
4,840 



11,884 



U,26e,848 



11,065,586 
224,262 



81,648 
900,820 
906,877 
496,618 

89,606 
848,066 

43,160 
1,661,009 
706,244 
406,224 
487,406 
688,408 
198,071 
484,592 
443,818 
461,180 
622,226 
607,014 
318,973 
441,778 
488,486 



23,392 

168,498 

9,090 

7,186 



11,111 



10,862,886 



10,658,066 
209,271 



78,060 
782,979 
096,702 
461,461 

18,877 
268,608 



1,187,429 
680,581 
483,906 
488,880 
818,698 
826,287 
428,666 
447.713 
409,627 
618,668 
810,886 
872,662 
448,748 
479,118 



86,675 

187,886 

5,020 

1,226 



16,275 



9.426,889 



9,180,309 
245,680 



106 



TBADB Ain> OOlOIBRCn OF 



PUBLISHED RATES OF FREIGHT BY RAIL FROM EAST 
ST. LOUIS TO NEW YORK, DURING 1902. 



Dayb. 


Meata. 

Per 
100 lbs. 


Grain and 

Grain 
Products, 
Per 100 lbs. 


Floor, 
Per 
bbl. 


Oompreesed 

Cotton, 
Per 100 lbs. 


JftBU&rr lilt to DMwnibAr 7th . . ^ r t- ^ t - • 


85 
86 


r 


41 
46 


80 


December 8th to December 81st. 


80 



Grain and Grain Products to Boston 2 cents higher than New Yojpki to Phila- 
delphia 2 cents lower than New York; to Baltimore 8 cents lower than New York. 

Ootton to Boston 6 cents higher, to Philadelphia 2 cents and Baltimore 8 cents 
lower than New York rates. 

Meats to Boston 8 cents higher, to Philadelphia 2 cents and BsAtinoDe 8 
lower than New York. 

GLASS BATB8. 



To New York 

To Boston 

To Philadelphia.. 
To Baltimore 



87 
04 
86 

84 



l6H 
81^ 
78H 



68 
93 
66 
66 



4034 

88H 



n 

87 



Bate on Grain from St. Louis Bleyators 1 cent per 100 lbs. more than East 
Bt. Louis rates. 

Bates on other heary freight from St. Louis U to 6 cents per 100 lbs. mors than 
Bast St. Louis rates. 



ALL RAIL RATES OF FREIGHT IN GENTS FROM ST. LOUIS 

TO SOUTHERN CITIES DURING 1902. 



ABTICLS8. 

Inonr per barrel, 0.L 

Pork per barrel, O. L 

Grain per 100 lbs., any quantity 

Meat packed, per lOOlbs., O. L 

Meat loose, per 100 lbs., O. L 

Hay per 100 lbs., O. L 



Memphis, 


YieksbaxK, 


NewOilesMi, 


Tenn. 


Miss. 


La. 


90 


84 


84 


66 


89 


69 


19 


98 


90 


18 


80 


80 


18 


80 


80 


13 


90 


90 



PUBLISHED AVERAGE RATE OF FREIGHT BY RAIL ON GRAIN 

FROM EAST ST. LOUIS TO NEW YORK. 



1902 

ItfOl 19.88 

j^QQ^ ^^ ^ . .19.88 

1880 On Giain (except 'dorn) V.'M 2l'.96 

180eOnCk>rn 20 7-10 

l896iinCk)m 20K 

IBn On Com for Export 17>< 

1887 On Grain 98-96 

1806 98 

1886 98.67 

1804. 94.78 

28J0 



Per 100 lbs. 
.90.66 cts. 



«* 
«• 
It 



«« 



c< 



M 

*( 
4* 



Per 100 lbs. 

lOn Grain 96.61 cts. 

1801 On Wheat 90 '< 

1801 On Com UH 

1890 On Wheat WH 

lOOOOnOom. 98^ 

1880 Except Com 98)^ 

1880OnOom. i 

1888 99K 

1887 88 9-16 

1886 90 

1886 99 1-7 

1884 .1 



« 

M 
« 



f« 



•f 
«i 
(« 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 107 



THE RIVERS. 



Biver traffic during 1902 was slightly less than lor the preoeiing year, 
as shown by the following table : 

1900. 1901. 1903. 

Tons received by steamboats and barges 488,670 412,285 886*046 

Tons leceived by rafts. 78.840 00,660 80,875 

Tons shipped by steamboats and barges 246/S80 209,271 224,262 

Total 757,090 672,076 641,182 

There was a good stage of water in the lower riyer daring the year, but 
the traffic was light on through businessi there being but a small movement 
in export grain. Could a good stage of water be depoided upon eyeiy 
year, the lower riyer traffic would be reyiyed, and new boats enter the trade. 

The appropriation by the general goyemment of $660^000 per year f(H: 
lour years for the improyement of the Mississippi between the mouth of 
the Oliio and the mouth of tiie Dlinois, justifies the belief that a nayigable 
channel of eight feet will be secured for the entire year. 

Captain D. M. Connors, makes the following report of the Memphis 
route: 

<' The business of the Lee Line Steamers operating between St. Louis 
and Friar's Point, Miss., showed a marked improyement oyer the proceed- 
ing year both in freight and passengers. To this^ however, we attribute 
the unusual good stage of water which was the most favorable for the past 
ten years, also the good coxmections made at Memphis with the lower river 
boats whidii enabled us to caity freight and passengers to points on the 
lower river as far south as Vicksburg." 

The local packets rmming to Comm«x» and intermediate pc^ts were 
actively engaged daring the entire season and did a good business. 

Mr. Isaac P. Lusk gives the following statement of the business of the 
upper river: 

'^ The passenger and freight traffic ot the Upper Mississippi river has 
been very satisfactory for the past season. All the local packets running 
in short trades have done the largest business in their history. There has 
been an excellent stage of water in the Upper Mississippi except between 
LaCross, Wis., and the foot of Lake Pepin, and for this stretch of river 
there was only three feet of water for several weeks, and on which account 
our steamers were unable to handle any shipments of freight for St Paul, 
Minn., or for any point above LaCross, Wis., although considerable business 
was offered us. This low water spoken of, came early in August and con- 
tinued through August and part of September, and although onr steamers 
could handle no freight whatever for points above LaCross to St. Paul, 



106 TRADE AKD OOMMKROE OF 

Minn.^ still they contlnaed to ran through to St. Paul until the middle of 
September, and never miased a trip in getting through to St. Paul; being 
being able^ however, to carry only passengers and no freight. 

'< The passenger business handled by the steamers of the Upper Mississ- 
ippi river is constantly increasing. There is a certain amount of freight 
business which can always be augmented when there is a good stage of 
water, but with the low stage of water experienced almost every year in the 
Upper Mississippi after the middle of July or first of August, the freight 
handled by steamers from St. Louis to points, say north of Davenport, 
Iowa, is insignificant. "With proper improvement of the Upper Mississippi 
river by which a good navigable channel could be maintained of not less 
than five feet of water during the low water season there would be an 
immense amount of traffic brought to the river that is now dependent upon 
the railroads, while local industries would be greatly benefited by the low 
rates that would prevail. 

<' The average yearly receipts for the Diamond Jo Line Steamers is made 
up of more than 75% from the passenger traffic, leaving only about 26% 
for the freight traffic receipts, and this small percentage is accounted for 
solely for the reason that the steamers of this line are unable to handle the 
freight offerings a large part of the Ume that they are running, on account 
of the low stage of water. It is only on account of the good passenger 
business enjoyed for a few sunmier months that the steamers are enabled 
to run; otherwise there would not be a through steamer running at any 
time from St. Louis to St. Paul.*^ 

Mr. J. E. Massengale made the following report on the Tennessee river 
trade: 

'^ In reference to the trade of the Tennessee river valley, our steamers 
(six in number) that serve St. Louis from that territory, traverse the 
Tennessee river a distance of 800 miles, between Paducah, Ey., and Flor- 
ence, Ala., and have had a better business from that section this year than 
for several years past, particularly in shipments of cotton, peanuts and 
stock. Thnt territory was favored with veiy large crops this year, particu- 
larly in cotton, com and peanuts ; hence is prosperous, and we have brought 
and will bring to St. Louis from the present crop, say 10,000 bales of cotton, 
which is 40% more than the average. Our fiour, bacon, groceries and 
produce from St. Loui6 have increased possibly 15% to that section, but I 
regret to say that our dry-goods, boot and shoe trade has not increased; in 
fact, it shows less this fall than formerly, but as a whole the business has 
been very satisfactory, and the outlook is not gloomy by any means. 

'< The business of both the Illinois and Missouri rivers has been fairly 
satisfactoiy and up to the average." 



THK 0IT7 or BT. LOUIS. 109 



STBAMBRS PLYING BETWEEN ST. LOUIS AND OTHER 

PORTS DURING 190J. 



*^ DIAMOND JO'' LINE. 

Steamer Sidney, Upper Missifiaippi Biver. 

" St. Paul, " " " 

" Quincy, " " " 

EAGLE PACKET COHPAmr. 

Steamer Spread Eagle, Upper MiasiBsippi Biyer. 

** Bald Eagle, IllinoiB Biyer. 

" Grey Eagle, Lower Misslasippi Biyer. 

" JoBle, " " " 

" Cape Girardeau, " " " 

ST. LOUIS A TENNESSEE BIYEB PACKET COMPANY. 

Steamer City of Memphis, Temiessee Biyer. 

" City of Clifton, Tennessee Biyer. 

LEE LINE. 

Steamer Peters Lee, Lower Mississippi Biyer. 
" Bees Lee, " " " 

" Georgia Lee, " " " 

" Stacker Lee, " " " 

ST. LOUIS A MISSISSIPPI TALLEY TRANSPORTATION COMPANY. 

Steamer S fi. H. Clark, Lower Mississippi Biyer. 

" H. M. Hoxie, " " " 

" Henry Lonrey, " " " 

STEEL BARGE LINE. 

Steamer J. H. McDougall, Lower Mississippi Biyer. 

INDEPENDENT PACKETS AND TOWBOATS. 



Steamer Chester, 


Lower Mississippi Biyer. 


(( 


City of Peoria, 


Upper " " 


i( 


City of St. Louis, 


Lower Mississippi Biyer. 


(( 


Columbia, 


ii li ii 


(4 


Jacob Bichtman, 


Upper Mississippi Biyer. 


it 


J. M. Bichtman, 


it li ii 


(i 


Polar Waye, 


ii ii ii 


ii 


Jack Frost, 


Illinois Biyer, 


it 


Charlotta Boeckeler, 


(i ii 


it 


Saturn, 


Upper Mississippi Biyer. 


it 


Satellite, 


ii ii i< 


i( 


Pathfinder, 


ii ii ii 


(( 


W. H. Grapeyine, 


Lower " " . 



TRAJ>K AND OOHVEBC^ Ot 



8te»iner Seawiog, 


Upper Hladsdppi Hirer. 


» PhUDiTU, 


» u « 


" Peulte DmTls, 


11 11 « 


" Kit Canon, 


Upper Mlssisdppt River. 


" Lnmberbc^, 


" " " 


" New HaveiL, 


nllDOlS BlTBT. 


" John BMTett, 


Lower MlariBippiHhrer. 


" Waih Hon^ell, 


11 41 i> 




Upper 


•' IdA Hmo, 




" Vmttt, 


Lower " " 


" KvmAJiM, 


Upper 


" BoUe (rf CiihMm, 


" " " 


" Fred Hartney, 


Lower 


" Blanore, 


niinojB 


" Lotua Sims, 


Lower " " 


" JeSide BflC, 


Upper 


" Xditti, 




" Joho H. mrtoy, 


Lower -" 


" H. V. FrisWe, 


U 11 « 


" RoBBeU Lord, 


11 .1 11 


" DoJi*1ji, 


" " " 


" Mary H. Michael, 


Lower MiariMlppiEiTOr. 


» Plying Kagle, 


Upper 


« Lita« Ciyde, 


niinoU Kver. 


« Lic^Owdnv, 


Upper UlBdaslppi Rivec. 


" Polly, 


11 n 11 


" Frite, 


Ohio Blver. 


" T. H. Davia, 


Lower MifiBtBsippl River. 


" India Otvenc, 


Upper 


" City o( St. Shefl«ld, 


" " 


" Meglddo, 


11 11 11 


" Herman Paepeke, 


Ohio RlTer- 


" Kennedy, 


Lower HtsaliBippi River. 


" Julia, 


Upper 


" Clymai, 




" Hasoot, 


I. ■( 11 


" Tenbroeck, 


(1 If II 


" Woodrufl, 


11 11 u 


" Eagle, 


Lower '• 


" Wanderer, 


Upper " " 


» Vera, 


niinoia River. 


" Bart. B. Linehan, 


Upper lOaalsdp^ River. 


" City of St. Joseph, 


Missouri River. 



TMB fSMSm OF m. wmA. 



m 



Steuner Annie BnBsell, 
" Lnlu G, 
Undine, 
Henrietta. 
Glad ndkigB, 
Gazely 



U 
<t 
it 



Steamer 

tc 

a 
it 



Steamer Sachem, 
" Choctaw, 



ft 

it 
it 
a 
tt 
it 
tt 
tt 
it 
tt 
ti 



XJVtrSO STATfeS BOATS. 

Steamei^ 

tt 

tt 



Wynoka, 

KaJcomla, 

Leota, 

Oeneral Gihkioiei 

Search, 

Genenu John Newton, 

Minnetonka, 

H. G. Wrid^ 

Colonel A. n. Ifaohengje, 

C. W. Howell, 

Ko. 9. 



it 
tt 
tt 

a 
it 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



mUOilgF, 

Lotas, 

La To9oa, 

Midia, 

Midway, 

City of ProTldence. 



LUy, 

Genecal BateArd, 

John K. Macomb, 

Miasinippi, 

Vixen, 

A. L. Abbott, 

General Caaey, 

C. B. Suter, 

Titan, 

Colonel Pattenon, 

A. J. Whitney, 

T. B. Florence, 

Patrol. 



DEPTH OP CHANNEL SOUTHWARD IN 190J. 



The nayigable stage of the riyer below St. Louis as repoited by Mr. 
P. S. Drown, Seoietuy of Uie Mississippi and Ohio Biver Riots' Society, 
waaasfoUowv: 

ST. LOUIS TO OAIBO. 



JaanatjStolS^ S^ft. 

•* ifito 28 en " 

Febmarj. froze up, no boats, no 
Bonnolngs. 

March ItolS 10 

** 16to80 IS 1-6 

AnrU 2tolfi U^ 

^' 15toM ItH 

** 22to80 lOK 

May, whole month is 

Jnae ItolS 14 

" IStoSO 19K 

July, no Boundings, throughont 

month latolS 

August itolO B)i 



M 

<« 



«( 



tf 
tt 



tt 
tt 



tt 
tt 



Augnat ]/Dtoao 8 ft. 

^* 20to31 lOi^ " 

September itolO 12 " 

«• I0to20 7 " 

" 20to80 7X " 

October, no reports from pilots stage of 
water, 12 to 18 ft. on St. Louis gauge, 
which indicates 12 feet at' shoalest 
place hence to Cairo. 

NoTember StolS 8 

'* 16to20 9 

" »to80 B)i 

December ltol2 10 

12to22 11 

25to81 8K 



ft. 
«« 

u 
<1 



GAIBO TO NSW OBLBANS. 



January, no boats, no soundings. 
February, no boats, no soundings. 
March, no boats, no soundings. 

Throughout all three months there was 
good stage, 9 to 13 ft. on all shoal places. 
Aprtt ItolO i»Hn. 

•* 17toS0 ia)i " 

May Otol2 17K " 



•I 



10 to 29. 17U 

1.. 19 2-6 



tt 



June, average depth for monl^. 

July, no through boats out of St. Louis, 
no soundings; shoalest water hence 
toNewOrleans 9 ft. 



August, no boats till 17th. 

^* 17 to 20 ISitfft. 

" 20to20 12 •• 

•♦ SOtoBl d)i 

September 4tol0. 8 

'* lOtoSO 9 

October 1 tolO 10^ 

lOtoaO 12 

November ItolO 8 

istoao SH 

December lOtolS 20 

18to26 21 

20 to 80 19}i 



tt 



tt 
tt 
•I 
*« 
If 
«* 
<« 
11 



it 



The city directrix is 83.74 aboTe the zero of river gauge^ and is located 
opposite In o. 4 South Levee. It is the high water mark of 1826^ and is 
412.71 feet above mean Gulf level. 



2 TRADE AND OOUMKBOS OT 

For the pact tlilrt7-fiTe mhoiu navlgAllon loathwwd hu been siu- 
mded by Ice a* follows ; 

liitarUe6-«8,froinDMMnbuUlhM/Milury UUl tTdni. 

" 18aS-07, " OMombar Wtb M r«bi1)UTM aS -^ 

■• UBI-«8, " JaiHunMh to Fabnui7 18th W " 

■* 18BB-6(, op«D *U wfDtra. 

•■ l«»-Ti>.OromI>MambarIIMtoDMamlMrMth T " 

•• 1870-71, ■■ Deoemb«rtlM to JiDiwrv Wd Bt « 

" 1871-71. " DwMmber lit tolMll.aiu1bonJuauTlOtlktorA.Uth.... 41 " 

» 1872-71, I^om NoTsmbcrMth to JannuTlOth H •• 

•• lBT»-74.opanBllwlnl«r. 

•■ 1874-71, from DBoemlmtOth to rabniHySItta 58 <■ 

" 187B-7S. op«u kU wlDtcr. 

•■ 1816-77, (Tom DMombarSth to FabnutrrBth BB " 

■■ 1877-78. open kll wlntn 

** 1878-78, from Deotmber IBth to JannuT Wth ud FebmurlltbtolTth.... 18 " 

" 1879-80, rrom Deoamtxr 17th to DeoamfiarSIitlaolIulre IB " 

" 1880-81, troia Not. 18 to Doo. S, ud from Deo, 7 to U. kod from Dm. 84 to 

reb.18 78 " 

" 1881-81. oprakll winter. 

" lS89-88,fn>mDss. 7 toll, and from Jui. 1 to Feb. IS ES ■• 

" 1888-84, fromD«0.18lorcb.S. , 4S " 

" 1881Bt.fromD«o. IfllbtaSMb.udSSdkTilaJanaMTMdFctniutTT.... 47 " 
•' lSSt-88, frainDea.10toDeo.ia, aadbMUJu.Tth taFeb.Uth SB •■ 

18BS-S7,rmmI>eo.ltoDeo.l4,uid(roDiDwi.»toJu.lT 41 " 

■' 1837-88, rrom Deo. 18 to Jan. 81. 41 " 

" 1888-», open M winter. 
" ie8*-<W, open all winter, 
" 1888-81, Op«a all winter. 
" 1S81-M, from Jarnurr Slh to Febnuur lit K " 

1881-M, from Deo. SOOi toreb-lS 67 ■■ 

" 18aS-M, opiin aU winter. 

■■ 1884-86, from JnnanrTlHt to UaichlBt GB " 

" 1890-88. opAn nil winter. 
•■ 1898-97, open all winter. 
" 1897-88, open all wlater, bat some Ice ranalng. 

1898-99, from Dec. 7th to Und, Jan. 1st to tOth, Jan. 80th to Uarch let, S4 " 
•> 1899-1900, from Dec. 80th to Jan. Uth and U daja between Janaary tSth 

and March tth 87 " 

1900-1901, during Pebraary M - 

" 1901-1901. rrom Dec. Uth to .Tan. ISth, and from Jan. Kth to Feb. Kth . W " 

181)1-1908, from DecembeTl7tb to 



STEAMERS AND BABGES. 

Number of yessela, and tbeir tonnage, permanentlj' and temporarily 
irolled and licensed at the Port of St. Louis, Ho., December 31st, 1903 : 

Xi.dTiaali. ShmTiuii*. HatTnuf*. 

annanent Enrolled Wood Steamera Bi 35,810 21,ili 

" " Iron and Steet Bteamers... 8 3,889 tiK 

Barees(wood) 4B 88.761 ae.A91 

Barxes (?t6Bl) 1 l.Slt 3,1» 

" " Steam Yachta (wood) 2 113 81 

Stpam Yachts (steel) 3 177 138 



THE CITY OP ST. LOXHS. 

HIGHEST AND LOWEST STAGES OF WATER. 



113 



The record of the highest and lowest water noted at the St. Louis 
Weather Bureau Office since its establishment is as follows: Zero of 
gauge being low water mark in 1863, which . indicates about 12 feet of 
water in the channel in the harbor of St. Louis^ and 4 feet of water in 
shoal places between here and Cairo : 



HIGHEST. 



Tear. 



Date. 



Stage. 



1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 
1880.. 
1881.. 
1882.. 
1888.. 
1884.. 
188S.. 
1886.. 
1887. • 
looB. • 
Xcoo. . 
1890.. 
1891.. 
1892.. 
1893.. 
19H.. 
189S.. 
1896. . 
1887.. 
1898. • 
1899.. 
1900.. 
1901.. 
1903.. 



May 10 and 11. . . . 

JnneU 

June 15 

Julys 

Jaly 10, 11 and 12. 

May B 

July 6 

June 25 

April 

JnnelT 

May 13 

April S 

June 8 and 4 

Jnnel 

June 80 

July4 

May 19 

Mays 

May 12 

December 22 

May 36 

May 2 

May 38 

April 27 

March 16 

April 18 and 19.... 
July 26 



32 n.- 6 in. 
26 ft - 6 in. 

26 ft.- 8 in. 
21 ft.- 2 in. 
25 ft.- 6 in. 

83 ft.- 7 in. 
32 ft.- 4 in. 

84 ft.- 8 in. 
28 ft.- 2 in. 

27 feet. 

27 feet. 
20.fi feet. 
20.8 feet. 

24.4 leet. 
20.7 feet 

28.7 feet. 
86.0 feet. 

81.5 feet. 

23.8 feet. 

28.8 feet. 
27.7 feet. 
81.0 feet. 
27.2 feet. 

26.6 feet. 

28 ft. - 4 in. 
22.4 feet. 

26.9 feet. 



LOWEST. 



Year. 



Date. 



Stage. 



1876.. 

1877.. 

1878.. 

1879. 

1880.. 

1881.. 

1882.. 

1883.. 

1884.. 

1885.. 

1886 . 

1887.. 

1888.. 

1889.. 

1890.. 

1801.. 

1892.. 

1898.. 

1894.. 

1896.. 

1896. . 

1897.. 

1896.. 

1899.. 

1900.. 

1901.. 

1902. 



Pebruary7 

October 4 

December 27 

December 26 

November 29. 

February 4, 5 and 6 . . . . 

December 18 

January 12 

January 4 

December 16 and 17 

December 4 and 6 

December 26 and 27 ... . 

January 1 

February 27 

December 80 and 81. . . . 

December 6 

December 27 

December 

February 8 

January 2 

December 11 

December 34 

December 11 

February 1 

January 2 

December 10 

January 80 



6 feet 
6 ft.-10 in. 

6 ft.-ll In. 
3 ft.- 6 in. 

2 ft.-10 in. 

7 ft.- 7 in. 

3 ft.-10 in. 

4 ft.- 5 in. 
3 ft.- 4 im 
2 ft.- 1 in. 
ft.- in. 
0.8 feet. 
3.5 feet. 

2.7 feet. 

2.8 feet. 
2.8 feet. 
0.2 feet. 
0.0 feet. 
0.2 feet. 

-4).5 feet. 
8.8 feet. 
0.4 feet. 
0.8 feet. 
0.7 feet. 
2 ft.- 6 in. 
-1.8 feet. 
-1.2 feet. 



( - ) Indicates below zero of gauge. 

SUMMAKY OF THE ST. LOUIS WEATHER BUREAU RIVER 
GAUGE READINGS FOR THE YEAR 1902. 

Highest and Lowest Stages of Water in the Mississippi River at 
St. Lonis, Mo.; for each month of the year 1902, as determined from the 
records of the United States Weather Bureau. 



Month. 



Highest. 



Date. 



Lowest. 



Date. 



January .. 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . . 
September. 
October.... 
NoTember. 
December . 



ft. ioa«. 

9 5 



6 
18 
12 
18 
21 



1 
4 
4 
2 
2 



26 



22 
20 



7 
2 



20 8 
14 8 
14 7 



7 

27 

17 

8 

80 

80 

26 

1 

1 

9 

80 

1 



ft. lOtht. 
-1 2 




8 
6 
7 
17 
21 



2 
8 
7 
6 
4 
2 



14 8 

7 5 
U 6 

9 4 

8 8 



1 

1 

28 

9 

2 

U 

18 

24 

81 

6 

17-18 



Highest stage during the year 

Lowest stage during the year. 

Absolute range 

Greatest monthly range 

Least monthly range , 

Mean range 

( - ) Indicates stage below zero gauge. 



26.9 feet, on July 26th. 
-1.2 " on January 80th. 
28.1 " 
12.7 " in September. 

3.8 '* in June. 

7.7 " 



TBADK Ain> OOHmROB OV 



BITER QAUGB BEADmOS AT ST. LOUIS, MO., FOB 1903. 
Fboh U. S. Weathkb Bcroai] Becobds. 



ua. 


1 

1 


1 


i 


1 


a 


i 


i 


^ 
1 


■ 


1 


1 






ti 

!:! 

1.1 
l.T 

-*> 


-0.2 

W 

3.1 


8.8 

!;! 

at 

a.i 
a.a 

li 

M.B 

i:! 
11 


!!1 

li 

1 

S.8 

11 

8.6 

B.a 

SI 


Ilia 

816 

li 

ll'.t 
n'.a 

1 .7 
1 .6 

1:! 

U.S 
11.1 

li:? 

il 


19.6 
18!8 

S 
1 

91.9 

If 

IS.l 

lait 

IB.B 

M 


li 

Is 

n.o 
11. s 

».a 

iil 

M.t 
S.l 

X.6 

S,! 

16.8 

K. 

36. 
M. 

S: 

36'7 
36.0 
16.3 

«,8 


M.7 

91.8 

li 

ie.2 

IBS 
16.7 
18.1 

IB.B 

If 
K 

is!* 

isle 
wis 


30.1 

i;l 

isIs 

1617 

is:9 
II 

8.6 

1»'.0 

i6;fl 


B:! 

n'.i 

ts.s 

»ii 

wis 

lo:* 

16.1 

Is 

33 


11.0 

1:1 

i 

uii 

10.0 

iS 
1s 

ait 

6.1 

uIb 

P 


1 




t 


1. 










,?■■■: :: 








































































s£;ii;i:;;; 




8imB 


98.4 




266.8 


180.S 


BSl.l 


S7B.1 


756.9 


W6.0 


UB.l 


519.B 


6B6.S 


a- 


Means 


8.0 




8,8 


"■* 


11.7 


iB.a 


M.* 


18.3 


IB.S 


16.8 


U.S 





< Minus sign lnOlcatss stage below 



THE CfFf Of ST. LOTTIS. 



US 



ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES OF STEAMBOATS AND BARGBS,1002. 



JainiAry . . . . 
W%brmaTf .. 

liaroh 

Aprtl 

M*y 

June 

July 

Aagait 

8eDt«mber.. 

Ocsober 

November . . 
Deoember.. 



Sf£r 



ToM. 



19 
48 
69 
62 
67 
89 
66 
83 
44 
18 



Low*r 
Mlw. 



8 



494 



81 
73 
97 
75 
110 
88 
74 
76 
81 
40 



IU1«- 
noil. 



746 



10 
10 
9 
10 
18 

la 

18 

16 

10 

6 



Mis. 
■ourl. 



107 



a 

6 

6 

6 

12 

8 
7 
7 
7 

4 



Ohio. 



4 
1 

a 



62 



Comb 

A 
Tenn. 



4 
6 
7 
6 
7 
6 
4 
8 
4 
8 



60 



Tbtel 
Btmrt 



8 



90 
148 
179 
168 
198 
181 
164 
168 
128 

70 



Burr* 

ABc'i 



81 
68 
107 
88 
64 
44 
28 
86 
87 
17 



1,466 



461 



Toot of 

yreljrht 

BeeeiTed 



440 



18,680 
46.020 
71,280 
86,56» 

61»740 
64^926 
27,406 
82,646 
28,040 
18,296 



886,046 



Tom of 
Lumber 
and loire 
bjrul 
recelT*d 
tfom 
upper 
ICto<il*p. 



660 
2,040 
6,726 
6,190 
4,625 
2,780 
8,610 
4826 



DBPABTUBB8. 



1902. 



Jumary... 
Vebnuury.. 

Mnroh 

April 

»y 

June 

jmy 

Aagaat..... 
September. 
October.... 
K^Tember. 



Total 



9&'' 



21 
64 
61 
08 
60 
70 
62 
64 
88 
16 



486 



LoWr 
Mlfft. 



44 

74 
94 
66 
108 
89 
76 
80 
87 
41 



786 



niin- 

oii. 



18 
8 
12 
10 
14 
10 
10 
10 
10 
2 



Mli- 
Morl. 



2 
6 
6 

4 
18 
8 
6 
8 
6 



99 



42 



Tenn. Oble 



8 
8 
6 
7 
6 
7 
4 
8 
7 
10 



62 



White, 

Bid* 

O'eh'ft. 



Totel 
Dep'e 



88 
149 
178 
146 
196 
184 
167 
166 
127 



Tons 
Ship'4 



16,940 
20,916 
26,968 
14,056 
16,460 
87,825 
19,911 
88,212 
26,088 
28,688 



1,448 224,262 



ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES FOR TWENTY YEARS. 



ABRiyALS. 



Tears. 



Boats. 



Barges. 



Tons of 

Freight 

BeoelTed. 



Tons of 
Lumb'rAL'jKS 
by Baltreo^. 



1902 
1901 
1900 
1899 
1898 
1897 
1896 
1895 
1894 
1898 
1801 
1891 
1890 
1889 
1888 
1887 
1880 
1886 
1884 



1466 


461 


1641 


698 


1622 


686 


1670 


680 


1680 


792 


1898 


927 


9865 


1426 


9007 


J126 


9061 


1246 


9087 


1003 


9063 


1090 


1881 


1019 


1927 


1274 


8196 


1474 


9079 


1244 


8861 


1272 


2087 


1289 


1878 


1080 


9048 


999 


9240 


1186 



386.046 
412,260 
488,670 
894,660 
440.626 
607,106 
687,765 
410,146 
466,175 
472,895 
666,980 
460,060 
680,790 
643,990 
687,965 
668,880 
670,206 
479,066 
620,860 
620,926 



80,875 

60,550 

78,840 

71,960 

67,060 

69,666 

84,010 

88,686 

128,866 

126,610 

130,220 

142,090 

132,940 

127,696 

18u,856 

218,166 

200,786 

917,860 

940,880 

281,886 



DSPABTURXS. 



Boats. 



1902 
1901 
1900 
1899 
1896 
1897 
1896 
1896 
1894 
1898 
1892 
1891 
1890 
1889 
1888 
1887 
1886 
1886. 
1884 
1888 



1418 
1619 
1605 
1682 
1614 
1676 
1946 
1904 
1998 
9009 
9018 
1846 
1910 
8211 
2076 
2828 
2108 
1888 
9018 
9140 



Tons of 
Freight 
Shipped. 



224,262 
200^71 
246,680 
208,208 
399.568 
460,366 
679,410 
808,866 
868,080 
486,900 
608.216 
612,080 
617,986 
712,700 
610.116 
687,060 
661,896 
634,176 
614,910 
•77,340 



TIUDl AMD OOIOOCBOK OV 



S BT SODTHBBN BOATS DDBINQ 1903. 



0U8. 


By 

NewOrlMU 


Btwta. 


"H" 




IB 
170 

75 


442 
40,880 
2,870 

48 






l,Oi 
















a^ 


646,690 
6,760 
6,986 
1,438 
SS,efi0 










17^1 

1 

8,978 

8aB,*00 

6,775 


















18,676 


























SB,8I9 
06 
96 


83,038 

8,890 

2,188 

17 

1,268 

170 

616,115 

2,121,026 

477,180 

680 

48,830 


11,3S 














8,80! 

loa 
i,aoo 

68,SO0 
3M8B 


























18,!80 
38,408 










1,296 

6,730 

876 














1 




38^ 






tor 

700 

6 

99,680 

249 




















19,« 










2,806,™ 

03 

21,866 

86,768 






31088 
388,660 
846,143 






6,7 




148,6 








86,862 


68,260 


11,0 





THI Orn Ot BT, LOUIS. 



SHIPUENTS BT BABOE LINES TO NEW OBLEANS DUBINQ 1909. 



TBADB AMD OOUUSBOX OV 



RIVER ACCIDENTS, 190a. 



Habch is. Stekmer Provldeiice wu wrecked In & storm on the Low 
HUdssippl river. Twenty Uvea were lost. The boat w 
cargo were vtlued at ^0,000. 

Af BiL ai. Steamer Cil; ot Fittiborg; was destroyed by fire in tbe Ob 
river. Fifty lives were lost. The boat and cargo were valu 
at 180,000. 

Afbil 36. Stewner Stmriw was 4e8troyed 1^ fire at New Orleans. T 
boat wu valued at ti6,000. 

Mat B. 8te«mer Kanawha etraok roeks In the Ohio river and sank. T 
boat and cargo valiwd at tSO,000 will prove a total losa. 

Kat 31. Steamer John E. Speed wh deetrof ed by fire at New Oilesi 
Boat and cargo valued at 170,000. 

Jiora 13. Steamer Raiienna was wreaked by the high winds in tte Up[ 
Ulsdaaippl river. Four of lier crew were drowned. T 
boat was valued at (1S,000. 

JUI.T S. Steamer New Haven iank In the Waba^ river. Losa {6,000. 

OcTOBBB 19. SMamer Fred. Nellis exploded her boilers, killing two 
her crew. The accident occurred wiiile neat Memphis. 

October 20. Steamer City of Sheffield was destroyed by flie near GrK 
Tower. Loss S30,000. 

Dbcehbkb 12. Flood water in the Ohio river wrecked fitt; coal barg< 
Tbe loss is estimated at $30,000. 



THB orrr of st. louis. 



U9 



FREIGHT RATES TO imw ORLEANS BY BARGES DURHTG 

1898, 1899, 1900, 1901 AND 1902. 

Flour and Meal, Pork. ^d^iSto'^ ^V[k 

perbbl. per 100 Iba. JerlW^.' FerlOOlbe. 

1896 30 10 10 13K 

1889 30 10 10 15 

1900 30 10 10 16 

1901 30 10 10 16 

1903 30 10 10 16 



MONTHLY RATE OF FREIGHT ON BULK GRAIN BY BARGES 
FROM ST. LOUIS TO NEW ORLEANS FOR SIX YEARS. 

WHEAT AND CORN, FEB BUSHBL. 



MOKTH. 



1897. 


1898. 


1889. 


1900. 


1901. 



1909. 



January... 
February.. 

March 

AprU 

May 

June 

July 

AUfUBt 

BeiwEember 
Oetober. . . 
NoTomber. 
December. 



Ota. 
6 
6 



• 



Cts. 



Ota. 



Oto. 



Ots. 



Wheat, ^ to X cent per bushel more than Oorn. F. O. B. New Orleans. 

During September, October and November, 1894, and October and Noyembez* 
1896, navigation by barges was suspended on acoount of extreme low water, also 
during October, November and December, 1897, and 14 days In December, 1898, and 10 
days In January, 1899, and closed again January 80th till March 1st, closed from 
December 80th, 1899, to January 13th, 1900, and 94 days between January aoth and 
Much 4th. 1900; 1901, during February; 1901-190S, December 16th to January 16th; 
1902-1908, from December 2nh to 

AVERAGE RATE OF FREIGHT ON GRAIN BY RIVER FROM 

ST. LOUIS TO NEW ORLEANS. 





YSAB. 


In Sacks by Steamboat. 


Wheat In Bulk by Barges. 




Cents per 100 lbs. 


Gents per bushel. 


1901 


10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

15 

14.56 

13.60 

17.14 

17.64 

1B.87 

16.38 


4.20F.O.B.,N.O. 
4.86 


IflQl... 


1900 


4.96 


1899 


4.60 


1898 


4.60 


1897 


4.98 


1899 


6 


1896 


6.96 


1884 


6.89 


1808 


6.66 


189S 


6.60 


1891 


6.88 



RATES ON FREIGHT TO MEMPHIS AND VICKSBURG 

DURING 1902. 

Flour, 
per bbl. 



Meat, Grain, 

per 100 lbs. per 100 lbs. 



Meal, in Sacks, 
per 100 lbs. 



To Memphis — 10 
ToVicksburg... 90 



10 
15 



20 
80 



17X 



Hay. 
perlOOlbi. 

UK 

20 



TEUDK AMD OOUIBBCB OF 

I 
4 



2 s 
i § 

8 I 

9 a 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



121 



FOREIGN GRAIN AND FLOUR TRADE. 



Foreign shipments of Flour and Grain from the United States compare 
with previous years as follows : 



Wheat, 
bu. 

1902 128,a61,712 

1901 179,201,418 

1900 99,079,153 

1899 109,686,161 

1896 148,058,894 



Com, 
bu. 

18,434,269 
102,859,089 
190,886,489 
206,185,288 
205,894,289 



Oats, 
bu. 

6,864,042 
26,929.048 
82,160.642 
41,085,082 
49,888,912 



Flour, 
bbls. 

17,996,681 
19,852,880 
18,632,608 
18,717,161 
16,515,406 



Shipments from Galveston and New Orleans for the past five years 
compare as follows : 

WHEAT— Bu. OOBN— Bu. 

New Orleans. Galveston. New Orleans. Galveston. 



1908 15,648,746 

1901 24,410,W9 

1900 8,059,677 

1899 11,562,812 

1896 12,796,548 



U, 081, 826 
16,714,466 
11,188,066 
16,718,400 
11,288,278 



2,464,128 
12,882,139 
23.408,463 
21,930,666 
20,736,669 



968,205 

8',673i686 
7,049,697 
6,666,600 



Exports of grain from St. Louis were 5,981,577 bushels wheat, 2.079,972 
boshels com, 235,942 bushels oats and 258,800 bushels rye, of which 
2,308,704 bushels wheat and 226,400 com went by river via New Orleans, 
the balance going by rail to Atlantic and Gulf Ports. All of the wheat by 
rail went to the Seaboard for export, destination not given. Of the com 
259,912 bushels went to Cuba. 

Exports of flour were 905,205 bbls. against 1,189,321 bbls. the previous 
year. Cuba took 171,479 bbls., Central America 11,165 bbls., South 
America 8,145 bbls., and Porto Bico 8,700 bbls., while the larger part went 
to European countries, as will be seen by reference to the table of exports 
on next page. 

All export flour is shipped in sacks and is reduced to barrels for con- 
venience of comparison. 

SHIPMENTS OF BULK GRAIN, BT RIVBR, FROM ST. LOUIS TO N£W ORLEANS 

FOB FOURTEEN TEARS. 

Bj«,bai. 
28,212 



Wheat, bm. Cora. Inm. 

1902 2,308,714 226,400 

1901 1,828,244 585,706 

1900 169,241 2,871,670 

1899 284,720 1,748.617 

1896 2,747,994 8,006,488 

1897 1,191,082 8,827,968 

1896 1,782,668 8,868,087 

1896 488,614 1,251,803 

1894 1,042,198 1,263.810 

1896 8,710,860 8,«)8,806 

1892 6,149,708 8,228,646 

1801 6,940,216 1,482,781 

1800 1,409,440 8,717,849 

1880 1,661,960 12,806.965 

— 1,247,962 6,844,042 



912,720 
190,968 



46,600 
'i7i482 



0«l«.lmt. 


Totftli. 


28,409 


2,691,786 




2,868,948 


878,049 


8,814,160 


249,998 


2,288,286 


6S3,A06 


6,600,707 


266,879 


6,476,842 


486,568 


10,527,206 




1,690,417 


40,000 


2.346,508 


75,430 


7.079,666 


86,687 


8,414,940 




8,468.646 


89,960 


10,217.244 


M,707 


14,168,046 


160,684 


7,262,678 



TBADX ASD OOlfXIBOX OF 



FOREIGN SHIPSIENT8 OF FLOUB AND GRAIN 
Om Thbodqh Bills or Ladoto fboh St. Louib bt Railboax 

AKD BiTXB 

Fob thz Yeah 1902. 



Dbbtutatiok. 


Flour, 
barreli 


Wh«at, 
biubeU. 


bSa 


.^%. 


.Sffl 




311,I»T 

$i,m 

380 
U9,C88 

4<ya8 

1,180 
7,611 

afi,6ea 

S9,0W 

m 

400 

*.ioa 

16,4U 

6,*8I 

8,787 

171,479 

11,166 
879 
8,146 
1,618 
8,700 

60,648 




































































































































































268,613 


106,388 


















































" Saaboard for Bxport 


8,678,868 


1,698,680 


101,360 


aaofi 


Total for BxportbjrBaU 

Total for Export by Rirflr. . . . 


90G,S0e 


8,e73,86» 
3,808,714 


1,868,673 
336,400 


207,688 

38,409 






906,a06 


6,981,077 


2,079,973 


386,9*3 


m^ 





THK cm OP fir. Loms. 

MXFOBTB or WHKAT VBOK THB UNITHD 8TATH. 
As raported bj the Bureau ot Statlatlcs, WuhlogtoD. 



1BS9. 



UOl. 



Biuliali. Bnalielf. Btuheli. Bnahete. 



190S. 



BXPOBXB or OOBH FBOH THB CHITBI) 8TATBB. 



BZFOBTfl OT OATS FBOK THE UNITBD 8TATKI. 



THB CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



125 



AVERAGE PUBLISHED BATES OF FREIGHT ON GRAIN IN 

CENTS. 

Fbom St. Louis to Liybbpool yia Riybb to New Orlkans and via 

Rail to New Tobk. 





To New Orleans by Biver. 


On Wheat 
to New York 

by rail, 
per 100 lbs. 


To Liyerpool. 


YSAlt. 


On Grain 

innks. 

per 100 lbs. 


On Wheat 

in bulk 
per bushel. 


Via New Orleans, 

On Wheat 

per bu. 


Via New York, 

On Wheat 

perbn. 


1881 


20 
' 20 


6 

6 5-12 


82 
29K 






1882 


22 2-8 


28X 


1888 


11H 


5M 


88 


19 7-12 


27 


1884 


14 


65-8 


26 


14 7-12 


21X 


1885 


16 


6^^ 


221-7 


15 1-0 


»K 


1886 


16 


6K 


20 


16 1-6 


24 


1887 


18^ 


6 


822-16 


15 


24H 


1888 


15 


6M 


29K 


15 1-6 


22.95 


1888 


17.98 


5.95 


28K 


17 1-8 


1U7 


1800 


15.66 


6.58 


27^ 


14 1-8 


21.48 


1881 


16.28 


8.87K 


29 


15 8-4 


23.65 


1882 


16.87 


6.60 


26.62 


14 


21 


1898 


17.54 


6.66 


28.50 


14.71 


21.72 


1884 


17.14 


5.89 


24.78 


11.69 


18.71 


1895 


18.00 


6.95 


28.67 


12 1-8 


18.83 


1896 


14.54 


6.00 


28.00 


18.50 


lO^K 


1897 


10.88 


4.88 


28.64 


12.89 


20.83 


1896 


10.00 


4.50 


22.25 


14.24 


20.32 


1899 


10.00 


4.60 


21.96 


12.83 


17.88 


1900 


10.00 


•4.26 


19.38 


14.64 


18.41 


1901 


10.00 


•4.26 


19.83 


9.48 


14.03 


1902 


10.00 


•4.20 


20.66 


8.68 


16.33 



•F. O. B. New Orleans. 



12B TaU>K AND OOVKEBOK Of 

COTTON. 

St. Lonia, September Ist, 190S. 

Thfl oottcw crop of the United SUtea, for ttte eotton f«mr just doMdj 
wu 10,680,680 stAudATd bales, as against 10,889,433 tor the previone year. 

Th* amount handled at aod throngh St. LodIs was leae than in 1000-01, 
but a fair average of preceding fears. The gross receipts were S41,36S 
bales, and the net reoelpte 331,680 bales. The amount of round half bal«f 
concentrated at thU point was lsa,IM, which are included In the recdptt 
as 91,677 standard bales. While the amount of local receipts amounted to 
only 331,080 bales, there was a much larger amount handled by St. Louie 
factors, the sauqiles bdng exhibited and saka made here, while the cotton 
was shipped direct from the country presses through some northern gate- 
way, or via the gulf port^. 

The average weight of St. Louis standard bales was 610 pounds, and th« 
average value p^* bale $43.10. Arkaneag contributed 433,070 bales, Texae 
followed next with 166,783 and Oklahoma 63,330. The amount exported 
was 384,876 bales, of which more than one-baU went to England. 

Values for middlings ranged from 7^<38 9-lfl hi January to 8Ji@ 8 13-16 
in December; the lowest quotation being 7^ In April, and the highest 2H 
in August and September. Stocks in warehouse at the elose of the year 
were 11,715 standard bales, ag^net 34,878 at the close of the previous year. 

Ur. Henry Q. Hester, Secretary, New Orleans Cotton I^sohange, makee 
the following statement as to valne of this year's, as compared with pre- 
vious crops: 

"On the basis of middling, which represents the average of the crop, ■ 

fair average of price for the United States Is 8 6-100 cents per pound, com- 

' paring with 9 33-100 cents per pound for last year, 7 3G-100 cents for the 

year before and 4 SS-100 cents for 1898-99, the highest price touched during 

the season having been 9|^ and the lowest 7}^. 

"The average commerda] value per bale of the crop is $41.01, against 
$47.68 last year, $38.66 the year before, and $36.08 in 1398-99. The total 
value of the crop compared with the previous Ave years is as follows; 

VALTJK OF COHMEBCIAL CBOF. 

Baleg. Values. 

1901-190! -. . . 10,680,680 $488,014,687 

1000-1901 10,883,422 4&4,S«T,649 

X899-I900 8,438,416 368,784,820 

1808-1899 11,374,840 282,782,987 

1897-1888 11,199,994 320,662,606 

1896-1887 8,767,964 321,924,88* 

"This shows that while the crop was in excess of last year by 397,3d( 
bales, the money value thereof was $68,562,862 less. 

"When it is considered that the combined values of the past three crops 
resulted in payment to farmers, common carriers, merchants and otbei 
handlers of nearly $1,300,000,000, their importance as the great factor ii 
the prosperity of the South may be fully appreciated." 



THB OITT 01* 8T. LOOXA* 



127 



TABLE SHOWING THE GROSS AND NET BBOKPTB OP COTTON AT ST. LOUIS. 



SSAflON. 



Gross 

Receipts, 

toales. 



Through 

Bhipments, 

oaJes. 



Net 

Receipts, 

bales. 



1901-1902.. 
1900-1901. 
1809-1900 . 

1S07-96... 
1806-97... 
1805-96... 
1804-96... 

AOIM>— Vs. . . , 

1802-06... 

1801-02... 

1890-91... 

1880-90.... 

1888-80... 



841,268 
078,497 
802,760 
989,969 
889,239 
570,418 
565,688 
926,285 
685,421 
474,024 
728,628 
706,460 
588^910 
584,572 



619,578 
788,860 
648,605 
814,880 
771,712 
455,516 
474,796 
781,694 
462,082 
801,186 
425,787 
400,454 
811,828 
828,610 



221,680 



154,074 
175,620 
127,517 
114,807 
90,887 
144,691 
168,880 
172,888 
297,891 
806,015 
227,087 
260,968 



NoTB.— Since season 1898-99 light weight round bales have been counted as 
equivalent to half -bales, and the total given as standard bales. 

XONTHLT RBOBIFTS AND 8HIFMXNTS FOR SEASON 1001-1902. 



Mouths. 



RaOBIFTS. 



Local. 



Through. 



Total. 



Shipments. 



September, 1901 

Oetober. , 

November 

I>eoember 

January, 1903 

February 

March , 

April 

May 

Jane. 

July 

August , 

Totalbales 

Deduct for X round bales 

Net total, standard bales. . 



14 
86 
98 
51 
88 
16 
8 

a 



,987 
.660 
.600 
,917 

.040 

,048 
,624 
,469 
791 
4117 
198 
408 



813 
91 



.267 
,677 



221,680 



14,866 

77,817 

127.808 

96.296 

107.680 

70.426 

64,111 

26.794 

16,440 

9,169 

4,417 

6,810 



619,678 



619,678 



29,868 

168,477 

226.806 

148.218 

140.878 

86,478 

72,786 

29,268 

16,281 

0,696 

4,610 

6,213 



982,836 
91,677 



841,268 



16,897 

120.268 

186,780 

142,449 

188,678 

80,640 

91,694 

42,881 

28,611 

16,972 

8,927 

10,667 



888,664 
91,677 



791,977 



RBOBIFTS OF COTTON BT BAOH ROUTB FOR THREE OOTTON TBABS. 



ROUTBB. 



1901-02. 



1900-OL 



1899-1900. 



St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern R. R. 

Missouri Pacific R. R 

MobUe & Ohio R. R 

St. Louis & San Francisco R. R 

St. Louis & Southwestern R. R 

Illinois Central R. R 

Missouri, Kansas & Texas R. R 

Chicago & Alton R. R.)West) 

Wabash R. R. (West) 

Keokuk & Northwestern R. R. and O. B. & Q. R. R 

LouisvlUe & Nashville R. R 

Lower Mississippi River Boats 

Cumberland and Tennessee River Boats 

Total Bales 

Deduct for light bales 

Net total 



490,161 

741 

66.390 

167,997 

46,942 

9,688 

149,704 



1,826 

7,187 

4,089 

670 



982,836 
91,677 



841,268 



466,624 

' '68^876 

118,102 

71,408 

68,264 

809,682 

68 

16,696 
6,261 
8,491 
1,216 



1,113,626 
140,028 



978,497 



896.689 
1.682 

108,664 

112,972 
79,294 
40,622 

127,949 

487 

1,699 

6,421 

6,922 

260 



880,251 
77,482 



802,760 



TRADt AMD COICUXECK OF 



STATEMENT SHOWING- THE SOURCES OP SUPPLY OF 
COTTON FOR FOUR YEARS. 




'bUj™. 


ItUO-Ol. 


Bales 


B>l«. 




m.rno 

lS&,TSt 

1!;S 

60, m 

"1:3 
"■"! 

st.rao 


401, SKI 

^ 

U.ltS 


uo,9n 

89;bi4 

as 
"•a 

si.ns 






asi,(» 

&3 


















■' LoaoUu* 


37,IW 


-' Oklahnnifl 


»^ 




B1.M7 


i,iis,(ue 
ito.ms 


n,iBi 




Deduct for balf rouDd bftlns. 


'••^S 


NetreoetpU 


841,268 


B78,*97 







DIRKOnOM c 






1,0M 
41,819 



SmFHBNXe OF GOTTOH BT BACH BODTK FOB THBEB OOTTOM TEARS. 



THl OITT OP ST. LOtnS. 



129 



SHIPMENTS TO UNITED STATES PORTS AS REPORTED 
BY ST. LOUIS COTTON EXCHANGE. 



Bales. 

ToBoston 101,585 

" Providence 2,507 

New York 97,576 

Philadelphia 6,854 

" Baltimore 14,588 

" Pensaoola 2,579 

Since 1888-08 half round bales hare been reduced to the equivalent of Standard 
bales. 



It 



Bales. 

To Newport News 14,742 

" Norfolk 1,949 

" New Orleans 75 

" Portland, Maine 1,896 

PaoifLo Coast 80,459 



<4 



RSPOKT OF OOTTON OOlfPRBSSKD AT ST. LOUIS. 



Tear ending Receipts. 

Aug. 81. bales. 

1902 178,718 

1901 92,231 

1900 67,697 

1899 124,906 

1898 120,606 

1897 109,297 

1896 111,617 

1806 161,219 



Shipments, 
bales. 

196,876 
66,656 
111,668 
97,219 
103,205 
119,498 
100,888 
171,451 



Stock, 
bales. 

11,715 
84,878 

8,808 
46,962 
25,077 

7,677 
17,878 

7,549 



COMMBBOIAL CROP BY STATBS, IN THOUSANDS OF BALES, AS RBPORTED 
BT THE NEW ORLEANS OOTTON EXCHANGE. 

1901-1903. 1900-1901. 1899-1900. 

Alabama 1,200 1,000 1,044 

Arkansas 820 762 750 

Florida 64 45 50 

Georgia 1,525 1,295 1,809 

Ix)uiBiana 880 719 625 

Mississippi 1,875 960 1,230 

North Carolina, eto 560 642 561 

South Carolina 926 911 921 

Tennessee, eto 859 860 865 

Texas and Indian Territory 2,998 8,809 2,951 

Total orope— bales 10,681 10,888 9,486 



VALUE OF COMMERCIAL CROP. 

Bales. 

1901-1903 10,680,680 

1900-1901 10,883,423 

1899-1900 9,486.416 

1898-99 11,274,840 

1897-96 11,199,994 

1896-97 8,757,964 



Valne. 

8438,014,687 
494,667,649 
86.1,784,820 
282,772,987 
820,663,606 
831,934,884 



130 TRADE AMD COlfHIBOE OF 

TABLE SHOWING THE HIGHEST AND LOWEST PRICES OF 
MiDDLDro Cotton ix<m homth foe worn tkabs. 



1901-01 19IW41. isee-uoQ isa 

Averue weight per Imie lbs. lbs. l 

UDltedStateBatandaKlbaleB MB.M BIO.U Kt.a BI 

St. LoQla Becelpta " " (UO Gil 006 41 

" connd " MO GOO US U 

'■ hmit " IBO^TO isasna 1S093TO IT 

ATersse vklaa per bate Bt. lyonla Becelpts. 1SD041, l41.T8i 1901 -OX, tl3.10. 

THE CBOP or TBI TTMirXD STATES, IK BALES, rOH 65 TBAB8. 



GENERAL CROP MOVEMENT, SEASONS 1901-02 AITD IMO-IWI 

From NewOrluni Cotton Kxoluuige Beport. 

COMSUUPTIOH UNITED STATES. 

iwim. 1900-1901. 

Balaa. B»Iu. 

Totkl Crop United Stttet 10,680,680 10,S8t,41I 

BtoekU Parts beRlnnlDSoI rear 3M,M4 88, U) 

TOTiL 8DPPI.T— 10,931,314 lD,tTI,S64 

Exported dart n IT vear e.MO.BlO S,IW8,TII8 

" ■'- IM.Ml IM.GM 



It DsllTery Ports 1,6U 

■ iotjt 



Stock M oloae ot ye&r, . . 



- 6,ffi2,46a 6,88B,a 



Total taklDRa tor oonanrnptlon, U. B B,98S.TtlI 3,t89,B01 

Ol wbioh— TKken by ■plnnen In Southem 

State*, Total 1,987,971 I,B30,m 

Tkhen by Ifortbem tplnDen 1,050 ,77( 1,907 ,S70 



THE OITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



131 



COMPARATIVE BUSINESS IN LEADING ARTICLES AT 
ST. LOUIS FOR PAST FOUR YEARS. 



ARTI0LB8. 



Flour, receipts bbU. 

Flour, amount numulkotured bbls. 

Wheat, total receipts bush. 

Oom, '• " " 

Oats, '• '« " 

Bye, " «♦ « 

Barley, " " 

All Grain reeeiyed (Including 

flour reduced to wheat) 

Cotton, receipts bales. 

Bagging, manufactured yards. 

Hay,reoeipts tons. 

Tobacco, receipts hhds. 

Lead, receipts in pigs 80 lb. . .pigs. 
Hog Product, total shipm'ts . . lbs. 

Cattle, receipts head. 

Sheep 



u 



u 



u 



« 

Horses and Mules, receipts . : . ** 
Lumber Ss Logs, ** ... feet. 
Shingles, " ...pes. 

Lath, « ... «« 

Wool, total receipts lbs. 

Hides, «* " 

Sugar, receired '* 

Molasses Qadiliif (Hicih) rec'd, galls. 

Coffee, reeeiyed bags. 

" " pkgs. 

BJce, receipts P^gs- 

Coal, " tons. 

Nails, " kegs. 

Potatoes, receipts bush. 

Bait, « bbls. 

" " sacks. 

« « ... bush, in bulk. 

Butter lbs. 

Tons of fireight of all kinds reeeiyed 
and shipped 



1899. 



1,514,315 

1,166,489 

10,428,168 

28,844,475 

12,606,835 

454,790 

1,409,474 

55,068,154 

1,028,192 

12,278,500 

175,820 

66,802 

1,611,112 

885,458,945 

766,082 

482,566 

2,147,144 

130,286 

1^48^24.000 

58,621,000 

11,862,150 

28,491,625 

68,988,720 

204,322,225 

6,884,038 

290,700 



1900. 



1,869 

1,846 

19,786 

25,618 

18,257 

475 

2,011 

69,555 

1,011 

9,975 

284 

44 

1,577 

889,946 

795 

484 

2,156 

169 



l,386^408i254 



168,105 

4,862,714 

589,980 

8,468,560 

427,020 

78,765 

581,280 

18,729,188 



81,119 

18,503 

17,000 

60,531 

216,982 

5,244 

360 

72 

119 

4,360 

560 

2,564 

238 

27 

776 

12,901 



070 
059 
614 
410 
925 
365 
500 

619 
587 
666 
256 
914 
448 
455 
800 
138 
972 
082 



1901. 



250 
950 
790 
540 
465 
060 
871 
912 
615 
299 
110 
568 
105 
575 
160 
690 



23,742,0801 25,318,340 



2,170,548 

1,505.234 

20,860,805 

20,884,060 

15,728,180 

686,810 

1,939,993 

69,827,264 

913,328 

12,500,000 

251,132 

52,127 

1,800,235 

386,188,896 

969,881 

534,115 

2,286,945 

149,716 

U14,698,766 

11,198,250 

12,385,560 

26,877,110 

65,005,080 

209,688,510 

5,895,387 

374,675 

138,340 

173,530 

4,955,228 

688,200 

2,896,059 

315,285 

85,280 

772,800 

13,476,929 

28,758,664 



1902. 



2,217,685 

1,322,530 

80,667,212 

16,024,715 

20,570,245 

940,396 

2,234,504 

80,416,654 

766,419 

11,000,000 

213,224 

56,534 

2,007,720 

378,668,410 

1,181,628 

540,443 

1,494,895 

122,697 

164,648,100 

6,455,000 

7,067,000 

26,878,080 

56,237,220 

206,826,860 

5,522,460 

882,255 

120,858 

196,576 

5,706,794 

752,575 

3,641,808 

228,770 

38,660 

777,840 

14,572,645 

29,737,577 



I. 



132 



TBADB AXD OOUMKRCB 07 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE ENTIRE 



RE0SIPT8. 



By- 


Flour. 
Barrels. 


Wheat. 
Bush. 


Oom. 
Buah. 


Oats. 
Buah. 


Bye. 
Busb. 


Barley. 
Bnsta. 


Ghldigo ft Alton B.B. (Mo. DIy.) 
MlMOuri Paoiflo B. B 


219,146 

662,870 

79,270 

858,860 

266 

68,470 

120 

6,816 

19,026 

'"8;756 

1,696 

20,486 

800 

48,640 

12,716 

27,812 

66,616 

4,085 

192,176 

147,600 

884,120 

4,966 

9,273 

10,836 

476 

90 


1,215,900 

6,744.846 

2,920,964 

2,804 752 

1,076,200 

2,968,106 

82,400 

893,938 

198,697 

900 

12.600 

49,600 

68,600 

21.600 

896,600 

208,800 

64.668 

195,700 

146,016 

921,700 

1,841,100 

6,328,600 

219,168 

82,400 

482.288 

1,441,640 

177,692 

147,204 

*'682,*690 


640,000 

787,640 

107,100 

1,108,810 

2,600 

271,166 

3,600 

6,775 

1,008,766 

4,600 

9,065 

2,700 

28,800 

2,283,200 

70,800 

117,790 

1,481,040 

138.460 

2,066,600 

1,688,000 

3,426,000 

18,600 

'87i945 

78,700 

10,170 

610 

"sooiooo 


961,600 

807,875 

112,160 

2,019,486 

'i84i626 

5\m 

1,228,660 

""ik',m 
ilm 

161,200 

1,671.600 

128,250 

107.610 

1,883,460 

61.620 

4,686.400 

2,282,000 

4,867,400 

1,350 

"'is\iso 

660 

980 

"6Qo!oo6 


9,900 

84,284 

961 

171,150 

*"2;767 

WO 

20,604 

900 

17,100 

6,400 

4,636 

16.600 

2,700 

6.900 

826,660 

808,273 

900 

'"4,'m 

8,988 

2,868 

61 


778 


St. Louis and San FranoiBoo R. B 

Wabash R.R. (West) 

St. Louis, Kas. CSty A (3olo. B. B. . 

Mo., Kansas ft Texas R. B 

St. Louis Southwestern B. B 

St. L., Iron Mount, ft So. B. B. . 

TlllnoU Central B. B 

Loai8Ville,HendersonA 8t.L.B.B 

Louisville ft Nashville B.B 

Mobile ft Ohio B B. 


"eoliio 

**87;266 


flnntih Am B. B. Oo .....■•. 


1,000 


Baltimore ft Ohio S.-W. R. B.... 

Ohlcago ft Alton B.B 

(nereland, Cln.. Ohi. ftSt. L. R.R 


Wabash B. B (Bast) 


9,760 

1,066,600 
256,260 
74S,S50 


Toledo, St Lou s ft Western B.B. 
Ohleago, Peoria ft St. Louis B. B. . 

Ohlcafl^o, B. ft Q B. B 

St. L., Keokuk & N. W. B. B. . . . 
Bt. Louis Valley R R 


St. Louis, Troy & Eastern By. .. 

Upper MiBSianppi Blrer 

Lower ** « 
Illinois «< 
Missouri •• 

Ohio, (;nnib. A Tenn. Blyers 

Wagon 


476 

. • • • « • . 


Total Beoelpta 


2,217,686 

1,322,630 
60,732 


30,667,212 


16,024,716 


20,670,246 


940,896 


2,234,604 






In Store, January Ist, 1902 


8,660,244 


1,010,046 


88,971 


114,888 


8,429 


VntiiJ moTenient 


8,600,947 


34,327,466 


17,084,760 


20,609,216 


1,066,229 


2,287,988 





MOVEMENT IN FLOU^ 



OhioagO * Alton B E. <Ho. I>1K 

MlnoaTiPMilloS B. 

St. IiOnU and Sod rntnolioo B- 

ffabuliaB. (WeM) 

St. LoDlii, 8>ii*M CItr A Col. R. : 
MlMOnrl, Kuuda A Texas K. ] 
8t LoBla Snathwritrrn B. B . - 
n Lonls, Iron Honnt.A 8o.B.] 

Ultnoil OtDtrat R. B - 

LoiUBTllle.H«DdeTaoi> ASt-LB.. 
IiOaliTlUe A NuliTllU K. B.. 

Habile AObloBB 

Southern Br. Co 

Baltimore t Ohio S. W. B. 1 
Cbloaso ft Alton B.B. 



, n R. 

01ilc«go, FeorUA3t.LonUB.I 
QHcago, Borl. A Qalno* B. B. . . 
St. Loula, Keokol A H. W. B. X 

St. Louis VBlle; 

Upper MlHiulppl BlTei 

Illinois •• 






Obio, Oamb A Ti 



Total Kilpments . . 

QToand In City Ullli. 
Olty oonnmiptloa . . . 
Btook on hsnil Doo. t 

Total 



TBADK AHD OOUHEBOB OF 



r LEAOmO ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF EACH 
WEEK FOR THE TEAB 1902. 



At tn 

millW 



a OOXHEBCE OF 



5 OF LBA.D1NG ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF 
BACH WEEK FOR THE TEAR IMS. 



MiSBlSBlppI v'&U 18'U 
BarllnKIon....„p„ ^ 

Rogera '"'^''lat 

Total, Jan. iBl?*** fe 

" :: iths ir, 



•' the \y 

" Louii 
-^dwlu- 

byae 









at. Lonla Viet. ™ 

Uontoamery, q thM 
John Dower . ,„ 
Exchange Oral m»> 
Geo. P7Plaat„ ,(.|e 
Kehlor Bros. .1" 1* "* 
Oratlot HtreetBlg. le 
P. P. WllUani, . _. 

Purina Mill ototan* 
Wabash Eleri .- Je 
W. D. Judd...'"!^ 
Boutbem Ele90l a 
J. B. Buss Ml ™ ,-a 

H. w. Beck..."neni™ 
B.W. Beck&U>, re 
a H. Albers ~'"i 
P. W. Gocke a the"? 
A. Miller era ^^ jin 

Total capig to '^ 

»!»'•■ 

lat trr 

mU1^7 



TRADE AMD OOHIIKBOE OT 



PUBUC BLBVATORS. 



M:lt;, t^lSflM buBbeU. 



THE 0IT7 OF ST 



140 



Ml 



RATES OF STORAGE ADOPTEt 
ELEVATORS TO APPL1 

On Wheat, Com and Rye, 1 cent per 1 
thereof, and )iotl cent per bushel; for i 
thereof. 

On Oat0, }4of 1 cent per bushel for fil 
no charge for special bin, and ^ of 1 cent 
ten days or part thereof. 

On Barley, 1 cent per bushel for flrst t) 
1 cent per bushel for each subsequent thi| 

Special bin, >^ of 1 cent per bushel, e% 

Dumping sacks from riyer >i{ of 1 cent 

Dumping sacks from rail )^ of 1 cent H 

Sack charges from riyer on Com, Wtti 
for the flrst fiye days, and 1 cent per sack ] 
part thereof. 

Oats from riyer, 4 cents per sack for fin 
for each subsequent ten days, or part ther< 

Wheat, Com and Rye from rail, 3 cente 
1 cent per sack for each subsequent ten da; 

Oats, from rail, 6 cents per sack for firs 
for each subsequent ten days, or part ther< 



FEES FOR INSPECTmG AND WEI 

BY THE MISSOURI STATE INSPl 

AND IN FORCE JANl 

Inspection and Weighing on arrival at Pub 

Inspection and Weighing out of Public Wq 

Inspection at places other than a Public W 

Inspection and Weighing into Public Ware 
Barge or Wagon 

Inspection and Weighing out of Public Wan 
Barge or Wagon j 

Inspection and Weighing Grain in sacks. . . i 

Reinspection of Grain from Bins in Public 

On all Grain inspected at places other 

unloaded at a Public Warehouse after the 

date of flrst inspection, there will be an ad 



FEES ADOPTED BY ILLINOIS 
DEPARTMENT AND IN FORC 

For In-Inbfbctiox.— 60 cents per oar loi 
load; 60 cents per 1,000 bushels from boats; 

Fob OuT-lNSFBcnoK.— 60 cents per 1,00( 
oar load to teams; 16 cents per wagon load. 

For Wbighino.— 16 cents per oar load ii 
cents per 1,000 bushels to boats; 3^ of a oen 



to 

IflO 

as 

HIT 

of 
nd 

The fiat 
volume i,^^ 

were 24gt 
reached ^^^ 
From 18| ^j 
Shipmex^g^ 
277,109 Ijjts 
months ^ 

Thet ' 
to some j^^ 
United^ 
For the kw 
the expc^^ 
St. Louit 
pared wi^^^ 
1898 by de 

Comt^i^g 
side sou^uf 
of St. L^e[ 

Receipts, t)- 
Manufac^^f 

jre 

Inth.ln 
local m'to 
From 18»le 
barrels. ^® 
and tota»i»8 

total ex^l« 
in 1901 8 
shipmenr^ 
barrels, ^^^ 
than thePP 
Thec*'^ 
ways to ^rt 
large pa*^ 
wheat P^ 
the milh^y 
wasmor<^' 



TRADK AND COUHBBCE OF 



FLOUR. 



iouT handled In St. Louis during 1903 has not been exceeded In 

n any prerlous jeaxe, excepting 1901, 1883, 1880 and 1879. BecelptB 

a7,e85 barrels against 2,170,548 in 1901. Receipts never before 

I millioB mark except In ISSa, when the total was 3,003,424. 

OO the average yeariy receipts have been about 1,600,000. 

> 3,084,464 barrels against 2,961,663 In 1901, a falling off of 

EscepUng last year, however, ahipments in the twelve 

ied exceed tnoae of any other year since 1891. 

or manufactured by mills Id St. Lonis and vicinity reflects, 

the decline In exports of bread stuffs of all kinds from the 

luing the closing months of 1901 and the first half of 1902. 

lontbs ending July 31st, 1903, these were in value about half 

901 for the corresponding months. Still the prodnct ol the 

In 1903 fell short of 1901 only about 12%, and 3% as com- 

, while It exceeded the output of 1899 by about I8$6, and 

he flour manufactured with the amount recdved from out^ 
liich may be taken as a measure of the total flour businesB 
e figures for the past five years are as follows: 



l,lll,9es l.eSO.TU B,!15,119 S.STE.TSl S.UO.ISS 

1870, 1880 and 1883 the combined receipts and product of 

ched a total of between 8,600,000 and 8,700,000 barrels. 

78 there was a gradual growth ot from 1,600,000 to 3,000,000 

uall decline in 1902 in flour manufactured, flour exported 

enta Is easily located in the Item of foreign shipments. The 

flour from the whole Unlt«d States were 19,284,779 barrels 

18,667 in 1902, a decrease in the year of about 6^. Foreign 

St. Louis were for these two years 1,180,821 and 905,206 

B ui:v><ta8e of 384,116 barrels, about 36^. This decrease Is great«r 

falling off in either the amount of flour manufactured or shipped. 

Mnditione following the severe drought of 1901 operated In several 

curtail the output and the export of flour. The destracUon of a 

rt of the com and oats crop so enhanced the value of all kinds of 

eed, that It was worth more than the lower grades of flour which 

^r usually turns out at the same time with the bett«r qualities. It 

.-e profitable for him to turn low grade floui material into the bran 



THB OITY OF ST. LOUIS. 141 

«nd Bell it as feed stuff. There is no doubt that this tended strongly to 
diminish the output of flour. High prices of wheat in the West also 
naturally discouraged export sales. 

Again, the high prices ot feed and feed grains in Europe^ as well as 
America^ encouraged foreign markets to buy wheat rather than flour 
because while importing wheat they were necessarily getting the hull of 
the wheat; that is the bran, along with the other parts of the berry, and 
the whole was transported, at the relatively cheap freight for which wheat 
Is carried, wliile bran and other feeds, being builder than the unmanufact- 
ured grain, are charged very much higher rates, and would therefore cost 
proportionately more at destination. European buyers could not get 
American com or oats, nor could they take the bran as a substitute, as it 
was held at the highest prices in the West where it is produced in largest 
quantities^ because this section was the nearest to the stock raising districts 
where the feeds were needed. Foreigners bought wheat instead of flour, 
milled it and utilized the bran. 

With the increasing deliveries of the com crop of 1902, during the last 
part of the year, the results of the drought gradually disappeared. Exports 
of flour from the United States from July 1 to December 1, 1902 were nearly 
2,500,000 bbls. in excess of the exports for the preceeding six months and 
exceeded the figures for the same months in 1901. 

During the year there has been a decided increase in shipments of flour 
to southern points amounting to nearly 20%. These figures may Include 
some export flour, which it is impracticable to distinguish, but as there was 
a decided falling off of foreign shipments, it is clear that the trade of our 
millers and flour dealers in southern markets was substantially increased 
in 1902. 

The decline in the foreign trade was principally in shipments to Euro- 
pean countries which have large milling capacity of their own. In other 
directions the decline, if any, was small, and in some directions there were 
noticeable increases. Cuban markets took about 10,000 bbls. less than in 
the previous year. South American and Central American and Porto 
Bican ports, on the contrary, bought 10,000 bbls. more. In general, while 
the movement is not yet very pronounced, the figures indicate that the 
millers in this territory are successfully seeking markets in new directions 
to offset the losses of trade which may be anticipated from the hostile 
tariff legislation in European countries. 

The condition of wheat in 1902 was a source of some anxiety to millers 
in early crop months. Frequent rains during harvest threatened more 
serious damage than was actually realized later. In some sections the crop 
was more or less a failure, but in the main, enough wheat was secured in 
prime condition to supply all milling requirements and leave an export 
surplus. By care in the selection and grinding of the wheat, St. Louis 
millers are having no difficulty in turning out a product which in every 
way sustains the old reputation of their brands. It is generally agreed by 
flour exx)erts that the wheat of 1902 produces a slightly stronger flour of 
better flavor than the berry for the preceding year. 



142 TRADB AND COMMBBCE 07 

All millers report satififactorj results from the year's business, notwith- 
standing occasional periods of dullness and close prices. European buyers 
express entire satisfaction with the American flour of the season and are 
buying the product in an increasing ratio as compared with the unmanu- 
factured wheat. 

The value of soft wheat patents reached a maximum during January 
and February, ranging from $4.00 to $4.20 per bbl. in wood. Starting at 
about $4.00 early in March, there as a steady decline to an average of $3.80 
in April. About the same in May, and to $3.70 to $3.75 in June and July. 
Toward the close of the latter month values began to drop to the new crop 
basis. In August the bottom was reached at $3.10 to $3.20 per bbl., from 
which there was a steady recovery to $3.40 to $3.50 per bbl. at the end of 
December. During the year 1901 $3.40 was approximately the bottom, aud 
$3.75 the highest price for soft wheat patent^ except in the month of 
December^ when a considerable advance was established. 



THJB OITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



143 



TLOUB MAKUFAOTURBD IN ST. LOUIS FOB THBKB TSABS. 



MIU.KB8. 



Geo. P. Plant Milling Co. 

Keblor Bros 

Begina Floar Mill Co. . . . 
Victoria Flour Mill Co. . . 

Hezel Milling Co 

Saxony Mill Co 

Sesstngbaus Milling Co. . 

H. B. Eggers & Co 

Oarondelet Milling Co. . . 
J.B.Buss 



Total. 



Name of MilL 



Plant's Boiler A 

Kehlor 

Begina 

Victoria 

East St. Louis. . 

Saxony 

Jefferson 

Meramec 

Carondelet . . 
Buss 



III 

5aa 


Barrels 

Manuf. 

1903. 


Bairels 

Manuf. 

1901. 


3,600 

8,000 

1,000 

1,300 

600 

900 

600 

600 

300 

836 


877,794 

384,600 

64,371 

103,000 

113,018 

118,080 

113,989 

98,480 

33,400 

46,018 


843,497 

880,987 

66,396 

180,676 

118,949 

111,749 

107,948 

101,600 

34,690 

70,096 


10,626 


1,833,681 


1,606,384 



Barrels 

Manuf. 

1900. 



813,731 

880,700 

89,264 

186,460 

Ul,800 

97.900 

93,147 

90,400 

81,097 

46,700 



1,846,069 



FLOUB MANUPACTUBBD BY MILLS OUTSIDB OF THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS 

BUT OWNED OB THB PBOOUCT CONTBOLLED BY GITI- 

ZSN8 OF ST. LOUIS, MBMBEBS OF THB 

MBBCHANTS' BXCHANGB. 



OWNSB. 


Name. 


Location. 


Capacity 

in bDls.per 

34 hours. 


Manufac- 
tured 1908. 


TTflhlni* Bros ■.••■.... 


Bex 


Kansas City 

Alton, 111 

Dallas, Tex 

Nashville. 111.... 
Springfield, Mo.. 

Clinton, Mo 

St. Jacobs. 111... 
Sprtngfleld, Mo. . 


6,000 

3,000 

1,300 

1,000 

600 

600 

860 


391,800 

•348,438 

342,091 

334,600 

145,186 

160,000 

70,493 

46.728 


E. O. Stanard Milling Co.. . . 
£. O. Stanard Milling Co.... 

Camp Spring Mills Co 

John F. Meyer A Sons 

Mar. Bernheimer M. & M. Co 
St. J&oobs Enterprise Mill.. 
Jno. P- Meyer * Hopi?, ...... 


Alton City 

Empire 

Oamp Spring... 

Queen City 

Banner Mills... 

Enterprise 

Model. 


Jno. F. Meyer Sc Sons 


Ozark 


Ozark, Mo 




10.630 












Total 





















*Six months. 



TBADS AKD COMHXBOI Or 



STOCK OF FLOITH IH BTOBK DBO. SlST, FOS TWXHTT TEAKS. 



T«M>. 


Bbla. 


Tear. 


Bbla. 










































































































UM 








00 


W 



MOMTHLT STOCK OF F: 



S Uf BTOKK FOB TBBCE TBA.B8. 



Month. 


bble. I)bta,!bbl9. 


Konlli. 


1901. 1 IMOl. 
bbli.|bbl>. 


woo. 

bbli. 




S0,7«2IU,60e7S,Q67 
W,ai5fiO,IM7fi,M6 
[>8,WCI, 10.668 71,282 
SO ,Wa 57,836 60, M8 
M,«Ba KB ,710 6S,474 
B0,B»ea.700S9.B7a 


SSse:::;;;;;; 

October lit 

HoTtmber lit 


4a,oto'4fi,9» 
n.m'.BS.im 








jMiglUt. 


Ht.tK) 






/OMlst 


n.soo 



1 OITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



MOITTHLT BBOBIPTS ADD SHIPIIIKTS OT FLODB FOB TWO YXABA. 



™„,.. 




Hontlw. 


1901. 


1SD2. 


HoDth*. 


1901. 


1902. 




IS 

148,010 

m.iwo 

202,011 

S;S 

ifl7,OTa 

M1,0W 


w,!no 

■S;g! 

80.060 
77, 890 

iS:SS 

i28:(no 




^:^ 

aiilotti 

354,890 
233, B26 

22i,*ao 


311 Tin 






1»< 

IM 
28C 












^rU 














S.ee:e 






*"SJt^ 
































Total bbls 


2.170.5*8 


2,llT.e8S 


Total bbla 


»,961,B63 


2,89#,«1 



BECXCPTS or FLOUB BY CROP TBAB. 



Yearending June so, '87, 1,00S, 



Year eDdlDB June I 



BOOBOBS or 8DFFLT, AND DIBEUTIOy OF SHIFllBiHTS TOR TWO YEABS. 





BBlncxiiTS. 


By 


1901. 


1902. 


Dlnetlon. 


1901. 


1901. 


BuMniBaUn»ds 


l,19f 

2 


OSS 
GtO 

i 


S86,M2 
1,273.870 

es,«8o 
lo.tas 

ni,e20 


Direct for export 

North™ " '.'.'.'.'.'. 


1,180,321 

8,882 


4,379 


KSSsrs:,'::;:: 


S!S;.?iSS;ii;: 
















Total bbls 


i,m,iua 


a,31T.68S 


Total bbU 


!,9ei,lW8 


2,«84,1M' 



146 



TBADI AND OOMMBBOX 0¥ 



EXPORTS OP FLOUR FROM THE UNITED STATES. 



As reported byO. P. Austin. Chief of Bureau of Statistics, Washington. 

riinif ^^^* 10^- 1^1- 1902. 

'^ Bbla. Bbls. Bbla. Bbu. 

New York 4,741,035 4,487,306 4.082,711 4,149,129 

Boston and Cbarlestown 1,528,207 1,606,175 1,496,168 901 326 

Philadelphia 2,101,486 2,174,567 2,287,527 2,621 7W 

Bi^ltimore 8,867,486 3,008,787 8.824,953 8 074,886 

MewOrleans 462,464 378,306 688,222 612 290 

Ssn Francisco 967,056 1,180,146 1,091,790 1,090,876 

Ohiesgo 13 675 86 898 

Doluth and Snperior "" 866 ,860 "298^488 887|977 52o|585 

Portland 129,020 

Pnget Sound..... 698,816 1,194,197 1,186,470 1,630,565 

Portsmouth and Norfolk 847,996 412,786 478,629 178,676 

WiUamette 655,579 888,610 648.826 691,471 

NewPortNews 1,726,128 2,209,602 2,757,889 1,954 488 

Q»lvwton 171,674 191,468 143;678 * 145 076 

Mobile.. 129,127 212,128 290,909 261818 

OtherPoints 960,736 602,099 569,626 106)714 

Total 18,717,161 18,682,609 19,362,830 17,998,581 



RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AT YARIOUS CITIES. 



1899. 1900. 

Bbls. Bbls. 

St. Louis 1,514,316 1,869,070 

New York 6,728,062 6,896,487 

Boston 2,321,588 2,694,868 

Baltimore 8,864,828 8,941,888 

Oincinnatl 2,164,874 2,661,977 

Milwaukee 8,165,106 3,012,626 

Minneapolis 228,102 

Toledo 916,281 1,196,864 

Buffalo 9,088,878 11,463,079 

Ohioago 5,890,189 9,813,591 

Philadelphia 8,247,879 8,712,177 

New Orleans 784,027 647,796 

Detroit 208,610 286,600 

Peoria. 611,120 837,170 

SanFrandBoo 1,606,160 1,221,448 

Montreal 1,675,069 888,182 

Duluth and Superior 4,678,980 4,519,640 

Cleveland 990,610 1,182,720 

Indianapolis 216,726 220,880 

Tacoma 

Galveston 13 



1901. 
Bbls. 

2,170,548 

6,868,242 

2,477,072 

8,862,482 

8,031,748 

2,919,800 

240,779 

680,416 

11,058,489 

10,282,286 

8,485,022 

585,871 

887.550 

940,197 

1,675,007 

1,081,825 

4,785,800 

1,060,860 

246,066 



1903. 
Bbls. 

2,217,686 

6,898,784 

1,945,758 

8,757,265 

2,408,068 

8,681,400 

246,241 

700.000 

12^026,616 

7,895,207 

4,218,907 

561,145 

873,800 

1,017,620 

1,748,558 

1,048,016 

6,907,765 

861,480 

825,048 

415,224 

270,100 



THK CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 



147 



AMOUNT OF FLOUK MANUPACTUEKD m VABIOUS CITIES. 



1902. 
Bbls. 

Minneapolis 16,260405 

8t. Louis 1,822,680 

Baltimore 864,758 

PhHadelphia 600,000 

Milwaukee. 1,755,061 

Buffalo 966,662 

Toledo 1,600,000 

Detroit 313,000 

Ghioago 1,262,224 

Duluth and Superior 1,809,620 

Kansas City 1,298,359 

Peoria 107,000 

Cincinnati 416,298 

Cleveland 

Indianapolis 665,614 

NashTille, Tenn 988,876 

GalTeston 172,240 

Taooma, Wash 1,186,000 



1901. 


1990. 


1899. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


15,921,880 


15,082,725 


14,291,780 


1,505,284 


1,846,059 


1,166,489 


849,785 


816,940 


410,086 


586,000 


551,000 


586,000 


1,989,966 


1,866,601 


1,787,826 


895,060 


962,573 


1,068,944 




1,002,000 


1,150,000 


568,400 


626,000 


594,700 


1,280,000 


1,274,776 


1,125,745 


860,605 


845,460 


1,768,920 


1,480,684 


1,291,684 


1,094,846 


112,000 


150,000 


67,500 


416,805 


856,718 


454,000 


180,000 


190,000 


200,000 


506,604 


489,491 


542,701 


877,481 


261,068 


680,808 


200,000 




203,000 


a • • • • * • 







FLOUB INSPECTION. 



Beport of Flour Inspeoted by the Merchants' Exchange Flour Inspectors. 



January . . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May ^ 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October . . . . 
November , 
December. 



1902. 


1901. 


1900. 


1889. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


10^ 


14,190 


16,557 


14,477 


11,066 


11,468 


16,608 


9,776 


9,027 


17,147 


18,870 


14,792 


9,228 


14,672 


17,827 


15,829 


8,134 


12,669 


15,950 


20,464 


8,090 


14,201 


18,461 


16,704 


8,917 


9,810 


18,881 


15,880 


12,014 


16,446 


16,494 


14,876 


10,547 


11,840 


11,948 


14,386 


13,662 


18,466 


14,425 


19,681 


14,608 


16,086 


14,868 


17,002 


9,840 


8,600 


14,804 


20,918 



Total bbls 184,675 



169,578 



184,148 



194,184 



AUGUST RUMP, Inspector. 



i i 


iSISISSilJ. i 


t i 


iiMiiiiii I 


I4 H- 

1^ 


isiiii!ii§ ; 


3 5 
^ « 


IliSiiilll 5 

SSSS-S28SS g 


M 


IllSliiSII 8 


^i 


§i!l§!lill 3 


s^ 


l§llii!§ll ! 


§ 1 




b i. 

U -1 


IIIIIISSI! ! 


ii 


aaas-s-sss | 


ii 


SasE*a*s83 2 




asss«s»|aa | 


ll 


iiii 



I 

II 

i 



THS CITT or ST. LOXHS. 



149 



WEEKLY PRICES OF ST. LOUIS WINTER WHEAT FLOUR 

PER BARREL FOR 1902. 



1902. 



Patents. 



Extra 
Fancy. 



Clear. 



Low to 
Medium. 



January 4, 

11. 

•• 18 

25 

February 1 

8 

15 

•♦ 22 

March 1 

" 8 

15 

" 22 

" 29 

April 5 

12 

" 19 

♦• 26 

May 8 

•• 10, 

17 

" 24 

81 

June 7, 

14. 

21 

28 

July 6 

12. 

19. 

'• 26. 

AufTUSt 2. 

9. 

16. 

28, 

80 

September 6. 

•• 18. 

" 20. 

27. 

October 4. 

" 11. 

18. 

" 25. 

Norember 1. 

8. 

" 15. 

" 22 

29. 

I>ecember 6. 

18. 

20. 

27. 



8.86^.10 
4.85 4.25 



4.00 
8.95 
8.95 
8.95 
8.06 
8.90 
8.80 
3.85 
8.80 
8.60 
8.60 
8.60 
8.66 
8.6f 
S.70 
8.70 
8.66 
8.66 
3.65 
8.60 
8.55 
».60 
8.60 
8.66 
8.65 
8.56 
8.50 
8.25 
B.20 
8.10 
8.1U 
8.16 
8.16 
8.20 
8.20 
8.20 
8.25 
8.80 
8.30 
3.86 
8.85 
8.35 
8.30 
8.80 
8.80 
8.80 
8.30 
8.85 
8.86 
8.36 



4.20 

4.20 

4.10 

4.10 

4.10 

4.06 

4.00 

4 06 

4.00 

8.80 

8.80 

8.80 

3.80 

8.80 

8.86 

8.85 

8.80 

8.80 

8.80 

8.76 

8.70 

3.70 

8.70 

3.66 

3.76 

3.66 

8.66 

8.40 

3.80 

8.20 

3.20 

3.25 

8.80 

8.80 

8.35 

8.85 

8.35 

8.40 

3.40 

3.60 

3.60 

8.50 

8.50 

8.46 

3.46 

8.46 

3.45 

3.50 

3.50 

3.50 



8.45(^.60 
8.66 8.80 



8.66 
8.56 

8.60 

3.50 

8.50 

3.45 

8.40 

8.46 

8.40 

3.30 

8.80 

8.30 

3.85 

3.85 

3.40 

8.40 

8.36 

3.85 

8.36 

8.80 

8.26 

8.80 

3.30 

3.26 

3.30 

3.80 

8.20 

2.96 

2.90 

2.80 

2.80 

2.85 

2.85 

2.90 

2.90 

2.90 

2.95 

3.00 

3.00 

3 05 

3.05 

3.00 

2.95 

2.96 

2.90 

2.90 

2.90 

3.00 

3.00 

8.06 



8.70 

3.70 

3-70 

8.70 

8.70 

8.60 

8.50 

8.55 

8.56 

8.40 

8.40 

8.40 

3.45 

3.46 

8.50 

3.50 

3.60 

3.50 

3.50 

8.45 

3.36 

8.40 

3.40 

8.85 

8.46 

8.40 

3.30 

8.06 

8.00 

2.90 

2.90 

2.96 

3.06 

3.10 

3.10 

3.10 

3.10 

3.10 

3.10 

3.20 

3.20 

8.20 

3.15 

3.16 

8.15 

8.15 

3.15 

8.20 

3.20 

8.20 



3.10^.26 
3.26 8.40 



3.25 

3.25 

3.26 

3.26 

8.25 

3.20 

8.10 

8.10 

3.05 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

3.00 

3.00 

8.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

8.00 

3.00 

3.05 

3.00 

S.liO 

2.80 

2.80 

2.65 

2.66 

2.65 

2.70 

2.70 

2.70 

2.70 

2.70 

2.70 

2.70 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.70 

2.70 

2.70 

2.70 

2.70 

2.70 

2.70 

2.70 



8.40 

8.40 

8.40 

3.40 

3.40 

3.86 

8.25 

8.85 

8.20 

8.16 

8.15 

8.15 

8.15 

8.15 

3 20 

3.20 

8.80 

3.20 

8.20 

8.20 

3.20 

3 20 

3.20 

3.20 

8.25 

3.29 

3.20 

2.90 

2.90 

2.75 

2.75 

i.75 

2.80 

2.80 

2.80 

2.80 

2.80 

2.80 

2.80 

2.90 

2.90 

2.90 

2.8.5 

2.86 

2.85 

2.85 

2.85 

2.85 

2.85 

2.86 



2.80^.00 
2.80 8.00 



2.75 

2.75 

2.76 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.70 

2.70 

2.66 

2.65 

2.66 

2.65 

2.65 

2.66 

2.66 

2.65 

2.66 

2.66 

2.66 

2.65 

2.66 

2.65 

2.66 

2.66 

2.75 

2.76 

2.76 

2.40 

2.40 

2.26 

2.25 

2.26 

2.25 

2.25 

2.25 

2.26 

2.25 

S.25 

2.25 

2.26 

2.26 

2 26 

2.25 

2.25 

2.26 

2.25 

2.20 

2.20 

2.20 

2.20 



8.00 

3.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

2.90 

2.90 

2.80 

2.76 

2.76 

2.76 

2.76 

2.76 

2.75 

2.76 

2.66 

2.85 

2.86 

2.85 

2.85 

2.86 

2.86 

2 85 

2.90 

2.90 

2.90 

2.60 

2.60 

2.50 

2.86 

2.85 

2.85 

2.86 

2.36 

2.36 

2.36 

2.86 

2.85 

2.40 

2.40 

2.40 

2.40 

2.40 

2.40 

2.40 

2.40 

2.40 

2.40 

2.40 



150 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



GRAIN. 



The grain crops of 1902 were the largest ever haryested, aggregating in 
wheat, com, oats, rye and barley 4,345,138,647 bushels. The yield of wheat 
was less than in 1901 and 1898, but greater than in any other year. The 
yield of com was far in excess of any previous year, and was only 
approached by the crop of 1896. In oats also previous records were 
eclipsed; and the same was true of rye and barley. Other crops were like- 
wise abundant, so that the year 1902 was a banner year for the fanner. The 
average yield and value of the crops of 1902 are given by the Department 
of Agriculture as follows: 



OROPS. 



ACREAGE. 



PRODUCTION. 



Farm value 

December 1st, 

1902. 



Com 

Winter Wheat. 
Spring Wheat . 

Oats 

Barley 

Rye 



Acres. 
94,048,618 
28,681,426 
17,620,996 
28,668,144 
4,661,068 
1,978,648 



Bushels. 
2,628,648,312 
411,788,666 
268,274,842 
987,842,712 
184,954,028 
88,630,692 



$1,017,017,849 

266,727,475 

156,496,642 

'808,684,852 

61,896,684 

17,060,798 



The yield as compared with previous years was as 


follows : 




YEAR. 


Whbat. 
Bushels. 


COBN. 
Bushels. 


Oats. 
Bushels. 


Rtk. 

Bushels. 


Barlst. 
Bushels. 


TOTAfi. 
Bushels. 


1902 

1901 

1900 

1899 

1898 

1897 

1896 


666,068,006 
748,460,218 
622,229.505 
647,308,846 
675,148,706 
530,149,168 
427,684,346 


2,623,648,312 
1,622,519,891 
2,106,102,616 
2,078,148,983 
1,924,184,660 
1,902,967,933 
2,283,876,166 


987,842,712 
786,806,724 
809,126,969 
796,177,713 
780,906,643 
698,767,809 
707,346,404 


83,630.592 
80,344,830 
23,995,927 
28,961,741 
26,667,522 
27,363,324 
24,869,047 


134,954,023 
109,932,924 
6S,925,838 
78,381,663 
65,792,257 
66,686,127 
69,695,223 


4,846,188,647 
3,148,066,687 
3,619,879,770 
3.518,968,796 
8,411,689,767 
8,225,988.881 
8,612,970,186 



The yield of wheat per acre in bushels in 1902 is given as follows: 
Spring wheat 14.7, winter wheat 14.4; com 26.8, oats 34.5, rye 17.0, and 
barley 29.0. In yield of com Missouri holds first place, the yield being 39 
bushels per acre and Illinois next with 38.7 bushels. Farm values for 
several years compare as follows : 



1899. 

Corn $629,210,110 

Wheat 819,646,259 

Oats 198,167,976 

Rye 12,214,118 

Barley ; 29,694,264 

Hay 411,926,187 

Potatoes 89,828,882 



1900. 

$751,220,084 

823,516,177 

208,669,288 

12,296,417 

24,076,271 

446,688,870 

90,811,167 



1901. 

$921,655,768 
467,850,156 
293,658,777 
16,909,743 
49,706,168 
506,191,589 
148,979,470 



1902. 

$1,017,017,849 
422,224,117 
808,684,852 
17,080,798 
61,898,684 
542,036,864 
184,111,436 



It will be noticed that com is the most valuable product of agriculture 
and that hay and wheat are the next. 



THX OITT OJP ST. LOUIS. 



161 



The exports of grain from the United States for the past Uiree years 
compare as follows : 



TEAB. 


Wheat. 
Bushels. 


Corn. 
Bushels. 


Oats. 
Bushels. 


Btb. 
Bushels. 


Barlst. 

Bushels. 


TOTAIi. 

Bushels. 


1902 

1901 

1900 

1890 


129,466,280 

179,201,418 

90,079,158 

109,686,161 


18,728,960 
102,899,089 
190,886,489 
206,186,288 


6,976,708 
25,929,048 
82,188,242 
41,086,128 


4,865,264 
2,617,570 
1,096,785 
4,852,840 


8,712,874 

8,686,110 

12,819,162 

16,949,846 


167,735,081 
818,778,286 
886,964,881 
878.667,702 



The grain business of St. Louis during 1902 was eminently satisfactory, 
the receipts being greater in all the cereals except com^ and in that article 
St. Louis receiyed its proportion of the light crop of 1901. 

Beceipts daring the past Ave years compare as follows: 



1902. 

Wheat, bushels 80,667,212 

Com, ** 16,024,716 

Oats, *' .... 20,570,245 

Bye, " 940.396 

Barley, '• 2,284.604 



R1&CEIPT8. 

1901. 

20,860,806 

20,834,060 

15,728,130 

686,810 

1,989,993 



1900. 

19,786,610 

26,618,410 

18,257,925 

475,855 

2,011,500 



1899. 

10 428,168 

28,844,475 

12,606,885 

454,790 

1,400,744 



1608. 

14,240,252 

26,788,962 

10,725,880 

571,707 

2,001,9U 



Total, " 70,487,072 60,049,798 61,144,805 48,248,787 64,278,212 

Including flour reduced to wheats the receipts would be as follows : 



Bushels. 

1902 *.... 80,416,654 

1901 69,817,294 

1900 69,556,619 

1809 55,058,164 

1888 60,884,606 

1897 68,581,864 



Bushels. 

1896 57,208,249 

1895 87,410,880 

1894 61,646,405 

1898 66,848,786 

1892 80,548,186 

1891 68,886,764 



Bushels. 

1890 : 77,796,822 

1889 68,466,596 

1888 51,105,121 

1887 48,848,562 

1886 42,918,800 



The relatiye position of the ten principal primary teoeiylng points is 
shown by the following table : 



BBOEIFTS OF GRAIN FOB FOUR TEARS. 



1902— bush. 

Chicago 185,735,874 

8t. Louis 70,437,072 

Minneapolis 112,889,660 

Peoria .. 84,776,815 

Kansas City 48,869,000 

Milwaukee 32.896,177 

Toledo 26,491,802 

Duluth and Superior 49,807.816 

Detroit 12,828,840 

Glndnn aU 20, 122,812 



1901— bush. 

245,207,668 
60,049,798 

114,817,400 
6,609,466 
46,768,600 
88,710,300 
26,324,886 
51,217,696 
12,887,116 
26,667,871 



1900— bush. 

807,726,186 
61,144,804 

105,718,596 
82.588,6iK) 
46,688,250 
41,046,180 
41,840,418 
40,869,596 
11,008,717 
26,885,828 



1899— bush* 

298,901,815 
48,243,787 

109,364,480 
19,961,800 
81,745,660 
46,221,926 
87,839,184 
69,624,484 
8,712,280 
18,164,179 



WHEAT. 

More wheat was received and distributed at St. Louis during 1902 than 
in any year in the history of this market. The receipts for the year were 
30^667,212 bushels, of which 25^743,604 was of the crop of 1902 and was 
receiyed after July 1st. Of the receipts nearly 17,000^000 bushels came by 
Western railroads and nearly 9,000,000 from North and Northwestern roads. 
The shipments amounted to 22,276^507 bushels^ of which 3,672^863 bushels 



162 TRADE AND OOMHEBCB OF 

were exported via Atlantic Seaboard and 2|308;714 by river via New Orleans. 
There was a steady demand from Southern and Eastern milling points, and 
some 16,000,000 bushels was taken by these outside mills. About 6,000,000 
bushels was taken by city millers. The quality was not up to the year 
before^ the crop of 1901 being unusually good on account of a most favor- 
able harvest. The crop of 1902 was damaged to some extent by continued 
rains during harvest time, so that but a small proportion graded No. 2. 
Out of 31,456 cars inspected, but 7,914 graded No. 2. Inspections show the 
different kinds of wheat received, to be as follows: 

Wheat. Oars. 

Bed Winter 26,819 

Hard Winter 4,740 

White Winter 97 

Spring 800 

Total 81,466 

The 1,067^203 sacks of wheat received was all red winter wheat. The 
largest weekly receipts were 1,971,472 bushels for the week ending August 
9th, and the largest single day^s receipts were 687,836 bushels on Saturday 
August 9th. 

Receipts of wheat at the principal primary markets for the past three 
years compare as follows : 

1903— Bu. 1901— Bu. 1900— Bu. 

Minneapolis 88,762,120 90,888,670 88,812,320 

Chicago 87,940,968 51,197,870 48,048,298 

Kansas City 24,018,400 26,962,804 84,775,450 

Duluth and Superior 42,406,928 47,000,966 81,964,824 

St. Louis 80,667,212 20,860,806 19,786,614 

Milwaukee 9,426,200 18,050,850 9,681,380 

Toledo 18,100,260 8,216,206 9,228,047 

The^crop of the surplus wheat States for the three years were as follows : 

1902— Bu. 1901— Bu. 1900— Bu. 

Kansas 45,827,496 99,079,304 82,488,666 

Minnesota 79,752,404 80,102,627 51,509,000 

Nebraska 62,726,451 42,006,885 24,801,900 

Iowa 14,869,245 21,048,101 21,798,228 

South Dakota .... 48,978,033 61,662,307 20,149,684 

Missouri 66,266,494 31,137,097 18,846,718 

nilnois 32,601,932 30,052,058 17,982,068 

Wisconsin 9,656,094 7,576,874 18,166,699 

North Dakota . . . 62,872,241 59,310,669 13,176,218 

The average yield per acre was 14.5 bushels for the whole crop. Winter 
being 14.4 and spring 14.7. In Kansas the yield was 10.4, in Nebraska 23.2, 
in Iowa 17.5, in Missouri 19.9 and in Illinois 17.9. 

CORN. 

The amount of com handled in this market during 1902 decreased some- 
what owing to the short crop of 1901, while the phenomenal crop of 1902 



THB CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 153 

did not begin to reach the market till November and December, when the 
receipts largely increased. The total amount handled was 16,024,716 
bushels, against 20^834^060 bushels the preyious year. Values were too 
high for export and but a small proportion of the crop went to foreign 
markets ; the bulk being taken for home consumption. 

The receipts were less from the West and larger from east of the river. 
Shipments amounted to 13,698,459 bushels^ the larger part going to the South. 
The market opened for No. 2 in January at 693^ cents and ranged from 59 
to 63)^ cents until the new crop began to arrive in November, when the 
price fell to 44^ closing in December at 403^ to 41 >^. 

Receipts at the principal primary markets were as follows : 

RECEIPTS OF CORN. 

1902. 1901. 1900. 1899. 

Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. 

Chicago 60,622,907 84,136,687 184,663,456 183,776,360 

St. Louis.. . 16,024,716 20,834,060 25,618 410 28,844,475 

Peoria 18,276,649 19,604,566 18,596,800 17,061,200 

Kansas City 16,092,800 13,488,860 8,834,250 8,769,250 

Toledo 5,960,791 10,969,628 24,828,879 15,498,089 

Detroit 2,069,587 8,266,974 3,378,984 8,208,945 

Milwaukee. 2,701,220 8,425,800 5,780,400 7,233,290 

Cinchmati 7,910,048 11,598,425 14,420,798 6,607,090 

Indianapolis 6,599,520 5,698,060 7,498,200 8,204,700 

The crops of the com surplus States for the previous three years, as 
reported by the Department of Agriculture^ are as follows : 

1902— Bush. 1901— Bush. 1900— Bush. 

Ohio.... 121.608,612 80,818,802 106,890,188 

Indiana 171,332,142 87,753,541 163,200,800 

niinois 372,436,416 198,026,718 264,176,226 

Iowa 297,686,016 280,264,660 806,869,948 

Missouri 264.282,606 66,486,376 180,710,404 

Kansas 222,806.621 61,606,034 168,870,680 

Nebraska 262,520,173 109,141,840 210,480,064 

Total 1,702,621,485 888,441,866 1,886,188,266 

OATS, 

The crop of 1902 was the largest ever raised, and the receipt in the 
St. Louis market increased accordin^y. The total amount received aggre- 
gates 20,570,245 bushels^ while the receipts of 1901 were 15,728,130 bushels. 
The crop was below the average in quality, but fairly merchantable. Aside 
from the home requirements, there was an unusual domestic demand, 
especially in the Southeastern and Southern States, Texas being the largest 
buyer. The price of No. 2 in January was 50 cents, ranging from 41 3^ to 
48 cents until harvest, when values declined materially. During August 
quotations were 26>^ to d2^, October 29 to 32, closing in December at 33>^ 
to 34 cents. 



164 



TRADE AND COKMIROI OF 



The crops of the Western States for four years oompare as follows : 

1903. 1901. 1900. 1899. 

bosh. bush. bush. hush. 

Iowa 12i,788,m 122,804;^ 130,572,188 126,966,740 

Minnesota 82,259,687 65,734,027 41,907,046 52,688,416 

Wisoonsin 95,087,810 66,647,881 61,971,552 67,687,380 

niinois 158,450,428 112,581,903 188,642,884 127,278,948 

Indiana 48,565,685 38,688,022 44,866,085 84,301,248 

Ohio 46,409,791 35,217,878 40,340,584 82,945,976 

Missouri 27,816,166 10,197,746 24,695,378 20,299,850 

Kansas 81,529,128 17,382,410 48,068,943 89,129,410 

RYE. 

The rye crop of 1902 was lilce the other cereals, greater than ever before, 
reaching 33^680,692 bushels. Receipts at St. Louis were also larger, amount- 
ing to 940,396 bushels, the major part coming by rail fromthe .West. Prices 
of No. 2 ranged from 55 cents to 68 cents during the first six months, and 
from 47 to 51 cents the balance of the year. 



BARLEY. 

Receipts for Barley were 2^234,504 bushels, a considerable increase over 
previous years, practically all of which was taken by home brewen and 
malsters. 

AMOXJNT OF BBEB MANUPACTUBED IN ST. LOUIS. 

1890 1,856,883 bbls., or 58,498,114 galls. 

1891 1,810,812 " 56,135,172 " 

1892 1,961,449 " 60,814,919 " 

1893 2,092,908 " 64,879,998 " 

1894 1,981,666 " 59,881,646 " 

1895 1,962,059 " 60,828,844 " 

1896 2,193,785 " 68,007,858 " 

1897 2,124,507 " 65,859,744 " 

1898 2,040,158 " 63,204,898 " 

1899 2,100,411 " 65,112,741 " 

1900 2,283,603 " 70,791,698 " 

1901 2,517,755 " 78,050,402 " 

1902 2,707,508 " 83,932,748 " 



THK CITS OP 8T. LOUIS. 



MOXTHLT RSOBIPTe OP rLODB AMD QKAUK WOK 1903. 



MOMTHS. 


Ploor. 
BbU. 


Wbeat. 

BMh 


Com. 


sst 


Jffi;. 


ISS: 


}S^::::::: 


ITS.IW 

140, MS 

S:a 

si 

191, OSS 

319,970 


b; m 

8, 67 
SO 


l.DM 

soe 

!:S 


MO 1 
400 1 

no ! 
soo ; 


eo 

no 

110 


i 

38 
31 

« 

17( 

Its 


1 

1 

«7 


1 

1 

i 


IS 
























ffi 




MO 












Total 


a.aiT,e8s 


80,887, Jia 


is.oM.Tis lio.nD.au 


M0.S96 


3.aH.!l01 



MOMTHLT amPKBNTS OF FLOUB AMD QBAIM FOB 1903. 




i.ao7,wi 

'84<!929 

1,2J4|U8 

l',433|615 
4,0tW.'/IS 









' 


























































SS ::;:: 








£;;;;;:;;;;^;;;-:;;-;;;:E;::-E:;i;:;;;;;;;; 





I bnahaU to the barrel 



jl 



i 







THE OITr OF 8 



MOKTHLT BSGXIPTfi AHD SHIPUEHTS FOB TWO TKAB8. 



BicBirre. 


SmnixNn. 


KODtltt. 


1903. 


IMl. 


aoniu. 


1M3. 


1901. 




9B 

!: J! 


1, U 

80 

a, <9 

^ 1 

30 




!: !! 

1. 140 




lSrE£ 


asr?.:::::::::: 


3,4% 

■a 

6« 


OM 




K? 










ss:;;i:::;;;:;::; 










Ss-;;;:;;:;; 


ffi 




"*""'*" 


:m8 










Tout buihcli... 


so,«eT,ii2 


so,860,8as 


ToUlburtwaB... 


»,K8,NI7 


n.01S,E58 



SOURCES OF 



FOB THREE rXASS. 



Fbom 


!«.. 


1901. 


1901 






16,886,970 

l.MlifiW 

M(,3S6 

1,158,471 

■■s;:s 


i^eofilzTS 

1,298, J2S 

t(w,«o 






i;| 

1,94! 


m 




070 




0117 








80.887 ,ill 


io.8SO,eoB 











DIRECnOH OF BHIPlfKinS FOR -THREE TEARS. 



6BIFFBSTO 


1902. 


1301. ( 1900. 




s.fjn.HS9 

!, 1108.714 
*.S84,B78 

'44«'.413 








EutbV rail (not exported) 


4.198.«ra 8,0lfl.ra 























TEU>I ANP OOHKIBOB OP 



S AND BHIPIfBirra FOB TITO TkABt. 



"~- 


SHIfMBirt*. 


Uondw. 


im 


1901. 


Uoatb*. 


IMl 


IMl. 




1, I8S 

WO 

•' i 

no 
uw 

>(» 

1 nw 

mo 


I as 

1 1 

1 MS 

1 1 

MO 


1 

I 




LOU 
l.Kl 
i.eit 

il 

l.BU 








I'l 
















^::::::::::::::: 
























































Total toulud* .. 


16.031. 716 


10.8U.OSO 


Total biMbds... 


i»,6ee 


U^ lT.7IS.aB 



flOUBOKB OF SDPPLT POB THKBB TBABB. 



t*OK 


UOl. 


IML 


uoo. 




•■".;g! 

Ts.TOD 
B.tBl,9U 

soo.ooo 


4.oi3,aKi 
on lew 


8,e«i.wo 

OU.IMS 




"■S-B 






Total BMclptB, baibeU 


K, 014,116 


io,ss4.aeo 


a».ni,4H 



DIBBOTIOH or SHIPmtlTS FOB THRKB TBABfl. 



SoirPBDTO 


.«. 


ISW. 


,«.. 




'■11 


'!:SI;S! 
'■■S:S 

SI .010 






















S7,Be8,0Bl 


so.ui.m 









DIBSCTIOK OF SHIPMBKTS, 1001-09. 



Exported vlK Quit uid Atl&Dtlc norte I.SOS, 

Exported Tia New Orleans. Ue, 

South by ran (or consumption a.Ne, 

East by rtiil tor consumption TIS, 

South by rivertorconsnmptlon iH, 

West by rat! tor conaumptloD " "" 

To local polula 

Total stalpments. bushels 11.696, 



«6,96l 
l.on.07> 

a.tea 
i7.7ae.as 



THE OITY OF BT. I1OUI8. 

OATS. 

MOMTHLT RECZIPTB AMD 8H1PKEKTS rOR TWO TEABS. 



-o™. 




Months. 


im. 


1001. 


Months. 


"»■ 


i9in. 


JXS?^ 


i;»7< 

i,*e8 
mi 

I'.toe 
i)oia 


MO 
)1S 

000 


ii i 

ll 95 

I. w 
'■™,J00 


Jannar, 


OH 
SH 


1» 

ffi 

ns 

MO 

ou 

STO 
OM 
020 


1,BW 

a 
J 

■1 


BSO 
















sSii:;;:;;-;::;;: 

July 

IS"'''-''''- 


i 














^aSSS::::; :: 


Total bushels... 






Total bushels .. 


1S,T38,I30 


M,STO,J*S 


10,I>U,30E 


ii,en,9ss 



OF SUFFLT FOR THBEE TEARS. 



FROM 


uoo. 


UOl. 


19«. 




961, sett 

I,S77.0e» 

6,97a ow 

'«o;ooo 


I.IIB.W 

9BT,BiS 

!;Si:SS 

MO ,00a 




The South, by raU trom West at Ulaalsslppl Blver. 

The South, by Mississippi Elver Boaw 

The North and Northwest, by raU and river 


7,10B,S80 








1B,3ST.0U 


1B.™,1B0 


M,070,MS 





DIRECTION OF SHIPMENTS. 



TO 


1900. 


1»D1. 


lem. 


The West 


170,177 
6,088,481 


soB.sao 

'ill 


W MO 
























T,BS8.T00 


io,ui,m 


ll,eS7,M0 



bushels were exported Tia Atlantic ports and sai.tio bushels via 
nshela were exported via Atlantic neaporta and 881,717 bushels via 
bosbelB were exported via Atlantic ports and 110,809 bushels via 
bushels were exported via Atlantic porte and 687,904 boshels via 
bnshela were exported vIk Atlantic potM and n,40S bushels via 



TIUDK AKD COUHBBOE OF 



HONTRLT RECEIPTS AND SHIFIfXNTS FOB TTO TBABS. 



BlOEtPTS. 


8hii 


-«>». 




Uanthi. 


1801. 


im. 


Month*. 


uu. 


1901. 




■S:| 

186^898 
IW.WN 


■'.IS 

tti.Tea 
ausoo 


g^E;;;;;; 


4TMS 


BOTTll 


E^::;;:::::; 


14 

83 

i 


eio 

i 

i 

lU 


e: 

i 


ON 
































Si^':;;;;:;::: 






























Total baBbali... 


M0.»« 


688.B10 


ToUlbneheli... 


1(05,909 


«0,61J 



80DBCES OP 8UPPI.T FOR THBBB TBAB8. 



Fboh 


I90a. 


1901, 


IMO. 




119 ,!« 

se,0M 

638,907 


S8,I21 

11,000 

113,29: 
8S1,9S1 


110, TBO 

Jl'iS 


The Sonth b; nU tmm cut of Ulaslsalppl Tim 












910,»96 


.86.8.0 









THK OITT or ST. LODIS. 



BARLEY. 

]fOKTHI.T RKOXIPTS AKD 8HIPHENTB 



rOR TWO TEARS. 





.Hmaim. 


KCHitha. 


MOl. 


1901. 


Uontb*. 


1901. 


1901. 






714, SOO 
14I,M0 

!•! 

l[OM 
lU.OOO 
S8J,0W 

m.ooo 




1S:2S 
E>;uo 

■ .000 






J 

871 


s 

ISO 

z 

wo 










'!« 


























908 
llftlS 

soeY 


























il:S 








TotdboalMU... 


l,B8»,eBS 


2,M4,B0* 


ToWlbiHlMla... 


91.101 


6B,U1 



BOITRCBS OF BUPFLT VOR THRRE TEARS. 



FBOK 


1901. 


IBOl. 


1900. 




si,on 


U.8N 




















h„.l..h. 


),3H,IM 


I,iB9.99« 


1,011.«» 





No Osnadft BarlsT recetred Id ISM. 

U,oao bmhelB Canada Barley received la 1997. 

Mo OMiada Barley racelred hi isra. 

90,099 bosbelB Oaoada Bnrloj recelTdd In 1899. 

f),Il7 tmahelH Canada Baney recelred In 1900. 

l>,000 bnsbeta Canada Barle7 received in 1901. 

No Canada Barley received In 1901. 



TRADE AND OOUKESOK OF 





bbU.' 


S-' 


rlODT knd Wheat 
In bmhela. 


ToMl Wheat Crop Per Mnt. of Total 


uet 


ae 


1!9M.IDS 


iw.gu 


4H,8B,000 « 


„ 


18M 




IS 


wx 


IM 




SM 


NW 


WOSSD.OOt 1 


n 


1801 


M 


11 




MO 




SM 


BIT 


mimooo 4 


tl 


UM 


90 


M 


m 


KS 




W 


10 


tll.TM.OOD B 


» 


IM 


08 


M 




SS8 




»I 




BIS MS.OM e 


M 


UW 


ss 




W! 


BM 






Kl 


n6.in,7u 4 


10 


isn 


ss 


IC 


IM 


SIS 




181 


SS7 


««o.ie7.4ie ■ 


so 


UM 




M 


S8( 






4« 


lie 


tsi.ita.Mi 1 


7t 


U01 
















127,eM,S« 4 


11 


laae 




IS 




S» 




SM 


967 


ssolmltw 8 


K 


1§9E 


S8 




s» 






sse 




e7s,i4a,7os « 






.,«»,.7fi 


111 




6>S 




wc 




M7, SOD ,848 8 


48 


J901 


2,0J9,8M 






uo 




BM 




SK,2J9,S0S 8 


» 


IBM 


],»9,S1S 


_1 


BUS 


US 




TBI! 


7IM 


7«»,«eo,2ie s 





As reported by O. P. i 



[, Chief of Bareaa of Statlstfca, WaahlngtOD, D. O. 



THB CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



163 



RECEIPTS OF WHEAT AT ST. LOUIS. 



TEAS. 



AnaUBT— Bu8H. 



JULT-- Bush. 



TOTAIh 

Two MONTBB. 

BUBB. 



190S 
1901 
1900 
1899 
1898 
1897 
1896 
1896 
1894 
1698 
1893 
1801 
1890 
1889 
1888 
1887 
1886 
1885 
1884 
1883 
1882 
1881 



6,948,847 
8,883,249 
4,780,064 
2,107,170 
1,694,962 
2,639,971 
8,093,790 
2,863,692 
9,881,038 
8,486,328 
6,610,977 
6,194,606 
3,169,492 
8,060,893 
4,031,192 
8,094,637 
2,738.037 
2,167,176 
8,463,623 
3,880,267 
8,787,030 
1,828,189 



6,944,132 
6,691,140 
4,180.881 
1,929,118 
1,110,230 
1,261,628 
2,266,192 
1,902,860 
8,848,308 
2,207,104 
8,276,484 
8,627,926 
8,476,860 
3,880,065 
2,111,396 
4.419,464 
4,476,270 
984,858 
1,976,134 
1,299,448 
4,022.118 
1,602,428 



12,287,489 
9,434.889 
8,860,966 
4,086,288 
2,706,182 
8,901,499 
6,868,982 
4,266,042 
6,679,841 
4,698,883 
9,887,401 
8,83i,481 
4,646,862 
6,410,967 
6,182,687 
7,614,091 
7,199,807 
8,152,038 
6,489,666 
4,689,710 
7,769,148 
3,430,612 



RECEIPTS OF WHEAT BT CROP TBABS. 
Bnshols. 



Tear ending Jane 80, 1891 13,812,360 

•* « ** 1893 36,996,228 

•• •• " 1898 26,013,688 

•• " •• 1894 13,668,604 

" " " 1896 10,126,818 

" •* 1996 12,886,766 



Bushels. 

Tear ending June 80, 1897 11,814,494 

*• •« " 1898 12,719,825 

" " " 1899 14,322,491 

" " " 1900 10,211.628 

" " " 1901 23,911,245 

" " 1902 19,822,546 



EXTREME MONTHLY RANGE of cash track prices of No. 2 Red Wheat, No. 2 
Hard Wheat, No. 2 Ck>rn, No. 2 Oats and No. 2 Rye. during 1902 : 



No. 2 Red 
Wheat. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July f 

August -j 



) 



September. 

October 

November . 
December . 



i 



92X 

86 Ji 

89 

88X 

865^ 

76% 

83H 

TDi 

84)^ 

76>^ 

80 

70 

81 

65V4 

68X 
63 

68K 

66 

72 

71 
69 
75 
69 



No. 2 Hard 
Wheat. 

86^ 
77 
81 
75 

78X 

71 

80 

^0K 

79^ 

73 

76>^ 

72 

78H 

65 

71 

64 

71K 

66 

74 

67 

72)tf 

66 

72X 
66 



No. 2 
Corn. 

69 

es^ 

B8>i 

63 

69 

66X 

59K 

66 

63)< 

67 

62 

67 

61 

61H 

54 

62 

66K 

69 

43 

49 

44 

49K 
40>i 



No. 3 
Oats. 

60 
46 

48 

48 

48 

42)tf 

46 

43M 

45H 

41>tf 
59 

82X 

26>^ 
83 

28K 

82 

29 

82 

283^ 

36H 
82 



No. 3 
Kye. 

e8H 

61 

62^ 

&1K 

62 

66 

60 

56 

60 

59 

60 

65 

57 

54 

63 

47>tf 

61 

47)tf 

48 

48% 

46 

49H 
47 



FIRST NEW WHEAT.— One car received June 11th, from Dyer, Tenn.; one 
car, June 13th, from Bertrand, Mo. ; one car, June 16tb, from Tulsa, I. T. ; June 19th, 
137 sacks from Caruthersville, Mo., and June 20th, 140 sacks from Chester, Ills. 



CORN MEAL. 

OORM HKAL, HOKINT, OKITS, AKS BTE FLOUR lUKITFACrCFBBD IK lOOS. 



RKCUFTS AKD IHIPICBHT8 OF OOBK lUAL, HOIOMT AMD OBITS. 



Tbab. 


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IfOXTHLT PBI0B8 Or OORM HRAL, PES BRL., DUBINS 190L AMD IMS. 





1901. 


1901. 




1902. 


1901. 


^nw? 


8'J*»8-«> 


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OAT HRAL, KAMUrACTDRBD. 



Atobie Cuml H 



.. X,(00 ■ 
.. K.OOO ' 

..10,000 ' 



TBK om or ST. Loms. 



MILL8TUFFS. 



) HHIPKKNT8 OF BBAM AXD HILL FEED FOB 
TWIMTT-FIVK TEAKS. 















Vmam, 




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MB 


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«»:s» 


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BIQHEST Aim LOWEST HOMTHLT PRICES OF BBAH, HDCSD FEED 
AKD SHXPSTCrrS FOR 1903. 



HMIBS. 


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TR^DE AND COMUBSCS OT 



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TRADE AKD OOMlaBOB Of 



QRMN lySPECTION. 

BBPOBT or WVMA.T XBOBXYKD AXD OrSPBOfSD OT 0T. LOUII AXD BAtfT 

BT. IX>UI8 mnUNG THE TXAB 1902. 



1902. 



0AB8 BT 
BAH*. 



WIMTEB WHSAT. 



Bed. 



Hard Winter. 



8 



White 
Winter. 



8 



BPBIH G WHBAV. 



Mixed. 



I 



Jannary ••• 
Febraaiy... 

March 

AprU 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . 

October 

Norember.. 
December . . 



Totals.... 5,104 

I 



166 
237 
285 
29i 
662 
428 
814 
647 
671 
445 
441 
204 



10 

80 

89 

28 

16 

66 

8,116 

8,783 

1.907 

1,728 

1,591 



12,900 5,965 



7 

9 

15 

8 

9 

18 

1,884 

1,588 

1,129 

867 

726 

820 



1 

6 
186 
815 
386 
200 
196 
78 



1,281 



8 

1 

3 

9 

4 

24 

68 

262 

174 

48 

84 

6 



193 

806 

895 

206 

501 

225 

76 

78 

206 

247 

188 

75 



619 2,686 



24 

6 

76 

19 

16 

11 

68 

188 

801 

461 

587 

285 



1,876 



1 
2 
2 
8 



6 



1 

26 
79 
48 
22 



179 



8 



7 
8 
6 
8 
1^ 
1 



14 46 



10 

11 

10 

4 

2 



87 



6 
8 
6 
1 
9 
5 
4 



7 
80 
51 



130 



49 
86 
88 

62 

113 

40 

4 

9 

16 

10 

20 

81 



428 



8 



8 
18 



• • . 



87 



3 

1 

4 

34 

5 

U 

21 

4 

2 

4 

8 



81 



19 

36 

3 

5 

19 

13 

30 

18 

8 

4 



189 



488 

634 

887 

680 

1,376 

840 

6,710 

6,794 

4,604 

4,106 

8.880 

1»€20 

31,456 



SACK WHEAT IN8PECTED. 

Sacks. 

No. 2 Bed Wheat 325,098 

No. 8 •• 460,541 

No. 4 •« 318,098 

BeJeotedlWheat 43,686 

No Grade 30,941 

Total Sacks 1,067,308 

Oars. Sacks. 

Inspections— West Side 38,918 665,890 

EastSlde 7,588 401,818 



THi oiTT or ST. iioxns. 



179 



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TRADE AXD COUUXBCK OP 



STOCK OF WHEAT IS STORE AT ST. LODIS AND EAST 
CLOSE OF EACH 



THE Onr OP ST. LOUIS. 



ST. LOUIS or pubuc elevators, by grades, at the 

WEEK, DTTRING 1902. 



TKADI AMD OOHKEBOI OF 



STOCK OP COBN IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. 
OF EACH WEEK 



Sfttnrd&r BrenliiB. 


NO.S. 


No. I. 


No.*. 


^£d. 


#ai. 




, 


g!:!S 

091,021 
166,I9t 

■n:!!,' 
If 
II 

ii 

.,iS! 

is 

tn.iw 


RSg 

(§l|6tB 

<a>;TU 

<7B,I30 

S:SS 

l:i 

6,4W 

IGTS 
17,764 

w.eis 

1»,S74 
J,47l 

no 

'i 

AS 

fi.isa 


i»,ua 

""ew 
■■■'eii 

G,M1 

■S:!S 

7.»T0 


47,ea 

e],G97 

61 Ml 

11 

i;i 

9,S61 

!;S 

s.wffl 

B,4W 

ii 
1 

887 

!;!S 
|:S 

l|947 

t.m 
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July 


28 


1,9M 


















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TBB OITT OF 8T. liOUIfi. 



JS3 



LOUIS IN PUBLIG ELEYATOBS BY GRADES AT THE CLOSE 
DURING 1902. 



Saturday Eyenlng. 



No. 4 
White. 



No. 2 
YeUow. 



No. a 
Yellow 



No 
Grade. 



Ck>m 

and 

Wheat 

Mixed. 



Total 

Com. 

bushels. 



Jan. 
« 

« 

<• 

Feb. 



it 

March 
« 

(I 

<« 

«< 

May 

tt 

II 
<i 
t« 

June 
II 

II 

II 

July 
•I 

II 

II 

Aug. 
II 

II 

II 

II 

Sept. 

II 
ii 

Oct. 
II 

II 

II 

Nov. 
II 

II 

II 

II 

Dec. 
II 

i< 

M 



4. 

11. 
18. 
26. 

1 

8. 
1ft. 
22. 

1. 

8. 
16. 
22. 
29. 

6. 
12. 
19. 
26. 

8. 
10. 
17. 
24. 
81. 

7. 
14. 
21. 
28. 

5. 
12. 
19. 
26. 

2. 

9. 
16. 
28. 
80. 

6. 
18. 
20. 
27. 

4. 
11. 
18. 
26. 

1. 

8. 
16. 
22. 
29. 

6. 
18. 
20. 
27. 



2,026 
2,026 
2,026 
2,026 



8,888 
9,709 
8,888 
11,128 
8,888 
8,888 
8,888 
7,646 
7,646 



782 
782 
782 



741 



114,867 

114,602 

124,680 

126,400 

180,880 

181,628 

181,802 

124,742 

125,244 

120,066 

119,847 

112,109 

88,491 

86,218 

81,668 

5,000 

6,488 

9,802 

16,668 

16,014 

8,207 

8,740 

19,487 

10,713 

"7|i02 

8,826 

8,825 

8,826 

2,426 

1,868 

868 

696 

696 

696 

695 



761 



779 

8,192 

4,871 

7,288 

16,991 

21,188 



67,819 

79,467 

96,814 

104,080 

115,264 

117,678 

110,068 

100,970 

80,622 

78,041 

64,287 

24,781 

6,914 

12,708 

9,729 

963 

806 

' '4i849 

3,069 

502 

981 



807 
807 



871 
1,016 

"*768 
1,880 

4,919 
8,298 
7,284 



•••••• 

1,389 
1,074 
1,074 
1,074 
1,074 
1,074 
1,074 
1,074 



1,671 
'i",648 



1,004 
1,004 






11 
2,147 



1,000 
1,080 



1,186,908 

1,889,786 

1,460,676 

1,512,681 

1,662,887 

1,608,218 

1,569,694 

1,505,284 

1,272,821 

1,120,686 

1,041,802 

800,029 

611,186 

628,078 

880,120 

181,026 

148,700 

101,818 

117,967 

106,572 

88,518 

122,488 

184,871 

114,414 

96,780 

126,881 

146,049 

179,008 

282,146 

409,850 

497,906 

866,862 

187,701 

54,994 

84,770 

88,288 

6,612 

2,469 

10,986 

11,845 

12,088 

6,154 

896 

5,778 

16,666 

10,628 

89,889 

212,906 

628,421 

1,179,262 

1,564,841 

1,660,867 



TRADE AND COMIURCB OF 



STOCK OP OATS, EYE AND BARLEY IN STORE IN PUBUC 
AT CLOSE OF EACH 



THB OITT OF ST, LOUIS. 



BLBVATOES IN ST. U>UI8 AND EAST ST. LOUIS BY GRADE 
WXEK DURING 1902. 



RYK. 


B&BLEY. 


ISS5S 


i 




■J 


oSSe. 


sSl. 


Tom 




bb™ 


neM 




,^ 






I 

I 
I 

I 

At 
51 

S3 

S 

1 

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3 
3 

1 

S 

1 
1 

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i 

ois 

s 

MS 

i 

§ 

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M 
81 

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;; 














































June 








































iS 

B.STS 

i.eso 

iS 

1,MS 
1011 
1.011 






SiS 

«,9ae 

s;i 

ISiffi 
!!:S 

ii;si9 

1 








*«»■ 




































































:: S::::::;;;:::;::::::::;:::: 










■ 











TK&DB AND OOIOCBBOX OP 



STOCK OF GRAIN AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. LOUIS IN 

PUBUO BLET AT0B8 

Eaoh Satdboat Btbnimq Ddbixq 1903. 



UOl. 


b*u5£2J:. 


bffiii. 


.a's. 


.SSv 


Kit 


jAunaTj 




,18 

1 
1 

1 
1 

i 

1 
i 

99 
■29 

1 

08 


8e 

ITS 

1 
1 

.96 
OB 

i 

„.,jTi 

3sItM 

imIssi 

Its .049 

i:S 

497,906 

IST.TOl 
M,9W 

8»;i8S 

j'Jra 

io:9BB 

11,848 

i2,osa 

•■ss 

1ft, S3« 

S:S 

112, 90§ 
S3S,121 

i.iT9;aK 

1,S»4.M1 


Si 

ia7,fi89 

ii 

If 

sis 

tEl.S9] 
138,601 
IDS 690 
9S,264 

47.'71J 
28.990 
01B9I 
11,214 

i,vn 

7;^ 

IS, 374 

islws 

li,K7 

71 1910 
h;G98 
ll.StB 

lis 

S 

89,228 
S0,SS6 

n;9S2 

24;»8 


111,'M2 
101, 140 
101, U2 
102 IW 
102,219 
102,219 
101,(»T 

ii 

li 

i 

■ISS 

S 

u| 

1 ;m7 

54,018 

4 ',1SS 
G ,1S9 

!;S 

66,201 

silsm 

2T,8S4 

21,0B9 






s:iT9 












February 




















Uarch 




























April 






















May 




















































Jnl, 






















Aagnit 




























Beptambc 









































































































STOCK OF WHEAT IN HILLB AND PRIVATE ELEVATORS, NOT INOLDDBD 
IN ABOVE. 

BasbelB. Biuhels- 



BDBhels, 

Jkn. 1 SAS,70a Uav 1.. 

Sab.l 4*9,100 jQue 1. 

Hkteb 1 418,700 Jalrl. 





















187,000 


Decl 





TH* OITY <»■ »T. ;iOUIS. 



VISIBLE StJWLT OP GBAIN rOB 1908. 

AT TBM DDTEBXMT FOIHTS OP A00C1CDLA.TI0M IS THE UKITED STATZB 

Un> CANADA AND IK TBAN8IT DDBINO 1908, A* BBPORTBD 

BT THE OHIOAOO BOARD OF TBADB. 



TRADE AND COUHKBCE OF 

EECEIPTS OP GRAIN AT VABIOUS CITIES IN !«». 



RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN AT 7 ATLANTIC PORTS. 





1899. 1 1900. 


IBOl. 


1903. 






ie.896,413: ia,3O4,M0 
96,707,390 61,561,319 
184,862,1791 179,709,682 
88,181,622 76,434,089 
6,792,123 2,794.327 
11,781,091 10,394,918 


19,461,380 
186,393,942 
108,841,180 
70,129,612 
8611,008 
1,800,706 


19,197,838 
110,113,081 
36,943,681 
68,861,983 
5,973.684 
4,(m,M9 


whMt 

Com 

Barley 


Bu«h«te. 



EXPORTS FROM THE UNITED STATES BT CLASSES DDBINQ 
THE OALENDAB TEARS 1898, 1900, lOOl AND IBOi. 
As reported b; Bureau of Statistics, Wuhtngtoo. 
1B99. 

Agrioultnre 1783,183,406 

IConufRotareB 880,787,891 

UlDlng 83,279.187 

Forest 47,662,121 

FUhsrles 6,637,077 

MUoellaneoui 8,683,663 

Totals $1,353,983,814 

Foreign 22,686,627 

Gr»Qd totals, 0,275,467,971 



1900. 
WM,856,411 

441,108,943 
89,233,902 
64,481,146 


1001. 

{910,341,149 

10,'416,'b97 

60,461,306 


1903. 
$819,882,105 
4106S5967 
86,065,384 
53:98l!3S6 
8,018,399 


$1,477,940,118 


$l,4e6,876,8«0 


11,388,288,491 
27;41S;444 

«l,8eO,7ai,93S 



THE CITY OP ST. LOXTIS. 189 



MISSOURI CROP REVIEW, 1903. 



By Geo. B. Ellis, Secretary State Board of Agriculture. 



WHEAT. 

A greatly increased acreage was sown in the fall of 1901. This was due 
to two reasons. First, to the fact that the yield of each of the crops har- 
vested in 1900-1901 were above the average prodaction and of excellent 
quality, and second, on account of the disastrous drouth in 1901, a great 
many farmers sowed wheat for pasture to help take the stock through the 
winter. In sections where there was sufficient moisture and where the 
wheat was sowed in well-prepared lands the fall and spring pasture more 
than paid for the seed and expense of seeding. Oyer the northern and 
central parts of the State the winter was very dry during the early part of 
the season of 1902 and the seed made little growth, hut as the season 
adyanced there was sufficient rain to mature a bountiful crop. In many of 
the southwestern counties there were good rains in the fall of 1901, and the 
rain continued in the following spring and the wheat made rank growth 
causing it to lodge badly which reduced the yield. The fields that were 
pastured heavily in this section produced the best crop. In some of the 
southeastern counties wheat was injured by a heavy sleet in the winter 
which reduced the yield in that section. The quality of wheat at the 
harvest was not up to the standard of the crops of 1901. The grain was 
rather small and on account of the excessive rains which continued from 
the time of harvest to late in the season over a great portion of the State, 
a great amount of damage was done to crops in the shock and stack and 
much of it was fit for nothing but stock feed. The acreage given in the 
table below is based upon the census report for 1900. There are some 
differences between the acreage given and the estimates last year which 
are caused by correcting the figures upon the census basis. 

WHEAT SOWN, FALL OF 190a. 

The present wheat crop was sown considerably later than the average 
and at the beginning of winter most of it was small affording very little 
protection for the winter. In a few localities the Hessian fly did consider- 
able damage, a few reported damage from rust, some from plant lice and 
several reported injury from too much rain causing the wheat to rot before 
germinating. But taking the crop as a whole it was in excellent condition 
December Ist, as may be seen in the table. 

The acreage sown this year is about 11 % below that sown last year, the 
greatest decrease being in a group of counties in the western part of the 



19D 



TftABS AKD OOMHXBCl OF 



State including, Pettis, Johnson, Cass, Bates, Heniy, Vernon, St. Glair and 
Benton. However, these are not large wheat-prodaoing coonties. Seyeral 
correspondents placed the acreage in their localities in the above named 
coonties as low as 10 to 90% of the acreage of the previous year. One- 
fourth of the correspondents reporting for the State reported an increased 
acreage. It should be remembered that last year's crop was much larger 
than the average and that the crop now sown was 42% larger than the crop 
harvested in 1900. 

Further detailed information is given in the following table: 

•wheat. 



Fob Cbop 

1902. 



N.E. 
Sectlon^M 
Ooantles. 



N. W, 
Sectlon,21 
Ooanties. 



Oentral 
Section, 21 
Oounties. 



8.W. 
Sectlon«28 
Ooanties. 



8. £. 
Section. 29 
Oounties. 



Whole 
State, 114 
Ooanties. 



Acres harvested 

Acreage compared 
with 1901, percent. . . 

Average yield per 
acre, bushels 

Total yield in bushels 

Quality of grain at 
time of harvest, per- 
cent 

Average price per 
bushel on farm Nov. 

_^1, 1901, cents 

Total valua 

New crop sown fall of 
1902. Percent of 
acreage sown com- 
pared with previous 
year 

Total acreage 

Condition of growing 
plant Dec. 1, percent 

Oondition at same 
time 1901 



406,800 


818,800 


618,900 


1,167,100 


758,800 


189 


187 


124 


198 


in 


22.4 

9,lM,00t 


22.4 
7,141,000 


22.0 
11,808,000 


18.0 
21,008,000 


16.4 
12,444,000 


M 


98 


92 


94 


88 


69.2 
18,414,482 


57.4 
84,098,984 


64.4 
16,160,464 


66.2 
SU ,096,416 


68.9 
17,229,616 


90 
404,200 


80 
288,000 


90 
462,600 


80 
988,700 


101 
766,400 


100 


96 


98 


90 


101 


88 


100 


90 


96 


86 



8,166,900 

181.44 

19.8 
61,015,000 

92 



184,490,000 



89.1 
3,821,900 



91 



CORN. 

The com crop is king in Missouri. The value of the crop for this year 
\s equal to the combined value of all other farm products. Com being the 
main crop, there is less variation in the area devoted to com tbian to any 
other crop except perhaps the area devoted to grass. The season of 1902 
was generally favorable for the growth of the com crop, although in several 
of the extreme southeastern counties the crop was damaged by drouth, and 
in a large number of southwestern counties extensive rains prevented proper 
cultivation and reduced the yield. Taking the State as a whole, the yield 
is the largest on record. The total production 807,800,000 bushels. This 
gives Missouri first rank in the United States in average yield, and only 
second in total production. The largest crop previous to this was in 1896, 
when the total yield was 260,000,000 bushels. This makes an increase above 
that year of 67,000,000 bushels. The average yield for the State is 40 
bushels, which is two bushels above the yield of the highest previous year, 
which was also in 1896, when the average production was 88 bushels. The 
quality of the grain is generally good, although some damage has been 



THi omr or st. Loms. 



191 



siutained on accocmt of the extremely wet season. The average quality of 
the crop is 96, compared with average of 45 the previous year. The total 
value of the crop^ not including the value of the fodder, is $197,089,000. 

The five oountieB in the State having the largest acreage planted in com 
are in order named as follows : Nodaway, Bates, Atchison, Saline, Vernon. 
A great many farms in different parts of the State have made phenomenal 
yields. A number have been reported making from 75 to 110 bushels per 
acre. Further detailed information is given in the following tables : 

♦ GOBN. 



Fob Obop 

1903. 



N. E. N. W. Central 8. W. S. E. 
Sectlon,ao Section,21 Section,21 8ection,a8 8ectlon,29 
Oounties. OountieB. Ctonnties. Oounties. CJoanties. 


1,600,000 


3,888,000 


1,171,000 


1,781,000 


919,000 


106 


106 


104 


96 


96 


48.8 


48.6 


41.8 


86,6 


81.8 


66,840,000 


106,036,000 


48,831,000 


61,461,000 


30,336,000 


80.6 


81.4 


39.6 


81.7 


87.6 


66 

$19,994,000 


64 
183,360.000 


61 
$14,366,000 


68 
$19,480,000 


73 
$10,960,000 


96 


98 


96 


96 


98 


64 


66 


40 


88 


88 


.8 


.6 


.3 


.2 


.6 


23 


24 


84 


27 


48 



Whole 

State, 114 

Oounties. 



Acres in cultivation 
1903 

Acreage compared 
with crop 1901, per- 
cent 

ATerage yield per 
acre, busnels, 1903... 

Total yield In bushels. 
1903 

Farm price Not. 1, 
1903, per bush., cents 

Farm price Nov. 1, 
1901, per bush., cents 

*Total value crop 1903 

Average quality grain 
1903, percent 

Average quality grain 
1901, percent. 

Percent damage by 
froet. crop 1903 

Percent fodder crop 
harvested 1903 



7,606,000 

103 

••••• ,•••• 

807,864,000 

83.1 

63 
$07,089,000 

96 

46 

1.8 

81 



* Grain only, does not include forage value. 

NoTS.— The acreage given In the above tables for Oom and Wheat have been 
corrected upon the basis of the census of 1899. 



OATS. 

On account of the high price of seed oats in the spring, the acreage 
sown to oats was decreased 15% below the previous year. The oats in some 
localities failed to germinate or were killed by late freezing, and about 8% of 
the oat crop sown was plowed up and planted to other crops. The greatest 
decrease of acreage was in the southwest section^ which was caused largely 
by it being too wet for seeding at the proper time. The average yield of 
the crop this year was 31 bushels per acre and of good quality at the time 
of harvesting, but on account of rain during and after harvest^ the crop 
was damaged 25%. 

MEADOWS. 

The area devoted to the hay crop has been in the past few years about 
as stable as the area devoted to any of the principal farm crops. However, 
on account of the drouth last year which killed out a great many meadows^ 



192 TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 

the area this year hag been reduced 15 % . The average per acre is given by 
all correspondents for timothy^ 1.6, clover 1.76 tons. The average yield of 
timothy for the past five years has been 1.55 tons. The average price of 
timothy per ton on November Ist, this year, was $6.57 and for clover, $5.86. 
The value of the hay crop in the State is exceeded only by the value of 
wheat and com. 



THE FRUIT CROP. 

By L. A. Goodman, Secretary Missouri State Horticultural Society. 



The apple crop was only about one-half and the peach crop only one- 
fourth. The cold killed the buds^ and only a very small portion of the 
trees bore any crop at all. 

Missouri has about 20,000^000 trees in orchard, the largest area of any 
State in the Union, and it will not be many years before this State will be 
first in number of bushels produced. 

The increase in acreage of apple and peach trees, is somewhat phenom- 
inal, and there seems to be no let up. The apple crop of the year is valued 
at $6,000,000. The peach crop $1,000,000, the berry crop $2,000,000 and 
other fruits $1,000,000. 



THB OITT OF BT. LOUIS. 



AdtBAOB, PBODUCnOK AtfD VALUE OP CORN IN 1901. 



Afl BIFORTSD BY THB OSPARTKKKT OF ASBIOULTUBB, WASHQTOTOIf . 



TBAt>K AUD OOtaaiOB OF 



ACBEAQE, PBODOCnON AND YAJAJR OF WHEAT IN 1«M. 



IM UFOBTBD BT TSK DlPABTIBaT OF AaBIOULTdSK, WASEtniOTOB. 



Btath AXn TlUUtOHM. 


Acreage. 


'SSf-' 


Prodnetlon 


bSSJe. 


ToMl 
T»lue. 


fSr"*"--'"--'::::-"-:: 


.T"' 


IB 

i 

! 

f 

It 

s 
1 
( 

10 
10 

s 

is 

K 
11 

S 

13 

i 
i 

f 
1 


T 
S 

i 

3 
S 


Bnabeli. 
l7J.su 


"ii 


1 m.M 

wloo 






Mj,f.:::.:::::::::::;:::;: 






MawTork 


'IS 




















M':-: 








IJ1.788 


8S 
SG 

1 

i 

i 
s 

i 
1 

10 

•■ 
i 
































SSiiii;..;:::::::;::::::;;:: ::::::: 
ag;^:;::::::::::::::::::::::: 
















N*wMexlM 

Sffi^::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

H«T>dk. 

Hi*":;;::;;; :;;:;;;:;;;;;; 












lodlsQ TenitoTT 






tB,8gt,6ii 1 is.g 


»B,MO,»S 


ta.< 


Me7.Mo,ue 









TSX OITT or 8T. LOOIS. 



ACBBAQE, PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF OATS IN 1901. 



AB KKPOBTKD BT THK DCFAKTHENT OF AOBIOULTDBE, WA8HIKOT0H. 



StAnB An TSRBTKWm. 


*o™». 


YtoWp-I 


IbuBhe 


V^^l. 




iis.ios 

•11 

uilioe 


Bnlheli. 
<S. 
W. 

i: 

11. 

sl 
si 

18. 

IS; 

IB. 

19. 

'i: 

1 
1 

1; 

a. 

41. 

n. 
a. 

1 

8i: 

n. 


Oenta. 

■ 






^■1 

189 

18,468 

B41 

„.«. 

1,880 


308 
738 
8<B 
Ml 

Z 

MS 

IS 








Ssys^.'.:::;::;;:::;::::::::: 










E 




















































































ro^bSSS;:;;:;:;:;:::::.::;:; 






























































J8,B«.ne 


3S.e 


786,808,734 [ M.O 






* ' 



TKAOC AMD OOtOaBOl Of 



ACHEAQB, PBODUCnON AND VALUE OP ETB IN 1901. 



AB BIFOBTKD BT THB DBPABTMSHT OF AOBIODLTOBB, VASHnQTOM. 



Statb* un> Tixsnouu. 



Vflrmont. 

XM**cbn*etU.. 

OonDMit[aat 

Mew TOTk 

New Jeraej 

F*naarl«nDlS... 

DeUwsrB 

Uarfland 

VlrglnlB 

North Oarollna. 
SODlb Carottna.. 

Alabama 

TeDQeaaee 

VeatVlrglDEs... 

KentnokT 

Obto 

UtohEgan 

Indiana 

miDOlt. 

HInaeiata 

lItaK>iiriI'i^^".'i 

Nabraaka 

South Dakota... 
North Dakota... 

Uontana 

Wyoming 

Oolorado 

Dtah 

Idaho 

Waabtngton 

Oallforilia". *.'.'.'.". 
Oklahoma 

Total 



'™«- ^Klf 



THE OFTT OF ST. LOUIS. 



197 



ACREAGE, PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF BARLEY IN 1901. 



AB BBPOBTED BT THB DBPABTMBNT OF AOBICULTUBB, WASHINOTOIf . 



States aitd Tsbritobib8. 



Acreage. 



Yield p'r 
Acre. 



Production. 



Value 

I>er 
Bufbel 



Total 
Value. 



Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont. 

New York 

PennsylTanla. .. 

Maryland 

Virginia 

Texas 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Ohio 

Michigan 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Kansas. 

Nebraska 

South Dakota... 
North Dakota... 

Montana 

Wyoming , 

Oolorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

Oalilomla. 

Oklahoma 

Total 



Acres. 
8,668 
1,853 
12,577 
130,272 
9,067 
1,646 
2,824 
4,870 
1,641 

80,780 

40,298 

12,853 

21,022 

496,866 

840,834 

639,880 

1,637 

187,663 

74,298 

291,186 

267,408 

16,896 

1,249 

30,811 

1,108 

13,280 

8,662 

6,828 

84,301 

183,406 

61,707 

1,089,785 

14,623 



4,296,744 



Bushels. 
27.6 
31.6 
29.6 
14.0 
17.2 
18.0 
24.9 
18.6 
16.8 
19.4 
24.9 
22.8 
26.4 
34.6 
37.3 
36.8 
38.6 
16.6 
15.9 
16.0 
33.4 
38.3 
39.0 
83.6 
38.7 
81.7 
38.7 
86.0 
33.0 
40.3 
48.6 
80.6 
36.0 
33.0 



35.6 



Bushels. 

338,095 

89,818 

873.379 

1,683,806 

166,780 

37,810 

70,818 

66,746 

35,889 

19,823 

766,422 

918,680 

813,766 

515,089 

13,419,256 

21,680,617 

12,493,868 

27,010 

2,187,252 

1,188,688 

6,622,666 

7,268,984 

689,522 

40,692 

597,276 

35,128 

881,136 

299,320 

225,824 

1,878,900 

6,808,118 

1,888,284 

28,834,410 

319,606 



109,982,934 



Oents. 
67 
80 
66 
66 
69 
63 
47 
88 
70 
71 
51 
64 
61 
58 
61 
45 
47 
66 
45 
41 
43 
40 
67 
66 
68 
66 
68 
53 
70 
63 
41 
49 
41 
49 



45.3 



169,634 

81,864 

346,704 

943,933 

91,910 

14,461 

88,049 

67,856 

18,122 

18,719 

890,875 

496,067 

160,021 

272,971 

6,843,821 

9,756,278 

6,871,888 

14,856 

964,268 

487,362 

2,739,478 

2,903,574 

364,628 

26,886 

876,284 

22,831 

269.172 

158.640 

157,727 

730.817 

2,879,278 

925,236 

11,617,106 

156,668 



49,706,168 



196 



TRADl AKD OOMMSBOB OF 



AORJIAGE, PRODUCTION AND VALUE OP BUCKWHEAT IN 1901. 



AS BSPOBTBD BT THB DBPABTICI&NT OF AGBlCULTUBBy WASHINGTON. 



Yield 

per 

Acre. 



Statm ahd Tbrbitoiuu. 



Acreage. 



Prodactlon. 



Value 

per 
Bushel 



Total 
Value. 



Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Hasaachusetts . . 

Oonnectlout 

New York 

New Jersey . . . . 
PennsylTanla... 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Vir^nla 

North Oarollna. 

Tennessee 

West Virginia .. 

Ohio ....:. 

Michigan 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Wisoonsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Kansas 

Nebraska 

North Dakota... 

Total 



Acres. 

35,470 
1,91S 

10,158 

2,528 

8.6M 

688,899 

18,968 

242,402 

1,606 

8,875 

18,462 

5,848 

900 

21,024 

10,286 

44,789 
6,816 
6,819 

80,670 
6,602 
8,042 
1,962 
1,960 
988 
1,267 



8U,164 



Bu^el 
81.7 
21.0 
26 1 
18,9 
18.0 
18.8 
19.0 
19.6 
17.8 
17.5 
15.9 
15.6 
14.2 
20.6 
16.1 
14.1 
18.1 
11.0 
12.4 
14.6 
18.6 

6.0 

7.9 
11.6 
11.6 



18.6 



Bushels. 

807,399 
40,216 

264,840 

47,686 

65,592 

6,861,901 

265,297 

4,726,889 

26,789 

146,562 

298,546 
88,351 
12,780 

483,094 

165,606 

681,626 
82,740 
68,509 

880,808 
79,779 

106,667 
11,772 
15,484 
11,804 
14,466 



16,126,989 



Gents. 
48 
55 
09 
61 
66 
57 
62 
06 
66 
60 
66 
62 
09 
59 
60 
01 
61 
70 
09 
62 
70 
78 
76 
08 
60 



06.8 



887,668 

22,118 

160,8B6 

29,068 

42,635 

8,626,284 

187.964 

2,647.030 

14,734 

87,987 

164,886 

51,678 

7,540 

256,625 

99.363 

822,078 

50.471 

40,966 

224,883 

49,468 

75,997 

8,947 

11,613 

6,566 

8,674 



8,628,317 



THK OTTT OF ST. LOUIS. 199 

ACREAQB, PBODUCTION AND VALUE OF THE POTATO AND 
HAY CEOra OF THE UNITED STAl-BS IN 1901. 

AS BBFOBTKD BT THE DEPABTKENT OF A6EI0ULTUBE, WASHINOTON. 



TKADI AHD OOIOIKBOI OT 



ACREAGE, PEODUCnON AND VALUE OP THE CORN CROP OF 
THE UNITED STATES IN ISOa. 



AS BEPOBTED BT THE 



or AQBICDI.TnKE, WABHIMGTOK. 



8T1TM un> Tbokitokibb. 



MBine 

New Hampshire. 

Uassacliiisetts . . ■ . 
Rhode Islaud.... 

Oonnectleat. 

New York 

New Jersey 

PennsylTBDla 

Delaware 

Haryland 

Virginia 

North OaroIIna... 
SoDth Carolina .. 

Floriaa.""".'.'"!! 

Alabama 

UlBslBslppI 

Tesas '.'.'.'.'.'.'." 

Aiksnaas 

Tenaeaitee 

West Virginia... 

Kentackj 

Ohio 

Hlchlitaii 

Indlaua 

lIllDols 

WlBCOIlBiD 

Hlnoesota. 

MlsBonrl 

KansBa 

Nebraska. 

South Dakota 

North Dakota 

Houtana 

Wjomlns 

Oolorado. 

New Ueilco 

JJUh.... '.'.'.'.',','.'.'.'.'. 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

Oalltomla... 

Oklahoma 

Indian Territory. 

nmted States. 



Tleld 



J3S,SM 

Ma, 196 
esB.eii 

1,080 ,S71 

lo.soi.ao! 

5,6S6,SU 
SI, m, 887 

V,H;,47H 

io,a9a,s9 

21. tta.m 



X.a I,<UB,6t8,811 



THl OITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



201 



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OQ 

g 



o 
o 

Q 

n 

H 

O 

Hi 

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< 
O 

M 

H 

O 

O 



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< 






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p. 

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ss 

«8 



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s 



•k •« flk 



338 






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I 



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•k « •« 






c«aDMge« lo 



oo aeioco 



Is 



3 



O 

M 

A 
oc 

0S 






.<; 



CO 00 






• « • 

aOOQN 



A A c« a> o le o fH r«e« .H «H 00 oo 
Qeoc«ioss^t*a'>^&£9fil? 



§ 

e 



goo^ 



Hi 

IO.H 






coae 



i 



O 



S 

R 
P 

E 






2*1 



5 

d 
o 



n 



s 

I 

00 



< 
h 



o 

IS 

I 



9 

a 






la 

CQ 






(O ^ t« ,H 00 C4 c« f-i «H «<H^c<9io«oe«^o»i-4 



^S£^iS?&SSSSSSE:&^SS?f^SSS3 



e^»M9P«%i-Hg>cSe«Sot*ff40aeM<<««d)e 



aooaoier«t»9o<DOooop^e«toCQ.Ht<Boaace 
<o<DiQ«^ioioie<ccDaDa>a>oc«a>r*c*<DOQO 



Sigi§iii§ll3§§S§iHg§§ 



e^^c9*-4 







898 



838$ 



§1 



» Sk » «h 



t«a>Ofo 



K » •> « 



w 



00^O> A t« 

«k «k flk ah ^ «k 



•k «« « «k «k M 



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00 

3 



II 



^ 9^ 9* 0* m 



c<9t«aoc4c«c<« 



gS' 



ot«OAiHce 



IS^g^^S 



leoi 



»**»- 



§iSiS§ 



M»-^ 



i 






Tusi ijn> ooKKueoi or 



ACRBAGE, FBODUCnON AND TALUE OF THS OAT CROP OF 
THE UNITED STATERS IN ISM. 



At BEPOBTKD BT THE DBPABTHBHT OF AOBICHLTDBE, WASHIKOTOK. 



Statm awp TcMuioRm. 


Aetfmgo. 


Yield 


ProdaetloQ. 


ralD« 
BUM 


SSI 




77.TBO 

t.tia 

i,m 

B.OM 

mini 


Bart. 




Cents. 
a 
« 

1 

43 

i 

i 
g 

■6 

n 

1 

i 

38 

1 

1 
S 

K 






as 
w 
n 

s 

M 

n 

X 

11 

u 

ic 

i 

n 

BO 

n 
u 

is 

H 
M 

S 
S 

38 

S 




'■i 

"■1 

i 

l,Mj 
1,I7( 

10,19( 
14,8S1 

sz 

IBBll 
13;3U 

1 
7:w8 

I.IDO 
«C1 

'1 

■1 
11 
























E^.iik'-------'-'----- 






































3W 






































WtaMortn 


M> 






g{«^n1 


g 

ua 

M 

Bl 

1 

in 


188 

i 

IM 
ITI 

MM 
SU 
8M 

MO 
OSl 


G3i 














































































9S7,8U.T13 


BO,T 






' 













THB dTT or ST. homa. 



AORBAOE, PROOUOnON AND VALtTK OF THE BAItX.ET CBOP 
OF THE UNTTBD STATES IN 1903. 



AS BBPORTKD BT THB DBPAKTHENT OF 



WABHIMOTOM. 



STAIM AlCD TiBUTOBnS. 


Acreage. 


Yield 


p^.»». 


Vrtue 


?ss. 




^TIt. 


W 


"SfSfe 


a 

i 
i 

«s 

M 

M 

W 
W 
88 

IS 

K 

S 

to 

71 

1 






1 

i 

s 
1 
i 

'i 

i 


1M 
DM 

S 

ESS 

TM 

eee 

TOS 

S 

7M 

S 

BID 

MS 

»T< 

oer 

Ml 

tee 

138 

S 


11 

II 
11 

1 

at 

X 

M 
IS 

i! 

» 

14 

ii 

i 

■1 

IS 




..s 

1 


MS 


1 

,1 

"1 

1 
!:l 

1B.74I 
































































ffi 


















































ISJS^*^ 


™ 
























U.» 























TIUDK AND OOUHBROK OP 



ACBEAGB, PBODUCTION ANT) VALUE OP THE BYE CKOP OF 
THE UNITED STATES IN 1903. 



B BEPOBTBD BT TBX DEPABTMENT OF AOBICULTUBE, WASHIHQTOM. 



StATK and TutBITOBIIS. 




Yield 
per 


Production. 


V»lue 

bS£., 


». 




*"?!« 


w- 




CentB. 

i 

68 

lis 

i 

68 
48 

i 






■i 

1 
i 

J 
]( 

1 

If 

", 

li 
» 

1 

1 


i 

BIT 

1 

i 

»1 

Ha 

034 

1 

STI) 


i 

e 
11 

17 

3! 

i 

17 

le 


2 

) 


8,I» 
17( 

se 

7! 

1 

lis 

1,S6S 

74S 

AM 
311 
476 

1 

1 

36 


























































































































































i.VJSiM 




B8,eM,i»a 


69.B 














' 





THB OITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



206 



ACREAGE, PRODUCTION AND VALUE OF THE BUCKWHEAT 

CROP 0¥ THE UNITED STATES IN 1902. 

A8 BXPOBTKD BT THS DSPABTMBMT OF AGBICULTURB. WASHINGTON. 



Statbb and Tbbritobikb. 



Acreage. 



Yield 
per 

Acre. 



Production. 



Value 

per 
Bushel 



Total 
Value. 



Maine 

New Hampi^ilre . 

Vermont 

Mafisachusetts . . 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylranla 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North OaioUna.. 

Tennessee 

West Virginia.... 

Ohio 

Michigan 

Indiana 

lUinols 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Kansas 

Nebraska 

North Dakota.... 

United States 



Acres. 

35,215 
1,896 

10,866 

2,271 

8,826 

886,015 

18,404 

247,260 

1,480 

8,291 

20,862 

6,664 

747 

22,706 
8,689 

88,071 
6,063 
6,866 

27,608 
4,782 
7,881 
2,110 
1.940 
968 
1,270 



804,889 



Bush. 
80.4 

ao.o 

26.0 
14.4 
18.4 
17.7 
22.6 
18.1 
16.2 
17.0 
16.6 
14.6 
18.0 
22.6 
18.9 
18.0 
17.6 
15.5 
16.0 
18.9 
16.0 
16.1 
12,0 
14.7 
10.0 



18.1 



Bushels. 

766,686 

87,920 

268,900 

82,702 

70,896 

5,929,766 

801,680 

4,476,225 

22,648 

140,947 

846,809 

82,128 

18,446 

610,885 

184,899 

494,928 

106,700 

86,668 

441,648 

65,775 

126,096 

84,116 

28,280 

14,166 

12,700 



14,629,770 



Cents. 
52 
65 
66 
74 
71 
60 
64 
61 
80 
61 
80 
62 
76 
62 
61 
58 
68 
71 
68 
57 
70 
58 
75 
58 
54 



S9.6 



I 898,609 
24,648 

144,984 

24,190 

49,968 

8,496,582 

1»),018 

2,729,887 

18,689 

85,978 

207,785 
60,919 
10,219 

816,748 
81,988 

262,809 
61,891 
61,468 

980,572 
37,492 
88,267 
19,787 
17,460 
7,508 
6,868 



88,654.704 



TRIDS ASD OOlOaBCX OF 



ACKBAGB, PRODUCnOS AND VALUE OF THE POTATO CROP 
OF THE UHTTED STATES IN 1902. 



AS BBFOBTED BY THK DEPABTKSNT 



AOIUCCI.TCBB, WABHIHQTOIT. 





Acreage. 


Yield 


Prodnctlon 


Value 
Bn^el 


Total 
Value. 




Acraa. 
K.m 

4^ 
T,:!S 

K.m 

!:S 

no .989 

m.xx 
a»,0Ji 

m'.ia 

S:g 

81 ,'801 

IS 

■!:S 

<T,97S 


Biub. 

1 
,1 

n 

i 
1 

M 

s 

96 

m 

101 

m 

M 

i 

i 

1 
a 

1 


s'.eeilDBo 

'■SS 


Centa. 

1 

7B 
18 
U 

1 

96 

JS 
i 
1 

s 

i 

1 
i 

1 

77 


























U,8S1,TTS 


pen'nijrr^ik" :■::;: 












North Carolina 






<&I.9B 




















Arkanaag 


i,ass,)BS 








1.614,083 






■ 'm?'™ 












b.Tm.«e 








i,sn,-ai 




Sou tb Dakota 


1.0».M1 










3,«9.WJ 






7t9.ina 






649,989 










•■i'S 














J.Sa,M7 


ee.o 


■m,m,wi 


«.l 









THB am OF ST. LOCIS. 



ACBKAGE, PBODUCnON AND VAUJT! Or THE HAT CHOP IN 
THB UNirXb STATES IN 1M3. 



X THB DKPARTMBMT OF AQBIOtJLTUBR, WASHJKOTON. 



ftriTW AKD TBSBIIOKtES. 


AcresKe. 


Yield 




V«lne 


WL 


Htlne 


936, Ens 

1:8!? 

180,046 
B, 018 ,967 

,sz 
lis 

11.884 

If 

m'.iM 

Bn.64* 

B00.2O4 

2,768,!H7 

i:a;| 

'S41J!B 
«, 101,104 
3,696, SM 
1883 981 

ue.rae 

1SS|420 

ffiS 

Si 

ESS ,838 


.M 

1 

1 

:o6 

1 

.60 
.40 
.80 
.40 
.EO 

:i3 
1 

l!76 

1 

.33 
.86 

i 

!4o 

1 

. -29 
.04 

'.7B 
1,31 


■S*™ 








'1 

641 

■■1! 

101 
Ml 

ISO 

i 

J 


i 

i 

388 

SM 

703 
8M 


ii 

11 

li 
11 

1] 

( 
f 

\ 

1 


6B 

8B 
6S 

64 
00 
18 

OS 
68 

40 

It 
to 

80 
33 
SO 

•T 

8fi 

38 

67 

18 
89 

IS 
31 
H 

X 

48 

10 
«8 






ii-R'lS 






1,390,174 














S-i 


North ciii^iii^i' :;::::■ ;::.■; 


^MhOBOllDt 


;« 




























e,oe«,»si 






^ST^''' 


8,139,331 










Ullnots 


















ie,8«l,M2 










36< 

S8e 

i 


8S8 
S33 

SSI 

1 

678 

SI 

oia 

778 
























wwhiiitii; :::";:.".:'".::::" : 


S, 396,118 

tss 






£SKf.*«», ::::;::::;:::. 


•■ss 


United SutM 


«9,83S,aJ7 


l.W 


Sa,8ST,EI8 


8.06 


1043,066,364 



208 



TRADB AND OOMMSROB OF 



FOREIGN IMPORT DUTIES ON WHEAT. 

Oompiled by Fbbdsiuo Bmobt, Ohlef Bureau of Foreign Oommeroe, 
Department of State, Waahlngton, D. 0. 

As in force January 1908. 



OOUHTBISS. 



Tariff Batm of Dutibs. 



UiriTBD Statu EgnivAiiSHTS 



Russia 

Sweeden 

Norway: 
Conventional duty, 
applicable to 
countries having 
commercial treat- 
ies with Norway . . 
General, applicable 
to non-treaty 

countries 

Denmark 

Germany : 
Conventional duty 

General 

France 

Spain 

♦Italy 

Austria-Hungary. . . . 

Switzerland 

Greece: 
Conventional duty 



General. 



Netherlands. 
Belgium .... 
Roumania . . . 

Turkey 

Portugal 



United Kingdom 

Servia 

Bulgaria 

Cuba 

Porto Rico 

Philippines 



Free 

Per 100 kilograms, 8.70 kronor. 



Per 100 kilograms. 0.60 kronor. 



Per 100 kilograms, 0.80 kronor. 
Free. 



Per 100 kilograms, 8.00 marks. 
Per 100 kilograms, S marks — 
Per 100 kilograms. 7 francs.... 
Per 100 kilograms, 6 pesetas. . . 
Per 100 kilograms, 7.60 liras. . . 
Per 100 kilograms, 1.60 florins. 
Per 100 kilograms, 80 francs... 

Per 100 okes. 

4.11 drachmas 

Per 100 okes. 

7.86 drachmas 

Free 

Free 

Free. 

8 per cent, ad valorem 

Prohibited, except under cer- 
tain conditions and restric- 
tions. Where importation 
is allowed the import duty 
charged is at the rate of two 
milrels per 100 kilograms 
(68.79 cents per bushel of 60 
pounds.) 

Free 

Per 100 kilograms, two dinars. 

Per 100 kilograms, 80 levs 

Per 100 kUograms, fl.00 

Per 100 kilograms, 60 cts 

Per 100 pesos, .60 



Ftaa 

Per bushel of 60 lbs., 36.99 cts. 



Per bushel of 60 lbs., 4.88 ots. 



PAr bushel of 60 lbs., 6.78 cts. 
Free. 



Per bushel of 
Per bushel of 
Per bushel of 
Per bushel of 
Per bushel of 
Per bushel of 
Per bushel of 



60 lbs., 
60 lbs.. 
60 lbs., 
60 lbs., 
60 lbs., 
60 lbs., 
60 lbs.. 



32.67 cts. 
82.89 cts. 
86.77 cts. 
81.02 cts. 
89.89 cts. 
16.67 cts. 
1.68 cts. 



Per bushel of 60 lbs., 16.86 cts. 

Per bushel of 60 lbs., 80.16 cts. 

Free. 

p ree. 

Free. 

Eight per cent, ad valorem. 



Fl*AA 

Per bushel of 60 lbs., 10.61 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 4.90 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 37.18 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 16.83 cts. 
Per bushel of 60 lbs., 38.06 cts. 



* Subject to two cents surtax. 



Tui orrr or st. lotus. 



OOVPABATITS QBAIH CBOP8 OP UNITED STATES FOB A 
SSBIES OF TBABS. 



HABVBST TEKB OF THE WOBLD. 

Tbe fDllowing shows the mouths of tbe wbeat hureat In the dUterent 
wheit-grovliig aecdons of the world : 

JuinaiT— Atutralla, New ZMluid, Chill and Argentine Republic. 

Febroary and Harch— East India and Upper Egypt. 

April— Lower Egypt, Syria, Cypma, Persia, Asia Minor, India, Hexico 
and Cuba. 
H»y— Algeria, Central Asia, China, Japan, Morocco, Texas and Florida. 
Jnne— Turkey, Oreece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, South of France, Cali- 
fornia, Oregon, Loolslana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Carolina, Ten- 
Bewoc , Virginia, Kentucky, Eanua, Arkansas, Utah, Colorado and Uia- 
SOnri. 

Jnly— -Boumanla, Bulgaria, Aostro-Eongary, South o( Russia, Qer- 
many, Switzerland, France, South of England, Nebraska, Minnesota, 
Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Miohigan, PennsylTanla, Ohio, New 
Tork, New England and Upper Canada. 

August— Belf^nm, Holland, Great Britain, Denmark, Poland, Lower 
Canada, Colombls, Manitoba and Dakota. 

September and October— Scotland, Sweden, Norway and North of 



TRASS AMD CXUOflBOB OF 



TOTAL VISIBLE 6UFPLISS OF QBAIS ATAILABLB IN THE 

UNITED STATES AND CANADA AT THE DATES GIVEN, 

AS BBFOBTXD BT BRADBTRBBTS. 

The following Bgnrei represent stocks ol Brain ftvkllable At 61 of the principal 
polDta of accumulation eaat of the Rocky Mountaloa, stocks to Hanltoba elenton 
and ttocks afloat on lakes and duals. 

Pacific OoMt stocks are showa only In the case of wheat. 





a&Am STOCKS KAST of ROOKT MODHTAtHB. 


COAST 
STOCKS. 




Wheat. 


Cora. 


Oau. 


Barley. 


Bye. 


Wheat. 


SfV::;:;:: 
jufyi,::;;;: 

October!.... 

pi;;;; 


B 

i 

Sf 

r. 

1 

7( 

i 

81 


87( 

1 

111 


na 

i 

W 

no 

00 

lOO 
lOO 

«> 

00 
00 

no 
wo 


E 

1 

i 
i 

u 

u 


m 

1 
i 


00 

i 

00 

00 

DO 

00 

DO 
00 
00 
00 

00 
00 

00 

300 

i 

000 


E 

;| 

1 

« 

u 

( 
g 


989 
IH 

MJ 

1 


Is. 
OD 

00 
00 

00 
00 

00 

00 
oo 

00 
00 
00 

s 

00 

00 
00 
00 

no 

00 

000 

i 

000 


Is. 
00 

no 
oo 

00 
00 

00 

no 

00 

oo 
no 
oo 

00 

no 

00 

>oo 

■» 
no 

00 

no 

0,064,000 

gIbtbIdoo 
«;989;ooo 


1 

',1SS 


00 
00 
00 
00 

i 

00 
00 

no 

00 

i 

00 

1 

MO 

ss 

000 












December 10 






BROOUHALL'S ESTIMATE OF CROPS OF THE WORLD. 



THB OITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



211 



5zi 



S3 

QQ 



QQ 



H 



{H 




PQ 


• 




H 


Q 






H 


§ 


g 


^ 


O 


^ 




CQ 


^ 


<< 


Pm 


OQ 


O 






<J 




g 





I 



O 

H 
S 



Imii 



o £ 

<5 






OQ 






Im 



•a 
o 



s 

o 

<5 



Im 



ce 

2 

>1 



u 

o 

<5 



< 



010 






T-iFi «Ho6 iH« ^ •« ^ So «5 009 10 ee o 9 










^ CO 09 eo <<« -^ •>« 10 eo CO o le o S S t^ t^ 

9' 01 c^* Q e« th « M o fH 00 ee e(l CO* eo Q ^* :4! 

^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^% fif^ t^^ f^S #^B ^^ <!rf% ^iM ^^S t^B MB 

«i X 9 a» 00 So ^ t* « 06 oD t* S c9 <b 04 

THi^rHiHiHr-IMTHHTHOtfHOl^MvHMOl 

t-Q52o5r-iocoo53oSSoa»'^^o»-9QO<S 
e4c^eeeo94fijoeo4THTHiHiHcoaooaeoo)t* 

CO CO rH CO vH a» ao » o o CO 00 <H o> lo ee 04 ■««( 
o» ei ei r4 eo'o* '^* eo' g -^ fH tn '^' ■^' t-I eo* lO* -^ 

^ssiSois^Siisi^iig 

F*OOOOOQtrc3o«9rHS^cbOdOC4 
T-iiOMd»eoiOi39aaoeoS^&t*e5fiNio9i3 



OQ ^Q QQ QQ QQ Q& ^^ ^b ^fi ^B fl) GO C^ ^m Ga ^^ ^d * 

aSdDODODQDaQSOwSoooooSaoaooDwS* 



212 



QQ 

a 

I 



o 

a 

< 
o 



S 



a 

o 

S 
g 

&^ 
o 

o 



o 
5 



0S 

D 



3 

-^ 

h 
O 

I 

a 

B 



& 



^ 



m 

1 


TRADE AKD 


OOMHXBOS 01* 


IflttftiT 


8SSS688S^SiS^I^Sf:SSSSS3S 


•Xpif 


88S:SSS8S385&«r:SSSS8S8SS 


"•inir 


8888S8888S8&388S8S8S 


• 


•IMIOIOO 


00 t*«ioaOf^e«ioio^ i«c««4«o 

f&88S^8SSiSS^^38$t:SSfSSgi 


'JMtim^dss 


38SSSg!i8^SS^SS88SSiS88S3 


*)8llSllY 


• «•■•«• •••• •••• 


•Xrnf 


88S8S:8888S5SSSS88S8SS; 


1 

O 

QQ 

1 


-J»qiiit9dag 


ift^e««aoo)«« . • . . 

S§88SSl:8{^&SS :::::::::: 


nioSDT 


S;888SSSse88^&^8£SSS8SSS 


•xnir 


888SigS88ai882£S88si8SSS8S 


••anf 


8S88&8S388S8S888SSS8S 


1 

s 

1 


-jaqa»9itoS 


m> ^'^tot'to 

S&8883r:8^8S? :::::::::: 


•^pir 


^8858^8S^88E:S8JSS388SS£: 


9iin|^ 


iS888SS;8SSS8^8^{:S^8^SSsS^ 


•i«H 


88^38S^88S:S^o5SS38S:^S3S^ 


•llJdY 


S8S^3883S8SS:8a5r:s8Sr:SSS'^ 


^1 


*jdqmo^<l98 


00 «eo<eo»eo e*^«er«r»o)«aoe 




« 





THB Onr 07 ST. LOVtS. 

THB WORLD'S WHEAT CROP 

Fot Four Tekn, Bavlwd np to Janaarr ISth, 1908. 

From OaoROB Bboombau.'b Ooni Trade Nevs, Uverixxil. 

' iiblLoaMiDf lBlta«iuai<Iba CH.A-.vhai noD|g 
,f^^_^, _-A(. Tb» iinir»« i i ii iMBB I iht PTOy* harr— fad Ln Julj kad 

^■l^hilbtaHiiilaitHHidlBdlltlllfDIIWWhal JatrT^or Iha on 



OODNTEIE8. 


„,. 


19DL 


1900. 


IW. 


Edbopb— 


M,0OO,O0O 

a 78,000,000 
31,800,000 

".XS 
!« 

1,000,000 
], SOD, 000 

'•ffi:!!! 

900,000 
SNI,000 


Sir 

9,300,000 
000,000 

d 19,700,000 

11,900,000 

■IS 

::S 

e, 700. 000 

'■KB 

EGO 000 
SKlloOO 

■S;SS! 

IBOloOO 


n 
n 
n 
w 
m 

w 
n 
n 

n 
n 

10 

10 
400,000 

wlooo 

800.000 






Polaarf.^.^^. j- 




i^z 




§SSfcS!.^l'ffife,;:; 


'■'£« 










^^E^-iEE: 


800,000 
8,180.000 














Greece......^. 








?«?.i-d::;::::;::;::::. 


B'ffi 
























m, 7*0,000 

3,000,000 


198,900,000 

t H,aoo,ooo 
^'ooo'ooo 

7;ooo;ooo 
'■S.C 


189.870,000 
t 7B ,000 ,000 

1000,000 

TOOioOO 




United BtaMi 


' ^;!S:!I! 






















Total AmerlM 

^:^^ .,::■: 


U4,«0,000 

c 39,000,000 
S,S00.00O 

1100,000 

1,000,000 




98,100,000 

■1,800,000 

8,900.000 

i;S;S 


87,100,000 

X,000,000 
















«,300,000 
B,M)O,D0t 


89,800,000 

1,800,000 

800,000 

1,100,000 

'boo,ooo 


».«00,000 
3.100,000 

'■SS:SSS 




AlBSS'^^t" 






















9,800,000 

■iS 

100,000 
100,000 
6O0O0 

soolooo 


9.>00.000 

1.600,000 

1000 000 

1800 000 

110,000 

110.000 

100 000 

BOOIOOO 


4,600,000 
1.100.000 

11 

140,000 
81»,000 




































Total AmtnJMla 


2,880,000 


a.iBo,ooo 


8,890,000 


B.410.000 


'"":""■;;;;« 


a8s,Beo,ooo 

8,071,910,000 


8*9.600,000 

1 om'mt'ooo 


BW,68B,0D0 

■•Si,i 


838.410,000 

1,811,880,000 
710,618 000 
948.618,000 



214 TSADB AND COHMSBOB OF 



PROVISIONS AND PACKING. 



PORK PRODUCT. 

The amount of packing house product handled during 1902, was consid- 
erably less than for any of the three previous years, aggregating 666,440,210 
pounds. 

The receipts of hogs were 1^494,396 head^ as against 2,236^945 head in 
1901. Receipts of cattle and sheep, however, show a considerable increase. 

The packing on both sides of the river for the winter season of 1901-1902 
was 642,030 head, and for the twelve months ending March 1st, 1902, 
1,726,407 head. The summer packing of 1902 was 760,000 head as compared 
with 1,088,377 the previous season. The amount of product handled in this 
market for past four years was as follows : 

1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 

Received, pounds 324,837,690 854,004,110 898,864,600 292,771,800 

Shipped, pounds 886,826,146 889,946,466 896,188,896 873,668,410 

Total!, pounds 710,162,886 748,960,666 789,638,496 666,440,210 

TOTAL TEABLY PACKING AT PBOMimSMT PLACES. 

This city still holds fourth place among the prominent packing points. 

Total number of hogs packed in the West for twelve months ending 
March 1st, at fifteen places mentioned, with comparisons for previous 
years, as reported by Cincinnati Price Current: 

1901-02. 1900-1901. 1899-90. 1898-89. 

Chicago 7,686,000 7,268,616 7,119,440 8,016,676 

Kansas City 8,427,802 2,981,288 2,621,727 3,107,068 

South Omaha 2,890,416 2,241,699 2,192,496 1,977,922 

St. Louis 1,726,407 1,666,660 1,607,961 1,680,286 

Indianapolis 1,226,800 1,186,600 1,146,262 1,096,666 

Milwaukee dk Cudahy 760,068 911,266 864,690 1,096.408 

SiouxCity 879,768 783,764 614,286 897,898 

Cincinnati 669,782 617,082 666,244 696,060 

St.Paul 668,681 614,886 894,098 864,486 

CedarRapids 496,790 496,808 427,687 483,626 

Cleveland. 496,281 600,786 489,282 496,624 

Louisville 376,000 360,426 897,976 469,681 

Ottumwa 610,002 668,786 688,989 702,178 

NebraakaCity 180,746 114,962 286,928 288,816 

St. Joseph.... 2,106,298 1,728,877 1,846,738 1,120,449 

Fifteen places 23,667,106 21,869,621 20,602,617 21,878,646 

Another...; 1,844,480 1,731,088 1,698,804 1,778,160 

Aggregate 26,411,676 28,600,674 22,200,821 23,661,696 



THE CITT OF 8T. LOUIS. 215 



DRESSED BEEP. 



By Philip H. Hals, Publisher National Farmer and Stock Reporter. 



In keeping with the continued growth of the St. Louis cattle market^ 
the dressed beef trade broke the record once more. The gain in home 
slaughter in the jear 1902 was 76^039 cattle and 43^119 calves. This is over 
and above the high mark of the previous year. This gain in slaughter is 
wholly due to the enlargement of the houses which have made every gain 
heretofore recorded. It ten years the dressed beef trade of the city has 
been enlarged four to one. 

During the year 1902^ another immense packing plant was erected at the 
East St. Louis National Stock Yards, which is fully capable of increasing 
it« present output one-third. The new house is about finished and ready 
for business; thus insuring further gains in the dressed beef trade in the 
year 1903. The dressed beef trade handled 683,827 cattle and 103,893 calves 
in 1902. The cattle slaughter was the largest on record at the market, and 
the number of calves slaughtered and dressed for the market, passed the 
hundred thousand mark for the first time in the history of the city. The 
outward shipments of dressed beef and veal in the year 1902, amounted to 
the magnificent total of 318,387,455 pounds. This did not exceed the ship- 
ments of the previous year for the reason that home consumption claims 
larger and larger quantities each succeeding year. The refrigerated 
dressed beef received at St. Louis in the year 1902, amoimted to 31,968,200 
pounds, the smallest amount in five years, denoting without doubt the 
increasing ability of home slaughterers to control the local trade while 
gaining in general shipments to the large Eastern cities. 

The firms engaged in the dressed beef trade of St. Louis, report 

unanimously great improvements in facilities and enlargement of plants. 
It is a trade in which St. Louis is gaining in greater proportion than other 
centers. 

The following statement gives the cattle and calves slaughtered at 
St. Louis and East St. Louis by dressed beef houses, also the receipts and 
shipments of dressed beef: 

Cattle Oalves Dressed Beef Dressed Beef 

slaughtered, slaughtered, shipped, received. 

Tear. head. head. pounds. pounds. 

1903 688,827 108,898 818,887,455 81,968,200 

1901 607,788 60,774 848,448,080 110,707,200 

1900 484,564 50,116 298,807,810 85,460,100 

1899 455,604 45,918 290,470,460 44,962,660 

1896 459,051 49,794 277,765,720 48,285,860 

1897 482,528 47,890 259,002,550 20,880,600 

1896 540,280 58,880 248,746,200 17,847,900 

1895 450,806 40,828 288,966,600 42,895,270 

1894 865,677 82,609 196,069,875 64,612,840 

1808 274,579 29,672 108,887,622 25,167,902 

1892 180,790 8,581 68,071,698 25,584,464 

1891 188,158 2,862 72,688,266 17,741,474 

1890 181,184 2,785 66,987,858 22,790,102 

1889 56,684 1,899 19,898,680 10,749,877 



TBADB An> eomiXBOB OP 



BXCBIPT8 OP DBS8SBD BSBF IK FOU1ID6. 



1902. 

By Chioago ft Alton (Mo. Dir .) R. R 5,268,000 

By IflMonrl Paoiflo R. R 128^ 

By WabMli (West) R. R 1,004,800 

By Chicago ft Alton (Main Um) R. B 16ft^ 

By Bt LoniB, Keokuk ft Northwertern R. R. . . . 814^7,900 

By Wabaeh (£a»t) R. R 4,Ui,000 

By YandAlia R. R 

By Toledo, St Louis ft Weitern R.R 88,000 

Total ponndf 814Nn,S00 



IML 
20,288,800 
1(^882,800 
08»7e7,400 



0,218^ 

4,M2^ 

12,100 

110,707^100 



SHIFlODrT OP DRB88BD BBBP IN POUIIDS. 



190L 



Chioago, Peoria ft St. Louis R. R 02,400 

Missouri PaoiBo R. R 

Chicago ft Alton Mo. Div 48,800 

Missouri, Kansas ftTexas R. R. 76,800 

St. Louis, Keokuk ft Northwestern R. R. 668,160 

Toledo, St Louis ft Western Ry 57,476,200 

Chioago, Burlington ft Quincy R. R 28,700 

St. Louis Valley R. R 1,000 

St. Louis Southwestern R. R 860,260 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain ft Southern R. R 2,028,860 

niinois Central R. R 11,064,600 

LouisYllle ft Nashville R. R Sflmfi60 

Southern Railway 182,600 

Baltimore ft Ohio Southwestern R. R 18,884,600 

Chioago ft Alton R. K 71,871,600 

Cleyeland, Cincinnati, Chicago ft St. Louis R. R. 49,455,060 

YandaUa R. R 44,020,660 

Wabash R. R. (East) 58,505,850 

Mobile ft Ohio R. R 762,100 

LouisTille, Henderson ft St. Louis R. R. 4,661,100 

River 287,705 

Total pounds 818,887,465 



41,700 

80,000 

506,660 

105,280 

70,787,980 

28,700 

49,960 

2,814,465 

18,026,870 

6,046,715 

29,260 

10,92MS(i 

76,861,460 

58,720,700 

49,654^ 

06,678,420 

804,666 

6,068,690 

278,860 

848,448,080 



Shipments of Canned Beef in 1807 were 8,046,600 pounds. 
" " " " 1898 " 1,485,725 " 

" " " " 1800 " 8,588,860 « 

" " " " 1900 " 1,762,660 " 

" " " « 1001 " 2,419,140 " 

" " " " 1902 " 4,582,680 " 



* "5; ;||i!;IJ|!- .-; :■ * -- " 



m 



WFW^WmK^ 



li*H:ll» 



lipjijiissiii 



Mi 



m'^muimm ^ 

■.:■■■.:■ :: ■ : ::-■■ 



w 



mrnrnv 



m 



s -3, 




HHiiiyhHyHininH 



mm 



TBADE AND OOUXEBOI OF 



BI0UFT8 AND SHtFHBMTSOP HOO PRODUCT AT BT. LOUIS. 



TOTAI. TEABLY PACKIMO- AMD HABKETDfO OF HOOS. 

Totftl Weetem and Eastern packing, and receipts of h<«s at New Torb. Phila- 
delphia and Baltimore, tor yean ending Uatch 1, according to Tetuina to the 
Cincinnati Price Current. 





1901^. 


ISDO-Ol. 


1899-00. 


18Se-9S. 


Packed in the West 


S,lSfl,(K» 


»,601.«» 

ua,ooa 
i,rao,ooo 


ii,ui,oao 

3SI:SSS 

a,BTB.000 


»,«u,oao 






^SrsrS'::™-: 


S,9TO,a» 






8o.a»,ooo 


S8,9«,l)00 


ae,in,ooo 




■ 


' ■ 



THE 0IT7 OF ST. LOUIS. 



219 



GSNSBAL SUMMARY OF PACEING FOB THE YEAB. 



Packing in the West during 1901-1902, oompared with the preceding 
year in leading exhibits^ according to compilatlonB by the Cincinnati 
Price Cnrrent: 

WIKTBB SKAtOM. 

November 1 to March 1— 1901-03. 1900-01. 

Numberof hogs packed 10,840,196 9,277,760 

Increase 1,002,446 

Ayerage Utc weight, lbs 206.88 280.81 

Decrease 28.98 

Average yield of lard, lbs 81.80 84.16 

Decrease 2.86 

Percentage yield of lard 1B.16 14.88 

Increase .88 

Costof hogs, 100 lbs., aliye $6.97 $6.02 

Increase .96 

Aggre^te Utc weight,lbs 2,188,972,000 2,186,864,000 

Decrease 2,882,000 

Green meats made, lbs 1,170,114,000 1,178,876,000 

Decrease 8,781,000 

Iiardmade, lbs 828,636,000 816,928,000 

Increase 6,718,000 

Total meats and lard, lbs 1,498,780,000 1,496,796,000 

Decrease 2,018,000 

Aggregate cost of hogs $127,619,000 $107,248,000 

Increase $20,271,000 

Tierces of lard, 880 lbs 960,700 966,400 

Increase 14,800 

Mess pork made, barrels 73,970 60,886 

Increase 12,086 

Other pork, barrels 143,660 168,840 

Decrease 14,680 

Pork of all khids, barrels 216,680 219,226 



TKADB AMD OOMMBBOB OF 



SUKMBB flBASOK. 

March 1 to November 1* 1901. 

Knmber of hogs packed 15,071,480 

Inorease 748^ 

ATeraee live weight, Ibi 819.48 

Ijeorease 9.88 

ATerage yield of lard, Ibi 81.81 

iJeoreaM 2^ 

Percentage yield of lard 14.18 

Deoreaie .79 

Coitof hogs, 100 lbs., alire I6.9S 

Increase JSO 

Aggregate liye weight, lbs 8,807,986,000 

Increase 81,704,000 

Green meats made, lbs 1,886,065,000 

Increase 81,480,000 

Lard made, lbs 479,498,000 

Decrease 9,887,000 

Total meats and lard, lbs 2,816,648,000 

Increase 22,198,000 

Aggregate cost of hogs $196,827,000 

Increase $88,898,000 

Tiercesof lard,8801b8 1,468,000 

Decrease 28,100 

Mess pork made, barrels 88,225 

increase 18,985 

Other pork, barrels 816,670 

Increase 28,010 

Pork of all kinds, barrels 249,895 

TOTAL FOB TWBLVB MONTHS. 

T«ar ending March 1— 1901-1902. 

Number of hogs packed 25,411,676 

Increase 1,811,002 

ATcrage Utc weight, lbs 214.15 

Decrease 16.21 

Average yield of lard, lbs 81.60 

Decrease 2.54 

Percentage yield of lard 14.76 

Decrease .18 

Cost of hogs, 100 lbs., alive. 15.94 

Increase .87 

Aggregate lireweight, lbs 5,441,896,000 

Increase 28,822,000 

Green meats made, lbs 8,006499,000 

Increase 22,749,000 

Lard made, lbs 808,129,000 

Decrease 2,574,000 

Total meats and lard,lbs 8,809,828,000 

Increase 20,176,000 

Aggregate cost of hogs $828,846,000 

Increase $48,664,000 

Tierces of lard, 880 lbs 2,488,700 

Decrease 7,800 

Hess pork made, barrels 106,196 

increase 81,080 

Other pork, barrels 860,880 

Decrease 18,880 

Pork of aU kinds, barrels 466,685 



1900. 
14,828,984 

888.74 

84.18 

14.98 

$5.12 

8,276,222,000 

1,804,576,000 

488,780,000 

2,898,865,000 

$167^484,000 

1,481,100 

14,890 

188,600 

902,960 

19Q0-01 
88,600,674 

829.86 

84.14 

14.88 

$5.07 

5,418,076,000 

2,988,540,000 

805,708,000 

8,789,168,000 

$874,688,000 

8,441,600 

75475 

847,000 
488,175 



THS (BTT or 8T. LOUia. 



PA.aKma AT ST. LOUia FOB THIBTT-ONK SEAAOMS. 
November Ist to Harch lat. 



wSS£ 



LTsran ylBli 



ioKB?G 




251.07 
158.18 



...U.OO... 
...8S.U... 
...MM... 
..35.11... 





!S 




























:» 























SUIIMKB PAOKtMQ AT ST. LOtnS. 

IlEBibaT of Hoai. AtStm* ^f 



R :■.■■.■.•.■.:■.:•.•.;■. 


ss 






















s ;:;;;:;;;;:;;; 


i» 












































!S ::::::::;:::;: 


s- 












w 



a OOUUBBOK 07 



PACKIKG AT ST. lOUa FOB TWBLVX HOKTHB. 



laei-ei. . . 
mw-si... 
use-so.,. 



WDTTEB PACKINO IN THE WE3T FOB TWEMtT-THKEE BEAfiOHS. 
Ai raported ttj tha Cloelimul PrlM conrant . 






THE CITY or ST. LOtTIS. 



SUHHEB FAOKDia IN THE ITEBT fBOM HAB. Ist TO ItOT. lit, 
Ab nportod bj Iba Clnolniuti Frlee CnmnL 



. 11,160, 
. U.Sll, 
. 1>,M3, 



TBIRLT COUPABISOMS - 



,000 n>.«i 



BKDIKQ HAKGH 1. 





ATTUdLut. 


























s-g ■■•■:: 


SI 


m.M 


g;S 


























aw.M 

ID IN THE 11 


Bl.W 
EST FOB THE 



lWl-1902... 
1800-1901... 
1890-1900. . . 

aB7~x"..'.'. 

1896-91..... 



S.191,S1» 

B.StS.ltt 
S,T«I,9U 



T,76T.l 
6J66* . 

8,«Sl!s01 
i9M,BT2 

(,DW,se« 



FOBK PACKIMO IH THE BAST. 

The aggregate nnmber ot hoge packed during the year ending March 
1 at Eastern points Irom which retuma and estimates hare been obtained 
by the Cincinnati Price Corrent, embracing Boston, New Haven, PtotI- 
dence, Worcester^ Brigtatwood, Fall River, Bridgeport, etc., in New 
England States ; Buff alo, Albanv, Troy, Hndson, etc., in If ew York State, 
and PotttvlUe, Hanisbi^, Erie, etc., In Pennsylvania, Is shown in tbe 
following, tor summer and winter seasons, and for the year: 



TBu>x urn oonuBOi o* 



THB CITY OP ST. LOXnS. 



225 



WEEKLY PBICE8 OF PROVISIONS FOR 1902. 



DATS. 



Jftnoflry 4 

18 
%, 

Febnuvy 1 

8 

16 

S2 

Hareh l 

8 

15 

S2 

29 

April 5 

12 
19 
26 

May 8 

10 
17 
24 
81 

Jan* 7 

14 
21 
28 

July 6 

12 
19 
26 

▲ngiist 2 

9 

16 

28 

80 

September 6 
18 
20 
27 

October 4 
11 
18 
25 

IToTember 1 

8 

15 

22 

29 

December 6 
18. 
20 
27. 



POJUC 



MesB. 



$ e, 
16 40 
16 20 
16 26 
15 90 
15 20 
15 25 
15 86 
15 10 
15 06 

14 90 

15 00 

15 20 

16 20 
16 16 

16 42X 
16 40 

16 76 

17 05 
17 46 
17 47H 
17 22Vi 
17 26 
17 45 
17 57)i 

17 97>^ 

18 26 
18 62>^ 
18 67)^ 
18 80 
17 22Vi 
17 86 
16 86 

16 82X 

17 27H 
17 60 
17 80 
17 20 
17 15 
17 00 
17 45 

17 40 

18 00 
17 65 
16 10 

16 10 
15 90 

17 86 
17 45 

17 76 

18 00 

17 90 

18 45 



$ e. 

^6 60 
16 60 



Prime Steam. 



t e, $ e. 



965 
925 

9 22H 
9 12i< 
9 15 
925 
9 15 

9 07X 
9 15 

9 12H 

9 22H 

946 

980 

9 60 

966 

9 80 
10 (t2% 
10 15 
10 20 
10 07H 
10 00 
10 10 
10 02)4 
10 25 
10 26 

10 46 

11 06 
10 62H 
10 47H 
10 70 

87H 

996 
10 86 
10 02M 
10 27H 
10 60 
10 60 

990 
10 16 
10 86 
10 86 
10 75 
10 82H 
10 67H 
10 26 

10 62H 
10 90 
10 70 
10 86 
10 25 
10 17H 



^90 
966 



D. 8 
Clear Rib. 



Bulk. 



$ c. $ c. 

8 67i<®8 80 
840 

8«2^ 8&JH 

8 60 8 66 

8 46 8 47X 

866 8 60 

8 67^ 8 62X 

8 47X 8 52X 

8 86 8 40 

8 87X 8 42>^ 

8 40 8 45 

8 66 8 60 

8 87>i 

9 01^ 9 12>^ 
9 22>^ 9 27X 
9 82X 9 87)^ 



9 62H 
9 70 

9riX 
9 80 
9 80 
9 92>i 
10 224 



9 76 

9 77« 

986 

9 86 
10 00 
10 27X 



lO 47H 10 62H 
10 60 10 75 
10 67H 10 72H 
10 76 10 80 
10 90 10 96 
10 86 10 90 
10 47H 10 62X 
10 65 10 60 
10 02>i 10 10 
9 77>^ 9 823^ 
9 97>^ 10 02>^ 
10 82X 10 87>i 



10 60 

10 80 

11 06 

10 90 

11 40 
11 40 
11 60 
11 10 
11 00 
11 26 
10 90 
10 40 

9 75 
8 76 
860 
860 
860 



10 66 

10 86 

11 10 

10 96 

11 46 
1146 
11 66 
11 16 
11 26 



10 60 
10 00 

8 87X 
8 70 
8 75 
8 76 



Bacoh. 
Clbak Bib. 



Packed. 



i c. $ c. 

9 75 
9 62X 
9 62X 
9 60 

9 87X 
9 87>^ 

9 87X 

9 87X 

9 26 9 87X 

9 26 9 87)^ 

9 60 

960 

9 75 
10 12>( 
10 31H 
10 87K 10 60 
10 60 
10 60 
10 62X 
10 87>i 
10 87)i 

10 87M 

u ri>i 

11 60 

11 62)^ 11 76 
1187>i 

1187X 

12 00 

12 12X 
12 00 
12 I2yi 

1187>< 
11 00 

11 VJH 
1187X 

11 62)^ 

12 00 
12 26 
12 62>^ 

12 62X 
12 62K 
12 623^ 

12 62K 
12 60 
12 60 
12 87X 
12 60 
11 26 
10 60 
10 60 
10 60 
10 60 



IS 



226 TBAOB AND OOlOaBOB OF 



LIVE STOCK. 



By E. S. MoInTTBa, Assistant Editor of the Daily National Live-Stock Reporter. 



For the first time in the hiitoty of the live stock market at St. Louis the 
receipts of cattle passed the million mark^ the total arrivals amounting to 
1^181,628 head, which Is 211^747 more than the previous record made in 
1901 y and more tlian double the number received any year prior to 1891. 
The arrivals of sheep^ 540,443^ is also a slight increase over 1901, and the 
largest ever received except in 1896 and 1897. Hog receipts amounted to 
1^494^395 head, which is not only nearly 750,000 less than arrived in 1901, 
but less than arrived any year since 1895. The drouth and the failure to 
raise a com crop in Missouri during 1901 is the cause for so large a falling 
off of hog supplies. Compared with last year^ the receipts of horses and 
mules show a loss of nearly 27,000 head^ and are the smallest since 1897. 
The total number of all classes of stock combined received during the 
year amounts to 3^891,163 head, which is the largest on record except 1901. 

While the arrivals of cattle were increasing, the demand was also grow- 
ing, and as a cattle market, St. Louis at the close of 1902 holds a much 
stronger position than ever before. As for the arrivals of hogs, they were 
simply a disappointment to the buying interest from the beginning to the 
close of the year ; in fact the greater portion of the time the supply was 
not more than half as large as the demand. The demand from the larger 
packing houses at present is not only greater than ever before, but local 
butchers which are a larger factor in the trade here than at any other 
market in the United States, are using larger numbers of all kinds of stock 
than at any time in the past. Another feature of the trade which has 
been on the increase for several years, is the percent of arrivals bought and 
slaughtered locally. It is very seldom that prices offered justify forward- 
ing the stock to other markets^ as was the case up to a few years ago. 

Another improvement in the market is, that at present the demand is 
more uniform one day with another, than ever before; consequently the 
arrivals during 1902 were well cleaned up each day. The amount of busi- 
ness done in dollars and cents is by far the largest since the establishment 
of the market, as values were on the highest basis in all branches of the 
trade. While the growth of the market in the past has been enormous, 
the outlook for the future is brighter than ever before. Another great 
slaughter house will be open for business early in the spring, and as it 
will have a capacity of 1,600 cattle, 3,500 hogs and 2,500 sheep per day, 
increased supplies will be needed to meet this enormous demand. 



THK OITT 09 ST. LOXHS. 227 

NATIVB CATTLB. 

Owing to the drouth in Missouri which caused stock raisers to market 
their cattle in 1901 instead of holding them over and breeding them as they 
generally do^ the receipts of native cattle last year show quite a decrease 
compared with the previous year. This decrease was principally of good 
to choice^ com fed beef steers. This of course made the better class sell at 
a premium^ and not for many years has the price for good butcher and 
export cattle been as high as during the year just closed. 

The highest price paid during the year was $8.75 per cwt. during 
August^ and the top reached $8.00 or more nine different weeks, while 
more than half the weeks in the year it was $7.00 or more. Under normal 
conditions, prices $2.00 per cwt. less than these would be considered high. 
Other grades of stock sold proportionately as high. The extraordinary 
high prices paid is 8ufl9cient proof that the demand was extra good. In 
the stocker and breeder line the business also shows a decrease which is 
also explained by the heavy marketing of cattle from Missouri during 1901. 
Illinois and eastern breeders who usually get their supplies at this market 
were greatly disappointed at the small number that arrived, and many 
limes had to look elsewhere tor cattle or do without them. 

From every point of view, the prospects for native cattle trade in this 
market is much better than ever before. The demand has already increased 
and larger supplies are expected. 

SOUTHERN CATTLE, 

In the Southern or Quarantine Department, cattle arrivals broke all 
previous records, by nearly 10,000 cars, or about 275,000 head. The total 
number of cars received during the year was 27,487, containing 800,662 
cattle. The St. Louis market has been recognized for many years as the 
largest in the United States for quarantine cattle, and the. fact was still 
more noticeable during the past year. The record was also broken in 
prices; the best selling up to $8, and the general market throughout the 
year was also much higher than ever before. There are two reasons for 
tills, one the small supplies of native, and the other that the cattle were of 
better quality, and better prepared to make beef than any time in the past. 

Southern cattlemen are fast finding out that this is the best market from 
every point of view, and the prospects are good that in a few years there 
will be but one market for quarantine cattle, and that one will be located 
at St. Louis. 

HOQS. 

The hog market was a disappointment to the trade from the beginning 
to the end of the year. The receipts for the year show a loss as compared 
with 1901 of nearly 750,000 head, or about 2,600 per day, and were the 
smallest since 1895, but larger than any year previous to that time. The 
redeeming feature of the arrivals were their quality. Never in the history 
of the market was there so large a proportion of the receipts good, well 
fattened, medium and heavy weights. This is explained by the teiritory 



22S TBADB AND OOMMKBCB OF 

from which they came. Iowa and Central niinols fomiBhed a mach larger 
nomber than ever before. Missonri on account of failure to raise a com 
crop in 1901, marketed less hogs than any year for a quarter of a century^ 
and the southern part of the State and Arkansas, practically shipped no 
hogs of any kind. The total number of pigs and lights reoeived during the 
year is not any larger than were received during the last two months of 
1901. So while the number of head shows an enormous decrease, the 
decrease in pounds is not near so large. 

The year opened with the best hogs selling around $6.75, which was 
$1.60 per cwt. higher than the opening of 1901. During the first three 
months of the year values declined slightly, but early in the spring prices 
took an upturn and continued to advance until the middle of July, when 
the best hogs sold at $8.25, the highest price reached since early in 1893. 
The market then began declining, and by the middle of August the loss 
amounted to about 75 cents per 100 pounds, when another advance set in, 
and by the middle of September prices were almost as high as during the 
best time of the year. During the last three months of the year there was 
a steady decline, and at the close the market was fully $1.50 per 100 pounds 
lower than the high time in July, and on exactly the same basis as at the 
beginning of the year. At the high time prices were $2 higher than at the 
same time the previous year, and throughout the year ranged as a rule 
fully $1.50 higher, and more than double prices paid a few years ago during 
the extreme low period. 

Not more than a dozen days during the entire year did the receipts 
approach what might be called a liberal supply, but most of the time were 
not sufficient to meet more than half of the demand. So great was the 
local demand that the Eastern buyers, which heretofore have been an 
important factor in the trade, were almost entirely shut out. Never was 
there so good a demand from the small city butchers, which of course made 
competition keen on the best grades, and frequently they not only sold as 
high as some of the Eastern markets, but often higher. Packers as a rule 
got only about half the number wanted; yet they were willing to pay good 
strong prices for them. It is hoped and expected that not only the decrease 
of the past year will be made up in 1908, but that all previous records will 
be greatly surpassed. This will be necessary in order to meet the demand, 
as buyers already on the field not only want increased supplies, but the new 
plant, which will soon be in operation, will need over half a million. This 
enormous demand insures to the farmers tributary to St. Louis, a good 
strong market for all the good quality, well fattened hogs they can possibly 
raise. 

SHEEP. 

The sheep market during 1902 was in good condition from every point 
of view. The receipts amounted to 5i0,443 head, which is a slight increase 
over 1901, and the largest on record except in 1896 and 1897. The demand 
was larger and more uniform than ever before, and prices averaged higher 
than any year recently. While the receipts are not quite the largest ever 



THE OITT OF ST. LOUIS. 229 

received; the sales are by far the largest, as practically the entire namber 
received were sold, and all that were flt for mutton were slaughtered by 
local concerns. 

The only fault to find with this branch of the trade was that supplies 
were not sufficient to meet the demand, and buyers were frequently forced 
to make purchases at other markets and ship them in to fill urgent orders. 
This of course is sufficient proof that everything offered for sale, found the 
market on a good high basis compared with others where supplies were 
larger than the demand. 

Another branch of the sheep trade which has improved considerably in 
the past few years, but is yet in its infancy, is the stocker and feeder 
department. Country buyers secured nearly twice as many sheep in 1902 
as during the year previous, and yet were unable to get more than one-half 
as many as they wanted. No branch of the trade has any brighter future 
before it than the sheep department, and farmers and stock raisers tributary 
to St. Louis will be well paid for their trouble if they will give this matter 
a little more attention. 

The year opened with the best lambs selling around $5.00 per cwt., but 
gradually advanced until they were bringing $7.00. In the mean time good 
mutton sheep advanced from $4.25 to $6.35. The first spring lambs sold 
quickly at $10.00 per cwt., but declined to $7.00 by July 1st. Sheep also 
declined until early in the summer, the best were selling around $4.00. 
Lambs continued to decline until by the 1st of October the best were worth 
only $5.60, and showed no material change between that time and the end 
of the year. During the last six months sheep remained on much the same 
basis, but sold a little higher right at the end of the year; the best being 
worth $4.25 to $4.50. 

HORSES AND MULES. 

While the receipts in this branch of the live stock market show a small 
decrease as compared with 1901, they were still larger than that of any 
other market in the world. The low prices paid a few years ago caused 
farmers to discontinue raising so many horses and mules, and the heavy 
demand from the British government during 1900 and 1901 are responsible 
for the decrease in business during the past year. 

Although the receipts were smaller, there was no material decrease to 
the demand, and all good horses sold readily and on the highest basis for 
several years. The best sellers were the good draft horses and good drivers 
and coachers. Horses are now selling for nearly double what they did a 
few years ago, and at no time during the last half of the year were buyers 
able to get more than half as many as they wanted. On account of the 
high prices the export trade was not near so large as former years. 

The mule trade of course was much the same as in the horse line. 
Beceipts were smaller and prices higher than any time for several years. 
While the export fell off to a considerable extent, the Eastern and Southern 
demand was quite good, which kept the trade in good lively condition, and 



280 TBADK AKD COmCIRCI OF 

botb Urge »od null mnles, If good, toond ready ulo. JoM at tbe oIom of 
the year OieFe was not quite ao tnadt aotlTl^ to the tzade, eqMoially from 
tbe SootJi, bat thla la expected to pick up ibortly after tbe new year. 

St. Lonlf Is oot only the largest mole market In tbe world, but more 
molsB can be bamed here on feed than at any other point; tbe mualiai 
frequently reacbiag 30,000. Tbla givee bi^en a large aaaortmuit to giA 
tmm, ajid can readily fill any kind of order. 



i 

1 


P 


sSS.|*l=||6||E|3|pii|S.«SJS=3 ; 1 


11 




II 




11 


-■-■-■- -■ -2" -" -3|s«s=a»- -■-" i s 


1 


III 




|1 


lilPMIiiPiiiiil^iS''^ 1 


it 

it 




illlfiriPlilisilp'^i 1 




j 


yH!iyJninHmy:hN| 



TBADI AND COVKEROE OF 



BEOIIPra AND SHEPUENTS Or LITE STOCK AT THE ST. LODIS 
STOCK TARDB FOR THE TBAB 1902. 



BBOEtPTS AND SHtPHBNTS Ot LtTB STOCK AT UNION STOOK TABOS 
FOB THE TBAK 1903, 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



233 



WEEKLY PRICES OF LIVE STOCK FOR 1902. 



From Daily National Live Stock Reporter. 



Week Ending. 


CATTLE. 


HOGS. 


SHEEP. 
















Best Native 


Best Texas 


Top. 


Bulk. 


Best 


Best 




Steers. 


Steers. 


Lambs. 


Sheep. 


Janaary 4 


6 87X 


6 10 


690 


6 10®6 60 


600 


426 


11 


700 


640 


6 70 


6 05 650 


6 16 


4 26 


18 


6 16 


6 80 


660 


6 15 6 46 


620 


500 


26 


6 10 


686 


666 


6 00 646 


625 


4 75 


Febmary 1 


650 


650 


660 


6 80 620 


6 20 


4 75 


8 


650 


6 46 


660 


5 90 6 86 


686 


600 


16 


600 


6 00 


6 47)^ 


6 90 6 35 


6 75 


685 


S2 


686 


6 75 


650 


5 85 680 


685 


660 


March 1 


6 76 


656 


646 


5 80 625 


6 75 


6 76 


8 


6 40 


660 


655 


5 90 635 


6 75 


5 50 


15 


640 


690 


660 


6 90 650 


686 


660 


22 


6 76 


8 00 


660 


6 16 6 45 


6 75 


660 


29 


640 


650 


6 69X 


6 20 6 75 


6 75 


6 50 


April 5 


7 10 


626 


7 00 


6 46 6 96 


7 00 


650 


12 


700 


660 


725 


6 76 7 10 


6 75 


6 76 


19 


695 


650 


7 40 


6 90 720 


660 


6 10 


26 


7 10 


6 10 


750 


6 80 7 26 


6 75 


6 26 


May 8 


7 00 


626 


7 40 


6 70 7 80 


6 76 


6 36 


10 


690 


680 


7 86 


6 76 7 20 


650 


600 


17 


7 16 


6 10 


760 


6 90 7 26 


650 


6 00 


24 


750 


6 76 


7 15 


6 80 7 20 


700 


600 


81 


7 50 


8 00 


746 


6 80 7 25 


7 70 


660 


Jane 7 


750 


6 00 


7 50 


6 96 7 25 


660 


5 60 


14 


7 75 


626 


766 


7 06 755 


7 00 


4 75 


21 


800 


626 


7 75 


7 16 766 


700 


4 60 


28 


790 


7 00 


796 


7 40 780 


6 75 


8 76 


July 5 


8 00 


626 


8 06 


7 56 786 


700 


4 00 


12 


886 


5 70 


8 26 


7 76 8 10 


680 


4 00 


19 


765 


600 


825 


7 80 8 15 


650 


400 


26 


750 


5 75 


8 16 


7 50 806 


6 76 


460 


Aagnst 2 


850 


550 


8 12M 


7 56 7 90 


626 


4 86 


» 


780 


5 16 


786 


7 80 7 70 


660 


4 00 


16 


8 00 


6 80 


745 


6 70 7 86 


5 80 


4 00 


28 


8 76 


496 


756 


6 70 7 80 


6 00 


8 85 


80 


7 40 


4 26 


796 


7 80 7 80 


5 76 


400 


September 6 


680 


480 


790 


7 80 7 70 


660 


8 85 


lo« • • ■ • 


800 


600 


8 10 


7 80 7 80 


550 


8 65 


20 


726 


486 


820 


7 85 800 


560 


8 90 


27 


660 


4 70 


806 


7 80 7 70 


566 


400 


Oetober 4 


7 00 


4 10 


7 70 


7 05 7 46 


660 


890 


11 


7 10 


6 10 


7 90 


680 760 


550 


8 90 


18 


6 86 


4 80 


756 


7 00 7 85 


6 76 


8 90 


25 


700 


580 


780 


6 40 7 20 


600 


400 


NoTember 1 


726 


4 60 


680 


6 40 6 70 


6 80 


4 00 


8 


600 


6 75 


690 


6 40 6 75 


560 


400 


15 


6 15 


6 10 


660 


6 05 6 40 


5 60 


8 75 


22 


6 40 


4 76 


660 


6 16 6 40 


560 


886 


29 


680 


600 


6 46 


6 05 680 


650 


8 86 


December 6 


526 


460 


6 62i^ 


6 00 685 


6 50 


880 


18 


600 


600 


650 


5 96 6 85 


550 


4 26 


20 


6 75 


4 20 


6 70 


6 05 656 


5 70 


4 25 


27 


550 


490 


6 70 


6 16 6 65 


5 10 


4 50 



TUCK AMD OOmCIBOM OF 

TOBACCO. 



LEAP. 

Hie receipts aod ibipments ot hat tobsooo for the put aeiea jean 
eompmre u (oUows: 

v„. BncelpU. Receipts, Bblnmeiiu, 

IBM U.SU 11,0»7 1,SU 

1801 B,m B.aB8 I,T7t 

net u,9n 13,W7 i,w 

un Mfm 1U0 s,«8 

W«8 W.SU 113M »,»» 

18OT umh 9jm ^,vo 

1S8B «s,M7 M,i»s t;ua 

Nearly all the lesl tobacco wu brought from polntg outside the Sttte, 

iaigely from Kentuckj, and used \>j the locail factories In the manofscture 

ol iobaooo, SDuS, olskra and olgarettes. Some receipts were from Cuba 

and Porto Rloo tor tBe manufacture of cigars. 

MANUFACTURED. 

St. Louie maintalDed Its position as the place irhere more tobacco Is 
muiufactared annually than any other place in the world. The total 
amount mannfactored In 1903 In the first Hlssoori district, of which 
nearlr the entire amount is the output ot Bt. Louis factories, was 83,693,541 
potiDda, against 79,294.957 pounds in 1900 and 83,010,863 pounds In 1901, 
and, if snuft le Included, the amount would be 82,003.966 pounds. In 
addition to the amount manufactured In St. Louis, there was received 
16,962,410 pounds from other points, maldng the total business of the year 
99,566,370 pounds. Shipments were 94,330,136 pounds. 

The output ol cigars was 48,131,634. The total number of cigars sold In 
this market during the year Is placed at 276,000,000. The value of tobacco 
and cigars manufactured was fully $46,000,000. 

The Commissioner of Internal Revenue reports the total amount of 
tobacco manufactured In the United States In 1901 as 813,891,391 pounds, 
ot which the first Missouri district produced 81,131,104 pounds, equal to 
neariy 36%. 

The figures for 190a are not now available, but as the St. Louis output 
of 1903 was considerably increased, doubtless the percent^ for 1902 will 
correspondingly increase. 

TOBSGCO HANUFACTITBED IN THE UNITED STATES DUKIHO 1901, 

And TotAlB for Prerloua Yean. 

FroiD tbe reportof the OommiBSloaer ot TaterDal EteTODne. 



THE OITX or 0T. LOOU. 



FIRST MISSODBI INTEBNAL BETBNUE OOLLECTION 
DI8TKICT. 



Tub. 


botnnd. Lbs. 


*«■•(»« pid. 


riMnJ, JBTI 


S, Ml ,871 


moa 


" ISM 


t.m 


888 


sin 


IBTfl 


t,su 


408 


8tM 


isrt 


i.aat 


U7 


UlS 


Oalaidu.iSTV 


B48I 


411 


aou 


1878 


B.990 




18 84 


isro 


8978 


408 


80 00 


" 1880 


a,m 


T84 


40 40 


1881 


17 .m 


888 


07 00 


isn 






38 81 


*• 1B8S 


»;« 


7W 




UM 


nlflsi 


IM 


«« 


•• UBS 


K,BI7 


401 


08 08 


MM 


is, US 


OBB 


04 41 


war 


laist 


875 


74 00 


" 1888 


40.000 


805 


44 38 


^ laae 


MBH 


08T 






S17K 


108 


«8 11 


18>1 


W,se4 


480 


«8S4 


un 


07,877 


8fil 


141 OS 


i8>S 


!»> 


0*7 


U8 87 


im 


^7,I»T 


448 


ne7» 


1886 


STM7 




TBOO 


1886 


88.184 




TOTS 


18m 


08.888 




9»74 


1888 


64,898 




48 88 


I8B9 


86 871 




88 61 


18W 


»> 


809 


Wll 


1801 


m,aiD 


m 


48 81 


IM) 


83,«« 




,J»14 



The maDDf sctareo of the put Ave jean oan be cUssifled as follows : 





IMH 

rODDd*. 


Ponnili. 


PoQikla. 


PooDdi. 


isse. 

Pooud^ 


Bjjg-wm,Tob««.... 


3:s 

io;ia* 


"^11 


"11 


•:|i 


"•■^SS 






SSff,,'; 


'•lolon 




81,flOS.9gB 


S1.0»,871 


«T.80B,8W 


«8,88*,8e« 


M,4U,«M 





TBADK AKD OOIOIBBOB OF 



oioAEs HunrrAOTURBD nr bt. locib. 



7M. 




^%u. 


nXKl, 1874 




• i7a,aa 4b 




18» 




Ua.88l8l 




ara 




ISLOH » 


aUBon'* 


an 




ioe,no« 


Otl^OdH 


an 




ns aai oa 




ITS 




«<!,« M 








«1,W<S 




961 




»i xt7 n 




HI 




M,M>aa 




« 




iae.074 ai 




SSI 




iii,aMM 




B8S 




m,m n 




m 




UO.TMOt 








14D,U«M 




m 




Mi.aaau 




an 




U8,aaiaa 




m 








tn 




'■'iie'.aiB'ii 


m 




ITO.MU 


lata 




i6i,sie n 






iHmn 


eac 




i«,««aB 


;| MB 




ui.sn IB 








8M 






BW 






1900 






" »Q1 




loalsnoQ 


W» 




lao.tnTa 





IBM. 


UOl. 


UOl. 


uw. 


isaa. 


UVI. 


TobMoo llM. 


ai,n4,w 


1«^ 


u:«i 


ai,ino,os7 
«i,iaT 
as.Bts 

ulfiBB 


ai.HS.BO 


'Sis 



THE OITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



237 



BAQQINQ AND COTTON TIES. 



The business in bagging and ties for 1902, shows a falling off in valae as 
compared with 1901. This was in consequence of the short cotton crop. 

Local mannfacturers report a decrease in the amount of bagging manu- 
factored and an increase in the amount on hand at dose of the year as 
compared with previous year. 

BBCEIPTS OF JUTE FOB SIX YEARS 



HViniFTB. 


1902. 


1901. 


1900. 


1800. 


1896. 


1897. 


Jote. bales 


78,510 


51.888 


87,818 


43,806 


»,86i 


88,898 





SHIPMENTS OF BAGOING FOB NINE TSABS. 



8HIFMS1IT8. 


1902. 


1901. 


1900. 


1899. 


1886. 


1897. 


1896. 


1896. 


1894. 


Bagging, poB 


261,820 


881, U8 


218,619 


256,812 


278,661 


806,870 


181,811 


209.071 


886,008 



i( 
i( 
i( 
«< 
it 

CI 

tt 

ic 
<« 



BAGGING HANUFAOTUBBD. 

1902 11,000,000 yards. 

1901 12,600,000 " 

1900 9,975,666 

1699 12,278,600 

1696 12,600,000 

1697 9,000,000 

1696 8,000,000 

1895 11.700,000 

1894 13,000,000 

1898 12,000,000 

1892 13,000,000 

STOCKS OF BAGGING ON HAND. 

Deo. 8lBt,1902 4,000,000 yards. 

1901 2,600,000 « 

1900 8,781,245 

1899 5,181,200 

1898 721,000 

1897 900,000 

1896 1,000,000 

1895 1,200,000 

1894 1,000.000 

1898 200,000 

1892 800,000 



BBCEIPTS BAGGING. 



1902. 



Pieces. 

. 45.080 



1901 6,708 

1900 12,788 

1899 10,760 

1898 98,645 

1897 86,878 

" 42,129 



1885 8,020 

1894 1,577 

1808 18,880 

" 11,488 



Yards. 

• •••■■ ■ 

886,400 

689,400 

587,600 

4.682.250 

1,798,900 

2,106,450 

161,000 

78,860 

689,000 

621,660 



TBADB AUD OOiOCXBCX OF 



HIGHWnnS AND WmSEDBS. 



B«««lFtiHigliwlxieBa]idWliiikiM. Burclf. |( 




Bcrrelfl. 



tm. 

1901. 
1900. 
1899 
1896. 

tm. 

1898. 
1895. 
1894. 
1898. 
1891. 



151,965 
IIS,7» 
165,906 

116,598 
141.W 
107,178 
114,806 
188,718 
188,088 
168,904 



The following l8 a 8tateinent of the amount of grain used, product of 
BplrltB and tax paid, etc., In St. Louis during 1901 and 1902: 





1901. 1902. 


Hnlrlta nrodnnfld. srftlL^-Boivboii • 


82,688.8 
000.0 
000.0 
000.0 
000.0 

8,775.0 


18.845 6 


Alcohol. 

Gin 


000.0 
000.0 


HifhwliMt 


000.0 
000.0 

8.893.2 


Pnie neatnl or ooiogne 
■piritB and whisky sp'ts 
Bye WUsky 






ToUl 


86,408.3 

( «129,075J( tx.gal8. 
8141,9^.5 
000.0 gaU. 
18,355.1 *< 


21,787.8 


Amonnt of t^x i>AJd. n% 81.10 04r vallon ......* t . t t t 


*88,119.3tz.gals 
8 41,8S1.S 
None. 
5.098.8 '* 


Alcohol wlthdrftwn ibr soientiflo puzposcB free of tax 
Whiflky allowed by reason ofleakage and eraporat^n 



♦Big diatilleis closed in this district by trust. 

BXMAININa ON HAND IN DISTUXBRT WAREHOUSES. 



Dec. 81, 1901. Dec. 81, 1903. 



Bourbon 

Alcohol 

Gin 

Pore neatral or oologne spirits and whisky spirits . 
Bye Whisky 



Total. 



47,888.5 gals. 
None. 
None. 
19,060.4 
9,171.7 



it 



75,619.6 



( « 



38,506.4 gals. 

None. 

None. 
6,290.4 •' 
14,847.6 



<i 



54,144.4 



«r 



SPIBTTS BBGTIFIBD OB COKPOUNDBD. 



1890 3,398,447.86 gals. 

1896 2,508,188.18 «* 

1897 8,412,279.60 

1896 2,883,874.17 

1895 8,388,166.18 

1894 8,933,860.88 



■ < 

<« 
< t 



1898 8,182,027.00 gals. 

1892 8,867,4U.78 «• 

1891 8,288,462.87 «* 

1890 8,158,456.98 *< 

1889 8,187,984.18 ** 

1888 2.184,546.88 '* 



July l8t, 1899, to June 30th; 1900, 2,098,824.81 proof galls, or 2,798,423.08 
wine galls. 

Ju^ 1st, 1900, to June 80th, 1901, 2,433,069.29 proof galls, or 2,761,720.18 
wine firalls. 

Ju^ 1st, 1901 to June 30th, 1902, 2,691,664 prod galls, or 2,928,6a7 
wine galls. 

Total numher of gallons gauged In three years hy U. S. Gangers : 

1889 4,929,880.49 gals. 1900 4«728,817.40gals. 1901 5,284,515.31 gaU. 

Total number of wholesale llquoif dealers* stamps issued on change of 
package: 

1900 98,169 1901 84.670 1902 88J963 



THE CTTT OF ST. I.0UI3. 239 



NAVAL STORES. 



Bblt. PkgB. 

Turpentliit. BoBin. 

1902—81 bbls., 163 tanks. =20,456 81,006 

1901 26,077 90,961 

1900 18,000 78,197 

1899 16,000 59,620 

1898 21,084 87,846 

1897 .-.. 18,019 76,831 

1896. -v 16,981 49,902 

1895 14,752 49,850 

1894 17,814 57,456 

1893 15,679 44,870 

1892 19,890 53,788 

1891 19,470 56,322 

1890 15,686 48,900 

1889 18,900 49,897 

1888 17,622 47,052 

1887 18,262 45,281 

1886 18,912 88,742 

1885 18,125 48,273 

1884 9,846 86,857 

1883 12,286 40,010 

1882 18,994 86,882 

1881 5,045 41,717 

1880 8,076 48,148 



Gommeroiftl 
Bblt. of 
ttOlbs. 


Bbls. Tar 
and Pitob 


122,000 


5,899 


188,066 


4,596 


104,000 


10,120 


89,430 


6,878 


134,606 


7,028 


109,758 


7,100 


75,098 


8,475 


78,144 


12,240 


82,080 


8,170 


51,875 


12,048 


76,947 


10,218 


75,822 


5,679 


68,699 


5,157 


69,800 


4,167 


68,250 


5,516 


66,200 


8,675 


72,000 


5,095 


66,860 


7.843 




5,818 




5,779 




8,796 




6,298 




4,544 



The receipts of naval stores, as indicated by the above table, show a 
falling off of both turpentine and rosin from 1901, but larger receipts than 
for 1900 and 1899. The larger part of the naval stores received at this point 
are handled by St. Louis houses, this being the largest distributing point 
in the West, only a small portion being shipped through to Western 
cities. 

Turpentine ranged from 41 to 56 cents per gallon during the year, and 
rosin was quoted at $1.65 to $2.20 per barrel for common, $4.50 to $4.90 for 
the best grades. 



240 TRADE AND OOHMEBOS OF 



LEAD AND SPELTER. 



PIQ LEAD. 

By John Wahl Ck>mmi8Slon Ck>. 

The course of the lead market dnring the year 1902 was very uninterest- 
ing in many respects^ and was followed with no marked attention on the 
part of those directly or indirectly connected with the industiy^ as well as 
by the general public. The prices of Missouri lead in St Louis ranged 
between $3.90 and $4.00 during the entire year; and for desilverized; the 
price remained stationary at $4.05. It proved impossible to bring about 
the same high range of values as that of the previous year (average 1902 is 
about ^ cent pound lower than for 1901), owing to the danger of foreign 
lead being imported even with a duty of 2)^ cents per pound. This was 
due to the fact that the European markets have been very much depressed 
and on account of bad business abroad, and constant fear of a deluge of 
exports from this side, in the event of an advance. While the consumption 
of lead in the United States has been very heavy, the demand for electrical 
purposes, cables, etc., especially, showing a large increase, and while the 
stocks existing at the end of 1901 have practically disappeared, it was nec- 
essary in order to bring about the existing state of affairs to take recourse 
to the same expedient as those of last year, namely, to curtail the produc- 
tion of ores and export certain quantities of domestic lead to Europe. This 
naturally entailed heavy sacrifice, which, however, to a large degree came 
out of the pockets of the ore producers. There has also been a tendency 
to centralize the smelting of ores, and refining of lead bullion by closing 
down some of the plants and diverting material to others. 

The silver mines of Coeur d^Alene districts in Idaho were actively 
worked throughout the year and showed an increase in the total production, 
while the mines of the same class in Montana and Colorado were also 
active. 

The soft lead mines of Missouri showed a remarkable increase; the 
reported production for 1902 being 74,3G3 short tons as compared with 
57,898 tons in 1901. 

Total production of desilverized, antimonial and Missouri lead for the 
year 1902 amounts to nominally 300,000 tons, as compared with 280,000 tons 
for the year 1901. 

The St Louis receipts for the year were 2,007,720 pigs against 1,800,236 
in 1901, and shipments 1,354,119 pigs as compared with 1,243,956 pigs the 
previous year, showing that the amount handled was considerably larger 
in 1902. 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 241 



WHITE LEAD. 

St. Louis holds the foremost position in the manofacture of white lead. 
The brands of St. Louis have an established reputation for purity and gen- 
eral excellence. It is estimated that one-tliird of the output in the United 
States is manufactured here. Near the close of the year a new company 
was organized and the construction of a large white lead plant commenced 
which will soon be in operation and add largely to the output of 1903. 

That the business is increasing year by year is shown by the following 
statement of shipments which does not include the amount used in the city 
and suburbs or on the World's Fair buildings. 

Pounds. 

1902 09,430,976 

1901 69,070,720 

1900 60,646,780 

1899 48,460,260 

SPELTER. 

The spelter industry during the year 1902 has been marked by numerous 
features of interest. The consumptiye demand for the metal has been very 
large in spite of a somewhat slack call from the galvanlzers^ and although 
pn'Kluction was very large the prices for the metal rose gradually during 
the year and remained practically at high level imtil November, when the 
market assumed a sagging tendency. The year opened with the market 
for spelter rather dull and irregular at around (4.16 nominally. Towards 
the end of January prices declined to nominally $3.85. The month of Feb- 
ruary again showed more animation and prices advanced to $4.16. The 
highest point was reached during August when prices reached $6.25 to 
$5.30. The year closes tame with sellers of metal around 4.37>^ to 4.40. The 
production of metallic zinc or spelter in the United States during the year 
1902 amounted to nominally 168^000 tons, which is the highest on record 
and nearly double that of 1896. The production in 1901 was 140,000 tons, 
which shows an increase for the year 1902 of something like 17,000 tons 
orl2>ii%. 



16 



TRADB AND OOWtlBOB Or 



LEAD. 

BBOKIFTS ASD SBtFMCMTS OF t-MiD IM PIQfl OW 80 UBt. BAOH. 



sousOBa or sdfplt or pig lsad ros thbxe xxabs. 



M.<SO 
<1,0«0 

sae,4n 



T<wAi. i.ow.Tio C 

SHiPHXNra 



r WHITS I.EU>. 





:::::::&»» 


SS::::::: 


:::::::»» 




j^sra 








!!S.::::: 




iS;:::::: 


::::;::S:S;iS 


'S.v.v.v 


■.'.■.■.■;.»:JS:SS 


■.■::.::»;!i!:OT 



HOMTHLT PBIOBS Or 


LKAD AND 


SPBLTBIB FOR TWO TKAEB. 


MONTH. 


LHID. 




190L 


im. 


lem. 


1MB. 




11 ip 


Pll 


1111 


4 13X94 30 
























Bfi?^ 4 Oa^'B eo Is 17X SM 






4 00 4 CSX 4 OO 4 113<'.S IS S SS 
tVlit 4 01» 4 ISJif' 4 U 4 « G 2S 







THE oiTT or ST. Loms. 243 



WOOL AND FURS. 



By FtmsTON OoxifissiON Oo. 



WOOL. 

The year 1902 can really be called the most succesgful and satisfactory 
one known to the St. Louis wool trade for many years. From the opening 
of the season^ which is shearing time, to the close of the year, there has 
been a good healthy and legitimate demand for wool on the part of the mills 
and manufacturers from all over the country. The St. Louis merchants, 
pursuing the custom that they have in recent years, laid in a good supply 
by buying heavily at shearing time in the leading wool producing States 
and Territories. They not only bought in large quantities, but showed 
good judgment in securing the most desirable wools. Manufacturers 
realizing this naturally favored St. Louis more than usual, and were buying 
in this market steadily throughout the season. There has been no boom 
whatever, but a good healthy consumptive demand. Prices as a whole have 
been relatively higher than the previous season, which was caused mainly 
by the increased demand for wool, and the general healthy condition of the 
trade. For instance, at the beginning of the year, domestic quarter blood 
combing wools sold to the mills at 20 to 21 cents, while at the close of the 
year it sold at 23 to 24 cents. Territory wools of other grades and sections 
also experienced the same advance in prices. There is less shoddy, cotton 
or other substitutes used in the manufacture of woolen goods than ever, and 
the increased demand and a general healthy condition of the wool trade 
being reported from foreign markets, also tended to strengthen the position 
of wool in this market. 

Each year St. Louis grows stronger and more popular as a wool market, 
and is now recognized as a big factor in the wool trade of the West, and 
does much toward establishing values in the Territories at shearing time. 
It is the second largest market in the United States, and a very strong 
competitor for both domestic and territory wools, and draws supplies from 
a greater scope of territory than ever before. 

Pulled and scoured wools have kept pace with the fleece and territory 
wools, and have sold extremely well during the past year. The amount 
handled in this market being somewhat larger than the previous year. A 
conservative estimate of the value of wool handled in St. Louis during 1902, 
amounts to about $11,000,000. 

FUR. 

St. Louis has even increased her importance as a great fur center, and 
the season of 1902 and 1903 will prove a record breaker in many respects. 
It is a well known fact that St. Louis is the largest primary fur market in 



244 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



the world, and the largest coon skin market in the world, not excepting 

London or any of the foreign markets. During the past season it has been 

more of an independent market than ever. It has taken the lead and 

established its own values for furs. As a primary market it doubtless 

draws furs from a greater scope of territory than any market in the world. 

It has made its greatest strides in the past four or Ave years, having reached 

out into the most remote parts of the far North, where the rarest and most 

expensive furs are to be secured. For instance, the finer bear skins bring 

from $25 to $100 each, and the beautiful skins of the silver fox sell for from 

$200 to $600, and the rarer specimens often sell as high as $1,000 each. Many 

other kinds from the far North, such as Marten, Lynx, Otter, etc., sell at 

$5 to $30 per skin. 

The catch for the season of 1902 and 1908 will be somewhat smaller in 

volume than in 1901 and 1902, but on account of the advance in prices the 

total value will be ereater. The active fur season only lasts about four 
months in the year, during which time something over $4,600,000 worth of 
raw furs are received and sold in this market. 

RKCBIPTS AND SHIPMENTS FOR SIXTEEN YEARS. 



1902 

1901. 

1900. 

1899. 

1S96. 

J897. 

1896. 

1896. 

1894. 

1898. 

1892. 

1891. 



Wool. 



Receipts. 
PoandB. 



26,878,080 
25,877,110 
17,000,790 
28,491,625 
28,710,715 
80,866,410 
16,139,840 
21,5()8,780 
84,861,466 
15,024,486 
263>V),690 
21,976,964 



Shipments. 
Pounds. 



80,072.850 
27,811,876 
15,057,290 
82,617,076 
21,266,999 
84,808,700 
16,939,679 
20,526,100 
24,430,971 
15,726,166 
87.460,879 
21,464,662 



Hides. 



Receipts. 


Shipments. 


Pounds. 


Pounds. 


66.237,220 


99,367,210 


66,006,080 


116,723,695 


60 581,540 


106 496,640 


68,988,720 


92.692,028 


58 716.180 


78,705,785 


60,872,110 


88,906,100 


46,506380 


81,681,130 


44,169.790 


78,039,400 


46 456,970 


68,648,869 


46,011,866 


61,522,479 


38,412,854 


47Jt86,'J04 


84,744,949 


89,487,722 



BBOEIPTS OF PBI/TRIES AND FURS. 



BUHDLBS. 

1902 81,084 

1901 86.08* 

1900 146,607 

1899 269,266 

1896 818,948 

1887 «74.9U0 

1896 210,432 

1896 195,496 

1894 87,068 

1896 96,855 

1892 101,442 

1891 123,626 



BUNDLBS. 

1890 78,888 

1889 43,816 

1888 45,331 

1887 22,0I» 

1886 18,889 

1886 17,474 

1884 16,468 

1888 15,691 

18^2 18,089 

1881 16,1W 

1880 12,073 



RBCBIPT8 OF LBATHBR. 



BOLLS. 

1892. 98,896 

1898 H*8.0e2 

1894. 89,688 

1896 88,688 

1896 80,188 

1897 72,024 



BOLLS. 

1898 83,316 

1899 104,040 

1900 186,9i8 

1901. 168,660 

1902 132.136 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



245 



HAY. 



By the St. Ijouis Hay Exchange. 

The hay market throughout the year has been in very j^od condition, 
and at the close of the year we find there is a smaller stock on hand than 
for seyeral years — only about 600 tons in store. In fact there has been no 
surplus stock to speak of at any time during the year as the supply has 
hardly been equal to the demand. The receipts for 1902 fell under those of 
1901 by about 88,000 tons; but this shortage, we believe, was due mainly to 
the lack of proper railway facilities, it beins almost impossible to obtain 
empty cars, during the past few months, to load with hay. 

The prices on both timothy and prairie hay have ruled high throughout 
the year. This was especially noticeable during the last two or three 
months. Shipments for the year have been very large, considering that 
prior to the new crop most of our hay came from Mi3iigan, Indiana and 
Iowa. While the Southeast didn^t take as much hay from this market as 
in former years,, when our crops were larger, a demand sprung up from 
nearby towns which took care of any surplus we might have. 

Considering^ the shortage in the crop during the first part of the season, 
and the lack of railway f aSlities during the last few months, we think that 
St. Louis did her share of the business, and the St. Louis merchants should 
be given great credit for their efforts under adverse conditions. 

RBCBIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OF HAT FOB A SERIES OF TEARS. 



Ybar. 



BBOBIPTS. 



SHIFMSKTS. 



1902. 

1901 

1900. 

1S99. 

1806. 

1S97. 

1896. 

1895. 

1894. 

1898 

1893 

1801 

1890. 

1889 

1888 

1887. 

1886. 



TOBB. 

213,234 
251482 
234,2o6 
175,820 
160,860 
178,516 
230,852 
196,582 
159,969 
141,288 
131,148 
141,896 
114.092 
116,846 
107,864 
81^304 
85,078 



TOBB. 

89,028 
117,667 
120,777 
64,838 
46.488 
64,067 
107,960 
69,046 
41,288 
30,095 
82,078 
88.263 
40,247 
68,522 
34.666 
28,861 
80.006 



Stock Id store December 81st, 1895, about 7,500 tons. 



** 
<i 
«< 
•« 



(« 
<i 
i< 

M 



(t 

«< 
« 
M 
II 



«( 
If 
«f 
<l 
II 
II 



81st, 1896, 
81st, 1897, 
81st, 1898, 
Slst, 1899. 
81st, 1900, 
81st, 1901. 
Slst, 1902, 



II 


8,260 


•1 


l< 


3,600 


t( 


•1 


2.600 


•I 


II 


8,600 


II 


M 


2,040 


II 


II 


1,600 


II 


11 


600 


•4 



Beceipts of Hay during 1902, at the principal primary markets, were 

as follows : 

Tons. 

St. Lonls 218,224 

Cincinnati 161,898 

Indianapolis. 24,204 

Cleveland 62,682 

Chicago 220,225 

Kansas City 146,820 

Peoria 81.696 

Minneapolis 29,471 



246 



TEADS AND OOMlCEitOB OF 



RECEIPTS AKD SHIPMENTS OF HAY DURING 1901 AND 1902. 



BY 



HAY 
Becelpt8/l90a. 



Local 
TonB. 



Thro' 
Tons. 



HAT. 
SUpmenU 

no. 

LmiIVoii 



HAY 
Receipts, MOl. 



Local ITbro* 
Tons. Tons. 



HAT. 

Shipmoiti 

190L 

LNllfMl 



Ohioago ^ Alton R. R., Mo. Div . . 

Miasouri Paoiflo R. R. 

St. L. & San FranolBoo R. R. 

Wabash R. R. (West) 

St. L., Kas. City & Colo. R. R. . . . . 

Mo., Kanflas & Texas R. R 

St. Louis Southwestern R. R 

St. L.. Iron M'nt^n & S'th'n R.R. . . 

Illinois Central R. R 

L'Fille, Henderson & St. L.R. R. . . 

LouisYille & Nashville R. R 

MobUe & Ohio R. R 

Southern Railway Co 

Baltimore & Ohio S.- W. R. R 

Chioago It Alton R. R 

Cleveland, Cin., Chi. & St. L. R.R. 

Vandalia R. R 

Wabash R. R. (East) 

Tol., St.Lonis It Western R. R. . . . 
Chioago, Peoria A St. Louis R. R. 
Chioago, Burl'n 9q Quinoy R R. . . 
St. Louis, Keokuk &; N. W. R. R . . . 

St. Louis Valley R. R 

Upper Mississippi River 

Lower Mississippi River 

Illinois River 

Missouri River 

Ohio, Cumb. and Tenn. Rivers. . . 



1,180 
6,885 
6,690 
7,786 

100 
7,160 

460 

66 

8,470 

p • ■ • ■ • 

460 



466 

9,800 

6,806 

17,220 

10,666 

88,460 

20,160 

6,960 

18,640 

16,266 



2,194 
68 
42 



Total, tons 174,839 



10 

11,646 

280 

70 



1,820 



80 
116 



286 
2,670 
7,840 

816 
8,860 
8,686 
1,860 

610 



88,885 



6,878 

6,966 

1,660 

1,866 

570 

680 

26,062 

11,463 

160 

14,079 

11,126 

2,686 

120 

671 

60 

880 

680 

407 

826 

886 

190 

80 

60 

8,466 

46 

68 

277 



89,028 



006 

10,746 

9,960 

10,270 

40 

9,626 

826 

410 

6,226 

10 

190 

80 

616 

6,766 

8,166 

11,966 

11,886 

29,720 

18,600 

6,666 

27,440 

28,280 



1,186 
28 
74 



198,142 



276 

17,400 

1,940 

1,126 

*4,*796 

116 

80 

80 



40 
80 



60 

60 

4,660 

4,640 

20 

11,170 

4,640 

4,380 

2,780 



67,990 



26 

6,846 

8,660 

480 

1,624 

488 

608 

26.914 

18,616 

464 

34,069 

10,660 

8,899 

143 

823 

1,069 

1,562 

869 

68 

1,621 

700 

10 



8,636 



117,667 



MONTHLY RANGE OF PRICES OF HAY DURING 1902. 



MONTHS. 


No. 1 Timothy, 
per ton. 


No. 1 Prairie, 
per ton. 


January 


$18.60 ® 16.60 
18.00 14.60 
18.00 14.60 
18.00 16.26 
18.00 16.60 
12.00 16.00 
18.00 16.00 
10.00 16.00 
9.60 12.00 
11.00 18.00 
11.00 18.60 
18.60 15.60 


$11.00 <2 

11.00 

12.60 

12.60 

10.00 

9.00 

8.60 

8.00 

7.60 

8.60 

9.00 

10.60 


^ 12.50 


February 


12.60 


Maroh 


13.60 


April 


18.60 


May 


14.00 


June 


10.60 


July 


10.00 


August 


9.00 


September 


9.00 


Ootober 


11.00 


November 


11.60 


Deoember 


12.00 







THE 0I1T OF 8T. LOUIS. 



247 



SALT. 

RECEIPTS AND SHIPMBMTS FOB TWENTT-FOUB TEAB8. 



YXAB. 


Bbobipts. 


SmnfaNTS. 




Barrels. 


Saoks* 


Bulk In But. 


BarrelB. 


Saoks. 


Bulk in Ens. 


1902 

1901 

1900 

1889 

1898 

1887 

1896 

1896 

1894 

1898 

1892 

1891 

1890 

1889 

1868 

1887 

1886 

1886 

1884 

1888 

1882 

1881 

1880 

1879 


228,770 
816,286 
288,106 
427,020 
888,120 
861,686 
889.666 
804,204 
248,880 
241,189 
290,487 
881,671 
826,188 
298,668 
880,110 
894.676 
400,868 
887,787 
486,440 
886,176 
287,426 
282,848 
818,879 
244,966 


88,660 
85,280 
27,676 
28,266 
48,280 
83,046 
89,168 
72,796 
60.787 
80,198 
48,968 
42,478 
83,840 
21,816 
24,649 
82,060 
61,992 
46,881 
68,287 
67,961 
42,760 
78,289 
61848 
78,846 


777,840 
772,800 
776,160 
681,280 
461,540 
419,460 
464,160 
804,980 
020,660 
864,020 
478,200 
888,440 
168,080 
804,080 
264,700 
820,490 
247,160 
648,700 
496,800 
698,720 
868,290 
814,720 
888,868 
439,788 


229,881 

2881769 
870,406 
819,911 
229,072 
267,106 
288,641 
288,404 
196,481 
280,280 
816,679 
846,691 
280,359 
268,410 
297,126 
806,487 
809,671 
818,088 
296,287 
291,188 
218,186 
289,168 
221,966 


68,081 

20,846 
40,201 
29,826 
18,867 

9,840 
17,048 

8,628 
16,769 
88,266 
26,808 
26,676 

8.228 
22,821 

9,474 
11,668 

8,967 
18,246 
14,647 
16,619 
26,197 
81,688 
21,691 


76,040 

'ioioeo 

16,680 

44,800 

17,840 

28,026 

64,820 

22,900 

299,680 

149,928 

68,016 

70,029 

144,800 

187,680 

92,819 

66,924 

845.828 

288,020 

467,808 

246,071 

182,882 



BB0EIFT8 AND SHIFMBirrS OF SALT FOB 1902. 



Bt 



CtUeago A Alton B.B. (Mo. DiY,) , 

MiBioiiri Paoiflo BaUroad 

0t L. * San Franolaoo Ballroad . 

Wabash BaOroad (Wast) 

St. L^ K.O. A Colorado B.B .... 

Xo.,Kjuisas A Texas R. B 

St. Lonis Southwestern BJft 

St. L.. Iron Mountain A So. B. B. . . 

miaois Central B. B 

Lo'isrUle, Hend'son A St. L. B. B. 

LoulSTUleAKsshYilleBJfc 

Mobile A Ohio B.B 

Southern Bailway 

Baltimore A Ohio S.- W. B. B 

Chicago * AltOQ B.B 

O., C. G. ASt. Louis B.B 

yaiidanaB.B 

Wabash Ballxoad (East) 

Toledo, St. LoulB & Western B. B. 
Chicago, Peoria * St. Louis B.B. . . 
ChieagOfBiirUngton AQoiiieT B.B. 

Si.L.,Keokiik<kK.-W. B.B 

St. Louis Valley B. B 

BiTer. 



Rxcmrrs. 



Sacks. 



8,020 
100 



Total 



4,860 



1,860 

976 

2,816 

1,080 

2,775 

10,680 

666 



88,660 



Bbls. 



100 



66,966 



2,860 
18,206 
21,066 
20,906 
88,200 
26,740 
710 



228,770 



Cars, 
In Balk. 



647 
12 
14 



167 
2 



18 

86 
191 

91 
269 

44 



8 



1,889 



SHIPMBHT8. 



Sacks. 



800 



6 

18,006 

18,690 

8,220 

24,190 

6 

682 

1,087 

1,661 

80 

160 

4,061 

26 

60 



860 

6 

125 



630,811 



Bbls. 



1,676 

46,484 

69,206 

6,920 

160 

51,746 

6,866 

21,210 

9,889 

5 

1,209 

1,647 

1,490 

860 

1,970 

1,226 

2,290 

2,182 



700 

6,886 

265 

8,967 



229,881 



In 



Oars. 
iBnlk. 



8 
18 
16 
80 

4 



15 
2 



2 

1 



17 



1 
1 



184 



218 TBADI AMD OOMUBOI Ot 



CANDIE5. 



St. Louis continues to be one of the greatest candy markets in the 
United States. 

The Yolume of business in 1902 has been about the same as in 1901, 
and the class of goods purchased during the year would show an increasing 
appreciation of the higher grades of confectionery by consumers generally. 

There are seven large factories in St. Louis, employing about 2,000 
hands and paying in wages nearly three-quarters of a million dollars per 
annum. 

All grades of candies are manufactured, from the cheapest to the most 
expensive, thus offering to the purchaser, whether he be wholesaler or 
retailer, facilities for selection unsurpassed by any other market in the 
country. 

The trade extends oyer nearly the entire United States, reaching on the 
east to the New England and the Atlantic Coast States, and on the west to 
the Pacific Slope. 

St. Louis is geographically the center of the Mississippi Valley, and 
enjoys exceptional advantages as a distributing x>oint. This gives St. Louis 
confectioners a predominating position with the Central, Western and 
Southern States. 

The confectionery manufacturers of St. Louis are progressive, alert and 
maintain a pre-eminent reputation for integrity and fairness, and their 
business constitutes a very important element in the city^s manufacturing 
industry, and aggregates between three and four million dollars per 
annum or about 50,000,000 pounds per year. 



THi cnrr or st. louis. 249 



DRIED FRUIT. 



Bt HoniAHiT Brothsbs Produci Go. 



The past years* business in the dried fruit trade has been a satisfactory 
one, although the prices have ruled rather low. Receipts of all kinds of 
dried fruits showed an increase of more than 25% over the previous year, 
and are the largest recorded during the past fourteen years. This shows 
that the business in this line is on the increase, and St. Louis now ranks 
as one of the largest distributing markets for dried fruits of all kinds. 

California and Eastern dried fruits are shipped here in large quantities, 
and from here sold to the trade tributary to this great center. 

Dried and evaporated apples are, however, the principal dried fruits 
handled in this market. This is due, aside from the great popularity 
enjoyed by this most staple of dried fruits, to the advantageous position 
occupied by St. Louis as the natural distributing market for the orchard 
products of Missouri, Illinois and Arkansas. The fruit growing industry in 
each of these states is making rapid progress, and much of the annual crop 
is dried and evaporated. 

Sundried apples are a commodity wanted and required by a certain class 
of trade for export, as well as for domestic use. The receipts of this class 
of fruit were very small this season, and in consequence prices were high, 
about the same as bleached evaporated apples of the better grades and 
much higher than the inferior stock. This branch of the industry should 
not be neglected. 

The outlook for a large spring trade in dried fruits is favorable. 



RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OF DRIED FRUIT. 

BBOBIFTS. 8HIPMSKT8 

8k«. And BblB. Ska. and Bbla. 

1903 « 810,789 420,856 

1901 »9,814 889.286 

1900 168,981 810,275 

1800 810,854 848^1 

189S 206.617 9»A» 

1807 267.499 441,706 

80,466 140,690 

160,908 181,868 

1894 99,406 219,062 

1896. 166,016 200,888 

1992 160,766 218,486 

1891 128,982 182,997 

1890 160,917 312,880 

1889.. 126,788 316391 



2G0 



TBADB AND OOMHIIIOB OF 



SEEDS. 



RB0BIPT8 lOR FOUR TSARS. 





1902. 


lioi. 


1900. 


1899. 


8BBD8 


Sii^s 


BaBh. 


Tons. 


Saoka 


Bnali. 


Toiui. 


Sacks 


Boflh. 


Tons. 


Saeks 


Boflh. 


Tons. 


FlAZ.... 

Other.. 


• • • • • • 

81,767 


800,000 


• • • • ■ • 

5,570 


188 
00,668 


196.600 


2,990 


146 
69,968 


649,600 




900 
68,216 


604,600 




Ootton. 




4,940 


8J26 















Shipment of Flaxseed for 1888, 6,154 eaeka and 46,975 bushels. 



«* 
(1 
it 

« 

II 
« 

IC 

II 
It 
«< 
<c 
It 



" 1889, 


2,6W 


•( 


i« 


840,288 


«( 


<* 1890. 


618 


II 


II 


700,160 


«« 


•• 1891, 


712 


«< 


« 


120,011 


« 


« 1892, 


. • • 


i« 


«« 


161,248 


(« 


" 1898, 






•• 


•< 


166,667 


■t 


« 1894, 






•< 


•• 


225,906 


c« 


" 1896, 






« 


M 


926,846 


C( 


«* 1896, 






II 


<« 


606,879 


C< 


" 1897, 






II 


IC 


446,662 


cc 


" 1896, 






«• 


(1 


294,045 


•c 


" 1899. 






II 


M 


248,871 


M 


" 1900, 






II 


11 


467,164 


IC 


" 1901, 






•1 


CI 


68,967 


II 


*' 1902, 






II 


II 


129,205 


II 


FT.AXSl 


SEj 


D. 









Monthly range in price of prime in oar lots (small lots sold at 9 and 5 
cents less) for four years. 



MOlfTHS. 


1902. 


1901. 


1900. 


1899. 


.Tn.nn A.T^ ...••.•....*.••«•■. 




160 
166 
160 
149 
156 
1 67 
160 
1 87 
187 
1 88 


91 7S 
171 
160 
162 
167 
168 
166 
166 
186 
148 


146 
192 
167 
162 
162 
166 
186 
126 
143 
146 
160 
162 


9160 
158 
162 
170 
166 
168 
1 60 
146 
166K 
176 
178 


106 

1 U 

110 

1 10 

96 

96 

98 

98 

102 

112 

126 

184 


911<itf 
1 13X 


ITehTOiirv. .••■.... 




Mavch 




1 17 


A nrll 




1 16 


May 


160 9166 
160 

141 160 
1823^ 146 
122 1 88 
1 12 1 25 
1 11 1 UH 
1 U 1 14 


1 UH 


Jnnfi •*•••...... 


100 


July 


98 


Au^t.... 


lUK 
1 16 


October «... 


1 36K 


NovATnlMfr 


iS 


December •■.•••••••.•••••• 




1 46 









THX OTTT OF ST. LOUIB. 



OF BinriB AND CHKKSI FOR 1903. 



BE0EIPT8 AMD SBtPKUrTS OF EQOS. 



■OIIPT*. 


BHirMBins. 


aK.m 


'S-i'S 


.m.m 


Tio.tn 


m^Kt 


lTl,tM 


m.nt 


BU.4H 


8V8,8B« 


Ma.iM 


BH^SM 


G«0.8n 


m,*»n 


mjM 


6M,«38 


ia.m 


m,m 


117,111 


tatfiia 


mjaa 


m3\6 


mjM 


UMIB 


nijti 



TBADX AKD OOIOIIBCX OW 

BRASS. 
■■OHm AMD SBtPUCMTfl FOB Tmorrr-ovc tkabb. 



Maroh 



CABTOB BEANS. 

MONTHLT EAMOB IN FKICB OT FBIME, IN CAB LOTS, 190S. 

tiwaito II joir •iwe 

131 110 AocnM I 80 

1 «t 110 Scptomlwr ISO 

IM 110 [ Oclobet IM 

1 8S IW I NoTambu 1*0 



P0TAT0B8 AND ONIONS. 

BBOBIPTS AND BHIPHBNTB FOB TVKMTT-ONB TBABB. 



THE OITY OF ST. LOUIS. 253 



FRUIT AND PRODUCE. 



By Maklst 6. Bighmond. 



Taken as a whole, the business of St. Louis, in 1902, has surpassed all 
preceding years. The tonnage larger, and the values on most commodities. 
veiT satisactoiy. Only one t)rancn of the fruit trade has been a decided 
sunerer through the conditions of 1902. The foreign lemon trade specu- 
lators in Sicily lemons, having had about the worst season in their records. 

APPLES. 

The crop of 1902, was the largest ever raised in the United States, 
exceeding the bumper crop of 18%. The visible supply in storage on 
December 31st, as furnished by the National Apple Shippers Assoc&tion, 
including the holdings of Canada, were 4,074.169 barrels, equal to 12,222,507 
bushels. Exports out of the crop up to December 31st, were 1.737,070 
barrels. The total exports out of the 1896 crop, was 2,900,000 barrels, 
which were the largest ever exported out of any one crop. It is reasonable 
to predict that the exports out of the 1902 crop will exceed those of 1896, 
by several thousand barrels, and taking into consideration that the values 
so far, have been fully 33)^ per cent better than the preceding bumper 
crop year, speaks well for the gaining popularity abroad for our American 
apples. The States looking to St. Louis for their distribution of its crops, 
distributed their proportion to making up of the record breaking crop. 
The receipts for St. Louis, were 448,22o barrels, (These do not take into 
account the wagon receipts.) 

POTATOES. 

The local crop of potatoes for 1902, was large. Shipments alone out of 
the American Bottom was 5,175 cars, equal to 2,587,500 bushels. Also 
wagon receipts, which are conservatively estimated at 800,000 bushels more. 
The average price paid to the farmer was fifty cents per bushel, making 
$2,193,750 paid out for the crop. The receipts for 1902, added to the Bottom 
potatoes, were 2.729 cars and 758.936 packages, or 3,261,840 bushels, making 
a total of 6,649,340 bushels handled through tne St. Louis market. 

The Government flgores for 1902 crop, were large. The States of which 
St. Louis is the natural outlet and distnbuting center, contributed largely 
to makixig of the large crop, as indicated in the government report and 
received handsome returns. As a whole, the potato trade was very satis- 
factory to both dealer and grower. 

ONIONS. 

The receipts of onions for 1902, was 373 cars and 106,600 packages: these 
figures do not include the local crop, which was moved principally by 
wagons. 

ORANGES AND LEMONS. 

The receipts of oranges for 1902. was 675,779 boxes and barrels. The 
receipts of lemons, 126,^1 boxes. The business done in oranges was satis- 
factory, showing a gain over previous year ; but the lemon traders suffered 
to some extent, owing to the season not being adapted to their consumption, 
summer too cool. 

MELONS. 

Receipts of melons for 1,902, was 1940 cars. 



254 



TRADB Aim OQMMKBOB OT 



RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OF SUNDRY ARTICLES 

FOR 1902. 




Applet 

AlesndBeer. 

Bsnsnat 

Barbed Wire 

Beef 

Fresh Beef 

OAoned Beef 

Boots and Shoes . . . 
Cordage and Bope. 
Cement 



.bblj 

.packages 

.oars 

.pounds 

barrels and tierces 
.pounds 



ft 



M 



Cotton Seed Meal . . . 
Candles 

Egg* 

Fish 

Fertilizer 

Hops 

Iron and Steel 

Leather 

Lemons 

Malt 

Nails 

Oils 

Oil 6ake .!.. 

Oranges 

Ore, Iron 

** Zlno 

Pig Iron 

Railroad Iron 

Staves 



.cases 

.coils 

.sacks 

.barrels 

.tons 

.boxes 

.packages.. 

.tons 

.bales 

.tons 

.rolls 

.boxes 

.sacks 

kegs 

.barrels .... 

.tanks 

.tons 

.packages., 
.tons , 



41 
(« 



II 



Soap 

Tallow 

Tin 

Wines and Liquors. 



if 



if 



Zinc and Spelter. 



.M 

•oars 

.boxes 

.pounds 

.boxes 

barrels 

boxes and cases... 
.slabs 



448,225 

2,126 
48,761,300 

81,968,200 

087,625 

81,275 

1,966,565 

149,885 
S4,29J 

825,999 
71,800 

4,557 
278,027 
182,125 
126,406 
178,000 
752,575 
75,805 

9,066 

676,779 

110,282 

87,512 

275,428 

174,825 

449 

5,572 

6,792,600 

122,090 

28,545 

95,120 

2,857,885 



821,473 

5402,060 

1,528 

72,354,620 

8,544 

818,387,466 

4,532,680 

1,151,281 



20,188 
163,753 
512,662 

63,412 



92,886 
149,175 
883^226 



1,681 

478,658 

12,850 

81,652 

221,764 



1,121,449 
10,897,900 



2,542,446 



THi cflTT or ST. Lome. 



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256 



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