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^^ -- 



.J- 



% 



\ 



if 



^PPEISTDIX 



TO THE 



HOUSE AND SENATE JOURNALS 



OF THE 



' REGULiS.R SESSION 



OP THE 



TWENTY-FIFTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



OF THK 



STATE OF MISSOURI. 



JEFFERSON OITY, MO., 
r, P! 

1869. 



LLWOOD KIRBT, PUBLIC P R I If T B R . i 



BIENNIAL REPORT 



OF TEM 



STATE AUDITOR OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI 



TO THB 



TWENTY-FIFTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 



DECEMBER 81, 1868. 



81SCT10K 6y Article XI, Constitution : "An accurate accoant of the receipts and expendi- 
tures of the public money shall be annually published." 



J3FFBRS0N OITY: 

BLLWOOD KIRBY, PUDLIO PBINTKB. 



1869. 



-, t-r'^ 






General Statutes, 1865, pa^e 86. 

Sbctioh 12. The auditor shall digest, prepare and report to the general assembly, at the com- 
mencement of each regular session : First, a full and detailed statement of the condition of the 
revenae, and the amount of expenditures for the two preceding fiscal years ; second, a full and 
detailed statement of the public debt ; third, estimates of the revenue and expenditures for the two 
succeeding fiscal years ; fourth, such plans as he may deem expedient for the support of public 
credit, for lessening the public expenses, for promoting frugality and economy in the public offices, 
and, generally, for the better management and more perfect understanding of the fiscal aflairs of 
this state ; fifth, a tabular statement, showing separately the whole amount of each appropriation 
of money made by law, the amount paid under the same, and the balance unexpended ; sixth, a 
tabular statement, showing the amount of rerenue chargeable to each county for the two preceding 
flacal years, the aggregate amount of each object of taxation, together with the tax due on the 
same ; seventh, he shall also publish annually an accurate account of aU the receipts and expend- 
itures of the public money. 

General SUtutes, 1866, page 80. 

Sbction S4. He shall accompany bis report with three thousand printed copies of the same, 
one thousand of which shall be f or tha use of the senate and the remainder for the use of the 
house. 



RECEIPTS INTO THE TREASURY 

DURING THE TWO FISCAL YEARS ENDING SEPTEMBER 80, 

1868, AND THE THREE ADDITIONAL MONTHS, 

ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1868. 



RECEIPTS INTO THE REVENUE FUND. 

Into this fond are paid, first, the proceeds from the collection of the rerenue tax ; second^ all 
other payments into the treasury not by law directed to be paid into some other fund. 



Date. 



Oct. 9, 1866.... 



. ^ 



17. 

30. 

6. 

24. 

19. 
25. 
18. 
13. 

4. 

6. 



From whom. 



18 

27 

10 

11 



Nov., 186C.... 



James Russell 

R. S. Judy , 

George Funkhouser. 

William King , 

same 

H. Clark 

H. M. Rice 

0. Moberly ...., 

William Kaucher 

Wm. n. Ilillman 

U.K. Williama 

Samuel H. Caldwell. 

L. W. Albertson 

Thomas Thompson... 
M. &. Foster 



same 

Wm. H. Bonlware 

Josiah B. Barnes..^ 

B. F. Dailey 

John H. Lightner 

John Baker , 

I. D. Johnson 

For taxes and fees during month . 



Amos F. Owen 

Hamilton Hall 

John Atkison 

Samuel K. Williams 

Morgan Mace 

H. H. Williams 

George W. Fulton '. 

H. J. Alley • 

E. Q. B. McNutt 

Henry Ward..... 

Beni. H. Haupe 

B. F. Dailey #. 

John H. Lightner 

Phillip F. Bryan 

same 

For taxes and fees during month 



Amount. 



$ 175 00 

3,792 U 

348 35 

900 00 

10,128 06 

2,884 20 

2,477 89 

1,000 00 

200 00 

6|838 55 

16,000 00 

38 00 

854 70 

230 16 

2C0 00 

2,945 00 

9,000 00 

800 00 

5,840 81 

1,023 21 

70 00 

100 00 

» 75 



9,053 
3,500 
1,500 
7,000 
1,450 

11,069 
8,463 
231 
8,364 
166 
1,410 
6,417 

55,042 

1,108 

6,515 

17 



93 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
70 
49 
35 
36 
85 
08 
92 
28 
38 



Total for 
month. 



$64,855 80 



UO^MO 84 



RECEIPTS INTO 



RECEIPTS INTO THE REVENUE FUND.— Cohtihitbd. 



Bate. 



Dec.', 1866. 



From whom. 



January, 1867. 



J. P. Rftney 

Thomas Ilarbine 

L. B. Davis 

H. M. Rice 

H. H. Williams 

C. C. Fletcher 

Thomas W. Williams. 
John W. Stewart 



same • 

James S. Hume 

W. W. Wallis 

William H. Porter 

R. A. Love 

John Caldwell 

John U Austin , 

Henry Ward 

Ben. F. Dailey , 

John H. Lig^btner 

Hannibal i, St. Joseph Railroad.. 
For taxes and fees during month. 



Amos F. Owen 

A. E. Wyatt 

same 

John Atkison .., 

Samuel Webb \ 

James Rogers y. 

James F. Xubb 

J. M. Russell 

H. Bruihl 

R. S. Judy 

L. B. Davis 

John Schee 

J. M. Jones 

George Funkhouser 

Thomas E. Rochester 

Joe Davis 

Thomas P. Welch 

J. L. Powell 

William Orr 

H. Clark 

Julius Wilhelmi 

William Berger , 

S. F. Gibson 



same 



0. Moberly , 

S. K. Williams 

J. W. Quigg 

William Kaucher 

P. M. Jackson 

Morgan Mace 

same 

H. H. WilUams 

5. H. Caldwell 

C. C. Fletcher 

Thomas W. Williams 

Thomas Adamson 

A. P. Gibson 

John Sisler 

John R. Knox 

James A. Neal 

6. Harker 

W. H. Bottlware 

Wm. Crisman 

fl. J. Alley 

B. Q. B. McNutt , 

W. McCormack .•.. 

L. B. Hutchison 

J. B. Alexander 

J. N. Laughlin 

yf. H. Porter 



Amount. 



$ 2,754 56 

46,215 15 

2,169 50 

1,020 32 

765 00 

7,791 88 

14,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,429 58 

10,458 00 

549 39 

1,695 00 

5,687 90 

11,229 31 

8,000 00 

133 00 

6.02:) 13 

238,140 17 

6,530 67 

33 38 

4,326 50 
7 00 
3,321 00 
3v36S 06 
3,000 00 
3,508 59 
643 58 
1,679 61 

11,167 54 

4,058 67 

. 1,026 20 

10,499 03 
7,157 71 
2,000 00 

12,023 61 
1,8.31 29 
1,037 45 

10,727 23 
4,527 74 

14 00 
6,890 06 
8,608 78 
9,920 34 
7,419 54 
5,160 60 

723 95 

1,8.30 53 

3,213 07 

16,047 80 

2,188 00 

37 00 

25 00 

4,436 48 

92G 92 

2,500 00 

17,05« 24 

7,463 13 

14,742 78 

12,939 96 

4,640 69 

8,076 86 

15 74 
2,000 00 
4,424 15 
4,535 84 
1,888 16 
2,030 21 
9,352 67 
3,899 32 
9,525 17 



Total for 
month. 



$365,616 94 



THE REVENUE FUND. 



5 



RBCBIPTS* INTO THE REVENUE FUND— Coittinubd. 



Bate. 



January, 1867. 



Feb., 1867. 



From ^wbom. 



William Peniz .... 

N. P. Ogden 

G.W. Colley 

James Spencer 

Samuel Smith 

John H. Austin . . 

A. K. Reybum 

Josiah B. Bamea .. 

Henry Ward 

F. W. tiatzweiler.. 

B. a. Roberts 

A. Anderson , 

John H. Lightner. 

B. F. Dailey 

Samuel W. Eager. 

B. H. Haupe 

James S. Best 

same ...... 

J. H. Foreman 

W. McCuUoch 

John Brown 

Paul Schmidt 

Phillip F. Bryan .. 

L. H. Linville 

I. D. Johnson 



'r' 



same ..... 
John F. Mason .. 

John Moore 

Francis Rodman. 



A. B. Wyatt 

iJohn F. Baker 

'Jon. Sackman 

William ^ing 

George Funkhouser. 

G. H. Dulle 

Samuel E. Shaw , 

Wm. B. Shoemaker.., 

Wm. H. Hillman , 

Wm. Kaucher 

P. M. Jackson , 

A. P. Gibson 

John V. Hargrove...^ 

Jacob Gilstrap , 

same 

H.J. Alley 

L. W. Pritchett 



same 



E. G. B. McNutt 

B. S. Walker 

Ben. F. Boyce 

same 

J. N. Laughlin 

Thomas Lay ton 

William Peniz 

John H. Austin 

John U. Lightner .... 
B. F. Dailey 

same 

John Baker...... 

James S. Best 

Benjamin F. Sillman 
L. M. Ringer .......... 

W.G.J. Crow 



March, 1867.... 



H. F. Harrington . . 
Samuel E. Webb.... 

James F. Tubb 

Enisy Veatch , 

George Funkhouser 
Peter Meyer , 



12^026 83 



Amount. 


Total for 
month. 


$12,000 00 




15,043 62 




3,171 43 




4,159 00 




6,870 41 




30 00 




12,639 98 




1,359 46 




1,620 50 




14,772 69 




4,834 23 




4,995 86 




70,710 36 




7,303 56 




4,336 50 




5,000 00 




1,235 30 




6,942 88 




6,491 29 




2,818 07 




5,812 34 




78 18. 




1,969 93 




3,124 07 




7,076 15 




216 22 




2,065 70 




2,199 74 




1,131 97 


$ 463,355 24 


1,956 39 




15,395 02 




5,388 75 




1,621 08 




463 93 




329 35 




5,081 78 




1,269 37 




4,954 63 




1,200 00 




2,499 88 




327 75 




931 39 




18 29 




10,385 44 




150 00 




631 59 




1,711 87 




4,417 34 


• 


4,020 00 




2,026 54 




3,221 89 




112 80 




1,043 82 




4,430 00 




500 00 




93,297 24 




4,619 48 




3,070 34 




433 00 




338 99 




6,278 65 




1,365 95 




2,069 09 


185,551 64 


3,036 17 




714 76 




502 29 




7,918 49 




771 58 





6 



BKCEIiTS IKTO 



RECEIPTS INTO THE REVENUE FUND— CoKTwrBD, 



Date. 



March, 1867... 



April, 1807. 



May, 1867. 



From whom. 



Thomas E. Rochester. 

W. II. Ferguson 

William Orr 

Moses F. Wood 

W.H. Hillman 

William Kaucher 

Morcan Mace 

H. H. Williams 

Thomas Adamson 

Gt. Ilarker 

Jacob Oilstrap 

W. H. Boulware 

L. B. Hutchison 

■J. N. Laughlin.. 

Tames Darnall...«r» 

Thomas Lajton........ 

James Spencer 

lobn H. Austin 

B. \y. Roberts 

Rufus Alexander 

B. F. Dailey 

John H. Lightner 

John Walt 

John Baker 

Benj. F. Silman 

same 



John W. Ownby.... 
James M. Roberts. 

same 

S. E. Shaw 

E. <T. Rathburn.... 
P. M. Jackson 



J. II. Foreman ^ 

L. M. Ring'er • 

R. P. Wini^ate 

Defense Warrants 

For taxes and fees daring month. 



Thomas W. wiiliams 

WiUiam Grisman 

Jamos S. Hume 

L. B. Hutchison , 

Frank Murphy , 

B. F. Dailey 

John H. Lightner 

E. S. Rowse 

J. M. Collier 

John Baker 

W. G. J. Crow 

■John Moore 

Francis Rodman , 

For taxes and fees durinc^ month.. 



William M. Blake. 

John Atkison 

Harrison Mitchell. 

G. H. Dolle 

B. G. Rathburn.... 

James A. Neal 

L. M. Pritchett.... 
J. E. Alexander.... 

William Penix 

James Spencer 

same 

A. K. Reyburn..... 
Joshua Gamblin ... 

B. F. Dailey 

John n. Lightner. 

E. S. Rowse , 

D. G. Coleman 



Amount. 


Total for 
month. 


$ 1,444 97 




260 82 




600 00 




667 66 




2,636 64 




1,4.30 90 




807 67 




1,426 08 




4,474 64 




683 36 




443 85 




7,964 81 




98 00 




193 24 




1,454 14 




23 43 




455 00 




600 00 




696 96 




102 25 


• 


8,153 20 




S0,056 72 




319 00 




1,742 50 




285 00 




149 80 




1,163 60 




2,069 14 




4,582 17 




1,200 00 




35 00 


$ 100,979 57 


338 85 




3,796 53 




213 00 




21 00 




2,117 91 




436 45 




3,686 87 




500 00 




606 80 




360 14 




100 00 




4,436 79 




7,870 92 




1^939 59 




342 22 




409 01 




395 00 




289 61 




92 00 




555 50 




9 60 


39,017 69 


47 60 




1,000 00 




150 00 




487 00 




601 50 




742 13 




600 00 




755 79 




410 80 




261 69 




729 24 




1,487 22 




327 86 




6,629 38 




465 02 




9,656 80 




4,176 00 





THE REYENIJE FUND. 



RECEIPTS INTO THE REVENUE FUND— Conwhubd. 



Date. 



May, 1867. 



June, 1867. 



July, 1867. 



From whom. 



John Ba1(«r.... 
A. K. Cowgill 
L. M. Ringer . 



B. Darrow 

Joseph P. Raney. 

John Atkison 

Samuel Webb 

John F. Baker.... 
James M. Miller 



same 

Thomaa W. William 

J. A. Price 

R. 0. Cooper 

H. E. Machens 

B. G. Roberts 

B. F. Dailey 

E. S. Rowse 

John Wall 

John Baker 

L. M. Ringer..'. 



August, 1S67... 



James F. Tubb 

R. S.Judy 

Jonathan Sackman.., 
James M. Russell..., 
James M. Roberts.... 

Henry Brnihl 

L. B. Davis , 

John Schee 

George J. McDaniel. 

James M. Jones , 

Joe Davis 

James M. Neal 

John D. Meredith.... 

B. L. Newsome 

R. A. Love 

William Penis 

John H. Austin 



game 

John Baker 

A. K. Cowgill 

B. F. Dailey 

E. S. Rowse .' 

D. C. Coleman 

William Staton 

0. M. Nelson 

For taxes and fees during month. 



William King 

G. H. Dulle 

W. H. Ferguson.. 
Samuel E. Shaw .. 

H. Clark 

William Berger... 

S. F. Gibson 

same 

0. Moberly 

Albert Roecker ... 
W. D. Mustion ... 
Morgan Mace...... 

W. W. Wallis 

Joshua Gamblin .. 
Franklin Murphy 

B. F. Dailey 

E. S. Rowse 

John Wall 

Paul Schmidt 

Francis Rodman.. 



8ept.9 1867.«.... William A. Norris 



Amount. 



$ 100 00 

248 66 
10 00 

1,623 40 

1,468 71 

467 57 

16 76 

2,836 71 

278 30 

66 80 

169 90 
6,226 00 

170 36 
826 15 
316 24 

7,784 46 

24,033 82 

682 64 

100 00 

184 96 



11 22 

310 06 

11 

600 00 

688 30 

1,371 42 

678 53 

657 21 

8 42 

1,294 16 

24 89 

1,760 10 

362 69 
278 89 
649 36 
632 22 
132 61 

363 82 
89 26 

127 12 

7,791 13 

10,626 42 

1,716 00 

22 76 

126 00 

34 78 



614 
256 
650 
196 
916 
338 
646 

3,186 
901 
447 
800 

1,356 
113 
368 
639 

8,009 

23,106 

304 

230 

608 



66 

00 

52 

00 . 

44 

77 

31 

96 

66 

90 

00 

21 

75 

48 

00 

09 

19 

47 

00 

00 



400 00 



Total for 
month. 



$27,783 99 



47,228 64 



80,066 46 



43,687 38 



KECEIPTS INTO 



BBCEIPTS INTO. THE REVENUE FUND— CoHnNCKD. 



Date. 



Sept., 1867. 



James F. Tubb 

Isaiah Jones 

Thomas E. Rochester. 

same , 

Thomas P. Welch 

same 

H. Clark 

Frank Barkley 

S. K. Williams 

J. W. Quirg 

William Kaucher , 

H. H. Williams 

Thomas W. Williams. 

George W. Fulton 

John Sisler 

John R. Knox , 

L. W. Albertson 

E. G. B. McNutt 

Benj. P. Boyce , 

L. B. Mntchison , 



October, 1867.. 



ov., 1867. 



From whom. 



same 

Thomas Layton 

A. K. Reybum 

B. F. Dailey 

E. S. Rowse 

0. M. Nelson 

James W. McFaden. 

1. D. Johnson 



same 

Contingent expenses Attorney General. 



A. F. Owen 

J. M. Carson 

William M. Blake 

L. B.Davis 

William H. Ferguson 

John Wheat 

Julius Wilhelmi 

Frank Barkley 

Orville Moberly 

J.M.Miller 

Morgan Mace 

Thomas W, Williams 

Lewis Sells 

Garrison Barker 

L. W. Albertson 

J. L. Shelby 

James 8. Hume , 

B. F. Boyce 

John H. Austin 

Joshua Gamblin 

Elias Disney 

same 

B. F. Dailey 

E. S. Rowse 

A. K. Cowgill , 

W. G. J. Crow 

0. M. Nelson 

James W. McFaden 

For taxes during month. 



John Atkison 

William A. Norris 

H. Mitchell 

William Kinr 

George Kuecbler.... 

G. H. Dulle 

J. J. C. Breaseale . 

John Ballinger 

Frank Barkley 

Albert Roecker 



Amount. 


Total for 
month. 


$ 65 33 




2,000 00 




2,816 73 




1,8.33 70 




2,008 26 




198 09 




938 94 




4,000 55 




1,487 07 




131 60 




1,189 00 




93 95 




1,114 97 




256 51 




832 64 ; 


20 00 


3,864 05 


495 31 




100 00 




1,141 70 




198 00 




282 40 




512 22 




7,493 46 




4,164 18 ' 


228 00 




281 50 




242 06 




684 17 




2 00 


$ 39,026 28 


600 00 




6,000 00 




215 22 




74 25 




669 24 




177 01 ' 


1,315 00 




723 85 




166 25 




6,163 76 


1 


3,160 00 




753 85 




427 08 




1,030 54 




53 20 




550 00 




5,000 00 




1,055 80 




500 00 




95 75 




3,800 55 




4,662 78 




6,907 97 




31,483 66 




400 00 




392 35 




1,450 00 




7,000 00 




108 20 


84,936 25 


1,454 58 




301 65 




6,000 00 




11,333 00 




5,003 60 




2,500 00 




14 00 




6,000 00 




1,000 00 


' 


450 00 





THE REVENUK FDKD. 



9 



REQEIPTS INTO THE REVENUE FUND— Continued. 



Date. 



^"oy., 1867, 



From ^bom. 



Mor^n Mace 

James M. Powers.. 

J. L. Shelby 

same 

James Ownby 

B. S. Walker 

J. E. Alexander 

August Kleinsorge. 

W. H. Porter 

John Caldvrell 

iJohn H. Steers 

John H. Austin 



I same 

.'A. K. Reybum 

!J. B. Barnes , 

!B. F. Dailey 

E. S. Kowse 

!D. G. Coleman 

lA. K. Cowgill 

;\V. G. J. Crow 

|0. M. Nelson ;. 

'John F. Mason , 

'Lewis Sells 

iFor taxes during month. 



December, 1867 J. w. Carson 

jWilliam King 

James M. Russell 

iL. B. Davis 

|G. H. Dulle 

!b. R. Ra^sdale 

Julius Wilhelmi 

Frank Barkley 

0. Moberly 

Murgan Mace 

jThomas W. Williams. 

Thomas Adamson 

James A. Neal 

Garrison Harker 

William Forbes 

John D. Meredith 

L. W. Albertson 

James Ownby 

R.J. McCormack 

Wm. McCormnck..... 

J. R. Permenter 

WilUam Penix 

N. P. Ogden 

John Caldwell 

John H. Austin 

J. B. Barnes 

F. W. Gatzweiler...... 

Henry E. Machens.... 

A. Anderson 

B. F. hailey 

E. S. Rowse 

A. K. CowgiU 

J. M. Collier 

J. H. Foreman 

L. M. Ringer 

W. G. J. Crow 



same 
*>ohn Brown 

0. M. Nelson.... 

1. D. Johnson .... 
John F. Mason. 



same 

John Moore 

Plate, Olshaasen &, Co 

Hannibal A St. Joseph Railroad. 



Amount. 


1 Total for 




1 monm. 




t 

$ 400 00 


* 


1,2(56 01 




746 18 




436 24 




l,OliO 00 






348 06 






1,906 70 


t 




4,000 00 




26.3 51 




1,4U8 24 


■ 




6,874 90 






917 79 






347 48 






1,568 79 






272 9.3 


t 




7,226 73 






90,542 94 






1,764 00 




1,733 84 




36 45 




2,000 00 




1,000 00 






370 81 






4 33 


$ 160,632 61 




%700 00 






1,197 65 i 




1,457 80 1 




551 52 1 




3,500 00 




5,580 96 




8,000 00 1 




1,212 6(5 






1,525 00 






641 65 






, 8,760 00 ! 




60 50 






3,134 05 






794 08 






440 33 






11,000 00 






1,550 03 






1,126 81 






5,000 00 






601 66 






1,497 82 






1,080 55 






3,624 72 






5.533 95 






1,289 00 






431 29 






115 05 






11,600 41 






1,244 48 






6,116 67 






141,826 09 






2,077 79 






733 49 






133 74 






308 40 






296 84 






45 20 






1,887 05 






100 60 






328 79 






\ 711 53 






1,742 53 






353 75 






65 75 






7,303 09 


252,182 6:* 





10 



KKCEIPTS INTO 



RECEIPTS INTO THE REVENUE FUND— Continued. 



Date. 



From whom. 



January, 1S6S.. Edwin Darrow , 

Amos P. Owen , 

\f illiam M Blake. 

A. B. Wyatt 

J-. \V. Carson 

;.Tolm II. Moore... 
II. Mitchell 



same 

James Rogers 

James C. Orr 

John Ping^er..... 

James F. Tubb 

Isaiah Jones 

Herman Bader 

James M. Roberts.. 

|R. S. Judy 

iL. B. Davis , 

Oeorge Kuechler.... 
J. J. C. Breazeale. 



same 



George J. McDaniel. 
J. II. Rickards 



same 

F. D. Phillips *. 

Thomas E. Rochester 

.W. H. Ferguson 

same 

Thomas P. Welch 

John BalUnger 

same 

Daniel Ransom 

U. Clark 

John Wheat 



I same 

Julius Wilhelmi 

1 William Berger 

S. F. Gibson 

tOrville Moberly 

W. R. Simms 

James M. Miller 

J. W. Quigg 

'Albert Roecker 

Rice Patterson 

iWm. D. Mustion 

jMorgan Mace 

'S. II. Caldwell 

I James W. Whitehead. 

James C. Powers 

a. W. Fulton 



same 

V. J. McAdoo 

'Thomas Adamson 

!A. P.Gibson 

James F. Gibson 

S. R. Woolfolk 

James A. Neal 

'Lewis Sells 

iSamuel Baker 

William Forbes 

'John D. Meredith 

H.J. Alley 

Ijames Ownby 

George W. Painter.... 

same 

R. J. McCormack 

William McCormack. 

L. B. Hutchison 

I. N. Wray 

same 

W. W. Wallis 

Augnstufl Kleinsorge 



Amount. 



$ 4,U5 

10,192 

4,621 

7 

85 

2,420 

1,4.33 

600 

3,014 

20,394 

27,901 

1,267 

2,994 

12,M6 

6,500 

13,729 

1,314 

4,154 

1,983 

2,407 

9,435 

8,000 

1,945 

5,784 

10,000 

950 

370 

730 

1,000 

660 

4,051 

1,789 

497 

158 

2,881 

6,973 

6,206 

4,975 

8,934 

3,489 

2,620 

5,263 

16,711 

790 

155 

7,026 

6,514 

305 

6,181 

12 

3,128 

7,290 

208 

5,221 

9,4.35 

3,966 

11,683 

1,549 

13,247 

10,139 

4,.318 

8,780 

4,963 

1,600 

2,455 

230 

3,723 

36 

7,246 

184 

940 



19 
97 
99 
64 
78 
93 
68 
00 
48 
22 
32 
01 
09 
94 
00 
28 
44 
33 
96 
05 
11 
00 
21 
38 
00 
91 
03 
69 
00 
56 
49 
77 
31 
06 
67 
70 
08 
80 
27 
90 
16 
51 
56 
00 
62 
68 
05 
89 
39 
00 
27 
00 
78 
82 
08 
46 
61 
56 
69 
08 
31 
53 
68 
00 
60 
40 
16 
00 
78 
47 
26 



Total for 
month. 



*.» 



THE KEVENUE FUND. 



11 



KECEIPTS INTO THE BBVENUE FQND— Continubd. 



Date. 



January, 1868.. 



February, 1868 



March, 1868.... 



From whom. 


Amount. 


Total for 
month. 


A IT Dftaliion.i .........•.•..•••••«•..••. 


$7,040 45 

3,000 00 

17,642 59 

17,361 49 

2,720 72 

5,222 54 

524 61 

8,6,36 08 

11,941 29 

61 47 

1,021 01 

7,176 50 

45,519 41 

200 00 

5,815 55 

4,068 21 

4,909 86 

670 93 

4,369 00 

696 96 

1,014 02 

42 49 

2,055 41 

8.234 70 
562 50 

2,519 68 
3,821 55 
2,590 84 

2,764 33 

3,994 00 

699 39 

105 28 

1,566 36 

1.235 85 
42 75 

679 33 

91 00 

27,959 99 

122 00 

7,791 23 

1,000 00 

793 23 

8,994 56 

1,868 20 

1,000 00 

364 20 

2,494 69 

287 09 

14,399 48 

lUO 10 

1,245 66 

530 00 

170 39 

6,350 92 

1,336 22 

4,437 98 

4,208 77 

5,113 38 

2,037 23 

14,1.39 27 

791 01 

16,936 73 

55 71 

197 95 

25 00 

7,165 22 

54 00 

898 40 
707 67 




"R A Love * 




N P Of den 




P V Tjonprc*An. .........•..•••• •.••••••••• •••••••• 




G. W. CoUev 




.TnTTiAfi Rtiptipaip .....•«...••••.•••••■•••••••••••»•••••••••• 




J H Stpprfl 




.Tnhn I^T Anstin. ..........••••.....•..*..•..........*..•«.•••••• 




A If Upvhiini ................•••.•..........*.•..•..•..•...•*•- 




UAni*ir Wfti*/1 - ....•■•.....•.•••..•.....•....... 




.TiiahiiQ. f«a.mn1in . .. ........ .•••.•••■•••...*.......... 




B F D&ilev 




"R S P.nwse • • •• 




Jnhn T^Akfir.. .....•...*•.....■.•.••....«•••-•■••••«••• ••••••••••••••• 




H H Bvrne 




ThnmftA S Rhoadpa\ ••• •••• 




J. M Collier 




•TiLmPfl (TinfinTi ...«•.••..> «...•.>«•■•.■•••••••••••••«•••••••• 




William McGuUoch 




Aflmo ^ . -^ ^. .......... »•«....««*««•■••••*•■•■•••••••• 




Tjarlcin AdAniBon...... ....... ••..•••••• ••••••••••••• 




ftnmo .. .. .........«.*«*...*.«■•••• ««*•••«••«•••«■ 




W G J. Crow 




I) M Nelson. •• 




.TnmP« MrPftdon ... .........................••«•....■....'..•• 




T. W Tiinvillp ... . .............•.•••••.•......•...•..• 




r T) .Tohnson...... ........ ....•••••••*•*..«.•............•••••.•• 




S!fl.miip1 (^fiAiLV ... ..••...•...•...••. 


$514,897 00 


William A. Norris 




.Tnhn Atkison ^.... .......••..«••.••••••••• «•••••••••• •••• 




J H Rickards 




F D Philliog 




O H. DnllP 




W H Pprff-naon 




BILTYIA . .......-...•.■«■■>•••••■••••*■••■•■•*•••••• 




Albert Roecker 

\V D Mnstion 




PhiLrlpa TJoucViPftrv .................••..•••.••••«••.............• 




S n. Caldwell 




Thomaa W Williams 




Thnnifui AdiLTnsnTt ........••.«...••..«.>•••■•• •••■••••••••••«•••«• 




fanmo . ... . ..•..».•■«•■■■■«•••••••••••••■•••••• 




(1 Harker 




Winiftm r^TiHTiiAii. . ............•••««•••■•••••••••••««••••••••■••• 




J L Shelbv 




jAmpfl OvrnbT....... ••..••.• .•••••• •• •••••••••••••.•. 




•TfLmPfl S. If ump. .......•«..•«..>••>•• •••••«•*•*••••••«••••••■• 




:T M TjA.u0*h1in ......«•..«..««.......•••• *.•••••••••••••* 




W H Porter » 




flume «....*...•«•.«.••.■• ...««•••••••••••••••• •••• 




William Penix 




•Trmifkh B DiLrn as...... «••.«.....••««••••■••■••••••••••• •••••••••■•■ 




.TrkohtfA. fl^fimhlin . . .............•«...•■••»•••••••■•■■■• 




n E Mac^faena 




T'^liiiii T)inTiPv.. ... .......... ........ ••••■••.••• ••«••••••••••••••• 




PrUTikltfi Murnhv- ••••••••••••••••••••••• 




A- Andprson.. .........•••«. .....••«••••••••••••••••• «.••••«•« «•••• 




B. F- Dailev • 




same • 




E. S. Rowse 




iSAtne . ••••••••••••«••••••••*••••••• 




John Wall 




SRinA ...........•-••••••••••••••••-••••• •••••••• 




A. K. Cowrill 




W.G.J Crow •• 




John fJ. Tlrppkpnrid<rp ..••••••>••••• ••«••••• 




G^enerAl Aaiipmlilv fAr nav of... ..«••••••••«•••••••••••••••••• 


143,048 50 


John Atkieton 

Harriaon Mitchell 





12 



RECEIPTS ISTO 



RECEIPTS INTO THE REVENUE FUND— Contikum. 



Date. 



From whom. 



March. 1368.... Harrison Mitchell. 
A. P. Holland 



April, 1868. 



May, 1863 



June; 1863. 



same , 

J. H. Rickards 

Thomas E. Rochester. 

same 

John Wheat 

E. G. Rathburn , 

H. M. Rice 

0. Moberly 

Thomas W. Williams. 

Thomas Adamson 

James A. Neal 

same 

Samael Baker 

II. J. Alley 

B. F. Boyce 

same 

J. B. Barnes 

B. F. Dailey 

E. i^. Rowse 



same 

John Baker 

Georg:e F. Chilton.... 
(xeorge W. Kitchen., 

L. M. Ringer , 

Larkin Adamson , 

James L. Minor 



Wm. A. Norris 

J. M. Roberts 

A. P. Holland 

B. R. Ragsdale 

Daniel Ransom 

Wm. H. Uillman 

W. D. Mustion 

Thomas Adamson 

Aag^ustus Kleinsorge. 

R. A. Love 

Elias Disney 

Benjamin Charles 

D. C. Coleman 

B. F. Dailey 

G. K. Chilton 

L. U. Linville 



same 



J. W. Carson 

W. A. Norris 

John Atkison 

James F. Tubb 

Isaiah Jones 

A. P. Holland 

G.H. Dulle 

W. D. Mustion 

Thomas Adamson.. 
Garrison Ilarker.... 

W. II. Higdon 

James Ownby. ...... 

John H. Austin 

A. K. Reyburn...... 

Joshua Gamblin .... 

Elias Disney < 

Bei\jamin Charles.. 

B. F. Dailey 

E. 8. Rowse 

W. G. J. Crow 



J. W. Carson 

John Atkison 

Harrison Mitchell. 



Amount. 



$ 1,446 35 
6 00 

1,501 24 
307 12 
918 10 

1,758 75 
121 37 
982 12 
250 82 
346 91 

4,392 13 

9,224 55 
38 00 

1,003 53 

13 00 

355 28 

2,281 67 

1,749 97 
245 06 

8,118 59 
789 97 
955 10 
835 00 
113 80 

1,325 64 

179 35 

13 00 

175 00 

450 00 
3,235 81 

67 19 
610 05 

38 55 

105 61 
92 10 

2,671 47 

15 60 

110 00 

1,091 02 

2,373 28 

6,100 50 

8,266 11 

578 25 

115 05 

167 75 

227 42 
545 00 

1,166 00 
95 45 

1,180 55 
700 00 
609 29 
207 95 
364 01 

1,085 93 

2,311 98 
190 75 
120 70 

1,505 49 

534 34 

175 85 

10,644 77 

6,291 90 

1 59 

738 21 

106 35 
104 90 
300 00 



Total for 
month. 



$ 41,053 49 



26,094 VA 



28,697 18 



THE BEVENUE FUND. 



13 



RECEIPTS INTO THE REVENUE FUND— Continued. 



Date. 



From whom. 



June, 18C8. 



James F. Tubb.... 

Joe Davis 

John Ballinirer.... 
James F. Gibson. 
Qarrlson Barker.. 
John H. Steers.... 
F. W. Gatzweiler. 
Benjamin Charles . 

B. F. Dailey 

J. M. Collier 



July, 1868. 



Angost, 1868... 



James M. Russell. 

R. S. Judy 

J. U. Kickards 

John Ballinger 

II. Clark 

James M. Miller..., 



same 

Albert Roecker...., 
Thomas Adamson. 
R. J. McCormack. 
John U. Austin.... 
Benjamin Charles. 

B. F. Dailey 

L. H. Llnville 



J. W. Carson 

A. P. Holland 

W. II. Ferguson 

Albert Roecker 

George W. Fulton 

Jas. A. Neal 

Joshua Gamblin 

Benjamin Charles 

D. 0. Coleman , 

B. F. Dailey 

A. K. Cowgill 

For taxes and fees during month. 



Beptemb'r,1868 



^ 



October^ 1868. 



William M. Blake 

Joseph W. Carson 

John Ballinger 

A. W. Jeffries 

Mor|;an Mace 

Garrison llarker 

L. W. Albcrtson 

\Vm. McCormack , 

J. Gamblin 

Thomas B. Sutherland. 
Benjamin Charles 

B. F. Dailey 

A. K. Cowgill :...., 

G. F. Chilton 

I. D. Johnson 



Amos F. Owen 

Wm. M. Blake 

U. Mitchell , 

A. P. Holland 

George Kuechler.., 
W. H. Ferguson.. 

John Wheat 

Franklin Barkley.. 

Morgan Mace , 

James A, Neal , 

W. W. Wallis 

A. H. Cushman... 
P. F. Lonergan... 

J. B. Barnes , 

Joshua Gamblin..., 
Benjamin Charles, 



Amount. 



$ 



78 50 
1,634 33 

1.500 00 
ftl 55 
93 50 

1,228 64 

683 73 

21,013 49 

5.501 Ifi 
2,024 88 



22 

61 

1,060 

1,303 

382 

500 

3,103 

616 

1,110 

178 

500 

l.%829 

6,024 

18 



68 
10 
63 
75 
25 
00 
69 
96 
65 
79 
00 
55 
37 
24 



336 66 

45 90 

128 26 

20 00 

40 60 

1,497 40 

u64 65 

18,487 87 

2,021 50 

10,123 3S 

29 21 

89 S5 



208 

40 

28 

72 

968 

344 

2,565 

1,423 

210 

40 

5,255 

7,719 

20 

50 

1,554 



12 

95 
77 
18 
67 
70 
00 
04 
00 
95 
41 
91 
55 
00 
69 



1,000 00 

1,454 77 

2,609 35 

70 97 

807 70 

1,445 23 

165 75 

2,087 71 

1,799 99 

2^000 00 

400 00 

2,968 00 

562 50 

845 84 

139 28 

16,390 63 



Total for 
month. 



$34,231 03 



28,712 64 



33,985 28 



20,502 94 



14 



RECEIPTS INTO 



RECEIPTS INTO THE REVENUE FUND— Coktihuid. 



Date. 



From vrhom. 



October, 1868... B.F. Dailey... 
'A. K. Cowgill. 
0. P. Phillips. 



Xoverab'r,1868 J. W. Carson.... 

William King 

A. P. Holland. .., 

William Baskirk 

John Howard 



John Ballinger 

Frank Barkley 

Wm. R. Simms 

Morgan Mace 

Thomas AdamsoD... 

Jamee S. Hume 

James Ownbj , 

J. B. Barne8 

Benjamin Charles... 

B. F. Dailey. 

Thomas S. Rhoades. 



0. M. Nelson 

L. H. LinviUe • 

J. F. Mason 

For taxes and fees during month.. .i. 



December, 1868[H. Mitchell.. 
John Pine^er. 



William King 

A. P. Holland 

R. S. Judy 

G. H. Dulle 

John Ballinger. 

{Morgan Mnce , 

!A. P. GibHon 

'.lames A. Neai 

G. Harker 

John D. Meredith 

William Penix 

Robert Steele 

J. B. Barnes 

J. Gamblin 

H. E. Maohens 

Thomas B. Sutherland 

Benjamin Charles.. 

B. F. Dailey 

D. C. Coleman 

A. K. Cowgill 

Thomas S. Rhoades , 

Phil. F. Bryan 

Thomas W. Williams 

Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Co, 
Phil. Zeppenfelt 



Amount. 



$4,485 U 

1,600 00 

266 69 

3,250 00 
10,028 23 

250 00 
1,531 57 

575 00 
4,036 70 

500 40 
3,8fi8 42 
1,902 00 
1,000 00 
6,000 00 

719 13 

1,000 00 

55,826 41 

8,463 82 

1,500 00 

73 10 

. 250 00 

1,329 00 

15 33 

1,669 05 

27,500 00 

4,115 49 

101 40 

136 00 

2,500 00 

2,253 10 

1,260 00 

1,494 60 

2,000 00 

2,500 00 

805 00 

450 00 

1,000 00 

994 50 

568 45 

262 35 

5,877 87 

179,308 34 

8,096 88 

2,150 00 

1,200 00 

2,067 09 

599 60 

6,745 59 

8,199 98 

25 00 



Total. 



ToUl for 
month. 



$ 41,099 52 



102,119 13 



263,875 29 
$.3,808,427 3,". 



STATE INTEREST FUN©. 



15 



RECEIPTS INTO STATE INTEREST FUND. 



Date. 



December, 1866 

January Z, 1867 
4...... 

7 



From whom. 



Robert A. Watt. 



Amount. 



April 17. 



20. 
May, 1867. 
Jane^ 1867. 



Sovtbem Bank of St. Louis 

Weston A Atchison A Atchison A St. Joseph Railroad 

Sale of St. Louis A Iron Mountain and Cairo A Ful- 

ton Railroads 



E. S. Rowse. 
R. A. Watt.. 



E. S. Rowse. 



E. S. Rowse 

Exchange Bank of St. Louis, 



July, 1867 :R- a. Love 

|E. S. Rowse , 

J. Condit Smith. 



August, 1867... 



8eptemb'r,1867 



E. S. Rowse 

Mechanics' Bank of St. Louis. 



W. A. Norris 

Fsaiah Jones 

Thomas P. Welch. 

K. S. Rowse 

William Cook 

Henry Mitchell... 



$ 25,000 00 

4,511 00 
9,520 00 

225,700 00 

611 28 
10,000 00 

3,453 37 

33,448 14 
5,136 90 

463 00 

19,368 76 

149,470 00 

9,283 83 
3,122 34 



October, 1867. 



J. M. Carson 

Isom Matlock 

Julius Welhelmi 

Frank Barkley 

J. M. Miller 

Morgan Mace 

J. L. Shelby 

James S. Hume , 

John H. Austin 

E. 3. Rowse 

A. K. Cowgill 

0. M. Nelson 

James W. McFaden. 



Novemb'r,1867 John Atkison 

Harrison Mitchell. 



William Kinr 

Qeorge Knecfaier 

G. H. DuUe 

John Ballinger 

Frank Barkley 

Albert Roecker , 

Morgan Mace..... 

J. L. Shelbv 

James Ownby 

Augustus Kleinsorge. 

E. W. Bishop 

John H. Steers 

E. S. Rowse 

A. K. CowgiU 

0. M. Nelson 

[John F. Mason 



635 00 


3,680 00 


3,200 00 


6,172 15 


200 00 


100 00 


9,000 00 


400 00 


726 93 


1,000 00 


10,122 29 


4,d90 00 


550 00 


10,000 00 


246 52 


52,721 49 


700 00 


1,480 00 


8,000 00 


2,000 00 


6,000 00 


16,999 51 


7,100 50 


3,500 .00 


8,000 00 


1,316 90 


650 00 


500 00 


900 00 


1,.300 49 


4,197 51 


.361 10 


9,000 00 


137,468 79 


2,142 50 


2,500 00 


1,600 00 



Total. 



$ 25,000 OO 



239,731 00 

10,611 28 
3,453 37 

43,^85 04 

169,.W1 76 
12,406 17 



1?,937 15 



99,637 2.1 



205;437 30 



16 



RECEIPTS INTO 



RECEIPTS INTO BTATB INTEREST FUND— Conttnuid. 



Date. 



December, 1S67 



Jannary, 1868. 



From whom. 



J. W, Carson 

William Kin^ , 

James M. Russell... 

G. H. Dulle «..„ 

B. R. Ragsdale 

Julius Wiikelmi 

Frank Barkley , 

Morgan Mace » 

Thomas W. Williams 

James A. Neal 

John D. Meredith. 

L. W. Albertson 

R. J. McCorraack 

R. A. Love M..... 

John Caldwell 

Henry E. Machens 

E. S. Ruwse ; 

A. K. Cowgill 

J. M. Collier 

0. M. Nelson 

John F. Mason 

Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company. 

Robert A. Watt ^ 

John U. Richardson 



Edwin Darrow 

Amos F, Owen „.,. 

William U. Blake , 

J. W. 'arson 

John II. Moore < 

James Rogers 

James C. Urr , 

John I'inger • 

James F. Tubb 

Isaiah Jones 

Herman Bader 

James M. Roberts. .... 

R. S. Judy 

L. B. Davis 

Ge( rge Kuechler 

J. J. C. Breazeale...... 

George J. McDaniel... 

J. H. Rickards , 

F. D. Phillips 

Thomas K. Rochester. 

Thomns P. Welch 

John Bnilinger..... 

Daniel Ransom 

H. Clark 

John Wheat 

Julius Wilhelmi 

AVilliam Berger 

Frank Barkley 

S. F. Gibson 

Orville Moberly 

W.R. Simms 

James M. Miller 

J. W. Quigff 

Albert Koecker 

Rice Patterson. 

William I). Mwstion.. 

S. II. Caldwell 

jjames \\\ Whitehead. 

George W. Fulton 

F. J. McAdoo 

James F. Gibson 

S. R. Woolfolk 

James A. Neal.., ■ 

Lewis Sells 

Samuel Baker 

William Forbes 



Amonnt. 



Total. 



• ««*• ••.•.^.•••. 



$ 6,500 00 

255 51 

1,988 24 

4.500 00 
4,773 12 

12,000 00 
2,000 00 

600 00 
13,140 00 

3,000 00 

19,000 00 

1,900 00 

9,U00 00 

500 OO 

7,?44 92 

15,000 00 

223,666 65 

1,000 00 

800 00 

150 08 

1,395 14 

11,684 94 

1,586 54 

23,040 00 

5,941 86 
7,583 50 
6,166 75 
47 08 
2,486 13 
3,707 38 

29,391 15 

34,556 99 

963 57 

3,000 00 

15,880 31 
9,842 59 

li,987 17 
2,571 03 
5,908 33 
2,878 52 

13,115 39 

15,000 00 
8,885 24 

11,000 00 
643 95 
1,971 80 
5,212 78 
1,681 28 
572 70 
4,005 25 
8,072 17 

1.501 72 
11,604 54 

6,652 80 

11,807 70 

2,642 86 

2,759 07 

7,253 75 

23,104 85 

493 00 

4,034 04 

5,401 67 

7,409 49 

4,539 83 

7,025 67 

12,758 23 

1,123 86 

' 16,326 22 

601 80 
15,948 71 



$364,636 14 



STATE INTEREST FUND. 



- n 



RECEIPTS INTO STATE INTEREST FUND— Continued. 



Date. 



From whom. 



JaaiiMr7/,1868* John D. Meredith 

H. J. Alley 

James Ownby.. , 

G. W. Painter 

R. J. McCormack 

L. B. Hutchison.. 

I. N. Wray 

W. W. Wallis 

jAug^ustus Kleinsorge. 

'.T. K. Perinenter 

'A. H. Ca«hion 

R. A. Love 

X. P. Ogden 

P. F. Lonorgan 

James Spencer 

J. II. Steers 

I John H. Austin 

lA. K. Reyhurn 

Joshua (Jamblin 

E S. Rowse , 

A. K. Cowgill 

H. H. Byrne 

Thomas S. Rboades.., 

J. M. Collier 

Wm. McCullough 

W. Q. J. Crow 

0. M. Nelson 

* L. II. Linville 

1. D. Johnson 

Samuel Coday 

R. A. Watt 

Thomas Allen , 

E. S. Rowse '..., 



February, 1838 Amos F. Owen. 
John II. Moore. 



MpfCly loVD.x 



William A. Norris 

John Atkison 

G. II. Dulle 

Thomas E. Rochester... 

W. H. Ferguson 

John Ballinger 

Charles Dougherty 

Thomas W. Williams... 

Thomas Adamson 

G. Marker 

Samuel Baker 

Wm. Crismnn 

L. W. Albertson , 

J. L. Shelby 

.Tames S. Hume 

W. H. Porter 

John H. Austin 

Joshua Gamblin 

H. E. Machens 

Eliae Disney 

Franklin Murphy , 

A. Anderson „ , 

E. S. Rowse 

John Wall 

W. G. J. Crow 

John C. Breckenridg«. 

I. D. Johnson 

E. S. Rowse •• 

John Atkison 

Amos P.. Holland , 

Thomas £. Rochester.., 
Thomas W. Williams... 

Thomu Adamson 

James A. Neal 



Amount. 



Total. 



$ 5,012 00 




6,497 10 




l.^SST 40 




. 6,708 28 




803 85 




.3,903 6fi 




10,826 89 




408 86 . 




2,048 42 




1 • \r I.i) 




o.-sfii np 




3,58.3 <)4 




14,i;i2 12 




22,582 :)0 




0,2S() 99 




1,304 84 




14.528 30 




18,040 79 




•J2i 08 




70,727 63 




2^3 .38 




7,363 70 




4,096 97 




6,053 19 




5,756 96 




.1,087 48 




1,690 11 




2,075 01 




2,841 6.3 




1,766 97 




825 00 




40,45^? 00 


• 


5/J52 75 


$660,0?3 90 


6,004 60 




379 10 




846 73 




4,000 00 




550 91 




1,001 95 




3,069 92 




119 94 




26,071 13 




7,243 79 




2,201 66 




7,784 88 




381 00 


** 


973 35 




4 00 




1,294 65 




1,524 87 




18,328 62 




390 19 




63 71 




4,804 45 




1,.336 22 




6,859 38 




6,093 26 


w 


1,231 86 




24>146 67 




57 61 




7,720 03 




334 00 




.132 82 


ui,om #9 


630 82 




670 35 




4,000 00 




146 94 




16,463 49 




962 00 





2-A 



18 



RECEIPTS INTO 



RECEIPTS INTO BTATE INTEREST FUND— Cohtiiiuep* 



Date. 



March, 1d6S. 




. G. Barker 

B. F. Boyce 

,E. S. Rowse • 

same - « 

Goorq^e W. Kitchen 

W. G. J. Crow 

J. H. Britton 

.William Strahan 

! Mechanic!' Bank of ^t. Louii. 



April, 1868. 



:B. R. Ragsdale 

E. 0. Rathburn... 

In. p. Ogden 

! Benjamin Charles. 



May, 185S. 



Isaiah Jones 

(J. H. Dulle 

|B. R. Ragsdale 

Thomas Adamson.. 
iW. 11. lligdon...!.. 
iVVilliam Crisman..., 
; Benjamin Charles.. 

,\V. G.J. Crow 

S. D. Barlow 



Jane, 1808. 



Thomas W. Williams , 

.Toshua Gamblin 

Benjamin Charles 

Exchanp^e Bank of St. Louis. 
Pacific Railroad Company 



July, 1S68 iJames M. Miller 

■James A. Neal 

JBenjamin Charles 

'Missouri Valley Railroad Company. 
{North Missouri Railroad Company. 



August, 1868... 



Septemb'r,186S 



Benjamin Charles 

Mechanics' Bank of St. Louis. 



October, 1868. 



Novemb'r,1868 



John Ballinger 

Morgan Mace........ 

Benjamin Charles. 

G. F. Chilton 

U. M. Nelson 



Amos F. Owen 

Harrison Mitchell.... 

i\f organ Mace 

James A. Neal 

A. H. Cnshman 

Benjamin Charles 

Pacific Railroad Company. 
Fund Commissioners 



J. W. Carson 

William King 

W. U.Ferguson 

John Balliuger 

Frank Barkley 

Wm. R. Simms 

Morgan Mace 

James A. Neal 

L. W Albertson.... 

J. S. Hume 

J. B. Barnes 

Benjamin Charles.. 
Thomas S. Rhoades. 

G. F. Chilton 

J. F. Mason 



$ 1,230 40 

2,.365 10 

27,590 32 

883 38 

1,734 79 

239 n 

7,970 11 

100 00 

4,500 66 

29 02 
500 00 

6^419 08 
800 25 

90 90 

228 00 

690 31 

1,452 29 

3,422 58 

1,092 73 

13,031 43 

82 00 

6,130 94 

200 50 

38 80 

19,743 31 

5,000 00 

350,000 00 

1,846 94 

500 00 

13,297 92 

6,180 00 

200,000 00 

21,186 06 
7,300 00 

3,000 00 
972 00 

3,803 08 
500 00 
635 45 

900 00 

2,300 00 

1,300 00 

2,000 00 

2.067 00 

l.'),741 34 

4,650,000 00 

30 00 

3,250 00 

0,906 30 

42 35 

3,975 00 

500 00 
3,000 00 
1,900 00 
2,000 00 
2,340 00 
6,000 00 

980 00 

58,887 03 

2,000 00 

500 00 
1,329 85 



Total. 



$69,278 11 



7,748 35 



26,221 IS 



374,982 61 



221,824 8(1 
28,486 06 



8,910 53 



4,675,2;J8 .S4 



98,670 51 



' 



STATE INTEREST FUND. 



19 



EECEIPTS INTO STATE INTERBST FUND— Coktikubd. 



Date. 



December; 1868 



From whom. 



H. Mitchell 

John Piofer 

William King. 

O. H. Dalle 

John Ballinger 

Morgan Mace.. 

James A. Neal.... 

G. Harker 

J. Qamblin 

Thomas B. Sutherland... 

Benjamin Charles , 

B. F. Dailey 

A. K. Cowgill 

Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Co. 



XO vlLI*«« ••«•••••• 



Amount. 



$1,669 05 

20,000 00 

5,896 28 

2,500 00 

2,226 90 

1,250 00 

2,998 25 

2,500 00 

510 00 

5,195 65 

177,305 56 

381 64 

1,200 00 

8,199 87 



Total. 



$231,833 20 



$7,707,884 2$ 



*' 



20 



RECEIPTS INTO 



KECEIPTS INTO UNION MILITARY FUND. 



Date. 



Oct. 



10, 1866 

19 

9 

17 

30 

6 

24 

25 

18 

4 

6 

17 

18 

4 

20 



Novemb'r,1866 



From whom. 



John W. Ownby 

Amos Ladd 

James Russell 

R. S. Jady 

George Funkhouser. , 

William King 

H. Clark 

ri. M. Rice 

William H.Hillman< 

II. H. Williams 

L. W. Albertson 

Thomas Thompson.. 

Martin G. Foster 

H.J. Alley 

Wm. H.Boulware... 
JohnH. Lightner,.. 
John Baker 



Amos F. Owen 

Hamilton llall 

John Atkison 

H. M. Rice 

0. Moberly 

Morgan Mace 

H. U. Williams..., 

G. W. Fulton 

H.J. Alley 

L.W. Albertson... 
E. G. B. McNutt.. 
JohnH. Lightner. 
Phillip F. Bryan.. 

same 

John F. Mason.... 



Decern Vr. 1866 



•y, 1867. 



H. Hall 

Joe P. Ranev 

Thomas Harbine 

L. B. Davis 

H. M. Rice 

H. H. Williams 

C. C. Fletcher 

Thomas W. Williams. 
John W. Stewart 



same 

H. J. Alley 

James S. Hume ••• 

W. W. Wallis 

Wm. H. Porter 

R. A. Love 

John Caldwell 

John H. Austin 

F. W. Gat«weiler 

John H. Lightner 

Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. 



Amos F. Owen.... 

A. B. Wyatt 

John Atkison 

Samuel Webb 

James Rogers 

James F. Tubb.. 



Amount. 


Total for 
month. 


$610 74 




713 98 




175 00 




3,262 18 




2,662 92 




600 00 




599 00 




3,000 00 




8,310 31 




4,5.'^>0 64 




854 70 




72 15 


1,431 85 


3,000 00 1 


6,000 00 




333 81 




1,262 46 


$37,319 74 


7,111 34 


3,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,237 51 , 


1,000 00 : 


2,442 73 ' 


4,544 12 i 


6,536 50 


88 30 ' 


551 10 


10,100 27 ' 


52,086 43 1 


1,589 61 ; 


• 5,500 00 
800 00 


08,687 91 


5,387 31 


4,037 96 


62.424 45 


1,944 00 


1,016 82 


2,189 79 ' 


8,287 23 1 


14,998 50 1 


1,429 57 




400 00 




2,895 13 




10,362 00 




731 48 




767 95 




2,586 97 




12,232 11 




4,290 00 




3,000 00 




384,238 37 
8,163 34 


521,372 98 


5,162 93 




4,712 95 




2,726 96 




3,000 00 




4,502 67 




2,369 97 





TUE UNION MILITART FUND. 



21 



RECEIPTS INTO THE UNION MILITARY FUND— Contikoed. 



Date. 



Jaauary, 1867. 



From whom. 



William Kiog 

.Tames M. Russell 

Henry Bruihl 

R. S. Judy 

L. B. Davis 

John Schee 

James M. Jones.. 

Geor^ Funkhouser.. 
Thomas E. Rochester. 

Joe Davis 

Thomas P.Welch 

J. L. Powell 

William Orr 

H. Clark 

Julius Wilhelmi 

William Berger 

S. F. Gibson 

same 

Orville Moberly 

S. K. Williams 

J. W. Qui^g 

William Kaucher...... 

Prior M. Jackson 

Morgan Mace 

H. H. Williams 

Samuel H. Caldwell.. 

0. C. Fletcher 

Thomas W. Williams. 

G. W. Fulton 

Thomas Adamson 

A. P. Gibson 

jjohn Sisler 

jjohn R. Knox 

wJames A. Neal 

|G. Harker 

W. H. Boulware 

William Crisman 

H.J. Alley 

L. W. Albertson 

E. G. B. McNutt 

W. McCormack 

L. B. Hutchison 

J. E. Alexander 

J. N. Laughlin 

Wm. H. Porter 

William Penix 

|N. P. Ogden 

!G. W. CoUey 

IJames Spencer 

jSamuel Smith 

John H. Austin 

A. K. Reyburn 

JJosiah B. Barnes 

Henry Ward 

IF. W. Gatzweiler 

|B. G. Roberts 

lA. Anderson 

Uohn H. Lightner 

Benjamin H. Haupe.. 

James S. Best 

|J. 11. Foreman 

IW. McCulluch 

[Jobn Brown 

Paul Schmidt 

Phillip F. Bryan 

!l. H. Linvir.e 

1. D. Johnson 

John F. Mason.... 

John Moore 



Febraarj, 1867 John F. Baker 



Amount. 



17 

09 



26 
05 



$14,471 55 
2,783 39 

14,201 01 

3,371 16 

935 57 

14,013 02 

14,385 18 

3,241 07 

7,000 00 

3,601 43 

531 92 

11,910 
5,725 
2,615 98 
3,107 00 

14,607 45 
6,604 42 

12,296 76 
5,701 31 

10,484 39 
2,833 70 
7.988 89 

10,236 71 
887 21 

13.194 01 
5,079 51 

324 

2,546 

1,120 91 
19,496 29 
10,123 05 
17,901 40 

23.195 04 
6,762 40 

11,804 55 

15,758 36 

2,029 96 

260 

525 

2,747 

5,033 15 

3,403 47 

13,030 44 

11,914 68 

12,266 89 

14,891 08 

19,750 39 

1,828 57 

3,175 70 

10,912 10 

1,103 15 

15,136 89 

790 30 

1,796 38 

16,756 99 

803 77 

10,679 46 

51,015 41 

8,572 67 

11,688 67 

9,998 98 

4,631 81 

8,6.S4 89 

8,882 13 

10,185 28 

2,777 10 

8,624 75 

2,598 46 

2,397 



00 
25 
59 



26 



16,234 79 



Total for 
month. 



$602,107 »9 



22 



REClilPTS INTO 



RECEIPTS INTO THE UNION MILITARY FUND-Costihubd. 



Date. 



Febrnaij, 1867 



From whom. 



Jon. Sackman........ 

William King 

G. H. Dalle 

Samuel E. Shaw 

William H. Hillman. 

P. M. Jackson 

John F. Hargrove.... 

Jacob Oilatrap 

L. W. Pritchett 



same .., 

B.S.Walker 

B. F. Boyce 

same 

Thomas Layton.... 

William Penix 

John II. Austin...., 
John H. Lightner . , 

John Baker 

B. F. Silman 

L. M. Rinrer 

W. G. J. Crow 



March, 1867.... 



AprU, 1867. 



Maj, 1867. 



June, 1867. 



Jiil7^ 1867. 



Amos F. Owen 

A. E. Wyatt 

H. F. Harrington 

Jonathan Sackman.... 

Kinsy Veatch 

Peter Meyer 

Thomas E. Rochester 

Moses F. Wood 

S. F. Gibson 

Martin G. Foster 

James Damall 

James Spencer 

John H. Lightner 



John W. Ownby...., 

Amos F. Owen 

James M. Roberts., 
E. G. Rathbum.... 
Julius Wilhelmi...., 

P. M. Jackson 

James S. Hume...., 

Frank Murphy 

John H. Lightner., 

John Baker , 

W. G. J. Crow 



Amos F. Owen ., 

Harrison Mitchell , 

G. H. DuUe 

Thomas E. Rochester., 
William M. HUlman.l. 

William Penis 

James Spencer 

A. K. Reybum 

E. S. Rowse 



B. Darrow 

John Atklson 

W. H. Hillman 

James M. Miller 

Thomas W. Williams. 

Thomas Adamson 

R. C. Cooper 

John Wall 



P. M. Jackson.. 
E. L. Newsome 
R, A. Lore 



tionn zjL* AUSMn« ..««..«»....»..»» •.•••...•*.•••. 



•%••»•*•»••** ..^^^ 



Amount. 


Total for 
month. 


$6,272 36 


/ 


1,.378 51 




101 86 


• 


7,916 26 




2,121 37 




85(> 35 




9-tl 13 




12,014 14 




86 54 




1,093 22 




3,440 40 




1,681 93 




1,784 91 




3,334 43 




6,000 00 




357 4fa 




195,247 79 




1,290 19 




6,919 91 




4,746 67 




2,115 20 


$274,1)85 45 


3,000 pO 




2,738 00 




1,709 73 




231 73 




6,919 78 




1 14,013 76 




555 03 




778 79 




1,708 62 




2,040 31 




2,S19 90 




231 19 




79,921 19 


110,668 03 


139 54 




1,270 00 




7,727 30 




1,295 45 




387 47 




76 54 


1 


645 31 


1 


7,273 38 




17,045 15 




57 00 




237 70 


.^6,154 84 


663 40 




226 61 




213 00 




428 18 




562 30 




367 41 




438 50 




202 44 




21 58 


3,123 42 


511 60 i 




5:^ 28 




500 00 




349 90 




330 10 




821 01 




92 45 




210 54 


3,353 8S 


2,131 42 




271 11 




542 65 




213 05 





I 

J 



THE UNION MILITARY FUND. 



23 



RECBIPTS INTO THE UNION MILITARY FUND— Costinued. 



Date. 



From whom. 



July, 1867 iWilliam Staton 



Auffust, 1867... <>• H. Dalle 

• W. II. Ferguson. 

W. D. Mastion... 
Morgan Mace.... 
a. W. Fulton.... 
Joshua Gamblln. 

E. S. Rowse 

(John WaU 



Sept., 1867. 



October, 1867.. 



Thomas P. Welch 

W. H. Ilillman 

S. K. Williams , 

P. M. Jackson 

Thomas W. Williams. 

George W. Fulton 

Thomas j^ damson 

L. W. Albertson 

John Baker 



Amos F. Cwen 

J. W. Carson 

William H. Ferguson. 

W. H. Hillman 

Thomas W. Williams. 

Garrison Harker 

James S. Hume 

G. W. Colley 

Elias Disney.... 

0. M. Nelson 



Nor., 1867. 



December, 1867 



January, 1868.. 



John Atkison 

George Kuechler 

John Ballinger 

Morgan Mace 

same 

U. J. Alley 

Augustas Kleinsorge. 

E. S. Ro\rse 

Lewis Sells 



J. W. Carson 

William King 

James M. Russell.. 
B. R. Ragsdale .... 

Morgan Mace 

John Caldwell 

John F. Mason 

F. W. Ludwig 



Edwin Darrow 

Amos F. Owen 

William M. Blake..., 

J. W. Carson 

John H. Moore 

H. Mitchell 

James Rogers... , 

James C. Orr 

John Pinger , 

James F. Tubb , 

Herman Bader 

James M. Roberts..., 

R. S.Judy 

L* B. Davis 

George Kuechler 

J. J. C. Breazeale..., 
Georee J. McDaniel. 

W. H. Fergnion , 

Thomas P. Welch.... 
Daniel Random , , 



Amount. 



$26 91 

210 00 
502 23 
500 00 
511 39 
879 40 
166 87 
26,677 78 
168 89 



72 

50O 

2 

38 

69 

1,718 

39 

756 

100 

587 
438 
404 
350 
49 
778 

1,213 
116 

5,350 
68 



67 
00 
86 
60 
55 
76 
70 
57 
00 

65 
65 
49 
00 
93 
18 
71 
41 
99 
80 



545 42 

2,092 86 

1,000 00 

265 00 

27 66 

1.017 24 

845 00 

103,904 47 

701 73 

1,300 00 

1,322 81 

300 00 

1,346 88 

412 40 

319 17 

988 99 

40 25 

1,509 08 
1,315 96 

630 29 
24 90 

425 44 
91 07 

299 47 
1,043 17 
2,958 23 

634 14 

234 46 
1,232 66 
2,498 29 

667 85 
4,028 34 
3,222 60 

792 U 

337 48 
47 12 



Total for 
month. 



$3,185 14 



29,616 56 



3,288 51 



9,358 81 



109,899 88 



6,080 50 



-M 



RKCEIPTS INTO 



RECEIPTS INTO THE UNION MILITARY FUND— Comtwukb. 



Date. 



January, 1868.. 



Feb., 1868. 



rr. Clark 

John Wheat 

Julius Wilhelmi 

W^illiam Berger 

Frank Barkley 

S. F. Gibson 

Orville Moberly , 

VV. R. Simms 

William H. Uillman. 

James M. Miller 

J. W. Quige 

Albert Roecker 

R.ice Patterson 

S. H. Caldwell 

James W. Whitehead 
<i. W. Fulton 




some , 

James F. Gibson , 

A. P. Gibson ...., 

3. R. Woolfolk 

James A. Neal 

Lewis Sells , 

Samuel Baker 

William Forbes 

John D. Meredith...., 

James Ownby 

G. W. Painter 

R. J. McCormack...., 
William McCormack . 

L. B. Hutchison 

I. N. Wray 

W. W. Wallis 

A.. H. Cashion 

R. A. Love , 

N. P. Ogden 

P. F. Lonergan , 

G. W. Colley 

James Spencer 

J. H. Steers , 

John H. Austin 

A. K. Reybum 

Joshua Gamblin 

A. K. Cowgill 

H. H. Byrne 

Thomas S. Rhoades., 

J. M. Collier 

James Gipson 

William McCuUoch., 

same 

W. G. J. Crow 

L. H. Linville 

L. D. Johnson 

Samuel Coday , 



William A. Norris . 
John F. Baker....... 

J. H. Rickards 

James M. Jones 

P. D. Phillips 

G. H. DuUe 

0. Moberly 

Charles Dougherty. 
Garrison Harker.... 
William Crisman.... 
L. W. Albertson..., 

James S. Hume 

W. H. Porter 

John H. Austin...., 
Henrr E. Machens 
Franklin Murphy.. 
A. Anderson......... 



Amount. 


Total for 
month* 


$ 958 70 




200 62 - 




10,105 71 




168 86 




635 51 




943 30 




4,033 74 




1,250 18 




210 00 




1,392 02 




355 46 




588 31 




149 88 




3,733 04 




1,705 54 




1,413 .37 




109 99 




313 22 




261 03 




456 42 




3,281 57 




358 82 




462 97 




1,295 38 




2,181 11 




786 54 




1,296 00 


« 


1,232 23 




267 44 




770 69 




1,162 18 




104 79 




93 46 




1,000 00 




2,728 00 




1,454 31 




86 07 




276 2^ 




984 62 




4 78 




851 43 




629 92 




20 02 




1,131 43 




563 53 




293 50 




247 09 




636 65 




204 57 




723 98 




327 92 




529 39 




756 91 


$77,988 6S 


1,469 57 




188 55 




500 00 




455 96 




135 61 




110 52 




319 90 




7,946 91 




1,180 13 




558 45 




281 00 




581 93 




2,471 75 




516 37 




2,275 14 




418 96 




572 47 





SUNDKY FUNDS 



26 



KECEIPTS INTO THE UNION MILITARY FUND— CoKTiNnED. 



Date. 



Feb., 1868. 



March, 1868.... 



From Whom. 



E. S. Rowae 

John Wall 

John Baker 

John G. Breckenridge. 



AprU, 1868 

May, 1868 

August, 1868... 

Sept., 1868 

Nor., 1868 

Dec, 1868 



John Atkison 

Amos P. Holland , 

J. II. Rickards , 

Thomas E. Rochester 

same 

E. G. Rathbum 

Thomas Adamson 

B. F. Boyce 

same 

E. S. Rowse 

George W. Kitchen ... 



Josiah B. Barnes. 



Isaiah Jones 

G. H. Dalle 

William Crisman. 

same 

E. S. Rowse 



Benjamin Charles., 
L. W. Albertson... 
Benjamin Charles. 



William King 

Thomas B. Sutherland, 



Total 



Amount. 



$22,530 38 

860 89 

80 00 

1,154 35 

2,846 35 
1,525 20 
1,295 84 
2,018 57 
709 20 
6U 10 
4,354 26 
3,106 72 

69 32 
1,810 37 

17 27 

219 85 

373 80 

13 46 

240 00 

667 27 

1 25 

1,442 00 

3 S3 

1,291 93 

916 45 

237 71 



Total for 
month. 



$44,553 84 



18,863 20 
219 85 



1,295 78 

1,442 00 

3 8S 

1,291 93 

1,154 16 



$2,001,371 01 



RECEIPTS INTO THE STATE SCHOOL FUND. 



Date. 

Jan., 1867 

Mar., 1867 

June, 1867 

Oct., 1S67 

Not., 1867 

Jan., 1868 

Mar., 1868 

May, 1868 

June 12, 1868 
July 8, 1868.. 
Nov., 1868 .... 
Dec, 1868 



William U. Boulware . . 

E. F. Farrish. 

Jamison & Cotting 

AuU, Pollard & Renick. 

A. Black & Co 

B. M. M. CoUoct 



From whom. 



United States , 

St. Louis National Bank 

National Loan Bank 

Jamison &> Cotting 

Dan. Rice, Com. P. S. G 

Clark Bro's. & Co ... 

United States , 

National Loan Bank, St. Louis. 

Total 



Amount. 


Total. 


$ 615 70 




206 21 




46,640 00 




516 00 




3,320 62 




4G3 50 


$51,822 03 


12,732 82 




496 15 




,3,217 50 




44,000y00 
50 00 




14,584 79 




5,223 67 




2,866 87 


83,171 80 



$134,993 83 



2« 



KECI^IiTS INTO 



RECIilIPrS INTO THE INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT FUND. 



Date. 



From whom. 



Nov., 1866. 



Dec, 1866. 



William Paxton 

M. M. Jamps 

R. W. W. Kichardson. 



William Runyan ;i^. 

I Mr. Shields 

William Dollarhide 

! Christopher C. Simpson 



Jan., 1867. 



'Catharine M. Boardmnn. 

|Cyru8 Thompson 

jThomas ilarbine 

(Nancy F. Shelton 

|G. W. Hood 

William Callahan 

Uiram P. Vrooman 

iDavid Bonham 



Feb., 1867. 



J. B. Freeman 

'Thomas Harbine 

Mary A. Bishop 

William Bishop 

Fred. W. Ludwig^ 

Robert H. Crawford.., 

John J. LIndsey « 

William Challacombe. 

Robert Patterson 

John Doniphan , 



March, lS67...IAlonzo Thompson 

iCyrus Thompson 

AloDzo Thompson 

ICyrus Thompson 

William P. Hobson 

William Challacombe 

Alonzo Thompson 

Bryant Hagins 

Alonzo Thompson 

James A. Matney ». 

Madison S. Faris 

J. A. Matney & W. Z. Ransom 

Philip Penger 

W. Z. Ransom 

D. P. Dyer 

Charles Gr. Comstock 

D. P. Dyer 

^ Alonzo Thompson 

Thomas Harbine 

James Caldwell..... * 

William Bishop 

.John C. Orrick 

N. T. Doane 

W. A. Berry 

N. T. Doane 



1867 .Charles 0. Comstock. 

L. A. II. Montague .. 
0. G. Hess 



May, 1867. 



June, 1867. 
Aug., 1867. 



Cyrus Thompson. 
William Bishop.. 
George Kimmel.. 
Cyrus Thompson. 



Stephen Peercey A W. C. Harvey. 
Theodore Bruere 



B. S. Barron.... 
Jared K. Smith 



Irvin D. Wright. 



Amoant. 


Total. 


$ 200 00 




100 00 




400 CO 


$ 700 00 


50 00 




200 00 




100 00 




! 100 00 


450 00 


1,097 .38 




799 40 




1,070 8.3 




200 00 




172 90 




1 50 00 




' 250 00 




550 00 


4,190 51 


! 100 00 




1 l,5d0 00 
1 ' .... 





100 00 


l,5d0 00 


8.34 05 


1,100 00 


900 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 28 


150 00 


100 00 


250 00 


100 00 


550 00 


100 00 


100 00 


200 00 


300 00 


150 00 


300 00 


200 00 


100 00 


2,400 00 


1,450 00 


1,383 05 


200 00 


50 00 


100 00 


6,659 45 


749 40 


198 17 


50 00 


6,369 50 


200 90 


200 00 


1,100 00 


200 00 


450 00 


500 00 


100 00 


200 00 


150 00 


800 00 



300 00 



4,884 05 



16,240 35 



6,770 40 



3,250 00 

300 00 

950 00 
800 00 



SUNDRY FUNDS 



£7 



RECEIPTS INTO THE INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT FIIXD-Coxtixuki>. 



Date. 



From whom. 



Amount. 



Oct., 1867 Mary Wickersham 

|H. Cla.T EwingA J. L. Smith. 



Bee, 18«7 11. Clay Ewing k J. L. Smith. 

! Francis Brocoklein ^ .. 



Feb., 1868 R. T. Brock 

March, 1868.... W. W. Caldwell 

May, 1868 Iw. Hamilton k Lyman Warner. 



June, 1868 IWilliam H. Grigsby 

iH. L. Grigsby 

T R. A J. B. A Ja0 M. jr., A £. S. & V. GrigBby. 
AVorden Grigsby 



July J. A. Pool & W. Grigsby 

v. Grigsby k J. A. Pool 

J. A. Pool k William H. Grigsby 

jj. A. Pool k H. L. Grigdby 

I J. A. Pool k V. Grigsby 



Aug. 10 v. Grigsby k J. A. Pool.. 

jW. Grigsby A J. A. Pool. 



Sept. 25 Mary E. Whiteside. 

29 William WhUt 



Nor. 28 .William Bishop. 

Dec, 18G8 William Bishop. 

Total 



$ 150 00 

2,250 00 

800 00 
500 00 

450 00 

11 47 

200 00 

100 00 
100 00 
250 00 
100 00 

200 00 
189 56 
Ifio 07 
121 87 
8:i 89 

500 00 
150 00 

100 00 
lUO 00 

100 00 

200 00 



Total. 

$2,400 00 

1,300 00 

450 00 

14 47 

. 200 00 



550 00 



760 39 

C50 00 

200 00 
100 00 
200 00 

$i:5,800 17 



RECEIPTS INTO THE SALINE FUND. 



Date. 



April 
May 


27, 1867 
10 




25 


June 


3 




10 




13 




U 




17 




26 




29 


July 


6 


August 7 



From whom. 



^>illiam Bishop 

Josiah Cornine 

William H. Judd 

Benjamin K. Land 

F. W. Ludwig 

F. A. Richardson 

J. L. O'Bryan 

P. G. StiCfford, Glasscock k Cotton 

J. L. O'Bryan .; 

C. W.Somhart 

T. M. Smith 

P. G. Stafford 

Mary Wickersham 



Amount. 


Total for 
month. 


$1,050 00 


$1,050 00 


50 CO 




200 00 


250 00 


H6.S 13 




350 00 




50 00 




1,287 77 




50 00 




700 00 




100 00 




100 Oi) 


3,000 00 


150 00 


150 00 


! 200 Oi) 

1 


200 00 



Total. 



$4,650 90 



'28 



KECEIPT8 ISTO 



RECEIPTS IMTO THE SEMINARY FUND. 



Date. 



From whom. 



April 8, 1867 

Sept. 30 

Jan. 22, 1868 G. W. Arnold <k G. W. Fricker, 

Totnl 



J. Montgomery. 
J. R. Winters 



Amount. 



$50 00 

50 00 

150 00 

103 60 



Total for 
iponth. 



$250 00 
103 60 



$353 60 



RECEIPTS INTO THE SEMINARY MONEYS. 



Bate. 



From whom. 



July 10, 1868'A. Thompson, State Auditor. 
January 17 same 



Total. 



Amount. 



$4,207 50 
4,170 00 



Total for 
month. 



$8,377 50 



$8,377 50 



RECEIPTS INTO THE STATE SCHOOL MONEYS. 



Date. 

October 1867 
Nov. 6.... 

11.... 
Jan. 23, 1868 
March 12.... 

28.... 
May 21.... 

28.... 
July 8.... 
Dec. 28.... 



From whom. 



United States 

same 

tuame 

siirae 

same 

State Auditor 

United States 

Jamison &> Cotling^. 
Unit d States 

same 



Total. 



Amount. 



$1,200 00 
8,250 00 

. 1,200 00 

33,180 00 
1,260 00 
4,200 00 
8,250 00 
5,280 00 

36,235 50 
8,250 00 



Total for 
month. 



$10,650 00 



96,655 50 



$107,305 50 



RECEIPTS INTO COUNTY REVENUE. 

payments into this fund were made for delinquent taxes under the operation of the former 
revenue law. 



Received in October, 1866. 
November, 
Derember, 
March, 1867. 
April, 
July, 
October, 
November 
August, 1868. 
November, 

Total 



Date. 



Amount. 



$6 00 
14 24 
35 35 
43 05 
13 45 
63 09 

211 28 
24 05 

187 65 
23 SO 



Total. 



$55 59 



354 92 
211 45 

$621 96 



8USDRY FUNDa. 



29 



RECEIPTS FROM EXECUTOEIS AND ADMINISTRATORS. 

This is a Trust Fund from deposits made for the unknown heirs of intestate parties. Qenera^ 
Statutes, 1865, pages 509, 510 ; g^ 18 to 23. 



Date. 



Nor. 22, 1866 
March 4, 1S67 

16 
January 18 
May 



By whom. 



4*« ■■• • 



26.... 
29.... 

9.... 
16, 1868 

27 

12 

20 

8 

22 

25 

16 



8. G, Wentworth, for heirs of Julius Burton 

A. J. Uibler, for heirs of T. Phelps 

James II. Shock, for heirs of Edward Keiths 

E. M. Hnnsburger, for heirs of F. J. Armentrout. 
L. C. ilirshbere, for heirs of James M. Johnson.... 

same, for heirs of James Hayden 

David Nelson, for heirs of B. G. Washington 

J. A. Holliday, for heirs of W. H. Davis 

A. Fulcher, for heirs of W. D. Elliott 

Joseph W. Ilickman, for heirs of Daniel Grant.... 
Fred. Cottle, for heire of A. Stone. 



June 

July 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

March 

May 

June 
July 
August 21...... J. P. Jones, for heirs of Christina Eslinger. 



W. Goat, for heirs of Wm. Brickey 

L. Bremer, for heirs of Charles D. Brandt. 
Wra. Calhoun, for heirs of James Collins. 

J. Hunt, for heirs of 0. Duncan 

Fred. Cottle, for heirs of A. Stone 

II. Bunce, for heirs of E. McMillan. 



Amount. 



Totnl. 



$67 03 


183 7« 


20 50 


1,122 e5 


8 35 


45 46 


354 05 


307 03 


276 35 


81 26 


262 00 


141 38 


69 04 


148 00 


8 50 


49 12 


242 00 


514 40 



Total. 



$:^900 90 



Date. 



RECEIPTS INTO THE LIBRARY FUND. 



From whom. 



Jan. 24, 1867 Francis Rodman 

April 16 1 same 

May 14 B.inie 

July same 

Dec. same 



Total. 



Amount. 



$204 00 

1,1(50 00 

1,0(10 00 

1,125 00 

615 00 



Total. 



$4,104 00 



RECEIPTS INTO THE SOLDIERS' ORPHANS' HOME FUND. 



Date. From whom. 

! 


Amount. Total. 


July 25, 1867... 

Jan. 18, 1868... 

27 

August 26,1868 


J. Wood. Ser'e S. 0. II. F 


$54 32 
40 00 
32 03 
50 00 




I L. Ride-lev » 




'\(i«Mouri Henevolent And Loan Association. 




Union Itianrance Comnanv 




Total 








$176 35 



30 



RECEIPTS INTO StJKDBY FUNDS. 



REIMBURSEMENTS FROM UNITED STATES. 



Date. 


From whom. 


Amonnt. 


Total. 


Jmhs iq ignr 


United Staten Gov^mment .^t,. 


$ 635,651 12 

1,670,945 60 

985,000 00 




Julv 27 


pame •.... •....• 




September 4.... 


8AIQ0 ....•....•....• 




Total 








$3,291,596 72 



RECEIPTS INTO THE SOUTH PACIFIC RAILROAD LAND FUND, 



Date. From whom. 

• 
1 


Amount. 


ToUl. 


Octob'r 5. 1868 C. C. Bland 


$65 00 
54 00 
31 60 




Dec. 18. 1868. Campbell, Love k Co 


• 


William A. RuBseJi 




21 James Kine: 


67 00 
31 67 




L. M. liove 








Total 




$249 27 



DISBURSEMENTS 



DURING THE TWO FISCAL YEARS, COMMENCING OCTOBER 1, 

1866. AND ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1868. 



DISBURSEMENTS OUf OF THE REVENUE FUND. 



FOR CIVIL OFFICERS. 



Date. 



Oct. 1, 1866.... 




To whom. 



F^b. 26, 1867... 



27.. 
28 

M&rch 1, 1867 
4 



[ 



15.38 

15.39 

LUOa 

I510ib 

1541 

1542 

1543 

1544 

1545 

154G 

1547 

1548 

1549 

1551 

1552 

155.3 

158 

166 

179 

185 

186 

190 

196 

205 

220 

226 

227 

2.37 

240 

238 

241 

245 

248 

268 

270 

283 

284 



Tbos. C. Fletcher, Governor 

JX. DeWyl, Pbyaician Penitentiary 

i.J. W. Johnson, Chaplain Penitentiary 

Ed. 8chueller, Factor Penitentiary , 

S. W. Cox, Clerk Penitentiary , 

II. A. Swifr, Warden Penitentiary , 

,1. D. Wright, Deputy Wnrden 

iWilliam M. iSmith, Olerk Auditor's oEBce , 

'flenry Ihubte&d, Comm'er Permanent Seat of Gorernment. 

jAIotizo Thompson, Auditor and Inspector 

|.f«)hn Ppstell, Clerk Auditor's office , 

IF. A. Xitchy, Chief Clerk Auditor's office 

JCyrus Thompson, Clerk Auditor's office 

iDugene F. Weigel, Clerk Secretary of State 

jGert. Gocbel, tierk Secretary of State 

iThomas M. ^raith, Clerk Secretary of State 



AmoQit. 



H. B. Johnson, Circuit Attorney. 
J. P. Vastine, el al 



;Wm Biybop, Treasurer, f/ a/. 

|G. II. Burckbardt, Circuit Judge 

;Rufu8 Abbott, el at 

'Albert Jack(*on, Circuit Judge 

iC. B. Lord, Circuit Jud^ 

'James C. Moody, Circuit Judge 

•Wilson Prinun, Judge Criminal Court 

Eugeue F. Weigel, Clerk Secretary of StAte 

*y. UeWyl, Physician Penitentiary 

!A.^y. Bishop, Clerk Treasurer 

William Bishop Treasurer and Inspector 

!C. N. Brown, Clerk Treasurer , 

jE. II. E. Jameson, Clerk Treasurer .'. 

James W. Mack, Clerk Register , 

'Jared E. Smith, Register of Lands 

■R. F. Wingate, Attorney General and Inspector, 

'William Whist. Clerk Register 

|I. D. Wright, Deputy Warden Penitentiary 

£. W. Cox, Clerk Penitentiary 



$1,0.32 60 
175 00 
125 Off 
.375 00 
300 00 
500 00 
250 00 
250 00 
87 50 
775 00 
376 00 
459 25 
375 00 
375 00 
375 00 
121 93 
100 00 
1,98:^ 70 
3,987 />0 
500 00 
875 (10 
500 00 
500 00 
500 GO 
500 00 
375 00 
175 OO 
250 00 

775 00 
375 00 
191 69 
250 00 
750 00 

776 00 
375 00 
250 00 
300 00 



J 



32 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF 



CIVIL OFFICERS— CoxTiNUED. 




Mftrch 5, 1867. 



6. 
7. 





11 

12 

13 

14 

16 

20 

21 

22 

23 

27 



April 



28 
30 

1 



2S5 

2S7 
283 
294 
298 
300 
:]03 
306 
308 
310 
320 
323 
327 
359 
30 1 
366 



"79 



•> 



380 

381 

3St) 

oS7 

403 

411 

432 

434 

468 

469 

473 

501 

525 

550 

553 

571 

581 

593 

596 

603 

606 

641 

642 

657 

672 

686 

687 

709 

712 

721 

727 

738 

747 

771 

772 

781 

782 

784 

785 

786 

787 

788 

7S9 

792 

794 

796 

797 

798 

799 

800 

803 

805 

806 

807 



i Edward Schaellfcr, Factor Penitentiary 

iThoiuas Allln, Jud^e Common Pleac 

'David Murphy, et al 

*Jared £. Smith, Register, et al 

'H. W. Fyan, Circuit Judge 

'John A. Mack, Judge Common Pleas 

Elijah Perry, Circuit Attorney 

|Mary Sullivan, Matron Penitentiary 

'Ru£ua Abbott, et al 

IS. P. Melton, et a/.. Guards Penitentiary 

William Whiat, Clerk Register 

'Thomiis II. Collins, Circuit Attorney 

Mary Sullivan, Matron Penitentiary 

(iert. Goebel, Clerk Secretary of ^tate..... 

James C. Moody, Circuit Judge 

J. W. Johnson, Chaplain Penitentiary 

Thomas C. Fletcher et al 

William P. Harrison, Circuit Judge 

C. B. Lord, Circuit Judge 

Joe J. Wyatr., Judge Common Pleas 

William Carter, Circnit Judge 

J. H. Creighton, Circuit Attorney 
C. M. Wright, Circuit Attorney... 



Attorney. 
Thomas AUin, Judge Common Pleas .. 

Charles P. Johnson, Circuit Attorney 

J. 11. Vail, Circuit Judge..., 

K. A. DeBolt, Circuit Judge !!.".!!. 

John C. Orrick, Circuit Attorney ]'..'. 

I. C. Parker et al !!!!...!!.'.' 

Wilson Primm et al '.,['.','. 

Jacob S. lioreman. Judge ],. 

Jackson Brock, Judge !.'!!.!!!!!!!!.!!!!! 

A. H. Smith, Circuit Attorney ".!!*.*!.!!!!!.!!.'.' 

0. G. Burch, Assistant Librarian !...!!.. 

Samuel Reber, Judge ."!.!!.!!!!.'..!!.* 

William Heren, Judge .'.'.'!.*!.'.*.'.'.'..'!.'.*."!.'.*, 

George J. W. Nexsen, Clerk Secretary....!!!!!.!..!.!!!!!".* 

N. C. Burch, Librarian !!!! 

J. Bennett, et al., Guards Penitentiary..!.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

G. H. Burckhardt, Judge !!' 

Henry Umstead, Com. Permanent Seat of Government! 

Aaron VanWormer, Judge 

George W. Miller, Judge ! 

N. DeWyl, Physician Penitentiary !!!!!!!!!!!! 

William P. {larrison, Judee 

J. H. Vail, et al !...!!!!!!!! 

Jacob S. Boreman, Judge !!!!!!!!!! 

William M. Boulware, Attorney...! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

W. C. Ban*, Attorney 

1. C. Parker, Attorney !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

Nathanial Holmes, Supreme .Judge !! 

Philip Stock, Clerk Secretary !!!.. 

Peter Jecko, Com'r Permanent Seat of Government!..!. 

Eugene F. Weigel, Clerk Secretary 

William Whist, Clerk Register Lands 

Thomas C. Fletcher, Governor 

Jared B. Smith, Register of Lands ..!!!!! 

James W. Mack, Clerk Register of Lands 

William D. Kerr, et aL, OflF. D. <fc D !.. 

Wm. D. Kerr et al ! 

George J. W. Nexsen, Clerk Secretary!..!!!!!!.!!!!!!!!!!! 

William M. Smith, Clerk Auditor 

JohnPestell, Clerk Auditor 

Henry C. Nitchy, Clerk Auditor 

Alonzo Thompson, State Auditor and Inspector 

F. A. Nitchy, Chief Clerk Auditor 

Cyrus Thompson, Clerk Auditor 

T. A. Parker, Superintendent of Public Schools 

Francis Rodman, Secretary "bf State 

Alfred Genael, Attorney First Circuit ..!" 

(Jonas J. Clark, Circuit Judge !...!' 



Amount. 



$375 
45 

220 

878 

1,445 

62 

147 

125 

875 

6,990 

375 

100 

lli5 

500 

125 

3,200 

562 



00 
68 
24 
07 
05 
50 
82 
00 
00 
41 
00 
00 
00 
00 
()0 
00 
87 
50 



5IU) UO 

62 50 

500 00 

209 UO 

2li0 00 

50 00 
V 58 

500 00 

500 00 

92 39 

\t',l 50 

5S7 50 

12.) 00 

4 34 

lliO 00 

355 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

51 63 
233 15 

6,661 17 

.00 00 

147 -78 

1,000 00 

],125 00 

155 55 

5»'>2 50 

600 00 

125 00 

400 00 

100 00 

mo 00 

750 00 

250 00 

27 22 

375 00 

375 00 

1,250 00 

750 00 

250 00 

7ii2 50 

1,525 00 

3r5 00 

250 00 

375 00 

998 65 

775 00 

375 00 

375 00 

750 00 

625 00 

200 00 

500 00 



^THE BEVENUB f UKD. 



CIVIL OFFICEBS—CoVTiiivBD. 




AprU 1, 1867 



«. 



10. 



ai^ 



12 

13 

15 

17 

18 

19 

22 

26 

27 

29 

8 

4 ., 
« 



808 
809 
810 
811 
812 
819 
822 
823 
825 
82D 
828 
829 
830 
841 
842 
843 
844 
845 
848 
847 
849 
851 
852 
854 
855 
856 
857 
858 
866 
871 
873 
874 
875 
876 
878 
880 
882 
886 
887 
888 
890 
891 
893 
908 
9U9 
910 
911 
915 
921 
922 
926 
927 
929 
933 
938 
939 
959 
961 
968 
971 
973 
979 
980 
990 
999 
1009 
1035 
1038 
1049 
1104 
1112 



• •• •••••• ••■ 



Alonso Thompson, State Auditor aod Inspector ...... w...^... 

Cyras Thompson, Clerk Auditor ..^ «.. 

F. A. Nitchy, Chief Clerk Auditor 

Nathaniel Holmes, Supreme Judge. , 

John A. S. Tutt, Circuit Judge ^ 

David Wagner, Supreme Judge ^ 

A. W. Bishop, Clerk Treajsnrer » «. 

Wm. Bishop. State Treasurer and Inspector ^ 

Bobprt F. Wingate^ Attorney General And Inspector 

Charles N. Brown, Clerk Treasurer.... «.... 

Albert Jackson, Circuit Jjidge 

Edward Schueller, Factor State Penitentiary 

S. W. Cox, Clerk Missouri Penitentiary 

C. M. Wright, Circuit Attorney 



Nathaniel Holmes, Supreme Judge 
Wilson Primm, Jud^e ('riminal Tot 



onrL. 






!•••••••■ 



T. H. Collins, Circuit Attorney 

James McWilliams, Circuit Attorney and J. C. P 

J. B. Robinson, Circuit Attorney ^ » 

W. W. Edwards, Circuit Attorney 

Wm. C. Barr, Circuit Attorney 

Jac S. Boreman, Jud^e C. P. C 

E. K. Johnson, Circuit Attorney 

J. W. Johnsbn, Chaplain Penitentiary 
John C Davenport, Guard 
II. A. Swift, Warden 
Mary Sullivan, Matron 
John Creedon et a/., Guards 

N. C. Burch, Clerx Treasurer 

C. B. Lord, Judge 

Samuel Reber, Judge.... 

R. A. DeBolt, Judge .- 

Jonas J. Ciark, Jud^e :, 

William C. Hillis, Circuit Attorney ^.,.. 

I. D. Wright, Depu»y Warden Penitentiary , 

B. H. Emerson, Judge „ 

G. W. Miller, Judge 

J. H. Vail, Judg^...,.. 

ElyahPerrv, Circuit Attorney ^ ^ 

Aaron VanWormer, Jui<;e 

L. Davis, Assistant superintendent i^chools 

Walter King, Judge 

Thomas J. C. Fagg, Supreme Jndge „. 

C. U. Hughes et al., Officers Lunatic Asylum 

James W. Owens, Judge 

Q. H. Burckhardt, " « 

E. J. Montague^ " 

B. V. Wili.on, 
Jackson Brock, 
W illiam Heren, 

William P. Harrison, " 

John A. Mack. " 

I. C. Pnr'ker, Circuit Attorney -.- .... » 

Abram H. Smith. Circuit Attorney 

N. r. Burch, ^tate Librarian , 

William (*arter, Jud^e ^ ., 

G. W. Randolph, Circuit Attorney 

George Smith, Lieutenant Governor 

Philip Stock, Clerk .*»pcrelary of btate « 

D. Q. Gale, Circuit Attorney 

James W. Owens, Judge « , 

Jodn C Price, .Judge 

ii. B. Kingsbury, Circuit Attorney , 

S. S. Burdett, Circuit Attorney 

John A. S. Tutt, Circuit Judg^e 

|William Heren, Circuit Judge 

Jami*s C. Moody, Judge 

iW. W. Kdwards 't al , Jud}>:e Nineteenth Circuit 
R. W. Fywn, Judi^e Fourtpenth (.'irctiit 

E. F. Esteb, Attorncv Filth Circuit ... 
iWm. Carter, Judge Twentieth Circuit. 



41 



4t 



*' * • •« ••••«• 



$775 Od 

375 -Ott 

875 00 
750 00 

1,000 00 
760 00 
250 00 
775 00 
775 00 
375 00 
600 00 

876 00 
000 00 
100 00 
760 00 
600 00 
100 OO 
212 60 
100 00 
260 00 
200 00 
125 00 
100 OO 

125 00 
28 30 

600 00 

126 00 
7^13 60 

375 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
100 00 
250 00 
600 00 
662 60 
600 00 
100 00 
600 00 
600 00 
333 30 
750 00 
876 00 
£00 00 
600 00 

62 60 
600 00 

60 00 
600 00 
662 50 

62 m 

100 OO 
100 00 
125 00 
500 00 
100 00, 
192 31 
46 70 
130 43 
1,000 00 
600 00 
107 «l 



00 

m 



100 
600 
600 00 
3H3 3S 
350 00 
600 00 
100 00 
MO 00 



S-AE 



M 



BISBXTRSBMBNTS OtTT OF 



CIVIL OFFIOERS— OoxmruBD. 




Ma/ 



12, 1867 

S8.... 

SO.... 

S.... 

10.... 



Jal^ 



1162 

1184 

1109 

1222 

1243 

1283 

1325 

1326 

1327 

1329 

1.S.30 

1331 

1332 

1333 

1336 

1339 

1340 

1341 

1342 

1.343 

1344 

1345 

1345^ 

1346 

1347 

1349 

13.^0 

1351 

1353 

1354 

1356 

1363 

1364 

1365 

1366 

1367 

1368 

1369 

1370 

1371 

1372 

1373 

1374 

1376 

1380 

1381 

1382 

1389 

1390 

1391 

1392 

1404 

1406 

1408 

1410 

1411 

1412 

1413 

1416 

1416 

1419 

1421 

1422 

1423 

1426 

1427 

1430 

1431 

1432 

1436 

1437 



W. L. LoTplace, Jndre SapreoM Conrt 

Jftioef W. Mack, Clerk Register of Lands 

William Mejett, Guard Penitentiary 

Lewis Brown, Circuit Attorney 

H. B. Johnson, Circuit Attorney 

W, W. Edwards, Circuit Judge 

W. 0. Hillis, Circait Attorney 

Albert Jackson, Judge • 

Eugene F. Weieel, Clerk Secretary of State 

Qeorge J. W. Nexsen, Clerk Secretary of State 

Lewis Brown, Circuit Attorney 

W. H. Bishop, Clerk Treasurer ; 

Wm. Bishop, State Treasurer and Inspector 

C. N. Brown, Clerk Treasurer 

J. W. Johnson, Chaplain Penitentiary 

Henry C Nitchy, Clerk Auditor 

Robert F. Wingate, Attorney General and Inspector 

Alonso Thompson, State Auditor and Inspector 

Wm. M. Smith, Clerk Auditor 

John Pestell, Clerk Auditor 

Cyrus Thompson, Clerk Auditor 

Charles P. Johnson, Circuit Attorney 

Samuel Reber, Circuit Judge 

Thos. C. Fletcher, Governor 

Francis Rodman, Secretaij of State 

Thomas H. Collins, Circuit Attorney 

John A. Mack, Circuit Judge 

H. B. Johnson, Circuit Attorney 

C. B. Lord, Judge 

C. A. Thompson, Physician Missouri Penitentiary 

U. L. BrunSy Clerk Register of Lands 

R. E. Rombauer, Judge 

Jared B. Smith, Register of Lands , 

William Whist, Clerk Register of Lands 

Peter Jetko, Com'r Permanent Seat of GoTemmeDt 

J. 8* Boreman, Judge 

W. C. Barr, Circuit Attorney 

C. H. Hughes et aL, Officers Lunatic Asylum 

6. H. Emerson, Jud^ 

6. B. Kingsburry, Circuit Attorney 

Walter Kin^, Judge 

George W. Miller, Judg^ 

W. W. Edwards, Judge 

S. W. Cox, Clerk Penitentiary , 

Marv Sullivan, Matron Penitentiary , 

H. A. Swift, Warden Penitentiary , 

James Bell et al., Guards Penitentiary 

James W. Owens, Judge , 

J. H. Vail, Judge 

I. D. Wright, Deputy Warden Penitentiary 

William D. Kerr et al., Officers Deaf and Dumb Asylum. 

Jonas J. Clark, Judge 

J. C. Parker, Circuit Attorney 

0. M. Wright, Circuit Attorney 

William Heren, Judee 

N. C. Bnrch, Clerk Treasurer 

James McWilliams, Judge 

John B. Robinson, Attorney 

L. Davis, Assistant Superintendent Public Schools 

T. A. Parker, Superintendent Public Schools 

B. V. Wilson, Judge 

David Wagner, Supreme Judc^ 

Nathanial Holmes, Supreme Judee 

Thomas J. C. Fagg, Supreme Judge 

B. Schiereiiberg, Clerk Secretary 

F. A. Nitchy, Clerk Auditor 



Wilson Primm, Judge 

R. A. DeBolt, Judge 

G. H. Burckhardt, Judge 

Jamea McWilliams, Attorney. 
S. 8. Burdett, Attorney 



$760 00 
159 34 

76 66 

25 55 
100 00 
250 00 
100 00 
600 00 
375 00 
375 00 
100 00 
250 00 
775 00 
375 00 
125 00 
375 00 
775 00 
775 00 
250 00 
375 00 
375 00 
175 00 
500 00 
1,250 00 
626 00 
100 00 

62 50 
100 00 
500 00 
194 45 

90 66 
616 67 
750 00 
375 00 

87 50 
125 00 
100 00 
866 68 
500 00 
100 00 
612 82 
5fi2 50 
2f>0 00 
300 00 
125 00 
600 00 
7,761 56 
500 00 
600 00 
250 00 
873 73 
500 00 
100 00 
100 00 
500 00 
375 00 

86 95 
100 00 
500 00 
750 00 
500 00 
750 00 
750 00 
750 00 
250 00 
375 00 
500 00 
500 00 
600 00 
425 00 
100 00 



THB RSVmUB FUND. 



85 



CIVni OFFICBBS— CoKTunriD. 




July 9, 1M7 



12 



15. 
17. 
18. 

29. 



Auc^et 3. 

12, 

13. 

15. 

17. 

29. 

30. 

Sept. 2. 

3. 



6. 
10. 
17, 
21. 
23. 

October 1 . 



1440 

1441 

1443 

1444 

1445 

1456 

1457 

1467 

1468 

1491 

1502 

1506 

1508 

1547 

154^ 

1586 

1619 

1625 

1668 

1652 

1704 

1715 

1733 

1738 

1738 

1757 

1770 

1794 

1814 

1830 

1827 

1859 

1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 

1865 

1866 

1868 

1869 

1871 

1873 

1879 

1881 

1882 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1894 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1007 

1908 

1009 

1910 

1920 

1922 

1928 



G. W. Randolph, AUorney .«•. 

William P. Harrison, Judge , 

0. G. Burch, Assistant Librarian 

N. C Burch, Librarian ~ 

Edward Schueller, Factor Penitentiary 

Aaron VanWormer, Jndge 

R. W. Fyan, Judge 

J. H. Creighton, Attorney ..., 

E. P. Johnson, Attorney.'. 

Gilchrist Porter, Judge 

A. H. Smith, Attorney 

John A. H. Tntt, Judge 

Jackson Brock, Judge • 

£lijah Perry, Attorney 

William Carter, Judge 

E. J. Montague, Judge m 

John C. Price, Judge /. 

Isaac W. Brown, Guard Penitentiary 

William M. temitb, Clerk Auditor 

W. S. Moffat, Guard Penitentiary 

John A. Mack, Judge 

R. A. DeBolt, Judge 

H. A. Swift, Warden Penitentiary ^. 

John Pesteil, Clerk Andiior 

Wm. M. Smith, Clerk Auditor :. 

E. V. Wilson and W. C Hillts, Judge and Attorney 

George M. Mans, Guard Penitentiary 

E. F. Esteb, Attorney 

J. C. Price and G. W. Randolph, Judge and Attorney .... 

J. B. Robinson, Attorney , 

G. W. Randolph, Attorney 

Albert Jackson, Judge 

Thomas U. v oUins, .attorney 

Gilchrist Porter, Judge 

B. F. Weirel, Clerk Secretary '. 

George J. W. Nexsen, Clerk Secretary 

Jackson Brock, Judge ^ 

Alfred Gensel, Attorney 

N. C. Barch, Clerk Treasurer 

Samuel Reber, Judge 

C. B. Lord, Judge .» 

J. B. Johnson, Attorney 

F. A. Nitchy, Clerk Auditor 

William P. Harrison, Jud^ 

L. Davis, Assistant Superintendent Public Schools 

T. A. Parker, Superintendent Public Schools 

C. N. Brown, Clerk Treasurer 

W. H. Bishop, Clerk Treasurer » 

William Bishop, Treasurer and Inspector 

Ed. Schneller, Factor Penitentiary 

S. W. Cox, Clerk " 

.1. A. Swift, Warden " 

I. D. Wright, Deputy W. " 

Mary Snlli van, Matron " 

{Francis Rodman, Secretary of Stata 

C. A. Thompson, Physician Penitentiary 

N. W. Charles, Clerk Auditor 

J. B. Smith, Biegister of Lands 

William Whist, Clerk Register of Lands 

Mrs. D. Thompson, Clerk Register of Lands 

Henry C. Nitchy, Clerk Auditor .*. 

Robert F. Wingate, Attorney General and Inspector 

Lewis Brown, Attorney 

John Pesteil, Clerk Auditor 

George W. Miller, Judge 

Cyras Thompson, Clerk Auditor 

Peter Jecko, Commissioner , 

B. H. Emerson, Judge 

James S. Henderson, Treasurer Luaatic Asylum 

R. B. Rombaaer, Judge 

A. fl. Smith, Attorney 



$100 

562 

18 

125 

876 

500 

500 

200 

100 

562 

100 

500 

50 

100 

500 

62 

500 

260 

125 

78 

62 

500 

500 

375 

250 

1,200 
108 
100 

1,100 
100 
100 
506 
100 
562 
375 
375 
50 
200 
375 
500 
500 
100 
375 
562 
500 
750 
375 
250 
775 
875 

' 800 
500 
350 
126 
626 
176 
126 
760 
876 
250 
875 
775 
100 
876 
662 
876 
87 
600 
888 
600 
100 



00 
60 
00 
00 
01 
00 
00 
00 
00 
60 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 
00 
33 
60 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
38 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

oo 

00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
01 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
60 
00 
60 
00 
88 

oo 
oo 



/■ 



36 



DIBBURSEMBKTS OUT OF 



CIYIL 0FFIGEB3— CoHTXRtmtr. 



Date. 



October 2, 1867 



3. 




7 

10 

12 

14 

19 

21 

23 

80 

31 

For. 1, 1867... 

33 



1926 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1934 
1952 
1958 
1960 
1962 
1963 
1966 
1969 
1970 
1975 
1977 
1978 
1985 
1988 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1997 
1993 
2000 
2005 
2008 
2019 
2020 
2028 
2036 
2066 
2077 
2085 
2112 
2126 
2127 
2169 
2193 
2194 
2195 
2196 
2197 
2198 
2199 
2200 
2201 
2202 
2203 
2204 
2205 
2206 
2207 
2208 
2209 
2210 
2211 
2212 
2213 
2214 
2215 
2216 
2217 
2218 
2219 
2220 
2221 
2222 
2223 
2224 
2225 
2226 



Wilson Primniy Judge 

J. S. Boreman, Judge 

H. B. Johnson, Attorney 

Nath. Holmes, Supreme Judge 

R. W. Fyan, Supreme Judge 

Thomas B. Nesbit, Treasurer Deaf and Dumb Asylum. 

P. Lucas, Judce 

William G. Hillis, Attorney 

William Heren, Judge 

James H. Vail, Judge 

Georn) W. Bjindolph, Attorney 

E. Schierenberir, Clerk Secretary 

Qeorre Smith, liieut. Goremor 

r. C. Parker, Attorney 

C. M. Wright, Attorney 

R. A. DeBolt, Judge 

N. C. Burch, Librarian 

Aaron VanWormer, Judge 

David Wagner, Supreme Judge 

James McWilliaras, Judge 

Jonas J. Clark, Judge 

B. B. Kingsbury, Attorney 

W. W. Edwards, Judge 

J. W. Johnson, Chaplain Penitentiary 

G. H. Burckhardt, Judge ^.. 

Thomas C. Fletcher, Governor 

E. V. Wilson Judge ^ 

William Carter, Judge 

Thomas J. G. Fagg, bupreme Judg^e 

John A. Mack, Judge 

E. J. Montague, Judge 

W. C. Barr, Attorney 

S. 8. Burdett, Attorney 

James W. Owens, Judge 

Thomas J C. Fagg ei al 

0. G. Hess, Guard Penitentiary 

Dennis Mooney, Druggist, Penitentiaryo 

James F. Bell, Guard Penitentiary. 
Thomas J. Burch, " 
Wm. Blackburn, " 
Frank Brenisen, " 

E. Boai, " 
Geo.W.CampbeU, " 
P. H. Crump, 
John Creedon, 
James H. Craig, 
H. M. DeBolt, 
Georee Gallant, 

F. Al. Gray, 
William Grimm, 
J. W. Henderson, " 
W. M. Harrison, 
James M . Jobe, 
Reuben lobe, 
George Mclntyre, 
Henry Meisel, 
Richard Murphy, 
John Mort, 
Dennis Mooney, 
William Pauley, 
A. L. Reavis, 
Joseph B. Reavis, 
James 0. Smith, 
A. Smith, 
Jasper Scott, 
Henry Shoup, 
J. R. Bpaunhorst, " 
Philip 8mith, 
Mark Thompsop, 
Allen Thomas, 
Qr««nb«rry Todd, 



tt. 
it 

4t 



it 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
It 
tt 
ft 
it 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



tt 
tt 
it 
it 



it 
tt 

it 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 

t4 
tt 
tt 
t-t 
tt 
tt 
tt 
it 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
t4 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



$500 0» 
125 00 
100 00 
750 00 
500 00 
925 00 
527 47 
100 00 
500 00 
500 00 
100 00 
250 00 
407 60 
100 00 
100 00 
500 00 
125 00 
500 00 
750 00 

112 50 
500 00 
100 00 
250 00 
125 00 
500 00 
842 40 
500 00 
500 00 
750 00 

62 50 
62 50 
100 00 
334 45 
500 00 
748 10 
50 00 
88 10 
150 00 
150 00 
212 50 
150 00 
150 00 
150 00 
225 00 
375 00 
150 00 
189 99 
148 33 
150 00 
150 00 
300 00 

145 00 
130 00 
210 00 
202 50 
150 00 
300 00 
218 00 
195 00 
148 33 
150 00 

146 66 
150 00 
150 00 
160 OO 
150 00 
270 00 
150 00 
300 00. 

113 33 
160 00 



THB BEYEHUB FCNB. 



87 



CIVIL OFFICBRS— CoRnxusft. 



Dftto. 



KoT. 13, 1867.. 



80. 



D«c.2, 1867—* 



3. 
4. 



6.... 

13.... 

20.... 

26.... 

Jaa. 2, 1868.... 




2227 

2228 

2229 

22:' 

2231 

2232 

2233 

2234 

2235 

2236 

2237 

2238 

2340 

2.346 

2346 

2347 

2362 

2363 

2363 

2376 

2384 

2390 

2393 

2416 

2467 

2481 

2604 

1 

2 

.3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

28 

24 

26 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

83 

84 

86 

36 

37 

88 

89 

40 

41 

42 

48 

47 



it 

4t 
<t 
tt 
(t 
ti 
« 
II 
€( 



II 
It 
it 
tt 
tt 
it 
tt 
tt 
ft 
tt 
It 



James M. Tharp,Qaard Penitentiary. 

George W. Urben, 

J. J. Wright, 

Peter Welser, 

J. B. Watts, 

C. F. Yerger, 

Geo. Zimmerman, 

Wm. Zimmerman, 

A. A. Gordon, 
James Caldwell, 
Geo. n. Sanford, 
John Hermleben, 

B. H. Emerson, Judge 

B. P. Bsteb, Attorney v 

Walter King, Judge 

G. B. Todd, Guard Penitentiary -. 

James Caldwell, Guard Penitentiavy 

J. C. Price, Judge 

A. Thompson, Audi tor and Inspector 

J. B. Robinson, Attorney 

Jonas J. Clark, Judge 

T. n. Collins, Attorney 

E. P. Johnson, Attorney 

George Mclntyre, Guard Penitentiary 

Richard Murphy, Guard Penitentiary 

A. H. Smith, Attorney 

William Zimmerman, Guard Penitentiary.. 
James F. Bell, 



It 


tt 


tt 


tl 


11 


II 


tt 


tl 


tl 


(t 


It 


tl 


tl 


tt 


It 


tl 


11 


tt 


tl 


tt 


tt 


tl 


tt 


tl 


tl 


It 


tt 


It 


II 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


It 


tl 


tt 


tl 


ft 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


It 


it 


tt 


tt 


It 


It 


It 


tt 


tt 


tl 


tt 


tt 


II 


tt 


It 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tl 


tt 


tl 


tt 


It 


tl 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tl 


tt 


tt 


tl 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tl 


It 


tt 


tl 


tt 


tt 



T. J. Burch, 
William Blackburn, 
Frank Brenisen, 

E. A. Boas, 
G. W. Campbell, 
P. H. Crump, 
John Creedon, 
James H. Craig, 
George Gallant, 

F. M. Gray, 
William Grimm, 
J. W. Henderson, 
William M. Harrison, 
James M. Jobe, 
Reuben Jobe, 
HenrT Meisel, 
Dennis Mooney, 
WUliam Pauley, 
A. L. Reavis, 
J. B. Beayis, 
J. 0. Smith, 
A. Smith, 
Jasper N. Scott, 
Henry Shoup, 
J. R. Spaunhorst, 
PhUip Smith, 
J. H. Sanford, 
Mark Thompson, 
Allen Thomas, 
James M. Tharp, 
George W. Urben, 
J. J. Wright, 
Peter Welser, 
J. B. Watts, 
C. F. Yerger, 
George Zimmerman, 
J. Herrnleben, 
J. F. Baker, 
Charles Hansen, 
Andrew Lockrood, 
John Mort, 

Thomas B. Nesbit, Treasurer Deaf and Dumb Asylum 
Ed. Schneller, Factor Penitentiaiy ^ 



$178 00 
187 60 
150 00 
150 00 
150 00 
148 88 
146 00 
148 33 
150 00 
60 00 
60 00 
36 00 
1,000 00 
200 00 
500 00 
100 00 
100 00 
500 00 
775 00 
100 00 
500 00 
300 00 
100 00 
189 66 
220 00 
54 86 

139 16 
150 00 
150 00 
225 00 
150 00 
141 67 
146 67 
225 00 
376 00 
150 00 
146 00 
150 00 
150 00 
300 00 
138 83 
148 33 
210 00 
160 00 

65 00 

145 00 
175 00 
150 00 
138 33 

146 67 
141 67 
150 00 
270 00 
146 67 
138 38 
300 00 
150 00 

140 00 
187 60 
160 00 
160 00 
150 00 
148 88 
143 88 
160 00 
167 88 
100 00 

26 67 
184 08 
926 00 
876 00 



S8 



BISBUBSEMBKTS OUT OF 



CIVIL OPFICBBS— OoKTurOBB. 



Bate. 



No. 



Jab. i, 1868.... 


48 




49 




60 




61 




62 




63 




64 




66 




66 




67 




68 




69 




60 




61 




62 




63 




64 




66 




66 




67 




68 




69 




71 




72 




73 




74 




76 




76 




f 78 




79 




80 




81 




82 




83 




84 




86 


3 


86 




88 




91 




92 




94 




lliO 




112 


- 


113 


• 


114 




116 


4 


118 




123 




124 




126 


• 


126 




127 




130 


- t 


132 




134 




186 




136 




137 




143 


- 


144 


7 


148 


8 


152 


« 


168 


10 


166 


11 


176 




177 


18 


183 




184 


14 


193 


16 


196 


IT 


214 



To whom. 



J. W. Johnson, Chaplain Penitentimry j 

S. W. Cox, Clerk Penitentiary 

Mrs. D. Thompson, Clerk Register , 

WUliam Whist, Clerk Register 

C. A. Thompson, Physician Penitentiary , 

J. E. Smith, Re^ster , 

William P. Harrison, Judge 

N. DeWyl, Clerk Secretory ^ , 

T. A. Parker, Superintendent Public Schools , 

E. Scbierenberg, Clerk Secretary 

Edwin Clark, Assistant Superintendent Public Schools., 

U. A. Swift, Warden Penitentiary , 

N. W. Charles, Clerk Auditor 

Peter Jecko, Commissioner 

Francis Rodman, Secretary 

Thomas C. Fletcher, Qovernor 

B. H. Emerson, Judge 

U. B. Johnson, Attorney 

William M. Boulware, Attorney 

C. M. Wright, Attorney 

Mary Sullivan, Matron Penitentiary 

I. D. Wright, Deputy Warden Penitentiary..... 

C. N. Brown, Clerk Treasurer 

William Bishop, Treasurer and Inspector 

A. W. Bishop, Clerk Treasurer 

Robert F. Wmgate, Attorney General and Inspector. ... 

Henry C. Nitchy, Clerk Auditor 

Thomas H. Collins, Attorney 

Cyrus Thompson, Clerk Auditor 

John Pestell, Clerk Auditor , 

D. M. Draper, Attorney 

L. Davis, Assistant Superintendent Public Schools 

J H. Vail, Judge ♦ 

R. A. DeBolt, Judge 

Natb. Holmes, Supreme Judge 

C. B. Lord, Judre 

G. H. Burckhardt, Judge 

B. B. Kingsbury, Attorney 

G. W. Miller, Judge 

George J. W. Nezsen, Clerk Secretory , 

Jackson Brock, Judge 

N. C. Burch, Clerk Treasurer. 

Aaron VanWormer, Judge 

N. C. Burch, Stote Librarian w 

F. A. Nitchy, Clerk Auditor 

Gilchrist Porter, Judge 

Wm. Carter, Judee.... 

J. S. Boreman, J^dge 

E. V. Wilson, Judge 

Wm. C. Hillis, Attorney 

Samuel Reber, Judge 

Wm. Heren, Judge 

John C. Ptice, Judge 

John A. Mack, Judge 

J. B. Robinson, Attorney 

Jonas J. Clark, Judge 

W. C. Barr, Attorney 

R. E. Rnmbauer, Judge 

James McWilliams, Judge 

Charles P. Johnson, Attorney 

James 8. Henderson, Treasurer Lunatic Asylum 

BlMah Perry, Attorney 

I. C. Parker, Attorney 

E. J. Montogue, Judge..... 

Lewis Brown, Attorney ; 

Albert Jackson, Judge .'. 

R. W. Fyan, Judge 

W. W. Edwards, Judge 

E. F. Esteb, Attorney 

J. H Creignton, Attorney 

Jamei W. Owens, Judge „ 



Amount. 



$126 
300 
260 
376 
176 
760 
662 
260 
760 
876 
166 
600 
260 

87 
626 
1,260 
600 
100 
400 
100 
126 
260 
376 
776 
260 
776 
876 
100 
376 
876 
169 
133 
600 
600 
760 
600 
600 
100 
662 
876 

60 
876 
600 
126 
876 
662 
600 
126 
600 
100 
600 
600 
600 

62 
100 
600 
100 
600 
112 
176 
1,076 
200 
100 

62 
100 
600 
600 
260 
200 
200 
600 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
60 
00 
00 
00 
66 
00 
00 
60 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
66 
34 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
60 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
60 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
60 
00 
00 
00 
00 
60 
00 
00 
00 
06 
60 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



THB RSYBNUK FDIH). 



se 



CIVIL OFFICBBS— OoRmuBD, 



Dftto. 


No. 


Jan. 17,1868 


215 


20 


230 


22 


245 




240 


23 


257 


24 


273 


26 


281 


27 


290 


27 


291 


31 


323 


PebramryS 


331 




335 


4 


339 


5 


350 


11 


425 




456 


18 


641 


24 


608 


26 


620 


Much 23 


833 


26 


922 


30 


955 


AprU 1 


961 




962 




963 




964 




966 




966 




967 




968 




969 


• 


970 




971 




972 




973 




274 




976 




976 


- 


977 




978 




979 




980 




981 




982 




983 




984 




986 




986 




•87 




f88 


• 


989 




990 




991 




992 




993 




994 




995 




996 




997 




998 




999 




1000 




1001 




1002 




14)03 




1004 




1006 




1006 




1007 


r 


1008 


1 


1«09 



D. Q. Gale, Attorney 

O. W Blindolph, Attorney 

David Wagner, Supreme Judge 

Thomae J. C. Fagjg, Supreme Judge 

Gilchrist Porter, Judge 

T. K. Smith, Clerk Secretary 

P. Lucas, Judgje 

Alfred Gensel, Attorney 

Wm, Pauley, Guard Penitentiary 

J. B. Watte, Guard Penitentiary 

Wilson Primm, Jud^e 

Peter Jecko, Commissioner 

S. S. Burdett, Attorney 

H. B. Johnson, Attorney 

Alonxo Thompson, Auditor and Inspector. 
John A. S. Tutt, Judge 

0. G. Burch, Assistant Librarian 

J. H. Creighton, Attorney 

1. C. Parker, Attorney 

R. J. Patterson, Clerk Register 

0. G. Burch, Assistant Librarian 

Charles Hanson, Guard Penitentiary. 
James F. BeU^ 



To whom. 



€1 



ti 



T. J. Burch, 
Wm. Blackburn, 
Frank Brenisen, 

E. A. Boas, 
Geo. W . Campbell, " 
P. H. Crump, 
John Creedon, 
Geo. M. GaUant, 

F. M. Gray, 
Wm. Grimm, 
Wm. M. Harrison, 
James M. Jobe, 
Reuben Jobe, 
Henry Meise!, 
John Mort, 
A. L. Reavis, 
J. B. Reavis, 
J. 0. Smith, 
A Smith, 
Jasper N. Scott, 
Henry Shoup, 
J. B. Spaannorst, 
Philip Smith, 
Mark Thompson, 
Allen 'I'homas, 
James M. Tharp, 
George W. Urben, 
J. J. Wright, * 
Peter Weleer, 
C. F. Yerger, 
John Zimmerman« 
A. A. Gordon, 
John Hermlebeny 
J. F. Baker, 
A. Lockroodf 
Wm. Hardy, 
A. Magraw, 
Bobt. A ins worth, 

G. P. Buffington, 
H. C. Rich, 
J. L. Smith, 
Dennis Mooimj, 

H. B. Johnson, Attorney «. .^. 

R. E. Rombaner, Judge.« m... ...... 

Thomas H. Collins, Attorney 

John B. Robinson, Attorney 

Jackson Brock, Judge 

Thomas J. C. Fajgg, Snpreme Jiidge.*.*..*..*^..—..*.. 



it 

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it 
it 
tt 
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Amomil. 



$300 l]# 
100 00 
760 00 
760 00 
460 00 
27 40 
600 OO 
100 00 
46 00 
50 00 
600 00 
82 70 
200 00 
100 00 
776 00 
600 00 
220 DO 
60 44 
63 86 
600 00 
186 00 
130 00 
160 00 
160 00 
226 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
220 00 
376 DO 
140 00 

140 OO 
160 00 
160 00 
146 07 
207 07 
160 00 

195 00 
160 00 
160 00 
160 OO 
160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
270 00 
160 00 
BOO 00 
148 88 
180 00 
160 00 
160 00 
150 00 
146 00 
136 00 

46 00 

141 67 
262 60 
141 67 
100 00 
800 00 
120 00 

73 88 

100 00 

60 00 

196 00 
100 00 
600 00 
100 00 
100 OO 

60 00 
760 00 



40 



DIfiDURS£MEN19 OUT OF 



CIVIL OFFICERS— CoNTiFUEEr. 



Ihkte. 



April 1, 1868 




4 

6 

10 
10 

13 

16 

18 
20 
23 



1010 
1011 
1012 
lOU 
1015 
1017 
1018 
1019 
1020 
^021 
1022 
1023 
1025 
1026 
1027 
1028 
1020 
1030 
1031 
1032 
1038 
1034 
1035 
10H6 
1037 
1038 
1040 
1041 
1042 
1043 
1644 
1045 
1046 
1047 
1052 
1053 
1054 
1058 
1051^ 
1060 
1061 
1062 
1063 
1066 
1068 
1069 
1072 
1073 
1074 
1082 
1083 
1085 
1086 
1087 
1096 
1097 
1098 
1102 
1109 
J 110 

nil 

1136 
1137 
1139 
1161 
1175 
1191 
1196 
1204 
1222 
1242 



To whom. 



• • •»• •••»«••• 



Darid Wagner, Bopreme Judge „ 

S. W. Cox, Clerk Penitentiwy 

I. D. Wri/cbt, Dpputy Warden Penitentiary 

A. W. Bishop, Clerk Treaenrer 

Wm. Bishop, Treasnrer and Inspector 

C. N. Brown, Clerk Treasurer 

Ed. Schueller, Factor Penitentiary. <. 

Maria Eberwine, Clerk Secretary 

Francis Rodman, Secretary of State ...» 

Samuel Reber, Judge «.^ 

N. C. Burcb, Clerk Treasurer 

C. A. Thompson, Physician Penitentiary 

H. A. Swift, Warden Penitentiary..... « 

George W. Randolph, Attorney 

Albert JacksoD, Judge „..., 

D. M. Draper, Attorney « 

Thomas C. Fletcher, Goremor. 

George J. W. Nezsen, Clerk Secretary 

Henry C. Nitchy, Clerk Auditor 

T. A. Parker. Su|)erintendent Public Schools.....* 

Edwin Clark, Assistant Superintendent Public Schools 

F. A, Nitchy, Clerk Audi or 

John Pesiell, Clerk Auditor 

N. W. Charles, Clerk Auditor : 

Cyrus Thompson, Cleric Auditor ..- 

N. DeWyl, Clerk Secretary 

Gilchrist Porter, Judge » ^ 

C. C. Draper, Clerk Govenor ^ „ 

Daniel Rice, Commissioner. , 

F. Corbax, Clerk Secretary 

Mrs. D. Thompson, Clerk Register 

Wm. Whist, Clerk Register -.. 

R. J. Patterson, Clerk Rerister 

J. B. Smith, Register of Lands 

R. A. DeBolt, Judge , 

B. B. Kingsbury, Attorney 

R. F. Wingate, Attorney General and Inspector 

G. H. Burckhardt, Judge.... 

Wra. P. Harrison, Judge ^ 

Wm. Heren, Judge ^ ^ 

A Gi*nsel, Attorney 

J. W. Jdhnson. Chaplain Penitentiary...... ^ 

G. W. Miller, Judge 

E. Blackburn, Guard Penitentiary...... 

Nath. Holmes, Supreme Judge 

C. B. Lord, Judge 

Alonxo Thompson, Auditor and Inspector 

James S. Henderson, Treasurer Lunatic Asylum 

Thomas B. Nesblt, Treasurer Deaf and Dumb Asylum., 
Jacob 8. Boreraan, Judge , , 

B. H. Emerson, Judge 

Mary Sullivan, Matron Penitentiary 

R. W. Fyan, Judge 

N. C. Burch, Librarian 

Wm. Carter, Ji/dge ^..., 

C. M. Wright, Attorney ^ 

James McWilUams, Judge 

Lewi« Brown, Attorney ^ 

B. V. Wilson, Judge ^ 

Jonas J. Clark, Judge ^. 

Wm. C Hillis, Attorney «..„ 

John A. Mack, Judge «,... 

E. J. Montague, Judge 

Elijah Perry, Attorney 

J. H. Vail, Judge 

W. W. Edwards, Judge...„ 

Aaron VanWormer, tMidge 

Ira E. Leonard, Attorney 

F. Corbas, Clerk Secretary 

C. F. Yerger, Guard Penitentiary 

George Smith, Lieutenant GoTecnor^..^. 



AmouBt* 



■ a. .»...»... .«.••»*.. 



I »»»■»»» »••••• 



»••■•••• 



$750 0» 


300 00 


250 0» 


250 OO 


775 09 


375 00 


375 OO 


83 33 


625 00 


500 00 


375 0» 


175 00 


500 00 


100 00 


500 OO 


100 OO 


1,250 OO 


375 00 


375 00 


750 00 


500 00 


375 00 


375 90 


250 00 


375 00 


375 OO 


562 50 


20 60 


54 80 


222 60 


250 oa 


.375 00 


250 OO 


750 OO 


500 OO 


100 OO 


775 OO 


500 OO 


562 50 


510 00 


100 OO 


125 OO 


562 50 


100 OO 


750 OO 


500 00 


775 OO 


1,241 6T 


925 OO 


125 OO 


500 00 


125 00 


500 00 


125 OO 


500 OO 


100 OO 


112 50> 


100 OO 


500 OO 


500 OO 


100 00 


«2 50 


62 5a 


100 00 


500 OO 


279 OO 


600 OO 


127 IT 


41 15^ 


12 8$ 


178 5T 



THB BKYXNITB FOND. 



41 



CIVIL OFFICKtS«-OoNTiHini]>. 



Bate. 



April 24,1868 

Mftj 1.... 

2.... 

6.... 
23..., 
27.... 
28.,.. 

29.... 
June 1.... 

17.... 

27.... 
July 1.... 




1244 
1279 
1303 
1305 
1314 
1418 
143S 
1447 
1449 
1460 
1471 
1539 
1568 
1585 
1536 
1587 
1588 
1590 
1591 
1592 
1593 
1594 
1596 
1597 
1598 
1599 
1600 
1601 
1602 
160S 
1604 
1605 
1606 
1607 
1608 
1609 
1610 
1611 
1612 
1613 
1614 
1615 
1616 
1617 
1618 
1619 
1620 
1621 
1622 
1623 
1624 
1625 
1626 
1627 
1628 
1629 
1630 
1631 
1632 
1633 
1634 
1635 
1636 
1637 
1638 
1639 
1640 
1641 
1642 
1643 
1644 



To whom. 



W. C. Barr, Attorney.. 

D. Q. Gale, Attorney 

Wilson Primm, Jud|^e 

S. S. Burdett, Attorney 

Bernard Schepers, Clerk Secretary 

H. C. Osbom, Guard Penitentiary 

S. Harry Wright, Clerk Adjutant General 

John A. B. Tutt, Judge 

B. F. Eflteb, Attorney 

Jefferson Chandler, Attorney 

J. Uerrnleber, Guard Pent ten tiary.^ 

George Smith, Lielitenant Governor 

Wm. Hardy, Guard Penitentiary 

Wm. P. Harrison, Judge 

N. W. Charles, Clerk Auditor 

Samuel Reber, Judge 

H. B. Johnson, Attorney 

James 8. Henderson, Treasurer Lunatic Asylum. 

Charles P. Johnson, Attorney 

S. Harry Wright, Clerk A^utant General 

Ira E. Leonard, Attorney 

Thos. H. Collins, '* 

W. W. Kdwards, Judge 

Ed. Schueller, Factor Penitentiary 

William Whist, Clerk Register 

R J. Patterson, «* 

G. W. Hood, jr., «* 

H. A. bwift, Warden Penitentiary 

T. W. Johnson, Chaplain Penitentiary 

Thomas C. Fletcher, Governor 

.Tohn Pestell, Clerk Auditor 

H. C. Nitchy, " " 

P. A. Nitchy, " ^** 

C.Thompson, " " 

Robert Ainsworth, Guard Penitentiary 



it 



n 



James F. Bell, 
T. J. Burch, 
Wm. Blackburn 

E. Blackburn, 
Frank Brenisen, 
£. A. Boas, 
J. F. Baker, 
G. P. BufBngton, 
G. H. Campbell, 
P. H. Crump, 
John Creedon, 
George Gallant, 

F. M. Gray, 
William Grimm 
A. A. Gordon, 
Wm M. Harrison, 
fi. Hopper, 
J. M. Jobe, 
Reuben Jobe, 
Andrew Lockrood, 
Henry Meisel, 
John Mort, 
Austin Ma^aw, 
J. B. Reavis, 
A. L. Reavis, 
H. C. Rich, 
Miss Sarah Richards, Clerk Penitentiary. 
J. 0. Smith, Guard Penitentiary.... 
J. L. Smith, 
Jasper N. Scott 
Henry Shoup, 
J. R. Spaunhorst 
Philip Smith, 
Mark Thompson, 
Allen Thomas, 
James M. Tharp, 



it 

it 
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it 
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tt 

it 
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tt 
it 
tt 
it 
it 
it 
tt 
it 
It 
tt 
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tt 
it 



a 
tt 
II 
It 
It 
tt 
tt 
tt 



ft 
tt 
tt 
11 
tt 
tt 
tr 
tt 
it 
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It 
II 
II 
11 
tt 
It 
It 
It 
it 
It 
II 
It 
It 
II 
11 



II 
11 
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It 
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Amount. 


$100 00 


100 00 


500 00 


100 OQ 


83 4Q 


75 00 


28 85 


500 00 


100 00 


46 15 


103 33 


137 36 


46 66 


562 50 


260 00 


500 00 


100 00 


1,183 52 


175 00 


875 00 


100 00 


100 00 


500 00 


375 00 


375 00 


250 00 


250 00 


500 00 


125 00 


1,250 00 


375 00 


375 00 


375 00 


375 00 


300 00 


150 00 


150 09 


212 50 


143 33 


146 67 


195 00 


262 50 


144 16 


146 67 


225 00 


450 00 


139 16 


150 00 


150 00 


30 00 


146 67 


135 00 


150 00 


180 00 


125 83 


150 00 


273 33 


300 00 


141 67 


150 00 


147 50 


118 33 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


300 00 


148 83 


375 00 


146 67 


122 00 



D1SBUBSEHKBTB ODT OF 
CXVn. 0FFICBB8 -^ 



DmU. 


No. 


To whom. 


AuOQBt. 


j«iy 1, ises... 


1645 

laie 

11147 

lais 
ie)9 

lOJO 
IBSl 
1652 
1693 
16^1 

lais 
lesT 

1S5S 
1862 
IS83 
1064 
16flS 
1668 
1667 
lfl..8 
1688 
1870 
1671 
1672 
1673 
1674 
167S 
1676 
1679 

leso 

16BI 
lfiS2 
1833 
18S4 
188S 
1687 
1G88 

im 

16DS 
1TU3 

1705 
1706 
1TU7 
1T03 
1710 
1713 
1714 
171S 
1718 
1717 
1721 
1728 
17J7 
17!S 
1729 
1733 
1734 
1738 
1741 
1748 
1717 
1750 
1753 
1751 
1755 
17S9 
1762 
1768 




$ 1ST H 


















G. if. Wiener, " " _ 

John ZiniDieriiiM, " " - 


ISO 00 
153 3S 
HI e7 

73 8S 




J. A. TLptoD, " " -.... 




























TbomM B. Nsbbit, Treuarar Deaf uid Dumb Aijloa.^... 


SSSOO 

600 eo 
eoooo 

fiOOOO 
375 00 
100 00 








George H. Burkbarill, Judge 
































250 00 
S76 00 




Oert Hoebel, " " „ 






1T5O0 
175 0* 








el Rice, ComniiMioner - _ 


8T M 






STt 01 
175 0> 
250 •» 




ism Biibrp, TreMiirer and Inspector ^...^ 






250 00 










lOO 00 
500 CO 










250 00 












lOOOO 
100 00 
SDOOO 




. Kjj^r,, Attorne,.....^..................^ 




























lODOO 
500 00 
62 50 
















































































































1?. aindolph, " 


lOpOO 



THB BKVENUE FUND* 



48 



CIVIL OFFICBBS— GoMTiNUSD. 




JTulyU, 18G8.. 

17.... 

18.... 

23.... 

80 

Ang, 1, 1868... 

3.... 

10..., 

28 

Sept. 4, 1868... 

12.... 

14.... 

17.... 

25.... 

26 

Oct. 1, 1868.... 



1770 
1780 
1785 
ISO I 
1823 
1833 
1835 
1838 
1859 
1952 
1986 
2016 
2026 
2048 
2087 
2092 
2104 
2105 
2106 
2107 
2108 
2109 
2110 
2111 
2112 
2113 
2114 
2115 
2116 
2117 
2118 
2119 
2120 
2121 
2122 
2123 
2124 
2125 
2126 
2127 
2128 
2129 
2130 
2131 
2132 
2133 
2134 
2135 
2136 
2137 
2138 
2139 
2140 
2141 
2142 
2143 
2144 
2145 
2146 
2147 
2148 
2149 
2150 
2151 
2152 
2153 
2154 
2155 
2156 
2157 
2158 



W. F. Geii^er, Attorney 

D. M. Draper, ,, 

Mrs. D. ThompsoD, Clerk Beg^ister 

0. G. Burch, Assistant Librarian 

Jeff. Chandler, Attorney 

Wilson Primm, Judge 

Nath. Holmes, Supreme Judg^e 

Q. H. Wicker, C^ard Penitentiary 

Elijah Perry, Attorney 

Alonso Thompson, Auditor and inspector. . 

John Mort, Guard Penitentiary 

William S. Shirk, Attorney 

A. J. Hannah, Guard Penitentiary 

PhUip Smith, «' " 

0. M. Draper, Attorney 

Geo. Smith, Lieutenant GoYernor 

N. W. Charles, Clerk Auditor 

Alonxo Thompson, Auditor and InsptCtor. 

Henry C. Nitchy, Clerk Auditor 

P. A. Nitchy, " " 

John Pestell " " 

Cyrus ibompson, '' " 

Robert Ainsworth, Guard Penitentiary 

James F. Bell, 
T. J. Burcb, 
William Blackburn, " 
Elgah Blackburn, 
Frank Brenisen, 

E. A. Boas, 
J. F. Baker, 
G. P. Buffiinfton, 
G. W. CampbeU, 
P. H. Crump, 
John Creedon, 
Georg^e Gallant^ 

F. M. Gray, 
William Grimm, 
A. A. Gordon, 
Wm. M. Harrison, 
El^ah Hopper, 
James M. Jo be, 
Reuben Jobe, 
A. P. Knife, 
Henr^ Meisel, 
Austin Ma^aw, 
A. L. Reavis, 
Joseph B. Itearis 
H. C. Rich, 
Miss Sarah Richai 
J. 0. Smith, C 
J. L. Smith, 
Jasper N. Scott, 
Henry Shoap, 
J. R. Snaunnorst, 
Mark Tnompson, 
Allen Thomas, 
James M. Tharp» 
Owen Todd, 
Jonathan Tipton, 
L. R. Thomas, 

G. W. Urben, . 
J. J. AVrig^ht, 
Peter Welser, 
C. S. Tonnt, 
John Zimmerman, 
Abe. Gordon, 
Dennis Mooney, 
Frank Drinkard, 
tTohn Cnrrey, 

H. A. Swift, Warden Penitentiury 

C. A. Thompson, Physician Penitentiary. 



tt 


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1, Clerk ] 


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Amount. 


$127 47 


100 00 


250 00 


16 00 


100 00 


500 00 


250 00 


50 00 


100 00 


775 00 


83 33 


32 97 


254 00 


113 33 


66 30 


135 86 


250 00 


775 00 


375 00 


375 00 


375 00 


375 00 


293 33 


150 00 


150 00 


217 60 


150 00 


150 00 


195 00 


262 60 


150 00 


138 33 


220 00 


450 00 


133 33 


150 00 


150 00 


45 00 


130 00 


141 67 


118 33 


141 67 


148 33 


150 00 


300 00 


150 00 


195 00 


148 33 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


145 00 


150 00 


300 00 


375 00 


131 67 


195 00 


148 33 


145 00 


150 00 


150 00 


225 00 


150 00 


150 00 


210 00 


130 00 


195 00 


20 00 


70 00 


500 00 


175 00 



44 



laSBUBSBlCBNTS OUT OF 



CIVIL OFFICERS— OoxninTio, 



Date. 



Oct. 1, 18C8.... 




7 

8 

10 

13 

Not. 4, 1808.. 



2169 

2L60 

2161 

2162 

2163 

2164 

2166 

2168 

2169 

2170 

2171 

2172 

2173 

2174 

2175 

2176 

2177 

2178 

2179 

2180 

2181 

2182 

2183 

2184 

2188 

2189 

2190 

2191 

2193 

2194 

2196 

2196 

2197 

2198 

2199 

2200 

2201 

2202 

2206 

2207 

2213 

2214 

2216 

2216 

2217 

2218 

2222 

2226 

2228 

2229 

2230 

2242 

2243 

2244 

2246 

2247 

2248 

2249 

2263 

2264 

2261 

2288b 



S. W. Cozi Olprk Penitentiary 

I. D. Wri^hty Depaty Warden Penitentiary 

Marv SnlUvan, Matron Penitentiary «.. 

J. W. Johnson^ Chaplain Penitentiary 

N. C. Borchy Librarian 

C. C. Draper, Clerk Governor 

C. N. Brown, Clerk Treasurer.... > 

N. C. Burch, " " 

Ed. Schueller, Factor Penitentiary 

A. W. Bishop, Clerk Treasurer 

William Bishop, Treasurer and Inspector .*. , 

T. A. Parker, Superintendent Public Schools 

Kdwin Clark, Assistant Superintendent Public Schools, 

R. F. Wing^te, Attorney General and Inspector 

William P.Harrison, Judg^ 

J. E. Smith, Reg^ister. 

WilUam Whist, Clerk Re^ster 

George J. W. Nezsen, Clerk Secretary 

William N. Nalle, Attorney 

David Wagner, Supreme Judge..; 

B. B. Kingsbury, Attorney 

R. J. Patterson, Clerk Register 

Mrs. i>. Thompson, Clerk Register 

Albert Jackson, Judge 

Eugene F. Weigel, Clerk Secretary 

G. W. Hood, Jr., Clerk Register 

G. W. Miller, Judge 

Daniel Rice, Commissioner • 

C. M. Wright, Attorney 

R. £. Rombauer, Judge 

S. Harry Wright, Clerk Adjutant General 

Thomas H. Collins, Attorney 

E. Schierenberg, Clerk Secretary 

Francis Rodman, Secretary of Stat« 

William C. Hillis, Attorney 

Gert. Goebel, Clerk Secretary 

Thomas J. C. Fagg, Supreme Judge 

G. H. Burckhardt, Judge 

Thomas B. Nesbit, Treasurer Deaf and Dumb Asylum.. 
Maria Eberwine, Clerk Secretary 

C. B. Lord, Judge 

Wilson Primm, Judge 

J. H. Vail, Judge 

'Jacob 3. Boreman, Judge 

lira E. Leonard, Attorney 

|jas. S. Henderson, Treasurer Lunatic Asylum 

A. Gensel, Attorney 

Thomas C. Fletcher, Governor 

B. H. Emerson, Judge 

William S. Shirk, Attorney 

E. J. Montague, Judge 

John C. Price, Judge 

William Carter, Judge 

R. A. DeBolt, Judge 

E. Y. Wilson, Judge , 

D. Q. Gale, Judge 

Gilchrist Porter, Judge 

Aaron VanWormer, Judge 

John A. Mack, Judge 

W. W. Edwards, Judge •. 

L. R. Thomas, Guard Penitentiary 

Abr. Gordon, Guard Penitentiary > 



Total. 



$ 300 06 
260 00 
126 00 
126 00 
126 00 
876 00 
376 00 
876 00 
876 00 
260 00 
776 00 
760 00 
600 00 
776 00 
662 60 
760 00 
376 00 
376 00 
100 00 
760 00 
100 00 
250 00 
260 00 
600 00 
260 00 
260 00 
662 50 

87 60 
100 00 
600 00 
376 00 
100 00 
260 00 
' 626 00 
100 00 
291 67 
760 00 
600 00 
926 00 
260 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
126 00 
100 00 
1,012 60 
100 00 
1,260 00 
600 00 
100 00 

62 60 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
418 AS 
662 60 
600 00 

62 60 
600 00 

20 00 

60 00 

$342,114 26 



THE B&VBNUK FUSD. 



45 



FOR ASSESSING AND COLLECTING REVENUE. 




October 4, 1806 
17 

27 

Not. 17, 1866 

19 

22 

30 

Dec. 4, 1866 
Febr. 26,1807 



Mirch 1^1867 



8. 



*•••••• 



11. 



1566 
1592 
1593 
1606 
1631 
1635 
1643 
1668 
1678 

156 

163 

171 

174 

176 

181 

194 

204 

209 

224 

239 

243 

256 

258 

260 

276 

286 . 

291 

295 

296 

312 

313 

325 

332 

337 

343 

350 

351 

358 

360 

872 

378 

382 

383 

389 

398 

399 

400 

401 

404 

405 

406 

408 

412 

418 

419 

420 

421 

422 

425 

426 

428 



Allen P. Richardson, Postmaster. 
Theodore Plate A Co 

same 

U. S. Express Co 

same 

same 



same 
same 



same ».>• 

Horace Wilcox, Clerk Phelps , 

William H. Losk, Clerk Cole 

J. W. Mclntyre et al 

A. B. Maddux, Clerk Dallas 

J. S. Wilson, Clerk Lawrence 

L. W. Manlsby, Assessor ^ew Madrid. 
William C. Evans, Clerk St. Francois.. 

D. S. Hooper, Recorder Adair 

W. 8. McClanahan, Clerk Linn 

Theodore Plate k Co 

John B. Harder, Assessor Buchanan.... 

M. U. Foster, Recorder Johnson 

Robert F. Johnson, Assessor Caldwell. 

J. A. Mott, Clerk New Madrid 

William J. Trimble, Assessor Webster. 

J. L. Powell. Collector Daviess 

C. S. Keer, Assessor Chariton 

James W. Steel, et al 

U. S. Express Co 

Samuel W. Eager, Clerk St Louis 

Horace Wilcox, Clerk Phelps 

Thomas J. Spillman, Assessor Wright. 

George W. Boardman etal 

J. A. J. Lee, Assessor Phelps 

J. G. Anderson, Clerk Crawford 

Theodore Plate ACo 

Joseph HuflF, Clerk Iron 

J. S. Bennington, Assessor Knox 

James A. Wilson, Clerk Donglns 

M. Lancaster, Assessor DeKalb 

S. Self, Assessor Ralls 

B. L. Fisher, Recorder Carroll 

C. H. Stewart, Clerk Mercer 

L. M. Fitts, Assessor Monroe 

R. L. Hargrove, Clerk McDonald 

J. R. Swearingen, Clerk Jackson 

William G Bulgin, ClerH Jasper..* 

E. B. VanVleet, Assessor Macon 

V. B. VanDyke, Assessor Bates 

W. B. Wilson, Clerk Callaway 

A. L. Winchell, Assessor Putnam 

W. L. Snodgrass, Recorder Polk 

Ch. G. Comstock etal 

W. L. Jerome, Recorder Mercer 

Philip J. Shulte, Assessor Madison.... 

H. C. Levens, Clerk (^ooper 

J. Shaver, Assessor Adair 

C. W. Conrad, Assessor Perry 

C. G. Bigger, Asjfssor Linn , 

J. H. Thogmartin, Assessor Mercer .... 

G. Russell, Assessor Iron , 

S. McDonald^ Clerk BcotUnd. 



Amount. 


$ 10 00 


753 00 


488 00 


7 50 


3 00 


2 90 


2 10 


75 


1 00 


196 83 


861 64 


75 23 


17 75 


257 34 


219 25 


20 05 


37 42 


253 82 


69 50 


803 40 


85 30 


423 95 


157 19 


216 35 


220 80 


705 95 


519 22 


4 30 


1,805 31 


6 50 


153 37 


1,213 51 


303 29 


9 54 


255 10 


27 22 


348 00 


141 35 


193 00 


356 62 


74 30 


94 84 


453 27 


77 05 


91 39 


214 77 


746 10 


383 57 


44 01 


399 34 


14 20 


465 91 


30 40 


207 10 


60 67 


544 34 


346 51 


693 96 


420 47 


8^5 96 


26 57 



N 



46 



DISBUBBEMBNTS OUT OP 



FOR ASSESSING AND .COLLECTING REVENUE— Cortihited. 



'Date. 



March 11, 1867 


429 




430 




431 




433 




436 


12 


466 


• 


470 




476 


13 


493 




498 




500 




504 




505 




507 




508 




517 




524 


U 


532 




536 




569 


15 


577 




579 




5S0 


16 


598 




600 


18 


608 




615 




617 




634 


19 


636 


20 


644 


21 


650 




654 




660 




662 


22 


667 




668 




669 




674 




679 


23 


683 




684 


25 


695 




700 




701 




703 


26 


705 




706 




707 


27 


713 




715 




717 




720 




725 




729 




732 




734 




737 


28 


744 




745 




746 




750 




751 




753 


30 


764 




766 




773 




776 


April 1, 1867 


793 




818 


2 


853 



No. 



To whom drawn. 



Amount. 



N. D. Starr, Clerk Lewis 

J T. Moss, Aesessor Livingston..... 

E. A. Uolcomb, Clerk Chariton 

(iust. Bruere, Clerk St. Charles 

D. R. Henderson, Clerk Dent 

R. W. Anderson, Clerk Maries 

W. B. Uobbs, Assessor Qrnndy 

C. M. Ward, Clerk Cole 

H. Levens et al 

R. B. Newman, Assessor Cooper 

George A. Tearcj et al 

James Allen, Clerk Cass 

iVilliam Uulstone, Recorder Cedar 

A. B. Maddux, Recorder Dallas 

C. R. Peck, R. i. S. L. 

J. C. Shaefer, Clerk Randolph 

William II. Heath, Auditor St. Louis.. 

William HixsoD, Clerk Lafayette 

II. D. Mariihall, Clerk Putnam 

H. J. Reed, Assessor Randolph 

Robert Taylor, Assessor Latayette 

Fred. Grati', Assessor Lewis 

A. Speucer, Assessor Ray 

A. F. Uarvey, Clerk DeKaib 

B. Appleby, Recorder Dade 

J. T. McMullin, Assessor Jefferson 

C. R. Peck, K. U. S. L. O 

C S. Bush, Assessor Pemiscot #. 

Robert F. Wingate, Attorney General. 

5. W. Miller, Clerk Wayne 

J. J. Inghram, Assessor Holt 

C. A. Peck, Recorder U. S. L. 

U. S. Express Co.... 

D. Melone 

Warren Woodson, Clerk Boone 

W. D. Campbell, Assessor Audrain 

W. C. Boon, Assessor Howard 

6. T Vittitow, Assessor Jasper 

M. Lancaster, Assessor DeKaib 

L. Dunn et al 

William A. Norris, Assessor Barton.... 

L. M. Timmonds, Clerk Barton 

D. B. Colle^, Clerk Pulaski 

I. H. Cunningham, Clerk Webster 

L. K. Williams, Assessor Dent 

W. D. Sigler, Assessor Scotland 

L. Dobbin, Assessor Shelby 

D. W. Moore, Clerk Platte 

L. Barnes, Clerk St. Clair 

Joseph Huff, Recorder Iron 

J. V. Bassett et al 

Charles A. Weber, Recorder Perry 

W. C. Ransom et al 

II. H. Winchell, Recorder Marion 

W. B. Davis et al 

John Eudaley et al 

C. Glover, t lerk Osage 

W. T. Gilman, Recorder Macon 

G. W. Boardman, R. U. S. L. 

C. R. Peck, R. U. S. L. 

J. M. Anthony, Assessor Washington.. 

E. B. Smith, Clerk Washington 

P. C. Berry, Clerk Stone 

E. A. lloicomb. Clerk Cburitun 

C. C. Crawford, Assessor Pettis 

B. F. Bibb, Clerk Benton 

J. W. Brown, Recorder Harrison 

H. 0. Bryant et al 

L. T. Bragg, Clerk Dunklin 

E. S. Foster, P. P 

R. P. Games, Clerk Grandy 



$ 24 49 

683 36 

454 36 

80 30 

35 20 

79 27 

239 77 

9 80 

246 05 

537 65 

149 14 

93 42 

24 62 

13 87 

430 00 

3 30 

1,998 18 

31 36 

161 03 

449 70 

666 02 
518 99 
468 46 

11 22 

10 00 
596 10 
153 76 

34 37 
100 00 

23 27 
474 95 
135 00 

22 10 
297 60 

18 OS 
414 92 
681 07 
723 30 
293 23 

89 48 
659 17 
373 68 

11 00 
46 17 

290 24 
412 32 
410 56 
112 89 
218 36 

35 84 

24 82 
8 73 

890 52 
100 75 

70 69 
217 66 
193 24 

79 35 
200 00 

20 00 
422 44 

29 61 
167 04 
668 90 
602 32 

76 61 

20 26 
723 67 
161 86 

667 66 

19 11 



THB BBYENUK FUNl). 



47 



FOR ASSESSlNa AND COLLECTING BBVENUE-<?oirTWinu>. 



D»te. 




April 2, 1867. 

6 

« 

8 

9 

10 

12 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

29 

30 

May 4, 1867.... 
6.... 

7.... 

8.... 

9.... 
11.... 
13.... 
16.... 



May 17, 1867. 

18.... 

21.... 

22.... 

24.... 

26.... 

27.... 

June 1, 1867. 



3.... 
6.... 

I •••• 
10.... 



11. 
12. 



869 

868 

869 

897 

898 

906 

906 

913 

916 

917 

920 

925 

934 

940 

949 

962 

963 

961 

967 

972 

976 

977 

1007 

1003 

1010 

1011 

1014 

1017 

1039 

1041 

1046 

1055 

1056 

1065 

1071 

1076 

1077 

1100 

1103 

1105 

1108 

1110 

nil 

1115 

1118 

1121 

1123 

1137 

1141 

1146' 

1147 

1166 

1171 

1176 

1212 

1213 

1219 

1220 

1221 

1223 

1231 

1233 

1237 

1241 

1244 
1247 
1248 
1249 
1262 
1254 
1267 



To whom drawn.' 



D. B. Smileyj Assessor Lincoln 

J. Hornbeaky Assessor Jasper 

\y, H. Liggett, Clerk Hickory 

Joseph O. CranSt Assessor Csllaway 

James Forrest, Clerk Wright 

James M. Templeton, Recorder Atchison.. 

William Harrison, /^B8es8or Crawford 

W. R. Samuel, Recorder Randolph 

H. Oorrell, Assessor Clinton 

W. M. Daridson, Assessor Saline 

R. St. John. Recorder Ralls 

A. J. Hemdon, Clerk Howard 

N. Buchanan, Assessor Newton 

Charles Hart, Assessor 8t. Francois 

J Hoskinsy Assessor Carter , 

y. B. Vandyke, Assessor, Bates 

M. L. G. Crowe, Clerk Franklin , 

J. H. Steffiens, Clerk Texas 

Ch. M. Hamill, Clerk Phelps 

R. R. Howard, et al 

M. L. G. Crowe, Clerk Franklin ,.. 

John Richy, Clerk Adair 

Ham. Tresenriter, Clerk Pemiscot 

Abr. Dobbs, Clerk Andrew 

Thomas Selby, Clerk Camden 

W. W. Lee, Assessor Barry., , 

B. S. Foster, Public Printer 

W. B. Hobbs, Assessor Grundy , 

Gustare Bruere, Clerk St. Charles 

Joseph Jackson et al, Clerk Nodaway 

Thomas Walker, Assessor Schuyler 

Henry Ruge, Assessor Warren 

Joseph M. Styles, Assessor Polk 

John T. Fiala, Treasurer St. Louis County 

AlbertP. Frowein, Clerk Warren 

0. W. Hutcherson, Clerk Ripley 

John Eudaley, Assessor Butler 

United States Express Company 

S. W. Miller, Clerk Wayne 

J. B. Turner, Clerk Ray 

Z. W. Stephens, Assessor Ripley , 

J. W. Cheek, Assessor Dallas 

H. H. Fox, Assessor McDonidd 

G. M. Ochiltree, Clerk Clark 

A. B. Owen tt al. Clerk Stoddard 

T. II. B. Dunnegan, Clerk Polk 

G. W. Hutcherson, Clerk Ripley 

Joseph Simpson, Assessor Worth 

J. Q. Boner, Clerk Sullivan 

Jas. M. Templeton, Clerk Atchison 

R. R. Howard, Assessor Moniteau 

James Lee, Assessor Jackson 

G. W. Houts, Clerk Johnson.., , 

J. C. Murray 

G. H. Shawwecker, Assessor Osage 

Hadhr Brown, Assessor Daviess 

H. W. Moore, Assessor Marion 

John Riggen, Assessor Sullivan 

W. C. Evans, Clerk St. Francois 

Jacob Freund, Assessor Benton 

John L. Bogy, Recorder Ste. Genevieve... 
W. W. Lee etal 

E. 0. Sanford, Assessor Taney 

W. M. Davidson, Assessor Saline 

U. B. Cole, Assessor St. Clair 

Daniel Belchamber, Assessor Bollinger.... 

J. J. Conrad, Clerk Bollinger 

W. C. Boyd, Clerk Oregon 

Robert Allison, Assessor Oregon 

John D. Meyers, Clerk Bates 

Robert H. Query, Ajiessor Cape Girardeau 



.......#•• ............*. .....I 



Amoont. 


$ 602 67 


140 35 


146 67 


371 72 


233 81 


32 60 


366 40 


19 20 


313 89 


462 63 


16 50 


9 24 


274 34 


246 36 


87 76 


46 96 


39 39 


17 33 


15 22 


404 66 


306 67 


43 77 


8 30 


40 16 


16 62 


197 17 


18 15 


366 66 


217 68 


613 82 


248 66 


290 52 


146 26 


12,683 79 


167 63 


327 86 


163 37 


60 


76 79 


166 49 


753 60 


210 70 


187 89 


58 82 


l(f^ 44 


6 04 


10 96 


716 60 


117 49 


10 00 


404 26 


1,462 60 


34 73 


12 60 


389 67 


416 76 


533 03 


431 77 


156 36 


361 60 


.30 00 


472 16 


216 27 


297 76 


316 24 


393 98 


4 12 


66 87 


121 16 


446 86 


372 62 



48 



DISBURSEMKNT8 OUT OF 



FOR ASSBSSING AND OOLLEOTING BBVBNUB— CoHTiRinv, 




June 13,1367.. 
14 .... 

16 

18 

19 

21 

22 

24 



20. 
27. 
29. 



Joly 1, 1867.... 

3 

5 

6 

8 

9 

11 



12 

13 

16 

16 

17 

19 

20 

22 

23 

24 

25 

27 

29 

30 

31 

An^. 1, 1867... 

3 

6 

7 

9 

10 



1259 
1262 
1267 
1273 
1280 
1288 
1291 
1292 
12)7 
129S 
U99 
13(J6 
1307 
1312 
1314 
1318 
1M22 
1324 
1356 
1402 
1405 
1409 
1420 
1424 
1436 
1442 
1455 
1469 
1463 
1464 
1465 
1471 
1472 
1479 
1486 
1483 
14U2 
1497 
1498 
1603 
1511 
1612 
1513 
1514 
15Ii6 
1516 
1518 
1523 
1526 
1632 
1635 
1537 
1540 
1545 
1651 
1562 
15.')8 
1566 
1567 
1672 
1576 
1582 
1583 
1588 
1589 
15'>3 
1598 
lft02 
1603 
1605 
16U7 



C. H. Malone et al, Clerk Adair 

W. A. Hughes, Clerk Scott 

John Creek, AsBessor Johnion , 

C. R. Peck, R. II. S. L. 

Warren Shedd, Assessor Johnson 

G. il. Qentner, Assessor Gasconade..* 

W. H. Bailey, Clerk Callaway 

Geo. W. Boarduian ei al, R. U. S. L. 

I. B. Tubb, Clerk Butler 

R. H. Farrar, Assessor Franklin % 

R. M. McNeil, Assessor Vernon ^ 

John PI. Remsberg, Assessor Vernon 

J. H. Lightner 

same 

Geo. W. Boardman, R U. S. L. 

Sol. B. Hubbs, Assessor Stoddard 

W. B. Caster, Clerk Gentry : 

J. F. Wielnndy, R. U. S. L. : 

St. McDonald, Clerk Scotland * * 

A. W. Chenoweth, Clerk McDonald.... 

W. Winfi*'ld, R. U S. L. 

Ab. Dobbs, Clerk Andrew 

I. B. lubb. Recorder Butler 

Wm Flentge, Clerk Cape Girardean 

Ch. H. Kew .\«se8flor Sc:>tt....» » ....» 

Samuel A. Yankee, Clerk Pettis 

Treosurer Buchanan County 

P. S. Marshall et al. Assessor Cedar 

W. T. Goodson, Assessor Carroll 

James Allen, Clerk Cnss 

D. M. Cuwnn, Assessor Christian 

n. B. Cole, Ascessor s>t. Clair 

B. Kirby, Public Printer 

G. M. Ochiltree, Clerk Clark 

Wm. Brlutiig, Clerk Clay , 

J. G. Rodders, Assessor like 

Samuel A. Ynnkee, Clerk Peitis 

J. G. Anderson, Clerk Crawford, ft ul 

Wm. T. Hoskins, Assessor Carter 

W. B. B. George, Assessor Polk 

F. C. Cake, Clerk Lincoln 

Wm. M. Sherwood, Clerk Buchanan 

E. F. Boyd, Assessor St. Genevieve 

H. C. Levens, Clerk Cooper 

C. H. Stewart, Clerk Mercer J 

Robert P. Oarnes, (<lerk Grundy 

W. Miller, Clerk Caldwell 

W. H. Bailey, Clerk Callaway 

Wm. B. Cnster, Clerk Gentry : 

H. S. Smith, Clerk Pike 

E. B. Smith, Clerk Washington 

A. M. Felton, Clerk Schuyler 

S. E. Hoge, Clerk Moniteau 

T. R. Dale, Assessor Clay 

G. L. Carlin, Clerk Barry ; 

A. B. Maddux, Clerk Dallas 

C. M. Ward, Clerk Cole 

Wm. Caldwell, Ri^corder Andrew 

W. H Bailey. Clerk Callaway 

C^. D. Starr, Clerk Lewis 

James H. Bridges, Assessor Mississippi • 

George Whitcorah, Clerk Mississippi 

R. W. McMuUin, Herk Jeflferson 

J. II Bethune. Clerk Mississippi 

Joseph Iluflf, Clerk Iron 

James H. Todd, Assessor Miiler 

C. R. Peck, Reo. U. S. L. 

R. V. Keller, Clerk Newton 

Scovern k Bro 

Wm. B. Allen, Assessor Andrew • 



Amoimt* 



$ 52 9f 


125 00 


13 32 


550 n 


142 Y6 


251 10 


429 56 


6 22 


763 27 


76 68 


731 89 


353 90 


860 47 


672 25 


193 54 


146 85 


135 80 


335 95 


182 50 


286 31 


A 52 


12 05 


221 93 


11 22 


170 23 


237 00 


291 01 


47 26 


407 08 


588 30 


310 06 


460 28 


7 50 


60 63 


234 27 


635 55 


632 22 


67 99 


24 89 


701 24 


276 72 


333 88 


671 78 


133 06 


16 24 


239 75 


264 29 


116 88 


248 44 


24 60 


261 59 


274 93 


127 12 


349 23 


252 42 


12 00 


128 52 


4 96 


39 10 


15 40 


808 02 


187 62 


260 99 


183 83 


104 27 


218 22 


188 60 


176 00 


17 60 


2 30 



623 56 



THE REVENUE FUND. 



49 



FOR ASSBSSINa AND COLLECTING RBVENUB-Coxtoubd, 



Dfttd. 


No. 


Aug. 10, 1807. 


1608 




1610 


12 


1611 




1612 




1616 




1617 




1618 


18 


1623 




1624 




1626 




1627 


U 


1632 




1634 




1636 


16 


1637 


10 


1643 




1644 




1646 




1646 




1647 




1648 




1649 


17 


1651 




1655 


19 


1656 




1659 




1660 


20 


1661 




1662 




1663 


21 


1665 




1666 




1667 




1669 


22 


1671 




1672 




1673 




1676 


29.M... 


1677 




1678 


24 


1680 




1681 




1683 


20 


1684 




1685 




1687 




1688 


27 


1689 




1693 


28 


1697 




1698 




1699 


29 


1701 




1702 




1705 


4pV«»«««a 


1707 




1708 




1718 




1714 


81 


1719 




1721 


8«pt. 2, 1807... 


1729 




1734 


3 


1736 




1739 


4 


1743 





1749 




1750 




1751 




1752 




1766 



To whom drawn. 



J. C. ShsBfer, Clferk Randolph 

A. Demath, Clerk Greene ^ 

H. W. Moore, Clerk Marion 

I. H. Cuoniofham, Clerk Webster 

W. C. Boyd, Clerk Oregon..,^ 

J. M. Samnel, Recorder Boane 

D, W. Smith, Clerk Worth „. 

W. L. Snodgpraes, Recorder Polk 

M. L. G. Crowe, Clerk Franklin 

H. Tresenriter, Clerk Pemiscot 

0. S. Bash, Assessor Pemiscot...... 

Merchants Union Express Company 

Wm. 8. Scorille, Assessor Clark 

D. R. Hendersoni Clerk Dent 

W. E. Davis, Clerk Holt 

B. L. Locke, Clerk Audrain 

Chas. A, Weber, Clerk Perry 

N. McDoweU, Clerk Dade.... 

J. B Bnrros, Clerk Polk 

Jos. Jackson, Clerk Nodaway 

Is. Hunter, Assessor New Madrid 

B. Amick, Clerk Wrieht 

G. W. Houts, Clerk Johnson 

Thomas Selby, Clerk Camden 

J. C. England, Recorder Gasconade 

D. B. Fields, Clerk Benton 

John DeSha, Clerk Livingston. 

C. M. Ward, Clerk Cole 

W. M. Sherwood, Clerk Buchanan 

A. W. Chenoweth, Clerk McDonald 

John Slinger, Clerk Harrison. 

R. A. Huffard, Assessor Cole 

W. Woodson, Clerk Boone 

D. R. Henderson, Clerk Dent [ 

John Baker, Recorder Schuyler [", 

John Farrar, Clerk Maron 

R. W. McMullin, Clerk Jefferson !" 

W. Miller, Clerk CaldweU .' 

C. B. Rowland, Assessor Wayne 

Scovem A Bro., et al 

John Richey> Clerk Adair .".V"!!! 

Meyberg ft Waneelin '..!..VV 

L. M. Timmonds, Clerk Barton.. .7.V.V..*. 

A. J. Barr, Recorder Ray 

Wm. 0. Mead, Clerk St. Clair ! 

G. H. Gentner, Assessor Gasconade ', 

Robert C. McCroi^, Assessor Oregon... ' 

W. A. Hughes, Clerk Scott 7. 

James J. Conrad, Clerk BoUineer .7 

D. B. CoUey, Clerk Pulaski...?. .' 

W. D. Graham, Recorder St. Clair 

H C. Levens, Clerk Cooper 

F. M. Redburn, Recorder Chariton .! 

G. W. Sanders, Clerk Crawford 

R. A. C. Mack, Recorder Greene ,' 

St. McDonald, Clerk Scotland , 

Z. W, Stephens, Assessor Ripley .".'..*" 

J. C. Sellers, Clerk Douglas:........ 

P. C. Berry, Clerk tftone ""'. 

W. McDonald, Recorder Dent... 

Wm. A. Mills. Clerk Morgan. .'.'.".T." 

Wm. Hizon, Clerk Lafayette....." 

W. B. Davis, Clerk Holt. !..!.'!.*."! 

B. Dent, Assessor Hickory '.'.!!!!*.'.".".! 

James W. Afiller, Assessor Henry, iV«i' 
James H. Todd, Assessor Miller ', 

A. Comingo, Recorder Jackson.. 

L. T. Bragg, Clerk Dunklin 

B. Amick, Clerk Wright. 

GusCave Bruere, Clerk St. CharlesV.'.'.".'!! 
J. S. Bennington, Assessor Knox, «i i/.V. 



Amount. 



$ 247 77 


180 82 


310 02 


114 41 


42 60 


77 82 


141 .0 


26 00 


378 98 


57 80 


119 42 


8 20 


519 36 


132 22 


447 90 


111 30 


148 95 
196 db 


190 29 


465 72 


200 59 


25 64 


59 55 


72 74 


14 57 


158 71 


246 66 


218 05 


28 50 


84 27 


254 52 


532 86 


239 63 


632 13 


13 75 


382 92 


18 90 


14 40 


259 95 


8 80 


192 54 


12 50 


149 76 


44 52 


23 88 


333 77 


253 56 


130 84 


159 58 


52 88 


52 90 


234 19 


47 12 


110 30 


34 80 


14 70 


163 17 


67 62 


30 77 


8 87 


218 11 


173 13 


32 28 


131 50 


854 21 


116 16 


96 57 


36 34 


86 10 


222 39 


616 47 



4-A B 



50 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF 



FOR ASSESSING AND COLLECTINQ REVKNUE-CoXTiHirM. 



Date. 



Sept. 7, 1867... 


1758 


9 


1760 




1761 




1762 




1763 




1764 


10 


1765 




1766 




1767 




1768 




1760 


11 


1771 




1772 




1773 




1774 




1775 


12 


1777 


13 


1770 




1780 




1781 


1 


1782 




1783 


U 


1786 




1786 




1787 




1788 


16 


1789 




1790 




1791 


17 


1792 




1793 




1796 


19 


1799 




1800 




1803 


20 


1804 




1805 




1806 




1807 




1808 




1809 


21 


1810 




1811 




1813 


28 


1817 




1822 




1825 




1828 




1831 




1834 




1835 


25 


1838 




1839 




1841 




1843 


26 


1847 


27 


1848 


28 


1853 


30 


1854 




1855 




1856 




1857 




1858 


OcMkr 1,1867 


1906 


2 


1924 




1940 




1950 




1954 




1955 


3 


1959 




1964 



No. 



To whom drawB. 



J. Edwards, Asseesor Barton 

J. H. Willtame, R^sorder Caldwell 

G«or^ Bloeky Olerk Warren , 

E. Kerr, Clerk Qasconade , 

aeorge E. Mayhall, Clerk Ralls , 

Thomaa J. Gideon, Clerk Christian , 

George W. Tatham, Recorder Carroll , 

James West, Recorder Gentry 

J. L. Bogji Clerk Ste. Geneviere 

E. L. Allen, Recorder Holt 

H. H. Fox, Aesessor McDonald 

K. R. Hickman, Clerk Jackson 

J. N. Barlow, Clerk Henry 

D. W. Smith, Recorder Worth 

JobnRicfae]^ Clerk Adair 

John C. Terhnne, Recorder Nodaway 

B. F. Boyce, Collector New Madrid 

John SHnger, Clerk Harrison 

A. J. Hemdon, Clerk Howard 

J. M. Farmer, Assessor Cass 

William 0. Mead, Clerk St. Clair 

B. H. Wilson, Recorder Saline , 

William Bowman, Clerk Monroe 

I. H. Canningham, Recorder Webster 

A. W. Maapin^ Recorder Fraiiklin 

8. R. Woodwortii, Assessor Howell 

W. M. Sherwood, Clerk Buchanan 

B. 0. Gates, Recorder Adair , 

B. A. Bailey-y Recorder Clay 

George A. Fearcey, Recorder Buchanan 

George N. McGee, Clerk Ray 

H. D. Marshall, Clerk Putnam 

Samuel A. Reppy, Recorder Jefferson 

I. B. Tttbb, Clerk Butler 

W. Z. Buck, Olerk Howell 

John DeSha, Clerk Livine^ston 

E. F. Honov, Recorder Jefferson , 

Samuel B. LaForce, Clerk Jasper 

William S. Johnson, Assessor Maries , 

R. W. Anderson, Clerk Maries 

W. W. Taliaferro, Recorder Cooper 

A. K. Sykes, Recorder Grundy 

R. P. Cames, Clerk Grundy 

J. D. Hillhonee, Assessor Lawrence 

Plate, Olshausen A Co 

Jacob L. Sharp, Clerk Montgomery 

J. R. AbernatDy, Clerk Monroe , 

W. I. I. Morrow, Clerk Newton, et ai....^.., 

James C. Noell, Recorder Perry 

Wyatt Harris, Clerk Lawrence , 

H. C. LoUar, Recorder Lawrence 

B. L. Lockey Clerk Audrain 

Treasurer Johnson County 

A. H. Martin, Recorder Lincoln 

N. D. Starr, Clerk Lewis, et al 

United States Express Company...... 

George W. Thompson, Recorder, Linn < 

S. 0. Hall Recorder Vernon 

W. McDonald, Recorder Dent 

R. V. Keller, Clerk Newton 

R. N. Moore, Olerk Dade 

Arch. M. Long, Recorder Dade 

Samuel T. Sharp, Clerk Montgomery 

M. U. Express Co 

U. S. ExpreM Co 

J. H. Steifens, Clerk Texas 

EUwood Kirby, Public Printer 

John T. Fiala, Treasurer St. Louis County 

Plate, Olshausen k Co 

H. R. Dickson, Assessor Reynolds 

S. W. MiUer, 6erk Wayne 



Amount. 


299 01 


52 50 


281 50 


124 15 


291 65 


110 85 


56 95 


73 86 


98 4» 


27 50 


208 84 


454 7S 


254 50 


32 00 


47 68 


99 32 


100 00 


29 41V 


211 5J 


460 31 


212 79 


98 62 


193 01 


9 25 


110 40 


402 15 


25 52 


38 10 


23 67 


149 17 


260 14 


193 80 


32 90 


65 33 


132 07 


12 32 


52 72 


120 67 


262 57 


179 33 


28 25 


65 00 


26 37 


394 60 


10 50 


691 68 


195 56 


515 11 


29 70 


115 29 


IS 00 


19 44 


422 83 


20 00 


65 77 


1 55 


182 50 


63 17 


9 47 


105 70 


132 30 


31 87 


3 25 


4 10 


7 50 


134 19 


5 25 


8,951 87 


1,003 64 


615 27 


187 40 



THS RBYHNUB FDND. 



51 



FOR A88BSSING AND COLUBCTING RBVENUE— CoRrnnTBD. 




October 4, 1867 



Nov. 



8. 

9. 

10. 

12. 
14. 



18. 



17. 



18. 
19. 

21. 

22. 

24. 

25. 
28. 
29. 

30. 

31. 

2. 
4. 



8. 
8. 

9. 
13. 

14. 

16. 

18. 

18. 



1980 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1988 

1990 

1994 

2U10 

2016 

2018 

2021 

2030 

2032 

2033 

2035 

2045 

2048 

2047 

2049 

2052 

2054 

2057 

2059 

2060 

2061 

2062 

2064 

2065 

2067 

2060 

2074 

2078 

2079 

2080 

2081 

2082 

2086 

2087 

2094 

2103 

2106 

5108 

2109 

2110 

2114 

2117 

2123 

2125 

2133 

2140 

2141 

2142 

2144 

2U6 

2148 

2158 

2160 

2163 

22;)9 

2240 

2244 

2247 

2251 

2252 

2253 

2255 

2257 

2265 

2268 

2267 

2268 



John C. Smithy Recorder Scotland.....". 

A. Ourrigon, AMeesor Douglas 

John Wheat, Aaseeeor Douelas 

John A. MoU, Clerk New Madrid 

U. 8. Exprees Co. 

John DeSna, Clerk Livingston 

J. I'nrdom, Assessor Atchison 

D. £. Fields, Clerk' Benton 

John M. London, Recorder Macon 

John L. Wilson, Recorder Vernon 

William Flentge, Clerk Cape Girardeaa 

J. £. Burden, Recorded Lafavette 

G. W. Boardman, R. U. S. L. 

G. M. Ochiltree, Clerk Clark 

William S. McClanahan, Clerk Linn.... 

P. P. Parker, Recorder Pike 

G. W. Hutchereon, Clerk Ripley 

G. W, Boardman, R. U. S. L. O 

R. W. Dunlap, Recorder Crawford 

H. H. Winchell, Recorder Marion k 

A. B. Owen, Clerk Stoddard 

Charles Snow, Recorder Johnson , 

M. U. Express Co , 

G. W. Honts, Clerk Johnson 

F. Crandall, Recorder Pettis 

E. R. Hickman, Clerk Jackson 

11. U. Fox, Assessor McDonald 

U. S. Express Co 

John Ricney, Clerk Adair 

L. M. Timmonds, Recorder Barton 

John M. Busbv, Assessor Nodaway 

Joseph H. M^Gee, Clerk Daviess 

R. H. Grantham, Recorder Daviess 

A. J. Briggs, Clerk Cass , 

A. W. Chenoweth, Clerk McDonald 

G. L. Carlin, Clerk Barry , 

T. B. Robinson, Clerk Miller , 

Milton Canby, Recorder Putnam , 

George W. Boardman, R. U. S. L. 0., tt «!., 

E. G. B. McNutt, Recorder Monroe 

William Caldwell, Recorder Andrew 

R. H. JeSVies, Clerk Audrain , 

Johns. WaddiU, R. U. 8. L. 

L. Dobbin, Recorder Shelby 

U. S. Express Co 

A. F. Harvey, Clerk DeKalb 

Fred. Weinreben, Assessor St. Charles 

J. G. Rodgers, Assessor Pike, el al 

J. S. Campbell. 



W. H. Bailey, Clerk Callaway 

John S. Campbell, Assessor Morgan. 

E. A. Holcombt Clerk Chariton 

W. T. Austin, Recorder Randolph.... 

M. U. Express Co 

U. S. Express 

M. U. Exprees 

U. S. Express 

H. M. Rttss, Assessor Harrison 

H. Clark, Collector Dent 

D. C. Coleman, Clerk St. Louis 

H. Tresenriter, Clerk Pemiscot. 

H. L. Wheat, Recorder Phelps 

J. M. Powers, Assessor Laclede 

M. S. Beckwith, Assessor Laclede... 

J. T. Talliaferro, Clerk i>aclede, 

James Allen, Recorder Case , 

Charles M. Hamill, Clerk Phelps 

Abr. Dobbs, Clerk Andrew 

K. D. Starr, Clerk Lewis 

Z. N. Gk>ldsby, Recorder Livingston 
John DeShfty Clerk Livingston 



Amount. 


27 50 


79 25 


97 78 


159 01 


3 90 


28 51 


215 22 


13 00 


174 86 


36 17 


174 73 


48 82 


126 00 


208 34 


413 18 


23 05 


95 76 


20 00 


16 20 


71 02 


82 59 


93 70 


40 


226 7» 


78 00 


185 01 


55 56 


38 


4 65 


S4 95 


863 00 


382 64 


40 30 


401 44 


4 40 


129 86 


135 89 


22 07 


350 00 


22 32 


36 92 


67 6$ 


125 70 


25 50 


8 40 


247 40 


550 28 


426 46 


228 00 


71 57 


348 08 


948 49 


32 65 


1 15 


1 95 


2 60 


1 05 


601 77 


130 60 


85S 42 


ft 85 


24 8& 


sn o« 


^92 


U90 


091.T0 


2tlO,4& 


26 90 


62 86i 


48 82 


Ul^ 



52 



DISBURSSMBirCS OUT OF 



FOR ASSESSING AKD GOLLSOTXNG BBTENUB-.<?ommm]>. 




Nov. 18, 1M7.. 



Xp^v« 



20 

21 

22 
23 
25 



20 
29 

30 






7. 
0. 



10. 

11. 
12. 



1«,... 
17.... 
18.... 

19.... 
20.... 

23.... 

24.... 

26.... 



2269 
2270 
2278 
2279 
2282 
2285 
2287 
2293 
2298 
2299 
2300 
2301 
2302 
2304 
2308 
2314 
2328 
2331 
2332 
2336 
2339 
2342 
2343 
2348 
2356 
2357 
2358 
2364 
2365 
2371 
2372 
2375 
2379 
2380 
2381 
2383 
2389 
2394 
2395 
2396 
2397 
2399 
2406 
2409 
2410 
2427 
2428 
2429 
2432 
2437 
2438 
2439 
2447 
2448 
2450 
2451 
2454 
2456 
2461 
2462 
2470 
2471 
2472 
2474 
2480 
2484 
2487 
2488 
2495 
2496 
2499 



D. B. CoUey, Clerk Palaaki 

0. W. Arnold, Recorder Scott 

W. T. Hanter, Recorder Washing^ton 

E. B. Smith, Clerk Washing^n 

Joseph Huff, Recorder Iron , 

U. S. Express 

J. C. Sellers, Clerk Donglaa 

U. S. Express 

U. 8. Express 

D. R. Henderson, Clerk Dent 

D. W. Uoskins, Clerk Carter 

D. C. Coleman, Clerk St. Lonis 

C. W. Williams, Recorder Pike 

J. S. Waddill, R. U. S. L. , 

James C. Noell, Recorder Peny 

G.J. Carty, Assessor Reynolds , 

W. G. J. Crow, Collector Texas 

D. M. King, Recorder Mercer , 

Gust. Reicne, Recorder Warren 

E. A. Holcomb, Clerk Chariton , 

M. U. Express , 

A. J. Barr, Recorder Ray 

C. M. Ward, Clerk Cole , 

Thomas E. Bassett, Clerk Pettis, et a/..... 
M. TJ. Express Co .*. 

D. H. Connaway, Clerk Cedar 

D. E. Fields, Clerk Benton 

William Uixon, Clerk Lafayette 

A. W. Chenoweth, Clerk McDonald 

William J. UolUday, Clerk Shelby, et al. 

D. W. Moore, Clerk Platte 

S. H. Guthrie, Clerk Ste. Genevieve , 

Samuel. F. Currie, Recorder Lafayette .., 

John H. Remsberr, Assesaor Vernon 

S. C. Hall, Clerk Vernon 

John DeSha, Clerk Living;8ton 

Z. Morgan, Recorder Worth 

Thomas H. Luck, Clerk Pike, et al 

J. N. Angel, Assessor Texas , 

John Richey, Clerk Adair. 

John Moore, Assessor Wrieht. 

H. R. Dickson, Assessor Reynolds, et al, 

J. H. Williams, Assessor Pulaski 

Charles M. Hamill, Clerk Phelps 

1. M. Goodrich, Recorder Miller 

H. C. Levens, Clerk Cooper 

W. J. HolUday, Clerk Shelby.... 

E. Dent, Assessor Hickory 

A. E. Delosier, Assessor Camden 

R. v. Keller, recorder Newton 

L. Murdoch, Recorder Bollinger 

Williun Hixon, Clerk Lafayette 

William 0. Mead, Clerk St. Clair 

H. W. Moore, Clerk Marion 

A. B. Owen, Clerk Stoddard 

U. S. Express Co • 

U. S. Express Co 

C. B. Peck, R. U. S. L. 

George W. Boardman, R. U. 8. L. 0...., 

W. C. Boyd, Clerk Oregon 

U. S. Express Co.# 

G. W. Houts, Clerk Johnson 

8. C. Hall, Clerk Vernon 

H. M. Miller, Recorder Clark 

G, W. Hutcberson, Recorder Ripley 

Thomas B. Jef&ies, Recorder Lewis , 

J. Q. Boner, Clerk Sullivan 

A. J. Biggs, Clerk Cass 

Bob. P. Games, Clerk Grundy 

Samuel K. Caldwell, Recorder Ralls 

A. C. Widdicombe m , 



Amoimt. 



24 41 


22 07 


79 20 


77 49 


22 15 


1 00 


7 45 


2 00 


1 55 


86 30 


144 78 


810 82 


24 07 


125 00 


20 52 


272 93 


192 60 


25 00 


21 15 


402 75 


80 


102 50 


262 02 


263 61 


40 


85 10 


68 27 


148 70 


5 20 


133 74 


345 71 


481 45 


60 50 


045 12 


941 93 


22 15 


133 83 


260 50 


296 84 


60 25 


353 75 


396 59 


144 30 


24 45 


18 20 


45 65 


167 87 


178 63 


194 97 


31 50 


23 17 


24 44 


99 54 


63 39 


318 40 


9 80 


3 00 


212 50 


154 08 


88 07 


4 00 


22 30 


286 77 


29 12 


9 62 


36 77 


290 38 


18 75 


12 10 


17 42 


287 50 



THB RBVENUB FUND. 



S3 



FOR ASSESSING AND GOLLBCTING REVEKUE-^loNTiiruBD. 



D»te. 



No. 



Dec. 2%, 1867 


2602 




2606 




2509 




2611 


27 


2613 




2614 




2616 




2616 




2618 


80 


2626 




2626 




2628 


81 


2630 




2631 




2636 


January 8,1868 


87 


• 


00 




03 




100 


4 


117 




119 




129 


6 


138 




139- 


7 


146 


8 


164 




157 


9 


162 




163 


10 


166 




170 




m 




172 


11 


178 


13 


186 




186 




189 


16 


196 




198 




199 




200 




203 


16 


207 




208 




211 




213 


17 


216 




217 




218 


18 


221 




226 


20 


231 




232 




234 


21 


239 




240 




241 


22 


242 




244 




248 




254 


28 


261 




263 




268 




269 


24 


271 




272 




274 




273 


25 


279 




280 



To whom drawn. 



W. H. Bailey, Qerk Callaway 

United States Expreee Company 

Thomas Selby, Clerk Camden 

S. W. MUler, Clerk Wayne 

G. L. Carlin, Recorder Barry .*. 

Joseph Jackson, Clerk Nodaway 

Ueorce Block, Clerk Warren '. 

William Brining, Clerk Clay 

C. H. Stewart, Clerk Mercer 

J. H. Steffens, Clerk Texas 

Z. W. Stephens, Assessor Ripley 

A. M. Felton, Clerk Schoyler 

J. W. Lisenby, Recorder weene 

Merchants Union Express Company 

D. W. Smith, Clerk Worth 

John C. Bender 

James M. Templeton, Clerk Atchison 

A. F. Tiffany, Recorder Atchison 

£. Kirby, Public Printer 

S. E. Hoge, Clerk Monitean 

Joseph Jackson, Clerk Nodaway 

James D. Hillhouse, Assessor Lawrence.., 

Jac. J. Conrad, Clerk Bollinger 

W. R. Taylor, Qerk 8t. Francois 

George Bradshaw, Recorder Harrison.,... 

James Love, Recorder Clay 

I. B. Tubb, Recorder Butler 

Is. Hunter, Assessor New Madrid 

Krum, Decker A Krnm 

G. L. Carlin, Clerk^arry 

J. D. Meredith, Sheriff Marion 

A. W. Ohenoweth, Clerk McDonald 

James M. Love, Clerk Macon 

Merchants Union Express Company 

L. K. Williams, Assessor Dent 

W. 0. Mead, Clerk St. Clair 

W. Q. Paxton, Clerk Hickory 

W. P. Fisher, Assessor Montgomery , 

A. n. Martin, Recorder Linn 

Samuel T. Sharp, Recorder Montgomery. 

W. M. Sherwood, Clerk Buchanan , 

Merchants Union Express Company* 

J. W. Hickam, Assessor Boone 

United States Express Company 

C. H. Stewart, Biecorder Howard 

J. M. Rea, Assessor Vernon , 

B. Amick, Clerk Wright 

J. S. WaddiU, R. U. 8. L. 

C. Glover, Clerk Osage 

G. M. Ochiltree, Clerk Clark 

James C. Agnew, Clerk Knox 

H. R. Parsons, Assessor Knox 

W. E. Peck, Assessor Iron 

S. T. Vittitow, Assessor Jasper 

F. M. Tufts, Recorder Platte 

Samuel P. Lewis, Clerk Platte 

G. L. Carlin, Clerk Barry 

L. U. Jennings, Clerk Taney 

M. L. G. Crowe, Clerk Franklin 

J. S. Waddill, R. U. 8. L. 

Plate, Olshansen A Co 

United States Express Company 

P. C. Berry, Clerk Stone 

J. H. McGee, Clerk Dariess 

J. Q. Boner, Clerk Sulliran 

D. H. Connaway, Recorder Cedar; 

P. 8. Marshall, Assessor Cedar 

United States Express Company 

D. W. Whitting, Assessor If ran klin 

Charles A. Weber, Clerk Perry 

G. W. Hntcherson, Clerk Ripley , 





$ 7 17 


2 00 


16 06 


64 02 


18 76 


13 60 


17 45 


264 40 


38 48 


46 20 


69 08 


77 79 


98 66 


1 86 


14 26 


88 33 


136 20 


84 60 


18 60 


68 07 


28 25 


200 62 


38 33 


164 61 


82 86 


46 40 


30 62 


21 62 


600 00 


14 87 


16 00 


7 06 


86 86 


2 50 


896 67 


37 60 


154 99 


464 44 


20 75 


27 50 


63 65 


75 


468 50 


4 86 


28 72 


103 37 


20 25 


125 00 


219 37 


32 25 


443 42 


447 60 


288 72 


204 30 


53 40 


288 17 


6 68 


117 82 


21 60 


125 00 


123 60 


25 


7 75 


91 06 


26 75 


87 75 


260 02 


12 00 


623 62 


16 22 


33 70 



54 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF 



FOB ASSBSSma AND COLLBCTmO BBVBNUB— ConnrimD. 



Date. 



Jan. 29, 1868... 


295 




298 




299 




300 




302 




304 




305 


30 


308 


31 


322 


February 1 


330 


3 


332 




336 


4 


341 


6 


343 




345 




346 




349 




351 


6 


352 




355 


7 


356 




859 




360 




361 




262 




363 




364 


8 


365 




368 




380 


10 


385 


11 


438 


12 


464 




466 




475 




476 


13 


479 




480 




486 


14 


49 L 




492 


• 


493 




600 


16 


511 




612 




614 




515 




518 


17 


528 




529 




530 


18 


637 




638 


19 


542 




543 




544 




545 




546 




650 




552 


20 


553 




654 




655 




560 




566 


21 


567 




668 




669 




670 




671 



No. 




J. Farrar, Clerk Macon 

W. G. J. Crow, Sheriff Texaa 

R. W. McMullin, Clerk Jeflferson 

J. T. Jackman, Assessor Monroe 

William A. Mills, Clerk Morgan 

J. T. Talliaferro, Clerk Laclede 

M. S. Beckwith, Assessor Laclede 

George W, Boardman 

E. Blackiston 

J. M. Roantree, Assessor Greene 

J. Van Sickles, Assessor Ste. Genevieve 

W. H. Bailey, Clerk Callawav 

W. T. Hunter, Recorder Washington 

N. Crockett, Assessor Andrew... 

W. B. Hobbs, Assessor Grundy 

United States Express Company < 

M. L. G. Crowe, Clerk Franklin 

Philip Schulte, Assessor Madison 

Joseph Huff, Clerk Iron 

J. T. Walker, Assessor Greene 

H. W. Snyder, Assessor Adair 

P. E. Maupin, Clerk Saline 

James B. Scott, Assessor Gentry 

James M. Kirby, Assessor Dade 

R. B. Newman, Assessor Cooper 

R. F. Johnson, Assessor Caldwell 

Henry Bruihl, Collector Cape Girardeau 

W. H. W.Argenbrigbt, Assessor Morgan 

James M. Gardner, Assessor Chariton 

George Essi^, Clerk Clinton 

Samuel A. Icankee, Clerk Pettis 

A. J. Hemdon, Clerk Howard 

C. C. Crawford, Assessor Pettis .-. , 

W. D. Sigler, Assessor Scotland 

A. H. White, Clerk HoweU 

N. H. Patton, Assessor Macon 

Thomas Walker, Assessor Schuvler 

James H. Martin, Assessor Webster .....:. 

Fred. Graff, Assessor Lewis 

William Weaver, Recorder Henry 

John T. Moss, Assessor Livingston 

John De Sba, Clerk Livinrston 

John W. Smith, Assessor Pemiscot. 

John Comstock 

E. C. Hawkins, Assessor Shelby 

Joseph Mathers, Assessor Buchanan 

Walker Miller, Clerk Caldwell 

N. Crockett, Assessor Andrew 

Warren Woodson, Clerk Boone 

J. J. Inghram, Assessor Holt 

D. R. Henderson, Clerk Dent 

Jesse Vanderford, Assessor Dallas 

S. D. Whitton, Assessor St. Clair 

E. R. Hickman, Clerk Jackson 

W. T. Goodson, Assessor Carroll.... 

D. E. Fields, Clerk Benton 

William Bowman, Clerk Monroe 

John Riche^, Clerk Adair 

JohnB. Slinger, Clerk Harrison i. 

T. B. Robinson, Clerk Miller 

D. C. Quick, Assessor Johnson 

S. McDonald, Clerk Scotland....; 

E. B. Smith, Clerk Washington 

W. H. Manrel, Assessor Moniteau 

A. L. Winchell, Asaessor Putnam 

Charles M. Hamill, Clerk Phelps , 

Adc^h Weber, Assessor Jefferson 

A. W. Chenoweth, Clerk McDonald 

J. R. Moore, Assessor Perry 

J. M. Brown, Assessor Mississippi 



Amoimt. 



SI 17 


175 00 


S3 88 


842 80 


169 44 


94 78 


37 00 


812 50 


7 66 


847 49 


662 20 


16 26 


76 00 


339 85 


819 90 


2 05 


85 94 


318 02 


28 02 


293 99 


465 24 


234 90 


330 07 


185 82 


462 86 


390 00 


16 67 


840 02 


862 65 


287 88 


29 00 


11 88 


606 05 


310 90 


34 06r 


894 22 


197 95 


200 63 


606 85 


62 37 


768 50 


31 80 


110 46 


63 49 


619 16 


368 82 


18 42 


81 60 


29 41 


866 00 


20 27 


191 93 


234 72 


116 03 


841 60 


6 00 


21 40 


89 89 


22 70 


62 00 


294 81 


23 98 


32 71 


803 03 


869 86 


15 00 


868 03 


1 65 


263 28 


166 28 



THE REVESUE FUND. 



55 



FOR ASSESSING AND COLLECTING REVENUE-€oxTiirns». 



Date. 



F^b. 21, 18fi8. 
22.... 




24. 



25. 

26. 
27. 



28. 
HATch 2,. 



8.... 

4... 

5.... 

o •« • • • • 



9.... 



n 

12. 



13. 

16. 
17. 



18. 
19. 
20. 



572 
678 
581 
582 
584 
585 
580 
580 
691 
592 
593 
596 
597 
699 
600 
604 
605 
607 
612 
613 
614 
618 
619 
624 
626 
629 
636 
637 
639 
642 
666 
667 
668 
670 
671 
688 
690 
694 
695 
696 
701 
703 
707 
708 
709 
718 
725 
726 
728 
729 
730 
731 
732 
733 
750 
755 
760 
761 
763 
764 
765 
767 
771 
775 
777 
778 
779 
783 
791 
793 
799 



G. W. Sanders, Clerk Crawford 

J. F. Waits, Assessor Phelps 

W. H. Stewart, Assessor Nodawaj 

B. L. Locke, Clerk Audrain 

D. d. Colman, Clerk St. Louis 

H. J. Reed, Assessor Randolph 

W. M. Sherwood, Clerk Buchanan 

W. A. Mills, Clerk Morgan 

Abe Dobbs, Clerk Andrew , 

Branch T. Rea, Assessor Vernon , 

v. B. Mesplay, Assessor Washington 

J. H. Steffens, Clerk Texas , 

Gnstave Brnere, Clerk St. Charles 

D. B. CoUey, Clerk Pulaski 

William C. Williams, Assessor Bollinger. 

A. Garrison, Assessor Taney 

N. D. Starr, Clerk Lewis , 

S. W. Miller, Clerk Wayne 

J. H. Wimpey, AMessor McDonald 

R. N. Moore, Clerk Dade 

A. A. Hays, Assessor Dade 

H. M. Russ, Assessor Harrison , 

H. H. Crooks, Assessor Audrain 

V. B. Van Dyke, Assessor Bates..... 

F. F. And8le;r, Clerk Carroll 

I. N. Browning^,' Assessor Laclede 

Ira L. Wood, Assessor Madison , 

William Hizon, Clerk Lafayette 

G. W. Boardman, late R. U. S. L. 

I. N. Browning, Assessor Laclede 

N. Jones, Assessor Crawford 



To whom drawn. 



A. J. Brings, Clerk Cass 

Thomas Patton, Assessor Callaway 

A. E. Delozier, Assessor Camden 

George Block, Clerk Warren 

Buchanan Countjr 

J. H. Thogmartin, Assessor Mercer..., 

G. J. Cu-ty, Assessor Reynolds 

James Crownorer, Clerk Reynolds 

Thomas Carter, Assessor Linn 

J. L. Bogy, Clerk Ste. Qenerieve 

John McFe^ohn, Assessor Christian.. 

J. A. Lee, Assessor Stone 

H. P. White, Assessor Howard 

Jos. Jackson, Clerk Nodaway 

P. A. Smith, Assessor Cape uirwdeau. 

L. H. Eve, Assessor Clinton 

A. B. Maddux, Clerk Dallas 

William 0. Mead, Clerk St. Clair 

William Hixon, Clerk Lafayette 

J. C. Waugh, Clerk Marion 

J. K. Sheley, Assessor Jackson..., 

William B. Watson, Assessor Marion.. 

William H. Liggett, Clerk Hickory 

H. D. Marshall, Clerk Putnam 

E. W. Williams, Assessor Barry 

J. A. Woodmaney, Assessor Cass 

J. N. Angel, Assessor Texas •• 

P. L. Roberts, Assessor Barton 

G. W. Sargeant, Assessor Ray 

Robert Taylor, Assessor Lafayette 

M. L. Stratton, Recorder Benton 

Henry Bamberger, Assessor DeKalb.... 

W. B. B. George, Assessor Polk. 

Josiah Goodson, Assessor Polk, (1861). 

H. A. Rice, Assessor Pike 

J. D. Meyers, Clerk Bates 

William B. Caster, Clerk Gendj 

D. W. Hoskins, Clerk Carter 

R. W. McMullin, Clerk Jefferson 

Thomas W. Law«on, Asseaaor Carter.., 



Amount. 



$42 75 


204 71 


538 23 


28 82 


29 85 


421 20 


26 80 


20 40 


19 94 


• 627 63 


285 69 


21 36 


62 22 


4 76 


219 02 


60 oa 


18 67 


29 19 


268 09 


18 85 


236 53 


385 51 


287 43 


354 10 


56 94 


165 03 


180 18 


6 50 


37 60 


212 SO 


198 04 


29 66 


232 94 


145 00 


8 38 


25 57 


355 28 


548 15 


72 16 


497 60 


112 50 


157 60 


•60 47 


296 95 


41 34 


474 18 


263 85 


60 03 


37 49 


26 SO 


110 90 


958 35 


632 50 


54 81 


104 60 


168 52 


366 53 


239 75 


258 75 


315 04 


545 00 


26 42 


203 92 


243 00 


135 00 


436 51 


550 75 


10 25 


6 35 


217 94 


127 63 



56 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF 



FOR ASSE SING AND COLLECTING REVENUE— CoHTiiium** 



Date. 



Itech 20, 1868 



April 



May 



23. 
24. 



27...... 

28 

30 

31 

3 

6 

7 

9 

10 

U 

13 

14 

15 

16 

18 

23 

24 

25 

28 

29 

30 

1 

4 

6 

7 

8 

w ■ •••fa 



11 

12 

13 
14 

16 

18 

19 
21 



No. 



800 

801 

803 

814 

821 

839 

844 

845 

849 

850 

851 

852 

931 

934 

937 

941 

946 

952 

953 

956 

1091 

1113 

1120 

1121 

1132 

1134 

1148 

1152 

1153 

1170 

1171 

1174 

1183 

1188 

1201 

1202 

1203 

1214 

1241 

1250 

1251 

1254 

1276 

1282 

1288 

1292 

1297 

1311 

1323 

1324 

1329 

1330 

1331 

1333 

1334 

1341 

1342 

1347 

1348 

1358 

1369 

1370 

1376 

1378 

1379 

1386 

1388 

1388 

1393 

1397 

1402 



To whom drawn. 



Thomaa J. Spillman, Assessor Wright........... 

G. W. Meyers, Assessor Taney 

P. C. Berry, Clerk Stone 

D. C. Snllins, Assessor Cole.....« 

K. A. Holcomb, Clerk Chariton...^ 

H. C. Lollar, Recorder Lawrence....^ 

L. T. Bragg, Clerk Dunklin 

R. M. Praker, Recorder Stoddard 

S. B. Hobbs, Assessor Stoddard 

Elihu Allen, Assessor Dnnklin ^^ 

James Gregory, Assessor Dunklin 

S. T. Vittitow, Assessor Jasper 

John Megown, Assepsor Ralls 

A. Garrison, Assessor Douglas 

S. R. Woodworth, Assessor Howell 

H. C. Levens, Clerk Cooper 

S. B. LaForce, Clerk Jasper 

G. W. Hntcherson, Clerk Ripley ',. 

Hadley Brown, Assessor Daviess 

James A. Stone, Assessor Platte 

D. C. Eastin, Clerk Dade 

L. H. Cordill, Assessor Howell ^ 

J. S. Waddill, R. U. S. L. 

J. B. Burros, Clerk Polk 

H. D. Marshall, Clerk Putnam 

Joseph Mathers, Assessor Buchanan.^ 

If. H. Crooks, Assessor Audrain 

R. P. Carnes, Clerk Grundy 

Isaac Phillips, Assessor Worth 

J. J. Spilman, Assessor Lawrence.. 

J. M. Brown, Assessor Mississippi , 

J. A. Brakebill, Assessor Hickory 

James Crownover, Clerk Reynolds 

D. C. Colman, Clerk St. Louis 

VV. B. Watson, Assessor Marion 

J. C. Thogmartin, Assessor Mercer.... 

P. Reynolds, Assessor Clark 

R. W. Anderson, Clerk Maries !!.! 

G. C. Bowen, Assessor Wayne 

B. J. Waters " 

U. S. Exnress Co „..........".......... 

C. C. McMillan, Assessor Pulaski..".!!!!!!!.!!.!! 

C. J. J. Leopold, Assessor Clay , 

U. S. Express Co 

J. B. NaWor & Co ! !.! 

J. G Smith, Assessor Sullivan 

S. E. Hoge, Clerk Moniteau 

U. S. Express Co 

D. S. bullins. Assessor Cole 

J. K. Sheley, Assessor Jackson 

R. S. Graham A Co 

G. H. Gentner, Assessor Gasconade 

W. B. Peck, Assessor Iron 

Thomas Patton, Assessor Callaway 

S. D. Whitten, Assessor St. Clair 

R. F. Johnson, Assessor Caldwell 

W. P. Fisher, Assessor Montgomery 

James B. Scott, Assessor Gentry 

Jacob Freund, Assessor Benton 

E. Kirbyv Public Printer 

George W. Salsman, Assessor Miller 

H. P. White, Assessor Howard 

A. L. Winchell, Assessor Putnam 

Wm. M. Newberry, Clerk Madison 

D. C. Quick, Assessor Johnson 

J. F. Waits, Assessor Phelps , 

Thomas Dinsmore, Assessor Saline 

P. E. Maupin, Clerk Saline 

8. T. Vittitow, Assessor Jasper 

D. W. Hoskins, Clerk Carter 

Thomas Selby, Clerk Camden 



Amount. 



•*•••■«• •••»••••••• • 



$164 6» 


96 45 


8 21 


326 21 


27 97 


15 50 


23 49 


67 15 


323 35 


126 04 


98 40 


267 10 


307 95 


91 62 


13 70 


57 06 


116 87 


15 94 


303 76 


335 29 


15 62 


9& 10 


75 00 


12 65 


24 90 


279 82 


106 35 


12 77 


243 60 


208 61 


32 ZfK 


184 13 


72 64 


89 23 


142 66 


88 00 


456 35 


25 83 


368 6.^ 


200 00 


30 


140 60 


297 15 


3 00 


83 00 


461 62 


15 76 


1 40 


78 73 


331 09 


491 62 


416 29 


86 66 


120 56 


123 84 


76 77 


432 12 


97 66 


359 46 


108 10 


285 93 


84 22 


105 24 


95 OA 


229 80 


116 95 


604 75 


54 25 


88 64 


24 06 


21 1^0 



THB RKYENtTE FUN]> 



61 



FOR ASSESSING AND COLLECTINa RSYENUE— CosnxiTKDv 



Date. 




May 22, 1863 
23.... 



26.... 

29.... 

June 1.... 

3.... 

6.... 
8.... 

9.... 
10.... 
11.... 

12.... 
15.... 

19.... 
22.... 
23.... 

26.... 

27.... 

29.... 

Jalj 1.... 

2.... 

3.... 

7.... 
11.... 
14.... 

16.... 



17 
18 
20 

21 
22 
2.1 
24 

25 

27 



1409 
1412 
1414 
1416 
1419 
1420 
1421 
1422 
1423 
1424 
1425 
1428 
1432 
1464 
1472 
1473 
1481 
1488 
1489 
1490 
1491 
1493 
1496 
1498 
1505 
1507 
1612 
1513 
1517 
1528 
1529 
1532 
1533 
1543 
1551 
1555 
1556 
1564 
1565 
1566 
1567 
1569 
1572 
1575 
1580 
1595 
1700 
1702 
1722 
1737 
1748 
1749 
1765 
1766 
1769 
1771 
1772 
1776 
1778 
1781 
1786 
1788 
1790 
1794 
1796 
1798 
1806 
1807 
1800 
1811 
1813 



To whom drawn. 



Wm. D. Sigler, ApseBtor Scotland 

Wm. H. Mangel, ABsessor Moniteau.... 

XJ. S. Express Co 

U. A. Rice, Assessor Pike 

James K. Cameron, Assessor Lincoln... 
Fred. Weinreben, Assessor St. Charles. 
Wm. C. Williams, Assessor Bollinger . 

John M. Dougherty, Clerk Shannon 

Adolph Weber, Assessor Jefferson 

L. K. Williams, Assessor Dent , 

I. C. Depriest, Assessor Shannon 

H. M. Russ, Assessor Harrison 

James Parks, Recorder Henry 

John Eudaley, Assessor Bntler 

C. M. Ward, Clerk Coie 

Thomas J. G-ideon, Recorder Christian . 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M ,..., 

E. Eehr, Clerk Gasconade 

Fred. Graff, Assessor Lewis 

H. W. Ruge, Assessor Warren • 

I. B. Tnbb, Clerk Butler 

J. G. Smith, Assessor Sullivan < 

H. J. Reed, Assessor Randolph. 

J. J. Conrad, Clerk Bollinger , 

B. Appleby, Recorder Dade 

Robert Taylor, Assessor Lafavette , 

R. W. Whitlock, Assessor Ripley 

G. W. Hutcherson, Clerk Ripley 

W. M. Sherwood, Clerk Buchanan....... 

John N. Angel, Assessor Texas 

Wm. T. Goodson, Assessor Carroll 

John C. Bender , 

J. W. Hickam, Assessor Boone 

H. H. Russ, Assessor Harrison < 

I. C. Depriest, Assessor Shannon 

R. B. Newman, Assessor Cooper.. ........ 

B. T. Rea, Assessor Vernon 

G. N. McGee, Clerk Ray 

P. Reynolds, Assessor Clark .,..., 

J. A. Woodmaney, Assessor Cass , 

G. H. Shawwecker, Assessor Osage 

Walker MiUer, Clerk Caldwell , 

same , 

Isaac Hunter, Assessor New Madrid 

N. D. Starr, Clerk Lewis 

John A. Wells, Assessor Henry... , 

James M. Templeton, Clerk Atchison.... 

Wm. C. Parks, Assessor Ozark , 

J. G. Smith, Assessor Sullivan , 

P. W. Murphy, Assessor St. Francois.., 

Charles H. Kew, Assessor Scott 

W. A. Hughes, Clerk Scott 

John F. Mason , 

N. Buchanan, Assessor Newton 

J. T. Walker, Assessor Greene 

W. B. Davis, Clerk Holt , 

AbeDobbs, Clerk Andrew 

G. M. Ochiltree, Clerk Clark , 

T.J. Spillman, Assessor Wright 

John W. Ellis, Clerk Montgomery 

L. M. Timmonds, Clerk Barton 

Wm. Winfleld, R. U. S. L. 

Wm. B. Caster, Clerk Gentry 

G. W. Boardman, R. U. S L. , 

S. A. Yankee, Clerk Pettis , 

R. W. McMullin, Clerk Jefferson 

H. W. Moore, Clerk Marion 

Jospph Jackson, Clerk Nodaway 

E. R. Hickman, Clerk Jackson 

A. B. Maddux, Clerk Dallas 

Is. McDonald, Clerk Scotland... 



Amovnt. 


$02 6& 


94 81 


1 60 


130 05 


489 30 


542 29 


81 82 


162 78 


148 Ot 


33 75 


255 47 


72 88 


46 07 


149 04 


8 46 


13 05 


30 00 


15 31 


110 56 


246 16 


78 60 


31 25 


118 95 


» 02 


10 42 


101 60 


302 72 


74 94 


949 41 


73 60 


93 76 


108 4S 


870 32 


72 88 


85 92 


98 73 


93 93 


234 85 


185 87 


142 27 


365 86 


112 34 


58 77 


117 55 


274 66 


451 95 


32 95 


148 85 


97 00 


308 08 


' 246 73 


143 05 


100 00 


531 91 


73 93 


551 96 


452 31 


26 73 


60 57 


178 79 


27 90 


101 50 


295 40 


121 08 


359 88 


265 26 


503 56 


360 12 


714 42 


108 60 


422 45 



68 



DIRBtTRfiBMENTS OUT OF 



FOR ASSESSING AND COLLFCTINO REVENUE— CoirmiOBD. 



Date. 




jr«l7 27, 1868 
29.... 
80.... 

81.... 

Angmt 1.... 
8.... 

5.... 
7.... 

8.... 

10.... 



U. 



12. 



13. 



14 

14 
15 
17 

* 

18 

19 
20 

24 



25. 
26. 



27. 



1814 
1819 
1822 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1828 
1832 
1836 
1840 
1841 
1845 
1848 
1850 
1851 
1853 
1854 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1865 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1871 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1830 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1893 
1894 
1896 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1903 
1909 
1910 
1914 
1920 
1921 
1929 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1944 
1945 
1947 



To whom drawn. 



Amoimt. 



D. R. Henderson, Clerk Dent 

J. J. Conrad, Clerk Bollinger , 

J. H. Martin, Asiesior Webster 

S. E. Hope, Clerk Moniteaa , 

J. C. Sbaefer, Clerk Randolph 

a. L. Carlin, Clerk Barry 

Barney Amick, Clerk Wright 

C. M. Ward, Clerk Cole 

J. H. Bethune, Clerk Mississippi 

D. W. Hoskins, Clerk Carter 

W. H. Bailey, Clerk Callaway 

R. C. McCrory, Assessor Oregon , 

Wm. B. Caster, Clerk Gentry , 

D. W. Smith, Clerk Worth. 

John A. Lee, Assessor Stonte , 

B. L. Locke, Clerk Andrain ;... 

Isaac B. Tubb, Clerk Bntler 

F. F. Aadsley, Clerk Carroll 

CM. Hamill, Clerk Phelps 

D. B. Fields, Clerk Benton 

jWm'. P. Fisher, Assessor Montgomery. 

,D. R. Henderson, Clerk Dent 

jH. Tresenriter, Clerk Pemiscot 

Wm. Hixon, Clerk Lafayette 

G. M. Ochiltree, Clerk Qark 

John M. Sumuel, Recorder Boone 

W. L. Snodgrass, Recorder Polk 

J. B. Burros, Clerk Polk 

J. Q. Boner, Clerk Sullivan 

N. D. Starr, Clerk Lewis 

Hirbee A D^sart ...., 

I. H. Cunningham, Clerk Webster , 

C. H. Stewart, Clerk Mercer 

A. M. Felton, Clerk Schuyler..... 

J. R. Moore, Assessor Perry..,.. 

W. S. Johnson, Assessor Maries , 

R. W. Anderson Clerk Maries , 

A. E. Rowden, Recorder Maries , 

Wm. M. Newberry, Clerk Madison , 

Walker Miller, Clerk Caldwell , 

G. W. Houts, Clerk Johnson 

Thomas Walker, Assessor Schuyler 

G. W. Tatham, Recorder Carroll , 

Barney Amick, Clerk Wright 

Robert P. Cames, Clerk Grundy 

John DeSha, Clerk Livingston 

Warren Woodson, Clerk Boone 

Arch. M. Long, hecorder Dade , 

N. B. McDowell, Clerk Dade 

D. B. CoUey, Clerk Pulaski 

S. E. Uoge, Clerk Moniteau , 

A. E. Delosier, Assessor Camden 

ThomsB Selby, Clerk Camden , 

Joseph Jackson, Clerk Nodaway 

Wm. Bowman, Clerk Monroe , 

E. B. Smith, Clerk Washington , 

A. Derauth, Clerk Greene 

G. W. Sanders, Clerk Crawford 

R. W. McMuUin, Clerk Jefferson , 

J. J. Inghram, Assessor Holt 

W. 0. Mead, Clerk St. Clair 

W. B. Davis, Clerk Holt , 

Wyatt Harris, Clerk Lawrence 

H. D. Marshall, Clerk Putnam 

A. J. Danforth, Clerk Wayne 

William D. Graham, Recorder St. Clair. 

W. H. Bailey, Clerk Callaway , 

C. M. Ward, Clerk Cole 

A. J. Herndon, Clerk Howard 

J. C. England, Recorder Gasconade .... 
George £. MayhaU, Clerk Ralls 



$101 40 

102 48 

45 00 

252 24 

268 87 

12 00 
95 59 

326 41 
112 83 

45 90 
177 12 
268 49 

19 80 
196 03 

10 80 
836 06 

86 09 
230 72 
477 78 
278 89 

33 18 
40 11 
56 06 

387 62 

277 59 
45 87 

30 00 
174 98 

278 86 
45 47 
25 00 
85 94 

427 45 

163 69 

45 00 

244 57 

16 23 

39 37 

31 88 
18 09 

587 41 

29 21 
59 67 

34 17 
342 05 
344 70 
456 94 

30 17 
286 98 

53 61 

80 70 
34 50 

92 29 
61 37 

191 72 
277 37 
250 59 
128 26 
23 61 

93 06 
377 25 

53 87 
188 21 
150 78 
233 79 

81 22 

13 68 
15 45 

184 71 

22 75 

313 92 



THB REVENUS FUND, 



59 



FOR ASSESSme AS1> COLLBCTINa REYENUB-Covtinubs. 




Aug. 38, 1868. 

29 

31 



Sept. 2, 1868.. 

3 

6 

7 

12 



14 

15 
16, 
17 



18. 



21 



22. 
24. 



25 

26 
28 
29 
80 



1949 
1951 
1959 
1960 
1962 
1963 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1976 
1978 
1980 
1981 
1998 
1999 
2001 
2005 
2006 
2008 
2013 
2015 
2017 
2018 
2019 
2020 
2021 
2022 
2023 
2025 
2027 
2028 
2032 
2033 
2034 
2035 
2040 
2041 
2042 
2043 
2044 
2045 
2046 
2049 
2056 
2057 
2064 
2065 
2066 
2067 
2068 
2069 
2070 
2071 
2073 
2079 
2080 
2081 
2082 
2083 
2084 
2085 
2086 
2088 
2090 
2091 
2093 
2094 
2097 
2098 
2103 



John S. Waddill, B. U. S. L. 

W. A. Mills, Clerk Morgan 

a: W. Chenoweth, Clerk McDonald 

James A. Greason 

C. M. Ward, Clerk Cole 

Charles A. Weber, Clerk Perry 

(George Black, Clerk Warren 

John Farrar, Clerk Macon 

John S. Waddill, R. U. 8. L. 

A. F. Harvey, Clerk DeKalb 

T. B. Robinson, Clerk Miller 

JohnM. Dougherty, Clerk Shannon 

W. M. Sherwood, Clerk Bnchanaa 

John Carter, Assessor Linn 

M. L. Stratton, Recorder Benton 

D. E. Fields, Clerk Benton 

B. Kirby, Public Printer 

H. S. Smith, Clerk Pike 

J. A. Mott, Clerk New Madrid 

A. A. Hays, Assessor Dade 

Jere Purdom Assessor Atchison 

John Sling^er, Clerk Harrison 

Joseph Hopkins, Clerk Newton 

John M. London, Recorder Macon 

W. W. Taliaferro, Recorder Cooper. 

H. C. Levens, Clerk Cooper 

James West, Recorder Gentry 

John E. Borden, Recorder Lafayette 

Ch. J. J. Leopold, Assessor Clay 

John Baker, Recorder Schuyler 

S. B. LaForce, Clerk Jasper 

James S. Ferguson, late Clerk Butler... 

Heni^ A. Clover 

H. H. Winchell, Recorder Marion 

P. Crandall, Recorder Pettis 

John Richey, Clerk Adair 

S. B. LaForce, Recorder Jasper 

E. 0. Gates, Recorder Adair 

A. W. Maupin, Recorder Franklin 

M. L. G. Crowe, Clerk Franklin 

John C. Terhune, Recorder Nodaway.... 

E. R. Hickman, Clerk Jackson 

A. Comingo, Recorder Jackson 

R. F. Wingate, Attorney General. 

W. T. Hunter, Recorder Washington ... 

Jos. Huff, Clerk Iron 

George A. Pearcey, Recorder Buchanan 

W. R. Taylor, Clerk St. Francois 

S. E. Hoge, Recorder Moniteau 

W. Weaver, Recorder Henry 

A. K. Sykes, Recorder Grundy 

J. P. Clark, Recorder Audrain , 

J. H. Steffens, Clerk Texas 

Joseph H. McGee, Clerk Daviess 

S. C. Hall, Clerk Vernon 

G. M. Ochiltree, Clerk Clark 

F. M. Redbnm, Recorder Chariton........ 

E. L. Allen, Clerk Holt 

J. H. Williamf, Recorder Caldwell 

D. C. Coleman, Clerk St. Louis 

£. A. Holcomb, Clerk Chariton 

G. W. Hutcherson, Clerk Ripley 

John Farrar, Clerk Macon.. 

F. C. Cake, Clerk Lincoln , 

B. A. Bailey, Recorder Clay , 

J. C. Sellers, Clerk Douglas 

J. A. BrakebiU Assessor Hickory 

D. M. King, Recorder Mercer 

H. M. Hiller, Recorder Clark 

C. M. Ward, Clerk Cole 

A. H. White, Clerk HoweU 



Amount. 



$ 84 48 


283 55 


65 71 


145 00 


249 45 


177 14 


159 37 


386 00 


125 00 


203 64 


208 03 


80 94 


59 25 


65 85 


49 25 


88 85 


179 00 


255 52 


61 21 


50 00 


208 12 


429 96 


339 79 


86 25 


36 97 


236 57 


41 87 


61 52 


. 144 60 


20 55 


246 01 


103 2« 


1,000 00 


92 40 


100 50 


281 07 


101 77 


26 92 


116 65 


365 16 


62 50 


210 60 


171 60 


250 00 


50 00 


288 SO 


123 80 


240 60 


36 47 


63 70 


26 40 


40 95 


207 77 


235 77 


520 86 


70 20 


59 00 


25 97 


61 00 


175 44 


433 72 


49 23 


91 80 


865 44 


32 47 


76 56 


11 00 


23 65 


36 37 


19 00 


42 10 



60 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF 



FOR ASSBSSING AND COLLSCTINO REVEKUE— CoimirVED. 



Date. 




Oct. 1,1363.... 



2 

3 

5 

8 

9 

10 

13 

15 

16 

29 

16 

17 

29 

19 

20 

22 

23 

24 

26 

Nov. 6 

9 

12 



13 
14 

16 

17 

13 



19. 
20. 



21 

23 
24 
25 

27 



2185 
2186 
2187 
2192 
2203 
2206 
2219 
2226 
2227 
2232 

22:u 

2250 

2252 

2255 

22A3 

2264 

2268 

2271 

2271b 

2275 

2276 

2276b 

2279 

2282 

2285 

2287 

2288 

2289 

2290 

2292 

2393 

2295b 

2299 

2300 

2304 

2305 

2307 

2308 

2309 

2312 

2318 

2321 

2322 

2323 

2^4 

2325 

2326 

2331 

2332 

2334 

2.335 

2336 

2338 

2339 

2340 

2342 

2343 

2345 

2346 

2347 

2350 

2351 

2352 

2253 

2354 

2369 

2364 

2379 

2381 

2385 

2386 



For whom drawn. 



Geor^ Esslgt Clerk Clinton 

W. L. Birney, Recorder Clinton 

L. II. Eve, As/esfor Clinton 

E. F. Uonev, Recorder Jeflferson 

James M. Templeton, Clerk Atchison 

C. M. Ward, Recorder Cole, 

R. M. Fraker, Recorder Stoddard 

J. J. Conrad, Clerk Bollinger 

Milton Caubr, Recorder Putnam 

William C. Evans, Recorder St. Francois ... 

Daniel W. Uoskins, Clerk Carter 

Thomas J. Gideon, Clerk Christian 

Joseph T. Bryan, Recorder Callaway 

William S. McClanahan, Clerk Linn 

John B. Waddill .-. 

John W. Lisenby, Recorder Greene 

Gustave Reiche, Recorder Warren 

G. L. Carlin, Clerk Barry 

II. L. Wheat, Recorder Phelps 

U. 8. Express CompaDy 

A. J. Brigrgs, Clerk Cass 

J. C. Shaier, Clerk Randolph 

E. G. B. McNutt, Recorder Monroe 

Thoma« B. Jeffries, Recorder Lewis 

John Sling^r, Clerk Harrison 

William Brining, Clerk Clay 

D. C. Coleman, Clerk St. Louis; 

same 

n. S. Express Co 

W. C. Bo^d, Clerk Oregon 

E. W. Williams, Assessor Barry 

W. H. Bailey, Clerk Callaway 

W. T. Austin, Recorder Randolph 

R. H. Grantham, Recorder Daviess 

E. A. Holcomb, Cl^k Chariton 

D. R. Henderson, Clerk Dent... 

W. McDonald, Recorder Dent 

J. T. Talliaferro, Clerk Laclede 

C. Glover, Clerk Osage 

A. J. Hemdon, Clerk Howard 

T. B. Robinson, Clerk Miller 

A. H. White, Clerk Howell 

J. T. Fiala, Treasurer St. Louis 

A. J. Danforth, Clerk Wayne 

N. D. Starr, Clerk Lewis 

B. Amick, Clerk Wright 

J. W. Ellis, Clerk Montgomery 

Jos. Jackson, Clerk Nodaway 

D. E. Fields, Clerk Benton 

William 0. Mead, Clerk St. Clair 

St. McDonald, Clerk Scotland 

J. C. Smith, Recorder Scotland 

Z. N. Goldsby, Recorder Livingston ^. 

L. Dobbin, Recorder Shelby 

W. J. HoUiday, Clerk Shelby 

C. H. Stewart, Clerk Mercer 

J. DeSha, Clerk Livingston 

G. W. Sanders, Clerk Crawford 

J. Richev, Clerk Adair 

A, W. Chenoweth, Clerk McDonald 

U. S. Express Company 

Charles Snow, Recorder Johnson 

E. Kehr, Clerk Gasconade 

Charles A. Weber, Clerk Perry 

J. R. Moore, Assessor Perry 

W. B. Davis, Clerk Holt 

U. S. Express Company 

R. W. Anderson, Clerk Maries • 

C. M. Ward, Clerk Cole 

L. Murdoch, Recorder Bollinger 

John Richey, Clerk Adair 



Amount. 



^ 24S 01 
42 80 
68 06 

44 60 
127 38 

81 22 
76 85 

2 97 
26 20 
12 57 

70 vr 

60 12 
42 55 

436 46 
175 00 

55 30 

23 62 
94 72 

26 40 

4 65 
422 57 
•53 17 

24 45 
33 37 
33 72 

275 83 
867 99 

5 00 
7 00 

102 96 
28 66 
14 55 

27 90 

40 00 
68 35 
30 00 

10 90 

120 96 
816 24 

65 13 

27 67 

72 18 

16,816 05 

56 10 
38 72 

19 07 
268 97 

63 00 

61 25 

41 60 

20 64 
27 50 
71 50 

25 12 
196 58 

45 00 

64 45 

42 35 
67 95 

19 97 

3 00 
167 76 
231 97 

14 77 

20 02 
44 25 
14 95 

121 08 

11 80 
32 90 

12 10 



THB REYENUB FUND. 



61 



FOB ASSBSSma AND COLLECTING REVENUE— CoanRuifi». 



Date. 



Not. vr, ises. 



28, 
SO. 

Dec. 2 

8. 

7. 
9, 

10. 

12, 
14, 

16 

18 
10 
21 



Harch 6, 1867. 

18.... 

21.... 
April 16 



No. 



2888 
2390 
2391 
2392 
2396 
2399 
2410 
2422 
2424 
2435 
2439 
2440 
2448 
2441 
2446 
2447 
2450 
2455 
2456 
2457 
2458 
2459 
2460 
2464 
2465 
2i67 
2468 
2469 



296 
524 
661 
945 



To whom drawn. 



A. M. Felton, Clerk Bchnyler 

8. E. Koge, Clerk Momtean 

U. 8. Express Company. .« 

B. W. Sonthworth, Recorder Ralls... 

A. J. Hemdon, Clerk Howard 

Thomas Selby, Clerk Camden 

Charles M. Mamilli Clerk Phelps 

Wm. M. Newberry^lerk Madison... 

Geo. Block, Clerk Warren 

U. 8. Express Company i.. 

Ira Brown, Recorder DeKalb 

A. J. Danforth, Clerk Wayne 

P. B. Manpin, Clerk Saline 

Gust. Bmere, Clerk St. Charles 

Wm. Hixon, Clerk Lafayette 

J. J. Conrad, Clerk Bollinger 

M. L. G. Crowe, Clerk Franklin 

H. W. Moore, Clerk Marion 

Wm. Flentge, Clerk Cape Girardeau 

Wm. J. Holliday, Clerk Shelby 

A. B. Maddux, Kecorder Dallas 

L. M. Timmonds, Clerk Barton 

S. A. Yankee, Clerk Pettis 

G. M. Ochiltree, Clerk Clark 

G. W. Hntcherson, Clerk Ripley 

P. P. Parker, Recorder Pike 

D. W. Hoskins, Clerk Carter 

J. L. Bogy, Clerk Ste. Genevieve 



Amount. 



Total 



S. W. Bam, ir. Clerk 8t^ Louis 

Wm. H. Heath, Auditor St. Louis 

Edmond O'Flaherty, Assessor' Jackson 
8. Levison 



Grand total. 



23 77 


89 85 


4 00 


17 97 


4 95 


29 50 


35 00 


158 77 


18 00 


12 25 


52 20 


32 20 


578 97 


2tt2 8» 


55 10 


96 35 


65 85 


70 61 


194 02 


25 50 


13 32 


43 44 


68 62 


59 85 


68 45 


45 47 


101 40 


57 06 


$241,178 21 


606 31 


239 07 


325 00 


11 75 


$242,360 34 



DISBURSBMBNTS OUT OF 



FOR COSTS IN CRIMINAL OASES. 



Date. 




Febr. 26, 1867 


161 




162 




166 




170 




172 




173 


1 


175 




177 




180 


27 


184 


28 


191 




193 




197 




198 


March 1 


206 




212 


4 


244 




251 




255 


5 


274 




275 




278 




290 


6 


346 


7 


375 




376 


8 


388 




391 




402 




407 





409 




410 




423 


11 


4:i7 


13 


492 




496 




502 




503 




523 


U 


533 




561 


16 


587 




590 


16 


601 




605 


18 


622 




624 


19 


625 




632 




637 




638 


20 


640 


21 


649 


22 


664 




666 




671 




673 




675 




680 




681 


23 


691 


26 


692 



To whom drawn. 



P. M. Jackson'y Sheriff Howard ^.... 

C. H. Steward, Circuit Clerk Howard , 

J. C. Engfland et al 

J. W. Mclntyre, Circuit Clerk Scotland , 

C. B. Starkey, *' St. Clair 

A. B. Maddnx, '' Dallas , 

H. C. LoUar, " Lawrence.... 

H. Hall, Sheriff Andrxin 

8. A. Reppy tt al 

William II. Luak, Circuit Clerk Cole 

W. C. Toole, " Buchanan. 



it 



it 
it 



W. C. Bvana, 
John McNeil, 
John McNeil, 
D. S. Hooper, 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Lonis 

M. U. Foster, Circuit Clerk Johnson., 
John P. Clark, " Audrain.. 

James Coff, Marshal St. Louis 

H. C. LoUar, Circuit Clerk Lawrence 



St. Francois. 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Adair 



ft 



€€ 
tt 
tt 



Daviess. 

Adair 

Franklin, et al. 
Schuyler 



K. H. Grantham, 

D. S. Hooper, 

A. W. Maupin, 
William McAfee, 
William P. Fenn. 

E. L. Fisher, Circuit Clerk Carroll 

R. L. Harerove, Circuit Clerk McDonald. .. 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

J. A. Patterson, Sheriff Greene.... 

W. L. Snodrrass, Circuit Clerk Polk 

Charles G. Comstock, Circuit Clark Gentry. 

W. L. Jerome, Circuit Clerk Mercer 

S. B. Woolfolk, Sheriff Lincoln «.., 

H. H. Finley, Circuit Clerk Madison 

Thomas E. Rochester, Sheriff Cooper 

J. Williams et al 

Ira Brown, Circuit Clerk DeKalb 

D. C. Hopkins, Sheriff McDonald 

John McNeil, Circuit Clerk St. Louis 

S. F. Currie, Circuit Clerk Lafayette 

B.F. Sillman, Sheriff Scott 



Charles H. Vincent, Clerk Kansas City Criminal Court. 

M. L. Stratton, Circuit Clerk Benton 

B. Appleby, " Dade 

H. L. Wheat, " Phelps 

B.H.Wilson, " Saline 

J. Maher, " St. Charles , 

J. H. Austin, Sheriff Randolph 

A. P. Frowein, Circuit Clerk Warren , 

I. H. Cunninjrham, Circuit Clerk Webster .• 

Thomas P. Welch, Sheriff Dallas 

Inrin Fish, Sheriff Buchanan 

John Caldwell, Sheriff Polk ^ i 

Peter P. Dailey, Clerk St. Louis 

P. F. Lonergan, Sheriff Pike 

R. A. LoTO, Sheriff Phelps 

same, et al 

H. L. Wheat, Circuit Clerk Phelps 

L. Dunn, Circuit Clerk Caldwell 

A. Ehlert, Jailer St. Louis 

Peter Meyer, Sheriff Cole 

R. Alexander, Sheriff St. Francois.... 



Amount. 



$ 39 10 

999 78 

1,036 36 

263 76 

61 96 

58 65 

346 27 

103 10 

659 19 

1,624 81 

1,303 08 

82 40 

11,060 07 

3,767 67 

143 93 

319 00 

43 60 

134 22 

2,828 50 

297 41 

807 80 

90 06 
480 99 

41 50 

50 00 
289 88 

90 26 
871 26 
283 46 
611 71 
450 46 
246 10 
103 70 

232 39 
66 90 

317 03 
565 10 
172 15 

6,793 43 

2,451 60 
149 80 

1,682 31 
421 46 
824 32 

1,142 73 
143 63 

1,006 43 
122 30 
111 67 
664 69 

141 79 

233 74 
157 13 

6,576 52 
116 06 
133 36 

1,607 46 
208 58 

142 23 
035 40 

19 00 
102 26 



THE RSVENUE FUND. 



63 



FOR COSTS IN CKIMINAL CASBS— OoimirvsB. 



Date. 



March 25, 1867 
26.... 
27.... 




April 



Maj 



28. 
29. 

80. 



4. 
5. 

6. 
8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
13. 
15. 

16. 

17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
22. 
27. 
1. 



2. 
3. 

4. 
6. 



8. 
9. 



704 

708 

710 

711 

•714 

716 

718 

719 

722 

723 

724 

726 

730 

733 

739 

741 

742 

743 

754 

759 

760 

703 

766 

768 

775 

778 

780 

790 

840 

850 

870 

881 

883 

892 

899 

900 

903 

912 

914 

918 

923 

932 

935 

943 

944 

948 

950 

951 

965 

974 

976 

982 

lOflO 

1019 

1020 

1021 

1025 

1027 

1028 

1032 

10.34 

1037 

1040 

1042 

1044 

1046 

1048 

1052 

10fv4 

1069 

1070 



It 



tt 
(t 
*€ 
tt 



Hickory 

Pettis 

Iron 

Clinton, €t al,, 

Shelby 

Perry 



W. H. Liggett, 

B. Montfomeryy 

Joseph Huff, 

W. L. Birney, 

J. S. Duncan, 

James C Noell, 

Charles H. Vincent et al 

W. C. Ransom, Circuit Clerk Jackson.... 

!I. H. Winchell, Circuit Clerk Marion... 

T. B. Jeffries, Circuit Clerk Lewis , 

H. H. WinchelU/«^. 

A. N. Ruleye/ al. 

I. B. Tubb, Circuit Clerk Butier 

Jac. Gils^ap etal 

A. B. Maddux, Circuit Clerk Dallas 

N. T. Doane, Circuit Clerk Orundy 

John C. Terhune, Circuit Clerk Nodaway 

B. H. Wilson, Circuit Clerk Saline 

Charles Dougherty, Sheriff Jackson 

Ira Brown, Circuit Clerk DeKalb 

James M. KuMsell, Sheriff Camden 

John McNeil, Circuit Clerk St. Louis 

John W. Lisenby, Circuit Clerk Greene... 
John W. Brown et al 

C. M. Ward, Circuit Clerk Cole 

James M. Roberts, Sheriff Carroll 



To whom drawn. 



C. M. Ward, Circnit Clerk Cole. 



Thomas B. Nesbit. Circuit Clerk Callaway. 

L. B. Davis, Sheriff Cedar 

William Forbes, Sheriff Macon , 

W. H. Lignitt, Circuit Clerk Hickory 

Milton Cauby. Circuit Clerk Putnam 

Joseph F. Tubb, Sheriff Butler 

John M. London, Circuit Clerk Macon 



tt 
tt 
tt 
a 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
ti 



Polk 

Moniteau. 

Scotland., 

Orundy.... 

Randolph. 

Morean... 

St. Louis. 

Macon 

Cooper.... 



W. L. Snodgrass, 

S. E. Hoge, 

J. W. Mclntyre, 

A. K. Sykes. 

W. R. Samuel, 

W. A. Mills, 

Peter P. Dailey, 

John M . London, 

W. W. Taliaferro 

G. H. Dulle, Sheriff Cole 

C. M. Ward, Circuit Clerk Cole 

R. V. Keller, Circuit Clerk Newton 

Lewis Sells et al 

U. H. Winchell, Circuit Clerk Marion 

W. G. J. Crowe/ al 

A. W. Maupin, Circuit Clerk Franklin 

.Tohn W. Owenby, Sheriff Adair 

D. P. Colley, Circuit Clerk Pulaski 

Thomas W. Williams, Sheriff Johnson 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Lonis 

M. R. Carmon, Circuit Clerk Chariton.. 

Carroll.... 
Nodaway. 
Stoddard. 
Callaway. 
Camden... 
Gentry.... 



tt 



George W. Tatham, 
John C. Terhune, 
R. M. Fraker, 
Thomas B. Nesbit, 
Thomas Selby, 
James West, 
Wm. T. Hunter «f al 

Joe Davis et al 

John C. Terhune, Circuit Clerk Nodaway 



tt 
tt 
it 
tt 
tt 



tt 



tt 
tt 
ft 



L. T. Bragg, 

I. B. Ttfbb, 

P. P. Dailey, 

J. C. Bneland, 

William Forbes, Sheriff Macon 

John Wall, Sheriff Saline 

Ihomas B. Nesbit, Circuit Clerk Callaway. 



Dunklin. 

Butler 

St. Louis., 
Gasconade 



Amovnt. 


$S9S 29 


153 30 


44 20 


171 83 


746 7* 


1,163 60 


14 70 


423 2S 


487 28 


2,196 2» 


3,308 97 


1,398 Oft 


1,330 21 


284 74 


264 50 


46 98 


492 74 


36 67 


190 67 


. 78 25 


364 26 


33 50 


2 45 


1,125 03 


1,892 72 


247 75 


181 7 b 


851 17 


120 60 


257 50 


307 34 


140 14 


133 40 


2,042 49 


99 86 


389 78 


145 87 


894 01 


185 71 


401 84 


617 35 


100 85 


542 93 


7 75 


2,019 27 


1,001 85 


258 68 


2,356 86 


296 05 


607 30 


253 15 


92 58 


41 95 


651 25 


511 98 


349 56 


178 9S 


275 88 


600 52 


59 69 


633 40 


599 58 


1,534 33 


141 97 


601 50 


16 05 


2,585 88 


64 55 


127 60 


43 90 


68 81 



u 



DISBfJRSIClfKirrS OUT OF 



FOR 008X3 IN CRIMIXAL CA8BS— Comnnniv^ 




Hay 10,1867... 



June 



July 



14. 
15. 



16. 
17. 

18. 
21. 

22. 

23. 
24. 
27. 



28. 
29. 

30. 



31. 



v*»» •• 



6. 

7. 

8, 
12 
13. 

16. 

17 
19, 

20 

24 

26 

26 

27 

29 

2 



1078 

1076 

1081 

1082 

1086 

1089 

1093 

1094 

1096 

1098 

1101 

1109 

1113 

1114 

1116 

1117 

1139 

1141 

1144 

1146 

1148 

1449 

1160 

1161 

1164 

1166 

1161 

1167 

1173 

1178 

1181 

1186 

1187 

1191 

1198 

1201 

1202 

1206 

1207 

1209 

1210 

1227 

1228 

1229 

1230 

1232 

1234 

1236 

1236 

1238 

1239 

1268 

1260 

1261 

1266 

1268 

1270 

1278 

1281 

1284 

1286 

1293 

1296 

1301 

1304 

1309 

1316 

1320 

1377 

1379 

1387 



t4 
ti 
tt 
t< 



Johnson.., 
Callaway. 
Chariton . 
Patnam.. 



M.iJ. Foster, 
Thos. B, Nesbit, 
F. M. Redhnrn, 
Milton Cauby, 

John Balling^r, Sheriff Dayiesa 

R. H. Orantham, Circnit Clerk Dariest. 

A. M. Long;, Circuit Clerk Dade 

Wm. M. Blake, Sheriff Atchison 

Oustare Reiche, Circuit Clerk Warren.*. 



James Allen, Circnit Clerk Cass , 

P. P. DaUey, '* St. Louis. 



ti 



*t 
it 
t< 

tt 



Stone. 

Macon 

McDonald . 

Gentry 

Gasconade. 
Mercer , 



P. C. Berry, 
John M. London, 
A. W. Chenoweth, 
James West, 
J. C. Enrland, 
D. M. Kinr, 

J. N. Lau^lin, Sheriff Osare 

John Williams, Sheriff Jefierson 

F. Murphy, Sheriff St. Francois 

R. W. Dunlap, Circuit Clerk Crawford 

A. F. Tiffany, *• Atchison 

F. M. Redbnm, '' Chariton 

W. R. Taylor, " St. Francois.. 

A. Ehlert, Jailer St. Louie 

0. T. Fishback, Clerk Supreme Court 

Joseph T. Bryan, Circuit Clerk Callaway...., 

John M. London, Circnit Clerk Macon 

James A.Neal, Sheriff Linn 

A. M. Long^, Circnit Clerk Dade 

S. W. Miller, " Wayne 

Thomas Selby, " Camden 

A. F. Owen, Sheriff Andrew 

William Q. Pazton, Circuit Clerk Hickory. 



tt 



tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 



C. M. Ward, 
John M. London, 
J. C. Smith, 
W. T. Austin, 
George W. Arnold, 
B. H. Wilson 

G. Barker, Sheriff Linngston 

R. Ridge, Sheriff Buchanan 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

Irvin Fish, Sheriff Buchanan 

R. A. Love, Sheriff Phelps 

G. L. Carlin tt al 

S. F. Currie, Circuit Clerk Lafayette. 
L. M. Timmonds, " Barton.... 

F. G. Hopkins, " Buchanan 

George Bradshaw, " Harrison . 

John M. Samuel, " Boone 

J. L. Morrison, Sheriff Howard 

E. 0. Gates, Circuit Clerk Adair 

Ed. Darrow, Sheriff Adair . 



Cole. 

Macon 

Scotland .. 
Randolph 

Scott 

Saline 



L. T. Bragg, Circnit Clerk Dunklin 

Geo. W. Thompson, " Linn 

B. H. Wilson, " Saline 

Joseph Huff, " Iron 

U. S. Machens, Sheriff St. Charles , 

same 

George W. A. Preston, Circuit Clerk Sullivan. 

H. C. Lollar, Circuit Clerk Lawrence , 

John F. Baker et cl 

T. W. Williams, Sheriff Johnson....;* 

W. L. Snodgrass, Circuit Clerk Polk 

P. P. Dailey, Circuit Qerk St. Louis 



John M. London, 
R. M. Fraker, 
C. H. Stewart, 
H. C. Lollar, 
John M* Jiondon, 



tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



Macon 
Stoddard . 
Howard.. 
Lawrence. 
Macon ... 



$614 89 

69 00 

161 69 

66 72 

726 96 

20 17 

172 66 

421 62 

538 85 

226 16 

120 25 

149 27 

1,037 48 

107 42 
172 05 

108 22 
1,666 04 

19 21 

77 59 

91 60 
963 06 

41 60 
2 90 
189 00 
202 20 
271 30 
106 2S 
214 62 
242 13 

17 24 
201 80 
197 23 
136 65 
100 66 
693 88 
182 29 

22 60 

69 16 
616 20 
308 66 
161 50 
321 25 
609 75 
246 26 

80 25 
986 55 
363 38 
126 18 
2,660 35 
297 73 
716 44 

63 14 

73 46 
148 25 

26 25 
461 89 

13 65 
273 68 

67 50 

72 25 

1,027 52 

271 47 

2,073 44 

41 95 
1,269 97 
3,366 94 
2,210 99 
142 94 
1,190 87 

95 86 
460 45 



THB BEVENUB FUND. 
FOR COSTS IN CRIMINAL CASES-4>>NTiiinBD. 



Date. 




July 2, 18«7.... 
8.... 

6.... 

8.... 

11 

18.... 

X9.*.««. 

16 

17 

22 

28 

24. 

2y..*.«. 



30...M. 



81. 
Anciiut 2. 



6ept. 



7 

9 

10 

16 

21 

80 

2 

8 

« 

28 



25 

Oetober 1 

2 






1888 
1897 
1899 
1401 
1418 
1484 
1468 
1462 
1485 
1487 
1489 
1495 
1501 
1519 
1525 
1527 
1536 
1549 
1550 
1554 
1557 
^564 
1570 
1577 
1578 
1580 
1581 
1584 
1585 
1597 
1604 
1606 
1609 
1642 
1668 
1706 
1716 
1725 
1740 
1755 
1823 
1826 
1829 
1832 
1833 
1840 
1842 
1870 
1905 
1918 
1921 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1939 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1957 
1961 
1965 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1976 
1987 



To whom drawn. 



O. W. A. Preston, Circuit Clerk SalliTan.. 



it 



tt 

<€ 
tt 
tt 
tt 



Franklin 

Boone. 

Iron ., 

Livinrston ., 

Cape Girardeau., 
Callaway , 



A. W. Maupiui 

John M. Samuel, 

Joseph Hufi;^ 

Z. N. Goldsby, 

Leopold Horsten, 

Joseph T. Bryan, 

L. B, Davis, Sheriff Cedar. 

H. M. Miller, Circuit Clerk Qark. 

James Love, Circuit Clerk Clay 

John H. Austin, Sheriff Randolph 

William Oaldwell, Circuit Clerk Andrew ^ 

P. J. Miseres, Marshal Kansas City Criminal Court 

John M. London, Circuit Clerk Macon 

John Caldwell, Sheriff Polk 

William Caldwell, Circuit Clerk Andrew 

W. T. Austin, Circuit Clerk Randolph 

R. A. Love, Sheriff Phelps 

H. L. Wheat, Circuit Clerk Phelps 

A. K. Revbum, Sheriff Ray 

John D. Meredith, Sheriff Marion 

Joseph T. Bryan, Circuit Clerk Callaway 

W. T. Austin, Circuit Clerk Randolph 

Qeorg-e W. Fulton, Sheriff Knox 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

Isaiah Jones, Sheriff Caldwell 

Samuel M. Wirt, Circuit Clerk Knox 

Thomas J. Gideon, Circuit Clerk Christian.. 

Z. N. Goldsby, Circuit Clerk Livin^ton 

John D. Meredith, Sheriff Marion 

A. J. Barr, Circuit Clerk Ray 

Thomas Selby, Circuit Clerk Camden 

John A. Patterson, Sheriff Greene 

H. H. Winchell, Circuit Clerk Marion 

W. McDonald, «' Dent 

R. A. G. Mack, '* Greene, et «/. 

N. T. Doane, " Grundy 

F. W. Gatsweiler, Sheriff St Charles 

H. H. Williams, Sheriff Jackson 

Georee W. Fulton, Sheriff Knox 

Jac. L. Sharp, Circuit Clerk Montg^omery... 

E. G. B. McMutt, Sheriff Monroe, et aU 

W. I. I. Morrow, Circuit Clerk Newton ..... 

James C. Noell, " 

I. M. Goodrich, « 

M. U. Foster, " 

Thomas B. Jeffries, <' 

L. W. AlberUon, Sheriff Miller 

C. M. Ward, Circuit Clerk Cole 

T. W. Williams, Sheriff Johnson 

T. B. Robinson, Circuit Clerk Miller 



Perry 

Miller, et al, 

Johnson 

Lewis 



tt 



tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



Lewis, et al. 

Clark 

Polk 

Webster 

Ore^n 

Mercer 

Texas 

Cooper 

Macon 



6-AK 



Thomas B. Jeffries, 

H M.Miller, 

W. L. Snodp'asst 

I. H. Cnnnineham, 

W. C. Boyd, 

D. M. Kin<, 

J. H. Steff(>ns, 

W. W. Taliaferro 

John M. London, 

L. B. Davis, Sheriff Cedar. 

Geor^ W. Ihomiison, Circuit Clerk Linn.. i!! 

S. R. Woolfolk, Sheriff Lim oln 

F. G. Hopkins, Circuit Clerk Buchanan 

L. B. Hutchison, Sheriff Newtun 

A. W. Chenowath, Circuit Clerk McDonald.. 
W. T. Austin, " Randolph... 

Milton Cauby, " Putnam 

James C. Noell, " Perry ', 

A. B. Maddux, *' DaUas.!!!!!!! 

W. T. Austin, <' Randoiph.V! 



Amomt. 



; 74 68 
648 & 

74 Ifl 

14 40 
590 26 
776 U 
181 89 
171 45 
422 94 
758 61 

74 IB 
408 85 
187 U 
177 80 

85 86 
102 42 

25 00 

128 85 

1,188 81 

253 71 

862 69 

20 00 

51 69 
150 2ft 
577 n 
177 00 

57 57 
125 20 

28 40 
840 2ft 
867 70 
143 80 
111 40 
201 22 
284 81 
8,734 90 
401 6ft 
116 0$ 

63 8ft 
159 80 
280 90 
299 75 
724 59 
152 79 
800 62 
687 U 
766 87 

58 20 
828 40 

49 flt 

158 00 

427 00 

810 80 

222 90 

174 02 

152 60 

800 90 

258 10 

888 59 

91 10 

74 2ft 

447 2ft 

88 50 

1^984 60 

102 50 

70 30 

12 2ft 

440 50 

227 00 

424 Qi 

246 52 



e« 



DISBUBSEICBNTS OUT OF 



FOB COSTS IN CRIMINAL CASES-€ontivvxb. 




October 7, 1867 



10. 



12.... 



15. 
16. 



17. 



19. 



2i. 



2fl|#...«* 

26.... 



28. 
29. 
30. 



¥oy. 



1 

4 

7 



9.... 



13. 



13. 



14. 



19. 



16. 



2006 
2013 
2015 
2017 
2022 
2031 
2037 
203S 
2040 
2042 
2043 
2044 
2060 
2051 
2053 

i 2056 
2071 

I- 2072 
2073 
2038 

I 2030 
2091 
2093 
2096 
2007 
2101 
2102 
2105 
2107 
2111 
2118 
2120 
2128 
2139 
2151 
2152 
2153 

i 2154 
2156 
2157 
2164 
2165 
2166 
2168 
2172 
2173 
2174 
21f6 
2178 
2179 
21 SO 
2181 
2182 
2183 
2184 
2185 
2186 
2187 
21S9 
2190 
2191 
2192 
2241 
2242 
2243 
2245 
2248 
2249 
2250 
2256 
3263 



Crawford. 
Marion ... 
Stoddard. 
DeKalb... 



John W. Lisenby, Circuit Clerk Greene 

P. P. Dailey, Circnit Clerk St. Louie 

William Forbes, Sheriff Macon 

Robert C. Cooper^ Sheriff Madison 

John M. London Circuit Clerk Macon 

John P Clark, Circuit Clerk Audrain 

J. D. Meredith, Sheriff Marion 

William Q. Pazton. Circuit Clerk Hickory. 

C. M. Ward, Circuit Clerk Cole 

O. Moberly, Sheriff Grundy 

A. K. Sykes, Circuit Clerk Grundy 

P. F. Lonergan, Sheriff Pike 

R. W. Dunlap, Circuit Clerk 
H. H. Winchell, " 

R. M. Fraker, " 

Ira Brown, ** 

G. W. CoUey, Sheriff Pulaski *, 

Charles H. Vincent, Clerk Kansas City Criminal Court. 

D. B. Colley, Circuit Clerk Pulaski 

F. D. Phillips, Sheriff Clinton 

A. F. Owen, Sheriff Andrew 

T. B. Robinson Circuit Clerk MiUer 

R. L. Todd, Circuit Clerk Boone.... 

James Parks, Circuit Clerk Henry 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

A. W. Chenoweth, Circuit Clerk McDonald 

M. L.^taratton, Circuit Clerk Benton 

Thomas W. Williams, Sheriff Johnson 

J. W. Carson, Sheriff Audrain 

Julius Wiihelmi, Sheriff Franklin 

B. lAibold, Marshal St. Louis 

James W. McFaden, Sheriff Warren 

A. K. Cowfill, Sheriff Schuyler 

William King, Sheriff Callaway 

J. H. Steffens, Circuit Clerk Texas 

P. 0. Berry, Circuit Clerk Stone 

W. B. Simms, Sheriff Harrison 

R. A. Love. Sheriff Phelps 

Aogf. Kleinsor^, Sheriff Osae^ 

John Baker, Circait Clerk Schuyler 

J. C. Sellers, Circuit Clerk Douglas 

W. W. Wallace, Sheriff Oregon 

W. C. Boyd, Circuit Clerk, Oregon. 



f€ 



M. U. Foster, 
E. L. AUen, 
J. C. Eneland, 
George W. Tatham," 
G. W. A. Preston, " 
T. B. Robinson, 
J. H. Williams, 
Ira Brown, 
William Caldwell, 
S. B. Hoge, 
Gustave Keiche, 
U. M. Hiller, 
Joseph Huff 

John Ballinger, Sheriff Daviess 

0. M. Nelson, Sheriff Vernon 

W. T. Austin, Circuit Clerk Randolph 



€( 



it 
it 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



Johnson.... 

Holt 

Gasconade. 

Carroll 

Sullivan.... 

Miller 

Caldwell... 
DeKalb .... 

Andrew 

Moniteau.. 

Warren 

Clark 

Iron 



Robt. H. Grantham, " 

A. W. Maupin, " 
Arch. M. Long, '' 
R. V. Keller, 

B. H. Wilson, 
L. T. Bragg, 
rhonuis ^Iby, 
John P. Clark, 
John M. London, 
P. P. Parker, 
R. Wallace, 
W. T. Hunter, 



tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



Daviess. 

Franklin 

Dade 

Newton 

Saline , 

Dunklin , 

Camden , 

Audrain 

Macon , 

Pike 

Jackson 

Washington. 



1,545 04 

5,606 18 

411 10 

108 25 

2,655 84 

3( 15 

154 25 

174 70 

159 45 

166 29 
64 75 

178 70 
156 53 
177 10 
628 07 
118 72 

91 05 

547 89 
61 69 

185 85 
142 10 
701 15 
382 64 
1,031 54 
497 75 
30 86 
191 30 

41 95 
165 26 
100 90 

66 2^ 

42 75 

167 75 
47 50 
36 45 
83 4C 

179 00 
227 17 

21 83 
233 73 
475 09 
134 50 
604 46 
693 23 
287 15 
.394 50 
205 59 
405 83 
778 4S 
312 34 
235 26 
900 76 
247 43 
138 48 
595 19 

79 20 
167 50 

95 85 
917 79 
567 51 

548 01 
732 53 
390 92 
241 82 

83 80 
1,240 8i^ 
746 OS 
184 35 
222 89 
845 34 
455 0» 



THB RtfiVJBNUE FUND. 



67 



FOR COSTS m CRIMINAL CASES— Comtiiiubd. 



Date. 



KoT. 16, 1867. 
20 



l>»c. 



21.. 

22.. 
23.. 

25. 
26. 
27. 

29. 

30. 

2. 
3. 
4. 



9 
10. 




Jan. 



A i « • ■••• 

12 

16 

19 

23 

24 

2« 

27 

30... 
Zf 1868... 



2264 
2272 
2273 
2277 
2280 
2281 
2283 
2284 
2288 
2291 
2296 
2297 
2305 
2306 
2307 
2310 
2311 
2315 
2318 
2319 
2324 
2325 
2326 
2327 
2329 
2334 
2335 
2341 
5344 
2351 
2^54 
2355 
2368 
2369 
2370 
2373 
2374 
2377 
2378 
2382 
2387 
2391 
2392 
2398 
2408 
2411 
2421 
2422 
2423 
2430 
2433 
2434 
2436 
2440 
2441 
2442 
2444 
2449 
2465 
2476 
2477 
2493 
2497 
2498 
2505 
2510 
2517 
2619 
2521 
2529 
89 



n 

i€ 

it 

it 

<< 

H 

tt 

i€ 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

It 

tt 



Clay 

Scott 

Chariton.. 
Moniteau. 
Andrew... 
Franklin . 
St. Louis. 
Jackson .. 
Laclede . . 
St. Louis. 
Maries ... 
Gentry.... 
Macon .... 

Ray 

Vernon .. 
Chariton . 
Nodaway. 



A.J. Barr, Circuit Clerk 

Geo. W. Arnold, 

F. M. Redburo, 

S. E. Hope, 

William Caldwell, 

A. W. Maupin, 

P. P. Dafley, 

R. Wallace, 

J. T. Talliaferro, 

P. P. Dailey, 

A. E. Rowdon, 

James West, 

John M. London, 

A. J. Barr, 
S. C. Hall, 
IF. M. Rodbum, 
I John C. Terhune, 

0. T. Fiflhback Clerk Supreme Court 

Jaihes Ownby. Sheriff Monroe 

B. Q. B. McNutt, Circuit Clerk Monroe- 

Franklin Murphy, Sheriff St. Francois 

William Berger, Sheriff Gasconade ;. 

William Crismon, Sheriff Maries 

J. C. England, Circuit Clerk Gasconade , 

Thomas Selby, Circuit Clerk Camden 

N. P. Ogden, Sheriff llatte 

Joseph Allen, Circuit Clerk Ca^s 

W. L. Snodgnrass, Circuit Clerk Polk 

.\. J. Barr, Circuit Clerk Ray 

J. M. Collier, Sheriff Shelby , 

William McDonald, Circuit Clerk Dent 

William Weaver, " Henry 

J. C. England, " Gasconade 

|j. M. Samuel, '' Boone 

IJ. H. Austin, Shariff Randolph 

G. W. Belt, Circuit Clerk Platte 

J. L. Bogy, Circuit Clerk Ste. Genevieve 

If. W. Gatiweiler, Sheriff St. Charles , 

1. H.Cunningham, Circuit ClerK Webster 



ti 



tt 
tt 
tt 



Livingston.... 
Montgomery. 

Worth «.. 

Pike 



R. F. Dunn, 
J. L. Sharp, 
Z. Morgan, 

C. W. Williams, 

J. 6. Barnes, Sheriff Reynolds 

J. B. Wicker, Circuit Clerk Pulaski 

S. R. Woolfolk, Sheriff Lincoln 

W. R. Taylor, Circuit Clerk St. Francois 

S. K. Caldwell, Circuit Clerk Ralls 

John Williams, Sheriff Jefferson 

William Berger, Sheriff Gasconade 

H. E. Machens, Sheriff St. Charles 

same 

Irrii) Fish, Sheriff Buchanan 

S. F. Curri*, Circuit Clerk Lafayette 

B. A. Bailey, Circuit Clerk Clay 

R. Patterson, Sheriff Howard 

W. C. Boyd, Circuit Clerk Oregon 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

D. H. Connaway, Circuit Clerk Cedar 

H. M. Hiller, Circuit Clerk Clark 

F. G. Hopkins, Circuit Clerk Buchanan.. 
W. D. Graham, Circuit Clerk St. Clair- 
William Forbes, Sheriff Macon 

Z. N. Goldsby, Circuit Clerk Livingston 

W. L. Snodgrass, Circuit Clerk Polk 

James C. Noell, Circuit Clerk Perry 

same .... 

William Kin^, Sheriff Callaway 

Ira Brown, Circait Clerk DeKalb 

E. F. Honey, Circuit Clerk Jefferson 

Dan. Ransom, Sheriff DeKalb 



393 5S 
266 91 

1,499 24 

63 42 

276 67 

135 43 

2,360 48 
250 17 

590 or 

1,307 11 
1,148 4M 
212 66 
2,28B 48 
1,474 17 
126 87 
29 88 
198 89 
210 97 
114 25 
819 50 
97 90 
22 3& 
43 31 
253 25 
161 22 
151 81 
60 00 
498 24 
766 29 
323 50 
178 16 
260 84. 
545 81 
432 38 
397 15 
8,279 61 
663 03 
108 30 
328 79 
265 68 
601 66 
277 70 
720 05 
34 70 
90 29 
52 68 
168 43 
607 32 
77 60 
22 86 
67 50 
07 60 
436 68 
742 96 
1,484 tt 
37 60 
208 67 
488 76 
466 42 
8 76 
22 40 
93 86 
127 60 
1,012 91 
843 63 
206 09 

106 or 

86^ 26 
440 25 
621 00 



CS 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF 



FOR COSTS IN CRIMINAL CASES— Cortikdbd. 



Date. 



No. 



J^dbfp 



Z, 1868 
4.... 
8.... 

7.... 

8.... 

9.... 
10...., 

Jl.... 

a*.... 
as.... 



0-y 

18 

^ 

«2 

28 

34 

28 , 

29.... 

31.... 

3.... 
4.... 
5.... 
8.... 

10.... 

11.... 

12... 
16.... 

17.... 

19.... 
20.... 
22.... 
24.... 

25.... 

20.... 

27.... 



118 
128 
140 
142 
147 
150 
161 
166 
169 
164 
167 
168 
173 
174 
175 
194 
197 
201 
204 
206 
209 
210 
212 
220 
223 
1^28 
229 
233 
287 
238 
260 
261 
262 
260 
270 
277 
293 
301 
303 
309 
310 
333 
340 
348 
370 
379 
401 
402 
430 
437 
443 
444 
460 
616 
617 
521 
623 
631 
636 
647 
668 
588 
603 
609 
610 
615 
616 
622 
623 
625 



To whom drawn. 



W. T. Austin, Circait Clerk Randolph... 

R.R. Smith, " Knox 

H. C. Lollar, " Lawrence.. 

Joseph Unff, " Iron 

J. M. London, " Macon 

Z. N. Goldsby, " Livingston 

R. A. LoTe, Sheriff Phelps 

Jos. T. Bryan, Circait Clerk Callaway 

I. B. Tnbb, 

U. H. Winchell, 

G. L. Carlin, 

L. Horsten, 

J. M. London, 

L. Horsten, 



«( 

ti 
ft 
II 
II 

II 



Butler 

Marion 

Barry , 

Cape Qirardeau. 

Macon 

Cape Girardeau. 



n. Bader, Sheriff Cape Girardeau. 

A. K. Reybum, Sheriff Ray 

F. M. Tufts, Circuit Clerk Platte 

B. II. Wilson, Circuit Clerk Saline #. 

P. J. Miesres, Marshal Kansas City Criminal Court. 

'B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

^. T. Sharp, Circuit C^rk Montgomery 



11 



II 
11 
It 
It 
II 



Uoward. 

Mercer 

St. Louis. 

Adair < 

Douglas.., 
Knox 



C. U. Stewart, 

D. M. King, 
P. P. Dailey, 

E. 0. Gates, 
^. C. Selkrs, 
R. R. Smith, 

M. Mace, Sheriff Iron 

S. B. LaForce, Circuit Clerk Jasper 

^. W. Lise^by, Circuit Clerk Greene 

J. Ballinger, Sheriff Daviess 

I. D. Johnson, Sheriff Webster 

R. H. Grantham, Circuit Clerk Daviess , 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

F. G. Hopkins, Circuit Clerk Buchanan , 

B. Amick^ Circuit Clerk Wright 

R. S. Tudy, Sheriff Cas 

P. P. Dailey, Circuit Clerk St. Louis 

James Coff, Marshal St. Louis 

A. Roecker, Sheriff Holt. , , 

R. A. Love, Sheriff Phelps 

J. L. 3ogy, Circuit Clerk Ste. Genevieve 

W. T. Hunter, Circuit Clerk Washington, et al 

S. E. Hoge, Circuit Clerk Moniteau 

H. Bader, Sheriff Cape Girardeau 

F. D. Phillips, Sheriff Clinton , 

Wm. L. Birney, Circuit Clerk Clinton ,., 

Thomas S. Rhoades, Sheriff Scott 

P. P. Dailey, Circuit Clerk St. Louis 

H. L. Wheat, Circuit Clerk Phelps 

James C. Orr, Sheriff Boone , 

C. Glover, Circait Clerk Osage 

W. H. Porter, Sheriff Pettis ,.., , 

Joseph Huff, Circuit Clerk Iron 



»»»« 



»!• 



ft 



J. L. Bogy, 
E. L. Allen, 
J.H. Williams, 
J. M. London, 
Joseph Maher, 
C. M. Ward, 

A. F. Owen, Sheriff Andrew 

W. A. Mills, Circuit Clerk Morgan 



It 
tt 
II 
it 



Ste. Genevieve. 

Holt 

Caldwell 

Macon 

St. Charles 

Cole 



•jf 



It 



Z. N. Goldsby, 
J. M. Samuel, 
J. W. Lisenby, 
H. C. CockeriU, 
B. Montgomery, 

J. fi. Moore, Sneriff Barry 

G. L. Carlin, Circuit '^lerk Barry, 
L. Dobbin, Circait Clerk Shelby . 



II 
It 
11 
II 



Livingston. 

Boone 

Greene 

Howard...., 
Pettis 



Amount* 



\ 82 76 

- 600 16 

273 26 

721 OS 

193 05 
469 14 
113 76 
221 89 

194 27 
692 83 

680 06 
603 23 
300 76 

1,108 46 
167 76 
119 26 

2,826 77 

172 76 

82 09 

243 00 

. 449 41 
879 12 
194 85 

3,642 97 

54 85 

108 78 

164 80 

94 30 

711 03 

2,368 13 
135 53 
197 40 
241 80 
568 60 
774 15 
391 73 
69 50 
456 48 
977 05 
125 05 
80 25 
203 84 

1,068 94 
166 78 
275 5;^ 
178 26 
51 30 
149 80 

3,224 87 

628 .33 

46 Si 

2,836 69 
30 .35 
164 74 
271 94 
213 .33 
307 19 
87 44 

3,565 21 

486 35 

4 50 

267 21 

456 52 

62 40 

1,685 61 
545 63 

1,132 99 
102 6o 

681 1) 

658 «t 



THE REVENUE FUND. 



69 



FOR COSTS IN CRIMINAL CASES—Cohtisukd. 



Dat«. 



Feb, 27, 1868 



March 2 

6 

10 

11 
12 

13 
Id 
18 
19 

20 
24 

26 

27 
28 
30 
31 

f 

April 1 
2 

3 



4« ••«• 



6. 
7. 

8. 

9 
10. 



13. 



U. 

15. 
17. 
20. 



22. 
23. 
24. 



25. 
27. 



28 



No. 



632 

633 

634 

673 

712 

739 

744 

748 

756 

762 

766 

776 

785 

788 

790 

792 

795 

840 

846 

887 

896 

939 

942 

951 

957 

958 

959 

1013 

1067 

1077 

1080 

1084 

1088 

1094 

1099 

1100 

1101 

1108 

1112 

1117 

1118 

1126 

1128 

1129 

1140 

1141 

1147 

1168 

1177 

1179 

1184 

1185 

1190 

1210 

1225 

1227 

1228 

1233 

1239 

1245 

1348 

1249 

1258 

1262 

1271 

1272 

1273 

1274 

1278 

1280 



To whom drawn. 
t 



L. Horsten, Circuit Clerk Cape Girardeau 

W. T. Austin, Circuit Clerk Randolph 

R. W. Dunlap, Circuit Clerk Crawford 

G. H. DuUe, Sheriff Cole 

A. W. Chenoweth, Circuit Clerk McDonald 

I. D. Johnson, Sheriff Webster 

I. H. Cunningham, Circuit Clerk Webster 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

J. H. Austin, Sheriff Randolph 

R. St. John, Circuit Clerk Ralls 

M. L. Stratton, Circuit Clerk Benton 

J. Caldwell, Sheriff Polk.. 

Irvin Fish, Sheriff Buchanan 

F. G. Hopkins, Circuit Clerk Buchanan 

A. H. Martin, Circuit Clerk Lincoln /. 

P. F. Lonergan, Sheriff Pike 

J. H. Bethune, Circuit Clerk Mississippi.. 

F. D. Phillips, Sheriff Clinton 

G. W. Kitchen, Sheriff Stoddard 

L. Horsten, Circuit Clerk Cape Girardeau 

H. Mitchell, Sheriff Benton 

Wm. Weaver, Circuit Clerk Henry 

T. W. Williams, Sheriff Johnson 

M. Cauby, Circuit Clerk Putnam 

R. V.Keller, Circuit Clerk ^ewton 

A. B. Maddux, Circuit Clerk Dallas 

L. B. Hutchison, Sheriff Newton 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

W. T. Austin, Circuit Clerk Randolph 

Chaa. Dougherty, Sheriff Jackson 

T. J. Gidebn, Circuit Clerk Christian 

A. K. Sykes, Circuit Clerk Grundy 

L. H. LinvUle. Sheriff Wayne 

D. H. Connaway, Circuit Clerk Cedar. 



it 
it 
ti 
it 



Cooper ... 
Gentry.... 
Stoddard . 
Marion... 
Henry...., 
Camden . 



W.W.Taliaferro, 
James West, 
R. M. Fraker, 
H. H. Winchell, 
William Weaver, 
Thomas Selby, 

William Forbes, Sheriff Macon 

M. U. Foster, Circuit Clerk Johnson 
G. W. Tatham, Circuit Clerk Carroll. 

B. Disney, Sheriff St. Clair 

R. A. Love, Sheriff Phelps 

H. L. Wheat, Circuit Clerk Phelps 



it 



tt 

It 

tt 

tt 

tt 



Moniteau. 

Phelps 

Marion.... 

Polk 

Cedar 

St. Louis. 



S. E. Hoge, 
H. L. Wheat, 
H. H. Winchell, 
W. L. Snodg^ass, 
D. H. Connaway, 
P. P. Dailey, 

I. N. Wray, Sheriff Nodaway 

Chas. H. Vincent, Clerk Kansas City Criminal Courts. 

same «•• 

M. Cauby» Circuit Clerk Putnam 

S. W. Miller, Circuit Clerk Wayne , 

Ira Brown, Circuit Clerk DeKalb 

J. H. Williams, Circuit Clerk Caldwell 

T. W. Williams, Sheriff Johnson 

B. Amick, Circuit Clerk Wright 

Wm. Weaver, Circuit Clerk Henry 

W, D. Graham, Ci-cuit Clerk St. Clair 

N. P. Ogden, Sheriff Platte 

A. W. Maupin, Circuit Clerk Franklin 

Thomaa B. Jeffries, Circuit Clerk Lewis 

M. U. Foster, Circuit Clerk Johnson 

William Caldwell, Circuit Clerk Audrain 

J. Wilhelmi, Sheriff Franklin 

D. W. Hoskina, Circuit Clerk Carter 



Amount. 



I 131 30 

48 25 

308 10 

9 50 

42 01 

123 00 

eio 66 

365 25 

135 38 
91 89 

428 01 

85 35 
106 50 

2,289 13 
233 00 
110 70 
613 32 
277 90. 
149 00 

136 40 
132 12 
438 99 

41 95 
60 41 
526 68 
259 81 
132 50. 
866 50 
249 03 

129 15 
398 09 
411 95 
115 05 

1,263 59 

83 25 
616 08 
238 77 

2,119 25 

65 63 
159 98 
270 35 

44 50 
845 81 
105 81 
128 86 
622 42 
175 29 
8 23 
859 18 
408 21 

86 83 
5,812 80 

130 25 
435 85 

91 85 

66 50 
110 60 
717 27 
257 25 

41 95 
495 58 
231 10 
109 94 

84 75 
395 16 
287 78 
690 63 
699 27 

62 15 

67 19 



70 



DISBURSKMBNTS OUT OF 



FOR COSTS IN CRIMINAL CASE&-Coiitinued. 



Date. 



April 30, 186.' 


1290 




1293 


lUy 1 


1290 




1302 


2 


1304 




1306 


7 


1325 




1326 


8 


1327 




1328 


11 


1343 


12 


1349 


13 


1351 




1362 




1354 


14 


1371 


16 


1377 




13S2 


18 


1385 




1390 


19 


1394 




1395 


20 


1398 


21 


1399 




1400 




1403 


22 


1404 




1405 




1411 


23 


1415 


25 


1427 




1429 


26 


1433 




1435 


27 


1439 




1442 




1444 




1445 


28 


1446 




1448 




1453 




1455 


29 


1465 


:iO 


1469 


Jttne 1 


1475 




1476 




1477 




1478 




1479 




1480 


1 


1485 




1486 


6 


1492 


10 


1506 • 


11 


1510 




1511 




1514 


12 


1515 




1516 




1519 




1521 


13 


1524 


16 


1530 




1531 


16 


1534 


17 


1536 


18 


1540 




1541 


19 


1544 



No. 



To whom drawn. 



R. Wallace, Circait Clerk Jackson 

James C. Noeil, Circuit Clerk Perry 

George Kuechler, Sheriff Chariton 

1. B. Tubb, Circuit Clerk Butler 

J. H. Austin, Sheriff Randolph 

M. Mace, Sheriff Iron 

J. W. Carson, Sheriff Audrain...* 

P. P. Parker, Circuit Clerk Pike 

John Wall, Sheriff Saline 

J. C. England, Circuit Clerk Gasconade 

G. W. Ilutcherson, Circuit Clerk Ripley 

J. P. CJark, Circuit Clerk Audrain 

S. K. Caldwell, Circuit Clerk Ralls 

J. C. Breckenridre, Sheriff Washington 

W. T. Hunter, Circuit Clerk Washington 

August Kieinsorge, Sheriff Osage 

J. M. London, Circuit Clerk Macon 

J. H. Steffens, " Texas 

L. H. Jennings, " Taney 

G. W. A. Preston, " Sullivan 

W. L. Snodgrass, " Polk 

J. C. Smith, " Scotland. 

T.A.Collins, " UoweU 

S.K.Caldwell, " Ralls 

C. Glover, " Osage 

J. A. Mott, <' New Madrid .. 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

P, P. Dailey, Circuit Clerk St. Louis 

S. E. Hoge, Circuit Clerk Moniteau 

James Ownby, Sheriff Monroe %. 

W. C. Boyd, Circuit Clerk Oregon 

B. A. Bailey, Circuit Clerk Clay 

A. K. Cowgill, Sheriff Schuyler 

E. Disney, Sheriff St. Clair 

F. M. Tufts, Circuit Clerk Platte 

W. A. Mills, Circuit Clerk Morgan 

Z. N. Goldsby, Circuit Clerk Livingston........ 

J. Williams, Sheriff Jefferson 

Thomas Adamson, Sheriff Lafayette 

A. K. Reyburn, Sheriff Ray 

Irvin Fish, Sheriff Buchanan 

F. G. Hopkins, Circuit Clerk Buchanan 

B.H.Wilson, " Saline 

A. E. Rowden, " Maries 

S.F. Currie, *' Lafayette 

W. McDonald, " Dent 

W. R. Taylor, " St. Francois. 

A. M. Long, ** Dade 

W. M. Newberry, " Madison 

Joseph Huff, <* Iron 

G. W. Arnold. " Scott ^.. 

Wm. Caldwell, " Andrew 

J. C. Orr, Sheriff Boone 

G. Harker, Sheriff Livingston 

E. 0. Gates, Circuit Clerk Adair 

E. Darrow, Sheriff Adair 

J. M. Samuel, Circuit Clerk Boone 

G. Bradshaw, *' Harrison 

J.Baker, " Schuyler 

J. H. Steffens, " Texas 

Z. N. Goldsby, " Livingston ...... 

L. Horsten, *' Cape Girardeau 

L. Dobbin, " Shelby 

J. H. Johnston, Clerk First District Court..... 

W. D. Graham, Circuit Clerk St. Clair 

A. J. Barr, " Ray 

F. M. Redbum, " Chariton 

Wm. Caldwell, " Andrew 

J. M. London, " Macon 



Amoont. 


$ 829 41 


346 09 


104 25 


95 45 


120 70 


94 30 


227 42 


509 50 


41 50 


5 60 


73 35 


248 38 


226 17 


103 70 


687 37 


14 35 


2,399 28 


752 86 


238 08 


1,983 03 


1,829 83 


455 05 


150 95 


39 56 


140 64 


406 67 


621 00 


4,463 53 


39 95 


183 25 


709 95 


2,752 36 


349 05 


65 85 


2,668 36 


333 06 


1,750 73 


77 50 


61 50 


74 25 


248 18 


1,294 01 


396 51 


509 88 


610 65 


50 56 


76 50 


111 64 


479 CO 


428 42 


359 57 


273 46 


30 15 


113 50 


91 84 


146 25 


980 21 


8,717 65 


232 09 


42 80 


771 95 


391 29 


574 74 


10 00 


32 78 


1,037 29 


586 00 


198 50 


101 45 



/ 



THE RBVENUB FUND. 



71 



FOR COSTS IN CRIMINAL CASES^-ComivvvD. 



Date. 


No. 


June 19, 1868 


1547 


22 


1562 


26 


1563 


July 7 


1723 


Nw- 28 


2398 



To whom drawn. 



J. H. Austin, Sheriff Randolph 

W. L. Snodgprase, Circuit Clerk Polk 

W. D. Graham, Circuit Clerk St. Clair '. 

N. C. Burch, Clerk Supreme Court. 

W. L. Snodgrass, Circuit Clerk Polk , 

Total ^ , 

" ; 

I 



Amoiint. 



$121 50 

2 00 

8 Z5 

88 20 

822 05 



$32d»864 24 



78 



DISBUB8BMSNT8 OUT 07 



FOR PAY OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



Dftte. 



Jan. ^1867... 

9 

10 



11. 
IS. 



14 
15 

10 



17. 



18. 



No. 



7 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
II 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
20 
27 
28 
20 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 



To whom drawn. 



Reuben Smith, regular. 

D. M. Draper 

H J. Deal 

John A. Hockaday 

John S. Gavendor 

H. J. F»ber 

L. F. Koch 

J.'R. Winters 

O. W. Elwell 

M. T. Graham 

T. B. Bratton 

J. G. Woemer 

D. Bonham 

J. H. Kllie 

Theodore Brnere 

George A. Moeer 

Jantee T. Adame 

N. T. Doane 

John F. Rjland 

J. L. Fant 

G. W. Rinker 

J. B. Harper 

A. L. Beti 

A. K. Sittinrton 

J. J. McBride 

G. A. Finkelnborg 

M. T. Graham 

Ira C. Busick 

Henry Hnhn 

H. C. Wellman 

Jacob Eetep 

James A. £wing 

J. C. McGinnia 

J. V. Odell 

Val. Sntton 

W. L. Jerome 

W. LawBon 

G. S. Van Wagoner .... 
Robert Waide .«.. 

F. T. Ledergerber 

B.J. Waters 

John A. Brown 

0. B. Walker 

J. B. Freeman 

Oonrad Weinrich. 

Gideon Howell 

Wm. Q. Dallmeyer 

John P. Robertson 

H. M. Rice 

R. L. Childress 

A.. M. Ellison 

P. W. Smelser 

J. 8. Shields 

M. G.Martin 

Jesse Jennings 

N. J. Colman 

G. H. Howe 

H. A. Applegate.. 

Samuel Duwsej 

L. Balisburj « 



Amount. 


$ 225 OO 


169 40 


255 00 


65 00 


110 00 


110 00 


45 00 


233 00 


285 00 


130 00 


45 00 


110 00 


281 00 


III 00 


125 00 


70 00 


234 40 


98 00 


141 20 


149 00 


215 20 


280 40 


149 60 


130 00 


130 09 


160 00 


25 00 


294 49 


110 00 


252 00 


262 80 


248 00 


130 00 


250 00 


184 80 


255 00 


230 80 


125 00 


270 00 


130 00 


268 40 


202 00 


271 20 


250 00 


160 00 


198 40 


119 60 


227 29 


312 40 


215 20 


229 20 


254 09 


198 60 


256 00 


268 40 


130 00 


250 00 


320 00 


303 20 


218 OO 



THS R&VKliUK FUND. 



78 



FOR PAY OF QBNSBAL ASSEMBLY— CoifTi!tfm>. 



Dftte. 



Jab. 18, 1867. 



19. 
21. 



33. 



34. 



No. 



60 

61 

62 

63 

64 

65 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

86 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

109 

110 

HI 

113 

113 

114 

115 

116 

117 

118 

119 

120 

121 

122 

123 

124 

125 

126 

127 

128 

129 

180 



E. D. Brown 

J. M. Goodson.. 

John T. Scott 

J. H. Reqaa 

C. A. Kuhl 

C. H. Branscomb.... 

Wm. Kidwell 

John Cos^ove 

John Whitaker 

S. B. DeLand 

J. M. Hoskinson..., 

O. B. Cole, 

John Hornbeak 

E. P. Firrell 

H. G. MuUinn 

James 8. McMurtjr. 

W. H. Lynch 

Val. Sutton 



To whom drawn. 



Amonnl. 



Wm. Key. , 

Richard Britton 

A. J. Harlan 

J. C. S. Colby », 

Wm. Monks *. 

J. B. Clark 

J. R. McCormack 

G. L. Hewitt 

R. H. Farrar 

L. Zevely 

B. L. King „ 

H.J. Drammond *. 

0. B. Payne 

L. A. Thompson « 

Gert. Goebel 

G. W. L. Mitchell 

G. L. Hewitt 

W. W. Riggs 

L. A. Rountree 

D. T. Jewett 

Wm. B. Adams .' 

C. B. Wilkinson 

J.W.Baldwin 

S. W. Headlee 

D.L.Caldwell 

W. A. Jones.... • 

W. Bennett 

H. J. Wolf 

M. Hickman 

Fred. Miller 

B. M. Burch 

H. C. Cockerill 

J. C. Gage 

L. Salubary 

R. G. Leaming 

J. J. Akard... v.. 

A. H. Linder 

L. Schulenbnrg 

M. L. Laughlin 

S. W. Birch 

8. D. Cannon 

P. G. Stafford 

Thos. B. Reed 

Fred. Buehrle 

Frank J. White 

P. H. Jaqnith 

John C. Orrick 

R. McMillan 

R. Lyman 

D. P.Dyer .... 

S. W.Smith 



A. K. Sittington. 



IS: 



P. Ritchie 



175 00 
255 00 
272 00 
197 20 
164 00 
130 00 
158 80 
158 80 
137 00 
250 00 
260 00 

167 60 
191 00 
146 00 

168 60 
206 80 
196 40 
no 00 
156 00 

193 20 
323 60 

70 00 
214 20 

190 00 

191 00 
308 OO 
117 40 
170 00 
160 00 
244 00 
304 00 
174 00 
121 00 
130 00 
248 00 
266 80 
185 20 
130 00 

194 00 
271 60 
236 80 
190 00 
200 00 
313 60 
214 80 
166 80 
333 20 

95 00 
2.'t3 60 
222 80 
143 20 

30 00 

130 00 

164 00 
238 40 

131 60 
140 00 
316 00 

165 00 
100 60 
227 00 

70 00 

70 00 

174 80 

148 00 

176 60 
110 00 
154 00 

76 00 

46 00 

193 30 



74 



DISBUKSEMKNT8 OVT OF 



FOR PAY OF GENERAL ASBEMBLT— Cohtirued. 



J)ate. 


No. 


Jan. 24, 1867... 


131 




132 


26 


133 




134 




135 




136 




137 




138 


26 


139 




140 




141 




142 




143 


28 


144 


29 


145 




146 




147 


30 


148 




149 




160 




151 




152 




153 




154 


31 


155 




156 




157 




158 




159 




lAU 




161 




162 




163 




164 




165 




166 


Feb. 1 


167 




168 


2 


169 




170 




171 




172 


4 


173 




174 




175 




176 




177 




178 


5 


179 




180 




181 


t 


182 




183 




184 




185 




186 




187 




188 




189 




190 




191 




102 




193 




194 




195 


6 


196 




197 




198 




199 




200 


7 


201 



To whom drawn. 



Albert Grifltn 

W. M. Beal 

J. R. L^gg 

D. K. Steele 

J. W. Boon 

C. W. Howard 

B. F. Sillman 

U. J. Deal 

John Dram 

Chaa. F. Schneider 

S. W. Hathaway 

H. J. Fiaher 

Jas. A. Eppstein 

E. G. Evans , 

K. Schierenberg; 

S. C. Bohanan , 

Alex. McElhinney 

\Vm. C. Unman 

L. F. Koch 

A. C. Eubanks 

T. J. Forgey 

R. T. Cartmel 

J. C. S. Colby 

N. T. Doane 

W. D. Huff. 

J. J. McBride 

Gideon HowbU 

Cha«. R. Smythe 

Paul Hubbard 

J. B. Odell 

W. S. Holland 

F. McGinnia 

Wm. Shafer 

M. T. Graham 

G. W. Boardman 

Geo. Smith, Lieut. Governor. 

Carroll Nevill 

ThoB. Uarbine 

R. Smith 

G. Wolbrecht 

T. A. Eagle 

W. H. Blodgett 

L B. Dodson 

D. R. Conrad 

C. Fox 

J. S. Shields 

8. W. Smith 

A. L. Beta 

J. R. Winters 

C. P. Townaley 

Chaa. Long 

Wm. Q. Dallmeyer 

R. G. Leaming 

J. F. Ryland 

G. A. Finkelnburg 

H.J. Wolf 

Henry Huhn 

D. M. V. Stuart 

G. L. Hewitt 

J. B. Ellis 

N. J. Colman 

Geo. W. Rinker 

Fred. Buehrle 

John Whitaker 

C. C. Fletcher 

A. E. Wyatt , 

B. P. Ritchie 

W. B. Adams 

E. Schierenberg 

G. 8. Van Wagoner 

J. A. Pond ««.. 



Amoimt. 


224 80 


250 00 


94 00 


100 00 


276 40 


117 00 


254 00 


75 00 


214 80 


213 60 


268 00 


75 00 


115 20 


221 00 


70 00 


88 00 


126 00 


235 00 


95 00 


246 00 


191 60 


218 00 


80 00 


112 00 


172 40 


80 00 


80 00 


125 00 


179 00 


80 00 


210 00 


150 00 


120 00 


70 00 


196 00 


4^6 00 


91 20 


348 00 


197 20 


130 00 


217 00 


120 00 


314 00 


300 00 


198 60 


75 00 


55 00 


80 00 


120 00 


211 00 


143 20 


80 00 


80 00 


80 00 


112 00 


80 00 


80 00 


150 00 


80 00 


185 40 


80 00 


80 00 


80 00 


80 00 


158 00 


307 60 


80 00 


70 00 


80 00 


80 00 


282 00 



THE REVENUE FUND. 



75 



FOR PAY OP GENERAL ASSEMCLY— Costinubd. 



Bate. 



Feb. 7, 1867... 
March 4 



No. 



202 

203 

204 

205' 

206 

207 

208 

209 

210 

211 

212 

218 

214 

215 

216 

217 

218 

210 

220 

221 

222 

223 

224 

225 

226 

227 

228 

229 

230 

231 

232 

233 

234 

235 

236 

237 

238 

239 

240 

241 

242 

243 

244 

245 

246 

247 

248 

249 

250 

251 

252 

253 

254 

255 

256 

257 

258 

259 

260 

261 

262 

263 

264 

265 

266 

267 

268 

269 

270 

271 

272 



To whom drawn. 



George A. Moser 

Jas. A. Ewing 

J. R. McCormack 

Alex. McElhinDey.... 

G. B. Cole 

I. B. Dodson 

J. C5. S. Colbj 

L. P. Koch 

H. M. Rice 

Fred. Miller 

J. C. Fox 

W. L. Jerome 

J. B. Freeman 

0. P. Townsley 

A. M. Elliaon 

Theo. Bruere 

E. L. King 

A C. Eubanks 

G. W. L. Mitchell , 

John S. Cavender 

Geo. W. Rinker , 

G. A Finkelnbnrg.... 

C. A. Kuhl 

D. Bonham 

B. P. Ritchie 

H. C. Cockerill 

J. H. Morse 

John Allej , 

W. P. Williams 

John Hornbeak , 

H. J. Wolf , 

J. W Boon 

H. J. Deal 

Fred. Buehrle 

R. L. Childress 

Jas. S. McMurtry 

Wm. Kidwell 

John Cosg^ove 

H. J. Fisher 

P. W. Smelser^ 

J. W. Baldwin 

L. Bulkley 

J. G. Woerner 

Robert Waide 

F. T. Ledergerber 

Wm. Monks 

W. Lawson , 

U. A. Applegace 

John Whitaker , 

John T. Scott 

A. L. Betz 

G. L. Hewitt 

E. D. Brown 

Albert Griffin 

Robert Waide 

R. T. Cartmel..' 

C. B. Walker 

Frank J. White et al. 

M. T. Doane 

8. W, Birch 

Henry Huhn 

D. M. V. Stuart 

H. G. Mullings 

R. Lyman 

Jesse Jennings 

M. C. JMartin 

J. 0. McGinnis 

F. M. McGinnis 

J. A. Pond 

W. Bennett .^... 

Wm. Key 



Amount. 


82 00 


220 00 


225 00 


220 00 


220 00 


150 00 


140 00 


135 00 


220 00 


215 00 


220 00 


220 00 


220 00 


135 00 


220 00 


265 00 


245 00 


220 00 


220 00 


140 00 


140 00 


196 00 


220 00 


100 00 


140 00 


220 00 


90 00 


480 40 


285 20 


220 00 


65 00 


220 00 


190 00 


140 oa 


220 00 


220 00 


220 00 


220 00 


175 00 


220 00 


80 00 


403 00 


160 00 


80 00 


220 00 


220 00 


220 Oo 


220 OU 


140 00 


220 00 


140 00 


140 00 


220 Oo 


220 Oo 


140 00 


220 Oo 


220 Oo 


865 Oo 


91 Oo 


220 Oo 


140 Oo 


140 Oo 


220 Oo 


220 Oo 


220 Oo 


220 Oo 


220 Oo 


140 Oo 


140 Oo 


220 Ort 
220 Oq 



:6 



DISBDBSEMKNTS OUT OP 



FOR PAT OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY— CovmusD. 



Date. 



March 5, 1807. 



8.. 



11. 



12. 



No. 



273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
281 
282 
283 
284 
285 
280 
287 
288 
289 
290 
291 
292 
293 
294 
295 
290 
297 
298 
299 
BOO 
301 
802 
303 
304 
305 
300 
307 
308 
309 
310 
311 
812 
313 
314 
315 
310 
317 
318 
310 
320 
321 
322 
323 
324 
325 
820 
327 
328 
320 
330 
831 
832 
333 
334 
335 
330 
837 
338 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 



To whom drawn. 



Val. Satton ^ 

P. G. Stafford 

H. J. Drummond ^ 

J. P. Robertson 

Carroll Nerill 

D. K. Stoele 

W. W. Ri^^ 

Jas. B. Harper 

John B. Ellis 

J. R. Lerg* 

Wm. Q. Dallmeyer 

Ohas. Long 

D. D. Bumes 

E. P. Ferrell 

Rich. Britton 

Samuel Downey 

W. H. Blodgett 

R. H. Farrar 

Paul Hubbard..... 

T. B. Bratcon .* 

T.J. Forgey 

G. Wolbrecht * 

G. S. Van Wagoner «. 

J. P. Alexander 

R. McMillan 

ThoB. Quinn 

J. F. Ryland 

C. W. Howard 

Ira 0. Bttzick 

W. D. Huff. 

Reuben Smith • 

S. D. Cannon 

8. M. Hargrove 

C. F. Schneider 

J. J. Akard..... 

W. K. Pyle 

M. L. Laughlin 

E. G. Evans k • 

Geo. A. Moser 

J. M. Filler 

Wm. B. Adams 

G. W. Elwell : 

J. R. Winters 

L. A. Thompson 

8. W. Hathaway 

E.Taylor 

T. A. Eagle 

A. H. Linder •• • .^ 

J. G. Woerner 

Gideon Howell • 

L. Schnlenburg....! 

John P. Robertson > 

B.J. Waters 

J. B. Harper • 

C. A. Kuhl 

I. B. Dodson 

J. F. Ryland .' 

Robert T. Brock 

D. L. Caldwell 

U. M. Filler 

W. C. Human 

H.J. Deal 

H. J. Spaunhorst 

L. F. Koch 

J. H. Morse 

Paul Hubbard 

A. M. Ellison 

Gert. Goebel f 

W. 8. Holland 

J. H. Morse • 

George H. Rea 



Amonni. 


129 M 


220 00 


220 00 


220 0% 


220 9% 


220 0« 


220 M 


220 00 


140 06 


220 00 


140 00 


220 00 


251 80 


230 00 


220 00 


220 00 


220 00 


220 00 


170 00 


130 00 


220 00 


220 00 


140 00 


152 00 


220 00 


170 80 


140 00 


220 00 


05 00 


220 00 


320 00 


220 00 


403 00 


220 00 


220 00 


420 00 


220 00 


200 00 


852 50 


477 00 


185 00 


255 00 


100 00 


220 00 


220 00 


315 00 


220 00 


220 00 


125 00 


140 00 


220 00 


05 00 


285 00 


05 00 


05 00 


45 00 


05 00 


415 00 


220 00 


20 00 


210 00 


45 00 


415 00 


75 00 


46 00 


40 00 


05 00 


270 00 


205 00 


250 00 


41100 



THE RBYENUE FUND. 



FOR PAY OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY--CoNTniDBD. 



I < 



Date. 



lUrdi 12, 1867 



No. 



To Trbom drawn. 



844 
345 
346 
847 
84$ 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
854 
355 
366 
357 
358 
359 
360 
361 
362 
363 
864 
365 
366 
867 
868 
369 
870 
371 
872 
373 
374 
375 
376 
377 
378 
379 
380 
381 
382 
383 
384 
385 
386 
ZS7 
388 
389 
390 
391 
392 
393 
394 
395 
396 
397 
398 
399 
400 
401 
402 
403 
404 
405 
406 
407 
408 
409 
410 
411 
412 
413 
414 



J. Q. Woemer 

J. B. Clark..... 

C. P. TowDBley 

J. 8. Cavender 

Jas. R. McCormack. 
James H. Requa .... 

Qeorge A. Moaer 

Theo. Bruere 

Val. Sutton , 

S. Ridffley 

D. H. Porter 

J. A. Brown 

M. C. Martin 

?^. T. Doane 

R. G.'lieaming 

Ira 0. Baiick 

E. Taylor 

J. M. Hoskinson 

T. J. Forgey 

Samuel Downey 

John Hornbeak 

Jacob Uatep 

C. B. Walker 

James C. Fox 

R. T. Cartmel 

B. F. Silman 

H. C. Cockerill 

B. P. Ritchie.... 

Thomos P. White .... 

J. R. Le^j 

R. L. Childress 

C. H. Howe 

T. A. Earie 

Wm. M. Beal 

A. Griffin 

G. W. L. Mitchell... 

F. T. Ledergerber.... 

John Alley 

H.J. Fisher 

Fred. Miller 

D. Bouham 



same 

W. Q. Dallmeyer.... 

John Whitaker 

J. B. Freeman 

D. R. Conrad 

Carroll Nevill 

L. A. Rountree , 

C. C. Fletcher 

Samuel B. DeLand. 

J. J. Akard 

James A. Ewing^ .... 

E. M. Bnrch 

M. L. Lauf^hlan 

J. M. Goodson 

Wash. Bennett 

H. J. Drammond..., 

J. H. Ellis 

John T. Scott , 

J. B. Clark 

S. W. Headlee 

Gideon Howell 

D. L. Caldwell 

H. A. Applegate .... 

G. B. Golb 

Jos A. Eppstein.... 

Robert Waide 

C. W. Howard 

Jesse JennincTS 

C F. Schneider 

A. C. Enbanks 



Amount. 



$ 20 00 


125 00 


45 00 


105 00 


45 00 


285 4)0 


30 00 


4b 00 


45 00 


415 00 


350 00 


285 00 


65 00 


105 00 


65 00 


65 00 


65 00 


285 00 


65 00 


65 00 


65 00 


285 00 


65 00 


65 00 


65 00 


285 00 


65 00 


65 00 


485 40 


65 00 


65 00 


285 00 


r>5 00 


285 00 


65 00 


65 00 


65 00 


65 00 


55 00 


45 00 


45 00 


155 09 


65 00 


65 00 


65 00 


185 00 


65 00 


285 00 


285 00 


130 00 


65 00 


65 00 


285 00 


65 00 


285 00 


65 00 


65 00 


355 00 


65 00 


150 00 


275 00 


65 00 


65 00 


65 00 


65 00 


2 5 00 


65 00 


65 00 


65 00 


66 00 



78 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF 



FOR PAT OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY-^oramnD. 



Date. 



Miurchl2, 1867 



13. 



No. 



415 
416 
417 
418 
419 
420 
421 
422 
423 
424 
425 
42S 
427 
423 
429 
430 
431 
432 
433 
434 
435 
436 
437 
438 
439 
440 
441 
442 
443 
4-14 
445 
446 
447 
448 
449 
450 
451 
452 
453 
454 
455 
456 
457 
458 
459 
460 
461 
462 
463 
464 
465 
466 
467 
4<)8 
469 
470 
471 
472 
473 
474 
475 
476 
477 
478 
479 
480 
481 
482 
483 
484 
485 



To whom drftwn. 



A. H. Linder 

Wm. Key 

H. O. Mullinga 

Wm. fihafer ^..., 

John C. Orrick 

W. B. Adam8.*« 

w. w. Rig:gg 

Reuben Smith 

John Co8gTOTe 

R. II. Farrar 

R. Lyman 

Wm. Lawson 

E. P. Ferrell 

J. M. Hoskinson 

B. G. Evans 

Ira C. Buzick 

George Wolbrecht 

Rich. Britton , 

George W. Rinker 

Alexander McElhinnev. 

S. W. Birch "... 

R. McMillan 

W. P. Williams 

W. D. Huff 

P. G. Stafford 

H. J. Wolf 

J. C. McGinnis 

E. D. Brown..... 

Wm. Kidwell 

C. Weinrich 

Charles Long 

Thomas Quinn 

Louis Schulenbnrg 

L. Zevely 

W. L. Jerome 

A. L. Betz 

A. Valle 

Joseph Bogy , 

J. A. Pond 

S M. Hargreye 

C. B. Wilkinson 

J. W. Boon 

H.G. Mnllings , 

J. B. Robinspn .r..... 

J. P. Alexander 

A. J. Harlan 

A. B. Wyatt 

P. W. Smelser , 

D. K. Steele 

William Monks 

A. Valle 

J. W. Baldwin 

John ^um 

E. Williams 

C. C. Fletcher 

L. Bulkley 

James S. McMurtry 

N. J. Colman 

S. W. Hathaway 

F. J. White 

S. D. Cannon 

W. K. Pyle 

P. H. Jaquith 

F. T. Ledergerber 

II. lluhn 

M. T. Graham 

E. L. King 

G. S. Park 

Thomas S. Hackleman.. 

L. Zerely 

J. B. Ellis , 



Amount. 



$ 65 00 

65 00 
65 00 

309 40 

285 00 
20 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 
55 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 
41 00 
20 00 
41 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 

106 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 

285 00 
65 00 

285 00 
65 00 

360 00 
65 00 
81 00 
65 00 

333 80 
65 00 
65 00 

285 00 
65 00 
41 00 
41 CO 

285 00 

399 00 

326 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 

350 00 
75 00 

285 00 

591 00 
41 00 

180 00 
65 00 

205 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 
65 00 

285 00 
41 00 

65 00 
205 00 

no 00 

455 00 

467 40 

14 60 

66 66 



TBS BEVENUK FUKD. 
FOB PAT OF CUNEBAL ASSEMBLT— Coiraiinw*. 



n 



Date. 



Much 13, 1867 



14. 



IC 

19 

April 1 

27 
May 13.... 

16 
18 

20 



21. 
2.^. 
24. 



2o. 



Jane 1. 



28 
29. 



No. 



486 
487 
4S8 
489 
490 
491 
492 
493 
494 
495 
496 
497 
498 
499 
500 
501 
502 
503 
504 
.305 
506 
507 
508 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 
516 
517 
813 
820 
821 
1002 
1079 
1080 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
525 
526 
527 
528 
529 
530 
531 
532 
533 
534 
535 
536 
537 
538 
539 
540 
541 
542 
543 
544 
545 
546 
547 
548 
549 



Tq whom drawn.. 



Aytonnt. 



G. W. Elwell „.. 

D. M. V. Stuart 

William A. Jonei 

A. W. Mullins ^ , 

G. W. Boardman 

D. T. Jewett 

F. M. McGinnia 

C. B. Smythe 

N. T. Doane 

W. H. Blodgett 

G. A. Finkelnbarg 

S. W. Smith 

J. C. S. Colby 

M. Hickman * 

Thomas Harbine 

0. B. Payne 

J- J. McBride 

H. M. Rice 

G. L.Hewitt 

C. H. Branscomb 

L. A. Thompson 

J. R. Winters 

W. A. Shelton 

Wm. B. Adams et al , 

G. S. Van Wagoner 

George Smith 

Fred Buehrle 

T. B. Reed 

H. C. Wellman 

D. P. Dyer 

■James S. Rollins 

B. Schierenbere 

John F. Ryland, (regular) committee 

J. R. Winters, " " 

W. Q. Dallmeyer, " " 

John F. Ryland, " " 

J. R. Winters, (regular) committee 

Wm. Qv Dallmyers, (regular) committee. 

J. R. Winters 

W. A. Shelton 

G. W. Elwell 

D. Bonham 

W. B. Adams 

M. T. Graham 

S. W. Smith 

T. B. Bratton 

E. G. Evans , 

George A. Mostfr 

H. J. Deal 

D. P. Dyer 

J. H. Morse 

Fred. Miller 

Tbeo. Bruere 

George W. Boardman , 

Paul Hubbard 

H. J. Fisher 

John H. Ellis 

S. W. Smith 

T B. Bratton .; 

J. G. Woerner , 

F. M. McGiunis 

George A. Moser 

E. Williams 

W. A. Shelton 

M. T. Graham , 

George W. Elwell 

FT. J. Fisher 

H. J. Spannhorst 

rheo. Bruere 

D. Bonham 



$ 4« 00 

65 00 

285 OO 

511 00 

205 00 

285 00 

65 00 

285 00 

133 00 

65 00 

91 00 

135 00 

65 00 

285 00 

200 00 

285 00 

55 00 

65 00 

65 00 

285 00 

65 00 

20 00 

555 00 

181 50 

65 00 

287 00 

65 00 

260 00 

155 00 

378 00 

381 00 

205 00 

125 00 

215 00 

84 60 
90 00 

180 00 

190 00 

188 00 

215 00 

245 0() 

170 00 

144 00 

105 00 

90 00 

175 00 

110 00 

151 00 

245 00 

183 00 

140 00 

50 00 

130 00 

96 00 

89 00 

117 00 

227 00 

40 00 

45 00 

105 00 

168 66 

105 00 

336 00 

85 00 
70 00 
85 00 
45 00 

160 00 
50 00 
70 00 



80 



DlSBimSBMENTS OUT OP 



FOR PAY OF OBNBRAL A8SBHBLT— GovmnniD. 



Dato. 


No. 


To wh«m. 


Amount. 


Junes, 1867... 


660 

661 

662 

663 

664 

666 

666 

667 

668 

669 

660 

661 

662 

663 

664 

666 

666 

667 

668 

669 

670 

671 

672 

673 

674 

676 

676 

1271 

1286 

1287 

1348 

1506 

1663 

1696 

1613 

1614 

1910 

2024 

2026 

2226 

2464 

2466 

2467 

141 

1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

• 23 

24 

26 

26 

27 


Wm. B. Adami » • 

Paul Hubbard 


$ 70 00 
46 00 




W. C. Human , 


200 00 




J. M. Filler 


197 06 




E. L. King 


100 00 




B. Q. E\*an8 


70 00 




J. G. Woemer • • 


10 00 




John H. EUiB • • 


46 00 




J. H. Morse ^ 

I. B. Dudson * 


60 00 
264 00 




C. P. Towneley , ••.... „„ 


136 00 




S. W. Headlee 


210 00 




J. P. Clark 


210 00 




W. S. Holland 


100 00 




Oeorre W. Boardman ,.,,., 


60 00 




Fred. Miller 


60 00 




H. J. Deal 


66 00 




6. W. Smith 


463 00 




Gert. Goebel 


136 00 




D. R. Conrad 


230 00 




James H. McCormack 


196 00 




G. S. Park 


190 00 




J. R. Winters 


90 00 




T. B. Reed 


232 00 




Thomas Harbine 


226 00 




Geo. A. Moser 


76 00 




Geo. Smith • 


Zbp 00 
180 00 


18 


John F. Rvland. frecrular) committee ..••..•. 


20 


W. Q. Dallmever " ** 


136 00 




J. R. Winters *' '* 


90 00 


JbIt 1 


D. P. Dver 


77 00 


18 


John F. Rvland. Treerular^ committee. 


100 00 


30 


W. Q. Dallmeyer. " ** 


120 00 


Avrosi 7 

12 


John F. Rvland. " *' 


104 26 


W. Q. Dallmever. " '* 


60 00 




J. R. Winter*, " " 


62 76 


October 2 

11 


John F. R>land, " " 

snme '* " 


76 00 
70 00 




W. Q. Dallmeyer. ** " 


140 00 




.1. R. Winters, " ** 


100 00 


Dec. 16 


John F. Rylnnd. " " 


86 00 




John R. Winters, '* " 


60 00 




W. Q. Dallmeyer. " " 


120 00 


Jan* 6. 1868... 


John F. Ryland. " '' 


20 00 


7 


G. W. Elwell 


230 00 




E. G. Evans......... , 


86 00 


9 


D. Bonham 


140 00 




J. W. BNldwin 


130 00 




E. P. Ferrell 


80 00 


10 


C. H. Kuhl 


94 00 




J. C. McGinnis 


60 00 




J. M. Hoskinson. 


190 00 




S. W. Birch 


246 00 




M. C. Martin 


186 00 




John P. Robertson 


167 20 




Samuel Downev.... • 


233 20 




G. W. L. Mitchell 


60 00 




W. Bennett 


204 80 




George W. Rinker '. 


146 20 




John f'ourt « 


114 80 




John Whitaker 


82 00 




B J. Waters 


198 40 


11 


L. Bulklev 


188 00 




R. li. Childress..... 


146 20 




.Iftines A. EwinsT «... ••. 


178 00 




.T limes B. Uiirner. •..•.•*...•..........••....•...•*•*• 


210 40 




P. W. Smelser 


184 00 




J. W. Baldwin 


166 80 




8. W. Ilathawav 


198 00 


18 


A. J. Harlan 

H. A. Applegate •* 


233 60 
260 00 



THE REVENUE FUND. 



81 



FOK PAT OF GBNBBAL ASSBMBL7— Govtenukd. 



Dftte. 



Jan. 13, 1608... 



14. 




15. 



^V«»p» • • 



17. 



18. 
20. 



28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
^ 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 



G. A. Finkelnbarg; 
John Hornbeak 

B. P. Ritchie 
£. Williams 
Ira G. Bttzick 
John Doniphan 
A. C. EubankB 
William Kidwell 
J. A. Brown 
A. L. Betz 
Theo. Bruere 

J. G. Woerner 

John Alley 

J. R. Winters 

W. Q. Dallmeyer. 

;D. R. Conrad 

jj. S. Cavender ... 

John Cosgrove 

|E. D. Brown 

S. W. Smith.. 

P. Hubbard 

E. Taylor 

N. J. Colman 

S. B. DeLand 

William Monks. 

W. L. Jerome 

H. J. Drummond 

E. G.- Evans 

R. 11. Farrar 

H. G. Mulling 

Thomas Qninn 

G. B. Cole 

Alex. McElhinney.... 

Robert Waide 

John T. Scott 

0. B. Payne 

M. T. Graham 

J. B. Clark 

Jos. A. Eppstein 

C. B. Wilkinson 

|Wm. Shafer 

jM. Hickman 

iWm. A. Jones 

|Wm. Lawson 

!D. P. Dyer 

J. H. Morse 

H. J. Fisher 

H. M. Rice 

James A. McFarland 

C. P. Townsley 

J. H. Ellis 

R. .G Leaming 

N. T. Doane 

Fred. Miller 

Wm. B. Adams 

R. T. Brock 

C. Weinrich 

C. R. Smythe 

A. W. MuUins 

Robt. McMillan 

Albert Griffin 

H. C. Cockerill 

George Wolbrecht ... 

J. B. Freeman. 

J. A. Pond 

Wm. M. BeaJ 

Jacob Estep , 

R. Lyman , 

J. H. Reqna , 

A. B. Wyatt 

J. Jeuninga 



Amount. 


$ 113 00 


131 00 


123 20 


238 00 


226 89 


96 80 


176 00 


88 80 


192 00 


79 60 


120 00 


100 00 


190 40 


25 00 


30 00 


130 00 


100 00 


88 80 


110 00 


40 00 


74 00 


35 60 


60 00 


180 00 


169 20 


190 00 


174 00 


45 00 


52 40 


103 60 


100 80 


97 60 


56 00 


245 00 


202 00 


234 00 


125 00 


160 00 


45 20 


201 60 


50 00 


263 20 


243 60 


160 80 


70 00 


90 00 


117 00 


242 40 


229 20 


91 00 


216 06 


115 00 


70 00 


55 00 


114 00 


115 00 


90 00 


60 00 


156 00 


105 60 


154 80 


152 80 


60 00 


180 00 


142 00 


180 00 


192 80 


132 49 


127 20 


237 60 


198 ia 



6-A B 



S2 



DISBDRSHMKNTS OUT OF 



FOR PAY OP GENERAL ASSEMBLY— CoKTiiruED. 



Dat«. 




Jan. 21, 1SG3.. 



To whom drawn . 



Amount. 



22. 






J^ 



24. 
27. 



»-■»* 



.•\ 



28. 



29. 



30. 



99 |C. W. Ilownrd. 
100 1.1. J. McBride. 



103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
1L4 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
102 
163 
164 
165 
165 
167 
16? 
169 



101 IJ. F. Ryland 

102 ,S. W. Smith. 



iTbomas S. Hackleman 

|C. B. Walker 

jR. T. Cartmel 

,J. R. Lcgg 

David K. Steele 

G. L. Hewitt 

;D. M. V. Stuart 

J. J. McBride 

N. T. Doane 

.C. Nevill 

R. Smith 

,P. O. Stafford 

|F. M. McGiimie 

'a. A. Finkelnburg 

S. D. Cannon 

|R. Britton 

iC. F. Schneider 

;C. W. Howard 

J. C. McGinnis , 

C. R. Sraythe 

E. G. Evans 

James 6. Rollins 

\yilliam Key 

J. R. Winters , 

D. P. Dyer 

Jas. A. Ewing 

J.T. Fourt 

B. Lyman 

T. J. Forgey 

L. F. Koch 

Fred. Miller 

J. J. McBride 

G. A. Moser 

E. Williams 

Jos. Bogy 

W. G. Human 

Jas. B. Harper 

J. H. Ellis 

J. C. S. Colby 

C. A. Kuhl 

J. C. Orrick 

E. Taylor 

J. P. Ryland 

M. L. Laughlin 

D. Bonham 

J. W. Baldwin 

L. Schulenburg 

W. W. Riggs 

J. Cos^rove 

J. Whita&er 

Wm. Shafer 

H. A. Applegate 

A. M. Ellison 

A. U. Linder 

J. Hornbeak 

L. A. Rountree 

Chas. Long 

R. T. Brock 

J. R. Legg 

C. Nevill 

J. W. Owens 

S. B. De Land 

C. B. Walker 

A. V Bets 

Jos. A. Eppstein 

Chas. R. timythe 

B. Taylor...., 



67 60 

60 00 

116 20 

35 OO 

112 40 

201 20 

148 00 

24 00 

30 00 

188 00 

127 60 

150 (H> 

215 00 

38 GO 

127 20 

35 CO 

85 00 

70 00 

100 GO 

123 20 

143 CO 

90 00 

140 00 

140 00 

60 00 

182 60 

191 00 

283 00 

77 00 
105 00 
110 00 
110 00 
226 60 
115 00 

CO 00 
125 00 

07 50 
100 qO 

93 80 
100 00 

55 00 

65 00 
250 00 
125 00 

78 00 
90 00 
70 00 

195 00 
120 00 
125 00 
186 GO 
r,21 8« 
125 00 
125 00 
125 00 
125 00 
2.S4 20 
M03 40 
125 00 
210 20 
198 20 
70 00 
125 00 
125 00 
130 00 
125 00 

125 00 
145 00 

126 00 
126 00 

S5 00 



THB RKVENUE FUND. 



83 



FOR PAY OP GENERAL ASSEMBLY—Coktinubd. 



Date. 



Jan. 80, 1868... 



81. 



February 1. 



3. 



No. 



6 

7 

8 
10 



170 

171 

172 

173 

174 

175 

176 

177. 

178 

179 

180 

181 

182 

183 

184 

185 

1S6 

187 

183 

189 

•190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
198 

. 199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
2Jl 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 



To whom drawn. 



Amonnt. 



D. K. Steele 

J. B. Harper 

L. Buckley 

N. J. Colman 

G. S. Van Wagoner. 

Wm. Kidwell 

J. C. McGinnis 

J. B. Freeman 

T. A. Eagle 

J. Jennings 

H. G. Mullingfl 

Rob. Waide , 

;E. p. Ferreil.. 

Jas. M. Hoskinson.. 

J. W. Bdon 

R. G. Leaming 

R. T. Cartmel 

F. J. White 

A. C.Eubanks../. 

H. J. Spaanhorat.... 

G. W. L. Mitchell... 
Paul Hubbard , 

E. L. King ; 

Sam. Downey , 

R. McMillan 

I. C. Buzick 

F. T. Ledergerber... 

Thomas B. Reed 

Wm. Q. Dallmeyer.. 

S. D Cannon , 

W. Bennett 

J. G. Woerner 

I. B. Dodson , 

Geo. Wolbrecht 

Wm. Monks 

R. L. Childress , 

C. B. Wilkinson 

P. H. Jaqulth 

J. T. Scott , 

D. M. V. Stuart 

M. T. Graham , 

Jas. A.. McFarland... 

E. M. Burch , 

£. D. Brown , 

G. B. Cole 

Thos. S. 4ackleman, 

R. BritCon 

W. S. Holland 

B. F. Silman 

F. J. White 

Thos. Essex 

G. S. Park 

,Wm. Lawson ......... 

J. C. Orrick , 

,11. J. Deal , 

,C. C. Fletcher 

;A. Valle 

,J. B. Harper , 

G. W. KlwoU 

D. L. Caldwell 

P. G. Stafford 

M. Proffer 

R. T. Brock 

C. W. Howard. 
J. C. S. Colby 
B. P. Ritchie 
\. McElhinuey 
Ueo. A. Moser. 
I. Doniphan. 
G. A. Finkelnburg 
R. Smith., 



125 00 

70 00 

125 00 

T25 00 

185 00 

125 00 

125 06 

125 00 

277 00 

125 00/ 

125 oO 

80 00 

125 00 

125 00 

331 40 

70 00 

125 00 

80 00 

125 00 

185 UO 

125 00 

177 00 

125 00 

125 00 

125 00 

125 00 

185 00 

257 00 

174 60 

125 00 

125 CO 

85 00 

289 00 

125 00 

125 00 

125 00 

125 00 

229 80 

125 00 

60 00 

75 00 

125 00 

288 60 

125 00 

125 00 

125 00 

125 00 

200 00 

309 00 

45 00 

196 00 

240 00 

125 00 

125 00 

355 00 

88 00 

210 00 

25 00 

50 00 

255 00 

125 00 

180 00 

41 00 

65 00 

60 00 

160 00 

125 00 

37 50 

125 00 

112 00 

225 00 



84 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF 



FOB PAY OP GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Costiiiued, 



Date. 



Feb. 10, 1868... 



11. 
12. 



13. 



14. 



15. 



18. 

J9. 

20. 
21. 



No. 



24. 



241 

242 

243 

244 

245 

246 

247 

248 

249 

250 

251 

252 

253 

254 

255 

256 

257 

258 

259 

260 

261 

262 

263 

264 

265 

266 

267 

268 

269 

270 

271 

272 

273 

274 

?76 

276 

277 

278 

270 

280 

281 

282 

283 

284 

285 

286 

287 

288 

289 

290 

291 

292 

293 

294 

295 

296 

297 

298 

299 

300 

301 

302 

303 

304 

305 

306 

307 

308 

309 

310 

311 



To whom drawn . 



S. W. Headlee 

G. Howell 

Wm. M. Real 

A. Griffin 

J. M. Uoskinson.... 

J. J. Akard 

Jas. M. Woods 

Fred. Buerhle 

G. Howell 

W. B. Adams 

J. A. Pond 

G. Howell 

C. B. Wilkinson .... 

J. Hornbeak 

J' P. Robertson 

H. C. CockeriU 

J. C. Fox 

W. Q. Dallmeyer.... 

Theo. Bruere 

J. S. Cavender 

S. W. Smith 

F.J.White 

J. G. Woerner 

C. P. Townsley 

H.J.Fisher 

Paul Hubbard 

H. M. Rice 

J. M. Goodson 

R. T. Brock 

Chas. R. Smythe.... 

M. Hickman 

L. P. Koch 

R. G. Learning 

J. F. Ryland 

B. H. Hord../ 

B. Taylor 

Rob. Waide 

JohnT. Scott 

E. Schiernberg 

Jas. A. McFarland. 

Jas. Kelley 

Jas. W. Owens 

J. Whitaker 

D. T. Jewett 

Fred. Miller 

D. P. Dyer 

D. H. Porter 

N. T. Doane 

C. A. Kuhl 

L. Zevely 

F. J. White 

L. A. Thompson .... 

same 

J. B. Clark 

J. H. Morse 

E. G. Evans 

Gert. Goebel 

S. W. Smith 

IraC. Buzick 

N. J. Colman 

E. Williams 

Geo. B. Cole 

J. C. McGinnis 

A. Griffin 

C. B. Walker 

Wm. Monks 

W. Bennett 

T. A. Eagle, 

Chas. F. Schneider.. 
Wm. C. Human .... 
J. C. Orrick 



Amount. 


$ 295 00 


128 40 


175 00 


125 00 


50 00 


269 0(^ 


261 80 


136 50 


155 00 


185 00 


125 00 


80 00 


60 00 


60 00 


185 00 


125 00 


323 60 


65 00 


150 00 


150 00 


115 00 


55 00 


70 00 


140 00 


140 00 


70 00 


125 00 


170 QO 


75 00 


75 00 


125 00 


260 00 


75 00 


75 OO 


185 00 


' 75 00 


75 00 


75 00 


142 50 


75 00 


298 60 


75 00 


50 00 


260 00 


105 00 


291 00 


75 00 


140 00 


no OO 


245 00 


40 00 


104 00 


225 00 


180 00 


230 00 


125 00 


266 00 


60 00 


105 00 


105 00 


135 00 


105 00 


105 00 


105 00 


105 00 


25 00 


120 00 


120 00 


245 00 


245 00 


120 00 



THE BEVENUE FUND. 
FOR PAY OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Coktimubd. 



85 



Bate. 

Feb. 25, 1868... 
26 ... 
27..., 



No. 



28. 



29. 



312 
313 
314 
315 
316 

3ir 

318 
319 
320 
321 
322 
323 
324 
325 
326 
327 
328 
329 
380 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
338 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
354 
355 
356 
357 
358 
359 
360 
361 
.362 
363 
364 
365 
366 
367 
368 
369 
370 
371 
372 
373 
374 
375 
:J76 
377 
378 
379 
380 
381 
382 



To whom drawn. 



Amount. 



J. R. Leg^g; 

J. C. S. Colby 

E. L. Kine 

F. J. White 

D. R. Conrad 

G. W. Boaruman.... 

J. U. Ellis 

Thos. P. White 

D. L. Caldwell 

C. W. Howard 

D. P. Dyer 

R. T. Brock 

J. M. Hoskinson.... 

E. P. Ferrell 

T. B. Reed 

A. C. Eubanke 

G. A. Moser 

J. J. McBride 

J. G. Woerner 

II. A. Applegate.... 

P. W. Smelser 

H. J. Spaunhorst... 

R. Lyman 

Paul Hubbard 

M. T. Graham 

Rob. McMillan 

J. A. Pond 

John Cos^rove 

Wm. Q. Ballmeyer. 

A. J. Harlan 

Wm. KidweU , 

J. C. S.Colbj 

A. L. Betz 

John Ilombeak..... 

John F. Ryland 

W. W. Riggs 

H. C. Cockerill 

Rob. Waide 

J. T. Scott 

S. B. De Land 

E. M. Burch 

Ira C. Busick 

Wm. Shafer 

r. J. Forgey 

James Keliey 

J. P. Robertson 

R. L. Childress 

Chas. R. Smythe.... 

Geo. W. Riiiker 

Chas. Long^ 

J. A. Eppstein 

F. T. Lederperber.. 

R. G. Leammg 

N. J. Colman 

J. W.Baldwin 

D. K. Steele 

P. G. Stafford 

L. Bulkley 

J. B. Freeman 

G.L.Hewitt 

John Whitaker 

A. M. Ellison 

B. P. Ritchie 

Wm. A. Jones 

J. T. Fourt , 

Wm. Monks 

L. A. Rountree , 

R. T. Cartmel 

W. Bennett , 

Geo. Wolbrecht...... 

C. B. Walker , 



120 00 

190 00 

126 00 

50 00 

255 00 

301 00 

140 00 

400 4% 

145 00 

115 00 

56 00 

70 00 

95 00 
145 00 
140 00 
145 00 
106 0,0 
145 00 

70 00 
145 00 
270 00 
140 00 
160 00 

70 00 
140 00 
145 00 

145 00 

146 00 
80 00 

378 00 

145 00 

40 00 

145 00 
86 00 
70 00 

146 00 
146 00 

70 00 

70 00 
146 CO 
146 00 

40 00 

146 00 

166 00 

.146 00 

86 00 
146 00 

70 00 
270 00 
146 06 
146 00 

145 00 
70 00 
40 00 

146 00 
146 00 
146 00 
146 00 
146 00 
270 00 

96 00 
146 00 
110 00 
270 00 
160 00 
146 00 
146 00 
146 00 

26 00 

146 00 

40 00 



86 



DISBURSEHKNTS OUT OF 
FOR PAY OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Continued. 



Date. 



Feb. 29, 1868... 



25 

March 2, 1868 



6. 



I •••••• 



9. 



10. 
12. 



13. 




383 

384 

385 

386 

387 

388 

389 

390 

391 

392 

393 

394 

395 

396 

397 

398 

6L 

399 

400 

40 1 

41'2 

403 

404 

405 

406 

407 

408 

409 

410 

411 

412 

413 

414 

415 

416 

417 

418 

419 

420 

420i 

421 

422 
423 
424 
425 
426 
427 
428 
429 
430 
431 
432 
433 
434 
435 
436 
437 
438 
439 
440 
441 
442 
443 
444 
445 
446 
447 
448 
449 
450 
451 



To whom dra?m. 



C. B. Wilkinson 

J. C. McGinnis 

J. J. Akard , 

G. A. Finkelnburg 

G. B. Cole , 

E. Taylor 

J. Alloy. 

A. H. Linder , , 

A. M^Elhinney , 

J. W. Boon 

J. W. Owens , 

John A. Brown 

G. W. L. Mitchell 

H. J. Drummond , 

rf. Downey , 

Fred. Buehrle 

J. F. Rjland, (regrular) committee 

C. A. Kuhl 

S. D. Cannon , 

C. P. Towneley 

J. Doniphan , , 

L. F. Koch 

I. B. Dodson 

M. Hickman.... 

Wm. Kev 

D. -M. V. Stuart 

Wm. M. Beal 

VV. L. Jerome , 

E. Williams t , 

Thos. Quinn , 

Jas. M. Woods 

L. A. Thompson , 

G. A. Moser 

E. G. Evans 

Theo. Bruere , 

W. S. Holland 

H. G. Mailings 

P. H. Jaquith 

H. J. Deal 

C. H. Howe 

Jas A. McFarland 

Jacob Estep , 

J. C. S. Colby 

C. Nevill 

J. R. Winters 

II. J. Fisher 

Thomas S. Hackleqian 

W. H. Blodgett 

r. A. Eagle 

0. B. Payne.. 

M. L. Lauehlin 

F. J. White 

S. W. Birch 

L. Zerely 

J. Alley 

Wm. A. Shelton 

J. Jennings 

L. A. Thompson 

Ihos. Essex 

J. G. Woerner ^ 

C. P. Townsley 

N. J. Colman 

G. S. Van Wagoner 

A. Valle 

J. C. S. Colby , 

C. A. Kuhl , 

S. W. Smith 

E. G. Evans 

P. Hubbard 

Wm. B. Adams 

J. R. Legg 



Amount. 




$ 85 OO 


40 00 


95 


00 


147 00 


40 


00 


70 00 


370 00 


145 00 


145 


00 


145 00 


70 


00 


270 00 


145 


00 


270 


00 


145 


00 


123 


50 


54 


00 


35 00 


145 00 


70 


00 


145 


00 


85 


OO 


155 


00 


145 00 


165 


00 


217 


50 


95 


00 


270 00 


55 


00 


270 


00 


145 


OO 


45 


00 


150 


00 


60 


00 


100 


00 


150 


00 


145 


00 


145 00 


150 


00 


450 


00 


70 


00 


270 


00 


50 


00 


145 


00 


195 


00 


105 


ou 


145 


00 


320 


00 


25 


00 


270 


00 


145 


00 


45 


00 


270 <)0 


45 


00 


115 


00 


515 


(»0 


145 


00 


50 


00 


190 


00 


65 


00 


65 


00 


60 


00 


145 00 


120 


00 


63 00 


65 


CO 


145 


ro 


45 


00 


70 


00 


160 


00 



25 OU 



THE REVENUE JFUND. 



FOR PAY OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Coxtwitbd. 




March 13, 186S 



!♦.. 



10 

17 

18 



19. 



20. 



21. 



23. 



24. 



452 
453 
454 
455 
456 
457 
458 
459 
460 
461 

462 
463 
464 
465 
466 
467 
463 
469 
470 
471 
472 
473 
474 
475 
476 
477 
478 
479 
480 
481 
482 
483 
484 
485 
486 
487 
483 
4.^9 
490 
491 
492 
493 
494 
495 
496 
497 
493 
499 
500 
601 

502 
503 
504 
505 
506 
507 
503 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 



To whom drawn. 



J. R. Legj 

G. H. Rea 

M. T. Grahnm 

G. A. Moser 

L. Scbulenburg 

E. D. Brown 

A. Griffin 

F. J. White , « 

Jas. W. Owens 

H. M. Rice ; 

0. H. Branscomb 

J. T. Scott 

J. B. Ilarper 

S. Downey 

G. W. Elwell «. 

Wm. Key 

J. P. Alexander.. .f 

G. A. Finkelnburg 

C. C. Fletcher 

J. P.Robertson 

R. Britton 

R. T. Brock 

A. E. Wyatt .*. 

Ira C. Buzick , 

J. F.Ryland 

J. B. Clark 

Wm. Lawson.... * 

A. C. Eubanks 

C. W.Howard 

Theo. Bruere 

J. W. Boon '. 

C. A. Kuhl 

C. Weinrich 

J. Whitaker , 

E. Taylor 

D. M. V. Stuart 

J. H. Morse 

J. M. Goodson * 

J. S. Cavender 

J. Hornbeak * 

W. Bennett %. 

J. J. McBride 

G. Wolbrecht 

U. C.Cockerill 

A. H. Linder 

A. M. Ellison .• 

M. C. Martin « 

J. Cosgrove 

J. M. Filler 

J. M. Goodson 

J. P. Robertson..... 

G. W. Rinker 

Jas. Kelley 

Wm. Monks 

B. P. Ritchie 

J. P. Alexander 

U. A. Applegate 

R. L. Childress 

II. J. Deal 

E. P. Ferrell 

J. M. Hoskinson 

E. M. Burch 

G. W. Elwell 

Theo. Bruere 

J. C. Fox 

Jas. Requa....'. 

Jas. A. Ewing 

J. Jennings 

Thos. Quinn 

R. T. Cartinel ^ 

E. Williams 



Amount. 


$ 65 00 


397 00 


70 00 


217 50 


145 00 


145 00 


40 00 


20 00 


75 00 


145 00 


330 00 


80 00 


200 00 


115 00 


335 00 


115 00 


352 00 


126 00 


75 00 


90 00 


145 00 


115 00 


270 00 


100 00 


100 00 


135 00 


145 00 


115 00 


100 00 


80 00 


100 00 


35 00 


270 00 


130 00 


100 00 


75 00 


145 00 


270 00 


185 00 


130 00 


100 00 


105 00 


105 00 


106 00 


130 00 


130 00 


400 00 


105 00 


527 00 


130 00 


40 00 


130 00 


130 00 


130 00 


130 00 


130 00 


130 00 


130 00 


105 00 


130 00 


130 00 


130 00 


15 00 


30 00 


210 00 


270 00 


165 00 


130 00 


130 00 


130 00 


115 00 



S8 



DISBUKSEMBNTS OUT OY 



FOR PAY OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY— CoHnHUBD. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Araoimt. 


March 24, 1865^ 


523 
624 
525 
526 
527 
528 
529 
530 
531 
532 
533 
534 
535 
536 
537 
538 
539 
540 
541 
542 
! 543 
544 
545 
546 
547 
548 
549 
550 
551 
552 
553 
554 
555 
556 
657 
558 
559 
560 
561 
562 
563 
564 
565 
566 ■ 
567 
568 
569 
570 
571 
572 
573 
574 
575 
576 
577 
578 
579 
580 
581 
582 
583 
584 
585 
586 
587 
588 
589 
590 
591 
592 
693 


G. B. Cole 


$130 00 
270 00 


Jos. BOfiTV 




G. H. Rea 


65 00 




A. Griffin 


130 00 




C. Nevill 


130 00 


25 


E. G. Evans 


65 00 


S. W. Headlee 

\y. A. Shelton 


225 00 
85 00 




I. B. Dodson 


120 00 




\Vm. Q. Dallmever ', 


130 00 




Georsre Smith 


776 00 




G. w. Boardman 


145 00 




William Lawson 


130 op 

280 00 




D. Bonham 




G. W. L. Mitchell 


130 00 




J. B. Cavender 


25 00 




D. R. Conrad 


145 00 




H.J. Fisher 


100 00 




D. H. Porter..,. 


400 00 




J. M. Filler 


15 00 




J. H. Morse • 


25 00 




A. L. Betz 


146 00 




S. W. Smith 


65 00 


. 


\y. S, Holland ) 


110 00 




J. B. Clark 


35 00 




Gert. Goebel 


170 00 




L, A. Rountree.. 


130 00 




P. W. Smelser 


130 00 




E. L. Kine ...: 


150 00 




S. Ridelev 


460 00 




M. T. Graham 


65 00 




\Vm. Shafer 


154 40 




J. F. Ryland 


30 00 




J. T. Bcott 


50 00 




Robert Waide 


130 00 




James A. McFarland.. 


130 00 




W. W. Rigps 


130 00 




Thomas P. White 


180 00 




H. C. Cockerill 


26 00 




C. W. Howard 


SO 00 




James B. Harper ^ 

W. B. Adams 


50 00 
65 00 




J.H.Ellis 


140 00 




P.Hubbard 


65 00 




S. D. Cannon 


130 00 




E. Taylor 


30 00 




Fred. Miller 


180 00 




L. F. Koch 


120 00 




G. A. Finkelnburer 


49 00 




J. A. Pond 


130 00 




J. A. Ewing^ 


130 00 




J. T. Fourt 


130 00 




N. J. Colman 


70 00 




C. F. Schneider 


155 00 




P. G. Stafford 


130 00 




S. W. Hathaway 


400 00 




T. .7. Foreey 


130 00 




C. R. Smytoe 


130 00 




B. J. Waters 


400 00 




M. L. Laug^hlin 

Charles Loner 


130 00 
130 00 




J. C. Orrick 


130 00 




L. Bulkley ". 


130 00 




J. Estep ., 


130 00 




D. L. Caldwell 


130 00 




F. J. White 


65 00 




J. A. Brown..... 


130 00 




L. B. DeLand 


130 00 




H. J. Snaonhorst •«..... 


135 00 




H. M. Rice 


130 00 




C. Weinrich 


ISO 00 



TAB REVENUE F0N1> 



89 



FOR PAY OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Contihued. 



Date. 



Maroh25,1868 



2«. 



No. 



504 
595 
596 
597 
598 
599 
600 
601 
602 
603 
604 
605 
606 
607 
608 
609 
610 
611 
612 
613 
614 
615 
616 
617 
618 
619 
620 
621 
622 
623 
624 
625 
626 
627 
628 
629 
630 
631 
632 
633 
634 
635 
636 
637 
638 
639 
640 
641 
642 
643 
644 
645 
646 
647 
648 
649 
650 
651 
652 
653 
654 
655 
656 
657 
658 
659 
660 
661 
662 
663 
664 



To ivhom drawn. 



Amonnt. 



W. C. Human 

Thomas Essex 

C. P. Townsley 

\Vm. K. Pyle 

J. B. Freeman 

James Requa 

6. S. Van Wagoner.... 
Charles B. Wilkinson... 

Thomas B. Reed 

A. E. Wvatt 

L. A. Thompson 

Louis Hoffmeister 

I. C. Buzick 

Thomas S. Hackleman. 

C. B. Walker 

0. B. Payne 

H. J. Mailings 

Joseph Bogy 

M. Proffer 

J. R. Legg 

J. G. Woerner 

J. R, Winters 

J. C. McGinnis 

F. T. Ledergerber 

F. McGinnis 

G. Howell 

J. B. Ellis 

Robert McMiKan 

J. Drum 

C. C. Fletcher 

W. H. Blodgett 

W. Bennett 

G. L. Hewitt 

M. Hickman ».. 

S. Downey 

J. W. Owens 

George S. Park , 

J. C. Orrick 

Joseph A. Eppstein.... 

L. Zevely 

W. L. Jerome 

George Wolbrecht 

J. J. McBride 

C. A. Kuhl 

A. Valle 

R. Lyman 

J. W. Baldwin 

James M. Woods 

B. F. Sillman 

A. C. Eubanks 

S. W. Birch 

William Kidwell 

R. Britton 

J. J. Akard 

William M. Beal 

C. H. Howe 

A. W. Mullins 

N. T. Doane 

G. L. Hewitt 

A. McElhinney 

William A.Jones 

Thomas Harblne 

E. H. E. Jameson 

L. Sqhulenbnrg 

R. H. Farrar 

P. H. Jaquith 

D. K. Steele 

R. G. Leaming 

H. D. Drummond 

T. A. Eagle 

J. Coigrove 



$155 00 

60 00 

70 00 

530 00 

130 00 

130 OO 

130 00 

130 00 

135 00 

130 00 

80 00 

240 20 

30 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

400 00 

65 00 

70 00 

100 00 

130 00 

130 00 

315 00 

105 00 

510 40 

130 00 

544 SO 

325 00 

130 00 

30 00 

130 00 

130 00 

15 00 

55 00 

260 00 

25 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

25 00 

25 00 

30 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

275 00 

15 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

400 00 

105 00 

150 00 

130 00 

130 00 

526 00 

150 00 

130 00 

400 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

130 00 

25 00 



90 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF 



FOR PAY OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY— CosrrninaD. 



Bate. 


No. 


March 26, 1868 


665 




666 




667 




668 




6C9 




670 




671 




672 




673 




674 




675 




676 




677 


27 


678 




679 


28 


6S0 


Aagust 3 


1916 



To whom drawn. 



D. M. y. Stuart 

E. Scbierenberg 

£. D. Brown 

D. P. Dyer....;. 

D. T. Jewett 

fl. M. Bond 

A. J. Harlan 

D. K. Smith 

G. A. Moser 

Fred. Buehrle 

W. H. Roberts 

J. C. S. Colby 

C. H. Braniscomb 

J. Doniphan 

J. S. Rollins 

E. L. King; 

Reuben Smith, (regular) 



Total $196,476 86 



Amoimt. 



$120 00 


195 OO 


130 00 


245 00 


200 00 


210 OO 


182 00 


298 50 


172 50 


169 00 


210 00 


126 00 


130 00 


130 00 


345 00 


150 00 


176 00 



THE BEYKNUE FUKD. 



91 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



Date. 



No. 



Feb. 26, 1867... 



23. 
March 4. 



12. 



154 

160 

169 

178 

192 

202 

222 

231 

,2.32 

233 

234 

235 

230 

242 

246 

247 

249 

250 

252 

253 

257 

261 

262 

269 

273 

279 

280 

282 

292 

293 

209 

301 

302 

304 

314 

318 

324 

320 

328 

S29 

331 

333 

335 

339 

340 

341 

345 

343 

352 

353 

355 

356 

^57 

443 

444 

446 

447 

448 

449 

450 

451 

452 

453 

454 



To whom drawn. 



Emory S. Foster, Public Printer.. 

A. F. Denny, Commissioner 

Emory S. Foster, Public Printer.. 

George W. Keebaugb et al , 

Emorv S. Foster, Public Printer... 

E. fechierenberg 

jTheodore Plate A Co , 

:Jacob Miller , 

Conrad Schneider et al , 

E. 11. E. Jameson 

John Miller et al 

D. 0. Crane , 

Emory S. Foster, Public Printer.. 

E. H. E. Jameson ..., 

Frank Eisner 

J. Grimshaw 

Jnmes I. Dozier 

William A. Berry 

A. A. Kin^, Jr 

L. W, Hickok 

W. P. Williams 

W. Buehrle et al 

J. B. Dobyns 

A. o, Barr et al , 

Adam Rielman , 

Morris G. Urben 

Thomas Phelan , 

Samuel Umstead 

Allen P. Richardson et al 

EIus;h L. Rice 

Thomas L. Byrne 

W. Bennett 

•fohn Hoffman 

Charles B. Maus 

Adam Roth et al 

11. C. Pickering 

J. W. Bunnell 

Albert Todd et al 

James 0. Broadhead «. 

John Coleman 

A. Gundelfinger 

same 

Charles Staats 

E. H. E. Jameson 

A. Gundelfinger 

Charles F. Krause et al 

J. R. Dobyns 

A. D. Reichel 

Warren Currier 

Thomas Phelan 

Emory S. Foster, Public Printer. 

Robert Brent 

C. F. Hasard.... , 

Frank Eisner 

Fred Buehrle et al 

J. Grimshaw , 

L. W. Hickok 

Fred. Miller 

M. G. Urban 

N. C. Burch 



same 

Thomas Phelan 

Amos P. Foster 

Emory S. Foster, Public Printer. 



Amount. 


$15,650 32 


968 00 


5,000 00 


672 00 


10,000 no 


295 00 


2,870 50 


203 00 


450 00 


80 OO 


762 50 


65 00 


2,949 00 


65 00 


62 50 


387 00 


35 OU 


70 00 


28 20 


85 eo 


100 00 


150 00 


15 00 


460 68 


40 00 


100 00 


70 00 


'16 00 


6,656 01 


125 00 


31 50 


60 00 


101 00 


45 22 


537 54 


98 00 


32 50 


47 50 


23 75 


23 74 


86 80 


71 45 


97 75 


76 00 


40 90 


81 00 


203 00 


145 00 


23 75 


140 00 


14,219 09 


23 75 


290 00 


45 00 


94 00 


1,350 00 


110 00 


9 50 


22 50 


125 00 


230 00 


65 00 


216 05 


585 05 



92 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OP 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Coiitihubd. 



Date. 



No. 



To whom drawn. 



March 12, 1867 



13. 



U. 



4d5 
450 
457 
458 
4(3U 
401 
462 
463 
404 
465 
407 
472 
474 
475 
478 
479 
4S0 
4^1 
482 
4^3 
4S4 
4S5 
480 
487 
488 
489 
490 
491 
4U7 
490 
506 
509 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 
510 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
526 
527 
528 
529 
531 
534 
535 
538 
539 
540 
541 
542 
54^5 
bU 
545 
546 
547 
548 
549 
551 
552 
554 
655 
556 
557 
558 
559 
660 



I A. P. Richardson, P. M 

'J. (ifim&hnw 

'A. P. Richardson, P. M 

Charles Guenther 

J. W. Hendricks 

iSamuel Umstead 

J. D. San-er et al 

JI. C. Pickering 

[Fred. Miller 

JA. P. Richardson, P. M 

jCharles S. Rankin , 

,.T. M. KJfi^erton 

Edmund Price 

'Pacific Railroad Company.... 

F. W. Mayer 

Hugh L. Rice 

M. T. Clemmens et al 

JErank Schmidt 

Charles Staats 

William Brining et al 

S. S. Block 

Noah Berry */ a/ 

iBrown & Wil?on 

iF. W. Perkins 

'J. Grimshaw 

Eirory S. Foster, Public Printer. 

George A. Moser 

E. W. Southworth 

J. A. WhitUiker 

A. A. King, Jr., et al 

Henry Rubi^abl 

0. H. Weidner 

E. H. E. Jameson 

D. 0. Crane 

S. W. Smith 



'George B. Willis. 



C. F. Hazard. 

A. Fulkerson m 

James I. Dozier 

W. A. Berry 

J. W. Bunnell 

H. A. Edgerton , 

A. Fulkerson , 

j Emory S. Foster, Public Printer. 

,G . McGinnis , 

L. W. Hickok 

Jacob Heinrichs , 

S. F. Currie 

H. E. Bartling 

Paul Hubbard et al 

J. C. S. Colby 

J. B. Dobyns 

M . W. .Jameson 

H. L. Rice 

J. R. McCormack et al 

Conrad Schneider 

Jacob Miller 

H. C. Pickering 

Walbridge A Allen 

'S. W. Smith 

Fred. Miller 

'W. H. Rodewald 

-W. A. Berry 

H. Y. Burt 

■ E. C. Davis 

,0. H. Weidner 

Frank H. Ewing 

D. O. Crane 

J. W. Hendricks 

.Tohn P. Rice 

Samuel Umstead. 



Amount. 




$ 10 


00 


297 


00 


160 00 


. 175 


00 


355 


00 


40 


00 


78 


84 


6 


00 


302 


50 


35 


00 


28 


55 


65 00 


142 00 


14 


90 


22 20 


30 


00 


64 10 


4 26 


5 


00 


272 43 


30 47 


134 14 


75 13 


102 60 


85 14 


1,873 .36 


45 


00 


290 00 


65 


00 


1,023 


00 


27 


30 


80 


00 


05 


00 


05 


00 


60 


00 


355.00 


65 


00 


25 


00 


100 


50 


285 


00 


68 00 


75 


00 


165 60 


477 


12 


137 


15 


08 


00 


29 50 


81 


81 


225 


00 


100 


00 


355 00 


152 00 


10 


00 


152 50 


75 


00 


102 


50 


152 00 


152 


00 


102 


00 


45 


00 


22 00 


30 


25 


177 50 


45 


00 


35 


00 


40 


00 


180 


00 


177 


60 


60 00 


25 00 


131 60 



THE BEVENUE FUND. 



98 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Coktimotd. 




March 14, 1867 



April 



May 



15 

16 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

27 

1 

4 

6 

24 

30 

3 

7 

15 

16 

20 



24.... 

July 25»... 
Dec. 6.... 
Feb. 8, 1868.... 



10. 



562 

563 

564 

665 

566 

567 

56S 

570 

572 

573 

575 

576 

583 

534 

585 

589 

594 

602 

611 

613 

614 

618 

626 

628 

629 

639 

643 

658 

665 

676 

682 

735 

817 

836 

889 

904 

984 

987 

1003 

1033 

1063 

1092 

1099 

1102 

1106 

1126 

1132 

1133 

1134 

1135 

1160 

1541 

2407 

369 

371 

372 

373 

374 

375 

376 

377 

378 

381 

383 

387 

380 

390 

392 

393 

394 

395 



E. M. McMurtry 

D. M. V. Stuart 

Samuel F* Bryant 

J. C. McGinnis 

Fred. Buehrle et al 

Georj^e Keelen 

Ernst Kieselbach.. 

Francis Roer 

G. B. Willis 

Henry Karges • 

A. D. Reichel , 

William Whist 

Fogi^, Miles & Co < 

McKee, Fishhack & Co.-. • 

Theo. Plate & Co 

Xra M. Bond 

D. C. Freeman 

Charles Thompson 

John N. Craven et al 

D. 0. Crane, 

William Meyers 

W. T. McGinnifl 

S. Bennett 

0.,H. Weidner 

E . Schierenberg 

Charles F. Krause 

Nic. Melcher 

Pacific Railroad Company 

W^ell.s & Donahue 

United States Express Company.. 

Edmund Price 

C. B\ Lohman 

Emory S. Foster, Public Printer. 

same 
John Miller 

B. H. Wilson 

C. R. Smythe 

Emory S. Foster, Public Printer. 

same 
William M. Mosby 

E. il. E. Jameson 

T. B. Bratton 

U. W. Shotwell 

Emory S. Foster, Public Printer.. 

A. K. Reyburn et al 

L. L. Walbridge 

M. G. Urben 

James T. Harris 

Emory S. Foster, Public Printer.. 
EUwood Kirby, Public Printer... 

C. Jacobs 

J. Orimshaw 

M. G. Urben 

L. W. Hickok 

W. A. Berry 

James R. Dobyns 

W. 11. Roberta , 

George B. Willis 

John P. Rice et al 

Ira M. Bond 

P. Q. Bond 

Fred. MUler 

Amos P. Foster 

F. M. McGinnis 

George Keelen 

Frank Eisner, 

Jacob Miller 

H. C. Pickering 

Frank Hoerscbgen ,\ 

J. R. Dobyns 

P. T. Miller (for others) , 



Amount. 


$ 15« 00 


177 50 


25 00 


557 50 


629 00 


173 50 


102 50 


4 80 


35 00 


140 30 


185 00 


2 00 


68 00 


30 00 


30 00 


462 50 


26 25 


80 00 


84 60 


50 00 


4 00 


15 00 


23 00 


50 00 


177 50 


94 75 


51 00 


6 70 


14 10 


2 50 


4 00 


16 74 


205 75 


54 00 


4 00 


137 60 


550 00 


796 40 


15 00 


28 20 


70 00 


35 00 


28 20 


12,967 08 


165 71 


90 00 


15 00 


119 94 


2,792 51 


3,538 89 


28 20 


61 18 


52 50 


75 00 


187 60 


85 00 


165 00 


125 00 


250 00 


165 00 


165 00 


46 00 


30 63 


50 00 


87 60 


52 50 


90 00 


40 00 


68 00 


40 00 


1,370 09 



94 



DI8BURSEHBKTS OUT OF 
FOR CONTINGEf^T EXPENSES GENERAL ASSEMBLY— CoimKiTBD. 



Bate. 



• No. 



Feb. 10, 1868... 



II. 



12. 



13. 



14. 



16. 



397 
3»S 
399 
4U4 
405 
406 
407 
4(18 
409 
410 
411 
412 
413 
415 
416 
417 
4L9 
420 
421 
422 
423 
424 
427 
428 
429 
431 
432 
4.33 
434 
435 
436 
439 
440 
441 
445 
447 
448 
449 
451 
452 
454 
455 
457 
458 
459 
H\2 
405 
467 
4()8 
470 
471 
472 
473 
48 L 
4«2 
484 
487 
490 
40A 

4n5 

496 
497 
498 
4U9 
501 
503 
504 
505 
506 
507 
609 



To whom drawn. 



,Chi.rlo8 Ouenther 

'Jacob Miller 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer. 

h\ W. Perkins 

W. Buehrle. 

John Miller et al. 

.M. AJ. Obermayer. 

M. Kleiner. 

Ernst Kieselbacb tt al, 

U. L. Rice. 

0. G. Burch 

Krnst Scbierenberg. 
F. M. Mc(}innis.... 

Fred. Buehrle 

E. G. Evans 



Lewis Uellstein.... 

John W. Bunnell 

J. S. Fleminjf (for others). 

iThomos Phelan 

iP. Lucas 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

James Pullitzer 

Charles Staats 

J. G. Schmidt 

T. B. Bratton et cl 

Spaunhor.<«t k Wagner 

Theo. Bruere 

Zipper Trotter 



•ipper 
. W. 



Bunnell. 



P. T. Miller (for others) 

J. Grim»haw 

.Joseph Thompson 

E. T. Allen 

A. P. Richardson, et al 

A. Fulkerson 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer. 

J. R. Winters 

A. Gundelfinger 

Uenrv Karges.... 

A. DI Reichel 

J. H. Rickards, (for others) 

David DeGroat 

Abe Fulkerson, et al 

J. Grimshaw 

Joseph Schneider 

J. Chrisraan, et al 

M. G. Urben 

X. Sch waller 

Jacob Heinrichs 

Francis Roer 



same 



same • 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

W. A. Berry 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer. 

W. II. RoberU 

Joseph Pullitzer 

J. A. Whittaker 

J. G. Woerner 

M. U. Express Company , 

J. H. Ellis. 
M. T. Graham. 
Jas. I. Dozier. 
U.J. Fish.r. 
John Miller. 

U. L. Rice 

Thomas I'helan 

.M. G. I rben 

E. n. E. Jameson.... 

J. M. Edfi^erton 

WiUiam U. Cornell. 



Amonnt. 



$ 137 50 


85 00 


907 83 


128 50 


62 50 


462 50 


1,101 


92 


22 


00 


125 00 


50 00 


25 


00 


157 


50 


68 


00 


91 


00 


81 


05 


434 60 


13 


00 


1,183 92 


125 00 


32 


78 


1,370 


00 


35 


00 


430 


50 


50 


00 


302 


70 


5 


00 


56 50 


62 


50 


42 00 


1,165 33 


831 


60 


180 00 


2.S 


75 


92 40 


33 


00 


306 


00 


40 


00 


274 65 


148 


50 


ISO 


00 


755 


30 


3 


50 


102 


50 


24 S 


40 


62 


50 


98 


68 


35 


00 


300 00 


327 


00 


8 


00 


15 .30 


8 


75 


1,299 00 


97 


50 


702 


55 


•120 Go 


75 


oo 


75 


00 


20 


00 


7 


25 


25 


Oo 


25 


Oo 


42 


Oo 


20 


Oo 


4 


On 


52 5n 


141 


On 


97 5' 
75 Oj 
45 Oj 


110 0? 



THE REVfiNUK FUND. 



95 



FOR GONTINTGENT EXPENSES QENBRAL ASSEMBLY— Coxtixurd. 



Date. 




P*b. 15,1868... 
17 



19. 
30. 



21. 



22 
24 

20 
27 

28 



29. 



March 2. 



3 

4 

6 

6 



519 
520 
524 
525 
526 
627 
.')32 
533 
534 
539 
549 
551 
556 
557 
559 
561 
562 
563 
564 
565 
573 
574 
575 
577 
579 
530 
583 
590 
594 
598 
601 
621 
628 
635 
638 
640 
641 
644 
646 
647 
648 
6^9 
660 
651 
652 
663 
654 
655 
656 
657 
653 
659 
660 
661 
662 
063 
664 
665 
669 
676 
678 
679 
683 
684 
685 
689 
691 
697 
699 
705 
711 



To whom drawn. 



Amoant. 



E. n. Norton 

II. 0. Pickering. 

Thomas Quinn 

Jacob Miller 

J. W. Hendricks 

A. D. Reichel 

C. Tiffen «.... 

J. T. Field 

J. W. Reid 

II. E. Schulte 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer. 

John G. Schott. 

T. K. Smith 

John Kieselbach .«... 

George Wolf 

Fred. Schayler : , 

Amos P. Foster , 

E. M. McMurtry 

John P. Kice , 

James Love .At 

P. Q. Bond 

Pacific R. R 

Plate, Olshausen A Co 

U. D. Phelps 

J. M. Edgerton 

same , 

Plate, Olshausen & Co , 

L. L. Walbridge 

S. A. Gilbert 

J. E. Black et al , 

J. W. Bunnell 

Wm. R. Wilson 

J. C. Murray 

W.H. Roberts 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

1 homas Phelan 

^M. G. Urben , 

Hugh L. Rice , 

Joseph PuUitzer 

Geo. Keelen , 

Abe Fulkerson 

H. C. Pickering 

M. &, J. Obermayer 

E. H. E. Jameson 

Jacob Miller , 

J. A.Whittaker 

F. W. Perkins , 

W. A. Berry 

Joseph 1 hompson 

W. McNeil Claugh , 

Geo. Wolf , 

Wm. H. Cornell , 

Jno. P. Rice 

E. M. McMurtry 

F. M. McGinnis 

J. R. Bobyns 

E. Schienberg 

Joseph Schneider. 

Geo. B. Willis 

II. L. Rice 

P. Q. Bond 

John Miller et al 

same 

n. D. Phelps 

Frank Eisner 

J. Grimahaw 

J. H. Porter 

J. Grimshaw 

W. H. BaUard 

Joseph Thompson 

L. W. Hickok 





$ 52 22 




75 00 




55 97 




62 50 




130 00 




130 00 




41 75 




52 23 




29 35 




37 75 




11,743 37 




7 25 




307 60 




60 00 




337 50 




80 00 




20 00 




100 00 




100 00 




34 26 




82 60 




3 00 




2,728 95 




74 00 




106 00 




60 00 




6S1 60 




1,780 00 




46 75 




104 32 




67 00 


\ 


1 25 




49 m 




105 00 




35 00 




70 00 




35 00 




46 00 




«0 00 




101 60 




54 00 




70 00 




48 60 




70 00 




137 60 




80 00 




69 00 




120 06 




90 00 




42 00 




135 00 




70 00 




45 00 




45 00 




70 00 




145 00 




105 00 




436 00 




145 00 




40 00 




167 60 




316 00 




121 50 




30 00 




25 00 




5U2 20 




87 50 




162 28 




66 61 




80 00 




105 00 



96 



DISBUBSEUENTS OUT OF 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES GENERAL ASSEMBLY— CoimirvBD. 




M»rch 6,1863 



9 
10 

11 

21 



23. 



24. 
26. 



26. 



713 ;T. B. Bratton 

717 Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M. et al 

719 Fred. Schuyler 

720 |Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer. 

722 E. 1£. £. Jameson , 

723 F. M. McOinnie 

724 A. W. Maupin , 

727 Geo. Wolf 

734 tliwood Kirby, Public Printer, 

735 M. G. Urben 

730 Thos. Phelan 

741 U. S. Express Co 

743 Wm. 11. Cornell « 

746 John W. Bunnell 

747 W. Buebrle 

749 J. A. SVhittaker :.... 

805 'F. M. McGinnis et al 

806 J. R* Dobyns et al. 
807 
808 
809 
81Q 
811 
812 
813 
815 
816 
817 
813 
823 
824 
825 
827 
829 
830 
831 
835 
837 
841 
843 
855 
857 
853 
860 
862 
863 
864 
865 
866 
863 
869 
870 
871 
872 
873 
874 
875 
876 
877 
878 
879 
880 
881 
382 
883 
834 
835 
886 
838 
889 
890 



J. M. Edgerton. 

.T. Grinishaw 

E. M. Burch 

U. S. Express Co 

Plate, Olshausen k Co. 

Geo. W. llinker 

Josoph Pallitzer 

Wm. U. Cornell 

11. J. Bnimmond 

Henry Schierenberg.,.. 

D. T. Jewett el al 

M. G. Urben 

Geo. Wolf 

U. C Pickering 

Francis Koer 

A. L. Betz 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M. 

J. Grimshaw 

J. M. Edgerton et al.,. 
W. A. Berry et al 

E. R. Parker et al 

E. U. E. Jameson 

C. P. Townsley et al.». 
Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M. 

T. B. Bratton 

¥. M. McGinnis 

Geo. Keelen 

Frank Eisner 

Bernard Shej^pers. ...... 

J. W. Hendricks 

Henry Schierenberg.... 

Henry Karges et al 

E. H. E. Jameson 

John Miller et al 

Jacob Miller 

H. L. Rice 

Chas. Guenther 

Fred. Miller e/ a2 

J. R. Dobyns 

E. Bowman 

W. H. Cornell 

A. D. Aldrich 

M. G. Urben 

S. W. Smith 

J. A. Whittaker 

Joseph Pullitzer , 

J. M. Edgerton 

D. P. Dobvns 

B. M. McMurtry 

J. D. Johnson.. 

0. G. Burch 

Wm. M. McGinnis 

Id. H. Porter 



Amoimt. 


$ 426 00 


23 50 


270 00 


1,627 66 


35 00 


13 50 


25 70 


67 50 


6,012 32 


25 00 


50 00 


1 00 


50 00 


45 00 


54 00 


55 00 


234 00 


210 95 


260 00 


581 76 


22 00 


5 35 


278 75 


22 00 


100 ou 


221' (»n 


57 00 


200 00 


1,500 00 


7 50 


105 CO 


100 00 


9 00 


22 00 


158 00 


1,843 75 


137 35 


262 50 


3 75 


180 00 


50 00 


41 00 


100 00 


41 00 


91 00 


112 50 


330 00 


802 50 


80 00 


97 40 


60 00 


360 00 


225 00 


67 50 


112 50 


05 00 


30 00 


35 00 


60 00 


225 00 


32 50 


145 00 


75 00 


35 00 


45 00 


70 00 


130 00 


130 00 


100 00 


70 00 



THS WSVESVE FUND. 



97 



FOR CONTIKGENT BXPENSBS QENBBAL ASSEMBLY— CoirmruiD. 



Date. 



March 26> '08. 



27, 



April 



May 

Jone 
Jalj 



28. 

SI. 

1. 

2. 
11. 
18. 
22. 
27. 
29. 
30. 
28. 

2. 
16. 



No. 



20.... 
Ang, 81 ... 
Sept. 18.... 
October tS.... 

12.... 

30.... 
Not. 21 ' 

28.... 
Dec. 4.... 

31.... 



^x. 



892 

893 

894 

895 

897 

898 

899 

900 

001 

902 

903 

904 

906 

000 

907 

008 

909 

910 

911 

912 

913 

914 

916 

916 

917 

918 

919 

920 

921 

9» 

025 

927 

928 

929 

980 

933 

936 

947 

949 

960 

1030 

1070 

1165 

1216 

1232 

1266 

1287 

1289 

1450 

1484 

1760 

1761 

1763 

1767 

1789 

1974 

2069 

2237 

2260 

2279 

2366 

2397 

2429 

2494 



To whom drawn. 



John P. Rice 

H. L. Rice 

Joseph Thompson..... 

Henry Schierenberg^ 

John Miller ^„ 

George B. Willis 

Bllwood Kirby, Public Printer. ... 

Ira M. Bond 

Geo. B. Willis 

A.J. Harlan 

H. G. Pickering. 

A. D. Reichel 

W. Buehrle 

P. Q. Bond 

Zipper Trotter 

Jos. Schneider 

A. Fulkerson 

John Kieselbach et al,. 

Conrad Schneider 

P. W. Perkins 

Zipper Trotter 

L. W. Hickok 

C. Crawford 

J. W. Hendricks 

N. T. Doane , 

J M. Edgerton 

George Wolf 

L. "W. Hickok 

W. A. Berry 

H. L. Rice , 

Fred. Schujrler 

Edmund Price 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

A. D. Reichel 

J. Qrimshaw , 

Jacob Heinrichs 

Ja«. S. Rollins..... , 

J. I. Dozier 

Henry Karg^es , 

Edmund Price , 

U. S. Express Co 

M. A J. Obermayer .., 

EUwood Kirby, Public Printer... 

George W. Belt et al 

Wells A Donahue 

N. P. Oeden etal 

M. U. Express Co 

J. W. Shotwell , 

A. K. Reybum (for othen) 

James H. Tnck^ 

L. P. Koch 

D. H. Porter 

D. W. Moore , 

J. N. Craven 

James Love 

Nic. Stehlin 

George Smith, President Senate. 

Daniel Rice 

S. H. Sone 

A. MeDowell A Co. 

S. II. Sone 

G W. Sone 

S. H. Sone 

A. McDowell A Co 



Amount. 



Total. 



; 180 00 

110 00 

256 00 
60 00 
68 60 

260 00 
1,806 81 

166 00 
6 00 

489 00 
30 00 

220 00 
91 00 

112 60 
66 00 
66 00 
16 00 

217 60 
66 00 
78 00 

120 00 
60 00 

27 oa 

76 60 
623 H 

46 oa 

97 60 
30 00 
62 60 
66 00 
217 60 

160 0$ 

8 00 
376 00 

161 80 

9 00 
41 00 
78 00 

6 00 

10 00 

3 4^ 

124 66 

8^499 64 

145 64 

6 00 

494 44 

8 2& 

46 86 

615 30 

1 26 

876 00 

375 00 

112 07 

46 86 

46 23 
220 00 
489 00 

26 16 
60 36 
12 36 
680 66 
69 25 

47 40 
626 60 



$183,438 19 



7-AR. 



98 



BISBUBCriMKEntB OUT OF 



TAKING THE CENSUS. 



Date. 



Oct. 11, 1866 



13 

Jan. 2, 1867 

10 

F^b. 1 

Aag. 2 

Sept. 6!!!!!'. 
6 

27 

May 29, 1868 
Juire 8.... 

28.... 



Aug. 



Sept. 
Not. 



Dec. 



29. 
81. 

17. 
14. 
28. 
25. 

2 
4. 



9. 

14. 



No. 



1580 
1581 
1588 
10 
48 
101 
1579 
1687 
1748 
1754 
1850 
1461 
1500 
1955 
1965 
1972 
1994 
2054 
2819 
2858 
2377 
2380 
2408 
2425 
2427 
2428 
2442 
2444 
2454 



To whom drawn. 



John Baker, Sheriff Schvyler 

W. Holland, Sheriff Webster 

8. H. Caldwell, Sheriff Jasper 

John Atkieon, Sheriff Bates 

WiUiam Penix, Sheriff Pike 

W. G. J. Crow, Sheriff Texas. 

N. Sikes 

A. J. Coffcjr 

Thomas B. Bochestsr, Sherilf Cooper 

O. W. Falton, Sheriff Knox 

H. F. Woods, Sheriff Douglas 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

same 

U. S. Express Company 

same 

Sams 

E. Eirby, Pnbllc Printer 

Plate, Olshausen A Co 

Georre W. BaJsman, Assessor Miller 

W. H. Mengel, Assessor Moniteau. 

G-. J. Oarty, Assessor Reynolds 

J. D. Jackman, Assessor Monroe 

E. 0. Hawkins, Assessor Shelby 

B. H. Hatcher, Assessor New Mad;rid. 

L. K. Williams, Assessor Dent. 

J. J. Soilman, Assessor Lawrence 

D. W. Whiting, Assessor Flranklln 

N. DeWyl, Assessor -Cole 

J. J. Ingfaram, Assessor Halt 

Total „ 



Amount. 



$ 70 00 


100 00 


88 00 


60 00 


100 00 


100 00 


100 00 


40 00 


100 00 


100 00 


80 00 


112 40 


60 00 


1 45 


5 00 


4 80 


14 30 


652 00 


235 18 


406 54 


168 55 


527 41 


889 82 


235 60 


196 54 


112 45 


619 21 


411 83 


130 44 



$5,1T1 07 



FOR COPYING LAWS AND JOURNALS. 



Date. 



March 19, 1867 
AprU 17.... 
May 18.... 
29.... 
Jnne 24.... 
Febr. 10,1868 

19 

24 

March 26 

27 



No. 



633 

953 

1122 

1195 

1295 

406 

418 

483 

548 

606 

891 

932 



Francis Rodman 

same 

D. P. Dyer 

N. T. Doane 

Francis Rodman. 

same 

D. P. Dyer 

T. J. C. Fagg.... 

N. T. Doane 

D. M. Draper 

Francis RoKiman. 
D. P. Dyer 



To whom drawn. 



X o . a i . .— . ... .«♦.— . 



Amoant. 



$ 775 00 


196 48 


573 67 


913 50 


41 35 


1.^3 65 


2,491 33 


1,542 50 


2,510 92 


589 00 


1,336 00 


533 10 



$11,686 50 



VHB SKVBNCB FOND. 



9i> 



FOR PRINTING LAWS AND JOURNALS. 



Data. 



April 
May 


1,1867 


835 

1058 


Julj 


12««««»« 


1476 


JaiK 


22,1868 


247 


Febr. 


10..*... 


388 
400 


AprU 
May 


29. 


1281 


X •«*%«* 


I3«0 




13.,^.. 


1361 




X2...*«% 


1408 


Jni)« 


9 


1603 


July 


^ •• •««• 


1677 


Sept. 


4a»»««« 


1992 



Ko. 



To whom drawn. 



E« S. Foster, Pnblic Printer...,. 

same 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer. 
£. & Foster, Public Printer 

same 

same 

EUwood Kirby, Pnblic Printer, 

same 

eame 

same 

same ..... 

same ..i.. 

«ame ..... 

Total 



Amount. 



$ 30 4»O 


3,428 47 


40 00 


11,501 l»8 


17,641 81 


1,836 43 


2,396 39 


3,502 49 


570 15 


4,615 06 


2,326 05 


3,086 17 


30 00 


$51,005 45 



FOR INDEXING LAWS AND JOURNALS. 



Date. 


Ko. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


I^hr. 26, 1867 


168 


Ftancis Rodman *..*. 


$570 $0 




Total , .w... 






$570 90 



FOR BINDIKG GENERAL STATUTES. 



Date. 



Kor. 21,1866 
Dec. 15.... 
Febr. 26,1867 



No. 



1637 

1701 

157 



To whom drawn. 



E. 8. Foster, Public Printer 
same 
same 

Total 



Amount. 



$M,ooo ao 

5,000 00 
2,000 09 



$10,000 00 



100 



DISPBUUBKMSKTS OUT OF 



FOR PRINTING OF GENERAL STATUTES OF 1865. 



Date. 



Febr. 26, 1867 
Jane 4 



No. 



155 
1225 



To whom drawn. 



B. 8. Foster, Public Printer 
William Whist 

Total 



Amount* 



$1,145 53 
48 75 



$1,194 28 



FOR DISTRIBUTING LAWS AND JOURNALS. 



Date. 



Febr. 26, 1867 



March 



April 



Ma/ 

July 
Febr. 

March 
April 



July 
Aug. 
Sept. 



28.... 

6.... 

9.... 
14.... 

1.... 
10.... 
16.... 
24.... 
.30.... 
20.... 
SI ... 
12.... 
24.... 
10, 1808 



6. 
20. 

2. 

1. 

9. 
14. 
27. 
21. 
17. 
25. 



No. 



159 

164 

195 

954 

415 

537 

8.32 

928 

946 

986 

1016 

1131 

120H 

1475 

1533 

386 

391 

396 

715 

796 

1057 

1298 

1:532 

1372 

1440 

1793 

1904 

2089 



To whom drawn. 



J. Grimihaw. 
same 



same 

A. P. Richardson, P. M 

Pacific Railroad Co 

J. Grimshaw 

E. S. Foster, Public Printer 

A. P. Richardson, P. M 

same 

Francis Rodman 

E. S. Foster, Public Printer 

A. P. Richardson, P. M 

J. N. Hoyer 

E. Kirby, Public Printer 

J. Grimshaw .%. 



same 



same 

same 

H. H. Wegeman 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M. 

A. Klelman 

B. Lackey, P. M 

J. Grimshaw 

B. Lackey, P. M , 

same 

J. Orimshaw 



same 
same 



Amount. 



Total. 



$5,601 39 

1,169 44 

2,064 M 

69 00 

16 10 
1,121 55 

32 05 
71 00 
36 00 
M25 

17 66 

18 46 
2 SO 
9 40 

2,071 34 

1,000 00 

3,-372 95 

884 11 

2 00 

308 80 

14 00 

31 12 

134 40 

64 64 

25 SO 

852 15 

891 60 

291 88 

$20,20T 69 



THB REVENUE FUND. 



101 



FOR PUBLISHING DECISIONS OF SUPREMt COURT. 




Fob. 22, 1867.. 

Alaich 2 

7 

18 



April 
May 



17 

4 

23 

9 

5 



July 
Sept. 

October 1 

Nov. 16 

27 

Jan. 23, 1868.. 
Marcli 10 

23 



April 17 

May 13 

July 23. ... 

AueuBt 18 

^ 20 

Sept. 12 

17 

October 2 

Nov. 20 



144 

218 

862 

609 

663 

956 

1036 

1157 

1446 

1744 

1895 

2261 

2316 

258 

740 

819 

820 

1207 

1863 

1803 

1913 

1923 

2012 

2052 

2211 

2348 



Thomas B. Big^ers 

George Koapp a Co 

N. C. Burch 

William M. Albin 

0. T. Fiehback 

William M. Albin 

George Enapp A Co 

0. T. Fishback 

N. C. Burch 

William M. Albin 

George Knapp A Co 

H. Weereman 

0. T. Fiahback 

N. C. Burch 

George Knapp k Co 

William M. Albin 

George Knapp k Co 

0. T. Fishback 

E. Kirby, Public Printer..., 

N. C. Burch , 

Pacific Railroad Company., 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

William M. Albin 

George Knapp A Co 

A. Kielman 

O.T. Fishback 



Total 



Amount. 



$ 13 84 


2,693 66 


105 55 


80 44 


147 90 


10 65 


2,693 7£ 


494 12 


81 15 


82 44 


2,694 20 


3 60 


1,273 28 


34 60 


2,474 61 


232 92 


217 89 


462 56 


49 00 


112 37 


18 ID 


66 80 


171 12 


2,693 60 


18 88 


736 90 



$17,862 M 



FOR ARRESTING FUGITIVES FROM JUSTICE. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 

■ 


Amount. 


Oct. 19. 1866 


1597 

1688 

1709 

35 

38 

91 

94 

833 

994 

1127 

1279 

1679 

2:^6 

414 

502 

540 

602 

1299 

1995 

2372 

3495 

• ; 


Georre Wolf 


$200 00 
435 00 


Dec. 10 


JTere. Bennett............ ......■••... 




Garrison Barker • 


80 7^ 


Jan. 8. 1867 


J. L. Powell 


225 00 




G. A. A J Ti. Moser Tt...*........T..T t—t i-. 


8 00 


30.... 


L. B. Davis 


125- 09 




'). L. Bashford 


50 00 


April 1 

26 


B. 8. Fester, PubUc Printer 

same 


21 62 
9 40 


May 20 

June 19 

August 23 

Jan. 21. 1868 


B. 0. Hill 


300 06 


J. H. Rickards 

J. D. Meredith 


208 80 
81 76 


Sains Howard .«•• 


92 66 


Feb. 10 


Gideon Howell*. 


76 85 


14 


R. A. LoTe* 


138 96 


18 


M. Somers 


150 00 


24 


A. Roecker 


65 00 


May 1 

6ept. 4 

KoY. 24 


Charles A. Liircret 


55 36 


E. Kirbv, Public Printer 


9 40 


I. N. Wray 


121 00 


Dec. 31 


S. W. Cox 


52 76 




• 

Total 






$2,501 13 



IQS 



DI8BURSSMEKT8 OUT 07 



FOR APPREHENSION OF CRIMINALS, 

APPROVED MARCH 6, 1866. 



Date. 



No. 



Not. 15/1806 
27.... 

Dec. 14.... 

Jmn. 8^ 1867.... 
23.... 



P«b. 

March 

April 



29. 
21. 

25. 

4. 

7. 
12. 
10. 
15. 
18. 



Uny 



June 
Jvly 



26.... 

27.... 
7.... 

15.... 

20.... 

27.... 

30.... 

18. .. 

29.... 
8.... 

10.... 

12.... 

30.... 
AogQst 16.... 
8«pt. 4.... 

12.... 

21.... 

October 2.... 

5.... 

30.... 

Not. 2.,.. 
Jan. Z, 1868... 
11.... 
13.... 
27.... 
31.... 

3.... 

7.... 
27.... 

2.... 

4.... 

6.... 

6.... 
13.... 
16.... 



Yeb. 



March 



4*ril 
Oct. 



18. 
23. 

2. 

3. 
25. 
27. 
12. 
28. 
29. 



1629 

1659 

1699 

S9 

72 

86 

88 

138 

140 

148 

266 

386 

442 

924 

941 

966 

969 

970 

992 

1001 

1061 

1090 

1130 

1183 

1197 

1272 

1323 

1438 

1452 

1470 

1555 

1650 

1741 

1776 

1778 

1815 

1956 

1995 

2113 

2115 

2134 

101 

180 

187 

289 

312 

337 

357 

6.30 

677 

693 

704 

710 

768 

770 

773 

786 

826 

1078 

1081 

1260 

1267 

1346 

1456 

2272b 



To whon dn 



.••.*»>••••. 



.... . .. .*•••■»••..•.. 



...-.•..«.•..• 



.«»»..»«. 



>...• ...... 



Charles W. Bowman 

ihomaa M. Garland 

Fortochnt Company 

F. McGinnie ^^ .^ 

S.W.Smith „ I. 

Bacon Montgomery ^ , 

fT iiuam r^mKston. ••..>... .•».»».»•...•...•••.•.•...•.»,,.»,.«,,.„«., 

Quat. Heinriche «. 

J. P. Tracey 

N. C. Konna 

Mahony, Hntcfains A Hodbnett.. ...... 

J. S. Leach 

James T. Beach A Co 

D. A. Ely and W. B. Harlan 

James K. Hall 

GUI A Pickles 

Union Printing Company 

E. S. Poster ^ 

A. W. Beale 

S. B. Missouri Enterprise 

J. P. Tracey 

Fortschrit Company 

H.Wilcox 

G. A. A J. L. Moser 

Foster A Wilder 

P. H. Farmer 

W. H. Sallyards A Son 

L. J. Roach A Jasper Green 

Graham A Brothers 

Foster A Wilder.... 

Graham A Brothers 

A. M. Casebolt A Son 

Gideon Howell 

Irvin Pish 

Thomas P. Welch 

W. J. Mitchell ., 

J. P. Tracey 

McKee, Fishback A Company 

D. K. Abeel 

J. H. Mackley 

E. Kirby, Public Printer 

G. W. Thomas 

R. A. LoTe 

Foster A Wilder 

N. D, Perry 

William H. Murphy A Cnndiff 

A. Wuera 

Gust. Heinrichs 

Fred. Stemmer 

J. L. Moser , 

James P. Jones et al .., 

Samuel Wade et ol , 

Thomas J. Wright A M. F. Jaynes. 

Union Printing Company , 

Charles H. Springer et al , 

C. P. ShiTel , 

— Van Bledsoe , 

Charles Doucherty, Sheriff Jaclsson 

Georee Wolf. 

J. W. Francis A M. F. McDonald.. 
Joseph Stampfli , 

A. 11 alling^s worth 

B. C. Carr 

George Wolf 



■...k.^.. 



Total 



Anonnt* 



$ 16 0» 



00 
00 



6 

30 CO 

24i 50 

9 00 

300 00 
dOO 00 

7 50 

8 20 
390 00 

5 00 
124 70 

8 00 
800 00 
600 OO 

8 00 

16 OO 

146 00 

6 00 
15 OO 

7 50 
59 50 
10 50 
10 50 

6 86 

12 50 

10 00 

600 00 



00 
2& 
00 



T 
5 

6 
6 37 

."too 00 

200 00 
250 00 
300 00 

7 
7 



50 
50 



6 00 
200 OO 

29 7& 
300 00 
200 00 

12 OOi 

200 00 

100 OO 

6 50 

30 00 
100 00 

12 OO 
300 OO 
600 00 
300 00 

30 00 
900 OO 
300 OO 
300 OO 
200 OO 
200 OO 
300 00 
153 00 

90 2& 

60 IS 
275 OO 

$9,466 50 



THB RBVftNVB FUKB. 



103 



FOR EXECUTION OF CIVIL LAW. 

APPROVED MARCH 19,1866. 



Bate. 



Oct. 5, 1866.... 
Nov. 15.... 

19.... 

26.... 

Jan. 8, 1867... 
21.... 
22.... 



No. 



Feb. 
March 



April 
May 



Jim» 

July 
Aug. 

Oct. 

Not. 



Bee. 



29... 
25... 

2... 

4... 

6... 

8... 
25... 
29... 
26... 

7... 
10... 
20... 

1... 
11... 
13... 
26... 
31... 
16... 
23... 
26... 
27.. 

5... 
21... 
23... 



31 

Jan. 7, 1868... 




Peb. 
April 



Jane 
Jnly 



Ao|^. 



30. 
31. 
4. 
27. 
13. 

28. 



19. 
15. 

18. 
21. 
23. 
28. 
12. 
14. 
17. 



1174 

1628 

1636 

1652 

1653 

87 

64 

67 

69 

87 

149 

216 

225 

811 

896 

696 

761 

993 

1060 

1074 

1129 

1218 

1253 

1484 

1686 

1718 

2048 

2294 

2312 

2320 

2404 

2486 

2489 

2401 

2492 

2494 

2533 

149 

161 

306 

311 

342 

1268 

1353 

1.362 

.1451 

1457 

1459 

1545 

1751 

1752 

1784 

1795 

1799 

1816 

1879 

1892 

1901 

1905 



lowborn drawn. 



T. A. O'Mara 

J. H. 'Batcher 

T. A. O'Mara 

H. C. Pickering^.^ 

8. C. BavU 

L. B. MiUer 

G. A. A J. L. Moeer. 
Davis A Earl 



A. M. CaeeboltASon. 
8. W. Smith.. 



Jolm Swearing^on 

George Knapp A Co 

J. H. Creighton..... 

Raral Ezprese 

Ibomas Smith 

Roes A Mills 

Charles Dougherty, Sheriff Jackson. 

Emory S. Foster 

S. E. Missoari Enterprise 

T. J. Jamieson 

Fortschrit Company 

W. U. Telegraph Company 

A. P. Richardson 

Bacon Montgomery 

Lewis Leet 

Ewing A Smith 

H. P. Woods 

Horace Wilcox 

Gnst. Heinrichs 

L. B. Yickery 

^ditors Enterprise 

li. D. Yickery 

Foster A Wilder 

H. C. Pickering ».... 

C. C. Braper 

Thomas W. Heman 

p. R. Raesdale 

H. C. Pickering 

C. C. Braper .^..^ 

H.Clark 

R. A. Love 

C. G. Braper 

F. J. McAdoo 

C. C. Braper 

C. B. Drake : 

William R. Lesley 

E. C. Carr 

Geo. R. Herritt 

Gust. Heinrichs 

A. M. Casebolt A Son ...«; 

Union Printing Companj^l^ 

W. L. White « George »:ism 

Union Printing Company 

Charles T. Reppy 

Fortschrit Company 

James C. Childs 

Wm. Caifrey 

J. C. Breckenridge 

Fortschrit Co 



Amount. 



$ 125 00 


175 00 


44 00 


100 00 


100 00 


25 00 


7 50 


17 00 


7 50 


6 00 


100 00 


16 00 


177 76 


7 60 


6 50 


7 87 


33 38 


53 60 


15 00 


9 00 


45 50 


32 74 


18 00 


300 00 


15 00 


200 00 


30 00 


45 50 


55 00 


40 00 


9 00 


20 00 


11 00 


50 00 


50 00 


60 00 


40 00 


25 00 


25 00 


300 00 


19 55 


100 00 


116 00 


100 00 


250 00 


150 00 


139 87 


150 00- 


12 00> 


10 00. 


23 5a 


600 00 


8 00 


6 00 


27 75 


600 00 


10 06 


200 00 


21 50 



104 



2>I8BUB6BMBSTS OUT OF 



FOR EXECUTION OP CIVIL LAW— Cohtihued. 



Date. 



AQen8tl9,1868 
20.... 

24.... 

28.... 
8ept. 4.... 

Oct. 5.... 

6.... 

13.... 

19.... 

29.... 
Nor. 6.... 

18.... 

24.... 

88.... 
Dec. 5.... 

9.... 
11.... 
21.... 
22.... 



No. 



1915 

1917 

1918 

1930 

1966 

1985 

1990 

2233 

2239 

2262 

2280 

2277b 

2294b 

2337 

2341 

2:^73 

2374 

2376 

2403 

2431 

2433 

2438 

2448 

2471 

2475 

2476 



To whom drawn. 



Gust. Heiorichs 

A. O. Martin 

A. J. Gardener 

E. Skewei, A Co 

Foster, Wilder t Co 

Hawes dt Montgomery 

B. Kirby 

P. M. Briber 

C. C. Draper. 

S. W. Smith 

Laclede Hotel 

Charles F. Ernst 

Uouck A Durbin 

N. C. KouDS 

L. A. Owens 

Joseph 6. Ford 

B. R. Ragsdale 

0. D. Austin. 

A. Saltzman 

E. Casselberry, A C. P. Johnson 

Fortschrit Co 

Klaine A Baldwin 

Wm. B. Glenn 

A. G. Seller 

H. L. Rice 

Charles N. Brown .*.. 

Total , 



Amount. 



$ 46 00 


^00 00 


800 00 


8 00 


10 60 


00 


9 00 


6« 00 


280 00 


27 00 


122 00 


249 88 


6 00 


244 00 


300 00 


222 75 


800 00 


18 00 


500 00 


400 00 


27 60 


7 60 


160 00 


10 00 


60 00 


50 00 



$8,650 64 



ENFORCEMENT OF CIVIL LAW. 



APPROVED MARCH 14, 1866. 



Date. No. 



Not. 10, 1866 1617 

15 1627 

23 1644 

Jan. 2, 1867 , 11 

13 

9 40 

23 73 

Febr. 7 116 

21 137 

July 1 1334 

18 1507 

Dec. 6 2418 

2419 

Jan. 11, 1868 181 

March 17 780 

April 24 1263 

July 21 1792 

Bept. 4 1997 



To whom drawn. 



H. H. Lacy et al 

J. N. Ellis 

N. Adams et al 

Wm. A. Brigham et al 

Lewis Cheser 

H.Clark 

Robert McMillan et al 

Wm. Graham et al 

3. E. Shaw. '. 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Lewis Lett ^ 

Thomas W. Heman 

D. Bhemister 

J. T. Leslie 

W. L. Willard et al 

Jesse West. 

D. Thomas A F. M. Monks 
L. H. CordiU et al 

Total 



Amount. 



$ 255 00 
64 00 

169 00 

198 00 
30 00 
10 00 

616 00 

616 00 

68 52 

9 35 

20 00 

60 00 

150 00 
15 00 

615 00 
60 00 

130 00 
88 00 



$3,171 87 



TBI UYXiruS FUMU. 



1(» 



PAY OF CONVENTION. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


March 18, 1897 


620 


A. Erekel 


$90 00 




Total 




$90 00 



PRINTINa JOURNAL OF CONVENTION. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


May 3,1807... 


1024. 


C. D. Drake 


$275 00 




Total 




$ 275 00 



FOR INTEREST ON STATE BONDS PROPER 




Dec. 29, 1806 
Feb. 14, 1867 
March 16.... 



April 

May 

June 



July 



5 

8. 
18. 
24. 
26. 
28. 

3. 
27. 



31.... 
Sept. 17.... 
Oct. 7.... 

18.... 
Dec. 11.... 
Jan. 13, 1868 
Feb. 8.... 
March 28.... 
April 27.... 
July 15.... 
Ang. 8.... 
October 2.... 



1712 

132 

604 

896 

1067 

1274 

1294 

1308 

1316 

1396 

1544 

1546 

1571 

1795 

2007 

2063 

2443 

190 

867 

944 

1266 

1756 

1S55 

2212 



A. S. Robinson, Cashier State Bank 

James H. Britton, President National Bank, 
National Bank of State of Missouri 



same 
same 



same 

Southern Bank of St. Louis 

National Bank of State of Missouri. 

same 

same 
Wm. Bishop, State Treasurer 

same 



same 






National Bank of State of Missouri 

National Bank of Commerce, N. T 

James H. Britton, President Bank State of Mo. 
National Bank of Commerce, N. T 

same 

same 

State Auditor 

National Bank of Commerce, N. T 

National Bank of State of Missouri 

same 

Fund Commissioners 

Total 



$23,970 00 

, 13,456 80 

90 00 

360 00 

1,110 00 

2,400 00 

672 19 

450 00 

540 00 

720 00 

6,120 00 

10,720 00 

22 55 

18,690 00 

1,470 00 

438 55 

17,237 75 

.%364 11 

13,034 00 

4,200 00 

13,904 89 

1,440 00 

21,562 54 

80 00 

$156,003 88 



DUBDBBEHENTB OUT OT 



FOR REPAIRING GOVERNOR'S MANSION. 



10...... 


1B99 
ISRl 
103 
111 
133 

aoi 

S03 

no 

330 
3« 
7S7 
801 

eiT 

989 
lOOS 

ion 

10S7 

UG& 
11«B 
W90 
1511 
MM 
121 
202 
219 

OTS 

9M 

0T9 
0» 
1S7 
1*9 
1340 
1347 
1961 
1361 
1440 
2451 
147* 




5sn 

19 >I 

47 46 


:. L PMIej ... ™!I..J!"!!'Z "" 




















1! 40 
















19 10 
49 60 
a 00 










April 1 








n 


J. C. Dot _ ,■. . „ _ „„ 


7 SO 


"" ; 


Willi«mH.rdj „ . 


ST 70 
73 SO 
















10 00 








Wine, Cheaver * Co „ _,.„™ 


13 80 












97 40 
11 IS 


Feb. 21 


















*"" fc:: 
















M.y 11 

Angajt 4 


P. J. Tbomp.oB A Sod „„..„.. ....,..._ 


3 as 


Z. 0. Smith A Co ^ „ 


14 2S 


















14 TS 
100 00 








ToUl 




ti,4oi as 



THB REVENUS FUKBb 



IQT 



FOE GENERAL CONTINGENT FUND. 



Date. 



October 8, 1866 
9 



NoY. 



Dec 



12 

18 

25 

27 • •••• 

26 

27 

1 



6 

10 

19 

Febr. 26, 1867 

27 

March 6 



April 



6. 

7. 

15. 

16. 
21. 
23. 

1. 

2. 

3. 



22. 



27. 



May 



1 

2. 
24. 
27. 



June 1. 

21. 
Joly 1. 

2. 

3. 

6. 

8. 
10. 
13. 
16. 

AVLgOMt 1. 

* 17. 
Sept. 2. 

3. 

23. 

October 1. 



No. 



1576 

1578 

1584 

1596 

1601 

1607 

1616 

1655 

1660 

1673 

1675 

1679 

1692 

1705 

167 

187 

805 

315 

336 

373 

378 

891 

897 

659 

690 

816 

848 

877 

884 

907 

978 

981 

983 

997 

998 

1006 

1018 

1023 

1164 

1174 

1179 

1180 

1182 

1211 

1217 

1289 

1328 

1362 

1378 

1394 

1428 

1439 

3450 

1481 

1500 

1575 

1654 

1728 

1732 

1737 

1819 

1867 

1872 



To wbom drawn. 



A. Kielman et ah 

H. W. Deshler 

C. Staata 

M. Steiner 

Robert Naylor 

S. F. Cnrrie, Recorder Lafayette County. 

Staats, Coatmeyer et ai 

Cyras Thompson 

A. Thompson 

M. Steiner 

A. P. Richardson 

E. L. King 

F. W. Mayer 

H. Starks et al 

U. Umstead, commissioner 

Jacob Heinrichs 

M. Steiner 

E. H. E. Jameson 

Fred. Fisher 

E. Herrick , 

John Hoffman 

D. P. Dyer 

A. Kielman 

U. Umstead 

F. Roer 

E. S. Foster, Public Printer 

M. Steiner 

A. Kielman 

M. A J. Obermayer 

F. Roer 

Jos. Schneider et al 

W, D. Pratt 

Fred. Buehrle .., 

C. F. Blaser 

Joe. Stampfli , 

W. Buehrle 

M. Steiner 

H. E. Schulti« 

A. Gundelfinger 

H. E. SchulU 

M. A J. Obermayer 

C. F. Blazer 

Job. Schneider , 

M. Steiner 

Jacob Heinrichs et aL , 

N. C. Burch 

M. Steiner , 

A. Kielman 

F. Roer 

M. A J. Obermayer 

Robert Bittner 

M. A J. Obermayer ..., 

W. Buehrle 

H, E. Schulti 

S. T. Bryant 

M. Steiner , 

A. Gundelfinger ,.••*•• , 

M. Steiner 

S. Bennett 



same 

Plate, Olshausen A Co. 

C. Staats 

M. Steiner 



Amount. 



$ 61 0# 


357 0% 


134 60 


60 OO 


169 17 


2 90 


994 00 


22 50 


20 00 


58 50 


5 40 


100 00 


35 20 


523 45 


16 44 


1,906 70 


60 75 


160 00 


10 25 


56 OO 


18 00 


75 00 


26 00 


40 00 


5 85 


41 00 


22 50 


8 00 


6 90 


10 45 


226 85 


10 00 


5 00 


35 00 


12 00 


145 50 


45 00 


10 36 


50 30 


36 20 


23 10 


10 00 


34 00 


45 00 


327 70 


3 00 


45 00 


34 00 


18 80 


20 80 


6 00 


7 90 


81 50 


13 50 


3 00 


45 00 


51 00 


45 00 


9 00 


15 00 


30 00 


290 10 


46 00 



108 



BISBURSEHBNTB OUT OF 



FOB GENERAL CONTINGENT FUND-<;ohtihubb. 



Bate. 

Oct. 1, 1867 
2.... 



8. 

4. 

6. 
11, 
26. 

30. 

Nor. 4 

6. 

7. 

16. 

22. 

23. 

Dec. 2. 

4. 



7.... 
20.... 
26.... 
January 3, 1868 

26.... 

27... 
31.... 

Feb. 12.... 

March 23 ... 

26.... 

28.... 

AprU 1.... 
2.... 

29.... 
Julj 8.... 

18... 

28.... 
Aoriut 19.... 

26... 

27.... 

28.... 
Sept. 16.... 
October 6.... 

14.... 

81.... 
Nor. 6.... 

14.... 



No. 



1876 

1877 

1880 

1014 

1938 

1953 

1967 

1981 

1999 

2027 

2096 

2099 

2116 

2119 

2143 

2146 

2166 

2260 

2286 

2296 

2360 

2386 

2388 

2400 

2401 

2426 

2483 

2601 

103 

111 

282 

284 

287 

316 

320 

463 

822 

866 

946 

960 

1061 

1071 

1284 

1712 

1743 

1802 

1916 

1943 

1946 

1948 

1963 

2030 

2238 

2266 

2282b 

2289b 

2317 



To whom drawn. 



Meyberg ft Waogelin.... 

C. Staate , 

G. Fisher 

A. Kielman , 

M. ft J. Obermayer 

J. Heinrichs , 

A. Gundelfing^r 

Jos. Schneider 

M. U. Express Go 

C. SUats 

P. Zeppenfeld 

H. Stark 

F. H. Friese 

U. E Schultx 

J. Heinrichs 

M. Steiner 

Jos. Schneider , 

U. Weg^eman , 

William Meyers et oZ.... 

C. Staats 

•M. Steiner 

C. D. Williams 

Jos. Stampfli 

Jos. Schneider 

H.Upshalder 

W. Baehrle 

Con. Schneider 

Geor^ Husmann... 

A. Kielman 

M. Steiner 

Thompson ft Parsons.... 

J. C. Noell 

Z. Trotter 

William Meyers 

J. Fikenscher 

F. Roer 

H. Tutt 

F. Roer 

U. S. Express Co 

H. Karg^s 

A. Kielman 

M. ft J. Obermeyer 

U. S. Express Co 

T. A. Parker 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M.. 

N. C. Burch et al 

T. A. Parker 

E. Clark 

H. A. Clover 

Krum, Decker ft Krom , 

E. L. King ft Bro 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M., 

same 

A. Kielman 

Charles B. Maus 

A. J. Carnatt.. 

Huffardft Steel 



Amount. 


$ 6 60 


89 00 


16 00 


17 60 


46 76 


186 88 


16 80 


7 00 


3 60 


211 10 


66 08 


40 00 


273 14 


28 60 


96 19 


46 00 


11 00 


7 80 


41 00 


26 60 


46 00 


2 00 


3 00 


16 76 


4 60 


27 86 


6 00 


100 00 


36 00 


46 00 


11 25 


34 66 


16 00 

' ft AA 



46 00 

1 76 

200 00 

1 26 



43 60 


37 00 


43 00 


8 00 


9 66 


144 00 


80 04 


6 00 


161 00 


123 70 


26 00 


60 00 


100 00 


1 29 


64 00 


30 00 


62 00 


12 00 


1 21 



Total. 



$9,606 19 



THB REVEirUK VDND. 



109 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES GOVERNOR, 



Dkto. 



Bee. 10 


,1866.. 


1689 


Feb. 21 


,1867.. 


139 


March 


4 


230 




6 


277 




7 


367 




13 


510 


April 


24 


985 




26 


995 


Mmy 


13 


1078 




20 


1128 




24 


1169 
1170 


Octobei 


1 


1876 




6 


2004 




7 


2009 




24 


2090 


Not. 


1 


2130 




6 


2150 




26 


2313 


Dec. 


6 


2403 




6 


2412 
2416 




7 


2426 




14 


2459 




21 


2485 


Janaarj2^1868 


70 




3 


102 




8 


155 




25 


286 




27 


292 


Feb. 


1 


335 
326 




6 


354 




11 


446 




17 


535 


March 


2 


674 




17 


782 




27 


938 


April 


1 


1048 




3 


1090 


May 


9...... 


1336 




13 


1355 







1356 




28 


1452 


June 


1 


1474 




3 


1487 




27 


1571 




29. 


1577 


Jnly 


14 


1745 




28 


1817 




81 


1830 


Ang:a8t 


S 


1844 




13 


1886 


. 


28 


1958 


Sept. 


8 


1983 




4 


1987 




22 


2072 


Octobei 


' 6 


2240 




29 


2275b 


KOT. 


2 


2284b 




28 


2868 



No. 



To whom drawn. 



Missouri State Penitentiary..... 

Oust Ueinriehs. 

Theodore Plate k Co 

Allen P. Richardson tt al 

X. Schwaller 

A. P; Richardson 

Missouri State Penitentiary 

Emorv S. Foster 

J. R Lamkin 

Fortschrit Co 

Miller A Bros 

Warne, Cheever A Co 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

same 

Mrs. 6. Lackey, P. M 

X. Schwaller 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Finney A McGrath 

Oast. Heinrichs 

Hardon, Taller A Co 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Plate, Olshansen A Co 

X. Schwaller 

McKee, Fishback A Co 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

E. Kirby, Public Printer 

Huffard A Steel 

X. Schwaller 

M. A J. Obermayer 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Scovem A Bro 

J. R. Lamkin 

X. Schwaller 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

J. J. Gordon..... 

J. W. Barber, Janitor 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

same 

JohnBrell 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

X. Schwaller 

Vr. U. Telegraph Co 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

same 

W. U. TelejrraphCo 

Saovem A Craven 

Fortschrit Co 

W. U. Telerraph Co 

Scovem A Craven 

X. Schwaller «. 

Wells A Donahoe 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

U. S. Express Go 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

same 

W. U. Telerraph Co 

Thomas A i^aven 



Amonnt. 


$108 70 


16 50 


36 09 


290 87 


180 00 


21 75 


53 00 


6 00 


152 10 


9 00 


104 58 


162 14 


9 95 


20 90 


9 00 


101 25 


11 50 


7 60 


14 00 


16 50 


18 55 


68 20 


41 00 


13 00 


13 27 


18 50 


8 50 


3 00 


46 75 


5 68 


15 52 


10 80 


2 70 


6 00 


44 62 


18 11 


22 38 


40 00 


24 00 


15 61 


2 10 


48 00 


9 85 


24 00 


10 45 


9 41 


9 00 


27 40 


3 55 


6 00 


19 85 


1 78 


42 50 


4 15 


8 84 


10 71 


68 


8 00 


12 87 


80 48 


248 



110 



DlgBURBEHEKTS OUT OF 



FOK CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF aOVERNOR— CoimiruBfi. 



Date. 



Dec. 


5 


24S2 
2434 




14 


2453 




22 


2472 




2f 


24S7 



No. 



To whom drami 

X. Schwaller ...^.. 

W. U. Telegraph Co ., 

J. N. De Martigvv 

Mn. B. Lackeji P. M 

A. Ghindeliinger 

Total .«,^ ., ^.. 



Amonnt. 



$22 M 


2 36 


3 05 


10 08 


22 at 



$2,1M 71 



CONHNQENT EXPENSES OP THE GOVERNOR ANJ> SEORE. 

TARY OF STATE. 



I » * ■»* » __^aB. 



Date. 



Veh. 27, 1867.^. 
March 13 

18 

20 

21 

27 

October 31....^. 
Dec. 4..h.it 
Jan% 22, 1808... 



No» 



]89 
495 
610 
646 
648 
740 
2124 
2385 
249 



To whom drawn* 



— ■" -- '-^ ■ - >... -^ -. — - - ^ - ■ ■ .- ■ 



- -• — • 



H. K. Davis 

Aug. Wuers 

Cooley A Davis ». 

J. D»l)opf Ik. 

D. M. SnAdidge' 

St. Louis Daily Ft^bb ^ 

J. L. Heeser 

M. S. Harfooagh 

Geo. T. Ridings 



Total. 



Amount. 



JOt^—^^. 



$6 25 
f 50 
6 28 
6 00 
6 50 

89 76 

5 00 

6 26 
5 00 



iMllH 



$78 56 



THB" BXVEHtnt FtKS. 



Ill 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES SECRETARY OP STATE. 



Date. 



Feb. 26 


f lOOf^*.! 


162 


March 


4 


221 
228 
264 
263 
271 




5 


297 




4 •«•**• 


866 
874 
377 

384 




9 


416 
424 




U 


439 




20 


646 




22 


677 


April 


1 


783 
837 




2 


861 




9 


919 




27 


996 


May 


8 


1066 




29 


1190 


June 


19 


1277 


July 


1 


1362 
1360 




17 


1604 




22 


1621 


Aognat 


1 


1673 




6 


1692 




8 


1601 




12 


1616 




29 


1700 


Bept. 


2 


1727 


October 


1 


1874 




21 •«•«•• 


1912 
1927 
1947 




4« •••• 


1979 




14 


2034. 




26 


2092 


Nov. 


16 


2262 


Dec. 


6 


2413 




12 


2468 




18 


2468 




19 


2476 


Jan. 8, 


1868.... 


.106 




4 


121 




18 


226 




28 


267 


Feb. 


16 


622 


March 


8 


686 




20 


797 




28 


948 


April 


2 


1066 




8 


1089 




7 


1116 




8 


1127 




29 


1286 




80 


1291 


May 


4 


1309 




IS 


1366 


June 


8 


1499 




27 


1670 



No. 



To whom drawn. 



Francis Rodman 

Theo. Plate ft Co 

A. P. Richardson, Postmaster , 

R. J. Comptoti , 

M. A J. Obermayer........ , 

A. Kielman , 

United States Express Company , 

J. N. Hover , 

Francis Roer ; , 

John Affolter , 

Western Union Telegraph Company.. 

H. H. Wegemann 

C. F. Lohman ., 

A. Ir. Richardson, Postaiaster , 

Conrath A Umfried 

United States Express Company , 

Western Union 'i'eleerapb Company.. 

Emory 8. Foster, Public Printer. 

A. Kielman 

A. P. Richardson, Postmaster 

C. F. Blaser 

A. P. Richardson, Postmaster 

C. F. Blaser 

United States Express Comjpany 

Western Union Telegraph Company . 

A. Kielman , 

A. P. Richardson, Postmaster , 

United States Express Company 

Western Union Telegraph Company . 

Fred. Bnehrle. 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

F. Hafksmeyer 

United States Express Company 

Western Union Teleg.aph Compaay . 
same 

A. Kielman 

Jacob Heinrichs .'• 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

C. F. Blaser m 

F. Hafkemeyer 

Pacific Railroad Companv 

Western Union Telegraph Company . 

Plate, Olshansen A Co 

C. Crevelt 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

A. Kielman 

Western Union Telegraph Company. 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress. 

Merchants' Union Express Company. 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

Western Union Telegraph Company. 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

McKee, Fishback A Co 

A. Kielman 

Western Union Telegraph Company. 

C. F. Blaser 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

same 

H. B. Schttlts 

Bean A Mason 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer 

Western Union Telegraph Company. 
N. C. Bnrch 



Amount. 



$232 64 

284 00 

64 60 

26 00 
80 00 

117 48 
6 26 
6 70 

17 50 
21 26 
28 08 

6 60 

18 29 
88 

17 80 

2 00 

6 76 

82 80 

60 00 

9 00 

4 00 

86 00 

13 00 

1 25 
6 86 

89 00 

27 00 

2 06 
1 28 

17 00 

6 20 

202 88 

1 90 

2 40 

1 60 
46 60 
41 00 

82 00 
70 00 

9 76 
20 81 
23 80 

3 99 
120 00 

2 00 
9 00 

48 00 

3 80 
9 00 

8 46 

9 00 
13 14 

6 29 
86 00 
48 OO 

8 70 

8 00 
12 00 

9 00 
17 00 

7 60 

83 00 
6 16 

10 30 



112 



BISBUBSEMSNTS OUT OF 



FOR CONTINOENT EXPEK8B8 8ECBBTART OF STATE-OovTunnD. 



Date. 


No. 


July 2, 


1868... 


1698 




16 


1778 




24 


1804 




31 


1831 


Aagaut 


17 


1906 




18 


1911 
1912 




28 


1964 




81 


1973 


Sept* 


3 


1982 




4 


1993 




16 


2029 




17 


2066 




23 


2077 




29 


2099 




80 


2102 


October 


2 


2208 




9 


2261 




16 


2273 




29 


2273 b 


Boy. 


4 


2287 b 




5 


2290 b 
2293 b 




20 


2344 




30 


2406 
2406 



To whom drawn. 



A. Eielman « 

Mrs. B. Lacker, Post Mistress 

United States Express Company 

Western Union Telefftapb Uompanj. 

Mrs. B. Lackeji Post Mistress 

H. E. SchaltB , 

Pacific Railroad Company 

United States Express Company 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress! 

Western Union Telegraph Company , 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

Plate, Olshausen A Co 

United States Express Company 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

F. Kluender .' 

A. Kielman 

Western Union Telegraph Company . 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

same 



same 

C. F. Lohman 

Western Union Telegrwh Company. 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress , 

same 
Western Union Telegraph Company. 

Total 



Amount* 



$69 36 

18 00 

5 7& 

13 20 

18 00 



2 
1 

9 

4 



46 

10 

50 

00 

85 

27 20 

3 63 

229 25 



3 
9 

4 



80 
00 
00 



46 36 

13 26 

9 00 

3 46 

9 00 

8 06 

19 69 

18 00 

18 00 

8 32 

$2,634 U 



THE RSVfNUE TUin). 



113 



OONllNGENT EXPENSES STATE AUDITOR. 



Date. 



No. 



March 4« 1867. 


223 






229 






272 




6 


289 
317 




6 


314 




7 


344 




8 


394 




11 


438 




12 


471 




21 


662 
666 




22 


670 




26 


694 




27 


731 




30 


770 


April 


1 


814 




2 


860 




6 


902 




11 


931 


May 


14 


1086 




16 


1091 




21 


1140 




27 


1176 


Jane 


22 


1290 




26 


1303 


Jalj 


1 


1368 




2 


1384 




8 


1433 




10 


1463 




12 


1478 




13 


1482 




24 


1634 




30 


1660 


August 


7 


1696 




14 


163 L 


t^t. 


2 


1726 




7 


1769 




18 


1798 


. 


21 


1812 




23 


1818 




28 


1862 


October 2 


1911 






1946 






1949 




5 


2002 




10 


2023 




21 


2076 




31 


2121 


Ifor. 


1 


2131 




4 


2138 




11 


2167 




20 


2276 




26 


2309 




27 


2321 




29 


2330 


D«c. 


8 


2360 
2366 




11 


2446 




19 


2478 
2479 


Jan. 8^ 


1868.... 


99 
109 




6 


133 



To whom drawn. 



Theo. Plate & Oo 

Geor^ Scbarman et al 

A. Kielman < 

G, W. Sone 

F. Boer 

Theo. Plate A Co 

Francis Koer 

Hoskins A Cammever 

A. P. Richardson, Postmaster 

Theo. Plate A Co 

Merchants' Union Express Compaoy.. 

United States Express Company 

George Scharman 

Theo. Plate A Co 

A. P. Richardson, Postmaster 

same 

E. S. Foster, Public Printer 

A. Kielman 

Merchants' Union Express Company. 
A. P. Richardson, Postmaster 

same 

R. F. Winrate 

George Scharman 

A. P. Richardson, Postmaster 

S. T. Brvant 

Geor^ Scharman , 

A. Kielman 

Merchants' Union Express Company. 

if. C. Burch 

A. P. Richardson, Postmaster , 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer , 

William Roesen 

.1. Grimshaw 

Huffard A Steel 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress , 

Merchants' Union Express Company 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

A. P. Richardson et al 

John M. London y... 

M. Jacobs 

Plate, Olshausen A Co 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

A. Kielman 

Merchants' Union Express Company., 
Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer 

G. W. Sone 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

same 

Francis Boer 

Western Union Telegraph Company.. 

Joseph Maher 

0. T. Fishback 

Wilcox A Loughran et al 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

William Gohde ..::.. 

Pacific Railroad Compan;^ ..., 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress ........ 

Western Union Telegraph Company., 

F. Roer et al 

Wilcox A Loughran....^ 

A. Ihompson » 

B. Kirby, Public Printer 

A. Kielman , 

William W. Kerr 



Amount. 


$71 76 


2 60 


81 80 


32 10 


9 90 


61 80 


18 76 


42 76 


60 00 


32 96 


1 00 


6 86 


6 00 


34 40 


30 00 


30 00 


63 89 


66 20 


2 80 


10 00 


30 00 


100 00 


6 00 


6 60 


4 60 


7 60 


U 60 


1 66 


41 46 


30 00 


28 26 


20 00 


20 62 


6 60 


60 


66 


30 00 


30 69 


1 60 


30 00 


243 00 


10 00 


38 66 


2 16 


68 16 


72 00 


60 


31 00 


7 00 


2 70 


3 36 


8 00 


283 30 


30 00 


30 00 


3 40 


10 00 


80 


3 26 


60 60 


26 00 


171 60 


46 00 


10 66 



8-A B. 



1U 



DI8BURSEME1STS OUT OP 



OONTINOENT EXPENSES STATE AUDITOR— Cohtxhuid. 



Date. 



No. 



Ffb. 

March 

April 

May 

J HUB 

Aug. 

IK!pt. 



Oct. 

XOT. 

Jiec. 



18AS... 

22 

24 

31 

3 

6 

U 

14 

2 

9 

13 

6 

13 

6 

12 

24 

30 

1 

2 

6 

9 

3 

11 

17 

4 

5 

11 

17 



18. 
22. 
23. 

2. 
26. 

6. 
24. 
12. 
19. 
22. 
23. 

24. 
26. 

29. 



160 
253 
275 
821 
334 
344 
754 
769 
1065 
1133 
1176 
1318 
1357 
1495 
1518 
1559 
1584 
1690 
1691 
1720 
1730 
1846 
1870 
1907 
1988 
2002 
2011 
2047 
2050 
2053 
2058 
2074 
2078 
2209 
2294 
2297 
2365 
2452 
2466 
2473 
2477 
2479 
2482 
2484 
2488 
2489 



To whom drawn. 



Mrs. B. Lackej, Po«t Mistrees ... 

Plate, OlBhausen A Co 

United States Express Company 

J F. Grandy et «/ , 

Peter Jecko 

Francis Roer 



same 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress .. 

A. Kielman 

Francis Roev et al 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress .. 

same 
Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer.. 

H. E. Schultz et al 

Francis Roer et al 

United States Express Company. 

Pacific Railroad Company 

United States Express Company. 

A. Kielman 

United States Express Company. 

McKee, Fisbback &, Co 

F. Roer 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

F. Roer 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

E. Kirby, Public Printer 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

same 

R. F. Wingate 

Plate, Olshausen & Co 

F. Roer et al 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

U. S. Express Co 

Adam Kielman 

F. Hase & Co 

F. Roer 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

F. H. Friese 

iGeo. Knapp <& Co., et al 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

Plate, Olshausen & Co 

U. S. Express Co 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

A. Thompson 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

Francis Roer 



Total. 



Amount. 



$80 60 

146 60 

12 00 

41 70 

8 00 

2 60 

3 10 
."to 00 
63 45 
20 26 
30 00 

2 80 
36 90 

4 36 
2 80 
4 30 
2 40 

16 90 
36 00 

2 60 
86 10 

T 15 
30 00 

7 00 
38 

• AS 90 

10 OO 

10 00 

50 00 

97 60 

28 26 

30 00 

1 60 

39 36 

106 60 

75 

50 00 

32 26 

34 60 
1 18 

30 00 
50 

8 26 
110 00 

35 00 
30 00 

$3,641 67 



TflK hKVENUE FUND. 



116 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES TREASDREli. 



Date. 




Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 
Jan. 
March 



April 



Jane 
Jaly 



Aug. 
Oct, 



Vov. 



Dec. 



Jan. 



April 

May 

June 



July 
Aug. 

Sept. 



Oct. 



2,1866 

19.... 

26.... 

12.... 

20.... 

7, 1867 

12 

2 

11 

14 

16 

28 

30 

1 

m ...... 



13. 
30. 
H. 

18. 
10. 
11. 
19. 
26. 
1. 
10. 

12. 

10. 

2. 

5. 

17. 
28 

1. 

8. 



9 , 

25 

.^0 

3. 

6.. .. 

7 

26 

3, 1868 



14. 
2U. 

2. 

6. 
1<. 
12 
24. 
29. 

2. 
10. 
11. 
10. 
16. 
28. 

2. 



1556 

16.34 

1658 

1695 

1707 

33 

49 

218 

441 

530 

595 

758 

767 

838 

864 

872 

937 

1012 

10S3 

1U88 

.1119 

1246 

1250 

1276 

ino 

1357 
1448 
1449 
1474 
mil 

i'.n3 

194.S 
21)01 
2iJa.S 
21 UO 
2132 
21511 
2161 
21G2 
2:iU3 
23:i8 
2307 
2414 
2420 
2512 
95 
107 
191 
235 
1064 
1114 
1359 
152U 
1557 
1676 
1693 
1863 
1872 
2010 
20.38 
2095 
2210 



To whom drawn. 



A. Kielman 

U. W. Marshal 

A.. P. Ktchardson, P. M 

(J. L. Cullender 

(Jeorge Schariuan , 

A. P. KichardBOD, P. M 

A. Kielman , 

William Uerrick 

A. P. Kicbardson, F. M 

N. Condtttble 

William Bishop , 

A. P.Richardson, P. M 

U. S. Express Co 

E. S. Foater, Public Printer 

A. Kielman 

R. P. Mudley A Co 

Jac. Blattner 

R. P. Btudley A Co 

S. Bennett A Co 

A P. Richardson, P. M 

U. 8. Express Co 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

R. P. Studley A Co 

U. S. Express Co 

A. P. Richardson, P. M 

A. Kielman , 

R. P. 6tudley A Co 

0. T. Fishback et al 

IC. Kirby, Public Printer 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

A. Kielman .,... 

E. Kirby, Public Printer 

(J. W. JSone 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

A. iMeDowell A Co 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

M. U. Express Co.... 

E. E. Dozier 

R. P. Siudley A Co 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

M. U. Express Co ,.. 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Isaac T. Wi^ie 

R. P. Dudley A Co 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

Eliwood Kirby,' Public Printer 

A, Kielman 

Mrs. B. Lackey, I*. M 

R. P. Studley A Co 

A. Kielman 

w. u. leiegraph c«».. ..!!.".*.!".'!!*.!;!.!.!! 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer 

U. jS. Express Co 

R. P. Stmlley A C«. 

W. L'. Telegrapb Co .'." 

A. Kielman 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M .*.".*!! 

John A. Willis, Clerk Supreme Court 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

R. P. StudleyACo 

U. 8. Express Co 

A. Kielman ' 



Amonnt. 



$ 33 55 


2 6« 


13 UO 


13 25 


24 00 


('6 


42 6« 


20 00 


4 90 


5 00 


2 05 


12 no 


1 00 


67 40 


44 25 


85 50 


3 10 


1 25 


180 00 


6 00 


26 


1 70 


35 00 


50 


8 00 


34 00 


18 50 


12 50 


142 50 


9 00 


38 15 


28 00 


72 00 


6 00 


139 25 


90 


2 20 


10 00 


56 26 


« CO 


55 


3 2S 


200 00 


81 00 


6 00 


42 80 


42 00 


69 10 


1 75 


44 00 


2 30 


37 00 


25 


12 50 


3 40 


34 00 


6 CO 


2 00 


6 OO 


18 10 


85 


36 00 



116 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF 



FOB CONTINaBNT EXPENSES TRBASUREB— CoRTnroiD. 



Dftto. 



Oct. 


6,1808 


2236 




12 


226« 


Not. 


2 


2286b 




4 


2286b 




80 


2404 



No. 



To whom drawn. 



W. U. Telegraph Co.. 

R. P. Stadlej A Co 

W. U. Telerraph Co.. 
Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 
•ame 

Total 



Amount. 



$ 80 

10 00 
1 7* 
6 00 

20 90 



$1,^84 91 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF ATTORNEY GENERAL. 




Oct. 

Not. 
Jan. 
March 

April 

May 

Jane 
July 

Ang. 
Oct. 



Not. 

Dec. 
Jan. 
Feb. 

March 

April 



May 

June 
July 

Ang. 

Oct. 

Dec. 



2, 1866 
26... 
12, 1867 
18... 
30... 

2..., 
16... 

0.... 
20.... 

1.... 
80.... 
14.... 

2.... 
16.... 
28.... 

4.... 
20.... 

3, 1868 

11..., 

28.... 

2.... 
27.... 

2.... 
10.... 
21.... 

6.... 
22.... 

2.... 
16.... 
24.... 
12.... 

2.... 
23.... 
24.... 



1666 
1666 
47 
627 
774 
866 
947 
1072 
1282 
1361 
1661 
1633 
1916 
2039 
2104 
2136 
2274 
2417 
104 
442 
643 
682 
940 
1066 
1142 
1229 
1320 
1660 
1694 
1774 
1936 
2267 
2409 
2480 
2481 



A. Kielman 

A. P. Richardson, P. M 
A. Kielman........... ..... 

R. F. Wingate 

•ame 

A. Kielman 

R. F. Wingate 

eame 

•ame 

A. Kielman 

R. F. Wingate 

R. P. Stndley A Co 

A. Kielman «... 

R. F. Wingate 

•ame 

■ame 

•ame 

same • 

A. Kielman 

R. F. Wingate 

Nic. Melcher 

R. F. Wingate 

•ame 

A. Kielman. 

R. F. Wingate 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M.... 

•ame 

R. F. Wingate 

A. Kielman 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M.... 

R. F. Wingate 

A. Kielman 

R. F. Wingate 

•ama 

Mri. B. Lackey, P. M.... 



Total. 



$ 24 50 

18 00 
34 60 

87 26 
36 96 
32 00 
63 60 
63 46 

88 60 
26 UO 

23 00 
67 60 
80 60 

4 60 
121 00 
76 60 
66 00 
43 00 
SO 00 
21 00 
16 00 
30 00 

19 60 
80 00 
10 00 
10 00 

4 00 
10 00 
26 00 

9 99 
28 60 

24 00 
88 00 
37 60 
24 99 

$1,189 18 



CONTINGENT EXPEN! 



Dkto. 


Ho. 


To whom drawn. 


AmonDt. 


Oct. 

Nov. 


t,l3» 

i.'.'.'.'. 

19 

7, 18*7 

12 

SB 

11 

IT 

SO 

27 

4..... 

12!";; 
22..... 

23 

1* 

28 

3 

2i 

J 

3 

6 

ISOS.... 

I« 

13 

24!!!". 

2i!!"' 

13 

17 

a 

iCZ 

« 

> — 


WST 
1657 
1*8! 
170* 
34 

78 
440 

839 
383 
•M 
lOlS 
IITI 
1220 
13Se 
I48U 
1«3 
1*20 

mo 

1040 
16«« 
173S 

1844 

iBia 

184* 

2070 
!I« 
33*1 

24D2 

105 
208 
227 
77S 
854 
1050 
1230 
13*0 
1533 
1*93 
1726 
1800 
181B 
19B4 


A 


» 33 30 
42 40 










Jm. 




17 OS 














April 






i.Kielinui .'. '.„.„ ». 










July 


Emoi7 B. FoiWr, PublEe PriBter _... 


1ST 50 




10 SO 
























Ane. 


Mfi. a. L«key, P. M 


26 80 


Btpt. 






Mr.. B.L«*ej, P. H 


»70 




EUwood Kirby, Public PtiBtor. » .. 

Q. W. Sone...... 


21 76 
7* 00 


















































AprU 






Mr.. B. Lickfy, P. M ™C...™« ..™ 


18 DO 

126 96 




Jul, 


A. kiflmu. ..:.'. ....„ 


34 50 




Fntncii Ro«r „ 


10 00 










ToUl 






$1,080 18 



118 



riSBUBSEMENTS OUT OF 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF SUPERINTENDENT OF 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



Date. 



Oct. 1, 1866.... 

2 

3 

29 

5oy. 14 

23 

27 

Dec. 6 

ID 

19...— 
Jftn. 2,1867.... 

12 

14 

31 

Feb. 6 

March 4 

6 

7 

20 

21 

■ 

22 

25 

28 

April 1 

2 

3 

6 

26... .. 
27.... 
ICaj 3.... 
14.... 
29.... 

Jane 24.... 

.lulT 1.... 

6.... 

II.... 

11.... 

16.... 

23.... 

26.... 

30.... 

* 12.... 

13.... 
17.... 
20.... 
21.... 
October 1.... 

2.... 

5.... 

9.... 

19.... 

Not. 1.... 

16.... 

18.... 



No. 



1554 

1559 

15fi4 

1609 

16-.'5 

1646 

16H3 

1681 

1687 

1704 

6 

14 

60 

51 

99 

113 

259 

338 

»42 

371 

647 

651 

653 

678 

698 

748 

795 

862 

885 

901 

991 

1003 

1031 

1087 

1188 

1189 

l.'tOfl 

1335 

1417 

1454 

1466 

14»6 

1529 

1542 

1559 

1574 

1«20 

1622 

1628 

1653 

1664 

1670 

1878 

1883 

1917 

1996 

2014 

2075 

2129 

2259 

2271 



T. A. Parker, (snlary) 

A. Kielman g. 

Francis lloer 

T. A. Parker 

same 



To whom drawn. 



same 

A. P. Richardson, P. M. 

T. A Parker 

Bennett. A Williams 

T. A. Parker 

same (salary) 

same : 

A. Kielman 

T. A.Parker 



same , 

B. P.Gray 

H.C. Pickering 

F. Rowe 

W. F. Parker 

Haskins & Cammeyer 

1. A. Parker 

A. P. Kichard'ton 

U. S. Express <^ompany. 
W. F. Parker 



same 

P. C {?chott 

W. F. Parker 

A. Kielman 

M. A J. Obermayer 

T. A. Parker 

A. P. Richardson, P. M 

K. S. Foster, Public Printer. 

W. F. Parker 

T. A. Parker 

Methodist Book Depository. 

T. A. Parker .* 

K. P. Gray 

W. U. Telegraph Company. 

B. St. James Fry 

W. F. Parker. 

A. P. Richard«on, P. M 

Nowcomb A Co 

A. P. Richardson, P. M.. . 

same . . . . 



same . . . . 

W. U. Telegraph Company. 

2. C. Draper 

U. S. Express Company 

B. St. Jauies Fry 

S. Bennett 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M' 

flame 

W. U. Telegraph Company. 

J. J. Abell et al 

!a. Kiplman 

iMrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

C F. Blasfr 

0. T. Fishback 

W. U. Telegraph Company, 
.J. T. Beach, St. Joe Union. 
A. Gundelfinger <t al 



Amount. 



750 00 

33 30 

2 75 

150 00 
50 00 

125 00 
60 36 
50 00 
20 00 

125 00 

750 00 

110 00 
42 85 
75 00 
75 00 
49 00 
2 50 
8 00 

125 00 
18 00 
75 00 

26 51 
17 85 
35 00 
20 00 

27 00 
40 00 
39 60 

2 00 
25 00 
45 00 
54 00 
84 55 
15 00 
13 00 

12 00 
4 05 

3 88 

8 00 
15 00 

15 00 
7 00 

4 00 

13 00 

6 00 

7 48 
10 00 

1 75 
3 00 

16 00 

9 00 

17 00 
6 15 

71 30 

77 70 

20 00 

9 40 

f- 35 

1 20 

14 00 
62 00 



^ 



THE REVENUE FUND. 



119 



FOB CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS— CoHTiwini*. 



Date. 


No. 


ITOY. 


27, 1867 


2322 
2323 


Dec. 


16 


2463 




17 


2468 


Jan. 3, 


1868.. •• 


96 
108 




4 


131 




14 


192 




26 


286 




31 


318 


Fd). 


16 


613 




27 


631 


Marcli 


3 


687 




20 


798 




23 


832 
836 




27 


936 


April 


1 


1049 




20 


1226 




23 


1240 


May 


6 


1322 




29 


1462 


Jane 


18 


1542 




29 


1678 
1579 



To whom drawn. 



Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

U. S. Express Company 

Cantwell k Shorb 

U. 9. Express Company.... 
K. Kirby, Public Printer.... 

A. Kielman .' 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

same 

C. C. Draper 

Fred. Buebrle 

same 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

W. U. Telef>japh Company 
Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

same 

A. W. Barton 

U. S. Express Company.... 

A. Kielman 

E. P. Gray et al 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

same 

same 

T. A. Parker 

W. U. Telegraph Company. 
T. A. Parker 

Totol 



Amount. 


$ 33 U 


2 85 


8 09 


2 00 


25 09 


33 49 


4 69 


16 09 


12 00 


16 00 


16 00 


3 90 


1 95 


13 00 


13 09 


18 90 


96 


36 25 


26 66 


98 40 


30 00 


11 00 


32 00 


6 89 


27 24 


$4,043 67 



120 



DISBURSBMENTS OUT OP 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF SUPREME COURT. 



Date. 



Nov. 12, 186fi 
Dec. 4 

12... 



16.... 
Jan.' 28, 1867. 
26 

?1... 

Feb. 21 , 

Harch 2 

18 

38 

26 

AT>ril 17 

May 28 

Jaly 6 

8 

9 

18 

30 

Aa^uat 30 

October 81 

Nov. 16 

27 , 

Jan. 23, 1868... 

Feb. 12...... 

14 .... 

27.... 
March 2.. .. 

26 .... 
April 17.... 

Jnly 11 

Sept. 8 

16 

Nov. 2 

20 

28 

24 



No. 



1622 

1626 

1677 

1696 

1697 

1700 

71 

81 

86 

98 

142 

148 

146 

217 

607 

623 

688 

689 

699 

702 

964 

1168 

1169 

1420 

1438i 

1447 

14«8 

1662 

1709 

2122 

2268 

2317 

266 

317 

824 

473 

488 

627 

680 

867 

1208 

1780 

1979 

2036 

2037 

2288b 

2349 

2.^60 

2871 



To whom drawn. 



Ja<. C. Adamf, Marshal... 

J. T. Beach 

0. T. Fishback, Clerk 

Jas. C. Adams, Marshal.... 

J.J. Dailey tt al 

McKee, Fishback A Co 

Wm. C. Dancan 

A. Kielman 

A. Macule 

N. C. Burch 

Jas. T. Beach 

Thos. B. Biggers 

same , 

same 

N. 0. Borch 

R. P. Stndley A Co 

Wm. Kinnie 

F. Roer 

J. H. Cranes/ al 

E. B. Woodson 

Thos. B. Bigg^rs 

W. H. Gray el al i 

CD. Williams 

Wm. C. Duncan , 

M. A J. Obermayer 

N. C. Bnrch 

Foster A Cooper 

Wm. Kinnie. 

Wm. M. Albin ef of.... 

0. T. Fishback 

Jas. T. Beach 

0. T. Fishback , 

Wm. C. Duncan , 

Wm. Kinnie 

M. A J. Obermayer 

Wells A Donaboe 

R. P. Studley ACo 

Wm. M. Albin 

Kirby A Cooper 

O.T. Fishback 

same * , 

Wm. G. Duncan 

Wm.M. Albin 

Union Printing Company. , 

Wm. Kinnie 

Wm. Keiler 

0. T. Fishback 

McKee, Fishback A Co 

Wm. H. Gray 

ToUl 



Amonnt. 



I 

120 00 
26 00 
44 70 

132 00 

121 45 
237 60 

20 00 
12 00 
12 00 
62 50 
44 00 

109 90 

140 00 

176 05 

73 05 

12 50 

24 00 

8 35 
1,476 21 

24 00 

71 02 

1,350 15 

35 00 

18 90 

6 50 

9 85 

21 00 
14 00 
31 15 

403 79 
20 70 

829 50 
20 00 

24 00 
1 80 

7 75 
87 00 

187 50 
20 00 

85 00 
847 10 

19 50 
68 20 

25 00 
12 00 

1,125 00 
828 60 

86 50 
10 87 



$7,471 69 



TBX KEVENVE FUBD. 



121 



, I 



OONTINGENT EXPENSES DISTRIOT COURTS. 



Date. 


No. 


To vhom drawn. 


Amount. 


Maj 6, 1867 
7 


1053 
1062 
1240 
1245 
1255 
1319 
1414 
1461 
1469 
1524 
15?3 
1569 
2137 
2520 
145 
296 
297 
338 
1522 
]52» 
1525 
.1535 
1573 
1697 
1711 
1782 
1810 
1815 


• • 

H. K. White ^ • 

L. Sarsreant 


$ 18 00 
269 85 


JuiM $ 


William C. DnncaD tt <!/...................•.••.». 


28 50 


10...... 

11 


J. H. Johnston tt al,„ „ 

8. Bennett & Co 


205 65 
50 00 


29 


Janes P. Ryan. ...... ..••«.*. i •• 


11 00 


Jvlj 5....... 

11...... 


R, P. Studley A Co., et al', 


300 65 


• tonkins A AVise'e/ al 


225 75 


12...... 


W. W, Donham 


12 80 


22 


J. T. Clements tt ai 


185 50 


29 


Macon Arsras.. ..■•.>.■• 


8 00 


' 31 


L Sar^reant cl oi... 


64 65 


IffoT* 4 


S. L^vison.... 


51 75 


Dec 28 


W. W. Donham 


130 15 


JaaiiarT7,l868 
29 


H. K. White 


98 05 


J. T. Clements 


65 20 




J. Maher • 


53 35 


Peb. 4 


H. B. Machens. • 


42 00 


Jan* 13 


W. C. Duncan 


5L 43 




W, Kinnie » 


34 00 




A. B. Hart..'. 


48 00 


16 


J. H.- Johnston 


50 00 


27 


Reran A Julian... ...r..... •....tt'rt.....................f». ...... 


53 00 


Jul/ 2 

3 


II. K. White .-. 


71 23 


W. W. Donhitm > ; 


139 55 


17 

25 

27...... 


W. W. Davenport m 

L. Sargeant ...^ 

W . C. Barr • .' 


24 00 
91 00 
30 90 




Total 






$2,414 56 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF ELECTIONS. 



Date. 



OctoUr 2, 1866 
Dec 15 

Jan. b, 1867 
April 1.... 
Dec 6.... 

Kagr 13. 1868 
June 17.... 
Jolj 15.... 

16.... 

17.... 
Ani^t 16.... 



No. 



1562 
1702 
1703 
29 
834 
2405 
2482 
1364 
1537 
1757 
1776 
1779 
1895 



To whom drawn. 



George Whitcomb A Co 

J. L. Moeer 

O. G. Bnrch .-. 

James Mack. 

E. S. Poster, Public Printer. 

G. A. Moser 

Georre Hall 

E. Kirby, Public Printer 

Mrs. B. Lackey, P. M 

L. M. Conkling. 

P. McGinnis... , 

0. Kirkham 

Tbomaa Phelan 



Amount. 



Total.. 



$ 7 50 

80 OO 

70 00 

78 20 

155 00 

23 50 

10 00 

21 00 

7 00 

109 00 

108 00 

196 35 

303 00 

$1,118 55 



122 



DISBUBSEHBNTS OCT OF 



SALARY AND CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF COMMISSIONER 

OF STATISTICS. 



Date. 


No. 
1579 


Oct. 10, 1866 


Jan. 10, 1867 


42 




41 


April 11 


930 


Aug^Qst 8. .... 


1600 


Uct. 1:3 


2083 



To whom drawn. 



L. D. Morse, Commissioner , 

R. P. Studley A Co, et al 

L. D. Morse, Commissioner .'., 

same 



same 
same 



Total. 



Amonnt. 



$250 00 


44 Ih 


2i>0 00 


284 00 


250 00 


130 32 



$1,209 or 



SALARY OF ADJUTANT GENERAL. 

ACT APPROVED MARCH 21, 186S. 



Date. 



May 
.July 
Oct. 



6, 1868 

6 

1 



No. 



To whom drawn . 



1321 'S. P. iSimpson. 
1718 same 

2165 same 



Total. 



Amount. 



$ 60 44 

600 00 
500 00 



$1,060 44 



FOR PAY OF SWAMP LAND AGENT. 



Date. 



Jan. 11, 1867 



Ko. 



44 



To\7hom drawn. 



Charles E. Moss, Jr., Agent 
Total 



Amoont. 



$400 00 



$400 00 



THE BEVENOE FOND. 



123 



FOR SALARY AND CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF SPECIAL 
AGENT 'JO PROSECUTE SOLDIERS' CLAIMS. 



Date. 


No. 


Oct. 4, 1866 


1569 


Jan. 6, ldG7 


2S 


April 6 


894 


July 3 


1395 


Oct. 3 


1968 


Jan. 4, 1868 


120 


April 4 


1107 


July 6 


1719 


Oct. 6 


2231 



Albert Sigel. 
same 
same 
same 
same 
same 
eamo 
same 
same 



To whom drawn. 



Total.. . . 



Amount. 



$1,000 30 

1,005 55 

1,008 70 

1,003 50 

087 08 

995 25 

995 75 

998 00 

1,001 45 



$8,996 18 



FITTING UP GOVERNOR'S OFFICE. 



Date. 


No. 


March 4, 18C7 


207 


6 


3:H 




347 


7 


3(^8 


8 


395 



To whom drawn. 



M. A J. Obermayer 
A. Gundelfinger.... 

C. Staats 

II. C. Rich 

C. F. Krause 

Total.... 



Amount. 



$163 20 

3 90 

134 80 

43 50 

10 70 



$365 10 



REPAIRING AND FITTING UP STATE LIBRARY. 



Date. 


No. 


March 5,1867 


316 


7 


369 




370 




390 


8 


397 







To whom drawn. 



A. Maee^ie 

II. C. Rich 

S. T. Bryant 

A. McDowell & Co. 
H. Rabsahl 



Total. 



Amount. 



$ 22 60 

65 50 

42 00 

180 00 

1,700 00 

$2,000 00 



124 



DISBURSEUEKTS OUT OF 



CONSTRUCTING WAIER CLOSET. 



Date. 


No. 


To whomd 


Amonnt. 


Ifftreh 6. 1867. 


319 


H. Umstead 


$635 00 




Totel 




$635 00 



CARPETING AND FITTING UP SENATE CHAMBER. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


lUreh5,1867. 


809 


4. McDowell & Co 


$1,065 69 





Total 



$1,65 60 



THI BBVKNUK FVBD. 



125 



REPAIRING CAPITOL AND GROUNDS. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


March 4. 1867. 


264 

281 

307 

321 

322 

363 

169 

319 

327 

329 

426 

450 

469 

645 

714 

716 

789 

802 

842 

847 

1104 

1106 

1106 

1173 

1217 

1231 

1234 

1261 

1301 

1335 

1410 

1417 

1434 

1482 

1508 

•1527 

1546 

1549 

1561 

1574 

1581 

1582 

1724 

1731 

1740 

1808 

1824 

1829 

1866 

1897 

1908 

1919 

1924 

1925 

1950 

1964 

1966 

1967 

2003 

2004 

2007 

2051 

2060 


M. A J. ObermaTor 


$ 83 Oft 


5 


J, Q. Schmidt 


16 00 




J. Bohm.. •••........ • 


14 00 




H. Stark 


63 10 


6 


B. R. Naylor 


58 75 


7 


J. Roesen .•»•..... 


87 10 


Jan. 10. 1868... 


CharlM Staatff. .........i..w ..x..^. . . j . 


140 10 


31 


W. Buehrle , 


40 50 


Feb. 1 


Ed. Scbueller. Factor Missouri Penitentiary..... 


6 50 




J. Roesen 


33 50 


11 


Charles Staats 


169 05 




A. Qundelflnsrer • 


27 25 


12 


Jacob Ueinrichs 


73 60 


28 


A. A. Rice.... 


60 00 


March 6 


J. Hoffman 


45 00 




J. Fikenscher 


45 OO 


19 


A. A. Rice • ; 


50 00 


21 


Rob. Bettner 


12 40 


24 


Z. 0. Smith A Co 


2 01 




S. C. Davis. 


18 75 


April 4 


J. Hoffman 


51 00 


J. Fikenscher ...» 


51 00 




L. B. Belden 


50 00 


13 


M. Wallendorf 


86 61 


18 


P. S. Whitaker , 


5 00 


22 


J. Fikenscher. ......... ............T..r*-.........t.....M.. 


9 60 




J. Hoffman. .............^....1.^..^... ....t.... ......... ......... 


9 60 


25 




61 50 


May 1 

9 


C. Way 


45 00 


A. A. Kice 


20 00 


22 


D. DeGroat 


3 50 


23 


J, Fikenac her. 


24 75 


26 


Andrews A Wilson • 


166 70 


Jung 1..... 


C. Way 


45 00 


11 


H. E. Schultx 


6 00 


13 

19 


J. P. Rice ^ 

A. A. Rice 


13 75 
20 00 


20. 


C. Wav 


30 00 


24 


E. Camnlin 


12 75 


27 


J P. Rice 


38 76 


29 


Riddler A Bojer...... •. 


30 45 
5 00 


July 7 

9 


F. W. Maver 


29 25 


J. Hoffman 


5 25 


13 


Uuffard A Steel 


6 68 


25 


J. P. Rice 


60 00 


30 


J, Fikenscher... .........•••... 


28 00 


31 


H. L.Rice 


92 50 


Aufiiut 10 

15 


C. Staats 


14 00 


H. L. Rice 


30 00 


17 


Colman A Sanders .....*... 


16 00 


20 


Riddler A Boyer..... 


25 30 


21 


J. P. Rice 


88 76 




A. A. Rice .....«• 


90 00 


28 


li. L. Rice..... • 


25 00 


29 


A» Eckenroth •••..•• 


12 40 




Josenh Schneider. 


19 00 


fM)t. 6 


J. Fikenscher 

Thomas Crawford ••• 


25 00 
6 50 




Josenh Schneider. .....•.*■ ••....... 


8 00 


7 


H. li. Rice.. •••••.••.......•• ••.••••.. 


16 00 


17 


U. S. Exnresi Co 


2 40 


18 


J.P.Rice 


18 76 



i2< 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OP 



REPAIBINO CAPITOL AND GROUNDS— CoimiruMB. 



Date. 




Sept. 19; 1868 

23.... 
Octber 1.... 



Not. 



3. 

6. 

7. 
12. 
15. 
16. 

17. 

20. 
26. 
28. 
30. 



6. 
12. 

13. 
U. 



17. 
24. 



2061 

2075 

2167 

2220 

2236 

2241 

2245 

22d9 

2267 

2269 

2272 

2277 

2278 

2283 

2291 

2296 

22S0b 

2281b 

2291b 

2202b 

2296b 

2:U)2 

2303 

2310 

2313 

2315 

2320 

2333 

2367 



To whom drawn. 



A. A. Rice 

H, L. Rice 

Thompson & Parsons 

Thomas Cotsworth 

J. P. Rice 

A. A. Rice 

J. Hoffman 

II. L. Rice 

G. Owens 

J. Owens 

•James McClure et al 

U. A. Ahrens.... 

J. P. Rice 

Gr. Owens 

H. A. Ahrens 

Benj. DeLemos 

Joseph Slett 

J. P. Rice 

Ben^. DeLemos.. 

Pacific Railroad Company. 

Joseph Schneider 

A. J. Curnutt 

Benj. DeLemos 

lliddler &. Boyer 

J. P. Rice 

Uuffard <fc Steel 

A. A. Rice 

II. L. Rice 

Benj. DeLemos 



Amount. 



Total 



$ 42 00 


12 ftO 


20 60 


10 25 


26 25 


27 00 


4 50 


70 00 


2 OO 

3 00 


7 OO 


5 OO 


23 75 


14 OO 


3 75 


16 OO 


6 OO 


17 50 


20 60 


83 30 


64 00 


25 00 


17 50 


8 36 


22 60 


16 15 


67 00 


62 60 


4 10 



$3,030 10 



FENCING CAPITOL GROUNDS, 



Date. 


No. 


March 18, 18(57 


019 




621 


27 


736 


30 


779 


June 13, 1S6S 


1526 


23 ... 


1554 


30 


15S3 


July 13 


1741 


21 


1791 


August 3 


1842 


10 


isr.4 


20 


1922 


Sept. 1 


1975 


Not. 14 


2314 




2316 



To whom drawn. 



I). F. Howo 

James D. Leonard et al 

C. F. Lohman 

William llardy 

J. P. Rice 

C. Muus 

Paoilic Railroad Company 

Huffard A Steel 

Barnum &> Bro 

D. U. DeGroat 

Barnum &> Bro 

Pacific Railroad Company 

Jt^fierson City Machine and Foundry Company. 

J. P. Rice f 

lluff«ird k Steel 



Amount. 



$ 37 08 

313 46 

40 03 

46 00 

6 26 

96 00 

4 06 

33 00 

246 00 

27 00 

600 00 

6 70 
30 45 
10 00 

7 94 



$1,500 O.'i 



H 



THB REVENCK FTND. 



127 



SALARY OF FOND COMMISSIONERS. 



Data. 



Oct. 12, 1865 
Not. 30.... 
Msrc1il9, 1867 
April 1.... 



July 



October 1.... 
Dec. 3.... 
Jan. 2,1868.... 
Febr. 11.... 



April 

July 
Aug. 
Oct. 



1. 
2. 
1. 
28. 
6. 




1586 

1669 

635 

801 

824 

1337 

1338 

1887 

2362 

77 

453 

1016 

1076 

1B86 

1957 

2223 

2224 



Wm. Bishop.... 
A. Thompson.. 

same 

same 
Wm. Bishop.... 

same 
A. Thompson.. 
Wm. Bishop.... 
A. Thompson.. 
Wm. Bienop.... 
A. Thompson.. 
Wm. Bishop.... 
A. Thompson.. 
Wm. Bishop..., 
A. Thompson.. 
Wm. Bishop..., 
A. Thompson., 



Total. 



To whom drawn. 



Amount. 



$ 250 00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


125 00 


250 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


125 


CO 


125 CU 


125 00 


125 


00 


125 00 


125 


00 



$2,875 «0 



EXPENSES UNDER AN ACT PROVIDING FOR THE SALE OF 

CERTAIN RAILROADS, etc, 

APFROVED FEBKUARY 19, 1^66. 



Oct. 16, 1866 

VOT. 1. 




To whom drawn. 



Theo. Plate A Co.. 



same 

Charles G. Ramsey Jk Co 

same 

J. W. Forney A McMichael 

G. W Henrick, Supt C. A F. R. R 

A. W. Mftapin^ Commissioner S. W. B. P. R. R 

.McKee, Fishback & Co 

Chester Harding, Jr., Com. St. Louis A I. M. R. R 

Charles G. Ramsey A Co 

R. Weber, Commissioner 

B. Rt. James Fry 

D. P. Tiederoann 

McKee, Fishback A Co 

lyharles Rankin, Commissioner 

R. J. McElhinney 

George Knapp A. Go • 

I*. J. Osterhaas 

R. M. Baker 

J. McFall, Auctioneer 

A. W. Maupin. 

W. H. Heath 



Amount. 



Tolnl. 



$ 510 40 


599 70 


374 50 


332 eo 


897 20 


500 00 


209 75 


1,(>91 76 


2,786 13 


206 40 


1,000 00 


274 00 


950 00 


142 29 


2,000 00 


125 06 


1,020 50 


155 67 


1 50 


7,339 56 


250 00 


200 00 


^'J?.'.«l' .«5 



128 



DISBURBEMBNTS OUT OF 



BOARD OF IMMIGRATION. 



Date. 



March 0, 1867 
April 11, 1868 



No. 



413 
115i 



To whom drawn. 

A. Vall«, Treasurer , 

same 

Totol 



Amount. 



$ 2,000 00 
2,000 00 



$ 4^000 



BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 



Date. 



May .7, 1867 
April 10, 1868 



No. 



1059 
U43 



To whom drawn. 

Wm. T. Essex, Treasurer 

same 

Total 



Amount. 



$ 2,200 00 
5,100 00 



$ 7,300 00 



EXPENSES UNDER ACT TO SECURE THE SELECTION OF 

PUBLIC LANDS, etc. 

APPROVED MARCH 19, 1866. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


Nov. 17, 1866 


1632 

1670 

15 

22 

815 


^ 


$786 00 
150 00 


Dec. 1 


J. J. GravelT. " 


Jan. 2. 1867 


Wm. H- McLane. " 


1,116 00 
402 00 


5 


James 8. McMurtry* " 


April 1 


K. S. Foster. Public Printer........ 


41 00 


ToUl 






$ 2,405 00 



THE RBVANUtt FUND. 



129 



APPROPRIATION TO PAY COUNSEL IN SUIT REGARDING 
• ' WOLF ISLAND. 




Nov. 21,1866 
Dec. 26, 1867 
March 26, 1868 



1688 

2500 

926 



0. A. Newcomb..... 
J. A. Christopher . , 
Henderson A Dyer., 



Total. 



$ 1,000 00 

37 75 

1,200 00 



$ 2,237 75 



FOR SALE OF BANK STOCK 

APPROVED MARCH 6, 1866. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


Nov. 22, 1866 


1642 


J. FofiTs:. Commissioner • .......... 


$418 55 




« 

Total 






$ 418 55 



SINKING FUND— (Old Debt.) 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amonnt. 


KoT. 22, 1866 


1641 


J. Poev. Commissioner sale of Bank Stock .t....i..w«t •••> 


$21 08 




Total 






$21 08 



EXPENSES UNDER ACT FOR THE PAYMENT OF ARREARS 

TO E, M. M. . 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


Not. 27, 1866 


1661 
656 


M. Weber 


• 


$150 60 


March 21, 1867 


U. S. Express Co... 




$ IS 




Total.... 








$ 168 25 



9-A B 



180 



DISBUBSBMBirra OUT OF 



ACT IN RELATION TO SWAMP AND :OVERFLOWED LANDS. 

APPROVED HABOH 27, 1868. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


May 5, 1868 


1815 


J. E. Smith, lleeister of Lands 


$ 206 60 




Total 






$ 206 50 



ACT TO PAT ARREARS OF E. M. M. 

APPROVED MARCH 9, 1867. 



Date. 



March 12, 1867 
15 



No. 



445 
588 



To whom drawn. 



A. S. YogdeB^. 
same 



Total. 



Amount. 



$ 10,000 00 
191,000 00 



$201,000 00 



ACT TO REBUILD THE HOUSE OF THE PRESIDENT OF 

STATE UNIVERSITY. 

APPROVED MARCH 11, 1867. 



Date. 


Ne. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 

1 


Apwl 17,1867 


052 


.TatnAfl "H. Wanrh. TiManrer.... ..; 


$16,000 00 


iIhUIOS &&. »• ^••^■*# *.«wi^»« •• ..•.....*..*..*....•...•*..•*■..*.......... 

Total 






$10,060 00 



THK BKVKinjE FUND. 



131 



ACT FOE THE RELIEF OF HEIRS OF ROBERT CREIGHTON 

APPROVED MABCH 4, 1868. 



Data. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


March 7. 1868 


721 


Heirs of Rohert Creiehton 


$591 50 




Total 






LSP** 



EXPENSES UNDER ACT SUBMITTING CONSTITUTIONAL 

AMENDMENTS. 

APPROVED MARCH 8tH, 1867. 



Date. 



Sept. 4, 1868 
Nov. 24 

27 

28 

30 

Dec. 2 

3 

6 

9 



No. 



1906 
2366 
2368 
2369 
2370 
2382 
2384 
2387 
2389 
2393 
2394 
2395 
2400 
2407 
2423 
2430 
2437 



To whom drawn. 



Ellwood Eirbj, Public Printer. 

Union Printing Co '. 

A. M. CaseboltA Son 

M.Blair 

A. Ackerman 

Foster & Wilder 

J. H. Bode 

E. Schierenberg 

Plate, Olshausen A, Co 

Chas. Weissmann 

O. A. A J. L. Moser 

J. S. Worthington 

A. F. Lewis 



Cutler &> Young. 
Chas. H. Day.... 

S. W. Smith 

Thos. Proctor... 



Total. 



Amount. 


$ 5 04 


86 50 


86 60 


86 50 


86 50 


86 50 


86 50 


86 50 


86 50 


80 50 


. 86 50 


86 50 


86 50 


86 50 


86 50 


86 50 


86 50 


$1,3^9 04 



183 



DlflBUBSBMBHTS OCT OV 



PAY OP PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS. 
(general statutes 1866, pa0K 78, section 26.) 



iif»i* 

Date. 
Oce^ 2, 1868 




2411 
2412 
2413 
2414 
2416 
2416 
2417 
2418 
2419 
2420 
2421 
2445 



To whom drawn. 



C. I. FUley 

Theo. Brnere , 

B. S. Waterbury.... 

Geo. Husmann 

E. A. Holcomb 

Bacon Mont^^mery, 
Thos. E. BasBett.... 

Carl Schan 

Lewis GeorgenB 

C. N. Brown 

J. P. Tracey 

C. N. Brown 

Total 



Amount. 




$ 60 


00 


85 


00 


145 


00 


80 


00 


70 


00 


35 


00 


35 60 


60 00 


90 00 


10 


00 


90 00 


114 00 



$824 00 



EXPENSES UNDER ACT FOR REGISTRATION OF VOTERS. 

APPROVED MARCH 21, 1868. 



Date. 

S«pt; 4, 1868 
19 

28.... 

Oct. 22.!!! 

29.... 

30.... 

Nov.- 7.... 

13... 

16.... 

17.... 

* 21.... 

25.... 

27.... 
30.... 

Dee. 29.... 
26... .t 
30 



^^^r. 



No. 



1991 

2062 

2063 

2096 

2284 

2270b 

2274b 

2278b 

2298b 

2311 

2327 

2328 

2329 

2355 

2376 

2378 

2383 

2401 

2402 

2478 

2485 

2491 



To whom drawn. 



Amount. 



EUwood Kirby, Public Printer 

H. Wilcox 

L. M. Conklin 

Jas. Foster 

Ohas. F. Bruihl , 

F. M. McGinnia 

A. 6. McKee.. 

S. A. Reppy 

Ed. Angiistin 

A. F. Lewis 

David Wells 

E. H. Benham 

J. K. Kidd 

H. Berry. 

Jaa. T. Foster 

Thos. S. Rhoades 

H. Wilcox ^ 

B. Montgomery 

L. M. Conklin 

B. £[. Benham... ••■•^■^•••vM >•»••■ 

D. M. Draper 

P. D. Popenoe • 

Total f 



$ 191 85 
460 00 
135 00 
170 00 
204 00 
733 00 
321 30 
550 00 
1,045 00 

62 00 
214 00 

44 00 
506 85 

56 00 
166 00 
500 00 

34 50 
584 00 
536 00 
7 00 
204 00 
805 00 



$7,529 50 



THE BEVEmiE FDBI). 



19S 



LIBRARY OF MISSOURI PENITENTIARY. 

(laws 1867, PAGE 8, SECTION 3 AND GENERAL STATUTES, PAGE 875, SECT. 3^.)- 



Bate. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


July 18, 1867 

Aug. 29 

AprU 29>1868 


1609 
1703 
1286 


J. W. JohnsoDi Chaplain 

same , , 


$ 50 00 
100 00 


same 


126 00 


1 
Total 






$276 00 



REPAIRING PORTRAIT OF COL. BENTON. 

APPROVED FEBRUART 21, 1866. 



Date. 


No; 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


Nov. 21. 1866 


1619 


Wm. BiflhoD. 


$ 170 6 




Total 




$170 60 



ACT FOR ERECTION OF MONUMENT, &C. 

APPBOVED MABCH 19, 1869. 



Date. 



March 30. 1867 
June 



No. 



777 
1321 



To whom drawn. 



J. W. Brown et al, 
E. W. Wame 

TotaL 



mm 



Amount. 



$ 72 75 

236 00 

$307 V5 



134 



DISBURSfiHENTS OCT OF 



/ 



ACT TO PAY EQUESTRIAN PORTRAIT OF GENERAL LYON. 

APPROVED MARCH 15, 1867. 



i«» '■' 



Date. 



Mweh 16, 1867 



No. 



599 



To whom drawn. 



G. G. Biagham. 
Total 



,»m» m I V 



Amount. 



3,000 00 



$3,000 00 



FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE MISSOURI MILITARY INSTITUTE. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


Jan« S. 1867 


16 
283 




$ 3,000 00 
3,000 00 


Jao« S6. 1868 


same 




TotaL 


' ■ ■■ ■ '*'/»■ ^-' 


$6,000 00 



ACT FOR LINCOLN MONUMENT. 

APPROVED FEBRUARY 6tH, 1868. 



Date. 



■ M i »«l»'< W. » ' 



18,1868 



" • » '1 ? ' 



No. 



948 



To whom drawn. 



Lincoln Monument Aeeociation. 
Total 



Amount. 



$1,000 00 



$1,000 00 



THX BXVXSUB FUND. 



135 



TO PAY THE DEBTS OF THE PENITENTIART. 



Date. 


9o. 


March 16, 1868 


502 


18 


612 




616 


19 


630 


ou.«...> 


760 


AprU 3, 1868 


1093 


May 4 


1310 


July 8 


1709 


Oct* 12 


2268 



To whom drawn. 

Bd. Bchneller, Factor 

same 

same 

same 

same 

same 

same , 

same 

same 

Total 



Amount. 



$19,079 04 
1,778 60 
340 22 
6,660 38 
1,241 86 
40,084 04 
2,736 66 
1,430 94 
2,278 21 



$76,629 86 



EXPENSES UNDER ACT TO PROVIDE FOR SALE OF STATE 

TOBACCO WAREHOUSE. 

APPBOYED DECEMBER 15, 1865. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


Oct 17. 1866 


1606 


McEee. Fishback k Co... 


$99 00 




Total 




$99 00 



PAYMENrS UNDER CONCURRENT AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 

APFBOVBD VXBRUART 27 Ain> 28, 1868. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


March 2. 1868 


681 
698 
774 


Emory S. Foster. Public Printer 


$872 40 
300 00 




William Walker 


1ft 


Samufl Enoz... ......... ..a.. ..t...T T.--t.tt.. 


300 00 




Total ., 






. $972 40 



1B6 



BisBHRSBiasinDs om ov 



FOR PDBLIO OHARITIES. 

1. FOR THE USE OF THE DEAF Ain]F DUMB ASYLUM. 



Date. 



Jane 
May 

Jan. 
July 



5, 1867 

24 

2, 1868 
1 



No. 



27 
1162 

46 
1661 



To whom drawn. 



Thomas B. Nesbit, Treasurer 
suae 
same 
same 

Total 



Amount. 



$2,500 00 
2,500 00 
2,500 00 
2,500 09 

$10,000 00 



EDUCATION OF THE DEAF AND DUMB. 



Date. 



Oct. 

Jan. 

April 

July 

Oct. 

Jan. 

April 

July 

Oct. 



3^ 1866 

5. 1867 

1 

3 

2 

2. 1868 

2 

1 

2 



No. 



1563 

25 

Y91 

1393 

1951 

44 

1075 

1659 

2204 



To whom drawn. 



Thomas B. Nesbit, Treasurer 
same 
same 
same 
same 
same 
same 
same 
same 

Total 



Amount. 



$2,062 60 
2,368 36 
2,549 19 
2,706 25 
2,695 89 
2,951 38 
3,193 44 
3,225 00 
3,249 60 



$25,000 61 



INDIGENT FUND OF THE DEAF AND DUMB ASYLUM. 



hDate. 



Jan. 
May 

Jan. 
July 



[5. 1867 

24 

2, 1868 
1 



No. 



26 
1163 

46 
1660 



To whom drawn. 



Thomas 6. Nesbit 

same 

same 

same 

Total.. 



Amount. 



$1,060 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 06 
1,000 00 



$4,000 00 



THK EBYENUB FCm). 



187 



2. FOR THE SUPPORT OP THE LUNATIC AStXUM. 



Date. 


No. 


Oct. 2, 1866 
Jan. 1, 1867 

March 9 

Sept. 2 

March 2,1868 
Bept. 2 


1558 
2 

417 
1724 

672 
1977 



To whom drawn. 



James S. Henderson, TrenBorer 
flame 
same 
same 
same 
same 

Total 



Amount. ' 



$,3750 00 
3,760 00 
8,000 00 
8,000 00 
8,000 00 
8i000 00 



$39,500 00 



ACT FOR THB BENEFIT OF LUNATIC ASTLUM. 



APPBOYSD XABCH 25, 1868. 



Date. 



May 6, 1868 

July 1 

Dec. 26 



No. 



1317 
1589 
2484 



To whom drawn. 



James S. Henderson, Treasurer, 
same 
same 

Totel 



Amount. 



$5,000 00 

5,000 00 

10,000 00 



$20,000 00 



3. FOR THB MISSOURI INSTITUTE FOB THB EDUCATION OF THE BLIND. 



Date. 



May 16, 1867 
AprU 20, 1868 



No. 



1097 
1223 



To whom drawn. 
J 

T. B. Edgar, Treasurer 

same 

Total 



Amount. 



$15,000 00 
10,000 00 



$25,000 00 



138 



PIBBUBSEHKHTS OVT OF 



4. FOR THE ENDOWMENT OF THE SOLDIERS' ORPHANS' HOME. 



Date. 



Jan. 7, 1867 
Jan. 13, 1868 
July 27 



No. 



31 

182 

1812 



To whom drawn. 



T. B. Ed^ar, Treausurer. 
same 
same 



Total. 



Amoont. 



$2,500 00 
2,500 00 
2,500 00 



$7,500 00 



y^ 



5. PENSIONERS. 
LAWS 1841, PAGB 222, Ain> laws 1844-5, pags 248. 




April 1, 1867 

May 6 

April 10,1868 



804 
1043 
1145 



Samnel Tarwater.. 
Thomas H. Lloyd.. 
Samuel Tarwater.... 



Total. 



$100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



$300 00 



APPROPRIATION TO PAT FUNERAL EXPENSES OF HON. J. 

F. POWERS. 

APPROVED MARCH 6, 1866. 



Date. 



Nov. 24, 1866 




To whom drawn. 



Charles Thompson 
Total.... 



Amount. 



$300 00 



$300 00 



XHE RKVIH1IB timik 



139 



APFEOPEIAHON TO PAY FUNERAL EXPENSES OF HON. T* 

P. BRDTON. 

APPBOVED 7BBBUABY 19, 1866. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amoiut. 


Nor. 24, 1866 


1650 


Chiurlefl ThomDBon • 


$120 00 




Total 






$120 00 



APPROPRIATION TO PAY FUNERAL EXPENSES OF HON. M 

0. MARTIN. 

APPROVED MAKCH 19, 1868. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


March 23, 1868 


838 
843 
853 
861 
1837 


A. M. Ellison 


$ 28 00 

10 00 


24 


J. A. Justice 




Jac. Heinrichs 


150 00 


25 


G. L. Hewitt et ml 


50 00 


Aug. 1 


Charles Thomnson ...*... ••...•• 


110 00 


Total 






$348 00 



140 



DISBURSBM EMT» OUT OF 



REVENUE FUND. 

FOB REFUNDma OF PAYMENTS MADR BY COLLECTORS IN EXCESS OF AMOUNTS 

BUB FROM THEM. 



Dftte. 



J^n. 15, 1867.. 

Feb. 7 

March 19 

28 

April 6 

Sept. 4 

27 

Pec. 81 

Jan. 23,1868.. 

31 

March 4 

Dec. 30 



No. 



52 

114 

631 

752 

755 

894 

1742 

1849 

2534 

265 

313 

692 

2492 

2498 



To whom drawn. 



Thomas W. Oreen, Collector Scotland... 

R. A. Love, Collector Phelps 

W. R. Bryant, CoUector Platte 

Robert Carman, late Collector Chariton. 

B. H. Haape, late Collector Saline. 

B. F. Sillman, 

H. Bruihl, 

M. F. Woods, 

S. E. Shaw, 

James W . McFaden, 

R. A. Love, 

J. N. Langhlin, 

E. S. Rowse, 

J. H. Lightner, 



n 
n 

(t 

t€ 
tt 
H 
it 
It 



Scott, 

Cape Girardeau. 

Douglas 

Dade 

Warren........... 

Phelps 

Osare 

St. Loais 

St. Louis 



Total. 



Amount. 



$ 12 75 

3,491 45 

1,069 12 

14,639 93 

762 71 

150 69 

33 35 

HI 63 

215 47 

1,814 70 

331 31 

94 16 

118 98 

2,143 59 

$25,589 84 



SUNDRT FUIVB8 



141 



OUT OP THE INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT FUND. 



Bate. 



Jan. 22, 1807. . 

26 

Feb. !• 

22 



25. 
March 29. 
AprU 3 

17. 

25. 

May 2. 

3. 

14. 

15. 

16. 

21. 



June 
July 



27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
12. 
25. 
2. 

8. 



6. 

15. 

24. 

30. 
August 13. 

14. 

22. 

24. 

31. 
Sept. 5. 

14. 

23. 

25. 

October 4. 

9. 



16.... 
Nov, 6 ... 

13.... 

20.... 

22.... 

29.... 

30.... 
Dec. 8.... 

11.... 

12.... 

14.... 
Jan. 8^ 1868.... 

18.... 



Feb. 



i2. 

23. 

8. 

13. 



March 5. 



No. 



68 

80 
136 
146 
147 
151 
762 

87y 

960 
988 

1026 

1029 

1084 

1096 

1107 

1136 

1143 ^ 

1177 

1186 

1196 

1203 

1208 

1256 

1305 

1385 

1386 

1398 

1403 

1426 

1493 

1531 

1566 

1629 

1686 

1675 

1682 

1722 

1746 

1747 

1784 

1816 

1837 

1989 

2012 

2041 

2149 

2188 

2276 

2290 

2833 

2349 

2859 

2446 

2455 

2460 
153 
222 
265 
264 
384 
477 
485 
706 



To whom drawn. 



N. F. Shelton 

William M. Paxton. 

Gyrus Thompson 

same 



same 

same 

N. T. Doane 

H. P. Vrooraan .. 

A. Thompson 

CM. Boardman. 
Thomas Harbine. 

A. Thompson 

J. C. Orrick 

D. Bonfaam 

Thomas Harbine. 



same .• 

0. Thompson 

Thomas Harbine 

W. A. Berry 

N. T. Doane 

0. Thompson 

W. Z. Ransom 

William Challacombe. 
Charles G. Gomstock., 
John C. Orrick 



same 

D. P. Dyer..; 

Thomas Harbine 

William Bishop 

J. G. Orrick 

G. M. Boardman , 

C. 0. Gomstock 

D. P. Dyer 

G. Thompson 

William Bishop 

P. W. Ludwig 

William Bishop 

Mary A. Bishop 

A. Thompson 

J. G. Orrick 

0. O. Hess 

C. M. Boardman 

Thomas Harbine -/. 

J. G. Orrick 

G. G. Gomstock 

Thomas Harbine 

J. G. Orrick 

0. M. Boardman 

Thomas Harbine. 

G. Thompson 

1. D. Wright 

H. G. Ewing A J. L. Smith 

G. G. Gomstock 

H. G. Ewing A J. L. Smith... 

P. W. Ludwig 

G. G'. Gomstock 

B.G. Barrow 

H. P. Vrooman 

Mary A. Bishop..... • 

M. S. Paris 

William Bishop • , 

J. Shields 

L. A. H. Montague , 



Amount. 



$ 200 00 


200 00 


199 40 


50 00 


60 00 


100 00 


50 60 


50 00 


50 00 


600 00 


800 00 


50 00 


100 00 


100 00 


250 00 


200 00 


51) 00 


200 00 


198 IT 


749 40 


200 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


650 00 


8,983 52 


1>060 00 


350 00 


200 00 


1,627 78 


100 00 


100 00 


50 00 


50 00 


100 00 


200 00 


300 00 


400 00 


50 00 


49 15 


200 00 


lUO 00 


300 00 


100 00 


1,250 00 


lUO 00 


200 00 


m 88 


100 00 


150 00 


50 00 


350 00 


250 00 


TOO 00 


100 00 


8,eoo 00 


100 00 


60 00 


184 0§ 


200 00 


100 00 


200 00 


900 90 



142 



DlSBtJRSBMENTS OUT 09 



INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT FUND— Cortinubd. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. '^ 


March 9. 1868 


737 

781 

784 

834 

859 

1146 

1316 

1380 

1494 

1777 

1805 

1834 

1843 

2009 

2426 

2436 

2483 


William Biahop 


$ 50 00 

413 60 
650 00 


17 

18 


Bemamin Davis « » 

C. G. Gomstock .....%..» 


23 


M. S. Faris 


100 00 


26 


D. Bonham • 


100 00 


AprU 10 

May 6 

16 


J. A. Matnf^Y A William Z. Rannom 


50 00 


C. 0. Comstock , 


350 00 


B. Tweedell 


94 96 


JnnA 6 


C. ThomDBOD 


100 00 


July 16 

24 


W. P. Hobson 


200 00 


William L. Mills 


190 74 


AvgiXBt 1 

3 


D. Bonham , 


100 00 


William Hamilton A L. Warner , 


200 00 


Sept. 8 

Dec. 4 


J. A. Pool et al 


750 00 


Jane C. Tate 


447 72 


7 


William Whist 


lOO 00 


34 


D. P. Dver » 


50 00 




Total 






$26,340 67 



CUT OF THE SAUNE FUND. 



Date. 


No. 


Jan. 26, 1867.. 


79 


June 26 


1311 


AuspiBt 22 


1674 


31 


1720 


Sept. 18 


1797 


19 


1801 


October 17 


2055 


Dec. 28 


2623 


30 


2527 


Feb. 26, 1888.. 


617 


July 17 


1783 


22 


1797 



To whom drawn. 



Georre Miller 

F. W. Liidwig 

William Bishop. .. 

B. K. Land , 

F. W. Ludwig 

Mary Wickersham 

L. 0. Bryan , 

P. G. Stafford 

J. L. O'Bryan 

P. G. Stafford et al 

J. R. Winters 

F. A. Richardson... 

Total. .. 



Amount. 



; 50 00 
100 GO 
350 OO 

3on 00 

50 00 

150 00 

1,637 39 

150 00 

350 3S 

50 00 
150 00 

5U 00 



$3,387 77 



SVNDRT FiINDS. 



143 



OUT OF SEMINAKY MONEYS. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


. Amount. 


Jan. 80. 1868.. 


807 

288 

1092 

1732 


James H. Waurh. Treasurer Uniyersity.......... 


$ 9,493 78 

4,170 00 

11,388 00 

4,207 50 


27 


same 


April 8 

July 10 


eame 


eame «,,, 


Total 


1 


$29,259 23 



OUT OF THE SEMINARY FUND. 



Pate. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount* 


Noy. 22. 1866. 


1639 

2469 

958 


J. FofiTcr. Commissioner for sale of Bank Stock.. ••...... 


$ 136 65 

107,876 00 
1 50 00 


Dec. 17. 1867.. 


State Auditor, in trust for Seminary Fund........ 


April 17 


.Tnhn MnntvnmArv 


Total 






$108,060 55 



our OF THE STATE SCHOOL FUND. 



Date. 


No. 


Noy. 22, 1866.. 


1640 


March 23, 1867 


685 


Dec. 18 


2473 


26 


2508 




2508 


Jan. 23^ 1868.. 


259 




262 



To whom drawn. 



J. Forr, Commissioner for sale of Bank Stock 

State Board of Education , 

U. 8. Express Co , 

William Bishop, State Treasurer 

U. S. Express Co 

William Bishop, State Treasurer 

U. S. Express Co 

Total 



Amount. 



$ 897 35 


43,117 10 
30 


49,795 00 
1 20 


12,696 87 
3 60 


$106,611 42 



144 



DISBUKSBMKNTS OOT OF 



DISBURSEMEN TS OF STATE SCHOOL MONEYS. 



Data. 



October 1,1866 


1660 




3 


1666 




4 


1667 
1568 
1670 
1672 




9 


1677 




12 


1583 
1585 




13 


1687 




16 


1689 




18 


1694 




26 


1600 




27 


1603 
1604 




29 


1608 


Nov. 


6 


1612 




8 


1613 




12 


1621 




23 


1646 


Dec. 


1 


1672 




13 


1698 




29 


1713 




31 


1716 


Jan. I, 


1867.... 


8 




4 


17 
19 
20 




6 


23 




8 


36 




16 


64 
66 




21 


61 




23 


74 




28 


82 




30 


89 

.92 

96 


Feb. 


1 


102 




4 


104 




6 


110 




8 


116 
118 




13 


124 
127 




14 


130 




18 


1.34 




27 


183 




28 


199 


March 


1 


208 




4 


219 




11 


436 




16 


682 




27 


• 728 


April 


27..«.. 


1003^ 
1004 


May 


6 


1060 




20 


1124 




29 


1192 


Joae 


1 

X •• • • • , 


1214 




16 


1264 


July 


W 


1477 



No. 



To whom drawn. 



B. F. Hnrris, Trreasorer Callaway 

Adam Miller, " Osage 

D. W. Brewin^n, Treaeurer Knox 



W. C.Reed, 
Geo. W. Peay, 
Miles Allen, 
M. W. Johnson, 
H. Piepraeier, 
Wm. C. Benson, 
John E. Rains, 
R. B. Jones, 
R. Wallace, 
Jas. Price, 
S. H. Skinner, 
S. Poole, 
H. C. Oamer, 
John S. Verner, 
Sam. 'Williams, 
W. R. Love, 

E. P. Cayce, 
G. C. Church, 
T. C. West, 

R. F. W . B. Weber, 
\]ex. Andrews, 
Jaa. Bell, 
dias. Hug, 
A. Bechtol, 
A. W. Mulline, 
Q. W. Moss, 
R. R. Stanley, 
Chas. Van Pelt, 
A. J. P. Deatherage, 
Oeo. Keyser, 
A. E. Rowden, 
I. N. Rogers, 
Ed. Beaumont, 
H. G. Borth, 
Thos. Herbert, 
Jere. White, 
!8. H. Carlile, 
;E. M. Hurst, 
'Chas. Reinhard, 
R. G. Oilman, 

C. P. Cumley, 
John M. Boyd, 

D. Landon, 
John B. Bales, 
T. D. Pettijohn, 
Wm. P. Hobson, 
J. N. Dunn, 

G. W. Lipscomb, 

F. P. Anderson, 
John Hoskins, 



it 
n 
ti 
»i 
n 
it 
tt 

€4 
tt 
tt 
II 
II 
II 
It 
II 
II 
II 
II 
It 
It 
It 
tt 
tt 
tt 
It 
tt 
It 
II 
It 
It 
It 
It 
II 
It 
tt 
It 
It 
It 
II 
It 
It 
It 
It 
It 
It 
II 
It 
It 
It 
It 
tt 



A. March, 

Emory S. Foster, Public Printer 

same 

Fred. Wing, Treasurer Lincoln 

Wm. M. Miller, Treasurer Douglas 
^Vm. J. Piland, Treasurer Oxark.... 

los. T. Field, Treasurer Clay 

H. R. Sloan, Treasurer Carroll 

Blwood Rirby, Public Printer 



Morgan 

Pike 

Moniteau 

Camden 

Bates 

Grundy 

Polk 

Newton , 

Jackson 

Harrison 

Worth , 

Sullivan 

Ray 

Butler 

Adair 

Dent 

St. Francois. 

Cedar 

Pulaski 

Stoddard , 

Oregon 

Shelby 

St. Charles..., 

Clark 

Linn , 

Monroe 

Dallas 

Barton 

Shannon 

Pemiscot 

Maries 

Henry 

Wright 

Ripley 

Reynolds , 

/ Texas 

Barr:f 

Atchison 

Franklin 

Randolph , 

Mississippi.... 
McDonald .... 

Saline 

Phelps , 

Christian ...... 

Andrew 

Benton , 

De Kalb 

Vernon 

Carter .• 

Marion 



Amount. 


$ 112 64 


360 25 


374 77 


162 47 


656 50 


450 23 


206 92 


1,460 14 


426 19 


620 63 


373 23 


346 83 


657 70 


139 81 


414 37 


639 88 


568 37 


309 87 


207 79 


246 74 


174 68 


166 42 


310 31 


145 31 


SOS 33 


623 59 


493 02 


897 87 


620 19 


816 26 


90 09 


440 00 


4:^3 07 


150 37 


210 66 


797 72 


977 35 


137 06 


298 21 


1,630 26 


215 71 


393 91 


219 78 


161 70 


184 25 


328 02 


186 23 


187 44 


478 50 


261 91 


253 65 


949 19 


217 03 


650 77 


149 00 


3,688 70 


361 90 


131 01 


128 26 


208 12 


320 87 


486 00 



SUNDRY FUNDS. 
DISBUBSSMSNT8 OF 8TATB SCHOOL MONBTS-^htihvsd. 



U5 



Date. 



Aurnst 6. 1867 

7.... 

Auroit 27.... 

28.... 

80.... 

Sept. 2.... 

28... 

Oct. 8.... 

Jsn. 18, 1868... 

April 6.... 

7.... 

8.... 



9. 
10. 



11. 
18. 




14. 
16. 



16. 

17. 
18. 



20. 



28. 



24. 

25. 
17. 



1690 
1699 
1692 
1696 
1711 
1730 
1821 
2011 
224 
1116 
1119 
1122 
1123 
1124 
1126 
1130 
1136 
1138 
1144 
1149 
1160 
1161 
1156 
1167 
1158 
1169 
1160 
1162 
1163 
1164 
1166 
1166 
1167 
1169 
1172 
1178 
1180 
1181 
1186 
1187 
1189 
il92 
1193 
1194 
1197 
1198 
1199 
1200 
1206 
1206 
1209 
1211 
1212 
1213 
1216 
1218 
1219 
1220 
1221 
1224 
1236 
1236 
1237 
1238 
1243 
1246 
1247 
1252 
1265 
1266 
1268 



To whom drawn. 



Tohn M. C. Wood, Treamrer Taney. 
Jo8. H. Todd, " Miller 

Joe. T. Anderson, *' Scott.. 

EUwood Kirbv. Public Printer 

W. T. Short, Treaenrer Wayne 

W. H. Sterrett, Treaenrer Holt. 

L. H. Bigg, 

B.F. Halbert, 

Geo. M. Dewey, 

John T. Fiala, 

G. W. Beames, 

J. G. Peck, 

Charles Reinhard, 



4{ 

it 
it 

€i 
t€ 
U 
t« 
4t 
t4 
€t 
€t 
€( 
ft 
H 



Montgomery. 

Hickory , 

Chariton , 

St. Louis , 

Mocon , 

Pettis , 

Franklin , 

Montgomery. 

Lafayette 

Dayiess , 

GruDdy , 

Cooper 

Gasconade . .. 

Carroll 

Livingston .... 

Jackson 

Madison 

De Kalb 

Lincoln 

Christian 

Boone. 



10-AB« 



L. H. Rirg, 
Moses Cnapmaa, 

0. H. McGee, 
W. H. Benson, 
Christian Eeill, 
H. Reltemeyer, 
H. K. Sloan, 
J A. Trumbo, 
John T. Pendleton, " 
Daniel Peterson, " 
Geo. W . Lipscomb, ** 
Fred. Wing, " 
J. R, Weaver, '* 
R.B. Price, ** 
H. W. Hollingiworth, Treasurer Marion. 
Geo. Keyser, 
David Landon, 
S. F. Dunlap, 
N. H. Hampton, 
H. Stelbrink, 
G. A. Kenamore, 
Adam Miller, 
C. B. Maus, 
John Dawson, 
G. W . Drake, 
John Kelsay, 
Geo. Lyon, 
John 6. Rash, 
T. W. Radford, 
John Christian, 

A. R. Cushman, 
J. B. Bales, 
Moses Baker, 
J. N. Norman, 
Veasev Price, 
Geo. M. Dewey, 
Chas. Huffg, 
W. L. Johnson, 

E. F. Halbert, 
Geo. W. Parks, 
Sam. Johnson, 

F. P. Anderson, 
Jas. Abbott, 

1. N. Rodgers, 
Jas. Bell, 
L. P. Payne, 
W. H. 3terrett, 
S. W. Walker, 
R. G. Gilman, 
John Bonney, 
Wm. Litch^ 

B. F. Hams. 
John H. Smith, 
Ed. Beaumont, 
A. R. Patton, 
John S. Vamer, 
Sam. B. Turner, 
Geo. W, Belt, 



4t 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
« 

44 
44 
4t 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

41 

44 

44 

44 

44 

i< 



Pemiscot 

Saline 

Crawford 

Webster 

Jefferson 

Dent 

Osage.. .«• 

Cole 

St. Clair 

Polk 

Ray 

Buchanan 

Lewis 

Howard 

Cass 

Scotland 

Phelps 

Schuyler 

Laclede. 

Harrison 

Chariton 

St. Charles 

Nodaway..... 

Hickory 

Adair 

Maries 

Vernon 

Greene 

Henry 

Shelby 

Audrain 

Holt 

Washington 

Randolph 

Cape Girardeauw. 

Perry 

Callaway ^„, 

Johnson 

Wright 

Mercer .... 
BuUer. .. 
CaldweU. 
PUtte... 



Amount. 



830 72 


261 47 


252 89 


2,039 86 


194 26 


208 12 


367 60 


192 94 


255 97 


43,969 20 


4,882 31 


2,557 63 


3.«M 62 


2,276 74 


3,840 14 


%814 79 


2,324 26 


3,710 78 


2,263 54 


2,594 69 


2,585 62 


6,087 28 


771 94 


1,522 76 


2,752 99 


1,270 37 


3,882 38 


8,575 09 


524 30 


3,284 16 


1,163 18 


1,778 SO 


2,768 88 


1,153 68> 


2,236 61 


1,685 38. 


1,665 87 


2,555 5^ 


3,47^ 99 


6^84 69* 


3,115 16 


2,811 07 


2,594 24 


2,057 09 


560 21 


1,621 49 


1,724 65 


2,952 05 


3,011 18 


3,251 42. 


2,088 77- 


1,147 34 


2,072 93 


802 56 


1,263 50 


3,36L29> 


2,095 63: 


2,024 88 


1,719 70 


1,378 08 


2,297 86 


2,532 82 


3,260 37 


1,952 54 


2,990 06 


3,927 26 


868 03 


2,151 07 


666 86^ 


1,887 06 


2,516 4a. 



146 



DISBUBSEHBNTB OUT OF 



DISBUBSEMBNTS OF STATS SCHOOL MONEYS— CoNTUrmeo. 




April 27, 1868 
May 



JaDe 



July 



28. 
1. 



4.. 

6.. 

«.. 
11.. 

12.. 

13.. 
14.. 

16.. 

18.. 

19., 

21., 
22., 

25.. 
26.. 

27. 



28. 
29. 
30. 



8. 

9. 
20. 
22. 

3. 
16. 



Augast 17. 
Sept. 4. 

30. 
October 3. 

16. 

23. 
Nov. 12., 



1269 
1270 
1275 
1294 
1295 
"1307 
1303 
1312 
1313 
1319 
13.37 
1339 
1345 
1350 
1.366 
1367 
1368 
1376 
1381 
1383 
1384 
1387 
1392 
1396 
1401 
1406 
1407 
1426 
1430 
1431 
1437 
1441 
1443 
1458 
1463 
1466 
1467 
1468 
1470 
1483 
1497 
1502 
1543 
1553 
1701 
1758 
1764 
1902 
1989 
2101 
2221 
2270 
2286 
2306 



James M. Martin, Troaanrer Pike. 

B. F. Meyers, 
H. Waller, 
Jno. G. Farmer, 
R. B. Jones, 
Marion Cave, 
G. W. Mobs, 
W. P. Hobson, 
E. P. Cayce, 
S. H. Carlile, 
P. B. Linville, 
Thomas G. West, 
Wm. M. Miller, 
Geo. G. Hays, 
Wm. P. Knox, 
Sol. Poole, 
L. B. Valle, 

C. A. ElBon, 
H. C. Borth, 
J. T. Anderson, 
C. P. Cumley, 
Wm. M. Bennett, 
Jas. H. Todd, 
John Hoskins, 
John N. Dunn, 
C. S. Gallihan, 
John H . Howard, 
Alex. Andrews, 
A. B. Rather, 
N. C. Hood, 
Wm. Hulstone, 
R. B. Williams, 
Wm. B. Cox, 
G. A. Burckhardt, 
J. H. Howard, 
J ere. White, 
J. F. Harrington, 
[Volnev Carter, 
John H. Faulconer, 
|C. B. Maus, 
iDavid Lutes, 
Jos. T. Field, 



4€ 
44 
4t 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
« 
44 
44 
44 
(( 
44 

44 

44 

44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
« 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
4t 
44 
44 
44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 
44 



H. P. Russell, 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer 

Wm. J. Piland, Treasurer Osark... 
M. W. Johnson, " Camden. 
S. H. Skinner, " Worth... 

H. C. Donnahue, " Bates..... 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer 

IM. Cosine, Treasurer Reynolds 

Ellwood Kirby, Public Printer 

E. M. Hurst, Treasurer Atchison... 
J. W. Owen, " Gentry 



Taney 

Lawrence 

McDonald 

Newton 

Linn 

Monroe 

Andrew. 

St. Francois .. 

Barry 

Knox 

Pulaski 

Douglaa 

Ralls 

Stoddard 

Sullivan 

Ste. Genevieve. 

Putnam 

Ripley 

Scott 

Mississippi 

Dallas 

MiUer 

Garter 

Benton 

Clerk 

Dade 

Oregon 

Dunklin 

Jasper 

Cedar 

Morgan 

Stone , 

Moniteau ., 

New Madrid.... 

Texas 

Clinton , 

Howell , 

Warren 

Cole 

Bollinger.. ..k... 

Clay 

Iron 



Amoimt. 



W. F. Short, 



44 
44 



Wayne 



$ 3,921 46 


385 97 


2,160 68 


784 61 


1,893 41 


2,552 88 


3,548 69 


2,641 58 


1,546 61 


1,351 68 


1,998 48 


937 73 


667 89 


2,137 30 


1,190 64 


2,147 38 


790 42 


2,062 87 


534 34 


733 92 


1,040 16 


1,597 73 


1,620 11 


267 17 


2,652 14 


2,992 70 


1,446 72 


621 66 


1,883 44 


2,064 58 


1,529 09 


1,472 06 


684 34 


2,628 91 


1,461 10 


794 64 


1,986 86 


435 46 


2,035 44 


786 40 


1,674 29 


1 846 89 


891 90 


2,495 86 


416 54 


1,211 23 


913 44 


1,610 93 


89^ 60 


345 84 


919 50 


1,327 39 


2,087 71 


907 10 



Total I $304,360 06 



8UVDBY FUNDS. 



m 



OUT OF THE DNION MILITARY FUND. 

FOR REFONDINQ OF PAYMENTS MADE B7 COLLECTORS IN EXCESS OF AM0U1I9S 

DUE FROM THEM. 



Dat«. 


No. 


Jan. 28, 1867... 


84 


March 28 


756 


June 27 


1313 


Dec. 31 


2535 


Jan. 31,1868... 


314 


Feb. 21 


676 


Oct7 27 


2295 



To whom drawn. 



John Collins, Collector Christian 

B. H. Haape, late Collector Saline... 
J. H. Lightner, Collector St. Louis... 

S. E. Shaw, Collector Dade 

R. A. Love, Collector Phelps 

W. H. Ferguson, Collector Crawford. 
H. Childress, Collector Lawrence 



ToUl 



Amonnt. 



$ 99M 


3464 


526 01 


41 73 


229 55 


404 49 


430 06 



$1,765 37 



ACT FOR THE PAYMENT OF MILITIA — APPROVED MARCH 21, 1868. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. . 


April 27, 1868. 


1264 


S. P. Simpson, A. P. M. G 


$35,500 00 




Total 




$35,500 OO 



OUT OP THE MILITARY FUND OF 1847. 



Date. 



June 1, 1867.. 



No. 



1216 



To whom drawn. 



Joseph T. Field, Treasurer Clay, 
Total 



Amount. 



19 



19 



148 



DISBURSBMENTS OOT OT 



DISBURSEMENTS OF AMOUNTS PAID INTO THE TREASURY 

ON ACCOUNT OF COUNTY REVENUE. 



>mW< I 



Date. 




Ock n, 1866... 

26 

Nov. 12 

.Inn: ,A'\ 
13 



•V) UQ 
4i<; it: 



*26. 









10.... 

31.... 

Tf 1667.... . 



"-' -^.r't-.r 



it. I. 



2. 

4. 



1698 

1602 

1618 

1620 

1623 

1633 

1647 

1651 

28 r ■1666 

1 .r*t671 

• 1676 

•1686 

••17U 
.... J 



5,... 

7.... 
11.... 
IBv.l... 



.j/fi- 



m (HI.' 

Feb. 



17 

1^ 

21 

as 



4 

9 

18 

21 

24 

32 

46 

63 

66 

67 

68 

60 

62 

76 

83 

90 

93 

97 

106 

111 

117 

121 

126 

M28 

131 

136 

141 

182 

200 

207 

414 

686 

693 

697 

1061 

~" ■^O'.TT. -.■+ ■ ~i 1 26 

J«Sfti.r ■l--'-' ^216 



MMMh 



4. 

6. 

8. 
11. 
13. 

14. 
18. 
21. 
27. 
28. 

1. 

9. 
16. 
26. 



Haj 



ruu 



I: 









1 1 •••.<• 



2S 

8) 

Sepi. 2 

23 

April 16, 1868. 



•.' 1265 
'.^-0266 
1276 
•1617 
1691 
-4691 
1694 
1712 
1731 
1820 
1196 



To whom drawn. 



George Lyoni Treasurer Buchanan. 

J. T. Fiala, " St. LonU. 

S. M. Newlan 

J. H. Moore, 

Christ. Wagner, 

J. W. Owen, 

II. Reitemeyer 

W. R. Love, 

K. B. Jonee, 



n 
i< 

ti 

€1 
H 
it 
ft 



Lewis 

Vernon 

Cole 

Gentry 

Gasconade. 

Dent 

Kewton. ... 



L. B. Davie, Agent Cedar 

S. H. Skinner, Treasurer Worth 



u 



€4 

t€ 

(t 

U 

H 

it 

U 

(t 

tt 

(t 

<t 



J. A. Trumbs, 
Alex. Andrews, 
John S. Varner, 
Jas. Bell, 
J. Aull. 
A. BecDtely 
A. W. Mullins, 
G. W. Moss; 
£. F.^albert, 
G. M. Dewey, 
Wm. Litch, 
Chas. Van Pelt, 
A.J. P Deatherage," 
N. H. Hampton, '' 
I. Patton, *' 

Thos. W. Radforth, " 
A. E. Rowden, 
I. N. Rogers, 
Ed. Beaumont, 
H. C. Borth, 
Thos. Herbert, 
S. H. Carline, 
£. M. Hurst, 
R. G. Gilman, 
James M Martin, 

C. P. Cumley, 
J. M. Boyd, 

D. Landon, 
J. B. Bales, 
M. Baker y 
T. D. Pettijohn, 
W. P. Hobson, 
J. N. Dunn, 
A. Miller, 
J. Hoskins, 

D. Lutes, 

E. P. Cayce, 
Fred. Wing, 
Wm. M. Miller, 
Jos. T. Field, 
S. E. Turner, 
H. R. Sloan, 
J. Bonney, 
W. C. Benson, 
J. M. C. Wood, 
J. T. Anderson, 
M. W. Johnson, 
W. T. Short, 
W. H. Sterrett, 
L. H. Rigc, 
A. R. Cushman, 

Total 



u 

€t 

ti 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

ti 

it 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

u 
ft 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



Livingston 

Oregon 

Butler 

Shelby 

Lafayette 

Clark 

Linn 

Monroe 

Hickory 

Chariton 

Perry 

Barton 

Shannon 

Webster 

Mercer 

Howard 

Maries.., 

Henry 

Wright 

Ripley 

Reynolds 

Barry 

Atchison.... 

Randolph 

Pike 

Mississippi 

McDonaJd 

Saline 

Phelps 

Schuyler 

Christian 

Andrew 

Benton 

Osag^ 

Carter 

Bollinger 

St. Francois 

Lincoln 

Douglas 

Clay 

Caldwell 

Carroll 

Cape Girardeau, 

Grundy 

Taney 

Scott 

Camden 

Wayne .• 

Holt 

Montgomery.... 
Scotland 



Amount. 



$ 129 96 
2,880 70 

46 71 
311 60 

343 76 
690 03 

102 63 
199 70 
179 63 

344 82 
22 06 

521 26 
90 64 
64 69 

702 46 

141 73 
66 60 

237 39 
73 94 
80 47 

173 64 
11 38 

210 84 

797 08 

103 69 

47 67 
666 33 
367 64 
137 64 
118 18 
866 96 
187 90 
373 86 

1,433 08 

96 61 

209 01 

4 26 

110 61 

30 11 

10 04 
26 38 
20 27 

347 92 

11 83 
273 19 
294 65 

29 21 

49 86 

4 76 

609 32 

622 86 

107 89 

266 37 

22 74 

72 62 

29 10 

66 94 

83 22 

216 42 

344 60 

142 98 
54 78 

$16,987 68 



SUNDRY FUNDS. 



149 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF THE STATE fNTEKEST FUND. 



Date. 




May 23, 1867.. 

July 30 

Oct. 6 

Not. 16 

22 

Dec. 9 

10 

31 

Jan. 23, 1868. 

24 



March 



April 
May 
June 
Aug. 

fiept. 

Nor. 
Dec. 



28. 
31. 
10. 
11. 



12... 



18. 
30. 

1. 

4. 
12 
15. 
11. 
24. 
21. 

22. 
6. 
30. 
11 
18. 



1153 

1556 

2003 

2254 

2289 

2431 

2435 

2532 

266 

276 

294 

215 

745 

761 

752 

763 

757 

758 

769 

787 

964 

1024 

1103 

1344 

1874 

1609 

1560 

1926 

1927 

1928 

2000 

2100 

2301 

2463 



Fund Commissioners. 

William Bishop, State Treasurer. 

same 
United States Express Company 

J. Hillyer ». 

Fund Commissioners 

National Bank Note Company 

Merchants Union Express Company 

James W. McFaden, Collector Warren. 

United States Express Company 

James F. Fitspatrick 

R. A. Lore, Collector Phelps 

Mechanics Bank, St. Louis , 

National Bank State of Missouri 

Merchants Bank, St. Louis 

Farmers Bank, Lexington 

Bank of St. Louis 

Union Bank of St. Louis 

Third National Bank of St. Louis 

P. T. Miller 

J. H. Britton 

J. S. Fleming 

F. H. Friese 

I. B. Alexander ifc Co 

F. W. Mayer 

Fund Commissioners 

United States Express Company 

Wm. Bishop, State Treasurer 

same 

same 

same 

United States Express Company 

Fund Commissioners 

same 



Amount. 



$ 600,000 eo 

127,030 00 

3,106 00 

4 76 

15 00 
460,000 00 

3,770 50 
6 60 

1,082 61 

12 60 

1 60 

1,519 81 
61,340 00 
98,660 00 
94,580 00 
69,960 00 
36,450 00 
43,860 00 
68,840 00 
21,811 00 
11,647 00 

1,313 00 

5 00 
6,132 00 

9 50 
500,000 00 

16 25 
705 00 

90 00 

4,980 00 

150 60 

9 00 

10,000 00 

560,000 00 






Total .1 12,754,986 12 



150 



DISBOBSEUBNTS OUT OT 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF THE STATE LIBRARr FUND. 



D^■ ^ li III I ■ 
Date. 

Oct. 2, 1866... 

4,... 

.18.... 

25.... 

Nor. 10*.!!! 

l>mr. 8.... 

Jan. 17, 1867. 
Feb. 11 

12 

n 

25 

M«di 1 

2 

April 1 

13 

17 

Msjr 9 

18 

21 

24 

30 

JaD< 3 

10 

11 

16 

26 

29 

Jn^ 2 

6 

10 

12 

15 

16 

18 

22 

81 

Anr. 6 

* 12 

14 

16 

27 

30 

31 

Sbpfa 6 

19 

23 

24 

26 

Odft 2 

12 

19 

NaT* 11 

U 

28 

80 

Dee** 7 




1560 
1561 
1571 
1595 
1599 
1616 
1684 
1711 
69 
119 
120 
122 
123 
129 
150 
211 
216 
831 
936 
957 
1068 
1120 
1138 
1166 
1200 
1224 
1242 
1251 
1269 
1302 
1317 
1376 
1383 
1407 
1451 
1480 
1494 
1499 
1510 
1622 
1568 
1594 
1621 
1630 
1639 
1690 
1717 
1723 
1746 
1802 
1824 
1836 
1846 
1925 
2029 
2068 
2084 
2170 
2171 
2246 
2292 
2337 
2424 



To whom drawn. 



United States Ezprese Company 

Pacific Railroad Company 

United States Express Company 

same - 

same 

same 

same 

same 

same ...•• 

Mercliants Union Express Company. 

United States Express Company 

Georg^e Scharman 

D. B. Canfield A Co. tt al 

F. W. Jordine 

S. Renpett 

United States Express Company 

D. Vanosdran, et al 

United States Express Company 

G. W. Paschall 

United States Express Company 

Merchants Union Express Company. 
United States Express Company 

same 

Little, Brown A Co. et ah 

United States Express Company 

T. StJ.Vf. Johnson & Co 

United States Express Company 

R. P. Studley A Co. et al 

Little, Brown A Co . 

United States Express Company 

same 

N. Y. Tribune Association 

Merchants Union Express Company. 

T. A J. W. Johnson A Co 

U. S. Express Co 

M. U. Express Co 

same 

Little, Brown A.Co 

N. 0. Burch 

U. B. Express Co 

same 



same 

same 

M. U. Express Co 

U. S. Express Co 

same 

Little, Brown A Co 

Rebellion Record et al >... 

R. P. Studley & Co 

McEee, Fishback A Co. et al, 
U. S. Express Co 

same 

same 



same 

same 

N. C. Barch et al 

United States Express Company 

Little, Brown A Co 

R. P. Studley A Co 

Merchants' Union Express Company. 

United States Express Company 

Merchants' Union Express Company. 
United States Express Company 



Amount. 



6 50 

8 95 
2 00 

2 75 

1 25 

3 85 
3 05 

2 25 

3 90 
2 50 

1 85 

9 00 
72 60 

2 00 
35 00 

12 76 
26 04 

13 76 
15 00 

75 

3 15 
2 00 
8 40 

276 82 

1 60 
25 00 

4 25 
181 00 
189 00 

2 25 
2 00 

24 20 

2 60 
SO 20 

3 05 
50 

10 23 

915 23 

6 00 

1 85 

1 50 

1 90 

6 45 

76 

1 10 

1 50 

166 76 

20 72 

18 00 

24 00 

1 26 

2 26 
20 26 

1 25 

2 76 
8 66 
6 60 

103 13 

14 00 
10 00 

25 
1 35 
1 50 



SUNDRY FDNDS. 



151 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF THE STATE LIBRARY FUND— Cohtikubd. 



Date. 


No. 


Dec. 12f, 1867... 


2462 




26 


2607 


Jan. 8^ 


1868.... 


97 


Febrnary 1 


328 




6 


347 




6 


363 




7 


368 




8 


366 




12 


474 




14 


489 




16 


608 
610 


March 


6 


700 
702 




20 


794 




21 


804 




MtO • . • ■ • 


828 


April 


28 


1277 




29 


1283 


May 


16 


1373 




23 


1413 




28 


1464 


Jane 


24 


1568 




26 


1562 


Jaly 


1 


1678 
1689 




11 


1738 




13 


1742 




18 


1787 




29 


1820 
1821 


Augnat 


6 


1849 




13t ..>• 


1887 


Sept. 


14 


2024 




16 


2031 




23 


2076 


October 14 


2266 




16 


2274 




19 


2281 


Not. 


IT 


2330 




23 


2357 


Dec. 


16 


2461 




17 


2462 




21 


2470 




30 


2490 



To whom drawn. 



R. P. Studley k Co 

United States ExpreBB Company 

EUwood Kirby, Public Printer 

United States Express Company 

same 

same 

Rob. Clarke a; Co 

Henry Earges 

WellB k Donahoe 

R. P. Studley h, Co 

St. Louis k Pacific Express Line 

J. D. Dillenback 

Little, Brown k Co 

United States Express Complmy 

same 

Little, Brown k Co 

F. Roer 

St. Louis Book and News Company. 
United States Express Company 

same 



fame 

Mrs. B. Lackey, Post Mistress 

United States Isxpress Company 

Pacific Railroad Company 

EUwood Kirby, Public Printer 

United Slates Express Company 

P. Rowe 

United States Express Company 

New York Daily Tribune 

St. Louis Book and News Company.. 
Leonard Scott, Publishing Company. 

United States Express Company 

S. H. Wright 

United States Express Company 

Little, Brown k Co 

United States Express Company 

George Knapp k Co., tt al 

United States Express Company 

T. k J. W. Johnson ^.. 

Little, Brown k Co. et al. 

same 

United States Express Company 

R. P. Studley k Co 

United States Express Company 

Pacific Railroad Company 

Little, Brown k Co 



Amount. 



$ 133 75 



Total. 



1 

21 
1 
1 
3 



75 
00 
75 
25 
00 



2 60 
13 50 

7 36 
21 25 

8 80 
4 00 

948 80 
. 16 60 

9 46 
160 00 

9 00 

37 76 

2 76 

1 10 

1 40 

10 10 

6 75 

6 20 

10 00 

36 



6 
1 



00 
86 



10 10 
44 06 
16 10 

1 75 

1 00 

11 66 
262 68 

3 20 
24 00 

4 25 
20 00 

116 77 

4 86 

10 66 

104 00 

2 86 
13 10 

418 78 

$4,821 64 



163 



BIBBUBSEMKNT8 OUT OF 



DISBURSEMENTS OF MONEY BELONGING TO HEIRS, DE- 
POSITED BY EXECUTORS AND ADMINISTRATORS. 



Date. 



Oct. 11, 1866... 

Nov. 10 

Jan. 21, 1867... 

Feb. 13 

27 

May 3 

July 23 

August 30 

October 26 

Feb. 22, 1868... 

April 9 

May 19 

June 8 

Sept. 16 



No. 



1582 

1614 

63 

126 

188 

1030 
1528 
1710 
2098 
587 
1131 
1391 
1601 
2039 



To whom drawn. 



J. T. Campbell, heir of M. Parks 

H. P. Can^bell, heir of M. Parks 

Thoa. G. WilliamB 

George L. Miller, heir of John Mnlky 

fl. J. A W. L. Parka, heirs of L. V. Parks 

Also, part of railroad tax receipt 

S. B. Armentrout A G. Hanis, heirs 

Snaannah Gilley, heir of S. Gilley 

S. W. Tower, heir of J. Goodwin 

Heirs of W. D. Elliott 

Nancy J. Lawrence, heir of W. Weisman 

Jane Payne, heir of Georre Hartman..... 

N. McDaniel, heir of J. (Godwin 

C. A., Wm. G. and J. P. Hays, heirs of J. P. Hays. 
Wm. Stafford, heir of W. D. Elliott 



Amount. 



Total, 



$ 19 81 

19 81 

120 58 

139 36 

225 33 

10 87 

1,122 65 

5 74 

286 27 

78 70 

79 00 
106 12 
143 14 
640 06 

29 35 

$3,026 73 



SUNBBY FUNDS, 



153 



DISBURSEMENTS OF MONEYS RECEIVED INTO THE TREAS- 
URY FOR THE PARTIES NAMED ON ACCOUNT OF 
REDEMPTION OF LANDS. 



Date. 



Oct. 6,1866.. 

6..., 

NoY. 14..., 

16.... 

26.... 

Dec. 11... 

20.... 

Jan. 1,1867.. 

2.... 

6..., 

11.... 

22.... 



23. 
25. 
26. 
30. 
Febmary 1. 



5. 

26. 

March 4. 

8. 



April 
May 



July 



12. 

13. 
14. 
28. 
15. 

6. 

7. 
29. 

80. 

3. 

15. 

26. 



27. 
Angoflt 19. 



No. 



Sept. 



6.... 

26.... 

88.... 
Nov. 4.... 

11.... 

12.... 
Jan. 11, 1868. 

22.... 



April 
May 

July 

Au^st 

Sept. 



14. 
11. 
26. 
11. 
7. 
12. 



1673 

1575 

1624 

1630 

1654 

1693 

1708 

5 

8 

30 

45 

65 

66 

70 

76 

77 

95 

100 

103 

106 

107 

109 

153 

265 

392 

393 

477 

459 

494 

674 

749 

942 

1047 

1054 

1193 

1194 

1204 

1400 

1490 

1538 

1539 

1543 

1657 

1658 

1753 

1845 

1851 

2135 

2175 

2177 

179 

243 

1182 

1338 

1436 

1736 

1852 

2014 



To whom drawn. 



S. H. Davis , 

J. Clark 

N. Stone , 

John J. Martin 

J. Clark 

J. A. Key , 

B. Bell 

J. J. Taylor 

A. Brookover 

J. R. Winchell 

H. T. Singleton 

W. S. Helm 

Wm. Folden 

J. M. Payn 

W. D. Bush 

R. J. Poindezter 

J. Ogle , 

J. M. Smith 

J. D. McFarland 

J. Tucker 

W. S. Davidson 

J. M. Grammer 

T. K. Yandell , 

H. H. Cundiff 

L. F. Havden 

Charles A., or G. A. McNair. 

D. B. Stout 

'Stanfield Ross 

M. T. Bufford 

W. M. Albin 

Peter Qinther 

J. A. Culvertson 

N. S. Gay 

H. Love 

Wm. n Blliott , 

A. D. Christy 

J. Jordan 

J. H. Whedbet 

C. Lafferty 

J. Fist 



Thomas C. Fletcher. 

J. J. Young 

Painter A Martin 



Amount. 



same .*. 

A. Patterson 

WUliam Shelby u. 

M. 8. Grafif .~. 

C. Hardy 

A. B, McFarland 

J. L. Flint 

Wm. Hubart 

Wm. Penticost 

Joseph Odell 

Jackson Thorp 

William Hiller 

James W. Beck 

Benjamin E. Johnson 

R. W. Townley 



I 



Total. 



3 40 

8 00 



7 
3 
1 



30 
00 
62 



13 04 



3 

7 



90 
36 



23 30 
48 94 
6 30 
13 06 
5 74 
8 64 
8 00 



11 
3 
5 



75 
32 

84 



17 20 

19 36 

9 68 

8 04 
3 04 
7 84 
3 02 

118 08 
29 74 
24 66 

10 02 
17 08 

5 16 
7 04 

3 90 

5 46 

4 46 
2 20 

31 78 
19 93 

4 10 
1 84 

6 38 
23 94 
15 52 

5 00 

9 10 
9 66 

12 14 

11 22 
23 90 

12 44 
14 88 

7 72 
10 86 
19 60 

4 68 
23 36 
37 39 
10 60 



$767 93 



154 



DTSBUBBEUEKXS OUT 07 



TOTAL AMOUNT OF WARRANTS DRAWN ON THE TREAS- 
URY DURING THE TWO FISCAL YEARS ENDING SEP- 
TEMBER 30th, 1868, AND THE ADDITIONAL THREE 
MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1868. 



AppropriationB. 



For pay of civil officera 

AsseBsing^ and collecting rerenue. 
CoBtfl in criminal cases 



Pay of General ABBembly 

Contingent expenBes of General Assembly 

Taking the census 

Copying laws and journals 

Printing laws and journals 

Indexing laws and journals , 

Binding General Statutes 

Printing General Statutes 

Distributing laws and journals 

Publishing decisions of the Supreme Court < 

Arresting fugitives from justice < 

Apprehension of criminals 

Execution of civil law 

Enforcement of civil law 

Pa^ of convention 

Printing journal of convention 

Interest on State debt proper 

Repairing Governor's mansion 

General contingent fund 

Contingent expenses of Governor , 

Contingent expenses of Governor and Secretary 

Contingent expenses of Secretary of State 

Contingent expenses of State Auditor , 

Contingent expenses of Treasurer , 

Contingent expenses of Attorney General 

Contingent expenses of Register 

Contingent expenses of Superintendent Public Schools 

Contingent expenses of Supreme Court 

Contingent expenses of District Courts ..-. 

Contingent expenses of elections 

Salary and contingent expenses of Commissioner of Stetistics 

Salary of Adjutant General 

Salary of Swamp Land Agent ^. 

Salary and contingent expenses of Soldiers' Claim Agent 

Fitting up Governor's office 

Fitting up library 

Fitting up water-closet 

Carpeting Senate chamber 

Repairing Capitol grounds 

Fencing Capitol grounds 

Fund Commissioners 

Sale of railroads 

Board of Immigration 

Board of Ajppriculture , 

Selection otAgricultural College lands 

Suit about Wolf Island, etc 

Sale of bank stock 

Expenses under act for payment of arrears to Enrolled Missouri Militia. 

Expenses under act of swamp and overflowed lands -. 

Arrears to the J^nroUed Missouri Militia \.. 

Rebuilding house of President of University 

Relief of neirs of Robert Creighton 

Expenses of submitting amendment to Constitution 



Amount* 



342,114 28 
242,360 34 
323,.364 24 
196,476 S6 
18.3,438 19 
6,171 07 
11,636 50 
61,005 45 
570 00 
10,000 00 
1,194 28 
20,207 69 
17,662 64 
2,501 13 
9,466 50 
8,650 64 
3,171 87 
90 00 
275 00 
156,003 38 
1,401 66 
9,506 19 
2,104 72 
78 50 
2,634 16 
3,641 67 
1,884 91 
1,189 13 
1,980 78 
4,043 67 
7,471 69 
2,414 56 
1,118. 56 
1,209 97 
1,060 44 
400 00 
8,996 18 
365 10 
2,000 00 
635 00 
1,065 60 
3,030 10 
1,600 00 
2,375 00 
21,062 36 
4,000 00 
7,300 00 
2,495 00 
2,237 76 
418 55 
153 25 
206 50 
201,000 00 
10,000 00 
591 50 
1,389 94 



H 



SUNDBT FUNDS. 



155 



TOTAL AMOUNT OF WABRANTS, btc.— CcHnirimi>* 



Appropriations. 



Pay of Presidential Electors... 

Registration of voters ...• 

Library of the Penitentionr 

Repairing portrait of T. H. Benton 

Erecting monument • 

Portrait of Qeneral Lyon 

The Military Institute at Lexington .• 

The Lincoln monument 

Debts of the Penitentiary 

Sala of the tobacco warehouse • ; , 

Concurrent resolutions 

Use of the Deaf and Dumb Asylum $10,000 00 

Indigent fund of the Deaf and Dumb Asylum 4,000 00 

Education of the deaf and dumb 25,000 61 



Support of the Lunatic Asylum , $39,600 00 

Benefit of the Lunatic Asylum 20,000 00 



Amount. 



$ 824 00 


7,529 60 


275 00 


370 50 


307 75 


3,000 00 


0,000 00 


1,000 00 


76,529 85 


90 00 


972 40 



Education of the blind... 

Soldiers' Orphans' Home 

Pensioners 

Funeral expenses of Hon. Powers. 
Funeral expenses of Hon. Brutoti , 
Funeral expenses of Hon. Martin., 
Befunding overpayments 



Total out of Berenne Fund 

Out of Sinking Fund, 0. D 

Internal Improrement Fund 

Saline Fund 

Seminary Fund 

State School Fund 

State School moneys 

Seminary^ moneys 

Union Military Fund 

Military Fund of 1847 

County revenue 

State Interest Fund 

State Library Fund 

Executors' and Administrators' Fund. 
Redemption of lands 



Grand total $5,547,605 2a 



S9,000 61 



59,500 00 

25,000 00 

7,500 00 

300 00 

300 00 

120 00 

348 00 

25,589 84 

$2,152,688 90 

21 08 

26,340 67 

3,387 77 

108,060 55 

106,511 42 

804,360 05 

29,259 23 

87,265 87 

19 

15,987 68 

2,754,986 12 

4,821 54 

3,026 79 

787 98 



156 



dKftTIFICATKS OF INDBBTEDISTESS. 



Sbctioit 32. In all cases wberA tlie laws recognize a claim for money against the State, and na 
appropriation shall he made, by law, to pay the same, the Auditor shall audit and adjust the same, 
and giv the claimant a certificate of the amount thereof, under his official seal, if demanded ; and 
shall report the same to the General Assembly, with as little delay as possible. General Statutes, 
1865, pag;e 89. 

CERTIFICATES OF INDEBTEDNESS 

Have been issued in conformity to the law above cited, on the following appropriations, after 
they had become exhausted : 

FOR CIVIL OFFICERS. 



Date. 



Oct. 


10, 1868... 


98 




12 


100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
106 
107 




13 


108 




16 


lis 


Nov. 


18 


154 




17 


158 




28 


177 


Dec. 


4 


184 




30 


257 



No. 



To whom drawn. 



H. B. Johnson, Attorney.. 

William Heren, Judge 

Samuel Reber, Judre 

Jonas J. Clark, Jude^ 

Jefferson Chandler, Attorney 

James McWilliams, Judge , 

B. T. Gilkey, Officer Deaf and Dumb Asylum 

R. P. Kavenaurh, Officer Deaf and Dumb Asylum. 

Lewis Brown, Attorney 

Jackson Brock, Judge , 

Philip Lucas, Judge ,.,.... 

E. Perry, Attorney „ .„ 

W. C. Barr, Attorney ..,..., 

C. B. Lord, Judge „ , 

H. B. Johnson, Attorney , , 



Total, 



AmouBi. 



100 eo 

500 00 
500 00 
5O0 00 
100 00 
112 50 

50 00 

50 00 
100 00 

50 00 
500 00 
106 00 
100 00 
250 00 

97 82 



$3,116 32 



0SBTIFICATB8 OV INDEBTKDNESS. 



16T 



FOR COOTS IN CRIMINAL CASES. 




Jan. Sy 1867.... 
Jan»22, 1868... 

23 

24 

26 

26 

27 

29 

July ' 2.... 
3.... 



8. 

11. 

13. 

14. 
16. 

16. 

17. 

20. 

24. 

27. 

August 3., 

6.. 

6., 

7. 

8., 

14. 



19. 

20. 
21. 
22. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 

31. 
6. 

7. 

8. 



Sept. 



10 



44 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
26 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
36 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
46 
46 
47 
48 
49 
60 
51 
62 
53 
54 
56 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
94 
65 
66 
67 
68 



James LoTei Circuit Clerk Clay , 

Leopold Horsten, Circuit Clerk Gape Girardeau.. 

A. F. Owen, Sheriff Andrew , 

John S. Smith, late Jailor Pike 

J. A. Pattereon, Sheriff Oreene 

John W. Lisenb^, Circuit Clerk Greene 

JoeT. Bryan, Circuit Clerk Callaway 

A. F. Tiffany, Circuit Clerk Atchison 

Wm. Q. Pazton, Circuit Clerk Hickory 

H. K. White, Clerk Fifth District Court 

John W. Lisenby, Circuit Clerk Greene 

J. H. Steffens, Circuit Clerk Texas 

Z. A. Goldsby, Circuit Clerk Livingston 

A. J. Barr, Circuit Clerk Ray 

Gustave Reiche. Circuit Clerk Warren 

Rice Patterson, Sheriff Howard 

C. H. Stewart, Circuit Clerk Howard 

H. C. Lollar. Circuit Clerk Lawrence ^.„ 

A. W. Maupin, Circuit Clerk Franklin ^.. 

H, Bader, Sheriff Cape Girardeau 

R. H. Grantham, Circuit Clerk Dariess 

R. R. Smith, Circuit Clerk Knox 

Samuel T. Sharp, Circuit Clerk Montfpamery 

L. B. Hutchison, Sheriff Newton 

P. J. Miserez, Sheriff Jackson 

B. Laibold, Marshal St, Louis • 

L. Murdoch, Circuit Clerk Bollniger 

N. P. Ogden, Sheriff Platte 

S. B. LaForce, Circuit Clerk Jasper 



it 



tt 
It 

t€ 
it 
tt 



Platte 

Howard....'. 

Cape Girardeau. 

Ozark 

Barton 

Macon 



F. H. Tufts, 
C. H. Stewart, 
Leopold Horsten, 
W. M. Thompson, 
L. M. Timmonds, 
John M. London, 

Wm. Forbes, Sheriff Macon , 

A. W. Maupin, Circuit Clerk Frsnklin... 

H. M. Hiller, " Clark 

John C Terhnne, " Nodaway . 

P. P. Dailey, " St. Louis . 

J. C. England, " Gasconade 

Wm. Berger, Sheriff Gasconade 

John M. London, Circuit Clerk Macon.., 

J. D. Meredith, Sheriff Marion 

W. T. Austin, Circuit Clerk Randolph 

J. A. Patterson, Sheriff Greene 

Leopold Horsten, Circuit Clerk Cape Girardeau.^ 

John W. Lisenby, Circuit Clerk Greene 

Irvin Fish, Sheriff Buchanan 

W. Z. Buck, Circuit Clerk Howell 

F. G. Hopkms, Circuit Clerk Buchanan 

C. Glover, Circuit Clerk Osage 

Thomas Adamson, Sheriff Lafayette •• 

H. Mitchell, Sheriff Benton 

S. F. Currie, Circuit Clerk Lafayette ^.... 

H. H. Winchell, Circuit Clerk Marion 

G. H. Dttlle, Sheriff Cole 

J. C. England, Circuit Clerk Gasconade 

John Baker, Circuit Clerk Schuyler 

I. D. Johnson, Sheriff Webster 

James C. Orr, Sheriff Boone 

L (1. Cunningham, Circuit Clerk Webster 

Rice Patterson, Sheriff Howard. «.. 

J. M. London^ Circuit Clerk Macon 



$ 306 29 
331 60 
106 70 
75 20 
214 35 
662 31 
593 62 
407 66 
286 35 
63 96 
96 25 
367 47 
102 08 
508 35 
61 50 
23 30 
1,237 44 
420 24 
139 08 
152 30 
162 10 
331 62 
232 t)2 
180 00 
82 09 
532 00 
38 86 
89 10 
811 86 
549 19 
59 83 
190 45 
243 81 
61 33 
339 14 
127 60 
46 65 
106 18 
31 20 
3,700 41 
86 90 
22 35 
24 65 
247 25 
174 16 
91 00 
79 93 
1,731 01 
164 62 
662 16 
5y326 69 

30 67 
135 25 

31 70 
284 33 
385 44 

6 25 

156 80 

146 00 

123 00 

17 55 

831 28 

85 50 

89 12 



158 



CERTIFICATES OP INDEBTEDNESS. 



FOR]COSTS IN CRIMINAL CASES-<-CoifTiRt7Bi>. 



Date. 



Sept. 12, 1888 
U.... 
16,... 



21. 
23. 



24. 



25. 
26. 
29. 

30. 
October 1. 



Nov. 



2. 
8. 



6. 
7. 

8. 
10. 
12. 
13. 

U. 



16 

17 

20 

21 

23 



26. 

27. 
2<J. 



30. 

31. 
2. 




9. 



10. 
11. 



12. 
18. 



69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

76 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

82 

83 

84 

86 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

99 

106 

109 

110 

HI 

112 

lU 

117 

118 

119 

120 

121 

122 

123 

124 

126 

126 

127 

128 

129 

130 

131 

132 

133 

134 

135 

1.36 

137 

138 

139 

140 

141 

142 

143 

145 

146 

147 

148 

149 

150 

151 

152 

163 



To whom dmwn. 



M. L. Stratton, Circuit Clerk Benton 

J. M. Samuel, Circuit Clerk Boone 

Wm. R. Taylor, Circuit Clerk St. Francois. 

J. Caldwell, SheriflFPolk ; 

A. "W. Maupin, Circuit Clerk Franklin 

0. Moberly, Sheriff Grundy....* 

D. M. King, Circuit Clerk Mercer 

A. K. Sykee, Circuit Clerk Grundy 

Thomas B. Jeifries, Circuit Clerk Lewis 

L. Sells, Sheriff Lewis 

A. B. Maddux, Circuit Clerk Dallas 

G. W. Hutcherson, Circuit Clerk Ripley .... 

G. L. Carlin, Circuit Clerk Barry 

W. H. Ferguson, Sheriff Crawford 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louie 

F. J. McAdoo, Sheriff Laclede 

F. D. Phillips, Sheriff Clinton 

S. £. Hoge, Circuit Clerk Moniteau 

W. W. Taliaferro, Circuit Clerk Cooper 

Charles Dougherty, Sheriff Jackson 

MTm. Forbes, Sheriff Macon 

R. M. Fraker, Circuit Clerk Stoddard 

J. M. London, Circuit Clerk Macon ...» 

R. Wallace, Circuit Clerk Jackson 

H. H. Winchell, Circuit Clerk Marion 

S. Coday, Sheriff Wright 

P. F. Lonergan, Sheriff Pike 

Thomas B. Sutherland, Sheriff St. Clair 

S. R. Woolfolk, Sheriff Lincoln 

Thomas E. Rochester, Sheriff Cooper 

A. B. Maddux, Circuit Clerk Dallas 

James West, Circuit Clerk Gentry 

W. D. Graham. Circuit Clerk St. Clair 

N. P. Ogden, Sheriff Platte 

J. H. Williams, Circuit Clerk Caldwell 

James M. Miller, Sheriff Henry 

Wm. Caldwell, Circuit Clerk Andrew 

A. F. Owen, Sheriff Andrew 

D. B. Colle^, Circuit Clerk Pulaski 

A. H. Cashion, Sheriff Perry 

James C. Noell, Circuit Clerk Perry 

Wm. Lee, Chief Police St. Louis 

George iCuechler, Sheriff Chariton 

H. L. Wheat, Circuit Clerk Phelps 

R. A. Love, Sheriff Phelps 

W. G. J. Crow, Sheriff Texas 

J. C. England, Circuit Clerk Gasconade 



it 
tt 
tt 
it 

it 
tt 
it 
tt 
it 



Wright. 

Franklin. 

Scotland. 

Stoddard 

Scotland. 

Cedar 

Miller 

Ray 

Henry 



B. Amick, 
A. W. Maupin, 
J. C. Smith, 
R. M. Fraker, 
J. C. Smith, 

D. n. Connaway, 
T! B. Robinson, 

A. J. Barr, 
Wm. Weaver, 

B. F. Boyce, Sheriff New Madrid 
J. A. Mott, Circuit Clerk New Madrid .., 

M. U. Foster, Circuit Clerk Johnson 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

M. Mace, Sheriff Iron 

W. R. Simms, Sheriff Harrison < 

J. C. Noell, Circuit Clerk Periy , 

G. W. Thompson, Circuit Clerk Linn 

L. Murdoch, Circuit Clerk Bollinger 

E. L. Allen, Circuit Clerk Holt , 

P. P. Parker, Circuit Clerk Pike , 

J. Baliinger, Sheriff Daviess , 

R, H. Grantham, Circuit Clerk Daviess.. 

F. M. Redbum, Sheriff Ray , 

J. T. Talliaferro, Circuit Clerk Laclede., 



Amonnt. 


$ 27 SO 


297 24 


77 63 


85 35 


18 00 


166 26 


119 39 


171 74 


312 .31 


34« 76 


247 17 


20 66 


893 16 


70 70 


442 76 


160 85 


178 26 


348 04 


21 00 


63 96 


127 60 


133 63 


842 61 


1,670 77 


453 18 


132 60 


110 70 


43 83 


81 60 


27 96 


20 00 


119 88 


460 46 


89 10 


330 03 


40 96 


l,.38l 67 


111 50 


13 16 


113 75 


09 03 


64 75 


159 50 


252 43 


80 25 


104 60 


93 69 


124 99 


400 87 


434 95 


264 94 


27 05 


146 16 


120 97 


1,010 19 


712 41 


287 00 


653 28 


490 53 


676 25 


94 30 


283 73 


86 72 


736 34 


690 17 


600 73 


306 95 


172 25 


1,111 62 


429 12 


619 21 



CEKTIFICATES OF INDEBTEDNESS. 



169 



FOR COSTS IN CRIMIMAL CASES— Costinttbd. 




Nov. 



Dec. 



13. 1868 
14.,.. 
16.... 
17..., 
18.... 

la.... 

20.... 
23.... 
26.... 

27" 

28.... 
SO.... 

4.... 

9.... 
10.... 
11.... 
12.... 

14.... 
16.... 

16.... 
17.... 
18.... 

19.... 
23.... 
24.... 

26.... 

28.... 
29.... 
80.... 



155 
166 
167 
159 
160 
161 
162 
163 
167 
168 
169 
171 
172 
173 
176 
176 
178 
179 
180 
181 
182 
183 
186 
188 
189 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
203 
204 
206 
209 
211 
813 
216 
220 
227 
230 
233 
236 
248 
249 
266 
266 



H. M. Hiller, Circuit Clerk Clark 



T. A. Collins, 

D. B. Colley, 
W. M. Newberry, 
W. T. Hunter, 
J. M. London, 

E. F. Honey, 
G. W. A. Preston, 

James Ownby, Sheriff Monroe 

E. G. B. McNutt, Circnit Clerk Monroe 

Irvin Fish, Sheriff Buchanan 

J. C. Sellers, Circuit Clerk Douglas 
B. W. Southworth, " 



tt 
it 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



Howell 

Pulaski 

Madison 

Washington. 

Macon 

Jefferson 

Sullivan 



tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



W. R. Taylor, 
J. L. Bogy, 

F. G. Hopkins, 
W. L. SnodgrasB 
W. McDonald, 
Thomas Selby, 
I. H. Cunningham, 

G. W. Arnold, 

J. M. Fleming, Sheriff Lafayette. 

Z. N. Goldsby, Circuit Clerk Livingston.... 

Gust. Reiche, Circuit Clerk Warren 

B. Laibold, Marshal St. Louis 

H. £. Machens, Sheriff St. Charles 

B. Montgomery, Circuit Circuit Pettis 

L. T. Bragg, Circuit Clerk Dunklin 

W. L. Snodgrasp, Circuit Clerk Polk 

Wm. Caldwell, Circuit Clerk Andrew 

Rice Patterson, Sheriff Howard 

Wm. Lee, Chief Police St. Louis... I 

B. A. Bailey, Circuit Clerk Clay 

J. C. England, Circuit Clerk Gasconade 

G. Harker, Sheriff Livingston 

P. M. Tufts, Circuit Clerk Platte 

S. F. Currie, Circuit Clerk Lafayette 

C. M. Ward, Circuit Clerk Cole , 

Joseph Hopkins, Circuit Clerk Newton 

B. H. Wilson, Circuit Clerk Saline 

John W. Toppaa, sheriff Livingston 

J. H. Steffens, Circuit Clerk Texas 

I. B. Tubb, Circnit Clerk Butler 

George Bradshaw, Circuit Clerk Harrison.. 

Gust. Reiche, Circuit Clerk Warren 

J. D. Meredith, Sheriff Marion 



Ralls 

St. Francois 

Ste. Genevieve 

Buchanan . 

Polk 

Dent 

Camden.... 
Webster.... 
Scott 






Total. 



$ 651 47 

31 76 

61 20 

213 10 

126 69 

210 07 

367 83 

426 72 

175 60 

449 00 

318 60 

11 02 

456 20 

204 28 

148 46 

3,123 78 

1,007 08 

182 08 

296 40 

167 08 

322 40 

61 60 
2,773 69 

62 86 
653 25 
284 60 
393 16 
436 13 

48 20 

188 00 

37 60 

64 76 

132 36 

126 30 

151 60 

2,116 96 

1,275 29 

510 46 

861 24 

93 40 

161 60 

421 26 

6 20 

2,480 90 

919 31 

164 26 

$68,243 04 



160 



CEKTIEICATES OF INDKBTEDNEFS. 



FOR ASSESSING AND COLLECnNG REVENUE. 



Date. 



Jan. 21, 1867 

Dec. 21, 1868 

26 



28. 
31. 



No. 



103 
224 
237 
238 
241 
242 
243 
245 
246 
247 
251 
252 
260 



To whom drawn. 



J. G. Ro8B> Recorder Scott 

J. L. Bog:y, Clerk Ste. Geneyieve 

J. H. Steffens, Clerk Texas 

Wm. Hixon, Clerk Lafayette 

J. N. Barlow, Clerk Henry , 

George Bradshaw, Recorder Harrison 

John Slinger, Clerk Harrison 

J. Q. Boner, Clerk Sullivan 

G. W. Houts, Clerk Johnson 

1. B. Tubb, Clerk Butler 

Thomas J. Gideon, Clerk Christian... 

Charles A. Weber, Clerk Perry 

D. C. Coleman, Clerk St. Louis 

Total 



Amonnt. 



$ 12 


50 


159 32 


62 


75 


45 


70 


627 


88 


44 


00 


8 60 


135 


71 


159 


81 


38 


73 


9 


90 


29 


78 


26 


20 



$t,2«0 88 



FOR REPAIRING CAPITOL AND GROUNDS. 





Date. 


No.- 


Oct. 


19, 1868 


115 


Nov. 


• 24 


164 




27 


174 


Dec. 


10 


190 




15 


198 
201 
202 




19 


217 
218 




21 


223 




22 


226 




26 


244 




30 


258 
259 




31 


261 



To whom drawn. 



Schulenbnrg & Boeckeler 

Beni. DeLemos , 

H. Wolflf. ^ 

0. F. Rigel 

J. P. Rice 

Daniel Rice 

Jas. W. Clark 

Benj. DeLemos 

Thomas Lamb 

M. Steiner 

John Fickenscher 

D. Garvey A Son 

n. Eaton 

Peter Miller 

Seebold A Welge 

Total 



Amount. 



$ 209 22 

7 15 

84 00 

24 50 

68 75 

37 50 
15 75 
39 00 

38 25 
22 50 
15 75 

5,000 



OO 



8 75 

2 85 

12 50 



$5,526 47 



^H 



OEBTmOATKS 09 Il<n>£BIKDHE8B. 



161 



TAKING THE CENSUS. 



Date. 



Dec. H 18^8 


197 


15 


205 




207 


16 


208 




210 


17 


212 


18 


2U 




215 


19 


219 


21 


221 




222 


22 


225 


23 


228 




229 


24 


231 




232 


26 


239 




240 


28 


253 




254 



No. 



To whom drawn. 



J. J. loghram, Assessor Holt 

H. M. Russ, Assessor Harrison 

Wm. D. Siller, Assessor Scotlaod 

Wm. H. Stewart, Assessor Nodawaj.. 
J. M. Gardner, Assessor Chariton....;.. 

J. F. Waits, Ajsessor Phelps 

P. Reynolds, Assessor Clark. 

T. J. Spillman, Assessor Wright 

H. W. Snyder, Assessor Adair , 

Wdi. C. Williams, Assessor Bollin^r. 
Jas. M. Brown, Assessor Mississippi.... 

Jas. E. Sheley, Assessor Jackson ,. 

I). C. Qnick, Assessor Johnson 

R. J. Rombaner, Assessor St. Lonis 

N. H. Patton, Assessor Macon 

Jas. H. Martin, Assessor Webster 

J. N. Angel, Assessor Texas 

B. T. Rea, Assessor Vernon 

J. H. Thogmartin, Assessor Mercer.... 
George C. Bowen, Assessor Wayne 

Total...... 



Amount. 



$ 259 IS 


425 14 


347 ^ 


316 81 


385 00 


371 50 


424 0.S 


210 94^ 


322 15 


310 39 


216 40 


1,145 3S 


453 11^ 


2,000 00 


533 98 


288 46 


250 30 


220 93 


826 65 


229 oa 



$0,03« 89 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF ELECTIONS. 



Date. 


No. 




• 

To whom drawn. 


Amonnt.- 


Dec. 10,1868 


1^1 


R. J'. Pikttenion 


$ 75 00 


Total 




$75 00 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES OT' SUPERINTENDENT OF 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


Dec. 4. 1868 


186 
234 


W. U. Telegraph Co., et al 


$ 16 85 

320 88 


24 


B. Clark, Assistant Superintendent, et al 




Total 






$337 73 



11-A B. 



162 



CEBTIFIOATBS OF INDEBTEDNESS. 



OONTINQENT EXPENSES OF REGISTER OF LANDS. 




Not. 9, 1868 



144 



B. Lackey, P.M. 
Totftl. 



$21 00 



$21 00 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF SUPREME COURT. 



Date. 


No. 


Not. 2i,1868 


165 


26 


166 


27 


170 


Dec. -9 

■ 


187. 



To whom drawn. 



Wm. H. Gray 

Wame, CbeeTer A Co 

Wm. A. Blandell A Co.... 
SigelABobb 



Total. 



Amount. 



$ 87 08 

8 40 

13 00 

4 00 



$62 43 



FOR FENCING CAPITOL GROUNDS. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amonnt. 


Dec. 16. 1868 


200 
235 


Jeflfereon City Machine ShonCo , 


$ 6 80 


24 

• 


J. F. FiUpatrick 

Total 


31 64 




$88 44 



FOR COPYING LAWS AND JOURNAI^S. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


March 27. 1868 

28 

June 17 


8 
4 
5 


D. P. Dyer, Secretanr Senate. 

J. 0. S. Colby, Chief Clerk Hooee 

Araaciii Rodman. Becretarr State • 


$1,132 60 

1,911 84 

742 25 




Total 






$3,786 69 



H 



CStTlTICATES OF nn>EBTia>KB88. 



US 



FOR DISTRIBUTING LAWS AND JOURNALS. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


Amount. 


iSept 26,186?* 


81 


J. Grimshaw. U» 8. BaareM Acrent 


$202 8f 


XOlftl...***....... •«•«.• ••«.•••*• ••.•■«*•• •<•«•••«•■••••«.>••«•.« 






$202 V 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



Date. 



Oct 10, 1S68 




To wliom drawn. 


Amount. 


A. McDowell k Co 


$572 36 


Total 


$572 26 



FOR CONTINGENT EXPENSES STATE TREASUKER. 



Date. 


No. 


To whom drawn. 


■ 


J a ..^ 

Amount 


D«c. 28* 1888 


250 


R. P. StudIeT& Co 




$200 




Total 




$200 



164 



BALANCES. 



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00 






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o 
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o 
m 


s 

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a 

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a 



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cS 

I 





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a 





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s 

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16S 



RKCEIPTS. 



KECEIPTS INTO THE TKEASURY FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

MONTHS ENDING 



During the month of. 



1867. 

October 

November .... 
December .... 



1868. 

January 

February 

March , 



April 
May . 
Jnne , 



Jnly 

Angnst ..... 
beptember , 



1868. 

October 

NoTember ..... 
December 



a 

s 

I 



$ 84,936 25 
160,632 61 
252,182 68 



614,897 00 

143,048 50 

41,063 49 

26,094 .34 
28,697 18 
84,231 03 

28,712 64 
83,985 28 
20,502 94 



$1,368,973 94 



$ 41,099 52 
102,119 13 
263,875 29 



$407,093 94 



S 
S 

^'3 



$ 99,587 23 
205,437 30 
364,625 14 



650,093 90 

131,921 09 

69,278 11 

7,748 35 

26,221 18 

874,982 61 

221,824 86 

28,486 06 

8,910 53 



$2,189,066 36 



$4,675,238 34 

93,670 53 

231,833 20 



$5,000,742 07 



I 

.•a 

a 
o 

a 





$ 9,358 81 

109,899 38 

6,030 50 



77,988 68 
44,558 84 
18,363 20 

219 85 
1,295 78 



1,442 00 
8 83 



$269,160 87 



$1,291 93 
1,154 16 



$2,446 09 



I- 



a 



I 



$211 28 
24 05 



187 65 



$422 98 



$23 80 



$28 80 



i 



•2 

gOM 



si 



I 



$2,400 00 
"l,'300*00 



o 
o 

•s 

CO 



QQ 



.fl 



$ 516 00 

3,784 IS 



450 00 
14 47 



200 00 
550 00 



$100 00 
200 00 



$300 00 



12,732 82 

iiwii 



47,217 50 
60 GO 



760 89 
650 00 


14,584 79 


200 00 








$6,524 86 


$79,381 38 



$5,223 67 
2,866 87 



$8,090 64 



RKOEIPTH. 



leo 



SEPTEMBER 30, 1868, AND FOR THE ADDITIONAL THREE 
DECEMBER 31, 1868. 



• 

o 

» 

QQ 

s 

•9 


Into State School 
Moneys. 


Into the State Library 
Fund. 


s 

II 

5-2-5 


Into Redemption of 
Lands Fund. 


Into the Seminary 
Fund. 


Into the Soldiers' Or- 
phans' Home Fund. 


South Pacific Railroad 
Land Fund. 


• 

i 

3 




$ 1,200 00 
9,450 00 














% 198,159 57 
















489,227 46 
624,138 33 

1,298,819 29 
320,240 43 
134,875 84 
















$4,170 00 


83,180 00 




$ 81 26 




$103 60 


$72 03 








262 00 








5,460 00 




210 42 






















34,062 54 




18,530 00 




156 50 
49 12 

242 no 

514 40 










117,318 14 






••.... •...* 








409,862 76 
306,567 68 


4,207 50 


36,235 50 


















50 00 




65,315 39 














29,617 30 


















$8,377 50 


$99,055 50 




$1,515 70 




$103 AQ 


$122 03 


...«..•••••. 


$4,022,704 72 




















$ 65 00 


$4,716,402 86 
202,429 06 


















$8,250 00 


$615 00 










184 27 


508.978 79 














$8,250 00 


$615 00 








$249 27 


$5,427,810 71 



170 



DISBUftflEMKNTS. 



DISBURSEMENTS OUT OF THE TREASURY ON AUDITOR'S 

TEMBEK 30, 1868, AND FOR THE ADDIl'IONAL 



Baring; the month of. 



1867. 

Octoher 

November 

December..... 



1868. 

Janaary 

February 

March 



April 
May. 
Jane . 



Jaly 

Attest .... 
September 



1868. 

October 

November , 

December 



« 



a 



& 



• 







5' 



$ 81,939 90 
49,848 92 
47,097 16 



146,8.53 76 
154,767 03 
114,687 40 

160,863 61 
65,005 67 
20,007 16 

74,433 84 
39,894 61 
24,191 77 



$959,493 72 

49,498 66 
31,313 38 
21,140 55 



$101,952 i9 



i 

u 



•'S 

o ^ 

o 



$ 3,106 00 

19 76 

463,777 10 



2,616 62 
'4d6,*028'o6 



1,318 00 

5,141 50 

600,016 25 



i 

a 

ii 



p 
o 



$41 73 



229 65 
404 49 



35,600 00 



a 



e 
O 



5 



SI 



6,775 00 
159 00 



$1,467,956 12 



10,000 00 
650,000 00 



$560,000 00 



$36,175 77 
430 00 



$430 00 



p 

•M P 

« 
o 



64 73 



"a . 

■S 9 
Pta 






p 
o 



J 



$ 1,650 00 
797 88 
1,000 00 



4,134 05 
600 00 
J,519 40 

60 00 
444 96 
100 00 

390 74 
300 00 
750 00 



$54 73 



$11,636 63 



69f 72 



o 
o 

O 

I 

00 



o a 

o 

O 



$ 198 94 



255 97 



198,072 14 

64,378 19 

9,729 78 

2,540 21 
1,610 93 
1,239 44 



$268,019 60 

4,334 60 
907 10 



$597 72 $5,241 70 



SISBXIRSBHEIITS. 



171 



WARRANTS DRAWN DURING THE YEAR ENDING SEP- 
THREE MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1868. 



Oat of the Seminary 
Moneys. 


Oat of Bedemption of 
Lands. 


® oil 

|8. 


Oat of State Library 
Fund. 


• 

1 

QQ 

o 

1 


Oat of State School 
Food. 


• 

& 
i , 

<M 

o 

1 


i 

< 

1 






$78 70 


$ 18 26 
128 73 
137 00 

21 00 

63 40 

1,132 93 

\ 40 50 
f 12 6fl 


$1,637 3r 


••*••••**••••««••• 




$88,622 19 

60,842 34 

670,224 86 

171,008 92 
155,863 92 
603,267 73 

897,408 96 
115,160 24 
630,606 14 

81,882 10 
47,620 68 




$47 66 






600 38 


$49,796 60 
12,700 47 


$107,875 00 


$4,170 00 


22 60 






79 00 


60*00 












11,388 00 


10 86 
24 28 


106 i: 
143 ] 





•••.••..••■.•.•••a 






640 0' i 12 Oji 


••.•.•.•••••«••••• 






4,207 60 


28 86 
37 30 
10 5(! 




86 45 
2 75 


200 00 




•»••••*«••••••• 






29 35 


277 43 

• 








26,660 49 












$19,766 50 


$176 65 


$1,076 31 


$1,934 00 

48 25 
131 17 
538 73 


,$2,387 77 


$62,496 97 


$107,876 00 


$2,989,048 67 
64,311 61 








• 






42,351 66 














572,277 00 




















$718 15 







•.•■•■.a ••••••• 


$668,040 16 



172 



BALANCE SHEET. 



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176 



STATE DBBf. 



STATEMENT OF THE BONDED DEBT OF THE STATE ON 

JANUARY 1, 1869. 



I. OLD STATE DEBT PSOPSB. 



NO. OP 
BONDS. 


DENOMINATION. 


RATE OF 
INT. 


• 

WHEN DVS. 


AMOUNT. 


450 
3 


One Thousand Dollars 

One Thousand Dollars 


6 per ct 
6 per ct. 


1882-83 
1863 


$450,000 
3,000 




■ 




§453,000 



II. RAILROAD DEBT. 



NO. OP 
BONDS. 


SERIES. 


RATE OF 
INT. 


WHEN DUE. 


AUOUNT. 


6570 
3000 
3090 
2478 
643 
424 
1629 
1589 
2830 


Pacific Railroad 

H. & St. J. G. R 

North Missouri R. R 

Iron Mountain R. R 

Platte Country R. R 

Cairo & Fulton R. R 

Southwest Branch P. R. R. . . 

U U i( 

Consolidation Bonds 


6 per ct. 

u 
u 

(4 
U 
(( 

7 per ct. 
6 per ct. 


1872-89 
1873-87 

1874-88 

1874-88 

1889-90 

1877-89 

1876 

1876-92 

1888 

. 


$ 5.570,000 

3,000,000 

3,090,000 

2,478,000 

543,000 

424,000 

1,629,000 

. 1,589,000 

2,830,000 

$21,153,000 



m. WAR BEBT. 



NO. OF 
BONDS. 


DENOMINATION. 


RATE OP 
INT. 


WHEN DUB. 


AMOUNT. 


24 

24 


One Thousand ©bllars 

One Thousand Dollars 


6 per ct. 


asm 

1869 


$24,000- 
1^4,000 




$'8,000 



Note: The number of consolidation bonds issued is 8,868, of which 
1,038 have been paid into the treasury and thus retired. 



8TATK BKBT. 177 



THE STATE SCHOOL FUND, 



This fund is invested as follows: 

Twenty Missouri State Bonds 9 20^000 09 

United States 6-20'8 86,000 00 

United States Consols 11,950 00 

In the Treasury 1,591,013 8S 

$1,708,963 82 

Against 81,678,604 8S 

one year ago. *• 

The amount in the treasury consists lor the most part of bonds of 
the United States, not yet reported to this office. 

The income of the fund was for the year closing September 30, 1868, 
999,055 50, which, under the law, was added to the '^State School 
Moneys,'' which are to be distributed to the counties for the benefit 
of public schools. The amount transferred from the general revenue 
of the State to tlie State school moneys was $217,011 10, and $268,- 
019 60 have been paid to the several county treasurers during the 
same period. 

The attention of the General Assembly is again called to the fact 
that there is no law which, under strict construction, authorizes 
the distribution of the State School Moneys, and that such payments 
have been made by the State officers only in the belief that the^ 
spirit of the law was being followed out by them. 



19--A B» 



178 BTATK DKBK 



THE SEMINARY FUxND. 



This fond for the benefit of the State University, at Columbia, is in- 
vested 

In United States 5-2(ys $100,000 00 

In the Bank at Ohillicothe 23,000 00 

In the Treasury.. 707 50 

$123,707 10 

Against 123,603 90 

one year ago. 
The income of the fund amounted to— 

From the United States $ 8,377 50 

From bank dividend 2,300 00 



• 



$10,6 i 7 50 

To which were added 11,388 00 

from the general revenue of the State. 

A large portion of the money in the treasury credited to the State 
School Fund, as well as the Seminary Fund, is liable to be drawn out 
again upon certificates from the Register of Lands, that the lands for 
which the money was paid into the treasury were patented by him or 
his predecessors through errors in his books ; in this manner $11,636 
S3 have been drawn back during the year out of the Internal Im- 
provement Fund, and $2,387 77 out of the Saline Fund, both of which 
funds are now, by law, merged into the Public School Fund. 

It is, therefore, not safe to recommend the investment of the bal- 
ance of the fund until the absolute certainty is established that no 
more erroneous patents ior State lands will be returned for refunding 
of the purchase money, with interest 



8TATB DEBT. 179 



THE STATE INTEREST FUND. 



This fand is now re-established by the ordinance forming a part of 
oar constitution, and is intenued for the payment of the interest on 
the State debt The income of this fund for the year closing Septem- 
ber 30, 1868, was 

From taxes 81,529,528 44 

From other sources 659,53r 92 

The receipts from "other sources" are the following : 

Balance from the Oommissioner of the I. M. R. R 2,411 54 

" " " S. W. P. R. R 6,0S5 57 

From the Missouri Valley R. R .' 29,l'20 00 

From the Iron Mountain R. R 40,458 00 

From the Mechanics Bank St. Louis 11,8 66 

From the Exchange Bank of St Louis 5,000 00 

From the Pacific ll. R. Co 350,000 00 

From the N. M. R. R Co \.... 200,0(K) 00 

From the Bank of the State of Missouri 7,970* 11 

From the L M. R R Lands 6,130 94 

From the S. W, P, R R Lands 461 10 

The payments out of the fund for the same period amounted tq 
$1,467,956 12, which were for the following items : 

Interest on State debt, payable at New York $960,000 00 

For 354 past revenue bonds and interest 452,670 00 

For 32 past due bonds 0. b. D. P. and interest 39,803 00 

For interest paid by the State Treasurer, 9,030 00 

For contingent expenses 80 20 

For cost of consolidation bond« 8,770 50 

Refunded to collectors 2,602 42 

' The account of the State Fund Oommissioners with the National 
Bank of Oommerce in New York for the period closing December 31, 
1868, stands as follows : 

Deposited in the Bank of Oommerce in New York : 

By Gen. J. B, Gray, agent of the State $ 8,070,682 68 

1867. May, by the Fund Oommissioners 600,(00 00 

December, ** " 460,000 00 

1868. June, " " 600,000 Oa 

November, " ** 10,000 0» 

December, •* " 660 000 0ft 

$6,190,682 6a 



/ 



ISO STATIC DEBT 

The bank has paid : 

118,501 coupons of $30 00 f3,555,030 0© 

9,555 " 35 00 334,325 00 

Commissions 9,723 64 

For advertising 326 40 

Which coupons have been stamjjed and registered as required bj 
law; another large lot oi coupons paid by the bank and those ex- 
changed for the new twenty-year consolidation bonds have not yet 
been cancelled and registered by the Auditor lor lack of clerical 
force ; the in-coming administration will lind time to do it after th9 
adjournment of the General Assembly. The amounts deposited in 
the bank have been used to pay the past due interest coupons of 
July 1, 1861, 
Jinuary 1, 1862, 
July 1, 1862, 
January 1, 1863. and 
July 1, 1863, 
and coupons maturing 
July 1, 1867, 
January 1, 1868, 
July 1, 1868, 
and some of dates prior to July, 1861. The last deposit of $550,000 \m 
for the interest maturing January 1, 1869. 
The coupons of January, 1864, 

July, 1864, 
Januarv, 1865, 
July, 1865, 
January, 1866, 
July, 1866, and 
January, 1867, 
have been, 'as far as presented at the bank, funded into new consoli- 
dation bonds running twenty years, bearing six per cent, interest, 
payable in ^New York, On December 24, 1868, the whole number ot 
such consolidation bonds issued by the National Bank of Commerces 
in New York, amounted to 3,868; the number prepared is four thou- 
sand. The number of 1,038 have been paid into the treasury^and ava. 
therefore, retired. 



REPORT 



Crrr op Jbfperson, Treasury Department,) 
Auditor's Office, December 31, 1868. ) 

As required by law, I herewith present to the General Assembly 
my biennial report on the condition of the State finances for the two 
fiscal years from October 1st, 1866, to September oO,* 1^67, and from 
October 1st, 1867, to December 31st, 1868. A law enacted at the last 
session of the Twenty-Fourth General Assembly fixes the close of 
the fiscal year with the last day of December, instead of the thirtieth 
of September, as was the case under former laws. The fiscal year 
closing this day extends, therefore, over fifteen months. For the 
sake of a proper comparison with other years of normal length, I 
have stated the monthly aggregates and balances in the respective 
tables of "Receipts," "Disbursements," and "Balances" for the 
twelve months closing with the thirtieth September separate from 
the three months which end with this day. 

The total of receipts irom all sources was : 

First year $7,167,357 83 

Second year. 4,0:^2,704 73 

Extra three months 5,427,810 71 

The total of expenditures on Auditor's warrants was : 

First year $1,939,516 fiO 

Second year 2,939,048 57 

Extra three months 668,940 16 

The total of redemptions of State obligations during the same 
period, exclusive of Auditor's warrants, as reported by the legislative 
committee in proper form, is : 

Wolf scalp certificates $ 2,449 00 

Defense warrants 296,780 00 

Union military bonds, with interest 4,728,434 19 

There were also redeemed through Auditor's warrants : 

354 revenue bonds of 1861 with accrued interest $452,670 00 

32 old State bonds of 1837 with accreted interest 39,803 00 



182 



BEPORT. 



Among the receipts for the year 1868 are also 5190 State bonds re- 
ceived from the purchaser of the St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad, 
from the North Missouri Kailroad, the Pacific Eailroad and the Mis- 
souri Valley Railroad, which have not yet been reported to this 
ofSce in such form as to cancel them oif our registers. 

The largest receipts into the Treasury during the first year (1867) 
are from the Federal Government for the war indemnity, on which 
account the State has received in full the following net amounts : 

Into the State Treasury '. $3,291,596 72 

Into the State Interest Fund ^. . . 3,070,682 63 

Sixty-three old State bonds^ with accrued interest 69,930 00 

Coupons past due, from other Missouri State bonds held 

by the Department of the Interior 40,080 00 

$6,472,289 35 

* 

The available funds in the treasury subject to ordinary appropri- 
ation amounted in the first year to $iS53,9]9 53; the amounts drawn 
by authority of appropriations were $i,100,736 32, leaving a deficit of 
$446,816 79. In the second year we had the sum of $1,122,754 37 com- 
ing into the treasury available for appropriations, and have actually 
drawn for $959,493 72, reducing the deficit of the first year to $283,- 
656 14. 

The receipts and expenditures of the last three months have bal- 
anced this deficiency, and leave now on hand subject to appropriation 
the small sum of $21,585 21. 

In tabular form the above will appear thus : 



First y^ar, including balance. 

Second year 

Additional three months 



First year 

Second year , 

Additional three months.. 



Expenditures. 



$1,100,736 32 
959,493 72 
101,052 59 



$2,162,182 63 



Income. 



$ 653,919 » 

1,122,754 Sr 

407,093 94 



$2,183,767 84 



The Union Military Fund is now at the disposition of the General 
Assembly, because only very few Union Military Bonds and Defense 
Warrants remain unredeemed. If we, therefore, add this fund to the 
available means in the treasury, we have now a balance subject to 
appropriation of $^88,239 19. 

This sum, together with the receipts during the year 1869, will suf- 
fice for ordinary appropriations. 

A law should be enacted to make this transfer, and to finally wind 
up the Union Military Fund. 

The probable income from all sources during the year 1869. and 
available for appropriations, m^^ be estimated at $975,000 00, and the 
ordinary expenditures will require the following sums: 



REPORT. 18S 

For civil list «197,486 00 

For assessing and collecting the revenue 118,6^0 00 

For costs in criminal cases 180,000 00 

For pay of General Assembly 100,000 00 

For contingent expenses of General Assembly 100,('00 00 

For taking the census 80,000 00 

For laws and journals 20,000 00 

For Supreme Court '. 10,000 00 

For arresting fugitives from justice, and apprehension of 

criminals 6,000 00 

For repairs of Capitol and Governor's mansion 16,000 00 

For contingent expenses of the executive offices 7,000 00 

For contingent expenses of elections 1,260 00 

For Board of Agriculture 6,000 00 

For Board of Immigration 2,000 00 

For public charities (asylums) 80,000 06 

For District Courts . 2,600 00 

For the Penitentiary 85,000 06 

For interest on Old State Debt and War Debt 33,000 00 

or a total of $991,725 00. This sum is equal to a tax of 21-100 per 
cent., or 21 cents on the $100 00, assessed valuations, and is more than 
the exact amount remaining to the State out of the revenue tax of 1 

Ser cent, alter deducting the portion transferred to the State School 
[oneys, and for the benefit of the State University. Of the 26 cents 
revenue tax levied by the State, • 

6 25 cents go the State School Moneys, 

328125 cents go to the State University, and 

1S-421S75 remain for the other expenses of the State. 

It is apparent from this that we can just meet the regular and 
necessary expenses of the State with our present tax of 2^ mills (and 
that no extra appropriations should be made), if the Union Military- 
Fund, and receipts into it, are by law transiferred to the Revenue 
Fund. The appropriations for the pay of civil officers, costs in crimi- 
nal cases and a few others for the closing year have been exhausted, 
and certificates of indebtedness have been issued, for the amounts oi 
which I beg to refer to the list given in the body of this report. 

COSTS m CRIMINAL CASBS. 

The State is liable for these in cases of conviction for a crime which 
is punishable solely by imprisonment in the penitentiaiy, or by death, 
and when the partv convicted is insolvent or acquitted, or the case 
continued generally. This limits the expenses of criminal jurisdio- 
tion borne by the State to a comparatively narrow circle; but the 
nat'ire of the offenses for which the State is paying the costs ot a 
prosecution is such that prompt and energetic action by the courts is 
a duty which the State owes to every inhabitant. The protection of 
lite and property, and the certain punishment of offenses against 
either, is one of the very first principles of civil govemmenu. The 
expenses of such prosecution are very properly borne by the State at 
larsre ; the whole commonwealth owes protection to a rich county as 
well as to the poor and sparsely settled neighborhood. It is therelore 
an unfounded complaint which is so often heard against the large 



184 RSPOBT. 



amounts appropriated (or necessary) for costs in criminal cases, and 
in no instance nave my estimates been adopted by the legislature: 
tiieyhave always appropriated less than I had reason to believe woula 
be required. The consequence has been a great injustice to the 

Seople and the constituents of the legislators; the law demands 
utiesof sherifTs, constables, justices of the peace, clerks, witnesses 
and jailors, and nxes a compensation for such services. In most cases 
the pay is not received until more than six months after the duty was 
performed, often not before two vears have gone by, and when then 
the legislature has failed to make the necessary appropriation (in 
other words, failed to authorize the Auditor to draw a warranty 
although the money is lying idle in the Treasury), another six months 
or more elapse before payment can be obtained. Such delay is not 
calculated to increase the faithfulness and energy of the officers, who 
are commissioned to bring criminals to justice. I would therefore 
most urgently insist, that the appropriation for this purpose be made 
ample apd large enough to leave a balance for the succeeding year, 
rather than a deficiency. The frequency of such criminal cases will 
diminish, the belter we advance again in the peaceful pursuits of 
industry; the disturbed condition consequent upon the close of a 
bitter civil war, may be considered as nearly passed away. If this be 
the case, the amounts paid for criminal prosecutions will become less 
with every year of our prosperity. 

/ CIVIL . LIST. 

My estimates for this appropriation can be made with more cer- 
tainty than others, because the amount of salary which the laws 
grant to each and every civil officer in the State is known precisely. 
Only in the amounts required for the officers of the two asylums at 
Fulton, and for the employees at the Penitentiary, the exact sums 
cannot be given before hand, the number of persons thus employed 
being regulated by the number of inmates in those institutions. A 
reduction in the appropriation below the estimates from this office, 
will, however^ neither diminish the number of officers, nor relieve the 
State from obligation to pay them.* 



CONTINGBNT EXPENSES OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 

The amounts allowed by the legislatures under this head are un- 
necessarily large. Common laborers, who are satisfied with $1 75 
for a day's work of ten hours, unfrequently receive $3 50 for six hours 
very light employment, and clerical labor engaged during only a few 
days at the close of a session, has brought mileage and full pay. To 
guard against such abuses, the act of January 14, 186S (acts 1868, 
page 52), was passed, but guards only against additional pay to the 
**omcers'' of either house, and says nothing about other employes." 
The Auditor is powerless to stop uvauthorized or unnecessary ex- 
penses under this head^ the responsibility for them rests with the 
Ueneral Assembly alone. 

*Tlit City of St. Iionii »pproprUtM $60,000 tor iha pay of ita officers, ud actaallj paid 

l$t,eo6. 



REPOBT. 185 

BEPAIRS OF PUBLIC BUILDmGS. 

The condition of the ceilings in the Senate Chamber and in the 
House of Representatives rendered the seats of the members of the 
General Assembly exceedingly daneerons. The Commissioner has 
had the one already thoroughly repaired, but the other is still in its 
unsafe condition. The roof of the armory building is reported unsafe 
also. The fence around the Capitol grounds should be wanting no 
longer, most of the material for it is on hand. 

qoyebnor's mansion. 

The structure which is at present bv courtesy dignified with the 
name of an executive mansion, is totally out of repair, inconvenient^ 
unbecoming the digniiv of the office, and by no means an honor to 
the State. Already eight years ago an act was passed providing for 
the erection of a new mansion, which with republican simplicity 
should unite the objects of giving a convenient and pleasant home to 
our chief executive, as well as being emblematic of the dignity of a 
great State. During the civil war we could not afford to spend money 
for such purposes; but we are well able to do so now, and it is hoped 
that if additional legislation is found to be necessary, the present 
General Assembly will direct the immediate erection of such an 
edifice. 

RETRENCHMENT. 

Every General Assembly since 1862 has endeavored to reduce the 
expenses of the State to a minimum, and as far as salaries and fees of 
public officers are concerned^ there can be no question that the lowest 
figure has been reached. The few suggestions I can offer in this 
respect will commend themselves : 

The office of Soldier's Claim Agent may now be dispensed with, 
which will save between $3,000 and $4,000 per annum. 

The Military Institute at Lexington is of benefit only to that city.; it 
tfhould be given to the corporation, saving $3,000 per annum. 

The Judges of the Supreme Court should each receive a salary of 
$5,000 annuallv. 

The City of Kansas^ h iving the benefit of a special criminal courts 
should be obliged to have a jail, or pay the expense of transportation 
of prisoners from the jail in Independence to the court in Kansas 
Oitv. 

The pay of Judges of Common Pleas Courts should come from the 
Qounty enjoying the privilege of such courts. 

CONTROL OVER BANKING AND INSURANCE INSTITUTIONS. 

The public desire, and the above named corporations expect that the 
State exercise some supervision over these institutions for the pur- 
pose of officially informing the community as to the safety and good 
management of these now almost indispensible associations. The 
State ot New York has a separate department for the control of banks 
and insurance offices; our State might follow the example of Ohio, 
and intrust the State Auditor with the duty ; this seems, at least, to 
be the general opinion expressed in the numerous letters on this sub- 
ject addressed to this office. 



186 BEPO&T. 

If such action should be had, the Auditor will require at least one 
additional assistant 

STATE BANES. 

There are now only two banks in the State organized under the 
General Bank Act of 1857, but the control over them has ceased since 
the o£Sce of Bank Commissioner was abolished. Under their charters 
they pay one per cent, on the paid-up capital into the treasury in lieu 
of all other taxes. Evidently this taxes them more for State pur- 
poses than all other property, including the stock of corporations, is 
drawn upon ; the total of iState taxes is now one-half per cent. In 
view of this injustice, and referring to a late decision of our Supreme 
Court on this point, some action of the General Assembly is desira- 
ble. 

TAXES FROM BAILROABS. 

All the railroads in the State are now subject to taxation the same 
as other property. The charters of two (the Hannibal & St. Joseph 
Railroad and the Pacific Railroad,) establish a modus for the levy 
and collection of the State taxes; the same should be made to apply 
to all the other railroads. It may be remarked, however, that no 
county taxes are paid by any of them, and if it is the desire of the 
General Assembly to provide for a revenue for county purposes from 
these large public works, an act should be passed regulating the levy 
and collection of the same. 

The tax of ten per cent, on the gross earnings of the railroads men 
tioned in the first section of the ordinance adopted by the people in 
1865 has not been collected ; the State officers have not come to a 
decision whether it can or cannot be enforced. 

RELIEF TO COLLECTORS. 

During the times of invasion by armed forces, which overpowered 
the resistance of civil officers, there was justice and equitv in grant- 
ing relief to Collectors for the public money taken Irom tfcem by an 
armed public enemy. These times have happily passed now, and I 
recommend the unconditional repeal of the relief act (§§ 131-136, 
Chapter 13, General Statutes, as amended by acts 1868, p. i48), which 
has caused more embarrassment to the State Auditor than any other 
duty devolving upon him. The public safety and the interest of the 
State demand that Collectors be personally responsible lor losses of 

{)ublic money. It is, perhaps, generally by their ill judgment or neg- 
igence that they can lose the public funds or have them stolen from 
them. 

POWER OP CIROUIT COURTS OVER STATS T4XATION AND DISTRESS WARRANTS. 

During my administration some cases have come into the Circuit 
Courts by decision of which the State has lost two years' taxes from 
one county and the special tax of 1863 from another, simply because, 
in my opinion, the proper State officer, the Attorney General, was not 
aware of the pending of the cases, nor was the Auditor. The decis- 
ions enjoin the collection of the whole tax book upon the petition of 
but one individual tax-payer. That the Circuit Courts have no power 



REPOKT. 187 

to relieve a county from paying a tax properly due from it. there can 
be no question • still this power has been exercised, and tne General 
Assembly should by law prohibit the recurrence of such intermed- 
dling with the State finances, which, if permitted, might result in the 
suspension of all collections of taxes 

Another Circuit Court has persisted in enjoining the execution of a 
distress warrant against the securities ot a defaulting Collector of 
Cooper county. The Attorney General obtained a decision in favor 
of the State in both the District and Supreme Court, yet the injunc- 
tions against the -Auditor have been renewed from the same Circuit 
Court and transferred to the courts in Moniteau and Cole counties. 
An act of the General Assembly should either entirely restrain Cir- 
cuit Courts from jurisdiction over such matters, or at least regulate 
proceedings so as to protect the interest of the State. 

THE REVENUE LAW. 

The foundation of all public revenues, and their full collection, is in 
the assessment ol taxable objects. If the assessment be incorrect, 
incomplete, and otherwise untrue, the taxes cannot be collected , nor 
can they be levied with justice and equitably upon all those liable for 
them. The policy of having assessors elected on a general ticket, and 
depending upon party nommations, has not always put the best qual- 
ified men into this important office. To secure a correct and complete 
assessment, and one which will represent the true cash values of tax- 
able objects, it has been suggested to empower to County Courts to 
appoint assessors in every Congressional township, or in sparsely set- 
tled counties, in convenient districts; and it is hoped that by such 
means a full and true assessment would be obtained These several 
township — or district — assessors should then, together with the pre- 
siding justice of the County Court, the Surveyor, and County Clerk, 
form the County Board of Equalization. 

Thc^ compensation for collecting the revenue has, by an act of the 
last General Assembly, been considerably reduced, which, in the 
majority of counties, brings it to a point below living expenses. 
There may be justice in reducing the compensation of collectors in a 
few large, rich counties, which pay a heavy revenue ; but the labors 
of a collector in a less densely populated county are at least as ardu- 
ous, if not more so, as those of his brother officer in wealthy districts, 
and he should receive a j ist compensation. The commissions might 
be graded by the amounts of revenue to be collected in any one 
county, so as lo equalize the compensation somewhat. 

With these exceptions, and those of a few trifling inaccuracies in 
our present law, I consider it as near perfect as any State can desire. 
The object being the sure and prompt collection of the necessary 
revenue, the present law accomplishes it much better than other sys- 
tems, and I would urgently counsel against any important changes 
in our system, which is now familiar to the people and its officers, and 
has stood the test of four years. 

In this relation, I desire to refer to the sales of real estate upon 
which a judgment and execution for delinquent taxes has been ob- 
tained (tax sales.) The State has the power to levy a tax; then it 
must have the power to enforce its collection. Every owner of 
property knows full well that a tax upon his property becomes due 
once a year. The State obtains judgment against the property upon 
which the taxes remain due and unpaid, and induces parties to buy 
such real estate under execution, conveying, by the solemn authority 



18S REPORT. 

of the State, the right and title to the purchaser. Thus, the State ob- 
tains its due taxes, and counties and public schools likewise, through 
the authority of the State. It is, then, imperative upon the State to 
protect the purchaser in his acquired rights; but, when the same 
State, by its Courts, decides such conveyances to be null and void, 
where is then the faith of the State? How can it expect to raise any 
revenue at all, except from motives oi patriotism, and not because 
the law enforces their pavment? 

Our present revenue law makes the tax deed "conclusive evi- 
dence '' that each and every act and thing required to be done by the 
provisions of the revenue law has been complied with. This would 
seem to make a tax deed as good and valid as any other conveyance 
of property under execution of a decree of a court But a decision of 
ouf Supreme Court, rendered a year ago, has been understood to go 
behind the "tax deed,'^ and to require proof that the property sold 
was assessed to the real owner. Under this impression, the tax sales 
of last October have been very small in some counties. 

The impression is certainly erroneous. The Courts cannot, nor will 
they, make or amend, but only apply the laws. But, if some action is 
deemed necessary, the General Assembly should not fail to make the 
lax sale, after tHe time for redemption has elapsed, as absolute and 
incontrovertible a conveyance of the title to the property as laws 
can make it. In as much as the State is the grantor, it might be 
found expedient in all cases in courts, when the title acquired by tax 
deeds is involved, to require the courts to notify the Attorney General, 
and to authorize this otficer to defend, either himself or by the best 
legal talent, at the expense of the State, such title. A few such cases, 
properly managed by the State, would eecure to us the full collec 
tion of all the revenue which we levy for State, county, and school 
purposes without so large "forfeited lists," from which, in many cases, 
nothing is realized. 

The dct on pages 149-^56, acts 1867, purports to be an amendment 
of chapter 13, General Statutes, but is in fact intended only for one 
of the numerous special laws for the city of St. Louis, and is a fair 
sample of the absurdity of most such special legislation. By section 
6 of this amended act, (if considered a general law, as it evidently 
reads) every county clerk, from Clark to McDonald, or from Adair to 
Wriffht, is required to "transmit to the mayor of the city of St. Louis'' 
an abstract ot the tax book. Again, the county clerk of St. Louis is, 
by th« same section required to make and furnish the abstract of the 
tax books, when the book never comes into his hands. 

The General Assembly should pass an explanatory act command- 
ing this piece of special legislation to be considered only as a local 
law referring to the city of St. Louis, but that the sections pretend* 
ing to amend chapter 13 General Statutes, shall not applv to any 
other county. If such explanatory act is not passed, it wi.l be neces- 
sary to repeal the act of 1867, and re-enact chapter 13 General 
Statutes. 

RATE OF TAXATION. 

The rates of taxation for 1868, which were 

Poll tax 50 cents. 

Revenue tax 2^ mills. 

State Interest tax* %\ milis. 

do not apply any further, and unless the General Assembly enacts i 



BBPOBT. 189 

law establishing a different rate, they ^ill, by existing laws, be for 
1869 and 1870 

Poll Tax 1 dollar. 

Revenue Tax 4 mills. 

State Interest Tax 2:^ mills. 

I recommend again the abolishment of the poll tax, which costs 
28 cents to levy lor every name, and yields but very little, except 
from persons paying tax on property. The rates of tasatiou for 18t>9 
and 1S70 might again be fixed at 

Revenue Tax 2-J mills. 

State Interest Tax 2^ mills. 

Trusting that no extraordinary appropriations will become neces- 
tary, otherwise the revenue tax will not suffice. 

BOARD OF EQUALIZATION. 

The work of this body in 1867 was the first step toward an Approxi- 
mately correct and equalized taxation. The principles established by 
the board will guide its future action, and may be briefly stated : 

1. The board considers the value of real and personal property to 
be the result of intrinsic value, multiplied by proximity of markets 
or facilities of cheap transportation and density of population. 

2. When the average valuation per acre of improved and of unim- 
proved lands in any one county is by the judgment of the board 
raised or lowered, it is done by either ten per cent or multiples of 
ten per cent., and the aggregate valuation of the real estate in the 
county is accordingly fixed at a minimum, below which the county 
board of equalization must not permit the aggregate on the assessors 
book to go. The board, at its first session, had established the mini- 
mum valuations for both the years 1867 and 1868. In 1868 only the 
county of 'Boone failed to comply with the law and assessed its total 
taxable property at$5,881,23j instead of $7,518,543, as fixed by the 
State Board. 

The influence of this board upon our State finances has been- so 
marked, and the principle of political economy upon which it is act^ 
ing has been so well understood, that notwithstanding the errors of 
judgment which the board at its first session may have committed, 
the last General Assembly refused to alter or amend the law regulat- 
lag the proceedings of the board. 

The practice of the board at its first session excepted the assess- 
ment ot St. Louis Irom consideration of the State board, probably 
upon the presumption that the city and county of St. Louis, with their 
€txpenditures being so much larger than those of the whole State, 
would be obliged to comply with the letter of the law, which require* 
property to be assessed '' at its true value in cash." But, by the latest 
official reports from the competent city officers, we learn that real 
estate in tlie city of St. Louis is assessed at only 43 per cent, of its 
market value. Even if the valuations in the counties outside of St 
Louis do not represent the exact figures of true cash value, so much is 
certain, Jiat in almost every instance they will not be so far beloW the 
truth as 57 per cent. The method applied by the cit^ authorities of 
8t. Louis in finding the true cash value of real estate is probably the 
•afest which ever could be employed. It will be almost impracticable 
for the State board to estimate the value of city property of St. Louis 
by any other rule. That St. Louis, with its vast wealth, should contri- 
bute to the support of the State only 48 per cent of its due share it 



190 REPOBT. 

neither right nor defensible ; but how to remedy the evil^ with the 
perplexing multiplicity of special laws governing St. Louis, is not easy 
to suggest, without a radical, sweeping repeal of all exceptional legis- 
lation touching St. Louis, and putting it under the operation of the 
general laws of the State. 

In no cas^, however, should this failing of St. Louis be made the 
basis of assessments in the State at large. If every county is to be 
assessed at less than its true cash values, we shall be bankrupt in less 
than a year. The figures given elsewhere in this report show that 
with our low rate of taxation we cannot afford to assess property at 
only half price, without at the same time reducing our revenues to 
only half the amount which is required for ordinary expenses under 
economical management. 

REVIEW. 

The labors of this department for the past four years have been of 
a magnitude and importance which is ineffaceably impressed upon the 
condition of our State. When we took char/^e of the administration 
the State groaned under a debt of thirty six millions of dollars ; the 
taxation was heavy, and there was no prospect for paying the fright- 
fully accumulating sums of past-duo interest upon our bond^^d debt, 
nor the coupons n^aturing. But efforts were at once made to restore 
the State's financial honor, and measures were proposed looking 
toward a full and just payment of the obligations toward our credit- 
ors. Circumstances favored us, and the determination of the last two 
General Assemblies accomplished, by the joint action of all the finan- 
cial wisdom and energy ot those bodies, what had been our fervent 
hope. 

Our State debt has now been reduced to about one-half of what it 
amounted to four years ago ; the School Fund has been doubled ; the 
floating debt has been paid; the taxation has been reduced nearly 
one-half, and the credit of our State ranges higher than that of any 
other former slave Slate. 

Besides, the revenues of the State have been gradually assuming 
order and regularity; the arrears of taxes have been levied and col- 
lected in seventy-two counties, so that at the present day, with two 
exceptions, all the counties in the State levy and collect the current 
revenue. The State can, therefore, with good assurance, estimate the 
revenues which are to come into the treasury, and the expenditures 
which are required for the administration. 

With economy and strictest order in the management of our State 
finances, we may well feel satisfied that the future before us is bright 
with the hope of prosperity such as only in a regenerated free Stata 
can be witnessed. 

In retiring, I cannot close my official labors without publicly ex- 
pressing my gratitude to my able and efficient corps of clerks, who 
nave richly earned their respective salaries by their strict attention 
and fidelity to the interests of the State ; nor would I forget, in my 
closing review, to thank the numerous assessors, clerks and collectors 
in every part of the State, who have so faithfully assisted this office in 
its efforts toward bringing regularity and order into the administration 
of our revenue. 

A. THOMPSON, 
State Auditor. 



\ 



(SIxmVTH AJm BITUmENTH AJKKVAL) 

/ 

OF THE 



TRUSTEES AND SUPERK^TENDENT 



OF THE 



MISSOURI INSTIUTTION 



FOR THE 



EDUCATION OF THE BLIND, 



TO THE 



TWENTY-FIFTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 



DECEMBER, 1868. 



Sbxatb. — Lud on the taM%, mod 200 copies orderd printed. January IS, 1860. 

G. A. MOSEB, Secretary Senate. 

H0081. — Bead, and 1,500 oofiet ordered printed for the use of the House. Janoary 11, 1809. 

Jv C. S. C0LB7, CkUf Clerk. 



J2FFBBS0N CITY: 

■UtWOOD KUtBTy PUBUO PBUinW 

1809. 



BOARD OF trustees- 
Mr. JAMES E. YEATMAN, Ppbsident. 
Mr. GEORGE PARTRIDGE, Vice Pkemdeitt. 
Hon. IRWIN Z. SMTl'H, Skorkary. 
Mr. T. B. EDQAR. Tbbasurbr. 
Rev. S. T. NICCOLLS, D. D. 
S. POLLAK, M. D. 
HoK. STEPHEN RIDQLEY. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



ADHISSIOir AND DISOHABGE, 

S. POLLAK, M. D.; Hon. L Z. SMITH. 



mSTRlTOTIOIT. 

Rev. S. T. NICCOLLS, D. D.; S. POLLAK. M. D. 

WORKSHOP, 

T. B. EDGAR, Hok. S. RIDGLET. 
GEORGE PARTRIDGE, Hon. L Z. SMITH. 



OFFICERS OFiTHE INSTITUTION 



SUPERINTENDENT, 

H. RENSSELLAER FOSTER. 

TEACHERS IN LITERART DEPARTIOINT, 

H. MORTON MEYERS, MISS FLAVILLA A. EMERY, MISS AN 

NA ZALTMAN. 

ADOLPH WILLHARTITZ, professor of music. 

ASSISTANTfly 

H. SCHIRMACHER, Teacher of Hiring ed instruments. 

MISS JENNIE D. NEAL, Teacher of piano and juvenile cJwir. 

MISS ANNA SOHMIEDEKE, Teacher of piano and guitar. 

Mr. FRED. NEUKOM, Teacher of piano and ilute. 

Mr. JAMES CORNETT, Teacher of piano and ilute. 

Mr. CHARLES 0. HENLEY, Teacher of piano. 

PRINTING ROOM. 

H. MORTON MYERS, MISS CHRISTINA RENTZ. 
MISS JENNIE D. NEAL, MISS ANNA SCHIEDEKE.' 

Mrs. JULIA S. WILKINSON, matron. 

ANDREW W. KICHLI, poremait op workshop. 

GIRLS WORKROOM, {Ih charge of Matron.) 

S. POLLAK, M. D.; attenmng physician. 

CONSULTING PHYSICIANS, 

C. A. POPE. M. D.; JOHN GREEN. M. D.; 

J. S. B. ALLEYNE, M. D.; E. H. GREGORY, M. D.; 

JOHN D. HODGEN, M. D. ^ 



rsj 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



To the Honorable General Assembly of the /State of Missouri : 

At every regular biennial meeting of the Honorable General As- 
sembly, the trustees are required to render an account of their 
stewardship, to make a full statement of the condition, of the wants 
and necessities of the institution, and to communicate everything 
that is in or that may accrue to its interests. 

A benign Providence watched over it the last two years, as it did 
from its very foundation. Few and far between have been its trials. 
Moral and physical evils found no ingress ; peace and concord reigned 
within ; prosperity and progress marked every day of its existence. 

For these blessings we can only be profoundly thankful to Him, 
who provides for the poor and the needy, for the blind as well as the 
seeing. 

Since our last report, three members have withdrawn from the 
board, viz : Rev. Dr. Nelson, Hon. W, Ourrier, Hon. Felix Coste ; and 
three others have been appointed in their place, viz : Rev. Dr. Nic- 
coUs, Hon. J. Z. Smith, Hon. S. Ridgley. 

The retiring members have the thanks of the board and of the 
institution, for duties well and cheerfully performed. 

There were also some changes made among the officers. The new 
Principal, Mr. H. R. Foster, has fully met the expectation of the board. 
He has proven himself a competent teacher, a mild but firm discipli- 
narian, and the possessor of superior administrative ability. 

Mr. Willhartitzhashad the charge of the musical department for 
the last sixteen months. He has given entire satisfaction. He has 
a sufficient and able corps of assistants — all of our own raising and 
training. 

We regret to have had to part with Mr. Daniel S. Wilkinson, our 
graduate, and late an assistant teacher of music in this institute. He 
has received and accepted a call as principal of the musical depart- 
ment in the Iowa Institution for the Blind, a highly honorable and a 
far more profitable position than he held here. 

Also Mrs. Elizabeth Houck,our oldest graduate, and subsequently 
a very efficient teacher, both of music and of the primary classes, hat 
accepted the more responsible and more remunerative position as 
principal of the same branches, in the Kansas Institution for the Blind. 
Their places have been satisfactorily filled again by our own pupils. 

This is a most ^ratifying result It proves that the system and 
thoroughness of this institution are being appreciated in other States, 
and that our pupils are being selected as the propagandists and most 
practical instructors of the plan and mode of instruction, so long and 



[6] 

80 successfully followed in this institution. We have, of course, ref- 
erence to the "Braille System," of which mention has so often been 
made in our former reports that we may dispense with it at present, 
and merely recite the above facts. 

A recapitulation of our "Fifth Biennial Report," of 1866, would 
be perfectly in its place now. There the necessities of this institution 
have been fully demonstrated ; but, unfortunately, for some cause or 
other, have not been attended to. 

The inadequacy of the present accommodations has before been 
clearly shown, and the experience of two more years has rendered it 
only more glaring. On the score of an efficient school organization, 
of a judicious classification of the scholars, and of hygienic require- 
ments, there is too much crowding everywhere. 

Mental and musical studies cannot be pursued in the same room, 
not even in rooms contiguous to each other; but there is no altema* 
tive left in this institution. 

The sound of musical instruments is heard everywhere, very much 
to the annoyance, and to the detriment of those who follow other pur- 
suits. 

Ta the invalid, this crowding, this constant din of wind and 
stringed instruments is a perfect torture. Until of late there has not 
been an infirmary room in this institution. In case of sickness oar 
kind matron, Mrs. Wilkinson, has often generally surrendered her own 
room ; a room generally the £:reat rendezvous of the pupils, who call 
for every trifle on their lovea matron, and thus rendering confusion 
worse confounded. 

During last vacation, an old smoke house on the premises, was 
converted into a class room and a servants room. The space between 
the smoke house and the main building was walled up, and a small 
room for an infirmary gained, at a cost of $750, which temporarily re- 
lieved a pressing necessity. It was not more than finished when it 
was occupied by an aggravated case of typhoid fever, which, most 
probably would have proved fatal but for ttis airy and quiet room. 

There are space for two beds in it which are appropriated for male 
pupils. Where female pupils should be placed in case of sickness, 
we are at a loss to say. They cannot remain in their dormitories, for 
these are not heated except through the halls, which is wholly insuf- 
ficient for a sick room. Even if the patient in bed could endure it the 
nurse certainly could not. The generosity of the matron should not 
be taxed too much. It will not do to make a voluntary act compul- 
sory. 

The addition of a wing to the main building, already mentioned 
in our last report, is imperatively demanded. 

To put up the wing as per plan furnished by the architect, and to 
make the most indispensable repairs to the main buildins:, the sum of 
S20,000 wilt be required, and the appropriation is respectfully asked for. 

Liberal as the Honorable General Assembly has always been to 
this institution, yet it is demonstrable that every dollar spent on this 
property was an admirable investment, for the building and grounds 
will bring, at least, double the amount the State paid for them. 

The improvements indicated are highly demanded on the score of 
the above, and many other considerations. It is confidently hoped 
that they will not be longer delaved. 

The treasurer exhibits that the expenditures of the institution for 
the last two years amounted to $38,716 75, namely, $19,067 20 for 
1866-7, and $19,648 55 for 1867-8, which is $13,715 75 more than th# 
amount appropriated by the last Honorable General Assembly. 



[7J 

These increased expenses were met by a small surplus in the 
treasury, the result of savings of previous years. But by the let of 
March next there will not be a dollar left to the credit of the iustitu* 
tion. Its doors will have to be closed unless the Honorable General 
Assembly comes with accustomed liberality speedily to its relief. 

The increased number of pupils, the enhanced cost of all articles 
of food and raiment, the higher wages required and paid to officers 
and employees make a larger permanent appropriation indispensably 
necessary. The great deficiency in musical instruments, in books, 
school apparatus, is wholy due to the insufficiency of means to supply 
ihem. 

Constant repairs of old, nearly worn out musical instruments, the 
purchase of low-priced pianos, is a very poor economy, but only re- 
sorted to from want of means to do better. A regular annual appro- 
priation of $20,000 would obviate all these difficulties, and enable the 
institution to effect all the good which the spirit of the age demands, 
and to maintain the high rank as an educational and charitable insti* 
tution which it claims, and which is conceded to it, not only in this 
country, but also abroad. 

Twenty thousand dollars a year now is onl^ a little more than the 
910,000 a year received prior to the late war oi the rebellion, and are 
respectfully and urgently asked for. 

In comparing the cost of educating the blind in this institution, 
with that of like institutions in other States, the economical administra- 
tion of this institution will become manifest. Even the younger insti- 
tutions in the West, have incomes chiefly from their respective States, 
largely in excess of this, which enables them t(T set out from the 
point, which this institution has attained after years of hard struggle 
and labor. 

Most of the sister institutions in the United States are also more 
or less endowed by legacies and bequests, which furnish resources 
independent of State aid. 

This institution has not been so fortunate yet, to be remembered 
in that way, though quite a number of wealthy and reputed philan- 
thropists have died in Missouri since the origin of this institution. 

It is hoped that this reminder will hav^e the desired effect. Until 
then the aid derived from the State is its sole dependence, which we 
feel confident will be commensurate to the necessities above in- 
dicated. 

It has become customary for county or municipal authorities, and 
even for parents or guardians, in sending pupils, to transfer all further 
care of them to the institution, so that pupils when discharged have 
no place where to go, and none to care for them in anv shape or form. 
They are left at once to the cold charity of the world. The institu- 
tion cannot retain them, nor this city or community provide for them. 
It is therefore desirable that the Statutes be so amended as to require 
parents or guardians to obligate themselves to receive the pupils 
when discharged by the proper authorities of the institution. 

For a more detailed account concerning the management and 
interior condition of the institution, the report of the principal is re- 
spectfully referred to, where the number, name, residence, and ulti- 
mate destiny of the pupils is given; also the names of officers, teach- 
ers, and employees, and their respective salaries; also, a list of bookr 



18J 

school apparatus, and musical instraments now in use, and their 

respective pecuniary value. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

JAMES E. YEATMAN, 
GEORGE PARTRIDGE, 
8. POLLAK, 
IRWIN Z. SMITH, 
T. B. EDGAR, 
8. T. NIOCOLLS, 
STEPHEN RIDGLEY, 
St. Levis, December 8, 1868. Truateet. 



[9] 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trudtees : 

In accordance with the Statute and usage, I have the honor of 
making to you a detailed report of this institution for the two years 
ending November Ist, 1868 

KEGISTSR. 



Number present Noyember 1, 1866 

Number admitted during the two years 

Number discharged dnrinr the two years 

Number remaining Noyember 1, ]868 , 

Whole number under instruction for two years 



Males. 


Females. 


31 


26 


29 


16 


23 


12 


37 


30 


60 


42 



Totid. 



67 
45 
36 
67 
102 



Five of those discharged were properly teachers, but had been 
reported as pupils ; three had completed their course ; sixteen were 
discharged at their own request to pursue their trade, or to teach; 
three had their sight restored by successful surgical operation ; two 
removed from the State; and six were either withdrawn by their 
friends, by reason of ill health, or from being otherwise disqualified 
from receiving further benefit from the institution. 

The foregoing figures exhibit a marked increase in the number of 
pupils over any previous year, and we may reasonably infer from this 
increase that a renewed interest in our work is being awakened 
among those who favor education and progress. But we have failed 
to reach all those within our State who ought to be here receiving the 
benefits and advantages provided for them through the liberality of a 
munificent people. We would therefore call upon you, and through 
you upon the humane in every part of our State, to make known the 
object and designs of this institution, and to influence all eligible sub- 
jects to avail themselves of the opportunities here afforded them of 
becoming useful, respectable and independent members of society. 
It should be understood however, that this is neither an asylum, nor a 
hospital, but an educational institution, and mental and physical 
capacity are essential to the successful enjoyment of its privileges. 

The school comprises three departments— literary, musical and 
mechanical — all in operation at the same time, with a schedule of 
hours and exercises so arranged as to accommodate the several 
pupils. 



u 
tc 



I 10 J 

The daily order of exercises is as follows : 

Rise at 6 o'clock a. m. 

Breakfast 6:30 " 

Recreation till 7:15 '' 

Chapel exercises 7:15 to 8 " 

School 8 to 12 " 

Dinner and recreation 12 to 2 p. m. 

School 2 to 5 " 

Supper and recreation 5 to 7 

Chapel exercises and reading 7 to 8 

Last retiring bell 9:45 

House closed at 10 

LITSBARY. 

Our aim in this department is to give our pupils a good, solids 
English education. 

The studies pursued during the last two years have been : Braille 

Erinting; reading; spelling and writing; etymology, with Greek and 
atin roots; grammar; physical and descriptive geography; physi- 
ology ; natural and intellectual philosophy ; history, both ancient and 
moaem, and rhetoric. 

In the evening, an hour is spent reading from standard authors 
and the various magazines and periodicals of the day. 

The exercises on Saturday are varied from the regular programme : 
From 8 to 9 o'clock a. m. — reading of reports of attendance ; also, of 
scholarship, as determined from the daily recitations, and general re- 
marks upon the work of the week. From 9 to 10 — ^Elocutionary exer- 
cises, recitations, declamations and composition. At the close of these 
exercises, the scnool is divided in two classes, and from thirty to forty 
minutes spent in calisthenics and light gymnastics. 

MUSICAL. 

This department receives here, as in all similar institutions, a large 
share of attention. 

This is not because the loss of sight specially fits one to become a 
musician, but the study and practice of this delightful art is specially 
adapted to the blind. All can, and do, derive much pleasure from it, 
while a fair proportion of them become skillful performers and most 
excellent teachers. 

All of our pupils, except those admitted to the mechanical depart- 
ment alone, receive instruction in vocal music. 

There are two choirs, one meeting two, and the other, the juve- 
nile, five times per week. The number of pupils taking lessons in in- 
strumental music is as follows : 

Piano 28 

Organ : 2 

Guitar 5 

Flute. 3 

Violin . . .' 7 

Comet 2 

Double Bass 2 

Cello 1 



« 



4»# 



[11] 

Regular instmction is gWen in musical composition, and a class 
has been formed of those who intend making the teaching oi music 
their profession, which recives special instruction in written music, 
thus fitting them to teach the seeing as correctly and successfully as 
Beeing teachers. 

MECHAl^ICAL DEPARTMENT. 

In many respects this is the most important of the three, for in- 
dustry is to the bliud as to the seeing — the basis of success ; and that 
student will form more correct habits of application to his lessons who 
has been, or is, required to devote a portion of his time to manual 
labor. This is especially applicable to our pupils, for blindness gen- 
erally predisposes to physical inactivity, and as a consequence the in- 
tellect, in many instances, becomes sluggish — hence this department 
is a most necessary and valuable adjunct to the literary and musical 
departments, and should not be separated from them, as some of the 
educators of the blind have advocated. 

I would have all the pupils employed for at least one hour per day 
in some manual labor ; but, unfortunately, we have not been able to 
practice upon this theory, from the very limited space allotted for our 
work-rooms. 

In the workshops the trades of broom and brush-making and 
chair-seating are taught, and as many of the pupils are employed in 
these branches as our conveniences will accommodate. A statement 
of the work-shop account will be found in the Appendix. 

The girls are taught sewing, knitting, crocheUng, beadwork, etc.; 
take care of their own rooms, and wash the table dishes of the entire 
household. 

Though they may not be able to provide wholly for themselves 
from the pursuit of any or all of these acquirements, yet a knowledge 
of them is far more necessary and will contribute more to their hap- 
piness than the ability to solve some intricate problem in Euclid, or 
to repeat the paradigms of the French verbs. 

Many of the pupils in this Institution are orphans, without home 
or friends, and have been placed here by some kind acquaintance or 
the proper authorities, in order that they may be educated and fitted 
in a great degree to support themselves, as well as made useful and 
agreeable members of society. 

They have a good home while here, but their stay is limited, as 
this is an institution for learning, and not an asylum. And when the 
time allotted has expired, they must be discharged, sent out into the 
world " with no- where to go," unless it may be that a kind Providence 
has put it into the hearts of some benevolent persons to offer a home, 
which is seldom the case. This has always been a sad fact, and be- 
came more apparent at the close of the session of 1867, when several 
of these homeless ones were discharged, having remained the full 
time, and the place they occupied being needed lor new pupils. And 
. at the commencement of the next session, or the 8th of October, 1867, 
the young lady pupils organized tl^emselves into a society called the 
'^ Band of Industry," for the purpose of raising means to establish a 
home for the indigent blind, so that those without natural homes and 
protectors may have a place where they can sustain themselves bv 
their own industry, and put to usefulness the knowledge acquired 
while here. They have devoted their leisure hours to knitting, cro- 
cheting, making tatting, beadwork, etc., etc., and have realized from 



[12] 

the sale of articles thus manQfactured, and those made for sale daring 
work hours, $350. They have also made many articles for use in the 
Institution^ sheets, pillow-slips, towels, and various articles of their 
own clothing, for which they have received no pay. 

It is not expected that the necessary funds can be raised by this 
slow process. They have merely set the stone to rolling, hoping that 
with the aid of contributions, donations and bequests Irom a liberal 
and benevolent people, enough will soon be collected to found the 
80-much- needed Industrial Home for the blind. 

PRINTING. 

We have continued our work in this department, adding to our 
collection of books in the Braille type an ^'Abridged Musical Dic- 
tionary of Italian, English, French and German words;" a Speller 
and Definer, abridged from ^'Town's Speller and Definer for the use 
of common schools ;" and a " Selection of Prose and Poetry from the 
best English authors." Here our success has not been all that we 
would desire, but all that we might reasonably expect, when we con- 
sider that our corps of teachers is barely sufficient for the educational 
wants oi the pupils, and the making of the text-books can only re- 
ceive a secondary attention. 

ASSISTANT OFFICERS AND TEACHERS. 

Our worthy -and efficient matron, Mrs. J. S. Wilkinson, still re- 
mains with us, extending her motherly care and sympathy to all. 
With the large increase of pupils, her labors have correspondinglv 
increased, and in addition to the supervision of the entire household, 
care of the sick, etc., she has been required to give three hours per 
day to the instruction of the girls in. the work-room. She should be 
relieved of this extra charge. It was supposed that one of the 
teachers from the literary department might be assigned to this, but 
it is not possible to do so without neglecting that division. 

Mr. A. Kichli is foreman in the workshop, exercising the same 
saving care as if the shop were his own. 

Since my last report several changes have taken place in the 
teachers of music and literature. Mr. Delvs K. Haynes resigned in 
March, 1867, to accept a position as Principal in a Public School, at a 
salary of $1,800 per annum. Mr. H. Morton Meyers a graduate of this 
institution has been appointed to fill his place. Mr. Adolphe Wil- 
hartitz has been appointed to fill the place formerly occupied by 
Mr. H. Eobyn as Professor of Music. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Houck a graduate of this institution, and for 
several years a most efficient teacher in both literature and music, 
resigned at the close of the last session, to accept a position offered 
her by the Kansas Institute for the Education of the Blind. 

^ Mr. D. S. Wilkinson, also a graduate and a teacher in music, 
resigned his position here, and accepted that of Professor of Musio 
in the Iowa Institute for the Education of the Blind. 

Miss Flavilla A. Emery has been appointed as teacher in litera- 
ture, and Mr. H. Schirmacher as instructor on stringed Instruments. 

So many changes occurring in so short a time would ordinarily 
be detrimental to the succesis of the school — but I am happy to 
testify to the faithful manner in which the new appointees have dis- 
charged the duties assigned them. To all of them our work was a 



[13] 

new one at the time of their appoiniment ; but they have aesiduoasly 
devoted themselves to their new profession, and tbeir success and 
conduct, thus far, merit your fullest confidence. 

In a school of this kind, tlie fixed policy should be to select offi- 
cers and teachers, with strict reference to their qualifications, and to 
make only such changes as are imperatively demanded in the proper 
fulfullment of our responsible trust. We should have first class 
teachers, equal to the best in our educational establishments for the 
seeing. 

In order to secure this requisite high order of talent, officers and 
teachers must receive such remuneration as will make it an object 
fer them to devote themselves to our work as a profession for life. 
This fact is recognized in fixing the salaries in all Institutions for deaf 
mutes ; but such is not the case in most of the Institutions for the 
BUnd. 

The general health of the inmates has been good. There have 
been several cases of illness — some quite severe; but through the 
blessing of God and the skill and care of our attending physician, 
none have resulted seriously and the death angel has not visited our 
household, for which we have especial reason to be thankful, since 
during the past two years the cholera has raged with fearful mortali- 
ty around us. 

OUK PRESENT CONDITION AND FUTURE PROSPECTS. 

My Assistants have co-operated heartily with me in discharging 
the responsible trust which you have committed to my supervision. 

The pupils have been regular in their attendance, and have main- 
tained a commendable standard of discipline, and deportment, and 
have shown a marked desire to excel. 

Eleven new pupils have been received since opening of the 
present session, and nine more have been admitted who have not^ yet 
arrived. " What shall we do with them," becomes a question of more 
than passing importance — ^for, long ago our present accommodations 
were more than crowded, and we have been compelled to do, not as 
we should, but as we could. 

After a careful consideration of this matter, I would suggest as 
the best and wisest course, a disposal of the present buildings and 
grounds, which have nearly doubled in value, since they became the 
property of the State, and the purchase of a lot upon which to erect 
such buildings in style and arrangement^ as experience has shown are 
best adapted for the successful prosecution of our especial work. 

I would not advocate going out from the city, where we would be 
debarred from the privileges we now enjoy of attending church, con- 
certs and lectures, and which are so really essential to the education 
of the pupils. 

But it a suitable lot of several acres could be procured in some 
healthy locality, in the suburbs of our fast growing city — and on the 
line of some one of the many horse railroads, we should then have 
the same city privileges, without the dust, ana noise, in the purer air 
of the country. 

In behalf of the officers and pupils, I hereby tender our hearty 
thanks to the Philarmonic Society for free entree to all their concerts; 
to the different Musical Troupes who have accorded us like favors ; to 
the Public School Library for complimentary tickets to the course of 
Lectures given under its auspices; to the Starkweather and Misses L. 



1141 

B. Irwin, E. M.Mack, O. H. Post, Florence Foster, E. Freeborn and S. 
F. Allen, for readings on Sabbath and other afternoons. 

The Missouri jJemocrat and the Missouri Valley Register havB 
been kindly furnished ns, for which the proprietors will please accept 
our thanks, with the express wish that we may be similarly favored 
in the future. And we hope that the proprietors of other publications 
within our State will remember us in the same way. Our thanks are 
due to the Rev. Mr. Baenger, for a present of a full set, 18 yolumes 
of the New Testament and Psalms in German raised letters, printed 
at Stuttgart ,Oermany. 

We are also under great obligations to the several railroads for 
the many favors shown to us in granting free passes to the pupils to 
go home, and also to return after vacation. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, please accept my thanks for your uni- 
form kindness, judicious counsel and earnest co-operation for the 
welfare of this institution. 

With devout thanks to Almighty God for His continued favor to- 
ward us, and profiting from past experience, we go forward hopefully 
and prayerfully, to strive by our deeds to accomplish that, which our 
hearts so much desire : That we may be eyes to the blind. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. RENSSELLAER FOSTER, 

Superintendent 
St. LouiSi December 8, 1868. 



tl5] 





sssssss 


£ 




i5SSs3i 




g 


s 




• «-«- •«--,- 




1 




£ 




^ 










3 


1 




j 










ii 






k 




ii 
























A 








5 


■ 


js 




: 


s 


^ t 


H < 




J! 


i 

s 


S ! 


si i 
11 

H 


2 


1 

i 




{S! 


! S3 


H 




-"a 


s a^ 






£ t 


sssse 






ii 






s 








s 


". " 




M- 




















|_E_.l?; a fr; ;=?;!( 




J 






1 






1 












■1 












1 


A A^s^^^s'^AA'^i 




1 




iisspiiiii 






=-s-s=="a2"-- 




ll 


III! 


mm 





[16] 

CLASSIFIED LIST OF DISBCESEMENTS FOR THE TWO YEAES 

ENDING NOVEMBER 1, 1868 



ExpenditnrM. 



Salaries of officers and teachers 

Employees wages 

Groceries and proyisions 

Foel and lights , 

Drac^y medicines and sarg^ical appliances 

Music and masical instruments 

Tuning and repairing musical instruments 

Books, stationery and printing 

Binding books 

Braille paper, slates, type, etc... 

Posta^&nd revenue stamps 

Dry roods and clothing , 

Blankets, bedding, carpets and furniture , » 

Table, tin and wooden ware 

Kepairs to cooking and heatine apparatus. ..•••.. 

Improyements and repairs on building 

Mechanical department , 

Insurance and special taxes 

Lumber, nails, paint and glasing... 

Gar fare and travelling expenses 

Btock and feed 

Miscellaneous 

Total *. 

Receipts from sundry sales 

Net expenses 



Amoant. 



$ 8,150 93 


3,040 IS 


11,841 21 


1,156 05 


146 63 


088 65 


255 80 


318 25 


68 55 


844 71 


63 45 


2,334 25 


847 86 


361 35 


666 07 


4,843 53 


1,503 06 


335 91 


155 80 


218 15 


325 56 


266 81 


$38,715 75 


1,991 49 



$.16,724 26 



WORKSHOP IN ACCOUNT WITH INSTITUTION. 



Dk. 



Cr. 



Expenditures. 


Amount. 


Receipts. 


Amount. 


To inyentorv Nov. 1, 1866.. 


$ 277 85 

1,310 51 

90 00! 

60 00, 

42 55! 

8 23 


By 443 1-6 dosen brooms. 


$1,117 K 
4 20 


To raw material, for two years... 
To six broom machines 


By li dosen brushes 


Bv raw material <....... ». 


67 94 


To four broom presses 


By 6 broom machines 


102 00 


To \mli dozen brush shears 


By 2 broom presses 


28 00 


To balance. 


By 3 pair brush shears 


23 25 




By brooms and brushes used in 
institution 


41 7 




By 3 broom machines loaned 

By 3 broom presses loaned 

By inventory Nov. 1. 1868 


51 
45 

308 75 


/ 


Total 




Total 


$1,789 14 


$1,789 1 



rn] 

Adult males of any age, if physically capable of learning and 

Sursuing a trade, are admitted to the mechanical department, and are 
ischarged as soon as they have acquired it 

On leaving the shop they are furnished with a machine, press and 
other necessary tools. 

These they seldom feel able to pay for, and in the above account 
I have given credit for them as laoned. We have generally sold our 
brooms to blind men unable to follow a trade, they finding ready sale 
for them among the citizens. 



[18] 



LIST OF PUPILS OF THE INSTITUTION. 

FMOM TUK oPKXlNa OF THE SCHOOL, JANUARY 1, 1S51,T0 NOVEMBER 1, 18f^>^' 



Names. 



Males. 



Adams, James 

Anderson, Joseph..., 
Anderson, William.. 

B.ibenr Dennis 

liehmer, August 

Blades, George W.... 

t31iess, Louis 

13lock, Eugene 

lirady, John 

Brookins, Charles F. 



County. 






Remarks, 



Montgomery 1863 

St. Louis '1$60 1861 RemoTed. 

do Il865| I 

do ll 860,1 861 Broommaker. 

Gasconade |1857 1858 Broommaker. 

St. Louis 1866' 

do ,18661 

Cape Girardeaa...il8J0 1855, Removed. 
St. Louis ...,U862'l8C3 Broommakrr. 



•own, Owen 



Burks, William S 

Buxton, William R 

Tinavan, James L 

vuatelloa, James 

Charlton, John 

Choate, Jefferson 

Christopher, William L. 

'^oraus, Eutjene 

Conrad, Henry H 

Cuoper, Alexander 

Corby, William 

Czwierdenski, Z. H 

Cornett, James , 

Cundiff, Marion.. 

Davenport, William 

Dewees, Crasmns M 

Douglass, George A 

Douglass, William H..., 

Douglass, Hugh B , 

Dosrgett, William 

Duff, Thomas M 

Uualiam, John 

Durgnate, Vincent 

i>ixon, Charles C... 

Kz:geraaB, Louis 

Ellersieck, Gottlieb 

Farley, James 

Pitzpatrick, Jeremiah.... 

Fletcher, Richard S 

Foley, William 

Footman, Gerard 

Porhan, Patrick 

'' mkli'^, ."''■'ni'^'-- T> 

i^'ranklin, Jesse D 

Fronch, Josiah T 

Fulbright, John F 

•Oabriel, Francis 

Galf^y, George H 

■Graie, Patrick 

•Groves, Charles M 

Hahneman, Joha , 

Hare, Thomas 

ilarp, Ichabod 



I •••■• I 



do 

Cole 

Warren,... 

St. Louis. .......»«. 

do 
do 



1859' 1863 Broommaker. 

18661' 

1804, 

1865'l865 



Broommaker. 



Broommaker. 
1859il860iTeacher Kansas Institute. 
1865 1866 Broonimftker. 
1855 1857, Deceased. 

Bollinger 1861 1864 Removed to Kentucky. 

Osage 1863 l«65 Broommaker. 

|St. Louis 11857 1864 Deceased. 

do |l858ll859!Removed. 

Cole 1863,1867|Moved to Kansas. 

St. Louis 1863 1866 Broommaker. 

do |1854,1855Phy8ician. 

Audrain '1859, 

'Monroe |l856 1869 At home. 

'St. Louis l]868{ 

Lewis '1806 

St. Louis 1 1865 1866 

Marion |18H() 1806 Broommaker. 

St. Louis 1805 1866|Broommaker. 

Moniteau I1864; | 

Sullivan I1SOSI86S Broommaker. 

St. Louis iij<04 I 

do J1S5S 1859 Broommaker. 

do 1S()S| 

do 185 9 I 

do 180S 

do 1M5S'I806 

do 1S50 1858 Brushmaker. 

Hickory 'l859 1861 Broommaker, 

St. Louis |1853 IS58 Brushmaker. 

do i8o6 1806 1 Broommaker. 

do 1806 1867 Broommaker. 

do ilSOO 

liutitr , ihoO 1867 lirooramakoi. 

Franklin 1863 1865 Broommaker. 



Broommaker. 



Cape Girardeau. 



• •••••••«•••! 



1859 1861 



Carroll 
Clay 

St. Louis. 1 1858 1859 

Lewis 1868i 



1805 1867 



Teacher. 
Withdrawn. 
1804 1806 Unknown. 

Broommaker. 



St. 



Louis. 

do 

do 



1859 1860 
1859] 1862 
18651866 



Broommaker. 
Broommaker. 
Removed. 



[19] 



LIST OF PUPILS IN THE INSTITUTION— Contimued. 



xt aixicw* 



n. . . * 

V« - I i. • 









Mals 



a • 



Harriflon, John W jSt. 



TT 



Henley, Charles C 

Hoack, Thomu L. R. 

Hoyle, Edrar H 

Hughes, Henry 



Louis?. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

St. Charles. 



<b CO 



OS 



"R^mnrl"*. 



Hughes, B. Douglass Pettis... 

Hurst, Albert iPulaaki, 



Jonson, Nicholas 'Jasper 

Johnson, Levris H 'Ste. Genevieve.... 

Johnson, Julius S ISt. Charles 



St. Louis. 

Marion 

St. Louis. 

do 
Laf^ettd.. 



1868 
1851 1863 

I853ll864 

1858|l86.o 

l852'lS62 

18601867 

1868 

1865 1860 

185711860 

186811868 

1868! 

186611866 

186RI186S 

18641865 



Brushmaker. 

Unknown. 
At home. 
Moved to Tf^^wa. 
Broomoiaker. 

At home. 
Broommaker. 
Music teacher. 



Broommaker. 

Broommaker. 

Removed. 
1868!l868'Broommaker. 
1856 1858*Removed. 



1861 
1858 



1863 {Deceased. 
1859'Broommaker. 



1865'1866'Brooramaker. 



Teacher, diedlSGl. 
Withdriiwn. 



Jones, Henry 
Jones, Samuel W 

Kahn, Peter 

Kane, Patrick 

Kersey, John 

Ketchman, Matthias.. jSt. Louis 

Kirby, Thomas ^ 'Clinton... 

Kohle, John.^ Ray 

Kramer, Henry P 'Lafayette 

Krpmer, John Fred , St. Charles Il864'l865'Broommaker. 

Lainhart, John C iOentry |1859!l867 Broommaker. 

Langley, William C Fulton.. 

Laurence, Abelim JSt. Louis... 

T-eakey, George Nodaway. .. 

Louden, Thomas Callaway.... 

Lutrell, Churchwell • iMcDonald.. 

Lvnch, Mark 'St. Louis... 

xMagofiiD, John h Fotilit 

Manis, Calvin H .Cole , 

Maxwell, William H 'Washinglon 

McGuire, Eddie St. Louis 

Merwin, John 

Mills, Wilson 

Miller, George..., 
Moonan, Thomas 

Morgan, James E Miller 

Morris, Calvin H Cole 



18621 

1854|1855 
18671 
1865ll865 
1858il859 



do 
do 
do 
do 



Musbach, Charles. 
Mulligan, Charlie. 
Murphy, Jeremiah. 
Myers, H. Morton. 
McCall, Charlie.... 
McClusky, John.... 

Mclvor, Daniel 

Neagle, Andrew...., 
Neukom, Fred 



St. 



Louis., 

do 
Jackson..., 
Nodaway.., 
Buchanan^, 
St. Louis. 

do 

do 

do 



Xunley, John A Osage 



O'Brien, William 

OTallon, Michael 

Orrick, Charles...., 

Osborne, Thomas B |St. 

PattersoDt George W 
Powers, Fsancis N... 

Ra^, William S 

li.uuertooii, kjuii^uel... 
Routen, Lanceford L 

Ruebels, George. , 

Rueb«ls, Michael 

Quirk, John 

Saunders, Alfred W.. 

3hiebels, John 

Sexton, Ambrose H |Callaway . 

Shave, Daniel •• St. Louis., 

Shebels, James Terry, 111. 

Simmons, James T% St. Louis, 



St. Louis 

do 
St. Charles.. 

Louis. ... 

Knox 

Montgomery. 

Macon 

Miller 

St. Louis 

do 

do 

Knox... 

St. Louis 



Withdrawn. 

Removed to Tenueaaee. 
186711S67 Broommaker. 
1S5S 1861 Broommaker. 
1863!i864'Broommakcr. 
1 853'1866'Broommaker. 
1867 

1865 1866 At home. 
1861'1862'Broommaker. 
l863'i864iVision restored. 

18891 r 

1 863 1855'Broommaker. 

1863 1864 Broommaker. 

1866 1858'Broommaker. 
1867| I 

18631864 "Broommaker. 
I868'l867!Teacher at Institution. 
l863|i857*Removed. 
1867, 1859'Broommaker. 
18661 865 Broommaker. 

1864 1865 Broommaker. 
I861i 

18551865 

1866 1866 Removed. 

1886 I 

1864 

1867'! 868 Broommaker. 

l884il865;Moved to Iowa. 

185311863 Broommaker. 

1868 

1868 

1852 1861 Music Teacher. 

1866'l867iMoved to Illinoi?^ 

1862:i862;Moved to Illinois. 

1866;i867iBroommaker. 

18521864'Matmaker. 

1868:i868'Broommaker. 

1867;i859'Broommaker. 

1853l86i;Deceased. 

1866'1865 Broommaker. 

1859!l863iVision restored. 



Stephenson, Charles Lewis 11866 1866 [Removed. 



[20J 

LIST OF PUPILS IK THS INSTITUTIOK— ComnrvBD. 



Namee. 



Males 



Stobbs, Einah 

St. John, MichMl 

Talley, Barton W....... 

Timan, John 

Trim, Joseph M. •..«..... 

Turk, Robert 

Vailed, Francis 

Valle, M 

Vickers, Jolm. 

Wack, Jacob 

Wallein, Jefferson. 

Wallace, Patrick. 

W algell, Francis 

Webster, John A 

Welch, Patrick H 

West, WiUiam 

Wienoff, Bernard 

Wilkinson, Daniel S.... 

Williams, Joseph 

Wilmes, Antoine 

Woodcock, James....... 

Wooliyer, Ebenexer H. 

Wooli^er, Jacob L 

Yates, WillardG 

ZeUar, Alex. W 



Fekalbi. 



Adams, Mary B , 

Anderson, Mary J... 

Balseger, Mary 

Bayles, Bmma W.... 
Bemhart, Anna...... 

Brown, Fannie , 

, Nancy..., 

Caine, Katie 

Campbell, Barab A. 
Courtri^ht, Betty.., 

Cox, Virrinia B , 

Crawford, Mar^ J.. 

Crudis, Anna J. 

Candiff, Harriett.... 
Dixon, Jessie. 



Doyle, Margie. 
Darning, £iidoi 



iadora • 

Doming, Lucinda 

Elliott, Julia. 

Everett, Marj....^ 

Fitsgerald, Mary , 

G-oerrisch, Amelia. , 

Glenn, Annie ,„... , 

Garroatte, Sophronia 

Gereke, Mary , ».. 

Givens, Mary B , 

Gapton, Lacy 

Gampton, Rebecca 

Gapton, Teniperance , 

Hamsbarr, Therasa. 

Harris, ^nnie ,. 

Hart, Alice 

Hassell Blla T 

Harden Liuie W , 

Heitkamp, Josephine... 

Hill, Alice V 

Honck, Mrs. E. F , 

Hunter, Mary J 

Gerald, Maggie M , 




o ..- 

CO 



Illinois 

St. Louis 

Cape Girardeau. 

St. Louis 

Phelps 

Audrain 

St. LouiB 

do 

do 

do 

Iron 

Kansas 

St. Lcuis 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Cape Girardeau. . 

do 

Gasconade 

St. Louts 

Dent 

Dade 

Kentucky 

St. Louis 



Platte 

Johnson »,,.,. 

St. Louis 

do 

Chariton 

St. Louis 

do 

do 

do 

Cole 

Scotland 

Pettis 

St. Louis 

do 

do 

do 
St. Louis..... 

do 

Ray 

Gasconade......... 

St. Louis 

St. Lonis 

St. Lonis 

Greene 

St. Lonis 

Pike 

Macon..... 

Macon 

Macon 

St. Louis 

St. Louis.. 

St. Louis 

Lafayette 

Cape Girardaau. 

St. Louis 

Caldwell 

Marion 

Cole .« 

Bollinger 



1862 
1862 
18«7 
1863 
1868 
1864 
1854 
1856 
1859 
1867 
18— 
1861 
1857 
1858 
1868 
1867 
1855 
1851 
1858 
1860 
1866 
1863 
1859 
1851 
1863 



1853 
1867 
1867 
1866 
1859 
1859 
1857 
1863 
1866 
1853 
1864 
1865 
1851 
1852 
1863 
1866 
1859 
1859 
1857 
1868 
1859 
1865 
1864 
1868 
1867 
1867 
1869 
1865 
1859 
1863 
1866 






1865 
1855 
1859 
1866 
1851 
1863 
1865 



1862 
1863 
1867 
1864 



1855 Brushmaker. 



1856 
1860 
1867 

1862 
1858 
1860 

1867 
1860 
1862 
1863 
1861 
1866 

1864 
1854 
1866 



1861 

1868 

1866 
1866 
1858 
1866 

1863 



1867 
1853 
1866 

1861 
1862 
1859 

1865 

1866 
1868 



18621853 



1866 
1861 
1864 



Kemarka. 



Broommaker. 
Broommaker. 
Broommaker. 
Broommaker. 



ISSS. 



Unknown. 

Broommaker. 

Broommaker. 

Killed by accident, 

Broommaker. 

Broommaker. 

Died in 1863. 

RemoTed. 

Broommaker. 

Mnsic Teacher. 

Broommaker. 

Broommaker. 

Withdrawn. 

Music Teacher. 
Willowworker. 
Vision restored. 



Whole number... 14€ 

At home. 

Withdrawn. 

Withdrawn. 

Moved to PennaylraDia. 

Deaf, dumb and blind . 

Remored. 

At home. 



At home. 

Moved to Indiana. 

Vision restored. 

Vision restored. 
Musie teacher. 
Withdrawn. 

Moved to Illinois . 

Vision restored. 
Removed. 



1866 Died 1866. 
1866 Vision restored. 
1866 At home. 



Moved to IU*noi6 . 
Deceased. 
At home. 
At home. 



1854|Teacher xnKan. institute. 
1864 Vision restored. 



[21] 



LIST OF PUPILS IN TAB INSTITUTION— Continued. 



Names. 



Pmalbb. 



Kane, Catherine 

Kavanaueh, Fannie 

Latour, Earenia 

Mayberry, Emma. i. 

Meredith, Doithula J 

MiUer, Sarah E 

Miner, Mary 

Mockbee, Mamie 

McQinnifl, Katie E. G 

Murphy, Ann...... 

Malone, Mattie B 

Neal, Elisabeth... .« 

Neal, Jennie J) 

Odle, Sarah R. 

Painter, Belle 

Peery, Martha 

Pell, Hannah A. 

Prince, Martha 

Quinnj Mary Ellen 

RentZy Chriitina 

Ramsey, Mary 

Russell, Matilda. 

See, Luann 

Simsted, Anna M 

Smail, Sarah 

Schmeideke, Anna 

Smith, Fannie M 

Stark, Amelia 

Stark, Minnie 

Steele, Allie E 

Stiefarman, Katrina. 




18641 
1856 
1864 
1859 
1865 
1866 
1860 
1861 
1860 
1866 
1868 
1865 
1857 
1857 
1857 
1859 
1868 
1866 
1866 
1855 
1863 
1865 
1868 
1866 
1860 
1858 
1865 
1868 
1868 
1867 

Osare 11867 

St. L< 



CrawfordT. 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Livinf^ton 

Pemiscot 

Perry 

St. Clair 

Pettis 

Dade 

Mississippi 

Lafayette 

Cape Girardeau. 
Cape Girardeau. 

Monitef^Q 

Platte.; 

Gentry 

Dariess 



Dent 

St. Louis 

St. Louis. ... 

Cole 

MUler 

Montgomery. 

St. L«uis 

Grundy 

St. Louis 

Bollinger 

St. Louis..... 

St. Louis 

Pike 



Taylor, Lizzie L 'St. Louis. 

Toole, Mary A .iSt. Louis. 

Truel, Nannie W iPettis 



Stuermer, Katie L St. Louis '1865 

Stuart, Mary R 'St. Louis :1863 

Taylor, Fannie M St. Louis !1864 

1865 
1864 
1861 
1855 
1866 
1660 
1866 
1864 
1851 



Boone 

Platte 

Franklin .. 



White, Mary Jane 

Williams, Sarah.... 

Wilson, LucindaE 

Winnifield, Mary A ^Cass 

Wanfield, Mary St. Louis 

Young, Mary Ann St. Louis 

Zattmann, Annie St. Louis 



I" 



1858 
1865 
1865 



1861 
1867 

1867 

1866 
1867 
1862 
1867 
1861 
1868 



1867 
1864 
1866 

1861 
1865 

1865 
1868 
1868 

1868 

1865 



Remarks. 



1864 
1857 



Vision restored. 
Vision restored. 
At home. 



At home. 
At home. 

Bemoyed. 

Vision restored. 

Teacher in institute. 

Teacher. 

Moyed to Kansas. 

At home. 

Remoyed. 



Teacher in institute. 
Vision restored. 
Moyed from State. 

At home. 

Moyed to Illinois. 

Remoyed. 
Vision restored. 
Vision restored. 

Vision restored. 

Moyed to Illinois. 

Died 1865. 



At home. 
Remoyed. 



1863 Remoyed. 

1866 Withdrawn. 
1866 'Deceased. 

1867 Teaclier in institute . 

Whole number— 83. 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



Males 

Females 

Total. 




[23 J 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS AND SCHOOL BOOKS AND APPARATUS. 



Present 

value. 



Oni* uprig:ht piano, cost $225 

One square piano, cost $200 

One square piano, cost $382 50 , 

One square piano, cost $432 50 ^ 

A «-.'u Equare pianu.?, corit ^()(.^(^ 

One violincello, $15, and bow, $4 

One double bass, $10, and bow, $4 

Three guitars, each, $5 

One Tiola, $25, and bow, $3 

One violin, $15, and bow, $2 50 

Two violins, each, $5, and bows, each, $1 

Three violins, each, $25, and bows, each, $4 

Two violin bows, each, $2 50 ^ 

Three violin boxes, one $3, two $4 each 

Two comets, each, $25 

One cornet 

Two flutes, each, $25 

Twenty-five volumes instrumental and vocal music 

Nineteen copies *' Our Musical Leaves," each $3 .' 

Ninety-five copies musical dictionary, 10 bound, each $2 50, 86 un- 
bound, each, $2 

Scales, exercises, amusements, pieces, etc 

Scoreij, orchestra parts, etc » 



$100 
100 
250 

200 



19 
14 
15 
28 
17 
12 
87 
5 
11 
50 
10 
60 
200 
57 

197 

200 

50 






00 tin use 10 year a. 
00 In use 6 years. 
00 In use 3 years. 
00 In use 3 years. 



■ii/U V V. ±i.t \.t^^ _ 



00 

00 ' 

00 

00 

50' 

00 

00- 

00 

00 

00 

00 

oo' 

OO In common type. 
00 In Braille type. 



00 In Braille type. 
00 In Braille type. 
00 In Braille type. 



Total value $2,122 50 



BOOKS PRINTED IN RAISED LETTERS. 



Title of books. 



Three copies Bible '8 

Four copies Book of Common Prayer 1 

Eight copies Book of P»alms !1 

One copy Psalms, in verse |l 

Three copies Psalms and Uymns 1 

Two copies Proverbs-. • jl 

Two copies Pilgrim's Progress il 

Two copies Pope's Etfsay on Man, and Diderot's Essay on the Blind il 

Two copies Milton's Poetical Works |2 

One copy Vicar of Wakefield jl 

One copy Paley Evidences 1 

One copy Cyclopedia , 8 

Onecop^ Lardner's Universal History « 3 

Two copies Philosophy of Natural History 1 

One copy Constitution of United States 

One copy Dictionary of Enj^lish Language 

Four copies Guide to Spelling , 

Two copies English Reader 

One copy English Grammar 

Two copies Principles of Arithmetic 

Five copies Pierce s Geometry 

Four copies Blind Child's 1st Book 

Nine copies Blind Child's 2d Book 

Twelve copies Blind Child's 3d Book 



Total 



vols 
vol. 
vol . 
vol . 
vol . 
vol . 
vol . 
vol . 
vols 
vol . 
vol . 
vols 
vols 
vol. 
vol , 
vols 
vol . 
vols , 
vol . 
vol . 
vol . 
vol . 
vol . 
vol . 



Total No. 
volumes. 

'24 vols. 
.J4 vols. 
.|8 vols. 
.,1 vol. 
.,3 vols. 
.|2vol8. 
.!2 vols, 
.12 vols. 
,'4 vo^8. 
,1 vol. 
,11 voL 

8 vols. 
3 voltj. 

2 vols. 
\l vol. 

3 vols. 
'4 vole. 
2 vols. 
IvoL 
2 vols. 
5 vols. 

4 vols. 

9 vols. 
12 vols. 



108 vols. 



A large portion of these books are so much worn as to render the text illegible to the pupils, 
and should be replaced by new ones. 



[23] 

BOOKS PRINTED IN THE BRAILLE TYPE. 



Title of books. 



No. copies. 



Physical geography 

Common school geog^raphy 

Speller and definer.... , « 

Selections of prose and poetry 

Musical dictionary 

Our musical leaves 

Collection of songs with instrumental accompaniment 

Ihe above books wore prlilleu &<; this InaUiuilua. 



16 
9 
99 
100 
96 
19 
10 



POTTOOT. APPAT^ATFS 



One hemispherical map. 

OT>a di^'iecHng map. 

One set philosophical apparatus, inqpmplete. 



Braille slates, No. 1. 
Braille slates, No. 2. 
Mathematical slates. 



40 

15 

5 



EMPLOYEES IN THE INSTITUTION. 



Names. 



H. Kensssellaer Foster.. 

11. Morton Myers.. ..^ 

Mis3 Flavilla A. Emery. 
Miss Anna Zaltmann.... 

Adolph Willhartitz 

II. Schirmacher 

Miss Jennie D. Neal. ... 
Mrs. J. S. Wilkinson .... 

Andrew W. Kichli 

M. T. Howarth 

Yir?. Pnrnh Larkiii 

Mrs. M. Fitzgerald. 

Mary Bryan 



Occupation. 



••«•••• 



iMarv \\ ooflloclc... 

i'llen Dnguire 

Annie Hickey 

Margaret Marony. 
May Smith 



Superintendent. 

Astiistant teacher... 
ARsi^tant teachpr... 
Assistant teacher... 
rrofessor of music 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Matron 

Foreman 

Porter , 

F^nrv'^trcrs 

Cook 

Assistant cook 

i.WI.UllUie&9 

liaunuress 

Chambermaid 

Dining room girl... 
Waitress 



Compensation. 



$1,000 

500 

2/>0 

125 

1 000 

125 

250 

875 

360 

25 

?.Q 

20 

12 

12 
12 

8 



per annum. 

per session. 



per annum, 
per annum, 
per month. 



<< 

K 



tt 



[241 



REGULATIONS FOR THE ADMISSION OF PUPILS. 



Any person wishing the admission of a pupil into the institution, 
should first communicate with the Superintendent and await the 
necessary authority before sending the person here. 

Vacation from the third Wednesday in June to the first Monday 
in September. 

Former pupils must be present at the opening of the session. 

Persons admitted to the ^'department of handicraft" should be 
present as early in the session as possible, that they may acquire their 
trade before the close of the term. 

Applications for the admission of pupils can be made at any time. 

Relatives and friends are requested to give correct answers to the 
following questions : 

1. Name and age of person for whom application is made. 

2. Where was lie or sne born? 

3. Was he or she born blind ; if not, at what age was the sight 
impaired ? 

4. What degree of vision does he or she possess ? 

5. What was the supposed or real cause of loss of vision ? 

6. Has he or she been subject to fits ? 

7. Is he or she now in good health and free from eruptions and 
contagious diseases of the skin ? 

8. Is the blindness accompanied by any physical deformity? 

9. Has he or she any marked peculiarity of temper or dispo- 
sition ? 

10. Is he or she of sound mind and susceptible of moral and in- 
tell ectual culture ? 

11. Were the parents related before marriage ; and if so, in what 
degree ? 

12. Were or are any of the relatives blind, deaf and dumb, insane 
or inflicted with any infirmity of body or mind ? 

13. If an adult, state previous occupation. 

14. Is he of good moral character, industrious, and physically 
able to pursue some industrial occupation ? 

15. What church shall he or she attend ? 

16. Who will provide clothing, a home during vacation, and re- 
ceive when discharged ? 

17. Name of parents or guardians, and exact post office address f 

18. Nearest point of communication by railroad, steamboat or 
other public conveyance. 

Letters and packages for the pupils should be addressed : ^^Mis- 
souri Institution Education Blind, St. Louis Mo." 

Any other information will be readily furnished by addressing 
the Superintendent 



SEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 



OV THE 



MISSOURI INSTITUTION 



FOE THE DEAF AND DUMB, 



TO THE 



TWENTY-FIFTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 



FOE THE YEAES 1867 -6& 



Sbhatb. — ^Laid on the table tad 100 eopiei ordered printed, January 18, 1869. 

O. A. M08EB, SeereUtTf <^ EemUu 
HoiTSS.— Laid ott tbt table and 2,600 eopief ordered printed^ Jannaiy 14, 1800. 

J. C. 8. C0LB7, CM<r CUrk. 



JEFFER60X CITY : 

KXWOOD KOBT, PfTBLIO PinnB. 

1809. 



2^. 




^ 



V't'c^ 



S^/ 



^ 



J' 




m 
^H^ 



bX 



o^ 



£ 




1^ 



-^ 




^ 



6^ 



r* 



-^ 








^' 



k 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTrTUTION. 



90 AMD OP COMlflSSXOVBBS. 

DAliTCBL NOIXET, Chttbrman, 
W. W. TUTTLB, SecrtUrp. 
T. B. NE8B1T, Treaturer. 
JAMES H. TUCKEB, 
H0SJS8 MIOHAEL. 

lUPBUllTUfDMrT. 

WM. D« KBBHy A« M* 



W. 8. MARSHALL, A. B., Flc< anpttinienitiU, 

B. P. KAYSNAUOH, 

B. T. OILKEY, 

Mu. DOLLIB 8. KERR, 

Him LYDU A. EEHmEDT. 

VATBOir. 

MRi. SUSAN M. KERR. 

PSTSIOIAK. 

eluah t. scerr, m. d. 



REI^ORT. 



To the General Assembly of the State of Missouri : 

The Seventh Biennial Report of the Missouri Asylum for the 
Deaf and Dambj, being for the years 1867 i^nd 1868, is herewith re- 
spectfully submitted : 

BRIBE REVIBW, 

In looking back to the 1st of November, 1851, when the institu- 
tion was founded, my heart swells with, I trust, a laudable pride. 
Then we were in a frame building, illy suited to our purposes — 
cramped by the want of means to such an extent that our objects 
could not oe carried out without personal sacrifice — ^under the em- 
barrassment of be^nning such an enterprize .before public sentiment 
had been made fully alive to the dignity and importance of our aims. 
Now, we are in large, commodious and handsome buildings, sur- 
rounded by grounds, possessing rare natural advantages, with a nistory 
of seventeen years of constant progress. 

Two hundred and seventy-seven pupils already taught within 
our walls, redeemed through this means from a life of ignorance, to 
intelligence, virtue and religion. I may well congratulate your body 
upon tne history, as well as character and objects of the interests 
which I represent. Many of our former pupils are now pursuing use- 
ful callings. Some are unusually intelligent, accomplished and re- 
fined; numbers of them are members of churches of various denomi- 
nations, while others have died in the triumphs of faith, with pleasing 
evidences of their acceptance with God. 

GENERAL IMPROVEMENT. 

The general improvement of our pupils deserves the highest com- 
mendation. With a few exceptions, they have been industrious, obe- 
dient and orderly, and we are persuaded they will compare favorably 
with those of similar institutions in our country. Of course, the pro- 
gress made, has been in proportion to their application and mental 
endowments. A large mtgority of them have made rapid improve* 
ment in the correct use of written language. In some instances, even 
very dull pupils have rewarded the patient labors of their teachers to 
instruct them, with astonishing and gratifying success. 



16] 

H£ALTH OF THB FUFILS. 

Life is made up of sunshine and shadow, of joy and sorrow. In a 
sanitary point of view, during the past two years, we have had much 
of sunshine, the general health of the pupils having been remarkably 
good; more so than usual with us. Yet we have had some dark brief 
shadows which have greatly afSicted us and left us sad. 

During the present session, though the number of pupils is larger 
than ever before, we have reason to be thankful for unusual health, 
there being scarcely any ailment whatever among the pupils. 

But, while we feel grateful to a kind Providence for the pleasant 

f periods of uninterrupted health, which we have enjoyed during the 
ast two years, and would prefer to dwell upon them, we feel it but 
our duty, especially to those personally interested, to give a brief 
summary of those afflictive periods, which we have also suffered. 

On the 14th of June, 1867, Martha F. Lucas died, in the eighteenth 
year of her age, of whooping-cough, which prevailed among the 
pupils as an epiaemic. She had been under instruction two vears, 
and was making good progress in her studies. She was loved \yy all 
who knew her, and trusted alone in Him who is the resurrection and 
the life. 

On the 7th of October, of the same year, William W. Young, of 
Monroe county, died of epidemic dysentery. For some months pre- 
vious to his last sickness he had been deeply concerned in reference 
to his future happiness. He was amiable, studious, and we trust, a 
sincere Christian. 

Six days after, John L. Payne died of the same disease, in the 
fourteenth year of his age. ' His connection with the institution, was 
too short, for him to acquire any clear or definite ideas of the great 
future. 

Ellen F. Bailey died February 17, 1S68, of typhoid pneumonia, 
after a tuition of only five months. She could therefore have no clear 
views of God or of a future state. 

George T. Estes died July 8, 1868, of congestive chills, at the age 
of nineteen years. This youth was gifted with more than ordinary 
powers of mind, and though he had been under instruction only five 
months, was able, through the significant language of signs, to assure 
us of his unwavering trust in Christ as his all-sufficient Saviour. 

Were it compatible with the limits of this report, we could relate 
many pleasing reminiscen*ces of those departed ones. While we weep 
over their early graves, we are cheered with the hope that they are 
now far removed Irom the sorrows of earth to an innerit&nce among 
the redeemed in heaven. Except during the prevalence of epidemics, 
we have been comparatively exempt from severe sickness. In all 
cases of indisposition, requiring medical treatment, a skillful and ex- 
perienced physician is prompt m attendance. 

THE CAUSES OF DEAFNESS. 

The causes of deafness have been profoundly discussed by several 
able writers, and are a constant topic of inquiry to friends of deaf 
mutes. But this is no longer, at least in many respects, a matter of 
mere hypothesis or curious speculation. Conclusions have been 
reached, which should be known and studied by all, as matters of 
momentous practical importance. When it is substantiated, as it has 
been, that the unequal ages of parents— the ill-health or feebleness of 
one or both of them — the ill-health of the mother during gestation 



■ 

— the imagination of the mother before the birth of the child — the 
intermarriage of blood relations — the occupation and mode of living 
of the parents— direct hereditary descent—and the tendency of cer- 
tain diseases^ such as scarlatina^ measles, scrofula, and pneumonia — 
-when, I say, it is well known that these are productive of this great 
calamity to man, is there not a potent, practical utility to all, in such 
information ? 

But more, it is also known that certain features of physical 
geography tend powerfully to the production of deafness. In some 
countries, in proportion to the population, there are more deaf mutes 
than in others^ and in some localities of the same country there are 
far more than m others. In Germany, for example, there are not as 
many as in France ; and in France there are some provinces which 
produce one deaf mute to 700 individuals, while in others there is 
one to 2,000, ^'according to the situation of the province to the 
south or north of the empire, in a mountainous or flat country, in 
healthv or unhealthy places, in manufacturing or agricultural dis- 
tricts. It is a well ascertained fact that, in proportion to the popu* 
lation, in the beautiful plains ^hich occupy the centre of France, 
there are onl^ one-half the number of deaf and dumb that are 
to be found m the ^^ irregular table land, which border on the 
frontiers,, north, south, and east^ and in tne uncultivated moors 
on the west" There is, no doubt m my own mind, that these purely 
climatic and geo^aphical causes have a large share in the production 
of this sad affliction of humanity. The ^^ social causes at work, pro- 
ducing both congenital and acquired deafness," are also potent and 
numerous as before stated. Having, in a former report, presented this 
subject more at lar^e, we now dismiss its further consideration, with 
the earnest expression of the hope, that the researches and observa- 
tions of men of benevolence and science, may rapidly tend to miti- 
fate or lessen the prevalence of deafness. The facts introduced un- 
er the head of the causes of deafness, have, in a former report been 
given at length, and references made to the sources of information. 

THE CURK OF DEAFNESS. 

To the often and anxiously asked question, can deafness be 
cured? I can only answer, as I have done in former reports in the 
negative. After an intercourse of more than forty years with the 
deaf and dumb, and having made the amelioration of their condition 
the study and aim of much of my life, I am still unshaken in the con- 
viction that congenital deafness cannot he oured^ and that those who 
make pretences of that sort are quacks and imposters that deserve 
the reprobation of mankind. 

ARTICULATION. 

In Oermany. the instructors of the deaf and dumb have chiefly 
confined themselves to the method of articulation, or developing the 
latent power of vocal utterance in the possession of the deaf mute. 
While the French system, or the method of teaching by signs, is still 
and always will be, the main instrument of imparting instruction to 
the deaf and dumb, public opinion at present, demands that the Ger- 
man system should have a fair practical test. Some mutes, that is 
those who could once hear and speak and who still retain some idea of 
spoken language, may in many instances be thus benefited ; but of 



[81 

the congenitally deaf very few can be taught by that method to any 
useful extent. The following resolutions which were adopted at the 
Conference of the Principals of the American Institutions for the 
Deaf and Dumb, held in the City of Washington, in May, 1868, are 
expressive of the views of those best competent to judge upon so dif- 
ficult and vexed a question: 

Reaolved^ That m the opinion of this Conference, it is the duty of all 
institutions for the education of the deaf and dumb, to provide ade- 
quate means for imparting instruction in articulation in lip reading, 
to such of their pupils as may be able to engage with profit in exer- 
cises of this nature. 

ffesolved^ That while in our judgment, it is desirable to give some 
mutes and semi-deaf children every facility for retaining and im- 
proving any power of articulate speech which they may possess, it is 
not profitable, except in promising cases, discovered after lair experi- 
ment to teach congenital mutes articulation. 

Resolvedy That to attain success in this department of instruction, 
an added force of instructors will be necessary, and this Conference 
hereby recommends to Boards of Directors of institutions for, the 
deaf and dumb in this country, that speedy measures be taken to pro- 
vide the funds needed for the prosecution of this work. 

Resolved^ That the American system of deaf mute education as 
practised in the institutions of this country for the last fifty years, 
commends itself by the best of all tests, that of prolonged, careful, 
and successful experiment, as, in a pre-eminent degree, adapted to 
relieve the peculiar misfortune of deaf mutes as a class, and restore 
them to the blessings of society. 

The two methods — the French and German — ^have each undoubted 
merits and while we thus cheerfully concede the value of oral lan- 
guage as a means for the intellectual improvement of some of those 
deprived of the sense of hearing, it must ever be true, as before inti- 
mated, that sign language is the basis of this improvement. Oral 
language is, and must be of secondary importance. Believing a com- 
bination of the two methods will be progress in the right direction 
and promotive of the greatest good to the greatest number of those 
whose improvement we seek, I would recommend that the Missouri 
Institution should have afibrded it, the means of emploving a teacher 
capable of imparting instruction by means of articulation and the 
labial alphabet ^ Prove all things : hold fast that which is good." 

INDIGENT FUND. 

Of the beneficent results accomplished by the indigent fund, 
the facts in my possession would enable me to sav much that is highly 
interesting, and that would demonstrate the wisdom of this provision. 

During the first years of the existence of the institution, the 
traveling expenses and clothing of manv indigent pupils were paid 
chiefly by one person. It is easy to see how, great a tax upon indi- 
vidual benevolence this proved. When it is stated, that many of 
these children are without parents, homes, or friends, — ^that the natu- 
ral guardians of others are in utterly indigent cirpumstances, — ^that 
the utmost others can do is to clothe their children, in part, it will be 
seen at once, that often times the alternative is presented between a 
future of ignorance and perhaps degradation, or personal generosity. 
In connection with this, we are in danger of overlooking the fact, 
that a very large number of i>eople, even in our own age and country, 



[9] 

haye no just conception of the unspeakable advantageg of education. 
Only a few weeks since, I met a yonn^ girl, for a short time under my 
care, who told me her father retained her at home because he was un- 
willing to pay the necessary expenses of her tuition, and that now her 
lot was to cook and wash for the family for life. Wnen we remember 
the length of time even a moderate English education of children 
of ordinarily good natural advantages requires, it may astonish 
some to know that the father ot a deaf mute once asked me, whether 
his daughter could not learn enough in a year to stop school ! 

These facts speak for themselres^ and render further appeal un** 
necessary. Provision must be conHnued both for the indigent, and 
also a reasonable discretion should be left to the Oommissioners with 
reference to those who have parents that are unwilling, from the want 
of an intelligent perception of the blessings of an education, to incur 
the cost of board and tuition. 

It may be well, in this connection, to state that in all the institu- 
tions of the west, so far as I know, for example, Indiana, Iowa, Illi- 
nois, Ohio and Kentucky, the doors are thrown wide open, free of 
chare:e, to all who desire the advantages of education. If the deaf 
and. Qumb are ever to be generally educated, this is the only way in 
which it can be accomplished. 

BXJILDIKOS. 

The buildings and grounds are in a good condition, but the in- 
crease in the number of pupils, necessitates our having more ample 
accommodations. It is m; firm conviction, that if we had the facili- 
ties requisite in our hands^ double the present number of deaf child- 
ren would, with little effort, soon be enjoying the benefits of this 
noble charity. 

Chapel. The chapel we now have is entirely too small. We neel3 
a building capable of seating at least six hundred people. The pre- 
sent chapel is scarcely one-third this size. On all public occasions ' 
examinations especially, we have not sufficient space to accommodate 
the spectators that assemble. The room at present in use for this ob- 
ject, is also required for a school room, and beside is much needed as 
a study room for the female pupils. 

School rooms, — Every class should have a separate room in order 
that the teacher mav have full opportunity to do justice to his work. 
At present three to four classes are in a single apartment. We should 
have four or five more. 

Apparatus, — A valuable auxiliary in the instruction of the deaf 
and dumb is the philosophical apparatus, which has now been in our 
possession for a number of years, but this needs repairs, and also an 
addit:on of several useful instruments. 

library. — ^The $500 which were appropriated to the library of the 
institution nave been judiciously expended, and it would be a grea(; 
advantage if $500 or $1,000 could now be expended in increasing the 
reading material, within the reach of our teachers and pupils. 

Shops. — ^The building to be devoted to the instruction of the male 
pupils m the various mechanical trades, is under cover, but nothing 
further has been done, for want of funds, towards carrying out their 
design. 

Oas. — ^We would call attention to the danger incurred in the use 
of kerosene oil in lighting the building. The safety,both of the pu* 
pils and of the house, is thus constantly emperiled. We most urgent- 



[10 1 

ly call the attention of your body to the importance of lighting the 
institution with gas, and recommend that steps should be taken at an 
early date to make this improvement 

Painting. — Most of the building needs repainting, not only for 
the pleasantness of the appearance, bat for its protection against the 
wastes of time. 

BUih rooms. — We have no bath rooms, either in those parts of the 
building occupied by the male or female pupils. It would be highly 
conducive, both to the health and comfort of all, to have appliances 
of this sort, and we have long felt their need. 

TEACHERS. 

The present law authorizes the employment of only five teachers, 
but these are not enough for the number of classes to be taught 
There should be at least six, apart from the Superintendent, whose 
duties have, by the growth of the institution, become so burdensome 
as to necessitate his relief from much of ttie labors of the school 
room. The law should also be so amended as to empower the Board 
of Commissioners to employ additional teachers, as they may from 
time to time be needed. 

FEEBLE-MINDED CHILDKEN. 

The duties of my office have led me to many parts of our State, 
and from this opportunity of personal observation, I am convinced 
that there are in our midst a large number of weak-minded or imbe- 
cile children. I caunot give exact numbers, but I think there are not 
less than 700 or 800. 

Although these cannot possibly receive more than a very limited 
education, yet some of them may be improved to an astonishing de- 
gree. Most of them can, at least, be taught to work and so improve 
in their habits and manners, a? to make them useful to society instead 
of being a burden to themselves, to their families, and often even an 
annoyance to the community. 

In many of the States, institutions have been founded for this 
class, and in Missouri one is much needed. From one hundred to one 
hundred and fiftv of these truly unfortunate ones actually suflFer for 
the want of such a place of refuge, and I most earnestly commend 
this subject to your wise legislation. 

OONCLOSION. 

In closing this reportj I should do violence to my own feelings, did 
I not express mj appreciation of the faithful manner in which the 
Board of Commissioners have discharged their duties, and of their 
uniform kindness to me personally. 

Not least, among the evidences of the success and prosperity of 
the institution, I deem the character and qualifications of our teachers, 
and the pleasant and friendly personal relations which exist among 
them. 

With expressions of gratitude lor His favor upon us in the past, 
to the kind Father of us all, and with cheerful acknowledgment of 
the interest your honorable body has hitherto manifested in the suc- 
cess and usefulness of this institution, and urging your earnest atten- 
tion to his report, I submit the same. 

Most respectfully, 

W. D. KERK, Superintende7it. 



[11] 

ACENOWLEBGMEKTS. 

The editors and publishers of the following papers will except 
our thanks, in behalf of the pupils, for whose benefit they are gratuit* 
ously sent. They are read with interest and profit by the most culti< 
vated and intelligent among them. 

Missouri TelegVkph, Warrensburg Banner, 

Columbia Statesman, Lexington Register, 
Lagrange National American, Picket Guard, 

Mexico Ledger, Signs of the Times, 

Mexico Messenger, Kansas City Times, 

Clinton Advocate, Kansas City Journal, 

Montgomery Independent, Glasgow Journal, 

Macon City Times, Deal Mute Gazette. 

Miss Dix, so famed for her philanthropy, has donated ten dollars 
to the institution. With this an addition has been made to our 
library. 

Messrs. Hurun Burt and J. B. Williams have also donated valu* 
able books. 

Free tickets have been furnished by Col. G. R. Taylor, the humane 
and gentlemanly President of the Pacific railroad, to some of our indi- 
gent mutes, passing on that road to and from St. Louis. 

Mr. J. Bennet, the proprietor of the line of hacks running to Mexi- 
co and St. Aubert, has charged onlv half-fare for conveying many of 
our indigent pupils to and from those points. For all these acts of 
charity, we tender our thanks. 

W. D. KERR. 



[12] 



LIST OF PUPILS IN THE INSTITUTION DURINCF THE YEAB8 

OP 1867-68, 



Names. 



Sarah F. Sema 

Anna C. Ingrani 

Thomas Pool 

Mary Benneker 

James L. Stuart 

Hamden White 

James L. Vincent 

William Patterson 

William W. Young 

Oeorge Jones 

Octavia G. Lacy • 

Elijah M. Terry 

Thomas F. Russell 

Maria L. Kayenaugh.......... 

Anna M. FraysL m........ 

Ruth A.Stuart 

Evaline Daws 

Elisa Winn 

James Lewis 

Ellen Bunton 

Martha J. Connelly 

Sallie M. NeweU 

Flora Buffield 

Nannie McBride 

Theodoria A. Orimmett 

Jacob F. Ruff 

Paulina A. Laramore 

Ann E. King 

Octaria A. Dayidson 

Elisa McMullen 

Nannie McCoy 

Maria Hubbard. 

Andrew Flarity. 

Charles L. Minor 

James A. Rogers ^,, 

David T. Nelson 

Edwin Hord 

Mary D. Smith 

Wm. S. Kempen 

Henry McCamley « 

JohnH. Wolf 

Martha F. Lucas 

Bidwell A. Webberly 

Wm. T. Campbell 

Mary McCamley 

BariuiE. Warehurst 

Emma Oi^as 

John H.Terry 

JoelW. Estis 

Silvester W. Colyer 

Keiiah C. Elsey 

Jacob Shamley 

Mary Finnecane 

Thomas Finnecane 

Henry Maul 

Fred. W. Stockrick 

Lewis Minor 

Elizabeth Smith 

Joseph H. Marksburg. 

Smilie Qrag^r 



PcstoflVce. 



Millersburg 

Chillicothe 

Bloomington 

St. Louis 

Cap Au Oris 

Keytsville 

Forkner's Hill 

Qreenton 

Florida 

St. Louis 

Cambridge •«.. . 

College Mound 

St. Louis 

Qlasgow 

St. Louis 

Smith City 

Teelly City 

Hallsville 

Concord 

Jake's Prairie 

Columbia 

Carbondale 

Warrensburg 

Centralia 

New Boston 

St. Louis 

New Haven 

Bridge ton.. .» 

South Point 

Concord 

Independence 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Nebraska City 

Warren 

St. Louis 

Cote Sans Dessein. 
Bellair 



County. 



St. Louis , 

St. Louis 

Cambridge , 

St. Louis , 

do 

do 

Salisburg 

Tipton 

College Mound , 

Liberty , 

Cape Girardeau.... 
Chamois 



bt. Louis... ..•• ...I 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Louisiana , 

California 

Emerson , 

St. Louis 



Callaway 

Livingston 

Macon 

St. Louis 

Lincoln 

Chariton 

DaUas 

Johnson 

Monroe. 

St. Louis 

Saline 

Randolph 

St. Louis 

Howard 

St. Louis 

Pettis 

Lewis 

Boone 

Callaway 

Gasconade 

Boone 

Montgomery, Ten. 

Johnson 

Boone 

Macon 

St. Louis , 

Franklin 

St. Louis 

Franklin 

Callaway 

Jackson 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Nebraska 

Marion 

St. Louis 

Callaway.. 

Cooper 



St. -Louis 

St. Louis 

Saline 

St. Louis 

do 

do 

Chariton 

Moniteau 

Macon 

Clay 

Cape Girardeau. 

Osage 

St. Louis 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Pike 

Moniteau 

Marion 

St. Louis 



Cause of BeafneM. 



Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Cong^enital. 

Congenital. 

Brain Fever. 

Cong«nitaL 

Fever. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Fever. 

Congenital. 

Scauet Fever. 

Congenital. 

Unniown. 

Inflammation of Brain. 

Unknown . 

Inflammation of Brain. 

Measles. 

Inflammation of StonuM^h. 

Scarlet Fever. 

Measles. 

Scarlet Fever. ; 

Congenital. 

Congenital* 

dongenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Risings in Ears. 

Defect of vocal org^ans^ can besr 

Not known. 

Scarlet Fever. 

Fever. 

Severe Cold. 

Congenital. 

Fever. 

Scarlet Fever. 

Cong«nital. 

By a fall. 

Not known. 

Not known. 

Scarlet Fever. 

Congenital. 

Typhoid Pever. 

Not known. 

Congenital. 

Rising^ in Ears. 

Too much quinine. 

Congenital. 

Notknown. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Unluiown. 



[18] 

LIST OF PUPILS IN THE INSTITUTION, Bro.— Oohtwiwd. 



Nunea. 



Annie McCamlej 

John Buehler 

Mary E. Hord 

Edwin T. Gaerin 

ISuncjJ, Meflford 

Wilhelmin* E. Hacke 

Clara S. Perklna < 

dances A. M. Whiteaker... 

JTohnL. Payne....... 

Mary A. Vincent , 

ElisaA. Daniels 

James 0. Sims , 

Sarah S. Lippman 

Anna F. Dickeraon , 

Adalaska Perdue 

Sarah E. Kelson 

Marrilla Leeper , 

Martha A. Baker 

Giles R. Sammers 

AlTems Stnart......... 

Bmma C. Lawrence 

Jannette Dajm 

BllenF. BaUey 

Bmily Berkey 

Mary C Ellis 

William Miller 

Albert G. Soneer 

Melcena E. Morris 

Margeret Ren&o..... 

Elisa Neil 

L^enrg^ Sims 

Nancy J. Fuller 

Marg^et Hopkins 

Nancy A. White 

Mary B. Kettle 

Geo. T. Estis 

Comelio Win^t 

Genera R. Smith 

Sarah BliUikshaw 

Mary K. Brannock. 

Archibald T. Peery 

Jane Y. Keller 

Mary B. Winn 

Geo. Bourherty 

Henry 0. Hubbell 

EUiabeth Martin 

James C. Uiergs 

011a 0. Beakios 

Lydia J . Gentry 

Mary E. Roberts.... 

Edward Eneel 

Andrew C. ^ondfit, 

Mary A. Sampson., 

Michael T. O'Brien 

John Bowe 

Eugene See 

John T. Dailey 

Medora Pride 

Xiouisa Thomas 

Jemima W. Gentry 



PoitoiBce 



. 



St. Louis 

Hermann* ...•.••••••• 

Cote Sans Deasein. 

Cambridge 

Palmyra 

St. Louis 

Salisbury..... 

Salem 

vsarK ...«..•. 
Forkner's HiU 
HarrisonTille . 
Millersborg.... 

Sprin^eld 

Hannibal 

Savannah 



••...••••*% 



. ............... 



County. 



Sholesburg 

Huntsville 

Port Henry ....... 

Humboldt 

Libertrville 

Memphis 

Wintorop 

Lee's Summit.,.. 
Macon City 

do 

Trenton 

Long^ood... 

Trenton 

Easton 

Millersbnrg 

Ten Mile 

Lon^ood 

Marion ville 

Bethany. 

Prospect Hill.... 

Excelsior 

Modina 

WelUvUle 

Clear Springs... 

Trenton 

Neosho , 

Hallsville 

Carondelet 

TenMile 

Memphis 

St. Joseph 

do 

CarroUton 

Mexico 

Cape Girardeau.. 

Phelps City 

DeKalb 

St. Louis 

do 
New Florence... 

Linden 

Lexington 

ot. liOUlS. ...•...•...• 

CarroUton 



......«....••.. 



St. Louis.... 
Gasconade... 

CalUway 

Saline 

Marion 

St. Louis.... 

Chariton 

Dent 

Ohristian*.... 

Dallas 

Cass 

Callaway 

Greene 

Ralls 

Andrew 

Callaway » ... 

Newton 

Randolph ... 

do 

Pulaski 

St. Francois. 

Scotland 

Buchanan..., 

Jackson 

Macon 

do 
Grundy. , 

Pettis , 

Grundy 

Buchanan , 

Callaway , 

Macon •.«., 

Pettis , 

Lairrence , 

Harrison. 9 

Clay , 

Morgan , 

Mercer 

Montgomery...,. 

Cedar ..., 

Grundy 

Newton 

Boone 

St. Louis 

Macon 

Scotland 

Buchanan 

do 

Carroll 

Audrain 

Cape Girardeau. 

Atchison 

Buchanan. 

St. Louis 

do 
Montgomeryf.... 
Atchison... ..... 

Lafayette 

St. Lows 

Carroll 



Cause of Deafness. 



Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

CongenitaL 

Unknown . 

Congenital. 

Typhoid Ferer. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Scarlet Feyer. 

Brain Fever. 

Scrofula. 

Congenital. 

Unluiown. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Unknown. 

Unknown . 

Congenital. 

Unknown. 

Epilepsy. 

Fever. 

Unknown. 

Congenital. 

Unknown. 

FaU. 

Fever. 

Spotted Fever. 

Rising on neck. 

Congenital. 

Brain Fever. 

Congenital. 

Unknown . 

Paralysis of auditory nerve. 

Brain Fever. 

Inflammation of the Brain. 

Typhoid Fever. 

Disease of Spine. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Spotted Fever. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Unlmown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Congenital. 

Congenital. 

Unknown. 

Congeilital. 

Typhoid Fever. 

Congenital. 



Number of pupils in attendance, December Slst, 1868, sixty females and thirty-nine malas. 



[14] 



TERMS OF 'ADMISSIOISr. 

All applicants must be seven years of age, and nnder thirty. 

Pupils who are not beneficiaries of the State will be charged on« 
hundred and fifty dollars per annum, for board and tuition, wnich, in 
all cases, must be paid as follows : One-half upon entering the insti- 
tution, and the remainder on the first day of February succeeding. 

Pupils who are beneficiaries of the l^tate must bring a certificate 
from the county court of their respective counties, the lorm of which 
18 appended to this report. 

Each pupil must be furnished with comfortable clothing for one 
year, each article marked distinctly with the owner's name. A good 
trunk must also be lurnished. 

Parents must furnish money to procure books, stationery and 
postage stamps for their children, and, in all cases, their traveling ex- 
penses must be paid to and from the institution. 

The Superintendent will not be responsible for any moneys sent 
to the children^ but will take charge of all moneys sent to his care, 
and dispose of it as parents may direct. Except for good and sufS- 
cient reasons no pupil will be permitted to leave the institution until 
the close of the session. 

No idiotic deaf mute will be received in the institution. None 
need apply. 

The Superintendent will not be responsible for any trunks, bag- 
gage or clothing left at the institution for a longer period than six 
months. 

When it is established that a pupil is in indigent circumstances, 
and the parents unable to furnish necessary clothing, etc., it will be 
supplied by the Board of Commissioners. 

All pupils, both male and female, will be expected to perform 
such duties as may be required by the Superintendent and matron; 
and male pupils to learn some branch of mechanical arts, when such 
is providea ; reference being had to the wishes of their friends. 

All letters of inquiry should be addressed to W. D. Kerr, Super- 
intendent of the Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb, at Fulton, Missouri. 

The opening of the sessionis the most suitable time for admitting 
pupils, and it is particularly desired that parents have their children 
ready in time, although none will be rejected at any period of the 
session. 

The annual session begins on the third Tuesday in September, 
and closes the second Thursday in July, 

Written answers to the following questions should be sent with 
each pupil to the asylum, unless accompanied by some one who can 
l^urnisk the desired information, to wit : 

What is the name of the person ? If a middle name, state it 

What is the name of parents (father and mother), or in case both 
are dead, the name and po^office address of the guardian or nearest 
friend ? 

When and where born ? Give year, month and day. 

Was he or she bom deaf? 

Has he or she any relations deaf and dumb ? 

Were his or her parents related before marriage t e. g., were they 
eousins t 

A t what age was hearing lost f 



[16] 
FORM OF OERTIFIOATK 

Offici of Couhtt Coinnr, — — CotniTT, 
, MiSBOiriu, — — 18—. 

Thii is to certify^ that on the ■■ day of 18 , the conntj court of — conntj. 

upon satisfactory evidence produced, order that it be certified to the Commissioners of the Deaf and 

Dumb Asylum, that is — years of ag;e, is a resident of this county, is deaf and dumb, 

and is a proper object of the charity of the State. 

[l. s.] a true copy from the record. 

Attest : , Clerk. 



Gentlemen : My remarks in reference to the sanitary condition of 
the asylum during the last two years will be brief. 

I am happy to say that^ in general, the pupils have enjoyed 
remarkable ^ood health. I think there has been less of casual, ordi- 
nary complaint, than I ever knew among them, and less of obstinate 
chronic disease ; still, we have had times of severe sickness, and some 
deaths. 

Daring the year 1867 we had two epidemic visitations of consid- 
erable severity, leaving some unpleasant results. The first of these 
was whooping cough, m the early part of the summer ; it passed 
through the whole institution, selecting many victims, all of whom, 
however, made a safe recovery, except one, who, at the close of a se- 
vere ordeal of the cough, was attacked with pneumonia, which proved 
fatal, more from the previous exhaustion of the whooping cough than 
from the severity of the pneumonia attack. 

Our second epidemic visitation was in October, from dysentery 
or flux. We had many cases, some of them quite severe — two died. 
One of them was a delicate boy, whose physical constitution was 
scarcely sufficient for the confinement of the school room. During 
^he previous year, the Superintendent and myself had more than onca 
discussed the propriety of his remaining in the institution ; but in 
view of the great necessity to him of the advantages of education, he 
was allowed to continue. The other had passed through his attack to 
a state of convalescence, and gave promise of a speedy recovery, 
when he suddenly became very ill, and soon died, leaving us at a loss 
(even with the addition of able counsel) to account for the sudden 
change, as there was no re-appearance of the previous disease. 

In the early jiart of the year 1868, we had quite an epidemic, or 
rather endemic, of catarrhal fever. We had a great many cases of it, 
rendering the patients very sick for a few days, after which they 
speedily recovered, except one, which resulted in typhoid pneumonia, 
with indications of great prostration from the commencement of the 
attack. During the remainder of the year the health of the pupils 
wan unusually goo^L although in July one of the bovs was attacked 
with a congestive chill, from which we were unable to rally him. 
There was no premonition of this, save a slight chill, and a brief fever 



[16] 

on the previous day, giving no indication of anything more than a 
light intermittent, to prevent the return of which he was taking the 
usual remedies at the time of the congestive attack. 

During the present season, although the number of puirils is 
^eater than ever before, their health is remarkablv good indeed. 
Thev are cheerful and happy, well cared for physically, morally and 
intellectually, and seem to be making fine progress in tlie acquisition 
of knowledge, by means of the inimitable sign-language. 

Respectfully, E. T. SCOTT, ' 

Physiciaju 



oommission:er8' heport. 

The Board of Commissioners of the Missouri Institution for the 
education of the Deaf and Dumb, beg leave to present to the General 
Assembly of the State the following, as their seventh biennial report: 

Referring withj)leasure to the comprehensive report of the Super- 
intendent, herewith presented, in whicn much will be found to inter- 
est those whose sympathies have been awakened in behalf of the un- 
fortunate child of silence ; and also 3n intelligent account of the 
internal workings of the institution during the two years past, since 
the date of our last repoit to the Assembly of 1S66, it ohly remains 
for the Board of Commissioners to report its financial condition, its 
wants and future prospects. 

FINANOES. 

Whilst the Commissioners have often been cramped in their ef- 
forts to afford necessary facilities for educating the deaf mute, and 
have not been able to supply many of the modern improvements, to 
say nothing of desks and slates, on account of the limited means at 
their disposal, it has been our aim to supply every comfort and facility 
within our power, carefully guarding against involving the institution 
in liabilities, to be hereafter provided for. 

The accounts for ^^ incidental expenses," under which head every 
article of supply (except for the table, and clothing for indigent 
mutes), are enumerated, including all repairs, improvements, fuel, 
furniture, bedding, etc., have been kept distinct from all others ; a^ 
also the accounts ag^ainst the ^ indigent fund " and ^^ workshop fund." 
The condition of each fund, as well as a detailed statement of the ex- 
penditures on each account, will be found in the treasurer's report 
appended to this communication, a summary of which, embracing two 
years from the date of our last report, is as follows : 



[17] 

INCIDENTAL FUND. 



V 



CR. 



By amonnt on hand Noy. 26, 1866. , 


$4,660 29 
4,617 93 


$ 401 58 
5,000 00 
5.000 00 


By amount annual appropriation for 1867 


" " 1868 


Receiyed from other soarcea ....^ 


209 15 


DR. 

To amount ezpendituros. 1867 


$10,610 7S 


" " 1868 


0,278 22 


Balance on hand Noy. 27, 1868 


$1,382 51 



INDIGENT FUND. 



CR. 



Bj amonnt annual appropriation, 1867 
" " 1868 

DR. 

To amonnt ezpenditurei, 1867 

" " 1868 

Balance dne Noy. 27, 18IS... 



$1,028 12 
1,161 66 



$2,000 00 
2,000 00 



$4,000 00 
2,184 78 



$1,815 32 



WORKSHOP FUND. 



CR. 



By amonnt appropriated^ 1866 

Bj^ amount borrowed of indigent fund. 



To amount expenditures, 1866., 
" " 1867, 



DR. 



$ 526 17 

2,649 00 



$8,000 0$ 
175 IT 



$8,176 IT 
3,176 IT 



Payments made from the above balances on the Ist ot January 
entirely exhausted^ the incidental fund, and left only a small amount 
in the bands of the Treasurer due to the fund for clothing indigent 
mutes. 

From the above, it must occur to every intelligent legislator, that 
those who have charge oi an establishment of this kind, devoted to the 
protection and elevation of those whose silent eloquence so strongly 
appeal to their liberality and benevolence, most naturally feel great 
solicitude ; when it is remembered that in a case of sudden emergencv, 
they would at the end of each recurring year, be without means to 
make provision for those who are so illy prepared to provide for them- 
selves. 

This being the practical result, after two years of the most economic 
cal management, we are prepared to speak advisedly when we state 
that the sum of five thousand dollars is insufficient for the annual sup- 
port of the institution, even with its present capacitor, and we there- 
fore strongly urge the annual appropriation for incidental expenses 
be increased to 



[18] 

TEN THOUSAKD D0LLAK8. 

This sum will not be more than adequate to meet imperative 
wants/ and it will not be considered a large appropriation, when it is 
remembered, that out of this amount all expenditures, except for the 
table, for a family numbering largely over one hundred, must be sup- 
plied, including improvements, repairs, and the keeping of the grounds 
and buildings ; and with the ratio of increase experienced during the 
past four years, the number of pupils may be safely estimated at 200, 
besides employees, before the close of four years to come. 

THB DEAF AND DUMB— WHAT OTHER STATES ARE DOING. 

Nearly every State in the Union has made liberal provision for 
the education of this unfortunate class of persons. In some of the 
older States, through th^ munificence of inaividuals, together with 
the liberality of their legislatures, institutions have been reared in 
their behalf unsurpassed by any of our colleges for hearing persons, 
and supplied with teachers and apparatus for giving the aeaf mute, 
not only a liberal, but a scientific education. This expenditure is not 
an experiment — but the fruits of fifty years experience in America — 
demonstrating the fact, that the highest state of mental and moral 
culture may be attained. The educated mute has gone out from these 
institutions, not only learned in the arts and sciences, but in trades 
and mechanism ; so well prepared are they to battle with the storms 
of life, that in the possession of these attainments, they forget in some 
measure that God in his providence has deprived them oi the sweet 
sounds of mu>ic, and the tender voice of a mother's- love. 

When such results may be accomplished through the beautiful 
art of sign-language, can any philanthropist withhold the means 
necessary to its attainment, or regard the cause of deaf mute instruc- 
tion with indifference. 

The State of Ohio has recently torn down her old buildings, and 
erected others in their stead, at a cost of $625,000. Iowa has expend- 
ed for her 200 deaf mutes $300,000. Illinois a much larger sum, and 
the bill reported and now before the legislature appropriates $100,000 
for additional buildings alone, due $75,000 for the support of the in- 
stitution for 1869 and 1870. Indiana having already accommodations 
for over 200 pupils, will ask this winter for additional improvements, 
to cost some $75,000. And this amount will be in addition to an es- 
tablishment already fitted up with gas, steam, workshops, and a good 
supply of modern improvements for the instruction of her mutes. 

What shall we say for proud Missouri, the pride of her people, 
and the gem of the constellations; her, whose fair fields and endless 
resources invite the emigrant from every land to come and till her 
soil, and exhume her minerals ? What has she done for the five hun- 
dred mutes within her territory ? We answer, that her generous and 
noble people, through their representatives in General Assembly, 
have met every call up to the present, that has been made upon them. 
Her buildings, though erected at a cost of less than fifty thousand dol- 
lars, have served their purpose. A number of mutes who have been 
educated here are now useful citizens in the communities in which 
they reside, earning a competent support for themselves, and in some 
cases, families. Although not supplied with many appliances neces- 
sary for instruction and comfort, they have proved a blessing to many 
families whose children have been led within these walls ft'om '^Na- 



[19] 

tare's darkness to Nature's God" — but now their full capacity has 
been reached, and the poor child who may hereafter seek admission, 
must either be crowded into dormitories already full, or remain in 
darkness and ignorance. 

With one hundred pupils in daily attendance, there are still 2n0 
mutes in our State, as justly entitled to'the benefits of this charity as 
those now enjoying it Without presumption, the Board of Commis- 
sioners ask of the Legislature, now assembled, the means to erect 

ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS, 

in order that the demands hereafter made upon us, by the mutes of 
our State, may be met without detriment to those already in attend- 
ance. The plan of the present building is, fortunately, such as to admit 
of enlargement without alteration, except to tear away a building 
which is utterly insuflBcient, and unfitted for the purposes for which 
it was erected. It is now occupied on the first floor for culinary and 
laundry purposes, but the rooms are by far too small for the demands 
of the institution — besides the heat in summer, and fumes from the 
kitchen, we have found it exceedingly unpleasant in the hospitals for 
the sick, situated in the rooms above. These important rooms cannot 
be ventilated, and the physician of the institution, strongly recom- 
mends their removal, which would have been done, but for the want 
of rooms to locate the hospitals elsewhere. 

Plans with specifications and estimates for an additional building, 
in which tiie basement will be used for cook-room, bakery, laundry, 
store-rooms, etc.; the second and third stories for dining-room, hospi- 
tals, and dormitories, will be found in the hands of the Committee on 
Deaf and Dumb Asylum^ to which we invite the intention of all who 
will interest themselves m this behalf, and also plans for a 

A CHAPEL. 

This much needed building, we propose to erect on the east side 
of the asylum, two stories high, and sufficient in dimensions to furn- 
ish additional school-rooms of which we are now deficient, and also a 
chapel large enough tor daily services, and to accommodate visitors 
on public occasions ; if the Legislature should favor these improve- 
ments, another important and much needed purpose will be accom- 
plished, in supplying a room the want of which has been greatly felt, 
and has retarded, to some extent, a branch of instruction, which will 
commend itself to every thinking mind. 

A OIBLS' WORE-ROOM. 

The present dining-room is admirabljr suited to this purpose, and 
also for an evening study-room. The institution has never been abl# 
to do, all that might be done, in the wajr of training the female pupil 
in the practice of those duties, which will be of practical utility after 
they have left the school^ simply for the want of a suitable room. 

To educate the mute, male or female, and send them away un- 
prepared to be useful to themselves or others, will be to a great ex- 
tent to defeat the aim of their friends, and the claims of humanity. 
Heretofore nearly all the clothing for the boys has been either bought 
ready-made, or by hired labor. With a suitable room for the purpose, 
the female pupils may soon be taught to do nearly all the sewing, not 



[20] 

only for themselves, but also for the boys ; preparinjic &11 for usefiil- 
ness, and some, perhaps with the means to gain a support after they 
shall have received an education. The absolute necessity for addi- 
tional buildings is earnestlv urged for the consideration of your hon- 
orable body, and especially before your Oommittee on Asylums, 
whose attention we hope to direct in person to the wants of this insti- 
tution at some suitable time during the session. 

WORKSHOPS FOR BOYS. 

By act, approved February 19, 1866, the sum of $3,000 was appro- 
priated by the Legislature for the erection of workshops for boys. 
This sum has been expended, and an excellent building 24 k 60, two 
stories hish, has been inclosed, which consumed the amount appro- 
priated. To finish this building and supply it with suitable materials 
and tools to commence this important branch of instruction, will 
require an additional appropriation of five -thousand dollars. 

The experience of institutions who have successfully prosecuted 
this branch of education, will guide the Commissioners in selecting 
such trades as have been founa to be the best adapted to the tastes 
and capacity of the Deaf and Dumb. Shoemaking and cabinet-making 
have been adopted by most of the institutions of the kind in this coun- 
try, and it is believed that after the workshops have been fairly gotten 
into opferation, they can be made self-supporting, except for the wages 
of a foreman for each department. The importance of immediately 
organizing this department, we cannot too strongly urge. 

Most of the boys under instruction will necessarily be thrown in 
after lite upon their own resources for support, and we regard their 
instruction in the practical knowledge of some trade, as an essential 
part of their education. 

HBATINa BY STEAM. 

To heat an establishment of this kind by stoves, is at once expen- 
sive and dangerous. A uniform heat througb6ut the dormitories at 
night would save, in the purchase of bed clothing, alone, when the 
number of pupils shall reach one hundred and fifty, irom three to five 
hundred dollars per annum, which, added to (he cost of stoves, would, 
in ten years, more than supply the institution with heat by steam. 
Upon the score of economy, alone, this improvement should be made; 
and yet another and perhaps more important argument is found in 
the fact that where so manv children are congregated, it is almost 
impossible to keep bed clothing on them at night, and it requires the 
most careful watching to prevent suffering in very cold weather, re- 
sulting as exposures always do, in sickness and disease. 

OF LIGHTS. 

When we say that from thirty to -fifty coal oil lamps are nightly 
used in this institution, subject at any time to be broken and ignited 
by careless handling, resulting, probably, in the serious loss of both 
life and propertv, we have used all the arguments demanded by the 
thoughtful and humane, in favor of providing this building at an early 
day with gas. The frequent disasters occasioned by explosions from 
coal oil, fills us with alarm upon this subject, and we trust that it may 
not require any persuasion on our part, to induce the adoption of a 
seder mode of lighting the buildings. 



[21] 

The Asylum for the Insane, located at this place, ihas recently 
been fitted up with gas at a cost of less than $3,000, which gives satis- 
faction. It is estimated that this Institution can be lighted for two 
thousand dollars, and we would regard this sum as most wisely ap- 
propriated for that purpose. 

CHANGE OF 8TATUTE. 

By reference to the report of the Superintendent, it will be seen 
that he deems the appointment of an additional instructor for the 
purpose of teaching Articulation, as essential to the advancement of 
a number of children under his charge. The present law, as to officers 
and teachers, is a copy of the original enactments, passed when the 
institution was first founded, and when five teachers were entirely 
sufficient for the duties before them. With more puj^ils in attendance 
than ever before, and the advancement of the age m the science of 
deaf mute instruction, the necessity for an instructor in Articulation 
has arisen^ and as the number of pupils continue to increase, which 
will certainly occur if additional buildings are provided, additional 
assistance will be required in the faculty. No matter how great the 
demand may be for additional teachers, they cannot be supplied un- 
der the present law, as it restricts the board to the employment of 
five — without the change suggested. We respectfully ask that the 
views of the Superintendent upon this subject be met, and that the 
law be changed to read as follows: "The Board of Commissioners 
may increase the number of teachers as circumstances may require, 
ana that master workmen may be appomted for each trade taught in 
the mechanical department, who shall draw their salaries as other 
officers of the institution." 

OF OFFICERS. 

The Board of Commissioners are happy to state that the most 

fileasant relations have existed between them and the officers of the 
nstitution. Since the date of our last report Miss Lydia A. Kenne- 
dy, from the National College at Washington City, has been added to 
the corps of teachers, and* we take pleasure in recognizing commend- 
able zeal and success in the discharge of her duties. 

. The want of an additional hearing teacher, qualified to take 
charge of the more advanced classes, and relieve the Superintendent 
of some of the arduous duties of his office, has been greatly felt for 
some time past, and we are happy to announce that the services of 
W. 8. Marshall, A. M., who has long been connected with the Indiana 
institution, has been obtained to fill this important position. This 
gentleman will enter upon the discharge of his duties in a short time, 
and it is hoped that his labors among us as Vice Superintendent may 
result in great good to all who come under his influence and control. 
We are pleased to state, in this connection, that the efficient services 
of Professors Kavenaugh and Gilkey have been retained, as also of 
Mrs. Dollie Kerr, a hearing teacher, who has been connected with the 
Institution for two years past, and who gives great promise of useful 
ness in her profession. 

With the corps of teachers now employed under the able control 
of the Superintendent, we anticipate a future of success to this insti- 
tution unsurpassed by any of a similar kind in our country, and with 
liberal legislation may be made to advance in usefulness commensur- 



[32] 

\i tbe rapid advancea of the great and growing State in whicli 
:ated. 

\ congratulate ourselves, as well as the parents and friends of 
ortunate mute, that Frof. W. D. Kerr has been induced to give 
irpose to discontinue his labors in this Institution. We should 
igarded his resignation at this time as a great calamity. His 
perience, zeal and success as an instructor of deaf mutes, to- 
with those high qualifications so happilj' blended in his char- 
ir training the young mind in morality, txuth and religion, enii- 
fits him for the responsible position he has so long and so ablj 
He has been re-elected as Superintendent for ten years, a; 
: excellent lady as Matron. It would be the wish of all who 
liem,that as the founders of the Institution, they may long live 
the results ot their labors ; and when increasing years shall 
asted the sands of life, may they, at a green old age, within 
rails, lay off the harness, and peacefully enter that asylum, 
.he deaf hear the music of angels, and the dumb unite in sing- 
ises unto God. 

C0NCLC810M. 

conclusion, permit us to say, that in asking appropriations for 
af and Dumb Asylum in former reports, we have only sought 
t immediate wants. 

continue this policy, in view of the rapidly increasing popula- 
our great State, and consequent increase in the outuber of 
'bo may claim the benefits of this noble charity, would at once 
Tary to the intelligence and liberality of your honorable body 
manifest an indillerence, if not ignorance, on our part, as to 
2:iiitude of the interests committed to our charge. The poor 
e always with us, the unfortunate and distressed, these all 
ur commiseration and relief; and yet among all the children 
)w there are none from whom Charity receives so rich a re- 
1 that interesting class in whose behalf Nve now address you. 
:he minds of any are impressed with the opinion that there are 
' deaf and dumb to be provided for, and are indulging in apa- 
)n this subject, simply because your attention has not been 
,0 the subject, we refer you to the fact that at the dat9 of our 
18U6 there were over 500 in the State, and the number has sines 
I creased. 

V York had, in 1868, four hundred and fifty children in her 
; Indiana has over two hundred in hers; Illinois two hundred 
7 ; Ohio has near three hundred, and Iowa has recently made 
an for accommodating two hundred pupils. Shall we tail 
these, our neighboring States, in providing for our charitable 
ions f Had itnot been for the misfortunes incident to the late 
. in our State, closing the doors of this Institution, demand 
lecessarily have been made, ere this, for increased facilities for 
ruction of our deaf and dumb. 

th the esception of S'},000 alluded to in this report for building 
ops, no appropriations have been made for building purposes 
benefit of this Institution since 1855. 

vingthuB imperfectly set forth our own convictions as to the 
tf this Institution, matured after its management for a number 
s past, you are prepared for the statement that during the ses- 
ills will be presented for your consideration appropriating 
for consummating the purposes herein enumerated. 



[23] 

With feelings of assurance that this subject will commend itself 
to your wisest counsels, and that no contracted view of its import- 
ance will cause you to withhold your munificence from a cause which 
appeals to your synapathy and the highest interests of your enlight- 
ened constituency, we most respectfully commit to your hands its 
destiny. Believing that ample appropriations to this Institution, at 
this time, will yield to the State and to society a most direct and pal- 
pable return, m the accession of useful citizens from the children of 
silence, who, without your aidj may never learn their duty to " them- 
s<elves, their neighbor and their God," we confidently anticipate your 
liberality in their behalf. 

DANIEL NOLLEY, 
T. B. NESBIT, 
I. H. TUCKER, 
MOSES MICHAEL, 
' W. W. TUTTLE, 

Commiasioners. 



]R'8 



TAamas B* Neabity Treastkrer Missouri Institution for the Deaf and 

Dumby 



TO INCIDENTAL FUND. 



DR. 



Not. 26,1866.. 
Jan. 1, 1867... 

May 22 

JaD. 1, 1868.... 
July 1 



To balance on Mttlement 

To cash received on annual appropriation, 1867. 
a ti It tt J 857, 

1868. 
1868. 



it 

n 



tt tt tt 

tt tt tt 

To cash on aale of sundry articles.... 



CREDITS. 



By amount paid on warrants firom Board, December, 1866 . 

January, 1867 .... 
February, 1867... 

March, 1867 

April, 1867 

May, 1867 

June, 1867 

July, 1867 

Anc^ust, 1867 

September, 1867.. 

October, 1867 

November, 1867.. 
December, 1867.. 
January, 1868 .... 
February, 1868... 

March, 1868 , 

April, 1868 

May, 1868 

June, 1868 

July, 1868 

August, 1868 

September, 1868.. 

October, 1868 

November, 1868., 



tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
it 
tt 
tt 
tt 
•t 
tt 
tt 



tt 
%* 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



Amount paid on exchange. 



tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 



$ 401 58 

2,500 00 
2,500 00 
2,500 00 
2,500 00 
209 15 



$10,610 78 

406 00 
S29 14 
411 78 
143 63 
773 37 
547 59 
1,108 91 

03 55 

8 57 

466 52 

156 45 

209 78 

1,042 08 

52 90 
863 45 
247 23 
503 76 
199 00 
650 10 

32 05 

63 77 

768 27 

104 96 

586 06 

4 37 



Balance due incidental fund, Nor. 27, 1868. 



$9,278 22 



$1,332 51 



[24] 



TO mDIQENT FUND. 



DR. 



Jan. 1, 


1867.... 


May 


22 


Jan. 1, 


1868.... 


June 


30 


March 31, 1867 


April 


31 


May 


31 


June 


31 


Sept. 


30 


Oct. 


31 


Not. 


27 


Dec. 


27 


Marck 31, 1868 


April 

-lima 


31 

fti 


»ept. 


31 



Amount received on appropriation for 1867 
" « " 1867 

tt it tt 1868 

tt tt tt 1868 



CREDITS. 



By amount paid on warrants £rom Board. 
tt tt tt tt 



tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



tt 
tt 
tt 
It 



tt 
it 

tt 



tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



Amount loaned " Shop Fund".... 

By amount paid on warrants from Board. 
(( tt tt tt 



tt 
tt 
it 



tt 
tt 

tt 



tt 
tt 
tt 



tt 
tt 
tt 



Balance due Indigent Fund. 



$1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 Od 

1,000 le 



$4,000 00 



15 S8 


176 05 


231 40 


264 63 


157 54) 


2 50 


175 17 


292 21 


5 10 


130 97 


515 53 


217 85 



$2,184 78 



$1,815 2S 



TO WORKSHOP FUND. 



DR. 



Nov. 26. 1866.. 


To balance on hand 


$300 00 
250 00 
59 85 
649 64 
913 46 
.160 10 
116 05 


$2,473 83 
175 17 




To smount borrowed of Indicrent Fund. .....t.t 




CREDITS. 
By amounts naid on warrants from Board. •>.... ........ 




Dec 31. 1866 


$2,649 10 


Jan. 31, 1867.. 


tt tt tt tt 




June 30 


tt tt tt tt 




July 81 

August 31 

Sept. 31 

Nov, 31 


tt tt tt tt 




tt tt tt tt 




tt tt tt tt 

■••ftftftftVftft«aft»ft 

tt tt tt tt „„,„ 


$2,649 10 



RECAPITULATION. 



To amount received from all sources, at per statement 

CREDIT. 

By amount disbursed of Incidental Fund 

By amount disbursed of Indigent Fund 

By amount disbursed of Workishop Fund 

Balance due on annual settlement Nov. 26, 1868, as follows : 

Due to Incidental Fund 

Due to Indigent Fund 



$9,278 22 
2,184 78 
2,649 10 



1,332 61 
1,815 22 



$17,259 83 



$14,112 10 



$3,147 73 



$3,147 73 



T. R NESBIT, Treasurer. 



EIGHTH BIENNIAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOj^RD of MA.NA.aER8 



mcLvansB the keports or 



SUPERINTENDENT AND TREASURER 



OF THB 



MISSOURI STATE LUNATIC ASYLUM, 



FOR THE YEARS 1867 AND 1868, 

KOYB.HBEB 30, 1868. 



SsHAn.— Lud on the tabto, and 3000 copiet ordered printed, 1000 for (he ue of the SvpenB- 
tCfBdeot. Juiauy 22, 1850 • 

f. C. S. COLBY, CM^f atrk. 



JBFFEBSOir OITT: 
«LLWo«» xmr, puBU« f; 

1809. 






•t! 

I 
t 
1 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION. 



MAHAOBBS : 



H. LAWTHSBy Pruident, 
HIRAM CORXELLy 8eer$tAry, 
STEPHEN D. BARLOW. 
WILLIAM H. THOMAS. 
CHARLES W. STEVENS, M. D. 
WESLEY HUMPHREYS, M. D. 
JOHN P. CLARK. 
JAMES M. MARTIEN, M. T>. 

— ' , Faccncy. 

I 

TBIABURSB, 

I JAMBS S. HENDERSON. 

1 

I 

lupaBaminwirTAn) PHTsiciAir, 

CHARLES H. HUGHES, M. D, 

;r 

nun ASBISTAHT PHT8I0IAK, 

! HAMILTON SHIDY, M. D. 

fSCOKD ASSISTANT PHTSIOIAK, 

WILLUM H. WOOD, M. D. 

i, 

SnWABD, 

RICHARD CHAMBERLAIN. 

XATBOV, 

Mbs. LAURA A. HTTOHES. 



J : 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 



To the Oenenal Assembly of Missouri : 

Gentlemen: — Conformable to the requirement of the^Slatutes-of* 
the State, the undersigned, Managers of the Missouri State Lunatic 
Asylum, respectfully submit their eighth biennial report. 

We are pleased to be able to state that the Instiitution is now fill- 
ing its full measure of usefulness to the unfortonaie beings who re- 
quire its benefits. 

The resident officers of the Institution are* efficient and compe- 
tent, and actuated by those humane and philanthropic impulses so* 
essential to the well-being of so noble a charity. 

Harmony prevails throughout the entire establishment, and %sif 
dences of public confidence have been received from all parts of the* 
State. 

Its inmates now number three hundred and sixty-nine, being: 
nineteen more patients than the actual capacity of the building, and 
an increase of one hundred and fbur more patients than at the time 
of the last report 

We are looking anxiousljr forward to the time when the St. Louia. 
patients, one hundred and thirty-five in number, shall be removed to* 
the new asylum now preparing for their reception, so that the door» 
of the asylum, now closed to patients, may be agaiu thrown open to 
them. 

The report of the Treasurer,. lowing the condition of the finances^ 
is herewith submitted. 

Especial attention is called, to the accompanying report of the* 
Superintendent and Physician^ 

The recommendations therein contained, meet with our approval^ 
and it is hoped that they may be deemed worthy of consideration 
and action during the present session. 

Respecting the progress of improvements, made in compliance- 
with the act which passed your honorable body at the last session,, 
appropriating the sum of twenty thousand dollars for the purpose, we^ 
have to report as follows: 

The old sewer has been, replaced, wherever found defective, with 
Alton stoneware. Work upon its extension will be resumed in the- 
spring. All the materials for the purpose are on the ground. 

Work on the new reservoir has been discontinued, in consequence* 
of unfavorable weather. About six weeks or two months' labor are 
requisite to complete it. It will hold, when finished, at least one- 
million gallons of water — sufficient to supply all our wants. 

The materials for lighting the building with i^as are nearly all. 
upon the grounds, and are beinff rapidly put up. We expect to light- 
the house with gas by the middle of February. 



The repairs and painting contemplated in the bill are abont com' 
pleted, and the piano and melodeon have been purchased. 

Materials for the ten pin alley are on the ground, so that it can be 
constructed early in the spring. 

All work has been done oy day labor, under the supervision of 
the Superintendent and Managers. 

We have purchased, from the Missouri Gas Works Building Com- 
pany, the patent gas apparatus of Archer, Pancoast & Co., for making 
^as from gasoline, parafine oil and other fatty substances. The cost 
of the works at St. Louis is $1,013 91, to be paid for when in working 
order and found to ^ive satisfaction. 

The work is being done by one hand, aided by our engineer and 
regular employees. 

These works are no experiment, being now in successful operation 
at the Laclede Hotel and county jail, St. Louis, and at Long BrancL 
N. Y. The same works are now being put up at Sedalia, to light that 
cily with gas. 

Accurate estimates cannot now be made of the cost of the re- 
spective improvementa now in process, but, when completed, it is 
probable that all the objects contemplated in the bill making the 
appropriation, will be accomplished out of the amount provided. 

The following is an exhibit of the materials purcnased for im- 
provements, and work done on same, and paid for out of the fund ap- 
propriated : 



Date. 



K«T.tO,18C8.. 



For what purpose expended. 



Amoniit paid to dat« for lamber .v. 



ti 
u 
tt 
it 
ti 
tt 
it 
it 
n 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



it 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
it 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
»t 
tt 



fencing materials. 

sewer " 

Work on sewer 

" on reservoir 

Horse, cart and harness 

Wheelbarrows and scrapers. 

Sundry tools 

Harness and repairs 

Carj^enters' work 

Cabinet organ 

Kitchen range 

Freight 

Work on cisterns 

Painting materials 

Painters .« • 

Masonry 

Books 

Iron pipe 



Amoont 



50152 

803 « 

388 19 

710 5T 

133 ()• 

93 Si 

30 11 

25 M 

328 W* 

141 a 

S40 3y 

13 Si 

592 61 

670 31 

350 3j 

227 12 

S4 74 



$6,426 ^ 



[Signed.] 



H. LAWTHER, 

HIRAM CORNELL, 

STEPHEN D. BARLOW, 

WM. H. THOMAS, 

CHAS. W. STEVENS, M. D., 

WESLEY HDMPHREYS, JM. D., 

JNO. P. CLARK, 

JAS. M. MARTIEN, M. D. 



i:%El?OIlT 



OF TVB 



SUPERINTENDENT AND PHYSICIAN. 



To the Honor dhle^ the Boaa d of Manag.er^ of the Mieeouri State Lu* 
natio Asylum : 

Gentlemen: — With the return of annother biennial epoch in the 
history of this institution, comes the duty of drafting our report. 

A retrospective glance at the history of the Asylum for the past 
two years affords us abundant cause for devout thankfulness to Al- 
mighty God, for the full measure of prosperity He has vouchsafed 
unto us. He has averted from our household the '^ pestilence that 
walketh in darkness, and the destruction that wasteth at noonday."— 
No unusual occurrences have complicated our labors, or aggravated 
our mortality. The general health of our patients has never been 
better. For the past two years, our death rate, notwithstanding the 
unprecedently crowded condition of the hospital, has been less, and 
our proportion of recoveries greater, than for any similar period since 
the re-opening of the institution, in 1863. 

The actual and proportionate number of patients discharged im- 
proved, for this period, is also greater than the number so discharged 
during any preceding two years, except 1861. In the latter year it 
will be remembered, all the patients in the house were sent away, 
and the Asylum was closed up on account of the disturbed condition 
of the State. 

Successful elopements of patients have been unfr^quent, and none 
of those startling fatal casualties incidental to asylum life, and some^ 
times unavoidable under the best of human management, have hap- 
pened, to cast a gloom over our comparatively happy, though afflicted 
household. The homicide has been restrained from violence, and the 
hand of the suicide has been stayed. We have not always been so 
fortunate. 

But exemption from accidents, freedom from pestilential visita- 
tion, a diminished mortality and increased number of recoveries are 
not the only measure of our prosperity. An asylum for the insane is 
prosperous in proportion to the amount of home life, rational conduct, 
good order, quietude and contentment, secured to all its inmates, 
hopeless or curable. In this respect, Providence has smiled upon our 
efforts, and intermingled with the daily life of our household, more 
than tiie usual share of domestic happiness and tranquility. 



ing tables, condenBed from the records of the Asylum, 
nber admitted and discharged since the last biennial 
I biennial per centage of recoveries, deaths, etc., since 
of the Asylum in m63. 

TABLE I. 
*t Adml—ioiu mt DiKiarau firam Hn. 20, 1S«S, toUm. SO, ISSS. 





1 


1 


1 




in 


13; 






I« 




trMtment in two jmn _ 


SSS 

4S 

b 
if. 


M7 

1 

29, 


81 
















116 
ISO 


801 

... 




>ral {*m^ patitiiU, not b>'d Jdri ^'t«, now kwait re- 


3S» 



the oldest patieot that died in the Asylum, since the 
eport, was eighty<three, and of the youngest, seven 
i of the oldest patient remainiDg, is seventy-sis, and 
t, five years. 





•1883 
■nd 

ISM 


18«S 

■Dd 

i8as 


1S»7 

ud 




.076 
.080 
.011 


.17* 

|030 

•OOS 


n, 






1- 




.0i7 




ISth. I8C4. 






1 •nbruM ODl; from 8»p(. 7lb, 188S, to Oct 


.ISS 


.870 


.158 



een gratified at the recovery of some of oar apparently 

and pained to witness some of our most promising 

> incurable dementia. This is the experience of all 

tendents. 

r patients, whose insane history anti-dates the founda- 

um. have lately passed away, and some still remain, liv- 

if tne almost utter hopelessness of confirmed chronic 



The history of the physical decline of most of our patients who 
have died, repeats the same story told in the records of all other 
asylums, of progressive enervation and masked phthisis, the bronchial 
and pulmonic nerves being insusceptible to customary impressions, 
and the purulent pulmonary excretion exciting little or no expecto- 
ration. 

Tubercular deposition may be as rapid in the phthisis of insanity, 
as in that oi sane persons, but the breaking down of the deposited tu- 
bercle, appears to go on slower. 



TABLE III. 

Showing ih0 civil wndMan 9/ thoM dif charged timcc the opening of the Aejflum, o,nd that of theeo 

now in the Aeylum, 



Bit charged : 

Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Unaacertained 



Single... 

Married 

Widowed 

Unascertained 



Total 

Remaining: 



TotaL I 180 



1 


1 


1^ 



E 


• 


3 




809 


111 


420 


105 


218 


411 


20 


42 


62 


68 


62 


180 


692 


431 


1028 


82 


43 


125 


44 


65 


109 


6 


12 


IS 


48 


69 


117 


180 


189 


869 



TABLE V. 



Showing per cent, of recoveriee, etc,, to whole number under treatmeni. 



RecoTeriei 

Deaths 

ImproTed ....m 

Stationary • 

Total per cent, of Discharges 



1852 
and 
1853 



.180 

.092 

.033 

.02 

.326 



1854 
and 
1855 



.168 
.031 
.005 
.084 
.294 



1856 
and 
1857 



.103 
.016 
.007 
.095 
.190 



1858 
and 
1859 



.092 
.060 
.018 
.095 
.266 



1860 
and 
1861 



.129. 
.218 
.266 
.411 
.976 



8 
TABLE VL 

ShouHng Ike tuppoied cautet of ituanity in 1392 catn. 



nSl^ABBS. 



Cerebri til 

Deranged mexutmatioii 
Domestic berearement 
Domestic ixkf elicitj 

Djspepsia 

Bpileptia ..^ 

KEpoBure to lan and weatiier 
Hereditary transmission 
Intemperance 

Intense stadT 

Injuries of the head 

K^asles 

Menstrual climacteric 

Mental anxietj 

Masturbation 

Opium eating 

Prior attacks 

Physical diseases and general debility 

P^cuniarr embarrassment 

Paeri^ral state 

Senility.., 

Seduction 

Spirit rappingi 

TpbaocQ. 

Typhoid ferer «. 

unrequited aflbction 

Unaecertained 

Baligious excitement 

War excitement 




TABLE VIL 



Showing the mge$ of 1392 patiente when admitted. 



pi 

[r 



AGES. 



Under ten years ....; 

Between ten and twenty , 

" twenty and thirty 

" thirty and forty 

" forty and fifty 

'f fifty and six^ 

" sixty and seventy 

" seventy and eighty .\ 

Unascertained 

* Total 



m 

• 


B 


7 


2 


44 


44 


238 


169 


178 


167 


91 


90 


61 


80 


26 


11 


12 


1 


115 


116 


772 


620 



o 



9 

83 

407 

335 

181 

91 

37 

IS 

231 



1392 



; 



9 
TABLE VnL 

Sho^ng thi fornu cf dUMa$ of 1392 patUnU when admiiUd, and the ttaU of 1023 p^tiontt at time 

of diteharge* 



Whole ntttnbcnr admitted.... 
Diicharc^ recovered 

" improved 

'' itfttionary , 

" otherwise 

" died 

Whole namber discharg^ed. 
Whole namher remaining. . 



Mania. 


Melancho- 
Ua. 


Monoma- 
nia. 


Dementia. 


1098 


158 


31 


110 


254 


38 


11 


10 


125 


19 


2 


8 


102 


6 


4 


9 


104 
239 

824 


16 
17 
95 


5 
2 

^24 


7 

61 

' 80 


269 


63 


7 


30 



ToUl. 




TABLE IX. 

Skofting the whole fMMR^er admitted {and remaining) from eaeh county, from lieeember 2, 1851, to 

November 30, 1868. 



COUNTIES, 



Adair 

Andrew .. 
Audrain.. 
Atchison 



Barry 

Bates , 

Benton 

Bollinger 

Boone 

Buchanan 

Caldwell 

Callawaj-.......M 

Camden 

Cape Girardean. 

Carroll 

Cass 

Cedar 

Chariton ». 

Christian 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Cole 

Cooper 

Crawford... , 

Dadp 

Daviess 

DeKalb 

Dent 

Doniphan 

Franklin 

Gasconade 

Gentry 

Greene 

Grundy 

Harrison 

Henry... , 

Hickory 

Holt 

Moward 

Iron 

Jackson 



...«»•,»«« 



3 

o 


Remaining. 


o 

• 


Pri- 
vate. 


Co. 


9 

18 

18 

8 

1 


*"*3*" 
2 


4 

• ••••••« 

6 
3 


5 

8 


1 


1 


1 
30 
61 

2 
41 

3 
17 

7 
10 

3 






2 
6 

1 


2 
18 


8 






1 
3 


8 
2 

1 


10 
2 

14 
6 
6 

13 

18 
3 
5 
8 
2 
4 
1 

14 
7 
5 
4 

20 
2 
3 
2 
2 

80 
5 

31 




•• 


1 


2 






1 
5 


8 
3 
2 








2 










......»•• 


........ 




1 


2 
1 
1 


1 
1 
6 










....... 

1 
1 


1 
4 
1 
9 



.10 
TABLE IX— OoNTDsroED. 






a 



COUNTIES. 



Javper ,.. 
Jeflferson 
Johnson.. 
Knox 



Laclede ... 

Lafayette 

Lawrence. 

Lewie 

Lincoln ... 
Linn 



Livingston 
ICacon 



Madison..... 

Maries 

Marion...... 

McDonald.. 

Mercer 

MiUer 

Mississippi 
Moniteaa... 



Monroe 

Monti^omery. 

Morgan 

New Madrid., 

Newton 

Nodaway 

Osace...., 

Pettis , 

Phelps 

Pike 

Perry 

Platte 



Polk 

Patnam ■ 

Balls u. 

Randolph 



Ray. 

Saline 

Schuyler 

Scotland 

Shelby 

St. Charles 

St. Clair 

St. Frapcois.... 
Ste. Genevieye. 

St. L«ui8 

Sallivan 

Texas..... 

y«mon 

Warren 



Washington 



Worth 

Other SUtes... 

State patients 



Whole nnmber.... 
Total remaining 



tr 
o 

S* 

o 

• 


Remsuning. 


Pri- 
vate. 


Co. 


3 

12 

11 

12 

5 

30 

7 

7 

20 

9 

4 

11 

3 

2 

35 

1 

6 

8 

5 

10 

25 

30 

7 

4 

3 

8 

11 

8 

4 

24 

6 

27 

5 

2 

15 

26 



16 

10 

4 

10 

24 

1 

3 

2 

410 

1 

1 

3 

14 

8 

1 

4 

4 




1 
3 




2 


3 
........ 




3 




1 


2 
2 
3 












2 


5 




1 
1 
1 
I 


1 






1 


3 
2 

1 
......... 1 








3 ! 

1 

3 

S 1 






• •••••• • 

1 


2 


ft 1 




3 


1 
5 






2 
3 
1 
2 
3 
1 




2 








4 


134 








1 
3 


1" 


1 


2 




1392 


58 


311 
369 



>*• ■ 



1 



Tot«i. 


ES|I3| 


1 j ii;sSS|SS5S=a|gsssss3 


less. 


. £3SS5||SSSStJS=51"'-'S"SSiSK3a«="' 


1B8T. 




1808. 




IBDS. 


SSSSa2e = 3-SSS53~— - -SS3S — — 


1884. 


SSSS2SSS3^-S — 3 — ' ; ..=-55 


18BS. 


S3S i ; ;sss i j j i ; 


nniiin^iiiii 


1881. 


sasssg i i iSss-ssssasssB-s-sa*- 


1880. 


essssssss— ss*5- |-2-assss— - 


1889. 




1888. 


sas=sss=g--S'— — — lass-— ; 


1657. 


-SSS325SS3--S-— | i"-'ai!S3— j 


1858. 


ssstsassg""" i"" "-■ .-s-as"— 


1858. 


sssa-asEsS-s—- ; j- j-sss-s— 


18S4. 


a=3=sass5— j-~- j— |-s=s'— r 


1851. 




18S2. 


SSE~— S53~"- r- 1 i i j— -SS' 




Nombw of m.l« .dmitwd „ „ ..- 

Mumbsr of femnUi .dmitlod - „ 

Nombori ........i„ « 

WholB a — 


iiiiUl 


, , I i , , 

■..:j. ]•':■ .. 

.1.1' 1' ,■ 

I 1 

111! 
1 ill 

1 : a£.2 a 

iiiiiiiiiiiffi 



12 

Oinr thanks are due to the inveetigating committee who visited 
ns last winter, for so forcibly urging, andto the last (jfeneral Assem- 
bly, for so promptly granting the special appropriation of twenty 
thousand dollars asked for, for improvements, repainting and repairs ; 
and to vou, gentlemen of the board, are due the thanks of the people 
of the State, for the judicious and economical manner in which you 
have expended, and are expending the money appropriated, and for 
the efficient and substantial character of the improvements you have 
made and are making. 

The five new cisterns which you have constructed^ and the auxili- 
ary reservoir, now rapidly approaching completion, with an aggregate 
capacity of one million gallons of water, added to the capacity of the 
Old cisterns and reservoir, not less than two hundred and fifty thou- 
sand gallons, will give us a supply of water amounting to twelve hun- 
dred and fifty thousand gallons, sufficient at our present rate of con- 
sumption, about ten thousand gallons per day, to last us through the 
longest drought 

I am glad that the days of hauling water to supply the laundry, 
the kitchen, and heating coils of this vast building are over. 

Our ice, also, will hereafter be cut on our premises, arid carried 
but a few hundred yards to our ice-bouse, instead of one or more 
miles, as heretofore. Nor need the quantity be ever again uncertain, 
because no longer dependent on a precarious supply of water. The 
qu^ty of our ice may be uniformly good, hereafter, because of our 
ability, at pleasure, to overflow the new reservoir from the old, and 
make good thitjk ice there, when the weather is not cold enough to 
make it elsewhere. 
^ The new Alton* stoneware piping, with which you have replaced 

* the old, decaying, and obstructed sewer, promises to give entire satis- 
faction. It possesses, I think, all the merits claimed for it over other 
drainage material, namely : Greater durability, cheapness and saiooth- 
Bess, and is laid with facility and at little expense. 

' Conformable to your order, the material for "replacing worn out 
floors, and for ceiling rooms" (m violent and destructive patients, the 
third object specified in the bill making the appropriation, has been 
purchased, and the whole lower floor of the center building, includ- 
ing the back porch, has been relaid with a good quality of narrow yel- 
low pine lumber. The remaining floors which need replacing, and the 
bownng alley, the materials for which have also been purchased, can 
be»laid at a future time, and at less expense than npw, when our car- 
^nter will be be less engaged than at present. 

The "painting of the halls and inner building, and the painting of 
the wood work on the entire eastern side of the house," contemplated 
in the bill, and entrusted to my superintendence, is completed, besides 
the painting of the iron window sash of the whole eastern side of the 
building, within and without, the floor and Wood work of the amuse- 
ment hall, the three upper floors of the center building, the walls and 
wood work of the first hall dining rooms, and several bath rooms. 

It is to be regretted that the means at our command would not 
permit us to go further with the painting. In a large building like 
this, painting should be going on constantly. In an economical point 
of yiew, no expenditure is so judicious as that made for paint. Our 
halls cannot be whitewashed, because the patients would rub off" the 
wash as fast as applied, besides painted walls are curative of insanity, 
especiallv if their colors are brilliant, and dissimilar on the different 

* halls. They please the ejje, and avert the thoughts of patients from 
the subject of their delusions, 



a^ijsa^^ 



18 

The piano purchased by yoar order out of the current expense 
fund, pending the bill appropriating money for this purpose, was a 
most opportune purchase. The old instrument had become useless 
from long service, rendering the new one an imperious necessity, as 
we had at the time, no other instrumental music for female patients. 

The Mason and Hamlin cabinet organ, purchased instead ot the 
melodeon contemplated in the bill, proves to oe a very fine instrument 
and a most valuable accession to our chapel service, being sweet in 
tone, and possessed of the organ swell, peculiar to the best of these 
instruments. Our thanks are due Saxton & Co., of St. Louis, for sell- 
ing it at a reduced price. 

I regard the lowering of the kitchen floor, and the enlargement 
of the kitchen by removing, and including the room of the old bakery, 
the introduction of Van's roiproved wrought iron range and steam 
table, and the copper steam kettle for expeditiously ooiling coffee, 
tea, and soup, as among the best of the many substantial improve- 
ments made during the past two years. These changes, with the side 
entrances, replastering and repainting, have effected an entire trans- 
formation in our kitchen, and made it adequate to the large and daily 
increasing demand upon it. 

With a new hotel broiler to accompany the range, and tramwavs 
and trucks to carry food from the latter to the dumb waiters, our culi- 
nary department would be complete. Our present method of con- 
veying victuals by hand, to the remote waiters, a distance of over 
two hundred feet, each way, from the kitchen, is rather too primitive 
for the present age of progress, too expensive and too slow. In win- 
ter months, the food gets cold before it reaches the tables. The tram- 
ways would obviate this, and dispense with four of the six waiter 
hands now employed. The cost of this track and trucks would be 
about two thousand dollars, and would be saved to the State in a few 
yeari' use. I urge these two yet needed improvements. 

A well-ordered kitchen is as essential as a well-arranged dispen- 
sary^ and the presiding genius of the former, with access to a well 
suppJied larder, has as much to do with the well-being of the insane, 
as the physician,* who commands the therapeutic armamentarium of 
the latter. Each, in his sphere, is a potent instrumentality of relief 
and beef is sometimes more effectual th«n physic. 

The insane, with few exceptions, are hearty eaters. The enerva- 
tion, and often conc'omitant gastric irritability of exhausting mania, 
demand an abundance of nntritious and well-cooked food, to rejditce 
the daily waste of the system, and to elevate the depressed vitsu sc- 
tions to the standard of healthy function, a diet super-abundant for a 
sane person, is often requisite. 

Ine prospective earl^ immunity from one more source of danger, 
from fire, in tne substitution of gas for coal.oil, relieves us of a weight 
of anxiety* During (he past two years^ we have had one kerosene 
explosion, which might have resulted disastrously, had it occurred 
otherwheres and less opportunely for extinction. It was the lamp of 
the fourth hall, south, that exploded, but, fortunately, when no one 
was in immediate proximity to it, and the attendant was sufficiently 
near at hand to promptly put out the flames, before any damage had 
been occasioned, other than the destruction of the lamp and contents,* 
and the soiling of the wall and floor. 

In this connection, let me urge the better security of the build- 
ing from fire and its disastrous consequences* I shudder when I con- 
template the possibility of our house on fire, with no better means at 
hand than we now have forits extinguishment, and no better avenneej 



14 

of escape for oor patients than are now provided, f^-om the halls im- 
mediately adjoining the center building. The structure would not 
only have to be abandoned to the flames, but, with every attention 
directed to the rescue of the patients, it would be a miracle if all 
escaped with life, and if some of the more dangerous among the 
rescued did not, in the confusion incident to such a catastrophe, and 
freedom from customary restraint, destroy themselves or others. 
During the present month, the Central Ohio Lunatic Asylum, at Co- 
lumbus, has been burned to the ground, and. with its destruction, 
perished six of its unfortunate inmates. Witn fire-proof walls and 
zealous care we guard our public archives. The afflicted, confided to 
the keeping of the State, demand no less attention. 

I recommend that the tops of the house be amply supplied with 
water-tanks and hose, and the building throughout, at proper dis- 
tances, be amply furnished with means of promptly extinguishing fire. 
The rear center building, including the laundry and boiler house, 
should be re-covered with some fire-proof material, instead of the 
pine shingles which now cover it, and which will have to be replaced, 
in many places, on account of leakage. 

Fire-proof rear exits should be provided, by means of stone or 
iron stairways, from the halls on each side of the center building, not 
only to afford better facilities of escape in case of fire, but to furnish 
convenient and ready access to the back yard at all times, and 
thereby diminish the amount of annoying travel through the passage- 
ways of the centre building. 

The omission of these stairways was an oversight in the original 
construction of the building, which, however, can be easily remedied 
by erecting them in the recesses occasioned by the junction of the 
northeast and southeast corner rooms with the corridors .of these 
halls. 

I recommend that the whole ventilating and heating apparatus 
be overhauled at as early a date as practicable, and put*in more per- 
fect working order, and that drying rooms be provided for all the long 
halls, such as \\e have on all the short halls. Though we have gone 
long without drying rooms on the long halls, they are almost indis- 
pensable for drying the bedding and clothing soiled, and small arti- 
cles washed on the halls. By adjoining them to the bath rooms, as in 
the I>ean additions, they would serve an additional purpose of warm- 
ing the patients while bathing. Our bath rooms get all their heat 
from the hall registers, which is insufficient, in very cold weather, to 
make them as comfortable as they ought to be. 

I have to call your attention to the defective condition of the tin 
rooft on the center building and Dean additions, and recommend that 
they be repaired, and the plastering, damaged, and fallen off in con- 
sequence, and whenever the old floors of the original building are 
replaced, as they will all eventually have to be, the interspaces be- 
tween tnem and the ceilings beneath, should be filled with cement 
and gravel, or other suitable material, to prevent the traiismifision of 
fire, sound and water. 

I recommend the purchase of two new pianos for the convales- 
cent halls, and a music box for levery hall in the house. A visit to the 
halls where we now have music, would suflice to convince the most 
skeptical as to the power of music over the insane, and the necessity 
of abundantljr supplying it. The Pennsylvania hospital for the insane 
has twenty pianos, four* melodeons. and other musical instruments in 
proportion, and no more patients than we have. 

Our long neglected cemetery, wherein lies buried many a cher- 



pmmm 



■«B 



15 

ished member of our household, should be inclosed with a neat fence, 
to separate it from the remainder of the grounds. 

The north basement is sadly in need of better drainage. The air 
"which goes from there to supply the halls above it, is too much im- 
pregnated with unhealthy telluric emanations and moisture, for long 
continued health, and the foundation walls will soon begin to rot and 
crumble, unless a speedy remedy is instituted. 

Our laundry is badly placed, and our Shaker wasbini? machine is 
wearing out. Ihe machinery should be removed from the second to 
the ground floor. The constant jarring produced by the steam boil- 
ing tub, and the motion of the centriiugal wringer, has produced a 
sensible effect on the whole rear center building. The floor of the 
ironing room is lowered many inohes in some places, and the bake 
oven underneath the wash room will have to be rebuilt, owing to 
damage received from constant shaking and leakage. 

I recommend tlie construction of a new laundry building, large 
enough to include a bake oven, at ri^ht angles north of the present 
one, and the introduction of new wasning machinery. 

It would be well, also, to consider the propriety and economy of 
making aerated bread, as now made by steam, in other asylums. 

The old farm house should be repaired and tenanted by a practi- 
cal dairyman and farmer. 

It will be necessary, before the close of another two years, to 
replace, at least, one-third of all our bedding and bed furniture, and 
the house needs a much more liberal supply of furniture. 

The corridors and bedroom floors of the flrst^ second and fifth 
halls, on each side of the house, should be carpeted, as they were 
before the war, to give them that home-like, cheerful appearance so 
essential to the comfort and recovery of those who occupy them. 

The passage ways ol the center building should be covered with 
stout hemp matting, so as to drown the noise occasioned by their 
almost constant use as thoroughfares. 

Many of our dining and bath rooms, and all the attendants' rooms, 
require steam heating coils to make them comiortable in winter, ana 
our garden would be incomplete without a hot house. 

Kenewed efforts ought to be made to decorate our promenade 
grounds in front of the asylum with shade trees and shrubbery, and 
much care will be requisite to insure success to our efforts, owing to 
the barrenness of the soil, or rather absence of soil, it having been re- 
moved when the grounds were being leveled. Unexpected success 
has attended our efforts at transplanting forest cedars along ttie car- 
riage way. They were made to grow by removing and replanting 
them along with their native earth. This process will have to be re- 
sorted to in all successful transplantations. 

Of course, you will not be able to supply these things out of the 
current expense fund, legislative appropriations have always, hereto- 
fore, been made for such purposes* 

A pressing want of the institution at this time is an infirmary, 
detached from the main building, for separating cases of serious bodily 
disease for special medication ana nursing, and in time of an epidemic, 
for isolating the infectious and contagious. I recommend the cottage 
infirmary building recently constructed in connection with the Cen- 
tral Ohio Lunatic Asylum, at Columbus, as a suitable model. 

Our colored insane are rapidly increasing. On the north wing, 
the hall set apart for their accommodation is full, and the hall on the 
south wing, similarly appropriated, is nearly so. No more colored 
males, and but four more colored females can well be accommodated. 



16 

and there are probably, fit the present time, not less than one handred 
and twenty colored insane in the State, or one in every one thousand 
of the colored population. 

The Legislature should at once imitate the example of other 
States, and make suitable provision for this class oi our people. 
However unfounded the prejudice of color, the fact is, that it exists 
intensified among the insane, and it would perhaps be well to respect 
this prejudice, and erect a separate building. A structure of suffi- 
cient capacity for the immediate wants of the colored insane, could 
be cheaply constructed on the present Asylam grounds, and suffi* 
ciently convenient to the present asylum building, to render the 
water and steam accessible to it, and a separate corps of officers un- 
necessary. 

Should the colored insane asvlum be located elsewhere than here, 
it should be at Jefferson City, the proper place for our State institu- 
tions, so that the Legislature might visit it frequently, and ascertain 
its wants, and supply them. This institution has felt the inconve* 
nience of distance from the General Assembly in failing to get needed 
appropriations, because that body, not seeing our necessities, could 
not be impressed by representation, with a belief in their existence. 

The removal oi the St. Louis county patients, soon to be effected, 
will greatly relieve our over-crowded wards, but at the rate of in- 
crease of patients during the past two years, two more years will not 
elapse before we are again over full. Since November, of 1866, we 
have admitted two huni&ed and ninety-nine patients, and gained over 
one hundred. 

The increasing facilities of travel make the asylum, every year, 
more accessible to the insane in remote parts of the State, and the 
recovery of the people from the financial embarrasment consequent 
upon the late prevalence of war in their midst, enables them to better 
provide, than heretofore, for their insane charges. 

In 1860, the census of the United States gave the proportion of 
insane as one to every thirteen hundred of the whole population. 
The census of the same year ^ave to Missouri twelve hundred and 
eighty insane, demented and idiotic. Subsequent estimates, care- 
fully prepared, make the present proportion throughout the United 
States, about one to seven hundred. 

New York, has one in nine hundred, Massachusetts, one in four 
hundred, and California, one in six hundred. 

The proportion of one to one thousand would give to Missouri, 
with her present population, about fifteen hundred insane. Of this 
number, three hundred and fifty can be accommodated here, two 
hundred and fifty at the new St. Louis county asylum, and one hun- 
dred and fifty at St. Vincent's Asylum, St. Louis, making a total provi- 
sion for seven hundred and fifty, and leaving half of the insane of the 
State still unprovided for. 

The great battle for the nation's life is ended, "the clash of re- 
sounding arms" has ceased, but the never-ending conflict of life 
goes on. 

Our wounded patriots no longer claim our attention, but the 
mentally maimed are all about us, calling for sympathy and aid. Our 
present means of relief are inadequate. 

The duty of making more ample provision for the care of the 
seven hundred and fifty uncared for insane of the State, now devolves 
upon the Legislature, and the question presents itself as to whether 
the present asylum had better be enlarged, or new ones erected 
elsewhere. 



17 

It would be more Economical to add to the present structure, but, 
in my opinion, not more conducive to the welfare of the insane. Three 
hundred and fifty patients, and fifty to seventy-five oflBcers and em- 
ployees, making an aggregate ol at least four hundred people, are as 
naany as should be congregated at one time in one compact building, 
far too many in time of epid'^mic vidtatioiu 

The *' Association of Medical S'iperintendents of Hospitals for the 
Insane," has vaccillated somewhat in its opinion on this sulgect; at 
one time declaring two hundreil and fifYy^ and at another declaring 
five hundred as the maximum number. The average capacity of State 
asylums now in operation in the United States^ ia about three hun* 
dred. 

A large central asylum is also objectionable^ because of it« inac* 
cessibility to many parts of the State. The statistics, collected by that 
eminent statistician, Dr. Ed. Jarvis, of Massachusetts, show conclu- 
sively that the benefits of insane hospitals are mostly bestowed upon 
the ii^sane of ac^jacent and readily accessible counties. New York 
has one large asvlum at Utica, which is the common receptacle for 
all her insane. Ohio, until the recent destruction of one by fire, had 
three ; a northern, a southern and a central one. I recommend the 
Ohio plan as the preferable one for providing for our insane. New 
York is now adopting it by erecting: two more asylums,- in different 
portions of the State, instead of enlarging the one at Dtica, and Ken- 
tucky is now doing likewise. 

It is not necessary to Urge upon the General Assembly the duty 
of providing lor all her insane, it is only necessary that that body 
should be convinced of the necessity for the discharge of the duty. 

It was the custom of another, and in many respects an exemplary 
people, in a remoter age, to destroy those among their number who 
did not promise, by reason of early acquired or congenital, mental or 
physical deformity, to become useful members of the State. Thei^ 
unfortunates were looked upon as dead weights in battle, and patriotic 
mothers regarded them as incumbrances, and grieved not at the law 
which lopped them off as excrescences from the body politic. 

Our mothers cling to their deformed offspring with greater tena- 
city and affection than to the sound, and it is our bpast that we 
take care of all our unfortunates, that they may enjoy as much of life 
and realize as much as possible from the talents God has fi:iven them. 
The idiotic and the feeble minded are trained to think ; the deaf and. 
blind, through the senf^e of touch, are taught to hear and see ; th<^>! 
mute speaks, an inaudible, yet intelligible language, and the unfor-- 
tunate lunatic goes out restored from the liospital for the insane, to> 
reunite the severed ties of the family, to become again a tax payer of, 
the State, and supporter of the househola. The latter returna to so- 
ciety "as one risen from the dead," and testifies to the wisdom and 
Ehiianthrophy of the State, that restores to the family circle, and the- 
ody politic, valued members otherwise lost to both. 

We have refused admittance, as in duty bound, under the law, to. 
many idiotic and feeble minded persons, during the past two years.. 
We could have done them no good could we lawfully have admitted 
them. The large number of these unfortunates in the State, suggests 
the necessity and duty, on the part of our law makers, of establishing 
a training school for their education and support 

Other States are far in advance of our own, in providing for this, 
class of unfortunates. 

I congratulate yon, gentlemen, upon your snijLCiessfnl management: 
of the financial affairs of the institution during t^ past two y^ars. 

2 L ASTLUH • * 



18 

t of the treasurer exhibits a very satisfactory atate of the 
he treasury, in viev of the fact, that you have maintained a 
'8ge of one huodred more county patients than have ever 
en supported in the asylum, and at the same rates for board 
ore, two 'ioUars and a half per week. 

ose managenrent, you have provided beds, bedding, and 
itnre for tnese one hundred additional patients, besides re- 
orn out bedding, furniture, etc., withoat calling upon the 
re for a special appropriation for the purpose. This, I be- 
inprecedented in the former history of the Institution, and 
le most rieid economy, rather too rigid perhaps, than is best 
tlfare of the insane. Cheap management is not the most 

cures, and hence, in the end, not toe most economical. 

more is requisite to the cure of insanity than wholesome 
antial food. Of this, our patients have had abundance. The 
ngs of the insane cannot be too cheerful ; they cannot Jiave 
comforts, or be provided with too manv means of beguiling 
e or diverting tneir thoughts from all-absorbiog and sel^ 
g delusions. 

liary restraint in the management of an insane asylum, re- 
! means for moral treatment, and this restriction diminishes 
irtion of recoveries. I would rather exclude all medical 
; than do without the many moral appliances now brought 
>on the mentally adUcte^ in every lioerally conducted hos- 
he insane. 

bt if many patients would ever recover, if placed in a bed 
id with medicine alone, like one sick of a pnysical disease, 
in an ordinary hospital. 

are of insanity is an expensive process, and insane hospitals 
iessity bur most costly charities. 

y interest you, gentlemen, to know the actual amount we 
9m the State, counties, and individuals for board of ourpa- 
i to compare the same with the cost of maintenance in other 

IS. 

ave now in the asylum three hundred and sixty-nine patients, 
ard of which we have received since November 30th, 1867, 
.f »51,674 03. 

ave received from the State the regular annual appropria- 
[teen thousand dollars. The two sams added together make 
il of 967,470 03, for maintaining three hundred and sixty- 
iDts for one year, so that we are now supporting our patients 
a of $183 00 each per year, or (3 &'i each per week. 
>re8ent rate of maintenance, per patient, is $89 40 per an* 
than the average cost in all the asylums, and $24 OOless per 
an the cost of maintenance in the cheapest asylum in the 
ates, of which I can get any information, and $1 72 per week 

average, and forty-seven cents per week lower than the 

the following table will show : 



19 
TABLE XL 

Showing th* eo9t mnd wuUniefwnee of patienti in twenty aiylumt of iht United Stalet. 



No. 



1 

2 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 



NAMB OF ASYLUMS. 



PennsylTUkia Hoipital for Insane, Philadelphia 

Govemroent Hospital for Insane, Washington, D. C. 

Northern Ohio Asylnm, Newberr 

Tennessee Insane. Uospital, Nashville........... 

Michigan Insane Asylam 

Illinois Insane Hospital, Jacksonville 

New York Asylum, Utica. 

Longyiew Asylam, Hamilton county, Ohio 

New Hampehire Asylam for in«ane...«. 

Sonthem Ohio Asylum, Dayton 

West Vir^nia Hospital, Weston 

New Jersey State Asvlum, Trenton 

Wisconsin Hoepital, Madison 

Massachusetta Hospital, Northampton 

Dixmont Insaae Hospital, Pittsburg 

Eastern Kentucky Asylum, Lexington 

ITJState Lunatic Hospitib, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.. 

18|Central Ohio Asylum, Columbus 

19 Western Lunatic Asylum, Stanton, Virginia 

Missouri State Lunatic Asylum, Fulton 

Insase Asylum, North Carolina, Raleigh 



20 
21 



Average cost. 



No. of 
patients. 



836 
271 
HI 
181 
169 
308 
641 
418 
2.35 
178 
4i 
450 
ISO 
413 
247 
250 
340 
330 
338 
369 
217 



Annual coat 
per capita. 



$438 €0 
410 00 
372 00 
3^ 00 
316 00 
305 00 
283 00 
274 00 
269 00 
255 00 
233 00 
•247 00 
233 00 
226 00 
222 00 
215 00 
215 00 
212 00 
207 00 
183 00 
250 OO 

272 40 



Weekly 

cost per 

capita. 



$8 S3 



7 
7 



88 
17 
6 40 
6 04 
87 
64 
27 
19 
91 
50 
75 
43 
34 
20 
13 
13 
07 



5 
5 
6 
5 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
8 99 

3 52 

4 80 



5 



24 



Thifl sum of three dollars and fifty-two cents per week includes 
all that we receive for bedding and bed room furniture, medicine, and 
all articles of personal comfort and convenience, except clothing. It 
include8,a]so,the customary repairs and improvements, and some ad- 
ditional ones rendered necessary in consequence ot the sudden filling 
up of the house to its utmost capacity. These repairs and improve- 
nients amounted during the past year, to about five thousand dollars, 
which, if deducted, would materially lessen the actual cost of main- 
tenance of each patient. 

It would be well if the board rate for county pstients, or the an- 
nual appropriation now provided by the statutes, were increased, so 
that we might be enabled annually to make all required improve- 
ments and repairs, and to provide more liberally for our patients, with- 
out having to call so oftea on the General Assembly for special appro- 
priations. 

The present appropriation of sixteen thousand dollars per year, 
was fixed when we had not over half the jiumber of patients that are 
now in the asylum. The annual appropriation should be increased to 
twenty-five or thirty thousand dollars, to enable us to properly keep 
up the repairs of the building, farm, garden, fences, walks, steam 
coils, gas fixtures, water apparatus, etc., and to make up deficiencies 
in the hoard of county patients at two dollars and a half per week, 
the present statutory limit of charge for board of such patients. 

The rapid progress of provision for the care of the insane through- 
out the united States within the present century, the improved 
methods of treatment now in vogue, and the successful results attend- 
ing the same, are sources of gratification to the philanthropist, and the 
man of science, and indicative of the humanitarian and enlightenea 
spirit of the age in which we live. 



reaaoDSblv hope, tbut tbe dsy ia not far distant. 
lyisioa will be made, throughout the length and 
road land, for (.he relief and cure of erery onfortu^ 
t of reason within its borders. 

Buneoceotent of the jear 1800, there bat three insane 
ountry: one in Pennsylvania, one in Yirginia, and 
; there are now upwards of sixty ia operation, or 

i; table, extracted from a recent "Report on lasaoi- 
irican Medical Aaaociation, by Dr. Chas. A. Lee, of 
ighty corrected, exhibits much valuable information 
>cation, uiunber aod capacity of American Insane 



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23 

The United States has now abont 35,000,000 inhabitants, and about 
85,000 insane, re(]^uiring asylum provision, so that over one-third of the 
insane of the United States are now provided for in asylums. 

When the greater cost of insane asylums, over all other charitable 
institutions is considered, it must be conceded that the American 
people have made exceedingly rapid progress in provision for their 
insane. 

The following table, from the same source as the j)receding one, 
exhibits the cost of thirteen leading asylums in the United States : 

TABLE Xm. 

T^U of huane Atplumt, with Co$t9 of BuUding9, 



Ko. 



8 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 






Names. 



1 fTew York State Asylom, Utica 

2 Maryland Hospital, Baltimore 

McLean A8;|rliim, SomerriUe, Mass 

PennBylvania Hospital for Insane 

New Hospital for Insane, Philadelphia.. 

New Jersey Asylam, Trenton 

Marine Hospital for Insane 

Mt. Hope Institution, Baltimore 

•jBatler Hospital, Providence, R. I 

10, Lunatic Asvlom, Taunton, Mass 

lljMichigan Hospital, Kalamaioo 

12 Northampton Hospital, Mass 

13 Iowa Hospital, Mt Pleasant 

Arerage cost per capita.. 



Capacity. 



440 
130 
200 
240 
250 
250 
175 
120 
140 
250 
288 
250 
250 



Cost. 



$517,400 00 
213,600 00 
821,000 00 
330,000 00 
325,000 00 
250,000 00 
150,700 00 
200,000 00 
116,000 00 
250,000 00 
840,000 00 
835,000 00 
859,666 00 



Cost per 
patient. 



$1,185 00 
1,443 00 
1,605 00 
1,877 00 
1,300 00 
1,000 00 

861 00 
1,66« 00 

828 0« 
1,000 
1,180 
1,340 00 
1,440 00 
1,248 00 



00 
00 



While much remains to be done for our asylum, before it will be 
equal to others in States no older than our own, a good deal has been 
done, especially during the past two years, to promote the comfort, 
happiness and cure of our insane. • 

1 have not space to enumerate all you have accomplished in this 
direction. Let it snfSce to say, that every day has witnessed some 
new and beneficial improvement With the limited funds at our com- 
mand, we have been unprecedentedly prosperous, and I am grateiul 
^ you, gentlemen of the Board of Managers, and to that Providence 
whose fostering care over our house has been so signally manifest, in 
enabling you to accomplish so much substantial and enduring good 
from such meagre means. 



TREATMENT. 



MORAL AGBNTS. 



It is, doubtless, expected that we should say something respecting 
the means employed for the restoration of our patients, and to the 
medical members of the board, a few remarks respecting the general 
pathology, nosology and therapeutics of insanity, may not be unir 
teresting. 



24 

Three quarters of a century ago, the celebrated Binel, in France, 
apd the philaathropic Tuke, in England, abolished, from their respec- 
tive hospitals, the manacle and the dungeon, and substituted kindness 
for violence, medical treatment for physical restraint 

From that day to this, lunatic asylums have been gradually as- 
suming the charac^teristics of hospitals, presided over by numane and 
enlightened medical and other officers, and differing in their appoint- 
ments from other hospitals, only in the better security and^ watchful- 
ness provided for their inmates against escape, or personal ii\jury. 

Their inmates are now regarded as afflicted human beings, requir- 
ing moral and medical treatment, rather than fieffds in human shape, 
to be confined and punished lor supposed diabolical possession. 

An insane asylum is an aggregation of the consequences of dis- 
appointed ambition, physical affliction, unsatiated avarice, blasted 
hopes, unrequited anection, domestic affliction and bereavement, 
vicious indulgences, crime and sin and folly. "The iniquities of the 
parents visited unto the third and fourth generation," are there mani- 
fest, and the offspring of the comparatively sinless, afflicted by the 
mysterious hand of Providence, are also there. 

All ages, sexes and conditions ; the evil and the good, the high 
and low, the rich and poor are there, all reduced, by loss of intellect, 
to one common level. There, the prince removed from his palace, 
and the vassal from his cot*, the intellectual giant, breaking like the 
shattered oak, and the mental pigmy, bent and distorted by the storm 
of life's conflict, alike command our sympathy, and the sympathy de- 
manded, is an essential element in their treatment. 

Kind words, personal attention, and acts of kindness evincing 
our sympathy and friendship, will often subdue the most violent 
maniac, and always exert a favorable influence over the melancholic. 
Sympathetic kindness is the "balm of Gilead'^ to the wounded in spirit 
and the broken-hearted, on whichever side of that shadowy line of 
demarkation, separating sanity from insanity, we may manifest it. The 
law of kindness, as our by-laws require, continually governs here, and 
all whom we employ are required to obey it. 

Personal surveillance takes the place, in a great measure, of mecha- 
nical restraint. The strait waist, the leathern wristlet., the lock-up 
seat and bedstead, for the destructive, the impulsively homicidal and 
suicidal, are in use only when attendants are so few, or so much em- 
ployed that they cannot be constantly watchful of each individual. 
The dark room and the shower bath, for seclusion or punishment, we 
do not employ. Mechanical control irritates patients. They regard 
it as degrading. The less of this kind of management the better. 
Anaesthetics and narcotics are preferable, as means of restraint, to 
camisols and bed straps. 

EXERCISE. 

Exercise in the open air, and a bountiful allowance of sunlight 
are salutary. Long walks, in pleasant weather, compose the mind 
and invigorate the oody. Our patient, who can be entrusted out of 



25 

the asylum, walk out an hour or two twice daily, with their attendants, 
whenever the weather is not too inclement for Buch exercise. 

LABOR. 

I regard a judicious system of organized labor for patients, as one 
of the most efficient means we can employ toward effecting their re- 
storation. It is both prophylactic and curative ; prophylactic in main- 
taining and improving the tone of the physical organs ; curative in 
the occupation it gives to the mind, modifying, dissipating or holding 
in obeyance, insane thoughts, and in the healthy fatigue it produces 
in the body, substituting the wholesome sleep which naturally follows 
bodily weariness, for the abnormal and fitful somnolency of narcotics. 
Idleness begets many vices, among them those which not infrequently 
lead directly to mental derangement. By arresting the prim^ cause, 
we may prevent or modify its effects. 

I would make labor, in a certain sense, compulsory. I would lead 
the patient out to work by a system of rewards and special privileges 
for any manual labor he might perform, and deprive nim of those re- 
wards in case of refusal. ^The laborer should always be worthy of his 
hire." 

This, in eflect, would be the same as drivine to labor, but not so 
objectionable, and the end accomplished would be better on mind 
and body. Paradoxical as appears the proposition, this system would 
be both compulsory and voluntary. Compulsory as that of the tiller 
of the soil, whose daily recurring wants, compel him to labor for the 
bread which God giveth to alibis children, on condition that they 
earn it in the ^^sweat of their faces," voluntary, because the patient 
may either forego the labor or the enjoyment of its reward. 

Labor will probably be more generally employed, better regulat- 
ed and somewhat more compulsory than now, in the psychopathic 
hospital of the future, but few, I apprehend, will ever be found will- 
ing to introduce into insane asylums the systematic coercive drudgery 
oi the penitentiary, though distinguished alienists now advocate it. 
I would esteem goaded labor as detrimental to an unwilling patient 
as mechanical restraint. Compulsory exercise associated with pleas- 
ure of some kind would be less objectionable. 

Our male patients work about the farm, dairy and garden, our 
female patients in the laundrv, kitchen and sewing room, and all help 
more or less about the work done in their respective halls. We have 
not been able to dispense with much paid help on account of the 
labor done by patientfe. They work too irregularly to be always re- 
lied on, but the work clone by them is remunerative in bodily health, 
mental quietude and restoration, and this is what we want, 

AMUSEMENTS. 

^ Amusements and recreation play an important part in the resto# 
ration of the insane, and the new gymnasium and bowling alley, 
provided for in last winter's appropriation, will add much to our facil- 
ities for cure. We now have croquet, billiards, chess, dominoes, cards, 
dances, lectures^ magic lantern exhibitions, tableaux, theatrical exhi- 
bitions and music. No agencry so potent as the latter in calnfing the 
excitement of the maniac and dispelling the gloomy thoughts of the 
melancholic. Few there are, sane or insane, who are not susceptible 
to its influence. It has more than ^^charms to soothe" or power to 



26 

calm. It cures, especially when the patient is not only susceptible of 
being "moved by concourse of sweet sounds," but has *'mu8ic enough 
in his soul" to produce them, through mastery of an instrument. 

DEVOTIONAL EXERCISB3. 

Devotional exercises, and the readine of the scriptures exert a 
very beneficial influence over the minds of those accustomed to them 
during sanity, if their delusion appertain not to scripture subjects. 
The bible is forbidden to religions monomaniacs, and such patients 
are kept away from the chapel. 

MUTUAL INFLUENCE. 

Patients are frequently curative of each other. One monomaniac, 
unconscious of his own insanity, will readily recognize the * existence 
of mental aberration in another^ and, if sympathetically constitutei 
will forget his own delusions while commisderating the misfortunes of 
others, or in endeavoring to correct what are to him manifest absurdi- 
ties, hence the importance of classification of patients according to 
their social afSnities and their disorders, and hence^ also, arises one of 
the advantages of treatment within oyer treatment without an asylum 
for the insane. 

DIETARY. 

The dietary of an insane hospital should not only be wholesome 
and substantial, but it should abound in variety. Some patients are 
constantly asking ior particular delicacies, and where gratification is 
possible, they should have their requests complied with. Those nn* 
fortunate lypemaniacs, who fancy that the world bears heavily upon 
them, that they are friendless and forsaken objects of derision or ap- 
probrium, are often made worse when we have to refuse them any 
particular article of diet which they crave. 

CLOTHING. 

The clothing of a patient often materially influences the result of 
treatment. 

A patient made insane by reverse of fortune, and accustomed 
during the days of his prosperity and sanity, to broadcloth and the 
artificial comforts and conveniences of wealth, will not always con- 
valesce so rapidly if fed on plain diet and clad in homespun, though the 
latter be good enough for any man. An insane asylum is not a social 
reformatory school. A judicious blending of restraint and indulgencei 
• exists in every well-ordered asylum, and habits not always the most 
economical, are sometimes fostered in patients, when such a course 
promises to cure. 

The removal of all sources of irritation from a patient, entire 
change of scenery, and surroundings, placing the over-wrought mind 
under the most favorable conditions for rest and recuperation, are es- 
sential to recovery. The exhausted mind, like the wearied body, re- 
gains its lost tone by timely relaxation, opportune exercise, whole- 
some food, mental recreation and ample rest. 



27 

MEDICAL TREATMENT. 

In those atonic states of the nervous system accompanying mel- 
ancholia and hysteria, no tonic proves so speedily and certainly re- 
constructive of weakened nerve power as nux vomica, iron and opium 
combined, as circumstances require, with aloine and protoiodide of 
mercury. 

Therapeutic placebos exert a powerful moral influence for good, 
on the insane mind and will often come to the aid of the alienist phy- 
sician when other means fail him. Give a patient the remedy he 
deems most potent in addition to any other treatment you may insti- 
tute, if it be not contraindicated. 

blisters and emetics do great good in melancholia by rousing the 
system, and transferring the attention from delusion to local uneasi- 
ness and pain. Antispasmodics, especially assafoetida and Hoffman's 
anodyne, with valerian, are temporarily b^neficial in melancholia. 
The cold bath is here of much service. 

The warm bath is relaxant to the skin and calmative of the nerv- 
ous system. Anaesthetics are sometimes invaluable, especially chlo- 
roform saturated with camphor, administered by inhalation, in subdu- 
ing exhausting maniacal paroxysm and epileptic spasm. Maximum 
doses of ferrocyanide of iron, and of the bromide of potassium have 
in our hands aborted, but never cured epilepsy. 

The whole class of narcotics comes to our aid, and opium is the 
sine que non, 

1 would part with any other remedy before I would give up 
opium. When the erratic wanderings of the insane mind are re- 
strained in narcotic splints, it is in the most favorable state for recov- 
ery. Morphine administered with valerian, and black drop, given in 
beer, are the best forms of giving an opiate. Tiie more lupulin in the 
beer the better. 

I recall one case of unremitting excitement which would always 
yield to opium given with beer, when the same dose of the remedy 
was ineffectual administered any other way. He would converse 
rationally for hours under this treatment, and his wife thought him 
recovering, though he was rapidly wearing out from maniacal exhaus- 
tion and physical complications. 

Recent melancholia almost always yields readily to opium, 
through the sleep engendered and the substitution of the peculiar 
exhilarant influence of the drug for the diseased impressions of the 
patient 

Of course the condition of all the physical organs will be inquired 
into, and if any co-existent or precedent bodily disease can be detect- 
ed, it must be remedied, if possible, by appropriate medication. 

The quantity and frequency of repetition of any hypnotic must 
be commensurate with the effect desired as in delirium tremens. 

A correct pathology and sound nomenclature have much to do 
with the proper treatment of insanity. 

I think when the scalpel, the microscope and the crucible shall 
have done for physiology, physiological chemistry and pathology, what 
the telescope has alreadv done for astronomy, medical alienists will, 
with one accord, admit tnat the true disease, in every case of mental 
alienation, consists not in its symptomatic manifestations, but in the 
altered molecular action, and consequent structural cereoral change 
existing precedent to the mental derangement The term functional 
insanity, with its attendant erroneous nomenclature, will then be 



28 

abolished. Physicians will speak of the structural change and its pre- 
cedent co-existent, and consequent abnormal molecular action, as the 
true disease, and regard the functional derangement as the efiect of 
disease, obscure or manifest., and not the disease itself. Then the 
homicidal and suicidal manias, the dipso, klepto and pyromanias, the 
whole class of monomanias, moral insanities and melancholias, will he 
discarded, or employed to represent prominent functional maifest- 
ation. 

When the pathology of epilepsy, catalepsy, chorea, paralysis and 
paresis shall become known, and their exact relation to the pathologj 
of insanity better understood, then will insanity be called epilepti'. 
cataleptic, choreic, or insanity from or with epilepsy, catalepsy, cho- 
rea, etc., according as investigation shall reveal the existence of the 
materies morhi of these affections to be identical with, antecedent tc. 
or co-existent with, the true materies morbij or altered cerebral mole- 
cular structure of insanity. 

The nomenclature of mental diseases will then be as exact as that 
of chemistry, and physicians engaged in the practice of our specialtr 
will understand each other better than now, when a disease is name! 
in regard to its specific nature. Such terms as dipsomania and oino- 
mania will not mean, as now, either mania apotu or m^ania pro poiu, 
according as the person using the term may regard an over indalgence 
in alcohol as the cause, or the effect, of the insanity. Erotico-mania 
will then no longer signify either the melancholy of unre<]^uited love, 
or the violent, insatiable venerial tury ot the nymphomaniac. 

A specific lesion of the cerebrospinal nervous system, or a reflect- 
ed one of the vascular or absorbent systems or physical organs, will 
be looked for in every case, and the disease will derive its name from 
the structural lesions or pathological changes upon which it is fonnd 
to be dependent. 

^ Pyromanias and kleptomaniacs then, as now, may become insane 
when detected in the acts of arson or thelt, or their mental derange- 
ment may precede these violations of the laws, but they will be 
known to the pathologist by another and more scientific nosology. 
These terms may answer well the purpose of the criminal pleader at 
the bar, but in the domain of psychopathic medicine, they do not help 
the cause of science. 

INTfiBESTINO OASES. 

Some interesting cases have fallen under our observation within 
the past two years. 

We record first the case of H. J., aet four years at time of admis- 
sion. Her mother had puerperal mania. This child was lively and 
intelligent until immediately subsequent to an attack of measles, 
which occurred a short time before admission. Has had some epi- 
leptic seizures since, and frequent outbursts of maniacal excitement, 
characterized by great destructiveness and violent fits of uncontroll- 
able passion. U nable to talk. Comprehends pretty well when spoken 
to. Addicted to masturbation. 

6. T., aet. eight years, when admitted. Had'ponvulsions when an 
infant, and occasional spells (probably epileptiform seizures) as he 
grew older, but seemed as healthy and intelligent as most children, 
until fourth year. At that time inflammation of the brain destroyed 
his mind. Now has epileptic dementia. Addicted to masturbation. 
His parents are healthy. 

F. J., aet ten years. Admitted when eight years of age. A fall, 



29 

in his fotfrth year, deprived him of speech, which he has never regain- 
ed, though he now utlers a few words, and comprehends moderately 
well when spoken to. Is not epileptic^ hut maniacal. He is always 
in motion, violently passionate and destructive.* Can brook no re- 
straint. 

Fannie A.— No history before admission. Has spells of period- 
teal sick headache^ and violent passion. No epileptic or epileptiform 
seizure!^. Attacks occur in day time. Admitted September 27, 1865, 
and is now about nine yeara old. 

A case of chronic hydrocephalic dementia came in recently, and 
is worthy of record. 

The history of the case, as given by her father, makes it one of 
acute general mania, of two months' duration, with violent impulse. 
The hydrocephalus was congenital. 

The autopsy revealed no sub-arachnoidan or subserous surface 
effusion. The water was all in the lateral ventricliss, and amounted 
to forty-eight fluid ounces. The anterior lobes of the brain were push- 
ed forwarcL attenuated, and compressed against the os frontis. The 
middle and posterior lobes were reduced, by the pressure of the in- 
ter-ventricular effusion, to a thickness varymg from one to five lines^ 
and resisted, under the knife, more like semi cartilaginous than med- 
tillary matter. The thin cerebral envelope that inclosed the water 
seemed, in places, like the sac of an abscess ready for the surgeon's 
knife. White and srey matter, in about equal j[)roportions, composed 
what remained of tne posterior and middle hemispheres. 

This patient, also, had had rickets and curvature of spine. 

She came in on the eighth and died on the twentieth of the pres- 
ent month, in her twenty-seventh year. We made the following 
measurements : 

Height, anterior median line 4 ft, 8 in. 

Length, tollowing spine posteriorly 5 ft., 2 in* 

Antero posterior diameter of thorax W\ in. 

Greatest circumference of thorax 88^ in. 

Oceipito frontal circumference of head 27| in. 

Line over vertex, from ethmoidal spine to occipital protu- 
berance 18 in. 

Lateral antero posterior semi-circumference of right side of 

head 21 in. 

Antero posterior diameter of head 10^ in. 

Transverse diameter of head, between the ears 7i iw- 

Length of face, from ethmoidal spine to chin 4^ in. 

The history of this case recalls a class of cases, against the send- 
ing of which to the asylum, we desire to enter our earnest protest 
They are hopeless, harmless cases, in which early dissolution is appar- 
ent They can only die here, and had better be allowed to remain 
and die at home. The fatigue and exposure on the wav here often 
hastens their demise. Bucn cases are usually the senile demented, 
puerperal and typhomania cases. They reach us almost in articxilo 
mortis^ and over-sanguine friends sometimes wonder that they do not 
f ecover. It is sad to have to admit such patients, 

"Whose poor bnini • • * dotb, bj tiM idle commenti thikt they luktf, 
ForteU the ending of mortolitj.'' 

But humanity forbids us to bar the door, even though within there 
exists no hope. 



30 

Since the last biennial report, thirteen cases have been adEnitted^ 
who have died from maniacal exhaustion in from two to thirty days 
after admission. 

I desire now to address a few words to those directly interested in 
insanity. 

A morbid public sentiment, extending to those who should be 
more enlightened, attaches an odium to the unfortunate victim of in- 
sanity. He is not always regarded, as he should be, as an afflicted 
brother, demanding care ana sympathy, and prompt medical aid, as 
any other sick person. 

The knowledge of the existence of this diseased public sentiment 
often leads the conscious insane to conceal from their friends the 
early manifestations of their malady, and to defer efforts for cure, until 
the time lor relief has passed. This ieeling also leads misguided 
friends to screen the vagaries of those whom they esteem, from the 
public gaze, and to keep them out o1 an asylum until too late for cure. 

It is thus that the misdirected kindness of mistaken friends leads 
to death, or to that which is but little better, confirmed chronic insan- 
ity. 

Friends of patients should bear in mind that delay in treatment 
of insanity, as in the treatment of all other grave disorders, is danger- 
ous, while no serious pliysical disease yields so readily to treatment 
as recent mental derangement. Three fourths of all cases treited 
within three months after the first symptoms are manifest, recover, 
while not much more than one-fourth of the cases of longer standing 
get well, and nearly all recoveries take place within one year from 
commencement of the attack. Insanity of longer standing than one 
year, is nearly hopeless. 

Marked eccentricities and sudden changes of character are some- 
times overlooked until an unexpected suicide renders friendly assist- 
ance unavailing, and robs society of a valued member, whom prompt 
asylum treatment might have restored to family and friends. 

A startling and unprovoked homicide, or other stupendous crime, 
is necessary to convince some people of the existence of insanity. 

DECOYING PATIENTS TO THE ASYLUM. 

« 

I have to reiterate the oft-repeated protest against the reprehen- 
sible, but innocently practiced device, so often improperly resorted 
to by those having the custody of the icsane, to induce them to leave 
home and come willingly to the asylum. 

Any deception practiced towards patients, either in regard to 
the object of their removal from home, or respecting their place of 
destination, is pernicious, and should always be avoided. 

This practice evidently originates in a very natural desire to get 
along well with the patient, to have as little difSculty with him as 
possible, while on the way to the asylum, and is sometimes regarded 
as exceedingly adroit; but, while it relieves friends of a temporary 
burden, in transitu^ it not unfrequently, at the asylum, entails a 
heavy and enduring one upon those there having the subsequent care 
of the patient, and materially retards, and sometimes effectually pre- 
vents his restoration to reason. 

Never promise a confiding patient a pleasure trip to a distant 
friend, as is often unwittingly done, and then bring him direct to the 
asylum, unless, indeed, as mav justly be done, he be told that the asy- 
lum is the abode of friends who understand tne nature and treatment 



81 

of his mental inalady, and will sympatbize with him in his a£9iction, 
and endeavor to restore him speedily to reason. 

He may be assured, also, that he will find pleasant companions 
htoe, even among those similarly afflicted, and that he will here have 
an opportunitv to enjoy agreeable pleasure walks, church privileges, 
relaxation and amusements suited to his state of mental and bo'lily 
health. 

Never make definite promises to a patient respecting his proba- 
ble length of stay in the asylum. The most experienced adept in the 
treatment and prognosis of mental alienation, cannot pronounce, with 
absolute certainty, upon the duration of any case, or foretell the man- 
ner of its termination. 

In all our intercourse with mankind, sane or insane, honesty is, 
certainly, the best policy. If patients are decoyed here by false prom- 
i8es,which cannot be fulfilled on arrival, they lose faith in those friends 
who have been instrumental in getting them here through deception, 
and the transition is easy and natural, from loss of confidence in 
friends, to distrust and suspicion of strangers, therefore^ deal candidly 
with every patient. If he objects to coming to the asylum, encounter 
his resistance, and combat, if possible, his objections to coming, be- 
fore leaving home with him. 

Tell him that competent judges have pronounced him insane, and 
that the mind, like the body, when diseased, should have relaxation 
and medical treatment, and that a residence in the asylum promises 
the best chance for speedy recovery. If you fail to induce him to 
come by honest argument and persuasion, then bring him by over- 
povrering force, rather than through deception. By such a course, 
the interests of the patient are better subserved, and the cure is often 
begun. 

PRIMATURE REMOVALS AND VISITS. 

Premature removals of patients, during their convalescence, 
often result in hopeless relapses, and inopportune visits, on the part of. 
friends, are equally disastrous in their consequences. I 

It is painful to see promising acute cases thus converted into 
hopeless chronic insanity, and the life prospects of the patient forever 
blasted, by the iigudicious conduct of indiscreet, though well-mean- I 

ing friends. 

No one would think of imposing upon the body, just recovering 
from a physical disease, the customary burdens endured by it with 
impunity, while in perfect health. Yet, friends insist on taking pa- 
tients home just as soon as delusions vanish, and on seeing them even 
before. The effect of subh a course is to throw upon the mind a bur- 
den of retrospective thought, which it is not sufficiently recovered to 
endure. 

Wait until the cure is complete, before removing a patient, or 
seeking an interview with him. Familiar scenes and faces excite the 
mind of the recovering patient to diaeased^instedi^ of healthy, action. 
Dormant delusions are awakened into new life, the work of the phy- 
sician undone, and the fate of the patient sealed, by the conduct of 
those whose interest and desire it is, above all others, to have him re- 
stored. 

When written to upon this subject, we always advise candidly, 
but when those connected to patients by the closest ties of consan- 
guinity, present themselves at the office, and ask to be permitted to 
see a wife or a husband, a son or a daughter, a father or a mother, we 



Si 

cannot find it in our hear! to peremptorily refuse the solicited inter- 
view, notwithstanding our duty to counties, in the case of patients 
sent and maintained by them, would Seem to require such a course. 

BEQUESTS. 

This institution has never been favored by any considerable do- 
nation from any source, except the State. Yet, no institution in the 
State is more worthy the attention of our philanthropic millionaires 
than this, and a legacy bequeated to no other institution could more 
thoroughly perpetuate the name of the donor. 

What better inscription over one's grave than one like this : ''He 
bestowed his means to restore lost inlellects." 

The trustees of the Massachusetts general hospital acknowledge 
the receipt, for last year, of $43,312 75, from donations and legacies. 
How long shall it be before the Managers of this institution shall be 
permitted to publish a similar acknowledgment ? 

ACKNOWLKDGMKNTS. 

Our thanks are due the Presbyterian Board of Education, Ameri- 
can Tract Society, Ticknor & Fields,. Putnam & Sons, Koutled^e & 
Sons, Nichols & Noyes, 0. D. b\ Randolph, Iveson, Phinney, Blake- 
man & Co., and Oopperthwaite & Co., for gratuitous donations of 
books, in all, five hundred volumes, obtained through solicitation of 
the philanthropic Miss Dix, to whom we also desire to record our 
thanks. 

We are under obligations to Reverends Fisher, Caughland, Peniu 
Shumate, Farrah, Pedelupe, Campbell and Williams, for ministerial 
services, also to our Stewards for conducting the chapel services regu 
larly, in the absence of ministers from abroad. 

The editor of the Guardian^ of St. Louis, has our thanks for the 
separate contributions of books and exchanges, ^nd the Young Men s 
Christian Association, of St. Louis, for bibles, testaments and tracts. 
Our thanks are also due the Surgeon General, United States Army, 
for circulars Nos. 6, 6 and 7. 

The following papers and periodicals come regularly to us: 
Missouri Republican, Missouri Democrat. St. Louis Dispatch, Central 
Christian Advocate, Guardian, St. Joseph Herald, St. Joseph Union, 
Hannibal Courier, Wakenda Record, Ralls County Record, Lagrange 
American, Fulton Telegraph, North Missouri Messenger, Ledger, 
Mexico, Colman's Rural World, Harper's Weekly and Monthly, 
Godey's Lady's Book, New York Herald, Danville Star, Democratic 
Picket Guard, Louisiana Republican, Grand. River News, Chillicothe 
Spectator, Boonville Eagle, State Times, St. Charles Cosmos, Warren 
County Banner, Jefferson County Leader, Southwest Missourian. 
Anzeiger Des Westens, Yolk's Zeitung, Westliche Post, Mississippi 
Blatter and Der Fortschritt. 

These papers are all appreciated by our patients, and are among 
our instrumentalities of cure. I would be glad if the list includeu 
every paper in the State. 

DISGIPLIKE. 

A review of the interior workings of the. house is, at the present 
time, quite satisfactory. Personal friendship and harmony prevail 
among the employees, and a more than usual amount of congeniality 



33 

exists between attendants and patients. During' the past year, a 
steady improvement in the esprit de corps of the house has been 
manifest. 

The fatigaing, and often trying duties of attendants, entitle those 
who faithfully discharge them, to our gratitude and esteem, and the 
qualities they are required to possess, intelligence, morality, even 
temper, affability and sympathy for the afflicted, command the appro- 
bation of mankind in whatever sphere of life displayed. 

The assistant physicians, steward, matron, and supervisor, are 
each entitled to my grateful thanks for fidelity and zealous discharge 
of duty. 

CONCLUSION. 

I cannot close this report without expressing to you, gentlemen 
of the board, my grateful thanks for opportune and prudent counsel, 
harmonious support and united confidence, and for that singular 
unanimity, which has uniformly characterized your official action in 
everything appertaining to the true interests of the institution and to 
which is mainly due its present prosperous condition. 

I am sure that a grateful public would unite with me in thanking 
you, could they know the amount of gratuitous and disinterested 
labor you have performed, during the last two years, in the cause of 
Christian charity and philanthropy. 

I am sure, also, that you have a higher reward than my poor 
thanks or public gratitude. Tou have the approval of satisfied con- 
sciences, and what is still higher, of Him who^enturies ago, uttered 
those significant words, still re-echoing from ^Palestine : ^Inasmuch 
as ye have done it unto the least of these, my brethren, ye have done 
it unto me." 

0. H. HUGHES, 
Superintendent and Physician. 

NOVEMBBK 30, 1868. ' 



8 L ASYLUM 



REPORT OF 'IHE TREASURER. 



the missouri state lunatic asylum, is account current with james s. 

henderson, treasurer. 

Dr. 



1867 A 1868.... 



It 
It 
It 
ti 
It 
tt 
tt 
It 
It 
It 
It 
ft 
It 
tt 
tt 
It 
It 
It 
It 
It 
tt 
tt 



To cash paid u follows : 

For Bacon 

" Beef 

Blacksmithing^ 

Batter 

Clothing^ 

Coffee • 

Cornmeal • 

Stone-coal (4,466 tons) 

Cash refunded patients 

Domestics, calicoes, etc « 

Eggs 

Exchange, stationery, postage and revenue stamps 

Farm and garden expenses 

Freights and commission 

Flour 

Fish 

Furniture 

Fruits — green, dried and canned 

Hauling ice and water 

Household expenses.. .< 

Hauling and drayage 

Lard ^ 

Lights and wood 

Lumber 

Miscellaneous 

Molasses 

Medicines and medical supplies 

Mutton 

Mechanic's, gardn^r's, carpenter's and farmer's tools and 

implements 

Milk 

Paints and painting materials 

Printing «»..... 

Pork ', 

Poultry ^ 

A'ovender 

Ordinary repairs and improrements 

Rice 

Removals, elopements and traveling expenses 

Salt 

Soap 

Live stock 

Straw 

Sugar 

Shoemaker's materials....'. 

Tea 

Tobacco « 

Vegetables 

Contingencies , 

Wages of employees , 

Special improvements, act of 1868 

Balance 



It 
It 
11 
tt 
tt 
ft 
tt 
tt 
It 
tt 
tt 
It 
tt 
It 

41 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
ft 
tt 
It 
tt 



$ 2,776 99 

12,134 34 

438 10 

1,952 13 

12,853 96 

3,646 57 

126 97 

10,857 17 

444 70 

6,921 98 

285 01 

499 58 

510 85 

1,123 58 

12,383 17 

20S 38 

1,049 10 

996 38 

700 9S 

13,063 35 

436 75 

42 26 

1,001 39 

427 14 

1,286 95 

1,662 65 

3,210 07 

2,774 90 

1,008 30 
362 22 

1,279 39 
235 80 

3,664 66 
755 74 

1,313 12 

3,392 79 
302 b9> 

1,267 91 
285 65 

1,571 55 
660 50 
197 00 

4,377 49 
76 97 

3,155 05 

139 29 

841 63 

83 40 

26,621 59 

6,426 64 

1,537 42 



35 

eONTBA. 



Gb. 



1866. 
November 29... 

1867. 



1868. 



Kovember 30... 



By balance due the inBiitution aa per statement 

Bj cash from Connty patients 

" Pay patients 

State of Miasoori 

Sale of dry hides, etc 

County patients , , 

Pay patients , 

State of MisBonri , 

State of Missonri, for special improvements.... 
Sales of dry hides, tallow, empty barrels, etc., 



it 

it 
ft 
it 

t€ 
ft 
it 

a 



By balance brought down. 



$ 8,570 02 
34,712 76 
12,061 93 
19,750 00 

881 14 
39,180 21 
12.343 82 
16,000 00 
10,000 00 

421 31 



$153,372 09 



$ 1,537 42 



JAMES 6. HENDERSON, Treasurer. 
To the Honorable Board of Managers, of the Missouri State Lunatic Asylum. 
VuLTOH, November 30, 1868. 

Approved by the Board, 

H. LAWTHER, President. 
HiRAX Cornell, Secretary. 



FORM OF REQUEST FOR ADMISSION. 



S£C. 21. The request for the admission of a patient into the asj*- 
lum shall be in writing, and of the following form, with all blank? 
suitably filled: 

To the Superintendent cifthe JdUemiri State Lunatic Asj/lum : 

The undenigned, of the county of , is deeiroiiB of placing in the S^ate Lunatic Asylum 

at Fulton, and hereby requests the admission therein of , a resident of the county of ,. 

whose a^ is , and has been (here state what the occupation of the person has been) . Be 

(or she) is a native of , in the State of , and is (here state what the relationship or cir- 
cumstances of connection may be) of the undersig^ned (then should follow a written historv of the 
case, including the alleged cause of tasanity, when it commenced, and aU the particulars thereof). 

Dated, day of , 18 — . 

Sec. 22. The certificate of two physicians shall be substantially 
of the following form, with all blanks suitably filled : 



state of - 
County of 



-, }"• 



We, -^— . and — , of the county and State aforesaid, physicians, do hereby certify that 

we hare this day seen and examined (here insert the name of the patient), of the county of , 

and believe to be insane, and a proper patient to be sent to the Btate Lunatic Asylum. 

(Signed). 



The above named , being duly sworn, say that they are practicing physicians of the 

county aforesaid, and that the facts stated in the above certificate, by them subscribed, are trae 
according to the best of their knowledge and belief. 

(Signed). 

8wom to and subscribed before me, this day of , 18 — . 

, J. P. 

Sec. 23. The bond provided for in section two shall be of the fol- 
lowing form, with all blanks appropriately filled : 

Know all men by these presents, that we, , of the county of ^, are held and firm- 
ly bound unto , Treasurer of the Missouri State Lunatic Asylum, and his successors in office, 
in the sum of five hundred dollars, for the payment of which we, jointly and severally, bind our- 
selves firmly hj these presents, sealed with our seals, and dated this day of — —, 18 — The 

condition of this obligation is such that : Whereas, , of the county of , in the State oi 

, and who is insane, has been admitted a patient in the Missouri State Lunatic Asylum, at 
Fulton ; now, dierefore, the condition of this obligation is, that if the said obligors shall pay to the 

said treasurer, or his successors in oflBce, the sum of dollars and ceuts per week, for 

the board of said patient, so long as h* shall continue in said asylum, with such extra charges af 

nay be occasioned by requiring more than ordinary cu,re and attention, and shall provide 

lor suitable clothing, and shall pay for all necessary articles of clothing as shall be procured 

ioT f by the steward of said asylum, and shall remova from said asylum, whenever re- 

quired to do so by the superintendent ; and if he shall be removed by either of us, or by any one, 
before the expiration of tnree calender months after reception, then, if said obligors shall ppy board 



37 

for thirteen weeks, nnless ihould be sooner cured ; and if they also paj not exceeding fifty 

dollars, for all damages said ■ may do to the famitore or other property of the asylum, and 
for reasonable charges, in case of death ; Bnch payment for board ana clothing to be made in ad- 
vance, quarter-annually, on the first day of October, Jannary, April, and July in each year, and at 
the time of removal, or in case of death, within one month thereafter, with interest on each bill from 
and after it becomes due, then this obligation to be void ; otherwise, to remain in full force. 



-[l. b.] 

■[L. 8. J 



Those that take private patients to the asylum must be prepared 
to give such bond, and, if strangers, evidence must be taken of their 
responsibility. 

Sec. 24. Before pay patients shall be received into the asylmn 
they shall be provided, by those acconapanying them, with suitable 
changes of raiment, of the kind, quality, and quantity specified in sec- 
tion twenty-six of this chapter, to be provided lor the insane poor; 
and whenever pay patients shall be in need of clothing, the steward 
of the asylum snail, under the direction of the superintendent, iumish 
the same, at the cost of those executing the bond provided for in the 
last preceding section. 



REPORT 



• V THI 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



OV T 



STATE OF MISSOURI, 



TO TH 



TWENTY-FIFTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



7. jAl. Z>JLS.lCZ33t, ST7Z>X:ZtI297rS31TZ>E2Srr. 



Sbnati.— Lud on th« Uble, and 1,000 copies ordered printed, 200 for the nee of the Buperitt- 

tendent, Jannary 18, 1M9. 

a. A. HOSBRy Steretary, 

flovfti — ^Laid on the tabl«y and 5,000 copies ordered printed, 1,000 for the uee of the Saperin- 

tendent, January 18, 1809. 

J. C. 8. Cour, CkUf CUrk. 



JBFFEBSOK CITT : 
■LLWoo» OBST, povuo rBumL 

1M9. 



REPOKT 



OF TBH 



SUPERINTKNDENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



^ m^ \ 



To the General AsBemlHy : 

If, in midst of the multifarious business which presses upon you, 
this report can gain a moment's attention, I venture to say it will af- 
ford you gratification. 

Nothing can be more grateful, in public, as well as in private 
labor, than continuous prosperity, and this is the fair test by which to 
try the utility of any movement, which has within it the means of self 
development, and is designed for general and perpetual use. Of this 
character is the plan of public instruction devised by your predeces- 
sors, now deeply fixed in the interests and affections of the people, 
and by that test is to be tried. It is free ; capable of indefinite expan- 
sion ; has settled to its place in the commonwealth, and will continue 
to grow with its growth, and strengthen with its strength. But, lest 
the moment claimed for this report be nearly exhausted, I present, at 
the outset, these considerations : 

1. JDo not attempt any further amendments of the school law^ 
except in few unimportant partioulan^ which, in due time, will be 
proposed to the Committees on Education. In 186S, a general school 
law was passed, which, althon/2:h excellent in the principttl features, 
was found to be too complex for successful operation by the people. 
At the last session, the same law was reduced and simplified, but as 
the ojScers elected by its provisions did not assume their duties until 
September last, it is scarcely possible to judge of its efficacy. By- 
comparison with similar laws in other States, I conclude that the. 
school laws of this State are well adapted to the objects contemplated. 
The best laws, those of the oldest institutions in this country, fail to . 
give entire satisfaction ; and it is a curious fact, that fewer objections . 
are presented to the school laws in Missouri, than the people of the 
New England and Middle States urge against .their respqcjtive codes 
with so many years of peaceable experience. ) ^ 

2. Complete the system of public instruction by, t^ie eptftbli^h-.- 



ment of schools for the proper edacation of its teachers. The time for 
such schools arrived long ago, but the opportunity never presented 
itself more auspiciously than now. A number of years ago, a bill was 
passed, authorizing the erection of a normal professorship at the State 
University, but the generous offer of the State was rejected by the 
curators. This was at the time when the State was deeply involved 
in debt, and when the comparatively new experiment of common 
schools scarcely justified the measure. Now the public debt is in 
course of rapid liquidation, and the public credit firm and surely ap- 
preciating, and there will be a surplus from the general revenue, after 
all demands are met. The time is approaching when the honor of 
this enterprise will not belpng to you ; and that consideration urges 
you to complete the work so well begun, and add lustre to a history 
already replete with great and good acts. For the first time, a plan 
of normal schools, both practical and economical, is proposed, and I 
respectfully refer you to its provisions, contained in a subsequent 
chapter. 

3. Slightly amend the chapter relating to county superintend- 
ents, to the effect that those officers may receive equitable compensa* 
tion for the labor required of them. The provision, as it now stands, 
is absurd and upjust. Glance over the list of special duties required 
by law of the superintendent, and then at the compensation provided 
for him, and mark the ridiculous contrast. The work done by the 
various county superintendents may be fairly estimated by rea<iing 
their reports included in this volume. We are now sufficiently ac- 
quainted with the county superintendency to appreciate that office as 
it deserves. It is now an indispensable part of the school system, and 
for that reason, it is surely the wisest economy to properly sustain it 
I suggest, therefore, that section 49, of the chapter concerning county 
superintendents, be amended by striking off the provision that he sAall 
not serve, and receive compensation for, more than sixty days, unless 
otherwise ordered by the county court. He should be permitted to 
serve as long as the public interests require his services, and no 
longer; but when actually employed in that service, he should be 
properly compensated, whether the time be Un or three hundred davs. 

4. The article concerning the organization of separate schools^ 
as far as it concerns the duty of boards of education, should be revised 
and made explicit. As it now stands, it only defeats the object in 
view, and it is questionable whether or not it is in contravention to 
the provisions of the Constitution, and so long as it so remains it is al- 
most inoperative. 

5. An act providing for the encouragement and support of teach- 
ers' institutes will be presented by the proper committee, for youf 
favorable consideration. Almost every county in the State now has 
an institute regularly organized. What benefit has been received b; 
the teachers, and, indirectly, by the cause of public education, can be 



estimated by a glance at the reports of the respective county super- 
intendents. It has become necessary that the institute should be 
made a legal organization, as well as a mere educational school. Pub- 
lic school teachers should, by virtue of their office, be made members 
of the county institute, and be required to attend them. The inci- 
dental expenses absolutely necessary at the semi-annual sessions of 
the 'institute, should be partially borne by the teacher and the county, 
as both arel3enefited; and directors should be made to understand 
that the time occupied thus by the teacher is neither to be lost nor to 
be. "made up." 

6. I also urge the adoption of an act instituting and maintaining 
township "school libraries." A careful study of the plans pursued by 
other States on this subject, reveals the cause of their failure, in some 
cases. It originates in the oompuUory nature of the acts, instead of 
making the establishment of a library purely voluntary upon the part 
of school authorities, and only in compliaiice with the clearly pro- 
nounced will of the people in the township. If an act can be passed, 
which authorizes a certain per cent, of the income for common school 
purposes to be applied to the purchase of books and periodicals, but 
does not oompel this to be done, I am assured that it will meet the 
cordial sanction of all intelligent citizens. Every city, town and vil- 
lage in the State, organized under special acts for school purposes, 
and every populous township, will soon have a perpetual fund, and an 
increasing library, to which individual contributions will be added, to 
make it of incalculable advantage to the youth, and the pride of the 
community. 

As required by law to make a statement of the work done in this 
department, I have the honor to say that the work has been prose- 
cuted with delight. County after county has been organized under 
instructions from this department, until, within two and one half years, 
every county in the State is organized, and receiving the benefits of 
public instruction. The correspondence of the office has largely in- 
creased, and averaged about three hundrea letters per month during 
1868. It is a perplexing task to reply promptly to the various ques- 
tions which come up from the small subdistricts over the State. Great 
care, in many instances, must be exercised, in order to appease a whole 
neighborhood, excited with a rancorous dispute, which, it is agreed, 
can be settled by a decision from this department; and this corres- 
pondence is not confined to one class, but extends to all grades of 
school oflScers, directors, township boards, county clerks, county su- 
perintendents and boards of education, organized under the "special 
act." This species of official correspondence is multifarious and large, 
but not much larger than that of a non-official character, proceeding 
from citizens directly and personally interested in the welfare of the 
"district school," a class of correspondence which is cheerfully and 
promptly acknowledged, as it surely indicates the growth of the free 
school system in the popular appreciation. Besides, thousands upon 



6 

thousands of circulars of instruction, laws and blanks for returns are 
prepared and distributed through the successive lines of officers to 
the seven or eight thousand directors, to be used in their work for the 
purpose of securing systematic operation of the school law, and uni- 
form reports to the General Assembly. It is necessary for you to hear 
from every subdistrict in the State. It is a difficult problem to so- ar- 
range a vast system of returns, as is required in Missouri, so that it 
shall work smoothly and eifectively throughout all its parts, and so 
that every school district shall be properly represented to you. I take 
the liberty of assuring you that this work cannot be done successfully 
until the people have confidence in the permanence of the laws, and 
that they will not be disturbed every year. It deserves mention, also, 
that when the returns are made from the one hundred and fourteen 
counties of the State, they are generally in such a crude and imper- 
fect state that about three months are consumed in correcting, con- 
densing and tabulating them for the report annually required from 
this office. You can easily conclude, how perplexing the work is of 
finally arranging and correcting returns which, directly and indirect- 
ly, come from the eight thousand directors, from about eighteen hun- 
dred township boards, and from one hundred and fourteen county 
clerks and county superintendents. 

In the annual report of labors and observations, required of me, I 
inciude the grateful work of visiting ^'teachers' institutes," education- 
al meetings and conventions, where were met together hundreds of 
citizens, to whom the interests of public schools were presented as of 
chief importance. About thirty weeks have been employed by myself 
and assistant, in attendance upon educational meetings, and, in that 
time, less than one-half the State was visited, it being my design to 
travel throughout the remaining portions the present year. One con- 
clusion, from extensive observations, is, that nowhere on the conti- 
nent is there more general and intelligent interest shown in the sub- 
ject of popular education, than in this State, with some localities to be 
excepted, but which cannot be mentioned without offense. As much 
cordial pride is exhibited in the rapid development of our free school 
system, as in the recounting of our material resources, or the repeti- 
tion of our flaming military history. 

Silently the work moves on. Gradually all opposition is dying 
out Local political antagonism is giving way. The chief obstacles 
yet to overcome, are the pride of wealth, which shrinks from the in- 
discriminate society of the free school, and the pride of selfishness, 
which grudges the small tribute which the law demands for the public 

good. 

STATE SCHOOL FUND. 



Amount inreited in United States 6-20'fl under act of Genef al Assembly, 1868. 

United States consols 

From sale of Tobacco Warehouse 

From Saline Fund 

From Internal Improrement Fund 

From Road and Canal Fund „ 

Amount invested in twenty Pacific Railroad Bonds 



$1,546,000 

17,950 

132,000 

3,5^ 

17,622 

5,333 

20,000 



7 
GENERAL STATISTIOS. 

Ximb«t ohUdnn in Stato between fiye tad twenty-oiie jun of age.. 

" children in public ichooli 

'' teechen in public echoole.....^ 

" public school! in 8tate...«M. 

" pablic school houses , 

Total Talue of school housee in Stflte*..«....«*. 

Total amount of Township Fund 

" " of State School Fund 

'^ " leried for school purpo8ee» 

" " paid for teacher's wages 



183,564 

7,100 

6,434 

6,040 

$l,071|g96 

1,911,922 

1,842,344 

1,803,403 

^ 780,307 14 



COMPAEATIVE STATISTIOS. 



ITunber of children in the State between fire and twenty-one years of 
age, 1867 

Number of children in the State between Are and twenty-one years of 

age, 1868 ^ .• - 

Increase 



Number children in public schools, 1867. 

Number children in public achoola, 1868. 

Increase 



Number of teachen in public schools, 1867. 

Number of teachers in public schools, 1868. 

Increase... 



Number public schools in State, 1867. 
Number public schools in State, 1868 
Increase..................^....... 



Number public school houses, 1867. 

Number public school houses, 1868. 

Increase < 



Total value of school houses in State, 1867. 

Total Talue of school houses in State, 1868. 

Increase 



Total amount Township Fund, 1867. 

Total amount Township Fund, 1868. 

Increase 



I M*.****** 



Total amount State School Fund, 1867. 

Total amount State School Fund, 1868. 

Increase 



Total amount levied for school purposoe, 1867. 

Total amount levied for school purposes, 1868. 

Increase...*............*....................... 



Total amount paid for teachers' 

Total amount paid for teachers' 

Increase • 



1867.. 

1868.. 



476,192 
544,664 



169,270 
183,564 



6,262 
7,100 



4,840 
6,434 



4,135 

6,040 



$1,480,729 
1,971,896 



978,073 
1,911,922 



1,687,074 
1,842,344 



870,650 
1,803,403 



641,974 
730,307 



1 



18^72 



14,294 



838 



1,594 



1,905 



$491,167 



933,849 



155,276 



932,753 



88,383 



TOWNSHIP SCHOOL FUND. 



The township school fand of this State had its origin in a propo- 
sition made by Congress to the convention, to determine on the for- 
mation of a Oonstitation for the State. The proposition is as follows : 
^^That section numbered sixteen, in every township, and when such 
section has been sold, or otherwise disposed of, other lands equiva- 



8 

ent thereto, and as contigaoas as may be, shall be granted to the 
State for the use of the inhabitants of such township, for the istse of 
schools." This proposition was accepted, and the convention which 
assembled at St. Louis on the 12th day of June, 1820, passed an ordi- 
nance to this eifect, which was finally signed on the 19th of July fol- 
lowing. Under this ordinance, and subsequent acts of Oongresst 
there has been granted to this State for school purposes 1,199,139 
acres of land, an amount had it been judiciously managed in each 
township, would have laid a foundation for a school fund, the annual 
income from which would constitute the schools free for at least six 
mouths in the year. Section 1, article 6, of the Constitution of 1820, 
conjLains the following provision: ^^Schools, and the means of educa- 
tion shall forever be encouraged in this State, and the General As- 
sembly shall take measures to preserve from waste or damage, such 
lands as have been, or hereafter may be granted by the United States, 
for the use of schools within each township in this State, and shall 
apply the funds which may arise from such lands in strict conformity 
to the object of the grant. One school, or more, shall be established 
in each township as soon as practicable and necessary, where the poor 
shall be taught gratis.'' 

Notwithstanding, the safeguards that have been thrown around the 
munificent provisions of Congress for our public schools, by the people 
in forming the Constitution, and of the acts of the Genend Assembly, 
many of the townships have lost the entire fund, and others have 
suffered greatly from the mismanagement of those who have bad 
charge of this matter. It was early enacted that the county should 
have charge of the township school fund belonging to each township, 
and all subsequent legislation has placed this fund under the care of 
the same guardianship, with the i)rovision that these moneys ^^shall 
be sejured by a mortgage in fee on real estate, free from liens and 
incumbrances within the county, of double the amount of the loan, 
etc.'' Had these funds been invested in accordanoe with the above en- 
actment, or in United States bonds as is further provided by law, 
much more would have been saved to the school fund than is now 
the case, yet, after all, the losses from unsafe investment and sales of 
lands prematurely, the township school fund amounts in the ag^e- 
gate to $1,911,922 39, with an annual income of nearly $200,000. 
Many of the counties of the State have not yet disposed of the school 
lands belonging to the townships, and as the lands in the State are 
constantly and steadily increasing in value from the great flow of im- 
migration, in a few years, these lands, if sold, will swell the township 
funds to about $3,000,000, with an annual income of $300,000, an 
amount greater by about $37,000, than was distributed last year to 
,the counties of the State, from the income of the State school fund. 

My attention has been called within the last year, to some irregu- 
larities committed in some of the counties, indisposing of the income. 



9 

from the township school funds. In a few- of the counties, the county 
courts have ordered that the school moneys be appropriated toward 
defraying the expense of building a court-house, or in defraying ex- 
penses entirely disconnected with school matters, and in other coun- 
ties, the indebtedness to the school fund has been allowed to be paid 
in county bonds, not bringing, in many instances, fifty cents on a dol- 
lar. In this way, these moneys have been diyerted from their original 
purpose, and the people living in such counties have great cause of 
complaint County courts should be made to understand that while 
they are the trustees of this fund, they have no right, either legal or 
moral, to appropriate any part of this fund, to any other than school 
purposes. If the law is not already sufScient to insure a right use of 
these funds, and to compel a return of all that has been misapplied, I 
would recommend that it be so amended, as to speedily reach those 
who have thus presumed to pervert this sacred gift, or in any way im- 
pair or diminish this rich inheritance, which our children and our 
children's children have a right to demand, should descend to them 
unimpaired. 

The foUowmg table carefully collated, exhibits the total of the 
township funds, in the counties therein named : 



Atcbiflon 

Audrain 

BoUin^r 

Boone 

Bachanan ; 

Camden 

Cape Qirardean 

Carroll 

Carter 

Christian 

Clay 

Cedar 

Crawford «, 

Cooper 

Dade 

Daviess 

Dent. 

Omndy 

Greene 

Harrison 

Henry 

Hickory 

Howard ..., 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Laclede 

Lawrence 

Lewis .'. 

Linn , 

Livingston „ , 

JIadison 

Ma^on , 

Mercer , 

MiUer ,., 

Honroe ; 

Morgan , 

New Madrid 

Osa^e , 

Pemiscot , 

Pettis 

Phelps ^ 



$ 6,242 49 

23,710 96 

300 00 

36,033 07 

4,903 10 

5,861 38 

8,161 29 

38,071 02 

60 00 

6,467 30 
13,125 80 

9,300 00 

7,426 13 
15,449 90 

5,308 44 
20,206 00 

5,253 04 
16,766 40 
18,765 17 
14,779 84 
24,231 
12,129 
16,277 
19,774 
31,612 
28,394 83 

5,282 53 

1,236 
45,680 

1,712 
25,000 

2,848 
37,091 34 
30,101 80 

9,170 
81>149 

7,399 

2,581 
10,675 60 

6,343 89 

7,192 30 

5,500 00 



75 
00 
39 
00 
95 



00 
11 
67 
76 
54 



20 
00 
00 
14 



10 



Pntnam m................ 

Perrj ^ 

RaUfl ^ 

JUadolph .••.•...•...•••... 

Bay 

BtOhirlM ^«..^ 

St. Francois 

Bte. GmeyieTe • 

St. Lonia , 

Sftline 

Schuyler .............•.••.•..•. , 

Scotland. ^.....^ 

Shelby 

Snlliran ^ » 

Wuren 

WMhington ^ >.*•••• » 

Worth, ,..,v....* 



13,003 OS 
19,S64 0« 
11,053 8C 
22,10S M 
23,270 W 
73,144 91 
21,3S6 04 
11,206 C8 
577,120 41 

9,790 es 

1,620 47 
10,068 6S 
20,893 81 

345 d 
15,740 n 
36,140 M 

40S3S 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE LANDS. 



The act of Congress, approved July 3,1862, donated to the several 
States, ten millions acres of public lands for the benefit of colleges of 
agriculture and the mechanic arts. Of this amount, three hundred 
and thirty thousand acres (330,000) were allotted to Missouri. 

It is not my desi^ to dwell, in general terms, even upon either 
the importance of this act, or the necessity of using our munificent 
gift to the best advantage, for the object contemplated. The practi- 
cal questions before this General Assembly are : 

Ist. Shall a college of agriculture and the mechanic arts be estab- 
Ushed as an independent institution, or_ in connection with the 
State University at Columbia ? 

2d. Is it better for this college, however established, that the 
lands now selected and registered, be permitted to remain unsold for 
the present, so that the increase of value on the available portions 
may, when finally sold, be such, as to form an endowment, sufficient 
to maintain the school generously. No small, or half-sufficient in- 
come will answer. It must be ample and unfailing in order to sustain 
a college of a character, such as the nature of our wants and the ca- 
pacity of our commonwealth require — ^with the college of agriculture 
is to be combined the department of the mechanic's arts, and if neces- 
sary, that of literature— ^classical and modem. To meet the require- 
ments of such an institution, with full scope for expansion, will re- 
quire a large board of instruction, consisting of not less than sixteen 
teachers — ^for the support of whom a large productive fund will be 
absolutely necessary — to say nothing of the expenditures contingent 
upon the supply of experimental apparatus. 

On the 28th of November last, I addressed a circular to the 
superintendents of the respective States, in which action has been 
taken, looking to the establishment of a college, as contemplated in 
tlie Congressional act of 1862. The following were the questions pro- 
posed in the circular : 

1. How much land was granted to your State to maintain a " col- 
lege of agriculture and the mechanic arts, by act of Congress, July 
2,1862? 

2. How much fund has been realized, (or will be realized) from 
the sale of the lands ? 

3. Will the fund, so realized, be sufficient to support the institu- 
tion, independent of State aid? 



12 

4. If established, is the college separate from any other institution 
of learning ? 

Replies from a number of the States have been received, a^ lol- 
lows: 

Massachosetts — Received three hundred and sixty thousand (360,- 
000) acres of land, from which a fund of two hundred and thirty-6ii 
thousand and three hundred and seven dollars ($236,307 00) was real- 
ized, of the income of this fund, two-thirds will go to the agricultural 
college, the other third to the Massachusetts Institute ot Technology. 
The fund is not sufficient to support the college, without aid from the 
State. The institution is separate, and located at Amherst, in the 
neighborhood of Amherst college. 

North Carolina — Has two hundred and seventy thousand acres 
(270,000.) Nothing has, as yet, been realized. The scrip has been 
sold, but under such circumstances that the trustees of the university 
declined to receive the proceeds. If the act under which it was 
sold is not invalidated, the university will realize $135,000. " By eo 
means," is the emphatic reply to the third question. No decision 
has yet been made, whether or not the college of agriculture shall be 
attached to the State University. • 

Nbw j£R8BT---Received two hundred and ten thousand acres, 
from the sale of which a fund of one hundred and ten thousand dol- 
lars ($110,0000,) was accumulated; but which is insufficient to main- 
tain the college in a suitable manner, The institution is connected 
with Rutger's College and Scientific School. 

Indiana— Received three hundred and ninety thousand (390,000 
acres, which have been sold for two hundred thousand dollars (S20C^ 
000), which is supposed to be much below the sum adequate to the 
support of an independent school, if such should be established. 

West Virchnia— Had a grant of one hundred and fifty thousand 
acres (150,000), for which only eighty-five thousand dollar (§S5,O0C) 
were received, an amount not quite sufficient to maintain the college. 
It asks now for legislative aid. It is separate and distinct from any other 
institution of learning. 

Kansas— Congress granted to this State ninety thousand acres 
(90,000). The endowment will amount to nearly three hundred and 
sixty thousand dollars ($360,000), which, if judiciously managed, will 
support the college. It is disconnected from any other institutioof 
and located at Manhattan. 

Minnesota — Received one hundred and twenty thousand acret, 
from the sale of which a fund was established, amounting to six hun- 
dred thousand dollars ($600,000). This income will be amply sufficient 
to maintain the college, which is a department of the State University. 

Michigan. — ^The agricultural college grant was two hundred and 
forty thousand acres (240,000). The land has been recently put into 
market ; but little, however, is yet sold. It is valued at two dollars 
and fifty cents per acre ; but many are in favor of reducing the price* 



18 

ivliich may be done, so that from the sale of the lands, a fund will be 
jeceived between four or five hundred thousand dollars. The lowest 
amount will be ample for its design. The college is distinct and pros- 
perouB, after eleven years of operation. 

OoNNEGTidTJT — Received one hundred and eighty thousand acres of 
J and (180,000), the representing which, was sold at seventy-five cents 
per acre, yielding the sum of one hundred and thirty thousand dollars 
($130,000). This sum is Invested in State bonds, at six per cent in- 
terest, and affords an annual income of eight thousand one hundred 
dollars (^,100). This income is not sufficient to support a school of 
agriculture and mechanic arts, independent of State aid. The fund, 
therefore, was placed in the hands of the commissioner of the school 
fiind, who is required, by law, to pay over the interest, semi-annually, 
to the presidjent and fellows of Yale College, who are to devote it 
wholly and exclusively to the maintenance of certain courses of in- 
struction, in that department of Yale OoUege, known a^ the ^^Sheffield 
Scientific School." 

Kentuckt — ^Located three hundred and thirty thousand acres of 
land (330,000), which were sold at great sacrifice by an agent appointed 
by the Legislature, and only fifty cents per acre realized ($165,000). 
The Agricultural College is part of the State University. It is fully 
organized, having two hundred students for the last two years. 

Illinois — Received four hundred and eighty thousand acres. The 
land is not yet all sold, but, at present, the sales have yielded over 
two hundred and fifty thousand dollars ($250,192 60). The hope is ex- 
pressed, by the president, that the whole amount, when finally in- 
vested, will be ample to sustain the college without State aid. It is dis- 
tinct from any other institution. 

Ohio. — The whole amount of lands granted to this State, was six 
hundred and twenty-nine thousand nine hundred and twenty acres 
(629,920). It has all been sold for three hundred and forty-two thou- 
sand four hundred and fifty dollars ($342,450 80). This sum has been 
invested in six per cent stocks. The college has not been established, 
nor any plan, concerning it, determined. 

Wisconsin — Received two hundred and forty thousand acres (240,- 
000). The fund, thus far realized, is only fourteen thousand four hun- 
dred and eighty-eight dollars ($14,488 40) ; but the lands are selected, 
and it is anticipated that a large fund will be accumulated, sufficient 
to support the college, without further aid. The fund has been given 
to the State University, an4 an agricultural department connected 
therewith. Forty thousand dollars were given by the county con- 
taining the university, with which an experimental farm was pur- 
chased, adjoining the college grounds. 

Pennsylvania— From a donation of seven hundred and eighty thou- 
sand (780,000) acres of land, received four hundred and thirty-nine 
thousand one hundred and eighty-six dollars ($439,186 80). The State 
has also given some one hundred and fifty thousand doUarA (^iSOfiOO) 



u 

to the Agricultaral College, and, unless differently managed in the 
future, the income from its present fund will not be sufficient to sup- 
port it. The college is distinct from any other institution of learning. 
Iowa — Received two hundred and forty thousand acres (240,000)l 
The scrip was located within the State, by an agent, whom the trustees 
appointed, and the lands have since been offered for sale or for lease. 
The plan of leasing for ten years has been preferred. The lands se- 
lected are valued at four hundred and eighty thousand dollars ($480,- 
000). The Agricultural College is distinct from any other institution, 
with a farm of 640 acres, and buildings, valaed at one hundred and 
eleven thousand dollars ($111,000). 

Martlakb — ^From the sale of two hundred and ten thousand acres 
of land (210,000;, received but one hundred and five thousand dollars 
($105,000). This amount was assigned to the agricultural college, 
already in existence, yielding an income of six thousand dollais 
($6,000). The Secretary of State adds that it is doubtful, as to the 
competent support of the institution from this income, that the col- 
lege is distinct from other schools. ^But the best agriculturists and 
educators are dissatisfied. The prophecy is that the State will sink 
$100,000, and then the college will go under. It cannot thrive as a 
purely agricultural school. 

New York— Received nine hundred and ninety thousand (990,000) 
acres in scrip, valued at one million dollars ($1,000,000). The Legis- 
lature, in 1865, devoted this national grant to the endowment of ^Oo^ 
nell University," at Ithaca. It is an institution combining the fea- 
tures of general education, with a school of agriculture and the 
mechanic arts. In 1824, the scientific school of Troy, afterward named 
Rensellaer Institute, was opened. From this institute, for thirty 
years, went out more State geologists, principals and assistant engi- 
neers, practical chemists, naturalists, and scientific professors, than 
from all the colleges in the Union for the same period. The school of 
agriculture was unsuccessful. 

OALiFORiaA — ^The share of this State amounts to one hundred and 
fifty thousand acres of land. The proposition is favorably considered 
of locating the "college of agriculture, mining and the mechanical 
arts," at Oakland, and also, to make here the foundation of the State 
University. 

The national grant to Missouri was three hundred and thirty 
thousand acres, which, on account of a portion having been selected 
by the commissioners along the line of the South Pacific railroad, was 
reduced to two hundred and eighty thousand acres (280,000). One 
year ago, these lands were valued at three hundred and thirty-six 
thousand dollars ($336,380). The Register of Lands, in a communica- 
tion to me, of date, January 16, 1869, says, that "since February 5, 
1868, 1 am safe in estimating an increase of twenty-five per cent in 
the valuation of the lands along the line of the South Pacific railroad. 



15 



Two conclnsions force themselves upon us after a careful review 
of the history of agricultural education in this country. First, that 
the policy of establishing distinct colleges of agriculture was discour- 
aged in. the eastern portions of the Union, but was followed generally 
in the west Second, that as the failures of this class of institutions 
-wslb chiefly owing to InsufGiGient support, the General Assembly 
should not be in haste to add Missouri to the list of failures. Our lands 
are rapidly improving in value, and must so continue, and; however 
strong the inducements to sell them may be for the interest of immi- 
gration, yet the vital interest of agricultural education, dictates the 
contrary. I recommend that the lands be suffered to lie unsold for 
the present, that legislation be had to protect such as are timbered 
from injury. All experience testifies that it is unwise and unprofit- 
able to authorize the establishment of such a school as is contem- 
plated by the national grant, until the capital fund shall afford a cer- 
tain income of at least thirty thousand dollars. 



SCHOOLS FOR TEA-CHOERS. 



NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

The growth of ideas is slow. Those which tmd^rlie the institih 
tions of our commonwealth have had development, through iDcessant 
opposition. The maxims — which are spiritual powers — which regulate 
legislation and determine the institutions of a community are few, 
and take long time to impress themselves. We may be permitted to 
call the idea of normal school as a State idea, the legitimate child of a 
community which boasts its foundation upon popular intelUgence and 
virtue. The round of connection between them is easily reached. 
The prosperity of the commonwealth is proportionate to the aggregate 
intelligence and virtue of the people, and owes to itself the duty of 
providing for its prosperity. A thorough system of public instruction 
is the best means ever devised for that end. All intelligent observers 
concede the fact, and experience certifies it. Yet a system of public 
instruction cannot be, from its character, thorough nor successful, 
except as the teachers are thorough, well-trained and permanent^ 
that is, who seek the business of teaching for a life-business. Hence^ 
the necessity of the means by which they may signify their devotion 
to the work, and by which they may be trained and prepared. 

To any person, who thinks upon the relation of the teacher to the 
pupil and the State, the necessity for their thorough preparation 
becomes evident, and any remarks to that effect, it seems to me, are 
unnecessary and unprofitable. Besides, while it is quite easy to de- 
monstrate the material benefit and practicability of a railroad, it is not 
so easy when we wish to show how these are produced by an imx>rove- 
ment of popular education. It would then be requisite, to show how 
difficult is the art of teaching, how much knowledge of mind and of 
means are indispensable to a correct understanding and practice. It 
would be necessary, to make exposure of how little is generally un- 
derstood, concerning the branches of instruction prescribed in the 
law, as to the best methods of teaching them. I pass it by as an un- 
grateful task, and address myself to a discussion of the subject in 
other relations. In April, of 1868, the Missouri Association of Teach- 
ers met in St. Louis, and, after a discussion of the subject of normal 



I 



17 

schools, adopted a report prepared by the committee for that purpose, 
the substance of which is a summary of reasons^ for the necessity of 
such schools. This document is contained in the reports of this 
department, hitherto published, but is again presented in deference to 
the wishes of that body, that their collective views upon the subject 
may be known to you : 

"1. There is an obvious distinction between the ability to ac- 
quire knowledge and the ability to communicate it. Again, there is 
difference in modes of communication. A man may be very learned, 
and able, moreover, to express his knowledge in rigid, scientific 
forms, while he is utterly unable to explain anything so that a child 
can understand it; the teacher, however, must, above all, be able 
to translate his knowledge into the form adapted to the youthful 
mind. The normal school is the only school that professes to attempt 
this art 

^^2. The history of education is made a special object of investiga- 
tion in the normal school. All past experience is thoroughly dis* 
cussed, and the cause of success or failure set forth. It is seen that 
eminent teachers, of all times, have lollowed, essentially, the same 
method. It is further seen that this method involves the waking up 
all the faculties to activity ; how to stimulate the mind to self-activity 
in the proper manner; how to govern the school in accordance with 
the spirit of our national idea,by training the pupil to self-government ; 
how to avoid those evil customs that have rendered the name peda- 
gogue odious from time immemorial; to teach these, constitutes the 
business of a normal school. 

^^3. The thorough indoctrination, in their true principles, of in- 
struction, saves a long and unfortunate experience, unfortunate for the 
scholars, who are practiced on for the teacher's benefit; unfortunate 
for the teacher, who is forced to waste his time in groping about in 
the dark for that knowledge of method which he might have acquired 
at the normal school. 

"4. The same sentiment that refuses to place confidence in the 
uneducated lawyer or physician, should refuse to intrust the children 
of the community to the care of the empiric, to serve as waste mate- 
rial, upon which he experiments, while learning the art of teaching." 

Since 1S35 (in which year the first normal school was established 
in Prussia), they have rapidly increased throughout the enlightened 
countries pt Europe. In 1839, the first normal school in the United 
States was established in Massachusetts. The historical fact of the 
establishment and multiplication of such schools would, of itself, be 
of little interest to us. But there is one view of the fact which has a 
philosophical aspect, like any other great fact in the economical laws 
of human progress. It seems, wherever the demand for such institu- 
tions became manifest, that it was recognized and supplied. It is not 
probable that the governments of Europe would have adopted the 
2 s R 



18 

policy of training teachers for the public instrnction, tinless they 
clearly saw the reflex advantage to their safety, stability and dignity. 
Leaving out any question as to the increase of happiness to the peo- 
ple, as not generally supposed to weigh much in governmental insti- 
tutions, we are at liberty to suppose that the normal school was con- 
sidered an indispensable servant of the State. With us the first 
question is the advancement and happiness of the people ; as these 
are secured, so is the proportional security and dignity of the State; 
and it is a maxim of statesmanship, that the imperative duty of the 
peoples' representatives is to omit no policy, no institution, no e^ocial 
plan, no law which the people may require and support. On this 
ground, the necessity of the normal school may be placed. It does 
minister to the stability of the State, the enlightenment and happi- 
ness of the people. The best examples of such facts are admitted to 
be those which have survived the period of their experiment; and, 
having been tested by time and every rule which determines the 
public utility of all plans, they become historical truths — counselors 
through which the past speaks to the present. 

Rev. Dr. Ryerson, of Canada, in an able report on the system and 
state of public education in Europe and the United States, dwells 
upon the manifest failure of the magnificent systems of public schools 
to produce the results intended. There is, somewhere, a deficiency— 
a continual barrier to the application of the benefits of the school 
funds to their best advantage. The inference is that there may be a 
complete school system, a vast machinery of schools, and yet num- 
bers of youth not educated at all, and of those who attend the 
schools, many learn very little, and that very imperfectly. Discuss- 
ing the causes of imperfection in the American system, he attributes 
it chiefly to the want of qualiXoationa of teachers. There cannot be 
a good school, without a good teacher. There must, then, be provis- 
ion against the employment of ill-qualified teachers, and for securing 
good ones." The remedy proposed, is the establishment of a system 
of normal schools, so complete that every rural district can be sup- 
plied with a trained teacher. There is but slight advantage in niulti- 
plying quotations from authorities as to the utility and necessity of 
such institutions. If they are not self evident, then nothing is. 

To be as brief and practical as possible. I propose the subjoined 
plan of normal schools for consideration by the General Assembly — 
believing it to be, in its main features, best adapted to this State : 

Divide the State into six Normal DistrictSyeach one embracing the 

number of counties as follows : 

First Normal District — The counties of Atchison, Holt, Buchan- 
an, Platte, Nodaway, Andrew, Worth, Gentry, DeEalb, Clinton, Clay 
Harrison, Daviess, Caldwell, Ray, Mercer, Grundy, Livingston, and 
Carroll. 



19 

Second Normal District — ^The counties of Putnam, Sullivan, Linn, 
Chariton, Schuyler, Adair, Macon, Randolph, Scotland, Knox, Shelby 
Monroe, Clark, Lewis, Marion, Ralls, and Pike, 

Third Normal District — The counties of Howard, Boone, Moni- 
teau, Cole, Audrain, Callaway, Osage, Montgomery, Gasconade, Lin- 
coln, Warren, Franklin, St. Charles, and St. Louis. 

Jt^ourth Normal District — The counties of Jackson^ Cass, Bates, 
Lafayette, Johnson, Henry, St Clair, Saline, Pettis, Benton, Hickory, 
Cooper, Morgan, Miller, and Camden. 

Fifth Normal District — ^The counties of Vernon, Barton, Jasper, 
Newton, McDonald, Cedar, Dade, Lawrence, Barry, Polk, Greene, 
Christian, Stone, Taney, Dallas, Webster, Laclede, Wright, Douglas, 
Ozark, Pulaski, Texas, and Howell. 

Sixth Normal District — ^The counties of Maries, Phelps, Dent, 
Shannon, Oregon, Crawford, Washington, Iron, Reynolds, Carter, Rip- 
ley, Jefferson, St. Francois, Madison, Wayne, Butler, Ste. Genevieve, 
Bollinger, Stoddard, Dunklin, Perry, Cape Girardeau, Scott, New Mad- 
rid, Mississippi, and Pemiscot. 

This division of the State into districts, is neither abitrary nor po- 
litical, but is dictated by the experience of every state and country, 
wherein a system of such schools is maintained. It is manifest that on^ 
school for the State is entirely insufficient ; else the excellent college 
now in operation at the site of the State University, would supply all 
necessity. The leading states in Europe and in this government have,, 
after careful experiment, adopted the multiple system, instead of the 
single school. Maine sustains two normal schools; Massachusetts,, 
with an area of 7,800 square miles, and a population of 1,231,066, has 
four; Rhode Island, with a population of 174,620, has one; Pennsyl- 
vania, with a population of 2,906,115, has four; Wisconsin, with a pop- 
ulation of 775,881, has two, (and preparations are being made to es- 
tablish two more) ; New York has six, with more in process of com- 
pletion ; Canada East, with a population of 1,111,566, has three. The 
basis of this multiplicate system, is either the ntimber of school dis- 
tricts, or the enumeration of educable youth, in a given area, usually^ 
an enumeration ot twenty-five or thirty thousand pupils, to each 
school, to whom a force of three hundred and fifty, or four hundred 
teachers may, in the course of time, be supplied annually. The reflex, 
benefits of such a corps of well-trained teachers, upon the prosperity 
of the State, is incalculable. 

Whenever a Normal School is to he established in any District^.to- 
be subject to th% following conditions^ vis: 

(1.) The State Board of Education, together with the Governor 
to be anthorized to receive bids for the location, of the school^ fromk 
the counties in the respective districts. 



20 

(2.) In every case the county in wbiah a Normal School is loca- 
ted to give a site, healthy and accessible; to erect a building capable 
ot accommodating a number of pupil teachers, equal to the number 
of districts in the Normal Di8trict\ to provide all needful furniture, 
books, apparatus, etc. 

(3.) When two or more counties compete for the location of the 
8cho.)I, all the bids to be referred to the Senate, at its next session^ 
for final decision. 

The State Board of Education consists of the Superintendent of 
Public Schools, Secretary ol State, and the Attorney General, and 
with the Governor, may bo constituted a permanent board of Com- 
missioners, for the purpose indicated. Kemoved entirely by virtue 
of their respective position, from local preferences, their action ought 
to be disinterested, and for the welfare of the Commonwealth. Al- 
though this is admitted, a sense of personal safety dictates the policy 
of referring for final decision to the State Senate, whenever two or 
more propositions are sent to the Board of Commissioners. 

It should be distinctly stated in any law, recognizing this plan, 
l^iat no proposal should be entertained for a building to cost less than 
forty thousand dollars, with capacity for acccommodating at leasi 
five hundred pupil teachers ; to be erected upon designs approved by 
the board of commissioners; abundantly supplied with the requisite 
furniture and apparatus, and easily accessible from the different por 
tions of the district. 

All Normal Schools to he subject as follows: 

(1.) A Board of Directors, — one from each county in the Dis- 
trict, — who shall be a body corporate, with the usual powers ; to make 
all regulations necessary for the due protection of the property and 
the welfare of the school ; to employ and dismiss all teachers, and de- 
termine salaries, etc., and by means of an Executive GommitUey to 
annually inspect and to report to the General Assembly the condition 
of the school; to grant certificates of qualification to graduates, 
which may entitle them to a diploma from the President of the State 
Umversity. 

(2.) To be exclusively for the training of teachers. 

(3.) Tuition to be absolutely free. 

(4.) To admit no person without a certificate of second grade 
from the County Superintendent, of the county in which he or she is 
resident 

(5.) All graduates to teach at least two years in the" public 
schools of the State. 

(6.) To have a model school attached. 

Relative to the Board of Directors, it is an open question whether 
the custody of the schools herein contemplated, may not better be 
confided to one Board of Regents, selected in the same manner as 



21 

the Curators of the State University, and composed of twelve mem- 
bers, two from each district, with the State Board of Education Ex- 
oflScio. The duties of superintending, inspecting, employing teachers, 
conferring honors, etc., can easily be performed by one board for six 
schools, and the only advantage of a separate Board of Directors for 
each school, is that the expense attendant upon their duties, may be 
borne by the counties composing the District. 

It is suggested here, that graduates of these schools may be en- 
titled to a diploma, from the President of the University, and with 
special propriety, because the University is, and in its proper char- 
acter, must become and be acknowledged, the crown of the public 
school system, of which the normal school is an intermediate chain. 
Besides it is presumed that the college of Normal Instruction at the 
University, am^ly supported by the state, will afford a higher degree 
of instruction, than it is profitable to offer in the other schools. It 
should and doubtless will become a professional center, when the»art 
and philosophy of education are presented in the highest degree of 
culture, and established a grade above the normal schools, attract 
such teacher from their classes, who desire to become fully accom- 
plished. 

It is certainly desirable, that such institutions, should be exclu- 
sively used for the instruction of teachers. The testimony of other 
states is, that where admission is allowed indiscriminately, the schools 
become the instruments for the private advantage of the mana- 
gers. If the General Assembly may determine to adopt this plan, 
then the schools to be authorized, should be so amply provided for, 
as to take away from instructors, the necessity of self-support, other- 
wise the State will fail to gain the advantage expected and due. It 
is also desirable, that all persons admitted, should have passed an ex- 
amination before the County Superintendent, because the principal 
design of a normal school, is not to give instruction ah initio^ to stu- 
dents in the common school branches, but, rather to give attention 
to methods of teaching these, and to whatever else pertains to the art 
of teaching. Otherwise, the course of study must be greatly pro- 
tracted, and the public schools needlessly deprived of teachers from 
these institutions. 

The State^ when the above conditions are complied with^ 

(1.) To pay $ annually, in quarterly installments, upon 

order of the Treasurer of the Board of Directors. 

(2) To authorize the State Board of Education to cause an in- 
spection every year of the various schools, and to report thereof to the 
General Assembly. 

(3.) To require suflScient security from the Treasurers of the re- 
spective Boards of Directors. 



32 

* In the plan here proposed, it is assumed that the State will take 
upon itself no pecuniary responsibility, only so far as to control the 
selection of boards of instruction, and to provide for their support. 
No expense incurred in the erection of the buildings, the provision of 
furniture and apparatus, the purchase and adornment of grounds, is 
to be chargeable to the State treasury. Nothing but the support of 
the board of instruction is to be assumed by the State. But I know, 
herein lies the only objectior which can reasonably be urged against 
the adoption of the proposed plan, and yet, the State can take upon 
itself this further charge without any increase of taxation. 

1. By virtue of the provisions of the acts of Congress March 2d, 
1855, March 3d, 1857, and March 12th, 1860, the State of Missouri is en- 
titled to indeninity for swamp lands sold and absorbed by land war- 
rants since September 28, 1850. Where the lands have been entered 
with land warrants the State receives other lands, and where sold for 
cash, the money ir to be paid over to the State. It is ascertained, by 
examination of the records oi the Land Office at Washington, that the 
cash claim will amount to at least $250,000, and the land indemnity 
to 100,000 acres. If the General Assembly will set apart thia indem- 
nity as the nucleus of abnormal fund," the experiment of teachers' 
schools will be at last successful, after sp many vain efforts. Or, if 
this is thought to be impracticable, let the whole body of public lands 
in the State yet unsold, if obtained from Congress, ordered for sale, 
and fifty per cent, of the proceeds converted to the same fund ; and 
in a short time there will be established a permanent and increasing 
capital, the income of which will be sufficient to maintain the normal 
schools. 

2. If the act, based upon this plan, shall be passed, it is probable 
that one school, at least, may be established during the next year; 
and in order to provide for it, and at the same time give encourage- 
ment to the further establishment of the schools, it is recommended 
that an appropriation be made of five thousand dollars annually, from 
the State treasury, for such school when established, in accordance 
with the terms of the act. This is a small amount, but it is supposed 
that it can be considerably increased from the proceeds of the insti- 
tutions themselves. Besides the amount apportioned is now small, 
because these schools will not be immediately established. We will 
be more fortunate than other States, in which the policy of volunta- 
ry building on the part of the people has been pursued, if one school 
each year is begun, and at the time the sixth is decided upon, it is 
certain that all of them can be maintained from the proceeds of the 
-normal fund. 

The chief argument for normal schools, proceeds from the posi- 
tive and permanent benefit they bestow upon the best interests of 
the State. If this is not manifest, without discussion, it cannot be 
juade BO in a volume of discussion. The mind of the commonwealth 



23 



18 its highest and most enduring wealth, compared with its mountains 
of ore and miles of railroads, are utterly insignificant. A State in- 
habited and governed by the highest number of intelligent and vir- 
tuous citizens, has the chief place in all the constellation. If then, 
its republican institutions are not made perpetual, they cannot, by 
any known means, be made perpetual. If then, the widest and deep- 
est prosperity of the State be not secured, it cannot be made certain. 
Aside from every other consideration, the State owes to itself the duty 
of taking care, that its youthful citizens be made intelligent and vir- 
tuous. Intelligent teachers, make intelligent pupils, and enforce the 
precepts of virtue taught in the house; and to make teachers mielli- 
genty in a complete sense^ is the work and object of the normal 
sehooL 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 



OF 



PDBLIC EDUCATION IN MISSOURI 



"Some books," says Lord Bacon, "are to be tasted, some to be 
swallowed, while others are to be chewed and digested." In the first 
class must be included this sketch of public education in MissourL 
At the best^ the taste is dry and dusty. 

There are no rich juices in the government archives. The ma- 
terial of historical merit must be taken out of the dust laid in the 
sunlight and fumigated, before it can be offered to the discriminating 
taste of your honorable body. But few persons, I am aware, will feel 
interested in the subject presented, one taste will be sufficient for the 
many. Notwithstanding this, the work requisite has been prosecuted 
with pleasure. Volume after volume of dusty journals nave been 
patiently examined, and the judgments and errors of our predecessors 
carefully scrutinized* Whoever studies them will construct his own 
philosophy upon them ; yet, he cannot be wrong who condenses the 
past into one sentence: The struggle of libe7*ty and labor with sla- 
very. The few who may read it in the time to come will feel some 
interest in tracing the slow development of educational forces. I say, 
in the time to (j(?m«, because, recollecting the hopeful words of Kepler, 
"I can well afford to wait more than forty years for a reader, since this 
subject has waited more than forty years for some one to give it 
form." 

"Religion, morality and knowledge being necessary to good gov- 
ernment and the happiness of mankind, schools, and the means of 
education, shall be encouraged and provided for from the public lands 
ot the United States in the said territory, in such manner as Congress 
may deem expedient." 

We cannot conceive a more generous proclamation concerning 
the dignity and character of government than is contained in the 
above order of Congress. It is found in the organic act of 1812, by 
which the territory of Missouri was erected from that of Louisiana, 
and its temporary government organized. It was the manifest design 
of Congress to endow the future States established within its terri- 
tory with grants of public lands, so ample in domain, and so safely 
secured from any Legislative proscriptions, that the means of educa- 
tion should be provided without further local taxation, and offered to 



:5 

every child in the commonwealth. In pursuance of this desi^, the 
act authorizing the people of Missouri territory to form a Constitution 
and State government, containing, first of all others, the following 
proposition : "Section numbered sixteen, in every township, and 
when such township has been sold or otherwise disposed of, other 
lands equivalent thereto, and as contiguous as may be, shall be granted 
to the State for the use of the inhabitants of such township, for the 
use of schools." If the prudent and liberal spirit of the general gov- 
ernment had been properly appreciated, and this noble gift of land, 
amounting to over 1,208,12<) acres of land, at the time the State was 
established in 1820, as prudently and wisely husbanded, the public 
schools might now be supported from the proceeds of the various 
school funds, without the necessity of resort to private taxation. A 
moderate estimate of the income which should be now available, is 
$o46,476, an amount suflBcient to pay ninetv per cent, of the expen- 
ditures necessary to maintain the public schools. The consequence 
of the policy of the General Assembly in remitting the custody ot 
this great trust to the courts of the respective counties, is a loss of 
Aftyper cent, upon the honest valuation of the lands. 

It is impossible for the most impartial judgment to find apol ogy 
for this destructive policy of the founders of our commonwealth. We 
observe from their proceedings, that the utmost care was bestowed 
upon all material and social interests, all that wise legislation could 
do for the security of life and liberty, was done. The agricultural, 
mechanical, and commercial interests of the commonwealth were fos- 
tered and protected. Protection was granted to a ludicrous extent 
against the possibility of invading any person's religious enjoyment, 
but not a word was written in support of the right and privileges of 
education. It was the only economical subject ignored throughout 
the history of the territory. 

During the interval from 1813 to 1820, the General Assembly of 
the territory of Missouri met every year. Laws relating to rights and 
measures, tq courts and practice at law, a full code of criminal jurispru- 
dence, banks, elections, revenue, slaves, census, counties, and to other 
canonical subjects were enacted, but during that same interval not 
one act appears upon the pages of the statutes providing for the edu- 
cation of the people. 

It may seem absurd to charge either apathy or neglecb upon leg- 
islative bodies so apparently insignificant as far as their representa- 
tive capacity is concerned. The inhabited portion of the territory 
was comparatively small, more properly, the population sparse, and 
adventurers was scattered over a wide extent ot country. One coun- 
ty included an area of about twenty thousand square miles. In 1813, 
when the territory of Louisiana become that of Missouri, there were but 
five counties erected and organized, but they were all except St. Louis 
of enormous extent. The five counties then existent, were respect- 
ively named St. Charles, St. Louis, Ste. Genevieve, Cape Girardeau, 
and New Madrid. 

The ^'seats of justice" have the same name as the counties, and in 
addition to the honor of being the capital towns^ they represent also 
the type of intelligence and the degree of social and religious ad- 
vancement. With few exceptions, the customs and manners and 
modes of living were of the most primitive character. The inhabi- 
tants were chiefly descended from the French adventurers, who had 
pushed their way from Canada and the interminable forests and 
wastes of the vast southwest to the banks of Missouri. A hardy, 
brave and adventurous race, as little careful of the material interests 



26 

of community, so long as the river and the vast forests tempted them 
with abundant game, and prodigal of life, so long as the Indians, not 
yet dispossessed of their titles, contested them with murderous perti- 
nacity. Secure under the parapets of government posta, they lived 
unconscious of the boundless wealth deposited throughout their am- 
ple territory, and, so gradually emerged from the childhood of a pro- 
tectorate to the maturity of a commonwealth in the United States. 

The first General Assembly of the new territory, met in obedi- 
ence to the order of Congress, on the first Monday in JDeceniber, ISli 
in the town of St. Louis. The organic act provided that the number 
of representatives in the assembly should be one for every five hun- 
dred white male inhabitants, until the number increased to twenty- 
five. It is reasonable to conclude,that the legislature was composed 
ot twenty-one members. 

The habits, character and enlightenment of a. people are aptlj 
mirrored in their laws. The prevalent evils which afflict the general 
community, the peculiarities of society exhibited iu all public and 
private relations ; the interests which in gradual succession are de- 
veloped in the growth of the people, the predominant opinion upon 
matters of religious conscience, the recognition of perso;nal rights 
and liberties, and their protection through the institute of justice and 
equity, the average intelligence and culture of a community, may 
all be more or less faithfully discovered in the laws sanctioned bv a 
State. In the study of the laws passed by the General Assembly 
above mentioned, it is no difficult task to discover the prevalent ideas, 
opinions and intelligence of the constituency they represented. In 
the fragmentary code they adopted, we find pre-eminence given to 
the institution and practice of such courts of law as wpre best adapt- 
ed to their state of society, particularly such as would prevent any 
forcible entry into any of tneir land, tenements, or other possessions. 
The proprietorship of land became an object of legal protection, and 
the methods by which personal rights ana ownership should be main 
tained, employed the most of their legislation. Security and peace 
of communities it is presumed were constantly exposed to danger. 

Those who may be anxious to know how the public virtues of fru- 
gality in the expenditures were practiced in th^ purer days of the 
Republic, may be gratified by a glance at the appropriations made 
by the Oeneral Assembly of 1813. 

''There shall be paid to Pierre Chouteau, for a room by him furn- 
ished the Hnuse of Representatives, in December last, twelve dollarsL 
To Charles Lauquenette, for two rooms furnished for the use of the 
present General Assembly, the sum of ninety-six dollars. To Thomas 
S. Roddick, for stationery furjiished the present General Assembly, 
and House of Representatives, in December last, to be paid out of 
the first money that may be in the treasury, the sum of thirty-nine 
dollars and sevety-five cents. 

"For printing the laws, passed at the present session, not exceeding 
three hundred dollars. To Andrew Scott, the sum of two dollars 
twelve and a half cents for articles furnished the present General 
Assembly. To J. T. Garnieo for a blank-book, ink stand, ink powder, 
and quills, five dollars and sixty five cents, and to Joseph^ Charless for 
printing ^one for the Legislature, fifteen dollars." 

As before remarked, all the interests which then pertained to the 
welfare of community were encouraged and protected, except the 
indispensable interest of popular education. Throughout the forma- 
tive period, in which population oalled immigration, advanced from 



27 

the centers and military posts, pushing further and further the out- 
posts of victorious civilization, we can distinctly trace the elements 
and various business of society, developing in regular sequence, and 
requiring according to their importance the shield of the law. By 
degrees the front of the 3|oung community^ was extended wherever en- 
terprise or self-interest Kd. New counties were carried out of the 
original counties ; mile after mile of the dense forest were filled, 
lengthening roads, connected the centers of trade with the previous 
posts, hamlets and towns increased rapidly in population and extent. 
Step by step, the first rulers of the soil gave way, the haunts of bar- 
barism became the homes of civilization. Its strong hands broke the 
veils of ancient night, as the case in the slow progress of any 
people, whenever any interest became important or prominent, the 
power of law was invoked to give to it stability and protection. 

Withal, it is not a little remarkable, that no act appears upon the 
territorial statute books, by which the general estimate of the im- 
portant subject of education mi^ht be judged. 

To conclude, however, that this subject was entirely ignored would 
be erroneous. In 1808, an act to incorporate the Trustees of the Ste. 
Genevieve Academy was passed. 

The two notable provisions in the act are: "First, that an 
institution for the education of females should be established by the 
trustees, as soon as the funds of the academy will admit of it; and, 
second, that the trustees shall cause, at all times, the French and 
English languages to be taught in the said academy." 

In 1817, an act was passed authorizing the commissioners of the 
courthouse and jail of the county of Cape Girardeau, to convey a 
certain quantity of land in the town of Jackson to commissioners for 
the use of erecting a school house; and in the same year, 
William Clark, William C. Carr, Tliomas H. Benton, Bernard Pratte, 
Auguste Chouteau, Alexander McMair, and John P. Oabaune, were 
incorporated a "^ board of trustees for superintending schools in the 
the town of St. Louis." A liberal grant of rights and jurisdiction 
was made to this board. The law was compact, but comprehensive 
in general, and in some respects, has not been improved b^ late 
legislation. In the same year, an act was passed, locating and mcor^ 
porating an acadamy at Potosi, Washington county. The preamble 
of this institution informs us that the enterprising inhabitants of this 
county had built, and :n part, finished two houses for the education 
of youth, and to supplement such beneficent design, the Legislature, 
^^at that session," gave the trustees authority to raise by lottery, four 
thousand dollars. There were some peculiar provisions in this char- 
ter; one of which made the payment of five dollars, a pre-requisite 
to voters tor trustees by the academy. It was divided into what was 
termed senior and junior branches, and in the junior branch, the first 
principles of literature, with reading, writing, and arithmetic, as far 
as the rule of three was to be taught. 

The inquiry, naturally arises, why alone of all the primal laws, 
which underlie republican government, the one of general free 
education, was neglected or at least greatly depreciated. It could not 
have been, because its importance was not considered, for it was 
made prominent among the grand principles proposed by the organic 
act of 1812, as the basis of a free commonwealth. It could not have 
been for want of funds, because the income from general taxes largely 
exceeded the frugal expenditures ot the territorial government. 

Whatever view may be taken by those interested, two considera- 
tions will force themselves upon us : 



28 

Ist. That from immigration especially the population of the Ter- 
ritory had increased sixl^ thousand in 1820^ that the Territorial limite 
were extended thousands of square miles during that interval, the 
number of counties doubled, and the representation in the Qeneral 
Assembly grown from seventeen to forty-one members. 

2d. That the predominance of an e< c'esiasticism, whose genius 
has always opposed a theory of public education, with absolute free- 
dom from sectarian influence, and hence, the manifest preference for 
an academy or seminary in every town, as soon as it had a legal ex- 
istence, and gave promise of stability and growth. 

In 1820, March 1st, an act of Congress was passed, to authorize 
the people ol Missouri Territory to form a Constitution to admit the 
new State into the Union and to prohibit slavery in certain territory. 
At the time, there were sixteen counties erected and duly organized, 
rapidly inceasing in population, and wealth. They were, as follows: 
Howard, Cooper, Montgomery, Pike, Lincoln, St Louis, St. Charles^, 
Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Ste. Genevieve, Madison, Cape Gir- 
ardeau, New Madrid, Wayne, and Lawrence. By the most careful 
enumeration, we find there were sixty thousand inhabitants. The 
geographical boundaries of the new State included an area of about 
70,000 square miles. At first the metaliferous section of the State was 
occupied not so much, perhaps, from inducements therein oflfered, as 
from considerations of security from hostile Indians; but it is notable 
that as soon as government treaties gave protection, the adventurous 
immigrants pushed by the pioneer lodged in the fortresses of the 
southeastern hills, and along the banks of the Mississippi, and crrasped 
the fertile agricultural districts along the valleys of the Missouri. 
This secured, and its exhaustless resources tested the question, as to 
the establishment, of a commonwealth of imperial proportions was 
forever answered. One of the basis of permanent structure for a 
Government was laid at once: The other two, commerce and 
manufactures, being later and slower in settling to their foundation. 

As is well known in the history of this country, Missouri entered 
upon its course as a State, in the wake of a profound agitation of sec- 
tional antagonism. The power of free labor was effective only to pre- 
vent the admission of this state except upon a compromise, which 
was understood to be merely an armistice, during whicn to make 
greater preparations. Unfortunately, the majority of the inhabitants 
of the State, preferred to continue the system of slavery, which had 
been fastened upon it by its pioneer settlers, and strengthened by 
legislation, for many years. First, of all the states, a clause was in- 
troduced in to the Constitution, which was adopted in 1820, prohibiting 
the General Assembly from intermeddling with the subject of slavery, 
except to provide a proper police for its defence. It is remarkable to 
observe the unjust prominence, which was given to the species of 
property, both in the organic act, and in subsequent legislation. 

From the beginning, when by this decree of the people, the new 
commonwealth took position with the slave states ; any other interest, 
general and particular, was subordinated to its safety and prosperity. 
On the nineteenth day of July, 1820, the convention concluded the la- 
bor of forming a Constitution. David Barton signed it as President^ 
and it was submitted to the public, and promptly ratified. Congress 
debated long and furiously, before recognition was' granted to the 
pleading State, and finally gave admission under certain conditions. 

Article sixth related to education, and was as follows : " Schools 
and the means of education shall forever be encouraged in this State, 
and the General Assembly shall take measures to preserve from 



29 

• 

waete or damage, such lands as have been, or shall hereafter be 
granted, by the tJnited States, for the use of schools, within in each 
township in this State, and shall apply the funds which may aiise from 
such. lands, in strict conformity to the object of the grant. One school 
or more, shall be established in each township, as soon as practicable 
and necessary, where the poor shall be taught gratis." 

The second section of this article, was to the General Assembly, 
to take proper measures for the improvement of lands granted by the 
United States, for the support of a University. As the people adopted 
the Coiisntution,itisfair to presume, that this article, engrafted in the 
supreme law, is a fair index of the popular appreciation of free edu- 
cation, at least of the large majority. If so, it affords a just point of 
comparison, by which we may measure the great advance of public 
opinion on this subject. From the least, it has grown to be the subject 
of greatest significance. Every state government fosters and supports 
a public school system, as indispensable to their dignity and stability, 
nor could they be separated without self-destruction. 

The public opinion of the State to-day, would reject instantly, as 
harshly discriminative, the provision, "that a school should be establish- 
ed in every township, where the poor should be educated gratis." The 
munificent grant of lands was made by Congress for the free instruc- 
tion of all, without limitation to any class, rich and poor, native and 
foreign alike. It was made, because the education of all the people 
is necessary to the welfare and permanency of the Republic and be- 
cause this thing was stated with such noble emphasis in the act, by 
which the territory of Missouri was organized. The true reason of 
the appearance of this article, is to be lound in the Constitution of 
1820. It is a subject of regret that the elevated and national ideas 
concerning popular culture, which obtained, when the older states of 
the Union were erected, were not imitated if not properly valued in 
this first Constitution. Had a more prominentand intelligent view of 
education been taken from the beginning, no doubt a better and 
more extensive culture would have been attained. The General As- 
sembly would have opened the way, immediately, to the voluntary 
establishment by the people, as necessity, required a thorough system 
of schools. The waste of school lands would have been prevented, and 
the productive funds accruing from them better secured; higher 
grades of intelligence would have succeeded liberal views of our re- 
lations, domestic and national, have prevailed ; the material and 
every economical interest would have been better maintained. On 
the other hand, it is a subject of congratulation, that some recogni- 
tion of popular education, in a prominent manner was made, and thai 
it was approved by the large majority of the people. At least the 
obligation was thus imposed upon the General Assembly, to comply 
with the will of the people, by proper legislation. In what manner 
this duty was performed, we proceed to examine, gleaning from the 
meagre statute books, and journals, the only source of information, 
everything having any historical importance. In November, 1820^ 
during the session of the first General Assembly of the State, thefirst 
act was passed relating to the subject under investigation. It was an 
act establishing an "Academy in the town of St. Charles, and an 
Academy in the town of Franklin." This charter contains two ex- 
traordinary provisions, one is, that the board of trustees shall take 
into consideration and examine the state and situations of the grants, 
and donations, which have been heretofore made, by an act ol the 
Congress of the United States, of the thirteenth y day of June, one 



30 

thousand ei^ht hundred and twelve, and devise means for securing 
the said town lot or lots, and such other lots and lands, as were by 
the acts aforesaid, granted to the inhabitants of the town of St, 
Charles, for the use of schools, and for putting them with such other 
donations as may be hereafter made, for the purpose aforesaid, in a 
state of profit to said institution. Ii, was also provided, that the trus- 
tees should cause to be received and educated, in the said Academies, 
orphans, and the children of such persons as may be unable to defray 
the expenses of their education, who shall be taught the rudiments 
of an English education, and the higher branches of literature, if the 
said trustees shall think them worthy of the same, without fee or re- 
ward. 

We come now to the first act on record, relating to the custody of 
school lands. It is the first acknowledgment of the grant trust im- 
posed upon the Government by the Congress of the United States, 
which was to be sacredly guarded and wisely improved, so that the 
comprehensive design of the gift should be fully accomplished. Tak- 
ing into account the effects and the policy resulting from this act, it 
is the most important of the whole series passed at this session. The 
question to determine was as to the safest and most profitable 
method of disposing of the land grants, so that the maximum of se- 
curity and productiveness might be attained, with the least possible 
remove from the people who, were the immediate beneficiaries of the 
grant. It may have been impossible to decide whether it was better 
for the State Government, by means of proper officers, to take super- 
vision of the lands, and the fund derived from their sale, faithfully 
subserving the interests of the whole people, and annually distribut- 
ing the income of the funds pqually throughout the State, or to trans- 
fer them entirely to the care of the cdunty governments, and dele- 
gating to themjthe sacred responsibilities involved in the sale of the 
lands to the best advantage, and the proper security of the capital 
arising therefrom. It is reasonable to decide, in questions of such 
magnitude, that a trust is safe when guarded by self-interest. This 
endowment, so munificent and grand, was, after all, for the sole bene- 
fit of the people who were interested in its preservation, and who 
surely would take care that their officers should act with reference to 
the welfare of those to whom they were finally accountable for all 
their official actions. It was decided, then, to delegate to the respect- 
ive counties the whole charge of the Fchool lands, and to exact from 
their trustees such guarantees of their fidelity that those interested 
should be satisfied, were amply sufficient. Experience, however, in 
this policy, as in all others, is the best testimony, and experience 
proves that the General Assembly committed an irreparable injury 
when it transferred the custody and responsibility of this vast trust to 
the counties. Despite the utmost vigilance and faithfulnesss of 
county officers, great losses have been incurred, and, in consequence, 
the income from the fund so much reduced that the public school 
system must be indefinitely dependent upon the bounty of the State 
government. Not such was the design of Congress, nor the expect- 
ation of those who laid the foundation of our commonwealth. The 
grand conoeption was that of a system of schools, extending as popu- 
lation extended, and maintained by the endowment of public lands, 
which would increase in value with the advancing wealth of the State, 
so that the supply from them should be always sufficient, always in 
exact ratio to the demand. 

The act alluded to was approved December 6, 1820, and orders 
the courts of the several counties to appoint five respectable house- 



81 

holders^ commissioners of school lands, to serve for two years. It was 
their duty to preserve from waste or damage all the school lands, to 
rent or lease them for any term of years not exceeding five, and to in- 
vest, with permanent security, the funds thus produced. They had 
power to do whatever might become necessary, to eflFect the purpose 
of Iheir appointment, as if the complete titles were vested in them, 
^provided always^ that the said commissioners shall have no power 
to sell or alienate said lands, or any part thereof." They had power 
to recover damages to the extent of one thousand dollars, from any 
person who committed any waste on any of the school lands. The 
saving provision in the act was that which forbade any sale or alien- 
ation of the school lands by the commissioners. 

In December, 1822, an amendment to the above act was passed, 
which made it the duty of the county courts to appoint *' two respect- 
able householders" commissioners of school lands, in each iowns/iipj 
who should possess all the powers, and be subject to all the restric- 
tions, as the former five commissioners. In addition, however, they 
were ordered to erect ''a sufficient school house for the benefit of ed- 
ncation," in the township. This latter clause is the first recorded in- 
stance in which the necessity for school houses was recognized, and 
authority given to build them, although the authority is in evident per- 
version of the object of township funds. In the same year the St. 
Mary's Seminary was located in Perry county, at the request of the 
inhabitants who gave a section of land for the support of such institu- 
tion. 

It should have been mentioned that in the month of Angust, 1820, 
the first election for State and co irt officers was held, in pursuance of 
an ordinance of the convention passed in July of the same year. It 
was a part of my design to extract from the messages of the Governors, 
successively, what is therein contained relative to the subject under 
investigation. As a rule, they represent the true state of education 
as to its general appreciation in the public opinion, the errors reme- 
died, and the deficiencies to be supplied. 

Alexander McNair was the first Governor of Missouri, but, unfor- 
tunately, the official journals which contained his messages and the 
proceedings of the First General Assembly, were destroyed by fir*^ fit 
is supposed), and as yet have not been replaced by others.* The leg- 
islation upon public schools was quite insignificant, as is evident from 
subsequent acts and journals, and was occupied almost exclusively by 
trivial special enactments concerning the school lands of various 
counties. 

In 1824 Frederick Bates was elected Governor, but died soon after 
his inauguration. The Lieutenant Governor resigned, antl A. J. Wil- 
liams, President ;t?ro tempore of the Senate, was vested with the pow- 
er of Governor. On the 8th of December, 1825, he ordered an elec- 
tion to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Governor Bates, and 
on January 19, John Miller was declared duly elected Governor of 
this State. The whole number of votes cast at that election, was five 
thousand seven hundred and thirty- three (6,733). The whole popu- 
lation of the State was nearly one hundred and twelve thousand 
(112,000). On the 20th of January, 1826, Governor Miller took charge 
of the executive office, in St. Charles, then the seat of government. 
In his inaugural, he briefly admonished the Legislature of their vari- 

*A manUBcript journal of the firat House of RepreBentativee was in the poBBession of Benjamin 
BmmonSy jr., of St. GbarleB, MiBsouri, and by him transmitted, a few jears ago, to Jefierson City, 
bat bj some mishaps was not receir^d bj the Secretary of State. 



82 

ous duties (the Legislature, it may be well to mention, consisted of 
forty-six representatives and fourteen senators). He says: *'Surround- 
ed by the most powerful and warlike tribes of Indians, it becomes a 
duty of the first importance to prepare at all times for defense. Xo 
attempts should be made to discharge debts by legislation, or to in 
terfere with the olyection of contracts, education, and the diffusion of 
useful knowledge, the encouragement and improvement of agricul- 
ture should receive the greatest attention. 

It becomes necessarjr, at this time, to direct attention to the first 
general act upon the subject of schools, andschoctl lands passed prob- 
ably in 1824. It provided for the appointment of three respectable 
householders in every township, who should be the commissioners of 
school lands in their respective townships. Their duties and power3 
were limited to leasing the lands, exacting guarantees for their pre 
aervation, and paying over the rents to the county treasurer. Each 
township was made a school district, and whenever the householders 
of any school district, or two-thirds of them, wished their district to 
be organized, they presented a petition to that effect to the "tribunal 
transacting county business," and become incorporated as the inhabi- 
tants of such school district, and were invested with the forms and 
privileges usual to bodies "politic and corporate," together with the 
power to lease these school lands, dispose and manage the school 
funds, to hold property, real and personal, for the l^enefit of schools, 
"and may do all other acts as natural persons." A board of trustees 
was then appointed by the county "tribunal," consisting of five mem- 
bers, and subsequently were elected on the first Mondav in September, 
in each year. The active officers of this board were a clerk and a treas- 
urer. The former was required to keep a journal of all the proceed- 
ings of the board, and was the custodian of the records, bonds, leases, 
accounts, securities, and papers belonging to the district. The treas- 
urer received all the moneys due the district from the county, found 
results, and profits of school lands, fines, penalties, forfeitures and 
damages. The board of trustees, after proper organization, succeeded 
to numerous rights and duties. They had power and authority to 
loan moneys and lease real estate, to build or otherwise procure 
school houses, to repair the same, to fix the places, and to procure 
suitable sites for school houses, to subdivide their districts into or 
many "school precincts" as were necessary, to appoint teachers and 
visitors of schools, to make rules relative to the school houses. When- 
ever the expenses attending on a school in any precinct' exceeded the 
amount appropriated, the board of trustees, if petitioned by two- 
thirds of the householders, levied and collected a tax proportibnablj 
upon those having scholars to send to such school, ^^agreeable to the 
number each shall send." 

The "visitors" appointed by the trustees were nine in number 
usually. They examined all instructors, superintended the instruc- 
tion of the scholars, visited the schools once, at least, every three 
months, and when there could "demand of the teachers such exer- 
cises as they deemed necessary," to show the proficiency of the 
scholars. No person was permitted to "k*^ep a common school" with- 
out a previous examination and a certificate from the visitors. The 
trustees, annually, determined what number of children should be 
educated during the year free of expense, and to determine that the 
"benefit of education" should be extended to all poor children equal- 
ly. In all common schools the branches which should be taught were 
reading, writing, arithmetic and the English grammar. All free white 



S3 

persons, twenty-one years of age, and honseholders, were entitled to 
a vote for trustees. In this act the policy of transfeiyin.s: the charge 
of the public lands to the county authorities is definitely recognized, 
and practiced, a policy which has been successfully accepted without 
question or protest from that time to the present. There is also ob- 
served the first official organization for the purposes of a school act^ 
the first experiment beginning and ending with subordinate officers. 

There was no system with dependent duties and responsibilities, but 
a series of independent powers, accountable to no higher authority 
than their own. The law also contains the gem of that species of 
special tax, which afterward took the more offensive shape of the 
"rate-bill system" in imitation of some of the New England States. 

Returning to Governor Miller, and his first message of 1826, we 
find him dissenting; from the plan of leasing the school lands, as det* 
rimental to the interests they were designed to subserve, and he 
" submits to the sound discretio/i of the Legislature, the propriety of 
selling the lands as soon as practicable," and, after such injudicious 
advice, adds, with magisterial pomp, the old truism : " Education is 
the corner-stone of free and republican governments. Monarchies 
are supported and defended by standing armies, while republics re- 
pose upon the intelligence ana virtue oi the people. Hence it is the 
peculiar duty of the latter to promote and diffuse the blessings of ed- 
ucation throughout the whole body of it« citizens." 

By an act of Congress, 1827, it was made the duty of the Presi- 
dent of the United States, to cause to be selected, by sections, the 
several townships of land heretofore secured by compact to this State 
for the support of seminaries of learning. Accordingly, the Gover- 
nor appointed Commissioners to select these lands, during that year^ 
and in his message of 1828, recommends the immediate sale of them, 
in great trepidation, lest the retention of these lands for a few years 
would encourage a system of proprietorship ruinous to the country. 
^^ We also advise the sale of the twelve salt springs,with the six sections 
adjacent, and the reduction of the proceeds into some safe and 
profitable stock." This wise suggestion of the Governor was not 
adopted, until eighteen hundred and thirty-one, when an act was 
passed authorizing the sale of the salines, but it failed 'to direct the 
investment of the proceeds in stock, for the '^ general diff'usion of 
knowledge." During the interval between the year 1826 and 1835, 
eight separate acts concerning school laws were approved, but none 
of them is of special importance, except that of 1831, which provided 
for the sale of the sixteenth section. An agent was appointed 
by the 'tribunal of each county," who was empowered to sell the 
sixteenth section, whenever three-fourths of the inhabitants of a 
township desire to dispose of it. He sold at public auction, kept a 
record of the sales made by him, secured the patent for the land fron^ 
the State authorities, loaned the money on the highest interest, nat 
exceeding ten per centum. He gave securitv by mortgage on, 
real estate for all sums over one hundred dollars, and in case he 
failed to account properly lor all moneys received, he was removed 
from office by the county court No order is given for the final dis- 
position of the moneys received from the sale of the lands, the whole 
responsibility beginning and ending with this irresponsible agent, re- 
stricted only by a slender bond. Such a concession to the fidelity oi' 
men, was becoming the golden age of which Ovid sung, but it is 
scarcely consistent with the severe practices of modem legislatures^ 
by means of which the interes.t^ of the people are protected. As iw 

8 8 B 



84 

consequence of snch a policy, examples are not nnfrequent of nnfor- 
tunate commissioners praying for a release from the obligation of 
their bonds to the State, because of losses incurred from worthless 
leases and mortgages. 

Daring the first administration of Governor Miller, beginning in 
1826, no act concerning education was passed, except a few insignifi- 
cant items, looking to the preservation of school lands from waste. 
The statute books of two successive assemblies are silent on that 
subject. 

No means are accessible by which the experiment made by the 
act of 1831, can be judged. We have evidence that the necessity 
existed for school houses, teachers and a system of educational devel- 
opment. Tiie evidence is furnished in the rapidly increasing popula- 
tion, which swelled from sixty thousand, in 18:^0, to ninety-two thon- 
sana eight hundred and one in 1828, and to one hundred and twelve 
thousand and sixty-five, not including the enumeration of colored 

Eersons. Of this number, there were fortv-three thousand of educa- 
te age, which, equally distributed through the State, gave over thir- 
teen hundred to each county, requiring, at least, a force of twenty -five 
teachers. It is, therefore, apparent how insufficient were the means 
of education. 

The second administration of Governor Miller began in ISSO. 
On the sixteenth of November, his message was transmitted to the 
General Assembly. In that document, valuable for the larg:e amount 
of contemporaneous history it contains, he reiterates his view£f of the 
^^ importance of education," and especially enjoins the necessity of 
disposing of the seminary lands, to found a ^' State College." " He 
manifests impatience, because the General Government continued to 
be such a large and arbitrary proprietor of lands in the State. In ac- 
cordance with the suggestions of the message, authority was granted 
for the sale of the seminarv lands. Registers and receivers were ap- 
pointed by the act, with orders to sell the lands for not less than ten 
dollars per acre« which were under the precipitate and iixjudicioos 
action, of the Assembly, sacrificed. They should have realized nine- 
ty-two thousand one hundred and sixty dollars ($92,160). 

During the same session, academies at Fayette and Palmyra, a 
college at Marion and Charlotte seminary were incorporated. 

As might have been foreseen, the plan adopted of hastily dispos- 
ing of school and seminary lands, for the purpose of dissolving 
old proprietary rights of the State and National Government, without 
regard to the interest of the cause they were given to subserve, failed 
of success. 

The Governor, in his message of 1832, informs the Assembly that 
the law for the sale of the lands was but partially executed ; and that, 
in consequence of representations made to him, ^that means were em- 
ployed to prevent a fair and equitable sale,'' patents were withheld 
until the Legislature could investigate the truth of the charges. He 
recommends the consolidation of the saline and seminary lauds into 
one fund, for the purpose ot education. ^ A more sacred application 
of the funds, arising from the saline and seminary lands, could not be 
made, than in their devotion to the cause of education." 

How to invest such a fund, so as to combine safety and profit, was 
a question of much solicitude to him ; but, finally, with fatal ingenu- 
ity, suggests t^e establishment of a ^^ State bank," to which the State 
might subseribe, at once, ^^$40,000 of the three per cent, fund, $63,000 
from seminary and saline fdnd, and $189,000 of money arising from sale 



85 

of sixteenth section." '* Should snch a bank be established. I am in« 
dined to think that the investment of these funds in it, mignt be ad« 
Tan tageously made. It would, no doubt, place the college fund upon 
a safe and firm foundation." Our Governor had a rare genius for 
plausible theories, and abundant confidence in mankind. In the same 
connection, attention is directed to the act passed at the last session 
of the General Assembly, " by which commissioners were appointed 
to sell the sixteenth section." Under this act, there may be as many 
different commissioners, for making these sales and loans, as there are 
counties in the State. It is too obvious to the understanding that this 
system, if continued, must lead to great irregularities in the payment 
of interest, and, in numerous instances, to the loss of the capital itself. 
Inasmuch, as that act was passed upon the earnest suggestion of the 
Governor, the effect of which was the destruction of a valuable por- 
tion of our inheritance, it should have been apparent that his judg- 
ment, upon any other project which concerned the management of 
school funds, was of little consequence. To what extent his sugges- 
tions modified the action of the Legislature, will be manifest here- 
after. 

At this time his official term closed, and he vacated the executive 
claim in favor of Hon. Daniel Dunklin, who, in eighteen thousand 
five hundred and twenty-five votes, received nine thousand one hun- 
dred and twenty-five, and on November 22, 1832, sent into the Assem- 
bly his first message, which contains a few brief generalities upon the 
^^ diffusion and encouragement of education," a compend of which 
would be but repetition of preceding quotations. At this session, an 
act to "incorporate the St. iouis University," was passed, which was 
described as the St Louis College, in "successful operation near the 
city of St. Louis;" but now, as is well known, is an institution of the 
first grade and magnitude within the city. No other act of importance 
appears upon the pages of the journals or laws of that session of the 
Assembly, the time of the members having been engrossed in a vast 
amount of special legislation, in the erection of new counties, in an im- 
peachment trial, debates upon the report to establish a State bank, 
and upon current politics. From this remark there are a few excep- 
tions, one, a bill providing for the sale of the sixteenth section, which 
repeals a former act, requiring the purchase of the lands to be for 
cash^ and expressly says that "sales of such lands, in the future, shall 
be on a credit of one and two vears from the day of the sale," clearly 
implying that the honesty of the purchaser was a safer guaranty for 
the money than the official bond of the commissioner ; the other act 
orders the continuance of the sale of the seminary lands. Mention, 
also, should be made of an act establishing a corporation in the city 
of St. Louis, for the purpose of public education, by virtue of which, 
the election of a school board was transferred to the people, and a 
large grant of power, with reference to school lands and lots, was made 
to the board of directors. A joint resolution was voted, authorizing 
the Governor of the State to appoint three suitable persons to form a 
system of " common primary school education," as nearly uniform as 
practicable, throughout the State, and to make report to the next 
meeting of the Legislature," which is the first expression, on record, 
lookinfi^ to a generad and practical system of public instruction. This 
properly introduces the proceedings of 1834, and the message of Gov- 
ernor Dunklin^ so far as it represents the prevalent opinion upon edu- 
cation by the Stote. At that time, it should be understood, tne semi- 
nary and saline funds were united into a university fund, which, by 



86 

prudent managemeDt, should amount to one hundred and forty-five 
thousand, three hundred and forty-three dollars ($145,343). " We are 
under strong obligations," says the Governor, " to establish a univer- 
sity." In no country is it so pre-eminently important as it is in this, 
to promote a general diffusion of knowledge. The will of tlie people 
being the basis of our government, and the supreme law of the land, 
render it of the first importance that they should qualify themselves 
to discharge the duties they have assumed, in prescribing the rules of 
government, and controlling its administration. K we uo not know 
those rights and duties, secured and imposed by government, how can 
we maintain and discharge them ? This spirit (patriotic) is wearing out 
and unless it be assisted by general intelligence, that we may know 
our rights and duties ; and the moral worth of the one, and the politi- 
cal obligations imposed by the other, it will require no prophet to 
foretell an end to our happy form of government." The proposition 
is then made to dispose of the ^^sixteenth section" of land, amass the 
product in a capital fund, invested under the supervision of the State 
government, and, from the income therefrom derived, added to a small 
sum to arise from taxation, to support a school in every township. The 
advise is opportune, and might be called statesman-like, were it not 
very much qualified by what follows: ''Our Constitution requires that 
the poor be educated gratis." 

IDoiiibtless, there will be some poor orphans in the State, and per- 
haps now and then, children witn parents too indigent to educate 
them. * * * That class, though small, must be provided for. Who 
are the poor, within the meaning of the Constitution, may be deter- 
mined by the county courts; by such rules as you may think proper 
to prescribe ; and authority should be given to those tribunals to ed- 
ucate such gratis. As the Constitution did not provide that the edu- 
cation of the poor was to be made gratis by direct payment out of the 
county treasuries, we conclude that the Governor, able and magnani- 
mous in other respects, regarded the great endowment of Congress 
as a tribute to the poverty; and not to the intelligence of the people: 
an opinion which retarded the development of public education for 
years. During the session of 1835, a general revision of the laws was 
made. The laws relating to school and school lands, reported by the 
special committee of them appointed by the Governor, was included 
in the published volume. It is composed of fifty-two school sections, 
twenty of which relate exclusively to the school lands. The act dif- 
fers in several important features from all former acts, and in these 
respects, is the result of experiehce. It provides that the county 
courts shall be the custodians of all school funds, and abolishes the 
office of township commissioner. The method of selling the lands and 
the form of securities and payments, the place of deposit of all school 
moneys, and the routine to be followed for applying it for the benefit 
of the aistrict, do not differ materially from the plan now pursued. 
Every congressional township composed one district, and fractional 
townships entitled to less than one hundred acres was attached to an 
adjacent township. The corporate powers and duties of a district 
were vested in a board of three trustees, who were annually elected. 
They had power to build school houses, to employ teachers, to appoint 
visitors to ''keep up" a school for six monthsin theyear,or for a whole 
year if desired by a majority of patrons, to levy a county tax of three 
and one-third cents, if the citizens shall so order, to report annaally 
to the county court the whole number of children in their district, be- 
tween the ages of six and eighteen years, the number attending 
school, the name of the teacher, amount of salary received; and the 



37 

■ 

branches of instruction taught. The county court in October every 
second year, transmitted to the Secretary of State, an abstract of the 
reports of trustees, and amount of permanent school fund with the 
yearly income. The Governor, Auditor of Public Accounts, State 
Treasurer, and Attorney General, constituied a board of commission- 
ers for literary purposes." It was made the duty of the Secretary of 
State to lay before this board the reports sent to him from the several 
county courts, and the board was required to report to each General 
Assembly all the defects discovered in the school law, and recom- 
mend such amendments as would remedy these defects. 

Such is a brief abstract of the school law of 1835, It is manifest 
how the unadjusted items separately proposed in previous legislation 
was being harmonized into a system with the broad base resting upon 
the interests of the people. Time and experience have not suggested 
any change in the original subdivision of school districts, but great 
improvements have been made in the official management of school 
aifairs, and the writing of school reports, and the responsibilities of 
officers. 

On the thirteenth of September, 1836, Governor Dunklin resigned, 
and Lieutenant Governor Lilburn Boggs^ succeeded to the functions 
of the executive. In his first message to the General Assembly of 
1836, are some fiscal items which properly cpme within our purview. 
During the two preceding administrations, a plan for legislating the 
outstanding State debt, was adopted, which was to form the revenue 
derived from the sale of the seminary and saline lands. The debt was 
chiefly incurred by the remarkable financial policy inaugurated early 
in our history (1821), of lending the public credit by means of "loan 
offices." Bepacious and unscrupulous speculation thwarted the be- 
nevolent design of the Legislature, and soon the State was immersed 
in debt. In order to relieve the government from the pressure of in- 
dividual claims, the General Assembly borrowed from the seminary 
and saline funds, at different times, until in 1836, the amount due 
these funds was $S7,819 90, not including interest, with the probabil- 
ity of increasing that amount largely from the proceeds of the lands 
then under sale. Had the State remained the debtor, as well as the 
creator of the limd, thus accumulated, then the demands of honor and 
conscience might have been satisfied, but as it is shown, hereafter the 
policy of establishing a State bank, as authorized by the Constitution, 
was strongly advocated by the leading public men in the government 
with plausible arguments, and in the capital stock invested by the State 
was to be included, the surplus revenue received from the general 
government by act of Congress 1835, together with the seminary and 
saline funds. This measure was prosecuted with force and ability by 
Governor Boggs. On the topic in which we are directly interested, 
he says : "education is a subject of abiding interest to the people, and 
demands the fostering of the Legislature, * * * Notwithstanding 
all acknowledge the importance of education, yet but little has been 
done to advance the cause in our State. It therefore devolves on you 
or the representatives of the whole people, to adopt and put in mo- 
tion such a plan as will meet with their necessities." The Legisla- 
ture of that session did not meet the necessities of the people with 
respect to education, but amply met the prevalent demand of money- 
ed enterprise, and instituted the "Bank of the State of Missouri," 
which controlled and determined imperiously the financial cred.t 
of the State. 

The government subscribes shares of one thousand dollars each, 



S8 

in amount equal to the principal and interest of the seminary and sa- 
line funds, in addition to many thousands of dollars in bonds of the 
State. It is not within our province to observe the career of this bank 
and its branches, except to trace the educational funds intrusted to it, 
and to examine in what manner the trust was protected and made 
available. During the same session, twelve academies and two col- 
leges, Kemper and St Charles, were incorporated. 

On the 6th of February, 1837, an act to establish a permanent fund 
for the support of common schools was passed. The Governor of the 
State was required to invest the principal and interest of the saline 
fund, with all additions that might be made to it, and the money to be 
received from the United States by virtue of an act of Congress, June 
23d, 1536. The investment was to be made in the stock of any bank 
incorporated by the State, and whenever the capital amounted, to five 
hundred thousand dollars, or more, the income was to be appropriated, 
under the direction of the General Assembly, to the payment of 
^^ teachers in common schools." Special acts concerning school lands 
and academies were passed by this session, but, as legislation imme- 
diately relating to the subject of public schools, increased largely, it 
is thought best to transfer to another chapter all that concerns scnool 
lands and private institutions. 

In November, 1838, the Tenth General Assembly, composed of 
ninety-six Representatives and thirtv-three Senators, met. In the 
message of Governor Boggs, we find the expression of the general dis- 
satisfaction with reference to the operation of the school law then in 
iorce. The population had extended further and further ; new terri- 
tory had been organized into counties; the new foundations of cities 
and towns were laid; the elements of substantial society, as yet in- 
choate, were gradually harmonizing; the demand for educational 
facilities was heard, and the necessity become manifest for a system 
which could be expanded to meet old as well as new demands, with- 
out the necessity of amending the law for each new demand. Gover- 
nor Boggs meets the demand fully and ably. He recommends, with 
emphasis, the increase of the school fund, which was limited to five 
hundred thousand dollars. Among the obstacles to the successful 
operation of the school system, is tne incompetency of the teachers, 
and advises the establishment of a seminary of learning, "with a de- 
partment devoted to the education of teachers for common schools," 
and at the same time advises the education, at the public expense, in 
the best seminaries in the State, of a limited number of young men 
for the same purpose. With comprehensive foresight, he recommends 
the outline of a "common school system," simple and easily under- 
stood, although a modification of the system in practice in other States, 
yet adjusted to the subordinate plan already begun in this State : 

1. The appointment of a Superintendent of Common Schools, in- 
vested with a superintending control over the whole system, and with 
powers similar to those now intrusted to that oflSce. 

2. The institution of a board of commissioners in each county, to 
manage all affairs connected with schools and school funds, and to 
report to the Superintendent the condition of district schools. 

3. A board of trustees in each school district, with authority sim- 
ilar to that before vested in that body. 

When the funds necessary to support school were deficient, the 
remainder should be raised by taxation, each district, before receiving 
its apportionment of the school fund, being required to raise the sum 
equal to double the amount apportioned to each district. 



39 

In accordance with the earnest and practical suggestions of the 
message, a law for the organization and support of common schools 
was passed at that session of the Legislature ^February, 1839), chiefly 
through the instrumentality of Henry S. Gager. of 8t Louis. The act 
is lon^ and minute in details, comprehending tne prominent features 
ol all Taws upon the subject, but deficient in the esprit de ooty>8 which 
is necessary to the operation of any law left almost entirely to the 
people to put into execution. In reference to the State, it proyided 
lor the establishment of a State school iund, the composition of which 
has been heretofore mentioned. The Auditor of Public Accounts was 
required to keep a register of common school lands, an abstract of all 
sales of lands, and to superintend and manage the whole fund. The 
State Treasurer was maae the custodian of the fund, and, witli the 
Auditor, exhibited to the Legislature an exact account of all receipts 
and expenditures. A Superintendent of Common Schools, who held 
his ofSce for two years, was chosen by a joint yote of the Gfeneral As- 
sembly. His duty was to apportion, annually, the State school mon- 
eys, upon the enumeration of white children between the ages of six 
and eighteen years. In other respects, his duties were nearly the 
same as those now fulfilled by that officer, with the exception of tray- 
eling and attending institutes. The Goyernor, Attorney General and 
Superintendent x)f Common Schools were made ex-officio commission- 
ers of the State school fund, coupled with the duty of securing the 
most profitable inyestment for school moneys. 

With reference to counties, county courts were inyested with au- 
thority, to loan all moneys belonging to the yarious townships ; to 
keep all accounts in relation to township funds ; to apportion the 
Bchool moneys of the county (arising from fines, penalties and per- 
fectiyes), amongst the townships. Respecting the method of security 
oi school moneys, the liabilities of debtors, and of officers, there is 
but little difference from that as prescribed in the law now in force. 
The duties of the county clerk, are likewise similar to those now ful- 
filled by that officer. The county treasurer receiyed and paid out on 
the warrants oi the county courts, all school moneys irom the State or 
the county. 

With reference to townships, the primal organization not effected 
as under the law of 1836, tne officers were, one commissioner of com- 
mon schools, not less than two, nor more than four inspectors, and a 
township clerk, and these constituted a board of directors. The direc- 
tors had power to diyide the township into a conyenient number of 
districts, to number them and to apportion the school monies named 
by the commission. The commissioner was the treasuer of the town- 
ship, receiying and paying out moneys as usual. The directors were 
required to report the customary school statistics to the county clerk, 
the commissioner to the township clerk; the township clerk was the 
secretarjr of the trustees ; the inspectors examined and licensed all 
teachers, yisited, and inquired into the condition of all common 
schools. 

With reference to districts, eyery school district was organized 
bv a yote of the inhabitants, upon the order of the township directors. 
Tne Qualified yoters of each school district filled all yacancies in the 
board of trustees, determined the sites of school houses, leyied the 
necessary tax on the district, ^^ not at any time to exceed fiity per cen- 
tum on the amount of tax as imposed by la^ for State purposes." The 
trustees were a corporate body, called special meetings, and made out 
the tax list, proyided the houses and furnished them upon the order of 
the trustees, employed and paid all teachers, made out a rate bill, ap- 



40 

pointed a collector for the district, who collected all the monies 
reported to the township clerk all school statistics, atad in brief, were 
invested with the control and superintendence of the districts. 

With reference to town and villages, the lands and lots granted 
by the United States to the several towns and villages, in the act of 
Congress, Jnne 15, 1812, were to remain an inviolable common school 
fund, for the support of common schools, in towns and villages. The 
inhabitants of such towns and villages, were incorporated for school 
purposes, the corporate powers being vested in a board of directors, 
'*not less than five nor more than nine.'' The director had power to 
hold, lease, sell and loan, the proceeds arising from the sale of lands, 
under proper security, to build or rent houses, and furnish them, to 
employ teachers, to make and collect a rate bill, and to do whatever 
was required, for the eflBciency of schools, under their management. 
The treasurer of the board was also collector, with powers and re- 
sponsibilities, similar to the commissioner of common schools, under 
tne general act. The trustees reported the general school statistics 
to the county clerk, which latter reported to the superintendent of 
common schools. A study of this law discovers its good and bad 
features. In some respects the law now in force is quite similar to 
the one under consideration. Its weakness is found in its complexity. 
It« mechanism is heavy and involved. The perfection of any law 
which rests for its execution permanently in the hands of the people, 
is simplicity of detail, and such a distribution of responsibility, that 
every office will perform its own duty, without clashing with that of 
others, and without interference from others. ITiis law, too, is neces- 
sarily complex, when it takes cognizance of school lands, and funds. 
It is based upon the laws already in force upon that subject, and it is 
unfortunate that the policy was not then adopted of releasing the 
county courts and county treasurer, of all care concerning school 
lands, and of transferring it to the State Government. It is also man- 
ifest, that this act proceeded upon the erroneous idea of entrusting 
school reports, and the superintendence of school affairs, to officers, 
whose chief functions were entirely different. School affairs should 
be entrusted to school officers. In accordrnce with its own provis- 
ion, the General Assembly, on February 11, 1839, elected to the office 
of Superintendent of Common Schools, Peter G. Glover, Esq., and at 
the same time chose the first board of curators, for a State University. 
The Legislature of '38-39, completed its labors so various and important, 
by an act providing for a State University, thereby completing as far 
as they were able, the chain of intercommunication from the district 
school house to the temple of science, an act designed to be the no- 
ble crown of the system of Fiee Education. The act included five 
different articles. The first related exclusively to the creation and 
management of the seminary fund, the income of which was for the 
support of the university, when the principal should amount to one 
hundred thousand dollars. The second article contains the account 
of the institution of the university, the government of which was 
vested in a board of curators, elected by the General Assembly, bi- 
ennially. Their lease of rights and power were very little different 
from that usually granted to boards of trustees, for college purposes. 
Additional to this however, the curators were required to visit and in- 
spect annually, all colleges, seminaries, and academies in the State, 
which were subject to inspection. All colleges and seminaries ot the 
university, and all other such institutionSj (not exempted by their 
charter), incorporated, were subiect to this visit of inspection. The de- 
sign of this provision seems to have been to place certain academies 



41 

and Beminaries under the tuition patronage of the university through 
a visit of the curators, so that they might receive the benefit of one- 
half the income of the seminary fund, made distributable by that 
class of schools. 

This apportionment was made in the ratio of the number of pupils 
who, for six months during the year^ pursued classical studies, or the 
"higher branches of English education." In order that there might 
be no misunderstanding as to the exact intentof that provision, it was 
ordered that no student must be considered classical "unless he shall 
have advanced so far as to have read in Latin the first book of the 
iEneid, not to have pursued the higher branches of English education 
unless he shall have advanced beyond such knowledge of arithmetic, 
English grammer, and geography, as is usually obtained in common 
schools.'' The curators made an annual report to the Secretary of 
State, giving a general view of the condition of education in the col- 
leges, academies, and seminaries under their supervision. Authority 
were given to the curators to appoint a President of the university, 
and to fill all vacancies in the ofiSce of President of a college, princi- 
pal of a seminary, lelt so for six months. They had no control over 
the colleges of the university, which was governed by a separate 
board of trustees. The trustees were incorporated with power simi- 
lar in detail to those vested in trustees of colleges usually. The gov- 
ernment of seminaries and academies, of the university was also vest- 
ed in a board of trustees. The control of all affairs, the appointment 
of principal, curators, teachers, tutors, and other officers ; the removal 
of any officer, rules and regulations, the custody t)f property, were in- 
vested in the board. These various boards transmitted, annually, to 
the curators, particular statements of the condition and welfare of 
their institutions. In the plan of this institution the proprietors 
meant to build up a Studium Generate] to foster a familv of scholars 
acknowledge one paternal authority which had neither local habita- 
tion or name. The number of subordinate institutions was not limit- 
ed, except by the visitation of the curators, which was a source of 
weakness, since the whole capital of the seminary fund was nearly 
one hundred thousand dollars. The design was magnanimous, but the 
endowment fund requisite to make it effective was absurdly inade- 
quate. The site of tne university was to be selected by a board of 
commissioners, consisting of Peter H. Burnett, of Clay, Cnauncey Dark- 
er, ot Lewis, Archibald Gamble, of St Louis, John G. Bryan, of Wash- 
ington, and John S. Phelps, of Greene county. The site was to con- 
tain at least forty acres of land, with two miles of the countv seat of 
Cole, Cooper, Howard, Boone, Callaway or Saline county, 'the com- 
missioners reported in favor of Boone county, and accordingly the 
State University was therein located in 1840, by act of the eleventh 
General Assembly, which met in November of that year. Governor 
Boggs having sent in his last message containing an exhausted re- 
sume of the public questions of the day. withdrew from thie Chair of 
State, which was immediately occupied by Hon. Thomas Reynolds, 
who was elected by a vote of 29,625 out 51,837, the whole number cast 
at the general election of 1840. His inaugural oration is a summary 
of political views, interspersed with generalities on patriotism and ed- 
ucation gracefully expressed. It is chiefly occupied with the preva- 
lent opinion of his party, as to the danger threatening State rights 
from the constructive power of the Constitution. The General As- 
sembly of that year was kept busy discussing the monetary interests 
of the State to the exclusion of political and educational topics. The 
State debt was to be adjusted ; the Bank of Missouri, it was supposed. 



42 

was being perverted rather to the purposes of private enter- 
prise than used for the public weal, and legislation was had in the 
vain attempt to control it. The seminary fund, augmented by the 
dividends of the State bank, once the proceeds of land sales amount- 
ed to $97,818 89, with 2,774 acres of land yet unsold. The State 
school fund increased in the same manner to $558,032 09 in 1840, the 
first year in which the income of the fund was distributable. The 
number of inhabitants in the State, according to the report of Hon. 
James Minor, the able and indefatigable Secretary of State, was 2Slr 
249 white persons, with about 100,0W) of educable a^. It is a subject 
of regret that no report on the subject of education was made, on 
which account we are in total ignorance of the condition of the State 
in that behalf. If proper care had been taken in its preparation, un- 
doubtedly it would have remained a historical document of great 
value. Everything in our view conspired to that effect. There was 
no cessation to the remarkable development of the State* The rich 
agricultural portions of the State were producing riches in abundance, 
the internal and external trade was rapidly increasing, towns and 
cities were established from one limit of the commonwealth to the 
other, the frontier population was absorbed, and skilled labor and in- 
telligent industry grasped imtnedtately the resources of wealth. The 
shadows that sat upon the land disappeared with the pioneer. The 
last haunt of barbarism was recovered for the use of civilization. Acad- 
emies, seminaries colleges, and universities were founded and erected, 
types of intelligent society, but no page is on record giving informa- 
tion of the results of all educational enterprise. ^The common school 
system" had been in operation one year, but to what extent, or how 
successful we have no means of ascertaining. The only edacational 
report made was one concerning the ^'deaf and dumb asylum," estab- 
lished at Oarondelet, February 13, 1839. Two thousand dollars, each 
year^ was ^ven toward the support of this institution in a certain pro- 
portion. From the report it appears that two mutes were in attend- 
ance, supported by the State. A report from the curators of the 6tate 
University was referred to the Committee on Education, where it dis- 
appeared forever from the public archives. We are free to suppose 
that in consequence of the absence of an official report from tlie de-. 
partment of education, the office of- Superintendent of Common 
Schools' was transferred and attached to that of Secretary of State, 
leaving intact the powers and duties of the office. 

Passing to the proceedings of the twelfth General Assembly, we 
meet at the threshold, a communication from Governor Reynolds 
which recounts, in a brief summary, the "blessings'' bestowed by 
"beneficent Providence'' upon the people, which is prefatory tea 
doleful account of the "artificial causes" which'have plunged the State 
into the midst of embarrassments, arising from inflated and irre- 
deemable paper currency. He invites the attention of the Legisla- 
ture to the act concerning the State University, advising such action 
as would place that institution more directly under the control of the 
State, and tdso would dispense with the organization and government 
of colleges separate from the University. The seminary fund in this 
year (1842) amounted to $100,000, invested in certiAcates of stock in 
the Bank of Missouri, the State school fund increased to $575,667 9^ 
from the income of which $1,994 60 was apportioned to thirteen 
counties. Very little legislation pertaining to public instruction was 
passed during the present session, the committee on edupation forci> 
bly protested against the mischievous practice of amending the 
school laws just as the people began to understand its operation and 



43 

to appreciate its benefits, a protest which needs to be repeated to 
every General Assembly. It seems, from the representation of the 
committee, that the organization of common schools was rapidly 
being accomplished throughout the State. We may, therefore, do 
honor to the memory of that General Assembly, which, nothing to do, 
did not. Shortly alter the adiournment, Governor Reynolds died by 
self-violence, and Hon. M. M. Marmaduke, Lieutenant Governor, 
assumed the functions of the executive, who, in his message to the 
thirteenth Assembly, calls attention to the precarious condition of 
the university and common schools. The dividend declared by the 
State Bank had been gradually diminishing until they amounted to 
scarcely one per centum upon the capital stock. There Was invested 
the sum of one hundred thousand dollars for the benefit of the univer- 
sity, and five hundred and seventy-five thousand six hundred and 
ninety-six dollars, on account of the common school fund. In the 
year 1843 and 1844 declared no dividend. It was evident that the 
bank was enacting the role of Saturn, aiid devouring all its own pro- 
geny. The State was reaping th^.result of lending its credit to a cor- 
poration, whose interest it was to withdraw itself further and further 
from State interference. The consequence of this action of the bank 
was the almost total suspension of the university, and the retardation 
of the common schools, dependent to some extent upon the income of 
the State school iund. The Lieutenant Governor did not long enjoy 
the privileges of this new ofi&ce, for on November 20, 1844, Hon. John 
C Edwards succeeded him, having been elected by aTote of 36,978 in 
a vote of 68,335, the whole number cast at the last quadrennial elec- 
tion. ^'But of all subjects," says he, in his inaugural address^ ^^that of 
education is the most important, the importance of the subject has 
been overlooked. It should be in advance of all other subjects of 
legislation. An universal diflfusion of knowledge is felt in every 
ramification of society, it is felt in the workshops, in the corn fields, 
on our roads, canals and navigable rivers, in our social intercourse, in 
legislation, in morals, politics and religion. Its influence in facilita- 
ting labor, in alleviating the distresses of mankind, in promoting 
civiIi2ation, in improving the condition of the world is incalculable.^ 
An unusually liberal andexalted view of public instruction was taken 
in this address, and the title of the poorest to the amelioration and 
enjoyment of the richest culture was eloquently advocated. In his 
ofiicial report, Hon. James L, Minor, ex-ot&jcio Superintendent of 
Common Schools, presents the same complaints against the bad faith 
of the State Bank, in withholding the dividends of the State school 
fund, and urges the transfer of the stock to the bonds of the State, so 
as to ^^render the income irom this source at once certain and perma- 
nent He earnestly seconds the suggestion of Governor Edwards 
in reference to the establishment of a normal schooL supported at 
public expense, and for the public good. The increased organization 
under the common school law was exhibited as follows : 

In 1842, the number of children taught was 6,192, the number re- ^ 
ported between the a^es of six and eignteen years, 10,839. In 18^ 
organized common schools were supported in twenty-eight counties ; 
in 1843, in forty-two counties, there being seventy-seven counties in 
the State. It iB manifest to us, notwithstanding the views of the 
secretary, that the cause of popular education moved forward with 
discouraging slowness. Figures are keen as swords to cut rhetoric to 
pieces. Considered in the light of history, of political and social 
economy, it would be far more satisfactory to record that one hundred 
thousand children were taught in the schools oi the State, than to 



44 

have, as we do have in the official messages, elaborate platitudes con- 
cerning the diffasion of the blessings of education." What avail va* 
it that wealth of soil and of mines were incalculable, that the skie? 
were genial and the clouds *'drop fatness," or that under a g^arment oi 
imperial richness, the commonwealth was hiding a cancer, which was 
consuming its strength and vitality, if there were not developing, at 
the same time, the intelligence to utilize the one, and the political 
skill to destroy the other. 

It is well to understand, before alluding to the condition of the 
State University, that it was duly organized in 1848, by the election 
of John H. Lathrop, of noble memory, as President. He was assistcJ 
by professors in what was then known as Columbia College, used a^i 
preparatory school. The University edifice was dedicated to its hiri 
uses, on the Fourth of July, 1843, and in September following, tir 
Curators completed the department of instruction. The edifice vlj 
declared, by the board, to be equal to any building of that character 
in the United States, over seventy-five thousand dollars having bee: 
expended in its construction. Classes were regularly formed, «ii 
young men were ready to graduate, the number of pupils was grad'i 
ally increasing, and everything betokened prosperity. Bnt, at xu 
juncture, the State Ban^ ceased to pay its proper aividends to tie 
seminarv fund, and the doors of the University " were on the eve o: 
being closed.'' The Legislature was called upon to aflFord the he!r 
necessary to provide for this unexpected emergency, and authorize: 
the Curators to borrow twelve thousand dollars ($12,000) from tht 
Bank of Missouri, but took the precaution that the State should* no' 
be liable for any loss that might occur to the seminary fund, if thi? 
loan should be made. This was the extent to which the Generi 
Assembly would grant assistance — considerate enough, perhaps, to 
its own interests, but scarcely just to the institution which the sot- 
ernment had pledged to foster, and whose fund, by its action, was dot 
placed in seemingly hopeless insolvency. Except this act, the tweini: 
Assembly closed its session, with no legislation upon the subject :: 
education. 

His Excellency, Governor Edwards, was much dissatisfied, anc. 
in a very compact and forcible manner, makes a remarkable state- 
ment : ** It is a fact, which it is needless to attempt to disguise, tha 
with our rich soil and genial climate, and all our industry, care an^ 
economy, we are not a prosperous and thriving people. The grer 
mass of us are not growing in wealth, nor accumulating many of tii: 
comforts, nor even the necessaries of life.^ He attributes the fact r 
ignorance, as applied to all departments of labor and industry. Wr 
depend upon physical labor, and reject the superior advantages • 
mental labor. We depend on brute force, and reject the advantaire: 
of skill and science." The remedy to the disadvantages is by for 
methods — encouraging the common school, increasing the interests 
parents, establishing manufactures, improving roads, and navigab!^ 
streams. To establish an institution for the preparation of teacher 
is the best mode for the encouragement of the common school. A 
superior population is required to carry on manufactures successfoUr. 
and this could soon be had, by fostering the common school. Th« 
best means for facilitating the construction of public works, is to sen! 
the schoolmaster into, every village and hamlet of the State. Tlie 
common school will accomplish everything, if properly encouraged.* 
The views of Governor Edward.s were those of a statesman, and ha: 
they been properly valued, and embodied in legal forms, the historv 
of our State would have been far more illustrious. The popular in- 



45 

telligence would have overthrown all methods of public wrong. 
That the' diffusion of the influence of the free school, was making 
slow progress in the State, we judge from many circumstances. 
From the report of Hon. F. H. Martin, Secretary of State, we learn 
that while common schools were slowly organized, yet its results 
were insignificant. In his view the deficiency was the want of money. 
The people were not yet willing to pay the necessary tax for the 
maintenance of schools, and the sagacious Bank doled out a mere 
pittance of dividends on the school fund, just sufficient to keep the 
whole system in a state of starvation. The same evil, also, affected 
the State University. The failure to receive the income from the 
seminary fund, brought' debt and distress upon the Curators, which, 
to some extent, were relieved in 1846, when the Bank resumed the 
payment of semi-annual dividends. President Lathrop's report to 
the Curators breathes a cheerful spirit, despite the numerous obsta- 
cles so unexpectedly placed before him. He entered on the adminis- 
tration of the institution with the knowledge that the pioneer in a 
literary enterprise lives not for himself, but for posterity. He desired 
to accomplish his full mission in the University, in laying broad and 
deep the foundations of its prosperity, and then band over to his suc- 
cessor the more pleasant task of erecting a beautiful and durable 
superstructure. The model President afterward, ibund lions in his 
path more terrible to meet than the moneyed embarrassments which 
then beset him. He gave the ripe years of his life to the service of 
the University, went away, returned again; and, dying, was laid 
away under its shadows, when the roses of peace were blossoming in 
the furrows of war. 

At the beginning of the session of 1847, a request was made by 
the Legislature, that the Governor would communicate to the mem- 
bers his views concerning a school for the preparation of teachers. 
In his reply, the Governor proposed, in detail, a plan which combined 
the normal and the manual ideas in one institution. The pupil teach- 
ers were to have a variety of improved machinery, witn which to 
make experiments upon a farm (to belong to the school), was to be 
supported at public expense: lectured to, and drilled daily in the 
school room, and then were pledged to teach in the common schools 
of the respective townships in which they lived, for two or three years. 
A school for females was to be established, having the same object in 
view, but combining with the instructionB in didactics, a system of 
household manufactures. The Governor's utilitarian ideas perverted 
his judgment on this question. His scheme was impracticable, although 
we cannot but admire the shrewd philosophy which underlay his plan, 
in which he desired to have teachers so trained that they .might im- 
part to the children they might teach, new views concerning the dig- 
nity of labor, and the economy of agriculture by machinenr, as com- 
pared with it by forced labor. A much more practical and economi- 
cal suggestion was made by the legislative committee sent to inspect 
the condition of the University. Honorable James S. Rollins, chair- 
man, with admirable prudence, recommended that a professorship of 
theory and practice of teaching be added to the bdard of instruction, 
for the support of wbich a small annual apnropriation should be made 
from the income of the school fund, until the unwilling bank should 
enable the curators to maintain it irom the proceeds of the seminary 
fund. The Committee on Education, in a very elaborate report, en- 
forced the same suggestion, and, in addition, proposed to confer the 
office of Superintendent of Common Schools upon the ^* normal pro- 
fessor." The social, moral, political and commercial advantages of 



46 

general edaoation are dilated npon with ability and force: ^ If ire 
adopt a system of universal education, by means of common schools, 
we will have better citizens, better laws, and more parity in the ad- 
ministration of public affairs, our liberties would rest on asecorefonn* 
dation, and commerce, manufactures, agriculture, arts, mechanics, and 
the resources of the country would be improyed, and placed in a more 
prosperous situation/' 

At that time there were twenty thousand free white people in the 
State, oyer the age of twenty-one, who coyld neither read nor write, 
or one in every sixteen persons. In Missouri, with a population of 
three hundred and twenty-five thousand, four hundred and sixty-two 
(325,462), there were sixteen thousand, seven hundred and ei^^htr- 
dight (16,788) scholars in primary scnools, and five hundred sac 
twenty-six in the free schools. In Maine, with a population of five 
hundred and one thousand seven hundred and ninety three (501J^. 
there were one hundred and sixty-four thousand four hundred and 
seventy-seven (164,477) at primary schools, and sixty thousand twc 
hundred and twelve (60,212) in the free schools. Facts like these were 
potent motives to action, and especially when the representatives ^ 
the people were reminded that they made an unwise investment whec 
they placed the educational trust funds in the State bank, from whicii 
a loss of $200,000 was incurred, upon reasonable calculation. There 
was no recourse but for the State to assume the payment of the losi 
It was also advised by the committee to change the basis of appor- 
tionment, and place it upon the enumeration of children in the Suu 
between the ages of six and eighteen years ; to create the office d 
county superintendent; organize an educational court in each county, 
composed of the county superintendent, county clerk, ex-officio treas- 
urer, and the directors of each township, to possess the same powers 
over the school fund as the county court, and to place the manace- 
ment of school affairs in each township under three directors and i 
clerk. The bill, embodying the well digested conclusions of the com- 
mittee, was entombed in the House of Representatives, and the Lefir 
lature contented itself with educational legislation, by passing th€ 
short acts looking toward the relief of the State University. 

Time and space forbid any extended review of the educatioD^ 
movements through the twenty-eight years of our history which end- 
ed with the administration of 1849. That the progress was slow is en 
dent from the results given ; but substantial progress was made. Lav> 
for the maintenance of public instruction were made with much care. 
school funds were created and invested^ encouragement was given tc 
the organization of the common school, m every hamlet and township; 
a State University was founded, and its doors opened to the yoath of ifle 
country; the feeling in favor of enlarging and rendering more usefo. 
the system of free education was deepening and exhibiting itself on all 
public occasions, and in all State papers; the belief that tne degree of 
public welfare is proportionate to the amount of popular intelligence, 
was generally entertained. Governor Edwards, in his videdictorr 
message to the Fifteenth General Assembly, gives eloquent embodi- 
ment to this feeling and belief, and takes leave of the chair of State, 
pleading for enlightened and liberal legislation upon education for the 
people. 

At the general election in August, 1848, 82.885 votes were cast 
out of which number Hon. Austin King received 4^915. The enu- 
meration of the free white population, 510,4%, that of youths of legal 
school age, was 144,835. The school funds, considered on October 1. 
1848, of the seminary lund $100,000, on the ratio of forty cents to each 



47 

child; from which we conclude thiait there were 14,265 children re- ' 
ported from the different townships in the State, a ludicrous estimate, 
when compared with the whole number of an edncable age in the 
State; but a fact which discloses the weakness of the system which 
had no channel of inter-communication from the State department, 
except by means of the Secretary of State, who could not depart from 
the regular duties of his ofSce to give the requisite attention to the 
duties of the Superintendent of Common Schools. Conscious of that 
fact, Secretary Martin strongly advises the restoration of that 
office. 

Qovernor Ein^, in his inaugural oration, advises the elevation of 
the common school to the foremost place in the care and counsels of 
the representatives of the people, ^^for it is emphatically the cause of 
the people.'' The condition of the university was evidently improving 
inasmuch as the indebtedness was provided for. The design of the 
curators was not yet accomplished, nor the expectations of the people 
realized, nor could they be until free education was offered within 
the halls of the State University. The whole number of students in 
attendance was sixty-three. The plan of ingrafting a normal depart- 
ment upon the universitjr was again urged with commendable persis- 
tency, and most convincing reasons, as is manifest in the act passed, 
appropriating one thousand dollars per annum for the support of a 
normal department, to the benefits of which one boy, between four- 
teen and twenty years of age, to every representative, was entitled. 
This department, however, was not established, the legislature having 
ordered a reorganization of the board of curators, it was affected. 
Among their first acts was their acceptance of President Lathrop's 
resignation, and the election of Reverend James Shannon, of Ken- 
tucky, as his successor. The board, with questionable propriety, 
stated this, or was in consequence of a desire to fill the vacant presi- 
dency, "with a man of known ability, learning and wide-spread celeb- 
rity." They also reiused to elect a normal professor, as required by the 
act of 1849. Qovernor King, speaking for the body of the people in 
his message, deplores the timidity of the representatives who have 
failed to give efficacy to the system of common schools by failing to 
vote adequate means. He recommends the election oi State and 
county superintendents, suitable provisions for district libraries, and 
for the education of teachers. This inefficiency of the system of 
schools was forcibly shown in the report of Secretary £ wing. 

To maintain a population of school-age, amounting to one hun- 
dred and fifty thousand seven hundred and fifty-one (150,751), he 
apportioned $59,456 39 to each child. The preceding legislature 
cnanged the basis of enumeration from six and eighteen years of age, 
8o as to include all betwean the ages of five and twenty years, and 
then, by inadvertance, re-enacted the law repealed. In addition to 
this, by the same act, the sections of the law of 1845, urging reports to 
be transmitted to the Secretary of State by subordinate officers, was 
also repealed, so that there were two basis of enumeration, and school 
reports were left to fly about in the winds, like wandering birds, with 
no one authorized to receive them. The total amount of school lands 
then in the State was 1,132,920 acres of which 581,883 acres had been 
sold for $727,000, leaving 551,037 acres unsold. The income from the 
fund realized from the lands sold was 72,700, which, added to the sums 
received from rate bills (about $60,000), making in all $192,146, as the 
amount available and expended in support of the whole system of 
public instruction in Missouri. The General Assembly of 1850 and 
1851 distinguished itself by establishing, upon a permanent basis, two 



48 

great educational charities: one, the institution for the blind, the 
other, the asylum for the deaf and dumb. * The former was located in 
St. Louis, and under the law then, was appropriated the sum of fifteen 
thousand dollars, on condition that ten thousand dollars in addition 
were paid toward its assistance by the citizens or courts of St, Louis. 
The latter was located in Fulton, and was entitled to receive n«'t less 
than eighty dollars per annum, for every person admitted to its 
privileges. 

It is also distinguished for the adoption of that policy of intern-! 
improvements by lending the security of the State for the benefit of 
the railroads. Fifty thousand dollars, in State bonds, were to be issueu 
by order of the Governor (upon whose recommendation the act wai 
passed), when he became satisfied that an equal amount had been 
expended by the directors of the roads mentioned in the act. The 
plan thus inaugurated was not without precedent in other parts of the 
country nor can the honorable intent of the legislature be brough: 
into question. But every citizen of Missouri, estimating the intents 
by the results of the act so disasterous to the public credit, cannoi 
but deeply regret that the plan was ever proposed and execated. 1: 
is worthy of remark that the commonwealth in no instance, has U- 
come security to any corporation without great loss of credit ani 
money. From the first act of this nature a large indebt-edness wi? 
incurred which consumed, annuallv, the surplus revenue of the Sia*c 
accumulating with the increase of revenue. For that reason no ad 
of generous relief to public education or charities could be passed bj 
the Legislature, and unquestionably, the slow and insufficient advance 
of public education to a certain extent is chargeable to the policy oi 
assisting private corporations with the public credit 

Where much was demanded for public improvements, little wa? 
left for expending upon public education. The citizens, called up^n 
for oppressive State taxes, did not cheerfully add to his burthen, by 
voting additional taxfor school houses ; and, while these great natiocai 
interests were beidg erected by aid of public funds, the greater in- 
terests ot popular education, at once the head and heart of the coir. 
monwealth, was left to languish in the university, half supported, an: 
in the old log school house. 

The report of the Curators of the University to the General As 
sembly of 1852, was quite hopeful, in spite of local and financial di£* 
culties, and " believes that in its onward and upward course, cheerec 
by every lover of morality and learning, and guided by your wisdox. 
it will shed no reflected li^ht, but, as the great living oracle of westert 
literature, rank with the first institutions of the country." The com* 
missioners of the Deaf and Dumb Asylum elected William D. Ker. 
A. M., Superintendent (who has ably conducted the institution to the 
present time), and reported an attendance of forty-one pupils. A* 
the Institution for the Blind, there were fourteen pupils present durinz 
the year. 

How insignificant was the beginning of this noble charity, con- 
pared with its present position, may be judged from the fact that the 
whole household, the year previous, consisted of twelve persons, oc- 
cupying a hired awelhng, just sufficient for their accommodation, k 
1852, the Secretary of State distributed $58,411 among 193,884 children 
of the proper school age. The experiment of thirteen years, with 
existing system of common schools, had not been satisfactory to the 
people. The; insufficiency was chargeable to the cumbersome ma- 
chinery of the law. Each township, having its own board of inspec- 



49 

tors and examiners, instead of bein^ a part of a general system, was 
practically separate and distinct, with all the evils of dissimilar stand- 
ards and methods of instruction in the same coanty. There was no 
head to the township organization, nor to the county, nor to the State 
department. Acting upon the suggestion of this experience, the 
Legislature, in 1853, revised and materially amended the existent 
school law. The superintendency in the State was restored. A commis- 
sioner for each county was appointed^ whose duties were those of 
supervision without any control ; the districts were managed by a less 
number of officers, who were subject to higher authority ; the school 
funds were made more secure ; twenty-five per centum of the revenue 
of the State was set apart for annual distribution as State school 
moneys; higher qualifications were required of teachers; the routine 
ot reports was simplified, and a more elastic tone and spirit was infused 
into the whole system of common schools. At the same time, an effort 
was made to rescue the seminary and State school funds from the grasp 
of the powerful corporation, which held and controlled them, and, by 
means of them, to a large extent, controlled the great cause confided 
to their patronage. 

In January, 1853, Hon. Sterling Price was duly inaugurated Gov- 
ernor of Missouri, having received 46,494 on a total vote of 79,180. 
One of his first acts was the appointment of John W. Henry, Esq., 
as Superintendent of Common Schools, who, in the brief time in which 
he served, performed his duties faithfully and energetically. The 
view, afforded us of the condition of the public school system, was 
neither flattering to the humanitv of the citizens, nor to the intelli- 
gence of the Legislature. " With regard to our district school houses,, 
they are the old kind, ten by twelve log cabins, with one door in the 
middle, and one oblongwindow extending from the door casing to the 
corner of the house. Who has seen one, has seen the counterpart of 
nine-tenths of the school houses in the State; low, dismal, dreary 
things, in an open space to themselves, with missiles of every descrip- 
tion scattered around them, even the view cause enough for the fever 
and ague to the whole neignborhood. No humane master would cabin 
his negroes in such noisome dens, and yet, with an inexplicable in* 
fatuation, affectionate parents send their children there to sit and 
sweat a whole summer day, to acquire habits ot neatness and order, 
and a love of knowledge. The long summer days that I have sat in 
such, upon a hard bench, with a back as straight as a corset, enjoying 
not only the birds flitting about at liberty, in which was poetry, but 
even the little pigs wallowing in their filth, are graven upon my mem- 
ory as with sharp steel; and often, in this State, have I been reminded, 
by the school houses, of those wretched days." 

It is gratifying to him, as to all who have regard for the welfare 
of humanity, to know that the era of the log school house passed 
away with that of the negro cabin. Free education, in comfortable 
school houses, comes with the era of free institutions. One is the 
exponent of the other. There were, according to the official returns 
of 1854, 233,327 children of a school age in the State, of which num- 
ber 86,505 were uncomfortably stalled in the houses described by the 
Superintendent; 152,722 were either without instruction, or taught in 
private schools. Such a fact is sufficient testimony against the ineffi- 
ciency of the whole common school establishment. So long as means 
were inadequate to supply the children of the State with the benefit 
of education, to that extent were those in authority derelict in their 

4 s R 



50 

most sacred duty to the true prosperity of the State. Much better 
provision was made for the care of the deaf and dumb and the blind. 
At the asylum where the former were instructed and sheltered, there 
were eighty-six pupils, and the Legislature appropriated six thousand 
dollars for the support of teachers, and one hundred dollars each for 
the maintenance of the pupils, while for the tuition expenses oi the 
blind pupils (of whom there were twenty six in attendance), five 
thousand dollars were appropriated (from 1855 to 1857). 

The first attempt toward a system of reporting school statistics, 
worthy of mention, was made by Hon. K. 0. Davis, in 1855. It was 
impossible to secure prompt and accurate items the first year, and in 
consequence the exhibit made by him does not possess the historical 
significance they have since attained by a persistent prosecution of 
his plan. With unusual vigor and elegance of style, the Superintend- 
ent exalted the idea of public instruction among the rich ideas which 
underlie our form of republican government, urged, with force and 
plausibility, the establishment of a normal school, for reasons of 
safety and economy, and the support of '• Teachers' Institutes" as 
invaluable auxilaries to the common school teacher. The proposi- 
tion for a normal department in the State University was again made. 
The bill embodying the proposition was evidently incorporated, and 
wisely rejected. 

On January 5th, 1S57, Hon. Trusten Polk — who received 46,9!)3 
votes, 115,200 the whole vote polled — assumed the high Affice of Gov- 
ernor. The opinions he entertained concerning educauon he failed 
to express in his inaugural address, but he left no doubt as to the lofiy 
character of his patriotism. He congratulates the Assembly " that a 
love of our cherished Union still pervades the bosoms of the people 
of the entire republic. * * * That the patriotism of oar 
true-hearted citizens, their attachment to our Oonstitution, their love 
for that Union by which, as a nation, we have attained to unexampled 
greatness and happiness, have triumphed over the fell spirit of sec- 
tionalism and disunion." 

At the beginning of this administration, the evidences of pros- 
perity were numerous and gratifying, not so much when compared 
with Illinois, which entered the Union about the same time witii Afii- 
Bouri, but when compared with our own past. The population num- 
bered 900,000 ; valuation of property had increased $120,049,010. The 
great railroad projects were rapidly nearing completion. The native 
wealth of the State, buried in the soiLand the hills, was yielding 
itself up to skilled industry; the voice of the commonwealth had 
great influence in the councils of the nation, and the fame of our 
material resources had become national. In some respects, there was 
improvement manifest in the spirit and effect of education. The 
heavy machinery of law through which the government evolved its 
benefits of money and influence, worked more efficiently. The com- 
plaints of officers and patrons partially ceased. Unorganized por- 
tions of the country were brought under the operation of the law. 
Cities and towns, aided by a special act, were building school houses, 
and otherwise providing for the facilities of public instruction. St. 
Louis, rapidly increasing in population, in wealth, and in all other 
metropolitan powers, had fostered a separate system of public schools, 
which, with wise superintendence, discreet investment of funds, true 
economy in building school houses, and with a thorough grade of in- 
struction from the primary to the normal department, has advanced 
to a degree of sufficiency and strength, unsurpassed in the United 
States. In 1856, there were 8,123 pupils registered; the total receipts 



61 

and expenditures of money were $98,035 93. Within the two years, 
during which notable improvements in many directions had been 
made, the condition of the State University had, also, improved. Its 
catalogue of students nutnbered 112. The lopal disturbance ceased 
with the accession of W. W. Hudson to the Presidency, and the sup- 
port of the faculty was secured by the income of the seminary fund 
and tuition fees, which, together, amounted to about $29,000, from 
1855 to J b56-7. 

The Hon. W. B. Starke was elected Superintendent of Common 
Schools in 1856. In his brief report to the Legislature, no informa-. 
tion concerning the operation of the law, and the condition of public 
education was given. With abrupt and singular impropriety, we are 
told the number of organized children in the State, was 233,766, 
while the number of unorganized children, was 26,507. This phrase- 
ology, was something new, and might startle any interested in the 
well being of humanity, if he were not acquainted with the terms of 
the school law. The condition of so many children "unorganized,'' 
would greatly move his sensibilities. The prominent items of interest 
sent to the department, are tabulated as follows : 

No. of children between 5 and 20 years of age 297,303 

No. of school houses, 2,454 

No. of colleges T 

N(K of academies 49 

No. of teachers 2,829 

Amount raised to build school houses $32,902 04 

In 185S, there were reported to the department of Public Instruc- 
tion, an enumeration of 341,121 children to whom was apportioned 
the sum of $238,784 70. The total number of districts in the State was 
-3,8 8 ; of school houses 2,671 ; of colleges 9 ; of academies 48 ; of teach- 
ers 2,889 ; children of school age 302,126. The amount paid for teachers 
wages was 379,815 88; number of acres ot unsold school lands 189,- 
357. There were nearly 200,000 children in the State, who were re- 
X)orted as non-attendants at school, a statement, which, if correct, re- 
veals a lamentable deficiency on the part of school authorities and 
patrons. Ihe solution of thisdiffioult problem in the opinion of the 
^Superintendent is to be found in the want of normal schools, wherein 
teachers might be instructed. Such a non-sequituv method of state 
ment is un^atisfactory• 

I'he true remedy was in a better and more easily applied system of 
instruction, amply supported and capable of expansion, to meet the 
demands of the times. In 1858, the State Treasurer invested $17,000 
of proceeds from the sale of saline lands, in the bonds of the Paci^c K.R. 
Company, and this added to the amount of the State School Fund, in 
Bank of Missojiri, made a total, $592,667 96. That there was a gradual 
iiuTease of the fund is evident from the statistics, but when compared 
with the enormous assistance given to various internal improvements, 
it is utterly insignificant. At the same time, that the nmd for the 
maintenance of public education was slowly accumulating. The State 
pledges, its securities, to the amount of $19,056,000, to railroads, with 
65,8^4,000 additional, but repaid to them in 1858. The history of error 
\\\ which Missouri is distinguished, was unprecedented, was concluded 
ill the policy, by which a debt of so many dollars was suddenly im- 
posed upon posterity. I pass by the first policy, by which a system 
of domestic slavery was introduced, which produced its legitimate 
results. The second error was in the authorization of loan offices, by 



52 

means of which the State was involved In debt of considerable mag- 
nitude, while yet in its pupilage. The third error was in the estab- 
lishment of the State Bank and its branches, a family of voracious 
dependants, which constantly oppressed the beneficent hand which 
fed them. The fourth error was the issuance of bonds to the railroad 
corporations, with the plausible intent to assist the material develop- 
ment of the country. The fifth error was the release of the custo.iv 
of public lands, to the various counties of the State. It is manifesi 
that a benevolent design underlay all these errors, which were suc- 
cessively committed, during the short existence of the commoD- 
wealth, but it is also manifest, that the State cannot enter conjointlr 
with individual interests, without damage to its credit, and in the eni 
financial embarrassment, if not ruin. It is not too much to say, th^i 
the next twenty years will be employed in correcting the errors o: 
the last twenty years of our history. No partnership in private <>- 
terestSy ohouldoe the rule of future statesmanship inMissoari. 

The view of education which Governor R. M. Stewart (in bii 
message of 1858) presents is cheerful and hopeful: " The chief conie: 
stone and crowning glory of our educational facilities is the State.' 
In 1854, there were 1,546 school houses. In 1856, there were 2,673. In 
1857, there 3,382. The number of teachers increased from 1780, in IS'l 
to 4,397 in 1857. The amount of money raised by tax to build and repair 
school buildin/i:s, was $30,487 05, in 1855 and 1857 the amount raise: 
for the same purpose, was $130,236 85. Urgent cohsiderations were 

{)roduced to induce the General Assembly, then in session, to estab- 
ish a school of agriculture : but the proposition met with but littie 
favor in the Legislature, altnough supported by a strong array of ar- 
guments, and the testimony of sucessful experiments in other portici 
of the Union. Engrossed with the subjects relating to railroads aci 
banks, the public debt, and the condition of the material politics, n? 
attention was given by the Legislature to the subject of popular e<in- 
cation. A courteous reception was given to the usual annual reporu 
from the respective State institutions, and every one seemed satisfied 
that the university, the common schools, and the charitable schoo. 
for the blind and the deaf and dumb, were prosperous and well ad- 
ministered. The university, for the first time m its career, was sustain- 
ed without personal sacrifice. The board of instruction consisted o: 
ten teachers, with a catalogue of one hundred and eighty-seven ste- 
dents. From January 8, 1857, to January 8, 1859, the receipts fror 
bank dividends and other sources, amounted to $58,562 88. '• i am nci 
aware,'' says Governor Stewart, in his valedictory message, " that anj 
legislation affecting the universitv is necessary, and trust that thei^ 
may be none calculated to disturb tne course now marked out bv it^ 
present able board of curators." 

The common school system was manifestly increasing in popula- 
appreciation, as the following table will prove : 



63 





• 

o 
h 

.a 


) niimber 

childien 

reen 5 and 

years of 

1 


hi 


f school 
ses. 


i 
1 


nt paid 
hers dur- 
the year. 


mount raised 
to build and 
repair school 
houses* 




ft 

• 

o 


i-ohi 


5u, 
d.9 


o d 

i-2 


o 

• 

o 


|5.S 


|H 


^ 


^ 


izs 


^ 


^ 


< 


< 


1856 


3,85« 


302,126 


97,907 


2,671 


2,880 


$379^815 


$32,571 


Jtodi.xi •« 


4,640 


^41,121 


141,328 


3,302 


4,397 


497,810 


180,230 


1858...... 


4,916 


867,248 


159,941 


3,878 


5,053 


560,767 


107,599 


!f659 


5,277 


385,639 


171,378 


4,272 


5,720 


691,421 


192,428 



These figures furnish encouragement to every lover of educational 
progress, although not indicative of much real advancement, bv 
means of education, to whi^h access was not had by the Superintena- 
ent of Common Schools, for at least one hundred thousand were 
taught in private institutions. 

On Friday, January ith, 1861, Governor Stewart tendered his offi- 
cial farewell to the General Assembly, after presenting an earnest 
an eloquent plea for the Union, and against the destructive doctrine 
of secession. He depicts the terrible consequences of revolution. 
**" all the social, industrial, commercial and educational interests, would 
languish and die. The wheels of commerce would rest upon the rails, 
the hammer upon the anvil, the plow in the furrows. Farms would 
be untended, mercliants idle, mecnanics unemployed, our cities deso- 
lated, as by a plague, and the country by a revolution.^' It is not 
within tho scope of my design to dwell upon the general history of 
Missouri, in the civil revolution, into which the guns of Fort Sumpter 
precipitated the nation, but only to include it while tracing the action 
and policy of the misguided loaders, then in authority, from the con- 
sequences of which the educational progress of the State was stayed, 
the money appropriated for the support of schools, unlawfully taken, 
the system of popular instruction suppressed and well nigh crushed, 
the little school house closed, and the teacher driven away by neces- 
sity or violence, and the whole routine of school support and admin- 
istration suspended. 

On the same evening in joint session, 0. F. Jackson was inaugu- 
rated as Governor of Missouri. His vote was 74,446, out of a total 
vote of 156,579, and both in political opinion, and the relation of the 
State to the general government, represented but a miiiority of his 
fellow- citizens, there being then 540,280 white male inhabitants in the 
State. His inaugural is a bold avowal of hostility to the Federal 
«:ovemment, declaring *'that the honor, the interest, and the sympa- 
thies of Missouri, determine her to stand with the South.'' With much 
plausibility and subtlety, inducement are presented to persuade the 
representatives of the people to act with the rebellious States, and 
the astonishing spectacle was seen of the highest executive officer of 
Missouri, wh6se lips had just repeated a solemn oath of fealty to the 
constitutional government, general and State, in a few minutes there- 
after justifying the destruction of both. On tne 16th of January. 1861, 
the bill providing for a State Convention to determine the ruture 
political relations of Missouri, was passed, but plainly declared that 
no act, ordinance or resolution of the Convention should change the 
rolations of the State to the General Government, until ratified by a 



54 

majority of the qualified voters. The Convention met at Jefferson 
City on the 2Sth day of February, 1861, but in a few days afterward 
adjourned to St. Louis. The secret enemies of the government were 
grievously disappointed at the tone and loyal temper of the Conven- 
tion. Every resolution passed was an expression of Unionism. One 
offered by Judge Orr, said ''ours is the best government in the world 
and we intend to preserve it,'' embodied the patiotism of the majority. 
Every day in the hall of the Convention, scenes were enacted which 
struck a pulse of fervid loyalty throughout thelieart of the common- 
wealth. Sentiments of noble patriotism fell from the glowing lips of 
the speakers, and among the scenes of ruin, faithfully predicted, was 
the utter destruction of educational interests. 

On Thursday, May 2, 1861, the Legislature assembled in special 
session, called evidently to enact measures, and to organize the in> 
strument by which the patriotic influence of the Convention might be 
counteracted. Act after act authorizing the organization of military 
companies were passed, but timid and hesitant the assembly failed to 
meet the demands of the chief conspirators in the government until 
the news of the surrender of Camp Jackson, on the 1 0th of May ac- 
complished what the arts of treasonable officials failed to do. In a 
few minutes the notorious "military bill" was passed — an act not only 
extraordinary and unconstitutional, but conferring dictatorial powers 
upon the Governor. A militia fund was created lor the purpose oi 
arming and equippipg the militia. All the money in the treasury or 
to be received from the proceeds of the special tax of one-tenth of 
one per cent, on the hundred dollars levied by act of 1857, to secure 
the completion of railroads, or from other sources, except the interest 
due on revenue bonds ; the amount necessary to carry on the State 
government, and the special appropriations for the benefit of the 
State charities, were directed to be made a part of the militia foni 
The Governor was authorized to borrow one million of dollars, the 
several county clerks were ordered to levy an additional tax of fifteen 
cents on every hundred dollars of taxable property. The Govenior 
was authorized to buy all munitions of war, according to his own dis- 
cretion, and whether he bought arms or not, nevertheless the Auditor 
was required to drawn his warrant upon the order of the Governor 
for the whole of the militia fund, whenever his Excellency should de- 
sire it. But the singular iniquity of this act was consumated by a 
section suspending until (1S6*^), the one-fourth of the revenue appro- 
priated for the purpose of education. 

A joint resolution forbade the Superintendent of Common Schools 
to apportion the State school monies. This act was nearly fatal to the 
interests of public education. This State subsidy was confidently ex- 
pected by School officers, and their levies of special tax were made 
with reference to it. As a consequence, the school houses were in- 
evitably closed. The great artery was tied. A general demoraliza- 
tion, on the part of subordinate officers, succeeded. They would not 
act, and teachers could not venture to teach when their pay was un- 
certain. The Legislature soon afterward adjourned, after doing what 
was deemed necessary to put the whole State under the control of the 
Governor, with all its resources of money, troops, and munitions of 
war. Nothing now opposed the ripe plan of Governor Jackson, and 
the prominent conspirators in the State capital and elsewhere A 
single proclamation would call thousands of men to arms, and a single 
order would place millions of dollars at his disposal. But, under favor 
of Heaven, at this juncture General Harney and General Lyon inter- 
posed the strong arm of the Federal Government^ and destroyed the 



55 

Slan. The Governor then issued his call lor soldiers: "Rise, then, and 
rive out, ignominioosly, the invaders who Lave dared to desecrate 
the soil which your labors have made fruitful, and which is conse- 
crated by your homes." The indignant words were in vain ; they fell 
like sparks upon the iron front of General Lyon's brave guards, who 
advanced toward Jefferson City. The Governor and the other State 
officers fled, three of whom afterward returned 

From one extreme of the State to the other, troops were muster- 
ing, and rapidly concentrated upon important points, to prevent any 
stir of secession. General Lyon in St. Louis, Generals Hurlburt and 
Pope in North Missouri, and General Sweeny in Southwest Missouri, 
held the ^tate to the Union with a firm grasp. Battles for the posses- 
sion of the Southwest were fought, in one of which General Lyon, the 
flower of the Western army, was slain. It is scarcely credible, but it 
is true, nevertheless, that fifty nine different battles and skirmishes 
took place in Missouri, 1861. 

In the midst of this disorganization, the State Convention met, on 
the 22d day of July, in the City of Jefferson. Hamilton R. Gamble 
was made Provisional Governor; the act apportioning twenty-five per 
centum of the public revenue, annually, was revived, which, together 
with other school moneys in the treasury, amounted to nearly $250,* 
000, but which was lost to the schools by the unjust act of the last 
Assembly. 

On December 30th, 1862, a new General Assembly met, composed 
chiefly ot men whose opinions were the exact opposite of those which 
controlled the Assembly of 1860-61. There were many distinguished 
for energy and ability, and they put themselves immediately to the 
duty of remedying the evils introduced by the treasonable acts of the 
last Assembly, and the fugitive Jackson. Governor Gamble, in his 
message to this Assembly, says: "The embarrassments produced by 
the rebellion have deeply affected the common schools of the State, 
and it will remain for you to endeavor, in the midst of our present 
financial difficulties, to devise some practicable scheme of restor- 
ing our school system to its former successful operation." 

The embarrassments were more serious when the Convention 
had transferred the office of Superintendent of Common Schools to 
the Secretary of State, and that of county commissioner to the 
county clerk. In this year the school fund amounted to $578,967, 
with $129,617 in the treasury subject to distribution. No apportion- 
ment was made, however, in 1862, by the Superintendent ex-officio, 
because not one-third of the counties had be^n reported to his office, 
and scarcely any of them were reported correctly. "In consequence 
ol the war, which has, with unparalleled ferocity, devastated our 
State for the last twenty months, common school are prostrated and 
broken up, colleges have been converted into hospitals, and school 
houses into barracks ; school teachers have laid down the ferule, and 
taken up the sword, and parents have sent their children to learn war 
on the battle plains, instead of letters in the quiet groves of literature 
and science." 

The institution for the education of the blind was prosperous and 
nntouched, amid the calamities of the civil war; but the State Univer- 
sity was suspended during the session of 1861-62, and did not resume 
operations until seven weeks after the usual time, 1862-63. 

Located in a country subject to sudden and unexpected inya- 
eions by armed bands of guerrillas, the interests of the institution 
must necessarily suffer. Its doors were finally closed to students and 
opened to soldiers, who occupied its ample hall for garrison and ho8> 



56 

pital purposes. It was re-opened in 1863, and now under the able ad- 
ministration of D. Eeed, L.L. D., is rapidly re-assuming the position of 
influence it held in former times of peace, maintained by a liberal en- 
dowment fund, set apart by the General Assembly of 1866. A normal 
department under the care of E. L. Bipley, as principal, has at last 
been successfully established after many years of effort, and various 
experiments in that direction. In March 1863, it was resolved by the 
Assembly to suspend so much of the common school act as required 
the superintendent to apportion the school moneys in April of each 
year, because of the impossibility of making a fair and equitable ap- 
portionment. This prohibition, however, was removed in 1864 by leg- 
islative enactment, which required the ex-oMcio superintendent to 
distribute the school moneys upon returns made to his office in 1860. 
The amount distributed was $169,685. The same year witnessed a 
partial reconstruction of the prostrate school system under the power 
of an act of the General Assembly, giving special power to trustees 
of the respective school districts, to levy a tax of one hundred and 
fifty dollars for the payment of teachers' wages. 

On January 2a, 1865, a new administration begun in the State 
with the inauguration of Thomas 0. Fletcher^ as Governor, who re- 
ceived 73,600 votes in a total of 104,664. In his salutatory oration to 
the joint session, there is happily depicted the future of grand results 
for the State, emancipated from the institution of slavery, and dedi- 
icated by solemn decree to freedom. It was "henceforth to be the 
asylum of all nationalities and races, and people: the repository of 
wealth, and a theater for the development of the laoor and enterprise 
of the nand and spirit of industry, and the home of free thoughts, free 
speech, and a free press, where the prejudices of caste and class have 
no leeral embodiment or political encouragement." 

The restoration of the office of Superintendent of Common Schoob 
was recommended as an independent office, and suitable care over 
the educational system of the State, including an organization of the 
university, was earnestly enforced, No returns were made from the 
various counties to the Secretary of State, and hence, no information 
of the condition of public schools was available, except that a gen- 
eral suspension still existed over the State. The General Assembly 
responded to the request of the Governor. The office of State Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction was established, to which James L. 
Robinson, Esq., was appointed. The school law was amended so as to 
include within its benefits, the colored youth lately emancipated, dis- 
loyal men were prohibited from acting as school omcers,'and all teach- 
ers were required to instruct their pupils in the fundamental princi- 
ples of the government. 

In the meanwhile, a convention of the people elected under act j 
of February 13, 1864, was in session in the city of St. Louis. The 
present Constitution of the State is the product of their long session. 
The article upon education is a specimen of noble and prescient states- 
manship, liberal, just and comprehensive, and justly raises it to a co- 
ordinate department of the State government, nor subordinate any 
longer to the caprice of unfriendly legislation. The first section is a 
fitting exponent of the remainder, "a general diffusion of knowledge 
and intelligence being essential to the preservation of the rights and 
liberties of the people, the General Assembly shall establish and 
maintain free schools for the gratuitous instruction of all persons in 
this State between the ages of five and twenty-one years.'^ At last, 
after forty years experiment, with failure after failure, to establish the 
true corner-stone of a substantial edifice, it was found in this supreme 



67 

provision, and its resting place discovered. The building is advan- 
cing silently, without the noise of hammers, based upon the institu- 
tions of freedom. This article, too, is the oright transformation oi 
that condition in the provisional act , of 1802, by which Congress re- 
leased the territory from its pupila/a:e, religion, morality and knowl- 
edge being necessary to good government, and the happiness of man- 
kind ; schools, and the means of education shall be encouraged and 
provided for." The past thus speaks through the present. This idea 
emerged with radiant growth, with the day spring of liberty, to the 
land and all the inhabitants thereof. 

We conclude this brief sketch here, expecting to resume it, when 
the time shall be more fitting to recall the progress of free education 
since 1865. 



3sro. II. 



REPORTS 



or 



COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS. 



No. ftDd CODdi- 

tion of Scboo 


1 1 

i 1 


il 1 ! 


Il in 




1 




j 




1 




pil> attending 
School. 


Is 


5» i 


ss |ass 


i 




Sfl 


g 




No. BcbooUfor 
Colored PqpUs 




-,» , 1 




- 




M.«e< 


- 




So. OoDtKM. 






- 








1 


i" 


- 




No. BnolniriM 




- j- p 1 


" 








-" 


- 




No. of Belect 
School!. 




— :— - 1 js 


— - 2Sg 


" 


"S"-=a 


No. of HiEh 
School.. 


« i « 


1 i i 


: !-««*-«« 


il 


- 


- 


No. ofPrimuj 

Schooli. 


ss 


ss^ess Isscsa Issssssg"*! 


ssxsas-s 


No. OOe'l Lat- 
Wri writWD. 


S2S3 iSSSSSS 1 isSS-=S3 i-^Sg-S 


s! 


is-sas 


No. MUestrav 
clpd. 


iSliaiSgilrips 


SS|9 i ilipi 


11 


ipsii 


Ho. d£ dnjg 
■pent in oSci&l 

dati«. 
No. Educati.)n- 
■1 M«etmc> at- 
tended. 


S3SSSSSSgSSSSS5 


.SKIS jsEgas 


SSSS3|2S 




i" \""- 1 i" ! 


■ i-s is'S- 


— 


h 


— 


No.ScfaoDl>T»- 
iWd. 


|3S2SS*gfesa jS- 


55SSS isss-a 


3-aSES-S 


So.CBrtillciite. 
iisnrd. 


5!S2S*S'-S3SS sasag8gK£t3SKSRsssggss*a 


No.ofFemii 
r^«ct«d. 




Ho M*l» r 
j«t«l. 


ined. 


3S23""'-R2'-2-'i3Sa-SSS2Sa3S*'!£S"Sa'-S"5 


ined. 


RS33Sa-gsg3'°S33SSSSafeS53SSS!sS3SSS'-S 


N-D. of PriTtte 
EiMniDMiDdi. 


3g 2 


N' JB2 i N : 


5 JSSSI is=- 


i:asss" i 


No. of pgblic 


" a 


- SSS3 S=S 


"S"3 ssa"2 


s- 




- 


3i 


i 


■i "i 


i 


Jill : 




a 




i 


■S; 


i 


^. 



REPORTS OF COUiNTY SUPERINTENDENTS. 



ADAIR. — R Mercer. 

The educational progress in this county is good. Work done by 
Superintendent forty-eight visits and six township meetings, making 
in all fifty-four visits and ei^ht days' instruction. The normal school 
has done a good work for this part of the country* The qualifications 
of teachers will average seventy-five per cent. 

Obstacles in the way of improvement are want of time, and the 
blanks did not come in time. 

The public schools have been kept open at least three months 
during the year. 



in 1 1 * 



ANDREW.— H. P. ALBXA5DER* 

There have been fifteen new school houses built in the county 
during the year, making twenty-nine in two yearsj besides purchasing 
the building for the Savannah public schools. 

Most of the new houses are large, comfortable and conveniently 
arranged, with good desks and sufficient blackboard surface ; but a 
few of our directors appear to think they are conserving the interests 
of their districts best by building as small a house with as little money 
as possible. Some subdistricts that were managed thus, are already 
tr}'ing to sell their small houses, that they may erect larger and more 
convenient ones. 

Our houses are all located on good sites, though generally 
lurther from the more traveled roads, I think, than is necessary. 

Most of our new houses are well seated, and some of the old ones 
have been re-seated with the latest improved desks. 

A few subdistricts have apparatus, and the subject is being gen- 
erally discussed throughout the county. 

Teachers, generally good, most of the " fogies" having lett the 
county or quit the profession, though, like in every hive, a few drones 
remain, who will neither leave the profession nor attend the institute^ 
that they may see their inadequacy. 

We hold two sessions of the county institute, annually, of five 
days each. 

The colored people have the same advantages that the whites 
have, in schools of the same grade. 

There are four private schools in the county, two of which are run 
by small minority parties, who are opposed to public schools, or 
oould not have them conducted to suit their tastes. 



64 

There is a school at Fillmore under the control of the conference 
of the Methodist church. I have not visited it, but, from reputation, 
believe it to be one of the best of that class of schools. 

Would like to have some provisions made to sustain connty insti- 
tutes, and to have normal schools established and put in operation in 
different parts of the State. 

The county snperintendency should be made a sustaining ofSce oi 
itself. 



AUDRAIN.— M, M. Holmes, 

In a few subdistricts considerable interest is manifested, and the 
schools are in a prosperous condition. This interest is shown in the 
employment of capable teachers, the continuance of school beyond 
the four months, and the purchase of suitable apparatus. The school 
houses built are better, and more attention has been paid to the site 
than formerly. Some improved furniture, from the manufactory of 
the W. P. & S. F. Co., of St. Louis, has, also, been introduced. 

The limited time allowed the county superintendent, has made i( 
impossible to accomplish much. 

Two teachers' institutes have been held, with interest and profit 
to the members. 

There are a few first-class teachers in the county. The mjyoritv. 
however, have had no special training for the work. A few have 
been granted certificates, more to enable all the subdistricts to have 
a school, than of the fitness of the applicant. 

A system of " free normal schools " is certainly needed and de- 
manded by the best interests of public education. The plan propose: 
by the State Superintendent is, undoubtedly, well a4apted to the pur- 
pose. 



BATES.— D. A. McGaughey. 

In compliance with the school law of Missouri, as well as with the 
custom in our State, I address you this, my third annual statement o: 
our school matters, in this county, and as is the practice of some of 
our county superintendents, and as I have done heretofore, 1 shall be 
practical, and as brief as possible. 

Two years ago, when 1 was elected to the office of county super 
intendent of public schools, of this county, we had but two or thre« 
school houses in the county, and they were 'very indifferent houses, 
and about one-half oi our county unorganized. To-day, on almost 
every hilltop may be seen a bright new school house, and every sec> 
tion of land in the county is in some organized district 

This has been accomplished by a constant and determined effort 
on the part of the superintendent, that the public school system of 
Missouri should be a success in this county, and this has been done 
at the expense and threats of a few pettifoggers ; that they would or 
could destroy our school tax in the different townships, that was levied 
to accomplish this object. These were akin and very similar to the 
threats of our rebels in this state, and came from the same kind of a 
spirit and desire that actuated them. 



6& 

Oar school houses are most all new, and are built with some taste, 
and are being moderately well provided with furniture, in the way of 
desks and black boards, etc. Our school grounds consist of about 
one acre of ground to each school house. Very few of our school 
houses are yet inclosed. Our teachers are rather more than an aver- 
age class of teachers, most of them have been engaged in the pro* 
fession of teaching, in the eastern states, and come with first-class 
certificates from those states. 

When I first came to the county, I was shown the spot where the 
first rebel camp was made, and the place where the first rebel flag 
was raised in this county. During the past summer while visiting the 
schools in this county, in my official capacity, I found a new school 
house located in the very same spot, with a house lull of bright boys 

aud girls. 

Our examinations have been private, or whenever the candidates 
presented themselves. We have had no public examinations. We 
nave not yet organised a teachers' institute in this county ; there will 
be one organized as soon as we have a suitable room to meet in. 

Our school officers are doing their duty as well as they know how, 
under the law, and we have no reason to complain on that score. The 
trouble is with our school law, it is so complicated, that it is almost 
impossible for all to understand it alike. There is not that connection 
between the township boards of education, clerks and superintend- 
ents, there shouH be. Our people are generally interested in keep- 
ing up good schools, and I thins the day is not very distant, when 
Bates county, with its splendid school fund of nearly $100,000, wiU 
become famous for ita good schools* 



BOLLINGER.— S. A. Oallvkrt. 

9 

Relative to the educational progress of my county, allow m© to 
say, that in December, 1868, when I took charge of the office of county 
superintendent of schools for this county, through the perseverance 
of my esteemed predecessor, the school townships and subdistricta had 
been organized with that care and seemingly correctness, there appear- 
ed nothing before me but Watchfulness, in order to keep the wheel re- 
volving. But before long, in many of the subdistricts, the directors 
became convinced, by their own reasoning, they were, or should be, 
the ruling power of their respective school townships, and if their 
modes of teaching, and their version of the law, were not adopted, 
the organizations so wisely and carefully constituted, should speedily 
perish. Township clerks, and boards of education, stubbornly refused 
to act upon plain principles of law. Quarrels and dissensions ensued ; 
ousting, resignations and refusals to serve, seemed to be the order of 
the day, until their organization, in fact, were well nigh destroyed.— 
Now, how was this evu to be remedied? Who was to act in a manner 
to efifectually destroy this bitter feeling, and dispose of those disturb- 
ers of our schools? Had the Legislatiure in its supposed wisdom, de- . 
vised any means in the hands of those who have, by virtue of their 
office, control of the schools of the county, whereby refractory clerks 
or boards of education, or even subdirectors could be made subser- 
vient to the law. 

I am aware that the law makes it the duty of the county^Bupe^* 

8 B 



66 

tendent, to confer T^ith and instrnct township boards, sobdirectors. 
&c. But what would a superintendent do, when a board, or its clerk, 
would not receive the opinion of the Attorney General of the State, 
in rebuttal of his own views of the law, and to sustain the good order 
of the township. As was done in this county, what resources haTe 
the Legislature placed at the disposal of and to sustain himself in 
such a dilemma? He has none. 

It was not for two months that this difficulty became quieted, and 

{>eace and harmony reigned throughout these several townships. Yet 
or all this, the new scnool law cannot claim any favor for alleviatinf 
these disturbances; but on the other hand, we may look for more and 
greater dissensions. For this reason, many townships are without their 
proper funds, by the failure of their clerk to give bond, that he misrlir 
collect the assessment return. In some one or two instances, in mj 
county, townships failed to find collectors, (clerks), who would take 
the responsibility, or were competent to act in that capacity. 
Who is to blame for this i the people? No, the law. 
And another great difficulty : We will say that A has lands in 
every township in the county; ne must needs take from three to fire 
days, and ride many miles, to pay a small school tax; if he fails to ap- 
pear, or has no notice of the time and places of paying these taxes, he 
must pay a penalty for his ignorance — a penalty assessed against hin 
by the Legislature, and put into the hands of an agent to execute, not 
''by due process of law," or a "judgment of his peers," or the law of 
the land (sections 19 and 20): ''It is the duty of parties assessed witb 
school tax, to pay to the township clerk the sum thus due, on or before 
the first day of September following; and it shall be the duty of s^ad 
clerk to make out a list of taxes delinquent, on the first day of Sep- 
tember, and return the same to the collector of the county," etc We 
find either that it was intended for the clerk to deliver th^is list to the 
collector "on the first day of September following," or that there was 
no time specified when the clerk was required to deliver the same; 
and if the latter be the case^ as we must so construe the law, and the 
clerk failed to deliver this list for many days, or even months, and thi? 
man A came in to the collector of the county, in the interim^ to p:*^ 
his tax, and finds nothing in that office, who is to suffer ? A and tk 
school township ? ' 

I think a correction in this law could be safely made, with grei: 
justice to the people. I do think the collection or the school monej. i 
which, by the way, is small enough, is distributed among too manj " 
officers to make it profitable to any, and those depending upon tb^ 
collection of the same ; our taxes are not of such great sums, or so dif- 
ficult to collect, but what one man might do it all, without making 
every man a collector — leaving none to pay. Many of our townshi:? 
are without funds, from such failures, and the refusal of the counrj 
collector to receive these lists after the first of September, as the law 
does not specify when these lists shall be presented to him. 

I have, during my official term, visited about thirty schools, and ! 
many school meetings; have used every means within my power tc ' 
encourage the work of education to go on, I have, by great exertion, 
been able to organize a county teachers' institute, which proved a 

Eeat benefit and encouragement to education throughout the eountj. 
this connection, I would say, I do think more interest should be 
manifested by the Legislature in encouraging and forcing teachers to 
become members of these institutes; if need be. force them to attend, 
or give into the hands of the county superintendent the power to re- 
voke their certificates. It is very humiliating to think the count; 



f7 

superintendent is bound down by responsibilities, with no power to 
act. 

We have upward of forty school houses, mostly log, while some 
are built with a view of worth and permanence. We are deficient in 
apparatus. I have held six public examinations, and twenty-seven 
private examinations; th«y have in every case been oral. We have 
twenty-nine teachers in active service in the county, most of whom 
are under second and third grade certificates. I have oiily three first 

Sraded teachers. The pay is generally very good, from twenty-five 
ollare to sixty dollars per month. In most subdistricts, schools have 
been kept open for four to six months, the last school year, and many 
are in the first and second month of the next year, now upon us. 

In conclusion, allow me to say for and in behalf of those coming 
after me, and, I hope, for the benefit and encouragement of education, 
feeling a deep sense of its great importance, and the importance of 
the office I now hold, and toe good that must of necessity accrue, if 
properly attended^ that, under the requirements of the law, and the 
responsibilities imposed, he, the county superintendent, does not re- 
ceive compensation for his labor, sufficient to attract the attention of 
men of education. On the other hand they feel disposed to, and do, 
decline the office, and class it as one of the cheap offices of the county, 
leaving political humbugs, and men of very inferior education, to take 
charge of an office of great importance to the county. Our law- 
makers must soon find it a very violent supposition indeed, that edu- 
cated men will take such an office through a sense of benevolence. If 
it was intended to be an important office in the State, an office that 
would call around it educated men, why, in the name of justice, hide 
its fees and salary withid the folds of the judicial cloak of a county 
court, that acts upon the principle that they were elected by the 
people as a committee of retrenchment only. 

I do think the law could' be amended, paying the county superin- 
tendent a stated salary, that he might devote all his time to the inter- 
ests of education. 



BOONK-^. A. Hendbbsok. 

In regard to the educational procress in this county, I am happy 
to state, there is marked increase in ^e interest in the public schools. 
There areiewer private or select schools, and the public schools are 
better patroniEed. As we become more familiar with the law, its 
objects, and the means by which those results are to be secured the 
more it is adopted, but in some respects we find it very difficult to 
carry out I have particular reference to tne method in which the 
school tax is collected, and I desire to call your attention specially 
to the Aict, that it is impossible for the cbunty clerks to prepare, in 
tim€^ the tax books for the different township clerks. Among other 
things, it is made the duty of the township clerks, to return to the 
collector of the county, the delinquent tax lists in their hands-, on the 
first day of September, while in fact^ many of them do not receive 
their books until after that time; the result of which is confusion, 
and that produces complaint and aissatisfaction, and it is all referred 
to the school law, or rather to the change made at the last session of 
the Legislature. I am entirely in favor of the county collector col- 
lecting also the school tax. 



68 

Many ^^ ^^e districts were induced to levy a tax this spring, hav- 
ing witnessed the good results, to those districts which have fully 
adopted the law the year previous, but I am of opinion that the con- 
fusion above mentioned, will operate as a damper upon those who 
have been favorabljr impressed, and unless some remedy is provided, 
they will lose what interest they now have in the schools. 

My effort has been strictly directed to securing a full organiza- 
tion of the county, as I, in substance, stated in my last rei>ort No 
one can do, satisfactorily to himself, and to all others interested, the 
work expected of a county superintendent ; and it never will be done 
until such a salary is provided as will command the services of a 
thorough, competent, practical teacher. 



BUCHANAN.— E. B. Neelky. 

In presenting my third annual report of public schools of this 
county, it affords me pleasure to report a most encouraging advance- 
ment in the condition of our educational interests. The people gen- 
erally throughout the county, are becoming more interested in the 
subject of education. Many neat and commodious school houses 
have been erected, and incompetent teachers have been compelled to 
withdraw and make room for those possessing the proper qualifica- 
tions. 

When, contrary to my own personal wishes, I took charge of the 
county schools two and a half years ago, I determined to labor hon- 
estly and conscientiously for their improvement. It seemed to me, 
that two objects were first to be accomplished, which having been ef- 
fected, the rest would follow naturally and in order. 

In looking around upon the condition of affairs, I found that there 
were only two or three school houses in the whole county worthy even 
of the name. They had been erected in the first place without any 
reference to comfort or convenience, and through the lapse of time 
and ill-usage, had fallen into woful (ulapidation. This, then, was the 
first evil to be remedied, and hence, my first effort was to convince 
the directors, in whose hands the remedy lay, that they could not ex- 
pect good schools until they furnished good school houses. I am hap- 
py to inform you that my efforts in that direction have been success- 
ful even beyond mv expectations. In most of the subdistricts neat 
and commodious school houses have been erected, and many of them 
have been furnished with the new style of desks. Other subdistricts 
have provided the necessary means, and will build early in the spring. 
The old log school houses is fast becoming one of the relics of the 
past, and in its place the eye of the traveler is greeted with neat struc- 
tures of frame, brick or stone. This, then, is one great advance in the 
right direction, and if nothing more had been accomplished, there 
would be sufficient cause for encouragement and perseverance. But 
improvement even more marked can, I think, be reported in another 
essential particular. 

We have now a much better class of teachers than I found in the 
county two and half years ago. Under the old order of things, any 
one who would take the trouble to apply for a certificate to teach, 
could procure it. The consequence was, that the county was flooded 
with persons wholly incompetent as teachers, who offered their ser- 
vices to directors at low rates to the exclusion of well-qualified teach- 



69 

ers. 8ome excellent teachers were here, and they still remain, but 
the great majority were wholly unfit for their calling, and should 
never have received a certificate to teach. To remedy this evil, I de- 
termined to make my examinations searching enough to test thorough- 
ly the qualifications of every candidate, on each branch of study pre- 
scribed in our public schools, and to refuse certificates to all who 
failed to come up to the required standard. This unpleasant duty, I 
have been compelled to perform in many inst.^nces, but the good re- 
sults of adhering to that policy have not been slow in making them- 
selves apparent: 

A better class of teachers now present themselves for examina- 
tion, those who know themselves to be incompetent, have discovered 
that it is useless to apply for a certificate, and our schools, with but 
few exceptions, are supplied with intelligent and faithful teachers. 
Let county superintendents throughout the State, be firm and con- 
scientious in this matter of granting certificates, and then let the Leg- 
islature give us an adequate supply of well endowed normal schools, 
and we may soon expect to see the dawn of a brighter day for the ed- 
ucational interests of Missouri. 

I was much pleased with your proposed plan for the establishment 
of normal schools in the State, by districts, as explained in your re- 
cent circular. I trust that this or some similar plan will be adopted 
by the Legislature at its next session. Until we have normal schools 
in Missouri, we must continue in the future as we have in the past, to 
depend upon other States to furnish us teachers, thoroughly trained 
and qualified for their work. 

The public schools of the city of St. Josfeph, which were organized 
under a special charter, have been under my supervision for the past 
four years, and it is proper that I should close this short letter with a 
brief report of these schools for the year ending July 31, 1868. 

During the year the names of one thousand seven hundred and 
sixty-six different pupils were enrolled in the St. Joseph public schools. 
The average number belonging during the year was one thousand and 
ninety-eignt; the average daily attendance was one thousand and 
eighteen, and the percentage of daily attendance estimated upon the 
number belonging was ninety-two and a half. The schools were 
eleven in number ; school rooms, twenty-two; teachers, twenty-two; 
besides a teacher of vocal music for all the schools during the whole 
year, and a teacher of gymnastics for half the year. The total number 
of seats in all the houses was one .thousand three hundred and six- 
teen. 

The board now own five school buildings, and have in process of 
erection, and rapidly approaching completion, two more. One of the 
new buildings contains four school rooms and a recitation room ; the 
other contains six school rooms and a recitation room. Lhey are both 
built after the most appro\red plan, will be provided with all the 
necessary conveniences and appliances, and externally, will present 
an exceedingly handsome appearance. They will furnish ample a^id 
good accommodations for seven hundred pupils. 

All of the school houses owned by the board are built of brick 
except the colored school house, which is a frame building. When 
the new houses are completed, the board will have provided seats for 
2,016 pupils. It is probable, however, that some schools, now taught 
in rented buildings, will then be discontinued. The population of the 
city is about 30,000, and the number of children of school age, 5,044. 



TO 
CALLAWAY.-nJ. D. Jolly. 



I am proud to say that the cause of education in this eonntvis 
proirressing far better than I had any reason to hope that it would, in\ny 
last letter. The people seem to be taking greater interest than ever 
before, and I hope we will soon have schools that will be an ornament 
to the county. , 

I have endeavored, as superintendent, to do all the work possible 
in the time allowed for school duties, and have labored, to the best of 
my ability, to make the people appreciate and understand the great 
advantages that our present school system has over our old law, and 
thus get them to interest themselves in organizing and carrying on 
the schools. 

The qualifications of the teachers are about 3^ on a scale of 5. 

The great obstacle to overcome is low wages. Professional teach- 
ers have not sufficient inducement to come here. 

The schools have all, so far as I am able to learn^had at leasi a four 
months' session, during the year. 



OAMDEN.— F. L. Withaup. 

1. Educational progreBs in the oovnty — ^This is by no means what 
it might have been, owing to the indiflfefence manifested by the citi- 
zens towards popular education. Every effort has been made to 
lessen this evil, but so far, success is far away. This indifference, 
coming as it principally does, from those who have children to edo* 
cate. The children are not free from it. After a very imperfect thre« 
or four months' school has been taught, school books are thrown 
aside, until (perhaps) eight months later, the same thing is repeated. 

2. Educational work dove hy county superintendent, — I visited 
every township but two, distributed the school law and blanks, gave 
directions how to go to work to organize lawfully. I also visited the 
various schools about the middle of the term, addressing the childrei 
on the great importance of securing an education, admonishing obe- 
dience to their instructor, and diligence in their studies, closing, bj 
extending a general invi-tation, through their teacher, and the whole 
school, to their parents, friends and patrons, to honor us with their 
presence on the closing day of the school, when we would have as 
examination, and also give a few remarks on popular education, and 
various other items, to increase interest in general education, etc. 
With but two exceptions, in attending the closing days of twenty 
schools, outside of the scholars not a single person, male or female, 
attended. Nor was this all. Teachers generally complained of a vert 
slim attendance of the scholars, while school oflBcers generally *''turne<l 
up missing.'' 

3. Educational progress from other affencie8,—0f this we know 
nothing. Citizens being so prompt in letting matters pertaining to 
education, remain "m etafu quo^ so that those who may feel disposed 
to do something, give up the idea as useless. Repeated efforts have 
been made to get teachers, school oiRcers and heads of families to 
subscribe for some educational journal, periodical, or mag'azine, bot 
invariably the reply was ^'can't afford it." 

4. Qualifications of teachers, — Also great room for improvement 
Last November we made an eflFort to found a teachersMnstitute. The 



71 

county, having no public building, suitable to hold meetings infer the 
purpose (our court house only existing in name) enquiries were made 
of our county court, as to some assurance, that the expenses would be 
paid, but that august body, in their great wisdom, also thought that 
they couldn't aflord it As but very few of the teachers now em- 
ployed, or likely to be employed in the future, follow teaching as a 
profession, but few make any eflForts toward improving, for the impor- 
tant duties of teacher. Teaching a school is considered more in the 
light of making a few dimes, than to the all-important fact of 'teaching 
the young idea how to shoot." Again, few, if any of our teachers 
read any authors on teaching, and the greater portion, with and by 
the consent of school officers, and parents, not only believe in keep- 
ing or teaching a loud or open school, as they term it, but more pro- 
perly called disorderly or noisy, but cling to the old fogy idea with a 
pertinacity well worthy of a better cause. 

5. Obstacles in the way of improvement. — ^The first and greatest 
one is this : That under the circumstances, last above enumerated, the 
dignity of the teachers' profession is entirely lost, nor can I see any 
hope for improvement., until we go to work, and educate teachers 
first, and then do away with the detrimental practice of employing 
those who teach for the least money. Next comes the irregular at^- 
tendance of scholars. The greatest and bitterest complaints from 
teachers have been on this account. It is very strange, but neverthe- 
less true, that after parents go to the trouble and expense of getting 
up a four months' school (which, in the general estimation, is the ne 
plus ultra)^ they do not send one-half of the time. In examining the 
registers in three schools, the highest attendance was, out of eighty 
days, thirty. In two others, thirty-five ; a few only have a two-third 
attendance, while by far, the meg ority fall below one*half. One teacher 
remarked to me that he had been six months' teaching a four months' 
school. He could give no cause other than over-indulgence of the 
parents. Hence, if only a four months school is taught, the children 
on an average, receive only two months'' instruotion in the year. 
Next comes the niggardly manner in which children are furnished 
with books by their parents. In no school have I found all the books 
necessary, while in many, classes of from three to six, had but one 
book. In one school, asking the teacher how many classes he had his 
school divided into, was answered with the utmost nonchalance, hut 
one^ and that in the spelling hook^ and on being told to proceed 
(this happened on closing day), as if usual,hehad two scholars chose 
ibr a spelling match, arranging, true to his remark, the whole scl.ool 
in the same, consisting of forty scholars, when they began atthehend, 
spelt to the foot, back to the head, and so on, till ^'Webster's ElennMi- 
tary" was exhausted. On further examination, I found that none of 
the best spellers could read monosyllabic words, or repeat the least 
part of the multiplication table. On taking the teacher to task ibr 
the ^reat oversight and negligence, was told^^that it was impossible 
for him to teach without books,^the truthfulness of which was apparent, 
and I could say no more. The above is by no means an exaggerated 
or isolated case, but very nearly represents the feelings of parents, as 
to the knowledge of Addison remarks, ^'niggardliness is not good Lus- 
bandry." Again, it is my firm belief, that as long as so much of the 
management, as the law now imposes, rests with county courts, the 
good the law has in view will never be accomplished. The courtf^, to 
a great extent, are composed of men, who have become popular by 
some actor deed during the last war, and but very little weight is 
laid on what intellectual qualification they may possess. Thub ii 



72 

often happens, and will, as long as men are fi'nided by political en- 
thusiasm, that men, who are not only entirely devoid of any intellec- 
tnal qnalificaiions, but do not even possess sound sense enough to 
judge those who may possess a small degree of intelligence, are placed 
in positions to control those in whose care and custody the develop- 
ment of the mind is entrusted. Such men are, therefore, called upon, 
and by law have authority to pass judgment upon services required, 
and as far as their knowledfi:e extends, performed. If we are to take 
the accepted term, that "they are to judge others by themselvev 
ought we to wonder at the 7n(hg7\aniraity with which we are compen- 
sated? Ou^ht we to complain at the niggardly manner to them, per- 
haps a hereditament, in which county warrants (worth fifty cents ob 
the dollar), are issued to us at the xKie of ihref^ dollars per ditm\ 
Ought we to complain, when in order to attend to our duties, we must 
hire, therefore, ahorse at two dollars, and pay board and lodging at 
the same rate, viz : four dollars per diem (all of which has to come in 

freeniaoks for aught they know), and come to receive one 50-100 del- 
ars, and clear what — our pockets ? We only make these suggestions 
for the benefit of our successors. 

6. With but few exceptions, every township, or fractional par! 
thereof, has had one or more public schools, for three or four monti? 
during the year. 



CAPE GIRARDEAU.— F. M. Grove. 

I am pleased to be able to state that for the last year, there hts 
been a general improvement in school matters. The privileges oi 
general education is now extended to all classes. The qualificatioDs 
of the several teachers remain nearly the same. Many obstacles in 
the way of improvement are being removed. New houses are build- 
ing, and the schools, in many cases, are kept open longer than is re- 
quired by law. 

Renewed activity, on the part of all oflScers in school matters ha? 

{)roduced results that promise much lor the future welfare of the pub- 
ic schools of this county. 



CARROLL.— J. H. Baker. 



Since the last report from this county, there has been a decided 
change in the school houses. Many have been totally destroyed, and 
new buildings, principally frame, have been erected. 

There yet are several districts that cannot have schools in the 
winter time, from the fact that the houses are untenable for winter 
use. Others are still unorganized, among which I am compelled to 
mention our own town, OaiTollton, which has a population of about 
fourteen hundred inhabitants, and no prospects of a school house. 

Last year the directors levied a tax of ten thousand dollars for the 
purpose of erecting a school house here, but the county court 
"vetoed'' it, and hence it was given up, and since then I have heard ot 
no efforts being made towards building one. 

Where new houses have been built, I have noticed, as yet, no 
move towards improving or ornamenting the grounds surrounding 
them. 



78 

In reference to furniture, I am glad to say that the old benches in 
their various forms, are fast disappearing, and very good desks are 
being made, generally to accommodate two papils each. 

Good, substantial blackboards Bjre finding their way into almost 
every school house. 

As to the qualification of those engaged as^ teachers in the public 
schools where i have visited. It is a pleasure for me to bear testi* 
mony to the ability of a majority of them, especially was I pleased 
with the words which so often greeted me, ^^I have not whipped a 
single scholar in my school," it shows the fact that the teacher 
could govern as well as teach their pupils. 

At least three-fourths of the teachers are from the East, and 
the most of them reflect credit upon the profession. 

My examinations have generally been oral, from the fact that 
very few attended them. 

There is no public school at present within the county for 
colored persons. 

The schools of the county, in districts where organized, have 
generally had from four to six months school during the last year. 



CARTER.— John Hoskins. 

As I have but little to report, it will, necessarily, be short. 

Much interest is tiow being manifested in the cause of education 
in some parts of the county. 

Our school houses are, generally, of a very inferior class. 

The grounds are, usually without fences. 

Furniture, none; apparatus, none. 

Teachers are not of the best, though we have some very good — 
generally of the second grade. I have been obliged to adapt my 
plan of examinations to the necessities of the case. 

The oiBcers are not as punctual in reporting as they should be. 

There are no colored children to care for. 

We have no institute in the county. 

We have no private seminary or academies in the county. 



CLAY.— G. Hughes. 

Since my last annual report, no new school houses have been 
built in this county. The old ones have been repaired, in many cases 
by voluntary contributions. 

Many subdistricts remain unorganized, nevertheless, we have re- 
ceived many additions to our corps of teachers, and a number of the 
subdistricts are provided with very good schools. 

The reports of school officers are not so full and prompt as they 
should be. Some time must elapse before the requirements of our 
hew school law are sufficiently understood to insure prompt reports 
from all sections of the county. 

The complete organization of the county would be greatly facili- 
tated by a law giving to the county superintendent the power to ap- 
point resident local directors, with the qualifications of grand jurors, 
within those subdistricts where a sufficient number of qualified voters 



u 

cannot be i'ound to hold an election according to the general provis- 
ions of the school law. 

As a higher grade of qualifications among the teachers employed 
in our public schools,is, doubtless, a want seriously felt in all sections 
of the State, a system of normal schools, judiciously distributed, 
would, certainly, be an important appendage to our public school sys- 
tem. I hope that our Legislature may, at an early day, appreciate 
the importance of such a movement. 



OUNTON.— B. F. PoE. 

There has been quite an improvement in our schools since my 
last report. Notwithstanding the minds of our people have been ab- 
sorbed, to a great extent, in political questions, the subject of educa* 
tion has received good attention. 

The provision in the law authorizing directors to make estimates 
either for four or six months' school dunng the year, meets the appro- 
bation of the people of Clinton countv. The directors who had not 
made their estimates before the new law came in force, have made 
them for six months' school. 

I have visited most of the schools of this ,county during the year. 
I have spent about seventy days in oflBcial duties. 

We nave some private schools in the county, which are doing much 
for the cause of education. But we have others, which are doing more 
harm than good, being kept up for the benefit of a few aristocrats, 
who will not patronize public schools, where the rich and poor meet 
as equals. 

I consider that we have an average grade of teachers for the 
present day. 

All of the schools have not been kept open three months during 
the year. 

Obstacles in the way of improvement-^1. The limited number of 
professional teachers. 

2. The lack of uniformity in text-books. 

3. The want of commodious school houses, properly furnished, and 
supplied with suitable apparatus. 

4. The law provides for only six months' school during the year» 
when we should have ten months, without submitting it to a vote. 

The plan proposed by you, for the establishment of normal 
schools in the State, is approved by the leading men of the coantv. 



COLE— Jam£S Enloe, Jr. 

1. Educational progress in the county of Cole has been consider- 
able. As an evidence of this conclusion. 1 will give a few items : But 
a short time ago, we had scarcely any schools, and what we had were 
hardly anything but the name, being poorly taught and badly attend- 
ed ; the morals of our youths almost wrecked and ruined by neglect 
bad habits contracted, until it seemed that they thought nothing 
worth their attention but drinking, swearing, and an almost total dis- 
regard for morality, or even civility ; society almost broken up, and 
the seeds of discord sown broadcast ; churches deserted and rotting 



76 

down in neglect; dramshops and places cf public resort crowded to 
overflowing; ignorance, idleness and vice having full sway; the use- 
ful pursuits neglected. This lamentable state of affairs was canned 
partly by the war, but principally for the want of education. Our 
public schools were not encouraged or patronized, poor teachers being 
generally employed, such as would not work, and could not teach 
(properly), and they not furnished with apparatus^ or suitable houses. 
Such was education in this county; but, by the untiring efforts of the 
friends of popular education, a great change has been wrought; lib- 
eral educational ideas have been diffused among the mass of the people 
(in the face of strong opposition), until they see the necessity of a more 
thorough education, and have set about the work in earnest, and we can 
begin to see some of the fruits of their labor, in the shape of more and 
better school houses, better teachers, better society, moral and intelli- 
gent children. We can now see the deserted school house once more fill- 
ed, and the neglected playground filled by smiling children. Now we 
can point, with a just pride, to a school house in almost every district — 
and many of them good ones, too — which shows how high education 
is esteemed. 

2. Educatio7ial work done hy the county svperintendent — This 
has been principally examining and instructing teachers, instructing 
school ofiScers, visiting and lecturing schools, and encouraging educa- 
tion as much as possible. 

3. Educational work done hy other agencies. — ^The increased in- 
terest manifested by the people, has been a most powerful help to the 
cause of education, as well as to the school officers and teachers ; also, 
people coming m who have seen the benefit of public schools, has 
been a great help in bringing about the change for the better. 

4. Qualification of teachers, — ^Their qualifications are various; 
while some are not very well qualified, others are eminent. I am 
pleased to say that there is a great change for the better in the way 
of teachers ; we still lack a sufSciency of good ones; they are not all 
of the best class; however, we have to do with such as we have, until 
we can get better teachers. 

5. Obstacles in the way of improvement. — I might say that one 
of the obstacles is the want of gooa, energetic teachers ; another, the 
want of funds (without direct tax) to carry on the school; also, the 
want of apparatus, furniture and comfortable houses, and last, but not 
least, is the hatred and prejudice that some have toward anything like 
progress. 

6. Have all the public schools in the county been kept open at 
least three months during the year? I think all,or very near all, have 
kept open that time, and many of them much longer. 



COOPER.-jr. W. Smiley. 

In no particular is the educational progress of schools in this 
county more apparent than in providing better school houses. 

Houses. — ^Ten new houses nave been built. Five of these are first 
class buildings, size 24x36 feet, with clothes room, and seated with 
patent combination desks. Average cost $1,200. It is to be regretted 
that a few of the new buildings are too small. This is bad economy, 
as these buildings must soon give place to others of larger diniensions. 

Apparatus. — About twenty-four schools are now supplied with 
outline maps, charts, globe, and numeral frame; and but few, if any, 



76 

are without that indispenfiable article to the live teacher^ the black- 
board. A few schools are furnished with clocks and dictionanes. 

The duties imposed upon the county superintendent by law, in 
this county, would employ him more tiian three times the number of 
days fixed by law, consequently, if any regard is paid to the time men- 
tioned, many of the duties remain unperformed. 

Visitations. — About twenty schools were yieited, devoting, on an 
average, two hours to each school. 

Examinations. — Public examinations are held on the last Satur- 
day in each month, but many teachers, unacquainted with this arrange- 
ment, presented themselves at other times, and were examined pn- 
vately. Total number of certificates issued, 77. Number^ rejected, 6. 

institutes,— '^wo institutes were held during the year ; one at 
Mount Vernon, which continued two days. Much interest was mani- 
fested by citizens, as well 'as teachers. JProf. Ripley, of the State Dni- 
versity, and Prof. Kemper, of Booiiville, were present during the en- 
tire session, and rendered valuable assistance. 

The second meeting was held at Pisgah. More teachers were 
present than at any previous meeting. Prof. Clark, assistant soperin- 
tendent. Prof. H. H. Merrill, of the Missouri Female College, Boon- 
ville, and Mr. O. H. Fethers, were present, and contributed, by lec- 
tures, addresses and readings, to entertain and instruct those present 

It gives me pleasure to say that many of the school directors were 
present at these meetings, and took a lively interest in the proceed- 
ings. 

In nearly all the townships, the school directors have discbargeo 
their sometimes thankless duties with a degree of faithfulness that » 
commendable. 

Teachers. — ^There is more inquiry for good teachers. To employ 
poorly qualified teachers, at any price, is bad economy. 

School directors should pay more attention to the grade of certi- 
ficates, and pay accordingly. 

I think it rather unfortunate that the form of certificates, "author 
ized," should be designated by ^'first grade" and ''second grade," since 
the difierence is in the number of branches specified. Iwouldsug 
gest *' high school" and "common school." 

Many of the teachers examined were deficient in a knowledge oi 
the elementary sounds of the letters, and in the art of producing them, 
and but few have introduced it as an exercise in the schools. Mentt 
arithmetic is another branch, in which many teachers are deficient 
Some overlook the great benefit to be derived from this study, tbeiffi- 
provementof the reasoning faculties, by striving, merely, for the ^^ 
suit. They fail in not giving a logical solution to the problems, seetn^ 
ing to be satisfied, if they have obtained the true answer. We canno* 
expect these and other imperfections, which exist, to be entirely eradi- 
cated, until schools are provided whose specific object is the qualili 
cation of teachers. 

Irregularity of attendance, the want of better qualifications on 
the part of teachers, and more permanent employment, are the cbiet 
obstacles in the way of improvement. On the whole, our schools have 
accomplished as much during^ the year as could be expected. Bat 
one district has failed to provide a three months' school. 

I cannot close this report without a passing notice of the graded 
school in Boonville, under the efficient supervision of Professor J. <^' 
Mason. Owing to the increase in the number of scholars, two addi- 
tional rooms have been opened. A teacher, in music and German, has 



77 

been added to the corps, and instructions in those branches are now 
given in the school. 

Since my last report, Otterville has organized under the ^^ special 
act," and has opened a ''graded school," which bids fair to be a sac- 
cess. 

We expect, by earnest and well directed efforts, to keep pace with 
the march of improvement in education, and Subserve this great in- 
terest, which underlies the welfare of our growing State. 



DADE.— T. J. Ca VENDER. 

Educational progress in this county has far surpassed all expecta- 
tion. To every person who has noted our progress for the last two 
years, in the broad fields of labor, it is gratifying, not only so, but a 
pleasure to him who is connected with our present school system, 
when he compares the present plan of instruction with the past Our 
educated men no longer stand aloof from our system of public in- 
struction ; they are lending a helping hand, making education more 
among the masses. 

Great zeal is being manifested, by all friends of education, to ex- 
tend the limits of our schools to all embraced within the law. 

Great interest is manifested in regard to the education of the 
colored youth. We have colored schools in nearly every locality, 
where tnere is a sufficient number for an organization. 

I have spent seventy-eight days in the discharge of my official 
duties; visited every school in the county, and find them in good run- 
ning order. The obiect system of teaching is becomingmore general, 
and patrons generally appreciate the teacher's labor. 

Oi^r teachers, with few exceptions, are alive to their calling. 
Teaching, in this county, is no longer looked upon as an imitative art, 
learned by following the footprints of former time, but an art. based 
upon unchangeable principles. During the past two years there has 
been a liberal supply of Eastern teachers, and thev bring with them 
the fruits of a well-trained education. We have other teachers, born 
in Missouri, that honor their profession. I find no obstacles to impede 
the progress of mental training, but it is moving forward gradually. 
Nearly every sub-district in the county has a four months' school ; 
many new houses are being built ; the frame building is taking the 
place of the log hut, and comfortable seats instead oi slab benches. 

The county that I have the honor to represent, though lying near 
the frontier, is rich in resources. Our vast undeveloped resources are 
attracting tne '^wise men of the East^" who are coming with all their 
wealth, to make homes on our luxuriant soil. We can safely say, that, 
before twenty years^ agriculture will revel here. Our streams will be 
rendered twice musical by machinery, enabling us to manufacture for 
our own consumption. Our prairies will be dotted with school houses, 
our hills adorned with churcnes, working up the sublime object of 
universal Christian brotherhood. 



DALLAS.— W. B. Ooon, 



It is tme, that the canse of education is not making as mnch pro- 
gress as might be wished for, yet it is surely and steadily advancing. 



78 

Last year, great efforts were made by many school officers, and lar<^ 
and liberal estimates were generally made by directors who expected 
some aid from the State. Ihc result was, that school taxes were very 
heavy, and many enemies were made to the public school system and 
school officers. Patrons were often heard to say that they had little 
nse for such a free school system. Now, that we have had some aid 
from the State, and see a prospect of that aid increasing, the people 
are working with more energy, as may be seen in the new school 
houses being built in almost every part of the county. Several toler- 
ably good houses have been built since my last report 

We have not had more schools during this year than we had last; 
but they have been generally of a better character. Some of our 
teachers have improved, and some new teachers have come to the 
county. I think the people in general manifest a desire to employ 
better teachers than formerly. 

The law, as revised last winter, came to us very late in the spring, 
after directors had begun to make their estimates, as directed by the 
old law, which made it very difficult for school officers to learn their 
duty in good time, but by patient efforts they generally succeeded in 
preparing estimates, although a few districts failed. My most difficult 
task, as superintendent, has been to secure good estimates and enu- 
merations, and in most cases, I have met with tolerable success. 
Some of the schools of this county have not been kept open for three 
months during the present year, in some cases, on account of means, 
and in other, on account of the difficulty of obtaming good teachers. 
1 think that that clause of our school law, which requires a district to 
have, at least, three months' school in each year, in order to be enti* 
tied to any share of the public school fund, does not have the effect 
desired; but has rather an injurious effect. Sometimes it is very 
difficult to get a good teacher, and directors have to get a poorer one 
or lose their school fund. At other times districts might do well, if 
they could only save the fund, and continue for a longer term in the 
next year. 

There are but few colored children in this county, only one town- 
ship has enough for a school, and there we have a school for them. 
They appear to be doing well. They attend regularly and study dili- 
gently. There should. I think, be some changes made in our school 
law. Provisions should be made for a special meeting, when directors 
have not been elected at the proper time, and better provisions for 
the appointment of officers, when whole townships fail to elect. I 
know, from experience, that the chapter on county superintendent 
should be changed. His duties should be more definite, and he 
should be allowed a salary as large as that of the best teachers in his 
county, so that he may devote all of his time to his duties as county 
superintendent, who has to make his support by some profession, can 
do but little for the public schools. It appears, upon close exaniina- 
tion, that the law was passed in a hurry, and not sufficiently consid- 
ered in many respects. 



DAVIESS.— W. M, BosTAPH. 

Since the report of last year, there has been a decided improve- 
ment in the school houses in this county. Many of them have been 



I 



79 

almost untenable and worthless ; but by the earnest efforts, on the 
part of many of onr citizens, a material change has been 
effected, many of the old houses have been refitted, and quite a large 
number of new school houses erected, which in style and capacity are 
creditable to the localities in which they are situated ; but little at i 

tention has as yet been given to the ornamenting of the grounds, and 
the grounds are generally held by a lease so long as the same is used 
for school purposes. There appears to be a general disposition on 
the part of our citizens, to dispense with private schools entirely, as 
the '^ common school " can be fully organized. 

.As to school furniture, there is but little of any value, an ordinary 
blackboard to be seen in almost every school room — there are, how* 
ever, a few schools furnished with outline maps, reading charts, 
globes, cubical blocks, &c.; but these articles are not in general use. 

I have frequently called the attention of school officers to the im- 
portance of furnishing the school houses with good and substantial 
seats, and also the many advantages derived from a full suppl^v of the 
apparatus so necessary in assisting the teacher in the proper discharge 
ot the duties imposed upon him, and a lively interest is manifested in 
the matter, but a want of necessary means, and an indisposition on 
their part to impose any heavier tax at the present time, cripples them 
in their endeavors to advance the interests in their townships. 

As to the teachers, it affords me great pleasure to bear testimony 
to the ability and fidelity of some of them, and the untiring energy 
with which they press forward in the great cause in which they are 
engaged. And especially to some of those young lady teachers, who 
have devoted themselves to this profession. Their great success, 
under so many disadvantages, affords the. amplest proof of their qual- 
ifications, and of the interest they manifest in their calling, while I 
regret to say that many, both male and female, regard their position 
as rather humble, and pursue the calling but temporarily, care but 
little for the cause of education, and, therefore, are wanting that 
qualification the most essential for a successful teacher. 

The plan of examination which I have adopted is to examine, 
orally, in the various branches authorized by the school law, holding 
two public examinations each year, at the regular sessions of the in- 
stitute, and when application for an examination is made, after the 
regular examination, I examine privately, but examine only such 
teachers privately who were not in the county at the regular examin- 
ation, or unable to attend. 

So far, I have found the grade of scholarship below the grade of 
average, and none have been thoroughly educated for the profession. 
I do not expect to see much improvement, in this respect, until the 
means are supplied by which such an education will be brought 
within the reach oi the student. 

The county teachers' institute in this county is In a flourishing 
condition, with about fifty members, most of whom are regular at- 
tendants, and a lively interest is manifested by some of them. The 
lecture which you delivered here, at the fall session, has thoroughly 
aroused our teachers to renewed efforts on their part, and to a thor- 
ough appreciation of the dignity and responsibility of their position. 

There is but one colored school in this county, and but little in- 
terest is manifested in their behalf, conseauently, the school is not as 
prosperous as it might be, although it is doing much better than was 
at first expected. The colored people are very much interested, and 
are doing all they can, and are accomplishing a great deal ; but, con- 



80 

sidering the opposition the edacation of the colored people had to 
contend with fur a long time^ and now, the stolid indifference, on the 
part of many of our citizens, the result, of course, could not have 
been as great as if there had been no opposition. 

In conclusion,! may add, that there has been no special supervia* 
ion exercised over the schools in this county, and there will not be, so 
long as the salary ot the county superintendent is so precarious. 

Under the head of general remarks, I would most respectfully 
suggest a few changes and amendments to our present school law. In 
my opinion, the section of the law relating to the making out of the 
tax books, by the county clerk, for the various township collectors, is 
almost, if not entirely, impracticable. In the first place, the law re- 
quires the county clerk to make out and deliver to the township clerk 
the tax books, for the collection of the school tax, between the first 
day of April and the first day of June. During that time, the county 
clerk is employed in making out the tax book for the collection of Uie 
State and countv revenue, and, consequently, the books for the col- 
lection of the school taxes cannot be delivered to the township col- 
lector much before the first of September, or about the time that the 
law requires the township collector to return his delinquent list 
This section needs amending, and I see no necessity for the county 
officers having anything to do with school taxes of the different town- 
ships. If we nad township assessors as well as collectors, the expense 
would be no greater, and, so far as my information extends, would be 
much more satisfactory to the citizens. 

And further, in the acts relating to cities, towns and villagas, 
there is no provision for the collection of school taxes upon the mer- 
chants' statements, and, of course, none is collected upon those state- 
ments. This part of the law, I think, ought to be amended, lor it 
would certainly be just and right that all property should be taxed 
alike, whether it be goods or any other property. With the excep- 
tions I have mentioned,! think, the law is a good one. 

The general prospects of cur public schools are daily brightening, 
and many improvements have been made during the past year, and 
we hope the time may not be far distant, when popular education will 
be recognized in its true form, and regarded as it should be — ^necessa- 
ry for the preservation of our political institutions. 



DOUGLAS.— T. K Yawdklls. 

We have twenty-five or thirty school houses— mostly log build- 
ings, in good repair, with suitable play grounds. School furniture 
and apparatus are scarce. Teachers are generally of the third grade. 
We have not any county association or institute. But little interest 
is shown in the education of colored pupils. I have had ten examin- 
ations — nine males and one female. I have visited eleven schools. I 
have spent twenty-five days in official duties. I have traveled two 
hundred miles in attending to official business. I have written ten of- 
ficial letters. We have thirteen public schools and six private. We 
have no high schools, colleges or seminaries. We have no schools for 
colored children. We have no school libraries. 

I find the cause of education advancing in this part of the State; 
the citizens are alive to their interest In my visits to schools, while 
lecturing, I generally found crowded houses, township boards, parents. 



81 

teachers and yoaths, all participating in the general cause. I am 
proud to see the march of improvement; it is increasing faster than 
could be expected, after the misfortunes we have survived, the dan- 
gers we have encountered, and the losses we have sustained. 



DUNKUN.— S. Brannum. 

My health has been so bad since August, that I have not been 
able to visit schools, or do anything else. There have not been as 
many schools kept open this year as I expected, on account of so much 
sickness in the county, the chills and fever have been considered al- 
most an epidemic this year. The people have been doing the best 
they could, as to erecting school houses for the time coming. In some 
places when the money stops, the interest in school stops. The 
school houses are not furnished with anvthing, except wooden slabs 
and hazel limbs. The grounds for school purposes cannot be objected 
to. As for teachers, we cannot complain ; those examined this year, 
with the exception of one, have stood on a scale of five ; they are- 
from TexaSj Virginia, Tennessee, South Carolina, &c.; my plan of ex- 
amination IS generally oral. 

I made one attempt to organize a teachers' institute, but failed. 

I would say that the people have no use for such a law as the onA 
they now have; not one man out of every five or ten that will under- 
stand anything about it. I think the law should be so amended as to- 
give the countv superintendent, supervision over the whole school 
business ; let all the money come into his hands, and to be paid out hy 
him and to receive his salary out of the same fund ; a man may travel 
far and wide, wear his tongue out, and then go before the county 
court, and the judges will allow him ^fiOper diem in county warrants^ 
that will not buy a sheet of paper, nor anr envelope, nor anything^ 
else. The Superintendent had last as welLhave a sheet of brown pa- 
per as the county warrants. There is a considerable amount of school 
notes for collection, and those owing these notes, are so afraid that 
the notes will be collected, that they consider the school law a perfect 
farce. 



GENTRY— J. B. Twist. 

Educational progress in the county, — ^We are making rapid stridea- 
in educational matters. The old log houses are giving way for neat, 
comfortable frame houses, about thirty of which have been built du- 
ring the past year. Many of these houses are well furnished with out- 
line maps, charts, apparatus, etc. 

Educational work donehy the county superintendsnt. — ^The edu- 
cational work of the county superintendent during the past year has 
been Kmited, owing to various reasons. A few subdistricts have been, 
organized under his supervision. He has given directions for build- 
ing and furnishing a number of houses. He has also endeavored to 
revive the institutt^ by soliciting able speakers and teachers to at- 
tend. 

Educational work done hy other affenciea,~I!heTe has been no- 
educational work done by other agencies. 

6 B R 



82 

« 

Qualificationa of teacher 8,~1 must say that we have a very fair 
<;orp8 of teachers, and it is encouraging to report the grade of scholar- 
ship on the advance. Tet, we have not enough of first-class teachers. 
At present, however, it becomes necessary to grant certificates to 
many who should be pupils instead of teachers. 

Obstacles in the way of improveme^it, — I migjit here add, the 
main obstacle in the way of improvement, is the want of a suitable 
number of proficient teachers. The schools of the county have all 
been kept open from four to seven months during the year. 



GREENE.— H. S. Creighton. 

It is with pleasure I now attempt to make a statement of the con- 
dition of the public schools in this county. Education is progressing, 
slowly but steadily in this county. Notwithstanding the many difii* 
culties and drawbacks it has to encounter, for there are very many ol' 
our people opposed to the present system of schools, and are sighing 
for tne ''Constitution as it was,'' and the good old schools of the daji 
of yore, untrammeled by rigid school laws that savor of equality ora 
common system for rich ani poor; and then the horrors of being tax- 
ed to educate the poor, build school houses^ and furnish them witii 
comfortable seats, blackboards, etc., when they themselves had re- 
ceived their bountiful share of education sitting on the half of a split 
log, in a pole house, without a nail or pane of glass about it, and not 
a sign of a blackboard thought of. But still, worse than all, yooi 
school law provides for the education of colored children, and we are 
taxed to provide houses, pay teachers, etc., "to give them niggers some 
larnin^ which is putting them on an equality with us," But we have 
a large population in this county who are putting forth their best ef- 
forts to make the common school system a success, and they may re5t 
assured that their honest toil will not be unrewarded, or their labor 
spent in vain. 

I have spent some eighty days during the past year as superin- 
tendent of schools. I have attended to business regular twice every 
month, and often double that number per week by special agreement 
I have visited quite a number of schools, met some of the townshi? 
boards, consulted others by letter, etc. My reasons for not sperdinc 
more time visiting schools are, because oir county is considerably in 
debt, our taxes are heavy, and we are obliged to tax people to "rue 
our schools the lawful time. 

Our county court is composed of men that are up with the limes. 
And all thanks are due them for the extension of time they have 
granted me during the years I was superintendent, for it requires a: 
least one hundred and fifty days to do the business of superintendent 
of this county as it shoula be done. 

We have a good grade of teachers, some of them graduates of 
colleges East, others native born. But a large mjgority of our teach- 
ers were educated East. I think the teachers of this county are fully 
up to, if not above, an average of the State. I believe all our public 
schools have been kept open the time req^iired by law, except in 
newly organized subdistricts, where they have no school houses. 
There have been several new school houses built in our county this 
year, but there has been very little done in the way of fencing or 
adorning school house grounds. 



83 

I think the greatest obstacles in the way of improvements are, 
a want of public funds, and negligence in executing the law. But,! 
think, if there could be any means devised to increase our public 
school funds, so we could run our schools at least four months with- 
out airect taxation, it would aid materially in the execution of the 
laws. But some of our township clerks say, the small amount drawn 
does not pay to keep up the organization. I suggested a plan in my 
last year's report for raising funds, which I still think would work 
welL And now, I close my report by saying, that this about closes my la- 
bors as superintendent of schools for Greene county, and when I take 
into cor sidt ration the condition of the schools af this county when I 
commenced my official career, I feel there has been quite a change 
wrou2:ht in our county in educational interests, and that our people 
have been aroused to the interest of the young and rising wants of 
our fast growing population. And while I attach very little impor- 
tance to my own labors, I would say that more might have been done, 
had the office been more remunerative, but at present it has to be 
coupled with other business, which, in my case, always conflicts, and 
therefore, I could not spend the time. 

I close, my alreadv, too long report for the interest contained in 
it. 



GRUNDY— R. C. Norton. 

I have the honor to report the following, relative to the schools 
and educational interests of Grundy county: 

Our reports show that schools have been maintained in all the 
districts of the county as the law requires, and that many districts 
have, by special arrangements sustained schools for nearly (Rouble the 
time required. Most districts of this county which had not built 
suitable school buildings during the year preceding, have built them 
during the past year, so that now, nearly every district in this county 
has a good school house, well furnished, costing from eighty to twelve 
hundred dollars. Thus the old sheds, exponents of the thoughtless, 
antiquated, and illiterate, have given place to new, comfortable ana 
commodious school buildings, true exponents of science, literature, 
civilization, and general prosperity. 

The furniture in our school rooms is all of home manufacture, yet. 
is made according to the most improved plans, is well arranged, and 
speaks volumes to the comfort and advantage of both teacher and 
pupils. 

The grounds have been fully described in my previous reports, 
and I need only add that some districts have fenced them, and have 
planted trees and land marks, thus commencing to beautify and adorn 
them. 

About half of the schools are well supplied with apparatus. 

Of its corps of teachers this county may well be proud, although 
isonie do not possess superior attainments, and are not just what we 
would have them, or what they would be themselves, yet they are 
^trivi^g to become efficient in their calling, and the others, which 
constitute the major part, are of the first order. 

Eight days have been spent in holding teachers' institutes, said 
nstituies were well attended, and have done much to advance the 
;he cause of education in this county. Examinations have been con- 



84 

ducted largely upon the oral plan, yet written examinations hare 
been frequently substituted, tne graduation of competency beini: 
from one to five. The law being quite well understood, and the or- 
ganizations complete, school officers have had verv little trouble in 
making their reports, and have not, to my knowledge shown an? 
tardiness whatever. 

There being but few colored children in this county, but little 
interest has been awakened in their behalf, still an effort is now beine 
made to organize a school for them. Educate the masses and the 
country is safe is our motto, and for that will we work. There is on^ 
college in this county, situate at Edinburg, said college is under tbe 
management of Frof. J. K. Yertrees. It is b^ilt in a pleasant aci 
healthy locality, and, with its efficient corps of teachers, offers rare 
opportunities to all desiring to obtain a thorough and complete eo> 
cation. We have also the public schools of Trenton, organized ondrr 
the graded system, which are now in a prosperous condition, and doini 
their part in the great work of educating the youth. 

The school law, by its successive revisions, has been much is'- 
proved, but it is not perfect. Still, as the committee to whom tte 
revising or amending is committed, will be apprised of the need ::. 
changes, I will not name them, but suggest that the changes o: 
amendments be just as few as will answer the purpose, that theyU 
plain, definite, easily understood and obligatory. 

Legislation, which contemplates taxation, and permits the willin: 
to pay, without giving power to compel payment from the unwillin: 
is of little benefit to a State. 

Having resigned my nomination at the primary election to tk 
office of superintendent. Prof. J. E. Vertrees is elected my success:, 
and I feel assured, that under his direction, the public school interer? 
of Grundy county will be well cared for, and that 1876 will notiv 
franchise a single person in this county, on account of his igtc- 
ranee. 



HARRISON— B. G. Miller. 

^ 

1. Educational progress in the county. — Under this head I c^ 
say that there is quite an advance, evidently the people are becomi- 
interested on the subject of education. New school houses are beb: 
erected and old ones repaired, and furniture for the sam^, and scho 
apparatus furnished. 

2. Educational work done hy county superintendent. — ^I ha'' 
traveled, lectured, visited schools, examined teachers, counsele: 
school officers, written letters and held two regular institutes of ti^' 
days each. 

3. Educational work done ly other agencies. — I have had ^ 
assistant to examine teachers j and the teachers, many of whom ha^t 
agreed to organize township institutes throughout tne county, a:^- 
some are already being put m operation. 

4. OualiAcations of teachers. — ^In this* there is considerable ai; 
vance. Old-fashioned teachers are giving way to a better class, aru 
erelong, old Harrison will compare with tne older settled parts. 

5. Obstacles in the way of improvements. — ^There are manv -^ 
the way. Some think that ^^it is not necessary to be educated much." 
others, that ^Mt is too expensive." As a general rule I think that th^ 



85 

parents would send to school, if it would always come free, and yet 
there are some that would hot send much if the schools were free and 
in reach of their ^little ones." My opinion is that the schools should 
be free and the parents compelled to send their children to schooL 
This, and this only^ will make education general. 

6. Have all the public sohooU in the county been kept open at 
least for three months during the year, — I think so, at least I have no 
reports to the contrary. 



HENRY- M. Zkner. 

Daring the past year, the educational interestsof our county have 
received more than usual attention. A number of school-houses have 
been erected. The interest in schools, on the part of officers, parents, 
and teachers, is measurably augmented. School officers, in quest of 
teachers, make pertinent inquiries after fitness and qualifications, 
rather than for diminution in pay. 

I visited all the schools in operation in the county during the past 
year, so far as practicable. Organized a teachers' institute, of which 
we held two sessions during the year. (The second one was a decided 
success.) • . 

On the reception of the new school law, in April last, I made 
appointments throughout the county, meeting the school officers in 
each township^ and assisted them in making their estimates for school 
purposes, and as a consequence, there was not an organized sub- 
district in the whole county, which had not made adequate provisions 
for schools, school houses, etc., for the current year. 

We cannot acknowledge ourselves under obligations to foreign 
agencies for co-operative aid, having been less favored than we de- 
served. Our co-efficients extraordinary, have been a few live teachers 
elimenated from the totality, who have kept up local organizations, 
which have been salutary and effective. 

I think our teachers in qualifications and adaptability, will make a 
favorable comparison with their confreres in other counties, although in 
exceptional districts, the harvest transcends the capacity of the reap- 
ers, a state of affairs, however, unremedial at present. 

One of the greatest obstacles in the way of improvement,.is the 
constant manipulations of the school law by each successive Legisla- 
ture, without any apparent betterment. Its repeated mutations, baf- 
fling the understanding of school officers and people, and exhausting 
their patience. For this reason, I did not recommend any change in 
the law in my last annual letter, and I do not advise one now, but I 
do think it advisory to have a county board of education in each 
county, composed of the superintendent, county clerk, and county 
treasurer, to settle disputed points between township boards of educa* 
lion and other difficulties that often arise. 

-Nearly all of the public schools in the county have been kept 
open thiee months during the past year. Some few latelv organized 
districts, had not the funds for a public school, and others had no 
school houses in which to have a school taught. 



86 
HOLT. — Stephen Blanohard. 

1. Educational Progress. — Considerable attention has been 
given, by some of the school directors, in the selection of the best 
qualified teachers, and in visiting the schools, and co-operating with 
tne teachers for the advancement of their pupils. 

2. A commendable zeal has been manifested, in some portioDs 
of the county, in the erection of suitable school buildings. 

3. Our county court has made siich appropriations to the county 
superintendent as keeps him busily employed aniong the school? 
about four months in the year. This is not enough time, but it is so 
much in advance of former years, that the people are greatly gratiiieJ 
and benefited. 

4. Teachers' institutes have been held twice each year, as the 
law requires. The teachers have come together, and have exchangtd 
their views, particularly upon the theory and practice of the teach 
ing, and have been greatly benefited, and better prepared to act weil 
their part in the duties of the school room. 

6, The best lecturing talent that we could procure, gratuitously, 
has been employed, and our teachers instructed and the people edi- 
fied. 

Forest City has organized under the law for towns and cities. 
The educational board has nearly completed a brick school house 
62 by 22^ feet. 

1. Work done hy County Superintendent — All of the school? 
have been visited. There are now forty-five in the county. Sonieo: 
them have been visited twice, and a lecture delivered at night, earl 
time. This has required a travel of eight hundred and forty-three 
miles. The pupils have also been examined, and their progress nctei 
One hundred and fifty-four letters have been written. 

At each sitting ot the township board required by law, the super- 
intendent has been present. 

The school law, and blanks, have been distributed by him, throuLib 
the county, and in portions of adjoining counties, when found des- 
titute. 

2. QualiUcationH of Teachers, — The majority of our teachers are 
well qualified for the discharge of their duties. Some are deficient in 
regard to a knowledge of human nature, and consequently donot su^ 
ceed as well as they otherwise would. 

3. Obstacles in the way of Improvement. — Poor school houses 
may be mentioned as one great hinderance. In a house without i 
blackboard of any kind, and perhaps destitute of any thing on which 
writing can be done, with seats to correspond, no teacher can impar. 
the instruction to pupils that could be done with better fixtures. 

4. Some of the subdistricts contain so few pupils, that thev ^^ 
not draw sufilicient money to keep the schools in session beyond four 
months, and some of them hardly that length of time. 

5. Unwillingness on the part of tax-payers to continue the 
schools after the public money has been expended. The children 
throughout the county do not attend the schools quite one-half of the 
time thev are taught, and it is easy to see how this is : If the school- 
are taught in the summer, the larger pupils, in the rural districts, are 
on farms; if taught in winter, the small children can go only a month, 
or possibly six weeks, when bad weather and roads bearin, they 
cannot go. The fall work is not finished until after the scliool has 
been in session for four or six weeks, and, after a commencement has 



87 

been made, the pupil goes quite irregularly until its close, and gets, 
perhaps, scarcely two months' instruction. Can any one be astonish- 
ed, under these circumstances, if their pupils do not learn much ? 

6. Parents are too careless, in regard to the attendance of their 
children upon our free schools. 

7. Irregularity in attendance is another great obstacle in the 
way of the pupil's advancement. 

All of the schools have been kept open three months. 



HOWARD.— T. J. Dkatherage.^ 

• 

The condition of the schools in this county, I think, is probably 
better than they have been in the past few years, but they are not yet 
in such an improved state as I would desire. 

The great difficulty seems to be in getting the school officers 
throughout the county to take the proper interest in their duties, and 
the schools in their own immediate subdistrict, many of whom do not 
seem to think that prompt action is any great virtue. 

We have had schools in very near all of our subdistricts in the 
county. Some, however, for want of school houses, and other causes, 
have failed to organize and keep up schools, but the necessity of hav- 
ing comfortable school rooms is becoming more manifest to all, and 
there is now a considerable number of comfortable and generally con- 
venient hpuses, that have been finished in the past year, and, I think, 
will be more in the next year to come. The school houses that are 
being built are generally framed, neat and convenient. 

The amount of school furniture in the county is very small ; but 
little of the improved kind is in use. Maps, charts and globes are 
things of history, and not known, except in high schools and colleges. 
I hope to see a greater interest in all improvements of schools and 
school furniture throughout the county, very soon. 

My time has been spent, principally, in trying to get the school 
districts in the county organized, and in working order. The great 
diflSculty seems to be the fear of taxation to keep up schools. Not- 
withstanding this objection, our people are anxious to have good 
schools, and I hope the schools will be better patronized and sustain- 
ed in the next year than in the past. 

I hope to do more work in the ensuing year, than I have done be- 
fore, hoping the salary of county superintendent will be more liberal 
than it has been. 

The salary of teachers in this county will average about fifty dol- 
lars. An experienced teacher would have no difficulty in gettinff 
even more than the above amount. Some districts have paid as much 
as seventy-five to one hundred dollars. 

We have teachers of probably as good a grade as any county in 
the State, at least, I think, would compare favorably with any. But I 
still hope to see the qualification of teachers of a much higher grade 
filling all our schools. Certainly, one of the most important qualifi- 
cations in a teacher is a high moral qualification, and one that will 
labor to impress morality upon the minds of his pupils. The manner 
of opening most, if not all, oi our schools, is an evidence of the want 
of this qualification in teachers. Words'of moral instruction seldom 
escape the lips of teachers. How long shall this practice be kept up 



88 

in our schools ? Let us recollect that early impressions have the meet 
lasting effect upon children. 

The colored schools of our county have been almost a failure, from 
several causes. One is, the colored population have congregated at 
or near the towns of the county, and those who are left in the country 
are so much scattered, that there has been but small provision made 
to school them. There has been colored schools in Glasgow, Roan- 
oke and Fayette, and some other places in the county, but they have 
been conducted principally by colored teachers, of little experience, 
and consequently done but little good. The school at Glasgow last 
year numbered some ninety scholars, and was taught by a white 
teacher of very good qualifications. 

In the exammation of teachers, I have generally questioned them 
on the principles of all the branches required by law to be taught in 
the public schools. I have granted, to male teachers, sixty-seven cer- 
tificates, and to females, twelve. 

The inquiries, etc., that I have answered by letter, I have not 
made any record of, but suppose that one hundred would not be an 
over-estimate. This, alone, shows something of the labors of a super- 
intendent, and the insufliciency of his pay. 

Besides the primary schools of the county, we have Central College 
located in the city of Fayette, and conducted by a very able corps of 
teachers, and numbers eighty pupils ; also at the city of Glasgow, we 
have Pritchett Institute and Lewis College, and most deservedly 
popular. 

Besides these institutions, we have a female institution in Fay- 
ette, unoccupied, at present, which, before the war, was one of the 
most flourishing and popular institutions in the State. Hoping these 
scattered remarks may elicit proper attention from those interested 
in schools. 



IRON.-»-JoHN Donaldson. 

Since my last report, I am happy to be able to say, that there has 
been a greater interest manifested on the subject of popular educa- 
tion in Uiis county than last year. Quite a number of school build- 
ings have been erected, and others commenced, but not as yet 
finished. 

The village of Pilot Knob has two commodious public school 
buildings, in each of which is a school in a flourishing condition. A 
large number of children in regular attendance in each, and under 
the instruction of faithful,, zealous, and in every way competent 
teachers. Fortunate, it would be, if every neighborhood where dis- 
tricts are located, were blessed with such teachers. However, I can 
say this much, for the other public schools in the county, that the 
teachers seem well-qualified, both morally and intellectually for the 
responsible positions they are called to occupy, and are so laboring as 
to show that the work of teaching is a pleasant employment, and Uiat 
their hearts are in the work. 

While I have written thus encouragingly, I do not wish it to be 
understood that the people are as much interested on the subject of 
education as they should be, and as the importance of the subject 
demands. When we consider that the prosperity and permanency of 
our government and free institutions depend under Qod upon the 



89 

morals and intelligence of the rnlers and the ruled, the subject of 
education becomes at once a subject of vast importance. 

As to the education of the colored inhabitants, I would report 
that it is being attended to as far as practicable. There is a school 
for them in Ironton, which is attended by the children from 
Pilot Knob, Ironton and Arcadia. The teacher is a lady of fine abili- 
ties, and one who takes a deep interest in the welfare"^ of this long, 
degi'adedj neglected, and despised race. They have in contemplation 
the erection of a building in Ironton, both lor school and religious 
purposes. 

I have issued the past year, seventeen certificates to about an 
equal number of males and females. The average time of these cer- 
tificates, about one year and six months. The average standing of the 
persons commissioned, is from three to lour. 

We have been endeavoring to keep up our teachers' institute, and 
teachers' association, as faithfully as circumstances vould admit. 

I have not been able to visit all the schools in the county, on ac- 
count of poor health, and the want of suitable transportation, as my 
salary was not sufficient to justify me to hire conveyances. 

And here, I would beg leave, to make a suggestion through the 
State Superintendent, to the Legislature, on the subject of the salary 
of county superintendents. What thejr now get is not sufficient to just- 
ify them in spending much of their time from home, especially, 
when they have families to support, and when they have other busi- 
ness to attend to, and at which they can make more money. If, as in 
some States, a salary, say from five to eight hundred dollars, was al- 
lowed to each county superintendent, the State, instead of being a 
loser, would a gainer in the end. The people would then be more 
particular in putting the right kind of men in as superintendent, and 
well qualified persons would be more willing to take upon them such 
office. The interests of education would be greatly promoted be- 
cause these officers could and would give most of their time to this 
work, and in this way, the subject of education with all its bearings 
and interest, would be continually kept before the minds of both 
parents and children. 



JACKSON.— S. S. Brtant. 

In answer to your circulars, requesting information on certain 
points. I submit the following, imperfect though it may be, on ac- 
count of meagreness of reports. And, though I may not be able to 
furnish you with all that you require, yet I can give you such a gen- 
eral view o[ our educational matters as will acquaint you with our 
status. Jacks n, then, reports progress, and begs but little more 
time to become the great educational centre of the State. Our pro- 
gress of this last year is more easily reckoned by reference to tax- 
Books, by estimates, by the number of school buildings erected, than 
by the few words I am permitted to use in this letter. I cannot give 
these in detail, but there are some things, it would be unjust to pass 
without a reference. As a house discovers the mind of the architect, 
so a school building discloses the state of education — what the people 
think of it; just here, Kansas City claims honorable tnention; for she 
haa done wonders in this particular: many cities much older cannot 
claim half as much. Her public scnool buildings being the most at- 



90 

tractive buildings in the city, not the least expensive, and the most 
comfortable ; she has made great eflFort, put forth every energy to 
have the little ones properlv cared for and to render their school days 
the most pleasant of life. But the work is only begun according to 
her plan; many more such buildings are to be erected, which plan, 
when complete, will render this city as famous for its schools as it is 
for its hills and the energy which is leveling them. The cause of 
education, in Kansas City, this year has run, ^^pari pastu^ with her 
commerce; resting to some extent, the equilibrium once disturbed 
by her commercial interest. If this same public spirit continues, 
(and there is no reason why it should not,) the schools of Kansas City 
will be its own pride, as well as one of its chief attractions. 

The question will not be much longer, " How are the schoolsf 
for they will be known far and wide. Independence, too, is not least 
among the cities, though, for the present, shaded in a commercial 
point of view, by her more illustrious neighbor, yet she presumes to 
rival her (and even those more experienced), in instruction and dis- 
cipline. We cannot lay claim to as fine houses, and if we could, it 
would be ungenerous tor a parent to eclipse the daughter in style. 
One day we expect to see our grounds adorned and beautiful to such 
an extent, that it will be the chief resort for those who wish to feast 
the eye or refresh the min «. We have good public schools here, 
Westport sends in, also, a very favorable report, adding : " This will 
give only a remote idea of our future." This town has been very lib- 
eral, expending about twelve thousand dollars for school purposes. 
These, and such like, will give you some idea of education in Jackson. 

As to the rural districts, if there is anything in the public school 
system, they will have it; schools they will have; accepting what is 
given by the law, they will do more, if necessary. 

Thus far, all that has been said is concerning the preparation of 
the people to have their children taught; but there is another side to 
it, that of the teacher. Would that the zeal of the people lor good 
education could be met by the corresponding zeal of the teacher. 
We have but few experienced teachers, and some that experience has 
not profited, and some that refuse all means to profit. A teachers^ 
institute is passed unheeded by most, but we congratulate ourselves, 
we have enough to manage it. Profesnonal teachers are scarce. 
Many persons come to spv out our goodly land — have taught 
before, but have come to the conclusion they were not " called.^ 
They come with no idea of teaching, but then they do not like to be 
on expenses. '* Itinerants " is the word; attainment sufficient to ob- 
tain a certificate, but not tact enough to impart; can hear a lesson, 
but cannot teach: take but little pride in their success, teaching not 
being their " traae." All of this class have gone to school some, but it 
is now three or four years since, and "I expect you will find me alittle 
rusty," is generally the introductory remark to an examination. 

" 'Tis certain they can write and cipher, too/' 

except in mental arithmetic, which most have never seen. We have 
some splendid teachers among us, as good as anv county can boast- 
loving their work, and not " stern to view." Ihey " do not dismiss 
their cares when they dismiss their flock ;"^ men of " letters, manners, 
morals." Many of this class — enough to tone up the others, if com- 
munication could be established, and I hesitate not to say ttiat this is 
already accomplished, in the election of a good and faithful school 
man as my successor in office. The projected normaKschool would 



91 



have fine play here. '* Passahle^^ is not a sufficient! j strong word, but 
^^good'' is too strong, to affirm of all of our teachers. 

As to the normal school, Independence is, without doubt, the 
place for one, it the idea becomes a success. 

Schools have generally continued over three months. 



JASPER.— J. C. WiLLODGHBY. 

School houses. — ^There are eighty-five school houses in the county ; 
twenty comfortable; forty that are passable, being warm, but without 
any conveniences. The remaining twenty are well ventilated log 
huts. Some fifteen are in process of erection, being built with a view 
to comfort and convenience. 

Grounds. — From one to five acres are allowed to each school 
hou^e, to be inclosed and planted in groves, in the future. 

Furniture — Most of our school nouses are poorly furnished, hav- 
ing benches, without backs, for seats, and rough boards for writing 
' tables. Some six or eight are even destitute of blackboards ; a few 
are furnished with patent seats. Those in process of erection will be 
furnished with the same. 

Apparatus. — But lew of our schools are, as yet, provided with 
any apparatus. Some four or five are furnished with globes and out- 
line maps, and national school tablets, in lieu of spellers. 

leaohers. — Our teachers are all we could expect. Few older 
States can boast of better. Nearly all of them had been teachers in 
fi;ood standing prior to their coming to Missouri. They are, as a class, 
faithful, energetic and competent. 

Institutes. — I held, during the past year, two institutes of four 
days each. In the first session, sixty teachers were present ; during 
the last institute, there were some fifty in attendance. In both ses- 
sions there was considerable interest manifested; all seemed anxious 
to become fully prepared for the great work before them. 

Reports of school officers are not what might reasonably be ex- 
pected, many not being as prompt as they should be in sending in their 
reports. 

That our schools may become anything like a success, more ample 
provisions must be made for a general supervision by the county su- 
perintendent. Our local officers do not manifest the interest in 
schools requisite to the proper education of our children; therefore, 
it would be well for us to imitate the exemple of some of the older 
States — pay the superintendent of schools sufficiently to devote all 
of his tims^ if necessary, in the interests of the schools of his county. 



LAFAYETTE.— G. K. Smith. 

^Educational Prooress. — During the year, seventeen good school 
houses have been built, mostly frame, but neat and tasty in their ar- 
rangement, and many of them are seated with the improved gradu- 
ating hinge seat and desk. Others are under contracjt and will be 
finished soon. I am encouraged to say, I believe the good work will 
go bravely on, until every subdistrict is provided with a good house^ 
conveniently and comfortably furnished. 



92 

Educational Work Done. — I have visited the schools so far as 
time and circumstances would allow; delivered four public lectures; 
wrote twenty letters ; traveled about four hundred miles ; examined 
one hundred and eighteen teachers ; issued seventy-eight certificates ; 
attempted three times to organize an institute, and failed for want of 
sufficient attendance. 1 very much regret I cannot claim a more ac- 
tive engagement in behalf of the schools of the county, but must 
confess myself one of those whose time and thoughts have been too 
much tasked by other things, to permit me to render as much per- 
sonal aid in this important work as I desired, or so much as my views 
of dutv to the community dictated. I would most respectfully sug- 
gest, that the next General Assembly so amend the law, applying to 
county superintendents, that the office may be made more efficient. 

Educational Work done hy other Agencies* — None. 

Qualification of Teachers. — We have a few men and women who 
make teaching their profession, who are devoting their time and en- 
ergies to make themselves an honor to the cause, and to fill with dig- 
nity the responsible calling, but a large majority are young teachers 
in their first terni, a few in their second, consequently of but little or 
no experience. Some of them are doing well, and eive promise of 
great usefulness, others will have to abandon the wort. 

Obstacles in the way of Improvement. — ^The want of greater in- 
terest among the people. 

Have all the Scnools been kept open at least three months in the 
vearf — In all the townships organized, most of the subdistxicts have 
had a three months school, many four and six months. A few only 
have failed, and that where no house could be procured ; two town- 
ships have no organization. 

Normal Schools. — I am gratified to see the efibrt you are mak- 
ing, to bring the subject of normal schools before the next General 
Assembly, for I regard such schools as one of the most important 
branches of the educational department of any state; their influence 
upon, and benefit to other schools can scarcely be over-estimated.— 
Many of our schools are filled with young teachers, without any ex- 
perience in teaching or discipline. , The nrst few months with them, 
are of little value to pupils placed in their charge ; weeks at least, 
and months more probably, are consumed by them in learning how 
to go to work ; meanwhile, the valuable time of the children is lost, 
perhaps more than lost, for children in school are either doing well, 
or ill, are never idle; and unfortunately, it is customary to select 
teachers of inexperience to classes of small children. The normal 
school rectifies all these mistakes, for in selecting teachers who have 
passed through one of these scnools, the directors will have full 
knowledge of what has been their success as teachers, not merely as 
scholars. It will be known that they have received the necessary in- 
struction and experience, to enable them at once to enter upon the 
successful discharge of their duties as teachers. But my honest con- 
victions are, that we would reap a greater and more immediate ben- 
efit, by establishing a school of tnis sort, for every three or four 
counties at most, instead of the division as laid down in your plan. — 
And the Legislature that moves in this matter, will do a ^reat work 
for the educational interests of the State, which will lay her people 
under obligations, and claim their warmest gratitude and sincerest 
thanks. 



93 
LAWRENCE.— J. H. Woods. 



The process of education in this coanty, is onward and upward, 
slowly though it be in some subdistricts. We have a higher grade 
of teachers than last year, and about thirty new school houses have 
been built and furnished, since October, 1867. 

Through our countv teachers' institute, we hope to effect greater 
improvements within the next two years. Our institute is incorporated 
as a permanent literary society, with power to prosecute literary en- 
terprises. Through it we have already established a county library, 
consisting of valuable books for teachers, school officers, and advanced 
students. 

The institute has also matured plans for, and located in the 
county, (at Marionville), an institution to be known as the " Missouri 
Normal tJniversity." The work is in progress, foundation wall laid, 
and material being gathered upon the site, for the work of construc- 
tion. 

We shall unitedly labor for the completion of this building, that 
we may secure the State patronage, according to the plan you pro- 
pose for State normal schools. 

My labors as county superintendent, have been earnest, and 
scarcely has a day passed lor the last two years, but what I have la- 
bored publicly or privately, for the elevation and prosperity of our 
school interests. 

I have nearly secured uniformity of school books. The list of text 
books recommended by you, predominate in the county. The arith- 
metics and geo^aphies have no opposition. The National Headers 
have the Eclectic to compete with, but are gaining ground. 

I am endeavoring to bring the primary schools near^^r to what they 
should be, and at the same time, I am laboring to show to school offi- 
cers the advantage of central or graded schools. Several townships 
are about wrought up to the acting point on this subject, and I think 
six or eight central township schools will be established during the 
next year. 

In educational interests, I h»ve had the voluntary aid of L. M. 
Andrews, teacher, Mt. Vernon, Robt. Kelly, editor ** Fountain," and 
numerous other teachers and citizens of the county. 

I grant three grades of certificates to teachers and examine by 
written lists of questions. To ihos'e passing satisfactory examination 
in the primary, also in the higher mathematics and natural sciences, I 
grant first grade certificates. To those passing with perfect marks in 
the primary branches only, I grant second grade, and to those barely 
passable, third grade. Those nolding these grades are about equally 
divided. 

The obstacles in the way of improvements are numerous, the 
principal of which are the continual complaints against taxation, and 
a want of proper appreciation among the people, of the public school 
system. 

Out of sixty- four subdistricts in the county, not more than four 
have failed to open public school at least three months during the 
year; Many of them five and six months. Many of the districts open 
private or subscription schools, after the public schools are out 

I shall soon make mv official bow to my successor, and vacate in 
his favor. But I and others will' not relax our efforts to make Law- 
rence county, stand first in Southwest Missouri. 

We ask your aid and advice in the future as in the past 



• 94 
LINCOLN.— J. R. McOlkllan, 



1. Several school houses have been built, since my report last 
year) and are ornaments to their districts. They are comfortable and 
convenient, and some have furniture of the most improved styles. 
Nearly all the old houses have been repaired. Ten districts have 
made arrangements this year to build next spring. We shall soon 
have all the school houses in this county of a good and substantial 
character. 

2. Where new houses have been built, the grounds are receiving 
some attention. 

3. Improved furuit re is in some of the new houses, and will be 
placed in nearly all the houses to be built next year. 

4. No apparatus in any district. * 

5. and 7. No professional teachers; and the grade of scholarship 
is very low. 

6. My plan of examination is: asking questions so as to ascertain 
whether or not the applicant understands the principles of the subjects 
required to be taught. 

8. I have no institute. The sixty days allowed in which to per- 
.form all services, does not allow time to discharge other duties, which 

cannot be avoided, as they , should be done, and thus prohibits the 
institute from being held, unless the superintendent works for noth- 
ing. 

9. Reports of school oflScers are generally well made. Their re- 
ports are to be made in April, and the requirement of them this tail, 
created some confusion. I do not find any law requiring reports from 
districts in September. 

10. Interest manifested in education of colored . people, is such as 
required by law, and no more. People will not be driven into doing 
distasteful things by any laws on the subject. 

11. The "'Christian Institute" and 'Tarker Seminary," both in 
Troy, are excellent schools, and in flourishing condition. I have no 
reports from other private schools in the county. 

12. The changes which have been made in the law have improved 
it, but has left some sections conflicting, which should be rectified 
by further legislation. In my opinion, the central school system 
should be abolished, because it is so complicated and expensive that 
it is entirely disregarded. The duties of county superintendent 
should be specific md not general. He should have the power to re- 
voke certificates granted teachers. The time of service shoul be ex- 
tended to more than sixty days, and the per diem fixed by law. Great 
interest is manifested in education, and great efforts are being made 
to have better school houses and teachers. 



LIVINGSTON.— J. D. Roberts. 

The public mind is becoming awake to the great subject of edu- 
cation in our county, and a large per cent of our public schools have 
made rapid progress during the past year, l^lew school houses are 
being built in nearly every congressional township in the county. 

The labor performed by the county superintendent, though very 
inadequate to the demands of the general welfare of the schools, has 
boH X). erood effect in aiding the teacher to impress upon the minds of 



\ 95 

his employers and pupils the necessity of a united effort, to overcome 
the vague and limited ideas that have been entertained of an educa- 
tion. 

The teachers' institute is one of the best agents to inspire the 
teaclier with new life and animation. We have in this county two 
weeks in the year devoted to holding institutes, and have succeeded 
in securing through your aid, the assistance of some of the best teach- 
ers in the State; 

We have also some of the county teachers, who are of the first- 
class, and are well calculated to honor their profession. 

But the great desire of the people to secure cheap teachers, and 
in some places to retain all their old school books, regardless of the 
classilication of their schools, and their tardiness in purchasing school 
furniture, appear to be the greatest obstacles at present in the way of 
gtMieral improvements. Our public schools in the county have all 
heen open at least four months in the year, and some six. 

There appears to be a general dissatisfaction in the count;;r with the 
new law, in reference to the mode of collecting the township tax, the 
impression is, that the township tlerk should have the collecting of 
the whole of the township funds, or not any, and the old mode of three 
subdirectors in each suhdistrict, is generally preferred to one. 

We think that section 15, of the public school law, providing for 
township central schools, does not appear at present to meet- the 
wants of people. But if we could have a central county school for 
the advanced pupils of the county, under the direction of the county 
court, our wants would be better supplied. 



MACON.— S. P. VanDoozer. 

Educational progress. — ^The interest taken in the public school 
the past year, has been as much, if not more, than the year before. 
New school houses have sprung up in various parts of the county, and 
Macon City has now the best public school building in North Mis- 
souri. 

Educational work, done by the superintendent^ is meager in com- 
parison with what it should nave been. When asked by a county 
judge how much time would be necessary to do the work necessary to 
be done, I replied three hundred days. 

The county court allowed less than one hundred to superintend 
between ninety and one hundred schools, to examine teachers and 
confer with officers. Is not the law lame at this point, when judges 
are ? Competent men for the office of superintendent feel the posi- 
tion an undesirable one under the present arrangements, and it is to 
be hoped, for the good of the cause of education, that the law will 
soon be changed for the better. 

Work done by others has been very little. Prof. Green, of Kirks- 
ville, did good service in the teachers' institute at Atlanta, and was 
highly appreciated by all. 

Obstacles in the way. — ^The greatest is high taxes and little money, 
and the second is a want of qualifications in teachers. Some of them, 
however, are eminently qualified. 

All the public schools in the county have been kept open from 
three to eight months during the year. 

Remarks. — 1 hope the Legislature will appoint a committee of 
educational men to put the school law in a better and more proper 
shape. 

I 



96 

MADISON.— D. Petersok. 

The educational progress of our county, from our present statis- 
tics, indicate nothing very favorable, though I believe our future pros^ 
pect is gradually brightening. 

The people are becoming considerably aroused to the interest of 
edjucation, and the system of common schools generally. 

During the last twelve months I have visited nearly every public 
school taught in the county, generally examine the pupils, and give 
them a short lecture on the elementary principles of our language, 
and on topics having a tendency to inspire the children w^ith a desire 
to obtain, at least, a good English education. I have also organized a 
number of subdistricts, and two townships in which no public schooh 
have been taught since the commencement of the late war, and en- 
deavored to reason the school officers out of the idea of having 
schools taught in the kind of school houses generally used in onr 
county. 

We have had a few select schools of a common grade, and gene- 
rally produced satisfactory results, 'considering the shortness ot their 
duration. Some efforts have been made to rear up a college in this 
part of Missouri, and indeed the indications were once favorable for 
its ereotion in this place (Fredericktown\ but it turned out to be '^all 
talk and no cider,'? as it invariably will be in a place where the peo- 
ple are too niggardly to build even a public school house. I am far 
from repudiating the idea of building a college, but I think the idea 
of having one here, whilst we are destitute of a common school house, 
is ridiculous and reprehensible. 

The certificates given to teachers this year were all second grade, 
but few of our teachers being able to expound the English alphabet 
thoroughly. This is saying a good deal, but it is nevertheless trae, 
and I furthermore find it true, that when we find a teacher who under- 
stands the elementary principles, we find one generally competent to 
teach most, if not all, of the English branches. 

The old fogy or aristocratic principle prevailing in many parts of 
the country, disallowing, or rather grudgingly allowing the children 
of poor parentage equal privileges in the school room with those 
whose parents chance to be in more affluent circumstances, is one 
grand obstacle impeding the progress of education in our countv, 
especially in our immediate vicinity. Doubtless the chief cause why 
FredericKtown is minus a school house, may be with much truth at- 
tributed to this gigantic evil. We have some men, very good men 
too, who are aniuous to donate their thousands to construct a magni- 
ficent college as a nucleus around which the affluent youth can clus- 
ter, who would also spend their additional thousands in feeing law- 
yers and witnesses to repudiate the common school law, which makes 
it obligatory on them to pay a small pittance as a tax to aid in educat- 
ing the poor orphan, hence the influence of the opulent is a mighty 
current against which the friends of popular education have to strug- 
gle. 

The ipjudicious manner of distributing the school funds, also op- 
erates greatly to the prejudice of our common school system. I would, 
therefore, in regard to tnis matter, beg leave to make a few sugges- 
tions to our next General Assembly, now soon to convene. 

You are apprised of the fact that many townships, and conseauent- 
ly many subdistricts, receive ample means to continue their schools, 
and that, too, independent of any special tax« for the term of six 
niont.bfl in the year; whilst others, burthened with a grievous tax, can- 



87 

not continue their schools over three or four months, being compelled 
to employ the most inferior teachers at that. Our present system ren^ 
dering this unavoidable, I see no impropriety in so changing the law 
|ts to give an equal amount of the township funds arising from the 
sale of the sixteenth section. A moment's reflection will develop the 
propriety of this change. For example^ here is our township, sparsely 
inhabited, in which it is impossible to organise more than two sub- 
districts, with forty scholars each. The proceeds of the sixteenth sec- 
tion yields them a maximum- income of $80 only; admitting the in- 
come from other sources to equal this^ the entire amount would be 
$16D, as the wages of two teachers, for four months each, the people 
being too poor and thinly settled, as is invariably the case in town- 
ships of this character, to continue their schools by subscription. But 
enjoining us is another township, the sixteenth section of which yields 
an income of from $800 to $l,OuO annually, in addition to which, it re- 
ceives from other souroes a similar amount, making, in the aggregate, 
some §1,800 or $2,000, an amount more than sufficient for all educa- 
tional purposes, not excluding even the central schools. The citizens 
are wealthy, and said township densely settled, hence abundantly 
able, and generally willing, to keep open good select schools all the 
year round, independent of the public funds; whereas, according to 
the present system of distribution, the former township, where the 
people are needy ani unable, as to means, as well as in point of num- 
bers, to continue their schools longer than two months, and, owing to 
the paucity of their children, can nave no school at all, unaided by 
the school fund, get a mere pittance as its moiety. < 

The object ot the public school system is to educate the masses, 
and especially those who are unable to educate themselves. The 
present arrangement, however, is a prostitution of the grand, noble, 
and original design — taking the township funds from the dependent 
orphan, and lavishing it upon the opulent and independent. Itis vain 
to argue thai the child in the one township has no right to the funds 
arising from the sale of the school lands in any other township, be- 
cause the sixteenth section of every township was reserved for educa- 
tional purposes, is a gratuity, ^. «., for the purpose of establishing a 
free school system throughout the State. Hence the school lands in 
Dunklin or Pemiscot are, of right and justice, as much the property 
of the child in Atchison county, as the land in the latter county itself, 
and vioe versa. This being an incontrovertible fact, the only fair and 
liberal mode of distribution is to merge the township funds into a 
general or State fund, to be equally apportioned among all the sub- 
districts within the State, proper regard being had to central or grad- 
ed flchools. 

The achool funds, regardless of the source whence derived, should 

n^yer be distributed according to the number of children, because it 

reauires just as large a salary to pay the wages of a teacher who, 

serves in a subdistrict containing but forty children, as it does to pay- 

tiie ^wa^res of the one serving in another subdistrict containing eighty 

children. Hence the present impropriety of giving double the amount 

^f jxxan^y to the latter, than that received by the former, except in 

cases when the childrens' attendance is sufficiently laige to render- 

the services of an assistant necessary, in the event of which an extra i 

annropriation should be made, sufficient for this em,ergency. 

^-^ "Virith a fe^ exceptions, all the public schools within the county- 
fia.ve been kept open the three months, and most of th^em four monthei,, 
during the current year. 
7 a B 



f8 
MARION-J. W. Aters. 

1. Educational progress in the county. — ^The educational pro 
ffress of Marion county is exhibited by the appearance of new, com- 
fortable school houses in several districts, and the liberal estimates 
generally made for improvements and teachers' wages. The city of 
Hannibal, now well organized, is sustaining excellent public schools. 
which are truly a credit to the board of education, which has estab- 
lished and maintained them in the face of many difficulties, and mucii 
opposition, as well as to the corps of teachers who have labored so 
faithfully and efficiently. Every one who has had an eye on HanDi* 
bal for years past, must admit that a most noble advance in edoca- 
tional progress has been accomplished by means of the proviaions of 
the public school law. 

2. Educational work done hy county superintendent,— l^he eiio- 
cational work done by the county superintendent is such as makei 
but little show, yet I may say that the county superintendent of Ma- 
rion county has accomplished some good, by a personal influence r.t 
the teachers, generally, throughout the county; by rendering aidaDi 
instruction to school officers; dv organizing teachers' institutes; h 
convening the school officers of the county to j^iscuss various topi: 
of interest to the schools, generally; bv visiting and encoDrapE? 
schools (both teacher and pupils), ana by exerting an influence 



among the citizens in favor of the public school system, and defen 
ing the school law against the attacks of its opposers. But it neri 
not be expected that the county superintendent will do what is ei- | 
pected of him, and what he ought to do, while (as at present) scarce J | 
one-fifth of his time is allowed nim for his various official duties. 3H | 
men are so constituted, thai, a secondary occupation does not enli'^ 
the zeal and energy of the mind. 

After nearly three years' experince as counter superintendent. 1 
am thoroughly convinced that the duties, by law assigned to theconntr 
superintendent^ are worthy of the zeal and energy of a man of to 
business capacity, and I would suggest that, instead of sixty days, at 
least one hundred and fifty days be>llowed to county superinteodentN 
Much of the work now done by county clerks might be turned over 
to county superintendents. 

8. Educational work done hy other agencies. — ^The teachers' inft> 
tute has accomplished a great deal of good. At our last session, bell 
in Palmyra, last June, besides the benefit of the instruction to cor 
teachers, we had quite a concourse of the friends of education an^ 
public schools. Addresses, delivered at the court bouse^ to the citi- 
zens, by George P. Beard, Esq., and Mgjor J. B. Merwin, of St Louis^ 
were not without telling effect in favor of education and pu^^^^ 
schools. The presence and aid of the State Superintendent and As- 
sistant State Superintendent ot Public Schools, had a good effect^ both 
with teachers and citizens. I cannot do justice without mentioning 

garticularly. the work and influence of Rev. Dr. Corby n, of St Panl^ 
oUege, ana Rev. Mr. Rhoades, of Bethel College, both of whoci 
labored faithfully for the interests of the county institute. 

4. Qualifications of teachers are generally fair. 

5. Obstacles in the way of improvement. — ^The chief obstacles I 
have observed, are the prejudices among the peoi)le on account ot 
political differences, and a few old fogy ideas still in existence ; but 
Doth these causes are fast vanishing, and the future looms up brightly. 



99 

6. All the public whools in the cauniy, except one, have been. 
kept open at least three months daring the year, and, in a large major- 
ity of the districts, we have had schools from four to eight months. 



McDONALD.-J. a Sampson. 

There has been a commendable progress, in educational matters, 
in this county, during the past year. 

A goodly number of log buildings have been put up throughout 
the county, for school house purposes — the voluntary contributions of 
the people of the resj^ective sabdietricts. 

The county superintendent has visited the various neighborhoods 
and districts of the county, and has counseled and advised with the 
school officials as to school matters generally. 

He has held no teachers' institute, there not being teachers 
enough in the countv to organize one. 

He has delivered no educational lectures, the people being in 
more need of school funds than school lectures. 

Teachers are few, and indifferently qualified. 

The obstacles inthe way of improvement are, la<5k of school funds, 
want of competent teachers, and the general inefficiency of school 
officials. 

Five public schools have been kept open^ at least three months 
during the past year. 



MERCER.— W, Adaxs. 

It sives me ^eat pleasure to make a report upon the general 
educational interests of the county, which, contrasted with the status 
of last year, shows a very marked progress in almost every respect, 
a progress, none the less strongly pronounced, that it is due, I am 
eorry txi confess, only in slight degree, to the labors of the county 
superintendent. Silently, but rapidly, during the past eighteen 
months, the popular ideas of common school education, its scope, 
benefits and the means by which it should be obtained, have been 
undergoing radical changes. Juster and more liberal views obtain, 
and the people everywhere within our limits, are found taking a 
deeper and far more active interest in their local educational affairs. 
I can rive no more striking illustration of this most gratifying progress, 
than the instructions I received during this fall, almost daily, from not 
only local directors, but the people in a great many districts, in regard 
to persons who might apply for certificates, to enable them toteach 
their district schools, ^to put them through. We want none but good 
teachers in onr districts. We request you to be sure that the qualifi- 
cations are ^ood.^ 

In addition, far less gmmbling at the amount of tax to be paid 
bas been observed than was noticeable in the collection of the tax 
for 1867. And yet, it has been more burdensome this year, as a gen- 
eral rule, tiian it was then, there having been more new school houses 
bailL and better salaries paid teachers. ^ 

The current year has witnessed the erection of twenty new school 
booses. The oat^oppin^ of progressive ideas are veiy noticeable in 



100 

their construction. They are all frame baildings, and nniformly good. 
Some are even elegant in their external appearance, being painted 
and tastefully ornamente'd with cornice, while ail are comfortably ar- 
ranged internally, and very well adapted to the purposes for which 
they were built, seated with good desk seats, and liberally supplied 
with blackboards. 

In reference to the latter, the fact that teachers, participating in 
the general manifestation of increasing interest, have been sedulously 
qualifying themselves for a more intelligent discharge of the arduous 
auties of their pro^'ession, gives ample assurance that they will not 
remain simply articles of ornament, but will industriously be devoted 
to their proper uses. Besides the blackboards, quite a number of dis- 
tricts have supplied their school rooms with much needed apparatus, 
outline maps, school tablets, numeral frames, cubical blocks and 
terrestrial globes, and the coming year, I have no doubt, will see these 
necessary aids to thorough teaching in nearly every new school house 
in the county. I am thus prolix on the gratifying general edacational 
progress and its evidences, because it is almost exclusively the result 
of the sober reflection of the people, assisted but very little by other 
agencies, and in the face of obstacles of a very annoying character,!! 
not of great magnitude. 

The work done by the county superintendent being* confined 
chiefly to conferences and consultations with boards of education and 
district directors and in the examination of teachers. With a very 
small margin indeed for the visiting of schools, exhausting the tioie 
placed by law at his disposal. This has been owing to the obstacles 
above referred to. And of these, the most prominent, and perhap* 
the only real obstacle is the school law itself. This may seem a wild 
assertion made of a school law in a county where, though subject to 
its operations, decided educational progress has been reported, lot 
wild as it may seem, it is none the less truthful on that account. The 
genius of the law in its general ideas, the magnificent system it incor- 
porates, the means it provides lor the advancement of the true in- 
terests of education in our noble *'Free Missouri," are certainly grand, 
admitted by all. But while all this is justly admitted of the law ass 
whole, claimed by nearly all classes of the people of the law as whole 
it is also claimed, and even a cursory examination of the law will 
establish ample grounds for the claim, that its details are so compli- 
cated, many of its provisions so conflicting, so difficult to harmoniie 
With each other, susceptible of so widely difi'erent constractions, and 
the means provided for its execution, for familiarizing the people 
with it, for, in short, placing it in practical working operation, so sin- 
gularljr vague and inadequate, as, in the vexatious annoyances to 
which it gives rise, and the uncertainties in regard to the proper dis- 
charge of the duties, created in the minds of the officers upon whom 
they are imposed, to act as a check to the progress which might be 
evoked so decided, as to be apparent to the most casual observer in 
contact with its every day workings in country localities. Permit 
one illustration : minor dimculties every day arise in the discharge of 
a district director's duties, some of them involving a degree or respon- 
sibility, all affecting the neighborly relations of the director with the 
people of his district. Anxious to conform to law and prevent un- 

{deasant discord, the director comes to the county superintendent, 
ays his difficulties before him, and asks his advice on the meaning of 
the law. The sui)erintendent gives him his advice honestly, careful 
to state that his dicta amounts to nothing more than a mere opiDioo. 
possessing no legal weight whatever, ana no more valuable than that 



101 

of any other person competent to form an intelligent opinion, and 
who has given the law a careful study. He goes to the lawyers, who 
diiter widely among themselves, and, after spending a day, perhaps, of 
valuable time, in the .attempt to set himself right, is no nearer a real 
solution of his difficulties than he was before such attempt was made. 
The result is obvious. The perplexed director returns to his district 
discouraged, his ardor dampened, and the educational interests of the 
district sympathizing with his discouragement and dejection, a^e 
compelled to suffer. This is not an illustration drawn from imaginary 
facts, but a recital from the history of almost daily experiences. 

The details of the law simplified, so that the officers who should 
execute it, shall be at no loss in its interpretation; its conflicting 
sections repealed or harmonized, and adequate means provided to 
carry out and to develop into familiar working, to practicalize its 
general plan, by removing every obstacle tq rapid and permanent pro^ 
gress will leave nothing to be desired. 

You will see by the tabular statement herewith enclosed, that 
our public school fund, both township and county,is in a very healthy 
condition. With amount received from the State fund, it has formed 
a very large item in means to defray the expenses of teachers' salaries, 
a small tax only having been levied to keep open the three months' 
school which has been taught in every district in the county. In 
quite a number of districts, school have been kept open six months, in 
one or two as much as nine months, and next year it is confidently 
expected that tho six months' term will be adopted as the general 
rule. 



MILLER. — H. S. BuKLiNGAMR 

In reply to your official circular, I herewith transmit you my 
annual report for this county : 

The good citizens of this county are beginning to manifest a laud* 
able zeal in the cause of popular education and progress. A number 
of new school buildings are in course of construction, and within the 
next year our county will be dotted with a respectable number of 
substantial and comfortable houses for educational purposes, furnished 
with modern improvements and keeping pace with the age. 

I have endeavored to labor and use my influence in favor of pro- 
gress, but have succeeded only to a limited extent. The greatest 
obstacles in the way of progress and improvement are an empty 
treasnpy and '*old foficyism." 

I have granted tnirty-three certificates, in all, within the lastvear. 
Seven for two years, five males, and two females, twenty-four lor one 
year, sixteen males and eight females, and two for six months. The 
qualificationsof teachers ranking considerably higher in the last year, 
a number combining a high grade of scholarship with experience and 
abilitv in the art of teaching. 

We yet have a few subdistricts unorganized, but so far as I can 
now speak advisedly, our organized districts have all afforded the re* 
quired amount of public schools, and a number of sub districts have 
extended schools to four, five and six months within the year. 

We have two flourishing colored schools taught by experienced, 
able and efficient teachers. 

I received your plan of State normal schools this morning, and 
heartil J* approve ol the same, and will use any efibrt m my power tc 
advance same. " • 



102 

MONROE.— A. E. Gobr 

We have, in Monroe county, seventy-eight school haases. Of 
these, fifty-five are Irame, nineteen are log, and four are brick. A 
large number of these are very .comfortable, heated by stoves, well 
seated, and provided with some farnitare. Some are supplied with 
globes, maps and charts. 

• Our teachers, as a class, are only moderately qualified. Some 
few possess superior qualifications, and would be creditable to their 
profession in any locality. So long, however, as the four months' sys- 
tem continues, we cannot expect teachers, as a general rule, of supe- 
rior or of even respectable attainments. For this reason, being em- 
ployed only four months in the year, teachers, of necessity, embark 
in other enterprises, and if that in which they engage pays better 
than teaching, they will, of course, continue in it. The consequence 
is, that every season, a district has to hunt up a new teacher, and the 
chances are that, among so large a number of floating pretenders, 
many of them will get situations. Now, if our schools continued 
eight or ten months in the year f and an investment for this purpose 
would pay better, would yield a larger dividend, than any otner dis- 
position a community could make of the same amount of money), we 
would have, in every county, professional teachers, who would devote 
their whole time and energies to their employment, who would take 
a pridein their profession, and use every eflbrt to qualify themselves 
for the proper discharge of their duties. This question should be 
pressed upon our lefi:islature. We owe our children an education; it 
is all the most ol us will be able to give them. It is the only way in 
which we can properly fit and qualify them for the great contest in 
life which awaits them. We cannot do it by a four month school. I 
would, therefore, suggest such a change in our school law as tore- 
quire at least an eight or ten month school to be kept up every year. 

Three directors in a district, would be better than one. 

The provisions of the new law, in regard to the collection ol 
levies made on districts, are not so good, in my opinion, as the old 
law. 

Our institute is getting along poorly. We have had bat one 
meeting during the year, and then but few attended. I would sug- 
gest such a change in the law as to relieve teachers, as much as pos- 
sible, of the expense and loss of time which they incur in attending 
an institute, and to make it imperative upon them to attend. 

In regard to the education of colored children,! would state that 
we have now in successful operation four schools for negro children. 
This number will not likely be increased. 

The suggestions you make in regard to normal schools are good. 
The people, however, are not y^ prepared for such a number, and 
are unwilling to incur the expenses necessarily attending their estab- 
lishment. Indeed, we shall not be ready for normal schools until we 
are willing to continue our common schools longer than four months 
in the year. I suppose the design of a normal school is to provide us 
with professional teachers, but now can a professional teacher live on 
four months' employment during the year? At the end of the first 
school, he woula most likely engage in some other enterprise, and 
that would be the last we would hear of him as a teacher. Induce 
our le^s^islature to require an eight or ten month school in every dis- 
trict, then normal schools will be a necessity. Then there will be an 
inducement for young gentlemen and ladies to qualify themselves for 
professional teacherir. They will then have assurance of constant and 



103 

Frofitable employment in their protession. Until that time, however, 
doubt the economy of incurring much expense in the education ot 
teachers, who« if they continued in their profession, would be forced 
to the necessity of seeking employment in other StAtes, 



MONTGOMERY.-J. 0. Elus. 

In compliance with your request, I have the honor to submit the 
following report of the condition of ttie educational interests of this 
county. As it is always the case, that any innovation upon the old 
and established customs and rules of order — no matter how forcibly 
the advantages of a change may appear to some — ^is fought as bitterly 
as a stroke at the heart of our American eagle, by some of the best 
citizens, so the establishment of the new common schoolsystem upon 
a firm basis, in our county, has, in some cases, been deferred, and the 
interests of the law been frustrated. But, I am happy to be able to 
say, that as the beauties of the new plan unfold, and its objectionable 
features are chan&:ed by our legislators, rendering it more comprehen- 
sive, good and industrious men are beginning to come forward, and 
show a willingness to discharge the duties of the school offices, which 
they have, heretofore, rather shunned. 

There seems to be a general desire, on the part of the people, to 
have the schools kept open as long as possible, without excessive 
taxation, and to support and encourage the boards of directors in the 
several townships, although there are some '^old foffies," who claim 
that the old way was the best, and fight everything like improvement 
as a waste of ^time and money, not warranted by the necessities of 
the times — wlio, in short, oppose everything except " free trade," and 
grumble if they have to pay a dollar school tax. 

That the people are beginning to see the beneficial results attend- 
ing a more liberal educational organization, is evident from tl\e man}'' 
new and, in some cases, commodious buildings which have been 
erected in the county during the past summer, for school purposes. 
These buildings, in almost every case, are of a character to reflect 
credit upon the liberal feelinfi;s of their communities, and afford 
ample room for the comfortable accommodation of their youth, 
although, in some of the more backward subdistricts. the eye is still 
forced to meet the dilapidated and cheerless establisnment wherein 
the children of a nei^nborhood huddle together, osten.^^ibly for the 
purpose of having instilled into their minds the elements of an ( du- 
cation, or, in other words, where they are expected to learn to '* read, 
and write, and cypher,'' but where they, in realitv, have their hands 
full if they succeed in keeping the old "ten plate'' stove w;irm. 
These instances, however, are few, and, under the present pressure, 
will soon have to give way to comfortable houses. 

I regret very much that the records of this office afford no in- 
formation in regard to the ''educational work done by the county 
superintendent/' or " other agencies," during the past year. A tc ach- 
ers' institute, (district), was held in this county, I thiuK under the aus- 

Eices of the State Superintendent which I think was quite a success, 
ut of its details I am uninformed. 

The principal obstacles in the way of improvement, I would con- 
ceive to be: First, objectionable features in the school laws, and 
second, in a lack of a uniform series of books. In fact I believe that 



104 

the second obstacle may well be considered as under the head of the 
first, for any attempt to establish a uniform series^ without the assist- 
ance of the law, will be attended with a great amount of trouble and 
dissatisfaction. I do not propose to offer any advice or suge^estions in 
relation to the school law, but will leave this to those better ac- 
quainted with the making of laws, and will content my-eelf with the 
hope that the desired changes may be brought about, and the edu- 
cational interests of our great State, be thereby greatly enhanced. 



MORGAN.— T. TtJKNBULL. 

It affords me pleasure to report, that the majority of the schools 
in the county have made favorable progress, and at present evince a 
greater degree of efficiency, than at the time of my last annual re- 
port. Some of the causes that have conduced to this marked im- 
provement, are quite palpable to the ordinarjr observer. Our improved 
school system, as amended and simplified in the ^ School Act, ap- 
proved March 25th, 1868," is exerting a salutary influence upon our 
schools. The cause of education has received a new impetus thereby. 

School Iloxises. — ^I'here have been seven new school houses 
erected in this county since my last report. The board of education 
of Versailles, have erected a large, commodious school house, finished 
in the best manner, combining beauty and comfort^ an ornament not 
only to the village, but to the town and county. 

Quali^ations of Teachersr^l am pleased to say that the stan- 
dard of qualifications of teachers to-day, as a whole, is much higher 
than in years past: but still far below what it should be. 

The greatest obstacle in the way of obtaining a class of teachers 
of the highest order of qualifications, is the constant demand for 
" cheap.teachers," true, in many districts, and the number is increas- 
ing; wages are a secondary consideration; but too often the lower 
grade of teachers are employed, to the exclusion of the more compe- 
tent. 

Examinations, — Examinations have been for the most part, writ- 
ten. Every effort has been made to make them thorough and search 
ing, and as fair as possible. A careful record of results is kept par- 
ticularly of deficiencies. Each applicant who is refused, is fully 
informed of the reason for such refusal. Those who receive licences 
are also informed of the nature and extent of their failures, and noti- 
fiied that unless the next succeeding examination shows improvement, 
Uiey will be rejected. The more effectually to secure rapid improve 
ment, certificates are granted for but short periods of time. 

Official Duties. — ^The most onerous duties, are those of traveling 
over a large territory, and over many very rough roads, to visit the 
several schools in the" county. I have endeavored to visit each school 
at least twice during the year, but hfiVe tailed in several instances, 
because the term of some of the schools bas been short, and the term 
having expired before I was able to reach the school, and therefore 
only visited the district. What I have named is only a small part of 
the work performed ; but I forbear to specify farther, as you are well 
advised of other duties performed belonging to this ofiSce. 

The present school law imposes many grave responsibilities, and 
a vast amount of labor upon the county superintendent, while at the 
aame time it very narrowly limits his power and authority. He may 



105 

work patiently and faithfully to promote the interests of education, 
and inspire the people ^ilh the same zeal and enthusiasm that he 
feels ; he may visit the schools often and regularly; he may warmly and 
eloquently exhort the pupils to be punctual in their daily attendance, 
to keep their desks and school room neat and orderly ; and while he 
is doing all .this, the house in which they are so strongly exhorted to 
learn habits of tidiness, pnnctuality and order, may '* by reason of the 
infirmities of age," be just ready to topple down upon their innocent 
heads; and the seats so rude and uncomfortable, as to be better 
adapted to some felon's cell, as model instruments X)f torture. And 
yet the superintendent can only consult and advise I Experience and 
practice show conclusively, that the authority and power of the county 
superintendent are far too limited. The time allowed him is too short 
*for the amount of labor required, and should be extended to two hun- 
dred days. 

Normal sohooU.— True with some, the first school is the best 
school but this an exception, not the rule. We have our medical col- 
leges the better to prepare our young men for the profession of medi- 
cines ; law colleges lor the profession of law ; commercial colleges, for 
accountants, and more recently, agricultural colleges for farmers. All 
agree that these are very desirable and necessary. Why is it not then 
equally desirable and imjwrtant, that means should be provided 
to fit voung men and women for. the profession of teaching? We 
hope the Legislature this winter will authorize the establishment of 
at least six normal schools in this State. We have not organized a 
teachers' institute yet, on account of having so few teachers. 

Allow me in conclusion to express my thanks to you, and all 
others who have aided me in the performance of my duties. 



NODAWAY.— J. N. Albin. 

In my annual letter for the year 1868, brevity will be the chief 
feature. 

The educational progress of the county finds its parallel only in 
the rapid improvements of the preceding year. 

The labors of the county superintendent might have been more 
efficient, had the law makers, in the discharge of their duties, granted 
to him more time, sixty davs being about one-third the time requisite 
to perform what is required of him by law. Beyond what is already 
required of the county superintendent, he should have a general su- 

Eervision over the buildings, seating and furnishing of school houses, 
ocal directors having been educated in the eld log house, have at 
best but an imperfect and limited knowledge of the proper propor- 
tions of a room in which to teach school, and much less do they know 
about the most <5onvenient method of seating such a room. Thou- 
sands of dollars have been uselessly expended that might have been 
profitably applied, if some competent person had been employed to 
take charge of the hxmdredsot new houses that have been built ibr 
school purposes in the last two years. One of the great obstacles to 
improvement is, that school rooms are frequently entirely too small. 
The style of seating often more inconvenient than the old-long-slab- 
seat with no back. Such houses and seats must ultimately be thrown 
aside as useless property* We are lacking competent teachers* 



106 

Schools should be kept open eight months in the year, so as to secure 
to all children of school age at least four months of iiistruction, and 
furnish employment to those who make teaching their profession. 



PEMISCOT.— Sandford Jackson. 

This county is not making much progress in the way of educa- 
tion. 

I have visited nearly every organized school district in the coun- 
ty, have left the necessary blanks and instructions, also the school 
laws furnished me with the officers of said school districts. I regret to 
say that in some cases these blanks have not been filled as required 
by law. The people seem anxious for schools, but fail to take the 
necessary steps to secure them, the benefits of the public money. 

No other agencies save the agency of private enterprise within 
the districts, and the small pittance of public moneys doled out, have 
been at work in this county in furtherance of the cause of education. 

As to qualification of teachers, I can only say this, now and then, 
a good scholar, interested in the education of his own children, as well 
as those of his neighbors, will consent to 4;each a school for a period 
of three or four months during the year. We have no teachers who 
have qualified themselves properly, m any State institution or normal 
school. The floating applicants for positions as school teachers, are 
of an inferior order. Some very inferior. 

The obstacles in the way of improvement, are various. Some of 
which are, the unwillingness of the people to submit to a school tai. 
Thev prefer a voluntary subscription. There is a lack ot unanimity 
on the part of those interested in schools. Another cause is, the Terv 
small amount of State school money which is apportioned to each 
district, generally not more than enough to pay a^ood teacher his sal- 
arv for a month. Public money in this county is a small item ; an- 
other cause is sometimes a want of efficient district officers. In most 
districts those persons who would make good officers, are proscribed 
by the Constitution. Proscription is the bane of Pemiscot coanty; 
and it is felt in the cause of education as much, if not more, than id 
any other department in the county. 

In consequence of the reasons stated in the last answer, there 
have been but few schools kept open three months daring the past 
year, in this county. There are more subscription or select schools 
in the county, than public schools. 

In general, the school districts in this county have school grounds 
conveyed to trustees for the use oi the district, on which in most cases 
is erected a log school house. Benches and desks are rude. Now and 
then a blackboard may be seen in a school house. 

No school apparatus can be found in our school houses, save slaU$ 
andpeneils. 

No public examinations. 

Six male teachers examined. 

No female teachers examined. 

Two male applicants examined and rejected. 

Four certificates issued to male teachers. 

Two school visitors. 

Owing to the small number of colored people in this county, we 
have not enough in any school district to support a school. 



107 
PERRY.— D. W. Ckow. 

The progress of the educational interests of the county have not 
been satisfactory. However, some advancement has been made in a 
few very important partict^lars, viz : School houses are in a better 
condition than formerly, several good buildings have been erected 
during the last year, and some old ones have been repaired. The new 
school house in Perry ville, is a large and well arranged building for 
school purposes. 

Provisions for the support of schools are more liberal, and the 
schools are becoming more efScient, in many instances, this, however, 
applies to those school districts where an interest is manifested in the 
cause of education, for on the other hand, some have made no provi- 
sions whatever, nor do they seem to be disposed to avail themselves 
of any privileges or advantages of the system of public schools. 

2. I have held five ^^teachers' meetings'' during the year, visited 
thirty schools, and have examined and lectured each one visited. I 
have supplied, every board of education, and subdistrict director with 
the school law, together with the forms and blanks necessary for 
making all reports and returns required by law. I have held public 
examinations on specified days, for the convenience of applicants, and 
private examinations at any time. 

Some boards of education have done much to advance the cause 
of education in their respective districts. The countv clerk has been 
very prompt in the performance of the duties devolving upon him, 
pertaining to public schools. 

The qualifications of teachers, althou£:h below the requisite stan- 
dard, are good, and would do very well if thev possessed more inde- 
pendence and professional pride, but as it is, the standard will not im- 
prove rapidly, from the fact that few have these essential qualifica- 
tions. 

Obstacles in the way of improvement are as follows : Too many 
"under bidders" among the teachers, and too little interest among the 
people, too much authority invested in the directors, and no provision 
for compelling or restricting his action, too much recklessness in the 
manner in which estimates are made out and levied for school pur- 
poses, and too little benefit derived therefrom, to much change in the 
school law. 

The schools have been kept in operation for from four to six 
months during the year. 



PHELPS.— F. D. Morgan. 

1. Educational progress in the county. — Has been very good. 
From an organization of four districts eighteen months ago, we nave 
now in working order twenty-seven subdistricts, and all the townships 
are organized but one. 

2. Educational work done ly the County Superintendent. — My 
work has been chiefly (and object also), to get the county well or- 
ganized, and have succeeded very well. 

3. Educational work done hy other .agencies. — ^The private 
schools are preparing good teachers for our public schools. 

4. Qualifications of Tea^hersr—'Soi very good, have been using 
the best material offered. 



108 

5. Obstacles in the way of improvement, — ^They are so numerous 
I hardly know where to commence. First. The strong and deep root- 
ed prejudice against free school, and the prevailing ideas, you educate 
a man and you make a rascal of him. Second. School officers coin* 
ciding with the aforesaid views, refuse to do their duty, with few ex- 
ceptions. There id a continual warfare going on against the public 
school interest. Another reason is, the county court will not pay the 
county superintendent any thing for his services. I have received 
for my services for two years, $360 in county warrants, worth 60 cents 
p>er dollar, and have done over two hundred days work during the 
time. 

6. Have all the Public Schools been kept open three months dur- 
ing the year t — ^They have not for the reason, if the teacher's did not 
use Cobb's Speller and McOuffey's oldest Reader, and adopt the old 
plan of teaching, he was turned off. There has been only one school 
organized under the special act, and but one short session taught, in 
fact, there is such a bitter prejudice here against public schools that 
it will be some time before they ^et into good working order in this 
county. 

Number of school houses in the county 18 

Number of frame 3 

Number of log 15 

Value 33,000 



PIKE.— S. D. Chasb. 

One year ago there was not in the county of Pike, a single public 
school house .suitable to teach school in, but the influence exerted by 
the enactment of what is called the ^4iew school law" (laws passed in 
1867-8), has been during the past year very marked and beneficial. 
It has caused a generous emulation, and suitable buildings for the ac- 
commodation of nearly all of our schools are now in contemplation, 
and many have already been completed. The report of the school 
officers this year have not been very prompt, and several organiza- 
tions and building of new houses have taken place since the time for 
report. 

The furniture of the new houses are all "patent graduated hinge 
seat desks," which, in my opinion, are better adapted to our public 
schools than any other seats and desks now in use. 

We have given certificates to eighty-five teachers, forty-nine 
males and thirty-six females ; rejected seventeen, seven females and 
ten males. 

We have held three sessions of the teachers' institute this year, 
the first on the 12th of February, the second on the l^th of June, the 
third on the 13th of October, each one continued for four days. At 
the first about fifty teachers were in attendance, the other twx) were 
not as well attended. 



POLK— J. 0. NODURFT. 



1. Educational progress in the county ^ — ^The township reports 
are flattering. The public schools in the county are prospering finely. 



109 

The people are becoming more earnestly engaged in the interest ot 
the youths of our country. They are beginning lo realize that the 
future destiny of our State will depend upon the education of the ris- 
ing generation; 

A better class of school houses are being built, and furnished with 
better furniture for the convenience of children. 

2. Educational work done hy the county superintendent — I have 
visited forty-four ^chools during the present year, and found ihem in 
a flourishing condition. I found the children in every school all aglow 
with zeal for an education. In every school I visited, I delivered 
them a lecture on the subject of "Popular Education," which they 
seemed to appreciate very highly. 

3. Educational work done hy other agencies. — Many of the school 
officers are doing their work nobly. Others have done the best they 
probably could, under the circumstances. Eight of the township 
clerks failed to file their reports with the county clerk, or in ray office, 
hence our reports are meager. Efficient sub-directors, in many in- 
stances, procured more than four months' school for their sub-districts. 

4. Quali/ications of teachers. — The grade of qualifications of 
teachers is fifty per cent, better this year than it was last. Female 
teachers, in many instances, excel male teachers. Our teachers are 
improving in school government. 

5. Obstacles in the way of improvement. — . 

1. Poorly furnished scnool houses. 

2. Too many barely passable teachers, who can afibrd to teach 
for low wages. 

3. Inactive and careless subdirectors. 

4. Inefficient school fund. 

5. In many instances, the school law is not explicit enough. 

6. Have all the public schools in the county been kept open at 
least three months during the year f — Nearly all of the public schools 
have been kept open from three to six months during the year. 

7. I have spent seventy days in the service of public schools. 
Our teachers' institute held two sessions this year, but received 

no funds from the State or the county for its support. 



PUTNAM— M. V. LooMis. 

Our schools are of a decidedly better character than they were 
last Year, both in thoroughness and interest 

In regard to work done b^ the county superintendent, I must con- 
fess it has not been as extensive as might have been desired. I have 
done some little toward having our schools conducted more thorough- 
ly and practically. I have succeeded also, to some extent, in remov- 
ing the old-fogyism of imitation and mechanical teaching. 

We have been greatly assisted by the professors of the North Mis- 
souri normal school, who have visited our institutes, and have given 
us valuable instruction in the theory and practice of teaching, and 
other subjects connected with educational interests. 

The qualifications of our teachers are much better than they were 
last year. 

I presume all the schools have been kept open three months dur- 
ing the year, but so many districts have failed to report that I cannot 
answer definitely. 



110 

RALLS— Wm. D. Bishop. 

When I first assumed the duties of school superintendent for Ralls 
county. I was much embarrassed at the condition of the school inter 
est of this county. I found the whole free school system very imper- 
fectly organized under the various acts of the Legislature. The school 
directors, heretofore elected by the few who possessed the qualifica- 
tion of voters, were, for the greater part, ill-suited^for that important 
and responsible trust. 

I hope you will use your influence in our next Legislature to have 
the school law amended so that all who are interested in our schools 
can have a voice in all school matters. Sufficient care had not been 
taken in the selection of competent teachers, and the school houses 
were mostly dilapidated, and unfit to be occupied. In the discharge 
of my official duties, I have endeavored to remedy these evils, and in- 
fuse a new spirit into the educational interest of this county. It was 
apparent to my mind, that the first prerequisite to the successful ope- 
ration of the free school system, which has been so wisely established 
by our laws, was to procure the services of competent teachers, teach- 
ers whose educational acquirements fitted them for the office of im- 
parting knowledge to those under their charge. Without the assist- 
ance of competent and experienced teachers in our free schools, the 
munificence and humane policy of the Legislature will utterly fail to 
accomplish its object — the education of the masses. 

A grave, though popular error, abounds in our country on the 
subject of the quali6cation of teachers. It seems to be generally con- 
ceded that any one who has not proceeded beyond the mere* rudi- 
ments of education is as competent to instruct the youth in the pri- 
mary branches, as those whose minds have been expanded by an 
extended course of study. The education of youth should be entrust- 
ed to those whose education, intelligence and moral worth fit them for 
that high and important office. 

When ^ commenced my duties, I found the great msgority of 
teachers wholly incompetent to instruct, even in the primary branches. 
Mv object was to get rid of them as soon as possible. With much 
labor, 1 have succeeded, even beyond my expectations ; but there re- 
mains much to be done yet. I apprehend that the services of the 
most competent teachers could be procured for our schools, but the 
small salaries are inadequate to secure the services of professional 
teachers. I have endeavored to remedy this growing evil in this 
county, and now the people of old Ralls are beginning to realize the 
importance of high-priced teachers. Heretofore salaries ranged from 
$15 to $lO per month. Now we are givina: from $40 to $75 per month. 
The change is having a most salutary effect. Incompetent teachers 
are gradually growing out of fashion, and men of ability and compe- 
tency are supplying their places. 

In my selection of directors I have had but one object in view, 
and that was to secure the services of those whose qualifications fitted 
them for the discharge of their high responsibility. In this, I have 
been successful to my entire satisfaction. 

Our school houses have been repaired, and the grounds much im* 

S roved, in the last year. Also, quite a number of new houses have 
een erected, others are in course of construction, and, before lonsr, 
we shall have little complaint' for the want * of comfortable acfaoiJ 
houses. 



HI 
RANDOLPH,— Q. F. Rothwell. 

In reflecting npon the history of the school year just closed, I find 
mnch, not only to repay me for all my ofELcial labors, but also to in- 
spire every well-wisher of childhood, and friend of humanity and en- 
lightened civilization, with hope for the future. 

So far as the happiness and dignity of society are dependent upon 
the moral and intellectual culture of ^the rising generation, the Chris- 
tian patriot ma^ well take encouragement, and, from tne present 
state of prosperity, find an argument to allay something of his anxiety. 
The year has been one of uninterrupted progress ; but, like the reign 
of peace, it has no history that I can write. I know it; I feel it; I 
epjoy it. But the separate facts, each too unimportant in itself to be 
caught up and individualized, yet, in their accumulated force, most 
clearly speak advancement. So the hurricane may be traced by the 
rent forest and roofless houses that mark the way of its destruction, 
and the eloquent pen mourns over the homeless suffierer that it has 
made wretched; but who takes notice of the silent moisture falling 
from *^ heaven upon the place beneath,*' except to say " it rains ;" yet, 
the green earth is refreshed by it, the violet drinks it and is glad, and 
the tnrush sings when it is over. All I can eay to you is, the "children 
go to school." You, yourself better than I, can argue out the results, 
m all those pure and benign influences, whose aggregate of benefac- 
tions constitute the sum of individual and social nappine8s,.even as in 
nature, the smallest and the grandest consequences are alike attribut- 
able to one common cause. 

"The law that moalda the starting tear, 

And bidfl it trickle from its eoarce, 
That law preserres the earth a sphere, 

And holds the planets in their course." 

The great mathematician, revolving in his mind the vast i>ower 
of the lever to effiect results in the physical world, exclaimed, in his 
fruitless rapture: ^^Dosponetokai ton/cosmon kinaso!^ . But the phi- 
losophic educator, studying to move the moral world, to a high and 
lofty purpose, and more divine accomplishments, points, with undie- 
guised enthusiasm, to jthe children thronging the public schools, and 
'replies, " Eureka .'" 

This county embraces ten entire and six fractional townships, 
sub-divided into sixty-five subdistricts: These all enjoyed a free 
school of four months, and in many instances the term was prolonged, 
by private subscription, to five, six and even ten months. About 
three thousand children were in attendance. The average daily at- 
tendance, considering that most of the subdistricts are in the coun- 
try, and some of them three or four miles in extent, was very large. 

This year the terra of the free schools will most generally go to 
the legal limit, six months. Our sixty-five schools are now in opera- 
tion, with much larger attendance than formerly, as our annual enu- 
meration, to your honor will show, we number about two thousand 
more children this than last year, '^with one precinct still to hear 
from." In the absence of any extensive immigration,! am at loss how 
to account for this unprecedented increase, except upon the supposi- 
tion of a zeal for the public schools, or the influence of some other 
philosophic principle, unless, indeed, it may, in some degree, be at- 



112 

I 

tributed to my own industry in the discharge of my official duties. 
But we, nevartheless, move on harmoniously. 

With over two hundred school officers, a revenue of $28,000, spread 
upon sixty-five tax books, with sixteen township collectors, having no 
power of levy and sale, sent forth to beg revenue like Christian 
paupers to implore charity in a thronged city; with sixty-five delin- 
quent lists, made out by inexperienced hands, with sixty-five different 
settlements to make with the county collector, with more than thirty 
contracts to build school houses; with sixty-five teachers, and about 
five thousand children, yet, we have never had a law suit, nor a teacher 
dismissed, nor a child expelled. Too much praise cannot be bestowed 
on officers and patrons, for their devotion to the interests of the 
schools and the children. Their efforts, in this behalf, are well de- 
serving of public thanks. But in the kind testimpnials of their own 
good consciences, they shall find the most enduring reward. 

• Our corps of teacners are earnest, industrious and generally very 
competent. Some of them stand high as model educators. As a 
body, I feel proud of their proficiency. For it is to their qualifications 
and faithful effort, at last, we must mainly look for the building up of 
the schools. They are the very pillows upon which rest success. 
Without good teachers, in vain we make revenue laws or fret the 
people with many officers. 

This is the Thermopylae where Greece is saved or lost. This de- 
fended, all else is safe. This neglected, we but wage a fruitless battle 
of shorter or longer duration. For this reason, I have, in the absence 
of anything better, labored to make the institute a means of improFe- 
ment. I flatter myself that it has not been an entire failure, though, 
you must know, it is not very efficient. 

At our last session, in October, Messrs. E. Clark, Assistant State 
Superintendent, — . Osborne, O. H. Fethers and Professor Ripley, of the 
State University, attended, and, by their labors and lectures, contrib- 
uted greatly to its success. I feel myself under many obligations to 
them for the kindness which led them to add us this service. 

Again I say, we have everything to inspirit us. The cause of eda* 
cation is in itself worthy the best efforts of the human mind, and the 
best wishes of the human heart. 

The fact is gratifying; the future is cheerful. Thousands of little 
hearts palpitating with the deathless thirst for truth, and thousands of 
little palms raised imploringly for the ministration of knowledge, 
force on us an argument that cannot be evaded. The dignity of oar 
race, the happiness of society, the glory of the State, the ornaments 
of civilization, and the utilities of government, all hang suspended on 
the right culture and development of the juvenile intellect. 

One success but urges to another. We have landed, and burnt 
our ships. There is no retreat. Our sword is in the balance, fif 
vidua! We have crossed the Rubicon in this conflicts to go whei« 
God and our enemies bid us. We conquer or perish. Ambitions, 
starry finger points the way, and not on the Hellespont, nor yet on the 
Granicus, but only where ocean laves the Orient's farthest shore 
will we pause, and that but to weep that there is not another world to 
conquer. 



118 
RAY.— Guy C. Smith. 

I herewith send yon this, my third letter in general report, per- 
haps the last officially, with it my thanks for what you have done to 
enhance the system of education, under the new law. 

And now, the question naturally arises, what have you done, have 
vou been filled witn the spirit of your mission, being the nominal 
head of the school system of Ray, Missouri. How compare the 
school houses with those of former days. I will say, those of former 
days are not to be found, excepting a few, which stand as monuments 
of a system that once has been. We have now school houses, a sys- 
tem of schools, that comport with the spirit and intent of the new lain^ 
but not to that perfection desirable. Our township organizations. I 
believe, are nearly complete, or was, before the last election, and tne 
officers have done much to enhance the valuation ol school ]property, 
by building comfortable houses, and repairing others and m many 
districts, have consulted taste, ease and comfort, not only in the build- 
ing and repairing, but in the furnishing. 

Our college, has undergone extensive repairs, the exterior is 
beautiful and commanding. But few locations in the State can be 
found combining more desirable elements as a seat of classical learn* 
ing, the interior of it is of such division and construction, as will ac- 
commodate a host of students. The social, moral and religious influ- . 
ences, which tend to preserve the character of young men and wo- 
men, are the graces tnat characterize, not only the teachers, but the 
inhabitants of the town. The semins^ry or public school house of the 
town has been remodeled and fitted up in a manner, corresponding 
with the improvement of the place, giving credit to the worthy and 
efficient officers. Colonel Barr and Sheriff Keyburn, these officers 
have built a commodious brick building for the freedmen's children, 
and since its construction, schools have been kept up nearly all the 
time. 

A majority of the teachers of this county have shown themselves 
worthy the name of teachers, they have labored earnestly to advance 
the cause of education, many of them being skilled in their profession, 
having a complete knowledge of the teacher's work. I have granted 
forty certificates to applicants during the past scholastic year. At 
present there is a lacK of efficient and able teachers. The school 
directors of this county are more liberal in offering wages than form- 
erly, and at the same time more discreet in the selection of their 
teachers. 

The interest manifested in the education of the colored people 
seems to be secondary. The apathy apparent with those who hold to 
the sanctity of the ^^ negro bible'' have wrought against the building 
of negro school houses and keeping up schools in them* Yet, not- 
withstanding the persecution, sites have been selected for building, 
while some few have been already built, and schools taught in them. 
It is conceived, by many, to be disgraceful to a white teacher to enter 
the sanctum of a negro school house with purpose to teach, and it 
would be difficult for such a teacher, if known that he had taught a 
negro school, to ever afterwards get a situation to teach any other 
kind. It is truly embarrassing to officers and teachers. Yet duty 
calls, principle calls, and the law calls us to act in this matter and see 
that the colored youth have a chance to make known to the world 
that he is of the human race, and is entitled to the immunities and 
privileges of light and knowledge. 

8 8 R 



114 

The school law, is being in the main, understood by a majority of 
the school officers. Those who do not understand it, but wish a 
knowledge of it, had better take the Journal of Education, published 
in St. Louis, by J. B. Merwin, a better guide to the school officer in 
the discharge of his duties, cannot be found in any other iournal. 

And now, I will say of this county, for which 1 have labored the 

East two years, that it has no reason to complain, but on the other 
and be thankful that it has prospered ; its dozen towns of rapid 
growth, its seminaries of learning, its churches built and being erect- 
ed, its fertility of soil, and wealth, as marks of improvement and pros- 
perity should inspire feelings of gratitude, for the blessing of educa- 
tion, one of the chief agencies of all this improvement. 



RIPLEY.— W. 0. Webb. 

We have advanced but little in the cause of education since mr 
last report. 

The people, as a general thing, take but little interest in it. Con- 
sequently it is very hard for the few to do much by way of advancing 
its interest. 

I have endeavored so far as I could, to have school organizaUons 
throughout the entire county, and to accomplish this. I have appointed 
local directors in every township where I could fina men that would 
take any interest in the matter at all. I have visited schools, and 
observed closely the mode and manner of teachers, in conductine 
their schools, and have given them such advice and instruction, as I 
thought circumstances required, with but very few exceptions, do I 
find schools conducted in a manner, calculated to do any good or 
educate anybody. The teachers, themselves, have no education or 
qualifications necessary to constitute good teachers, therefore, it is 
impossible for them to teach a school, as the light of experience has 
•demonstrated, schools should be taught. But a good model teacher 
•could not get employment here, unless he could produce satisfactory 
evidence that he was all right on the questions of the present day. 

Political prejudice seems to be the greatest obstacles in the way 
•of our improvement. A few men who have influence, and could beef 
;great advantage to the cause of education, if they would only lay 
aside their prejudices, and take hold, are afraid that they might iguo- 
rantly be supporting a law, that recognized negro education, or pa- 
tronizing some teacher that believed in the same; some have been 
known to say (hat they would let their children grow up in ignorance, 
rather than send to a radical teacher. I don't see how these obstacles 
are to be overcome, or how education can ever prosper here, while 
such fanaticism exists. I regard education as an elevator of the human 
mind, high above politics, and the opinions of prejudiced men, and a 
little more of it would be a blessing here. The future prospects of 
education in this county seems gloomy to me, unless there is some 
interest taken in the cause by those interested. There has been 
taught a school in every organized district., of at least three months, 
within the year. 



115 
ST. CHARLES.— 0. Bbckington. 

Tliere has been a marked improvement in the feeling towards 
public schools within the past year. Old prejudices, which came of 
u state of society differing from the present, are rapidly passing 
away. Many that were formerly conducted as private scliooU have 
changed, and accepted the advantages of the public school system. 
Many- new school houses have been put up within the past year in 
this county ; and some localities have exhibited a most laudable spirit 
in bearing a heavv burden of taxation, to accomplish this result. 
With some of the changes hereinafter suggested, I think there is a 
most hopeful future for the public schools ot this county. 

Since my appointment in March, 1868, my labors as county super- 
intendent have been chiefly confined to the examination of teachers, 
conferring with school omcers, and attempting to bring something 
like order out of the confusion produced by the amended school law. 

The educational work performed by other agencies than those 
above mentioned, has not been sufficient to create an^ great interest 
among our people. We have one very excellent private school in 
the county. Of corporate institutions, I know of none that reaches 
the level of a good high school. It is most deplorable, in my estima- 
tion, that we have'nt a good^igh school, and largely increased pub- 
lic school advantages at our county seat. 

I should be glad if our people would demand higher (Jualifications 
in those they employ as teachers. I should be further rejoiced if fully 
one-third of those who apply to me for certificated, would not come 
at all. During the eight months which I have held this office, I have 
been compelled to reject eleven. Had no element of mercy con- 
trolled my action, but simply a sense of justice to the county, that 
number would have been twenty. Many who apply to me are very 
deficient in arithmetic. Notation and numeration have been almost 
wholly neglected by the majority. They seem to have begun in ad- 
dition, and simply '* worked the sums.'' It is suprising that so many 
should judge themselves qualified to t^ach, who are unable to assign 
a reason for placing the first figure of the second partial product, 
when multiplying by tens, under the second or tens figure of the first 
partial product — who cantiot reduce three or four fractions to a com- 
mon denomination — who are unable to enumerate in decimals, and 
Bit in blank silence when questioned as to discount, allegation and the 
extraction of roots. But the most marked deficiencies are in orthog- 
raphy and U. S. history. These branches seem to have been consid- 
ered unworthy of the attention of most of our schools. Hardly any 
know when, or from whom, the territory out of which Missouri was 
carved, was acquired. Many are unaware that we have ever had any 
other wars on this continent, than the revolutionary and recent civil 
war. A few isolated facts as to our national history, is the sum of 
their acquirements. Anything like an extended knowledge, espe- 
cially of the causes and consequences ot events — the essence of his- 
tory — is out of the question. Yet, we have some good teachers in the 
county, and their number is hopefully increasing. With the advan- 
tages of a good high school in the largest town of each county, our 
public schools woul.l receive a tremendous progressive impetus, while 
it would further serve as a normal school, and supply us with a 
greatjy superior class of teachers. 

Our greatest present need is a plain, clear, harmonious school 
law. The deficiencies of the prasent law, the doubts which hang 
about its construction, have checked a healthy enthusiasm in some 



lie 

townships, and produced unpleasant feelings in otherwise harmonioas 
localities. 

A school law should be so plain in its provisions, so clear in its 
language as to stand in no need of being construed. The possibility 
and probability of numerous nfiishaps, omissions and acts of negli- 
gence, on the part of school officers and people, should be abundantly 
provided for. I make a few suggestions which my experience, here 
and elsewhere, dictates should be embodied in any new school law 
which the General Assembly may give us. In all matters of diffi- 
culty between school officers, or between school officers and people, 
there should be some authority pointed out to which it should be re- 
ferred for decision. In case parties are disatisfied with the decision 
rendered by the authority first indicated, a mode of appeal should be 
provided for. As authority to decide matters in the first instance^ 1 
should suggest the county superintendent. Parties not being satis- 
fied with his judgment, he might be required to certify the whole matr 
ter to the State Superintendent, or the circuit court — to any compe- 
tent authority by which we might reach uniform decisions. I further 
suggest that no school officer be permitted to teach in his own town- 
ship ; that townships of only one school district, be required to elect 
three directors; townships of two sub-districts be required to elec: 
two directors each ; and townships of more than two subdistricts, be 
required to elect one director for each district. As to county super- 
intendency, I would abolish it altogether, or make its powers, duties 
and compensation, in some measure commensurate witn the immense 
good it can do. In a county like this, there is abundant labor for an 
able, energetic, first class man employing all his time. His salary 
would be a small consideration compared with the great help he would 
be to the public schools of the county. Let all township school offi- 
cers- be required to report to him annually, and hold themselves is 
readiness to answer all proper inquiries which he may make. Far- 
ther, let the county superintendent nave power to summarily stop the 
misapplication ot school mone^, with right of parties feeling them- 
selves aggrieved to appeal to mgher authority. And further, let the 
salary of the county superintendent be something definite, or thai 
can be made so ;< for a beggarly pittance, doubly earned, but reluct- 
antly paid, is far from satisfactory to men who ought to hold the po- 
sition. 

In conclusion, I express the earnest hope that somethings: ^iH ^ 
done by the next General Assembly, to supply our deficiency in the 
matter of normal and high schools. I can think of no better method 
of partially meeting this great need, than the followinfz: : Require 
every town or city in the State, of three thousand inhabitants and 
upwards, to build and sustain a good high school. When any town 
does this, especial aid and encouragement should be given ; saj a 
pure gift from the State treasury, proportioned to the number of peo- 
ple in the place. When they fail or refuse to do their duty in thi» 
respect, within a specified time, penalties should be attached in the 
shape of diminution of privileges, and a withholding of a portion oi 
the school funds. 



ST. OLAIR— J. W. CoKN. 

The educational progress in this county has increased. The citi- 
Mns are all awake to the interests oftheir children. Within the last 



117 

two years, we have built and repaired some sixty school houses in 
this county. And now, the subject of education, is the all-prevailing 
theme, when it was once something else. We are all laboring with 
one accord, and we expect some day, not far distant, to see our coun- 
ty not one whit behind any of her sister counties. With these glow- 
ing hopes burning within our bosoms, we shall labor until we'obtaiii 
the obiect of our heart's desire. 

Educational toork done by the county superintendent, — I have 
labored and done all that laid within my power for the special inter- 
est of the youth in our county, irrespective of friend or foe.^ 

Educational work done iy other agencies. — ^It is my opinion (and 
also that of others), that the teachers' institute of this county has 
done much, if not more, to awaken the citizens of this county up to 
a deeper sense of their duty, than any other cause. It proves conclu- 
sively that the teachers of this county are alive and awake to their 
calling. And I will here state, that I think the plan of normal schook 
for the proper training of our future teachers would be one of the 
greatest agencies ^if adopted by our Legislature! to forward the 
present and future liistory of public education in Missouri. 

Qualification of teachers, — ^The qualifications of teachers of thifl 
county, are of a medium grade. 

Obstacles in the way of improvement. — ^The only obstacles, that 
I know of, are those that would clog the wheels of any general reform* 
The insufficiency of our financial resources and the condition of our 
county, has been left in, after passing through a five years' war, are 
the only obstacles. 

I think all of the public schools of this county have been kept 
open at least three months, if not four, during the year. The citizens 
of this county are wideawake on this point, and are determined to 
see that the youth gets the full benefit of the law. 



ST. FRANCOIS.— F. M. Oartee. 

There has been considerable progress in the cause of education 
in the county since my last annual letter. The people are becoming 
more reconciled to the method of carrying on the public schools by 
yearly assessments. Many of them, who really object to the new 
school law, having sufiicient discernment to readilv understand, that 
they cannot better themselves by complaining of the manner of sup- 
porting the public schools, have accepted the situation. Many of the 
largest landholders in the county take considerable interest in the 
public schools. Many of them are directors. The new school law 
seems to be a fixed fact. Therefore, the people promiscuously take, 
interest in the public schools, and look to them for the education of 
their children. There is only one dissatisfaction which seems to be 
prevalent among the wealthier classes of this county. They are forced 
to pay tax for the education of the children of their poor neigh- 
bors. But these poor children whose parents pay little or no tax, re- 
main often at home while the public schools are in progress. M!any 
of them, through false pride. They delay, until their neighbors, who 
have a surplus of means, get up a subscription or select school, then 
they send their children to school for the association, and almost in- 
variable fail to pay their tuition. It is high time that such afiected 
aristocracy was done away with in this country of progress. A portion 



118 

of the Prussian system of public education ought to be adopted id 
this country. During certain months of the year every child between 
five and twenty-one years ought to be compelled to attend a public 
or select school, except in extraordinary circumstances. The inter- 
est of property holders demands it. The wellare of the government 
necessitates it. 

I regret very much that I could not visit the public schools and 
school meetings, as often as the cause of education demanded. But 
my business was such that it could not be neglected* If all the im- 
portant business of public schools was required to be transacted by 
the county superintendent, there would be a sufficiency of business 
to justify them to employ all, or a good portion of his time, in the in- 
terest o^ education. But the new school law has multiplied official 
duties, until it is everybody's business to attend to these duties. 

The business is distributed among so many officers that it is im- 
possible for all of them to be competent men. The county superin- 
tendent ought to be treasurer and collector of the school funds and 
moneys. All the business that is done by the county clerk, in making 
out returns to the State Superintendent, ought to be attended to by the 
county superintendent. He ought to be required to keep an office at 
the county seat. In no case should he reside away from the county 
seat^ and should there not be sufficient business to justify him to move 
to the county seat, there ought to be an amendment to the law^ em- 
powering him to appoint a competent agent, residing at the county 
seat, to attend to the business; of the office. 

Our county treasurer has, time and again, notified the different 
township treasurers to come in and get the moneys due their respec- 
tive townships. Some say, in reply, that they do not feel competent 
to keep a correct account of the moneys. Others rdply that tbe^ are 
afraid to draw the money and take it home and deposit it in their log 
cabins ; that if they do, , (naming some well known des- 
perado), will come and get it, and appropriate it to the benefit and 
education of his own family. 

A few of the leading men of the county have used their influence 
for the advancement of education. With a judicious management of 
affairs by the county superintendent and township officers, the lead- 
ing men of the county would become interested in public education. 

The qualifications of the teachers of this county are pretty good. 
On a scale of five, they average nearly four. The great obstacle in 
the way of the improvement of the teachers of this county, is that 
many of the resident teachers only teach for a few months, in order 
to acquire means sufficient to set them up at some other business. 
Such teachers will not take any pride in teachers' institutes, or the 
permanent improvement of their vocation. Another obstacle, is that 
teachers are not held in sufficient esteem, or paid sufficiently to rema- 
nerate them for the time they must necessarily occupy in improving 
themselves, and in imparting their learning to others. Teaching is a 
high and responsible calling, and men who follow it, should be re- 
spected and paid for their services in proportion to their qualifica- 
tions. 

So far as I can ascertain, nearly all the public schools of this 
county have been kept open at least three months during the past 
year. 

Not so many townships reported their enumeration this year as 
did last. It is owing, most probably, to a change in the time of re- 
porting the enumeration. It is to be hoped that the time specified in 
the amendment will be permitted to remain. It is much better for 



119 

the school year to end in March than in October, as in the previous 
law. Under the former law, the schools were not more than half 
taught out when the school year ended. 

I wish to make a few remarks in regard to the amendment, em- 
powering the county superintendent, " when, from any cause, the 
voters of any township of any of the several counties of this State, 
shall be disqualified from, or shall have failed of holding an election, 
for the purpose of electing school directors for the several subdistricts 
of said township, or any of them, as provided for by law, in chapter 
forty-six, section two, of the General Statutes of the State of Missouri^ 
the county superintendent of public schools shall appoint, for any 
such subdistricts of said township, three school directors, from the 
nearest district or township in the county where the same can be 
found, who shall possess the qualifications of a grand juror of the 
circuit court,'' &c. The county superintendent ought first to have 
been required to appoint men of such qualifications, who are resi- 
dents of the township or subdislrict. The county superintendent 
ouffht, certainly, to be allowed the privilege of exhausting the mate- 
rial of the subdistrict or township, before appointing outsiders to levy 
taxes upon the people of a township or subdistrict in which they have 
no property or interest. Before making such an appointment, I should 
consult the people, and in that case, it would be the dernier reaorU 
Carpet-bag school officers are a novelty to this country, anyway. 



ST. LOUIS.— A. W. Murphy. 

In no previous year has the progress of education, in this county, 
been so marked and rapid. The people have become aroused to the 
importance of the public school system, as the only means of secur- 
ing the advantages of education to the great mass of children. Ex- 
tensive improvements have taken place in school furniture and appa- 
ratus, many large and substantial school houses have been built, and 
it is estimated that almost double the number of children received 
instruction in the public schools of the county during the past year, 
than at any former period. 

The work which devolves on the county superintendent, in a pop- 
ulous county like St. Louis, to make the public schools effective and 
useful to the extent to which they are designed, is necessarily arduous, 
and requires his whole time and best energies. The few subdistricts 
and schools which remained unorganizea last year, were organized 
and put in successful operation. Every township, and almost every 
subdistrict and school, were visited, and many of , the schools exam- 
ined. A county teachers' association was organized, which promises 
to be beneficial in awakening a desire for sefi-improvement, and cre- 
ating a more lively interest among the teachers in their work. A 
successful session of the county institute was held, the ^ood results 
of which were perceptible in the schools lor the remainder of the 
term. 

Probabl}'', the most perplexing duty performed, was to examine 
and endeavor to select the best from among the many applicants who 
presented themselves for the responsible position of teachers. One 
of Ihe principal objects of attention kept constantly in view, was to 
foster and create in the public mind a more extensive interest in edu- 
cational matters. 



' ISO 

There was very little educational work performed by other agen- 
cies, except that of the various school officers and teachers. 

The standard of qualification of teachers is much higher than it 
was the previous year, but is yet too low. There, are, nowever, a 
number of first-class teachers in the county, many of whom were ed- 
ucated in normal schools in other states. The appreciation of the 
valuable services rendered by the true teacher, and the willingness 
on the part of directors to pay better wages to those who are well 
qualified, have assisted materially in elevating the standard of teach- 
ing. 

Among the obstacles in the way of improvement, may be men- 
tioned the want of earnestness and a desire for improvement on the 
part of the teachers themselves. This may be accounted for, in part, 
A*om the fact that many intend to teach only for a short time, for the 
purpose of procuring fund&Ho enable them to pursue some other pro- 
fession or business. They feel no interest in it, professionally, and 
hence make no effort at improvement This can only be remedied by 
establishing normal schools, capable of supplying the requisite num- 
ber of professional teachers. 

The length of the school term in most of the townships in this 
county, for the past year, was ten months, and th^ schools were kept 
open not less than four months in any of tnem. 



SCHUYLER— E. Hughes. 

I am compelled to make a brief report, principally from want of 
material. Our county has been steadily advancing in education since 
the close of the rebellion. Living near the borders of the noble State 
of Iowa, we could scarcely help but progress, even if we were so dis- 
I>osed. Our people are alive to the interests of education. From 
every school district, we hear the crv (from the non-progressive) of 
^ heavy taxes ;" but these taxes are for the building of school houses, 
and paying of teachers. 

There nave been qjiite a number of very good frame houses, bat 
no log ones, erected. The grounds are generally well selected, and, 
in a number of subdistricts, they are preparing to get good furniture 
and school apparatus. 

We have a number of very good teachers. As our county is yet 
comparatively new, we cannot pay the highest wages, and, therefore, 
cannot expect all to be the best teachers. Educators are not nnlike 
other persons, they will hunt those localities where money is plenty. 
Honor is a very fine thing, and teachers should strive to ennoble their 
profession, yet it will not support life — no "bread and butter " in it 

Examinations. — Generally oral. 

Reports of oMcers, — Very imperfect. I think it is particularly 
owing to the rapid changes in the school law. It takes some ^time to 
publish and distribute school laws, and very often the time in which 
those things, required to be done by the last change, is past before 
the officers get the law. You see this makes it a little inconvenient 
about keeping the books correct. 

Colored people. — ^There are now ten living in Lancaster. I think 
they do not want to go to school. 

Changes in the law. — I would recommend that the superintend- 
ent of the counties either have more control and supervision over the 
schools in his county or his office abolished. A great many questions 



121 

arise among the various schools of the county ; the officers exf^ecl to 
appeal to the superintendent, and when they find he has nothing to 
say in the matter, they feel disappointed, and say they don't like such 
a law. I think a great many of the duties now imposed on the county 
clerk should be turned over to the superintendent. The duties of 
school matters should be done by a person dijrectly in that business. 
I think the changes recommended by the State Superintendent, in his 
last year's report, are just such as are needed, and hope they will be- 
come the law this winter. 

Seminaries* — We have one in Lancaster, doing a very good busi- 
ness. It was very well attended this fall. 



SHELBY— E. P. BXJRLIKGAMB. 

The progress of education in Shelby county, during the past vear, 
has been, for the most part, gratifying and encouraging. Though we 
have not yet reached the acme of our hopes and expectations, we are 
nevertheless making some advance toward its attainment. 

Public sentiment seems to be turning in the right direction, and 
gathering force as it goes. This indicates an interest on the part of 
individuals whose influence has not heretofore been exerted in the 
cause of public school education. 

Immigration is conducing to the general good, by the importation 
of a very iavorable element in respect to schools. We have among 
us, also, an influential class of citizens, who are not patrons of the 
public schools, having no children to educate, who seem disposed to 
aid in building up our system of public instruction. School officers 
are to be commended for the efforts they have made to secure good 
houses, and carry out the provisions of the law. Though a few of tnem 
have violated some of the most plain and pointed requirements which 
the law imposes, it is with pleasure that I can refer to our directors, 
as a class^ and commend them for their good works. 

The Press. — "The Shelby County Herald" has been, during my 
entire administration, a firm friend to the educational interests of the 
county, and it has been a power for good that cannot be too highly 
estimated. 

Upon the whole, I think there is evidence of progress, though I 
will be obliged to notice some things which will indicate how slowly 
we are advancing. By keeping high our standard of education, and 
putting forth appropriate energy, we shall certainly, in time, achieve 
the most desirable results. 

Of the official labor performed, I will make but a brief statement. 
Visiting schools, advising directors and teachers, and endeavoring to 
perfect the operation of our present school system, have taken a large 
portion of the time allowed me for the performance of the duties which 
belong to the office. During January and February of this year, I vis- 
ited twenty-six schools. Ten davs have been occupied in aUenaance 
upon the teachers' institute, and conventions of school officers. To 
economise the time as much as possible, I called the several township 
boards to meet in convention, for the consideration of important mat- 
ters connected with the public schools, and was thus relieved from 
the necessity of calling upon each, individually. 

The office business of this department has been somewhat exten- 
sive. Letters are frequently received from directors and teachers who 
seek advice, and relief from difficulties. To return such answers as 



122 

their importance demands often requires considerable time and trouble. 
The law must be carefully examined, not only in the letter of particu- 
lar sections, but also in its f^eneral spirit and intention. Careful con- 
sideration of business of this nature no doubt often prevents strife 
and dissension, and serves to harmonize discordant influences. Some- 
times personal attention was necessary to prevent repeated and con- 
tinued violations of the law. Frequent visits were made to one town- 
ship where there was a persistent, determined attempt made to keep 
in oflSce men who cannot legally act as directors. 

The county superintendent is almost ignored, except when sus- 
tained by the law, and although he has ^^general supervision," yet it is 
hardly suflScient authority upon which to take action. 

While the law stands as it is, I earnestly hope the General As- 
sembly will provide for its proper execution by attaching a severe 
penalty for its violation, and although I am opposed to rebels having 
anything to do with the management of the schools, I would rather 
see the Taw changed on that point than to have it so often violated 
without fear of punishment. I am happy to state that there are but 
three townships in this county which give cause for complaint in this 
particular. 

Our teachers are improving in faithfulness, capacity and usefal- 
ness, thereby doing themselves great credit, and the public valuable 
service. True, we have some teachers who would better be content 
to follow some other profession. Selfish and narrow-minded, with pur- 
poses and ends that terminate in themselves, they follow teachingfor 
the sake of funds to meet pressing demands for personal expenses. 
No man, whose price is silver, can ever be a true teacher. The warm 
and loving heart, and a strong desire for the good of others, are prom- 
inent characteristics of the true teacher. He will feel intense solici- 
tude for the improvement of his pupils, and will rejoice in their ad- 
vancement. 

Too many over-estimate their Qualifications, and to their estimate 
is added that of their friends. Such persons are satisfied with certifi- 
cates of qualification, though destitute of the qualifications them- 
selves. Once in possession of certificates, study and training are at 
an end. There are no enlarged ideas of the greatness of their calling, 
no elevated views of its sacredness. 

They seldom, if ever, attend the teachers' institute, unless their 
certificate have expired, and they wish to have them renewed. 

In a word, the '^almighty dollar" is all that lures them to the 
school room, and binds them to the work. It is hardly necessary to 
say that these are an obstacle in the way to success. The low wages 
paid to teachers are enough to prevent those who are well qualified 
from engaging in the worE, and those whose preparation has never 
been an expense, are kept in employment because they can afford to 
teach for thirty or forty dollars per month. Inadequate compensation 
necessitates frequent changes, and these are, by no means, of any ad- 
vantage to the success of the cause of public school education. The 
want of good houses, teachers, furniture, apparatus and oflBicers^is the 
chief obstacle to be surmounted. The same troubles that existed a 
year ago are still to be met with, although there has been some suc- 
cess in efforts to obviate them. Perhaps the present system is imper- 
fectly understood, or else it is not carried into execution with the pro- 
per energy. However, the experience of the past may be of value in 
connection with future operations, and by a continued and appropri- 
ate pressure the truth may be established with permanence, where 
now it has no lodgement 



1^ 

Owing to the fact that some of our subdistricts were without 
school houses, there has not been in each the three months' school re- 
quired by law. 

It is hoped that by next fall no subdistrict will be thus deprived 
of the benefit of the public funds. Local troubles of a personal na- 
ture have resulted in keeping one subdistrict without a school bouse 
for about two years, and during that time there has been no school at 
all. 

Another subdistrict, although without a school house, kept up the 
school, having rented a house for the purpose. 



SULLIVAN.— D. L. Hinckley. 

So far as public schools are concerned in this county, it is impos- 
sible for me to make much report. It being late when I received my 
commission, and when I was supplied with the school law, I have had 
time to do but little. But when 1 received legal authority and mate- 
rial to work with. I did the best I could, it being at a time when the 
people were hignly excitea with the political questions, and when 
political meetings were being held in almost every school house, and 
the people being also busily engaged in taking care of their crops, it 
was impossible lor me to do much with the public school business. I 
am sorry to say, however, that the educational car moves but slowly 
in our county, at the present time. 

Our teachers are, generally, not of the first grade, though we have 
a few good teachers. The want of competent teachers, and a better 
school law, or perhaps a better understanding of the present law, are, 
I think, amon^ the great obstacles to improvement. . 

In my opinion, a sjsiem of free normal schools, dispersed over 
our State, the grand object of which should be, to train and educate 
teachers for the benefit of our State, would wholly supply the demand 
for competent teachers. But so long as we depend upon other States 
to furnish us with teachers, just so long we shall fall far short of 
making our schools just what they should be. We have the material 
in our own State out of which we can manufacture our own teachers, 
if we have but the machinery to operate with. 

Most of the schools of this county have been kept open, at least, 
three months during the year. 



bTONE.— S. B. Wright. 

» 

When I came into o£Sce, about eighteen months ago, this county 
was entirely unorganized, I have organized every township in the 
county. There have been public schools in every township and nearly 
every subdistrict. I have labored very hard to get the board to per- 
form their duty, as a goodly number of the citizens are opposed to the 
law as regards the levying and collection of taxes. The wealthy have 
to pay the taxes of the poor. I think I will, with the assistance of the 
board, overcome that obstacle. I think we will have better times in 
the future. 

This county was greatly damaged during the war, the citizens, 
most of them, were driven from their homes on account ol their loy- 



124 

alty, and their houses and farms destroyed, so that we had to com- 
mence anew, and this county lying on the border, had to be resettled. 
The citizens begin to manifest some interest in education. 

I have labored very faithfully for the educational interest of this 
county, but I cannot boast, owing to the backwardness of our citi- 
zens. ' 

There has been comparatively nothing done only what I have 
done myself, with some assistance of the board. 

We have three or four first class teachers for common schools in 
this county, in the second class, four or five, the remainder poor. The 
boards of education have not offered that inducement to teachers they 
should have done. 

The only obstacle in the way is that we have not good, energetic 
teachers, w&o understand the art of teaching. 

All the districts in the county have, with the exception of one, 
been kept open from three to six months during the year, and some 
districts intend to continue during the winter. 



TANEY.— J. J. Brown. 

1. School houses. — ^We have in the county about twenty-five or 
thirty buildings that bear the name of school houses, but they are all 
built of logs, owing to the scarcity of sawed lumber, consequently, we 
we have not a first class school house in the county. Some of the 
districts are making arrangements to build respectable school houses, 
and I fondly hope the day is not far distant when every pupil in the 
county, will have a comfortable and well-furnished school house, in 
which to secure instruction. 

2. Grounds. — The people are beginning to learn that it is a daa- 

ferous practice to build school houses on the public domain, or lands 
elonging to some individual, without requiring a deed for it, hence 
nearly all the subdistricts are purchasing the ground on which their 
buildings are being erected; and I yet have topes that at no distant 
day, they will have them beautifully ornamented with groves of trees 
suitable for the purpose. 

3. FuTniture, — Our furniture is very limited, in fact, we have 
almost none, except ^'wooden benches" and a few writing desks. 

4. Apparatus. — We have none whatever in the county, but I 
hope that out school officers will, in a short time, procure a sufficiency 
for our public schools. 

6. Teachers. — We have, at this time, some very able teachers, 
who, as a general thing, manifest considerable interest in a popular 
education, though I regret to say that a very large portion of them are 
poorly qualified to teach school. The people being, generally, uned- 
ucated themselves, are as apt to make choice of an imposter, as a 
competent person, for their teacher, and if the superintendent refuses 
to grant a certificate, the local directors, being governed by public 
sentiment, will employ none. 

6. County associations or institutes. — We have a teachers' insti- 
tute, its first session was held in last June, and the second in October, 
they were each in session three days, and proved to be a complete 
success. 

7. Reports of School Officers. — School officers have been very 



125 

prompt in reporting the number of school children in their respec- 
tive subdistricts, but as yet have made none to the superintendent. 

8. Interest manifested in the Education of Colored People. — We 
have not a sufficient number of colored children in the county for a 
school, but judging from the vote, on the Constitutional Amendment, 
at the late election, I think a majority of the people would take con- 
siderable interest in the education of that unfortunate class of hu- 
manity. 

When the people learn to elect men to office who are intelligent, 
and have the good will ot the county at heart, then we may expect 
the cause of education to advance, but so long as the people are so 
ignorant that they will elect men to offices of the greatest impor- 
tance, simply because they are good citizens, so long we may expect 
the cause of education to be retarded. 

Our county iustices compose the most ignorant tribunal^ that ever 
occwpied the judge's seat in the State, consequently, we cannot expect 
anything but opposition, to everything calculated to advance the 
cause of education. 

Our county clerk is equally ignorant ; being incompetent to make 
out the tax books, with anything like correctness, consequently we 
have no money to pay teachers. 

It has too long been the practice in our border counties, to elect 
men to office, without regard to qualification, and so long as that^ is 
kept up, our public schools will not rise above the present grade of 
ejlucation. 

I do really think, that our Legislature ought to give the State Su- 
perintendent, the sole power of appointing the county superintend- 
ents, and require him to appoint none but those well qualified to 
discharge the duties. 



TEXAS.— D. S. DoNEGAN. 

We are making some progress in this county, in the cause of ed- 
ucation ; a number of school houses have been , built the present year, 
as well as an academy, at Licking. 

I have traveled some 400 miles durinir the year, visited every 
township in the county, organized school districts, and used every 
means in my power to create an interest in the cause of education.' 

We have no first-class teachers in th^ public schools in this 
county, neither can we expect to have until there is a demand for a 
ten months' school in each subdistrict in the county. Constant em- 
ployment and respectable living wages is what the intelligent, active 
teacher must have; ^' small pay commands small abilities," and in 
this county, we have both at present. 

The great obstacles in the way of improvement in this county, is 
the mode of raising school funds. In your last report you recom- 
mended an amendment to the law, so as to authorize the levv of a 
general tax upon all the taxable property of the State, and to be de- 
voted exclusively, to the payment of teachers' salaries. I heartily 
coincide with you in the above change, and believe it to be the only 
effectual means of raising money for school purposes. 

We can average about four months' school tnis year, in each sub- 
district, quite a number however, were private schools. I think it 
necessary that school officers should report directly to the county so- 



126 

perinlendent, and that the county superintendent devote his time 
exclusively to the educational interests of his county, that he have a 
stated salary of so much a year, or so much per diem, and no limit to 
the time he works ; if he is engaged in school business every day in 
the year, so much the better for the county. 



VERNON.— L. J. SHAW. 

Since my last report, the school, interest in Vernon has suffered 
greatly, owin^ to a decision that was given in the circuit court her