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Full text of "Appendixes to the Final Technical Report of the Great Lakes Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center, Volume II"

Appendixes 
to the 




Great Lakes Region 
Repo JoShr^ Special Education 
Instructional Materials Center 



VOLUME II 



Append^ B (pp. 433-669) 
anSkC (pp. 671-890) 







M.C. MIGEL MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
American Foundation for the Blind 

15 West 16th Street. New York, New York 
10011 




Final Technical Report 
Project Number 322005 
Grant Number OEG-3-6-062377-1557-607 



Continuation of 
Appendixes to the Final Report of the 
Great Lakes Region Speoiat Education 
Instructional Materials Center 



Appendix B, pages ^33 - 669 
Appendix C^ pages 671 - 890 
(Appendix C is continued in a separate volume) 



Ml 'i\ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/appendixestofOOgrea 



Materials from In-Service Workshops: A Final Report 
OF THE Leadership Workshop; Planning, Report and 
Evaluation Forms from Various Workshops; and 
Some Workshop Agenda 



433 




I'SOl 'MSI! 
RK.ION \l 
ISSIKIH IK )S \1 
M \l( Ki \l s 

I I M I k [I )K 

II \M)|( \PV\ I) 
([IJllJKI N 

wn 'i')l III 



ii»|M*'dli'<K V\'h '1 ,1.- ,». I 



FINAL REPORT 

Leadership Workshop 
February 14-15, 1972 

This report Is a compilation of a series of papers that 
describe the Leadership Workshop held at Michigan State University in 
February of 1972. Forty-three participants from six states attended 
this workshop. The focus of the workshop was on the development of 
in-service training competencies. 

The report consists of the following sections: 

A. Pre-Workshop Information 

R. Schedule ot Workshop Activities 

C. Description of Workshop Activities 

D. Participant Profile 

E. Evaluation Studies 

Study //I - Workshop Contract 

Study #2 - Cognitive Change 

Study //3 - Participant Reactions 

Study /'A - Long Term Contract 

F. List of Participants 

G. Post-Workshop Correspondence 



S. Joseph Levine 
June 1972 



435 



^t \Vml»«'t ln\Tu 



■r.,*U Nrh»i>ft. ti'i Hj-^'ii .4(>r"' 



,i.iil tr.Mih I ^ i,»tti. 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MAItRIAlS 
CENHK FOR 
HANDirAPPEI) 
SL CHILDKIN 
AND VOL'TH 



January 10, 1972 



Happy New Year! I hope your holidays were as restful and relajcing as 
mine were! 3y now, I'm sure you're well into the swing of things once 
again and are looking forward to another break! Well, I think I have 
a solution! 

Because of numerous requests from teacher-trainers in our three-state 
region, the RIMC staff will host a conference here at Michigan State 
University. The conference will be a two-day intensive session focusing 
on conducting, designing, and evaluating in-service teacher-training 
experiences and you are invited to attend. So, mark Monday and Tuesday, 
February lU and 15, 1972, on your calendar! The conference will be 
held at the University Inn in East Lansing, and will begin promptly at 
8:30 am on Monday, Feb. lU and will end at 3:00 pm Tuesday, Feb. 15. 

Due to the importance of this conference, we have made arrangements to 
subsidize the participants' expenses. The RIMC will take care of your 
room and board expenses and mileage costs. (Included is a list of 
others in your area who have been invited. You might want to utilize 
this in making arrangements to travel with others.) 

Please RSVP! Because of the pressure of time, we need to know IMMEDIATELY 
if you are going to be able to attend. Therefore, please complete the 
enclosed card and return it to me ON OR BEFORE TUESDAY, JANUARY 25. 1972 . 

Upon receipt of your caxd, detailed information will be sent. 

Looking forward to hearing from you soon! 

Sincerely, 



Sue Ann Yovanovich 

Field Consultant and Coordinator of 

Human Resources for Dissemination 

SAY:ss 436 



"•pr< lal lau> a I ion Nelwu'k - Bui<-Ju ol Kluc^lion fm rhf Mjndu dUPi-d 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 

INSTRUCT lONAl 
MATIRIAIS 
CiNTtR fOK 
HANDlCAPPin 
CHIIORIN 
AND \n{ IH 



January ?1 , 1972 



Dear Institute Participant: 



Thank you for your proT.ptness in returning your reservation card for 
the Special Education Leadership Conference : In-cervi ce Training 
Techniques . 

As stated in my initial correspondence, the conference will begin 
sharply at 3:30 am on Monda;y , February lU . The session? will be 
held in the conference rooms at the Starboard Tack, which is located 
on the grounds of the University Inn. Lunch will be served in the 
same building. The afternoon session will conclude at approximately 
3:30 pm, at which time you will be given an opportunity to visit the 
regional center (optional). Dinner will be at your leisure (Included 
in conference expenses only if you eat at the Starboard Tack). 
There will be a required evening session which will begin promptly 
at 7^00 pm , followed by a social hour. On Wednesda;,', we will again 
begin at 8: 30 am , and will conclude before 3:30 pm . The institute 
staff is planning two days of intense activities, but feel that by 
concluding at 3:30, you will have ample time to begin your journey 
homeward. Therefore , we strongly urge you to plan to remain for the 
entire session . 

Enclosed are some maps which we think night be helpful to you in 
planning your trip. 

Also included is a pre-assessment form and a self-addressed, stamped 
return envelope. In order for the institute staff to most effectively 
and efficiently meet the needs of the participants, we ask your 
cooperation in completing the pre-assessment form and returning it 
on or before February 8, 1972 . 




437 



Page 2 

January 31, 1972 



All participants who attend the entire session vill be jjrovided with 

a complete set of workshop materials. Thes^^ material:- will De in a 

form whii^h will permit participants to fully repl'cate them for their 
own individual use. 

Looking forward to receiving your pre-assessment form and to seeing 
you on the lUth! 

Sincerely , 




U^jC 



(I"liss) Sue Ann Yovanovich 

Field Consultant end Coordinator of 

Human Reso\arces for Dissemination 

SAY:ss 

Enclosures 



438 



SPECIAL EDUCATION LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
In-Service Training Techniques 
USOE/MSU RIMC-HCY 
F'eb. 14-15, 1972 

SCHEDULE 



Handout Monda y 

#1-Leader's Guide 8:30 



Activity 

Get-acquainted activities 
--Ward, Yovanovich 



WHO ARE WE? 



#2-Program 
#3-Participant List 

& Profile 
#4-0b jectives 
#5-Learning Contract 



9:00 Examine and personalize 
objectives 
--Levine 



WHY ARE WE 
HERE? 



#6-Instructional 
Strategies* 



10:00 BREAK 

10:15 Classifying in-service 
leadership problems 
(an instructional game) 
--Carlson, Ward 

11:00 Revision of game, useful 
to introduce an in- 
service session on 
instructional strategies 
--Ward, Carlson 



WHAT HELP 
DO WE NEED 
TO GET? 



WHAT CAN WE 
LEARN FROM 
EACH OTHER? 



12:00 LUNCH 

1:20 Karnak the Great tells how 
to use a kit to create 
an experience 
— Levine, Carlson 
Yovanovich 



WHAT CAN KITS 
DO? WHAT CAN 
WE DO TO KITS? 



#7-Kits Available, 

List 
#8-How to Preview 

a Kit* 



2:20 BREAK 

2:30 Previewing kits of materials LET'S LOOK AT 
for workshops SOME KITS! 

HOW DO YOU 
DECIDE IF YOU 
COULD USE ONE? 



#9-Hints for Preparing 3:30 
Kit Materials 



Lab . I-preparing ditto 

masters & overhead 

transparencies 
Lab . Il-handling audio 

cassettes 
Lab. Ill-Regional IMC/HCY 

facilities 



*To be distributed later, 



439 



Handout 



#10-Planning Kit 



#ll-You Are! 



#12-Evaluation 



#13-Learning Contract 
# 14-Long-term Contract 
#15-Basic Reading List 



Monday 
7:00 

8:15 
Tuesday 
8:30 



10:00 
10:15 

12:00 
1:15 

2:00 
2:45 

3:15 



Activity 

Instructional Games for 
Observation skills 

Social Hour 



Use WORKSHOP PLANNING KIT 
to design a plan for a 
workshop, given one of 
two simulated requests 

BREAK 

Work on new book on work- 
shop planning 



LUNCH 

Sharing experiences in 

problem- solving 



Summation, oral and 
written 

Contract for implementation 
of follow-up 



Departure 



FUN AND GAMES 
EMPHASIS: GAMES | 
FUN AND GAMES 
EMPHASIS: FUN 



CAN WE GET 
A MORE PRECISE 
APPROACH TO 
PLANNING? 



LET'S ALSO 
TRY TO HELP 
PEOPLE WHO 
AREN'T here: 



HOW DO OUR 

EXPERIENCES 
RELATE TO OUR 
NEEDS? 

WHAT HAS 
HAPPENED? 

PUT LEARNING 
INTO practice: 



440 



IlESCRIPTia'l OF L£ADER^f!IP :'0R'(Si'OD /\mVITIES 

L^eadei's'iip Workshop 
February i4-i5, 1972 

FIRST DAY 

GET ACQUAnm^ ACTIVITIES 8 = 30 - 9:00 a.^n. 

Consisted of three structured exTjeriences . 

Experience #1 - Small Groups 

In a small gr^up, each particijiant introduced himself/herself by saying 
his/her first name and repeating the names of those who preceded him. 

Experience #2 - Total Group 

Participants were instructed to find another person wi^h whom he ''she had 
something: in common, sit together and tell the entire group ^ibout them- 
selves , 

Experience #3 - Workshop Leader 

The workshop leader explained the roler. and positions of the participants 
and introduced each group of participants, i.e. IRMC .coordinators are in- 
service educators of an I;.structional Resource and Materials Center in 
Ohiti; .I'urriculuir. Resource Consultants (CRCs; -are in-service eluca'.ors in 
Michigan; Teacher-trainers are in-service educators in Indiana. 

The IMC liaison staff members from each state depa;tment of education were 
also introduced and the leader briefly explained how this person cooperates 
with the RIMC. 

The leader explained the participant profile which was constructed from the 
pre-assessment inforir.ation completed by the participants prior to the work- 
shop. 

EXMNF. m PERSOriAIIZE 0B,JECTIVE5 9:oo - io:oo a.m. 

Workshop participants were given an opportunity to examine the stated 
objectives . 

The participants were given a learning contract and wei-e asked to check 
those tasks which they would be expected to complete during the two-day 
workshop. 



441 



-2- 

CLASSIFYIN6 I\LSERVICE LEADERSHIP PRORLEJIS - An instructional Game 10:15 - 11:00 a.m. 

The partic ip-i.nt, s we.-'e ':iven a ret of -' x ■■ ■ •. o.' written problems 
which mighL he enccunt^ "ed in pianriin^r ar.d j ■. ^'tinr: 'in in-service 
progfajn. The rx^'Mp wif Instructed to c,!i;-:-i*\v t ne prrtle.-ri ■ i nt j trouble- 
some and non-tr "uMesc'r. ■ :atep;ories, and to vn-in'- additional rr'",b].em£ on 
blank cards. 

The leader askei the participants 'o chc'ose '.hree oi' the most troublesome 
problem." nnd to write f-.iu'^ions for theue [. :'oblemb for the rr :ui) to 

di SCUSE . 

REVISION OF r#1E - instructional Strategies 11:00 - l?:00 a.m. 

The instruct i.nal game consisted of two par-ts, each lasting 30 minutes. 
The participants were divided in teams of two. Each team was riven an 
instruction sheet and a deck of cards with an instructi-'inal strategy. 
The tefu"! was directed to crjtegorize the cards and complete a recording 
form . 

After the first y minutes, the teams were Ins'-.ructed to e;<ch:ini:e decKS, 
sort the exchanged deck, and complete the second half of the recording 
form. After sec; ing recording form #r, pairs of teams compared scores 
and a -^roup discussion followed. 

YARW. THE GREAT - "How To use A Kit To Create An Experience" 1:20 - 2:00 p.m. 

This activity presented Karnak the Jr^^at with nis crystal baJ ^ in which 
{ he found solutions to problems posed by his helper. In his crystal ball, 
.\arnak was able *^^n see what purposes kits can ser\ - and r. w they can be 
adapted to fit a particuxai' need. 

PPB/IEWI^IG KITS 2:30 - 3:3C p.m. 

Participants were given a list of kits which are available on Imn from 
the Regional IMC. 

Workshop leaders led a discussion on: 

How to preview kits? 

What questions to ask to determine the choice of a particulir kit? 

When to use it? 

How to usp it? 

Participants examined the training kits and were given a handout, "How "!'o 
Preview A Kit." 



442 



-3- 

LAR SESSIONS ^:-0 - U:00 p.m. 

Part i cifantG vere allowed t j },-:rticipat,e i r. ri' "f r.ore of Ihree labs. 

Lab I Instruction i how ti i-irecare 'ii'to ..■;;•.. ;t era us. i t* a thermo- 
fax machine 

How tc prepar-,^ overhead transbarer^-ies . 

How to use a jopyin,- maoiiine. 

Lab II Provided hin'.s for pmducin,^ audio c'iE3ette taoes . 

Lab III Provided an opportunity to tour the Ret^ional IMC facilities; 
to meet with the RT>iC support personnel (data processor, 
librarian clerk,etc.); use the library; cl^eck out materials, 
etc . 

I^KTRUainr^IAL mTS FOR OHSEPVATION SKILLS ■:-:oo - 8:is p.m. 

This activity, entitled "A Wa^k Through Penaiu^," eiuphasizes observation 
skills. It consists of three games utilizing a set of l8 s.i'ies (a 
simixJated hike through the ^'ty of Penang); participant worksheets, a.nd 
leader instructions. 

Game ="1 : SCAN PENANG 

Eac.\ slide is projected n the screen for 10 -econds; eac}. j..f-..rticipant 
indei.endently completes the "Worksheet for Scanning ienang," ind the group 
dlscusse.' responses. 

Game ^2: ANOTHER LOOK 

Group' is divided into two equal teams; one team receives a copy of the 
Secret Instructions for Another Look ; sliues are shown ag-iin; participants 
independently complete "Worksheet for Another Look; ' and the group discusses 
the I'ollowine; questions: 

1. Was there any relationshic between the ability to recall additional 
observations and the particular sort of motive that people had 
when they took a further ^ook? 

2. Were those who fo2 lowed the secret instructions also able to con- 
firm some of their uncertainties f >• :m the first worksheet? 

Game ^3: EDUCATED GUESSES ABOUT PENANG 

Participants independently ccmplete workshee' for "Educated Guesses About 
Penang." Slides are shown again while worksneets are being completed. 
Activity is concluded with group discussion on what hac been learned about 
taking an "observaticn hike." 



443 



SECOND DAY 

WORKSHOP PLANNING KIT 8:-'0 - 10:00 a.r.. 

This experien-^e active. y involved the p': r-ti'-ij.-iiits in plann'n,^ -i workshop. 
Each team was given a .e' of cards, ea.-h 'f which stated ai; ac+ivity 
necessary to plan a woj-kr,hop, and two simulated workshop requests. After 
deciding!; upun a workshop request, tie team proceede:! to lay cut the 
activity cards in the f c rm of a few chart. i.p-r. .•ompieti-.n of the flow 
chart, they explained it to another team, 'ictal rr up iisrussi^n followed 
this intyrr-hange of infirmation. 

WORK ON NB^I BOOK Ofl ICRKSHOP PLA.'Jr>IIfJ6 io:i5 - 12:00 a.m. 

Participants were given the booklet, "Az An In-Service Educator, YOU ARE...'' 
This guide was developed to highlight the many and varying roles of an 
in-service leader. The workshop leaders talked through the guide; then t-ach 
team member was asked to share a personal experience in whi^h, as an in- 
service educator, he had been a teacher, change-agent, discussion leader, 
evaluato'-, reporter, planner, communicator, manager, organizer, trouble- 
shooter or host. :.ach tea-'.'i was instructed to choose one person who would 
relate this experience to the total grcp. 

The workshop xeader, acuing as a facilitator, brought all the teams together 
an-, the chcsen team member shared his experience with •;he total group. This 
part cf ■ ne a:tivity was video-taped for later use. 

SHARIffj E>PERIENCES IN PRO^.LEM -SOLVIfl] i:i5 - 2:00 p.m. 

Participants •. iewed the video tape which they made earlier and shared 
experiences in problem solving, focusin*-: on the relat icrship cf experiences 
V.-.. needs. 

3UWATI0N - ORAL m 'IRITTE:^ 2:00 - 2=1^ p.m. 

The workshop leaders reviewed the stated objectives of the workshop; the 
activities in which the participants had been involved; and discussed the 
relationship of the two. Participants were asked to complete a follow-up 
learning contract in which they indicated the degree to which they felt 
they had accomplished each task they had checked. 

F-vrticipants completed a written evaluation cf the two-day activities. They 
also completed a Participant Reaction Form , a short questionnaire about the 
general reactions to the workshop. 



444 



-5- 

COrn'RACr for I^PLBEfTATinN OF FOLLnfl-P ■>-M - 3:15 I .m, 

The participants were given a ioi.^-'.erir. r'rT.jvic' •:.nJ w -re 'iskei t: check 
thie t'lskr which they v„uid t.cpe tc &"■• ^nplis:. sf+er th'. :, workshop. 
The "rntract in-iuaei i'.'-r.s which hnd a two cr • :,ret: n^onth t:.-ne Jimit; 
(a ffjilow-uT. f^pcrt wi : 1 be :jent -ii'ter- ' r.e spe 'i-T'ied lenfrth ■ '■ '-irae to 
detern.ine t!.e extent i t- t -irticip-ints hfid aofomplishftd (he checked items). 

This at_5ree7r.ent ti.?-.. inv.^lven resj)or ■ib:'i:ty on th«- ": -irt of the Re^^icnal 
-enter staff as many itens indicated ■., resp.->r.se W(Vi^d he received from the 
PIMC within a two-week reriod. 

The part J ,:ip.-irit 3 were alst. give:, a Basic PeadinR List c;i "'In-Service 
Traininr, of '^eTchers" and exam; i es of the '"ollowine; items: T;re-!)Ost tests; 
in-meetin?; anTi post-meeti np; •^i-,' ect Lves; behavior i-nntract; sel f-se.". e.'ted 
pos*-meeting .-^b,; ecti-.'es ; and i.anned .lutcomes "f in-se.-vice training. 



S. Joseph Levine 
Sue Ann Yovancvich 
May 15, 1972 



445 



SPECIAL I'DUCATIO;; LL'vJERSHIP WORKSHOP 

In-Service Truining Techniques 

Feb. lU-15, 1972 

usoe/;'su ^imc-hcy 
participa:]T profile 



All participants at the V/orkshop received a Pre-Asscssment Forni prior to the 
Workshop. T-v/enty three (23) of the thirty-nine participants returned these 
f orins . 

59. 0% response 
of the twenty-three replies. 

18 (78.3%) are eriploijed in a teaahav trainini capacitu, 

and all of these participants have conducted workshops. In fact, one participant 
not employed as a teacher trainer., has also conducted workshops. 

19 (82. 6Z) nave aonduated in-sarvice teacher- training workshops. 

These 19 participants have conducted aijproximately 390 workshops. The range 
is from 1 x/orkshop for some to 150 workshops for a single participant. 

ZOO/19 = average of 20.5 workshops per experienced p a.-pticipant 

Of the twenty- three replies, a little more than half have attended a trainer 
conference . 

13 (50.5") have attended a tr-ziner conference 

Most of the respondents use small group'' and interaction techniques for 
their workshops . 

19 (35.8%) Small Group 

15 (28. 3%) Interaction 

9 (17.0%) Lecture 

5(9. 4%) Large Group 

3 ( 5. 7%) Mediated 

2 ( 3. 8%) Slide/Tape 



446 



Participant Profile 
Page 2 



There is not a threat deal of frj.ili- rity aincnr, the jifirtic-ir'nnts vii-.h th*? training 
materials developed by the L'EOi:/ TU ?i::C-HCY 

10 
9, 

8: 

7 :< 



5 A 



V 



u jsr :' X 

3' ;? A' A' a: 

2 A' jsr A" -V A' 

1_ _-^ A Z _-Y X 

"' 1 " 2 3 "' ^ 5 
less f?jniliar more familiar 



There is a moderate de,;;ree of familiarity vith instructionril objectives. 





10 






X 








Q 






X 








8 






X 






# 


7 

5] 




X 
X 


X 
X 

X 
X 








3 


X 


X 


:•: 




X 






X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




1_ 


X 


A 


X 


X 


X 






1 


9 


-> 


k 


q 


less 


fanil 


iar 








more fa:niliar 



Yet, they are more often used in planning for their workshop". 



10 














9 
c 








X 






7 
6 








X 
X 






5' 








X 

X 


X 

X 




3 






X 


X 


X 


X 


2. 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1_ 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 






1 


2 


3 


\ 


5 


less oft 


en 










more often 



447 



Participant Profile 
Page 3 



The respondents were as);ed to list t:ie specific content areas in vhich they 
receive workshop requests. Twenty-five (25) different areas vsre listed with 
the nost frequent being the c-rea of instructio nal, '-^rerj^als (l^ rer.p^-nr.os ) 
and followed by behavior r:.ar:a.'rer.ent (7 responses). 



^ of responses 

12 

7 

3 
3 

2 

2 

2 
2 
2 



2 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
2 

1 

J. 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 



c ontent area 

instructional nnterials (evaluating ^ selection, 

cons truc:,ion, i r.fomati on ) 
behavior management (ncdifi cation^ control, and 

analysis) 
objectives (behavioral., i irttructicnaZ) 
inJivi lual assessment 
parent involvement 
occupational information 
leam.ing disabilities 
pnysical education 
individualized instruction 
progran development 
special education teckniaucs for regular class 

teachers 
cogni tive devel opnen t 
non-verbal cormunication 
description of role 
art 

perception 
trainable retarded 
deaf 

multi-media 
learning problems 
precision teaching 
interactioyi analysis 
creativity 

affective development 
mxilti-sensory approach to reading 



13 of the respondents (33.") indicated that they have specialty areas, 
snecialties include; 



These 



instructional materials 

behavior management 

use of tapes 

interaction analysis 

cognitive development 

programed material 

use of overhead projectors 

independent activities 

individual assessment 

physical education 

multi-sensory approach to reading 



448 



Participant Profile 
Page k 



art 

niai'o- teaching 

leaminj disabilities 

precision teaching 

language development 

prading 



The respondents' own objectives for the training session fall into four primary 
categories . 



17 

14 
6 



to leavi about new (and currently used) training 

procedures 
to be able tc design (conduct, plan) a uoi'-kGhop 
to be able to evah^ate the effectiveness of a 

workshop 
to interact with ot^^er trainers 



449 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CLNTFR FOR 
HANDICAf'Ptn 
(HIIDRIN 
AND YOUIH 



LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
F.valuation Study ^■ 1 



SUMMARY 



S. Joseph Levine 
Sue Ann Vovanovich 



All participants at the Leadership Workshop were asked 
at the beginning of the workshop to "contract" a scries of 
activities tliat they would accomplish during the two days. 
(See Appendix A). A copy of this contract was collected by the 
workshop staff and a copy was retained by the participant. 

At the conclusion of the workshop, the participants 

were asked to examine the list of activities and rate each 

one according to the degree to which it was accomplished. 

(See Appendix B) . They were asked not to consult their earlier 

contract, nor limit their rating to only those activities 
contracted . 



PURPOSE 



purpos 
part ic 
staff- 
light 
obj ect 
obj ect 
design 
the pa 
involv 
ideas 



This CO 
e . Firs 
ipants t 
selected 
on the n 
ive will 
ive than 
ed as a 
rticipan 
ed with 
that wou 



ntra 
t, i 
owar 
) ob 
otio 
hav 
tho 
proc 
ts i 
teac 
Id b 



ct in 
t wa 
d th 
j ect 
n th 
e a 
se w 
edur 
n a 
her 
e us 



g/ra 
s de 
e ac 
ives 
at t 
high 
ho d 
aim 
"doi 
trai 
able 



ting 
sign 
comp 
. S 
hose 
er p 
id n 
odel 

ng" 

ning 
in 



activity had a three-fold 
ed to promote involvement of 
lishment of individual (yet 
econdly, it was designed to shed 

"learners" who contract for an 
robability of attaining that 
ot contract. Finally, it was 



that could be demonstrated to 
manner. (All participants were 

and were in fact looking for 
their own setting.) 



RESULTS 

1) It is questionable whether this procedure created a 
very large amount of participant involvement in the 
attainment of individual obj eatives . This is due 
primarily to the tight scheduling of the two day session 
and the lack of appropriate "work times" where 
participants might be able to pursue their own objectives 



'Member — Sp«ci«l Education 



i ivifc 



450 



Mer^orli — Bureau ol Education foi ihr Handxapped- 



Dlhcp o< Idut^io 



2) 



3) 



The results of the comparative study (those that 
contracted an item versus. those that did not contract 
that item) indicate tliat j If ohu'-ng pur t. tar' pants to 
aontvaat .:r J eot' ■^■- i^ > -ijnr-. ;■ the ' r at.' ziii-vi-'' '' 



thcsp ob,' CO n'.ves. 



Ot the 2 1 objectives, 15 show 



definite differences between grouj 
that contracts. (U, "3, M, ''6, - ' 
m, M 5, #16, 17, (<18, #20, '^2]) ; 
differences bet w-. en groups in lavor 
not contract ; " i o , ^\^]\ and 4 shou 
between groups ["2, '^5, s <j , ;/ I 9 ) . 



in favor of thuse 
f S , - 1 : , "12, 
2 show definite 

of 

no 



those that did 
real differences 



o puvtiairantp. 



Thu use . ;■ ^hiiS procedure in i p ."t .;' 
f.;.7o' j.n pJ'^f-^atiV'. 'nanner in "suggest '.ng' 
that thei) utilize a cimilar prco'dure ■>■? th-' ir ou'\ 
vcrksh->ps . This was evaluated on the basis of the 
large number of requests for an "extra co]i\'" of the 
rating sheet by individual participants. Most all 
participants reiiuesting the extra copy \olunteered that 
they wanted to use this procedure. 



D \TA 



The following is the data collected as a result of this 
stud). The 21 objectives are listed in the left column. To 
the right of each objective are j^ercentages of those that 
contracted the item (A) for each level of fulfillment, and (Bl 
percenta",es of those that did not contract the item for each 
level of fulfillment. 

r.xample: For obiective #1, 33.31 oi' those that 
---^ -"-- ' -'--- -,-•---.■--- !-ul filled It 



contracted that objective fulfilled i 
at the 100% level; 16. "'i fulfilled it 
at the 80% level; etc. For the .^arr.e 
objective, 1 .h% of those that did not 



objective, 1 . h', 
contract that objective 
t the 1007» l^vel; Lli.'"<7» ful:"l'ed it 
80% level, e^c 



a 

at the 



fulfilled it 



» 



39 



#1- I will sketch out the 

planning steps that will 
be needed for my next 
workshop . 

#2- I will discuss with two 
other participants how 
to plan a workshop. 

#3- I will write a set of 
objectives for my next 
workshop . 







LEVEl 


. OF 


Fill 


flLLMFNT 


Mot 




100% 




80% 




50% 


Attempted 


A 


33.3 




16.^ 




33.3 


16.7 


B 


l.h 




lU.8 




lU.8 


59.3 



A 


78.3 


21 .7 


0.0 


0.0 


B 


68.8 


12.5 


6.3 


6.3 


A 


0.0 


20.0 


40.0 


40.0 


B 


R.8 


0.0 


11 .8 


73.5 



A51 



#4- I will check off the 

objectives on Handout ■• 4 
as they are met. 

ft 5- 1 will clarify my use of 
objectives in plannii:, i 
workshop . 

!t6- ] will sketch out my 
concerns for m\' next 
workshop . 

#7- I will briefly list some 
procedures for assessing 
the needs of teachers in 
my area. 

#8- I will take notes on two 
procedures used at this 
workshop and how they 
can be modified to 
better suit my needs. 

#9- I will learn the meaning 
of "the medium is the 
message . " 

#10- I will list five aspe^.ts 
of workshop leadership 
that are the same as 
teaching . 

^11- 1 will list three of my 

leadership behaviors that 
need improving. 

mZ- I will list three workshop 
leadership behaviors that 
1 would like to begin 
using . 

#13- I will get to know three 
other participants whom I 
have not previously known. 

#14- I will list five ideas 

related to worksliops that 
1 gleaned from other 
participants . 

#15- I will critically examine 
two training kits devel- 
oped by the USOE/MSU 
RIMC-HCY. 





100% 


80% 


50% 


Not 1 

Attempted 


A 

B 


21.4 


4 2.9 

. ) 


14.3 

2g .0 


21.4 

5 2.0 


A 

B 


2 5.'/ 


:, . 


16.:' 


0.0 

1 * .s 


A 
B 


28.6 
8.0 


21.4 


7. 1 
L 6 . 


4 2.9 
56.0 


A 

B 


26.3 

10.0 


-1 .1 
5.0 


26.3 

1 ' ^ . 


26.3 

7 0. r 



A 91.3 

B 68.8 



4.3 



4.5 

18.8 



0.0 

6.3 



A 


70.8 


12.5 


12.5 


4.2 


B 


k6 .7 


;; . 


13. J 


13.3 


A 


53.3 


0.0 


11.1 


55.6 


B 


26.7 


10.0 


i 6 . 7 


h3.i 



A 


45.5 


13.6 


15.6 


27.2 


B 


0.0 


5.9 


29. i* 


5^.8 


A 


43.5 


30.4 


8.7 


17.4 


B 


12.5 


25 .0 


: ? . 5 


1+3.8 



A 


100.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


B 


88.9 


11 .1 


0.0 


0.0 


A 


30.8 


5 0.8 


7.7 


30.8 


B 


26.9 


23. 1 


,-,0.8 


19.2 



A 


92.6 


7,4 


0.0 


0.0 


B 


83.3 


8.3 


0.0 


8.3 



452 



#16- I will suggest in writing 
two topics for training 
kits 1 would like to sec 
developed . 

#17- I will take notes on mv 
reactions to Jifferenr 
leadership styles used 
during the worksliop. 

#18- I will be perceptive to 
the other participants 
and their reactions 
during the workshop. 

^ 19 - I will list five areas 

that sliould be evaluated 
at a workshop. 

#20- 1 will outline a pro- 
cedure for assessing 
individual pa rt i c i i.int 
learning. 

#21- I will list two different 
types of participant 
assessment measures. 





100°o 


8 05o 


sn?„ 


Not 
Attempted 


A 

E 


12.5 

. "' 


6.5 


12.5 


68.8 

73.9 



A 

B 



A 



23.1 

7. 7 



54.8 



7 . 7 



8.7 



15.5 

- :: . s 



4.5 
37 . '. 



8 5 . 5 


16.7 


o.n 


0.0 


b6. 7 


) . ''.' 


.1 i . 3 


CO 



\ 

E 


18.2 
■ . 6 


18.2 

7.1 


9. 1 
25.0 


54.5 
57.: 


A 
B 


14.5 


28.6 


0.0 
9.'t 


42.9 

7S.1 



55.8 
69.2 



April, 10- 



453 



Appendix B Leadership Worksiiop Handout i^l3 

LD\RN1NG co':t;',act 
Foil -u ■ : 

In the spnce precoedin;' i;_m _ '.'i' cK. ■ i t^s , ■-•ti"cr "hv. bi'.fr wh i c!i 

most closely c.^rresp.'" ■: c'le ■'■ .i.-o ■ ■ . -. • i ■• ' •■ \'\' \\': •■.\r\ irem 

during .he works'.-, p. 

A = 100% fulrillcd . . ■ v.! ;. >; • 

B - 30"' ful'IiUe-: -.J 

i wi.ll sl-.etih ''ij: r'le \ . •■■nin-.; ?Lep: '.!■.!-. ■.; i 1 ; .c-', for r.y nexL workr-ho; 

P "' '.;ill discuss '-.'ith '.' ■'"her p.ir t ic ip.'inc _; hew i. ■ •) i : •, * ...'•^r !<:•". ;ip . 

L 1 will write I s(i! oi ohjectivoj Tor r.y n 'xt v.m i ;;:. |, 

I will ci-.eck .^:f Lho cibic.rtives on H ind.^ut ■ '^ p ■ h--- ire > et. 

^ 1 will clirify rr.- use cf objectives in plannin,; i w rkshop 

N 1 wili sKftch nu^ my concerns t')r ny next '.^■>rl<cii--iiv . 

1 I '■•'iil briefly list so-Tie procc' ures or ssessin/. tiu"; iiue is of to icncrs 

in r.v irei. 

1 will take nctc-s or ? proceoures used at ■ .is ■.••"'rk:- ifp .ir'-.i h .-.w thev cm 

be mt^iditied :o ;>etter "uit my needs. 

T I will le-irn the •■ce ii-. ini'; d "the r.iediuTi is ^\\^: nies;? !;',e .' 

a I will list 5 ispects Df workshop le;iiters!i ir> '1..U .Te L'-e s iv.X' ^s tcichinu. 

^ I ivTill list 3 01 my lenders'iip behiviors thii : wc.v. improvi ar; . 

C I will 11 ri t 3 'orkshop le.i<!ership bei: iviors t:ia' 1 woild like to be,;in usinj;, 

H ___ T will get tr know 3 c:rhier participints whom I !: >ve not T^reviously known. 

I i will list 3 ideis rel.ced to workshops Lh.t I .zleiucd iron other 

H part icipants . 
G 

-..-•A->-.V-**VrttvV);:-V*-,'--..-..-*V.--..--,V-.V* •r-i': > .■•.■.•■.V)ir-.''*Vr .■<■•>•> -rV. V(-*-,V**T^iif Vi- ;, ■,•-■• >i i-,V-;. V V .■ VrVv', A-'.-..- ..- .,•■.'- .V-.V^r. V«* .'. ;(***-A*****-.'!"k-* 

E I will critically ex.inine .' trUninj; kits Jcvelcpod by the USOE-F.SU RIMCVHCY. 

V 1 will suggest in writing 2 topics for tr-iiiimj kito I w"iijld like to see 

^. deve loped . 

L I will take notes on my re-'.ctions to -.iffer^-nt leider.hip styles used 

'.I during it.e u'orkshop. 

.A I u'ill be perceptive to the other p^r ;. ic ip >;Uh and their reactions durin,"; 

T the wor'.' ihop . 

I I will list 5 jroas that should be evalu.ateJ i i. t v'orkthop. 

N I will outline a procedure for .issessin^ individual participant learning. 

" I will list 1 different types of participint asscs^trent trie isures . 

I Will 





T 

H 

E _ I will 

R 



454 (signiture) 



Leadership Workshop Handout #5 

Appendix A 

LEARNING CONTRACT 

Read through the following list of items ind check (^ those chat you will com- 
plete during this two day workshop. You must check at least 3 items in each of the 
three categories . You will be expected to complete those items that you check, 

P I will sketch out the planning steps that will be needed for my next workshop 

L I will discuss with 2 other participants how to plan a workshop. 

A I will write a set of objectives for my next workshop. 

N I will check off the objectives on Handout /M as they are met. 

N I will clarify my use of objectives in planning a workshop. 

I I will sketch out my concerns for my next workshop. 

N I will briefly list some procedures for assessing the needs of teachers in 

G my area . 

I will take notes on 2 procedures used at this workshop and how they can be 

modified to better suit my needs. 

T I will learn the meaning of "the medium is the message." 

E I will list 5 aspects of workshop leadership that are the same as teaching. 

A I will list 3 of my leadership behaviors that need improving. 

C I will list 3 workshop lea(!ership behaviors that I would like to begin using. 

H I will get to know 3 other participants whom I have not previously known. 

I I will list 5 ideas related to w kshops that I gleaned from other 

N participants. 

G 

ii***ir**irk***ic***irk*itirk*******ie**1ck****ick*irk**it**iHrkiririrkit* 

E I will critically examine 2 training kits developed by the USOE-MSU RIMCAlCY. 

V I will suggest In writing 2 topics for training kits I would like to see 

A developed. 

L I will take notes on my reactions to different leadership styles used 

U during the workshop. 

A I will be perceptive to the other participants and their reactions during 

T the workshop. 

I I will list 5 areas that should be evaluated at a workshop. 

N I will outline a procedure for assessing individual participant learning. 

G I will list 2 different types of participant assessment measures. 

*** ** * ** *1Hrk**ir*1rk*irk**ir********1rk*irk*irk1rkirk********irk**irk**^ * A A A A irk-k* 

I will 



T 

H 

E __ I will 

R 



(signature) 

455 




USOE/MSU 
RFCIONAl 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MAliRIAIS 
CENliR yoR 
HANOICAPPII) 
SL < HI! IIKtN 

-\NU v(X!rn 



LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
Evaluation Study #2 

S. Joseph Levine 
Sue Ann Yovanovich 



SUMMARY 



The initial and final activities of the workshop 
asked the participants to complete an evaluation form. 
The evaluation consisted of a series of questions that 
called for factual responses. The same form was used for 
both the pre-test and the post-test. Participants were 
asked to write an identifying number on their form. In this 
way it would be possible to match each participant's pre-test 
and post-test without disclosing the identity of the 
respondent. 



PURPOSE 



This activity was designed to reflect any cognitive 
change that was brought about through the two days of the 
workshop. It was hoped that participant responses would be 
"better" on the post-test than they were on the pre-test. 



RESULTS (n = 40) 



Question #1: 



"What are 7 roles of a good in-service 
educator?" 



Pre-test 

An average of 5.425 
correct responses per 
respondent . 



Post-test 

An average of 6.925 
correct responses per 
respondent . 



This question was designed to assess the participant's 
awareness of the many roles of an in-service educator. 



— ^[Ject*l Educilion 




456 



NeN»orli— Burr«u ot I due 4 1 tun lu 



Th.; 



:1 Y" 1 7. <i 7 1 a-'t."? /, ft. '.■;'»; .- 



f . ■ ■ 'r^.' " .■•• ■■ ! as 

- .■' i J' ■ ,'':-.;• >•■'■.•■ '. • • :' . 'I'h. i ,, Lri an exuecte:'. 
result siiice the entire aftornoo;-i activity directly 
prior to ttie pos' -tc.-st .vas devoted ' . Jef inin-i and 
discussin; tfiese roles. It's in'.c-i:- ring to note that 
many participant -■ extended their lis' beyond se'/en in 
the post-test (ti'ose "extra" responses were not 
tabulated) wheri_'a£ no one went beyond seven in the pre- 
test . 



. ... . er t ii', 
:r':;er . (1 



wing IV. 



lorst ial 

iu.t) 



ley.j .-n •rtrPK:-ho;p ■ ' ■ 
•:cic'-. t ii-rrr.-i' J . 
develop woi -:; h ">■.■ ohj' 
V'-'-'iy-e WDrks- -■:.» acti-.- 
c-nr u:r w-;ik3hop 



.1 or cedure 



This ]U(?stion was designed to reflect the participant's 
awareness ol." the sequence of events that go into the 
development of a workshop. (if particular interest were 
the sequence of "develop workshop evaluation procedure" 
prior to "design v;orkshop activities," and "conduct 
workshop" prior to "revise workshou activities." 
Respondents were given a score of "2" if they got both 
sequences correct, a score of "1" ior a single correct 
sequence, and a score of "0" if both were incorrect. 



Pre- test 






score n 


= 16 


1 


score n 


= 22 


2 


score n 


= 2 




TOTAL 


= 26 



Post-test 

score n = 12 

1 score n = 22 

2 score n = 6 

TOTAL =34 



The J .iPti -iipant ' ^: uh:(i yenesis ?r t/zw ; 
r.hat ..T i'l'o y:lj.nninj a icorkshcp '.».■ 
two dj-ys. 



reasea 



ev-jnts 
i'.- ; the 



'>.estion ^3 : "What ace 2 reasons for "--di^vlnc^ 
workshoi:; rna'eriala?" 



Pre-test 



Post-test 



15 respondents were 
able to list 2 
acceptable responses. 



20 respondents were 
able to list 2 
acceptable responses. 



A57 



This question indicates that- r.:)ye vavtiaipants v.e'ce better 
able to cite r..:s'>t- ;' r 'nrdif;jinj .■^r'kskui- -^.at^rialc at 
the conclusion of the two days. It' should be noted, however, 
that the number of acceptable response;; in both the pre-test 
and the post-test, are equal to or less than half of all of 
those responding. Consequently, it is frit that •i:s rrea 
ic, still I'elow a:-:! i^t-ibl. 



.' ^ iy C 



Quest ion ^U : "y.isc 6 ciiteri.^. I'D!" eva.! udt ,' n, wor KShc.p r:;aterialG. 

This question was not evaluated due to the diversity of 
resporises in both the pre-test and the post-test. 

Quest i'-.n ^ S : "Of -^he foilowinr w■^^k^.hop oro-.edures, which are 
the best 2_ 'cr use in a workshsp on "he sub'iecr 
ol "Pr .cedur-.s ; or /-.-isessing riassioo:r; Per f crmance" ? 

a handout 

a workshop pre-iett 

a viL.iting lecturer 

an ob'jervaticn game 

di?cu:ision er'O'j". :'"■ 



The correct responses to this question are "a workshop 
pre-test" and "an observation game." An acceptable response 
is "discussion groups." 

Pre-test Post-test 

4 - Handout 1^ - Handout 

15 - Pre-test 2_0 - Pre-test 

3_ - Lecturer - Lecturer 

28 - Observation Game 3_3 - Observation Game 

28 - Discussion Groups 2T - Discussion Groups 

The responses to this question indicate an impfcvement in 
the participant's understanding of the appropr-i ateness of 
worksh.rp procedures for the accomplishment of objectives. 
The workshop was designed to support the concept that the 
design of activities should support the desired learning. 



Question #6 : "Interaction of workshop p.>,rt icipants can best 

be developed through 

activities . " 

Responses to this item were scored as "acceptable" or 
"non-acceptable." Acceptable responses were those that 
directly related to involvement (doing, group participan-* 
discussion, etc.) Non-acceptable responses were those 
that did not directly relate to involvement (pre-planne 
individual, informal, etc.) 



458 



Pre-test Post-test 

27 acceptable 31 acceptable 

responses responses 

An analysis of t'ne responses indicate that more participants 
responded with an involvement -- related response at the 
conclusion of the worksho^^ than at the beginning. It is felt 
that ikr uU.r''-'nho: vidcd t Iip .■a-"i: ? 'i ;*;if^ ,v /.'.-.■■.',. ■• un.Ier- 



•1- 



Question '' '; : "Whit is the Eticnresr 'n^.:.^ r ' : i 

re -nrded presentation on "t"*-, - x" ■ide.j)- 

t ipe 'jquipmenl ':' " Check one. 

use ol television 

use of tap-= I'eccrleis 

u^:e of video tr. es 



This question was designed to probe the participant's 
understanding of the concept that a delivery mode can 
be more powerful than the instruction that is delivered 
through the mode. 

Pre-test Post-test 

2 - use of television 2 - use of television 

13 - use of tape recorders 12 - use of tape recorders 
25 - use of video-tapes 26 - use of video-tapes 

According to the responses, tlu par-tiaipan^s havt a 'ess 
than acceptable undei'stand 'ng cf th? .-jcnaept. (The -nedium 
is the 'recsage.) Als-^,, there is ■■...■ diffeven.'.-'.is in their 
understanding as a result of zh^ uorksho; . 



Question #8 : "It is important, when evaluatin,-^ a workshop, 
to consider the following 3 aspects:" 

a . 

b. 

c . 



This question was not evaluated due to the diversity of 
responses in both the pre-test and post-test. 



Q u c o L i ^ . . <f '"' : "T;.- be.:! wtv t-Q evaluate 'our el tt^ f^ . ei.ess as 
3 workc'" ". eudor Is '. . . ^^urh t..-'; use of pre- 
assessment rvc-edures . " 

True F^l'^'e 



This question was designed to .assess the participant's 



459 



understanding of the use of assessment procedures. The 
answer is "false." 

Pre-test Post- test 

19 responded 2 4 responded 

correctly corractly 

The responses to this question indicate that the vai't ic ' •. an - i^ 
bettei- judin'vf iriu ri:-' usi, ;" j ,•• s, ;<>■.•.•'■) ^ '. • :•)" . .^e ;',< j"t--.- t chouse 
5/ the ^hofkph-'!. The number of correct responses indicate, 
however, that a larje nu-ihey nf par i^irjyita t^tiil io r: ^ t 
under .i t ind ih^ ust >f <! ssefisment pr:-*, ■Ki;'.:;; . 



r ':est ion //lO : "Tht. most imi-ortant .i^oai of '-i >.''■• rV 3 hor is 

transfer o." 1 earn ! n,f, . " 

v.- 1 



:ru'i f a ! "ze 



This question was designed to assc;ss the participants under- 
standing of the concept of transfer as the most imi'ortant 
goal of a workshop. The answer is "true." 

Pre-test Post-test 

10 responded correctly 5 responaed correctly 

The responses to this question indicate that the f jr * tcfpaw ts 
d'd r.-'t learr. this acnacpt 2t the •■• : ■.■kn nr n and ^.?i. . !'.d njt 
kn . -J -it pri:r to the wjpksh:,i . 



April, 1972 



460 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTLR t^OR 
HANDICAPPrD 
^ CHII HKEN 
AND "lOL'TH 



i"del'l ^ '.111 -.'»\.f' 



i W.lh N'^h- t>epjtl-i' 



LEADERSHIP 
Evaluation 

S. Joseph 
Sue Ann Yov 



KORKSHOF> 
Study PI, 

Lcvine 
anovich 



SUMMARY 

A "Participant Reaction Form" was used at the conclusion 
of the workshop to assess the reactions of the participants 
to the workshop in general and any of the specific activities 
Participants were asked not to identify themselves on the 
form. 



PURPOSE 

This activity was designed as a procedure to allow the 
individual participants to react in writing to those aspects 
of the workshop to which they had particularly strong feelings 
The structure of the form was utilized to channel their 
thinking in very general areas without channeling the exact 
nature of their response. 



RESULTS 

Question #1: "Use descriptive words to describe your 

reactions to this Workshop. List the words 
as fast as they come to you. Limit one 
minute I No sentences, please." 

A total of 319 words were elicited by this question. Of 
these, 302 (94.7%) were positive and 17 (5.31) were negative. 
Those words that were elicited 10 or more times were 
interesting (16), informative (15), planned (13), helpful (12), 
good (11) , and organized (10) . 

The response to this question indicates that the 
participants left the workshop with exceptionally positive 
feelings. The response also indicates that a number of the 
objectives of the workshop were met, especially those that 
were related through modeling behavior. 



■M«mb«( — Special fdut^ii 




461 



Setwiirli— itue^u qI (du< jlion fo> Ihe HjrHlii. jpprtJ - 



llflKr Ol tdutal'OO— An {gud- Oppof" ur..t» I mplovn 



Question #2: "What do you feel were the two most 
valuable aspects of the Workshop?" 

This question uas designed to as.~-cs-< '.vhetlier the planned 
objective? of the workshop were met ;i ; uirceived by the 
participants. The responses to this iT?;: indicate that the 
participants did peiteivc the obiectives through tb^' workshop 
and that they fell 1 liev were met. The niost Significant aspect 
of the workshop, as seen by the participants was "MeetJnij 
and interacting with other teaclier trainers." 



Question #3: "If this Workshop were to be offered again 
for a different group of participants, 
what one thing should he eliminated?" 

This question was included to find out those aspects of 
the worksiiop that should be modified or eliminated. A total 
of 13 responses (32.51) indicated that nothing should be 
changed. Seven responses (17. S"'. I identified the video taping 
activity as unnecessary and the same number |17.5ii) felt 
the "Karnak" skit could be eliminated. Six responses flSo) 
felt the examination of the Kits should be changed. 



Question #4: "What was omitted, yet should liave been 
included in this Workshop?" 

This question allowed the individual participants to 
recommend additions to the workshop. It was hoped that this 
question would provide input that would clarify participant 
needs that were not met by the workshop and should be included 
in a future workshop . Sixteen of the responses Mil) indicated 
that there was nothing omitted. Nine (23%) asked that more 
time be allowed for individual work. Five responses (13°) 
highlighted "evaluation of worksiiop materials" as needed in 
future workshops. This last item, evaluation of materials, 
is seen as an area for increased focus in the future. 



Question #5: "Suggestions or comments:" 

This question was included as a "catch all" to allow the 
participants an opportunity to react on any aspect of the 
workshop not previously mentioned. Besides the general -posit ive 
comments, the most significant response to this question is 
the number of respondents who mentioned the lack of time to 
fulfill their contracts. It's interesting to note that the 
comments were not against the idea of the contract, but rather 
frustrated about the lack of time to work on the contracts. 



APRIL 197 2 



462 



PARTICIPANT RESPONSES 



Use descriptive wjvds t :> desar!h,3 i,l.av reactions to this 
W?rkshjp . List the ^^ords as far.t a.- th^y come to you. 



Limit one minute.' Nc sentenjei 



<li 



lise 



(16) interesting 
(interested) 
(interests) 

(15) informative 
(informed) 

(13) planned 

(planning) 
(well planned) 

(12) helpful 

(11) good 

(10) organized 
(8) fun 
(8) meaningful 

(meaning) 
(7) structured 

(6) enjoyable 
(6) excellent 
(6) useful 
(5) motivating 
(motivated) 
(motivational) 

(4) great 

(4) interaction 

(interactive) 
(4) involvement 

(involved) 

(4) learning 

(4) people 

(4) stimulating 

(4) valuable 

(3) boring 

(bored) 
(3) exciting 
(3) friendly 
( 3 ) humor 

(humorous) ., 

(3) ideas 

(3) innovative 

(3) relax 

(relaxed) 
(relaxing) 



(3) repeat 
(3) varied 

(var j '=»ty) 
(3) work 
(3) worthwhile 

(2) active 

(2) busy 

(2) clear 

(2) comfortable 

(2) confusion 

(confusing) 

(2) creativity 
(creative) 
(2) developed 
(2) different 
(2) dynamic 

(2) effective 
(2) enthusiastic 
(2) fast 
(2) frustrated 

(frustrating) 

(2) groups 
(2) materials 
(2) model 

(modeling) 
(2) needed 

(needs) 

(2) prepared 
(2) presentation 
(2) professional 
(2) profitable 
(2) reactionary 
(react) 

(2) relevant 

(2) timed 

(2) timely 

(2) usable 

(2) well done 

(1) activities 
(1) ambiguous 
(1) appropriate 



(1) 


awake 


(1) 


awakening 


(1) 


aware 


(1) 


best 


(1) 


bewildered 


(11 


carry over 


(1) 


cold 


(1] 


committed 


(1) 


comprehensive 


(11 


concise 


(11 


convenient 


(1 


crisp 


(11 


curious 


(11 


demonstrative 


(11 


descriptive 


(11 


directive 


(1^ 


dull 


(1 


encouraging 


(1 


enlightening 


(1 


eventful 


(1 


experience 


(1 


expertise 


(1^ 


food 


(1 


format 


(1 


fruitful 


(1 


fulfilling 


(1 


functional 


(1 


generous 


(1 


gracious 


(1 


improvement 


(1 


insightful 


(1 


instructional 


(1 


intrigued 


(1 


kits 


(1 


lag 


(1 


1 leadership 


(1 


1 lively 


(1 


long 


(1 


media 


(1 


more 


(1 


moving 



463 



(1) 


muddy 


(1) 


multi-media 


(1) 


objectivity 


(1) 


okay 


(1) 


paced 


(1) 


participant 


(1) 


personalities 


(1) 


pleasant 


(1) 


pleasurable 


(1) 


practical 



(1) precise 
(1) productive 
(1) purpose 



(1) reassuring 

(1) reinforcing 

(1) resentful 

(1) rcvealinc 

(1) roles 



[' ) 


rushed 


(i) 


setting 


( .) 


sharing 


( ) 


smooth 


(1) 


successful 


(1) 


suitable 


(1) 


superb 



(1) tantalized 

(1) techniques 

(1) thinking 

(1) thorough 

(1) thought provoking 



(1) 


unanticipated 


(1) 


uncertain 


(1) 


ur.clear 


(I) 


understanding 


(1) 


unique 


(1) 


unprofound 


(1) 


unused 



What In yo'i feel ^ere the tco mc-c-t v-iluabl -.i -srec^ts ;' the 
W j!-k,:h :>p? 

(26) Meeting and interacting with other teacher trainers. 
(18) The replicable training materials that were provided. 

(4) Workshop Kits 

(4) Workshop Planning Kits 

(1) Instructional Strategy Activity 

(14) The information that was provided. 

(13) Experiencing a workshop led by other trainers. 

(12) Involvement activities. 

(4) Video tape activity 
(3) You Are. . . activity 

(2) Visiting the Regional IMC. 

If this Workchop u^ere to be cffeved i.jair. for a d'j'ferent gvohp 
of partiaipayits, what one thing sh'ULo ht cliriir.aied? 

NOTHING (n == 13) 

Nothing 

Nothing as far as I am concerned as of this moment. 

At this time I'm not sure if anything should be eliminated, 

Nothing 

Keep as is 

Nothing 

Nothing should be eliminated. 

Nothing 



464 



(Question 3 continued) 

Nothing - keep all components 

Nothing 

Nothing 

Nothing 

Nothing 

VIDEO TAPING (n = 7) 

The video tape of personal experiences 

The video taping procedure. Obviously it didn't suit 
as many needs as the other sessions. It's just not 
your style. 

While filming people having non-participants receiving 
some other input elsewhere. 

Felt "You Are" activity too lengthy and TV taping long, 
not that informative and pressure to get it organized. 

Use of video-tape in contrived situation. 

Video-taping 

The entire video-tape activity 

KARNAK (n = 7) 

Karnak - cute but not needed at that point. Good 
experience for first time contact. 

Karnak 

Not sure I saw relationship to Karnak ' s performance and 
time it took and value received. 

Karnak 

Re-tool Karnak skit - not necessarily omit. 

The Karnak routine was excellent, but could be shortened 
time-wise . 

If anything, the time with Karnak could be modified to be 
more effective. 



465 



(Question 3 continued) 

USE OF THE KITS (n = 6) 

Reviewing kits (su'^qpst ' i^.a t it :^- r. total jroup 
activity with nore introduction '■ t i^e activity.) 

Evaluating tht kits yesterday. Activity not claril'ied 
enough or sin iify it. 

Observing kits rather 1 b.an using in gioups. 

The locking at kits - I felt that there was not enough 
t:nie to understand many o<^ th<.' kits as there were no 
cassettes available to hear then an 1 ge' total 
understanding . 

Looking at kits instead of actually wo: kin^^* v;ith one kit. 

Reliaice on kits - should be an adjvinct not a .najor focus. 

EVENING ACTIVITY (n - 2) 

The Monday evening activities should be done in terms 
of needs of the group - this could be changed. 

The evening n.eeting - really very rushed and some 
people 'who couldn't get to the meeting on time due to 
slow service were quite unhappy. 

MEETING FACILITY (n - 1) 
The Iniversity Inn 

SEQUENCING GAME (n = 1) 
Sequencing games 

TIMING (n = 1) 

The close timing which at least on one occasion during 
this session was too short to allow for closure. 

LENGTH OF WORKSHOP (n = 1) 

I would like to have more time - 3 full days perhaps 

STARTING TIME (n = 1) 

You covered the ground well, but how about 9 AM instead 
of 8:30. 

A66 



4. What TJas omittedy yet should hav,'' been included in this 
Workshop? 

(16) Nothing 

(9) Needed more time to work on individual objectives 
(contract) 

(5) More information on evaluating workshop materials 
(and workshops) 

(2) Actual demonstration of kits. 

(2) More individual participation. 

(1) Actually adapting a kit. 

(1) Teacher made materials. 

(1) More discussion of interlock between local IMC's. 

(1) More discussion of "Yours for a Better Workshop" 
booklet. 

(1) More shifting between groups. 

5. Suggestions or comments : 

Allow time to work through rather than just read through 
kits - active participation. 

There should be a multi-county-statewide workshop next year 
for IRMC coordinators. Provide continuous inservice. 

The follow-up on the contract which involved lettering each 
item on whether the task was completed was poorly designed 
because of the words "list, sketch," etc. These items should 
be changed to terms which do not require actual writing. 

Use of overhead projector was not as effective as it could be - 
e.g. size of image on screen, clarity, overflow of light, 
(beyond screen) , etc. 

Believe there will be excellent transfer. 

Excellent workshop. I am glad I was invited. 

An excellent workshop. 

Make participants aware at the outset that some time should be 
set aside for evaluating of material. 



467 



Keep up the good work I You practice what you preach I 

Foster the 'seed' of competition between groups that you 
began to introduce. e.g. silly little award for group 
that accumulates most 'points,' etc. 

This was a most rewarding experience. Thctnk you for a most 
informative, well oroanized learning experience. 

In pre-conf erence contract, some explanation should accompany. 
In addition, items should be altered some way to allow 
completion in spite of tight time schedule of sessions. 

Keep up the good work. 

Different facilities where you didn't have to go outside for 
everything . 

Two more meetings here, two in our own states. 

Continue use of groups, discussions, summaries. Another choice 
of motel could have been more physically comfortable. Cold 
floor! Better than I anticipated. Excellent:! 

It would have been helpful to go through a kit completely and 
discuss its contents. Tuesdays sessions were far more 
meaningful for the contents related to frustrations of in- 
service coordinator. 

Good job. Semi-annual involvement of 3-state group using 
people from the states to assist implementation of the program. 
Perhaps an IRMC - CRC - ETC. membership unit in CEC. Perhaps 
a summary of our skills. 

Let's do this again real sooni 

A most beneficial workshop. 

Experience, if nothing else, has taught most in-service trainers 
how to conduct training sessions. I thought most of the activity 
was not particularly profound or new. The materials used were 
excellent and the organization of the two days was good. Private 
discussions with participants were particularly helpful. 

Meeting was very worthwhile at times. However, there were times 
when I felt that the MSU staff talked very abstractive in order 
to sound impressive. Small words are always understood. 

Follow-ups where at least part of group could get back together 
to refresh ideas and the urge to really try some of the 
suggested innovations. A very well-planned session - most 
enjoyable and full of ideas which have multiple use in 
adaptability. 



468 



Time to fulfill the "written" parts of the contract if one 
selected that as I did. Similar to work sessions we had in 
June . 

This has been a valuable experience in m.iny ways. I most 
appreciated meeting staff and participants, and obtaining 
such good ideas for our own inservice. I would like more 
direct information on group dynamics, and how to anticipate 
some of the feeling generated by inservice activities. 
Thanks to all the Michigan Regional IMC staff. 

All roles of v7orkshop leaders were demonstrated by the staff - 
except for the reporting, which will be sent to us. Good job. 
Thanks. 

I feel I am leaving better informed this time. 

Please, expand into content areas. If you can do the perceptual 
kit you can do kits such as "Reading, Phonics, Linguistics 
and look say" etc. Why not another workshop where we are 
the leaders using the kits that we have. 

Very good workshop for in-service trainers. 

It is a pleasure to do business with you folks - may I return 
the favor at a later date. 

A very well planned conference. 

I feel my time was very well spent. Would like to see any 
follow-up workshop keying in on specific w orkshop skills, i.e. 
change agent, communicating, etc. 

The workshop was excellent and most helpful to me. It may have 
been helpful to provide time in the middle of the workshop to 
have people reflect on contracts. A reaction sheet following 
each package would have provided opportunity for feed back 
on items that may need change. Since it was not provided, many 
comments that were made during examination of kits were lost. 

Lodge us in a cleaner motel. 

I do have a need to see and use your instructional material 
center has. Time did not allow me to use it as I would have. 
More time to overlook the Centers when workshops are held in 
the area. 

I think that we should have new leaders. It seems that the 
leaders techniques are repeated to some of us who have been 
with them before. The leaders do not show any new areas that 
have not been used before. We need many people that show 
different techniques. Retool. 



469 



should there 1:^ annth:'r >--,''■' 
nature n-:xi year'/ 

(37) Yes 

(1) True 

(1) Certainly 

(1) Perhaps 

(1) Yes - with new leaders 



■- rk;-h Jp of this 



470 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRI'CTK5NA1 
MATERIALS 
CfNHR FOR 
HANDICAPPLO 
^ CHILDREN 
\NI) VOL'IH 



Jlr, I'K V<uin Mftll Mil hlK.I" Mrtif \. 'ivl"».H ^^sl .«' -^ -lt(*'iK<tr> J 



LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
Evaluation Study #4 

S. Joseph Levine 
Sue Ann Yovanovich 



SUMMARY 



At the conclusion of the LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP all partic- 
ipants were asked to make out a "LONG TERM CONTRACT". Contained 
within this contract were a series of 14 possible items that a 
participant could check as activities that they would fulfill 
following the workshop. Some of these items were expected to be 
fulfilled at the end of two months and some were expected to be 
fulfilled by the end of three months. A blank space was provided 
at the bottom of the contract for each participant to enter any 
other item that they would like to contract for. 

Two separate follow-ups were made of the LONG TERM CONTRACT. 
The first follow-up, at the end of two months, asked each partic- 
ipant that had contracted for two month items the level to which 
"-.hey had accomplished those items which they had contracted. The 
second follow-up, at the end of three months, asked for level of 
accomplishment on the three month items. 



PURPOSE 



This contracting activity was designed for two primary 
reasons. First, it was used to demonstrate to the participants 
a procedure for promoting some degree of particinant accountability 
after the conclusion of a workshop. In this way, the participants 
could get a better feel for the use of long term contracts. The 
second motive behind the use of this contract procedure was to 
create a vehicle for subtle reinforcement of concepts and content 
that occurred during the two day workshop. The use of the two and 
three month follow-up letters provided an opportunity to remind the 
participants that they had in fact attended a workshop that they 
should continue to think about. 



471 



^t SVnihcr ln\liui:liiinal M*I#-'.jK ■•(>r\fc.wk tor Haniln jc>f>eil ' hiMfen J»nd >outh -US O'tm' i>l tiliiirflicm Hun-Jii iil i<luc Jlii"^ 



RESULTS 



1) Those contract items that did n- t i ■ luire a direct contact 
with the REGIONAL CEMEH show a hi.j-.cr level rf accomplish- 
ment than those items that did !'.^qu:re contaci . This can 
be explained in two possible ways. First, those items that 
required contacting the REGIONAL CENTER could be considered 
harder than the other items and therefore not as easily 
accomplished. Second, the respondent had to be truthful in 
his response to contact items since his reply could easily 

be checked. This second possibility could infer questionable 
reliability on the non-contact items. 

2) Two contract items on the TWO MONTH FOLLOW-UP appear to be 
significant. Meeting with a "local ad'vini strator" and with 
a "local group of teachers" seem to be two activities that 
the participants contracted f?r and did accomplish to a 
high degree. 

3) The use of the FOLLOW-UP CONTRACT resulted in a large number 
of feedback letters directed to the REGIONAL CENTER. Most 
of these letters provided workshop staff with good feedback 
on the content and techniques from the workshop. These 
letters were primarily stimulated by the use of the contract. 
As such, the contract stimulated valuable feedback that 
might not have been stimulated if the contract hadn't been 
used , 



DATA 



The following two pages show the data from the two and 
three month follow-up studies. An explanation of "COMPLETION 
INDEX" is shown at the bottom of the first page. 



472 



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474 



Leadership Workshop Handout #14 

LONG TERM CONTRACT 

Please check those items that you feel you will accomplish after this Workshop. 
A follow-up will be sent to you after the specified length of time to find out to 
what degree you have .iccomplished those that you have checked. 

I will relate in writing to the Regional Center my reactions to the 

Leadership Workshop. (Time limit: 2 months) 

I will contact the Regional Center in writing for more information about 

conducting my own workshops. (Time limit: 2 months) 

I will request in writing one of the Regional Center Workshop Kits for 

more detailed inspection. (Time limit: 2 months) 

___ I will meet with a local administrator to discuss the possibility of a 
workshop for his teachers. (Time limit: 2 months) 

___ I will meet with a local group of teachers to plan a workshop. (Time 
limit: ? months) 

_^__ I will develop a "profile" of a group of teachers in my area that better 
defines their instructional needs. (Time limit: 2 months) 

___ I will develop a detailed plan for a workshop and send it to the Regional 
Center for feedback. (Time limit: 2 months) Note : The Regional Center 
will reply to me within 2 weeks. 

___ I will modify an available or existing set of workshop materials to 
better meet my own needs. (Time limit: 2 months) 

___ I will send a copy of my next Workshop Pre-Assessment Form to the Regional 
Center for their reaction. (Time limit: 3 months) Note : The Regional 
Center will reply to me within 2 weeks. 

___ 1 will Incorporate at least 3 new ideas learned during these 2 days into 
a workshop that I conduct. (Time limit: 3 months) 

___ I will use one of the Regional Center Workshop Kits at a workshop. 
(Time limit: 3 months) 

____ I will conduct two workshops that I have designed. (Time limit: 3 months) 

___ I will send a copy of my next Workshop Evaluation Form to the Regional 

Center for their reaction. (Time limit: 3 months) Note : The Regional 
Center will reply to me within 2 weeks. 

I will 

(Time limit: months) 



Name Date 

\.t.3&-o«a 475 



LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
February 14-15, 1972 

Two Month Follov-Up 
Long Term Contract 

At the end of the Leadership Workshop you checked some i<i: the items below 
as ones that you would be able to accomplish after returning home. Two months 
have gone by and we're wondering what's happened. Please enter a letter by 
each checked item that reflects your level of accomplishment. Return this form 
to us in the enclosed envelope. 

A = 100% accomplished 
B = 807« accomplished 
C = 507o accomplished 
D = Not accomplished 

I will relate in writing to the Regional Center my reactions to the 

Leadership Workshop. (Time limit: 2 months) 

1 will contact the Regional Center in writing for more information 

about conducting my own workshops. (Time limit: 2 months) 

I will request in writing one of the Regional Center Workshop Kits 

for more detailed inspection. (Time limit: 2 months) 

I will meet with a local administrator to discuss the possibility of 

a workshop for his teachers. (Time limit: 2 months) 

I will meet with a local group of teachers to plan a workshop. (Time 

limit: 2 months) 

1 will develop a "profile" of a group of teachers in my area that 

better defines their instructional needs. (Time limit: 2 months) 

I will develop a detailed plan for a workshop and send it to the 

Regional Center for feedback. (Time limit: 2 months) Note : The 
Regional Center will reply to me within 2 weeks. 

I will modify an available or existing set of workshop materials to 

better meet my own needs. (Time limit: 2 months) 

I will 

(Time limit: months) 



Name Date_ 

Address 



P.S. A copy of the results of the Follow-Up Study will be sent to you! 



LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
February 14-15, 1972 

Three Month Fol low-Up 
Long Term Contract 



At the end of the Leadership Workshop you checked some of the items below 
as ones that you would be able to accomplish after returning home. Three months 
have gone by and we're wondering what's happened. Please enter a letter by 
each checked item that reflects your level of accomplishment. Return this form 
to us in the enclosed envelope. 



A = 1007. accomplished 

B = 807o accomplished 

C = 507> accomplished 

D = Not accomplished 



I will send a copy of my next Workshop Pre-Assessment Form to the 
Regional Center for their reaction. (Time limit: 3 months) Note : 
The Regional Center will reply to me within 2 weeks. 

I will incorporate at least 3 new ideas learned during these 2 days 
into a workshop that I conduct. (Time limit: 3 months) 

I will use one of the Regional Center Workshop Kits as a workshop, 
(Time limit: 3 months) 

1 will conduct two workshops that I have designed. (Time limit: 
3 months) 

I will send a copy of my next Workshop Evaluation Form to the 
Regional Center for their reaction. (Time limit: 3 months) Note : 
The Regional Center will reply to me within 2 weeks. 

I will 

(Time limit: months) 



Name Date 



Address 



P.S. A copy of the results of the Follow-Up Study will be sent to youl 



477 



SPECIAL EDUCATION LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
In-Service Training Techniques 
USOE/IC;U RIMC-HCY 
Feb. ll*-15, 1972 
List of Participants 



Betsy Ross 

CRC 

Hillcrest School 

lliOl Cherry Street 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 149001 

Fred Parker 

CRC 

2 30 1*3 Lalcevay 

Farmington, Mich. U802l* 

313-1*76- 8676 

Mrs. Blanche G. Benwire 

CRC 

R 03 

Paw, Paw, Mich. 1*9079 

616-628-2606 

Gail Wiemer 
CRC 

Charlevoix- Bmnet 

Lnt ' !--"«> df. ate School Dist. 

Charlevoix, Mich. 1*9720 

Peggy Sue Tenney 

CRC 

1650 Wa-okazoo Drive 

Holland, .'I'.ch. 1*91*23 

61—335-9167 

Janet Fortenbacher 
CRC 

Kalamazoo VcLlley Int. Dist. 

Box 2025 

50S E. Dutton 

Kalar:?azoO: Mich. 1*9003 

6l6-36l--5910 



Jeaie Walline 

CRC 

tUchi^an Dept. of Education 

Special Ed. Services 

Box 1*20 

Lans5n,i, Mich. U8902 

517-373-0923 

Dennis J. Tomaaallo 

IT 

Diagnostic Teachin<5 Center 

725 K. New Jersey Ave. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 1*6219 

317-635-1*557 

Lowell B. Smith 

TT 

Box lUO 

School Administration 
New Albany, Ind. 1*7150 
812-91^5-6631 

i'lrs. Josephine K. Mosby 

TT 

Diagnostic Teaching Center 

725 i. New Jersey 

Indianapolis, Ind. 1*6202 

Paul Ash 

IMC Co or. 

Division of Special Education 

Ind. Dept. of Public Instruction 

Bex 100 

Butler University 

U600 Sunset 

Indianapolis, Ind. 1*6208 

317-633-5259 



Beverley J. Farr 

CRC 

Box 155 

Plainwell, Mich. U908O 

616-673-3703 



William C. Soudera 

TT 

22I* N. Delaware 

Hobp.rt, Ind. 1*631*2 

219-91*2-6729 



* IT - Teacher-Trainer 

* CRC - Cu-riculun Resource Consultant 

* IRMC Coor. -Instructional Resource Se >!aterials Center Coordinator 

* IRC Coor. - Instructional Resource Coordinator 



478 



-2- 



David E. Gre«»nburg 

TT 

120 E. Walnut St. 

Indianapolis, Ind. U620U 

317_63li-238l 

Robert E. Kritkausky 
IRC Coor. 

Saint Francis College 
2701 Spring Street 
Fort Wayne, Ind. l*6808 
219- 1*32-3551 

Glen Taylor 

TT 

Sp. Ed. Regional Consultant 

(North Central Indiana) 

1836 College Ave. 

Huntington, Ind. 1*6750 

219-356-5180 

Robert J. Robertson 

TT 

Sp. Ed. Regional Consultant 

(northern Indiana) 

Northern Regional Service Ctr. 

635 South Main St. 

South Berd, Ind. k6G23 

219-289-7901* 

I*frs. Laura Doeden 

TT 

P.O. Box 513 

Plymouth, Ind. I46563 

219-936-2627 

Carol Weller 

TT, IRC 

St. Francis Collsie 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. 1*6305 

219-1*32-3551 Set. 208 

Thomas E. Fisher 

Ed. Consultant 

Ohio Dept. of Education 

Dlv. of Special Education 

3201 Alberta St. 

Columbus , Ohio l*320l* 

61U-I69-265O 



Howard G. Ball 

Ed. Consultant 

Ohio Dept. of IMucatin 

Div. of Special Education 

3201 Alberta St. 

Colunbun Ohio l*320l* 

61I4.H69-265O 

Weston Orloff 

ir::c Coor. 

7090 Hopl'ins Rd. 
^tentor, Ohio UlO'^O 
2I0 -255-92U8 

Mary Crocker 
IRMC Director 
County Office Eld'^. 
Jefferson, Ohio Ui*Ol*l 
216-576-1*085 

Dan Brown 

IB:!C Coor. 

County Office Bldg. 

Jefferson , Ohio 1*1*01*1 

216-576-1*085 

Erma B. Thomas 
IRi:C Coor. 
2100 Frank Road 
Columbus , Ohio 1*3223 
6ll*-276-81*01 

Betty Ausenheimer 

IKjMC Coor. 

791 Williamsburg Dr. 

Galion, Ohio 1*1*833 

l*lo..l;68-61*l*7 

Betty McMillin 

IRYiC Coor. 

Tracy Elementeiry School Bldg. 

Tracy Road 

Toledo, Ohio U3605 

1*19-372-2958 

Don Reynolds 

TT 

Sp. Ed. Regional Consultant 

(Southeastern Indiana) 

1*00 Jackson Park Dr. 

Seyrour, Ind. l*727l* 

812-522-3280 



479 



-3- 



Sberyl Kaye Nelson 
IRMC Coor. 
UOO Holmes Ave. 
Lima, Ohio U580U 
Ul 9-22 3- 39 5 5 

llorraa Jane Zappin 

IRMC Coor. 

15 N. -lain St. - Rm. 317 

Dayton, Ohio li5'402 

513-'*6l-3996 

Wallace P. Coleman 

IRMC Coor. 

Lorain Co. Pub. Sch. 

k?.0 W. Third Street 

Elyria, Ohio 1+U035 

216-323-7518 

G. Wayne Swezig 

IRMC Director 

576 W. Main Street 

Wilmington, Ohio 1*5177 

513-385-891*7 

Lee Debnar 

ir;;c Coor. 

261 W. Higli Street 

I'lew Philadelphia, Ohio kkh63 

2l6-36k-2(^lh 

Dave Braukman 

IRirc Coor. 

3101 Clifton Ave. 

Cincinnati , Ohio !*5220 

513-861-1*953 

John Opperman 

IRMC Coor. 

A. G. Bell School for the Deaf 

11815 Woodland Avenue 

Cleveland, Ohio 1*1*120 

216-229-6966 



Gary Dutey 

IRMC Coor. 

Second S: Chillicothe Streets 

Portsmouth, Ohio 1*5662 

61I+..35U-I4526 

'-■lildred Rowland 

Miss. Learning Resources System 

Special Education Section 

Dept . of Education 

P.O. Box 771 

Jackson, Miss. 39205 

601-3514-6905 

Judy Wilson 
Special Education IMC 
University of Texas 
2613 Wichita Street 
Austin, Texas 78712 
512-1*71-311*5 

Dainey Lege 
Texas Bd. Agency 
201 E. 11th 
Austin, Texas 787OI 
512-1*75-3507 

Tom fferedith 

Instructional Materials Center 

1020 South Spring St. 

Springfield, 111. 62706 

217-525-21*36 

Ms . Lee Patton 

Instructional Materials Center 
1020 S. Spring St. 
Springfield, 111. 62706 
217-525-21*36 

Doris Stone 

Dept. of Education 

Bovling Green State University 

Bowling Green, Ohio 1*31*03 



Joseph George 
ira-lC Coor. 
13200 Pearl Road 
Strongsville , Ohio 1*1*136 
216-238-6991 



480 






Bowling Green Slate University 



Department of Education 
Bowling Green. Ohio 43403 



^^c:^^ 



Kay 5, 1972 



Miss Sue Ann Yovanovich 

USOE/MSU 

Hogional Instructional Materials Center 

213 Erickson Hall 

Michigan State University 

East Lansing, Michigan 48823 

Dear Sue, 

The February leadership workshop on In-Service Training 
Techniques Is clearly the outstanding experience of its type 
that I have participated in since beginning my study of con- 
ferences and workshops. Because it has so effectively pro- 
vided direction and resources I feel doubly apologetic that 
I have not told you this earlier. 

After this lapse of time I would judge the following 
workshop experiences remain the most profitable for me, in 
terms of my professional needs: 

a) The carefully timed participant involvement, 
followed by discussion, which occurred consistently through- 
out the workshop. The use of on-going evaluation was demon- 
strated effectively, 

b) All participants were viewed by the leaders as 
potential resource persons. This attitude freed the participants 
to really contribute to the total program. 

c) The notebook of mimeographed materials, organizaed, 
numbered, useable, provide a continuing source for classroom 
teaching and in-service meetings. The usefulness of this 
material is by no means limited to working with special class 
teachers. 

d) The participation in the video-taping session, plus 
the demonstration-discussion of its use was valuable. 

e) The opportunity to "live" with the group for two 
days was tremendous fun. 

Thank you for Including me in this workshop and making 
me feel so very welcome. I look forward to receiving information 
on the follow-up study. 




Deris' W. ' Stone 

P.S. Behavior change in me: The workshop pushed me to invest in 
a tape recorder, which I now use in teaching and some of 
my group work. Next on the list is a cameral 



481 



State 




State Superintendent of public instrjction 
JOHN J LOUGHLIN 



INDIANAPOLIS 46204 



PIVISION OF SPFCIAL I DLCA floN 

KooM ins sfAri oi I ici, m.ix.. 

PHONf (-il7if,T! 47A-1 



April 13, 1972 

Miss Sue Yovanovich 

Field Consultant and Co-ordinator 

US0E/>BU Instructional Materials Center 

213 Erickson Hall 

Michigan State University 

East Lansing, MI 48823 

Dear Sue, 

To keep you informed as to progress made since the leadership workshop 
relative to In^ervice Training Techniques held February 14-15, many of the 
concepts and ideas have been used since the vrorkshop. 

Of special value has been techniques learned for stimulating group inter- 
action, conducting, designing and evaluating in-service training workshops, 
exploration of curriculum materials and information through bulletins 
issued by the RIMC staff. 

I trust in the future you will be able to provide the kinds of services 
currently being offered as I personally view your "total operation" as 
an integral part for a total system in helping individuals such as myself 
to acquire ideas and concepts. As you know, with the manditory special 
education law coming in 1973 in Indiana, many of the concepts and ideas, 
in my opinion, will be useful in helping me working with school personnel 
to "gear up" for the meeting of the requirements of the law. 

In summary, I hope to be able to use the resources from the RIMC in the 
future to a greate- extent than in the past. I am looking forward to working 
with you and your staff at Michigan State as I personally feel the RIMC 
is definitely needed. 



Sincerely yo 




Glen Taylor 

North Central gifegional Consultant 
Dept. of Public Instruction 
Division of Special Education 



482 



State 



Indiana 




State Superintendent or Public instruction 
John J. Loughlin. Superintendent 

Room p^s State house 
Are* Code 3I7 633 66lC 

April 18, 1972 




INDIANAPOLIS 46204 



Nnrlhcin Rc^icjii.il ( iiiur 

); ; .irliiK-nl ut I'uMii InsliiHlum 

h\^ Soiilli M.iMi Slr.cl 

Siiiilh Hi nil Indunj 4hh:A 

PhiHi. :i'» 2H'I ''<ii4 

•MIr.il bi'C.k. I)it..:ni 



USOE/MSU 

Regional Instructional Materials Center 

213 Erickson Hall 

Michigan State University 

East Lansing, Michigan 48823 

Dear Sue : 

I'm sorry that I have not coitutiunicated with you 
since the workshop. 

In response to my contract, I have marked it and 
am including it with this letter. My reactions to the 
workshop are all in one word - terrific - after that I 
can't say anymore. It really gave me confidence in 
planning workshops. I have communicated this material 
from the workshop to my fellow consultants in Indiana- 
polis, froip this we planned a three day workshop that 
just finished last week. We did not use any game 
simulations. The evaluation of the workshop made us 
feel real good about our. planning. 

I have not met with a local group of teachers, so 
1 have to default myself on this contract. 



Thanks , 



'-'-tr)u-^i,-3^ 



Bill Souders 
Field Consultant 
Psychological Services 



BS:as 



P.S. I don't have the word power to really tell you 
what I got out of the workshop, except Thanks! 



483 



NORTHWESTERN OHIO INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER 
FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN 

aitle Vl-A, E5EA) 

library 141, B. G. $ U. 

Bowling Or««n, Ohio 43402 

Phono: 419-353-8411, oxt. 34<2 



Bolty McMillin, Diroctor 



.^pril 19,1972 



USOE/MSU Regional 
Instinictional Materials Center 

213 Erickscn llall 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 4^825 

Dear Sue, 

I am sorry I have been so late in vo-iting this letter 
but as you know when I attended the Leadershop Workshoo they 
had just moved our Center. Needless to say, the past few 
weeks have been "hectic" (hiring a secretary, writing a 
proposal, getting boxes impacked, neiterials on shelves, etc.). 

At the time I felt the workshop was very worthwhile but 
in thinking back about it now I even feel more that way. The 
idesis ajid materials I received can be of great help to me and 
all I need now is some time to use them. 

At the end of a workshop of this type I think we all feel 
rather "saturated" as there is so much given to us in such a 
short period of time. I realize this is necessary if the work- 
shop is going to be worthwhile. With such a full schedule I 
felt you people did a fine job of keeping a relaxed atmosphere 
throughout the conference. 

Thanks again for everything and I hope you will have more 
of this type of thing for us. 



Sincerely, 



Betty McMillin 
lilMC Coordinator 



484 



Texas Education Agency 201 East n* stre« 

Austin, Texas 

• STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 




78701 

.STATE COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION 



• 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



April 26, 1972 



Miss Sue Ann Yovanovich 

Field Consultant & Coordinator of 

Human Resources for Dissemination 
USOE/MSU Regional Instructional 

Materials Center 
Michigan State University 
213 Erickson Hall 
East Lansing, Michigan 48823 

Dear Sue: 

Thank you so much for sending me the copy of the letter sent to Ben Hodge, 
El Paso. He has been in contact with me several times, but I am not cer- 
tain why he wrote you. He has only one instructional game available to ray 
knowledge. 

The Leadership Workshop Judy and I attended in February was excellent. 1 
can't express how much I gained from the session. In fact, Judy and I are 
hard at work making final plans for a training session for the Texas System 
scheduled May 22-24 in Austin. Many of the ideas we learned from you will 
be included. Thank you again for allowing me to attend. 

1 was delighted to note in your letter that you plan two follow-up workshops 
next year. I would be most greatful if you would again allow me to attend. 
Would it be possible for you to let me know the dates as soon as they are 
firm.? I must request permission in August so it can be included in next 
year's budget. 

Sorry we didn't have time for a visit in Washington. 

Sincerely, 

(Mrs.) Dainey Lege', Director 
Texas System of Special Education 

Instructional Materials Centers 
Division of Special Education 

Development 

DL:cn 



485 





PliANNING FORM 



SPECIAL EDUCATION INSTRUCTIONAL ,^4ATKRIAI.■ CEN^FER 



Universaty of Texas 



Request Received From: 
Analysis of request by: 
Plan designed by: 
Who are the trainees? 

How many? 

What is the mission? 



What objectives can be 
achieved? 



What procedures' 



What evaluation? 



Generated in l.ouse 

Training Coordinator 

Judy Wilson 

Lou Alonso, Ted Ward, Joe Levine, 
Nancy Carlson, Sue Yovanovich et.al, 

The whole staff of the MSU RIMC 

To express thanks for the training, 
the information, the ideas, the 
visit, the taxi service, and the 
Tender Loving Care. 

Cognitive: Recall level of events 
that made up a successful workshop, 
level - 100% 

Affective: Pleasure in knowing 
you did a good job. 

A note to convey my appreciation 
by mail an' 'i personal thanks the 
next time I see each of you. (1) 

Subjective - IT WAS GREAT 1 



1. Visual Aid - the smile on my face 



DATE 2/29/72 



PARDON THE PLAGIARISM 



A86 



■" :'6, 1972 



lis.' bus ,'vnn Yov-:.r\-v:\r.r. 

Rer/iovxl Tnp.tnjct 'nn.'Ll ''r. '.'••• J ".Ir; C'^'itrr 

for Tardicap'od ChJldr^n ..! Yout':. 

213 F,ricT,on'!!ali ' 

Michi^-'n 3t~.tf.' Univori'Tty 

y.rxst T.an3in,3, ! iichi ;3 n 

Doar .jue, 

Think you rnr -jo^ir- letter f^f Febni:.ry '^A "h. r. '>lr;.-i"e(^ •'.'^ 
1 oirn 'IV fef?'' ' rr's rn-irdir ■ the ■; •.oce'ss of t'v" ■.-.'ork? :■ '-/gt'-."' t*- r-""^ 
by the R'J'C 3t'ifr. For ••-.e, it i-n- .1 trepp- do:,) o; yc-i"t';;v ty *'cr " 
conoc't'^'^ tei J ".r.-dfT't'' ex'^orien"?* )n t-:'" 'rro" of ','■'' r'""'" ■i""'^ Cf=;'^"-^r- 
tcac'i^r ednc t'on f::e?d. 

As you jiro: -ibly knov.' '• y nc.-', T a-' f ■.•';■ .1]y ; ari cf f- .■ P.. C 
tea." ir Ohio, Ho-'ever, t!:f? c'ran^.e has net cct'": "^b'lut '.■ri.t'.!~'-t "nnrl.l-'-itirn-: 
Rather thin 2cin^ into det-i?. - v;hich would u.'3e up '-.cr-T r:. rr-T tk'n •.•e 



have in stock ri "ht row - let r^e .'-av th.-.t ' 'e *^-ave ni^t ar. 



;!1-^ to 



off in: illy be^^in oprr-^tion. r^etv/cjr th.9 Clovol- id ?ca'"d '-f .viuoaticn 
and the Div::-;ion of jpeci:-.! iCiur.ation in C'0-."-.hr.'-, and tie r.il'.-r of r=d 
t^jpo " joiriin-3"the tv;o, '.-re ':v-.ve yet to I'e able to ^yr v-.d fu'^dr. for 
inservic? oxporionce.s, e-_'..r. nont, r.-!at -rials, and ot); r '-uch — archa::o"'' 
( H von s t •! t :. c n t? ry ) . 

I hav? hov/ever been v.">r ir;f; vnth our nuj ■■>nr"' -ors nnd con.-ultan'n 
in .'peci-,?. education and 1I.00 with :-o!ne of cur ''r:e ' un<^r d p"'-:-: tenc'v-rr 
V/e hor-,? to : r-.hl/i V^ reilly " t novin^' perhaps by the f:'rr.t of next 
v/eok. 

For the reason.'^ noted "hove, I hope "ou vv"'"'! ur'lerst-r.d '-.'hy I •■•■■z 
not 'b^e to dn as ruch '•■ri.th my lon^ ter>n ccntr''Ct a:; I ' '.d ■ r.nt'id to. 
The "D"s recorded on the shoe+ certainly -io not r^font any I-^ck nf 
inti^rest or ccncern. It is -ny hope to b^'.^n t'-^ beco:-'-^ rore 'nvolved ■.-'i th 
your center an I he/^-.n to smooth o\it the rou -.h ed^es of "v '^ erntlcn. 

Ry the :-'r-.y, T looked for you at the niiiC "'^et to£;et'-'?r" -^n :''riday 
ev'^ai:.,- •■■t t' <? 3hcrehar, I •••"i.s s-r.rry n')t t^' )--'.vci h'.d the '^;rcrtv-"ty 
to tali, v.'ith ,'0-1 t"^re. T did nee ".-ncy Car!' :r:n, trio'^h, ri«ai-.e s-'v "H'." 
t; h-^r fcr ro. 

T do appreci'.te the ."up;~ortj encoura 3 ^."'ent ar.d r" i "t '.i^ce "' h-ive 
r 'Ceived fro-: both y:.v. -m.'i the TiJU Center. It ha?? h--'"'. per! ■v.f' -; -rent 
de-'l in lockin.'^ teyond ry i-vnediate prov'ie--::: to v/hat our pro ■r.ar, '.vill 
( I hope!) be in tie future. 



"•incerely, 




(John J. Opperr.an 
Coordinator Ti'J'C 



A87 



FItCIl INKT ^ TIUfMKI: 

LOMAIN COUNTY ^M Lor»in |21B| 24*. 1668 

■ OARO OF EDUCATION mI '^'" 2«* 1«eO 

Elyrla (216) 322-4924 
(2161 322 1200 




'^;'i. 
-"»'^- 



MultJCounty 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

PregraiR Center 



West 3rii Street-Elyria, Ohio 44035 



February 25, 1972 



M.S.U. RIMC-HCY 
213 Erickson Hall 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 48823 

To All the Fine People at Your Center: 

As a participant in your In-service Workshop held February 
14, 15, 1972 I wish to extend my sincere appreciation as 
to how well it was handled. 

Your Workshop possessed all the qualities that anyone 
could ask for regarding the presentation, content, and 
evaluation. 

I was very pleased to attend. 



Sincerely, 



Wallace P. Coleman, Director 
Regional Special Education Center 

WPC/lcw 



488 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
G. H. Johnston. Superintendent 




DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

JOE E HOUOWAY, Director 
P O. Box 771 

JACKSON. MISS. 39205 

February 23, 1972 



Miss Sue Yovanovich 

USOE - MSU 

Regional Instructional Materials Center for 

Handicapped Children and Youth 
213 Erickson Hall 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 48823 

Dear Sue: 

You are to be congratulated on managing an excellent workshop. 
It was really a pleasure and a privilege to join you and the 
staff at the MSU - IMC. I am deeply in your debt, it was one 
of the best learning experiences I have had over these many 
years. Your managerial and leadership ability are quite evi- 
dent and although we heard tales of trouble behind the scene, 
it was not evident within the working of the workshop itself. 
The living quarters, the luncheon - everything was excellent, 
and I think I can speak for the other members of the group. 
We all enjoyed ourselves immensely and we learned an immeasur- 
able amount of workshopmanship. 

If in the future I can be of any service to you, please feel 
free to call me. It is most stimulating to work with a group 
such as yourselves; I came back to Mississippi with enthusiasm 
restored and am busy plotting and planning ways to improve our 
educational support systems here. 

I am looking forward to talking with you at CEC in Washington. 
Please save some time for me, unless my reservations are all 
fouled up I will be at the Park Sheraton. I think I am also 
tapped for time in the CEC booth. Now I am ready to whip off 
another proposal with the accompanying CRAM form, I guess the 
Feds want us to practice our cursive writing. 



489 



Miss Sue Yovanovich 

Page 2 

February 23, 1972 



Thank you again for including me in the workshop activities, 
They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks, but friend 
they are so wrong. See you in Washington! 



Affectionately , 

I 



fl.'flM 



(Mrs.) Mildred T. Rowland, Consultant 
Mississippi Learning Resources System 
Special Education Section 

MTR:cmb 



490 



State 



Indiana 



State Superintendent of Pubuc Instruction 
John J. Loughlin, Superintendent 

Room 229 • State Hou3C 
Area Code 3I7 ■ 633-66IO 




March 28, 1972 



INDIANAPOLIS 46204 

Robert J. Robertson, Consultant 
Northern Regional Center 
Division of Special Education 
635 S, Main St. 
South Bend, Indiana 46623 



Miss Sue Ann Yovanovich 

U. S. 0. E.-MSU 

Regional Instructional Material Center 

For Handicapped Children and Youth 

213 Erickson Hall 

Michigan State University 

East Lansing, Michigan 48823 

Dear Sue: 

Please forgive the delay in responding in writing re- 
garding the leadership workshop held in January at Michigan 
State University. The workshop was tremendous. I feel 
that it has done a great deal to help me-not only in terms 
of planning and implementing in-service workshops, but also 
in my daily routine as a Regional consultant. The workshop 
was well planned. There was a great deal of involvement by 
all the participants and it was enjoyable. The staff of 
the Regional Instructional Materials Center are commended 
for a job well done. 

Perhaps one of the greatest benefits I received from the 
workshop was the opportunity it presented me to interact and 
discuss similiar problems with the participants from other 
states, especially Ohio. Since the workshop, I have had 
contact with Tom Fisher, who has been especially helpful in 
providing our state with information about their financial 
reimbursement formula and the methodology they followed in 
securing adequate state funds for special education programs. 
Weston Orloff, from Mentor, Ohio, has also been helpful by 
providing me with specific information. 

Looking at my long term contact and those items that 
I checked, my general response is that I have, in fact, done 
everything that I indicated I would do, excluding sending 
a copy of my next workshop evaluation form (I will do this 
in the forseeable future as we have a three day workshop 
planned for May 3, 4, and 5 coming up. 



1 



491 



- 2 - 

Miss Yovanovich 



The workshop coordinating kit that you and Nancy 
designed for the motor perceptual training was recently 
utilized at a South Bend workshop and was reasonably 
successful. However, I had the feeling that the trainor 
utilizing the kit, tended to rush too much and that didn't 
allow appropriate time for the participants to complete the 
test. 

If it would be possible for you to meet with me at 
sometime during the first three weeks in April to discuss 
an upcoming workshop, it would be appreciated. There 
are numerous things that I would like to discuss with 
you relative to its implementation. 

I am looking forward to hearing from you. 

Sincerely, 

Robert J. Robertson 
Consultant 
Special Education 



RJR/as 



492 



.'^,'^(' : /--£', ^,.. 



^-^ -*> c_^ 



CENTRAL OHIO SPECIAL EDUCATION 
PROGRAM PLANNING and MATERIAL CENTER 



•,.^^ 



,^u: 



EHA-B 



February 28, 1972 

Regional Instructional Materials Center 
For Handicapped Children and Youth 
213 Erickson Hall 
Michigan State University- 
East Lansing, Michigan 48823 



ERMA B. THOMAS. DIRECTOR 

Instructional Resource Material Center 
2100 Prank Road 
Columbus, Ohio 43223 
Phone 276-8401 

FISCAL AGENT 
Southwestern City Schools 



Dear Lou and staff; 

I wish to express my sincere thanks to you for a 
most informative and well planned two day in- 
service training conference. As I expressed to 
you while there, I feel that more of these kinds 
of training sessions are needed. 

Looking forward to receiving answers to some of 
the requests which were made while in Lansing. 

Again thanks. 



Sincerely yours. 



2nyyyUl^ /Q. -^/JutT^t^CC-a^ 



Erma Thomas, Director 
IRMC 



rho^ 



BT/ma 



ROBERT C. CARLSON. DIRECtOR 

Central Ohio Program Planning Project 
52 Starling Street 
Columbus, Ohio 43215 
Phone : 463-9828 

FISCAL AGENT 

Franklin Co. Board of Education 



493 



THOM L. COOPER, DIRECTOR 

Fairtield-Pickaway Program Plannir>g Project 
710 North Broad Street 
Lancaster. Ohio 43130 
Phone 653-7119 

FISCAL AGENT 

Lancaster City Schools 



SERVING HANDICAPPED CHILDREN IN DELAWARE. FAIRFIELD, FRANKLIN. LICKING. MADISON. PICKAWAY, UNION COUNTIES 




EDUCATION 
CENTER 



Special Semces Difisioii 

March 9, 197<^ 



,J't^ 



Miss Sue Yovanovich 
USut/MSU HIMC-HCY 
dl^ Erickson Hall 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 48823 

Dear Sue: 

Please convey my thanks to all who were involved in the February 
l^-l^ workshop for the opportunity to be a participant. You've 
pulled off another smooth-running session which was packed with 
information and pointers in spite of the prearranged tirre schedule. 
In short, it was exactly what I had expected from you and the rest 
of the MSU HIMC staff. 

One of the pleasant surprises which I had not necessarily ex- 
pected was the contact I was able to establish with some of the 
IMC personnel in both Ohio and Michigan. Since I am not directly 
involved with these programs, I was unaware of the wealth of re- 
sources they themselves could be. Interaction with them provided 
not only the opportunity to discuss the processes involved in 
arranging teacher-training, but also the realization that many 
of them could serve in a consultant role on specific education 
problems. I am exploring with my school administration the pos- 
sibility of contacting a couple of the Ohio coordinators in par- 
ticular to serve in this capacity. 

The list of teacher training kits has given me several ideas for 
sessions I would like to schedule. From tiiat list, I would like 
to request initially Goals for Sducation^ ^IW ^712) and Designing 
w ^riterion Measures (IW '+710) . 

Sincerely, 



David Greenburg, Consultant 
Special Education Office 



494 



State 



Indiana 



State Superintendent of Public Instbuction 
JOHN J, LOUGHLIN 




INDIANAPOLIS 46204 



INS I Kl ( I lU.N MATFRKLS 1 1 \ 1 1 R 

U,i\ Idil, buiUr UriHcrMtv 

4(iiin Sunsci Ascnui 

liidijnapoli^. Indiana 4h2()8 

I'lioncliPi (.33-5259 



February 21, 1972 



Miss Sue Ann Yovanovlch 
USOE/MSU RIMC - HCY 
213 Erlckson Hall 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan ^8823 

Dear Sue: 

I want to thank you and the staff of the RIMC for the 
high-quality intensive workshop for in-service educators. 
The multiplier-effect of such workshops will assume that, 
eventually, all of Indiana's Special Educators will have the 
opportunity to attend workshops conducted by our newly de- 
fined core participants. 

Also, Sue, I thought you might like to know that the 
workshop on "Selection and Use of Instructional Materials" 
has been replicated at Hammond and will be replicated 
several times at Ball State University by workshop partici- 
pants . 

Sincerely, 



^Z/ ^^ 



Paul Ash, Coordinator 
Instructional Materials Center 



PA/md 



495 




INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCE CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN & YOUTH 



SAINT FRANCIS COLLEGE 

2701 SPRING STREET 

FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 46808 

PHONE 432-3551, EXT. 208 



February 21, 1972 



Sue Ann Yovanovich, Field Consultant - A 

and Coordinator of Humein Resources for Dissemination - li JJ 
USOE/MSU Regional Instructional Materials Center /V 
for Handicapped Children and Youth .f^K 

213 Erickson Hall M^ ^n 

Michigan State University / /^ 

East Lansing, Michigan 48823 




Dear Sue : 

First of all I'd like to congratulate you and the rest of 
the staff on a really fine workshop. I know /that all who attended 
^felt it was very worth while. 

Sue, I'll be conducting a workshop soon on instructional 
^ objectives and would like to borrow your kit that was shown 
^^ at the workshop: Workshop Coordinator Kit - "Toward an Under- 
Ij'l.stouiding of Instructional Objectives" by Ted Ward and 
y v^S. Joseph Levine. I believe there are three or four parts 
to it. Could you send this as soon as possible? 

Could you also send me eight copies of YOURS FOR A BETTER 
WORKSHOP by Ted & Joe? 




Thanks for your help. 



Sincerely, 




Robert E. Kritkausky, Coordinator 
Instructional Resource Center 



REK:kk 



A CoopcTitive Pngnin: IihUuu Ofilce of the StaU Supe 



496 



ucHon, E«»t AUen County SchooU. S»lnt FrtncuCoUefe 



State 



Indiana 




State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
JOHN J LOUGHLIN 





r^ .„- 

INDIANAPOLIS 46204 



c;iLBhRT A. BLITO.N, DIRECTOR 



OIVISION OK SPECIAL EDUCATION 

ROOM 108-STATEOFHCE BLDG. 

PHONE (317) 633-4763 






March 14, 1972 



Mrs. Lou Alonso, Director 

Regional Instructional Materials Center 

213 trickson Hall 

Michigan State University 

East Lansing, Michigan 48B23 

Dear Lou: 

Thank you for your letter of March 2, 1972. I was pleased that 
we had several persons in attendance at the recent workshop. I would 
be happy to review the letters from the workshop participants if it 
is not an inconvenience. I will also be looking forward to seeing 
the evaluation when it is completed. 



I am going' to try to make it to Lincoln in April 
you there. 

Sincerely, 



Hone to see 



S>^^ 



Gilbert A. Bliton, Director 
Division of Special Education 



GAB : s rm 



497 



Farmington Public Schools 

23450 MIDDLE8ELT ROAD 
FARMINGTON. MICHIGAN 48024 



THBODORC r. CUNIO 

JINftCTOR SPCCIAL EDUCATION 



DOUGLAS H SMITH 

"f»*VISOR -JPeCfAl. EDUCATION 



^RED W PAWKER 

t , UM Ht SOURCE CONSULTANT 



March C, 1YI2 



Miss Sue Ann ^. /anovich 

r ieid .. onsuit-:-.nt and Coordinator 

of Huinan Kesources "nr Disseminaticri 
21^ Frickscn !,aii 
Michigan State University 
fast Lansing, Micnigan h^tV.i 

Dear Sue : 

Upon reviewing the long term contract of the Leaieratup 
workshop, which, by the way, I feel was an excellent idea, I crjne upon 
an item discussing a profile to define inctiructional neeas. Although 
I did not check this item on the contract, I do feel it is an area 1 
would like to explore further. With a total of seventy teachers on 
different level? with different disability areas, •-, survey i -rm may 
not be effective. If you have any hints or suggesLi .sis , 1 woula 
appreciate hearing frcwi you. 

Possibly some of our colleagues may have devcinped an 
adequate survey form of how best to determine these neeir. 1 would like 
to have some survey material before school closes in June in order to 
spend the summer months planning for next year's in-servije. 

Once again, I felt the leadershij- workshop was a tremendous 
success. Thank you. 



FWP/mjv 



Sincerexy, 



1 



Fred W. Parker 

Curriculum Resource 'Jonsultant 



498 



farmington Public schools 

23430 MIDDLEBELT ROAD 
FARMINGTON, MICHIGAN 48024 



THEODORE F. CUNIO 

DIRECTOR SPECIAL EDUCATION 



DOUGLAS H SMITH 

SUPERVISOR SPECIAL EDUCATION 



FRED W. PARKER 

CURRICULUM RESOURCE CONSULTANT 



Februs.ry 21, 1972 



Mr. S. Joseph Levine 

Regional Instructional Materials Center 

for Handicapped Children and Youth 
State Departments of Education 
U30EA1SU 

Michigan State University 
213 Erickson Hall 
East Lansing, Michigan L(8823 

Dear Joe : 

Congratulations . The planning of the workshop was well done . 
The physical structure of the University Inn Motel worked well to keep the 
participants tuned in on the purpose of the workshop. I, for one, really 
enjoyed cortacting the out of state group and feel that we shoiild repeat such 
a combined workshop again. It was beneficial for me to meet people doing the 
same kind of work in different situations. 

I was particilarly interested ±n the instructional game - 
INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES - and hope to ijnplement it with the Special Education 
staff here in Farmington. Since I'm new at this teacher training role and hope 
to plan effective future workshops, the planning kit for planning workshops seems 
to be a valuable tool. I can see how useful it will be in designing the overall 
workshops. I felt the contract idea was a valuable one for me to adapt since 
it makes the participant responsible for his own ivolvement in the activities. 
The long-term contract is an excellent device to implement a commitment viiich 
will effect change . 

The evaluating portion of the February workshop was a helpful model 
to me. In order to have meaningful closure to a workshop, the contract and 
long-term contract ideas are excellent and I hope to use them both. Since my 
background in leadership and teacher training is weak, I was most appreciative 
of the reading list hand-out on Tuesday. 

I really enjoyed the two-day session and feel it deserves a repeat 
performance including the out-state folks. Possibly next year. 



Sincerely, 



tJ^L^ 



FWP/mjv 



Fred W. Parker 

Curriculum Resource Consultant 



499 



mniz of ^tssisstppi 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
G. H. Johnston, Superintendent 




DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

JOt E HOUOWAY, Oir.ctor 
P O Box 771 

JACKSON. MISS. 3B205 

February 23, 1972 



( 

I 
I 



Dr. Joe Levine and Dr. Ted Ward 

USOE - MSU 

Regional Instructional Materials Center for 

Handicapped Children and Youth 
213 Erickson Hall 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 48823 

Dear Joe and Ted : 

You and your co-workers and staff at the IMC Center are to be commended 
for the excellent teacher-trainer workshop you conducted on February 14 
and 15. I have attended many workshops over the years and I can state 
without reservation that this was one of the best learning experiences 
I have been privileged to participate in. The material you presented is 
pertinent and useable and I shall put it to practical use here in the 
state of Mississippi. I am in your debt. 



I 



As I stated in my contract, I will keep in touch with you regarding the 
progress I am making with the workshops and use of your materials here 
in Mississippi. Any adaptations or modifications that I use in this state 
I will forward to you for your information. 

I am most impressed with your guidelines for the leader of in-service 
education, YOU ARE . . . I can say sincerely that you have covered every 
base. It is one of the most comprehensive guidelines I have seen to date, 
and I think others in the field will view at in the same manner. It is 
nice to know such talented people. 

I am enclosing a copy of our remediation workbook that was developed out 
of our Developmentally Delayed Workshop for your perusal. We will be 
field testing this product for one year in the classrooms using thirty- | 
five teachers employed in different sections in the state. At the end 
of the year we will compile the corrections and additions and hopefully 
put this into production. We think we have covered all bases, but you 
never know. 



500 



Dr. Joe Levine and Dr. Ted Ward 

Page 2 

February 23, 1972 

Thank you for including me in your workshop. The people that you are 
working with in your three state area are excellent, and it was a very 
stimulating experience. I am looking forward to working with you in 
the future. 

Sincerely yours, , 

(Mrs.) Mildred T. Rowland, Consultant 
Special Education Section 
Mississippi Learning Resources System 

MTR : cmb 

Enclosure 



501 



#1 of 2 



IN-SERVICE EDUCATION PLANNING FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



Request received from: Mich. Div. of Sp. Ed. - Jane Walline 
Analysis of request by: Levine & Ward 



Plan designed by: Levine & Ward 



Who are the trainees? Curriculum Resource Consultants 



How many? 30 



What is the mission? To prepare participants to conduct in-service trainin g 
with teachers (train participants in use of 12 training kits) 

Time available? 1 week 



Date: June 1I+-I8, 1971 



Location: East Lansing, Michigan 



What objectives can be achieved? Play roles of participant and leader of 

in-service education experiences. Develop skills of leadership and 

an \inder Stan ding of the affective aspects of the leader's role. 

What instructional materials? Eleven in-service education kits including 
one kit leading to independent design of in-service education workshop 
experience. 

What procedures? 3 days of intense involvement, preparing to present 

experiences to one another in simulation of in-service workshops. 



What evaluation? Prepared written form to assess participant preferences, 

Also, provide opportunity for feedback re: participants' perception of 

achieved objectives. 

502 



9/71 



#1 of 2 
IN-SERVICE EDUCATION REPORT FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 

Request originally received from: Mich. Dept. of Education - Jane Walline 

Date: ^^^ l^-l8, 1971 ' 

Location: University Inn, East Lansing 

Analysis of in-service program hy: Yovanovich 



Who were the trainees? Prospective Curriculum Resource Consultants 



How many? 30 



What was the mission? To prepare participants to conduct in-service training 
with teachers (train participants in use of 12 training kits ) 

Amount of time used: 1 week (see attached program) 



What objectives were achieved? Played roles of participant and leader of 

in-service education experiences. Developed skills of leadership and 

an understanding of the affective aspects of the leader's role. 

How were these objectives measured? Written evaluation; tape recording of 
discussion on "How to Conduct a Workshop" 

What existing instructional materials were used? 



What materials were specially-designed? Tape for "Yours for a Better Workshop" 
11 kits (see attached) 



Comments : Verbal feedback of participants indicated that they felt thev had 
developed self-confidence and expertise in conducting workshops and as a result 
of the week's training, felt mo re secure in their role a.R an in-service educator. 

503 



SPECIAL STUDY INSTITUTE 
'In-Service Techniques & Methods for Curriculum Resource Consultants" 

June 14-18, 1971 



INSTITUTE EVALUATION 
The following evaluation is designed to provide us feedback regarding your 
reactions to this Institute. The results of this evaluation will assist us in 
planning future Institutes of this nature. (Please be candid in your remarks.) 



1) Please rate each of the training kits in terms of their INTEREST to you. 
Check the appropriate blank after each title. 



1. Designing an Instructional Game 

2. Defining Objectives for the 

Teaching of Concepts 

3. Designing Criterion Measures 

4. Learners' Approaches to Learning 

5. Goals for Education 

6. Designing Objective-Oriented 

Instruction 

7. Focus on Feedback 

8. Building a Perceptual -Motor 

Experience 



Mery Not 

Interesting Interesting Interesting 



23 



18 

17 



22 



19 



17 



17 






10 



10 



_2L 



2) a. How much did you know about in-service training procedures prior to 
this Institute? Check the appropriate blank. 

2 Considerable Amount 



10 Moderate Amount 



13 Small Amount 
4 Nothing 



504 



SPECIAL STUDY INSTITUTE June 14-18, 1971 



b. How much do you feel you now know about in-service training pro- 
cedures? Check the appropriate blank. 

19 Considerable Amount 



10 Moderate Amount 

Small Amount 

Nothing 



3) Have you conducted in-service training workshops prior to the Institute? 

15 Yes 14 No 
If yes, did the Institute assist in clarifying workshop procedures? 
15 Yes ]_ No 

4) When you return to your own locality you will be expected to offer in- 
service training to teachers. How comfortable do you feel about carry- 
ing out that training? 

7 Very Comfortable 



22 Comfortable 
Not Comfortable 



Comments : 
5) a. What training kit did you lead? 18_ 



b. What training kit did you co-lead? 12_ 



c. What training kit did you evaluate? 18_ 



6) Would you please write a short statement regarding what you feel were the 
objectives that we had for this Institute. (Complete sentences are not 
necessary--an outline, short sentences, statements, etc. are sufficient.) 



505 



SPECIAL STUDY INSTITUTE June 14-18, 1971 



■3- 



7) Please rate each of the training kits in terms of their IMPORTANCE to 
the teachers you work with. Check the appropriate blank after each 
activity. 



1. Designing an Instructional Game 

2. Defining Objectives for the 

Teaching of Concepts 

3. Designing Criterion Measures 

4. Learners' Approaches to Learning 

5. Goals for Education 

6. Designing Objective-Oriented 

Instruction 

7. Focus on Feedback 

8. Building a Perceptual -Motor 

Experience 



Very Not 

Important Important Important 



19 
21 



20 



23 



22 



25 



19 



11 



10 



10 



14 



8) General Comments : 



506 



Responses to Question Four 



Question: When you return to your own locality, you will te expected to 
offer in-service training to teachers. How comfortable do 
you feel about carrying out that training? 



VERY COMFORTABLE 



COMFORTABLE 

22 

"I have a better idea of organization and the direction of specific 
goals which must be developed." 

NOT COMFORTABLE 



507 



Responses to Question Six 



Question: Would you please write a short statement regarding what you feel 
were the objectives that we had for this institute. (Complete 
sentences are not necessary — an outline, short sentences, state- 
ments, etc. are sufficient.) 



The main objective that I see is preparing for workshops by learning 
various in-service training procedures. The 8 kits did a good job in 
setting the stage for this institute. A little social life was also 
acquired through "Great Western" and "Jim and Jean." Thanks for a busy, 
helpful, enjoyable week. 



1. Planning 

2. Organization 

3. Flexibility 
h. Frustration 



The process by which one can teach a group the various processes, 
methods, materials needed to improve instruction. 



1. How to conduct a workshop 

2. Help trainees feel comfortable in conducting workshops 

3. Development of kits through process procedures using products 



To prepare selected persons to conduct workshops 

Define your goals and objectives of teaching in meaningful way 

Leadership experiences 

Organization 

Methods or techniques of group conduct 

People working with people who work with younger people 



To understand process of: 

1. Developing kits 

2. Developing concepts with concrete examples 

3. How to work successfully with groups 
k. Getting output with teachers 



To actively participate in and observe the process of conducting in-ser- 
vice workshops 



508 



I 



-2- 



The objectives were to: 

1. Give participants a better understanding of the mechanics 
of preparing an in-service training meeting 

2. Give participants an experience in conducting such a meeting 
so that they could be more comfortable as well as competent 

— Necessity for good structixring ahead of a workshop 

— Responsibilities of leadership in same 

— Need for evaluation to see if objectives of workshop were reached 



1. Refine the writing of goals and objectives 

2. Demonstrate the participant involvement in a workshop 

3. Give practical experience in the conducting of a workshop 
k. Have participants design and use a workshop 



— Preparing, structure, informal views, of a workshop 
— Interaction, leadership tips, do by experience 
— Improve one ' s own teaching techniques 



1. Understand and try to use techniques of the kits 

2. Understand process rather than outcomes 



— To prepare this group to assume CRC role in their local area. 
Methods, techniques, modes, do's - don't 's - provide experiences 
and develop some skills in teaching teachers. 



— Show a variety of methods in handling sessions/problems that may 
occur and techniques we could use to keep session along line of ob- 
jectives 

— Provide basic materials with which to begin with 



Need for: objectives, planning, skills, good evaluation, in any 
leadership role 



To indoctrinate us with the fundamentals of good leadership practices 
and policies, to expose us to some actual practice and application and 
an experience in structuring some worthwhile project(s) for presentation. 



Training procedures for during workshops 

Awareness of need for planning and awareness of objectives 
Experience with kits and learning by doing and sharing experiences 
Self-evaluation of own goals, methods, etc. 



509 



■3- 



I feel the primary objective was for participants to become familiar 
with the processes involved in training programs. 

Skills in evaluation techniques, feedback utilization and goals em- 
phasis were sharpened. I believe I am better able to critically evaluate 
and better prepared to lead workshops. 



— To provide us with knowledge on how to develop workshops and carry- 
out workshops 

— To provide us with kits or knowledge which teachers have a general 
lack of 

— To develop people to fill the CRC role 



Training of teachers in the proper methods of in-service education 
Proper methods in conducting effective workshops 



— Emphasis for process-thinking throiigh the process involved to reach 

an objective 

— Help us to be more effective in working with others 

— Help us become more aware of the reactions of others while we are in 

a leadership role 

a) Being exposed to procedures in presenting an inservice training session 

B) Being shown our own weaJcnesses and strengths by actually taking a 
leadership role 

C) Having concrete materials with which we can use in our home areas 

D) a brief exposure to how we can plan and devise our own materials 



Having people work in activity groups. They were to reach their own 
ideas of various concepts in education. We saw the pitfalls of leading 
a group and gaining help in knowing how to do this with the least blunders. 
The concept is the important thing — not the activity. We were being 
trained to hold institutes, as well as innovative creators of activities 
to be given in helping the teacher (learn how to work out a prescription 
when there is a need.) 



— For us to experience leadership role and problems that would be en- 

covintered conducting workshops 
— Different aspects that sho\ild be considered in planning workshops 



1. To prepare a group of people to structure and conduct training experi- 
ences for others . 

2. To demonstrate the effectiveness of utilizing activities to reach ob- 
jectives. Involvement vs. Passivity. 

3. To structiore a learning situation in which all participants must 
contribute. We had to act I 

510 



-k- 



1. To help the curriculum resource consultant become skillful in 
helping teachers to use their creative techniques in designing, 
producing and evaluating instructional materials and techniques. 

2. To clarify the realization of teaching goals and objectives 

3. To help CRC's to help teachers to more clearly plan educational 
goals and objectives to meet specific pupil needs. 

k. To help CRC's to make workshop procedures more effective in actively 
involving people in in-service workshops — to help them do and not 
just be done for , such as passing out lists, carting materials to 
them, etc. 

5. To help us to realize our needs for improvement of our leadership 
skills (CRC's). 

6. To motivate us to plan workshops (CRC's) 



— Clarify our way of thinking 
— To prepare us to teach teachers 

— To be aware of needs of those with whom we will be dealing 
— To be certain we ourselves are familiar of terms — correct 
definition to avoid confusion — goals; concepts; objectives. 



1. Exposiire to variety of approaches useful in planning and carrying 
out a workshop (observations of leaders) 

2. Experience in using kits as a tool in workshops — becoming familiar 
with structure 

3. Experience in playing roles — opportunity to react to these roles 

h. Opportunity to plan and have evaluated some of our own ideas (kit 12) 
5. Exposure to experiences that would help us \mderstand how we affect 
children in a classroom situation. 



— Realization of planning necessary 

— Self-evaluation 

— Participation 

— Methods of leadership 

— Adaptability and flexibility 



511 



Responses to Question Eight 
Question: General Comments 



— Despite the pressure of the week, I felt that the workshop was 
well prepared and extremely valuable to me. Looking back I can 
see the value of what we have covered but there was some negative 
feedback on the part of a leader that developed an attitude of 
rebellion which may have gotten in the way in terms of wanting to 
participate. 



— I need time to assimilate all the impressions and experiences. It 
has been a stimulating week — very practical. I admire and appreciate 
all the work that went into planning and putting on the workshops. 



— More clearly defined perspective role of CRC. 

— Tremendous amoiint of information presented in short period of time 
— A most profitable workshop — well planned- structured 
— One that has not been complete but had stimulated us to continue 
and digest information we have received 



— The whole workshop was a very important experience for me. I am 

highly motivated to go back home and become more involved with 

helping my teachers to help children . 
— My growth in leadership skills will be promoted because of this 

workshop '. 
— This workshop will help me also in the leadership of parents, civic 

leadership, etc. 



1. I have never had to "put out" so much, nor have ever derived as 
much; 

2. Perhaps the ineffectiveness of some of the kits to "turn me on" 
was not due to the kit as much as due to the ineffectiveness of 
presentation; 

3. I would hope to be fractionally as effective as Ward & Levine and 
I would be doing a good job. 



-In another institute perhaps looking at the time schedule would 
be beneficial in terms of the last day perhaps winding it up by 
noon instead of afternoon. 



We worked very hard, but it was just the way I wanted it. Why put 
in this time if we weren't going to gain. I surely did'. 



This is no doubt the busiest workshop I ever attended, but probably 
the most productive. I felt the materials presented were pertinent 
and will be useful in the coming year. 



512 



-2- 



Excellent I 

Well planned 

Interesting 

Not idealistic 

Outstanding leadership staff 



— One of the most valuable contributions of this workshop has been 
the clearer definition of the roles that a leader assumes. 

— Awareness of the roles and of some basic interaction processes 
that occur within the group setting has been most valuable. 

Well-planned, interesting, stimulating and worthwhile experience. 

Feeling that some kits are more useful than others — or more practical- 
or easier to use. I feel that I can utilize the basic kit but revise 
it for better use with other teachers. All had value, but not equal 
value as far as implementation with the regular rixn of teachers 



We needed to have some of the pressure relieved on Wednesday. It 
took too long to get pulled back together. 

One of the best planned institutes I have ever attended. I am going 
away with a great deal of knowledge/material that I am eager to try. 



Excellent workshop for me for a variety of reasons. I needed to have 
ideas/concepts refreshed before entering my new job in the Fall. 



I'm new to this area — shy, withdrawn, etc. I feel I gained experience, 
practice in the mechanics of the techniques and an opportunity to com- 
pare my personality and skills with others who will do or have done 
this kind of activity. I feel comfortable now in making a start in 
my school district. 



1. Please try to keep the evening free from any planned structure. 

2. I liked the structure in this institute as others did not seem to 
be as smoothly rxxn. 

3. Good job. 



I do appreciate the planning that went into the workshop. Most of 
the kits I can use. 



It's been a good week — busy, but informative. 



513 



-3- 



I thought this was an extremely valuable and practical workshop — 
I appreciated the structure and feel I am going home with a great 
deal more ability to lead inservice and that's what I came fori 



I think this workshop was exceptionally well planned and the leaders 
were very effective in holding the group to the purposes for which 
the workshop had been planned. A good example to follow. 



Ted and Joe, yoiir idea to use a tape to brief us on the institute 
was clever. It made me more aware of the many uses of the tape re- 
corder. The kits, in my opinion, were well-written — it was easy for 
the leaders to follow the intended purpose . 

One of the best workshops I have ever attended. 



— Extremely valuable institute 

— Kit 12 — not particularly worthwhile 

— Could have used a break mid-week 

— Would definitely rate overall effectiveness of weeks work as HIGHl 



— This has been an excellent workshop. It was well-planned and organized. 
Participants were involved to the degree that they did not become bored. 
The most important aspect of the Institute is that we now have some 
knowledge in the development of workshop kits and that we have specific 
kits with which to conduct in-service training. 



1) Staff tend to get into ruts, and some would change if given the right 
motivation. 

2) Part of our staff are para-professionals — are in need of all the help 
they can get. 



This was my first institute which is probably why I feel I got so much 
from the experience. I feel although you worked our tails off, it 
was so well structured I really felt like actively participating in each 
session. Your parties were great. 



51A 



SPECIAL STUDY INSTITUTE 

"Resources For Effective Teaching" 

June 14-18, 1971 
East Lansing, Michigan 





Participants 




Mr. 


Russel L. Andreotti 


Mrs 


Mrs, 


, Blanche G. Benwire 


Mr. 


Mrs. 


, Evelyn L. Burde 


Mr. 


Mr. 


Charles Crowley 


Mrs 


Mrs, 


. Mary Lou Durbin 


Mrs 


Mrs, 


. Beverley J. Farr 


Mrs 


Mrs, 


. Janet Fortenbacher 


Mrs 


Mrs, 


. Margaret C. Goldthorpe 


Mr. 


Mrs. 


. Olive Hansen 


Mrs 


Mrs, 


. Eleanor D. Haroldson 


Mrs 


Mr. 


Robert Hemming 


Mr. 


Mr. 


William S. Jones 


Mr. 


Mrs, 


. Linda L. Kalin 


Mrs 


Mr. 


Norman R. MacDonald 


Mr. 


Mrs, 


. Lois Marcy 





, Ruth McGregor 

Roy A. Montroy 

Fred W. Parker 
. Florence E. Patrick 
. Geneva Reid 
. Mary Ann Sund 
. Peggy S . Tenney 

James M. VanTassel 
. Patricia Vivio 
. Gail Wiemer 

Lyle Williams 

Larry C. Wilson 
. Elizabeth Wing 

John Peter Zsolczai 



515 



#2 of 2 
IN-SERVICE EDUCATION PLANNING FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



Request received from: Mich. Special Ed. Div. - Jane Walline 
Analysis of request by : Ward 



Plan designed by: Levine & Ward 



Who are the trainees? Curriculum Resource Consultants 



How many? 30 



What is the mission? Follov-up session to June.. 1971 Institute 



Time available? 1 day - 10:00 am to 3:00 pm. 

Date: Oct. 29, 1971 

Location: East Lansing, Michigan 

What objectives can be achieved? Identify and describe problems in role of 
Curriculum Resource Consultant. Propose solutions (from experience) for 
one another ' s problems . 



What instructional materials? New instructional game: "Problems & Hints" 
New booklet: "Yours for a Better Workshop" 

What procedures? Sharing and proposing solutions: examining new booklet; 

culmination in group-work reports as tape-recorded suggestions for a 

training tape to supplement the booklet. 

What evaluation? Assess amount of involvement in anticipated role of 

Curriculum Resource Consultant, in terms of numbers of workshops held and 

number of teachers affe cted. 

516 



9/71 



#2 of 2 

IN-SERVICE EDUCATION REPORT FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



Request originally received from: Mich. Sp. Ed. Div. - Jane Walline 
Date: 10/29/71 



Location : Union Building. MSU. E. Lansing 



Analysis of in-service program by: Yovanovich 



Who were the trainees? Curriculum Resource Consultants 



How many? 30 



What was the mission? Follov-up session to June 1971 workshop. 



Amount of time used: 1 day - 10 am to 3 pm 



What objectives were achieved? Identified and described problems in role of 
Curriculum Resource Consultant. Proposed solutions (from experience) for one 
another's problems. 

How were these objectives measured? Written evaluation; tape recording of 
reactions; discussion 

What existing instructional materials were used? Booklet compile^ from tape 
made at June workshop - "Yours for a Bet-ter Workshop" 

What materials were specially-designed? "Problems & Hints" 



Comments: ^ee attached follow-up evaluation summary 

517 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
\L CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



i.ii(>fia"ir*H U '»' -.1^1*- f tep-HliTii'-i- ..1 l.lui dim 



EVALUATION 

Curriculum Resource Consultant 
Summer Institute 1971 

Follow-Up Meeting October 29, 1971 

Participants in the 1971 Curriculum Resource Consultant Sutmer Institute 
were asked to respond to questions prepared by the Michigan State University 
Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth. The 
responses were tabulated during a follow-up workshop held at the MSU Union 
Building on October 29. The information contained in this report then, was 
based on approximately eight weeks of work in the jobs these people presently 
are holding. Of the 30 participants in the Summer Institute, a total of 21 
responses were received. 

Summarized information is as follows: 

1. 15 of 21 persons had conducted one or more in-service training 
programs. A total of 3_1. in-service training programs were 
conducted by these 13 persons since attending the sumner 
institute. 

These 31 in-service training programs were 
attended by approximately 885 people. The 
breakdown is as follows: 

Special Education teachers: 461 

Regular teachers: 241 

Parents: 57 

Para-professionals: 76 

University students: 35 

Student teachers: 12 

Administrators: 3 



20 of 21 had discussed with their administrators how they might 
function in the area of in-service training in their district 
or area. 



X rvi;c 



518 

— bpec>4t tducilion Nerw.wk- Bvtt»u al fduCilion (of th* H*nd.i»OP«l - l' ^ t)4fK:e ol Idotalmn - An (qojl Opportun.lv t mplo 



-2- 



3. In response to the question: "Which kits do you feel will work 
the best?", five persons did not respond; therefore, the following 
rank order is based on responses from 16 persons. The number of 
responses and the percentage of responses relating to any one 

kit are given also. Each of these kits is a self-contained 
teacher-training workshop kit. 

1. Kit #1: Designing An Instructional Game 

(10 responses = 20.47„) 

2. Kit #5: Goals For Education (8 responses = 16.3?o) 

3. Kit #2: Defining Objectives For The Teaching Of 

Concepts (7 responses = 14.37„) 

4. Kit #6: Designing Objectives-Oriented Instruction 

(6 responses = 12.27,,) 

Kit #8: Building a Perceptual-Motor Experience 
(6 responses = 12.27,) 

5. Kit #7: Focus on Feedback (5 responses = 10.27,) 

6. Kit #4: Learners Approaches to Learning 

(4 responses = 8.27,) 

7. Kit #3: Designing Criterion Measures 

(3 responses = 6.127o) 

The participants were presented with a total of eight different 
kits and all of these were selected at some level of "working 
best." Since no single kit received a great percentage of the 
responses, it is assumed that the selection of the kits met the 
different needs of the participants. 

4. Nineteen persons answered the questions about their present 
employment: 

3 indicated they are currently employed as a CRC. 

5 indicated they are NOT currently employed as a CRC, 
(2 expect to be, and 3"would like" to be). 

8 indicated they did not plan on becoming a CRC, but do 
expect to conduct at least 3 in-service training programs 
each year. 

1 indicated no plans for becoming involved In conducting 
In-service training programs. 

2 indicated by question marks that they were not sure where 
th^ catagorically "fit." 



519 



-3- 



In discussing the three most VALUABLE aspects of the institute, 
the comments have been broken down into four general areas: 
participative experiences; delivery system; affective components; 
follow-up . 

A. The one valuable aspect mentioned most often (i.e., 
21 times by those responding) related to how those 
attending the institute viewed themselves as 
participants . Their comments pertained to on-going 
daily active involvement during the institute; the chance 
to individually plan and present a kit; and the 
utilization of workshop techniques. 

Closely associated were positive comments pertaining 
to feedback sessions, including discussions both on 
the group experience itself and on individual presen- 
tations. (Four comments related to this.) 



The aspect mentioned second most often was how those 
responding viewed the delivery system including organi- 
zation and institute staff . Nine comments appreciated 
the availability of the kits themselves and an additional 
six comments highlighted the effective aspects of the 
Institute itself (i.e. planning and preparation , pacing , 
achievement of goals . and leadersh ip techniques .) 



Ttie third valuable aspect centered around affective 
components : Participants felt that it was valuable 
to meet others wi th similar concerns , to have had 
experiences that assisted in building self-confidence 
and to be motivated in what they were doing. 



The last statement: "I would like to see the following areas of 
focus for another summer institute", was handled primarily during 
a discussion period at the follow-up meeting. 



On the reaction form, six of the respondents had indicated that they would 
like to see more kits developed as one area of focus. The majority of the 
remaining suggestions for areas of focus pertained to content areas (such as 
junior-senior high, behavior modification, etc.). The Institute staff did an on- 
the-spot tabulation of these suggestions and grouped them. (As listed on the 
following page.) The participants were then asked to vote for the three topic 
areas of most concern for which they would like to see kits developed. 



520 



-4- 



AREA OF CONCERN 

1. Identification and remediation of 

specific learning disabilities 

2. Classroom and pupil -- group 

management and dynamics 

3. Models for organization of individualized 

instruction 

4. Procedures for the "regular" classroom 

teacher of a handicapped child 

5. Motivation techniques 

6. Problems in teaching reading 

7. Problems related to Junior-Senior High 

--academic discrepancies 
— behavioral discrepancies 



NUMBER OF VOTES 



15 



14 

11 

10 

6 
2 



0* 
3 



*Although mentioned as an area of concern on the reaction form, this 
area received no votes, therefore, could be conaidered low priority. 



Nine of the respondents mentioned in various ways that they would like 
to see the focus on specific group management techniques, with participants 
becoming more skilled in various strategies of leadership techniques. 
(Suggested strategies: sensitivity training, soft and hard sell approaches, 
group dynamics, Taba strategies, changing attitudes, motivational methods). 
During the discussion period, it appeared that most participants agreed this 
should be another focus. 



Two persons mentioned that more discussion time during an institute would 
be helpful--e8pecially if there were fewer kits. 

A few comments relating to "more kit 12" (the kit the participants them- 
selves designed, produced, presented and evaluated) were felt to indicate a 
desire for more practice. 



521 



The discussion period brought forth the suggestion that it would be 
helpful to have training in techniques of how to adapt materials and strategies 
for all types of handicapped children in special and regular classrooms. It 
was felt that such expertise might then be shared with the classroom teacher 
of the handicapped child. 



NAC: rh 



522 



REACTION FORM 



1) Have you conducted an in-service training program since the 
sutimer Institute? 

Yes No 



If yes, how many? (Circle) 12 3 4 5 



2) Have you discussed with your administrator (s) the part you might 
play in in-service training for special education teachers in 
your district or area? 

Yes No 



3) Which kits do you feel will work the best? 

1. 

2. 

3. 

4) Please check the most appropriate blanks . 

I am currently employed as a CRC. 

I am NOT currently employed as a CRC, but expect 

to be in the near future. 
I do not play on becoming a CRC, but expect to 

conduct at least 3 in-service training programs 

each year. 
I do not plan on becoming involved with conducting 

in-service training programs . 

5) The three most valuable aspects of the summer Institute were: 

1. 
2. 
3. 



6) I would like to see the following areas of focus for another 
Sumner Institute: 

1. 

2. 

3 523 



IN-SERVICE EDUCATION PLANNING FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR PiANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



Request received from: Indiana Div. of Spec. Ed. - Paul Ash 
Analysis of request by: Yovanovich 



Plan designed by: Levine and Ward 



Who are the trainees? Spec. Ed. Directors (or appointed supervisor): 
University Personnel; State Dept. Consultants 



How many? 60 



What is the mission? orientation session for series of 3 in-service 
training sessions 



Time available? 2 hours 



Location: Indianapolis, Indiana 



Date: Oct. 27, 1971 



What objectives can be achieved? (l ) To introduce prospective trainers to 
role & responsibility of an in-service trainer of teachers: (2) to develop 
an awareness of problems which may be encountered. 

What instructional materials? 



New Instructional Game - "Problems and Hints" 



What procedures? Paul Ash, state IMC Coor. . will discuss participants' fntn-r p 
responsibility; conduct "Problems & Hints" and discuss purposes of future 
workshops and roles of Indiana teacher-trainers . 

What evaluation? Assess amount of involvement in anticipated role of 

teacher-trainer , in terms of workshops held and number of teachers affected 

(Written evaluation to be done 2 months after completion of series) 

524 



9/71 



SAY 



#1 of k 
IN-SERVICE EDUCATION REPORT FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 

Request originally received from: Indiana Div. of Spec. Ed. - Pfl.ii1 Ash 

Date : 10/27/71 

Location: Indianapolis, Ind. 

Analysis of in-service program by: Sue Ann Yovanovich 



Who were the trainees? Special Ed. Directors (or appointed supervisors ) ^ 

State Dept. regional consultants 

How many? 27 

What was the mission? Orientation session for series of 3 in-service training 
sessions 

Amount of time used: 2 hours 



What objectives were achieved? (l) Introduced prospective trainers to role & 
responsibility of an in-service trainer of teachers; (2) developed an awareness 
of problems which may be encountered 

How were these objectives measured? Through discussion and use of "Problems & 
Hints" 

What existing instructional materials were used? 



What materials were specially-designed? "Problems & Hints" 



Comments : Was very successful in that it stimulated interaction & discussion 
among participants; verbal feedback indicated that participants, at end of sess ion, 

felt more self-confident in their role as a teacher-trainer. 

525 



State 



Indiana 



State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
JOHN J. LOUGHLIN 






INDIANAPOLIS 46204 



INSTRUCTION MATERIALS CENTER 

Box 100, Butler University 

4600 Sunset Avenue 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46208 
J , Phone(317)633-5259 / / //V 

r^ ^ (P^,,u:..j67£^ JLy^y^''^ c/-.^*-<i^l4' 




I hope you found the Pre-Workshop Orientation of Octob er 27, 
1971 an informative introduction to the future workshops 

The next meeting will be on November 17, 1971 at 511 '^th 
Street, Huntingburg, Indiana. This meeting, on Design and Use of 
Instructional Objectives, will begin at 9:30 a.m. and end approxi- 
mately U:30 p.m. You may wish to send a fellow member of your 
staff should you be unable to attend this meeting. 

PARTICIPANTS OF THE PRE-WORKSHOP ORIENTATION 



NAME 

Joan Beghtel 

Valeria DeLaughter 
- — &-1 en T ay 1 o r 

Ron Schepp 

James R. Alley 

Paul F. Hooker, Jr. 

&©b Kritkausky 
■ — Josephine K. Mosby 
— William Kruzan 

Mary Kelly 

Vera Pitts 

— Laura Doeden 
—Donna Palacios 

John Robinson 
Jerry Keener 
— -&eb Robertson 

— Carol We Her 

— Jack Cripe 
Harold W. Wallace 
Ben Morgan 

Dave Greenburg 
Mike Haley 
Seulah Canfield 
Beverly V. Wart 
— Paul Ash 
Gaj^i^*Vorth 
Jeanne Tibbie 



SCHOOL CORPORATION 



Wabash Miami 
Manchester Co 
D.P.I. 
D.P.I. 

Elwood-Tipton 
South Bend 
I.R. C. 

Diagnostic Te 
Huntington Co 
Indpls . Publi 
Shelbyville 
Marshall-Star 
Goshen Comm. 
Bloomington 
Bloomingt on 
D.P.I . 
I.R. C. 

Warsaw Public 
Muncie Comm. 
Indianapolis 
Indianapoli s 
Logansport 
Barthol . Cons . 
Barthol . Cons . 
D.P.I. 
New Castle 
Hammond 



Program 
mm. Schls 



ach. Center 
. Comm. Schls 
c Schls. 

ke Service 
Schools 



Schls . 
Schools 



Schl . Corp , 
Schl.Corp, 



CITY 
Wabash 

North Manchester 
Huntington 
Indianapolis 
Elwood 
South Bend 
Fort Wayne 
Indianapolis 
Huntington 
Indianapolis 
Shelbyville 
Plymouth 
Goshen 
Bloomington 
Bloomington 
South Bend 
Fort Wayne 
Wars aw 
Muncie 

Indi anapolis 
Indianapolis 
Logansport 
Columbus 
Columbus 
Indi anapolis 
New Castle 
Hammond 



Please contact me if you have q^uestions concerning the 
future workshops. 

Sincerely , 



PA/md 



526 



Paul Ash, Coordinator 
Instructional Materials Center 



Ifh of hr 



IN-SERVICE EDUCATION FLAMING FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



Request received from: Indiana Div. of Spec. Ed. - Paul Ash 
Analysis of request by: Yovanovich 



Plan designed by : Levine, Ward & Carlson 



Who are the trainees? Sp. Ed. Directors (or appointed supervisors); 

University Personnel; State Dept. Consultants 

How many? 60 

What is the mission? To train participants in use of in-service Series #VII 
"Selection & Use of Commercially-Available Materials" 



Time available? 1 day - 8:30 am to U:30 pm 



Date: Jan. 19, 1972 



Location: Indianapolis, Indiana 



What objectives can be achieved? To develop an understanding of the criteri a 
needed to evaluate instructional materials. To be able to relate informa- 
tion about selected assessment procedures to other teachers. 

What instructional materials? 1. Evaluation Game (Activity); 2. Slide 
Presentation (Commercially available measuring devices); 3. Issues and 
Answers (Activity); h. Teachers & Teaching (Activity) 

What procediires? Large group presentation and small group activities. 



What evaluation? Written evaluation, participant reaction to activities 
and reaction to Indiana "series" of training sessions. 



527 



9/71 



«h of It 
IN-SERVICE EDUCATION REPORT FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



Request originally received from: Indiana Div. of Spec. Ed. - Paul Ash 
Date :__1/19/T2 



Location: Indianapolis, Indiana 



Analysis of in-service program by: Yovanovich 



Who were the trainees? Special Ed. Directors (or appointed supervisors); 

University personnel; State Dept. regional consultants 

How many? 27 

What was the mission? To train participants in use of in-service Series #VII 

"Selection & Use of Commercially-Available Materials" 

Amount of time used: 1 day - 9=30 am to 3:30 pm 



What objectives were achieved? Developed an understanding of the criteria neede d 
to evaluate instructional materials, and ability to relate information about 
selected assessment procedures to other teachers. 

How were these objectives measured? Written evaluation; tape-recording of 
discussion; pictures 



What existing instructional materials were used?_ 
#1 Evaluation Game 



What materials were specially-designed? ff^ - Slide Presentation (Commercially 
Available Measuring Devices); §3 Issues and Answers 

Comments : Didn't use last activity ("Teachers and Teaching") - many participan ts 

left after lunch and others kept drifting away. 

528 



January 19, 1972 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Very 

Interesting 


la 


herestiriK 


In* 


not 

ereatln/? 

,0 


9 
_ 6 




9 
9- 





2 



IN-SERVICfi WORKSHOP ^VALU/VTIOM 
"Selection and Evaluation of Cor.K-^rc ' sJ.iy A-.-illahli; 1% ei-lels" 



Tri- evaliiation is designed to proi''i('t& t.^e (/oiVBhoo aLtff vTh Tfedliack ref^arding 
you-- reactions to thio vorkshcp. The x-esuli 3 will a-3Jt3t ua in pliinrjin'!; future 
in- lervlce ocl.ivltieB. 

1. ?lepse rate each of the activiticE in teAiM of 1 ":? TNT'KRES'r to yon. 
Jheck the appropriate blank after eac'a acti/lty. 



A. Evaluation Game 

2. Coininerc;lal3y Available 

Measuring Devices 
C. Queatloos and Issues 
n. Teachers and Teaching 

Vhat has each of today's training kita mtant tr. . ra. Be specific. 

A. Bvalviation Game 

(See attached sheet) 

B. Coffimerclally Available Measuring F^evloeB 

(See attached sheet) 

C. (^estlons and Issues 

(See attached sheet ) ' "■ 

'). Teachers and Teicbing 



3. i^hich of the training kits has tha uioat value *-• ciii' use in i'-a'.rvtce 
draining? 

A. Evaluation Game - 8 

B. Commercially Available Measuring Devices - 5 

C. Questions and Issues - 4 

th. The two most valuable aspects of today '3 seoslo r if. : 

' See attached sheet ) 
5. Please rate each of the activities in te.iTBs of U ; niPOETAPCE to 7. li. 



A. Evaluation Game 

•i. Commerclclly Available 
Measuring Devleea 
Questions and Issues? 

•J. Teachers and Teaching 






Ve-v 
Inportaot 

12 


Ir«ortant 

,5 , 


not 
IsDortant 

9,. 


10 


11_ 


1 



529 



What has each to today's training kits' meant for you. Be specific. 

A. Evaluation Game 

Forced deeper thinking about materials, their i;.'e3 ^inl criteria ne^.^essa^ 
to consider prior to purchase 

I liked it - good to use in In-service 

Valuable for use with teachers in in-service prof^raras 

Not setting up prior likes or reasons for liking 

I liked it. Good! I will use this one. It has and will help. 

Plan to use. 

More insight to the pertinent questions to be asked. 

Provided an insight for future purchases and recommendations to other 
teachers 

Never realized how well general guides could be applied tc a wide 
variety of materials 

Insight into materials evaluation - might be omitted if short of time 

Opened avenues of thought with the knowledge of other ideas to be 
presented to a training group 

More positive evaluative techniques 

Points out need for systematic sound approach 

Gave new ideas as to evaluation and selection of materials 

Make me more aware of importance of close selection 

B. Commercially Available Measuring Devices 

I'm glad to have knowledge of these materials. I teach H-IR-l and think 
the Bercy might serve as an instructional gixide. 

Brought me up to date on these devices 

Fortifies our concerns about tests 

Examples of available items - need to let teacher diagnope and not rely 
on psychologist 

Very little - but mainly because I am presently using each of the devic 
presented and have been "pushing" them for some time 

530 



2. B. (Continued) 

Solid useful information 

I was unfamiliar with a couple of the tests ar d think they would be 
valuable 

A chance to "see the real thing" and hear others opinions on them 

I was interested especially as a teacher wanting more knowledge on 
materials for predictive measurement 

Plan to use 

Interesting, but I had the information already. 

Idea for use of para-professionals assigned to teachers for assessment 

Liked the presentation 

I was familiar with all but one - found that of interest - worth 
repeating 

C. Questions and Issues 

As a participant in the experiment I got less from this, I think, than 
had I been a spectator - although I did enjoy my role. 

Good 

Valuable for use with teachers in in-service program - am revising 
in-service program for next week 

It was more fun for the center group than for me. It lacked in part the 
active participation and I did not feel that new information was gained 
as in a lecture. Althoxogh I realize the "live-presentation" was necessary 
I have to be honest. It soured the rest of the activity. 

Will need to modify - a separate session 

Good although sometimes couldn't hear nor see. 

Some guides are necessary particulatrly for effective use of time 

The questions (criteria) are most helpful and could be sent to teachers 
considering materials selection if they had no opportunity to attend a 
workshop. 

Nothing 

Adoption need for more specific EinaJysis to make final decisions 

Not of value 

531 
Little value 



k. The two most vtiluable aspects of today's session were: 
Evaluation Game - 5 responses 

Commercially Available Measuring Devices - 3 resj jnses 
Questions and Issues - 1 response 

Interaction and feelings of all 

Awareness of group needs versus self. 

Group brainstorming, "Judging" evaluating materials 

Working with tangible objectives which in turn can be used later with other 
groups . 

Criteria sheet 

Becoming familiar with tests; guides for evaluation, etc. of materials 

Group discussions 

Available materials and tests, ways of selecting 

Reinforcing, providing an approach 

Information gained, sharing ideas 

Techniques and kits 

The specific helps and suggestions for giving workshops 

Self-evaluation in adoption of materials and hopefully, can be of better 
assistance to teachers 

To get together and stimulate thinking concerning material and its evsiluation 

Suggestions for format of our in-service here and the evaluation of specific 
materials 



532 



January 19, 197? 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



C. I have attendevi vibe t'oij.ov,lng t.valnlrf', ^ccsions : 

40 Indianapolis, Oct. 27, 1971 "Problems and ifints" 

, ,g Huntiugburg, No-. 17, 1971 - "DcGl^n and U3^_- of Insti-uctlonal Ofcjectivea" 
6 South Bend, Dec. 1^, 1971 - "Toward an Unc?';. standing of Percept ual-Mcrt,or 

Progro^as " 
1 6 _ IndiajiapoliSj Jan. 19, 1972 - "Celec-tion anu ".valuation of Coimnerclolly 

Available M£.terltilB" 



T- A« a te;^cher-t:ralner in Indiana, you will be ei;-pf cted to conduct In-service 
training with teachers in your local area. 

As a result of the training sessions I've attended, I aa better pj-epared to 
conduct in-service training with teachers. 

16 Yes 1 ? No 



The traiainp Itits pr^jsented duriiig the iralnln ; ;.• sniona ai'e aelf-explanacory 
and easy to use. 

li* Yes 2 7 :io 



f. 1 have used the fol-lovlng woritshop kits in condv^ ^Ing ia-aervice training: 

2 Instructional Objectives 
5 Perceptual- »totor Activities 

IC. Since the Initiation of this series of four tv. .1 dng sessions, I !ieve held 
in-service training programs for 37^ (total ■ 1 ollment) peojle. 

.^ 316 teachers 
Show # of ( IJ liupei-vlsors 

each type > 11 adidnistrators 

/ _^£ college students 

( parents 

1. Conuacnts (>i-hat other topics should be covered :l 1 futuro trai-ninK tessionsT) 
(See attached sheet) 



533 



11. Comments (what other topics should be' covered in future training sessions?) 

I am not a teach?r this year but work as n f-imily counselor and although I 
do not do the ordering of materials I feel your workshop has helped me to 
know what to refer to others. 

Teacher Made Materials; R. jading; Math 

Very well done 

Teaching the slow learner in the regular clasfirooni. More workshops of 
newly developed materials. I generally enjoyed the workshop and will make 
an effort to attend future ones - depending on geographic location. Thanks, 

I found your techniques very helpful. 

Please include a comparison of similar materials to be evaluated. 

Tests (formal) - diagnostic! 



534 



Crystal Boling 

4540 Gifford Road #3F 

Bloomington , Indiana 47401 

Mary McKenna 

5957 Carvel Avenue 

Indianapolis, Indiana 46220 



Harrold W. Wallace 
1406 Briar Road 
Muncie, Indiana 

Laura Doeden 

Box #65 

Plymouth, Indiana 



47304 



46563 



Carol Weller 

Rural Route #3 

North Manchester, Indiana 46962 

Bob Kritkausky 

319 Brlarcliff Street 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 46804 

William Kruzan 
Rural Route #8 
Huntington, Indiana 46750 

Bill Harlow 

8046 Camellia Lane 

Indianapolis, Indiana 46219 

Lonnie Adams 

2001 North Walnut Apt. //IE 

Muncie, Indiana 47303 



Rowena Piety 

5435 Hohman Avenue 

Hammond, Indiana- 46320 

Jeanne Tibbies 
5935 Hohman Avenue 
Hammond, Indiana 46320 

Charles Edwards 

128 East Jefferson 

Tipton, Indiana 46072 

James R. Alley 

128 East Jefferson 

Tipton, Indiana 46072 

Josephine K. Mosby 
65 West 54th Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46208 

Ann Hardman 
Special Services Unit 
Madison State Hospital 
Madison, Indiana 47250 

Dorothy Elmore 
Special Services Unit 
Madison State Hospital 
Madison, Indiana 47250 

Marsha Smith 
Special Services Unit 
Madison State Hospital 
Madison, Indiana 47250 



Bill Myers 

207 h North Dill 

Muncie, Indiana 47303 

Jon Templin 

511 4th Street 

Huntingburg, Indiana klbkl 

Mildred W.alls 

5701 East 17th Street 

Indianapolis, Indiana 46218 

Mrs. Alice M. Gill 

3619 North Olney Street 

Indianapolis, Indiana 46218 



Valeria De Laughter 

Rural Route #4 

North Manchester, Indiana 



46962 



Joan Beghtel 

2 Cloverleaf Drive, Rural Route //4 

Wabash, Indiana 46992 



Kraig D. Dawalt 
200 Highland 
Logansport, Indiana 



46947 



William Sherfey 

Indiana State University State 

Special Education 

Terre Haute, Indiana 47809 



535 



- 2 



Doris Williams 

Indiana State University 

Special Education 

Terre Haute, Indiana 47809 



Judy Jones 
845 Matthews 
Clinton, Indiana 



47842 



David Titus 

635 South Main Street 

South Bend, Indiana 



46623 



536 



#1 of 2 



IN-SERVICE EDUCATION PLANNING FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



Request received from: Oakland Schools Sp. Ed. - Mary Levis 
Analysis of request by: Levine & Yovanovich 



Plan designed by : Levine & Yovanovich 



Who are the trainees? Spec. Ed. Classroom Teachers 



How many? 20 



What is the mission? To provide infonnation about the use of instruct! nnn.1 
games and simulations vlth handicapped children 

Time available? 1 day, 9 am to 11:30 pm, 1 pm to 3 pm 

Date: Nov. 10, 1971 



Location: Pontiac, Michigan 



What objectives can be achieved? To develop an understanding of the c-ritpri a 
needed to design an instructional game and to develop an xinder standing of 
a role-play, and to be able to apply these techniques to teaching 

What instructional materials? (l) The Instructional Game Design Task 

(2 ) Role-Play ^^_ 



What procedures? Small group activities 



What evaluation? Written evaluation 



537 



n of 2 

IN-SERVICE EDUCATION REPORT FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 

Request originally received from: Oakland Schools Sp. Ed. - Mary Levis 

Date : H/lO/Tl 

Location : Oakland Schools , Pontiac , Michigan 

Analysis of in-service program by: Yovanovich 



Who were the trainees? Special Ed. Classroom Teachers and supervisnrs 

How many? l8 ________^_____ 

What was the mission? Involved teachers in design of instructional gninPR a-nfi 
role-playing 

Amount of time used: 1 day, 9 am to 3 pm 



V/hat objectives were achieved? Developed an understanding of the critR-ria npprjp ri 
to design an instructional game and developed an understanding of a rnlp-play; 

developed ability to apply these techniques to teaching 

How were these objectives meas\ired? Written evaluation 



What existing instructional materials were used? Design of Instructional dninpR 



What materials were specially-designed? Use of Role-Playing in the Classroom 



Comments : 

9/71 538 

SAY 



Participants: classroom teachers 



11-10-71 



Date 



OELkland Schools, 
Pontiac, Mich. 



Results of Evaluation 

IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP OF FROGRAM^'IED EXPERIENCES 

"Use of Games, Simulations aud Role-Playing in the Classroom" 



1. 



Use descriptive words to describe your reactions to tc^day's workshop. List 

the words as fast as they come to you. Limit one minute! No sentences, please. 



interesting (8) 
informative (8) 
fun (6) 

stimulating (4) 
helpful (3) 
enjoyable (3) 
learn (ed) (ing) 
involved (3) 
useful (2) 
excellent (2) 
relevant (2) 
applicable (2) 
ideas (2) 
valuable (1) 



(3) 



encouraging (1) 

enlightening (1) 

insight (1 ) 

eventful (1) 

worthwhi le (1 ) 

fast (1) 

thought-provoking (1) 

difficult (1) 

thinking (1) 

proving (1) 

casual (1) 

motivational (1) 

refreshing (1) 

active participation (1) 



try (1) 
pretend (1) 
feelings (1) 
relative (1 ) 
enthusiasm (1 ) 
meaningful (1) 
entertaining (1) 
thoughtful (1) 
clear (1) 
inspired (1) 
skills (1) 
interaction (1) 



2. What specific applications can you make to your classroom teaching? (Cite 

one or two specific ways in which today's experience applies to your teaching.) 

The responses can be broken down into the following categories: 

a) will design and use games in teaching - 10 

b) will use role-playing in the classroom - 11 

c) will be able to design a workshop using games and role-playing - 2 

(see attached page) 

3. Rate the workshop (as a whole) in terms of learniniP; value for you: 

5 About the same as always. 

Very poor (poorest 10^ of those I've attended). 



n Very good (best 10/5 of those I've attended) 



k. Suggestions or comments: 
(see attached page) 



539 



2. What specific applications can you make to your classroom teaching? (Cite 

one or two specific ways in which today's experience applies to your teaching.) 

I intend to develop some more games for instructing my group. I feel more 
free to start some role playing situations with my group and feel more con- 
fident now in trying this. 

Can design workshop if asked. Can design situations to aid in teaching child 
how in discrimination of behavior. Can look more objectively at my own role. 

Think it will be interesting to try role playing with Type A - later el. class 
to bring out some emotional hang-ups as well as to help them identify some of 
their own emotions - and possibly (hopefully) con+ rol them. Thinking speci- 
fically of aggression. Definitely going to try it! 

I have found that todays role playing when used with my students could bring 
about a greater understanding of behaviors in my students that are hard to 
bring about as many of my students are passive and non-verbal so stimulation 
of this kind in a possible charade type form. Students are Title IV multiply- 
handicapped. 

Made me aware of what I can do in math and also other areas that will make it 
more meaningful but enjoyable at the same time. Enable me to widen my scope 
in teaching. Made me think about being more creative in my teaching. 

1. Use role-playing in classroom to help children settle their disputes. 

2. Help parents better understand program through role-playing. 3- Use of 
games in classroom - watching the directions more specifically. ^4 . Be more 
aware not to assume children bring the same set of background to the game. 

Involve boys in thinking of actions of others rathei- than self. Help to 
develop some creative expression from less verbal children. 

I can use several of the card games - modified to the level of my class. 
I'll be able to create my own games using the information I gained today. I 
will have a better idea of how to conduct role-playing experiences - especially 
how 10 have the children evaluate their role playing. 

1. Help some children in expressing their sincere feelings about school, me, 
and other children. 2. Role playing may be used as an enjoyment - or recrea- 
tion for the children. 

Use number game with Intermediate Type A boys to motivate. Try role playing 
to help child identify himself - stimulate communication. 

Use some of games made up with my group. Think of different ways to use 
materials I have. Use role playing with my kids - switch roles of leaders 
with the followers of the room - etc. 

Card games - new ideas for children for number work. 

Will use card games for instruction in classrooms more often - for enjoyment 
and learning. Role playing with students to bring Jut inner behaviors not 
noticed nor evident. 

540 



(continued) 

I can use role play in the classroom lo show the children that we can 
handle situations in many ways. Then reverse roles so each child can see 
how the other child feels. 

Will use card game for teaching trainable to match like nvunbers. Then work 
toward card game for adding two numbers. Use role playing to help trainable 
understand other peoples feelings. 

1. Use games to teach certain skills. 2. Reinforces an idea and help better 
clear up the idea of showing parents how to use gomes to teach their readers 
certain words - to be used in a parent's workshop-type meeting. 3. To use 
the materials in some inservice that I must provide for other teachers. 



541 



h. Suggestions or comments: 

I'm usually a very shy person and I was surprised how much I enjoyed getting 
up and doing role playing. I'm very anxious to try this with ray class. I 
also enjoyed your enthuf.iasm. You're a /ery fine teacher! 

Always keep it as enjoyable as it was today because it if_ a learning experience. 

Have such workshops at intervals throughout year . 

Talk more about what types of role playing to use with kids. 

No suggestions lu improvements. 

I think it should have been called role playing or else this area appealed 
to me. 

Role playing is always threatening to me. Wish it could be disguised! 



542 



IN-SERVICE EDUCATION PLANNING FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



Request received from: Indiana Div. of Spec. Ed. - Pa\il Ash 
Analysis of request by: Yovanovich 



Plan designed by: Carlson 



Who are the trainees? Sp. Ed. Directors (or appointed supervisors); 
University Personnel; State Dept. Consultants 



How many? 60 



What is the mission? To train participatns in use of in-service Series #VI - 



"Innovation in Perceptual-Motor Programming" 



Time available? 1 day - 8:30 am to ^: 30 pm 



Date: Dec. 15, 1971 



Location: South Bend, Indiana 



What objectives can be achieved? Develop set of teaching activities to reme - 
diate a specific psycho-motor learning problem and to evaluate same. For 
participants to become avare of the variety of materials for use in p-m 
activities that can be drawn from a broad range area. More adeptness at 
ordering activities in relation to their level of difficulty. 



What instructional materials? In-service training kits (5) plus Introductio n 
ffl - Why Bother to Move; #2 - The Numbers Game, The Alphabet Game; #3 - The 
Warehouse Game; ffh - From Simple to Complex; ff5 - Now That You're Moving 
What procedures? Group-oriented activities specified in each of the five 
kits above. 



What evaluation? On-site written pre and post test 



543 



#3 of 1+ 

IN-SERVICE EDUCATION REPORT FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HAITOICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



Request originally received from: Indiana Div. of Sp. Ed. - Paul Ash 
Date: 12/15/71 



Location: South Bend, Indiana 



Analysis of in-service program by: Yovanovich 



Who were the trainees? Sp. Ed. Directors or appointed supervisors; State Dept. 

regional consultants 

How many ? 15 

What was the mission? To train participants in use of in-service Series j^VI - 

"Innovation in Perceptual-Motor Programming" 

Amount of time used: 1 day, 10 am to ^ pm 



What objectives were achieved? Developed set of teaching activities to remediate 
a specific psycho-motor learning problem and to evaluate same. Participants 
became aware of the variety of materials for use in p-m activ-Jties that pan hP 
drawn from a broad range area. More adeptness at ordering activities in relation 
to their level of difficulty. 

How were these objectives measured? Post-test - written evaluatinn nf 

activities 



What existing instructional materials were used? #^ - "The Warehmisp Cimnp", 
"Yours for a Better Workshop" 

What materials were specially-designed? Introduction, ffl "Whv Bother to Move"; 

#2 "The Numbers Game; The Alphabet Game", ^k "From Simple to Complex", 

»5 "Now That You're Moving" 

Comments : Five activities are too many for a one-day session; #3 could be 

9/71 cut-down to 20 min. and still be effective. 

SAY 

544 



December 15 , 1971 
South Bend, Indiana 
IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 
COMPARISON OF PRE- AND POST-EVALUATIONS 
"Toward an Understanding of Perceptual-Motor Programs" 

Assuming that you will be conducting in-service training with teachers, how 
comfortable do you feel in the role of a teacher-trainer? 



Pre-Evaluation 



Post -Evaluation 



1 Very comfortable 

7 Comfortable 

7 Somewhat comfortable 

Not comfort able 



5 felt more comfortable after workshop 



1 Very comfortable 
12 Comfortable 

2 Somewhat comfortable 
Not comfortable 



Perceptual -motor activities involve: (check one or more) 



fi. eye-hand coordination 

10 auditory reception 

12 visual-motor integration 

11 gross movements 

6 recall of specific facts 



13 eye-hand coordination 

12 auditory reception 

13 visual-motor integration 
lU gross movements 

10 recall of specific facts 



Perceptual-motor activities can be designed for: f^check one or more) 



ik low vision students 
12 concert musicians 



12 taxi driver 



15 low vision students 
15 concert musicians 
1$ taxi driver 



1^ culturally disadv-mtaged students 15 culturally disadvantaged students 
11 r^hoe salesrr.an 15 shoe saxesman 

Materials fc working with cliildren with perceptual-motor problems can be obtained 
from: 



IMCs 6 

MSU IMC 2 

Indianapolis IMC 3 

Fort Wayne IRC 3 

Publishers 7 

Local School Corp. 2 

Community 

Home 

Teacher-raade 2 

Students 
Federal surplus Warehouse 

Optometrist 1 

Anywhere 3 



8 
2 
1. 
3 
5 
1 
3 
1 
3 
2 
2 




545 



■3^, resp onden ts Decenher 15, 1971 

Identifying # South Ben J , "r.llGna 

IN-SLkVICI' workshop - PRE-KVAIU.ATIO;} 
''Towft.!-d twi IVidf^r-itundifjo^ of Perceptue.l •- Motor Frograxas" 



AsBumla^ thnt ;•?:••: viil ur- c; alt'ctln?; '.i;-ierv'Jt'e train^n," wluh teachers, how 
C'Oiif ;'>-ab'.e ao j'ou fstr! In the rol.e ol' h teacr'er-*ii-3ir:erV 

.- 1_ Very Comfor*.%"bI'J> 

_1 CoT'jfortablo; 

J Ou-«what Cori Ton. :••"!■ i " 

No". CojRr'j.ridfc.'.s 

(•"eroept ial-iiot :■ ' ^ocItt' t.-.es . ivoivf ; {cheek oac oc i.oj ■») 

12 «i!ye--;iai.d cr;ord'I»*'ii 1 Jn 

10 RU'Uto-y i'f-ciijoioii 

12^ vlfnuLL-io'.ar iutefor&uion 

11_ g'OBB r.TOVeBiS-ilC'J 

__6_ r'ineJLi of .'p'io '...-' : fnct; 

rercejylued" '.'.iOi- :cti"' '■•I :-i cjfi-'. './•■; i^^sJo'ied fr : ^chcc one rr- aor(? ? 

lk_ jcv Vj.:d.rn utudrr:';! 

12 corcsrs nrL-.v-icl'^u 

"l2_" I'-'-d d(i-,?v 

II4 cultut-: i.iy ul:..>uv.jr.i;:\7 3d ;;ta(?f-,r' i>. 

_11_ ah-ie o' :*?.;■ .a:, 

'■^aoei-isUb f-r w\ r), ^ . '. '^ 1 . ■ • h p^;.ci-:. ':-ia''.---rir. or i-i^'o^-;'"'!!:' Oh?^ 

Indlana£olis IMC - 3 _ 

MSU IMC -"~2 ' 

Fort Wayne IRC - 3 

Publishers - 7 

Local School Corp. IMC's - 2 : 

Materials Centers - 6 

Anyvhere - 3 

Teacher- made - 2 

Optometrist - 1 



546 



15 r tap on dantE - Deoeiiib-,;/ x5 1^71 

-decit Ifyin'zD South Bend, Indiani 

:r;; -irvimc.-. workshop lvali/ati'in 

"Tovajt-d or i'nd*:rataiialu(: of Peroeptual-."AJtor PrograriB" 

•r>iis eva].uii.oion la degLgnsa t-:: p- ovi^;.e the workaliop staff with feedback regarding 
yovir reactions to ti.is v. . shop. Tne resuJta vlll assist us in pisLnnlng future 
la -service actlrixiso. 



L^slnf^ the fo.i Loirfin?'. -•-.-in,: s.jp-.p. ludl'-ats che extent uo which you agre" with 
the rollovrl;.;-: 3t«'-fr;£:-l:. : 

Strongij'- ''L..dly I/o t'ij.dly Strcr^ly 

}., Dinagree £■- L-iEac ■vci 3- Opinion '4. Agree 5« A^ree 

la Tiiere vg^; &.:[•;_■ t • .-.l i.o <=^K -ue :-v.1 ->r.:. aad sxchn:^f<? Ideas during? the 

5^_ rMitrrftS'-tori'- f->:- r ■ai-.-J;j"'~ £»;■•■..:' ;»\t:.f:n /.^n.- -- .^s.-n :ed. 

j.g Teciiiiqufta '■''■ra sii^;: ■.7;- d c.r ovmuH';5 ii<:- the n,-v liiiiarOi'T prHctices. 

]_^ji The worrJhci '.'jattf' " ^sc pres^rnted :• a axi In- -rpJwJng fis.'iiori. 

]_g T.i- vork.ihop waR v.v.ii. 3*". '■;,■. tuj.'.;d . 

If "" .• Mc-s u'A'jp ■\.-- i^'i'A ■■:i jLi; ifi»'I l:>i? ffi^-vhc-l of pres ;j.oatlon, 

(See attached sheet) 

'ivhat aspect.) '..f ^jx.'iW ■- vor.v; ;>■■•■ did /ou find i^iT'Acx^ax-lj difficult to 'mder- 
fc^cvFid'/ Vh//.:'. :ii'\I''-, :• i : it .-ytAnclin^s "xte you r.^t^ ^ ».ni=T, yv;a ne«id to ouildT; 

(See attached sheet) 



\;1'," .■>;.'■• V-.'' ••o . .-*■ li f ■..■■ r/.s/i i.,i '•■h.'ioh ■■ .jCii^-' ' b • j.- rj-tvrico •■■■■y.i.;, =:s ".<» y .)-ir 



(See attached sheet) 



547 



-2- 



Decenber 15, 1971 

South Bend, Indiana 



U. /LssuffiAng that yoa vlil be ccnaucLlng in-servire training with teachers , how 
comfortable do you nov i»<»l Ir. the roL-e of a teacher-trainer? 



I Veri 'Jotaf ort. able 

IP 1 o.-afor'ahlt-. 

2_ aoSBSwhar, i.oeii'oTtaoi.e 

Q_ Not Comfortable 



f). Pereeptval r.iDcor activities invcl.v>^: (cheo''. one or more; 

17, eye-hand coorltuaflon 

12 auditory reception 

1^ vlnua-L-moLor inf'r-sr itlon 

\k sroflB moveiiien'.B 

2^ recal..'. of B]>ecific fR:;t<J 

6. Perceptviul-rootcf actlvltAe.-i -riic ^>e deelgue-' for \check one or more) 

J^ loTw Visl^'': fitursnts 

15 concert cvalclex- 

15 taxi drl%f(i 

15 culturaftly fi'.SRO'' f!i - ai^'-.'i st.;i'>-:i. s 

15 she* aalr^Sin^n 

Y- t-'.atejlalj ior v-:rir.!i«; vicr- j.- 1 if;..rRn wl1 h j.er';'-ptuai-Jnotor problemi; can be 



iMCL^_a __■ 

Publishers - 5 

Home - 1 

Many Sources - 7 

8. iJ^igf^er't Jon; or Coi'.uMer:'- 



-Dmi. creati vity -t:-J 

MSU/IMC - 2 

Ft. Wayne IRC - 3 

Indianapolis IMC - U 



Local School Corp. - 1 

Community - 3 

Students - 2 

Federal Surplus Warehouse - 2 

Teacher-made - 3 



(see attached sheet! 



548 



Post-Evaluat i on 

1. Using the following rating scale, indicate the extent to which you agree with 
the following statements: 

Strongly Mildly No Mildly Strongly 

1. Disagree 2. Disagree 3. Opinion h. Agree 5. Agree 

la There was ample time to ask questions and exchange ideas during the 

workshop. 

lb Suggestions for classroom application were presented. 

Ic Techniques were suggested for evaluating the new classroom practices. 

Id The workshop content was presented in an interesting fashion. 

le The workshop was well structured. 

If The workshop activities clarified the method of presentation. 





Strongly 


Mildly 


No 


Mildly 


Strongly 




Disagree 


Di 


s agree 


Opinion 


Agree 


Agree 


la) 


1 




2 


1 


3 


8 


lb) 


1 




1 





T 


5 


Ic) 













11 


3 


Id) 













1 


1I4 


le) 













1 


lU 


If) 













1+ 


11 



549 



Post-Evaluation 



What aspects of today's workshop did you find particularly difficult to under- 
stand? (What skills and understandings are you awaire that you need to build?) 

I will do more reading. Remain open minded 

Not enough room to list all those areas that I need to build. Last part - 
Critical Incident Report. Either it's too early - too late or I'm Just dull. 

Better understanding of task analysis. Better understanding of the effects 
of P-M programs. More sophisticated skills in conducting in-service sessions. 

None particularly - perhaps some definitions for some people as to psycho- 
motor domain 

Terms - I would like a list of terms and definitions as they will be used, 
i.e. laterality, cognition, etc. 

The difference in terminology was often confusing. Often people were discussing 
the same thing but the terms were completely different. 

None. Help in identifying the learning problem. 

Feel that I have been out of the classroom too long to fully appreciate some 
of the feelings of frustration that face classroom teachers, this is something 
the workshop made me awEire of. 

Had difficulty with 2nd activity. Developing criteria for "from simple to 
complex" 

I'm not certain. 

Clinical incident report - perhaps my thinking was confused as to setting or 
stating the criteria used to rank activities from simple to complex. 

The transfer of this trend of thought or activity to a local situation 
Designing and implementing similar programs at local level 



550 



Post-Evaluati on 



3. What specific applications can you make in your role as a teacher-trainer? 
(Cite one or two specific ways in which today's experience applies to your 
role as a teacher-trainer. ) 

Have the workshop well planned - scheduled and structured as this one. 
Do not allow tangents to be extended. Brain storming is good. 

1. Coordinator kit should be very helpful. 2. Better understanding of 
task analysis - especially as this relates to perceptual motor programs. 

Utilization of this technique in teacher training. 

Can use in faculty meetings to perhaps get teachers to look at kids and tasks 
in a different light. Get out of the lock-step. Through these meetings 
stimulate a more critical analysis of perceptual-motor activities and programs, 

1. Show the teacher the role of the student. 2. Help teacher to always be 
aware of individual differences in learning. (I'm sure they forget this 
when they leave college.) 

Will help me in working with teachers as I now have experienced frustrations 
similar to some they face. 

I'm not a teacher-trainer but can use these later. Getting organized is of 
utmost importance. 

I feel that I can spread this information to other potential trainers since 
I'm not involved in actual bui.lding work - by being able to present them 
with this material I will be able to spread the concepts presented today. 

1. Provide training for primary regular class teachers in understanding 
perceptual motor activities such as the numbers and alphabet games and in 
providing time to >»arn vocabulary words such as cognition, perception, etc. 

2. Provide time for special class teachers to order levels of activities 
so that they begin with easier tasks rather than difficult ones for their 
students. 

Develop interest for perceptual motor training within my system. Assist in 
preparation of inservice workshops. 

Will be able to assist other teachers and teacher trainers when specific 
questions concerning perceptual-motor programs arise... and they frequently 
do arise. 

Active participation of trainee must be stressed - involvement of trainee 
in evaluation of sessions. 

Can use a group approach to problem solving rather than lecture presentations. 
Get feed-back on b:ases and orientations of others. Learned about a good 
reference book. 



551 



#2 of h 



IN-SERVICE EDUCATION PLANNING FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



Request received from: Indiana Div. of Spec. Ed. - Paul Ash 
Analysis of request by: Yovanovich 



Plan designed by: Ward & Levine 



Who are the trainees? Sp. Ed. Directors (or appointed supervisor). Universit y 
Personnel; State Dept. Consultants 



How many? 60 



What is the mission? To train partipipants in n.^e nf in-c^^vvi^^ <:;»t-!"S .'^II - 
"Design & Use of Instructional Ob.iectives" 



Time available? 1 d-ay - 9 =30 am to U :30 pm 



Date: Nov. 17, 1971 



Location : Hiontingburg , Indiana 



What objectives can be achieved? Identify specification of objectives as on e 
of the means to effective instruction. Apply 3 mager criteria to a teaching 

task; Implement a micro-teaching plan utilizing objectives-oriented 

instruction. 
What instructional materials? Newly reorganized and expanded set of four 

in-service training kits: #1 The Island of MUSU; f/2 Objectives Have to 

Make Sense; #3 Knowing What you are Teaching; ^h Objectives-Oriented Instru ct i on 

also distribute "Yours for a Better Workshop" 
What procedures? 

Group- oriented activities specified in each of four kits above. 



What evaluation? On-site written post test, assessing familiarity and 

recognition of value of learnings 

Also word association, free form 

553 



9/71 



#2 of It 

IN-SERVICE EDUCATION REPORT FORM 
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AM) YOUTH 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 



Request originally received from: Indiana Div. of Spec. Ed. - Paul Ash 
Date: 11/17/71 



Location: Huntjngl'ijrg. Tnriiana 



Analysis of in-service program by: Yovauovich 



Who were the trainees? Sp. Ed. Directors (or appointed supervisors). State 

Dept. regional consultants 

How many? 17 

What was the mission? To train participants in use of in-service Series i^II - 
"Design & Use of Instructional Obj e ctives" 



Amount of time used: 1 day - 10 am - 3 pm 



What objectives were achieved? Identified specification of objectives as one of 
the means to effective instruction. Applied 3 Mager criteria to a teaching 
task. Implemented a micro-teaching plan utilizing objectives-oriented instruction. 

How were these objectives measured? On-site written post test, assessing fami- 
liarity and recognition of value of learnings. Also work association, free fo rm. 

What existing instructional materials were used? H'^ - "Objectives-Oriented 
Instruction" - (modified and revised) 



"Yours for a Better Workshop" 



What materials were specially-designed? ^1 The Island of MUSU; §2 Objectives Ha ve 
to Make Sense , #3 Knowing What You Are Teaching 



Comments : see evnluation si"Tiniary 

554 



11/17/71 
Huntingburg, Ind. 



Summary: In-Service Workshop Evaluation 
"Design and Use of Instructional Objectives'' 



Listed below are the responses and the freq^uency with which each appeared; 



informative (5) 



interesting 
needed (2) 
objectives 
thought-pr-: 



(j) 



(2) 
jvoking (2) 
personal involvement (2) 
valuable (2) 
inspirational (2) 
organized (2) 
performance (2) 
good (2) 
evaluation (2) 
helpful (2) 
stimulating (2) 
defining (2) 



motivating ( 1 ) 
entertaining ( i ) 
guiding (l) 
creative ( 1 ) 
eye-opening (l) 
clarifying (l) 
well-taught (l) 
cooperative (l) 
constructive (l) 
planned (l) 
great (l ) 
learning (l) 
discussions (l) 
possibilities (l' 
outcomes ■ (l) 



attitude (Ij 
time (l) 
audience ( 1 ) 
m.ike sense (l) 
direction (l) 
fcducai ionai ( i) 
idea provoking (. 
important (l) 
useful (l) 
timely (l) 
relative (l) 
introspective (l 
originality (l) 
creative (l) 
group (l) 



2. Method of presentation and content tended to be rated eviually interesting 
by the participants, while the use of instructional media seemed least 
interesting. 

3. Of the 11 participants, 3 showed a significant change jf behavior; ':• 
indicated a moderate change, while 3 remained stable. 

U . Out of the 11 part icipa.nts , U who had previously used the material, 
indicated that this workshop helped to clarify it^- use. 

5. All participants indicated a more comfortable feeling about the mater:' al. 

6. Participants felt that the content of the workshop was more important than the 
method of presentation and felt the use of instructional media to be jf least 
importance . 

7- The responses jould be broken down into the following categories: 

a) writing Instructional Objectives (6.5) 

b) use of Objectives (2.5) 

c) Mager (2) 

d) Instructions in kits (l) (kit k) 

e) How to help teachers gain skills (l) 

8. Responses indicate that participants feel comfortable about conducting 
in-service training. 



SAY 



555 



wovemoer x i . 


±^l± 


Dut...' 




Huptiagturg, 


Indiana 



Participants - Teacher-Trainers 



Results 

''Design and Use of Instructional Objectives" 

'riiis evaLuati; ri if :•-:;; ';iip.-i ' '^ j.r'-vide '.hv v. r.-u'.:. ii ;-'^" -.■ i ' .'. " •■''»iiba."k regarding 
;.' ur reic* ir.n;; !(■ th.'.; wci'!' .~!.. i. . '.'he rr-sa'.'.;- wi : 1 :i-i,.:\- 13 '..•. ;"H.r.r.inp ;'utLi>'i- 
in-servii;e ;f;ti vit if-3 . 

1. '.IP' .-.ingir d-^.'i-ri ;. ' ; ve v vdr, t.'.Ht dr-. ;::;>• ' l>' t, ■ ... ' v it..;-. ; . :> :.,_• u^-.f; 
oeii* enci-.'K ! You h'r.c only -Tif' minu*'-^! 



(See summary) 



'c\ f Lease rate ea.?h f th*.' 'u-'. i vit.ies i:: i'.';-:ns •;' thei)' : ^". Ehr,:".; tt. yiu. Crr'ok 
f.he appropriate blnn.k •iC'---v each ac'ivity. 

Very Not 

Intei-est i rit; I:.' 'vreL^: i::;; .'.•;• -r^jting 

A. Content 9 2 



B. i'-^ethod of Present.atic /i IQ 

C. l-'se of Instructional NV-dia I4 



3. a) How much did you kni';w about this ^method, tchr. ; .; 10 , i.'iJtructior'.a.! 
material) prior tc "riis workshop? 

2 Considerabl'=> amount. 



3 Moderate anc^uj.t 
3 Small amount 



1 Nothing 



b) How muc^. do you feel y..-u r.ow know ab.mt if: 

6 Cons ide rat le amount 

5 Moderate amount 

Graall amount 

Nothing 



k. Had you used this (terhniiue. method, iiist ructi ..naj material) prior to this 
workshop? 

If yes, did this workshop clarify its u.ic-V 

■3 ^''S Q 'J- 



556 



Ho' c irn'or^^Hi' ^■ 
Corrjne :;',.-; : 

(See attached sheet) 



Nov. 17, 1971 



5. How comfortable dD y> u n iw • ■ hI , :■ 
instructior. 1 '. mat er 1 ai ^ 'r 

6 Very .-i inf.. rtab.if 
5 C.inforf -dblr 



.•;i: ' ^,\ -- ( l-' -iir. . -ll*- , :^fct::o!. 



6. F.c^'ty-:- rat" f'ach i.''f the actlvit.ies in tt.Tin.- . !' 
.':.eck the f;;-propriate blank after each -tcti vity 



Jr , .LJ',;:. •■■) j'j: 



A. C-ntent 

B. Method of Preser.tali -jn 

C. Use of Instructional Media 



Very 

Important 

8 



: n.: :. r' 'an' 



' -t 



"l"'. ■:nt 



What, aspects .. f today's workshop did y..^u flui par' i c. : -iriy d:ffic.Ji.t to 
anderstandV (What ikiils '.inc understfi;.ji lii^s are y> >< -r/a'-'r *.hat you net>d 
to buiid?) 



(See attached sheet) 



S. Afsuming that you will be expected t.:- .'.;nduot 1 n-.:f-r-.'ir-..- training wi ',h 
teachers, how ,;- imf ortable do y :u feel in the ri le of a leaoher-t ra; ner? 

p Very confortable 



f, Comfortable 

^ r^'.jraewhat comfortable 



li.'t comfortable 



SAY-ij--'l 



557 



Responses to Question Four 

Question: How comfortable do you now feel about using this (technique, method, 
instructional material)? 

VERY COMFORTABLE 

Very worthwhile - helped me to see the need of activity planning and 
mini-teaching instead of instruction objective writing as the end goal. 

COMFORTABLE 

I will appreciate the extra time I will have to review the material. 

Following re-reading of distributed material 

Have used Mager in college workshop classes but had a week or so - not 
a few hours - does maJce me think. 



558 



Responses to Question Seven 

Question: What aspects of today's workshop did you find particularly difficult 
to understEind? (What skills and understandings are you aware that 
you need to build?) 

Writing objectives - I tend to generalize. 

Some difficulty in understanding directions for afternoon session. Need to 
develop skills in preparing educational objectives. This workshop and the 
Mager reference should help. 

Mager, Phase II 

Need to develop strategies in aiding teachers move from writing objectives 
to planning activities. 

Getting objectives that both relate to the problem as such and also to the 
"leader" and his interest or ability. 

Discriminating between general objectives, specific objectives and teaching 
activities. Practice and time will help me to better discriminate, not between 
the terms themselves, but to what I actually see written as an objective. 

Working out a workable objective - need ability to adequately think through 
objectives. 

Whether to make participants aware of the instructional objectives before 
conducting said activity. 

Area 3 - Instructions limited. Limitation of topic. Creative needs. 

Mager 's concepts - not fully explained and developed. 

Writing clear understandable objectives that can be evaluated. 



559 



Statb 




INDIANAPOLIS 46204 



State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
JOHN J, LOUGHLIN 



INSTRUCTION MATERIALS CtNTER 

Box 100, Butler University 

4600 Sunset Avenue 

Indianapolis. Indiana 46208 

Phone (317) 633-5259 



November 19, 1971 



Miss Sue Ann Yovanovich 
USOE/MSU RIMC - HCY 
213 Erickson Hall 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan U8823 

Dear Sue: ^/ . / 7 ' 7 / 

The following is a list o f Huntingbur^ Work shop jj iar t ici pants 
I believe there were five persons in attendance during 't^'e "mor'n- 
ing who did not sign the list. 



NAME 


STREET 


Raymond Pflug 


R.R.#2 


John Holmes 


R.R.#2 


Laura Doeden 


P.O.Box#65 


Helen Utt 


505 Geiger St. 


Nancy Best 


728 13th St. 


Beranard Fehriback 


Box #1+78 


Dave Greenburg 


120 E. Walnut 


Kenneth Hernley 


P.0.Box#151 


Dick McQueen 


1021 S. Forrest 


Jim Kolb 


Garfield Avenue 


Van Pierce 


511 1+th Street 


Carole Verkamp 


1009 W. 13th St . 


Suzanne Savage 


202 Taylor 


John Robinson 


1965 S. Walnut 


G-ary Ryan 


2301 W. Michigan 


Mike Price 


511 Hh Street 


Dr. Charles White 


511 1+th Street 



CITY 

Huntingburg , 
Huntingburg , 
Plymouth, IN 
Huntingburg , 
Tell City, I 
Poseyville , 
Indianapolis 
Boonville , I 
Boonville , I 
Princeton, I 
Huntingburg , 
Jasper, IND. 
Cannelton, I 
Bloomington , 
Evansville , 
Huntingburg , 
Huntingburg , 



ZIP 



IND. 


1+751+2 


IND. 


I+75I+2 


D. 


1+6563 


IND. 


I+75I+2 


ND. 


1+7586 


IND. 


1+7633 


, IND 


.1+6220 


ND. 


1+7601 


ND. 


1+7601 


ND. 


1+7570 


IND. 


I+75I+2 




I+75I+6 


ND. 


1+7520 


IND. 


I+7I+OI 


IND. 


1+7712 


IND. 


I+75I+2 


IND. 


I+75I+2 



PA/md 




Paul Ash, Coordinator 
Instructional Materials Center 



560 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
SL CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



213 Ericksofi Hall Michigan Slale University Easr Lansing, Michigan 48823 
Cooperating Wilh Stare Departments of Education in Michigan-lndiana-Ohio 




The MSU Regional Center has developed a schedule of workshops 
designed specifically for professionals in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio who 
are involved with in-service teacher workshops. Each workshop will 
deal with separate topics. The workshops have been planned in various 
locations throughout the three state region. You are invited to attend 
any or all of these workshops. Please use the enclosed reply card to 
reserve your space at the workshops you would like to attend. You 
will receive confirmation of your choices. Also, a reminder will be 
sent directly prior to each workshop you will be attending. 



During the year, each procedure 
that is utilized at a workshop 
training session will be field 
tested, refined and made avail- 
able to teacher trainers in Ohio, 
Michigan and Indiana. 



The following Regional IMC staff 
members are responsible for the 
design and implementation of this 
years in-service training program. 

Ted Ward 

Joe Levine 

Sue Yovanovich 

Nancy Carlson 




Specific questions about particular 
training sessions outlined in this 
brochure should be directed to 
Sue Yovanovich. 




Please feel free to write to any of 
these staff members about any 
questions you may have regarding 
in-service training. 



'Member — Special Education 



561 

Network- Bureau ol Education for the Handicapped— U S Office of Education — An Equal Opportumtv Employer 







Date: April 26, 1973 

Time: 7:30 pm - 10:00 pm 

Date: April 27, 1973 

Time: 8:1+5 am - 10:15 am 

Title: ELICITING DISCUSSION BEHAVIORS 

AT IN-SERVICE WORKSHOPS 
Location: CEC National Convention 
Dallas , Texas 



Two sessions conducted by the MSU staff, 
have been included in this year's CEC 
program. They will be restricted to teacher 
trainers and will consist of activities and 
procedures for developing interaction 
through discussion. This is a topic of 
concern to all of us and shoiild be an 
interesting session. The second session 
will be a repeat of the first. Advance 
reservations are available until Feb. 1, 1973 
for people from our three-state region. 




mfW 



All of the training sessions described in this brochure will be designed 
and conducted in accordance with the guidelines for designing in-service 
education experiences that have been developed at the MSU Regional Center: 

1. When possible, the medium, procedure, or resource about which we 
want teachers to learn should be used in making the communicative 
presentation. 

2. When possible, involve every participant in an active role. Rather 
than showing them and telling them, the in-service educator should 
involve teachers in doing -- planning, designing, creating, writing, 
talking, sharing. 

3. Plan an in-service education experience very precisely. Teachers 
often approach such an experience with a chip-on-the-shoulder. Their 
time and their energy can be expected to be limited. The leader must 
know exactly what he is to do and how he is to go about it. 

4. When possible, the in-service education experience should stand alone 

and not be dependent upon an expert to deliver the instruction. The 
stand alone experience should be of a nature that a local coordinator 
or teacher-trainer can conduct it with little or no difficulty. 



562 



Date: November 7, 1972 

Time: 2:00 -U:30 pm 

Title: HELPING CHILDREN WITH LEARNING 
DIFFICULTIES - FART A* 

Location: Kalamazoo Valley Intermediate 
School District 
Kalamazoo, Michigan 

Local Coordinator: Jan Fortenbacher 

A two and a half hoiar workshop with local 
teachers in attendance. The first part of 
the session will be directed toward the 
attending teachers and will be run as an 
actual teacher workshop. The second part of 
the session will be run exclusively with 
teacher trainers and will focus on the 
activities presented d\iring the first part. 



Date: November ih, 1972 

Time: 2:00 - ^:30 pm 

Title: HELPING CHILDREN WITH LEARNING 
DIFFICULTIES - PART B* 

Location: Kalamazoo Valley Intermediate 
School District 
Kalamazoo, Michigan 

Local Coordinator: Jan Fortenbacher 



Again, this workshop will focus on learning 
difficulties, but a different training 
experience will be used. Classroom teachers 
and teacher trainers will be in attendance. 




Date: 
Time: 
Title 



November 21, 1972 
2:00 - it: 30 pm 
HELPING CHILDREN WITH LEARNING 
DIFFICULTIES - PART C* 
Location: Kalamazoo Valley Intermediate 
School District 
Kalamazoo, Michigan 
Local Coordinator: Jan Fortenbacher 



A third training experience will be used. 




Date: November 28, 1972 

Time: 2:00 - U:30 pm 

Title: HELPING CHILDREN WITH LEARNING 

DIFFICULTIES - PART D* 
Location: Kalamazoo, Michigan 
Local Coordinator: Jan Fortenbacher 



A fourth training experience will be used. 

November 30, 1972 
9:30 am - 3:00 pm 
HELPING CHILDREN WITH LEARNING 
DIFFICULTIES - PARTS A and B 

plus 
CREATING EFFECTIVE IN-SERVICE 
WORKSHOPS 
Location: Northeast Indiana Instructional 
Resoiirce Center 
Fort Wayne, Indiana 
Local Coordinator: Carol Weller 



This will be a full day workshop. Half of 
the day will focus on the effective 
utilization of Part A and Part B of the 
Learning Difficulties training experiences 
(see November 7 and lU). Classroom teachers 
will be used during this portion, along 
with teacher trainers. 

The second half of the workshop will be 
devoted to the topic of in-service workshops 
and the procedures for creating effective 
ones I This portion will be restricted to 
teacher trainers . 



Date: 
Time: 
Title 




563 



*You may sign up for any or all of the parts I 



December 6, 1972 
9:30 am - 3:00 pm 
ASSESSING LOW FUNCTIONING LEARNERS 

plus 
CREATING EFFECTIVE IN-SERVICE 
WORKSHOPS 
Location: Lincoln Way Instructional 

Resource and Materials Center 
Louisville, Ohio 
Local Coordinator: Eunice Shonk 

This will be a full day workshop. Procedures 
and materials for conducting in-service 
workshops in the assessment of low- functioning 
children (deaf /blind, multi-handicapped, 
severely retarded, etc.) will be the focus 
for half of the day. 

The second half of the workshop will be 
devoted to the topic of in-service workshops 
and procedures for creating effective ones I 
Both of these sessions will be limited to 
teacher trainers. 



Date: January 19, 1973 

Time: 1:00 - 3:30 pm 

Title: THE ROLE OF IN-SERVICE TRAINING 

PROGRAMS 
Location: Ingham Intermediate School 

District 

Mason, Michigan 
Local Coordinator: Frank Bruno 

A half day training session designed to alert 
teacher trainers to the role of in-service 
training and procedures for implementing 
training programs. Limited to teacher 
trainers . 





January 25, 1973 

9:30 am - 3:00 pm 
HELPING CHILDREN WITH LEARNING 
DIFFICULTIES - PARTS C and D 
plus 

DESIGNING INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP 
EXPERIENCES 
Location: Northeast Indiana Instructional 
Resource Center 
Fort Wayne, Indiana 
Local Coordinator: Carol Weller 

This will be a full day workshop. Half of 
the day will focus on the effective 
utilization of Part C and Part D of the 
Learning Difficulties training experiences 
(see November 21 and 28). Classroom 
teachers will be used during this portion, 
along with teacher trainers . 

The other half of this workshop will be used 
to examine the dynamics of interactive 
experiences and their use in working with 
teachers. This portion will be restricted 
to teacher trainers . 



Date: February l6, 1973 

Time: 1:00 - 3:30 pm 

Title: DESIGNING INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP 

EXPERIENCES 
Location: Genesee Intermediate School 

District 

Flint, Michigan 
Local Coordinator: Dave Williams 

This half day workshop will be used to 
examine the dynamics of interactive 
experiences and their use in working with 
teachers. This session will be restricted 
to teacher trainers. 

564 



Location: 



February 21, 1973 
9:30 am - 3:00 pm 
DESIGNING INSTRUCTION FOR LOW 
FUNCTIONING LEARNERS 

plus 
DESIGNING INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP 
EXPERIENCES 

Southwestern Ohio Special 
Education Regional Resource Center 
Cincinnati , Ohio 
Local Coordinator: Dave Braxokman 

This will be a full day workshop. Proced\ires 
and materials for conducting in-service 
workshops in the design of instruction for 
low- functioning children (deaf /blind, multi- 
handicapped, severely retarded, etc.) will 
be the focus for half of the day. 

The other half of this workshop will be used 
to examine the dynamics of interactive 
experiences and their use in working with 
teachers. This portion will be restricted 
to teacher trainers . 




Date: March 3, 1973 

Title: IMPROVING BRAILLE READING SPEED OF* 
BLIND LEARNERS 
ocation: Illinois Instructional Materials 
Center 
Chicago, Illinois 
Local Coordinator: Gloria Calovini (in 
conjunction with the American 
Printing House for the Blind) 



This workshop will be for teachers of the 
blind and teacher trainers. The experiences 
will relate to recent research and some new 
materials being produced by the American 
Printing House for the Blind that are 
designed to enhance the braille reading 
speed of the older blind student . 




Date: March 22 and 23, 1973 
Time: Begins at 9:00 am on the 22nd and ends 
at 3:30 pm on the 23rd 
itle: DI-SERVICE TEACHER TRAINING IN 

INDIANA, MICHIGAN AND OHIO , 
Location: USOE/MSU Regional Instructional I 
Materials Center 
East Lansing, Michigan 
Local Coordinator: Sue Yovanovich 

This is a repeat of last year's successful 
two day session. At the top of the list of 
activities will be experiences related to 
evaluating the effectiveness of in-service 
workshops. This two day workshop is limited i 
"to teacher trainers . l 



PLEASE RESERVE A SPACE FOR HIT, AT TTE FOLLO^'T^'G ttorttS'^OPS- 

12 

13 

14 



1 


5 


9 


2 


6 


10 


3 


7 


11 


4 


8 




Name : 






Address- 







(area code) 



(city) (state) (zlo code) 

Phone 



565 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
JiL, CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



21 J Enckson Hall Michigan Stare Universilv tasi Lansing, Michigan 48823 
Cooperating Wilh Stale Deparlmenls ol Education in Michigan-lndiana-Ohio 



November 13, 1972 



MEMORANDUM 

TO: Local Coordinators 

FROM: Sue Ann Yovanovich, Field Services Coordinator 

SUBJECT: 1972-73 In-Service Training Workshops 



Thank you for your cooperation and assistance in assuming the role of 
local coordinator for the in-service workshops to be held throughout 
the year. 

Facilities and equipment needed for each session would include the 
following : 

— one large room (accommodates 30-35 people) 

— several tables and chairs 

— overhead projector and screen 

I have taken the liberty of advising the participants to contact you 
regarding specific travel directions or suggestions about overnight 
accommodations . 

Any extra arrangements that you would care to make would certainly be 
appreciated. If at all possible, coffee should be available. If this 
presents a problem in terms of "finances," participants at the workshop 
can be asked to contribute. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch with me. 
Two weeks prior to your session, I will call and give you more specific 
information regarding the following concerns : 

— projected number of participants 
— other equipment needed 



SAY:rh 

566 



JH 

•Membef-Special Education ^^||»«^^ Network -Bureau of Education for the Handicapped- U S Office ot Educaiion-An Equal Opporlumtv (mptovei 





USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
JiL CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



213 Erick&on Hail Michigan Slale University East Lansing, Michigan 48823 
Cooperaling With Stale Deparlmenls ol Educarion in Michtgan-lndiana-Ohio 



WORKSHOP CONFIRMATION 

We have reserved a space for you at the workshops that have been 
circled below. 

#2 - Title: Helping Children With Learning Difficulties - Part B 
Location: Kalamazoo, Michigan 
Date: November 14, 1972 

#3 - Title: Helping Children With Learning Difficulties - Part C 
Location: Kalamazoo, Michigan 
Date: November 21, 1972 

#4 - Title: Helping Children With Learning Difficulties - Part D 
Location: Kalamazoo, Michigan 
Date: November 28, 1972 

#5 - Title: Helping Children With Learning Difficulties - Parts A and B 
plus Creating Effective In-Service Workshops 
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana 
Date: November 30, 1972 

#6 - Title: Assessing Low Functioning Learners plus Creating Effective 
In-Service Workshops 
Location: Louisville, Ohio 
Date: December 6, 1972 

#7 - Title: The Role of In-Service Training Programs 
Location: Mason, Michigan 
Date: January 19, 1973 

//8 - Title: Helping Children With Learning Difficulties - Parts C and D 
plus Designing Interactive Workshop Experiences 
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana 
Date: January 25, 1973 

y/9 - Title: Designing Interactive Workshop Experiences 
Location: Flint, Michigan 
Date: February 16, 1973 



567 




Member — Special Education p^^UJ^^^j Network — Bureau of Education for the Handicapped— U 5 Office of Education— An Equal Opporlunity tmplover 



Workshop Confirmation Page 2 



#10 - Title: Designing Instruction for Low Functioning Learners plus 
Designing Interactive Workshop Experiences 
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio 
Date: February 21, 1973 

#11 - Title: Improving Braille Reading Speed of Blind Learners 
Location: Chicago, Illinois 
Date: March 3, 1973 

#12 - Title: In-Service Teacher Training In Indiana, Michigan and Ohio 
Location: East Lansing, Michigan 
Date: March 22 and 23, 1973 

#13 - Title: Eliciting Discussion Behaviors At In-Service Workshops 
Location: Dallas, Texas 
Date: April 26, 1973 

#14 - Title: Eliciting Discussion Behaviors at In-Service Workshops 
Location: Dallas, Texas 
Date: April 27, 1973 



If you will need overnight accommodations, please contact the local 
coordinator of each workshop. (Address and phone listing is enclosed.) 

A reminder will be sent to you prior to each workshop you will be 
attending. We look forward to seeing you at these workshops. 



Enclosure 
SAY : rh 



568 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
\L CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



213 Enckson Hall Michigan Slare Universiry £as1 Lansing, Michigan 48823 
Cooperaling Wdh State Oepaflments of Education m Michigan-lndiana-Ohio 



February 5, 1973 



MEMORANDini 



TO: 



Indiana Teacher Trainers 

Michigan CTirriculum Resource Consultants 

Ohio IRMC Coordinators 



FROM: Sue Ann Yovanovich, Field Services Coordinator 
SUBJECT: Tri-State Leadership Workshop, March 22 and 23, 1973 



The Tri-State Leadership Workshop, to be held in East Lansing on 
March 22 and 23, 1973, has been designed to meet the needs of those 
in-service educators who have been identified for us by the Specia l 
Education Divisions of Indiana, Michigan and Ohio . 

The materials and techniques which are being developed by the RIMG 
staff will be different from those presented at last year's February 
workshop. 

The workshop will be held at the University Inn in East Lansing beginning 
promptly at 8:30 am on Thursday, March 22 and ending at 3:30 pm on Friday, 
March 23. Due to budget cuts, the RIMC will NOT be able to reimburse 
participants for accommodations, food or transportation. There will be 
no conference registration fee. 

Please RSVPl Complete the enclosed card and return it to me UN OR 
BEFORE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1973. Upon receipt of your card, detailed 
information regarding accommodations, maps, workshop schedules, etc., 
will be sent to you. 

We're looking forward to hearing from you soon I 



SAY:rh 



•Member — Special Education 




569 



Network- Bureau of Education fof the Handicapped- US Office of Education- An Equal Oppoftumly Employer 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
AL CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



213 Enckson ^all Michigan Stale Universitv Eait Lansing. Michigan 48823 
Cooperaling Wirh Slate Departments ol Educalion in Michigan-lndiana-Ohio 



March 5, 1973 



MEMORANDUM 

TO: Workshop Participants 

FROM: Sue Ann Yovanovich, Field Services Coordinator 

SUBJECT: Final plans for March 22-23 Workshop 

Thank you for returning your workshop confirmation card so promptly! 

Enclosed with this memo is a reservation card for your motel acccnniodation 
for the upcoming workshop. Please complete \TOTediqtely an'^ send it direct!" 
to the University Inn . I've enclosed a map and directions lor getting to 
the University Inn. (By the way, the University Inn is a privately owned 
motel, though the name might imply it is a part of MSU. It is located 
about two blocks from the campus.) 

The beginning session of the workshop will be held in the lower level 
conference facilitieo of the Starboard Tack Restaurant. This restaurant 
adjoins the University Inn. Starting time of this first session is 3:31,' am 
sharp ! 

The entire two day workshop will be organizc;d around a modular schedule. _ 
Between 15 and' 20 planned sessions will be offered. Each participant will 
be able to elect a group of sessions to meet his own specific needs. Sessions 
will be either one or one and a half hours in length. All sessions will be 
held in the University Inn facilities. - 

. ,_ ■ . .- ' . " ^ " - - . • - • 

time will also be provided for participants to evaluate a collection of other 
available in-service materials; discuss in-ser>7ice training problems with 
each other; and be able to work individually with the staff members of the MSU 
SEIMC. If you have any of your own training materials that you would like to 
share with the group or get feedback for revision, please bring them along. 



5 70 



w3Em 

•Member- bpecial Sducal.on F^ l— '"-f^ Nehvork- Bureau ol Educalion lor Ihe Handicapped- US Office ol Educalion- An Equal Opporlunilv Employee 



Workshop Participants 
March 5, 1973 
Page 2 



An informal get-together session will be held on Thursday evening. This 
will be optional and designed to provide interaction among everyone at 
the workshop. 

We will conclude all activities by 3:30 on March 23. 

If you have any questions, please give me a call at 517-353-7810. 

See you on the 22nd! 



Enclosures 
SAY:rh 



571 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
SL CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



213 Enckson Hall Michigan State University East Lansing. Michigan 48823 
Cooperating Wtth Slate DepaDmenis oi Education in Michigan-lndiana-Ohio 



A.p t A ' 



'^'7'^ 



M t( iVl, »(' '» ivt' II ■CI 



•r^O'-i ; 



1073 Tri-r.lair T.ei-iurij sli i-.i WorKsivp iv'"*" • " i '_^inrs 
'"-Tirovich, yield bcrviccc Cccrain.itor 



,Mie ^^'y 



ii^J^JHa:: rarticipcnt L\zzct±c\ 



firzlczcd is a 3u~rr.nry ot the Pjiiticluc^nt "ciiLL'on Tdrms t-ihi' n 
y'."i cc'inMjp.tpH i^L t'p.r copclusicr. or the Tvi ■ S'.i^t.t I.e.^Jerc^Iili^ 
"uckbliop. The. WO-. k-^'"-]! Ktrtlf is pT cased r-.'if.h tl'.c rcru'.'"s cf 
the rccctior. fern; -.rhich indii-,-: L.--S Mi-it- the. ^".joil.,- o'' i^'.t 
;n"'t LC.ip--'nts f"'T: I'v^z Lncir indiviclusl ncci^ wCiVC n:,i.t Ju. Inj; 
tile worlcsliDi) , 

'^2^'", ^•■"^ t'lK-riv y^'! Cer ycjr participeticn a.'^d ir.vitc niiV 
c>-.;,;.i.c-.,Ls, Su^';; ri u.i.oi-]i> , cj. J t i c :i ^"•■•^ , P'. c. i^et u"" kno'^.' ho;; '.:e 
car. ccntinue to serve -nc-u! 



:urc 



572 



•Member — Special Education 



Network— Bureau o( Education tor the Handicapped- US Off ice of Education- An Equal Opportunity Employer 



TRI-STATE LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
March 22-23, 1973 



List of Participants 



Russel L. Andreotti 
6235 Gratiot Rd. 
Saginaw, Michigan 48603 
517-799-4733 



Mary A. Anthony 

Box 515 

Ft. Recovery, Ohio 

419-375-2302 



45846 



C. Donald Beall 
951 E. Lafayette 
Lafayette Clinic 
Detroit, Michigan 48207 
313-963-5400 ext. 252 



Jerry Bowling 
4647 West 30th St. 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46222 
317-293-6150 



David J. Braukman 
3147 Clifton Ave. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 45220 
513-861-4954 



Helen J. Castle 
405 West Main St. 
Hillsboro, Ohio 45133 
513-393-1133 



McLTtha Janell Dennis 

Mott Children's Health Center 

Child Development Department 

806 Fifth Avenue 

Flint, Michigan 

313-234-7675 



Mike Dennis 

A-M-A ISD 

M-32W 

Alpena, Michigan 4 9707 

517-354-3101 



William Heward 

NRMCD 

Thompson Hall 

University of Massachusetts 

Amherst, Massachusetts 01002 

413-545-2457 



Maryann Jones 

3106 North Grand River 

Lansing, Michigan 48906 

517-485-0885 



Martin Kallaher 

Champaign County Board of Education 

Box 269 

Urbana, Ohio 43078 

513-653-5296 



Mrs. Lucile Karner 

3019 Woodruff 

Apt. 9 

Lansing, Michigan 48912 

517-489-5517 



Jim Kite 

303 S. Walnut St. 

Seymour, Indiana 

812-522-7793 



47274 



Mrs. Dainey Lege 
201 East 11th St- 
Austin, Texas 78701 
512-475-3507 



Bernard C. Lutkenhoff 
3147 Clifton Avenue 
Cincinnati, Ohio 45220 
513-861-4954 



Mrs. Evelyn McGregor 
280 Crescent Drive 
Portland, Michigan 48875 
616-527-4900 



573 



List of Participants 
Page 2 



Donna Miller 

St. Francis College 

IRC 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 46808 

219-432-3551 ext. 208 



Ellie Roosli 

711 St. Joseph Ave. 

Berrien Springs, Michigan 49103 

616-471-7725 



Diana Oberschulte 

2325 S. Garfield 

Traverse City, Michigan 49684 

616-946-8920 



Michael Shaver 
562 W. Spring St. 
Lima, Ohio 45804 
419-225-6530 



John Opperman 
11815 Woodland Ave. 
Cleveland, Ohio 44120 
216-229-4535 



Robert Snyder 

Rt. #2 

Ft. Recovery, 

419-375-4198 



Ohio 45846 



Fred Parker 

33000 Freedom Road 

Farmington, Michigan 

313-477-1300 



48024 



Peggy Tenney 
349 West Webster 
Muskegon, Michigan 
616-722-1602 



49440 



Betty Patrick 
East U.P. ISD 
Rudyard , Michigan 
906-478-6811 



49780 



Arnold Trafelet 

CO. P. Intermediate 

Indian River, Michigan 49721 

616-238-6365 



James R. Phillips 
635 South Main St. 
South Bend, Indiana 
219-289-7904 



46623 



Richard A. Wall 

Lock Box A 

Caro, Michiaan 48723 

517-673-3191 



Geneva Reid 
2128 Tulip Lane 
Jenison, Michigan 
616-457-2539 



49428 



Ms. Janet Wallace 

3200 N. Monroe 

Apt. 217 

Monroe, Michigan 48161 

313-243-6948 



Donald B. Richards 

117 S. Pt. Crescent 

Bad Axe, Michigan 48413 

517-269-7192 



Jane Walline 
Box 4 20 

Lansing, Michigan 
517-373-0923 



48902 



Thomas Risto 
23350 Meadow Park 
Garden City, Michigan 
313-533-2588 



48135 



Carol Weller 

St. Francis College 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 46808 

219-432-3551 ext. 208 



574 



t 



List of Participants 
Page 3 



Gail Wiemer 
Charlevoix-Emmet ISD 
County Building 
Charlevoix, Michigan 49720 
616-547-9947 



Betty Wing 

121 Pleasant St. 

Charlotte, Michigan 

517-543-2127 



48813 



David Williams 
2413 W. Maple Ave. 
Flint, Michigan 48507 
313-232-9161 ext . 58 



MSU SEIMC STAFF PRESENT* 



Mrs. Lou Alonso 
Director 



Ms. Nancy Carlson 

Senior Training Specialist 



Ms. Rita Harmon 
Secretary 



Mrs. Lynn Kinzel 
Secretary 



S. Joseph Levine 
Coordinator: Technology 
of Dissemination 



Max Moore 

Coordinator: Information 
Systems 



Peter Sorum 
Operations Coordinator 



Ted Ward 

Assistant Director 
Engineering and Development 



Sue Ann Yovanovich 

Field Services Coordinator 



*USOE/MSU Regional 
Instructional Materials Center 
For Handicapped Children and Youth 
213 Erickson Hall 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 48823 



575 



March 22 - 23. 1973 
■PARTICIPANT REACTION FORfl-- 



^ ■/ /'- 



1. For each session that you attended, please check the appropriate 
blanks . 



Describe Your Learner 

A self-paced activity that has participants 
complete a series of worksheets that narrows in on 
specific observable behaviors of a learner. The 
activity can be easily modified to focus on any type 
of learner. This session will use an adaptation of 
the activity designed by Dave Braukman. 



Relevant to 
your needs? 



Yes 

w 



No 



Will you use 
in the future? 



Yes 

(IL 



No 






Problems and Hints 

"Problems and Hints" is designed as a work- 
shop activity that will allow the participants an 
opportunity to share their concerns relating to 
a specified area. Rather than just raising issues, 
the activity structures participant answers for 
the issues. A series of short "identify-write" 
rounds make up the activity. A time schedule is 
provided at the beginning of the activity that 
establishes the procedure for each round. This 
is a very simple activity that can be successfully 
used without any prior preparation. 



Braille Reading Training Materials 

This is a completely group-run activity 
that does not need a leader ! The kit includes 
a cassette and simulated exercise that provides 
the participant an understanding of the problems 
involved in learning a symbolic code. The kit 
has been designed for use in situations where a 
workshop leader is not available. 



Task Analysis Game 

A three stage activity calling for participants 
to sequence a set of objectives and their correspond- 
ing activities. The content focuses on a low func- 
tioning learner and the necessity for a teacher to 
use task analysis to move the learner towards 
educational goals. 



Charting Behavior 

A case study on a low functioning learner 
is presented through a series of charts describing 
specific behaviors of that child undergoing mod- 
ification. Participants, in dyads, are asked to 
look at the charted inforroation and work in a 
problem.-solving situation. 



(S a 

lilL 



ML 






(:r 



// 



C c 






Participant React ' i 
Page 2 



'm 



Educational Planning 

This is a three part workshop activity that 
is designed to focus on three types of decisions 
involved in educational planning: 

— decisions that relate to educational 

responsibility 
— decisions that relate to educational 

placement 
— decisions that relate to educational 

programming 

The activity asks the workshop participants 
to assume' the roles of some of the key planners 
who may provide input for decisions involving 
children with learning and/or behavioral problems. 

This in-depth case study used over time can 
be used to facilitate understanding of the planning 
process and to develop skills in decision making 
and understanding of other viewpoints. 

Those workshop participants who choose this 
activity will be expected to attend all three 
aessions. 

The first session will focus on educational 
responsibility . 



! Educational Planning - 2nd Session 

This is a continuation of the educational 
planning activity described above. The focus 
for this session is educational placement . 



Educational Planning - 3rd Session 

This is a continuation of the educational 
planning activity described above. The focus 
for this session is educational programming 
and is an intensive programming session. 






Relevant to 
your needs? 

Yes ? No 



-Mix 



o 



(/'I ^^ 



will you use 
in the future? 



Yes 



No 




% Ox 

I? 




© 



Creating Discussion Tapes 

This simulated activity calls for teams 
of two participants to create a tape recording 
which will be used with teachers. The objective 
of the presentation is to deliver information 
about a new instructional material and to stim- 
ulate discussion among the listeners. . Particu- 
larly useful for persons who will be developing 
interactive audio tapes . 



<9 



® 



577 



Participant Reaction Form 
Page 3 



Polar Algebra 

A series of unique learning problems are 
created whereby the participant experiences the 
feelings of a student with learning disabilities, 
The activity is resolved through individual 
selection of remediation processes. Designed to 
develop a teacher's understanding of learning 
difficulties and the necessity for providing 
optional learning activities . 



6) 



Communication Handicaps 

Participants operate in pairs and work through 
a series of four activities that demonstrate 
auditory learning and visual learning. A worksheet 
provides the structure for participants to reflect 
on each experience in terms of helpful and hindering 
teaching strategies. 



Planning With Teachers 

A demonstration (role play) activity showing 
the value of three alternate strategies for plan- 
ning workshops. This activity is exceptionally 
useful if you are using other professionals to 
assist in your teacher training activities. The 
activity can be used with these professionals 
as part of their training. 



L.D. Card Game 

This workshop activity is designed to facil- 
itate understanding of the symptoms, remedial 
strategies, and terms that are used in dealing 
with children who have learning problems. The 
activity is built around a matching game whereby 
the teachers, operating in groups, are asked to 
sort out terms, symptoms and strategies into 
appropriate combinations. Following the discussion, 
each participant will be able to take home a book- 
let containing the information the groups have been 
organizing. 



Relevant to 
your needs? 

Yes ? No 



I 

till - 



1/// 



^ 



tK. _ 



Evaluating A Workshop Material 

This group activity is designed to provide 
participants with an opportunity to examine and 
analyze a potential workshop material. Partici- 
pants are provided t^-ansparencies on which to 
record their analysis data which will then be 
projected for group discussion. The activity 
highlights those aspects of a workshop material 
that are necessary for success. 



6 

mi- J- 



will you use 
in the future'; 



Yes 



S 



No 



tU- JL 

(2 Q 



W^Q 

nil 



d a 
III 



Cn Q 

II 

ItiL 1 



c 



fHk Ji_ 



578 



Participant Reaction Form 
Page 4 



L.D. Planning Priorities and 
Numbers/Alphabet Game 

These activities are designed so that work- 
shop participants can experience the diagnostic/ 
prescriptive process in a planned way. The two 
activities focus on specific problems related to 
children with learning disorders. One of the 
activities will utilize an adaptation designed by 
Carol Weller. 



Relevant to 
your needs? 



Will you use 
in the future^ 




^jT; 



>Mi^'^-^'^ o-^oh%l /?^.^, ^-'^^C'" 



^ 



2. How useful was the OPTION ROOM? 
Comments : 



Very Useful 



@ 



Useful 



Not Useful 



\\\ 



3. How useful were the OVERVIEW 
TAPES in the option room? 

Comments : 






lOLM 



4. How was the MODULAR SCHEDULING 
that was used during the two- 
day workshop? 



mm 



m^i I 



I 



(2) 



O 



How many kits did you examine 
in the option room? 

/ 



^^ ^j^. ^i, ^> i "j i ^> ^> ?. -^^^; "''^^ ^1 ^'^' ^"'^5 ^y-l 



L^ ^7^ r ^^ oM, /^ 






'/ 



579 



Participant Reaction Form ^ > I •■ ', ■ J ' ■■' ■ 

Pago 5 T ' . ■■■ •"'''' 

6. Use descriptive words to describe your reactions to this two-day 

workshop. List the words as fast as they come to you. Limit one 
minute! No sentences, please. 



What do you feel were the two most valuable aspects of the two-day 
workshop? 



8. If this two-day workshop were to be offered again for a different 
group of participants, what one thing should be eliminated? 



9. What was omitted, yet should have been included in this two-day 
workshop? 



10. Suggestions or comments: 



580 



\ 



USOE/MSt! 
RCCIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CtNTLR FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
^i. CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



.•\ 



fc-^^ 21i (rickiuo Hjtl Mich.Kaii Sure L;nivrri.)\ [.1%I l-iiiMn^Mif lnRriii 48021 
^ Cnopcrdlinf! Wilh St^le Oeparlmenrs ul tduciiliun in MiLhigan-lntJianJ-lJhib 



.U"; 573 



TRI-STATE LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 

Rita Harmon 
Sue Ann Yovanovich 



SUMMARY AND PURPOSE 

At the conclusion of the two-day workshop, participants were 
asked to complete a "Participant Reaction Form." This allowed 
participants to anonymously record their reactions to the workshop 
and served as an assessment measure for the workshop staff. 

RESULTS 

Question //I: "For each session that you attended, please check 
the appropriate blanks." 



This question was designed to allow participants to indicate 
whether or not the sessions attended were relevant to their needs. 
Participants were also asked to indicate their future action with 
regards to the use of the kits. It was expected that the responses 
would indicate to the workshop staff the relevancy and potential 
use of the materials. 



DESCRIBE YOUR LEARNER 



PROBLEMS AND HINTS 



BRAILLE READING TR^ilNING MATERIALS 



TASK ANALYSIS GAME 



CHARTING BEHAVIOR 



EDUCATIONAL PLANNING 



W2Trr^ 



581 



Relevant to 
Your needs? 



Yes 


? 


No 


12 








4 


1 





1 


1 





4 


1 


1 


9 


1 


1 


15 


1 






Will you use 
in the future? 



Yes 



11 



24 



No 




2 



-2- 



EDUCATIONAL PLANNING - 2im SESSION 

EDUCATIONAL PLANNING - 3RD SESSION 

CREATING DISCUSSION TAPES 

POLAR ALGEBRA 

COMMUNICATION HANDICAPS 

PLANNING WITH TEACHERS 

L.D. CARD GAME 

EVALUATING A WORKSHOP MATERIAL 

L.D. PLANNING PRIORITIES MK) 
NUMBERS /ALPHABET GAME 



Relevant to 
your needs? 



Yes 


7 


No 


13 


1 





14 


1 





1 








7 








11 


1 





9 


2 





8 








9 


1 


1 



Will you use 
in the future? 



Yes 


? 


No 


13 


1 





13 


2 





1 








5 


2 





9 


3 





8 


3 





7 


1 





9 





2 



The response to this question indicates that the participants felt that 
their needs were met and that they would utilize them in carrying out their 
local in-service programs. 

Question //2: "How useful was the OPTION ROOM?" 
Very Useful Useful Not Useful 

This question allowed the participants to indicate the usefulness of 
the OPTION ROOM. It was intended to provide input that would clarify 
participant reactions to the OPTION ROOM. 

Of the 25 respondents who answered this question, all felt it was 
useful - 12 (48%) indicated it was very useful ; 13 (52%) indicated useful . 

Question //3: "How useful were the OVERVIEW TAPES in the Option Room?" 
Very Useful Useful Not Useful 

This question was designed to provide feedback re^jarding the useful- 
ness of the OVERVIEVJ TAPES. It was hoped that the responses would provide 
input which would guide the workshop staff in preparing overview tapes, for 
future projects. 

Of the 21 respondents who answered this question, 13 (52%) felt that 
the overview tapes were u seful ; 8 (48%) felt that they were very useful. 
The responses indicate that overview tapes were an asset and should be 
included in future projects. 



582 



-3- 



Question #4: "How was the MODULAR SCHEDULING that was used 
during the two-day workshop?" 

Very Useful Useful Not Useful 

This question was designed to elicit participant reactions to the 
workshop format, ie, modular scheduling. It was hoped that responses 
would provide input which would assist the workshop staff in planning for 
future workshops. 

Of the 24 respondents who answered this question, sixteen (66.7%) 
found it to be very useful; 7 (29.1%) indicated useful; 1 (4.2%) did not 
consider it useful. The responses indicate that the participants had very 
positive feelings about the modular scheduling. This also indicates to 
the workshop staff that this format should be planned for a future work- 
shop. 

Question //5: "How many kits did you examine in the Option Room?" 

This question was designed to provide feedback as to the number of 
kits examined. It was hoped that the responses would provide input which 
would assist the workshop staff in planning for future workshops. Hope- 
fully, the responses would yield information such as: time allotment 
in Option Room; number of kits for examination; use of overview tapes; 
consultation by SEIMC staff. 

Of 24 participants, 10 examined between 1 to 5 of the 32 available 
kits; 9 examined betv7een 6 to 10; 3 examined between 11 to 16 and 2 
examined all of the kits. 

Responses indicate that the participants did use the Option Room 
during the workshop. It would seem that the use of such a format assists 
the participants in becoming aware of available resources. 



Question #6: "Use descriptive words to describe your reactions to 
this two-day workshop. List the words as fast as 
they come to you. Limit one minute! No sentences, 
please." 

A total of 153 words were elicited by this response. Of these, 141 
(98.2%) were positive and 12 (17.8%) were negative. Those words which 
appeared 5 or more times were: informative (9); interesting (8); fun (7); 
good (7); and helfpul (5). 

The response indicates that the participants left the workshop with 
positive feelings. 



583 



-4- 



PARTICIPANT RESPONSES 



Use desaviptive words to describe your reactions to this 
Workshop. List the words as fast as they come to you. 
Limit one minute.' No sentences, please. 



(9) 


informative 


(8) 


interesting 


(7) 


fun 


(7) 


good 


(5) 


helpful 


(4) 


educational 


(4) 


frustrating (-) 


(4) 


planned 




(well planned) 


(3) 


active 


(3) 


interaction 


(3) 


organized 


(3) 


relevant 


(3) 


useful 


(2) 


brainstorming 


(2) 


enjoyable 


(2) 


excellent 


(2) 


exciting 


(2) 


fast 


(2) 


great 


(2) 


ideas 


(2) 


involved 




(involvement) 


(2) 


late (-) 


(2) 


relaxed 




(relax) 


(2) 


stimulating 


(2) 


structured 


(2) 


tired (-) 




(tiring) 


(2) 


worthwhile 


(1) 


analyze 


(1) 


applicable 


(1) 


a-v materials 


(1) 


beneficial 


(1) 


carry over 


(1) 


casual 


(1) 


challenging 



(1) 


choice 




(1) 


people 


(1) 


compare 




(1) 


personable 


(1) 


concentrated 




(1) 


profitable 


(1) 


consistent 




(1) 


quick 


(1) 


different 




(1) 


reinforcement 


(1) 


different appi 


roaches 


(1) 


review 




to problems 




(1) 


rewarding 


(1) 


different disciplines 


(1) 


satisfied 


(1) 


elementary level 


(1) 


schedule 




mainly 




(1) 


sequence 


(1) 


evaluative 




(1) 


share 


(1) 


experiential 




(1) 


some holes (-) 


(1) 


explanations 




(1) 


successful 


(1) 


facilities 




(1) 


teaching tool 


(1) 


functional 




(1) 


thought provok 


(1) 


glad 




(1) 


together 


(1) 


happy 




(1) 


to-the-point 


(1) 


informal 




(1) 


valuable 


(1) 


input 




(1) 


variety 



(1 

(1 
(1 
(1 
(1 
(1 

(1 
(1 
(1 
(1 
(1 

(1 
(1 
(1 
(1 
(1 

(1 

(1 
(1 



insightful 

justifiable 
kits 

knowledgable 
learning experience 
less tiring 

like to do again 

limited on time (-) 

lively 

logical 

lots 

many good features 

meaningful 

more 

motivating 

not real (-) 

not relevant to 

ray needs (-) 

nothing 

other states - more 

input needed 



584 



(-) = negative word 



Question //7: "What do you feel were the two most valuable 
aspects of the two-day workshop?" 

This question was designed to assess whether the planned objectives 
of the workshop were met as perceived by the participants. The responses 
indicate that participants did perceive the objectives through the work- 
shop and felt that they were met. 

Participant response: 

(17) Interaction - Provided opportunity to' interact with others. 
(12) Replicable training materials that were provided. 

(11) Educational Planning 

(1) LD Card Game 

(10) Workshop Format . 

(3) Meaningful topics - relevant 

(2) Modular scheduling 
(2) Small group sessions 

(1) Modeling of emphasis on evaluation 

(1) Organization 

(1) Informal with great variety of offerings 

(8) Option Room - Provided opportunity to preview a variety of 

available in-service training materials. 
(6) Involvement Activities 

Question //8 : "If this two-day workshop were to be offered again for 
a different group of participants, what one thing 
should be eliminated?" 

This question was included to determine which aspects of the workshop 
should be modified or eliminated. A total of 13 responses (50%) indicated 
that nothing should be changed and a like number (50%) indentified the formal 
sharing evening session as unnecessary. 

Participant response: 
NOTHING (n = 13) 

FORMAL SHARING - EVENING SESSION (n = 13) 
PRE & POST TESTS (n = 3) 
EVALUATION OF WORKSHOP MATERIAL (n = 2) 
TASK ANALYSIS (n = 1) 
CHARTING BEMVIORS (n = 1) 



585 



-6- 



Queatl'^n y/9: "VJliat was omitted, yet should have been included 
in this tx;o-day workshop?'' 

This question was designed to determine what, if any, participant 
needs were not met by the workahop. This information would provide input 
for planning of future workshops. The following areas were specified: 



(4) Nothing 

(A) Coffee early on first morning 

(3) More emphasis on leadership style; planning, conducting and evaluating 
in-service workshops 

(3) More time for group sharing 

(3) More time and materials in option room 

(3) These topics v/ore omitted: 

(1) Behavior management in the classroom 
(1) Planning for the retarded 
(1) Low functioning learners 

Question #10: "Suggestions or comments." 

This question was designed to provide participants with an opportunity 
to react in an unstructured manner on any aspect of the total workshop. 
Those comments relating to content were positive. Negative comments centered 
around physical arrangements (facility, starting times, etc.). 

Coffee the first morning first! 

Very well done! 

Workshop should be held later in the school year. 

The majority of the kits are appropriate but in listing my priorities 
they need some revision for my use. 

Better eating facilities so can get back to sessions on time. 

Beginning on time. , 

Ending on time. 

In regards to modular scheduling — offer all vjorkshops several ti-ies — 
give participants master schedule and let them pick and choose, altliough 
with a small group such as this, your approach v;as probably most practical. 

Continuation of an option room - maybe expand. 

Overall, a very good two-day session. 

586 



-7- 



I feel many of the activities I could never use or adapt. Yet the idea 
does let me build on it and do something else — yet I needed the idea here! 
A real learning workshop even if all the activities didn't come through as 
such. 

Every session was good. I enjoyed the fellowship. 

9:00 for beginning sessions. Lunch period second day too short. 

All sessions in same building. Take off earlier on Friday (2:30 or 3:00) 
or schedule solid until time to go. 

Longer lunch hour on second day. 

End session on Friday at 2:30 or 3:00 for those from a distance. 

The concept of a self-directing activity was good but there are other 
good methods. Many teachers will not sit do\>m with a cassette tape or 
respond to a self-directed activity. 

I gleaned from each of the seven sessions attended. Leadership is good. 
I like the format and modular scheduling. 



587 



IN-SERVICE SESSION 

Rudyard, Michigan 
September 20-21, 1973 

1:15 pm Welcome Betty Patrick, CRS , 

Region II 

Overview of goals and objectives for 
in-service sessions for 1973-74 . . . .Jane Walline, Michigan 

Dept. of Education 

Who's Who Sue Yovanovich, Randy Gross 

Great Lakes Region SEIMC 

Great Lakes Region SEIMC - How We 

Can Help You Sue Yovanovich, Rita Harmon 

Randy Gross 

Historical overview, policies, etc.. .Sue 

News Notes - Idea Series Rita 

User Authorization Cards Randy 

Child-Use Mediated Teacher-Use 

Catalogs Randy 

Browsing Catalogs Randy 

PrIMMERS Randy 

COFFEE AND DOUGHNUTS 

Development of Associate SEIMCs Sue 

A Look at Tomorrow's Agenda Sue, Randy 

Tour of Region II Special Education 
■ Learning Media Center Betty 

Friday, September 21 

8:30 am Computer-Based Resource Units (CBRU) . .Randy 

9:30 am Review of Dr. Stepp's Media Institute. .Sue 

Introduction of Instructional 
Development Model Randy, Sue 

Guidelines for product development . . .Randy, Sue 

12:00 pm Adjournment - Good luck for a successful year! See you on 
October 18-19. 



588 



PARTICIPANTS 

September 20-21, 1973 
Rudyard, Michigan 



CRSs 



Ahn, Grace 
Boultor, Sue 
Henyon, Henrietta 
Herbert, Ben 
Oberschulte, Diana 
Patrick, Betty 
Pritchard, Ralph 



Re id , Geneva 
Robinson, Janet 
Roosli, Eleanor 
Russell, Ruth 
Schaefer, June 
Thomas , Ron 
Trafelet, Arnold 



Benwlre, Blanche 
Dorie, Marie 
Farr , Beverly 
Jones , Maryann 
Kekke, Robert 
Land is, Ray 



CRCs 



McGregor , Evelyn 
Mellon, Betty 
Montroy, Roy 
Richards, Don 
Wiemer, Gail 
Williams , Lyle 



Babcock, Earl 
Grand Rapids 

Cousins, Jo 
Adrian 

Hovyl , Marge 
Stanton 



Librarians 



Long, Muriel 
Traverse City 

Ringelberg, Harriett 
Grand Haven 



589 



r^-^r ^xr.}-;; 



rill assi;. I 



sentences! Vou r 

t 

I 



:op. [?o not use 



k 2. Rank tlic '.orkshop ecfivities in terr.s of IMPORTA^JCE to you: 



10 



10 



11 



iV 



.User Authorize-, ion Card 

,Usc of Brcv.'Sir;: ;nd Chi id-Use-Mediated Teacher-Use Catalogs 
'Developpient c" -.ssociate SEIilCs (fi In-strip/cjsseLte presentation) 

-CER'J 
Ins-crjcticncl j;velorT;:nt Wcoel 



IT 



3. Rank the workshop activities in terms of INTEREST to you; 



T 



11 



10 User Authorization Card 

1 ,Use of Brcv-sinc zrr. C:-.ild-U5e-Mc-diated Teachor-Use Catalogs 
^ iDovelopnent of Associate SEIIlCs (fi imstrip/cc-ssettc presentation) 
_2_ ;CEP.l! 

8 ^Instructional Develop-nent Model 
i 



'^.a.How much did you know ato^t this .rcrivity prior to f'^is v/orkshop? 

Ccnsiderablej Mode^'ate 
A^iiount 



VsT Autiiorization C"-^ M 



.iiTount 
. — —- 



Use of Grov;:ino a;- 



; Qi 



Develoo,,e:n of .'.ss: : 



Iriftructional De.v; 



2 

1 



_9 

12 



Small I 
A[,,0JMt; 






Nothing 



. : 5 [ ^_a- 

'2 -91 



2^i__ . 



T 



3 



b.Hcw eiuch do you feel y:.' ^J_ kncv about it? 



;• -iounl 



Srall ' "othing 
Anojnt 



_L'i •Il'LjilLt h.Q rJ.?P t-ll"; 'A _ 



"T — 






;.gV;2Jc-r ";rit. c ~ ; sj 



11 
15^ 






19 



LirJaiiiCtiori 



22 
—9 

18 







0_ 

"0 

0' 



590 



"CTii- 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 
September 20-21, 1973 

1. List single descriptive words that describe this workshop. Do not use sentences! 
You have only, minute ! 

Excellent. Helpful. 

Gregorious . . 

Informative . Fun . 

Informative, creative, interesting, enjoyable, structured. (Other - Sue, 
transparencies GREAT! CLEVER!) 

Informative, good location. 

Informative, impressive. 

Productive, friendly, pleasant, constructive, apt, inspirational, 
frustrating, problem solving, and problem creating! 

Input I Direction! Fun! Confusion! Clarification! Anxiety! Motivation! 

Informative, flexibly structvired. 

Interesting! 

Enjoyed, as usual, meeting with other CRCs . Good, fun, sleepy. 

Clarifying, informative, initiating. 

Informative, however scarey! Good! 

Informative, whirl-wind, fun. 

Good. 

591 



-2- 

Informative, rapid moving. 

Good, ideas, information, problems. 

Informative, helpfiil, well-organized, excellent balance of activities. 

I felt you vere sensitive to the needs of the people in attendance. 

Fast-moving, Informal, Informative, Useful. 

Informative, useful. 

Very good, informative, comfortable. 



Reinforcement, time for coffee& donuts , stimulating, exhausting, practical, 
helpful, excellent, refreshing, fast-speed, enjoyable, anxiety, big job, 
consideration. 



Very good, too much, too fast, keep it going, tired, happy, willing, trying, 
motivational . 



Reassiiring, helpful, informative, mind blowing, great job, 
Friendly, caring, motivational. 
Moderately informative . 



592 



WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES 

Media Workshop 

for 

Division of Special Education, Lansing School District 

October 11-12, 1973 

The Midwest Regional Media Center for the Deaf 

University of Nebraska - Lincoln 

In cooperation with 

USOE/MSU Regional Instructional Materials Center 

Michigan State University 

The najor r'oal of t»-.is nedla workshop Is to provide a "hands-on" 
experience vhich involvns the design, selection and utili^at->n of educatior=^l 
media in the teaching learriinq process. Enphasis is qiv'tiri "o ideas for 
practical application of inr-dia in the classroom. Briefly, this includes 
the following objectives: 

1. Each particinant should be able to list at least ten 
differrnl ■'•or^niques or ideas for iis'tnr pc'u.cational 
media, ( 'vpr»!'---:».d Transparencies, Sur.er ?■■'•■' ■'■ovies, 
and Sliues) in the instructional rrccess. 

2. Rach pertirioar,* should be a.cU to '^"-rrhe various 
productic": o'^i'irr^ert" 

A. Thereof ax Secretary Copy "iachine 

D. (n.i.' Laf'i'irtcr 

C. TiT;tT'?t1c visi.ial -'iai-er 

u. Super !OT"i -ovic- cainere, tripod anci li'Vr.ts 

3. Eac^' rrir-'-if ■ir^-'^'Ti: ■vill take f">'>rf i" .'.iv-.i^rin- soiti*^ 
eciucatior.al t-ji? in tnf variOLiS i ;' ■= • 

A. i.!ir-r-r •;■ fil'V, lab (live action and aniiiiation) 

C. Sli'ies (conv work and live action) 

C. Trancrf^rency lab (color lifts ar.d leat process) 

These workshop experiences should provide the narticipants the basic 
skills necessary for developing and using educational media in tiieir 
classroom. 



593 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA 
L.INCOI-N. NEBRASKA 68508 



TEACHERS COUl-EGE 

OKPARTMKNT OF 
EDUCATIONAU ADMINISTRATION 



PUBABK RKPLY TOi 
NEBRASKA HALI- 428 



MIDWEST RESIONAI. MEDIA CENTER 
FOR THE DEAF 



October 16, 1973 






^7=^ 







»r. Robert C. Weir 
Coordinator Specialist 
Lansinq School District 
Division of Special Education 
3426 S. Cedar 
Lansing, Michigan 48910 

Dear Bo*>: 

Thank you for the .ixcclUiiit orqanlzatlon and t;;e fine help you and your 
staff extended us during thp workshon. 'ie all tirou^hl" onioyod "ori im 



with yo'jr teacher' ant. aT 
activities. 



lO participated so /i-lT ',r, all tl.o rieJia 



Enclosed is a cony of .->]] ■■■\,u rer;isterod. ide ."ilins arc- a'll out for nrocossing 
and s'ojld L^e "iicl; cc v.. 



Hnce aaain, t'l3n'•'■^, ■. 
time. 



Sincerely, 




Michard H. Young 
Media Sneclallst 

enclosure 



■.icioants "it!iin t/c vi-cks. 



6lll Stoefen 
Field CoordinaT;or 




loiirii '.aVIcr 
iraduatc \ss1stant 



594 



SAMPLE SCHEDULE 

Media Workshop 
for 
Division of Special Education, Lansing School District 
October 11-12, 1973 
conducted by 
The Midwest Regional Media Center for the Deaf 
University of Nebraska - Lincoln 
In cooperation with 
USOE/MSU REGIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER 
Michigan State University 

THURSDAY October 11th 

8;30 a.m. Opening Session (large group) 



9:00 a.m. 



Media Labs (three 3-hour rotation groups) 



First Lab Rotation: 
lab 1 Lab 2 

Group A Group B 



Lab 3 

Group C 



12:00 


LUNCH 




1:00 p.m. 


Second Lab Rotation: 
Lab 1 Lab 2 
Group C Group A 


Lab 3 

Group B 


4:00 p.m. 


Adjourn 




FRIDAY October 12th 






8:30 a.m. 


Third Lab Roartion: 
Lab 1 Lab 2 
Group B - Group C 


Lab 3 
Group A 


11:30 


LUNCH 




1:00 


Wrap-sup Session (large 


groupsj 


2:30 


Adjourn 





595 



Media Uorksiioi 
for 
Division of Sjifcv'ia'i Education, L&^ring Sc'noo, District 
October 1''-12, 1573 



/ittfjorla Adcock 
Teocher Aide 
Walnut Street School 
Lansing. J Michigan 48906 

f'ls. Dsbra Barnoff 

Teficivar 

vfcodcreek Elerrieiitary School 

-lOOO Ivoodcreek Lane 

Lansing, Michigan 48910 

'fe. D-MH iJeasley 
Speech Theriipist 
Woodcs-^ek Elementary School 
4000 ''loodCi'eek Lans 
L^.nsino, Michifjan 48910 

(■fc . o jsan Be son 

Teacher of the Hearing Jir,pai-:'«d 

Reid Road Eleirentcsvy Scl'.ool 

^^i^A^d Blsnc, Itlchigar 46439 

;'1s. Marcia Bowmaster 

Tpaeher of the Hearing Impaired 

Soyce Ele-jtsnif'.i-y School 

3553 iSorth State Rocd 

Tfinig, Hichigcn 43S16 

'•':■:. print; Breard 

Ts{ich'3r 

t'tlchigtn School for the D=3f 

West Court i^nd Milief i?oaa 

Fn'nt, Michigan 

fL Connie Brown 
Stiident Teacher 
■■lalnu': Street School 
La?is-'ng. fnchlgan as906 

%. Joyce Chaprn;jn 
readier Aide 

Woodcreek Elemer;ta''y Sdvool 
4000 Hoodcreak Lane 
'.iinsjiva, Midiigan 4B9in 

ite. Viro-Snis ChrlstenAen 

TeaciKir and Coiinse'-^cr 

iOiile Cuynty Intenrsdiorie SchvCils 

2'*2 Lafayette S::reftt 

L-xy'/i > ''ichlgan 



i*1s. Virginia Coppens 

Teacher 

Wocic-^eek Elementary ScJiool 

4000 Woodcreak Lane 

Lans-liig, Michigan 48910 

lis. Verng Ccx 

Teacher Aide 

Forest Averill Elementary School 

3201 Averill Court. 

Lansing^ Michigan 4£!910 

Ms. Audi^y Fickle 

Speech Pathologist 

lap er County Intemiscilate Schools 

1996 West Ot^'gcn 

Lapeer,, Michigan 48446 

lis. Sua Flussland 

Teadisr 

-sh.-er Hitji School 

3456 Lalise - Road 

31oomneld Hills, Michigan 48013 

Ay1..'. Forsyih 

Teacher 

rmqht r<ic:) .Junior High 

2500 Hampden Drive 

Lansing, f'ichigan 48910 

Ms. Jill F.-ank 
Teticher-Coinselor 
V/oodcreek i-lementary School 
4000 Uoodc^ek Lane 
Lansing, Michigan 48910 

Ms. Janenn'! Grinnell 
Tea.iher Ai 1e 

Woodcreek 'ilementary School 
4000 Uoodc ^ek Lane 
.an::-1ncj, n chigan 48910 

Ars. B-'jiHba'a Kellogg 

Teacher 

'.iinrred Grievner School 

:3.2Vit'! Van Jyke 

Ut1ca, M-icdgan 43087 



596 



I 



fis. Meredith Kennedy 
Student Teacher 
Walnut Street School 
Lansing, Michigan 48906 

lis. Jeanette 0. Lester 

Teacher 

Wa'iiiut Ste^et School 

1012 Walnut Street 

Lansing, Michigan 48906 

Ms. Sue Louisignau 

Teacher 

Michigan School for the Deaf 

West Court and Miller Road 

Flint, Michigan 

Mr. Ted Mitchell 
Consultant 

Cheboygari-Otsego-Presque Isle 
Intermediate School District 
6065 Learning Lane 
Indian River, Michigan 

fis. Nancy Mosher 

Teacher 

Woodct'eek Elementary School 

4000 Woodcreek Lane 

Lansing, Michigan 48910 

Ms. Cynthia Murphy 

Teacher 

Lahser High School 

3456 Lahser Road 

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 48013 

Ms. Marj Neubache** 

Teacher 

Lahser High School 3456 

3456 Lahser Road 

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 48013 

Ms. Donna Nugent 

Teacher 

Michigan School for the Deaf 

West Court and Miller Road 

Flint, Michigan 48502 

Ms. Adelle Pugh 

Teacher 

Woodcreek Elementary School 

4000 Woodcreek Lane 

Lansing, Michigan 48910 

Sherry Roach 

Teacher 

Woodcreek Elementary School 

4000 V/oodcreek Lane 

Lansing, Michigan 48910 



Mrs. Leslie Schroeter 
Primary Teacher 
Woodcreek Elementary School 
4000 Woodcreek Lane 
Lansing, Hchigan 48910 

Bemie Sermak 

leaJier 

Walnut Street School 

1012 North Walnut 

Lansing, Michigan 48906 

Ms. Janet Spence 
Teacher 
Handley School 
3021 Court Street 
Saginaw, Michigan 48602 

Ms. Carol VanHoaren 

Teacher 

Ave rill Elementary School 

3201 Averill Court 

Lansing, Michigan 48910 

Mr. Gordon Thomas 

Teacher-Counselor 

Hill Community High School 

5815 Wise Road 

Lansing, Michigan 48910 

Mr. Robert C, Weir 

Coordinator 

Lansing School District 

3426 South Cedar 

Lansing, Michigan 48910 

Ms. Mary Womiak 

Teacher 

Walnut Elementary School 

1012 North Walnut 

Lansing, Michigan 48906 

Ms. Lorene Zagata 

Teacher 

Frank Schi.ll Elementary School 

325 E. Fnnk Street 

Caro, Michigan 48723 



597 



AGENDA 

November 5, 1973 
Butler University 



9:30 - 10:00 am - Registration 
10:00 - 12:00 am - Select-Ed Presentation - Vince Shortt 
12:00 - 1:00 pm - LUNCH 



1:00 - 1:45 pm - Sue Ann - IMC/RMC Network 

Services offered by GLRSEIMC 

1:45 - 2:00 pm - Rita - News Notes 

Idea Series 

2:00 - 3:30 pm - Randy - Browsing Catalogs 

CT Catalogs 
CBRU Explanation 

3:30 pm - ADJOURNMENT 



598 



INDIANA IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP 

November 5, 1973 
Butler University 



Paul Ash, Coordinator IMC 
Box 100 - Butler Univ. 
4600 Sunset Ave. 
Indianapolis, In. 46208 

Linda Blanton 

(for Dr. H. Schroeder) 

Developmental Training Ctnr. 

10th & By Pass 

Indiana Univ. 

Bloomington, In. 47401 

Jerry Bowling 

208 N. Warman Ave. 

Indianapolis, In. 46222 

Devota Burros 
(for Dr. J. VanTassel) 
Dept. of Spec. Educ. 
Ball State Univ. 
Muncie, In. 47306 

Robert Currie 

Spec. Educ. Dept. 

Purdue Univ. 

W. Lafayette, In. 47906 

Dick Eisinger 
Dept. of Mental Health 
1315 W. 10th St. 
Indianapolis, In. 46202 



Jim Horton 

Special Services Unit 
Madison State Hosp. 
Madison, In. 47250 

Don Reynolds 
Room 10-A Ludwig Park 
400 Jackson Park Drive 
Seymour, In. 47274 

Bob Robertson 

Northern Reg. Service Cntr. 

635 S. Main St. 

South Bend, In. 46623 

Glen Taylor 

1836 College Ave. 

Huntington, In. 46750 

Carol Waller, Coordinator 
Northeast RIRC/HCY 
2701 Spring St. 
Fort Wayne, In. 46808 

Doris Williams 
Dept. of Spec. Education 
Indiana State Univ. 
Terre Haute, In. 47809 



599 



AGENDA 

Program Profiles For The Severely And 
Profoundly Mentally Retarded 

January 18, 1974 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Martha S. Rowland, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Special Education 

University of Virginia 



9:30 - 10:00 am Registration - Coffee and Donuts 



10:00 - 10:30 Inservice Training Techniques for 

Staffing SMR, PMR Programs 



10:30 - 12:00 Planning Sensible Modifications of 

Behaviors in SMR, PMR Students 



12:00 - 1:00 LUNCH 

1:00 - 2:30 pm Training Early and Pre-Language Skills 
2:30 - 2:45 Break 



2:45 - 3:15 Operating Effective and Relevant 

Programs for the SMR and PMR 



3:15 - 3:30 Evaluation 



600 




23 respondents 



GREAT LAKES REGION SEIMC 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



January 18, 1974 



Date 
Indianapolis , Indiana 



Location 



Program Profiles for the Severely & Profoundly 

m. . ., rm — ; — r Retarded 

Title of Workshop 

Dr. Martha S. Rowland 
Presenter 



This evaluation is designed to provide the Great Lakes Region SEIMC with 



feedback regarding your reactions to this workshop. 
as you really feel about them. 



Please check: 



(positive) 



13 special education teacher 
regular classroom teacher 
5~ administrator 



Organization of presentation 
18 3 1 



Please answer all questions 



in-service educator 

student 

other (specify) 

1 - psychologist 

1 - speech therapist 

1 - multi-hdcp. unit leader 

1 - psychometrist 



(negative) 



2, Was the selected media appropriate to the presentation 
of subject 

19 3 



Clarity of instructional objectives 
18 3 1 



Personally useful to me 
14 5 1 



601 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



7. Specific positive comments you would care to make about any aspect of 
this presentation. 

Handouts and material are much appreciated. Overall, a very interesting 
day. 

Good over-all presentation. 

Very well organized .and presented. Dr. Rowland was most patient and 
cooperative in answering questions. 

Dr. Rowland has excellent knowledge of the subject and was able to make 
the presentation interesting and informative. 

Presenter was excellent - very knowledgeable and perceptive in area. 

I feel I have a good or rather better idea of how to set up a program 
of training the PMR child and a better idea of content. 

Excellent presentation and explanation of material. 

The presentation was extremely useful to me in that I have two children 
in my room that I think the language program will help. 

You are a very humanistic , warm individual who shows through your 
enthusiasm and concern for the retarded! You have make me think - 
Particularly about ACCOUIWABILITY ! Thank you and good luck. 

Very relevant and useful to me. It is difficult to find pertinent 
materials for this group. 

Videotaped sessions, content of presentation, and hand-out materials were 
excellent. Although presently involved with TMR children, I feel much 
of today's presentation is applicable. Well worth the time spent. 

Videotape very helpful . 

Only a desire that more of our staff could see this - and see that it 
can be done - that some kids can do somethings. 

Dr. Rowland was well organized and presented many valuable ideas for 
curriculum. She is an excellent speaker! 

Visual aids . 

Very good reinforcing and good selection of media to get the program 
across. 



602 



-2- 



(Question #7 continued) ; 



The content was excellent. The attempt of applying this information is 
extremely important and useful. 

Presented a host of realistic alternatives and program possibilities. 
Very thorough. I appreciated in-service suggestions. 

I feel I have gained tremendously from this symposium. I realize where 
I have missed the boat in some respects and am encouraged that there are 
many things I am doing well. Your preparation is excellent and this 
appears to be a program which should be accepted by many. I'm anxious 
to try it . 

Few simply put to my actual functions. 



I 



603 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



8. Specific negative comments you would like to make about any aspect of 
this presentation. 

More shoiild have heen covered concerning SMR and PMR at earlier stages 
(non-verbal, non-stimulable) and how to deal with specific problems. 

Too simplistic. Many important variables (especially concerning effective 
use of reinforcement principals) were not discussed. More emphasis on 
SMR and little discussion of effective programming for PMR — what about 
multiple-handicapped, motor-involved PMR. 

Too much time was spent on basic concepts for me. 

A little long and the introduction to behavior modification might be 
condensed. 

Too basic at times - more specific areas. 

Dealt with individuals in ideal situations; a bit idealistic for most teachers. 

The organization of presentation and materials should be improved. 

The testing aspect was a bit laborious . Could be streamlined so that 
people would understand the basic sequence and concepts without having 
to go through each step. 

Perhaps a reevaluation of the tapes could be done -and some group tapes 
could be made to provide those of us in PMR classrooms with a more realistic 
picture of the program. 



604 



"Program Profiles for the Severely and Profoundly Retarded" 



NAME 



1. 

2, 
3, 
4, 
5, 
6, 
7. 
8, 
9, 

10. 

11, 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

18. 

19. 

20. 

21. 

22. 

23. 

24. 

25. 

26. 

27. 

28. 

29. 

30, 

31. 

32. 

33. 

34. 

35. 

36. 

37. 

38. 

39, 

40. 

41. 

42, 

43, 

44, 

45, 

46, 

47, 

48, 



Mary Hobbs 
Sandra Todd 
Beth Gilligan 
Joann Linsmith 
Lisa Bauman 
Noel G. Reed 
Janet Lane 
Glen Taylor 
Sonja Eubank 
Pat Newman 
Betty Due 

C. Charles Greiner 
Patricia Riggan 
Sally Graham 
Grace Hull 
Joanna Harris 
Calissa Berkshire 
Bob Donaldson 
Jan Wheeler 
Luana Burris 
Michael Hooley 
Susan Ellsbury 
Stuart Swenson 
Karen Day 
Carol Weller 
Normandie Mindheim 
Karen Lois Brown 
Diane Hanlin 
Ron Lewis 
Marjorie Schroch 
Gene Clemens 
Bob Handlon 
Jan Pinkerstaff 
Ron Myers 
Cyndi Smith 
Kathy Pedretti 
Kathy Mitchell 
Noel Erickson 
Linda Eszenyi 
Pam Herman 
John M. Keifsrider 
Sarah Litch 
Gerald Bellistri 
Arthur Spohr 
Jan Olszewski 
Janet Meeks 
Lynn Eckart 
Jim Alley 



REGISTER 

cm 

Franklin 

Greenwood 

Franklin 

Shelbyville 

Indianapolis 

Bluffton 

Greencastle 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

La Porte 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Plymouth 

Plymouth 

Connersville 

Indianapolis 

La Grange 

Crawford svi lie 

Logansport 

Indianapolis 

Hammond 

Warsaw 

Ft. Wayne 

Bedford 

Redkey 

Portland 

Carmel 

Berne 

Berne 

Valparaiso 

Valparaiso 

Greenfield 

South Bend 

So. Bend 

South Bend 

Highland 

Highland 

Highland 

New Haven 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Highland 

Highland 

Highland 

Wayne Twp. 

Indianapolis 



SCHOOL COPPORATinN 

Johnson City Spec. Services Sch, 

Johnson City Spec. Services Sch, 

Johnson City Spec. Services Sch, 

Shelbyville Central School 

Perry Township 

Adams S Wells Joint Services 

Putnam W. Hendricks 

DPI 

Perry Township 

Perry Twshp RISE 

Perry Twshp RISE 

South La Porte Comm. Coop. 

Cold Spring School, IPS 

Cold Springs 

Joint Services Sp. Ed. 

Joint Service Sp. Ed 

Fayette Co. 

DPI 

Westview Sch. Corp 

Crawfordsville Comm. 

Logan Comm. Schools 

DPI 

Hammond P.S. 

Warsaw 

N.E. IN IRC 

No. Lawrence Co. PS 

Jay School Corp. 

Jay School Corp. 

Hamilton-Tipton Sp. Ser. Coop. 

South Adams 

South Adams 

Porter Co. Sp. Ed. 

Porter Co. Spec. Ed. 

Hancock So. Mad. Jt. Ser. 

So. Bend Comm. School Coop. 

South Bend Comm. School Coop. 

South Bend Community Sch. Coop. 

N.W. Sp. Ed. Coop. 

N.W. Sp. Ed. Coop. 

N.W. Sp. Ed. Coop 

East Allen Co. Schools 

East Allen Co. Schools 

EastAllen Co. Schools 

N.W. Sp. Ed. Coop. 

N.W. Sp. Ed. Coop. 

N.W. Sp. Ed. Coop. 

Indianapolis 

Wayne Township 



605 



AGENDA 
Thursday, October 18, 1973 

9:30 am - Registration, coffee and rolls 

10:00 am - Welcome - discuss 2 day agenda 
Announcements - Jane 

10:30 am - Distribute CBRU information sets and copies of 
request forms - Answer any questions regarding 
CBRU use. 

10:45 am - "Selected Retrieval and Information Systems" 

11:15 am - PrIMMIRS — Question and Answer period 
Distribute — CEC Thesaurus 

PrIMMIRS Thesaurus 

11:30 am - Adjourn for LUNCH 

1:00 pm - Select-Ed 

2:45 pm - Coffee Break 

3:00 pm - Russ Andreotti 

3:30 pm - Diana Oberschulte 

4:00 pm - Jan Fortenbacher 



606 



AGENDA 
Friday, October 19, 1973 

8:15 am - Review Session (for those not in attendance at September meeting), 

9:00 am - Individual Reports (2 groups - white) 

9:30 am - Apparent Solutions (large group) 

10:00 am - Advantages and Disadvantages (individual - blue) 

10:15 am - Feedback on Solutions, etc. (2 groups) 

(Re-evaluate problem, choose one solution) 

10:45 am - FUNCTION 2 - Analyze Setting - (large group) 
Randy - transparency 

FUNCTION 3 - Organize Management - Randy 

11:00 am - FUNCTION 4 - Identify Objectives 
Write objectives - (individual) 
Analyze objectives - (2 groups) 

LUNCH 

1:00 pm - FUNCTION 5 - Specify Methods 

Transparency - Randy (large group) 

1;30 pm - Answer Questions and Complete Chart - (individual) 

1:45 pm - Analyze Chosen Method - (2 groups) 

2:15 pm - Summary - Assignment - (large group) 

2:30 pm - A Look at Next Month's Program 
Evaluation of Workshop 



607 



CRC-CRS IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP 

October 18-19, 1973 
East Lansing, Michigan 



Participants 



Dave Williams 
Janice Frieder 
Ben Herbert 
Russ Andreotti 
Nancy Mast 
Thomas Trantum 
Betty Mellon 
Lucile Karner 
Arnold Trafelet 
Janet Robinson 
Jo Cousins 
Evelyn McGregor 
Marie Dorie 
Bob Kekke 



June Schaefer 
Roy Montroy 
Betty Patrick 
Henrietta Henyon 
Ralph Pritchard 
Rom Risto 
Ray Land is 
Ruth Russell 
Ellie Roosli 
Maryann Jones 
Peggy Tenney 
Sharon Sergent 
Jan Fortenbacher 
Betsy Ross 



608 



22 respondents 



WCR KStIO? EV^;L U ATION 

Michigan CRGs 

East Lansing, Michigan 

October 18-19, 1973 



Please rate the following segments of the workshop on a 5 point scale in reference 
to their perceived benefit to you: 



TOTALS ; 



19 



1) 


Northwest SEIMC f ilmstrip-tape set 
on CEC and CBRU 


POOR 

1 


2 


(2) 
3 


(6) 
4 


GOOD 

(li+) 
5 


2) 


Prescriptive Materials Retrieval 
System (PMRS) or Select-Ed 


1 


2 


3 


(1) 
4 


(21) 
5 


3) 


PrIMMIRS (keysort card system) 


1 


a) 

2 


(5) 
3 


(11) 
4 


(M 

5 


A) 


Sharing of 3 Michigan CRSs cataloging 
systems. 


1 


(1) 
2 


3 


(9) 
4 


(8) 
5 


5) 


Friday's Instructional Development 
session 


1 


(1) 
2 


(7) 
3 


(6) 
4 


(8) 
5 


6) 


How would you rate the total two-day 
workshop? 


1 


2 


(1) 
3 


(9) 
4 


(12) 
5 



k2 6t 



COMI'IENTS : 



609 



WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



Octoter 18-19, 1973 



COMMENTS 



These sessions are extremely helpful - the chances to share ideas and 
systems and materials available especially. 



Very good workshop. Helpful. Enjoyable, 



I appreciate the close cooperation and help I have already received 
in preparing me to do my job better. Thank you. 



Very fine two-day session. I was up-tight initially about the media 
presentation but feel very much more comfortable knowing what I'm 
going to do. Dave was a big help to me in clarifying my thinking. 



Thursday was really a good day - Friday was kind of loose! 
Very informative. Lot of information packed into time. 
Well done. 
Good - interesting - informative - helpful. 



610 



Asenaa 
Larr>* Jr Rigat 

7«00 P.1'3, Prol-aac 

7-15 Discussion - V>'ork,«-hop Intro<'''i.:iion 

Contci-it iifid Pvocecliiree 
Avaiir-b'-ilcy of Mcdlr 
Co;.;p}«;xiLy o'c bohavior tnd its 
inflrcncca 

7 J 50 i)lRCJS5ion - l)Aslc T("iitf3 

R-oefivch liagi-.j 
B'-;havlci" !<?.n-gv..rrr\!; 

iffcdSctabl.o., ^e2su^^■blc -f frets 
Chai\f'ln<«. »-';)rf;e',vef; (a;; tsjch'jra) 
Social and Acidemir Gahaviors 
SysttHnatrJc ProgramKung 
D?f InlLicng of Tjr.iia enj Prc/ceduroa 
Psoc5«lor. and Con^-Jctcwcy 
Opcrakit ConditVonln^-T Kodtl 

7:45 Film Srorslse - Observation aad Ppcorsllr.g 

Teacher Pre-^entatipn 

Te.-'ci.&r tixpactcit ions 
JHjp'l Kesponse 

8 J 00 Dificijrsiop - Uecordlnr, Bthavinro 

Pjste 

L<.».racSc'n 
lime Stflwpling 
Graph! r.j? 

SjJ.5 Jiscusr-ior - r-M'^-^et f>«'navlor and ''io'ls 

Cnaracue-riaf'.cn of T<iij,;©t B«>.Aviors 
Irobl.ra^t of i>.f h-i'.':lon 
Svatomenc r.2 Go" Is 

8:i5 S,-?a2X Group Int^inrtlon (^-5 pArCicipantp) 

l>t.it>rlpt loii ol .Int'.ividjiii Tar^sca 

TotrtJ CsOJp Ol3r,;;,f,ien 
611 



iVgnxda continued 



•2- 



CiOO P.M. 



9tl5 
9 J 35 



lOsOO 



Oiocusglon - Aov^ssimtint of an Operant 
Operant Levels - Resdlncs?^ 
Bcisalin^:' and i'.sjtlplcs 
Prograra Mods is 

Tape - FJliTiEtrip Exercise - Coiisac,'jatlon 

Discussion - RolnforcOTient and Ex'"inc:Clon 
AcceJ.raratln.q •"or.cequer.css 
Kt^gatlve Attention and Help 
Catching Children iielng Good 
Tcklng fcr Granted vmat wa Ey.p«ct 

Adjournment 



NoTemher 30 



9 J 00 A.M. 



9520 



9SA5 
10:25 



Discussion - Classroom Relnforcccei 
Grades 
Attcatiori 
Categories 

Dlsaisalon - Alternatives to Rialnf or cement 
and Extinction 
Punlshiflent 

Negative Roinforcf:m!>r.t 
DlffGrancial ReSulorcGDtaiit 
Response Cost 
Timtj Out 
PalrSnj? end Fading 

Film ExprclsG - "Who Did Whac to Whorii*" 

Discussion - Assuring Succe;7s 

Film L'xcorpt - "Rc„?.rJa and Rainfci teraontg" 

Film Excerpt - 'Vlilp for Mark" 

Siiaplng 

Ci,5elns> Signaling 

Prompting 

Rover »a Chaining 



llsOO 
1U15 



Coffee 

Discussion - St:hsdJlao of Rel.ifor ."'•Tnent 
Ptrfom.^nce iCatrs 
Tl'/t? Intervals 

Learning .it-.d Rote.itlon Cur/^fsj 
Tokens £.:% Conci It leaned xX-.ir.foreers 



1L2«00 



Lunch 



612 



Agenda continued 



-3- 



1:00 P.M. 



2J30 
2U0 

3:60 
3:50 
6:00 



Dlaeucslnn - Clsssroom Control 
Modelling 

Self -Evaluation (teacher) 
Self-Recorning (pupil) 
Peer Tutoring 
Behavior Contracting 
RE Menus and Areas 

Coffee 

Uiscussion • Ethical and Practical 
Crltlciana 

Postteat 

Wrap-Up 

Adjournment 



613 



BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION WORKSHOP 

November 29-30, 1973 
East Lansing, Michigan 



PARTICIPANTS 

1. Don Richards 21. Jan Fortenbacher 

2. Ralph Pritchard 22. Peg Tenney 

3. Tom Trantum 23. Betty Mellon 

4. Ben Herbert 24. Verla Mohler 

5. Ray Landis 25. Lyle Williams 

6. Henrietta Henyon 26. Geneva Reid 

7. Ruth Russell 27. Bev Farr 

8. Betsy Ross 28. Roy Montroy 

9. Ellie Roosli 29. Don Beall 

10. Janet Robinson 30. Evelyn McGregor 

11. Janet Wallace 31. Russ Andreotti 

12. Jane Walline 32. June Schaefer 

13. Maryann Jones 33. Ron Thomas 

14. Dennis Farley 34. Blanche Benwire 

15. Arnold Trafelet 35. Bob Kekke 

16. Gerald Waite 36. Barb Watson 

17. Dave Smrchek 37. Gail Wiemer 

18. Susan Boulter 38. Nancy Mast 

19. Lucille Karner 39. Colette Witherspoon 

20. Betty Patrick 



614 




29 respondents 



GREAT LAKES REGION SEIMC 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



November 29 & 30, 1973 
Date 

East Lansing, Michigan 
Location 



Behavior Modification 



Title of Workshop 
Larry J. Mas at 



Presenter 



This evaluation is designed to provide the Great Lakes Region SEIMC with 
feedback regarding your reactions to this workshop. Please answer all questions 
as you really feel about them. 



Please check: 



special education teacher 
regular classroom teacher 
administrator 



22 in-service educator 

student 

2 other 



1. Organization of presentation 
5 11 10 



(positive) 



(negative) 



2. Was the selected media appropriate to the presentation 
of subject 



11 



12 



3. Clarity of instructional objectives 
4 8 14 3 



4. Personally useful to me 

6 8 10 



615 



-2- 



5. Relevance to my current professional role 

8 11 7 3 



6. Overall rating of this presentation 
6 14 6 2 



7. Specific positive comments you would care to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 

(See attached sheet) 



8. Specific negative comments you would like to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 



(See attached sheet) 



616 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 

November 29-30, 1973 
Behavior Modification 

Specific positive comments you would care to make about any aspect of 
this presentation: 

Thorough review of behavior modification, however, most people were exposed 
to this material before. It was a good review and well organized with proper 
media used. 



Larry Masat is a fine presenter. The media he used supported his presentation 
and answered questions . 



Multi-media presentation as technique for presenting to teachers very helpful. 



Larry covered a large area of Behavior Modification in a short time. I was 
enlightened in the subjects of: "Changing Ourselves as Teachers," systematic 
programming, precision and consistency, recording behaviors, and the film strips 
on consequation. May I say the coffee breaks were also enjoyable. 

It helped me to define behavior more objectively - which in turn will help me in 
assisting teachers. It is always so difficult to specify the behavior that is 
to be focused on. 



Very interesting and a totally new field for me. Will be contacting local people 
who are doing this type of modification for more understanding. 

I felt that the presentation was well presented but the nature of the material 
is such that it is difficult for many to grasp. I thought the workshop atmosphere 
was a good way to present it . Attempts were made to adapt material to personal 
situations and problems. 

Presenter was personable, informal and could clarify problems. Informality of 
sessions allowed for cross-dialogue. Examples given were helpful in illustrating 
concepts . Difficulty in variances in prior familarity with topic fairly well 
adapted to by presenter. I picked up some new methods of presentation for behavior 
modification workshops but for the most part, level of difficulty to high to 
present to teachers and parents . 



Larry shows great human sensitivity. 



617 



-2- 

(Question #7 continued) : 

Interaction good - Freedom to question. 
Very interesting presentation! 
Resources shared with us ! 
Very knowledgeable on his topic. 
Films and handouts . 



I need to learn more about these techniques as apparently they do get 
positive results. 



Subject relevant. Movies excellent. Sincere delivery. Good beginning - 
more clarification needed on regular basis. Pre-Post test idea good. Points 
out ray need for clarification of behavior modification techniques over greater 
length of time. 



Well organized. Interesting. Appreciated having an agenda. 
Well prepared and interesting. 



Discussion format great and presenter most likable and congenial which set 
positive tone for whole meeting. Agenda and time were as set up on green sheet. 
Continuously was ++ for learning!! 



618 



-3- 



Specific negative comments you would like to make about any aspect of 
this presentation: 

Too classroom oriented. Needed more small group work. 

I came to the in-service with the understanding that the subjects we were 
asked to choose would be followed through on a total behavior modification 
program sequence. I really wanted an expert to help me organize a program 
to help and show teachers how a program can be useful and possible in the 
classroom setting. I wanted the actual "how to" in-service. 

We wanted an opportunity to design a program with the help of a professional. 
We wanted to learn to use the method, not about the method. I guess it was 
the chairs and not the program 

Much too basic; I attended with the understanding that the presentation 
would be more in depth. 

Sitting, listening, lecture type presentation was very difficult for me. 
Questions from audience were poorly answered. Noise and activity of audience 
was distracting and I imagine unnerving to speaker . 

I wish that I had more time to digest the wealth of information that came my 
way. Perhaps, next time, Larry might give us handouts of various terms and 
definitions leaving us more time to listen rather than being busy taking notes . 
I liked Mr. Masat's method of presentation — confident, knowledgeable, and happy. 
His many smiles helped me to enjoy, "that day in Lansing." 

The presentation was like a "short course" all in one. Personally, I was saturated 
by 11:00 am on Friday - I needed to try a few things which he was discussing. We 
learn by doing - I think that we should remember that during our own in-service. 
Talking "at" people for long periods of time reduces the quality and quantity 
of learning. I would have liked to role-play within small groups, then we could 
have ourselves analyzed whether we were giving positive reinforcement, negative 
reinforcement, etc. There was not sufficient opportunity to digest the differences - 
that comes from doing . In this respect , I hope that we remember to practice what 
we preach: conduct in-services similarily to effective methods of classroom teaching, 

Terminology - difficult to understand; more background necessary to feel secure. 
Films need replacing. Please - more frequent breaks for moving and relaxing, both 
mentally and physically. 



619 



(Question #8 continued) 



At this point we need get togethers that focus on our specific problems 

(eg. circulation, cataloging, piorchase in context with our specific political 

problems . ) 



Physical set-up. Seating should include tables as writing was difficult. 
Setting too formal as was. In spite of this, there was an informal atmosphere. 



No tables to write on. 



Too long to sit! 



Would like to have more time for question/answer. Would like to have list 
of names and addresses . 



None - just seat got hard! 

Better organization , pacing — 

Too carried away on individual questions, I could not hear. Seemed to use 
too many same words for similar implications . 

It did not appear to be the most appropriate for the CRSs-CRCs to spend as much 
time on this subject. It perhaps would have been better to spend this time 
with E.D. or Soc. Wks . As curriculum resource the presentation should have been 
the source or goal attainment should have been done. Did not have as much practical 
applications as I had hoped. 

The only limitation is my own ignorance to this point. 

Content was heavy for the time - So was the nicotine smoke in the room. 

Poorly presented. Better organization needed for me. Lost almost 2/3 of his 
subjects during workshop. Lacked enthusiasm. Too much technical information 
to be absorbed in this length of time for me. Required to sit too long. Not 
enough participation for each of us. Test too tiring. Good ideas but too 
comprehensive for me. 



620 



CRC AND CRS IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP 



Friday, February 22, 1974 



MEA Building 
(Across from the Grate Steak on South Saginaw in East Lansing) 



8:30 - 9:00 am Coffee and donuts 



9:00 - 10:00 Discussion - 1) General concerns of CRSs & CRCs. 



2) Selection of representatives to 

CRC & CRS advisory council and 
supervisor's group. 

3) Michigan CEC - Janet Robinson. 



10:00 - 10:45 Cataloging Conmittee 

State cataloging plans. 

10:45 - 11:30 Media Show and Tell 

Results of January 29 workshop. 

11:30 - 1:00 pm LUNCH 

1:00 - 3:00 "I CAN" Dr. Janet Wessel and staff. 

Physical Education Project for the handicapped. 



621 



CRC-CRS IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP 

February 22, 1974 
East Lansing, Michigan 



Participants 



Ruth Russell 
Don Richards 
Ben Herbert 
Jan Frieder 
Ellie Roosli 
Arnold Trafelet 
Peggy Tenney 
Blanche Benwire 
Diana Oberschulte 
Sue Boulter 
Nancy Mast 
Bev Farr 
Roy Montroy 



Ray Land is 
Russ Andreotti 
Ralph Pritchard 
Jan Fortenbacher 
Ron Thomas 
Grace Ahn 
June Schaefer 
Henrietta Henyon 
Geneva Re id 
Bob Kekke 
Tom Trantum 
Betty Mellon 



622 



AGENDA 



Workshop: Parent Counseling Role of the Special Educator 
December 17, 1973 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Leader: Raymond J. Dembinski, Ed.D. 

Assistant Professor of Special Education 
Northern Illinois University 



9:00 
9:15 



Introduction 

I. Role: Realized or Ignored 
II. Parent Counseling 

A. Professional View 

B. Parent View 

C. Reality: Problem Orientation 



10:15 


Break 


10:30 


III. Implications of Problem - Oriented Approach 


11:15 


Discussion 


12:00 


Lunch 


1:00 


Parent Counseling Strategies 

1. Professional Recommendations 

2. Parent Recommendations 


2:15 


Break 


2:30 


Discussion 


3:00 


Evaluation 



623 



I 



PAUL ASH. COORDir.-.TOR jk 

INSTRLJCTIOFnJAL M.\Tr.:KIALS CENTER 
BOX ;00. BUTLER UNIVERSITY 
4600 SUNSET AVE 
INDIANAPOLIS. IND 46208 



"Parent Counseling" workshop Dec. 17, 1973 



Name 

Linda Woods 
Bob Donaldson 
Sandy Lambrecht 
Linda Lashbrook 
Judy Rogers 
Glen Taylor 
Robert Wooft 
Robert S. Pasfield 
Rauric P. Ringlaber 
Ronald W. Zrull 
W. Bruce Davis 
Ron Myers 
Mary L. Armfield 
Scott DeHaven 
Lowell Schultz 
Peggy Orth 
Marsha Austen 
Lowell Smith 
Bob Hannan 
Bill Mittendorf 
Sherri Straws er 
Bernard Solomon 
Mary Hildebrandt 
Sue Stanby 
David Barnett 
John N. Haan 
Gay Worth 
John H. Hess 
Marcella C. Egnes 



City 

Bloomington 

Indianapolis 

Plymouth 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Hunlxiigron 

Indianapolis 

Madison 

Madison 

Crawfordsville 

Crawfordsville 

Greenfield 

Kokomo 

Marion 

Marion 

Indianapolis 

Logansport, Ind. 

New Albany 

Sunman 

Sunman 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Logansport 

Logansport 

Logansport 

Logansport 

Indianapolis 

Salem 

Indianapolis 



School Corp. 

MCCSC 

DPI 

Plymouth Joint Ser. Sp 

IPS 

State Department 

Pike 

Madison Comm. Schools 

Madison Cons. Schools 

West Cent. Ind. Spen.Co-i 
It II II 

Greenfield Center 

Kokomo-Center 

Ma ion Coram. Sch. 

Marion Comm. Sch. 

Pike 

Logansport Comm. Sch. 

New Albany-Floyd Co. 

R-0-? Co-op 

R-O-D Co-op 

N.E. Ind. IRC 

St. Francis College 

Logansport JSSE 



Logansport JSSE 

DPI 

West Washington 

DPI 



Ed. 



1 



624 



"^ 



State^"^-^ Indiana 




Dr. Harold H Nculcv Supcnntcndcnr 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION * 
ROOM 229 - STATE HOUSE 
AREA CODE 317-633-6610 




INDIANAPOLIS 46204 



INSTRUCTION MATERIALS CENTER 

Box 100, Butler UnivLTsitv 

4600 Sunsei Avenue 

Indianapolis. Indiana 46208 

Phone (317) 633 5259 



TO 

FROM 
RE,. 



December 11, 1973 



MEMORANDUM 



Sue Yovanovich 



Paul Ash 

Workshop Participants 



Enclosed is the list of particpants which you requested. 
This list is not complete and we are expecting a greater 
turnout than is indicated. 



PA:ad 
enclosure 



625 




27 respondents 



GREAT LAKES REGION SEIMC 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



December IT, 1973 



Date 

Indianapolis , Indiana 



Location 



The Parent Counseling Role of the Special Educator 
Title of Workshop 

Dr . Ray Dembinski 
Presenter 



This evaluation is designed to provide the Great Lakes Region SEIMC with 
feedback regarding your reactions to this workshop. Please answer all questions 
as you really feel about them. 

Please check: 





special education teacher 
regular classroom teacher 


6 


in-serv: 
student 


Lce educator 










10 administrator 


11 


other = 


h psychometrist 
3 social worker 
2 consultant 
1 psychologist 


1. 


Organization of presentation 






1 counselor 




If* 9 3 










(positive) 


5 4 3 


2 




1 (negative) 



Was the selected media appropriate to the presentation 
of subject 

l6 7 2 10 



3. Clarity of instructional objectives 

11 11 . 3 1 



Personally useful to me 

12 9 6 



626 



-2- 



Relevance to my current professional role 

16 J h 



6. Overall rating of this presentation 

15 9 3 



7. Specific positive comments you would care to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 

(See attached sheet) 



8. Specific negative comments you would like to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 



(See attached sheet) 



627 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 

December 17, 1973 
The Parent Counseling Role Of The Special Educator 

7. Specific positive comments you would care to make about any aspect of this 
presentation. 

I was present for only PM sessions - approach of remarks was positive and 
seemed sound. In view of a long period of experience, have had to apply 
these techniques, and use rationale suggested. It was helpful to understand 
problems and points of view of educators from other areas . 

The role playing activity was most beneficial. 

Clarification of parents feelings and expectations concerning conferences and 
professionals . Bibliography and specific recommendations regarding the 
handling of parent conference/counseling situations . 

Liked the group involvement methods. Speaker appeared sincere in his efforts 
to help the people in attendance. Role playing with task audience. 

Appreciated the specific suggestions to special educators. Something they 
can actually use. 

Methods of presentation - varied and appropriate. 

Well organized and material dissemination relevent to current problems in field. 

Very sincere, down to earth, presentation. 

Very appropriate subject matter. Informal atmosphere. Practical application. 

Good informal approach. Liked use of role-play. Workshop was pretty well "reality" 
oriented. I enjoyed it. 

Interesting topic - speaker very good and down to earth - handled problems and 
questions realistically. 

Excellent - interest kept up all through in informal way. 

628 



-2- 

(Question #7 continued) : 

Speaker was informal and informative. 

Good handouts. Well-organized presentation. 

Handouts - very beneficial. Discussion and presentation - practical!! 

Enjoyed structure of workshop. Good to get participants involved. Appreciated 
knowledge of the presenter!! 

The morning presentation was very well done - organized and specific. 

Very good session. I feel the involvement of some parents would he excellent. 



8. Specific negative comments you would like to make about any aspect of this 
presentation: 

Unsure of purpose (explicit). Group didn't get to know each other. 



None 



Poor preregistration information. How about sending outline of program prior 
to we know if program is going to be relevant . 



Since I heard only the latter part, I responded to only a few questions. 

None 

Tapes - a bit long in am. Discussion after lunch - not directive at times, 

Could have used more "workshop" involvement of participants . 



629 



(Question #8 continued) : 

Should be on more local levels ; so more local school administrators , teachers , 
etc . , could benefit . 

Have a real "hang-up" about starting meetings on time. I make a real effort 
to arrive on time and expect meeting to start when stated on announcement . 

Afternoon session on rewording of "jargon" was a waste of time and boring. 

Too bad there were not principals and regular classroom teachers in attendance. 

Spoke in generalities - most good counseling is really only good common sense. 



630 



-5- 

(Question #8 continued) : 

Too much to get into a day - got tiring. 



Primary concerns of group not related to any academic grovrth rather 
mandatory CRC-CRS functioning. Time needed for exchange of pertinent 
issues . 



Seats got awful hard - needed more , short , "breaks . Would have liked models 
first, then verhal discussion ahout. Would have liked specific examples of 
application of various types of sequences of "behavior "besides movies , slides , 



631 



/\ ll^ [jjlll^iFlPM Teachers College UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA Department o( Educational Administration 

rn mWi ^ m[?n^ midwest regional media center for the deaf 



Nebraska Hall 175 402-472-2141 Lincoln, Nebraska 68508 



March 19, 1974 



Miss Sue Yovanovich 
Field Service Coordinator 
Great Lakes SEIMC 
213 Erickson Hall 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 48824 

Dear Sue: 

Enclosed are two items pertaining to the media workshops in South 
Bend (April 8-9) and Indianopolis (April 10-11): 

1. Schedules 

2. Equipment Checklists 

Even though we will require the same equipment for both workshops, 
I included to checklists. Hopefully, both locations will be 
able to provide most of the needed equipment, espeically the video 
tape cameras and decks. 

As usual, the participants will be divided into three groups and they 
will rotate into each of the media labs. This setup will require the 
use of three classrooms. There should be a water source in, or near, 
the room that will be used for Overhead Transparencies. Also we will 
need a room large enough to hold everyone for the opening session. 
One of the lab rooms can serve as the main meeting area, if it is 
large enough. 

Yes, we would like to have you teach the transparency sessions. 
Also, we will make reservations for you at the same motel. We'll 
let you know all the details as soon as the staff is assigned, flight 
schedules made, and motel reservations confirmed, etc. 

Thank you for all your help. See you at the Symposium. 

Sincerely, 



'/?M; 



Ronald R. Kelly 
Coordinator of Instruction 

RRK/bgs 

enclosures 632 



Bureau of Education (or the Handicapped 
Division of Educational Services 



SCHEDULE 

Media Workshop 

for 

South Bend Area Teachers of the Hearing Impaired 

April 8-9, 1974 

conducted by 

The Midwest Regional Media Center for the Deaf 

University of Nebraska - Lincoln 

in cooperation with 
Great Lakes Region Special Education 
Instructional Media Center 
Michigan State University 



MONDAY April 8th 

4:00 p.m. Opening Session (large group) 

4:30 p.m. Media Labs (three rotation groups) 
First rotation 
Group A Group B 

Instructional Overhead 
Television Transparencies 

6:30 p.m. Adjourn 



Group C 
Slides 



TUESDAY April 


9th 






9:00 a.m. 


Visual Communicati 


on 




9:45 a.m. 


Coffee 






10:00 a.m. 


Media Labs 
Second rotation 








Group A 
Slides 


Group B 
Instructional 


Group C 
Overhead 






Television 


Transparencies 


12:00 


LUNCH 






1:15 p.m. 


Media Labs 
Third rotation 








Group A 
Overhead 


Group B 
Slides 


Group C 
Instructional 




Transparencies 




Television 


3:15 p.m. 


Wrap-up Session 






4:00 p.m. 


Adjourn 







633 



SCHEDULE 

Media Workshop 
for 
Indianapolis Area Teachers of the Hearing Impaired 
April 10-11, 1974 
conducted by 
The Midwest Regional Media Center for the Deaf 
University of Nebraska - Lincoln 
in cooperation with 
Great Lakes REgion Special Education 
Instructional Media Center 
Michigan State University 



WEDNESDAY April 10th 

4:00 p.m. Opening Session (large group) 

4:30 p.m. Media Labs (three rotation groups) 
First Rotation 





Group A 
Instructional 
Television 




Group B 
Overhead 
Transparencies 


Group C 
Slides 


6:30 p.m. 


ADJOURN 








THURSDAY April 


nth 








9:00 a.m. 


Visual Communi 


cation 






9:45 a.m. 


Coffee 









9:45 a.m. 


Coffee 


0:00 a.m. 


Media Labs 




Second Rotation 




Group A 
Slides 


2:00 


LUNCH 


1:15 p.m. 


Media Labs 




Third Rotation 




Group A 
Overhead 




Transparencies 


3:15 p.m. 


Wrap-up Session 


4:00 p.m. 


Adjourn 



Group B 
Instructional 
Television 



Group B 
Slides 



Group C 
Overhead 
Transparencies 



Group C 
Instructional 
Television 



634 



MEDIA WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS 

South Bend, Indiana 
April 8-9, 1974 



Mrs. A. V. Barrett 
1602 Hildreth St. 
South Bend, IN 46615 



Estella Jackson 
Lew Wallace High School 
415 West 45th St. 
Gary, IN 



J. Wheeler 
5050 Vermont 
Kuny School 
Gary, IN 



Nancy Rios 
George Kuny School 
5050 Vermont 
Gary, IN 



Irene Coker 

702 North Harvey 

Griffith, IN 46319 



Terry Magie 

3139 Whipple Drive 

Merrionette Pk., IL 60655 



Pauline Morton 
1837 North Huey 
South Bend, IN 46628 



Hortense C. House 
Lew Wallace High School 
415 West 45th St. 
Gary, IN 



Anita L. Dortch 
Hoagland School 
354 West Butler 
Fort Wayne, IN 46804 



Mary Mavis 
Hoagland School 
354 West Butler 
Fort Wayne, IN 46804 



Pam Kasprzak 

321 Walter St. 

South Bend, IN 46614 



Mae E. Phillips 

1015 West 35th Ave., #204 

Gary, IN 46408 



635 



MEDIA WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS 

Indianapolis, Indiana 
April 10-11, 1974 



Thelma Rice 

8355 S. Kimbark Ave. 

Chicago, IL 60619 

Edna Rieth Gilraore 

421 Nitsche 

Terre Haute, IN 47803 

Jean Sevisher 
2718 Emmet Drive 
Logansport, IN 46947 

Jan Morton 

1215 West 10th Place 

Hobart, IN 46342 

Joyce Revere 

3112 Orchard Terrace 

Indianapolis, IN 46218 

Mary Keys 

453 South 9th St. 

Lafayette, IN 47904 

Mollie Hollswell 
520 West 21st 
Connersville, IN 47331 

Sally Buck 

3317 Green Valley Rd . 

New Albany, IN 47150 

Evelyn Upp 

802 St. Clair Ct. 

Indianapolis, IN 

Lynn Kimble 

144 26th St. 

Park Forest, IL 60466 

Paula Magnuson 
300 Meridian St. 
Niagara, WI 54151 



Terry M. Martin 

RR//2 

Sullivan, IN 47882 

Mary Hannah 

1123 Mohawk Hills Drive 

Carmel, IN 46032 

Anne C . Cawthon 

RR#2 Box 71 

New Albany, IN 47150 

Janet Pool 

1309 Morningside Drive 

Chesterton, IN 46304 

Cinda Davsman 
Hickory Village Apts. 
Hickory Rd . 
Apt. 4230 #2B 
Mishawaka, IN 46544 

Barbara Herschman 
RR/Zl Decatur St. 
Hobart, IN 46342 

Mary Hodgess 

108 Eddy St. , Apt. 209 

Michigan City, IN 46360 

Kay L. Greener 
5302 S. Calhoun St. 
Fort Wayne, IN 46807 

Emily Caldwell 
572 Rutledge St. 
Gary, IN 46404 

Pat Amstead 
5168 Madison St. 
Gary, IN 46408 



636 



TRAINING TEACHERS TO TRAIN PARAPROFESSIONALS 

PROGRAM 

9:30 - IOjOO a.m. Regtetratton, Coffe@ and Introductions 

10:00 - 10:30 a.m. General Sesalon - "What Every Paraprofesalonal Should 

Know" 

Small Group Sosslonfi 
10:30 - 11:30 a.nr^. Session A - 'The Paraprofssslonal In The Special 

Class " Developing a Handbook of Oos and Oon'ts" 

10;30 - 11:30 a.nn. Session B - "Paraprofesalonal Versus Teacher Or A 

Team Approach" 



11:30 - 12:15 p.m. Session C - "Practical Suggestions for Utilizing The 

ParaproflBsslonal " 
(Assessnwnt, Music, and the Academic Areas) 

11:30 - 12:15 p.m. Session D - "Practical Suggestions for Utilizing the 

ParaprofBSSlonal " 

(Instructional Materials, AV Equlpnr^nt, Bulletin 
Boards, and Non-«:ademic Teaching Areas) 

12;15 - 1:16 p.m. Lunch 

Small Group Sessions 
1:15 - 2:15 p.m. Session A - "The Paraprofeesional In The Special 

Class - Developing a Handbook of Dos and Don*ts" 

1:15 - 2:15 p.m. Session B - "Paraprofeesional Versus Teacher Or A 

Team Approach" 

2:16 - 3:00 p.m. Session C - "Practical Suggestions For Utilizing The 

Par j^rofesslonal " 
(Assessnnent , ^/b/sic, and the Academic Areas) 

2:13 - 3:00 p.m. Session D - "FVacttcal Suggestions for Utilizing The 

Par aprofesslonal " 

(Instructional Materials, AV Equipment, Bulletin 
Boards, and Non-academic Teaching Areas) 

3:00 - 3:30 p.m. General Session - "Putting It All Together" 

3:30 - 3:45 p.m. Evaluation 

637 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP 

April 23, 1974 
Indianapolis , Indiana 



Participants 



Joan Melsheimer 


Hamilton, Boone, Tipton Mad. Co-op 


Sue Ellen VanRiper 


Barth. Consl., Columbus, 


Ind. 


Donald R. Delaney 


Barth. Consl., Columbus, 


Ind. 


Herschel H. Wilby 


Barth. Consl., Columbus, 


Ind. 


Jean Bunton 


Barth. Consl., Columbus, 


Ind. 


Mary White 


Barth. Consl., Columbus, 


Ind. 


John Reifsnider 


EACS. New Haven, Indiana 




Paul Ash 


DPI, Indianapolis, Ind. 




Gary Perkins 


ROD Spec. Educ. Coop. 




Bill Mittendorf 


ROD Spec. Educ. Coop. 




Bob Hannan 


ROD Spec. Educ. Coop. 




Lowell Schultz 


Marion Comm. Schools 




J. Scott DeHaven 


Marion Comm. Schools 




Mary Bizzaro 


Marion Comm. Schools 




Glen Taylor 


DPI, Indianapolis, Ind. 




Gay Worth 


DPI, Indianapolis, Ind. 




Don Reynolds 


DPI, Indianapolis, Ind. 




John Smith 


Wabash Center 




Paul Lane 


Lafayette, Indiana 




Bob Donaldson 


DPI, Indianapolis, Ind. 




Jim Alley 


MSD Wayne Twp . , Indianap 


olis , Ind 



638 




16 respondents 



GREAT LAKES REGION SEIMC 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



April 23, 1974 



Date 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



Location 



Training Teachers To Train Paraprofessionals 
Title of Workshop 

David J. Braukman & Ardis Weis 
Presenter 



This evaluation is designed to provide the Great Lakes Region SEIMC with 
feedback regarding your reactions to this workshop. Please answer all questions 
as you really feel about them. 



Please check: 



_3 special education teacher 

regular classroom teacher 



4 administrator 



1. Organization of presentation 



(positive) 



10 



_2 in-service educator 

student 



_7 other 2 - DPI consultants 

4 - Psychometrists 

1 - Speech pathologist 



(negative) 



2. Was the selected media appropriate to the presentation 
of subject 

7 7 2 



3. Clarity of instructional objectives 

5 7 2 2 



4. Personally useful to me 

4 7 3 



639 



-2- 



5. Relevance to my current professional role 



6. Overall rating of this presentation 
3 10 2 



7. Specific positive comments you would care to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 



See attached sheet, 



8. Specific negative comments you would like to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 



See attached sheet, 



640 



In-Service Workshop Evaluation 

Training Teachers To Train Paraprofessionals 
April 23, 191^ 

7. Specific positive comments you would care to make about any aspect of this 
presentation. 



Good, but felt more could be used in selection and training of 
teachers and paraprofessionals and problems that could arise. 



A very good over all presentation concerning paraprofessionals 
I wish this had been available last school year. 



Good material selection. 

Excellent — fine presenters. 

Presenters did a good job of involving the group in the presentation. 

Dr. Weiss had excellent ideas and was personally committed to her subject. 

Speakers were lively and creative people with information to give. 

Well planned. Qualified speakers. Useful handouts. Thank you! 

Well presented. Useful. Friendly atmosphere. 

Weiss - very good. Dave - good information. 



Mr. Braukman and Dr. Weiss seemed to speak with a great deal of experience 
in the area of paraprofessionals. Were able to answer questions from the 
floor very expertly. 



Speakers were knowledgeable — gave practical advice. Informality yielded 
greater group participation. 



641 



Specific negative comments you would like to make about any aspect of this 
presentation. 



All materials seems to be aimed toward how the teacher "handles" the 
paraprofessional , not enough on how to make the "para" feel professional 
toward herself. 



None, 



Perhaps tried to cover too much material in the time allotted, 



Ideas could have been presented in much shorter form. Role playing was 
superfluous. Filling out ideas for "The Paraprofessional Handbook" was 
a waste of time; never used! 



Too much time on interesting but not pertinent things. 

Cut sessions shorter, and give more breaks so a person can stretch. 

Began to drag in p.m. May have tried to over-emphasize certain points. 

None. 

Probably not as well organized as it could have been. 



642 



THE GRE/iT LAKES 
. REGION SEEMC 



IN 

COOPERATION WITH THE INDIANA 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, 

DIVISION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION 

AND THE UNITED STATES 

OFFICE OF EDUCATION 

presents the 

SEASE Workshop 



T 


D 


G 


1 


X 


A 


U 


F 


M 


E 


T 


C 


N 


U 


R 


E 


A 


C 


L 


C 




T 


Y 


A 


I 




1 




T 


S 




O 




I 


E 




N 




O 

N 





March 20, 21 , 22, 1974 

RAMADA INN NORTHWEST 

Indianapolis, Indiana 

643 



WEDNESDAY 



March 20 


10:00 


a 


.m. 




10:30 


a 


.m. 




11:00 


- 


11:30 a.m 




11:30 


- 


12:00 p.m 




12:00 


- 


1 :00 p.m 




1:00 


- 


1:30 p.m 




1:30 


- 


3:00 p.m 




3:00 


- 


3:30 p.m 




3:30 


- 


4:30 p.m 


THURSDAY 









March 21 



8:30 
9:30 
9:45 
11:00 

11:30 

12:00 

1:30 

2:30 

3:30 



- 9:30 a.m. 
•- 9:45 a.m. 
-• 10:45 a.m. 

- 11 :30 a.m. 

- 12:00 p.m. 

- 1 :30 p.m. 

- 2:30 p.m. 

- 3:15 p.m, 

644 



Coffee & Registration 

Introduction & 
Welcome: Paul Ash 
Gil Bliton 

Orientation to Simulation 

Orientation to "LaFayette" 

LUNCH 

Bureau Staff Meeting 

Independent Study - Packet 
A; "Interview with the Boss' 

Feedback Session - A 

Work Session - Packet B 



Feedback Session - B 

COFFEE 

Group Task: Case Conference 

Feedback on Group Role 
Behavior 

Problem-Solving Analysis 

LUNCH 

Work Session - Packet C 

Feedback Session - C 



Cn 



eciil Study Institute 



lo'l 



I 



FRIDAY 
March 22 



8:30 - 


9:30 a.m. 


Work Session 
Packet B 


9:30 - 


9:45 a.m. 


COFFEE 


9:45 - 


10:45 a.m. 


Feedback D 


11:00 - 


12:00 a.m. 


Group Task: 
Training 


12:00 - 


1 :00 p.m. 


LUNCH 


1:00 - 


1 :30 p.m. 


Feedback - R 



■Joint Planning 

1:30 - 2:00 p.m. Summary, Evaluation 

Adjournrrient 



645 






WORKSHOP STAFF: 

Dr. Edward Sontaq - Branch Chief, Division of Personnel 
Preparation, United States Office of Education 

Dr. Daniel D. Sage - Professor of Special Education 
Administration, Syracuse University 

Dr. Marcel Duval - Project Officer, Division of Research, 
United States Office of Education 

Ms. Judy Fein - Liaison Officer, Division of Personnel 
Preparation, Uniced States Office of Education 

Mr. Joseph Gaurjhan - Administrative Intern, Division of 
Personnel Preparation, United States Office of Education 

Or. Kenneth F. McLaughlin - State Plan Officer, Aids to 
States I3ranch, United States Office of Education 

Dr. Willia.ii Peterson, Adninistrative Intern, Division 
of Personnel Preparation, United States Office of 
Education 

Mr. Russell G. Rice, Jr., Syracuse University, Doctoral 
Candidate in Special Education Administration 



Wor kshop Coorditiators : 

Paul Ash, Field Consultant, Indiana Department of 
Public Instruction, Special Education Division 

Sue Ann Yovanovich, Field Services Coordinator, 
Great Lakes Region SEIMC 



646 



SEASE WORKSHOP 

March 20-22, 1974 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Participants 



Carol Weller 
Bob Robertson 
Don Reynolds 
Gay Worth 
Bob Currie 
Jerry Bowling 
Glen Taylor 
Bob Donaldson 
Parker Eaton 



Jim Phillips 
Linda Blanton 
Dick Eisinger 
Paul Ash 
Devota Burros 
Niles Daggy 
Bill Duckworth 
Carol Eby 
Elaine Heaton 



647 



THf: GKEAT LAKES 
REGION SEIMC 



IN 

COOPERATION WITH THE INDIANA 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, 

DIVISION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Presents 

"The Monterey Program For Language Disorders' 



August J. Mauser, Ed.D. 
Professor, Northern Illinois University 



April 5, 1974 
AIRPORT HILTON 
Weir Cook Airport 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

648 



AGENDA : 

9:30 - 10:00 am - Registration, Coffee and 

Donuts 

10:00 - 11:00 - Presentation: Past and 

Present Language Development 
Systems 

11:00 - 11:15 - Coffee Break 

11:15-12:00 - Film: "Monterey Magic," 

Discussion and Group 
Formulations 

12:00 - 1:00 pm - LUNCH 

1:00 - 3:15 - Presentation: Part I - Imple- 
mentation of the Monterey 
System 

Part II - Group Session: 
Developing Additional Language 
Development Activities 

3:15 - 3:30 - Evaluation 



649 






WORKSHOP PRESRHTOR: 



August J . Mau 
in the Department 
Illinois Universi 
began his teachin 
He was also an As 
tion at Indiana U 
ment at Northern 
Professor of Spec 
versity, Terre Ha 
the Caleb Mills D 



ser, Ed.O 
of Speci 
ty. Dr. 
g career 
sistant P 
ni versity 
II 1 inois 
ial Educa 
ute, Indi 
istinquis 



., is currently a professor 
al Education at Northern 
Mauser, a native Hoosier, 
in the Gary Public Schools, 
rofessor of Special Educa- 

Prior to his appoint- 
Uni versity, he was Associate 
tion at Indiana State Uni- 
ana , where he was awarded 
hed Teaching Award . 



Dr. Mauser's recent publications include: 

Diagnostia and Assessment Instruments for Learning 
Disabled Children, and Developmental Systems for 
Learning Disabled Children. 



Workshop Coordinators : 

Paul Ash, Field Consultant, Indiana Department 
of Public Instruction, Special Education Division. 

Sue Ann Yovanovich, Field Services Coordinator, 
Great Lakes Region SEIMC. 



650 



I 




GREAT LAKES REGION SEIMC 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



April 5, 1974 



Date 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Location 



The Monterey Program For Language Disorders 
Title of Workshop 

Dr. August Mauser 
Presenter 



This evaluation is designed to provide the Great Lakes Region SEIMC with 
feedback regarding your reactions to this workshop. Please answer all questions 
as you really feel about them. 



Please check: 



special education teacher 
regular classroom teacher 
administrator 



Organization of presentation 
13 15 4 



in-service educator 

5 student 
29 other (specif y) 1 - psychometrist 

3 - speech pathologists 

6 - speech & hearing therapists 
11 - speech & hearing clinicians 

4 - speech clinicians 
4 - speech therapists 



(positive) 


5 4 3 


2 1 (negative) 


2. 


Was the selected media appropriate 
of subject 


to the presentation 




10 9 10 


5 1 



3. Clarity of instructional objectives 

7 17 • 5 4 



4. Personally useful to me 

8 8 10 



651 



-2- 



5. Relevance to my current professional role 

9 8 9 5 



6. Overall rating of this presentation 
4 15 9 5 



7. Specific positive comments you would care to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 



(see attached sheet) 



8. Specific negative comments you would like to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 



(see attached sheet) 



652 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



The Monterey Program For Language Disorders 



7. Specific positive comments you would care to make about any aspect of 
this presentation. 



Dr. Mauser is a pleasant speaker to listen to and was organized, 



We are concerned with quality and accountability evaluation. Much 
of this teaching by objective policy will be used. Very glad to be 
asked to attend. 



You gave us materials which we can really use ! Most present ideas 
and number of materials with which to implement ideas gained. This 
was like having an Intensive Workshop — only in 1 day! Wish you 
(Dr. Mauser) were still at I.N. teaching! 



The morning presentation was very good. I thought it was presented 
well . 



Morning presentation was interesting. Hand-outs look useful for 
motor skills. 



Morning presentation very good. 

The morning presentation was good. 

The spiral-bound handout should be very helpful. 

Think the materials are excellent in terms of organization and 
seq lEncing. 

The materials will be helpful. 



Appreciated the information presented in the developmental scale 
from Monterey. 



653 



-2- 



7. Continued: 



I especially enjoyed the speaker. He kept the discussion to the 
point and was very interesting. He presented to the audience the 
area in which they were most interested. 



I would like to hear more of Dr. Mauser's methods of reaching 
objectives. Enjoyable speaker aware of audiences needs. 



The information was not biased in either direction. More of 
these workshops would be helpful. 



First meeting I've been to in a long time that was so well 
organized and the information was pertinent and well explained! 



Speaker presented material in such a way as to be understood 
by all. Notes could be taken easily. 



Well organized presentation of step by step procedure to be 
followed . 



The review of language development was cohesive and clear. 



654 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



The Monterey Program For Language Disorders 



Specific negative comments you would like to make about any aspect 
of this presentation. 



I still am not sure what the content of the Monterey Language 
Program is . I think that you could have spent more time on 
explaining it and more exercise type things. 



I would like to have heard more practical, everyday teaching ideas 
and methods. 



Projector material seemed irrelevant and trivial. Motor skills are 
important, but what about specific verbal language problems? 



Not enough information on specific assessment and remediation 
procedures of language delayed child. 



Need time for questions and discussion. 



Was not directed to speech clinicians specifically. Why were our 
special education teachers not invited? 



Little information regarding the remediation of language disorders 
was disseminated. This particular workshop had little value to the 
speech pathologist. 



Thought the afternoon presentation was not pertaining to language 
as anticipated and too elementary for teachers. 



I was under the impression it was a "language program" presentation- 
what happened?? 



Believe me language area was not covered as anticipated. 
I believe the language part of the program was not covered, 



655 



-2- 



8. Continued; 



There was iw relevance to language so far as specific help is concerned. 
"Pre-digested" background material we don't need! The title "Monterey 
Program for Language Disorders" was very misleading to potential parti- 
cipants. Dr. Mauser didn't seem to be aware his audience was to be 
speech pathology oriented and did not appear prepared to direct his 
material to them. 



Did not think it was necessary to show the overhead slides about the 
program. The material was somewhat redundant. 



Overhead materials not interesting. 



The entire presentation was geared to writing behavioral objectives for 
lessons — most of which was geared to motor behaviors. I didn't feel 
that the program presented anything new, and nothing specific to language 
remediation. It was much too general. 



As with so many of these workshops, too much time is spent on theoretical 
concepts and little (if any) time is spent on actual sample lessons. 
Just once I'd like to go to a workshop that was geared to the uncreative 
teacher who would appreciate concrete suggestions rather than statements 
such as "writing lesson plans is very difficult for language disabled 
children." 



NONE 



Would like to have had the presentation more language oriented, 



The presentation seemed to be aimed at an audience whose academic 
background was somewhat less detailed in language theory than 
the many of us present today in speech and hearing therapy. 



I would like to have been shown how this program would more specifically 
apply to Language Therapy . Why weren't any of the lesson programs dis- 
cussed? Too general of a presentation. 



656 



i 



April 5 th Registration 



NAME 



ADDRFSS 



Kathyrn Smith 
Chris Long 
Connie Robinson 
Shirley Cree 
Janne Ade 
Connie Masse 
Dureta Sexton 
Mekle Clendenin 
Linda Erb 
Sharon Grain 
Holly Heldt 
Susan Hummer 
Debbie Williams 
Ellen Longo 
Deane Elkin 
Alice Phelps 
Paulette Young 
Laura Steats 
Janet Novak 
Bonnie Swarner 
Celia Patterson 
Gary Perkins 
Diana Doyle 
Beverly Smoot 
Diana Howell 
Dennis Bowman 
Marguerite Edmonson 
Clare Fischer 
Lynn McClaine 
Carolyn Tunin 
Caroline Wynolds 
Caren Herald 
Glenn Farling 
Diane Gill 
Joanne Bong 
Eleanor Bywaters 
Shirlev Pollock 
Glen Taylor 
Gay Worth 
Janis Stewart 
Deb Hopseker 
Kim Riggin 
Cliff Danielson 



63 2 Marston Ct . Ft. Wayne 

1661/2 Usher St. Logansport 

2508 E. Broadway Logansport 

612 Nordale Dr. Ft. Wayne 

16161/2 Usher St. Logansport 

Box 572 Monticello, Ind. 

1408 W. Main - Muncie 

R.R. 7 Muncie 

3301 Miami Trail, Muncie 

2020 W. Jackson, Muncie 

Scheidler Apt. 419, Muncie 

1211/2 Cherry, Muncie 

1705 Harfield Dr. #252 Indpls. 

513 East 8th St. Bloomington 

319 E. 20th St. #29 Bloomington 

R.R. Greensburg 

3033 De Soto - Columbus 

1350 So. 3rd St. Clinton, Ind. 

R.R. #1 Petersburg, Indiana 

6051 Beachview Dr. Apt. 234, Indy. 

Village in the Woods #5 Batesville 

Lawrenceburg , Ind. 

2605 W. N. Bend Rd . #1004 Cincinnatti 

5913 W. Morris Indpls. 

1006 Longfellow Lane Plainfield 

City R. 6 Monticello, Ind. 

19 Rebecca Dr. Indpls., 46241 

1000 E. Buchanan St. Plainfield 

8525 Greta Dr. 

R. 3 Crawfordsville 47933 

439 Euclid Greenwood, 46142 

63 S. Bolton, Indpls. 46219 

119 Neely Ave. Muncie 

27 Morningside Dr. Washington, Ind. 

26510 Cold Springs Manor Dr. Indpls. 

430 Mutton Creek Dr. Seymour 47274 

R.R. 3 Box 23A Nashville, Ind. 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

601 N. Dill Muncie 

211 E. N.St. Muncie, Ind. 

Rt. #13 Muncie 

Muncie, Ind. Apt. #11 Scheidler 



657 




23 respondents 



GREAT LAKES REGION SB IMC 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



April 26, 197A 



Date 

Saginaw, Michigan 



Location 



Early Childhood Education for the Multi-Handicapped 
Title of Workshop 

Dr. Robert Lance 
Presenter 



This evaluation is designed to provide the Great Lakes Region SEIMC with 
feedback regarding your reactions to this workshop. Please answer all questions 
as you really feel about them. 

Please check: 



_5 special education teacher 

regular classroom teacher 

5 administrator 



_9 in-service educator 

student 

1 other - 1 CRC 



(positive) 



Organization of presentation 
7 4 7 



(negative) 



2. Was the selected media appropriate to the presentation 
of subject 

2 4 6 7 2 



3. Clarity of instructional objectives 

7 4 5 2 



4. Personally useful to me 

8 5 5 



658 



-2- 



Relevance to my current professional role 



6. Overall rating of this presentation 

7 5 5 6 



7. Specific positive comments you would care to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 



See attached sheet , 



8. Specific negative comments you would like to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 

See attached sheet . 



659 



In-Service Workshop Evaluation 

April 26, 197^ 
Saginaw, Michigan 

7. Specific positive comments you would care to make about any aspect of this 
presentation. 

Very pertinent and relevant information. The content of the presentation 
was functionally salient . 

Specific mention of diagnostic techniques were informative. Outline 
of diagnostic and perscriptive services is useful. 

Manner of Dr. Lance, informal, easy to attend. Correlates well with 
our EPPC of parent involvement and required 0-5 programming required . 

Content excellent. Much information given. 

Very pleased to see what is being developed. 

Dynamic, positive presentation with particular emphasis on need for 
workable diagnosis as opposed to non-productive descriptions of problems. 

Enjoyed the material related to application, but did not care as much 
for philosophy. 

Enthusiastic about findings and results of program at Bllck Clinic. 

Had a lot of Information to share. 

He was a good speaker in general, as far as presenting to a group. 

We need this reinforcement for these areas. Good way to look at the 

development sequencing. (SR > process > expression). 

Glad to have. 



Reinforced participants theory that what we're doing with kids is on the 
right track. 



Many useful ideas were presented with materials available to us that 
we can utilize. 

660 



Specific negative c omments you would like to make atout any aspect of this 
presentation. 



The organization of the presentation, would have been useful to have? 
visual media to clarify some of the points he was making. 



Too long. Few specifics to apply. 



I would have liked to have seen slides as to set-up of clinic, working 
with parents, etc. Needed more visual media. 



I wish there were more handouts and access to the developed tools. It 
is great that it exists but would be greater if available. 



Could have been better organized or thought out, 



Case examples or description of clients first. Less talking more 
content with examples. 



Had a lot of materials but seemed to wander. Wish we would be able 
to have forms . Should have used more visuals . 



1) No objectives. 2) Rambling. 3) Could have a good speaker tell about 
some Michigan facilities rather than Ohio. 4) Too general in scope. 



Half hour too long. 
Length . 



I am interested mainly in the application of programs — more detail on 
how prescriptions are written and carried out. 



Could have had more handouts , 



Did not really hit on the topic of Early Childhood Education for the 
Multi-Handicapped — it was just on Developmental Learning. 



Not clear on some issues. Some information was presented on too vague a 
surface level where going into more depth would have helped. 



He was not adequately prepared by this group to present what we expected 
to hear . 

661 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP 

April 26, 1974 
Saginaw, Michigan 



Participants 



Diana Oberschulte 
Geneva Re id 
Janet Robinson 
Arnold Trafelet 
Russ Andreottl 
Jan Frleder 
Bob Kekke 
Gail Wiemer 
Peggy Tenney 
Sue Boulter 
Marie Dorie 
Betty Patrick 



Ron Thomas 
Grace Ahn 
Ben Herbert 
Don Richards 
Bev Farr 
Roy Montroy 
Betty Mellon 
Ray Land is 
Betsy Ross 
Henrietta Henyon 
Ellie Roosli 



662 



AGENDA 

Bi-State Workshop 
Hay 16-17, 1974 



Thursday, May 16 

8:30 - 9:00 am 
9:00 - 12:00 

12:00 - 1:15 pm 
1:15 - 4:30 
8:00 - ??? 



Registration and Coffee 

Dr. August Mauser & Dr. Ray Dembinski 
Parent Counseling 

LUNCH (catered) 

Dr. Sivasialam Thiagarajan from CITH 

"Puntlme" 



Friday, May 17 

9:00 - 12:00 am 
12:00 - 1:15 pm 
1:15 - 3:00 

3:00 - 3:30 



Joe Levlne & Staff - Auditory Learning 

LUNCH (catered) 

A Review of the Past Eight Years; A Look 
Ahead - The ALRC National Network; The 
Great Lakes ALRC 

Summary and Evaluation 



663 




GREAT LAKES 
REGION 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
•TT CENTER 

213 Efickson Hall Michigan State University East Lansing Michigan 4aa24 
Cooperating With Stale Departments of Education in Michigan-lndiana-Ohic 



April 30, 1974 



MEMORANDUM 

TO: Indiana Special Education Division Staff 

Michigan Special Education Department Staff 

FROM: Sue Ann Yovanovich, Field Services Coordinator 

SUBJECT: Bi-State Workshop, May 16-17, 1974 



Enclosed you will find a workshop confirmation card for the 
upcoming Bi-State Workshop. Please complete the card and 
mail it back to us as soon as possible. 

The workshop will be held at the Holiday Inn East in Lansing 
beginning promptly at 8:30 am on Thursday, May 16 and ending 
at 3:30 pm on Friday, May 17. (See attached agenda.) 

Enclosed with this memo is a reservation card for your motel 
accommodations. Please acnrplete immediately and mail it 
directly to the Holiday Inn East. We have reserved rooms for 
the evenings of the 15th and 16th. Some participants will 
need to arrive on the evening of the 15th to insure an early 
starting time on the 16th. The Great Lakes Region SEIMC will 
reimburse participants for accommodations, food, and trans- 
portation expenses. 

We're looking forward to seeing you on the 16th and 17th! 



Enclosure 
SAY:rh 



664 

•Membef — Special £duc»rion ^^I^^^ Netvwofh- Bufeau of Educalion for the Handicapped- U S Office of Education- An Equal Oppotiumiy Employef 




I 



BI-STATE WORKSHOP 
May 16-17, 1974 



Participants 



Peggy Tenney 
Lyle Williams 
June Schaefer 
Betty Patrick 
Nancy Mast 
Gail Wiemer 
Jane Walline 
Geneva Reid 
Jay Bartner 
Janet Robinson 
Maryann Jones 
Betty Mellon 
Bob Kekke 
Diana Oberschulte 
Ellie Roosli 
Gene Thurber 
Paul Ash 
Glen Taylor 
Don Reynolds 
Fred Chappell 



Russ Andreotti 
Ruth Russell 
Earl Heath 
Bill Duckworth 
Martha Wesson 
Don Richards 
Ralph Pritchard 
Roy Montroy 
Arnold Trafelet 
Paul Tower 
David Williams 
Grace Ahn 
Betsy Ross 
Tom Howard 
Lynn Hecht 
Sue Boulter 
Ben Herbert 
Lucile Karner 
Blanche Benwire 
Don Beall 



665 



REGIONAL SPECIAL EDUCATION WORKSHOP 

SPONSORED BY 

GREAT LAKES REGION SPECIAL EDUCATION INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER 



June n, 1974 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Participants: Special Education Staff of the Indiana Department 
of Education 

Presenters: Jan Baxter 

Harrold W. Spicknall 



AGENDA 
9:00 - 9:30 am Registration - Coffee - Introduction 

9:30 - 12:00 1. Experience in Accountability 

2. The Missing Link (Theory) 

3. Six Step Accountability Model 

4. Accountability in Special Education 

12:00 - 1:00 pm Lunch 

1:00 - 3:15 Use of Accountability as: 

a. Management Tool 

b. Consultation Tool 

3:15 - 3:30 Evaluation of Workshop 



666 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP 

"Accountability Model For SEA Staff" 
June 11, 1974 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Participants 



Paul Ash 
Henry Binder 
Niles Daggy 
Sharon Dailey 
Bob Donaldson 
Bill Duckworth 
Carol Eby 



Don Reynolds 
Bob Robertson 
Glen Taylor 
Gay Worth 
Jim Phillips 
Jerry Bowling 
Dick Eisinger 



667 




GREAT LAKES REGION SEIMC 



IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP EVALUATION 



June 11, 197 A 



Date 



Indianapolis, Indiana 



Location 



Accountability Model For SEA Staff 
Title of Workshop 

Dr. Harrold Splcknall & Mr. Jan Baxter 
Presenter 



This evaluation is designed to provide the Great Lakes Region SEIMC with 
feedback regarding your reactions to this workshop. Please answer all questions 
as you really feel about them. 

Please check: 



special education teacher 
regular classroom teacher 
administrator 



In-service educator 
student 
_oth6r (specify) 



1. Organization of presentation 



(positive) 



(negative) 



2. Was the selected media appropriate to the presentation 
of subject 



3. Clarity of instructional objectives 



4. Personally useful to me 



668 



> 



-2- 



5. Belevance to my current professional role 



6. Overall rating of this presentation 



7. Specific positive comments you would care to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 



8. Specific negative comments you would like to make 
about any aspect of this presentation. 



669 



Appendix C 

Materials Relevant to the Media and Materials Development 
Chapter (Chapter Z) of the Final Report of the Great Lakes 
Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center 

Sample Product Opinion Papers 675-710 

Early Child-Use Materials: Reports and News Releases.. 711-720 

Report of a "Barsch Room" in Operation 721-731 

Games Teach: Evaluation of a Workshop 733-738 

Non-Verbal Films: A Description 739-742 

Ball Utilization:. Report of a Study 743-754 

Improving Low Vision Skills: Evaluations and a Guide.. 755-817 

Recorded Aid for Beginning Piano, Vol. 1: A Descriptive 

Guide 819-838 

Resources for Effective Teaching: Descriptive Booklet 

and Evaluations of Some Workshops 839-890 

"Yours for a Better Workshop" : Booklet and Report on 
Dissemination Data 891-914 

Problems and Hints: An Evaluation of a Workshop 915-923 

Workshop Coordinator Kits and Workshop Evaluations 925-1016 

"You Are. . ." 1017-1065 

Info-Paks: A Sample -. . .■ 1067-1095 

Survey on Learning Disorder Terminology: Analysis of 

Responses 1097-1114 

Braille Code Recognition Materials: Leader's Guide 

and Results of Use 1115-1170 



671 



Appendix C - Contents Continued 

visual Training Cards: An Evaluation 1171-1185 

Workshop Training Kits : Evaluations 1187-1215 

Workshop Training Kits: An Introduction and Some 

Samples 1217-1323 

Some Final Evaluations of Various Aspects of the Media 

and Materials Development Unit 1325-1408 



673 



Sample Product Opinion Papers 



I 



675 



Product Opinions #904 

Size Sorting Triangles 

A. Daigger & Company 

159 West Klnzie Street 

Chicago, Illinois 60610 

1967 

$3.00 



Six yellow inset triangles of varying sizes with square peg handles and wooden 
tray. To be used as an individualized exercise in sorting, size discrimination, 
and coordination. 



Relevant & accurate? 

Attractive to pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before request 

for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 





EVALUATIONS 


#302 




#403 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


There is 


none 




If low 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Month 




Month 


No 




No 


No 




No 


5-7 




7-10 


Slow 




Slow 


Supplementary 


Regular 


Small group 


Unsupervised Study 



#302 This should be used with very young children to be effective. 

#403 The material is a little small for handicapped youngsters to handle. 



Thit paper publithsd purtuini to a Cr«nt from tht U S Of'ice of Education. DapartrTiar>t of Haalth, Educaiiort, 

and Malfare However, the opinioni expressed hereir> do r\ot r>ece$s»rilv reflect the position or policy of the U.S. 

Office of Education, and no official endorsanneni by the US Office of Education should be inferred 

677 



May 2, 1969 



Product Opinions itS20 

"Numberaid Abacus" 

Nasco 

Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin 53533 

Copyright: 1967 

A type of abacus made of a steel frame and plastic discs with internal 
springs that remin in place while the problem is being performed. Helps develop 
an intuitive understanding of primary mathematics and the value and grouping 
concepts of the decimal system. 



Relevant & accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 
Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness Justifies cost? 
Used as producer intends? 
How long have you used it? 
V/ere you using it before 

request for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 

Teaching procedure 



EVALUATIONS 








#301 


«05 






#60A 


Yes 


Yes 








Yes 


Yes 






Not particular 


Yes 


Yes 






No 


I had none 


Yes 






No 


Positively 


Yes 






No 


Yes 


Yes 








Several months 


More 


than 


a year 


Several months 


Yes 


Yes 






Yes 


No 


Possi 


bly 




No 


9-12 


5-10 






S-14 


Any grade level 


10-13 






Any 


All 


All 






Slow 


All 


All 






Supplementary, 
remedial 


All 


Group 


, sm£ 


11 


Unsupervised ; 






group 


loall group 



#301 easily cleaned; v;ithstands a considerable amount of use.. Its manipu- 
lation produces only accurate answers and the iomediate sight of the problem is given 
to the child for reinforcement. I understand that there is a larger model available 
that would be better for group demonstration, but even the individual smaller size 
was used for the group. The plastislate worksheets for recording answers makes 
this an excellent "Teaching Machine." 

y/305 Best tool ever for teaching base ten and number recognition. Because 
of tactile advantages and concreteness of counters in relation to the Base 10 
concept of numbers, this should be a good tool for blind children. 

#604 This item is not included in our approved list of Mathematical Learn- 
ing Aids. Concepts could be developed with more serviceable aids. 



678 



Product Opinion #935 



"Phonic Mirror" 

H. C. Electronics, Inc. 

1640 A Tilburon Blvd. 

Tiburn, California 94920 



An automatic amplified speech playback instrument. The subject speaks into 
the instrument and the speech is played back. Intended for children with speech 
and hearing defects. 



EVALUATIONS 



#808 



l!t810 



J . lit. \^. 



Relevent & Accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 
Dvirable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness justifies cost? 
Used as producer intends? 
How long have you used it? 
Were you using it before 

request for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Not tape 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


1 year 


Longer 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


1-12 


4-18 


All 


Fast 


Remedial 


Remedi 


Small group 


Small 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Week 

No 
No 
6-9 



(EMR) 



Average 
Remedial, Supp. Remedial 

up Small group 



iie08 This material tends to improve the children's listening habits and 
increase their attention span. The Immediate playback makes it easier to point 
up their speech problems, hear their deficiencies, and try to correct them. 
Lateral lisps can be heard but not lingual lisps. A 2 and 8 second response would 
provide variation. It is a good teaching tool but too expensive considering its 
limited response. 

#810 Maximum benefit comes from experience with it. 



6 79 



Product Opinions #936 



"Language Master" 
Bell & Howell 
Nearest Audio-Visual Dealer 
Copyright: 1957 



A tape recorder with instant feedback, employing pre-recorded or teacher/ 
student-made cards for visual stimulation while the accompanying magnetic tape 
pronounces the word illustrated. 



Relevent & accurate? 

Attractive to pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies 

cost? 
Used as producer irttends? 
How long have you used it? 
Ware. -.you using.-- it before 

request for evaluation? 
Special training needed 

for use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



#807 



EVALUATIONS 
#810 



#811 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 



Yes Yes Yes 

More than a year More than a year More than a year 



Yes 



Yes 



Yes 



No 


Yes 






Introduction 


3-: 5 


4-:8 






All 


Ali 


All 






All 


All 


Fast 






All 


Remedial 


Remed- 


lal 






Small group 


Small 


gro 


up 


Small group, 
unsupervised st 



#807 This machine is especially useful for language therapy with disturbed 
and/or retarded children as the cards can be geared to the individual disorder. 

#810 This is one of the most valuable tools for a speech correctionist. 

#811 The only limitation of the Language Master is the creativity of the 
user. 



680 



PRODUCT OPINIONS 
#944 



Resonator Whistle 

Creative Playthings, Inc. 

Princeton, NJ 08540 

Copyri^t 1967 Price $6.95 



Fourteen inch slide whistle o£ birch plywood and maple with push and pull 
slide to control tone; extra mouth pieces. 



Relevant & Accurate? 

Attractive to Pupils? I 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer Intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using It before re- 
quest for evaluation? 

Special training needed for 
use? 

Age for which used 

Other ages recommended 

Learner Characteristics 

Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 





EVALUATIONS 




.,_ #103 




#406 


Somewhat 




Yes 


1 Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


None 




None 


No 




No 


Yes 




Don't know 


Week 




Week 



No 

No 
7-12 

13-14 MR 
Average, Slow 

Supplementary 

Small group 



No 

Possibly 
7-16 

Slow 

Supplementary 

Small group 



#103 It was used with the blind. Scale is reasonably accurate except at far end 
of whistle where pitch doesn't vary during last inch. Sometimes the note played near 
the mouthpiece is low rather than the highest note. Sound most pleasing when child 
blows sufficient amount of air in short blasts. Amount of air tends to give effect of 
natural notes and sharps without moving the slide. It is too long for a 7 yr. old and 
even difficult for a small 12 yr. old. They can use it only if the slide is operated 
by the teacher. 

#406 This, to us was a "fun" item. It had some relations to sound, but very little 
more. The children enjoyed it, and can be used by anyone who can blow. I had hoped 
to get more variety of sounds. It sounded something like the wail of a siren. Per- 
haps it has more useful qualities that I did not know about. 



681 

Thi. p.per publ.shed pursuant to a Grant from tht U.S. Off.c. of Edocalion. O.partment o« Health. Educat.on. 
tna W.ifara. However, the opinion, expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the U.S 
Office of Education, end no official endorsement by the US Office of Education should be interred. 



Product Opinions i'>96S 

"Peabody Language Kit #1" 
American Guidance Service, Inc. 
Publisher's Building 
Circle Pines, Minnesota 55014 
Copyright: 1967 



Kit contains a daily lesson manual, categorized stimulus and story cards, 
color chips, puppets, and tape recordings of fairy tales. Motivates children in 
the oral expression of ideas. 



Relevant & accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 
Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness justifies cost? 
Used as producer intends? 
How long have you used it? 
Jere you using it before request 

for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 

Teaching Procedure 





EVALUATIONS 




#314 


moe 


#807 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


1^ years 
>st 

Yes 


2 months 


More than a y 


No 


Yes 


e? No 


No 


No 


6-12 


4-8 


4-10 
3 


All 


Fast 


All 


Supplementary, 


Regular 


Supplementary 


remedial 




remedial 


Group, small 


Small group 


Group, small 


group 




group 



#314 The lessons are planned so that the children learn through sight, hearing, 
and feeling. Can be used for number and reading readiness. I do not feel the 
story pictures are appropriate for the lov^er age .iroup, 

#306 When using materials with pre-school, kindergarten, and first grade speech 
classes, one to five in a group — materials help to develop reception, concep- 
tualization, and expression. The kits are mainly used for oral language development, 

#807 The beauty of this kit is that it can be used with children of various age 
levels and the pictures are very accurate as well as durable. The puppets and 
story-cards allow for creativity. Useful for language disorders (Deaf, Hard of 
Hearing, DelayeH Language, Retarded). 



682 



Product Opinions #972 

The Syllable Game 
Garrard Publishing Company 

Garrard Press 
Champaign, Illinois 61820 
1967 
$2.10 



Three sets of cards, Set 1 containing thirty-two pairs of words with common 
initial syllables; Set 2 containing thirty-two pairs of words with common final 
syllables; and Set 3 consisting of sixteen groups of four words each, dealing with 
.1 sin>;le topic. The words ranging in length from one - four syllables. Especially 
helpful in developing speech skills in the deaf, the speech impaired, and mentally 
retarded, this game teaches quick recognition of common syllables and the sounding 
of long words by dividing them into long syllables. 

EVALUATIONS 



#206 



#821 



Rolevcnt & accurate? 

Attractive to pupils? 

Dumb le? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before request 

for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 
Tcacliing procedure 



Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


2 years 


Yes 


No 


11-15 



All 

Supplementary, remedial 

Small group 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 

Don't know cost 

Yes 

1 month 

No 

No 

12-16 

10-11 

Slow 

Remedial 

Small group 



#206 Vary good for teaching children an analysis-synthesis approach for self 
moni tor i/cation and self therapy in speech correction. The games are difficult 
enough to be challenging and they seem to teach a concept that goes further than 
tlie game. 



May 9, 1969 



683 



T hn 



...P«- ..ub..sh„d o„„u.n, ,„ a Cr.n, from ,h. US o,.,c, o( Educ.I.oo. D.p.r.m.n, of H.alth bduc.uor 
»r.„ w.„.,, H.,«,vH,, ,he op.o.oo. ..,„«ss,d he,„n do no, nec,«„.lv '»fl«, .h. po„„on or pol.cy o. th. US 
O.-.c. u. t.l.cM.n. «nd no ofl.c.l endorvem.n, oy .h, US Off.ce of touc.on should be ,nf^„ed 



PRODUCT OPINIONS 
975 

Group Sounding Game 
Garrard Publishing Co. 
Champaign, XL 61820 
Copyright 1945 Price $2.50 



15 sets of 6 cards each covering 14 steps in sounding to develop the habit of lis- 
tening to sounds and sound-letter combinations. A developmental or remedial read- 
ing game designed to progressively teach the phonetic elements by means of group 
participation in a bingo type game. 



EVALUATIONS 



#606 



yA802 



Relevant & Accurate? 

Attractive to Pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before re- 
quest for evaluation? 

Special training needed for 
use? 

Age for which used 

Other ages recommended 

Learner Characteristics 

Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



than a year 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
More 

Yes 
No 

8-12 



Average, Slow 

Regular, Remedial 
Supplementary 
Small group 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

Week 

No 
No 

7-11 

Average 

Remedial 
Supplementary 
Small group 



#606 We did not usually use this material as the primary method of teaching the 
sounds, but did find the game popular with the children and helpful as a supple- 
mentary material. 

#802 When I used it, I had them make sentences with the words. It did not matter 
if they could not find a word. 



684 



Th,t papa, publ.shed pursuant to a Grant from the US. Office of Education, D.partment of Healtfi, Education, 
and Waitare However, the opn.onj expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the U.S 
Office of EduCdiion. and no official endorsenient bv the U.S. OffiCP of l=n..r«..-,« .hoyld be inferred. 



Product Opinions /^992, 993, 1001, 1002 

Say Tt Arithmetic Gaines 

Garrard Publishing Company 

Champaign, Tlllnois 61820 

1967 

$1.98 each 



Each game (Addition. Subtraction. Multiplication, and Division) consists of 
player cards on each of which are printed sixteen arithmetic problems in four rows of 
successive difficulty and ninetv-slx cover cards printed with a single arithmetic 
combination Can be used to teach the arithmetic combinations Included or in prac- 
tice sessions to promote rapid recall. 

EVALUATIONS 



#306 



#315 



V.S, 



Yes 






Yes 


Yes 


Yes 








Yes 


Yes 






Yes 


Yes 


Yes 








Yes 


Yes 






No 


Yes 


Yes 






No 


Yes 


Month 






Year 


Month 


No 






Yes 


No 


No 






No 


No 


9-12 






8-11 


6-12 


All 






Slow 


Slow 


Suppl 


sme 


ntary. 


Supplementary 


Remedial 


reme 


iia 


1 






Small 


group 


Unsupervised 


Small group 



Relevant (x accurate? 

Attractive to pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness iustlfies cost? 

Used as producer Intends? 

How long have yon used it? 

Were you using it before request 

for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 

Teaching procedure 

#306 I used "Say It" to take the drudgery out of drill. Each group loved it. 
It presented enough of a challenge to hold their interest. I work in small groups, 
time of each setting being 30 minutes. I would like to see it tried in a classroom 
where there are a variety of abilities. 

#315 I feel that since the problems matrh and are complete, that is. with no 
missing parts , the educational value Is miplmal and math skills are not improved. 
I find almost no memory recall as the problems are complete with answers and Involve 
no memory training. 

V.S. Great success with younger childreri (1st & 2nd grade), particularly for 
those with severe reversal problems. Onlv moderately useful with older children. 
There is sufficient challenge in Instant recognition of the whole combination for 
the younger, but not the older ones. 



May 1, 1969 



685 



Thri paper published pursuent to « Grant from the US. Off.ce of Education. Department of Health, Education. 
tnri Melfare However, ihe opmiont expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the U.S. 
Office of EduCdiion. end no official endorsement Dy the US Office of Education should be inferred. 



Product Opinions #1104, 1105, 1110 

Fitzhugh Plus Program 
Allied Education Council 
Gallen, Michigan 49113 
Copyright: 1966 
$14 Entire set 



Program consists of a teacher's manual giving background and philosophy of the 
program, and several "series" dealing with different subject matters of language and 
numbers, and spatial organization. These series are presented in individually paced, 
self-instructional workbooks that inform the child when he is correct, and are suffi- 
ciently repetitive to enforce complete learning. Useful as a supplementary, remedial, 
or preparatory aid for pupils with learning deficiencies. 

EVALUATIONS 



#302 



#310 



#610 



Relevant & accurate? 

Attractive to pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before request 

for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Currlcular function 

Teaching procedure 



Yes 

Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Year 

Yes 

No 

6-14 

Average 

Regular, remedial 
supplementary 



Basically 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 



More than a year 2 years 



Yes 



Yes 



Brief explanation No 

8-15 6-9 

4-7 

Slow Average, slow 

Remedial Remedial 

Individual with Unsupervised 
some supervision 



#302 My young students like these work books because they know at once whether or 
not their answers are correct. They cannot argue with the little yellow mark on the 
paper, however they do get weary of having the teacher tell them that they are wrong. 
Book 3 with its pictured beginning vocabulary has been a "boon" and a challenge to my 
dyslexic student. He is making progress, enjoying his work, and slowly gaining confi- 
dence. Book 4 has been particularly good for my boy who can read but whose reasoning 
ability needs much improvement. The questions stress "how many, each," which are so 
difficulat for these people, however when written in a vocabulary which is not too diffi- 
cult, slow but sure progress becomes evident. 



#310 A good material that could be improvcil to become an excellent material. 
Basically accurate but pictures could be more roallstic and use of all capitals is 
8 latent. I feel it is somewhate expensive for a consumable workbook but price has 
decreased once and is expected to again. 



incon- 



686 



Product Opinions #1100 

"Mott Basic Lan3ua3e Skills Program" 
Allied Education Council 
Galien, Michigan 49113 



Uorlcbooks contain photographs of objects frequently uced by people in 
homes and schools. The word for the object is presented in larse type with 
a spnce provided for the student to copy the word. As he fills in blanks he 
immediately removes the plastic strip that covers the ansi;er8 to be sure 
that he is ri^ht. If he is not ri^ht, he can then correct himself. The word 
is also included in a sentence. A review story is presented at the end of 
each unit. 



Rolevent & accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 
Durable? 

Tcncher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness justifies cost? 
Used as producer intends? 
How long have you used it? 
Were you using it before 

request for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
A3e Cor which used 
Other a^es recowmended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 

Teachin,'; procedure 



f:valuations 






#301 


#508 




#606 


No 


Yes 




Yes 


No 


Yes 




Yes 


No 


Yes 




Not used lon^ 


Yes 


Yes 




Had none 


No 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Don't know 


Year 


Month 




Month 


Yes 


Yes 




No 


f No 


Yes 




Yes 


AdultE 


14,13 




10-18 


Average, slow 


Slov; 




Slow 


Regular 


Regula 


r 


Supplementary, 
remedial 


Supervised 


Small 


group 


Supervised stud 


study 









#301 I am not impressed with this material. It uses poor quality paper, 
iti bulky and comes aport easily, 

//50G Should be used for the slot; learner, not severely retarded or 
perceptually handicapped. It is related to comnon experience and reinforces 
pri.vious principles taught. Each item learned builds to new knowledge and 
relates to past learning. It is too costly to use up by one student. I have 
the child write on a separate sheet of paper. I use each lesson for about 
three sessions. It is well designed to present related material. 

#606 Appealed to older underachieving disturbed boys better than many 
other remedial materials, because the v;ords were polysyllabic. 

687 



Thit paper published pursuent to a Grant from iha U S Optica of Education. Dapartmani of Haalth. Education, 
and Walfare However, the opiniont expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the U.S. 
O'tice of Education, and no official endorsement by the U .S Office of Education should be inferred. 



PRODUCT OPINIONS 
#1178 

Listening & Moving, The Development 
of Body Awareness & Position in Space 
Educational Activities, Inc. 
Freeport, New York 11520 
Copyright 1967 Price $5.«5 



Record for the development of body awareness and position is space through precep- 
tion of body surfaces of self and other people and object. 



EVALUATIONS 



#106 



#406 



Relevant & Accurate? 

Attractive to Pupils? 

Durab le ? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before re- 
quest for evaluation? 

Special training needed for 
use? 

Age for which used 

Other ages recommended 

Learner Characteristics 

Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Month 

No 

No 
9 

1-10 
Slow 

Supplementary 

Small group 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Month 

Yes 

Yes 
5-11 
5-18 
All 

Regular, Remedial 
Stnpplementary 
Small Group 



#106 The student enjoyed the movement as a change from regular studies. 

#406 The record has helped to accomplish some of the things we had been trying to 

teach. The teacher must demonstrate as the pupils follow the record. The students 

found it interesting, but hard to follow in some parts, I would have liked a guide 
or preview or a bit of explanation of the record before using. 



688 



Tha piptr publ.jhed pur.u.nt lo » Gr.nt from th« US. Off.c* o» Education. D.p.rtm.nt of Health. Educai.on. 
• nd Malfarc However, the opm.ont exprei.ed harem do not necesj.rilv reflect the poiition or policy of the US 
Ofl.ce of Edudt.on, and no official endorsement by the US Office of Education ihould be inferred 



Product Opinions #1159 

"Eyegate Filmstrips" 
Eye Gate House, Inc. 
14o-01 Arcl>.er Avenue 
Jamaica, Mev; Yorlf 11435 



A whole series of filmstrips and tapes on reading, speech, raithematics, 
number comprehension, heQlt^i habits, safety rules, good citizenshp, social 
behavior, nature, anima' s , seasons, xjeother, and history. Includes a special 
set of filmstrips for Educable and Trainable Mentally Retarded. 



EVALUATIONS 



#406 



#406 



#C02 



Rclevent & accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 
Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness justifies cost? 
Used as producer intends? 
Hov; long have you used it? 
Were you using it before 

request for evaluation? 
Special training needed for 

use? 
Age for V7hich used 
Other ages recommended 

Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 
Yes 

1 we el; 

Yes 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
1 v;eek 

Yes 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 



Yes 



No 


No 


Yes 


n-ii 


7-16 

Younger normal 
children 


6-10 


All 


Average, slox; 


All 


Supplementary 


Supplementary 


Remedial 


Group 


Group 


Small group 



#404 The pictures \;ere delightful, the story Interesting, I used this when 
I taught the youngest trainable group. 

#406 "The Seasons in Oaktree'' It x;ould seem that small children up through 
the 2nd grade and retarded children of liif^her age xrauTd enjoy it more. Older 
retarded children might consider these fi^ms infantile. I'm impressed that the 
film deals with so many tilings or ha'jits the children need to '-novj. These sorts 
of films enrich our offerings for trainable children. 

#u07 "Riddlc-a-Rhyme" Used for speech deficts and delayed language. It 
is primarily aimed at the classroom teacher. It needs to be adapted for more 
speech practice. T'.ie strips are not too oiactical for the travelling speech thera- 
pist as we don't have time to set up projectors after rounding it up. Many children 
were bored with rhjnnes quickly. 



689 
June 5, IZCr. 

Thit (5»per published pursuant lo » Grint <rom tht US i)«fic« ol Educttion. D«p»rtm«nt of Health, Educetion. 
end Welfare However, the opiniont expressed herein do not necesianly reflect the po«ition or policy o< the U.S. 
Office of EduCdtion, ano no official endoriement by the US Office of Education should be inferred. 



Product Opinion #1263 

Affixo 
Remedial Education Press 

2138 Bancroft Place NW 
Washington D.C. 20008 
Copyright 1967 Price $2.00 



Work with 13 root words, 17 common suffixes and prefixes, producing 160 possible 
inflected forms, for the child with severe reading difficulties. 

EVALUATIONS 



#301 



#802 



Relevant & Accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 
Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness justifies cost? 
Used as producer intends? 
How long have you used it? 
Were you using it befor request 

for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner Characteristics 
Curricular function 

Teaching procedure 



Yes 






Yes 


Yes 






Yes 


Yes 






Yes 


Yes 






Yes 


Don't 


know 


Don't know 


Yes 






NO 


Week 






Week 


No 






No 


No 






Yes 


15-18 






10-11 


Slow 






Average 


Regular, 


Remedial 


Remedial 


Supplementary 




Small 


gr 


oup 


Small Grou 



Unsupervised study 



#301 Didn't find the material too valuable, 
visual direction. 



Too limited. Good for right- left 



#802 It was challenging to the children and they enjoyed making the new words. 
One of the affixes could se both prefix or suffix - en. It was a little confusing to 
the children. I used it as a game for the purpose of maximum speech therapy for the 
children. 



690 



Th,i paoe, published pursuant to a Gran, from the U S Office of Eduction. Department of Health, f.duca.ion. 
and A.ifere However, the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the US 
Office of Eduction, and no official endorsement Dv .h. US Off.ce '>< c-..,-.-- ..^..iq t), inferred 



Product Opinion.-; #1147 

Culsenairo Rods 
Culsenalre Company of America 

9 Elm Avenue 

Mount Vernon, New York 10550 

$6.95 



A set of cloth string-tied bags, each containing seventy-two brightly colored rods 
of ten varied lengths. Each different length is color-coded and represents a number, 
which can be combined with other lengths to demonstrate number relationships. Teaches 
basic principles of addition, subtraction, fractions, etc., through color, touch, and 
manipulation. 

EVALUATIONS 



#310 



#505 



#701 



Relevant 6< accurate? 

Attractive to pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before request 

for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 

Teaching procedures 



Yes 




Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




Yes 




More 


than a year 


5 years 


1 year 


Yes 




Yes 


Yes 


No 




No 


Yes 


7-10 






5-6 


5-6, 


11-12 




4. 7 


All 




All 


Average, slow 


Regular, remedial. 


Supplementary, 


Supplementary, 


supp 


ilementary 


remedial 


remedial 


Group 


1, small group, 


Small group. 


Small group. 


unsu 


ipervised 


unsupervised 


unsupervised 



#310 For used with the visually or mentally handicapped or whenever child is unable 
to visualize concrete concepts or can be stimulated by discovery approach. Visually 
and factually veiy appealing -- hard to keep hands off -- reasonable cost. Here is a 
supplementary aid that has possibilities limited only by time spent and the Imagination 
of the teacher -- but it is that -- a supplementary aid. I don't see this as an arith- 
metic program to replace, for Instance, Stern's Structural Arithmetic, although concepts 
of the programs overlap. 

y/505 Without supervision of those using the rods, they are easily lost. It seems 
to me that larger rods would be more practical especially for use with cerebral palsied 
children. The box in which they came was not very durable and soon went to pieces. For 
the price paid, I think a stronger container ci.nlil be providjed. 

#701 The Cuisenaire Rods were quite good ' nr use with a small group of students. 
Many of the average and above average children in the regular classroom used these for 
supplementary work as well as creative investi/,aiion of their new math concepts. 
February 17, 1969 

691 

Thit paper published puriuent to e Grant from the US Office of Education. Dapartment of Health, Educanon, 
and Welfare However, the opimoni eapressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the U.S. 
Office of Educdtion. and no official endorsement by the US Office of Education should be inferred 



Product Opinions #1191-1193 

Basic Songs for Exceptional Children 
Concept Records 
North Bellmore 
Long Island, New York 
$6.95 each 



These are three 33 1/3 RPM records designed to be used with Neurologically 
Impaired, Mentally Retarded, and Emotionally Disturbed Children. The first deals 
with body concepts and self- identity, time relationships and sequences, and environ- 
mental experiences; the second with hygJene, nutrition, exercise, and rest; and the 
third with body articulation, orientation, and rhythmic motor coordination through 
active participation with the songs. A teacher manual is included with each 
record. 



EVALUATIONS 



#314 



#509 



Relevant & accurate? 

Attractive to pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before request 

for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
2 months 

Yes 

No 

6-13 

4-5 

Slow 

Small group 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
1 month 

No 

Yes 

5-18 

Slow 

Supplementary 
Small group 



#314 I have found records 1 and 3 effective with the younger group in my 
room and record 2 better with the older group, ages 6-8 and 9-13. 

#509 These records meet an important need in providing learning experiences 
for the trainable. The catchy simple tunes are pleasant and even a non-musical 
teacher could handle them. Many of the concepts are in the TMR and the songs could 
fit in with the Primary Peabody Language Material. Teacher manual is exceptionally 
sound in concept and suggestions on effective presentation. 



Thij ptp*r publithad purtuint to a Grant from th« U S. Ot«ic« of Education. Ditpartmtnt of Haatth, Education, 
•nd Wal'ara Homcer, th» opimont e>pr«s&ed heram do not necessarily raflact tha position or policy of tha U.S. 
Otiica of Education, and no official andortan^ant by tna US Offica of Education ahoulo ba infarrad. 

692 



May 2, 1969 



PRODUCT OPINIONS 

#1256 



Signs of Everyday Life 

Exceptionale Products Company 

Box 6374 

Richfield Branch 

Minneapolis, MN 55440 



101 rectangular cards printed in 2 inch block letters showing 28 signs of common 
places and things, 32 warnings signs, and 41 signs of instruction, guidance, and 
direction. Useful for primary children with reading handicaps in building a mean- 
ingful everyday sight vocabulary and in developing acceptable social behavior and 
skills. 



EVALUATIONS 



#206 



Relevant & Accurate? 

Attractive to Pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before re- 
quest for evaluation? 

Special training needed for 
use? 

Age for which used 

Other ages recommended 

Learner Characteristics 

Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



#6Q6 



Yes 
Yes 

Yes 

None 

Yes 

Yes 

Month 

No 

No 
12-15 

Slow 



Supplementary 

Group, Small Group 
Unsupervised study 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
2 Months 

No 

No 

9-12 
13-18 
Slow 

Remedial 
Supplementary 
Group, Small group 
Unsupervised study 
Individual 



#206 Kids seemed highly motivated, 
knowing meaning. 



They knew many, recognizdd others without 



#606 Adapt for a language master. Prepare a tape which "reads" the words for 
children with learning problems. Create stories which use the words. 



693 



This paper published pursuant to a Grant from the US. Office of Education, Department of Health, Education, 
and Welfare. However, the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the U.S. 
Office of Education, and no official endorsement by the U.S Office of Education should be inferred. 



Product Opinions #1409 

Sights and Sounds 

Captioned Films for the Deaf 

UOSE/HEW 



Using gross noises of the circus, home, band concert, the city, farm, and Christ- 
mas, this set of six long play records and six corresponding captioned and non- 
captloned filmstrips develops auditory perception in the hearing impaired primary 
level child. At the end of each sight-sound sequence, twelve sounds selected from the 
story are used to test perceptual Improvement, using test booklets, erasable grease 
pencil, and the testing bands that are part of each record. 



EVALUATIONS 



#204 



#807 



Relevant & accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 
Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness justifies cost? 
Used as producer intends? 
Kow long have you used it? 
Were you using it before 

request for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Ix^arner characteristics 
Curricular function 



Teaching procedure 



Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Definitely 


Yes 


Definitely 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Primarily 


Yes 


4 years 


4 months 


Yes 


Yes 


Not necessarily 


No 


4-9 


4-10 


10-11 




Average 


All 


Regular, Supplementary 


Regular 


for later Elementary, 




Remedial for Readiness - 




Normal Hearing 




Small group 


Small gr 



#204 The item has incorporated units of sounds and sights that are of most 
interest and most familiar to young children. The colors in booklets and on the film 
strips are beautiful -- the sounds authentic and clear. One look at my copy tells it 
has been put to much use. The filmstrips can be incorporated with unit projects -- 
spelling -- field trips. I have used the auditory stimulus to produce spelling 
words of object or sound. No teacher training needed although a teacher of deaf 
would have to know if a child is capable of hearing certain frequency sounds. 

#807 It would be very useful for other than hard of hearing but it is hard to 
«ct a hold of for others. This can be purchased through University Films Inc., 
New York City, and McGraw-Hill Book Co. for children other than deaf youngsters. 



694 



February 10, 1969 



Product Opinions #1410 

See and Say Puzzle Cards 
Visual-Motor Perception Teaching Materials 
Teaching Resources 
334 Boylston Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 
1967 
$4.75 



Fourteen pairs of picture cards showing items with names that rhyme. The cards 
are matching by sound and only the correct pictures will lock together to form a 
"puzzle." 

EVALUATIONS 



#206 



#405 



#819 



Relevant & accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 
Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness justifies cost? 
Used as producer Intends? 
How long have you used it? 
Were you using it before 

request for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 

Teaching procedure 



Yes 


Yes 






Yes 


Fairly 


Could be 


improved 


Yes 


Yes 


No 






No 


Didn't use. 


No 






Yes 


Don't know 


Yes 






Don't know 


No 


No 






No 


2 years 


A year 






2 weeks 


Yes 


Yes 






No 


? No 


No 






No 


5-7 


6-16 






6-8 


3-4, 8-10 










All 


Average 


!. 


slow 


Average 


Supplementary, 


All 






Supplementary 


remedial 










Small group 


Group, 


unsuper- 


Small group 




vised 


study 





#206 Used in speech correction for motivation for speech, sound awareness, 
vocabulary building, coordination of speech development and reading readiness. Will 
work with most any handicap; visual perception development, probably visual motor 
coordination. Could be more cards, longer sequence of rhyming words. Not real attrac- 
tive, but clear, uncluttered. Greatest assets are durability, freedom from distraction, 
and simplicity of design. Also, I think, its uses are as many as the teachers who use 
it. 

#405 Item should be in color against off-white background. Suggest that it be 
laminated in plastic for durability. Instructions should be logical guide to various 
uses. If lasting quality can be increased, cost is justified. 

#819 Placed the puzzle parts upside down in two groups. As a child attempted 
to match two parts he was asked to use a phrase such as "A tree goes with a bee." 
The children enjoy rhyming the words. Could be made more durable with a plastic finish. 
I used it to motivate language rather than visual perception. Since I have made many 
materials to fit the needs of my classes in speech and hearing therapy, I would not be 
tempted to purchase this item. 

695 



February 6, 1969 



Product Opinions #1411 

"Frostig Program of Visual Perception" 

Follett Company 

1010 W. Washington Blvd. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Copyright: 1966 

$3.75 



A set of books with removable worksheets, meant to cover three semester's 
work. Used to develop visual discrimination in the Perceptually Handicapped 
child, in the formation and directionality of figures and characters; positional 
relationships between objects; perception and identification of forms regardless of 
different sizes, color, position; drawing; writing; identification of relevent 
stimuli from distracting backgrounds. 



Relevent & accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 
Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness justifies coat? 
Used as producer intends? 
How long have you used it? 
Were you using it before 

request for evaluation? 
Special training needed for useY 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 





EVALUATIONS 








#508 




#702 






#807 


Yes 




Yes 






Yes 


Yes 




Yes 






Yes 


Yes 




Yes 






Yes 


Yes 




No 






Yes 


Yes 




No 






Yes 


Yes 




Yes 






Yes 


6 months 




More 


than a 


year 


2 years 


Yes 




Yes 






Yes 


? Yes 




Yes 






Yes 


4-6 




6-10 






5,6,8 


Any 




^,3 






4-15 


Slow 




Brain 


damaged 


All 


Regular, 


remedial 


Reraed 


ial 




Remedial 


Group, individual 


Small 


group 




Small group, 












individual 



#508 Material is clean cut and directions for use are clear. Paper is firm, 
but material is up by the subjects. However duplicator material is available. 
The program is corrective and preventive. It would be well to use this material 
at the earliest school age to see that perceptions are well developped. 



field. 



#702 Instruction booklet would not be adequate for any teacher nev; in the 



//807 The program can be used in the regular classroom such as kindergarten 
or with special education classes for children with learning difficulties. Could 
be a corrective and preventive supplementary measure. 



696 



WfiPMLi11S[?l/IP'^ 



1. Trade name of item: Tzaching PlctuKzh and SonQi (^on. the. fiannzl BoaA.d 

2. Publisher or producer's name and address: 

Vavid C. Cook Publiiking Company 
B50 HoKth Gfiovz Avenue 
Elgin, Jlllnoii 60120 

3. Copyright or production date, if given: 19 66 

4. Developmental information: Mot Available 

4a. Author X 

4b. Where developed X 

4c. Why developed X 



5. Evaluation setting: Pn.imaA.y zducable rmntatly xttandtd tla6ifioom 
located in a high ^ocio-zconomic uxban anta. 



6. Contents: 

6a. Subject matter area(s): Social Stadi^6 , Healthy <^riov,nq ^ ^"jit y 
6b. Factually ?.ccurate? Yes x No 



7. Description of the item: luaching Pictufiz^ - PacktU contain 12 colon 

pi.ctan.tii> and Az^oufice. i,hze.ti, wh^ch pKovidc teaching idzai [Suggeitzd 
queiUom, backg/LOund inioKmatlon, /ihythmic activititi, id&ai {^ofi 
cla6^ pnojecti, and Atonie.i to tell. Sonq6 {,0K the Tlannzl Boand - 
Packzti, include pictufiZ-illaitA.ate.d 4,ongi, wh-cch afi.z alio inconpofiatzd 

8. Describe how you used the item: on a itcoid. 

The pictixfizi wzKz displayed on a bulletin boaid and zach picture. 
Mai d-Licuaed individually. I {tollowtd the dinzctiom givzn on 
thz xziouKcz ihzzti . 

Is this the use the manufacturer recormends? Yes X Mo 

9. Cost $ '• ^^ Pg-^ packet 

9a. Does its teaching value or effectiveness justify its cost? Yes X No 



697 



10. PItysiral characteristics: 

10a. Is it adequately durable? Yes ^ No 

10b. Can it be reused? Yes ^ No 

10c. Are replacement parts available? Yes No 

Information not available ^ 

lOd. Is it portable? Yes_f_ No 

lOe. Is it easy to use? Yes ^ No 

11. Teaching procedure: Show plctait, diica^i, aik quz^tiom , ■i-lng 6ongA, 

u4 e {i-ilm^t^'ip , ztc. 



12. Teacher preparation: 

12a. Is a teacher manual available? Yes X_ No 

12b. If available, is it adequate? Yes ^ No 

12c. Would some special teacher training be advisable in order to make 
effective use of it? 

Very necessary Helpful Unnecessary ^ 

12d. Are pupil progress reports provided? Yes No ^ 

13. Pupil reaction: 

13a. Attractive? YesX No 

13b. Does it consistently hold the interest level over a period of 
time? Yes_X_ No 

14. Comments: Eve.n.y two ok thxc.z weefe-6 a dif^d^fiznt packet wa^ dlAplayad 

and a tzachtng unit wai dtvtlopzd abound the theme. 0({ that pafit-i- 
cutafL packet. The-ie matefilali an.e vQ.fiij helpful 6Znce thexe ane 
lew matefilali available that coveA the iubject ateai Included in 
the packets. 



Evaluator Can.ole Se{,lKln 



Date febiuafiy 17, 1969 IEG/3 
698 



PRODUCT OPINIONS 
#1942 



Spin-It Sets 1&2 
Speech & Language Materials 
Box 721 
Tulsa, OK 74101 
Copyright 1967 Price $12.00 



Each set consists of four colorful cards with divided circles and plastic spinning 
arrows, each emphasizing one consonant or blend sound as the medial or final sound 
in the name of the object depicted. 



EVALUATIONS 



Relevant & Accurate? 

Attractive to Pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before re- 
quest for evaluation? 

Special training needed for 
use? 

Age for which used 

Other ages recommended 

Learner Characteristics 

Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



,.... #808 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Month 

Yes 

Yes 
5-6 
4-8 

Fast 

Remedial 

Group, Small group 



#823 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

None 

No 

Yes 

Month 

No 

No 
5-7 

Average 

Remedial 

Small group 



#808 The "Spin-It" set are a very useful aid in speech correction. They are most 
effective when used with early elementary school children. They are easily adapted 
to word, controlled sentence, and conversational speech work. 



699 



Th.s p.per p.bl.shed pursuant ,o a Gran, from ,h. US Off.ce of Educat.or,. O.par.men, of Health Educe„on 
and W.ifara However, .he opm.or,, expressed herem do r,o. r,eces5ar,ly reflect .he posit.or, or pol.cy of ,he US 
OtI.ce of EducLon, ar,d no off.cal enOorsenian, by the US Office of Educ.on should be mferred 



PRODUCT OPINIONS 

#1940 

Listening Time Stories (Vol. 
Bowmar Records, Inc. 
10515 Burbank Boulevard 
North Hollywood, Cal. 
Price $7.95 



1-3) 



Three albums of children stories making use of isolated consonant sounds. Suggested 
for children between ages four and eight. Used for speech improvement and relaxation- 
helping to improve auditory skills. 



Relevant & Accurate? 

Attractive to Pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used It? 

Were you using it before re- 
quest for evaluation? 

Special training needed for 
use? 

Age for which used 

Other ages recommended 

Learner Characteristics 

Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



EVALUATIONS 



#802 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Week 

No 

No 

5-6, 
4 
All 



8-9 Retarded 



Remedial 

Group 
Small Group 



#818 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

None 

Yes 

Yes 

Week 

No 

Yes 
1-6 

All 

Supplementary 

Group 



#802 Could be used in kindergarten speech improvement for all children or even 
for pre-schoolers. Parents could easily help their children with these records. 



#818 It is attractive to pupils, but not above the 1st grade level, 
is valauble in the area of awareness of listening developmental stages. 



Some training 



700 



Tr,,. p,p„ p.bl.hed pursu.n, ,o . Gr.n, from ,h. US Off.ce of EduC.on. D.p.Mm.n, of H..l,h Educ.on 
.nd W„f.r, However, the op.n.on, expressed h.re.n do no, necessarHy reflect ,h. po.it.or, or pohcy of ,he US 
Of..c. of Educ.on. end no off.c.l endorsemer,, by ,„e US Off.ce of Educ.on .hould be mferred 



Product Opinions #894 

"Peabody Language Kit ifX" 
American Guidance Service, Inc. 

Publisher's Building 

Circle Pines, Minnesota 5501^! 

Copyright: 1957 



Visual and kinetic materials, consisting of manual, pictures, and manipu- 
lative puppets developed to encourage good articulation and speech patterns in the 
pre- and primary school child. 



Relevant & accurate? 

Attractive to pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Use'] as producer intends? 

How l»ng have you used it? 

'..ere you using it before request 

for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
A^e for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 

Teaching procedure 











EVALUATIONS 






#301 










#604 




#810 


Positively 








Yes 




Yes 


One of 


the 


best 




Yes 




Yes 


Yes 










Yes 




Yes 


Yes 










Excellent 




Yes 


Yes 










Yes 




Yes 


Yes 










Yes 




Yes 


1 year 










1 year 




More than a y 


Yes 










Yes 




Yes 


No 










Yes 




Yes 


10-12 










7-11 




3-G 


3-9 
















All 










All 




Slow 


All 










Regular, 




Remedial 












supplementary 




Group, 


sma 


11 


group 


Group, sm. 


group 


Small group 



#301 Useful for Speech Defective, Language Impoverished, and Mentally 
Handicapped. Reinforces weak language patterns and establishes nev; ones. A most 
beautiful and v;orthy product to implement the language arts and communication 
problems of elementary children. 

#004 Suitable for all primary pupils except where physical handicap v/ould 
nake such materials inappropriate. 

#flO This is a most valuable tool not only for speech pathologists but 
also for pre-school and primary teachers and especially for teachers of EMR. 



» 



701 



I 



PRODUCT OPINIONS 

#2014 

Pathway School Program 1 

Eye-Hand Coordination Exercise 

Teaching Resources 

334 Boylston Street 

Boston, Mass. 

Copyright 1968 Price $15.00 

A ball hanging at a set position from a wooden support rod is to be batted by wooden 
rolling pins against a color target at certain distance. Manual exercise of increasing 
difficulty are structured to improve skills in eye-hand coordination. 



EVALUATIONS 



Relevant 6c Accurate? 

Attractive to Pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer Intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before re- 
quest for evaluation? 

Special training needed for 
use? 

Age for which used 

Other ages recommended 

Learner Characteristics 

Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



Ut2U. 



JtMlL. 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Month 

No 

No 

No 
7-12 
6-18 
Slow 

Supp lementary 

Remedial 

Group, Small group 

Unsupervised study 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Week 

No 

No 

No 
6-16 

Slow 

Remedial 

Small group 



#315 The children loved this "ball game" and would stand in line to play the games 
as we called the exercises. After brief instruction 3 or 4 of same height would 
practice quietly as others came for reading or math groups. It is easily Installed 
and adjustable. 

#406 The children liked this device. All could participate on some level. You 
could tell 1-he ones who had difficulty with hand work in their Inability to do the 
most difficult of the tasks. I would like to have one for our group because it works 
with the arms and eyes better than some things we use which develop the eyes more. 



702 



Thu paper published pursuani to a Grant from the US. Off.ce of Education. Department of Health, Educenon. 
and Welfare Howiover. the opinionj expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the US 
Office of Education, and rvo official endorsement Dv the US Office of Frti.r.t.on .hnuld be inferred 



PRODUCT OPINIONS 

#2470 

Listening and Speech Nimber 1 

Pacific Records 

Box 558 

Palo Alto, CA 94302 

Price $5.95 



Stories on record stressing certain speech sounds (R, S, L, & CH) to promote active 
participation by the children and improve listening ability. 



EVALUATIONS 



Relevant & Accurate? 

Attractive to Pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before re- 
quest for evaluation? 

Special training needed for 
use? 

Age for which used 

Other ages recommended 

Learner Characteristics 

Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



.,.#802 



No 

No 

Yes 

None 

No 

Yes 

Didn't use 

No 

No 
4-5 

Slow 

Remedial 

Small group 



#817 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

None 

No 

Yes 

Week 

No 

No 
5-6 
3-4 
All 

Remedial 
Supplementary 
Small group 



#802 I did not use It as it was too elementary for my students. I felt the adults 
were too patronizing to the children on the record. Children would not like the voice 
of the woman on the record. The stories are too long and not really interesting; al- 
most silly. I have previously played Elaine Mikalson's 2 volumes to children and 
found that they did not identify with her or even enjoy the records. She is just too 
gushy and very artifical sounding. 

y/t817 They liked it! 



703 



Tn.. paper publijhed pursu.nt lo a Grant from ih. US Office of Education. O.partment of Health, Education, 
and Welfare However, the opinion, expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the U.S 
Office of Education, and no official endorsement by tne US Office of Edur,i,on should be inferred 



PRODUCT OPINIONS 

#2492 



Word Making Cards 

Word Making Productions 

Box 305 

Salt Lake City, ITT 84110 

Copyright 1968 Price $8.00 



A set of word cards (pictures) foled according to sound content to be used for 
stimulation and elicitation of speech sounds and language development activities. 



EVALUATIO^C 



Relevant & Accurate? 

Attractive to Pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before re- 
quest for evaluation? 

Special training needed for 
use? 

Age for which used 

Other ages recommended 

Learner Characteristics 

Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 



JMi. 



MiA. 



Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

2 years 

Yes 

Yes 

No 
5-12 

All 

Supplementary 

Group 
Small group 



Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

3 years 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 
1-10 
11-12 
All 

Remedial 
Supplementary 
Small Group 



#824 May be of value to beginning clinician who doesn't have sets of stimulation 
cards. 

#818 This device could be improved with color and a more durable finish on the 
cards, but it is very useful as is. 



704 



Th„ paper published pursuent <o a Grant from Ih. US Ottice of Educ.Iion. D.partmeni of Health, Eduret.on. 
and W.Uare However, the op,n,on. expressed herem do not necesjanly reflect th. position or policy of the US 
OtI.ce of EduCdt.on, and no official endorsement by the US Office of Education should be inferred 



Product Opinions 

My Speech Workbook I-II 
Interstate 
Danville, Indiana 
1964 
$2.50 



Workbooks providing practice in articulation of "S," "Z," and "R" sounds 
through isolation of the sound, stimulation, identification, discrimination, rein- 
forcement, etc. Most helpful when used as a supplemental aid at home, individually 
or with the help of a parent. For the child with cerebral palsy, cleft palate, 
learning English as a second language, the mentally retarded and accoustically 
handicapped . 



Relevant & accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 
Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness justifies cost? 
Used as producer intends? 
How long have you used it? 
Were you using it before 
request for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 





EVALUATIONS 






#816 




#822 




#824 


Yes 




Yes 




Yes 


Somewhat 




Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 




Yes 


There is 


none 


Yes 




There is none 


Yes 




Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 




No 


4 years 




6 years 




More than a year 


Yes 




Yes 




Yes 


? No 




No 




No 


5-9 




10-13 




5-12 


All 




Fast, aver 


age 


Average 


Supplementary 


Remedial 




Supplementary 


All 




Unsupervised 


Group, small group 






study 







#816 Activities are very self-explanatory. Many activities could be thought 
of as busy work but still apply some needed repetition and experience. I wish there 
had been some easier method of removing pages for the children individually to work 
on. All in consideration, I feel it is a very useful supplementary book. 

#822 At times the instructions and pictures give the impression that the 
books are for primary students. However, most of the materials only lend themselves 
to upper elementary or junior high students. A good supplemental aid to be used for 
improving misarticulations of S^ & Z, and R at home. 

#824 Has variety of activities for use in individual and group therapy. 
Excellent as supplemental material. 



705 



January 15, 1969 



Product Opinions II 

My Speech Workbook I-II 

Interstate 

Danville, Indiana 

1964 

$2.50 



Workbooks providing practice in articulation of "S," "Z," and "R" sounds through 
isolation of the sound , stimulation, identification, descrimination, reinforcement, 
etc. Most helpful when used as a supplemental aid at home, individually or with the 
help of a parent. For the child with cerebral palsy, cleft palate, learning English 
as a second language, the mentally retarded and accoustically handicapped. 



Relevant & accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness justifies cost? 
Used as producer intends? 
How long have you used it? 
Were you using it before 

request for evaluation? 
Special training needed for use? 
Age for which used 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 
Teaching procedure 







EVALUATIONS 




#808 






#811 


#823 


Yes 






Yes 


Yes 


Yes 






Not colorful but 
fun 


Yes 


Yes 






Yes 


Yes 


There 


is none 


Yes 


Self-explanatory 


Yes 






Yes 


Yes 


Yes 






Yes 


Yes 


More 


than a 


year 


4 years 


6 years 


Yes 






Yes 


Yes 


No 






No 


No 


7, 11 






6-9 


7-12 


All 






Average 




Supplementary 


Supplementary 


Any 


Small 


group 




Small group. 


Small group 



unsupervised study 



#808 The lessons are practical and interesting to the children and make fine 
supplementary material. Many pages could be used with children who have dif f iculaties 
in phonics. 

#811 These books are particularly useful for use with children who need rein- 
forcement -- those who seem to make only minimal progress in a twice a week program. 
If given as a home assignment, the parent could benefit from some instruction. 



706 



February 7, 1969 



Product Opinions #2018 - 2021 

Stern Arithmetic 

Houghton Mifflin Company 

1900 S. Batavia Avenue 

Geneva, Illinois 60134 

$27 - S28 



The program consists of Teacher Manual and film strip, reinforced by the individual 
use of workbooks and colored wooden counting blocks that fit into pattern boxes and 
boards. Demonstrates mathematical concepts and relationships through color cue, touch, 
and arrangement. Sets for Kindergarten through third levels. 



#315 



EVALUATIONS 
#610 



J.L. 



Relevant & accurate? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies cost? 

Used as producer intends? 

How long have you used it? 

Were you using it before 

request for evaluation? 
Special training needed for 

use? 
Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Currlcular function 

Teaching procedure 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

3 years 

Yea 

No 
5-10 

Average, slow 
Supplementary, 

remedial 
Small group 



Yes 

Yes 

If used 

Yes 

Yes 

4 years 

Yes 



Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Don ' t know 

No 



Yes 



Beneficial No 

8-15 4-12 

5-7 

Average, slow Average, slow 

Supplementary, Supplementary, 

remedial remedial 

Group, unsupervised Small group, 

unsupervised 



#315 The Structural Materials are attractive and are manipulative. Thus are 
appealing and motivating to children, especially valuable in classes for Mentally 
Handicapped, slow learners, those unable to abstract. The math presentation is block 
vertical Instead of spiral with addition and subtraction presented separately. (Also 
better for MR). Concrete, colorful, game-oriented. 

#610 The Stern's Kits are a necessar- part of m" classroom math materials - used 
properly they have helped my pupils. I personallv think that this program can be adapted 
to anv class as a program which would be beneficial to all children. The materials 
are colorful and easv to handle, and after the teacher has given instructions to the 
children in a group, they can work individual !■ or in small groups and the teacher can 
work with individuals if nccessarv. I think that this is excellent and sound material 
to use with children who cannot think in the abstract: slow learners, problem children, 
emotional problems. In-service help would he beneficial, but not necessary if the 
teacher follows the directions of the program. 

J.L. Although I have not used it with children. I have seen a demonstration of 
Its potential. It Is extremelv effective and valuable, partlcularlv for the aphastc 
retarded, brain damaxed, blind. T would find the Sterr materials very useful for devel- 
opment of matli concepts on the elementarv or iunlor high level. 



December 16, 1968 



707 



Product Opinions -M782 

"Best Speech S?rios, My S.<und Books & Manual" 
Stanwix House 
3020 Chartiers Avenue 
Pittsbur;4h, Pennsylvania 15204 
Copvrisht: IS(60 
$1.25 each 



Croup ol spi-och liooks, each emphasizing a particularly difficult speech sound, 
coiita i n i 11); material tor auditorN d isc r imina t i''n and speech practice. For use by 
speech tliorapists as wejl as classroom teachers. 

EVALUATIONS 

#fc.02 '^816 #821 



{ 



Relevant 6< accurate? Yes Yes Yes 

Attractive to pupils? Ves Yes Yes 

Dui.iblo? Yes Yes No 

Te.uiu'r manual adequate? Have not seen Y'es Do not have 

Effectiveness justifies cost? Yes Yes Yes 

Used as producer intends? No Yes Yes 

How lon^ have you used it? 3 years More than a year A year 

Were you using it before 

re<|uest for evaluation? Yes Yes Yes 

.Special training needed for 

use? 
Ay,f lor w\\\ I. h used 
ilthcr .i).',os recommended 
Lcarnor i ha rac ter i sties 
(;utri<ular function 
Toaclunj; procedure 

y/'H02 Useful for Rroup work and individual speech practice. Can be used by 
pareiUs to help child at home. 



No 




No 




No 




f)-7 




6-17 




6-12 




Average 




Average 




All 




Remed ia 1 




Suppleme 


ntary 


All 




Small grou 


P 


Small gr 


i-iup 


Group, 
vised 


unsuper 
study 



708 



Product Opinions 

Go-Mo Cards 
Go-Mo Products, Inc. 
1441 Headford Avenue 
Waterloo, Iowa 

P.O. Box 143 



A set of twelve pairs of picture cards suitable for use In games, Identifica- 
tion, stimulation, and conversation activities. Used to learn specific sounds or 
groups of blends. Twenty-three different sets available. 

EVALUATIONS 



#817 



#822 



#824 



#827 



Yes 




Yes 




Yes 




Yes 


Reasonab 


ly 


Yes 




Yes 




Adequately 


Yes 




YeH 




Yes 




Yes 


Had none 




Yes 




Yes 




No 


Yes 




Yes 




Yes 




Yes 


Yes 




Yes 




Yes 




Yes 


Several 


years 


5 year 


s 


1 year 


+ 


3 years 


No 




No 




No 




No 


6-12 




6-16 




5-15 




6-18 
4-5 


All 




All 




Fast 




All 


Remedial 








Remedial 


Supplemental 














remedial 


Sma 1 1 gr 


oup 


Small 


group 


Group 




Small group 



Relevant & accurate? 

Attractive to pupils? 

Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 

Effectiveness justifies 

cost? 
Used as producer intends? 
How long have you used it? 
Special training needed 
for use? 

Age for which used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner characteristics 
Curricular function 

Teaching procedure 

#817 To be used for the speech defective. Generally speaking, valuable aid 
in therapy procedures, although some of the pictures are outside the experience of 
many children. Cards can be used in a much wider variety of ways than the manuafac- 
turer suggests. Reasonably attractive, however the colors are rather washed out. 

#822 Speech pathologists will find these cards helpful in reinforcing parti- 
cular sounds. These cards have a light coating that permits them to be cleaned 
with a damp cloth. They are reasonably priced. 

#827 These cards are of great value in speech therapy because of their ease 
ofuse and handling, their attractiveness to students, and the variety of activities 
in which they may be used. More color would increase attractiveness, but present 
color seems adequate. More uses and activities could be suggested in the teacher 
manual . 



May 24, 1968 



709 



Th.i p«p«r publiihad purtuint lo « Grtnt from the US Off.et of Education. Department of Haalth, Education, 
and Welfare Hovwe>/«r. the opinions expretiad herein do not necesienly reflect the pout. on or policy of the US 
Office o( Education, and no official andofisment by the US Office of Education should be inferred 



Product Opinions 



Mitchell Wire Forms Kit 
American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, Kentucky 40206 



A kit with a set of geometric figurej^ for use in explaining raathenatics and 
geometry. It includes 15 solids, 11 planes and 24 wire forms of the same scale 
contained in a durable, wooden box. 



EVALUATIONS 



#103 



#104 



Relevant & accurate? 
Attractive to pupils? 
Durable? 

Teacher manual adequate? 
Effectiveness justifies cost? 
Used as producer intends? 
How long have you used it? 
Were you using it before 

request for evaluation? 
Special trainin;^ needed for use? 
Age for vjhich used 
Other ages recommended 
Learner Characteristics 
Curriculum function 

Teaching procedure 



Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


There is none 


There is none 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Longer -1 year 


5 years 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


No 


12-16 


7-13 


6-11 


4,5, 14-16 


All 


All 


Regular, 


Regular 


supplementary 




Small group 


Small group, unsuper- 



vised study 



#103 Since the new math emphasizes geometric figures starting in the first 
grade, the Mitchell Wire Forms Kit has some value at that level. However, we 
have found it most useful at the Junior high school level. They are accurately 
construcsed and easy to manipulate. Its use and value are obvious. 

#104 Some of the wire forms and planes can be used in Thermoformlng additional 
material . 



710 



Early Child-Use Materials: Reports and News Releases 



711 



Develop^ment of the Recorded Aid for Braille Music 

S. Joseph Levine 

The Recorded Aid for Braille Music has been developed by the Regional 
Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth at Michigan 
State University to assist visually handicapped children in learning instrumental 
music. The follov/ing paper outlines the history of the project with special 
emphasis given to primary developmental stages. 

Identification of Problems The Summer Youth Music Program (1966) held at 
Michigan State University pointed out a need for improved materials for blind 
musicians. Twelve blind high school students attended the program. They all 
showed enthusiasm with the opportunity of extending their musical knowledge, 
but expressed a definite need for: 

1. more preparatory materials (quantity available) 

2. improved preparatory materials (instructional techniques) 

3. better quality materials (selection). 

Local surveys of teachers of the blind (Michigan and Indiana) supported the 
student comments. 

Independent Survey Initial research and survey was instituted outside of 
the IMC by independent teachers interested in seeing cuch sat''iria1 s developed. 
Their survey included three main parameters, all of which supported the hypot.TJSis 
that a need did exist. 

1. teachers of the blind 

2. professional teacher organizations 

3. available materials (Library of Congress, American Printing House 
for the Blind). 

713 



2. 

With this initial step taken, the IMC was asked to assist in seeing materials 
developed. IMC staff met, reviewed possible alternatives, and decided to accept 
responsibility for developing prototype materials. 

Initial Design An initial design was developed in conjunction with the 
initiators of the project. A multi-sensory approach, calling for tactual and 
audio materials, was outlined. A survey was taken of volunteer readers who had 
experience in tape recording for the blind. This survey showed that there is: 

1) little organized recording activity being conducted for blind musicians, and 

2) no organized format for presentation of recorded material. Unsolicited 
comments supported the original hypothesis that materials in this area are needed. 

Throughout the design period, organizations connected with the education of 
blind musicians (Library of Congress, Michigan Schoo] for the Blind, etc.) were 
kept informed of the project. Periodic meetings with these groups v^re held to 
assure that the design of the Recorded Aid for Braille Music met the identified 
needs. 

Prototype Developement Prototype copies of the Recorded Aid for Braille 
Music were developed as outlined in Prospectus Paper #3. All expenses of the 
pilot study were paid by the IMC. 

Evaluation Copies of all materials were sent to schools serving blind 
students in the United States. Teachers were requested to use the materials 
according to: 

1. general guidelines established in the IMC design 

2. specific ways dictated by their particular teaching situation. 
All teachers were requested to fill out evaluation forms reporting their use of 
the materials. These forms were then utilized by the IMC to access 1) the im' 



714 



of the materials, and 2) suggested revisions. 

t. 
All evaluations supported the use of multi-sensory materials of this nature 

as effective for the education of blind musicians. A few changes, primarily 

technical in nature (e.g. package design, etc.) were suggested and incorporated in 

a new design. 

Production The IMC met with the Library of Congress to discuss possible 
avenues for production. The Library of Congress, the primary organization in the 
United States for disseminating materials to the blind, offered to provide the 
necessary funds for production. They requested the IMC, with the experience gained 
in developing the prototype materials, to assist as consultant to the production. 

The Educational Publication Service of the College of Education at Michigan 
State University, a University based production agency, agreed to carry out produc- 
tion of a set number of copies of the Recorded Aid for Braille Music for the 
Library of Congress. The IMC, in turn, released one quarter time of the original 
project director to serve as consultant to the Educational Publication Service. 
Salary for the release time of the consultant is met by the Educational Publications 
Service, thus no federal funds are involved in production efforts. 

Production copies of the Recorded Aid for Braille Music will become sole pro- 
perty of the Library of Congress for dissemination to users. 



715 



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716 



THE STATE JO^^AL 

^ A^nstng, Mil Iiijjm ^ 

0-16 Mon., Dec. 25, 1967 




Suitcase Aids Retarded Youth 

Hasic Inslruction Device Developed at MSU 

But (0 a iiienlally retarded merit of Elementary and Special The cpnin,- m:„„tu,„ 
*W ,t offers basic instruction Education, the center's teacher ' en hhrar \.Z1 t , ', "'"''" 
:ns"b,ect,s ianj;ins from person- trainins activities include a w^e sludv, 'formation on ^n'' h'"" 
^1 hygiene to farm antmals. ples of new instructional aids. ,tl "'ha c'app "'and" „ e sam' 

Known as the "suitcase tu- I'^ise of involvement of stu- lp.es of new mstruciional aids ' 
11. this unique leaching aid 
las been developed bv the Re- 
Sional Instructional 'Materials 
tenter for Handicapped Chil- 
<ren and Youth at Michigan 
Mate Universitv. 



"The ".suMca.se lutoi" is onlv 
lone of several new tcachinj ap- 
i proaches developed bv the cen- 
ter's staff. , 

A portable carlrid;;e tape i 
pla.vei- has l)een adapted for iisc^ 
with the "suitcase tutor" and ini 
other instructional situations.! 
I The pla.ver presents a 12-minut(-' 
message and offers a wide 
range of uses in leaching handi- 
capped youngsters. 

The center ser\cs teachers of 
students who are mentally re- 
{tarded. physically handicapperl. 
deaf, visualh handicapped, 
emotionally disturbed, and ulio 
have learning disabilities or 
speech problems. 

"The center cooperates wilh 
and supplements existing re- 
; gional, state and local pi o- 
I grams," Mrs. Alonso points out. 
I "First and foremost, we serve 
as a central collection and de-i 
ipository agency for conimciciall 
land field - developed instruc- 
I tional materials." j 

( MSU's computer - ba.sed Ba-j 
I sic InforiTiation Retrieval Svs- 
Mem (BIRS). located in Uie Col- 
lege of Education, gathers and 
provides information regarding 
teaching of handicapped pupils. 
In operation a vear, the MSU; 
center is one of 14 located! 
throughout the country. 



Three field consultants aid the 
center in this part of its activi- 
ties. Mrs. Dcnise VanAkcn has 
clocked hundreds of miles iiieel-' 
ing teachers and administra-l 
tors throughout Michigan. ' 

In Indiana, William McKinney 
contacts special education pcr- 
sonel throughout the slat o 
Miss Martha Venturi is the cen- 
ter's field consultant in Ohio. 
Both hold dual appointments) 
with their State Departments' 
jof Education. This relationship 
between the center and the De- 
partments of Education pro-' 
jvides a unique cooperative ef-i 
fort in special education. 

.Another important aspect of 
the center is teacher training in 



717 




Suitcase tutor 



MSU center for instructional materials displays a 'Suitcase Tutor' for retarded 
children. Using a modified cartridge tape player, it teaches the children personal 
cleanliness. State News Photo by Bob Ivins 

Teaching aid for refarded 



The "Suitcase Tutor", an ed- 
ucational aid for trainable men- 
tally retarded children, has been 
recently developed by the MSU 
Instructional Materials Center 
for Handicapped Children and 
Youth. 

The MSU Center, located In 
218 Erickson Hall, is one of 14 
regional centers in the United 
States established by the U.S. 



Office of Education to aid 
teachers in improving the basic 
education of the handicapped. 

The "Suitcase Tutor" isa par- 
titioned fiber-board case which is 
filled with related, removable ob- 
jects which the mentally retarded 
child can comprehend in terms of 
everyday situations. 

Several units have been 
created. One concfei'ns "Self 
Care; Everyday Body Care." 
This unit includes washcloth, 
soap, towel, toilet paper, faucet 
and models of a bathtub, toilet 
and sink. 

Each object is related to a tape 
on a portable tape recorder. This 
machine was modified at MSU 
so that the child could easily 
push a large button instead of 
using intricate mechanisms. 

"Look at the soap. Soap Is 
1 



small. Soap is like a block. 
Soap fits in your hand. Pick 
up the soap," the recorded voice 
enunciate slowly. Other In- 
structions follow when the button 
Is pushed again. 

Eventually the child is led 
through the steps of washing his 
hands. The tapes on the other 
artJtles in the suitcase follow 'a 
similar pattern. 

The "Suitcase Tutor" unit is 
' accompanied by an instructional 
booklet which offers further ac- 
tivities and ideas for the teacher 
to discuss on the subject. 

Other units included in the 
series are "Self Care; Eating 
Utensils", "Household Items; the 
Bedroom", "Community Help- 
ers; the Policeman", and "Ani- 
mals; the Farm." 

These suitcases have been as- 
sembled for demonstration and 
evaluation. Modifications maybe 
made to meet teachers' needs. 



718 



Michigan State University, East Lansing Telephone: (517) 3ib-22ai 

12/19/67 

RELEASE : Immediate REQEWED 

EAST LANSING, Mich. — To the casual observer it looks like a plain, black 
suitcase. 

But to a mentally retarded child it offers basic instruction in subjects 
ranging from personal hygiene to farm animals. 

Known as the "suitcase tutor," this unique teaching aid has been developed by 
the Regional Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth at 
Michigan State University. 

The center, operated by MSU's College of Education in cooperation with the 
Handicapped Children and Youth Division of the U.S. Office of Educaticxi , serves 
teachers and administrators in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio. 

The "suitcase tutor" is truly a suitcase. Made of fiber board, it is easily 
transported. It contains instructional materials which have proven useful in 
teaching mentally retarded youngsters who are trainable. 

For teaching handicapped children about farm animals, the "suitcase tutor" 
carries small animal models which the students can touch as each animal is explained 
to them. The same approach is used in teaching the children personal hygiene. 

"The center's major contribution to special education," explains Mrs. Lou 
Alonao, center director, "is in providing information regarding curriculum, 
instructional materials and teaching techniques." 

The "suitcase tutor*' is only one of several new teaching approaches developed 
by the center's staff. 

A portable cartridge tape player has been adapted for use with the "suitcase 
tutor" and in other instructional situations. The player presents a 12-minute 
message and offers a wide range of uses in teaching handicapped youngsters. 

719 



Page Two — Suitcase Tutor MSU Information Services 

The center serves teachers of students who are mentally retarded, physically 
handicapped, deaf, visually handicapped, emoticxially disturbed, and who have 
learning disabilities or speech problems. 

"The center cooperates with and siqjplements existing regional, state and local 
programs," Mrs. Alonso points out. "First and foremost, we serve as a central 
collection and depository agency for commercial and fie Id- developed instructional 
materials." 

MSU's computer-based Basic Information Retrieval System (BIRS), located in the 
College of Education, gathers and provides information regarding teaching of 
handicapped pupils. 

In operation a year, the MSU center is one of 14 located throughout the 
country. 

Three field consultants aid the center in this part of its activities. Mrs. 
Denise VanAken has clocked hundreds of miles meeting teachers and administrators 
throughout Michigan. 

In Indiana, William McKinney contacts special education personnel throughout 
the state. Miss Martha Venturi is the center's field consultant in Ohio. Both 
hold dual appointments with their State Departments of Education. This 
relationship between the center and the Departments of Education provides a unique 
cooperative effort in special education. 

Another important aspect of the center is teacher training in special 
education. Operated in cooperation with MSU's Department of Elementary and Specia.' 
Education, the center's teacher training activities include a wide range of 
involvement of students in special education programs. 

The center maintains a modem library where students can stucfy information on 
teaching the handicapped and use samples of new instructional aids. 

"Teacher preparation offers an excellent opportunity to provide future teache 
in special education with new approaches," Mrs. Alonso adds. "The center also 
provides a setting and a staff which generates a wide range of research and 
development activities in the field." 

720 



Report of a "Barsch Room" in Operation 



I 



721 




USOE/MSU 
RECIONAl 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
\L CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



21J Eitckson Ha\t Michigan SUle Umversily U>T Lan>.ing. Michigan 46623 
Cooperating With Slatp Departments ol Education m Michigan-lndiana-Ohio 



"BARSCH ROOM" 



The work presented herein is published pursuant to a 
grant from the U.S. Office of Education, Department 
of Health, Education and Welfare. However, the opinions 
expressed do not necessarily reflect the position or 
policy of the U. S. Office of Education, and no official 
endorsement by the U. S. Office of Education should be 
inferred. 



This information is in the public domain and may be 
reproduced. Credit must be given to the USOE/MSU 
Regional Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped 
Children and Youth, 213 Erickson, Michigan State 
University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823. A copy of 
the reproduction must be filed with this office. 



723 



Member — Special Education ^^P W^^ Network— Bureau of Education for the Handicapped- U S Office ol tducaiion- An Equal Opporiumly Ernplovei 




"Barsch Room" 

(Experimental Room At Okemos Central School, 
Okemos, Michigan, June - July, 1969) 

Philosophy 

Ray Barsch has described a "Movigenic Curriculum"^ based on the principle 
of the child learning about the particular space world in which he lives and 
(hopefully) learns. Space world in this sense means the environment which 
surrounds the child and how he relates to it. Each child needs to learn the 
answers to some basic questions: "Who am I?", "What am I?", and "Where am I?". 
For any number of reasons some children cannot learn these terribly Important 
answers when exposed to normal surroundings. We speak of them as having 
learning problems. But we, parents and educators, believe the child still 
wants to learn. He wants answers and needs success. Perhaps he can learn 
if he is exposed to a unique environment or learning situation at his own 
level. Based on much of Ray Barsch 's philosophy and principles esooused by 
some of the leading proponents of the "child can learn" philosophy^' the 
following guidelines were set up: 

1. Using a regular classroom (inside room, having no windows) all desks, 
chairs and moveable furniture were eliminated, creating a non-stereotype 
classroom situation and feeling of space. 

2. At the outset, individual structure was created for each child in 
regard to his relationship to the room and with the teacher. Variables 
influencing structure included: age, distractibility, curiosity, 
withdrawal tendencies, hyperactivity, anxiety, etc. 

3. Groups were kept small (4-6) to enable teacher to individualize as 
much activity as possible. 

4. Token rewards were not given. It seemed the child was sufficiently 
rewarded by being able to successfully accomplish any given activity. 

A relaxed atmosphere with a great deal of positive reinforcement (praise 
and encouragement) was established. 

5. A particular goal in this situation was to help the child to establish 
his own modified goals and to seek successful resolution of any 
problem, through teacher help, peer group help or on his own. The 
important point was that his resolution was adequate for him at that 
time. 

In structuring this room much care was given to selecting an environment 
which could be completely devoid of light. Initially this part was to be an 
experiment in visual tracking only, but we decided to broaden the scope of 
activities in the dark based on the following observations of childrens' 
responses : 



724 



1. Freedom from dlstractibtllty : with nothing to distract them visually, 
the children were able to pay attention to the stimulus presented — 
whether it was auditory, visual or tactile. 

2. Increased awareness of self : it seemed that shy, withdrawn children 
who felt no "eye" upon them could participate more easily; at the same 
time, hyperactive children were sufficiently slowed down to enable them 
to attend to the task. 

3. Increased verbalization : in the beginning the children had to ask 
for what they wanted, and hence they became used to talking in dark- 
nes8--perhaps for company. Whatever the reason, we capitalized upon it. 

4. Lack of fear : there was not one child who experienced any kind of 
fear. They loved the dark and often asked: "When can we turn out the 
lights?" 

Therefore, when activities are described as "in the dark," bear in mind 
eager, excited, verbal, non-distracted youngsters under close supervision. 
(The adaptive tendencies of teachers' eyes are quite remarkable.) 

Methods 
In this modified classroom then, the following areas were explored: 
A. Space 

1. Movement : jumping, hopping, skipping, crawling, creeping, running, 
rolling but explored totally : 

a. i.e. jumping: into, off, over, onto, toward, behind, around, 
across, high, far, twice, 10 times, sideways, frontwards, back- 
wards, eyes closed, continuously or starting and stopping. 

b. Utilizing some of the following aids for some of the above 
movements: jump ropes, balance beam, mat, slide, "footsie." 

c. Including transportation through space by another medium -- 
wagon, scooter boards, tricycle. (If we had had these items, 
skate boards, roller skates, bicycles, scooters, etc., would 
also have been used.) 

2. Position in space : Much of this work was done in total darkness. 

3- Learning to accept clues from environment: auditory stimulus 
clues (direction by teacher, sounds of children, etc.) visual 
stimulus clues, (items which glowed In the dark, penllghts, 
etc.) 



725 



■3- 



b. Establishing item relationship with lights on and establishing 
same relationship with lights out. (Ex. "Find the blue rectangle 
on the ceiling." (Then with lights out) "Go and stand under the 
blue rectangle and when you think you're directly under it, turn 
your penlight on it." 

c. Balance activities: progressing from a wide board six inches off 
the floor to walking on a two inch balance beam- forward, backward, 
turning around, etc. Each activity utilized a visual target that 
the child must watch and each was geared to the child's level. 

(Ex: some children were unable to walk the two inch beam, but they 
had another board which they could walk) . This was done occasion- 
ally in darkness with the penlight as target, encouraging the 
child not to look at his feet. 

B. Language 

1 . For identification and directional improvement 

a. "In the dark" activities created opportunity and desire for the 
child to verbalize. For example, if the child wanted a glow-ball 
rolled to him he had to ask for it and tell where he was. Short 
one-word sentences were not enough; another child would insist 

on more direction. 

b. Items (pencil, plastic grapes, dresser knob, etc.) placed in 
socks were identified and/or described in the dark by the children. 
They learned new ways of dealing with language based only on 
tactile clues. 

2. For descriptive purposes : 

a. Whenever a child planned a motor act, he was encouraged to 
verbalize what he was going to do and how he was going to do it. 

b. An extension of this was having one child tell another what to 
do. The child following directions was instructed to do only 
that which was described, no more. Their directions, therefore, 
became more precise. 

3. For auditory attention, comprehension and interpretation skills 

a. Sometimes stories were read and/or acted out. If the child 
was paying close attention, he was allowed to demonstrate a 
part. Short term recall on some interesting points of the 
story were also encouraged. The whole story was followed by 
a few minutes of group "moralizing" and relating to concrete 
situations in the home, school and community. 

b. The children were asked to tell the difference between loud, 
soft, fast, slow beats, etc., and identify different sounds in 
the darkness. 

726 



-4- 



c. One of the most Interesting experiences was the creation of an 
obstacle course, with directions for completion given by a 
portable tape recorder. The child had to listen carefully to the 
"box" and then do whatever was asked. "Following oral directions" 
In this way was an enjoyable experience. 

d. Almost all the children were so Intrigued with the tape recorder 
that we had a spontaneous session during which they were allowed 
to record anything they wanted. The playback was exciting for 
both teacher and children. In addition we explored sound levels, 
distance from microphone, etc. Quite a learning experience. 

C. Body Awareness 

1. An interesting variation in body awareness was undertaken. Either 
Individually or In groups, the children were asked to stand facing 
a light-colored wall. With the lights out, a flashlight was placed 
directly behind the child with the beam projecting a shadow on the 
wall. As a modified game of "Simon Says" was played, the child 
experienced the kinesthetic awareness of the body parts he was moving 
along with the visual and non-reversed stimulus from the shadow In 
front of him. After these sessions. It appeared that left and right 
orientation (laterality) was more firmly established. The child was 
able to correct himself and the teacher was also able to get immediate 
check without having to give visual clues herself. 

2. In order to eliminate extraneous activity at the chalkboard during 
sessions, the child was asked to stand on a large, cubical, wooden 
block. While doing bilateral arm movements (circles, squares, etc.) 
some attention therefore, had to be paid to balancing and just staying 
on the block and much non-directed activity was eliminated. (Note: 
many of these chalkboard activities are described fully in Kephart 
and Getman material.) 

3. Each child was given a ball (varying sizes from ping-pong ball to 
beach ball) and asked to move it around the room utilizing as many 
body parts (one at a time) as possible. For the younger children 

a great deal of structure was used: ("Use your nose, chin, and hand, 
etc.") the older children were given less concrete directions ("Use 
something on your right side, midline, etc.") and finally, "See how 
many different was you can move it." One class came up with 27 
variations . 

^. We also did a great many mat activities in this area. ("See how much 
space you can take up, how small you can make yourself, how far can 
you reach, etc.") Rolling and tumbling were also utilized. Many of 
the children needed a great deal of help with somersaults and all 
needed help with cartwheels. 

5. One of the most exciting areas explored was in our "detective game." 

Footprints, handprints and knee prints (made from leather- like material) 
were placed in a trail around the room. The children had to figure out 
what they were supposed to do from the trail. Some of the patterns In- 

727 



-5- 



volved turning, skipping, jumping, hopping. A very novel experience 
came when they were told the teacher was going to leave the room and 
they had to prepare a trail for her to follow when she returned. (They 
really programmed a winner!!) Note: Animal tracks are conmercially 
available from Michigan Products. 

D. Consistency and Contiguity 

Lest this program sound like a game-type situation, it needs to be explained 
that each experience was related, in so far as was possible, to conceptual 
learning and generalization. We always talked about what other kinds of 
things were like what we were doing. For example: footprints were a part 
of a trail, but you have to look at the whole trail--ju8t like looking at 
parts of words to get the whole; listening to directions from the "box" is 
just like listening to the teacher--if you listen carefully you don't have 
to play the tape over or ask for directions again. Perhaps descriptions of 
some experiences relating to the total situation will give a better idea. 

1. Prior to the first day of school, various shapes had been placed around 
the room--on the wall and on the ceiling. We decided to do the same 
thing with a circle on the floor. First we took a long rope and tied a 
knot in it. Near the middle of the floor we placed a piece of tape. 
This was identified as the "center" of the circle. One child held 

the knot on the tape, the other children took turns walking around the 
whole circle holding the rope. Then we attached a paint brush to the 
free end of the rope and each child (with the rope taut) painted a 
"part" of the circle. We talked about 1/A circle, 1/2 circle, 3/4 circle 
and finally their whole circle. Then we talked about how to dry the 
circle and why paint needs to be covered. We divided the circle many 
times with jump ropes and jumped into the sections thus created. We 
walked around and across the circle. Wo all drew a circle on the 
chalkboard. Then we found all the circles in the room: on the wall, 
on the ceiling, the wheels of the wagon, the doorknobs, the rim of the 
wastebasket, the water faucet and many others. One little boy even 
went to the pencil sharpener and demonstrated the rotary movement 
explaining that this too makes a circle. From there we found squares 
and contrasted them with rectangles--learning that there are many 
more of the latter. The whole experience took a little over an hour, 
and during the entire time, eight children, ages 3-11 (who supposedly 
have learning problems), were completely and utterly absorbed. In 
addition, it would seem they learned the "concept" of circle and how 
it related to other shapes. 

2. A nimibcr of empty cardboard boxes were brought into the room and placed 
strategically. The children wore asked to go between, around and over 
them using various movement patterns. Then the wagon and scooter board 
were brought out and with one child pushing and one steering, the same 
activities were asked. The children were next asked to place the boxes 
so that they could go "under" them. Next they were asked to find all 
the things in the room that they could go between, over, under, across 
or around and tell how. Then they told the teacher what to do. Finally 
they went to the chalkboard and drew a miniature obstacle course going 

728 



-6- 

around, between and In front of the variously represented "obstacles. 
With children who had the necessary skills, crayon or paper and pencil 
activities could be programmed at this point. 

Hence a supposedly 'Snotor" act Is easily transformed into a basic 
fine motor act and thence to writing activities. 

3. This activity involved 6 inch plastic empty pop bottles, and six 
boys ages 6-11. Plus or minus numbers were written on the bottom 

of six bottles. In addition each was marked with a price. The children 
were first asked how many different ways the pop bottles could be set 
up so that: a) all could be knocked down, b) only one could be knocked 
down, c) half could remain standing, etc. Then we decided on one set- 
up and the child had to add up his score based on the numbers on the 
bottom. They soon figured out the number 2 bottle had a minus 3 value 
and the number 6 bottle a plus 6 value. We varied the activity when each 
child had earned 50 points and had them set up for each other with only 
one bottle having plus value. The children themselves decided to increase 
the level of difficulty by increasing the throwing distance, adding the 
cost of each bottle knocked down, and then by placing the bottles on a 
long table instead of the floor. Some of the boys went to the chalk- 
board to add up their total number of points when they felt it wasn't 
accurately done in their head. We discussed how we were participating 
in the raw material from which story problems are made, and made up 
and solved a number of story problems for our own "amusement." 

4. While doing some gross motor warm-up activities one day, we discovered 
that quite a number of the children were unable to figure out "half 
the distance of the room." Backtracking quickly, we realized that 

no one really knew the concept "half" although they had many isolated 
"half of 's" stuck away. Starting from half-circles made of wood in 
puzzle form which had previously been explored, we then literally 
took the room apart looking for those things which could evenly be 
divided making halves. We explored piles of books, blocks, cubes, 
balls, marbles, chalk, erasers, measurements with a ruler— on the 
floor and at the chalkboard. And then finally we came back to the 
entire room. We carefully measured the number of steps in the whole 
room, divided by two--whlch we knew would create one-half--and counted 
out the appropriate number of steps and placed tape on the half-way mark. 
We were even able to figure out half of the half. This was done with 
children 7-10 who are very concrete in their behavior. Generalizations 
are not easily learned. 

5. Although a separate section on Motor planning was not included, most 
if not all of the activities included something of this physical and 
cognitive aspect of behavior. A description of the very last day in 
class may serve to illustrate. Many of the items which had been used 
throughout the five weeks were placed around the room. Each child was 
asked "What did you do with this? Tell me." "What else can you do with 
it? Show me." A totally integrated child can appreciate the questions 
and respond appropriately. Each of our children in the program made 
responses appropriate to their level of understanding and in many cases 
surpassed even our aspiration levels. 

729 



-7- 



Conclusions 



The staff who worked at the school, the children who participated in the 
program, the teacher and her advisors and the parents who had a chance to respond 
all felt the program was a success. The enthusiasm generated by those within 
the school program was spontaneous and exciting. The desire to learn through 
doing was unexcelled. Most impressive of all was the children's eagerness in 
approaching any new activity at the end, knowing that they could succeed. Truly 
it did not seem that there was anything they would not try. But then they knew 
that each activity was programned for their successful accomplishment. No, it 
was not the typical paper and pencil school situation but yes, it undeniably 
Involved learnlng--totally, functionally and multivariantly. 



Nancy Carlson 



i 



730 



Items used in Room 

Shapes and objects on celling (giant alphabet cards) 

Shapes on walls 

Shapes on floor 

Balance beam and long, wide board 

Wagon 

Steering Scooter board 

Frlsbees 

Ring tosses 

Balls -- all sizes 

Chalkboard 

Jump ropes 

Musical instruments for rhythm activities 

Items in socks 

Large Wooden blocks 

Bean bags 

Mat activities 

Scoop 

Penlights 

Flashlights 

Puzzles 

Stories 

Glowworm board 

Ping-pong balls 

Glow crayons 

Large cardboard boxes 

Shadow Simon Says 

Obstacle course 

Glow balls 

Footsie 

Foot , hand and knee prints 

Metal letters with matching letters on paper 

Plastic bottles 

Slide (portable) 



Footnotes: 

^Barsch, Raymond, "Achieving Perceptual Motor Efficiency," Special Child 
Publications, 1968. 
Barsch, Raymond, The Movigenic Curriculum, Bulletin #14 State Department, 
Madison, Wisconsin. 
2Kephart, N.C., "The Slow Learner in the Classroom," C Merrill Books, 1950. 
Valett, Robert, "The Remediation of Learning Disabilities," Fearon Publishers, 

Palo Alto, California, 1968. 
Moustakas, Clark, "The Authentic Teacher," Doyle Publishing Co., Cambridge, 

Massachusetts, 1956. 
Getman, G.N., "How to Develop Your Child's Intelligence," G.N. Getman, 

Luverne, Minn., 1962. 

731 



Games Teach: Evaluation of a Workshop 



733 



Participants: classroom teachers ii-iO-Tl 



Date 

Oakland Schools, 

Pontiac, Mich. 

Results of Evaluation 

IN-SERVICE WORKSHOP OF PROGRAMMED EXPERIENCES 

"Use of Games, Simulations and Role-Playing in the Classroom" 

1. Use descriptive words to describe your reactions to today's workshop. List 

the words as fast as they come to you. Limit one minute! No sentences, please. 

interesting (8) encouraging (1) try (1) 

informative (8) enlightening (1) pretend (1) 

fun (6) insight (1) feelings (1) 

stimulating (4) eventful (1) relative (1) 

helpful (3) worthwhile (1) enthusiasm (1) 

enjoyable (3) fast (1) meaningful (1) 

learn (ed) (ing) (3) thought-provoking (1) entertaining (1) 

involved (3) difficult (1) thoughtful (1) 

useful (2) thinking (1) clear (1) 

excellent (2) proving (1) inspired (1) 

relevant (2) casual (1) skills (1) 

applicable (2) motivational (1) interaction (1) 

ideas (2) refreshing (1) 

valuable (1) active participation (1) 

2. What specific applications can you make to your classroom teaching? (Cite 

one or two specific ways in which today's experience applies to your teaching.) 

The responses can be broken down into the following categories: 

a) will design and use games in teaching - 10 

b) will use role-playing in the classroom - 11 

c) will be able to design a workshop using games and role-playing - 2 

(see attached page) 

3. Rate the workshop (as a whole) in terms of learning value for you: 

5 About the same as always. 

Very poor (poorest 10% of those I've attended). 
1 1 Very good (best lOJt of those I've attended). 

U. Siiggestions or comments: 
(see attached page) 



735 



What specific applications can you make to your classroom teaching? (Cite 

one or two specific ways in which today's experience applies to your teaching.) 

I intend to develop 3ome more g-imes for instructing my group. I feel more 
free to start some role playing situations wit). m;>" group and feel more con- 
fident now in trying th's. 

Can design workshop if i.tked. Can design situations to aid in teaching child 
how in discrimination c:' behavior. Can look more objectively at my own role. 

Think it will be interesting to try role playing with Type A - later el. class 
to bring out some emotional hang-ups as well as to help them identify some of 
their cwn emotions - and possibly (hopefully) control them. Thinking speci- 
fically of aggression. Definitely going to try it! 

I have found that todays role playing when used with my students could bring 
about a greater understanding of behaviors in my students that are hard to 
bring about as many of my students are passive and non-verbal so stimulation 
of this kind in a possible charade type form. Students are Title IV multiply- 
handicapped. 

Made me aware of what I can do in math ajid also other areas that will make it 
more meaningful but enjoyable at the same time. Enable me to widen my scope 
in teaching. Made me think about being more creative in my teaching. 

1. Use role-playing in classroom to help children settle their disputes. 

2. Help parents better understand program through role-playing. 3. Use of 
games in classroom - watching the directions more specifically, h. Be more 
aware not to assume children bring the same set of background to the game. 

Involve boys in thinking of actions of others rather than self. Help to 
develop some creative expression from less verbal children. 

I can use several of the card games - modified to the level of my class. 
I'll be able to create my own games using the information I gained today. I 
will have a better idea of how to conduct role-playing experiences - especially 
how to have the children evaluate their role playing. 

1. Help some children in expressing their sincere feelings about school, me, 
and other children. 2. Role playing may be used as an enjoyment - or recrea- 
tion for the children. 

Use number game with Intermediate Type A boys to motivate. Try role playing 
to help child identify himself - stimulate communication. 

Use some of games made up with my group. Think of different ways to use 
materials I have. Use role playing with my kids - switch roles of leaders 
with the followers of the room - etc. 

Card games - new ideas for children for number work. 

Will use card games for instruction in classrooms more often - for enjoyment 
and learning. Role playing with students to bring out inner behaviors not 
noticed nor evident. 



736 



(continued) 

I can use role play in the classroom to show the children that we can 
handle situations in many ways. Then reverse roles so each child can see 
how the other child feels. 

Will use card game for teaching trainable to match like numbers. Then work 
toward card game for adding two numbers. Use role playing to help trainable 
understand other peoples feelings. 

1. Use games to teach certain skills. 2. Reinforces an idea and help better 
clear up the idea of showing parents how to use games to teach their readers 
certain words - to be used in a parent's workshop-type meeting. 3- To use 
the materials in some inservice that I must provide for other teachers. 



737 



h. Suggestions or commem.s: 

I'm usually a v'-rj shy perBor; and I w.-? i:i.;rj rh^pfi h. w much I enjoyed getting 
up and ; pirfyitif. I'', -('vy ai:xi ;■'.;.: ' :ny cl'-^r 

alPO ■■■!>' , . ,. ■ enihii:- ■ -i:--!!. '•''■■-.'r-- ■. vi-v 

Alway.j kee;. ;• . eri,jiy;,;i.e ■\.3 it w-is tc li^ ti--''-^i-Je it ^ ■: lenrning -xr^;-if?fice . 

Have suc'fi workshops :x' : ' e-rvais throuh-h'. at yer i'-. 

Tall'; more ubcu"*- what typr-;- .f r' '. c {.'lay iii,-:: * '.■ use w '. 

Mo sugfTe- :■'::- ii.-iprov^ments . 

T think it shouiJ have t.'?on c-a.i led role pl^^'ing -r else this area ap; 
I o me . 

Hole piayin,'! Ls aiwavo threatening; to tr-^. V/ish it j-'Uld be aisguiseal 



738 



Non-Verbal Films: A Description 



739 



Non-Verbal Teaching 



John A. Davis 

The character confronts a drink- 
ing fountain wliich, despite his 
pleadings and beatings, will pro- 
duce no water. Wliat would you do 
in his place? What he does is turn 
the handle, and behold! Water for 
his thirst! Similar situations involv- 
ing a doorknob, a locked drawer, 
and a dial telephone confront our 
hero with similar frustrations, and, 
ultimately, similar solutions. 

Sound like an old-time comedy 
film? Actually, this describes the ac- 
tion in an 8mm film designed to 
teach concepts to mentally retarded 
children. It was one of four care- 
fully conceived, effectively pre- 
sented examples at a session on 



"Non-Verbal Teacliing Through 
Super-8 Silent Films." The films, 
according to Ted Ward, director of 
the Learning Systems Institute at 
Michigan State University and Jo- 
seph Levine of the Instructional 
Materials Center for Handicapped 
Children and Youtli (USOE at 
MSU) , seek to present a model the 
retarded child can exceed, not just 
"live up to." Hence the simple 
problems presented — such as the 
use of the doorknob to open the 
door — are solved by the viewers be- 
fore the character on the screen fig- 
ures out what to do. Moreover, the 
generalizations to be drawn, which 
round out the learning of the con- 



cept, are accomplished by the audi- 
ence well in advance of the film's 
"hero," who happens to be a boy 
of about their age. 

Made for individual or small 
group use, the films include such 
features as a shoe-tying lesson with 
a learner's eye view, a Keystone Kop 
type of episode in which minor 
goofs and inept decisions cascade 
upon one another interrupted only 
by pauses in the film for discussion, 
a fascinating "Round Objects" 
game, and the aforementioned story 
of a "Daddy" at his office. 

The shoe-tying lesson was pre- 
sented first, and gave Ward and 
Levine an opfxjrtunity to make 
some important points about teach- 
ing materials for the mentally 
handicapfied. Some items rein- 
forced the "groimd rules" for train- 
ing films tliat emerged from instruc- 
tional film research two and three 
decades ago— i.e., the camera should 
view the process from the same 
angle the learner will see it; "real" 
time should be used, no fancy time- 
passing dissolves or cutaways; repeti- 
• tion of the activity is advisable. The 




JUNE-JULY- 1970 



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741 




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producers interwove tlicse findings 
with other considerations for the 
film's audience, such ns providing 
for repetition by having tlic film's 
"liero" forget to tic both siioes, so 
that he loses one, has to conic back, 
for it, then ties it as he did tiie first. 
The mentally retarded children 
viewing the film deligiited in spot- 
ting the "hero's" obvious error be- 
fore he did, presenting them with a 
model they could exceed — an im- 
portant psychological "plus" for the 
project. 

"Archie and Charlie" showed the 
tale of two boys confronted with 
the task of transporting a stack of 
newspapers. Tlie problem was at- 
tacked in a series of steps, each of 
which requited a decision the audi- 
ence was invited to make before 
the ciiaracter in the film did. And 
tlie film character's decision usually 
turned out to be the wrong move, 
so that the consequence of each de- 
cision was a fresh problem requir- 
ing a new decision ... a kind of 
simplified "Keystone Kops" sce- 
nario. 

The "Roimd Objects" game gave 
the producers an opjjortunity to 
display tiieir creative originality 
and to demonstrate the flexibility 
and versatility of their Bolex Mac- 
rozoom camera. For this viewer, 
• tliat short film was one of the most 
fascinating, visually niid intellec- 
tually stimulaiing experiences of 
the whole convention. Oljjects rang- 
ing from pencils to eggs were sub- 
jected to a treatment in which the 
viewer's first perce])tion of the ob- 
ject was as a roimd "somctiiing," 
from wliicli the camera then backed 
away to anotlier angle to reveal 
what, imleed, the thing was. For 
most viewers, the game of trying to 
name the ol)ject made the camera's 
movement a sus|)cnscful .ilfair lead- 
ing to confirmation or ( 01 rc( tion in 
the best Skinnerian iradiiit)n. More- 
over, the entire proihiction was a 
stimulating le.s.son in |)crce|)ti<m. 

The VVard-I.evinc presentations 
in C;ol)o room S137 on A])ril 20th 
j)layed to a room jiackcd with fa.s- 
cinatcd obscrveis who found tii'in- 
selves p;irly lo lonsidiiiiiioiis ol vis 
n.il lilciacy, of Siiiiii iiiolion piduie 
techni(|ue, and of cduialional in.i- 
terials for mentally retarded chil- 
dren. 



AUDIOVISUAL INSTRUCTION 



Ball Utilization: Report of a Study 



743 



USOE/MSU REGIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER 

FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AND YOI]TH 

213 Erickson Hall 

Michigan State Silvers ity 

East Lansing, Michigan 48823 



A Study of Ball Utilization and Its Effect on Young 
Deaf-Blind CTiildrens Progress Report Part I 



Phyllis Ann Thompson 
Louis M. Tutt 
George V, Gore 



December 10 ^ 1970 

745 



Statem ent of the Problem 

I'he ability of young deaf^blind children to achieve their full potential 
of visual tracking and gross motor involveoent through instruction is not 
easily comtunioated by verbal means. Therefore, it was the purpose of this 
study to use balls of different colors, sizes, and textures to determine 
the subjects' ability of visual tracking and to determine vhether th« balls 
were a source of motivation for gross motor involvement. Flexibility in 
procedure uas employed vhere necessax^. 
Methololoi^Y 

A sample of six subjects was taken originally from The Michigan School 
For The Blind , hosever,, two subjects ware dropped after the chird day of 
the study; one because of lack of general maturity; the other because of 
insufficient challenge of the task. Only one subject was add":d to the 
study due to the pupils" and cxperirpoters' schedules. These subjects 
t»ere selected by their respective teachers and met with the e:;jpsrim<3nters 
ttrf.ce a week for six weeks, A brief date report of each subject follows; 
(1) Subject A 

a, female, 4 years, 9 months. Rubella baby^ C.Pi 

b„ bom 2 "le^ee 

c, started present school Septend^er, 1969 

d, low hjrperopic refractive error 

e, no auditory response 

f „ wears corrective lenses and auditory aid 
<2) Sd>Ject B 

a, male, 4 years^ 11 months^ Rubella baby 

b, bom 12=20-65 

746 



c„ started present school SeptenA^er 1970 

do TiystagDRts, mlcropthalmos , surgical aphakia, secondary cataract O.S. 

e, severe auditory loss 

f . wears corrective lenses and auditory aid 

(3) Subject C 

a, female, 5 years, 11 months^ Rubella baby 

bo bom 1-10"65 

Co started present school Septenber, 1969 

d, slit in cornea O.S. and apparently no useful vision, cataracts 

e, severe auditozy loss 

£o wears corrective lenses and aiTditory aid 

(4) Subject D 

a. female n 5 years, 9 months, Rubella baby 

bo bom 2-22-65 

Cc entered present school Septeni>er, 1969 

do retinopathy 5 retinal degeneration j, opticatrophy, nystagmus 

Co moderate atzditory loss 

£o wears no corrective lenses but does wear auditoxy aid 

(5) Subject E 

a, maleg 5 years, 8 months, Subella child 

bo born 3 2? 65 

c, <3!Qtered presanc school Sep(:eobe2.% 1968 

d^ congenital cataracts 

severe hearing loss 

f o wears corrective lenses and auditory aid 

747 



Materials and Equipment 

Two different environments were used In the study: one site vas an 
Isolated room In the dea£~bllnd cottage and the other %iaa a hallvay of 
the Elementary School. A distance of eight feet between experimenter and 
subject was used for rolling the balls while the other experimenter was 
In close proximity to the subject for returning the balls when the subject 
failed to return them. 

The balls eniployed (100 balls « 50 rubber and 50 Btyrotosm} were of 
different textures (rubber and styrofoam), colors (tAlte, blue, green, 
yellow, red) and sizes (approximately 4 Inch diooeter; 3 inch diameter, 
Zk inch diameter; 1% inch diameter; and 1 inch diameter). The paint used 
for coloring the balls iras of a soft matte finish for the styrofoam balls 
and an enamel for the rubber balls. A clear plastic spray was used on the 
styrofoam balls in an effort to keep them from flaking. 

With the exception of Subject E„ the balls xjere rolled at various 
speeds to the right, left and center of the subjects o Subject E was not 
ready for this type visual task, Thp experleranters introduced larger balls 
than the study calle^i for in the third week in an attempt to encourage 
Subject E to use his residual more than in the past. The colors of these 
balls were White, blue^ green and orange; these balls were not painted as 
they were solid colors when purchased where the others were iK)t„ la an 
attempt to get the subject to use his remaining visiou more £han he bad in 
the past, the balls were laid in different positions or areas of the floor 
instead of being rolled to him to see it he would creep, crar^l, or walk 
In the right direction to pick them up visually rather than tactually, 

748 



CoQcloslons 

Tho following conluslons represent a breakdown on individual subjects 
as to what the experimenters observed. Srf)1act A (added to study on the 
fourth day) vas adninistered a total of 222 trials responding positively 
to 90 vlth a percentage of 40.5. A breakdoim of the total trials is as 
follom: left side - total 71, positive responses 23, and percentage 32.4; 
central - total 68, positive responses 29, and percentage 42.65; right side - 
total 83, positive responses 38, and percentage 45.8. The subject wss absent 
from the study on days ei^t and ten. At the tenslnatioa of tbe 8th day of 
the study, the std>Jeet had a total of 186 trials and responded positively 
to 34.4%. At the end of the period of study the 8id>ject shoved an increment 
of 6.1% of total trials. Other relevant observations made by the researchers 
are as follosss (1) subject did not seem motivated by the balls after the 
second day, (2) subject fixated on other objects in the room more than she 
did the balls, (3) std>ject preferred to be in a semi-reclined position 
rather than a sitting po'^ltion that the study called for, (4) subject pre-^ 
ferred the yellow balls, (5) affection was not welcomed by the subject but 
a ladies purse was and this was used as a reward, (6) gross motor mtvemcata 
were lacking and balance was ataxic (probable C.P.) , <7) subject enjoyed 
putting the styrofoam balls in her suuth, (8) subject preferred the hand 
•iced balls (1 inch dianeter) , (9) subject preferred right side for motor 
responses to the balls that were rolled. 

It is hoped that the researchers will find the type motivation for this 
subject so that she will benefit from the task. 

Subject B was administered a total of 204 trials and responded positively 
to 149 for a percentage of 73.0. A breakdown of the total trials is as follows s 

-4- 

749 



left aide - total 71, positively responded to 53 for a percentage of 70,4; 
central - total 48, positively responded to 37 for a percentage of 77 oO; 
right side - total 85 and positively responded to 59 for a percentage of 
69. 4„ This subject was absent from the study on days seven, eight, nine, 
ten and eleven. At the end of the eighth day of the study the subject had 
a total of 204 trials and responded positively to 73%. At the termination 
of the period of study the subject showed the same percentage, for he did 
not return because of illness. Other pertinent observations made by the 
experimenters are as follows s (1) subject ^as highly motivated, enjoyed 
the task, and made very good use of his vision, <2) excluding central, 
subject preferred the left side for motor responses to the balls that 
were rolled^ (3) subject worked equally veil with all colors, (4) subject 
was absent the last part of the study and no size preference t;as evident, 
(5) subject liked to bounce styrofoam balls on the floor, (6) subject uaa 
intriqued by light but this did not defer his performance. 

It is hoped that this subject will not lose the carry-over because 
of his absence the last five days of the study and that further opportuni- 
ties be provided so that the subject will use his vision more fully. 

Subject C was administered a total 239 trials and responded positively 
to 164 for a percentage of 68<,6. A breakdown of the total is as follo\»s; 
left side - total 81, positive responses 53 for a paseentage of 65. 4j central 
- total 73, positive responses 54 for a percentage of 73,97; right side - 
total 85, positive responses 57 for a percentage of 67,2^ This subject was 
absent from the study days two, three, ten and eleven. At the termination 
of the eighth doy of the study, the subject had a total of 239 trials and 
responded positively to 68„6X. At the end of the period of study, the 



750 



sabjeet sho««d a decrease of 2,2\. Other relennmt observations made by the 
experimenters are as follows: (1) subject enjoyed taking balls a«ay from 
experimenters and away from the experimenting station, (2) subject vould 
look one vay and throv the balls the opposite vay purposefully, (3) ex- 
cluding central, subject had a slight preference to the right, (4) could 
not detemine the preference of sise of balls due to subject's absence on 
last two days of study. 

This subject was highly active during the study. On occasions, she 
would impose her oun rules to set the attention of the experimenters by 
running with the balls down the hall. It is hoped that this motivation 
can be channeled in a direction for better proper visual and motor responses 
on the task. 

Subject D was adnlnistered a total of 200 trials and responded positively 
to 185 for a percentage of 71.15, A breakdown of tha total is as follows: 
left side " total 96, responded positively to 71 for a percentage of 73o95j 
central >= total 75, positive responses 54 for a percentage of 72,0; right 
side - total 89, positive responses 60 for a percentage of 67.4. This sub- 
ject was absent from the study on days three, four, five, six, and eight. 
At the termination of the eight day of the experiment, the subject had re- 
ceived 71 trials and responded to 50. 7X. At the end of the period of study 
the subject showed an increase of 21.08%. Other pertlni>:nt observations made 
by the researchers are as follo^'ss (1) subject wjuld not attend at the first 
part of the study, (2) introduction of HSil's on the eighth day of the study 
was definitely a source of motivation for the subject to attend Co the task, 
(3) subject showed no evidence in color or siae preference over-all, f4) 
subject began to move whole body to obtain balls cea? the end of the study, 

'*6*" 

751 



(5) subject preferred the left side for motor responses to the balls rolled „ 
The experltoenters have used fewer and fewer M&N's with the Increase in 
trials and it is intended that the use of this type of reward for motivation 
will be eliminated and the subject will attend as a result of the enjoTment 
and fan from positively responding to the balls that are rolled, as she 
seemed to be more enthusiastic about the task as the study progressedo 

Subject K was being trained by the experimenters to use more of his 
remaining vision than he had in the past. The procedure used vma different 
from that of the other subjects » Ho percentages can be stated, but the ex-^ 
partmenters did observe an employment of more vision then at the Initisfcio!?. 
of the study. The balls were placed on the floor in different positions 
and the subject vould scoot along the floor in an effort to locate the bails^ 
Opoa realizing thiSg the esperintenters placed the subject in a biped position 
at times and a crawling position at other times to begin his on his \?ny to 
asqplore visually. This subject was eztraisely motivated vhen succej^sf ul „ 
On more than one occassion the subject attempted to reproduse the impetus 
of the ball vocally. The si^jeet has the potential to use his residual 
vision more if he is placed in situations that demand «:his type of re&pon>e„ 
It is hoped that further tmrk of this type will enable this subject to •■•a- 
turn to the normal procedure of the study in the future^ 
Reconmendatlons g 

1. The testing environment should be isolated „ 

2. Flexibility in total procedure should be employed^ 

3. Rubber balls should be purchased in their respective colors 
rather than painted when possible. 

752 



4. The speed at vhicli the ball is rolled should not be a factor 

In determining positive responses. 
5o Styrofoam balls should be utilized «^en audition can ba improvad 

and also used as a source of tactual discrimination between 

st3rrofoao and rubber balls. 

6. The task employed in thia study should be attempted also vlth 
low vision children^ 

7. The task ea^loyed in this study should be attempted with multi- 
handicapped children, visually handicapped exclusive. 

8. A clinical approach to this procedure should be maintained. 

9. Various types of rewards should be attempted when the subject 

is not motivated, (Special rewards should be eliminated as soon 
as possible.) 
10. A task analysis procedure should be employed to delineate areas 
lAich need training. 



-8- 

753 



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754 



Improving Low Vision Skills: Evaluations and a Guide 



755 



SPECIAL STUDY INSTITUTE 

"Methods & Materials For Improving Low Vision Skills" 

March 2h-26 ,■ IQll 

Michigan State UnivTslty 



INSTITUTE EVALUATION 



Follow - Up 
June, 1971 



Nov that some time has passed since you attended the March 2i4-26, 1971, 
Institute, would you please share with us your reactions to what went on at 
the Institute. 

1) Have you had an opportunity to speak with others about low vision training? 

/7 Yes /_ No If yes, how many: -^ ^ '^ 

If yes, what were their reactions in terms 
of their interest: 

/ Very interested C- Moderately interested c^ Not interested 

ComnentB : 



2) As you think back to the Institute at MSU, would you please rate the 
activities in terms of their IMPORTANCE to you. 



A. Background Information 
(Wednesday Afternoon) 

B. Administering the VES- 

Videotape 
(Wednesday Afternoon) 

C. Low Vision Aids - Ro\md 

Table Discussion 
(Wednesday Evening) 

D. Administering the VES- 

Role playing 
(Thursday Morning) 

E. Training (remediation) 

Materials- Videotape 
(Thurs. Morning 8e Afternocr;) 

F. Feedback Session 
(Thursday Evenirn.'^ 

G. Procedures for Re)) Li ("at ion 
(Friday Morning) 



Very 
Important 

7 



IS 



13 



Important 
8 



/C 



Not 
Important 

/ 



O 



o 



o 



-2- 



3) Finally, what suggestions or conraenti: .:c y._ u :. ■•• rc-^^ardin^ the 
Institute? 

I feel we could have used mor>- time for the material we covered to make us 
more proficient. I was amazed at the friendly and helpful attitude of the 
Michigan State University staff. You were so willing to give so much, and 
you seemed to have so much knowledge that could help me do a better job of 
teaching. 

The video-tapes were too long to hold one's interest. More time to discuss 
the Profiles which we made. Some discussion of Holmes study at the Jr.-Sr. 
high level. 

As well as this institute was prepaired and presented, it was almost regretable 
that it was done only once or that it involved so few people (participants). 
I am wondering if, with a few adjustments, this could have included all the 
75 who will be coming for the "replicated" institute this August. With some 
exception, the institute was mainly involved with the transmission of infor- 
mation. We have come to realize in education that while some learning is best 
done in small groups or even on an individual basis, other types can be con- 
ducted in large assembly-type settings. To be taught how to do something is 
not quite the same as to be taught how to teach it, and although the "each 
one teach one" plan is fesisible here, the duplication of effort and materials 
here in Michigan does seem a bit of a waste of the talent and efficiency and 
effort that went into an institute that was prepared so well. Sue, I'm 
probably Just lazy and annoyed that you gave us so much to live up to! 

The Institute was generally well organized ajid the staff was well prepared. 
The session, concerning remediation materials and when to apply the materials, 
was particularly stimulating to me. 

This is one of the first institutes that I've attended where I can honestly 
say I came away with something really concrete. In addition to "learning", 
I had an extremely enjoyable time, suid the hours went by very rapidly. The 
thoroughness with which the institute was run made the replication in Minnesota 
much easier for those in charge. The awareness that I now have regarding low 
vision students will be of great help to me in no^ teaching, especially with 
three students in the lower elementary level. If I could be assured of the 
effectiveness of other institutes, I'd be very willing to provide my own 
expenses to them. My thanks to all in charge. 

I felt the institute was very worthwhile. It was really the first practical 
training I have had in the area of visual impairment. I hope to make even 
more use of my new knowledge next year. 

I Just hope that we can generate enoxogh enthusiasm at the Nebraska School for 
the Visually Handicapped to have some training sessions there this fall and 
include the very few out state teachers who coiild also benefit from the training. 
Don Pickering (who also attended your Institute) is on the staff of the State 
School and is responsible for Statewide resource services. Without the coopera- 
tion and participation of the State School, we could not have a training prograai 
which would have any chance of being useful. 

758 



3) (cont.) 

It was an especially good experience for me to get infonnation in the eirea of 
the visually impaired as this has bef^n a minor program up to this point in our 
state. Since coming back from the cinTercnce we have put a nur;ber of things 
in motion. 

It was conducted with greo' enthusiasm. The ' ^■^..'..s w.-re interesting, as applied 
to my partially seeing st ;Jt'iits, but are acre i.-nj. -Lant- for chi.idren with a 
severe loss. With the part. ally seeing, I wou 1 1 f'-«-j more oer'ain of meaningful 
results by having more te- t in each category. 

My sincere thanks to those in charge of the institute. It was highly organized 
sjiid indicate of much time and preparation. I especially enjoyed conversing 
with other individuals in similar fields. 

The institute, so well planned and presented, the friendly atmosphere for 
learning, the active participation of each member in learning how to administer 
the VES , and the remediation procedures provided the keys to its great success. 
It inspired us to go back to our states eager to share with other teachers the 
methods and materials that can be used to help visually handicapped children. 

I thought the Institute was well managed and successful to the extent that ^' 
clearly explained the administering of the V.E.S. I have, however, found after 
giving the V.E.S. several times, I am not very satisfied with it. 

The numerous suggestions for running an institute were excellent and have 
proved to be most useful. It might be useful to develop a manual concerning 
the Scale including uses and remediation techniques to give it perspective. 

I did not appreciate fully the helpful Coordinator's Manual until we came to 
plan for our own workshop. Then it became invaluable. We could not have held 
such a successful local institute without your help. 

The institute was very well planned, both day and night! I feel before the 
institute begins (several weeks) that participants know what "low vision" isl 
There were some of us that had very little background in working with the 
visually handicapped. 



759 



Question 1 : 

Have you had an opport.uiiity t '. speaJ'. wi ' h o'h.,-)-? 'tro';t low visi :, training? 

Comments : 

Conversations with teachers, ipthalmologists , and parents of children having 
low vision who are in my clasj. 

I have opoken informally to many people, but priranriiy I have contacted 2 
individuals re^^arding future workshops. 

Attended and participated in the Minnesota Institute. 

I talked with the elementary teacher .n our system and wt- are going to uiie the 
VES next fall. 

Many of the opthalmologists with whom I spoke about such training felt it invalid. 
Early El. Ed. teachers generally thought it was great. 

Our follow-up institute for teachers was most successful. 

We hel:J a three day workshop at Carleton College. The response was good. 
Others that I have mentioned the scale to in passing (e.g. the young man who 
is to take my place next year) have been more moderately interested. 

I have contacted the counselor at the Sch. for Visually Handicapped. She felt 
the staff at the school would be interested. 



760 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATEKIAIS 
CfMtK K)K 
HANOU APPIO 
\L < HILPRIS 

ANLJYOLMH December, 1971 



EVALUATIONS 

Low Vision Institutes For Teachers 

Conducted by 1>CU Institute Participants 



The Regional Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped 
Children and Youth, located at Michigan State University has received 
responses from teachers involved in two low vision institutes in two 
of the six states represented at last March's Institute. We thought 
we'd share with you these results Ln the hopes that they may assist 
you in planning and carrying out your own institute. Since there 
were some differences in the nature of the responses between the two 
institutes, we have compiled them separately. 

Many of the participants who attended Institute "A" are func- 
tioning as consultants and indicated that perhaps the structure of 
the third question on the evaluation form could be changed to include 
"resource and itinerant personnel" who may adopt procedures but who 
are not in a "classroom." 

Some participants in both groups indicated that there was insuf- 
ficient information available for use with older pupils'-especially 
secondary level. The emphasis throughout has been on elementary school 
age children. For those who feel it necessary to cover strategies for 
working with adolescents, a local consultant might be instrumental in 
helping teachers adapt materials and procedures. 

We have also received information from Institute participants in 
one other state who Indicated that the following had been done in that 
state: 

1) All visually impaired children were visited by an institute 
participant in June 1971. Teachers, administrators and parents 
were seen also, and reconmendations for educational planning 
were made for this year. 

2) Follow-up discussions with local directors of Special Education 
were held regarding low vision aids. 



761 



3) Opthamologis t s , optometrists, physically Viaadicapptd nurses 

and teachers attended a one-dav con f e itMict (70 people attended) 

U) An open house was held for regular tea^h.-rs who have visually 
impaired children in their classes. CAttendance was extremely 
sparse, unforti:nately) . 



We are very much interested in hearing from e ich of you as you hold 
your workshop. We will be sending you nwre evaluation forms under separate 
cover. 

Thank vou for your continued cooperation. 



762 



INSTITUTE "A" 

Special Study Institute 
August 19 71 



1. Were you familiar with this approach to visual efficiency training 
prior to this workshop? 



Yes 23 Somewhat 4 No 38 Total 65 
(357,) (67,) (59%) 



2. Do you feel the procedures that were discussed are appropriate for 
your students? 



Yes 55 Somewhat 6 No 3 



i.e., 867 of those responding felt procedures were 
appropriate. The No respondents qualified their 
answers by stating that they were not working directly 
with elementary school age children. 



3. Do you expect to adopt these procedures in your classroom? 



Yes 56 Some 5 No 1 Not applicable 2 

i.e., 887 of those responding felt they could and would 
use procedures . 



CoTiments : 

Those aspects seen as beneficial: 

--organization and planning of Institute 
--resourcefulness - speakers, ideas, etc. 
--exchange of ideas with others 
--usefulness in teacher/consultant work 

--applicability to use with perceptually handicapped children 
--a slide presentation relating to visual efficiency by a 
local teacher 

Those aspects in need of further work: 

--lack of remediation materials and ideas for use with 

secondary level 
--test-retest reliability 



763 



INSTITUTE "B" 

Special Study Institute 
June 16-18, 1971 



I. Were you familiar with this approach to visual efficiency training 
prior to the workshop.' 



Yes 9 Somewhat 8 No Ij Total 30 
(307,) (2770 (437,') 



2. Do you feel the procedures that were discussed are appropriate for 
your students? 



Yes 25 Somewhat 1 No i 



i.e., 86'/o of those responding felt procedures were 
appropriate. TVie No respondents qualified their 
answers by stating that they were not working directly 
with elementary school age children. 



3. Do you expect to adopt these procedures in your classroom? 



Yes 56 Some 5 No 1 Not applicable 2 

i.e., 797,, of those responding felt they could md would 
use procedures. 



Cotiments: 

Those aspects seen as beneficial: 

Workshop: stimulation, reinforcement, participative experience, 
organization, problem-solving behavior 

Those aspects in need of further work: 

--VES may have been "uncritically accepted"by 

participants 
--lacking Information about later elementary and 

secondary 
--parts of workshop Irrelevant 



i 



764 



workshop 



coordinator 

guide 



dUfliiyf'-*. -7^ 



METHODS AND MATERIALS 
FOR 
IMPROVING LOW VISION SKILLS 




USOE/MSU Regional Instructional 
Materials Canter for Handicapped 
Children & Youth 

765 



The work presented herein was performed pursuant to a Grant from the U.S. 
Office of Education, Department of Health, Education and Welfare. However, 
the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy 
of the U.S. Office of Education, and no official endorsement by the U.S. 
Office of Education should be inferred. 



Cover Design: Clarence Mixon 




USOE/MSU Regional Instructional 
Materials Center for Handicapped 
Children & Youth 

213 Erickson Hall 
Colloge of Education 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 48823 



766 



METHODS AND MATERIALS 
FOR 
IMPROVING LOW VISION SKILLS 

A GUIDE FOR WORKSHOP COORDINATORS 

S. Joseph Lervine 

The following guide has been developed to assist the participemts 
at the March, 1971 Special Study Institute in planning and conducting 
their own training institutes. This guide is not meant to be a "sure- 
fire" cookbook for running an institute. Instead, it attempts to pro- 
vide a number of basic ideas that can be built into any institute con- 
cerned with the training for utilization of low vision skills. 

Scope of the Institute 
There are two primary tasks that should be undertaken in the in- 
stitute. 

A) Training in the administration of the VISUAL EFFICIENCY 

SCALE (VES). 

B) Presentation of procedures for remediation. 

Each of these tasks can be quite extensive. Separate training institutes, 
each concerned with one of the tasks, can provide adequate treatment of 
both. The combining of both tasks at a single one-day institute can pre- 
sent the participants with an overwhelming amount of information for 
processing. 

The inclusion of actual learning-by-doing ("hands on") experience 
during the institute is a unique procedure for motivating the participants, 



767 



-2- 



Having an opporttinity to actually do the task provides the participant 
with a base for discussion. You can enhance the success of your teach- 
ing of the administration of the VES and remediation procedures by first 
providing an experience based learning activity and then, following it 
with a discussion of the activity. 

An essential part of any training program is the use of some evalioa- 
tion device or measure. If your evaluation is designed well it will, 
a) reinforce in the participants' minds exactly what has been covered 
dxiring the institute, and b) provide you with further insight into the 
effectiveness of your own teaching. Evaluation forms do not have to be 
complex to yield usable information! 

Using This Guide 

This guide is divided into four separate sections: 

Section One - Administration of the Visual Efficiency Scale 

Section Two - Using the Profile 

Section Three - Materials for Remediation 

Section Four - Evaluation of the Workshop 

Each section presents a n\imber of workshop activities that can be 
utilized in training teachers in the methods and materials for improving 
low vision skills. 

Following these four sections is a checklist and set of questions to 
help you organize your workshop. 

The appendix includes a number of different supplementary materials 
to assist in your planning. 



768 



SECTION ONE 
WORKSHOP PROCEDURES 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE VISUAL EFFICIENCY SCALE 



The Visual Efficiency Scale (VES) is made up of U8 separate items. 
We have categorized the items into l8 separate areas. Most of the items 
relate to a specific category. Others, relate to two areas. Become 
familiar with each of the categories. Understand their mecuiing and 
be able to demonstrate each. No doubt, you will be asked specific ques- 
tions at your institute relating to the definition of one or more of these 
categories. The simplest way to answer one of these questions is to be 
able immediately to provide an example for the questioner. This can be 
most effective if you can develop the example on the spot, demonstrat- 
ing your own familiarity, rather than searching for a commercially avail- 
able example. 

Learn each of the items in the VES and the category that it focuses 
upon. You must truly understand why that item fits its particular cate- 
gory. A complete listing of all 18 categories, their definitions and 
the particular test items they relate to is included as an appendix to 
this guide. 

Before you conduct your first training institute, take the time to 
actually administer the VES to a visually handicapped student. This will 
provide you with a first-hand look at the potential problems involved in 
the actual administration. Be alert during this administration to the 



769 



-l4- 



problems you encounter and also the possible problems others might en- 
counter. You might want to keep in mind some of the concerns that are 
presented in the appendix — "Suggested Guidelines for Assessment and 
Interpretation of Visiial Behavior." 

The following activities can be built into your training institute 
to provide the participants with an \inderstanding of the administration 
of the VES. 

Designing yoior own test 

Divide your participants into teams of two to six people. (There 
should be from four to eight separate teams operating during this acti- 
vity. Any more than eight teams can present management problems.) 
Provide each team with three sheets of paper. At the top of each piece 
of paper write a category from the VES and its definition. Instruct the 
participants that they are to design a visual test concerned with each 
of the three eu:eas that they have been given. (Each group can have the 
same three areas. Or, groups can be given different areas.) Instruct 
the groups that their test cannot be verbal — there may not be any writ- 
ten words. They must confine their test items to pictures. A test item 
can consist of a single picture, a series of pictures in sequence, a 
series of unrelated pictures, etc. Allow the participants 20 minutes 
to design their test items. Inform them when 10 minutes have elapsed, 
thereby keeping them on course. At the conclusion of the activity, have 
each group present its items to the rest of the participants. Discuss 



770 



-5- 



each item as it is presented in terms of whether or not it has fulfilled 
the category and its definition, (if an overhead projector is available, 
you can have the participants draw their test items on transparency film — 
they can be projected for the rest of the participants to see during the 
discussion period.) 

This is an excellent activity for providing the participants with an 
opportunity to better understand exactly what goes into the design of test 
items in the area of training for visual efficiency. The discussion will 
no doubt bring out the pitfalls in the design of such items. Such prob- 
lems as clarity of visual representation, confinement to the particular 
category, and clarity of directions should be brought out. By setting 
the stage with this activity the participants will have an introduction to 
the categories that are used and the basic format for the VES. At the 
conclusion of this activity, it would be appropriate to hand out copies 
of the test items of the VES and discuss those items that are similar to 
those developed by the participants. It is important to stress the under- 
standing of the categories and their definitions for each of the items. 

Matching game 

Divide the participants into groups. Provide each group with a 
packet of slips of paper. There are three different types of slips in 
each packet. Type A, is the actual illustration or the "graphics" from 
the VES. Type B, is the category. Type C, is the definition of the 
category. The task for the group is to match graphic with category and 
with the appropriate definition. Each packet should include approxi- 
mately 10 different items, or 30 separate slips of paper. Each group 



771 



-6- 



should be provided with a cork board, or some other device for tacking 
up the items as they unscramble them. As a group finishes the task, they 
should bring their board to a specified place in the room, signifying 
that they are finished. When all groups have completed the task, select 
the board that was completed first. Check it with the whole group to 
ascertain whether or not it is correct. If it is correct, that group 
is the winner. If it is not correct, go on to the next board turned in. 
Allow participants the iniative to question the correctness of any of the 
items on the board. Ask for whole group consensus regarding the question. 

This activity focuses on a complete understanding of each of the 
items . It promotes group involvement that can now set the stage for 
discussing the actual VES. 

Role playing 

Make up role definition cards that describe a particular visual 
problem or set of problems. ("You are a student with a visual problem. 
Your problem is hidden figure discrimination. Whenever the teacher pre- 
sents a test item to you that calls for you to find a figure within a 
more complex figure you are unable to do it.") Divide group into teams 
of three participants each. Within each team, two participants are to 
be teacher and one participant is to be the student. Provide each set 
of "teachers" with a magazine (Life, Time , Look, etc.). Provide "student" 
with his role definition card. Instruct "teachers" that their "student" 
has a visual problem. They will have (the two teachers operating to- 
gether) 15 minutes to discover the particular problem that their "student" 
has. The only materials they will be allowed to use in testing their 



772 



-7- 



"student" is the magazine. Their "student" is completely verbal and will 
attempt to answer all questions as completely as he/she can. Questions 
calling on the use of the "student's" visual deficiency will obviously 
be answered in a negative manner. When a team of teachers feels they 
have isolated the visual problem, they are to write it on a piece of 
paper. They are not allowed to ask their "student" if they have found 
the correct areal At the conclusion of the 15 minute testing session, 
ask each team of teachers to specify what problem they feel they have 
discovered and how they were able to discover it. Then, ask the "stu- 
dent" to certify whether the "teachers" have been able to find his prob- 
lem. You might also want to have the "student" comment on the procedures 
the "teachers" used. 

This activity draws attention to the full understanding of the dif- 
ferent categories in the VES. You might want to provide each team of 
"teachers" with a list of the categories and their definitions to assist 
in the activity. This activity can best be used as a follow-up to the 
actual discussion and use of the VES. 

Practice administration 

Sometimes it is helpful to have teams of two participants administer 
the test to each other. ("Student" and "teacher"). Unless the "student" 
does have a visual handicap, this can be a very unreal situation and care 
should be taken in its use. In many cases, the strongest learning will 
be for the "student" rather than the "teacher." To assist the student in 
answering the test items more realistically you can either use special 
corrective lenses that simulate visual problems, or something like a 



773 



drinking glass with a thick bottom where the student closes one eye and 
with the other eye must sight through the drinking glass to view the 
materials . 

Stress the importance of this activity as it relates to fully un- 
derstanding what the student goes through while taking the VES. The 
obvious problems, the ones we typically don't think of, are the ones that 
present most of the problems for the learner. If we have a full tinder- 
standing of what the student is undergoing, we will be able to better 
judge how he is reacting to the VES. 

Videotape 

A videotape showing the administration of the VES to a partially- 
sighted student has been prepared by the Regional Instructional Materials 
Center at Michigan State University. A copy of this tape may be bor- 
rowed by writing to the Center. Copies of this videotape are available 
for purchase at cost. 

The videotape shows the complete administration of the VES. It is 
ideally suited as a later activity for a training institute. Since the 
viewers play a passive role in just watching the tape, it is important 
that they will have had some actual experience with the VES or its com- 
ponent parts prior to viewing the tape. In this way, the tape serves 
as a reinforcer rather than an introducer of new information. As a rein- 
forcer, it will also answer many questions that will have come up during 
other activities at the training institute. 



774 



SECTION TWO 
WORKSHOP PROCEDURES 

USING THE PROFILE 



The profile is utilized to graphically display a particular child's 
low vision skills. Your workshop should provide the participants an un- 
derstanding of both, a) filling out the profile, and b) reading the 
profile . 

Filling out an Entry Behavior Card 

To diagnose a learner, we must be able to observe some sort of 
demonstrated behavior. This activity calls for the participant to de- 
sign a single "test" item that he/she can use to observe a student with- 
out actually interacting with him. (i.e. play behaviors, studying be- 
haviors, written behaviors , etc.) 

Provide each participant with an Entry Behavior Card. At the top 
of the card, write in one of the visual behavior areas from the Profile. 
Each participant must then list five observable student behaviors that 
will let you know if the student is proficient in that area. 



ENTRY BEHAVIOR CARD 



Visual Behavior Area 



In the spaces below, list 5 observable student behaviors 
that will let you know if the student is proficient in 
the above area. (i.e. play behaviors, studying behaviors, 
written behaviors, etc.) 

1. 
2. 
3. 
k. 
5. 



775 



-10- 



This activity will assist in developing an understanding of the 
Visual Efficiency Profile. Notice that the emphasis is on diagnosis and 
not remediation. To understand the profile we must have a clear under- 
standing of diagnosis. Have each participant read their cards aloud 
to the total group. Have the group react to the behaviors that are 
listed. Are they observable? Will they tell us something about the 
student? Do they relate directly to the area? 

Grouping Categories 

Since most children will show a group of categories in which they 
are deficient (rather than Just a single category) it is helpful to 
the participants to understand possible groupings and their implication. 

Divide the participants into groups. Using the listing of cate- 
gories and definitions (appendix), have each participant group randomly 
select four different categories. Then, instruct each group to write a 
behavioral description of a "typical" child who is deficient in this group 
of categories. Their description should focus on classroom learning be- 
havior. The behavioral description must be a complete "picture" of the 
child. 

One format for assisting with this activity is a pack of 3 x 5 inch 
cards . Each group member fills out two or three cards . Each card de- 
scribes a specific incident in the daily routine of the child. This 
group of Specific Incident Cards then represents a child with a parti- 
cular group of visual efficiency problems. At the completion of the 
activity have each group describe "their" student and his specific in- 
cidents. 



776 






-11- 



Working backyards 

Probably the eaoiest way to have participants understand the full 
meaning of the profile is to do it backwards! Rather than have the par- 
ticipants attempt to fill out a profile, provide them with one or more 
completed profiles. Give them only minimal instructions regarding the 
interpretation of the profile. Working in groups, have the participants 
study the profile and then select appropriate materials that might be 
used for remediating the child in question. The focus, then, is on 
the selection of a material rather than on reading the profile. This 
selection, however, cannot be made unless they truly understand the 
profile. Their understanding, or lack of understanding, will become very 
clear to them when they attempt to select the material. It is more 
meaningful to the participants to discover on their own the accuracy of 
their diagnosis rather than attempting to tell them how to diagnose 
from the profile. 

After each group has selected the materials they feel appropriate 
for remediation, have them present to the rest of the participants their 
profile and what they were able to find out about the child from it. 
Each group can have a different profile, or groups can all have the same 
profile. It is helpful to have an overhead projector with the profiles 
made up on transparencies for showing to the entire group during the 
discussion period. 

A variation of this activity calls for the participants to design 
and construct a simple material rather than selecting a commercially 
available material. To conduct this variation, provide a table with 
basic construction materials (scissors, construction paper, magic 



777 



-12- 



markers, paper clips, glue, magazine pictiires, etc.). This variation 
will conclude similarly with each group discussing their findings from 
the profile and then describing their material and how it will remediate 
the problems uncovered. 

Designing a child 

This activity calls for the participant to select a material from 
amongst <>. large group of materials set out on a table. The participant 
is given no criteria or structure by which to select the material. He 
is merely told to pick a material that looks interesting. Once he has 
selected his material, he is asked to examine the material in terms of 
the 18 categories. He should try to isolate those categories the ma- 
terial focuses upon. Then, he is to construct a profile for the child 
who would most benefit from the use of this material. As the partici- 
pants are developing their profiles, clear the remaining materials from 
the table. When the participants have completed their profiles have 
them replace their materials on the table and then hand in to you their 
completed profiles. You should then shuffle the profiles and re-distri- 
bute them to the participants. Each participant, then, goes to the table 
and selects that material which he/she feels best fulfills the visual 
characteristics of the learner described in the profile. Make sure that 
the person who has designed the profile can recognize it during the dis- 
cussion, Eind be able to show the material that they designed the pro- 
file around. The discussion session following this activity is built 
around each participant describing the profile and then showing the 



778 



-13- 



material they felt fit it. The person who designed the profile then 
says whether or not the group has selected the "correct" material and 
if not, what the correct material was. 

This activity focuses on the necessity for clearly defining the 
learner through the profile. A poorly defined profile tells us little 
about the learner. A clearly defined profile allows us to select ma- 
terials appropriate for remediation. (This activity can also be used 
for the next section — Materials For Remediation). 



779 



SECTION THREE 
WORKSHOP PROCEDURES 

MATERIALS FOR REMEDIATION 



The activities cited above in the section on understanding the pro- 
file can all be used to begin a further look at materials and methods for 
remediation of visual efficiency problems. Care should be taken during 
this section of the institute so as not to "bombard" the participants 
with too much information. The focus should be on thoroughly understand- 
ing the specific categories and the selection of appropriate materials 
to fit these categories. Once more, allowing the participants an experi- 
ence in selecting or designing appropriate materials, is a much stronger 
teaching strategy than merely showing the various materials that are 
available. A chance to view or inspect a large number of materials, 
however, should be provided the participants. This should be provided 
toward the end or as a final activity for the institute. 

Case study 

Prepare a short case study describing the visual behavior of a 
student. Describe this behavior in terms of his actions during school 
hours, rather than using category labels. Divide the group into small 
teams and instruct each small team to design a material to assist this 
child. 

A variation of this procedure calls for the use of commercially 
prepared materials. Display the materials on a table to one side of the 
room. Have the participant groups select a material or materials that 
will benefit the child described in the case study. 



780 



-15- 



When you are writing the case study bave a particular student In 
mind. Jot down on a piece of paper the various ways in which this 
student will manifest his visual problems. Then, select out activities 
he will be participating in during the day and describe his actions 

during these activities. 

Demonstration 

Selfcct a group of materials that can be used flexibly. Each ma- 
terial should have qualities permitting its use in more than one of the 
categories. Describe each material to the group in terms of its flexi- 
bility. Stress the adaptlveness of single materials to many areas of 
visual training. 

After you have established this model of examining materials in 
terms of their miiltiple uses, select single materials and have the group 
offer various ways in which It could be used for visual training. It is 
often helpful to select at least one very coanon item found at home or 
in the school, but is not typically associated with being an instructional 
material. Use this item toward the beginning of your demonstration to 
establish the concept of multiple use. (i.e. a dozen pencils of dif- 
ferent lengths, or a set of plastic dishes of different sizes. How can 
materials like this be used for training in visual efficiency?) 

Slide sets 

Obviously, you will not have available all of the materials you 
would like to show or demonstrate for your group. It is sometimes handy 
to spend some time in a classrooon tcJcing pictures of students involved in 



781 



-16- 



an activity that demonstrates some aspect of training for visual ef- 
ficiency. These slides can then be shown at your institute and used to 
promote discussion regarding what the learner is doing, or how the teacher 
might better focus on visual efficiency throiogh the use of the material 
pictured. When taking slides be sure to get close enough to the subject 
and the material so that it is easy to recognize when projected. It is 
always preferable to show the material in use with a child rather than 
Just having it laid out on a table. 

Videotape 

The videotape that you have seen at this training institute is 
available for loan, or copies may be made at cost by addressing your 
request to the Instructional Materials Center. The tape available is 
approximately one hour in length. This is an awful large "dose" for one 
sitting. It is suggested that if used, you divide the tape into two or 
three separate sessions. Each session can be concerned with a group 
of the 18 categories. 

After you have had an opportunity to view the tape a few times you 
might find it more manageable if you delete the narration provided and 
provide your own narration. Most of the activities shown are quite 
obvious and it is a simple task to talk along with the tape and thereby 
personalize the presentation for your group. A short set of notes to 
accompany the tape will assist you in knowing what is coming up. Be 
sure you don't talk too much! Hopefully, the videotape will do a lot 
of the teaching by itself without your narration. Your narration should 
be to fill in the gaps that occur on the tape. 



782 



-17- 



Bibliographies and lists 

Attached to this guide are some bibliographies and lists that you 
might want to duplicate and pass out to people at your institute. One 
list, from the American Printing House for the Blind, contains sections 
on books relating to the topic, periodicals, and materials and their 
producers that can be used for training for visual efficiency. Another 
list, prepared to accompany the videotape, also lists materials for 
training for visual efficiency. 

There is also included a listing of the l8 categories and their 
definitions plus the items they correlate with. This list can be a handy 
supplement or take-home aspect of your institute. People attending in- 
stitutes expect to receive something to take home with them. Make sixre 
that whatever you provide for them is material that will refresh their 
memories of what you discussed at the institute. Material that you do 
not have a chance to talk through with the participants, unless it is 
self-teaching, should not be given as a tsJte-home piece. 

Finally, there are four completed profiles of visually handicapped 
children and a copy of the blank profile. 



783 



SECTION FOUR 
WORKSHOP PROCEDURES 

EVALUATION OF THE WORKSHOP 



Whenever we try something new it is very helpful and also very 
interesting to evaluate what has happened. A simple evaltiation format 
will provide information about the exact success of our teaching effort. 
In particular, it will shed light on the strong points and weak points. 
The following pages offer some examples of possihle evaluation in- 
struments. These instruments, like this guide, do not have to be used 
exactly as they are designed. They are presented primarily to give 
exajnples of possible items that might be included on an evaluation form. 
Look over these forms and decide which aspects (items) are usable for 
your institute and what changes should be made. The important thing 
when designing an evaluation form is that you question each of the items 
as they are written in terms of what sort of usable information these 
items will provide you. There are many questions that can be asked on 
an evaluation from that really don't help us find out about the success 
of the institute. 



784 



-19- 



Sample Evaluation Form A 



1. What did you know about visual efficiency training prior to today's 
institute? 



How do you think you will use visual efficiency training in yo\rr 
own classroom? 



3. What new information did you find out during today's institute? 



If a follow-up to this institute is held, what topics would you 
like to see treated at that time? 



Do you feel that the procedures discussed today are applicable to 
your students? 



785 



-20- 



Sample Evaluation Form B 

1. In the spaces below list five things you learned at today's institute. 

A. 
B. 
C. 
D. 
E. 

2. Are the procedures for training in visual efficiency applicable to 

your learners? 

Yes No 



Comments: 



3. What two topics woiild you like to see discussed at a follow-up to 
this institute? 

A. 

B. 

h. Will you be using procedures discussed today in your own classroom? 

Definitely Maybe No 

5. What were the two most INTERESTING aspects of today's institute? 

A. 
B. 

6. What were the two most IMPORTANT aspects of today's institute? 

A. 
B. 



786 



-21- 



Sample Evad.uation Form C 



Yes 7 No 



1. I enjoyed today's institute. ( ) ( ) ( ) 



2. I felt that the topic discussed at {)()() 

today's institute was important. 



3. I would like to see a follow-up in- ( ) ( ) ( ) 

stitute held to further discuss to- 
day ' s topic . 



h. 1 will be using the procedures dis- ( ) { ) ( ) 

cussed today with my students. 



5. More time should be devoted to visual ( ) ( ) ( ) 

efficiency training with partially 
sighted students. 



6. Today's presentation was very clear. ( ) ( ) ( ) 



7. Most of the teachers at today's insti- ( ) ( ) ( ) 

tute seemed receptive to the procedures 
that were discussed. 



787 



-22- 



A Checklist Of Facilities And Materials 

The following items typically turn up on most checklists designed 
for individuals running workshops or institutes. Look it over prior 
to your institute and see if it brings to mind any aspects you might 
have forgotten in yovir planning. A well-planned institute is obvious 
to the participants. Organization and planning can be an important 
factor in the success of your institute. 



Room 



Ample space 

Good lighting 

Chalk board (and chalk 1) 



Seating 



Chairs 

Tables (if needed for group work) 



Equipment 



Tape recorder 
Overhead projector 

Transparency film 
Marking pen 
Videotape recorder 
Slide projector (and slides) 



Miscellaneous 

Paper 
Pencils 
Name tags 
Program 



788 



-23- 



Do you know the names and addresses of all people attending your 
Institute? 



Do you feel the purpose of the Institute is clearly understood by 
those planning to attend? 



Have all materials needed been duplicated? 



Have you tried out all equipment you will be using? 



Will you introduce the program, or will you invite someone to give 
the introduction? 



Have you made effective use of media, (i.e. overhead projector, role- 
playing, etc.) rather than relying solely on lecturing? 



Are you clear in the objectives you hope to accomplish during the 
meeting? 



GOOD LUCK 



S. Joseph Levine 

Coordinator: Technology of Dissemination 

USOE/MSU RIMC-HCY 

789 

March, 1971 



APPEND I X 



1. Categories and Definitions 



2. Suggested Guidelines for Assessment and Interpretation of 
Visual Behavior 



3. Bibliography - Books and Reports* 

4. Bibliography - Periodicals* 

5. Materials List* 

6. Materials List (MSU Videotape) 

7. Sample Profiles 

8. Blank Profile 



♦Prepared by the American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville 
Kentucky. 



790 



Visual Efficiency Scale 
Categories & Definitions 



FORM DISCRIMINATION (l,2,3,'+,5) 

The child is able to distinguish differences and/or similarities 
among FORMS. (Geometric or contour). 

LIGHT-DARK DENSITY DISCRIMINATION (6,7,8,9) 

The child is able to match forms according to their DENSITY. 

POSITION DISCRIMINATION (8, 13, 1^^,30) 

The child is able to distinguish differences in POSITION of similar 
figures. 

INNER DETAIL DISCRIMINATION (9,^+1+, 1+5,^+6,1^8) 

The child is able to distinguish differences of DETAIL WITHIN 
conf igvirations . 

SIZE DISCRIMINATION (lO, ll) 

The child is able to distinguish differences in SIZE of similar figures, 

SIZE AND POSITION DISCRIMINATION (l2) 

The child is able to distinguish differences in SIZE and POSITION of 
similar figures. 

DETAIL DISCRIMINATION (I5,l6,17,l8) 

The child is able to distinguish DETAILS between similar figures 
or outlines. 

POSITION IN SPACE DISCRIMINATION (l6,2l) 

The child is able to distinguish differences and/or similarities 
among figures which are ALTERED IN POSITION. 

PATTERN DETAIL DISCRIMINATION (19,20,U6) 

The child is able to distinguish a specific PATTERN from among similar 
patterns . 

OBJECT UNIFICATION (22, 23, 2U, 25, 26) 

The child is able to UNIFY a set of object parts to form a complete 
object. 

791 



-2- 



VIGUAL CLOSUnE (2i4, 141,1*2) 

The child is able to distinguish a COMPLETE OBJECT from an incomplete 
picture or set of picture parts. 

SPATIAL PERSPECTIVE DISCRIMINATION (27,28,29) 

The child is able to distinguish differences and/or similarities among 
figures which are ALTERED IN POSITION and/or PERSPECTIVE. 

FIGURE DETAIL DISCRIMINATION (29,30,35,36) 

The child is able to distinguish DETAILS between similar FIGURES. 

OBJECT DISCRIMINATION (31,32) 

The child is able to distinguish differences and/or similarities 
among OBJECTS. 

HIDDEN FIGURE DISCRIMINATION (32,33,31+) 

The child is able to distinguish specific FORMS which are integrated 
WITHIN a more detailed picture. 

SYMBOL POSITION DISCRIMINATION (37) 

The child is able to distinguish between like SYMBOLS which have 
DIFFERENT POSITIONS in space. 

SYMBOL SEQUENCE DISCRIMINATION (38,39) 

The child is able to distinguish differences in the ORDER of groups 
of SYMBOLS. 

CONFIGURATION DISCRIMINATION {kO ,kl ,^2 ,h3 M ) 

The child is able to distinguish differences in the OUTLINE SHAPE 
of the configurations of symbol groups . 



792 



Siaggested Guidelines 

For 
Assessment and Interpretation of Visual Behavior* 



Every child who is known to have observed or measured vision should 
be administered the Visual Efficiency Scale in order to determine his 
functional efficiency. In addition, the teacher will have a better basis 
for estimating the visual learning potential of the child and the nature 
and type of visually stimulating materials most appropriate for him. The 
following guidelines are suggested for assessment and interpretation of 
the behavior to be observed: 

1. How close to the page does the child hold his head? 

2. Does he use both eyes together, only one eye, or first one and 

then the other? Does he move his head as he looks across the 
page or does he move the page back and forth? Does he use cen- 
tral or peripheral vision? 

3. How does he look at the items — as a whole, in parts, in a circular 

fashion, or without any particular pattern? 

k. What are the verbal remarks and reactions of the child during the 
procedure? 

5. How does he use the pencil for marking? Does he mark on the form 

or figure, beside it, above it, or under it? 

6. What is the child's interest in the items? Does he seem relaxed, 

anxious, tense, or disinterested? 

7. How much and what type of lighting does the child seem to need? 

Does he try to screen-out light? 

Taking notes regarding the above will be very valuable. His functional 
performance as such is important, but is no more important than the manner in 
which he performs and the attitude reflected by his remarks or his interest. 



*Barraga, Natalie C. (Editor) Teacher's Guide For Development of Visual Learning 
Abilities and Utilization of Low Vision , Louisville: American Print- 
ing House for the Blind, 1970, pp. 8-9. 

793 



The American Printing House for the Blind 



BOOKS ANU REPORTS 



All port, F. H. Theories of perception and the concept of structure . 
New York: wTTey & Sons, 1955,, 

American Foundation for the Blind. A teacher education program for 

those who serve blind children and youth . New York: Author, 1 961 , 

Ashcroft, S. C, Halliday, C. , & Barraga, N. Study II: Effects of 
experimental teaching on the visual behavior of children educated 
as though they had no vision„ Nashville, Tenno: George Peabody 
College for Teachers, 1965,, (Office of Education Grant No. 32- 
52-0121-1034) 

Barraga, N. Increased visual behavior in low vision children. American 
Foundation for the Blind, Research Series , 1964, No. 13, 

Bateman, B. D, Reading and psycholinguistic processes of partially 
sighted children. Council for Exceptional Children Research 
Monographs . 1963, Series A, No. 5. 

Bateman, B. D, Some educational characteristics of partially seeing 
children. In Council for Exceptional Children, Inspection and 
introspection of special education . Washington, D. C.: Council 
for Exceptional Children, 1964, Pp. 74-82. 

Bier, N. Correction of subnormal vision . London: Butterworths, 1960. 

Douglas, A. G. A tachistoscopic study of the order of emergence in the 
process of perception. Psychological Monographs , 1947, 61. 

Erikson, E. H. Childhood and society . New York: Norton, 1950. 

Fonda, G. Management of the patient with subnormal vision . St. Louis, 
Mo.: Mosby, 1965^ 

Frostig, M., & Home, D. Teacher's guide for the Frostlq Program for 
the development of visual perceptiorT Chicago: Follett, 1964. 

Gesell, A., Ilg, F., & Bullis, G. V1sion--its development in infant and 
child . New York: Harper, 1950. 

Gibson, E. J. Principles of perceptual learning and development . New 
York: Appleton-Century Crofts, 1969. 

Gibson, J. J. The senses considered as perceptual systems . Boston: 
Houghton-Mifflin, 1966. 

Goins, J. T. Visual perceptual abilities and early reading progress . 
Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 19581 (Monogr. No. 87). 

794 



-2- 

Graham, M, D. Opening remarks. In L. L. Clark (Ed.), Proceedings of the 
symposium on research 1n blindness and severe visual impairment . 
New York: American Foundation for the Blind, 1964. Pp. 1-5. 

Gregory, R. L. Eye and brain . New York: McGraw-Hill, 1966. 

Hebb, D. 0. The organlzation'of- behavior . New York: Wiley & Sons, 1949. 

Herm, R. J. Limited vision and Tow vision aids - the ophthalmologist's 
view. In American Association of Instructors of the Blind, Forty- 
seventh biennial convention . Watertown, Mass,: American Association 
of Instructors of the Blind, 1964. Pp. 31-32. 

Hirsch, M. J., & Wicks, R. E. (Eds.) Vision of children, an optemetric 
symposium . Philadelphia, Pa.: Chilton, 1963. (Chapters 2, 4, 5, 
8, 10, 14, 17) 

Hoover, R. E. Toward a new definition of blindness. In American Association 
of Workers for the Blind, Blindness 1964. Washington, D. C: American 
Association of Workers for the Blind, 1964. Pp. 99-106. 

Hunt, J. M. Intelligence and experience . New York: Ronald, 1961. 

Inhelder, B., & Piaget, J, The growth of logical thinking from childhood 
to adolescence . New York: Basic Books, 1958. 

Jones, J. W. Blind children degree of vision mode of reading . Washington, 
D. C: USGPO, 1961. (OE-35026, Bulletin 1961, No. 24) 

Jones, J. W. , & Collins, A. P. Educational programs for yi!'^-]]^-*^^"'^^" 
capped children . Washington, D. C: USGPO, 1966. (OE-350/0, 
Bulletin 1966, No. 6) 

Juurmaa, J. Ability structure and loss of vision. American Foundation 
for the Blind, Research Series . 1967, No. 18. 

Kabrisky, M. A proposed model for visual information processing in the 
human braTfu Urbana, 111.: University of Illinois Press, 1966. 

Lowenfeld, B. Psychological problems of children with impaired vision. 
In W. M. Cruickshank (Ed;), Psychology of exceptional children and 
youth . Engl ewood Cliffs, N.~j71 Prentice-Hall, 1955. Pp. 214-283. 

Montessori, M. Dr. Montessori*s own handbook . New York: Bentley, 1914. 

Nolan, C. Y. Blind children; degree of vision, mode of reading: A 1963 
replication. In CounciT for Exceptional Children, Inspection and 
introspection of special education . Washington, D. C: Council 
for Exceptional Children, 1964. Pp. 86-94. 



795 



The American Printing House for the Blind 

-3- 

Orton, S. T. Reading, writing, 'and speech problems in children . New 
Yor k : Norton, 1937. 

Piaget, J. The origins of tnteVligence in childrer . New York: Inter- 
national Universities Press, 1952. 

Pritchard, R. M. Mechanisms of seeing: Parameters of vision. In L. L. 
Clark (Ed.), Proceedings of the International Congress on Technology 
and Blindness" Vol. II. Panel 1 1- -living systems . New York: 
American Foundation for the Blind, 1963. Pp. 37-43. 

Robinson, H. M., & Huelman, C. B., Jr. Visual efficiency and progress 
in learning to read. Chicato: University of Chicago Press, 1953. 
Pp. 31-53. (Supplementary Educ, Monogr. No. 77). 

Rosenzweig, M. R. Mechanism of seeing: The role of the brain. In L. 

L. Clark (Ed.), Proceedings of the International Congress on Technology 
and Blindnes s. Vol. II. Panel II--living systems . New York: 
American Foundation for the Blind, i963, Pp, 45-85. 

Segal, A., & Stone, F. H. The six-year old who began to see. In R. S. 
Eissler (Ed.), The psychoanalytic study of the child . Vol. 16. 
New York: International Universities Press, 1961. Pp. 481-509. 

Smith, H. P., & Dechant, E. Psychology in teaching reading . Englewood 
Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice-Hall, 1961. 

Vernon, M. D. A further study of visual perception . New York: Cambridge 
University Press, 1952. 

Von Fieandt, K. The world of perception . Homewood, 111.: Dorsey, 1966. 

Von Senden, M. Space and sight - the perception of space and shape in 
the congenital ly blind before and after operation . Glencoe, 111 . : 
Free Press, 1932. 

Wilman, C. W. Seeing and perceiving . New York: Pergamon, 1966. 

Zahl , P. A. (Ed.) Blindness: Modern approaches to the unseen environ- 
ment. New Yorkl Hafner, 1962. 



796 



The American Printing House for the Blind 
PERIODICALS 



Ashcroft, S, C A new era in education and a paradox In research for the 
visually limited. Exceptional Child ren, 1963, 29, 371-376. 

Barraga, N. C, Learning efficiency in low vision,. T he Journal of the 
American Optometnc Association , 1969, 40, 807-810„ 

Binder, A. A statistical model for the process of visual recognition. 
Psychological Review . 1955, 62, 119-129 

Blair, H. L., & Martens, T. G. Refraction and visual physiology. 
Archives of Ophthalmology . 1962, 68, 107-139. 

Bower, T. 6. R. The visual world of infants. Scientific American , 1966, 
215(6), 80-84, 87, 88, 90, 92. 

Brod, N. Visual development and reading. American Journal of Optometry , 
1969, 46, 96-102. 

Brown, W. P. Conceptions of perceptual defence. British Journal of Psychology , 

1961, (Monogr. Suppl . 35). 

Bruner, J. S. On perceptual readiness. Psychological Review , 1957, 64, 
123-152. 

Cohen, A. S. A dynamic theory of vision. Journal of Developmental Reading , 

1962, 6, 15-25. 

Coopersmith, S. Relationship between self-esteem and sensory constancy. 
Journal of Abnormal Social Psychology , 1964, 68, 217-222. 

Day, R. H. The physiological basis of form perception in the peripheral 
retina. Psychological Review . 1957, 64, 38-48. 

Dearborn, W. F. Structural factors which condition special disability in 
reading. Proceedings of the American Association of Mental Deficiency , 
T933, 38, 266-283. 

Dickinson, C, A. Experience and visual perception. American Journal of 
Psychology . 1926, 37, 330-344. 

Djang, S. S. The role of past experience in the visual apprehension of masked 
forms. Journal of Experimental Psychology , 1937, 20, 29-59. 

Dorman, P. Sight restoration in a school for the blind. American Journal of 
Ophthalmology . 1935, 47, 187-221. 

Drury, M. B. Progressive changes 1n non-foveal perception of line patterns. 
American Journal of Psychology . 1933, 45, 628-646. 

Eames, T. H. Visual handicaps to reading. Journal of Education , 1959, 141, 
3-29. 

797 



Page 2 

Ehlers, H. Clinical testing of visual acuity. Archives of Ophthalmolog y, 
1953, 49, Aol-^A. 

Enoch, J. M. Workshop on refractive anomalies of the eye. American Journal 
of Optomet ry, 1966, 43, lb2-lb'\. 

Fantz, R. L. The oi^igin of form perception. Scientific American , 1961, 
204(5), 66-72. 

Farris, L. P. Visual defects as- factors influencing achievement in^reading. 
Journal of Experimental Education , 1936, 5, 58-60. 

Fehrer, E. V. An investigation of the learning of visually perceived forms. 
American Journal of Psycho l ogy , 1935, 47, 187-221. 

Ffooks, 0. Vision tesi for children: Use of symbols. British Journal 
of Ophthalmology , 1965, 49, 312-314. 

Flax, N. Visual function in dyslexia. American Journal of Optometry, 1968, 
45, 574-586. 

Fonda, G. Report of five hundred patients examined for low vision. American 
Medical Association Archives of Opthtalmology , 1956, 56, 171-175. 

Fonda, G. Definition ar.d classification of blindness with respect to ability 
to use residual vision. New Outlook for the Blind . 1961, 55, 169-172. 

Fonda, G. Subnormal vision correction for aphakia, American Journal of 
Ophthalmology . 1963, 55, 247-255. 

Forrest, E. B. Vision and Visual process. Education , 1962, 82, 299-301. 

Forrest, E. B. A dynamic model of vision. American Journal of Optometry, 
1966, 46, 37-44. 

French, J. D. The reticular formation. Scientific American . 1957, 196(5) 
54-60. 

Friendenberg, H. L. Vision and its relationship to school achievement. The 
Optometric Week ly, 1965, 56, 29-33 (Nov. 4, 1965). 

Gartner, J, N. Large type reading materials for the visually handicapped. 
New Outlook for the Blind. 1968, 62, 233-239. 

Gibson, E. J, Perceptual learning. Annual Review of Psychology . 1963, 14, 
29-56. 

Gibson, E. J. ,8 Walk, R. D. The visual cliff. Scientific American, 1960, 
202(4), 64-7!. 

Gibson, J. J. What is form? Psychological Review . 1951, 58, 403-412. 

798 



The American Printing House for the Blind 

Page 3 

Gnade, M. Low vision services. Sight-Saving Review , 1965, 35, 216-219. 

Goldstein, H. So that all may see. New Outlook for the Blind , 1964, 
58, 280-284. 

Gregory, R. L. Visual illusions. Scientific American . 1968, 219(5), 66-76. 

Hatfield, E. M. A year's record of pre-school vision screening. Sight- 
Saving Review . 1966, 36, 18-22. 

Hendrickson, H. H. The developmental vision sequence. Journal of the 
American Optometric Association . 1962, 33, 1-4. 

Henle, M. An experimental investigation of past experience as a determinant 

of visual perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology , 1942, 30, 1-22. 

Hildreth, H. R. The effect of visual training on existing i^yopia. American 
Journal'Of Ophthalmology. 1947. 30, 1573-1576. 

Hoover. R. E, Visual efficiency as a criterion of service needs. American 
Foundation for the Blind, Research Bulletin , 1963, No. 3, 116-119. 

Jones, J, W. Problems in defining and classifying blindness. New Outlook 
for the Blind , 1962, 56, 123-129. 

Karnes, M. B.. & Wollersheim, J. P. An intensive differential diagnosis of 
partially seeing children to determine the implications of education. 
Exceptional Children . 1963, 30, 17-25. 

Koetting, R. A. A broader base for the management of subnormal vision. 
American Journal of Optometry . 1967, 44, 381-388. 

Kurzhals, I. W. Reading made meaningful through a readiness for learning 
program. International Journal for the Education of the Blind , 1966. 
15. 107-llT:: 

Lairy, G. C. & Netch-MiE, S. The e*«troencephalogrdm in partially sighted 
children related to clinical and psychological data, /toerican Foxffidation 
for the Blind. Research Bulletin . 1962, No. 2, 38-56. 

Lancaster, J. E. The learning process in orthoptics. American Journal of 
Ophthalmology . 1949, 32, 1577-1585. 

Lancaster, U. B. Present status of eye exercises for improvement of visual 
function. Archives of 00 h thai wo logy , 1944, 32, 167-172. 

Law, F. Theproblem of t*»e^visoa>ly defective infant. Transcription of the 
Ophthalmological^ Society of the United Kingdom , 1960, 80, 3. 

Lebensohn, J. E. Scientific and practical considerations involved in the near- 
vision test with presentation of practical and informative near vision 
charts. American Journal of Ophthalmology , 1936, 19, 110-117. 

799 



Page 4 

Lemkau, P. V. The influence of handicapping conditions in child development. 
Children . 1961, 8, 43-47. 

London, I. D. A Russian report on the postoperative newly seeing. American 
Journal of Psychology . 1960, 73, 478-482. 

Lowenfeld, B. The visually handicapped. Review of Educational Research , 
1963, 33, 38-48. 

Margach, C. B. Spatial perception in low-visioned persons. Optometric Weekly , 
1969, Jan. 

McKee, G. A. The role of the optometrist in the development of perceptual 
and visiomotor skills in children. American Journal of Optometry, 
1967. 44, 297-310. 

Neisser, U. The processes of vision. Scientific American , 1968, 219(3), 
204-208, 210, 212, 214. 

Postman, L. Visual perception. Psychological Review, 1955, 62, 438-451. 

Pratt, C. The role of past experience in visual perception. Journal of 
Psychology . 1950, 30, 85-107. 

Prince. J. H. Special print for subnormal vision. American Journal of 
Ophthalmology. 1959. 48, 122-124. 

Renshaw, S. The visual perception and reproduction of forms by tachistoscopic 
methods. Journal of Psychology. 1945, 20, 217-232. 

Riesen. A. Effects of stimulus deprivation on the development and atrophy 
of the visual sensory system. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry , 
1960, 30, 23-36. 

Riesen, A. H. Viston.- Amertcan-Review of Psychology. 1954, 5, 57-88. 

Riesen, A. H.. Chow, K. L., Semmes, J., & Nissen, H. W. Chimpanzee vision 
after four conditions of light deprivation. American Psychologist , 
1951, 6, 282. 

Rock, I;, & Harris, C. S. Vision and touch. Scientific American . 1967, 
216(5), 96-104. 

Sells, S. B., & Fixott, R. S. Evaluation of research on effects of visual 
training on visual functions. American Journal of Ophthalmology , 1957, 
44, 230-235. 

Sibert, K. N. The legally blind child with useful residual vision. 

International Journal for the Education of the Blind, 1966, 16, 33-44. 



800 



The American Printing House for the Blind 



Page 5 

Sloan, L. L. , & Brown, D. J. Relative merits of headborne, hand and stand 
magnifiers. American dourna] of Ophthalmology , 1964, 58, 594-604. 

Sloan, L. L., & Habel , A. Reading aids for the partially blind. American 
Journal of Ophthalmology . 1956, 42, 863-872. 

Sloane, A. E. The value of low vision aids. Sight-Saving Review , 1961, 
31, 144-160. 

Sloane, A. E. Identifying children with visual problems. Sight-Saving 
Review, 1965, 35, 13-16. 

Spaeth, E. Estimation of loss of visual efficiency. Archives of 
Ophthalmology , 1955, 54, 462-468. 

Taubenhaus, L. J. , & Jackson, A. A. Vision screening of pre-school children. 
Sight-Saving Review . 1965. 35, 100-104. 

Wallach, H. The perception of motion. Scientific American , 1959. 201(1), 
56-60. 

Weiss, S. Optical aids for the partially sighted. American Journal of 
Ophthalmology . 1963, 55, 255-261. 

Witkin, H. A. The perception of the upright. Scientific American . 1959, 
200(2), 50-56. 

Woodruff, A. B., & Wickens, D. D, The effect of sense restriction of 
visual experience on form perception in the white rat. American 
Psychologist . 1951, 6. 281. 

Zimmerman, A. An appraisal of partial vision: Its dual nature and problems. 
New Outlook for the Blind. 1965, 59, 153-156. 



801 



The American Printing House for the Blind 



UTILIZATION OF LOW VISION * MATERIALS LIST * IMRC/APH 
Summer 1970 



I. GEOMETRIC FORMS 



Tactual 



1 . Wonder Texture Box 

2. Form Boards 

3. Progress Development Project #1 

4. Graduating Shapes 

5. Mitchell Wire Forms 

6. Form Board 

7. Geometric Figures and Solids 

8. Geometric Forms 

9. Cuisenaire Rods 

10. Peg Grading Board 

11 . Contour Cone 

12. Wooden Cylinders (graduated) & Stand 

13. Grade Circles, Squares &• Triangles 

14. Inset Cylinders 

15. Geometric Insets 

16. Pattern- Learning Forms 

B. Tactual and Visual 

1. Geometric Form Cards "(Montessori) 

2. Parquetry Blocks' & Designs 

3. Parquetry Design Blocks 

C. Visual 



Creative Playthings 
Tactile Aids for the Blind 
Tactile Aids for the Blind 
Tactile Aids for the Blind 
American Printing House 
Playskool ,. Inc. 
Milton Bradley 
Judy Company 

Cuisenaire Company of America 
Constructive Playthings 
Creative Playthings 
Creative Playthings 
Creative Playthings 
Creative Playthings 
Creative Playthings 
Creative Playthings 



Educational Teaching Aids 
Division of A. Daigger Co. 
Developmental Learning Materials 
Milton Bradley Company 



1. Geometric Shapes in Color 

2. Shape Dominoes 



Teaching Resources, 
Creative Playthings 



Inc. 



Puzzles-Integration'of Parts 

(1) Shapes Puzzles 

(2) Small Form Puzzles 

(3) Large Form Puzzles 



Developmental Learning 

Materials 

Teaching Resources, Inc. 

Teaching Resources, Inc. 



802 



PAGE 2 

II. OBJECTS 
A. Tactual 



Progress Development Project #2 



B. Visual 



1 . Simple Objects & Geometric Forms 

a. Association Cards 

b. Figure-Ground Transparencies 

2. Object Ootlines'with Inner Detail 

a. Stimulus ResponseStrips 

b. Transparency Duplicating Books 

c. Perception Plaques, Clowns & Faces 

d. Picture Readiness Game 

3. Object P1ctares'=''-eol or •&- Detail 

a. Picture Dominoes 

b. Match-Me 

c. Picto-Lotto 

d. Object Lotto 

e. Farm Lotto 

f. ABC Lotto 

4. Missing Parts 

a. What's Missing Lotto 

b, Story-Cards --Tell What Part is 

Missing 

5. Integration of Parts 

a. Whole-Part-Whole Puzzle 

b. Fruit & Animal Puzzle 

c. Shape & Size Puzzles 

d. Animal Puzzles 

e. People Puzzles 

6. Spatial Relations 



a. 
b. 

7. 

a. 

b. 
c. 



Spatial Relations Picture Cards 
Fitzhugh Plus Program 

Categorizing 

Food Series 



Tactile Aids for the Blind 



The Classification Gamp 
Go-Together Cards 



803 



Teaching Resources, Inc. 
Speech and Language Materials 



Follett Publishing Company 
Mil liken Publishing Company 
Creative Playthings 
Garrard Publishing Company 



Creative Playthings 
Benton Review Publishing Co. 
F. A. Owen Publishing Co. 
Constructive Playthings 
Constructive Playthings 
Constructive Playthings 



Constructive Playthings 
Milton Bradley Company 



Playskool, Inc. 
Teaching Resources, Inc. 
Creative Playthings 
Developmental Learning Materials 
Developmental Learning Materials 



Developmental Learning Materials 
Allied Education Council 



Captioned Films Education Media 
Distribution Center 
Instructo Corporation 
Creative Playthings 



d. Go-Together Lotto 

e. Association Picture Cards 

f. Motot Expressive Language Picture 

Cards 

g. Opposite Concepts 

h. Opposite Ideal Charts 

8. Picture Sequencing 

a. See-Quees 

b. Sequential Pictures 

9. Color 

Color Association Cards 
10. General Activities 

a. Match and Check 

b. Independent Activities, 

Level I 



The American Printing House for the Blind 

PAGE 3 

Constructive Playthings 
Developmental Learning Materials 

Developmental Learning Materials 
Instructo Corporation 
Ideal School Supply 



The Judy Company 

Developmental Learning Materials 



Developmental Learning Materials 

Scott, Foresman and Company 
The Continental Press, Inc. 



III. OBJECTS AND SYMBOLS 
A. Tactual 



Wood Lower Case Letters 

B. Visual -Picture/Word Association 

1. Matchetts 

2. Structural Reading Series 

3. Word Matching Cards 

4. Picto-Lotto Cards 

5. Picto-Word Flash Cards 

6. Dolch Picture Word Cards 

7. Picture Word Builder 

8. My First Dictionary 

9. Families and Friends 

10. Words and Action 

11 . Sort-a-Card Game 

12. Action Pictures & Name Pictures 

13. The Game of Match Word 

14. Ben-G Reading Readiness Puzzles 

15. Match Games-Sets - One and Two 

16. Object Lotto 

C. Words 



1. 

9 



Basic Word Cards 

Basic Sight Vocabulary Cards 

Basic Sight Word Test 



Creative Playthings 



The Judy Company 
L, W. Singer Company, Inc. 
Open Court Publishing Co. 
F. A. Owen Publishing Co. 
Constructive Playthings 
Garrard Publishing Co. 
Milton Bradley Company 
Grosset & Dunlap, Inc. 
Instructor Publications, Inc. 
Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc, 
Milton Bradley Company 
Ideal School Supply 
Benton Review Publishing Co. 
Creative Playthings, Inc. 
Garrard Publishing Co. 
EdrU-Cards Manufacturing Corp. 



Steck-Vaughn Company 
Garrard Publishing Co. 
Garrard Publishing Co. 



804 



PAGE 4 



4. Dolch Popper Words, Sets 1 & 2 

5. Phonetic Quizmo 

6. Global Flash Cards 

7. Phonetic Drill Cards 

8. Pre-Primer Words--Flash Cards 

D. Phrases and Sentences 



Garrard Publishing Co. 
Milton Bradley Company 
Milton Bradley Company 
Milton Bradley Company 
Webster Division, McGraw-Hill 



1. Sight Phrase Cards 

2. Sentence Builders 

E. Easy Reading 

1. Readers Digest Skill Builder 

2. Surprise Stories, First Reader 

3. The Silent Readers, Second Reader 

4. I Wonder Why (Large Type Edition) 

5. My First Reading Unit, Part 2 

6. Cowboy Sam Series 

7. Butternut Bill Series 

8. Read and Play Book 

9. Easy-to-Read Books 
10. Button Family Series 

F. Broad Application Items 



8. 
9. 

10. 

n. 

12. 



Frostig Pictures and Patterns 

Program 
Perceptual -Motor Teaching Materials 
Frostig Program for the Development 

of Visual-Perception, Teacher's 

Guide 
Frostig Exercise and Worksheets 
Harris Lateral Dominance Kit 
Detect: A Sensorimotor Approach 

to Visual Discrimination 
Erie Program/Perceptual Motor 

Development 
Fairbanks-Robinson Program 
Try: Experiences for Young 

Children 
Rhyming, Levels 1 and 2 
Thinking Skills, Levels 1 & 2 
Visual Discrimination, 

Levels 1 8 2 



Garrard Publishing Co. 
Milton Bradley Company 



Reader's Digest Services, Inc. 
Clear Type Publishing Committee 
Clear Type Publishing Committee 
Stanwix House, Inc. 
Gel-Sten Supply Company, Inc. 
Benefic Press 
Benefic Press 
Garrard Publishing Co. 
Melmont Publishers 
Benefic Press 



Follett Educational Corporation 
Teaching Resources 



Follett Educational Corporation 
Follett Educational Corporation 
Follett Educational Corporation 

Science Research Associates 

Teaching Resources 
Teaching Resources 

Noble & Noble Publishers, Inc. 
The Continental Press, Inc. 
The Continental Press, Inc. 

The Continental Press, Inc. 



805 



The American Printing House for the Blind 

PAGE 5 



SOURCES OF ALL MATERIAL ON ATTACHED LIST 



Allied Education Council 
Distribution Center, P.O.Box 78 
Galien, Michigan 49113 

American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, Kentucky 40206 

Benetic Press 

10300 West Roosevelt Road 

Westchester, Illinois 60153 

Benton Review Publishing Company, Inc. 
Fowler, Indiana 47944 

Captioned Films Education Media 
Distribution Center 
5034 Wisconsin Avenue, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20016 

Constructive Playthings 
1040 East 85th Street 
Kansas City, Missouri 64131 

I he Continental Press, Inc. 

P. 0. Box 554 

Elgin, Illinois 60120 

Creative Playthings, Inc. 
Educational Services Department 
Princeton, New Jersey 08540 

Cuisenaire Company of America, Inc. 

12 Church Street 

New Roche! le. New York 10805 

Developmental Learning Materials 
3505 N. Ashland Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60657 

Td-U-Cards Manufacturing Corporation 
60 Austin Boulevard 
Commack, New York 11725 

Educational Teaching Aids Division 
A, Dfligger & Company 
159 West Kinzie Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60610 

Follett Educational Corporation 
1010 W. Washington Boulevard 
Cliicago, Illinois 60607 



Garrard Publishing Company 
1607 N. Market Street 
Champaign, niinois 61820 



806 



Gel-Sten Supply Company, Inc. 
9014 Brookfleld Avenue 
Brookfield, Illinois 60513 

Grosset and Dunlap, Inc. 

51 Madison Avenue 

New York, New York 10010 

Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc. 

383 Madison Avenue 

New York, New York 10017 

Ideal School Supply Company 
11000 South Lavergne Avenue 
Oak Lawn, Illinois 60453 

The Instructo Corporation 
Paoll, Pennsylvania 19301 

The Instructor Publications, Inc. 
Dansvllle, New York 14437 

The Judy Company 

310 North Second Street 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55401 

Melmont Publishers 

1224 W. Van Buren Street 

Chicago, Illinois 60607 

Mil liken Publishing Company 

611 Olive Street 

St. Louis, Missouri 63101 

Milton Bradley Company 

74 Park Street 

Springfield, Massachusetts 01101 

Noble and Noble Publishers, Inc. 

750 Third Avenue 

New York, New York 10017 

Open Court Publishing Company 
1039 Eighth Street 
LaSalle, Illinois 61301 

F. A. Owen Publishing Company 
Instructor Park 
Dansvllle, New York 14437 

Playskool, Inc. 

3720 North Kedzie Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 50618 



PAGE 6 

Reader's Digest Services, Inc. 
Education Division 
Pleasantville, New York 10570 

Science Research Associates, Inc. 
Industrial and Special Education Division 
259 East Erie Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60611 

Scott, Foresman and Company 
1900 E. Lake Avenue 
Glenview, Illinois 60025 

L. W. Singer Company, Inc. 

201 E. 50th Street 

New York, New York 10022 

Speech and Language Materials, Inc. 

P. 0. Box 721 

Tulsa, Oklahoma 74101 

Stanwix House, Inc. 
3020 Chartiers Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15204 

Steck-Vaughn Company 

Box 2028 

Austin, Texas 78767 

Tactile Aids for the Bl+nd, Inc. 
2625 Forest Avenue 
Des Moines, Iowa 50311 

Teaching Resources Corporation 
100 Boylston Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02116 

Webster Division 
McGraw-Hill Book Company 
Manchester Road 
Manchester, Missouri 63011 



807 



Materials For Improving Low Vision Skills 
(Presented on Videotape) 



This list includes all materials shown on the videotape prepared by 
the Regional Special Education Instructional Materials Center for Handi- 
capped Children and Youth at Michigan State University. Materials axe 
listed in the order in which they appear on the videotape. 



ITEM & DESCRIPTION 
Touch Book 

Puzzle (wooden) 
Form Dominoes 

"Shapes-Sizes" 



Sheets of Geometric Forms 
With Columns (matching) 



3-Part Sponge Material 



Loose Beads & Lace 

Plastic Cowboy and Indian 

Set with Log Cabin to Assemble 

Sponge Material 

orange sheet with circular holes 
sheet with large holes (about 6" high) 
nerf balls 
sponge cylinder 



PRODUCER 

Teacher-made 

felt, braille paper 

Not known 

Teacher-made 

tagboard, sandpaper, biirlap, 
construction paper, spray paint, 
black marker 

First Learning Games 

Western Publishing Company, Inc. 

Walt Disney Productions 

"Reading Time" 

Professors & Teachers Aides, Inc. 

Phoenix, Arizona 

Foamade Industries 
Royal Oak, Michigan 

Kelp 

Purchased at dime store 



Foamade Industries 



808 



-2- 



ITEM & DESCRIPTION 



PRODUCER 



Puzzle Pieces for Spatial Relations 
Exercises 

tree, rabbit, elephant 

Magazine picture 



Visual-Motor Perception 
Teaching Materials 



Teaching Resources 



Teacher Idea 

pictiire mounted on cardboard 

Teaching Resources 



Abstract Art Project 



Object Unification 
Art project-printing 



Teacher Idea 

white construction paper, 

colored markers , tagboard 

Teacher idea 

construction paper, water 
color paint , brayer , masking 
tape 



Parquetry Blocks 

j\mibo 

flat triangles & diamonds 
colored pictures 

inch cubes - flat pictures 
inch cubes - perspective pictures 
flat triangles & diamonds - 
only outline pictures 

Picture Sequence Cards 
outdoor activities 



Ideal School Supply 
Chicago, Illinois 



Developmental Learning Materials 

(DLM) 

DLM 

DLM 

DLM 



Speech and Language Materials 



Sequence Pictures 

old workbooks & comics 



Obtained by Teacher 



Letter Readiness 
worksheets 



Not Known 



High Intensity Light 



Tensor Corporation 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Perceptual-Motor Development 
Program, Level II 

inner detail discrimination 

form and shading 

hidden figure-geometric & contour 

mazes (plus transparency sheet & 
crayon) 



Teaching Resources 



809 



-3- 



ITEM fc DESCRIPTION 

Transparencies to Correct Reversals 
transparency-complete the figure 
transparency-visual tracking 

Lotto Game 
"ABC Lotto" 

lotto game for visual closure 

Magazine Pictures 



What ' s Funny Cards 

Matching Designs With Clothespins 



Imagine and Write - enlarged print 
(creative writing books) 

Educational Teaching Aides for 
Early Learning and Special Education 
cylinder blocks — two kinds 

(height changed, width changed) 

Ready? Go! 11 Disks 



Sponge Pieces 

sponge cylinders varying in 
width and height 

Number Rods 

Felt Squares and Stripes 

Perceptual-Motor Development Program 
Level II 

sheets with geometric forms of 

varying sizes 

Partial Pictures — Alphabet 
Visual Closure Exercise 



PRODUCER 

Teacher-made 

transparency paper, black marker 

overhead projector 

Teacher-TDade 

braille paper, colored markers, 

clear contact paper 

Teacher Idea 

pictures mounted on cardboard 

Speech and Language Materials 

Teacher Idea 

black construction paper, 

two kinds of clothespins 

Weekly Reader 



A. Daigger & Cox 
Chicago, Illinois 



Cantrell Industries 
Princeton, Wisconsin 

Foamade Industries 



Ideal School Supply 

Kelp 

Teaching Resources 

Speech and Language Materials, Inc. 

Teacher Idea 

white construction paper, 
many inch squares of colored 
construction paper 



810 



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•:■: Form Discrimination 

,„ Light-Dark Density b i ser iminatii'Ti 

*™ and (Position Dir.frimination ) 

¥:■;■:■: and (inner Detail rdscr iminat ion ) 

■•'■'Size Discrimination 

•:■: Size and Position Discrimination 

,.:... Position Discrimination 

;.:.>:.■.: and (Figure Detail Discrimination) 



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Detail Discrimination 
and (Position in Space Discrim- 
ination) 

Pattern Detail Di scrim: nrition 

......Position in Space Di 3,-rimiiiat i in 



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■■■■Spatial Perspective Discrimination 
:.;.;.:.,. and (Figure Detail Discrimination) 

Object Discrimination 
and (Hidden Figure Discr L:'iinati':n) 

Hidden Figure Discririinat i '. 

■■■•■■■■■ Figure Detail Discrimination 




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■■:■:• Symbol Position Dlscrimi na *:lon 

■■'■■Symbol Seq'.ier.ce ['user imin=-it inn 

■■■■■Configuration Di sit imi natic.-i 
«*anU (Visual Cloju-«) 



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811 



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•»•■•: and (Position Dis^Tiinination) 
»:w-and (Inner Detail I'lscrimi nation^. 



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.•.■.v. and (Position in Space Discrim- 
ination) 

■'■<■ Pattern Detail Disi-riminati-in 

...... Position in Space I'i;.;jr imiiiat ion 

■■■■'"Object Unification 
.•X-: and (Visual Closure) 



iv) ......V... 



•■•■•■ 00 



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•■"Spatial Perspective Discrimination 
,:.:.,,. and (Figure Detail Discrimination) 

■•■•■• Object Discrimination 

;wx: and (Hidden Figure Discrimination) 

"■■ Hidden Figui-e Disci-irTiinati ■. 

■■■■■•■ Figure Detail Discrimination 



y"-\ 



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■'■.tDi'-"'^ /'■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 



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rx?f ..^.'e 

LO\f ■•■■■•■■••■•-'•■•■■■■■■■■'• •■■■•■■■■■■■ 



■■••■■■■■Symbol Posit.ion Dio'-.'-im; n;i • i'/rj 

■•■■■■ Sym Do i liequenr'''.- I)i r;cr iir. i n-'i I'Ti 

■ Oonf iguratio.-i i/i ijci- iii.i nut iwn 
¥>:x and ( V i sua 1 C 1 o s u '■ 1; ) 

....... I nnej- Detail Discr iminat i^-^ti 

:.,:.v. and (Pattern Detail Discrimination] 



812 



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■:'^:-:-:';<-:-:-x-:-»*:-:-:-;-::-»:->:'X-:-:'-'"-v.^-^ 
S»S:Wft'RSftfiftC:KfWX-»»W')0«->Xv: 



':•:*;•;■:•:•:^■o:■:■:■>:■;^x«>:<•:^•^r•^^:■:<<<•xc•xox<<<<•:■x«*xc<■x•x•:v:-:■c■:■:•>^^^ := 



— ••{i:;>— - 



..Light-Dark Density Discr iminaticn 
■=•=■- and (Position Discrimination) 
iw^-: and (inner Detail Discrimination) 

''■'Size Discrimination 

« Size and Position Discrimination 

..... Position DisL-rimlnaticn 
;,(.:.:.:.:. and (Figure Detail Dis -riminaticn) 



\n> 



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'!*>X'ScWi'r':';W;'SA":'; ■:■:-:-:■;■:•:•:•: 



..,ro I 
■■■\o\J 



Detail Discrimination 
and (Position in Space Dis^-rim- 
i nation) 

■:■ Pattern Detail Di scriminition 

...... Position in Space 1.1 -.crimination 

■'■"Object Unification 
Kv; and ('Visual Closure) 



x^vX-x-x-x-x-r-x^x-:-:':-;-;-: 



■■■:■■.■■. K) 



■tl^>- 



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■■■'Spatial Perspective Discrimination 
:....:.,... and (Figure Detail Discrimination) 

• ■■ Ob.iect Di r.cr iiniiiaLion 

:¥::■: and (Hidden l-'iinire l) i l-;i- t- ; in i n.-i t i c 'n ) 



V^J- 



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4r- ■ 



Hidden i''iguro Ui i;cr iiiii ii'ii i. :i 
'■■■ i-'igure Detai L 



il r.'T uri 1 i: 






#: 



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.... j^ 

■■■ -(:-■ 



Symbol Position Di scrlmi na*, ion 

Symbol Sequence Discfin. inution 

Configurat icii Di s.-r i.-iiinat Ion 
■:<■ and (Visual Closui-e) 

.Innei Detail Discr iiiiinat. i..ni 

V. ar.d 'v fat tern Detai -i Discriininu". ■ 



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ro W'WMWK^ftW:::!;::;;:*:': OJ m-^x-x-x-r-x- 4r* ^•l-: 






;•: Form Discrimination 



,., Light-Dark Density Discrimination 
««*» 03 .•:'Mw;'^4'A;jMsws*W!Ws«wftw« and (Position Discrimination) 

»:i¥: and (Inner Detail Discrimination) 



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Size Discrimination 

I 

» Size and Position Discrimination 

.:«. Position Discrimination 
:.:.x.:and (FiguTe Detail Discrimination) 



y_p •X'X'X««X-X'X':.%X.W.;.v.v.v, 

00 



vi•>;■^;-«•x•x•>x«■x«•x•x•;■x•x•x•x•x•x-x■M■x.^x«.K«wwwx«x«c««•^x■^x■K■x■:•: 



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•X Detail Discrimination 
sff» and (Position in Space Discrim- 
ination) 

»•:• Pattern Detail Discrimination 

,....., Position in Space Discrimination 

*'■ Object Unification 
>:■:■: and (Visual Closure) 



. U) 



SSSftf^ SSiWi 



:.S¥.'5S«:sSft«*SftCSft:s*:*i 



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:W:::¥: ^ '■fffffffffiSf^'SfSiiimS^^i^WiWfffSffffl/ifim:- 



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:««.: S^ x«r.x.:..... ^ -.■...■.......-;-;...;.;.X';«w;.X.: 



x«S5SSSSSSSftK*;-x«x.x.x.x.x.x.x.x <-»! ^SftWftsirWsw 



■■••■■•Spatial Perspective Discrimination 
.......:.... and (Figure Detail Discrimination) 

•■••■•Object Discrimination 

:¥:w and (Hidden Figure Discrimination) 

" Hidden Figure Discrimination 

■•■■■■'Figure Detail Discrimination • 



^^-« 



•X^X'XtfSSSSSftWSrX'K'I'X^X'X^X^X'X^ 



•^•m«4:S5a-w«»»:*Ks-^>x.x««sMWS!ft^ 



00 tjo 

> 00 ''■^■•^' \0 •I'X'WX'.'^t.x 



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;.x.x.>WWfttf:XftSS;Wr:!WN«*X'X.x.x«.x.x.x«x*X'X.X'X.x.x.:.x.X'X/..X'X.X^: > 



■:■.■•:■ Symbol Position Discrimination 
■■■•■'Symbol Sequence Discrimination 



..X...X.X.X.X.X.X.X.X....................;.. ^ X'X*^.^ ••X.>»KiX'>W-X'K'!'W-v..... 

„ *- 4=-... 

.. j_i X.X.XWX ro •.■■x.x.x.xW:WS:X*y*SftX*x*K'K¥i*W?;S':?¥:¥: 



.-c-*^. 



.;...j... £" :¥s^as55SftXftc*x*{«x■^x^^•*x■x 



814 



■■■■■'Configuration Discrimination 
«¥;¥ and (Visual CloQure) 

.„.Klnner Detail Discrimination 

;.x<.x and (Pattern Detail Discrimination) 



Any More Ideas? 



This Workshop Coordinator Guide has been designed to provide unique 
and innovative ideas for conducting a workshop in "Methods & Materials 
for Improving Low Vision Skills." If you find a certain activity works 
well at your workshop we would appreciate receiving a description. This 
guide will be periodically updated to include these new ideas. Full credit 
will be given the designer. 



Name of the Activity: 



Objective of the Activity :_ 



Description of the Activity :_ 



Materials Needed: 



Name: 

Address: 



Date: 

815 



Any More Ideas? 



This Workshop Coordinator Guide has heen designed to provide unique 
and innovative ideas for conducting a workshop in "Methods & Materials 
for Improving Low Vision Skills." If you find a certain activity works 
well at your workshop we would appreciate receiving a description. This 
guide will be periodically updated to include these new ideas. Full credit 
will be given the designer. 



Name of the Activity: 



Objective of the Activity: 



Description of the Activity: 



Materials Needed: 



Name; 

Address: 



Date: 

816 



Any More Ideas? 



This Workshop Coordinator Guide has been designed to provide unique 
and innovative ideas for conducting a workshop in "Methods & Materials 
for Improving Low Vision Skills." If you find a certain activity works 
well at your workshop we would appreciate receiving a description. This 
guide will be periodically updated to include these new ideas. Full credit 
will be given the designer. 



Name of the Activity: 



Objective of the Activity: 



Description of the Activity :_ 



Materials Needed: 



Name; 



Address: 



Date : 

817 



Recorded Aid for Beginning Piano^ Vol. I: Descriptive Guide 



819 



^::i§^^!i^^fi^ff^^^^^^^i^^$^ipg^fi^^^^^^^^^^^^!^^^^ 



THE RECORDED AID FOR BEGINNING PIANO 

S. JOSEPH LEVINE 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 



KENNETH MEDEMA 
Essex County Hospital Center 
Cedar Grove, New Jersey 




VOLUME ONE 

Prepared for 
THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 
Washington, D.C. 

Produced by 
THE LEARNING SYSTEMS INSTITUTE 
Michigan State University 



1971 



>C-^^^^fe^^^^^^^^^:^^^^^^^:^^^^^^i^^^fe^^^X 



821 



RECORDED AID FOR BEGINNING PIANO 
Volume I 

LESSON I 

I. INTRODUCTION 

The basic tools for this course are a piano, well in tune, 
and a cassette player. No prior experience is necessary. At 
any time the student needs more time to work something out he 
may stop the tape. 

II. SEATING POSITION 



It is important that the student sit near the center of the 
keyboard. He can achieve this central position by measuring his 
distance from each end of the keyboard with his arms. Equally 
as important is good posture. 

III. EXPLORING THE KEYBOARD 

First the student is introduced to the two kinds of keys, 
the white flat keys and the raised black keys. 

Beginning at the extreme right end of the keyboard, the stu- 
dent is asked to find and play each group of black keys all the way 
down to the extreme left end of the keyboard. First he should use 
only his right hand. Then, he is instructed to count first the 
number of groups of three black keys and then the number of groucs 



822 



Lesson I, Vol . I 

-2- 



of two black keys. Take into account the one "extra" black key 
at the extreme left end of the keyboard. The same process of play- 
ing and counting is repeated with the left hand. This gives the 
student a good idea of how the black raised keys are organized in 
alternating groups of two and three and how many groups of each 
there are. (There are seven groups of two and seven groups of three.) 

Now the student is asked to play patterns of one, two and three 
notes on the middle group of black keys with the right hand. At 
this stage of learning the fingers used are referred to as index, 
middle, and the finger next to the pinky, or finger one, two and 
three respectively. (The traditional numbering of the fingers will 
be taken up in a subsequent lesson.) Various sequences of the three 
middle black keys are used; for example, the lowest note followed by 
the highest note; then the highest note followed by the lowest note, 
etc. The same patterns are used for the left hand on the group of 
three black keys just below the group used in the right hand. 

In conclusion, the student is introduced to the concept of high 
and low which has been indirectly referred to throughout the lesson. 
The highest notes are toward the extreme right end of the keyboard 
and the lowest notes are toward the extreme left end of the keyboard. 

IV. REVIEW 

Any parts of the lesson which seemed particularly difficult 
may be reinforced by running the tape back and repeating those parts. 



823 



LESSON II 



I. REVIEW 



A short review of the first lesson will refresh the student's 
memory of the basic organization of the white and black keys on the 
piano. This lesson will continue to use only the black keys. Re- 
locate the groups of three black keys u sed for the right abd left 
hands in the previous lesson and review the fingers which will be 
used on these keys. (Note that in the right hand the index finger 
is playing the lowest note of the group and in the left hand the in- 
dex finger is playing the highest note of the group.) This review 
emphasizes that when the same sequence of notes is played in each 
hand the fingers are going in opposite order. 

1 1 . THE "METRONOME" 

The "metronome" is the student's helper. It provides a steady 
clicking sound which helps to space evenly the notes the student is 
playing. In this part of the lesson it is used with various patterns 
of the three black keys on which the right and left hands are playing. 
(Four beat patterns can be created by using one of the black keys in 
a group twice. ) 




y i f ^ ^ ^ 



824 



Lesson II, Vol. I 



-4- 



III. THE "REST" 



By playing a pattern of four beats which contains only three 
notes the student is introduced to the idea of a pause, or a space, 
or a "rest." Again, these examples are played with the metronome 
so that no note is played on the 4th click of each pattern. 

-H 1 




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^^^^^m^ 



At this point, the student is asked to make up patterns of 
three and four beats with both hands as the metronome continues on 
the tape. 



825 



LESSON III 

I. PLAYING A MELODY WITH AN "ACCOMPANIMENT " 

In this lesson the student is introduced to a pattern of notes 
which is to be played with a melody but in the background. This 
pattern is called an "accompaniment." 

At first, the student is asked to play only a three note melody 
with his right hand, on the three black keys it has been using. 
The accompaniment is provided on the tape. The same process is re- 
peated with the left hand on the three black keys it use; (three 
groups up from the left end of the keyboard). Then, the student is 
given a chance to invent his own melodies in both hands as the accom- 
paniment continues on the tape. For now, he should invent only three 
note melodies. 



jJl 



^f^rt 



Stumn 




Following that creative exercise a new accompanii^ert is orovided 
on the tape. This one is to be used with four note melodies. First, 
the student is asked to play given melodies with his right and left 
hands, the accompaniment being provided on the tape. 



826 



Lesson III, Vol. I 



fAPf 



StupcmT 




Again he is given a chance to invent his own four note melodies 
in both hands. 

II. BEING CREATIVE WITH MELODIES 

By combining various two, three and four note patterns different 
melodies can be invented. Several examples are given on the tape. 
The student should try to identify the ordering of the three black 
keys as he hears them. 

There are several techniques of varying melodies. One is to 
use rests. Another is to lengthen certain notes. (Up to now, one 
note or one rest has always corresponded to one beat. Now a note 
may be held for more than one oeat.) Still another method is to 
repeat some of the notes in the melody. Again, the student is given 
a new accompaniment as background while he creates melodies with both 
hands. 






%11 



Lesson III , Vol . I 



-7- 



[. REVIEW 

In this lesson the student should concern himself only with 
playing the melodies while he listens to the accompaniment. Three 
kinds of melodies have been introduced up to now; melodies in three 
note patterns, melodies in four note patterns, and creative melodies. 



828 



LESSON IV 

I. TWO NEW WHITE KEYS FOR THE RIGHT HAND 

In this lesson the student is introduced to the two white 
keys on either side of the group of black keys he has been working 
with. These keys are to be played with the thumb and the pinky. 
First, he is asked to work with just the right hand, playing various 
:attems using the three black keys and only one of the new white 
«e.s--the lower one. 



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Then, he can add the upper white note and play patterns using 
tie pinky on the top white note. 



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Then, he can try some patterns mixing up all five notes. 
Several examples are given on the tape. 




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:ttit 



829 



Lesson IV, Vol. I 

-9- 

By this time, the student should have a good familiarity with 
the five notes which make up the new group. Now he is using all 
five fingers in his right hand. 

By putting short patterns together he can make longer patterns 
and finally a complete melody. The short patterns are: 




^l^^S 



First he is asked to try them separately; then, altogether 
without stopping. There are twelve notes in all, four groups of 
three. Finally, he is asked to try shuffling them around so that 
tyey come out in the following order: First, pattern one, then 
pattern three, then two, and finally four. The melody is recogniz- 
able as "America;" but it is missing two measures. See if the 
student can find them by himself. Let them be pattern five. 




II. TWO NEW WHITE KEYS FOR THE LEF HAND 

The same process that was used for the right hand is repeated 
for the left hand, emphasizing that in this hand opposite fingers 
are playing the two new white keys. Whereas, the pinky played the 
upper white note in the right hand, in the left hand it plays the lower 
white note. The thumb played the lower white note in the right hand; 
it plays the upper white note in the left hand. 



830 



Lesson IV, Vol. 1 



-10- 



III. REVIEW 



When the student has learned America with both hands, he 
should go back and try to play it first with one hand and then 
the other. 



831 



LESSON V 
I. REVIEW 



The lesson begins with a practice session for the student. 
He can review the previous lesson by practicing the five note 
patterns he learned using all five fingers in each hand. 

L.H. 



^^^^^j^^^M^^^m 



While one hand plays, the other hand should stay in position 
over its notes. Then, starting with the right hand, he can try 
going directly from one hand to the other without stopping. Finally, 
in this review section he is asked to play the patterns, hands 
together; first from the thumbs to the pinkies, then from the 
pinkies to the thumbs. 




^^^^^^^ ^^^':^ ^^ 



thiMib 



f'-*; 






PLAYING A TUNE WITH BOTH HANDS GOING IN OPPOSITE DIRECTIONS 

Like "America" this new melody is made up of smaller patterns. 
The patterns are: 




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832 



Lesson V, Vol. I 



-12- 



The student 1s instructed to put these three together and then 
to try a fourth pattern. 




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hand. 



Now he can put them all together and add a last note in each 



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The student should be aware that in this melody the same fingers 
are always playing together in each hand but the hands are always going 
in opposite directions. The whole melody looks like this. 




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This is a good place to review. If necessary have the student 
go back and practice the hard spots. He can practice doing this 
"opposite" exercise, as well as playing the new melody. 



833 



Lesson V Vol. 



-13- 



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[ I . PLAYING "PARALLEL " 

Up to now, the hands have always been going in opposite 
directions. Now the student is asked to play some exercises in 
which the hands go in the same direction at the same time. 



ib^^^^^ ^ fept qJ ^J J jj ^ 



L^":#z^^ ^^¥ ^ 



This time the thumb in the right hand starts with the pinky 
in the left hand. (This is contrasted with the "opposite" exercise 
in which the thumbs start together.) "America" is used as the 
"parallel" melody first. The student should review it in each hand 
separately and then put them together. In putting the hands together 
the student should be aware that each hand uses different fingers 
for the same note of the melody. (Make sure that the notes go down 
together in both hands.) 



IV. REVIEW 



At the end of this lesson the student should go back and practice 
the opposite and parallel melodies. 



834 



LESSON VI 

I. MORE NEW WHITE KEYS FOR THE RIGHT HAND 

In this lesson the student will be learning three new white keys 
for the right hand. These will first be heard in a five note pattern 
similar to the pattern heard in the last lesson. First the student 
is asked to listen to the old pattern and the new pattern to try to 
hear the difference in the two. Then he can set out to learn each 
new note separately. The new five note pattern is: 




The new white keys are circled. The student is asked to play 
just the highest note in the new pattern with his pinky; the other 
fingers should continue to play the notes in the old pattern. He 
will have to stretch his pinky to get the new note. 



i ry-j p / 



^ 




Then, one at a time, he can add the new keys for the index finger 
and for the middle finger. Note that the only finger left on a black 
key is the finger next to the pinky--the third finger. Now, the stu- 
dent is asked to play the whole pattern. 

At this point, the student can play some games with the new 
white keys so that he will learn them more thoroughly. These exer- 
cises are short and simple. The student is asked: 



835 



Lesson VI, Vol. I 

-15- 



1. To play the new pattern excepting the new white key 

for the index finger. That finger should be back on its 
old black key. 

2. To play the new pattern with the middle finger on its 
old black key. 

3. To play the old pattern. 

4. To play the old pattern with only the pinky on its new 
white key. 

5. To play the new pattern. 

II. MORE NEW WHITE KEYS IN THE LEFT HAND 

The same process that was used for the right hand is repeated 
for the left hand only this time the first new white key is the one 
to be played with the thumb. The second new white key is the one to 
be played with the third finger, and the last new white key is to be 
played with the middle finger. (The third finger is the finger next 
to the pinky. ) 

In the last part of this section the student is asked to listen 
to a pattern using various continations of all the notes learned so 
far. He should try to identify which notes are used in the pattern 
each time it is played. 

III. A NEW EXERCISE IN PARALLEL MOTION 

Before being introduced to the new exercise the student is asked 
to play the old pattern with both hands in parallel motion three times 
up and down; the top note is not repeated. Then he is asked to play 
the new pattern the same way. Now that he has both patterns fresh 
in his memory he can go on to the new exercise. The new exercise 



836 



Lesson VI, Vol. I 



-16- 



uses both patterns alternating from one to the other beginning 

'I 



with the old pattern. 







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Then three more ways of using the old and new patterns are in- 
troduced. First, up and down with only the middle finger on the 
old black key. (Remember that in both the old and new patterns, the 
thumb and third finger are always on the same key.) Second, up 
and down with only the first finger on the old black key. Third, 
up and down with only the pinky on the old white key. Finally, the 
student is asked to play four times up and down beginning with the 
old pattern and each successive time changing to one of the new white 
keys until the new pattern is being played. 



837 



The RECORDED AID FOR BEGINNING PIANO is 
designed as a self-instructional set of ma- 
terials for a blind individual to develop 
beginning competencies with the piano. No 
prior knowledge of the piano or music is 
needed by the student to utilize the mater- 
ials. A set of five volumes make up the en- 
tire set. Each volume contains a series of 
six recorded lessons, an introductory tape 
and a review tape. The first three voliames 
require no braille reading on the part of 
the student. The fourth volume introduces 
braille music notation and the fifth volume 
presents a set of original compositions for 
the student. These later two volumes in- 
clude the braille notation along with the 
recordings. 

A Teacher Guide accompanies each volume. 
The Guide provides a teacher with a lesson- 
by-lesson overview of the material that is 
covered. It is not necessary for the teacher 
to know braille music notation to assist the 
student with the material. It is important 
to note that a teacher is NOT necessary for 
the effective use of the RECORDED AID FOR 
BEGINNING PIANO. 



During the preparation of the RECORDED 
AID FOR BEGINNING PIANO, the authors received 
extensive help from two outstanding musicians 
whose names should not go unmentioned. Mr. 
Andrew Froelich (Music Dept. , North Dakota 
State University) and Mr. Stephen Tarpley 
(School of Music, Michigan State University) 
both contributed greatly to the development 
and recording of the materials. Also, the 
assistance of the entire staff of the Region- 
al Instructional Materials Center for Handi- 
capped Children and Youth at Michigan State 
University is genuinely appreciated. 



838 



Resources for Effective Teaching: Descriptive Booklet and 
Evaluations of Some Workshops 



I 



839 




RESOURCES 
FOR 

EFFECTIVE 
TEACHING 




SPECIAL STUDY INSTITUTE 
' July14-18,1971 



CURRICULUM 

RESOURCE 

CONSULTANT 




vi/l 






841 




Twenty-nine persons came to East Lansing June 14-18, 
1971, to participate in a Special Study Institute, 
Resources for Effective Teaching. The objective was 
to train Curriculum Resource Consultants (CRCs) for 
the State of Michigan. Sponsored by the Michigan State 
Department of Education, Division of Special Education, 
and the Bureau of Education for tne Handicapped (USOE) , 
the Institute brougiit together already appointed or 
potential CRCs to uevelop initial competencies in their 
new roles. 

Tiie planning and structure of the Institute was based 
on the assumptions that. . . 

1. The CRC serves educational needs of other teachers; 

2. The CRC conducts workshops; 

3. The CRC carries on consultations with small groups 
and individuals related to the effectiveness of 
the teacher ; 

4. The CRC maintains channels for receiving and 
relaying new and timely materials about the im- 
provement of instruction; 

5. The CRC serves as a link among three agencies — 
the local school districts, the State Department 
of Education and teacher education institutions; 



842 



6. The CRC is involved in the use of prepared instruc- 
tional experiences for teachers; 

7. The CRC designs specially-created experiences to 
meet specific local needs ; 

Based on their experience in the Institute, the CRCs 
are now prepared to carry out these objectives. 



The Institute program was designed in workshop 
sequences which would. . . 

1. Develop teacher- training coitpetencies in CRCs; 

2. Provide CRCs with actual kits of training materials; 

3. Provide the opportunity for the CRCs to develop 
kits for their own particular needs; and 

4. Share their concerns with other members of the 
group . 



WHO ARE THE CRCs? 

Institute participants were chosen in accordance with 
the Division of Special Education proposal for CRCs 
and state instructional materials centers. 

The Division of Special Education expects to 
endorse the establishment of local, intermediate 
or regional instructional materials centers for 
special education. These centers may be developed 
in conjunction with existing Title II centers or 
other instructional materials centers already 
established. Monies for such centers may be pro- 
vided by the sponsoring district. 

In addition, the Division of Special Education 
expects to endorse the hiring of a reimbursable 
person to provide services to the special educa- 
tion staff through the center, in regard to: 



843 



i . In-servi ce 
Materials 
Curriculum 

2. Selection of materials 

3. Direct consultation on children' s or 
program needs. 



The Curriculum Resource Consultant would be 
well versed in all areas of special education. . . 
as well as having a knowledgeable background in 
curriculum for special education and materials in 
special education. He would be hired as a 
Curriculum Resource Consultant for 100 percent of 
his time, having no classroom assignment. He 
might work in conjunction with an existing instruc- 
tional materials center director or might in the 
future, hold this role. He would be fully cer- 
tified in at least one area of special education, 
hold a valid Michigan teaching certificate, and 
have taught special education successfully for 
three years in Michigan. The Curriculum Resource 
Consultants would also submit a letter of recom- 
mendation for their immediate superior and /or 
superintendent. 



Such a person would be qualified , with Department 
approval, for reimbursement under the clause of 
"other professional personnel." Intermediate and 
first class or second class districts would be 
the districts. . .reimbursed for this position. 



Workshop co-directors, Ted Ward and S. Joseph Levine 
of Michigan State University, used the above guidelines 
when they designed kits to be used by the workshop 
participants. The sessions were planned to promote 
participation in game-like experiences. Says Dr. Ward: 



In general, when experiences capitalize on the 
motivations of enjoying a participatory exper- 
ience — where there's some sense of winning, some 



844 



sense of collaboration with a group of pegple 
working together for a common good — we enjoy it 
more ttian if we are simply brought together to be 
lectured at. 




^ 



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^^^^^< 



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\ 



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"**«*■ 




THE KITS FOR THE INSTITUTE 

Eight basic in-service education kits for the Curriculum 
Resource Consultants were prepared for the Institute. 
Each participant was assigned a number which he kept 
throughout the week. The group was then subdivided 
according to numbers. Each small group then worked 
together on the eight kits. Members of groups changed 
each time a new kit was introduced. The positions of 
leader, co- leader and evaluator were assigned in 
advance. Therefore, when all the kits had been used, 
each person had taken a leadership role at least once. 

Some kits contained tape cassettes with instructions 
for the kit's use. 



845 



The following eight kits were used by the participants: 

1. Designing an Instructional Game 

2. Defining Objectives for the Teaching of Concepts 

3. Designing Criterion Measures 

4. Learners' Approaches to Learning 

5. Goals for Education 

6. Designing Objectives-Oriented Instruction 

7. Focus on Feedback. 

8. Building a Perceptual-Motor Experience 

The participants became thoroughly versed in the 
employment of these kits and are now prepared to 
offer their services using these kits in workshops 
with teachers in their districts. 



In addition to the eight basic kits, the Institute 
participants were able to experience three other kits : 

9. The Evaluation Game 

10. Ad Agency (a language usage game) 

11. What's the Sentence? (language usage) 

The final test of what they had learned in the course 
of the workshop was the development of Workshop Kit 12. 
The participants were given instructions for designing 
their own kits. The specification and plan sheet read: 

In partnership with two or three of your asso- 
ciates, you are to design and prepare a training 
kit for in-service education of teachers. 

It might deal with the use of an instructional 
material, a teaching procedure , or a skill in 
planning and evaluating instruction. To stimulate 
your thinking , the first meeting will be held in 
the USOE/MSU Regional Instructional Materials 



846 



Center where you can look over many new instruc- 
tional resources and select one or more to use as 
the focus of your training kit. 

Remember these constraints and suggestions : 

1. 30-minute time allocation for teaching the 
unit; 

2. Specify your objective (s) clearly; 

3. Don't attempt to teach too much at once; 

4. Make the experience active; 

5. Plan and carry out an evaluation of the 
teaching effectiveness of the experience you 
design; and 



84 7 



6. The finished kit should be written up well 
enough that others could use it. 

The group was to present its original kits. 

Two other design teams (combined) will constitute 
your "learner group," so be prepared to teach your 
kit to six or seven people at that time. Be sure 
you have adequate materials planned. 



HELPING TEACHERS IMPROVE INSTRUCTIONAL 
EXPERIENCES FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN 

Throughout the five-day Institute, three words were 
stressed — commiani cation, dissemination and adoption. 
These were key concepts for potential CRCs to employ 
in their activities with teachers. 




848 



COMMUNICATION— Know! ngr About 

For in-service education this would mean: 

telling/hearing 

showing/seeing 

writing/reading 

DISSEMINATION — Experience With 

For in-service education this would mean: 

doing 
trying 
gaining skills 

ADOPTION — Identification With and Predictable Use Of 

For in-service education this would mean accepting 
through : 

reduced anxiety 

stimulus- response-reward 

redesign of the teacher's own system. 

The CRC must acconplish all three in order to be 
effective in his relationship with teachers. His 
workshop and in-service sessions, as well as his per- 
sonal contacts with special education personnel will 
draw upon his knowledge of these concepts. 

The kits from the Institute will help him implement 
these ideas. The CRC knows (through his own partici- 
pation in the use of the kits ) the iirportance of having 
teachers take active, rather than passive, roles in 
any workshop he holds in the future. 



INSTITUTE EVALUATION 

An evaluation questionnaire at the conclusion of the 
Institute indicated only 12 participants had had 
either a considerable or moderate amount of experience 
in in-service training procedures prior to the 
Institute. After the Institute, 19 felt they knew a 
considerable amount and 10a moderate amount. 



849 



Of the 15 who had previously conducted workshops, 
14 felt the Institute assisted in clarifying workshop 
procedures. And all participants indicated they would 
be comfortable in offering in-service training in 
their own districts. 

In general comments about the Institute various 
participants wrote: 

This is, no doubt, the busiest workshop I ever 
attended , but probably the most productive. I 
felt the materials presented were pertinent and 
will be useful in the coining year. 

One of the most valuable contributions of this 
workshop has been the clearer definition of the 
roles a leader assumes. Also, awareness of roles 
and of some basic interaction processes that occur 
within the group setting has been most valuable. 



I feel that I can utilize the basic kit, but 
revise it for better use with other teachers. 

I'm new to this area — shy, withdrawn. I feel I 
gained experience, practice in the mechanics of 
the techniques and an opportunity to compare my 
personality and skills with others who will do or 
have done this kind of activity . I feel comfort- 
able now in making a start in my school district. 

I thought this was an extremely valuable and 
practical workshop — J appreciated the structure 
and feel I am going home with a great deal more 
ability to lead inservice and that's what I came 
fori 

The idea of using a tape to brief us on the 
Institute in advance was clever. It made me more 
aware of the many uses of the tape recorder. The 
kits were well written — it was easy for the leaders 
to follow the intended purpose. 

The most important aspect of the Institute is that 
we now have some knowledge of the development of 
workshop kits and we have specific kits with which 
to conduct in-service training. 



850 



In the fall of 1971, a one-day follow-up session will 
be held in which the Ciirriculum Resource Consultants 
will discuss problems they may be encountering and 
share ideas with each other. Then, the State of 
Michigan's CFJCs will be on the job again, helping 
special education teachers meet the needs of their 
handicapped students with new ideas, materials and 
workshops . 




851 



For additional information about the role of the 
Curriculum Resource Consultant contact: 

Mrs. E. W. Walline 

Michigan Department of Education 

P.O. Box 420 

Lansing, Michigan 

Phone: 373-092 3 



INSTITUTE STAFF 

Co-directors 

Dr. Ted Ward 
S. Joseph Levine 
Michigan State University 
East Lansing, Michigan 

Presenters 



Mrs. Nancy Carlson 
Miss Sue Ann Yovanovich 
USOE/MSU Instructional Materials 

Center for Handicapped Children 

& Youth 
East Lansing, Michigan 



Consultant 

Mrs. E.W. Walline 
Michigan Department of Education 
Special Education Division 
Lansing, Michigan 



852 



INSTITUTE PARTICIPANTS 






Mr. 


Russel L. Andreotti 


Mrs 


Ruth McGregor 


Mrs. 


Blanche G. Benwire 


Mr. 


Roy A. Montroy 


Mrs. 


Evelyn L. Burde 


Mr. 


Fred W. Parker 


Mr. 


Charles Crowley 


Mrs 


Florence E. Patrick 


Mrs. 


Mary Lou Durbin 


Mrs 


Geneva Reid 


Mrs. 


Beverley J. Farr 


Mrs 


Mary Ann Sund 


Mrs. 


Janet Fortenbacher 


Mrs 


Peggy S. Tenney 


Mrs. 


Margaret C. Goldthorpe 


Mr. 


James M. Van Tassel 


Mrs. 


Olive Hansen 


Mrs 


Patricia Vivio 


Mrs. 


Eleanor D. Haroldson 


Mrs 


Gail Wiemer 


Mr. 


Robert Hemming 


Mr. 


Lyle Williams 


Mr. 


William S. Jones 


Mr. 


Larry C. Wilson 


Mrs. 


Linda L. Kalin 


Mrs 


Elizabeth Wing 


Mr. 


Norman R. MacDonald 


Mr. 


John Peter Zsolczai 


Mrs. 


Lois Marcy 







853 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCIIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



EVALUATION 

Curriculum Resource Consultant 
Summer Institute 19^1 

Follow-up Meeting October 29, 1971 



Participants in the 1971 Curriculum Resource Consultant Summer Institute 
were asked to respond to questions prepared by the Michigan State University 
Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Cliildren and Youth. The 
responses were tabulated during a follow-up workshop held at the MSU Union 
Building on October 29. The information contained in this report then, was 
based on approximately eight weeks of work in the jobs these people presently 
are holding. Of the 30 participants in the Summer Institute, a total of 21 
responses were received. 

Summarized information is as follows: 

1. 15 of 21 persons had conducted one or more in-service training 
programs. A total of 3_1_ in-service training programs were 
conducted bv 'hese 15 persons since attending the summer 
institute . 

These 31 in-service training programs were 
attended by approximately 885 people. The 
breakdown is as follows: 

Special Education teachers: 461 

Regular teachers: 241 

Parents: 57 

Para-professionals: 76 

University students: 35 

Student teachers: 12 

Administrators: 3 



2. 2C of 21 had discussed with their administrators how they might 
function in the area of in-service training in their district 
or area. 



854 



* M«mt>»r ->p«(iAl iduf Al'On Srtwotk — DulUJU »t Idut JIhi 



)hr il.tn^ln jpppd 



-2- 



In response to the question: "Which kits do you feel will work 
the best?", five persons did not respond; therefore, the following 
rank order is based on responses from 16 persons. The number of 
responses and the percentage of responses relating to any one 
kit are given also. Each of these kits is .i self-contained 
teacher-training workshop kit. 

1. Kit #1: Designing An Instructional Game 

(10 responses = 20.4%) 

2. Kit #5: Goals For Education (8 responses = 16.37o) 

3. Kit #2: Defining Objectives For The Teaching Of 

Concepts (7 responses = 14.3°/,,) 

4. Kit #6: Designing Objectives-Oriented Instruction 

(6 responses = 12.27o) 

Kit #8: Building a Perceptual-Motor Experience 
(6 responses = 12.27„) 

5. Kit #7: Focus on Feedback (5 responses = 10.27o) 

6. Kit #4: Learners Approaches to Learning 

(4 responses = 8.27.,) 

7. Kit #3: Designing Criterion Measures 

(3 responses = 6.127,,) 

The participants were presented with a total of eight different 
kits and all of these were selected at some level of "working 
best." Since no single kit received a great percentage of the 
responses, it is assumed that the selection of the kits met the 
different needs of the participants. 

Nineteen persons answered the questions about their present 
employment: 

3 indicated they are currently employed as a CRC. 

5 indicated they are NOT currently employed as a CRC, 
(2 expect to be, and 3"would like" to be). 

8 indicated they did not plan on becoming a CRC, but do 
expect to conduct at least 3 in-service training programs 
each year . 

1 Indicated no plans for becoming involved In conducting 
in-service training programs. 

2 indicated by question marks that they were not sure where 
th^ catagorically "fit." 



855 



-3- 



Tn discussipj c)ie three most VALI'AHl.l". aspects of the institute, 
the comments liave been broken cU^wn lato foiir ^lentral areas: 
par t i c i p.T t ive experiences; delivery system: aftective components; 
f ol low-up . 

A. 'Hie one valuable aspect mentio-ied most often (i.e., 
21 limes by those responding) related to 'now Miose 
attending the institute viewed tuemselves as 
par t ic ipants . Tlieir comments pertained 1 15 on-ijuing 
daily active involvement dnriny: the institute; the chance 
to ind ividually plan and presen t a kit; and the 
ut i 1 i za t ion of workshop techniques. 

Closelv associated were positive comments pertaining 
to feedback sessions, including discussions both on 
the group experience itself and on individual presen- 
tations. (Four comments related to this.) 



ITie aspect mentioned second most often was how those 
responding viewed the delivery sys tem including organi- 
zation and ins titute s taf f . Nine comments appreciated 
the availability of the kits themselves and an additional 
six comments highlighted the effective aspects of the 
Institute itself (i.e. planning and prep.Tratlon , pacing , 
ach ievement of goals , and leadersh ip techniques .) 



C. The third valuable aspect centered around affect ive 
components : Participants felt tliat it was valuable 
to meet others wi th 3 imi lar concerns , to have had 
experiences that assisted in bu i Id ing self-confidence 
and to be motivated in what they were doing. 



The last statement: "I would like to see the following areas of 
focus for another summer institute", was handled primarilv during 
a discussion period at the follow-up meeting. 



On the reaction form, six of the respondents had indicated that they would 
like to see more kits developed as one area of focus. The majority of the 
remaining suggestions for areas of focus pertained to content areas (such as 
junior-senior high, behavior modification, etc.). The institute staff did an on- 
the-spot tabulation of these suggestions and grouped them. (As listed on the 
following page.) Tt\e participants were then asked to vote for the three topic 
areas of most concern for which they would like to see kits developed. 



856 



-4- 



AEIEA OF CONCERN NUMBER OF VOTES 

1. Identification and remediation o£ 15 

specific learning disabilities 

2. Classroom and pupil -- group 14 

management and dynamics 

3. Models for organization of individualized 11 

instruction 

4. Procedures for the "regular" classroom 10 

teacher of a handicapped child 

5. Motivation techniques 6 

6. Problems in teaching reading 2 

7. Problems related to Junior-Senior High 

--academic discrepancies 0* 

--behavioral discrepancies 3 



*A1 though mentioned as an area of concern on the reaction form, this 
area received no votes, therefore, could be considered low priority. 



Nine of the respondents mentioned in various ways ttiat they would like 
to see the focus on specific group management techniques, with participants 
becoming more skilled in various strategies of leadership techniques. 
(Suggested strategies; sensitivity training, soft and hard sell approaches, 
group dynamics, Taba strategies, changing attitudes, motivational methods). 
During the discussion period, it appeared that most participants agreed this 
should be another focus. 



Two persons mentioned that more discussion time during an institute would 
be helpful--especially if there were fewer kits. 

A few comments relating to "more kit 12" (the kit the participants them- 
selves designed , produced , presented and evaluated) were felt to indicate a 
desire for more practice. 



857 



-5- 



The discussion period brought torth the suggestion thai it would be 
helpful to have training in techniques of how to ad.ipt niterials and strategies 
for all types of handicapped ctiildren in special and regular classrooms. It 
was felt that such expertise might then be shared with t^>>- classroom teacher 
of the handicapped child. 



NAC:rh 



858 



REACTION FORM 



1) Have you conducted an in-service training program since the 
suttmer Institute? 

Yes No 



If yes, how many? (Circle) 12 3 4 5 



2) Have you discussed with your adminis tra tor (s) the part vou might 
play in in-service training for special education teachers in 
your district or area? 

Yes No 



3) Which kits do you feel will work tlie best? 

1, 

2. 

3. 

4) Please check the most appropriate blanks . 

I am currently employed as a CRC. 

I am NOT currently employed as a CRC, but expect 

to be in the near future. 
I do not play on becoming a CRC, but expect to 

conduct at least 3 in-service training programs 

each year. 
I do not plan on becoming involved with conducting 

in-service training programs. 

5) The three most valuable aspects of the summer Institute were: 

1. 
2. 
3. 

6) I would like to see the following areas of focus for another 
surmer Institute: 

1. 

2. 

3. 859 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
^ CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



( uoperjtfinj; \% Ih bla'e Orpd'IfTienls nl lduidi< 



LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
Evaluation Study #1 

S. Joseph Levine 
Sue Ann Yovanovich 



SUMMARY 



All participants at the Leadership Workshop were asked 
at the beginning of the workshop to "contract" a series of 
activities that they would accomplish during the two days. 
(See Appendix A) . A copy of this contract was collected by the 
workshop staff and a copy was retained by the participant. 

At the conclusion of the workshop, the participants 
were asked to examine the list of activities and rate each 
one according to the degree to which it was accomplished. 
(See Appendix B) . They were asked not to consult their earlier 
contract, nor limit their rating to only those activities 
contracted . 



PURPOSE 

This contracting/rating activity had a three-fold 
purpose. First, it was designed to promote involvement of 
participants toward the accomplishment of individual (yet 
staff - selected) objectives. Secondly, it was designed to shed 
light on the notion that those "learners" who contract for an 
objective will have a higher probability of attaining that 
objective than those who did not contract. Finally, it was 
designed as a procedural model that could be demonstrated to 
the participants in a "doing" manner. (All participants were 
involved with teacher training and were in fact looking for 
ideas that would be usable in their own setting.) 



RESULTS 

1) It is questionable whether this procedure created a 
very large amount of participant involvement in the 
attainment of individual obj ectives . This is due 
primarily to the tight scheduling of the two day session 
and the lack of appropriate "work times" where 
participants might be able to pursue their own objectives 

860 




M*mbp' — SpKial tducilKi" p-fvUSTiVJ Nelwo»li — Bu'mu dI fducilion (or ihr H^niJirappfd- L "> DM .if .•! (dutrfl'ijn -An Iqu^l DiK^O'iui 



2) The results of the comparative study (those that 
contracted an item versus those that did not contract 
that item) indicate that allowing participant s to 
contract objectives enhances their attaiyvnent of 
those objectives . Of the 21 objectives, 15 show 
definite differences between groups in favor of those 
that contracted (#1, #3, #4, #6, #", #8, #11, #12, 
#13, #15, #16, #17, #18, #20, #21); 2 show definite 
differences between groups in favor of those that did 
not contract (#10, #14); and 4 show no real differences 
between groups (#2, #5, #9, #19). 

3) The use of this procedure as a part of the workshop 

was an effective manner in " suggest in^," tc participants 
that they utilize a similar procedure in their own 
workshops . This was evaluated on the basis of the 
large number of requests for an "extra copy" of the 
rating sheet by individual participants. Most all 
participants requesting the extra copy volunteered that 
they wanted to use this procedure. 



DATA 

The following is the data collected as a result of this 
study. The 21 objectives are listed in the left column. To 
the right of each objective are percentages of those that 
contracted the item (A) for each level of fulfillment, and fB) 
percentages of those that did not contract the item for each 
level of fulfillment. 

Example: For objective #1, 33.3% of those that 
contracted that objective fulfilled it 
at the 100% level; 16.7% fulfilled it 
at the 801 level; etc. For the same 
objective, l.h% of those that did not 
contract that objective fulfilled it 
at the 100^ level; ll4.8^ fulfilled it 
at the 80^ level, etc. 



n = 39 

#1- I will sketch out the 

planning steps that will 
be needed for my next 
workshop . 

#2- I will discuss with two 
other participants how 
to plan a workshop. 

#3- I will write a set of 
objectives for my next 
workshop . 



A 

B 



100% 



33, 

T 



LEVEL OF FU 

8 0% 



16, 

li4 



.FILLMFNT 
50% 

33.3 

1I4.8 



Not 
Attempted 

16.7 
59.3 



A 


78.3 


21.7 


0.0 


0.0 


B 


68.8 


12.5 


6.3 


6.3 


A 


0.0 


20.0 


40.0 


40.0 


B 


8.8 


0.0 


11.8 


73.5 



861 



#4- I will check off the 

objectives on Handout M 
as they are met. 

#5- I will clarify my use "f 
objectives in plannini: ;i 
workshop . 

ttb- I will sketch out my 
concerns for my next 
workshop . 

#7- I will briefly list some 
procedures for assessing 
the needs of teachers in 
my area. 

#8- I will take notes on two 
procedures used at this 
workshop and how they 
can be modified to 
better suit mv needs. 





100% 


8 0% 


50% 


Not 
Attempted 


A 

3 


21.4 
12.0 


4 2.9 
0.0 


1 4 . 3 


21 .4 
5 ^:' . 


A 

B 


25.0 


3 0.0 

:q .f 


16.7 

. t'. 


0.0 


A 

B 


28.6 

8.0 


21.4 
- ' . . 


7.1 
16.0 


42.9 
56.0 


A 

B 


26.3 

10.0 


2] .1 

5.0 


26.3 

"1 '■"' . 


26.5 

7 f"' . 1 ■ 



A 


91.3 


4.3 


4.3 


0.0 


B 


68.8 


6.3 


16. B 


6.3 



#9- I will learn the meaning 
of "the medium is the 
message . " 

#10- I will list five aspects 
of workshop leadership 
that are the same as 
teaching. 

#11- I will list three of my 

leadership behaviors that 
need improving. 

#12- I will list tliree workshop 
leadership behaviors tliat 
I would like to begin 
using . 

#13- I will get to know three 
other participants whom I 
have not previously known. 

#14- 1 will list five ideas 

related to workshops that 
1 gleaned from other 
part ic ipants . 

#15- I will critically examine 
two training kits devel- 
oped by the' USOh/MSU 
RIMC-HCY. 



A 


70.8 


12.5 


12.5 


4.2 


B 


1+6.7 


;'0.o 


13.:-^ 


13.3 


A 


35.5 


. 


11 . J 


S5.6 


B 


26.- 


10. 


Ib.Y 


h?.. 1 



A 


45.5 


13, 


.6 


15.6 


2 "" 


T 


B 


0.0 


5. 


.9 


29. h 


53, 


^:) 


A 


45.5 


30, 


.4 


8.7 


17. 


■1 


B 


12.5 


25 


.0 


■.2.5 


u:^. 





A 


100.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


B 


86.9 


11 .1 


. 


0.0 


A 


30.8 


50.8 


7,7 


30.8 


B 


26.9 


23.1 


30.'^ 


19.2 



A 


92.6 


7.4 


0.0 


0.0 


B 


83.3 


8.3 


0.0 


8.3 



862 



#16- I will suggest in writing 
two topics for training 
kits I would like to see 
developed. 

#17- I will take notes on my 
reactions to different 
leadership styles used 
during the workshop. 

#18- I will be perceptive to 
the other participants 
and their reactions 
during the workshop. 

#19- I will list five areas 

that should be evaluated 
at a workshop. 

#20- I will outline a pro- 
cedure for assessing 
individual participant 
learning . 

#21- I will list two different 
types of participant 
assessment measures. 











Not 




100°6 


8 0^0 


50*» 


Attempted 


A 


12.5 


b.7, 


12.5 


68.8 


B 


0.0 


U.3 


1 i.O 


7 ? . 9 



A 


52.2 


54.8 


8.7 


4.3 


B 


31.3 


l8.8 


12.5 


37.5 



A 


83.3 


lb. 7 


0.0 


U.O 


B 


66.7 


2 0.0 


13.3 


0.0 



A 


18.2 


18.2 


9.1 


54.5 


B 


3.6 


7 .1 


25.0 


57.1 


A 


14.3 


28.6 


0.0 


42.9 


B 


3.1 


6.3 


9.** 


78.1 



A 
B 



23.1 
T.T 



7.7 
7.7 



15.3 

11 .5 



53.8 
69.2 



April, 1972 



863 



Leadership Workshop Handout #5 

LEARNING CONTRACT 

Read through the following list of Items and check {^^ those that you will com- 
plete during this two day workshop. You must check at least 3 items in each of the 
three categories . You will be expected to complete those items that you check. 

P ___ I will sketch out the planning steps that will be needed for my next workshop 

L I will discuss with 2 other participants how to plan a workshop. 

A ___ I will write a set of objectives for my next workshop. 

N __ I will check off the objectives on Handout #4 as they are met. 

N I will clarify my use of objectives in planning a workshop. 

I __ I will sketch out my concerns for my next workshop. 

N ^^ I will briefly list some procedures for assessing the needs of teachers in 

G my area. 

___ I will tike notes on 2 procedures used at this workshop and how they can be 
modified to better suit my needs. 

T I will learn the meaning of "the medium is the message." 

E I will list 5 aspects of workshop leadership that are the same as teaching. 

A I will list 3 of my leadership behaviors that need improving. 

C I will list 3 workshop leadership behaviors that I would like to begin using. 

H I will get to know 3 other participants whom I have not previously known. 

I I will list 5 ideas related to w kshops that I gleaned from other 

N participants. 
G 

•k-k kkkk ik** *******^H>:*******iHc**-«r**^Hr**A*****THr****JHr*-^ 

E I will critically examine 2 training kits developed by the USOE-MSU RIMCAlCY. 

V I will suggest in writing 2 topics for training kits I would like to see 

A developed. 

L __ I will take notes on my reactions to different leadership styles used 

U during the workshop. 

A I will be perceptive to the other participants and their reactions during 

T the workshop. 

1 I will list 5 areas that should be evaluated at a workshop. 

N ____ I will outline a procedure for assessing individual participant learning. 

G __ I will list 2 different types of participant assessment measures. 

__ I will 



T 

H 

E 1 will 

R 



864 (signature) 



Leadership Workshop 



Handout #13 



LL^RNING CONT?„VCT 
Foll:c-'ip 

In the space preceeii ui;-, e : l \i cl the ^.^ll ■..ir, itc-ms, c.nt.cr the le'.ter wli i ch 
most closely corresponiis to the ''(jr^-cce to r;hicli yeu '.t^re il-Lc to luliill ''h.it item 
during the workshop. 



P 
L 

A 
N 
N 
I 
K 



A = 1007. fultillcd 
B - 30?= fulfilled 



C = 507., fulfilled 
b - not a Ct onpte i 



1 will sketch out the plinnint; step:; th>it '.;ill be nee. led for ny next worksho; 

I will discuss with ? other participants how to oliii i workshop. 

I will write a set of objectives for my next workshop. 

1 will check off the objectives on Hindout i^U p.n chev ire met. 

1 will clirify my use of objectives in planning, i workshop. 

I will sketch out my concerns for my next workshop. 

I will briefly list some proceoures for assess in.j tiie needs of teichcrs 

in my area. 
I will t.ike notes on 2 procedures used at this workshop .ind how they c.nn 

be modified to better suit my needs. 



I will learn the me ming of "the medium is the mess.ige." 

I will list 5 aspects of workshop leadership that ?re the same ts tenching. 

I v>'ill list 3 of my leadership behiviors that need improving. 

I will list 3 \.'orkshop leadership behiviors that I would like to begin usinp,. 

I will get to know 3 other participants whom I hive not previously known. 

I will list 5 ideas relr.ted to workshops th . t I :;le,inod from other 

p irtic ipants . 



E 
V 
A 
L 
U 
A 
T 
I 




T 

H 
E 

R 



I will critically ex.imine 2 tr.iinmR kits developed by the USOE-MSU RIMC/HCY, 

I will suggest in writing 2 topics for training kits I would like to see 

deve loped . 
I will take notes on my re.-'ctions to different leadership styles used 

during the v;orkshop. 
I will be perceptive to the other par t icip.ants and their reactions during 

i-he wor''shop . 

1 will list 5 areas that should be evaluated ^.t '. workshop. 

I will outline a procedure for assessing individual participani learning. 

I will list 2 different types of participint assessment measures. 

t*-.V*ir;.-V<Tlr*V*-]WcVc.VVr*ii*Vr>-,Vv\nk****-V.VVrt.-*iWr*Vr*Vr*-*Sf-.*^**->tVc*TV^ 

I will 



I will 



865 



(signature) 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
^ CHIlDRtN 
AND YOUTH 



1 U'Kloon »i*ll M.ifii|t-. .-!«>--' Mv^r-.i, (as' a^s^Mk -^ ^.b-.. -trttf. j 
ixioffjiing Willi Sial«?l)cpaflm«?/«K <il lduf»iion .^ \in ?im.»iHntlijnrf-< irim 



LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
Evaluation Study #2 

S. Joseph Levine 
Sue Ann Yovanovich 



SUMMARY 



The initial and final activities of the workshop 
asked the participants to complete an evaluation form. 
The evaluation consisted of a series of questions that 
called for factual responses. The same form was used for 
both the pre-test and the post-test. Participants were 
asked to write an identifying number on their form. In this 
way it would be possible to match each participant's pre-test 
and post-test without disclosing the identity of the 
respondent. 



PURPOSE 



This activity was designed to reflect any cogniti'ra 
change that was brought about through the two days of the 
workshop. It was hoped that participant responses 
"better" on the post-test than they were on the pre-test, 



P.ESULTS (n = 40) 



Question #1 : "What are 7 roles of a good in-service 
educator?" 



Pre-test Post-test 

An average of 5.425 An average of 6.92 5 

correct responses per correct responses per 
respondent. respondent. 

This question was designed to assess the participant's 
awareness of the many roles of an in-service educator. 

866 






The participants became more aware of the major roles 
of a good in-service educator . This is an expected 
result since the entire afternoon activity directly 
prior to the post-test was devoted to defining and 
discussing these roles. It's interesting to note that 
many participants extended their list beyond seven in 
the post-test (these "extra" responses were not 
tabulated) whereas no one went beyond seven in the pre- 
test. 



Question #2 



"Number the following in correct sequential 
order. (1 = first 5 = last) 



develop workshop evaluation procedure 

design workshop activities 

select format for workshop 

develop workshop objectives 

revise workshop activities 

conduct workshop 



This question was designed to reflect the participant's 
awareness of the sequence of events that go into the 
development of a workshop. Of particular interest were 
the sequence of "develop workshop evaluation procedure" 
prior to "design workshop activities," and "conduct 
workshop" prior to "revise workshop activities." 
Respondents were given a score of "2" if they got both 
sequences correct, a score of "1" for a single correct 
sequence, and a score of "0" if both were incorrect. 



Pre-test 



Post-test 



score n = 16 

1 score n = 22 

2 score n = 2 

TOTAL =26 



score n = 12 

1 score n = 22 

2 score n = 6 

TOTAL =34 



The participant's awareness of the sequence of events 
that go into planning a workshop increased during the 
two days. 



Question #3 : "What are 2 reasons for modifying existing 
workshop materials?" 



Pre-test 



Post-test 



15 respondents were 
able to list 2 
acceptable responses. 



20 respondents were 
able to list 2 
acceptable responses, 



867 



This question indicates that more participants were better 
able to cite reasons for modifying workshop materials at 
the conclusion of the two days. It should be noted, however, 
that the number of acceptable responses in both the pre-test 
and the post-test are equal to or less than half of all of 
those responding. Consequently, it is felt that this area 
is still below acceptable levels. 

Question #H : "List 6 criteria for evaluating workshop materials. 

This question was not evaluated due to the diversity of 
responses in both the pre-test and the post-test. 

Question // 5 : "Of the following workshop procedures, which are 
the best 2_ for use in a workshop on the subject 
of "Procedures for Assessing Classroom Performance"? 

a handout 

a workshop pre-test 

a visiting lecturer 

an observation game 

discussion groups 



The correct responses to this question are "a workshop 
pre-test" and "an observation game." An acceptable response 
is "discussion groups." 

Pre-test Post-test 

£ - Handout 1^ - Handout 

15 - Pre-test 2_0 - Pre-test 

~J - Lecturer £ - Lecturer 

25" - Observation Game 33 - Observation Game 

?F - Discussion Groups 5T - Discussion Groups 

The responses to this question indicate an improvement in 
the participant's understanding of the appropriateness of 
workshop procedures for the accomplishment of obj ectives . 
The workshop was designed to support the concept that the 
design of activities should support the desired learning. 



Question §& : "Interaction of workshop participants can best 

be developed through 

activities . " 

Responses to this item were scored as "acceptable" or 
"non-acceptable." Acceptable responses were those that 
directly related to involvement (doing, group participant 
discussion, etc.) Non-acceptable responses were those 
that did not directly relate to involvement (pre-planned, 
individual, informal, etc.) 



868 



Pre-test Pos t-test 

27 acceptable 31 acceptable 

responses responses 

An analysis of the responses indicate that more participants 
responded with an involvement — related response at the 
conclusion of the workshop than at the beginning. It is felt 
that the workshop provided the participants a better under- 
standing of how to create interaction of workshop participants . 

Question #7 : "What is the strongest 'message' of a tape 
recorded presentation on the use of video- 
tape equipment?" Check one. 

use of television 

use of tape recorders 

use of video tapes 



This question was designed to probe the participant's 
understanding of the concept that a delivery mode can 
be more powerful than the instruction that is delivered 
through the mode. 

Pre-test Post-test 

2 - use of television 2 - use of television 

13 - use of tape recorders 12 - use of tape recorders 
25 - use of video-tapes 26 - use of video-tapes 

According to the responses, the participants have a less 
than acceptable understanding of the concept . (The medium 
is the message.) Also, there is no difference in their 
understanding as a result of the workshop . 



Question #8 : "It is important, when evaluating a workshop, 

to consider the following 3 aspects:" 

a. 

b. 

c . 



This question was not evaluated due to the diversity of 
responses in both the pre-test and post-test. 



'^^'^■st j:.' » ^ • "'^> > be!^-^ wav +0 evaluate /our el lecti . c.-.ts- as 
1 ■•- • '• ^ . .a.ie: Is • "iph the use of pre- 
assessmen-*- procedures." 

True ^"alse 



This question was designed to assess the participant's 



869 



understanding of the use of assessment procedures. The 
answer is "false." 

Pre- test Post-test 

19 responded 24 responded 

correctly correctly 

The responses to this question indicate that the participants 
better understand the use of assessment procedures because 
of the workshop. The number of correct responses indicate, 
however, that a large number of participants still do not 
understand the use of assessment procedures . 



Question #10 : "The most important goal of a workshop is 

transfer of learning." 

True False 



This question was designed to assess the participants under- 
standing of the concept of transfer as the most important 
goal of a workshop. The answer is "true." 

Pre-test Post-test 

10 responded correctly 5 responded correctly 

The responses to this question indicate that the participants 
did not learn this concept at the workshop and they did not 
know it prior to the workshop . 



April, 1972 



870 




USOE/MSU 
REGIONAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIALS 
CENTER FOR 
HANDICAPPED 
^ CHILDREN 
AND YOUTH 



213 l<.ck»oo Hall Mifhig*n Sut« Un»v»*»"'v E«i L*n«'rvi Mit hig*n 408^3 
Coop*«a''ng Wiih Siaie C>epjnni«nis ot Educarion m Mm h>flan-intJijn«-Ohio 



LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
Evaluation Study #3 

S. Joseph Levine ^ 
Sue Ann YovanovicK^ 



SUMMARY 

A "Participant Reaction Form" was used at the conclusion 
of the workshop to assess the reactions of the participants 
to the workshop in general and any of the specific activities. 
Participants were asked not to identify themselves on the 
form. 



PURPOSE 

This activity was designed as a procedure to allow the 
individual participants to react in writing to those aspects 
of the workshop to which they had particularly strong feelings 
The structure of the form was utilized to channel their 
thinking in very general areas without channeling the exact 
nature of their response. 



RESULTS 

Question #1: "Use descriptive words to describe your 

reactions to this Workshop. List the words 
as fast as they come to you. Limit one 
minute! No sentences, please." 

A total of 319 words were elicited by this question. Of 
these, 302 (94.7%) were positive and 17 (5.31) were negative. 
Those words that were elicited 10 or more times were 
interesting (16), informative (15), planned (13), helpful (12), 
good (11) , and organized (10) . 

The response to this question indicates that the 
participants left the workshop with exceptionally positive 
feelings. The response also indicates that a number of the 
objectives of the workshop were met, especially those that 
were related through modeling behavior. 



*fctow*ii — Spacijl Education 




871 



NMxxti-turMuiifUwalionigc *» HtntKtrfl ~ U i OOca o< fductlioo- An Eaual OpixxiuniK Eixplovo 



Question #2: "What do you. feel were the two most 
valuable aspects of the Workshop?" 

This question was designed to assess whether the planned 
objectives of the workshop were met as perceived by the 
participants. The responses to this item indicate that the 
participants did perceive the objectives through the workshop 
and that they felt they were met. The most significant aspect 
of the workshop, as seen by the participants was "Meeting 
and interacting with other teacher trainers." 

Question #3: "If this Workshop were to be offered again 
for a different group of participants, 
what one thing should be eliminated?" 

This question was included to find out those aspects of 
the workshop that should be modified or eliminated. A total 
of 13 resjJonses (32.5%) indicated that nothing should be 
changed. Seven responses (17.5%) identified the video taping 
activity as unnecessary and the same number (17.5%) felt 
the "Karnak" skit could be eliminated. Six responses (15%) 
felt the examination of the Kits should be changed. 

Question #4: "What was omitted, yet should have been 
included in this Workshop?" 

This question allowed the individual participants to 
recommend additions to the workshop. It was hoped that this 
question would provide input that would clarify participant 
needs that were not met by the workshop and should be included 
in a future workshop. Sixteen of the responses (41%) indicated 
that there was nothing omitted. Nine (23%) asked that more 
time be allowed for individual work. Five responses (13%) 
highlighted "evaluation of workshop materials" as needed in 
future workshops. This last item, evaluation of materials, 
is seen as an area for increased focus in the future. 



Question #5: "Suggestions or comments:" 

This question was included as a "catch all" to allow the 
participants an opportunity to react on any aspect of the 
workshop not previously mentioned. Besides the general-positive 
comments, the most significant response to this question is 
the number of respondents who mentioned the lack of time to 
fulfill their contracts. It's interesting to note that the 
comments were not against the idea of the contract, but rather 
frustrated about the lack of time to work on the contracts. 



APRIL 1972 



872 



PARTICIPANT RESPONSES 

Use descriptive words to describe your reactions to this 
Workshgp . List the words as fast as they come to you. 
Limit one minute! No sentences , please. 



) interesting 


(3) 


reJpeat 


(1) 


awake 


(interested) 


(3) 


varied 


(1) 


awakening 


(interests) 




(variety) 


(1) 


aware 


) informative 


(3) 


work 


(1) 


best 


(informed) 


(3) 


worthwhile 


(1) 


bewildered 


) planned 


(2) 


active 


(1) 


carry over 


(planning) 


(2) 


busy 


(1) 


cold 


(well planned) 


(2) 


clear 


(1) 


committed 


) helpful 


(2) 


comfortable 


(1) 


comprehensive 


) good 


(2) 


confusion 
(confusing) 


(1) 


concise 


) organized 






(1) 


convenient 


) fun 


(2) 


creativity 


(1) 


crisp 


) meaningful 




(creative) 


(1) 


curious 


(meaning) 


(2) 


developed 


(1) 


demonstrative 


) structured 


(2) 
(2) 


different 
dyncunic 


(1) 


descriptive 


) enjoyable 






(1) 


directive 


) excellent 


(2) 


effective 


(1) 


dull 


) useful 


(2) 


enthusiastic 


(1) 


encouraging 


) motivating 


(2) 


fast 


(1) 


enlightening 


(motivated) 


(2) 


frustrated 


(1) 


eventful 


(motivational) 




(frustrating) 


(1) 


experience 


) great 


(2) 


groups 


(1) 


expertise 


) interaction 


(2) 


materials 


(1) 


food 


(interactive) 


(2) 


model 


(1) 


format 


) involvement 




(modeling) 


(1) 


fruitful 


(involved) 


(2) 


needed 










(needs) 


(1) 


fulfilling 


) learning 






(1) 


functional 


) people 


(2) 


prepared 


(1) 


generous 


) stimulating 


(2) 


presentation 


(1) 


gracious 


) valuable 


(2) 
(2) 


professional 
profitable 


(1) 


improvement 


) boring 


(2) 


reactionary 


(1) 


insightful 


(bored) 




(react) 


(1) 


instructional 


) exciting 






(1) 


intrigued 


) friendly 


(2) 


relevant 


(1) 


kits 


) humor 


(2) 


timed 


(1) 


lag 


(humorous) 


(2) 


timely 








(2) 


usable 


(1) 


leadership 


) ideas 


(2) 


well done 


(1) 


lively 


) innovative 






(1) 


long 


) relax 


(1) 


activities 


(1) 


media 


(relaxed) 


(1) 


ambiguous 


(1) 


more 


(relaxing) 


(1) 


appropriate 


(1) 


moving 



873 



(1) 


muddy 


(1) 


reassuring 


(1) 


tantalized 


(1) 


multi-media 


(1) 


reinforcing 


(1) 


techniques 


(1) 


objectivity 


(1) 


resentful 


(1) 


thinking 


(1) 


okay 


(1) 


revealing 


(1) 


thorough 


(1) 


paced 


(1) 


roles 


(1) 


thought provoking 


(1) 


participant 


(1) 


rushed 


(1) 


unanticipated 


(1) 


personalities 


(1) 


setting 


(1) 


uncertain 


(1) 


pleasant 


(1) 


sharing 


(1) 


unclear 


(1) 


pleasurable 


(1) 


smooth 


(1) 


understanding 


(1) 


practical 


(1) 


successful 


(1) 


unique 


(1) 


precise 


(1) 


suitable 


(1) 


unprofound 


(1) 


productive 


(1) 


superb 


(1) 


unused 


(1) 


purpose 











2. What do you feel uere the two most valuable aspects of the 
Workshop? 

(26) Meeting and interacting with other teacher trainers. 
(18) The replicable training materials that were provided. 

(4) Workshop Kits 

(4) Workshop Planning Kits 

(1) Instructional Strategy Activity 

(14) The information that was provided. 

(13) Experiencing a workshop led by other trainers. 

(12) Involvement activities. 

(4) Video tape activity 
(3) You Are. . . activity 

(2) Visiting the Regional IMC. 

1. If this Workshop were to he offered again for a different group 
of participants J what one thing should he eliminated? 

NOTHING (n = 13) 

Nothing 

Nothing as far as I am concerned as of this moment. 

At this time I'm not sure if anything should be eliminated. 

Nothing 

Keep as is 

Nothing 

Nothing should be eliminated. 

Nothing 



87A 



(Question 3 continued) 

Nothing - keep all components 

Nothing 

Nothing 

Nothing 

Nothing 

VIDEO TAPING (n = 7) 

The video tape of personal experiences 

The video taping procedure. Obviously it didn't suit 
as many needs as the other sessions. It's just not 
your style. 

While filming people having non-participants receiving 
some other input elsewhere. 

Felt "You Are" activity too lengthy and TV taping long, 
not that informative and pressure to get it organized. 

Use of video-tape in contrived situation. 

Video-taping 

The entire video-tape activity 

KARNAK (n = 7) 

Karnak - cute but not needed at that point. Good 
experience for first time contact. 

Karnak 

Not sure I saw relationship to Karnak ' s performance and 
time it took and value received. 

Karnak 

Re-tool Karnak skit - not necessarily omit. 

The Karnak routine was excellent, but could be shortened 
time-wise. 

If anything, the time with Karnak could be modified to be 
more effective. 



875 



(Question 3 continued) 

USE OF THE KITS (n = 6) 

Reviewing kits (suggest that it be a total group 
activity with more introduction to the activity.) 

Evaluating the kits yesterday. Activity not clarified 
enough or simplify it. 

Observing kits rather than using in groups. 

The looking at kits - I felt that there was not enough 
time to understand many of the kits as there were no 
cassettes available to hear them and get total 
understanding . 

Looking at kits instead of actually working with one kit. 

Reliance on kits - should be an adjunct not a major focus. 

EVENING ACTIVITY (n = 2) 

The Monday evening activities should be done in terms 
of needs of the group - this could be changed. 

The evening meeting - really very rushed and some 
people who couldn't get to the meeting on time due to 
slow service were quite unhappy. 

MEETING FACILITY (n = 1) 
The University Inn 

SEQUENCING GAME (n = 1) 
Sequencing games 

TIMING (n = 1) 

The close timing which at least on one occasion during 
this session was too short to allow for closure. 



LENGTH OF WORKSHOP (n = 1) 

I would like to have more time - 3 full days perhaps 

STARTING TIME (n = 1) 

You covered the ground well, but how about 9 AM instead 
of 8:30. 

876 



What was omitted, yet should have been inaluded in this 
Workshop? 

(16) Nothing 

(9) Needed more time to work on individual objectives 
(contract) 

(5) More information on evaluating workshop materials 
(and workshops) 

(2) Actual demonstration of kits. 

(2) More individual participation. 

(1) Actually adapting a kit. 

(1) Teacher made materials. 

(1) More discussion of interlock between local IMC's. 

(1) More discussion of "Yours for a Better Workshop" 
booklet. 

(1) More shifting between groups. 

Suggestions or comments : 

Allow time to work through rather than just read through 
kits - active participation. 

There should be a multi-county-statewide workshop next year 
for IRMC coordinators. Provide continuous inservice. 

The follow-up on the contract which involved lettering each 
item on whether the task was completed was poorly designed 
because of the words "list, sketch," etc. These items should 
be changed to terms which do not require actual writing. 

Use of overhead projector was not as effective as it could be - 
e.g. size of image on screen, clarity, overflow of light, 
(beyond screen), etc. 

Believe there will be excellent transfer. 

Excellent workshop. I am glad I was invited. 

An excellent workshop. 

Make participants aware at the outset that some time should be 
set aside for evaluating of material. 



877 



Keep up the good work I You practice what you preach! 

Foster the 'seed' of competition between groups that you 
began to introduce. e.g. silly little award for group 
that accumulates most 'points,' etc. 

This was a most rewarding experience. Thank you for a most 
informative, well organized learning experience. 

In pre-conf erence contract, some explanation should accompany. 
In addition, items should be altered some way to allow 
completion in spite of tight time schedule of sessions. 

Keep up the good work. 

Different facilities where you didn't have to go outside for 
everything . 

Two more meetings here, two in our own states. 

Continue use of groups, discussions, summaries. Another choice 
of motel could have been more physically comfortable. Cold 
floor I Better than I anticipated. Excellent I I 

It would have been helpful to go through a kit completely and 
discuss its contents. Tuesdays sessions were far more 
meaningful for the contents related to frustrations of in- 
service coordinator. 

Good job. Semi-annual involvement of 3-state group using 
people from the states to assist implementation of the program. 
Perhaps an IRMC - CRC - ETC. membership unit in CEC. Perhaps 
a summary of our skills. 

Let's do this again real soonl 

A most beneficial workshop. 

Experience, if nothing else, has taught m.ost in-service trainers 
how to conduct training sessions. I thought most of the activity 
was not particularly profound or new. The materials used were 
excellent and the organization of the two days was good. Private 
discussions with participants were particularly helpful. 

Meeting was very worthwhile at times. However, there were times 
when I felt that the MSU staff talked very abstractive in order 
to sound impressive. Small words are always understood. 

Follow-ups where at least part of group could get back together 
to refresh ideas and the urge to really try some of the 
suggested innovations. A very well-planned session - most 
enjoyable and full of ideas which have multiple use in 
adaptability. 



878 



Time to fulfill the "written" parts of the contract if one 
selected that as I did. Similar to work sessions we had in 
June. 

This has been a valuable experience in many ways. I most 
appreciated meeting staff and participants, and obtaining 
such good ideas for our own inservice. I would like more 
direct information on group dynamics, and how to anticipate 
some of the feeling generated by inservice activities. 
Thanks to all the Michigan Regional IMC staff. 

All roles of workshop leaders were demonstrated by the staff - 
except for the reporting, which will be sent to us. Good job. 
Thanks. 

I feel I am leaving better informed this time. 

Please, expand into content areas. If you can do the perceptual 
kit you can do kits such as "Reading, Phonics, Linguistics 
and look say" etc. Why not another workshop where we are 
the leaders using the kits that we have. 

Very good workshop for in-service trainers. 

It is a pleasure to do business with you folks - may I return 
the favor at a later date. 

A very well planned conference. 

I feel my time was very well spent. Would like to see any 
follow-up workshop keying in on specific w orkshop skills, i.e. 
change agent, communicating, etc. 

The workshop was excellent and most helpful to me. It may have 
been helpful to provide time in the middle of the workshop to 
have people reflect on contracts. A reaction sheet following 
each package would have provided opportunity for feed back 
on items that may need change. Since it was not provided, many 
comments that were made during examination of kits were lost. 

Lodge us in a cleaner motel. 

I do have a need to see and use your instructional material 
center has. Time did not allow me to use it as I would have. 
More time to overlook the Centers when workshops are held in 
the area. 

I think that we should have new leaders. It seems that the 
leaders techniques are repeated to some of us who have been 
with them before. The leaders do not show any new areas that 
have not been used before. We need many people that show 
different techniques. Retool. 



879 



should there he another 'nulti-s tate vorkshop of this 
nature next year? 

(37) Yes 

(1) True 

(1) Certainly 

(1) Perhaps 

(1) Yes - with new leaders 



880 




USOl,MSli 
RFCKJNAL 
INSiKUCIIONAI 
WAFLRIAIS 
( [NFtk lOK 
HANI)ICAPf'll> 
CHILDKFN 
AND VOUIH 



LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP 
Evaluation Study #4 

S. Joseph Levine 
Sue Ann Yovanovich 



SUMMARY 



At th 
ipants wer 
within thi 
participan 
following 
fulfilled 
fulfilled 
at the bot 
other item 



e conclusion 
e asked to ma 
s contract we 
t could check 
the workshop, 
at the end of 
by the end of 
torn of the co 
that they wo 



of the LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP all partic- 
ke out a "LONG TERM CONTRACT" . Contained 
re a series of 14 possible items that a 
as activities that they would fulfill 

Some of these items were expected to be 
two months and some were expected to be 
three months. A blank space was provided 
ntract for each participant to enter any 
uld like to contract for. 



Two separate follow-ups were made of the LONG TERM CONTRACT. 
The first follow-up, at the end of two months, asked each partic- 
ipant that had contracted for two month items the level to which 
they had accomplished those items which they had contracted. The 
second follow-up, at the end of three months, asked for level of 
accomplishment on the three month items. 



PURPOSE 



This contracting activity was designed for two primary 
reasons. First, it was used to demonstrate to the participants 
a procedure for promoting some degree of participant accountability 
after the conclusion of a workshop. In this way, the participants 
could get a better feel for the use of long term contracts. The 
second motive behind the use of this contract procedure was to 
create a vehicle for subtle reinforcement of concepts and content 
that occurred during the two day workshop. The use of the two and 
three month follow-up letters provided an opportunity to remind the 
participants that they had in fact attended a workshop that they 
should continue to think about. 



881 



^t vVmbr* InMrucnofdl ^A^tfmU Mptiwnrh tot MjfwlKAprM'vl f hitdipo jiirt Vniith - L. S <)»ln i- ul Educ4li<>n Bufju t>l Idui *lii>n tm 1S*- Mdndu «{>|>r4l 



RESULTS 



1) ihose coKtra.''t itt.rnr, ^hit ..li.I r • ; < ' r^: ;. I-'rcc'- ^■■rta.'^t 
uith the FEGJON..L CEl^TEH shoi) ; • ■.. ■• ;' acocmplf^h- 
mont t'iijn thor.r- i terns that d-i d ."c /;< > •■ ■ > • 1.7 ■ . This can 
be explained in two possible ways. First, those items that 
required contacting the REGIONAL CENTER cculd be considered 
harder than the other items and therefore not as easily 
accomplished. Second, the respondent tiad to be truthful in 
his response to contact items since hiri reply could easily 

be Checked. This second possibility could infer questionable 
reliability on the non-contact items. 

2) Two contract items on the TWO MONTH FOLLOW-UP appear to be 
significant. Meeting with a "Ir^ul idr^iyiintx'atcr" and with 
a "l:cj.l jroup of teaohers" seem to ^f- tuo activities that 
the part ijzp'znts contracted for and did accnplish to a 
hijh degree. 

3) The use of the FOLLOW-UP CONTRACT resulted in a large number 
of feedback letters directed to the HfJSONAL CKNTEh. Most 
of these letters provided workshop staff with good feedback 
on the content and techniques from the workshop. These 
letters were primarily stimulated by the use of the contract. 
As such, the contract stimulated valuable feedback that 
might not have been stimulated if the contract hadn't been 
used . 



DATA 



The following two pages show the data from the two and 
three month follow-up studies. An explanation of "COMPLETION 
INDEX" is shown at the bottom of the first page. 



882 



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884 



January 19, 1972 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



XN-SET^VICE WORKSHOP ?i;^'AI,UATION 
"Selection and Evaluation of Cotin:i«:rc ' ally Available Tfe-'erieJ-s" 



This evaluation is designed to provi(tS the vorkt»iiop ati.tx vi'.;; feedback regarding 
youi" reactions to this vorksLop. The resul-.a will assise ua i.i plonnine future 
in-ser^/lce activities. 

1. Please rate each of the activitiec in termH of its INTPH^EST to you. 
Check the appropriate blank after each activity. 



A. Evaluation Game 

B. Commercially Available 
Measuring Devices 

C. ^estlons and Issues 

D. Teachers and Teaching 



Very 
Interesting 



Hot 



A. 



What has each of today's training kit 3 moant fr. 

A. Evaluation Game 

(See attached sheet) 

B. Conmerclally Available Measuring Eevices 

(See attached sheet ) 

C. (Jueations end Issues 

(See attached sheet) 

D. Teachers and Teaching 



I-iterestir 


-J 




In 


terestia^ 


1+ 











9 








__SL 


9 








2 


r:: . Be 


^T 


eci 


fie. 





3. Which of the training kits has the nosL vaiav? f 
tradning? 

A. Evaluation Game - 8 

B. Commercially Available Measuring Devices - 5 

C. Questions and Issues - h 

U. The tvo most valuable aspects of today's sePE;i<~> 

(See attached sheet) 



cur uae in i'-a.,iVlce 



5. Please rate each of the actlvltie.i in te?ui8 nf 



IMPOFP.'AI'C!^ to y-u. 



A. Evaluation Game 

B. Commercially Available 
Measuring Devices 

C. Questions and Issues 

D. Teachers and Teaching 



Very 
Important 

i? 


Isaportant 

5 


lot 
Ic port ant 






JLL_ 


1 . 



885 



January 19, 197? 
Indiauapolio , Indiana 



6. I have attended the follovrlrig traininjr seEsion.''- 

10 IndlanapollB , Oct. 27, 1971 ■ "Problame and ro.ntn" 

Huntingburg, No/. 17, 1971 - "Design and Use it inat-uctional Cbjectlvce" 
6 South Bend, Dec. 15, 1971 - "Tovsrd su; Uad<.—diiandiiig of P'!;rc.-»ptual-f>1oi.Oi' 

Prograica " 
l6 Indianapolis, Jan. 19, 1972 - "Selection &nd n-valuaticn of Cor!imercia.lly 

Available Materials" 



7. As a teacher-trainer in Indiana, you will be erpected to conduct in-service 
treiining with teachers in your local area. 

As a restilt of the training sessions I've atteai3?^a, I am better prepared to 
conduct in-service training vlth teachers. 

16 Yes _1_ ? ^0_ N •> 

8. The trolrdng kits presented durii:g the •.relninr; • saiona are aelf-explejiaK;or>' 
and easy to use. 

lU Yes 2 T i(cj 



p. I have used the followiiig workshop kits in con<'.v : •'ng ia-i:ervlc.e tra:ining: 

2 InEtruclionaJ. Objectives 
5 Perceptual-?fotor Activities 

10. Since the initiation of this series cf four tr ' j'ng cessiorf;, I hcv; held 
in-service training programs for 37^ (total : olliiierit) yeof ].e 

.^ 3l6 teachers 
Show -I of { 17 supervisors 

each type I 11 adJidnistrators 

/ 2^ college students 

( parents 

11. Comments (vhat other topics should be covered : i future tr jf.nin'^ rcasrcnsf ) 
(See attached sheet) 



886 



What has each to today's training kits meant for you. Be specific. 

A. Evaluation Game 

Forced deeper thinking about materials , their uses and criteria necessary 
to consider prior to j urchase 

I liked it - good to ».^e in In-service 

Valuable for use with teachers in in-service programs 

Not setting up prior likes or reasons for liking 

I liked it. Good! I will use this one. It has and will help. 

Plan to use. 

More insight to the pertinent questions to be asked. 

Provided an insight for future purchases and recommendations to other 
teachers 

Never realized hew well general guides could be applied to a wide 
variety of materials 

Insight into materials evaluation - might be omitted if short of time 

Opened avenues of thought with the knowledge of other ideas to be 
presented to a training group 

More positive evaluative techniques 

Points out need for systematic sound approach 

Gave new ideas as to evaluation and selection of materials 

Make me more aware of importauice of close selection 

B. Commercially Available Measuring Devices 

I'm glad to have knowledge of these materials. I teach EMR-1 and think 
the Bercy might serve as an instructional guide. 

Brought me up to date on these devices 

Fortifies our concerns about tests 

Examples of available items - need to let teacher diagnose and not rely 
on psychologist 

Very little - but mainly because T am presently using each of the devices 
presented and have been "pushing" them for some time 

887 



B. (Continued) 

Solid useful information 

I was unfamiliar with a couple of the tests and -chink they would be 
valuable 

A chance to "see the real thing" and hear others opinions on them 

I was interested especially as a teacher wanting more knowledge on 
materials for predictive measurement 

Plan to use 

Interesting, but I had the information already. 

Idea for use of para-professionals assigned to teachers for assessment 

Liked the presentation 

I was familiar with all but one - found that of interest - worth 
repeating 

C. Questions and Issues 

As a participant in the experiment I got less from this, I think, than 
had I been a spectator - although I did enjoy my role. 

Good 

Valuable for use with teachers in in-service program - am revising 
in-service program for next week 

It was more fun for the center group than for me . It lacked in part the 
active participation and I did not feel that new information was gained 
as in a lecture. Although I realize the "live-presentation" was necessary 
I have to be honest. It soured the rest of the activity. 

t 

Will need to modify - a separate session 

Good although sometimes couldn't hear nor see. 

Some guides are necessary particularly for effective use of time 

The questions (criteria) are most helpful and could be sent to teachers 
considering materials selection if they had no opportunity to attend a 
workshop. 

Nothing 

Adoption need for more specific analysis to make final decisions 

Not of value 

Little value 

888 



k. The two most valuable aspects of today'' s session were: 
Evaluation Game - 5 responses 

Commercially Available Measuring Devices - 3 res] rmses 
Questions and Issues - ] response 

Interaction and feelings of all 

Awareness of group needs versus self. 

Group brainstorming, "Judging" evaluating materials 

Working with tangible objectives which in turn can be used later with other 
groups . 

Criteria sheet 

Becoming familiar with tests; guides for evaluation, etc. of materials 

Group discussions 

Available materials and tests, ways of selecting 

Reinforcing, providing an approach 

Information gained, sharing ideas 

Techniques and kits 

The specific helps and suggestions for giving workshops 

Self-evaluation in adoption of materials and hopefully, can be of better 
assistance to teachers 

To get together and stimulate thinking concerning material and its evaluation 

Suggestions for format of our in-service here and the evaluation of specific 
materials 



889 



11. Comments (what other topics should be covered in future training sessions?) 

I am not a teach-r fn-:. ynar but work us a rami I y counselor and although I 
do not do the ordering qP materials I reel yo'.r v irKshop has helped me to 
kn'ivr what to refer to olni-TS. 

Teach^'r- tfede Maic-r: . . -!ing; Math 

Very well done 

Teaching the slow learner in the regular clastroom. More workshops of 
newly developed materials. I generally enjoyed the workshop and will make 
an effort to attend future ones - depending ^n geographic location. Thanks. 

I found ycur techniques very he;pful. 

Please include a comparison of similar materials to be evaluated. 

Tests (formal) - diagnostic! 



890 



LC3955 Alonso, Lou. c.l 

Al 71 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT VOL.11 
OF THE GREAT LAKES SPECIAL 
EDUCATION INSTRUCTIONAL 
MATERIAJ^^^C^g^ER. (1974) 



A^^ A^^Tt iJj . CqyJ^^ 



LC3955 
Al 71 



c.l 

VOL . II 



Alons o. Lou. 



FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT OF THE 

-GREA^iAKES-S^EGIM. EDUCATION 

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER. 

1 I f 



ISSUED TO 



PijjA^^fiJ /W/ 



AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR THE BLIND 

15 WEST 16th STREET 

NEW YORK. N. Y. 10011