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Full text of "Anthology Of Magazine Verse For 1922 And Year Book Of American Poetry"

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ANTHOLOGY 

OF 

MAGAZINE VERSE 

FOR 1922 

AND YEARBOOK OF 
AMERICAN POETRY 



EDITED BY 
WILLIAM STANLEY BRAITHWAITE 




SMALL. MAYNARD & COMPANY 
PUBLISHERS 



COPYRIGHT, 1923 
Br SMALL, MAYNAttD & COMPANY 

(INCORPORATED) 



THE MUREAT PRINTING 

CAMBRIDGE, MA86, 



TO 

MY FRIEND 
JOHN T. HUGHES 

WHO LOVES IRELAND WITH THE 

SAME PASSION THAT HE LOVES 

THE POETS OF EVERY LAND IN 

HIS UNSELFISH HEART 



CONTENTS 

FAGS: 
INTRODUCTION ... ix 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ... .... xv 

ANTHOLOGY OF POEMS ... . ... xix 

THE YEARBOOK OF AMERICAN POETRY 255 

INDEX OF POETS AND POEMS PUBLISHED IN AMERICAN 

MAGAZINES, AUGUST, 1921 JULY 31, 1922 . . . 257 

ARTICLES AND REVIEWS OF POETS AND POETRY PUB- 
LISHED DURING 1921-1922 348 

VOLUMES OF POEMS PUBLISHED DURING 1921-1922 . 363 

A SELECT LIST OF BOOKS ABOUT POETS AND POETRY , 373 

INDEX OF FIRST LINES . ... .... 377 



INTRODUCTION 

The current stage of our poetic history is one of 
solution. A year ago it would have been difficult to 
have foreseen this condition. It is now ten years 
1912 is the accepted date by the radicals, when 
the dawn of the Renaissance broke since the art 
functioned into a period; the annual Transcript 
articles began seven years earlier, playing the role 
of prophecy. Last month Miss Monroe's magazine, 
"Poetry, A Magazine of Verse," celebrated its tenth 
anniversary; and my own "Anthology of Magazine 
Verse, and Yearbook of American Poetry," reaches 
its tenth volume with the current publication. The 
decade has been packed with incidents; there have 
been groups and battles, propaganda and persecu- 
tion; there have been large successes, and sincere and 
respectable attention to the average adequacies and 
minor distinctions. The period has been long enough 
in time and broad enough in the mass to observe the 
undulations and get the perspective. Mr. Masters 
shot to his peak, wobbled, and rebounded with the 
"Domesday Book"; Frost rolled over the mountain^ 
tops like a pale mist, and hangs there with a mellow 
flush; Amy Lowell blazed skyward to run in and 
out of shadows; Sandburg, who began swimming so 
arrogantly in the waters of realism and slang, lost 
the vigor of his stroke and went head under the eter- 
nal waves of truth and experience; Lindsay's early 
vision with its burning evangelicism jazzed itself into 
popularity; only Robinson, among the poets of major 
importance in the mid-period, and John Hall Wheel- 



ock in its later phase, kept steadily progressive 
towards a consistently high achievement. The so- 
called "intellectualists" from Bodenheirn to Aiken, 
whose intellectualism made a fetich of technique 
which, like the priest and the Levite, led them to 
pass on the other side of the road where Life lay 
stricken. All through the last five years the increas- 
ing contribution of books of poems gave promise 
that a succession of figures would arrive to match the 
impressive talents which ushered in the Renaissance, 
These poets may be named by the score; but they have 
done nothing better than break up the early cohesion 
of achievement, and project into the current time 
a state of solution. The controversy during the year 
by the leading proponents of the various modes on 
the "return" of strictly conventional metressis is an 
evidence of this state. There has been attack and 
defense; defections from the ranks; and claims that 
tradition has never wholly been abandoned. The 
controversalists have, perhaps, little realized that the 
cause of the conflict has been more or less determined 
by the practice of the countless new arrivals in the 
field during the last year or two. 

Has the craze for anthologies had anything to do 
with these vague and indefinite conditions of poetic 
affairs? If so, I may have to take much of the 
blame. The tenth anniversary of the "Anthology 
of Magazine Verse," may be an appropriate time for 
a little searching into facts. Mere collections of 
verse are no new literary innovation; the performance 
goes back to the Greeks, from whom the name 
Anthology is taken to characterize such a work as a 
collection of poetry by various authors. I suppose 
what my critics have meant when they call me the 
"Arch Anthologist," is, that I started an innovation 
which was unique, and then became dangerous in 
its susceptibility to imitation. Of course, there were 
all sorts of "annuals," even before I was born; Vic- 
torian literature was full of them, but they were 



recruited from prose talents, and made a Christmas 
feature. So there was not much originality in grasp- 
ing the idea of an "annual" publication; the unique- 
ness of my venture, in the beginning was to have 
the courage, and, yes, the faith, to produce an 
"annual" recruited with verse, and that verse the 
verse printed in the magazines of the current year, 
and by the supposedly Tom-Dick-and-Harry of the 
art. No one approached even the idea of doing 
such a thing in the dim antiquity of 1905; I did. 
But it took seven years to cultivate the disastrous 
opportunity of putting the idea into effect. The 
audacity of the idea in itself preempted imitation 
immediately; but it was foolish to think that an 
opportunity which lent itself so freely to the assimi- 
lative mind would go unchallenged. Pioneers build 
poor roads, but there is no traveling and discovery 
without them. We have now a number of annual 
and bi-annual collections of verse, and they keep 
multiplying down to the latest "Bookman Anthology 
of Poems, 1922," edited by John Farrar. The seed 
has grown a good crop, and one has only blessing 
for the harvest. One day some imaginative mind, 
impracticable (it will be believed), with faith, will 
create a new mode and method of serving the art 
as a human need, and the practical ones will take 
a new tack. 

Perhaps a word here might be said of the aim 
with these annual collections of verse. I have been 
severely criticized for not doing this or that with 
them. Mr. Lawrence Mason puts me in the same 
hole that Mr. Joseph Warren Beach puts Joseph 
Hergesheimer and Theodore Dreiser, an opening no 
purist will smutch his imaginative nose in. I have 
had letters from representative practitioners in every 
mode and school of verse in the country, censuring 
me for not making these collections up wholly with 
the particular kind of verse they produced; all the 
other "kinds" were failures and "rot." Considering 



only their own point of view there could not pos- 
sibly be anywhere near the number of good poems 
produced in a single year which my volumes 
included. Well, Time has its own ironic way with all 
of us; and our judgments can only be trusted for 
their honesty and sincerity. The purpose of these 
annual volumes has been to represent the achieve- 
ment of the year in magazine poetry of every char- 
acter and quality and form, except that of common 
humor, for the appreciation of the general public. 
If I had been editing such a collection for poets and 
critics merely, the purpose and the character of the 
work would be different. The spirit, not the body, 
of the public is a better judge of values in this matter 
than the professional critics; the latter are but the 
merest servants to fetch and carry standards. 

Let us go back to what the year has measured in 
the art. It has been a time, as I have said, of loose 
factors. The pointed achievement of the year was 
the publication of Edwin Arlington Robinson's "Col- 
lected Poems." Nothing has done so much to crystal- 
lize the poet's position. The work won for Mr. 
Robinson the Pulitzer Prize of one thousand dollars 
for the best book of poems produced by an American 
poet during the year; added to this he received the 
Poelry Society's Prize of five hundred dollars. The 
New York Authors* Club voted the work the most 
significant publication by an American author during 
the year; and Yale University conferred upon Mr. 
Robinson an honorary degree. Mr. Robinson's career 
proves an artistic axiom which ought to be heeded 
by all young poets. 

Prize awards for poems have begun to show a 
promise of growing as numerous as the prises given 
for pictures hung in the various exhibitions* All the 
poetry magazines are offering prizes, though the 
awards are not made in a set competition. The 
Blindman Prize offered by the Poetry Society of 
South Carolina is one of the most important annual 



xit 



awards; distinction should be made between the 
awards that are made for books and those for indi- 
vidual poems. An interesting competition of the 
year was the Clark Equipment Company's prize of 
one thousand dollars for the best poem on the sub- 
ject of transportation. Though the contest closed in 
July, the award has not at this writing been made. 

The mass of magazine poetry has been as interest- 
ing as ever. The outstanding poems have not been 
as numerous as in other years; for instance, there 
has been nothing to match Lew Sarett's "The Box of 
God," of last year, though Vachel Lindsay's "In 
Praise of Johnny Appleseed" and Robert Frost's 
"Paul's Wife," made distinct impressions. Mary 
Johnston's "Virginiana" is a fine contribution. Amy 
Lowell's "Revenge" has a quality she has not got into 
any other of her shorter poems since "Patterns." My 
reference last year to the progress being made poeti- 
cially in the South appears fully justified by the 
quality and quantity of the work coming from that 
section of the country in the past year. Du Bose 
Heyward arid Hervey Allen of Charleston are both 
poets of exceptional gifts; Mr. Allen's poem, "The 
Leaping Poll," in a recent issue of the London 
Mercury, shows a quality of expression possessed 
with inferior brightness by Rupert Brooke. In Nor- 
folk, Virginia, is a group of poets who are doing 
splendid lyrical work, and where an excellent poetry 
magazine, The Lyric, which has printed contributions 
by the best poets the country over, is edited by John 
Richard Moreland with rare discrimination and skill; 
Mr. Moreland himself is a lyric poet of exquisite 
sensibilities. Also some well-informed and well- 
expressed criticism of poetry comes from this city, 
the work of Virginia Taylor McCormick. 

With the exception of Robinson's "Collected 
Poems" no books by the outstanding figures were 
published during the year. Carl Sandburg was 
another exception that might be noted for signifi' 

xiii 



canoe of a kind. Elinor Wylie's "Nets to Catch the 
Wind," and Florence Kilpatrick Mixter's "Out of the 
Mist," were first books whose significance the puhlic 
could not escape. Olive Tilford Dargan's "Lute and 
Furrow" maintained the excellent tradition of this 
poet's work. Maxwell Bodenheim's "Introducing 
Irony" exhibits this poet at his best. Two books 
bordering the end of the year present each a case 
of extreme importance in contemporary poetic his- 
tory. Mr. John Hall Wheelock's "The Black 
Panther" establishes his position among the major 
contemporary figures, and Mary Sinton Leitch's "The 
Wagon and the Star" is the beginning of a poetic 
career that has been hailed by William Lyon Phelps 
and others as promising conspicuous attainment and 
admiration. Professor Prescott's "The Poetic Mind " 
and Robert Graves' "On English Poetry" both pre- 
sent theses which raise problematical questions. All 
this points to the vitality, both, creatively and criti- 
cally, which possesses the art in America today. 

W. S. B. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

To the American poets, and to the editors and pro- 
prietors of the magazines from which I have selected 
the poems included in the Anthology, I wish to 
express my obligation for the courteous permissions 
given to make use of copyright material in the prepa- 
ration of this volume. 

I wish, also, to thank the Boston Transcript Com- 
pany, for permission to use material which appeared 
in my annual review of American poetry in the 
columns of The Evening Transcript. 

To the following publishers I am indebted for the 
privilege of using the poems named from the volumes 
in which they have been included, and which have 
been published before the appearance of this 
Anthology: 

The Macmillan Company: "Caput Mortuum" in 
Collected Poems by Edwin Arlington Robinson; "The 
Mountain Graveyard," "To Edgar Allan Poe," 
"Dusk" by Du Bose Heyward; and "Shadows," and 
"Dead Men, To a Metaphysician" in Carolina Chan- 
sons by Du Bose Heyward and Hervey Allen. 

Charles Scribner's Sons: "Panther! Panther!" 
"Night Hath Its Fear," "O Happy Heart," and "In 
the Dark City" in The Black Panther by John Hall 
Wheelock; and "In the Black Country (Stafford- 
shire, England)" in Lute and Furrow by Olive Til- 
ford Dargan. 

Henry Holt and Company: "To a Dead Pembina 
Warrior," "Indian Sleep Song" and "Maple-Sugar 
Song" in The Box of God by Lew Sarett. 



G. P. Putnam's Sons: "The Last Fire" in The Bar- 
carole of James Smith by Herbert S, Gorman. 

Harcourt, Brace and Company: "Women's War 

Thoughts" in The American Rhythm by Mary Austin. 

Alfred A. Knopf: "The Death of a Dandy" in 

The Undertaker's Garland by John Peale Bishop and 

Edmund Wilson, Jr. 

Boni and Liveright: "Dear Minna," "Instructions 
for a Ballet" and "Two Sonnets to My Wife" in 
Introducing Irony by Maxwell Bodenheim; *"A Print 
by Hokusai," "All Souls' Eve" and "Lullaby" in Out 
of the Mist by Florence Kilpatrick Mixter. 

B. J. Brimmer Company: "To a Hermit Thrush," 
"On Being Told that My Child Resembles Me" and 
"Silence" in the Waggon and the Star by Mary 
Sinton Leitch; "The Northeast Corner," "Heritage," 
"Under-Currents" and "In April" in Backroads: A 
Book of Poems by Winifred Virginia Jackson; "Elegy 
on a Dead Mermaid Washed Ashore at Plymouth 
Rock," "For Maister Geoffrey Chaucer," and "Thren- 
ody" in The Hills Give Promise, A Volume of Lyrics 
With Carmus: A Symphonic Poem by Robert Sili- 
man Hillyer; "Measure" in Bronze: A Book of Verse 
by Georgia Douglas Johnson; and "Fragilities" in 
The Carrying of the Ghost by Nelson Antrim Craw- 
ford; and "The Minister's Wife" and "A Rain Song" 
in Frescoes by Jay G. Sigmund. 

Robert McBride: "A Moral Emblem of Maturity," 
"At the Symphony" and "Love Hath No Physic" in 
Youth Grows Old by Robert Nathan. 

Yale University Press: "Earth Lover," "To Per- 
sephone" and "Sea-Nearness" in White April by 
Harold Vinal. 

Moffart, Yard and Company ; "Sifting My Dreams" 
in The Roots of Beauty by Muriel Strode. 

James T. White Company: "The Little Sin," "A 
Grave," "A Minor Poet" and "Birch Trees" in Red 
Poppies in the Wheat by John Richard Moreland. 
Will Ransom: "Words," "Changeling" and 



XVI 



"Zenith" in Star-Pollen by Power Dalton; and "The 
Peacock" in a volume as yet unnamed by Scottie 
McKensie Frasier. 

Workers Party: "To My Little Son" in Bars and 
Shadows, the prison poems of Ralph Chaplin. 



rvw 



ANTHOLOGY OF POEMS 

ALLEN, HERVJSY 

Shadows ... ... 1 

Dead Men, To a Metaphysician 3 

ALLING, KENNETH SLADE 

Summer Night 3 

The Unscarred Fighter Remembers Erance . .4 

First Ice . . 4 

February Thaw 5 

ANDERSON, MAXWELL 

"The Time When I Was Plowing" 5 

ATTSLANDER, JOSEPH 

Sunrise Trumpets .... 6 

Crying, "Thalassus!" . 7 

Somewhere a Lonely Bird . 7 

AUSTIN, MART 

Women's War Thoughts . . 8 

BATES, KATHARINE LEE 

Shut Out . 12 

Sarah Threeneedles (Boston, 1698) 13 

AtCamden 14 

BBLLAMANN, HENRY 

Portrait Sonnets 14 

God 16 

BERENBBRG, DAVID P. 

Two Sonnets 18 

BISHOP, JOHN PEALE 

The Death of a Dandy 19 

BISHOP, MORRIS 

A New Hampshire Boy 26 

Ecclesiastes 27 

BLANDEN, CHARLES G, 

The Weaver 28 

Overtones 28 

Yesterday 29 

Little Windows 29 

BODENHEIM, MAXWELL 

Dear Minna 30 

Two Sonnets to My Wife 32 

Instructions for a Ballet 33 



BOGAN, LOTJISE 

Memory . .... . . 34 

Women . . . 35 

The Alchemist ... . . . SG 

The Crows . ... 36 

BOWIES, O. J. 

Clouds . 37 

BRADFORD, GAMALIEL 

The Surprise . 37 

Cherry-Buds SB 

A Common Case . . 88 

The Thing to Do 38 

The Anniversary .39 

The Fabric 30 

Illimitable 40 

BRTANT, LOUISE 

Aftermath 40 

BTNTNBR, WITTER 

Donald Evans 41 

CARL.IN, FIUNOXB 

Pax , . . 41 

CHAPLIN-, RALPH 

To My Little Son 45 

CHAPMAN, JOHN JAY 

Books and Reading 45 

The Grandfather 46 

Summer's Adieu 47 

CLARK, THOMAS CXTETIS 

Lincoln 40 

Upon Reading a Volume of Ancient Chinese Poetry . 40 

CLEGHORN, SARAH N. 

Three Great Ladies 50 

Mountains 5S8 

The Vermonter Departing 53 

CoATswoKi-n, ELIZABETH J. 

ifive Inconsequential Charms 54 

Refaction 55 

CODK, GBANT H, 

Sea Quatrains ....,*.. 56 

CBANB, HABT 

Traise for an Urn (In Memoriam E, N.) . . . . 57 

C-DMMINGB, E. B. 

Poeni 58 

IX, H, 

Hippolytus Temporizes 59 

D'ANOBXA PASCAL 

To Some Modern Poets 61 

Song of Light 01 

Mdday 0^ 

xx 



DALTON, POWER 

Words 62 

Zenith 63 

DAMON, S. FOSTER 

Epilogue . 64 

DARGAN, OUVE TILFORD 

In the Black Country (Staffordshire, England) . 64 

DAVIS, JULIA. JOHNSON 

My Books 66 

DENNEN, GRACE ATHERTON 

The Frost 66 

Winding the Clock .... 68 

EASTMAN, MAX 

To a Dancing Partner (Who Asked for a Poem) . 69 

A Question ... 69 

ELLIOTT, ELLEN COIT 

Prima Donna of the Negro Jazz Orchestra . 71 

EMBRY, JACQUELINE 

TJnregenerate ... 72 

EVANS, ABBIE HUSTON 

Wild Apples 7$ 

Sea Fog 7S 

FAWCETT, JAMES WALDO 

Macabre 74 

FIELD, WRIGHT 

To a Skull 74 

FITCH, ANITA 

Grace Before Meat 75 

FLEXNER, HORTENSE 

Poets 76 

FOSTER, JEANNE ROBERT 

John Butler Yeats 76 

FRABIER, SCOTTIE MOKENZIE 

The Peacock 78 

FRAZEE-BOWER, HELEN 

Three Sisters 79 

GARNETT, LOUISE AYRES 

The Sisters 79 

Fishin' .... 80 

Gwine Up Ter Heab'n 82 

GILTINAN, CAROLINE 

The Builder 83 

Transformed 83 

GORMAN HERBERT S. 

The Last Fire 84 

HALL, HAZEL 

He Walks With His Chin in the Air 85 

A Man Goes By 85 

Passers, The Patrician 86 

xxi 



HALL, HAZEL Continued 

Maturity ... . 86 

Incidental .... ... 87 

HAMILTON, ANN 

Sonnet . . . . ... .87 

Susie . .88 

Pelcr . . 88 

HAMILTON, DAVID O&BORNB 

The Idiot . . 89 

HAYNES, CAROL 

AuntSelina , .... . . . 89 

HENRY, EDNA G. 

Trees Walking . . . 90 

HEYWARD, Dtr BOSK 

Dusk . . . 90 

Edgar Allan Poe 91 

The Mountain Graveyard . 98 

HEYWARD, JANIE SCRBVEN 

Autumn Leaves 94 

HILLYKK, ROBERT SILUMAN 

Threnody 95 

Elegy on a Dead Mermaid Washed Ashore at Plymouth 

Rock 95 

For Mnister Geoffrey Chaucer 96 

INMAN, AHTHUR CHEW 

Paths Across the Sea 97 

River Song 98 

JACKSON, WINHCBKD VIRGINIA 

In April . , . ... 98 

Under-Currents . 99 

The Northwest Corner 99 

Heritage 100 

JOHNSON, GEORGIA DOUGLAS 

Measure 100 

JOHNSTON, MARY 

Virgmiana * 101 

KENYON, BKUNICK LEMBIA 

Answer to a Timid Lover 105 

Premonition 105 

Homecoming in Storm . 100 

Nocturne 100 

KOBMAK, KATHARINE 

Sunrise 107 

LABARBH, MAUY 

Blind Clay 10 

sr, MARGARET 

Goodbye to My Mother 108 

AGNKS 
The Jilt 100 

xxxi 



LEITCH, MART SINTON 

On Being Told That My ChOd Resembles Me . . . ill 

Silence Ill 

To a Hermit Thrush 113 

LINDSAY, VACHEL 

In Praise of Johnny Appleseed 114 

LONGFELLOW, HERBERT H. 

Mirrors 122 

Low, BENJAMIN R. C. 

Yellow Leaves 123 

LOWELL, AMY 

The Revenge 124 

The Book of Stones and Lilies ... . . 127 

Miniature . . . 129 

Aquatint Framed in Gold .... ... 130 

MARKS, JEANNETTE 

Indian Summer . . . . . 131 
Clear Pools 182 

McCLELLAN, WALTER 

Arrangement in Black and Gold, New Orleans, 1821 . 138 

McCoRMicK, VIRGINIA TAYLOR 

Miss Liza . 133 

The Basket-Maker 135 

McCotiRTiE, WILLIAM B. 

A New England Spinster 136 

MCCREARY, FREDERICK R. 

Alone on The Hill 137 

McKAY, CLAUDE 

Subway Wind 138 

La Paloma in London 139 

MEEKER, MARJORIE 

Color of Water 139 

Song for a May Night 140 

MITCHELL, RUTH COMPORT 

Pullman Portraits 140 

MITCHELL, STEWART 

A Shrine 142 

MDCTER, FLORENCE KILPATRICK 

All Soul's Eve 143 

Lullaby 143 

A Print by Hokusai 144 

MONROE, HARRIET 

Utah 144 

MORELAND, JOHN RICHARD 

Growth 145 

Birch Trees 146 

A Minor Poet 146 

A Grave 147 

MORRIS, MAURICE 

Iowa 147 

xxiii 



MULLINS, HELENE 

ThePasser-By 148 

MURPHY, CHAELES R. 

By the Wissahickon 149 

To Earth 151 

NATHAN, ROBERT 

A Moral Emblem of Maturity ,152 

At the Symphony (Ce"sar Franck D. Minor) . . . 152 
Love Hath No Physic .153 

NORTH, JESSICA NELSON 

Hunger Inn 153 

O'NEIL, GEORGE 

Where it is Winter 154 

PATTERSON, ANTOINETTE DECOTJRSEY 

Folk Song From the Danish 155 

Lucrezia Borgia's Last Letter 156 

PERCY, WILLIAM ALEXANDER 

Sight and Sound 156 

The Green Bird Seeth Iseult 157 

The Pilgrim of the Upland Meadows 158 

In the Cold, Bright Wind 159 

The Unloved to His Beloved 159 

Beth Marie 160 

She Grieves in the Dusk 160 

PFEIFFER, EDWARD H. 

She Dreams of Autumn 161 

PINDER, FRANCES DICKENSON 

Shallows 163 

POORE, DUDLEY 

Three Canticles For Madame Sainte Ge"nevieve . .163 

PULSIFER, HAROLD TROWBRIDGE 

Thoughts Upon a Walk With Natalie, My Niece, at 

Houghton Farm 168 

Haven 170 

The Duel . . 171 

The Waters of Bethesda 171 

RAVENEL, BEATRICE 

Coasts 172 

Lill' Angels 173 

REESE, LIZETTE WOODWORTH 

The Young Beauty ... 174 

The Young Ghosts . ... .... 175 

ROBINSON, EDWIN ARLINGTON 

Caput Mortuum 175 

RYAN, KATHRYN WHITE 

Ireland: Invocation 176 

SARETT, LEW 

Indian Sleep-Song 177 

Maple-Sugar Song .... 178 

To a Dead Pembina Warrior 182 

xxiv 



SAUL, GEORGE BRANDON 

Elizabeth .... . . 183 

Figure . ... 184 

SIEGKIST, MART 

Main Street Mumbles On . 184 

SIGMUND, JAY G 

A Rain Song 186 

The Minister's Wife ... .... 186 

SIMPSON, WILLIAM H 

Yucca is Yellowing. . ... .... 188 

TewaSong ... 189 

SMITH, MARION COUTHOUY 

The Trees That Lean Over Water 189 

SPEYER, LEONORA 

In Praise of Abrigada ... . ... 190 

Upon Reading a Love-Lyric . . 194 

Two Women Meet .195 

Tears for Sale . . . . . 196 

Opinions (To a certain woman in this town) . . . 197 

STARRETT, VINCENT 

Squirrel . . 198 

Cricket ... .... . . 198 

Turtle 199 

STEVENS, WALLACE 

Of the Manner of Addressing Clouds . . , . 199 

A High-Toned Old Christian Woman . . . 200 

The Bird With the Coppery, Keen Claws . . . 200 

STORK, CHARLES WHARTON 

The Forbidden Rose . . . . .201 

The Parson o' Porlock Town, A Moral Ballad . 202 

STORM, MARIAN 

The Dancing Fern , . 204 

STRODE, MURIEL 

Sifting My Dreams ... . . . . 205 

TAGGARD, GENEVIEVE 

For a Shy Lover 209 

TEASDALE, SARA 

Words for an Old Air 209 

Those Who Love 210 

The Solitary , . 210 

The Crystal Gazer .... 211 

Full Moon, Santa Barbara . . > ... 211 

The Wise Woman ... 212 

TIETJENB, EUNICE 

Fire 212 

TJ&OMBLY, ALBERT EDMUND 

A Boy's Hands (For May) 215 

TUNSTALL, VIRGINIA LYNE 

Evening on the Harbour . . . , ... 215 

The Unknown Soldier 216 

XXV 



TUBBTFILL, MARK 

Spectres of Spring . . 216 

UNTERMEYER, Loins 

Dorothy Dances . . 217 

Daughters of Jephthah . . 318 

He Goads Himself . . . . 223 

VINAL, HAROLD 

To Persephone 224 

Sea Nearness .... 224 

Earth Lover 225 

WATTLES, WILLARD 

Good Neighbors . 225 

When I First Felt 22C 

Requicscat . ... ... 227 

WEAVER, BENNETT 

The House . , . . 228 

WELLES, WINIFRED 

The Last Night of Winter 229 

Ah Gabriel 230 

Indian Pipes 231 

The Poppy-Room . . . . ... 232 

Silence . 233 

White Fear 234 

WESCOTT, GLENWAY 

Natives of Rock .... 235 

WHEELOCK, JOHN HALL 

In the Dark City 230 

Exultation .... , . 236 

Happy Heart! 237 

Night Has its Fear 238 

Panther! Panther! 241 

WILLIAMS, WATLAND WELLS 

Where Beauty Lodges 241 

WILSON, ALBERT FREDERICK 

Blackberry Briars 242 

WOOD, CLEMENT 

Eagle Sonnets 244 

WYLIE, ELINOR 

Pretty Words 9A* 

Castilian * . , . 24b 

The Good Birds 249 

Demon Lovers , .... 249 

Full Moon &>Q 

Drowned Woman 251 

Epitaph 251 

Let No Charitable Hope 252 

Heroics 252 



XXVI 



SHADOWS 

There is deliberateness in all sea-island ways, 

Outlandish to our days as stone wheels are. 

The islands cannot see the use of life 

"Which only lives for change; 

Their days are flat, 

And all things there move slowly. 

Even the seasons are conservative 

No sudden flaunting of wild colors in the fall, 

Only a gradual fading of the green, 

As if the earth turned slowly, 

Or looked with one still face upon the sun 

As Venus does; 

Until the trees, the fields, the marshes, 

All turn dun, dull Quaker brown, 

And a mild winter settles down, 

And mosses are more gray. 

All human souls are glasses which reflect 

The aspects of the outer world. 

See what terrible gods the huge Himalayas bred! 

And the fierce Jewish Jaywah came 

From the hot Syrian desert 

With his inhibitory decalogue. 

The gods of little hills are always tame; 

Here God is dull, where all things stay the same. 

No change on these sea-islands! 

The huge piled clouds range 

White in the cobalt sky; i 

The moss hangs, 

And the strong tiring sea-winds blow 

While day on glistering day goes by. 

The horses plow with hanging heads 

Slow, followed by a black-faced man, 

Indifferent to the sun. 

The old cotton bushes hang wjth whitened heads; 

1 



And there among the live-oak trees 

Peep the small whitewashed cabins, 

Painted blue perhaps, with scarlet-turbaned women, 

Ample-hipped, with voices soft and warm; 

And the lean hounds and chocolate children swarm. 

Day after day the ocean pumps 

The awful valve-gates of his heart, 

Diastole and systole through these estuaries; 

The tides flow in long gray weed-streaked lines; 

The salt water, like the planet's lifeblood, goes 

As if the earth were breathing with long-taken breaths 

And we were very near her heart. 

No wonder that these faces show a tired dismay, 

Looking on burning suns, and scarcely blithe in May. 

Spring's coming is too fierce with life, 

And summer is too long; 

The stunted pine trees struggle with the sand 

Till the eyes sicken with their dwarfing strife. 

There are old women here among these island homes, 

"With dull brown eyes that look at something gray, 

And tight silver hair, drawn back in lines, 

Like the beach grass that's always blown one way; 

With such a melancholy in their faces 

I know that they have lived long in these places. 

The tides, the hooting owls, the daylight moons, 

The leprous lights and shadows of the mosses, 

The funereal woodlands of these coasts, 

Draped like a hearse, 

And memories of an old war's ancient losses, 

Dwell in their faces' shadows like gray ghosts. 

And worse 

The terror of the black man always near, 

The drab level of the ricefields and the marsh 

Lend them a mask of fear* 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse Hervey Allen 

2 



DEAD MEN 
(To a Metaphysician) 

If they were shadows walking to and fro 

Upon a screen you call reality, 

Then, when the light fails, where do shadows go? 

This boy enigma rapes philosophy. 

But if they really occupied three-square, 

And now are only shadows on a screen, 

How can the light still cast a shadow there 

From shades of shadows that have never been? 

Such questions are a mimic pantomime 
Of ghosts to utter nothings in dream chairs, 
Myopia squinting in a mist of time, 
An eye that sees the eye with which it stares. 
Your light too clearly shows the ancient stigma 
Of questions solved by posing an enigma. 

The Bookman Hervey Allen 

SUMMER NIGHT 

Like a bell note shivered into fragments of fine sound: 
The summer night. But silence and the stillness do 

astound 

Me more than all this strange-go-round 
Of multitudinously minted chords along the ground. 

This is an edifice of silence, vast: 

Into the chinks of silence sound will creep 

A little while and fall asleep, 

Its strength being spent and past* 

They say the crickets sing all night: 
I know 

They strike against the walls of silence, 
Insistently, a futile blow. 

The Measure Kenneth Blade Ailing 

3 



THE UNSCARRED FIGHTER REMEMBERS 
FRANCE 

That amazing holiday: 

Wine and brotherhood and passion, 

Paradisal in its way. 

Elemental in its fashion. 

Those of you that must come after, 
Will not know this blithe and brave 
Thing we met with vivid laughter, 
Standing by an open grave. 

The Measure Kenneth Slade Ailing 



FIRST ICE 

No wind will walk upon the water there, 
That wears the pale defiance of the ice; 
First ice, a crystallizing of the air, 
Thin, brittle. When the pond is frozen twice 
The water will be then, congealed and locked 
By shore and shore. Now there are open places, 
Dark mirrors where the clouds are making faces, 
The wind dislimns, as if he thought they mocked 
His play. 

Gruff winter, airy, blithe as spring, 
With fragile fancies men that deem him harsh 
Should see this ice today along the marsh, 
This magic of his momentary touch; 
For even early April would give much 
To build so light and delicate a thing. 

New York Evening Post Kenneth Slade Ailing 



FEBRUARY THAW 

Now these ephemeral glaciers move, 
And racked apart by rain and sun, 
Disintegrate; and with strange cries, 
A thousand crying rivers run. 

Not yet the spring and singing frogs; 
But these bright rainbows of the ground 
Are promises, and they are words, 
And occult ecstasies of sound. 

The Measure Kenneth Slade Ailing 



'THE TIME WHEN I WAS PLOWING" 

The time when I was plowing 
The fields and days were long, 
The weeds went back forever 
And the morning-glory clung; 
Behind the rumps of horses 
The sod ran off forever, 
With earth the share was bright; 
The sod ran off forever, 
The days ran into night. 

The time when I was seeding 
With rain in the wind 
The fields and days were endless 
Under the sky's end; 
Here with the disks 9 turning 
And with the horses' treading 
A white day was unending, 
And time was out of mind. 

The times when I was binding 
The fields and hours were wide; 
Clear to the utter sunset 



My sheaves lay side by side; 
And life was long as seeming 
In a dusk falling, 

And in the road the dust was brown 
With wagons going up to town. 

The time I drove my wagon 
Beside a tradesman's door 
I dropped the reins and left it 
Nor reaped or seeded more, 
And years are counted pennies 
Dwindling to a score. 

The New Republic Maxwell Anderson 

SUNRISE TRUMPETS 

Dim wind pillared the hills: stiller than mist it 

seemed; 
Somewhere water challenged silence, somewhere 

water failed; 
Spiders brooded thick in silver and the willows 

dreamed . . . 
Then the wind crumpled richly; night paled. 

Black-eyed starlight dimmed; a voice blushed 

timidly; 
Sombre crimson crouched in shadow, rifts of hazel 

fire: 

Dawn a drowsy eagle, and the brief audacity 
Of thrushes fluting through the dew one choir! 

O the lift, the liquid blindness of their throats! 

O the high white music and the blue plumes of the 

wind! 
Upl the crested moment points a sword! the Hashing 

notes 
Of sunrise-trumpets! Up! dawn is javelined! 

The New Republic Joseph Auslander 



CRYING, "THALASSUS!" 

Then, as now, let it be the drawl of rivers 

Parleying broken silver that compels 

With voice whose beauty burdens and delivers 

My dust to struggle like a stir of bells. 

To rally wild, remembering the streams 

Of all the earth, rise valiantly, respond 

Some night when poised on swarthy silence dreams 

The moon, a great cool aqueous diamond! 

Oh! let desire go forth unpiloted 

And passionate to meet the glowing Hood, 

Crying, "Thalassus is no longer dead: 

His fire trembles blindly in my blood!" 

Crying, "Thalassus is not dead, his fire 

Is in my blood and blinds me with desire!" 

Voices Joseph Auslmder 



SOMEWHERE A LONELY BIRD 

Somewhere a lonely bird makes incoherence lovelier 
Than song of knitted gold: 

I have never heard 

Slim water beating in a white-birch thicket 
Or deftly-syllabled singing bird 
So frail, so fugitive, so uncontrolled! 

1 will not speak, nor with the shadow of my listening 
Affront your loneliness; 

Let me the rather go 
To mine, the agony of stammered words 
Your wild dark throat can hardly guess, 
Your wild dark music never, never know. 

The New Republic Joseph Auslander 



WOMEN'S WAR THOUGHTS 

A room in Time from which a window looks 
on the Present. 

THE TRUMPETS: 
Wake, Women! 

A WOMAN AT THE WINDOW: 
Oh, no more for women 
Shall the trumpets tear their throats! 

No more the white riders, 

Strong thewed and breastless 

Come reiving and raiding. 

We modern women are undone by our own 

preciousness. 
Like viols of few strings 
Plucked at by lovers in their silken intervals, 
Live in the prelude to our womanness. 
Our music seldom swings 
From the apassionata's opening phrases 
Into the star-built theme of mastery. 

Not even like the Spartan women. 

Guardians of the Gate whereby life entering is 

made man 

By virtue of that clean divinity 
That lives in women's flesh. 
Not ours to turn, 
Whose sons return not 
Borne on their shields or bearing them, 
To rear a sterner offspring to our conquerors. 

Trumpets sound, and summoning drums. 
Our sons are too much ours I 
Too much the child, that means, 
Too prone to keep us 
The condoning lap, the leaned on bosom, 
The ever pleased spectator of their plays 
Filling the gaps with ready make believe* 

8 



We talk of giving. 

Who cannot throb to world adventure 

Save through the still unsevered stalk of being. 

Who suffer, deep in the womb of our affection. 

Perpetual pangs of parturition. 

Suddenly the drums 

Quicken the male pulse of the world, 

The questing trumpets 

Seek out the part of them that is not us, 

And with a sword 

Time heals us of a too prolonged maternity. 

Flags go by, and the tips of bayonets, passing 

the window in full procession. 
Strange they should look so much alike! ' 

I cannot find my son's 

Among the lean brown shanks, 

Crossing and uncrossing like the shears of Atropos 

To cut the thread of over-ripe autocracy. 

Nor trace the alien strains 

Gave rise to that steel glinting river, 

Frothed bright with banners. 

What tongues do trumpets speak, 
Welding all men into one moving unit? 

Women are welded at heart 

By the rhythm of rocking cradles. 

World-wide, they are starting awake to feel if one 

is well covered, 
Who at that moment may be lying stark in the 

trenches. 

Women of any nation, 
For the sake of a long sheared curl 
Between two leaves of a prayer book, 
Will weep on each other's shoulders. 
But the word of the trumpet to men 
Is the seed of a forthright intention. 



The drums go by, and the Allied banners. 
When I was young, my son, 
I dreamed of a life exempted as yours is today, 
From the claims of the past and the present, 
A tiny, two-penny candle to burn on the altar of 

Now. 



But the cant of a world made sleek by soul strok- 
ing phrases, 

Offered your life for mine. 
As though your life were a thing I could make 
For my soul's diversion, 
To dangle before my mind 
And quiet its hunger* 

Oh, my son, how times like these give the lie 
To that smug maternal illusion! 

VOICES OF YOUNG SOLDIERS (singing) : 
Land, my Land! 
Thy sons are going 
Where like a wind from the west we feel God 

blowing 

Kings from their seats and Empire from its stays. 
Land where the Vision blessed our fathers, 
Perfect in us thy praise! 



THE WOMAN (repeating the word of the inner Voice) : 
. . . You are no more to the making 
Than the nozzle is to the fountain. 
I am the source and the stream 
And the deeps to which I have called him. 
I will drink up the life of your son 
To quicken my harvest* 
I will take up his life and lay it 
To the lips of my larger purpose, 
Trumpeting forth my power, 
And my will to Freedom . . . 

10 



YOUNG SOLDIERS (singing): 
Land, my Land! 
Thy sons go singing 

Forth to the work of our God, our lives free flinging 
Nothing withholden or scamped, for thy sake; 
Land, by whose voice the larger Freedom 
Has called the world awake! 

THE WOMAN (muses) : 

Life that passed through us, 
Did it leave no tang of the man strain, mordant, 
unruly . . . 
The Red Cross nurses go by. 
Yonder the barren women . . . 
Women whose breasts are scarcely grown 
But whose hearts are steadied with skill, 
Will sit on the Pit's red edge 
And hold back death with laughter. 

Bite back the moan in your throat, my son, 

If the shrapnel tears you. 

Lest the unwed women say 

I was too woman-soft when I shaped you, 

I that am left to hand- waving, balcony service! 

The music grows faint in the distance. 
Why should we weep 
Who taught them to follow the music; 
We who attuned them 
To feints, pursuits, and surprises? 
Have we ever denied them die game that we should 

wonder 
When they go roaring forth to hunt one another? 

Blood . . . 

There is no virtue in blood . * . 
Any woman will tell you! 

Torn flesh . . . and a gay endurance . . . 
I did as much for you in the bearing. 

11 



War is a sickness sucked from your shiny toy male- 
ness. 

When your teeth have met on hard metal awhile 
You will be cured of your sickness. 

. . . And then 
We will go hack to our playing, 
Sally, retreat, and ambush, handling and stroking, 
Till Peace is choked with the rising scum 
Of our passionate prepossessions. 

Was it you or I, son, 
Made this war, I wonder! 

The Dial Mary Austin 



SHUT OUT 

Death bars me from my garden, but by the dusty 

road 
Glints many a vagrant blossom the wind's caprices 

sowed. 

Death locks my door against me and flings the golden 

key 
To sink with many another beneath the moaning sea. 

But there are haunts for gypsies upon the heather 
moors, 

Where we share with one another the lore of out- 
of-doors; 

And gypsy tells to gypsy what healing herbs are best 
When the old wound starts a-throbbing and starlight 
brings no rest. 

Voices Katharine Lee Bute* 



SARAH THREENEEDLES 
(Boston, 1698) 

]3y the grim grace of the Puritans she had been 
brought 

Into their frigid meeting-house to list 
Her funeral sermon before the rope ran taut. 

Soft neck that he had kissed! 

Through the narrow window her dazed blue eyes 

could see 

The rope. Like a glittering icicle it hung 
From the hoar cross-beam of the horrible gallows- 
tree. 
His arms about her flung! 

Two captive Indians and one Guinea slave, 
Hating at heart the merciless white God, 

In the stubborn ground were hacking her shallow 

grave. 
Sweet April path they trod! 

Her shivering neighbors thrilled to the fierce 

discourse 

Of the minister, who thundered the dire sting 
Of a sinner's death till his vehement voice went 

hoarse. 
She heard love's whispering. 

And still she stood while the frozen communion 

bread, 
That the preacher broke ere he poured the chilly 

wine, 

Rattling into the plates, her judges fed. 
Her food was more divine. 

The Double Dealer Katharine Lee Bates 

IS 



AT CAMDEN 

But why, Walt Whitman, loveliest serenader 

Of "sane and sacred Death," the veiled "Dark 

Mother," 

From dread of dust our most assured dissuader, 
Why in this massive tomb your own dust smother? 
Why lavish thousands of your hidden treasure 
On that grim prison, you the gipsy lover 
Of leaves of grass in every dancing measure 
Caprices of their piper winds discover? 
Comrade of comrades, Child of Adam, lonely 
Your body bears its changes, walled from fusion 
Of friendly earth and dew, companioned only 
By grandeur, Death's ironical delusion. 
April's fresh voice, chanting her new Te Deum, 
Beats vainly on that sullen mausoleum* 

Voices Katharine Lee Bales 



PORTRAIT SONNETS 

1 

She was more like a tree upon a hill 
More like a sycamore than anything 
And was so much alone up there, that spring 
Or fall or summer she seemed quite to fill 
A place which otherwise had lacked the trill 
Of birds and grace of leafy gesturing. 
I think no one of us could know the sting 
Of high free winds could be so keen and kill. 

But all of us remember how the shade 

Crept sometimes down the slope and lingered there 

Among the trees that grew along the stream* 

We feel a lesser friendliness displayed 

Between us and the height we miss a stair 

By which we climbed to know a hill-top dream. 

U 



2 

She must have lived so long with only trees 
For friends, and so have known at last too well 
Some certain curious facts she could not tell 
To anyone; for she found larger ease 
With things that had no faces, and took these 
To be a perfect sign of demon spell 
That soon or late would break the even hell 
Which seemed to be beyond this world's appease. 

And now that she has lived a rapture there 
Where none of us would venture now it seems 
Almost as if a greater wisdom crowned 
Her every day than favors even rare 
Or final moments with its surest gleams; 
Nor can she tell us what it was she found. 

3 

It was so much the way that tulips bloom, 
Her coming and the way she had with me 
So much the way a tulip mocks a tree 
Which late in April keeps a winter gloom 
That I, like one who guards in a close room 
Precarious fires, was wholly glad to see 
Such light, incautious burning glad that she, 
Completely torch, made gay her certain doom. 

But since those bright, disturbing flowers are dark 
And lie, more ash than ember, on the ground- 
I feel a purpose in the brilliant play 
That was of very life, and less a mark 
Of folly than of knowing quite profound 
And perfect things about brief-living clay. 

4 

Sometimes when Eastern carpets wear so thin 
Their borders lie like fringes on the floor 
And even palace feet seem almost more 

15 



Than the frail dreams and legends held within 

Mere thread and silk can bear, we begin 

For the first time to see a deeper store 

Of meaning in the place that had before 

Shown nothing where a meaning should have been. 

Perhaps what seems futility in her 
Was, after all, the final strength of race 
Which, less flamboyant as it wins its goal, 
Became expressive of the things that were 
For each of us die highest certain grace 
The ultimate design of his own soul. 

Voices Henry Bellamann 



GOD 

I often spend week-ends in heaven, 

And so I know him well. 

Most times he is too busy thinking things 

To talk; 

But then, I like his still aloofness 

And superior ease. 

I can't imagine him in armor, or in uniform, 

Or blowing like a windy Caesar 

Across the fields of Europe, 

Or snooping in my mind 

To find what I am thinking, 

Or being jealous of the darling idols 

I have made. 

If ever that slim word aristocrat 

Belonged to anyone, it is to God. 

You should see him steadying the wings 

Of great thoughts starting out 

On flight 

Very like a scientist trying a machine* 

Patrician, cool, in a colored coat 

16 



Rather like a mandarin's; 
Silver sandals quite a picture! 
I can't see him 
Fluttering in wrathful haste, 
Or dancing like a fool. 

I don't go there often 

Only when I'm at my best. 

I save up things: 

Pictures of the sea wild with white foam. 

Stories of engines beating through the clouds, 

News of earth in storm and sun, 

Some new songs the best. 

He's fond of being entertained 

With what I choose to tell him of myself 

Very kind about tomorrow, 

Indifferent of yesterday. 

He's like that 

God in his heaven alone. 

I know, for I made him, put him there 

Myself. 

Poetry ', A Magazine of Verse Henry Bellamann 



17 



TWO SONNETS 

I 

Antigone and Helen would they laugh 
To see La Belle Florinda shake her limbs? 
How would the sacred Eleusinian hymns 

Sound on the record of a phonograph? 

Oh, you who cherish La Belle's autograph, 

Who serve her eyebrows and her slightest whims, 
Oh, you who pay her supper bills at Tims' 

Who pride yourself that you can stand the gaff 

Would you be shocked beyond your puny wits 
Were you to stumble on the hidden glade 
Where Bacchanals and Helen danced and swayed 

Nude in the moonlight? Ah, the code that fits 
The glowing Broadway lights is much too staid 
To tolerate such frolics in the shade! 

II 
Or is it all illusion? Do the years 

Cover with glamor what was tawdry then? 

Did moralists and such like thunder when 
Antigone got drunk on Attic beers, 
And danced too freely mid the eager leers 

Of Plato's seniors, who bought up the glen 

To prove to Athens that they lived like men 
And gave Antigone the college cheers? 

It may be so* I should not think it strange* 

Herodias, Antigone, La Belle 
One sisterhood. Perhaps we do not change 

As much as some pretend to think. Ah, well 
Don't let me spoil your pleasure in the show 
For me, my vision of the long ago! 

The Measure David P. Berenberg 



THE DEATH OF A DANDY 

Charles Almery Henry Coatsworth, 1751-1825, 
only son at least in the eyes of the law of Henry, 
Lord Coatsworth by Georgiana, his fifth wife, became 
known as an exquisite while still at Eton. Coming 
up to London, after a brief but sartorially brilliant 
passage through Oxford, he soon outmoded the most 
extravagant macaroni of his day, particularly by his 
wigs, which assumed a height and elaboration hitherto 
unknown in England, He was said at this period 
to have employed three barbers, one to dress the side 
curls, one the bag of the wig and the third to apply 
the powder. He commonly called his barbers Clotho, 
Atropos, Lachesis, because, he said, they controlled 
his destiny. On one occasion he had himself carried, 
in his lacquered sedan chair, into the "Green Cocoa- 
nut" and suddenly appeared before the fops who 
habitually gamed there, quite naked, adorned only by 
a fantastic wig of curled and powdered hair. He after- 
wards referred to the incident as a boyish attempt to 
revive Restoration wit: "The spectacle," he said, "was 
designed for philosophers, and I fell among scandal 
mongers." He is said to have run the young Lord 
Sedley through in a duel because the latter had 
insulted the chaste memory of his mother, who had 
recently died in a delirium brought on, it may be 
hinted, by an indiscreet indulgence in mulled rum. 
He was, for a decade at least, the arbiter in elegance 
at the English court, and was only discredited when 
Brummel introduced a more sober mode. Their 
rivalry began when Brummel bribed Coatsworth's 
valet to disclose the secret of that marvelous varnish 
which made Coatsworth's boots the most envied of 
his day. He never married, though he was rumored 
to have formed several irregular attachments about 
the Court. He died in comparative obscurity amid 
surroundings of decayed extravagance. Memoirs of 
Helen, Lady Etheridge. 

19 



The exquisite banality of rose and ivory: 
Shadoivs of ivory carved into panels, stained 
And decayed in the ceiling; rose color Iooped 9 
Casting a sliadow of mauve; blown cherubs, 
Bulging in silver, 
Lift six tapers to the lighted mirror. 

A dusk, deep as the under side of a rose, 
Is curtained under the old bed-dome. 
Contracting the coverlet* a shape lies, 
Which may or may not be a man. 

What thoughts should an old man have 

In the London autumn. 

Between dusk and darkness? 

Behind the shrunken eyelids, what apparitions? 

What pebbles rattle in a dry stream? 

A boy with a pale lovely dissolute face 
sprawled on the green baize, among the cards, 
a Spanish pistol dropped from one hand* 

Seen from the glazed squares of the Club, a street 
cobbled with faces, bundles of rags and lice, 
a yellow dwarf rising with protruding face. 

Gilded Indian gamecocks, clawing blood 
amid the clapping of pale hairless hands* 

Lady Barfinger, masked in satin, disclosing her gums, 
labored graces of a cracked coquette. 

A Jew that came on sliding haunches, 
crouched, and with distended palms whined for his 
pledges* 

Alvanley 

embroidered in silver foil, poised at the court, 
the ball a mirror of silvery Alvanleys. 

Phantoms under a cloudy ceiling* uneasy images; 

20 



Sentences that never come to a period; 

Thoughts of an old dandy, shrunk to a nightgown. 

The chamfered fall of silken rose 

muffling London and the autumn rain 

lifts and recurves; 

a beautiful young man, 

naked, but for a superb white tiewig, 

moves in with the slow pacings of a cardinal 

dreaming on his cane. 

The firelight blushes on the suave 

thighs of the young man, as he glides 

from his calm, with an inessential gesture, 

to brush his tiewig. Palm upon knuckles, 

fingers over the cane-head, he regards 

amusedly his own face in the crystal. 

"Without my powdered curled peruke, 

I were but a man. So, I am a dandy. 

For what was there to do, being no god 

burnished and strong, amorous of immortals, 

but to escape this disappointing body 

punily erect, patched with scant hair, 

rank in its smell, too 

by hiding it in silk and civet adding to silver hair, 

pomp of vermilion heels? 

What else, indeed, unless to drown, 

all naked, to drown all sense in wine? 

They thought my wit was all in waistcoats, 

my epigrams pointed but with dainty tassels, 

when every ribbon that my fingers tied 

protested with a fragile, indolent disdain 

a world exquisitely old and gross and vain. 

So I gave them my jest 

walking stark naked to the gaming room 

where the preened dandies leaned across their cards. 

their pale long fingers spread among the cards. 

Ttey laughed; I did not laugh: so old, 
so pitiful, so pitiful, 



so brutal and so dark, the buffoonery. 

But the body's the jest of Another I make my 

obeisance!" 

Young Coatsworth has become 

a naked glimmer on the lighted glass, 

fainter than the shimmer among rainy bees. 

An old man lies propped on a bed 
Counting the candles of the empty glass, 
An old man who has seen 
His own youth walking in the room. 

The window silk puffs with a winter gust, 

and Coatsworth, aetatis suae XXV, 

flapped in gold braid, crinkled in air-blue, 

with inscrutable precision 

bows in a lady, 

who repeats the scene with the graces of a marionette. 

"Madam," he says, addressing her panniers, 

"your bodice is miraculously a double moonrise, 

your throat the traditional swan's white, 

but fuller; your lips an exciting cochineal. 

But, in truth, love is at best 

a fashionable intrigue, an accompliced secret, 

unendurable without grated orris root. 

Love remains to the proud mind 

a ladder loosened from the brazen tower, 

a furtive flight from the sentinelled domain 

where self is utterly contained in self* 

Though you ordered the death of a thousand roses, 

I've caught the breath of a garden, where 

no man has ever been, and the ripe fruit 

drops through the tarnished air 

unheeded, and yew trees are made peacocks. 

I thank you for your horrible favors. 

Adieu" 

The lady unravels to a ragged smoke; 
Coatsworth darkens with blood like a satyr, 



blushes in a burnish on the mirror, 
burns, and is gone. 

The dry skull stretches regretful claws. 

And the points of the tapers twist and bend 

Sallow fingers of Jewish usurers. 

A rapier flicks through the curtains, 

like a needle of sunlight splintered on the sea. 

Coats worth presses before him 

back to the fireplace a panting stripling. 

A jet of wet red spurts from his shirt front; 

the youth sinks and dribbles in blood through the 

carpet. 

"The end of such upstart heralds 
As would bar my shield to the sinister." 
The reflected visage is rigid, 
puckered thinly with wrinkles. 
"What if I got my fingers* trick 
whether with rapiers or puffing neckclothes 
from a confectioner of Bath 
whose fastidious years were spent 
tracing on cakes, white labyrinths of ice 
squeezing pink fondant into petalled buds? 
What that, overnight, through an open window, 
he got me because a crooked pear tree 
climbed to the window ledge? 
No man's to call me bastard. 
I bear Lord Coatsworth's name. I am his son! 
And what's a murder more or less 
amid the inane fecundity of blood and sweat. 
A barmaid and a groom repair the loss." 

The dead youth has subsided in blood, 
leaving the floor unsoiled; 
Coatsworth has leapt through the silvered glass, 
leaving its flames unspoiled. 

His pallor stained by the rose dimmed dusk, 
The old man lies on his curtained bed, 

23 



Whimpering like a beggar in a wet loft 
When the wind's found the cracks and the straw is 
cold. 

Coatsworth, modishly old, steps from the window 

folds with a gesture consciously Iragic; 
stands for a moment 
half Don Juan, half Chllde Harold; 
and stalks, a magpie motley, 
black, buff and silver, up to the mirror. 
He regards the vain, brave fall 
of the surtout, the triple-tied neckcloth, 
the bronze hair brushed as in busts of Nero 
then, with a posture almost Byronic, 
confides, in silence* 

"Amid the bumpers, the scaffoldings, the ilex cones, 

I have ever worn the scorn of death 

with the careless grace of a bouttoniere. 

But let me be buried with a fiery choir, 

a scarlet and lace processional of boys, 

and priests too old to lift their stiffened folds, 

too wise to hold their clouded incense as a prayer. 

Tie up my chin, lest I should smile. 

And press into my hand my laurel cane 

where Daphne, with blown crinkled hair, feels the 

hard wood invade her silver thighs; 

leave me my snuff-box for its musty yawn 

and for its intricate cool ivory 

showing an April faun at his desires; 

probate my will, offer my house for rent. 

I had thought to find a languor; to attain 

a gallant erudition in the snuff-box and the cane; 

to restore a tarnished splendor* 

ceremonious as stole, 

gorgeous like a vestment yet urbane; 

between the opening and the closing of the doors, 

to have stood between the sconces, ripe in silk, 



ancestral laces falling to a sword; 

reflected in the parquetry, to dream 

of Giorgone in a tricorn, and high wigs 

powdered with palest silver, piled like clouds; 

of odorous mummied rose, grown dusty with a queen, 

tender and slight and proud. 

But I have sat so long 

before so many mirrors, I'm afraid, 

afraid at last that I may be 

a shadow of masks and rapiers between the 

girandoles, 
A satin phantom, gone when the wax is down." 

He becomes a toothless grimace 

between the moveless cherubs, silver blown. 

Under the lustred bed-dome, in the curtained dusk, 
A throat moans the sudden and lonely 
Cry of one long ridden by a nightmare, 
Who wakes and finds it is no dream. 

Old Coatsworth unravels from the bed clothes 

A ghost unwinding its burial linen 

And stands, toes clutched and indrawn* 

Ridiculously muffled in linen ruffles; 

Totters slowly to the glass 

To find therein, grinning wide with terror 9 

The toothless mist of the last apparition* 

Shrieking., he plucks a candle from its socket 

And drives the double flame into darkness. 

Another, anotlier, another; 

Four tapers extinguish their windy stains 

In a smear of wax on the mirror. 

Another flame drops from a bony claw. 

Like the drums of a defeat 9 his heart sounds. 

And he peers at the dwindling face in the mirror 

The face of a dandy brought to a shroud. 

Clutching the last tremulous candle 
The old dandy sways; 



Clings to the air, 

And sinks in a slow movement of exhausted mirth. 

The mirror is heavy with shadows 

And a white candle spreads a film on the hearthstone. 

Vanity Fair John Peale Bishop 



A NEW HAMPSHIRE BOY 

Under Monadnock, 

Fold on fold, 
The world's fat kingdoms 

Lie unrolled. 

Far in the blue south 

City-smoke, swirled, 
Marks the dwellings 

Of the kings of the world. 

Old kings and broken, 

Soon to die, 
Once you had little, 

As little as I. 

Smoke of the city, 

Blow in my eyes 
Blind me a little, 

Make me wise. 

Dust of the city, 

Blow and gust 
Make me, like all men, 

Color of dust. 

I stand on Monadnock, 

And seem to see 
Brown and purple kingdoms 

Offered to me. 

Poetry > A Magazine of Verse Morris Bishop 



ECCLESIASTES 

In the smoke-blue cabaret 

She sang some comic thing: 
I heeded not at all 

Till "Sing!" she cried, "Sing!" 
So I sang in tune with her 

The only song I know: 
"The doors shall be shut in the streets, 

And the daughters of music brought low," 

Her eyes and working lips 

Gleamed through the cruddled air 
I tried to sing with her 

Her song of devil-may-care. 
But in the shouted chorus 

My lips would not be stilled: 
"The rivers run into the sea. 

Yet the sea is not filled." 

Then one came to my table 

"Who said, with a laughing glance, 
"If that is the way you sing, 

Why don't you learn to dance?" 
But I said: "With this one song 

My heart and lips are cumbered 
The crooked cannot be made straight, 

Nor that which is wanting, numbered/ 

"This song must I sing, 

Whatever else I covet 
Hear the end of my song, 

Hear the beginning of it: 
*More bitter than death the woman 

(Beside me still she stands) 
Whose heart is snares and nets, 

And whose hands are bands/ " 

Poetry., A Magazine of Verse Morris Bishop 
27 



THE WEAVER 

The shuttles of the sun fly fast 

Between a warp of boughs; 
The master weaver's at his work, 

Fulfilling all his vows. 

In spring, his loom is full of bloom, 

In summer full of green; 
But when the crickets wake and sing, 

His Tyrian wares are seen. 

With royal purple, red and gold, 

With brown, or silver gray, 
He dowers each weed and bush and tree 

Then wanders far away. 

He fares unto a realm of snow, 
To test more subtle gleams; 

On wintry nights, his Northern Lights 
Are shuttles, weaving dreams. 

The Chicago Tribune Charles G* Blanden 



OVERTONES 

So softly sang a bird, 

So gently flowed the stream, 
The overtone I heard 

Perchance was but a dream. 

One spake so sweet and low, 

And went so soon away, 
My heart will never know 

What thrilled it yesterday, 

The Chicago Tribune Clutrles G. Blanden 



YESTERDAY 

All days gone by are one with Yesterday: 

Then yesterday it was that Helen shone, 

And Homer sung, and rose the Parthenon; 

'Twas yesterday the Greeks were crowned with bay 

And flowers, and every marble-gleaming way 

Festooned for Salamis or Marathon; 

'Twas yesterday the Jews in Babylon 

Were slaves; the Nazarene in prison lay. 

Loud thunder, yesterday, shook heaven and earth; 

One sound was Lexington, one Waterloo, 

And one was from the Marne; yea, all events 

Mingle; and we who yesterday had birth, 

And may perchance not live this bright morn through, 

Are but as foam upon a sea immense. 

The Chicago Tribune Charles G* Blanden 



LITTLE WINDOWS 

I 

From dusk to dawn, the worlds on high 
In haughty splendor pass 

Give me the friendly worlds that lie 
At morn upon the grass. 

II 

The wood burns down to embers, 

The embers fall to ashes; 
But still my heart remembers 
To warm its cold Decembers 

At fires beneath your lashes. 

Ill 

I did not see you draw; 

So swift the thrust you made, 



1 did not leel the blade; 
Twas only when I saw 
The hate within your eye, 
Love felt that he must die. 

IV 

From Arcady to Avalon 

Are many roads to go: 
Through foamy lanes of azure seas, 

Through mountain trails of snow. 
I'll take a shorter way, tonight, 

Adown a moonlit stream; 
From Arcady to Avalon 

I'll journey in a dream. 

The Chicago Tribune Charles G. Blanden 



DEAR MINNA 



Catastrophe in a bric-a-brac shop. 

The proprietor lies murdered. 

Pieces of jars, cups, and vases 

Have attained the disorderly freedom 

That is so objectionable 

To scholars and bankrupt fanatics. 

Once the jars, cups, and vases 

Were unyielding and symmetrical 

And immersed in their task of holSing nothing, 

Now they rest in pieces; 

Spell many an accidental sentence; 

Renounce the hollow lie. 

Death, you shatter objects 

That were small and inflexible 

And give them little mysterious 

Possibilities. 

00 



And we are grateful to you for that. 

Our eyes become weary scanning the living array. 

Each man takes his inch of belief 

Upon the Shelves, and will not move. 

Soon we know what he will say; 

Know the accompanying gestures 

That he will never forsake; 

Know the exact amount of space 

To which he insists on reducing his grace. 

Yet we must continue to see and listen! 

II 

Dear Minna, visit the orderly salons 
And look for missing Fixtures. 
Another poet or critic may be dead, 
Bringing to us our bit of pleasure. 
Dear Minna, buy the newspapers 
And read the relieving list of deaths. 
Banker, Freudian, and Dadaist 
Knocked from the bric-a-brac Shelves 
And altered to uncertain shadows, 
Exquisitely invisible, inviting 
Curiosity and conjecture. 
It is well that we are metaphysical. 
We must not lose the only delight 
That springs from peering at the living figures. 
Death must not become 
A mere black frame surrounding 
The memorized reiterations. 
Death must remain a surmise; 
Swallower of all traditions. 
And against his black must appear 
The colored gymnastics of words^ 
The antics of unchained ideas; 
The "minor" and "decadent" host. 

Ill 

Dear Minna, insanity 
Is the rapture with which certain men 

31 



Discover new combinations of words 

Accidentally released 

By a convulsion within their heads. 

When the catastrophe occurs 

The cups 5 jars, and vases are broken 

And wild hands play with them. 

Dear Minna, I love the promises 

Of insanity rounding your face. 

But be not always spontaneous. 

Let your madness approach 

Objects, with a conscious gallantry 

The first note in perfection. 

The Nation Maxwell Bodenheim 



TWO SONNETS TO MY WIFE 

I 

Because her voice is Schonberg in a dream 
In which his harshness plays with softer keys 
This does not mean that it is void of ease 
And cannot gather to a strolling gleam, 
Her voice is full of manners, and they seem 
To place a masquerade on thought and tease 
Its strength until it finds that it has knees, 
And whimsically leaves its heavy scheme. 

Discords can be the search of harmony 
For worlds that lie beyond the reach of poise 
And must be captured with abandoned hands. 
The music of my wife strives to be free, 
And often takes a light unbalanced voice 
While madly walking over thoughtful lands. 

II 

My wife relents to life and does not speak 
Each moment with a deft and rapid note. 

32 



Sometimes a clumsy weirdness finds her throat 

And ushers in a music that is weak 

And bargains with the groping of her heart. 

But even then she plays with graver tones 

That do not sell themselves to laughs and moans, 

But seek the counsel of a deeper art. 

She drapes her loud emotions in a shroud 

Of glistening thought that waves above their dance, 

And sometimes parts to show their startled eyes. 

The depths of mind within her have not bowed 

To sleek emotion with its amorous glance. 

She slaps its face and laughs at its surprise! 

The Measure Maxwell Bodenheim 



INSTRUCTIONS FOR A BALLET 

Raise the right foot bound in sheer 

Reasons of white and gold 

One inch from the black stage-floor. 

Then perform these torpid words: 

"Money is dangerous to men: 

It shames the clearness of their thoughts." 

After thus accounting 

For the loquacious smallness 

Of those rare gifts that come from doubting men, 

Tear the left foot vigorously 

From the black grip of the floor, 

And attend its nakedness 

"With this coronation of words: 

"Money is emptiness 

Curiously violated by colour. 

Crown it with originality 

That burns with careless discernment, 

And amaze the limpid 

Familiarity of Time/' 

33 



After thus accounting 

For an improbable situation. 

Abandon the farce and shrewdly 

Tiptoe across the stage, 

Peering down at your feet 

And mistaking their lean mysteries 

For possibilities in syncopation. 

Having thus emulated 

The tension of a psycho-analyst 

Who confuses routines with causes, 

Suddenly kneel upon the floor, 

Limp with the collapse of sightless longing, 

And raise one hand to the sky 

While clenching the other hand at your audience, 

Of Occidental religions. 

Then dance across the stage, 

Giving complex decisions to your legs 

And interrupting the dance with a pause 

In -which you question its cumbersome cause. 

Having thus defended 

The broken rhythm of Western philosophers 

Sprinkled with a carnival of details 

Change the dance to a borrowed waltz. 

Picking suave tricks from a harp 

That lacks an ascending scale of notes, 

And insisting that the result is music. 

The end of the ballet should portray 

A gradual sinking to the floor. 

With plentiful whispers resenting 

The final intrusion of Buddha, 

The Dial Maxwell Bodenheim 



MEMORY 

Do not guard this as rich 5tuff without mark 
Closed in a cedarn dark, 
Nor lay it down with tragic masks and greaves 
Licked by the tongues of leaves, 

34 



Nor let it be as eggs under the wings 
Of helpless startled things, 
Nor encompassed by song, nor any glory 
Perverse and transitory. 

Rather, like shards and straw upon coarse ground. 
Of little worth when found: 
Rubble in gardens, it and stones alike, 
That any spade may strike. 

The New Republic Louise Bogan 



WOMEN 

Women have no wilderness in them, 
They are provident instead, 
Content in the tight hot cell of their hearts 
To eat dusty bread. 

They do not see cattle cropping red winter grass, 
They do not hear 

Snow water going down under culverts 
Shallow and clear. 

They wait, when they should turn to journeys, 
They stiffen, when they should bend. 
They use against themselves that benevolence 
To which no man is friend. 

They cannot think of so many crops to a 6 eld 
Or of clean wood cleft by an axe. 
Their love is an eager meaninglessness 
Too tense or too lax. 

They hear in any whisper that speaks to them 

A shout and a cry. 

As like as not, when they take life over their door-sill 

They should let it go by. 

The Measure Louise Bogan 

85 



THE ALCHEMIST 

I burned my life, that I might find 
A passion wholly of the mind, 
Thought divorced from eye and bone 
Ecstasy come to breath alone. 
I broke my life, to seek relief 
From the flawed light of love and grief. 

With mounting beat, the utter fire 
Charred existence and desire. 
It died low, ceased its sudden thresh. 
I had found unmysterious flesh 
Not the mind's avid substance, still 
Passionate beyond the will. 

The New Republic Louise Began 



THE CROWS 

The woman who has grown old 
And knows desire must die, 
Yet turns to love again, 
Hears the crows' cry. 

She is a stem long hardened, 
A weed that no scythe mows. 
The heart's laughter will be to her 
The crying of the crows, 

Who slide in the air with the same voice 
Over what yields not and what yields, 
Alike in spring, or when there is only bitter 
Winter burning in the fields. 
The Literary Review, 

N. Y. Evening Post Louise Bogan 

36 



CLOUDS 

Clouds always seem such helpless things 
When slapped by wind across the skies, 

Or torn to feathery flecks and strings 
If winds blow counterwise. 

And anyone, observing, sees 

With something that is almost pain 

Their reaching down at roofs and trees 
With fragile hands of rain. 

The Lyric West 0. J. Bowles 



THE SURPRISE 

Life is full of subtle things, 

Singular surprises: 
Splendid memories hide their wings 

Under quaint disguises. 

That old lady over there 

With the crooked bonnet, 
Once her gay and piquant air 

May have bred a sonnet. 

That forlorn^ unshaven wretch, 

All in rags and tatters, 
May have let his fancy stretch 

To diviner matters. 

I myself, too pale and old 

Longer to aspire, 
Under my demeanor cold 

Nurse celestial fire. 

The Outlook Gamaliel Bradford 

37 



CHERRY-BUDS 

When cherry-buds appear 

And the dainty May is young, 

The joys of love, my dear, 
Should not be said or sung. 

And when the autumn leaf 

Is dying, dying, dead, 
Love in its lonely grief 

Should not be sung or said. 

Tempo Gamaliel Bradford 

A COMMON CASE 

She tossed a soul 

In the air for sport; 
But she missed her goal 

And her aim fell short, 
And she let it lie 

In a dark, dark place, 
And wither and die 

Just a common case. 

Voices Gamaliel Bradford 



THE THING TO DO 

For, after all, the thing to do 

Is just to put your heart in song, 
To let your passions glimmer through, 

Your whole life, be it right or wrong* 

And some will laugh and sonic will frown, 
And some will shake their heads and sigh, 

"These things should not be written down" 
But all will listen eagerly. 

Contemporary Verse Gamaliel Bradford 

38 



THE ANNIVERSARY 

The mighty tides of fate still ehb and flow. 

The mighty moons of fortune wax and wane. 
Death and disaster out of pleasure grow 

And God's high ecstasy returns again. 

Some green, delightful oases are found 
In the enormous desert of despair, 

Some lovely acres of enchanted ground, 
Some sunny regions of celestial air. 

But that which grows where nothing flourisheth, 
And that which blooms where ruin else would be, 

And that which heals the sting of even death 
Is love and I love thee and thou lov'st me. 

Scribner's Magazine Gamaliel Bradford 



THE FABRIC 

She could untangle without scandal 

The complicated threads of Fate, 
Was amply competent to handle 

Her stocks and bonds and real estate. 

She thought she could maintain unbattered 

The fine, firm fabric of her wits; 
And then love came along, and shattered 

The structure into little bits. 

Contemporary Verse Gamaliel Bradford 



ILLIMITABLE 

Parting love, far -fled content, 

Illimitable woe 
For a thousand kisses spent 

Kiss me, and I will go. 

Age with all its wrinkled fret 

Waits us ere we know, 
Age, the nurse of pale regret 

Kiss me, and I will go. 

Contemporary Verse Gamaliel Bradford 



AFTERMATH 

Dear, they are singing your praises, 

Now you are gone. 

But only I saw your going, 

I ... alone ... in the dawn. 

Dear, they are weeping about you, 
Now you are dead, 
And they've placed a granite stone 
Over your head. 

I cannot cry any more, 
Too burning deep is my grief. . , . 
I dance through my spendthrift days 
Like a fallen leaf. 

Faster and faster I whirl 
Toward the end of my days. 
Dear, 1 am drunken with 
And lost down strange ways. 

40 



If only the dance would finish 
Like a flash in the sky . . . oh, soon, 
If only a storm would come shouting 
Hurl me past stars and moon! 

The Liberator Louise Bryant 



DONALD EVANS 

So I shall never hear from his own lips 
That things had gone too ill with him awhile 
Nor ever see again, but in eclipse. 
The brown precision of his smile. 

It does not seem his way at all, 
To shoot no firecracker to a friend 
But to make the usual interval 
Unusual and finite and an end. 

It is not hushed, like other deaths, nor grim, 
Nor tragic nor heroic news, 
But more as if we had not noticed him 
Go by on lightly squeaking shoes 

And down the coffins of the race 
Tiptoe and stumble till he found his own, 
Then clear his throat and decorate his face 
With the consummate silence of a stone. 

The Dial Witter Bynner 



PAX 

Our Father Who, in clay 
From Eden, set that root 

Through which to Thee we may 
Yield goodly deeds as fruit 

Of faith man offers up 

With Sacrificial Cup: 

41 



We hail Thee, One of Three, 
Sole Power Whose purpose sealed 

Thy Word, the Peace-Decree, 
Through Whom Thou wert revealed; 

Sire of Shepherd, yea, 

Of fold, and flock astray! 

And Thou, Peace-Prince, in Whom 

Both King and Priest are blent; 
Whose Lateran Upper Room 

First throned Thy Sacrament 
ThyselfWhose Vatican 
Is now the heart of man: 
We hail Thee Chribl, withal, 

Who left in Peter's care 
Thy Keys Pontifical; 

Thou Who didst not spare 
That very Self of Thine 
Concealed in Bread and Wine! 

Thou, too, Living Light 

In Glory's vesturogold, 
Whose pallium (as white 

As Lamb in Heaven's Fold) 
Binds Thee, with crosiered Son 
And Shepherd's Sire, as One: 
We hail Thee, lingering Dove, 

At hover Jn the dome 
Rock-pillared; Thou above 

The cathedra of Rome, 
Truth Who may but rest 
Within the Spouse's breast! 

Thou Hidden All Whom speech 
Of cieaturc may not name 

In order, since thai Each 
In glory is the same; 

Sacred, Triple-Crowned 

Supremacy profound! 



On this Thy Sabbath feast, 
Thrice Holy, do Thou deign 

To bless our Sovereign Priest 
So that, through him, his reign 

May win that peace but won 

Through Mercy's benison. 

Even as Nature's green 

Doth shine with hope in Thee 
Thy Vicaress, the Queen 

Of that Theocracy 
Which Thou dost rule through her 
"Whose edicts may not err 
So shine the emerald beams 

Of hope from Peter's gem, 
Thou Whose ruby gleams 

With rays of love on them: 
Thy Vicar, Holiness, 
And Beauty's Vicaress! 

Hail, Triarchy! Immerse 

Thy blessed olive bough 
In rain-bow, and asperse 

Souls militant whom Thou 
Dost ever lead afield 
Through him who may not yield; 
Yea, even as he at Mass 

Sends forth the pax of Christ 
So that the kiss may pass 

To Redeemed from Sacrificed, 
May fostering Pius thus 
Pass on Thy peace to us 

And if Thy Justice still 

Wouldst chasten home and mart 
With sword, deign Thou to will 

Tranquillity of heart 
To her whose hallowed blade 
Is ever drawn in aid 

43 



Of our dread battlefare. 

Ah! then her children, far 
Yet ever near, would share 

That peace which Michael's War 
Broke not in Heaven that great 
True peace of soul and State. 

Grant such, Trinal Mace. 

Through Thy Vicegerent's See 
To men in whom Thy grace 

Prompts each, as child, to plea: 
Father, Sanctifier 
And Saviour Triune Sire! 
Deliver us from ill, 

If not from war and strife 
Permitted here until, 

With branch from Tree of Life 
Thy Dove wings o'er the dark 
Of doom to Peter's Ark. 

Lead Thou, Paternal Hand 

In Whom Thy peoples trust, 
All hearts in every land 

From bonds, and ways unjust, 
Yea, draw by Adam's cords, 
Tiaraed Lord of Lords, 
Our souls to peace of Heaven 

Who wait the Sign of Love 
In benediction given 

From Balcony Above; 
Thou Crosier, Sceptre, Rod, 
August Almighty God! 

Trinity Sunday, 1922 
The Catholic World Francis Carlin 



TO MY LITTLE SON 

I cannot lose the thought of you; 

It haunts me like a little song; 
It blends with all I see or do 

Each day, the whole day long. 

The train, the lights, the engine's throb, 

And that one stinging memory: 
Your brave smile broken with a sob 

Your face pressed close to me. 

Lips trembling far too much to speak; 

The arms that would not come undone; 
The kiss so salty on your cheek; 

The long, long trip begun. 

I could not miss you more, it seemed; 

But now I don't know what to say: 
It's harder than I ever dreamed 

With you so far away. 

Leavenworth 

The Liberator Ralph Chaplin 



BOOKS AND READING 

These journals, notes, and missives of the dead 
These poems of all ages form a kind 
Of ever fresh ambrosia for the mind; 

And we like half-gods, as it were, cloud-fed 

On song and thought and parable, break bread 
With all the wits and poets of mankind, 
Who looked on life and left their souls behind 

With ours immortally companioned. 

45 



Rather than honors, riches, and renown 

By heaven, I'd rather be like one of those! 
One who in thought so close enwrapped himself 
As to live penniless and die unknown, 
Leaving no record of his joys or woes, 

Save a small volume on the scholar's shelf. 

The Yale Review John Jay Chapman 



THE GRANDFATHER 

There's a kind of morning prayer 

In the air 
That recalls the song and praise 

Of other days. 

And the lilacs all in bloom, 
And the sunny breakfast-room 
Open windows to the ground 

All around; 

Lawns a-glitter with the dew, 
Scents from many a field and flower 
In that early, quiet hour 

Greeted you. 

For, in coming down the stairs 
You could smell delicious airs 
The whole country-place seemed theirs; 
Were they creeping in to prayers, 

Or passing through, 
Or visiting the vases freshly set 
On the mantel, in the corner cabinet? 
Was it lilies, was it pinks or mignonette? 
What they were I'll hardly say 

Roses, roses anyway! 

I smell them yet. 
Just a morn like this, and then 
Came the maids (there were no men) 

One or two 

Decent maids; then jolly children not a few. 
And with shuffling of the chairs 

46 



They prepared the place for prayers. 

Romping through; 
And scarcely grew more tame 
When the silent moment came. 

For they knew 
When Grandpapa appeared 
He was little to be feared 

By the crew. 

And their mothers were in bed. 
(For surely for such notions 
As family devotions 

There's little to be said.) 

So the ancient prayers were read 

By that brilliant-eyed old man, 
Full of reverence, full of grace, 

To the children of his clan 
In the quaint old country-place 
That had nursed the elder race 

With its bloom. 

And he kneeled where they had kneeled. 
And the odors of the field 
Filled the room. 

Scribner's Magazine John Jay Chapman 



SUMMER'S ADIEU 

The lanes are green; the skies, bedight 

With puffs of fleecy clouds, are bright; 
All else, asleep you'd almost guess 

In deep midsummer leafiness. 
But ah, the twinkling poplar-spray! 

A little breeze has found its way 
Under the beech and cherry tree, 

Penetrating busily, 
Muttering as it passed the dell 
To every fern: "Awake, farewell !" 

4.7 



They stir, they flutter, shift and search 
Like maiden dames that doze in church ; 

Fan themselves and blink again, 
While the parson drones, Amen; 

Then the summery sleep descends 

Half-way before the sermon ends. 

Another gust: the gossip leaves, 

Roused by the rustle of the sheaves 
In neighbor corn-fields, catch the news 

And waft each other fond adieux. 
Oh, a joyous scene is then 

Acted in every little glen; 
For the branches toss their tresses 

In good-byes that are caresses: 
Farewell, sisters, we have known 

Secrets to the world unshown, 
Friendships, follies all our own; 

Ail day long such merry meetings, 
With our eager whispered greetings; 

Sober talks, amusing chatter, 
Scandal sweet, arid idle patter 

On some dear delicious matter; 
Starry nights when we have stood 

Bathed in a beatitude 
'By the still, celestial mirth 

Of the silent midnight earth; 
Fleeting dreamlands when the moon 

Swam like a dolphin in a swoon 
O'er the mist-encumbered meadows 

Chasing the affrighted shadows, 
And the daylight came too soon. 

We have lived and counted gain 

Shower and sunshine, mist or rain, 

Loved and lived and loved again. 

Thus the leaves in every dell 
Bend and nod and bid farewell. 

Scribner's Magazine John Jay Chapman 

48 



LINCOLN 

He walked among us and we passed him by 
And thought him but a country lawyer, crude 
As our red prairies are, and more than rude 
Who reveled in his jokes and deviltry. 
We could not know the heart within that breast 
Until the blood flowed freely from the wound 
A madman made; then was it that we found 
That God had loaned us for a time His Best. 
And now the nations, since their kings are gone, 
Have taken him across the wide-flung sea 
To rule their hearts as well as ours; to be 
The goal of their desires, with breaking dawn. 

The Living Church Thomas Curtis Clark 



UPON READING A VOLUME OF ANCIENT 
CHINESE POETRY 

And here, in this old book, we find discussed 
The themes we choose today: business and toil, 
Knowledge and fame, weariness born of moil, 
Daydreams of youth, visions of love and lust; 
Whether it pays to work that one may live, 
Whether it pays to live, if work is all; 
How one may think great thoughts in one room small, 
How one may gain great wealth, if he but give; 
Here one may learn the foolishness of pride, 
The curse of gold; and here are saintly prayers 
For high celestial joys: by mystic stairs 
These old philosophers and poets tried 
To burst the doors of heaven, as do we 
And as they will who after us shall be. 

The Chicago Post Thomas Curtis Clark 

40 



THREE GREAT LADIES 

They seemed a sort of frame for the town's life, 
In their old houses, wide with porch and wing, 
Bowered with syringa, snowdrop, flowering currant, 
On a green street of elms and lawns and leisure, 
A quarter of a century ago; 
Three powerful New England Abbesses 
Dwelling secluded in their Priories. 

I 

THE VICTORIAN 

She drove behind an ambling chestnut horse 
In a high stilted buggy; at home she rolle^ 
Like a plump pea about the stately pod 
Of her centennial house. She lived at ease 
On the invested habits saved and stored 
For seventy years; and kept her bygone place 
As the Preceptor's wife she once had been, 
Up at the old Academy. Plump and smooth 
Were her jowls, like an infant's; and not more 
Tranquil an infant's breath in sleep, than heaved 
The small round of her bodice in the sermon. 
When she took lilies-of- the-valley down 
To lay them alongside the Latin stone 
Upon her scholar-husband's mossy grave 
She stooped with placid eyes, and turned away 
With placid eyes, contented with herself, 
(Or so, at any rate, I always judged) 
To think that she had not forgotten him. 

II 

THE AMAZON 

The ample body of this Amazon 

(Or if you like to call her an old Roman) 

Was like a porcelain stove, where late at night, 

Richly and gustily her spirit crackled. 

50 



Her tongue was like a flag ripped with the wind. 
Her church was one exotic in New England; 
And by her countenance there must have been 
Latin or Oriental blood in her. 
Her ancestors were canny mountain lawyers, 
Judges, commissioners, and Congressmen, 
Who in their boyhood, ploughing out the rocks 
From their broad, beautiful and barren fields, 
Held open in the other hand their Blackstone. 
This their descendant jeered at sorrow and want, 
Dared her old age to come upon her, found 
Her loneliness a tonic. In the end, 
In her last illness, in her ninetieth year, 
She seemed, like a hawk, to fly into the face 
Of her own death, and beat it with fierce wings. 

Ill 

THE VESTAL 

Those thickly gathered, uniformly brown 
Skirts, and brown comb in sleekly parted hair, 
Still seem to me more nunlike than the veil ; 
And she more delicately virginal 
Than the most soft young sylph; more innocent 
Her worn, enduring body of eighty years. 
Her pleasant patrimony all was spent 
In her fond brother's ventures; she began, 
In comfort-loving middle age, to save, 
Closely to save and turn; I will not say 
To scrimp, of what was so serenely done. 
With such a dedicated firmness. More, 
As years went by, her face, her house, her ways, 
Withdrew into their mould. Time made her face 
More and more gaunt, more rigorous and more sweet; 
Her house more mystic, stately and forlorn; 
It's pictures more symbolic and more strange, 
Pictures of heaven, and of pilgrimage. 
Through downward shutters scarcely did the sun 
Force in a lath of light to show their strangeness. 

51 



Order and peace in her cold kitchen; order 
And peace in her faintly warmed sitting-room. 
Something about it made you fanciful ; 
A person, might imagine that he heard 
Beating of wings, hushed beating of the wings 
Of her familiar saint of self-control. 

Scribner's Magazine Sarah N. Cleghom 

MOUNTAINS 

It's fenced all round with mountains where we live, 

"Like as Jerusalem," the Bible says; 

You know, "as round about Jerusalem." 

Some people feel the mountains "on their chests"; 

They feel them like forbidding walls, they say, 

That scant the winter days, and darken them. 

But that's not true; for winter afternoons 

Are pieced out by the long-drawn afterglow. 

Blaze Mountain must have got its name from that, 

Although it's not like firelight, but darker, 

More purpling; cooler. The artist that comes here 

Has never painted Blaze. His favorite 

Is Bald Fowl; but he doesn't call it Bald Fowl, 

He calls it Eagle Peak, or Lair of the Winds. 

"Lair of the Winds by Moonlight" was one picture. 

Blueberry Mountain, Blaze, and Catamount 

Are all more suitable, I think, to paint; 

They're closer wooded, and a rounder shape* 

Or Windward Mountain; for it has a rock, 

A kind of castle cliff, that strangers take 

For a hotel, sometimes. 

On Blueberry 

There is a pond, where Daniel Webster came 
And made a speech, some eighty years ago; 
And all the villages, for miles around, 
Went up with toy log-cab?^; ,i;l hard cider 



Free for all comers. Strar 
We ought to mark the spot; 

52 



always say 
.1 it's well known. 



The one I like the best is Pioneer, 

Chiefly, I guess, because I used to live 

Over the saddle of it, in a town 

So little, and so backward, it's gone out 

Like damp leaves in a bonfire. And our house, 

Our square one-chimneyed house, our sagging barn, 

Our lilacs, locusts, and great wineglass elm 

The deer stray all over the old place now. 

I saw a young fawn in the schoolhouse door, 

And I was half afraid the timbers might 

Fall in and break its pretty, fragile spine. 

I frightened it away, and it ran down 

Right over where we used to keep our bees, 

And made me think of the last night my brother 

Julius . . . my youngest brother , . . was alive. 

But that was years and years and years ago. 

That long blue mountain, Lebanon, on the west, 

Has always seemed to me a fairy place, 

Largely, I take it, from its Bible name: 

"Cedars of Lebanon"; I used to think 

There must be cedars on the other side, 

For I could see the kind of woods on this side; 

Maples and birches white and yellow birches, 

Hemlock and spruce and patches of dark pine. 

But there was more than cedars calling me 

To Lebanon; a village over there 

Beyond the Hollow, where I had a cousin . . . 

The Nation Sarah N. Clegkorn 



THE VERMONTER DEPARTING 

jlo r rove alone beside his sugar bush; 

His measure-pacing horse was not quite slow 
Enough to let him fill his deepening eyes 

"With the wine-washed November afterglow. 



In silence sunk, he took the windy turn 

Round the gulfed woods, and past the Tories' well. 
The falls of Little River in his ears 

(Or in his memory!) sounded like a shell. 

The mountains had been hidden. Now, near home, 
He saw them: Windward, in its barren pride; 

Blaze, with its sunset rocks; and Pioneer, 
The cloven giant of that countryside. 

Their leaflessness, their stillness and their age 
He let his spirit drink. He slowed again 

His ancient horse, and stayed to look his fill 
All that last hour before the evening train. 

Everybody's Magazine Sarah N. Cleghorn 



FIVE INCONSEQUENTIAL CHARMS 

CHARM FOR A SILVER SPOON 
Spoon, spoon, 
Wrought from thin silver, 
Bright as a small moon, 
Drollest and most companionable 
Of all utensils of the housewife's table, 
Be serviceable beside my cup of tea 
And by the fire share bread and milk with me. 

CHARM ON MAKING A BED 
With sheets cool and smooth 
I bid you bring rest, 

With the fleece of soft blankets 
Lap warmly the spirit, 

With the quaintness of quilts 
Give whimsical dreams. 

54 



CHARM FOR RUNNING WATER 

Hesitator, 

Faltering from pool to pool, 

Leaping like a child, 

Or a fawn 

Among the rocks, 

Leaf-dappled, 

Wild and sweet, 

Turn not from us 

Languid with summer. 

CHARM FOR THE DISREPUTABLE CROWS 

Crow! crow! 
Ironic and rusty, 
Raucous-voiced, heavy-winged, 
Tattered and dusty, 
Tramp bird, scamp bird, 
I beg you to fly 
In grotesque grandeur 
Against my sky. 

CHARM FOR A JAR 

All the flowers of the garden 
Fresh from dew and slant of sunlight 
Fresh from song and the loam's clinging, 
Beg your kindness, foster-mother. 

The Double Dealer Elizabeth /. Coatsworth 



REFLECTION 

Geraniums . . . 

Who ever heard that Sappho put 

Geraniums in her hair? 

Or thought that Cleopatra brushed 

Her long Greek face against their petals? 

55 



Did Beatrice carry them? 

Or any bird sigh out his wild-fire heart 

In passion for them? 

Yet sparrows, far outnumbering nightingales. 

Have gossiped under their tomato cans, 

And lonely spinsters loved them more than cats. 

And living girls have felt quite festive, going 

Down vulgar streets 

With such unsubtle gaiety at their belts. 

The Dial Elizabeth /. Coatsworth 



SEA QUATRAINS 

I 

Too fast the silly white-caps run 
Their helter-skelter races; 

They stumble when the goal is won 
And fall upon their faces. 

II 
A purple light is shaken over 

The greener ocean shadows. 
Like clover on the cooler depths 

Of grass in upland meadows. 

Ill 
The sea hangs kelp upon the sand 

Like garlands on a grave, 
Mourning the dead and silent land 

With every living wave. 

IV 
The breakers thunder in the night 

With which the sea is drenched. 
Only one plunging line is white; 

Even the stars are quenched. 

59 



V 

The fairest ship ever a wreck 

Pad not so white a sail 
As this fair wave cast up to break, 

Driven before the gale. 

Poetry, Magazine of Verse Grant H. Code 

PRAISE FOR AN URN 
(In Memoriam E. N.) 
It was a kind and northern face 
That mingled in such exile guise 
The everlasting eyes of Pierrot 
And, of Gargantua, the laughter. 

His thoughts, delivered to me 
From the white coverlet and pillow, 
I see now, were inheritances 
Delicate riders of the storm. 

The slant moon on the slanting hill 
Once moved us toward presentiments 
Of what the dead keep, living still, 
And such assessments of the soul 

As, perched in the crematory lobby, 
The insistent clock commented on, 
Touching as well upon our praise 
Of glories proper to the time. 

Still, having in mind gold hair, 
I cannot see that broken brow 
And miss the dry sound of bees 
Stretching across a lucid space. 

Scatter these well meant idioms 
Into the smoky spring that fills 
The suburbs, where they will be lost. 
They are no trophies of the sun. 

The Dial Hart Crane 

57 



POEM 

Always before your voice my soul 
half-beautiful and wholly droll 
is as some smooth and awkward foal, 
whereof young moons begin 
the newness of his skin, 

so of my stupid sincere youth 
the exquisite failure uncouth 
discovers a trembling and smooth 
Unstrength, against the strong 
silences of your song; 

or as a single lamb whose sheen 
of full unsheared fleece is mean 
beside its lovelier friends, between 
your thoughts more white than wool 
My thought is sorrowful: 

but my heart smote in painful thirds 
of anguish quivers to your words, 
As to a flight of thirty birds 
shakes with a thickening fright 
the sudden fooled light. 

it is the autumn of a year: 

When through the thin air stooped with f ear, 

across the harvest whitely peer 

empty of surprise 

death's faultless eyes 

(whose hand my folded soul shall know 
while on faint hills do frailly go 
The peaceful terrors of the snow, 
and before your dead face 
which sleeps, a dream shall pass) 

58 



and these my days their sounds and flowers 
Fall in a pride of petalled hours, 
like flowers at the feet of mowers 
whose bodies strong with love 
through meadows hugely move. 

Yet what am I that such and such 

mysteries very simply touch 

me, whose heart-wholeness overmuch 

Expects of your hair pale, 

a terror musical? 

while in an earthless hour my fond 

soul seriously yearns heyond 

this fern of sunset frond on frond 

opening in a rare 

Slowness of gloried air ... 

The flute of morning stilled in noon 
noon the implacable bassoon 
now Twilight seeks the thrill of moon, 
washed with a wild and thin 
despair of violin. 

The Dial E. E. Cummings 



HIPPOLYTUS TEMPORIZES 

I worship the greatest first 
(it were sweet, the couch, 
die brighter ripple of cloth 
over the dipped fleece; 
the thought: her bones 
under the flesh are white 
as when sand along a beach 
covers but k***ps the print 
59 



of the crescent shapes beneath. 
I thought: so her body lies 
between cloth and fleece.) 

I worship first, the great 

(ah sweet, your eyes 

what God, invoked in Crete, 

gave them the gift to part 

as the Sidonion myrtle-flower, 

suddenly wide and swart; 

then swiftly, 

the eyelids having provoked our hearts 

as suddenly beat and close.) 

I worship the feet, flawless, 
that haunt the hills 
(ah sweet, dare I think, 
beneath fetter of golden clasp, 
of the rhythm, the fall and rise 
of yours, carven, slight 
beneath straps of gold that keep 
their slender beauty caught, 
like wings and bodies 
of trapped birds.) 

I worship the greatest first 
(suddenly into my brain 
the flash of sun on the snow, 
the edge of light and the drift, 
the crest and the hill-shadow 
ah, surely now I forget, 
ah splendour, my goddess turns: 
or was it the sudden heat 
on the wrist of the molten flesh 
and veins' quivering violet?) 

The Bookman H* D. 



CO 



TO SOME MODERN POETS 

Your names are like decapitated giants bleeding black 
oblivion; 

You are the frail voices. 

The indomitable rhythm of beauty writhes under the 
claws of your pens; 

Your eyes are twin candles burning flames of yearn- 
ing desire toward the high, sacred altar of poesy. 

All that you sought to attain has eluded you; 

You have tried, and your day is passing. 

Yet grieve not; 

Much that charms is small and fleeting 

To the greatness of eternity. 

The earth is a tiny shadow tottering on the edge of 
death; 

The moon is a throb of splendor in the heart of night; 

And the stars are ephemera in the long gaze of God. 

So grieve not 

That your poems are the cool, fresh grass of a short 
summer; 

The flowers are few. 

The Century Magazine Pascal D 9 Angela 



SONG OF LIGHT 

The sun robed with noons stands on the pulpit of 
heaven, 

Like an anchorite preaching his faith of light to lis- 
tening space. 

And I am one of the sun's lost words, 

A ray that pierces through endless emptiness on 

emptiness, 
Seeking in vain to be^freed of its burden of splendor. 

The Bookman Pascal D 9 Angela 

61 



MIDDAY 

The road is like a little child running ahead of me 

and then hiding behind a curve 
Perhaps to surprise me when I reach there. 

The sun has built a nest of light under the eaves of 

noon; 

A lark drops down from the cloudless sky 
Like a singing arrow, wet with blue, sped from the 

bow of space. 

But my eyes pierce the soft azure, far, far beyond, 
To where roam eternal lovers 
Along the broad blue ways 
Of silence, 

The Literary Review 

New York Evening Post Pascal D'Angelo 

WORDS 

If music could be loosened from its bars, 
And melody could rise untrammeled, high! 
Beating impetuous wings against the sky, t 
Tearing in passion at the shaken stars; 
If music could hold color of wild birds 
Deep ivory-black, rose madder, crystal jade, 
And moon-blown gold, and every tint and shade, 
Then music would be beautiful as words. 

Words give earth color and all harmonies. 
The scarlet sounds Giovanni's rage imbued 
With crimson such, tint Mycerinus' knees; 
Song flamed on Tristan's lips when Iseult wooed; 
And viols sobbed in inauve, words Mary said, 
When she stood white, above her Wordless Dead. 

Voices: A Journal of Verse Power Dalton 

02 



CHANGELING 

I do not understand 
My changeling self at all, 
Why should my heart answer 
A wild bird's call? 

Why should dancing iris, 
Sandaled by a pool, 
Burn my eyes with sudden tears 
Make me play the fool? 

Oh, I ache with longing 
Reaching to the sky, 
I, an earthly creature, 
Yearning so to fly! 

Why is loveliness a sword 
Thrusting deep in me, 
Wounding me because my arms 
Cannot hold the sea? 

Voices: A Journal of Verse Power Dalton 

ZENITH 

Urns of Carrara marble I have seen, 

Pale as the lily maid's white violet face, 

Urns delicately wrought as fine old lace, 

Woundingly beautiful in curve and sheen; 

Bright alabaster urns, and ivory 

Translucent as dim mist that veils a star, 

Flagons of silver, bluer than wind-rays are, 

And exquisite as Mozart melody; 

Frail china cups of beryl and chrysoprase, 

Like sheerest wings of moon-moths soaring high, 

Bowls modeled from the potter's golden clays, 

I know I shall not find before I die, 

Though I should seek forever down earth's ways, 

A bowl as lovely as the blinding sky. 

Voices: A Journal of Verse Power Dalton 

63 



EPILOGUE 

Sometimes I think that I shall live again; 
And chancing on these records of my times, 
I'll wonder dimly at the hidden pain 
Faded to quaintness in my early rhymes. 

And then, maybe, I shall be vaguely pleased 
To feel again the torture of myself; 
And by the ancient anguish gently eased, 
I shall return my own book to its shelf. 

The Bookman S. Foster Damon 



IN THE BLACK COUNTRY 
(Staffordshire, England) 

Hell hath its uses; here each mortar mouth 

Casts far as life some treasure dear to need; 
Welcome to men as ships the fruity South 

Sends to blown Arctic shores. These valleys bleed 
That others may be fair. In greener shires, 

Where glisten cols and byres, * 

Manors and castles, or where farther bide 

Young Adam and his bride, 
What aching wants are banished by these despot fires! 

Let Ceres bring sweet incense and blow white 

Yon furnace breath; for there flames leap to mould 
Her shares and harrows, chains and mattocks bright; 

There fashion eager blades that cut the gold 
Of wide Australia's fields when flow and wane 

Her Harvest tides of grain; 
And forge for far brown hands the hoe and spade 

To ruff some island glade, 
Or, chance be, turn the mellow sod in Argentine. 

64 



Look to our left. Bolts, rivets, girders, beams, 

That make our towers safe, too near the stars; 
Rods, pillars, shafts, that bridge unchallenged 
streams, 

Or bear a mountain's weight; unflinching bars 
That time alone can bend; and fairy wire 

For violin and lyre. 
That shall from Music's heart stir her to break 

Dream's silence, and remake 
That silence deeper, all are born of that swift fire. 

And there! Slack would die world go but for pins, 

Needles and buttons. When we lost our fur, 
Fishfcone and threaded thorn helped us our sins 

To hide again, and modesty relure 
To walk with us. Now showering from here 

To every port o' the sphere, 
Go, tidying the world, slim bits of pointed sun, 

And on the daintiest one 
What maid at bridal thrift shall drop a happy tear? 

Now where the cavern windows ghostly glow, 
As a dead dragon's eyes yet open burn. 

Stripped figures like strange beasts weave to and fro, 
And suddenly we know how beasts must yearn 

Who have no way out but to pass 
Through fire to the green grass. 

These strong, who for the weak make beauty sure, 
t How long will they endure 

An earth of ashes and a sky of brass? 

Scribner's Magazine Olive Tilford Dargan 



MY BOOKS 

When falls the winter snow I little care nor yet what 

cold winds blow, 
For here beside the fire 
Are many friends of whom I never tire: 
Jane Austin sits with me 
And oh, what company! 
Or else the Brontes make the fireside glow 
With their strange spirit. Wordsworth comes and 

then 

Most lovable of men, 

Dear Browning, ah, I've named not even ten 
Of those who come and go. 

When the December of my life shall come and those 

that now I love, 
The best, perhaps are gone, 
I shall not be quite friendless and forlorn, 
These same dear ones will be 
Spring, youth and love to me, 
I shall be young with them and happy too, 
And who can tell? In that great Afterplace, 
I, by diviner grace, 

May touch their hands and look upon each face 
With happiness anew. 

The Lyric Julia Johnson Davis 

THE FROST 

The dawn cold, pallid, half afraid, it seems. 
Within the house she moves about her tasks, 
Making the fire burn for the morning meal. 
I stand outside like one who fears to enter. 
She's singing I can hear the happy notes 
She has been mute for many months, I think, 
And now she sings. God, delay the dawn, 
She sings again tonight after long months! 

G6 



How the wan sickly light of these gray skies 

Reveals each makeshift of our cottage home 

As if in scorn. I brought her here to this, 

Plucked her with rude hands as one plucks a blossom 

Out of a sheltered garden. 

There was to be a new house long ago, 

We planned it in those first days of our love. 

But each new year, rising with newer hope, 

Saw some strange, stern experience forced upon us; 

First came the flood, 

And countless tons of devastating rock 

Crashed down the mountain slopes and carried 

My newly planted crops. When with fresh hope 

And infinite labor I had cleared the land anew, 

Then came the drought. 

Each glad green blade became a blackened thing, 

Scorched in the burning furrow where it grew. 

Tempest and drought that was enough, you'd think, 

Indeed, it seemed as though the fate that teased us 

Had wearied or grown kind. There came the spring 

So warm, so genial, such a fall of rain 

That all my acres plucked up heart again 

And smiled in the sun's good face the vines hung 

full, 

The orchard laughed with promise. 
Then in the vibrant gladness of those days 
She came to me, and whispered me her secret; 
*Twas time to build our home, for one would come 
To share it with us by another spring. 
And so she sings tonight. 

There breaks the dawn and she is at the door, 
Has heard my step now must I tell her all: 
Soul of my soul, the frost has done its work. 
Your sob and each sob is a sharpened knife 
To tear my heart. Creep close within my arms, 
And let us talk this over quietly, 
With understanding that shall bring us peace. 

67 



The man who plants his acres in full faith 

Has God for partner. Nothing is more near 

To the Eternal Heart than that a man 

Should help the barren earth to flower and fruit 

And fill the world with plenty. Such a man 

Becomes High Priest to all the growing plants, 

For this the summer skies, the winter storms, 

Rainhows and friendly stars have said to me. 

I find Him here in every springing blade 

I hear Him speak But in the city streets 

There are so many voices, can a man 

Be sure of what he hears? I must be sure. 

What, then, if such eternal partnership 

Requires eternal patience? All the forces 

That work with God are patient love, pity, 

Remorse for wrong and fuller understanding. 

And when the child shall come, he'll find his home 

Within the loving shelter of our hearts. 

You smile there's hope there's courage both at 

once. 

So we take up our gracious task again. 
Shall we go in? For the new day is here. 

The Lyric West Grace Atherton Dennen 



WINDING THE CLOCK 

The silence that had fallen stark between us, 
After the heat and flame of hostile words, 
Was broken by the striking of the clock: 
One-two eleven strokes it made. 
The slave of custom, I arose to wind it. 
Then, a wonder! 

I was aware of Time's vast cycle flowing 
Endlessly, endlessly, through the vibrant night 
My hand upon the clock face seemed to catch 

68 



And hold this fateful moment of our quarrel. 

There it hung poised between gold yesterdays 

And hlack tomorrows, poisoned, evil thing, 

To keep or cast away. 

With haste, as one in fear, I seized the key, 

Turned, turned and felt the willing wheels respond. 

The Lyric West Grace Atherton Dennen 



TO A DANCING PARTNER 
(Who Asked Me for a Poem) 

Suppose that in my poem you shall find 

A wave so thrilled and lifted by the wind, 

By him to her own sweeter motion moved, 

And in that motion so with rapture loved, 

That all the sounding round them of the sea 

Became the music of their unity, 

And warm light fell across them from the west, 

And warm love from the beating in her breast 

Touched him, but clasped him not, nor gave him 

rest . . . 

When in your slender veins its verses sing, 
Will you be dreaming or remembering? 

The Liberator Max Eastman 



A QUESTION 

Dark-voiced and deeply passioned as the dim 
Vermilion-lighted mysteries of faith and music 
In cathedrals old and holy; 

Dusk-eyed and velvet-throated as the slim 
Young warm Madonna-Magdalens of saints 
In painted windows rich with! melancholy; 



Dear friend and distant stranger: when the sum 
Of all our light, our wisdom, is gone out. 
And night has dimmed the candle of her vesper, 

Do you not sometimes simply rise and come, 

Feeling along the ray of my desire 

With silent hands and barefoot steps that whisper? 

I see the dusky circles of your eyes 

Like burnt hot torches in your moon-pale flesh, 

Your lips like warm wounds painted on its pallor, 

Your quickened vivid breasts that fall and rise 

Only too tenderly to pierce the veil 

That clings on them, but cannot hide their color; 

It cannot hide the flowing of your limbs, 

The pure bold flame of motion that you are 

Earth's vestal unto earth's divine communion. 

Is it a lonely phantom that but swims 

Up from the depth of my own long desire? 

Has not my dream in yours a dream-companion? 

Your speech is motion mine is poetry* 
You will not answer what I dare to ask; 
You will flow silent as a sacred river. 

And I who watch you in sad ecstasy, 

Have said my question as a saint his prayer, 

To float with you in your still breast forever. 

The Liberator Max Eastman 



70 



PRIMA DONNA OF THE NEGRO JAZZ 
ORCHESTRA 

I am the lemon-lily queen. 

Midnight crepe-myrtle is my hair, 
My face curves down to my pointed chin 

Betwixt my golden earrings like a warm seckle 
pear. 

My tunic is a withered buff rose. 

Palely my arms fall down. 
The fiddles leap behind me, a thin flute blows, 

Cr-r-racks a sudden trombone, then all notes drown. 

In the drum's eager rustle. Juggling the sticks 
Brown Joe tosses an aristocratic head 

Bow to right, smile to left, flourishing the tricks 
Of some fancy colonel his grandmother never wed. 

My walk is a poplar blown, 

Gift of a moon-white dame 
Whose star-white son left me besides 

My golden color of shame. 

The tom-tom is throbbing in my heart 

And the orchestra's catching surges; 
I sing you foolish airs 

That burst with shadowy dirges. 

I voice my wild black mothers: 

I drone them cool and low; 
I croon the winds that blew and ceased 

A thousand years ago. 

[ wail my captive fathers, 

The violins complain; 
[ hone for a passionate wilderness 

And the pelt of tropic rain. 

71 



I beat my hands and cry, 

The 'cellos moan and quiver; 
I fling my curse to a far-off sky 

Over a jungled river. 

I lift my arms and lean 

To the white song's white embrace, 
But I yearn to a thousand lovers 

Of my black forgotten race. 

* * * * 

The sooty leader sways, 

The violins flicker and hum, 
The wood-winds speak, the cornet brays, 

Joe is in a frenzy at the drum. 

And I am the tea-rose queen, 

Daughter of milk and wine; 
Like a willow blown I bow and I bow, 

And my earrings tremble and shine. 

The Lyric West Ellen Coit Elliott 

UNREGENERATE 

I shall come back in ways I think you'll know: 

A cocky, strutting robin where you pass, 

Perhaps a flake of sudden, stinging snow, 

A cricket mocking at you from the grass; 

A gusty little wind will whirl your hat 

(And laugh to watch your funny, pompous wrath) . 

I'll be an April rain and drench it flat, 

Then stand, a prickly hedge, straight in your path. 

I shall not come a sentimental thing: 

A star, a cloud, a Wordsworth daffodil; 

A woodpecker, red-topped, will light and bring 

Her maddening racket to your window-sill 

At five a.m. And when you've waked and heard, 

She'll love to hear you mutter: "Damn that bird!" 

The Nation Jacqueline Embry 



WILD APPLES 

Bright in September, bright against the sky, 
Bright against mountains, bright against the sea, 
Oh 5 acid fruit and worthless! pass it by; 
Oh, beautiful and worthless! let it be. 

Yet the birds take these branches for a house, 
Wild grape festoons them, binding tart with tart; 
And to the end of time unshaken boughs 
Are not for us to laugh at, O my heart: 

Unshaken boughs, and fruit ungathered yearly 
Save by the wind that brings its scattering down, 
To bruise on rocks, smash open, juicing clearly, 
And rot beneath the tree till it is brown. 

Out in back pastures known to sheep and cows, 
Blind foot-note to a page, they stand apart; 
But to the ends of time unshaken boughs 
Are not for us to laugh at, O my heart! 

The Measure Abbie Huston Evans 



SEA FOG 

The world's a ten-rod circle; hills are gone, 
Unless this floor of scrub and meadow-sweet 
Slanting to hidden nothing, on and on, 
May be a hill I guess it by my feet! 

The fir-tree dares not shake or even sigh, 
For fear of spilling beauty, bright as brief; 
The silvered cobweb scares away the fly, 
And quicksilver slides down the mullein leaf. 

Oh, fog-drops strung on birch like beads on hair! 
On each red barberry there hangs a tear . . . 
What wonder I forget the outer air, 
Shut in with a little beauty plain and near? 

73 



Here's privacy with weeds, relief from sky, 
A hollow in gray space; a place, may be, 
Where one might lay disguises safely by, 
And strip to the heart in fog from off the sea! 

The Measure Abbie Huston Evans 



MACABRE 

I saw them in the moonlight pass, 
Like silver shadows in a glass; 
With mournful step, erect and slow, 
The ghost of Edgar Allan Poe; 
Then quickly, like a frightened child, 
The weeping ghost of Oscar Wilde; 
And when I sought to give them aid 
I saw them , . . fade! 

St. Louis Much Ado James Waldo Fawcett 



TO A SKULL 

Why laughest thou, perched there among the books 
Wrought by man's hand and fathered by his brain? 
I strive to write with humorous twist of pen 
But thy wide grin makes all my effort vain ! 

I turn to sorrow, and my pen drips tears 
I cannot keep my eyes away from thee; 
Something sardonic, as if human woe 
Thy humor mocked, is in thy ghoulish glee! 

Religion's platitudes I next essay 
Sure sympathy thou'lt give me, knowing all ... 
Was that a chuckle, whisp'ring of the vault, 
That seemed to echo from the fire-lit wall? 

74 



Is there, then, nothing real, a phantasy 

Our dearest hopes, our deepest reverence? 

Will we, too, laugh at man's credulity, 

As at child whimsies, when we're summoned hence? 

Will human sorrow and it's vaunted wit 
Alike provoke that set, sardonic smile? 
Will we, too, grin that twisted grin, to know 
How man's best efforts were not worth the while? 

Nay, nay, I will not have it so! Mayhap 
Thy fleshless smile a tender one may be, 
To know that God, the Humorist, hath played 
His one great Joke in Death that sets us free! 

The Lyric West Wright Field 



GRACE BEFORE MEAT 

Saint Francis, bless my table's spread: 
This water and this broken bread. 

Grant me the heart of thankfulness 
For this the portion thou dost bless: 

The grace to see The Bread and Wine 
Set forth in Heavenly candleshine. 

With holy joying I would sup, 
Cleaning the platter and the cup. 

Saint Francis, bless my poverty: 
This portion and the heart of me, 
Through thy great love, 
Amen. 

McClure's Magazine Anita Fitch 

75 



POETS 

Earth, you have had great lovers in your hour, 
And little lovers, fearful and struck dumb; 
Those who have seen you whole, as from a tower, 
And others kneeling where the grass-blades come. 
Age after spinning age and day by day, 
They toss the dawn between them, as a ball, 
Ride Beauty plunging to the whip of May, 
And string the stars to light their carnival. 
They will not heed the shouting, singing flood 
Of lovers gone before them. Echoed cries, 
Too like their own may sound, but their wild blood 
Is out of hand at seas and moving skies; 
The last to come will make his little tune, 
And think it new about the weary moon! 

Voices, A Journal of Verse Hortense Flexner 



JOHN BUTLER YEATS 
( c *Alas, for the wonderful yew forest!") 

We shall remember him 

As a man who had a little in him of the men of ail 

time. 

We shall remember him 
This tall, lean-shouldered, witty Irishman, 
Master of the art of conversation, 
Jesting with us in his high-pitched Irish voice, 
That lilted to a delicate string 
Beyond our hearing. 

"Shakespeare was a kindly man," he often said* 

John Yeats was a kindly man 

Who gave lavishly of himself 

As if life had no end. 

Around him gathered 

The tangible aroma of life 

Full-flavored with intense living. 

76 



"Ireland is kind, 9 * he said. 
"She has many faults, but I feel about her 
As I do about Heaven, 

If Heaven were a perfect place it would bore me. 
I like to think of Heaven as a place with discords; 
As a beautiful orchestration with Love as master of 
the music." 

"Montaigne said" that phrase was often on his lips. 
Stories of wits and poets and artists, 
Memories of Morris and Samuel Butler and Dowden, 
Brilliant debris of irrecoverable personality. 

"The artist is the only happy man," he told us. 
"Art springs from a mood of divine unreason. 
Unreason is when a man cannot be at peace with 
external conditions." 

We shall remember him intimately 

As we knew him his room, his pipes, his drawings. 

We shall remember him sitting at his easel, 

Keen-eyed, young, eager to live a thousand years, 

Unwearied by life, 

Sheltered beneath tie green tree of his own thoughts. 

We shall remember him 

Ripening like an apple in quiet sunshine, 

Responsive to human affection, 

And patient of our human limitations 

Writing under his own portrait 

(Painted from his reflection in a mirror), 

"Myself seen through a glass darkly." 

The New York Times Jeanne Robert Foster 



77 



THE PEACOCK 

In the cold blue haze of a January day 

A peacock parades beneath my window 

A symphony of color. 

No rare orchid can boast such wealth of hues 

Yet, this vivid bird honored by the Gods 

Has no note of music; 

Nor does he render the world 

A single deed of service 

For what was he fashioned? 



Once a girl came beneath my window 

Her golden curls and sky blue eyes 

Laughed up at me. 

The color of the rose was in her cheek 

Love was in my heart, 

I stifled it 

For what was she fashioned? 

She gave nothing to the world 

She possessed no talents! 

She went away. 

Since then my life has been grey 

Like the cold blue haze of a January day. 

The peacock has gone 

Only dead weeds are beneath my window. 

peacock, did the Gods fashion you for a decoration 

To let beauty walk in the midst of ugly dying weeds; 

In the cold blue haze of a January day? 

The American Poetry Magazine 

Scottie McKenzie Frasier 



THREE SISTERS 

Johanna talks of Lemuel 

And I of spinning sing 
But Emily sits all alone 

Nor speaks of anything. 

The thoughtless words Johanna drops 

Are dull and little worth, 
They sink to rest with those I speak, 

As pebbles fall to earth. 

The silent words of Emily, 

I wonder where they go 
The secret things she does not say, 

When she is sitting so. 

Voices, A Journal of Verse 

Helen Frazee-Bower 



THE SISTERS 

The Martha-in-me filled her days 
With tasks devoid of joy and praise: 
She polished well the furniture; 
She made the locks and holts secure; 
She trimmed the lamps with barren ease; 
She rubbed the ivory of the keys; 
She made the windows shine and glow; 
She washed the linen fair as snow. 

The Mary-in-me did not stay 
At home, as Martha did, each day: 
She held aloof like some wild bird 
Whose music is but seldom heard. 
My Martha felt a little shy 
Of Mary as she passed her by, 
And one day hid the cloth and broom 
With which she garnishes my room. 

79 



When Mary saw, she paused and pressed 
A hand of Martha to her breast, 
And whispered, "We must learn to do 
Our labors side by side, we two/' 

So have the sisters found delight 

In doing fireside tasks aright: 

Together they have come to see 

The meaning in mahogany, 

Which now they rub that there may pass 

A pageant in its looking-glass; 

They shine the windows that the bloom 

Of earth be brought within my room; 

The lamps are gladly filled and trimmed 

And virgin wisdom goes undimmed; 

They polish the piano keys 

In readiness for harmonies; 

In bolting doors they've learned as well 

To throw them wide for heaven and hell, 

That all who will may enter there 

To be the guests of grace and prayer. 

Mary and Martha in sisterhood 

Dwell in me as sisters should; 

They fashion a garment and kiss its hem, 

And my house is in order because of them* 

The Outlook Louise Ayres Gamett 

FISHIN* 

De Tostles dey went seekin* fer to ketch a mess 

o* men, 

Fishin*, fishin* 9 fishin* in de sea. 
Dey thoo deir nets out patient, en dey drug *em in 

again, 

Fishin 9 , fishin 9 , fishin 9 in de sea. 
De waters dey wuz seekin* wnz de waters ob de worP, 
En dey ketch a heap o' nuffin' f o* dey eber seen a 

pearl, 

so 



But dey nevah git discourage' en deir nets dey alters 

hurl, 
Fishing fishin 9 , fishin 9 in de sea. 

'Postles, 'Postles, 

Fishin 9 in de sea. 

Yore nets am fuller sinners 

En yo 9 done kotch me. 

One night a mighty storm come up w'en dey wuz in 

a boat, 

Fishin 9 , fishin 9 , fishin 9 in de sea. 
En Thomas he wuz quakin' en 'is faith he couldn* tote, 
Fishin 9 9 fishin 9 , fishin 9 in de sea. 
Den glory halleluyer! may I nevah own mah grave 
Ef n blessed Massa Jesus didn' walk out on a wave, 
En ca'm dose ragin' waters, en dose skeery 'Postles 

save, 
Fishin 9 , fishin 9 , fishin 9 in de sea. 

'Postles, 9 Postles 9 

Fishin 9 in de sea. 

Yore nets am fuller sinners 

En yo 9 done kotch me. 

James he kotch a sinner man, en Petah kotch a t'ief , 

Fishin 9 , fishin 9 , fishin 9 in de sea. 

But Judas wuz a yaller man en founder on a reef, 

Fishin 9 , fishin*, fishin* in de sea. 

De 'Postles' nets git boolgy wid a monst'ous hefty 

weight, 
Fer dey fish w'en it wuz sunup en dey fish w'en it 

wuz late, 
En dey Ian' dis pore ole sinner lak a minner, sho* ez 

fate, 

Fishin 9 , fishin 9 , fishin 9 in de sea. 
'Postles, 'Postles, 
Fishin 9 in de sea. 
Yore nets am fuller sinners 
En yo 9 done kotch me. 

The Outlook Louise Ayres Garnett 

81 



GWINE UP TER HEAB'N 

Fs gwine up ter heab'n in a cloud o 9 fiah, 

Gwine, gwine, gwine up ter heab'n. 

Fs boun' ter keep a-mountin' 'til I cain't-a git no 

highah, 

Gwine, gwine 9 gwine up ter heab'n. 
De elements '11 t'under en de elements '11 quake, 
De graves '11 yawn an stretch deirsefs en all de dead 

'11 wake, 
En de worl' '11 ketch on fiah en burn up fer Jesus' 



Gwine, gwine, gwine up ter heab'n. 

Gwine up ter heab'n 

In a cloud o 9 fiah. 

Gwine up ter heab'n 

'Till I cain't-a git no highah. 

Fs gwine up ter heab'n fer to see de Holy Ghos% 

Gwine, gwine 9 gwine up ter heab'n. 

He's sho' ter mek me we'come, fer he am de Heab'nly 

Hos 9 , 

Gwine 9 gwine, gwine up ter heab'n. 
En w'en I ax um howdy, en draps mah bestes' bow, 
Fs gwineter tell um, Massa, I b'longs up yer, I 'low. 
You ax me fer to enter en I's in de fambly now y 
Gwine, gwine, gwine up ter heab'n. 

Gwine up ter heab'n 

In a cloud o' fiah. 

Gwine up ter heab'n 

'Till I cain'l-a git no highah, 

jubilee en glory! won' I holler wid mah might! 

Gwine, gwine, gwine up ter heab'n. 

Fll blow de clouds ter nuffin en FI1 stoke de stars up 

bright, 

Gwine, gwine, gwine up ter heab'n. 

82 



I'll be mighty glad ter git dere, fer it's lonesome yer 

below. 
Dere am sech a heap o* trouble wharsomever folkses 

S 
En Fs honin' ter git settled whar Fs got a right fer 

sho', 
Gwine, gwine, gwine up ter heab'n. 

Gwine up ter heab'n 
In a cloud o 9 fiah. 
Gwine up ter heab'n 
'Till I cain't-a git no highah. 
The Outlook Louise Ayres Garnett 



THE BUILDER 

The edges of the stones are sharp, 
But I shall travel far 
For I must seek and seek and seek 
Wherever such stones are. 

I am building me a secret place 
With stones that cut my hands; 
But I must build and build and build 
Until a temple stands. 

Contemporary Verse Caroline Giltinan 



TRANSFORMED 

Black and naked branches 
Always searching one, 
You await the coming 
Of your lord, the sun. 
Warmed with all his grandeur, 
Suddenly some day 
He who holds your worship 
Will achieve his way. 



In the glow of Springtime 
The sun is very wise! 
Turn and see within you 
With fascinated eyes, 
Wonderful as music 
Green leaves and moving boughs. 
In your thousand blossoms, 
Mating birds will house. 

Hidden in your branches 
Where you shield one nest, 
Tree of strange surprises 
The sun will find your breast. 

The Boston Transcript Caroline Giltinan 



THE LAST FIRE 

You saw the last fires burning on the hill 
In that far autumn twilight when we took 

The future by the hand through woods as still 
As your heart is today, and crossed the brook. 

The brook that gurgled through the quietude 
Was just a slender stream that sauntered on. 

How were we to know the thing we should 
That we had crossed our narrow Rubicon? 

And after, in the shadow of the leaves, 

When your great eyes grew with the growing night 
They left the hollows where the twilight grieves 

Ajad mirrored back the bonfire on the height. 

And what quick flame was in your eyes I knew; 

And how the moment caught us on our way 
Is Time's own story written for a few 

In dust of ashes in your eyes today. 

The Outlook Herbert S. Gorman 

84 



HE WALKS WITH HIS CHIN IN THE AIR 

Life in you is an incurious madness. 
Tell me, how good is life that is not known 
And is hut felt, like wind against the temples. 
Like touch beneath the feet, of turf or stone? 

But do not hear rne, Lover of life; an answer 
Is burning like a sorrow in my breast: 
There is flame in feeling, fineness in the knowing, 
And who shall say which way of life is best? 

Pass on, Seeker, seeking the touch of spaces. 
Many the ways of life, and many a one 
Is all too brief a fluttering of hours 
To serve our purpose here beneath the sun. 

The New Republic Hazel Hall 

A MAN GOES BY 

Where his sure feet pass 
The crowds are strangely thinned 
They are the furrowed grass 
And he is the wind. 

Many go with the thought 
Of their footfall's little beat, 
Wearing their own lives caught 
Like shackles on their feet. 

But he is disinterested 
In feet and their fevered way; 
There is motive in his tread 
That was not shaped from clay* 

Thresholds may make him small, 
But the wind is in his feet 
Dominant, impersonal 
As he walks upon a street. 

The New Republic Hazel Hall 

85 



PASSERS 

The Patrician 

If culture had fluidity 

It -would drip from her finger-tips like rain, 
And where it spattered there would be 
Indelible purple stain. 

If quietude had tongue what speech 
Would iterate above her head, 
What clamorous echoes would beseech 
Behind her quiet tread. 

But spent blood leaves no stain nor stir, 
Save in that art which marks her ways 
The background dead hands make for her 
With their defeated days. 

Voices, A Journal of Verse Hazel Hall 



MATURITY 

He is companioned secretly 
When, with meditative feet, 
He passes down an idle street. 

A slow and misted company 
Disputes his solitude. Ahead, 
Like figures in a pageant, tread 
All his tomorrows with eyes that peer 
Over the near horizon's rim. 
He cannot hear above the dim 
Sound of their feet; he cannot clear 
His thought from the restricting gaze 
Fastened upon him from behind, 
Where follow the gracelessly resigned 
Figures of his yesterdays. 

The New Republic Hazel Hall 

86 



INCIDENTAL 

How can I rid me 
Of what is not mine 
This self that was youth's. 
This song swift and fine 
That wraps me with fire, 
And yet is not mine? 

Song to be seemly 
For her that is I, 
Is song low with sleep 
To be hummed in a sigh, 
As I weave cool reason 
Out of sounds that go by. 

And who would be wanting 
Song not her own, 
Though it warms with warmth 
The sun has not known, 
When she might be thinking, 
And cold and alone? 
The New Republic Hazel Hall 

SONNET 

When I was far too young to comprehend, 

My great-grandfather one day talked to me 

As if I were his wise and aged friend 

And did not hold a new doll on my knee. 

I can remember how his voice was kind, 

But what he said I could not understand; 

Only these words clung oddly in my mind: 

"To burn out like a candle in God's hand" . . . 

What other words he uttered I forget. 

These are like rubies from a ring unrolled 

That in my fingers wait to be reset 

When I learn better how to work with gold. 

Yet when he spoke them, all I did was stare 

And wonder at the whiteness of his hair. 

The Nation Ann Hamilton 

87 



Down by the river-front, beside the docks, 
Susie scrubs in a quick lunch bummer's hole. 
She steals the money from the cashier's box, 
Being too ugly now to steal his soul. 
Susie's a used-up -whiskey-dyed old shoddy 
Once she drew encores in the cabarets 
And sculptors sought her for her lovely body, 
So she did posing on her vacant days. 
Now when she shuffles past the wharves to work 
The sailors when they see her turn away 
And some make jokes at her Saint Vitus jerk 
And others give her nickels from their pay. 
Yet there's a bronze nymph in a museum room 
That Susie posed for when she was in bloom. 

The Nation Ann Hamilton 

PETER 

Peter is a plain lad 

With a strong will. 
He never looks behind him 

When he climbs a hill. 

There are many others 

Equally as wise, 
With as much sparkle 

In their young eyes; 

But once Peter traveled 

Over foreign lands 
And brought back perfume 

In his simple hands; 

And when, I breathe its fragrance 

Exotic and rare 
I think first of Peter 

And his red hair. 

The Nation * Ann Hamilton 

88 



THE IDIOT 

When earth, was madly green he lay 

And mocked his shadow's dancing feet, 

Or from his laughter ran away 

To watch the poppies hum the wheat. 

But when the frozen leaves whirled by 
And colored birds were blown afar, 

He climbed the bitter winter sky 
And hanged himself upon a star. 

Poetry , A Magazine of Verse 

David Osborne Hamilton 



AUNT SELINA 

When Aunt Selina comes to tea 
She always makes them send for me, 
And I must be polite and clean 
And seldom heard, but always seen. 
I must sit stiffly in my chair 
As long as Aunt Selina's there. 

But there are certain things I would 

Ask Aunt Selina if I could. 

Fd ask when she was small, like me, 

If she had ever climbed a tree. 

Or if she'd ever, ever gone 

Without her shoes and stockings on 

Where lovely puddles lay in rows 

To let the mud squeege through her toes. 

Or if she'd coasted on a sled, 

Or learned to stand upon her head 

And wave her feet and after that 

Fd ask her how she got so fat. 

These things I'd like to ask, and then 

I hope she would not come again! 

Harper 9 s Magazine Carol Haynes 



TREES WALKING 

'When on dark starless roads I ride, 
Grim, stalwart oaks step out to see; 
And when I near my own hillside, 
White birches run to welcome me. 

In summer, when the long days wane, 
Elms stroll against an orient sky, 
While in the moonlit country lane, 
Poplars in couples hurry by. 

Bronze beeches, walking hand in hand, 
With me climb glowing autumn slopes; 
While serried ranks of cedars band 
To march and fight for my lost hopes. 

In God's cathedral, fragrant, dim, 
The altars rise both far and free, 
While pines swing censors high to Him 
And open endless aisles for me. 

The Lyric West Edna G. Henry 



DUSK 

They tell me she is beautiful, my city, 
That she is colorful and quaint; alone 
Among the cities. But I I who have known 
Her tenderness, her courage, and her pity; 
Have felt her forces mold me, mind and bone, 
Life after life, up from her first beginning 
How can I think of her in wood and stonel 
To others she has given of her beauty: 
Her gardens, and her dim old faded ways; 
Her laughter, and her happy drifting hours; 

90 



Glad spendthrift April, squandering her flowers; 

The sharp still wonder of her autumn days; 

Her chimes, that shimmer from St. Michael's steeple 

Across the deep maturity of June 

Like sunlight slanting over open water 

Under a high blue listless afternoon. 

But when the dusk is deep upon the harbor, 

She finds me where her rivers meet and speak, 

And while the constellations gem the silence 

High overhead, her cheek is on my cheek. 

I know her in the thrill behind the dark 

When sleep brims all her silent thoroughfares. 

She is the glamour in the quiet park 

That kindles simple things like grass and trees; 

Wistful and wanton as her sea-born airs, 

Bringer of dim rich age-old memories. 

Out on the gloom-deep water, when the nights 

Are choked with fog, and perilous, and blind, 

She is the faith that tends the calling lights. 

Hers is the stifled voice of harbor bells, 

Muffled and broken by the mist and wind. 

Hers are the eyes through which I look on life 

And find it brave and splendid. And the stir 

Of hidden music shaping all my songs, 

And these my songs, my all, belong to her. 

Poetry 9 A Magazine of Verse DuBose Heyward 



EDGAR ALLAN POE 

Once in the starlight 
When tides were low, 

And surf fell sobbing 
To the undertow, 

I trod the windless dunes 
Alone with Edgar Poe. 

91 



Dim and far behind us, 

Like a fabled bloom 
On the myrtle thickets, 

In the swaying gloom 
Hung the clustered windows 

Of the barrack-room. 

Faint on the evening, 

Tenuous and far 
As the beauty shaken 

From a vagrant star, 
Throbbed the ache and passion 

Of an old guitar. 

Life closed behind us 
Like a swinging gate, 

Leaving us unfettered 
And emancipate; 

Confidants of Destiny, 
Intimates of Fate. 

I could only cower 
Silent, while the night, 

Seething with its planets, 
Parted to our sight, 

Showing us infinity 
In its breadth and height. 

But my chosen comrade, 
Tossing back his hair 

With the old loved gesture, 
Raised his face, and there 

Shone that agony that those 
Loved of God must bear. 

Oh, we heard the many things 

Silence has to say 
He and I together 

As alone we lay 
Waiting for the slow sweet 

Miracle of day. 

92 



When the bugle's silver 

Spiralled up the dawn 
Dew-clear, night-cool, 

And the stars were gone, 
I arose exultant, 

Like a man new-born. 

But my friend and master, 

Heavy-limbed and spent, 
Turned, as one must turn at last 

From the sacrament; 
And his eyes were deep with God's 

Burning discontent. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse DuBose Heyward 



THE MOUNTAIN GRAVEYARD 

High on the mountain where the storm-heads are, 
Lying where all may see, there is a place 

As hideous and shocking as a scar 

That mars the beauty of a well-loved face. 

Infinitely drear, and raw, and nude, 

It waits and listens in the solitude* 

There is no friendly tree in all that square 
Of scattered stones and arid, troubled clay. 

Bleak as the creed of those who journey there, 
Hard as the code by which they lived their day, 

It gives them all they ask of it its best; 

No beauty and no softness only rest. 

But oh, the pity of it all is this: 

They lived with beauty and their eyes were blind. 
Dreaming of far strong joys, they came to miss 

Those that were near. So at the last we find 
No tenderness of blossom, but instead 
Mute emblems of the longings of the dead. 

93 



These rain-bleached sea-shells in an ordered row 

Tell of an ocean that they never knew 
Except in dreams which, through the ebb and flow 

Of years, set seaward as the torrents do. 
Always they planned to follow, knowing deep 
Within their hearts that dreams are but for sleep. 

And see these tawdry bits of broken glass 

Which speak the foreign glories of the town 

The crowds, the lights; these too are dreams that pass 
Here where the hemming walls of rock look down, 

And clasp their children fast within their keep 

Until they cradle them at last to sleep. 

Yet all the while if they could only know 

The beauty that is theirs to breathe and touch 

The whisper of the dawn across the snow, 

The vast low-drifting clouds that love them much 

Oh, they could call their dreams home down the sky, 

And carry beauty with them when they die. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse DuBose Heyward 



AUTUMN LEAVES 

The dear old ladies whose cheeks are pink 
In spite of the years of Winter's chill, 
Are like the Autumn leaves I think, 
A little crumpled, but lovely still. 

The Stepladder Janie Screven Heyward 



THRENODY 

I made a slow lament for you, lost magic 
Of schoolboy love and dreams in shadowed places, 
Where passed in visible parade, the tragic 
Desires of vanished gods and women's faces. 

On violins beneath long, undisputed 
New England orchards sombred by the spirit 
Of endless autumn, I awoke the muted 
Strings of your lament, but none could hear it, 

Except, perhaps, one passerby, who skirted 
The upland fields in that avoided spot; 
And, marveling at the music in deserted 
Orchards, hurried on, and soon forgot. 

The Bookman Robert Silliman Hillyer 



ELEGY 

On a Dead Mermaid 
Washed Ashore at Plymouth Rock 

Pallidly sleeping, the Ocean's mysterious daughter 
Lies in the lee of the boulder that shattered her 

charms; 

Dawn rushes over the level horizon of water 
And touches to flickering crimson her face and her 

arms, 

While every scale in that marvelous tail 
Quivers with colour like sun on a Mediterranean sail. 

Could you not keep to the ocean that lulls the 

Equator, 

Soulless, immortal, and fatally fair to the gaze, 
Or were you called to the North by an ecstasy greater 
Than any you knew in those ancient and terrible days 

95 



When all your delight was to flash on the sight 
Of the wondering sailor and lure him to death in the 
watery night? 

Was there, perhaps, on the deck of some faraway 

vessel 
A lad from New England whose fancy you failed to 

ensnare? 
Who, born of this virtuous rock, and accustomed to 

wrestle 

With heauty in all of its forms, became your despair, 
And awoke in your breast a mortal unrest 
That dragged you away from the South to your death 

in the cold Northwest? 

Pallidly sleeping, your body is shorn of its magic, 
But Death gives a soul to whatever is lovely and dies. 
Now the Ocean reclaims you again, lest a marvel so 

tragic 
Remain to be mocked by our earthly and virtuous 

eyes, 

And reason redeems already what seems 
Only a fable like all of our strange and beautiful 

dreams. 

The New Republic Robert Silliman Hillyer 



FOR MAISTER GEOFFREY CHAUCER 

A bard there was, and that a worthy wight, 
Who from the time that he began to write 
Served God and beauty with an humble mind, 
And most of all, he knew and loved mankind. 
Laughing he was, and quick at many a jest; 
The Lord loves mirth the devil take the rest! 
A simple grace ere wine was poured at dinner, 
A ready hand outstretched to saint and sinner, 
A prayer at times, not lengthy but devout, 
This was our poet's faith without a doubt* 
Travel he loved, and wonders had to tell 
96 



Of royal France and Italy as well, 
And everywhere he went, his furtive pen 
Took down the secrets of his fellow-men, 
Their faces and their stories, high and low, 
From lordly Petrarch and Boccaccio 
Unto the meanest villein who could hold 
Some tavern audience with the tales he told. 
Yet with his scrivening, he never swerved 
From duty to King Edward, whom he served, 
And though he roamed both France and Italy, 
England was where he ever longed to be, 
And thither he returned with magic spoils 
That England might have pleasure of his toils, 
And hear his brave chivalric stories sung 
By English pilgrims in the English tongue. 
Noble his spirit was, and gay his heart; 
A judge of wine, a master of his art, 
He loved all men, nor was ashamed to show it: 
He was a very parfit, gentil poet, 
Gentil in life, and parfit in his rhyme, 
God send us such another in our time! 

The Outlook Robert Silliman Hillyer 



PATHS ACROSS THE SEA 

On the silver crest of the ocean's breast, 
With the winds of rare delight, 
My ship and I like sea-wraiths fly 
To the surge of a tropic night. 

On the silver crest of the lustred west, 
Like the dance of a far-flung tune, 
We cleave a way of star-struck spray 
On our path to the fairy moon. 

The Freeman Arthur Crew Inma* 

97 



RIVER SONG 

Down the great and ponderous river, 

A man, lean, sinewy, tireless, 

Poles his deeply laden barge. 

And as he poles he chants a song, 

Monotonous, dreary, sad, 

A song from the centuries past, 

Born when the earth and race were young, 

Ages and ages ago. 

When he is dead. 

And the gay poppies on the bank 

Flaunt above his grave, 

Another, 

Even as he, 

Will pole his deeply laden barge, 

Down the great and ponderous river 

Awhile 

Ere he too passes. 

But the song will not die. 
Contemporary Verse Arthur Crew Inman 



IN APRIL 

Something back in April 

Wracked my heart with pain, 
Putting out joy's fires 

Like a fog-hunched rain. 

Something back in April 

Quenched the joy I had; 
What, I can't remember 

April was so gladl 

Voices, A Journal of Verse 

Winifred Virginia Jackson 
98 



UNDER-CURRENTS 

I was like a pebble 

On a sandy shore 
Where the sea waves stamped their feet 

At the green land's door. 

I was like a pebble 

That a gnarled hand, cool, 
Picked up from the sun-domed sands, 
'Flung into a pool. 

Is it then to wonder 

That, from where I lie. 
All I send to heaven is 

But a bitter cry? 

Voices, A Journal of Verse 

Winifred Virginia Jackson 

THE NORTHWEST CORNER 

I wish that Nate had let me grow 

Some roses there! 
I would have pulled the phlox, but, oh, 

I did not dare ! 

His mother planted of that phlox; 

So stiff and tall 
And friendlessly it grew, nor leaned 

Against the wall. 

For forty years I longed to have, 

Amid the fret, 
Some roses in the garden just 

To help forget. 

/ wish that Nate had let 'me grow 

Some roses there! 
I would have pulled the phlox, but, oh, 

I did not dare! 

The Outlook Winifred Virginia fctckson 



HERITAGE 

Door, I was, yes, afraid of you. 

So slowly you swung back, 
Your bending murmurs falling in 

The dark, with creak and crack. 

I pooh-poohed each move of yours. 

I whispered, "Tis the wind, 
That scurries by, swift poking you 

With mischief's fingered mind!" 

But suddenly a nameless fear 

Coiled like a snake of hate, 
And hissed and struck! I leaped and closed 

And locked you, cursing fate! 

Door, was I then afraid of you? 

I now lean low and hide 
More fearful of the shapeless things 

That stand and wait outside. 

Voices, A Journal of Verse 

Winifred Virginia Jackson 



MEASURE 

When we count out our gold at the end of the day, 
And have filtered the dross that has cumbered the way; 
Oh! What were the hold of our treasury then 
Save the love we have shown to the children of men. 

The Crisis Georgia Douglas Johnson 



100 



VIRGINIANA 

Slow turns the water by the green marshes, 

In Virginia. 

Overhead the sea fowl 

Make silver flashes, cry harsh as peacocks. 

Capes and islands stand, 

Ocean thunders, 

The light houses burn red and gold stars. 

In Virginia 

Run a hundred rivers. 

The dogwood is in blossom, 

The pink honeysuckle, 

The fringe tree. 

My love is the ghostly armed sycamore, 

My loves are the yellow pine and the white pine, 

My love is 'the mountain linden. 

Mine is the cedar. 

Ancient forest, 

Hemlock-mantled cliff, 

Black cohosh, 

Golden-rod, ironweed, 

And purple farewell-summer. 

Maple red in the autumn, 

And plunge of the mountain brook. 

The wind bends the wheat ears, 

The wind bends the corn, 

The wild grape to the vineyard grape 

Sends the season's greetings. 

Timothy, clover, 

Apple, peach! 

The blue grass talks to the moss and fern. 

Sapphire-shadowed, deep-bosomed, long-limbed, 
Mountains lie in the garden of the sky, 
Evening is a passion flower, morning is a rose! 

101 



Old England sailed to Virginia, 
Bold Scotland sailed, 
Vine-wreathed France sailed, 
And the Rhine sailed, 
And Ulster and Cork and Killarney, 
Out of Africa out of Africa! 
Guinea Coast, Guinea Coast, 
Senegambia, Dahomey 
Now One, 
Now Virginia! 

Pocahontas steals through the forest, 

Along the Blue Ridge ride the Knights of the Horse- 
shoe, 

Young George Washington measures neighbour's 
land from neighbour, 

In the firelight Thomas Jefferson plays his violin. 

Violin, violin! 

Patrick Henry speaks loud in Saint John's church. 

Andrew Lewis lifts his flintlock, 

Fringed Hunting Shirt, where are you going? 

George Rogers Clarke takes Kagkaskia and Vincennes. 

They tend tobacco, 
And they hoe the corn, 
Colored folk singing, 
Singing sweetly of heaven 
And the Lord Jesus. 
Broad are the tobacco leaves, 
Narrow are the corn blades, 

Little blue morning glories run through the corn 
fields. 

Sumach, sumach! 

Blue-berried cedar, 

Persimmon and pawpaw, 

Chineruepin. 

Have you seen the 'possum? 

Have you seen the 'coon? 

10$ 



Have you heard the whippoorwill? 
Whippoorwill ! Whippoorwill! 
Whip poor will ! 

White top wagons 

Rolling westward. 

Bearded men 

Looking westward. 

Women, children, 

Gazing westward. 

Kentucky! 

Ohio! 

Halt at eve and build the fire. 

Dogs, 

Long guns, 

Household gear. 

'Ware the Indian! 

White top wagons going westward. 

Edgar Allan Poe 
Walking in the moonlight, 
In the woods of Alhemarle, 
'Neath the trees of Richmond, 
Pondering names of women, 

Annabel Annie, 

Lenore Ulalmne. 

JVTaury, Maury! 

What of Winds and Currents? 

Maury, Maury, 

Ocean rover! 

But when you come to die, 

"Carry me through Goshen Pass 

When the rhododendron is in bloom!" 

Men in gray, 
Men in blue, 
Very young men, 
Meet by a river. 

103 



Overhead are fruit trees. 

"Water water! 

We will drink, then fight." 

"0 God, why do we 

Fight anyhow? 

It's a good swimming hole 

And the cherries are ripe!" 

Bronze men on bronze horses, 

Down the long avenue, 

They ride in the sky, 

Bronze men. 

Stuart cries to Jackson, 

Jackson cries to Lee, 

Lee cries to Washington. 

Bronze men. 

Great soldiers. 

The church bells ring, 

In Virginia. 

Sonorous, 

Sweet, 

In the sunshine, 

In the rain. 

Salvation! It is Sunday. 

Salvation! It is Sunday 9 

In Virginia. 

Locust trees in bloom, 

Long grass in the church yard, 

June bugs zooning round the roses, 

First bell second bell! 

All the ladies are in church. 

Now the men will follow, 

In Virginia, 

In Virginia 1 

The Reviewer Mary Johnston 



104 



PREMONITION 

The colorless thin voices of the dark 
Grow fainter as the moon begins to rise, 
And like a scimitar the river lies 
Curving among pale trees with silvered bark. 
Here at this height we stand, whose lips contain 
Our vain protesting youth that stirs and cries 
Dumbly within us. Under widened skies 
Star-deep in silence, how should we complain? 

The hours move slowly toward their shining end, 
Brimmed with broad moonlight and the damp of earth. 
We are but misers who are forced to spend 
Our heritage of time, and face long dearth 
Of wordless nights beneath moon-whitened trees, 
In years to come, more desolate than these. 

The Outlook Bernice Lesbia Kenyan 



ANSWER TO A TIMID LOVER 

These shall be my songs to you: 
Water running up a hill, 
Stones singing as birds do, 
Rain falling hot and shrill, 

Black flames burning high, 
Wind clouds changless and at rest, 
Sun that sets in the eastern sky 
And rises in the west! 

You may know by these things 

I am coming and very near; 

Then hide! hide when the first stone sings, 

Lest you be stricken down with fear! 

The Outlook Bernice Lesbia Kenyan 

105 



HOMECOMING IN STORM 

The ocean thunders in the caverned sky, 
And gulls fall straight against a crest of foam, 
The black wind roars to bring the great storm by, 
And all my sails are full to bear me home! 
Thus I come in with rain, and salty lips 
Crusted with spray, and eyes that see for miles 
Over the harbor bar, to the huddled ships, 
And docks, and roofs, and maple-darkened aisles. 

The rain smells all of maple and of hay, 
And now I put the sea behind my back, 
And cross the streets and fields in the old way, 
With all the clouds above me hanging black, 
And stand here in the rain before your door 
Moveless with joy, to know you near once more. 

The Nation Bernice Lesbia Kenyan 



NOCTURNE 

I 

Now of this nearness take your deep repose; 

Put the dim world aside. . . . 

Peace like the sea, as level and as wide, 
Over your eyelids flows. 

II 

No time can touch you, where the slow profound 
Measures of silence beat 
Eternally, whose music is complete 

Beyond all earthly sound. 

Ill 

Weighted with darkness bend your sorrowful head; 

The wind upon your brow 

The firm, cool touch of quiet softly now 
Is laid, till light be fled. 

106 



IV 

Gone is the hunger the insatiate thing 

The slowly ravening flame; 

Vanished the fear that had no certain name, 
Most sure their banishing. 

V 
Slow tides of air move over you to fold 

The ancient darkness near, 

Where silently through cloud, faint stars appear. 
That are so still and old. 

VI 

Oh, never shall the dream of morning find 

Its way to you, nor break 

Your shadow-marvel of rest, to bid you wake 
And leave your peace behind. 

The Outlook Bernice Lesbia Kenyan 



SUNRISE 

I've never seen the great sun rise, 

For then I am in bed; 
The sands of slumber in my eyes 

Hold down my drowsy head. 

I think the sun climbs up the sky 

And throws the clouds away, 
Then girds her flaming tunic high 

And strides to meet the day. 

Soft-touched by bird's wings is her head; 

Her feet caressed by trees; 
She turns their leaves to gold and red 

And stoops to drink the seas. 

Lincoln Lore Katharine Kosraok 

107 



BLIND CLAY 

onaparte Johnson and Nero Katz 
it in the shade and discuss doormats 
Uornhusk, fiber, and metal-meshed) , 
Tiile men stalk death in Omsk and Resht. 

is Grace of the Garter and tall Lord James 
it in their club beside the Thames, 
nd prate of polo and cricket score 
y Nile and Ganges the Red fires roar. 

is Grace and Katz must be blood-brother, 
nd Johnson and James must be each other, 
eer and plowman are one blind clay, 
Tien their souls are born in a rut and stay. 

The Nation Mary Fleming Labaree 



GOOD-BYE TO MY MOTHER 
(Kansas Authors' Club Prize Poem for 1921) 

et not your heart be altogether lonely 
Tow that the last, reluctant words are said, 
take away my face and voice, but leave you 
[y heart, instead. 

>ur separate lives will only make love dearer, 
nd beautiful as distant mountains are, 
Then all the little hills erase each other, 
jid leave no scar. 

or every westward-blowing wind is my wind, 
Pawning I send you, when my sun is high, 
jid all God's lovely stars are ours together. 
'Ood-bye ! Good-bye ! 

The Kansas City Star Margaret LarTdn 

108 



THE JILT 
I 

Let other feet go drudging 

About the house he built! 
A free girl, a jilted girl 

Pm glad he was a jilt. 

We quarrelled till it almost 

Destroyed my breath of life. 
He nagged me and bullied me, 

As if I'd been his wife. 

II 

We grew cold and bitter 

The more we would explain, 
And if we held our tongues 

The worse it was again. 

He flashed a cruel sign, 

I flashed a cruel word, 
And neither could forget 

The blame the other heard. 

Ill 

But his eyes could be tender with love, and his voice 

how tender! 
Some words he sang are with me the whole day 

through. 

I hang out the linen and burnish the brass and copper, 
And they won't go out of my head, whatever I do. 

Strange how they come when I feel alone and for- 
saken, 
How they wake me up when the dawn in my room 

is hazy, 
How they drug me asleep when the night has darkened 

my pillow! 

Ah, a song will sing in your head when your heart 
is crazy! 

109 



IV 

What can I do but sil here and shake 
And let the windows rattle mournfully, 

While Sunday brings him never and Monday brings 

him not, 
And winter hides the town away from me 

Dreaming how he drew my soul from my lips, 

Seeming just to hear forevermore 
What my heart tells the clock, what the clock tells 
my heart, 

Dreaming back the springtime at my door? 

V 

Why should I curl my hair for him? 

He said the trouble couldn't be mended, 
He said it must be good-bye and go; 

And he took up his hat, and all was ended. 

So all was over. And I'm not dead! 

And Fve shed all the tears I'm going to shed! 

And now he's wanting to come again? 

Perhaps he's sorry, perhaps he misses 
The hill-top girl. Well, let him come! 

But no more love and no more kisses 
Whatever the future, gay or grim, 
Why should I curl my hair for him? 

VI 

I shall go out in the sun today. 
I don't know whether to laugh or pray, 
For along the waking paths of spring 
Bird calls to bird till the branches ring. 

Something stirs me spring's own will 
To wander to the edge of the hill, 
Where I can see as I look down 
Patches of green on the gray old town. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse Agnes Lee 

no 



ON BEING TOLD THAT 
MY CHILD RESEMBLES ME 

I would not have you of my fashioning, 
Sweet child not yours these hands that spill the 

wine 
Life proffers! You, with steadier grasp than mine, 

Shall lift the chalice high; 
Shall drink and, drinking, sing 

The song that on my lips would never reach the 
sky! 

Not yours these faltering feet, these straining eyes 
That cannot see the stars for mists of earth! 
Oh, naught have I to give you of my dearth! 

For your clear gaze shall see 
Beauty through all disguise, 

And winged shall be your feet like those of 
Mercury ! 

Yet for your voice of sweetness and of power 
My voice shall set the key; my candle-light 
Shall fire your torch to flame through all the night. 

Be, dear one if you must 
Be aught of me the flower 

Of all my aspirations, blossoming from their 
dust! 

The Lyric Mary Sinton Leitch 



SILENCE 

What do I love the dearest in my wood? 
The violets as white as virgin's snood, 
The gauzy humming-bird? 
The scurrying insect-life when moss is stirred 
By an inquiring hand? 

ill 



The odors that the Balmy south wind brings? 
The brown pine-needles carpeting the land 
Richer than any rug from Samarcand? 
Oh dearly, dearly do I love these things! 

And yet, of all, I love the silence best 
The silence of the wood 
That gently seems to nest 
And nestle in the over-burdened heart; 
Soft as the feathered breast 
Of yonder thrush that hovers near her brood; 
Silence that soothes the ache and pain and smart 
Of Life's swift lash laid on the quivering soul. 
It is a chalice full of sanctities, 
It is a benediction breathing peace. 
It is as calm, as deep, 
As cool green wells of sleep 
In which the spirit sinks and is made whole. 
And if from some bird-throat a sudden rill 
Of sound may flow, 

It is but etched against the stillness so 
That all the wood seems even more deeply still. 

Yet most for this I love the silence best 
That it is big with longings unexpressed 
And lyric with unutterable song; 
Astir with winds and wings 
That ever with their soundless whisperings 
Up-lift my heart and make my spirit strong. 
For silence is as wide 

And boundless as the wide and boundless sea: 
It flows around me in a mighty tide 
Of vast beatitude, 

Oh may I ever live upon the shore 
Of its beneficent immensity 

That, when life's clamor grows too harsh and rude, 
I may steal forth to the great quietude; 
That I may feel its healing waters pour 
Over my tired soul and wash it clean 
Of trivial things and mean! 

And thus it is the silence of the wood, 

112 



The silence of renewal and of rest, 
That I love best 
The silence that today envelops me, 
Yet bears within its bosom all eternity. 

The Lyric West Mary Sinton Leitch 



TO A HERMIT THRUSH 

Great lyricist, you sing of vanished ships 
Whose spirits haunt the mist-enshrouded dune, 
Or of long-dead, forgotten lovers' lips 
That drank their draughts of joy beneath the moon; 

Of Cleopatra's form, of Helen's face, 
Of Ceasar's fame: Egypt and Greece and Rome 
You know not but all glory and all grace 
Within your cosmic strains are gathered home. 

And I who feel within my aching breast 
Your own wild, sweet necessity to sing; 
When clouds, rose-petalled, blossom in the west 
Or when arbutus buds are pink with spring, 

I must delay and grope for speech, with art 
Striving in vain to capture ecstacy; 
While unrestrained you pour your lyric heart 
Your lyric soul itself upon the sky, 

So clearly soars your pure, celestial song 
Above poor human need of stammering words. 
Ah, that is poetry! Speech does beauty wrong. 
I think there are no poets save the birds. 

The Stepladder Mary Sinton Leitch 



113 



IN PRAISE OF JOHNNY APPLESEED 
Born 1775-Died 1847 

Johnny Appleseed, whose real name was John 
Chapman, was horn in New England in 1775. He 
died near Fort Wayne in 1847. He was less than 
thirty years of age when he hegan the picturesque and 
purposeful life-work to which Mr. Lindsay pays vivid 
tribute in the following pages. In 1803, or perhaps 
a bit earlier, young Chapman moved westward to the 
neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. There he 
began to work out the settled purpose of his life, 
which was to move westward, keeping always a little 
in advance of the peopled frontier, planting orchards 
as he went. As civilization periodically caught up 
with him, he disposed of his trees for a "lip-penny 
bit" apiece, for food or old clothes, or, more fre- 
quently, gave them away. 

For forty-six years he walked barefoot and unarmed 
through the wilderness. He was often clothed only 
in an old coffee-sack, with holes for his head and 
arms, and carried a tin pan, which often served as 
his hat. The Indians regarded him as a great "medi- 
cine-man," doubtless because he scattered through the 
woods the seeds of medicinal plants, such as catnip 
and pennyroyal. He was a lover of children and ani- 
mals. He was never molested by the Indians or by 
the beasts. He was welcomed everywhere. He lived 
to see his trees bearing fruit over a territory of a 
hundred thousand acres. 

He was a sort of secular medicant friar. An inci- 
dental part of his mission was to spread the doctrines 
of Emanuei Swedenborg. In the following poem Mr. 
Lindsay pays homage to a character that has been 
too often treated as eccentric only, The Editor. 

I. OVER THE APPALACHIAN BARRICADE 
In the days of President Washington, 
The glory of the nations, 

114 



Dust and ashes, 
Snow and sleet, 
And hay and oats and wheat, 
Blew west, 

Crossed the Appalachians, 

Found the glades of rotting leaves, the soft deer- 
pastures, 

The farms of the far-off future 
In the forest. 
Colts jumped the fence, 
Snorting, ramping, snapping, sniffing, 
With gastronomic calculations, 
Crossed the Appalachians, 
The east walls of our citadel, 
And turned to gold-horned unicorns, 
Feasting in the dim, volunteer farms of the forest. 
Stripedest, kickingest kittens escaped, 
Caterwauling "Yankee Doodle Dandy," 
Renounced their poor relations, 
Crossed the Appalachians, 
And turned to tiny tigers 
In the humorous forest. 
Chickens escaped 
From farmyard congregations, 
Crossed the Appalachians, 
And turned to amher trumpets 
On the ramparts of our Hoosiers' nest and citadel, 
Millennial heralds 
Of the mazy forest. 
Pigs broke loose, scrambled west, 
Scorned their loathsome stations, 
Crossed the Appalachians, 
Turned to roaming, foaming wild boars 
Of the forest. 

The smallest, blindest puppies toddled west 
While their eyes were coming open, 
And, with misty observations, 
Crossed the Appalachians, 
Barked, barked, barked 

115 



At the glow-worms and the marsh lights and the 

lightning-bugs, 

And turned to ravening wolves 
Of the forest. 

Crazy parrots and canaries flew west, 
Drunk on May-time revelations, 
Crossed the Appalachians, 
And turned to delirious, flower-dressed fairies 
Of the lazy forest. 

Haughtiest swans and peacocks swept west, 
And, despite soft derivations, 
Crossed the Appalachians, 
And turned to blazing warrior souls 
Of the forest, 
Singing the ways 
Of the Ancient of Days, 
And the "Old Continentals 
In their ragged regimentals," 
With bard's imaginations, 
Crossed the Appalachians. 
And 
A boy 
Blew west, 

And with prayers and incantations, 
And with "Yankee Doodle Dandy," 
Crossed the Appalachians, 
And was "young John Chapman," 
Then 

"Johnny Appleseed, Johnny Appleseed," 
Chief of the fastnesses, dappled and vast, 
In a pack on his back, 
In a deer-hide sack, 
The beautiful orchards of the past, 
The ghosts of all the forests and the groves 
In that pack on his back, 
In that talisman sack, 
Tomorrow's peaches, pears, and cherries, 
Tomorrow's grapes and red raspberries, 
Seeds and tree souls, precious things, 



Feathered with microscopic wings, 
All the outdoors the child heart knows. 
And the apple, green, red, and white, 
Sun of his day and his night 
The apple allied to the thorn, 
Child of the rose. 
Porches untrod of forest houses 
All before him, all day long, 
"Yankee Doodle" his marching song; 
And the evening breeze 
Joined his psalms of praise 
As he sang the ways 
Of the Ajicient of Days. 

Leaving behind august Virginia, 

Proud Massachusetts, and proud Maine, 

Planting the trees that would march and train 

On, in his name to the great Pacific, 

Like Birnam wood to Dunsinane, 

Johnny Appleseed swept on, 

Every shackle gone, 

Loving every sloshy brake, 

Loving every skunk and snake, 

Loving every leathery weed, 

Johnny Appleseed, Johnny Appleseed, 

Master and ruler of the unicorn-ramping forest, 

The tiger-mewing forest, 

The rooster-trumpeting, boar-foaming, wolf-ravening 

forest, 

The spirit-haunted, fairy-enchanted forest. 
Stupendous and endless, 
Searching its perilous ways 
In the name of the Ancient of Days. 

II. THE INDIANS WORSHIP HIM, BUT HE HURRIES ON 

Painted kings in the midst of the clearings 
Heard him asking his friends the eagles 
To guard each planted seed and seedling. 

117 



Then he was a god, to the red man's dreaming; 
Then the chiefs brought treasures grotesque and 

fair, 

Magical trinkets and pipes and guns, 
Beads and furs from their medicine-lair, 
Stuck holy feathers in his hair, 
Hailed him with austere delight. 
The orchard god was their guest through the night. 

While the late snow blew from bleak Lake Erie, 
Scourging rock and river and reed, 
All night long they made great medicine 
For Jonathan Chapman, 
Johnny Appleseed, 
Johnny Appleseed; 

And as though his heart were a wind-blown wheat- 
sheaf, 

As though his heart were a new-built nest, 
As though their heaven house were his breast, 
In swept the snow-birds singing glory. 
And I hear his bird heart beat its story, 
Hear yet how the ghost of the forest shivers, 
Hear yet the cry of the gray, old orchards, 
Dim and decaying by the rivers, 
And the timid wings of the bird-ghosts beating, 
And the ghosts of the tom-toms beating, beating. 

But he left their wigwams and their love. 

By the hour of dawn he was proud and stark, 

Kissed the Indian babes with a sigh, 

Went forth to live on roots and bark, 

Sleep in the trees, while the years howled by. 

Calling the catamounts by name, 

And buffalo bulls no hand could tame, 

Slaying never a living creature, 

Joining the birds in every game, 

With the gorgeous turkey gobblers mocking, 

With *he lean-necked eagles boxing and shouting; 

118 



Sticking their feathers in his hair, 

Turkey feathers, 

Eagle feathers, 

Trading hearts with the whole young earth, 

Swept on winged and wonder-crested, 

Bare-armed, barefooted, and bare-breasted. 

The maples, shedding their spinning seeds, 

Called to his appleseeds in the ground, 

Vast chestnut-trees, with their butterfly nations, 

Called to his seeds without a sound. 

And the chipmunk turned a somersault, 

And the foxes danced the Virginia reel; 

Hawthorne and crab-thorn bent, rain-wet, 

And dropped their flowers in his night-black hair; 

And the soft fawns stopped for his perorations; 

And his black eyes shone through the forest-gleam, 

And he plunged young hands into new-turned earth, 

And prayed dear orchard boughs into birth; 

And he ran with the rabbit and slept with the stream. 

And so for us he made great medicine, 

And so for us he made great medicine, 

In the days of President Washington. 

III. JOHNNY APPLESEED'S OLD AGE 

Long, long after, 

When settlers put up beam and rafter, 

They asked of the birds: "Who gave this fruit? 

Who watched this fence till the seeds took root? 

Who gave these boughs?" They asked the sky, 

And there was no reply. 

But the robin might have said, 

"To the farthest West he has followed the sun, 

His life and his empire just begun." 

Self-scourged, like a monk, with a throne for wages, 
Stripped like the iron-souled Hindu sages, 
Draped like a statue, in strings like a scarecrow, 

119 



His helmet-hal an old tin pan, 

But worn in the love of the heart of man, 

More sane than the helm of Tamerlane, 

Hairy Ainu, wild man of Borneo, Robinson Crusoe 

Johnny Appleseed; 
And the robin might have said, 
"Sowing, he goes to the far, new West, 
With the apple, the sun of his burning breast 
The apple allied to the thorn, 
Child of the rose." 

Washington buried in Virginia, 
Jackson buried in Tennessee, 
Young Lincoln, dreaming in Illinois, 
And Johnny Appleseed, priestly and free, 
Knotted and gnarled, past seventy years, 
Still planted on in the woods alone. 
Ohio and young Indiana 
These were his wide altar-stone, 
Where still he burnt out flesh and bone. 

Twenty days ahead of the Indian, twenty years ahead 

of the white man, 
At last the Indian overtook him, at last the Indian 

hurried past him; 
At last the white man overtook him, at last the white 

man hurried past him; 
At last his own trees overtook him, at last his own 

trees hurried past him. 
Many cats were tame again, 
Many ponies tame again, 
Many pigs were tame again, 
Many canaries tame again; 
And the real frontier was his sun-burnt breast. 

From the fiery core of that apple, the earth, 
Sprang apple-amaranths divine. 
Love's orchards climbed to the heavens of the West, 
And snowed the earthly sod with flowers. 
120 



Farm hands from the terraces of the hlest 

Danced on the mists with their ladies fine; 

And Johnny Appleseed laughed with his dreams, 

And swam once more the ice-cold streams. 

And the doves of the spirit swept through the hours, 

With doom-calls, love-calls, death-calls, dream-calls; 

And Johnny Appleseed, all the year, 

Lifted his hands to the farm-filled sky, 

To the apple-harvesters busy on high; 

And so once more his youth began, 

And so for us he made great medicine 

Johnny Appleseed, medicine-man. 

Then 

The sun was their turned-up barrel, 

Out of which their apples rolled, 

Down the repeated terraces, 

Thumping across the gold, 

A presence in each apple that touched the forest mold, 

A ballot-box in each apple, 

A state capital in each apple, 

Great high schools, great colleges, 

All America in each apple, 

Each red, rich, round, and bouncing moon 

That touched the forest mold. 

Like scrolls and rolled-up flags of silk, 

He saw the fruits unfold, 

All color and all glory in one wild-flower-tangled 
dream, 

Confusion and death sweetness, and a thicket of crab- 
thorns, 

Heart of a hundred midnights, heart of thousand 
morns, 

Heaven's boughs bent down with their alchemy, 

Perfumed airs, and thoughts of wonder* 

And the dew on the grass and his own cold tears 

Were one in brooding mystery, 

Though death's loud thunder came upon him, 

121 



Though death's Idud thunder struck him down; 

The houghs and the proud thoughts swept through the 

thunder, 

Till he saw the wide nation, each State a flower, 
Each petal a park for holy feet, 
With wild fawns merry on every street, 
The vista of a thousand years, flower-lighted and 

complete. 

Hear the lazy weeds murmuring, bays and rivers whis- 
pering, 

From Michigan to Texas, California to Maine; 
Listen to the eagles, screaming, calling, 
"Johnny Appleseed, Johnny Appleseed," 
There by the doors of old Fort Wayne. 

In the four-poster bed Johnny Appleseed built, 
Autumn rains were the curtains, autumn leaves were 

the quilt. 
He laid him down sweetly, and slept through the 

night, 

Like a bump on a log, like a stone washed white, 
There by the doors of old Fort Wayne. 

The Century Magazine Vachel Lindsay 



MIRRORS 

I am told that beauty is a reflection. 

I am wondering if it is true that beauty does not exist, 

That it is a reflection. 

If beauty is a reflection there must somewhere be a 

mirror. * 

The mirror itself may be beauty. 
It is very puzzling. 

122 



I am in an elevated train. 

An old woman and a young woman are sitting 

together. 

It is by chance that they are sitting together. 
They are strangers. 

I can see that the young woman is modish. 

High heels and pumps are part of her beauty. 

A purple hat, the folds of her veil, suggestions of color 

are parts of her beauty. 
Slimness, contour, languor of manner 
Industriously support and reassure her beauty. 
I can see her beauty. 
It is not a reflection, 

I can see the slimness of the old woman. 

It is lean. 

I am aware of her contour. 

It is hungry. 

The old woman does not have a purple hat 

But there is a veil over her face. 

The pattern of the veil is fine and very soft 

It was woven by pain. 

The eyes of the old woman have been set in light 

It is not a common light. 

It was kindled by joy. 

I am not looking at die old woman. 

I am looking at a mirror and a reflection. 

Contemporary Verse Herbert H. Longfellow 



YELLOW LEAVES 

Songs, once heard, are heard again 
With first hearing laden; 

Be it joy they brushed, or pain, 
Be it man or maiden, 

123 



Down the years they bear off, now 

Memories for freighting; 
Sunsets in their sails, at prow, 

Lanterns of long waiting. 

Raindrops in the dark, to one, 

Hush two hearts together; 
This man loves an April sun, 

That, wild ocean weather. 
When you said it, yesterday, 

Yellow leaves wore sorrow: 
Yellow leaves will always say 

There is no tomorrow. 

Harper's Magazine Benjamin R. C. Low 



THE REVENGE 

All night I read a little hook, 
A very little book it was. 
It had a pretty, shimmering look 
Like silver threaded into gauze. 

I read it till the windows turned 
Into blue ghosts which stared at me. 
The fire tittered as it burned. 
A dwarfish sneer perched on my knee. 

Who was it put the poison there? 
Who has conceived this hellish thing 
To lay a sightless, soundless snare 
Amid its lovely whispering? 

So gently came the rush of rhymes, 
So lightly breathed the poison in 
Who thinks of cinquecento crimes, 
White hellebore on jessamine? 

134 



I took that little shy, sleek book 
And set a crimson match to it. 
It crinkled like a freshet brook, 
And flaked and vanished, bit by bit. 

There was no book my hands could hold, 
No book my eyes could ever see, 
But round my head it ran, a bold 
Ironical phylactery. 

I cannot read the book again, 
But there's no need, it scalds my head, 
A strip of livid, living pain 
I shall not lose till I am dead. 

For hate is old as eagle peaks, 
And hate is new as sunrise gulls, 
And hate is ravening vulture beaks 
Descending on a place of skulls. 

Hate is a torch, hate is a spur, 
Hate will accomplish my design: 
The author's first biographer! 
I pray, O Hate, that task be mine. 

I shall not need to criticize 
Nor look the subject up at all, 
But simply turn round both my eyes 
And gaze at my brain's inner wall. 

There I shall see a fresco wreath 

Of letters moulded of dried tears, 

And annotated underneath 

The things IVe thought and thought for years. 

'Twill be a pleasant job, I think, 
To crumble up those dusty tears, 
And stir them thickly in my ink: 
Hate paid at last his long arrears. 

125 



My footnotes will enrich the brew 
With colours I've brought back from Hell. 
I'll write down all I ever knew. 
By Satan's ears, I'll write it well! 

By Satan's tongue! I'll tell the truth, 
And not one word will add to it, 
From his egregious, twisted youth 
To his last frozen torture fit. 

I'll write down his biography 
So that the world will die of laughter. 
I'll pin him like a sqriirming fly, 
A comic spasm of hereafter. 

I'll make his sins a jig of mirth. 
His loves so many masterpieces 
Of high derision. I will dig 
Bare the cold roots of his caprices. 

I'll sling about him every soul 
He squeezed and drained to give him drink. 
His wife gone mad I'll make it droll. 
Bless the Hell colors in my ink! 

I'll leave him not a decent rag 

Of tragedy to wrap about him. 

I'll hang him up as a red flag 

Till every street boy learns to shout him. 

I've taken up a pretty whim, 
But, tit for tat, he had his chance. 
And I may end by blessing him, 
My partner in this ghoulish dance. 

He slew me for a time admitted; 

But I shall slay him for all time. 

Poor shrivelled clown whom I've outwitted, 

I pardon you your poisoned rhyme. 

126 



Go peacefully, for I have done 
"With you, and your false book is dead. 
There's sorrow, too, in having won. 
Go softly then, and go wellsped. 

The New Republic Amy Lowell 



THE BOOK OF STONES AND LILIES 

I read a book 
With a golden name, 
Written in blood 
On a leaf of flame. 

And the words of the book 
Were clothed in white, 
With tiger colors 
Making them bright. 

The sweet words sang 
Like an angel choir, 
And their purple wings 
Beat the air to fire. 



Then I rose on my bed, 
And attended my ear, 
And the words sang carefully 
So I could hear. 



The dark night opened 
Like a silver bell, 
And I heard what it was 
The words must tell: 
"Heaven is good. 
Evil is Hell." 

127 



The night shut up 
Like a silver bell. 
But the words still sang, 
And I listened well. 

I heard the tree-winds 
Crouch and roar, 
I saw green waves 
On a stony shore. 

I saw blue wings 

In a beat of fire. 

My hands clutched the feathers 

Of all desire. 

I cried for hammers, 
For a hand of brass, 
But my soul was hot 
As melted glass. 

Then the bright, bright words, 

All clothed in white, 

Stood in the circle of the silver night. 

And sang: 

"Energy is Eternal Delight. 

Energy is the only life." 

And my sinews were like bands of brass, 
And the glass of my soul hardened and shone 
With all fires, and I sought the ripeness of sac- 
rifice 
Across the dew and the gold of a young day. 

Scribner's Magazine Amy Lowtll 



MINIATURE 

Because the little gentleman made nautical instru- 
ments 

And lived in a street which ran down to the sea, 
The neighbors called him "Salt Charlie." 
I wonder what they would have said if they had 

known 

That he stole out every evening to a sweet-shop 
And bought slicks of red-and-white sugar candy. 
It was a pleasant thing to see him, 
Standing meekly before the custom-house, 
Sucking a sugar-stick, 

And gazing at the dead funnels of anchored steamers 
Against a star-sprung sky. 

I thought of him in an oval gilt frame 

Against sprigged wall-paper, 

Done in Fra Angelico pinks and blues 

Of a clear and sprightly elegance. 

Wherefore, being convinced of his value as ornament, 

I have set him on paper for the delectation 

Of sundry scattered persons 

Who consider such things important. 

The Century Magazine Amy Lowell 



129 



AQUATINT FRAMED IN GOLD 

Six flights up in an out-of-date apartment house 
Where all the door-jambs and wainscots are of black 

walnut 

And the last tenant died at the ripe age of eighty. 
Tick-tock, the grandfather's clock, 
Crowded into a corner against the black walnut 
wainscot. 

Surrounded by the house-gods of her family for 

three generations: 
Teak-wood cabinets, rice-paper picture-books, slim, 

comfortless chairs of spotted bamboo. 
Too many house-gods for the space allotted them, 

exuding an old and corroding beauty, a beauty 

faded and smelling of the past. 
Tick-tock, the grandfather's clock, 
Accurately telling the time, but forgetting whether 

it is today or yesterday. 

Sleeping every night in a walnut bedstead 
With a headboard like the end of a family pew; 
Waking every morning to the photographs of dead 

relations, 

Dead relations sifted all over the house, 
Accumulated in drifts like dust or snow. 

Tick-tock, the grandfather's clock, 

Indifferently keeping up an old tradition. 

Unconcernedly registering the anniversaries of ill- 
nesses and deaths, 

But omitting the births, they were so long ago. 

The lady is neither young nor old, 
She walks like a waxwork among her crumbling pos- 
sessions. 

She is automatic and ageless like the clock, 
And she, too, is of a bygone pattern. 
She sits at her frugal dinner, 

130 



Careful of its ancient etiquette, 

Opposite the portrait of a great-aunt 

Done by a forgotten painter. 

The portrait lived once, it would seem, 

To judge by the coquetry of its attire, 

But the lady has always been a waxwork, 

Of no age in particular, 

But of an unquestioned ancestry. 
Tick-tock, the grandfather's clock, 
Ironically recording an hour of no importance. 

The Nation Amy Lowtll 



INDIAN SUMMER 

Blossoms shaken from their star forms 

Back to earth, 

Flying seedlings warm and waiting 

Drift in sunlight with the going 

Of the birds towards the south. 

Birds are going! 
They will sing before they go, 
Fill the orchard with their mirth; 
Song of harvest, song of summer, song of spring- 
time 
They remember it was April long ago! 

We are parting, 

You are going towards the south! 
Love was birth. 
Is this dying, 

Death my harvest, grief my summer, tears my spring- 
time? . . . 
Well, kiss me kindly, 
Song is wannest on the mouth! 
Give me love before you go! 

The Lyric Jeannette Marks 

131 



CLEAR POOLS 

What is this bitterness of love that scatters dust in 

the eyes? 
What this absence that shrivels the heart and the 

blood? 

What these cries that stop the ears with their pain? 
Oh, my Beloved, let us take our love unto God, 
He understands, He has fashioned us and is kind; 
How well He knows that love must carry its burden 
If it would run to bathe in clear pools and lift its 

eyes to the stars! 

What are we that we should not know that we are His? 

And of Him our passion and of Him our tears? 

His breast is deep and He will fold us there 

In the mystery of his dark, in the miracle of His close- 
ness. 

Distance from us knows He not, nor space, 

And our love which is His, how can it be divided from 
itself? 

Are we not one even as we are His? 

What is that cry? 

Is it sorrow or is it the wind upon the waters? 

What is this light that flows like a brook? 

Oh, my Beloved, how well He knows that love must 

carry its burden 
If it would run to bathe in clear pools and lift its eyes 

to the stars! 

The Lyric Jeannette Marks 



132 



ARRANGEMENT IN BLACK AND GOLD 
X New Orleans, 1321 

The lovely Portuguese is dead, 
Tall candles burn about her head. 
Her negro slave, Lili-Alixe, 
Prays with an ivory crucifix. 
Until strange men knock on the door, 
And walk upon the painted floor . . . 
O men who bear this poor dead woman 
Unto that place where nothing's human, 
Behold your shadows this noon day 
And know that she is less than they. 
Rejoice that these black phantoms move, 
Your living presences to prove: 
Yourselves that still the heavy sun 
Finds here alive, and shines upon. 

The Double Dealer Walter McClellan 



MISS LIZA 

Miss Liza used to sew for us 
Wlien we were little folk; 
Her eyes were black like cut-jet beads, 
Her teeth clicked when she spoke. 
Across her breast were rows of pins, 
While dangling from a string 
Of turkey-red around her waist, 
Her scissors used to swing. 

She made us gay checked gingham frocks 

With sashes in the back, 

And when we wriggled, trying on, 

She'd give our heads a crack 

With her big thimble made of steel, 

Or stick us with a pin, 

133 



And then we'd cry so loud find sharp 

That Mother would come in 

To pat the place that hurt, or faring 

A plate of ginger cakes: 

Miss Liza'd raise her hands and say: 

"Well this beats all, lands' sakes! 

If these ain't just the spoiltest brats!" 

Then Mother* d stay a while 

And give us bits of dotted swiss 

To make doll-clothes, and smile 

And tell Miss Liza not to mind, 

For children didn't know 

How hard it was for grown-up ones 

To make their clothes, and so 

Miss Liza'd sew on petticoats, 

With puffs and tucks in slants, 

And lace-edged ruffled muslin drawers, 

Or little boys' pants. 

Then after supper by the lamp, 

She'd knit and tell us how 

Aunt Annie tried when she was young, 

To milk the spotted cow. 

But best of all the stories was 

The one that Father played 

At scalping Indians and the boys 

Went with him on a raid 

To Farmer Jones* turkey flock, 

Which scattered in affright, 

And over-turned a hive of bees 

That put the boys to flight. 

So windy nights when fingers seem 
To tap upon the pane, 
I see Miss Liza knitting socks, 
And hear those tales again. 

The Boston Transcript 

Virginia Taylor McCormick 

134 



THE BASKET MAKER 

Day after day he sits, 

His back like a low, round hill, 

While with knotted and work-worn hands 

(That have gained each year new skill) 

He plaits the reeds and withes 

Into intricate, beautiful things, 

Whose patterns, like thoughts, go out 

In infinite wanderings. . . . 

Patterns that bring to the man, 

Crouched under the matted hair 

(Gone grey with the sorrow of days 

And leaden nights of despair) 

Dear dreams of a wild-spent youth, 

When the fields and the roads called, Come! 

Of a girl, madonna-faced, pale, 

Whose beauty had left him dumb. 

For the heritage of his race 

Was silence ... he found no word . . . 

Love cowered and shrank away 

Like a wing-clipped, frightened bird. 

Ambitionless, dull, half dead, 

Day in, day out he stayed 

Bent over his wooden bench. . . . 

Plain useful baskets were made. . . . 

Then something stirred in his soul 

And wakened the beauty that lay 

Dormant through weary years, 

Too numb to hope or pray. . . . 

So the twisted yet habile hands 
Forever laid aside 
The patterns old and plain. . . . 
Fine flexible reeds were dyed 
With exquisite colours, soft 
As lights in the skies of June 
When the gold of the setting sun 

135 



Gives place to an argent moon: 
With crimson and blue and green, 
With deep, rich purple of Tyre, 
And delicate amber and bronze 
Like the flame of a driftwood fire. 

Now ever the strong gnarled hands 
Weave patterns whose splendour seems 
To crown the bowed grey head 
With a halo of wonderful dreams! 
And always the wearied back 
Leans over light shapes so rare 
That the spirit of ancient Greece 
Appears incarnate there. 
And deep in the grief -seared heart 
Where beauty has bloomed from pain, 
Is the music of rustling wings 
And the freshness of summer rain. 

American Poetry Magazine 

Virginia Taylor McCormick 



A NEW ENGLAND SPINSTER 

She never married, 

For she never tarried 

In all her life for her own pleasure; 

Wasted no youthful hours with love; 

Knew no regrets in her maturity; 

Gazed rigidly on futurity; 

And now in her tracks grown old the leisure 

This great square candled room speaks of 

To you or me 

Still is familiar to her as can be 

In terms of helpfulness to others. 

Religion enough were her six brothers 

Who are dead 

186 



And, as they never wed, 

She was mother to each brother 

And wife in wife's stead. 

Cyrus drowsed in the Pilgrim chair; 

A sampler young Ezra worked hangs there; 

William's geraniums are growing yet 

(She keeps them wet) ; 

Absalom stared at the low cracked ceiling, 

When his brain had no more thinking in it, 

Till the grandfather clock ticked his last minute; 

The cane blind Henry used for feeling 

Stands where his nervous hands 

Put it to stay (she would not move it) ; and the last, 

Epaphroditus, she told me, was the owner 

(Some earlier bygone being the donor) 

Of that scrupulously dusted plaster cast 

Upon the mantelpiece, to which each night 

She has brought for the ghosts their candle light 

As long as the town has known her. 

The Literary Review 
New York Evening Post William B. McCourtie 



ALONE ON THE HILL 

Alone on the hill 
In the warm October noon, 
With the woods below 
And beyond their brilliance the sea: 
The moment has come, 
The rapt still instant of being, 
When water and wood are gone. 
There is nothing now 
But the on-running fluid of hours 
Gleaming with blue, yellow, crimson. 
1S7 



Now quick! Let me run on sharp stones, 
Let me strangle in surf choked with the hitter salt- 
water ! 

Let me feel pain, feel torture, 
And the acid hunger of loneliness! 
Give me self, self 
Before I am lost 

In this madness of space eternal, 
This horror of dream triumphant. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse 

Frederick R. McCreary 



SUBWAY WIND 

Far down, down through the city's great, gaunt gut 

The grey train rushing bears the weary wind; 
In the packed cars the fans the crowd's breath cut, 

Leaving the sick and heavy air behind. 
And pale-cheeked children seek the upper door 

To give their summer jackets to the breeze; 
Their laugh is swallowed in the deafening roar 

Of captive wind that moans for fields and seas; 
Seas cooling warm where native schooners drift 

Through sleepy waters where gulls wheel and sweep, 
Waiting for windy waves their keels to lift 

Lightly among the islands of the deep; 
Islands of lofty palm trees blooming white 

That lend their perfume to the tropic sea, 
Where fields lie idle in the dew-drenched night, 

And the Trades float above them fresh and free. 

The Liberator Claude McK&y 



138 



LA PALOMA IN LONDON 

About Soho we went before tie light; 
We went, unresting six, craving new fun, 
New scenes, new raptures for the fevered night 
Of rollicking laughter, drink and song, was done. 
The vault was void, but for the dawn's great star 
That shed upon our path its silver flame, 
When La Paloma on a low guitar 
Abruptly from a darkened casement came. 
Harlem! All else a blank, I saw the hall, 
And you in your red shoulder sash come dancing 
With Val, against me careless by the wall, 
Your burning coffee-colored eyes keen glancing 
Aslant at mine, proud in your golden glory I 
I loved you, Cuban girl, fond sweet Diory. 

The Liberator Claude McKay 



COLOR OF WATER 

You will be the color of water; 

Your voice will be like the wind; 
You will go where the dust goes ; 

None will know you have sinned. 

None will know you are quiet, 
Or fluent, or bound, or free; 

None will care you are nothing; 
You will be nothing to me. 

Except a scarlet remembrance . . . 

As if , in a dream of pride, 
A poppy had flaunted her petals 

One day to the sun, and died. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse 

Marjorie Meeker 

139 



SONG FOR A MAY NIGHT 

Heigho! ' 

Many mysterious things I know! 

I know why the moon is like a moth 

Do you? 
I know why stars are many, and suns 

Are few. 

I know a place where a star fell down, 
And made a hole in the middle of town, 
And all the people jumped in. And so 

Heigho! 

Other mysterious things I know! 

Poetry 9 A Magazine of Verse 

Marjorie Meeker 



PULLMAN PORTRAITS 

I 
Down the green plush lane, at the forward end of 

the car, 

There are seven Iowa farmers' tired old wives 
With their faces set toward the perfumed orange 

groves 

For a lyrical end to their prosy, cumbered lives; 
And all day long with their red, work-twisted hands 
On their black silk laps they idle, they rest, they 

play; 
They badger the grime-gray brakemen, make new 

friends 
"Say, Pa, this gentleman here's from loway!" 

II 
While the bored, late breakfast crowd in the diner 

fumed 
And a thin man snarled that his coffee wasn't hot, 

140 



I saw them carry her by with clumsy haste 
A silent, sagging shape on a sagging cot, 
And all day long there seeps through my noisy car, 
Through the tight-shut, shining door of the drawing- 
room, 
The sense of a hreathless race with hours and 

miles . . . 

The sense of doom, of imminent, hovering doom; 
And whenever the loose-limbed brakeman hurtles 

through, 

Frolicsome-shy as a sidling setter pup, 
The mother's jerking face at the crack of the door 
"Are we late? How late? Do you think we can 
make it up?" 

Ill 

There's an old young soldier raptly hurrying home 
With a line of shining deeds across his coat, 
But the scar far back in his aching-tired eyes 
Is a deeper scar than the one along his throat, 
And all day long I am watching him realize . . . 
That the show is done; he has missed his cue; he's 

late; 
The bands are stilled and the WELCOME signs are 

down, 
And his shining deeds his war is out of date! 

IV 

A big, thick-wristed man in the section across; 
The delicate, fresh-dressed woman by his side 
With the look in her face of a stale, warmed-over 

dream, 

Is a bride, a pitiful, tardy, Autumn bride, 
And all day long, sitting still in her green plush seat, 
She escapes, she flees, she hides . . . till the train's 

harsh tune 

Summons her back to the touch of his thick, cold hand, 
To bring her November heart to the feast of June. 



141 



Can they ever learn to rest in their orange groves? 
Is the engine aware of the drawing-room's tragic 

need? 
And the soldier's eyes and the dream that stood too 

long? 

I am tense with the urge for a greater, kinder speed; 
And all day long, till the desert sun slides down 
And the farmers* wives are noisy with plate and cup, 
Now soft, now shrill, four-keyed, it pierces 

through . . . 
"Are we late? How late? Do you think we can make 

it up?" 

Scribner's Magazine Ruth Comfort Mitchell 



A SHRINE 

Think in what fashion this one man would rise 
From cold dust, coffined up against decay, 
To find his solitary place a way 

For stupid feet and trivial, staring eyes. 

These noisy rooks in blue, white-clouded skies 
Would have recalled for him all rapt delay 
Pleasure occasions death and judgment day; 

His second choice was silence, where he lies. 

Seas were not made to swim in: shallow streams 
Flowing through shadow, dappled with dim light, 

These be our playgrounds, as the deep sea teems 
Menacing, sullen shapes that haunt the sight 

Now and again divers dive down for dreams 
To come up calm from knowledge of its night. 

The Dial Stewart Mitchell 



142 



ALL SOULS' EVE 

Hark! do you hear the choral dead? 
Forgotten now their pride 
Who on- this night would have us know 
They passed unsatisfied. 

They shiver like the thin hrown leaves 
Upon a sapless tree, 
Clinging with palsied, withered might 
To their identity. 

Their voices are the unearthly winds 
That die before the dawn; 
And each one has some tale to tell, 
And, having told, is gone* 

Ah! you who come with sea-blue eyes, 
And dead these hundred years, 
Be satisfied! I hold the cup 
Still brimming with your tears. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse 

Florence Kilpatrick Mixter 



LULLABY 

Come, sleep. Her heart's a wood-anemone. 

Her thoughts are swallows flown 
Across the dusk. Her hair's a willow-tree 

By the west wind blown. 
Her eyes are pools where bubbles rise and break 

Dream-bubbles from the deep. 
Her souFs a moth that flutters in their wake. 

Come sleep. . . . come sleep. * . 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse 

Florence Kilpatrick Mixter 

143 



A PRINT BY HOKUSAI 

Of what avail 

The tiny winds that call 

To the indifferent sea? To ships a-sail 

The twilight's silver pall 

Whispers of night 

Without one ripple stirred. 

But on the shoals three fishermen in white 

Are watching . . . They have heard. . . . 

How still the ships! 

So soon to feel the breath 

Of winds that rush to meet the sea's cold lips 

And fill the night with death! 

The Bookman Florence Kilpatrick Mixter 



UTAH 

It was a queer country your harsh Lord gave you. 

Great Brigham, whom I see coated and curled 

In bronze before me in the public square! 

It was a scraped and shining skeleton, 

Gnawed to the bone long since at God's first breakfast 

And thrown away to bleach out in the sun. 

Yet here He led you 

The Lord and his vicegerent Joseph Smith 

He ordered you 

To take the dead earth from His niggard hand 

And set His Throne up by the salty sea 

The little bucketful of ocean, poured 

Over the desert's feet between the hills. 

And so you starved and prayed, 

Thirsted and starved and prayed through the lean 

years, 
Keeping the faith, digging your little ditches, 

144 



Making the desert blossom as the rose. 
You married many wives, 
And got you many children to fulfil 
The special order whispered in the night 
To His apostle hy the Lord Himself 
The God of Abraham, of Saul and David, 
Of Solomon and other lustful kings. 



here, tithe upon tithe, stone upon stone, 
Your saints built up His throne unto the Lord 
From plans the angel taught your hand to draw: 
His new Solomon's Temple, heaven-rememberd, 
To rise again here at the western gate, 
And prove His glory in these latter days! 
Great Brigham, sleeping now under the desert 
With all your wives, 

"What summary vengeance have you meted out 
To that ironic angel? 

He alone builds 

Who builds for beauty, shrining his little truth 
In stones that make it fair. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse Harriet Monroe 



GROWTH 

It was such a little, little sin 

And such a great big day, 

That I thought the hours would swallow it, 

Or the wind blow it away. 

But the moments passed so swiftly, 
And the wind died out somehow, 
And the sin that was once a weakling 
Is a hungry giant now. 

The Lyric John Richard Moreland 

145 



BIRCH TREES 

The night is white, 

The moon is high, 
The birch trees lean 

Against the sky. 

The cruel winds 

Have blown away 
Each little leaf 

Of silver gray. 

lonely trees 

As white as wool . . 
That moonlight makes 

So beautiful. 

The Personalia John Richard Moreland 



A MINOR POET 

The sun is a fire 
Of liquid gold, 
The moon is a beacon 
And silver cold. 

The planets burn 
With a flaming light, 
The stars are the topaz 
Eyes of night. 

But I am only 
A glow-worm's spark, 
Revealing the rose 
When the moon is dark. 

The Lyric John Richard Moreland 

146 



A GRAVE 

A grave seems only six feet deep 

And three feet wide, 
Viewed with the calculating eye 

Of one outside. 

But when fast bound in the chill loam 

For that strange sleep, 
Who knows how wide its realm may be? 

Its depths, how deep? 

The Lyric John Richard Moreland 



IOWA 

Flat as is pancake, fertile as can be, 

All the way from Keokuk to Calliope; 

Corn that kisses cloudlets when its tassels wave, 

Land that laughs a harvest where the reapers shave. 

Sing a song of mountains to Iowa's fame! 
You will find there -Etna anyway, in name 
Then too there is Lehigh (accent "high" of course), 
Maple Hill, and Morning Sun mounts up perforce. 

Early in the action, long before Des Moines 
Took thought to its cubits, girded up its loins, 
There was Cedar Rapids, there was Muscatine, 
There was Maquoketa, Calamus, Exline. 

Sing a song of hamlets of Iowa fair 
Audubon, Elkader, Larah, Tara, Clare, 
Anita, Stuart, Shambaugh, Casey, Imogene, 
Pella, Pocahontas, Packwood gild the scene. 

Run along the top line Swea, Mona, Rake 
Or if you prefer it, then the western take, 
Where the old Big Muddy swirls its browns and buffs, 
Twisting from Sioux City down past Council Bluffs. 

147 



Sing a song of streamlets, spreading like a fan 
Little Sioux Creek, Shell Rock, Wapsipinican, 
Floyd, Nishnabatana syllables have sunk 
In the ears that hear them Raccoon, Hoyer, Skunk. 

You can go to Harvard or to College Springs; 
You can go to Persia, though you have no wings; 
You can go to Lisbon, Tripoli and Rome, 
But somehow you'll find them very much like home. 

Come! a foreign chanson of Iowa trill 
Albion, Moravia, Batavia, Brazil, 
Hamburg and Manila, Geneva and Peru, 
Even a Virginia, a Virginia News. 

There is Promise City, Sac and Story too; 
Bonaparte, Marengo yes, and Waterloo; 
There is old Ottumwa, What Cheer, Swaledale lush! 
Adel, Waukee, Ollie, Oelwein needs no bush. 

Thus we sing Iowa Ida Grove, Calmar, 
Soldier, Marne, Kalona, Gray, Dubuque, Kamrar, 
Odebolt, Galva, Washta, Coggon, Rudd, Diff, Dows, 
Coin, Clarinda, Holstein go, and call the cows. 

The N. Y. Herald Maurice Morris 

THE PASSER-BY 

I have seen the shattering of shells 

And the shattering of hearts, 

And I do not know which is worse 

Only, the wound I got 

From the shattering of shells 

Is nearly healed 

While I cannot wash away 

The spatting of blood on my dreams 

From the shattering of hearts* 

The Forum Helene Mullins 

US 



BY THE WISSAHICKON 

I 

Here in this place there shall be solitude 
And harvesting of matter for your thought, 
Beauty to see that many dawns have brought 
Out of the night of earth to be this wood, 
Wintered to quietness where the trees brood 
On gentle buds whose waking shall be wrought 
By pressure of the sun of spring and taught 
A perfect flowering out of lowlihood. 
Here shall the city come to honor peace 
Where peace is precious with the new bird's song, 
And dare forgotten loyalties to worth 
Of simple, priceless things; or let it cease 
Its pilgrimage, and may this place belong 
To trees, and children, and the breathing earth. 

II 

Wherefore should any man, because no man 

Now makes this place his home, here fear to stay 

A little portion of his willful day 

And be a little useless, with no plan 

Save that of saying: that which will be, can? 

For here long since has last year gone its way 

With cast off leaves and not a twig, from gray, 

Is green enough for hope since thaws began. 

Yet in this meekness frontiers are made free 

For summer's kingdom; life has reached the light 

From deeps of seed and quails not to fulfill 

Its mystery because a mystery 

Of death and deeper planting has its night, 

Passionless, in the marble on the hill. 

Ill 

O hungry minds of men, here in the shade 
The summer broods and harvest shall be near; 
Maybe the budding of your hope shall here 
Break in the silence of a noon-hot glade; 
149 



Maybe you'll see this gentle water made 
The image where eternal things appear, 
Behind all moving and all rest, that wear 
Time, like a flower, on their bosom laid. 
Why should not tired hearts foretaste of bliss 
When promise of the summer dares to keep 
Such lovely troth? and tired eyes again 
Have quiet meditation, or in this 
Roof of the summer's kindness, gently sleep 
Beneath the hallelujahs of the rain? 

IV 

"Awake! Awake I The summer is forlorn 
With memory of how the winter came; 
The harvest that you dream is but a name 
To wither self-delusion up in scorn; 
This house of beauty beauty shall leave, torn 
And mutilated for the ready flame, 
And nothing shall remain to it but shame 
Of naked branches mercilessly shorn." 
Because of the coming of the wind, shall we 
Outrun the panic of the driven leaves? 
Empty ourselves of what our eyes have seen 
Because the summer's beauty left no sheaves? 
For failure to find here what cannot be, 
Forfeit the mercy that we know has been? 

V 

Autumn is wielding beauty like a sword 
And lifts the torch to set her woods afire; 
The splendor of her light is song borne higher 
On the deep colors of an organ chord ; 
And sudden wonder is again the lord 
Who battles once again for his empire; 
And truth seems almost what we most desire 
Since vision dares to be its own reward. 
Shall this be but an old discarded story 
Told for a little while in heart of youth, 

150 



Vanishing with a shout of "Glory, glory!"? 
Because beatitude and beauty meet, 
Is truth that finds its beauty less the truth, 
Though it be beauty of our own defeat? 

VI 

Now has the autumn, like the golden head 
Of childhood, vanished; and our paradise 
Of beauty has become a place of sighs 
Blown down the alley to the leaves' dark bed. 
Yet, back of failure of a vision fled, 
The unknown truth is waiting for our eyes, 
And that which bade us seek and bade us rise 
To meet the vision, is unwithered. 
For love, that gathers wisdom as it goes 
From lowlihood up to the pure' in heart, 
Will dare to offer to the truth's own sight 
Nothing but love at last; and when the rose 
Of autumn crashes, love shall play its part, 
Alone, with the unknown, and snow, and night. 

Independent and Weekly Review 

Charles R. Murphy 

TO EARTH 

Oh, fortunate the waiting that shall end in wonder, 
And blessed now the patience that is in thy biding; 
For now are the herded clouds and the wild rain's 

thunder 
Over the roof of thy quiet seeds' hiding. 

We too, earth, shall need thy blessedness of waiting 
For the green flowering of pastures, when the panting 
Storm shall cease; though blood be the rain that is 

abating, 
And men be the seeds of our wild planting. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse 

Charles R. Murphy 

151 



A MORAL EMBLEM OF MATURITY 



Man grows up 
In quietness. 

As he grows older, 
He talks less. 



"When he is old 

He sits among 
Gray grandfathers 

And holds his tongue. 

I'd rather sit 

By a wine shelf 
And tell people 

About myself. 

The Reviewer Robert Nathan 

(Frere Rombadille) 



AT THE SYMPHONY 
(Cesar Franck D, Minor) 

The 'cellos, preluding apart, 
Grumbled and sang, and so the day 
From the low beaches of my heart 
Turned in tranquility away. 

And over weariness and doubt 
Rose up the horns like bellied sails, 
Like canvas of the soul flung out 
To rising and orchestral gales, 

Passed on and left irresolute 
The ebony, the silver throat; 

Low over clarinet and flute 
Hung heaven upon a single note. 

The Literary Review 

New York Evening Post Robert Nathan 

158 



LOVE HATH NO PHYSIC 

Love hath no physic for a grief too deep, 
But like the adder that with poisoned breath 
Bites its own wound and stings itself to sleep, 
So with its hurt love wounds itself to death. 
That slender serpent, mottled as the pest, 
Is its own merciful and bitter friend; 
Hast thou a grief? Go clasp it to thy breast; 
Hast thou a poison? Drain it to the end. 
Cry then, cry all thy heart out with its pain; 
Hearts grow again, and eyes have better sight 
After too many tears, as summer rain 
Washes the air, and leaves it sweet and bright; 
And birds step out on trees, whose happy song 
Is often stilled, but never stilled for long. 

The Nation Robert Nathan 

HUNGER INN 

Waiter, waiter! 

The hour is late. 

Bring me love on a silver plate, 

Topped with green from die coolest springs, 

Garnished with kisses in golden rings, 

Warmed with laughter and spiced with tears, 

The love I've famished for all these years, 

"We're just out of love, tonight, Madam." 

Then hasten, hasten. 

The moments pass. 

Bring me fame in a tall thin glass, 

Ice to clink with a tinkling sound, 

Mint-leaves traveling round and round. 

Frothy bubbles to break and gleam, 

The heady draught of my headiest dream. 

"The cellars are empty. Madam." 

153 



But, waiter, waiter, 

An hour is spent! 

Bring me a bowl of old content. 

The good contentment we used to bake 

In a round hrown bowl of the earthen make, 

Seasoned well with a housewife's pride, 

Crispy crust, but a soft inside, 

Not so rich as a finer dish 

But hot and tasty as heart could wish. 

"We can't get the ingredients, Madam." 

Your fare is poor and your service slow, 
Hungry I came, I'll hungry go. 
Perchance I can feed me further on. 
Bring me my wrap and I'll be gone* 

"Just as you say. Madam." 

The Double Dealer Jessica Nelson North 

WHERE IT IS WINTER 

Now there is frost upon the hill 
And no leaf stirring in the wood; 
The little streams are cold and still; 
Never so still has winter stood. 
Never so held as in this hollow, 
Beneath these hemlocks dark and low, 
Brooding this hour that hours must follow 
Burdened with snow. . . . 

Now there is nothing, no confusion, 
To shield against the silence here; 
And spirits, barren of illusion, 
To whom all agonies are clear, 
Rush on the naked heart and cry 
Of every poignant shining thing 
Where there is little left to die 
And no more Spring. 

The Measure George O'Neil 

154 



FOLK-SONG FROM THE DANISH 

Little Rose and her mother, from the boat where it 

lay, 
Bantered each other in the merriest way. 

Ha, ha, ha, so, sa, so, sa! 
Bantered each other in the merriest way! 

"No lover shall wed me no matter how bold 
Till trees in the garden bear blossoms of gold." 

Ha 9 ha, ha, so, sa, so, sa! 
"Till trees in the garden bear blossoms of gold.'* 

From the porch thinks Hr. Peder, amused at her jest, 
"'Tis always the one who laughs latest laughs best!'* 

Ha, ha, ha, so, sa, sa, sa! 
"'Tis always the one who laughs latest laughs best!" 

And when later they entered the garden behold 
From each tree was hanging a ring of bright gold! 

Ha, ha, ha, so, sa, so, sa! 
From each tree was hanging a ring of bright goldt 

But Rosalie, scarlet as fresh-dripping blood, 

Kept both her eyes fixed on the grass where she stood. 

Ha, ha, ha, so, so, so, sa! 
Kept both her eyes fixed on the grass where she stood. 

Then Hr. Peder he kissed her, still full of the jest: 
"Most surely the one who laughs latest laughs best!" 

Ha, ha, ha, so, sa, so, sa! 
"Most surely the one who laughs latest laughs best!" 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse 

Antoinette DeCoursey Patterson 



155 



LUCREZIA BORGIA'S LAST LETTER 

Before me shine the words of her last letter 
Lucrezia Borgia to the Pope at Rome 

Wherein she begs, as life's remaining fetter 

Slips from her, that his prayers will guide her 
home: 

The favor God has shown to me confessing, 
As swift my end approaches. Father, I 9 

A Christian though a sinner 9 ask your blessing 
And kiss your feet in all humility. 

The thought of death brings no regret, but pleasure; 

And after the last sacrament great peace 
Will be mine own in overflowing measure. 

If but your mercy marks my soul's release. 

And here the letter finds a sudden ending, 

As though the dying hand had lost its power: 

My children to Rome's love and care commending 
Ferrara Friday at the fourteenth hour. 

An odor as of incense faintly lingers 
About the page of saintly sophistries 

And I am thinking clever were the fingers 

That could mix poison and write words like these. 

Antoinette DeCoursey Patterson 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse 



SIGHT AND SOUND 

I saw a handful of white stars, 
Blooming in a width of grass, 
I saw a cherry tree, snow-white, 
In woods as naked cold as glass. 
156 



I saw a blue leaf zig-zag down 
The blue-bird with his russet throat! 
From out the sallow cane-break stole 
Another blue-bird's aching note. 

The blue, the white, I wrote them down 
To soothe my heart when spring was over. 
No need or help, alas, to write 
That blue-bird's "Lover, lover, lover!" 

The Lyric William Alexander Percy 



THE GREEN BIRD SEETH ISEULT 

A green bird on a golden bush, 

And the leaves chimed out and spake: 

"What have you seen, what heard, green bird, 
Since you heard the blue day break?" 

"A sea, a sea, a saffron sea, 

And a creamy warm full sail 
Floating beneath me as I flew, 

And my shadow stamped the sail 
Like a clover leaf, a green clover leaf, 
Blown from an Irish dale." 

"Did lovers pale stand by the sail 
That furroughed the Irish Sea? 
Did you catch the glimmer of golden mail 
Or the glimmer of hair blown free?" 

"Golden each scale of his burnished mail 

And her hair was bronze and gold: 
From an emerald cup I saw them sup 
That their four hands scarce could hold." 

"Delight and woe, delight and woe, 

Bird of the Irish Sea 
These they drank up from the emerald cup 
On the sun-swooned saffron sea." 

157 



"Only delight, only delight, 
While the beautiful burning blue daylight 

Was dappled by me 

With the green leaf -shadow shapen in three. 
Delight I saw, delight I heard!" 
Sang the sunlight-aureoled emerald bird 
To the golden tree 
Deliriously. 

Contemporary Verse William Alexander Percy 



THE PILGRIM OF THE UPLAND MEADOWS 

Diverging trails we climb, 
But if you find a flower 
I will applaud its perfume, 
I will confess its power. 

I seek an amaranth 
More lovely than its name, 
For me a very heart's rue, 
For your hearts not the same. 

It blows above the blue 
Far-vistaed Paphian sea, 
Or so the woman said 
Whose green eyes 'sorcelled me. 

Joy to you in your meadows. 
But 1*11 search mine alone 
And find an amaranth 
Or else a quiet stone. 

Contemporary Verse William Alexander Percy 



158 



IN THE COLD, BRIGHT WIND 

Merlin, Merlin's gone away 

With a limmer witch for spouse, 

He's gone to spend a sorry year 
In the Queen o* Fairies 9 house. 

For gear he's took the sapphie bird 

Wf the bubble in his throat, 
His hat was prinked wi' the wee wet flowers 

That gaud daft April's coat. 

Sunny-cold the bold wind blew 
As he strode off down the hill, 

His red cloak bellied out and swirled, 
His eyes burned gray and chill. 

For promise of a warm high bed 

And rich renewing drink 
He's footed it to Fairyland 

Where love's the only swink. 

He's gone away, and not alone 

Brightly, O he sinned! 
His red cloak glimmers on the thorn 

And his laughter on the wind. 

Contemporary Verse Willican Alexander Percy 



THE UNLOVED TO HIS BELOVED 

Could I pluck down Aldebaran 

And haze the Pleiads in your hair 

I could not add more burning to your beauty 

Or lend a starrier coldness to your air. 

If I were cleaving terrible waters 
With death ahead on the visible sands 
I could not turn and stretch my hands more wildly, 
More vainly turn and stretch to you my hands. 

The Bookman William Alexander Percy 

159 



BETH MARIE 

Impatiently she drew her breath, 

So new was life, so wild: 
But patiently she waited death 

And when he touched her, smiled. 

She who had never wished to die, 

Who had such fear of pain, 
Was tranquil as an evening sky 

That flowers from spent rain. 

For us her loss was different 

From all we could suppose: 
The calm of Spartan stars she lent 

Who only seemed a rose. 

The Double Dealer William Alexander Percy 



SHE GRIEVES IN THE DUSK 

Ah, he was white and slender 

And the lamplight turned him gold 

And his groping hands were tender 

And his kisses never bold. 
How shall I sleep through the long, long nights 

In my wide cold-sheeted bed, 
Hearing the wild geese crying in their flights, 

And me afraid, 
And him not by to turn and hold me to his heart 

In the way he knew, 

And me no longer folded to his heart 
Thinking him true. 

Voices, A Journal of Verse 

William Alexander Percy 
160 



SHE DREAMS OF AUTUMN 

I dreamed that the children were gathering leaves 

In our old town. 

Autumn was shaking them from the trees, 
Down. . . . 

down. . . . 

down. , . . 

(The children sing:) 

"Autumn, autumn, fling us down your golden leaves. 
Send the maples 9 arms a-shaking, make their 

fingers fling 
Right and left and all about, high and low and under 

them, 
Coins of gold that jingle while we dance and sing! 

"Autumn, autumn, see us children gathering 

Leaves with golden points that gleam like sun- 
beams overhead. 
We are sweeping, we are heaping leaves and leaves 

and more of them. 

They come skipping down the street . . . Who 
says that they are dead?" 

"Children! Children!" 

"Mothers, we are listening*" 
"Pile the leaves up neatly now, and we shall make a 

fire." 
("Are they really dead, mother, all these golden 

running leaves?'*) 

"We shall do as we are told and pile them higher, 
higher." 

"Mother!" "Mother!" "Look, the heaps are ready 

now!" 
"All right! Sing again. We'll bring the matches 

soon." 

"Autumn, autumn, here are all your golden leaves! 
"See their golden fingers that go fumbling for the 
moon! 

161 



"Autumn, autumn, see, we light the golden fires; 
Carefully we hold the matches, watch the busy 

flame 
Pour among the golden leaves like silent golden 

water-streams. 

Just now, a blue smoke from out the gold-heap 
came! 

"Autumn, autumn! Smell the leaves, the burning 

leaves. 
They are golden flowers now. Their perfume fills 

the air! 
See, the curling smoke of them! See, the sky-blue 

breath of them! 
Every pile is singing as we dance around the glare. 

"Autumn, autumn! Thank you for your golden 

leaves. 
Thank you for the golden flames the burning 

golden hours! 

Autumn, autumn! Thank you for the golden sun! 
Thank you for the golden leaves that swell ta 
golden flowers! 

"And see us, see us! dancing round the golden heaps, 
Singing, hand in hand, a-whirl, a mist before ua 

spread. 
Fling us down your golden leaves, your children that 

have drunk the sun, 

Whose golden light turns golden flame, who never 
can be dead!" 

I have wakened. , . . The children are dancing still 

In our old town. . . . 
The dream is over, and life comes fluttering 
Down. . . . 

down. . . . 

down. . . . 

The Lyric West Edward H. Pfeiffer 

162 



SHALLOWS 

I must swim out 
Overlong have I stayed 
Here on the warm shale; 
Aimlessly played. . . 
Gathering sea-shells 
Empty and frail. 

One dwindles here 

Where the tides creep 

Grows dazzled, 

Gazing too long through the clear 

Wave at the sun asleep 

On the sands ovemear. . . . 

What if the thought of the deep 

Should become a fear? 

I must swim out 
Lest the urge fail, 
Darken duskward 
And fade, as a sail. 

Poetry 9 A Magazine of Verse 

Frances Dickenson Finder 



THREE CANTICLES FOR MADAME 
SAINTE GfiNEVIfiVE 

I 

Kind Saint, within your burnished casket lying, 
where wasting tapers weep 
tear after pompous trickling tear, 
take of your goodness I pray you 
this candle I offer, 
golden as honey that the bees distil 
into their dark close cells 

163 



through drowsy afternoons of summer 

in droning thickets fragrant with raspberries, 

or golden as the tawny grape bunches 

that hang among warm leaves, 

each full globe swollen to bursting 

with juices of untold sweetness, 

so clear that the translucent sunlight 

shows in each shining heart 

the tiny core of seeds; 

a candle fragrant as the October mist 

that flows, smoky blue, 

in your chilly evening city, 

when twilight shades with rose and marigold 

the end of long streets; 

and with my offering take also 

all my homage. 

Hear me and be propitious. 
Hide me in the close dark folds 
of your trailing sleeves 
that sweep the ground as you go, 
softly, so softly, 

with die whisper of autumnal leaves 
blown by the glittering wind 
along the moist pavement 
down to the quay's edge 
where under the bronzing plane-trees 
in a haze of sweet-scented smoke 
the autumn bonfires are burning. 
Shake out the folds of your mantle over me 
so I shall not feel the cold winds that are blowing 
out of the tortured lands, 
so I shall not hear the jackal voices that rise 
against the shrunken sky, 
for I am tired, tired, 
of the snarling tongues 
that urge on me night and day 
their tedious hatreds* 



164 



II 

If ever, kind Saint, 
your ghost, its old habit resuming, 
takes human form to walk 
in these thronging streets, 
how shall your face be known? 
By what sign shall we tell you? 

By garments of snowy wool 
from seraphic looms, 
stitched by the inspired needles 
of sempstresses in glory 
whose glimmering fingers float 
languioUy over the hem, 
as float and veer 
chestnut petals on the jade green river? 

Or by your gleaming nimbus 
that twirls and sparkles 
through the warm, close pressing dark, 
revolving in tempests of fire 
with lights blue and green 
like the Catherine-wheels of our childhood, 
while the ebony water, 
aglitter with burnished reflections, 
trembles in the black shadow of the bridges? 

Or by your green palm branch 
a little tattered and worn 
by the wind, by the rain, 
by the angry thwacks you deal 
at the swarming imps from hell 
that rise in the semblance of urchins 
to surround you and mock 
when hasty dawn, 
interrupting your diligent rounds 
and dimming your nimbus, 
sends you, with scuttling heels 
and a flutter of snowy robes, 

165 



up an obscure stair 

to your garret room on the Montagne 

where, in the placid sunshine 

under the weed-grown eaves, 

the plump young cherubs, 

seated like obese pigeons 

on the sill by the potted geranium, 

8rone their sleepy canticles? 

Or rather shall we not know you 
by the dress, by the tufted mole, 
of a marchande des quatre seasons 
who with eyes that glitter 
like an autumnal morning, 
trundles a cart of ripe figs 
down the sparkling street 
where in heaps of amber and topaz 
the tattered rags of the summer, 
spilled last night from the rain-wet, shivering 

branches, 

lie along brilliant pools 
in whose glass 

the revolving wheels of her cart 
flash and are gone as she passes 
over the grey, shining pavement? 

Ill 

Cold blue mist is flowing 
in the long street 
where the first pale blossoms 
of the orange street lamps 
shower their wealth of gleaming petals 
on hurried forms that pass 
like ghosts over the darkening pavement. 

The cold blue mist is full of stirring scents. 
Tingling odors of autumn 
wander frostily on the air, 

166' 



mixed with the winey fragrance 
of October fruits. 

Like heavy petals spilled 
by the crisp evening wind 
from roses overblown, 
the orange light of the street lamps 
falls on the flushed bright rinds 
in their heaping trays, 
on the grapes, golden green, 
that crack at a touch, 
overflowing with sharp sweet juices 
cold to the warm lips and throat; 
on shining nuts freshly stripped 
of their enamelled green casings; 
on pumpkins of orange vermilion, 
seated in the pride of swollen majesty 
like Chinese emperors, 
or glimmering like October moons 
of tarnished, ruddy gold, 
that rise, languorous and heavy, 
through the russet mist 
beyond the yellow, thinning boughs. 

On the sharp air 
creeps a spicy odor 
of delicate puckering wines, 
distilled from the dark sunburnt earth 
on vine-terraced hillsides 
and packed to bursting 
in crisp mottled skins 
that the cold lips of the summer rain 
and lusty fingers of the autumnal sun 
have embrowned and reddened. 

And from the street corner 

where the chestnut-vender, shivering with the cold, 
warms his gnarled hands over the glowing vents, 
spirals of pale blue smoke 
scented of roasting chestnuts 

167 



rise as from an altar, 

rise through the darkening plane-tree 

whose leaves are of burnished copper, 

rise through the bronzed branches 

in twisting, grey blue spirals 

toward the watchful chimney-pots that stand 

craning with bent heads, 

black against the cold yellow sunset. 

In the autumn twilight 

all things seem dying 

only through excess of life 

and the ripened year, 

perfectly rounded and mellow, 

is ready to fall like the ripe fruit that drops 

in the long grass 

of a forgotten orchard. 

Oh the fervour that wakes 
in the smouldering blood, 

more potent than the wistful fervour of spring, 
when, with the lights and the cries, 
comes, in the patch of sky 
far down the darkening street, 
the smoky flush of orange and apricot, 
and the frosty air is atingle 
with life fulfilled and golden! 
Oh the ardour of the evening in the autumnal city! 

The Dial Dudley Poore 



THOUGHTS UPON A WALK WITH NATALIE, 
MY NIECE, AT HOUGHTON FARM 

Here is the same familiar land 

My mother knew when she was young. 

This warm earth crumbled to her hand, 
She heard these very bird notes sung. 

168 



In that green meadow down the lane, 
Knee-deep her pony cropped the grass, 

The beaten pathways still remain 
That felt her flying footsteps pass. 

Beyond that willow tree the stream 
Plunges forever into foam, 

Let us go there awhile and dream 

Of this dear place that was her home. 



She must have stood here long ago 

Upon this lichen-covered stone 
Where we are now who loved her so; 

Blood of her blood, bone of her bone. 

She must have watched this sunlit pool 
With wonder in her clear young eyes, 

Finding within these waters cool 
The mystery that never dies. 

All this my heart has understood, 
Dear child, or ever you were born. 

The evening of her womanhood 
Long held a vision of the morn. 

Yet I had never hoped to see 

Through these fair fields, her lambent grace, 
Moving beside me on the lea, 

Turning to greet me, face to face. 

Now by the miracle that filled 
Your slender limbs with living fire, 

More than my daring spirit willed 
Lies in the cup of my desire. 

Long hence when you have know my grief 
You will look back and understand. . . . 

Now let us play awhile. This leaf 
Shall be a bark from fairyland! 
169 



We'll freight it deep with marigold, 

Give it a rainbow for a sail, 
Upon the deck a beetle bold 

Shall lord it in his flashing mail. 

Look! it is drifting down the tide, 

Wind-driven from the rocky shore. . . . 

Who knows what vagrant dreams may ride 
On this frail ship forevermore? 

The Outlook Harold Trowbridge Pulsifer 



HAVEN 

Give me to rest in a quiet town 

Built by old rovers of the sea, 
Where they have come to lay them down 

Sure of their spirits' mastery. 

On shaded streets along the sands 

Are white-walled homes where strong men dwell, 
And the presence of far-off lands 

Born of the sounding harbor bell. 

There is the peace of tasks well done, 
Of faith true kept with high emprise. 

This I ask when my race be run, 
To share the light in sea men's eyes! 

The Outlook Harold Trowbridge Pulsifer 



170 



THE DUEL 

Once I fought a shadow 

In swift and gallant play. 

She laughed at thrust and parry 

That dancing wraith of gray. 

Our flickering sword blades circled 
In whirls of phantom light. 
It was a high adventure 
With such a ghost to fight. 

At last, too blindly lunging, 
I passed her flashing guard 
And pierced her misty bosom 
With my impalpable sword. 

The ways of air-born women 
I do not understand, 
Nor how that wounded spirit 
Left blood on my sword hand. 

The Outlook Harold Trowbridge Pulsifer 



THE WATERS OF BETHESDA 

My spirit was a troubled pool 

That stirred with every passing wind, 

And I was thirsty for the cool 

Green depths of a long tranquil mind. 

Now let me rest, I cried, and sleep, 
While hours that vanish one by one 

Marshal the stars across the deep, 
And the still beauty of the sun. 

Let there be no more rain to fill 

My rocky chalice, harsh and brown; 

Let me know quietness until 

The warm earth-mother drinks me down. 

171 



There came a silence everywhere, 

And no clouds sailed and no wind stirred. 

Sun and stars shone stark and bare 
I had the answer to my word. 

All night the stars stabbed through the dark, 
All day the sun shot from the sky 

Swift, molten arrows to its mark 
The lidless circle of my eye. 

In the white torment where it lay, 

My troubled spirit learned, poor fool, 

The glory of that stormy day 

When passing angels stirred the pool. 

The Atlantic Monthly 

Harold Trowbridge Pulsifer 



COASTS 



Were the burned sand of 

Circe's, stranger than yours, 

Wadmalah? 

Myrtles squat Beastlike, each crouching inland, 

Sand heaped like a spell on their faces. 

Is Samos more white 

Than the beaches of Kiawah? 

Are the mighty spirits of Rhodes more terribly splen- 

did 

Than ghosts of Indian warriors? 
Their spears fiercer 
Thau points of palmetto and yucca 
Crossed like a sword dance 
On Edisto? 

Their towers more arrogant 
Than the belfries of thick white bell-flowers 
Carved in the air? 

172 



Is Marathon richlier echoed 

With voices of youthful heroes 

Than the swamps of Santee? 

When the bloom runs over the moss 

In a soft gray glory of tarnished silver, of shadowy 

pearl, 

Riders furrow the night. 
Marion, Marion's men, 
Pass in a voiceless tumult, 
Pass like the smoke from a torch, 
With dark unextinguished eyes. 

These are the coasts, the haunted coasts and the islands 
Of Carolina. 

The Lyric Beatrice Ravenel 



LILL' ANGELS 

Mammy rocks the baby 

In the wallflower-colored gloom; 
All the floor rocks with her, 

And the slumber of the room. 
Like the broad, unceasing trade-wind, 

Like the rivers underground, 
Rolls the universal rhythm 
And the rich, primeval sound: 
All de till* angels, 
All de baby's angels, 

Swingin 9 on de tree; 
Forty-one lill' angel 9 , 
Fifty-two lilF angel 9 , 
Sixty-fo 9 liir angel 9 , 
Sebbenty-free. . . . 

On the glory of the sundown, 
Of the wallflower-colored skies, 

I can see her vast Assumption 
In a cloud of Cherubs' eyes. 

173 



With their gold-persimmon haloes 
"Where the ripest sunlight falls, 
And the cherub-tree's espaliered 
On the winking crystal walls. 
Little yaller angels, 
Piccaninny angels, 

Chuckle on the tree. 
Forty-one lill 9 angel 9 , 
Fifty-two lill 9 angel 9 , 
Sixty-fo 9 lill 9 angel 9 , 

Se . , . ebbenty-free. . . . 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse Beatrice Ravenel 



THE YOUNG BEAUTY 

My two old neighbours come along the lane 
Tucking their sober skirts up from the grass 
"To see her you see April in a glass; 
She is the quince bough blowing at your pane." 
From village houses in a windy line 
"The folk in church have scarce the wit to pray; 
Her looks drift in between each word they say." 
But ah, I know a lovelier face was mine! 
Beauty indeed is but the flower of quince 
(And who so well as I should know this thing? ) 
Blown out of mind as out the white tree nigh, 
And down the dusty highways of Long Since, 
Blown out of mind. There is no second spring 
For ah, I know a lovelier face had I! 

The Lyric Lizette Woodworth Reese 



174 



THE YOUNG GHOSTS 

To old Verona, any dusk in spring, 
Up the dim, twisted road comes Juliet, 
Her haunted orchard close remembering. 
Some silver weather, when the panes are wet, 
Small Arthur drifts back to his mother's knee, 
Where she sits weeping, London April-mad 
Below her, and her ladies, two and three, 
Sighing about her, tall, and palely sad. 
Oh, the young ghosts, in the young year come back, 
To Newburyport, to York, and Norfolk town, 
To Springfield, Berkeley, little country Ware! 
Some old house calls them, high above the wrack, 
Packed with their lost springtime, their new renown 
To keep away were more than they could bear! 

The Literary Review 

New York Evening Post Lizette Woodworth Reese 



CAPUT MORTUUM 

Not even if with a wizard force I might 
Have summoned whomsoever I would name, 
Should anyone else have come than one who came, 
Uncalled, to share with me my fire that night; 
For though I should have said that all was right, 
Or right enough, nothing had been the same 
As when I found him there before the flame, 
Always a welcome and a useful sight. 

Unfailing and exuberant all the time, 

Having no gold he paid with golden rhyme, 

Of older coinage than his old defeat, 

A debt that like himself was obsolete 

In Art's long hazard, where no man may choose 

Whether he play to win or toil to lose. 

The Yale Review Edwin Arlington Robinson 

175 



IRELAND: INVOCATION 

On your keening waters like gray eyes tear-misted, 

On your green fields that harvest the ruins of castles 
broken, rook-haunted, 

On your thatched roofs pierced ty steel rains of mis- 
fortune, 

Let there be peace, 

Ireland! 

By the centuries like furled unflung banners that 

wrapped you in sorrows, 
By your broad-shouldered sons and they ever stooping 

to enter the black holds of ships, 
By your strong-limbed tall daughters and they ever 

waving farewell and turning back to the hovel, 
Let there be peace, 
Ireland! 

By the green of your sterile hilltops and the green of 
your tired hedges trailing the empty highways, 

By your whimsies that glint above heartache like but- 
terflies over dead bodies, 

By the story that wings from the sound of the names 
Thurles, Ballynarra, Listowel, 

Let there be peace, 

Ireland! 

By the past and the strange miscasting that made you 

a hater, 
By the present filled with a crying and no one to tell 

if a nation is born or is dying, 
By the future if lost to be chill with abasement, 

if won to be sad with attainment 
let there be peace, 
Ireland! 

The Nation Kathryn White Ryan 

176 



INDIAN SLEEP-SONG 

Zhoo . . . zhoo, zhoo! 
My little brown chief, 
The bough of the willow 
Is rocking the leaf; 
The sleepy wind cries 
To you, close your eyes, 
O little brown chief, 
Zhoo . . . zhoo, zhoo! 



K6o . . . koo, koo! 
My little brown bird, 
A wood-dove was dreaming 
And suddenly stirred; 
A brown mother-dove, 
Dreaming of love 
O little brown bird, 
Koo . . . koo, koo! 

Hush . * . hush, hush! 
My little brown fawn, 
The snow-flakes are f alling- 
The Winter -men yawn; 
They cover with white 
Their children tonight 
O little brown fawn, 
Hush . . . hush, hush! 

H6o . . . hoo, hoo! 
My little brown owl, 
Yellow-eyes frightens 
Bad spirits that prowl; 
For you she will keep 
A watch while you sleep 
O little brown owl, 
Hoo . . . hoo, hoo! 
177 



Zhoo . . . zhoo, zhoo! 
leaf in the breeze. 
K6o . . . koo, koo! 
Sweet bird in the trees. 
Hush . . . hush, hush! 
snow-covered fawn. 
Hoo . , , hoo, hoc I 
Sleep softly till dawn. 

The North American Review Lew Sarett 



MAPLE-SUGAR SONG 

When the first warm days and frosty nights of the 
spring-thaws usher in the season of maple-sugaring, 
the Otter-tail Indians pitch camp in their favorite 
sugar-bush. Before the real work of sugar-making is 
begun, however, the Indians go through a ceremony. 
They gather a few buckets of the first run of the sap 
and boil the first kettle of sap, down to sugar. At 
night a feast is spread in honor of Way-nah-bo-zhoo, 
a mythological guardian spirit of the Chippewas. At 
the feast one place is left vacant for Way-nah-bo-zhoo 
who is expected to attend the ceremony in spirit, to 
eat the first sugar which has been prepared solely for 
him, and to bless the Indians in the sugar-season. 

"Maple-Sugar Song" is an interpretation in no 
sense a translation or transcription, for no specific 
words are uttered of the spirit and the emotional 
content of the chants sung in this ceremony. 

I 

H6-yo-ho-ho! H6-yo-h6-ho! . . . yo-ho! . . . 

"Way-nah-bo-zhoo, big spirit of our brother, 

Come thou and bless us, for the maple flows, 

And the Moon-of -Sugar-Making is upon us. 

The nights are white with frost; the days are yellow 

With sunshine, and now the sap of the maple-tree, 

Humming the sugar-song, goes up the stem 

178 



With dancing feet. The gabbling geese come tumbling 
Out of the wind and into the wet mush-kaig 
In clattering families; among the reeds 
The fat old women-geese go chattering 
Of winter-lands; and gathered on the shore, 
Shouting with hearts glad to be home again, 
The old men strut in council, and flutter and snort. 
Ah-chee-dah-mo, the spluttering tail-up squirrel, 
Pokes his blue whiskers from his hole in the oak, 
And scurries up and down the swaying branches 
He runs in six directions, all over the earth, 
Hurrying, looking everywhere for somebody, 
Something he cannot find nor does he know 
Why the green wet days should be so bitterly sweet. 
Ho! The yellow birch throbs, for she knows the pain 

of life, 

Of swelling limbs and bursting buds; she stands 
With naked arms stretched out to the warm gray 

rains, 

With hungry arms that tremble for her lover, 
For See-gwun, the Maker-of-Little-Children, who 

comes 

With soft blue feet that rustle the fallen leaves! 
Hear thou the maple-water dripping, dripping, 
The cool sweet- water dripping upon the birchbark! 
Ho! the Moon-of -Sugar-Making is upon us! 

H6-yo-ho-ho! H6-yo-h6-ho! . . . yo-ho! . . . 
Hear thou our prayers, Brother, Way-nah-bo-zhoo! 
Hear, thou who made the flat green earth, for us 
To dance upon, who folds us in his hands 
Tenderly as a woman holds a broken bird 
In winter, thou our Brother who hung the sun 
Upon the sky to give us warmth and life, 
And the wet moon to make us cool and clean; 
Hear, thou who made the hills and the timber-beasts 
That roam among them, who made the sliding rivers 
And silver fish that shiver in the pools, 
That there might be wild meat for empty bellies; 

179 



Hear, thou who made cold rapids in the canyons, 
Wild waterfalls, and springs in the cool green hollows, 
That there might be sweet- water for parching tongues; 
Hear, thou who gave us thy mother, All-Mother 

Earth, 

That she might feed her children from her bosom 
Ah-yee! Way-nah-bo-Zhoo, come thou on this night 
With blessings as the maple- water flows; 
Make thou a song to our heavy-breasted mother, 
And pray thou that her children may not hunger, 
For now is the night for maple-sugar feasting. 

H6-yo-h6-ho! H6-yo-ho-ho! . . . yo-ho! . . . 

From the long cold of winter-moons, our eyes 

Are deep, our hands like the bundled veins and talons 

Of buzzard birds. Before the winter-winds 

The moose have run to other lands for feeding; 

The rabbits have vanished as the snow a plague 

Left a strange red sickness in their withered mouths. 

Even old Gang, the clumsy porcupine, 

No longer finds his way to our roasting-pots 

We boil his yellow bone-ribs many times 

Ugh! Our teeth grow soft without strong meat to eat. 

Ho! Way-nah-bo-zhoo, hear thou our many tears 

Dropping among the dead leaves of winter; 

Pray thou, and ask our grandmother, Waking-Earth, 

To take us in her arms, to make us warm 

With food, to hold us safe upon her bosom. 

Our mouths go searching for her mighty breasts, 

Where the maple-milk comes flowing from the trees 

Ah-yee! Brother, pray thou now the Mother-One 

To give us freely of her sugar-sap, 

The good sweet-water of her bursting breasts 

For the Moon-of -Sugar-Making is upon us! 

H6-yo-ho-ho! H6-yo-h6-ho! . . . yo-ho! 

Ho! 

II 

And if the sap flows thin with water, our hearts 
Will hold no bitterness; for we shall know 
180 



That long ago in thy wisdom thou decreed 

That our mother's milk might never be too thick 

Fearing that we should gather plenty sugar 

With little labor and soon grow sick with food 

And slow to move our legs, like glutted bear 

Ho! We are a faithful children of the soil; 

We toil with eager hearts and patient hands. 

And if our birchen baskets crack and leak 

The gathered sap, our tongues will speak no evil 

We know that thou, our Brother, in thy love 

For those of the Otter-tail totem, whipped the growing 

Birch tree until the bark was cracked and cut 

With round black stripes that our birchen pails 

might leak 

The silver sap, that thus all Indian children, 
Laboring long with many steps, might never 
Grow soft and fat with idling in the bush. 
Ho! We are a faithful children of the soil; 
We toil with eager hearts and patient backs. 

Hi! Way-nah-bo-zhoo! Hear thou, Mighty One, 

Who folds us in his tender hands as a woman 

Holding a broken bird in the winter-wind, 

Come thou and bless us on this night of feasting; 

Pray thou our mother to take us in her arms, 

To hold us warm upon her great brown bosom, 

To give us freely of her maple-water, 

The good sweet-water of her swelling breasts. 

And if we labor long, our lips will speak 

No bitterness, for our arms are strong for hauling, 

Eager for many buckets of sweet sap, 

For syrup dancing its bubbles up and down 

In the kettles, to the bubble-dancing song. 

Ho! For we are a faithful children of the soil; 

We toil with trusting hearts and patient fingers 

And now is the Moon-of -Maple-Sugar-Making! 

Ho-yo-ho-ho! H6-yo-ho-ho! . . , yo-ho! . . . 

Ho! 

Broom Lew Scnrett 

181 



TO A DEAD PEMBINA WARRIOR 

Killed by Indians in hostile territory and given by 
his enemies a tree-burial; L e. 9 wrapped in a bundle 
of birch bark and placed in the crotch of a tree. 

Slumbering warrior-soul, afloat 

Upon the seas of night, 

In your ghostly birchen boat, 

Anchored upon the black limb, 

And etched against the white 

Of the broken hunter's moon 

warrior-spirit, dark and dim, 

Draped with festoon 

Of moss, and shielded by lancing pines 

That ring their ragged lines 

Around the somber swamp 

Sleep without fear in your birchen shroud, 

Sleep with a heart secure, and proud 

In your ghostly chieftain's pomp. 

Know that the iron-hearted mountain-ash 

Lifts you with mighty arms 

Up to the proud flash 

Of the moon, holds you high 

In the unconquered sky, 

Safe in a starry cache, 

Safe from the little harms 

Of the little peoples of the earth. 

Through soundless nights, with ghostly mirth 

Echoing your crimson scalping-cry 

From peak to brooding peak, 

The lonely wolf will speak 

Of your valiant deeds and many wars. 

When white Bee-boan shall heap 

His snowy avalanche 

Soft as the down of the Canada goose 

In tufted drifts and bars 

On the black branch, 

To keep you warm in winter-sleep 

182 



The wild feet of the stars, 
Mirrored upon the frozen snow, 
Will dance for you, row on row; 
And when the hoary spruce 
Bends on your head. 
To whisper soft lullabies, to weep 
Sweet songs for the dead 
Lo ! out of the white deep 
Of night, the winter wind will sweep 
Down on your hirchen hed, 
To wrap its arms about your clay, 
To carry you away, 
To the land of your desires, 
To the country whence you came 
Like a devastating flame, 
Back to the country of your sires, 
To a land of peaceful slumbers and friendly council 
fires. 

The Lyric West Lew Sarett 



ELIZABETH 

She has the strange sweet grace of violets 

That stand in slender vases in the dusk 
When fireflies weave their unseen fairy nets 

About an unreal world of rose and musk. 
She has the glad young smile that poppies wear 

In quiet gardens when the day comes in 
With dewy cobwebs tangled in her hair 

And laughing eyes that bid the dance begin! 
Her path's a trail of beauty down the years 

And where she steps the dust is touched with flame; 
A genius, as of hills when night appears, 

Clings to her from the silence whence she came. 

She passes me and there remains behind 
A sense of flowers drifting down the wind. 

Contemporary Verse George Brandon Saul 

183 



FIGURE 

The fire speaks; the clouds shudder; 
Shadow on shadow covers the sun. 
It is a day's end; the windows darken. 
The flame mutters. The light is gone. 

Over the fields, a shape darker, 

Ruggeder, more obtuse than all 

The darkness tangled about his movements 

Conies, and his shoulders droop. The owls call. 

The owls call, and the hour falters. 
The winds shuffle under the hill. 
A gate clicks, and a door closes. 
The winds yield to the night's will. 

It is well as it is, at the day's passing; 
He will laugh tomorrow and face the sun, 
Forgetting this hour of broken spirit 
Forgetting, as men must forget, their dreams done. 

The New Republic George Brandon Saul 



MAIN STREET MUMBLES ON 

From out her heaven of heavens Beauty looked 
Upon the ugly glitter and the hopeless gaud; 
"I will go down and live with them," she said, 
"These deaf and blind, these starved, undreaming ones. 
They shall, through love, learn to know loveliness, 
I \vill incarnate in a poet's dream." 

**.. 

Perplexed, dismayed, a poet walked the ways. 
Silence lay on him like an unspent sea. 
Nor could he hope to come articulate; 
For song died ever on his opening lips. 

184 



"Your poets you would slay," he murmured low, 
"I must go forth where there is room for dreams." 
The wise ones touched their foreheads with a smile 
And, fat-eyed, looked on him indulgently. 

Out from her heaven of heavens Beauty looked, 

"I will go down myself to them and be 

Priestess to all the loveliness of life." 

A while walked Beauty, veiled, their dusty ways 

Seeking in vain to body forth her word 

Speaking in unknown tongue to unlistening ones 

Who mocked, or moved, incredulous, aside. 

Sadly the goddess turned and went away. 

Only a timid child clutched piteously 

Her flying robe. 

"Hovels shall yearn to me and all the dark 

Sad places of the earth shall quicken with 

My deeper flowering," she said, 

"But Main Street shall be dark till not one stone 

Is left upon another." 

But Main Street's ears were stopped. She only flashed 

More jauntily and more resplendently 

Her foolish lights. She only shrieked 

More hoarsely in her empty carnival. 

"I am success. I am prosperity. . . , 

No ghostly stuff of dreams is here!" 

Her blatant drums beat out. 



And so Main Street forever mumbles on. 

The New York Times Mary Siegrist 



185 



A RAIN SONG 

The plover pauses in his search 

For mollusks in the stream: 
And, nodding from his stilted height, 

Sends forth a frightened scream. 

Wee night-hawks veering through the mist, 

Indulge in croakings deep: 
While herons on the pebbly bar 

Their solemn vigils keep, 

The woodland's feathered choir is hushed . . . 

No note from all the throng: 
But with the passing of the rain 

Will come new feasts of song. 

Aye, sweeter will that music ring, 

Because for one brief day 
The Storm God in his fury snatched 

All loveliness away! 

The Cedar Rapids Republican 

Jay G. Sigmund 

THE MINISTER'S WIFE 

Ours is a peaceful town 

Of a thousand souls or so: 

It is cradled among the hills: 

And we are provincial, 

Self-satisfied, 

And contented. . , , 

But souls must be saved: 

So we hire parsons to do this 

Little service for us: 

And we have five churches 

Whose lofty spires, 

Like great inverted icicles, 

Pierce the blue sky 

Overhead. 

186 



No, I shall not waste time 

Telling you of the five pastors 

Who lahor in those churches 

Though many noble things might be said of them 

And the good works wrought by their hands. 

Nay: 

I have rather to speak of a woman 

Whom I saw today. . . . 

She stood in a doorway 

Of a modest cottage, 

Watching her three children 

As they left for shool. 

Her calico dress was a little faded. 

And her smile a little tired 

And worried: 

Her face was pinched, 

And wore the gray shadow of self-denial: 

But she waved a joyous good-bye 

To the neatly-dressed children. 

I have seen her frequently before, 

In various places: 

I have seen her in church, 

In her run-over shoes and shabby hat, 

For she teaches a Sunday school class; 

I have seen her calling on the sick: 

I have heard the kind words she spoke to a shiftless 

loafer: 
I have seen the wanning smile she gave a wayward 

girl . . . 

The village Magdalene. 
I have heard her voice in the choir, 
Singing old hymns. . . . 
But once I saw a flush creep over her face, 
And her eyes flashed fire: 
That was when the banker's pretty daughter , 
Tittered at her old-fashioned coat. . * * 
But this was the only sign 
That jibes stung her, 

187 



Or that her cross was heavy. * . . 
She is a brave woman. 

In our village, 

Souls must be saved: 

And souls may be the property 

Of humans exceeding poor in purse: 

And ministers have wives , . . 

And oh, 

We expect so much of them! 

Poor things, 

Why do we watch them so closely, 

Expecting them to set an example 

For us 

Who have less privation, 

And so little that calls 

For rebellion? 

The Country Bard Jay G. Sigmund 



YUCCA IS YELLOWING 

Yucca is yellowing 

Hello, yellow! 
Cactus is crimsoning 

Glow, glow, red fellow! 
And in the mesquite bush is seen 

A splash of green: 

As when sunset colors spill 

Their beauty down an evening hill. 

No one rides the trail today 
Who cares if strange or lonely? 

No one goes the desert way 
It is for beauty only. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse 

William H. Simpson 

188 



TEWA SONG 

Above the lands, 
Above the seas, 
You see, you know, 
AH mysteries 

Sun Old Man, 

Moon Old Man! 

Would I could fly 
On widespread wing 
Where whirlpools are 
And flame-tips sing 

Sun Old Man, 

Moon Old Man! 

Die in the sea, 
And rise at morn; 
Thus would I go, 
And thus be born 

Sun Old Man, 

Moon Old Man! 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse 

William H. Simpson 



THE TREES THAT LEAN OVER WATER 
(Awarded Laura Blackburn prize) 

The trees that lean over water, 

Living enchanted days, 
I have known them on quiet farmlands, 

I have seen them on golden bays; 
Dreaming in calm, cold twilights, 

Musing* in noonday suns, 
There are trees that lean over water 

Wherever the water runs. 



There is nothing in days or seasons 

These rapt trees ever know; 
The only world for their dwelling 

Is the crystal world below. 
They are deaf to the wind's alluring, 

They are dumb through its stormy song; 
They answer only the -water 

That whispers and glides along. 

The trees that lean over water, 

They miss the untroubled sky; 
They lose its fathomless splendor 

As the starry march goes by; 
In their own boughs entangled 

They view the eternal suns. 
There are trees that lean over water 

Wherever the water runs. 

The Stepladder Marion Couthouy Smith 



IN PRAISE OF ABRIGADA 

I had been told 

A foolish tale 

Of stone dank cold: 

But you, 

Held to wide winter storm, 

To clutch of blackening frost and ocean gale, 

Are warm! 

I thought that stone was silent too, 

Unmoved by beauty, 

Unaware of season or of mirth: 

But I hear laughter, singing, as I lay 

My face against your gray; 

Surely I hear the ritual of far waves 

And scent their winging spray, 

Mixed with wild-rose and honeysuckle, 

Budding sassafras, 

And the cool breath of pungent, leafy bay. 

190 



I knew that walls were sheltering 

And strong; 

But you have sheltered love so long 

That love is part 

Of your high towering, 

Lifting you higher still, 

As heart lifts heart. . . . 

Hush! 

How the whip-poor-will 

Wails from his bush: 

The thrush 

Grows garrulous with delight! 

There is a rapture in that liquid monotone, 

"Bob White! Bob White!" 

Dear living stone! 

. 

In the great room below, 

Where arches hold the listening spaces, 

Flames crackle, leap and gleam 

In the deep fire-places; 

Memories dream . . . 

Of other memories, perhaps, 

Of gentle lives, 

Of births, and of those other births that men call 

death, 

Of voices, foot-steps tapping the stone floor, 
And faces . , . faces . . . 

Beyond, the open door, 

The meadows drowsy with the moon, 

The faint outline of dune, 

The lake, the silver magic in the trees: 

Walls, you are one with these! 

High on the loggia-roof, 
Under the stars as pale as they, 
Two silent ones have crept away, 
Seeking the deeper silence lovers know: 

191 



Into the radiant shadows of the night, 
Into the aching beauty of the night, 
They dare to go ! 

The moon 

Is a vast cocoon, 

Spinning her wild, white thread 

Across die sky. 

A thousand crickets croon 

Their sharp-edged lullaby, 

I hear a murmuring of lips on lips: 

"All that I am, beloved! 

All!" 

Lovers' eternal cry! 

Lift them still higher, wall! 



You stand serene: 

The great winds linger, lean 

Upon your breast; 

The mist 

Lifts up a gray face to be kissed; 

The east and west 

Hang you with banners, 

Flaunt their bold victories of dusk and dawn; 

Seasons salute you as they pass, 

Call to you and are gone. 

Amid your meadow-grass 

Lush, green, 

You stand serene. 



Houses, like hearts, are living, loving, 
Joyful or woeful, 

Forget or are forgot; 

Houses, like tired hearts, 

Sicken at last, and die, 

Crumble and rot: 

But they who know you, Abrigada, 

They and I 

Forget you not! 

192 



Nor they who stand on Abrigada's roof, 
Glowing, aloof! 


Come with me now, 

Climb with me, stand, look down 
In new content of mood, 
"Withdrawn from clasp of crowd 
And tangle of the town! 
Climb swifter still 
From safe companionship of cloud 
The deeper to look down! 

Not back! 

Forget the thirst, the sordid cup, 

The plethora, the piteous lack; 

Forget the trafficking in tears, 

The arrogance of scars. 

Look up ... 

To dream undaunted dreams aloud, 

And stumble toward the stars I 

** 
This be in praise 

Of Abrigada; 

In all the ways 

That come to me 

Through the wise, wistful summer days. 

In speech, in rhyme and rhythm of word 
Call it a poem, maybe! 

In song tuck the brown shining wood 
Under my chin! 
Call it my bird, 
My heart, 
My violin! 
In prayer . 
In dream . . . 
In silence, best of all. 
Leaning on the beloved dew-drenched wall. 

193 



Leaning and lifting . . . 

High . . . 

With Abrigada's gesture toward the sky. 

Poetry , A Magazine of Verse Lenora Speyer 



UPON READING A LOVE-LYRIC 

I wonder if the singer of this song, 

Rousing the spectres of dead bliss 

In pallid throng 

I see them! Tripping, tripping along, 

Like midnight ghosts about their churchward wall- 

I wonder if she knew of what she sang, 

Of lover's clasp or kiss, 

Or love at all? 

Perhaps she knew the truer things 

Of dreams, 

From which her heart need never wake 

To burn or break; 

Perhaps her words 

Were swift, unbridled birds 

Whose wings, 

Exempt of shifting path of cloud, 

Indifferent to star's directing cry, 

Lifted her high, 

Into the lover's arms of her imaginings. 

There could she sing indeed 

From out the conquered skies, 

Of love and lovers' need, 

And of her lover too, 

In spendthrift praise; 

Sing of the world within his eyes, 

And of his hands' soft ways, 

And of his lips and of her own 

Sing happily, alone, 

Through lovers* nights and days. 

194 



Singer, sing on! 

Love dies ... but not the song, 

As long 

As lips shall curve and meet: 

Hearts crumble ... not their beat. 

Birds break of trilling, 
Drop from out the sky 
And die ... 
But not their tunes; 
June does not weep her roses 
For dead Junes. 

Surely from all this death 
Life catches fuller breath! 
Love dies, 
The song lives on: 
Then let me live within the song! 
Scatter and spill 
The clamor of my wrong 
Out of wide skies, 

Shrouded and shriven in a lark's leaping trill . . 
I who have looked too long 
Within a ghost's dear eyes. 

Contemporary Verse Lenora Speyer 



TWO WOMEN MEET 

They do not care about each other, these two, 

They never did; 

But they were girls together, years ago. 

Years! Years! 

How many, my dear! 

They look at each other with the furtive appraising eye 
Of women noticing the changes, 
Pretending not to. ... 
195 



And suddenly they cling, sobbing a little; 
They kiss. 

But not each other ! 

The one is holding to her heart a girl's mad dream, 

Forgotten, 

And the dream's end, 

Forgotten, too. 

And the other reaches wistful lips toward a far feast, 
And seems to taste the crumbs that fell from that 

shining table, 
Where, 

Careless, singing, 
She hardly touched the food. 

Contemporary Verse Lenora Speyer 



TEARS FOR SALE 

I wept a tear 

Like a little tune, 

A tear for an ache to croon, 

A quiet tear 

That lay on grief 

Like dew on a desperate leaf. 

I chose cool words 
That spoke of fire, 
Metaphor matched desire. 

I chose light words 
That spoke of pain 
In glib, iambic strain. 
196 



I chose two nouns 

And an adjective 

To make my pale tear thrive. 

I urged my tear 

To an unctuous rhyme, 

And sold it for a dime. 

I sold the tear 

That wept for you; 

It's a thing that poets do. 

The Literary Review 

New York Evening Post Leonora Speyer 



OPINIONS 

(To a certain woman in this town) 

We could have been such friends, dear almost-friend! 
Each time we chanced to meet, how well we knew it. 
We smiled and stood together for a while, 
Swift impulse made us do it. 

Your hand reached out toward mine, your kindly hand, 
Or was my hand the first? What did it matter? 
We knew and shared the solitude of crowds, 
Lifting above the clatter. 

And then we parted. Well, the world is big 
And busy so are we and more the pity! 
Opinions grip us close; mine heal my heart, 
Yours fortify the city. 

Opinions! Principles! And both are good! 
Can two so disagree . . . and each be right? 
I wonder! Can the white you see be black? 
And can my black be white? 

The Literary Review 

New York Evening Post Leonora Speyer 

197 



SQUIRREL 

He was so shy when I first wooed his glance. . . 
A rustle of the leaves and he was gone ; 
But from some sanctuary, dim, withdrawn, 
I knew he watched my circumspect advance 
With bright, distrustful eyes. His vigilance 
The second day relaxed, and once at dawn 
I found him frisking on my rustic lawn: 
Thereafter we were friends by ordinance. 

I hope he knows, wherever now he plays, 

It was not I betrayed him utterly: 

Bleeding and torn at last I saw him lie. . . . 

My little friend! * . . before a huntsman's gaze. 

Dead, in the wood, there is a riven tree. . . * 

And by what huntsman's weapon shall I die? 



CRICKET 

The cricket sings upon the No! not that! 
I have no hearth where haply he may sing. 
Pity for one who marks the planets swing 
From the high window of a city flat; 
A pigeon-hole where careless circumstance 
Thrust me away, some dozen years ago, 
Forgetting to return. And time is slow. . * . 

And I am through with casual romance. 

The cricket sings: I cannot place his song, 

But of my restless thought he is a part. 

Deep in some secret crevice of my heart 

He has found bed and board. And time is long. * 

And I would miss that cheerless, cheerful theme, 

Lone obligato to my lonely dream. 



198 



TURTLE 

Queer, tessellated, tardy snuff-box, you, 
Hillocked with mud, and slippery with slime; 
There is the dreadful certainty of time 
In your unhurried saunter Wandering Jew! 
I can believe you on an ageless quest, 
Lurching across the ocean's cozy floor 
But, of what God are you ambassador? 
And to what dismal shrine are you addressed? 

Still you are blind to all save wet and gloom, 
Maugre your leisured march through centuries 
Dwelling perhaps in more than seven seas, 
Impotent yet, within your living tomb. 
In my brief venture between walls of clay, 
I have met turtles all along the way. 

The Step Ladder Vincent Starrett 



OF THE MANNER OF ADDRESSING CLOUDS 

Gloomy grammarians in golden gowns, 

Meekly you keep the mortal rendezvous, 

Eliciting the still sustaining pomps 

Of speech which are like music so profound 

They seem an exaltation without sound. 

Funest philosophers and ponderers, 

Their evocations are the speech of clouds. 

So speech of your processionals returns 

In the casual evocations of your tread 

Across the stale, mysterious seasons. These 

Are the music of meet resignation; these 

The responsive, still sustaining pomps for you 

To magnify, if in that drifting waste 

You are to be accompanied by more 

Than mute bare splendors of the sun and moon. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse Wallace Stevens 
199 



A HIGH-TONED OLD CHRISTIAN WOMAN 

Poetry is the supreme fiction, madame. 

Take the moral law and make a nave of it 

And from the nave build haunted heaven. Thus, 

The conscience is converted into palms, 

Like windy citherns hankering for hymns. 

We agree in principle. That's clear* But take 

The opposing law and make a peristyle, 

And from the peristyle project a masque 

Beyond the planets. Thus, our bawdiness, 

Unpurged by epitaph, indulged at last, 

Is equally converted into palms, 

Squiggling like saxophones. And palm for palm, 

Madame, we are where we began. Allow, 

Therefore, that in the planetary scene 

Your disaffected flagellants, well-stuffed, 

Smacking their muzzy bellies in parade. 

Proud of such novelties of the sublime, 

Such tink and tank and tunk-a-tunk-tunk, 

May, merely may, madame, whip from themselves 

A jovial hullabaloo among the spheres. 

This will make widows wince. But fictive things 

Wink as they will. Wink most when widows wince. 

The Dial Wallace Stevens 



THE BIRD WITH THE COPPERY, KEEN CLAWS 

Above the forest of the parakeets, 
A parakeet of parakeets prevails, 
A pip of life amid a mort of tails. 

(The rudiments of tropics are around, 

Aloe of ivory, pear of rusty rind.) 

His lids are white because his eyes are blind. 

200 



He is not paradise of parakeets, 

Of his gold ether, golden alguazil, 

Except because he broods there and is still. 

Panache upon panache, his tails deploy 
Upward and outward, in green-vented forms, 
His tip a drop of water full of storms. 

But though the turbulent tinges undulate 
As his pure intellect applies its laws, 
He moves not on his coppery, keen claws. 

He munches a dry shell while he exerts 
His will, yet never ceases, perfect cock, 
To flare, in the sun-pallor of his rock. 

Broom Wallace Stevens 



THE FORBIDDEN ROSE 

She wore a cold, hard lily on her breast, 
This nun; she sipped its sweetly acrid scent 
All day between her prayers ; the perfume blent 
With her own lily bosom's parched unrest. 
She sang the anthems of the virgin blest, 
The brides of God; she sought enravishment 
Of soul-white adoration, but she bent 
Her head at evening like a flower distressed. 

Alone within her dismal cell at last, 
Writhing her hands in torment on her bed, 
She suddenly tore away and from her cast 
The lily, then caught back from out the past 
Another flower, whose warm, soft petals bled 
With passion, and whose very scent was red. 

The Freeman Charles Wharton Stork 

201 



'THE PARSON 0' PORLOCK TOWN 

A Moral Ballad 

There once was a parson o 5 Porlock Town 

And a well-favoured youth was he. 

With a task for his life and a shrew for his wife, 

He was sad as a man might be. 

The parson he strode on the broad highroad, 
He went with a downcast eye, 
Till he caught the half of an elfish laugh 
From a copse of the heath hard by. 

But when the parson had raised his looks 
He crossed himself in dread, 
For there by the wood a brown girl stood 
And her bodice was scarlet red. 

As soft was her eye as the evening sky. 
Her loose hair black and fine, 
And the man that looked on her wilful mouth, 
Oh! long his heart would pine. 

"Come, turn you, parson o' Porlock Town, 
And tarry a while with me. 
Your brow is bold and your locks are gold 
And comely of form you be." 

* S I know you not, you gipsy wench, 

I know not your kith nor kin. 

From your forward ways and your shameless gaze 

I deem you a child of sin." 

"You speak the words of a book, sir priest, 
You name but an idle name, 
For how can the cheek that is flushed with life 
Grow pale at the fear of shame?" 

208 



"Then come and try with hand and eye 
The truth of what I say." 
His step was slow and very slow 
As he turned from the broad highway. 

But he danced when the evening moon was up 
For joy of the gipsy life, 
He left the drone of his church of stone 
And the clack of his scolding wife. 

He's sworn a faith with never a word 
More strong than his plighted vow, 
For the brown girl's face is his book of grace 
And her eyes are his candles now. 

He's found the God that he never knew 

In the sun, in the thyme-sweet air, 

And he lauds his name by the camp fire's flame 

With a song that is living prayer. 



Oh, the worthy people o' Porlock Town 
Speak ill of their parson fled ; 
His wife by the banns is another man's 
And she hopes that the first is dead. 

But the priest that forsook his musty book, 
He shrinks for no idle name, 
For how can the cheek that is flushed with life 
Grow pale at the fear of shame? 

The Freeman Charles Wharton Stork 



203 



THE DANCING FERN 

At the time of the partridge berry harvest, 

In a wood of many-colored boughs, 
"While through the afternoon the silver milkweed 
floated 

And bells were silent on the lazy cows, 
I was going along the wood-road over the beech leaves, 

And squirrels had been before me at every turn 
Taking all the chestnuts out of their velvet cases, 

When I came upon the Dancing Fern. 

Now, I never saw a fern like this one, 

Trying her poses there alone, 
Throwing back her head in ecstasy and laughing, 

Curtsying to a chipmunk, dipping to a stone; 
Bending far back and flinging out her tresses, 

Drooping forward pensive, quivering again, 
As all the while her fragile fronded shadow 

Kept the wild step lightly, flickering; and then 
Though falling acorns clicked like castanets, for a 
breeze came, 

The Dancing Fern saw me did her tree-toad harper 

warn? 

And there she stood, as motionless as water in a 
cistern 

Or a very scared rabbit, hiding in the corn. 

The Literary Review 

New York Evening Post Marian Storm 



204 



SIFTING MY DREAMS 
I 

I have come to confess to the hyacinths, to seek abso- 
lution from the wisteria, I have come to be for- 
given of the roses, for I have outraged Beauty. 

I made an ash-girl of her, that one with the star-eyes. 

I set her in rags, that one of the tremulousness. 

I beat her with flails of ugliness, that one of the 
ravished flesh, that pressed the star-strands to her 
breast, and drank, like goblets of delirium, great 
draughts of the night-fragrant air. 

II 
God possess me! Express through me as through the 

hues of your flowers, the songs of your starlings. 
Vest me with brilliant hues, or with carols. 
Let me be some color of your soul, some sound of your 

uttering. 

Let me be some rapture of you some uttered 

ecstasy 

Like sap thrilling through trees, 
Like stars rising to perihelion, 
Like waves lapping the feet of cliffs, 
Like fledglings pressed close to a breast, 
Like azseleas opening, 
Like moonflowers thrown purple against a blue night. 

Ill 

I am the spinner of dream, 
I weave from the webs of yearning. 
I weave from the fragile reel that holds the fine red 
threads of my heart. 

I am the gentle dreamer, weaving in and out a warp 
of the moon with a woof of the mist; 

Fine wrought threads of gauze, with filament of dew; 

Strands of fairy tresses enwoven with a blue shimmer- 
ing, like a grotto's evening. 

05 



Somewhere my dream awaits me 
What matter that I had the wrong personnel. 
Maybe I called it Hyacinth, when it was Star-Drift; 
Maybe I called it the East Wind, when it was the 
Moomnist. 

IV 

I bring you the pujrple embroideries wrought in the 

black Pentecost of my pain. 
I bring all that life missed and lay it at your feet 

like friendly grasses. 

I bring the tenderness that speaks your name fondly, 
I bring the atonement and the reparation, annulling 

the world experience. 
I reestablish the Great Heart, I re-affirm the Great 

Potency. 

All that was withheld I bring. 
I bring seed to the barren fields, and birds to the 

restive trees. 
I bring flocks to the bare hills, and lovers to the 

moonlight. 

V 

I bring you up to the tablelands of your soul, 
To the undenied landscape and the deep inhalations, 
To your thatched house of joy, with its radiating 

cornices, and its lintels that laugh, 
Into a garden where trees clap their hands. 

I bring you in the early ecstasy, with dew on the spirit, 

in the birds' awakening, 
In the early radiance, to the vision that hangs in the 

sky, 
To the things you saw on the wide plain's distances. 

I bring you singing life, 
Setting it all to music 
From the lullaby over the cradle, 
To the requiem over the grave. 

206 



VI 

I moan at the water's edge at night, 

I press my heart to the pond lilies, 

I call my lover's name. 

I hear the answer of the moonlight, and the birds 

chirping in the trees. 

I hear him call to me out of the lone wind. 
I hear his swift unwilling feet go speeding hy. 
I reach my hand to touch the edge of his garment,, 
I reach my heart to touch the edge of his grief. 

VII 

I am braiding oakum with my long deft fingers, 
But my soul is braiding filament, 
Caught from the strands of stars. 

I am sifting ashes, 

And you do not know that I am also sifting my 

dreams. 

You see only Cinderella, the ash-girl, 
But I see the bride of the prince. 

VIII 

Once I prayed to come in the victorious concourse 
Now I know that victory is not in the pageant and 

the roll of bugles, 

It is not in the helmets, not in the clanking steel, 
Not in the prancing spirit of the fete day. 
It may be tears, not paeans. 
Once I prayed to the young God of daring now I 

pray to the grave God of experience, 
To that God that bears no crowning and no bay. 

IX 
What if I grew only towering pines out of my breast, 

and never grew the violets, shy in the grass? 
What if I brought only great granite boulders, and 

never brought the moss? 

207 



X 

I stand at the source, at the beginning, and tell you 

what was put into the attar jars; 
What pigments were mixed for beetles. 
I tell you the process for the inside of conch shells. 
I am from His workshop, and I tell you how He lathed 

the world, 

How with plane and plummet He scoped the sea. 
I know how He made trees, and how stars came to be. 
I am of the Divine Order of His Blue Blouse 
I carried timbers and wielded trowels. 
I am co-builder with God of His worlds. 

XI 

I pray to the God that made seas and sunsets and 

mountain ranges 

And the God that made mites and microcosms. 
Only a God of infinities can understand infinitesimals. 
Only a God that uttered the unendingness that thunders 

along the walls of ages, can hear the pigmy cry 

of me. 
Only the timeless, measureless One will be concerned 

with the moaning of moments. 
A lesser God might hear the cry of a star, but the 

God-One hears my cry, 
Hears the agony of the dust, 
The pain of the unassembling. 

XII 

God, keep me humble! 

Let me not boast my cross, my Calvary Hill. 

What have I done that I should be identified with 

saviors, 

Should share fate with these? 

Should bleed and die, pinioned by my hands and feet? 
God, keep me humble, here with Joan and Jesus 
That my lot should be so sweet! 

The Boston Transcript Muriel Strode 

208 



FOR A SHY LOVER 

If you will poise your forefoot in my pool, 
I will not loose a ripple, Beautiful. 
Crackle the fern-stems, arch aloft and stare, 
See! there's no fright for you, anywhere. 
A leaf shall not lift, nor a shade shake 
You and your shy love away from my lake. 
I know the noon is a Haze for you, 
This gaunt forest, a maze for you: 
Kneel near a drop of water on stone. 
No one comes plunging. You are alone. 
Today I am opal tinged with blue, 
My color darkens with the glassy heat, 
And I listen for hoofs. Am I timid, too? 
Noon is my enemy! Thrust in your feet! 
Trample this silver, trample this sand, 
I will not startle you, Little One; stand 
Slim as the larch, there, I'll not take 
Even your shade to the naked ache 
Of my lessening waters. If you lean, 
Another faun, like you, but green 
Will flick his ears and curve his throat, 
His shadow hoof will lift between 
These pebble-splotches. Will you float, 
Mingle and drowse and touch me, Beautiful? 
If you come down some blown noon to my pool, 
I will be <juiet, I will be cool. 

The Nation Genevieve Taggard 



WORDS FOR AN OLD AIR 

Your heart is bound tightly, let 

Beauty beware; 
It is not hers to set 

Free from the snare. 
09 



Tell her a bleeding hand 

Bound it and tied it; 
Tell her the knot will stand 

Though she deride it. 

One who withheld so long 
All that you yearned to take, 

Has made a snare too strong 
For Beauty's self to break. 

Scribner's Magazine Sara Teasdale 



THOSE WHO LOVE 

Those who love the most 

Do not talk of their love; 

Francesca, Guenevere, 

Dierdre, Iseiilt, Heloise 

In the fragrant gardens of heaven 

Are silent, or speak, if at all, 

Of fragile, inconsequent things. 

And a woman I used to know 

Who loved one man from her youth, 

Against the strength of the fates 

Fighting in lonely pride, 

Never spoke of this thing, 

But hearing his name by chance, 

A light would pass over her face, 

Scribner's Magazine Sara Teasdale 



THE SOLITARY 

Let them think I love them more than I do, 
Let them think I care, though I go alone, 

If it lifts their pride, what is it to me 

Who am self-complete as a flower or a stone? 

210 



It is one to me that they come or go 

If I have myself and the drive of my will, 

And strength to climb on a summer night 
And watch the stars swarm over the hill. 

My heart has grown rich with the passing of years, 
I have less need now than when I was young 

To share myself with every comer, 

Or shape my thoughts into words with my tongue. 

The Yale Review Sara Teasdale 



THE CRYSTAL GAZER 

I shall gather myself into myself again, 

I shall take my scattered selves and make them one, 
I shall fuse them into a polished crystal ball 

Where I can see the moon and the flashing sun. 

I shall sit like a sibyl, hour after hour intent, 
Watching the future come and the present go 

And the little shifting pictures of people rushing 
In tiny self-importance to and fro. 

The Yale Review Sara Teasdale 

FULL MOON 
Santa Barbara 

I listened, there was not a sound to hear 
In the great rain of moonlight pouring down, 

The eucalyptus trees were carved in silver, 
And a light mist of silver lulled the town. 

I saw far off the grey Pacific bearing 

A broad white disk of flame, 
And on tie garden-walk a snail beside me 

Tracing in crystal the slow way he came. 

The Bookman Sara Teasdale 

11 



THE WISE WOMAN 

She must be rich who can forego 
An hour so jeweled with delight; 

She must have treasuries of joy 

That she can draw on day and night; 

She must be sure of heaven itself. 

Or is it only that she feels 
How much more safe it is to lack 

A thing that fate so often steals? 

fhe Century Magazine Sara Teasdale 

FIRE 

Love, let us light 
A fire tonight, 
A wood fire on the hearth. 

With torn and living tongues the flames leap. 

Hungrily 

They catch and lift, to beat their sudden wings 

Toward freedom and the sky. 

The hot wood sings 

And crackles in a pungent ecstasy 

That seems half pain of death, and half a vast 

Triumphant exultation of release 

That its slow life-time of lethargic peace 

Should come to this wild rapture at the last. 

We watch it idly, and our casual speech 

Dtops slowly into silence. 

Something stirs and struggles in me, 

Something out of reach 

Of surface thoughts, a slow and formless thing 

Not I, but a dim memory 

Born of the dead behind me. In my blood 

The blind race turns, groping and faltering. 



Desires 

Only half glimpsed, not understood, 

Stir me and shake me. Fires 

Answer the fire, and vague shapes pass 

Like shapes of wind across the grass. 

The red flames catch and lift, 

Roaring and sucking in a furious hlaze; 

And a strange, swift 

Hunger for violence is in me. My blood pounds 

With a dark memory of age-old days, 

And mad red nights I never knew, 

When the dead in me lived, and horrid sounds 

Broke from their furry throats. 

In drunken rounds, 

Blood-crazed, they danced before the leaping flames, 

While something twisted in the fire. * . . 

Now as the flames mount higher 

Strange pictures pass. I cannot see them quite 

And yet I feel them. 

I am in a dread 

Dark temple, and I heat my head 
In maddened rite, 

Before the red-hot helly of a god 
Who eats his worshippers. . . . 

This is a funeral pyre 
And one lies dead 

Who was my life. The fat smoke curls and eddies, 
Beckoning suttee. . . . 

But the moment slips 
To Bacchanalian revels quick hot lips 
And leaping limbs, lit by the glare 
Of human torches. . . . 

A sudden spark 

Goes crackling upward, followed by a shower; 
And I am in the hills, cool hills and dark, 
Primeval as the fire. The beacon flare 

313 



Leaps in a roaring tower, 
Spattering in sparks among the stars 
Tales of wild wars. 
And on a distant crest 
Its mate makes answer. . . . 

But the embers gleam 

Like molten metal steaming at a forge, 

Where with rough jest 

Great lusty fellows 

Ply the roaring bellows, 

And clang the song of labor and the dream 

Man builds in metal. . . . 

Now the red flame steadies. 
Softly and quietly it burns. 
Purring, and its embers wear 
A friendly and domestic air. 

This is the hearth-fire home and peace at last. 

Comfort and safety are attendant here. 

The primal fear 

Is shut away, to whistle in the blast 

Beyond the doorway where the shadows twine. 

The fire is safety, and the fire is home, 

Light, warmth and food. Here careless children come 

Filling the place with laughter; 

And after 

Men make good council-talk, and old men spin, 

With that great quiet of the wise, 

Tales of dead beauty, and of dying eyes. 

The fire is drooping now. A log falls in 

Softly upon itself, like one grown tired 

With ecstasy. The lithe togues sink 

In ***b. and ember: 

And something I remember 

From ages gone and yet I cannot think 

214 



Some secret of the end, 

Of earth grown old, and death turned friend, 

And man who passes 

Like flame, like light, like wind across the grasses. 

Ah, what was that? A sudden terror sped 
Behind me in the shadows. I am cold; 
And I should like your hand to hold 
Now that the fire is dead. 
Love, light the lamp, and come away to bed. 
Fire is a strange thing, burning in your head. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse Eunice Tietjens 

A BOY'S HANDS 
(For May) 

Locked ail the winter long 

In mittens and pockets, 
Now breaking out in song 

Like set off rockets. 

Crusted, frost-bitten, and chapped 

And bony as gristle 
Boxwood's not near so apt 

To make a fine whistle. 

The Midland Albert Edmund Trombly 

EVENING ON THE HARBOUR 

(Awarded The Lyric Prize) 
The shining daggers of the harbour lights 
Stab the smooth waters of the quiet bay, 
As dusk comes in, like a belated guest, 
Waited and hoped for all the weary day. 

The swaying fringes of the shadows droop, 
To catch and tangle in the huddled spars: 

The day is gone, and all the restless night 
Is bound about with ribbons of pale stars. 

The Lyric Virginia Lyne Tunstall 

215 



TJtib UJNKLNUW1N 

Ah, does he see, the dead boy lying there, 

The wealth of splendid wreaths surrounding him? 

One white rose would have seemed so fair, so fair, 
There in the hloody mire when life was dim, 

And all its hell grew more than he could bear. 

Ah, does he hear the splendid words of praise, 
The humble prayer, the proud sonority 

Of rounded sentences and polished phrase? 
He lies beneath his roses silently, 

As he has lain, untroubled many days. 

Around his bier the tramp of many feet, 
As sorrowing, the nation passes by 

But he was young, and life was keen and sweet. 
"Unknown" it was a lonely way to die, 

"Unknown" how pitiful an end to meet. 

There in his hour of final sacrifice 

Did he perhaps know something of this day? 

God grant he found the way where comfort lies, 
And smiled, as in his glorious death he lay, 

To glimpse through closing mists his mother's eyes! 

The Nomad Virginia Lyne Tunstall 



SPECTRES OF SPRING 

The paling vine-leaf, Savant of Spring, 
Clings to the dizzy crag, 
And waits and weakly moves 
In the remembering wind 

As the mind waits and sadly moves 
On the meagre edge of now. 

16 



What derelict down, what nebula, 
What spectral shell 
Comes treading on the air 
To the mind's spiny tentacles 
To unsuspected lodgment there? 

A child's strange eyes, and crisp gold hair, 
Urgent, sweet mouth that clings: 
So soon, withal, a frightened faun, 
Troubled by the cause of things. 

A woman in Autumn 

Pale her life; but the foliage in flare: 

She takes a young man 

To dream of Spring. 

Youth, A Magazine of the Arts Mark Turbyfill 



DOROTHY DANCES 

This is no child that dances. This is flame. 
Here fire at last has found its natural frame. 

What else is that which burns and flies 

From those enkindled eyes, . . . 

What is that inner blaze 

Which plays 

About that lighted face. . . . 

This thing is fire set free 

Fire possesses her, or rather she 

Controls its mastery. 

With every gesture, every rhythmic stride, 

Beat after beat, 

It follows, purring at her side, 

Or licks the shadows of her flashing feet. 

Around her everywhere 

It coils its threads of yellow hair; 

217 



Through every vein its bright blood creeps, 

And its red hands 

Caress her as she stands 

Or lift her boldly when she leaps. 

Then, as the surge 

Of radiance grows stronger 

These two are two no longer 

And they merge 

Into a disembodied ecstasy; 

Free 

To express some half -forgotten hunger. 

Some half -forbidden urge. 

What mystery 

Has been at work until it blent 

One child and that fierce element? 

Give it no name. 

It is enough that flesh has danced with flame. 

The Bookman Louis Untermeyer 



DAUGHTERS OF JEPHTHAH 
Dance! 

Dance the crumbling world's expanse, 
Dance the rhythms of this water, 
Lift your arms in a wind of joy! 
Which among you is Jephthah's daughter, 
Dancing to destroy 
Fears of sacrifice and slaughter, 
Treading down death's arrogance? 
Dance! 

Dance the flaming heights of living, 
Dance the broken depths of suffering! 
Make your body sing the chants 
Of love and lonely hunger, giving 
All you are as offering! 
Never spare yourselves; uncover 

218 



All that you have hushed and hidden^ 

Free as to ait unforbidden 

And awaited lover. 

Whip the fires ivithin you, burn 

In a holy unconcern! 

Purged of time and circumstance, 

Dance! 

Jephthah was judge and chief in Israel; 

His arm was iron, his voice a great bronze bell. 

Alone, in passionate prayer upon the heights, 

He saw the leagues of armored Ammonites, 

Flash in the sun like a malignant sword, 

And Jephthah vowed a vow unto the Lord: 

"If You will grant me life and victory 

And bring proud A mm on down, then shall it be 

That whatsoever comes from out my doors, 

The first to greet my glad return, is Yours; 

It shall be God's, a gift from chief to King, 

And I will burn it as an offering*" 

So Jephthah slept, and in the morning woke 

To find new strength. The Lord's red trumpets spoke 

In Jephthah's battle-cry; he whirled and broke 

The glittering line beneath his army's heel. 

He saw the massive columns bend and reel 

From Gilead and Minnith; saw them fly 

Through twenty towns, his own troops rushing by 

Like storm on spray, like rain pursuing foam. 

So Jephthah came to Mizpeh, to his home. 

Knotting her hair in two black braids, 
Jephthah's daughter dismissed her maids; 
The kiss of flute and dulcimer, 
Voicing their pretty pains, the stir 
Of passions neither high nor rude, 
Smirched the white marble of her mood. 
"What is this love that I must hear 
In swooning notes from year to year 

19 



But an elaborate pretense 
To rouse the tired play of sense; 
A set of modulated sighs 
Seeking to bring a new surprise 
To jaded nerves and heavy eyes. 
Silence! I will not have it sol 
I want a wind of love to blow 
Its passions with so great a breath 
That, swept and tossed, I shall not know 
If it be charged with life or death. 
I want to stand in such a gale 
Until my blood beats with the cries 
Of all the wounded: those who fail 
With victory in their grasp, the songs 
Of outcasts quivering with their wrongs, 
The leper's dirge beyond the pale; 
The clang of bolts, the creak of thongs, 
The drums of all defeat, the ecstasy 
Of losing all and giving utterly 
Lord, let such music ring through me!" 



As if in answer to her cry, 

A word ran through the halls, a high 

Murmur of sudden victory. 

The ruinor blazed. She sprang to it 

With swifter flames. "Lord, can this be 

The windy fire to set me free? 

Girls, let the holy lights be lit! 

Bring drums and torches! Scatter flowers 

On the dark earth in brilliant showers! 

Arouse the singers! Let the bands 

Strike the harp with bolder hands! 

Let light and air run through the house! 

Put brighter fillets on your brows, 

So that the dusty saviors meet 

Rejoicing arms and laughing feet! 

Shiver the cymbals! Let us dance 

The dance of our deliverance!" 

20 



Between the crouching hills they came. 
She saw their banners 9 snapping flame; 
She knew her father's buoyant stride. 
And was the first to reach his side. 



Jephthah felt suddenly old and alone; 
His bones were water, his face was stone. 
"Sheilah I called you; Sheilah, the one 
Who is demanded," and, undone, 
He told her of his vow. 



And Sheilah spoke: 

"Why should you grieve for me, now that the yoke 
Is lifted? Do you not recall the price 
Asked of a patriarch for sacrifice? 
I know whose anguish found triumphant voice: 
Not the rapt father's, but the offered boy's. 
Such rapture will be mine, and I grieve now 
Only because my father made his vow 
Without me in his mind. I was not meant 
To serve as pathos for an accident. 
Look at me, Father, smile, and let me go 
Up to the hills awhile, so I may know 
How to prepare myself, how to award 
My spirit's ecstasy unto the Lord." 

This was the chant that Sheilah raised, 
Pacing the hills with solemn steps: 

"Hearken, ye mountains, to my last communion, 
Ye hills, ye listening rocks, when I am gone, 
Testify to my need, my deathless hunger. 
My pain will be another star in heaven, 
My tears will glisten on the firmament. 
Now that the hour of my bethrothal dawns 
And my dark lover waits with stormy -hands, 
Ye trees, incline your branches on these breasts 



Grown heavy suddenly, as April pools 
Swell witlt the weight of rainy rivulets. 
Beasts of the hills and demons of the night, 
Unite me with the flames that leap in you. 
So, to a mystic marriage I may come 
Not lite a child, half coy, half curious. 
But proud and passionate, with burning arms, 
Hair flying like a flag of victory, 
And all the blood within me singing hymns. 
So shall ye help me dance my way to death." 



Dance! 

Dance the soul's exuberance! 

Dance, and as you bow and bend, 

Be the instruments that blend 

Consonance and dissonance! 

Dance the fertile exultation 9 

Drooping but to reascend! 

Dance the final consecration 9 

Which is beauty* s end! 

With each radiant tread and turn 

Spurn the pallid life, the water 

In the veins of sick romance! 

Turn to this rejuvenation! 

Never spare yourselves y but learn, 

In a quickening immolation, 

What it is to burn! 

Learn what inner fires taught her 

Laughter and deliverance! 

Jephthah 9 s daughter, Jephthah's daughter, 

Dance! 

The Century Magazine Louis Untermeyer 



HE GOADS HIMSELF 

And was it I that hoped to rattle 
A broken lance against iron laws? 

Was it I that asked to go down in battle 
For a lost cause? 



Fool! Must there be new deaths to cry for 
When only rottenness survives? 

Here are enough lost causes to die for 
Through twenty lives. 

What have we learned? That the familiar 
Lusts are the only things that endure; 

That for an age grown blinder and sillier, 
There is no cure. 



And man? Free of one kind of fetter, 
He runs to gaudier shackles and brands; 

Deserving, for all his groans, no better 
Than he demands. 



The flat routine of bed and barter, 
Birth and burial, holds the lot. . . . 

Was it I that dreamed of being a martyr? 
How and for what? 



Yet, while this unconcern runs stronger 
As life shrugs on without meaning or shape, 

Let me know flame and the teeth of hunger; 
Storm not escape. 

The Yale Review Louis Untermeyer 



23 



TO PERSEPHONE 

No more you weave, Persephone, 
Gowns the colors of the sea. 

Your ivory fingers now are still 
And your grave a grassy hill. 

But everywhere songs are sung 
They sing of you who died so young. 

And lads and lassies passing hy 
Strew bergamot where you lie. 

No more you weave, Persephone, 
Gowns the colors of the sea. 

Emerald, chrysoprase and blue, 
That looked beautiful on you. 

But everywhere songs are sung 
They sing of you who died so young. 

Voices, A Journal of Verse Harold Vinci 



SEA NEARNESS 

Let me lie in an unremembered place 

With sorrel red about me and currants swaying, 

Let the cool darkness fall upon nay face 
I only want to hear waves playing. 

I only ask this thing, sound of the sea, 
Clean water shifting under a granite ledge, 

Spindrift flying wildly by a tree, 
The sound of wind among the sedge. 

Life must go on, tomorrow and tomorrow, 
Night following night and day following day; 

Give me the one thing, Life, that I desire 

The sound of wheeling gulls and waves at play. 

Voices, A Journal of Verse Harold Vinal 

224 



EARTH LOVER 

Old loveliness has such a way with me, 
That I am close to tears when petals fall 
And needs must hide my face behind a wall, 

When autumn trees burn red with ecstasy* 

For I am haunted by a hundred things 

And more than I have seen in April days; 
I have worn stars above my head in praise, 

I have worn beauty as two costly rings. 

Alas, how short a state does beauty keep, 
Then let me clasp it wildly to my heart 
And hurt myself until I am a part 

Of all its rapture, then turn back to sleep, 
Remembering through all the dusty years 
"What sudden wonder brought me close to tears. 

Voices, A Journal of Verse Harold Vinal 



GOOD NEIGHBORS 

Many a man hath gold to guard 
And house to keep him warm, 
And ale to drink and bread to eat 
And strong and ready arm; 
But many a man when time is come 
To rest him from his labors 
Hath not so rich a store as I 
Who boast me of good neighbors. 

There's many a lad would scale the hills 
And sail the fickle ocean, 
And touching keels at every quay 
Live ever in commotion. 
But what a man may buy with sweat 
Or carve with hearty saber 
He may not own so sure as I 
Who have a jovial neighbor. 
225 



Oh, some would cram a granary 

With oats and corn and barley, 

And some would dance a round or two 

With every fiddling Charlie. 

I like the time when malt is ripe 

And Jenny hrings the tabors, 

But mostly I like every day 

Because I have good neighbors. 

The Outlook Willard Wattles 



WHEN I FIRST FELT . . . 

When I first felt within me stir 
My manhood's subtle springs, 
There came a sudden beauty 
To long accustomed things, 
I found the revelation 
Of all my wonderings. 

I knew the touch of bodies, 

Why women's eyes are bright; 

In storied old romances 

There was a new delight; 

New understandings sought me out 

And told me in the night. 

The hills drew nearer to me, 

The earth exposed her breast; 

To all her wooded privacies 

I was a bidden guest; 

The murmur of a mountain brook 

Was like a friend confessed. 

Then men inclined unto me 
Yet never spoke their thought; 
It was enough to know that they 
The deeper meaning caught, 
The roughest salutation was 
Significantly fraught. 
226 



There was in little children 
Perpetual wonderment, 
Their grave and quaint decorum 
With some old passion blent, 
And then a smile that lighted all 
The face's firmament. 

New wonder hroke upon me, 
I saw with fresher eyes, 
I grasped at once how deep is hell, 
How high is Paradise . . . 
I knew the meaning of the Word 
And the dead Christ's sacrifice. 

Contemporary Verse Willard Wattles 



REQUIESCAT 

I will go out to the night and the wind 
And the clean rain coming down, 

For the walls of the sky are not unkind 
As the gray walls of a town. 

I will go out to the high hill 

And a cleft beneath a pine; 
In the heart of a rock it is dry and still 

And the heart of the rock is mine. 

I will go out with a cloak close drawn, 
With the cool rain in my face; 

And my pillow by night shall be a stone 
In a strangely quiet place. 

And I will not care if the rain come down, 

Or if the night be chill, 
For I shall have left the gray-walled town 

On feet forever still. 

227 



I will go out by myself alone 

To the dark night and the sky 
Till I am a brother to the stone, 

Mingled inseparably. 

Into my breast let the good rain seep 

Soothing as a prayer; 
The arbutus will remember and creep 

Out of my tangled hair. 

When my two hands and my two feet 

Quiet at last shall lie, 
I shall not know if the rain be sweet 

With my face to the open sky. 

The night shall come like an emperor's pall, 
The dawn like a crimson stain . . . 

I rise tonight for my coronal 
Out in lite wind and rain. 

The Outlook Willard Wattles 



THE HOUSE 

Troy is for beauty, the far, the broken 

Underneath the coral, the dust, the sand; 

The golden cymbal, the lute, the spoken 
Word and the buried hand. 

Troy is for Helen, the flesh, the narded 
Sweet of a woman. The topless minaret 

Is fallen^ and he who guarded 
And Agamemnon fallen they both forget* 

Here is a house now, ages after; 

No fable here, life is scarcely fled, 
The heart's heat, the mid pulse, the love, the 
laughter 

And yet she is just as dead 

228 



As the Helen dust. A broken rhythm 
Serves well enough for the theme, I guess; 

And this house, as open to the winds, the seism 
Of time as the Trojan's place no less. 

Time is a myth thing, beauty a jetting, 
A fountain jetting of dust from an urn, 

Rising, falling scarlet forgetting 
The shadow, rising but to return. 

All is a moment. Open the path wide, 
Carry her softly. Don't close the door! 

Troy be for Helen, this for a new bride 
Stolen away and returning no more. 

The Midland Bennett Weaver 



THE LAST NIGHT OF WINTER 

Whose whips are those cracking up the river, 

Till the long shudder of sound, 
Half a sharp cry and half ecstatic shiver, 

Clutches through the snow at the still ground? 

I cannot sleep, so I will light my candle, 
I will lead my shadow down the long stair; 

At the far door where some one tries the handle, 
Each of us will whisper, "Who goes there?" 

And wood will whimper and stone be shaken 
While, locked like a heart, the old house grieves, 

Rocking in its sleep and yearning to waken 
Warm tears in the silver eaves. 

When clouds collapse, when the darkness releases 
A trickle of stars, this house at one bound 

Will burst like a bulb and fall to pieces, 
Floor and door one dust on the ground. 

229 



Let the windows crackle and curl like paper, 

The rafters slide and the heams fly, 
I shall be off on the end of this taper, 

Out through the roof and up through the sky! 

Straight as a rocket I shall shoot through the shadow, 
All out of hreath and blinking I shall land 

In a green gown in a green meadow, 
A crocus, not a candle, in my hand. 

The Literary Review 

New York Evening Post Winifred Welles 



AH GABRIEL- 

If it should happen now, if a woman named Mary, 
Bending to the weeds in her rose and rosemary bed. 

Should see a flaming shadow fall, should hear a scary 
Whirring in the apple tree above her head, 

And rising up should find you, leaning on a lily, 
I think she would not speak at all, she would only 
stare, 

Wondering how a grown man could ever be so silly 
As to have a golden hat and long curled hair. 

And when your voice so singingly said, "Mary, Mary, 59 
"I have corne to tell you " she would never under- 
stand 

Your misson or your message, but feeling very wary, 
Wave you from her garden with imperious hand. 

Though, when you left, the sunset would glimmer 
stronger, 

As feathers from your wings floated tinily clear, 
She would only think, "Days are still getting longer," 

Or, "My, but the fireflies are thick this year!" 

230 



I know she would not know an angel from a fairy, 

Or recognize light save in the smoky lamp 
She sets to shine for Joseph plodding home to his 

Mary, 

Or believe that golden Gabriel was not a grey 
tramp. 

The Measure Winifred Welles 



INDIAN PIPES 

These are the flowers for a mad bride 
At dusk, on the black earth, under black trees, 
She shall fill her torn, white hands with these. 
She shall be heard by all the countryside, 
When she comes singing to the woods* edge 
Whiter than dogwood shall flutter on the ledge 
The silver tatters of her bridal dress. 
Singing in a cracked voice a song of craziness, 
Down the vague meadow, where her floating veil 
Rests on the mist, she shall wander till her wail 
Dies along the river in the mown hay. 

There they shall find her at break of day, 
With eyes like the first white frost, with the tips 
Of her tired fingers and the droop of her lips 
Blackened like the flowers she had carried away, 
The flowers that were all one waxen white, 
Leaf, stem and cup, but could not last the night. 

The Measure Winifred Welles 



81 



THE POPPY-ROOM 

Wide-open-windowed in the morning time 

It could belong to anyone, 

A sewing-room, where winds might scatter threads, 

A play-room for the sun, 

An easy height for sweetnesses to climh 

Those tendrilled fragrances, like ivies twining, 

Of cooling loaves and browning loam 

And blossoms moist with June 

But later in the afternoon 

It was my mother's. 

Then, with a bobbing, like bright heads, 

The sun stole 'round the house and hushed its shining, 

The wind put up its needles and went home, 

And fragrance swung no further than the eaves 

But held its breath there in the leaves, 

As if they knew this place was now no other's, 

As if, with me, each heard her say, 

"Run off now, dear, and play, 

I'm going to the Poppy-Room." 

Whether those paper poppies on the wall 
Were real to her or just a dreamy bloom, 
Whether she bowed to them or made them bow 
For her, I never knew at all 
I only knew that she came down the stairs 
At evening, as a star comes down the sky, 
Her eyes as calm as prayers, 
Her steps a lullaby. 

Remembering those rows of sleepy plumes 

And how my mother sought them all alone, 

I am not wistful now 

When, for a moment, people seek release. 

I watch their thoughts draw down across their minds 

With the finality of blinds; 

I hear their silence like a turning key, 

32 



And know that they have closed to me 

Some holy place they call their own. 

And so I am not lonely 

They have not really left me, they are only 

Going to their poppy-rooms. 

They will return in peace. 

Contemporary Verse Winifred Welles 



SILENCE 

She was a quiet little body 

In a quaint silk shawl, 
Who sat and sewed and listened, 

But hardly spoke at all. 

She let her copper kettle 

And her bright as copper fire, 

Wag like tongues and hum like voices 
In a cozy little choir. 

She was quieter with others 
Than they could be alone, 

But the flashing of her fingers 
Was a wit all its own. 

And while we talked her needle 

Like a swift dragon fly, 
Was sewing seeds of summer 

Into squares as blue as sky. 

I have taken tea from many, 
And talk from many more, 

But a blue bag of lavender 
I never had before 

Or since from any woman 
When I left her at her door. 

33 



Now that her fire, her kettle, 

And herself are still, 
Hearths seem merely hissing, 

Spouts only shrill. 

So I never stop from talking, 

So I always keep astir 
I would be afraid of silence 

That was not a gift from her 
In shiny bits like ribbons, 

Sweet, like lavender, 

Contemporary Verse Winifred Welles 



WHITE FEAR 

I am not afraid in April, 
I am cool enough to pass 

Where robins burn like embers 
And tulips scorch the grass. 

But oh, when snow has fallen 

On a little city park, 
I would not dream to venture 

Alone there in the dark! 

For if I made one motion 
Along the muffled street, 

Whole whitened trees would tumble 
Into ashes at my feet. 

The almond lamps would ripen 
In the velvet shell and fall 

Upon the plush of pavements 
With no sound at all. 

234 



And trembling in the silence 

Like someone very old, 
I would find my hair silver 

And feel my heart cold, 

The Measure Winifred Welles 

NATIVES OF ROCK 

The fire cut away 

The soft forest 

Down to the rose-pink rock 

Harder than light. 

Movement is not easy 
In the mountain clearing 
"Where all that is not stone 
Imitates and is above stone. 

We ride so high 

That we are embedded 

In the air, crystal. 

And cry for love among aspens, 

Ferns that uncoil beneath, 
Cry discontent. At night 
We lie down 
On red granite 

Ledges, throat on throat, 
Mid polished berry rods, 
Eyes wide open 
For the early rays' stir: 

Illusion of antelope 
Who make the horizon 
Quiver upon their lifted 
Spikes, and lap the dew. 

The Dial Glenway Wescott 

235 



IN THE DARK CITY 

There is a harper plays 
Through the long watches of the lonely night 
When, like a cemetery, 

Sleeps the dark city, with her millions laid each in 
his tomh. 

I feel it in my dream; but when I wake, 

Suddenly, like some secret thing not to he overheard, 

It ceases 

And the gray night grows dumb. 

Only in memory 

Linger those veiled adagios, fading, fading . . . 
Till, with the morning, they are lost. 

What door was opened then? 

What worlds undreamed of lie around us in our sleep, 

That yet we may not know? 

Where is it one sat playing 

Oven and over, with such high and dreadful peace, 

The passion and sorrow of the eternal doom? 

Poetry ; A 'Magazine of Verse 

John Hall Wheelock 



EXULTATION 

Before the dawn the very thought of you, 
That wakes me, as the morning wakes the night, 
Floods all my heart with most exultant joy. 

The thought of you that rises with the stars, 
When evening wheels all glittering through the dark, 
Floods all my heart with most exultant joy. 
'36 



life and joy and breath and death of me, 
With every breath I draw you in like air! 
I shall die of you, of you, of you! 

Though now you banish me forevermore, 
Never to look upon your face again 
Think you that I shall sorrow for rny love? 

Though I shall lie upon my bed of death 
And know you have forgotten me forever 
Think you that I shall sorrow for my love? 

life and joy and breath and death of me, 

1 shall cry out exultant, and lie dead! 
I shall die of you, of you, of you! 

love, I love you better than you know! 

1 love you as die water loves the sea. 

I love you as the twilight loves the dark. 

Contemporary Verse John Hall Wheelock 



HAPPY HEART! 

Beloved adorable and false, 

Whom have you taken now in the dear toils! 

By what pale margins do your footsteps stray, 
Or what enchanted wood? What valleys hold 
The lily of your loveliness? What hills 
Have known your weight upon them, what far shore? 

Twilight comes tenderly, while evening lifts 
Along the pallid rim her lonely star 

happy heart on which your heart is laid! 

The Bookman John Hall Wheelock 

237 



NIGHT HAS ITS FEAR 



\ its fear- 
As the slow dusk advances, and the day 
Fades out in fire along the starry way, 
The ancient doubt draws near. 

Vague shapes of dread- 
Soft owl, or moth, and timid twittering things- 
Move through the growing dark; on furtive wings 

The hat flits overhead 

And in the house 

The death-watch ticks, the dust of time is stirred 
With timorous footfalls, in the night is heard 

The gnawing of the mouse, 

Through the old room 



Tremble, and lips that laughed here long ago 
Gone back into the gloom! 

A whip-poor-will 

Bleakly across the baleful country cries 
From a blurred mouth, and from the west replies 

Echo and all is still. 

Now from her shell, 
Her body's prison, with the ancient doubt 
And terror stricken, the scared soul looks out, 

Asking if all be well. 

Great kings have been, 

Poets, and mighty prophets, shapes have cried 
About the world, or moved in mournful pride; 

And are no longer seen. 

From many lands 

Their plaint was lifted; from how many a shore 
Sorrows have wailed, that are not anymore! 

They sleep with folded hands. 



They have their day; 

Their cry is loud about the earth, who come 
To the one end; the singing lips grow dumb 

Always in the one way. 

Though they implore. 
Brief is the plea, inflexible the fate! 
Silence has the last word; and then the great 

Silence, forevennore. 

Pondering these, 

The fretful spirit in bewilderment 
Quickens with a vague doubt, and, not content, 

Broods, and is ill at ease. 

Her being is 

Throned on so frail a pulse, such fleeting breath 
Bears up her dream across the gulf of death 

And the obscure abyss, 

Always she hears 

The hurtling chariots of the hurrying blood, 
Her shuttling breath 'hat in the solitude 

Weaves the one self she wears, 

Now first the vast 

Veil over heaven is rent, and bares the whole 
Shining Reality; whereat the soul 

Sickens, and is aghast! 

Darkness reveals 

The tragic truth; her will sinks hopeless wings 
Before the inexorable Fact of things, 

Humbling the dread she feels. 

With the old Awes 

Confronted and the flaming Mystery, 
She may not speak; but, pondering, suddenly 

Grows silent, and withdraws. 



She may not bear 

That sight; the spangled heavens from east to west 
Stretch out too wide the confines of the breast, 

Straining in wonder there. 

Upon what Brow 

Of awful eminence thought that stuns! 
Is laid that chaplet of a million suns, 

Upon what Forehead now? 

Who was it wrought 
This universal glory all around, 
Of glittering worlds forever without bound? 

Great Poet, what a Thought! 

It is a Word 

Unutterable that is written there; 
The spirit, gazing, is one voiceless prayer, 

Careless if it be heard. 

Her thoughts ascend, 

Star beyond star, height beyond aching height 
Upward, in adoration infinite, 

Forever, without end. 

So shall it be! 

Till Time dim the high Legend; till the throne 
Of night be shaken, and the Face be known 

Beyond eternity; 

Till God divide 

And rend asunder the embroidered hem 
Of darkness; till the starry diadem 

And crown be set aside! 

All's Well John Hall Wheelock 



240 



PANTHER! PANTHER! 

There is a panther caged within my breast, 

But what his name there is no breast shall know 
Save mine, nor what it is that drives him so, 

Backward and forward, in relentless quest: 

That silent rage, baffled but unsuppressed, 
The soft pad of those stealthy feet that go 
Over my body's prison to and fro, 

Trying the walls forever without rest. 

All day I feed him with my living heart, 

But when the night puts forth her dreams and stars 

The inexorable Frenzy reawakes; 
His wrath is hurled upon the trembling bars, 
The eternal passion stretches me apart 
And I lie silent, but my body shakes. 

Scribner's Magazine John Hall Wheelock 



WHERE BEAUTY LODGES 

Where Beauty lodges there prevails 

Exuberance of life and bloom; 
She is a guest who never fails 

To render payment for her room 
In coin that many a startled host 

Disparages as counterfeit, 
Perceiving least where there is most, 

Or seeing, wanting none of it. 

Impetuously she journeys forth 

Unvexed by property or fence, 
Indifferent to south or north, 

Regardless of convenience. 
Yet with discerning eye to which 

Her entertainment most enjoys: 
She sets no ban on poor or rich, 

But looks suspiciously on boys. 

241 



She revels in luxurious space 

Yet in a flake can be confined. 
She hates the smug and commonplace 

But loves the brave and humble mind; 
She haunts direct and simple things, 

Distrusts the complex and the clever; 
Birdlike to twigs of whim she clings 

To flit away next breath or never. 

Mistress of myriad homes is she, 

But all are within alien gate; 
Her sites she picks capriciously, 

Inanimate or animate: 
A gutter song, a porcelain jar, 

A tiger, rain, a pheasant's quill, 
A cobweb, a volute, a star, 

A factory whistle piping shrill. 

The Yale Review Wayland Wells Williams 



BLACKBERRY BRIARS 

"The blackberry briars you bought 

I think it is too late 

To put them in," Seth said. 

"The earth is cold 
Clean to the elbow. 
Better wait for spring 
They'll 



But I went with him 

To make sure, 

And put my hand 

Deep in the broken ground. 

He leaned and packed the earth, 
And pressed hard with his foot. 

242 



He said: 

"Just let it stay until 

You get the feel of it. 

That cold comes on like a creeping palsy." 

Then he waited 

Watching me with covered eyes 

Until I shuddered 

And withdrew my arm. 

"You turned a little white," he laughed. 

"It's packing the earth," I said, 
"Pressing it down the way you do." 

"It's a game I learned once 

For myself," he said. 

"I call it playing 

With the sun's shadow. 

It isn't just like any cold 

That you can think of. 

And it's always following him around. 

"It's queer," he said, 

"When the sun gets through growing things 
You can put your hand in almost anywhere 
And find it. 

"When the sun goes 

How can the shadow linger? 

That's what I don't understand. 

"Sometimes I wonder if " 

But I said: 

u Seth, we'll let the blackberries go." 

The Nation Albert Frederick Wilson 

243 



EAGLE SONNETS 

I 
I have been sure of three things all my life. 

The first is that I am a final one 
That yields no room for doubt or windy strife 

More certain than the blazing of the sun. 
The second, that I was a fainter fact, 

Broken by sudden blanks and curious lapses; 
A shadow to each living thought and act, 

Yet shadowed by a host of vague perhapses. 
The third and last of these, that I will be: 

A moment leading to a lengthening span, 
A fragment formed of continuity, 

A child forever growing into man. 
Three things are sure. ... you who grope for 

four, 
Know, man is sure of three, and never more. 

II 

I cannot know that other men exist: 

It is but a belief, obscurely guessed. 
Within the mirror, brain, they move in mist; 

A wall of air holds back the friendliest breast. 
To me they are. , . . And so to me the vision 

My fancy builds this moment in the air, 
Food for a clearer glance's high derision, 

Food for a thoughtful hour's thin despair. 
For knowledge is from skill of inward seeing, 

Not bred of eye, or ear, or touch, alone: 
It is the younger, truer name of being, 

No gossip spread by careless flesh and bone; 
And though from seed to fruit to seed it change, 
It is one's self, and knows no further range. 

Ill 

We hear the ancients say that man is issue 
Of godhood spirit breathed into the dust. 

Man is a favored, roving bud of tissue, 

Fed on the countless blossoms of earth's crust. 
244 



le is a child ot iruit and sturdy grain; 

Of bird and beast bis sinews have been knit. 
These gave the stuff for body and for brain: 

If they are godhood, he is spawn of it, 
And though old Gabriel split his cheeks with blowing, 

No part of us shall rise in that last day: 
Within uncounted lives we shall be growing, 

Bird in the bird, and clay within the clay. 
If he should blow, to clothe again my spirit, 
Each part will be too hard at work to hear it. 

IV 
And spirit? Is it some ethereal spark 

Nurtured in disembodied realms of air, 
Sentenced to serve within the human, dark, 

Finding through death its deathless life elsewhere? 
It is the sum of ancient ache and feeling, 

All I have touched and seen. I cannot tell 
But there are, for a tardier revealing, 

More ancient aches and feelings found as well. 
Yet this is all. . . . The flower's scent is blended 

Of airy particles sprung from its core; 
And when the blossom's summer hour is ended, 

No scent lives on, to knock at Heaven's door. 
And so my spirit, which in striving shone, 
Shall follow where the striving heart has gone. 

V 
Flower of the dust am I: for dust will flower, 

Before its final reckoning is had; 
And then this dust, in a hot sudden hour, 

Shall stagger, veer, and flounder, in a mad, 
Tumultuous plunge into that blaming sun 

Mere dust on fire that gave it once its birth; 
And man and all his doings shall be one 

With the charred cinder that was once an earth. 
And then again a brief, unhurried cooling, 

More flowers that walk and dream, maybe and then 

245 



The aged sun will end its scanted ruling 

As surely as there is an end to men. 
The heavens at last will end, as all things must 
To let new heavens ripple out of dust. 



VI 

We are parts of a vaster thing than we, 

Not isolated aliens astray: 
We walk and breathe in a totality 

That links all men in its organic sway. 
Vaster than this, we grow within a one 

That clasps all things that grow within its heart; 
Yes, all the lifelessness from sun to sun 

Shares in the body in which we have part. 
How can the part prove traitor to the whole, 

Or how rebel against itself? No more 
Than body could rebel against the soul, 

Or soul betray the body that it wore. 
We are, for all our struts and ecstasies, 
Inexorably one with all that is. 



VII 

With all that is: and here the tongue is dumb, 

The voice is silent, and the heart is still. 
What things have been, what wilder things will come, 

Are locked forever from the straining will. 
Only we know no shaping thought or plan 

Started the weary whirling of the spheres; 
Only we know the drifting mote called man 

Is nothing in the spinning of the years. 
And whether there are years we are not sure: 

Or whether space is boundless or is bound. 
We only know that darkness will endure, 

And that no savior sun or moon is found: 
Only the flicker of a falling star, 
Taunting how black the blacker spaces are. 
246 



VIII 

Faith is the dream that things known false are true; 

Truth is our feeble vision in the dark; 
Love, that supremest pleasure men pursue, 

Is life's device to shield an undimmed spark. 
Right is a thing of person and of season, 

Justice the sagging of a rusty scale; 
And we need only watch the cheater. Reason, 

To see how man's last anchorage must fail. 
Faith is a vision we must cling to still: 

Truth is a god to serve, although we die. 
Love is the dear controller of our will, 

Justice and right must ring in every cry. 
Though Reason let our craft drift out to sea. 
Yet we shall find no truer guide than he. 

The Nation Clement Wood 



PRETTY WORDS 

Poets make pets of pretty, docile words: 

I love smooth words, like gold-enameled fish 

Which circle slowly with a silken swish, 

And tender ones, like downy-feathered birds: 

Words shy and dappled, deep-eyed deer in herds, 

Come to my hand, and playful if I wish, 

Or purring softly at a silver dish, 

Blue Persian kittens, fed on cream and curds. 

I love bright words, words up and singing early; 

Words that are luminous in the dark, and sing; 

Warm lazy words, white cattle under trees; 

I love words opalescent, cool, and pearly, 

Like midsummer moths, and honied words like bees, 

Gilded and sticky, with a little sting. 

The Bookman Elinor Wylie 

247 



CASTILIAN 

Velasquez took a pliant knife 
And scraped his palette clean; 
He said, "I lead a dog's own life 
Painting a king and queen." 

He cleaned his palette with oily rags 
And oakum from Seville wharves; 
"I am sick of painting painted hags 
And bad ambiguous dwarfs. 

The sky is silver, the clouds are pearl, 
Their locks are looped with rain. 
I will not paint Maria's girl 
For all the money in Spain." 

He washed his face in water cold, 

His hands in turpentine; 

He squeezed out colour like coins of gold 

And colour like drops of wine. 

Each colour lay like a little pool 
On the polished cedar wood; 
Clear and pale and ivory-cool 
Or dark as solitude. 

He burnt the rags in the fireplace 
And leaned from the window high; 
He said, "I like that gentleman's face 
Who wears his cap awry." 

This is the gentleman, there he stands, 
Castilian, sombre-caped, 
With arrogant eyes, and narrow hands 
Miraculously shaped. 

The New Republic Elinor Wylie 

248 



THE GOOD BIRDS 

Threading the evil hand and look 
I sprang, on sinews spare and light. 
To sleep beside a water-brook 
Where snow was sprinkled overnight. 

I spread my cloak upon the ground, 
I laid my head upon a stone, 
I stared into the sky and found 
That I no longer lived alone. 

He turned His burning eyes on me 
From smoke above a mountain-shelf; 
I did not want His company 
Who wanted no one but myself. 

I whistled shrill, I whistled keen; 
The birds were servant to my nod. 
They wove their wings into a screen 
Between nay lovely ground and God. 

The Nation Elinor Wylie 



DEMON LOVERS 

The peacock and the mocking-bird 
Cry forever in her breast; 
Public libraries have blurred 
The pages of his palimpsest. 

He wanders lonely as a cloud 
In chevelure of curled perruque; 
Masked assassins in a crowd 
Strangle the uxorious duke. 

249 



Castilian facing Lucifer, 
Juan does not remove his cap; 
Unswaddled infantile to her 
His soul lies kicking in her lap. 

While she, transported by the wind, 
Mercutio has clasped and kissed. . . . 
Like quicksilver, her absent mind 
Evades them both, and is not missed. 

The New Republic Elinor Wylie 



FULL MOON 

My bands of silk and miniver 
Momently grew heavier; 
The black gauze was beggarly thin; 
The ermine muffled mouth and chin; 
I could not suck the moonlight in. 

Harlequin in lozenges 
Of love and hate, I walked in these 
Striped and ragged rigmaroles; 
Along the pavement my footsoles 
Trod warily on living coals. 

Shouldering the thoughts I loathed, 
In their corrupt disguises clothed, 
Mortality I could not tear 
From my ribs, to leave them bare 
Ivory in silver air. 

There I walked, and there I raged; 
The spiritual savage caged 
Within my skeleton, raged afresh 
To feel, behind a carnal mesh, 
The clean bones crying in the flesh. 

The New Republic Elinor Wylie 

250 



DROWNED WOMAN 

He shall be my jailer 
Who sets me free 
From shackles frailer 
Than the wind-spun sea. 

He shall be my teacher 
Who cries "Be brave." 
To a weeping creature 
In a glass-walled wave. 

But he shall be my brother 
Whose mocking despair 
Dives headlong to smother 
In the weeds of my hair. 

The New Republic Elinor Wylie 



EPITAPH 

For this she starred her eyes with salt 
And scooped her temples thin, 
Until her face shone pure of fault 
From the forehead to the chin. 

In coldest crucibles of pain 
Her shrinking flesh was fired 
And smoothed into a finer grain 
To make it more desired. 

Pain left her lips more clear than glass; 
It colored and cooled her hand. 
She lay a field of scented grass 
Yielded as pasture land. 

For this her loveliness was curved 
And carved as silver is: 
For this she was brave: but she deserved 
A better grave than this. 

The New Republic Elinor Wylie 

251 



LET NO CHARITABLE HOPE 

Now let no charitable Lope 
Confuse my mind with images 
Of eagle and of antelope: 
I am in nature none of these. 

I was, being human, born alone; 
I am, being woman, hard beset; 
I lived by squeezing from a stone 
The little nourishment I get 

In masks outrageous and austere 
The years go by in single file; 
But none has merited my fear, 
And none has quite escaped my smile. 

The Literary Review 

New York Evening Post Elinor Wylie 



HEROICS 

Though here and there a man is left 
Whose iron thread eludes the shears, 
The martyr with his bosom cleft 



Does he survive whose tongue was slit, 
To slake some envy of a king's? 
Sportive silver cried from it 



The rack has crumpled up the limb 
Stretched immediate to fly; 
Never ask the end of him 
Stubborn to outstare the sky. 

m 



Assuming an heroic mask, 
He stands a tall derisive tree, 
"While servile to the speckled task 
We move devoted hand and knee. 
It is no virtue, but a fault 
Thus to breathe ignoble air, 
Suffering unclean assault 
And insult dubious to bear. 

The New Republic Elinor Wylie 



THE YEARBOOK 
OF AMERICAN POETRY 

1922 



INDEX OF POETS AND POEMS PUBLISHED 
IN AMEEICAN MAGAZINES, AUGUST, 1921 
JULY 31, 192 

Aber, Loureine. BEREFT, Poetry, A Magazine cf Verse, October, 
1921; CITY WED, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 
1921; Cur LOOSE, The Liberator, May; DEATH, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; ELEVATOR MAN, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; FROM CITY 
LANES, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; GIRL, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; OLD MAN, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921. 

Adair, Ivan. SONG, Contemporary Verse, June; THE POET'S SOUL, 
Contemporary Verse, June. 

Adams, Andrew Mclver. A LEAVE TAKING, Munsey's Magazine, 
March; THE MARRIED LOVER, Munsetfs Magazine, 
February; THE NEW HUSBANDMAN, Munsey^s Magazine, 
May; To A BEAUTIFUL LADY ON TOUR, Munsey's Magazine, 
July. 

Adams, Bill. BILLY PEG-LEO'S FIDDLE, The Outlook* October 26, 
1921. 

Adams, Franklin P. CODICIL TO A WILL, Harpers Magazine, 
September, 1921. 

Adams, J. Donald. THE MIRACLE, The Dial, September, 1921. 

Adams, John Alden. APRIL IN THE WOODLAND, Munsey's Maga- 
zine, April. 

Adams, Leonie. APRIL MORTALITY, The New Republic, November 
28, 1921; A WIND OP FALL, The Liberator, September, 
1921; HOME-COMING, The Liberator, October, 1921; QUIET, 
The Liberator, September, 1921. 

Adams, Letitia M. SONGS, The Granite Monthly, April. 

Addison, Medora. DREAMS AND A SWORD, Contemporary Verse, 
March; DREAM BUILDERS, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer; HERETIC, Contemporary Verse, March; LOVE'S 
BETICENCE, Contemporary Verse, March; MOTHERHOOD, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; TRAPPED, The 
Lyric, February; WALLS, Contemporary Verse, March; 
WANDERLUST, The Lyric, February; WASTED HOURS, 
Contemporary Verse, March; YOUR LOVE, The Lyric, April; 
YOURS, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter. 

257 



Aiken, Conrad. CONCERT PITCH, The New Republic, June 7; 
DRAGON SPRING, The Yale Review, April; IMPROVISATIONS: 
LIGHTS AND SNOW, Broom, June; PORTRAIT OF A GIRL, 
Broom, December, 1921; SUSANNA, The New Republic, 
August 24, 1921. 

Ainslee, Caroline. LONELY STREET, The Lync West, October, 1921. 

Aldington, Richard. NIGHTINGALE, The Double Dealer, July. 

Alexander, Hartley Burr. I AM KUNNING, The Midland, A 
Magazine of the Middle West, September-October, 1921; 
MIRAGE, Scribner's Magazine, January; THE BUZZARD,. 
Scribner's Magazine, January; THE CITIES OF WHITE MEN, 
Scribner's Magazine, January; THE GREAT DRUM, Scribner's 
Magazine, January; THE ORIGIN OP DEATH, Scribner's' 
Magazine, January; THE WET GRASS OF MORNING, 
Scribner's Magazine, January; THE SUN'S LAST RAY,. 
Scribner's Magazine, January. 

Algert, Bernadine. APRES-MIDI, The Lyric West, October, 1921, 
BLUE WATERS, The Texas Review, October, 1921; CHIN- 
OISERIE, The Lyric West, October, 1921; COMPLAINT OF A 
VAGABOND, The Lyric West, February; DEVIL TO A GHOST, 
The Texas Review, October, 1921; MIRROR, The Texas 
Review, April; MIST, The Lyric West, October, 1921; 
NIGHT TRAIL, The Texas Review, April; RAVINE (SPRING); 
The Texas Review, April; REPLY, The Texas Review, 
October, 1921; SONG OF A BALLERINA, The Lyric West, 
February; To COMMON-SENSE, The Texas Review, October, 
1921; WHEN WARBIORS DIE, The Texas Review, October, 
1921; WHITE LOCUSTS, The Texas Review, April. 

Allen, Effie Alger. NIGHT ON THE RIVER, The American Poetry 
Magazine, April; SUNSHINE LAKE, The American Poetry 
Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 

Allen, Hervey. DEAD MEN To A METAPHYSICIAN, The Boob- 
man, May; GARGANTXTA, The Measure, February; HAG- 
HOLLERIN' TIME, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April; 
MACABRE IN MACAWS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April; 
MOMENTS, Contemporary Verse, April; PORTENTIA, The 
Reviewer, May; PALMETTE TOWN, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, April; RELATIVITY, The Literary Review of the 
New York Evening Post, June S; SHADOWS, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, April; SUNSHINE, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, April; UPSTAIRS DOWNSTAIRS, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, April. 

Allen, Rae. A NATURAL ERROR, Ainslee's, February; SHORE 
LEAVE, Ainslee 1 s, May. 

Allen-Siple, Jessie. A CALIFORNIA IDYLL, The Country Bard, 
Summer^Autumn, 1921; A CORNER FOR ME, The Country 
Bard, Winter; *' BLARNEY," The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autmnn, 1921; HOME'S WHERE THE HEART'S AT REST, 
The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; ROOM A.T THE 
TOP, The Country Bard, Spring; SONGS OF PRAISE, The 

258 



Country Bard, Winter; SWEET LITTLE BRIER ROSE, The 
Country Bard, Spring; THE DOLLY DRESS, The Country 
Bard, Winter; THE MEADOW LARK, The Country Bard, 
Spring. 

Allie, Arthur F. AN ANGRY WORD, The American Poetry Maga- 
zine, April; THE RIVER, The American Poetry Magazine, 
April. 

Ailing, Kenneth Slade. FEBRUARY THAW, The Measure* March; 
FIRST ICE, The New York Post, December 21, 1921 ; GHOULS, 
The Measure, June; SOMETHING LTTCP. A WIND, The Measure, 
October, 1921; SUMMER NIGHT, The Measure, October, 
1921; STONES GATHERED TOR A CHIMNEY, The Measure-, 
October, 1921; THE BEE, The Measure, October, 1921; 
THE FREIGHT TRAIN, Leslie's Illustrated Weekly, March 4; 
THE UNSCARRED FIGHTER BEMEMBERS FRANCE, The 

Measure, March; To , The Midland, A Magazine of 

the M^ddle West, August, 1921; TOTJL SECTOR, OCTOBER 
THE AVIATORS' BARRACKS, SAIZERAIS, The Measure, 
February. 

Almack, John. THE LANES OP OREGON, The Country Bard, 
Summer Autumn, 1921, 

Ames, Lucile Perry. AGE, The Pagan, December, 1921, January; 
DREAM-ASH, The Pagan, The Pagan; MISTY-TRAIL, The 
Pagan, October-November, 1921. 

Ammidown, H. F. To MONADNOCK, The Granite Monthly, 
March. 

Andelson, Pearl. AT PLAY, Voices, A Journal oj Verse, Autumn, 
1921; TIDE Our, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921 ; 
MADONNA, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921. 

Anderson, Claiborne Hanks. COBWEBS AND IRON, The Reviewer, 
November, 1921, 

Anderson, Marguerite L. PLAYMATES, The ATnerican Poetry 
Magazine, April. 

Anderson, Maxwell. LUCIFER, The Measure, January; NOON 
IN A WOOD, The Measure, May; "SHE SAID, THOUGH You 
SHOULD WEAVE," The New Republic, July 5; THE BEGGAR 
GOD II, THE GOD MUTTERS; III, HE GATHERS HIB WRATH 
ABOUT HIM; IV, HE BROODS OVER His VENGEANCE, 
The Measure, December, 1921; JUDITH OP MINNEWAUKAN 
THE LAKE, EAST WIND, JUDITH'S HOUSE, MORNING 
AND NIGHT, JUDITH'S END, The Measure, September, 1921; 
"THE TIME WHEN I WAS PLOWING," The New Republic, 
June 21. 

Anderson, Sherwood. TESTAMENT OP THE Two GLAD MEN, 
The Double Dealer, April. 

Andrew, Thekla Hollingsworth. HEART'S DESIRE, Munsetf* 
Magazine, June. 

Andrews, Andrew L. REQUIEM, The Nomad, Spring, 1922. 

Andrews, George Lawrence. THE LOST PATH, Art Review, 
April. 

259 



Andrews, Loring. EMANCIPATION, The Pagan, August-September, 
1921, 

Andrews, Mary Raymond Shipman. CARDINAL MERCIBB, 
Scribner's Magazine, March ; PAX YOBISCUM, Scribner's 
Magazine, August, 1921, 

Anonymous. AT PARTING (Translated by Florence Brinkman), 
The Freeman, April 5; OUT OP WORK, INCREDIBLE PACTS, 
USES, WINDOWS AND SMELLS, DEPARTMENT STOBE 
DEMONSTRATOR, HOLIDAY, THE NIGHT WIND, PAPERS, 
THE MUNICIPAL LODGING HOUSE, The Nation, December 
28, 1922; SUMMER RAIN, The Pagan, October-November, 
1921. 

Arata, Oliver S. CANZONET, The Poet and Philosopher, September, 
1921. 

Armfield, Maxwell. BATTLE, The Double Dealer, October, 1921. 

Arno, Beth. AFTER SUNDOWN, The American Poetry Magazine, 
Autumn, 1921* 

Arnold, Anne. FUI^JAIENT, The American Poetry Magazine, 
February. 

Armstrong, Martin. ALL Is ONE, Broom, June. 

Armstrong, Nelchen. THE WHITE ROAD, The Lyric West, June. 

Ashleigh, Charles. DEATH BED, The Liberator, March; ORIENTAL 
NOCTURNE, The Century Magazine, November, 1921; 
VESPERS, The Liberator, March. 

Atkinson, Arthur W. To THE NORTHERN LIGHTS, The Lyric West, 
February. 

Atkinson, John Hampton. HELIOTROPE AND JARJORAM, The 
American Poetry Magazine, February. 

Atsu-Ko Saisho. WHEN BEAUTY DIES (Translated from the 
Japanese by Madam Yukio Ozaki), The Freeman, 
November 9, 1921. 

August, S. G. SILENT, The Step Ladder, July. 

Auslander, Joseph. ABANDONED, The Measure, May; BEAUTY, 
Contemporary Verse, August, 1921; BEAUTY WILL WOUND 
Us, Contemporary Verse, April; BUND SEARCHER, The 
Measure, February; BROKEN THINGS, Voices, A Journal 
of Verse, Winter; CANDLES AND TORCHES, The Measure, 
July; CRYING, "THALASSUS!" Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Winter; DEAD LEAVES, Contemporary Verse, November, 
1921; EBB-TIDE, The New Republic, April 12; FRAILTY, 

THY NAME is , The Measure, February; I GREET 

You! Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring; I HAVE WAITED 
FOR You LONG, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May; 
I KNOW IT WILL BE QUIET WHEN You COME, The 
Measure, May; Is THIS THE LARK! The Measure, May; 
LITTLE Lou, Poetry, A Magastine of Verse, May; OF COURSE 
THEY HAD TO VISIT THE INVALIDES, The New Republic, 
May 17; ONE INSTANT, Contemporary Verse, August, 1921; 
OUT OP THE FOG, The American Poetry Magasdne, Autumn. 
1921; SOME DAY YOUR BEAUTY WILL FRIGHTEN DEATH, 

260 



The Lyric West, April; SOMEWHEEB A LONELY BIRD, The 
New Republic, March 15; SUMMER'S END, Contemporary 
Verse, November, 1921; SUNRISE TRUMPETS, The Xew 
Republic, April 26; THE BRIGHT BLASPHEMY, The Lyric 
West, April; THE DABK EDGE OP THE DAWN, Contemporary 
Verse, August, 1921; THE SEA is LIKE A PANTHER PERI- 
LOUS, Contemporary Verse, August, 1921; THE SHIP SINGS, 
Contemporary Verse, August, 1921; TWILIGHT, THE 
LUXEMBOURG, Contemporary Verse, April; WHEN HOMER 
NODDED, The Bookman, June; WINTER, Voices, A Journal 
of Verse, Winter. 

Austin, Marjorie. GREAT-UNCLE JOE, The Outlook, June 7. 

Austin, Mary. GLYPHS RENDERED FROM THE AMERIND, The 
Dial, November, 1921; WOMEN'S WAR THOUGHTS 
A ROOM IN TIME FROM WHICH A WINDOW LOOKS ON THE 
PRESENT, The Dial, November, 1921; SONGS OF THE 
SEASONS, A FREE RENDERING OF AN AMERINDIAN SONG 
SEQUENCE, The Double Dealer, July. 

Avery, Bertha Grant. SPEAKING ME FACE TO FACE (Tribute to 
Edwin Markham on his Seventieth Birthday), The Step 
Ladder, June. 

Avery, Claribel Weeks. MY DAYS, Contemporary Verse, January; 

MY VERSE is LTKF (Tribute to Edwin MarkJham 

on his Seventieth Birthday), The Step Ladder, June; ROSE 
AND GARDENER, The Lyric West, April; THE BEAUTY OF 
WINTER, Contemporary Verse, January; THE STRANGER, 
The Step Ladder, July. 

Ayers, Joseph Henry. SILENCES, The Granite Monthly, October, 
1921. 

Babb, Stanley E. THE SINGER, All's Well, October, 1921. 

Bacon, Eleanor Kenley. As A TIEL TREE AND AN OAK, The 
Granite Monthly, July; TRAVEL WITH A SMILE, The Granite 
Monthly, May. 

Badger, King. MORE THAN THE PRAISE OF GODS, The Fugitive, 
June; Now THIS is PARTING, The Fugitive, June; THE 
WINDS BY CEYRAT, The Fugitive, June. 

Bagley, Frank R. THE TEAR THAT SAYS GOOD-BYE, The Granite 
Monthly, July; To AN ICICLE, The Granite Monthly, 
February. 

Bainbridge, W. H. ON THE OVERLAND, The Lyric West, Septem- 
ber, 1921; THE "SILLER" ON THE PLATE, The Lyric West, 
September, 1921. 

Baker, Karle Wilson. BURNING BUSH, The Nation, August 17, 
1921; COURAGE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 
1921; MEEKNESS AND PRIDE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
October, 1921; Nor IN THE WHERLWIND, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, October, 1921; STORM SONG, The Bookman, 
December, 1921; To GET WISDOM, Poetry. A Magazine 
of Verse, October, 1921. 

261 



Baker, Martha S. HOPES UNFULFILLED, The Granite Monthly, 

October, 1921. 
Balderston, K. C. To MY QUAKES GREAT-GRANDMOTHER, The 

Granite Monthly, November, 1921. 
Baldwin, Eleanor. THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN, The 

Granite Monthly, December, 1921. 
Baldwin, Faith. PORTRAIT, The Measure, May; THE PETTY SOUL, 

The Outlook, May 3, 1921. 
Barber, Bruce THE STREAM'S SECRET, Munsey's Magazine, 

April. 
Barnard, Edward W. A BALLADE OF YE TWENTIE-FYFTHE, The 

Freeman, December 38, 1921. 
Barnes, Peter. DREAM KISSES, Contemporary Verse, August, 



Barney, Anna Louise. CROSSING THE BAY, The Country Bard, 

Winter; I SHALL COME BACK TO You, The American 

Poetry Magazine, February; SEPTEMBER, The American 

Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; THE VALLEY, The 

Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921. 
Barrett, Lucile. AUTUMN'S TRAIL, Harper's Magazine, October, 

1921. 
Barrington, Pauline. Los ANGELES, The Lyric West, November, 

1921. 
Barrows, Elfrida De Renne. DEATH, Poetry, A Magazine of 

Verse, April; IMPRESSIONS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

April; I WONDER, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April; 

RECOGNITION, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April; TWI- 

LIGHT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April. 
Barrows, Marjorie. SUZANNE'S GARDEN, The Step Ladder, March. 
Bassett, Ruth, GOD-THANKS, The Granite Monthly, May; 

STORMS, The Granite Monthly, July. 
Batchelor, Jean M. THE LETTER, The Lyric West, December, 1921 ; 

TRADE'S TEMPLE, The Granite Monthly, December, 1921. 
Bates, Katharine Lee. FIRST LOVE, Contemporary V&rse> May; 

AT CAMDEN, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring; SARAH 

THREENBEDLES (Boston, 1698), The Double Dealer, April; 

SHUT Our, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921; 

THE FLIGHT or ASMODAEUS, The Double Dealer 9 June; 

THE SPIRIT WBAVETH WINGS (Tribute to Edwin Markham 

on his Seventieth Birthday), The Step Ladder, June; 

WHERE TIME'S LONG RIVER, The Lyric, November, 1921. 
Baxter, Sylvester. THE SKEPTIC, The Congregationalist, June 20; 

THE SAGE, The Congregationalist, June 20. 
Beck, J. 0. ON THE MOUNTAIN PEAKS, The Alumbu9 (Purdue) > 

January. 

Beddow, Elizabeth Russell. OCTOBER, The Nomad, Summer, 1922. 
Beebe, Lucius M. ENCORE, The American Poetry Magazine, 

Autumn, 1921. 
Beebe, Theodore B. THE PARTING, The American Poetry Maga- 

zine, Autumn, 1921. 

262 



Beeler, Florence Ashley. STORM, The American Poetry Magazine, 
Autumn, 1921; THE COMINTG OF THE SANDMAN, The 
American Poetry Magazine, February. 

Behre, Edwine. AT DAWN, The Pagan, December, 1921, January; 
MARCH NIGHT, The Lyric West, March, 

Bek, Herschelle. MOOD, The Pagan, December, 1921, January. 

Bell, Jessica. A DREAM HOME, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921; ARMISTICE DAT, The Country Bard, Spring; 
AUTUMN, The Country Bard, Summer- Autumn, 19:21; 
JOHN BUBROUGHS, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 
1921; LILAC WEATHER, The Country Bard, Spring; WHEN 
PLUM TREES ARE BLOOMING, The Country Bard, Summer. 

Bellaman, Henry. A LAST WORD, Broom, June; DECORATIONS 
FOB AN IMAGINARY BALLET, Broom, December, 1921; 
EDGES, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, November, 1921; 
FUNEBRE, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; GARGOYLES OP NOTRE 
DAME, Poetry, A Magasdne of Verse, November, 1921; 
GOD, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, November, 1921; 
HEDGES, Broom, June; HEROIC ELEGY, Tempo, Autumn, 
1921; HIGH TREES, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April; 
IN Mono BARBARA, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; IN A CHARLES- 
TON GARDEN, The Reviewer, April; LULLABY, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, November, 1921; Now is PURPLE, 
The Measure, January; PEAKS, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, November, 1921; PORTRAIT SONNETS, I, II, III, IV, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921; QUESTION, 
The Measure, January; THE ARTIST, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, November, 1921; THE STRANGER, The Lyric, 
July; THINNING MIST, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer; THROUGH A HUNDRED GATES, The American 
Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; TOWARD THE WINDS, 
The Lyric, May. 

Benet, Laura. ENEMIES, The Bookman, December, 1921; HOPE, 
Ainslee's June. 

Benet, Stephen Vincent. .DAYS PASS; MEN PASS, Vanity Fair, 
April; OH, TRICKSY APRIL, The New Republic, Apnl 26. 

Benet, William Rose. ANIMALCULE, The Literary Review of l3ie 
New York Evening Post, July 29; DOPFELGANGER, The 
New Republic, February 1; FIRE AND GLASS, The Century 
Magazine, January; THE BEATING HEART, The New 
Republic, November 16, 1921; THE FAWN IN THE SNOW, 
The New Republic, April 12; THE SOUTH WIND, The 
Bookman, May. 

Bennett,*Joy. THOUGHTS, The Lyric West, February; To You, 
The Lyric West, February. 

Berenberg, David P. Two SONNETS, The Measure, February; 
YOUR HALO, The Measure, January. 

Betts, Craven Langstroth. ROOSEVELT, Tempo, Autumn, 1921. 

Beyers, Meredith. BIT OF CURLS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse* 
June; FAT MAN, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June. 

268 



Bickley, Beulali Vick. ANCESTRY, Contemporary Verse, February; 
IN MEMORY, The Country^ Bard, Winter; MASTEBY, The 
American Poetry Magazine, February; MID-WESTERN 
STABS, The Country Bard, Spring; THE DREAMER (For 
Alice), The American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; 
THE GARDENER, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 
1921; THE GREAT AMERICAN (T. R,.), The CountrylBard, 
Winter; THE SPIRIT OF THE HEARTH, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; 'Tis LOVE THAT CALLS You 
HOME, The Country Bard, Spring, 

Biddle, Francis X. NOVEMBER 1 ITH, The Liberator, March; I WAS 
A SHIP, The Liberator, April. 

Billings, Warren T. THE CHURCH WITHOUT WALLS, The Granite 
Monthly, November, 1921. 

*' Billy, Uncle." JESUS* JOKE, Contemporary Verse, February. 

Binns, Archie. PASSING AT NIGHT, The Measure, December, 1921. 

Bishop, John Peale. THE DEATH OF A DANDY, Vanity Fair, April. 

Bishop, Morris. A NEW HAMPSHIRE BOY, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, March; ECCLESIASTES, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
March; SOME WORDS TO MOLTERE, The Literary Review 
of the New York Evening Post, June 3. 

Bjorkman, Edwin. FELICIA, The Reviewer, January; SONG OF 
THE BOWL, The Reviewer, December, 1921; THE POND, 
The Reviewer, May. 

Blackman, Kate. SONG OF THE REEDS, The Lyric West, February. 

Blake, Winifred Ballard. VISION, The Poet and Philosopher, 
September* 1921. 

Blanden, Charles G, APPLE BLOSSOMS, The Chicago Tribune, 
July 26; A TEAR BOTTLE, The Chicago Tribune, August 27, 
1921; DAYBREAK, AWs Well, May; CHICAGO, The Chicago 
Tribune, January 31; DAFFODILS, The Chicago Tribune, 
June 1; DUALITY, The Chicago Tribune, November 26, 
1921; FULFILLMENT, The Chicago Tribune, March 1; 
FUSION, The Chicago Tribune, October 8, 1921; HOURS, 
The Chicago Tribune, July 15; IN A FOREST, The Chicago 
Tribune, July 28; IN MARCH, The Chicago Tribune, March 
14; LITTLE WINDOWS, The Chicago Tribune, August 7, 
1921; NAKED TREES, The Chicago Tribune, April 6; OCTAVE, 
The Chicago Tribune, July 12; OVERTONES, The Chicago 
Tribune, August 29, 1921; ROOSEVELT, The Chicago 
Tribune, October 27, 1921; SHADOWS, Tlie Chicago Tribune, 
July SI; SHRINES, The Chicago Tribune, April 17; SONG 
(UPON MY WAY TO SHILLINGTON), The Chicago Tribune, 
May 17; SONG, The Chicago Tribune, July 4; SONG, The 
Chicago Tribune, July 10; SONG, The Chicago Tribune, 
July 14; SONG, The Chicago Tribune, July 17; SONG, The 
Chicago Tribune, July 28; SONG, The Chicago Tribune, 
October 29, 1921; SONG, The Chicago Tribune, September 
31, 1921; SONG, The Chicago Tribune, November 12 ; SONG, 
The Chicago Tribune, November 17, 1921; SONG, The 

264 



Chicago Tribune, November 30, 1921; SCXSET LEAVES, 
The Chicago Tribune, November 10, 1921; THE BELL, 
The Chicago Tribune, November 16, 1921; THE CHAXGE- 
LINGS, The Chicago Tribune, October 20, 1921; TEE 
DESERTED HOUSE, The Chicago Tribune, November 20, 
1921; THE PASSING THROXG, The Chicago Tribune, 
January 24; THE KEEP OP CARE, The Chicago Tribune, 
November 27, 1921; THE WEAVER, The Chicago Tribune, 
August 30, 1921; TRUTH, All's Well, April; WINTER JOTS, 
The Christian Century, February 23; To A RUBY-THROATED 
HUMMING-BIRD, The Chicago Tribune, July 22; ULTDIA 
THULE, The Chicago Tribune, November^, 1921; THE 
WINDS op DAWN, The Chicago Tribune, November 7, 
1921; WULLIE CAMPBELL'S DREAM, The Chicago Evening 
Post, May; YESTERDAY, The Chicago Tribune, August 3, 
1921, 

Block, Louis James. THE GOLD AND CRIMSON SUN (Tribute to 
Edwin Markham on his Seventieth Birthday), The Step 
Ladder, June. 

Blunden, Edmund. COUNTRY SALE, The Yale Review, July; 
THRESHOLD, The Yale Review, July; THE SHADOW, The 
Yale Review, July. 

Blunt, LL.D., Rev. Hugh F. BETHLEHEM, The Magnificat, 
December, 1921; GOD'S HANDMAID, The Magnificat, 
March; HER PATHWAY, The Magnificat, June; IN MAYTIME, 
The Magnificat, May; THE HOLY HOUSE, The Magnificat, 
October, 1921; To SAINT JOSEPH, The Magnificat, March. 
Bodenheim, Maxwell. CITY-GIRL, The Liberator, July; DEAB 
MINNA, The Nation, May 10; DRESS-MODEL, The Double 
Dealer, December, 1921; GARBAGE-HEAP, The Double 
Dealer, April; IMAGINARY PEOPLE, The Double Dealer, 
February; INSTRUCTIONS FOR A BALLET, The Dial, March; 
NEGRO CRIMINAL, The Bookman, October, 1921; NEGRO 
LABORER, The Nation, July 5; OLD ACTOR, The Double 
Dealer, February; SONNET TO MY WIFE, The Double 
Dealer, January; SUMMER EVENING : NEW YORK SUBWAY 
STATION, The Dial, August, 1921; To A COUNTRY-GIRL, 
The Yale Review, July; TRUCK DRIVERS, The Double 
Dealer, July; Two SONNETS TO MY WIFE, The Measure, 
December, 1921; UNDERWORLD NOTE, The Double Dealer, 
March; YILLAGE-CLERK, The Double Dealer, December, 
1921. 

Bogan, Louise. A TALE, The New Republic, October 19, 1921; 
DECORATION (For W.), The New Republic, August 24, 
1921; MEDUSA, The New Republic, December 21, 1921; 
MEMORY, The New Republic, May 10; PORTRAIT, The 
Liberator, April; STATUE AND BIBDS, The New Republic, 
April 12; THE ALCHEMIST, The New Republic, February 22; 
THE CROWS, The Literary Review, New York Evening Post, 
April 15; WOMEN, The Measure, February. 

265 



Borland, Harold G. THE FLUTE PLAYER, The Lyric West, June. 
Bornholdt, Florence Parker. Mr ART LOOKS UP, The Lync 

West, September, 1921 
Bosschere, Jean. THE OFFERING OF PLEBS (Translated by E. J. 

O'Brien), Broom, February. 

Bostick, Louise Stedman. SONG OF A MOUNTAIN FLOWER, The 
Lyric West, November, 1921; THE VISITOR, The Lyric 
West, November, 1921 

Bourquin, Mabel J. THE DEBAUCHEE, May. 
Boutelle, Grace Hodsdon IT VANISHED (To C. A. B.), Poetry, 

A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921. 

Bowen, Stirling. A MULATTO GIRL IN POLICE COURT, The 
Liberator, November, 1921; APRIL, The Liberator, June; 
CAGES, The Bookman, December, 1921; IN THE GOLDEN 
AGE, The Liberator, October, 1921; THE DESERTED ROOM, 
The Liberator, November, 1921; THE GOLD RUSH, 1849, 
The Liberator, September, 1921; THE RAINBOW'S END, 
The Liberator, September, 1921. 

Bower, Helen WANDERLUST, The Liberator, February. 
Bowles, 0. J. AERIAL, The Lyric West, October, 1921; CLOUDS, 

The Lyric West, October, 1921. 
Boyesen, Bayard. LAKE, Broom, November, 1921. 
Bradford, Gamaliel. A COMMON CASE, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Autumn, 1921; CHERRY-BUDS, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; 
HYMN TO IGNORANCE, The Literary Review of the New York 
Evening Post, June S; ILLIMITABLE, Contemporary Verse, 
April; RHYME, The American Poetry Magazine, February; 
THE ANNTVERfiARY, ScTibner's Magazine, October, 1921; 
THE FABRIC, Contemporary Verse, April; THE SURPRISE, 
The Outlook, January 4; THE THING TO Do, Contemporary 
Verse, April. 
Bradley, Virginia Burton. GATHERING FIGS, The Lyric West, 

November, 1921. 
Brady, Emeline Margaret. THE PORTRAIT, TO LOLA, The Lyric 

West, December, 1921. 

Braganca, Anita. KEATS, Harper's Magazine, October, 1921. 
Breese, Alan. IN You, The Liberator, January; THE SNOW 

AGAIN, The Liberator, December, 1921. 

Breton, Nicholas. ATTAR OF ROSES, Munsey's Magazine, March; 
BALLADE OF FISH IN THE SEA, Munsey's Magazine, June; 
To PHYLT.TDA IN THE CITY, Munsey's Magazine, July. 
Brintnall, Edna Goit. CHINATOWN, The Lyric West, November, 

1921. 

Broadus, Kemper Hammond. BLIZZARD, Poetry, A Magazine of 

Verse* May; BURNT OUT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse t May. 

Brockman, Zoe Kinzaid. LINES, The American Poetry Magazine, 

February. 

Brody, Alter. INVINCIBLE, The Bookman, August, 1921; ON THE 
SCREEN, Clay, Spring; NOCTURNE FROM A WINDOW, Clay, 
Spring. 

266 



Brooks, Clarissa. OF LOVE AND DEATH, The Step Ladder, July. 
Brooks, Fannie F. COMPENSATION, The Country Bard, Spring; 
MAKIN' HAY, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; 
SNOWFLAKES, The Country Bard, Winter. 

Brown, Abbie Farwell. THE CAVE, Contemporary Verse, August, 
1921; THE TEMPTING POLLY, Contemporary Verse, Decem- 
ber, 1921. 

Brown, Alice. HELIOTKOPE, Harper's Magazine, September, 1921. 
Brown, Leah. THE BEAUTY OP NATURE, The Poet and Philosopher, 

September, 1921. 
Brown, Marion Francis. WHEN SPRING COMES BACK TO GILEAD, 

Ainslee's, March. 
Brown, Sarah-Margaret. FROM CHICAGO **L, " Poetry, a Magazine 

of Verse, February. 
Bryant, Gladys. REFLECTION, The Liberator, February; THE 

RETURN, The Liberator, October, 1921. 
Bryant, Louise. AFTERMATH, The Liberator, November, 1921. 
Bryning, Winifred Livingstone. MESSENGERS OP HOPE, The 

Boston Transcript, February 4. 
Buchanan, Allison. THE UNLOVED, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse* 

March. 

Buckley, Nancy. "Ai SHUT OF EVENING FLOWERS," The Lyric 
West, April; THE ARTIST SPEAKS, The Poet and Philosopher, 
January; THE SPINNER, The Magnificat, July. 
Bugbee, Perley R. A WINTER'S NIGHT, The Granite Monthly, 

March. 
Bulknap, Helen Runyon. CORRESPONDENCES, The Lyric West, 

October, 1921. 
Bullen, John Ravenor. FAB DISTANT BELLS, The Poet and 

Philosopher, September, 1921, 
Bunin, I. A. A SONG (Translated by Babette Deutsch and 

Avrahm Yannohnsky), The Freeman, August 17, 1921. 
Burgess, Robert Louis. LIKE A YOUNG PLUM TREE, The Pagan, 

October-November, 1921. 
Burke, Kenneth. VER RENATUS ORBIS EST, Contact, Advertising 

Number. 

Burr, Amelia Josephine. TRINCOMALEE, The Lyric, November, 
1921; WEST OF SUEZ, Scribnefs Magazine, September, 
1921. 
Burroughs, Jack. A CHILD QUESTIONS MB, Harper's Magazine, 

November, 1921. 

Burt, Maxwell Struthers. "BEAUTY PERSISTS,** Bcribnefs 
Magazine, July; MOUNTAIN DAWN, Harper's Magazine, 
February; THE RIVER, Scribner's Magazine, April; WALLED 
GARDENS, Harper's Magazine, September, 1921; WHEN I 
GREW Up TO MIDDLE-AGE, Scnbner's Magazine, December, 
1921. 

Burton, Clara Moore. THE EARLY DANDELION, The Country 
Bard, Spring; THE Wnn^PooR-WiLL's SONG, The Country 
Bard, Spring. 

267 



Burton, Richard. LEARNING AND LOVING, The Personalist, 
October, 1921. 

Busch, Jr., Briton Niven. INSOMNIA, Contemporary Verse, 
February. 

Buss, Kate. GARGOYLE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, November, 
1921. 

Butts, Dorothy. ATTDIENCE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
November, 1921; A VANITY, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
November, 1921; DIFFERENCE, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, November, 1921; LISTENING, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, November, 1921; MAT BASKET, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, November, 1921; PLEASE, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, November, 1921; THE PARADE, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, November, 1921; THE TRANSIENT, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, November, 1921; To THE HTTVLS 
AROUND NORTHAMPTON, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
November, 1921. 

Bye, Jean Palmer. SINGING VOICE, The American Poetry Maga- 
zine, Autumn, 1921. 

Bynner, "Witter. A DRAGON PLY, The Freeman, May 3; A SONG 
OF THE WINDS, The Freeman, April 19; DEBS AND THE 
BUILDERS, The New Republic, December 28, 1921; DONALD 
EVANS, The Dial, April; HUNTED HUNTRESS, The Nation, 
March 22; SPRING IN THE Zoo, The Measure, May; THE 
ACTOR'S PROLOGUE, The Freeman, April 19; THE NEW 
WHISTLE, The Bookman, April; To A CHINESE SCHOLAR 
(Dr. Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, April 26. 

Bynner, Witter, and Kiang Kang-hu. A GBEEN STREAM (Trans- 
lated from the Chinese), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse* 
February; HARMONIZING A POEM BY PALACE-ATTENDANT 
Kuo (Translated from the Chinese), Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, February. 

Byrne, M. St. Clare. THE COMMON THINGS, McClure's Magazine, 
May. 



Cahn, Pauline. THESE Two, The Measure, January. 

Calkins, Thomas V. THE SAND DEVIL, The Lyric West, October, 

1921, 
Campbell, Helen M. THE OLD CANALS OP ENGLAND, The Granite 

Monthly, October, 1921. 
Campbell, Joseph. "THE MOON ROSE UP," The Double Dealer, 

June; "INTO THE GATHERED CORNFIELDS, " The Double 

Dealer, June. 
Campbell, Nancy. INNOCENT SLEEP, Poetry, A Magazine of 

Verse, August, 1921. 
Canon, Ralph. LIFE, The Country Bard, Spring; THE RAIN 

PREDICTOR, The Country Sard, Winter. 
Carew, Harold D. SPRING GREETING, The Boston Herald; RECON- 

SECRATION, The Boston Transcript, November 19, 1921; 

268 



WHEN BILL WENT WEST, The Boston Post, March 21; 
To A ROSE, The Boston Transcript, April 12. 

Carlin, Francis. THE SHAMBLES, The Measure, December, 1021; 
A CHILD'S GRACE, The Measure, December, 1921; GOD, 
The Catholic World, November, 1921; CONFESSIONAL 
PRATER, The Catholic World, February; GOSLING BROOK, 
The Measure, December, 1921; PAX, The Catholic World, 
June; AT CHRIST'S MASS, America, December 24, 1921. 

Carman, Bliss VESTIGIA, Harper's Magazine, September, 1921. 

Carman, Miriam Crittenden. To SYLVIA FOREVER STILL, 
Everybody's, August, 1921. 

Carrere, Angele. CORRECTION, The Pagan, October-November, 
1921; THE CLUNY MUSEUM (PARIS), The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921; MARKETING, The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921; MORNING IN ANTWERP, The Pagan, 
December, 1921, January; DISCORD, The Pagan, December, 
1921, January; STILL-LIFE, The Pagan, December, 1921, 
January. 

Canington, Mary Coles. HOMEWARD BOUND, The Lyric, June; 
THE LOST COMRADE, The Double Dealer, November, 1921. 

Carroll, Mary Tarver. THE WANDER-LURE, The American 
Poetry Magazine, June; THE POET, The American Poetry 
Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 

Carron, S. J M Lionel V. COMMENCEMENT, The Magnificat, June. 

Cattell, Hetty. THE NORTH WOODS, The Pagan, August- 
September, 1921. 

Chamberlain, J. D. ON THE VIRTUE or SOBRIETY, All's Well, 
January. 

Chandler, Josephine Craven. COCKAIGNE, The Step Ladder, 
March. 

Chang Chi (8th Century A. D.) . VIRTUOUS WIFE ODE (Translated 
from the Chinese by Albion N. Fellows and T. Y. Leo), 
The Measure, June. 

Ch'ag-Ling, Wang IN HF.R QUIET WINDOW (Translated by 
Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-Hu), The Nation, 
November 2, 1921 

Chapin, Henry. MIGRATORY MOON, The Literary Review of tfie 
New York Evening Post, October 8, 1921. 

Chaplin, Ralph. WESLEY EVEREST, The Liberator, March; 
To MY LITTLE SON, The Liberator, December, 1921; 
FREEDOM, The Liberator, March; TAPS, The Liberator, 
March; THE LIVING DEAD, The Liberator, March. 

Chapman, John Jay. SUMMER'S ADIEU, Scribner's Magazine, 
October, 1921; THE GRANDFATHER, Soribner's Magazine, 
May; BOOKS AND BEADING, The Yale Review, October, 
1921. 

Charles, Lester. GREEN STOCKINGS (From Paul Verlaine), 
The Wave, June. 

Chase, Chilton. ENSHRINED, The Nomad, Spring, 1922; FUL- 
FILLMENT, The Nomad, Spring, 1022. 

269 



Chastain, Mary Lee. {"AFTERWARD, Good Housekeeping, June. 

Cheney, Elias H. WHAT WOULD I MORE? The Granite Monthly, 
February. 

Cheney-Nichols, Beth. CONCESSION, Tempo, Autumn, 1921. 

Cheyney, Ralph. CRUCIFIXION, The Pagan, December, 1921. 
January; EMANCIPATION, The Pagan, October-November, 
1921; SURF, The Pagan, October-November, 1921; 
NOCTURNE, The Nomad, Spring, 1922. 

Childs, Dorothea M. SONNET, The Poet and Philosopher 
September* 1921, AWAKENED LOVE, The Lyric West, 
February; DEFERRED, The Lyric West, November, 1921. 

Chiu-Ling, Chang, FRUITS OF CIRCUMSTANCE (Translated by 
Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-Hu), The Double Dealer, 
June. 

Choyce, A. Newberry. I CAN BEAU So MANY THINGS, The 
Smart Set, April. 

Cinneidig, Robard Emmet Ua. TRANSFIGURATION, The Double 
Dealer, October, 1921. 

Clark, Allen. I AM YOUR LOVER, The Lyric West, May. 

Clark, Martha Haskell. THE SPECIALIST, Harper's Magazine, 
December, 1921; WICKET GATES, Good Housekeeping, 
June; BEACH TRAILS, McClure's Magazine, April; THE 
PRICE, McClure's Magazine, May; FROM FAMINE FIELDS, 
The Outlook, March 22; TRAITS, Scribner's Magazine, 
January. 

Clark, Thomas Curtis* KINGS, The Christian Century, March 9; 
WITH GRATITUDE FOR " LEAVES OP GRASS," The Christian 
Century, March 9; AN AWAKENING AMERICA SINGS, 
The Christian Century, April 6; THE HAND OF LINCOLN, 
The Christian Century, June 8; To CARL SANDBURG, The 
Christian Century, June 22; TRUST THE GREAT ARTIST, 
The Christian Century, July <3; WORLD BUILDERS, The 
Chicago Tribune, August 25, 1921; To JOHN KEATS, 
The Chicago Tribune, August 15, 1921; EXPLORERS, The 
Chicago Post, January 25; SONG, The Chicago Tribune, 
November 9, 1921; THEODORE ROOSEVELT, PROPHET, 
The Chicago Tribune, October 27, 1921; POET TO CYNIC, 
The Chicago Tribune, July 21, 1921; WHEN SUMMER DIES, 
The Chicago Tribune, October 23, 1921; WITNESSES, 
The Boston Transcript, January 14; POETS; The Chicago 
Tribune, August 7, 1921; To ROBERT BURNS, Minneapolis 
Journal, August 2, 1921; CAESAR AND CHRIST, The Christian 
Century, September 29, 1921, To JOHN BURROUGHS, 
Unity, February; AMERICA TO HER POETS, The Christian 
Century, August 4, 1921; To A CELEBRITY, The Chicago 
Tribune, August 24, 1921; KING OF AN ACRE, The Chicago 
Tribune, September 20, 1921; To THOREAU, The Chicago 
Post, January 6; To HOMER POET ETERNAL, The Chicago 
Tribune, November 7, 1921; THE MELTING POT, The 
Chicago Tribune, September 11, 1921; DEATHLESS (HORATI 

270 



CARMINA, LIB. in, 30), The Chicago Tribune, August 21, 
1921; PILOTS, The Chicago Tribune, August 5, 1921; THE 
PROCESSION, The San Francisco Chronicle, October 10, 
1921; THE ENDURING, The Chicago Tribune, September 
26, 1921; To THE SINGER, The Christian Century, October 
20, 1921; THE DAT BREAKS, The Christian Century, 
January 12; THEODORE ROOSEVELT, "THE HAPPY 
WARRIOR," The Christian Century, October 27, 1921; 
CORN, The Christian Century, December 15, 1921; AMERICA 
SINGS OF THE DAWN, The Christian Century, November 
10, 1921; ON REREADING KEATS, The Chicago Tribune, 
August 15, 1921; HUMDRUM, The Minneapolis Journal, 
August 10, 1921; GOD RULES THE SEAS, The Christian 
Century, November 17, 1921; "PARADISE ENOW," The 
Chicago Post, January 17; To QUINTUS HORATIUS 
FLACCUS, The Chicago Post, February 20; To WALT 
WHITMAN, Indiana University Quarterly, April; CHICAGO 
WORK SONG, The Chicago Tribune, September 25, 1921; 
QUESTIONINGS, The Christian Century; EASTER HYMN, 
The Christian Century; MARCH, The Chicago Post, March 
15; INFLUENCE, The Christian Century, March 30; TIME, 
The Chicago Post, March 23; To CARL SANDBURG, The 
Chicago News, April 12; MARCH YEARNING, The Chicago 
Post, March 4; BYRON, The Chicago Post, March 10; 
SEEKERS, The Chicago Post, April 12; THE DREAM, The 
Chicago Post, April 22; SONG (HoRATi CARMINA, LIB. I, 
22), The Chicago Tribune, December 8, 1921; SHAKESPEARE, 
Indiana University Quarterly, April; To WORDSWORTH, 
Indiana University Quarterly, April; THE POET'S CALL, 
The Chicago Post, February 9; SHACKLETON, The Chicago 
Post, February 16; AT MOUNT VERNON, The Chicago 
Post, February 22; THE DREAMER, The Christian Century, 
February 9; THE CHRISTIAN, The Christian Century, 
February 9; THE MASTER, The Christian Century, February 
9; LINCOLN, The Living Church, February 11; UPON 
READING A VOLUME OF ANCIENT CHINESE POETRY, The 
Chicago Post, March 81; THE GLORY OF LINCOLN, The 
Christian Century, February 9; THE MIRACLE, The Christian 
Christian Century, February 9; AT GENTRYVTLLE, The 
Christian Century, February 9; OCTOBER, The Chicago 
Tribune, October 30; THE NEW SONG, The Christian 
Century, October, 1921; THE GOLDEN AGE, The Christian 
Century, September 22, 1921; To POETRY, The Christian 
Century, September, 1921; THE UNIVERSAL CULT, The 
Living Church, April IS; To THE AUTHOR OF SPOOR RIVER, 
The Chicago Post, March 22; REVELATION, The Christian 
Century; GIFTS, The Christian Century; GOD'S VICTORS, 
The Christian Century, November 17, 1921; THE DREAM, 
The Chicago Post, April; EVIDENCES, The Christian Century; 
THE OPTIMISM OF FAITH, The Christian Century, November 

271 



17, 1921; THE HEART'S COUNTRY, The Christian Century, 
October 6, 1921. 

Clarke, Harlow. I COMPLAIN IN PASSING, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, February; AN OLD WOMAN, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, February. 

Cleghorn, Sarah N THE VERMONTER DEPARTING, Everybody's 
Magazine, September, 1921; MOUNTAINS, The Nation, 
June 7; THREE GREAT LADIES: I. THE VICTORIAN, 
II. THE AMAZON, HI. THE VESTAL, Scnbners Magazine. 

Clements, Colin Campbell. IF I SHOULD DIE TONIGHT, The 
American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 

Coatsworth, Elizabeth J. THE SHIP, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
June; THE Cows, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June; 
STREAM, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June; AT VERSAILLES, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June; THE CENTAURS, The 
Double Dealer, May; BROADWAY, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, June; FIVE INCONSEQUENTIAL CHARMS: CHARM 
FOR A SILVER SPOON, CHARM FOR RUNNING WATER, 
CHARM ON MAKING A BED, CHARM FOR THE DISREPUTABLE 
CROWS, CHARM FOR A JAR, The Double Dealer, April; 
REFLECTION, The Dial, October, 1921; SILENCE, Con- 
temporary Verse, January; THE SONG, Contemporary 
Verse, January; WIZARDRY, Contemporary Verse, January; 
FLY Low, VERMILION DRAGON, Contemporary Verse, 
January; NIRVANA, Contemporary Verse, January. 

Code, Grant EL ECSTACY, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter; 
THE SONGS OF HEAVEN, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter; 
SEA QUATRAINS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 
1921; THE SONS OF THE WATERFALL, Voices, A Journal 
of Verse, Winter; THE BLACK BEAST, The Pagan, August- 
September, 1921; RHODIS, Tempo, Autumn, 1921. 
WHEN You ARE MARRIED, The American Poetry Maga- 
zine, Autumn, 1921. 

Cody, S. J., Reverend Alexander J. SHADOWS, The Magnificat, 
February; THE MOTHER OP A PRIEST, The Magnificat, 
June; OUR LADY COURTESY, The Magnificat, July; To 
R. M. C. (DIED HOLY INNOCENTS* DAY. 1919), The 
Magnificat, December, 1921, SHADOWS, The Magnificat, 
December, 1921; APRIL, The Magnificat, April; THE 
HOUSE OF MAY, The Magnificat, May. 

Coleman, Ethel M. To MY MUSE A CONFESSION, The Poet 
and Philosopher, September, 1921. 

Coleman, Patrick. ENSHRINED, The Catholic World, November, 
1921; THE BURNING BUSH, The Catholic World, May. 

Coll, Aloysius. TODAY'S TASK, Mvnsey's Magazine, July. 

Coluin, Padraic. JOHN BUTLER YEATS, The Literary Review of the 
New York Evening Post, February 11; IN A FAR LAND, 
The Dial, November, 1921; THE POET, The New Republic, 
February 1; LAMENT, The New Republic, February 1; 
OLD SOLDIER, The New Republic, February 1; THE BIRD 

272 



OF JESUS, The New Republic, December 14, 1921; THE 

HUMMING BIRD, The New Republic, November 23, 1921; 

IN THE CAROLINA WOODS (To DR. E. C. L. ADAMS), 

The Measure, March, 
onant, Isabel Fiske. O EABTH, Too LOVELY! The American 

Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 
Confucius. EPITAPH TO A WARRIOR (Translated by Florence 

Brinkman), The Freeman, April 5, 
Conkle, W. LULLABY, The Country Bard, Winter. 
Conkling, Grace Hazard. QUICKSILVER, The Measure, October, 

1921; IN THE MAYTIME PEAR ORCHARD, The Bookman, 

May; ARE You AFRAID? The Yale Review, January; 

Detail for Music, The Yale Review, January; FIRST CROCUS, 

Ainslee's, April. 
Conkling, Hilda MESSAGE FOR A SICK FRIEND, T. he Outlook, 

July 5; THE MILKY WAY, The Literary Review of the 

New York Evening Post, November 12, 1921; VOLCANO, 

The Measure, October, 1921. 

Conner, Ruth. Irving. THE PASSING, The Lyric, June. 
Connor, Torrey. TWILIGHT AT DOLORES, The Lyric West, 

February. 
Cooke, Le Baron. FANTASY, Contemporary Verse, January; 

MASQUERADER, Contemporary Verse, January. 
Cooke, Mattie 0. EVENING, The New Pen, April-May. 
Cooley, Winifred Harper. TRIVIAL, The American Poetry, 

Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 
Coombs, Edith I. BRIEF MAGIC, Ainslee's, July 
Cooper, Belle. SONNET: A DESERTED CITY, The Lyric West, 

January; THE QUEST, The Lyric West, July-August* 
Cope, Mrs, Helen Tyler. "OLE VIRGINNY LULLABY," The 

Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921. 

Corbin, Alice. EXCAVATION AT PECOS, Harper's Magazine, May 
Corder, Raymond. THE SKYSCRAPER, The Liberator, October, 

1921. 

Cornelius, Mary Chase. SHIPS THAT PASS, The Poet and Philos- 
opher, September, 1921. 
Corwin, John Howard. A WET SUMMER, The Country Bard, 

Summer-Autumn, 1921; PLOWING UNDER, The^ 'Country 

Bard, Winter; CAPRICE, The Country Bard, Spring. 
Costa, Florio. SICILIAN LOVE, Munsetfs Magazine, May. 
Cowan, Sada. To A BIT OF JADE, The Lyric West, July-August 

1921; THE TIGER, The Lyric West, July-August 1921; 

AN EGYPTIAN LOVE SONG, The Lyric West, February. 
Cowdin, Jasper Barnett. THE HOME NEST, The Lyric West, 

January. 
Cowley, Malcolm. MOUNTAIN FARM, Broom, May; MOUNTAIN 

VALLEY, The Dial, December, 1921; THE TOWN WAS 

STRETCHED, Gargoyle, January-February. 
Cox, Eleanor Rogers* Music, America, October 15, 1921. 
Crafton, Allen. ON SUMMER TTTT.T.S, Contemporary Verse, June. 

273 



Crane, Hart. PRAISE FOR AN URN (Is MEMORIAM E. N ), The 
Did, June; LOCUTIONS DES PIERROTS (Translated from 
the French of Jules Laforgue, The Double Dealer, May; 
PORPHTRO IN AKRON, The Double Dealer, August- 
September, 1921; A PERSUASION, The Measure, October; 
PASTORALE, The Did, October, 1921. 

Crank, Gertrude. GREASEWOOD, The Lyric West, November, 1921. 

Cranmer, Catherine. AFTERWARD, All's Well, February; SISTERS, 
The Midland, A Magazine of the Middle West, August, 



Crapsey, Adelaide. BLUE HYACINTHS, The Did, July. 

Crawford, John. ENDYMION, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
September, 1921; BRACKISH WELL, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, September, 1921; SUMACH, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, September, 1921; NADIR, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, September, 1921. 

Crawford, Nelson Antrim. ON MAIN STREET, The Measure, 
September, 1921; CREED, The Measure, September, 1921; 
THE SWEEPER, The Measure, September, 1921; IMPOTENCE, 
Poetry , A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; SONG, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; BRANCHES, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; COMPANIONSHIP, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; LAKE, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921. 

Cresson,A.W. How FAB AWAY Is APRIL? The Smart Set, April; 
HEIGHTS, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; MESSAGE, Contemporary 
Verse, March; HEPATICA, Contemporary Verse, March. 

Crever, Anna Rozilla. MOUNT HAMILTON, The Lyric West, 
November, 1921. 

Crew, Helen Coale. IRISH SONG, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
January. 

Cross, John. BEAUTY, The Yale Review, April. 

Cross, Margaret Virginia. A YULETTDE GIFT, Contemporary 
Verse, December, 1921; " COUCH o' DREAMS," The 
American Poetry Magazine, February. 

Cummings, E. E. POEM, The Dial, October, 1921; THBEE UNITED 
STATES SONNETS, Broom, May; FIVE POEMS, The Dial, 
January; POEM, The Dial, April. 

Cunningham, Minna Jarrett. INDIAN SUMMER, The American 
Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 

Cunningham, Nora B. THERE'S A WIDE SKY, The Lyric West, 
March; CONTRAST, The Lyric, May; THE CAPTIVE, 
The Lyric West, February; THE COMING JOY, Contemporary 
Verse, February; THE PROPHET, Contemporary Verse, 
February; WILD FOWL, Contemporary Verse, February; 
THE CAPTIVE FANTASY, Contemporary Verse, February; 
BAFFLEMENT, Contemporary Verse, February; THE BLOOM 
OF PAIN, Contemporary Verse, February. 

Curran, Edwin. THE LIONS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
November, 1921. 

274 



Curry, Walter Clyde. IDLE QUESTIONINGS, The American Poetry 

Magazine, Autumn, 1921, 
Curtis, Christine Turner. NOVEMBER IN NEW ENGLAND, The 

Granite Monthly, November, 1921. 

D. f H. HIPPOLTTUS TEMPORIZES, The Bookman, October, 1921; 
SONG, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; AT 
BALL, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; EES- 
PERIDES FRAGMENT xxxvi, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, October, 1921. 

D., Z. G. THE ROAD, The Granite Monthly, October, 1921. 

Dabney, Julia P. STRADIVARIUS, Contemporary Verse, January. 

Daingerfield, Francis Lee. NOVEMBER DAY, The Reviewer, 
November, 1921; AT THE YEAR'S END, The Reviewer, 
December, 1921. 

Dalton, Power. SEQUENCE, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter; 
MY THOUGHTS, The Lyric West, November, 1921; TWI- 
LIGHT, The Lyric West, November, 1921; WORDS, Voices, 
A Journal of Verse, Winter; ZENITH, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Winter; HEART BEAT, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Winter; CHANGELING, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 
1921; TRIUMPH, The Lyric West, June; GRASS DAISIES, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer; QUESTION, Con- 
temporary Verse, May; FLAME, The Lyric, June; THEN, 
TeUing Tales, October, 1921; REQUEST, Snappy Stories, 
November 15, 1921; Go FROM ME, The New York Sun, 
September, 1921; MY OWN, Motion Picture Classic, 
August, 1921; OMNIPOTENCE, Tempo, Autumn, 1921. 

Dalzell, Hugh. LONGING, The Lyric, August, 1921. 

Damon, S. Foster. THE HOLY GILDE, The Dial, February; 
VOYAGE, Broom, June; EPILOGUE, The Bookman, January; 
CONVERSATIONS, Broom, June. 

Dancer, Ruth S. BITTERSWEET, The American Poetry Magazine, 
Autumn, 1921. 

D'Angelo, Pascal. NIGHT SCENE, The Liberator, July; MIDDAY, 
The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post; SONG 
OF LIGHT, The Bookman, May; To A WARRIOR, The 
Liberator, July; To SOME MODERN POETS, The Century 
Magazine, June; WHISPERS, The Literary Review of the 
New York Evening Post, May 20. 

Daniels, Earl. SOLITUDE, The Pagan, August-September, 1921; 
COMPREHENSION, The Liberator, August, 1921; CANDLES 
AT DINNER, Contemporary Verse, February. 

Dargan, Olive Tilford, INT THE BLACK COUNTRY (Staffordshire, 
England), Scribner's Magazine, September, 1921. 

D'Armes, Dominic. BALLAD INVENTORY, The DouUe Dealer, 
February. 

Darnell, Theodore. THE LIVING WORD, The Christian Century, 
March 11. 

d'Autremont, Hattie H. A PORTRAIT OF A CHILD, The Poet and 

275 



Philosopher, January; FOUND Nor LOST, The Poet and 
Philosopher, January. 

David, Jonathan. UPON A TIME, The Fugitive, June; THE QUIET 
HOUR, The Fugitive, June, BETHEL, The Fugitive, June. 

Davidson, Gustav. SANCTUARY, The Double Dealer, August- 
September, 1921; BEFORE DEPARTURE, Voices, A Journal 
of Verse, Summer; COVENANT, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer; ABSOLUTION, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring; 
SO:NNET TO ROBERTA, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring. 

Davies, Harold. GULLS, The^ American Poetry ^ Magazine, June; 
DBS AILBSB! The American Poetry Magazine, June; HIRON- 
DELLE, The American Poetry Magazine, June; WINGS, The 
American Poetry Magazine, June. 

Davies, Maty Carolyn. A LOVE SONG, The Literary Renew of the 
New York Evening Post, February 4; AFTER LOVE, The 
Ltferary Review of the New York Evening Post, February 4; 
OP JOT ALSO, The Writers Monthly, July; To AN OUTGOING 
TENANT, The Liberator, May; PINE SONG, The Bookman, 
February; I HAVE DANCED IN THE HOUSE OF THE SEA, 
Contemporary Verse, June; SENTRY Go, Contemporary- 
Verse, June; THE LAST OP THE COWBOYS, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, June. 

Davies, W. H. THE HAPPY MAN, The New Republic, January 4; 
THE WOODS AND THE BANKS, The New Republic, January 4; 
IMPUDENCE, TELLING FORTUNES, Two WOMEN, THE HOUB 
OF MAGIC, How MANY Burs, Harper's Magazine, March; 
THE HOUR OF MAGIC, Harper's Magazine, March; Two 
WOMEN, Harper's Magazine, March; TELLING FORTUNES, 
Harper' sMagazine, March; IMPUDENCE, Harper's Magazine* 
March; How MANY BUDS, Harper's Magazine, March. 

Davis, Clifford E. How IT HAPPENED, The American Poetry 
Magazine, October, 1921. 

Davis, Julia Johnson. DANTE, The Lyric, August, 1921; MY 
BOOKS, The Lyric, December, 1921; To A LITTLE BOY, 
The Lync, March. 

Davis, Leland. IN OLD TRINITY CHURCHYARD, The Literary 
Review of the New York Evening Post, June 3; A BALLAD 
or JEALOUSY, The Liberator, August, 1921. 

Davisson, Oscar. LAUS STELLARUM, The Bookman, October, 
1921. 

Dawson, Mitchell. CONTRARYWISE, The Wave, January; KNOWISE* 
The Wave, January. 

Day, Cora S. DTT.EMMA, The Granite Monthly, June; NBW 
HOUSES, The Granite Monthly, April. 

Dean, Mary. FORECAST, The Measure, December, 1921; INCOM- 
PREHENSIBLE, The Measure, February. 

Deanner, Geoffrey. A LEGEND OF THE DESERT, Contemporary 
Verse, June. 

de Ford, Miriam Allen. THEMES, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
October, 1921; SHADOW CANTON, Poetry, A Magazine of 

276 



Verse, October, 1921; WILL IT BE LIKE THIS' Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; SANTA CRUZ, The 
Lyric West, January; AT NIGHT, The Lyric West, October, 
1921; WHEATLAND 1921, The Liberator, September, 1921. 

de I'Abrie-Ridbey, Roubaix. STREETSCAPE, The Lyric West, 
January. 

de la Mare, Walter. Nor THAT WAT, Broom, December, 1921; 
COMFORT, Broom, December, 1921; IN THE DOCK, Broom, 
November, 1921; MARTINS: SEPTEMBER, The Literary 
Review of the New York Evening Post, December 17, 1921; 
TITMOUSE, The Literary Review of the New York Evening 
Post, September 24, 1921; THE STRANGER, The Century 
Magazine, December, 1921; SUNK LTONESSE, The Century 
Magazine, October, 1921; A LULLABT, The Lyric, January; 
THE MONOLOGUE, The New Republic, November 23, 1921; 
THE DOUBLE, Harper's Magazine, September, 1921; 
BREAK OF MORNING, The Yale Review, April; THE GIGANTIC 
IMAGE, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer. 

De Laughter, Margaret. TOWARD EVENING, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, August, 1921; REQUIEM, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, August, 1921; PIERROT AND COLUMBINE, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921; INVOCATION, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921. 

De Lubicz-Milosz, O. W. STROPHES (Translated by Ezra Pound), 
The Dial, November, 1921. 

Dendric. To A FETISH, The Fugitive, June. 

Dennen, Grace Atherton. WINDING THE CLOCK, The Lyric West, 
July-August, 1921; THE AWAKENING, The Lyric West, 
July-August, 1921; THE FROST, The Lyric West, January; 
PASTELS, The Lyric West, October, 1921; CHILDHOOD AND 
MEMORIES, The Lyric, March; APRIL MAGIC, The Lyric 
West, April. 

Dennis, Alberta Johnston. SAN MARINO RANCH, The Lyric West, 
July-August. 

Denny, Eleanor M. THE BOOK OP THE WHITE BIRCH, The Lyric 
West, April; THE GEYSER AT CAUSTOGA, The Lyric West, 
June; THE DESTROYER, The Lyric West, June. 

Derby, Jennette. A MULBERRY TREE, The Pagan, August- 
September, 1921. 

Deutsch, Babette. "Now SPEAK OP LOVE No MOBE," The Lyric 
West, January; RETURN, The New Republic, February 8; 
AND AGAIN TO Po CHU-I, The Dial, September, 1921; 
OP RICHES, The New Republic, April 12; THE MASTER, 
The Double Dealer, November, 1921; AT ASAHL The Double 
Dealer, December, 1921; PUNGENCE, The Reviewer, Novem- 
ber, 1921; MEASURE, The Double Deafer, November, 1921; 
FALL FANTASIA, The Literary Review of The New York 
Evening Post, November 19, 1921; PITT, The Literary 
R&oiew of the New York Evening Post, April 8; WOODS AND 
WATERS, The New Republic, November 2, 1921; TAK FOR 

277 



SEDST, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; DARK 
GATES, The Measure, July; CHESS, The Lyric West, March; 
Op BEAUTY AND LOVE, The Measure, February; MARRIAGE, 
The Nation, March 22. 

Dewey, Annette Barrett. YOUR PROSPECTS, The New Pen, 
April-May. 

Dewing, Andrew. KWANNON, The Lyric West, May. 

Dexter, Ernest. SIDNEY LANTER, The Lync West, December, 1921; 
LATE E VESTING AT SUISUN, The Lyric West,. July-August; 
WAVED A BLADE, The Lyric West, September, 1921; EARLY 
MORNING AT SUISUN, The Lyric West, July-August. 

Dickinson, Margaret. LILIES, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921; A Box OF CARNATIONS, The Country Bard, 
Winter, 

Divine, Charles. IN PRAISE OP A HOUSE ON A HTLT, Munsey's 
Magazine, June. 

Dockham, H. B. WE THREE, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921; JUST A FRIEND, The Country Bard, Spring; 
HANG ON, The Country Bard, Winter; His QUESTION, The 
Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921. 

Dodd, Lee Wilson. As THE SENATOR PUTS IT, The Freeman, 
January 25. 

Dodge, Margaret. THE MOTHER, The Christian Century, 
July 6. 

Dolson, Mrs. C. A* M. THE PLAY, The Poet and Philosopher, 
September, 1921. 

Donald, Gene. THE OLD MAN, The Reviewer, February. 

Donohue, Edward F. Htffft HOME, The Magnificat, July; OMNIS- 
CIENCE, The Magnificat, February, 

Donovan, Lois. IN HOSPITAL, The Magnificat, March. 

Dorset, E, THE TURN IN THE ROAD, Harper's Magazine, October, 
1921; THE BUILDERS, Harper's Magazine, November, 1921. 

Dos Passos, John. QTJAIS: JRivE GAUCHE, The Measure, July; 
QUAI DE LA TOURELLE, The Bookman, March; VERMILION 
TOWERS, The Bookman, November, 1921. 

Douthitt, Harold H. MY STAR, The American Poetry Magazine, 
Autumn, 1921. 

Dow, Dorothy. To A MIRROR, The Pagan, December, 1921, 
January; THERE ARE MOUTHS TO Kiss, The Pagan, 
October-November, 1921; IN WINCHESTER, The Pagan, 
August-September, 1921; To ATALANTA, The Bookman, 
May. 

Dowell, Ivan T. WORDS, The Doulle Dealer, March; GRIST, The 
Double Dealer, March. 

Doyle, S, J., William V. GOLGOTHA, The Magnificat, March, 

Dransfield, Jane. MISTS, Contemporary Verse, September, 1921; 
TIDES, Contemporary Verse, September, 1921; MORNING 
SUNSHINE, Contemporary Verse, September, 1921; MATINS, 
Contemporary Verse, September, 1921; THE MOUNTAIN, 
Contemporary Verse, September, 1921; WIND, Contemporary 

278 



Verse, September, 1921; THE YOUNG POPLAR TREE, Con- 
temporary Verse, September, 1921, 

Dresbach, Glenn Ward. RENEWAL, Contemporary Verse, June; 
THE LAST SHIP, Contemporary Verse, June; THE POOL 
NEAR THE SKY, Contemporary Verse, June; THE ENCHANTED 
MESA, The Measure, January; THE PATIO, Contemporary 
Verse, June; SONG, The Bookman, June; WILD GEESE 
OVER THE DESERT, The Double Dealer, January; CON- 
TRADICTION, The Double Dealer, October, 1921; CALM 
NEAR THE DESERT, The Double Dealer, October, 1921. 
MARDI GRAS NIGHT PANAMA, The Double Dealer, July. 
WHITE SAILS AGAINST THE MORNING, The Double Dealer, 
November, 1921; SPIDER WEB SONGS, AWt Well, June; 
SONG IN AUTUMN, AWs Wett, February; A Row OF 
WILLOWS, AW 9 Well, January; CACTUS BLOOM, AWs Well, 
October, 1921; SONG, AWs Wett, May; THE DEFEATED, 
AWs Wett, November, 1921; A PLACE IN THE SUN, AWs 
Well, September, 1921; WITCHES' SONG, AWs Well, August, 
1921; THE OLD SAILOR, The Century Magazine, March; 
THE LIZARD ON THE LEDGE, The Lyric West, July-August; 
THE GAME PANAMA, The Lyric West, July-August; VIC- 
TOR WATSON THE RANCHER, The Lyric West, June; THE 
TRAPPED RABBIT, Contemporary Verse, September, 1921; 
MOUNTAIN PASTURE, The Lyric West, March; MOUNTAIN 
WATER SONG, The Lyric West, November, 1921; THE ROAD, 
The Lyric West, January; APPLEBLOSSOMS NEAR THE 
DESERT, The Measure, May; SONGS OF THE PLAINS, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, January; SONG, The Double Dealer, 
April; YUCCA IN THE MOONLIGHT, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Summer; SONG, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer; 
IN WESTERN MOUNTAINS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
May. 

Drinkwater, John. THE MAID OF NAAMAN'S WIFE, The Measure, 
May; DECISION, McClure** Magazine, April. 

Driscoll, Louise. HONEY, Harper's Magazine, March; KEEP MY 
HAND, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; Two 
OLD MEN, Contemporary Verse, May. 

Driscoll, Marjorie Charles IN BABYLON, The Lyric West, May- 

Drury, John HURRIED, The Lyric West, July-August; EVENING 
IN THE WEST, The Lyric West, July-August. 

Dunn, Rhoda Hero. THE MAGIC TOUCH, Scribners Magazine, 
September, 1921. 

Dunsany, Lord. AN INTERRUPTED SONG OF THE IRIS MARSHES, 
The Double Dealer, December, 1921; OMAR'S SONG,' The 
Double-Dealer, December, 1921; IN NEW HAMPSHIRE, The 
Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, April 22 ; 

DTaughn, Amos M. LOVE, The&American Poetry Magazine, 
June. 

Earle, Betty. PRAYER, The Lyric, June. 

279 



Eason, Mrs. F. D. GLACIAL UNDINE, The Poet and Philosopher, 
September, 1921. 

Eastman, Max. A QUESTION, The Liberator, November, 1921; 
To A DANCING PARTNER, The Liberator , February; THE 
MISSOURI, The Liberator, October, 1921; A TELEGRAM, 
The Liberator, January. 

Eberhart, Nelle Richmond. HER HANDS, Munsey's Magazine, 
May; LOVE REESTCARNATE, Munsey's Magazine, April. 

Eden, Helen Parry. WINTER is COME, The Literary Review of the 
New York Evemng Post, December 24, 1921; "WHEN 
ISRAEL Our OF EGYPT CAME," The Catholic World, July. 

Edward, Zaida Packard. ABSENCE vs. PRESENCE, The American 
Poetry Magazine, June. 

Edwards, Charles. "ABOUT IT AND ABOUT," Contemporary Verse, 
September, 1921; LB JEUNE POETE DU BAUDELAIRE, Con- 
temporary Verse, September, 1921. 

Eddy, Rosamond Westoti. FOG, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Spring; AT EVENING, The Lyric West, November, 1921; 
REGRET, The Lyric West, November, 1921; THT NAME, 
The Lyric West, November, 1921. 

Eddy, Ruth Bassett. DESIRE, The Pagan, December, 1921, 
January; JUDGE ME Nor HARBELY, The American Poetry 
Magazine, Autumn, 1921, 

Edgerton, Gkdys. MY SEPULCHRE, Poetry, A Magasnne of Verse, 
August, 1921; LOVE'S PASSING, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, August, 1921 

Egan, Maurice Francis. To A POET IN THE SUMMER OP LIFE, 
Scribner's Magazine, November, 1921; To JOHN AUGUSTINE 
ZAHM, The Catholic World, April. 

Eggleston, Amy W. DREAMS, The Magnificat, June; LOVE'S 
YOUNG DREAM, The Magnificat, June. 

Eldridge, Paul. THE SCARECROW, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; RE-IN- 
CARNATION, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; GREETINGS FROM 
CONFUCIUS, The Double Dealer, July; THE ROSE, The 
Double Dealer, August-September, 1921; SINCE You LOVE 
BEAUTY, O MY SOUL, The Double Dealer, February; 
WEDDING GIFTS, The Double Dealer, January; ELEPHANT, 
All's Well, January; SNAKE, AWs Well, October, 1921; 
OWL, AWs Wett, October, 1921; FLY, AWs Well, October, 
1921; DAISY SEED, All's Well, October, 1921; LION, AWs 
Well, December, 1921; PEACOCK, AWs Well, December, 
1921; SPIDER, AWs Well, November, 1921; DEER, All's 
Wett, September, 1921; MOUSE, All's Well, September, 
1921; CAT, All's Well, September, 1921; WORM, AWs Wett, 
August, 1921; HOG, AWs Well, August, 1921; ROBIN, AWs 
Wett, August, 1921; To Fo BARGAINS WITH DEITY, The 
Lyric West, June; VAIN SBEKERS, Contemporary Verse, 
August, 1921; RUINS, The Double Dealer, April; POTIPHAH'S 
Wane, The Double Dealer, May; SWAN, The Double Dealer, 
March; FROG, The Double Dealer, March; GOAT, The 

280 



Double Dealer, March; FLEA, The Double Dealer, March; 

GOOSE, The Double Dealer, March; GAOTER, The Double 

Dealer, March. 

Eliot, Ruth F. AT THE PLAT, Munsey's Magazine, May. 
Ellerbe, Cecilia. MAKERS OP LIFE, The American Poetry Magazine, 

Autumn, 1921. 
Elliot, William Foster Aus IMMORTALIS, The Lyric West, 

November, 1921; To ELEANOR FROM THE CITY, The Lyric 

West, February; DEFEAT, The Lync West, February. 
Elliott, Ellen Coit. PRIMA DONNA OF THE NEGRO JAZZ ORCHESTRA, 

The Lyric West, April. 
EUiston, George. FULFILLMENT, The American Poetry Magazine, 

February. 
Ellsworth, Raymond. SONGS OF A LOVER, The American Poetry 

Magazine, April, 

Elsmie, Dorine. A HAPPY POET, The Liberator, April. 
Embry, Jacqueline. UNREGENERATE, The Nation, July 5. 
Evans, Abbie Huston. WILD APPLES, The Measure, March; 

SEA FOG, The Measure, July; THE END OF THE WORLD, 

The Measure, July; JUNIPER, The Measure, July; THE 

TAMARACK TREE, The Measure, July. 
Evans, Lucile. O LOVE THAT is BORN OF THE MOON AND A 

FLOWER, The Lyric West, May. 
Everett, Laura Bell. FAITH, The Christian Century, March 2. 

F., E. H. A SILVER JUBILEE, The Catholic World, February. 

Fairfield, Wynne. CLASS POEM, 1921, Lincoln Lore, November, 
1921. 

Falkner, William* PORTRAIT, The Double Dealer, June. 

Farkasch, Hazel. SEPTEMBER NIGHTS, The Lyric West, September, 
1921. 

Farrington, Harry Webb. THE EMPTY CUP, Boston Evening 
Transcript, December 31, 1921. 

Farwell, Gertrude Brice. LIBERATED, The Lyric West, July- 
August; SOUL OF EABTH, The Lyric West, July-August, 

Faunce, Frances Avery, AT SUNRISE, The Catholic World, June. 

Fawcett, James Waldo. JOSEPH PLUNKETT (May 4, 1916), 
The Liberator, January; MACABRE, Much Ado, December 
20, 1921; NOCTURNE, Unity, August 4, 1921; AFTERWARD, 
Unity, December 29, 1921; VAGABONDS, Unity, August 18, 
1921. 

Feathertop, Henry, IN SECRET VALLEY, The Fugitive, June; 
CUL-DE-SAC, The Fugitive, June; FAREWELL TO ANACTORIA 
(SAPPHO), The Fugitive, June; A SCHOLAR TO His LADY 
(To E. H.), The Fugitive, June; CALL ON, DEEP VOICE, 
The Fugitive, June. 

Feibleman, James. ^RESIGNATION, The Double Dealer, May; 
THE LAST NIGHT, The Double Dealer, February. 

Feldman, Jesse Hugo. MADISON, The American Poetry Magazine, 
April; MOBITURI AGONISTL, The Doubk Dealer, March, 

281 



Fellows, Albion N. and T. Y. Leo. SIGHS O'ER A BATTLEFIELD 
(Author unknown), The Measure, June. 

Felshin, Jo. CREED, Contemporary Verse, September, 1921. 

Fennell, Charles. THE VAMPIBE CITY, Tempo, Autumn, 1921. 

Ferl, Emily. REPLY TO MELANCHOLY, The "Lyric West, October, 
1921. 

Ferril, Thomas Horosby. CHICAGO RIVER, The Measure, 
February. 

Field, Ben. THE PASSING OF THE LONG WHABP AT PORT Los 
ANGELES, The Lyric West, March; OIL, The Lyric West, 
October, 1921. 

Field, Wright. To THE UNKNOWN, The American Legion Weekly, 
November 4, 1921; To A SKULL, The Lyric West, October, 
1921; DREAMS, The Lyric West, December, 1921; THE 
VISION, The Lyric West, December, 1921, HIGH NOON 
IN THE FOREST, The Poet and Philosopher, September, 
1921; FLOWER-O'-THE~WIND, The Lyric West, February 

Fischer, Raymond P. A YEAR, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May, 

Fisher, Caroline. MY TREE, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn. 
1921; ONE SWIMMER, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 
1921; THE FOREST CALL, The Country Bard 9 Summer- 
Autumn, 1921. 

Fisher, Mahlon Leonard. How WOULD IT BE? Ainslee's, 
January. 

Fitch, Anita. THE WANDERER'S SOUL, McClure's Magazine, 
July; THE MIDNIGHT MASS, McGlure's Magazine, May; 
THE NEWCOMER, McClurtfs Magazine, May; GRACE 
BEFORE MEAT, McClure's Magazine, May; 0, APRIL! 
McClure's Magazine, April. 

Fitzbucke, E. G. INDIAN SUMMER, The Lyric West, October, 1921. 

Fletcher, John Gould. NAPOLEON, The Dial, April; To A STARVING 
MAN, Broom, April. 

Fletcher, Louisa, DEBUSSY, Contemporary Verse, October, 191 

Flexner, Hortense. ABYSS, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 
1921; EFFORT, The Double Dealer, June; HOLIDAY CROWD, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March; WINGED VICTORY, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March; POETS, Voices, A 
Journal of Verse, Summer; FRAGMENTS, The Lyric, March; 
To CINDRELLA AT MIDNIGHT, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Autumn, 1921; PROPHECY, The Lyric West, February. 

Flexner, James. CITY NIGHTS, Lincoln Lore, April. 

Flynn, Clarence E. THE MAKING OF HEAVEN, The Christian 
Century, June 15. 

Folgore, Luciano. NUDE (Translated by Alfred Kreymborg), 
Broom, December, 1921. 

FolEard, Hugo. To ONE NAMED RUE, The Lyric West, May 

Forrest, Mark. BALLADE OF BAUBLES GAY, The American Poetry 
Magazine, April. 

Forater, George F. AN INDIAN LOVER SINGS, The Lyric West, 
February. 



Forsyth, Alice Whitecraft. SEPTEMBER DUSK IN THE ARROYO, 
The Lyric West, September, 1921 

Fort, Paul. ETERNITY (Translated by John Strong Newberry), 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, September, 1921; THE 
LITTLE SILENT STREET (Translated by John Strong 
Newberry), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, September, 
1921; THE MIRACULOUS CATCH (Translated by John 
Strong Xewberry), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
September, 1921; THE LAMENT OF THE SOLDIERS (Trans- 
lated by John Strong Newberry), Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, September, 1921; THE RETURN (Translated by 
John Strong Newberry), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
September, 1921; Louis ELEVENTH, CURIOUS MAN 
(Translated by John Strong Newberry), Poetry, A 
Magasdne of Verse, September, 1921. 

Fortesque, Thalia, fA NIGHT, Lincoln Lore, December, 1921. 

Fosher, Mahlon Leonard. THE SOUL STILLED, The Lyric, January. 

Foss, C. H. WOMEN,| The Poet and Philosopher, January. 

Foster, Jeanne Robert. JOHN BUTLER YEATS, New York Times* 
February 6. 

Fowler, J. L. (Mrs), A SUMMER SCENE, The Country Bard, 
Summer Autiimn, 1921. 

Francis, Martin. THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER, The Catholic World, 
January. 

Frasier, Scottie McKenzie. THE CALL TO THE WRITER, The 
American Poetry Magazine, February; THE PEACOCK* 
The American Poetry Magazine, June; I SHALL WAIT, 
The American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; OLD 
PERFUME, The Nomad, Spring, 1922. 

Frazee-Bower, Helen. OH IF THE SPRING SHOULD COME! Voices f 
A Journal of Verse Spring; BOYS, Unity \ June 1; NIGHT 
AND THE SEA, The Lyric West, December, 1921; 
AGE, The Freeman, July 12; ULTIMATE, The Lyric West, 
December, 1921; A SONG OP DILIGENCE, Contemporary 
Verse, May; ROADS, The Liberator, August, 1921; THE 
NEWSBOY, The Liberator, November, 1921; THE PRIMA 
DONNA, The Liberator, August, 1921; SEA-GULLS, The 
Liberator, August, 1921; TREASON, The Granite Monthly, 
May; HOUSEWIFE'S LAMENT, AJEs Well, March; NIGHT 
SILENCE, The Lyric West, February; AUTUMN, The 
American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; MY GIFTS, 
Harper's Magazine, June; THREE SISTERS, Voices^ A 
Journal of Verse, Spring; THESE THINGS WILL LIVE, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring. 

Freeburg, Victor Oscar. THE RUBIES OF CLEOPATRA, The Double 
Dealer, July. 

Freed, M. Elizabeth. QUERIES, The Poet and Philosopher, 
January. 

Freeman, Joseph. TB^S DANCERS, The Liberator, April; DB 
PROFUNDIS, The Liberator, April; FANTASIA, The Liberator* 

283 



April; REVOLUTIONARY PRELUDE, The Liberator, April; 
PASTORAL, The Liberator, April; LOVE AT DAWN, ffo 
Liberator, April; DON GIOVANNI, 2%0 Liberator, January; 
NOCTURNE, The Liberator, July; LOVE, The Liberator, 
February; A SONNET FOR POETS, The Liberator, December, 
1921; SONGS FOR A LADY, The Liberator, September, 1921; 
SONXET, The Nation, October 12, 1951; REGRESSION, 
The Bookman, October, 1921. 

Freeman, Mary E. WHkins. THE VASE, Contemporary Verse, 
July; THE PRISONER, Contemporary Verse, July. 

Freeman, Jr., Mason A. EPIGRAMS, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, August, 1921; THE WAY, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, August, 1921; THE TRIPLE SHROTJD, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, August, 1921; FROM THE VEDIC, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, August 1921; ONCE MORE, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921. 

Freeman, Robert. WHY? The Christian Century, March. 16. 

French, Louise. SLEEP (Translated from the Suvse of Statius), 
The University of California Chronicle, July. 

Frippe, Etholle lone. SHIPS, The American Poetry ^ Magazine, 
February; SEPTEMBER STTNSHINE, The American Poetry 
Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 

Frost, Robert. PAUL'S WIPE, The Century Magazine, November, 
1921, MAPLE, The Yale Review, October, 1921; THE WITCH 
OP Coos, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, January. 

Frye, Nellie Dodge, THE WINDING ROAD, The Granite Monthly, 
May; REBIRTH, The Granite Monthly, March. 

Fujita, Jun. POEM, The Wave, June. 

Fujiwara (1736-1811). ATTTUMN REFLECTIONS (Translated from 
the Japanese by Madan YuMo Ozaki), The Freeman, 
November 9, 1921. 

Gaillard, Peyre, JUNE SONG, The American Poetry MagasAne, 
June. 

Galahad, Joseph Andrew. Sic PASSIM, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, October, 1921; ARGOSY, Contemporary Verse, August, 
1921; A MOOD, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June; EASTER, 
Contemporary Verse, April; ISOLDE, The Lyric West, 
February; INTER Nos, The American Poetry Magazine, 
February; SONNET TO A LITTLE SHAVER (To Ollie), The 
American Poetry Magazine, February; LONG WHITE ROADS, 
The Lyric West, December, 1921; No ROSES, The Lyric 
West, December, 1921; To THE STAR OP SONG, The Lyric 
West, May; CHALLENGE, The Step Ladder, June; TRIUMPH, 
The Bookman, December, 1921; A POET'S CREED, Con- 
temporary Verse, July; PAT TO THE ORDER OP , 

Contemporary Verse, July; EPISODE, Contemporary Verse, 
July; MILE Two, Contemporary Verse, January, 
le, Zona. HALF THOUGHT, The Lyric West, December, 1921; 
BELOVED, jx is DAYBREAK ON THE HILLS, The Lyric West, 

284 



December, 1921; HERE is THE LOVE (Tribute to Edwin 
Markham on his Seventieth Birthday), The Step Ladder, 
June; NORTH STAR (News Notes of Portage, Wisconsin), 
The Bookman, September, 1921; KJLBUBX ROAD (News 
Notes of Portage, Wisconsin), The Bookman, October, 1921; 
THE VIOLIN (News Notes of Portage, Wisconsin), The 
Bookman, August, 1921; COME ON! The American Poetry 
Magazine, April. 

GaUagher, Marie SUICIDE, The Nomad, Spring, 1922; TRISTEZZA, 
The Pagan, October-November, 1921; SPECIES HOMO, 
The Pagan, October-November, 1921; WILL TO LIVE, 
The Pagan, August-September, 1921; SHADOW TREE, 
The Pagan, August-September, 1921. 

Gallatin, Neal. ASTRAL STONES, The Lync West, February; MY 
TALISMAN, Tempo, Autumn, 1921 

Gallivant, Robin. VOICE OF THE DUST, The Fugitive, June; THE 
VALLEY OF THE DRAGON, The Fugitive, June; THE TIGER 
WOMAN, The Fugitive, June; THE HOUSE OP THE SUN, 
The Fugitive, June; TEACH ME, The Fugitive, June. 

Gard, Wayne. DREAMER TO DREAMER (To John Kearns), The 
" e$ American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 

Garman, A. D. UNE NUIT, The Pagan, December, 1921, January. 

Garnett, Louise Ayres. THE LATCHSTRING, Contemporary Verse* 
December, 1921; JOHN BURROUGHS, Contemporary Verse, 
December, 1921; TREE-DREAMS, Contemporary Verse, 
December, 1921; MOONS, Contemporary Verse, December, 
1921; GWINE UP TER HEAB'N, The Outlook, April 12; 
FISHIN', The Outlook, February 8; THE SISTERS, The 
Outlook, August 81, 1921; REMEMBRANCE, Contemporary 
Verse, December, 1921; NIGHT-SONG, Contemporary Verse, 
June, THREE-SCORE-AND-TEN, AlTs Well, April; SLOW EN 
EASY, The Outlook, April 12; AIN'T GOT TIME TER TARRY, 
Contemporary Verse, June; EV*YWHARS DAT ANYBODY 
KNOWS, The Ouilook, April 12; HE PLOUGHS THE FIELDS 
(Tribute to Edwin Markham on his Seventieth Birthday), 
The Step Ladder, June; THE MOTHER, Edict, August, 1921; 
THE DOOR, The Ouilook, March 15. 

Garrison, Theodosia, PROPHETS, The Nomad, Summer, 1922; 
THE PENITENT, The Lyric, August, 1921; A HOST IN 
GAUJLEE, The Lyric, March; NEW YEAR'S EVE, Every- 
body's, January; SEVENTY AND TWENTY (Tribute to Edwin 
Markham on his Seventieth Birthday), The Step Ladder, 
June. 

Gary, Louise M. FIELD SONG, The Reviewer, June. 

Gates, Allene. THE VALEDICTORIAN, The Lyric West, June. 

Gavin, John H. IMMORTALTXY, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May; 
CREEDS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May. 

Geddes, Virgil. SPARROWS, The Pagan, August-September, 1921; 
FAITH, The Pagan, August-September, 1921; To A CHINESE 
LAUNDRYMAN, The Pagan, October-November, 1921; 

285 



To A FOUNTAIN, The Pagan, December, 1921, January; 
WINDS, The Lyric West, January; OLD WOMAN, The 
Nomad, Summer, 1922; PAUL GAUGUIN TO His WIFE, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921; VALLEY OP 
SLEW GKASS, The Lyric West, March. 

Gershon, Gladys. CLIMAX, The Liberator, August, 1921; INTER- 
VAL, The Liberator, August, 1921. 
Gessler, Clifford Franklin. THE VILLAGER SINGS, The Survey 

Graphic, May. 
Gessler, Gertrude Enid. TRIOLET, The American Poetry Magazine, 

April. 

Gidlow, Elsa. DECLARATION, The Liberator, August, 1921; THE 
POET, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring; BEFORE SLEEP, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921. 
Gibson, Lydia. THE BEGGAR, The Measure, December, 1921; 
NOT WITH BRIGHT POPPIES, The Measure, December, 1921 ; 
PLUNDER, The Measure, December, 1921; WISDOM, The 
Liberator, July; TAHITIAN HOLIDAY, The Liberator, May; 
POEMS, The Liberator, February; TREES IN WINTER, The 
Liberator, February; SONNET, The Liberator, March; 
NEVER ENSLAVED, The Liberator, April; THE GOLDEN 
CHILDREN, The Liberator, October, 1921. 
Gifford, Franklin Kent. EXPLOITATION, The Liberator, October, 

1921, 

Gilbert, Ellen Frances. QUESTION, The Outlook, March 8. 
Gilbert, Morris. ABOUT TIME, The Liberator, August, 1921; 

PREDICTION, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, July. 
Gilchrist, Helen Ives. HOMESTEADERS, Scribner's Magazine, 

December, 1921. 

Gilchrist, Mane Emilie. DAWN WIND, The Lyric West, April; 
To THE BURROWING KIND, The Lyric West, April; OLD 
WINDOW PANES, The Measure, March; A STOLEN M^ARCH, 
The Measure, March. 

Gilmore, Louis. NOCTURNE, The Double Dealer, April; INTER- 
MEZZO, The Wave, February; OCCIDENTALS, The Wave, 
February; AGATHA, The Double Dealer, October, 1921; 
IN THE PATIO, The Double Dealer, February. 
Giltinan, Caroline. TRANSFORMED, The Boston Transcript; 
THE BUILDER, The Boston Transcript; SPRING, The Lyric, 
May; DIBS DOMINICAE PASSIONIS, Alexandria Gazette, 
April 14. 
Ginsberg, Louis. FOR SALE, Newark News, December 9, 1921; 

To FIRE, Pearson's Magazine, January. 
Gitlow, Ben. STONE, The Liberator, March. 
Glaenzer, Richard Butler. THE GUEST, The Lyric, June. 
Going, Charles Buxton. MAGIC OF THE MOON, Munsetfs Maga- 
zine, April. 

Gold, Michael END OF THE WEEK, The Liberator, April. 
Goldbeck, Cecil Hamilton. BELEASE, The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921. 

286 



Golding, Louis. FULL OF LAUGHTER, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, July. 

Goll, Ralph E. KOKOMO ARRAIGNED, The Liberator, June. 

Goodfellow, Peter. SADIE, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 
1921. 

Goodrich, Constance. OF THIS LAST NIGHT, The Measure, 
December, 1921. 

Goodman, Blanche. THRENODY, The Freeman, May 3. 

Goodman, Charles. AUTUMN RAIN, The Lyric West, September, 
1921; FORGET-ME-NOTS, The Lyric West, September, 1921. 

Gordon, Armistead G. "WE RETURN No MORE" (Greek Chorus), 
The Lyric, October, 1921. 

Gorman, Herbert S. THE LAST FERE, The Outlook, July 12. 

Gould, Wallace. MATIN, The Dial, May; THE GAME, The Dial, 
May; Two GREEK HEADS, The Dial, March 

Graham, Gladys Wilmot. CANDLES, The Lyric West, July- 
August. 

Granuis, Anita. A FILLET OF THORN, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, November, 1921. 

Graves, Robert. THE PHILOSOPHERS, Harper's Magazine, May; 
THE RED RIBBON DREAM, The New Republic, March 8; 
CHRISTMAS EVE, The New Republic, December 18, 1921. 

Gray, Eunice T. A COLLEGE DANCE, The Lync West, June; THE 
AGITATOR, The Lyric West, December, 1921. 

Gray, Philip. JUNE SCHERZO, The Lyric West, June. 

Graydon, Alice A. JUNE, The Magnificat, June. 

Grebanier, Bernard D. MOVEMENT FROM A TSCH ivreowsgY 
SYMPHONY, The Pagan, December, 1921, January; A 
CHOPIN ETUDE, The Pagan, December, 1921, January. 

Gregory, Odin. THE FEAST, All's Well, March; THE WILDING, 
AWs Well, February; FEMINA, AWs Well, April; "1917," 
All's Well, January; THE APOSTLE, All's Wett, December, 
1921; SPINDRIFT, AWs Well, November, 1921. 

Green, Emma. IT MAY BE THAT SOME ONE OVER THE WAY, 
The Living Church, April 22; TIME TO THIN YOUR TROUBLES 
Our, Guide, April; LATE SPRING IN THE SOUTH, Guide, 
April; A SNOW STORM NEAR LAKB MICHIGAN, The 
American Poetry Magazine, April; THEY ARE BURNING 
OVER OLD MEADOW-LANDS, The American Poetry Maga- 
zine, April. 

Greenhood, David. A PSALM FOR CATHLEEN Ni HOOLEEEAN, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May; LIBERTY, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, May; LANDSCAPE The\ Measure, 
January. 

Griffith, William. ADREPT, AWs Well, February; VIEW-HALLOO, 
AWs Well, October, 1921; VISTA, AWs Well, December, 
1921; SONNET, AWs Well, February; NOVITIATE, The 
Lyric, November, 1921; TRAIN LOST, The Double Dealer, 
August-September, 1921; THE GARRET OF DREAMS, The 
Double Dealer, February. 

287 



Griswold, Isabel Winslow. CHICAGO'S MUNICIPAL PEER, Edict, 

August, 1921. 

Grokowsky, David. EMPTINESS, The Lyric West, November, 1921. 
Guthrie, Ramon. LA PERLE DE I/EGEE, Paris Review, January. 

H., M. D RELIEF, The Pagan, August-September, 1921; 
PROMISE, The Pagan, August-September, 1921. 

Haardt, Sara. WHITE VIOLETS, The Bookman, January. 

Hackett, Catherine Isabel. I WOULD Nor GROW OLD, Scribner's 
Magazine, May. 

Hadley, Florence Jones. JTTST BE GLAD, The Magnijicat, July; 
BUILDING A HOME, The Magnificat, June; THE DAT is 
DONE, The Magnificat, May; MAKE-BELIEVES, The 
Magnificat, April; WE Go THIS WAY Bur ONCE, The 
Magnificat, March; TOMORROW, The Magnificat, February; 
GOD'S^ PEACE, The Magnificat, July; TRUSTING, The 
Magnificat, July; BUBBLES, The Magnificat, July. 

Hagedorn, Hermann. THE BAD WINTER, The Outlook, September 
7, 1921; THE VISIONARY, The Outlook, September 7, 1921; 
THE QUARREL, The Outlook, September 7, 1921; THE 
BAD LANDS, The Outlook, September 7, 1921; THE TEXAS 
COWBOY, The Outlook, September 7, 1921; THE Ex- 
COWPUNCHER, The Outlook, September 7, 1921; THE 
"BUSTED" TOWN, The Outlook, September 7, 1921; 
THE ARGONAUTS, The Outlook, September 7, 1921; DAWN, 
The Outlook, September 7, 1921; DIGBY, The Outlook, 
December 14, 1921; THE CHICKEN, The New Republic, 
November 9, 1921. 

Hager,' Alice Rogers. CYCLAMEN (HACHIOJO), The Lyric West, 
October, 1921; A SHRINE IN UENO, The Lyric West. 
October, 1921; UME No EJ (THE PLUM TREE), The Lyric 
West, October, 1921; SHADOWS, The Lyric West, October, 
1921. 

HaigWJosuf. PELICANS, The Pagan, December, 1921, January. 

Hall, Amanda Benjamin. GROWTH, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Spring; DOLCE FAR NEBNTE, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Spring; "Go TELL THE BAKER SELLING BUNS," Voices, 
A Journal of Verse, Whiter; A DANCER DIES, Voices, 
A Journal of Verse, Whiter; "To BE SUNG WITH SIM- 
PLICITY," The Smart Set, April, GROWTH, Contemporary 
Verse, May; JOE TINKER, Contemporary Verse, October, 
1921; JOHNNY DICK, The Literary Review, New York 
Evening Post, April 29; THE BUDS HAVE BLOSSOMED, 
Contemporary Verse, May. 

Hall/Bolton. DOUBT, All's Well, September, 1921. 

HaU, A Carolyn. YOUNG SIMON PETER, The Measure, February; 
HUSBANDRY, The Measure, September, 1921. 

Hall Fred. MY SHIP AND I, Lincoln Lore, February. 

Hall,fcHazel. YOUR AUDIENCE, The Measure, February; NEW 
SPRING, The Lyric, June; ECHOES OF HER, The Lyric West, 

288 



June; A LATE PASSBB, The Lyric West; ON THE STREET, 
The Lyric West, June; HE RAN PAST, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Summer; AND EITHER WAT, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Summer; WHITE BIRCHES, The Bookman, November, 
1921; PASSERS THE PATRICIAN, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Summer; A MAX GOES BY, The New Republic, 
November 9, 1921 ; MATURITY, The New Republic, March 8; 
HE WALKS WITH His CHIN IN THE AIR, The New Republic, 
March 29; INCIDENTAL, The New Republic, June 21; 
DISPUTED TREAD, The Nation, January 25; WALKERS AT 
DUSK, The Step Ladder, March; A PASSER, The New 
Republic, March 8; WALKING, Contemporary Verse, May; 
MY SONG THAT WAS A SWORD, The Granite Monthly, 
February; CROWDS (Duplicated in the Magazine) The 
Liberator, February; AT THE CORNER, The Liberator, 
March; CROWDS, The Liberator, December, 1921; BRACKEN, 
The Reviewer, July. 

Hall, R. Merton. A REQUIEM, Munsey's Magazine, February. 

Haller, MaUevifle. OLD MR. So-AND-So, The Nation, May 17. 

Hamilton, Ann. PETER, The Nation, February 15; SUSIE, The 
Nation, December 7, 1921; SONNET, The Nation, November 
30, 1921; LONELINESS, The Nation, July 5; PAUSE, Th$ 
Nation, April 5. 

Hamilton, Davis Osborne. BEAUTY m FOURTH STREET, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921; TE DEUM, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921; THE IDIOT, Poetry, 
A Magassine of Verse, August, 1921; OUR TIME, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921; THE CIRCLE, The 
Measure, December, 1921; ENTREATY, The Measure, 
December, 1921. 

Hammond, Eleanor. PHANTOMS, The Lyric West, November, 
1921; SKY SCAPE, The Lyric West, November, 1921; 
AN OLD ITALIAN ARIA, The Lyric West, September, 1921; 
THE OPAL, Contemporary Verse, February; SOMETIMES, 
Contemporary Verse, February; THE BOND, Contemporary 
Verse, February. 

Hammond, Josephine. THE PABAPET, The Personalist, January. 

Hancock, La Touche. So WOULD You. The American Poetry 
Magazine, Autumn 3921; MOODS AND SEASONS, Leslies 9 
Illustrated Weekly, November 5, 1921. 

Hansen, Mabel Evelyn. YOUR NEIGHBOR'S HEART. The American 
Poetry Magassine, April. 

Haxdin, Charlotte. THE GORDLAN KNOT, The Liberator, August, 
1921; RIDERS IN THE DUST, The Double Dealer, August- 
September, 1921. 

Harding, Maude Burbank. Low TIDE, Contemporary Verse, 
August, 1921. 

Hardy, Thomas. THE Two HOUSES, The Dial, August, 1921; 
AN ANCIENT TO ANCIENTS, The Century Magazine* May; 
THE HAUNTING FINGERS (A fantasy in a Museum of 

289 



Musical Instruments), The New Republic, December 21 
1921. 

Harper, Isabel Westcott. "To EVERY MAN A PENNY," Scribner's 
Magazine, February. 

Harris, Florence. SILENCE, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter. 

Harris, Hazel Harper. CARUSO, The American Poetry Magazine, 
February 

Harrison, Freeman. GOLDEN MYSTERY, Ainslee's, June. 

Haruko Saigo. No RESERVATION (Translated from the Japanese 
by Madam Yukio OzaM), The Freeman, December 7, 1921; 
A SPLENDID SIN (Translated from the Japanese by Madam 
Yukio Ozaki), The Freeman, December 7, 1921. 

Harwood, Ruth. ALWAYS AND ALWAYS, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse; SUPREMACY, The Lyric West, December, 1921; 
MAKING LITTLE CLOTHES, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
March; THE SHOE FACTORY, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
March. 

Haste, Gwendolen. THE DRYLANDER'S DAUGHTER, The Lyric 
West, March; HOLLYHOCKS, The Lyric West, March; THE 
STOIC, The Lyric West, October, 1921; THE GUARDIANS, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; AILEEN, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, February; PORTRAIT, The Pagan, 
August-September, 1921; HORIZONS, The Lyric West, 
March. 

Hawkins, Mrs. E. N. AEROPLANE, The Poet and Philosopher* 
September, 1921. 

Hawthorne, Hildegarde. THE YEARS, LIKE TORCHES, FLARE, 
AND FADE (Tribute to Edwin Markham on his Seventieth 
Birthday), The Step Ladder, June. 

Hayes, William Edward. THE FALL, The American Poetry 
Magazine, October, 1921. 

Hayne, William Hamilton. THE OLD ARM CHAIR, Munsey 9 s- 
Magazine, April; THE GIANT TREE, McClure's Magazine, 
March; TEDS GREAT GAME, Munsey's Magazine, January; 
MY LADY'S EYES, Munsey's Magazine, June. 

Haynes, Carol. AUNT SELINA, Harper's Magazine, March; 
LOVE SONG FROM THE JAPANESE, Harper's Magazine, 
July; ON THE TRAIN, Harper's Magazine, January. 

Hazeltine, Burton. POEM, The Step Ladder, November, 1921, 

Heartt-Dryfus, Estelle. ACACIA BRANCHES, The Lyric West, 
September, 1921; GRATITUDE, The Lyric West, September, 
1921. 

Heath, W. M. THE VOICE, The Lyric West, July-August, 1921; 
LIFE, The Lyric West, November, 1921. 

Heine, Heinrich. MOON-MAGIC (Translated by Leonard Doughty) ,. 
The Texas Review, April; To A CHILD (Translated by 
Leonard Doughty), The Texas Review, April; THE LYRE 
(Translated by Leonard Doughty), The Texas Review, 
April; To ONE UNBORN (Translated by Leonard Doughty) , 
The Texas Review, April; THE HOME COMING (Translated 

290 



by Leonard Doughty), The Texas Review, April, THE 
MATTRESS-GRAVE (Translated by Leonard Doughty;, 
The Texas Review, April; COMRADESHIP (Translated by 
Leonard Doughty), The Texas Review, April; THE SHEP- 
HERD LAD (Translated by Leonard Doughty), The Texas 
Review, April; POET LAUREATE (Translated by Leonard 
Doughty), The Texas Review, April; LoEEUSi(Traiisktedby 
Leonard Doughty), The Texas Review, April; ICH LIEBE SEE 
(Translated by Leonard Doughty), The Texas Review, 
April; QUEEN MART (Translated by Leonard Doughty), 
The Texas Review, April; SENTIMENTALITY (Translated 
by Leonard Doughty), The Texas Review, April; HOHNS 
OF EFLAND (Translated by Leonard Doughty), The 
Texas Review, April; THE MESSAGE (Translated by 
Leonard Doughty), The Texas Review, April; PALM 
AND PINE (Translated by Leonard Doughty), The Texas 
Review, April; THE SUICIDE'S GRATE (Translated by 
Leonard Doughty), The Texas Review, April; HE AND 
SHE (Translated by Leonard Doughty), The Texas Review, 
April; ONCE ON A TIME (Translated by Leonard Doughty), 
The Texas Review, April. 

Heller, Helen West FIRST AND LAST, The American Poetry 
Magazine, Autumn, 1921; TOMORROWS, The Midland,, 
A Magazine of the Middle West, August, 1921; BEES, 
The Measure, September, 1921; INHIBITION, The Midland,, 
A Magazine of the Middle West, August, 1921 ; WEDNESDAY 
WEEK, The Midland, A Magazine of the Middle West, 
August, 1921; THE Two OF THEM DON'T MAKE A FARMER, 
The Pagan, December, 1921, January; WORDS, The 
Pagan, October-November, 1921. 

Heller, Samuel. FROM OFFENBACH, The American Poetry 
Magazine, June. 

Helman, Rebecca. THE COMFORTER, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921; WHEN MOTHER SINGS, The Country Bard, 
Whiter; KYBIELLE, The Country Bard, Spring; AT DAWN, 
The Country Bard, Summer; ONE LIBRARY, The Step 
Ladder, July. 

Hemingway, Ernest M. ULTIMATELY, The Double Dealer, June. 

Henderson, Anne. THE HOPE-CHEST, The Nation, March 22. 

Henderson, DanieL FRIENDSHIP, Poetry, A Magazine of Vene* 
June; SNOW FANTASY, The Bookman, March; SNOW 
TRAILS, The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, 
January 28. 

Henderson, Jessie. HEIGH-HO, ROMANCE, Aindeefs, March; 
WHEN BROADWAY WAS A LITTLE LANE, Ainslet?*, 
February. 

Henderson, Rose. TREES, The Independent, May 13; IN THE 
PARK, The Lyric West, June. 

Henry, Edna G. FINIS, The American Poetry Magazine, June; 
GONE, The American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; 

291 



ONE DAT, Lincoln Lore, December, 1921; TREES WALKING, 
The Lyric West, March. 

Hepburn, E. MacAIister. THE DANCER, The Lyric West, 
May, 

Herendeen, Anne. SHOP-TALK, The Liberator, February; THE 
STRANGER, The Liberator, February; THEY , The 
Liberator, December, 1921; MADAME LA GUERRE, The 
Liberator, September, 1921; COMRADE LEVY, The Liberator, 
September, 1921; REVOLUTION, The Liberator, September, 
1921; A WIPE, The Liberator, October, 1921. 

Herron, Edna. PATIENCE, The Poet and Philosopher, January. 

Hess, Maud Hogue. THE CABIN; The Lyric West, May. 

Heyward, Du Bose. MATINS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April; 
EDGAR ALLEN POE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April; 
DUSK, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse; THE MOUNTAIN 
GRAVEYARD, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921; 
THE MOUNTAIN GIRL, Contemporary Verse, April; 
CHARLESTON POEMS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April; 
THE AUTUMN, Everybody's, November, 1921. 

Heyward, Janie Screven. AUTUMN LEAVES, The Step Ladder, 
June; STAR-DEEAMS, The Step Ladder, May; AT BED-TIME, 
The Step Ladder, May; To ONE BELOVED, The Step Ladder, 
May. 

Hibbel, Bertha C. You, The Pagan, October-November, 1921. 

Hickey, Agnes M. LITTLE LEAVES, The New York Sun, November 
4, 1921; FAIRY FLAG PAINTERS, The New York Sun 
October 19, 1921; ALONE, The Paraclete, May. 

Hickey, Emily. BEHOLD YOUR KING, The Catholic World, April. 

Higgins, J. Lee. OLD CHANNELS AND WHABVES, The Pagan, 
October-November, 1921. 

Hill, Esther Clark. THE FOG, The Lyric West, April, McClure't 
Magazine, July. 

Hill, Florence H. COMPENSATION, The Magnificat, July. 

Hill, Frank Ernest. SNOW WATER, The New Republic, January 18; 
HIGH MOUNTAINS, The Measure, October, 1921; CLOUDS, 
The Measure, June. 

Hillman, Carolyn. WILD GEESE, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer. 

Hillnmn, Gordon Malherbe. GYPSIES, Munsetfs Magazine, 
November, 1921; POETS, The Smart Set, October, 1921; 
GARLANDS, ^ Shadowland, August, 1921; SEA ROADS, 
The Christian Science Monitor, January 10; AFRICAN 
HARBOR, Shadowland, May; Rio DE JANEIRO, The Christian 
Science Monitor, November 12; THE FIRST COMMAND, 
The ^ Open Road, September, 1921; PERSIAN GULF, The 
Christian Science Monitor, October 14; NOETHEHN BLOOD, 
The Christian Science Monitor, December 15, 1921; 
HARLEQUINADE, Telling Tales 9 March; A MOBAYSHIRE 
LILT, Motion Picture Classic, March; IF WINTER COMES, 
The Granite Monthly, October, 1921. 

292 



Hills, Gertrude. To A STRANGER, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer. 

Hillyer, Robert Silliman. INTERVAL, The Lyric, August, 1921; THE 
"BILLS GIVE PROMISE, The Lyric, February; SUSPENSE, 
The New Republic, January 18; FOR MAISTER GEOFFREY 
CHAUCER, The OutLooTc, July 19; THRENODY, The Bookman, 
November, 1921; ELEGY ON A DEAD MERMAID WASHED 
ASHORE AT PLYMOUTH ROCK, The New Republic, April 5; 
INTIMACY, Ainslee's, May; EVENING (Translated from the 
Danish, of Bernhard Severin Ingemann), American-Scan- 
dinavian Review, March; LARGO, Ainslee's Magazine, Sep- 
tember, 1921; THE Two TWILIGHTS, Ainslee's Magazine* 
August, 1921; THE TREADMILL, Life, December, 1921; 
ETHICS, Life, August 5, 1921; "HER OWN SHALL BLESS 
HER, " Boston Evening Transcript, January 28; INVOCATION, 
Ainslee's, April. 

Ho Chih-chang (born 659 A.D.). RETURN-HOME WRITING 
(Translated from the Chinese by Albion N. Fellows and 
T. Y. Leo), The Measure, June. 

Hogan, Mamie Lahey. THE OLD SETH THOMAS, The Poet and 
Philosopher, September, 1921, 

Holbrook, Weare. ERGO TAM DOCTJB, PROPERTIES HI, xxiii, 
The Lyric West, September, 1921; THE DRIFTER'S WIFE, 
The Lyric West, February; Risus ERAM POSITIS, PROPER- 
TIUS: HI, xxv, The Lyric West, September, 1921; PACIS 
AMOR DEUS, The Lyric West, January. 

Holden, Raymond. SPRING BUILDING, The Measure, July; 
NIGHT ABOVE THE TREE LINE, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, June. 

Holladay, Helen H. VANITY, The Lyric West, April. 

Holland, Laura Grant. SUMMER, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921. 

Hollis, Barbara. To A LITTLE SHIP, Earner's Magazine, March; 
IN APPRECIATION OF TEA, Ainslee's, April. 

Holmes, John Haynes. GOOD MEN, The Nation, October 26, 
1921. 

Holt, Guy. SHE FOR WHOM THE LEOPARD WAS SLAIN, The 
Reviewer, December, 1921. 

Hopkins, Frances Case. WHEN I AM DEAD, The American Poetry 
Magazine, February. 

Horton, Edith. MY KITCHEN, The Sewanee Review, October- 
December, 1921. 

Housman, Laurence. DEATH OF DAY, Harper's Magazine, July. 

Houston, G. d'A. HIDDEN, The Pagan, August-September, 1921. 

Houston, Margaret Belle. MEMORY, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, August, 1921. 

Howat, Helen. CHALLENGE, The Lyric West, September, 1921. 

Howe, Nancy Lee. BLUE-BIRD TIME, The Lyric West, April. 

Howe, Susanne. To M. A. S., The Measure, February; TUMBLE- 
WEED, The Measure, February. 

29S 



Howell, Editha. THE RETURN, The Lyric West, October, 1921 . 

Howes, Grace Clementine. FROM THE DESERT, Leslie 9 a Illustrated 
Weekly, November 5, 1921; ROSEMARY AND RUE, Fort 
Worth Record, April 24; THE RUNAWAYS, The New York 
Sun, November 22, 1921; THE TREE, American Forestry* 
October, 1921; INDIAN STARLIGHT, New York Sun, August 
25, 1921; FAITH, The Woman's World, March; MID- 
WINTER, The New York Sun, January 14; WINTER DAWN, 
The Woman's World, January; THE SUMMONS, The New 
York Sun, December 23, 1921; WESTERN AUTUMN, The 
New York Sun, October 19, 1921; THE DESERT FLOCK, 
The New York Sun, October 8, 1921; THE SAILOR'S CHILD, 
St Nicholas, September, 1921; THE TRAIL, The New York 
Sun, August 25, 1921. 

Hoyt, Helen Underwood, PLACE Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer; THEN FIRST IT WAS, The Double Dealer, April; 
WE NEVER LEFT OUR LOVE UNSAp, The New Republic, 
January 18; MY OWN SONG, The Pictorial Review, March; 
MUMMY, The D&uUe Dealer, August-September, 1921; RED 
RIBBON, The Bookman, March. 

Hubbard, George Henry. A CHRISTMAS WISH, The Granite 
Monthly, December, 1921. 

HubbeH Martha M. F. MOTHER THOUGHTS, The Outlook, 
May 10. 

Hughes, Mary RAIN, Contemporary Verse, June. 

Hughes, Richard. DIRGE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, August, 
1921; THE HORSE TROUGH, The Bookman, July, THE 
MOONLIT JOURNEY, The Literary Review of the New York 
Evening Post, November 5, 1921. 

Hughes, Russell Meriwether. THE RETURN, Tempo, Autumn, 
1921. 

Huguenot, Stephen. POSSESSION, The Wave, January, 

Huiginn, E. J. V. SANTA'S VISIT, Salem Evening News, December 
24, 1921; THE MISTLETOE, Salem Evening News, December 
30, 1921; JEAN, Salem Evening News, November 80, 1921; 
THE ROSE, Salem Evening News, November 3, 1921; 
LITTLE LASSIE, Salem Evening News, January 24; LIFE, 
Salem Evening News, December 23, 1921; THE VASE 
AND THE ROSE, Salem Evening New, May. 

Hummel, Edna Logan. ARBUTUS! The Granite Monthly, May; 
MY WIFE'S ROSES, The American Poetry Magazine, June. 

Humphries, Rolfe. FEBRUARY, The Lyric West, February; 
ETERNAL RECURRENCE, The Liberator, January. 

Hutchinson, Mary K. LIGHTS AND SHADOWS, The Poet and 
Philosopher, September, 1921. 

Hutchison, Hazel Collister. CAESURA, The Double Dealer, June; 
DAWN IN EAGLE STREET, All's Well, December, 1921; 
AUTUMN ARABESQUE, AWs Well, March. 

Hyatt, Jr., Jack. THE BEGGAR, The Lyric West, April. 

Hyatt, Lucy. ON FLANDERS FIELD, The Country Bard, Spring, 

294 



I., M. SEA-QUEEN-, The Catholic World, May. 

Inman, Arthur Crew. COLUMBINE DANCES, Voices, A Journal 
of Verse, Autumn, 1921; THE WATCHER AT THE Bow, 
Contemporary Verse, July; THE WALL-PAPER WITCH, The 
Boston Transcript; PATHS ACROSS THE SEA, The Freeman, 
July 12; RIVER SONG, Contemporary Verse, July; THE 
SPINSTER, The Boston Transcript; THE TRYST, Tempo, 
Autumn, 1921. 

Irving, Minna, AN OTHELLO OF THE SEA, Munsey's Magazine 
May. 

Jackson, Sarah. DAT DREAMS, The Granite Monthly, July. 

Janson, Ellen Margaret. THE UNKNOWN, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, January; NIGHT IN THE CITY, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, January; INCENSE SMOKE, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, January; SCHEEZO, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse t 
January; TBYST, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, January; 
SONNET, The Measure, June; LONELINESS, The North 
American Review, January; INSCRIPTION ON A GATE, Con- 
temporary Verse, November, 1921; APATHY, Contemporary 
Verse, November, 1921; MOON-SET, Contemporary Verse, 
November, 1921. 

Javis, Alexander. LAST MOVEMENT TSCHAIKOVSKY'S "PATHE- 
TIQUB," The Pagan, August-September, 1921. 

Jellette, Anne. THE RAINBOW, Ainslee's, July; THE AFFLICTION, 
Ainslee's, February; ENVIRONMENT, Ainslee's, January. 

Jenkins, Oliver. SPRING FEAR, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; CONVEN- 
TION, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921; To A 
DEBUTANTE, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring; INGRATI- 
TUDE, The Lyric, October, 1921; NIGHT SCENE, The Lyric, 
February; AWAKENING, The Lyric West, January; HOME- 
COMING, The Lyric West, January. 

Jennings, Amy S. PROTEST, The Measure, May; MUTATION, 
The Measure, May. 

Jennings, Leslie Nelson. WE COME FROM BABEL, The New 
Republic, November 23, 1921; BLTNTDMAN, The Outlook, 
May 24; PHOENIX, The Nation, November 9, 1921; 
COWARDICE, The New Republic, July 26; INTERIM, The 
New Republic, November 2, 1921; GIFTS, T e Lyric, June; 
AFTER SONNET MAKING, AWs WeU, September, 1921; 
FROM THE SKY-PLACES, The Smart Set, April. 

Jenny, Florence G. To APRIL, Contemporary Verse, March; 
To SPRING, Contemporary Verse, March. 

Jessup, Frederika Peterson. CHALDEAN SONG, The Freeman, 
February 15. 

Jewell, Hugh. MY OLD HOME, The New Pen, April-May. 

Jewett, Eleanore Myers. BALLADE, The Catholic World, October, 
1921; SORROW'S HOUSE, The Catholic World, April. 

Johnson, Arthur, THE ANTIQUE SHOP, Scribner's Magazine, 
March. 

295 



Johnson, Georgia Douglas. MEASURE, The Crisis, June, 

Johnson, Josephine. SILENCE AND SOLITUDE, The Lyric, April, 
THE LEVEL WAT, The Lyric, July; RENUNCIATION, The 
Lyric, October, 1921; ON THE BRIDGE, The Lync, Novem- 
ber, 1921; PRESENCE, The Lyric, January. 

Johnston, Mary. VIRGINIANA, The Reviewer, February. 

Jolas, Eugene. THE PEASANT, The Liberator, April. 

Jonas, Rosalie M. THEIR SECRET, Harper's Magazine, November, 
1921. 

Jones, Archer G. DEITY, The Reviewer, March. 

Jones, E Clement. NEW ENGLAND BURTING-GROUND, The Yale 
Review, January; INTERLUDE IN THE ANTIQUE MODE, 
The Yale Review, July. 

Jones, Howard Mumford. THE LAST RIDE OF DON QUIXOTE, 
University of California Chronicle, July; THE POET OP THE 
MISSISSIPPI ON Tvinr. MICHIGAN, The American Poetry 
Magazine, April; To A JAZZ DANCER, All's Well, August, 
1921. 

Jones, Leah Durand. THE WINDS OP MARCH, The Christian 
Century, March 9 

Jones, Louise. WHEN LOVE is GONE, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, April 

Jones, Ralph Mortimer. MART, The Christian Century, March 9; 
PRATER, The Christian Century, June 15. 

Jones, Ruth Lambert. SMOKE, Ladies* Home Journal, August, 
1921. 

Jones, Jr , Thomas S. THE REVELATION, The Boston Transcript, 
February 4; SAINT ORAN, The Boston Transcript, February 2. 

Jorgensen, Johannes "THE PLANTS STAND SILENT ROUND ME" 
(Translated by Robert Silliman Hillyer), The American- 
Scandinavian Review, February. 

Josephson, Mathew. FOUR ETUDES, Broom, May. 

K., J. AVE MARIA, GRATIA PLENIS, The Pagan, August-Septem- 
ber, 1921; QUASI ADAGIO (To P ), The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921; CHOICE (ToB ), The Pagan, De- 
cember, 1921, January; SALUT (To L ), The Pagan, 

December, 1921, January. 

Kauffman, Reginald Wright. FOR THE CRITICS, The Outlook, 
August 10, 1921; THE PRICE, Ainslee*$, February. 

Kawada, Jun. TRANSMUTED (Translated from the Japanese by 
Madam Yukio Ozaki), The Freeman, November 9, 1921; 
IS'T POSSIBLE (Translated from the Japanese by Madam 
Yukio Ozaki), The Freeman, November 9, 1921; MEMORT 
(Translated from the Japanese by Madam Yukio Ozaki), 
The Freeman, November 9, 1921; FATE (Translated from 
the Japanese by Madam Yukio Ozaki;, The Freeman, 
November 9, 1921; THREATENED (Translated from the 
Japanese by Madam Yukio Ozaki), The Freem&n, Novem- 
ber 9, 1921. 

296 



Keeley, Dorothy. ON THE WINGS, Poetry t A Magazine of Verse* 
January. 

Keene, Erwin F. CONSTANTINOPLE, The Granite Monthly, Novem- 
ber, 1921. 

Keene, Meta Fuller. RECOMPENSE, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921; MY GARDEN, The Country Bard, Spring, 
COMRADESHIP, The Country Bard, Spring; WINTER REVERY, 
The Country Bard, Winter. 

Kelley, Katherine Hearne. THE QUEEN'S GIFT, The Magnificat, 
July. 

Kelly, Sarah Hammond. FOG, The Lyric West, January; KATH- 
LEEN, The Liberator, September, 1921. 

Kemp, Harry. JOSES, THE BROTHER OF JESUS, The Christian 
Century, June 15; CITIES OF THE WORLD, Munsey's Maga- 
zine, July; BEETHOVEN, DEAF, Munsey's^ Magazine, May; 
IN A QUIET HEART, Munsey's Magazine, April; EACH 
DAY'S PERFECTNESS, Munsey's Magazine, March; To A 
NEW POET, Munsey's Magazine, January. 

Kendrick, Lucile. THE LONELY CHILD, Contemporary Verse, 
December, 1921; ICONOCLAST, Contemporary Verse, 
December, 1921; MADRINA, Contemporary Verse, June; 
THE CAPTIVE, Contemporary Verse, June; PRISON SONG, 
The Step Ladder, March; PARTING WAYS, The American 
Poetry Magazine, June. 

Kennedy, Charles W. LOVE WALKED WITH ME, Scribner's 
Magazine, October, 1921. 

Kennedy, James H. Two MADE ONE, Munsey's Magazine, 
July. 

Kennedy, Mary H. INVOCATION, The Magnificat, May; PEACE, 
The Magnificat, February; As OIL POURED Our, The 
Magnificat, December, 1021. 

Kennedy, Thomas. RIDDLE, The Wave, January; AN OLD STREET, 
The Wave, January; THE RUG, The Wave, January; WHITE 
GLORY, The Wave, June. 

Kenyon, Beraice Lesbia. THE LOVE SONG, Scribner's Magazine, 
December, 1921; THE CHEAT, Contemporary Verse, 
October, 1921; OCTOBER, Contemporary Verse, October, 
1921; ALTER EGO, Contemporary Verse, May; MAY SUNDAY, 
Contemporary Verse, May; PALIMPSEST, The Outlook, 
May 17; NOCTURNE, The Outlook, July 26; ANSWER TO A 
TIMID LOVER, The Outlook, October 5, 1921; PREMONITION, 
The Outlook, January 25; HOMECOMING IN STORM, The 
Nation, September 21, 1921; THE ENDURING, The Nation, 
July 5; "!F ON THE MORROW," Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer; IN WINTER, The Liberator, October, 1921; 
UNREST, The Liberator, October, 1921; FUTILITY, The 
Liberator, April; PORTRAIT, The Outlook, November 23, 
1921; ANCESTRY, The Liberator, December, 1921; DEATH 
WILL Nor FRIGHTEN ME, Voices^ A Journal of Verse, 
Autumn, 1921; THE SHORE, SUNRISE* Voice*, A Journal 

297 



of Verse, Autumn, THE ANSWERING HEIGHTS, The Lyric 
West, March; WHITE-THROAT, The Lyric West, June. 

Kenyon, Doris. THE Two BRIDES, Good Housekeeping, June. 

Kenyon, Theda, THE HAUNTED HOUSE, Munsey's Magazine, 
May. 

Keyes, Frances Parkinson. ROSES, The Granite Monthly, October, 
1921. 

Kiefer, Edmund J. The Catholic World, April. 

Kilmer, Aline. A GUEST SPEAKS, The OuilooTc, April 19; LIGHT 
LOVER, The Bookman, October, 1921. 

King, Gertrude. THE MOON, The Liberator, October, 1921. 

Kingston, Irene McFadden. THE LAND OF AFTERNOON, The 
Poet and Philosopher, January 

Kinsolvmg, Sally Bruce. SPRING VOICES, Baltimore American, 
May 5; THE ROAD, Baltimore American; To THE STATUE 
OF EDGAR ALLEN POE, Baltimore American, May 11; 
DAFFODILS, Baltimore American, April 1; PRELUDE, 
Baltimore American, March 2; ADVENTURE, The Reviewer, 
January. 

Kipling, Rudyard. A BALLADE OF PHOTOGRAPHS (Original 
publication), The Wave, June. 

Kirk, Richard. "FEAR DEATH? '* Contemporary Verse, September, 
1921; THE MONOTONOUS YEAR, Contemporary Verse, 
September, 1921; His LATER MANNER, Contemporary 
Verse, September, 1921; ON WEEDING, Contemporary 
Verse, September, 1921; LITTLE DUST, Contemporary 
Verse, September, 1921; CONUNDRUM, The Step Ladder, 
July; JANE HORNER, The Double Dealer, July; APPRECIA- 
TION, The Double Dealer, July. 

Klemm, Wilhelm. PETALS (Translated by Olive Sclarf), Broom, 
May. 

Kling, Joseph. WISH, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter; 
MACABRE, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter. 

Knipe, Bertha McE. MART, The Lyric, June; THE WALLS OF 
St FRANCIS, The Lyric West, December, 1921. 

Knox, Florence Clay. PITY, Contemporary Verse, February; 
APOLOGY, Contemporary Verse, February. 

Koenig, Myra Manning IN THE DESERT, The American Poetry 
Magazine, June. 

Kosmak, Katherine L. BY THE SEA, Lincoln Lore, November, 
1921; SUNRISE, Lincoln Lore, April. 

Kramer, Arthur J. AFTER AN EVENING, The Wave, February. 

Kreymborg, Alfred. BLOOM, The Dial, May; PIANISSIMO, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, July; HER VOICE, The New Republic, 
May 8. 

Krikorian, Alice Sargent. A DREAM OF MT. KEARSAGE, The 
Granite Monthly, February; THE WHITE FLOWER, The 
Granite Monthly, July. 

Kuhns, Grace Taylor. A DAY'S JOURNEY, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; OUR FRIEND, The Country Bard, 

298 



Summer-Autumn, 1921; "UNHIDDEN," The Country Bard, 
Winter; THE RED HAW TREE, The Country Bard, Summer; 
A GIFT OF My YOUTH, The Country Bard, Spring, JEWELS, 
The Country Bard, Winter; "Ross UNWORTHY," The 
Country Bard, Winter; PLAYING WELL His PART, The 
Country Bard t Winter; ALICE, The Country Bard, Spring; 
FIDELITY, The Country Bard, Winter. 

L., E. U. F. PASSION DEATH, The liberator, November, 1921; 
DORNROSCHEN, The Liberator, January 

L., M. THE STORY OF JACOPONE DA TODI, The Catholic World, 
March. 

Labaree, Mary Fleming. BLEND CLAY, The Nation, May 24. 

Laik, Regna. LITTLE JEAN, The Liberator, September, 1921; To 
MY HUSBAND, The Liberator, August, 1921. 

Lamb, Charles W. THE INDIAN FACE ON THE LIMESTONE CLIFF 
AT EPHRIAM, The American Poetry Magazine, April, THE 
BONE YARD WHERE THE OLD SHIPS ROT AT STURGEON 
BAY, The American Poetry Magazine, April. 

Lamb, Esther Hill. To PIERETH GONE, All's Well, April. 

Langbridge, Rosamond. THE WHITE MOTH, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, July; THE GENTLE HOUSEWIFE, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, July. 

Langley, Allan Lincoln. NEW WORLDS, The Liberator, October, 
1921. 

Laramore, Vivian Yeiser. PREFERENCE, The Double Dealer, 
December, 1921; PREPARATION, The Reviewer, January; 
AUTUMN, Contemporary Verse, November, 1921. 

Larkin, Margaret. GOOD-BYE TO MY MOTHER, Kansas City 
Star, 1921; THE RETURNING, The Oread Magazine, Spring; 
NEKRAL, The Oread Magazine, Spring. 

Larsson, R. Ellsworth. AT DAWN, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Winter. 

Latady, A. A PASTORAL, The Nomad, Summer, 1922. 

Laurie, B. L. THE END OF A GREAT CITY, The New Pen, April- 
May. 

Law, R, H. BRIDGE AND MOONLIGHT, AWs Well, September, 1921. 

Lawless, Margaret H. THE BRIDE OF THE YEAR, The American 
Poetry Magazine, June; ASLEEP IN THE ARGONNE FOREST, 
The American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; THE 
JOURNEY'S END, St. Anthony's Messenger, October, 1921; 
AWAKENINGS, St. Anthony's Messenger, November, 1921; 
AN IDEAL, Truth, March; THE PLAINT OF HAMAN, The 
Magnificat, July. 

Lawrence, Seabury. POOR HARLEQUIN, Harper's Magazine, April. 

Lawrence, Will AN IDLY IDYLL, The Country Sard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921; SONG, The Country Bard, Summer; LINES 
TO A VIOLET, The Country Bard, Spring; THE LEAVES, The 
Country Bard, Winter; Mrs* SUMMAH! The Country Bard, 
Summers-Autumn, 1921. 

299 



Leach, Bert. NOSTALGIA, The American Poetry Magazine, 
Autumn, 1921. 

Lear, Althine Sholes. WHEN THE BIBDS FLY NORTH, The Granite 
Monthly, March. 

Lechlitner, Ruth Naomi. To THE WILD ROSE, Contemporary 
Verse, November, 1921. 

Le Cron, Helen Cowles. EXPERIENCE, Contemporary Verse, 
September, 1921; MARRIAGE, Contemporary Verse, Sep- 
tember, 1921; THE HOME-KEEPERS, Contemporary Verse, 
September, 1921; THE BRIDE GOES MARKETING, Con- 
temporary Verse, September, 1921. 

Lee, Agnes. THE JILT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, November, 
1921; THE BLUNTED AGE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
November, 1921. 

Lee, Harry. LIGHTS OF BLACKWELLS, The Catholic World, July; 
WINTRY WINDS, The Catholic World, March; BAGDAD, 
Everybody's , October, 1921; APRIL, Ainslee's, April; GOSSIP, 
Ainslee's, June; A CITY STREET, The Outlook, May 31; 
THE FIRST EASTER, The Outlook, April 12; MARY 
McGiNDRY, The Outlook, July 26; LILACS, The Outlook, 
November, 1921. 

Lee, Margery. MISUNDERSTANDING, The Pagan, December, 
1921, January; To A MAN IN A BANK, The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921. 

Lee, Muna. SAN CRISTOBAL, The Double Dealer, July; THE 
FLAME-TREES, The Measure, June. 

Le Gallienne, Hesper. RETURN, Harper's Magazine, June. 

Le Gallienne, Richard. GAUDEMUS, Harper's Magazine, Sep- 
tember, 1921; A BALLADE or WATER LILIES, Harper's 
Magazine, July; THE MAGIC FLOWER, Harper's Magazine, 
March; RIVER Music, Munsey's Magazine, January; FAR 
AWAY AND LONG AGO, Munsey's Magazine, February; 
PAX AMERICANA, Munsey's Magazine, March; THE FOR- 
TUNATE VOYAGE, Munsey's Magazine, March; COSMIC 
FRIENDS, Munsey's Magazine, April; THE IMMORTAL 
GODS, Munsey's Magazine, May; To His LADY, WITH 
COUNTRY FLOWERS, Munsey's Magazine, June; LOVE'S 
BLESSING, Munsey's Magazine, July. 

Leigh, Alice. A MOTH IN A SUBWAY TRAIN, Voices, A Journal 
of Verse, Spring. 

Leigh, Richard. THE POET'S LOT, Munsey's Magazine, January; 
BALLADE op THE UNCHANGING BELOVED, Munsey's Maga- 
zine, February; MARKETING IN THE MOON, Munsey's 
Magazine, March; THE DREAM AND THE STREAM, 
Munsey's Magazine, April; Now THAT SHE is GONE, 
Munsey's Magazine, May; IN THE MOONLIT WOODS, 
Munsey's Magazine, June; THE WHOLE DUTY or A MAN, 
Munsey's Magazine, July. 

Leitch, Mary Sinton. ONE ROSE, The Nomad, Summer, 1922; 
To A HERMIT THRUSH, The Step Ladder; ON BEING TOLD 

300 



THAT MY CHILD RESEMBLES ME, The Lync, May; SILENCE, 
The Lyric West, May; PERSPECTIVE, The Lyric, October, 
1921; LOST HEARING, The Lyric, December, 1921; To 
MY MOTHER, The Lyric, March. 

Lench, W. H. PURITY, The Lyric West, November, 1921; GLAD- 
NESS, The Lyric West, 1921; LONELINESS, The Lyric West, 
November, 1921; DESIRE, The Lyric West, February, 
June. 

Leonard, Orville. THE SONG OF THE PINE American Forestry, 
October, 1921. 

Leonard, William Ellery, THE BEGGAR, The Nation, August 24, 
1921; ANOTHER STATUE, The American Poetry Magazine, 
February. 

Lesesne, Jeanne So MANY WORLDS, The American, Poetry 
Magazine, April. 

Lett-Hames. KABYLE SONGS, Gargoyle, January-February. 

Letts, Winifred M. No NIGHT IN HEAVEN, The Yale Review, 
January; HALLOWE'EN, The Sewanee Review, October- 
December, 1921. 

Leui, Jennie Orr. WINTER FIELDS, The American Poetry Maga- 
zine, February. 

Lewis, Frank C. FOOL'S GOLD, The Lyric, March; Two DAYS, 
The Lync, May. 

Lewis, Janet. THE WILD CRAB-APPLE TREE, The Lyric West, 
May. 

Lewis, Jay. EYES, The Lyric, November, 1921. 

Lieberman, Ettas. WEARY PEDDLERS, The Outlook, April 19. 

Lincoln, Elliott C. MAIL DAY, The Lyric West, June; THE GIRL 
OF THE LONELINESS, The Lyric West, March. 

Linderman, Frank B. CABINS, Scribner's Magazine, August, 
1921; THE TROUT POOL, Scribner's Magazine, August, 
1921; THE OLD CANOE, Scribner's Magazine, August, 1921; 
THE OLD FRONTIER, Scribner's Magazine, August, 1921; 
LUCK, Scribner's Magazine, August, 1921. 

Lindsay, Donald. ARCADY REVISITED, The Pagan, August- 
September, 1921. 

Lindsay, Vachel. IN PRAISE OF JOHNNY APPLESEED, The Century 
Magazine, August, 1921. 

Ling, Barbara. BORDEAUX, The Reviewer, June. 

Lipp, Frances Mullarney. OCTOBER, The American Poetry 
Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 

Li Po (750-762 AD.). QUERY AND ANSWER IN THE HILLS 
(Translated from the Chinese by Albion N. Fellows and 
T. Y. Leo), The Measure, June; HARD TRAVELING IN SHU* 
(Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-Hu), The 
Nation, May 3, 1921. 

Li-Tai-pe. ODE TO NANKING (Translated by Florence Brinkman), 
The Freeman, July 12. 

Li T'ai-Po. THE TERRACED ROAD OP THE TWO-EDGED 
SWORD MOUNTAINS (Translated by Amy Lowell), Asia, 

301 



The American Magazine of the Orient, October, 1921; THE 
RETREAT OF HSSIEH KUNG (Translated by Amy Lowell), 
The Dial, October, 1921; CRIES or THE RAVEN (Trans- 
lated by Florence Brinkman), The Freeman, April 5. 

Litsey, E. C. PANTHEISM, All's Well, January. 

Liu Yu-Hsi THE CITY OF STONES (Nanking) (Translated by 
Amy Lowell), The Dial, October, 192h 

Loftus, J B. THE SEA, The Pagan, December, 1921, January. 

Long, Haniel. UNIMPORTANT DIALOGUE, The Wave, January. 

Long, Vivian Aten. NASTURTIUMS, The Lync West, April. 

Longfellow, Herbert H. MIRRORS, Contemporary Verse, April; 
I AM A LITTLE BOY TRAVELING, Contemporary Verse, 
April; A PRAYER, Contemporary Verse, April. 

Longley, Snow. APRIL ILLUSIONS, The Lyric West, April. 

Longstreth, T. Morris, AFTER HEARANG THE TSCHAIKOWSKY 
"MELODIE," Contemporary Verse, June. 

Looker, Samuel J. MORN, The Country Bard, Spring ; FRIEND- 
SHIP, The Country Bard, Summer ; BEAUTY, I'VE LOVED 
THEE, The Country Bard, Winter. 

Looker, Samuel E. VENTNOR MEMORIES (To S ), The 

Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921. 

Love, Jane Groome. WINTER EVENING, Contemporary Verse, 
February; THE RAIN, The Pictorial Review, April. 

Loving, Pierre. Two OF THEM (Translated from Hugo Von 
Hoffmansthal), The Pagan, October-November, 1921; 
Loss, The Dial, September, 1921; DUST IN THE WIND, The 
Measure, July; IF I WENT BACK, The Nation, March 1; 
CHURNING, The Measure, September, 1921. 

,Low, Benjamin R. C. YELLOW LEAVES, Harper's Magazine, 
September, 1921; SPRING, RIDING, Contemporary Verse, 
April. 

Lowe, K. Elmo. THE SIEVE, The Wave, June. 

Lowell, Amy. THE HOUSE IN MAIN STREET, The Century Maga- 
zine, February; A NEW YEAR'S CARD, The Century Maga- 
zine, January; To CARL SANDBURG, The Nation, August S, 
1921; KATYDIDS, SHORE OF LAKE MICHIGAN, The Dial, 
January; WHITE CURRANTS, The Century Magazine, 
October, 1921; FOOTING UP A TOTAL, The Dial, August, 
1921; PURPLE CRACKLES, The Bookman, July; LILACS, 
Broom, November, 1921; THE REVENGE, The New Repub- 
lic, July 12; THE BOOK OF STONES AND LILIES, Scnbner's 
Magazine, November, 1921; AQUATINT FRAMED IN GOLD, 
The Nation, June 7; MINIATURE, The Century Magazine, 
August, 1921; THE SWANS, The Dial, August, 1921; 
PARADOX, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; THE LONELY WIFE 
(Translated from the Chinese of Li TFai-po), The Bookman, 
September, 1921. 

Lowry, Flora E. THE HORSE RACE, The American Poetry Maga- 
zine,, April. 

302 



Loy, Mina. PERLUN, The Dial, August, 1921; POE, The Dial, 
October, 1921; APOLOGY OF GENIUS, The Dial, July. 

Luke, Isobel. OLD LACES (To MRS. ROBERT F. CLARK), The 
American Poetry Magazine, February. 

Lummis, Charles F. SONG, The Lync West, July-August. 

Lund, Mary Graham. THE NORTHWESTERN WHEAT FIELD, 
The Lyric West, November, 1921. 

Lyndall, Dorothy S THE DANCER, The Lyric West, October, 
1921; THE MOON, The Lyric West, October, 1921; ETTCA- 
LYPTH AMYGDAUNA, The Lyric West, March. 

Lyon, Anne Bozeman. CARDINALS, The American Poetry Maga- 
zine, February. 

Lyons, Olive BouHemet. THROUGH A WINDOW, The Double 
Dealer, March. 

Mabie, Mary Louise. Two BEACONS, Munsey's Magazine, 
January; A SONG OF CHILDREN, Munsey's Magazine, June. 

MacDougall, Dugald. HOPE TRIUMPHANT! The Country Bard, 
Winter; REVERIES, The Country Bard, Spring; WORKER'S 
SONG, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921. 

MacGill, Caroline Elizabeth. THE SINGER IN SILENCE, The 
Magnificat, July. 

Mackall, Virginia Woods. ARTISAN, The Nation, March 15. 

Mackenzie, Jean Kenyon. THE WARNING, McClure's Magazine, 
March; THE YOUNG TRADER, McClure's Magazine, July. 

Macready, M. A. K. A PINE TREE IN EVENING, Contemporary 
Verse, August, 1921* 

Maddock, Frances. WASTE, The Catholic World, February; 
FORGETTING, The Magnificat, July. 

Maisch, Lilah Esther. SENSE IMPRESSIONS, The American 
Poetry Magazine, February. 

Malloy, Mary J. MARY AND MAY, The Magnificat, May. 

Maltby, Ian. THE HALF MOON SMILES, The Country Bard 
Summer-Autumn, 1921. 

Mann, Fred B. A MEMORY, The Poet and Philosopher, September, 
1921. 

Mann, Stella Lucia. NOT FOR SALE, Contemporary Verse, May. 

Manning, Oliver. THE "SNOWY PEAKS" UNVEILED, The Lyric 
West, September, 1921. 

Marin, Luis Munoz. COUNSEL, The Measure, July; FINIS, The 
Measure, July; HE MAKES A PICTURE OF His LOVE, The 
Measure, July; MOODS, The Measure, July. 

Marino, Josephine. To DANTE, The Forum, Dante Number, 1921. 

Markham, Edwin. IN HIGH SIERRAS, The Lync, January; YOUTH 
AND You, McClure's Magazine, May; THE POOL, McClure's 
Magazine, June; THE RAJAH OF MYSORE, McClure's 
Magazine, June; THE PERISHED POOL, McClure's Maga- 
zine, June; EVERLASTING, McClure's Magazine, June; 
SAPPHO'S SONG, McClures Magazine, July; AGAIN THE 
MOOD OF EDEN, The Step Ladder, June. 

303 



Marks, Jeannette. CLEAR POOLS, The Lyric, September, 1921; 
INDIAN SUMMER, The Lyric, October, 1921; COBWEBS, 
The Bookman, December, 1921; BLIND SLEEP, Contem- 
porary Verse, August, 1921. 

Marlatt, Earl. THE RETURN, The American Poetry Magazine, 
April. 

Marpha. To A CURIOUS, MODEST LADY, The Fugitive, June; 

f -* i - GRIEVE Nor, The Fugitive, June. 

Marquis,^ Neeta. THE ALIEN, The Lyric West, January; ON 
CHRISTMAS EVE, The Lyric West, December, 1921; A RED- 
WOOD FOREST IN WINTER, The Lyric West, December, 1921; 
AWAKENING, Munsey's Magazine, July. 

Marshall, A. G. DESECRATION, The American Poetry Magazine, 
February. 

Martin, A. E. THE STAR NEST, The Poet and Philosopher, Sep- 
tember, 1921; As WE JOURNEY ALONG, The Poet and 
Philosopher, September, 1921. 

Martin, Hermann Ford. AFTERWARD, The American Poetry 
Magazine, Autumn, 1921; CITY STREETS ARE COLD, The 
American Poetry Magazine, February. 

Martin, Portia. A CHIPPEWA LULLABYE, The American Poetry 
Magazine, February; IN THE-MOON-OF-RED-BLOOMING- 
LILTES, The Lyric West, April; ASPENS, The Lyric West, 
April. 

Martin, Winona. THE EGO, The Poet and Philosopher, September, 
1921. 

Martines, Pura E. DIMPLE CHEEK, The American Poetry Maga- 
zine, February. 

MaryngofF, Anatoly, OCTOBER (Translated by L. Lozowick), 
Broom, May. 

Masa-Ko Chino. OVERCOME BY CONFESSION (Translated from 
the Japanese by Madam Yukio Ozaki), The Freeman, 
November 9, 1921. 

Masters, Edgar Lee. DOUGLAS STRONG, McClure'a Magazine, 
March; REASON ROBB, McClure's Magazine, March; 
WALLACE HARDY, McClure*9 Magazine, March; GOLDEN 
Fox, Broom, April; BALFOUR TOZER, McClure's Magazine, 
March. 

Matson, Mabel Cornelia. OH, COME AND WALK WITH ME, The 
Granite Monthly, May. 

Matthias, Blanche Coates. DAWN'S NIGHT, AWs Well> December, 
1921; THE WISH TO SING, All's Well, October, 1921. 

May, Beulah. Music, The Lyric West, November, 1921; REDONDO 
BEACH, The Lyric West, May. 

Maynard, Theodore. A GRAY DAY IN CALIFORNIA, The New 
Republic, January 18. 

McAlmon, Robert. THE BLACKBIRD, The Bookman, February. 

McBkir, Robert. MAN, The Lyric, August, 1921. 

McCaigue, Philip. HATL, FULL OP GRACE, The Magnificat, 
March. 

804 



McCarthy, Dixie HILLS, The Lyric West, June. 

McCarthy, John Russell PEERING WATER, The Bookman, June; 
THE REAL ESTATE BROKER, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; 
TRILLIUM, The Pagan, August-September, 1921; THE 
GIFT OF BEAUTY, The Lyric West, November, 1921; 
PRIESTS, The Lyric West, January; RUE ANEMONE, The 
Lyric West, January. 

McCarthy, Thomas F. A GYPSY'S SONG, Devils Lake Journal* 
November 16, 1921. 

McClellan, Walter. UNQUIET, The Double Dealer, December, 
1921; ARRANGEMENT IN BLACK AND GOLD, The Double 
Dealer, August-September, 1921; AN OLD MAN DREAMS, 
The Double Dealer, May. 

McClure, John. JAZZ, The Double Dealer, October, 1921; LOVE 
is SUCH A MISCHIEF, The Double Dealer, February; 
LAUGHTER, The Wave, June; OWL-BLASTED, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, June; WIZARD'S LAMENT, Voices, A 
Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921; THE WORD, The Lyric, 
April; TIME FORGETS Us AS WE Go, Voices, A Journal 
of Verse, Autumn, 1921. 

McComb, Dorothy Shepardly. THE BRIDE SPEAKS, Munsey's 
Magazine, June. 

McCormick, Anne O'Hare. SONG OF PRAISE FOR NOT BEING A 
POET, The New Republic, May 3. 

McCormick, Virginia Taylor. MAMMY, The Lyric, July; INTRO- 
SPECTION, Smart Set, July; WHEREIN I FIND MY GOD, 
The Lyric, February; FACES IN THE FntE, Tempo, Autumn, 
1921; SHELLEY, The Step Ladder, July; Miss LIZA, The 
Boston Transcript; INDIAN SUMMER, The Lyric, November, 
1921; THE BASKET MAKER, American Poetry Magazine, 
October, 1921; THE PINE TREE, The Personalist, January; 
TWILIGHT, Telling Tales, February; THE PRETTY LADY 
READING, The Classic, February; UNKNOWN, The Classic, 
August, 1921; THE DARK, The Smart Set, November, 1921; 
SUNSET AFTER STORM, The Pagan, December, 1921, Janu- 
ary; PIERRETTE, Munsey's Magazine, June; DANTE, 1321- 
1921, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921; OLD 
SONGS, The Nomad, Spring, 1922; THE FAR COUNTRY, The 
Nomad, Spring, 1922; THE BASKET MAKER, The American 
Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; THOUGHT, The Lyric West, 
January; MOUNTAINS, The Lyric West, January; THE 
FUGITIVE, The Lyric, April; YOUTH'S SORROW, The Lyric, 
April; I Go TO MEET MY BELOVED, The Lyric, January; 
DANDELIONS, The Lyric, December, 1921; NOEL, The 
Lyric, December, 1921; **A SEA UNFATHOMED," The Lyric, 
August, 1921; AUGUST, The Lyric, August, 1921; SORROW, 
The Lyric West, October, 1921; POEMS, The Lyric West, 
October, 1921; FLAGS, The American Poetry Magazine, 
June; MEMORIES, The Nomad, Summer, 1922; TWILIGHT, 
Telling Tales, February, 

305 



McCourtie, William B. A NEW ENGLAND SPINSTER, The Literary 
Review of ike New York Evening Post, December 10, 1921. 

McCrea, Marion. EARTH TALK, The Pagan, December, 1921, 
January 

McCreary, Frederick R. A WORD FROM THE EAST TO THE MIDDLE 
WEST, The Nation, June 21; JUDGES, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, February; NOONTIME, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, February; A NAKED MAPLE, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, February; WINTER RAIN, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, February; ALONE ON THE HILL, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, February; MEMORIES, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Autumn, 1921. 

McDougal, Mary Carmack. THE CLOUD, Contemporary Verse, 
July; THREE MEN, Contemporary Verse, July; THE SUBWAY 
ACCIDENT, New York Call, July 12, THE LIAR, The New 
York Times, February 17; THE WAVES, The New York 
Times, May 25, March 25; A WOMAN'S SONG, The New 
York Herald, July 4; THE WIRE STRINGER, The New York 
Herald, July 6; THE PLAINS OP SILENCE, The New York 
Times, November 4, 1921. 

McDougal, Violet. THE WONDER RIVER, Argosy-All Story Weekly, 
July 8; WHITE WOLVES, The New York Times, April 11; 
THE FIRE-EATER, The New York Times, January 25; THE 
KNIFE THROWER, The New York Times, October 14, 1921; 
THE CALL OF THE SEA, The New York Times, March 18, 
HEREDITY, The New York Times, January 10; THE VERY 
OLD, The New York Times, December 2, 1921; CHAME- 
LEONS MANHATTAN ROOF, The New York Herald, 
July 3; ROMULUS AND REMUS, The New York Times, 
July 14. 

McFadden, Athena. YOUR WORDS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
June. 

McGaffey, Ernest. BALLADE OF THE MAYA MAIDEN, The Lyric 
West, July-August. 

McGowen, Elizabeth. To BABY PATRICIA, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; MERCILESS TIME, The Country 
Bard, Spring; OUTSHINING DEEDS, The Country Bard, 
Spring; "WATER LILIES," The Country Bard, Winter; 
REPENTANCE, The Country Bard, Spring; ILLUSION, The 
Country Bard, Summer; "AND I REMEMBER," The Country 
Bard, Summer; "NARCISSUS," The Country Bard, Spring; 
BiTTER-S-WEET, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 
1921; IDOLS, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921. 

McGregor, Smith. INDIAN SUMMER, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921. 

Mclntyre, Carlyle. THE VISIT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
May; THE SCISSOR-GRINDER, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, May; PROMENADING, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
May. 

McKay, Claude. FRENCH LEAVE, The Liberator, April; FUTILITY, 

306 



The Liberator, January; THROUGH AGONY, The Liberator, 
December, 1921; THIRST, The Liberator, December, 1921; 
LA PALOMA IN LONDON, The Liberator, January; STTBWAY 
WIND, The Liberator, August, 1921; BAPTISM, The Liberator, 
October, 1921; THE WHITE CITY, The Liberator, October, 
1921; To THE INTRENCHED CLASSES, The Liberator, May; 
THE NIGHT FIRE, The Liberator, May; ON THE ROAD, 
The Liberator, March; ABSENCE, The Liberator, March; 
THE WHITE HOUSE, The Liberator, May; NEGRO SPIRITUAL, 
The Liberator, May; THE NEW FORCES, The Liberator, 
Ju.y; JASMINES, The Liberator, August, 1921; ALONE, The 
Liberator, May; AFRICA, The Liberator, August, 1921; 
IN BONDAGE, The Liberator, August, 1921; A MEMORY or 
JUNE, The Liberator, August, 1921; MORNING JOY, The 
Liberator, August, 1921; FLIRTATION, The Liberator, 
August, 1921; To ONE COMING NORTH, The Liberator, 
August, 1921. 

McKenny, Margaret. AURATUM LILY BLOOMING IN OCTOBER, 
Contemporary Verse, October, 1921. 

McLean, Daniel. HOPES, The Measure, June. 

McMulIen, Dysart. JOHN KEATS, The Lyric, August, 1921. 

McPartlin, Catharine. FEBRUARY, The Magnificat, February; 
SAINT JOSEPH, The Magnificat, March. 

McVickar, Dorothy. THOUGHT'S WHITE NIGHT, Contemporary 
Verse, November, 1921. 

Meade, Merrill C. "!N THE SMOKE OF A CIGARETTE,** The Poet 
and Philosopher, September, 1921; TEARS, The Poet and 
Philosopher, January. 

Meeker, Marjorie. BY A WINDOW, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
January; ODE TO MYSELF TRYING TO SLEEP, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, January; COMRADES, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, January; SONG TOR A MAY NIGHT, Poetry 
A Magazine of Verse, January; COLOR OF WATER, Poetry <> 
A Magazine of Verse, January; IN DARKNESS, Poetry* 
A Magazine of Verse, January; LONELY SKY AND SEA, 
Poetry f A Magazine of Verse, January; AND so IT NEVER, 
MATTERED . . . All's Well, November, 1921; AN OLD 
WOMAN, All's Wett, November, 1921. 

Meily, Clarence. THE AGED LOVER PRAYS, The Wave, February. 

Meisinger, Mary. FANTASY, The Lyric West, February. 

Melbourne, Harold. AN OLD NEW YORKER, Munsey's Magazine, 
January. 

Melendez, Angracia. THE LADDES or THE FUERTE, The Measure, 
June. 

Menefee, Kate Handle. How THEY GREW, The Lyric West, April. 

Meredith, Floyd. IMPERMANENCE, The Lyric West, February. 

Merryman, Mildred Plew. To A PUBLIC LIBRARY, The Literary 
Review of the New York Evening Post, June 3; To A LAMP- 
LIGHTER, The Measure, June; IN THE SHADOW, The Lyric, 
June; MOLDS, The Measure, February. 

307 



Metzger, Elizabeth Stewart. VIOLETS, Contemporary Verse, May. 

Mew, Charlotte. To A CHILD IN DEATH, The Bookman, April. 

Meyer, Josephine A. NOCTURNES, Ainslee's Magazine, March. 

Meynell, Viola. A GIRL ADORING, The New Republic, August 24, 
1921. 

Miehm, Clara HARBINGERS, The Country Bard, Spring; THE 
BOYS AT THE MOVIES, The Country Bard, Spring; MY 
FRIEND, The Country Bard, Winter; CHUBBY LITTLE 
FELLOW, The Country Bard, Winter; How LOVE COMES, 
The Country Bard, Spring; WHEN You CAME ALONG, The 
Country Bard, Spring. 

Milam, May Thomas. JENICE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April; 
OPEN A DOOR, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April. 

Millay, Edna St. Vincent. SONNET, The New Republic, August 24, 
1921; Vanity Fair, April. 

Miller, A. York. THE FUTURE, Munsetfs Magazine, July. 

Miller, E. E. THE CROPPER SPEAKS, The Nation, February 22. 

Miller, J Corson. SOMETIMES, LIKE DISTANT Music, Voices, 
A Journal of Verse, Summer; REMEMBERED LOVE, Forum, 
June; FOUR JAPANESE LOVE POEMS: PREMONITION, THE 
MEETING, THE PARTING, EPITAPH, Japan Review, June; 
ON THE BIRTH OP A LITTLE SON, America, September 17, 
1921; HERITAGE, New York Sun, January; Ex NOCTE AD 
LUCEM AETERNAM, TheAve Mana, January 14; TESTAMENT, 
The Sign, January;CHRiSTMAS CAROL, The Sign, December, 
1921; WHERE BEAUTY LIVES, America, January 14; 
JEWELS, The Fortnightly Review, June 1, 1921 ; To PAVLOWA 
IN THE BACCHANAL, Beauty, February; THE OLD MOTHER, 
The Christian Herald, December 3, 1921; A SUNSET ON 
OLIVET, The Sign, November, 1921;THEODORE ROOSEVELT, 
Forum, December, 1921; MAJESTY, America, November 
26, 1921; IN Hoc SIGNO, The Sign, October, 1921; THE 
ENDURING, The Ave Maria, July 15; PREMONITION, Motion 
Picture Classic, March; PILGRIMAGE, The Ave Maria, April 
1; SORROW HAS BORNE ME BEAUTY, America, June 24; 
GROTESQUERIE, Pearson's Magazine, May; REGENERATION, 
Fortnightly Review, June; OBSEQUIES, New York Times, 
November 10, 1921; CONSECRATION, The Ave Maria* 
October 8, 1921; THE LAST JUDGMENT, The Rosary Maga- 
zine, September, 1921; THE SASSAFRAS MAN, The New 
York Times, September 19, 1921; REGINA COELI, The 
Magnificat, February; MADONNA OF THE ROSES, The 
Magmficat, July; IDEAL STREET, The Magnificat, June; 
INAUGURAL, The Magmficat, May; RESURRECTION, The 
Magnificat, April; OUR LADY OP SONG, The Magnificat, 
April; MATER DOLOROSA, The Magnificat, March; ALWAYS 
I FLUNG You GABLANDS, Voices, A Journal of Verse* 
Winter; THE LITTLE HOUSE or LOVE, Tempo, Autumn, 
1921; BENEDICT XV, The Magnificat, February; EVENING 
OVER THE VALLEY, Contemporary Verse, August, 1921, 

308 



Miller, Madeline Sweeney. MY STUDY DESK, The Christian 
Century, March 2, JUNE'S BASKET (At Ullswater Lake), 
The Christian Century, June 15. 

Miller, Nellie Burget. A PAGAN IN CHURCH, The Lync West, May; 
COMPENSATION, The American Poetry Magazine, June. 

Mills, Ellen Morrill. SPUING, THE HERALD, The Lync West, May. 

Mitchell, Cyprus R. DEAR HANDS or JESUS, The Christian 
Century, March 2. 

Mitchell, Ruth Comfort. PULLMAN PORTRAITS, Scnbner's 
Magazine, April; THE TRAVEL BUREAU, The Century 
Magazine, August, 1921; VOYAGERS, Harper's Magazine, 
January. 

Mitchell, Stewart. A SHRINE, The Dial, January. 

Mixter, Florence Kilpatnck. A PRINT BY HOKUSAI, The Bookman, 
September, 1921; ALL SOUL'S EVE, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, August, 1921; LULLABY, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, August, 1921; ALCHEMY, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, August, 1921; CHINESE EPITAPH, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, August, 1921. 

Monica, Sister M. GOLD, The Catholic World, October, 1921. 

Monro, Harold. FATE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; 
ONE MOMENT ONLY, Broom, December, 1921. 

Monroe, Harriet. AT O'NEILL'S POINT GRAND CANYON OP 
ARIZONA, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, July; UTAH, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, July; ON THE TRAIN, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, July; IN HIGH PLACES, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, July; IN THE YELLOWSTONE, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, July. 

Montgomery, F. L. AT DUSK, Munsey's Magazine, March; 
CERTITUDE, Munsey's Magazine, July. 

Montgomery, Louise Moss. EASTER, The Clarksdale Daily 
Register, April 15; To A MOCKING BIRD, The Clarksdale 
Daily Register, July 25; THE DELTA, The Clarksdale Daily 
Register, August 3, 1921. 

Montgomery, Roselle Mercier. THE BOOK, Munsey's Magazine, 
July; THE RESTLESS DEAD, The Outlook, June 21 

Montross, Lois. GALLEON DAWN, The Liberator, November, 1921. 

Moody, Winfield Scott. A REJOINDER, Scribner's Magazine, 
September, 1921. 

Moore, Marianne. PEOPLE'S SURROUNDINGS, The Dial, June; 
THE LABOR OF HERCULES, The Dial, December, 1921; 
NEW YORK, The Dial, December, 1921. 

Moore, Oliver C. A LOVER'S QUARREL, Munsey's Magazine, 
March; LOVE'S TREASURE-TROVE, Munsey's Magazine, 
April; THE DRIFTING YEAR, Munsey's Magazine, May; 
I SHALL BE THERE, Munsey's Magazine 9 June; THE 
ARROGANT POET TO His LADY, Munsey's Magazine, July. 

Moravsky, Maria. AN IMMIGRANT, The Liberator, July. 

Moreland, John Richard. LOVE NEVER COMES Too LATE, 
Tempo, Autumn, 1921; BIRCH TREES, The Personalist 9 

309 



April; "LOVE'S EYES WERE SAD " The Step Ladder, 
April; WERE LOVE so SURE AS THIS, The Step Ladder, 
April; LIFE AND SONG, The Persondist, July; INTENTIONS, 
Onward, May; THE LITTLE ROAD, Motion Picture Classic; 
July; THE WAY OP A MAN AND A MAID, Telling Tales, 
April; THE FORGOTTEN HOUSE, The Nomad, Spring, 
BITTERSWEET, The Classic, September, 1921; How WILL 
I LOVE THEE? Shadowland, February; A PICTURE, The 
Classic, September, 1921; SAND DUNES AND SEA, The 
Classic, September, 1921; THE FORGOTTEN HOUSE, The 
Nomad, Spring, 1922; IN APRIL, The Nomad, Spring; 
WHEN APRIL COMES, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring; 
WHO WOULD THINK OF SORROW, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Spring; **I LOVE ALL THINGS THAT CLUSTER 
ROUND THE SEA," The Lyric, May; TIME, The Lyric, April; 
SEA STALLIONS, The Lyric, January; A WATER COLOR, 
The Lyric, December, 1921; A MINOR POET, The Lyric, 
February; GROWTH, The Lyric, September, 1921; A GRAVE, 
The Lyric, September, 1921; WAITING, The Lyric, Novem- 
ber, 1921; THE MIRACLE, The Lyric, October, 1921; 
BEAUTY, Contemporary Verse, July; LIFE, Contemporary 
Verse, July; How VAST Is HEAVEN? The Lyric, August, 
1921; AUTUMN, The Lyric, October, 1921; SEA SADNESS, 
The Lyric West, December, 1921; RICH MAN, POOR MAN, 
The Lyric West, December, 1921; SAND DUNES, The Lyric 
West, December, 1921; LATE, The Ledger-Dispatch; GIFTS, 
The Ledger, Dispatch, September IS, 1921; THE WELCOME 
GUEST, Motion Picture Classic, December, 1921; THE 
ROSEMARY, Motion Picture Classic, November, 1921; THE 
FORGOTTEN HOUSE, The Nomad, April; APRIL, The 
Midland, April VHJLANELLE, Telling Tales, June. 

Morley, Christopher. PARSON'S PLEASURE, The Literary Review 
of the New York Evening Post, June 10; A CHARM, McClure's 
Magazine, April. 

Morris, Maurice. IOWA, New York Herald, July 23. 

Morton, David, HARBOR TALK, The Bookman, August, 1921; 
SPECTACLE, The Smart Set, April; Music, Harper 1 s Maga- 
zine, May; THESE FIELDS AT EVENING, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, June; VAGRANTS, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer; IN TIME OF LONG HEAT, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Summer. 

Moses, Barr. LATE NOVEMBER, The American Poetry Magazine, 
April. 

Mott, Elizabeth. WISCONSIN EVERMORE! The American Poetry 
Magazine, April. 

Moult, Thomas. HEEDLESS THE BERDS . , . The Bookman, 

f -t August, 1921. 

Mukerji, Dhan Gopal. BEGGAR SONG, The Bookman, July; 
ESCAPADOS, The Bookman, May; GOD-LOVER, The Ameri- 
can Poetry Magazine, February; IN BEDLAM, The American 

310 



Poetry Magazine, February; THE CAGED LION, Contem- 
porary Verse, August, 1921; AN ARAB NUPTIAL, Contem- 
porary Verse, August, 1921. 

Mulheron, Mary. Now LOVE is GONE, The Liberator, October, 
1921. 

Mullins, Helene. CULTURE, The Double Dealer, October, 1921; 
MORNING, The Pagan, August-September, 1921; SUR- 
VIVORS,!?^ Pagan, August-September, 1921; THE ETERNAL 
LOVER, The Pagan, October-November, 1921; SOCIETY 
BELLES, The Pagan, October-November, 1921; FORSAKEN, 
The Pagan, October-November, 1921 ; THE REVOLUTIONIST 
The Pagan, December, 1921, January; ASPIRATION, The 
Pagan, December, 1921, January, AU's Well, March; 
ADIEU, All's Well, February; THE REMEDY, All's Well, 
February; THE POET, All's Wett, April; EPISODE, All's 
Well, January; IMPOSITION, All's Wett, January; INVITA- 
TION, All's Wett, October, 1921; DRAB EXISTENCE, All's 
Well, December, 1921; THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING, AU's 
Well, May; ANSWER To A PLEA, Att's Well, November, 
1921; To A ROSE, All's Well, November, 1921; THE 
PASSER-BY, The Forum; PARTING, The Nomad, Spring, 
1922; THE TOWER OF BABEL, The Nomad, Spring, 1922; A 
CHARACTER Our OF A NOVEL SPEAKS TO THE AUTHOR, 
The American Poetry Magazine, February; PROFITEER, The 
Nomad, Summer 1922, MEMORIAL, The Nomad, Summer, 
1922. 

Munson, Gorham B. CRUDELLISSIMUS DEUS, Tempo, Autumn, 
1921. 

Murphy, Charles R. SONG FOR WINTER, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Winter; THE FLAG, Contemporary Verse, December, 
1921; SHADOW OF FLESH, Contemporary Verse, March; 
DANTE 1921, The Bookman, September, 1921; SPRING, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921; LANDSCAPE, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter; TEE DESERT, Voices, 
A Journal of Verse, Winter; WAVES, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Winter; MID-DAY, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
August, 1921; To EARTH, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
August, 1921; BY THE WISSAHICKON, Independent and 
Weekly, September 24, 1921; HUMILITY, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, August, 1921; SPRANG, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, August, 1921; WINTER, Poetry, A Magasine of 
Verse, August, 1921; SOWN, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
August, 1921; ADVENT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
August, 1921. 

Murphy, Francis. As MIGHT HIGH LADIES, The Liberator, 
June. 

Musser, Benjamin Francis. LOVE'S PRAYER, The Magnificat; 
May; MYSTICAL COMMUNION, The Magnificat, May, 
MENTAL PRAYER, The Magnificat, April; "Ls BON DIEU, 
QU'IL EST BON I" The Magnificat, May. 

311 



Nathan, Robert (Fr&re Rombadille) A MORAL EMBLEM OF 
MATURITY, The Reviewer, November, 1921; AT THE 
SYMPHONY (Cesar Frank D. Miner), The Literary Rewew 
of the New York Evening Post, March 18, LOVE HATH 
No PHYSIC, The Nation, July 5; WHEN THE LAST WORD, 
The Reviewer, July; SECURITY, The Reviewer, May. 
Nevin, Hardwicke. WANDERLUST, Scribner's Magazine, 

November, 1921. 

Newman, Wheeler F. THE JUNK, The Lyric West, March. 
Newman, William DAYS, The Pagan, October-November, 1921; 

To ONE I KNOW, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring. 
Nicholl, Louise Townsend. CANDLES BURNING, The Measure, 
December, 1921; ENCLOSURES, The Literary Review of the 
New York Evening Post, June 10; MURAL, The Measure, 
June; EVE, The Literary Review of the New York Evening 
Pest, March 4; THE MILKMAN, The Measure, March; 
TDOLESSNESS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921; 
THE OLD TURNTABLE, The Measure, December, 1921; 
TBDOT RAIN, The Measure, March, 

Nickerson, Paul S. WAITING, Contemporary Verse, April; VIEW- 
POINT, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer; AWE, The 
Measure, March; THE PEACE OF EVENING, Contemporary 
Verse, April; THE DIFFERENCE, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; 
RUMOR, The Nomad, Summer, 1922; IMPROVISATION, 
The Nomad, Summer, 1922; FANCY, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Summer; SONG, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer; 
The Lyric, May. 

Norman, Hilda Laura. "LA COURSE Du FLAMBEAU," The 
Pagan, August-September, 1921. 

North, Charles J, MY OWN HYMN TO GREATER AMERICA, The 
New Pen, April-May, 

North, Jessica Nelson. AMBUSH, The Measure, September, 1921; 
HUNGER INN, The Double Dealer, December, 1921; 
EXACTING, Ainslee's, April; THE LATE GUEST, All's Well, 
June; BULBS, The Lyric West, April; THE WAGES OF SIN, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, November, 1921, LULLABY, 
The Measure, Sept. 1921; EXCHANGE, The Measure, July. 

Norton, Grace Fallow THOUGHTS ABOUT STARS, Harper's 
Magazine, February; SHY PERFECT FLOWER, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, January; I SHALL REMEMBER, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, January. 

Novak, Ruthele. MOONRISE, Contemporary Veise, March; 
THE GROVE, Contemporary Verse, March, PEACH 
BLOSSOMS, Contemporary Verse, March 

Nusch, Briton Niven, Jr. WILD DUCK, The Measure, March. 

Nye, Jean Palmer. MY PLACE (To Ernest T. Seton). The 
Harrison Searchlight, October 7, 1921; THE LOVING HEART, 
Spokane Chronicle, September 28, 1921; ON THE LONESOME 
ROAD, The Harrison Searchlight, October 14, 1921; LOVE'S 
INNING, The American Poetry Magazine, June. 

312 



Nyman, Georgia Currier. A MAN'S APPRAISEMENT, The Poet 
and. Philosopher, January. 

Oafer, L. THE HORSES OF HELL, The Fugitive, June. 

Oakes, Katharine Sawin. OCTOBER, The Granite Monthly, 
October, 1921, DEAR ECHOES, The Granite Monthly, May. 

Oaks, Gladys. YOUR GIFTS, The Liberator, October, 1921. 

O'Brien-Moore, Ainsworth. ODYSSEUS, Scribners Magazine, 
December, 1921. 

O'Connor, Annel. REALIZATION, The Magnificat, March; THE 
COWARD, The Magnificat, February, THE WHITE QUEEN, 
The Magnificat, February; A GEEAT LITTLE SONG, The 
Magnificat, December, 1921; THE KING'S CAVES, The 
Magnificat, December, 1921; JESUS, The Magnificat, July. 

O'Conor, Nprreys Jepson. IN MEMOBIAM (Alan Seeger, Student 
of Irish), Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer. 

O'Donnell, C. S. C., Charles L. THE MOUNTAIN, The Catholic 
World, August, 1921. 

O'Donoghue, Julia. I THANK THEE, FATHER, The Magnificat, 
July. 

Oliver, Wade. SOLACE, Contemporary Verse, October, 1921; 
THE GEESE FLY SOUTH, Contemporary Verse, October, 
1921; How SHALL I KNOW THEE? Contemporary Verse, 
April; I HAVE KNOWN LAUGHTER, Contemporary Verse, 
April; "WANDERER," Contemporary Verse, April; KINSHIP, 
Contemporary Verse, April; DEDICATION, Contemporary 
Verse, April. 

Olson, Ted. THE BELIEVER, The Lyric West, October, 19 1; 
PURSUIT, The Lyric West, December, 1921; FINALE, 
The Lyric West, October, 1921. 

O'Neil, George. WHERE IT is WINTER, The Measure, February; 
ILLUSION, The Measure, December, 1921; THE MOTHER, 
The Measure, October, 1921; THE BATHER, The Bookman, 
August, 1921; PASSERS-BY, The Measure, October, 1921; 
IN A THEATRE, The Measure, October, 1921. 

O'Neil, Sheik. THE PRICE, The Magnificat, April; POSSESSION, 
The Pagan, December, 1921, January. 

Oppenheim, Bertha. THE HERMIT THRUSH, The Country Bard, 
Spring. 

Osbora, Elizabeth. MAGIC, The Country Bard, Spring; SACHET, 
The Country Bard, Winter, DUSK, The Courtiry Bard 9 
Spring; SPINSTERHOOD, The Pagan, October-November, 
1921; THE ROSE JAR, The Pagan, August-September, 
1921. 

O'Shasnain, Brian Padraic. BEHIND THE BARS, The Catholic 
World, January; VISION, The Catholic World, March. 

Ozaki, Madame Yukio. (Translated from the Japanese.) THE 
UNDERGROUND RIVER, HOPING AGAINST HOPE, AUTUMN 
SADNESS, THE SHOGUN SANETOMO (Twelfth Century); 
THE EVENING HOUR, THE REGENT GOKYOKU (Kamakura 

313 



epoch); SIGHS, MANYOSHU, The Freeman, October 19, 
1921. 

Packard, Doris. THE TRYST, The Lyric West, July-August; 
PRISONER, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter; THIEVERY, 
The Lync West, January; DISTURBED, Voices, A Journal 
of Verse, Spring. 

Packard, Marjorie. THE HOMELAND, The Granite Monthly, 
December, 1921. 

Page, Dorothy. WHIMSY, The Lyric West, February; AUTUMN, 
The Lyric West, September, 1921; BEWILDERMENT, Con- 
temporary Verse, September, 1921. 

Pakter, Paul D. MOOD, The Pagan, December, 1921, January. 

Paradise, Viola I. PITY, The Dial, September, 1921. 

Palazzeschi, Aldo. Rio Bo (Translated by Alfred Kreymborg), 
Broom, December, 1921; CHILONO (Translated by Alfred 
Kreymborg), Broom, December, 1921. 

Parker, Arlita Dodge. GREY DAWNS, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Summer. 

Parker, Helen Adams. MARCH, The Granite Monthly, March; 
THE BIRD'S MESSAGE, The Granite Monthly, April. 

Parker, Hetty C. THE ADVENTURES or MOLUE CULE, The 
Pagan, December, 1921, January. 

Parmenter, Catherine. THE VOICE OP THE WILDERNESS, The 
Lyric West, June. 

Parsons, Mable Holmes. FOR LOVE OF THE ROAD, The American 
Poetry Magazine, February. 

Partridge, Mary E. SUMMER TIME, The Granite Monthly, July. 

Patterson, Antoinette De Coursey. LUCREZIA BORGIA'S LAST 
LETTER, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921; IN 
VENICE LONG AGO, The Lyric West, May; FOLK SONG 
FROM THE DANISH, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, August, 
1921; LILIES OP THE VALLEY, Contemporary Verse, June; 
CHALLENGED, The Lyric West, January; THE MAGICIAN, 
The Lyric West, January; JUDGMENTS OP HISTORY, The 
Lyric West, January. 

Patterson, Dorothy. TELEGRAPH Hm, The Lyric West, March. 

Patterson-Guyol, Louise. GODDESS-MOON, The Granite Monthly, 
October, 1921; To A CYNIC, The Granite Monthly, Novem- 
ber, 1921; SONNET, The Granite Monthly, December, 1921; 
THE GRACIOUS LOVER, The Granite Monthly, December, 
1921. 

Peach, Arthur Wallace. ANSWERED, Munsey's Magazine, 
February. 

Peacock, Marion. THE WOODS ARE BROWN, The Country Bard, 
Winter; DULL, The Country Bard, Spring. 

Peck, Samuel Minturn. BEFORE THE MIRROR AT THREE SCORE, 
Boston Transcript, February 18. 

Pelee, Lillian Button. SHIRLEY POPPIES, The Lyric West, April, 

Percy, William Alexander. OCTOBER, Contemporary Verse, 

314 



October, 1921; THE UNLOVED TO His BELOVED, The 
Bookman, June; SHE GRIEVES IN THE DUSK, Voices, A 
Journal of Verse, Summer; SIGHT AND SOUND, The Lyric; 
THE GREEN BIRD SEETH ISEULT, Contemporary Verse, 
July; THE PILGRIMS OF THE UPLAND MEADOWS, Oon- 
temporary Verse, July; IN THE COLD, BRIGHT WIND, 
Contemporary Verse, July; BETH MARIE, The Double- 
Dealer, May; ONE PATH, Contemporary Verse, February; 
A MEMORY, Contemporary Verse, February; YOUTH, The 
Lyric, July; SIGHT AND SOUND, The Lyric, December, 1921; 
To ONE DYING, The Sewanee Renew, October-December, 
1921; A BURNISHED CALM, Contemporary Verse, February; 
FANFARE, The Lyric, March. 

Perkins, Lucy W. AT TWILIGHT, The Granite Monthly ; Febru- 
ary. 

Perry, Lilla Cabot. How DOES A WOMAN LOVE? Contemporary 
Verse, September, 1921. 

Peter, Lily. CHRYSANTHEMUMS, The American Poetry Magazine, 
Autumn, 1921. 

Peterson, Ames. OLD GARDENS, The Lyric West. February. 

Peyton, John R. C. GEYSER, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
November, 1921. 

Pfeiffer, Edward H. THE IDOL, The North American Review, 
July; AT A WINDOW, Contemporary Verse, November, 1921; 
LONG DAYS, Independent, February 4; NINON D*ENCLOS, 
Literary Review, September 10, 1921; SHE DREAMS OF 
AUTUMN, The Lyric West, November, 1921; JULY, The 
Lyric West, July-August; IN A WOOD, The Lyric West, 
May; LATE LOVE, The American Poetry Magazine, Febru- 
ary; REVELATION, Contemporary Verse, March; A WOMAN'S 
MEMORY, Contemporary Verse, March; THE MIRROR, 
Contemporary Verse, March; CONFESSETH THE IMAGE* 
BREAKER, Contemporary Verse, March; CALIBAN ASPIRING, 
The Lyric West, October, 1921; THE SOWER, The Measure, 
June. 

Philbrook, Helen Mowe. THE RECKONING, The Granite Monthly, 
October, 1921; THE TURNING OF THE TIDE, The Granite 
Monthly, March. 

Phillips, Harriet Duff. "BABY MINE,'* The American Poetry 
Magasdne, February. 

Phillips, Mabel W. CALCUTTA, The Lyric West, May. 

Phillips, Marie Tello. ALBERT TO HORTENSE, The American, 
Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; WATCH WITH ME, The 
American Poetry Magazine, February; A LITTLE WHILE, 
The American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 

Philora. FUGITIVE UNBOUND, The Fugitive, June. 

Phinney, Leslie H. LILACS, The Country Bard, Spring; A 
COUNTRY IDYL, The Country Bard, Spring; WORK-A-DAY 
DREAMS, The Country Bard, Summer. 

Pierso, Jane A. UNCHANGED, The American Poetry Magazine* 

315 



Autumn, 1921; DISSONANCE, The American Poetry Maga* 

%ine, February. 
Pillsbury, Dorothy Pinckney. COASTWISE HILLS, The Lyric 

West, March 
Pinckney, Josephine. SPRING MAKES ME WONDER, Poetry, A 

Magazine of Verse, April 
Pinder, Frances Dickenson. FORGOTTEN, The Lyric, July; 

SONNETS, Contemporary Verse, March; SHALLOWS, Poetry, 

A Magazine of Verse, April; MARSH POOLS, Poetry, A 

Magazine of Verse, April; His FLOWERS, The Forum, April; 

WIND OF APRIL, Poet Lore, Spring; SEA MARSH, Poetry, A 

Magazine of Verse, April. 
Piper, Edwin Ford. QUARRYMAN'S. JOY, The Measure, October, 

1921; OLD MAN WINTER, The Measure, October, 1921; 

BALM, The Measure, October, 1921; UNDER ROOF, The 

Measure, October, 1921. 
Platt, Charles D WHEN WOMEN THINK, The Country Bard, 

Summer; HEART OF GOD, The Country Bard, Winter; WE 

STAND, The Country Bard, Spring; PIG PHILOSOPHY, The 

Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921. 
Plotnik, Eva Helen. SONNET, The University of California 

Chronicle, July. 
Polen, George P. SONNET TO , The Poet and Philosopher, 

January. 
Pool, Ethel. BEDTIME ON A KENTISH FARM, The Country Bard, 

Summer-Autumn, 1921. 
Poole, Fanny Runnells. LODESTARS, The Granite Monthly, July; 

CANOEING ON GRANITE LAKE, The Granite Monthly, 

October, 1921. 
Poole, Louella C. BEYOND THE SUNSET SKIES, The Boston 

Transcript, November SO, 1921. 
Poole, Peter. NIGHT RIDING, The American Poetry Magazine, 

Autumn, 1921; GIFTS, The American Poetry Magazine, June. 
Poore, Dudley. THREE CANTICLES FOR MADAME SAINTE GENE- 

VTEVE, The Did, September, 1921. 
Porter, Anna. A SIERRA JUNIPER, The Lyric West, July-August; 

AT THE Zoo, The Lyric West, July-August. 
Porter, Laura Spencer. SHOW ME THE GATES OF MORNING, 

Harper's Magazine, April; MAGIC, Harper's Magazine, 

November, 1921. 

Potamkin, Harry Alan. MERCUTIO, The Double Dealer, July. 
Potter, William Paris. THE LAST REVEILLE, The American 

Poetry Magazine, February; NATURE'S LURE, The New Pen, 

April-May* 
Pound, Ezra. EIGHTH CANTO, The Dial, May; THREE CANTOS, 

The Dial, August, 1921. 

Pratt, Harry Noyes. THE SHADOW TRAIL, The Lyric West, 
July-August; THE GARDENER, The Lyric West, April; 

GYPSYING IN JUNETIME, The Country Bard, Summer; THE 

SHADOW TRAIL, The Lyric West, July-August, 1921. 

816 



Price, Ruth Clay. WOOD NOTES, The Lyric, April 

Preble, Cora M. THE HOME, The Poet and Philosopher, January. 

Prendergast, Alice M. THE EASTER MIRACLE, The Magnificat, 
April; NIGHT, The Magnificat, February; VISION, The 
Magnificat, December, 1921; THE SPERIT WIND, The Mag- 
nificat, December, 1921. 

Preston, Eugene D. IN THE MIDI, The American Poetry Maga- 
zine, February. 

Preston, Harold P. REPORT, The Nomad, Summer, 1922; AN OLD 
CLERK, AWs Well, March 

Preston, Jane F. FRAIL JOTS, The Reviewer, April. 

Price, Daisy ^Conway. "O SLOW OF HEART," The American 
Magazine, June. 

Price, Ruth Clay. INTERLUDES, The Lyric West, January. 

Prideaux, Rolla. POINT LOMA, The Lyric West, March. 

Prideaux, Tom. FROM A MINARET, Lincoln Lore, December, 
191. 

Prim, Roger. DESTITUTION RAISETH HER VOICE, The Fugitive, 
June; NECROLOGICAL, The Fugitive, June; THE SURE 
HEART, The Fugitive, June; EPITAPH, The Fugitive, June. 

Pugh, Louise K. DAT DAWN DUSK, The Granite Monthly, 
December, 1921. 

Pulsifer, Harold Trowbridge. THE DUEL, The Outlook, June 28; 
HAVEN, The Outlook, September 14, 1921; THOUGHTS 
UPON A WALK WITH NATALIE, MY NIECE, AT HOUGHTON 
FARM, The Outlook, November 9, 1921; THE WATERS OF 
BETHESDA, The Atlantic Monthly, June; HOME HUNGER, 
The Outlook, October 5, 1921; THE DUEL, The Outlook, 
June 28. 

Purnell, IdeUa. AFTERNOON SONG, The Lyric West, May; 
EVENING SONG, The Lyric West, May. 

Putnam, F. S. PLUMS, The Midland, A Magazine of the Middle 
West, September-October, 1921; THE WILD CRAB-APPLE 
TREE, The Midland, A Magazine of the Middle West, 
September-October, 1921; To REMEMBER, The Midland, A 
Magazine of the Middle West, September-October, 1921. 

Queerman, Joe. STEERS, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 
1921. 

Quimby, Mary Abbott. THE BETTER WAT, The New Pen, April- 
May; INNOCENT MAGIC, The New Pen, April-May. 

Quinter, George E. BIRDS, Contemporary Verse, February; 
VIGNETTE, The Pagan, October-November, 1921. 

Quirk, S. J., Charles. PASTEL (EVENING), The Catholic World, 
August, 1921 ; MY MOTHER, The Cathohc World, November, 
1921; THE LOVERS, The Catholic World, December, 1921; 
UNSEEN! The Catholic World, February; A LITTLE BOY 
QUESTIONS THE STARS, The Catholic World, May; INCON- 
SEQUENTIAL, The Lyric, March; SOUVENANCE DB LOUVAIN, 
The American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; AUTUMNAL 

317 



SOLILOQUY, The Magnificat^ December, 1921; A PROMISE 
OP SPRING, The Magnificat, April. 

R., V. R. RED DAHLIAS, The Lyric, August, 1921. 

Rain, Pixie. POOR PUSSY-WILLOWS, Lincoln Lore, February. 

Raison, Milton. BAFFLED, The Bookman, April; THE CABIN 

PASSES, The Bookman, July; VALPARAISO, The Bookman, 

February; PORTRAIT OF A SAILOR, The Century Magazine, 

April; THE LOOKOUT, The Century Magazine, April; 

THE CHEATED MATE, Thf Century Magazine, April; 

THE NIGHT WATCHMAN, The Century Magazine, April. 

Ranlett, Susanne Alice. PLEA OF THE HEART OF JESUS (From 

the German), The Magnificat, June. 

Ravenel, Beatrice. SPELL, Contemporary Verse, December, 1921; 
THE INDIAN TO His TREE, Contemporary Verse, December, 
1921; THE ONLY CHILD, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
April; WHITE AZALEAS IN MAGNOLIA GARDENS, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, April; LILL' ANGELS, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, April; COASTS, The Lync, July; DEW, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April; HARBOR WATER, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April. 

Raymund, Bernard. HAVOC, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; NEW LOVE, 
Tempo, Autumn, 1921; POSSESSION, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; 
THE QUICKENING, The Wave, June; RIVER SONG FOR A 
RED DEER, The Liberator, December, 1921; THERE is A 
WOOD, The Liberator, February; Is THERE JOY ? The 
Wave, June; THESE FIELDS, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Winter; EMPTY, All's Well, September, 1921; GRAY AND 
ROSE, All's Well, September, 1921; IN A COLD WIND, 
Airs Well, September, 1921; WEATHER SIGN, AWs Well, 
August, 1921; ON A HOLIDAY, The Lyric West, March; 
COLD, The Midland, A Magazine of the Middle West, 
August, t!921; ,LAKE IN THE HILLS, The Midland, A 
Magazine of the Middle West, August, 1921; EARLY START, 
The Midland, A Magazine of the Middle West, August, 1921; 
OVER THE HTT.I. The Lyric West, June. 

Recht, Charles. SUNDOWN IN AMERICA, The Liberator, July. 

Redegar, Herb. CHANGE OF HEART, The Country Bard, Spring; 
ON THE Pmr TRAIL, The Country Bard, Winter; REJUVE- 
NATION, The Country Bard, Spring. 

Redman, Ben Ray. COLOPHON, The Nation, February 22; POST 
CINERES GLORIA VENTT, The Nation, July 5; SONNET, 
Harper's Magazine, June; SEAWARD, The Reviewer, April. 

Reed, Anna Nelson. KEATS 1821-1921, The Liberator, February. 

Reese, Lizette Woodworth. TEE YOUNG BEAUTY, The Lyric, 
April; THE YOUNG GHOSTS, The Literary Remew of the 
New York Evening Post, May 27. 

Reid, Betty LITTLE CATERPILLAR, Lincoln Lore, March. 

Reynolds, Julia R. To SAPPHO, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
January. 

sift 



Rice, Al. THE EDUCATED BOY, The Country Bard, Summer- 

Autmnn, 1921; BOY TIME AND GIRL TIME, The Country 

Bard, Spring. 
Rice, Cale Young. STORM APPARITIONS, The Reviewer, June; 

COLD, The Double Dealer, December, 1921; ALTERATION, 

The Reviewer, November, 1921; VICTORY, All's Well, June; 

ART, The Double Dealer, April; THE JUNGLE, Harper's 

Magazine, July. 

Rice, Susan. I WASH MY DISHES, The Christian Century, April 27. 
Richards, Elizabeth Davis. CONFLICT, The Nomad, Summer, 

1922; ALTHOUGH WE PART, The American Poetry Magazine, 

June. 
Richardson, Isla PaschaL A FIELD or GOLDENROD, The American 

Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921, 
Richardson, Mabel K. THE PERSIAN RUG, The American Poetry 

Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 
Richardson, Mary. THE PILGRIM WOMAN, The Granite Monthly, 

February. 
Richmond, Charles A. BROTHER JONATHAN'S OPPORTUNITIES, 

The Outlook, April 19. 
Ridge, Lola. WASTE, Broom, June; HOSPITAL NIGHTS, Broom, 

November, 1921; THE WHITE BIRD, Poetry, A Magazine of 

Verse, July; BEES, The Bookman, June; THE SPILLING 

OF THE WINE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, July. 
Riggs, R. Lynn. SONG, The Smart Set, April; I WAS A KING, 

The Smart Set, April, 

Rihani, Ameen. A MAYA SONG, The Step Ladder, June 
Rilke, Rainer Maria. CHARLES THE TWELFTH OF SWEDEN 

RIDES IN THE UKRAINE (Translated by Jessie Lemont), 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, September, 1921. 
Ripley, Sherman. AT EVENTIDE, The Rotarian, April; INCENSE, 

Adventure, March 30; THE PAINTER OF WINDOWS, The 

Boy Scouts* Magazine, March; CRAZY BILLY, Adventure, 

March 10. 
Rittenhouse, Jessie. THE MIRACLE, The Lyric West, November, 

1921; UNSUNG, The Lyric West, November, 1921; THE 

SECRET, The Lyric West, November, 1921; THE LAD OF 

FLANDERS, McClure's Magazine, March; VISION, The 

Bookman, September, 1921. 
Ritter, Margaret Tod. SCULPTURE, The Measure, October, 1921; 

SONATA APASSIONATO, Contemporary Verse, January. 
Rivola, Flora Shufelt. QUESTION, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

May. 
Bobbins, Jacob. FROM THE RUSSIAN OF MAXIMILIAN VOLOSHIN, 

The Liberator, September, 1921. 

Roberts, Edna J. BEACON LIGHTS, The Country Bard, Winter. 
Roberts, Florence Cecilia. THE DIVER, The American Poetry 

Magazine, February. 
Roberts, Lillian Mayfield. THE PROFESSOR'S WIFE, Scribner's 

Magazine, November, 1921, 

819 



Robeson, H. THE BROOK, Contemporary Verse, June. 

Robinson, Anne Mathilde. A DAY DREAM, The Country Bard, 
Summer. 

Robinson, Edwin Arlington. CAPUT MOKTTTUM, The Yale Review, 
October, 1921. 

Rodker, John. THEATRE, Broom, April. 

Roe, Robert J. GREEN LOGS, The Bookman, January; HUMBLE, 
Contemporary Verse, January; MORAL, Contemporary 
Verse, January; LESSON, Contemporary Verse, January; 
GANGWAY, Contemporary Verse, January; ORIENTAL LOVE 
SONG, Contemporary Verse, August, 1921; INSIGHT, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, June; SAILOR, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, June; APPARITION, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
June; CAUTIOUS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June; 
TYPHOON, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June; SEA, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, June; WIND, Poetry, A Magassine of 
Verse, June; MOON, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June; 
MEINSELF, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June; DEAD 
CALM, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921; BARNEY, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June; JACK, Poetry, A 
Magassine of Verse, June; STABS, Poetry, A Magassine of 
Verse, June. 

Rollins, Leighton. BE KIND TO ME DEATH, Springfield Republican, 
December, 1921; HE DREAMED OF BEAUTY, The Granite 
Monthly, October, 1921. 

Romany, Robin. A LONGING, The Lyric West, September, 1921. 

Root, E. Merrill. THE FARMER, The Liberator, March; 
A SOUTHERN HOLIDAY, The Liberator, March; DREAD- 
NOUGHT, The Liberator, July; ANTIQUITY, The Liberator, 
July. 

Rope, Reverend H. E. G. No ABIDING CITY, The Magnificat, 
July, 

Rorty, James, HIGH FOG, The Jjiberator, July; THE BELL, The 
Nation, May 24; WORDS, The Nation, July 26. 

Rosenthal, Albert A. AUBADE, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; AUTUMN, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921; SYNCRASY, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, July; ECHO, The Pagan, 
August-September, 1921; ASTERS (D. D.), The Pagan, 
October-November, 1921; A POET, The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921, 

Ross, Gertrude Robinson. NATIVITY, The Catholic World, 
December, 1921. 

Ross, Kathleen Wheeler. WORRY, The Poet and Philosopher, 
September, 1921; FORGIVENESS, The Poet and Philosopher, 
September, 1921; His TALENT, The Poet and Philosopher, 
September, 1921; HOLDIN* ON, The Poet and Philosopher, 
September, 1921; ROOM AT THE TOP, The Poet and 
Philosopher, September, 1921. 

Rounds, Emma. THE SPOILERS, Lincoln Lore, April; THE SEA 
KING'S PALACE, Lincoln Lore, December, 1921. 

320 



Howies, George. PICTURES ON MY JAPANESE FAN, The Lyric 
West, January; DUETTE, The Lyric West, September, 1921. 

Ruble, Esther Louise. FIRST SNOW, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse* January. 

Rumry, F. Layton. REFLECTIONS, The American Poetry Magazine, 
February; FAIRIE PONDEEY, Contemporary Verse, April. 

Runbeck, Margie-Lee BALLET (In a Dandelion Patch), Voices, 
A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921; CYCLE, The American 
Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; LULLABYE, The American 
Poetry Magazine, February. 

Russell, Edith M. VISION, The Poet and Philosopher, September, 
1921. 

Russell, Sydney King. THE YOUNG DAVID, The Lyric West, May; 
DESIRE, The Lync West, October, 1921; WOODLAND FEAB, 
The Lyric West, October, 1921. 

Russmann, Helen C. FANTASY, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
June. 

Ruthrauff, Saidee Gerard. FOE APRIL, The Lync West, April. 

Rutledge, Archibald. RADIO, Scribner's Magazine, July. 

Ryan, Kathryn White. THE WASHINGTON MONUMENT, 
Springfield Republican, October 16, 1921; T.A-K-TC SUPERIOR 
(Unsalted Sea), The Forum, November, 1921; ATONEMENT: 
ARLINGTON, NOVEMBER 11, 1921, The Catholic World, 
December, 1921; CONVENT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
June; MOONLIGHT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June; 
MOON, The Measure, July; DAY, The Measure, July; 
DISARMAMENT AND ARLINGTON (November 11, 1921), 
The Catholic World, December, 1921; IRELAND: INVOCA- 
TION, The Nation; FOG, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
November, 1921; RIVER, The Measure, July; SOLDIERS, 
The Measure, July. 

Sabel, Marx G. THE CYNIC SHAMED, The Double Dealer, August- 
September, 1921; AMOR PATITUR MORAS SENECA, 
Tempo, Autumn, 1921; IMMORTAL CAUSE, The Reviewer, 
June; IF ONLY, The Reviewer, March; THE SNARE, The 
Nomad, Spring, 1922; THE MASQUERADER, Voices, A 
Journal of Verse, Winter; PRECIPITATE, The Lyric, July; 
THE TRYST, The Lyric, March; FELLOW FIGHTER, The 
Midland, A Magazine of the Middle West, August, 1921; 
THE ABANDONED PLACE, The Midland, A Magazine of 
the Middle West, August, 1921; THE TALKER, Voices, 
A Journal of Verse, Summer; INCOMPARABLE, Voices, A 
Journal of Verse, Summer; OFF! The Double Dealer, 
March; RECORDITION, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April; 
THE CORE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, April. 

Sachiwo Ito. THE CONSEQUENCE (Translated from the Japanese 
by Madam YuMo Ozaki), The Freeman, December 7, 1921; 
LOVE'S LESSON (Translated from the Japanese by Madam 
YuMo Ozaki), The Freeman, December 7, 1921. 

321 



Sackville, Margaret. ADVENTUHE, The New Republic, July 26. 
St. Jerome, Mother. THE BELLS OF ST. QUINTIN, The Magnificat, 

December, 1921. 

St. John, S. M. RELIGIOUS PROFESSION-, The Magnificat, Decem- 
ber, 1921; A SUMMER IDYL, The Magnificat, July; VISITA- 
TION, The Magnificat, June. 

Salbador, Alva Fisher. So SORET DEAR, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; THE SMILE OP GOD, The Country 
Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; SEEN FROM A WINDOW, 
The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; COLOR MAGIC, 
The Country Bard, Spring; ATONEMENT, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; THE ITALIAN WOMAN, The 
Country Bard, Spring. 

Salinger, David. RAINY SEASON, All's Well, August, 1921. 
Saltus, Edgar. THE FEAST, The Wave, February. 
Sandburg, Carl. MEDLEY, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March; 
THE NAKED STRANGER, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
March; FEATHER LIGHTS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
March; MOON-RIDERS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
March; WASHINGTON MONUMENT BY NIGHT, Harper's 
Magazine, June; THE WINDY CITY, The New Republic, 
March 22; THE RAKEOFF AND THE GETAWAY, Broom, May; 
AMBASSADORS OF GRIEF, The Bookman, April; PRIMER 
LESSON, The Bookman, March; THIS FOR THE MOON 
YES? The Bookman, March; GYPSY MOTHER, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, March; PROUD OF THEIR RAGS, The 
Century Magazine, May; MARCH OF THE HUNGRY MOUN- 
TAINS, The Century Magazine, May; BITTER SUMMER 
THOUGHTS, The Century Magazine, May; SLABS OF THE 
SUNBURNT WEST, The Dial, March; AND So TODAY, The 
Freeman, January 18; AT THE GATES OF TOMBS, The 
Liberator, January. 

Sanders, Emmy Veronica. STIGMA, The Double Dealer, April; 
THE PINE TREE, Contemporary Verse, January; DAI 
BUTSU, Contemporary Verse, January; TEA TIME, The 
Measure, October, 1921; THE Cow, The Measure, October, 
1921. 
Sangster, Margaret E. CHRISTMAS SONG, Ainslee's, January; 

GEISHA GIRL, Ainslee's, April. 

Santmyer, Helen. THE PRAIRIE TOWN, The Bookman, Dec., 1921. 
Saphier, William. IDLE AFTERNOON, The Double Dealer, August- 
September, 1921. 

Sapir, Edward. BARKER, The Pagan, October-November, 1921; 
MIST AND GLEAM, The Pagan, December, 1921, January; 
THE MOON'S NOT ALWAYS BEAUTIFUL, The Double Dealer, 
October, 1921; VESTMENTS, The Double Dealer, January; 
THE KING OF THULE, The Nation, July 26; UPHOLDING 
THE WORLD (Based on a Jewish Folk-belief), The Double 
Dealer, November, 1921; THE HOUSE TO THE INCOMING 
TENANTS, The Nation, September 7, 1922. 

322 



Sarett, Lew. THE SWORD (To E. M., after reading "The Man 
with the Hoe"), The Step Ladder, July, THUNDERDRUMS, 
A CHIPPEWA WAR-MEDICINE DANCE, The Lyric West, 
October, 1921; INDIAN SUMMER, Contemporary Verse, 
November, 1921; FISHER OP STARS, The Lyric West, June; 
LOOK FOR ME, Contemporary Verse, November, 1921; 
DROUGHT, Contemporary Verse, November, 1921; MESA- 
MIST, Contemporary Verse, November, 1921; TETON 
MOUNTAIN, Contemporary Verse, November, 1921; WIND 
IN THE PINE, Contemporary Verse, November, 1921; To A 
DEAD PEMBINA WARRIOR, The Lyric West, March; INDIAN 
SLEEP SONG, The North American Renew, January; MAPLE- 
SUGAR SONG, Broom, November, 1921; LEAVE MJE TO Mr 
OWN, The Liberator, November, 1921; OLD OAK, Voices, 
A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 1921; THE WEAVER, Con- 
temporary Verse, August, 1921; THE TRIBE SINGS, The 
Lyric West, October, 1921; IRON-WIND DANCES, The 
Lyric West, October, 1921; JUMPING-RIVER DANCES, The 
Lyric West, October, 1921; DOUBLE-BEAR DANCE, The 
Lyric West, October, 1921; GHOST-WOLF DANCES, The 
Lyric West, October, 1921. 

Sargent, Sarah. BESSIE, Lincoln Lore, April. 

Sargent, William D. O WIND A-BLOWING, Lincoln Lore f 
March. 

Satterlee, Anna E. BIRTHDAYS, The Lyric West, July-August. 

Saul, George Brandon. DOVES, Contemporary Verse, April; 
SONNET, Contemporary Verse, April; "AND WILL THE 
DAWN BE SAD WITH LITTLE BELLS," Contemporary Verse, 
November, 1921; DIALOGUE, Contemporary Verse, Novem- 
ber, 1921; "!T is NIGHT AND THE WIND BLOWS," Con- 
temporary Verse, November, 1921; "I SAW THE WHITE 
CHRIST LIKE A FLAME," Contemporary Verse, November, 
1921; NIGHT AND EAIN, Contemporary Vesre, November, 
1921; FIGURE, The New Republic, June 14; CHORUS, The 
New Republic, May 10; THE YEARS Go, Voices, A Journal 
of Verse, Autumn, 1921; PRATER, Voices, A Journal of 
Verae, Winter; WHEN DAWN is Music ON THE SNOW, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter; SONNET, Voices, A 
Journal of Verse, Winter; THERE is NO NEED FOR LOVE, 
The Lyric, January; THE END, The Lyric, December, 1921; 
SONNETS TOR MARGARET, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer; ELIZABETH, Contemporary Verse, April; ALL, 
Contemporary Verse, August, 1921; THE SONG IN THE 
NIGHT, Contemporary Verse, August, 1921; I THOUGHT OF 
Yotr AT FALL OF NIGHT, Contemporary Verse, August, 
1921; MEMORY, Contemporary Verse, November, 1921. 

Saunders, Whitelaw. THE DEAD WOMAN, ATI's Well, November, 
1921; PAGAN, Pagan, December, 1921, January; A WOOD- 
CARVING, The Lyric West, June; THE WOMAN WITH A FAN, 
Tempo, Autumn; 1921. 



Savage, Edgar. SELF-SLAIN, The Wave, January; MICHAEL, 
The Wave, January. 

Savage, Henry. THE WITCH, The Wave, February. ^ 

Savage, Mary Stebbins. THE PATRIOT. The Christian Century, 
July 6. 

Sawyer, M. White. SPRING PROMISE, The Granite Monthly, 
June. 

Scheffauer, Ethel Talbot. THE TROPIC SCREEN, The Double 
Dealer, August-September, 1921 

Schmidt, Jr., Fritz L. WASHINGTON, The Poet and Philosopher, 
September, 1921; CHRISTMAS MEMORIES, The Poet and 
Philosopher, January; To THE NEW YEAR 1922, The 
Poet and Philosopher, January. 

Schneider, Isidor. CONVERSATION, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
June; THE MIST, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June; THE 
BEGGAR AND THE VENDOR, The Measure January; THE 
LAMPPOSTS, The Measure, January; EMPTY Lor, The 
Measure, January; THE PEOPLE, The Measure, January; 
THE HOUSES, The Measure, January; THE GUTTER, The 
Measure, January; SUNSET, The Measure, January. 

Schriftgeisser, Hetty B. FIVE SENSE PICTURES: SIGHT, SMELL, 
TASTE, TOUCH, HEARING. Boston Teachers' News Letter; 
MARLEEN WANTED THE MOON, Boston Teachers' News 
Letter; FOUR VOICES GIVE THANKS: A CHILD SPEAKS, 
A LOVER SPEAKS, THE VOICE or THE RETURNED WARRIOR, 
THE VOICE OF AGE, Boston Teachers' News Letter. 

Schutze, Lenore. SONNET, To ALFRED TENNYSON, The Lyric 
West, July-August. 

Schutze, Martin. MAY, The Freeman, May 31. 

Schwartz, Ida D. WHITE TRASH (Mingo County, W. Va ), The 
Pagan, October-November, 1921; BEFORE DAWN. The 
Nomad, Spring, 1922. 

Scollard, Clinton. THE WHITE THOUGHT, Harper's Magazine, 
January; VAGABOND DAYS, Harper's Magazine, June; 
IN TEE PLAZA (Saint Augustine), The Lyric, May; 
TOMORROW, Mwisey's Magazine, June; THE JOURNEY, 
Munsey's Magazine, May; MOONLIGHT, Munsey's Maga- 
zine, February; CHRISTMAS CANTICLE, Scribner's Maga- 
zine, December, 1921; THE NUMBERED HOURS, Ainslee's 
Magazine, January. 

Scollard, Elisabeth. THE GARDEN, Munsey's Magazine, June. 

Scott, Arlie Wyatt. THE SECRET IMPETUS, The Poet and Phi- 
losopher, September, 1921. 

Scruggs, E. J. THE CALL, The Nomad, Spring, 1922. 

Seabury, David. GETHSEMANE, Harper's Magazine, March. 

Seabury, Emma Playter. PICTURES, The Step Ladder, July. 

Searcy, Helene. APRIL DAWN, The Lyric West, April; PERSON- 
ALITY, The Lyric West, April. 

Seawell, Ellen. CANA, The American Poetry Magazine, June; 
THE CRUCIFIX, The American Poetry Magazine, February. 

324 



Seiffert, Marjorie Allen. SEQUENCE, Contemporary Verse, May; 
ENIGMA, Voices, A Magazine of Verse, Summer. 

Selver, P. SUBURBAN LANDSCAPE, Broom, February. 

Seton, Harold. THE LITTLE THINGS OF LIFE, Munsey's Magazine, 
March; THE PLATERS AND THEIR PLATS, Munsey's 
Magazine, February; PUZZLES IN PROVERBS, Munsey's 
Magazine, January. 

Seymour, George Steele. BALLADE or ANT TOWN, The Step 
Ladder, February; SCARAMOUCHE, The Step Ladder, June. 

Shallcross, Eleanor Custis. RAIN, The Catholic World, May. 

Shanks, Edward. WINTER TREES, The Measure, March; THE 
WIND, The Measure, March; LEW is PIAGET, ALBA: FROM 
THE PROVENCAL, The Reviewer, December, 1921. 

Shao Yeh (8th Century A.D.). LOOKING Our ON ONE DEPARTING 
(Translated from the Chinese by Albion N Fellows and 
T. Y. Leo), The Measure, June. 

Sharpman, Maude Ralston. INDIA'S ROLL CALL, Unity, June 1. 

Sharp, Clarence A. MT LESSER SONGS, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921 ; A TWILIGHT PICTURE, The Country 
Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; SONG OF A TEAM DRIVER, 
The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; HER REBUKE, 
The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; A PRATER, 
The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; O I COULD 
WRITE, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; IN 
MT AUTUMN GARDEN, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921; JUST TO BE OUT, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; BOTHOOD SCENES, The Country 
Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; CB^NTICLEER, The 
Country Bard, Winter; RURAL ADVICES, The Country Bard, 
Winter; GIVING UP, The Country Bard, Winter; RAINT 
DAT VERSES, The Country Bard, Winter; A JANUART BOT, 
The Country Bard, Winter; SNOWBIRDS, The Country Bard, 
Winter; THE SMELL o' THE HAT, The Country Bard, 
Winter; O SING ME SOME SONG, The Country Bard, Spring; 
WORK CREED OF A REAL MAN, The Country Bard, Spring; 
JOSEPH*S KIND, The Country Bard, Spring; INSPIRATION, 
The Country Bard, Spring; THE PLEA AT ELLIS ISLAND, 
The Country Bard, Spring; To CLTTIE, The Country Bard, 
Spring; CONCERNING SWALLOWS, ETC., The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; Too EAGER, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; ABSOLUTE FAITH, The Country 
Bard, Spring; IMPRESSIONISM, The Country Bard, Winter; 
BT THE COAL HEAVER, The Country Bard, Winter; EIGHT- 
EEN AND FEFTT, The Country Bard, Winter; A NOVEMBER 
SONG, The Country Bard, Winter; THE RIVER, The Country 
Bard, Winter; Is IT You? The Country Bard, Winter; 
A BARN SONG, DOWN BT THE MEADOW, PICK HER FOR A 
WIPE, MT HORSE JACK, ON AN APRIL AFTERNOON, A 
SPRING SERMON, BARNTARD PHILOSOPHT, MUTTON ONLT, 
The Country Bard, Spring; THE VILLAGE BOT, The Country 

325 



Bard, Spring; GIVE Us DREAMS, The Country Bard, 
Summer; WHERE MOUNTAIN LAURELS BLOOM, The 
Country Bard, Summer; HE WAVES His CAP, The Country 
Bard, Summer; I PLOW MY ORCHARD SLOPES, The Country 
Bard, Spring; To THAT LITTLE BIRD, The Country Bard, 
Spring; WHITE CLOVER, The Country Bard, Spring; FRA 
ANGELICO, The Country Bard, Summer; A COMRADESHIP, 
The Country Bard, Winter; THE TREES, The Country Bard, 
Winter; KERSEY HICKORIES, The Country Bard, Winter; 
SONG OF A CITY BARD, The Country Bard, Winter; THE 
PROPHECY, The Country Bard, Winter; OLD SPORTS, The 
Country Bard, Winter; THE GRAVEDIGGER'S RESOLUTION, 
The Country Bard, Winter; SPRING MORNING, The Country 
Bard, Spring; SICK CHICKENS, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921; To SOME WOMEN, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; OVEREDUCATED, The Country 
Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; GOODNESS AND GOODNESS, 
The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; To A WORRIED 
POET, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; CURES, 
The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; INFORMATION, 
The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; Too BAD! 
The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; THE LOLLYPOP 
KID, The Country Bard, Summer- Autumn, 1921; TIME 
AGAIN, The Country Bard, Sunamer-Autum , 1921; AUTUMN 
AND THE STRAW-STACKS, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921; A BITE IN AN APPLE, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; AT THE PLOW, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; EXPLAINING JUNE, The Country 
Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921. 

Shedd, John A. THE LIVING DANTE, The Forum, Dante Number, 
1921. 

Shepard, Alice M. AWAKENINGS, The Granite Monthly, March. 

Shepherd, Dombey. CONCORDIA, The American Poetry Magazine, 
February; THE SUPREME ADVENTURE, The American 
Poetry Magazine, February; REFULGENCE (Joseph Andrew 
Galahad), The American Poetry Magazine, June; FREEDOM, 
Contemporary Verse, December, 1921; OMNIPRESENCE, 
Contemporary Verse, December, 1921; THE OUTCAST, 
Contemporary Verse, December, 1921. 

Sherwood, Margaret. THE PRESENT HOUR, Scribner*s Magazine, 
February. 

Shipman, Clare. ORANGE PEKOE, The Lyric West, January; 
RECOMPENSE, The Lyric West, January. 

Sholl, Anna McClure. RUYSBROECK, The Catholic World, January. 

Siegrist, Mary. REALITY, New York Herald, January 8; MAKERS 
OF Music, IN INVOCATION, The New York Times, July SO; 
THE SILENT SINGER, The New York Times, September 18, 
1921; WHOM SPRING LOVES BEST, The New York Times, 
March 12; GANDHI, The Survey, April 8; MAIN STREET 
MUMBLES ON, The New York Times, January 27; MY 



TORCH, The Gleaner, June; THE POETS, The New York 
Times, July 17. 

Sigmund, Jay G. THE WHITE MOMENT, The Lyric, April; 
THISTLE, The American Poetry Magazine, June; COWSLIPS, 
The Country Bard, Spring; THE BUILDER, The Country 
Bard, Spring; WE WHO FORGET, The Country Bard, Spring; 
BEWILDERMENT, The Pagan, December, 1921, January; 
FOSSILS, Davenport Times, November 2, 1921; THE 
LETTER-CARRIER, Davenport Times, November 7, 1921; 
YEARS, Rock Island Argus, November 1, 1921; A BREAK 
IN THE DROUGHT, Chicago Post, July 7; THE YELLOW, 
BREASTED CHAT, Rock Island Argus, July 8; To A GARDEN, 
SNAIL, Rock Island Argus, July 10; THE CICADA, Cedar 
Rapids Republican, July 18; MUSHROOMS, The Midland, A 
Magazine of Verse, July; FADED WREATH, Davenport Times. 
December, 5, 11921; BLUE-JAY, Cedar Rapids Republican, 
December 16, 1921; A FUR COAT, J&?c& Island Argus, De- 
cember 3, 1921; AVIATORS, Des Moines Register and Leader, 
February; RABBITS, Sports Ajttd, February; THE PARROT- 
Cincinnati Times Star, October 25, 1921; BARNACLES, The 
Springfield Republican, October 23, 1921; BIRDS OP PREY, 
American Poetry Magazine, Midsummer, 1921; To MY 
DAUGHTER, Cedar Rapids Republican, May 27; JUNE 
WOODS, Rock Island Argus, May 27, STORM, Rock Island 
Argus, June 4; SACRED Lais, The Chicago Post, June 4; To 
A GOLDFINCH, Rock Island, Argus, April 8; LADY'S MAID, 
Rock Island Argus, April 1; To A SCISSORS GRINDER, The 
Chicago Post, April 24; PAGEANT, The Chicago Post, March 
31; IN APRIL, Rock Island Argus, April; TEMPTED, Rock 
Island Argus, March 29; A RAIN SONG, Cedar Rapids Repub- 
lican, May 27; THE MINISTER'S WIFE, The Country Bard, 
December, 1921; THE HOUSE OF THE LIVING DEAD, Rock 
Island Argus, April 22; THE BAT, The Chicago Post, March 
30; TRAIN MESSAGE, Rock Island Argus, April 3; THE 
WISE MAN, Rock Island Argus, October 17, 1921; THE 
FATHER OP WATERS, Rock Island Argus, October 11, 1921; 
WALT WHITMAN, The Springfield Republican; THE ATHE- 
NIAN, Rock Island Argus, February; THE KILLERS, Rock 
Island Argus, March 5; JOHN TURNER, M.D., Rock Island 
Argus, February 28. 

Sill, Louise Morgan. TIGERS, Harper's Magazine, January. 

Simmons, Laura. APOCALYPSE, The Catholic World, June; 

?* | BARTIMEUS, The Catholic World, November, 1921. 

Simons, Hi. PORTRAIT OF AN OLD ROUE, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, February; THE STAR, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
February; TAPS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; 
DUST IN THE ROAD, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; 
SCINTILLATIONS, The Wave, June; TREE, The Wave, June; 
MOONRISE, The Wave, June; ETERNALLY, The Wave, June. 

Simple, Sam. CONCERNTN* PAINTIN*, The Country Bard, Winter. 

327 



Simpson, William H. BAREBACK, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
May; NAVAJO, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May; DESERT 
NIGHT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May; MANANA, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May, CAMPO SANTO, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, May; HEPI SONG OF THE DESERT, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May; LES LLANOS, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, May; DE NOCHE, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, May; So LITTLE You ARE, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, May; YUCCA is YELLOWING, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, May; TEWA SONG, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
May; INARTICCIIATE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May; 
COUNTRY NIGHT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May; TREES 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May; LANDSCAPE, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, May; BURRO LOADS, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, May. 

Sitwell, Osbert. MAXTXE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June. 

Skeen, Ruth Loomis. A MOTHER'S PRATER, The Magnificat, 
February; To THE LITTLE FLOWER, The Magnificat, 
February; IN SANTA FE, The Step Ladder, July; THE 
HILLS OF SANTA FE, The Lyric West, June; THE BLUE BIRD, 
The Lyric West, June. 

Skinner, Constance Lindsay. MANDOLINES UNDER THE MOON, 
The Lyric West, May; CREED, The Lyric West, December, 
1921; As THE RIVERS, Contemporary Verse, September, 
1921; SONG OF DAVID BEFORE SAUL, The Lyric West, 
September, 1921; WINTER DAWN, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, February; NAK-Ku REPLIES, The Lyric West, 
July-August; KAN-IL-LAK THE SINGER TO NAK-KU, The 
Lyric West, July-August. 

Sloan, J. Blanding. ATLAS, The Century Magazine, April. 

Sloan, J. Vandervoort. LIFE AND SLEEP, The Double Dealer, 
August-September, 1921. 

Smith, Adeline Holton. THE WOODSEY TRAIL, The Granite 
Monthly, June; MORNING IN THE VALLEY OF THE MAD 
RIVER, The Grande Monthly, February; SPRING AND DAWN 
(An Allegory), The Granite Monthly, April. 

Smith, Alfred J. STORMS, The Poet and Philosopher, Sept., 1921. 

Smith, Clark Ashton. IN LEMURIA, The Lyric West, July-August; 
THE INFINITE QUEST, The Lyric West, July- August; 
THE ABSENCE OF THE MUSE, The Lyric West, October, 
1921; HAUNTING, The Lyric West, February; ROSAMYSTICA, 
The lyric West, December, 1921. 

Smith, Harriet E. NOVEMBER, The Pagan, August-September, 
1921. 

Smith, Laurine. SWALLOWS BRUSH A POOL, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, October, 1921; WIND, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, October, 1921; JOY, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
October, 1921; CEREMONY, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
October, 1921; FIRST COMER, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, October, 1921. 

328 



Smith, Marion Couthouy. LATE IN SPRING, The New York Times, 
May; THE CITY OF THE DEAD, The Sewanee Review, 
October-December, 1921; A PICTURE, Harper's Magazine, 
November, 1921; THE YEARS WALK GAILY (Tribute to 
Edwin Markham on his Seventieth Birthday), The Step 
Ladder, June; THE TREES THAT LEAN OVER WATER, The 
Step Ladder, March; I SHALL NOT MIND, The Outlook, 
September 28, 1921; 1921; COMPANIONS, Contemporary 
Verse, March; VALEDICTORY, Contemporary Verse, March; 
THE OLD BURYING GROUND, Contemporary Verse, March; 
ON SILENT WINGS, Harper's Magazine, July. 

Smith, Nora Archibald. DEATH, THE SCULPTOR, Scribner's 
Magazine, July; LET ME IN! Contemporary Verse, January. 

Smith, Sarah Bixby. BLOWING GRASSES, The Lyric West, March. 

Smithson, Edith M. O TELL ME, The New Pen, April-May. 

Snedigar, Robert NEGLIGEE, The Liberator, December, 1921. 

Snow, Charles Wilbert. THE PAVING QUARRY, The Nation, 
October 12, 1921. 

Snow, Royall. VARIATIONS ON A VERY OLD THEME, The Pagan,. 
December, 1921, January; VERITAS, The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921; CLOUD-RIFT, Contemporary Verse, 
February. 

Southworth, Victor E. To THE MEADOWLARK, Unity, June 22. 

Spears, Raymond S. OPPORTUNITY, Munsey's Magazine, 
January. 

Spencer, Alice B NIGHT, Contemporary Verse, August, 1921. 

Spencer, Lillian White. SANTO DOMINGO-EASTER, The Lyric 
West, April; THE OLD PUEBLO, The Lyric West, November, 
1921; SAN MIGUEL TLAZCALTECOS, The Lyric West, 
February; ASPENS COLORADO, Contemporary Verse, May. 

Speyer, Leonora. FAGGI'S STATUE OP EVE, Contemporary Verse, 
July; "I HAVE A RENDEZVOUS WITH DEATH," (A tree is 
planted in Washington Square, New York, in memory of 
Alan Seeger), The Lyric, September, 1921; MIGRATION, 
The Century Magazine, July; SIGN OF THE HEART INN, 
The Nation, November 9, 1921; WORDS TO SLEEP UPON, 
The Bookman, May; TEARS FOR SALE, The Literary 
Review f of the New York Evening Post, July 8; OPINIONS, 
The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, October 
22, 1921; IN PRAISE OF ABRIGADA, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, February; UPON READING A LOVE-LYRIC, Con- 
temporary Verse, August, 1921; Two WOMEN MEET, Con- 
temporary Verse, July; MEASURE ME, SKY! The Bookman, 
September, 1921; THREE PERSIAN TELES (Translated from 
the Imaginary), The Nation, October 12, 1921; MOON IN 
THE MORNING, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring; PROTEST 
IN PASSING, The Measure, March. 

Spicer, Anne Higginson. THE CATHEDRAL CALLS, All's Wett, 
February; THE VALLEY UNVISITBD, The American Poetry 
Magazine, June; THE FOGGY SABBATH, The American 

329 



Poetry Magazine, February; THE AUCTION, The Wave, 
' June. 

Spingarn, J. E. SHEINE, The Nation, March 22. 

Stait, Virginia BEFORE COMMUNION, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; 
LOTUS, The Ajax, July; RESIDUE, The Dady Progress, 
April; BEQUEATHED, The Daily Progress, May, 1918; The 
Ajax, August, 1921; FINALITIES, The American Poetry 
Magazine, February. 

Starbuck, Victor. THE WIDOWEE, The Outlook, June 31. 

Starrett, Vincent. DANDELIONS, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer; CRESCENT MOON, The Double Dealer, June; 
RAIN, All's Well, September, 1921; IVANHOE, The Freeman, 
May 3; SELF PORTRAIT, All's Well, August, 1921; HOUSE, 
AWs Well, September, 1921; RETURN, All's Wett, Septem- 
ber, 1921; PALIMPSEST, All's Well, September, 1021; 
TURTLE, The Step Ladder, May; CRICKET, The Step Ladder, 
May; SQUIRREL, The Step Ladder, May; PICTURE, The 
Bookman, January; DIES IRAE, The Step Ladder, June. 

Steiss, A. J. GRAY SAILS, The Magnificat, February. 

Sterling, George. BEAUTY RENOUNCED, All's Well, April; "57," 
All's Well, January; To BEAUTY, AWs Well, October, 1921; 
FROM THE HEIGHTS, All's Well, October, 1921; ENIGMA, 
All's Well, October, 1921; PRINCESS ON THE HEADLAND, 
Al^s Well, December, 1921; THE NIGHT MIGRATION, The 
Literary Renew of ihe New York Evening Post, May 13; 
PUMAS, The IMerary Review of ihe New York Evening Post, 
March 25; THE EVENING STAR, AWs Well, August, 1921; 
PROBLEM, The Lyric West, February; THE HIDDEN POOL, 
The Reviewer, March; THE LOST NYMPH, The Reviewer, 
December, 1921; THE WILD SWAN, The Smart Set, April; 
RAINBOW'S END, Ainslee's Magazine, February; THE GULLS, 
The Nation, March 22; POE'B GRAVESTONE, The Nation, 
September 7, 1921; ODE TO SHELLEY, Scribner's Maga&ine, 
July; CARELESS, The Bookman, August, 1921. 

Stevens, A. Borden. SACROSANCT, The New Pen, April-May. 

Stevens, Eleanor Mathews. ON RETURNING FROM A JOUBNEY, 
Ainslee's Magazine, February. 

Stevens, Wallace. HYMN FROM A WATERMELON PAVILION, Broom, 
June; STARS AT TALLAPOOSA, Broom, June; ANOTHER 
WEEPING WOMAN, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 
1921; FROGS EAT BUTTERFLIES, SNAKES EAT FROGS, 
HOGS EAT SNAKES, MEN EAT HOGS, The Dial, July; THE 
ORDINARY WOMEN, The Dial, July; BANTAMS IN PINE 
WOODS, The Dial, July; HIBISCUS ON THE SLEEPING 
SHORES, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921, 
FLORIDA, VENEREAL SOIL, The Dial, July; THE EMPEKOR 
OF ICE CREAM, The Dial, July; THE SNOW MAN, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; THE DOCTOR of 
GENEVA, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921, 
THE BIRD WITH THE COPPERY, KEEN CLAWS, Broom, 

330 



December, 1921; A HIGH-TONED OLD CHRISTIAN WOMAN 
The Dial, July; ON THE MANNER OF ADDRESSING CLOUDS 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; THE CUBAN 
DOCTOR, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; 
TEA AT THE PALAZ OF HOON, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
October, 1921; GUBBINAL, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
October, 1921; OF HEAVEN CONSIDERED AS A TOMB, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921; THE LOAD 
OF SUGAR CANE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 
1921; PROM THE MISERY OF DON JOOST, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, October, 1921, PALACE OF THE BABIES, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921 

Stewart, Anna, Bird. MY LITTLE YESTERDAY, The Pictorial 
Review, May. 

Stewart, Clare. RETURN, Contemporary Verse, August, 1921; 
BY THE BEACH SLEEPING, Contemporary Verse, August, 
1921. 

Stewart, Edith Adams. BY AN OPEN WINDOW IN MAY, The 
American Poetry Magazine, April. 

Stewart, Marjory. SOMETIMES, Contemporary Verse, May. 

Stewart, Winifred Gray, PROTEST, The Lync West, June, 

Stillwell, Ethel Brooks. THE RETURN, The Lyric West, June. 

Stockett, M. Letitia. To A MUSICIAN, Contemporary Verse, 
January; A SONG, Contemporary Verse, February. 

Stockton. Peter. MY BICYCLE AND I, Lincoln Lore, March. 

Stoddard, Yetta Kay. SPRING IN CALIFORNIA (The Hosts), The 
American Poetry Magazine, February; STORM- VIGIL, The 
American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 

Storer, Edward. GOLD, Broom, June; BROKEN IMAGE, Broom, 
June; DREAMS, Broom, June; BY THE SHORE, Broom, June; 
ILLUSION, Broom, June. 

Storey, Violet Alleyn. REMEMBRANCE, Harper's Magazine, March. 

Stork, Charles Wharton. GREEN FIRE, The Bookman, April; 
THE PLATONIC LOVER, Ainslee's Magazine, July; THE 
TROUBADOUR OF GOD, The Lync, February; HORIZON, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter; WAKE ME TO LIFE! 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter; To TREES AT NIGHT, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter; " SWEET CUSTOM is 
THE CHIEFEST FOOD OF LOVE," The American Poetry 
Magazine, Autumn, 1921; THE PARSON o* PORLOCK TOWN, 
The Freeman, October 12, 1921; THE FORBIDDEN ROSE, 
The Freeman, July 12; TRUANCY, The Lyric West, Novem- 
ber, 1921; HALF-LIGHT HAPPINESS, The Lyric West, 
November, 1921; To HEIFETZ, The Lyric West, November, 
1921. 

Storm, Marian. THE DANCING FERN, The Literary Review of the 
New York Evening Post, November 26, 1921. 

Straus, Edna Adelaide. AT ST. ROCH'S CHAPEL, The Double 
Dealer, March. 

Street, Mary Dallas. To C. S. J. (November, 1920), The Reviewer, 

331 



November, 1921; TODAY, The Reviewer, July; ADAM 
SPEAKS, The Reviewer, April. 

Strobel, Marion. WE HAVE A DAT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
March; SPRING MORNING, Poetry, a Magazine of Verse, 
March; TONIGHT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March; 
THE SILENCE STIRS AGAIN, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
March; DAILY PRAYER, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
March; FRIGHTENED FACE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
March; ADMONITION, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March; 
I WOULD PRETEND, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March; 
THE NIGHT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March; I/ENVOI, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March 

Strode, Muriel. SIFTING MY DREAMS, The Boston Transcript. 

Strong, Helen Clark. I AM NOT HARD TO SATISFY, Contemporary 
Verse, May. 

Strong, William. THE UNMASKING, Scribner's Magazine, August, 
1921. 

Strother, H. Dana. SOLITUDE, The Poet and Philosopher, Septem- 
ber, 1921. 

Stuart, John Rollin. THE POET, The Granite Monthly, April. 

Sturdy-Smith, Margaret. THE FLIGHT OF YOTJTH, The Country 
Bard, Spring. 

Sturges, Lucy Hale. TEMPORAL, The Lyric West, May; NOON, 
The Lyric West, May; ROMANCE, The Lyric West, May; 
NIGHT'S END, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer. 

Sturges, Oliver T. MY FRIEND'S WIFE, The Pagan, August- 
September, 1921. 

Sturges-Jones, Marion. DESOLATION, The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921. 

Sullivan, D. C. THE FIGHT TO SURVIVE, The New Pen, April-May. 

Sullivan, Maurice S. TELEQBAPH POLES, All's Well, August, 1921. 

Summers, Llewelyn. SAYING rr WITH FLOWERS, Lincoln Lore, 
December, 1921. 

Svorn, Teodora (M. D, H.) To , The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921; NOCTURNE, The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921; GRANDMBRE, The Nomad, Spring, 1922; 
The Pagan, October-November, 1921. 

Swartz, David Lester. THE WISCONSIN DELLS, The American 
Poetry Magazine, April. 

Swearingen, Mabel. CHIME OF CHRISTMAS BELLS, The Poet and 
Philosopher, January. 

Swett, Margery. PATIENCE, The Lyric West, February; THE 
STOKM, The Lyric West, February; FINIS, The Lyric West, 
February; THE CITY, The Lyric West, February, 

Swift, Ivan. DESCENT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, September, 
1921; CIRCLES, The Step Ladder, April. 

Symons, Arthur. A MASQUE OF SHADOWS, The Double Dealer, 
June; TREES IN PARIS: 1890, The Double Dealer, January; 
SONG, The Double Dealer, January; ALVISI CONTARINI, 
The Double Dealer, December, 1921. 

332 



Taggard, Genevieve. FOB A SKY LOVER, The Nation; LITTLE 
HAMLET, The Measure, January; BEACH CABIN, The 
Measure, January; ANGULAR, The Measure, January; 
SPRING TOUCH, The Measure, January; THE LONG MAGIC, 
The Measure, January; CHILD TROPICS REMEMBERED IN 
NEW ENGLAND, The Lyric West, June; JTJST INTRODUCED, 
The Bookman, February; FOR A SHY LOVER, The Nation, 
November 9, 1921; THE QUIET WOMAN, The Liberator, 
September, 1921; WITH CHILD, The Liberator, December, 
1921; THE POET IN THE BASEMENT, The Measure, Septem- 
ber, 1921; DYING AWAY SONG (Hoary Puck passes a 
favorite pasture), Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 
1921; SHE COMES AFTER YEARS TO THE OCEAN, The 
Lyric West, December, 1921; MOODS or WOMEN: GOING 
HOME, Six O'CLOCK; SUMMER EVENING, The Lyric West, 
December, 1921. 

Tagore, Rabindranath. ONCE WHEN WE WERE BOTH TOGETHER, 
The Nation, August 24, 1921. 

Tallis, Grey. PORTRAIT OF A MOTHER, The Nomad, Spring, 1922; 
Life, The Nomad, Spring, 1922; RED MOUNTAIN, The 
Nomad, Summer, 1922; DEAD BIRD, The Nomad, Summer, 
1922; RAIN, The Nomad, Summer, 1922. 

Tanaquil, Paul. SEEKING AND FINDING NOT, Contemporary 
Verse, January; WORDS, Contemporary Verse, January; 
THE RETURN OF THE PRODIGAL, The Lyric West, July- 
August; THE LOVER, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
February; Nous N'IRONS PLUS Au Bois, Voices, A Journal 
of Verse, Autumn, 1921; PEDANT, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Summer; Two MEN, The Lyric West, October, 1921. 

Tanenbaum, Florence. BAAL MOLOCH, The Liberator, January; 
MORTGAGED, The Liberator, June. 

Tate, Allen. PARTHENIA, The Double Dealer, July; WILLIAM 
BLAKE, The Double Dealer, July; EUTHANASIA, The Double 
Dealer, May. 

Tate, Orley Allen. RED STAINS, The American Poetry Magazine, 
Autumn, 1921. 

Taylor, Dwigbt. SOME PIERROTS COME FROM BEHIND THE 
MOON, The Bookman, May. 

Taylor, Eletha May. SOFT WINDS, The American Poetry Magazine, 
February. 

Taylor, Lucile L. THE DANCER, The Pagan, October-November, 
1921; THE PHANTOM, The Lyric West, December, 1921. 

Taylor, Nell. NARCISSI IN A GLASS BOWL, The American Poetry 
Magazine, June. 

Teasdale, Sara. THE WISE WOMAN, The Century Magazine, 
September, 1921; WORDS FOR AN OLD AIR, Scribner** 
Magazine, August, 1921; THOSE WHO LOVE, Scrribner's 
Magazine, August, 1921; WISDOM, The Century Magazine, 
June; NOT BY THE SEA, Harper's Magazine, December, 
1921; SLEEPLESS NIGHT, The Century Magazine, March; 

333 



BLUE STARGRASS, Scribner's M agazine, August, 1921; THE 
SEA-LOVER, Scribners* Magazine, August, 1921; WINTER 
SUN, Lenox, The Bookman, December, 1921; THE CRYSTAL 
GAZER, The Yak Remew, October, 1921; THE SOLITARY, 
The Yale Remew, October, 1921; FULL MOON, SANTA 
BARBARA, The Bookman, December, 1921; TWILIGHT, The 
Bookman, December, 1921; EVENING, The New Republic, 
August 24, 1921 

Temple, May O. WILLOWS AND PALMS, The Country Bard, 
Spring; A BEAUTIFUL GRAY DAY, The Country Bard, 
Winter; FACE IT SQUARELY, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921. 

Thanliouser, Marian. AT NIGHT, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
September, 1921. 

Thomas, Edith M. So MANY JOYS, The Christian Century, 
March 16; FEUILLE MORTE, Harper's Magazine, May; 
ESCAPE, Harper's Magazine, October, 1921. 

Thomas, Elizabeth Wilkins. EGO, The New Republic, July 12. 

Thomas, Jack C. LASSITUDE, The Pagan, December, 1921. 

Thomas, Martha Banning. BABBLERS, The Double Dealer, 
April; LUCY, The Measure, June; LODO, The Measure, 
June; Miss ANNA, The Measure, June, FORE-LIGHT, 
Contemporary Verse, September, 1921. 

Thompson, Basil. REVEALMENT, The Lync, July. 

Thomson, 0. R. Howard. FEBRUARY 23, 1922, The Sun, 
Williamsport, February 24; THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER, 
Public Ledger, November 10, 1921; EVENING, Contemporary 
Verse, April 

Thu-Fu. MARCHING TO WAR (Translated by Florence Brinkmau), 
The Freeman, April 5. 

Thurston, Helen. WOODLAND SKETCHES, The Lyric West, June; 
COBWEBS, The Lyric West, September, 1921; BUTTER- 
PLIES, The Lyric West, September, 1921; THISTLEDOWN, 
The Lyric West, September, 1921. 

Tietjens, Eunice. FIRE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February. 

Toner, Edythe C. LONGING, The Poet and Philosopher, January, 

Towne, Charles Hanson LONDON, Ainslee's, April; THE ADVANCE 
GUARD, Munsey's Magazine, March; WONDER, The 
Century Magazine, February; ENIGMA, Harper's Magazine, 
March; IN APRIL, Harper's Magazine, April. 

Tracey, Tom. A BOOM m GREENWICH VILLAGE, The Pagan, 
August-September, 1921. 

Tractman, Judith. COMPLEXITY, The Liberator, May. 

Trapnell, Edna Valentine. CHERRY-BLOOM, The Smart Set, April; 

J HAPPINESS, Contemporary Verse, May. 

Trask, Sherwood. SING, CORNBELT MEN, The Liberator, January. 

Trausil, Hans. THE CAT (Italian Quarter, New York City), 
The Measure, March 

Trigg, Emma Gray. CONQUERED, Contemporary Verse, March; 
GREEN MIST, The Reviewer, April. 

334 



Trombly, Albert Edmund. THE DEAD MASTER, Tempo, Autumn, 
1921; Our OF YOUR MANLY HEART (Tribute* to Edwin 
Markham on his Seventieth Birthday), The Step Ladder, 
June; A BOY'S HANDS (For May), The Midland, December, 
1921; THE FIELDS, The Midland, A Magazine of the Middle 
West, December, 1921; THE DEAD MASTER (E H R), 
Tempo, Autumn, 1921; To CERTAIN TREES, The Midland, 
A Magazine of the Middle West, December, 1921; WALLS, 
The Midland, A Magazine of the Middle West, December, 
1921; TEXAS RANGERS, Owenwood Magazine, February; 
FACETS, Poet Lore, Winter Number, 1921; FOOTFALLS, 
Poet Lore, Winter Number, 1921; RED ROSE, Poet Lore, 
Winter Number, 1921; STARDUST, Poet Lore, Winter 
Number, 1921; "THE MAN WITH THE HOE" (For E. M. 
on his Seventieth Birthday), The Step Ladder, June; 
PLAT, All's Well January; THE LOG HOUSE, The Lyric 
West, March; RENAN, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer; 
GENTILE, Contemporary Verse, September, 1921. 

Troth, John Theodore. PRESCIENCE, The American Poetry 
Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 

Troy, Daniel W. LUELLA WAS RIGHT, AT THAT, Contemporary 
Verse, September, 1921. 

Trueblood, Orestes. FIRST LOVE, The Measure, January. 

Ts'uei-Hao. THE YELLOW CRANE TOWER (Translated by Witter 
Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, January 4. 

Ts'uei T'u. A SOLITARY WILD GOOSE (Translated by Witter 
Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, January 4. 

Ts'ui Hu (circa Ninth Century A.D.) INSCRIBED WHERE ONCE 
SOME ONE WAS SEEN (Translated from the Chinese by 
Albion N. Fellows and T. Y. Leo), The Measure, June. 

Tsu Yung. ON SEEING THE SNOW-PEAK OF CHUNG-NAN (Trans- 
lated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, 
January 4. 

Tu Ch'inniang THE GOLD-THREADED ROBE (Translated by 
Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, 
January 4. 

Tucker, Beverley Randolph. TODAY, BASED UPON AN IDEA 
SUGGESTED BY A SANSKRIT TRANSLATION, The Reviewer, 
February. 

Tu Fu (A.D. 712-770). A SONG or DAGGER-DANCING TO A 
GIRL PUPIL or LADY KUNG SUNG (Translated by Witter 
Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The iMerary Review of the 
New York Evening Post, October, 29, 1921; A HEARTY 
WELCOME TO VICE-PREFECT Ts* UEI (Translated by 
Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Literary Review 
of the New York Evening Post, October 29, 1921; A DRAW- 
ING OF A HORSE BY GENERAL Ts' Ao AT SECRETARY 
WEI FENG'S HOUSE (Translated by Witter Bynner and 
Kiang Kang-hu), The Literary Review of the New York 
Evening Post, October 29, 1921; STAYING AT THE GENERAL'S 

835 



HEADQUARTERS (Translated by Witter Bynner and 
Kiang Kang-hu), The Literary Review of the New York 
Evening Post, October 29, 1921; ON LEAVING THE TOMB 
OF PREMIER FANG (Translated by Witter Bynner and 
Kiang Kang-hu), The Literary Review of the New York 
Evening Post, October 29, 1921; A SONG OF A PRINCE 
DEPOSED (Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang 
Kang-hu), The Literary Review of the New York Evening 
Post, October 29, 1921; To Li Po AT THE SKY'S END 
(Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), 
The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, October 
29, 1921; A NIGHT ABROAD (Translated by Witter Bynner 
and Kiang Kang-hu), The Literary Review of the New 
York Evening Post, October 29, 1921; A LETTER TO 
CENSOR HATT (Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang 
Kang-hu), The Literary Review of the New York Evening 
Post, October 29, 1921; NIGHT IN THE WATCH TOWER 
(Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), 
The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, October, 
29, 1921; A NIGHT VIGIL IN THE LEFT COURT OF THE 
PALACE (Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang- 
hu), The Literary Remew of the New York Evening Post t 
October 29, 1921; THE WAR CHARIOT (Translated from 
the Chinese by Albion N. Fellows and T. Y. Leo), The 
Measure, June; A SONG OF WAR CHARIOTS (Translated 
from the Chinese by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), 
The New Republic, November 2, 1921. 

Tu Hsun-He. A SIGH IN THE SPRING PALACE (Translated by 
Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, 
January 4. 

Tu Mu. A MOORING ON THE CH'IN-HAUI RIVER (Translated 
by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Bookman, 
December, 1921; A LETTER TO HAN CHO THE YANG-CHOU 
MAGISTRATE (Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang 
Kang-hu), The Bookman, December, 1921; A STATEMENT 
(Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), 
The Bookman, December, 1921; IN THE AUTUMN NIGHT 
(Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), 
The Bookman, December, 1921; PARTING (Translated by 
Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Bookman, 
December, 1921; A NIGHT AT AN INN (Translated by 
Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Bookman, 
December, 1921; THE GARDEN OF THE GOLDEN VALLEY 
(Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), 
The Bookman, December, 1921; By THE PUROLE CLIFF 
(Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), 
The Bookman, December, 1921; I CLIMB TO LOOK-OUT 
CEMETERY BEFORE LEAVING FOR Wu-HsiNG (Translated 
by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Bookman, 
December, 1921, 

336 



Tunstall, Virginia Lyne. THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER, The Nomad, 
Spring, 1922; EVENING ON THE HARBOR, The Lyric, June; 
PASTING, The Lyric, November, 1921; SONGS FOR APRIL, 
The Lyric, April; WINTER WIND, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Winter; PAIN, The Lyric, July; SONATA APPAS- 
SIONATA, The Lyric, March; AFTER LONG YEARS, The 
Lyric, January; NOVEMBER ROSES, The Lync, December, 
1921; RECOMPENSE, The Lyric, October, 1921, SACRAMENT, 
The Lyric, September, 1921. 

Turbyfill, Mark. PERSONAL T^EME WITH NATURE ACCOMPANI- 
MENT, The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, 
June 24; SPECTRES OF SPRING, Youth, A Magazine of the 
Arts, January; A PERSONAL THEME, The Literary Review 
of the New York Evening Post, June 24. 

Turner, Alva N. To Two MOTHERLESS KITTENS, Contact, 
Advertising Number; MARGARETTE, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, June; OUR SORROW, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
June; OLD AGE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June. 

Turner, Ethel D. NOON, Voices, A Journal^ of Verse, Summer. 

Turner, Frances Wright. OCTOBER, The Granite Monthly, October, 
1921. 

Tuttle, Morris M. To A HERO OF THE GREAT STRIFE: DEDICATED 
TO MAX LUSTIG, A E. F., The Beacon Light. 

Tyler-Cope, Helen. THE HILLS OF NEW JERSEY, The Country 
Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; YOU'RE JUST A BIT OF 
HEAVEN, The Country Bard, Spring 

Uerkvitz, Herta. MOON MADNESS, The Lyric West, January; 
MUD, The Lyric West, January. 

Underwood, Edna Worthley. IMPROVISATIONS FROM OLD 
CHINESE PAINTINGS, The Lyric West, May; DANCES OF 
FLAME, The Lyric West, January. 

Underwood, John Curtis. ARIA, The Lyric West, June; WAITING- 
MIST, The Lync West, June. 

Unna, Sarah. ROADS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March. 

Untermeyer, Jean Starr. BAD WEATHER, The Reviewer, March; 
THE PASSIONATE SWORD, The Bookman, August, 1921; 
GOTHIC, The Double Dealer, October, 1921; SONG OF A 
WoatAN, The Liberator, May; LAKE SONG, The Century 
Magazine, September, 1921; AJNTI-EROTIC, Broom, Decem- 
ber, 1921; MIST, Broom, December, 1921; FROM THE 
DAT-BOOK OF A FORGOTTEN PRINCE, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, November, 1921. 

Untermeyer, Louis. STAND WITH ME HERE, The Nation, March 
29; THE SINGLE SONG (Grenville MeJlen 1799-1841), The 
Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, July 15; 
DOROTHY DANCES, The Bookman, November, 1921; 
DAUGHTER or JEPHTHAH, The Century Magazine, March; 
HE GOADS HIMSELF, The Yale Review, April; Two WOMEN, 
The Reviewer, December, 1921; THE MOTHER, The 

337 



Reviewer, July; DESIGN FOB A PERFECT WORLD, The 
Liberator, May; THE YOUNG MEN, The Literary Review of 
the New York Evening Post, October 29, 1921; VARIATIONS 
ON A MODERN THEME, The New Republic, February 15; 
MONOLOGUE FROM A MATTRESS, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, March. 

Upper, Joseph. TRIUMPH, Tempo, Autumn, 1921; HERMITAGE, 
The American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921. 

Unny, Clarence. CALIFORNIA WOODLANDS, Munsey's Magazine, 
March. 

Vail, Lammon. A CHILD IN THE DARK, Contemporary Verse, 
February. 

Vail, Lawrence. CANNIBALISTIC LOVE SONG, Gargoyle, January- 
February. 

Van de Poel, Romanic. THE LAST WORD, The Country Bard, 
Spring; SONG SPARROW, The Country Bard, Winter; 
CONTEMPLATIVE, The Country Bard, Winter. 

Vandercook, John W. COMPARISON, The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921. 

Van Doren, Carl. PASCAL D'ANGELO, The Nation, January 25. 

Van Dusen, Washington. SONG OF DAWN, The Farm Journal, 
June. 

Van Rensselaer, Mrs. Schuyler. YOUTH AND I, Scribner's 
Magazine, April; ASKED OF MY AGE, Harper 1 s Magazine, 
January; THE ULTIMATE HARVEST, Harper's Magazine, 
September, 1921. 

Vedder, Muriam. APRIL EVENING, The Liberator, February; 
SILENT, The Measure, December, 1921. 

Viereck, George Sylvester. RESPITE (For M. E. V.), The Liberator, 
September, 1921. 

Vinal, Harold. I SHALL FEEL, Contemporary Verse, June; SEA 
MOOD, Contemporary Verse, June; SEA URGE, Tempo, 
Autumn, 1921; TOKENS, The Bookman, January; CHERISH 
MY LOVE, The liberator, January; TREES IN APRIL, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring; SHE SEWS, The Double 
Dealer, May; EARTH LOVER, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Spring; To PERSEPHONE, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Winter; SEA NEARNESS, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Winter; NOCTURNE, The Liberator, March; SEA MEMORY, 
The Liberator, February; WHEN You COME BACK, The 
Wave, June; SPRING FLAME, The Granite Monthly, April; 
THE RETURN, The Granite Monthly, April; LAST OF APRIL, 
The Granite Monthly, April; GONE, The Granite Monthly, 
April; LAST DAYS, The Granite Monthly, April; THE HOUSE 
OF DUST, The Pagan, August-September, 1921; UNTIL, 
The Pagan, December, 1921, January; SONNET, All's 
Well, November, 1921, April; NIGHT MEMORY, The 
Nomad, Spring, 1922; SPRING BEAUTY, The Lyric West, 
April; LITTLE SONG, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter; 



DECORATION, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer; 
TOENADO, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer; THE SEA 
REMEMBERS, The Lync, May; QUERY, The Lync, August, 
1921 ; A SONG FOE APRIL, The Lyric West, September, 1921 ; 
SONNET, The Nomad, Summer, 1922; BEAUTY WILL 
BUEN, The Nomad, Summer, 1922; EARLY LOVES, The 
Lyric West, January; SNOW NOCTURNE, The Lyric West, 
January; DRYAD, The Lync West, December, 1921; 
AT MIDNIGHT, The Lync, August, 1921; FLIGHT, The 
Measure, June; WILL BEAUTY MAKE ME FORGET, Voices, 
A Journal of Verse, Spring; OLD THINGS, The Lyric, 
February, 

Vinton, Eleanor W, INSPIRATION, The Granite Monthly, June; 
SPRING MIST, The Granite Monthly, April 

Wade, Harmon C. LITTLE BOY, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer. 

Wadhams, Beatrice. DELPHINE, Lincoln Lore, April; A FRIEND 
IN NEED, Lincoln Lore, March; A FLOIVER REVERIE, 
Lincoln Lore, February. 

Wadleigh, Wallace To WISCONSIN, The American Poetry 
Magazine, April. 

Wagner, Charles A. ANNOUNCEMENT, The Pagan, October- 
November, 1921; COLORS, The Pagan, December, 1921, 
January; MY SOUL, The Nomad, Summer, 1922. 

Wagstaff, Blanche Shoemaker. I WILL TAKE THE LONE PATH, 
Munsey's Magazine, April. 

Wakeley, Charles R. IN THE AFTERMATH, The Christian Century, 
July 6. 

Walker, Francis I. AT THE GATES OF LIFE, The Poet and Philos- 
opher, September, 1921. 

Wallace, Grace. A PREFERENCE, The Lyric West, July-August. 

Wallis, Keene. A DAY AS A WAGE, The Liberator, August, 
1921. 

Wallop, Gerard. BURIAL BITTERNESS, Scnbner's Magazine, 
March. 

Wain, Nora. BEHIND THE WALLS (Chinese Sketches), Scribner'a 
Magazine, November, 1921; MY TEACHER (Chinese 
Sketches), Scribner's Magazine, November, 1921; BABY'S 
BATH (Chinese Sketches), Scribner's Magazine, November, 
1921; GOLDEN LILIES (Chinese Sketches), Scribner's 
Magazine, November, 1921 ; SHACKLES (Chinese Sketches), 
Scribner's Magazine, November, 1921; AT THE ALTAR 
OF HEAVEN, Scribner's Magazine, November, 1921; 
A WEDDING DRESS, Scribner's Magazine, November, 1921; 
THE EMPEROR'S BIRTHDAY (Chinese Sketches), Scribner's 
Magazine, November, 1921; HATAMEN STREET, Scribner's 
Magazine, November, 1921. 

Walsh, Ernest. COLLAPSE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, January; 
THE FICKLE LOVER, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, January; 

839 



SONNET, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, January; I ASK 
FOB A FRIEND, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, January. 

Walton, Eda Lou. LIFT UP YOUR EYES TO DARKNESS, The 
Texas Review, October, 1921; AT DAWN, The Texas Review, 
October, 1921; LOCKED ROOM, The Texas Review, October, 
1921; To A MADONNA, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer; 
I WILL RUN THEN ALONE, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Summer; WHEN I WRITE OF LOVE, The Measure, June; 
CRISIS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921; 
I WOULD BE FREE, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, August, 
1921; WITHOUT GRIEF, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
August, 1921; So IT BEFELL, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
August, 1921; IN RECOMPENSE, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, August, 1921; DESPAIR, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, August, 1921; Now MORE THAN EVER DIVIDED, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, August, 1921; IN* SILENCE, 
The Lyric West, December, 1921; TRUTH ABSOLUTE, 
The Lyric West, December, 1921; I HAVE COME IN To 
MYSELF Now, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Winter. 

Wan, Wang. A MORNING UNDER MOUNT PEi-Ku (Translated 
by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, 
December 21, 1921; A SONG OF LIANG-CHOU (Translated 
by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Nation, 
November 2, 1921, 

Wang An-shih (1021-1086 A.D.). EVENING HOUSE-TOP: IDLE 
GLANCES ROUND FROM THE CHINESE (Translated from 
the Chinese by Albion N. Fellows and T. Y. Leo), The 
Measure, June. 

Wang-Chang-Ling. FROM THE WEST WINDOW (Translated by 
Florence Brinkman), The Freeman, April 5. 

Wang, Wei, Poems by. A PARTING (Translated by Witter Bynner 
and Kiang-hu), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; 
A SONG AT WEI-CH'ENG (Translated by Witter Bynner 
and Kiang-hu), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; 
THE BEAUTIFUL Hsi-SniH (Translated by Witter Bynner 
and Kiang-hu), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; 
IN MY LODGE AT WANG-CH'UAN AFTER A LONG RAIN 
(Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang-hu), Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, February; MY RETREAT AT CHUNG- 
NAN (Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang-hu), 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; A VIEW OF THE 
HAN RIVER (Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang- 
hu), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; MOUNT 
CHUNG-NAN (Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang- 
hu), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; ON THE 
WAY TO THE TEMPLE (Translated by Witter Bynner and 
Kiang-Hu), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; 
A MESSAGE TO POAI Ti (Translated by Witter Bynner 
and Kiang-hu), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; 
ANSWERING VICE-PREFECT CHANG (Translated by Witter 

340 



Bynner and Kiang-hu), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
February; LINES (Translated by Witter Bynner and 
Kiang-hu), Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February; 
IN A RETREAT AMONG BAMBOOS (Translated by Witter 
Bynner and Kiang-hu), Poetry 9 A Magazine of Verse, 
February. 

Ward, Bernard D. SALVE REGINA, The Magnificat, May; SPRING 
The Magnificat, April. 

Warner, Eva E. THE INFINITE URGE, The Christian Century, 
May 11; FOOTHOLDS, The Christian Century, May 25. 

Washington, H. Wyatt. APRIL MAGIC, Contemporary Verse, 
April. 

Wasson, Ben F. FANNY SLAG, The Pagan, October-November, 
1921 ; LUCINDA ANN SMITH, The Pagan, October-November, 
1921; CYRIL SAND, The Pagan, October-November, 1921. 

Watson, Annah Robinson. THE CALL OF DAWN, The Commercial 
Appeal, Memphis, January 1. 

Watson, Virginia. APRIL AND I, Harper's Magazine, April. 

Wattles, Willard. LAST NIGHT, Contemporary Verse, March; 
REQTTIESCAT, The Outlook, March 1; GOOD NEIGHBORS, 
The Outlook, March 29; WHEN I FIRST FELT, Contemporary 
Verse, March; LET ALL BEAUTY, Contemporary Verse, 
March; So MUCH OF BEAUTY, The Outlook, December 21, 
1921; NIGHT OF TACIT- ABSOLVING, The Bookman, 
December, 1921, NOT EVEN SWORDED THOAS, Con- 
temporary Verse, March. 

Weathermax, Ruth. FISHING, The Poet and Philosopher, Septem- 
ber, 1921. 

Weaver, Bennett. LOST, The Midland, A Magazine of the Middle 
West, August, 1921; Our TO SLEEP, The Midland, A Maga- 
zine of the Middle West, August, 1921; THE HOUSE, The 
Midland, A Magazine of the Middle West, August, 1921; 
EARLY AUTUMN, The Midland, A Magazine of the Middle 
West, August, 1921; To FATHER, The Midland, A Magazine 
of the Middle West, August, 1921; "WHEN THE DRIFT 
COMES IN " The Midland, A Magazine of the Middle 
West, August, 1921. 

Weaver, John V. A. TRANSPLANTED, The New Republic, Novem- 
ber 9, 1921; Two WAYS, The Bookman, December, 1921. 

Webb, Charles Nicholls. CHANG Mow: THROUGH THE STEAM, 
"THE JASMINE FLOWER," The American Poetry Magazine, 
April. 

Webster, Martha. AT BROAD BAR, The Double Dealer, February. 

Weeks, Raymond. THE HUNCHBACK'S SONG, The Midland, 
A Magazine of the Middle West, August, 1921, NOT LIKE 
THE FLOWERS MY LOVE, The Midland, A Magazine of the 
Middle West, August, 1921. 

Wei Chauang. A NIGHT THOUGHT IN CHANG TAI STREET 
(Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), 
The Freeman, December 21, 1921. 

341 



Wei Ying-Wu. MOORING AT TWIUGHT IN Yu-Yi DISTRICT 
(Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), 
The Freeman, December 21, 1921; AT CH'U-CHOU ON 
THE WESTERN STREAM (Translated by Witter Bynner 
and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, December 21, 1921; 
A GREETING ON THE HUAI RIVER TO OLD FRIENDS FROM 
LIANG CH'TJAN (Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang 
Kang-hu), The Freeman, December 21, 1921; FAREWELL 
TO Li TS'AO IN THE EVENING RAIN (Translated by Witter 
Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, December 21, 
1921; A POEM TO SECRETARY YUAN IST AS I SET SAIL 
ON THE YANG Tzu (Translated by Witter Bynner and 
Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, December 21, 1921; 
A POEM TO A TAOIST HERMIT ON CH'UAN-CHIAO MOUN- 
TAIN (Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), 
The Freeman, December 21, 1921; MEETING Mr FRIEND 
FENG CHO IN CH*ANG-AN (Translated by Witter Bynner 
and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, December 21, 1921. 

Welles, Winifred. SUICIDE, The Measure, May; MIST SHELL, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring; OVERTONES, Voices, 
A Journal of Verse, Spring; ANGER, The Measure, May, 
AH GABRIEL , The Measure, January; INDIAN PIPES, 
The Measure, March; THE POPPY ROOM, Contemporary 
Verse, September, 1921; SILVER FOR MIDAS, The Measure, 
March; HARVEST DTTST, The New Republic, May 24; 
SILENCE, Contemporary Verse, June; WHITE FEAR, The 
Measure, February; THE LAST NIGHT OF WINTER, The 
Literary Review oj {he New York Evening Post, March 11; 
A THING OF WONDER, The Measure, March; SILVER FOG, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May. 

Wen T'ing-Yun. NEAR THE FERRY AT Li-Cnou (Translated by 
Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, 
January 4; To A FRIEND BOUND EAST (Translated by 
Witter Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, 
January 4; A SIGH ON A JADE LUTE (Translated by Witter 
Bynner and Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, March 15. 

Wentworth, C. THE MOUNTAINS, The Pagan, August- 
September, 1921. 

Wentworth, E. S, THE MORDANT, The Measure, May. 

Werner, Flora T. PAST, The Pagan, December, 1921, January. 

Wescott, Glenway. To L. S., Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
September, 1921; THE CHASTE LOVERS, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, September, 1921; NATIVES OF ROCK, The 
Dial, December, 1921; OMINOUS CONCORD, Poetry, A 
Magazine of Verse, September, 1921; WITHOUT SLEEP, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, September, 1921; THE POET 
AT NIGHT-FALL, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, September, 
1921; THE HUNTER, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
September, 1921. 

West, Alwin. EARTH, MY HEAVEN, The Measure, June. 

342 



Weston, Mildred. A POBTEAIT, Poetry, A Magazine of V&rse, May. 
Wheeler, Claude EL To RUTH, The Pagan, August-September, 

1921. 

Wheelock, John Hall. EXULTATION, Contemporary Verse, April; 

NIGHT HAS ITS FEAR, All's Well, June; HAPPY HEART! 

The Bookman, February; PANTHER! PANTHER! Scribner's 

Magazine, October, 1921; IN THE DARK CITY, Poetry, 

A Magazine of Verse, July; BY THE GRAY SEA, The Literary 

Review of the New York Evening Post, June 17; LEGEND, 

Scribner's Magazine, January; STARLESS MORNING, The 

Lyric, October, 1921; NOON, The Outlook, May 3, 1921. 

White, Eliot. THE WATER LILY, The New York Herald, July 23. 

White, Florence C. LOVE'S PORTION, Tempo, Autumn, 1921. 

White, Nancy EUen. WORLD WONDER, The Lyric West, February; 

MAY MOON, The Lyric West, May 
White, T. P. THE TREE, The Granite Monthly, June. 
Whitelock, William Wallace. A STATESMAN, Munsey's Magazine, 

May. 

Whiteside, Mary Brent. THE LAST EVENING, Tempo, Autumn, 
1921; THE CHALLENGE, The Double Dealer, January; 
OLD SELVES, Harper's Magazine, January, CONSOLATION, 
The Lyric West, November, 1921; GUESTS, The Lyric 
West, February; CONTENT, The American Poetry Magazine, 
June; THE PASSING, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Autumn, 
1921; THE POOL IN THE WOOD, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Autumn, 1921; THE ETERNAL QUEST, Contemporary 
Verse, October, 1921; CLAY, Voices, A Journal of V&rse, 
Spring; JOURNEY, The Lyric West, May; LEAVES, The 
Lyric West, November, 1921. 

Whitsett, George F. AN EPITAPH, AIVs Well, March; SKY- 
SCRAPER, AWs Well, January; CITY SEA, AW* Well, 
October, 1921; FORGE, All's Well, December, 1921; 
EVENING ON THE FARM, AWs Well, May; DANCE OF THE 
SYCAMORES, All's Wett, November, 1921; PORTENT, 
All's Well, September, 1921; WHEN THE DARK EACES 
COME, AW $ Well, September, 1921; DAY DROWNED, 
AIVs Wett, August, 1921; UNKNOWN, All's Well, August, 
1921; STRANGE THINGS HAPPEN IN THE WOODS BY THE 
RIVER, All's Well, June. 
Whittier, Mary Iva. HOUSE or DREAMS, The Granite Monthly, 

October, 1921. 

Wickham, Anna. CODE, The New Republic, January 25; THE 
MUDDLE, The New Republic, January 4; SIN, The New 
Republic, January 4; KING ALFRED AND THE PEASANT 
WOMAN, Poetry, A Maga&ine of Verse, July; A POET 
ADVICES A CHANGE OF CLOTHES, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, July; THE LAST ROUND, The New Republic, January 
4; WOMAN TO THE MALE PSYCHOLOGIST, The New Republic, 
January 4; WEAPONS, The New Republic, January 4; 
THE WINDS, The New Republic, January 4. 

343 



Widdemer, Margaret. COWARDICE, Contemporary Verse, 
November, 1921; MISTAKE, The Literary Review of the 
New York Evening Post, April 1; BEHIND THE HILLS, 
The American Poetry Magazine, February; A PATH IN 
CYPRUS (Five Songs Paraphrased from the Bilitis of 
Pierre Louys), Voices, A Journal of Verse* Spring; BEFORE 
MY HEART WAS BROKEN, Harper's Magazine, March; 
OMISSION, Harper's Magazine, December, 1921; MIMES, 
The Lync, February. 

Wilder, Charlotte Elizabeth. HOLLOWS, Contemporary Verse t 
September, 1921. 

Wilkinson, Florence DON JUAN IN PORTUGAL, Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, November, 1921. 

Wilkinson, Marguerite. THE GREAT DREAM, Contemporary 
Verse, February; THE FIRST GRAY HAIR, Contemporary 
Verse, November, 1921; SCORNFUL ANSWER, Contemporary 
Verse, November, 1921; SHELTER, The Outlook, January 11. 

Willard, Pierrepont. DECISION, The Lyric West, July-August. 

Wilkox, Louise Collier. WINGS, The Lyric, October, 1921. 

Williams, Hamilton. THE SUNNY MIND, Munsey's Magazine, 
January. 

Williams, Hazel Wyeth. WHERE ARE You, The Country Bard, 
Summer-Autumn, 1921; SUNSHINE, The Country Bard, 
Spring; BRING ON YOUR SPRING! The Country Bard, 
Spring; GOING BACK, The Country Bard, Spring; THE 
TUGS, The Country Bard, Winter; ALL ON A SUMMER'S 
DAY, The Country Bard, Summer-Autumn, 1921; 
THOUGHTS ON A FERRY BOAT, The Country Bard, Summer- 
Autumn, 1921. 

Williams, Oscar C. AFTER I AM DEAD, Contemporary Verse, 
October, 1921; A BLEAK DAY, The Double Dealer, October, 
1921; OBLIVION, The Double Dealer, August-September, 
1921; PAINTED GIRLS, The Double Dealer, February; 
PRESENCES, The Double Dealer, February; SPIRIT OF ALL 
THINGS, The Double Dealer, December, 1921; MAYBE, 
The Pictorial Review, May; THE HOLY GRAIL, The Pictorial 
Review, June; THE SEA OF SILENCE, The Pictorial Review, 
May; WANDERING, The Wave, June; THE MOUSE, The 
Pagan, August-September, 1921; CINQUAIN, The Pagan, 
October-November, 1921; THE VOICE, All's Well, 
February; OBLIVION, Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring; 
DARKNESS LIKE A BIRD, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Spring; THE PANE OF DREAMS, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Spring; PURSUIT, Voices, A Journal of Verse, 
Spring; A WALK IN THE WOODS, Voices, A Journal of 
Verse, Autumn, 1921; THE ACTOR, The Nomad, Summer, 
1922; WHILE I TALKED, The Double Dealer, March; THE 
CLOUDS OF DEATH, The Lyric, April; OUTCAST IN THE 
NIGHT, Contemporary Verse, October, 1921; A REASON, 
Contemporary Verse, October, 1921. 

344 



Williams, Wayland Wells WHERE BEAUTY LODGES, The Yale 
Review, January. 

Williams, William Carlos. THE JUNGLE, The Dial, February; 
THE BULL, The Dial, February; FISH, Broom, April; 
THE WIDOW'S LAMENT IN SPRINGTIME, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, January; SPOUTS, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 
January; ST. FRANCIS EINSTEIN OF THE DAFFODILS, 
Contact, Advertising Number; THE LONELY STREET, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, January; WILD ORCHARD, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, January. 

Wilson, Albert Frederick. BLACKBERRY BRIARS, The Nation, 
April 12. 

Wilson, Carolyn Crosby. THE DESERTED HOUSE, The Liberator, 
September, 1921; ON A CHILLY DAY IN SPRING, Con- 
temporary Verse, March 

Wilson, Edmund, Jr. QUINTILIAN A BALLAD, The Double 
Dealer, May. 

Wilson, Irene H. THERE is No WIND, Contemporary Verse, 
October, 1921. 

Wilson, John French. IN THE NIGHT, Contemporary Verse, April; 
NOCTURNE, The American Poetry Magazine, June. 

Wilson, Stanley Kidder. CHOICE, The Literary Review of the 
New York Evening Post, February 25. 

Wing, J. CHINESE POEMS (Translated by E. Powys Mathers), 
Broom, November, 1921. 

Winke, Charles. MILWAUKEE, The American Poetry Magazine, 
April; WISCONSIN AN EXPERIMENT IN DEMOCRACY, 
The American Poetry Magazine, April 

Winship, Charles. THE SHRINE OF SPIRIT, Munsey's Magazine, 



Winslow, Anne Goodwin. SPRING SONG (After Isaiah), The 
Freeman, April 26; FREE FORMS, The Freeman, July 12; 
TWELFTH NIGHT, The Freeman, May 31; A NEW 
ANTHOLOGY, Harper's Magazine, January; DANDELIONS, 
The Lyric, May; THE CARETAKER, Harper's Magazine, 
June. 

Wintrowe, Norine. SEARCHLIGHTS, The Midland, A Magazine 
of the Middle West, September-October, 1921 

Wolfe, Walter B. JACK FROST, The Granite Monthly, March; 
REFLETS DANS L'INFINTTE, The Granite Monthly, 
February; BITTE, The Granite Monthly, June, To A 
HAMADRYAD, The Granite Monthly, July; AMRITAM, 
The Pagan, December, 1921, January; SADHANA, The 
Pagan, December, 1921, January; AVIDYA, The Pagan, 
December, 1921, January; SANNYASIN, The Pagan, 
December, 1921, January; TRAUMEREI, The American 
Poetry Magazine, February; REFLETS DANS L'INFINITE, 
The American Poetry Magazine, Autumn, 1921; 
GROSBEAKS, The Granite Monthly, April. 

Woodberry, George Edward. AMERICA, Tempo, Autumn, 192 

845 



Wood, Annabel. WINTER MILWAUKEE-DOWNER, The American 
Poetry Magazine, April. 

Wood, Charles Erskine Scott. WAR, All's Well, April. 

Wood, Clement. WANDERSOUL, Contemporary Verse, March; 
THE SILVER HOUR, Contemporary Verse, July; MISTS, 
The World Tomorrow, May; RAGLE SONNETS, The Nation, 
December 7, 1921; A PLEASANT TRADE IN SPRING, Con; 
temporary Verse; THE CROOKED STREET OF DREAMS, 
GOSSIP, The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post- 
December 3, 1921; EAGLE SONNETS, The Nation, December 
7, 1921; HALVES, Smart Set; A BEGGAR, Smart Set; SPARTA 
(With thanks to the forgotten wit who first found the 
thirteenth line), The Bookman, July; CULTURE, The 
Nation, March 1; AT TWILIGHT, The American Poetry 
Magazine, Autumn, 1921; DE LAWD'S BAPTIZIN', Con- 
temporary Verse, October, 1921; WHERE DOES THE TALL 
SUN , The Lyric, July. 

Wood, Jane D. THE RAG, The Christian Century, July 6, 

Woods, Charles Coke. THE PHILOSOPHER, The Personalist, 
April. 

Woodi, William Hervey. COMES GREAT-HEART, Scribner*$ 
Maga&ine, January; COUNTRY-BRED, Scnbner's Magazine* 
June. 

Woolsey, E. G. FAITH AT FORTY-SECOND STREET, The Literary 
Review of the New York Evening Post, June 3. 

Woolsey, Gamel. GAY STREET, The Literary Review of the New 
York Evening Post, May 6. 

Worthen, Samuel C. THE FLAG AT HALF-MAST (Armistice Day, 
1921), The Granite Monthly, December, 1921. 

Wright, Muriel. STRANDED, The Pagan, October-November, 
1921. 

Wylie, Elinor. SIMON GERTY (Who turned Renegade and lived 
with the Indians), The Liberator, March; POOR EARTH, 
The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, February 
18; PARTING GIFT, The Outlook, June 14; BEWARE! (To 
Baba, playing a Nocturne by Chopin), The New Republic, 
January 25; THREE WISHES, The New Republic, November 
23, 1921; Prrr ME, The Measure, March; LILLIPUTIAN, 
The Outlook, June 14; SELF-PORTRAIT, The New Republic, 
March 29; THE PRINKIN' LEDDIE, The Century Magazine, 
August, 1921; LITTLE SONNET. The New Republic, May 10; 
PREFERENCE, The Measure, July; GIFTS AT MEETING 
(From the Greek), The Measure, July; FRANCIS'S FINGERS* 
The Outlook, June 14; Now THAT YOUR EYES ARE SHUT, 
The Outlook, June 14; HEROICS, The New Republic, June 28; 
CASTELIAN, The New Republic, November 2, 1921; FULL 
MOON, The New Republic, June 28; LET No CHARITABLE 
HOPE, The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, 
July 1; DEMON LOVERS, The New Republic, June 14; 
PRETTY WORDS, The Bookman, October, 1921; EPITAPH, 

34C 



The New Republic, May 24; THE GOOD BIRDS, The Nation, 
July 12; NEBUCHADNEZZAR, The New Republic, December 
7, 1921; DROWNED WOMAN, The New Republic, June 21; 
THE PEKINGESE, The Century Magazine, April; SONNET, 
Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer; NONCHALANCE, 
The New Republic, August 24, 1921. 

Yarnell, Esther. COLOR, The Lyric West, March; THE SKY- 
ROCKET, The Lync West, October, 1921. 

Yeats, William Butler. THOUGHTS UPON THE PRESENT STATE 
OF THE WORLD, The Dial, September, 1921. 

Yuan Chen. AN ELEGY (Translated by Witter Bynner and 
Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, January 4. 

Yuan, Chieh To THE TAX-COLLECTOR AFTER THE BANDIT'S 
RETREAT (Translated by Witter Bynner and Kiang 
Kang-hu), The Freeman, March 15; A DRINKING-SONG 
AT STONE FISH LAKE (Translated by Witter Bynner and 
Kiang Kang-hu), The Freeman, March 15. 

Young, Duncan Francis. TSE GWINE TER LIB IN TOWN, The 
Country Bard, Winter. 

Zaturensky, Marya. AMARYLLIS SINGS IN THE SHADE, The 
Liberator, November, 1921; INDIFFERENCE, The Liberator, 
February; THE POET SEEKS A NEW BEAUTY, The 
Liberator, June; AN OLD TALE, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, September, 1921; MEMORIES, Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, September, 1921; A SONG FOR VANISHED BEAUTY, 
Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, September, 1921; THE 
SPINNERS AT WILLOWSLEIGH, Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, September, 1921; SONG OF A FACTORY GIRL, Poetry, 
A Magazine of Verse, September, 1921; SHE LONGS FOR 
THE COUNTRY, Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, September, 
1921. 

Zeiss, J. Roy. ENCHANTMENT, The Granite Monthly, June. 

Zimmer, Henry. To MARGARET, The Magnificat, March; 
SHRINES, The Catholic World* July. 

Zukofaky, Louis. THE FAUN SEES, The Pagan, August- 
September, 1921; MOOD, The Pagan, October-November, 
1921. 



34,7 



ARTICLES AND REVIEWS OF POETS AND 
POETRY PUBLISHED DURING 1921-1922 

Abbott, Lyman. Edward Everett Hale An American Abou 

Ben Adhem. The Outlook, October 26, 1921. 
Edward Everett Hale. The Outlook, April 12. 
Adams, Elmer C. Don Marquis Satirist. The Detroit News* 

February 26. 
Aiken, Conrad. The Poetry of Mr. E. A. Robinson. The Freeman, 

September 21, 1921. 
Allen, Hervey. Introducing Irony (Bodenheim). The Measure, 

December, 1921. 
Allen, Hervey and Du Bose Heyward. Poetry South. Poetry, 

A Magazine of Verse, April. 

Amos, Molly. The Daniel Jazz and the Rabbi: A Private Letter 
to the Poet Vachel Lindsay. The Outlook, August 10, 1921. 
Andelson, Pearl. A Promise (Oscar Williams). Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, June. 
A Prize-Winner (Stephen Vincent Ben6t). Poetry, A Magazine 

of Verse, March. 

Persephone (H. D.). Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer. 
A Sunlit Clearing (Jean Starr Untermeyer). Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, July. 
Woodwinds (Loureine Aber). Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

May. 
Anderson, Maxwell. Irish History in Little (Colum). The 

Measure, May. 

Nets to Catch the Wind (Wylie). The Measure, January. 
Sandburg Overdoes it a Little. The Measure, July. 
Second April (Millay). The Measure, September, 1921. 
Anon. A Reviewer's Notebook (Don Marquis). %he Freeman, 

July 12. 
A Reviewer's Notebook (On Translations from Chinese and 

Japanese poets). The Freeman, November 2, 1921. 
A Reviewer's Notebook (On Free Verse). The Freeman, 
t June 14. 

Austin Dobson. The Outlook, September 21, 1921. 
The Poet Explains. The Nation, September 28, 1921. 
Arnold, William Harris. My Stevensons. Scribner's Magazine, 
January. 

348 



Arvin, Newton. The Moths and the Star (On Keats). *The 

Freeman, November 2, 1921. 
Auslander, Joseph. Among Other Things the Sonnet. Voices, 

A Journal of Verse, Summer. 

Harrington, Pauline. Comment (Legends, Amy Lowell). The 

Lyric West, May. 

Bateman,May. George Meredith. The Catholic World, August, 1921. 
Baum, Paull Franklin. The New Milton. The Freeman, May 17. 
Beach, Joseph Warren. Latter-Day Critics of Shelley. The Yale 

Review, July. 
Belloc, Hilaire. Dante the Monarchist. The Catholic World, 

September, 1921. 

Ben6t, William Rose. A Poet of Promise (Frederick Faust). 
The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, July 29. 
Amy Lowell and Other Poets, The Yale Review, October, 1921. 
Masefield's Fairy Tale The Literary Review of the New York 
f* Evening Post, November 12, 1921. 
"Poems: Second Series" by J. C. Squire. The Literary Review 

of the New York Evening Post, July 8. 
Robinson in Retrospect. The Literary Review of the New York 

Evening Post, February 11. 
Sterling's Latest Poems* The Literary Review of the New York 

Evening Post, March 11. 
The Life of Louise Guiney . The Literary Review of the New York 

Evening Post, April 29. 
Bodenheim, Maxwell. Isolation of Carved Metal (Poems by 

Ezra Pound) . The Dial, January. 
Bowen, Stirling. Claude McKay a Gifted Poet. The Detroit 

News, July 16. 

Ezra Pound and Swinburne. The Detroit News, April 16. 
Important Surveys of American and British Verse. The Detroit 

News, October 80, 1921. 

Poetry in Slabs (Sandburg). The Detroit News, June 25. 
Poetry: Strange, Grim, Beautiful (Ralph Chaplm), The Detroit 

News, May 14. 
Boyd, Ernest. Selected Poems of W. B. Yeats. The Freeman, 

November 16, 1921. 

Braithwaite, William Stanley. A Biography of a Human Soul 
^(Robert Nathan). Boston Evening Transcript, June 10. 
A Book of War Verse (Palmer). Boston Evening Transcript. 

March 8. 
A Chinese Mandarin (Christopher Morley). Boston Evening 

Transcript, July 8. 
A Group of English Poets (Masefield and Others)* Boston 

Evening Transcript, January 11. 
Alfred Noyes and His Telescope. Boston Evening Transcript, 

June 8. 

A Mentor to Young Poets (Amos R. Wells). Boston Evening 
Transcript, December 24, 1921. 
349 



A Modern Chatterton (Henry Martyn Hoyt). Boston Evening 

Transcript* March 18. 
A Mountain Farm a Poet's Parnassus (Olive Tilford Dargan). 

Boston Evening Transcript, June 17. 
An American Poet and Professor (Jeannette Marks). Boston 

Evening Transcript, October 22, 1921. 
An English Poet (Moult) . Boston Evening Transcript. 
An English Poet Discusses His Art (Robert Graves). Boston 

Evening Transcript, June 24. 
A New Claimant for the Poetic Throne (Hazel Hall). Boston 

Evening Transcnpt, September 7, 1921. 
A New Poet of the Aesthetic (Mark TurbyfiU). Boston Evening 

Transcript, December 81, 1921. 
A Novel Theory of Literary Ecstacy (Albert Mordell). Boston 

Evening Transcript December 7, 1921. 
A Poet of an Immense Array of Moods (Brokes More). Boston 

Evening Transcript, November 19, 1921. 
A Poet of Destiny and Mystery (Muriel Strode). Boston 

Evening Transcript, August 27, 1921. 
A Poet of Quiet Ecstacy and Appeal (Florence Kilpatrick 

Mister). Boston Evening Transcript* October 8, 1921. 
A Poetic Apostle of Britain's Might (Sir Henry Newbolt). 

Boston Evening Transcript, January 28. 
A Poetic Apostle of Lyrical Fervor (Mercedes de Acosta). 

Boston Evening Transcript, November 26, 1921. 
A Poetic Yision of Katharine Coman (Katharine Lee Bates). 

Boston Evening Transcript, May 27. 
A Straying Reveller With the Muse. Boston Evening Transcript, 

March 4. 
Bill Boram (Robert Norwood). Boston Evening Transcript, 

September 17, 1921. 
Drinkwater, The Lyric Poet. Boston Evening Transcript, 

March 22. 
English Prosody (George Saintsbury). Boston Evening 

Transcnpt, February 1. 
John Masefield's Merrie England. Boston Evening Transcnpt, 

November 12, 1921. 
Leslie Pmckney Hill Writes of the Wings of Oppression. 

Boston Evening Transcript, December 10, 1921. 
Lyrics of an Earth Lover (Harold Vinal). Boston Evening 

Transcript, March 25. 
Red Poppies (John R. Moreland). Boston Evening Transcript, 

February 4. 
Sea Songs and Ballads (C. Fox Smith). Boston Evening 

Transcript, March 8. 
Shelley and Others (A. T. Strong). Boston Evening Transcript, 

December 10, 1921. 

Shrines and Shadows. Boston Evening Transcript^ August SI, 1921. 
Slabs of the Sunburnt West (Carl Sandburg). Boston Evening 
Transcript, July 29. 

350 



Songs Out of Doors (Henry van Dyke). Boston Evening 

Transcript, April 22. 
The Gentle Dignity of Laurence Binyon. Boston Evening 

Transcript, July 15. 
The Hills of Arcestn. Boston Evening Transcript, December 

10, 1921. 
The Many-Sided Don Marquis. Boston Evening Transcript, 

February 25. 
The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker. Boston Evening Transcript, 

January 21, 1921. 
The Poetry of a Professor (Henry A. Beers). Boston Evening 

Transcript, September 14, 1921. 
The Poetry of a Super-Tramp (Davies). Boston Evening 

Transcript, September 24, 1921. 
The Poetic Rise of Margaret Widdemer. Boston Evening 

Transcript, December 17, 1921. 
The Selected Poems of Yone Noguchi. Boston Evening 

Transcript, December 3. 
The Vagaries of a Poet (Walter de la Mare). Boston Evening 

Transcript, April 8. 
Thirty Years of a Poet's Work (Bliss Carman). Boston Evening 

Transcript, February 11. 
Bregy, Litt.D , Catherine. Of Father Tabb. The Catholic World, 

December, 1921. 

The Inclusiveness of Chaucer. The Catholic World, June. 
Brooke, Tucker. Shakespeare Apart. The Yale Review, October, 

1921. 
Brownell, Baker. Must Art Be Interesting? Poetry, A Magazine 

of Verse, January. 
Bryher, W. Spear-Shaft and Cyclamen-Flower (H. D.). Poetry, 

A Magazine of Verse, March. 
Buell, Llewellyn M. Eilean Earraid: The Beloved Isle of Robert 

Louis Stevenson. Scribner's Magasdne, February. 
Burke, Rev. J. J. Everybody's Dante. The Catholic World, 

September, 1921. 
Burke, Kenneth, Heaven's First Law (W. C, Williams' "Sour 

Grapes ") . The Dial, February. 
The Editing of Oneself (J. Oppenheim's "The Mystic 

Warrior"). The Dial, August, 1921. 

Bynner, Witter. Translating Wang Wei, Poetry, A Magazine of 
* 7 erse, February. 

C., W. W. Uninspired Verse (Elinor Wylie). The Detroit News, 

January 29. 
Carnevali, Emanuel. Dante and Today. Poetry, A Magazine of 

Verse, September, 1921. 

A Spirit of Quest (McAlmon) . Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June. 
Chamberlin, Joseph Edgar. The Story of a Boston Poet's Life 
(Louise Imogen Guiney). Boston Evening Transcript, 
October 29, 1921. 

351 



Cheney, Sheldon. The Divine Comedy. The Century Magazine, 

April. 
Chew, Samuel C. The Byron Problem. The Nation, August 24, 

1921. 
Byron Once More (Lord Byron's Correspondence). The 

Nation, April 12. 
The Lesser Caroline (Minor Poets of the Caroline Period, 

Saintsbury). The Nation, February 8. 
Cline, Leonard Lanson. A Pergola in a Moonlit Garden (Millay). 

The Detroit News, August 28, 1921. 
Collins, J. P. Lord Byron Tells His Sins to a Lady Confessor. 

Boston Evening Transcript, March 22. 
Colum, Mary M. John Dryden, Redivivus. The Freeman, 

January 25. 
Colum, Padraic. A New Dramatic Art (Yeats' "Four Plays for 

Dancers")- The Dial, March. 
A World hi High Visibility (Amy Lowell's "Legend"). The 

Freeman, September 14, 1921. 
Irish Poetry. The Bookman, October, 1921. 
Japanese Artistry (Poems of Yone Noguchi). The Freeman, 

March 22. 
Looking Towards Parnassus (J. G. Neihardt, Leonora Speyer). 

The Freeman, December 7, 1921. 
Miss MiUay's Poems. The Freeman, November 2, 1921. 
Mr. Yeats' Selected Poems. The Dial, October, 1921. 
The Art of the Pantomimist (Alfred Kreymborg). The 

Freeman, March 1. 

The Later de la Mare. The New Republic, July 26. 
The Poetry of Edward Thomas. The Measure, May. 
Two Women Poets (Alice Corbin, Evelyn Scott). The New 

Republic, November 2, 1921. 
Connor, D. J. Father Tabb's Poetical Preferences. The Catholic 

World, May. 
Cooper, Belle. William Henry Davies. The Los Angeles Times f 

April 2. 
Cowley, Malcolm. Bonded Translation (Fir-Flower Tablets), 

The Dial, May. 
Programme Music (Amy Lowell's Legends). The Dial, August, 

1921. 
The French and Our New Poetry. The Literary Review of the 

New York Evening Post, May 6. 
Cox, Eleanor Rogers. Andrew Lang, Champion of the Maid. 

America, May 27. 

Austin Dobson, Poet and Friend. America, October 23, 1921. 
Craven, Thomas Jewell. The Freudian Incubus (Prescott's 

K. "The Poetic Mind"). The Dial, July. 
Crawford, Nelson Antrim. The Novelist as Poet (Philpotts). 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921. 
The Professor as Critic (Lowell O. Erskine). Poetry, A Magazine 
of Verse, October, 1921. 

352 



Unity Made Vital Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, September, 

1921. 
Croce, Benedetto. The Young Dante and the Dante of the 

Comedy. The Yale Review, October, 1921. 
Cross, Wilbur. From Columbus to Shakespeare. The Yale 

Review, January. 
Current Opinion for August. New Reminiscences of Oscar 

Wilde and William Morns. 
Current Opinion for September. What Verlaine Has Done for 

French Poetry. 
Current Opinion for January. Homer's World Through the 

Eyes of Georg Brandes. 
Current Opinion for March. The Song of Songs Interpreted as 

a Purely Erotic Poem. 
Current Opinion for April. The Dynamic Poetry of Bolshevik 

Russia. 
Current Opinion for May. Shelley's Doctrine of Love and Human 

Future. 

Current Opinion for June. Why Byron Still Holds Our Imagi- 
nation. 

Curtis, Natalie. Pueblo Poetry. The Freeman, January 25. 
Cuthbert, O. S. F. C., Father. Dante and the Franciscans. 

The Caihohc World, September, 1921. 

Dixon, James Main. The Song Divine. The Personalist, October, 

1921. 
Dole, Nathan Haskell. The Divine Comedy (Dante). Boston 

Evening Transcript, December 14, 1921. 
Drinkwater, John. Edwin Arlington Robinson. The Yale Review, 

April. 
Dudley, Dorothy. A Mystic Warrior. Poetry, A Magazine of 

Verse, January. 

Miss Lowell's Legends. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March. 
Dwight, S J., Walter. Our Lady at the Crib. America, December 

24 f 1921. 

Earls, S. J., Michael. Letters of Louise Imogen Quiney. The 

Bookman, April. 
Egan, Maurice Francis. The Greatness of Dante. The Outlook, 

October 12, 1921. 

Eliot, T. S. London Letter (On American Poets). The Dial, May. 
Elliot, William Foster. Nobility and Tone. The Lyric West, 

December, 1921. 
Erskiae, John. Byron and Shelley. The OuUook, July 26. "Le 

'Poeme Evangde* de Walt Whitman" by Leon Bazalgette. 

The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, 

May 27. 
Erskine, L. Y. Handsome Edition in English of Rostand s 

Plays. The Detroit News, January 22. 

353 



Fawcett, James Waldo. The Sad Years (Dora Sigerson). Unity, 

December 22, 1921. 
Feld, R. C. The Opinions of A. E. (George Russell). The Century 

Magazine, November, 1921, 
Firkins, 0, W, Mr, Masters Weighs Anchor. The Literary Review 

of the New York Evening Post, February 18. 
Flanigan, Mary Leedy. Red Poppies in the Wheat (Moreland). 

American Poetry Magazine, February. 
Fletcher, John Gould. A Metaphysical Poet (Gerald Gould). 

The Freeman, December 28, 1921. 
Born Out of Due Time (E. Blunden). The Freeman, August 3, 

1921. 
Feminism in Poetry (Anna Wickham). The Freeman, October 

26. 
The Captive Lion CW- H. Davies). The Freeman, December 

21, 1921. 

Exercises in Divinity. The Freeman, August 17, 1921. 
The Fortunate Island (Anthology of Irish Poets) . The Freeman, 

June 28. 
Poet and Translator (R. Aldington). The Freeman, September 

28, 1921. 

The Poetry of Charlotte Mew. The Freeman, March 15, 
The Poetry of Edward Thomas. The Freeman, October 19, 

1921. 

The Quality of Shelley. The Freeman, May 24, 
Two English Poets (Drinkwater, de la Mare). The Freeman, 

July 5. 

Vernal Twitterings (John Freeman). The Freeman, May S. 
Flewelling, Ralph Tyler. The Personalist, January. 
The Ring and the Book: A Study hi Sophism. The Personalist, 

October, 1921. 
Flexaer, Hortense. New Lyrics (Addison). Voices, A Journal 

of Verse, Summer. 

Foerster, Norman. "The Uncollected Poetry and Prose of Walt 

Whitman" Holloway; "The Gathering of the Forces" 

by Walt Whitman Rodgers and Black. The Literary Review 

of the New York Evening Post, May 27. 

Freeman, Joseph. Dreams Out of Darkness Jean Starr 

Untermeyer. The Liberator, January. 
Freer, Agnes Lee. Tarnished Gold (Harold Nicolson). Poetry 

A Magazine of Verse, July. 
Fujita, Jun. A Japanese Cosmopolite (Yone Noguchi). Poetry, 

A Magazine of Verse, June. 
Fuller, Henry B. Chicago Poets. The Literary Review of the 

New York Evening Post, December 10, 1921. 
Dante in English Rhyme (Anderson). Poetry, A Magazine of 

Verse, June, 
The Crocean Dante (Poetry of Dante B. Croc) . The Freeman, 

MaySl 

The Divine Comedy. The Freeman, October 12, 1921. 
354 



G , R. Books of Verse by Two Women (Gale-Widdemer), The 

Detroit News, April 23. 

Garnett, Porter. Yone Noguchi. The Nation, December 7, 1921. 
Gawn, Burnett Red Earth: Poems of New Mexico. The Double 

Dealer, December, 1921, 
Hymen (H. D ) The Double Dealer, January. 
Geddes, Virgil. Bodenheim's Ironic Lyricism. Voices, A Journal 

of Verse, Summer. 
Giles, Dorothy Poetry and Collar-Buttons. The Outlook, 

February 22. 
Gold, Michael. Two Critics in a Barroom. The Liberator, 

September, 1921. 
Goldberg, Isaac. A Spanish-American Poet (Jose Asuncion 

Silva). The Freeman, April 26. 

Gorman, Herbert S. The Later Mr. Yeats The Outlook, April 19. 

Edwin Arlington Robinson. The New Republic, February 8. 

Graff, Irvine. Wings (On Shelley). The New Republic, July 26. 

Gray, Agnas Kendrick. A Poet's Play (Millay). The Measure, 

September, 1921. 
Guerson, Helen The Religious Poetry of Paul Claudel The 

< Catholic World, August, 1921. 
Guiterman, Arthur. Household Poems. The Literary Review of 

the New York Evening Post, December 17. 

Hagedorn, Hermann. One Lyre: Lost, Strayed or Stolen. The 

Outlook, February 8. 
Hall, Carolyn. Poems of a Mystic (Hazel Hall). The Measure, 

October, 1921. 
Head, Cloyd. Influence of the Art Theatre on Poetic Drama. 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921 
Mr. Yeats' Plays. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, February. 
Hewlett, Maurice. The Anthology in English (Little Poems 

from the Greek-Leaf). The Literary Review of the New York 

Evening Post, February 25. 
Hill, Frank Ernest. Something Less Than Art (W. C. Williams). 

The Measure, June. 
Hillman, Carolyn. Seeds for the Sowing (Drinkwater). Voices' 

A Journal of Verse, Summer. 
Hillman, Gordon Malherbe. The Muse and Mr. Miller. Voices, 

A Journal of Verse, Spring. 

Holloway, Emory. Whitman in Extremis. The Nation, April 19. 
Hyde, Fillmore. Poetry in Prose (Tagore). The Literary Review 

of the New York Evening Post, December 10, 1921. 

Jones, Howard Mumford. A. E. Housman, Last of the Romans. 

The Double Dealer, March. 
Lord Byron's Letters. The Freeman, June 7. 
Jones, Llewellyn. A Poet's Prosody (Bridges on Milton is 

Prosody). The Freeman, February 1. 
Back to Shakespeare. The Freeman, October 12, 1921 

S55 



Kallen, H M. Convention and Revolt in Poetry (J. L Lowes) . 

The New Republic, December 14, 1921. 
Kalz, Adaline. A Miscellany of American Poetry. The Double 

Dealer, December, 1921. fcHj 

Sour Grapes (William Carlos Williams). The Double Dealer, 

March. 
Kelly, Mus.D., F. Joseph. Church Song in its Relation to 

Church Life. The Catholic World, April. 
Kelsey, W. K. Going, Gentlemen? (Thomas Hardy). The 

Detroit News, July 16. 
Two New Anthologies Do Honor to Moderns (A. M. Squire). 

The Detroit News, June 26. 
The Poet Goes A-Star Gazing (Alfred Noyes). The Detroit 

News, May 7. 
Kerlin, Robert. Some Singing Johnsons (Three Colored Poets). 

The Outlook, August 3, 1921. 
King, Gertrude Besse. Ex Libris (Plato's Studies and Criticisms 

of the Poets). The Freeman, October 5, 1921. 
King, Grace. Creole Negro Songs. The Literary Review of the 

New York Evening Post, May 13. 
Krutch, Joseph Wood. The Disgruntled Mr. Pound. The 

Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, March 18. 

L., F. R. A Canadian Poet Passes (Marjorie Pickthall). The 

Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, June 17. 
Land, Ernest M. A New German Classic (Arno Holz). The 

Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, July 8. 
Lanux, Pierre de. A Poet of a New Democracy (Charles Vildrac). 

The Freeman, August 10, 1921. 
Laub, D. Kenneth, Deftly Chipped from Blockhead and Bored 

(Keith Preston). The Detroit News, December 11, 1921. 
Lee, Muna. Porto Rican Poets. The Literary Review of the 

New York Evening Post, June 3. 

Vicarious Experience. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May. 
Le Gallienne, Richard. What's Wrong With the Eighteen- 

Nineties? The Bookman, September, 1921. 
Leo, Brother. Percy Bysshe Shelley. The Catholic World, July. 
Les, Martin J. Mediaevalism and Irish Literature. The Catholic 

World, May. 

Littell, Phillip. J. J. Chapman's "A Glance Toward Shakes- 
peare." The New Republic, April 19. 
Le Gallienne Book of English Verse. The New Republic, 

April 26. 

Littell, Robert, Negro Poets. The New Republic, July 12. 
Loeber, William. The Literary Tough (Carl Sandburg). The 

Double Dealer, February. 
Lowell, Amy. A Bird's-Eye View of E. A. Robinson. The Did, 

February. 
Lozowick, Louis. A Note on the New Russian Poetry. Broom, 

February. 

356 



Macgowan, Kenneth. Back to Shakespeare. The Century 

Magazine, July. 
Macy, John. The Happy Colyumist (Bert Leston Taylor). 

The Freeman, December 14, 1921. 
Marino, Josephine The Message of Dante to the Twentieth 

Century. The Forum, Dante Number. 
Mason, Lawrence. Mr. Nevinson's bony. The Freeman, August 

10, 1921. 
Poetry as She is Read. The Literary Review of the New York 

Evening Post, December 17, 1921. 
Maynard, Theodore. The Unexpectedness of J C. Squire. 

The Literary Review of the New York Evening Post, October 

22, 1921. 

Edwin Arlington Robinson. The Catholic World, June. 
John Masefield. The Catholic World, April. 
The Fallacy of Free Verse. The Yale Review, January. 
McClure, John. Collected Poems (Edwin Arlington Robinson). 

The Double Dealer, April. 

New Poems of Ezra Pound. The Double Dealer, May. 
The Junkman and Other Poems (Richard Le Gallienne). The 

Double Dealer, August-September, 1921. 
Willow Pollen (Jeannette Marks). The Double Dealer, October, 

1921. 
Youth Grows Old (Robert Nathan). The Double Dealer, 

June. 
McCormick, Virginia Taylor. A Hundred and Seventy Chinese 

Poems. Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch, June 24. 
Collected Poems (Edward Thomas). Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch, 

April 1. 
Collected Poems of Edwin Arlington Robinson. Norfolk 

ledger-Dispatch, March 18. 

Dreams and a Sword. Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch, July 1. 
Dreams Out of Darkness (J. S. Untermeyer). Norfolk Ledger- 
Dispatch, April 15. 

England America in Two Women Poets (Mew and Unter- 
meyer). Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring 
Everyday Poems (George EUiston). Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch, 

June 3. 

Ibsen's Portraiture of Women. The Personalist, July. 
Let Us Talk of Flecker. The Personalist, April. 
Lute and Furrow (Dargan). Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch, July 22. 
Open Shutters (Oliver Jenkins). Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch, 

April 29. 

Saturday Market (Mew). Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch, April 15. 
Some New Books of Poetry, Radical and Conservative (B. 8266, 

Wylie, etc ) Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch. 
Songs of Florida and Other Verse (Doris and James Kenyon), 

Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch, February 18. 
Spring Howers and Rowen (Currie). Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch, 

February 18. 

357 



Two Anthologies, Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch, December 17, 1921* 
White April (VinaJ). Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch, April 8. 
Millay, Edna St. Vincent. Elinor Wylie's Poems. The Literary 

Review of the New York Evening Post, January 28. 
Mitchell, Anna. An American Mystic (Guiney). Voices, A 

Journal of Verse, Summer. 

Mitchell, Stuart. A Century of Shelley. The Dial, March. 
Monahan, Michael. The Portrait of Mr, W. H. The Double 

Dealer, November, 1921. 
Monroe, Harriet, A Lute of String (Jessie B. Rittenhouse). 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March. 

A New Pulitzer Prize. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, July. 
Announcements of Awards. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

November. 1921. 
A Poet in Embryo (Mercedes de Acosta). Poetry, A Magazine 

of Verse, March. 
A Symposium on Marianne Moore. Poetry, A Magazine of 

Verse, January. 
Comment (Midsummer Delite). Poetry, a Magazine of Verse, 

August, 1921. 
John Adams' Prophecy. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse. 

September, 1921. 

Mrs. Wylie's Poems. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, January. 
Moving. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, May. 
Newspaper Verse. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, March. 
Poetry and the Allied Arts. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

October, 1921. 
Rhetoric Unashamed (Watson). Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

March. 

Prosody. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, June. 
Robinson's Double Harvest. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

August, 1921. 

Shelley. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, July. 
Songs and Splashes (Dresbach). Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

August, 1921. 

The Hope of Peace. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, January. 
The Utterance of Poetry. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

February. 
Thoughtful Measures. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

January. 
Youth and the Desert (Westcott-Winters). Poetry, A Magazine 

of Verse, September, 1921. 
Morgan, Marjorie B. Louise Imogen Guiney. The Detroit News, 

February 19. 
Moriarty, Helen. The Women of Shakespeare. The Catholic 

World, July. 
Morris, Lloyd R. Padraic Colum: Poet and Playwright. The 

Outlook, May 17. 

The Poetry of Ireland. The New Republic, June 14. 
Mortimer, Raymond. Thomas Moore. The Dial, October, 1921. 

358 



Moulton, P. R. Palestinian Love Lyrics. The Literary Review 

of the New York Evening Post, February 11. 
Moynihan, D. D., Humphrey. Dante the Theologian The Catholic 

World, September, 1921. 
Moynihan, F. Austin Dobson. The Catholic World, November. 

1921, 
Munson, Gorham B. The Limbo of American Literature. Broom, 

June. 

Munsterberg, Margaret. "II Dolce Stil Nuovo," A Contempla- 
tion of Dante the Poet. The Catholic World, September, 1921. 
Murry, J. Middleton. Gerhart Hauptmann's Idyll. The New 

Republic, January 18. 

The Commemoration of John Keats. The Dial, October, 1921. 
Myers, Rollo H. Jean Cocteau. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

May. 

Nicholl, Louise Townsend. A First Book (Hervey Allen). The 

Measure, October, 1921. 
A Negro Poet. (McKay), July. 
A Sheaf of Poetry. The Literary Review of the New York Evening 

Post, May 20. 

Brutus Roams the Ages (Masters). The Measure, January. 
Nickerson, Paul S. A Book of Poems Worth Reading. (Red 
Poppies in the Wheat-Moreland). Canton Journal, April 7. 
Nitze, William A. Panache Translated (Plays of Rostand). 
The Nation, May 17. 

O'Conor, Norreys Jephson. A Book of Remembrance. Voices. 

A Journal of Verse, Summer. 

Ancient China and Her Poets (Amy Lowell). Boston Evening 
Transcript, December 17, 1921. 

Phillips, M. A., Charles. Dante and Pastoral Poetry. The 

Catholic World, September, 1921. 
Pickens, Sylvan O. The Golden Darkness (Oscar Williams), 

The Double Dealer, March. 
Powys, Llewelyn. Percy Bysshe Shelley. 

Glimpses of Thomas Hardy. The Dial, March. 

The Veil and Other Poems (de la Mare). The Double Dealer, 

July. 
The Wessex Poet (S. C. Chew's "Thomas Hardy")- The 

Freeman, March 22. 

William Barnes, the Dorset Poet. The Freeman, July 12. 
Pulsifer, Harold Trowbridge. How Not to Approach an Editor 

With a Poem. The Outlook, April 26. 
Poetry and People. The Outlook, October 19, 1921. 
Wanted Readers Who Can Itead (Poetry). The Outlook, 
April 5. 

Redman, Ben Ray. Youth Grows Old (Robert Nathan). The 
Nation, May 24. 

359 



Reilly, Ph.D., Joseph J. Bazin and Hardy, The Catholic World, 

February. 
Ridge, Lola. Quaker-Gray and Rose (Jeannette Marks). Poetry, 

A Magazine of Verse, May. 
Roberts, Caesar A. An Appreciation of the Poetry of Madge. 

Morris Wagner. The Lyric West, September, 1921. 
Rolbiecki, J. J. Dante's Political Theories. The Catholic World, 

September, 1921. 
Rourke, Constance Mayfield. The Springs of Poetry (Poetic 

Origins by Louise Pound). The Freeman, October 12, 1921. 



St. Clair, George. Filipino Literature. The Literary Review 

of the New York Evening Post, February 11. 
Sapir, Edward. Mr. Masters' Later Work. The Freeman, June 14. 
Maxwell Bodenheim. The Nation, June 21. 
Poems of Experience (E. A. Robinson). The Freeman, April 19. 
The Manner of Mr. Masefield. The Freeman, February 15. 
Scott, Harold P. Some Seventy Poems by Professor Beers. 

The Detroit News, October 23, 1921. 
Witchcraft Again Interests Mackaye. The Detroit News, 

August 7, 1921. 
Scott, Temple. The Poet as Philosopher (Coventry Patmore). 

The Freeman, February 8. 
Scheffauer, Herman George. The "Absolute" Poem. The 

Freeman, September 28, 1921. 
The Chromatic "Othello." The Freeman, February 1. 
Scheifley, Ph.D., William H. Verlaine After Quarter of a Century. 

The Catholic World, November, 1921. 
Schneider, Isidor. Museum Ships (Morton). Poetry, A Magazine 

of Verse, October, 1921. 

Slavic Poetry. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, July. 
Schuster, M. Lincoln. The Passing of John Butler Yeats. Boston 

Evening Transcript, February 17. 
Sherry, Laura, Pageantry and Rhetoric (Mackaye-Neihardt). 

Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921. 
Sinclair, May. The Poems of H. D. The Dial, February. 
Smith, Preserved. An Australian Critic (A. T. Strong). The 

Nation, July 12. 
Snow, Royall. Agonized Adoration (Priapus and the Pool by 

Conrad Aiken). The New Republic, June 21. 
A Note on the Objective. The Double Dealer, July. 
Salt of the Individual (The Living Frieze, by M. Turbyfill). 

The New Republic, January 25. 
Starrett, Vincent. Edgar A. Poe: A Study. The Double Dealer, 

October, 1921. 
The First American Poet (Anne Bradstreet). The Freeman, 

May 17. 

Stewart, H. W. Brazilian Dance Songs. Poetry, A Magazine of 
Verse, August, 1921. 

860 



Stork, Charles Wharton. A Poet's Tragedy (Stephen Moylan 

Bird). The Nation, February 8. 
Strobel, Marion. Charlotte Mew. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

June. 
Two English Poets (Blunden-Vines) . Poetry, A Magazine of 

Verse, September, 1921. 
Symons, Arthur. The Sinister Side of Genius (Manifested in 

Poets). The Freeman, January 11. 

Taggard, Genevieve. Not Fairies, Animals! (Laura Benet). 

The Measure, June. 
Talmy, L. The Art of Russia (Work of Vladimir Mayakovsky). 

The Nation, November 2, 1921. 
Towse, J. Ranken. "Shakespeare to Sheridan" by Alwin Thaler. 

The Literary Review of ike New York Evening Post, July 8. 
Turner, D.D., Rt. Rev. William. Dante as a Philosopher. The 

Catholic World, September, 1921. 

Untermeyer, Louis. A War for Our Poets? The Nation, April 12. 
Fire and Ice (Aline Kilmer, Elinor Wylie, H.D ) The New 

Republic, December 28, 1921. 
Our Living Laureates. The Bookman, January. 
Return of the Vers Libretine. The Nation, June 7. 

Van Doren, Carl. Greek Dignity and Yankee Ease (E. A. 

Robinson). The Nation, November 16, 1921. 
"The Gathering of the Forces" (Walt Whitman). The Nation, 

March 8. 
Van Doren, Mark. Eagle and Worm (Masefield, Graves). The 

Nation, January 11. 
Edward Thomas (Collected Poems), The Nation, December 7, 

1921. 

George Edward Woodberry. The Nation, March 1. 
Paul Fort. The Nation, February 1. 
The Poetic Mind. The Literary Review of the New York Evening 

Post, June S. 

This Davies (W. H. Davies). The Nation, October 12, 1921. 
Unpopular Legends (Amy Lowell). The Nation, August, 1921. 
Women As Poets. The Nation, April 26. 
Women of Wit (M. Moore, E. Sk V. M., A. Wickham). The 

Nation, October 26, 1921. 
Van Rensselaer, Mrs. Schuyler. Richard Watson Gilder 

Personal Memories. The Outlook, March 8. 
Vinal, Harold. Alice Again (Mrs. Benet). Voices, A Journal of 

Verse, Summer. 
Irrevocable Earth (Wylie). Voices, A Journal of Verse, Spring. 

Waldo, Fullerton. The Earlier E. A. R., Some Memories of a 

Poet in the Making. The Outlook, November SO, 1921. 
Kipling in Philadelphia. The Outlook, January 25. 

361 



Walsh, Thomas. Teresian Poets (Influence of St. Teresa upon 

poets) The Catholic World, April. 

The Progress of Poetry: Spanish I, II. The Nation, Septem- 
ber 14, 21, 1921. 
Watkin, E Ingram. Dante and Mysticism. The Catholic World, 

September, 1921. 
Welles, Winifred. Speaking for the Tortoise (Lawrence). The 

Measure, June. 
Wescott, Glenway. A Sonneteer (Stewart Mitchell). Poetry, 

A Magazine of Verse, April. 
Classics in English (D. H. Lawrence). Poetry, A Magazine of 

Verse, August, 1921. 

New Fire (Speyer). Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, October, 1921. 
Wheaton,L. Dante the Man. The Catholic World, September, 1921. 
White, Lee A. "And What of Nimmo?" After Fifteen Stanzas! 
(Edwin Arlington Robinson). The Detroit News, June 26. 
White, Walter F. Negro Poets. The Nation, June 7. 
Widdemer, Margaret. Depths and Surfaces (Gale and Jenkins). 

Voices, A Journal of Verse, Summer. 
Wilbur, Harnette. Lily Lore (In poetry). The Catholic World, 

March. 
Williams, Michael. The Times of Dante. The Catholic World, 

September, 1921. 
Wilson, Jr. Edmund. Mr. Masefield and Racine. The New 

Republic, May 3. 
Mr. Pound's Patchwork (Poems 1918-21). The New Republic, 

April 19 

The Bronze Trumpet of Fairyland. The Bookman, February. 
The Poetry of Mr. W. B, Yeats. The Freeman, March 29. 
Winters, Yvor, A Cool Master (E. A. Robinson). Poetry, A 

Magazine of Verse, February. 

"A Distinguished Young Man" (Turbyfill). Poetry, A Maga- 
zine of Verse, March. 
A Woman With a Hammer (Wickham). Poetry, A Magazine 

of Verse, May. 
Carlos Williams' New Book. Poetry, A Magazine of Verse, 

July. 
Wood, Clement. A Homer from Hogwallow (Sandburg). The 

Nation, July 26. 
American Negro Poetry. The Literary Review of the New 

York Evening Post, June 10. 

Land-Locked Ships (David Morton) . The Bookman, September, 
1921. 

Yarmolinsky, Avrahm. Dante and Dostoyevsky. The New 

Republic, November 80, 1921. 
Yeats, William Butler. More Memories. The Dial, June, July. 

Four Years, 1887-1891. The Dial, August, 1921. 
Yust, Walter. Edgar Lee Masters: An Interview, The Double 
Dealer, August-September, 1921. 

362 



VOLUMES OF POEMS PUBLISHED 
DURING 1921-1922 

A. Book of German Lyrics. Selected and Edited with Notes and 

Vocabulary by Friedrich Bruns. D. C. Heath and Company. 
A Book of Women's Verse. Edited with a Prefatory Essay by 

J. C. Squire. Oxford University Press. 

Addison, Medora. Dreams and a Sword. Yale University Press. 
AUemong, Nettie P. The Harp of Life. The Stratford Company. 
Allen, Hervey. Wampun and Old Gold. Yale University Press. 
Alexander, Hartley Burr Odes and lyrics. Marshall Jones and 

Company. 
Anderson, Marjorie. A Web of Thoughts. The Four Seas 

Company 
Anderson, Melville Best. The Divine Comedy of Dante Aliffhieri. 

A Line for Line Translation in the Rime-Form of the Original. 

The World Book Company. 
Anthony, Edward. Merry-Go Roundelays. The Century 

Company. 
Appleton, Everard Jack. The Quiet Courage^ and Other Songs 

of the Unafraid. Stewart Kidd Company. 
Arthur-Behenna, K. Mystic Songs of Fire and Flame. With an 

Appreciation by Stanwood Cobb. The Cornhill Publishing 

Company. 

B. 8266 Penitentiary. A Tale of a Walled Town, and Other 

Verses. With an Introduction by William Stanley Braith- 

waite. J. B. Lippincott. 
Baker, Martha S. Songs of Homes, and Others. The Cornhill 

Publishing Company. 
Bates, Katharine Lee. Yettow Glover. A Book of Remembrance. 

E. P. Dutton and Company. 

Bax, Clifford. The Traveler's Tale. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. 
Bax, Clifford, and Rubinstein, H. F. Shakespeare. A Play in 

Five Episodes. With a Preface by A. W. Pollard. Houghton 

Mifflin Company. 

Beers, Henry A. Poems. Yale University Press. 
Benet, Laura. Fairy Bread. Thomas Seltzer. 
Bennet, Georgia E. Vagrants. Ralph Fletcher Seymour. 
Binns, Henry Bryan. Hill-Tops. London: Jonathan Capes. 
Binyon, Laurence. Selected Poems. The Macmillan Company. 

368 



Blunden, Edmund. The Shepherd, and Other Poems of Peace 

and War. Alfred A. Knopf . 

Blunt, Rev. Hugh. My Own People. The Magnificat Press. 
Bodenheim, Maxwell. Introducing Irony. A Book of Poetic Short 

Stories and Poems. Boni and Liveright. 
Bradby, G. F, The Way. Oxford University Press. 
Braithwaite, William Stanley (Editor). Anthology of Magazine 

Verse for 1921, and Year Book of American Poetry. Small, 

Maynard and Company. 
Anthology of Massachusetts Poets. Small, Maynard and 

Company. 
Brown, Mrs. Percy. Chenar Leaves. Poems of Kashmir. 

Longmans, Green and Company. 
Browning, Charles. My Sacramento. Sacramento: Wilbur 

Printing Company. 
Browning, Eunice. Poems. Sacramento: Wilbur Printing 

Company. 
Poems. Published by the Author, Sacramento, California. 

Carman, Bliss. Later Poems. With an Appreciation by R. H. 

Hathaway. McClelland and Stewart. 
Christie, O. F. England in the Eighteenth Century. Essays in 

Verse. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. 
Cobb, Ann. Kinfolks. Kentucky Mountain Rhymes. Houghton 

Mifflin Company. 

Cole, Carter S. Varied Verses. Moffat, Yard and Company. 
Colum, Padraic (Editor). Anthology of Irish Verse. Boni and 

Liveright. 

Companions. An Anthology. New York: Samuel A. Jacobs. 
Converse, Florence. Garments of Praise: A Miracle Cycle. E. P. 

Button and Company. 
Cooke, Rupert Croft. Clouds of Gold. St. Leonards, England: 

C. Howes. 
Courthope, William John. The Country Toum, and Other Poems. 

Oxford University Press. 
Crockett, Albert S. Ditties from a Ditty Bag, and War-Time 

Memories New York: S. L. Parsons and Company, Inc. 
Cumming, John Palmer. Me An* War Goin* On. The Cornhill 

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Cume, George Graham. Songs of Florida, and Other Verse. 

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D., H. Hymen. Henry Holt and Company. 

Dalliha, Gerda. Poems. With an Introduction by Edwin 

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Dargan, Olive. Lute and Furrow. Charles Scribner's Sons. 
Dario, Ruben. Prosas Profanas, and Other Poems. Translated 

from the Spanish by Charles B. McMichael. Nicholas L. 

Brown. 

364, 



Davies, William H. The Captive Lion, and Other Poems. Yale 

University Press. 
Davis, Franklin Pierre. Anthology of Newspaper Verse for 1921. 

Enid, Okla.: Frank P. Davis. 
Day, Anne Marjorie. The Guiding Light, Pilgrim Tercentenary 

Pageant Play in Four Episodes. Richard G. Badger, 
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Company, 
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Henry Holt and Company. 

The Veil, and Other Poems. Henry Holt and Company. 
De Witt, S. A. Iron Monger. A Book of Poems. Frank Shay. 
Dimpfi, John. The Silent Chord. The Stratford Company. 
Doyle, Edward. Freedom, Truth and Beauty. New York: 

Manhattan and Bronx Advocate. 
Dresbach, Glenn Ward. In Colors of the West. Henry Holt and 

Company. 

Drinkwater, John. Seeds of Time. Houghton Mifflin Company. 
Duckworth, Sophie Hageman. The Love of Quintett. B. J. 

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Elliston, George. Everyday Poems. Stewart Kidd Company. 

Farrar, John. Songs for Parents. Yale University Press. 

Farrington, Harry Web. Poems from France. New York: Rough 
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Faust, Frederick. The Village Street, and Other Poems. G. P. 
Putnam's Sons. 

Field, Beulah. A Silver Pool. Moffat, Yard and Company. 

Fir-Flower Tablets. Poems. Translated from the Chinese by 
Florence Asycough. English Versions by Amy Lowell. 
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Fletcher, Louisa (Mrs. Willard Connely). The Land of Beginning 
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Forbes, Anita P. Modern Verse Henry Holt and Company. 

Freeman, John. Music. Lyrical and Narrative Poems. Harcourt, 
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From Isles of the West to Bethlehem. Pictures, Poetry ; Tales, 
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Gale, Zona. The Secret Way. The Macmillan Company. 
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Gould, Gerald. The Journey: Odes and Sonnets. Yale University 

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Graves, Robert. The Pier-Glass. Alfred A. Knopf. 

365 



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Ibsen, Henrik. Early Plays: Catiline, The Warrior* s Barrow* 
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Love Lyrics of Ancient Palestine. A New Translation 

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Jones, John Langdon. Mid Light and Shade. Duffield and 

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366 



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367 



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368 



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Osgood, Ernest Earle. The Master Fisherman. The Stratford 

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Poulsen, Ezra J. Songs for the Toilers. The Stratford Company. 
Pound, Ezra. Poems, 1913-1981. Including Three Portraits and 

Four Cantos. Bpni and Liveright. 
Preston, Keith. Splinters. George H. Doran Company. 

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Richter, Irving S. The Power of Love, The City of Comrades, 
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369 



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Company. 
Rose, Heloise Durant. Dante: A Dramatic Poem. Oxford 

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Rostand, Edmond. The Princess Far-Away. A Romantic Tragedy 

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Bagstad. Richard G. Badger. 
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Saintsbury, George (Editor). Minor Poets of the Caroline Period^ 

Vol. III. Oxford University Press. 
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and Company. 

Sargent, Daniel. The Door, and Other Poems. Richard G. Badger. 
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by Francis W. Bronson, Thomas Caldecot Chubb and Cyril 

Hume. Yale University Press. 
Thomas, Edward. Collected Poems. With Introduction by 

Walter de la Mare. Thomas Seltzer. 
Thompson, Francis. The Hound of Heaven. The Four Seas 

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Thorp, N. Howard ("Jack" Thorp) (Compiler). Songs of the 

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Houghton Mifflin. Company. 
Thoughts Reflected in the Mirror of Life By a Soul that has Passed 

Beyond. New York: Privately Printed. 
Tompkms, William H. Mostly Boy. Richard G. Badger. 
Turner, Nancy Byrd. Zodiac Tovm. The Rhymes of Amos and 

Ann. The Atlantic Monthly Press. 

Untermeyer, Jean Starr. Dreams Out of Darkness. B.W.Huebsch. 

Valentine, Benjamin B. Ole Marster, and Other Verses. Richmond: 

Whittet and Shepperson. 

van Dyke, Henry. Songs Out of Doors. Charles Scribner's Sons. 
Van Rensselaer, Mrs. Schuyler. Many Children (With Drawings 

by Florence Wyman Ivins). The Atlantic Monthly Press. 
Van Wyck, William. Jessica's Book. Selwyn and Blunt, Ltd. 
Viereck, Von Georg Sylvester. Gedichte. Mit emer Einfuhrung 

von Eduard Engel. Leipzig: Hesse and Becker. 
Vinal, Harold. White April. Yale University Press. 

Wagstaff, Blanche Shoemaker. Quiet Waters. Moffat, Yard and 

Company. 
Ward, Lydia Avery Coonley. The Melody of Love, The Melody 

of Life, The Melody of Childhood. James T. White Company. 
Warren, Katharine. Early and Late. Duffield and Company. 

371 



Watson, Sir William. Ireland, Unfreed. John Lane Company, 
Weaver, Bennett. The Garden of Seven Trees. With a Foreword 

by William Johnston. The Cornhill Publishing Company. 
Wentworth, Edward C. Scattered Leaves. From My Diary 1915- 

1920 The Torch Press. 
Wetherald, Ethelwyn. Tree-Top Mornings. The Cornhill 

Publishing Company. 

Whitman, Walt. Leaves of Grass, 18oO-1881. With an Introduc- 
tion by Stuart P. Sherman. Charles Scribner's Sons. 
Whitsett, William Thornton. Saber and Song. Whitsett,, N. C.: 

Whitsett Institute. 
Widdemer, Margaret. Cross-Currents. Harcourt, Brace and 

Company. 

Williams, Oscar. The Golden Darkness. Yale University Press. 
Williams, William Carlos. Sour Grapes. The Four Seas Company. 
Woods, Margaret L. The Return and Other Poems. John Lane 

Company. 
Wylie, Elinor. Nets to Catch the Wind. Harcourt, Brace and 

Company. 

Yeats, William Butler. Four Plays for Dancers. The Macmillan 

Company. 
Yone, Noguchi. Selected Poems. The Four Seas Company. 



372 



A SELECT LIST OF BOOKS ABOUT POETS 
AND POETRY 

Bailey, Elmer James. Religious Thought in the Greater American 

Poets. The Pilgrim Press. 
Bates, Margaret Holmes. Browning Critiques. Chicago: The 

Morris Book Shop. 
Brawley, Benjamin. The Negro in Literature and Art in the 

United States. (New Edition, Revised.) Duffield and 

Company. 
Brett-Smith, F. B. (Editor). Peacock's Four Ages of Poetry. 

Shettey's Defense of Poetry, Browning's Essay on Shettey. 

Houghton Mifflin Company. 
Brown, S. J., Stephen, The Realm of Poetry. The Macmillan 

Company. 

Chapman, John Jay. A Glance Towards Shakespeare. The 

Atlantic Monthly Press. 
Chew, Samuel C. Thomas Hardy. Poet and Novelist. Longmans, 

Green and Company. 
Clutton-Brock, A. Essays on BooTcs. E. P. Button and Company. 

More Essays on Books. E. P. Dutton and Company. 
Colvin, Sir Sidney. Memories and Notes of Persons and Places, 

1852-1912. Charles Scribner's Sons. 
Croce, Benedetto. The Poetry of Dante. Translated by Douglas 

AinsHe. Henry Holt and Company. 
Cunnington, Susan. Stories from Dante. Frederick A. Stokes 

Company. 

Dante. Essays in Commemoration 1S21-1921. Edited for the 
Dante Sixcentenary Committee by Antonio Cippico, Harold 
E. Goad, Edmund G. Gardner, W. P. Ker and Wallace 
Seton. University of London Press. 

Duffin, H. C. Thomas Hardy, A Study of the Wessex Not/els. 
Longmans, Green and Company. 

Essays and Studies by Members of the English Association. Collected 
by John Bailey. Volume VH. Oxford University Press. 

Farinelli, Arturo. Lord Byron. (An Italian Essay on an English 
poet.) Milano : Casa Editrice R. Caddeo and C. 

373 



Fellowes, Edmund Horace. The English Madrigal Composers 
Oxford University Press. 

Finley, John H. Dante, A Guide to Further Study. Edited by 
the National Dante Committee. P. J. Kennedy and Sons. 

Fletcher, Jefferson B. Symbolism of the Divine Comedy. Columbia 
University Press. 

Friedlander, Gerald. Shakespeare and the Jew. With an Introduc- 
tion by Maurice Moscovitch. E. P. Dutton and Company. 

Garnett, Edward. Friday Nights. Alfred A. Knopf. 

Goethe's Literary Essays. A Selection in English Arranged by 

J. E. Spingari, with a Foreword by Viscount Haldane. 

Harcourt, Brace and Company. 
Gosse, Edmund. Aspects and Impressions. Charles Scribner's 

Sons. 
Graham, Stephen. Tramping with a Poet in the Rockies. D. 

Appleton and Company. 
Graves, Robert. On English Poetry. Being an Irregular Approach 

to the Psychology of this Art, from Evidence Mainly Sub- 
jective. Alfred A. Knopf. 
Grierson, H. J. C. Lord Byron; Arnold and Swinburne. Oxford 

University Press. 

Hamilton, W. H. John Masefield. A Critical Study. The 

Macmillan Company. 
Hartley, Marsden. Adventures in the Arts. Informal Chapters on 

Painters, Vaudeville and Poets. Boni and Liveright. 
Hearn, Lafcadio. Books and Habits. Selected and Edited by 

John Erskine. Dodd, Mead and Company. 
Hopkins, R. Thurston. Thomas Hardy's Dorset. D. Appleton 

and Company. 

Johnson, Lionel. Reviews and Critical Papers. Edited with an 
Introduction by Robert Shafer. E. P. Dutton and Company. 

Keats' Poetry and Prose. With Essays by Charles Lamb, Leigh 
Hunt, Robert Bridges and Others, with an Introduction 
and Notes by Henry EUershaw. Oxford University Press. 

LeBuffe, S. J,, Francis P. The Hound of Heaven. An Interpreta- 

tion. The Macmillan Company. 
Logan, J. D. Marjorie PickthalL Her Poetic Genius and Art* 

Halifax: T. C. Allen and Company. 
Longfellow, Ernest Wadsworth, Randon Memories. Houghton 

MifEin Company. 

Macdonald, Raymond. Shakespeare. Duffield and Company. 
Manly, John Matthews, and Rickert, Edith. Contemporary 

British Literature. Bibliographies and Study Outline*. 

Harcourt, Brace and Company. 

374 



Meynell, Alice. The Second Person, Singular. Oxford University 

Press. 

Mordell, Albert. The Literature of Ecstasy. Boni and Liveright. 
Harold Munro. Some Contemporary Poets, 1920. London: 

Leonard Parsons. 
Murray, John (Editor). Lord Byron's Correspondences. Chiefly 

with Lady Melbourne, Mr. Hobhouse, the Hon. Douglas 

Kinnaird, and P. B. Shelley. Two Volumes. Charles 

Scribner's Sons. 

New Chapters in the History of Greek Literature. Recent Discoveries 
in Greek and Prose of the Fourth and Following Centuries, B. C. 
Edited by J. U. Powell and E. A. Barber. Oxford University 
Press. 

Ord, Hubert. Chaucer and the Rival Poet in Shakespeare's Sonnets. 
E. P. Dutton and Company. 

Peters, John J. The Psalins as Liturgies. Being the Paddock 

Lectures for 1980. The Macmillan Company. 
Phillips, William J. Carols. Their Origin, Music, and Connection 

with Mystery Plays. With a Foreword by Sir Frederick 

Bridge. E. P. Dutton and Company. 
Prescott, Frederick Clarke. The Poetic Mind. The Macmillan 

Company. 

Raymond, E. T. Portraits of the Nineties. Charles Scribner's 

Sons. 
Reynolds, M. E. (Translator). The Rhythm of Life. Based on 

the Philosophy ofLao-Tse. E. P. Button and Company. 
Robinson, Cyril E. The Genius of the Greek Drama. Three Plays* 

Oxford University Press. 
Rosebery, Lord. Miscellanies. Literary and Historical. Two 

Volumes. George H. Doran Company. 
Roxburgh, J. F. The Poetic Procession. A Beginner's Introduction 

to English Poetry. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. 

Sarkar, Benoy Kumar. Love in Hindu Literature. Brentano's. 
Saturday Papers. Essays on Literature from The Literary 

Review. By Henry Seidel Canby, William Rose Bene*t and 

Amy Love. The Macmillan Company. 
Scott, John A. The Unity of Homer. The University of Calif ornia 

Press. 

Senior, James. Patrick Bronte. The Stratford Company, 
Shakespeare Adaptations. The Tempest, The Mock Tempest, 

and King Lear. With Introduction and Notes by Montague 

Summers. Small, Maynard and Company. 
Shuster, George N. The Catholic Spirit in Modern English 

Literature. The Macmillan Company. 

375 



Slater, D. A. Sortes Vergttianae, or Vergd and Today. Oxford: 

Basil BlackweU. 
Snider, Denton J. A Biography of Ralph Waldo Emerson Set 

Forth as His Life Essay. St. Louis: The William Harvey 

Minor Company. 
Soskice, Juliet M. Chapters from Childhood. Reminiscences of an 

Artist's Granddaughter . With a Foreword by A. G. Gardiner. 

Harcourt, Brace and Company. 
Stidger, William L. Flames of Faith. With an Introduction by 

Edwin Markham. The Abington Press 
Stopes, Charlotte Cannichael. The Life of Henry, Third Earl of 

Southampton, Shakespeare's Patron. The Macmillan 

Company. 
Strachey, Lytton. Books and Characters. Harcourt, Brace and 

Company. 
Strong, Archibald T. Three Studies in Shelley, and an Essay on 

Nature in Wordsworth and Meredith. Oxford University Press. 

Tagore, Rabindranath. Creative Unity. The Macmillan Company 
Thaler, Alwin. Shakespeare to Sheridan. A Book about the Theatre 

of Yesterday and Today. Charles Scribner's Sons. 
The Shakespeare Canon. I, The Origination of Henry V. II. The 

Origination of Julius Caesar. III. The Authorship of Richard 

HI. By J. M. Robertson. E. P. Button and Company. 
Thompson, E. J. Rabindranath Tagore. His Life and Work. 

Oxford University Press. 

Toynbee, Paget. Dante Studies. Oxford University Press. 
Turquet-Milnes, G. Some Modern French Writers. A Study in 

Bergonism. Robert McBride and Company. 

Untermeyer, Louis. Heavens. Harcourt, Brace and Company. 

Warren, Sir Herbert. Virgil. In Relation to the Place of Rome in 
the History of Civilization. Oxford: Basil BlackweU. 

Watts Dunton, Clara. The Home Life of Swinburne. Frederick A. 
Stokes Company. 

Widsith, Beowulf. Finnsburgk, Waldere, Deor. Done into 
Common English after the Old Manner by Charles Scott 
Moncrieff, with an Introduction by Viscount Northcliffe. 
E, P. Dutton and Company. 

Wilkins, Ernest Hatch. Dante: Poet and Apostle. The University 
of Chicago Press. 

Wilkinson, Marguerite. New Voices. An Introduction to Con- 
temporary Poetry. (Revised and Enlarged Edition.) The 
IVTacmillan Company* 



376 



INDEX OF FIRST LINES 

A bard there was, and that a worthy wight Page 

ROBERT SILLIMAN HILLYER .... 96 
About Soho we went before the light. 

CLAUDE McKAY 139 

Above the forest of the parakeets. 

WALLACE STEVENS 200 

Above the lands. 

WILLIAM H. SIMPSON 189 

A grave seems only six feet deep. 

JOHN MORELAND 147 

A green bird on a golden bush. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER PERCY . . . 157 
Ah, does he see, the dead boy lying there. 

VIRGINIA LTNE TUNSTALL .... 210 
Ah, he was white and slender 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER PERCY . . . 160 
All days gone by are one with Yesterday. 

CHARLES G. BLANDEN 29 

All night I read a little book. 

AMY LOWELL , 124 

All the flowers of the garden. 

ELIZABETH J, COATSWORTH .... 55 
Alone on the hill. 

FREDERICK K. MCCREARY .... 137 
Always before your voice my soul. 

E. E. CUMMDTGS 58 

And here, in this old book, we find discussed. 

THOMAS CURTIS CLARK 49 

And was it I that hoped to rattle. 

Lotras UNTEBMKYER 223 

Antigone and Helen would they laugh. 

DAVID P. BERENBERG 18 

At the time of the partridge berry-harvest. 

MARIAN STORM 204 

Because her voice is Schonberg in a dream. 

MAXWELL BODBNHEIM 82 

Because the little gentleman made nautical instruments. 

AMY LOWELX 129 

Before me shine the words of her last letter. 

ANTOINETTE DEComtsBY PATTERSON . 156 

377 



Before the dawn the very thought of you. Page 

JOHN HALL WHEELOCK . . . . 236 
Beloved adorable and false. 

JOHN HALL WHEELOCK 237 

Black and naked branches. 

CAROLINE GILTINAN 83 

Blossoms shaken from their star forms. 

JEANNETTE MARKS 131 

Bonaparte Johnson and Nero Katz. 

MABY LABAREE 108 

Bright in September, bright against the sky, 

ABBIE HTJSTON EVANS 73 

But why, Walt Whitman, loveliest serenader. 

KATHARINE LEE BATES 14 

By the grim grace of the Puritans she had been brought. 

KATHARINE LEE BATES IS 

Catastrophe in a bric-a-brac shop. 

MAXWELL BODENHEIM SO 

Clouds always seem such helpless things. 

0. J. BOWLES 37 

Come* sleep. Her heart's a wood-anemone. 

FLORENCE KILPATRICK MIXTEB r . . 143 
Could I pluck down Aldebaran. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER PERCY . . . 159 
Crow! crow! 

ELIZABETH J. COATSWORTH .... 55 
Dance! 

Louis UNTERMEYER 218 

Dark-voiced and deeply passioned as the dim. 

MAX EASTMAN 69 

Day after day he sits. 

VIRGINIA. TAYLOR McCoRancK . . . 135 
De 'Postles dey went seekin' fer to ketch a mess o* men. 

LOUISE AYRES GARNETT 40 

Dear, they are singing your praises. 

LOUISE BRYANT 80 

Death bars me from my garden, but by the dusty road. 

KATHARINE LEE BATES 12 

Dim wind pillared the hills: stiller than mist it seemed. 

JOSEPH AUBLANDER 6 

Diverging trails we climb. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER PERCY . . . 158 
Do not guard this as rich stuff without mark. 

LOUISE BOGAN 34 

Door, I was, yes, afraid of you. 

WUOTRBD VIRGINIA JACKSON . . . 100 
Down by the river-front, beside the docks. 

ANN HAMILTON 88 

Down the great and ponderous river. 

ARTHUR CREW INMAN 98 

S78 



Down the green plush lane, at the forward end of the car. Page 
RUTH COMFORT MITCHELL .... 140 
Earth, you have had great lovers in your hour. 

HOBTENSE FLEXNER 76 

Par down, down through the city's great, gaunt gut. 

CLAUDE McKAY 188 

Flat as a pancake, fertile as can be. 

MAURICE MORBIS 147 

For, after all, the thing to do 

GAMALIEL BRADFORD 38 

For this she starred her eyes with salt. 

ELINOR WTLIE 251 

From dusk to dawn, the worlds on high. 

CHARLES G. BLANDEN 29 

From out her heaven of heavens Beauty looked. 

MART SEIGRIST 184 

Geraniums. 

ELIZABETH J. COATSWORTH .... 55 
Give me to rest in a quiet town. 

HAROLD TROWBRIDGE PULSIFER . . 170 
Gloomy grammarians in golden gowns. 

WALLACE STEVENS 199 

Great lyricist, you sing of vanished ships. 

MART SINTON LEITCH IIS 

Hark! do you hear the choral dead? 

FLORENCE KILPATRICK MDCTER . . . 14$ 
He drove alone beside his sugar bush. 

SARAH N. CLEGHORN 58 

He is companioned secretly. 

HAZEL HAT,^ . 86 

He walked among us and we passed him by. 

THOMAS CURTIS CLARK 49 

He was so shy when I first wooed his glance. 

VINCENT STARRETT 198 

Heigho! 

MARJORIE MEEKER 140 

Hell hath its uses; here each mortar mouth. 

OLIVE TILFORD DARGAN 64 

Here in this place there shall be solitude. 

CHARLES E. MURPHY 149 

Here is the same familiar land. 

HAROLD TROWBRIDGE PULSIFER . . 168 
He shall be my jailer. 

ELINOR WTLIE 251 

Hesitator. 

ELIZABETH J. COATSWORTH .... 55 
High on the mountain where the storm-heads are. 

DuBosE HBTWARD OS 

Ho-yo-ho! Ho-yo-ho-ho! , . . yo-ho! 

LEW SARETT 178 

$79 



How can I rid me. Page 

HAZEL TTAT.T. 87 

I am not afraid in April. 

WINIFRED WELLES 234 

I am the lemon-lily queen. 

ELLEN COIT ELLIOTT 71 

I am told that beauty is a reflection. 

HERBERT H. LONGFELLOW . . . . 122 
I burned my life, that I might find. 

LOUISE BOGAN 36 

I cannot lose the thought of you, 

RALPH CHAPLIN 45 

I do not understand. 

POWER DALTON 63 

I dreamed that the children were gathering leaves. 

EDWARD H. PFEIFFER 161 

If culture had fluidity. 

HAZEL HA^T. 86 

If it should happen now, if a woman named Mary. 

WINIFRED WELLES 230 

If music could be loosened from its bars. 

POWER DALTON 62 

If they were shadows walking to and fro. 

HER VET ALLEN ' 3 

If you will poise your forefoot in my pool 

GENEVIEVE TAGGARD 209 

I have been sure of three things all my life. 

CLEMENT WOOD 244 

I had been told. 

LEONORA SPEYER 190 

I have come to confess to the hyacinths. 

MURIEL STRODE 205 

I have seen the shattering of shells. 

HELENE MULLINS 148 

I listened, there was not a sound to hear, 

SARA TEASDALE 211 

Impatiently she drew her breath. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER PERCY , . . 160 
I made a slow lament for you, lost magic. 

ROBERT SILLIMAN HTLLTER .... 95 
I must swim out. 

FRANCES DICKENSON PINDER . . . 163 
It was a queer country your harsh Lord gave you. 

HARRIET MONROE 144 

In the cold blue haze of a January day. 

SCOTTEE McKENZIE FflASIER . . , 78 

In the days of President Washington. 

VACHEL LINDSAY 114 

In the smoke-blue cabaret. 

MORRIS BISHOP 27 

380 



I often spend week-ends in heaven. Page 

HENRY BELLAMANN ... . . 16 
I read a book. 

AMY LOWELL ...... . 127 

I saw a handful of white stars. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER PERCY . . . 156 
I saw them in the moonlight pass. 

JAMES WALDO FAWCETT ... .74 
Fs gwine up ter heab'n in a cloud o* fiah. 

LOUISE AYRES GARNETT ..... 82 
I shall come back in ways I think you'll know. 

JACQUELINE EMBRY ... . . 72 
I shall gather myself into myself again. 

SARA TEASDALE ....... 211 

It's fenced all round with mountains where we live. 

SARAH N. CLEGHORN ...... 52 

It was a kind and northern face. 

HART CRANE ........ 57 

It was such a little, little sin. 

JOHN MoRELAND ....... 145 

I've never seen the great sun rise. 

KATHARINE KOSMAK ...... 107 

I was like a pebble. 

WINIFRED VIRGINIA JACKSON ... 99 
I wept a tear. 

LEONORA SPEYER ....... 196 

I will go out to the night and the wind. 

WILLARD WATTLES ...... 227 

I wish that Nate had let me grow. 

WINIFRED VIRGINIA JACKSON ... 99 
I wonder if the singer of this song. 

LEONORA SPEYER ....... 194 

I worship the greatest first. 

H. D. . . . ..... 59 

I would not have you of my fashioning. 

MARY SINTON LEITCH ..... Ill 
Johanna talks of Lemuel. 

HELEN FRAZBE-BOWER ..... 79 
Kind Saint, within your burnished casket lying* 

DUDLEY POORE ....... 163 

Life in you is an incurious madness. 

HAZEL HALL ........ 85 

Life is full of subtle things. 

GAMALIEL BRADFORD ...... 37 

Like a bell note that shivered into fragments of fine sound. 

KENNETH SLADE ALLING ..... 3 
Little Hose and her mother, from the boat where it lay. 

ANTOINETTE DECOURSEY PATTERSON . 155 
Let me lie in an unremembered place. 

HAROLD 



381 



Let not your heart be altogether lonely. Page 

MARGARET LARKIN 108 

Let other feet go drudging. 

AGNES LEE . 109 

Let them think I love them more than I do. 

SARA TEASDALE 210 

Locked all the winter long, 

ALBERT EDMUND TROMBLY . . . , 215 
Love hath no physic for a grief too deep. 

ROBERT NATHAN 153 

Love, let us light. 

EUNICE TIETJENS 212 

Mammy rocks the baby. 

BEATRICE EAVENEL 173 

Man grows up. 

ROBERT NATHAN 152 

Many a man hath gold to guard. 

WILLARD WATTLES 225 

My two old neighbors come along the lane. 

LlZETTE WOODWORTH REESE . . . 174 

Merlin, Merlin's gone away. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER PERCY . . . 159 
Miss Liza used to sew for us. 

VIRGINIA TAYLOR McCoRMicB: . . . 1SS 
My bands of silk and miniver. 

ELINOR WYLIE 250 

My spirit was a troubled pool. 

HAROLD TROWBRIDGE PULSEFER . 171 
Night has its fear. 

JOHN HALL WHEELOCK 238 

No more you weave, Persephone. 

HAROLD VINAL 224 

No wind will walk upon the water there. 

KENNETH SLADE ALUNG 4 

Not even if with a wizard force I might. 

EDWIN ARLINGTON ROBINSON . . . 175 
Now let no charitable hope. 

ELINOR WYLIE 252 

Now of this nearness take your deep repose. 

BERNICE LESBIA KENYON . . . . 106 
Now there is frost upon the hill. 

GEORGE O'NEIL 154 

Now these ephemeral glaciers move. 

KENNETH SLADEJ ALLING .... 5 
Of what avail. 

FLORENCE KILPATHICK MESOTR . . . 144 
Oh, fortunate the waiting that shall end hi wonder. \ t 

CHARLES R. MTJRPHY 151 

Old loveliness has such a way with me. f 

HAROLD VINAL ^ 225 

S82 



On the silver crest of the ocean's breast. Page 

ARTHUR CREW INMAN 97 

On your keening waters like gray eyes tear-misted. 

KATHRYN WHITE RYAN 176 

Once I fought a shadow. 

HAROLD TROWBRIDGE PULSIFEE . . 171 
Our Father Who, in clay. 

FRANCIS CABLIN 41 

Ours is a peaceful town. 

JAY G. SIGMUND 186 

Pallidly sleeping, the Ocean's mysterious daughter. 

ROBERT STLT.TMAN HTLLYER ... 95 
Parting love, far-fled content. 

GAMALIEL BRADFORD 40 

Peter is a plain lad. 

ANN HAMILTON 88 

Poetry is the supreme fiction, madame. 

WALLACE STEVENS 200 

Poets make pets of pretty, docile words. 

ELINOR WTUB 247 

Queer, tessellated, tardy snuff-box, you. 

VINCENT STAKRETT 199 

Raise the right foot bound in sheer. 

MAXWELL BODENEEBI 33 

She could untangle without scandal. 

GAMALIEL BRADFORD 39 

She has the strange sweet grace of violets. 

GEORGE BRANDON SAUL 183 

She must be rich who can forego. 

SARA TEASDALE 212 

She never married. 

WILLIAM B. McCouRTiE 136 

She tossed a soul. 

GAMALIEL BRADFORD ...... 38 

She was a quiet little body. 

WINIFRED WELLES 233 

She was more like a tree upon a hill. 

HENRY BELLAMANN 14 

She wore a cold, hard lily on her breast. 

CHARLES WHARTON STORK .... 201 
Six flights up in an out-of-date apartment house. 

AMY LOWELL 130 

Slow turns the water by the green marshes. 

MARY JOHNSTON 101 

Slumbering warrior-soul afloat. 

LEW SARETT 182 

So I shall never hear from his own lips. 

WITTER BYNNER 41 

So softly sang a bird. 

CHARLES G. BLANDEN 28 

383 



Something back in Apri". Page 

WINIFRED VIRGINIA JACKSON ... 98 
Sometimes I think that I shall live again. 

S. FOSTER DAMON 64 

Somewhere a lonely bird makes incoherence lovelier. 

JOSEPH AUSLANDER 7 

Songs, once heard, are heard again. 

BENJAMIN R. C. Low 123 

Spoon, O spoon. 

ELIZABETH J. COATSWORTH .... 54 
Suppose that in my poem you shall find. 

MAX EASTMAN 69 

That amazing holiday. 

KENNETH SLADE ALUNG 4 

"The blackberry briars you bought." 

ALBERT FREDERICK WILSON .... 242 
The 'cellos, preluding apart. 

ROBERT NATHAN 152 

The colorless thin voices of the dark. 

BERNICE LESBIA KENYON . ... 105 
The cricket sings upon the No! not that! 

VINCENT STARRETT 198 

The dawn cold, pallid, half afraid, it seems. 

GRACE ATHERTON DENNEN .... 66 
The dear old ladies whose cheeks are pink. 

JANIE SCEEVEN HEYWARD .... 94 
The edges of the stones are sharp. 

CAROLINE GILTINAN 83 

The exquisite banality of rose and ivory. 

JOHN PEALE BISHOP 20 

The fire cut away. 

GLENWAY WESCOTT 235 

The fire speaks; the clouds shudder. 

GEORGE BRANDON SATTL 184 

The lanes are green; the skies, bedight. 

JOHN JAY CHAPMAN 47 

The lovely Portuguese is dead. 

WALTER MCCLELLAN 133 

The Martha-in-me filled her days. 

LOUISE AYRES GARNETT 79 

The mighty tides of fate still ebb and flow. 

GAMALIEL BRADFORD 39 

The night is white. 

JOHN MORELAND 146 

The ocean thunders in the caverened sky. 

BERNICE LESBIA KENYON . . , , 106 
The paling vine-leaf, Savant of Spring. 

MARK TXTRBYFTLL 216 

The peacock and the mocking bird. 

ELINOR WYLEBI 5849 

384 



The plover pauses in his search. Page 

JAY G. SIGMUND 186 

The road is like a little child running ahead of me and then 
hiding behind a curve. 

PASCAL D'ANGELO 62 

The shining daggers of the harbor lights. 

VIRGINIA LYNE TTOSTALL .... 215 
The shuttles of the sun fly fast. 

CHARLES G. BLANDEN 28 

The silence that had fallen stark between us. 

GRACE ATHERTON DENNEN .... 68 
The sun is a fire. 

JOHN MORELAND 146 

The sun robed with noons stands on the pulpit of heaven. 

PASCAL D'ANGELO 61 

The tune when I was plowing. 

MAXWELL ANDERSON 5 

The trees that lean over water. 

MARION COUTHOTTT SMITH .... 189 
The woman who has grown old. 

LotnsE BOGAN 36 

The world's a ten-rod circle; hills are gone. 

ABBIE HUSTON EVANS 73 

Then, as now, let it the drawl of rivers. 

JOSEPH ATJSLANDER 7 

There is a deliberateness in all sea-island ways. 

HERVEY ALLEN 1 

There is a harper plays. 

JOHN HALL WHEELOCK 236 

There is a panther caged within my breast. 

JOHN HALL WHEELOCK 241 

There's a kind of morning prayer. 

JOHN JAY CHAPMAN 46 

There once was a parson o* Porlock Town. 

CHARLES WHARTON STORK .... 202 
These are the flowers for a mad bride. 

WINIFRED WELLES 231 

These journals, notes, and missives of the dead. 

JOHN JAY CHAPMAN 45 

These shall be my songs to you. 

BERWICK LESBIA KENYON .... 105 
They do not care about each other, these two. 

LEONORA SPEYER 195 

They seemed a sort of frame for the town's life. 

SARAH N. CLEGHORN 50 

They tell me she is beautiful, my city. 

DrrBosE HEYWARD 90 

Think in what fashion this one man would rise. 

STEWART MITCHELL 142 

385 



This is no child that dances. This is flame. Page 

Louis UNTERMETER 217 

Those who love the most. 

SARA TEASDALE 210 

Though here and there a man is left. 

ELINOR WTLIE 252 

Threading the evil hand and look. 

ELINOR WTLIE 249 

To old Verona, any dusk in spring. 

LlZETTE WOODWORTH REESE . . . 175 

Too fast the silly white-caps run. 

GRANT H. CODE 56 

Troy is for beauty, the far, the broken. 

BENNETT WEAVER 228 

Under Monadnock. 

MORRIS BISHOP 26 

Urns of Carrara marble I have seen. 

POWER D ALTON 63 

Valasquez took a pliant knife. 

ELINOR WTLIE ,248 

Waiter, waiter! 

TESSICA NELSON NORTH 158 

Wake, Women! 

MART AUSTIN 8 

We could have been such friends, dear almost-friend. 

LEONORA SPBTER 107 

We shall remember hitm 

JEANNE ROBERT FOSTER 76 

Were the burned sand of ^Eeea. 

BEATRICE RAVENEL 172 

What do I love the dearest in my wood. 

MART SINTON LEITCH Ill 

What is this bitterness of love that scatters dust hi the eyes. 

JEANNETTE MARKS 132 

When cherry-buds appear. 

GAMALIEL BRADFORD 38 

When earth was madly green he lay. 

DAVID OSBORNE HAMILTON .... 89 
When falls the winter snow I little care nor yet what cold 
winds blow. 

JULIA JOHNSON DAVIS . . 66 

When I first felt within me stir. 

WILLARD WATTLES 226 

When I was far too young to comprehend. 

ANN HAMILTON 87 

When on dark starless roads I ride. 

EDNA G. HENRT 90 

When we count out our gold. 

GEORGIA DOUGLAS JOHNSON .... 100 

386 



Where Beauty lodges there prevails. Page 

WAYLAND WELLS WILLIAMS .... 241 
Where his sure feet pass. 

HAZEL HALL 85 

Whose whips are those cracking up the river, 

WINIFRED WELLES 229 

Why laughest thou, perched there among the books. 

WRIGHT PIELD 74 

Wide-opened-windowed in the morning time. 

WINIFRED WELLES 232 

With sheets cool and smooth. 

ELIZABETH J. COATBWOBTH ... 54 
Women have no wilderness in them. 

LotnsE BOGAN . 35 

You saw the last fires burning on the hill. 

HERBERT S. GORMAN 84 

You will be the color of water. 

MARJORIE MEEKER .... 1S9 

Your heart is bound tightly, let. 

SABA TBASDALE 209 

Your names are like decapitated giants bleeding black 
oblivion. 

PASCAL D'ANGELO 61 

Yucca is yellowing. 

WILLIAM H. SIMPSON 188 

Zhoo, zhoo, zhoo! 

LEW SARETT 177 



387