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Full text of "A PRONOUNCING AND SPELLING DICTIONARY."

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CBJ 



kc^ 



A 

Pronouncing and Spelling 

DI CTION ARY: 

I N W H I C H, 

By diHinguifiiing Signs of the Literal Sounds* 

The proper Sounds of English Words 

are clearly intimated "; 

AND BY WHICH, 

Both His Majefty's Subje<Jls, and Foreigners, may 
correal an Improper^ or acquire a Right Pro- 
>:uNciATioN of the EngUJh Language. 

TOGETHER WITH 

An Introduction, and an Appendix, 

containing many new, and ufeful Obfervations on the 
Sounds of the Letters; diftinguifhing Signs of their 
different Sounds ; and Diredtions for attaining to a 
Right Pronunciation. 

And alfo^ by Way of Praxis, 

' A Discourse on an imporcant SubjeA-, 

IN WHICH, 

The Right Sounds of its Words are fo clearly intimated, 
that a Stranger, after acquainting himfelf with the 
Introdudion, may be able to pronounce them properly. 

To which is now added, 

A Short, and Plain GRAMMAR of 
the English Language. 

THE SECOND EDITION, 
With confiderahle Additions and Improvements. 

By WILLIAM JO HN S TO N, M. A. 

- - 1 ■ . - T 

LONDON: 
Printed for W. Johnston, in Ladgate-ftrcc^. 



M.DCC.LXXIL 






ji?j^. ^. s/. : : ■■■ 



I 



Ici 



111 



h 






\ 



v.. 



T O 

% 

Her moft Excellent Majesty, 

QUEEN CHARLOTTE, 

THIS LITTLE PIECE, 

At firft humbly offered as an Help to Her 
Majesty, in cultiv^ating the English 
Pronunciation ; 

IS, 

Wnh confiderable Improvement s» and 

A SHORT ENGLISH GRAMMAR, 

HUMBLY INSCRIBED, 

As a frefliTeftimony of his moft affcftionatc 
Attachment to Her Moft Uluftrious 
Confort the KING, and His Royal 
Family; and of his moft rcfpedful 
Regards to Her Majesty j 

By- 

Her Majesty's' 

Moft dutiful, 
Moft obedient, and 
Moft humble Servant, 

WiUiam Johhfton. 



i 




PREFACE. 



K^)i(3t^£RE a person ever fo well 
^ W » qu^l'f'ed for agreeable con- 
^ ^ verCtion, \iy Inotnkdge and 

ltt.1f)0(^tjrf learning, fenft and gnwuj, and 
goodnels of heart; or were his compares 
for the public ever fff valaablc and cl^ant ; 
yet if his converfition or difcCTirTfs are ut- 
tered with a broad, or foreian accent i the 
ohicuriiy of /i>em, th^rebjt' occt^ioned, will 
gtedtVf obftrij£t the pleafitre and proBt, h; 
woftid otherwFTc communu:atc\ aiid the 14- 
bour he cauf«s to his hwrers to comprfhend 
his mAning, together with ibe grating founds 
of his language, will neccffarily in >6me 
degree, raife tbeir diflrke,- 

A J ■ - M*»l,. 



vi P R E' F A C E. 

fAdny toh? labour under ibe dj/advantag^ 

of a tiirong pr^nunc/ition, are fo fenfible of 

tbek things, as t^ have earned desirta io 

acquire a right otic (won) : And for /j&at 

end, many have k/ndly endeavoured to fur- 

ni(h tbetDj with some f«itable afsiftance : 

And indeed many good things have been 

done, towards conv^ing a right pr^nunc/i- 

tion by the letters ; some of which have 

rendered the pr^duftiop of the folbwing 

pjece much moxt pra6l/cable, /ian otherwilc 

k wo^ have been. 

\ 
But wlien / firft engaged my attention 

Xl ibis {(ihje&f evtry thing of ibis k/nd, 

Id&at / cmitd find, fell grctftlj ftiort of a full 

dnail, d^fcriptioo, and n^tif/cation, of /^ 

.literal ibuods ; and conifquently of a {a£^ 

^cient help tS a right prmunc/^cion. (And 

ibi Umc may b^ tr£\y faid of 4be Publ/ci- 

tions g£ tb'y nitirre ever fince, ^ven till 4bt 

prel^at year 1771. 4b^ &rft edition of ibis 

-. . IVfy clfar perception of ibis^ and at ibe 

iamc time, my ilrong perfuizfion fhsu fuch 

v4i iaelp, if ic CQttid bi eflfedted, wo^id b^ 

hlghlj^ 



/ 



P R E' F A C E» ^t 

h/ghly u/tMj and acceptable, to a con- 
siderable part of mank/nd^ ^ng^ged me 
atttnti^ely t5 consider, whether wh5t had 
till then been deficient, might not b^ fgp* 
pUed; and whether whJt had been done 
before^ t^j^ether with fuch fupplics, watrid 
not amount id a help, fuSicient at \e$ttt to 
induftnbuj yoafth, converfant with letters, 
for tbeiv acquiring, in some good dfgree, a 
right pr^nunc/^cion : and finding f&son tS 
drtcrmine in the affirmirtive, with r^fpeft id 
both tbeie enqu/rl^s; / c^me t5 a xiUM- 
tion, as tx\y other affairs wo»ld permit, with 
neccl&ry c^re, t5 attempt it. 

And now, in cdnftquence of this rtMu" 
tion, and attempt ; with a view to incrhfc the 
inteU/giblenefs, ft/ef«lnefs, and acceptance, 
of public fp&kers ; and ffpccialljr of the 
minifters of rrfigion, tohofe Utterance is 
exceptionajple ; and in order t^ adorn tbi 
language of yoach, in tbe countto m^re 
rrmoce from London, with a proper and 
acceptable pr^nunc/ition ; and io render 
ftringcrs as agreeable and ufti\A inE'ngr 
land, as may be expefted from ' fuch aa 
acquisition i / her Em 6fFcr a help to tbe- 

6 right 



vUt P R Ef F A C. E. 

ngbt ^r^nundicioq of the engIKh Lan-^' 
guage, viherthy tboCe toha general!}^ fp^Ic 
well, may with greit facility^ rectify tbeir 
partici^lar impr^pritfti^s ; and by whica, / 
Bncertly think,, tie ymih of Cornwall and 
Cumberland, of Scotland and 7'r^land^ of 
Qur rmificeft c61^n/(s, and even of she mo{b 
diflant forHsners, ttho have any comp^cenc 
Inotoledge of our language, may learn by 
/if^cmfclves tS pronounce cnglifli tolerably 
well J and by which, w«"e /ifr, after tbis^ to 
usidc for some t/me in London ; tbeir pro^ 
nunc/itien m/ght foon, become hardly dif- 
tinguilhable from /ibat of ibe inhabitants. 

. For /haye endeavoured to defaihe every 
literal found, d^nt^ted by tbe englifli alph<a- 
bct ; and / humbly hcpe, tbis is done in a 
plain and intell/gible manner ^ and as feveral 
.letters have feveral different founds, / have, 
wth<:r b^ ob/erv^tionsor s/cns, notified tbeir 
proper founds,, or tbeir silence^ in /be ex-- 
amples of /i?^ Intr(9diiftion, and Appendix; 
and in tie words of this Preface, of ibe Die* 
ti^niary, and o(tbe Difc<?urfe ; errors excepted : 
S^ tb2it if tbe learner thoroughly acquaint him- 
Iclf with, tbjs diiFcrent founds of tbe letters, 

and. 



f 
f 



c / 



P R E' F A C E. is 

a$d with ibe ob/ervations and sif Qs, which 

^^ / noiify their founds in words, by cdrtfuUy 
peribTjng ibe Intr^dudion -, and if hr for 4 

wluTe, daiij pronounce a r/asonable p^rcioa 

of the book, According to sbefe ob/ervitions 

and s/flns, and as directed in ibe Appendix ; 

he will ibon bV dbkj with gre^ t ^afc, ta 

rend the words properly; and. by Sbe con^ 

un«ed practice of attentively (0 r/ading tbcm^ 

he m\] in a fhort time, make dfsirablc 

proficiency in a right pr^nunc/ition ; ii| 

which, and in ^11 his laudable enterprizrss^ 

/ heart/ly wifh him good fucceis. 

T5 f^miliarFze ibe founds of englifh 
words, as a praxis on /item, fo far as it 
g(^y I have added a Difc^rfc upon an fn- 
tcrefting fubjeft, pr/achcd on Mount S/on 
at Tun bridge r Wells •, ibe proper founds of 
the words of which, / have signifFed by ibe 
notation : unfSflncdly b^feeching ibe God of 
^1 gr^ce ib2Lt he wo«ld gricioufly exhibit 
211 Citable aids, for rendering it tra[y pro- 
f/table, to every one (won) tohS (ha\l r^ad 
it: and humbly entrming everj^ R/ader t5 
perftfe it, with ibat fmoufnefs and candour, 
which become ibe imp5rtancc of its con- 

t6ntS| 



« P R E' F A C E. 

t^nts, and the tynev^lence whmwfth iC is | 

publiflbed. Tbi truths of which, when in- 
timaiziy In^tnn, and h^bftcralljr regarded, are, 

through tlie d/v/ne concurrence, U abundantly 

efficacious to men^s h^/nefs and happmefs, 

b^th h^re and hn'eafcer, tb2X I fhoi^td think 

my felicity gre^t indeed, if this work, b/- 

j|de» anfwering \ts prox/m^te end, (ho^id alf^ 

iierve as an app^riiui for pr^mtfcing fuch a 

ftnoteledge oi tbe^t tr«th/, and fuch a regard 

ti tbettiy in dny ; and unfp&kably &y if in 

in4ny» of ffpr ii\\^U-QxUxuxt9. 




Art 



I 



(») 



IS 

I- 



An Advb'rtiscmbnt con* 
> c^riiing tHs Edition. 



k 

9 

9 



1 



t" Have» in tils £dition» enlarged ibe 
^ chapter on Term/nations, with some ^/t- 
ful obfervicions % and the Appendix,- wirii 
j m^re partict^lar d/redions ^bout d/viding 
words intJ Syllables ; whJre / have alb oiorc 
diftin^tlj fitted ibe diflference between tie 
p^l/ce, and provincial pronunciicion, in E'ng* 
land. / have alio added an uftful chapter, 
concerning the founds of the vow'els in mdn- 
«fyllables ; a large Table of words, alike in 
Ibund, but different in fenfe» and fpelling % 
and Tables of Initial fignif/cant letter^, and 
abbr^v/ations* 1 have aKo placed termin* 
ations after man^ words in ibe columns of 
tbe Di6iionary ; which when joined to fbofc 
words, as tbere fpelt, make {o many dif- 
tinft words ^ and by tbek^ and others, now 
inserted in tbe columns, tberc are iibove 
fcur thoiifand words m^e in tbis^ tbzn in 
the former edition ; and / have otAitt^d 
but very few englifh words, tbzx, are in 

common 



« 

4 



( xii ) 

commofi ufc. And through the t0h(?le, 1 
have reft/f/ttd the mift^kes, mrenched the 
r«iur>danc/es, and fuppl/ed the drficienc/es 
which /cc^id difcoveri'upon a ftrift review'. 
And 1 humbly h^pc, / have fi? intell/g/bly, 
iu^y^ and acccrr/itelj^, dffcr/bed /i'^ engliQi 
pr^nunrfition in the prefent ^ge, thdX what- 
ever Alterations it may undergo', in it's nat|r- 
ral c^arfe ; (which Jlteritions th\s work has 
a tendency lo prevent) it m/ght b^ poff/ble 
by the help of th\s book, fho«ld it contin/ze, 
and b^ underftood, xo find out whJc w5s /iE?^ 
prefent pr^nunc/ition, in minj^ fucceeding 
«g« of the world. 

/ have Jin?, in tVxs Edition, added A 
SHORT English Gra^mmar, in which / 
have tfvpided, as much as I co«ld, unnc- 
cef&ry grammat/cal terms ; and m<7de the 
principles of the, language obv/ous t5 511 ca- 
pac/ti^s; {o thzx, I h^pe, it will b^ found 
neither diff/cult t5 the undcrftanding, nor 
burthensome id the memory ; but an /?/eful, 
and conv/n/ent intr^dudion \o the finotoledge 
of the engliih language. 



<\ 



I N- 



\ 




Pronduncing DiiHonary, 



The I N T R O D u q T I O N. 

)9fS)«S)9f HE principal end piirfued in this 
S T- ® work, is, by the letters of the 
Qyj^^y® alphabet, cxaftly to fignify the 
^©®M proper founds or Englifli words; 
To that one who is unacquainted with their 
founds, may know them ; and learn, duly 
|io pronounce them. The ftandard of thefe 
founds, which we would all along keep in 
view, is that pronunciation of ihem, in molt 
general ufe, amongft people of elegance, 
and tafle, of the Englifli nation ; and ef- 
pecially of London. 

In order to convey the proper founds of 

(words by their letters, it is abfolutely necef- 

fary to afcertain the pr^cife founds of the 

B letters 



2 The IntroduSiion. 

letters themfelves ; for uncertainty concern- 
ing them, will caufe hefitation ; and a mif- 
take, a^ wrong pronunciation of the words 
idenoted by thenv: Wherca?, if the literal 
founds be truly alcertaincd, the letters wilJ 
give fulBcient intimation, how Englifh words 
ftiould be pronounced^ for this method will 
be efFedual, in the jLanguage of Lucan, 
Pharf. L. 111. 

Manfutam rudibas vecem figure ftguris. 

However the difference between the En- 
glifh fpelfing, and ptx)TiiiTrcTatitm, has hap* 
pened-, whether from too few alphabetical 
letters at firft, and too fcrupulous cxadlnefs 
in poflrrity, in tpdUng as their anceftors did 5 
or from the fettlements of ftrangers in thefe 
parts, who, nOdot-sbt^cauied great alterations 
in our words, and pronunciation ; or from 
fhe care of th^ learned, by infcrting filent 
tetiers, to intimate the powers of other let- 
ters in the fame words, or the different fig- 
Alfications of ttic feme founds, or t^ be nrye- 
fnoriak of the originals, from which words 
arc derived-, or finally,. from the praAice of 
the police, giving fofter and finer founds 10 
words than rhe received fpelUng conveyed. 
Whetlier this difference, I fay, has happened 
from thefe, or any other caufes, it is certainly 
very greit % infomwch, that in the prdent 
lyaillftin^uiflied fte^teof mir letters, ^U) ftrdn* 
get Ciin karn by ^t^htni) the tig^ prentiA* 

ciation 



T&e Introdiifiion. 3 

ciatiott of the Eoglifh lamguage; And, 

in order to render the letters a fufficienc 

means of conveying it, I ftiall treat, Firft, 

of letters iti general. Secondly, of qui- 

efcent letters. Thirdly, of the conlb- 

•na/its. Fourthly, of the rowels. Fifth- 

J/, of the diphthongs, Sixchly, of dif- 

fonants. Seventhly, of terminations ; and 

Eighthly," of the dlvifion of words into 

fylkblcs. 



CHAP. I. 

Of the Letters in general. 

ALL the founds of the Englilh lan- 
guage are denoted by letters, at 
which we have twenty-fix in number, 
called a, bee, cee, dee, e, cff, gee, h (aitch) 
i, jay, kay, ell, em, en, o, pee, qu, ar, 
efs, tee, eu, vee, w (double u) x (ekj) 
wy, zed. 

Of thefe letters fix are vowela, a, e, i> 
0, u, y •, and lometimes the w, founding 
00 in the diphthong ow ; as in brow, bow : 
All the reft, and fometimes the j, as in 
linion, billiard ; and the y, as in yet, yo//, 
are confonants. 

B 2 .The 



4 ~ TJ&i? IntroduSlton. 

The vowels are the ftream of the voice, 
if I may fo fpeak, formed by the organs of 
fpcech, into their peculiar founds 5 therefore 
they are called vowels, or vocal letters. 

The confonancs are particular obftruc- 
tions of this vocal ftream, made by the 
fame organs, giving it a greater variety, and 
articulatenefs. Thefe confonantal ftops are 
clofe, or open. The clofe are thofe confo- 
nants, which when ftrongly founded, fully 
obftru£t the voice, and therefore have been 
called mutes ; as b, hard c, d, g, j, k, p, 
q, t, X, and alfo Englifti ch. The open 
are thofe confonants, which being ever la 
ftrongly, founded, yet the voice is fome- 
whajc heard in them; as foft c, f, b, 1, m, n, 
r» s, w, y, z, ph, Ih, th, and wh. Of 
thefe, 1, m, n, and r, have been called 
liquids, and femi-vowels, becaufe of the 
vocal found, when uttered, heard in them ; 
and for the fame reafon, thefe following 
vOcal, or more open confonants, may be 
fo called ; foft s, s founding zh, or French 
j, as in pleafure ; v, w, wh, y, z, and fofc 
th : While, becaufe of their lower, and 
clofer founds, the following might be called 
whifperersj foft c, f, ph, hard s, fh, and 
hard th. 



CHAR 



J 7^ InfrodnSflon. 5 

CHAP. II. 

Cy Quiescent Letters. 

THESE are thofe letters in wordsy 
both, vowels and confonants, which, io: 
pronunciation, are no more founded, than if 
they did not belong to them. The.fign of 
a letter's quiefcence in this work, is, its 
being in an^ old Englifli, or black print 
letter; as in A'afpn, gre^, head, beauty, 
lamb, Lincoln, Cholmontieley. 

Yet it being eafy to remember that Ro^ 
man final e, and the guttural gh, in Roman 
letters, are always quiefcent -, I have omit- 
ted, as needlefs, to fignify their quiefcence, 
by black print letters^ 

CHAP. HL 

t 

« 

Of the Consonants. 

T^HE ibuiid of a .confonant in a word, 
is Gonveyed.by that: par t^^of its name,, 
in which its found is heard ; and not by 
the vowels of its name^. which only fcrve to 
lender it fufficicntly utterablcj, as when b. 



6 7be IntroduStkrt. ' 

is called bee, its found is not in the ee, h\xt 
in the b ; and when s i^ called els, 4ts found 
is not in the e» but in (T, 

The true founds of b, ftrft c, d^ f, foft g, 
j, k, 1, rn,. n, p, q, r, hard s, t, v, and hard 
x» are heard in their conimon names, bee,, 
cee, d«e» &c. and as little obftrudted b/ 
the Towela in them, (the founds of which 
ibouk) be difregarded) as poillble. 

The names of h, w, y, and z, are incon* 
venient, bccaufc they hinder the perception 
vi their proper founds in words ^ and for 
conveying their founds in fpeiling, thefe 
letters need more proper names. 

ch, ph, (h, and th, having only fingle 
founds, for the fame purpofe, need to be 
named more conveniently, than by the 
names oi their letters. 

^9 ^^> gi s, th, and x, have more founds 
than on«, which, need to be diftinguijQied^ 
and afcertained. , 

How far it may be proper to introduce 
the following new names into common ufe, 
it is fubmittcd to the j^tidgment of others. 
My^ intentions in propofing them are, ta 
ihew how much more naturally, and pro- 
perly, the letters to which they are affixed, 
liiight be named,, than they now are ; And 
alfo, as nearly as poflible, to fignify their 
precife founds^4 For by obfcrving bow they 
found in thefe names^ and difregarding at 
the faflie time, the found of the vowels in 
them, you will perceive the exaA found they 
have in words. - ATA- 



I 



Hhe LitrcduSHon^ 



A TABLE 



Of the proptr founds and names of the undijlifk- 
guifhed^ and improperly named confonants. 



Confonants. 

hard c 
foftc 

* Eng; ch 

hard g 

^ fof t g 

h 

ph 

hard s 

• fof t s 



Urn. 



en 



Names. 

kce 
cce 

chce 

gee 

hec 

fee 

efs 

ez 



. c 



OS 



Examples. 

c^zre c^rc c«re clear 
centre city c/linder 
chat cheer chin churcb 
gtfve got guft gbry 
gem gentle £'gypt 
had help h^ hifmait 
Philip ph/lo&pher 
feme fenfe sifter son ^ 
caufe r/fe r^fe prq^flle 



* Greek ch^ wi^h the h quiefcent, in thi» worfc^ 
founds always hard c ; as in C!^r/ft, fct^me, cl^le. f f 
the h has not the fign ofquiefcence, and both are iii< 
Roman letters; it founds Englifli ch; as in Arch^ 
bifhop. Arch-deacon : And generally Greek th foondti' 
hard Cy before a vowel ; bat ch, before a confonants 

^ The French roighr farmoont their difficulty ill' 
pronouncing the EngHfh ch, g, and ], by frequently 
uttering their own ch, as if t preceded it,, or the fyl^ 
kble tehee, or tlhee ; and their own g, and j, a« if 
d preceded them ; or the fyllables dgee, and djay. 

c Final s, whether perfonal, plural, or pofleifive, i» 
foft ; as in reads, hands,. William's ; exciept when it 
follows hard C, f, k, p, q, or t ; for then it is hard ^ 
as in tupic/, bricfj, feck/, fupx, pVqiiey, put/. 

Coa- 



B 



Tie IntrvduStian. 



Consonants. 

^ s and z, 
after a 
vowel, 
and be- 
fore ure 





NTamea 


1. 


c 


zhee 




V, 


or 


c 


CO 


Fr^n 

• 

. J- 


CO 




(hee 





Exaoipfes.. 



meafore pleafere 
treaferc iz«re 



(hall fhell (h/ne fli^ne 



* fi, and 21?, between two rowels, have this fame 
ibund ; as in occ^fion, vidon, gUz/'er, gr^i/er. I£ fi, 
in fuch a fituation, founds ihi ; thefe letters will be 
Italic ; as in A^Jta^ Jfiktic. 

« French ch founds (h ; a» in r^aife, capi/ciS'/he, 
machine \ and to diHinguifh it from Engiifh ch, it is, 
in this Work, in Italic letters ; as in thefe Examples. 

* Initial s before «re, and s preceded by a confa- 
nant in the fame word, and followed by are; and s in 
fbc words fugar, ifTue, tifTue, founds ih ; as iti fure^ 
^retyt afl«re, infwrance, prefTwre, fiffure ; as if fpelt. 
ihare, ihurttyy afh»re, in(h«rance,~ prefhivre, fifhure^ 
QiugSLTy {(hue, t]fh«e. 

e Unaccented ci, fci, (i after a confbnant, (il,. and 
• ti, followed by an unaccented vowel, found alfo (h> 
and the i is quiefcent : of which found, and quief- 
cence, the i beiog^ Roman, is a fign ; as in fpeciaU 
gracious, confcience, peniion, verfion, miiTion, con^ 
Hilton, nation, Mtion; as if thefe words were fpelt 
fpeihal, gr^ihufs, cdnfhence, penfhon, verfhon, mifhon,. 
confeflion, n^fiion, H^Qion. If e, i, or y, is heard with 
the found of fh, in fuch combinations ; thefe vowels 
will be Italic ; as in far/n^c^us, teft^c^ous, prefc/ence, 
halcyon ; which fhould be pronounced as if fpelt fax/- 
n^lh^ufs, tellifh^ufs,. prefh^'ence, halfhyoa: And in- 
deed the vowels in thefe combinations are always 
{bunded, when the following vowel is accented ;. as 
in confc/'entious,. pronunciation, propit/^tioa ; which 
&ould be pronounced conih/enihufsi pronunih/^lhon, 
propiih/oihon. If 



Confonants* 

hard th t 
'{ofttb 



w 
* hard x 



c/> 



315^ IntroduSiion. 

Names. 



9 



thay 

/Aee 

wee 

whee 

ekj 



03 



Examples^ 

thick thin foutb truth 
father mother brother 
wJs wit w(/dom wood 
wh5t wh^H whirl whjf 
wax annex box excel 



If any of the preceding combinations h^ve the 
vowel accented ; th^n the preceding c, Tc, -s, or t^ 
foand only foft c, or hard s, and the vowel ha? its 
proper found; ^as in Cy'on^ fc/ence, Sion, Gcf^ty, 
iaxUtyj as if fpelt iaittty* 

fc, or fch, followed by e, i, or y, without another 
vowel following^ never found ih^ as the Scotch comr 
monly pronounce them ; but hard s» or foft c ; as 
in f£epter> afcend, re(cind> fcl^dide^ fclirm> fc;;the» 
fcVchf'an. 

• Yet the t in tion after s, or x, retains its proper 
found ; and the following i l^as the found of the con^ 
fonant y; as in queftion, baftion, mixtion; whick 
Ihould be pronounced queflyon, bailyoa^ mixtyon. . 

In old Engliih words^ ti^ before a vowel, retaio 
their proper founds ; as in mrghtier^ pit/ed ; atid ia 
Hebrew words ; as in Ih^lt^ak 

' The French might learn to pronounce Engliih thy 

both hard and foft, by prefiing the tongue, near the 

-tip, againft the edge of their upper fore-teeth j 

ftrongly, to found it hard ; and more gently, to found 

it foft. 

s wh founds whee before a» e, i> and y ; as in the- 
above Examples, where the h is very Ut'tle heard ;, 
when o follows it> the h only, and not the w, is- 
lieard ; which therefore has the fign of quiefcence ;, 
as in tohole, inhere, InhJm, tihok^ v 

*> Initial x is often written, and generally foundco; 
I i as in Zcncphon, Zer;ws, for Xencphon, Xerxes. 

Coik* 



\ 



gro The IntrcduBioru 

Confonants. Names. Examples. 



X before ' 
lire, and / — 

xibe-V'H 

fore a 



vowel 

2 






CD 



egz. 




1 

cfhcc 


c 


■ 




yay 




zee 





ex5lt example exert 

fiex«rc nex«re plexwrc 

flexion complexion 

yaul yet yc^^ yo«th 
z^al Z/on Zodhc Zone 



Hard'C^ hard g, k, q, and x, give a ring- 
ing found to n preceding 5 and if another 
fyllaWe follow in the fame word •, their pro- 
per founds are, for the moft part, fully heard 
m the beginning of that fyllable •, as ia 
banker, bring, brink, cinque, ancle, angle^ 
tinkle, tranquil^ anxious : Yet they have 
not this e£fe£t upon the n in the prepofi** 
tiona in, un, or con preceding, except in the 
words cdngr#g/fte, congraent, conquer, and 
their derivatives. Nor is g^ ending words 
in ng, founded again, when terminations 
are added ; thus we do not fay leng-gthen» 
fing-ging, wing-ged ; but lengthen^ finging» 
winged. 

* X before a vowel, though never before a confo- 
nant, is often, though not always, pronounced foft.. 
When X before a vowel is hard, it will be Italic^ as 
in thefe Examples, er^cate, e;iffl'cJfe. 

^ As to the vowel y, though its precife found is 
fomewhat obftrudied by the w, in its name wy ; yet^ 
1 doubt, we can hardly aiffign it a name that will lefs 
obftrua it. 

RULES 



The Intr9du£twn* ' 1 1 

RULES 
Qnarm^ tie founds ^ c, g^ s, and tfa. 

Koman c, and g, in the didlionary, befiire 
a, 0, u, or any conibnant, and xn the end of 
words, arc hard ; as ij3 cap, oob, cup, Cf^nffl:, 
c^le, clear^ crown, a&, mftfic; gat, gone, 
gun, gl^^ g^^'ce, itag; and though the 
foUowing vowel be quiefcent, as in gtiidet 
gaQd. 

Roman c, and g, before e, i, and y, arc* 
foft; as in cell, dry, cylinder, ginger, 
%ypt. 

Italic c, and g, found contrary to tkefe 
rules ; to the firft in gcaU gorier, where g 
h loft iscfore o *, and to the fecond in f^ep* 
tic, frel^ton, Cifs ; ^et, ^ive, (kringy ; where 
c ts bard before r and i ^ and g before e, i, 
and y : And indeed hard g in the end of 
primitive words ahvays remains ia, though 
terminations beginning with xhefe vowelsy 
be added, as in £nger, j&ngiag, ftringy. 

Roman s in the beginning of words, and 
before, and after aconibnant, is hard ; as in 
fun, firnfc, sifter. 

Roman :S between two vowels, though 
the following is quiefcent, and in the end 
of words, is foft ; as in rrfe, r^fe, kings. 

Italic s founds contrary to thefe rules 5 

to the firft in bapti/m, clean/e, where the s 

. ^ before 



12 The IntroduStion.' . 

before, and after another confonant, is foft ; 
and it is contrary to the fecond in u/, «/e, 
generq^t^, where in the end, and middle of 
words, it is hard, as if thefe words were 
fpclt ufs, «fs, gencro^ty. 

th in words derived from the Greek, is 
always hard \ as in th^^ry, echici, thrift ; it 
is alfo hard in all Hebrew words, as in 
Matthew, Nathan, &c. And thefe obfer- 
Yations may fuffice concerning its found in 
all f4iich words *, but in old Englifh words, 
it is fometimes hatd, and fometimes foft ; 
and concerning it, pleafe to obferve that 

Roman th in the beginning, and end of 
old Englifh words is hard; as in thick) 
thin, fouth, tr^ch, path, cloth. 

Roman th in the middle of words is loft ; 
as in father, mother, brother, other, a\^ 
th(7ugh, paths^ cloths. 

Italic th founds contrary to thefe rules • 
to the firft in thet^ tbok^ thetc^ hooibj 
&ci00Sbj &c. where it is foft in the bcgiri- 
ning, and end of words ; and to the fecond 
in atbitikj athvfdrtj &c. where in the middle 
of words, it is hard. 

Thus Italic c, g, s, and th, generally fig- 
nify that their founds, where they occur, 
are irregular; or contrary to the gcneraj 
rules here propofed. 



CHAP. 



Tie JhtroiuBwn^ rj 

CHAP. IV. 

Of the Vowels, 

THOUGH it is impoffiblc for ftrangcrs 
to know, merely by the letters, in 
their undillingui(bed ftate, how the vowels 
of Engliih words (hould be founded; whech- 
er long, Ihort, or broad ; or accented* or 
unaccented % their proper founds in words 
are fufficiently afcertained in this work^ 
and after perufing this introduflicm, may 
be known by infpe£Uon. 

As there is a great affinity between the 
Scotch vowels, and thofe of the other na- 
tions of Europe, perhaps of the whole 
world ; and as the French, of all living 
languages, feems moil univerfally to be 
Wwn ; I have exemplified, where I could,' 
the found of the Englifh vowels, by thofe of 
the Scotch, and French. Moft foreign* 
ers may confider the Englifli vowels, that 
are of the fame found with the Scotch, as 
of the fame found with their own ; and 
thoie who fpeak French will have an ad- 
ditional evidence of their true founds, in 
fhe inftancef in which they agree with the 
French vowels* 

C each 



14 T'^^ MtnduBion. 

Each of our fix vowels has a grave long 
(bund, and an acute fhorc one ; and fonse 

of our vowels have more founds than thefe, 
as will by and by appear. 

S E C T. I. 

Of the long Vowels. 

I • 

TH £ long vowels are founded in words, 
exaftly as the vowels are commonljr 
named, in, and about Ijondon ; except the 
* y^ called w^; the w in tts name, being never 
founded in words ; but the y m its name, 
ha:ring the found of long r, exactly expref- 
fos its long found in theni« 

Thefe long vowels arc both accented, • 
asfl unaccented -, the unaccented being 

' • When I fay the vowels, of diphthongs are ac- 
cented ; I mean the wh^te fvllaMef to whi<m they be--* 
1<M|£, tnclodtog the precBoiin;, -or ioBowine confo* 
«9it9, are accented alfo; which fyllable thtrefore 
ihoutd be founded flronger, than the unaccented fyl« 
lables of the fame word« 

. Aad even if the fame, letter is ibsnded in the end 
of an accented fylbble, and in the beginning of att 
unaccented one following; it mull be founded ftronger 
in the firft, than in the lail ; as in pronouncing f)6nour» 
manour, the n in both thefe words maft be founded 
ftrongcr in the end of the firft, than In the beginning 
of the laft fyllable6« And fo vice ver&» in prooeun« 
cing ad^re, adorn^ the d mud be foiuided weaker in the 
end of the firft, than in the beginning of the laft (yl- 
lables, becaufe the laft are accented. 

weaker 



7he IntroduSHon. i ^ 

weak^r^ and fliorter than the accented ; buc 
otberwife, of the fame found ; except the 
moft frequently occurring unaccented i, and 
y^ as in itnicginaxy \ whrch found preciiely 
like unaccented lon]g e. Examples of the 
accrnted long vowels are tri the firft fyllableft 
of thefe wordsy naturty /quaU /dol, ^Ider,, 
jviage, cyder; and examples of the unac- 
cented long vowels are in the firft fyllables 
of theie, ra^?tftre, £rr^ne, dJurnal, drV/ne, pr*' 
vide> «D#te» t^raanrcal^ b)fpothfllr«. 

S E C T. II. 
Of the 4C€miti long Voweb^ 

THE founds of the vowels, are mo& 
commonly iignilied in woirds, by one 
letter^ often by two» and fometioies by 
three •» as of long Cy in naming ; ihort a, ia 
that) by one letter -, of long a^ in conflrain ^ 
fliort a, in plaintifF, by two *, and the founds 
cf broad Sj and long Oy by three letters^ in 
the words awe, and 6toe. 

For brevity fake^ and to diftinguifh the 
vowels according to the number of their 
fetters, I call thofc that are denoted by one 
fetter, fingle vowels \ thofc by two, double ^ 
and thofc by three, triple vowels. And it 
Ihould be remembered that the long ac- 
cented double, and triple vowels, (hould gen* 
erally be founded longer than the lingle. 

C 2 The 



i6 The introdu£iion. 

The figns of the long vowels, whether 
Cngle, double, or triple, or accented or un- 
accented, are in this work, Italic letters^ 
the fingle, and the founded of the double^ 
and triple vowels, being Italic ; and the filenc 
having the fign of their quiefcence •, as in 
n«t«re, ^ak, ^toe : Except thefe fix following 
double long vowels^ which, as there is no 
danger of miftaking their founds, are in 
Ronnan letters \ ai, ay, for long a \ au, av^, 
for broad a\ ee, for long t\ and oo, for its 
peculiar found. - 

The accented long a, as in nitirre, n^* 
.val, nation', has the found of ai in aid, or 
of a^ in nii^de, or of the Scotch ai in maifter, 
or of the French ai in maitro^ or of their 
open e in tete. The fame found is denoted 
by thefe double vowels, ae, ai, au, ay, a and 
final e after an intervening confbnant ; ea» 
e'e, e and final e after r ; ei, ey, oa^ and 
oy, as inRae, maid, g^uge, day ,n^2me, pe^r, 
ne-er, fre, vSn, iavSgh, convfj, giui\ alloy 
(lay.) When this a is denoted by e and 
another vowel, the e is Italic, with a long 
over it ; as In the above examples. 

The accented long ^, as in P/ter, liqual, 
b/fom, has the found of ee in eel, fteel, fee j 
or of the French long i in machine, ma- 
gazine : It alfo founds exadtly as the Scotch 
or French name their vowel i, or as the 
Scotch pronounce eye, the organ of fight. 
The found of accented long" e is alfo de- 
noted 



^Be IntraiuSihnj. 17 

noted by i^ aa in invalid, iotri^ttei and by 
Ihde double vowels, as, ea, ee» ei> eo, ie, 
0C9 ud bj e and i with final e, after an* 
liHcnreoinff confeoanC; as in thefe esc- 
ampler, axa^ieA^ feed, ricekrc^ p^le, be** 
l^vei arcirnaenieal, hrrr, mactinc, When^ 
i has the found of long accented f, it is> 
Ifafic with -two dots over it, as in the 
above exaaiples. 

The accented long r and y have one and 
the fanti^ found ; as in /dol, island, cyder^. 
cypher^ and founds exa£Uy like the pro-- 
noun I, both Englifh and Scotch ; or as 
the EngHfh {x-ohounce eye ; having a diph- 
thongal fouml, compounded of the begin^r 
mog of broad J, and long e. This 1 andjr' 
are aKa fignified by ie, ye; and by i and 
y and final e, after an intervening con-» 
fonant ;. as in d^n^s, djws, adv/fe, concife,, 
^TTc, Tyre. 

The accented' lotig 9, as in n^ble, n^t^ry^ 
ninion, has the founds though rather (borter*. 
of o in ^dc, or of oa in «ar, or of o in the 
Seosch . words bony, ony,, pronounced a» 
chey do: or of the o in sthe French word 
trone ; this fanie is denoted by tbele dou-* 
bie vowels, oa, oe, 00, ou, by the triple- 
▼owel owe, and by o and final e, after an 
intervening confonant ; as in bcBr^joe^ dwr,. 
c^urt, b^tti, ^tDC, m^de. 

The accented long », as. in tffagc, rf&iy,. 
;!aioQ, founds cxa£uy like euy in £ur^p<f, 
: C 3 or 



xS l^be IntroduSHon^ 

tr 3S the Scotch would* pronounce ew, or 
the French, eou. .This u is alfo denoted 
by thefe double and triple vowels, or rather 
diphthongs, eau, eu, ew, ewe, ieu, rew, ue, 
and by u, . with final e, after an intervening 
confonant; As in beauty, neiiter, pew, ewe^ 
Iteu, view, cue, c«re, p»re. 

Sometimes in old Englifh words, a fol<^ 
lowing u or w, efpecially if r follow it, and 
before Id, Ik, 11, or It, founds aw broad ^ 
or like the Scotch, or French a. When it 
has this broad found, it is Ggnified by an 
Italic a with a long over it, as in ^11, c^U^ 
tflder, wjlker, Jltar, alter, quirt, want» 
wJr, w&er. Thefe double vowels, au, aw, 
and oa, and the triple vowel awe, have the 
iiime found; as in claufe, audience, claw^ 
brawl, brood, awe. ' 

. Befides the long u already defcribed^ 
there is another that founds oo, thougb 
father fliorter, as in fafll, p£ll, hu\\ bullion » 
bf (hel. This u is pronounced by uttering^ 
the Englilb Ipng u without the found of 
the e, which begins it ; and is th« fame 
with that of the Scotch name of the vowel, 
u, or with the fotind of th^ French ou ir^ 
pour, tour. * The fame found is denoted 

by 



itfmmt^tmimmmmmmmmmroi'^^* 



* Both accented and. unaccented «> feem moft com<» 
Ihoaly to be foanded eu, after b, c, f, ^, h, m and p s 
at ift biSgkj ciKROiiaa fixux^t irg/ue, b^man, mSral, 

pare a 



^be IntroduSHofU r^u 

by 0, zsindojto : and o and u are fig- 
oi&ed to have this found by being Italic^ 
and having each a long over it, as in the 
above examples. The fame found is fig- 
sified by thef^ double vowels^ oe, oo, ou, 
ue, ui; o and final e after an intervening 
conibnaht, and by wo, as in fh%, too, jaS^ 
trie, fru^j iuitj m^ve, pr^ve, tto^. 

The long yowels, as well as the ihort, it 
Bionofyllables, and tbofe that have an ao 
cent over them in words of more fyllaUea 
than one, ihould be uttered with their ac« 
cented founds ; all che reft are unaccented^ 
except thofe which bear the marks of pe« 
culiar ibunds ; which marks are both figns 
of tboie founds, and of the accent % as in 
iklernnan, convftance, macifinty accsftre^ 
bft llion ; and alfo in thefe words, whofe 
marked vowels are hereafter to be ex- 
plained, father, engine, cloths, lover: yet 
if there be an accent befides, in the fame 



ftre ; b0c61ic, ctitaneota^ (uturitjf arg«iiient«rive, hn* 
nine, mivsiciaB* puiicitjf : Bat they are frequently 
foanded u^ or oo^ after a, 1, n, r, s, and t; as in d«-« 
rable, l^m/nons, n»meroiis, r»ral, Safan^ t»tor ; dura* 
|ioD5 Lvn^ion, n«t^tion, r»big/noQ8, fuperior, tjiition ; 
7et as many who fpeak weTi prono«nce the u dif- 
ferently in thefe fituations ; I (hall generally excufe 
Jnyfelf from giving aay other notice of it8 ipund in 
thetn, than thefe rules ; which, if I miftake not, 
ire founded oa the more eafy^ and genteel way of 
ipeaking. 

5 word J 



word V thcfe marks do not (sgnify the ae« 
ceot, but duty file ibunds ^ as ia tod^irroory, 

•,. ..i. «... , ♦ 

SB cT. hl 

.... 

Cf the uMiCitUid Imig Vmjoelx 

UN^Gcnted long ^, e^ c^ amd u^ are 
fiiorCBt and weako*, than when ac^ 
oeiMicdi but ocbefwife ara of the fame* 
famtd *s as m the firfl: fyllables of thefe 
nirords, nitrve^ nativity •, decent, defcend ^ 
BiAle, n^biUfff -, hi^man^ hiini^ne« 

Unaccented longi, znAy, have two (bunds y 
one 18 the fame they have when accented, 
thougk^fonacwhat fhorter, artd weaker ; anci 
occar6 only in the firft, . and laft fyllables o£ 
words V and in the laft but one, when to the 
&me laft fyllables, a termination is added. 
They have thia found ki the Hrft fyllable 
when the next is accented, as in dFurnal, 
tr/b«nal, tyrann/cal ; in the laft before a 
confonaat and final ej as in iacr/ffce, /qu«^ 
Kfe, an^yne, archetype ; and when to the 
fame, or the like final :^llables, a termina- 
tion is added, as in facr^ced, /qtuUTed^ 
Wlyzed : fioal y has* this found after f, p, 
and pi, as in jfiftrfy, occupy, rinult/ply ^ and 
when the fyUable ing is adtled to fuch words,, 
fks in ](i&i{ylngy occupying, multiplying •, and 
laftly, i for this y has the fame found, as ia 

juft/f/ed, 



7be IntroduSlitm. a*i 

j&flificd, 6cciq;>?er, miiltipl/ed. Thde feetri 
to me to be the only cafes, in which unac- 
cented i and y have a weak found of thefe 
accented vowels ; of which found, Italic i 
and J with a long over thetn, are the figns, 
as in the above examples. Their other 
found is that of unaccented iy as in #lite, 
^ince, Penel^p^; and unaccented Italic i 
and jr, in words of more fy llaUes than one, 
have every where the found of this e^ as in 
dfvine, dfvfde, diminilh, imaging, infp/- 
ration, incb'n^ion, admiration, indmsibil/ty» 
anonymous, alc^mjr. 

Unaccented e^ i, and jf, following a con- 
fonant in the firft fyllables of words, are 
u fliort as poflible, without founding the 
Mowing confonant in the ftme fyllable; 
asmd^ain, depend, divine, d/vfde, hyp6th« 
^ hj^rb^l^. In all other' fituadonjs, 
thefe, and the other unaccented, long vowels, 
have a longer found, but equally weak^. as 
in ^bide, ability, ^l^te, quality, innagf n^ ry, 
i^ic: Fdoliitry, tr?b»nal, orition, r^tition, 
xnxte, hfifmine, polyArllable. 

The unaccented long vowels almoft al- 
ways end their own fyllables, which nee- 
eflarily renders them longer than the Ihort ; 
(which very feldom end theirs, without a 
following confonant) as in h^-r^-i-t«-ry, 
*6n-^-rtf-ry, hir-man-i-ty, in^i-vj-fi-bil*i-9 ; 
except when in the end of a word, a con- 
fonant, which muft be founded with them, 

follows 



follows thi;m> as in ^tho-nC^ al*D<Viaic, 
mul-ii-ttfde; 

S E C T. IV. 

f 

Of fl^ Jbm^t Vdwh. 

ID O not &nd there has been a fuffickot 
diftuv6bk>n before made, between the uo* 
accented long^ and the flHMri vewela i wkfa* 
put which, k does not appear to me pof* 
fible, ibleiy by the ktter^ to COKfty the 
true prooupciation of thit langnaga. If 
aay JMfore^ b^s fufitcicDcly diftingaiilied 
tbcrn } it is norr. than I kdow. Hoiicvcr» 
WhenifiMttd I cotdd; ,alhd law the fufficW 
cslcy of fijcfci a< diftiii^i«n» with other .di» 
rci^ioos, fyf coov^mg a right prqAtiKi» 
tioAt I fco^r not help recofieftiig ilia 
f vt«aa of AifCbimedes • 

The Abort are a fett of vowek di&rent ii> 
ibund,^ as well as in length, hem the lotig» 
thpugii :dpnQtC<^ by the feme Ittttirs; and 
like them, are both accented, and! imac^ 
cented ^ are imimaied, both by fingle,. and 
double vowels v- and ase as txtenftvdy di£« 
fuied through the langMge, as the lQfig| 
vowe^are. 

The ibort vowels^ in the examples of the 
Introdui^^ioo, i>ni the : Di<^nafy^ and Dil^ 
cpurfct are alway s in Romafi letters 'p and none 
cUe that Me liaUcJBo bfc cakei^ foa them. 

The 



LitnditSikn, 



«J 



The ifiiort have ftiarp founds of the kmg 
Yowds, whidi can bardly, at firfl:,- be tit- 
flcicd, wkbooc the bely (k a following <otv 
fonanc^ as will af:^ar -bf trying to pro^ 
flounce tiietn by themiblvcs, «xa£t4y 'z% diey- 
found in tbefe monofyllabtes^ add, el), in, 
on, up, fyl. Upon fiich trial h will be 
fbood, chat thefevoweis are ienfitdy (horter, 
than die long ; -and that^ tbey havfc, the e 
excepted, an aoNe, (s^lharp found of «hem :' 
and by obferving kow they found in th€ffe> 
words, iind fvequemly trying to pronounce 
them by thenifelves, as cbey there (bund ; 
you will both know dieir founds, and be 
able to utter them, without the help of a 
foOowvng coQiibham': liowevet, whenever 
they occur in EnglHh wor^, the following 
confonant^ if not qiMfcent, as in Mc6£a&, 
M«i4fieis ftiOQld be founded in the fame 
fyllabk with them^ and therefore, except 
in this lad cafe, neither accented, nor im« 
accented, do they ^ver* ppopei4y ^end S^ 
\iblcs ; whereas both the accented, * and un* 
accented long vowds, moft frequently do. 

As there is no found in the Scotch or 
French languages, exaftlv like the Englifli 
flx>rt a, as in at, adb, A'dam ; fo to convey 
fome conception of it, I obferre^ that in' 
founding this letter, the root of the tongue 
prefles downward, fo as to opM^the mouth- 
a Uttle wider, than for founding^long, or 
broad a; aad4;he tip of it gently touches the 

infide 



24 7^ LitroduSHon. 

infide of the under fore-teeth : A very fhbrt 
(bund of the voice^ with the organs in this 
ppfition, is that of ihort a ; and as long a 
u>und of it, in the fame pofition, as that of 
a long vowel, is the found of the long acute 
a, as in father, grant, large, &c. hereafter 
to be mentioned. 

The Ihort e, as in ell, tell, eloquent, 
founds rather flatter, inftead of (harper^ 
than the long e\ being nK>re. properly the 
acute to the Scotch or French e, than to. 
the Engliih : And the found of Ihort i, as 
in thin, (kin, is prc^erly the Ihort acute 
to the Engliih long r, as it alfo is to the 
long /, and y* 

Short er and ir ixi^old Engliih words, 
when followed by fome other conlbnant, 
are by fomt pronounced ur, as well as er 
or ir; as in fervicet fermon, hermite, earheft,. 
heard, iiril, third, thirty, firm, thirit ; fpeak- 
ing thefe words, as if they were fpelt fur* 
vice, furmon, hurmite, urneit, furft, thurd, 
thurty, furm, thuril; Yet if another r, or. 
a vowel follow ; the e and i retain their 
acute ihort founds ; as in errant, fer^n^de, 
irrigate. 

Accented ihort i, before a fingle conlb- 
nanty in any fy liable but the laft, has the 
(bund of accented long e pronounced ihort, 
and ia the fame fyllable with the following 
conibnapt; as in image, idiom^ ahiMtyy c/- 
viWty ; except in a few old words, fuch as. 

lincHy 



^ie InfroduSion. 25 

linen, giving, living ; where \t* is quite 
.fliort ; as it is every where clfe, except in 
the above cafe, and in the word k/ng and 
its derivatives ; where the i founds like long 
€ ; perhaps to give a grandeur to the word« 
fuitable to its fignification. 

Short o before th, and v \ and between 
w, and r, in old Engtifh words, frequent- 
ly founds (hort u; as in mother, broth- 
er, love, dove, word, worftiip: The fign 
of o having this found is its being Roman, 
with a breve over it ; as in some, son, flood,, 
blood, and the above examples. 

Of the following double fhort vowels, 
the founded vowel is in a Roman letter^ 
and the filent has the fign of its quiefcence ; 
ai,, ea, ei, eo, ie, 00, ou, and ui ; as in 
platntiflF, captain, bread, heifer, Leonard, 
geogr^phj^, n-iend, fieve, flood, couple, build* 
The double .fhort vowels are pronounced 
as fliort, as if in the fame fltuation, they 
were fingle. 

The fliort vowels are botfi accented, and 
unaccented, as before obfervcd •, the former 
being founded ftronger than the latter, but 
neither of them fo long as the long vowels ; 
of both which fliort vowels, the following 
words conuin examples ; acid, ever, image, 
olive, ducat,*cynic ; manner, tender, inner, 
potter, upper, fylvefter. 

The a and o have fometimes their^ fliort 
founds conflderably lengthened v and when 

D thex 



'they hiVe, tfiey rtay Be'cailcd fe% ac6?& : 
In ' ref^a -of th«r Ich^tlr,' \Hiy ' trfght ^havc 
feecn placed atfidhgft 'tHc 'long Vbwds ; birt 
they arc here bWced' aHfKiirgft tlic -fh^^^ 
iigriified like'tHerni By Roihih Icttt??s, ahS 
a long over them*-, tmt it'irlay Weifily te- 
Tnembered, 'that they -htelvc ii Ibn^ f6uVi^ of 
their fllort vowels. 

^ Long acute a'6c(?urs before'!, m, h, r, 
followed By fonte ' other ' coriforiint -, ' befoft 
dbft th, U, ahd w-; khd'WHcn accent^ ^'h 
«he end "Of words -/as in31rfts,SimoHti, i>(Sms, 
chamber, ao(ber, TiiSit, 'Hrt, large, bar^e, 
5>, fafhcr, Suht, jSint, j3imdice, fjfeter, 
pappi, "nrfirrtttia. , v 

Ldrtgacifte S^ocoirs 'fe^re' r, *ahd'*s, ^1- 
Jbwed by'fdtfie otHtr'ci[nfbnanti affd'6?fore 
€h, and' ugTif; as • m Geprge,' 5rdfer, bSrflc^ 
^xiiSh, froft;c5ft;cBfli,^loth,doths3^^ 
bought, M^Vit. fofight, f h6ught,''far3frght ; hi 
Ml Which 'Words, it fo'trntis'^ilthofflHic'iJa/ ' 



. 'SEG'T. V. 

Of'(he'Ufiacc€mid'JfiortV6weh. 

THE S E are foun(3<?d ^^ireiker than the 
accented, aftd as Ihort^-is conflttcht 
with uttering them at aU*; ^s the uhacr 
tented vbwcls In ffi&r-^r, fwec-tcr, ac-^or, 
for-r^mdcr> ^gen^r-aU' 

v^ . Icon- 



^ke IntroduSlm^ 27 

I cpnfi^r, and tl^er^fore reprelcnc z% 

{(4) tiie unaccented fhorc vowels in the 

li^ol^ons, a^, ad> dis, ex, in, inter, naisi, 

^Kcr^ i^b^ %?i;, uii,, vp, 5fc ; which there- 

iore i^i^d bjc; always foijnd^d in the &mc 

pliable with their. fbUoyi^ing confopants 9 

and if t^ foilpwing fyllabks, begin with a 

rowq], their confon^n^s fhould be founded 

ag% bjjq not written^ in the bogi^ning o| 

tSeroj as in al^-pl-i/h, ad-^'re, dii-arm, ex- 

^l:^ ip-^rCi i?^-t^-?ftj fub-orn, f«-p.er-add^ 

f\f-qr-3(^ Vm^^-qual) up-6iv I likewife fq 

repjFe&ni; the una^ccented fhort vp^els, which 

do ^^ n^tv/ally, apj^ caGly, ejad ijheir owa 

f)^ayc% vithftut th,e tpllpwing cofl.fown? ^ 

as in gen-es-i^e, Kb-cr-^l, U^er-al, C9i>- 

iy-% te-ie^-^r, (yVYettc;r : find ajfp.jh^ 

Wacsiest^d ftipri; fip^lTyUa!ples. in old Engr 

^ wfirds, ^ rp^n^inirig 4hort, ^jrhen a ^er- 

^iWftpn % ak^$^/> as ^he der. in ^van-d^r-er^ 

wflri-der-ed, w5n-der*ing ; being un^g? exne4 

ftort, in w5n-den ' 

Th? Freripbi ftcoi ta tiaye none of th?^ 
Englifli fhort vowels in their language, cx^ 
cept the e, as in die, tel ; Nor do the 
Scotch feem/ti) haViP cither tte fhort a, or 
0, in theirs ; though they have all the reft ; 
for thfy pppoqynpe ejl, ip,- l^yf, |yl, and 
moft fyllables where thefe fhort vowels^ 
^%^V^M tHEiiglifh |3q-, bu? (bqi^t ^, tj^ey 
pcq^xpijn^ brQji4 % ?n^ ^^^^ 9.% iQ^g ; yet 

«^*ftF. baS to fftid ffiBcpTBing ^hgm». af 

D 2. haying 



a8 7be IntroduBkn. 

having the fhort and (harp founds of the 
long vowels, &c. 1 humbly think may 
enable both the Scotch and French, and 
thofe of other nations, as well as the En- 
glifli, to find them out, even without the 
afliftance of a teacher : But if fuch afliftance 
can be had ; it is, no doubt, bed to ufe it. 
N. B. There are no fuch founds in the 
Englifh language as the Scotch Cy which 
they pronounce much flatter than the En- 
glifh^^ nor as the Scotch auorei, which 
they found as diphthongs, in which both 
the letters arc heard; nor as the Scotch 
or French u, in their common word union, 
or in the Scotch word brue; nor as the 
Scotch or Dutch gutturals ch, *and gh ^ 
the Englifh gh being cither quiefcent, or 
cxprcft by the found of g, or f 5 and the 
ch, by that of Iiard c, or k. All thefe 
founds therefore Ihould be avoided, in fpea* 
king Englifh. 



CHAP. V. 
Of tie Diphthongs. 

THE diflference between a vowel, and 
a diphthong, is, that whereas a vowel 
has a fingle, and unvarying found, whether 

pro- 



WnftWc*^ l^pg^flf fljfirtj fff fig|»i^ by 
m f^Ht V 4^^fm ?f t«5pr# > in prono»npiiig 
j4ipfetlM>n& we >i>l?gin With <bc foiind of 
kf §x^ yojvd, j}fl4 wifhftut injqerruptiiig lir 
.vw??3 fi^d jvitt thaf of its laft : If thfi 
,y<4pc is i^$eri»i)itied feptjvcen twfl cgntigqojW^ 
.v«w€jl#, tijpy #Re two (^iftirvSt yo.wefc \ and 
#«?^ff fvh^t I i^ay,e ejWcd » double, pr 
ffirfc. po»«l^ Wr a 4ipl¥b9ng; 99 in r/- 

. ^)r the aJl^iQfre r^^e, no/pe of the double 
(QT tfiple vftwck, having pnly a fingle and 
yv^Y9^'i^^oi^if is properly a dipl^hoog; 

Jfe!^ by #5 ioQg / 9r jy> a^d Uj though de- 

So^qi o«Jy tey fwgle.ljetitpr?, .v.iU be fotw4 
^h ; fyf the Tofwd pf ^loog i pr y begins 
W^h 4;^t x>f ittve ;beg»nwg of fejco^d 5, «d 

:Hi4s yj(tii t^«c c*f JIfgwg #5 ijpd the fouM .of 
li i; e;ica^y that ;0f rte diphthong c,u. 

^ytte $fapy^ JuJe alfp, ^thefe ijbllowiag. 
fiOi^ptoWi «Bd triplets. cJf ypiiyels,. \^ijl he 
fyfV^ to be diphthongs ; Y^hicby in thjs 
. vori, arp alway* in ROnjan letters, except 
rfjofe <of tl\e;n that ar^ qviejce/if 5 iCiwi,. CW. 
cu, ew, ie, leu, few, oi, .oy, ow, oy, an4 
Moy ; ^1 wh^ch only denote five dil^infl: 
founds ; vi». ey, e^, jic, oi, and ou. Theie, 
jtoge^hc^ mtii , ^at of Aopg ^' or y^ fccai to be 
all the diphthojmgi^iwnd^ belonging to t^e 
^(^Ufi) language: ^at]id it hia^ not, ftri&ly 
speaking, one triphthong* 

D*3/ . eiM, 



i • - 



30 ^be IntroduSHm. 

ctu, dropping the a ; eu> ew, feu, and 
few, dropping tne i in the two laft, are all 
diphthongs of one, and the fame found; 
beginning with that of long f, and ending 
with that of £ ; as in beauty, and its deriv- 
.attves, Europe, neuter, few, jew, jewel, 
dieu, lieu, view. The diphthong eou be- 
gins with the (bund of long ^, and ends 
with that of fhort u, dropping the o ; as in 
r/ghteous, and its derivatives $ which Ihould 
be pronounced as if fpelt r/teufs : ie is a 
diphthong, beginning with the found of 
long f , and ending with that of (hort e ; 
as in fierce, pierce, tierce, and only occurs 
in thefe wonds, and their derivatives: oi 
and uoy, in the beginning or middle ; and 
oy in the middle or end of words, are diph- 
thongs of the fame found ; beginning with 
that of (hort o, and ending with that of 
long e% as in oil, boil, roya}, boy, qoy, 
bnoy, biroyant ; ou, and ow, are alfo diph- 
thongs of the fame found ; beginning with 
that of fhort a, and ending with that of u\ 
as in count, mount, town, crown, bow, 
cow, bow er, pow'er. 

The unaccented diphthongs found flior-^ 
ter, and weaker than the accented; other- 
wife both found alike ; as in Eur^^pe, neU- 
traWtjr, New-tww'an, turmoil, viceroy. 

Thefe couplets ua, ue, ui, uo, after g, q, 

and f, m the beginning, or middle of word^, 

a& in language, pcrfuide, queftion, languid^ 

5 quduent^ 



^he IntroduSiion. 31 

qujdent ; are not properly diphthongs ; be- 
caufe the u, in the^ ficuatiqns, has the 
i)und of the conibnant w ; which is made 
by a ftronger conftriftion of the lips, than 
the vowel u requires ; as wiU appear upon 
founding theie two words ooze, having the 
found of », and wood. 



5S()S08C3!080S08080808C:33(-)!08G308(^^^ 



CHAP. VI. 

♦ • ' -•■.•. 

Q/^DissoNANT Letters. 

THESE are fuch, as in right pro- 
nunciation, fhould be uttered by the 
found of fbme other letter than their own ; 
as the i in bird, the o in women, the eau in 
beau, the ew in few, ftrew^ the .ugh in laugh, 
the 1 in colonel, the e.in engine, the o in love^ 
prove, &c. If the founds of fuch difibnant 
letters are not fignified by marks, as in 
thefe laft examples ; the fyllables in which 
they occur will be fpelt over again, with 
letters^conveying their right founds* Thtss 
after the word bird, will be (burd) ; women, 
(wim) J beau, {ho) ; few, (fo) •, ftrew, (ftr^) j 
langln OSifl\\ colonel, (cur). 

Yet fyllables with the following diflb- 
nants, founding only fii \ ci, fci, fi, iFE, s 

before 



jlflcHfr tbWfe W«^ s,. ^ C, .;fi, ft)Ufl4ing j^^ 
«r FrfiioJi j j.,npr,w«b ?^i\^t^ yrp, flflf J|i 

being all knowable \ff $|)e p^fsdi^g, g^^ 
following obfervations upon thein. 

• , •• • - ... 

• . 

• * 

C H A P. VIL 






Of Terminations 



• 



THE final quicfi^ent .e ^tacrally/jg^ 
nifies diftC the vowd going bcfbns, Is^ 
long; ^whether it inainacdiaiCQly prcasede k, as. 
kx die J c^^ er e iiagie conioRaiut iodine 
i)6tw«eo, as in ipuune, noce ; iiu* jgii» as in 
riigiie, v^gfie ; aod it «vjen fignifies (bat t^e 
« befcyseng, and ft, is long;. as in r^nge, 
'ftMnge, ka&Cy woEbs ; but k is not a iign 
the preceding vowd is long, when aoy othrr 
cwo, or more x:onibnaots intervene : yet as 
the quancity of the .preceding vowel i6 .ik>c 
9lway$ r]goi6e;jd .by<Bnai,e; t^ it Qiay |pe 
known, without 4:egarding it *, I il^ia^e pvi: 
that yowei in an (ta;lic letter, >whece it is 
long I as in m^rc, itopt > ^ in a ^onxaii,^ 

where 



The IntroduSHon. 33 

vhere it is fhort; as in give, live, mg- 
nVe, practice. 

If final e follow c, g, s, or th ; it fie* 
nifies they are ibfc, as in p^ace, d^, rrle,' 
d^the ; except when the contrary found is^ 
intimated by an Italic letter •, as in rift^ ufc i 
as if fpelt rsffcj uffe ; and if the e is dropt 
when d is added to words ending with ce, 
ge, or fe; its abfence is fisnified* by an 
apoftrpphe over the place of it j which alfq 
intimates that the c,. g, or s, fhould be 
founded foft ; which otherwife, by the rules 
concerning them, would be hard ; as in 
grjc*d. engig'd, rais'd. 

When s is added to words ending with 
ce, ge, fe, or ze ; it makes with the final e; 
an additional fyllable; and es, added to 
words ending with ch, fh, or x, does the 
lame ; as in graces, chinges, fenfes, gizes,' 
churches, afiies, fexes; becaufe in hjch si 
fituation, s could not be otherwife^ heard : 
but when s is added to other words, ending 
with final e; this e continues filent, and 
there is no fyllabical- encreafe ; as in rides, 
r^ves, proves. 

Whjcn words, ending with final e, have 
an Englifii termination added, beginning 
with a vowef; fuch as ed, er, eft, etb, able^ 
slh, ing; the final e either becomes the 
vowel of fuch terminations, as in rule, 
ruled, ruler, ruled, ruleth •, or it is dropt 
before them, as in adv/fe, adv/fable ; ir- 

gue. 



gu<b SfSH'ngi ^'^^y ^Wi^'.. exfiCB? *^fi% 
able is added after ce, and g&i, icv^ tM?: 

the e muft <;qntuiu«, bu^ not. bp' fpHpd^d, 

to fignifjf ;h& ptec^i^g Cy ?pd g, aR? fe|t, ji , 

'WbeQ.tp,M/;oi;ds'endij]g yirkt) fi|i;4.^. ^^ 
mina^oijs,. beginning wi^li.a coni<)9W>F» a«"^ 
ad^cdi fuch a? fi?l, Ijeft^ ty,. ipcRt, ftdsj, 
lihc e is retrained, bufi nof fftundj^dj anfi 
^ba« its.qj^icf^encc mif b? Be*<JJfy; ly¥>»n*. 
^K ftr%Rg6rs.i. I hay« gfltig in.g.%Mf-.gwHi 

When to words cndipg wi^ y*- ^W *ff*" 
ft^ti^ i^. »d(^ wibf tfeff f t^ginPfflg Wth 
f y^wel,. Of c^iifeftafttk th^ ]6 is V1^9^ 

woisfcij f*.iafe(f«4t»; ^e<^«M> roigh^K 

%^^e^ ^^. tt^. fif!C<&jpaxiioM ¥>& '^ 9^f^ 

?WMng «»g«lfe9e>> *e y. i% ?»0$iivi^4 j ^ Iq 
Wiegit €epf)bf»ng, jyft^ijRg,, , 
. if |9i Wori^ fhding wi$H a |hqf| yoj«¥W 
;^4 ri()gl«-co^.^Mn a, t$c«iQ^i<Qi), b«gi«-; 
ning with a vowel be added •, that 6nal, Qoc^i 
iotn^nt is doubled, both , ia %!^li;ig, and 
|>ronQuncin^ i as in g?t, ge«i.ng j gos, got- 
ten, i hai, Mtter ; p.ut, inOttiqg. 

Thf vov?«ls in the tcrminswions. en, ^nf} 

pn, are fr«iupnsly quiefc^n^ i and when ^ 

they, are m^rkqd accordingly i, 9« in ^vcQi 

MvQi* hdtt<«» (Oi^ttM. ... ... 

Unac- 



UnaAreated *eMtaii»tiofis ^th ia» ie^ antt 
10} the i beif^ Rdtfaah^ nftir d, I, n, and 
t ^roper^ found yj|,, ^ytp yo, fliort ; as in 
o))/d\ehcCf 'fifldier, TAdiis, /fiUal, 'billiard^ 
nliflion^ l^nibh, eifl^i^l, dueiftioh, ihixtidn^ 
which 'ffioula be ^rAnotinced ^blfdycnccf, 
folayer, Indyes, (ih^] d, anil [y. In thefflt, 
and fiicTi like ivbrds, fouhding • like foft g) 
fftfal, billyard, iinifiybn, «'nyolri, crfeftyal, 
queftyon, mixtyon. | . - 

,When.,r follows e, i, dr y, iri the end d£ 
words ; ft founds as If e Iprcceded it.; thus 
the words car^ here, (hire, fire, lyife, iTyre, 
arepronouneed in one l^Uable, ad if tney 
were Ipelt '^er, h^er, Ifli&r or filler, f/er, 
}y^r^ Tytv. / : ' ^ 

1 have bmltted to fiiirk the Ibuod of 
the /olldwiog ' termiiidtlohs as ' thciy occur 
in the difliohary, ^beciufd, liftir attentively 
peruBhg this table, it* will be ^tvf eafy to 
remember "theni 5 and bbcaufe th« recol- 
leftion of them, will bd mbre agt-eeable, and 
profitable TO the pef uftr, 'thfin ihctepoated 
notation of them, could be. ; , 



.^ t 



-«. * 



A Tabls 



z^ 



TJb^ Intro AiSlion^ 



A Table of unaccented terminations^ and 

their ufual Sounds. 



inft 



M 



ibl 
igc 
in 
in 

m 

in or 
ing' 

I 

um 

ur 

ufs 

cr 

fum 

(hufs 

flian 

(hon 

(hon 

zhon 

cfhon 
cfhus 



GO 



aniicablc, pr6bablc 
«fage meflage paflagc 
captain mountain 
linen woollen pollen 
faithful ^riceful 

r^ing hming toritiog 

battle bundle fnaffle 

kingdom wi/dom 
fivour honour fiv/our 
generous gUr/ous 
acre centre metre luftrc 
gimefome lightfome 
gricious preciou!l 
adventitious pr^pitibu^ 
mathematician phjsicU 

[an 

converfion . penfion ^ 

• 

commiflion interc/iHon 
nation completion . 

occ^Iion adh/fion 

flexion complexion 
anxious n(?xious 

CHAP. 



T&£ IntrodttSlion, 37 



x)ooooo<xxxxxxxxx>ooc<:<x 



CHAP.' VIII. 

N 

Of the Dhijion of Words into Syllables. 

SOME of the received rules for dividing 
words into fyllables, wrthout any valu- 
able end being anfwered by them, are ut-» 
terly inconfiftcnt with a juft pronunciation : 
a^d in my humble opinion, the following^ 
obfervcd in this piece when neceflary, being. 
founded upon the natural, and eajy utter- 
ance of words, will be found much more 
convenient, both in writing and printings 
and if obferved in fpeaking, will greatly, 
promote a right pronunciation, 

1. If a long vowel, or diphthong precede 
^ fingle confonant ; that vowel or diphthong 
ihould end its own fyllable, and the con- 
6nant fhould begin the following ; as in. 
^•corn, n^-ming, r/-diiig, h^-red-z-w-rv, Eu- 
wp/-an. Except in the lafl: fyllable, where, 
the confonant muft be founded with it ; 
as in in-ti-m^te, r^-plae, r^-coil.. But, 

2. If a fhort vo\yel precede a fingle con- 
fonant ; that confonant ihould always bc- 
writtcn, and fgunded, in the fame fyllable 

E with 



L_ 



jS The IntrodttSiion. 

with it ; and founded, but not written, in 
the beginning of the next; as in can-on^ 
me^rit, man-our \ as if written, can-non^ 
tner-rit, man-nour. 

J;. If a long vowel, or diphthong, pre- 
e two,, or three confonants, apt to begin 
a word *, that vowel or diphthong (hould 
alfo end its own fyllable, and thofe con* 
fonants (hould begin the next; as in re^ 
plen-ifti, r^-prz-fal, ncfi-tral, r^-ftrafn, r^- 
Iplen-dent. But, 

4. If a fhort vowel precede two confo- 
nants, apt to begin a word ; the firft (hould 
be written, and founded, in the fame (yl- 
lable with that vowel; and both muft be 
founded, but the fecond only written, in 
the beginning of the following fyllable ; as 
in ref-T»-ent, rep-r^-fent, matter, faf-terj 
which (hould be pronounced ref-flis^-ent, rep* 
pr^-feat, maf fter, fal-fter. 

5. If any vowel or diphthong precede two 
confonants, unapt to begih a word ; the firft 
confonant (hould be written, and founded, 
in the fame fyllable with that vowel, or diph- 
thong; and the laft, in the beginning of the 
next fyllable; as in in-gel, in-cient, ten- 
der, mat-ter, ^-nofn-ted, foun-ded. 

6. When three confonants, unapt to begin 
a word, come between two founded vowels ; 
their fyllablcs (hould be divided, both in 
writing and fpeaking, between thofe two 
confonants, where the preceding fyllable 

naturally 



The IntroduSiiofu 39 

naturally ends, and the following begins ^ 
as in ftreng-thcn, dif-ting-ui(h, kin-dred. 

7. If two vowels be contiguous in a 
word ; the firft vowel Ihould end its own 
fyllable, and the other fhould make, or 
begin the following ; as in p/-^-t^, m/gh- 
t/cr, c^-er-cive, for-tu-i-tous, fr^-i-li-on. 

I have all along retained the more a(> 
proved way of fpclling, now in ufc j thait 
this may anfwer the end of a Spelling, as 
well as of a Pronouncing Didtlonary. 



End ^ tJbe Introduction. 




\ 
\ 



£ ai Ai» 



[40] 




AiiA PPEN DIX to the 

Introduction. 



DIRECTIONS 

■ 

How to acquire a. Right Pronunciation, 
by the Vfe of this Book. 

i.Tl Y carefully pcrufing the Introdu&ion, 
JD and^ thefe following Tables, make 
yourfelf mafter of the different founds of the 
letters, and of their figns : And pleafe to 
obferve, that there is hardly any letter in the 
words jof the Didionary, or of the Dif- 
courfe, nor in the examples of the Intro- 
duftion, or Appendix, but its proper found 
or filence is fignified in thofe words, cither 
by the letter itfelf, or by Ibme mark upon 
it, or by-fomc,rulc or obferyation in the 
loftoduftion. 

2. As 



Appen£x tor tBe IhtroduSlm. 411 

2. As xnoft foreigners will find difHculty 
b pronouncing the Englifli fhort a, long, 
j^uce a, thus m^rkcd^^ and the Englifh long. 
I; and the French in particular, in uttering 
the Ihort vowels, fbft g, j, q, w, ch, and th^-, 
ib they ffaould be at peculiar pains, by fre- 
quent practice, to pronounce thefe,, and 
every other difficult letter, properly. 

3. It (bould be early, and conftantly re- 
acmbcred, in pronouncing by this help,, 
that the confonant following a (hort vowel,, 
known by being in a Roman letter, (hould 
always be. pronounced, in the iame fyllablc 
with it ; as in interpret, indifpenJible : That: 
if that conibnant is followed by a vowel in^ 
die beginning of the following fyllable ; it: 
fiiould be founded alfo in the beginning of 
that fyllable \ as in can-on, ad-ore •,. pro- 
nouncing thefe words can-non, adi-dire r 
That if that confonant be a, c, or g ^ it 
ihould be founded hard before a, o, \Xy or 
any confonant ;; as in dec-^-logue, doc-^^ 
ment, dog-matic ; but that c, and g, ffaould 
Jbe founded foft before e, i, and y ; as in^ 
dec-/-mal, dig-it: On the contrary, the long; 
vowels, known by being in Italic letters,, 
and diphthongs, end their own fyllables. 
before fingle confonants ; as in ni^val,. ni« 
tal y. except when a confonant foUowSi, in. 
the fend of a word, which muft be foundedi 
in. the lame fyllable with itj. as in in-nate„ 

Ei gran^ 



42 Appendix to the IntroduSfionv 

gran-d€un If two confonants, unapt to 
begin a word, follow a long, or fhortf 
rowel, or diphthong; the firft confonant 
mud be founded, in the fame fyllable with 
\x \ and the lad, in the beginning of the 
following fyllable •, as in ftr/?n-ger, mat-ter, 
i-noin-tcd : But if thefe two confonants arc 
apt to begin word'iff; then, after a long 
yowel,. OF diphthong, ending its own fyl- 
lable, they fhould' begin the following fyl- 
lable •, as in r^-pleh-i(h, ntfi-tral; but after 
a (hort vowel, the firft confonant (hould be 
founded, m the fame lyilkble with it; and 
both, in the beginning of the following fyK 
Table; as in ref-l«-ent, rcp-rtf-ferit ; which 
jfhould be pronounced ref-fl//-ent, fep-pr^* 
iBnt. Thefe rules remembered', and ob- 
Iprved, will rendtc the right divifion of 
' words into fyllables, a very eafy matter; 

'4; Having acquFred, by the fight of the 
letters, and their figas, a juft idea of the 
found of a word (for it is r^P defign of the 
.Notation, to cortvey to the miiKl* fuch an 
idea, by the fight),, you (hould trjr to pror- 
nounce th-at word, with a ftrong voice, ex- 
aflly according to your idta of it. If your 
found anfwers that idfea, it i« right r but if 
it docs not,, (and very poffibly it may not 
at fir ft, your organs of fpecch not being 
ufed to it), by frequent efforts to utter it 
according to that idea^ you will be able dc 
5 length. 



Appendix ta tbt IntrodaSHoH^. 43, 

kngth- tevdo it ;. and when you can do it 
mdily^ you wiU kave learned its proper 

found. 

5. Should any word occur, remafkably 
different in found from your preconceptioi^ 
of it i in order to> imprefsy and retain its 
fight found, it would be welt worth while 
to write it down, and mark it, by putting 
ehe accents as here, a dot under the Italia 
letters, and a parallel ilroke under quief» 
etnts ; and frequently to Tead fuch words 
over, pronouncing them (iiftinftly^ 

6. I fliould think thfTe quarters of an 
Aour, employed m pronouncing words io 
ihis didtndli manner, in the > order in which 
they occur, would be a futficient extrcife zt 
a time ; for both the attention, and capacity 
for pronouncing well, will by that time gen*- 
crally flag : But in the interval of an hour 
Of two, they will be fafficiently necruite4 
again- And this excrcife repeated two or 
tkee times in a day, as affairs will permit^ 
for a month together, will carry you fcvetiil, 
times through the book, .and give you a 
general knowledge, and pradife of a right 
pronunciation ; efpecially if a eonftant care 
is maintained in all reading, and converfa- 
tion in Englifh, to pronounce properly ; and 
(where you have opportunity) to obfcrve, 
and ituitatc thofe, wJip fpeak well. But long 

intervals 



44 Appendix to the IntrbduiHoH^ 

intervals between tbefe ewrdfes». and great 
interruptions of this care, will netard, if not 
prevent this acquiQtion. Once more. 

7* 1 fbonld think k highly adVifea.ble for 
youth,, to have a convenient Diftionary '9X 
hand, for confulting the meianing of the 
words, they do not underftand. For by this 
means, they might enrich their minds with, 
the knowledge of things, as well as with the 
founds of their names, to the great eocreafe 
c/i their plcafure, and of their capacity for. 
future ufefulnels. 

1 would here obferve, that the chief dif- 
ference between the pronunciation of the 
Country people in England, and the proper^ 
1^ that of London, con(ifts in the diph* 
ihongal (bunds they give to fomc of the- 
long vowels; as when they fay g€2Xt for 
gtfte, p^aper for paper v and to fome of the 
long and iliort double vowels, which, I 
have obferved, have only fingle founds;, 
^ying fat for ^'at, h^ad for h^ad : In their 
founding long i and j, as if they Ibundied 
broad^^ and e^ inftead of the firft beginning, 
only of broad a, and ^v a* when they fay 
m5ind for mind, mJine for mine. In their 
uttering the diphthong ou or ow- as if it 
founded cou -, as in faying r^ount for count, 
geov/n for gown, t^wn for town : And in 
frequently u6ng one letter for another ; as 
fhort a, for the long y Zy for hacd s ; t> for 

thsi 



Appendix to the IntroduSiiom 45 

th ; calling ^ngel, angel ; ftringer, ftranger; 
son, zon ; month, monc. If the youth in 
t/ic country carefully obfcrve thefc, and the 
like differences, in the ufe of this book ; 
and, ioipeaking, guard againfl: thefe, and 
inch ruftic founds ; they will, with great fa- 
cility and expedition, rectify the impro^ 
pricties of their pronunciation. 

As the difficulty in learning the Englilh 
pronunci^ion by the letters, chiefly arifes 
from the great variety of the vowels, and 
of the different ways of denoting their 
founds ; and from the diflbnant, irregular^ 
and quiefcent conibnants ; fo an intimate 
acquaintance with the following Tables 
will greatly lefleni if not furmount, that 
difficulty. 



• 4 



A VIEW 



46 Appendix to the httiroduSim. 



^Sii!SiS£lliSl£^^ 



A V I E W 

OfallthVo^^Ls i^fri Diphthongs, 
find of the Letters by which their Sounds 
fire denoted in Engli/h Words ^ 

TABLE 1. 

Of the different Sounds of a, and of the dif^ 
f&rmt Ways by which t bey are denoted. 

Long a is denoted by 

a *f. jis in nicion, nact^re, nival* 
aa *ch, iaron. 

)^^ f. d.mc, fomc, n«ne. 

ai f. brain, gain, main, train« 

au *o. gfluge. 

ay f. day, gay, pray, ray. 

ea cb. be^r, be^rd, britfk, grt^t, pMr» 

ftetfk, fwe^^r, tt^r, wwn 
ee o, J'er, rif*en 



* The letter f. fignifiesi that the found is frequently 
fo denoted in ot^er words befides thefe examples i 
ch. that it is chiefly^ and o. that it is only fo denoted 
Ml thefe examples, and their derivatives,^ 

c &? 



Appendix^ to the IntroditStian. 47. 

V^ o. jis in fre, /^re, w?rc, wh?re. 

6 cfa. ABqxij Bght, £^n, ffint^ fr^hr, 

jSr, invSgh, ISfere, nSgh, nSgh* 
hour, r?Scn, r?ln, ftr^ht, -/i^^, 
vSI, van, wHgh. 

ey ch. B?F, conv??, Oek, ?i?re, ^b?H, tbh^ 

wJf, WJemouth, whSr. 

oa o. g^\ or jail, 0/^ g^al. 

67 o. alloy fli.) 

Short a by 

a {. Asin adani, add, gbd, man. 
aa ch. b^laam, c^naan, ffaac 

Long acute a by 

a f. As in 55, almond, ant, calf, cham« 

bcr, father, half, l^rt, mamma, 
pappa, palm, i^alm, paths; (lan- 
der ; and generally before r and 
. fome oiber confonant^ as in barge, 
large, bard, 

y ch. calve, halves, (laves. 

au ch. aunt, draught (draft) daughter, 

jaandice, jaunt, launch, laugh 
. (lafF) flaunt, sauce, alfo fauce. 
ea ch. heirk, heart, learn, 
oa 0. groat. 

Broad 5 by 

a ch. As in all, Jldg^te, Slm^nack, 5ltar, 

51tcr, b51d,' t5{k,* b51l, c5&, 

c511, 



48 Appendix to the IntroduSlim. 

za\\ chrTIdern, chalk, fJU, gJll, 
h^ll, h Jll^ wed, m5k, p Jll, quJfF, 
quality, qu^Ini, qu Jrrel, qu Jrry, 
quart, quJIh, fait, fcald^ fhall, 
fquJll, fquander, ftall, ftJlk, tall, 

wabble, wad,waddle,wafk, wall, 
wallet, walkto^ waiter, wander, 

.. want,wanton,war,warb!e,ward, 
warden, was, wofli, wafp, war, 
watch, water, wharf, wharle, 
what, Uirath. 

au f. As in applaufe, claufe, laud. . 

aw f. claw, jaw, law, paw, raw. 

awe o, awe. 

oa o. broad, ^alfo groat. 

TABLE IL 

Of the different Sounds of e. 

Long e is xknoted by 
ae ch. As in ^n/as, enigma,, ^'ra, ^cheri 

c f. b/fom, decent, PAer, finior. 
ea f. ^afe, pl^afcy preach, twch. 
ee f, feed, need, keep, fpeed. 

jl^^ f. acc/de, auft/re, ri?v/re. 

ei ch. conceive^ di?c/tve, pcrc/ive, r^c^ve, 

feze. 
ea o. faff, p«ple. 

ey 



Appendix to the IntroduSiion. 49 

cy f. As in attorney, honey, ic^, journgr, 

money ; and in proper names en^ 
ding in ey, as in Kelley, Koirjley, 
Wh/atley. • ^ 

i f. d/minifh, div/ne, inv^l/d. 

|L cb. cap^ch/ne, f^t/gue, intr/gue, m^i- 

•^ • cbitic^ magazine, nu^nnc, p^qur, 

quar^t/ne, (h/re. 

ic cL bdief, br/ef, ch/ef, crrfing, fief, field, 

fiend, grief, liege, mien, n?ecc, 
piece, pri'eft, relieve, retrieve, 
ihiirld, Ihriek, s/ege, thief, wield, 
jiVld. 

oe ch. o^con^mjp, o^c«men/cal, o/d/pu/, 

ph^nicians, pho/nix. 

y f. ^dny^ minj, very, mfghty* 

Short c by 

a o. As in an^ ^cn) man_y (men.) 

ae ch. ae'tn^, ae'ftw^ry, has'morrjage. 

c f. bleffed, gem, men, ten. 

ta ch. bread, breaft, breath, clean|y,clcanye, 

dead, deaf, dealt, death, dread, 
carl, early, earn, earned, earxh, 
feather, head, health, heard, 
hearfe, heaven, heavy, jealous, 
leacher, lead, leather, leaven, 
mead^to, meafere, pearch, pearl, 
peafant, peafcod, pheafant, pleaf* 
ant, read, readj^, realm, fpread, 
(lead, (lealth, fweat, thread, 
F threat, 



5Q Appendix to the Intro/kiSiion. 

threat, treacherous, tread, treaf-* 

«re, wealth, waithcr, yeaft, 

zealous^ 
ec o. As in Beelzebub, 
ci o. heifer. 

CO o. jeopardj, lewiard, leopard- 
i" ch. girl ( ger) miracle (merj sirrap (ler) 

fpirit (fper.) 
ie o. friend. 
U burj (ber) bur/al (t^r,) 

TABLE III. 

Of the different Sounds of i. 

N. B. Italic t and y in monofyllables, do every 
where, in this work,, fignify the found of ac- 
cented long / ; as in m/nd, my: But in words 
of more fyllables than one, without the accent, 
or the long over them, they always have the 
found of unaccented long ^, as in imaginary. 

The found of long / is denoted by 

ei ch. As in wther, he/ghth, ne/cher, fle/ght. 

ey o. hey-day. 

eye o. eye. 

i f. find, h/nd, kmd, m^'nd. 

ie f- corapl/es, d^nfes, mult/plfcs. 

^ f. life, Ime, pr/mc, t/me. 

ui a guile, gnide, guife. 

uy , o.- buy. 

y f. iny, thy^ comply, ally. 

yf£? 



Appendix to the IntroduSiion. 51 

\ f. As in chyle, Ijre, r^me, t^yme, tj'pc. 
7c ch. djrc, Ijc, tjrc* 

The found of fliort i by 

c f. As in england, enginp, prettjr- in the 

unaccentei cm and tn^for the fre^^ 
pojition in, as in embark, em- 
bellilh, embroidery, enable, en- 
chant, encourage, &fr. and in the 
termination en, as in garden , 
linen, pi^llen, woollen. 

ce a. breech, ^r, brich. 

i f. in, it, thin^ vific. 

l^ f. ^ive, live, miflive, mc'tive. 

ic o. fieve. 

o. onion (in or un) women (wim.) 

oi ch. avoirdwpofs, porpoife, tortoifc, 

u o. b6(y (biz) bustnefs (biz.) 

m ch. build, guild, guilt. , 

y f. fymptom, fynijfg^gue, fyftem* 



TABLE IV. 

Of tbi different Sounds of o^ 

The found of long e is denoted by 

an o. As in d/baur^^ee (b^) hautboy (hO 

hautgmit (hflg^.) 
aw o, bofcatoen (fco). fcataen C^ca.) 

F z. caa 



52 Appendix to the Introdudtion^ 

tau ch. -^i/»beau (be?) beaufet(b^) hut^Mi 

( x6) Beauclerfc ( ho) Beaufort ( ho. ). 
cw o. few (fi?) fewer (fticer) (hew (fti^) 

ftrcw (ftr^.) 
b^ld, fort, hefly, fol)er. 
approach, cc^ach, ^ak, ^ar.. . 
d^e, foe, xoty fl^e, foe, t^e, w^c. 

tfb^'de, m^re, ^de, ft^re, 

d^or, fl^or, m^er, alfo moor. 

am^r, cemrfe, c^urt, d^gh, four, 
g^urd, m^uld, m^lt, m^urn, p^ulr, 
poultry, poultice, ih^tdder, find. 

gr^tpth, iBtftii, ^Ji, follM *, pr^tol^ 

The found of ftiort o by 

0. Ai in ya^t, yot. 
o. cauliflower (col.) 
ch. gfogr^phjy, geometry, bludgeon, pi- 
geon, fiirgeon, fturgeon,^ wigeon. 
o f. odd, on, fong, throng. 

0&? - , X 

^ o. gone, one (won.) 

m 

* Though the w is qaiefcent in unaccented termi- 
nations in 0W9 as in folltftOy halb&i, wall^to ; yet if 
a termination is added, beginning with a vowe]» then 
the w is founded; not in the fyllable with the pre* 
ceding o, but as the firfl letter of the following fyl- 
|able ; as in f61Wer» halbwedj wallowing. If uie 
preceding o is accented, the w is not founded^ even 
when fuch a termination is added, as in blAier, kn^to- 
ing, fabied> f^toing. 

Ott 






f. 


€>a 


f. 


oe 


ch. 


oOf 
finx 


f. 


00 


0. 


ou 


ch. 


ow 


f. 


owe 


f. 


s 


0. 


au 


0. 


€0 


ch. 



Appendix td tbfi IntroibiSion. :■ 53' 

ou ch« jIs in cough (coflF) gough iS^jS) 

hough (hoffj trough (troffT) 

The found of long acute o by 

eo o. As in George, gcorgics. 

o £ broth, cloths, coft, croft, loft, lotlis 

moth, taroth ; and general^ he- 
fore r and fome other ccnfonants^ 
as in border, dormant, order. 

ou o. b&ight, brSi^ht, fooght, nought, 

ooght, sooght, thought, tvrought. 

TABLE V. 
Of the Sounds iif oo or u. 

The long found of 00 or « is denoted by 

ch. As in gSld, alfo gdd, r^m^val, t?mb, 

wSmb, d^, t^, irii^, toh^m. 

oe o. fhoe, canoe. 

off? 

r^ ch. 15fe, mJvc, prJve, behSve, triiJfe* 

00 f. brood, food, pool, tool, too. 

ou ch. accoutre, louvre, cofid, iho^d, 

wof Id, caro^fe, bo^fe, p$^, toifr, 
through, yo^, yo^r, yo«th. 

x^ ^ f. cr^de, intrftfde, pri?de, r«de, rale, 
^ ' magn/tirde, multitirde. 

u f, b^U, bainpQ, bafli, barfhel, c«ckoo, 

f«ll, pill, pHihy pafs J andgene- 
rally when long^ after d, j, 1, n, r. 



54 Appendix to the IntroduBim. 

s, and t, as in durable, Jiine, !»• 

m/nous, nutrition^ r^ral, f^perb, 

t«Iip. 
ue ch. As in blfe, diFe, imbr/^e, pti^e; f«e, 

r5c, trie. ^ 

HI ch« brtfife, br^, cmlfe, fr^it^ j^ce, 

flfice, fAt. 

TABLE VI. 

Q/* thi differmi 'Sounds of u. 

Englifh long u is denoted by 

cau o. Js in beauty. 

cu f, neiitcr, xteum, grandeur. 

cw f , . Tew'el^ jewel, new, pew^ 

ewe o. ewe. 

ieu o. Dleu^ lieq. 

iew o. view. 

u f. b^gle, c«rtfte, ft^ture, argnrmenr, 

h»rnan^ muiudX^ P^P*U and gi^^ 
neralljy when long, afttr b, c, £, 
g hardy h, m, iir»^ p, ^i in thefe 
examples. 

ue ch. aguQy c«e, hiie, imb^ey refc^^e, fpa^rc. 

^ !• ci^re, imm/^re, p^re, a^le. 

. fShort u by 

e f. w4f /» her, person ; and frequently ^e^ 

. . fore r ^»i another • eonfonant^ 
ca ch» heard, carljy j /^r(7/L hurd, utly. 



1 



Appendix to the. IntroduSmu 5 5 

i ch. Js in bird, dirt, fir, firm, firft, 

ibirt, fquirt, thirds thirty ^ pron. 
burd, 6fr. 

ch. attorney, bofpbj, borage, boraigh, 
• bofom, Bromly, brfther, colour, 
colonel (cur) conifits, comfort, 
' ^ company, compafs, conry, con- 
ftable, covenant, cover, cover, 
CQVcy, cozen, dove, dozen, for- 
ragC;, front, goverji, graveling, 
honip^*, hover, Lontjon,- Mon- 
day, money, monger, n^jongrel, 
monk, monkey, month, mon- 
mouth, mother, nothing, onioii, 
other, Gvrn, plover, pomel, 
po/i&er, romage> (hovel, floven, 
fmother^ Somerfet^ son,, sove^- 
clan, ftomac??, thor^ugh,^. ton, 
tongw, woman, won, wonder, 
word, work, worm, worftip, 
worftcd, wort, worth, 

^ ch. come, done,^ dove, glove, love, 
^'•^ some. 

00 o. blood, flood, soot. -. > 

qu . f. countr;^, couple, courage, cour/er, 

courteous, court>zan, cmnejyy 
coufin, double, drought (druft) 
flwrifbj hftufctoite^ jcurneji, naur- 
ift), rough (ruff) flough (ilufF) 
alfo flou i fcourge, louple, touch, 
tough (tuffj trouble 5 and in 

unac- 



56 Appendix to the IntroduSHon. 

unaccented termmaims in our and 
pus, as in fivour, precious. 

TABLE Vil. 
Of the Diphthongs. 



Dipbtbcngs. 



eu 




eou 









•cau 





■ 




eu 


i 






ew* 


f 


eu 


< 






¥ 


ewe 







5s 


• 




* 


•0 


icu 







"O 


• 






£2 


jew 


o.g 


lb 



a 




OS 




«0 ( 


oi 


f 


01 


^oy* 


f 




tuoy 







lou 


f 


ou 


cow* 


f 




r 


• ■» 

1" J 






Exampks. 

r/ghteous, as iffpeU rlteufs. 

beauty. 

Europe, grandeur, neuter. 

dew, few, few el, jew, jew'cL 

ewe. 

EHeu, lieu. 

view. 

fierce, pierce, tierce. 

boil, coil, oil, foil, toiL 

coy, employ, loj^al, ro^al. 

buoy, buoyant. 

found^ ground, mount. . 

cro^Mn, pow er, tow'cr. 

cucumber (cou.) 



* The w, ending diphthongs, has the found of « ; 
and y doing the fame, has that of e ; and if the follow* 
ing letter of the next fyllable of the fame word is 
a vowel; they are alfo conibnants» beginning that 
fyllable. Thus the words jew el, pow'er, loyal, roy'al, 
fiiould be pronounced as if fpelt jeu-wel> poa-wer» 
loy'-yal, roy'-yal. 



TABLE 



Appendix to the IntroduBOon^ 57 

TABLE VIII- 

Of dijfonant and irregular Confonants. . 

chfor ih. C&arlotte, cbdxk^ cbarnin^ chatnddc^ 
cbzxnpdancj csipucFinCf cbevaYitr^ 
cbevzut (vd) de fr/ze, macbHae. 

gh for ff. Laugh (laff) cough (coS[) draught 
(draft) drought (druft) al/o drouth 
enough (enuflFj al/o ^noV, gough 
(go^ hough fhofF) rough (ruff) 
flough (fluffy tough (tufi^ trou^ 
(tro?;. 

Se^ ihi Ruin anarmng C9 g} s, and tfa. 
Jmgukr ^Aci\6amay r/dron, ctncireaj rifs, 
hifd c. 3 &el^ton, j2reptics f^/v«. 
Irregular I Gew, gttft, ^Id, |vlt, jfet, |«Vw 
ifrtfr^/g. } gaws, j'ibberifh, gibbous, ^iddjr, 
- J^ift, ^ig, J^iggle, filbert, ^uild- 
h511, fills, ^imp, ^imblct, be^in, 
Gideon, ^ird, girder, girdle, jfirl 
(gerl) ^irth, five, f ivcn, jfizzard, 
together. Haikl* g in the end of 
words, having a termination be- 
ginning with e, i^ or y, added, 
remains hard j as in bring, brin; - 
eft, brinfer, bringing, ftringi 
ftrin^ed, ftrin^. 

^7fi^r \ ^"^^ ^''^' ^*'^' ""'^^ ^"'•^•^ 

Irregular 



J 



58 Appendix to the Intn^duEiiim, 

Irregular 1 B^^ye, c^yc, ch/z/fe, dec«|/e, d^crA/c, 

i&^r^ s. J d^, doii/c, ^ee/c, gr^, hou/c, 

incr?a/e, lou/e, rnou/&, r//e, fouye, 

. ij/e, refo/f , redufc^ dc^kte, d^l- 

t^ry, &c. In the prepoficion dls, 

accented before a vowel ; as in 

* df/afFefted, df/appcinted, di/ip- 

* purred. In the end of words,' as 
in this, ti^vis^ us ; and after c, f, 
Ic, p, and t, as in phyficj, briefi^, 
feekx, fupj, put/ ; and in the end 
of Latin and Greek words, as in 
f/ni/, hjpoth^fij, 

I^repihr 1 Ab/olve, c}6m/e, io/iars, &c. and 
foft s. J when preceding m in the middle 

and end of words ^ as in faiapt^ 
, t . . maU cq/h)etic, catf€hi/o>, ikkiipsf. 

Irregular \ Arli6ur,e/telbert5 an<J whe^ words 
Ji^d tb» ) beginning with hard th> baye a 

^prepoQtion, or endia^ \yith the 

fame, have a termination added ; 

as in tf/Hrft, atbwirty faUbfal, 

heal/i&fuL 
frngulttr 1 In the beginning of words ; as in 
Jofi tb. ) /£a<Q, /ifrat^ /i&if» /irSr» /£>em, /i&en, 

ib^notj /if re, /i&f fe, /i?^?F, /i^is, 

/i&ither, /i^^fe, /i&ou» /i^ough, /i^us; 

and in the end of words, as in 

henhf Jby he<{ueifty bootb^ {mooib^ 

tuffCditb. 



TABLE 



Appendix to the IntroduStien^ 5g| 

TABLE IX. 

Of Words with quiefcent Confonants. 

b Is quiefcent in bdcllfum, bomb, c^mB, 
crumli, def»t, doubt, dumb, plumb, thumb. 

c In Gloucefter, ind/ct, Lricefter, muftle, per- 
fect, verdict, victuals, W5tceftcr 5 in the fame 
fyllablc after s, and before e and i, as m 
d^fcend, li^ne, fcfcnce, fclat/c^, fciCrarsj 
>^ and before k, as in quick, thick, ftick. 
ch In i^d«le, f*i/m, fc|)l/mat/cal, dra^m. 

d Is quiefcent in ribbanti, hante6me,w^rWy. 

g In the fame fyllable before n, as in af- 
sfgn, cond/ani consfcn, dSgn, dtfs/cn> 
fBan, foreign, cnat, gnaw, fln^n\on, en- 
s?iBn, m^l/cn, rFicn, f^n^or, s/jprn, r«/an, 
iovereicn ; and in the termination ing, 
as in reading, tor^tinis, &c. which alfo 
may be founded, 
gh Always when both are in Roman letters, 
as in high, m/gh^, n/gh. 

h In tSr, i^irefs, Joneft, honour, Jerb, jK)ur, 
*«mour, Sofiler, gl^iTft, Jojn, n/jil, annf- 
^Ute, v^ement : often after c, in which 
cafe c is always hard, as in c!>am, cl^ioj, 
cfjaraflrer, c*iron, cf^a/m, citmixa^ c|&f- 
rurg/cal, cjoir (quire) cjjoler, coolie, 
cjorifter (quer.) cfj^rogr^phj^, c^^'ruj, 
c|>ri/m, Cf^n'ft, O&riftian, Cj^rift^pher, 
cjjronical, cl^ronicle, cl^r^nobgy, Cl^ryf- 

oftom, 



6o Appendix to the IntroduElion. 

oftom, c^le, c^ymift, fcl^lar, fcMaftic, 
fc|>^l/utn : Always after r in the fame 
fyllable, as in rl^p&d^, rj^nifh, rl^t^ric, 
rl^um, iteumatic, ri^fnoc^or, r^i/barb, 
ri^me : Sometimes after t, as in A'n- 
t^^njy, Dor^tj^, £'ft]^r, pi^ci^ific, Tj^ma^ ; 
and always after a vowel in the end of 
words, as in ai^ ! Ja^, J#b^Va|^, Ma- 
nafief^, Mefs/al^ o\ ! 

k In the fame fyllable before n, as in inap, 
inapfack, kn^ve, in^d, knee, ineel, 
knell, knife, kn/ght, knit, knob, knock, 
knuckle ; and after c in the end of 
words, as in phyfick, publick, which k 
in words of Latin and Greek original, 
is now commonly dropt, in fpelling. 

1 Is quiefcent in almond, bSk, Briftcl, caff, 
cJik, chJik, Cholmonliejey, coiJid, fJicon, 
Lincoln, psalm, salmon, fh^^ld, ftJlk, 
tJlk, wJik, wo5ld, vault. 

n In the fame fyllable after 1, and m ; as in 
kiln, miln, condemn, column, damn, 
hymn, limn, folemn, 

p In r^c^t, cup-b(7ard, psalm, ^x(Aomy. 

s In /Cle, /fland, Carl/fle, demffne, v/fcount. 

w In fto^rd, ftooon ; before ho^* as in toh^, 
toh^le, tohJm, toh^re, toh^fe *, and before 
r, as in torap, torJth, tor/a/^, toreck, 
toren, torench, hircft, toreftle, toretch, 
tor/ggle, tor/ght, tnring, torinckle, lorift, 
torite, terete, torong, torought, tory. 

4 Some 



Append to the IntroduSlion. 6i 

I 

Some Observations 

On tJfe Sounds pf the Vowels in Monofyllahks^ 
whereiy a Stranger may form a probahli 
Guefs of tbem^ and may more eafily retain 
tU Pronunciation he acquires^ hy the help of 
this Book. 

I. Single vowds in monofyllables, ending 
with one, or more confonants, are, for the ' 
mod part, ihort ; as in at, belt, ftrengtb, 
fling, prompt, burft, ^'gypt. 

Except I. That a is broad after w^ and 
wh; as in v^Jnt, war, wJs, w£{h, whirl, 
vihat; and afcer qu, as in quiff, quilm, 
quart, quiih, quit, except quack ; and be- 
fore Id, as in ild, bild, fcild ; Ik, as in 
b^(k, cilk, chilk, ftiik, tilk, wifk ; 11, as in 
ball, call, fill, gill, hill, mill, pill, fmill, 
Iquill, (hill, ftiil, till, will ; It, as in hilt, 
Q^lc, lilt ; and before Is, as in filfe. 

Except 2. That a is long acut^, before 
\ and m, and fome other confonant ^ as in 
ciif, baif, calm, itsaUn, arm, charm, harm, 
large, 8cc. * . 

Except 3. That i is long before gh ; as 
in high, m'gh, Cgh, thxgh, fight, fcnight, 
light, might, night, right, fight, tight, 
vright, loright ; before Id, as in child, 
Quid, wild, except gild; nd, as in bind, 

G blind. 



:6z Appendix to the IntroduBitm. 

blrnd, f/nd, h/nd, kmd, m/nd, r/nd, w/nd-^ 
alio in {/sn. « 

Except 4. That o is long before Id, as in 
b^ld, c^ld, f(9ld, g^ld, h^ld, m^ld, fcdd, f^^ld, 
'Wld, w^ld; n, as in dr^ll, N<?ll,,p^lJ, r^B, 
•ftr^ll, loVi'y !r, as inc^lt, drft, h^It, jrft, ni<?lt, 
p^ltj o is alfo long in c^mB, ford, p^rk, 
•ftoorn, fort, p^rt, fp^rt, g!?^ft, h^ft, m^^ft, p^ft. 

Except 5. That o founds 00, in xSmfe, 
g^ld, t5mb, toh^m, w5mfr. 

Except 6. That o is k)ng acute before r, 
and s, followed by fome other confonant^ 
as in- lord, sort, fr5ft, c5ft. And 

Except 7. That ti founds 00, in b511, fiJH, 
.p«ll, b«fh, p^(h, and p«fs. In moft other 
cales, fingle vowels, before final conibnants, 
in monofyllables, are (hort. 

II. All founded final vowels are long; as 
-in b^, mf, th^, w^, yf, b^, h^, 1^, n^, &, by, 
nry, ply, try, &c. 

HI. Moft vowels in monofyllables, pre- 
ceding final filent e, whether immediately, 
or before an intcrveningconfonant, arc long ^ 
as' in R/je, die, r^e, tr«e, dje, m<»dc, mtfre:^ 
nde, r^be, r«le, c^le ; except that they are 
Ihort, in give, have, live, one (won), gone, 
come, done, dove, glove, love, (hove, some ; 
fo alfo is the i, in the terminations ine and 
ive, in words of more fyllables than onci 
as' in examine, m^'tive, &c. 

IV. Moft double vowels have the firft 
vowel long, and; the laft quiefcent ; . as in 
maidj^^an, feen, pl/es^^ar, t«it, djes. 

Except 



f Appendk to' tbi IntroduEHoti^ 6 j. 

I Except I. The following, which have the 
I ftcond vowel long, and the firft quiefcent ; 
I the ctf, in br^r, bre^k, grr^t, pe^r, fte^k, 
I fwtfr,.tc0r, wet^r \ the \e in fi^ld, nifce, pri^IL 
I fbi^Id, &c. the ti in he/ght, fle/ght ; the of^ 

in Ciwld, fho^ld, wo^d, bozFfe, po^r, to^r, 

y«tf, yo^r, yof th ; and the uy in btry. 
Except 2, That ou before gh founds long 

acute 05 in bought, fought, nought, 5ught, 

fought, thought, ivrought. Aiid 
Except 3. All the Ihort double vowels; 

as in bread, friend, flood, couple, build. 

V, The three diphthongs, eu, oi, ou, 
however fignified, or where ever placed, are 
long; as in Jew, view, oil, boy, buoy, 
mount, brow, crown. Once more 

VI. Englifli monofyllables contintrc to 
Jiave the Tame founds, wiien prepofitions; 
or terminations are added to them, which 
they had in their primitive ftate ; as in un- 
mindful, fisimenefs ; and in thefe cafes, the 
accent is upon them, and not on thefe ad- 
ditions, as in thefe examples •, except when 
there is a manifeft antithifis, as in ftorn, 
ikthoTTk^ juft, unjuft : Without an an- 
tithifis^. the accent is laid thus, ioxti\o6xx\^ 
unjuft. ^ , ' 



Gr TABLE 



64 Append u the Intraiu^m. 



T A B L E X. 

Of Words alike in founds hut different^ both in 

Senfe^ and Spelling. 



Ail, totroulk 
jflCy drink 

Sl\^ none wanting 
AwU the Jhe-maker^s 

Afcent, goif^ up 
Aflent, (ftbemnd 

IbsLilj furety 
btflc, of goods y of a 
pail 

Bald^ wittont bakr 
BawPd, erfd wt 

Birkofa tree 
Barque» a Utile Jbip 

B^9 to sgoofi. 
Beau (b^) a fop 
B^iv, toflmt iviib 

Btffe, uncovered 
JBwr, to carry ^ a wild 
heafi 

Baize, a cloth 
Bays, bayleavesyor bay 
borfes 



R»/&, mean 
Btffs, in muftc 

B/an, pulfe 
Been, ^^i participle 

Beer, to drink 
Bier, /(?r carrying tbt 
dead 

B6rr)f, ayr»// 
B«ry \)siix) the dead 

B^e, did beat J a hole 

B^ard of wood 
B^r^d ^ i&^/; 

Bough of a tree 
Bow, to bend 

fioy, 4? male child 
Buoy, /0 ^^tfr up 

Brake, a wild plant 
Hxtak in pieces 

Bread to eat 
Bred, brought up 

Borough, 



appendix to the IntroduSlion. 65 
Bor^gh, a timn C6mip\emtnt in giom' 



Burro^for rabbits 

But,'tf conjunHion , 
Butt of beer 

Btjf, with money 
By, a prepofition 

CJH aloud 

Caul of the bowels 

Cawl of a wig 

* 

Can, aux. verb 
Cann, to drink out of 

Cannon, a great gun 
Canon, a rule 

Canvas cloth 
Canvafs, to fear cb into 

Chair, to fit on 
Clwrc, a job of work 

Cclhv for iiquor * 
%k\\tr\ one that felts ^ 

Ceftion, a giving up, 
Sfflion, a ^f ting 

CTeling of a room/ 
SeAing of a letter r 

CiolcTy anger 
CSAav for tbe neek-' 

eiaufe of a fentence- 
Qaws of a bird 



etry 

Compliment, a falu* 
tat ion 

Qovixk of things ' 
C^arfe, tot fine 

Cozen, to cheat 
Coufin, a relation 

Cmk, to make a noife ■ 
Qvtc\i of the Jhore ' 

Cyon of a tree 
S/on, a mount -' 

Cr^ife, ^ failing to and - 

H ... 
Cr«fe, a ftnall vej/el 

Cygnet, ayoungfwM ^ 
Signet, a ftnall feal - 

D^ne, a Danijh man ^ ^ 

vioman - 
DScn, to condefcend - 

I>ay of the week ^ 
EGj, an African mH^ 
gifirate ^ 

Dam, a brute mother^'' 
Damti, '/^ condemn > 

Deir^ not cheap ' 
Deer dfiifark': 

D/e, to depjdrt thts Uft' 
Dyc^ to ftjfiin cloth- 



G^ 



V 



ISk 



66 Afpmdk t9 the Tnfradu^iim 

Tiitt, irtaiful Vo\i\,fiUbf 

"Dytty toboftains tiotb Fowl, a bird 

t 

D3» U perform GaXL $ftbi Sver 

Dure, owif^ Gaul, a French man 

Docy tie buck's femle G\\t mtb geld 

Pwgh, unhaVdpisfie Guilt of fin 

Done, performed Gwte, for the fire 

Dun, cohar Gxtax^ not litik 

fanctofiiewtbeweih Graitr of mttmegs 

/^ Greater, more great 

Fain, i»ouId gladfy ' Hail, to faluie 

FSiajn, to pretend H^k, to draw along 

Tsiint' hearted Hair of the head 
FSnt, a pretenfe ' * H^rc of tU field 

Fail", not'dark^ a great Hart, ^ «?j/^ i?^ 

market Heart ^t/" ^»y creature 

Fure, «>^//r/V^ pj^j^r^ ^,.^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

F6llQn, tf «?iW/&# H^re, in this place 

Felon, tf criminal Heard, ^V *^^ 

Fillip, on the nofe Herd ofcattte 

Philip, ii i«tf»V «j/»^ Hew with an axe 

Fir, //w^^r H«e, colour 

Fur ^ ^ jkin H»gh, a mm\s name 

Fl^ an infeff Hre, /^ h$0en 

Flee, /^ r«» jw^y H/gh, w/ /^w 

Flour of wheat Him, the pronoun 

Flow'er of the field Hymn, afacredfovg 

Fonh^outof Higher^ more h^h 

Fwnrth, jwr/^ ^^ r/ H/rc, w^^^j 



Appendix to the 

Ho I a word of calUng 
Hotj a garden impk- 
meni 

H^ar, froji 

iDh^re, a lewd womM 

Htfle in the wall 
loh^lc, all the farts 

Hoop of a barrel 
tohoop, a word vf iol- 
ling 

1, the pronoun 

^yCj the organ ofjight 

Tit of a church 
Ale, a fmall ijland 
ni, / will 

In, prepofiHon 
Inn of courts or en the 
road 

Indict, to charge at law 
Ind/ce, to one that 
writes 

J«i7, tryers of caufes 
Jcv/ry, the Jews re- 
Jidence 

iinave, a dijhonejl man 
Niive of a churchy or 
"Wheel 

itneW) did knoV9^ 
New, mt old 



IntrocniSlhn. 6y 

^night, or Baronet 
Night, not day 

fxv\o\»%y dots \now 
'iiok for fmelling 

L^de, to empty water 
Laid, cr put 

Lam, did lie 

L^ne, a narrow road 

Lead, metal ^ 
Led, did lead 

L^ak, $0 let water thro ^ 
Leek of the garden 

L/ar, who tells lies 
Lj)rer, who lies in wait 
Ljre, a harp 

U\rc\%of the body 
Limn, to^rawpiiiures^ 

Lineament of the body 
Liniment, awointment- 

laO ! behold 
luotxjiy not higB 

Made^ formed 
Maid, a virgin 

Mail, a coat of 
M^le, the he kind 

Main, chief 
Mane of a horfe 

M^an, 



Appendix to the IntroduSiion. 



68 

M^an, bafe 
Mien, carriage^ air 

Mtvfsfor hawks 
Mdc, the poet^s god- 
defsy to meditate 

M^at, to eat 
MteXjfty to come to 
M^tc, tomeafure 

M/ght, power 
M/te, an infeSl 

M^, more 

M^tD, to cut down- 

M^n, to lament 
M^ton, cut down 

M^at of water 
M^tc, of duft 

Nap, afhortjleep 
*^.nap ^» ^/(?/i& 

Nay, no 

N Jigh ^i /i^ borfe does 



O, vocative 

Ofce, /^ i^ indebted 

Of, ^ belonging to 
Offyfrom 

One (won) w/ /w^ 
Won, gained 

Our, pojfeffive pronoun 
Hour of the day 

Pail, /^ wij/^ 

P^le, f^/^«r, ofafenfe 

Parn, ^^i&/»^ 
P^ne of glafs 

P5fl, tf funeral cloth "■ 
Paul, /i&^ tfp^/^ 

Pair, /t£?^ of a fort ' 
Pc/ir, a fruit 

Peer, tf» ^jwtf/ in r^wrf 
Pier, harbour^ glafs 



Nell, <2 womar^s.name p/.^- ^ ^-^>, ^^^^ 



*nell 0^^ ^^// 

Nit, in the hair. 
1^n\i Jlockings 

Not> no 
ftnot, /yifi 

Oar of a boat 
Ore of metal 
*Ovt^ before 



Fern fait 

Plain, /(W;^/ . 
Pkne, in geometry 

Plait /A^ hair - 
Pkte, /<?r /i^e table 

Pkce, occupied fpaco 
VldACt, fiat ^ 

Pleas 



Appendix to the 

Yim oftbi crown 
PJ^c, to give pkafure 

Plough, the ififiru- 

ment ta 
Plow witb 

P^lc, a longfiick 
U\ the bead 

Poor, the indigent 
^minafiream 

PraSice, ufe 
Praflifc, to i^ 

Pray, to ajka favour 

Prey, taken 

f raife, commendation 
^^^yhrequefts 

PrQphet,^ teacher from 
God 

Qu/rc of paper 

Choir (qu/re) e?/ «^^ 

^^ of cloth 

'^^'n from heaven 
RSan^ /^ govern 

Raife, /(; //// «^ ^ 
^^ysofBght 



IntroduBum. 6gr 

Rccd, or cane 

Read, ^ read 
Red r^/(Pffr 

R^ar, /tf raife up 
R^re, ^ft&wrf 

Reft^^w labour 
iweft, /^ /tfittf hyforct 

Retch, toflretch 
toretch, « miferahk 
perfon 

R/ce, tf ^tf/» 
R//c, the rijing . 

R/e, tf grain 

tory, crooked 

Rime, /r^ 
R^me, w^/r^ 

Ring/?r the finger 
toring, ^^ pf»^i> 

R/ght, »^/ wrtf«^ 
Rite, a ceremony 
tw/ght, ^« carpenter 
torite w//^ tf ^tf» 

R^, ^r way ^ 
R^de, did ride 
R^tQ'd„ did roy; 



TO Appendix to the IntroduBtom 

R«>e, a deer Sight €f the eye 

Rtfto a boat^ or rank 

R(?te, ^ heart' 



ftr^ce, did write 

RJmev /i&^ city, of 
Room of a houfe 

Kood of an acre 
RikIc, unpolifl^'d 



SitCy^tuation 
Gte, iefope a court cfi 
law 

S/cn or token 
S/ne, in geometry 

Sink, «^»^^r water 
Cinque, fve 

Slc/ght (jT ^<^»^ 
Rough(ruff)»<?/>^t?/* sk'ght, notftrong^ dif^ 
Ruff,./flr /A^ neck regard 

Sail ^ ^ fhip Sl^, a wild plumh - 

SdlCy felling S\otD, not quick 

Seas J large colleGion of Sa^Jn this manner 

waters Sot of beer 

Sees, . doe^ jee Se to feeds 

Sdze, to lay hold of s^al. a flatfifh 



S^am, lard^few*d 
Seem, appear 

S^ar with a hot iron 
S^cr, a prophet ■ 

Stent of the ft age 
Seen, beheld' 

Scent, fmell 
Sent, ij another 

Sh5e /<?r //&^ /t?^/ 
Shew, to expofe to view 

Shontj.didjhine 
Shown, . wtf J /hewed ' 



S?le, ^»/y, alone 
Sonl of a man 

SonVj to mount up 
S^re, fmarting 

Some, more than one^' 
Sum of money 

Son of a father 
Sun, in the heavens 

S^ar'd, did mount 
Stwrd, hiked 

Stair, of a houfe 
Sti^re, /tf /i?^^ earnt/lTy 

Sunl 



A^endix to the IntroduBion. 71 
'Stnlfrm another To\d a tale 



Sted, hardened iron 

St^ar, ayoiing bullock 
Steer ajhip 

St/'le of afield 
Spfle in writing 

^txm^ narrow 
StrSght, not crooked 

Subti], crafty 
Suttle, w^fg'i/ 

TdAlofan animal 
Tflle /i6tf/ /J told 

Tacks, tJw^j// »^7/7j 
Tax, the king^s 

'itm af hor/es 
Teem, /^ bring forth 

Tflre, weight 
^uv in pieces 

Th^, /^^ ariicU 
thee, '^i^ pronoun 

TfiSr, tf pronoun 
There, i« /i&<?/ //^ r^ 



ToQ of the foot 

T^ad, /? creeping thing 
T^lo'd, draw^d along 

Tray, /^r »ift7/ ' 
Trfr, three 

Vail, perquijite 
V/jle, ^ -y^Z/gr 
Vfll, ^r covering 

Vain, /^ »^ purpofe 
V^ne, /tf yZf^sc; ii^ 

weather 
V3n, ^ blood-veffel 

Und5 Wi&^/ /j ^^w 

C/fe, /^ w^^^ «/^ ^/ 
l^yfit^^ female fheep 

Wtfde in iJbater 
VfeigWdinfcalej 



nroK^afeatofJiate Wain, ^ «;/2|^^« 



T5, a prepojitiou 
Too, 4^ 

I^^} in number 



Vfzit^ for J or upon one. 
Weight of any thing 

yfdy^ or road 

W^'^j a certain weight 



^2 Appendix to 

W^ak, not fircrg 
\Veck,yeT;^» days 

Wct^/r, clothes 
WmY% to be fdd 

WJrc all prefent 

Whfal, cfimpk , 
Wheel of a carnage 



the IntroduSiion. 

Wood of trees 
Would, aux. verb 

Yarn, fpun 

Yearn, to commferaie 

Yoi?, the pronoun 
Yew, tf /r^tf 
Ewe, a female Jheef 



TABLE XL 

Of Words ^ alike in Speiling^ iut different hotb 

in Senfcy and Sound. 

N. B. Thofe with the accent on the firft (yl- 
lable, are verbal nouns ; thofe with the ac- 
cent on the laft Tyllable, are the verbs from 
whence thefe nouns are derived. 



Nouns Verbs 

A'bfent Abfent 
A'bftraa Abftraft 
A'ccent Accent 
A'ttn'btttc Attribute 
Cerficnt Oment 
Collcft CoHedt 
Compound Compound 
Concert Concert 



Conflift 
Con fort 
Conteft 
ContraA 



Conflift 
Consort 
Conteft 
Contraft 



Nouns 
Convert 
Convidt 
Defert 
E'xp^rt 
E'xtr^a 
t'erment 
Frequent 
Trnp^rt 
Tncenfe 
O'bjea 
Premife 
Prefent 



Verbs 
Convert 
Convift 
Defert 
Exp^'rt 
Extract 
Ferment 
Frequent 
Imp/rt 
Incenfe 
Objea 
Fr^m/fe 
Fcrfent 

Trojtft 



Appendix to the Introdu^ion, 73 



i\kw Verbs 

Prdjeft Prqedt 

Rebel R^bel 

Record Record 

iuk Rrf«fe . 



Nouns Verbs 

Subjcd Subjed 

Torment Torment 

Tranfp^rt Tranfp(?rt 

t/'nitc JThite 



Miscellaneous Words, 
flw/>rf <j^w/y in Spellings but different Senfesi 



t -^ 



Conjarc, verb. 
Extent, noun 
Gallant, noun 
Loq/e, adj. . 
Minute, »«//» 



Cloky verb 
Conj«re, verb 
E'Xtant, adj. 
Gallant, adj. 
L5fe, verb 
MFn^^te, adj^ 



TABLE. XIL 

0/ remarkable ScRipf ure Names, 



I. 



In the Old Teftament. 



Aon . 
•^ednrg^ 

/bel 

-^flther 

A'b/crail 

o 

^iav?lec5 
ift/Qiag 
Affhai 
A'bncr 



^'bn*am y^Taph 
A'bfalom yf>?« 
A'dam Affyria 
/f'hab Biai 
Ahaiuevus Bibel 
yf' baz Babylon 
./fb^jal» Balaam 
y^itd^phel Bilak 
^'moj BarzUlai 



Bith(\xeha 
B/l/al * 
BeMhazar • 
B^naia^ 
Bethel 
B^az 
Ciin 
Cidldea 
C^'leb 
C4naan 



74 Appendix ta the IntroduBion. 



Cinaan 
Cjfruj .. 
Dan 

Dan/el 

• 

D^r/uj . 
Dithan 
Divid 
Deb(?raft 

Deutero- 
nomy 
D/nai^ t 
Do'eg 
Eb^n/zer 
E'den 
£'dom . 
E'glon 
£'gypt 
Eccl^fiaft^s 
E\eazzv 
EM 

E'l/phaz 
EM^a 
E^ndor 
jE'noclr 
£'fau 

£ve 

Euphrit^s 
E'xd>dwj 
Ezekkl 
E'zra 



Gad 

Gath 

Giz^ 

Gehiz? 

Gen^fii 

Gerizim 



Jcfl> 

Je/»run 

Jezebel 

Immani^el 

J(?ab 

J^b 



Gibeonltes Joel 
Gideon JonaJ^ 
Golidi Jon^chan 
Gvecia JoCcph 
Htf bakkuk J6{hua . 



Manhi 

Medea 

Men>phiJ 

Methufehi 

M/cJacl 

M/c|>aj) 

M/ci^al 

Mir/am 

Mordecai 

M(?l>s 

Ni^iman 



Hagar 


Joshp 


Nibal 


Haggai 


/Taac 


Niboth 


Ham 


Kzid^ 


Nidab 


Haman 


r(hb(?fheth N^hor 


Hannai^ . 


rihnwcl 


Nihum 


H^ziel 


rzrael 


Ntfo'm? 


H/brew 


TzwelFces 


Napthijir 


H^man 


TflicKr 


Nithan 


Hez^kiat 


J«da* 


Neb«cjiad- 


H<?reb 


Ke/la» 


nezzar 


Ho\ea, 


Ket^rajft 


Nehemfaj 


dcoh 


Kilh 


Nimrod 


Jiphcth 


Ko'ra^ 


Nin/v^ 


Jehofophat Liban 


Nefa» 


JaD 


Limecl) 


O'bed 


JehoValJ 


Le'a!> 


Ob^dial 


]ehu 


Lebanon 


O'phir . 


Jephth^ 


"L^evi 


Jerem/aft 


Levit/cuj 


-P/kal> 


Jeroboam 


Lot 


Pers/ans 


Jemfitlcm 


M<;na(i€~& 


Phiw!> 




• 


Phinw 



Jppendix to the IntroduSkon. 75 



Phjfl^ar R»th 


Seth 


Tekoa 


Pot/phar S^b/ans 


Sh/baj^ 


Tev3p 


I9safms Samfon 


Shcm 


VafhiF 


RMifka» Sam2^^ 


Shemel 


I/r/aU 


Richel Sanballot 


S/hon 


tJ'zzaf> 


R^becctf Siraj 


Sini«)n 


2idoc 


R^h^btfam Saul 


Si/ew 


Zeb^lon 


Reuben Sennaei^* 


Sobtnon 


Zed^k/a^ 


R/zia rib 


Tdmdx 


Zephu»n/a]^ 



2. In the New Teftament, 

A'baddon Berea Demas Feftu/ 
/ET\hs Beth6(da Demetvius Fonundtus 
^%abus B€ih\ehcm DTdtia Gabriel 
Alexander Bithinia D76tr^ph«sGad/zrens 
A'ndrcw Blaftoj Dorcas Gaius 
A'nn^ B^^nerg^s VionyjSus Galdtia 
A'nt/oc|^ Caiaphvis £liz^bech G^licians 
-^polloj Calvtfiy E'lymaj Gallic 
A'qii/l^ *C/fn^ ^ Emmiuj Gan)d\k\ 
Arcjappui Candi^ce E p^phrai Gerg^el^ns 
Auopdgus Capernaum jEp^phr^- Gog 
^i'^op^gFte Cedvon d/tuj - Golg^th^j 

Ar/m^th/^ Ccndrea Epanei\is GommorJ^ 
AUens CafYar Eph^fui Greece 
Aiiguftiu CUcph^ £ph/fians Herod 
Bar^c!)/aj C\oe Ep/c«r/ans*H^r^d/a^ 

B^rabbaj Corinth Ethedpia H^m/n^U5 
Barn^baj Corinthians Eunfcf Jambrw . 
Bartholomew CypriU EuUciuS J^mes, al/fi 

ommeyxs D^mafciu p^n^ -•' [J^ms 

H z Won 



76 Appendix to the IntroduSlion. 

Won 

Jojn 

foppj Merc2/r/ui l^te 
Mcfs/a^ Prifcilb 
Ntfthanicl QuJrtu/ 
Nazar^ne Ri/me 
Nazareth Redmans 
Nazar/ce S^mir/^i 
N ic^d/muj Sapph/r^i 
Nic^li/tanjSardii 
Ones/tnuj Saxtipta 
Oruiiph^- Sitan 
^ru/ Saul 
Pamphil/tf S^fv^ 
Scrgiui 



MiJtthfaj Philemon Smyrn^i 
Mclcbifcdcc Pontruj PI- Sodom 

Syr/i» 
Syr^ph^ni- 

cian 
Tcrtulluj 
T/trarc^ 
Th^oph/lux 
Thcffal^iw- 

ca 
Theflil^nj-* 

ans 
Thcudaj 
Ti^mai 
Nlac^d^nMPatmoi Sergiui Thyaxira 
Migog Paul [Patilui TFinAhf Ui 

Malciiui Pergnmoi S/don Timothy 
Mammon P/tcr S/laj T/tu^ 

Mark Phibdel- Silvinuf Tyre 
Marthtf ph/^ Sim^n Zacl^'ux 

Miry Phil/tui S/monMi-Zeb^dce 



• Aft 
Jordan 

J^Tcph 

Ifcir/ot 

J/zdai 

J«de 

L^^d^c/tf 
Lazaruj 
JLj/ctfcr 
L«ke 

Lyd/if 



Matchew Philip 



gUJ 



Z^robabel 



End g/'/ifi^ Appendix. 




A PRAC- 




Practical Discourse 

ON 

2 Tim. i. la. 

■■ *< U^h? hath abolifhed Death, and 



*' hath brought life and Immortal/ty to* 
" Light, through tbe GofpcL** 

LOVE t5 our Lord J etuis Cjrrft, greater 
/j&an id any (vblunary objedt, is ntccffary 
to evidence our intercft in him, and his faf* 
vition i for h^ has d^clircd, * H^ //feat loveth 
father, or mother, m^re /ian him, is not 
worthj of him ; and h^ /iat loveth-son, or 
Cughter, m^re than him, is not v/onhy of 
him. And in order to our loving him m^rc 
/Aan iheic^ or any other earthly thing, it is 
highly reqU/Gte, tbsit v/e (hmld take fr/quent 
and cl^ views of his love and goodnefs t^ 
\\s\ for without /i>em, love to him woild 
dtfclnie, as fire does, without the addition 
of few'cl i but fmous and fr/quent review's 
of his love,, will, through the concurrence of 

aMatth. X. 37,. 

Ha 0e 



( 78 ) 

the Spirit (fpcr) of Love, fupptfrt our love 
to him, as few'el fuppt>rteth f/rc. - And fur- 
ther, as without realizing views of the gU" 
r/ous r^wJrds, h^ will b^ftow' upon his ler- 
vants, w^ ttwild too read/ly flag in his fervice ; 
fi? it is highly exp/dient /i&at theft alfoj (ho^ld 
b^ fr/quentljf tiken by uj. And both thek 
things, his love to uj, and his gimous re- 
w^rds, w^ fhall have 6pport«nnj^ of r^view'- 
ing, in any i^table illuftrition, of /^^ words 
of our text^ in which w^ are"taught, ^i&at 
our Siviour Jefixs Cfirift ha$ ab61i(hcd death, 
and brought 1/fe and immortal/^ to 1/ght, 
through ibe gofpcl. ♦ May wh5t i^ here faid 
upon it, b^ abundantly eff/cicious to exdte, 
and &tingthm our love t^ him,, and our 
endeavours to ferve and honour him \ and fo 
liis heavenly Father, toha fent him, in ihe 
courk of our U'ves. 

. ' In difci^iirring from /Me words, I fliall, 
in ibe 

I. Pkce, fhew, Wh5t is implied in Cfrnft's 
aboiifhing death. 

II. Whtft, in his bringing I/fe and immor- 
tal/ty to light, through his gofpel. And 

III. I fliall Goncl^ide, with a few fz?ttable 
inferene«*. 

1. 5l&en I am to (hew, Wh5t is implied 
]Q CixiR^s aboli&ing deaths 



( 79 ) 

TMc words arc not to hs underftood, a^ 
if b^ drii vered his pwplefrom natural deaths 
6 thtthtt (ho«ld not die -, for it is appointed 
unto men once (wonce) to d/c * j and accor- 
dingly a\\ men d5, and will die, the good as 
well as the ungodly , except tbof^ ib^t (hall b^ 
found tfl/ve at his fecund coming, toho (liall 
not d/e, but (hall b^ changed ^ 72^fre are 
tberifovt other fenfi?s, in which C^r/ft has 
aboliflied dearii /ifcan fbis •, and /Me / Ihall 
ict brfore yoa. 

I. Tien, Or/ft has ft abolifhed natural 
death, tbzt it (hall not hurt uj, if w^ are his 
fa&iful and ^b/Jient p/ople. 97>ij is ^ very 
rasonable fenfe of ibe original word (xarrrp- 
yDVavTOf) in /i6i:f pl^ce, which generally sig- 
niffes, to render vain, or uneffeft^al 5 for 
when death, considered as an enemy^ is vain 
and unefFe6l«al, it does not hurt ui, or da 
u^ r/al damage. Death is hurtful, when fbe 
ihoaghts of It fill men with diftreffing, and 
unprofitable dread ; or when it drags tbtm 
«way from /i^Sr.prefent enjoyments, without 
intr^acing tbcm to better -, or when it be- 
comes an inlet int5 f«t«rc punifhment: And 
in all thek r^fpeftj, natural death hurt^ tbe 
finally impenitent, and ungodly. But Ctrift, 
hy his h«milii^tion, and ^b/dience unt5 death,, 
kas, according ti fbe gracious appointment 
of his heavmly Father, obtained tbe pardon 
of ^11 his pAplf's fins ; and iberchy has fo; 
^ Heb. ix.zj^ *^ i Cor, xv. 91. 

disarmed 



. I 8a > 

disarmed death of its fting, which is fin, thzt 
though it may poffibly annoy tbttn with fit 
imz^inary £?ars, it cannot hurt tbeth with 
tie juft dread of future punifhment : And 
^ven tbck imaginary f^rars, might b^.generally 
In a grtat meafure, and sometimes tDh^Ily^ 
prevented or r^m^ved, by a proper regard t5 
his death, in a c^urfe of regdar obedience ;, 
for he is faid to have died ^, tb^t he might 
deliver tbem^ v/ho through the f^ar of death, 
w?re 511 tlexT l/fet/me, fubjeft to bondage* 
And as h^ is tbe author of eternal falvation, 
t^ 511 tbtm tbsLt obet him * ; and wJs givea 
by his heavenly Father, tb^t lDh5f(?ever b^- 
Ueveth on him, (hoiid npt perifh, but have 
everlafting life ^ ; though death rf m^ves fuch 
from some earthly enjoyments •, it ulhers 
tbcm in to inconcAvably m^re valuable; evm 
inta the joy of Cjrrft'j blifsful prefence, 
which is far better for tbttx)^ tb^n to continue 
h#re». S^ tbzt inftead of b^'ing lifers hy 
death, it becomes tbe occifion of tbeiv unr 
fp&kable gain. 

2. Ctriu. has abolifhed death, as h^ has 
li?c«red for his pAple, the utter abrfltion of 
nati^ral death, to commence 2,t their refurrecr 
tion. 5r^ough de^th, as /i?^ p/nal confirquence 
of A'dam's tranfgreflion, rflgneth over 511 
men, the godly as well as tbe wicked, yet it 
fliall not 51ways rSan ; for by our Lord J^ 

^ Heb. ii. \ 5. e Hcb, v. 9. ' Jphn iii. i^- 

• Phil. i. 21 J 23.. 

1 fUJi 



( 8i ) 

fui CMR^ both the godl^ and the wkked 
fhali b^ railed i^gain : But ib^ conditions a£ 
' the rcfurredion, (hall he very different ; for 
the godly Ihall rife to enjoy everlafting Itfe 
and happmefs, in tb^t bleded warld and ft^te, 
whJre tbetc (hJll b^ no m^rc death ; but the 
wicked Ihall r/fe, id be d^viiy condemned^ 
and punilhed for tbAx fins. S^ tb2X the ref- 
urredion of the r/ghteoiu^ ihall b^ c^ the 
gttat cncr«j/e of tbeir felicity ; but /iat of 
ungodly men, of ibeir mifery : and fbzt juft- 
Ij, D^caufe tbet wa^ld not in ibis life, /i^ac 
Cir/ft fho^id ir^«n ^Vcr fbcm ^^ Tb\s refur*. 
redion is brou0t»t ^bout b^ our I^ord J/fux 
C^rift ; for w^ arc exprefsly afTftred, * Tbzt as 
by man camt de^th, by man came alio ibe 
rcfurreftion of tbe dead j for as in , A'dam 
a\\ die, (a in Orift ihall all be made alive. 
His biirmil/ition unt^ death, has obtained 
tbis relbrition of mankind, from tbe gravt ;. 
and his divine pow'er (hall accomplifh it ; 
for ibe ^our is coming, in which all tbdX are 
\n $he gravis ihall b^ar his voice, and ihJll 
come f(?rth$ tbet tbzx havi^-done good, to 
tbe refurredtion of l/'fe, and tbet thzx. have 
done /vtl, xd tbe refurreftion of condemna- 
tion ^. And 

3. CiriA has abolifhed death, as h^ has 
tiken cffeftaal cave to- prevent iiis fai/iful 
p/pple*s end/iring iny of tbe diftrefs and ang- 
uiih, of the fecond death. St. Jobn d^- 

* Luke xix. 27. * 1 Cor. xv. 21, 22. k John v. 28, 29.U 

fcribea 



( 82 -) 

Tcr/bes the punilhmenw of the future ft^te, 
hytbis expreffion, when be fays, ^ The f/arf»l, 
and unbelieving, and murderers^ and toh^^'re- 
monjfcrs, and forcerers, and Fdol^zters, and 
a\\ 1/ars, (ball have their part in the l^ke, 
//&at burneth with fire and brimfti^ne, which 
is the fecond death. Now our blefled Si- 
v/otir exprefsljy promffifs, ^ TJbBt thok tohS* 
overcome (that is, the temptations of their 
fpir/t«al (fperj enem/es, ewi\ habitj, and other 
diff3fcuk/es in his fervice) (hJll not he hurt, 
of the fecond death. And well he co«ld ; 
for by his medialSridX interposition and of- 
fices, he has, and will deliver /i&em, from the 
tor5th t5 come ". And how ineffable^ bene- 
fit is it, id have th\s (ecohd death aboliJhed, 
ih refpeft of uj ! It is defer/bed not ^nly as 
in the ^bove quotioon, but by a worm tbzt 
d/eth not, and a fire tbzt is not quenched ** ; 
hy outer darknefs ; by weeping, and wailing, 
and cnafhing of teeth p ; and it is cJlled cvcr- 
lafting deftrudtion % and everlafting punifh- 
ment \ Immunity thertfore from it, muft 
at leaft, be an unconceivably grtdttr mercy, 
/Aan prefervition from the greiteft, poffible, 
temporal evils. I come now to the 

IV. General head, where / am to fhew, 
Wh^t is impl/ed in C|)r/ftV bringing bfe and 
immortal/t^ id 1/ght, through the gofpel. By 

. J Rev. xxi. 8. »nRev.ii. ii. » i Theff. i. lo. 
o Mark ix. 44. B Matt, viii. 12. 1 2 ThelT. i. 9* 
» Matt. XXV. 16.' 

Life 



( 83 ) 

Life h/rc, is ev^'dcntljr meant future cxiftenc 

and happincfs in heaven j and by Immorta!/i 
fienSrtidl continuance of iieic things ; i 
which t^^ether, are in ibe gofpel frequent 
cJJIed, Vernal life. And our Lord's brin^ir 
ikm to 1/ght, throirgh tb£ gofpel, impl/fs, 
I. Thai eternal Utt wJs but very impc 
fatly difcovered, before ibe publ/cicion of 
by the gofpel of our Sdviovr ; for when 
thing is faid to he brought to light, it is mcar 
/fat it wJs conc^ed ; or at xna&y very in 
perfectly kn^ion, till IfAat time. Mank/i 
indeed, feem in ^11 dges^ from ibe begi 
ning of ibe world, to have some expeftiti( 
of fl future ftatc of rdw^rds, as well as pu 
ilhmentj ; to which ibe hardftiipj of / 
rfghteoux, and ibefe often for thfir rfghteoi 
ncfs ; and the profperit^^ of the wicked, 
means rven of ibeir iniquities ; and me ; 
natural hijpej and fpars, upon d^ing good i 
evil, wfl^id mightily prompt ibctt). Nor d 
'^/ ^^'iginal word (<fb)Ticavrcs) h^re tit 
^tcellinly fuggeft any thing to ibe c6ntr<3 
for it as literally signiffes, to thrclo light up 
'^nncly, a fubjeft ahcAdy in part Tcn^ton 
^5 to make it plainer ; as to bring to b 
% thing, ^ItSfether unlnoinn. But m 
iiatftral, and even r^v/aled conceptions, o 
t»re r^wJrds and punifhments, wfre fo 
perfect ; and ibeir uncertainty^ ^ bout iber 
grwt; ibsit vre cannot fuppoTe, ibh had 
orally, any great influence upon ibeir livi 



(84) 

^be JewvtohS enjoyed ibeoradts of God, 
mfght of Jll other nations, he fuppTcd, i5 
have the f«llcft inotelcdge of eternal life. But 
yet, upon examining the Old Teft^mcnt, 
Vie (hall f/nd, iberc is but little dfreftly, and 
diftindljr faid of it. Tbere are indeed some 
intim^itions of it, now and then occurring \ 
but ibet feem td he fuch as co^ld, and ac- 
tuaWy wJre perverted, to other minings ; and 
tbough tbevt is enough (enu© faid, id render 
the Sadd/zcccs h£ghly crionmal, for not b^- 
l/eVing in a rcfurreftion, \ti the exiftence of 
Angels and fpirits (fper) % and con&quently 
in a future ft^te -, yet if tie rev^Wtion of 
tbek things co^ld not, with some Ihcw of 
riafcm, have been torefted to some other 
lenfirs; w^ fhall he at a grtat lofs to con- 
cave, how it wJs pofSble for tbzt feft, M 
prtffeffed t5 brfi'evc in tbe Old Teft/iment, t5 
have n^ faith in a future^ and invifible ft^te. 

And as to tbe Heathens, though thet had 
some conceptions of tbzt ft^ te, yet thet had 
much lefs ftnotoledge, and certainty of it, tbz^ 
tbe Jews. *The vtry corrupt n^uons, thet 
had of their falie gods, coirld not but greitly 
corrupt their ne?cions, of fat/ire happ/nefs, 
and of tbe way ihu kads to it. Tbe viant of 
an cxprefs, and authentic rev^lition, not 
^nly of thdit happinefs, but ^vcn tbzt God is 
at ^11 reconc/ieable to sinners ; and if h^ is, 
in wh5t manner -, muft have Itft the thoaght- 

* Ads xxiii. 8. 

m 



( 8s ) _ 

fifj/7m6ngft (bem very uncertain, as to K- 
turt hipp/nefs ; if not very fufpicious, tbet 
(hould rather be punifhed, /ian , r^w5rded» 
after /i&ii life. J'i^ imperfeftion of tbcir 
obedience^ wo^d grtdtly difcourage tbe hope 
of perfect happ/nefs ; and /i^ fliortncfs 
of it, of im mortal/ tjr. How h(?pelefs and 
forlorn /i&en, mull have been fbe condition, 
of Ae generality of fbe GcntHes ! And how 
juft does Ibe ^poftle Paul's d^fcription of sie 
hAthen w^rld appear, when he fays, ' Tbet 
wfre ^'ens from (be commonwealth of lyrael, 
ftringers tS ibe covenant/ of promife, having 
n^h^pe, and without God in tbe v/ovld. Tbus 
life and immortal/ty^ wfre but very imper- 
f^tly In^ton in fbe w^rld, bef<?re tbe app/aring 
of Ctr/ft, and his gofpel j and a more full 
and exprefs ftn6toledge of /i&em, in order ta 
men's h^inefs and happmefs, w5s infin/tely 
dfsfreable. 

2. Our text impl/fs, /<&at Cpr/ftxhas ex- 
prefsly, and fufHciently rev/aled fbe ftnotoledgc 
of 1/fe, and immortalitji, try his gofpel. Tbis 
i^e has done in fuch paflag^s as ^heie. " God 
io loved tbe w<?rld, tb^t he g^ve his ^nly be- 
gotten Son, ib^t toh^f^ver b^li'cveth on him, 
ftcwid not perilh, but have everlafting life. 
" My flieep, faith he, hear nry voice, and I 
Inctori&em, and ibh folbta me^ and I gWt 
unt(5 /i?em eternal hfe, and ibe^ fhall never 
perifti, nef ther (hall any .pluck tbcm out of 

* £ph. ii. 12. "John iii.l6f ^ John x. 27, 28.- 

I tny 



(86) 

my hand. The ^poftle Paul dfclires by his 
aiithornjr, * Tkat to /iem, toh5 by a picicnt 
continuance in well-xl5ing, feck for glory^ 
honour, and immorialiiyi God will render, 
jtcrnal life. And tbut tbok toh5 have tbixx 
fruit unt5 hoUncfs^ fhall, in the end, have 
cverlafting 1/fe, which is the gift of God id 
/i&em, through our Lord Jeius C>r/ft ^. The 
updftle J/annes (J^msJ a\fo^ 3l&at /i&^ Lord 
hath prom/fed a crov^^n of 1/fe, to tbcm /i&at 
love him *. The ^poftlc P/ter, 7Jat God 
hath, of his abundant mercy, begotten u; 
tfgain int5 a Uvtly h^pe, by the refurreftion 
of J/l'ujr Or/ft from the dead j t5 an inher- 
nance thzi is incorruptible^ and und^f/led, 
and //'at fideth not /?way *. And /^^ ipoftlc 
Jo!)n d^cl^rrs, 72»at /i?ij is the promile h^ 
hath prom/Ted ui, /vcn eternal 1/fe ^ And, 
5l6at /Aij is the record, meaning of /i>^ gofpel, 
tbdit God hathi^iven to ms eternal l;fe; and 
this 1/fe is in his Son ^ Now theft are buttf 
very few paflag^s of our Srtv/our*s gofpel, in 
compar/jon of thetu 511, by which h^ has 
aflared {Q[iu) uj, of life and immortal/tj^. 

And as h^ has revealed eternal 1/fe id u/j 
he has 51& ^iven ui some account of the nd- 
lure and Enjoyments of it ; aflXring {tbu) w, 
/jfeat there Godfliall w/pe ^zwaj^ Jll t«irs from 
our .5?es ;, and Afeat in it, there (hall he n^ 
m^re death j ne/ther forr^to, nor crying ; ne/- 

» JElom. ii. 7. y Rom. vi, 22,, 23. * [am. i* 12. 
* 1 Pet. i. 3, 4. * 1 John ii. ^5. « i John v. 1 1. 

rher 



( 87 ) 

thcr any tnorc pain ^ : d^fcnbing it as a ^atc^ 
where (be I'pints (fper) of j aft nien arc m^de 
perfect*; b^ng ni^de 1/ke to God, and 
Orift, and ibe hd^ ingels; whfre tbeir 
railed bod/Vs (hall b^ like to the gl^^/ous 
body of thi Son of God ' ; wh Jre /itar Inoiol- 
edge Ihall he perfect « ; at l^ft id a\\ the 
purp^fc of tkeit happinefs : and in which 
thh (hall enjoy ibe imm/dwtc, and blifsfttl 
prefence of God *, and of our Lord ]e\\AS 
Cjrr'fl'; dd/ghtfftlcomm//n/on, and felbtofhip, 
with the innj^merable companj' of ingds, 
and juft men * 5 nj^ft gl(7r/ouj honours, sig- 
n/f?cd bjr a kingdom, a crown of gl^rjr, sit- 
ing with Cjr/ft on his throne, &c. and m^ft 
fitisfaft^nr enjoymentj 5 fuch as far exceed 
<i« uttnw ftrctch of our prcfent conceptions ; 
for rye hath not feen, nor ^ar heard, ne/ther 
tave entered into tbe heart of man, the things 
which God h^ pr^pircd for tbam tbdX lov^ 
Mm \ Yw, it is exprefsljf prom/fed, *Tb?x 
*^het thzt ^fvercome, (hall inherit 511 things, 
M&ning at kaft, 511 things injw/fe cond«- 
^'^e t5, of perfeftivc (n tbFxv happiriefs. 
And Jll ibdc g\oviou% enjoyments (hall tbet 
P^flefs, not for a lim/ted i/me 4n]y^ bu{ 
^hro«gh ibe endlefs ^g^s of^ ^tern/ty ^ tb\s 
bleflcd ft^te b/ing c5Iled immortal/ty, or, as 
It m/ght have been rendered, incorrupt/bili* 

* Rev. XXI. 4. « Heb. xii. 21. ' Phil..i]i..2i. 
*^Cor, xiii. 9. *Rev. xxii. 3,4, 5. ^Johnxvii. 24. 
Hcb, xii. 21. ' I Cor. ii. 9. « Rev. xxi. 7. 

1 2 «> > 



( 88 ) 

ty, Vernal 1/fe, an inber/tance ihsit is incor- 
ruptible, and und^ffled, and /i>at ftideth not 
tf way : S^ /i'at, to uk the words of the royal 
l&salmift *, thez ihall inherit f;flnefs of joy, 
and pleafores for evermore. Such a d^fcrip- 
tion has our Lord ^ivcn of l/fe, and immor- 
tal/yr, by his gofpcl. And this his tefb'oiony 
w^ cannot r«is6nabl^ doubt of, if w^ consider 
it as Vie ^ught id d^, as /i^^ teftinn^nj^ of the 
Son of God, the ixut and izitMuX witnefsi 
loh^fe cl)ara6lers, and vexzchy^ have been d^, 
monftr^tcd, and confirnned, try a vaft vtf- 
rwt^ of divine miracles, (mer.) I add once 
(wonce) m^rc, 

3. C!)r/ft has brought life, and iiKmortal/t;, 
t? light, bjy his gofpel, as h^ has fSWy rmalcd 
tbi way, by which w^ may -attain to thtm^ 
The Jitnoteledge of th\s eternal life, wo^ld b4 
))ut of little benefit t^ uj, without some ceN 
fain information of thdX way : Biit tb\s our 
blefled Lord has rmaled 210, in the m^ft 
plain, and intelligible manner: for in his 
gofpel h^ has inftru&ed uj, tb2X xS the en<^ 
joy men t of it, w^ muft repent of our fins, 
fo as I J forij^e tbtm \ declaring, ** Except yi 
repent, ye ftall 511 llkewFfe pcriffi ; iTiat we 
Ihoifid beiifeve in himfelf as the promifed 
J^ef^fal^, and fbe Son of God, and as having 
been ^iven, and fent b;^, and come out from 
God i aflKring (fli») uj, ' Ti&at God io loved 
the w^rld, /i!>at he gavt his ^nljf beg6tttn Son, 

^ Pfal. xYi. II . ** Lvkc xiii. y p John iii. 16, 

tb^t 



( 89 ) , ■ 

tht tohJ&ever bri/eveth on him (ktSld not 

perflh, but have cverlafting hfe. H^ fifit 

prad/caUjf b^l/rvcth /i^fe things concerning 

Cfrrft (and n^ other faith \s availing in him) 

cimot^ while h^ fo b^lirveth, think himfclf 

at libert;^ to rejedl, or difobet^ evtn the mF- 

n«ceft thing, which he comes t^ b^ convinced, 

Cjr/ft has taught ; b^caufe by this faith; h^ 

)ee« every d6(5lrinc of his enforced by the 

Father's aut56r/t;r, as well as his ^ton : but 

Without If, the confcience f/nds itfelf under 

n^obifgicion io regard him as a teacher, or 

tf &fv/our come from God, nor confe'quent- 

Ijf tJ fubmit ti5 his^r^ligion ; and tberefcrc the 

iime divine wi/dom /irat inftlftated it, has, 

whew-ever ibe gofpel comes with fufficierit 

wfdence, m^ft r/asonably demanded /^i/fafth, 

and indifpenCblj? insifts upon it, in order id 

ialvidon. Further, Cjrilt has taught uj bjr 

Ws gofpel, as juft now hinted, ThdLt this 

fcVing faith in him, is not a dead^ butwr 

^^i«ig, and operative principle ^ : thst kpu^ 

'*fe the heart from itj siofjt dlfp^skions ' : 

'^t it worki by love*--, exciting and* fup- 

pming love to Gbdy t^-fais div/he fclf, and 

^^men: and ihu it conftradis t^^b^ience; 

^^^5 it is d^yred, ^ (C&at Hs'iffhe author of 

eternal falvition, to ail tbtm thzt cbet him ; 

^^t tbzt lbs\c tsho cbet him not, (hall b^ 

p6m(hed ivith cverlafting d^ftruftion ". Gon- 

' Jam, }i. 20. ' 'Aas XV. 9, « Gal. v. <, 

* Heb. V. 9. • ^Thcff. i* 5. . v. 

1 3 frqu^ntljf. 



(90) 

{equtntly the faith in him, which has tbt 
promife of life, and immortality, pr^c^ 
obedience. , H^ has aMo taught uj the obe- 
dience h^ r^u/rts of u/, throiFgh his lohole 
gofpel ; by which Jlfo h^ has authorHed thi 
prad/cal parts of the Old Teft^ment, thu 
are consiftent with CfH-iftmn/ty ; for the 
Scriptures thmof are faid in his goTpel to bf 
tfble io make ur wrie unt5 falvition, throf gh 
« faith tb2X is in Qr/ft J/fuJ "^^ H^ has taught 
ur much of this ^b^ience in the v. vi. and 
vii. chapters oifhe £vangeliil -Matthew; and 
^ven Ui a fumm^ry view of it in nwnjr paf- 
fag»; particularly in T/tuj ii. 12. £'vcn 
tbzx, we fimid deny ungodlinefs, and w^bly 
iuib ; and live fc^erlj, r/ghteouC^, and godly, 
in tbis prefent wm:ld : But all his command- 
ments, however diffi^fiveljr, or fumm^rily ex- 
J>reired, are for ibe moA part, readily to^n 
or pra£fcice, by tbe fuggeftions of a well-in- 
formed and uprrgbt confcience ; which are 
Sl(p tbe leadings of tbe Spirit of God. And 
concerning 211 his commandments, b^th vk- 
son and revelation will juftif^ tbek oti/ervi- 
tions, TZ^at tbevt is not one (won) of tbtm 
tbi'cStSt of mere will, or arbitrary pl6r&re} 
much lefs, df any lankind desire, t^ lay uj 
iinder any unnecefiary reflraint : but tb2X 
every prohibition, is a caution t^ avoid fuch 
a&ions, as wo«fd n6ccSavi\y in tbek coni/- 
quences, he hurtful to us ; and every iojunc- 

V 2 Tim. iii. 15, 

tion, 



( 91 ) 

cioo, a d?re£kioD for acquiring $ome good^ 
wfaich without ob^ving it^ w^ fhaiFld ne- 
ceflCiriljp wJnt. WhJc bright evidences are- 
/Me properties of QH'/ft'j cotninindinents^ 
tbzi tbet are from God, the God of love ! 
And how grei7t a demonftrition of the di- 
y/ne love and goodnefs, is the gift of tbtm 
bjr Jefui CDr/ft % and /i< enfM-cement of tbaxty 
hy the wBghtjr, and conftraioing m(7cives of 
,his gofpel! 

Cf^rift has a\{o fufficientljf intimated, /iat 
it is not perfect ^b/dience \ie in^ifts updn» 
/it^h wr fhofid finc^eljr aim at it "^ $ tor if 
/vcn h^ly b^lilevers fay, tbet have n^ fin ; tbtz 
dec^ve /i&emielves, and /^^ tr»ch is not in 
th^fSi ^ : but /6at h^ chiefljr insffts upon our 
finc/re ^b^dience, which fltftos from^r/al, 
and unreicrving difp^sicion, id dbh God in 
£11 things \ and which, tbon^ it may consaft 
with some im^llec fins of infirmit;?, in tbe 
general di^^ow'ed; butthr9£ghhi{maow^- 
nefs, or di/allow'ed ignorance, or ftrong and 
ludden temptations, furpr/fcd int? % and when 
difcovered; diiappr^ved, and r^sifted; yet 
will not admit of .inj^ wiifal, or ddiberiite, 
and much leis, of any h^bici^al ad of ttidtun 
di/^b^ience: for it is exprefsly dtfckired, 
' 72^at h^ tb^t keepeth tbe iiifaple law, mid 
yet ofi'endeth (mining in (uch a yii\Su\ man- 
ner) in one : (won) point, is guilty of 2U. 
Tbdt is, of an offence >^7gttnft JU tbe com- 

* Hcb« vL 1. 7 1 Johni. S. > Jam. IL i^ . 

mand- 



( 9^ ) 
inandments of God's law ; not only as hr 
commftf an indfgn/tj^ ixgainft ibe d/V/ne au- 
thornr, which enf(?'rces /Aem 511 -, but as he 
M the faw€ timcy and by tbe fame m/ans. 
Wakens the binding force of ^ach of ibcnh^ 
vp6n his o\m wind : for ^ he tohd allow's 
himfelf to hrtak dr)y one (won) command- 
menr, which h^ ftn^tps to be enforced b^ fhe 
<l/vine autsonty, will b^ in grwt dinger of 
breaking any other commandment, when he 
is (Irongly tempted 5 and at the Qime time 
feels little other r^ftraint /i?an ibzx, authoritjr: 
A wili»l difr^gard of it in one (won) c/t/c, 
miking way for, and m/ght/ly inducing a 
like dilr^gard of it in in^* other, when equailjr 
tempted. And as fuch a one (won) com- 
mits {0 grtat and aggr/av^ted an offence 
aokintk the tnholt law of God, and in the 
next vtffe is* faid, thenby to become a trani^ 
greflbr of the law ; his c&ara&er muft b^ the 
very r^^erfe.of ihe fincmljr obedient. 

When tbertfoTC any fin has got the^ afcen- 
dent ^Ver lu, or w^ are aHow'edly or habittf- 
ally dj/ib/dient to any plain commandment 
of God, Op ! let us not d£diifu\\y flatter our- 
Jclves, tbsLZ w^are fincmly ^b^lient, b^cauie 
of our regards to the othei^ parts of the di* 
vine will : for by the above icpipti/re argir- 
ment, and min^ others thzt m/ght b^ ad- 
vanced, it is Evident, tbzt eur ^b^dience is 
never finc^e, nor our h^pe of life and im* 
mortalifty folidi till fuiph allaw'ed^ or ha^ 

biiual 



( 93 ) 

Mu^ fins, are for£zken, and the tfn/verfallj^ 
t>h«]ient temper is r^ft^'red : But if, with tbxS' 
temper, w^ confefs our fins, whether of in- 
firm/gp, or of a move aggr^ vtf ted nature -, iht 
gofpel alKres uj % /i6at God, thra^gh hit re- 
gards id tbe facriflcial blood of Cftrift, and 
his advficacy for uj, is faithfAfl and juft t5 
forfive our fins, and to clean/c uj from £11 
unr/ghteoufnefs : And our faith in C)^r/ft, ex- 
c/cing uj ioy and yielding finc/re ^/dience ; 
b^th may, and fiio^ld prcdz^ce in Ui, 41 lively 
h^pe, and truA in him, for this pardon^ and 
^Kij other r/al bleiTing, in this )(fe ; and 
joyous expedtition of life, and- immortality 
tbrotfgh him, in tbi w^ rid t^ come *, for blefied 
are Jll thet^ sbai put tb&r truft in him ^. 

It is evident indeed, b^th from fcrlptore 
and explr/ence, f^at ibi ob/diet)/t tenaper. 
tfbove d^rlbedj withqut which our faith is 
not made perfect, is j^pt to rfl4x, thn^ghi^. 
i^cklenefs of the hifman heart, aad /& fcH 
fl^ence of internal, * and furro^adiag temii* 
tauons; and /i&at it will not long contioM 
in desirable ftrei^tb, however vigfrous it 
A3aj at prefent b«, without r/al paios i^ 
cheriih it, by contanning pr^fe0ed Clrifti^m^ 
and in the fmojus uft of the public ord/« 
fiance ; in the praftice of meditating oa 
God*s word, and of 0cret prayer; of tfvoa^ 
ding temptations, a^d fulfilling incumbent 
duties. And as w^ have mmy afl»ranc^a 

* I John i. 7» o. iiu i« 2. ^ Pfalm ii. 12. 



( 94 ) 

(fb«) from the oracles of God, that tbefk 
m^ins and endeavours, (bJll through (he du 
vine infiuences^ he cff6ft«al to the fupp^?c 
aftb\s «?b^dicnt temper •, the hahixudX and rrghc 
ufcofthem m.uftc6nft/t«tcan important part 
of the Cf>rillian's cb/diencc. all tbek things 
our blefled Lord feems xd intend, when h/ 
fays, *^/dc in m^, and / in yo»; as tbc 
branch cannot be^r fr«it of itlclf, except ir 
^/dc in the vine, x\o mort can y^, except yt 
^b/dc in vne. Vie tb2X tfbideth in m^ (min- 
ing, / doubt not, hy tbe uft of fuch hSSj 
m^sns and oideavours) and /m htm (which 
/ will not fail io dio in tVi$ oaft^ bf niy Doe- 
trine and Sp(rit) (fper) tbe Qtmt brxng^ch 
fi^rth much fr»it ; tor without mey tbe mg« 
^al sigmf ?c8, pw of me (ordtfingig^d from 
ibis mikuA conncdllon with mf) ye can d? 
iio/iHng r f^c is, ye can j/dd tiet frM tr/fljr 
ncceptwle t^ God, or wringj; beneficial 
t? vifffelV^s, 

M^re partlc»1arl)f as t? 'VnftVy inafmucli 
4i we ftand in zblAtat need of d/v^ne aisfl^ 
fiinceji, b^h Ibr beKfnflihg ind fupp^ttng 
tins rep^cance, faith, love, t^bMicnce^ and 
trtlft i tbettSptt our blefiM Siv/our has, i3gr 
his ^fpel taught u/, /i^at We (hs^(d by hrartjr 
and fr/quent prayer, feek tbe aids of God's 
Hoy Spirit (fper) /kt we may be eniWed 
for 511 tbek things ; and by an irrrfrrfgable 
argument, he has aflKrcd (ft») w, /*at if 

« Johnxr. ^^ 5; '^ * • - 



(95 ) 

w^d^, m fliJll obtain tbcm. For fays h/, 
^li^e b/ing /wl, in^to how id givt good 
^ifu tJ y(wr children, how much move Ihall 
)m haivenly Father, ^ive /i6tf Hoiy Spirit 
(fpcrj t5 /iem /i»at a(k him. 

But Irft w^ iho^ld /magine, fuch ^w'erfivl 

afsiftanc^s, when granted, will io fc\ighxi\y 

conftrain lu io do the wilt of God, as to 

uwiyt a[\ our rHu6^anc^s, and annibd^ te all 

our diffifcult/Jts in d^ing it; and con&quentjy 

I/fl w^ Ihoif id infer, t^ the gr^t dircDuragr- 

ment of our endeavours, tbiX ibm^ we afk 

/ifem, theii 5rc not granted, till w^£fnd in 

ourlelves fuch enlargement ; Thertfore we arc 

in/it^gofpel r^qu/red id believe, eyta in our 

afti of worfliip, tbiM God will not with-h^d 

ibe necef&ry gr^ce for ^ing his will, /iat w^ 

pray for in a r/ght manner; for w^ muft aflc 

m faith, nothing wJvering * ; and are t^ld, 

' tb2x without faith ic is Impoillble t^ pl^afe 

God ; for \\e tbdX cometh id God muft: b^liVvc 

^h^\ \\e is, and Z^&at h^ is a r^wJrder of thtm 

tkt dil/gently feck him. But at /i&^ fomqf 

t^me tbe gofpel leads uj io think, /i&at when 

nkeffary grac-e is^iven, it «&ally l^ves room, 

Specially at firft, and fr/qucntly afterwards, 

for gretft pains^ ftruggles, and endeavours, 

on our part \ d^cliring, ^ Shzt the kingdom 

oi haivm fuffereth vioXtnc^. and the violent 

t^ke it by iorz^ j and tbzt we muft work out 

^ Luke 3d. 13. « Jam. i. 6. 'Heb. xi. 6. 

< Matt. xi. i2» 

a our 



( 9<5 ) 

tnir d^m falv^tion with fear and tremblings 
even when God worketh in or, bi^th <S wiil, 
und to d^, of his good plhSure ^. And in 
eflfedt signrQ^ing, tb^t fhcnx^ divine gr^ce 
renders pur obedience pofiible, yet it is not 
effe&ttBl id it, without our attention, and 
ctfre ; and that our vig^roui exertions, to 
z6i according to its 1/ght, and gu/dance, is 
ihe moA cSB&stzl way to improve it ; and to 
dmye m^re abundant aids of it, from itf 
&vint Fountain : for to him /i&at hath (nimi- 
ly, gr^ce improved, by fuch pains, and dil* 
fgence) {ha\l he given; /i^at he may have 
m^re abundantly ; but from him thzx, hath 
'iK>t, (hall be tdkm ^wa^, /wn ti^x which 
he hath *. 

And finally, Cjrfft has taught uj by his 
gofpel, tbst whatever difKcult/es may attend 
our firft (furft) entrance upon a ciTurfe of 
«b/dience, or 4ny oticr part of it; yet 
through ibe continued afsiitance of d/v£ne 
gr^ce, and ihe habits of love ahd reverence, 
'of felf- dtfflf al and r/ghteoufnefe, acqu/red b^ 
a cartful improvement of it, his y^kc (hall 
bifcome esfy to uj, and his burden 1/ght ^ ; 
end ibzt through tbek things, and through 
the prefent blefled frSits of our ^b/dicnce, 
end ibe gl^r/ous h^pes, b^th a$ to ibis 1/fe, 
and /iat which 4s to come, whFrewith we 
fliall he favoured, through the pow^'er of ibe 
H% G^flft ; his fervice (hall become a ft^e, 

^ Phil. ii. 1 2, 1 3. < Matt« xui, 1 2* ^ Matt. xi. 30. 

III 



. ( 97 ) 

innompirifon of 511 earthly conditions, of 
per£ct liberty, joy, and pface. Thus Cjr/ft 
his brought life and imniortal/ty t^ l/'ght, by 
his gofpel ; b^th as h^ has thmin r^vAIed 
fkniy and as h^ has (o fully d/refted uj, how 
w^ may attain to Jbctn. I (hall now con* 
dude in the 

III^ And lift pbce, with a few f^ttable 
inferences. And, 

If Has Cfrrift ab61i(bed death ; and brought 
bfe, and imoiartal/ty, to 1/ght, by Jiis gofpel ; 
/ien how inexc/ifable will the f/nally im- 
pcn/cent, and ungodly be, i»h5 have heard 
the gofpel, for neglefting fo grtat falvition ! 
Tbh will not be ible, as the heathens might 
b?, to fay. in judgment, /iat tbh have^never 
heard of death being abolKhed, nor of eter- 
nallife, with any certainty; for b^th have 
been plainly d^clired to them : And ibeir 
Ofgled of //&em will demonftr^te tbeir en- 
mity, and tfverCon to God, and goodnefs, 
t? have been ^ mizingly gre^t ; For muft it 
ftot have been f^, when ibez could live in 
opposition to his good will, at the hazard of 
fefing, even life and immortality ; yw, at tbs 
rifle of eternal r«in, and punifliment. And 
as this ftnotoledge will greatly aggrjv^zte/i&ar 
condemnition, (o alio will /i;eir criminal dif- 
bdief of tbe teftim^nj, and tbeiv contempt 
of tbe authority of tbe ovXy begotten of tbe 
Father, as well as of tbe Father himfelf. 
For if tbe word fpc?ken by in gels wJs fled- 

K faft. 



( 98 ) 

faft, and every tranfgreffion, and dj/iWdience, 
r^c^ved a juft recotnpence (rf rf w5rd j How 
fhall w^ ekdpcj . if w^ n^gleft fuch grtat fal- 
v«tion ? which firft (furft) b^gan to he (pokm 
by the Lord, and w5s confirmed by tbo\t tbzt 
heard him : God himfielf a\(o bearing A&eni 
>vitnefs, b^th with s/cns, and wonders j and 
with d/verfc miracles (mer), and ^ifts of the 
Holy Giod K God forbid /i&at « nj' toh5 rmi 
/i&^fc things, (hoald b^ guilty of fuch perr 
ivicious folly. And may fbetj in ike r/ght ufc 
of God's gr^ce, forbid it ; and r^ift their 
prdfnenefs to it, and (Overcome it, with 511 
//&3r m/ght. 

2. Has Ctr/ft aboliflied death for uj, and 
brought l/fe and inimortal/tji t5our linotoledge, 
by his gofpel ; then how fit and reasonable is 
it, /i&at wtf flio^ld love him in fincer/tj^, and 
{o as t5 prefer him, and his will, brfi^re fa- 
ther, and mother, and w/fe, and children, 
and brethren, and sifters, and their wills; 
yetf,' and brfi^re our ^ton wills, and our ^ton 
1/ves ", when thet come in comprtition with 
him, or his will? The infmite obligations of 
dttty, love, and grar/t«de, w^ are under to the 
Father, and particularly for fending him, io 
he fuch an invaluable S<iv/our, and friend t5 
w, {ho«ld conftrain ux, /Auj to love the Lord 
Jffuj C|)r/ft; both fince he is his 6n\y b^ 
gotten, and well-beloved Son ; and fince he 
has exprefsljf commanded ui fo to love him, 

> Heb, ii. 2» 3» 4. "< Luke xiv. 26. 

in 



( 99 ) 

in hy gofpcl. And as Or/ft c^me for 
/Me gricious f)urpofo, not ^'iily in ^b/Jience 
t^/i^ Father, but alio in tender, and com- 
pASionatc love id vs ; for he is faid " to have 
Joved lu, and to have^iven hinrifelf for ua 
• To have loved uj, and w JIhed ui from our 
fins, in his ^tan blood. And ^ through his 
gr^cc to m, tl'Cixoh he was rich, for our fakes 
id have become poor, tbat y/e through his 
poverty, m/ght b^ made rich. Thu his love 
to uj (he^ld alio excite, and confirni our 
Uncereft atFedlion, and attachment id him. 
Without ibek things, w^ cannot he his 
difc/plfs ' ; w^ cannot fervc him, cnher fai//&- 
fully, or acceptably, wtf cannot fufRciently 
love his heavenljr Father, toh5 fo loved ui, 
as to fubje£t him to h«mil/icion, fufferings, 
and death, for uj ; w^ cannot but b^ d«ef- 
tibly bo/e, in ibe t)t% of all good beings, /i>at 
>n«to UJ ; nor can w^ have any (ecurity againft 
the utm^It calam/t^, and ruin. But with 
ibis fincae love to Cj^r/ft, we fhall abhor 
the thought J of breaking anj^ of his command/- 
o^cntj : It will even be our meat to do his 
will ; as it was his, to do his heavenly Fa- 
ther's : Our ev/dences of falvacion, and 
eternal life, will generally be br/ght ; and 
our t/tle to ibtm thro/7gh him, abf<?lately f«re 
((h«re). And wo«ld we often recolleft the 
deep h^m/l/atioo, the ard»ou^ obedience, ibe 

" Eph. v. 2. • Heb. i. 5.. R a. Cor. viii. 9. 

K 2. dif.- 



( 100 ) 

dirtreffing fufferings and death, by which he 
has abolifhed death for lu, in which he 
publifhed 1/fe and immortal/yF, and by which 
h^ has procured admiflion for us intS /Aem ; 
and wo^ld w^, with any fincentj^, impldfre 
ibe enl/vening infl«enc^s of the Spirit (fper) 
of Love ; while w^ thus mafcd on ^be ft«?- 
pendous love of Clrift to uj. She fire of 
love t6w5rds him, and to his heavenly Fa- 
ther for him, and to a\\ other ^vang61/cal 
objeAi, wo^ld burn ; enlarging our hearts 
to run fbe ways of his commandmenti. / 
Ihall ^nly infer once (wonce) m^re, 

3. Has Cjrift fet tb\s 1/fe, and immortal/- 
ty before us ? Tbtn how re/i?l«tely flio»<d w^ 
pursue tbe way, /i6at l«ids to the enjoyment 
of tbem ? Yo« may read/ly fee, by whJt hais 
been f»id, /i?at //feat way is a ^itient con- 
tinuance in wcll-dSing ; or a pcrf^v/ring ad- 
herence to Or/ft and his fervice, to tbe end 
of our 1/ves. And wh Jt greater motive /i»ar> 
this vernal life, can w^ have to this perfir- 
v/rance ? Without (b d5ing 5 vfe fho»ld 15fe 
tbe hope of it, and co«hi not but in tb^t 
lofsj if w^ have any fenfe of its val^e, b^ 
exceeding uncomfortable : And it is- ^nly in 
tb\s c^tirfe, tbzt w^ can enjoy a truly d^light- 
fS\ expe6Vicion of it. Ye^, though none of 
our obedience, ftrietly fpwiking, merits at 
tbe hand of God ; yet of his exwberant go6d»- 
nefs, h^ will, throirgh our Lord Jefus Cj^r/ft, 
' b^ft(?b tf degree of gb'ry, and happ/nefs, upon 



I 



(. loi ) ^ 

ux, in fht life and immortalfcy, richly pra- 

jxn-ciooed to fbe number, and greacncfs of 

our [crvices ; For h^ /Aat fc?tocth fpiringlj^, 

fhall resp fpiringl;^ ; and he ibaz f(?bcth 

bomtifullji^ Ihall rtap bountrfif II7 '. W^ may 

tbertforCj hy aftj of repentance, and felf-de-* 

n/aJ; p/et)^, and juftice-, char/tj, and mercy; 

and by dJing our common affairs after a 

^odlj sort, he continually laying up for our- 

felves, treaf«res in (be heavens ; and he daily 

adding rays of gb'ry to our heavenly crowns,. 

which fhall enrich, and adorn us, to aWetcr^ 

nhy. And as ic is an ettvniiy vfe have now 

an oppor-Cftnity of providing for ; how in* 

duftrious fho^d we he^ in making, tbsit pro^ 

vifioft ^ Wfre w^ ta provide ^oly for a fhorc 

time; tbe folly of negl/gence in it, wo^id he, 

pwpATti^ably- fm51l : But to negledt tbe^ 

augmenrition of our eternal happ/nefs, wh/te; 

it is in our pow'er, muft, next to continuing 

in tbe praftice of iniquity, be^ tbe gre^ccft, 

poffible, fubl«ni«ry folly. • Let uj tblvtfcrc 

bf ftedfaft, and immoveable, and Always 

abounding in tbe work' of tbe Lord, fora/- 

rouch as we fih^, our labour fhall not b^ 

in vain, in /i^ Lord. ^ To tohSm he gb'rjj 

and' dominion, for ever and ever. -4'men. , 

'2 Cor. ix. 6.. • 1 Cor. xv. 56. * Rev. i. 6.. 



IT 3^ AGe- 



A General View of the Notation. 



In Black Print, are 

The • quiefcent^ or filent letters, as in 
lamb, column. 

In Roman letters, are, 

I. The confonants. 2. The (hort vowels. 
3. a and for the long found pf thefe (horc 
vowels* 4. e for (hort i. 5. o for ihort u. 
6. ai, ay, au, aw, ee, and 00, double vowels,, 
having fingle founds \ and j. The diph- 
thongs. 

In Italic letters, are^ 

X . French cb for fli. 2 . <, g^ Syfi^ th^ ancj 
X, when their founds are irregular, j. The 
long vowels. .4. a for broad a. 5. f for 
long a. 6. ^? for ee. 7. T and J for unac- 
cented long I and y. and S. a and » hav- 
ing the found of 00. 



ir 




T HF 

Pronouncing DiiUonary. 

ABD ABO ABS 



Aa 


^'bel 


abch'cion 


>f'iron 


abet 


, ab6m/nable,bl)p 


abaft 


abettor 


abominate 


dbandon 


abhor 


abom/nition 


ahd/e 


abhorrence 


abortion 


flW/rment 


abhorrent 


abortive 


«ba{h 


eh'iS^ 


above 


abate 


abide 


abound 


dbiument 


abjeft 


^bouc 


abbd 


A'bigail 


//'brajBin 


'abbacy 
abbei^ 


ahiMty 


abridge 


abJKrition 


abridgment 1 


ibbty 


abjare ■ 


abroad 1 


ibboc 


abktivc 


abrogate 1 


abbrM'tfte 


able, ntfe 


abrogation 
abrupt, l>!, oeA 


abbrtv/ation 


ahJ^tion 


abdicate 


aboard 


A'bfalom 


abdication 


abwie 


abfcefs 


abdwncn 


ab^lifb^meiM 


abfcdnd 

abfence 



abfirnce acc^l^rition accretion . 

abfenc accent accrue 

abfent accent zccumulait 

ab/olve accept stccumuUtiow 

abl49kte,ly,nefs acceptable, blj^, accuracy 
abf(7l2/cion [nefs acc2/rjte,ly,nels 

absorb acceptance , accurfed 

absorbent acceptition acc^Cfcion 
abdain acceis acc^ljcive 

abft^Wous, I7, acceifible, nefs acctffe, r . . 

[nefs accefTion accuftom 

abft/nencc acccflirj^ ace 

abftraft accidence tfcerb- 

abftradt, tedly accident acerb/ty 

abftr/ife,ljr,ners accidental,, ly acpc 
abfurd, [y, nefs.acckm^tion^ iche-b^ne 
abfiardicy accommodate ich/evo 

abundance - accommodi- ^ci^ill^s 
abundant, \y [tion acid, neis 

abi^fe accompany 4Cid/t^ 

ab^ye accomplice acknotoledge,, 

abz?iive,ljR,nef^.acc6mpli(b,, . [TOent 

tfbut [ment /icorn 

abuttal .acc6mpt,€ount.acquaint 

iibyfs accopdj ing, \y acquaintance 

iiCadevny accoft acquiefce 

aciidea\y account acqurelcencc 

academic accountable acqaiefcent 

zcaicmicdX accomptant^ acquire 
ac^d^Dician [coun acquisition: 

acc/de accoi?tre acquit 

accckr^te acco^irement... acqui(tal< 

ac^ 



ADE 

acquittance 

acre 

acrid 

acnm/n/ou5,)y 

krimonj 

acrofs 

aft 

adion 

aflionable 

iftivc, Ijf, ncfs 

zStivity 

ador 

aftrefs 

aftnal, Ij^ 

^c»te, |y, ncfs 

adage 

A'dam 

adtfmant 

adtftnant/ne 

adapt 

^dd 

adder 

add ice 

addia 

addition 
additional 
addle 
add r els 
adept 
ad^qiwte, 1/ 



ADM 

ad^Ui^tenefs 

adh/re 

adh/rencc 

adh/renc 

adh^Iion 

adjacent 

adjmivc 

adjoin 

adjourn, ment 
adjudge 
adji^d/'cation * 
adjunft 
adjure 
adjufl: 
adjf/tant 
adj«t^ry 
admim'fter 
adm/niftnition 
adm/mftritor 
adm/niftritrix 
admirable, bly, 
fnefs 
admiral, Ihip 
adm/raly^ 
ad a f ration 
adm/re 
admiflion 
admit, ted 
admittance 
admonifh 
admonition 



ADV 

ado 

tfdonic 

^do'ni> 

adopt 

adoption 

zdordtion 

zdorc [ncfs- 

adw-able, biy, 

adorn, menc 

advance 

advancement 

advantai^ 

advantig(oli9y 

[ly, nefs 
advent 
adventitious, 

[ly, nefs 
adventure 
adventurous, 1/ 
adverb 
adverb/al, 1/ 
advcrferjr 
adverfitive 
adver(e . 
adversiy^ 
advert 

advertence, cy 
advertffc,ment 
advertifcment 
advert/fcr 
adv/cc 
adv/fe 

ad vz fable- 



AGE 



A I R 



A F F 

ad v/fable aflfeftiontf tc, ly, /igency 
adv/fcd,l7,nefs aff/ance [nefs ^gent 

aft/dtfvit aggrand/fe 

zffinhy aggrandife- 

afRrm [mcnt 

affirmative, \y iggvavate 

affirmation 

afflidt asgreffion 

afflidtioa 
afiUAivc 

affluence) c^ agAe 
afBircnt,ly,ncis agiliry 



adtfUtion 

ad^Iitor 

zdulatory 

adult 

adult^rtftc 

adulteration 

adulterer 

adulterels 

adulterous 

aduherjr 

advocacy 

adv^Ctfce 

advowTon 

aduft 

adze 



aggravition 

aggreflbr 
aggrifeve 



zffdrd 

afFranchffe 

afiray 

affright 

affront 

affrontive, Ijr 



agitate 
ag/tant 



• .^ 



enigmatic, al, afibrrfaid 



aerial 

^rther 

<fther/al 

JEJtna 

afar 

affabil/tjr 



\\y afraid 
afrcfli 
A'frica 
aft 

after^ noon, 

[ward 

again,, or 



affable, bly,.nefs of en 
affair . againft 

affedt agar'.c 

affe6bed,lj!,nefs agaft 
affeftation agizte 
affcftioa age 



agitation 
ago 

ag^nrze 
ag^n^ 
agree 

agreeable, b^ 
[ncfe 
agr/cultwc 
agr/m^ny 
aground 
ag«e 
dguidi 
a{)! 
aid 

aiU mcnt 
aim 
air 

airy 

air/ncls 



A L I 


ALL 


ALU 


airmefs 


tflike 


ally 


ah 


aliment 


almanack 


a izbafter, bias 


al/menwry 


a\mi^\\ly 


iliac! 


aU'm^njf 


almonn 


fliacrity 


a!/qu^ 


alm^n^ry 


ilJm^de 


tfl/ve 


almoner 


^larm 


511 ^ 


51m^ll 


^las ! 


allay 


alms 


Alb/on 


allegicion 


al<7es 


alc^mift 


ailed gc 


tfloft 


ikiymy 


all/giance 


tfb'ne 


^coran 


allegor/cal, ly 


tflongr 


alc<?ve 


zWegoxizt 


tfloot 


Jlder 


alK^cT^ry 


^iloud 


Jldcrman 


all^l/zjai^ 


Alps 


de 


al]/v//2te 


2\^\\a 


alegar 


allev/^tion 


a ph^bet 


fliehoof 


alley 


alph<abec/cal,ly 


alehou/e 


flIl-halbtoSjho 


I (ihcsiAy 


tflembic 


Sll-h/al 


iKo 


fllert, l)p, ncfs 


all/ance 


5ltar 


A'lexander 


all/gicion 


Jlter [nefs 


Alfred 


all/gitor 


Alterable, bly. 


algebra 


allot, mcnt 


alteration 


algebri/cal . 


allow', cdly 


tfltcMtive 


alg^briift 


allow'able, \y 


Jltercition 


aUdiS 


allow'ance ' 


Jltern<ate 


d\kti 


alloy, lat 


51tern<ative 


alienable, ncfs allude 


^Ith^ugh 


dUenate 


allj/re, ment 


altn^^de 


alienation 


allz^fion 


a\tdgeihcv 


flight 


allftfivc, ly 


alum 




I 


Always 



A M I 

Jlways 
am 

amantittiRs 

^mafs 

amaze J aient 

am^zon 

ambaflT^dor 

ambafl^drefs 

amber 

ambergrce/c 

amb/dexter 

amhigmy 



ANA 

am/cable, bjy, 
^midft [nefs 
amid 
kmity 

zmunitioa 

amncftjf 

amoncr 

o 

^mongft 
amorous, ly, 
^'mos [neft 
amount 
amour 
amphibious 



ambiguous, Ij^yamphith/^tre 

[nefs ample, ply 
ambition ampl/f/cidon 

ambitiops, Jy, ampl/fji 
ajnble [ncls amp]/t//de 
ambr^fe amp»t^cion 

Ambr^jitf am»lec 
ambr^ml amufcy ment 
ambufcide an 
ambj-i^ce an^ibaptifl: 
amb^fh, ment analogical, \y 
Jmen ^nabgous, \y 

izmeaablejnefs ^nal^g^r 
tfmend, ment aDz\yCu 
amtnity an^zlyt/cal, ]y 

/amerce, ment an^jlFze 
j4mtvka anarcljy 

amatiyft ^nath^mia 

^m/abl£» bly, an^tbem^iFze 
[nefs 



A N I 

an^tom/cal 

^nat^mift 

tfnat^mfze 

^nac^m^ 

anceftor 

anceftrjr 

ancf^or 

ancf^^rage 

knciorkc 

znchdvy 

Ancient, ly,nc& 

ancle 

and 

A'ndrew 

anecdote 

tfnew' 

^ngel 

angel/cal, \y 

ancrer 

anar/Iy 

angle 

angler 

angl/ci/m 

angry 

anguilB 

angular 
an/madvcrfion 

an/madvert 

animal 
an/malcule 

an/m^te 
anmiQ/?7 * 

anniilift 



ANT 


A P A 


A P P 


imaliA 


antepenult/m^ 


apathjp 


annals 


anterior 


ape 


annife 


anthem 


apevknt 


ann/feed 


A'ntj^nj? 


apert«rc 


ann/ai 


antechamber 


ipex 


annex 


ant/clrFft 


aph^ri/m 


ann/^iitfte 


antrcf^riftian 


apiary 


ann/Vlicion 


antic/p^te 


M^pifti, \y, nefs 


anrnVerfory 
znnotdiion 


antic/pition 
antic 


tf poc^lypfe 
apocdypt/cal 


znnotator 


antidote 


apoC^rypha 


annoy 


antil^pe 


apocryphal 


annoyance 


anc/m^arci^r- 


apobget/cal ■ 


annual, \y 


[cal 


apologia 


annuity 


intimony 


apologize 


annul 


ant/ndm/ans 


ap^bgue 


ann«far 


antip^th^ 


apology 


annanciition 


antipodes 


ap^jthegm 


an^djfoe 


zmiquary 


ap^pledtic 


anoint 
zn6nymous 


ant/quir/an 
ant/qu^tc 


ap^ple;py 
apo&ajy 


another 


antique' 


^poftiJte 


anfwer 


antiqu/ty 


apoSiattze 


anfwerable, ly 


ant/thefii 


tfpoltle 


ant 


antnj'pe 


tfpoft<?lic 


antag^nift 


antlers 


ap^ftol/cal 


antarctic 


anvil 


npotiecary 


ant^c/dence 


anxiety 


appall 


antecedent, \y 


anxious, Iy,n6ls app^ritus 


antedi^te 


any 


apparel 


anted/l«v/an 


apace 


apparent, ly. 


anteno^rid/an 


apirt, ment 
L 


[nefs • 
ap- 



A P P 

apparition 

apparitor 

app/al 

app/ar 

appearance 

app/alc, able 

appellant 

appellation 

appellative 

appendage 

appendix 

appertain 

appurtinance 

appet/te 

applaud 

applaufc 

apple 

appliable 

appl/cable 

appl/cition 

apply 

appoint, ment arbitrament 

app^fitejljjnefs arbour 

appraife arch, ly, nefs 

appraifer arct-^n^el 

appraifement arch-bi(bop 

apprehend arch- bifhoprick 

apprehenfion arch-d/acon; vy 

apprehenfive arch-duchcfs 

«>prentice, (hip arch-d«ke 

apprewch, able archer 

approbation archery 



ARC 

appr^prwte 

approve 

appr5ver 

ipr/cot, coc 

-^pril 

^pron, purn 

apt, ly, nefs 

zpxitudc 

iquidudt 

aquatic 

aqv\eous 

yirdhia 

yirdbiiin 

A'rjbic 

arable 

tfray 

arb/ter 

zrhitraiy 

arb/tr<?r/!y 

arbitr<£cion 

arbitrator 



ARM 

arc|>itype 

Arc^medes 

arch/peJtig^ 

arc|?/teft 

arct/teft«re 

arch/teft 

arch/ves 

arctic 

ardencjf 

ardent 

ardour 

ard«ous,|y,nefs 
are » 

area 

argent 

arg//e 

argument 

arg«ment4tiyc 
ar/an 

ariani/hi 

tfrfght 

avilt 

ariftocr^cjf 

ariftocratic 

AnQotle 

/arithmetic 

/arithmetical, Ijf 

/irithmeticiaa 

ark 

arm 

arm/^ment 

arminian 

irtnory 



ART 


ASP 


ASS 


armory 


articulate 


afp [rowgraft 


arnw/al . 


'iAWQuldiion 


afpar^jgujjfpar- 


armour 


art/fice 


alpen 


arms 


artif/cer 


afpeft 


Irmy 


art/iicial, ly 


afper/ty 


aromatic 


arciilcrjr 


alperfe 


around 


artffan 


alperfion 


airack 


anift 


a!p/r^c 


arraien, ment 


as 


afp/Mcion 


arrant 


^Taph 


afpfre 


arrafs 


afcerid 


afquint 


array 


afcendencjr 


afs 


arr/ars 


afcendent 


affail 


arr^ragc 


afcenfion 


aflailant 


arreft 


afcent 


afsafsin < 


arr/val 


afcertain 


afsafsmate 


arr/ve 


afcr/be 


afiafs/nition 


arr^aoce, cy 
arrogant, Ijr 


afcription 
aih 


affault 
aflay' 


arr^gtfte 


alhen 


aflfemblage 


arr^m • 


afh^s 


aflfemble 


arieoal 


tffbifre 


affembhf 


arfenic 


alh-wennifday afle^t 


aft 


^> 


aflert 


artlefs 


^acic 


aflertion 


ardefly 


tf/de - 


aflert^ry 


anlefnefs 


afk 


aflfefs, ment 


artmal 


afcaunt 


afleflbr 


artery 


afcue 


aflcts 


artful, ly, ncfs adlnt 


zSeverdtion 


artichoke, har 


/jfleep 


zisiduhy []j 


article 


tffl^pe 


afsidmusinefs. 




Lz 


afs/an^ 



AST 


ATT 


AU D 


afsfan, able. 


aftr^nom/cal 


attentive, fy. 


[ment aftron^my 


^ [nefs 


afHgnition 


ii/under 


atteni^^te 


afsi'anee 


^i^lum 


att^nt^cion 


afsimfl^te 


at 


attefl: 


zfsimildtion 


atchieve 


atteftition 


^fsift 


atch/evement, 


attfre 


tffsiftanoe 


[hatchment 


att/t«de 


^afsiitant 


dtheifm 


attorney 


afsfze 


dtbHa 


attradl 


alTefci^te 


athnft/cal, Ijf 


attraftion 


afT^dition 


atbens 


attraftive 


air^me 


aibirdy thurft 


attribute 


aflumption 


aibvfart 


attribiA:e 


aflKrance (afh] 


) atm^fph^re 


attribution 


affi/rc (a(h) 


atom 


attrition 


alKrcdly (afh) 


iit^ne 


^ivail 


alTwJge 


iit^nement 


iivailable, nefi 


aftcrilk 


atr(?cious, nefs 


, avaunt 


afteri/m 


atrocity [ly avarice 


afti^mtf 


ztrophy 


tfv^ricious, Ijr, 


aftibmatic 


attach, ment 


avzA [nels 


tf ftonifh 


attack 


auftion 


tfftonifhment 


attain, able. 


aufti^neer 


tfftray • 


[ment 


audacious, ly. 


i?ftr/de 


attainder 


[nels 


aftringency 


attaint, ure 


audacr^ . 


aftringent 


attempt 


audible, ]y,neis 


aftrobgcr 


attend 


audience 


aftr^log/'cal 


attendance 


audit 


aftrol^gy 


attendant 


aud/tor 


aftron^mer 


attention : 


aud/t(7ry 


- 


« 
• 


^'v^-m^ry 



AUR 

A've-maxy 
avenge 
avtngcr 
mnut 

tfver,rcd,tnent 
average . 
mrky ncfa 
flverfion 
flvert 
aii^er 
augment 
augmentation 
augur • • 
augural 
Auguft 
auguft, nefs 
Auguftuj 
Auguftinc 
imry 

aw'kward (kurd) 
[ly, nefs 
aunt 
a?0citioii 

ivoirdtfpoife 
Avouch 
flvow', ediy 
flvow'al 
auricttb (rec- 
tlu^) 
auricular 



A ZU 



B A I 



zxirota 

aufpidous, ly B* 

auft/re, ly, nefs 
aufterrty Bial 

Auftritf babble 

authentic, I7, bibe 
[nefs biby 
author baby ,, 

authoritative, bibel 
[ly baboon: 



auth^rFfe 
authority 
autom^tous- 
autumnal 
auxiii^r^ 
awe 
awYul 
avf^it 
avfakc^ n 
^w^rd 
avfdrt 
^way 
awl ^ 
awn 
a\»rf 
ax, axe- 
axiom 
axij 

axle- tree 
dzoxes^ 
dzsite.. 

L 3 



Bacei)Ui 
bachelor, fhip 
back . 
backb/te 
backs/de 
backfl/de, r 
backwiird, nefs 
bicoa 

bad, ly, nefs 
•badge 
badges 
baf&e> 
bag 

baggage 
baani^ 
bag-pFpe 
bail 

bailable 
bailiff 
bailiwick 
bait 

baize 

bakt 



b^ke 
biker 
Bilaatn 
balance 
hzlcdny^ bel 
b^d, ly, iiefs 

bJlderdalh 

hileful 

bJik 

bJll 

ballad, k€ 

ballaft 

ballifter 

b&llot 

baiuftn^e 

bSlm 

b^ifam 

bJlsamia 

B4ltic 

ban 

banditti 

bandage 

bandji 

b^ne 

bineful^ 

bang 

banifh 

banifter 

bank 

banker- 

bankrupt 

bankruptcy 



BAR 



B A S 



banner 


BarDAboi 


binnertc 


barnacle 


bann^ ' 


baromittt 


banquet 


baron 


banter, tt 


baroneft 


binding 


blrmet 


baptj/m 


bar^njr 


bapti/mftl 


barr^k 


b&ptift 


barrel 


bapt/ze 


barren, M& 


bar 


barrrtor 


barjtfjr 


barr/Cisde 


barb 


Wrrier 


barbtfrttti 


barrier 


hirharifm 


barrifter 


barbancj^ 


barr^to 


barbarous, ]y^ 


► barter 


[nefs Barthi61amew j 


barber 


bart^kam» 


barberrji 


hafe, ly, fiefs 


bard 


bafliaw 


btfre 


bafliful, ly, ndJ 


birefoot 


bas/lifk 


bargain 


hdCu 


barge 


balk 


bari^mot 
bark 


bafket 


hdfm 


barley 


bats 


barlcy.f/<!d 


baffoon 


barlcy-nK)W 


bas-r^l«?f 


barm 


b»ftatd 


barn-. 


baftardFze 


1 » 


ballardjf 



J 



B £ A 

ba(lard7 
b^fte 
BaOzle 
baft/nid^ 
baftion 
bac 
batch 
bath 
b^the 
batoon 
battalia 
battalion 
batten 
batter, cr 
battery 
/ battle 
battledM* 
battlement 
bauble 
bawd 
baw'dry 
baw'^djr 
bawl 

bayonet, bag 
bay 
be 

beach 
b/acon . 
b^d 
b/adle 
b^le . 
b^ak 



BED 

b&ker 
b^m 
b^an 
be^r 
beirer 
beard 
bcirdlefs 
b^ft, ly, bneis 
b^ac 
b^ten 
b^^^tific 
b^t/tz^de 
beau, b^ 
beaver 
beaufet, b^ 
beautj^ 
beauteous 
beaut/ful, Ijr 
beautify 
beaafj bos 
becalm 
becEufe 
beck 
beckon 
become 
becoming, \y, 
[ne& 
bcd^ 

bedaggie 
bedafii 
bedaub 
Bede 



BEG 

b^dew' 

bed-fel]0l» 

bedlam 

bedlamite 

bed- ridden 

bedftead ^ 

beduft 

bee 

beech 

beechen 

beef 

beef-eater 

Beeizebub 

been 

beer 

beefom 

beeftings 

beet 

beetle 

befJl 

befit^ 

befool 

bef<?re 

befoul 

befriend 

beg 

be^et 

began 

beggar^ Ijr, I/- 

[ne& 
beggtfrf 
be^in, ncr 

bij^' 



J E L 

begin 

b^got 

begotten 

b^giule 

b^gun 

behalf 

behave 

behaviour 

behead 

beheld 

b^heft 

behind 

b^b^ld 

b^h^'ldm 

bfhe?lder 

behoof 

behove 

b^ing 

b^libour 

belch 

beldam 

b^l^gtier 

belfry 

Belgic 

Beli3\ 

brf/ef 

brfieve 

beYitver 

bell 

bell^tD 

belktoa 



BEN 


B E S 


bell; 


bepifs 


belong 


bequeaib. 


beloved 


bequeft 


be\o\K^ 


bereave 


belfwagFer 


Berg^niot 


belt 


Berlin 


bely 


berry 


bemire. 


beryl 


bemaaa 


Brfant ' 


bench 


be/eech 


bencher 


be/cent 


bend, able 


\>ejet 


bendji 


besidts 


b^n/ap 


befiege, r 


benetjb 


befm&r 


ben^diftion 


befmdkc 


ben^fadion 


befmut 


benrfador 


b/fom 


benefice 


bejot 


b^nef/cence 


besought 


beneficial, ly 


befpatcer 


beneficiary 


befpaiil 


ben^c 


befp^k 


benevolence 


befp^c 


benevdent, ly brfprfnkle 


Bengal 


befp«e 


Benjamin 


beft 


benfghted 


baial, I> 1 


ben/8n,ly,neis beMlity ^ | 


benignitji 


beftink 


bent . 


beftir 


bendttik 


beft(^' 



beffrewr 



B I B 


B I R 


B L A 


bfftrew, ftr^' 


bicker 


bfrdl/me 


b^ftr/de 


bid, der 


Biroiinghanr 


b^ftrfdden 


bidden 


(Brum/jum) 


bet 


b/ennial 


birth (burth) 


b^tike 


bfcr 


birtb-rFght 


hefbink 


big 


bifliop 


belbought 


bigamy 


bifhoprick 


btft/de 


biggin 


bilket 


b^t/mes 


bignefs 


biffextilc , 


betoken 


bigot 


bit ' 


bet^ny 


bigotted 


bitch 


betray 


bigotry 


hite 


betroth 


bilander 


bitt 


better 


bilberrjr 


bitten 


brtween 


bilbi^^es 


bitter 


betwixt 


Wle 


• bittern 


b/ver ' 


bilious 


httumen 


beverage 


bilk 


bn^cnmous 


bevil 


bill 


blab 


bewail 


billet 


blabber 


beware 


billet-do^ip 


black 


bewildered 


billiard 


black-berries 


bewitch 


bilbto 


blackbird 


betoray 


b/nd 


(burd) 


beyond 


b/nder 


blacken 


b^ 


binn 


blackifti 


bez^tr 


binocle 


black/m^or 


bezzle 


b/ogr^phy 


blackmoor 


bias 


b/ogr^iphcr 


black-rod 


bib 


birch (^burch) blackrftnith 


bibber 


. birchen 


bladder 


b/ble 


bird (burd) 


bkde 


' 




blain 



b^ke 
biker 
Bilaatn 
balance 
hzlcony^ bel 
bJld» ]yj iiefs 

bJlderdalh 

bileful 

bJik 

bJll 

ballad, fee 

Hltaft 

baUifter 

b&llot 

baiuftn^e 

bSlm 

b^fam 

b^lsa^ia 

B4ltic 

ban 

banditti 

bandage 

bandji 

b^ne 

bineful 

bang 

banifh 

banifter 

bank 

bankef' 

bankrupt 

b^kruptcjr 



BAR 

banner 
binnertc 
banofr ' 
banquet 
banter, er 
b&htling 
bapt|/m 
bapti/mal 
baptift 
bapt/ze 
bar 

bar^tfjr 
barb 

barbtftttti 
barb/7riyin 
barbar/cj^ 
barbarous, ]y^ 
[nefs 
barber 
barberrji 
bard 
bjre 
birefoot 
bargain 
barge 
bar|:^mot 
bark 
bzvlty 

barley-fJifd 
barlgf.nx>W 
barm 
barni 



B AS 

Barn^bai 

barnacle 

baromitct 

baron 

baroneft 

blr^et 

bar^njr 

ban-dck 

barrel 

barren, M& 

barrator 

hzrrkadc 

bSrrier 

barrier 

barrifter 

barr^to 

barter 

BarthtSl^mew 
bart^knMi 

b^jfef bj Dcfs 
bafliaw 

ba(hful,ly,ne/i 

bas/lifk 

hdCis 

balk 

bafltet 

hdfm 

bak 

baffoon 

bas-r^M* 

baftatd 

baftardFze 

baitardf 



BE A 

hz&axdy 
btffte 
Bafl;1e 
baftmid^ 
baftioti 
bat 
batch 
bath 
b^the 
batoon 
battalia 
battalion 
batten 
batter, cr 
battery 
/ battle 
battled^or 
battlement 
bauble 
bawd 
baw'diy 
baw'dy 
bawl 

bayonet, bag 
bay 
b^ 

b^ach 
b/acon . 
b^d 
beadle 
beagle ^ 



BED 

beaker 
beam 
bean 
bf^r 
better 
be^rd 
beirdlefs 
bead:, ]y^ bnefs 
beat 
beaten 
beaii&c 
beat/c»de 
beau, b^ 
beaver 
beaufet, b^ 
beauty 
beauteous 
beautiful, ly 
beautify 
beatt^, b^s 
becalm 
becaufe 
beck 
beckon 
become 
becoming, ly, 
|^ncj& 
bed^ 

b^aggle 
bedafii 
bedaub 
Bede 



B E G^ 

b^dew' 
bed-fell^ 
bedlam 
bedl^mne 
bed- ridden 
bed (lead ^ 
beduft 
bee 
beech 
beechen 
beef 

beef-eater 
Beelzebub 
been 
beer 
beefom 
beefting^ 
beet 
beetle 
befJl 
befit 
befool 
before 
befoul 
befriend 
beer 
bejet 
b^gan 

beggar^ ly, ii^ 
[ncli 
beggary 
b^^in, ncr ^ 



J E L 

Seginnin^ 
hegirx 

b^got 

begotten 

hegailc 

b^gun 

b^hilf 

behave 

hehdviour 

behead 

beheld 

b^heft 

behind 

b^h(?ld 

b^h^dm 

bfh^lder 

behoof 

b^h5ve 

b^ing 

b^libour 

belch 

beldam 

b^l^gtier 

belfry 

Belgic 

BeM 

brf/ef 

brf/eve 

bfl/ever 

bell 

bell^tD 

belktoa 



BEN 

bell^ 

bWong 

brfovcd 

be\o\B 

belfwagjcr 

belt 

be\y 

bemirc 

b^m^an 

bench 

bencher 

bend) able 

bendy 

b^n/ap 

bermtb 

ben^diftion 

ben^fadion 

benrfaftor 

benefice 

b^nef/cence 

beneficial, ly 

benfficiary 

ben^c 

benev^knce 

benevolent, ly 

BengJl 

Benjamin 

ben/ghted 

ben/8n,ly,neis 

benign/tji 

bent . 

benumfr 



B E S 

bepifs 

bequeath. 

bequeft 

bereave 

Bergjniot 

Berlin 

berry 

beryl 

Befant 

be/eech 

befccm 

bej/des 

be/iege, r 

befmear 

befm^^ke 

befmuc 

befool 

be/ot 

besought 

beljpatter 

belpaiil 

befp&k 

before 

befcrinkle 

be(p«e 

beft 

beftial, ]> 

beMlity 

beftink. 

beftir 

heM^ 

beffrcwr 



BIB 


B I R 


B L A 


bfftrew, ftr^ 


bicker 


birdlime 


b^ftr/de 


bid, der 


Birminghanr 


b^ftr/dden 


bidden 


(Brum/jum) 


bet 


bJennial 


birth (burth) 


b^tike 


bJer 


birtb-rzgbt 


bethink 


big 


bifliop 


heibougjit 


bigamy 


bifhoprick 


hetidc 


biggin 


bilket 


b^t/mes 


bignefs 


biflextHe . 


hetoktn - 


bigot 


bit 


bet^njr 


bigocted 


bitch 


brtray 


bigotry 


bite 


brtroth 


bilander 


bitt 


better 


bilberry 


bitten 


b^wcen 


bilb^^es 


bitter 


h^twfxt 


b/ie 


^ bittern 


bfecr 


bilious 


bTtumen 


beverage 


bilk 


hhumitiow 


bevil 


bill 


blab 


bmail. 


billet 


blabber 


hevfdre 


billct-d«5k 


black 


bwildercd 


billiard 


black-berries 


Witch 


bilbto 


blackbird 


hrtDfay 


bmd 


(burd) 


beyond 


b/nder 


blacken 


b^ 


binn 


blackifli 


b^ar 


binocle 


blackim^or 


bezzle 


b/6grtfphjf 


blackmoor 


b/aj 


bFogr^pher 


black-rod 


bib' 


birch (burch) black-fmith 


bibber 


• birchen 


bladder 


b/ble 


bird (burd) 


bbde 


* 




blam 



B LI 



B L U 



blain blifsful 

hUmCy Icfe, blifter 

[leify bine 
blirnitableinefs^ bl/che, iy, neis 
blanch blnhefome 

blandifhnyent bl^at 
blank hlocddc 

blanket block 

bl^re blockhead 

blafph/me blockifti, ly, 
blafph^mous,ly [nefs 

blafph^my blood 



blaft 

hlazc 

blizon 

blizoniy 

bl«ich 



bioodmeis 
bloodied 
blood (bed 
bloodfhot 
bI6odjr,/Iy,/n€fi 



bl^k, ly^ neis bloom, ^ 
bltfar:ey*d bloffom 



bl^ac 
bled 
bleed 

blemllh 

blend - 

blefs 

bleflcdncfs 

blefJmg- 

bl/^ht 



bloc 

blotced 

blotch 

bbt0 

bld?ber 

hlotBti 

blowze 

blubber 

bl«e 



blmd, Ij^, nefs bl«i(h, nefe 

bl/ndt.;ld bluff ' 

blink blunder, er 

blifs blunderbufs 



B O L 

blunt, ly, nefs 
bluntifh 
blur 
blurt 
blufh 
blufter 
b^ar 
homfh 
b^ard, er 
b^aft, er^ ingljr 
b^at 

b^'atftoain 
bob 

bob-tail 
bobiMA 
b^de 
bodice 
bod/l/. 
bodkin 
Bodl^n 
bodjr 
bog' 
boggjF 
boggle 
boil, er 
boifterous, Ijt^ 
[nefs 
b^ld, ly, neik 
b^le 

blifter 
bolt 

bolter 



BOO 

belter 

b^^-fprit 

Mas 

bomd 

bombard 

bombardier 

bombafl: 

bombaftic 

bombjz/ne 

bond 

bondage 

bondman 

boadf-man 
b^ne 

bonf/re 

bongr/ice 

bonnet 

bonn^ 

b^'njf • 

booby 

book 

book- binder 

Wki{h,lj^,nels 

book-keeping 

iook-keeper 

bookfeUcr 

boom 

boon • 

boor 

bo6ri(h,ly>ncfe 

boofe 

boot 



bootlefs 
booty 
boo/i& 
b^-peep 
borage 
border, cr 
b^re 
born 
b^rne 
borough 
borr^tD 
borstrfder 
bofom 
bof&s 
boc/inics 
bot^nift 
bot^nj^ 
botch, ingJy 
botcher 
b^th 
bottle 

bottom, lefs 
bottomrj^ 
bough 
bought 
boult, er 
bounce,r,ingly 
bound 
bound lels 
boundary 
bounteous, ly, 
[ne£i 



BRA 

bount^uU fys 
[nds 
bounQr 
bout 
b^tD 
bow 
bow'el 
bower 

bowljing-grccn 
bow'ler 
box 
boy 

boyi(h, ly, nefe 
br^ice, r 
bracelet 
brack 
bracket 
brackifb, nefs 
brads 
brag 

bragg^d^'cw 

braggard 

braid 

brain 

br^^ke 

brakes 

Bramans 

bramble 

brae 
branch 
brand 

brandirttD(urn) 
brandiih 



B R E 

brandi(h 

brandy 

branglc, r 

brangling 

brafs 

brafl^^ 

bmficr 

brat 

bravado 

br<2ve, ]y 

brivery 

hvdvo 

brawl, er 

brawn, inefs 

braw'ny 

bray 

braze 

brazen 

brazier 

br^ch 

bread 

breadth 

bre^k 

breakfaft - 

br^am 

breaft-plate 

breathlefs 



B R I 

br^c 
breviary 
breviatc 
brev/tj 
brew 

brcw'hou/e 
brcw'cr 
brcw'is 
br/be, er 
br/bcrjr 
brick 
brick-kiln 
brfdal 
br/dc 

br/degroom 
bridge 
brfdle 

brief, jy, ncfs 
br/er 
bngtfde 
brigtfd/cr 
brigant/nc 
bright, i(h, ly, 
[ncfs 
brilliant 
brim 
brimil^ne 
brindled 



brrathe 

breech«,brich br/nc 
breed, er, ing br/niih 
breeze bring 

brethren brink 



B R O 

briny 

briony 

brifk, ly, nefs 

brifket 

biistle 

bristlj^ 

Brift^f 

Britain 

Br/'tann/tf 

Bririfh 

Briton 

brittle, nefs, ily 

breach, er 

broJd, ly, neis 

broJd-sFdc 

br^c^de 

broc^ly, la 

brogut 

broii, er 

br^ke 

broken 

br^er 

br^Tcerage 

brood 

brook 

broom 

broth 

brothel - 

brother, hood, 

brought [\y 

brow 

brown, ifli 

browzc 



B U F 

ferowze 

hrutk 

bruit 

hruaiBl 

brunt 

brufh,cr,wood 

br/?tal, ly 

bi»tal/r^ 

br«te 

br/?ti(h, ly, nefs 

bubble 

bubbjr 

bubo 

buccan/cr 

buck 

buck-thorn 

buck -weed 

buck-wh^ac 

bucket 

buckle, r 

buckram 

b»c6lics 

loickfom, ly, 

•M [nefs 

budge 

budget 
buff 

buff^b 

buffet 

buffle 

buffoon 

buffoonrjf 



BUN 

bug 

bugbear 

b//gle 

build 

building 

builder 

built 

bulb 

bulbous 

b/7ifinch 

'Jbulge. 

bulk, ^'j: /nefs 
b«]l 

bollock 

b^lrufli 

bulwark 

bi?llace 

ballet 

bullion 

b^lly 

bum 

bumble 

bump 

biimpkin 

bunch, _y, /nefs 

bundle, w/fe 

bung , 

bung-h^le 

btingle, r 

bunglingly 

bunn 

bunt 

M 



BUS 

bunter , 

buoy 

buoyant 

burden 

biirden&me, 

[neft 
bfirdoc 
bureau, ro 
burgf> ^ 
burgefs 
burg|>er 
burglar 
burglar/ 
burg<5mafter, 
huriai, berin 
burlefquc 
burley 
burnifh, er 
burnt 
burr 
burr<?to 
burfer 
burft; en 
bury (ber) 
b^fli, V, /nefs 
b^ffiel 
bufk 
bufkin 
bufy (bis) 
bcifinefs (bis) 
bufs 
bull 

buftard 



1 



'C A'B 


C A L 


'buftard 


ctfcljexy 


4>uftle 


. cackte 


but 


Mdav^rous 


butcher, v, h 


cidencfi 


butler 


Ctfdet 


*utt 


'cadc6 


butter 


cjde-lamb 


^butterflj 


OTar 


:^buttery 


cag 


t)uttook 


Caiph^s 


/button 


buttrcfs 


€aj6iQ ' 


ihiiy . 


cake 


buyer 


c^?]am/tous 


buz 


calimity 


'buzzfird 


ca\ii{h 


^y 


calc/n^ion - 


by-bkUi 


calc/ne 


>by-law 


calc^l^te 


Irfway 


calcination 


liw-word 


calrfaftion 


^r 


calendar 


c 


calender, drer 


- 


calends 


Cab 


calf 


c^bal 


calidity 


cabfllift 


cdViff 


.cab^lifttcal , 


caliph 


cabbage 


calkj er 


<iabbin 


c51l, ing 


fCabiaet 


calked 


*c^bk 


.calligr^by 



CAN 

callmianc^ 

callq^cy 

callous 

calm • 

calve 

calv/ni/m 

Ci^vary 

caliinwiate 

calumnrV7tion 

calummitCM: 

calumny 

calx 

cimbrick 

Cambridge 

c^ime 

camel 

cjm/l^on 

camlet 

camomile 

camp 

campaicn 

cam phi re 

can 

Canaan 

Ci^nal 

canary 

cancel 

cancer 

cancerous 

candid, Iv, nefa 

cand/djte : 

candle 

icandl^ 



CAP 

candlemaj 

candleftick 

candour 

dndy 

c^ne 

Can/bal 

cmcuhv- 

canin^ 

can/lie r . 

cankefi^- 

cannon 

caanon^e 

cannot 

canon 

canon/cal 

dnonJzc 

can^n/zicion 

D/no6 

canopy 

wn(?fous 

cant 

Canterbury, 

(ber) 
canthar/d^s 
canticles 
canton 
canvaj 

canvafs, cr 
cap 

capable 
c^picious 
c^paczcflte ' 
capac/ty 



C A R' 

cap/zpee 
Crtpar//ba 
c^pe 
ciper ■ 
capillary 
cap/taU 
cap/t4tion. 
cap/tol 
cjpit^l^te 
cap/t»licion 
G^pon- 
caprice 
capricious, ly, 
[nefs 
Capr/corn 
capftan 
captain 
captious, ly, 
[nefs 
captive 
captivate 
captmtjr 
capture 
cap^chi'ne 
car 

car^b/ne v 
car^b/oeer 
carat 
car<3van 
ciraw2Lys 
carb/ne 
carb/'neer. 
carbuncle 
M 2 



t*- A' Ki 

carcaye 

carcJ 

card/ac: 

carcjmal 

card«uj 

c^re 

cireful, ly, nefe- 

cirelcfly 

cirelefnefs 

cirdefs- 

careen 

Ci^reer 

c^refs 

cirec 

carga ' 

calk 

Carl/j3le 

carminative 

carnage 

carnal, ly, nefs 

carnainv 

carnicion- 

carnival 

carnivorous 

Carc?l/na 

carol 

c^roufe 

carp 

carpentetr 

carpentry 

carpet 

carriage 

earner 

carrion 



*\ 



CAS 

carrion 

carrot 

carroufol 

carry 

cart, er 

cartel 

cart/I age 

cart/lagmous 

cartoon 

cartridge 

carto^ch 

car\?e 

carver 

cafcide 
cafe 

cifement- 

cafli 

cafli&r 

cafk 

cafkct 

chilia 

caflbck 

caft, ers 

cafti^ntt 

cafttfway 

caftfg^tion 

caftle 

caftor 

caftrJtion 

caftr^tc 

caftrcl 

cMuaX 



CAT 

cafiyally 

cafwaltjf 

cafaift 

cafaift/cal 

cat 

cat^c^mbs 

catalogue 

cat^mne 

cat^raft 

Ctftarr|> 

catiHrcphe 

catch 

catch-p^fe 

cattfc|)et/cal 

cat^c|)i/m 

cat^c!)ifl: ' - 

cat^cjFze ' 

cat<?c&//mcn 

car^goiical 

cater 

caterer 

cater-pillar 

catt^rine 

catf?arine 

CrtthJrtic 

c^th/dral 

cathii?lic ' 

c^thol/ci/ln ' 

caiholicon 

catoptrics 

c^tterw^wling 



C E L 

cattle 

cavalcide 

ciivaVz<:r 

cavalrj^ 

caudle 

c^ve 

civ^at 

caveat 

cavern 

cavernous 

caught 

cavy,ler,IineTji 

cav/ty 

caul 

cauldron 

caiifal 

caulal/tjf 

caufe 

cau.^Fg 

cau/eway 

cauftic 

cautmze 

caut^rjf 

caution 

cauti(?njry 

cautious, ly, 

[ncfs 
c^a/e 
c^'dar 
c^de 

cel^br^tc 
celf brrnion . 

c^lcr/ye 



C E IT 

I 

wler/ty 

deftial 

cell 

cellar, age-' 

cels/t«de 

cement 

c^ment^ 

cenfer 

cenfor 



certain, Ij, nefs' 
certainty 

certif/c^ce- 

ciniiy 

cerufs / ' 

eels 

ceffitiont-' 

ceffion 

ceflfor 



Gcnfo'rioosjneft ch^cc' 
cenf«rable,acfs chad ' 
ecu fere cfi^^fe ' 

centaur chafF, jr 

centaury' chaffer 

center chaffinch* 

cent/ncl ch^fing-dilh 

central chagrin 

ctntrifegal chain 
centripetal- chair 
centry ^j&aife 

centry-box cl^aldee 
cent//pl6 G^aldiic 

centmoa c^ald^an 

century chaldern 

cephalic. chalice 

C€rtfte chalky y' 

Cerbfruj challenge 

cire-cloth^ • dalybesit 
Gcremon/al cl^am 
G£remon/clus, lychamdde'^ 
^ciemony chamber 

M 3 



C H A 

chamber, ing- 

chamberlain 

chan)p 

champain 

r<&amptiflne" 

champ/on 

chance 

chance-medlrjp^ 

chancel 

chancellor 

chancerjy 

chandler 

ch/2nge, r 

changeable, 

[neS** 
chjjngeling 
channel 
chant 
chanter 

chap 

ch^pe 

chapel 

chapelry ' 

ehaplaia ' 

chaplet 

chapman- 

chapter 

cijarafter 

c&arafteriftic 

e!)ara(5ter/ze 

chire-i 



C H A 

ch^re-woman 

charge 

chargeable^nefs 

charger 

ch^ring-crofs 

chariot 

charioteer 

char/tabJe, nefs 

char/tabljr 

chirhy ' 

Charles 

Cifcarlotte 

charm,ing,nefs 

charmingly 

charmer 

charqcl 

Chiron 

c|)art 

chart 

C!?artel 

charier 

ch^r^ 

ch^ye, r 7 

cjja/m 

ch^fte, Iv, nefs 

ch^ften • 

chtfft/fe, r 

chiftiftment 

chi^ftifement 

chdAiiy 

chat 

chattels 

chatterj 



C HI 

channt 

chauntrj 

ch^ap, nefs 

cheapen 

ch^ar 

ch/arful, IjK^nefs 

cheavy 

ch<?at, er 

check 

checker 

check-m^tc 

cheek 

cheer 

cheefe 

cheefe-c^ke 

cherilh, er 

cherrj^ 

cherub 

ch6rubitn 

chefs 

cheft 

chevaYkr 

chew 

ch/cine 

chkdnQvy 

chick 

chicken 

chid 

chidden 

ch/de 

ch/dingly 

chief 

chieftain 



C-H O 

chilblain 
child 

chndhood 
ch/ldi{h,ly,nels 
children 
chill 
ch/me 
ctitmera 
c!?Fmer/caI, I7, 
[nefs 
chimney 
chin 

chin-cough, 
(cofF) 
china, chin^ 
ch/ne 
chink 
chints 
chip 

cl^Trogr^phjf 
chirp 
c|)7rurgeon 
cj^Frurger^ 
c|?Frurgical 
chit 

chitterling 
chivalry 
ch/Ves 
chizzel 
chocokte 
choice, ly, ne(s 
c?>o/r, quire 

ch<?ke 

choky 



cpokr 

doleric 

ciolk 

choofe, r 

chop 

donl 

c^rd 

cjorifter, quir 

ciovography 

ciorogrzphicsA 

QiOTUS 

ch^Ten 

chouye, r 

c!in/hi 

Cjr/ft 

(Jriften, dom, 

ciiriftian [ing 

c!>rift/an/ty 

cjriftmaj 

cjron/cal 

cjronicle 

cljr^nol^ger 

4r^n0l6g/ca1, 

cjwnobgy 

chub 

chubby 

chuckle 

chuffy 

ehum 

chump 

church, ing 



C I R 

churl 

churlifli, ly, 

churn [nefs, 

cf^le 

c^ylification 

chyWcal 

chymift 

chymiftrj^ 

cicatrice 

cic^trfze 

Cicero 

Cic^r^mian 

c/der 

c/eling 

cim/ter 

cfn6t«re 

cinder 

cinnabar 

cinnamon 

cinque 

cinquefoil 

cion 

c/pher, ing 

Circle, fur 

Circuit 

Circular 

circ«ltfte 

circulation 

circulatory 

circumamb/ent 

circumcFre 

circumcifion 

circumference 



C L A 

circumflex 
circumbc/^tion 
circumfcr/be 
circumfpeft, 
[ly, ncfs 
circumfpedlion 
circumftance 
circumftantial, 
circumvent [ly 
circumvention 
C/rencefter, 

[Cicrter 
ciftern 
cit^^deL 
cFtition 
c/te 
citizen 
citron, turn 
cit^ 
c/ves 
civet 

civil, ly, nefs 
civilian 
civility 
civ/lFze 
clack, er 
clad 

claim 

claimant 

claimable 

clamber 

clammmefs 

claoimy, 

clam- 



1 



C L E 

clamorous, Ij, 
[nefs 
damour 
clamps 
clan 

clanc^Ur 
clandeftine, Ij, 
clang [ncis 
clap 
clapper 
clarencieu^ 
claret 
clarify 
clar/ftcition 
clary 
clalh 
clafp 
clafs 
claffic 
claflical, ly- 
clatter, 
cbve 
claufe 
claw 
clay . 
clayey 
cl^an 

cleanlmefs 
clean Ijy 
ckannefs 
clean/e, r 
ckar, ly, nefs 

5 



GEO 

cleave 

cl/avcr 

cleft 

demcncjf 

clernent 

clenchy er 

cler/cal 
clerk 



c L r 

cloifter 
cbke-bag 
cl<?fe 

' cb/e, ]y, nefc 
elofct • 
clot 
cl5th 
cbthe 
clct^zs 



cKver, Ijf^ nefsrcb'ch/er- 



clew 

click 

cl/cnt 

difF 

clift 

cl7ma6lcric 

climate 

cUtnh 

clinch 

cling 

clin^jr 

clink 

cUo 

clip, per 

dipping 

dipt 

cl^atl^s 

clock 

clod" 

cfcSddy^ ' 

clogs 

clogging 



cloths 

cloud, /ly 

cloudmels* 

cloudy 

clove 

cbVen 

clever 

clout 

clown 

clow'nifla, ly; 

cloy [ncfs> 

club 

clubbifli 

cluck 

clumy?Iy 

clum^nefr. 

clutnjy 

clung 

cliifter 

clutches 

cluttef 

clyfter, glyf 

coachr 



^ 



CO c 

coadi 

c^dion 

wadj«tor 

wagaltfte 

mguhtion 

c^aks 

Qoalcfcc 

coalckcncc 

coalition 

warfe 

waft, er 

cwifting 

c^at 

cob 

cobble 

cobler 

cob-nut 

cobweb 

coch/n^ 

cock 

cockidc 

cocki^hoop 

cockatrice 

cocker 

cockerel 

cocket 

cockle 

cockney 

cockpit 

cockliwin 



CO H 

cod 

coddle 

cede 

codicil 

codling 

c^"- efficient 

coercion 

coercive 
c<?efreacial 
ce-^in^ous 
c<?-fternal 

ce-exiftcnt 

coffee, -houfe 

coffer, cr 

coffin 

c6g, gfcr 

C(?gency 

c^genr,^ ]y 

cog/t^ce 

cognition 

cog/t^tivc 

cognizance 

c^rabit 

cohabitation 

coieir 

c^l^Srefi 

cohe're 

coherence 

coherency 

ce?h/fcn.tjly,nefs 



COL 

coheCioa 

G(?hort 

coif 

coil 

coin, er 

coinage 

coincide 

coincident 

colt 

coition 

•coke 

Goke 

cold, Ijr, nefs 

coldilh 

coUapied 

collar 

collate 

eolation 

collateral 

colleft 

coiica 

coUedioft 

coUcftivc 

colledtor 

college 

coll/giaii: 

coWegiato - 

collegue 

collier 

collifion - 

collogue 

(toHop 

coll^^quj 



CON 

concert 
conceflion 
conciliate 
condliatcry 
concinmry 
concfre,ly,neis 
concifion 
conclave 
conclude 
conclf/fion 
<;oncliiifive, ly, 
[nefs 
cpncodt 
concodtion 
concomnanqy 
concom/tant 
concord 
concord 
concordance 
concordant 
concfturfe 
concrete 
concretion 
concubinage 
c6nc«bine 
conc«p/Tcence 
conc«pifcible 
concur . 
concurrence 
concurrer\t 
concurfion 
concuffion. 



CON 

condemn 

condemnable 

condemnation 

condenf^tiorl 

condenfe 

cond^fcend 

cond^fcenfion 

cond/an 

condign 

condition 

conditional, \y 

condyle 
cond(?lence 

condonation 

condi^ce 

cond/^cible, ]y 

cond/kive 

c6ndu6l 

condudt 

condudor 

conduit 

cone 

coney 

confabftlition 
confiihulaiory 
confeftioner 
confederacy . 
confederate 
confer, ring 
conference 
confefs, cdly 
confeiBon 



C ON 

confeflbr 

conf/dc 

confidence 

confident, \y 

confine 

confines 

confinement 

confirm 

confirmation 

confifc^^te 

confiicitioo 

conSagritioa 

c6nfli<5t 

conflid: 

confluence 

conflux 

conform,able 

conformation 

conform id 

conformity 

confound, e6]y 

confront , 

confftfe, djy 

conftffion 

confi^rition 

confute 

congeal, able 

conge-dVl/'er 

congee 

con&enidl 

conger/es 

confer 

con- 



CON 

congl^t/ntfte 

coHgvztulate 

congratulation 

congriLtulatcry, 

congr^gtfte 

congr^gition - 

congrefs 

congruence 

c6ngr«ent 

QongTuity • 

congruous 

conic 

con/cal 

conjedbirral 

coDJeft«re, r 

conjoin 

mjugzU ly 
conjtfg^te 
conj«g/7tion 
conjundtly 

conjundtion 

coDJunfture 

conj»rition 

conjare 

conjare, r 

conn 

connate 

connatm'al 

conneft 

conneftion 

connivance 



CON 

connive 

conmfbral 

conquer 

conquerable 

conqueror 

conqueft- 

confanguin/ty 

confcience 

confc/entious, 

[Ir 

confci^nable 
confcious 
confcioufnefs 
coniircrtfte 
conHrcrition 
confent 
confentin^us 
con&quence 
CQnHfquent 
confirquential 
confervition 
coufervitor 
confervtft^rjr 
conicrve 
consider 
considerable 
considerably 
considerate 
confiderition 
consian, ment 
consimilar 
confifl: 
N 



CON 

consiftence 

consiftency 

consiftent, ly 

confiftmal 

confift^ry 

conf^lable 

con£?lition 

confoltft^ry 

conf61/d<7te 
confenance 
con&nancy 
c6nf(7nant, ly 
confbrt 
confort 
confp/c^'ty 
confpicKous, ]y 
conlpirtfcy 
conlpir<7torj 
qonlprre 
conftable, (hip 
conftancy 
conftant, ly 
confteiytion 
conilernition 
conft/pition 
conftir«ent 
conftrtate 
CQn&huiion 
conftrain^ ediy 
conitrainc 
conftru£t 
conftrudtion 
con- 



CON CON 



COM 



conftruftive^Ijr content, ed^ contxadi&oty 
conftnre, Jftur concention comnidiftia£t 
cofifubftaniial contentious,^, conrrtfmcy 
coniuhftantui- [nels contrinly 

[cion contentoaent contMnvvFre. 



conteft 

conteft 

<conteftabiIe 

context 

oontextirre 

contig«rQr 



contrary 

contraft 

contribote 

contr/biitiQtB 

contribttcor 

contrFce 



confol 
con&lar 
cdnfoLtce 
confult, e^ 
confultition 
coniumc^ r 

confummdte contiguous, 1^, contrtcion 
confumniition [nefs contrfvance 

coniumption cont/ncncy contr/vc, r 
confomptive cont/ncnt, I7 contr^ 
contacSk contingence contr^ler 

contigfon contingency controverfiai 
conuzgibus, \yy contingent, \y contr^veriy 
[neis continual, ly controvert 
contain continiranoe 

contamiWte contin«acion 
contam^^tion continice 
contemn, er contini^'ty 
contemplate ' contortion 
contemplation contraband 
contemplative contraft 
contemporary contraft, 
contemplitor [ednefe conv^lefcengr 

contempt contra&ion convi^ne 
contemptible contmdift convenience, 
contemptuous, con tradition convenient, Jjv 
contena [ly contradidtive [neis 

' convent 



X • 



cont«nf)4K:ious» 
[)y, nefs 

contirmtfcy 

conuirmei^us» 
[iy, neia 

conttfmeiy 

cbnti{fion 

convi^lefcence 



C ON 

convent 

conventicle 

conventioa 

convergent 

converfable, 

[nefi 
converfaDt 
converficion 
convcrfe 
converie , 
oottverfioa. 
Goavert 
oonvett 
convertible 
convex 
convex/cj^t^^ 
convS! 
convfsance 
oonvfrancet' 
coav^r 

OODvift 

convidt 

Qonvidion 

oonvince 

convincinglji' 

Gonvpcicton 

coBvoke 

conundrum^ 

convoy 

convoy 

ccinvulHon 

coavulfive 



C OR 

eoo 

cook 

cookery 

cool^ iihi nefs 

coomli 

coop 

cooper 

c^oper^tc 

c^operr^cion 

w-operotor 

coot 

GOp 

copartner 

c^pe 

copecoican 

c^pious,lj^€& 
copifl: 

copper 
copperaiT 
coppice, 
copic 
coptfhite 
copidittoft 
copirLitive 
c^. 

copy-h^W" 
cdquecce 
coqutfirjf 
coral 
cord 
cordage 
cordd/er 
N^2: 



CO Ifc 

cordial^ Ijr^ oeft 

cord/aticy 

cordwainer 

c^re 

c^riaftder' 

Cdcinth 

Oriathiao 

cork 

cormorant 

corn 

cQrn^'aa 

corner 

cornet 

comilh 

Gorolkry 

coronal. 

cor«n4ltion 

coroner 

cor^aei. 

corporal,- ly 

corp^rattt/ 

corp^rtfte 

corp^iY^kxn 

corpmal 

corpmity ' 

corps^tf^cpr 

corpttlcficy 

corpi^lent^ hi& 

corpufcle 

corpufctfla^ 

correftjly, efi^ 

corre&ion 

tor*- 



COS 

correftive 
correAor 
Gorrefe6nd 
cotTcipond- 

[ence 
correfpdhdenc 
corrigtble 
corr/val 
corroborate 
corroboricioo 
corroborative 
corrode 
corri^fion 
corri^iive, nefs 
corrupt,ly,nefs 
corruptibil/ty 
corruptible 
corruption 
corruptive 
corfair 
coriHet 
cofen 
cofenage 
cq/metic 
co/mogrjpher 
cq/mograph/- 

[cal, ly 
co/mogr^phy 
cq/mologjr 
coflfack 
coft, ly, 1/nefs' 
coftive, nefi 



CO u 

cot 

cotempor^ry 

cottage 

cotten 

couch 

cove 

covmapt 

cover v; 

coverlet 

covertly 

coverture 

covet 

covftous, ]y, 

[nefs 
cough, cofT 
C0«id 
coulter 
council 
counfel 
counfellor 
count 

coiantmance ^ 
counter 
counter*bilance 

counterbond 

counterfeit 

countermand 

counter-mine 

counterfcarp 

countefs 

country 

county 



C R A 

capped 
couple 
couplet 
courage 
courigfous, ]y, 
courant [nefs 
courier 
c^irfe 
coiirfcr 

court, ly, linefs 
court^us, ly^ 
[nefs 
court^an 
court^ 
courchce 
courtfhip 
co(iGn 
covey 
cow 
cow'ard> ly, 

[lineii 
cow'ardice 
cow'-herd 
cow'ilip 
coxcomb 
coxcom/cal 
coy, ly, nefs 
cozen 
cozenage 
crab, bedly 
crack 
crackle 

cracker 



CRE 

cracker 

cracknel 

crddk 

craft, ilyj /ncfi 

crafty 

crag,ged,gedlj 

craggy 

cram. 

crambo - * 

cramp ^ 

crampoon 

cramp-Trons, 

crinage [urm 

crtfne 

crank. 

crankle 

cranny 

erjpe 

cra(h' 

crafsic^de 

cratch 

cravat 

cw ve 

crivingly 

crawl 

craw-fiflv 

cray.filh 

criziljfk 

tvdiineik 
crazy . * 
aenk - 



C R I 


C R O 


cr^a/e 


crim/nal?ty 


cr^itc: 


crimp 


cr^ition- 


crim/bn' 


Cr^itor 


cringe 


cr«iturc 


crinkle- 


cr/dcnce 


cripple 


cr^ential 


er/fii^ 


cred/bil/tjr 


crifp 


credible, ncffr 


cr?r/r/or¥ 


credibly 


critic 


credit 


crit/cai,lyinefe 


cred/table 


critici/m 


cred/tably 


crit/cJfe 


cred/ror 


cr^ak 


credulity 


crock 


credulous 


croccd/le 


creed 


cr^'cui 


creep, er 


croft 


crefeent ' 


eroijide 


creSes 


cr^ny 


creft 


crook- 


Cr^te 


crooked, ly^, ' 


crevice 


crookle [ncfe 


crew 


crop 


crew'cl 


crdskrr 


crew'ec 


croflet: 


crib 


crofs 


cribbage- 


crotchet 


crick. 


croucb 


cricket 


croftp 


cr/me 


cropper ^ 


criminal, ly 


cr^te. 


Ni 


cn9wdi 



CUB 

crowd 
crown 
crow'ner 
cr^ci^ice 

crucible 

crucify 

crucifix 

cruciiixion 

crude^ ]y, nefs 

crudi^ 

crricl, \f 

crz/elty 

cr^fe, er 

crumb 

crumble 

crummjr 

crumple 

crupper 

crusadj^ 

crutch^ 

crufh 

craft 

cr% , 

cry 

crjtv 

cryftal 

cryftalline 

cryftsdbMtioo 

cryftallike 

cub 

<uht 

Cifbic • 



CUR 


cu s 


c^blt 


c^r^te 


cuckold, Vf 


curb 


cifckoo 


curd 


Ctfck^ia 


curdle 


cucumber,cou 


c«re 


cud 


curfcu 


ciidgcl, log 


c«r/4^j^ 


ci^e 


c/vr/ous,l)r>iie& 


dtfrafs 


curl ' 


otfrafsifer 


curlieu 


cuMnary 


curtn^dgcon 


cull 


curr 


cuUendar 


ciQrrants 


cully 


currcncjr 


culpaMe, nefe 


current, \y 


culpably 


curner 


culprit 


currilh, I^iocls 


cultiv4ite 


curfy 


culciv^cioQ 


curry-coniil 


cultirre . 


curfe 


culverin 


curfedlji 


camber 


cursftor 


Cumberland 


cur&nly 


cumberfoyQiQ^ 


cixrfoify 


[lfcw6 


curft 


cummiii 


curtail 


cunning, \j^ 


cfirtakl 


cup [nfifi 


ciirvtfUire 


c6|i- board 


curve 


Ci^pid 


ciirvitjr 


CHipoXa^ U 


c^fliion 


ci^visible 


cuftard 


curacy 


cufUdj^ 



CZ A 


D A. M 


D A Ri 


cuffddjr 


Cztfrina 


damii 


cuftom 


Czarifli 


damnabk 


cuftomabk 




daouiablyv 


cu&fftnariljf 




damntfcton 


cu&ffnuuy 


a 


damnify 


cuftomer 


^ 


damp 


cut, tcr 


Dafe 


dampilh, oA 


Ctftin/oua 


dabhlCt r 


dam/el 


ciitkk 


dabftcr 


datiVbo» zenrv 


cutlafs 


diic« 


dance^r 


cutkr 


daayl 


dandil/on • 


cutlctf 


dad 


dandle 


cuttle 


daddy 


dandrtff. 


cuc-piarft 


daf&dil 


Danes 


cut-thr#a 


dag^ 


dinger 


CttZ 


daggle 


dangerous, ly 


qfde 


Dagofl 


dangle 


cycle 


daily 


Dan/el ^ 


zjcm 


daint/cs 


dank 


9'dcr ' ' 


daintily 


dankiih > « 


cjfgnet 


daintineis 


Danube 


cylinder 


daincjr 


dapper 


c^odrrcid 


dairjr> 


dapple 


cymbtl 


d0y 


dare 


c]fmfaa]tfb 


dale 


daringly 


cynic 


dalliance 


dark, {y 


cynical 


dallii 


-darken 


cyon . 


dam ' 


darkneft 


gfphon 


damage^ abk 


1 dirkfooKP 


cypher 


damtffeotie 


darling 


9prc6 
Cypnan 


Dflfnliibiia 


dam 


dama& 


dare 


Csar 


dame 


daf 



A* 



DEB 

da(h 

dailard, 1^, 

dite [Uneis 

dative 

D^vid 

daughter 

daughter 

daunt 

daijntlels, nefs 

Dauphin 

daw 

dawb, cr 

dawn^ ing 

day 

dazzle 

deacon 

d/aconnefs 

dead, Iji, nefs 

deaden 

deadijp 

deaf 

deafen 

d^afifh 

deafnefs 

deal 

d/aler 

dean 

dianrjf 

deary Ij^, neft 

dearth 

i]eath, left 

debar 

debark 



DEC 

dehdfe 

debate: 

debatable - 

debauch 

debauifi&ee, b^ 

debauchery 

debentjyrc' 

debilitate 

debil/tj 

debonnair 

Deb^n^ 

debt 

debtor 

decide ' 

decjlogiir 

decamp 

decampment 

decant 

decanter 

decap/ttfte 

decay 

decea/e 

dec^t [nefs 

dec^tful, ly, 

dec^vablc 

deceive, r 

December 

decemv/rtftc 

d&ency r 

decennial 

decent, 1^, nefs 

deception 

decide 



EC 

decidivous* 

decimal 

d6ami7te 

decimition 

decipher 

decifion 

decijive,ly,nc!i6 

deck 

declaim, er 

deckmition 

declamatory * 

deckr^tion 

declare 

declarable 

declariitive 

declenfion 

declin^tioat 

decline 

declivig^ 

decoft 

decoAion 

decollation 

decoffipoundi 

decorate 

dec^r^tion 

decorura. 

decoy 

decrei^ 

decree 

decrepit 

decretals^ 

deer/ ^ 

dicum*^ 



DE F 

decumhiunc 

dicuplc 

dedccoratc 

dedicate 

ded/'cition 

dcdicdtoty 

deducG 

dd^cible 

ddua' 

ddudion 

deed 

deem 

deep, Ijf, nefs 

deer 

d^ice 

dffaiiance 

defamation 

drfam^t^ry 

Mime 

drfault 

AefhfMce 

drf&t 

defectftc 

def^cidon 

drfeft. 

drfedtioii 

drfeftive • 

drfence^ brfs 

drfend, cr 

defendant 

d^fendibJe \ 

drfenfive, Ij^ 

[nefs 



D EI 

drfer, red 

deference 

defhnct 

d^ficiengr 

drficient, ly 

drffle^ r, ment 

define 

definite 

definition 

drfiortive, fy 

d^fle6:ion 

deflow'er 

d^fluxion 

deform 

drformed 

d^rmJtj^ 

defraud 

drfray 

d^funft 

degincracy 
degenet^ce, 

[nefs 
d^geoctaus 
d^isdicion 
degrade 
degree 
diphort 
dehortation 
dtfjcA, edljr 
dgei5tion 
d^frcition ^ 
deify 



DEL 

dei0n 

deifm 

d/ift 

d^iftical 

Deity 

drfay, cr 

ddeaable,nc& 

drfeftably 

dfleA^tion 

delegate 

deUg^^tion 

d^l/cion 

deliberate, ly^ 

[nd» 
del/bcricion 
deliberative, ly 
delicacy . 
del/C0tc,Iy,nefs 
delicious, ly, 

[nefs 
delight, (ome 
delightful, ly, 

[nefs 
delineate 
dilfnedtion 
deiinquencjf 
d/Iinqucnt , 
delirious, neli 
deliver, cr 
deliverance 
delivery 
delivde 

delve. 



DJE PT 
ieive^ r 

deluRon 

dcaiagogui 
domain 
demand, er 



demerit 

dem^ne 

demiffritioQ 

difmjie 

d^roocrtfcyi 

d^mocraCMral 

dimoWQtk 

d/moft* 

d^m^niac 



D E P D E S= 

den/fon d^prawtjr 

d^ndfxvntfte depr^oiie 

denomination depr^icion^ 

denote 

denounce 

denfe, nefr 

density^ 

dent 

dental 

dentifrice 

d^nt^ddtion 



deprecatorjF 
d^pr^citfte 



•_• 




denunoiition* depth 



d^refs 

depreffion 

deprivation: 

deprive 

Dept&rd 



dtfpuifion 

deputation i 

deplete 

depi^9" 

derAi&ion* 

dgridt^t 

d^ri&bn 



d^ny 

deodand: 

depart • 

departure 

depend 

dq^endenco 

di^Wtibn 

d^Kl^rable,Mf$ derivitioa 
dem6nftrsrijle depVrably derivtftive 
demonftrate d^drc derive • 

demonftfition dep^tienc: derog 
demdhftrtftive^ dep6pid«ift 

[IjM depoftiUkku „- - 

demurt<ring dep^rtmeatv d^clht 
demifre,I^vn6fe dep^fe * 
dennurrage depolitc' 
den deposlsiOA' 

dendrol^. depravation 
denial depri«te, dly^ 



der^don 



defcen4 ^ 
deftenfioni 
defcenc 
defcribe * 
defcripticKi 



den/cn 



[dficft deftr^ 



dcfcm 



DES DE V D I A 

deiett dfftrudioa device 

d^ferc d^ftrudive« devd 

darter [nefs devtlifli^I^^^neft 

dirlertioii AeJvXvny d/Wous, nels 

d^rve d^tacbyOieitt dmfe 

dfj^n^ edJjp detail devoid 
d^jignition drcain^er^ mcnt d^v^'ir 

d^Crable, nd$ d^cedt devolve 

df0re 4d^e6lioft d^w]»u<Mi 

d^rous dtftencioii Aevdtt 

d^fift d^ter d^#tee 

deik d^erred dev^fcion ' 

(le/^l<itev^>ne(s d^erminable dfv^ci^nal 

de/ditioQ d^tertnm^ie,!/ devour, er 

dffpair , decerm/Wcion devout, ijr, nefii 

defperad^ determine Deuceran^mjF 

^efpcratc. If, deter five dew 

[nefs deteft dewcc 
defperition deteftable; nefs dew'lap 

<iefpfcable,nc(s de(eftab|j^ dewy 

defp/cablf deteftitioa dexterity 

ddp/fable, ne& dethrohe dexterous, ly, 

drfp/fe, r detradt d.h [ncft^ 

Wp/tffuUljr detrafkion dwbetei 

d^pond detriment diVrbol/cal, Ijp 

d^pondehcy detrimenul dtac^lum 

de^^te - detruncate 6iac6di\ita 

deipotic, ical . detri^fion dl^em 

de(l/tffte devaftidon di^^noftic 

deibne deveft ^dgm^X 

deftiny .devi/7te d/^igram 

<l^roy» er . devsiofiion d/al, ling 

dtaltdi 



D I F 


DIM 


DIS 


diaka 


diffident, ly. 


d/menfion 


dialogut 


[ncfs 


diminifh 


diameter 


. diffftfe, dly 


dim/n»tion 


d/4mecrfca1, \y dxffuCibh ' 


dimin«tive, ly, 


d/amond 


diflSifive, ly, 


dim/ty [nefs 


'DJdna 


dig [Yiefs 


dimple 


diapklma 


d/geft 


din 


diaper 


d/gcftion 


dine • 


dlaph^uious - 


d/geftivei alf$ 


ding-dong 


dtaphorem 


dJg€ft, fcf<. 


dinner 


df^phraom 


digger 


' dint 


diarvioSa 


digit 


d/oc^fan, ^r di 


diary 


dignify 


d/^cefs 


dti&ole 


digm't^ry 


dip 


tlibble 


dignity 


dipi^thong 


dicimy 


d/grefe 


d/pl^1m/?, ^ dr 


dice 


» d/greflion, ^^ 


> d/rc 


dicker 


djgrefs, &fr. 


dmful 


di&att 


dFlac^rtfte 


d/reft, k nefs 


dift^tor 


diJap/d^tion 


d/redion 


didionary^profk df'Iace 


direAor 


•alfa dixnary. 


.' diljtmnefs 


d/'rift^ry, i^/ffl 


dJdaftic, ordi 


. diltft^r^ 


dFreft, 6ff. 


die 


dilemma^ or di 


iditedioxy 


diet 


diligence 


dirge 


differ 


dil/gent, \y 


dirt, durt 


difference - 


dil//ad^te 


dirtj, dur 


different) \y 


d/l«c/d/ition 


dlxiiSy 


difficult, ly. 


diluents 


difible 


[ncfs 


' d/l«te 


di/"^ bil/tjr 


diff/cult^ 


diXuxxiyn 


di/ab«fe 


diffidence 


dim, ly, nefs 


di/advantagc 


\ 


3 


dj^d- 



DIS 

diylidvantigi* 
[ous>ly,nefs 
di/aiFeacd 
dlftiStSkion 
di/&greeyfhent 
di/^reeable,' 
[nefs 
di/igrceably 
di/allow' 
di/annul 
di/appnir 
di/appoint, 

[menc 
di/appr5ve 
disarm 
disafter 
disailrous, ]y 
Afavow^ al 
dilbatkl 
AifbeVitf 
AUbeVzivc 
difburden 
dilburfe, ment 
difcard 

difcern, ment 
difcernible 
difcerpible 
difdiarge 
difc/ple 
difciplfnirian 
difcrpliAe 
dliclaim 



D IS 

difclofe, r 

difcolour 

difcdmfit ' 

difcomf/cirre 

difconi&rc 

difcocnmend 



D IS 

difcreee, ly,neis 
difcrfpanc 
difcrecion 
difcricnm^te 
difcufe 
difcuSion 
difcomoiendi* di/dain, fulb* 
[tioa [fut&cfs 

difcomm^Kie difisife 
ditcompJSc di/embirk 
difcomp^lirre dLre(nb6guc 
difconcert dben^ge 
d\ic6n(o\ate^\y distntinglt ' 
difcontenc^ diienfiranchife^ 

[mcnt di/iftcecn 
dlfcontentedlji^, dis£zvour 
difcontented- disfigf^re^tnent 

[neis disfranchifc, 
diicontiiwance [aient 

difcontini/e difgarniih 
difcord di%orgc 

difcordant difericc 
difcover, able difgriceful, ly^ 
difcovcry difguffe [nels 

difcounc difgufl: 

difcounc difguftful, ly^ 

difcouat/nancediih [ne& 
difcfurage, dif-habille 

{mcnt dif-heartm - 
diCrdiirie . difheveUcd 
difcourt^^ dil^oneft, !>» 
difcredit [ncls 

O ^ dit 



D IS D I S D I S 

diiboneftj^ difoheditnce difpr^p^rti^- 
dtlj^onour Aifohedicnty Ijr [n^tc, Ij^, nefs 
dil^oBaurable, difobei . difpr^ve 

[ncfs d!/^bl/ge,ging^dirptftable,ners 
difftonourabljr dibbYigc [\j difputznt 
diiingige disorder^ \y difputdiioa 
disingenuity difdimi di(p//ce, r 

diiingenisrous, difparage diiqti/et, er 

[l^nefs dimar^gingly difqum»de 
di/inhahiced difparagemenCTiifqu/sidoA 

difpancy difr^gJrd 

difpacch difreliih 

dimel, led difr^«te 

difpenfable 

difpenfi^cion 

diipenCft^ 

dilpenfe, r. 



diiinberic 
diiintangie 
dbinterefted 
diiinter, red 
disjoin 
disjointed 
disjun&ion 

dis)un£tiire, ly di(pople 

diik dilperfe, dl; 

difk/ndnels difperQon 

difl/kc • dilpirit, fpcr 

drn^cjte difplice 

difl^ciuon difplay 

diflodge difpl^fe 
d\(loY^y\yint(% dilplea&re 

diflofalty dilp^Tal 
di/mal, iy^ nefs difp^e, r 

difmantl'e difp^sicion 

difmay dilboflefs 

difmecnbef difpofleffioa 

difmifs . . dilpraife, r 

difniifllon difproof 

dismount difpr^p/rtion 



difrdpea 

difr^fpeftful, !; 

difr^e 

difiads^Aion 

diSktisfa&oty ' 

difsacisf/ed. 

difleft 

difleaibn 

diflemble, r 

difleminjte 

diflention 

diflenc 

diflentin^oas 
. diflentcr [Ijr 
i diilertition 

diflervice 
. diflever 
: difsim/lar 
I difs/nuiicirde - 

dif. 



DI S . 

difs/m/^Ucion 

difsipate 

difsipition 

difaolvable, 

difeolve [nefs 

dif^olvent 

diSbluble 

[nefi 
iiBoluxion 
dil&nance 
d](&nancy 
di(&nant 
diflbtfdc, r , 
difiuiiion 
difluilfive 
diflyllablc . 
diftaff 
diftance 
diftant 

diftifte [nels 
difUftefu), 1>, 
diftempcr 
diftena 
diftentioa 
diftic» 
diftinft 

diftS,led,lable 
diftillicion 
diftillcr 
diftinft 
diftindtion 



D I y 

diftinguifh 

diftingui(hable 

diftort 

diftortion 

diftrad, cdly 

diftraftion 

diftrain 

diftrefs, edljr 

diftnbttCe 

diftribtfte 

diftribtftor 

diftnb»cion 

diftrib«tivc, \y 

diftrift 

diftruft 

diftruftfu],ners 

difturb, er 

difturbance 

difvel^pe 

difiinion 

di/irn/te 

d'lfu/e 

difuk 

difi/fage 

ditch, tt 

ditto 

ditty 

divan 

d/vc 

d/verge 

divergent 

d/vcrfe, Ijf. 

O 2. 



DOC 

diversify 

diverfion 

diversity 

divert 

Divfs 

diveft 

divide 

dividend 

diviniciqn< 

div/nc, ly, nc6 

diviner 

divinity 

divisibility 

divifible 

divifion 

divifor 

divorce* 

div^rament 

dJurctic 

diurnal 

divulge 

dizzinefs 

dizzy 

d5 " 

docile 

d^cilitjF 

dock 

doftor 

do£t(?riar 

dottrels 

dodrine 

doctrinal 

doGU^ 



DON DOW D R E 



document 
d6c«ment/zc 
dodge 
d^e 
dotr 
dog. 
d^ 
dogi'cd 
dog^ilh 
d6ggrcl 
dogin^i 
dogmat/^a],!^, 
[ncfs 
dogmatize 
dogm^tift 
doit 
d^le 

dtflefol, !y, nc6 
dollar 
dolorous 
dolour 
dolphin 
d<7lt 
d^ltiOi 
domain 
d^me 
dameftic 
dom/nicion 
dom/neer 
dominical 
dominicM 
dominion - 
doti 



donation 

d^n^ive 

done 

d^ndr 

dooms-day. 

d^r 

dormant 

ddrmftdry 

dormou^ 

d^ 

dot 

dotage 

d^rd 

d^te, r 

d^cingly 

doth 

doubk 

doublet 

dtubIo<^A 

doubt, ful 

doubtlef^ 

dove 

d^gh 

doughy 

doughty 

dow tfger 

dow'ciy 

dow'tr 

dow'laft 

down 

dow'nj» 

dowVjr 

dowye 



doxdl^gjr 

do^ 

d^ze 

dozen 

drab 

drachm 

drag , 

draggle 

driigon 

dragoon 

drain, able 

driike 

dram 

dr4ms 

dramatic 
draper 
driperjr 
draught, drifc 
draw, e^ 
draw'- back 
drawl 
drawn 
dray 

dread, Itfs 
drc8dfal,ly,ncfi 
dr^am,er,fngly 
, dr/ary 
dredge, r 
dregs 
dreggy 
drench 
drefs, er 

dribble. 



dnbble 

dffbblct 

drift 

drill .. 

dr/ly 

dr/riefs 

drink, cr 

drip, plug ^ 

drive 

drivel 

drivillcr 
driven . 
df/vcr 
drrfl, f 

drom^d^ry ^ 

df^ne 



drudgery • 
drug 
drugget 
drugi^ift : 
J3r«ids 
drum 
drummer ^ 
drunk, ifb ; 
drunkard . 
drunken 



drunkenneis ^ dung 



0U't: 

dftkedom • 

dulcify 
dulc/mer 
dull,j^, ncfs 
dullard 
dun)i>, neis . 
dumps 
dumplings . 
dun, n^ 
dunce 



dry 
Auil 

dub 



dungeon • 
dung- hill.! 
dape 



d^bious^yyfiefs: duplicate 



Dublin 

, dt^cal 



drd9i(b,ly^nei$ ducat 
droop ^ ductetood 

drop, ped d«ee 
dropsical. duck, ec 
droply ,duft 

drofs,jr,me6 dudile 
drcve, r duftih'ty 

drought,druft, dudgeon 

i2^ drouth d«e . 
drown 



duplicity 

di^rable 

di^rably 

d/^rablenefs 

di^rance 

d^rr^cion . 

duT6& 

durft 

dufk 

duflaib'^ 



drow'f/ly 

«kx)w'f/nef8 

drow'jy 

drubb 

drudge. 



dufl9 

d«el, ler, ling du ft, cr r 

d^eJHft , dutty 

d»ly . Dutch ' 

d«et". dtitchclk. 

dug ' dutchy 

d«fce d»t/ful, ly, ne6 
Q^'S ] duiyy 



£ A S 

dirumv/rtfte 

dwJrf 

dwirfiih 

dwcl', cr, ing 

dwindle 

djfc 

djycr . 

dynafty 

d)^nterjr 

dy>r; 



E DI 

iiftcr, ly 

&(lern 

rtt^ er 

mable 

tfitm 

fsyc 



E GT 

rdicioa 

ed/tor 

ediroice 

edfifcacioft 

eel 

efKice 

effea 



/aves-droppers effedive, |y 



JBich 

%er, I^ nefi 

€ag]e 

«iglet 

iar 

carl 

hx\dom 

carlji 

earn 

earncftjjjnefs 

earth, ly^quake- 

car/i&Iincfs 

ear/i&/neis 

earthy 

/afe, ment 

cas/ly 

^sinefs 



ebb 

eb^n^ 

ihxiety 

rbttllition 

ec-centric, al 

ec-centridty 

Ecd^aftfs 



eSe<5bva], Ijf 

efie6byiice 

eflem/rtucf 

effeminate 

effervefcence 

efficicioua, Ijr^ 

efficacy \nt& 



eccl^iaftic, al effictence 



eche 

rclfpfc 

rclipcic 

icio 

eclogur 

ecftan'cal 
eddy 
jB'dcn- 
edge, kfi 

i^et 

edifrcicion 
edifice 
edify- 
^?le 



e£Ficienqy- 

efficient, Ij^ 

efi%/^ 

cff/gy 

effl^viuni^ 

efflux 

€Soft 

effronteiy 

effulgence 

eff^Tion 

egg 

fgr/g/ous, ly, 
^rels [nefs> 
^reilion 

gypt 



E'dinburg^ ^ £gyptiaa 
^ [bprwigh gJEtj 



EL E 


ELS 


E M B 


^actfUdoa 


elfgant^^nefs >l//c/dtfte 


^^oAaxaxy 


d%iac 


txucididtxon 


(jeft, mcnt 


elf^ 


#l»de 


rjeftion 


element , 


d»(ion 


rtght 


elrmehCiiry 


elvfs 


%htcen 


elephant 


^Wfive 


%hth 


cl/phantihe 


di^&ry 


%huetb . 


eW#ce 


£iys/an 


Sghty 


eW^tion 


Elysium 


ttthcr 


devfn, th, tWyemitttat^ 


fke 


elf 


^inici/2ce 


flab^raie 


el/gible, nefs 


^mtfru9cioA . 


^lapfe 


mihu.. 


^m^ncip^ce 


daftic, nefs 


£l/jah 


^mancipition 


daftidty 


£l/af , 


embalm 


^Ute 


£l/fh^ 


embarga 


Akion 


AifiOTk 


. embark 


elb^m 


dixir 


embarkitioo 


elder 


£liztfbeth 


embarrafs, 


elrcampine 


elk 


[ment 


^Mft 


ell 


embaflftfdor 


^ledion 


ellipfis 


embalbdrefs 


dedlive 


ellipt/cal 


embaflage , 


deftor 


elm 


embafly 


da^ral 


ebciition 


embellifliy 


dect^Ftfte 


el^gjr 


[mcnt. 


A&Biov^is 


dongitioa 


ember-day^ 


riedr/cal 


E'l^^cn 


embers 


deftridty 


.E'kl 


embezzel, . % 


rfcft«4ry 


d^pe, rneiit 


[meat 


^teemo^^rji 


eloquence 


emblem 


flegance 


eli^quenCy Ijv 


embl/mau'caL 


S«gancjr 


elie [oefa 





ESIP 

cmbofs 

embow'el . 

embrace 

embr^cition 

embroider, er 

embroidery: 

embroil 

embryo 

emburfe 

^mendition 

Emerald 

emer^ 

emergencjr . 

rni6rgent 

emerods 

f merficm . 

emery 

eminence 
eHiinency 
eminent, iy, 
ehiiflT^rjp [nefs 
^miffioa ^ 
^niic 
emmit 
rlii611ient 

em pair 

empiliment 

empannel 

emperor 



EN'C EOM G: 

emp^^ encotnpais 

cmphaucal,]y encounter 

empFre encouni^, r, 
empiric [ment 

empimral encr^ 

empir/ci/n^ encr^ikih, ment 

emp}«Kl encumber 

employ, mrat encumbrax^cc^s 

emp^r3r> end 

empre6 . endamage* 

^prifon end^r, ment 

emptity •endeavour 

'Cmpt/nefV end/ce 



empty » 
empyreal ^ 
emiikte ■ 
emt^iicor. 
emirlition 
^muIgCDt 



endive, m: en ^ 
endlefs^ nefs 
endorfe; ment?. 
endow', oieat^i 
'Cndi/re 
en^my. . 
^f^lous, \yy energy 
^mulfioa [nels enerv/ate 
enable enfeeble 

cnadl enfo'rcc 

enamel, ler enfranchife, . 
enamoured [mcnr 

^narrition eng^e,ment 
encamp, ment engender 
encha-nt, ment engine 
encircle, ftir eng/nAr 
endtffe England 

endure EngHfli 

Enc^mrafljjC engraff 
encommm. civ- 



1 



E N T 



E P H 



engrave 
ensr^fs 



Eau 

enter tphcmeris 

enterprize -ephod 
en|iance,nient entertain, er, epic 
enigma [ment epicene 

AiigmatfcaU ^y enthrall 'Epicure 

^igmtftift enthrone ep/cisrr/afi 

enjoin enth^s/a/m tpicun/m 

enjoy, ment enthi^siaft [Ijr ep/demica}, |)r» 
^large, ment enthivsiaftjcaj, [ne& 

enl/ghten ent/ce, ment epigram, ma- 
enliven ent/re, I7 ep/leptic {lift 

enm/tjf ent/ty 

enn^^le entomb 

morm/tjr [oefs entrails 
morofious, Ijr, entrance 
enough, alfi entrap 

entr/ac 

entr^ty 

entrjr 

^ni^cWte 

enircWtion 

envelop 

envenom 



enud^. 
enquire 
enrige 
enrich 
enr^^ll 
cnr^ment 
ensample 
enlhrinc 
ens?0n 
cnftJU 

enftSlment 
enfi/e 

entabltftsre 
entail 

entangle 



• cpilcpljr 
epilogue 
rpipo^f^ 
^pifc^pagr 
fpifcppsi 
ipik^paUan 
ep^e 
rpiftle 
epi&olary 
epitaph 
ep/chtflinyum 
ep/thet 



cntendre,antan ipha 



envious, or in ipitome 

environ, ura ipivmhe 

enumerate epoCba 

tnumcrdxion . cpode 

envoy 

eoffre 

envy 

epadb 



equability 
fquable, neis 
^fiquablj^ ; 
f qu^l^ ly, ^fieft 
equahty 

fquSltze 



E R M 

equSihe 
equanimi^ 
^quition 
aquitor - 

fqueftrfan 
^u/diftant 
^bxlaccral 
^qu/libriunr 
rqu/n6£tial 
/quinox 
^quip 
&IUipage 
equipment 
/quipoife 
/quipollent 
equipondtrate 
equnable)ne& 
equ/cabljf 
equity 
equivalent 
rqufv^al, ly, 
[neis 
equivocal 
iquivdcation 
eradicate 
rrife, ment 
ere 
rreft 
^edioQ 

ermioe 



EST 


E VE 


evdde 


eft/mable 


evMotk 


eft/mil ce 


err 


eftjoiition 


errand 


eftringe, mcnt 


errant 


eftr&c 


erratic 


etch 


err^nmus, ly^ 


eternal, ly 


error [ncfs 


^ternalFfe 


^ru£bicion 


eternity 


#n^dicion 


eterntCe 


tfri^ption , 


etherizl . 


efcdide 


ethics 


ekdpe 


Ethedpisn 


efch&t 


cchnic 


efcbeW 


etymological 


efcort 


etymology 


efcutchean 


evacuate 


efpal/er 


fvac^ition * 


^fpecialljr 
eipoufais 


rvide 


rvangel/cal, ly 


efpoiife 


rvang^lift 
evaporate 


efqu/rc, or 


^aporition 



efiky [fqiure evdCive 
eflay evdCion 

eflence eucikirift 

Effents eucjftariftical 

eflential, ly Eve 
^ftablifh, ment MAion 
^fttfcc even 

e&e€m evtning 

S&ier ^cnt 

evW" 



EX A 

Centura], ly 
ever 

evqrlafting, Ijr 

evdrm^lre 

^erfion 

evts 
ev/dence 

cv/dcnt,ly,nefs 

evil 

ennce 

ev/table, neis 
^ifcer^te 

eunucj^ 

evolve 

tYohition ■ 

Aphony 

Euphrius 

Europe 

Eur^fpran 

Europ/an 

<vulfioh 

Euxinc 

ewe 

cv/er 

cxaa 

cxaSdr 

cxaaion 

exaager^ce 

czaageritioa 
cx5lt 



E XC 

exJltiition 
examine, r 
exam/'n^cion 
example 

exan/mace 
exarch 

exarcf^tfte 
exafpewte 
exafpericioo 
exc^vtfte 
exceed 
exceeding, ly 
excel 

excellence 
cxcellencjf 
excellent, ly, 
except [nefi 
exception, a- 

[ble,ableners 
cxcefs 

cxceffive, jy, 

[nefs 

exchange 
Q^ch^nge 
exchequer 
exc/feable 

CXCifc 

exciiSon 
excnc, ment 
exclaim, er 
e^ckmition 
exclam^t^r^ 

4 



EXE 

exclude, r 
^xcluCion 
excli^five, ly 
cxcommmi' 

[cate 
excomm«n/ci« 

[tion 
excoriate 
txcoridiioa 

excrement 
cxcr^mcntlti* 

[ous 
excrefcencc 
excwt^fy 

excrifci^rte 
excuip^e 
exculpation , 
cxcurfion 
exc^fable, nefs 
exci^l^t^ry 
cxcu/c 
txcufc 

execrable, nefi 

execrably 

ex^cr^te 

exipcrition 

ex^c«te 

ex^/^cion, er 

exicutivc 

executor , 

executory 

executrix 

cx- 



E X O 

cxeghiczX 

exemplary 

ex€tnp\armt& 

cx6mpl/^ 

Exempt 

exempt 

exemption 

istequits 

ixctcJfc 

exerdtition 

exert 

exertion 

exhale 

exhalitibn 

exiftaiift 

exhibit 

exhibition 

exhikriite 

ex^rt 

ex|>orttftion 

exjorttfti^rjf 

cx/gencc 

exfgcncy 

exile 

exile 

eximrous 

exift 
cxiftcnce 

exifttot 
exit 
cxitial 
Ex'^dui 



EXP 



EXP 



exoncfe^tc 
exoneration 
ex^rable 
ex5rb/tance 
exorbitancy 
exorbitant, ly, 
[ncfs 
cxorc^m 
exorcift 
cxorcJfe 
exordium 
exotic 
expand 
expanfe 
expanfion 
expK^ti^e 

expc^ 

expeftancp 

expe^ant 

expectation 

expe6lw<fte 

expcftcrition 

expedience 

exp/dient, Ijf, 

' [ncfs 

expedite 
expedition 
expeditiousjly, 

• expel [nefe 
expend 

' expenfe [nds 
expeafivc, I7, 



A • 



experience 

experiment 

experimental, 

expert,Iy, neft 

expiable, ncfs 

expi^ate 

expiition 

expi^prjr 

expirition 

expire 

explain 

expl^mition 

explaniit^jr 

expletive 

explicable v 

explicate 

explication 

explicit)l7,ne(s 

explode 

exploit 

explore 

expl^fion 

exponent 

expert 

cxpo'rt, er 

exportation 

expffie, r 

expi^sition 

expositjor 

expoftnlicion 



EXT 

expound, er 

exprefs 

cxprefljr 

cxprcffion 

cxpreflivc 

expulfion 

apulfivc 

expunge 

expurgation 

ixi^rgaioxy 

exqo/fitc 

extant 

ixtajy 

extatic [ous 

extcmp^ran^- 

tttttnporary 

cxtemp^^ 

extend, able 

extcnfion 

cxtenfive 

extent 

ttten««te 

cxten«ition 

extmor 

cxterm/n^zte 

exterm/nition 

external, ]y 

extinft 

extinftion 

extinguifh, cr 

extirpate 



FAD 



«ye 

eye-brow 
eye-lid 
fgre 



F. 



E X U 

extirpation 

extol. Fed 

extort 

extortion 

extortioner 

extraft 

extrafty or 

extraction 

-extrajudicial 

extran^us 

cxtra5rd;nary fabric . 

extraord/nar/ly fabr/cate 

extrapar(H:$/al fabdifl: 

extravagance fabulous, ly, 

extravagancy [ne6 

extravagant,Iy ftfce, Icfs 

extravafated fac/tious, ly, 

extr/me,ly,ncfs facile [nels 

exittmhy facilitate 



H 

fible 



extr/cate 
extrinfic 
"extrude 
^tr^fion 
ex/^berance 
exuberant, ly 
exulcerate 
exulceration 
exult 
exultance 
exultancy 
exultant 
exultation 
P 



facility 

fad 

faftion 

fad:ious,lj^,n€l$ 

faftitious 

fadlor 

faft<?rage 

fa^ultj^ 

facund 

facund/ty 

fiddle 

fade 

fadge 

fag- 



F A M 

fag-end 

fagoc 

fait 

i'zilurc 

fain 

faint, ly^ nefs 

fair, injg, Ijr, 

fairy [ncfs 

faith 

faithful,1^,nefs 

faith lefs, nek 

falcisted 

falcbim 

fJicon 

fJiconcr 

fJiconrjr 

fJll 

fallacious, ly, 

fallacy [nefs 

fall/bil/ty 

fallible^ nefs 

fall^tB 

f JIfe, ly, nefs 

f^Ifhood 

falsifier 

falsity 

{ahiiy 

filter 

fome 

fomil/ar, ly 

fonn/l/ar;tjr 

f0(nni<?rFle 



FAR 

fam/lid 

fam/ly 

famine 

familh 

fimous,ly,nefs 

fan 

fanatic 

fi!7nat/cal 

fanktici/cn 

fandful, nefs 

fancy 

fiine 

tangle 
fanta/hi 
fzntafy 
fantallic 
fantalb'cal, ly, 
[ne^ 
fan tome 
far 
farce 
farcjr 
fardel 
fardlngde 
f^re 
farewell 
fann^c^us 
farm 
farrig^ 
farr/er 
farr^t» 



F E A 

farther 

farthing 

fafcw 

fafcrn/zte 

fafc/nition 

fafc/nes 

fafhion, able, 

[ab]y,abUnefs 
faft 

faftrn, ing 
faftid/ous, ly 
fat, ty, nets 
fital, 1^ 
fatality 
fate 

father, Icfs, ly 
fathom 
f^t/gue, t0g 
fattrn 

favour [ncfi 
favourable, 
favourably 
fisvourice 
faucet 
fadt 
faulter 
fault/ly 
faultmefs 
faulcjr 

fautor 
fawn, ingly 
fi^ltjf 

fetVy 



p 



FE M 

for, Icfs, ful, 
[folIy,fulncfs 
f?sfib]e, nels 
fafibly 

f^, Ij^, nels 
feather 

febr/foge 

fec«lenc7 

feculent 

fecund/ty 

fed 

federal 

fee 

feeble, nefs 
feebly 
feed, er 
feel, in&Ijr 
feet 

fSgn, cdly 
fSnt 
felfcity 
fell, er 
felbiv 

felktofliip 
felon 

fclwi/ous, ly, 
fekn^ [nefs 
felt 

f/m^Ie 



F E T 

feminine 
fen 
fenfe 
fender 
fennel 
fennjr 
fifoflFee 
f/offer 
feoffment 
f/ral 
ferity 
ferment 
ferment 
fermentation 
fern 
ferochy 
ferret 

ferr^g/nous 
ferr^ 
fertile 
krtiUty 
fert/lffe . 
fervcnqy 
fervent,ly>nefs 
fcxuU 
fervour 
fefs ^ 
fefter 
fcftival 
feftivitjr 
feftoQn 
fetch, er 
P z 



F I F 

fetid 

fetlock 

fetter 

feud 

feudal 

feud^ry 

feud^ry 

fcVer, «h 

few, ncfe 

fewcl 

ffat 

fib 

fibber 

f/brc 

f/brous 

fickle, nefr 

fickly 

fia/le 

fiftion 

fiditious 

fiddle 

ffdel/tjr 

fidgc ' 

fief 

field 

fiend 

fierce, ly^ nefi 

f/ermels 

f/ery 

f/fe 

fffteen, th? 

fifth, ly 

fffey 



FI N 

fifty 

fig , 

tgdry 

f/ght, cr 

figment 

fig«Mtive, Ijp, 

fig«re [nefs 

filament 

f/lizcr, or ft 

filbert 

filch, er, inglf 

file 

fil/'al, Ijr, nefs 

fill 

fillet 

fiUigranc 

fOlip 

fil^-folc 

film 

filmmefs 

filmy 

filter 

filch, /]jr,jne(s 

fiUby 

filtr^jte 

filtricion 

fin 

finable 

f/nal, ]y 

finances 

financier 

finch 

find 



FLA 


FLA 


fine, ]y 


flabby 


f/ncncfe 


flaccid, ne& 


ffnery 


flag 


finefs 


flagdet 


finder 


fiagfy [nc6 1 


fin;cal, ly, nefs fl^igitious, Ijf^ | 


f/nij 


flagon, ^ia ^ 


finifli, cr 


fl^grance 


finite, nefi 


fligrancj 


finn^ 


flagrant ^ 


fir, fur 


flail 


fire 


take 


firkin, fur 


fiaky 


firm, jy, neis 


flam 


firmament 


flambeau, W 


firft, furlt 


fl^me 


firming, furft flank 


firth, furth 


flannel 


fitcal 


flap 


fiOi 


Rare 


fiflicr 


fla(h 


fithcry 


fia(h/nds 


fi(r«rc 


fla% 


lift 


flafk 


fiMa 


flafket 


fit 


flat, ly, nefs 


fitch 


flatcm 


Fitz 


flitter, er, ing- 


fiVc 


flattery' [Ir 


fix, ednefs, er flatulent, neis 


fixicion 


flat«Q^ty 


fixture 


flaunt, ingncfi 


fiabb/nefs 


flivour 



FLI 

Rdvovff 



flax 

% ' 

flam 
fled 

fledged 
flee 
fleece 
\ fleer 
fleet, I7, n'ds 
flf0m 
flegmaric 

Flemiflx 
flefh, ly 

fie(h/ne& 

fle% 

fiex;bilit)^ 

flexible, ncfs 

flexibly. , 

flexion 
flex«re 
flight 
fliHT^riefs^ 

flinch, 
fling 

flint 
flip. 



F L U F O L 

flippant^ly,nds flwke 
flirt, flurt flummery 



flic 

flitch 

fl^at 

floatage 

flock. 

flog 

fl^or 
floremlne 



flung. 

flurt 

flufli 

flutter 
Bute 

fluted- 
flutter- 
flux 
fiuxioni 



fl6rfd, ly, ncfa fl;^ 



florin- 

fl^nft 

aotilla 

flounce 

flouncing 

flounder 

flour 

flouriflr 



foam 
fob 

f0CUS 

foddcrj CJP' 

fog 

£5ggineis^ 
fog^y 

fo!>! 



flout, cr, ingly foible 
fl^lD, ingly foil 
flower 
' &or»n 
RuGiuaie 
Rudiuation 
fl«e 
Rucncy 
fl«cnt, ly, nefs folk 
Ruidj nefs f6\h\» 
fl«idfty» follower 

P 3 f% 



foift 
fold 
fole 
. fdlizge 
fol/itiom 



FOR 

folly 

foment 
f^mehuicion 



FOR 

f^rrmoft 
forc^/ght 
foreft, cr 



fond, h^ nefs forfeit 



fondle 

fondling 

font 

food 

fool 

foolcrjr 



FR A 

fortif/cotioa 
fortify 
fort/cude 
fortrcis 
fortjf/tous, Ijr, 
[neft 
forttfn^te, ly,. 



forfnti/re : 

ftrge, r 

forgery 

forget [nefe fortune [nefii 

for^etf«I, ly» fortieth 

forgive, ncli forty 
fooliihi ly, nefs forrfven forward, Ijr, 

f^ot fork^ednefs fofs [neii* 

fop • forl5rn,ly,ncfs foflii 

foppery form foftcr 

f6ppiDh,ly,nefs formal, ly, nefs fother 
for formalift fought 

forage, r formalitjr foul, ly, ne& 

forbad formotioa < found, er 

forbeir, ance fornxei?,. ly founditioa 
forbid form/dable^ foundling 

[nefe founder^ 

form/dabjy fountain. 



forbiddm 

forborne 

force, r 

forceps 

fifrcible^ neik 

forcibly 

&rd 

fordablc 

fore 

forehand 

f6rehead 

£6r^dii 



f6rm»ltfry 
fornicition] 

form'citor 

forrage 

forfike 

forfiken 

forsooth ' 

forfwe^r, eB 

for&K7ra. 

fort 

forth. 



four 

fiwirfc^re- 

foiirteeft 

fowl, er 

fox 

foy 

fraftion? 

frafti^nalj Ijr* 

fradious, ly, 

[nels 

MQturc 

fbo^ 



F-R E F R I F R U 

fragility french/ffcd friflonefs 

fragment frenzy frifky 

frigrancy frequency fritter 

frigrant, ly, fr/qucnt, ly, frivolous, Ijr, 

[nefe [ncfs fr/ze [ncfe 

frafght fr^qucat frizzle 

frail, ly, ncfe frequentative fr<? 

frailty frefc^ frock 

framc^ r frelb, ly, ncfs frog 

France freflien frolic 

franchire,mcnt fret fr6licfome,ne& 

frangible, nefs fretfully,. ncfs frora 

frank, ly, nefe frfable, ncfs front 

frankincenfe? fricafTee . front/eE 

frantic, lji,ncls fridlion frontifp/ece 

fri^ternal, ly Friday frontlet 

irattrnhy friend, ly, lefs Frontin/ac 

fraud frtendl/nefs froft 

fraudttlcncj^ friendfhip * frofty 

fraudulent, ly frier froft/ncfe 

fraught fricry froth 

fray frigate froth/Ijr 

fr^ak f"g^*f> froth/ncfs^ 

frfliki£h,ly,ncfs frtghc frothy 

freckle frightf«l, ly, frow; 

freckly [neCs fr^'w5rdi,ly,nefs 

Frederic fr/ghten frown, ingly 

free, ly,. ncf& frigid, Jy, ncfe frow'i/ly 

freedom frigidity frow'f/ncfs 

free-h(?Id frig^rific frow'fy ., 

freeze fringe frt?'zen 

Fucnch* fupperjr fcudtiferous. . 

6 fxuax- 



F U M FOR 

fru&tf/cicion furme 
fru&ify fumigate 

frt^gal, Ix, niefs fumigdtioa 
frugality fumy 

ihtfft, ^rer fun 
fr^icfulyly^neis f^ndioA 



fr^tage 

frftftion 

fnadefs 

frottlcfljr 

fri^lefnefs 

frum^ty 

fruftr^tc 

fruftricion 

fry 

{ucvs 

fuddle,, r 

futl 

fi/g/tive 

fulfil 

fulgcncjr 

fulgent, neis 

fulgid 

fulgtfr^tion 

fuliginous 

fall, JF^ ncfa. 

ffllcrs-ekrth 

fulmin^^ce 



fund 
fdndiiment 



G A I 

furz 

f«fee 

fusibility 

fuCihle^ ncft 

f«sil ^ 

f«s/leer 

fnifioa 

fuft 



fundamental,!; fufliai^ 



funeral 
, fungqfity 
fungous 
fimaus 
funk 
funnel 
funnjr 
fur 

furbWtfe 
furbifii, er 
fftrious,Iy,nefi 
furl 
furlong 
furlough 



fuftick 

fnfty 

fictile 

fftti^rc 

fmuritiort 

futurity 

ftfzee 

fjfC 



G 

Gabble 
gibion 



fulminicion 
fuirome,ly,nefs furr^li 
fumble," r further 
fumbling, Jy furj^ 



farmrty, frum g5ble-end 

Gabriel 
gad 
gadder . 
gaffer. 



furnace 

furnifh 

furn/t«re 

furr 

furrier 



gaffle 

gag 
gi7ge 

gaiety 



// 



gall/ 



GAM 


GAR 


GEN 


gzily 


gammer 


gafc^nade 


gain 


gammon ' 


gafli 


gainful,ly,n€ls gammut 


gafp 


gainnefs 


gander 


gaftlinefs 


gainfajr 


gang 


gaftly 


gallaxy 


Gang/s 


g^te 


gtfle 


gangrene 


gather, cr 


galinicdl 


gantlet 


gaud/ly 


gJll 


gantlop 


gaud/nefs 


gallant,ly,nefi 


i gap ^ 


gaudj 


gallant 


g^pc 


g^ve . 


gallantry 


gapes 


givel-kFnd 


galkon 


garb 


gaufe 


gall^is 


garbage 


gay 


gallery 


garble, r 


gaze 


galley 


garden 


gazttte 


galiiard 


gardener 


gjzettcer 


gall/can 


garg^riyhi 


g^r 


gall/ci/in 


gargle 


gccfe ' 


gallimafry 


garland 


^eld, er, mg 


gall/ot 


gar lick 


g% 


gallon 


garment 


^elt 


galloon 


garner 


gem 


gallop 


garnet 


gcm/ntftc 


galbway 


garnifli, er. 


gemination 


galbhis 


[mcnt 


t gemin// 
gend*armes 


gamb^^s 


garn/ti^re 


gambler 


garret 


gender 


gaqibols 


garr//bn 


g^n^^logical 


g^me 


garrwh'ty 


g^n^akgy 


gimefomc 


gar«lous, nefi 


I general, ly 


g^mcfter 


garter 


generalifs/m^ 
gene 



GEO GIL 

gcncral/ty German 

generate germinate 

generation germinicion 

generative germins 

gfnen'cal gerund, ivc 

gCDcrofity gefytion 

generous geft/c»1icion 
Gen^fijr - geft«re 

genial get 

gen/tals ^ew'-gaws 

gennive gjittar 

genius gj^ft 

gen net gioMintis 
gentecl,ly,ncfs gioAly 

gentian giant 

gent/le ^ibberifc 

gentfjy^ gibbet 

gentility ^ibb^^cy 

gentle gibbous, nels 

gentry gihc 
gen/iine,]jr,nefs giblets 

genus giddily 

g^ni^flexion giddintfk 

g^^centrjc ^iddy 

geographer ^ift 
gfc>graphical,ly|rig ^ 

gtography gigantic, nefi 
geotnttrical^ \y |;iggle 
gf^m^trician g\\dj cr 
geometry giU 

George ^ills 

georgics . ^gilli-flow'cr 



G L A 

^jlt 

gimlet 

^imp 

gin 

ginger 

gingerljr 

gingle, r 

gnd 
girder 
gitdle 
g\r\, gerl 
^irlifli, g€r 

girt 

i:irth 

^ittcrii , 

^ive, r 

^iven 

|:izzard 

glicij 

glad, lyy nefi 

gladden 

gbde 

gjladidtor 

gladfome 

glance 

gland, crs 

gland^lous, 

[nefs 
glandular 
glare 
' clafs 



G L O 

glafly 

gkzc 

glizicr 

gl^ad 

gl^cn 

gl^n, er, ings 

gi^be 

glee 

gleet 

glib, ly, nefs 

glide 

glimmer 

glimpfe 

gliften 

gliftcr 

glitter 

gl^be 

globous 

ghho/ity 

globular 

globi^lous 

gloom 

gtoomily 

gloomineft 

gloomy 

gbrif/c/^cion 

gb'r/Ty 

glorious^ \y 

glory 

glofs 

gloffary 

gldfs/nefs . 



GOB 

glofly 

gloflogrtfpher 

Gloucefter- 

glove, r 

gbto 

gbze 

glw 

glui(ti 

glum 

glut 

glntinous 

glutton . 

gluttonous, 

I^nefs 
glutt^t^ 
gluy 
flnafh 
0nat 
finaw 
an^moa 
flnoftic 

goad 

goal, jail 

joiler, jai 

god 

go&t 

go'atifh, nefs 

gob 

gobble 

gobblet 

gobblin 



GOV 

God 

goddefs 

Godhead 

godlineis 

godljr 

goggle 

g<^ld 

g^ld 

g^'lden 

gulden 

gond^Itf 

gondol/cr 

gone 

good, ly, ncft 

goodlack 

goq/fe 

goofeberry 
gore 
gorgeous, ]y, 

[nefi 
gorget 

gormandiTc, r 
gojling 
golpcl 
goffip 
goffiping 
gotten 
govern 
governable, 

[nefs 
gojvernante 
governefs 

governor 



G R A 

governor 

government 

g^rd 

gout 

goutmefs 

gouty 

gown 

grtfce 



griceful,l7,nefs granite 
gricelefs, neis grant, or 
gracious, ly, gran/^kite 

[nefs granulation 
grtfd^cion gr^P^ 
gradtfal»l;)f,ncfs ^raph^cal, ]y 
graduate grapple 

gradtfJcion • grafp 
" grafs 



graff 

graft 

grain 

gr^raiericy 

gr^miBfous 

grammar 

gran:>mir;an 

grammat/caljljrgrattfy 

grampuj . 

gran^^difer 

gvanddo 

granary 

grand 

igrandee 

grand/vous 

grandeur 



G R A G R I 

grand-f5ther grav/t^ztc 
grand-mother gray/t^tion 
grandfon grav/ty 

grand-daugb- grivy 

[tcr gray 
grand-cb/ld gray> ^ gr^- 

^ [hound 
grjze 
grizier 
gr«/e 
gr^afe 
gr/as/ly 
gr^ineis 
gr^ly 

grei7t, ly, ne(s 
graves 
Gr&ian 



grjniv^rous 
grange 



grafs-hopper Gr/ci/m 

Orcece 
grced/Ty 
grced/nefs 



grad/nels 

grafly 

gr<?te ^ 

gritefuljty, nefs greedjF 

grat/ffcicion Greek 

green, nefi 
gr^tw grcenifli 

gratitude greet 

gr^ iuitous G r^gefr/an 
grabuny, , gi/mial 
gr^ve, ly, nefs gr^nide 
gravel, ly grew 

grivrn gr/ce 

graver grid-/ron^?u rn 

griVf 



GR O 



G U A 



GUT 



'grief 


groop 


gadgeon 


grievance '. 


groove ' 


guefs, er 


grjeve ^ * 


gre?pe^ r 


gucft 


grievous, I>, 


gr% . 


g^ggJc , 


[nefs gr<?Tncft 


. gufdance 


grifEn . 


gr^fs 


guide, r 


g"g 


grot^ 


guild-hall 


grim, Ijr, -^neft 


gr^tefque 


Tgufle 


gr/mice 


gr6tt(7 


gu/ieful,ly,nc(s 


gr/nie 


tgr^ve 


guilt 


grin 


gpovellng 


guiltmeii^ 


g«nd„cr 


' ground, lefs 


guily^ 


grind-ffeae 


ground lefljr 


guinea 


€"P 


groundlefneis 


gu/Te 


gr/pc 


g««p 


gtt/tarrc 


gr/pingly 


grout 


guU& 


|rift, ^r gr/ft 


gr^to 


gulf 


griftle 


growl 


gull 


griftty . 


gr&ton 


gullet 


gric 


gr(?toth 


gulp 


grict/nefs 


grub 


gum 


gritty ; 


grudge 


gumminefi 


grizzle 


grudgingly 


gummy 


grizzlmefe 


gr«el ^ 


gun, net 


grizzlj; 


gruff, Ijy, nets 


gunnel 


grwn 


grumble 


gunnejQf 


groat 


griiniblingljr 


guOi '_ \ 



grocer ■ 

grocery 

grogram 

groin 

groom 



grampus 

grunt 

guarantee 

guard 

guardian 



guflet 
guft 
guft^ 
gut. * 
guding 



;gfitier 



HA I H AN 

gutter hairjf 

gutti^ral h^lbard 

guzzle hJlbard/er 

g^be halcyon 

^ytnnaftic hale 
gymn6/ffphi& half 

hiif-pennjf 
;h51l 
H . halk]^a» 

halliards 
Htfbakkuk hd\lo\o 
haberdafhcr halloo 
htfberg^n halkdnicion 
htfbil/mejus h^o 
habit h^t 

habrtable, nefs halter 
hab/tition ham 
hahitual^ly -hamlet 
habituate hammer, er 
habitude hammock 

hack hamper 

hackle hamftring 

had hanch 

haddock hand, ful 

hlk hand/Ty 

hag hand/ne& 

haggard . han^kercb/ef, 

h^gg^^> ^ [hank^her 

Higue - handle 
Jiail handmaid 

fiainou$,1]f|Qels h^n«fome, ly, 
hm Xnefs 

4 



rl A R 

handy 

hang 

hanger 

hangings 

hank 

hanker 

Hannat 

hanfel 

hap, Ijr 

happen 

happfljf 

happinefs 

happy 

harangue 

harals 

jiarbinger 

'harbour, er 

hard 

diarden 

hard/nels 

hardly 

hardneis 

hardy 

hiire 

harl^oia 

harlot 

harm 

harnilef^ 

Iharmlefiy 

harmlefhefs 

harmonics 

Jiarm^n/ous, jr 



HA T 

hirmcny 

harp, er 
harpoon 
harptfneer 

harpycford 
harpr 
narr^li 

harfli, Ij, nefs 
harflut 
hart 
harvcft 
has 
ha(h 
■ halk 

:/. hafp. 

; haa 
& hijfte 

htfftin,.cr 
;is hiftfly 

Bha(bae& 
^hiJljf 

hatch 

hatchet 
jfs Jitchment 
.jj hflte 

|fc&'f«'teful,Ijf,ncfs 

pjohath 

a^'n«tred 

lit. 



H E A 

hatter. 

have - 

h4ven 

haught/Ij 

hafight/nds 

ha6ghi7 

haunch 

haunt, ef 

havock 

hautboy, ho 



H £1 

heaiie 

heart 

hdrten 

hiart/Iy 

hiart/neft- 

hearth 

hcartlefs 

heaptfk 

hfac 
h^th 



haut-ga^t,b(7g^ h/athen t^els * 



haw 

hawk, er 

hawser 

hawT^ 

haw'thorn 

hay 

hizard 



heathcnifli, Ijr,, 

h/atheni/hi 

heiven 

hoBtvcniy 

heavenlf'neis 

heavily 

heavmeia 



hazardous, l^^ heavjr 
hazy [jicfs heb^t^te. 



h^ 

head 

headd/neis 

headd/ 

hfal 

health, fill 

hcul/ity 

h^p 

hnr 



h^rifiyin 
H^rew 
hfbrician 
hccatotnU^ 
' heckle 
hcftic 
Heftor- 



hedge . 

hced^ 

heardf ^hurd. hecdfirf^y,nef$^ 
hcark heel 

hearken . hS-day 

0^2 ^iSfcr 



H E K 



heffcr her, hur 

hright herald 

hrtnous,1y>ncls heraldry 
9Fir ferbs 

SSreft herbage 

hrf/t?centric herbal 



heliofcirjpc 

hell 

hcllfb^re 

h^ll-bound 

hell^nift 



herbtflift 
herc/^tnin 
H erodes 
herd 
h^re 



helHlh, Ijy, nefs hereafter 
helm . ] hereditament 

helmet . 'her6dnaty 
help • ; her^ 
he]pful,lj',ncfs heretic 
helplcfs - . herei/cal^ Ijr 
hciplefncfs . |heata<ge - 



heron 

herring -^ 

herfe 

hesitate 

hes/tition 

heterodox 

heter^g/n^ous 

hew, cr 

hexagon 

hexagonal 

hexameter 

Hezek/aj; 

H?bern/an 

hiccough, cupr 

hickup 

hid 

htddea . 



helve 

Helvetic. 

hem 

hemiTpherc 

hemlock 

hemorr|K)ids 

hemp 

hempen 

hen 

henbane 

hence 

hepatic 

heps ' . . 

heptarci^ ' 



h/dc 

I her maphr(7dFte hideous, lj,ne& 

hermeticaf^ljr hxe 

h7erarc|i/cat 
hierarcj^ 



hermit 

herm/tage 

hern 
. herner/ 
: hernfhaw 

hiro 
^ Herod 
• Her^'d/ans 

b^r^lc 

her^/cal, ]y 

heroine 
' her<?i/m 



hFer^glyphie 
higgle 
higgler 
high, 1> 
hfghnefe 
' Hilary 
hill 
hillbc 
hilt 
him 



ht9 



HOB H O M 

hin hob-goblin 

hind hock 

hinder, mo& ' hocus-pocus 
hindmoA hod 

hindrance hddge-podge 
hinge h^e 

hint hog 

hip hoggifh, ly, 

Hippocr^M • [ne(s 

hipp^ratic hdgo 
h/re, r . hpgs-hcad 

hireling .. hqift 
his . h^ld 

hifs hdldm' 

hift^rran h^Ie 

hiftor/caT, ]y hdlily 
)AB:oxi6gra]^het h^inefs 
hiftary holkto^ ne& 

hit . h$lly: , 

hitch . holm . 

hither, m^ftyt? hi^lpeiv 
hive h^lftcr 

h^l ^hdt . 

howd . ' holy 

h«ir-fr6ft fjomagCi v 

hoBvinth * h^me,J/ 
h^arfe, fy hamzlincis 

hflarftnefe H(?mer 

hflary hom/cFde 

hob .. . h6m/|y 
hobble, r h^rti^gen^al 
hobtgr hornogeneou% 

.0.3 



H OR 

h^mobgous 

h^ne 

tKSnefl: 

honey 

ionorary 

^nour 

inSntfuraUe, 

. [nei3 

i^ngurablj 

hood 

hoof 

hook 

hooked^ neis 

hoop 

hoot 

hop 
• h^pc 

. hi?j)!fful,lj)^,ncfi[: 
' hdpdefs 
= hopper 

hdppet 

hopple 

HtfVcb 

hiare- hound 

horizon 

horizon taL.b 

h5rn,-cr - ' 

hornet 

h^r^Gr^pe . 

horrible, nefs 

horribly 

horrid. 



\ 



H p O HUM 

horrid, \y^ ncfs how 

liorror how'kc 

fcorfe hoy 

horffmah hubbub 

Htfsanna^ hijcloiback 

helCc huckleb^ne 

h^'fier buckfter 

hdfp/tableine&hudcHe 

liofpf cabl; h«e 

ft6fp/ial,er* huff 

hoip/ial/tx huffiib', Ijr, nefs hurdle 

h^ft hi^ge, ly, nels* hurds . ; 

hdftage H«gh hurl 

h^c& h//g^not hurnoine 

hoftile, 1)5, ncft hulk huny 



H Y D 

h/?mor(bine,ljr, 
[ncfs- 
hunch 

hundred, tb 
hungi 
hunger 
hungrily . 
hunary 
hunks 
hunt, er , fmai^ 



hoftiVty 

loftier 

hot, Ijr, ne6 

botchvpotch. 

hot-cocklfs 

hovel . 

hover: 

hough, liofT 

houghcdi hoff* humbly 

hound 

•our, br 

hou/e 

hofife-lecfc 

hoi|/eh(?ld,\ef 

Iw6>ife 

hdu/feifrjc 

houGng^ 



hulk hurt 

hum hijitful,Ij^n< 

h^inan, ly hufband;.Jjr' 

humane, nefi hdrbandry 

h^nanift hufli 

hiKnam'tjr hulk^j^, 

humzntze huflars % 

humble,^^ ne(8 hu^.: 



hucniA 

h«mid/ty- 

hirniHity 

h^mourift 



huftings 

hut. 

hutch « 

huzza ^ 

hyacinth 

hibernal 

hydra 



[ncfs- bjdrogrfljphj^ 




^ 



IDE 



jaMpd 

jail 

yiki$ 

jalop 

Jamaica 



li^ropcal 

hydroaiiUa 

hjrVmal 

hjmtn 

hymn 

hyperbolical 
hjrp^c^iidr/ac, /ambic 
[cal jamBs 

h;p6cr(jQr. 

hfp$crztc Jaoe 

hyiw:rit/cal , jangle, 

^pe&%uc^ . jan/ztfr>. 

hrp6tb^fij . janfrni/in 
hypotbcucay^jaofirnift.. 

lyuop JanM^} 

iyfterics;. ^ Japixx. 

l^ftwqal>»efejar 

jargon-, 
jafper . 

jaitndice.c 

jay 

. ice 
icicle 



jtfde identitjr 

j^sdilh) Ij, oeis* idis 
jag 



idioia. 

icUoC'- 

iditftj/hi' 

Idle, ne& 

Idlr 

idol 

idobter 

fdobcrous. If 



idtflFze 
jcalou$9 Iy,.ne 
jetlttjj^. 
j^r, cr, ingtj 
J^h^vali 

jennet > 
j^ardou»s 
J«»P?rdy 
Jerfnilalf > 
Jwmjr . . 
jerk 
jerkin * 
jira&Ieni > 
je(£imw « 
je(i 
je&ite 
. jel«itfcali 
[nefs Jefu/ 



J[abbw 
jtfccnt 
jacinth ' . 
^ck 

Met 

J4cob 

ji.cob7te 

^wbitilh,|^ncfi Fd&l , _ ^ 

liJC^'bu^ ' Jdent/qal, Ix, jet 



icjr 

id/a 



J* 



JAhw 

jettcr 

jew'el, ler 

Jew 

Jcw'ifh 

if 



iM r 

illafive 



I RIM 

immacivkte, ly, 
[nefe 
Hlultr^te Imminent 

illuftricion imtnanitjit 
illuftrious, iy^ Immaiu^el 
image [hefs Immaterizl' 
imagtty . xmmaXemMty^ 
imagine . imm^t^re, ly, 

rtnagmablc £ne& 

immatuxiyf 

[nefs 
.itn medicable 
imm^m^r/aM> 

immemoraUe 
kntnenfe^ \yj 

Lne4 



ignfous 
ignoble ' 
igrwmih/ouSy 

• t^, nefe itnitginary 
ignomir^ ^ imzgindtiotk 
ignordm^^ runbilm 
ignorance . . irabargo 
ignorant, ly, imbark 
|ig [nefs imbark&ion 

^11 imb4/e 

ikac imbfciH/cy 

iliad . . imbellilb,mcn<t irnmctisintjf 

jilt /- imbezzlemcnt itnme»fcrablc 
31 " ' .imb£bc immerge 

illegal, ly, nefs . imbitter . immerfe 

ilkgalifty . imbo'lden immerfion 

ill^gWnitfte,!)!: imbofs immnhod/ca^ 

illegiximacf imbroidcr, cr imm/neat [Ijh 
yi{beral,lyjTiefs imbrofl ' ' • immin^tk>a 
aiiberil/tjf • imbrue immiffidn 

illicit, Ijf, n^fs . imbi/e - " immit 

illiteMte, Ijv imburfe, ment imtnobilky 

[nefs im/table * immodcMte^ 
iWutninatt ^ Atnitqtc _ [ly, nefe 

ilkminitioii^^ 'imitduon' ' | . imfnddefl:, ly,jr 
illi^a * ' iimt&or ' immoliite 



rMp 

« 

immoUmn 
immoral, I7, 

[nefs 
mmcriUty 
immortal, ly 
immortal/ty 
imraorul/ze 
immoveable 
immoveably 
immoveable- 

[nefi 
imm/?n/ty 
imm/?re 
mmtahility 
immiftable^. 

[nefs 
immiJtably 

impail 

impair f nefs 

Impalpable, 

impalpably 

impannel 

impar/ty . 

impark 

imparlance 

irr.part 

impartial, \y 

impart/alftjr 

impaflable 
impafllble 
impafsibiUty 



tMt 



IMP 



v.« 



imp/rticnce impertfnent,ljfy 
impatient, ly, ' [nefs 

[nefs, impervious 
impwch, menlf imprtrable 
impeccable, impftr^te 

fnefs imp^tricion 
impeccflbili'ty impetuous, Iy» 
irap/de icnp^tvs [nefs 

imped/meot impetuofity 
impel ♦ mpieiy 

impend Jmp/bus,ly,ncfi 

impeiuftwMl/tjr implacable, 
impenetrable, [nefs 

[nefs implacably 
impenrtrab|y impl<ac<abil/ty , 
impenrtchcc implant 
impeh/tency impl^ 
imp€h/tcnt, ly, implement . 
' [nefs implfcitipn 
imperative, ly implicit, ly 
imperceptible; implore 

. [nefs imploy, mcnt 
imperceptitjly imply 
imperfeer, ly; impe?l/te. 
. [nefs impol/tic 
impcrfcdlion Imports 
impmal imp^Vt 

in^petiaWGi importance 
imp/r/ous, ly,. impSrtant 

[hefs jmportation 
imperfe?nal, ly imporf/^n^te,, 
impert/nencc [ly, nefs- 

impor- 



IMP 

importune 

importunity 

imp^fe 

imposition 

impofs/bik'tjF 

imp6il^ble,ncfs 

impoft 

impoft^me 

Impoftor 

impofttfre 

fmpotence 

itnpctcncy 

impotent, ly 

impovcrilh, 

[mcnt 
impound 
Impow'cr 
impradl/cable, 
[nefs 
impra£bcab]jr 
fmpr^ci^te 
impr^cition 
impregnable, 
[ncfs 
impr^nably 
impregnate 
impregnation 
imprels 
Impreflion 
impr/mii 
imprint 
impriion 



INC 

nacceffiUc, 

naftion [nefs 
nadive^ly^Refs 
naftiv/ty 
nad^qutfte, ly, 
[nels 



improbability 
mprobable, 

[nefs 
mprobity 
mproper, ly 
mpr^pr/4te. 

mpropr/ition inadvertence 
mpropr/itor inadvertency 
mpropriety inadvertent, ly 
mpr^veable, \nd\in\zbk 

[nefs inamoured 
mprSve,ment inan/sni2te,nefs 
mprovident Jjr inan/ty 
mpri^dence inarticiiltfte,Iyi 



mpri^dent, ly 
mpifdence 
mp^dent, ly, 

[nefs 
mpfign,pung 
mpugner 
mpulfe 
mpulGve 
mpulQon 
tnpi/nity 
mpi/re, ly, 

[neis 
mpurity 

mptft^on 
mpi/te, r 

mpi^tive 



n 



^f •. 




[ne& 
nafigtn'tfte 
naugirrition 
nau^icious^Iy 
nbred 

ncamp, meoC 
ncantition 
ncipable 
ncispadttfte 
nctfpacitjr 
ncarcerition 
ncarntfte 
ncarnition 
ncendiiiry 
hcenfe 
ncenfe 
ncentive 
noeptive * 

inccp» 



INC INC . INC 

incerrittfde incotnmenfir- incoDsidcmble; 
inoSffiint, Ijr, [lablc ^ [ncfs 

inceft [nefs incommode inconsfdcMtc^ 
inceftirous, I7, incoming/- [1jf» nefi 

inch [ncfs [ous,ljr,nefs inconsiftence 

incomm^nJCfti* inconsfftencjr 

[ble, nefs inconsiftent, ]y 
incommtfnfca- inconMable, 

[bb [ncfi 

incompisrable, inconfiflably 
[nefs inconftancy 
incomp/?rably inconftant, ly 
incompafs inconteftaUe, 
incompacible, [nefs 

. fnefi rinconteftabljr 
incompatibly incdntinence 
incomp^teney *inc6nt/nency 
incompetent, incontinent, fy, 
[ly, nels [ncis 

inclement^ Ijf, tncomplrte,'^ly, ^nconv^ience 
[ncfs [nefs* inconv/niency 

incl/nable,nelsincomprfhen- inconvenient, 
incVmluon [fible^nefs [ly, nefs 

incl/ne jncomprehen- inconverfible 

[fibly incorporate 
incomprehen- incorporation 

[sibll/tjr incorpor^i 
inconc&vable, incorpor^rtjr 

[nefs incorreft, ly, • 
inconc/ivably [nefs 

incongr^itjr incorr/gibk. 



inchaot, er, 

[ment 
inchantrels 
inchdjc 
incidence 
inc/dental, ly 
incircle, l^r 
incifion 
incffirre 
inc/te, ment 
incivil, ly 
indvilny 
iiicle 
inclemency 



incite 

dncloftfre 

include 

bcb^five, ly 

in<:6g/tancy 

incognito 

4ncoh^ence 



incoherent, ly incongruous, ly 



income 



inconne^ion 



[neft 
incoF- 



ir 



INC I N P IND 

incorrigib!^ incutnbFance indenture 
incorrupt incur independence 

incorruptible ^nc^rable, nefs indi?penciencj^ 

[lity incarablj inci^pendent, [7 

in'borruptible, incurfian in^iicnwinatt^ 

(nefs iacuryaurc [ly, nefs 

ixKorruptibly ind^nger Index 

incorrupti9n ^nd/ar^ V^f^%. X^^i^ 
infounter indebted 1 ndi^s, g^s 

incouragc,. indecency ind/c^te 

[mcnt ind/cent, ly, indicition . 
incraflite f^efs indicative 

incr/i^ indeclinable ind/ct, ment 

incredibfl/ty indfC(?rum ind/ctable 
incrediblc^efs irxUci^rous, Ij, indidipn 
inci;^dibly £ncfs indifference 

incr^d«l/tjr indeed indiffcrencjr 

incredftlouSfly, indi^fat/gable, indifferent, Xy^^ 

[nel's (nefs [nefs 

increment j indrfatfgabfjr fnd/gence 
inqr{?ach,nient ind^f^ible, ind/gency 
incrfl[aching, Jj, • [nefs fndigenti ly, 

[nefs inde/^wJibly " _ [nefs 

incruft^tion indefinite, ly, ind/gefted 
inc«bition ,-. [nefs ind/geftiblc, 

incf^buj , indelible, nefs ; C'^eft 

inculc^Jte . ind/ljbly' ind/geftibly , 

inculcation indemn/f/ci- ind/geftion 
inculpable,nefs . [tion indign^tioa- 

iaculpably indcmru:^ indignhj 
incuaibcnt . .indecnnity iind/g^ 
ixicutober indent ind/redljly^nefs 



'J t * 'i*-. •<.•»'»•»' 



I N D 

indifcernible 
indifcrcet, ly, 
£ncfe 
indiicretion 
indHciim/n^ite, 

indifjpenfible 

indi(pcnfibljr 

indilp^Tc 

indifp^fedncfs 

indlTp^ition 

indifprftable, 

{nefs 
indMpwtabty 
indiij/olvablc, 

[ner$ 
indii/Sivabljr . 

indifla/rble, 
[titfe 

indiftiAft, \y, 
[neft 
individisral^ 1;^ 
indivisibility 
indi>ifiblc,ncfs 
indfvffibly 
indociblc^ncfs 
Indocile 
indpciiftjr 
indolence . 
indrfcncj 
indolent, nc6 



I n:e 

ndorle, mcnt 
ndow', mcnt 
ndi^bitable, 

[ncfe 
nddfbftably ' 
nd«cc, mcnt 
nduft 
nduflion 
nd^e 
ndulge 
wdulgcncc 
ndulgent, ly, 
[ncfs 
ndiilt^ 
nd^mcnt 
nd^rablc 
ndupott 
iVdftre 

nduftr/ous,Iy, 
' [ncft 
nduftry 
n/brrflte 
nefitible, ncfs 
neffably 
neflFcftiral, ly 
hi61?gant, ly 
nepc/twdc 
nfquJI/ty 

n^ft;maHe, 

[ncfs 
neft/mably 
ncv/tablc, ncfe 
R 



I N F 

inev/tably 
inexc^fablc, 

[ncfs 
inexcttfably 
inexhaufted 
inexhauitibic 
inex^rablc,ncrs 
inexorably 
inexp^icnt 
inexp/r/ence 
inexpiable, 

[ncfi 
ineipl/catrle, 

incxprQfTible 
incxpreffibljr 
inextlnguifh- 
{aWe, neli 
inextr/c^ble, 

infalWrfl/ty 
infallible, nels 
infallibly 
infamous, ly, 

[nefe 
Tiiiawiy 

infancy 

infant' 

infantry 

irrf^tuaic 

infatz/ation 

inf6a 

infec- 



INF 

infedion 
infcftious, ly, 
[nefs 
irifceble 
in&lic/ty 
infttff 
inf/ofmenc 
infer 

inference 

• f^ ■ * * 

vcAexioxhy 
infernal, \y 
infertile, nefs 
infertility . 
infeft 
infidel 
'infidelity 
infiniteyljx^nefs 
infinity 
infirm, Ijr, nefs 
infirmtfiy, 
infirmity 
inflammable, 
[nefs 
inflime 
inflammation 
inflammatory 
inflated 
inflation 
inflexible, nefs 
inflexibly 
inflexibility 



I N G 

inflexion 

inflia 

inflidlion 

influence 

]nfl/^entiai,ly 

influx 

in fluxion 

inf<:7rce, ment 

inform, er 

informition 

inforti^ntfte,ly, 

£ncfs 
infraftion 
infranchife, 

[ment 
infrequent 
infringe, r 
infringement 
infiKib 
infii^fion 
Engender 
ingenious, ly, 

[nefs 
ing^n«ity 
ingeni/ous» ly, 

[ncls 
ing^ncer 
ing^nj^ 
inglorious, ly, 

[nefs 
ingorge 
ingot 



I-N H 

ingraft 
ingrite 
ingr^ti^te 

ingratitude 
ingrive, r 
ingr/dient 
ingrefs 
ingri^Ts, cr 
ingr(?fment 
ingulf 
inhabit, er 
inhabitable, 

[nels 
inhabitant 
inhance ^ 
inh/re 
inh/rence 
inh/rexicif 
inh^^ent, ly, 

[nefi 
inherit, or 
inheritance 
inh^fion 
inhibit 
inhibition 
iphofpitable, 

[nefs 
inhofpitably 
inhuman, ly, 

[nefs 
inhumanity 
inh/^me 



INN I N Ct 

fnjeft iqn-h^lder 

injeftion inn-keeper 
iDiavtabie,ne(s innite 

inimicabl^ inner, m^ft 
injoin- 
injoy, ment 



IN S 



•. 



innocence 
inn^cency 



iniqg^cous, \y innocent, ly, 



[nefs 
inn^vtfte 
inn^vition 
inn^vitor 



iniqu/ty 
inicia), ly, 

in/t/ition 

injflrficious, ly, inn«end<7 

[neis inni^merab^e, 
injunAion [ncfs 

injio-c inm^mcrabljr 

injurious, ly, innoxious, ly» 
injury [nef$ [nefs 

ijufticc inobjSrvable, 

ink . [ncfs 

ink-^rnp in6c«l^e 

inkle Hioc/yytion 

inkling inoffenfivc, ly, 

inland [nefs 

inlat^e, ment inordmtf te, ly, 
inlay [nefs 

inlet inqueft 

inl/ghtm inquf^tffde 

inquire, r 
inquiry 
inquisition 
inquis/tive, 1^, 
[ncfs 
R % 



ifili 

inlzvenr 

inm^2te 



inquis/tor 
inrige 
inrich, ment 
inroad 
inr^l 

inr^lment 
inlatiable, nefs" 
inficiably 
inf^ci^te, nefi^ 
infcrfbe 
infcription 
infcr/^ cable, 

' [nefs 
nfcr^tably 
iBfcdt 
infet^ion 
infec^re 
infec/ir/tjr 
infenfiite 
kifens/bilitjr 
infenfible, nels 
infenfibly 
infep^rable, 

[nef* 
infep^rabiy 
infert, ep 
infertion 
insFde ' 
insidious, \% 

[iic{» 
(nsFght 
inOgnificang^ 

infigr 



"x 



I N S 

infigniiifcant) 
[ly, ncfe 
insinuatt 
insinMtion 
insipid, Ijr,ncis 
insipidly 
insift 
inflive 
infnire 

ins^ciable^oefs 
insifci^bljp 
infe^lence 
in blent, l^^neis 
infolvencjf 
infolvcnt 

mfon\{ic\k 

infpedt 

inipedion 

infpedor 

intpirStion 

in (pi re 

irifpii&tc 

inft^ble 
inftJl,- meat 
in&allation 
inftance 
inrtant, ]y 
inftanc^nuMs^ 

inflmi [b 
inftcp 

Infijgftt 



INT 

inft/gifion 

iiiftig4U)r 

infill 

inftilUcion 

inft infi; 

in&itute 

inft/ttftioA 

inftruft 

inftrudion 

inftru^ive 

inftruftor 

iQflr»menc 



I N T 

integer 
integral 

integric/ 
, intclle^ 
intelledi/al 

intelli^ace 
intell/geoc, ly» 

[nc6 
incell/g;ble» 

[ncf$ 
intell/gibly 
intemperance 



inftrirnientdU int^noper^te. 



inftr^nnentalitjp 

tafufficitn^ 
iiifiij9^tf:ient, \y 
wfuht 
i»fulu ingly 
iofi^perable, 

{nefa 
infifpembljr 
iofupp^table, 

[nefe 
infupp^rtabl^ 
iofi^rance (Ihiyj 
infftre,. cr 
infurmount* 

fable, nefa 
infurro^kioa 
intail 
tdtangle^ment 



ly, Qe(s 
fitend, meot 
Utebdaac 
nt(bfe| Ij, iitA 
(itent 
ntention 

ptentiraid> ly 
Uter 

OCercaUrji 
n(ercibted 
i^tcroriiooft 
nterc/de 
fitercept ' 
Interception 
iHterceiTion 
iotcrceflbr. 
ioterc hinge 
ioterchtfngf*^ 
[able, nei^ 
inter* 



f N T. 



rirr 



r N T 



O 



intercommon- 

[in 
ihterc^urfc 
ititcrdift 
incerdfdlion 
ihtcreft, ed 
interftre 
incerjicent 
intetje&ioO' 
[nteritn 
intmpr 
tnterlice * 
tnterlafd 
intcrlAve 
incerl/ne 
interlocution 
interlocj^^pf 
inCerUp^, r 
fntcrl«de 
inter meddle 
interm/dii^te 
interm/nable 
intermingle 
intermifBon' 
intermit ' 
intermittent 
intermix, une 
internal, ly 
interpolate 
interpolation 
interp^e 
iaterposittoa 



•' - ^ 



^■' 



interpret 

interpri^ti^tion 

interpreter 

in ter pr/fe 

interregnum 

interrogate 

interrogation 

interrogatory 

interrupt 

interruptibn 

iftterfeft 

interfeftion' 

interfp^rfc 

interfperfion, 

interftice 

interval' 

interv/nc 

intervention' 

interview 

interw«ive 

intepwA^m 

int^fttfte 

inteftina- 

inthril, ment 

inthr^e,ment 

intmiiit/' 
ihtrnMte, Ijp; 
int/titition 
intfmM#te 
intfre, Ijf, ne(t 
in title 

tin 



^ -_•• 



into, dr mta 
intolerable^ 

fnefts 
intdlerabljjF 
intomb. 
intox/ctfte 
intox/cition" 
intradable, 

[nefi^ 
intraif^ah)/ 
in trails 
intranee. 
intrarj^tive* 
intrap 
intr/At 
intr^ty 

intrench, mcnt: 
intr/pid, 1/ 
ihtrdp/d 
intrepidity 
ihtrioicy 
ihtr/diite, Ifi 

fhtr/gHe 
intrinfic 
intrihf/cal, Ij^. 

[nelJ^i ' 
imrodifce 
intr^dddtfve 
introdiidion' 

introd^Ooirjr 
iBtr«de,r; 

intriffibni 



I N V 

intruCioa 
intruft 
int/vicion 
int^/tive, ]y 
invflde, r 
invalid 
in v^jl/d 
invah'dtfte 
invtflid/tjr 
inv^nable,Dcfs 
invir/abljr 
inviQon 
inve<9:ivc 
invSgh 
invAgle, r 
invelop 
inyenom 
invent- 
inventiotl 
invefttive 
inventor 
inventory 
inventrefs 
inverfion 
invert 
inveft 
inveft/gtftc 
inveft/gitioA 
inveft/t«re 
invecer^cjr 
invecer^te, ly, 
[nefs 



J O A JOS 

invid/bus, Ij, j^^b 
[nefs jobb 
jnvig^r^te j^be 
inYfncible,nefs jockey . 
invincibly ^ocofo^ \y^ nc& 
invi^labkynefs jocular 
inviohhly j^«lan'ty 
invielatt jtfcund, Ij, nc6 

invlran, urn jog 
inv/rons joggle 

invifible, neis ^o^a 

joinder 

joiner 

joint 

joinr-l^ 

jointirre 

joint-tenani 



jOift 



invifibl> 

inv/sibil/cy * 

invnacicm 

invne, r 

inundicion 

inv^oice 

inv^cition 

invoice 

invoke 

involve 

involunttfrdy joll/tr/ 

involunttfr/- jollity 

[nefs j6ll/jy. 
involimttfry jollmefr 
in»rc jolly 

inirtiliry jolt-hcad 

invulnerable, J^nal^ 

(^nefs ionic 
invulnerably jdnquil 
JnwflFd J5rdan 

J^an Jtfeph 



Jofiwtf 



I R R 1 R R J ITD 

J6(hua iTTefrdgzhly is > ' 

J^j/a> irrrf«cablc /Taac 

jofllng-block irregular, ly, /saia^ 
jot > [ncfe Ifciwot 

J^ve - irr^g«lanty ifciury 

jovid]^ ly^ nefs irr^ligion isiclc 

journal irrdigious, ly, /finglafs 
joiirnalift [ne^ f0land, er . 

journey irremediable lele 

journiyman irremiffible lyhiel 

^owl' ^ irreparable,. Vfraeitie 
joy [nefs. iffae, lefs. 

joyful, ly, nefs irreparably iftjmui. 
Joyous, ly, nefs irrepr^chable it 

jovlefs irrepr<?tchably 7tal/aa. 

Frafcible, nefs -irr#prehenfible Tt^ily; 

/re irresiftable, itch 

i'reland ^ [nefe /tern 

7'rij irj^siftablj^ itcr^ate 

irkfome, nefs irre/^kt«, Ij^ itericion* 
mn, urn [nefs Itinerant 

Jron-monger, irref^livtion /cinerary 

[urn frretr/evablc j«b/licioa: 

iron/cal, ly. irretrievably j«bilee 

ifcny irreverence j«cund/tj^ 

irradiate irreverent, ly J«da> 

irr^jdwtion irreverfible j«diicaL 

irrational, ly- irreverfirbly ^udaiftn 

irreconcilable irrevocable prd^fzer 

irreconc/lably irrevocably J«de 

irrecoverbale irritate Judea 

irrecoverably irnwtioh judge 

krefrigablc irruption judg* 



JUR 

judgment 

jadicatovy 

judicature 

pwdicial^. If 

*judic\ary 

jn/dicious, 1^^ 

|iig [ntfs 

juggle 

juggler 

^g«lar 

j«icc 

jwicmcfr 

jumble, r 
jump, cr 
j|/n<fl«rc 

jKn/pcr 

junk. 

junket 

junt^- 

ivory 

Juphct 

juratc 




jin-ifdiaion 



K E R 

juft, Ij', ncfs 

juftice 

juftfcwry 

jiift/f/ablc,ncfs 

juft/f/abljr 

juft/f/cicion 

jiia/fy, 

jufilc^ 

jut 

JKVtfn?ic 

}uvemlity , 

ivy. 



Kalendkr 
kecks 
keckle 
kedgc 
keel 

keel^boUing 
ketn,, fy^ naf» 
keep^. eft 
keg' 
kemb^ 
ken 
kennel- 
kept 
kefchitf 
kerm« 
kernel 
at 



KN A 

ktrfy 

ketch* ' 

kettle. 

kflTf 

k/be 

kick 

kick-fbaws^ 

kid 

kidnap 

kidray 

kilderkin^ 

kill, er 

kila 

kin^ 

k/nd, \ji De& 

kindle 

kmdred 

kme 

king, If 

kSngdofir 

kin/mati 

kfn/i^woaiaiii 

kirlL 

kifsN 

kit 

kicchem 

kke 

kuteii' 

klick. 

klfcker 

finack 

taap. 



LAB 

tnapfack 
ftn^vc . . 
knavery 

knead 

inee 

ineel 

inell 

inew 

inick-ftnack 

knife 

knight 

l^n/ght'hood 

&nit, tcr 

inob 

inobtgr 

knock, er 

inot, meis 

indcty 

in^, ingljf 

iRolpleci^ 

knOa^n 

knuckle 



Libel 
lib'al 
Mboratory 
labotiousj ly, 

[oefe 



LAM 

labour, er 
labyrinth . 
lace 
lacerate 
lacericion 

laci^rym^I 
lack 

lacker 

lackey 

laconic 

UdWal 

lad 

ladder 

kde 

Uden 

lidle 

Udy 

tag 

liick 

laid 

lain 

lair 

Uity 

lake 

tacnii 

lambent 

lamk-kin 

I^me, ]y^ neb 

lament, er 

lamentable 

lamentably 

lamentiiioa 



L A R 

Lammaj 

lamp 

lampoon 

lamprey 

knee, r 

lancet 

lanch 

land 

landgrave 

)andgriv/^te 

landltfdj^ - 

landlord 

landmark 

landfkip 

landrefs 

landry 

l^ne 

language 

langu]d,lyi neU 

iangui(h,naent 

lanoruor 

lank 

lanrkiflHbsnels 

lanfquenet 

lantern 

lantern 

lap 

lapid^iry 

lappet 

lapfeci 

lap-wing 

larboard 

lirc^njr 



LAV 

larceny 
lard 

larder, cr 
large, Ijr, nefs 
larseis 
lark 

lafciviou5, ly, 
lafs [nefs 
Ikf&itudt 
la(t 

laftagc " 
latch 
lacchet 
kte, ly, nefi 
latent 
lateral 
lath 
l^the * 
lather 
L^tin 
Laanift-' ' 
lat/ttfde 
^atit»cjinarir^n 
lattin 
latter 
lattice 
laud 

taud|ble, nefs 
laudabljr 
kud/snum 
kve " 
Hvender 
er 



LEA 

laugh, lafF 

laughter, lif . 

Javilh, ly, nefs, 

laur^tfte ' [er 

laurel • 

law, le& 

lawTul, ly, nefs 

lawn "' 

law'yer 

lax, nefs 

laxative, n^& 

hxity 

ky 

layer 

lay-man^ 

Lazarus 

lazily '- 

Uzy 

lizmeis •* 

I^ch 

leacher 

leachcrous, If, 

leacherjr *' 

l^ad 

fead 

leadea 

ladder • 

l^af 

1/afy 

league 

l^ak 

leakage 



LEG 

\edkj 
kan, nefs 

learn, tf^lum,c 
[edljF,er,ing 

Ifaft 

leather 

l^ve 

leaveff 

leaver 

I^ves 

lecherous, Ijf; 

fecheiy [ncfc 

IcdUre, r 

fcdge 

ledger' 

leek: 

leer 

lees 

tee-w^^* ' 

reft . 

leg 

legacy ^ 
fegal,ly, ncf* 

kgaUty 

leg^ite 

legatee 

legtft/ne 

l^gition 

legend 

ligendaiy 

l«g?^ 



\ 



legerdemain . 
legible, \y^ nefs 
i/gion 
legionary 
Jrgifligye 
legiflitor 
legifliti^re 
legitimacy ' 
legitimatCj Ty, 

legit/miciOQ : 

lrg»mea 

kg2^mfnous 

Leicefler 

lemm^ 

lemon 

l£montfde 

length 

lengthen 

1/nient 

lenity 

lenitive 

lens 

lent 

lentil 

leontnt 

leopard 

leper 

lepid 

leprg^ 

leprous, nefs 

lefs 

Utki 



LIB 


■ 

L I M 


leffen 


libidinousinefs 


leffer 


librarian 


le^or 


library 


left, alfo left , 


1/ce 


lethargic 


licence 


lethargy 


1/ccntitftc 


letter 


IFcentious, ly. 


lettice 


lick [nefe 


levant 


lic^ri(h,ly,nels 


levee 


lidors 


level 


lid 


leveret 


1/e. 


UvJ 


l/egc 


Lev/<2than 


lieu 


lev/g<3te 


lieutenancj^,Uy 


levigition . 


lieu-tenant,liv 


Lev7ce 


life,lefs»Iefners 


kvitical , 


lift 


Leviucyj 


lig/iment 


levity 


ligatirrp 


levy. 


light,er,Jy,nefs 


lewd, ly, nefs 


lighten, ing 


lexicographer 


- lightfome, iy. 


lexicon 


lignious Lnefs 


liable, nefs 


k'ke 


1/ar 


likelihood 


IFbition 


likelinefs 


libel, lous 


likely - 


liberal, ly, nefe likenefs 


liberalitj^ 


liken 


libertFne . 


lily 


libertinj/in 


limb 


Hbcrty 


limbeck 



I N S 

infigniiifcant, 
[ly, neis 
insinuaxt 
insini^i^tioA 
insipid Jjr, ncis 
insipidly 
insift 
inflive 
infnire 

ins^ciable^oefs 
tnsifci^bljp 
infi^lence 
in relent, l^^neis 
infolvencjf 
iniolvenc 

\nfon\xic\k 

infpedt 

inipedion 

infpedor 

inf]pir#cion 

inlpire 

inft^bk 

inft51»'me»t 

inftJli^cion 

[nftance 

[firtant, ]y 

inftanc^nilMS» 

inft&d. [\y 

inftcp 

loftjgftt 



INT 

inft/gifion 

iiiftig4tor 

infill 

inftill^lon 

inftin<S^ 

in&ittne 

inft/ttftioA 

inftruft 

inftrudion 

inftru^ive 

inftruftor 

loflrMment 



I N T 

integer 
integral 

ntegrity 
ntelle^ 

ntelledi^al 

ntelli^eace 
ntell/gcot, Ijr^ 

[nefs 
incell/g^ble, 

[ncf$ 
intell/giblj 
intemperance 



inftrirmentdU int^naper^te. 



infttwmentalitjp 

tafuflScito^ 
iofttfi&ient, Ij 
lof«lar 
iQfdlc> Ingly 
iofi^perable, 

(nefs 
inf^pcrabljr 
Ufuppc^rtable, 

infuppJrtabl^ 
iof;^rance (Ihirj 
infarc,. er 
iijfurmount- 
fable, nefs 



Ijf, ncfi 
ntend, mcfit 
Uteodajit 
ntlfife, 1^, ntA 
(icent 
ntention 
ptentiontl^ Ijr 
Uter 

ocerciltfr^ 
n(ercibted 
i^tcroriicioa 
nterc/de 
fitercept * 
atcrception, 
'mterceiTion 
0tcrceflbr. 



i nfu r ro^tioa »o ter chinge 
iiitail ioterchtfng(*« 

iiitingle^ment {^able,nef3 

inter- 



f NT 

iQtercomnion'- 

fiiterc^nrfe 

fptcrdift 

inccrdidlion 

ihtcreft, ed 

interf^e 

incerpcent 

inteije<5lioa. 

interioi 

intmpr 

interlace ' 

interlard 

intcrlftive 

iocerl/ne 

incerltfcitftion 

incerlocirt^ry 

inferUpe, r 

uitcvludc 

intermeddle 

interm^/tfte 

interm/iiablc . 

intermingle 

intermiifion' 

intermit ' 

intermittent 

intermix, tirrd 

internal, Ijf: 

interp^Uice 

interpdicion 

interp^e 

iaterp^sittoa: 



rirr 

iiiierprct 

interpri^titioa 

interpreter 

interpr/fe 

interregnum 

int^rr^g^tc 

intenre^gition 

interrogtft^rjr 

interrupt 

interruption 

iftterfeft 

interfiJftion 

interfpcrfe 

interfperfion 

inter ft ice 

interval 

interv/nc 

intervention: 

interview 

interw«ive 

intepw^vm 

intefttfte 

inteftine- 

inthrJl, ment 

inthr^e^itient 

int/ire, menfr 

ihtmkite, Ijp; 
int/titition 
mtiokidsct: 
int£re, Ijr, M(t 
inutle 

R3> 



I M T 



^ .•• 



int^, 0r inta 
intolerable, 

[neft> 
ntdlcrabljF 
in tomb 
intox/ctfte 
intox/cicionr 
in tradable, 

[nefi' 
intra^^ahl/ 
in trails 
tntranee 
intrarj^tive 
intrap 
intr/At 
intr^tjr 

intrench, ment: 
intrepid, 1/ 
Ihtrepid 
intrepidity 
iiitrioicy 
ihtridiite, |y^ 

intrigue 
intrinfic 
intrihf/cal, lyj. 

[ne* ' 
ifttr^iice 
intridddive 

intr^^ion^ 
ifttr^d^O^ 

kitr^de, T; 



I N V 

intruCion 
intruft 
inu/icion 
int^mve, ]y 
in vide, r 
invalid 
invtfl/d 
inval/d^te 
invtflid/tjr 
invir/able,Dcfs 
invdridbly 
invifion 
inve<9:ivc 
inv3gh 
inv^gle, r 
invelop 
inyenotn 
invent 
invention 
inveotive 
inventor 
invcntf^ry 
inventre^ 
inverfion 
invert 
inveft 
inveft/g<2tc 
inveft/gitioA 
inveft/t«re 
inveter^cjr 
itivecer^te, Ijy, 
[nefs 



mvig^ftfte 



JO A JOS 

invid/ous, Ij, ^^b 
[nefs jobb 

inYfnciblc,nefs jockey . 
inviacibljf ^ocofc^ ly^ nefe 
mvjtflablc,nefs joci^lar 
invf^lably ' jtfc«lar/t^ 
inwiolatt j(?cund, Ij, nefs 

invfrwi, urn jog 
invirons joggle 

invifible, nels Jolni 
invifibl> join • 

inv/sibil/ty * joinder 



joiner 

joint 

joinr-i^ 

jointure 

Joint-tenam 

joift 

wkr 



mvnacion 

invne, r 

inundation 

inv^c^te 

iny^cition 

invoice 

invoke 

involve 

involuntarily lolJnr/ 

involuot^ri- joll/ty 

[nefs jolWly. 
invoiuntiirjf j6llme(i^ 
in»rc joUjp 

inutility jolt-head 

inv61ncrable, Jomft 

[nefs ?6nic 
invulReraWy jonquil 
inwflFd Jordan 

Jom Joieph 



Jo&ua 



IRR IRR JITD 

]6(hua irrrfrigably is 

Josisii irrrf«cablc /Taac 

joffing-block irregular, !j^, /saiajr 
jot . • [nc6 Ifciwot 

Jw ^ irr^girlaritj^ ikpury. 

jwal, ly^ nefe irrrfigton /jiele 

journal irreligious, ly, /finglafs 
journalift [ncls wland, cr . 

journey irremediable wle 

journeyman irremifliNe lyracl 

}owl ^ irreparable^ T/r^el/cc 
joy [nefe ilfoe, Ids, 

:!oyful, ly, nefs irreparably iftjmuj, 
joyous, ly, ncls irrepr^ichable it 

jojflers irrepreTachably /tal/an. 

?rafcible, nefs -irreprehcnfible Vtaly. 

're irresiftable, itch 

i'reland ^ [nels /tern 

J'rij iFTesiftabl/ iterate 

irkfome, nefs irrefilutt, Ijfr, iteration* 

»«n, urn ^ [nefs Ftinerant 

^ron-monger, irrefcKtion Fiiner^iy^ 

[ufn irretr/evable j«b/litioat 

Wn/cal, Jjjt irretrifcvably j«b/lce 

|r<?ny irreverence j«cund/tj^ 

irradwte irreverent, ly Judai 

jrrfldwcion irreverfible j«di/caL 

irrational, ly- irreverftbly mdaiftn 

irreconcilable irrevocable jad^fzfer 

irreconcilably irrevocably J«de 

irrecoverbalc irritate ' Judea 

irrec6vcrabj> irrititioft judge 

ttrrfr^gable irruption ju^g- 



JUR 

jflclgment 
jttiiicaiory 
judicature 

judicxary 
^wdicious. If, 
jiig [nefs 

juggler 

jidce 
jtficineft* 

j»lcp 
J«l/uJ- 

jumble, r 
jump, er 

J«nc 

Jirn/or 

j«n/per 

junk, 

junket 

junttf- 

J^prtcr 
jurats 







ifdi&ion 



K E R 

juft, ly, ncfs 

juftice 

jufticwrjr 

jfiftif/able,ncfs 

juft/ftabljr 

jofWfrcition 

jurft/fy: 

jufile- 

j*i^ 

yuvemli^ ^ 



Kalendar 

kecks 

keckie 

kedge 

keel 

keeli^h^fing 

ketn,.))', nd» 

keep^. w 

Keg* 

kSnb^ ' 

ken 

kennel* 

kept 

kefchiif 

kerm« 

kernel 



KN A.- 

ker/ey 

kccch' ' 

kettle: 

k^f 

k/bc* 

kick 

kick-fhaws^ 

kid 

kidnap 

Mdtay 

kilderkin^ 

kill, er 

kila 

kin 

k/nd, IjTt neft* 

kindle 

kmdred 

kfne 

king, Ijr 

kSngdonr 

kin/rn«it' 

kln/^wooFian 

kklc 

kifs^ 

kit 

kuchem 

Me 

kitten 

klick. 

klickcr 

toack 

taap. 



LAB 

ftnapikck 

ftn^ve 

Iniverjr 

ftnivi(h,l]p^ne& 

ftnnd 

knee 

Inecl 

inell 

incw 

inick-taack 

in/fe 

In/ght 

Itn/ght-hood 

knit, ccr 

Inob 

Inobbjr 

Inock, er 

Ihot, inefs 

Inottjr 

In^, ingly 

iBotoledgc 

In^n 

inuckle 



Ubcl 
Izheratory 

tncfs 



LAM 

iibour, cr 
labjrrinth . 
lace 
lacerate 
lacerition 

lachrymal 
lack 

lacker 

lackey 

laconic 

ladt^al 

lad 

ladder 

bde 

l^den 

V^le 

Udy 

hg 

Uick 

laid 

lain 

lair 

laity 

lake 

lamb 

lambent 

lamb-kin 

kme, ly^ nef$ 

lament, er 

lamentable 

lamentablj^ 

lamenticioa 



L A R 

Lammaf 

lamp 

lampoon 

lamprey 

hnce, r 

lancet 

lanch 

land 

land'grtfve 

landgriv/iite 

landl^djr • 

landlord 

landmark 

landikip 

landrels 

landry 

lane 

language 

languid,Ijr, neft 

langui(h,incn€ 

languor 

lank 

Iznkiihyly^neb 

lanfquenet 

lantern 

lantern 

lap 

}apfd4irj^ 

lappet 

lapfeci 

lap-wing 

larboard 

laFC<njr 



LAV 

larc^njr " 

lard 

larder, er 

large, ly> nefs 

Uriels 

larK 

lafcivious, ly, 

lafs [nefs 

lifsitudc 

laft: 

laftage " 

latch 

latchet 

kte, Ijy, neli 

litenc 

lateral 

lath 

l^thc • 

lather 

Latin 

Laanift'"^' 

latftf^de 

jatftddrnar^an 
' lattin 

latter 

lattice 

laud 

laudable, nefs 
* laudably 

h,udan\xai 

Uve ^ 

lavender 

laKver 



LEA 

laugh, laflT 

laughter, lif . 

lavilh, ly, nefs, 

laur^^te ' [er 

laurel 

law, \e& 

lawTul, ly, nefs 

lawn 

law'yer 

lax, nefs 

laxistive, nefs 

ikxky 

hy 

layer 

lay* main 

Lazarui 

liz/ly 

Mzjr 

Idzincfs -^ 

l«ich 

leachcr 

leacherous, Ijr, 

leachery ' 

i^ad 

fead 

leaden 

l&dcr • 

l^af 

Icdfy 

i«gue 

\esk 

1/akftge 

l^akuiefs. 



LEG 

kan, nefs 
l^ap 

[cdljF,er,ing, 

Ifraft 

leather 

l^ve 

leaven- 

leaver 

kaves 

lecherous, Ijr; 

Jecherj^ [ncf* 

ledtfre, r 

fcdge 

ledger" 

leek' 

leer 

lees 

fce-wJrd* ' 

left . 

leg 

Ugacy 

kgal, ly, nef* 

kgality 

leg^Jte 

legatee 

leg<jt7ne 

l^gition 

legend 

1/gendiery 

legJMK 



LJES 



LI B 



iegerd^main . leflfcn 
legible, ly^ nefs lefler 

legion leSbr 

legionary le&, alf$ left , 

l^giflidve . kchirgic 

l^giflitor lethargy 

i^gifliu^re letter 

l^git/m^cy ' lectice 

Irgiumtfte, Xy^ l^vanc 

[ncil levcc 

l^git/micioQ level 

liftmen leveret 

l^gt/minous L/vF 

Ldcefter ' L^v/^than 

ietnmii lev/g^ce 

lemon • lev/g^cion 

lecnontfde L/vFce 

length kvicfcal , 

lengthen L^viucvu 

lAvent levity 

lenity levy 

lenitive lewd, ly, nef$ 

leni lexicographer 

lent lexicon 

lentil liable, neis 

Ui^n/ne 1/ar 

leopard IFbition . 

leper libel, lous 

lepid li beral, ly, ne^ 

lepr^ liberalitjf 

leprous, nefs libertFne . 

leis libertin^ 

ieffce liberty 



L I M 

l/bidinoustnefs 
IFbririan 
library 
lice 
licence 
IFcentitfte 
IFcentious, ly, 
lick [neft 

lictfri(h,ly,neU 

lidors 

lid 

\i^ 

liege 

lieu 

licutcn^ncj^,Uv 

lieu-tcnant,liv 

life,lefs,lefners 

lift. 

ligament 

ligtfti/rp 

light,er,|y,nefs 

liglVten, ing 

lightfome, ly, 

lignious Lnefs 

l/'ke 

likelihood 

likelinefs 

likely 

likenefs 

liken 

lily 

limb 

limbeck 



L I O 

limbeck 

limber, ncfs 

limb^ 

lime 

limit, able 

)im/t<ition 

limti 

limner 

limoD 

limonide 

limp 

limpid, neft 

limy 

Lincoln 

linden 

1/ne 

linfagc 

lineal, 1^, nefs 

lineament 

linear 

linen 

ling 

lin^er,inglyter 

linguift 

liniment ^ 

link. 

linnet 

linfced 

linlcy-woolfty 

lint 

lintel 

Hon 

l/onefi 



LI V 

lip 

liquation 

liquifadion 

liquify 

liquid, nefs 

liquidate 

liqu/dition 

1/quid/ty 

liquor 

liquorice 

lilp 

lift 

liillefs 

liftlefnefs 

lifteftj er 

litany 

literal, ly, nefe 

liter«civre 

1/the, ly, nefs 

Inhotomift 

lichoti^mjr 

litigate 

lic/gitkm 

1/tigious, \y, 

litter [nefs 

little, nefs 

litufgjr 

live 

1/vc 

livelihood 

1/viWnefs 

lively 



LOG 

iver 

ivery 

ivid 

/vre 

ixiWal 

ixiv/um 

izard 



oady er 
ifel-ftonc 

oun 

om 

obby 

ohe 

obfter 

o'cal, ly, nefe 

ock, er 

ocket 

oco-m A:\ye 
dcu^ 

ocutkki 

odge, mcnt 

odger 

oft 

6ft/ly 

6ftine6 

ofi^ 

og 
og^rithm 

dg^erhead 

ogic 

log/caf. 



LOR 

logical, \y 
logician 
lo^omaclff 
J^'hoc 
loin 

loiter, er 
loll 
London, aJfo 

London 
]6nt\y 
lAiel/nefs 
1^'nefome, ly, 
long [nefs 
longanitnhy 
longe 
longevity 
\6nghudt , 
)ong/u/d/nal 
looby 
loof 

look, er 
loom , 

loon 
loop 

loofe ' 
loq/e, ]y, ncfs 
loo/en • 
lop,pcr [nefs 
bquicious, 
bquac/ty 
Lord, ly, 1/nefs 
lordlhip 



L U B 

iJfe, cr 
lofs 
loft 
lot 
loth 
l^the 
Idihfbtna 
1^'tion • 
lottery 
loud, ly, nefs 
love 
lover 

loving, ly, ncfs 
lo«/0d^^r • 
lounge 
louye ' 
louf/ly 
louffnefs 
loujy 
lo\o 

k'toerm^ft 
lotoing 
kin]; nefs 
Utoly 

lowr, ingly 
low'rinefs 
lowry 

lojral, ly, nefs 
loyalty 
lozenge 
lubber . 
l/^br/cous 
S 



LU N 

Iftbriatj 

li^cid, nels 

L»c/fer 

kciferan 

luck 

luck/Iy 

luck/nels 

luckjr 

I«cre 

l«cri?tivc 

If/ctfbrition 

li/ciirlent ^ 

ludihrious • 

li?d/crous. It 

lufF 

luor 

luggage 

lugubriouA 

luukc 

k/kf-warm 

lull 

lumber 

luminary 

lutninow 

lump 

lumpifli, ly, 

lunacy [nefs 

lumr 

li^n^tic 

krnition ' 

lunchion 

l/inette 

,lungs 



I 



MAC MA 

lungs mact 

luf ch, er macerate 

lure macericion . 

lurk, er mach/avilian 

lufciousjjinefs mzctinate. 
luft maci^/nicioA 

luftful, ]yy ne(s machine 
luftre, ^ lufter tnackarel 
lu&ify mdcrocofm 

lu(b'ne(V mad, ly, nefs 

luftrition madam 
luftring, lutM tnadder 
lufljr maddifli, ly 

lute tnade . 

lather Madrid 

WbcvsLTi Inadrigal 

lufbcTzwfai magtf zif'ne 
luxtfcion Magdiilene 

lux^riangr maggot, y^ 
luxuriant maggotinefs 

luxurious, Ij, magic, al 
luxury £iie(s magician 
iyt magifiirral, ly, 

Jjfdia [ncis 

lymphatic magiftracy 
lyre magiftr^te 

lyf4c , mzgnanimity 

lynx magnammous, 

[ly, ncis 



M 



magnet 



^ • 



magnetic 
Macaroon magn^ti/m 
M&coibces magnifircence 



M AL 

magnifiaent, 
[ly, hdk 
magnify 

magn/ti^de 

magpye 

m^ihogMy 

Mih^mec 

m^hom^an, 

[i/in 
m^faom^tiyitt 
maid 
maidm 
m^efticy ally 
majefty 
mail 
maim 
main 

main-maft 
main-fail 
main-prfle 
main«yaiKl 
maiotaln, men 
main trance 
tndjor 
niajprity 
m^ze 
m^ke, r 
MaUcDl 
malady 
mabpert 
malt 
m^le-coAt^nt 

mal^- 



MAN 
malfdidioa 

mal^fador 

maltvoltQU fy 

malice [nefs 

malicious, ly^ 

[nels 

m^lignanc^ 
m^lignanCs ly, 
{ne& 
Tnaligjaity 
mall 
tnalland 
malleable, A£& 
msilleabiUtj 
mallet 
mall^tos 
malm/r)f 
mJlt 
m^kfter 
malverf^cioB 
mamma 
mammock 
Mammon 
man, ly^ 1/nefe 
manacles 
manage, ment 
mina^cry 
Maniifkp 



MAN 


MAR 


manchec 


manteau, t^ • 


n^anciple 


manteau->mtf- 


mandimiw 


(ker, t* 


mand^r^n 


mantle 


mandit^^ 


manr/Ie 


mand/»te 


mantlc-|>iece 


mandii>le 


manUi!! 


mandrake 


manual 


msLnducdiion 


man/Mdu<5bian 


xtianc 


. man»f^«n^ 


manful,])i^nefs man/^fa£b/re,r 


m^^nge 


man^n^Ffe 


roingcr 


man^miinon 


mingmefs 


mMuvmt^ ted 


mangle 


manure ,. 


mang^ 


m^n^re 


mangy 


manafcript 


manhood 


many 


man/fcft, ly. 


map 


[ncfs 


miple 


manifellicion 


mar 


manifefl:^ 


mirbie 


maiufi^ld 


marojfite 


maniple 


march 


mankfnd 


march/mcis t 


manlj 


m^re 


manner 


margcnt 


mannmg 


margin 


manoar 


marginal 


manfion 


margriave 


manfliaughter 


mar/gcld , , 


man flayer 


aiar/ae 


S 2. 


mariner 



MAR MAT 



ma-Vner 

mar/time 
mark, er 
market 
marketable 
marl 

marm^ltfde 
marm^let 
marmtffet 
marqueis 
marquis 
marquiGite 
marriage, able, 
[ablenefs 
marr^to 
marry 
Mirs 
marfli 
mardial 
marfhalfty 
marlh-mallrtDS 
marfliy 
mart 
martial 
Martin 
martingal 
martyr 
martyrdom 
martyrol^gj^ 
marvel [nefs 
marv^louSj ly, 



Mirjr ' 

mafciirline 

ma(h 

mafk, er 

mailin 

mdfon 

mdfonty 

mafqueride 

ma(&cre, rer 

maflincfs 

mafl: 

mafter, ly, li- 
[nefs, Icfs 
mattery 
mafticition 
maftick 
maftiff * 
mat 
match, lefs, 

[Icfnefs 
m^te 

m^t/r/al, ly 
mat^r/aU'ty 
maternal, ly 
math^mat/cal, 

mathematician 

mathematics 

matins 

matr/c7de 

mtftric«l^te 



MAY 

matr/ctfl^cion 

matr/m^nial 

minrimony 

mitrix 

micron 

m^trois 

matted 

matter 

matterjf 

Matthew 

Matthm 

mattock 

mattrefs 

matis^ftfte 

mature, ly, nefs 

maxuriiy 

maudlin ' 

mauler 

mavis 

maul 

maunder 

Maundj^- 

[Thurfday 
maw 

maw^kifli, nefs 
mawks 
maxillary 
maxim 
may 
mayor 
mayoralty 
mayorels 

miza.' 



MEIT 

ma^ 
me 
mAid 
meadtflD 

iD^n 

mining 

m^ns 

measly 

meafore, r 
m^at 
meatus 
m^c|)anic 
mfc!?anfic^l, ly, 

mech^nl/m 

medal 

medallion. 

meddle 

medial 

mediate 

medmtipty , 

mediator 

medtawi^. 

medidtvefs^ 

med/cablc 



Kf E L 

* 


M ER 


mtdkaaycnt * 


member 


medicinal 


membrane. 


^edicii^e 


mefhbrii^U^? 


mediety 


m^moir^ 


mediocrity, 


memorable, . 


mtditatt 


^ £nerf> 


meditition • 


mem^randMi;^: 


Mcditerwnear 


1 mem^ri^l 


m/dium^ 


memory. 


medlar 


men 


medlpr 


. men<7ce' 


medjcyl 


mend, ^rr 


xned(i\\ary 


mendicant 


meek, ly, rveft 


m/nial: 


meer 


menftraal 


meet, ly> nefe 


menftri^ous. 


me^ter 


menftrinjm- 


meetre 


menl«rable^ . 


m/grim 


men&racioni 


melancfjolic 


mental 


melancMj)Sma 


1 mention 


Melchifedec 


mercantile 


meililot 


me'rc^n<?rj|j»* 


tx>€l'wratc 


mercer 


mel/(?rition 


mercery: 


inellifli/ous^ 


merchandHe^ 


n>ell^tss nefs^ 


merch^ndiise- 


mel<adious, ly^ 


mercbaao 


[ncfs 


merchantable^ 


rneltfdj^' 


; tOft^ 


melon*. 


incrcSrial 


i|iek 


Mk^my^' 


S 3: 


ni&- 



MET MID 

inerc/ful, I7, m^e 

mercy [nefs metempfyc]&«'- 

mete m/cfor [fii 

meretricious,!/ m/ter 

meridian metre 

meridional 

merit 

mer/t/r/ouS) ly, method/cal, ly 

[neJs mech^ift 
mermaid ^ meth^d/ze 
merrily Methi/felaJ 



methegHn 
method 



merr/mcnt 

merry . 

mefs 

mefiage 

meflengcr 

Mefsiafr 



mewnj^niy 

mecricalj ly 

metr6pe?iii 

metr<?p61itan 

mettle 

mettlesome. 



mefiieurs,mefli mew [nefs 
meflkage mezz^-tint^ 

met m^ce 

metal M/ct»cl 

metallic Mic|)aelmaj 

metaUine tnicrocofm 

mewmorph^fe mfcrometer ^ 
met^morph^Gj microfcopc 
met^phraft mid-day 
meti^phor middle, m^ft 
jnet<?ph6r/cal, middling 

[ly midriff 
met»phys/cal, midfhrpman 

[ly midft 
fneurphyfics Midfummer 



M I N 

midwife 

midwifery 

mJen 

might 

mightily 

m/ghu'ncfs 
mighty 

m/grition, or 
[mi 
milch. 

mild, ly, nefs 
mildew 
mile 
militant 
miUtary 
militia 
milk 
milkinefs 
milkj^ 
hiiJl, er 
millennium 
millepedes 
millet 
milliner 
million 
mile 
Milton 
mimic 
mimical, ]y 
mfmicrjy 
mince 
mind 

mind- 



r 



M I R 

mfndful, ly^ 

m/ae [neis 

mmer 

mineral 

MFnervtf , or mi 

mingle 

miniature 

minim 

minion 

minifli 

min/fter 

min/ft/rial, ly 

min/ftration 

min/ftry 

minn^kins 

m/nor 

min^rl^ 

mFnon'tjf 

Mfn^taur 

mmfter 

minftrcl, jy 

mint 

min^ec 

minute 

m7n«tc,Iy,ncfs 

minx 

miracle, mer 

m/rac^lous, ly, 

m/re [nefs 

mirror 

mirth, tnur 

7 



MIS 

mifappiy 
miiappr^hen- 

[fion 
mifb^come 
mifh^hive 
ini{b^hiv20ur> 
mi(b^l/ef 
niifcJll 
niifcarriage 
mifcarrjr 
mifcellin^ous 
mifccUtfnj^ 
mifchance 
mifchief 
mifch/evous, 

[ly» ncfs 
mifc6nftr«e, 

[ft»r 
mifcount 
mifcr^anc 
mifdeed 
mifd^m/anour 
mffer 

mfferable, nefs 
miferably 
niifery 
inisf6rt//ne 
mi^ive 
mis-bap 
misinform 
miiinterpret 
misjudge 



MIS 

miile 

mifly 

mifl/ad 

miflike 

mifmanagCt 

[jnent 
wifnotner 
mifpend 
mifplice 
mifpenc 
miljprint 
mifreckon 
mifr^pr^fent 
mifr^prrfenti- 
mifs . [tion 
miflfal 
miflelt^c 
misfliipe, n 
mis-happen 
mfflion 
mifn^n^ry 
miflive 
mift 
mifti^ke 
mifbfken 
miftfme 
mift/ncfs 
miilook 
miftrefs 
nriiftruft 
miftruftful, ly, 
[nefs 
tni&y 



MOD 

mifty 

mi/underftand 

ixii/underftood 

mi/uk 

tnitc 

m/trc 

mitigate 

mitigicioa 

mittens 

mitt/mui 

mix 

mixen 

mixture 

mizzm • 

mizzle 

mo 

Moabtvis 

moan 

m^at 

mob 

mobbilh, ly, 

[ncls 
mobility 
mock^ er 
mockery 
mockingly 
m^de 
md^dai 
model 
moderate, lj% 

[ncls 
tnoderition 



MOM 

moderator 
modern^ nefc 

m6deft,ly,nels 
mddeftjr 

modicum 

roadify 

m^'difh 

mod/^l^te 

modirLitiQa 

modus 

m^^hair 

moid^re 

mowtjf 

moil . 

moift, ne& 

moiOm 

moifti^re 

molzffes 

mdldxr 

moldj able 

m^Ie 

m£>left, cr 

m^^left^tion 

mollienc 

pnoWify. 

Md\oci 

molt 

molten 

moment 

mottieotdneom 

moiXitntarjr 

m^meatous . 



MOO 

mwacbifm 

Godnaro 

m^narc^'cal 

monarch 

mooailery 

m^naftfcal 

Monday 

money 

monger 

mongrel 

m^nitiod 

monitor 

monit^jr 

monk 

mookciy 

monkey 

inonkiflii Ij'j 

[nefs^ 
m^ndp^lift 
m^nop^lFfe 
monopoly 
mon^ly liable 
monfie6r,{hettr 
monfooos 
monfter 
monftrous, ly, 

[nete^ 
month, ly 
.monutnwt 
mont^nientali 
mood 
moon 

moor 



MO R 



M O U M U L 



mctr 
mwr-hen 

moot-point 
mop 

m^pe 

m^piih 

moppet 

moral, ly, ncfs 

moralift 

tnerility 

m6r^7U2e 

m^rafs 

morbid, ncfs 

morbific 

Morckcai 

nwrc 

mrtover 

m^relk 

morigerous 

morn 

morning 

mrojcj ]yy ncfs 

morphew 

morris-dancer 

morr^ 

morfcl 

mortj-head 

mortal, ly, ncfs 

mortal/tjr 

mortar 

monar'p<«:c 



mortgage, r 

mortif/cation 

mortify 

mortife 

mortmain 

mortMry 

mofdic 

m^iical 

mofc^^ 

mofque 

mofs, mcls 

mof^ 

m^ft, ]y 

mote 

moth 

moth-Mten 

mother, ly, left 

mothermcfs 

mothcHtnefs 

mother^ 

motion, lefs 

m^^tive 

motley 

motti? 

m^ve, r, ment 

moveable, ncfs 

mould, /rrefs 

mdulder, ing 

mouldjf 

mouitcr 

mound 



mount 

mountain, eer 
mouQtamous 
mountebank 
m^urn, er, fu), 

m^rnfully 

m^rnfulnefs 

mou/c 

moufer 

mouthy ful 

mow 

m^ser 

much 

m»c/lage 

mivcillgmous 

muck 

miickcnder 

mucous 

mucvs 

mod 

muddinefs 

muddle 

muddjr 

mufF 

muffle, r 

mug 

mug^mefs 

mug^jr 

mulberry 

muld 

mirle 



« 



M UR 


MU T 


irittle 


mufc^dine 


muleukr 


mfifelc 


muJJet 


mufcttlar 


mulMgrubs 


m«fe 


muluform 


. mtffmm 


mult/plc 


mufhvoom 


muIc/pl/cSad 


mafic 


mulupUcdikm m»iica1« \y 


mult/pl/'cicor 


mi/sician. 


mult/pKcicy 


• mulk 


n)uhip]y 


muflcet 


multiwde. 


muflcjr 


mum 


muilin 


mumble, r 


mufquec 


mumm^j 


mufquneer 


mump 


mufqti^tooa 


mumper 


muQtriffi^n 


mumpifh 


lOtti!; 


mufidi 


muftodhtft 


mundi^ne 


mMard ^ 


mund/fy 


muftcr 


mundungtv 


muAf^ 


tnuoiap^ 


mu(lme& 


munificently^ 


t mufty 


[nefi 


( mmble, nefs 


munition 


mviffbHity 


m»ral 


mutasion 


murder, er 


mjftc 


murclorous, Jty m^^iil^^ioji 


murmur,ifl^ mtrt/neer 


murrsim 


madnous 


murrey . . 


m/Jt/ny . 



N A R 

mutter, ingljf 

muttqQ 

m^tiraljjr,»ers 

muzzte 

myology 

myopy 

myr/ad 

ihyrrl^ 

oiyftle 

myft^riotts, jjv 

myftcry [nc6 

myftical^ Ijr, 

[m& 
n^tli^ld^sd 
mythokg^r 



ti 

Nihal 

nack, cr 
Ntfdir 
nag 
nail, «r 

nikiedy nefi 

n^me, k&, 1; 

nap 

n^pc 

Atpkm 

nappj^ 

narcotic, al 

nafd 

narri- 



NAY 

narrinoii 

narroctve 

narr^lo, I^, mis 

nifal 

na(b^ ; 

ni(tme& 

nafty 

nital 

N^than/el 

nition 

national 

nitive 

nativity 

natural, tft, F)r 

ngmrilization 

muralJzt 

mure 

iiival 

nave 

nivel 

naughti.!^, 

naughty 
navigable^nefs 
nav/gtfte 
navig^^cioa 
nav/giitor 
nau/^ijtc ' 
nau/^ouss ^5 
nautic [nefe 

nay 







NE F •' 


N E U 


Naz^rnie 


n^g^^cbn^ 


Naz^me 


neg^itivci fy 


Niz^redv 


mgiedk 


n^ize 


*^%l%cfl€e 


ti^l 


negJigent, fy. 


ti^p 


[ncfs 


ti^ar, lyj nefs 


tie%6i\att 


n^t, I7, nets 


n^goCAicion 


neb 


n^g^t/itor 


necei£fi% 


n%r^ 


necef&rmeft 


N^^m/a^ 


fteccflary 


ti^gh, ing 


tiecekita^ 


hSghbour, 


h^ceisicous. 


[hood,ly,ing 


[ncfs 


neither 


li«:efs/ty 


n/^ph^ce 


neck 


nephew, nev 


neck-cloth 


n^pterftic 


fi/cr^manfeer 


n/p<?ti^ 


n/cr^manc^ 


nerve 


neftar 


nervous, neft 


nedUrint 


nefs 


need 


neft 


heedfuljljr^ncfe nefde 


Aeednids- 


neftling 


iicedlcfs 


net, ting 


tieedUfly 


nether 


heedlefnefs 


nettle 


ftced> 


never 


iieedk 


neurology. 


ti^'cr Enefe neut 


ii^£ir/ao'S) )f^ 


neuter 


' 


neutral) 



NIP 

neutral, \y 

neutrality 

new, Jy, ncfs 

Ncw't«n 

next 

nib 

nibble 

n/ce, ly, ncfs 

NFc/nc 

mcity 

nich 

niche 

nichcls 

Nici^ol&f 

nick 

Nicely/tans 



N O M 

nipper^ • 

nipperkin 

nippingb 

nipple 

N/ian 

n/s/-pr/uj 

nit ' 

n/tre. 

n/trous 

nittmefs 

pKty. ; 

nubility 
n^'ble, nefs 
n^ly 
n^cent 
nofturnal 



N O T 



• ^ 



n/ece 

niggard, ly,nefs nod 

n/gh, n^/s noddle 



n/ght, ly 

Nile 

nill 

nimble 

nimblenefs 

nimbly 

n/ne 

nineteen, th 

ninet/eth 

n/nety 

ninth, ly 

ninn^ 

nip 



noddj^ 
n^e 

nodous, nefs 

nog 

noggm 

noisinefs 

noife 

noi/bme, ly, 

iioily [nefs 

n^mencUtor 

n^menclati^re 

nominal, ly 

nominate 



nomin^ition 

nom/ntftive 
n^lMge 
. nonagesimal 
nonconfocmift 
nonconforiifiity 
n^ne 

non-entity 
N^nes 

non-nari/rals 
nonpareil 
nonplus 
nonfenfe 
nonfensicalj ly, 
non&it [nefs 
nook 
noon 
noofe 
nor 
north 
northerly 
northern 
t^orthwJrd 
Nortoich 
note 

noftggty 

nofel 

noftril 

noftrum ' 
not 

notable, nefs 
p^'tabljp 

notary' 



NUL 


N Y M 


f^kary 


null/tjf 


notation 


numii 


notch 


number, lefs, 


note 


[lefnefs 


nothing 


numerable 


n^'ckc 


tiumtrzX 


n^tif/oition 


nisrmerition 


notify 


numtrdtoT 


nation 


n«mer/cal, \y 


notionH 


n/2merous, 


notortexy 


[riefs 


n^tmous, Ijf, 


numbnefs 


[nefs 


numlbfcull 


Dotwithftand- 


nun 


[»ng 


niinci^ 


novel, nefs, ill 


nuncupative 


novel tjr 


nunnery 


November 


nuptial 


nought 


nurfe 


novice 


nurfery 


n^icitfte 


nurture 


noun 


n^Tance 


nourifb, mcnt 


nut 


now 


nutmeg 


noxious, nefs 


n/zmment 


nublous 


n^trftion 


nuddle 


niitriciou9. 


n«de 


[nefs 


n»d/tjr 


nfttntive, nefs 


nugat$ty 


nuzzle 


null 


nymph 


nulhfjf 





OBJ 



Oaf 

<?afifli, Ij', nefs 

(fakm 

oav 
OdLtm 
^ath 
datmral 
Mts 

Obtfdiaft 
6\yAuTacy 
6bd«Mte, ly, 
- ^ [nefs 
^b«lience 
^b^dient, ly, 

[nefs 
cWd/ential, ly 
^b^fance 
ob^lifk 

objed: 

objcft 

objeftion 

objciStive 

obje£fcor 

objurgicion 
QbjOrg#tm 
ob^cion 



O B S OCT OFF 

oblation oh&inacy 6cc»lar 

obleft^cion 6bft/n/?te, ly, occulid 
obligate [nefs odd, ly, nefs 

obligation obftreperous,^ ^de 
obligjt(7r/nefs [ly, ilcfs ^'dious, ly, ncls 

obligtft^ry obftrudt ^wdour 

obl/ge obftrudion ^'dium 

oblige obftrudlive odoriferous, ly, 

obl/qtie, |y, nefs obtain [ nefc 

obliquity obcri^de, r . odbrous 

obliterate obtr/zfion e^c^noniics 

obliv/on obt/^e, ly, nefs oeconomiczl 

obliv/ous obv/iitc wconomift 

oblong obv/ous, ly, o^conomy 

obbqiiy [nefs oecumenical 

obn6xious,nefs occ^fion of 

obfc/ne,ly,nefs 0CCia(k?nal, ly off 
obfcen/ty occ/dental offal 

obfc/?re,ly,nefs occult, ly, nefs offend, er 
obfc//r/cy occult4?tion offence 

obl/qu/ous, ly, 6cc»pan|: offenfive, ly, 

[nefs occt^p4tion [nefi 

obHrqul^s 6cc«pFer offer, er 

ob/ervable, . occupy offertory 

[nefs occur offering 

ob/crvance , occurrence ofHce, r 
ob/ervant, nefs ocean ofKcial, ly 

ob/erv4tion o(5tang«lar ofKci^te 
ohfcrvatory odl^ve offic/nals 

obyerve, r o£idva officious, ly, 

obfolfte, nefs . Oft^l)er offing [nefs 

obftaclc od^on offspring 

oft 



OM N 

oft 

often, nefs 
I cgee 

; OH 

' oil 

oilet 

oil/ne& 
' oily 

ointment 

cider 

old, er, nefs 

cldilh 

AAginout 

oiio 

o//igarc^ 

olive 

O.'ympiad 

Olympic 

ombre 

mega 

omelet 

om/nous, ly, 
[nefe 

^miHion 

emu, ted 

omnipotence 
omnipotent, ly 
ommprefence 



O P I 

omn/prefent 
omnifcience 
omnifcient, \y 
on 

once, wonce 
one, won 
dner^te 
onion, in, or un 
only 
onlct 
onward 
onyx 
ooze 
oozy 
ifpkdiy 
opicous» nefs 
^pike, nefs 
optn^ ly, nefs 
opertf 
6per/?te 
operation 
operative 
operator 
oper^, nefs 
ophthalmic 
opiate 
opimatry 
opinion, ift 
opinionated 
opinion^tive, 
[nefs 
opimxi 

T 2 



O R A 

opponent 
opportune, ly^ 

[nels 
opport«n/ty 
oppoTc, r 
oppofite, ly, 

[nefs 
opposition 
oppr efs 
opprefliori 
opprefTive, ly, 

[ncis 
opprefTor 
opprobr/ous, 
[Ij, nefa 
opprobrium 
oppugn, pung 
optative 
optic, al, s 
optimacy 
option 
6p//lence 
6p«lenc^ 
6p«lent,ly,ncf», 
or 

oracle 
^racftlar 
oral, ly 
orange 
orangcrjr 
oration 
orator 

or<stor^ 



O R I 

oratorhl 
oratory 
orb 
Orbicular, ly. 



O V E 

Orion 

6r/fon 
ornament 
ornamental, ]y 



orbit [nefe orphan, age 



orchard 

orcjeftrc 

ordain, cr 

ord/al 

order, \y 

orderl/nefs 

ord/'nal 

ord/nancc 

oriiinatfly 

ordin^r/nefs 

ordinary 

ordiWte 

ord/nicion 

ordnance 

ordi^re 

crc 



orp/ment 
O'rrerjf 
orthodox, \y^ 

[nefs 
orth^doxj^ 
orthogr^pher 
orth^graph/cal 
orthogr^phj 
6rt<9lans 
ofcillition 
oScitdtion 
oCicr 
ofpr^ 
often five 
oftenticion 
oftent^ciousjly 
o&eohgy 
oitlcr, y 



5rgan 
or^an/cal, I7, 

[nefs oftr^ci/m 
organ/zicion oftricb 
org^nift 
org^nFze 
^n'ent 
^r/ental 
or/ficc 



other, w/fe 

octer 

O'tt^man 

ova.] 

tyvddon 



or/o:in 

o 



oven 
orig/nal,Iy,ncfs wer 



OUT 

pver-beir 

«ver-b^rd 

^ver-caft 

^ver-come 

^ver-fl(?ttt 

^ver-laid 

«^ver-lo6k 

^verplui 

^ver-r/ach 

^ver-run 

cver-fee 

cver-fet 

^ver-lhodt 

^vcr-tike 

©vert-aft 

rfvert«re - 

^verthr^W 

tfverthr^lii 

^verthrobn 

^verwheitn 
ought 
OVid 
eivlp^rou^ 
ounce 
our 
out 
outer 
out-law 
outlawrjr 
outlet 
outm^ft 
: outrage 



out 



PAD 

outrigious, Ijy, 
[nefs 
outs/de 
outwJrd, ]y 
ouze» alfo 
iuzt 
^toe, r 
owl 
Gwler 
^tDn 
dinner 
ox 
oxen 
O'xford 
oxygon 
oxjmcl 
oyer 
te'er 



VacCy t 

p^ciBc, Ijr, nefs 

pac/ficicioD 

pac/fy 

pack, er, ing 

package 

packet 

paction 

pad 

paddle 



PAL 

paddoc 

padlock 

pigan 

pdganiih 

pdgamfcn 

Pfge 
pageantrjr 

pigod 

paid 

pail 

pain 

painfuljjr^efs 

paint, cr, ing 

pair 

palace 

pakte 

palatable, nefs 

PaktFne 

Ptflatin^ate 

p«le, nefs 

palfrjr 

palin^djr 

pal/f^de 

pali(fa^ neis 

pJll 

pallet 

palliate 

pall/ition 

palliative, nefs 

Pallinall,Pcll. 

palm [mell 

palmiftrjp 



PAP 

palpable, neis 
palpably 
palp/tat ion 
paligrave 

pJ!/ejf 

pjjtr/ne(s 
p^ltrjr 

pamper 

pamphlet 

pamphUtew 
pan 

pan^c/if 
panada 
pan-cake 
panch, iaa 
pandcfts 
pander 
p^ne 
pan^g^ric 
pangs 
panic 
pannel 
panniers 
pant 

pantaloon 
panther 
pantofie 
pantry 
pap 
papa 
paptfcjr 
papal ' 

paper 



PAR 

piper 

pipift . 

p^pift/cal 

p^piftrj^ 

pappa 

pappotis 

par 

parable- 

p^rab^^ 

partbolicalv 

par^clftc 
parade 
paradigm 
paradiiorcd 
paradi/e 
paradox 
paradoxrcal^ 
paragon 
paragraph- 
parallax, 
parallel 
paralUli/!h 
parallekgrain 
piraiycic 
garal^/cal: 
paramount. 
paranKTsu* 
parapet 
paraphrafc 
paraphraflr 
paraphraft^cal 
garasncL 



FA R 

parasitical 
para/ang 

parboil 

parcel 

parch^imcntv 

pardon, er 

pardonable^ 

pare [nefs- 

parent 

parentage 

parental 

parcnth^fij 

parget 

par/an 

Paris 

pari (If 

pari(hi^er 

par/tjf 

park, er 

parley • 

parl/ament 

parl/am6ntar/. 

parlour 

parnwfaii. 

parefci^ral 

par<?le 

paroxy/m 

parr/cide 

parrot 

parr^quct- 

pstt-ry, ing^ 

garfc 



PAS 



^ • 



pars/m^n/ousy 
[ly, nefs. 
parsfm«njf 
parfl^ 
parfnip. 
parfon 
parl^nage 
part, ly 
partake, P. 
parterre 
partial, ly^ ne&^ 
part/al/ty. 
partic/patc 
partidpitiom 
part/ciple 
particle 
particivlar, Ijr, 
[itefr 
particiylarfty 
particularFza 
part/Tan^ 
partition 
partner 
partridge- 
part5 
pary 
pafc^r 
pafh 
pafquil 
paiquin* 
paiqu/nade 
gafs 



PA T 

pafiable, nefs 
padage 
paflenger 
pals/bil/cy 
paiCble 
pafTion 

paffi^iitc, ]y, 
* [ncfs 
paffive, Ijr 
pal&ver 
pafs-p^rt 
paft- 

ptffte 

paftern 

paft/me . 

paftor 

pad^ral 

piftry 

p4ftry.cook 

pafUrage 

paft«rc 

pafty 

pat, ly, ncfe 

patch 

p^te 

pat^faftiotv 

patent 

patentee 

pacents 

paternal, Ij^ 

[ncfs 
gtftern^jp^ 



P-A U 

path 
paths 
pathetic 
ptfthetical, Ijr, 
[ne& 
pathos 
pitience 
p^tient,ljr,ners 
pdtrnrcpi ate 
pitriarci^at' 
p^trkian 
patr/m^n/al 
patr/monjf 
patriot 
jpdtriouftn 
patrA 
patron 
patronage 
patrontfs . 
patr^n/ze 
panr^nymiG 
patten 
pattering 
pattern 
pauc/ty 
pave 
pivement 
pdvicr ^ 
pavilion 
Paul 
paunch 
paupw 



FE C 

paufe 
paw 
pavrm 
pawn 

paw'ft-bc^keK 
pay 

payable 

payment 

p^a 

p/8ce, ful 

p/aceable, nefr 

p/aceabljr 

peach 

p/acpck 

p/a-hen 

p^ak 

p/aking, Ijr, 

P^al Lncft. 

pwr 

pearl 

pear main 

pearch 

peafant . 

peafantr^ 

peak 

P«IS-CO(t 

p^ac 

pebble 

peccadillo^' 

peccant 

pcccivF 

peck 

Sedtl^rai: 



PEN 
pcft^ral 

j>ecuUkmy 

-pecuniary 

pedagogue 

pedant 

pedantic, nefs 

pedantry 

p^deftal 

pcd/grce 

pedlar 

p/d^-baptl/rn 

pecL 

prep 

peer 

peerage 

peercfe 

pccrlcfs, nefs 

peevifhjljjnefs 

peg 
pelf 

pel/carv 

pellet 

pell/cle 

piWhory 

pelli^cid 

pell-mell 

pelt 

pen 

p/nal, ly, nefs 

penalty 

penance 



PEN 

pence 

pencil 

pendan't 

pend/^Ious 

pendulum' 

pen^trwbfl/tjr 

penetrable, 

[nefs 
penrtrtfte 
pen^r^tivc 
penetration 
peninfuia 
pen/tence 
pen/tent, \y^ 

[nefs 
penitential 
pen/ten t/<iry 
pcn-toJfe. 
pennrlefs 
pennjr 

penn^-worth 
penfion 
penfi^ntfrjK 
penfi^ner 
penfive,ly,nefs 
pent, houie 
pentagon, 
pentagonal 
pentameter 
pent^teucii 
pentecoft 
penultmitf 



PER 

penumbra 

pen«r/ous, ly, 

[neii 
pinury 

pAple 
pepper 
peradventy/re- 
perambulate 
perambi<]atioi> 
perceivable 
perceive 
perceptible 
perceptioa 
perch 
percolition 
percuffioa 
perdition 
perdiifritioa 
peregr/natioft 
peremptorily 
peremptorincii 
peremptory 
perennial 
perfect, ly, nefs 
perfedlion 
perfeftive 
perfidious, ly,. 
[ncl& 



perforate 

perforation' 

perforce 



per- 



f 



PE R 

perform, er 

performance 

perfume 

perfun<a:(?r/Tjr 

perfunft^ry 

perhaps 

ferihelion 
peril 

per/lous, ly^ 

[ncfe 

perimeter 
pmod 

pmodfcal, ly 

per/p^tetic 
pMphcry 

perifti 
perilhable, 

[nefs 

P^riftaltic 
perj«re 
perj«r^ 
per/ wig 
per/winkle 
permanence 
perm^inent, \y 
permeable 
permiffion 
permiffivc 
permit 

pernicious, ly, 
[nefs 



PER 

perpendic«Iar, 
[\y 
perpcnd/ca- 

[lar/ty 
perprtMte 
pcrp^ricion 
perpetual, ly, 
[nefs 
perpetw^te 
pcrp^t«rty 

pei^lexjcdncfs 
perplex/ty 

perqu/fices 

perrj? 

Pers/tf 

perfirc«te 

per&c/^cion 

perfi?c«tor 

perfifverancc 

perC?v/rant 

perJ>v/re 

perfev/ringly 

persift 

persiftence 

person 

perf^nable, 

[nefs 
perftnage 
perfonal, \y 
perfi^nal/ty 
perfon^te 
perfpeftivc 



PES 

perfp/citious 

pcrfp/cz?/ty 

perfpicwous, 

[1;^, nefs 
perlb/rition 
pcrfp/re 
perfuidc, r 
pcrfuifion 
perfuifive^ ly, 
[nefs 
perfuifi?ry 
pert, ly, ncft 
pertain 
pertinacious^ 

pertinac/tjf 
peninacy 
pertrnence 
pert/nenr, ly, 

[nefs 
perturbation 
perv^e 
perverfe, }y^ 

[nefs 
per\^ert 
pervious, nefs 
per^fal 
per^fe 
p^r/iv/an 
pelt 

peftiferous 
peft/lence 

pelU^ 



P HA 

pcftilent, Ijy, 

fncfs 
peftilential 
pellle 
pet 
petard 
P/ter 
petit 
petition, cr 

pctr/ficition 
petr/fy 

petticoat 

pett/foggcr 

pettifli,ly,nefs 

pettitoes 

pett^ 

petty 

petirlance 

peti^lancy 

petulant, ly, 

pevct [nefs 

pew 

pew'et 

pew'ter, er 

ph<^n6m^non 
phan^ric 
ph^natfcal 
phanfy 
phantaym 
phantaftic 
phantaft/cal, 
l^i nefi 



P H R 

phant<2(y 

phantom 

phar/fif/cal 

phar/(2ifm 

pharifee 

pharm^cjr 
phtffij 

pheafant 

ph^r'nix 

ph/al 

ph/]anthr<7pjr 

Philemon 

Ph7\ea\on 

Philip 

phUobgcr 

phiblogfcal 

phTlol^g;^ 

ph/16/J?pher 

phVl^ph/cal, 

phil6/Jph7ze 

philq/J?phy 

philter 

phlebotomy 

phl^om 

phlegmatic 

phofphoruj 

phrantic 

phr^fe 

phrafifologjf 

phrenzy 

phrenetic 



P I L 

l*t!)ific 

ph^laftery 

phyfic 

phys/cal, Ijr 

phjsician 

phys/ognom^ 

phys/olog^ 

phyz 

pFac«Iar 

plafter 

piazza 

pick 

picket 

pickle 

picklock 

pift«rc 

piddle 

p/e 

p?ece 

pierce, r 

piercingly 

piety 

pigeoh 

piggin 

pigmjy 

p/kc 

p/lafter . 

pilch 

pilchard 

p/le 

pilfer, 



TI P 

pilfer,' er 

pilgrim 

pilgr/mage 

pill 

pillage, r 

pillar 

pillion 

pill^r^ 

pill^to 

p?bte 

pilotage 

pimp, ing 

pimple 

pin 

pincer 

pinch . 

pindaric 

p/nc 

pinfdd 

pinion 

pink 

pinnace 

piqn^cle 

pinner^ s 

pint 

p/^n/er 

piony 

p/ous, ly, nefe 

pip 

p/pe,r 

pipkin 

p?powdcr 



P L A 

pippin 

p/quant 

pifque 

prquet 

piracy 

pirate 

pF. at/cal, \y 

pifmrrc 

pifs 

piftol 

p RolQ 

pifton 

pit 

pitch 

pitcher 

pitchy 

pi't^ous,ly,nefs 

pith 

pich/ly . 

pith/ncfs 

pUhy 

pit/able 

pic/ful, ly, nefs 

pit/lefs 

piuahce 

pitty 

p/r»/cous 

pivot , 

pizzlc 

pUcahility 

plicable, neis 

pl^ard . 

2 



P L A 

place 

placid, ly, nefs 

plad 

p\dgiar\fai 

plagiary 

pltfgue 

pldguiy 

pUguy 

plaice 

plain, ly, nefs 

plaint 

plaintifF- 

pi aider 

plait 

plan 

pl^ne 

planet 

plan^ttfry 

plknifphere 

plank 

plant, er 

plantain 

planticion 

plaih 

pla(b> 

plaftic 

plat 

pbte 

platter 

Pldto 

pktoni: 

pl^to^n 

plau- 



iw^"*" 



P L I P O E 

plausibility pliers 
plaulible, nefs plight 
plaufibljf plin;h 

play, cr plod, ding 

pka plot, ter 

plwd, er plover 

p]eafant,ly,ners plough 
jAhdniiy - plow 
pkafe ^ pluck 

plea&rable, ly, plug 

[nels plum 
pleafirre plumage 

pWb^ian . plumb 
pledge plumber 

pledget pltfme 

plenary plumnAet 

plenip^tential plump, nefs 
plenip^tenti^gp plunder, er 
plenici^de plunge 

plenteous, ]y, pl/iral 

[nefs plurality 
plentiful, ly, plur^lift 
plentj^ [nefs plufli 
pl/^na/hi . ply 
plethoric pneumatics 

pleth^rjr p^ach, er 

plevin pock 

pleiirrjj' pocket, ting 

pleuretic pockjp 

pliable, nefs pod 
pliably p^em 

pliant) (y, nefs ^oefy 



POL 

l>6ct 

p^/tafter 

p^Vtcfs 

poetic 

p^eucal, ly 

pretty 

poianancy 

poianant 

poinard 

point 

poife 

poifon 

poi&nous 

p^ke, r 

p^lar 

p^e-cat 

p^Ic 

polemical 

policy 

politic 

political, ly, 

[ne^ 
politician 
polifli, cr 
pt^lite, ly, nefi 
polity 
p^U 
pollard 
pollute 
polluted, nefs 
pollution 
poltroon 

p^lj^gtf- 



POP 

polfgamiSt 

polyglot 

polygon 

polygram 

poljrpuj 

polj^'ilable 

poOidtum 

pomegranate 

pmiferous 

pommel 

potnp 

pompion 

pompous, ly, 

pond [nefs 

p6ndcr 

p6nderQUS» 

[ncfs 
ponderQ/?ty 
poniard 
pontiff 
pontifical 
pontif/cal/bu/ 
pontif/ctfce 
pontoon 
pool 
poop 

poor, ly, ncfs 
pooriQi 
p<?pe 
popedom 
papery 



P O R 

p^pifli, ]y 

poplar 

poppy 

poptfltfce 

p6p«lar,ly,nefs 

popularity 

pop^Ute 

popi^^tion 

popi^lous, nefs 

porcelain 

porch 

porcirpxne 

pore 

pork 

porket 

poro/tty 

p^Vous, nefs 

porpdis 

porridge 

porringer 

port 

p^'rtable 

po'rtal 

portcullii 

portend 

portentous, 

[nefs 
porter, ly 
porterage 
port/co 
portion, lefs 
portl/nefs 

u 



p o T 

partly 

portmanteau,t# 

portm^nde 

portrait 

portraiC0re 

portray 

portreeve 

pofe 

position 

p6s/tive,ljf,neis 
p6fl> 

pofTefs 

poflefllon 

pofleffivc 

pofleffor 

poflet 

pofs/bil/ty 

poffible, nefi 

poflibly 

poft 

pt^ftage 

poftmor 

poft^r/6r/tjr 

poft6r/t^ 

poftern- 

po(l-hi/mous 

poftillion 

poftpone 

poftfcript 

p6ft«rc 

poTey 

pot 

portable. 



PR A 

p^'cable, nefs 

fotdzots 

p^'ccnt, ly, ncfs 

p^'centtfte 

potential, \y 

pother 

p(7tion 

potQierd 

pottage 

potter 

pottinger 

pottle 

pouch 

poverty 

poulterer 

poultice 

poultcry 

pounce 

pound, er 

poundage 

poSr 

pourfuzvant 

pow'der 

power 

powerful, ly, 

powt fnefs 

pox 
praft/cable, 

[ncfs 
praftic 
pra£b'cal, ly, 

[nefs 



PRE 

praftice 
praftife, r 
praftiti^er 
pragmatic 
pragmatical, 

, [ly, ncfs 
praife, r 
prance 
prank 
pr^te, r 
prattle, r 
prawty 
prawn 
praxij 
pray 
prayer 

pr«rch,er,ment 
preamble 
prebend 
prebendary 
pr^cir/ous, ly, 
[ncfs 
precaution 
prec/de 
precedence 
precedency 
precedent 
precedent 
precentor 
precept 
preceptive 
preceptor 



PRE. 

preceflion 
precinft 
precious, ly, 

[nefs 
prec/pice 
precipitancy 
precipitant, 

[nefs 
precipitate 
precipitation 
precipitous, ly 
precf fe, ly, nefs 
precifiaa - 
precifion 
preconceive 
preconception 
pre^contradl 
pre-contrafl 
predeceflbr 
predeftinirian 
predeftin^atc 
predeftinitioa 
predetermini- 

[tion 
predetermine 
predial 
predicabic 
predicament 
predicate 
predift 
predidion 
predifp^Tal 

prediP 



PRE , P R E 

predifpok Tpremature 
pr^dom/nancy pr^medn<3te 
pr^dom/nant, pr^med/tition 

[ij, ncfs premik 
prfdom/ntfte prem/fes 
pre-eminence pretnium 
pre-eminent pr^monilh 
pr/-eng^ge premonition 
pr/-exiftence pretnunire 
pr/-exiftcnt pre-ojccupy 
preface pr/-ordafn 

pvefaterj preparation 

prtfcdt pr^artfdve 

prflfc6b/re ' prepar^zt^rj^ . 
prrfer, red prepare 
prefcrable,nefs prepenfe 
preferably prfponder^te 
preference preposition 
prderment prepoflefs 
prrfig«re prepofleflion 

prrfix prepofterous, 

pregnancy [Ij, nefs 

pregnant, ly prerogative 
prqudge prefage 

prejudice prefige 

prejudicial preibjter 
prelaay prejbj'tmal 

prelate prejbjter/an 

prrfatzcal preibytmani/in 

pr^leftion prejbytcrjf 
preliminary pr/fcience 
prelude prefc/cnt 

U 2 



PRE 

prefer/be 
prefcription 
prefence 
prefent, ly 
prefent 
prefenticion 
prefentee 
preferv^cion 
prefervtftive 
preferve 
preside 
prejidcncy 
p indent 
p.cfs, ingfy 
p.eflizre 
preftigtous 
prefttf 
pref«me 
prefumption 
prefumptive 
prefumpti/oiis, 
[I)', nefs 
prefuppcffe 
pfetence 
pretend, cr 
pretenfion 
preterition 
pretcrmiflion 
pi:etermit 
preternati/ral 
preterperfecc 

pretext 

pretor 



p R r 

pr/cor 

• pteioridLfi 
prect/ljr 
prettincft 

" pretty 
prevail 
prevalence 
prevalence 
prevalent, ly, 
[ncfs 
pr^vanci?te 
pr^vancAion 
pr^var/citor 
pr^v^nt 
prevention 
preventive 
previous J Ijr 
preif 
pr/ce 
pricket 
prickle 
prick 1/nefs 
prickly 
pr/de 

pr/eft; Ijf, Imefs 
pr/eft-hood 

pr/m/7Cjr 
pr/m^r/ly 
pr/m^rj^ 
pr/m^te, (hip 
prrme 



P R I 

primer 

prTm/val 

primitive, ly, 

prim [nefs 

pr/m^g/n/al 

pr/m^genitor 

pr/m^genitarc 

primrtffe 

prince,ljr,lincfs 

princefs 

princ/pal, Ijr 

j^rincipalrt^ 

principle 

print 

printer 

pr/or 

pr/^reft 

pr?6r/ty 

pr/^ry 

Prifcilb 

pri/m 

pri/matical 

prison, cr 

prift/ne 

prittle-prattle 

pr/vtfcjf 

pr/v^te,jy,nefs 

pr/V^t/er 

prFvition 

privative 

priv/lege 

priv/ty 



PRO 

privjf 

pr/ze 

prob/ibil/rjr 

probable, nefs 

probably 

probate 

pr^b^tion 

pr^biti^n^ry 

pr^be 

probity 

problem 

probl^mat/caU 

pr^bofcij [ly 

proceed, ings 

pr^c/d«re 

procefa 

pr^ceffion 

proclaim 

procl^imJtion 

proclivity 

proc6n{u\ 

pr^confiilar, 

pr^cradinizte* 
pr^craftin^itioQ 
pr^cr^iite 
pr^creition 
proftor, ihip 
pr^iirrtfcy 
pr^»rition 
pr^ciyritor 
pr^ci?re,nfi€nt,r 
prdd/galy 



PRO 

prod/gal, Ijf, 
[ncfs 

prodigality 

pr^dig^us^ Ijr, 
[nels 

pr6d/g;y 

prod^^ce 

pr^difce 

produA 

pr^udbion 

pr^duftive 

pr^m 

profanation 

profcr 

profefs 

prrfefledly 

prcfellibn 

profe0br 

pdficxency 

pr^cicnL 

proTile- 

profit 

pr6fitable,ncfsf 

profitably. 

proflig^Jte, \yi 

[nefs 
profound, 1^,. 

[ncfs 
^roKmdhy 
pr(?f«fe,l7,ncfs 
profifioa. 



PRO 



^ • 



progen/tor 

progeny 

prognoftlc 

prognoftictfte 

prognolbci- 

[tion 
prognofticator 
progrefs 
progrefiion, al 
progrcffivc, ly 
prohibit 
prohibition 
prohibitory 
projea ^ 
projeft 
prqeftile 
projeftion , 
projedlor 
prole 

prolific, ncfs 
prolhx, ly, ncfs 
prolixitjr 
prolocutor 
prologue 
prolong 
prolongation 
prom^n^de 
prommcnce 
prominent 
proniifc«ous, 
[ly, nefs 
promife, cr 



PRO 

promiflor^ 
promontorjf 
promote, r 
promotive ' 
promotion 
prompt, cr, - 

[ncfs 
pr6mptit«dc 
promulgate 
promulgation 
promulge 
prone, ly, nc6^ 
prong 
pronoun 
pronounce 
pronunditiou: 
proof 
prop 

prop^gtfte 
propagation i 
propjgitor 
propenfc, ly,. 

[ nels V 
propenfion 
propensity 
proper, ly, ncfs : 
property 
pr6ph^c3f 
proph^jy 
prophet; 
pr6phetefs\ 
prophetic 

pfOphOe 



PRO PRO 

pr(?phet/cal, \y profpcr 

propinquity profber/ty 

pr^piti^te proj^crousyly, 
prophidiion [ncfs 

propitiatory prdft/t^c 

prflpkious;, I7, profb'twtion 

[nefs proftr^te 

^Topdrtion proftrition^ 

propo^tioiT- proteQ: 

[able, neft pr(«:e£tion 

pr^p(?rtionably proteftor 

-ptopVTtiottd] pvotetvhy 

propdriionait proteft 

propdidl proteftant 

prd?p^Te, r proteft«tion 

pfop^^sition proteftanti/m 

propound, er protorhartyr 

ptopvietor prothonotary 

propriety prototype 

prorogition- protraft' 

prorogue protraftion- 

profile protra6tor^ 

profcrzbe . protrude 

profcriptioD^ piotriiCton 

prole protf^berarTCC 

proj^cwte protf^berant 

prq/ic«tion' proud, \y 

prq/^c«tQr proudifh. 

profelyio prove 

"profady ' proved/tor 

profptft provender 

grofpedtive grdverb 



PSA 

proverb/al, 1/ 
prov/de, r 
providence 
pr6v/dent, \y^ 
* [nefs 
prov/deatial,ljr> 
province 
provincial, ly' 
provifipn 
provilional, ly^ 
prov/fir 

provocation 

provoic/jtivc 

provdkcj r 

provift 

proto 

prow'efs- 

prpwr 

proxim/tjr- 

proxjy 

pr«de" 

prudence 

pr/ident,l7',ne&. 

prudential, l^. 

pr//he, r 

prwnello 

pr«nes, prwns-; 

PrufTxa 

pry 

jsalm - 

jsalmift' 

f^klmody 

pstfUer. 



P U L 

ys^Fcer 

fsJIterj^ 

9t/iai> 

Pttbertj^ 
public, ]y 
publ/can 
pubUc^tion 
publilh, cr 
pucker 
pudder 
p»ddii^ 
puddle 
pi^dic/ty 
puerile 
pueriUty 
pufF, ing ■ 
pug • 
p«gil 
P^ifiance 
piriflant, ly 
puke 

p61c|>r/t»dc 
puVm\ 
' pull 
pulkt 
p«llry 
pulldiste 
pwlm^n^rj^ 
pulp 

p^lp4t 

pulfition 



^g 



PUR 

pulfe 

pulvcrFze 

pulvenzacion 

pumice 

pummel 

pump 

pumpkin 

pun 

punch 

punri&i7nell^ 

punchion 

pundiW 

pun6l«al, ly, 

[ncfs 
pun£l«al/ty 
pun£h/anon 
pun(5l«re 
pungeng? 
pungent, ly, 
p«nic [nefe. 
puniih, cr, 

[ment 
punifhable, 
piinily [nefs- 
punincd 
punk: 
p«n^ 
p/^pil 
p/^pilage 

puppet 
puppjr 

purblFnd^ nel» 



PUR 

purchafcj er 
p«re, ly, ncfs . 
purgation 
purgnjtive - 
purgatory 
purge 

p«r/f/cition 
purify. 

P^rim 
p«r/tan^ 
p«r«an/car 
pttr/tani/mi 
purity 
purl 
purlieu- 
purling 
purloin 
purple 
purpart 
purp^fej ly 
purring 
purfe - 
purflain 
purf^ancc* 
purii^ant 
purf«e, r 
purfi^it 
purs/ncfs 
purfu/yant 
purly 

purttf nances* 
purv^E, ance 
purvfHor. 



Q^U A 

4^urvJ0or 

p^nrlence 

pi^rxrknt 

pus 

p«(h 

'puRllanimitj^ 

pirfillaKumouS) 

pirfs [IjF, nefs 

puftule 

pufttflous 

put 

jfutaxivc 

p«trid, nefs 

ptftrifadion 

P»tr/fy 

p6tty 

puzzle 

pjrc 

pyebold 

pygmjr 

pi^l^rui 

jjiyramid 

p^^ramidal 

P^romancjr 

Ig^thag^rai 



Quack 

quackerjr. 



Q^U A Q^U I 

quaclg(hnefi quart 
quadragesimal quartan 

quadrangle quarter, ly 

quadrangular quarterage 

quadrant quartern 

quadrate quarto 

quadratic quaih 

quadrature quaternik>n 

quadrennial quaver 

quadrilateral qu^n 

quadripartite queen 

quadr«p^dc queer, \y^ nefs 

quadruple quell, er 

qu^'rj quench^ able, 
quaff [cr 

quagqfi/re quer^m^ious 

quail qu/rift 

quaint queriftcr 

quake querry. 

quaker ^ querirlous; 

quakeri/m query 

qualification queft-man 

qualify^ ^ queftion, able-, 

quality. queftionabie- 
quaim [n^ls. 

qualm ifh queftionlefs 

quandarj^ queftor 

quantity quibble 

quarantain quick, ly, ncfs 

quarrcl,cr,5ng quicken 

quJrrelfome quickland 

quarrjr quid 

' quid/Qf-, 



R A B 

quidiiy 
quJefcencc 
qu/efcenc 
qu/ct, er, ift, 
[ly, ncfs 
qu/rti/cn 
quilt 
quince 
quinquennial 
qu/re 
quirk 
quinyiy 
quintal 
quintelflence 
quinri/plc 
quit 
quite 
quiver 

quodlibitdmn 
quoin 
quoit 
qu^ tit ion 
quotCy r 
qu^th 
quotidian 
quotient 



Rabbet 

Rabb? 



R A I 

rabbin 

rabbin/cal 

rabid 

rabble 

faca 

race 

Richel 

rack, er 

racket 

racy 

ridial 

tidiancj^ 

ridiant^ly^nefs 

rad/cal, ly 

tidicate 

radiih 

radius 

radix 

raff 

raffle 

raft 

rafter 

rag, ^ed 

ragg^mumn 
ragged, ljr,nels 
rdgmgly 
rtfgoo 
ragoSt > 
rail, er 
railerjr 
railingljf 



RAM 

raiment 

rain 

rainjr 

ratfe 

raifins 

r^ke 

rikiih, Ijfy nds 

rallerjf 

rally 

rani 

ram^^dain 
ramble, r 
ramif/cittoii 
rammer 
ramous 
ran>p 
rampsmt 
rampart 
ran 
rancid 

rancorous, \f^ 
[neft- 
rancour 
rand 
random 
r^nge, r 
rank, ly, hcfs 
rankifh 
ranfac 
ranfom, er 
rant, er 
rintingly 

r^nua- 



RAT 

rap 

rapacious, \yj 
[nefs 
r^pac/ty 
T^pe 

r%)^d, ]y^ ncfs 
rapidity 
rapier 
rapine 
rapparcc 
rapture 
rSpftfdy 

rapturous, ly, 
[nefs 
r^re, ly, nefs 
rarJf§<5lioa 
rar/fj 
rarity 
rishctxy 
rafcal, ^ 
ra&ali^ 
rak 

rafti, ly, nefs 
rafher 
rizor 
rafp . 
rdluTQ 
rat 

rata(h 
r^tan 
ratable, nefs 



R E A 

r^te 

rather 

ratif/citiott 

ratrfy 

rdtw 

r2itiodndtion 

ricion 

rati^nable 

rational, itty \y 

rationale 

rationality 

ratfb^ne 

rattle 

ravage, r 

r^ve 

ravel 

ravelia 

riven 

ravenous, ly, 

[nefs 
ravin 

ravi(h,er,ment 
raw, nefs 
ray 
r«ich 
r^adioti 
r^ad, er 
read 
readily 
read/nefs 
r^admilTion 
readmit, ted 



R EC 

readj^ 

reatc 

r/al, ly, ncfc 

reility 

r/alFze 

realm 

r^am 

r^n/m^te 

r^afcend 

r^ap, cr 

r^ar 

r/afoR 

r/afonable, nefsi 

r^fonably 

r^aflemble 

r/afs^me 

r^aflfumptioa 

r^bapt/zitjom 

r^bapt/ze 

r^bite 

R^becc^ 

rebel 

wbcl, led 

rebellion 

rebellious, ly, 

rebound . [nefs 

rebuflF 

rebuild 

rebttke, r 

rebuj 

rfcJll 

recant 

recan* 



11 E C 



^ •. 



«canttftK>n 
xec3,pitu\ate 
r^capfciirlicion 
r«:/de 

r^c^ve, r, able 
r/ccnt, ly, ncfs 
receptacle 
r«:eption 
receptive 
r^cefs 
recipe 
r^cip/ent 
r^cipre?cal, \y 
wc/tal 
recitativo 
recite, r. 
reckon, ing 
reclaim 
r^clfne 
reclufc ' 
^^cognition 
^tfcogn/zance 
rrcogD/ze 
recoil 
r^coin 
xccolle<5t 
recoll^ion 
recommence 
recommend 
jrecommendii- 
[cion 



K E C RED 

reeommendtf- recumbency 
[t^ry recumbent 
recompenfe, r recur 
reconc/le,ment recurrence 
reconcilable recurfion 
reconcil/ition recurv/jtion 
reconcilwr^ry recurv/ty 
recondu<5t recuCancy 
reconnoitre,ni recufznt 
record recyfant 

record, cr red 
recoverable, reddifh 

[nefs reddition 
recover, er redeem 
recovery 
recount 
recourfe 
recre^^te / 
recreation 
recrim/n^te 



redeemable, 

[nefs 
redeemer 
redeliver 
redelivery 
redemand 



recr/mmition redemption 



recr/^it 

reftangle 

redang«lar 

red/f/ablc 

redtiffcr 

redb'fj? 

reft/lineal 

ri&itude 

redor • 

reStorisl 

rt&ory 



redolent 
redouble 
redoufit 
redoubtable, 

[nefs 
redound 
redrefs, er 
reduce 

reducible, nefs 
reduftion 
redundancy 
• redun- 



REF 



REG 



r«dijndant,ne£i refr^a 



rccd 


refrangible. 


retdify 


[nefs 


reef 


refrefh, ment 


reck 


refrigerant 


reel 


refrigerate 


reentrtnce 


refogc 


reenter 


ref«aee 
refulgence 


r^ntrjf 


r^.aiabIUh, 


refulgencf 


reeve [ment rrfulgem: 


reexamination refund 


reexamine 


refirfal 


refe&^rjf 


rer«/e 


refel, led 


refftfe 


refer, red 


reft^atioa 


referee 


reflate 


reference 


regain 


refifxie, r, ment regal 


refit 


regale 


refleft 


regaUa 


reflexion 


regal/ty 


reflex 


regard, er,ful. 


refluent 


[leGi 


ieflux 


r/gencjr 


reform 


regenerate 


* reformation 


regeneration 


reformer 


regent 


refraftion 


r6g/cFdc 


refradli^rrncfs 


reg/men 



refrad^ry, al/o regiment 
xi£rz6ioiy reg/mental 



R E L 

region 

regrfter 

rcgiftry 

regorge 

regrater 

regrefs 

regret 

regi^)ar^Iy,ne£i 

regi^larity 

regelate 

regi^lator - 

regirlation 

rehearfal 

rehearic 

rejedt 

rqeftiott 

reten 

reimbark 

reimburfe 

reimpreffion 

r^ns * 

reinforce, ment 

reingige, ment 

reinftatc 

rejoin 

rejoinder 

rejoice 

reiterate 

relapfc 

relate 

relation 

relative, ]y 

relator 



R ErM 

r^Iax 

felzxation 

rrfay 

r^l/a/e, tnent 

re]£nty lefs 

r^l/ance 

relics 

relia: 

r^l/ef 

rd/eve 

relievo 

religion 

religious, ly. 



REN 

recn^d/lefs 

rimedy 

remember 



R E P 

rfncw'al 

rennet 

ren^v^ce 



remembrance ren(7vition 
remembrancer renounce 
remind renown 

remifs, ly, nc6 rent 
remiflible rental 

remiffion reniiaKrat^ 

remit, tcd^.tcr renunai4tion 
remirtance reobtain. - 
remnant - reordain 
remonflrancc reord/Wtion 



remonftrants 



[ne{$ remdnftrate 
relinquiflbf reaiora 

[tpent remdrfe^lefa 
reliques 
reliih,. able 
relu<5tance 
relurfancj 
relufbant 

remain . 

remainder 

remand 

remark 

remarkable. 



remote 

V 

removable 
removal 
remove - , 
I remount] 
: remunerate 



^, • 



repair, able, cr 

repartee 
repafe 
repaft t 

: repay', iWJIt 
: repeal, able . 
. repeat, ^r j '■ 



7 rem/^nerK^tion repentance 

repebple. 
repqrcCflioa 



renal . ^ 
rencounter 
. rend 
render 



^ [nefs : rendefvo«s 
remarkably renegade 
remed;fable, r^negid^ 
[nefs renew', er 
X 



: repercuQiy^' 
rrepetitipft^. 
.rep/ne, r 
.replar^t .' ■ 
replenim, er, 
; [ment 

replete 



REP 

r^pl^tion 

replevin 

r^p)6vy 

repUc^cion 

r^piy 

xe^ortr cr 

rfp6sii^jf 

rcpr^hehd 

repr^henfible r^queft, cr 

repr^^henfion rnju/re 

reprHem requite 

repivfeBt^km^ r^cpiftftion 

rcprrfentr^rive r^qu/tal 

r^prefs r^qa/tc- 

rrpr/eve ^' r^re 

repninand r/rev^rd 

reprint r^l«te 

r^pr/fal r^fcind ~ 

fipr^h^ able • r^Tcript ' 

r^prMchftHjly, refcte 

[ftefs r^arch 

repr^btftfe^nefs rrfemblance 

repK»biiden . rrfertttble 



RES 

republican 

republ/c^xtion 

re'pfidi^ie 

r^p<K)i^cion 

r^pOgna-my 

repugnant 

rep61fc 

repirtablC) nefs 

rep^ably 

repletion 

repine 



reproof 
repr5viiblc, 

r[ne6 
repr^ve^ r , 
reptile i 

r^blic 



refent, mcnt 
refervicion 
referve 
referved, fy, 

fncfs 
uiiiiVsi ment 



RES 

rewde 

re/?dence 

r^drot 

r^denti^jfjr 

residuary 

refiduc 

res/cn, er 

resignation 

res/enment 

resiliency 

resilient 

refin 

res/nous, nefs 

resift, er 

resfftance 

resiftable, nefi 

refolvable 

refolve 

refolved, I7, 

[dc6 
refolvend 
refolvent 
re/^l«te,ly,nefs 
ref^li^tion 
re/^nance 
re/^nant 
resort 

relbund 
r^rce 
refpift 

refpeaful, ly, 
[nefs 
relp6£t' 



RES 

rffpedable 
rffpedlive 
refp/ricion 
r^fp/re 
relpite 
r^fplendence 
r^fplen'dency . 
rdplendent, ly^ 
[nefs 
rffpondent 
r^fponfal 
refponk 
r^fponfable 
reft 

reftleft, nefs 
reftu»cion 
reftincfs 
reftive, nefs 
refty 

r^ft^'r^tive 
rcRordiion 
reRorc^ r 
rtfftrain 
r^ftraint 
r^ft rift ion 
rt'ftriftive 
r^ftiinge 

r^ftringence 
r^ftringencjr 

r<?fl:ringent, 

reiult [ncft 

r^l/ime^ able 



RET 

r<?/umn)bns 
r<?/umptk>n 

refurreftion 

r^ufdtition 

r£/ufc/t«te 

mail 

i-iftail 

* 

Tiftilce, n 

xeiaMdtion 

retain, er . 

retard 

retention 

retentive 

retch 

r^tm«e 

r^t/re, meat 

r^t/red, Ijy, nefi w verfe 

retort wverfible 

r^traft r^verfion 

r^tr/at revert, ible 

r^tr6nch,mcnt r^viccual 

retribution review' 

rf trie vab|e, nefs r<?v/le, r 

uixiivt rrvifal 

r^tr(?gr^d«rion r^v/fe, r 

r^tr^gr^de r^vifit 

r^tr^greflion ' r^ v/ val 

rtftr(?iningcnt Mvfve, .r . 

r^tr^^fpeft r^«nion 

rdtr(?lpeftion* rdunhe 

return, able rtfv^^cable 

X 2 



REV 

ivv/al, .tr 
revel, ler 
rev^ItftiQa 
revenge • 
r^vengfful, ly^ 
. [nefa 

Tfvtrhcratory 
r^v/re 
reverence 
reverend 
reverent, ly, 

' [nefs 
reverential, ly 
rever/es 



pev^co- 



R I C 



^* 



rewff^e^ r 
xew6it^ cr 
revolve 
revdi^tion 
r^vuMion 
reward, cr 
r^wJrdable, 
[nefs 

rl^enifli 
•r!>ete?ric 
r{)^t6nca], ly, 
fnefs 
itet^rician 

H^eumatic 
rjeumat/cal 

rtFnoc^roi 

rDomb^id 

r|)6mbui 

r&//barb 

rlyyme 

itythm/cal 

rib 

ribaldry 

rlbbann 

rich 
rfch^s 



R I L 

rick 

ricke^nefs 
rickets 
rickrtjr 

rid 

riddance 

ridden 

riddle 

r/de, r 

ridge 

ridgling 

rid/ctfle 

ridicalous, ly, 

[nefs 

r/dotttf 

rife 

r/fle, r 

rifFraflF 
ricT 

rigging 
rigtfdoon 
r/ght, ly, nefs 
rfghtcoos, ly 

[chufs 
r/ghteoufnefs 
r/ghtful, ly, 

[nefs 
rigid,' ly, nefs 
rigorous, ly, 

[nefs 
rigour 
rill 



R O A 

rim 

n'me 

r/my 

rmd 

ring 

rinfe 

r/ot 

r/^tbus, ly, nefs 

rip 

r/pe 

r/pen 

ripple 

n/c 

rife 

rifen 

ris/bil/ty 

rifible 

rifk 

r/te 

ritual 

r/vai 

rfvalry 

nVe 

riven 

river 

rivet 

riv«lct 

rix-dollar 

r^ch 

r^ad 

r^am 

r^ar 



ko O KV V 



rob, bcr 

robbcrjr 

rohc 

Robert 

wbuft 

rock 

rocket 

rock/neis 

rockj^ 

rod 

r^de 

rodomontade 

roc 

togdaon 

XOgV£ 

Togvcrj 

rogui{h,l)f,nef9 
r^ll, cr 
R^man, ift 
romance, r 
romantic, nefs 
Rome 

rood 
roof 
rook i 

rookerjr 
room 

roommefs 

roomjr 

tooit 



root 

tape 

ropy 

foqufleau, I« 

rdfary 

rofc 

r^fem^rjr 

Ros/cri^cians 

rofia 

roljr 

rot 

rotation 

rote 

rotten, nefr 

rotund/ty 

r^vc, r 

rough (ruff) 

[Ijir^nefs ruminate 
rounc^val ^umindtiotk 
round, ly, nets rummage' 
roundday riknour 
roufe rump 

rout rumpifh 

roto,er rumple 

row'cl " run 

royal, Ijf, neft rdnagatc 



RUR 

rudation 
rudder 
ruddle 
rudd/ 

r«dc, Ijr, neii 
rrfd/menta 
ri/e, fiSlljn 
ruff 

ruffian, Ijr, fr- 
ruffle [neis 

rugged, Inncfe. 
ri/m 

r2^/nous,ljr,nefs 
r»le, r 
rum, mcr 
rumble 



royaHft 
royaltj^ 
rub, ber 
rubbtlh 
rubric 
r«by 
X s 



runaway 
rundlet 
rqnt^ 
r^pee 
ruptirrc 
riral,* I7, ntfir 
ruih. 



SAC 

ru(h, mefs 
rufhy 
ruffet 
ruft 
ruftic, nefs 



SAL 



SAM 



ruft/cal,]y,ne{s fad, ly, nefs 
ruft/ctfce, d sadden 



&crif/cal salique 

sacr/ffce faliva 

sacr/'lege sal/V^^te 

facnl/gious,1y, fal/vicioa 
[nefs sallet 
• salbto 



ruftic/tjp 

ruffle 

ruftjr 

rut 

R^th 

ruchful 

ruthlefs 



saddle 

Saddivcees 

Siddudfm 

fcfc, ly, nefs 

£ife-guard 

£ifcty 

saSron, furn 



sally 

falm<7gundy 

salmon 

failoon 

filr, er 

faltier 

fJkifh 

salvable, nefs 

falyabiUty 



fag 

fugacious, ly, salvage 
[nefs falv^cion 



SuMoth 

fabbatir/an 

sabbath ^ 

fabbat/cal 

fible 

l^ber 

j&cerd^'tat 

sac^but 

£iclc 



figac/tjr 
foge, ly, ncis 
<feid 
fail, er 
faint 
&ke 
fialac/ty 



fali^bribus, nefs 

{alubrhy 

salve 

salver 

salvd 

^klutary 

faktitioQi 



£ilicious, neis f^I^te 



salad (et) 
sal^imander 
salary 
falc 
fiiabFe, nefe 



8acr<9.ment 
^cr^mental 
ficred^ljK^acis. fdlicnt 
titu&Mi idling 



iaktiferous^ 

[nef& 
Satndria^ 
S^marnan 
f^me^nefs 
samphire, 
samplar 

sample 



S A R 

sample 

Sam(bn 

Sam»el 

finable, nefs 

sanative, nefs 

san&ifjfc^cioi^ 

san£l/f/er 

sanfttfy 

faiySb'tn^nious 

san£t/m^ny 

san6bion 

sandity 

fand, /nefs 
sandals 
sandjF 
fane 

langurf/cicioa 
sangyine 
sangu/n4U7 
San^drim 
siniry 
santer 
fap, lefs 
saphice 
sapling 
sappj 
saraband 
S^ra)^ 
sarca/m 
&rcaib*cd, 1> 
[nefs. 



S AU 

sarcenet 

fa(h 

sa(&fra^ 

Sitan 

Stftanfcal 

satchel 

sacell/tes 

£?tellu^s< 

fited 

{dtiate 

iatiety (si) 

fafiistaftion 

fatisfafbrf]^ 

(atisfa6b^r/ners 

izxSsiz&oTy 

sacisfjf 

satcin 

Saturday ' 

Sicurn 

Ctire 

btyncal, ly, 

[n^is 
saty rF?^ 
satyrift 

savage, Iji, nefs 
sauce 
saucer, alfa' 

[fauce, islcn 
h(xci\y 
faucineiV^ 
faucjr 



S,C A 

sau/agc 

iave 

savin * 

fiving^Iy^ncfi 
(dviouT 

faun ten 
idvori]y^ 

fivmnefs 
iavq^y 

favour 

faw 

faw'yer 

fay 

Savoy 

i^voys 

fcab,^ b/nefe. 

fcabbard 

fcabby 

Icibrous^ 

fcaflfold 

fcJld 

fcde 

fcil/neft: : 

fcallioa 

fcalp 

fc^> 

fcamble 

fcamper, er 

fcan 

fcandal 

fifandtflFze 

firanda- 



sen 

fcandtflous, |y, 

[ncfs 

fcant,ily,^ncfs 

fcanty 

fcapdar 

fear 

fcar^mouth 

fcarry 

fctf rcc, ly, ncfe 

fcirc/ty 

fc^re 

fcarf 

fcar/fifcitiofi 

fcar/fy 

Icarlec 

fcarp 

fc^te 

fcattcr, er 

fcavengeF 

fcel^ton 

fcenc 

ftentiy 

ic^n/cat 

fient 

lieptcr _ 

freptic 

feeptical, I>, 

[nc6 
firepticj/m 



SCO 

fcji/tn 

i4'irmat/cal,ly, 

fc|>61ar [ncfs 

fc^laft/c, alt)^ 

fcD/l/aft 

{cioliutn 

fci^ool 

ic2auc« 

fc/encc 

fc/entific, aH;r 

fcim^cr 

ftfon 

fci/iars (fciz) 

fcincillitipn 

fc/dift 

fcofF 

fcold 

fcollap 

fconlie 

fcoop^ w 

it^pe 

fcorbiftic 

fcorb^t/cal, 

feorcb [nefi 

fc^re 

(corn 

fcorp/ofi 

Scot 

Icoc 

Scotch 



SCR 

Scotland 

fcoundrel 

fcourgc 

fc^rfe, r 

fcout 

fcowl, ingljr 

fcowr' 

fcrabble 

fcrag, ^dncfs 

fcrag^ 

fcramble 

fcraHch 

fcrap 

"fcr^pe, r 

fcratch, €r 

fcrawl 

fcreak 

tcritktn 

fcreech-owl 

fcretti 
fcrcw 

fcribble, r 

fcr/be 
' fcrip 
fcript^rat 
fcript^rc 
fcrivener 
fcr6pbn4ous 
fcrub, b/hr, bf- 

&rubh^^ 
fcryple 



S E A 

fcr«p«lous, Ijy, 

fcmable [nefs 

fcruu'nJzt 

{ctutiny 

fatitdrc 

fcuffle ' 

fculk, cr, ing 

fcuU 

fculler 

fcullerjr 

fcullion 

fculp. 

fculpt«re 

fcom ^ 

icummer 

fcurf, tilth 

fcurfy 

fc urril/ty 

fcurr/loust I7, 

fcurv/ly [nefs 

fcurv/ncfs 

fcuryjr 

fcutchcon 

fcuttle 

Scj^h/an 

fcythc 

feu 

fealy er 

fi?am,iefs 

feamfter ' 

feamftrefs 

fear • 



S E D 


S E L 


search . 


fed/ment 


scarce 


f<?duion [nefs 


f/afon, able 


feditious, jj'. 


f/afonablfnefs 


fed»ce, r, ment 


f(fafonably 


f<?du6tion - 


&at 


(edislity 


fecant 


fed«lous, ty. 


fefceflion 


fee [nefs 


f(?cl^de 


feed 


f<fcl«fion 


feedjr 


fecond, ly 


. feek 


fecondiry 


feem, ingljf. 


f(fcr<?j^ • 


f l/ncfs, ly 


f/cret, ly, nefs 


feen 


fjfcr/te 


ffcr 


fecr^t^rj^ 


fecthe 


{icretion 


fegment 


fea •) - 


fegr^g^te 


fedlir/ah 


(eiantor 


fed^r;^ ' 


f/icn/^ry 


ieftion 


feiCin 


feftor 


fdze 


iec»lar 


£?izable, nefs 


fec/rlar?ze 


(eizurc 


fec«laritjy 


S/la> ' 


fec«re,*ly, nefs ieldom 


lecuvhy 


felcft , 


fedan 


felf 


fcditc, Ijr, nefs felfilh, ly, nefs 


fedcnttfrinefs 


fell 


fedenti^Q 


fellcrjy 


fcdgc 


fclvagc 




felvcs 



SEN. 

fclvcs 

femblanjce 

{emi-brevc 

firmi-circ]e,fur 

femi-circirlar, 

[idv 
Crm/-c^on 

fem/nal 
fem/ntfry 
(emi- quaver 

femp/ternal 
fena 

ftnatt 

len^ator 

fcnatori^A 

knatdrnn 
/end 

f/n/or 

feniorhy 

fe'n-night 

lenf^tion 

fenfe . 

fenfelefs, nefs 

fenfelefl)^ 

fensibil/ty 

fen fible, ncfs 

I'enfibjy 

fensnive, nefa 
feniiry 

fea&al((b«)]7, 

[nefs 



SE R 

fen&al/ty, ihii 
fent 

fentence 
lenien.cious,ly, 

[ncfs 
fent/meht 
fent/mental 
fent/nel 
fcntry 

Sparable, nefs 
fcpawte^ |y, 

[nefs 
feparition 
feptangle 
September 
feptenn/^l 
fepwtfgint 
fepulcjre 
frpulcjral 
f^pult^rc 
f/quel 
ifquence 
iS?quefter 
J^quedriciQn 
ferigl/o 
graphic 
fcraph/cal^ ly, 

[ncfe 
fer^pkim 
ier^n<«de 
fer/ne, Jy, ncfe. 
feren/rjt 



S E V 

sergeant 
sergeantry 

fmous, ly, neis 

fermon 

(craionJze : 

ffrq^j? 

fifrous 

ferpent 

ferpcntJn^ 

fcrvant 

ferve 

fcrvice, able 

ferviceableneis 
ferviceaWy 
ferv/'l^, ly, ncft 
fervil/ty 
iSrvitor 

fervit«de 

frrunv 

feflion 

feflbr 

fct,' teir 

iJfton 

^ctle, foment 

lieven 

fetien -night 

Seventeen 

ieventh 

ievenly • 

fi-ver , 

j^vcral, ly 

fever- 



S H A 

leverance 

fev/rci 1^, ncfe 

fevcrky 

lew (Co)' 

few'cr (fheO 

few'ct 

fex 

fexenn/al 

fext/lc 

f«ton 

Ihab, b%, bi- 

(habby (nefs 

fhackle 

fhad 

fh^de 

fhad^ip 

ihkdowy 

fhidm^fs 

fhddy 

(haft' 

fhag|[y^ 

fh^green 

{hake 

{hiken 

fliall " 

IhJU 

ftiallop 

fhalk!»;iiefi' ' 

(balloon ^ i ; . 

{ha]6t 

(ham . 



SHE 

• 

(hamble 
(h^mc 
Ihimeful, ly, 

[nefs 
(h^rnclefs, nefs 
(himtlcfly 
fhamoy 
(hank 
fhapcj lefs, 

[lefnefs 
(hipeh 
(h(?re, r 
(hark 
(harp, cr, ly, 

[nc(s 
(harpen ' 

(hatter . 

(h^ve, f 

(hivm 

(haw 

(he 

(htfaf 

(h^ar, er 

(h^ars 

(h«th 

(htfathe 

(hed 

(hcep 

lhcepii(K b> 

(heep-(h^ring 
(heec 



S H O 

(hekel 

(helf 

(hell. 

(h^lly 

(helter, er 

(helve 

(helving 

(helvingnefs 

(helvjr 

(hep-ferd, c(s 

(herbct 

(herd 

(herifF 

(heriffaltjp 

(herry 

(hew 

(h/eld 

(hift, er 

(hilling 

Shfli* • 

(hin 

(h/nc • 

(hfrigle 

(hip - 

(hip-hireck 

(hip-hirFght 

(hire 

(hrre - - 

(hirk 

fliirt^ (hurt 

(hiver, s 

(h^r 

(hock 



S H R 

fliock 

Ihod 

fli5e 

{hoe- m^ker 

Ihog 

ihoW 

Ihook 

Ihoot, er 

ihop 

lh(?re 

fliorn 

Ihort, ly^ nefs 

fliorten 

(hot 

fhotwn . 

{hove, r 

IhoveV 

fho^ld.. 

Ihoulder 

Ihout 

fhow'cr 

[how'er;nefs 

ftiow'cry 

{hotay 

ftircd 

Ihrew 

{hrcwd,Iy,nefs, 

fliri'ek 

fhriu . ■; 

fhrihnp *. ' , 
ftirine 



S I G 

ftirlnk 

fhrivelled 

lhr(?vc-ude 

(hroud 

flirub 

(hrubbinefs 

ftirubbjr 

ihrug 

Ihrunk 

ftiudder 

rhuffle, r 

ftiun . 

(hue 

fhutter 

Ihuttle 

fliynefs . . . 

fhy 

sic-c/ty 

fick, ly, ncfs 

sicken 

sickle 

sicklinefs 

side : » 

sidmal 

s/de-ways 

siege 

fieve 

fift 

s/gh,- ^^ s/th 

sight, ly,lmcfs* 

s/cn ' 

signal, ly 



S I N 

sign^^Uze 



sign^t^re 

signet 

fignificancjF 

fignit/cant 

fignificition 

fignific^tive 

signify 

s/lencc 

s/lent, iy, nefc 

filk 

silken 

silbbub 

sill/ly 

sillinefs 

silly 

silver 

Sim^pn 

similar 

s\mi]h'ity 

simiU . 

simirit«de 

Sf mon 

sJmonical 

simony 

simper 

simple, nefs 

simpleton 

finiplifity 

simply f,, . . 

fm 

fince 

' finc/re, 



5 I T S K R 

i]nc^e,^,beft fit 

fincerrgr site 

siae snhe 

yn^-mie sitMce 

sioev,meft fitnitidKi 

sinewjr sIyis 

€f sfvi^ l)S m(s fix 

iing sixttcA 

£nge ^ 8ix^ 

singer sizable 

singer size 

single^ nefi ikain 

sin^jr (nefi (kelson 

singttlar, fy, fkellec 

fing^laritjr iketch , 

sinifter ikew 

fink ikewer 

sinlefs fkiff 

sinlefl; fkUi 

sinlefnefs fkilful, I7, nefs 

sinner (killet 

finflq^ty ' Ikim 

^nirous, nefs Ikin 

Sion fklniifoels 

fip> pet ' Ikinnjf 

sippec ikip 

fir (fur) fkippcr 

s/re Iklrmifli, cr 

Sfrcn flcirrct 

sirnaine(for) ikirc 

sirraj (fer) (kit 

sifter, Ijf, hood fkiccifhjljr^nefs 

Y 



SLE 

flcrMn 
ikrcea 
CkuU 

flab 

ilabber 

flabby 

flacky ly, nefs 

(lackm 

(lain 

fltf ke 

flam 

flander^ ef 

flanderoQs, Iy» 

flank [ncla 

flint, ing 

flap 

flaOi 

QatCj r 

flatter 

flattera 

fltfve 

flaver 

flivery 

flivifh, Ijr, nefii 

flaughter 

flay, V 

fledge 

fleek 

fleep, ititisj 

flcepy [/ly,kf$ 

fleet 

fleecy 



S L O 

fleery . 

flecvc, Jcfs . 

flrfght .. 

flendcr9ly,De& 

flice 

H/de 

Aim 

flime 

il/m/nefs 

fl/tivy 

fl/nefs 

fling 

flinlc 

flip 

flipper 

flipper/Iy 

flippennefs 

flippery 

flit 

flt've, r 

fl^e 

floop 

flop 

fl(7pe 

flopp/ncfs 

floppjy 

fl<?th 

fl(?thf uljiy^ncfe 

floucli 



S MI 

flough 

flough, fluff . 
flfffai, ly, nels : 
flubbcF'. ! 
Aug '\ • ; 
iluggard, ly^ - 
[1/nefs 
fluggifl^ Vfj 
fkice * [nefs 
flutnber 
ilutnp 
flung 
flunk 
flur 
flut 

fluttifli, ly,«cfs 
fly 

fmack 
fmJlI 
fnmilage 
fm^lnefs 
fmalt 

fmart, 1>% ncCi 
fmatfc^,. iog 
fmtfar 
fmell 
fmek 
fmerk • 
fmicket . 
fm/'le 
fmne 
f{5nith 



S N 1 

fmtthjr 

fmicten 

fmock 

fm^ke^ r 

flmSuhefs 

imcky 

ftnQQ/A,lj|f,ncfi 

fmothcr 
fmug 

fmuggic, r 

flnuc 

fmuccfly 

fmutt/nds 

fmutt^ 

fnack ! 

fnaffle 

fnag 

fnail 

fn^kc 

fnap, per 

fnappifti, \fy 

£ncfs 
fn^re 
fnarl, er 
fnatch 
fn^ak 
forking, Jy^ 

fncfs 
fneer, ingly 
fneeze 
fniggcr. . 

fiiip 



so 

ihip 
fn/pe 

fnip-ihap . 
fn/tc 
fnivel, ing 

fnort 

fnot 

fnott/nefs 

fnotty 

fnouc 

{ndiay 
fhub 

fnuff, crs 
fnvffle. 
fnug X 

fear 
fob 
{obetr 1/9 nefs 

foccage 
f(7ciablef nefs 

ft7ciaWi . 
iifcial. i 
fociety 

S^cin/an, i/Iti 
lock : 
focket *. 
Socr^t^ 
fed 



SOL 

£?dali^ 
Sodom 
lod^m/re 
C^dtfmit/cal 
fodamj 
soft, ly, ncfe 
soften 
softilh 
{oho 
foil 

iojourn, er 
fckc 
foUce 
ftlar 
f^ld 

solder, er 
foidier . 
f<;1diary 
fi^le, \y t. 
|81^ci/rrt 
f61emtt,]jr,nefs 
ftlemnn/ 
iblemn/z^cion 
f61emn7ze 
f^licic 
foI/c/Ctftion 
folfdtor . 
{olichouSy \y^ 
[nefs 
£^1ic/t^e 
folid, ly, nefs 
^lid/'ty 
Y 2 



SOP 

Ibl/fidian 
f(^lil^qujr 
_f6lft/jnly 
lol/ti2nnels 
fol/tjry • 

iolitsde - 

i6\o 

Sobmon 

Seflon 

folftice 

follHciaf 

foivable 

foi/^ble 

folvcnt 

fi^l^tion 

foWtivc 

some 

somrthrng- 

somctrmes 

somewhere 

son, (hip 

fong 

fdngfter 

f6nnet 

f^n^'rous i, 

foon 

foop 

soot, mefs> 

sootj^ 

foo/i&, er- 

footh-faycr 

fop 



13pe 



S6 V 

fept 

fo'pijf 

Sophy 

iophi/io 

fophifter 

ii^pbiftical, Ijr, 

[nefs 
£^phift/oite 
fophifticacion 
fophift rjF 
ftfphi 
ipp^riferoosy 

[orfs 
S6rbon 
lorcerer 
iorcerds 
lorccry 

sordJdt]jr,ners 
f^re, Ip^y nefs 
lorrcl 
forr^ls 
forr^oiful, Ij, 

[iief9 
{orrHy 
forrmefs 
forty 
sore 

sorcablc 
fot ^ 

fottifh, Ijr» nefs 
fouce 
soverdan 



SPA 

soverdsnQr 
sought 
&ul, lefs 
founds )7» neft 
four, ly^ nefs 
finirce 

f0»J 

fouthi 
ftutherly 
ftuthern 
ibw 

f«lD 

Aber 

fow-^elder 

firton 

ip^ce . 

fpicious, ndk 

fp^de 

Spain 

fpan 

fpangle 

Spaniard 

(paniel 

Ipanifh . 

K)anking 

mar 

ware 

Ipiringyl^jncfs 

fpark 

fparki(h> If^ 

[neis 
^arkle 



S P E 

i|)arkl/ng 
fykvrot» 
foa/matic 
fpac 
fpitioua, [y^ 

[nefs 
foatter 
fpatf/Ia 
ipavia 
ipaw 
fpawl 
Ipewa 
foay 

fp^, er 
fp^r 

fa)ecial,ly,ne(i 
fpedai/tjF 
(p/c/^s 
ip^ific 
Ip^cff/cal^ ly, 

fpecffifcitktt 
fpecif^ 
fpecimeii^ 
fpeciouSy ly^ 

[ncfi 
fpeck 
fpecklc 
fpedade, s 
fpcdator 
U)e6lre 
ifiaAatt 

fpccir- 



S A R 

sample 
Samlbn 
Sam»el 
£fnable, neis. 
sanative, nefs 
&kn&ifkdtion 
san6l/ffer 
sanft/'fy 

sandt/m^ny 
sandion 
sandl/ty 
sinStuary 
fand, /neis 
sandals 
sandj 
{anc 

fangurf/citioa 
sanguine 
sanguin4U7 
Sanf^drim 
san/Qf 
santer 
fap, lefs 
saphice 
sapling 
sappy 
saraband 
S^rai^ 
sarca/m 
&rcaib'ca], ly, 
[neik 



sarcenet' 

fafti 

sa(r<:{fra^ 

Sitan y 

Stftanfcal 

satchel 

satell/tes 

£?tell/ces< 

fited 

fdtiatc • 

iatiety (s/) 

fafiisiaftion 

fatisfadbr/ly 

(atisfa6b(7rfners 

latisfad^r;^ 

satis0 

sattin 

Saturday * 

Stfcura 

i2tire 

idtyr 

fotyrical, ly, 

[neis 
saty rFze 
satyrift 

savage, Iji, nefs 
sauce 
saucer, aljb' 

[fauce, (sfc, 
fkucily 
faucin€& 
faucjr 



SI C A 

sa«/agc- : 

favQ 

savin - : 

fiving^'Iy, nefi 
faviour 

faunter 
fdvorily^ 

fdvarincfs 

idmy 

fdvour 

faw 

fawner 

fay 

Savoy 

wvoys 

fcab,^ b/nefe 

fcabbard ^ 

fcabby 

Icibrous^ 

fcaflfold 

fcalddti 

fcJId 

fc^Ie 

fcil/nefr : 

fcallioa 

fcalp 

fcdly 

fcamble 

fcamper, er 

fcan 

fcandal 

fcandi^lFze 

fcanda- 



S dU 

rprouc 

ipTucCj lyj'nefs 
Iprung 
Ipud 
ipuc ^ 
fpume 
fpun 
founge 
Ipunging, Ijr, 
{ncfs 
fpupgmefs 
fp(m%y 
fpur 
Ijpurgc 
fp»r/ous, ly, 
fpurn [ncfe 
fourt 
fpy 
Squab 
ftjuSbble^ f 
iqu^dron 

iquallid, ffj 
fquaW [ncfs 
fquJlIey 
fqcrJnder, er 
fqutf re, ly, nefs 
fquJfh 
fquJc 

fqu^ak, er * . 
iqu^l 

[nefs* 



ST A 

lquecze,-rs 

fquib 

fquill 

fqu/nancy 

fquint 

fqu/rc 

fquirrcl 

fquirt, fquurt 

ilab 

RahUky 

fttfble 

ftablifli 

ftack 

ftadthe^lder 

ftafF 

ftag 

IttfgC 

dagger, er, 

[ingfy 
itagnanc 
ftagfljt€ 
Itagnicion 
Raid, nefs 
ftain, er 
flairs^ 

ft^ale, lyi nefs 
ftJik ' 
ftJXker 
ttJIl 
(Ullage 
^ftallioa ^ 



S T A 

Hammer, er, 

[ingly 
ftamp, er 

ftancn, ly, ncfs 

ftand 

flandard . 

ftandifh 

ilang 

ftanntfrjf 

Rknza 

ftiple 

ftar 

ftardi. 

fttfre 

ftark 

ftarr/nefs 

ftarry . 

ftart, er^ up^ 

ftartle 

ftartlilh. 

ftarve 

ftarvjrling 

fttfte, ]y 

fliceb'nefS' 

ilatics 

ftition 

Rdtionary^ 

ftitioner 

ftat«tfry 

llaci^e 

ftati^re 

fiatntableh 

ftac/irte 



ST 

Rktutt 
&avc 
flives 
ftay, er 



-scr a 

ftew'ard 
ftick 
ftickle, r 
ftickjf 



J ' . • 



ftay-m^k^er ttiff 

ftead ftiffen 

fteadily ft/f)e 

ftead/nefs ' ftigmatical* 

fteadj^ : ftigmat^e 

fte^k ftile \- 

ft^ar, er ftill. 

ftealtk ftilts 

^Mn . &imu\atc 

ftedfaftj^^nefs ftim^kkion 

ftecd fting 

fteel fting/Ty 

fteel-yard, ftai ftingmcfs 

ftecljp ft^ngy 

fteep, nefs ftink 

ftceple flinkHig) Ijs 

fteer ^ ftint [nefs 

ileecage ft/pcnd 

ftem ft/pendwfy 

ftench RipiAhte - ^ 

ft^nogr^phjr Hipuldtioa 

ftep ' ftir, ftur 

St/phen,Stmnftirrup, ftur 

fteril, nefe ftitch, cp,/ 

fterility ft/vcr • 

fterling Roccddo 

ftern,ly, nefs (lock 

ftern^ricion . ftockings 

Ihw . ft?ic 



S T Jl 
ft(»ca], Ik, nefs 

ft<?ker 

fi^le 

ftoliti 

ftomact^ -ful 

ftoiDtfcher 

ft^macl^ic 

ft^ne \ 

ft^'ny 

ftood 

ftook 

ftool . 

ftoop 

ftop^ pop 

ftoppage 

ftopple 

ft^'rage s 

ft^re 

ftork 

Rorm 

ftormj? 
Rory 

jftove • 
ftout, ly, nc4 

ftcfbiage 
llraddle 
ftraggle, r 
ftraighr 
ftraJgfetm.^ 



u 



' *.A 



ftiain, er 
ftrait, Iji, nefi 
ftraitca 
ftfakc 



Encfi 
ftraogle 

ftrap 

ftrapp^dtr 

ttrdta 

ftractfgem 

ftraw 

ftraw'-benrjf 

ftray 

ft'r^ 

Itr^im, er 
^ fltreet . 

ftrcngth 
* ftrengthcn 

£tr£ni«Ms, b9 
firefs [ncia 
ftretch 
jQtrcw, ftr(? 

ftria, Ijf, ncfr 
ftriaarc 
ftr/de 
ftrtfe- , 
ftnkc, r 
(bring, laefs 



ftrip 

ilr/pe 

£ripling, 

ftrive, IS 

fti:ivcn> 

ftr^ke 

ttrolCy r 

^ong» Ij^ nefs 

ftruck 

ftriifttfre 

ftrugglc 

firumpet 

firung .. 

ftrut 

ftub 

ftubbl<^ 

ftubby 

ftubborn, Ij^f 
ftuck [uc6 
ftud 
ftudded 

ffikJy [ncis 
ftuff 

ftum " 

(lumbte 

ilump 

(lun 

ftunt 

fii^pc 



SUB 

ftn^pendous^, Ijp, 
[ncfe 
ftiTpid, ])% ne& 
fttrpiditjR^ 

ft«p/fy 

ftuprdtiot^ 
fturd/ly/ 

]fturdme& 
fturdjr 

fturgeon 
ftuttcr, cr^ 

Stygian 

ftyptic 

ftyptfcrtjr*' 

fuifory^ 

fuiy;ty 

fubJltern> 

fubaltern 

fubalteriuita 

fub^d^con 

fub-d&n 

fubd/v^de 

fubdufbiont 

fubdw, r 

fubjedi; 

fubjeft: 

fubjedion- 

fubjoih 

fubjKg^^te 

fubjunc- 



SUB sue 

fubjun^live f^bftaoCtre 

fublapfiMan iubfbtaite 

fuUimoce iubftrti^don 

fublicn^fdoii lubtend 



SJJ L 

luck, cr 
fikkk 
fuckling 
ludion , 



fubl/mc, Ij^ ftbterfirae f^daiory 

[acfs lubierr«iitfaus ludden, I;, ne& 



fuUiitifff 

(ublunary 

fubmerge 

fobniemon 

fubmiifion 



fijttlle 
tdmVkf 
iubtilne& 
iiibtilty 

(ubtilFse 



fubmli&ve, Ijv fubcradl 

[nefs fubinifiion 
fubmit, trd fubv^fiiOB 
fuborcUMbe fubvdt,.ar 
fubordinitioh f6burbs 
fubora 
fubornittOA 
fu&p4ff nn , 
futycpdtioii^ 
fubfcr/be, r 
fubfcripdcHi 



fird^rific 
fuds 
fie 
fi?et 
fqATer^ able 

fufficc , 
Ibfikiciicjr 
iiifficicii«» \f% 
[iicfr 
fii]0foite 
fuff^ciftiofi 
ISiiflfblk 



fub&qttent 

fubferWencjp 

fubfervfeat 

fubs/dc 

fubsidifi^rjr 

fubsfdj^ 

fubsift 

fubsiftance 

fuUboce 



fubftantial^ I)r fucfak 



fuccfd^bixnis 

fuccc6d 

fuccefs 

fucc^faCul, l^f (bSrag^ 

[ncfs fijffwgc 

fuec^fikut fuffivfion 

fucceffive» fy %ar, ftui 

fticceflbr fuggeft 

fnccln&y br, fuggcftidfl 

[Qe& mclaci 

(i&ccour,cr,1e6 fiBts^k^ o^fs 

l^ccttlcnc, nefs GTicably 

fucc^b^ cnt firitor 

fuccMioa f611en»l)^«!Mfii 



fiilb 



fulphur 



&U P 

iulphur ' 
fulplurr^us 
Sulun, ef& 
i&lcnnefs 
fultrjr 

fiimm^ry 

fummer 

fummic 

fummbtl) cr 

fummons 

fumner 



S'lTP' S'tTR 



Jbper^imAence tupctviCt 
fupevcttdncntj f^pervlibr 

[ly &p/ne, ly, nels- 
fupertrogate fijpper,' lefs 
feperev^gition fiipplant, ei^ 
fnpei^xcdUeat fupple, ntis 
fi/perficial, ly^ fuppkmenty 9I 

[nefs fuppliant 
ibperfid^s fupplicant 
f«perf/ne * , fupplfOTte 
(upcrRui^ fuppl/cicion 
&perflifous, ly, fupphoittfry 
*: [ncfs fuppiy 
fumpcer-borfe &perintead fupp^rt 

fucnpttttfr^ jTifpenateiiden- fupp^aUe, 

fudJipcMous, Ijr^ [cy [nefs^ 

iun [nefs ff^peiiotindent fupp^fable 



Sundsffr 

funder 

fundry ' ' 

fung 

funk 

fmny 

fup 

fi^perable ^ 

f^pcr^bodnd 

fi/peradd 

fopei^nninite 

f«perb 

f«percarg^ 

fepercfl/oitf. 



fuperiority fupp/fe 
firpmor - ' fupp^aicion 
&per1tfiive^]y» fupposrdtious 

[nefs fuppdsic^ry 
firpernatiflraljly fupprefs 
&perntfmertf ry foppr^on 
firperfcrfbe fuppr6flbr 
&perfcription ftpputate 
ilirperfifcje fupp^racioa 

&perfticion fupputduon 
(upcT&inauti f^pr^Iapfi^nai^ 

[ly, nets {uprtmacy 
iipcrftrudkwe . ftpr/nse, ly, 
f«pcrv«ic. »- {[nefs . 

[Ij, neis &perventiom!:dbrQ^arge . 

furcingle 



« U R 

furcingle 
furd 
furd/ty; 
£urc {(hurt) 1)^^ 
{neis 
furety (ftwrr) ' 

furfacc 

furfeic 

furge 

furgeon 

jui^ry 

furlmefs • 

furjy 

fiirm/fe 

furmount 

furpafs 

furpafllngy ly, 

[nefs 
iurplice 
furpkiJ 
furplii/age 
furprifc 
furpr/fing, 1^^ 

[ncfs 
furrender 
furrendfy 
furrepticious, 
[ly, nefs 
furr^girte 
fsrround 
Surrey . 



S WA 

fur-t««t 
furvS? . 
furWior 
funrf vc 
furvf vorihip " 

fufceptible, 
{ne& 

fufc/tidon 

fuft}e£i: 

fulpcnd . 

fulpenfe » 

fufpenfion 

fufpicion 

fuipicious, ly, 
[nefs 

Suffcx 

fuftalh»er,able 

fuft^nance 

futtler • 

future 

fwJb 

fw^bbcr 

fwaddle 

fwag 

fwagf cr, er 

fwain 

fwtfle 

fwJlbtn 

fw5mp 

fwJn 

fwang « . 



S W I 

fwanking 
fwon-flua 

fw Jrm ' 
fwJrth/1^. 

fwJrthinds 
[warily 

fwtftho 
fway 
fwetfr, cr 
fwcat 
fweaty 
fwccp 

fwcet, ly, ncfs 
fwceten, cr 
fwectilh i 
fwcU 
fwelter 
fweltry 
fwept < 
fwirve 
fwift, R nclfi 
fwill 
fwiniy mer, 

[mingJy 
fwinc 
fwing 
fwinge 
fwingle 
fwiniih,ly,nels 
fwitch 
fwivd 

fw^la 



srvi 

fwchi 

fterd [foaad 
fwtfre < 

fwiioi 
Iwung 

fy^pphanc 
ffder. 
jyllaUcal,]y 
Pable 

fylpiis 
fylvan i 
nrmbol 
hrtnbSlicjd, ly 

lymmrtry 
lymptfth6cic 
fy»p4^ctiica], 
[iy, neft 
^mpothZize 

ymph^njr 
fymptotn 
fymptPiMtfloal 
fyntfgogur 

i^ndic 



TAG 

iynod 

lynodicdy fy 
fynon^mDin, 

fyii6pfii 

fynta< 




mgc 
mup 
nrftcm 
ty&emiuaifiif 



Tabby 



tibic 

tablet 

tiblaturt 

tibor 

tibret* 

tabular 

ttfci^gr^pfajr 

tacit, ly, nei$ 

tac/turn/9 

tack, er 

tackle 

tackling 

ta^ttcal 

taStics 



TAN 

tadpole 
taffirry 

tag-rag: 

toil 

tailor 

taint 

ttfke, r] 

t4ken 

ttfle 

talent 

tali/man 

tall/manacal 

t Jik, er 

talktftiye, ]y, 

tJll £iieia 

talbiB 

talbwKh 

tally 

TaloBud 

talon 

tamarinds 

tamarilk 

tambo&r 

t<«ne, ly, neft 

timable, nefs 

tammjir 

tamper 

tan 
taog 

tangent 
tangible^ neft 
tankard 

tanner 



T A V 

tanner 
tanjgF 

tantKfl£zc 

tanDfinoant 

tant/vy 

tap 

tope 

taper 

tapeftiy - 

tapftcr 

tar 

xarkntula 

tarcfeljr 

tardinefe 

tardy * 

tare 

targ^et 

tariflF 

tarnifh . 

tarpaulin 

tarrjr 

tart, I7, hefs 

Tartar 

tartarFze 

talk ' 

taflel 

ttfftc, r, Icfs, • 

tatter [lefnefs 

tat-terdmial- 

tattle [Hon 

tattoo ^ 

tavern 



T E M 

taught 
taunt, iftgly * 

taut^Iogrcal 

tautology 

taw 

taw'drjr 

tzv/ny 

tax, able, er 

taxation 

taylor 

t^ach, cr 

teachable, ncfs 

tAichably 

t^ 

t^ain 

tflir 

tear 

t^ac 

t^ze 

tcc^A/cal 

tech/nefs 

techy 

t«iious,I)*,nefs 

teem 

teeth ' 

teething 

teg«mcttt 

t?inc 

tel^fc^pc 

tell, er 

temerity • 

Z 



TEN 

temper 
temperament 
temperance * 
temperate, ly, 
[nefs 
temperature 
tempeft' 
tempefti^bus,' 

* [nefs 
temple 
templer 
tempM-al 
temp^ral/ty 
temporary 
temp^rFze, r 
tempt, er 
temptation 
tempting, ly, 
ten [nelV 

t/nable, ncfs 
tenacious, ly, 

[ncfi 
tenkchy 

tfnailc 

tenant, able 

ten6/l\]us 

tench 

tend 

tendencjr 

tender, Jy^nefi 

tendon 

tendril 

t^n^« 



T E R 


T H A 


J H E 


t^nArq^ty 


tirritory 


thankfglving 


ten^meac . 


terror 


that 


t/net 


tertian 


thatch^ er 


tennis-ball 


tefl: 


thaw 


tennis-c^rt 


tefticeous 


$be 


tenon 


t/fter . 


th^tre ' 


tenor 


iefttfmenc 


'th^tr/cal^ If 


tcnfe 


teft^ment^ry 


ibtc 


tenfion 


teMor 


theft 


tent 


tefticles • 

. m 


/*ar . 


tenters 


teft/fioicio^ 


tbcm 


tentl>» ly 


teft/fji , 


th^me 


tenuity 


teft/mefn/al 


/i&emfelvcs 


tenure 


' teft/npfs 


Sbcn . 


tepid 


teftoon • 


whence 


tepidity 


tefty 


theoloffon • 


t^r^br^tion 


tether 


th^^l^gicjd 


terg/veri^tion 


tejiragon 


th^^logue 


term 


t^trag<;nal 


thfobgy 


termagant 


t/trarct 


th^rom 


terminable 


t^crardwtc 


; th^^retic . 


termmflte 


ticrar(^ 


: theory 


termm4tion 


tetter 


t ibirt 


terriqufoas 


I'eutonic < 


Sbertabodt 

• • 


terrafs 


text 


/ifreafter 


terr/nc 


tixtuary 


ibenfore , 


t«rreftr/al • 


texture r • 


Jbeftiti 


terrible, nefs 


T^amt^ tenis 


/imwuh 


terribly 


than 


thcrniom^tcr 


terrier 


thane 


/*^fe 


ierriRc 


thank [nefs theCis 


terr/fy 


thankfvl, fy^ 


'/^?B 



thick) 



T^H O 


T H R 


TID 


thick, \yj n6fs ihou ' 


throng,ly, neli 


thicken 


/£r^ugh 


throftle 


thicket 


thought 


throttle ' 


thickifh 


thoughtful, ly, 


, thrive 


thief 


f4icfs 


thi-oagh 


thifve' 


thotrghtlefs 


xhrotn 


thjppvery 


t hough tlefliefs 


\ ithr^liin 


thievilh,ly,ne(s thoughtlcfly 


thr^w'fter 


th/gh • 


thouiand, th 


thrum / 


thimble • 


thowies 


thrufh 


thin, 1^, ne(s 


thraldom 


thruft 


thine 


thrJll 


thumB 


thing 


thread 


thump, er 


think, «p 


threaten,' Cf 


thunder, ingly 


third 


threats 


Thur/day 


thirft 


threddkf 


ih\}s 


thirltmels ' 


three 


thwack 


thii-ftjy 


threfli 

• 


'^hwJrt, iftglf 


thirteen * 


threlher •• ' 


/Ay ' 


thii^iethc 


ihrelhrfd ' 


\iymt' 


thirt^r, tf^ 


thr/ce 


tiara 


thurd. 


thrift 


tick 


thurfl:,£s?^» 


thriftily. 


ticket 


ihis 


thrift/nefs" 


tJcking^ 


thifele • 


thrifty -» 


tfckle, r 


/iithcr 


^ thrill 


tfcklifh, neft 


T>6mai 


thrive 


tick-tack. 


thong 


thriven 


tide 


thorn 


thrivingly 


tkUly 


th5rnjy 


threat 


t/dineft 


thorough, ly 


throb 


tfdings 


tMc 


thr£?ne 


tidy 




Z 2 


tktrce 



* 



T I N 

tierce 

xiffany 

tiff 

tiger ' 

t/ght, ly, nds 

t/ghten 

tfgrcfs 

t/kc 

t/le 

till 

tillage 

tilt 

timber 

timbrel 

trme 

tfmely 

timid, ly, ncfs 

t/mkJ/ty 

timorous, ly, 

[nefs 
Timothy 
tin 

tindlnrre 
tinder 
t/nes 
tinge 
tingle 
tinker 
tinkle 
tinkling 
tlnfcl 
tiiic 



T :o I 

tin^ 

tip 

tippet 

tipple, r 

tip-ftaff 

tip^r 

tip* tee 

tire 

tirefpine, Ijr, 

[oefs 
tifl«e, tifti 
tit 
tithe 
t/cheable 
tnle 

titcillition 
tittle 
titter 

tittle-tattle 
titular 
xo 

tfiad 
t^ft 
t^bacctf 
t^bacc^niil 

tod 

t5-day . 

x^t 

toft 

t^ether 

toil 



TO P 

toilet 

toilfome, nefs 

toiie 

t^^ken 

xo\\ 

tolerable, ii^fi 

tolerably 

tolerate 

toleration 

t^ll 

t^llbooch 

X07[\h 

t^me 

t^*m6rr6i9 
ton 
t^ne ' 
tongs 
tongue 
tonnage 
ton&re, flunt 
too 
tool 

tooth, Iei9 
to6th-tfcft 
toothfome 
top 
t^paz 
t^pe, r 
T^fphet 
topic 
topical 
ttfp^raph/cal 
t^po- 



TO W 

topography 
topping 
«t6pl^-turvy 
torch 
t^rc 

torment 
torment, er 
torn 

torpid, nefs 
tofrent 
torrrfaftion 
torrid 
torr^iy 
tort : . 
tortoife 
torture 
Tory 
tofs 

total, ly 
totter 

tottering, ]y; 
touch [nefs 
touchft^ne 
teuchwood 
t^Lich}^. 
tough, tufF 
to«r' 

tournament 
touzle 
t^to 

totosige 
tSwJrds 



ttlA^ 



f R M 



tov/ardyUntfsj trammel 
tow el £ly trample 

trance 



tower 
town 
touze 
toy 
toyifli 
tr^ce, r 
track 
traft ; 



tranquil 
tranquill/ty 
traiuaft 
tranjaftion 
tranfcend 
tranfcendenc^ 
iranftendent 
traftable, nefs traufcr/be, r 
traftably tranfcript 

tradlate transfer 

tr^de transfer 

trade/man transferable 
tr/fdition^ .^1, transf/g^r^cioa- 

[ally transfigure " 
tr^dition^rj^ transform, er 
tradUce ' . transfer raitioft ^ 
tr^duftion . transf^fe 
traffic ' transf/^fion 

tragjcanth,^. tranferefs, or 
[dragon tralilgrcflion 
tragicome^ tratiiient, ly, 

[nefs 
tranjit 

tranjirion ' . 
tran/tive, ly, 
[nefs 
tran/?t<jrfnefs 



1 



rragtfdjy 
tragf cai > 
trail 
train, er 



traitor 

traitofous, ly,. tran}?n?ry 
[neli franlMtc. 
Z 3 tranf- 



jT R A X R xi* 

tranflinon traveded 
tranflitor travcftjr 

tranftntfr/nc tray 
tranfm/gr^cion treacherous,!^, 
tranfmiuion [oefs 

tranfmit, ted treachery 
tranfrndgr^phy tr^le 
tranfmi/tation tread, er 
tranfinifce tr&son^ able 
trainfom troi&re, r 

tranfp^rencjf , treifiwji 
tranlpirent, . tr^it, meat 

[nefs tr/atife 
tranfp/re trhty 

traniplant treble . 
tranfp^rt trebly 

tfanrp0>t,abTe, treddle 

[er .tree 
tranfp^rtition trefoil 
tranfp^Te, r tremble . 
tranfp^sicion trembling, .Ij 
iranfubftanti- tremendous,, 

[tfte [Jy^ nefe 

tranrubltantitf- tvempur 

[tion trencft,,CF 
tfanfverfc trental 



trap 

trapes 

trai& 

travel 

traveller 

traverfe 



trepan 
trepanner 
trepid . 
trepid/ty 
trelpafs,. jcr 
treuea 



T R 1 

treflcl. 

tret 

trfj 

tr/al 

trfangle 

trJangirlar^ ly^ 

tribe [nefs 

tribf^Iatioa 

tribunal 

tr/btfne, fliipu 

tribute 

tr/cc 

trick 

trickifh,Ix,nc&< 

trickle 

tr/dent 

tr7(Snn/ar 

tr/fle, r 

tr/flingly- 

trig, 

trigger 

trigliph.. 

trigonal" 

tr/g^nohvtiy 
trilateral 

trim, ly, nefe- 

trimmer 

tr/ne 

Trin/tir/an^ 

Trinity 

trinket 

tr/hd- 



T R 

tr/nomiQsil 

trip 

tr/|>art/te 

tripe 

tripithong. 

triple 

tr/plic/tjr 

tri/yllable 

trite 

tr/thfl/m. 

trivet 



TUB' 

trough, troff 

trover 

trounce 

trout 

trow 

trow'el 

troy-waght: 

tr^nt 

jn^ce. 

truck 

truckle 



triv/al, Iy^ne& trifc^lent: 
triumph, er. trudge 
trFumphaL trfe 
trFumphant, l^^^jtrul! 
[ncfe truly 
tr/utnviMte. trump 



trod 

troddcit 
tr^U 
trollop' 
tr^ne 
troop, er. 
tr^pe , 
tr^'phj 
tropic 



trumpet)! 

trumpet, er 

truncheon 

trundle 

trunk 

trunnions 

trufs 

truft, rljf,^incf&» 

truftcQ 



trop/cal, nefs trufty 



trot 
troth 
trouble, r 



tr«fch 

try 

tub 



troublfrome,ljrj tube 

[flsib ti^berous, neis 



T U » 

tuck, er 

Tut/dzy 
tuft 
tufty . 
tu^ 

t^itiotk 
t»lip 

tumble, r- 
tumbrel 

tirmrfadUoiH 
tumefy , 
t»mid 
tumour 
ti^mult . 
tumultuary 
t^multi^ousyljf^, 
tun (^oefs. 
osrne, r 

ti;nfable,.Ders: 
t»n/cle 

tunnage 

tunnel 

tup 

turban 

turbulence 

turb/^lent, neis 

turbut 

turf 

turgid . 

turky 

furky-poiit 
turmeric / 
turmoil 



T W I 


tkh 


VAK 


tormoir 


twitch 


valence - 


turn 


twitter 


valerian 


turnip 


ttW 


v^et * \ 


turnpike '^ 


tj;e 


VBlaudindrizw 


turpcntFnc 


tympany 


vsAetikiinary 


turpitude 


t;^pe 
typ/cal,If,ners 


valiant, ly, nc6v 


turret 


valid, ]y^ nefe- 


turtle • 


tj^p^graphtcal 


validity 


tufh 


typography 


valley 


tulk 


t^rann/cal, ly. 


valorous. If, 


t«t^lage • ' 


■. . A"^ 


/ , [«fr 


n^t^lar 


tyrann?ie 


valour 


tfttor 


t^rann^. 


valuable, ne&. 


t^t^rage 


tyrant 


vaWcion 


tit^rcS 


tyr^ 


vake, r 


twain 


r 


valves i . 


twang* 


' ? ^tvm-* * 


vamp i 


tweezers^ 


u 


van 


twelfth ■' 




v^ne ' 


twelve 


vacancy 


vanguard \ 


twentieth 


vicant- 


vanilh 


twenty 


victfte 


viinity 


twVce. 


yacaiioti'' 


yanquifli, er- 


twig 


vacuity 


vapid 


twilight 


vac«uhi'^ 


Wp^rous 


twin 


vagi^bond . 


vaprition * 


twine 


yigrant . 


vipour 


twinge 


vail 


vip^ry- 


twinkle 


vain, ly, ncfs 


Viir/ablc, nefs^ 1 


twirl 


y^le 


i^iriably i 


twift,^cr 


vaUdiflion 


Wr/ance '\ 1 


twit 


vaMfftory." ' 


'VariSfihn 


•« ..„ . ■* 


, 


ydriC' 

- \ 



V E H 

ydriegatcd 

'variegation 
variety 

viirious,lj?,ne(s 

varlet 

varnifli > 

ydry 

vtf fe ' 

vaflal 

vafTalage ' 

vaft, \yy ncfs 

vac 

Vatican 

vac/aWcion 

vault 

vaultcr 

vaunt, er, 

^, : [ingb 
ftberous. 

urb/quitinan 

«biqu/ty 

udder 

yeA 

veer 

vegetable . , 

veg^c^ce 

veg^tition 

vegetative 
v<gac 
v^emency. 
v^ment 
v^ck - 



VE N 



vein 

veitxy * 

vellum 

ve\6city 

velvet 

v/nal 

venality 

vend 



VE R 

venturous, ly, 
[nefs 
veracity 
verb 

verbal, ly 
verbflcim 
verbenjte 
verberition 



vendible, nefs verbt^i nefs 
venerable,nefs vtvhofity 
venerably verdent, ncfi 



vencr<7te 

vencririon 

venereal 

venereous 

vencry 

vengeance 

venial 

veniibn 

venom 



verdigrea/e 

verdure 

verd«rcr 

verdict 

verge 

verger 

verifjf ' 

verily < 

verity 



^ • • 



ven^mouis, ly, verisimilar 

[nefs ver^militi^de 
vent 
ventilate 
ventilition 
ventiUtor 
ventq^ry 
ventricle . 
ventpil^quifl: 
venture 
yenti/refome,. 



verjuice ■ 

vermicidar 

vermillioa 

vermine 

vernacular 

verjial 

verfe 

vcrficle 

versificirioa 



^neis. ycrsificr 



versify 



t IN" 



* ^* •. 



VI e 

vit^Sy Ticin/ty vinegar 

vert v/cifsit«dc v/nous 

vixuhxa viftim vintage 

vertex viftor vintner 
vert/cal^lyi^efs vift^r/bus, ly, v/bl 

verticitjf " " ^ * 

sv^oxy 

victuals 



T I S 



vcrt/g^ 

very 

vq^Ci^t^ry 

veflel 

vcft 

veftmcnt 

veftry. 

vefti/re . 

vetch^ 

veteran 

vex 

vexition 

vexiciou$ 

%l/0efs 

ugly 

v/al: 

v/ands 

. v^br^oe 

vrbritioft 

vicar 

viqjrage 

vFc^r/ous^ 

v/ce 

v/ce-roy 

vicious^^^nefs v/nc 

vicinage • vipeyard 



[ncfs v/(/kte 
v/<?lidon 
v/^lence ^ 
vMcnt, ly, n^ft 
v&let 
v/^lm 
v/per 
vipertne 



v/rigtf 



« < 



victuafler 
vid^*ty 
view, er 
vigil 
vig/lancc 
vigilant, ly, 

[ncfc virgin ^ 

vigorous, \% virg/nals 
[ncis virgfnitjfc 
vigour . virid, n^(s^ 

v/le, ly, nefi vmd/tjjf 
.vil/fj^ v/r/le 

vi}U^e,.r v/rilKy . 
' villain ' virti^al, ly - 

vilbnous, \% virtue 

' £nefi virt«<^ 
villainy . . virtuous, lyi^ 
villainage {^nels 

Tincible VKwlence 

vind/ctfte vir«lency - 

vindication viririent,ly,ncfs; 
vindi<5tive,ncfs vifard 

: vifage - 
^ v^Sfcount 

VlfCOUHr 



tr L c 

^Tifqolis, nefs 

,vififale,.neft 
vlfibljf 
vlfioh 
yiGonary 
vifiiinift 
vi6c 



-» • 



UNA UNB 

ylccroM unapp«rfable, 

\tl(;/r/or w frtcfs 

' iA^mat€ '• » ' unag>r«ich. * 
ukwiiwfihe' Sblc,neft 
umbil/cal unapr,^/ne6 

unargued 
• unarmed 



visitirion 
vis/tor 

viOral 

v/cal, ly, nefs 

vitwte . - 
vicious, Jy, i 
[nels 
vitr^oas 
vitrify ' 
vitriol 
vitr/oUic 
v?c«pertfte 
vTvadty 
vivid, nefe 
vivifio^cion 
viv/ff 

v7vJpai-ous 

vixen 
vizard 
ulcer ^ 
ulcer/nc. 
ulcer^rion 



umbles. 

umbrage 
iimbretfci 

umprrage 

iimpFre 

uniblev 



' un arrayed 
unafe'ifted' 



unaflti^ged' ' 
' unattempted* 
unacceptable unattainable, 
unaccount- fnefi 

[able, nefs un^^vailable, 
unaccuftomed [nefs 

unacquainted unavoidable, 
unaftivc # j^nefs 

unadvifed, lj)r, un^zvofdably ' 

[nefs un«w<?rrs 
UnafFefted unbar 
unaided unbecoming, • 

unil/Vnable \\y^ nefs 

unaltow'ablc ' unb^gotten 
unJltcrable, unbegun 

[nefi unbrfaf 
un^lterablj^ Unbeliever 
uv^vAmhy unbend 
«nan/mous,ly, unbent 

[pels unbfddefi 
unanfwirable, unb/od 

[nefs unblamable, - 
unanfwerably [nefs 

uabU- 



U N C 

unbUnd 

uoblo^djr 

unboiled 

uob^t 

uobooced 

unborn 

unbofom 

unbound, ed 

unbow'el 

unbrice 

unbridled 

unbr(?kcn 

unbuckle 

unburden 

unb«iifed,ber 

unbutton ^ 

uncalled 

unc4/e 

uncaught 

uncercainj \y% 
[ncfs 

uncert«ntjf 

uncWn 

unchangeable! 
[nefs 

unchai^eably 

uncharuable 
unchifte, 1/, . 
[nefs 
Unchew'cd 
uncircumc/fed 



U N C 

unciiicumciB- 
[on 
unciFQum^ft 
unc{vil,|y,Q6& 
unc|ad 
unclafp . 
tinole 

unclm,ly,neis 
uncleinj^d 
uncleft 
uncl^fe 
unclothe 
uncollefted . 
unc^^mted 
uocomfort- 

[able, nefs 
uncomf^rtabl)^ 
unc5me]inefs 
uncotntly 
uncommon Jjf 
uncompound- 
[cd 
unconcerned, 
[nefs 
uncondemn- 

[ablc 
uncondemned. 
unconform- 

[able 
unconquer- 

[able,nefs 
unc6n(^ucred 
6 



U N D 

unconicion- 

(_^Ie^nefs 
uncpnftant 
UQCoujitrained, 

lb 

unconf^med . 
uncorded 
uncorrefted 
uncorrupted 
uncover 
uncouple 
uncourt^ous^ 
[ly, nefs 
uncouth 
uncreated 
undlion 
un6bi^ous 
uncultivated 
uncuftomarjr 
uncuftomed 
uncut 

undaunted, \y^ 
[ncfs 
und^/ded 
und^cl/nable 
und^/led 
und^frayed 
finder 
underbid 
underfoot 
under^frd 
undergo 

under- 



U N D 

.undergone 

Underhand 

underling 

undermine 

yndernioft 

undem^ifr 

underpin 

underprop 

underleli • 

underftand 

underftood 

undertake, r 

undertaken 

undervalue 



U N H 

unfixed 
unf^'ld 
unfifrced 
unformed 
unforefeen - 



ly N F 

und»e 
Xxndulatcd - 
vt\du\dt\on 
unduly 
undutifvlj l^, 

unAsily [nefs unfor tiffed 
un/as/nefs unforrcrn^te, 
un/afy £ljy, nefi 

unemployed unfr/quent 
unendow'ed unfrequented 
un/qual,ljF,nefs unfriendl/neli 
unerring ' unfriendly 
un/ven, Ijr, nefe unfrttitful, ly, 
unexectfced [neis 

undervaknient uncxpe6i:ed,ly, unfurnifhed 
underwood [ncls ungain,ly,ne& 

under-lDritun unexp/r/enced ungarn/ihed 
und^^rved; ly' unextingu/lh^ ungath'ered 
undetermined [able,nefs ungenteel, lyj 

undled unfair, ly, nefs unwind [neis 

undifeiplm'd unfai/Aful, ly, un^irc ' 
undifcharged [nefs ungl^e 

undiflingui(h- unfafhionable, ungodk'nefs 

[ed [nefs ungodly 

undidinguifh* unfadiionably ungovernable,' 
[able unfaften [nefs 

undivided unf^Rgned, ly, ungovernably 
undJ [nefs ungricious,Iy, 

undone . unfenfcd [neis 

undoubted, ly^ unfettered ungriteful, ly, 
undrcfs fnefs unfin/ftied unguent [nefs 
undrefs, ed unfit, ly, nefs unhab/table 

A a unhann- 



UNI 

unhantfome, 
[}y^ ncfs 
unhand/ly 
-unhandmefs 
unhandjf 
unhappiljr 
unhapp/nefs 
unhappy 
unharbour 
unharncfled 
unhafp [nefs 
unheal/Mul, 
unheal/i'/neis 
unheal/z&y 
unheard 
unheeded 
unhinge 
unh^Jjr 
unhook 
unhorfe 
unhurt 
ntiicovn 
ftnfform9l;y,nefs 
Utiiformhy 
unimaginable 
uninhabited 
unintelligible^ 
[nefs 
unintelligibly 
uninterrupted 
uninvited 
£n\on 
uni/oti 



U N L 



ftnit 



# • 



i^niunan 
unitt 

unity [nefs' 
tfniverfal, Ijr, 
irn/Versality 
uoiverk 
umvcr$iiy 
irniv^cal, \y 
unjuft, 1^, nefs 
unktoard 
unkennel 
unk/nd,l7,nefs 
un&nit 
unln^loingljf 
un&n^tpn 
unlice 
unlide 
unlamented 
unlawful, Ijr, 
[ne& 
unleirned, Ijr^ 
unleavened 
unlefs 
unl/cenfed 
unl/ke,lyjiefe 
unl/kelineis 
unlimited 
unl^d 
unlock 
unlooked-for 
unloofe 
unlovdjr 



U N P 

unluckilj^ 

unl^ckinefs 

unlucky 

unmike []y 

unman, linefs, 

unmannerly 

untnanurcd 

unmarked 

unmarried 

unmarry 

unmafk 

unmaftered 

unmea&rable, 

(nefs 
unmeaWablj 
unmeet 
un melted [^ne& 
unmerciful,];^, 
unm/ndful, 

[ncfi 
unmingled 
unm^lefted 
unmoor 
unmoved 
un muffle [nefs 
unnatural, ly, 
Unneceflary 
unincumbered 
unoccupied 
unpaid 
unparalleled 
unpardonable 
unpar- 



UNCL UNS UNS 

unpirdonabljf unqueftioned unfay 

unpAiccable^ unqiucc,1y,ncfs unliable 

[nefs unravel, led unsJlted 

unp^cabljr unread/ly unsandified 

unp^ple unread/nefs . unfacisfad^ijr 

unperc^vable unreadjr unfiv^rinefs 

unpercrftvabljp unr/afonablc, unUvory 

unplealant, ]y^ [nefs unfcrew^ 

(ncfs unr/aibnabljf unfcripttfral 

uapleadng unrehuknbk unf^ed 

unplowed vnr^laimable unsearchable . 

dnp61/(hed unr^compen- unf/alonable, 

unpolled unr/ave £fed fncfs 

unpollttced unr^ormed vtifetSonsibly 

unprec^nted unr^rded unfeemlineia 

unpmaeditif- unr^Knting unfeem^ 

. [ted unreairdiabl^^ unfeen 

unprejudiced unretnovtd unfervicrable 

unprepared unr^aired unfettled 

unpr^/table, unr^r?veable unfew^ io 

[nefs unr^erved unfbackle 

unprofftably unrefolved unihid^d 

unprofperous unreftraiacd unfliiken 

unproved unrewarded unlhaven 

unprovided unrig unfh^thc 

unprov^enc unr/ghteaus,l7 unfhod 

unpriined unr/ghtcouf- unfhora 

unpun/(hed [nefs unftxlic [nefs 

unquenchable umiiUntti un{kilful> ly,^ 

unquenched unr^iy unikilled 

unqu6(lionable unsaddle unfaciabl^^nefs 

unqueftionabiy unfife, Ij^, nefs unfociabl^ 

A a 2 uflfod- 



UN T 


U N T 


unfoddea 


u manned 


unlbiled 


un tided 


unsolder, fan 


untaught 


unfound, }y^ 


untftich 


[nels 


unt/achabkr. 


unfpakable. 


[pcfs 


fnefs un/i&ankful,Iy, 


unfp/akably 


[neft 


unfpotted 


^in/i'inking,!^ 


VLnAdble 


untkought 


unftayed, nefi 


wnibriftily 


unftained 


un/^n'ftinefs 


unftead/ly 


vnthrifty 


xinftoad/nefs 


untjf 


vnft^acjy 


Aint/le 


vinftitch' 


Aintil 


unftop 


^inrfHfd 


unftnng 


unt/nadjf 


unftrung 


fint5 


unfubdf^ed 


unt? 


unfuccefsful 


ijimold 


vinfufFerablc^ 


Untouched 


[neifs 


Unt^w5fd, ly^ 


nnfuffcrably 


[nefs 


unfi^itable,nefs un tradable. 


unffticabJy 


[nefs 


unfuU/ed 


untraftably 


vnfuTt^ (hurt 


untrfed 


unfw^chc 


untrioimcd 


untack 


untn^c 


untainted 


untr% 


untiken [nefs 


6ntr«th 


unt^mablca 


untrufs- 



U N W 

untruftinefs 

untrufty 

untuck 

unti^abie 

untwift 

unvafl 

unverfed 

un^f«al5l)',nef$ 

uAutterabie, 

[nefs 
Ainutterably 
\1nwJril7 
43nwir;ncfs 

tin wiry 
-unwarranted 

4in#3(hen 
\3iiwJtcrcd 
4jnw/aned 
unwAr/cd,1;'» 

[nc6 ' 
unwelcome, 

[nefs 
unl»h^1efome, 

[nefs 
unw/eld/ncfs - 

unw/eldjr 

unwilling, !y» 

unwf nd [nefs 

unw?(e, ly 

unwitting, |7> 
[nefs 

unworth/ly ^ 

unwor- 



r o T 

unwofth/ncfs 

unworthy 

untoriccm 

unjrtTke 

ycczhuUry 

v^cal, ly, nefs 

vocation 

vocative ' 

vocifcrdzion- 

vociferous 

voguz 

voice 

void, able, er 

vokcile, nefs 

voktil/ty 

volcina 

vd^licion 

volley 

voluble, nefs 

volume [nefs 

vdiim/nous,ly, 

voluntarily 

volunt^f'neft 

voluntary 

volunteer '^ 

ve?lupt«ous,ly, 

vc>l^te [nefs 

vomit 

voracious, ]y^ 

vortex * [nefs 

vJtary 

wte 



votive 

vouch, er 

vouchfife 

vow 

vow'el 

voyage 

up 

upbraid 

uphold 

upholder 

up-holfter 

up-hoifterer 

up-land 

upon 

upper. 

uppermoic 

uppi(h,ly,ncfs 

upr/ght 

upr/ghtly 

upr/ghtnefs 

upr/fing, 

uproar. ' 

upfhot. * 

upside • 

lipftart 

upward 

urban/ty- 

urchin 

^rrters 



urge 



urgericy 
urgent,ly,nef8 
A a 3, 



V U L 

Urhh 

U'rkl 

U'nm 

urinil 

urinary 

urine 

urinous- 

urn 

vs 

wfage 

^fance* 

ufe 

uk 

uftfy}]j ly, nefr- 

ufher 

ufqutfbSugh 

iifeal, ly, nefi . 

wfurp, er 

uhrp\zi\on* 

ufurtv 

ufury , 

tttenfilS' 

^terFne 

uiility 

utmj?(l 

fitter, ly- 

tittcrable, ne& 

utterance 

(ittermoft 

vulgar, ly^n^fc 

vulgtfte 

vuliuerabre 

V4il^ 



W A L 


WAR 


yulneraty 


WflUs 


vultare 


w5ik^ cr 


U}fu\a 


wJII . 


ux^n'ous, ly. 


wJUet 


vjre [nelk 


w51l-ey*d 




wJllop 


W. 


wJIbbi 


wJl lowing 


Wobble 


wJll-nut 


wJd 


WJlter 


wflddlc 


wJn, Ijf, ncfe 


w^de 


w2nd 


v/dfer 


winder, cr 


yfaft 


w^nc 


wag 


w^nt 


w^ge, r 


wJmoiijlyjnefs 


w^g^s 


wipen-uke 


wagjfcrjf 


wJr 


wagffiJh, Iy» 


wJrble 


waggle [nefi 


w5rd, cr 


waggon^ er 


warden 


waif 


w5rdfn^te 


wail 


wJrdrc^be 


wain 


w^re 


wainfcot, wen 


Vfarfavc 


waift 


wir/lv' 


waiftcoat^wef wir/nefe 


wait, er 


wJrlFkc, nefi 


wtfke 


wJrm, I7, ncfc 


wJkm 


w5rmth 


wikeful, Jyv 


w5rn^ er 


Wdle [ne{s 


w5rp 



WAY 

w^rraot, able 

wJrcancablc- 

w Jrrantj [nefc 

w5rren, cr 

wJrr/or 

wJrt 

w^irjr . 

wJs 

w51b, er 

wJfip 
wJfpiAJjfincfs 

w^flcl 

wtffte 
wifteful,!;,Defs 

wtftch, er 

watchful, fyy 

[nefs 

w5ter, gage 

w Jter-gang 

w Jtcrim, ncH 

wJterj? 

wJctle 

w^ve 

wiver,. ing'/ 

w^vj^ 

wax 

waxea 

way 
way-forirrg 

wa/-lay I^^^^ 
way-w^fcl, 1> 



W E I 

we 

w^ak, Ijr, ntfs 

w/akcn 

Wakling 

w^l 

wealth 

wealthmefs 

wealthy 

w«in, ing 

w/apon, lefs 

we^r 

w/ar/nefs 

w^r/Tome,nei& 

w/arjr 

WAafand 

w^fel 

weather 

Hvavc 

w«ivcr 

web 

Webftcr 

wed 

wedding 

wedge 

wedlock 

Wennefday 

wced^ cir 

weedjr 

week, \y» 

wecp^. cr 

weefel 

weevil 

wBsh 



W H E . W H I 



waghtjrly,/nefs 

wSghty 

Weiri^ 

welcome, nels 

weld 

welfare 

welkin 

well 

wek 

wen 

wench, er 

went 

wept 

wtfire 

weft 

wefterl/nefi 

weftcrly 

weftern 

weftwJrd ^ 

9 

wet, Kicfs 

wFh 

whtfle 

w|^5rf 

wjj^rfage 

wf^rfiiiger 

wh5t 

wheal' 

wheat 

wh/aten 

wheedle,, t 

wheel, er 

wheeze 

wheloi 



whelp, i(h 

when 

whence 

where 

whereas 

whereby 

wheref(?re 
wherein 
whereof 
wherefoevcr 
wheretS 
whereupon 
wherewuh. 
wherret 
wherry 
whet 
whetfttfnc 
whether 
whe? 
whe?i(h 
which 
whiff 
whiffler 
whig 

whfg/ilh, ne& 
whigi^i/m 
wh/le 
wh/lft 
whim 
whimper 
whim^cal,. lyv 
whim^ [nefi 
wh/ne 



WHO 

• 

mhme 

whvnnjr 

whip 

whipper 

whfplaw 

whirl, whurl 

whir%ig, 

[whurl 
whifk 
whifker 
whiJper, er 
whift, whifk 
whiftle, r 
whit 
wh/te 
wh/tea 
whftenefs 
whither 
whitherfi^ever 
whiting 
wh/[i(h 
whitl^ta. 
whitfter 
Whitfunday 
Whitfunt/de" 
whittle 
whiz 
toh^ 
toh<?le ,. 
Ifth^lejorne, Ij 
toh^'ieiomeuelV 
^hoop • 
tahcre 



w:r M WIT 

toh(?redoni wimpIc 

toh^?e-m6ngcr ;Win 

toh^'ri(h,lj,nefs wince 

hih^fe ' ' winch 

tohortle '.w/nd, er, ing. 

whj^ wind 

wick windfall 

wicked,ljf,Befs windj^, or 

wicker wfndj^ 

wicket . winnlefs 

w/de,"ly, nefs wind^tu? 

w/den wine 



widgeon 
widcto; er 
width 

• 

wield 

wield/nefs 

w/eldjfc 

w/fe 

wig 



wing 
wink 
winncto^ 
Winter, ly 
w/pe 
w/re 

wife-^crc^ 
wi/dom 
w/fe 
. wifeljf ^ 
wifh, fw, 
wifp 
wift 



wight 

w/ld, 1/, nefs 

wildernefs 

w/ldf/re 

w/le ' 

wilful, Ij, nefs, wit 

wfl/ly witch> 

w%. with 

will '*. withal 

, Wflliam . ^ withdraw^ 

wiHing,)jy,nefs wither 
' wilkto ^ within^ 

wimble: ■ without 



woo 

without 
wi/Mand 

wicnefs 
witty 
wizard 
w^e 
w^ad 

vfdful, ly, nels 
w^ld • 
w5If 
w5]fiQi 
woman, ly 
womanifh, ly, 
[ncfs 
women, wim 
y/omh 
won 

wonder, ment 
wonderful, ly, 
wont [nefs 
tooo 
tooder . 
wood 
wooden 
wood/nefs 
woody 
woof 
wool 

woolc^mier 

woollen 

woolly 



W k A i A H 



WJrcefter 

word 

work, er, man 

w^rld 

•wi?'rlTil/nef$ 

y/orhVmg 

w^'rhfy 

worm 

worm-men 

wormwood ' 

V^rn 

worry 

w^rfe 

worfhip 

worlhipful, ly, 

w^rft ^ [ncfs 

warded 

*'w6rt 

worth 

worth/ly 

worth/ncls 

wor/ifclefs 

w6r//&le(|y 

w6r//&lefnefs 

worthj^ 

wot 

w^ve 

Wd?ven 

wo^id 

wound 

torangle, r 

torap, per 



' torapt 

wSth 

torJrhful, ly, 

hir^ak^ [ncfs. 

hir^ath 

faireck 

toren 

torench 

torcft, er 

torefde, r' 

toretch 

hiretched, fy, 
;toriggle [ne&- 

ter/ght 
'toring 

torinkle ' - . ' 
•torift 

'tori/tband ^ 
:tor/t'e, r 
'toritten 
torong 

lorongful, ly, 
toroth '[ncfs 

tOTOtC 

'torought ' 
torung 
t»ry^ ly, ncft 



Xantipp^,zan 
Xanthuj, zan 
Xen^ 



Y E O 

Xen^hon, 

[zcn 
Xerxrs, zer 



Yacht, yot 

y5r4 

yarn 

yarroli 

yawl 

yawn 

y^an 

ym, Ijr 

y&rling 

yearn ; 

ycaft 

yelk 

yell 

yellM, nefs 

yelbiaifh, nefs 

yelp 

yeptnan. 



Z A C 

yf^manry 
yerk 

yes 

yefterday 
yet 
yew 

y/cid, ingneis 
y^ke, r 
yolk 
yon 
yonder 
yonker 
y^rc 
York 
yaff 

young, cr 
yaungfter 
yo«r 
,ytSth 
ymibful, ly^ 
y«lc , [nefs 

Z 

Zaci^ar/a^ 



Z O R 

z^al 

zealot 

zealous, Ijr 

Zect^^ina^ 

Zelotes 

Ztbuloti 

Zed^k/a^ 

Zell 

z^ith 

Zen^phon 

zephyr 

21^rubbtfbel 

zeft 

Zerx^s 

Zimvi 

zink 

zinz/ber 

z^iac 

z^ne 

ztfogr^ipher 

z^gr^phjf 

z^oltfgy 

zootomy 

ZApph3fte 

ZoTokhev 



The End of the Dictionary: 




A SHORT 



GRAMMAR 



O F T H E 



English Language ; 



WHEREBY 



A Stranger may foon and eafily acquaint 
himfelf with its Principles, and learn to 
fpeak Englifli properly. 




A SHOJIT 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 






The I N T R O D U C T I O N. 

T T Is gtMMly fuppofed there is more difficulty 
I in itcquiringthe Englifli, than almoft any other 
living language. And as pronunciation is included 
in that acquifition ; the fuppofition feems to be 
well founded : -For the fnanj d liferent founds of 
our vowels, and our many quiefcent letters ; al- 
moft all of them incapable of being reduced to ufe- 
ful general rules ; cauie difficultieis in learning £ng« 
lifh, hardly ieit in learning other languages; for 
furmounting which, I humbly hope it will be al- 
lowed by candid judges^ that toother with the 
opportunity of converfing in Englifh, this Di^o« 
nary is a fuitable, and] adequate al&ftance ; every 
literal found of the language being intelligibJy de- 
fcribed, and diftin£Uy fignified in it } by the help 
of whieh, an induftrious youth might, with prac- 
ticable attention in fpeaking, and hearing, con« 
quer thefe difficulties in lefs than a month ; though 
ke could not, without It, it is highly probable^ iii 
a much longer time. 

But though ftrangers have the difficulties of 
pronunciation to furmount in learning £nglifh» 

[AJ now 



£ The INTRODUCTION. 

now rendered much more - vanquiihable by this 
help, than thev were before; they will meet with 
much fewer dimculttes, in learning the |>finciples, 
and ghninds of this, ttxan of moft other languages; 
and particularly than in learning the French, as 
will appear by thefe obfervations. 

I. All nouns in Fr>ench are maiculine, or femi- 

. nine ; and their genders muft be known, and ex- 
pr^ft, lnu(tngXhem properly; which to be able 
to do, even wit4i the moft comprehenfive rules^ it 
will coft the learner a great deal of labour, and 
pains ; but in Englifh, moft nouns are of no gen-, 
oer at all, except thofe which fignify intelligent 
beings; and a few other living creatures, whofe 
genders are very obvious ; and; need biitlitde pains 
to learn, or recplle£t them. 
. 2. Almoft all French ;adjeSi^6 have four 'dif- 
ferent terminations ; two for the Angular nunQj>er, 
and two for the plural; which muft be know;), 
and made to agree with the genders, and numbers, 
of their refpedtive nouns, both in -fpeaking and* 
^writing ; which to be able to do, will alfo coft the 
learner a prodigious deal of pains ; whereas Eng- 
lifh adjedives do not at all vary their terminations, 
either, for genders, or numbers; but in their po- 
fitive degree, always continue the fame ; as in thefe 
expreBions: A good man, the good woman ; good 
men, the good women. S^ that the learning, 
and ufe of them to a ftranger, is comparatively a 
very eafy matter. 

. 3* Upon infpe^iing a French regular verb, you 
will ^nd- its difFerent terminations to amount to. 
foity-two i but the different terminations of an 
tnglifti regular verb do not exceed feven; fo that 
for every difierent termination of an Engliih verb, 
a (Iranger has fix terminations to learn, ^d retain, 
of a French verb* Add to this, that the French 

' have four difierent . forms of their regular verbs, 

2 each 



The I N T R 6D U C T I O N. 3 

each form having maay terminations, different 
from thofe of the other forms : Whereas the Eng- 
lifh have only one form of a regular verb; and 
while the French have a great mimber of irregular 
verbs, which vary much from the regular ; hardly 
any of the Englilh irregular verbs vary from the 
regular, more than by two or three tern^iiuitions : 
(fee the Grammar, on irreguhr Verbs), And 
whereas the different terminations of the two 
French auxiliary verbs, avoir ztid JuiSj amount to 
between ninety and an hundred 1 all the termina- 
tions of our auxiliaries, (eight or nine in number) 
do not exceed forty* How much eafieF a matter 
then, is. it to learn the Engltfb; than the French 
verbs ? 

4* There is a' much greater number of idioms 
in the French, than in the Englifh language ; or 
particular ways of fpeaking, peculiar to themfelves; 
differing, not only from thofe of other countries, 
but fometimes from the general rules of language* 

By thefe obfervations .(and.inany^ more of the 
like kind might be made) it appears^ that it is 
much' more difficult, and laborious, to team, and 
retain the French, than the Engliih language^ 
and after the pronunciation of both is learnt ; that 
a perfon might learn Englifh, in lefs than half the 
time, that he coutd French. 

And now after exerting my endeavours to pro- 
duce a fuitable affiftance, for acquiring a right Eng- 
lifh pronunciation ; I would alfo exhibit fome a,id 
for acquiring the knowledge, and ufe of the lan<- 
guage itfelf, by 



^^- 



[A] % ^ 



f 4 1 
A 

I 

O R A M M A R 

OF T K 9 

ENGtiSH LANGUAGE. 

GRAMMAR in general teaches tbc art ef 
conveying our thoi^hts to one another, in 
proper language ; therefore Englifli Ommm&bp 
Doaches to convey our thoughts, in pri>per Englifh*' 
Grammar couifts of fear parts. The firft t reaf^ 
of Letters i the (econd, of Words ; the tbifdy tff 
Seneencee i uti the fourth, ^of 



PARTI. 

cy L s T T s R at 

THE Englifli ufe twenty-fix tetteisa aa figne of 
tbirty-fevendiftin^difEerent literal foiaiii« 

The twenty-'fix letters are thde, a, b, c, d, e, f, 
g, h, 1, j j k, 1, i», «, o, p, <1, r, s, t, u, V, w, x, y, t. 

Thefe letters are divtded into vowels, and con* 
ibnants. 

The fix foHawing are vowels, oc letters, utter* 
able by the voice, without the help of a confonant; 
a, e^ I, o, u, y i.of whith, y Is redundant ; all it's 
founds being fignified by i ; and one of the founds 
of i is alfo redundant; for the word imaginaty 
founds exactly as if It were fpelt <-mag^-n^i-r^. 

Thefe fix vowels not only denote the five long 
founds^ expreftbyjhe names of the five firfl of 
tbemji ^ (bey ^e commonly pronounced in and 

about 



A fiiort Englijh Grammar. 5 

at>out London ; but they alfo denote the following; 
Yocal founds, diftindly different from them ; viz. 
a Ii^road, ^s in ^U;. a fhoFt, as in tb'at,f and a long 
acute, as in father i e fliort, as in ell ; i ihort, as \t$ 
It ; o mort^ as in on y o long acute, a& in cloths ;, 
i round, as in f»ll; and u fhoft, as in butr' Allr 
which, together with the five neeeffary Tongj 
vowels, firft above-mentioned, nrake faurtee»dif«» 
tind^ Engliffi vowels. r 

Diphthongs are two vowels, malting but orie^ 
continued found; beginlm'ng wfth' that of thte fiHH 
vowel ; and' ending, wfthout ihlierrapting the^ 
voice, with that of the Faft ; of which, befides the: 
Jong /, and u often iignified by eu, (which, in re-; 
igc£t of their founds, are properly diphthongs J . 
there are only three more in the Engfifli language^- 
viz. ie, or, and oh ; tho' various ways denoted*. 
Many double-^lettered vowels have been called im*» 
proper diphthongs ; but improperly indeed ; for 
they have only the« found of one of their vowels ^5 
as the ea, in head ^ the oa in r^ad, &q^ 

T*hc remaining tivcnty letters, and y Before- 
a vowel, are confonants ; fo called, becaufe they" 
found with the vowek y, and indeed^ cannot welB 
be uttered wrthsoot one. 

, Of thefe twenty-one confonants, the folFowing; 
are redundant; hard andfoft c, foft g, q, f6ft s,.and- 
bard and foft x : for their founds might be equally* 
well fignified, that of hah! c, and ^, by 11 ; of 
foft €, by hard d ; of foft g, byj j ©f foft s, by z;; 
and thofe of hard and foft x, by ks, and gz. The(er 
following double-letter'd confonants are alfo' re- 
dundant, French ch^ as in chaifo, wfafch might- 
be iignified by fli ; ai^d Greek phi by f. - 

Befides the fimple- founds of the neccflary fi^gfe-' 
confonants^ diftihdly different fifripfc founds are| 
fighified by thefe double confonants, ch^ ih,, Earai 
tb), foft tb, and zb s or^He foutid o£ French^ jv ' . * 

[Alat Th* 



6 AJhm EngSJR Gramfflitr, 

The following is a compleat alphabet of aU t^ 
Bceial founds of the EngliOi language, 

s^ 5, a, a, "b, d, ^ c, f> g, b, #, i, j, k, 
1, m, n, 0^ o, 5, p, r, 9, t, «, 5, u^ v, w, 
y, z, chy fh, th, /l^9 zh. 

If wcweretoreje^all the fupcrfluous letters, and 
to ufe only thefe neccfiary ones ^ a moft perplex-^ 
ing labour, both to teachers, and chiUren, in 
karnmg to fpcU, and read Englilh, would be pre- 
vented $ moK that ipeak juflly, could alfo fpell 
)BJUi£Uy ;. and reading according to fuch fpelling^ 
the exadl pronunciation would be both known^ 
and preferved ; but there are fo maoy difficulties^ 
in the way of fuch a reformation of our fpcUiogy 
that it is hardly to be expected. 

Of letters ^e formed fyllabtes, and words | for 
9, I, and O, are words thpm(el?es ; and a very 
great number <^ of iuigle fyllables are alfe JEnglilb 
words ; which words are therefore called mono- 
jyllables. 

A fyliable con&fts of a found, oompofod of ali 
the founds of its founded lettejrs ^ begumii^, and 
^ proceeding ii| the orders in which thofe Jstler» 
liand in itj and it may nave froia one, te nine 
letters in tt| as in thefe o^onofyllables, a, to, for^ 
from, grand, thinn, (bains, ftrength^ ftreights* . 

Words mav conM of any number of fyllables^ 
from oiie to Rven ^ as in man, farther, m%h*ti-er^ 
pr6f-per*ouf'ly, pcr^pe-ti-i^ty^ trao-^ftib-fian-y-^** 
tion, con-fub-ftan^tf-Sl-i-tju 

In words of more fyllables tlmi one,, there id* 
always an accented fyliable, whicb ihould be 
founded ftronger than the r^ft^ as in the laftrmen- 
tiani^ examptes* Tb^ accents are, .through cuf* 
t^m, .^id fo a^biti:^f t^, ti^t fow general rules caa 
^^.g^ctt about thepi^ but what wiU have fome ex- 
ceptiojns*. However (line |l»Uowjog wH ^ found 

amongfl 



^ Afiort EngBJk CrammoK y 

amongft the moft compreheofive.. t. If tKeword 
be primitive, the accent is commenlj upon the 
firfl |y liable > as in prdf-^pert tenrder. ; 2* If it 
confift of a pcepofitioii, and primitive ^ and have^ 
dr have not a termination ; the primitive is com^* 
monly accented ; as in pr^-fcribc^, d#»fcr/-bing^ 
3« If the. &me word is both a nmin, and a verb ;. 
the accent is frequently^ but not always, on the 
firft fyliable of the noun ; and on the following^ 
of the verb ; as in £c-cent, the notia y and ac*cent^ 
the verb ; com- pound, the noun ; andeomnpound^ 
the verb. 4. The fyllaUes preoediAg the termi-* 
Bations ci;^, cial, tial^ fion^ tion, cious, tious^ 
ical, and ity, are always accented |, though. with<^ 
out tfaefe terminations, the accents of their primi** 
tives are often on a preceding fyliable ; as ii^ 
ph7*ski*an, ben-^-fici-al, im-p^ttial^ pr^-viA-on,, 
pr^*fer«>V0-^ion, gr^-cious, pr9-p{ti<*0US) p^-lit-i^ 
caly Ctf-picri*ty, prob'tf*b3-/<-t}i^ . 

P A R T II. 

0/ W O. R D S» . 

ALL words madeufeof in fpeqchy-areertfter 
articles, nouns, adje£ktves, pronouns, vctbs^ 
adverbs, pxepoiltions, inter|e£Uoas> or conj.iinc<* 
tions* 

L. The Articles are fet before nonns to fignify. 
the extent of, the. fenfe^ in which tbey are u&d; 
The indefinite article a^ before a cos^napt ; or 
ant befipm^ a vowel, fignifies one of thf kind, with-* 
cut determining w)iicfa one } as a mai»s ao eagle.. 
The definite article ^^ fignifies one partic4jiar of 
the kind, fpoken of, excluding others} as the 
jnan^ the eagle s it e. that is ipokeo 0^ or referred. 

to. 



t A fiicrt EngRJh Grumm^r^ 

tch TBe indefinite article a, or an, is fometimey 
fet before plural words*; as a many, a few, anr 
Ikindred ; bat it giv^s them the foi^m of colle£Hve 
nouns <rf^ the fingular number. The indefinite 
plural, which fifpkhtS'fime indeterminately., has no* 
article ; as in this exprefHon, men live ibire'^ i. e* 
-fome men,.. without fignifying who: But the ia {he 
plural definite article, as well as die fingular ; as* 
in this fentence: The man, .or the men, who fear 
God, will work ngbteoufnefs.' A noua in the 
fins;ular number without an article, is colledive y. 
and fignifies alt of the kind, £• g. Man is born ta- 
trouble, i.e. all men. Though proper^ names do 
not propeily take an article before them,, in. the 
fingular number, yet they do in the plural; for 
we fay the Two Scipios, the Twelve Caefars. If 
tie preceeds them in the fingular^ it is ;the article 
of the word ihfp, or inn, or fign,,. or river, &c.. 
underfiood ; as the George^ the Shakefpear's Heady 
the Thames. 

The article tkr is fomctimes fet before adverbs 
in the comparative degree, where it more diftinftly 
points out the comparifon ; thus, The oftener you 
read, you will read the better. 

• IT/ ANoun is the proper,'or the common name 
oFa perfon, or tbing. Proper names of perfons 
are, George, Cterlotte, &c. of things, the Tft^mes^,; 
Sn^indon, &c. Common names of perfons are, 
a man, a woman, &c. of things, a river, a bill^ 
9f hou/e, a horfe^" a hat, &c. 

• AWoun niaybe known by making fenfe with 
an adjeftive, fuch as the word good, bad, right,. 
Wrong, &cv Thus, iii the expreflions, agobd man, 
arbad horfe,.'a right lin^, a bad adion; theword3 
man, horfc, line,- aSion^ are ^een to be nouns y 
becaufe they make fenfe with, their accompanying 
adjej£liives^ 

Somc^ 



Some nouns are d^ftinguiihed by; tbcir genders,. 
or fexes. Creatures, of the male kind are often of 
the mafculine gender ; and in the &igutar number^ 
are fignified by the juroaounhe, or bun, Thofp^ 
of the female kind are alio often of the feminine 
gender, and figniiied by £he, or her;.^md nouoa 
of neither fex, or when their fexes are not parti- 
cularly intended, are of no gander at all ^ and are 
expreft, in the Angular number, by the neutral 
pronoun k^ But excepting thofe, which de« 
note intelligent beings, and thofe whc^e fexes we 
would particularly exprefs ; moft nouns in Englifh^. 
are of no gender at ah : For we apply the neutral 
pronoun it, not only to things without life ; e. g. 
the mountain, it ftands ; the river, it flows ; but 
alfo to moft animals, if we do not particularly in- 
tend to exprefs their fexes ; thus we &y of the 
horfe, it. carries i of the ox, it labours \ of the 
bird, it flies ; and of the fifli^ it fwima* If we 
would particularly cxprefa theftxes of aatmals; we 
ufe the nouns appropriated to tfaeir icxes, if there 
be any ; fuck as horfe, for the nmie ; mare, for the 
fenude ) and fa buU, and cow $ buck, and'- doe ^ 
cock, and hen ; and the pvonouns be, ani (he,^ 
while the intimatiefi .of th«nr fexea is continued^ 
And if a (pecies has only one eononnon name^ for 
both fexes ; both are diftinguiihed, .by prefixing 
to that name, the words he, and flie > or the male,, 
and female defignations of ibme other fpecies^ 
Thus we fay a he, or jackals, afheafs; a he,, 
or buck rabbit ; a fhe, or doe rabbit; and fo a he,. 
or cock pheafant $ a fhe, or ben pheafant, &c. 

Nouns have generally two numbers, the fingu- 
lar, and plural. The fxngular Jiumber denotes only- 
one of the kind fpoken of ;.as>a man,, the^ angeU. 
The plural number figniiies xvKffc than one of. the- 
fame kind'j;, as menu £e men ^ angels, theangels. 

The 



'ke Aflmi EngUJh Grammar^ 

The plural Is commoivlf formed by adding s^y or 
C8, to the lingular number ; or by changing y> 
into ies ; as dukes, lords, churches, juries ; which 
arc the plurals of duke, lord, church, jury* " 

However focfie nouns -have their plurais other- 
wife formed, as in the following table. 

Sing. Plur. Sing. Plur. Sing. Plur* 

Man Men Knife'Knives Dye Dice 

Woman Women Life Lives Foot Feet 

Child Children Loaf Loaves Goofe Geefe 

Brother Brethren Leaf Leaves Lpiife Lice 

Ox Oxen Wife Wives Mouie MFce 

Penny Pence Thief Thieves Sow Swine 

Tooth Teeth 

Some nouns are the fame in both numbers ; as 
iheepy lingular and plural ; and fo lilh, grain, &c. 
which have alfo filhes, grains,- in the plural. And 
fome nouns are chiefly uied in the plural i as bel« 
lows, breeches, mians, &c. 

Nouns alfo take after them an 's, with an apo- 
firophe^ to fignify the genitive^or pc^effive cafe; 
which nouns, upon bifinging the following word 
before them^' may always be rendered by ef, as ia 
thefe expreffions, A man's head, or the head of ^ 
inan ; the nation's glory^ or the glory of the nation. 

The Latin and Greek Grammarians have de- 
clined nouns by cafes, which they call the nomi- 
native, the genitive, the dative, the aceufative^ 
the vocative, and (which the Latins have added) 
the ablative. The diftinguilhing theTe cafes by 
thefe, or fome fuch names, was necellary in teach- 
ing Latin, and .Greek $ both to fignify the parti- 
cular terminations of nouns ; and alfo their parxi^ 
cuiar meanings, with thofe terminations ;; 3» ia 
the following example of a Latin- noun,, according 
to whicb> the Engliih noun fignilied by it, or any 

other^ 



'4J^t En^iiffi Grammar. , xj\ 

other, (flight, in nfypEt of ita ca^es, be declined ia 
the manner h^eivprefeoted. 

• Sing: ; Plur. 



Norn, Rex,' . aTSng», 
Gen. Regis, ' of a King. 
Dat. Regi, io a King. , 
Ac, Regem, a King. 
Voc. Rex, O King. 
Abl. Rege, with^from^ 
in^ -or hy a A-ing. 



Nbip. Rege>,; Kings. 
Gen. R^g'ui^, . ofKings^ . 
Dat. Regibusji to Kings, , 
Ac. Reges, Kings. 
Voc. Reges, Kings. ' 
Abl. Regibiis, with^ . 
fram^ in^ or by Kings., 



In like mzntifst the King might be detlfned thus,' 
Nbm. The King. • Gen. Of the King. Dat. To 
the King.- »A<f. The King. -Voc; OKing. Abl. 
With, frort, in, or by the King;' Norn. Plur. 
The Kings. Gen. Of the Kings. yDat. To the 
Kings. Ac. Th* King^' Voc. OTCfngs. Abl. 
With, fr6in, in, or by the Kihgs. 

) ^J , « . 

But Englifli houn», haring.no. calual tenniiia<^ 
tions, except thetf^pfleffive s; and their. cafes being. 
fufHciently Jcnowabl^ by their conftriu£lions in fen- 
tences, and their prepoutions, without diftinguifh- 
ing them by tbefe Latintiaities ; iind as the appli* 
cation of ,thefe names of cafes to Englifh noun6, 
caufes much perplexity, in learnirig Engliih ; efpe- 
cially tQ thofe who lare unacquainted with Latin 
Grammar ; and even fometimes to the learned 
themrelves ; Englifh, and Latin cafes, not always 
correfpondiiig': For tbefe reafons, no other dif- 
tinftioa of cafes, in learning Englifh, feems ne-. 
cefTary, than to call the nominative cafe by that 
namej (which fignifies the cafe, by which we name 
the noun) and all the other, the oblique cafes ; be* 
caufe in fdme refpefts declining, or differing from 
the nominative : And even this difiinftion is no 
where neceflary but ip the ufe of the perfonal 
pronouns, as will hereafter appear. 

IILAd. 



12 AfloH Engl^ Grammar 

m. Adjeftfvcs denote tlie pfeperties of n^tmsi 
and may be known to ht Tuch, by making fenfe^ 
when join'd wich nouns ; as in thefe cquneffions^ 
A wife man, an amiabie.woman, a precious 4hip£» 
The obvious fenfe, cohveji^ed by tneir connedibn 
WTtb tfiefe nouns, manj, woman, thing, fufil- 
cicntly indicates ^at the words wife, amiable, and 
precious, are adjedives* 

-EngHfli a^eSives i^ndergo no tevminational va- 
riation, in Aeir pofitive degree, or jdmple date; 
cither for exprei&ng genders, numbers, orcaifes ; or 
for any other purpofe : But moft adje^ivea of o|ie, 
or two fyilables * vary their tormingtion by e.r, to 
iignify their ccynparative degree.^ and by eft, their 
(uperlative* Thus the a^^iyes pujre, and mighty, 
in the pofitive degree, have p^rer, m/ghtier,^ m 
their comparative dipgree^ and' puiieft, migbtieft, 
in their fuperlative: But if an adjective in the po- 
fitive degree exceeds two fyilables % its comparative 
is -fbmifid by &tting the word 'imr^ before it; and 
its fupedative, the word tneft \ thus -we fay judi- 
cious, more Judicious, mm, judicious; and not 
judicioufer, judicioufeft* And indeed thefe ad- 
. verbs more, and moft, may properly form the 
comparative, and fuperlative degrees of the flionefi, 
as well as of the loh|eft worded adje£fcives ; for voa 
may iky fafe, more ufe, moft fafes as well as ufe, 
ihfer,' fafeft. Yet, 

There are a few adjedives, whofe degrees of 
comparifon are more irregularly formed ; and it is 
remarkable that the degrees of the fame adjefHves 
in Latin, and Greek, are, at leaft, as irregular; 
viz. the following, 

Ppr. -Comp. .SupsrL Pof. Comp. Superl. 
■Cood Better 'Bdl Ltttle Lefs Leaft 
Bad Worfe Werft Much More Moft 

IV.Px*. 



A flmt 'Eng^fli Grammar. i j 

IV, Pronouns aire ufed to denote perfons, and 
things ; to prevent a ttrefome repetition of their 
names ; for which reafon they are called pronouns ; 
which fignify words ufed for, or in the place of 
nouns, or names. 

The perfonal pronouns, with reference to the 
▼erb, are, I, for the firft perfon lingular ; thou, 
for the fecond ; he^ ihe, or it, for the third ; we, 
for the firft perfon plural ; ye, more rarely, and 
yoa more commonly, for the fecond s and they 
for the third. 

The nominative of the firft perfon, is /; all its 
ether, or oblique cafes lingular, are me^ with its 
cafual prepofitipns ; as-of me, to me, me, with, 
from, in, or by me : and the nominative cafe of the 
firft perfon plural, is we ; all its oblique cafes are W^ 
with its prepofitions ; as of us, to us, us, with us. 

The nominative of the fecond perfon, and voca- 
tive (i. c. the cafe, by which we call upon, or ad- 
drefs) is thm\ all its oblique pafes are exprefs'd 
by ihee^ with its cafuaF prepofitions ; as of .thee, 
to thee, thee, with, from, in, or by thee. The 
nominative, and vocative of thp lecond perfon 
plural, is ye^ or you ; its oblique cafes are you^ 
with its prepofitions, as of you, to you, &c. 

The nominatives of the third perfon fingular are, 
he^ for the mafculine gender; Jhe^ for the femi- 
nine ; and /V, for the neutral noun ; all their ob« 
lique cafes are formed by htm^ mafculine ;. her^ 
feminine j and //, neutral, with their prepofitions ; 
as of him, of her, of it; to him, to her, to it, &c. 
The nominative of the third perfon plural, is they ; 
its oblique cafes are expreiled by iheniy and it^ 
cafual prepofitions, as of them, to them, &c. 

The demonftrative pronoun thisy in the fingular, 
has ihefe in the plural, without ^ny variation, ex- 
cept by their prepofitions, in their oblique cafes ; 
as of this, of thefe; to this, to thefe. ' So like wife 

[BJ the 



\ 



14 AJhort Englijh GrammaK 

the;deinonftrative pronoun that^ in the fingolar^ 
bas thvft in the plural, with their cafual prepofi- 
tions, for their oblique cafes* - 

The relative, who is both mifculine and femi* 
nine ; and it is both fingular and plural, in its no-^ 
minative ; but in its oblique cafes, it has whom^ 
both in the fingular and plural 3 as of whom, to 
vhom, whom^ &c« 

The relative which is neutral, relating to nouns 
that have no gender; it is both fingular zjA plural; 
and undergoes no variation in its numbers, or 
cafes, except what is made by its prepofitions* 

The relative that is often ufed for who, whom^ 
and which, £. g. The man that reads, for who 
reads ; the man that I faw, for whom I faw ; the 
houfe that he built, for which he built ; the men 
that were there, for who were there. This rela« 
tive that continues the fame both in its fingular 
and plural numbers, and alfo in its nominatives,, 
and oblique cafes* N. B. Befides the dembnilra- 
tive and relative ihat^ there is alfo that the con- 
junction ; as in this expreifion. He went that he 
might fee« 

Its, ours, whofe, .yours, and theirs, feem Xa 
be the genitives, or pofTeffive cafes of it, our, who, 
your, their. 

What is an interrogative pronoun of all gen* 
ders, cafes, and numbers ; and is only varied bjf 
its cafual prepofitions thus, of what, to what, &c. 
as in thefe examples. What man did it? What 
woman faid it? What motives produced it ?—— 
Yet fometimes it is not an interrogative, but pro- 
perly fignifies the thing that, or which. £. g. 
What he aims at, is obvious to all ; i. e. the thing 
that, or which he aims at, &c. 

V. The verb is ncceflary in all fentences ; for 
none can be fpoken, in which one is not exprefs'd, 

«r 



A fliort Englijb Grammar. 15 

or underftood -, it has the greatefl number of acci- 
.dents, and it require* more pains to learn it, than 
any other word : On all which accounts, it is 
called the verb, or the word of a fentence, by way 
of eminence. It denotes the ftate, or adion, pa(-- 
fion or paffivenefs of its nominative cafe going be* 
fore it; as in thefe expreffions, Wifdom ts good, 
a wife man learns, a book is read ; where is good^ 
learns, and is read, are verbs ; and wifdom, a man, 
and a book, are their nominative cafes. And that 
word in a fentence, denoting exiftence, ftate, ac* 
tion, or paffion ;> which makes fenfe with a noun^ 
-or with any of the perfonal pronouns, I, thou, 
he, is a verb. Thus write, viiits, reads, is efteemed, 
are verbs in thefe expreffions, I write, (he vif t», 
he reads, virtue is efteemed. 

To verbs belong voices, perfons, numbers, 
tenfes, moods, participles^ and gerunds. 

1. Verbs have two general forms, called voices ; 
the one the a£iive voice, the other the paffive. In 
the a£live, the agent or nommatfve cafe is repre- 
:fented as a£ling, or doing the thing iignified by 
the verb ; as in thefe expreffions, I read, he writes, 
they imitate. In the paffive voice the nominative 
cafe is exprefs'd as aded upon, paffive, or bearing 
the adion iignified by the verb; as in thefe, I am 
read, he is written, they are imitated, 

2. To verbs belong numbers. The fingulsnr 
number exprefles only one agent, or patient ; a» 
he loves, he is loved ; and the plural denotes n;ore 
than one, as we love, they are loved, 

3. The fingular and plural numbers of verbs 
have each three perfons, or nominative cafes. The 
three perfons for the fingular number are, I, or 
the perfon who fpeaks, for the firft perfon ; thou, 
or the perfon fpoken to, for the fecond ; and he, 
file, or it, the perfon, or thing fpoken of, for the 
third* la like manner the plural number has' alfo 

[BJ 2 three 



1 5 AJhrt Englifli Grmmor. 

three perfons, or nominative cafes; we, or the 
fpeaker and tfaofe on his part, for the Arft perfon \ 
ye, or more commonly you, or theperfons fpoken to^ 
for the fecond \ and they^ or the perfons* or things 
fpoken of, for the third.-*Ry adding thefe perfonai 
pronouns to any verb, you form its numbers, aod 
perfons* £• g. if you fet I before the verb love, 
and fay I love, you form the firft perfoa fingular ; 
if you fay thou loveft, you form the fecond \ he 
loveth, or loves, the third ; we love, the firft 
psrfon plural, you love, the fecond j and they 
iove, the third. 
• In thefe laft. examples you may obferve fouf 
terminations.of .the verb itfelf; viz. love, ^loveft, 
.Ipveth, loves; and no Englifh regular verb has 
any more than thefe four, and three terminatioss 
more ; viz. loved, the paffive^parttciple, and adive 
perfe£l tenfe ; Icvedft, for the fecond perfon frngo* 
lar of (he fame tenfe; and loving, for the prefent 
a£tive participle, and gerund. 

4. The tenfes, or times of a verb are priaci* 
pally three ; the prefent; the perfed, or fully paft; 
and the future. Thus I love, is the prefent tenfe; 
I loved, or have loved, the perfe£l ; and I fhall, or 
vrill love, is the future tenfe. 

But in fpeaking of the paft adion, or paffioncf 
the verb, V7e have often occafion, not only to 
fignify it is fully paft ; in which cafe, we ufe the 
perfect tenfe ; but alfo that' that paft action, or 
papion was a doing, or bearing at the time another 
thmg was a doing ; in which cafe, we ufe the im- 
perfe6i tQnfe; u> called, becaufe the aftion, or 
paffion was then imperfeA as to time ; being a 
doing, but not finiflied. £• g. He ftudied, or 
did ftudy philofophy when I firft entered the col- 
ledge. We have alfo often occafion to fpeak of 

a paft a3ion, or paffion, as done, or borne, and 
finii];^d, before another was begun i and then we 

* ufe 



ji /kart Kt^l^ Grammar. rf 

ttft the pretcrpluperfcd) or pluftfuampeifed tenfe y 
which iighifies the more than paft time, being not 
only pa{r when ipoken of, but paft before a paft 
aAiofi was begun ; as in this fentence, be had read' 
Horace, before I began Cordery. He bad beeno 
praifed, long before that adion. 

The futnre tenfe i^ expreiied by fhall» and will ; 
thus, I flis^l, or will lovei I (hall, or will be loved ;• 
&c« Upon the ufe of which (hall, and will, we^ 
may obferve, that fimU in the iirft perfon, both^ 
fingiilarand plitral only denotes the futurity of the 
adion, or paffion, fianiiied by the verb ; but \w 
the fame perfons, wiu implies, not only their futu- 
rity ; but aifo a promife or threatening,*, that they 
fliail be. In the fecond, and third perfons, both' 
fkigular and plural, >&3// denotes* a Command, op 
feme neceffity infoicing their future Exiftence ;. 
whereas, in the fame perfons, will only fignifies^ 
tbeir futurity. 

5^ The moods of a^ verb' are thofe particular 
forms of it, whereby,-^ I. we diredly (hew what i» 
figniiied by the verb^ which we do by the indicative 
mood, as llme^ lam kiytd^ &c. or %* whereby we 
exprefs a wi(h for, or the poffibility,.,or condition,* 
or end of the thing, fignified by the verb ; whiclv 
we do by thefubjundive mood ; fo called, becaufe 
it is often fubjoined to a preceding fentence,- or 
verb; which mood isi fometimes^ in refpe£t to the 
wifli, called the optative mood ; and in refpef^ of the 
poffibility, the potential mood; as in thefeexpref- 
fions, O that r may love ^ I may 6r can bve^ ifllove^. 

that I may Inn. Or it is a form of the verb- 

whereby 3dly, we command, entreat or pray for 
the thiog fignified by it; thus, hw^thou^ let him be- 
loved^ give ks, pardon, me ; and this is. called the 
imperative mood — And 4thly, whereby we fimply/ 
intimate the thing (ignified by the verb, as prefent,. 
]jaft>,or. to comes. without limiting its fignificatioA' 



i8 AJhort EngU/h Grammar: 

by perfons or numbers. And this is called the in- 
finitive mood. £. g. To lovef to have or had kvtd^ 
to be about to love. N. B. It is by the piefent. 
infinitive that we commonly exprels the meaning^ 
ef our verbs* 

6. To verbs belong participles (o called becaufe 
they partake of the nature, both of a verb, and an 
adjeSive j agreeing vrith nouns juft as adjeftives 
do; and at the fame time, like verbs, exprcffing 
the aftion, paffion, and tenfes of the verb to which. 
they belong. The prefent afiive participle is fig- 
nified by the termination ing, as loving 5 and the 
perfcft pafEvc participle mod generally by the ta- 
mination eJ, as loved 5 which is alio moft com- 
monly the fame word with the aftive perfect 
Thus the word loved is the aaivc perfea in the 
expreffibn he kvedwifdom ; but it is the perfeS pv- 
ticiple in this, he is loved by alL Once more 

7. The gerund (perhaps fo called a gercndo,. 
becaufe it bears the nature of a noun) denotes w 
adiion of a verb under the notion of a noun of the* 
fwigular number, having the feme cafual prepofiti- 
ons that a noun has. ^ E. g. Loving^ of loving^ /*• 
lovingy wkhffromj in^ or by loving. 

For fully declining oiir verbs,, the foUowipg a«** 
iliary verbs are abfolutely neceflary; viz- do, let*- 
muft> have, fliall, will, may, can, and am. 

Do, let, have, and will, are complete verbs- 
tbemfelves ; -and if no part of other verbs accom- 
pany them V then • they are principals, and not 
auxiliaries. JVlay, can, fliali, andiauft, are de- 
feftive verbs ; no other part of them being i^ ^^ 
in Englifli, but thofe that are ufed in the following 
example of acompleat verb. There being no more 
ef may, but mighty of can,, but could,, of ih*"» 
but fhould ; and muft being invariably the feni^», 
and only ufed in the prefent indicative, both ^&vi^r 
andpaffive,^ I muil Jove^^ thou >njLift.love> &C'J^. 

jDUlt 



A Jhort EngUJh Grafnnmr^ , if.' 

muft be loved, thpu muft be loved, &c. and in the 

ferfe£l of the fubjunAive, both adlive and paffive; 
muft have loved, thou muft have loved $ I muft* 
have been loved, thou muft have been loved, &c. 

How thefe auxiliaries fbould be ufed to form a 
compkat EngUih verb, will appear in the follo^ 
wing example of fuch a verb, both, in the a^ive^ 
and paffive voices. 

The Verb 

To love. 

In the a£live voice is thus* declined^. 

The Indicative Mood.. 

The Prefent Tenfe. 

Perf. Sing. Perf. Plur. 

1. I love, or do love; i. We love, or do love.. 

2. Thou loveft„ordo& 2.. Ye,, or you love, or 

love. do love. 

2^. He, (he, or it loveth, 3. They Icnx, or do- 
foves, or does love. fovc 

The Imperfefl Tenfe. 

Ptrf. Sing. Perf. Plur^ 

1. I loved, or did Ibvc. i. Weloved,ordidlove.. 

2. Thou lovedft,, ot 2. You loved, or did 

did it love; Tove. 

J, He loved, or did' 3. They loved^ or. djd> 
love. k)ve.. ^. - 

The Perfea Tenfe. 

Perf. Sing. . Perf^ Plur. 

i. I loved, or have i. We loved, or have- 
loved, loved. 
%m Thou lovedft, or 2. You loved^ or have 
haft loved. loved. 

3. He loved, or hath, 3*- They loved, or have 

QL has lc»^d» loved.. 

c. y The 



30 Afitort EngUfi GrawMr. 

The Pluperffea Tenfc. 
Perf. Sing. Pcrf. Plur. I 

I.. I had loted. i. We had loveth 

2. Thou hadft loyed.. a. You had -loved. 

3. He hul loved. 3. Tbey ha4 loved.. 

The Future Tenfc. 

Perf. Sing- Peif. Plur. 

1. 1 {hall, or will love. i. Wefiiall.orwill Iotc- 

2. Thou flult, or wilt 2. You Ihall, or will 

love. love. 

3. Hefliall,orwillIovc. 3. They ffliall, or will, 

love. 

The SoajuNCTiVE Mood. 
The PrefcnrTenfe. 
Peri". Sing. • perf. Plur. 

1 . I may, or can love. i. Wc nmy, or can lovt- 

2. Thoumayft,orcanft 2. You may, or cao 

love. love 

3. He may^or can love. 3. They may,, or caa. 

love.. 

The Imperfeft Tenfc. 

Perf., Sing. Ptrf, Plun, 

1, I might, could^ i. Wc might,, trouldi. 

Would, or Ihould would, or Ihould 

love. lo»e. 

1, Thou mighteft, 1. You might,, could,, 

couldeft, would- would, or Ibould^ 

eft, or Jhoulded love. 

Jove. . . 

3. He might, could, 3. They mighty could,. 

would, orlhould would, or Jbould 

love.. Isve. 

Tb« 



^JJh$rt EngHJh Grammar. a» 

' , The Perfca Tenfe. 

Pcrf. Sing. .^Perf. Plur, 

1. I may have Im^ed. i. Wc may have loved. 

2. Thou mayeft have 2. You may have loved. 

loved. 

3. He may have loved. 3. Theymay havelovcd* 

The Pla-perfeft Tcnfe. 

Perf. Sing. ' Pcrf. Plur. ^ . 

1. I might, could, i. We might, could, 
would, or fhould would, or (hould 

i have, er had lovedPr have, or had loved . 

2. Thou mighteft, 2, You might, could, 
couldeftywouldeft, would,, or ihould 
or (houldeft havet have,or had loved, 
or hacf loved. 

3. He might, could, 3. They might, could, 
would, or fbould would, or fhould 
have,orliadlov0d» have,orhadloved# 

The Future Tenfc. 

Perf. . Sing. Pcrf. . Plur. _ ^ 

I. I fhall have loved. i. We fliall have loved, 
2* Thou (hah have a« You (hall have loved. 

loved. 
3. He fhall have, loved. 3. They (hall hav^Ioved. 

The Im^erativie Mood. ' * * 

Perf. Sing. Perf. Plur. 

1. Let me love. }. Let us love. 

2. Love thou, or do 2. Love you, or do yoa 

thou love, love. 

3. Let him love. 3. Let them love. 

The Infinitive Mood. 

Pref, To love. - Perf. To have,. or had loved. 
Fut. To be about to love. 

The 



ii A Jhm EngUfl) Grammari 

The Participles. 
PrcC Loving. — Fut. About to Iov«# 

The Gbrunds. 

Loving, of loving, to loving, loving, with, from, 

in, or by loving. 



^mm 



The Paffivc Voice of the fame Verb, 

To be loved n 

The Indicative Mood: 

Ik 
The Prcfent Tcnfe. 

Pcrf. Siog. Perf. Plur. . 

1. I am loved. i. We are loved. 

2. Thou art lovied. 2. You are loved. 

3. He is loved. 3. They arc loved. * 

The Impcrfcft Tenfe. 

Perf. Sing. Perf. Plur. 

1. I was loved. i. We were loved. 

2. Thou waft loved. 2. You were loved. 

3. He was lovedl 3. They were loved. 

The Perfea Tenfe. 

Perf. Sing. Perf. Plur. 

1. I have been loved. i. We have beea loved. 

2. Thou haft been 2* YoU have been loved. 

loved. ' 

3. He hath, or has 3. They have been 

been loved. loved,* 

The 



A Jhort Enjili/h Grammar. 25 

The Plu-pcrfea Tcnfc. 

Pcrf. Sing. Pcrf. Plur. 

1. I had been loved. i. We had been loved. 

2. Thou hadft been 2. You had been loved. 

loved. 

3. He had been loved. 3. They had been loved* 

The Future Tenfe. 

Peril Sing. ' Pcrf.' Plur. 

1. I (hall, or will be i. We ihall, or will be 

loved. loved. 

2. Thou (halt, or wilt 2. You ihall, or will be 

be loved. loved. 

3. He (hall, or will be 3. They (hall, or will be 

loved. ' * loved. 

The Subjunctive Mood. 

The Prefent Tenfe. 

Perf. Sing. - Perf. Plur. 

I. I may, or can be i. We may, or can be 

loved. loved. 

2» Thoumayftjorcanft 2. You may, or can be 

beloved. loved. 

3. He may, or can be 3. They may, orcaiihbc 

loved. loved. 

The Imperfea Tenfe. 

Perf. Sing. Pcrf. Plur. 

J. I might, could, , i. We might, could^ 

would, or (hould would, or (hould 

be loved. be loved. 

2. Thou mighteft, 2* You mighty could, 

couldeft, would- would, or (hould 

eft, or fliouldeft be loved. 



be loved. 



3. He 



84 A Jhwi Ei^UJh Grammar. 

Perf. Sing. Pccf. Plur. 

3. He might, could, 3, They might, could, 

w.ould, or fliouU veould, or ihould 

be loved. be loved. 

The Perfe<a Tenfe. 
Sing, PerC Plur« 



Peff. 

1, I may have been 

loved. 

2. Thou fliayft have 

.l^cjjn loved. • 
' 3, He miy have been 
loved. , 



1. We may have been 

loved. 

2. You may have been 

Ipved. 

3. They may have beta 

loved. . 



The Plu-pcrfea Tenfe. 



2. 



*TerT.' Sing. 

I. I might, could, 
woyjcl) orfhiould 
have, or liad been 
loved. . . 
ThQtt mightcift, 
couldeft, would- 
eft^ or ftjouldeft 

.h^ve^or had been 
lovfed. 

He mifiht, c«ul4, 
would, or fhould 
have, or had been 
loved. 



f3f 



Perf. Plur. 

1. We might, could, 

.would) or ihould 
have, or had been 
loved. 

2. You nMght, couldi 

would, or ihould 
have, or had been 
loved. 

3. TbeymightjCouU, 

would, or ihould 
have,' or had been 
loved. 



The Future Tenfe. 



Perf. 



Sing. 
1. I ihalt have been 

laved. 
2.' Thou (halt have 

been lDve;d. 
3. He (hall have been 

loved. 



Perf. . Plur. 

1, We ihall have been 

loved. 

2, You (hall h^ve been 

loved. 

3, They (hall l^ave beefl 

loved. 

' The 



A /hart Englijh X^rammar, 25 

The Imperative Mood^ 

Tbe Preftnt Tenfe, 

Pcrf. ^ing. Perf. PJur. 

I, Let me be loved. i. Let us be loved. 

a. Be . thou loved. 2. Be you loved. 

3, Let him be loved. 3. Let them be Joved* 

Tht Infinitive Mood. 

Pref. To be loved. Perf. To have, or Iiad 

been loved, Fut. To be about to be loved. 

' The Participles. 



The Perf. Loved, or 
being loved. 



The Fut. To be loved, 
or muft be loved. 



Upon the preceding paffive voice. We may ob- 
ferve, that it is wholly made up of the paffive par- 
ticiple kved^ and the auxiuary verb to be^ ax I am \ 
which auxiliary is declined exactly as in this paflive 
voice : fo that if you go through this voice, without 
the participle loved \ you will decline the verb to he^ 
or I am. Now if inftead of this participle ^(j^^^^, yau 
join to it the paffive participle of any other veib ; 
you will form the paffive voice of that verb : E, g. 
If you fay / am feared^ I was feared^ I have been 
feared^ ice. you will form the paffive voice of the 
verb to fear, and fo of any other verb. 

If to the auxiliary verb I am^ inftead of the (iaf- 
Tive participle, you add the adive prefent par- 
ticiple ; the verb will have an adlive fignification, 
implying the continuance of the adion, fignified 
by it. A form of fpeech we have frequently oc- 
cafion to ufe. E. g. I am hearing, I am reading, 
I am thinking, I am ftudying. The prepofition /?, 
which figiiifies at, or about, is often fct before this 

[CJ prefent 



26 A fliort Englifli Grammar. 

prcfent aflive participle, and more ftrongly marks 
the continuance of the aftion, thus ; I am a ftudy* 
ing, a reading, a hearing, &c. Moft acSive verbs 
may be declined in this manner, through all their 
moods, and tenfes, E. g. I am ftudying, or a 
ftudying; I was ttudying, I have been ftudving, 
I ihall or will be ftudying, I may or can be ftudy- 
ing, let me be ftudying, being ftudying, to be 
ftudying, &c, 

I have faid the paffive participle is generally the 
fame with the aftive perfeft j .Loved being both the 
a<&ive perfe<a, as when we fay, / loved \ and the 
perfcft paffive participle, when we fay, He is Uvea 
Iry all: But there are many exceptions to this rule; 
. as there are alfo many to thefe following rules, for 
forming the a<aive perfetft itfelf, viz. that it w 
formed by adding ed to the prefent of the verb, if 
ending with a confonant ; as in learn, learned; or 
by turning the final y of the prefent, into iW; as 
in juftify, juftified ; or by adding d to it, if ending 
with a iilent e; as in divide, divided. In general 
the exceptions to thefe rules are old Englifli, or 
Saxon verbs, of one fyllable ; of which I fhall here 
fubjoin a table, with their difFerently formed aflirc 
perfedlS) and paffive participles. 

A TABLE 

Of irregular English- Verbs. 

The following verbs have their perfects, and 
participles alike ; but not formed according to the 
preceding rules, except the excepted. 

^ Pref. Pcrf. & Part. Pref. Perf. & Par^- 

bind bound build built 

bleed bled. buy bought . 

. bring brought breed bred 



Pref. 
catch 

dig 

feed 

fight 

flee 

fling 

g€ld 

grind 

giid 

gird 

lore 

lend 

make 

meet 

pay 

x^nd 

fay 

feek 

fell 

fit 

fhixie 



A Jliort EngUJIi Gratr^ar. 27 

Perf. & Part. Prcf. Perf. & Part. 



caught, alfo 
cacched 

dug, alfo 
digged 

fed 

fought 

fled 

flung 

gelt 

ground 

gilt 



flink 

fpend 

fpin 

fend 

fpring 

itand 

ftick 

fwini 

fwing 

-teach 

tell 

think 

work 



girt 

loft 

lent 

made win 

met wind 

paid wring 

rent awake 

faid 

fought abide 

fold befeech 

fat 

fhone^tf^fhined 



flunk 

fpenc 

rpuii 

fent 

fprung 

ftood 

fluclc 

fvvum 

fwung 
' taught 

t.)ld 

thought 
• wrought 
fiffo worked 

won 

wound 

wrung 

awoke 
alfo awaked 

abode 

be fought 
alfo befeeched 



The following prefents have their perfects, and 
participles different from one another ; and neither 
of them formed according to the preceding general 
rules, except the excepted. 



Pref. 


Perf. Part. 


Pref. 


Perf. Part. 


bear 


bore -born 


chide 


chid chidden 


bea,in 


began be^un 




chided 


bid 


bade bidden 


choofe 


chofe chofen 


bite 


bit bitten 




choofed 




alfo bit 


cleave 


clove cloven 


blow 


blew blown 




'alfo cleft 



LCJ2 



come 



tS 


^J 


fieri' Eng 


njh Gra 


mmar. 




Prcf. 


Pcrf. 


Part. 


Prcf, 


Perf. 


Part. 


come ' 


came 


come 


ring 


rang 


rung 


creep 


crope 


crept 


/ 


rung 






crept 




rife 


rofe 


rifen 


crow 


crew 


crow'd 


. run 


ran 


run 


dare 


durft 


dared 


fee 


faw 


feen 


do 


did 


done 


feeth 


fod 


fodden 


draw 


drew 


drawn 


(hake 


(hook 


fliaken 


drink 


drank 


drunk' 


{hear 


fhore 


fiiorn 


drive 


drove 


drivep 




(beared 


. 


eate 


ate 


eaten 


ihoot 


(hot 


fiiotten 


fall 


fell 


fallen 


fhrink 


(hrank 


flirunk 


forfake forfook forfaken 


fing 


fang 


fung 


fly 


6ew 


flown 


fink 


fank 


funk 


freeze 


froae 


frozen 


flay 


flew 


flain 


get 


got 


gotten 


Aide. 


flid 


flidden 




alfo got 


fmite 


.fmote 


fmttten 


give 


gave 


given 


flrike 


flruck 


ftricken 


go 


went 


gone 


fpeak 


fpoke 


fpoken 


grow 


grew 


grown 


fpit 


fpat 


fpitten 






grow-d 


ftrive 


ftrove 


ftfiven 


hew 


hewed 


hewen 


fwear 


fwore 


fworn 






hewn 


take 


took 


taken 


hide 


hid 


hiddi*n 


te<ir 


tare^ 


t< Jfn 


hold 


held 


hold en 


thrive 


throve 


thriven 


know 


knew 


known 


throw 


threw 


thrown 


lye 


lay 


lain 


tread 


trodc 


troden 


^ 




i(in 


wear 


. wore 


worn 


ride 


rode 


ridden 


weave 


wove 


woven 




rid 




write 


wrote 
writ 


written 



A^. B. Thefc irregular perfe£ts are only uftd rn 
the perfefl tenfe ; and if you choofe to exprcfs the 
perfe<Sl by / have^ the word here Ci*Ued the par- 
ticiple niuft be ufed; not the irregular perfeft- 
thus, I knew, or have known ; I wrote, or havj 
written 3 I chofe, or have chofen ; &c. Not, I 

have 



A fliort ^Englifif Grammar. ^Q^g 

have knew, &c. Hence it appears, th^t theft 
pailive participles are alfo adive perfects, with the 
auxiliary I have \ or elfe, as fome eminent writers 
ca]] them, adive perfedl participles. 

The following verbs are the fame in the prc- 
fent, the perfect, and participle; burft, caft, cut, 
hit, hurt, knit, let, put, rent, rid, fet, (bed, ihred, 
fhut, flit, fplit, fpread, thruft. £. g. Pref. It tuts, / 
Perf. It cut. Part. Is cut, and fo of the reft. 

Of neuter verbs (fo called, becaufc neither fully 
aflive, nor fully paflive, their fignifications being 
generally immanent, and not tranfitive), fome are 
only declined like tli^ a£live voice, fuch as thefe ; 
to lit, to fleep, to^land, to run, &c, being declined 
thus, 1 fit, I did fit, I fat, or have fat, &c. Not, 
I am fit, I was fit, &c. Others of thefe neuter 
verbs are only declined like the paflive voice ; fuch 
as, to be fick, to be lame, to be weary, &c. thus, 
I am fick, I was /ick, I have been fick, &c. Not, 
I fick, I did fick, &c. ^ 

There are fome verbs which are only ufed, in 
the' third perfon fingular, through their various 
moods and tenfes ; and are called imperfonal verbs, 
becaufe ic is not a perfon, but a thing that is their 
nominative cafe, expreCed by it, fuch a^ thefe ; it 
delights, it grieves, it pleafes, it become^, &c. 
£x. gr. It pleafes me, it did pleafe him, it has 
pleafed them, it may pleafe us, it would pleafe 
you, &c. and fo of the refl. 

VI. Adverbs commonly acconf>pany verbs, and 
therefore they are called adverbs ; as they do alfo 
adjectives, and adverbs ; expreiiMjg the nature, 
quality, degree, and circumftances (as to time, 
place, number, &c.) of the adlion, or paflion of the 
verbs ; or of the adjedlives, or advtibs, with.which 
they are joined i as in thefe expreflions, very uy/l^ 

[C J 3 wtiere 



'30 A flitrl Englifli Grammar. 

vbere i is joined to the adverb welhj uncommcniy 
Jrudenty where it is joined to the adjedlive prudent ; 
Ufpokedtftmifyandwell^ where dtflinSfly and tLeli 
are adveibs, accompanying the verb he fpi>ke^ ex- 
preifing the manner and nature of his fpeaking. 
—Many adverbs, like adjectives, are capable of 
degrees of comparifon ; thus we fay, wifely, more 
w fcly, moft wifely. Very many adverbs are 
fo med of adjcflivcs, by adding the termination ly 
to them ; as greatly, powerfully, duly, elegantly, 
&r.— The dcTign of adverbs feems to be to exprefs 
in one word, a property, or circumftance, which 
could not be well expreft without two, or more. 
Thus, he aSfed wifely^ i. e. with wifdom ; he reafoned 
folidly\ i. e. with folid arguments. There are va- 
rious kinds of adverbs. Some of place ; as here, 
there, where. Some of time; as now, then, late- 
ly, felJom, often. Some of order; as firft, fe- 
condly, thirdly, laftly. Many fignify quality ; as 
well, badly, bravely, timidly. &ome, quantity \ as^ 
much, little, more, lefs. Some are negative ; as 
no, not, not; at all : others are affirmative, as yes, 
indeed, truly, verily, certainly, &c» &c. &c. 

< 
VII. Prepofitions are Tet before nouns, or pro- 
nouns, in their cblrque, and never in their no- 
minative cafes. The idea of place is fuggefted by 
moft of them, and tlvc nouns to which they arc 
prefixed, are fignificd, locally affefted, and circum- 
fianced, by the perfons or things fpoken of. They 
are principally thefe following. About, according 
to, after; againft, amongft, at, above, below, be- 
fore, behind, beneath, befides, between, beyohrf, 
by, concerning, for, from, in, into, on, on this 
fide, on that fide, of, out of, over, through^ to, 
towards, under, unto, upon, up to, with, within, 
Without. Several of thefe prepofitions are affixed 
to words, fo as to make compound words with 

them I 



AJhort Englijh Grammar. 31 

them'; as afternoon, bygo«e, onward, outfhine, 
undergo, wichftand, &c. And befldes thefe, the 
following infeparable prepofitions make alfo com- 
pound words : a, be, counter, en, fore, mis, un, &c. 
as afide, -befpeak, countera£l, enforce, forewarn^ 
miftruft, unbend, &c.-but they are never ufed as 
prepofitions by themfelves, excejjt the a, ift fuch 
In exprefSon as this. He is a tvriiing, — N, B, As 
prepofitions are continually recurring in fentences, 
their exa£l meaning ibould be thoroughly learnt. 

VIII. Interjeftions are (hort words, or kn^ 
tences ; and fonie of them even natural found*, 
which flrongly intimate fome fentiment, or paffion 
of the mind. Such as wonder, expreffing it thus ; 
furprifing ! O ftrange, hah I — Admiration ; O ! Oh ! 
-r-Giief 5 ah ! alas ! wo is me ! — Joy ; well ! I am 

Slad ! I give you joy F — Praife, O brave ! well 
one ! — Difpraife ; O vile, O bafe, O fie. — Laugh- 
ter ; ha, ha, he. — Calling ; ho, foho, hallow.-^ 

Silence ; hufh ! filcnce ! hark ! All interjefli- 

on$ are emphatical words, and Ihould be uttered, 
not only with a (Irong voice, but alfo with that 
tone of it, that naturally cxprefs the pafEon, or 
ientiment, fignified by them. Once more, 

IX. Conjunflions connedl the different parts of 
fen tences together, and one fentence with another; 
Shewing at the fame time the particular views, in 
which the parts, or fentences which follow,, refer 
to what has already been faid. Such is the ufe of 
the following conjun£tions ; and, alfo, both; nei- 
ther, nor, either, or, though, although, yet, not* 
withftanding, nevenhelefs, for, becaufe, there-* 
fore, wherefore, fince that, that fo, if, provided, 
unlefs, except, at Icaft, whether or not, however, 
namely, to wit, &c* 

A PART 



3 4 A Jhort Engtijh Grammar m 



PART III. 

Of Sentences. 

THIS third part of Grammar called fyntax, 
conflru^lion, (hews how to join words Xom 
gether in fentences, fo as intelligibly to exprcfs the 
thoughts of the fpeaker by them. And the Eng- 
lifh fyntax is, perhaps, the mod fimple and eafy of 
any language in the world ; for, to make a fentence 
with £ngli(h words, little more is neceiTary than to 
utter the words, which exprefs the ideas of the 
mind, in tjie order in which thofe ideas ariie there. 
In doing which, thefe following things fbould be 
obferved. 

1. If an article accompanies a noun hy ttfelf ; It 
fbould immediately precede it. £. g. A man,. the 
king ;. the men, the kings. 

2. If the article and noun are accompanied with 
one, or more aJjedtives j the adje<5lives (hould be 
inferted between, them ; thus, A good, man; .the 
wife and juft prince. Yet in fuch a fentence as 
the following, the adjedlive follows the noun. A 
mariy good in his morals* A ntan^ good by the pra^ice 
pf beneficence* 

3. Two nouns, or a noun and pronoun, fig^ 
nifying the fame perfon, or thing, are put in the 
fame cafe, *E. g. I the writer, wifh thee the 
reader, every real good. Where I the writer, fig* 
nifying the fame perfon, are in the nominative 
cafe, preceding the verb \ and thee.jthe reader, are 
botfi in the fame oblique cafe, foUdwing it. And 
even if a veib fignifying being, pofture, or gefture^ 
comes between fuch nouns, or a noun and pror 
noun ; they alfo are in the fame cafe, E. g. He 
is the Joveretgn^ he ftU as lord^ jhe walks as a' queen. 

Where 



A flicTt Englijh Gramma f. ^j 

Where he the fovereign, he lord, and {be a queen, 
figiiifying the fame perfons refpeftively, are all in 
the fame nominative cafe. 

4. All prepofitions, whether the common cafual 
ones, as of, to, for, with, from, in, by; or any 
other whatfoever, have after them the oblique cafe 
of the noun, or pronoun, which they, precede ; and 
never the jiominative cafe, as before obferved : for 
example. Of me, to him, for her, through whom^ 
above us, beneath them; and not, of J, to he, for 
Ihe, through who, above we, beneath they; all 
which are grofs improprieties. 

5. The noun or pronoun that precedes* the , verb 
as its agent, or patient, is always in the nominative 
cafe ; but that noun or pronoun which follows the 
verb, expreffing its obje<Sl, fubjefl, or cffecS, is in 
the oblique cafe ; as in thefe expreilions, I viiited 
him, (he told her, he faw bim^ we love them, yoa 
pleafe us, they refpe<Sl you, &c. and not, me vh 
fited he,^ her told (he, him (aw he, &c. The only, 
danger to (Ir.angers of faUing info fuch improprieties^ 
and thofe mentioned Jn the preceding particular, is 
in the ufe of the perfonal pronouns, I, thou, he, 
(he, we, who, they; the oblique cafes of which, 
all differ from their nominatives, and both (liould 
be ufed ^s direded by thefe two rules: but aU 
ether nouns, and pr&nouns h^ve their nominatives 
and oblique cafes alike; at\d therefore there is no 
danger of ufing the one for the other. 

6. The verb (hould be of the fame perfon, and 
rj umber, with its nominative cafe. E. g. I read, 
we walk, they fit ; and not as fome improperly 
fpeak, I reads, we walks, they fits:. for all thefe 
jaft verbs are of the third perfon Angular; where- 
as, not one of their nominative cafes is the third 
perfon fmgular, but the firft perfon fingular, and 
the firft and third plural ; and therefore, thefe laft 
cxpreflions are not grammatical, ^ 

7. Col- 



34 jtjhert Englijh Grammar. 

7. ColIcAive nouns, which in the Hngtriar num- 
ber iignify many ; fuch as the people, the com- 
pany, the crew, may properfy have their verbs, 
chher in the fingular, or plural number; as in tfaefe 
expreffions. The people approves, or approve $ the 
company ciders, or order ; the crew works, of 
work the (hip. 

8. Two or more nominatives fingular ffiould 
have a verb plural, of the fame perfon with the 
perfonal pronouns, that would properly exprefs 
both nominatives. £. g. William and I are 
friends, i. e. we are friends : You and George are 
wife, i. e. you are wife : Robert and John are 
good, i. e. they are good. 

9. Nouns, adje£Hves, pronouns, and verbs, have 
often prepofitioRS between them, and their follow- 
ing nount • £. g. Nouns have, in thefe expref- 
fions ; The crram of the head^ a bird in the band. Ad- 
jedives in thefe ; Werlhy ofboneur^ addi^ed toftudyy 
eentinud toith his lot. Pronouns in thefe ; Which of 
MS? He with the hat : and verbs in thefe ; Mejgiki 
f4r the generaly he rode through the army* 

10. Verbs are often followed in a fentence by 
the infinitive mood ; thus, he loves to waik^ fie 
hates to /fV, he war like to have fallen, fhe is about ^ of 
going to write. The infinitive mood alfo'often fot- 
]aws both the verb, and its following noun, thus; 
He deftred his friend to Jit down, he commanded his 
fsrvants to attend, 

II'. Time, and mcafure, are moft commonly 
exprefe'd without prepofiiion?. E. g. He lived ten 
years at London; fhe was three months abfent; 
the houfe is fixty feet long, forty feet wide,- and 
fihy feet high. 

It, A queftion is commonly ftated" by putting 
the verb, or its auxiliary, before its nominative, 
th-us^ J Loves he to ride ? or thus,. Does he love to walk? 
If^at dees he fay ? fFhen will he come ? 

Of 



A flmrt EngUfli Grammar, 35 

Of Punctuation. 

After this account of the conftruflion of fen- 
tences, I (hall now (hew how they fhould be 
f>ointed ; and explain other marks that have re- 
lation to them, commonly ufed in writing, and 
printing. 

In pointing fentenccs, the comma is lifed, this 
(,) 5 the femi-colon, this (;) ; the colon, this (:) ; 
the period, or full ftop, this (.) ; the break, this 

(-- ) ; the point of interrogation, this (?) ; of 

admiration, this {!). 

This (-) is the hyphen, ufed in dividing words 
into fyllables, and compound words into their 
components i as in na-ture, vice-roy. This (a) 
is the caret, fignifying famething wanting fhould 
come in there, l^his {*) is the apoftrophe, which 
intimates a letter is left out, as in 'tis, us'd j or the 
genitive, or poffeflive cafe, as king's, majefty's. 
I'his () is the parenthefis, which includes fome- 
thing which may be read or omitted, without inter- 
rupting the fenfe. Thefe [J are the brackets, the 
contents of which (hould be omitted, or tranfpofed 
to fome other place. And thefe i \ are called 

braces, between which, words may be placed, 
which fhall connect the words on their fides. 

The fign of a paragraph, efpecially in the Holy 
Scriptures, is this (^J ; of a feiStion, this (§) ; of 
a quotation in the beginning, and on the margin, 
this (") ; and in the end of it, this ("). 

The marks of reference to the margin, or bot- 
tom of the page, are, the afteriik, this (*), which 
al fo ferves to fill up blanks ; the obelifk, this (f) ; 
the double obeliflc, this (J) 5 the parallel, this (||J ; 
the index, this (\^) j numeral figures, i, 2, 3, 4, 
&c. and alphabetical letters, a, b, c, d, &c. 

The 



36 A Jhrt EngUJh Grammar 

The paufe of the voice in reading, fliould be as 
long at the comm?) as while you could fay, one ; 
at the femi-colon, one, two ; at the colon, one, 
two, three ; at the full flop, break, interrogation, 
and admiration, one, two, three, four ; at the end 
of the paragraph, while you could read one line ; 
and of the fedion, while you could read two. 

In pointing a compofition, the following method 

feems to noe, the moft natural, and ufeful -, V4z. 

I. That the fmaller parts of a fentence fhould be 

pointed with commas, except the laft. 2. If the 

/mailer parts have particulars^ each of them fhould 

have a comma after them, except the laft, which 

ihould be pointed with a femi-colon. 3. So alf* 

ihould premifes,conditions, antecedents, be pointed, 

^before you come to the confequents. 4. The fame 

rules fhould be obferved in pointing confequents, 

5, If at the end of them, the fentence is compieat; 

.it fhould be flopM with a period : But if fomething 

is to be added by way of explicrtion, illuflration, 

^iroof, or argument 4^*^ then 6. Inftead of a period, 

a colon fliould be ufed before this addition ; which 

^Ifo fhould be pointed according to the preceding 

rules ; and at the end of it, fhould be the period. 

Many of thefe direfiions are illuftrated by the 

pointing of this very paflage, where I am propofmg 

them 5 atid generally, by the punftuation of thi« 

book. 

Of the Emphasis and Cadence. 

Emphatical words are the moft fignificant, and 
important in a fentence ; which fhould be diftin- 
guifhed by pronouncing them more flrongly, than 
the other \^ords of the fame fentence; which other 
words are faid to be uttered in cadence, becaufe 
the voice falls to a lower key in fpeaking 
them, than in fpeaking the emphatic words. — 

By 



A Jhort EngU/h Grammar. ^.y^ 

By laying the einphatfis on the diiferenC words of a 
fentence, different fenfes will be conveyed by the 
iame words, £. g. If in uttering this fentence^, 
Jgbn is gcod^ the emphafis be laid on John ; it inti- 
mates he is fo, whoever are not; it laid upon if^ 
it fignifies he is fo, whoever may fay the contrary ; 
if upon goad^ it fignifies he is fo indeed, and not 
in Ihew only : But if the whole be delivered^ 
^thout emphafis ; nothing more is intimated than: 
the obvious meaning of the propofition. The dif* 
ferent fenfes, conveyed by laying the emphafis- 
upon the different words of the fame fentence,. 
feems to arife from aa antithefis^ which the em- 
phafis fuggefb ; and which throws a fhong light 
upon the intention of the fpeaker, in uttering it. 

If there is an anti thefts in a fentence;' that word 
of it, that mofl diredly points it out, is empha- 
tical. Thus, in this antithefis. The things which 
are fun^ are temporal i but the. things which, ftre not 
feetiy are eternal \. the word not is emphatic ; and in 
this. He has fuffered fir Jin^ the jufty fir the unjuft,. 
that he might bring us unto God; the word unju/I is 
emphatic : Where we may obferve that the em- 
phafis even removes the accent from its proper, 
to an otherwife improper place ;. that the antithefis-^ 
may more fully appear. 

Though all fentences have not emphatic words,, 
with riegard to antithefes ; for many have no anti- 
thefes in them, either exprefs^d, or underflood ; . 
yet in all fentences, there are fome words of greater 
importance than others ; upon which, in reading, 
and fpeaking^ the emphafis fhould be laid : Such 
are generally interjedions, and nouns j and' verbs,. 
when alone. If nouns and- verbs are accompanied' 
with adjectives,, and adverbs, efpecially- thofe of- 
quality J the ilronger emphafis (hould be- generally 
laid on thefe lafl i and the fmaller words of a fen- 
Ccnve^ fuch as the articles^ pronouns,, auxiliary 

[DX verbs,. 



3* AJhtrf EngUpi'Orwnmr. 

verbs, prepofititfns, and conjunSbhs j If *thejr ie 
■not obvioufly ctnphatical, IfaoyM be^tittcred'rn ca- 
•dence;*or with a lower voice* So '^Ifo fhouid 
whole 'fcnrenccs of \th hnportance i^ uttered; 
fuc h as are only added as flight explications ; ^nd 
•thofe, in particular^ that are indofed in parenthefes. 
By this means, the fenfe will be more ftrongly- con- 
veyed ; and a tircfome monotony will "be agreeably 
'avoided. 



PART W. 

Of V'E^RSIF'I C ATIOiN. 

AN 'Eft^lifli veffe may cbnfiftof two, 'three, or 
four lines, or more, if connected with* harmo* 
nious numbers, and rhimes, till you come to "a fe- 
cond verfe, beginning, and proceeding in tbe^fame 
'manner : Yet a fingle line in a verfe, is alfo com- 
monly called a verfe; and all the lines 6f a verfe 
together, aftanza, 

£ach line in a verfe conftfts of fyllables, difpofed 
in fuch a manner as to be harmonious, or pleifing 
'to the ear. 

This harmony arifes from a due mixture, hot fo 
properly of lollg3^, and fliort, as of ftrong, and iveak. 
Syllables : The accented fyllables, and riie empha- 
tic mondfyllables being the ftrong ; and the unac- 
'cented fyllables, and the monoiyuabjes in cadence, 
being the weak. * 

The fyllables of a line may be divide<Milto ftet, 
v^hich may coilfift either or a 'ftrong, and weak 
lyllable, like the Latin Trochey 5 orof a weak, and 
ftrong fyllable, like the Iamb j Or 6f a ftrong, and 
two weak fyllables^ like the Da'dlyle; or of two 

3 urcak 



« >» 



^WtiM fyllables, and,a.flroiig,,Uke.tbe AnapaeA; or 
SL foot may.confift qnly^ of on« fyllable^ analogous 
to the Latin Gsefura. 

Moft of thefe feet are excniplified. in thefe two 
lines, of ten fyllables each« 

Nature, andl niture^s | law's, lay^ hid in | night : | 
God faid, I let New'lton be, j and all | was light. { . 

The- two following lines confift of feet which 
have two weak fyllables, and one ftrong one 5 or- 
of Anapaefts ; where the two weaker not- being. 
linger than the ftrong fy liable, afenfible brt(kn&fs^ 
and rapidity is obfervable in them. 

Tis the voice | of the fluglgard, Ihearil him com- 
plain, | 
You have wak'd | me too foon j 1 1 muft flumlber- 

again. | * . ' 

Verfts*are coniie£led with rhime,. when the final- 
fyllable, or woMvof one line, founds like the final 
fyllable^ orwDrdx>f another ; asiin the above lines^. 
\fi«ere light rhimcs with night^\ and again^ with 
i:empiaittk^—^l( there be an harmonious difpofitioa 
of ftrong, and weak fyllables in lines, but no con- 
nedling rhimes ; - fuch poetical productions are faid 
to be in blank verfe. 

The lines of verfes may confift of fyllables, from 
two to fourteen ; and in the fame verfe, may be of 
unequal lengths ; and may be conne6led with rhime, 
either every twcr together, and fometimes three ; 
or every other two, alternately ; or the three firft 
may be fo connefled, and then there may be a 
line, with which another fhall rhime, after three 
lines like the three firft, of the fame ftanza ; as in 
the following. 

' [D] 2 How 



40 A Jbori Engli/h Grammar • 

How hippy is the rdral clow'^i. 
Who, far rcfn6v'd from noife of tow^n^ 
Contemns the glories of a crow'n \ 

And in his fafe retreat. 
Is pleafed with his loV degree ; 
Is rich in decent poverty' ; 
From ftrifc, from care, and bus'nefs free; ' 

At once both good and great. 

And many other ways may this connexion 1>e 
carried on, either in imitation of others, or accord- 
ing to the writers own invention and fancy. 

Finally. It is reckoned a great weakncfs, and 
imperfedlion in Englifli verfes, to have any fuper- 
<iluous words, or even unneceflary fyllables in them 4 
fuch as the terminations eth^ and ed*y the fyllabical 
'quantity of which, fhould generally be done away, 
k' poilxble ; as by writing l<n>esy for loveth ; and 
iov^d^ for loved. And in general, the more fully 
verfes are freighted with important fenfe; and ani- 
.mated with flriking metaphors, pertinent jinvilies 
and aliuiions, and lively fallies of wit and humour ; 
and the more highly they are decorated with pro- 
priety, dignity, and grace ; the more excellent 
and perfe(^ aie they efteemed, by good judges of 
poetry. 



Xhe Ehd of the •Gila.mmaa. 



%■ 



>:?3»^*»^^r?^<>52«J»?^i5^w 



•>v^y/=-/^--vt 



Significant Initial Lctt^rc. 

A. B. Artium Baccalaureus, Batcbikr of Arts. 
A, D. AtwxoliQXAxtA^mtbe'yearofma^.Lflrd, 
A. M. Artium Magifter^ Majier of Arts. 

A. S. S» AiTCk)uark)rum Societal^ Socius, Felbm- 

tfthe Society of the Antiquarians. 

B. A. Batchelor of Arts. 

B. D. Batchelor of Dwinity. 

a 8. Cuftos Sigilli, Keeper of the Seal 

C. P. S. Cuftos Privati Sigilli, Keeper rf^Prlvj 

SeaL 

D. D. DoAar of Diviiirty. 

E. g. £9cetnp}i gratia^ ^sfor example. 
i, e. id eft, that is, 

F. R. S. Fellow of the Royal Society. 

G. -R* ♦Georgius Rcx,.Z/«^ Georgt. 

J. H. S. Jeftw iiofirinum SaWator, ^efus ih Sa^ 

viour of Men. 
L. L. 'D- Legum Do£lor,^ Do&or of Laws ^ 
M. A. Matter of Arts. 
M. D. Medicinal Do£l"or, DoSfor of Phytic. 
M. S. Memoriae Sacrum, Sacred ie 4he .memory^ 
N. B. Nota Bene, mark well, 
N.£. New Stile- 
N. T. New Teftament, 
O. S. Old Stile, 
O. T. Old Teftaoient. , 
P. S. Poft fcriptum, Pojlfcript. 
<q. d. quafi dixiflet, as if tie hadfaid* 
<\. s^ quantum fufficit, as much as isjufficienl. 
S. T, P; Sanaae Theologiaj Ptt)fcffi>r, Profefdr^ or 

DoSfor of Holy Divinity. 

Ufual 



^ ;^4.■5 f\^«\:i n£^^<:fv-»jH.r^u«^^^ltv^ 



TJfiial ABBREiriATTONS, 



^n. In. the year. An> 

fwer. 
•Abp. AodiKBifliop* 

Adm*. Admiral. 
Adm". Adcnintftrators. 
Bar^. Baronet. 
Bp. Bifhop. 
B?. Brother; 
Cant. Canticles; 
Capt. Captain. 
'Chap. Chapter. 
'Cent. Centum, an ban- 

dred, 
CI. Clerk, Clergy*man. 
'Co, County, Coinpany. 
•Col. Colonel. 
'Com'. C6mfmffi^ner, 
D**. Ditto, the fame. 
T>\ DoQor. 
«on*»**. Honopablc 
id. idem, the'fame^ 
"ibid. Jbidem, in the fame 

place* 
K'. Knight. 
I/. Lord. 



'Iiadp» Ladyfbjp. 
Math. Ma tbeiiiatics,Ma- 

tbematicians. 
^M^. Mafter, pr9munccd 

M". Miftrcft. 

Meff". Meffiews, Mif- 

tcrs, 
Obj. Objea, ob}caion. 
Pari'. Parliament. 
Per Cent. Per Gbntum, 

by the- hundred* 
RevJ^. Reverend. 
R?. HohWc, Right Ho- 

nopablei 
Scfl. Sciiictt, -f. i. fcirt 
t Ucet^ tO'Wity, 
S'. Sir. ^ 
S^. Sainti 
Ven Verfe 
Vkk Vride, S^^. 
Viz. Vi<kliGet, i.e. vi- 

dtr6 licetv trwit. 
Sec. et c«tcra, andihe 

refiiandfoforth^ 



P 1 N I S. 



(Ilf 



'X 



J^'J