(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Archaeologia aeliana, or, Miscellaneous tracts relating to antiquity"

/o 



ARCHAEOLOGIA AELIANA. 

THIRD SERIES, VOLUME VI. 



ARCHAEOLOGIA AELIANA: 



MISCELLANEOUS TRACTS 
RELATING TO ANTIQUITY. 

PUBLISHED BY THE 

'SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF NEWCASTLE UPON TYKE 

AND 

EDITED BY R. BLAIR. 



THIRD SERIES, VOLUME VI. 




v ( I. ( 



NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE : 
ANDREW REID & COMPANY, LTD., PRINTING COURT BUILDINGS, AKENSIDE HILL. 



M.DCCCC.X. 



D/\ 
(0-70 



NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE 

ANDHEW KEJD AND COMPANY, LIMITED, PBINTIJSG COURT BUILDINGS, 
AKENSIDE HILL. 



610597 



CONTENTS. 



List of plates and other illustrations ... ... ... ... ... ... vi 

Contributions of photographs, etc. ... ... ... ... ... ... viii 

Additions, corrections, etc. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... viii 

Annual report for 1909 ix 

Treasurer's report and balance sheet ... .. ... ... ... ... xiv, xv 

Gifts to Museum xviii 

Gifts of books, etc. ... ... ... ... ... ... xx 

Council and Officers ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... xxii 

Honorary Members ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... xxiii 

Ordinary Members xxiii 

Societies exchanging publications ... ... .. ... ... ... xxxiv 

Statutes xxxvi 

I. On the Medieval and Later Owners of Eslington. By J. Crawford 

Hodgson, M. A., F.S.A 1 

II. A Pedigree of Widdrington of Cheeseburn Grange. By J. C. 

Hodgson ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 34 

III. Extracts from the De Banco Rolls relating to Northumberland : 

1308 to 1558. By F. W. Dendy ... 41 

IV. The Armorials of Northumberland : an Index and an Ordinary. 

By C. Hunter Blair 89 

V. The Church of the Holy Cross, Wallsend, Northumberland. By 

W. H. Knowles, F.S.A 191 

VI. COBSTOPITUM : Report of the Excavations of 1909. By R. H. 

Forster, M.A., F.S.A., and W. H. Knowles 205 

VII. Obituary Notice of the Rev. J. Walker, hon. canon of Newcastle 
and rector of Whalton, Northumberland. By J. Crawford 

Hodgson , 273 

Index 275 

List of Publications 301 



VI 



PLATES. 

I. Octagon Towers, Alnwick Castle ... ... ... ... facing page 89 

II. Coats of arms derived from the Baliol arms ... ... ,, 100 

III. Gateway of Bothal Castle showing Bertram shields ... ,, 102 

IV. Coats of arms derived from the Fitz Roger arms ,, 112 

V. Coats of arms derived from the Grey arms ... ... ... ,, 114 

VI. Gateway of Lumley Castle showing the Lumley arms ... ,, 120 

VII. Coats of arms derived from the Umf re ville arms ... ... ,, 132 

VIII-XL- Northumbrian seals ,, 188 

XII. Romano-British pottery in Guildhall Museum ... ... ,, 226 

XIII. Plan of the Excavations at Corstopitum ... ... ... ,, 246 

XIV. Figured Samian ware discovered at Corstopitum ... ... ,, 270 

XV. Portrait with autograph of the Rev. John Walker ,, 274 



OTHEB ILLUSTRATIONS. 

PAGE 

Alnwick, seal of 136 

Bertram, Sir Robert, seal of ... 182 

Bertram, Sir Roger, seal of ... ... ... ... ... ... 182 

Berwick, seal of 136 

Corbridge, seal of 136 

CORSTOPITUM : 

Fig. 1. Porticoes of south front of granaries ... ... ... ... 204 

Fig. 2. Plan, etc., of portico to east granary ... ... ... ... 210" 

Fig. 3. Do. do. west granary ... ... ... ... 213 

Fig. 4. Site xiv 221 

Fig. 5. Plan and section, site xiv 223 

Fig. 6. -Romano-British god (?) 225 

Fig. 7- Sculptured panel 231 

Fig. 8. Plan and section, site xvn 234 

Fig. 9. Site xvn, showing apse on north side ... ... ... ... 236 

Fig. 10. Furnace near site xvn 240 

Fig. 11. Sections of ditch indicated on general plan ... ... ... 245 

Fig. 12. Figure of Mercury ... ... ... ... ... ... 247 

Fig. 12 A. Greco-Asiatic medal of Septimius Severus ... ... ... 255 

Fig. 15. ' Pig ' of iron ... 267 



OTHER ILLUSTRATIONS continued. 

PAGE 

Eure, Hugh de, seal of 184 

Houghton, Henry de, seal of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 183 

Lumley, Sir Ralph de, seal of 180 

Neville, John, lord, seal of 180 

Newcastle and Carlisle Railway ticket ... ... ... ... ... xxi 

Northumberland, seals of towns in ... ... ... ... ... ... 136 

Railway ticket, old, of paper, xxi ; of brass ... ... ... ... ... 300 

Roman pottery from South Shields ... ... ... ... ... ... xlii 

Seals of towns in Northumberland ... ... ... ... ... ... 136 

SEALS : 

Sir Robert Bertram 182 

Sir Roger Bertram 182 

Hugh de Eure ... 184 

Henry de Houghton 183 

Sir Ralph Lumley 180 

John, lord Neville 180 

Sir Gilbert de Umfraville 187 

Sir Ingram de Umfraville ... . . ... ... ... ... ... 1 82 

John Vesci ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 176 

John de Widdrington 184 

Shields, South, Roman pottery from ... ... ... .. ... ... xliii 

Umfraville, Gilbert de, earl of Angus, seal of 187 

,, Ingram de, seal of ... ... ... ... ... ... . ; . 182 

Vesci, John, seal of 176 

Wallsend, Hoi} 7 Cross church ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 190 

,, ,, plan of 195 

,, ,, south doorway 197, 198 

font 200 

i, ., communion plate ... ., ... ... 202 

Widdrington, John de, seal of ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 184 



Vlll 



CONTRIBUTIONS OF PHOTOGRAPHS, ETC. 

The following are thanked : 

Brewis, W. Parker, F.S.A., for photographs of illustrations facing pp. 89, 100, 

120. 

Haverfield, Professor F., for loan of block facing p. 226. 
Heatley, W. Robertson, for plate x. 
Hunter, Edward, for plates viu and ix. 
Knowles, W. H., F.S.A., for photographs, etc., illustrating his paper on 

Wallsend church. 

Welford, Richard, M.A., V.P., for plate xi. 

An unknown donor : for the four coloured plates of shields of arms facing 
pp. 100, 112, 114 and 132. 



ADDITIONS, CORRECTIONS, ETC. 

Page 42, end of third paragraph, beginning 'These extracts,' is not correct, as 
only the extracts copied are in books beginning volume vn. 

Page 50, line 23, for ' for ' read ' from. ' 

Page 74, line 13, for ' le ' read ' de.' 

Page 99, Amundeville, Robert de. X. describes him as of ' Wotton in Wardale,' 
and blasons for him Vair three pales gules. 

Page 108, Dalden. The birds should be blazoned popinjays not martlets. The seal 
of Jordan of Dalden (D.T. Misc. Charts, 6880) shows four birds, but they do 
not seem to be popinjays. Are they daws in canting allusion to the name? 

Page 118, Knut, Richard. This seal is ascribed to him in error, it is that of 
Nicholas Knut of Keepnich ; the legend on the seal is .... LLVM . . . OLAI 
KNOWT. The changes appear to be derived from the Errington arms. The 
writer has not been able to find the arms of Richard Knut. 



ix 



ANNUAL EEPOET 



OF 



of antiquaries 

OF 



ERRATA. 
Page viii, line 3 from bottom, for ' Keepnich ' read ' Keepwick. 



rnmarn mmioii rMrntrersun, nus 

actively engaged in our pursuits, lie was the representative of 

a local family whose interest in the history and antiquities of 

the district has always been sympathetic, and his loss is much 

regretted. 

The council also desire to join in the universal expression of 
respectful condolence which our noble president has received 
upon the recent death of his eldest son, Earl Percy. 

The council congratulate the society upon the completion of 
a fifth volume of the third series of Archaeologia Aeliana, con- 
taining, as usual, a number of valuable papers in the various 

3 8ER. VOL. VI. V 



Vlll 



CONTRIBUTIONS OF PHOTOGRAPHS, ETC. 

The following are thanked : 

Brewis, W. Parker, F.S.A., for photographs of illustrations facing pp. 89, 100, 

120. 

Haverfield, Professor F., for loan of block facing p. 226. 
Heatley, W. Robertson, for plate x. 
Hunter, Edward, for plates viu and IX. 
Knowles, W. H., F.S.A., for photographs, etc., illustrating his paper on 

Wallsend church. 
Welford, Richard, M.A., V.P., for plate xi^ 

A 1 Af\ -~ - - 



a. o,gc w, .amunaeville, Robert de. X. describes him as of ' Wotton in Wardale,' 
and blasons for him Vair three pale* gules. 

Page 108, Dalden. The birds should be blazoned popinjays not martlet*. The seal 
of Jordan of Dalden (D.T. Misc. Charts, 6880) shows four birds, but they do 
not seem to be popinjays. Are they daws in canting allusion to the name ? 

Page 118, Knut, Richard. This seal is ascribed to him in error, it is that of 
Nicholas Knut of Keepnich ; the legend on the seal is .... LLVM . . . OLAI 
KNOWT. The changes appear to be derived from the Errington arms. The 
writer has not been able to find the arms of Richard Knut. 



IX 



ANNUAL REPOBT 



OF 



jboctetg of 



OF 

NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE. 



REPORT OF THE COUNCIL FOR 1909. 



The council of the Newcastle Society of Antiquaries have 
the pleasure of submitting to the members their ninety-seventh 
annual report. 

Since the last annual meeting, one of our members, Mr. 
Richard Burdon Sanderson, has passed away. Although not 
actively engaged in our pursuits, he was the representative of 
a local family whose interest in the history and antiquities of 
the district has always been sympathetic, and his loss is much 
regretted. 

The council also desire to join in the universal expression of 
respectful condolence which our noble president has received 
upon the recent death of his eldest son, Earl Percy. 

The council congratulate the society upon the completion of 
a fifth volume of the third series of Arcliaeologia Aeliana, con- 
taining, as usual, a number of valuable papers in the various 

3 SEB. VOL. VI. 



X REPORT FOR 1909. 

departments of archaeological investigation. Among them are 
an exhaustive account of excavations at CORSTOPITUM in 1908, 
and details of discoveries near Haltwhistle-burn and at Alnwick 
castle. A fourth volume of the third series of our Proceedings, 
issued monthly to members, is in progress, containing the cus- 
tomary reports of meetings, excursions, etc., with a goodly 
number of contributions upon subjects and objects of general 
interest. The excellent manner in which the society's publi- 
cations are prepared by our editor, Mr. Robert Blair, is again 
heartily acknowledged. 

Excursions have been made during the year to the following 
places : (1) Heddon-on-the-Wall. with Newburn and Ryton ; 
(2) North Yorkshire, including Manfield, Stanwick, Forcett, 
Ravensworth, Melsonby and Piercebridge ; (3) the Roman Wall 
visited in conjunction with the Glasgow Archaeological Society ; 
(4) Marine house, Tynemouth, by invitation of Mr. R. C. 
Clephan, a vice-president, to inspect his collection of Egyptian 
antiquities, arms, armour, etc. ; (5) Brinkburn priory, with Long 
Framlington and Rothbury ; and (6) Grilsland. The council 
thankfully acknowledge the kindness and courtesy with w^hich 
members and their friends were received by the owners and 
occupiers of the places visited. 

Continuing what may be termed the structural improvements 
that have been undertaken by the society of late years, the 
council have given much attention to the oft expressed desire 
for a thorough and effective reorganization of the society's 
library. The valuable books and manuscripts which have been 
accumulated in past years, to which additions are continually being 
made, find no apartment in the castle keep wherein they can be 
properly preserved, conveniently staged and rendered at all times 
accessible. Upon receipt of a special report from the librarian, 
Mr. C. Hunter Blair, on this serious defect in our arrangements, 



REPORT FOR 1909. xi 

the council applied themselves to the consideration of a remedy. 
A suggestion made by Mr. W. H. Knowles, to set apart and 
furnish, at a cost of about 300/., the upper room of the Black- 
gate, in which, with the indispensable adjuncts of light and 
warmth, our literary treasures might be suitably displayed and 
conveniently utilized, met with general concurrence. A sub- 
scription list was opened, and under the impulse of our noble 
president, who offered to add ten per cent, to the sum collected, 
a large proportion of the necessary funds has been provided, 
and the work of adaptation has begun. It is hoped that the 
balance remaining will soon be obtained. 

The operations of the Corbridge Excavation Committee con- 
tinue to be the most important Roman research work carried on 
in the United Kingdom. During the past season Mr. R. H. 
Forster has been continuously on the site, while Mr. W. H. 
Knowles and Mr. H. H. E. Craster made frequent visits, and 
Professor Haverfield and other Oxford friends attended during 
portions of August and September. Among points of import- 
ance which have been established by these investigations, is the 
certainty of the occupation of the site by Agricola ; a ditch, en- 
closing part of the area opened out on the north side may have 
some connexion therewith. In the expectation of finding carved 
or inscribed stones, the neighbourhood of the granaries was 
searched, and immediately in front of the south wall were found 
the bases of the columns of porticos that stood before the build- 
ings, thus providing additional proof of the superior character 
of these erections. Most of the area investigated last year was 
apparently devoted to industrial purposes. One of the ' finds ' 
\v;is an unusually large mass of iron lying near a furnace, and 
that is now engaging the attention of metallurgists. A report 
of the season's work will enhance the value of the forthcoming 
volume of our Archaeologia. 



Xii REPORT FOR 1909. 

On the south-east of the camp of Housesteads, our members, 
Mr. J. P. Gibson and Mr. F. Gf. Simpson, have opened out a circu- 
lar Roman limekiln. Further investigations, in the interior of the 
north-east angle, disclosed foundations of an angle tower in the 
normal position, indicating that this tower had given place to 
another on the north wall where the great murus joins the camp. 
The west angle turret has been excavated and found to contain 
the base of an oven similar to those recently discovered at Halt- 
whistle-burn and Castleshaw. Excavations farther west, on the 
line of the murus at Peel crag, have disclosed a remarkably fine 
stretch of wall masonry and a wall turret hitherto unknown. 
Messrs. Gibson and Simpson have also conducted excavations at 
the mile-castle commonly called 4 the king's stables,' at Gil si and, 
but have not yet completed them. 

At Tynemouth priory, the preservative operations of the 
office of works have been continued. Two items of consider- 
able interest, hitherto unnoticed, have been revealed and noted 
by Mr. W. H. Knowles, who will exhibit explanatory drawings 
to the society. 

Useful restorative work has been effected at the vicar's pele, 
Corbridge, by our president, the duke of Northumberland. His 
grace has caused the accumulated rubbish, with the ivy and 
other injurious growths, to be removed, and the walls and floors 
to be put into a proper state of repair. A simple stone roof has 
also been erected to protect still further this relic of the past, 
which retains, in an unusually complete form, many interesting 
features. 

The churchwardens of St. Peter's at Wallsend having applied 
to our society for advice on the matter of clearing the ruins of 
the old church of the Holy Cross in that town, and the grave- 
yard, from the rubbish which encumbered them, Mr. Knowles 
and another member were deputed by the society to visit the 



REPORT FOR 1909. Xlll 

site, and following their report, the ruins have been enclosed, 
the site excavated, the plan revealed and the walls carefully 
pointed and covered with preservative material. Mr. Knowles, 
who had charge of the works, will no doubt communicate the 
result to the society. 

It is a pleasure to record that the keep and gateway tower of 
Etal castle have been put into thorough repair by our member, 
Lord Joicey, the owner. 

Outside of the society's operations, the council note with 
-ati>faction the publication, under Mr. H. H. E. Craster's 
editorship, of another volume of the Northumberland County 
History, forming the ninth of the series. The district included 
in this issue is that of Earsdon and Horton. Volume x., under 
the same editorship, will deal with a more interesting locality, 
that of Corbridge and Dilston. 

The interest which our fellow member, Mr. William Boyd, 
has shown in the preservation of old landmarks and the elucida- 
tion of past events in local history is exemplified by his publi- 
cation of Oliver's Map of Newcastle in 18-30, upon which he has 
superimposed a map of the town as it exists to-day. To this 

; id production, Mr. R. O. Heslop, one of our vice-presidents, 
has contributed historical forewords, which add materially to 
its value. 

The state of the society's funds, the valuable additions made 
to the museum, and the books added to the library, find appro- 
priate record in the respective reports of the treasurer, the 
curators, and the librarian, hereunto annexed. 



xiv TREASURER'S REPORT FOR 1909. 



THE TREASURER'S REPORT, WITH BALANCE SHEET FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31sT, 1909. 

The number of members on the roll on December 31st, 1909, 
was three hundred and sixty-seven, six of whom are life 
members. During the year sixteen members resigned, three 
died, and three were struck oft' by order of the council under 
Statute III. In the same period twenty-three new members 
were elected. 

The income for the year has been 570/. 17s. 6d., which, with 
the balance of 69Z. 15s. 6d. brought forward, makes a total of 
640/. 13s. The expenditure has been 625/. 9s. 4d., leaving 
a balance in hand of 15Z. 3s. 8d. Another member (Col. Jobling) 
has compounded for his subscription. The composition of twelve 
guineas thus received has been paid into the Post Office Savings 
Bank to the credit of the capital account in accordance with the 
council's order of the year 1890 to that effect. 

Another and enlarged edition of the Guide to the Castle and 
Blackgate was issued during the year, involving an outlay of 
211. 4s. Qd., which, of course, will be recovered as the Guides 
are disposed of. The only other item of expenditure of an ex- 
ceptional nature is that of 91. 12s. paid for the installation of the 
electric light in the great hall of the castle. 

The Library Fund : The donations received and promised 
towards the cost of removing the library to the Blackgate now 
amount to 2791. 12s. 6d. 



TREASURER'S BALANCE SHEET FOR 1909. xv 



BALANCE SHEET FOR THE YEAR 1909. 
RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS ACCOUNT FOR YEAR ENDED 31 ST DECEMBER, 1909. 

Receipts. Expenditure. 

s. d. s. d. 
Balance on 1st January, 1909 

In bank 63 8 9 

In hand 669 

69 15 6 

Members' Subscriptions on December 31st 387 9 

Books sold and bought 28 46 39 6 8 

Castle 122 3 9 88 6 7 

Blackgate 33 3 44 9 7 

Compounded subscription transferred to Deposit Account ... 12 12 

Museum ... 5 11 

Printing: Archaeologia Aeliana ... ... ... ... ... 185 3 4 

Do. Proceedings ... 70 8 

Illustrations ... ... 36 14 

Secretary (for Clerical Assistance) .. ... ... ... 40 

Sundries ... 102 18 2 

Balance in bank ...- 9 12 3 

Do. in hands of Treasurer ... ... ... ... ... 5 11 5 



640 13 640 13 

Examined with Vouchers and found correct, 

JOHN M. WINTER & SONS, Chartered Accountants. 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, 13th January, 1910. 

INVESTMENTS. 

s. d. 

24 per cent. Consols 4218 5 

In Post Office Savings Bank on December, 31st, 1908 83 5 7 

Paid in during 1909 ... 1212*0 

Dividends on Consols 114 

Interest on Deposit Account ... ... ... ... ... ... 223 



141 19 7 



XVI 



TREASURES' s BALANCE SHEET FOR 1909. 



EXPENDITURE ON CASTLF 


, 1909- 




s. d. 


Warden's salary 
Bonus to Miss Telford ... 


65 
1 2 6 


Rent 


026 


Property tax 
For electric current ... 


259 

388 


Gas account 


1 15 10 


Water account ... 


060 


Lock for oak case 


090 


Coals 


17 


Mantles ... 


046 


Repairs ... 
Electric installation in 


3 2 10 


Great Hall 


9 12 


88 6 7 



EXPENDITURE ON BLACKGATE, 1909 

s. d. 

Attendant's wages ... 23 8 

Rent : Newc. Corporation 100 

N.E.R. Company 300 

Property tax 1 17 6 

Inhabited house duty ... 1 2 6 

Gas account ... ... 5 15 6 

Water account 100 

Coals 1 15 

Repairs 469 

Sundries... 10 7 

Brushes .. 13 9 



44 9 7 



DETAILS OF EXPENDITURE FOR THE YEAR 1908. 



BOOKS BOUGHT, ETC., DURING THE YEAR 1909 

Subscriptions to Societies 
Parish Register Society 


s. d. 
1 1 
1 1 
1 1 
1 1 
1 
10 6 


s. d. 

5 14- 6 
1 6 
9 10 
1 15 
11 
076 
1 10 6 

4 14 9 
076 
18 4 


National Trust Society 
Harleian Society 


Surtees Society 


Congress of Archaeological Societies 
Northumb' 1 and Durham Parish Register Society 

History of Northumberland, Vol. IX. 
Rev. E. A. Downman, Plans of Earthworks (original 
The De Walden Library, 3 vols 
Scottish Historical Review (parts 21-24) 
Church's English Costume 
G. Harding, Marshall's Guide ... 


drawings) . 


Asher & Co. , for Transactions of Imperial German Archaeological 
Institute 
Guilds and Companies of London 
Notes and Queries 



Carried forward 



26 15 1 



TREASURER'S BALANCE SHEET FOR 1909. xvii 

BOOKS BOUGHT, ETC., 1909 S. d. 

Brought forward 26 15 1 

History of Furniture, (2 parts) ... 15 

Round's Feudal England ... ... ... ... ... ... 050 

Craighead Bros. , Coldingham Priory 110 

Mawson, Swan & Morgan, Banner Jahrbiicher .. 0110 

Year Book of Scientific and Learned Societies 060 

Reliquary and Illustrated Archaeologist ... ... ... ... 15 

Oxford English Dictionary (Prim-Pyxis) 12 6 

Bond's Rood Screens and Hood Lofts 1 12 

Duffs Literary History of Rome 012 6 

J. W. Fawcett, Lanchester Parish Registers 066 

Otto Fetters for Oberyermanisch-Raetische Limes 013 6 

J. G. Wilson for bookbinding ... ... ... ... ... ... 517 



39 6 8 



SUNDRIES FOR THE YEAR 1909 s. d. 

Subscription to Corbridge Excavation Fund ... ... ... 25 

R. Simpson & Sons for printing 2025 Guides to the Castle ... 21 4 6 

R. Simpson & Son for general printing ... ... 10 14 6 

A. Reid & Co., Ltd., do. do. 4 18 6 

Postage of Archaeologia Aeliana ... ... 7191 

Carriage on books, etc. ... ... ... ... ... 7 10 

Cheque Book 050 

G. S. Simpson, providing tea in the Castle on the occasion of the 

visit of the Glasgow Archaeological Society ... ... ... 200 

Entrance fees to Hexham priory church on the same occasion ... 15 

Secretary for out-of-pocket expenses ... ... ... 15 4 

Do. indexing Archaeologia Aeliana, vol. v. (3rd Series) 330 

Treasurer's out-of-pocket expenses ... ... ... 3 10 6 

Fire insurance premium on ' Brooks Collection ' ... ... .. 1 16 6 

Do. on Castle and Blackgate 519 9 

102 18 2 



xviii CURATORS' REPORT FOR 1909. 

The following is the report of the curators of donations to 
the museum during 1909 : 

Jan 27. By the Rev. W. GREEN WELL, D.C.L., F.R.S., etc., etc., Durham. A 
fine collection of Roman inscribed and sculptured stones, chiefly from 
the camp at Lanchester, cup-marked stones, etc., etc., in all 56 speci- 
mens (the inscriptions are nos. 675, 681, 691, 694-8, 705 and 711 in 
Lapid. Sept.). (Proceedings, 3rd series, vol. iv, page 2.) 

By R. BLAIR. Two bronze 'yetlings' dredged out of the bed of the 
river Tyne about 30 years ago ; each is nine and a quarter inches 
high. (Ibid.) 

By Mr. F. RAIMES, Stockton. A silk banner, 4ft. 6in. square, bearing 

the arms of Raymes of Ay den, etc. (Ibid.) 

April 28. By Mr. R. WELFORD, M.A., V.P. A bronze key, 4 inches long, pro- 
bably of fifteenth or early sixteenth century date, and six late 
English and foreign copper coins found in a quarry near Alston 
manor house. (Ibid, page 34. ) 

By Mr. R. BLAIR. (i) A two-handled jar, or small amphora, 17 inches 
high, of Roman date, from Egypt ; (ii) Two scale models, each 12 
inches high, of Pompey's pillar and Cleopatra's needle. (Ibid. 
page 34.) 

May 26. By Mr. T. MALTBY CLAGUE. 16 lantern slides of local views, 14 of 
them from drawings by T. M. Richardson and one (Newgate from the 
North) by M. A. Richardson, they consist of: Newgate from the 
North ; Newgate, 1823 ; Vaults, St. Thomas' Chapel ; Black Gate ; 
High Level ; North Side of Pilgrim Gate ; Austin's Tower ; South 
Postern at Castle Stairs ; Castle Garth ; St. Mary's Porch, St. 
Nicholas' Church; Whitefriar Tower; Newgate (outer view, West 
Moat) ; Nether Dean Bridge ; Old Tyne Bridge ; Pandon Gate ; 
and Magazine Gate, Old Tyne Bridge. (Ibid, pages 41-42.) 

By Mr. W. PARKER BREWIS, Jesmond. A cylindrical wooden box, 
containing a number of friction matches, made by John Walker of 
Stockton, the inventor of the lucifer match. A correspondent of 
Notes and Queries, writes (10 series, xi, 427), 'The 1st of May was 
the fiftieth anniversary of the death of John Walker, the inventor of 
the lucifer match. It was while he was in business as a chemist at 
Stockton-on-Tees that he discovered, more or less accidently, that 
sulphide of antimony and chlorate of potash formed a mixture which 
ignited under friction. This was in 1825, and a correspondent of 
Notes and Queries remembers buying a box of fifty matches from him 
for one shilling and four pence in 1826. They were known as "fric- 



CURATORS REPORT FOR 1909. XIX 

tion lights," and a box of them containing a folded piece of sand 
paper for the purpose of ignition, is still in existence. Walker did 
not think his invention important enough to patent it. In 1832 
Isaac Holden, who had also discovered the lucifer match several 
years after Walker, drew public attention to it, and the manufacture 
of lucifer matches was commercially begun in 1832 and 1833. Several 
years since it was proposed to erect a memorial to John Walker in 
the town of his birth. ' This proposal has never been carried out. 
(Ibid, page 42.) 

July 28. By Miss FLORENCE EMILY TODD of Prahran, Victoria, Australia (per 
Mr. R. Welford, V.P.). A certificate of membership, under the seal 
of the society, issued to Moses Aaron Richardson, 7 July, 1840, and 
signed by the then president, Sir John E. Swinburne, and the secre- 
taries, John Adamson and Henry Turner. (Ibid, page 83. ) 

Aug. 25. By Mr. W. F. ORWIN, Gateshead. A large dark green silk umbrella, 
with a staghorn handle, the wands being of whalebone. It appears 
to be of late eighteenth or early nineteenth century date. (Ibid. 
page 101.) 

Oct. 28. By Mr. R. WELFORD, V.P. One of the Newcastle and Carlisle Rail- 
way tickets, printed on yellow paper of ordinary thickness, for issue 
after the extension of the railway from Carlisle to Warden in 1836. 
(Ibid, page 118.) 

By Mr. R. OLIVER HESLOP, V.P. A similar ticket, but with the 
booking reference showing that it had been used, which Mr. Wei- 
ford's lacks. (Ibid.) 

By Mr. JOHN S. ROBSON. A fine inlaid chest, 3 feet long by 1 foot 
8 inches high and wide, which Mr. Robson said was 'bought in a 
very bad condition at a sale at Easington manor, co. Durham, 
recently ; after repair its beauty was revealed. It was presumably of 
Italian workmanship, and probably dated from the end of the six- 
teenth or beginning of the seventeenth century.' (Ibid, pages 
118-119.) 

By THE JOINERS' COMPANY OF NEWCASTLE (per Mr. John S. Robson). 
The two coats of arms, one of Mrs. Barbara Farbridge, the other of 
Mrs. Margaret Stephenson, benefactors to the company, which 
formerly hung in the hall of the guild, and which the company had 
' decided to hand over to the Society, to be held by them in safe 
keeping either in the Castle or Blackgate.' Reproductions of the 
escutcheons are given in Mr. Robson's history of the company, in 
Arch. AeL, 3rd series, v, pages 181 and 183. (Ibid, page 119.) 



xx LIBRARIAN'S REPORT FOR 1909. 

By Mr. E. PL WHITE. Two photographs of a fragment of Norman 
string course with star ornament, lately discovered in St. John's 
church, Newcastle, while making alterations for the organ. (Ibid.) 
Nov. 24. By Mr. W. W. TOMUNSON. An early railway ticket, exactly similar 
in design to that reproduced on page 118, Proceedings, 3rd series, vol. 
iv, but printed on green paper, and ' From Greenhead to Hexham | 
2nd. class paid 3s. Od.' It also has the complete printed counter- 
foil. (Ibid, page 127. ) 

By Mr. E. LEONARD GILL. A small copper coin, much worn, appar- 
ently a bodle of Charles II, ' picked up on Holy Island a short time 
ago.' (Ibid.) 

The librarian reported that the following gifts had been 
made to the library during 1909 : 

1909. 

Feb. 24. From Mr. WM. BOYD. Plan of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, based upon the 

survey of Thomas Oliver (1830), compiled by W. Boyd. (Two copies). 

From Mr. ALEX. WHITELAW. An album of photographs of the Roman 

forts at Barhill. 

From THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTE. Physiological and Medical Obser- 
vations. 
Mar. 31. From M. DE BERLANGA. A Monograph by himself on Malaga. 

From Mr. R. BLAIR. Two ancient deeds relating to South Tyne and a 

document concerning Byermoor colliery. 
April 28. From Mr. M. J. PAXTON. Post Office Directory for 1812. 

From Mr. W. I. TRAVERS. The Architectural and Topographical 

Record, no. 4. 

May 26. From Dr. HARTE GANLEY. (i) Sceptis Scienlifica, (ii) The Armorial 
Bearings of the Incorporated Companies of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and 
(Hi) a handbill dealing with Capital Punishment. 

July 28. From Miss EDLESTON. Transcript of a document relating to North- 
umberland and Durham. 

From Mr. E. R. NEWBIGIN. The Life of James Allan. 
From Mr. LAWRENCE JOHNSON. Transactions of the Viking Club. 
From Mr. ED. STANFORD, A Guide to Avebury. 
From Rev. R. EAST. St. Ann's Parish Magazine. 
Aug. 25. From Mr. A. M. OLIVER. Jones's Index to the Records. 

From Mr. THOMAS CHARLTON. An ancient deed relating to Haddrick's 
Mill, Gosforth. 



LIBRARIANS REPORT FOR 1909. XXI 

1909. 
Oct. 28. From Mr. L. JOHNSTONE. Orkney and Shetland Miscellany. 

From Mr. J. W. FAWCETT. The Church of St. John the Baptist, New- 

castle-upon- Tyne. 
From THE MANCHESTER BRANCH OF THE CLASSICAL ASSOCIATION OF 

ENGLAND AND WALES. Second Annual Report. 
Nov. 24 From Mr. A. J. RUDD.- Grant, dated 11 Oct., 1365, by Thomas (de 

Hatfield), bishop of Durham to Kepier hospital. 
From ROBERT BLAIR. The Antiquary for 1909. 

The following books have been purchased during the year : 

The Genealogist'* Guide ; The Guild* and Companies of London ; The 
three volumes of the ' De Walden Library,' (i) Some Feudal Lords 
and their Arms, (ii) Banners, Standards and Badges from a Tudor 
MS., and (iii) Two Tudor Books of Arms; Coldingham Parish and 
Priory ; The Bonner Jahrbucher, parts xcvi and xcvn ; English 
Costume ; A Literary History of Rome ; A History of Northumber- 
land, vol. ix ; Rood-screen* and Rood-lofts ; and Registers of Lan- 
chester, Co. Durham. 

The various serials and publications of learned societies to 
which the Society subscribes or receives in exchange for its own 
have been regularly received during the year (see list, p. xxxiv). 



4M4Mb*4MlMtoft &M&K*.4MMMt 
NEWCASTLE AND CARLISLE-RA1LWAY. | 
I No. o'Clock, 1836, ^ 

_ - _ .- iQ 

From Carlisle to Warden. ^ 

1st Class -Paid 6s. 3d. | 

This Ticket will be required on your Arrival at your Destination. . 
g NOTICE. -tVo Fees allowed to be taken by any Guard. Porter, | 
or other Servant of the Company. 



OLD RAILWAY TICKET (see'p. XJX, also p. XX\ 



THE COUNCIL AND OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY 
FOR THE YEAR M.DCCCC.X. 



Ipatron and {president. 

HIS GRACE THE DUKE OF NORTHUMBERLAND, K.G., F.S.A. 

lt)tce=ipresit>ents. 

LAWRENCE WILLIAM ADAMSON, LL.D. 

ROBERT COLTMAN CLEPHAN, F.S.A. 

FREDERICK WALTER DENDY. 

JOHN PATTISON GIBSON. 

THE REV. WILLIAM GREENWELL, D.C.L., F.R.S., &c. 

FRANCIS J. HAVERFIELD, D.C.L., F.S.A. 

RICHARD OLIVER HESLOP, M.A., F.S.A. 

THOMAS HODGKIN, D.C.L., F.S.A. 

JOHN CRAWFORD HODGSON, M.A., F.S.A. 

THE VERY REV. HENRY EDWIN SAVAGE, M.A. 

THOMAS TAYLOR, F.S.A. 

RICHARD WELFORD, M.A. 

Secretaries. 

ROBERT BLAIR, F.S.A. 

RICHARD OLIVER HESLOP, M.A., F.S.A. 

(Treasurer. 

ROBERT SINCLAIR NISBET. 

Bfcitor. 

ROBERT BLAIR. 

Xibrartan. 

CHARLES HUNTER BLAIR. 

Curators. 

RICHARD OLIVER HESLOP. 
W. PARKER BREWIS. 

Buoitors, 

HERBERT MAXWELL WOOD, B.A. 
ROBERT PEARSON WINTER. 

Council. 

REV. CUTHBERT EDWARD ADAMSON M.A. 

W. PARKER BREWIS, F.S.A. 

SIDNEY STORY CARR. 

WALTER SHEW T ELL CORDER. 

H. H. E. CRASTER, M.A. 

WILLIAM HENRY KNOWLES, F.S.A. 

MATTHEW MACKEY. 

ARTHUR M. OLIVER. 

JOSEPH OSWALD. 

HENRY TAYLOR RUTHERFORD. 

FRANK GERALD SIMPSON. 

WILLIAM WEAVER TOMLINSON. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



XX111 



MEMBERS OF THE 

SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE, 
IST MARCH, 1910. 



Date of Election 

1883 June 27 
1886 June 30 
1886 June 30 

1886 June 30 
1896 Oct. 28 
1906 June 27 
1906 June 27 
1909 Jan. 27 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Dr. Hans Hildebrand, Royal Antiquary of Sweden, Stockholm. 

Ellen King Ware (Mrs.), How Foot, Grasmere, R.S.O. 

Gerrit Assis Hulsebos, Lit. Hum. Doct., &c., Koningen Emms- 

kade 37, The Hague, Holland. 

Professor Edwin Charles Clark, LL.D , F.S.A., &c., Cambridge. 
Professor Ad. de Ceuleneer, Rue de la Confrerie 5, Ghent, Belgium. 
George Neilson, LL.D., Wellfield, Partick Hill Road, Glasgow. 
H. F. Abell, Kennington Hall, Ashford, Kent. 
Professor J. Baldwin Brown, 50 George Square, Edinburgh. 



ORDINARY MEMBERS. 

The signs * indicates that the member has compounded for his subscription, and 
t that the member is one of the Council. 



Date of Election. 
1904 Tidy 27 

1883 Aug. 29 

1892 Aug. 31 
1885 Oct. 28 
1906 Feb. 28 

1908 May 30 

1885 June 24 

1886 Jan. 27 
1898 Mar. 30 

1909 Jan. 27 
19D7 Mar. 27 

1893 Sept. 27 
1904 Feb. 24 

1884 Jan. 30 
1906 Oct. 31 



Adams, David, 22 Manor House Road, Jesmond, Newcastle. 
tAdamson, Rev. Cuthbert Edward, Westoe, South Shields. 
tAdamson, Lawrence William, LL.D., 2 Eslington Road, Newcastle. 

Adie, George, 8 Elmfield Villas, Gosforth, Newcastle. 

Allan, Edward, 9 Osborne Villas, Newcastle. 

Allan, Thomas, 1 Otterburn Villas, Jesmond, Newcastle. 

Allgood, Miss Anne Jane, Hermitage, Hexham. 

Allgood, Robert Lancelot, Titlington Hall, Alnwick. 

Allison, Thomas M., M.D., 22 Ellison Place, Newcastle. 

Appleby, Ernest, 22 Beechgrove Road, Newcastle. 

Angus, Joseph George, Cedars, Osborne Road, Newcastle. 

Archer, Mark, Farnacres, Gateshead. 

Armstrong, John Hobart, 5 Windsor Terrace, Newcastle. 

Armstrong, Thomas John, 14 Hawthorn Terrace, Newcastle. 

Armstrong, William Anderson, Beach Road, South Shields. 



XXIV THE SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE 



Date of Election. 

1892 Mar. 30 

1897 Nov. 24 
1904 Feb. 24 
1896 July 29 

1908 May 27 

1909 Sep. 29 

1893 Feb. 22 

1894 July 25 
1892 April 27 

1904 Feb. 24 
1900 May 30 
1874 Jan. 7 

1896 Dec. 23 

1892 Dec. 28 

1898 July 27 

1883 Dec. 27 

1883 June 27 
1892 May 25 
1894 Feb. 28 

1905 Mar. 29 
1898 Mar. 30 
1892 Aug. 31 
1892 Feb. 24 
1907 July 31 
1891 Dec. 23 

1906 Nov. 28 

1884 Sept. 24 
1891 Sept. 30 
1904 July 27 
1889 April 24 

1888 Nov. 28 

1884 Dec. 30 

1897 Jan. 27 



Armstrong, William Irving, South Park, Hexham. 

Arnison, William Drewitt, M.D., 2 Saville Place, Newcastle. 

Bajles, Thomas, 2 Fen wick Terrace, Newcastle. 

Baily, Rev. Johnson, Hon. Canon of Durham, West View House, 
58 Hallgarth Street, Durham. 

Bain, George Washington, Ashbrooke Road, Sunderland. 

Baj'ley, Kennet H., Alnmet Barn, Durham. 

Baumgartner, John Richard, 10 Eldon Square, Newcastle. 

Bell, W. Heward, F.S.A., Seend, Melksham, Wiltshire. 

Bell, Thomas James, Cleadon, near Sunderland. 

Bird, Henry Soden, 2 Linden Terrace, Gosforth, Newcastle. 

-Blair, Charles Hunter, 32 Hawthorn Road, Gosforth, Newcastle. 
tBlair, Robert, F.S.A., South Shields. 

Blumer, G. Alder, M.D., Butler Hospital for the Insane, Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 

Bodleian Library, The, Oxford. 

Bosanquet, Robert Carr, Institute of Archaeology, 40 Bedford 
Street, Liverpool. 

Boutflower, Rev. D. S., Vicarage, Monkwearmouth. 

Bowden, Thomas, 42 Mosley Street, Newcastle. 

Bowes, John Bosworth, 18 Hawthorn Street, Newcastle. 

Boyd, William, Prestwick Lodge, Ponteland, Newcastle. 

Bradshaw, Fredk., M.A., D.Sc., Earlsgate, Benton, Newcastle. 

Bramble, William, Moorsley House, Benwell, Newcastle. 

Brewis, W. Parker, F.S.A., 2 Grosvenor Road, Newcastle. 

Brown, George T., 51 Fawcett Street, Sunderland. 

Brown, William, F.S.A, Sowerby, near Thirsk. 

Brown, The Rev. William, Old Elvet, Durham. 

Bruce, the Rev. J. Colling wood G., Balsall Common, nr. Coventry. 

Bruce, The Right Hon. Sir Gainsford, Yewhurst, Bromley, Kent. 

Burman, C. Clark, L.R.C.P.S. Ed., 12 Bondgate Without, Alnwick 

Burn, Allon, Bridge Street, Morpeth. 

Burnett, The Rev. W. R., Hon. Canon of Durham and vicar of 
Kelloe, Coxhoe, Co. Durham. 

Burton, William Spelman, 2 Elmheld Villas, Elmfield Road, 
Gosforth. 

Burton, S. B., Jesmond House, Highworth, Wilts. 

Butler, George Grey, Ewart Park, Wooler. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. (1st March, 1910.) 



XXV 



Date of Election. 

1887 Nov. 30 
1885 April 29 
1892 July 27 
1882 

1908 Nov. 25 
1896 Oct. 28 
1901 Feb. 27 
1906 Feb. 28 

1905 April 26 

1887 Oct. 26 

1906 May 30 

1901 Jan. 27 

1892 Feb. 24 

1885 May 27 
1903 April 29 

Vug. 27 
iss:; Dec. 27 

1905 Aug. 30 

1893 July 26 

1886 Sept. 29 
1893 July 26 
1903 Sept. 30 
1892 Oct. 26 
]!><>:, Sept. 27 

1909 Oct. 27 

1906 Jan. 31 

1896 Feb. 26 
1908 April 29 

1908 April 29 

1897 Dec. 15 
1889 Aug. 28 
1903 May 28 

1888 Mar. 28 

1909 Feb. 24 
1906 Oct. 31 

1887 Aug. 31 
1905 Feb. 22 



Cackett, James Thoburn, Pilgrim House, Newcastle. 
| Carlisle, The Right Hon. The Earl of, Naworth Castle, Brampton. 
tCarr, Sidney Story, 14 Percy Gardens, Tynemouth. 

Carr, Rev. T. W., Long Rede, Harming, Maidstone, Kent. 
I Carr, W. Cochran, Condercum, Benwell, Newcastle. 
| Carr-Ellison, H. G., 15 Portland Terrace, Newcastle. 

Carrick, Frederick, 4 Park Terrace, Newcastle. 

Carrick, Thomas, The Park, Haydon Bridge. 

Carse, John, Amble, Acklington. 

Challoner, John Dixon, Mosley Street, Newcastle. 

Champness, Edward C., Restholme, 8 Terrapin Road, Balharn, 
London, S.W. 

Charlton, George V. B., Newton Geddington, Kettering. 

Charlton, Oswin J., LL.B., 1 Eldon Square, Newcastle. 

Chetham's Library, Hunt's Bank, Manchester. 

Clarke, Henry, 27 Dockwray Square, North Shields. 

Clayton, Mrs. N. G., Chesters, Humshaugh. 
tClephan, Robert Coltman, F.S.A., Marine House, Tynemouth. 

Cooke, James, Kilbride, Corbridge. 

Cooper, Robert Watson, 2 Sydenham Terrace, Newcastle. 

Corder, Percy, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle. 
tCorder, Walter She well, 4 Hosella Place, North Shields. 
tCraster, H. H. E., All Souls College, Oxford. 

Cresswell, G. G. Baker, Junior United Service Club, London, S. W. 

Griddle, Horace John, 16 Osborne Avenue, Newcastle. 

Cross, James, 8 Neville Street, Newcastle. 

Crossling, William, Brookside, Moor Crescent, Gosforth, Newcastle. 

Cruddas, W. D., Haughton Castle, Humshaugh. 

Cullen, W. H., 53 Osborne Road, Newcastle. 

Cullen, Mrs. W. H., 53 Osborne Road, Newcastle. 

Culley, Francis John, 5 Northumberland Terrace, Tynemouth. 

Culley, The Rev. Matthew, Coupland Castle, Northumberland. 
*Cuthbert, Lieut. Colonel Gerard G., Bingfield, Corbridge. 

Darlington Public Library, Darlington. 

Davidson, Thomas, Eastfield, Wylam. 

Davy, Mrs. George, Smeaton Manor, Northallerton. 
tDendy, Frederick Walter, Eldon House, Jesmond, Newcastle. 

Dick,R. Burns, 24 Grainger Street West, Newcastle. 



3 SER. VOL. VI. 



XXVI THE SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE. 



Date of Election. 

1909 April 28 

1883 June 27 
1898 Aug. 27 

1908 Oct. 30 

1884 July 30 

1900 Jan. 31 
1897 May 26 
1906 May 30 

1891 Aug. 31 

1904 Jan. 27 

1909 Sep. 29 

1902 Aug. 27 

1905 Oct. 25 
1909 Feb. 24 

1901 Feb. 27 
1865 Aug. 2 
1900 Oct. 31 
1894 Nov. 28 
1908 Oct. 30 
1894 May 30 
1894 Oct. 31 

1894 Oct. 31 

1892 April 27 
1908 Jan. 29 
1905 Aug. 30 

1907 May 29 
1859 Dec. 7 

1908 July 30 
1883 Oct. 31 
1879 

1903 Jan. 28 
1907 Mar. 27 

1904 Jan. 27 
1886 June 30 
1886 Oct. 27 
1894 Aug. 29 
1886 Aug. 28 
1897 Nov. 24 



Dickinson. Frederick Thompson. 1 Ashbrooke Crescent. Sunderland. 

Dixon, John Archbold, 5 Wellington Street, Gateshead. 

Dodds, Edwin, Low Fell, Gateshead. 

Dodds, Miss M. Hope, Home House, Low Fell, Gateshead. 

Dotchin, J. A., 65 Grey Street, Newcastle. 

Dowson, John, Morpeth. 

Drummond, Dr., Wyvestow House, South Shields. 

Duff, Prof. J. Wight, 10 Victoria Square, Newcastle 

Durham Cathedral Library. 

Edleston, Robert Holmes, F.S.A., Gainford, Darlington 

Elliott, James, 18 Heaton Road, Newcastle. 

Ellis, The Hon. and Rev. William, Bothalhaugh, Morpeth. 

Errington, C. S., Ben well Grove Lodge, Newcastle. 

Fairless, Thomas, Market Place, Corbridge. 

Fenwick, Featherston, County Chambers, Westgate Road, Newc. 

Fenwick, George A., Bank, Newcastle. 

Fenwick, Miss Mary, Lingy Acre, Portinscale, Cumberland. 

Ferguson, John, Dalton, Newcastle. 

Flagg, A. F. , Chapel House, Westoe, South Shields. 

Forster, Fred. E. , 32 Grainger Street, Newcastle. 

Forster, Robert Henry, Brooklyn Lodge, Mill Hill, Barnes, 

London, S.W. 

Forster, Thomas Emmerson, 3 Eldon Square, Newcastle. 
Francis, William, 20 Colling wood Street, Newcastle. 
Gayner, Miss Emily S., Beech Holm, Sunderland. 
Gays, Alfred H., 29 St. Oswin's Avenue, Cullercoats, Northd. 
Gee, Rev. H., D.D., F.S.A., The Castle, Durham. 
Gibb, Dr. , Westgate Street, Newcastle. 
Gibson, C. 0. P., Newcastle. 
Gibson, John Pattison, Hexham. 

Gibson, Thomas George, Lesbury, R.S.O., Northumberland. 
Gibson, William James, Bedlington, R.S.O., Northumberland. 
Gibson, William Waymouth, Orchard House, Low Fell, Gateshead. 
Glendenning, George H., 13 Eslington Terrace, Newcastle. 
Gooderham, Rev. A., Vicarage, Eglingham, Northumberland. 
Goodger, C. W. S., 20 Percy Gardens, Tynemouth. 
Gradon, J. G. , Lynton House, Durham. 
Graham, John, Findon Cottage, Sacriston, Durham. 
Graham, Mrs., Findon Cottage, Sacriston, Durham. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. (1st March, 1910.) 



XXV11 



Date of Election. 

1891 Oct. 28 
1845 June 3 

1883 Feb. 28 

1903 Oct. 26 
1909 Oct. 27 
1905 Nov. 29 
1905 Apr. 26 

1884 Mar. 26 

1898 July 29 

1889 Feb. 27 

1901 Mar. 27 
1886 April 28 

1901 Nov. 27 

1902 Jan. 29 

1908 Jan. 29 

1883 Feb. 28 

1904 Feb. 24 

1905 Jan. 25 

1903 Mar. 25 
1888 April 25 

1882 

1909 Oct. 27 
1865 Aug. 2 

1895 Jan. 30 

1899 June 28 

1890 Jan. 29 

1884 April 30 
1901 Nov. 27 
1909 April 28 
1905 Feb. 22 
1898 Aug. 27 
1895 July 31 
J891 Oct. 28 
1908 Nov. 29 



Greene, Charles R., Pigdon, Morpeth. 

tGreenwell, Rev. William, D.C.L., F.R.S., F.S.A., Hon. F.S.A. 
Scot., Durham. 

Greenwell, His Honour Judge, Greenwell Ford, Lanchester. 

Gregory, Arthur, 10 Framlington Place, Newcastle. 

Hadow, Principal W. H. , Armstrong College, Newcastle. 

Hall, Wilfrid, Prior's Terrace, Tynemouth. 

Hardcastle, W. H., 36 Eldon Street, Newcastle. 

Harrison, Miss Winifred A., 9 Osborne Terrace, Newcastle. 

Haswell, F. R. N., Monkseaton, Whitley, R.S.O., Northumberland. 
*tHaverfield, Prof. F. J., D.C.L., F.S.A., Winshields, Headington 
Hill, Oxford. 

Heatley, William Robertson, 4 Linden Villas, Gosforth, Newcastle. 

Hedley, Robert Cecil, Corbridge. 

Henderson, William Frederick, Moorfield, Newcastle. 

Henzell, Charles Wright, B Milburn House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. 

Hepple, Richard Bulmer, 3 Meldon Terrace, South Shields. 
tHeslop, Richard Oliver, M.A., F.S.A., 12 Princes Buildings, 
Akenside Hill, Newcastle. 

Higginbottom, Albert H., Simmondley, Adderstone Crescent, 
Jesmond, Newcastle. 

Hill, Benjamin Roland, Blackett Street, Newcastle. 

Hill, M. C., Southend, Newcastle. 

Hindmarsh, William Thomas, Alnbank, Alnwick. 

Hodges, Charles Clement, Newcastle. 

Hodgkin, Jonathan, Abbey Road, Darlington. 
tHodgkin, Thomas, D.C.L., F.S.A., Barmoor Castle, Beal, North- 
umberland. 

Hodgkin, Thomas Edward, Bank, Newcastle. 

Hodgson, George Bryan, Harton, near South Shields. 
tHodgson, John Crawford, F.S.A., Abbey Cottage, Alnwick. 

Hodgson, John George, Exchange Buildings, Quayside, Newcastle. 

Hodgson, M. N., 131 Westoe Road, South Shields. 

Hodgson, Reuben, 49 Grey Street, Newcastle. 

Hodgson, Rich, le Fleming, 1 1 Belmont Drive, Liverpool. 

Hodgson, T. Hesketh, F.S.A., Newby Grange, Carlisle. 

Hogg, John Robert, North Shields. 

Holmes, Ralph Sheriton, 3 Devonshire Terrace, Newcastle. 

Horsley, William Fred., St. Helen's Terrace, Low Fell, Gateshead. 



XXVlii THE SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE. 



Date of Election. 

1876 

1903 Sep. 30 
1907 Mar. 27 
1888 July 25 

1905 May 31 

1906 Oct. 31 

1909 Sep. 29 

1907 Feb. 27 

1910 Jan. 26 

1908 Aug. 6 
1883 Aug. 29 
1907 July 31 

1883 Feb. 28 

1907 Oct. 30 
1906 June 27 

1900 Jan. 31 

1884 Oct. 29 

1901 Feb. 27 
1899 Feb. 22 

1896 Dec. 23 

1908 July 30 

1897 July 8 
1894 Sept. 26 
1903 Mar. 25 
1897 Jan. 27 

1908 Jan. 29 

1909 Sep. 29 

1885 April 29 
1887 June 29 
1899 July 26 

1908 Oct. 28 
1905 May 31 

1901 Aug. 28 



Hoyle, William Aubone, The Croft, Ovingham. 

Humble, George, 32 Grainger Street West, Newcastle. 

Hume, George Haliburton, M.D., 61 Osborne Road, Newcastle. 

Hunter, Edward, Wentworth, Gosforth, Newcastle. 

Huntley, James, Shildon Grange, Corbridge. 

Irving, John A., West Fell, Corbridge. 

Irwin, Charles, Osborne House, Tynemouth. 

James, Captain Fullarton, Stobhill, Morpeth. 

Jenkin, Henry Archibald, 13 Portland Terrace, Newcastle. 
*Jobling, Col. T. E., Bebside, Northumberland. 

Johnson, Rev. John, Hutton Rudby Vicarage, Yarm. 

Johnson, Robert James, c/o Wilkinson & Marshall, Solicitors, 
Newcastle. 

Joicey, The Right Hon. Lord, Greg-y-Nog, Newtown, Mont- 
gomeryshire, No. Wales. 

Joicey, The Hon. James Arthur. Longhirst, Morpeth. 

Kirkpatrick, C. R. S., City Engineer, Newcastle. 

Kitchin, The Very Rev. G. W., Dean of Durham. 
+Kuo\vles, William Henry, F.S.A., 25 Collingwood Street, Newcastle. 

Kyle, Robert, Belle Vue, Alnwick. 

Lamb, Miss Elizabeth, Newton Cottage, Chathill. 

Lambert, Thomas, Town Hall, Gateshead. 

Langdale, John R , Lynton, Queen's Road, Monkseaton, North- 
umberland. 

Laws, Dr. Cuthbert Umfreville, J St. George's Terrace, Newcastle. 

Leeds Library, The, Commercial Street, Leeds. 

Liberty, Rev. Stephen, M. A. , St.Deiniol's Library, Hawarden, Flint 

Lightfoot, Miss, 5 Saville Place, Newcastle. 

Lishman, William Hutton, 3 Victoria Square, Newcastle. 

Literary and Philosophical Society, Newcastle. 

Liverpool Free Library. 

Lockhart, Henry F., Hexham. 

London Library, co Williams & Norgate, Henrietta Street, 
Covent Garden, London. 

Lovibond, John Locke, West Park, Hexham. 

Lovibond, Thomas Watson, West Jesmond House, Osborne Road, 
Newcastle. 

Lowe, Rev. Joseph, Hon. Canon of Newcastle and Vicar of 
Haltwhistle. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. (1st March, 1910.) 



XXIX 



Date of Election. 

1908 July 30 
1888 June 27 

1908 Nov. 25 
1907 Nov. 27 

1902 Oct. 27 

1877 

1904 April 27 

1904 Jan 27 

1902 Mar. 26 

1905 Oct. 26 
1910 Feb. 23 
1884 Mar. 26 
1891 May 27 

1899 Aug. 30 
I *<.:, Sept. 25 
lss4 Mar. 26 
1882 

1900 Jan. 31 

1909 Sep. 29 

1899 June 28 
1888 Sept. 26 
1904 Sept. 28 
1891 Jan. 28 

1903 July 29 
1909 Jan. 27 
1909 Jan. 27 

1906 Feb. 28 
1909 Mar. 31 
1891 Aug. 26 

1904 April 27 

1883 Mar. 28 
MM Dec. 29 
1896 Oct. 27 

1900 May 30 

1884 July 2 
1898 May 25 



Lynn, Robert Gray, B.A., 98 Polwarth Terrace, Edinburgh. 
Macarthy, George Eugene, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle. 
McAllum, Hugh, Riding Mill. 
MacCormick, Rev. F., F. S. A. Scot., Wrockwardine Wood 

Rectory, Wellington, Salop. 
McDonald, J. C., 21 Nixon Street, Newcastle. 
McDowell, Dr. T. W., East Cottingwood, Morpeth. 
Macfadyen, Frank Edward, 24Grosvenor Place, Jesmond, Newcastle. 
McMillan, James, Oak wood Street, Sunderland. 
McPherson, John C., Ben well Grange, Newcastle. 
McPherson, Leonard, Eastcliff, Whitley, Northumberland. 
McQueen, William Brewis, Oakwood, Clayton Road, Newcastle. 
fMackey, Matthew, 36 Highbury, West Jesmond, Newcastle. 
Manchester Reference Library (C. W. Sutton, Librarian). 
Markham, R. L., 9 Eldon Square, Newcastle. 
Marley, Thomas William, Martori Grove, Darlington. 
Marshall, Frank, Claremont House, Newcastle. 
Martin, N. H., F.R.S.E., Ravenswood, Low FeU, Gateshead. 
Matheson, Thomas, Morpeth. 

Mawer, Prof. Allen, 38 Sanderson Road, Newcastle. 
May, George, Clervaux Castle, Croft, Darlington. 
Mayo, William Swatling, Royal Insurance Buildings, Newcastle. 
Mawson, Joseph, 10 Ravensworth Terrace, Durham. 
Melbourne Free Library, co the Agent General for Victoria, 

Melbourne Place, Strand, London, W.C. 
Middleton, Lambert W., Oakwood, Hexham. 
Milburn, Sir Charles S., bt., Barnhill, Northumberland. 
Milburn, L. J., 25 Claremont Place, Newcastle. 
Miller, James, 11 Framlington Place, Newcastle. 
Miller, R. N. A., 17 Alexandra Terrace, Newcastle. 
Mitcalfe, John Stanley, Percy Park, Tynemouth 
Mitchell, Mrs. Charles William, Jesmond Towers, Newcastle. 
Moore, Joseph Mason, Harton, South Shields. 
Murray, William, M.D., 9 Ellison Place, Newcastle. 
Neilson, Edward, Avondale, Corbridge. 

Newbigin, Edward Richmond, 17 Tankerville Terrace, Newcastle. 
Newcastle Public Library. 

New York Library, c/o Mr. B. F. Stevens, 3 Trafalgar Square, 
London, W.C. 



XXX THE SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF NEWCASTLE-I7PON-TYNE. 

Date of Election. | 

1903 Aug. 26 Nisbet, James Thomson, Criflel, Ryton. 

1896 May 27 tNisbet, Robert Sinclair, 8 Grove Street, Newcastle. 

1893 Feb. 22 j Northbourne, The Right Hon. Lord, Betteshanger, Kent. 

1892 Nov. 30 ^Northumberland, His Grace The Duke of, E.G., F.S.A., Alnwick 

Castle, Northumberland. 
1901 Feb. 27 Ogilvie, Frank Stanley, Sollershott West, Letchworth, Herts. 



1897 Oct. 27 



Ogle, Capt. Sir Henry A., bt., R.N., United Service Club, Pall 



Mall, London. 

1898 June 28 *0gle, Bertram Savile, Hill House, Steeple Aston, Oxon. 
1898 June 28 Ogle, Newton, Kirkley, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. 
1901 June 5 ^Oliver, Arthur M., 1 Fenham Terrace, Newcastle. 
1906 May 30 ' Oliver, John Thompson, 11 Highbury, Jesmond, Newcastle. 
1901 Oct. 30 Oliver, Robert Charles, Bowmen Bank, Morpeth. 
1889 Aug. 28 Oliver, Prof. Sir Thomas, M.D., 7 Ellison Place, Newcastle. 
1894 Dec. 19 tOswald, Joseph, 2 Worswick Street, Newcastle. 

1906 Nov. 28 Oxberry, John, 21 Grasmere Terrace, Gateshead. 
1901 Jan. 30 Page, Frederick, M.D., 1 Saville Place, Newcastle. 

1889 Aug. 28 Park, A. D., Holly Lodge, Elmfield Road, Gosforth, Newcastle. 
1896 Oct. 28 Parker, Miss Ethel, The Elms, Gosforth, Newcastle. 
1884 Dec. 30 Parkin, John S., 52 Earl's Court Square, London, S.W. 

1907 Sept. 18 i Parmeter, Noel Llewellyn, Bowland Lodge, Grainger Park Road, 

Newcastle. 

1898 Jan. 26 Peacock, Reginald, 47 West Sunniside, Sunderland. 
1891 Feb. 18 ! Pease, Howard, B.A., F.S.A., Bank, Newcastle. 

1906 Mar. 28 Perrett, J. R., Glendyn, Jesmond Road West, Newcastle. 
1884 Sept. 24 Phillips, Maberly, F.S.A., Steyning, Enfield, Middlesex. 
1880 Philipson, Sir George Hare, M.D., Eldon Square, Newcastle. 
1888 Jan. 25 Plummer, Arthur B., Prior's Terrace, Tynemouth. 

1898 Feb. 23 Porteus, Thomas, 36 Avenue Hill, Leeds. 
1896 Mar. 25 Pybus, Rev. George, Grange Recto^, Jarrow. 

1882 Pybus, Robert, 42 Mosley Street, Newcastle. 

1907 Jan. 30 Raimes, Alwyn Leslie, Hartburn Lodge, Stockton-on-Tees. 
1905 July 26 Raimes, Frederick, Hartburn Lodge, Stockton. 

1908 Jan. 26 Reah, J. H., Newlands, Gosforth, Newcastle. 

1887 Aug. 31 Reavell, George, jun., Alnwick. 

1883 June 27 Redpath, Robert, 5 Linden Terrace, Newcastle. 

1908 Aug. 26 Reed, George P., St. Anne's, Heaton Road, Newcastle. 

1888 May 30 Reed, The Rev. George, Killingworth, Newcastle. 
1894 Feb. 28 j Reed, Thomas, King Street, South Shields. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. (1st March, 1910.) 



XXXI 



Date of Election. 
1905 Mar. 29 
1 883 Sept. 26 

1886 Nov. 24 

1894 Jan. 31 

1891 July 29 

1905 Mar. 29 

1908 July 30 

1909 May 26 

1895 July 31 
1898 Jan. 26 

1906 Jan. 31 
1906 May 30 
1889 July 31 

1905 Feb. 22 
1901 June 5 
1883 Jan. 31 
1900 Aug. 29 

1900 Mar. 28 

1906 June 27 

1907 July 31 

1909 Aug. 25 

1906 Feb. 28 
1894 Mar. 25 

1908 Nov. 25 

1901 Jan. 30 
1893 April 26 

1892 Sept. 28 
1891 Dec. 23 

1887 Jan. 26 

1904 June 1 

1905 April 26 

1910 Jan. 26 

1893 Nov. 29 
1901 Oct. 30 

1907 May 29 

1909 Jan. 27 



Reid, Sidney, 26 Claremont Place, Newcastle. 

Reid, William Bruce, Cross House, Upper Claremont, Newcastle. 

Rich, F. W., Eldon Square, Newcastle. 

Richardson, Miss Alice M., Holliuwood, Torquay. 

Richardson, Frank, Clifton Cottage, Clifton Road, Newcastle. 

Richardson, George Beigh, M.A. (Oxon.), 1 Lambton Road, 
Newcastle. 

Richardson, George P., 25 First Avenue, Heaton, Newcastle. 

Richardson, G. H., The Gables, Elswick Road, Newcastle. 

Richardson, Mrs. Stansfield, Thornholme, Sunderland. 

Richardson, William, Field Head, Willington, Northumberland. 

Richmond, Rev. G. E., Riding Mill, Northumberland. 

Riddell, C. D., Felton Park, Felton. 

Ridley, John Philipson, Bank House, Rothbury. 

Ridley, The Right Hon. Viscount, Blagdon, Northumberland. 

Ridley, Thomas W., Willimqteswick, Coatham, Redcar. 

Robinson, Alfred J., 55 Fern Avenue, Newcastle. 

Robinson, Rev. F. G. J., Rector of Castle Eden, R.S.O. 

Robinson, John David, Beaconsfield, Coatsworth Road, Gateshead. 

Robinson, John Walton, Brokenheugh, Haydon Bridge. 

Robinson, John Walton, jun., BSc., 6 Gladstone Terrace, Gateshead. 

Robinson, Richard Atkinson, Mainsforth Hall, Ferryhill, co. 
Durham. 

Robson, Rev. James, All Saints' Vicarage, South Shields. 

Robson, John Stephenson. Sunnilaw, Claremont Gardens. Newcastle. 

Rowell, Stanley, Osborne Terrace, Newcastle. 

Rudd, Alfred George, Low Middleton Hall, Middleton-one-Row. 

Runciman, The Right Hon. Walter, M.P., Doxford, Chathill, 

Northumberland. 
tRutherford, Henry Taylor, Ayre'sTer., South Preston, No. Shields. 

Rutherford, John V. W., Briarwood, Jesmond Road, Newcastle. 

Ryott, William Hall, 7 Collingvrood Street, Newcastle. 

Sainty, Saddleton Frank, Albourn Terrace, West Hartlepool. 

Sample, Harold Ward, St. Nicholas's Chambers, Newcastle. 

Sanderson, William John, Eastfield Hall, Wark worth. 
f-Savage, the Very Rev. Henry Edwin, Dean of Lichfield. 

Schofield, Frederick Elsdon, The Retreat, Morpeth. 

Sclater, James, 11 Portland Terrace, Newcastle. 

Scorer, G. S. , Percy Gardens, Tynemouth. 



XXX11 THE SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF NEWCASTLE-TJPON-TYXE. 



Date of Election. 

1905 Mar. 29 
1886 Feb. 24 

1905 Mar. 29 

1906 July 25 

1905 Jan. 25 
1888 Oct. 31 
1895 May 29 

1906 July 25 

1908 Nov. 25 
1901 Aug. 28 

1904 Jan. 27 

1898 Mar. 30 
1910 Jan. 28 
1891 Nov. 18 
1893 Mar. 29 
1883 June 27 
1903 April 29 

1901 Jan. 30 

1909 Jan. 27 

1906 Feb. 28 

1907 Sept. 18 
1882 

1891 Jan. 28 
1882 

1887 Mar. 30 
1880 

1897 Jan. 27 
1909 Aug. 25 
1866 Dec. 5 
1909 Jan. 27 
1900 Aug. 29 
1895 Feb. 27 

1892 April 27 

1905 Mar. 29 

1899 June 28 



Scott, James, Wingrove, Cleadon, Sunderland. 

Scott, Sir Walter, bt., Grainger Street, Newcastle. 

Shafto, Buncombe Slingsby, Beamish Park, Beamish, R.S.O., 

co. Durham. 

Shields, F. W., 3 Royal Arcade, Newcastle. 

[Simpson, Frank Gerald, The Moorland, Boston Spa, Yorkshire. 
Simpson, J. B., Bradley Hall, Wylam. 
Simpson, Robert Anthony, East Street, South Shields. 
Simpson, W. M., 5 Claremont Place, Newcastle. 
Sisson, James A., Fenham Terrace, Newcastle. 
Sisterson, Edward, Woodleyfield, Hexham. 
Skelly, Frederick George, Alnwick. 
Smith, George, Brinkburn, Gosforth, Newcastle. 
Smith, Wilfred Reay, West Avenue, Gosforth, Newcastle. 
Smith, William, Gunnerton, Barrasford. 
Smith, William Arthur, 71 King Street, South Shields. 
South Shields Public Library. 
Southwell, Rev. Canon, Bishop's Hostel, Grainger Park Road, 

Newcastle. 

Spain, George R. B., Victoria Square, Newcastle, 
Sperice, Philip, Melbreak, Gosforth, Newcastle. 
Spence, Robert, 29 Greville Road, St. John's Wood, London, N. W. 
Squance, T , M.D., 15 Grange Crescent, Sunderland. 
Steavenson, A. L., Holy well Hall, Durham. 
Steel, The Rev. James, D.D., Vicarage, Heworth. 
Stephens, Rev. Thomas, Horsley Vicarage, Otterburn, R.S.O. 
Straker, Joseph Henry, Howdon Dene, Corbridge. 
Strangeways, William Nicholas, Lismore, 17 Queen's Avenue, 

Muswell Hill, London, N. 
Sunderland Public Library. 

Swan, Victor, Prudhoe Hall, Prudhoe, Northumberland. 
Swinburne, Sir John, bt., Capheaton, Northumberland. 
Swinburne, Thomas Murray, 10 West Avenue, Gosforth, Newc. 
Tate, William Thomas, Hill House, Greatham, co. Durham. 
Taylor, 1 Rev. E. J., F.S.A., West Pelton Vicarage, Beamish, 

R.S.O., co. Durham. 

fTaylor, Thomas, F.S. A., Chipchase Castle, Wark, North Tynedale. 
Temperley, Nicholas, Carlton Terrace, Gateshead. 
Thompson, Mrs. George, The Cottage, Whickham, R.S.O. 

1 Elected originally Jan. 31, 1876, resigned 1887. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. (1st March, 1910.) 



xxxiu 



Thomson, James, jun., 22 Wentworth Place, Newcastle. 
Thorburn, H. W., Cradock Villa, Bishop Auckland. 
Todd, J. Stanley, Percy Park, Tynemouth. 

fTomlinson, William Weaver, Lille Villa, The Avenue, Monkseaton.. 
Toronto Public Library, c,'o C. B. Cazenove Sons, Agents, 26- 



Date of Election. 
1892 June 29 

1902 Feb. 26 
1888 Oct. 31 

1888 Nov. 28 
1897 April 28 

Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, London, W.C. 
1900 Oct. 31 ;*Trinity College Library, Dublin. 
1900 May 25 i Turnbull, William, Whin Bank, Rothbury. 
1904 April 27 Turner, G. Grey, F.R.C.S., 22 Jesmond Road, Newcastle. 

1903 Feb. 25 Tynemouth Public Library, North Shields. 

1889 Oct. 30 ] Vick, R. W., Highnam, West Hartlepool. 



1901 Jan. 30 
1891 Mar. 25 



Waddilove, George, Brunton, Wall, North Tyne. 



Walker, The Rev. John, Hon. Canon, and Rector of Whalton. Newc. 
1896 Nov. 25 ' Walker, John Duguid, Osborne Road, Newcastle. 
1896 Oct. 28 Wallis, Arthur Bertram Ridley, B.C.L., 2 Elm Court, Temple, 
London. 

1909 April 24 Watson, J. S., St. George's, Monkseaton, R.S.O., Northumberland. 
Jan. 26 Watson, Thomas Carrick, Plumtree Hall, Heversham, Milnthorpe, 

Westmorland. 

1895 May 29 Weddell, George, 20 Grainger Street, Newcastle. 
1906 Nov. 28 Weddle, John, 12 Lily Crescent, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. 
1879 Mar. 26 jtWelford, Richard, Thornfield Villa, Gosforth, Newcastle. 

1910 Mar. 30 j Wesley, Francis Gwynne, Hamsteels Vicarage, co. Durham. 
1898 Oct. 26 I White, R. S., Shirley, Adderston Crescent, Jesmond, Newcastle. 
1886 June 30 | Wilkinson, Auburn, M.D., 14 Front Street, Tynemouth. 

1893 Aug. 30 i Wilkinson, William C., 12 Argyll Terrace, Newbiggin-by the-Sea. 
1909 Mar. 31 Willans, Mrs., 3 Gosforth Villas, Gosforth, Newcastle. 
1891 Aug. 26 Williamson, Thomas, jun., Lovaine House, North Shields. 
1885 May 27 i Wilson, John, Archbold House, Newcastle. 



1908 Aug. 26 

1904 Sept. 28 
1896 Feb. 26 
1899 Nov. 29 
1898 April 27 
1*97 Oct. 27 
1886 Nov. 24 

1905 Feb. 22 
1908 Oct. 28 



Wilson, J. R. , The Willows, Gosforth, Newcastle. 

Winter, Robert Pearson, Hazelwood, Akenside Terrace, Newcastle.. 

Wood, Herbert Maxwell, 5 The Grove, Sunderland. 

Wood, William Henry, 38 Eldon Street, Newcastle. 

Wooler, Edward, F.S.A., Danesmoor, Darlington. 

Worsdell, Wilson, Gateshead. 

Wright, Joseph, jun., 7 St. Mary's Place, Newcastle. 

Youll, John Harold, 18 Grainger Street West, Newcastle. 

Wyatt, William, 88 Fern Avenue, Newcastle. 



3 8KR. VOL. VI. 



XXXI V THE SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF NEWCASTLE-TJPON-TYNE. 

SOCIETIES WITH WHICH PUBLICATIONS ARE EXCHANGED. 

Antiquaries of London, Society of, Burlington House, London. 

Antiquaries of Scotland, Society of, Museum, Edinburgh. 

Hoyal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, 20 Hanover Square, 

London, W. 

Royal Irish Academy, Dublin. 

Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, 6 St. Stephen's Green, Dublin. 
Royal Society of Northern Antiquaries of Copenhagen, Denmark. 
Royal Academy of History and Antiquities, Stockholm, Sweden. 
Royal Society of Norway, Christiania, Norway. 
Bristol and Gloucester Archaeological Society, c/o The Rev. W. Bazeley, 

Matson Rectory, Gloucester. 
British Archaeological Association c o J. G. N. Clift, Secretary, Hill View, 

Nightingale Road, Guildford. 

British School, The, Palazzo Odescalchi, Rome, Italy. 
Cambrian Antiquarian Society, c'o Rev. Canon Morris, St. Gabriel's Vicarage, 

4 Warwick Square, London. 
Cambridge Antiquarian Society, c/o Secretary, Rev. F. G. Walker, 21 St. 

Andrew Street, Cambridge. 
Canadian Institute of Toronto. 
Clifton Antiquarian Club, c/o Alfred E. Hudd, 94 Pembroke Road, Clifton, 

Bristol. 
Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society, Tullie 

House, Carlisle. 

Derbyshire Archaeological Society, Market Place, Derby. 
Heidelberg Historical and Philosophical Society, Heidelberg, Germany. 
Huguenot Society, c/o The French Hospital, Victoria Park Road, London, N.E. 
Kent Archaeological Society, Maidstone, Kent. 
Lancashire and Cheshire Historic Society, c/o G. T. Shaw, The Athemeum, 

Church Street, Liverpool. 

Literary and Scientific Society, Christiania, Norway. 
London and Middlesex Archaeological Society, London Institution, Finsbury 

Circus, London. 
Nassau Association for the Study of Archaeology and History (Verein fur 

nassauische Alterthumskunde und Geschichte), Wiesbaden, Germany. 
Numismatic Society of London (Secretaries, H. A. Grueber and B. V. Head), 

22 Albemarle Street, London, W. 

Peabody Museum, The Trustees of the, Harvard University, U.S.A. 
Powys-land Club, c/o Secretary, T. Simpson Jones, M.A,, Gungrog, Welshpool. 



SOCIETIES EXCHANGING PUBLICATIONS. XXXV 

Shropshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Shrewsbury. 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, U.S.A. 

Societe d'Archeologie de Bruxelles, rue Ravenstein 1 1 , Brussels, Belgium. 

Societe d'Archeologie de Namur, Namur, Belgium. 

Societe d'Emulation d'Abbeville, France. 

Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, The Castle, Taunton, 

Somersetshire. 
Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and Natural History, Moyses Hall, Bury 

St. Edmunds. 

Surrey Archaeological Society, Castle Arch, Guildford. 
Sussex Archaeological Society, The Castle, Lewes, Sussex. 
Thoresby Society, Leeds. 

Thuringian Historical and Archaeological Society, Jena, Germany. 
Trier Archaeological Society, Trier, Germany. 
Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 10 Park Street, Leeds. 



The Proceedings of the Society are sent to the following : 
Sunderland Antiquarian Society. 
Dr. Berlanga, Malaga, Spain. 

The Copyright Office, British Museum, London, W.C. 
Robert Mowat, Rue des Feuillantines 10, Paris. 
The Rev. J. F. Hodgson, Witton-le-Wear, R.S.O., co. Durham. 
T. M. Fallow, Coatham, Redcar. 



XXXVI 



STATUTES OF THE SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF 
NEWCASTLE4JPON-TYNE, AS AMENDED AT 
THE ANNUAL MEETINGS OF THE SOCIETY 
ON THE 27ra JANUARY, 1904, AND 30r H JANUARY, 
1907. 



Constitution 
of the Society. 



Election of 
Members. 



Obligations 
of Members. 



I. This Society, under the style and title of ' THE SOCIETY 
OF ANTIQUARIES OF NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE.' shall consist of 
ordinary members and honorary members. The Society was 
established on the 6th day of February, 1813, when the 
purport of the institution was declared to be ' inquiry into 
antiquities in general, but especially into those of the North of 
England, and of the counties of Northumberland, Cumberland, 
and Durham in particular.' 

II. Candidates for election as ordinary members shall be 
proposed in writing by three ordinary members at a general 
meeting, and be elected or rejected by the majority of votes 
of ordinary members at that meeting, unless a ballot shall be 
demanded by any member, which in that case shall take place 
at the next meeting, and at such ballot three-fourths of the 
votes shall be necessary in order to the candidate's election. 
The election of honorary members shall be conducted in like 
manner. 

III. The ordinary members shall continue to be members 
so long as they shall conform to these statutes, and all future 
statutes, rules, and ordinances, and shall pay an annual 
subscription of one guinea. The subscription shall be due on 
election, and afterwards annually in the month of January in 
every year. Any member who shall pay to the Society twelve 



STATUTES I ELECTION OF OFFICEKS, ETC. XXXVll 

guineas in addition to his current year's subscription shall be 
discharged from all future payments. A member elected at or 
after the meeting in October shall be exempt from a further 
payment for the then next year, but shall not be entitled to 
the publications for the current year. If the subscription of any 
ordinary member shall have remained unpaid a whole year the 
Council may remove the name of such person from the list of 
members, and he shall thereupon cease to be a member, but 
shall remain liable to pay the subscription in arrear, and he 
shall not be eligible for re-election until the same shall have 
been paid. 

IV. The officers of the Society shall consist of a patron, a Officers of 
president, vice-presidents (not to exceed twelve in number), 
two secretaries, treasurer, twelve other members (who with the 
president, vice-presidents, secretaries, treasurer, and librarian 
shall constitute the Council), an editor, a librarian, two 
curators, and two auditors. These several officers shall be 
elected annually, except the patron, who* shall be elected for 
life. 



V. The election of officers shall be out of the class of 
ordinary members. Any ordinary member may nominate any 
ordinary member or members (subject to statute VI) (not 
exceeding the required number) to fill the respective offices. 
Every nomination must be signed by the person nominating, 
and sent to the Castle of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, addressed to 
the secretaries, who shall cause it to be immediately inserted 
on a sheet-list of nominations, which shall be exhibited in the 
library of the Castle, and notice shall forthwith be given to the 
person so nominated. Any person nominated may, by notice 
in writing, signify to the secretaries his refusal to serve, or if 
nominated to more than one office, may in like manner, 
signify for which office or offices he declines to stand, and 

BER. 3 VOC,. VI. ( 



Election of 
Officers. 



xxxviii STATUTES: MEMBERS NOT ELIGIBLE, ETC. 

every nomination so disclaimed shall be void. The list of 
nominations shall be finally adjusted and closed ten days 
before the Annual Meeting, or before a, Special Meeting to b 
held within one month thereafter. If the number of persons 
nominated for any office be the same as the number to be 
elected the person or persons nominated shall be deemed 
elected, and shall be so declared by the chairman at such 
Annual or Special Meeting. If the number of persons 
nominated for any office exceed the number to be elected then 
the officer or officers to be elected shall be elected from the 
persons nominated and from them only ; and for that purpose 
a printed copy of the list of nominations and one voting paper 
only shall be furnished to each ordinary member with the 
notice convening the Annual or Special Meeting. If the 
number of persons nominated for any office be less than the 
number to be elected, or if there be no nomination, then the 
election to that office shall be from the ordinary members 
generally. Whether, the election be from a list of nominations, 
or from the ordinary members generally, each voter must 
deliver his voting paper in person, signed by him, at the 
Annual or Special Meeting. The chairman shall appoint 
scrutineers, and the scrutiny shall commence on the con- 
clusion of the other business of the Annual or Special Meet- 
ing, or at such earlier time as the chairman may direct, if the 
other business shall not have terminated within one hour after 
the commencement of the Annual or Special Meeting. No 
voting paper shall be received after the commencement of the 
scrutiny. 

Members not VI. Those of the ' twelve other members ' (see statute IV) 

Council. f the Council who have not attended one-third of the meetings 

of the Council during the preceding year, shall not be eligible 

for election for the then next year. 



STATUTES : PROPERTY OF SOCIETY, ETC. 



XXXIX 



VII. A general meeting of the members of the Society 
shall be held on the last Wednesday of every month, in the 
Castle of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. The meeting in January shall 
be the Annual Meeting, and shall be held at one o'clock in the 
afternoon, and the meeting in every other month shall be held 
at seven o'clock in the evening. But the Society or the Council 
may from time to time appoint any other place or day or hour 
for any of the meetings of the Society. The presence of seven 
ordinary members shall be necessary in order to constitute the 
Annual Meeting, and the presence of five ordinary members 
shall be necessary in order to constitute any other meeting. A 
Special General Meeting may be convened by the Council if, 
and when, they may deem it expedient. 

VIII. The ordinary members only shall be interested in 
the property of the Society. The interest of each member 
therein shall continue so long only as he shall remain a 
member, and the property shall never be sold or otherwise 
disposed of (except in the case of duplicates hereinafter 
mentioned) so long as there remain seven members ; but 
should the number of members be reduced below seven and so 
remain for twelve calendar months then next following, the 
Society shall be ipso facto dissolved, and after satisfaction of 
all its debts and liabilities the property of the Society shall be 
delivered unto and become the property of the Literary and 
Philosophical Society of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, if that Society 
be then in existence and willing to receive the same ; and 
should that Society not be in existence or not willing to receive 
the same, then the same shall be delivered to and become the 
property of the Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne. No dividend, gift, division, or bonus in money 
shall be made unto or between any of the members. 

IX. All papers shall be read in the order in which they 
are received by the Society. A paper may be read by the 



Meetings of 
the Society. 



Property of 
the Society. 



Reading of 
Papers. 



\1 



STATUTES: DONATIONS, DUPLICATES, ETC. 



Publications 
of Society. 



Removal of 
Members. 



Donations to 
the Society. 



Duplicates. 



Members 
entitled to 
Publications. 



author, or by any other member of the Society whom he may 
desire 'to read it, or by either of the secretaries; but any 
paper which is to be read by the secretaries shall be sent to 
them a week previous to its being laid before the Society. 

X. The Council shall be entrusted with the duty and 
charge of selecting and illustrating papers for the publications 
of the Society (other than the Proceedings) ; and that no paper 
be printed at the Society's expense before it be read in whole 
or in part at a meeting ; and that no paper which has been 
printed elsewhere be read at any meeting unless it be first 
submitted to the Council at a meeting of the Council, or 
printed in the Society's transactions except at the request of 
the Council. Two illustrated parts of the Archaeologia shall 
be issued to members in the months of January and June in 
each year, such parts to be in addition to the monthly issue 
of the Proceedings, and the annual report, list of members, etc.* 

XI. That the Society, at any ordinary meeting, shall have 
power to remove any member from the list of members. The 
voting to be by ballot, and to be determined by at least four- 
fifths of the members present and voting, provided, neverthe- 
less, that no such removal shall take place unless notice thereof 
shall have been given at the next preceding ordinary meeting. 

XII. All donations to the Society shall be made through 
the Council, and a book shall be kept in which shall be 
regularly recorded their nature, the place and time of their 
discovery, and the donors' names. All duplicates of coins, 
books, and other objects, shall be at the disposal of the Council 
for the benefit of the Society. 

XIII. Every ordinary member, not being in arrear of his 
annual subscriptions, shall be entitled to such publications of 
the Society as may be printed for the year of his first subscrip- 
* But see amended Statute, p. xlii. 



STATUTES : REPEAL OF STATUTES, ETC. xli 

tion and thereafter if in print ; and he may purchase any of 
the previous publications of which copies remain, at such 
prices as shall be from time to time fixed by the Council. 

XIV. Each member shall be entitled to the use of the The use of 
Society's library, subject to the condition (which applies to all 
privileges of membership) that his subscription for the current 
year be paid. Not more than three volumes at a time shall, 
be taken out by any member. Books may be retained for 
a month, and if this time be exceeded, a fine of one shilling 
per week shall be payable for each volume retained beyond 
the time. All books must, for the purpose of examination, be 
returned to the library on the Wednesday preceding the 
Annual Meeting under a fine of 2s. 6d. ; and they shall remain 
in the library until after that meeting. Manuscripts, and 
works of special value, shall not circulate without the leave of 
the Council. The Council may mitigate or remit fines in 
particular cases. 

XV. These statutes, and any statutes which hereafter may Repeal or 
be made or passed, may be repealed or altered, and new, or ' 
altered statutes, may be made or passed at any Annual Meet- 
ing, provided notice of such repeal or alteration, and of the 
proposed new or altered statutes, be given in writing at the 
next preceding monthly meeting. 

RAVENSWORTH, President. 

RICH. WELFORD, j 

f Three Members 

J. P. GIBSON, *An ; 

( of the (Council. 

WM. W. TOMLINSON, 

THOS. HODGKIN, 

1* Secretaries. 
ROBT. BLAIR, 

Newcastle, 27th April, 1898, 



xlii 



STATUTE X.I PUBLICATIONS. 



Register No. 705, Nbld., Sc. and Lit. 

It is hereby certified that this Society is entitled to the 
benefit of the Act 6 and 7 Viet, cap. 36, intituled : "An Act 
to exempt from County, Borough, Parochial, and other Local 
Kates, Lands and Buildings occupied by Scientific or Literary 
Societies. " 



This 6th day of May, 1898. 



E. W. B. 



Copy sent to the Clerk of the Peace, 

E. W. B. 



Seal ofthe 
Registry of 



Friendly 

Societies. '' 



At the Annual Meeting of the Society, on the 27th 
day of January, 1904, Statute X. was amended to read 
as follows : 

' X. The Council shall be entrusted with the duty and 
charge of selecting and illustrating papers for the publications 
of the Society (other than the Proceedings) ; and that no 
paper be printed at the Society's expense before it be read 
in whole or in part at a, meeting ; and that no paper which 
has been printed elsewhere be read at any meeting unless it be 
first submitted to the Council at a meeting of the Council, or 
printed in the Society's transactions except at the request of 
the Council. A complete illustrated volume of Archaeologia, 
bound in cloth or buckram, shall be issued to members in 
June of each year, such volume to be in addition to the 
monthly issue of the Proceedings, and the annual report, list 
of members, etc/ 



STATUTES : SUB-COMMITTEES. 



xliii 



At the Annual Meeting of the Society, on the 30th 
day of January, 1907, the following addition was made 
to the statutes : -- 

' VllA. The Council may appoint sub-committees, com- 
posed of members of the Council, and of ordinary members 
when desirable, for the purpose of dealing with any question 
arising that may require special or expert investigation. 

' It shall be an instruction, to any sub-committee so 
formed that it shall, on its first meeting, appoint its own 
chairman, whose duty it shall be to fix the day and hour of 
each meeting of his sub-committee, in communication with 
the senior secretary of the Society, and to prepare and sub- 
mit a report of proceedings to the Council. 

' Should the work entrusted to any sub-committee extend 
over a lengthened period, an interim report shall be made 
within six months from the date of its appointment/ 




CASTOR WAKE, FROM ROMAN CAMP, SOUTH SHIELDS. 



ARCHAEOLOGIA AELIANA. 



I._ Off THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTOff. 

By J. CRAWFOBD HODGSON, M.A., F.S.A., a vice-president. 

[Eead on the 24th February, 1909.] 

When the Conquest of England was completed by the sub- 
jugation of Northumberland, and its baronies and manors distri- 
buted among Norman knights, the Anglian thanes of Callaly, 
Halton, Hepple, three Middletons and Roddam, either by timely 
submission, or from comparative obscurity, were permitted to 
retain those estates, as were the drengs of Beadnell, Mousen, 
Throckley, Whittingham and Eslington, who also continued to 
hold their property. 

It has been stated that the distinction between thanes and 
drengs involved no difference in tenure ' but merely the extent 
of proprietorship, the owners of one ville being styled drengs, 
whilst those who owned two or three, have the more honourable 
designation of thanes.' 1 But the most recent writer on the sub- 
ject holds that drengage was a variety of sergeanty ' distinguished 
from military service by its peculiar incidents.' It appears to 
have included ' attendance on the lord in his hunting, overseer's 
duties in regard to less favoured classes of the population, mili- 
tary help in case of need without a distinct formulation of 
military service.' Thanes and drengs differed 'not in regard to 
substance, but in regard to their ethnographical origin,' the 
former being of English origin, the latter of Scandinavian. 1 * 

1 Hodgson-Hinde, Northumberland, p. 255. 
la Vinogradoff, English Society in the Eleventh Century, pp. 62, 66. 

3 SER. VOL. VI. 1 



2 THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 

Both thanes and drengs held by, what is termed, a servile 
tenure those in the northern part of the county of Northumber- 
land owed 'truncage' to the castle of Bamburgh, that is, they 
were bound to carry logs, used for firewood, but, apparently, at 
an earlier period, to repair the stockade of the castle. They also 
paid a money rent and were subject to an arbitrary tallage. 

It will be observed that more than half of the estates enum- 
erated lie under the shadow of the Cheviots, several of them 
being contiguous. 

Eslington, which has been selected as the subject of this 
paper, is situated near the southern base of the Eyle hills, where 
the beautiful valley of the Aln opens out into a larger space. 
The ancient tower, built by the native family taking its name 
from the place, stood where the pleasant Georgian house of the 
Liddells now stands, about two miles west of the village of 
Wliittingham, amid an ancient demesne. 

THE FIRST PERIOD, 1161-1362. 

The first owner of Eslington who emerges from the mists of 
the ages is Alan de Eslington i, who in 1161 was tallaged for 
his lands there at five marks. 3 By his marriage with Beatrice, 
one of the five daughters and, eventually, a coheiress of William 
de Framlington, he acquired lands in Framlington, which his 
descendants continued to hold for some generations. 4 

He was probably father of Alan de Eslington n, who, in a 
certificate dated 5th August, 1212, forming a portion of the great 
feodary known as Testa de Nevill, was returned as holding one 
vill in drengage by the service of 40s. a year, he was liable for a 
merchet and aids, and bound to carry timber to the castle of 

' Hodgson-Hinde, Northumberland, p. 256. 

3 Pipe Rolls, A.D. 1161. Hodgson, Northumberland, part in, vol. iii, p. 5. 

1 New Hist, of Northumberland, vol. vu, p. 419. 



THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 6 

Bamburgh. 5 By his marriage with Alina, one of the four 
daughters of Roger de Flammaville, and sister and coheir of 
William de Flammaville, he acquired lands in Whittingham and 
T'hrunton, which materially added to the value of his patrimonial 
property. 6 He was dead when Hugh de Bolbec, shortly after the 
year 1235, returned to the Treasurer the fifth of the eight North- 
umberland certificates for Testa de Nevill, in which document it 
is stated that John de Eslington i holds Eslington of the king in 
chief by drengage, etc. 7 

The De Banco rolls of the fourth and sixth years of Edward 
ii contain the records of suits brought by Robert de Eslington 
against Idonea, widow of Robert de Grlanton, to recover lands in 
Whittingham and Thrunton, originally the property of William 
de Flammaville, which prove not less than five generations of the 
pedigree. Alina de Flammaville by her husband [Alan de 
Eslington n] had three sons, William, her heir, who died, s.p., 
Elias (or Else), his brother's heir, who also died, s.p., and John 
[de Eslington i], who thus became heir of his brothers and 
mother. John [de Eslington i] was succeeded by his son Alan 
[de Eslington in], and he by his son John [de Ellington n], and 
he by his son Robert [de Eslington], the plaintiff. 8 By the aid 

5 Alarms de Eslington tenet unam villam de domino rege in drengagium per 
servitium xl,s\ per annum, et dabit merchetum, et auxilia, et cariabit truncas ad 
castellum de Banburg, et faciet consuetudines spectantes ad drengagium de predicta 
villa nihil alienatum est, vel datum, per quod dominus rex minus habeat de 
servitio suo. Testa de Nevill,' Arch. AeL, 2 ser., vol. xxv, p. 158. 

6 De, Banco Roll, 6 Edw. u, mem. 292. Wrottesley, Pedigrees from the Plea 
Rolls, p. 549. Cf. Hodgson-Hinde, Northumberland, p. 272. 

7 Johannes de Eslington tenet in capite de domino rege Eslingtun in drengagio 
et reddit per annum xl solidos et facit tale servicium quale Willelmus de Caluley 
facit, scilicet facit truncagium castello de Bamburg' et debet talliari cum dominicis 
domini regis et debet heriet et merchet. 'Testa de Nevill,' Arch. AeL, 2 ser. 
vol. xxv, p. 164. 

8 De Banco Roll, Mich. 4 Edw. n ; ibid. Mich. 6 Edw. u. mem. 292. 
Wrottesley, Pedigrees from the Plea Rolls, pp. 533, 549. Cf. De Banco Rolls, A.D. 
1346, roll 347, m. 247 ; see post, p. 51. 



4 THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 

of this evidence the entries preserved in the records can be attri- 
buted with greater precision to the persons whom they concern. 
On the 5th of May, 1247, John de Eslington i obtained from 
the king a regrant or confirmation of Eslington to him and his 
heirs, rendering the foreign service of cornage, suit of the 
county, and truncage to the castle of Bamburgh. 9 This favour 
was probably obtained at the instance of Roger Bertram of Mit- 
ford, to whose charter of confirmation to the abbot and convent 
of Newminster, given on the 28th of March, 1250, John was a 
witness, 10 and whose steward he was. 11 In, or about, the year 
125G he succeeded to part o>f the property of his kinswoman, 
Margaret de Framlington, widow of William de la Tur, 12 and his 
name frequentlv occurs in the Brinkbum Oartulary. He died 
in, or about, the year 1264, the inquisition on his death being 
held at Newcastle, on Friday, 17th January, 1264/5. 13 His wife 
was Johanna, daughter and coheir of Thomas de Pontop ; she 
was living in 1279, when she was described as ' domina Johanna 
quae fuit uxor Johannis de Esselington.' 14 

Alan de Eslington in, eldest son of John de Eslington i, had 
received in whole, or in part, the Framlington property, appar- 
ently on his marriage, for his wife Emma was jointly enfeoffed. 15 
Dying in his father's lifetime, the latter seems to have regained 
possession ; for eight days before his own death he conveyed the 

9 Col. Charier Rolls, 1226-1257, p. 321. 

10 Newmimter Cartulary (66 Surt. Soc. publ.), p. 32. 
" Col. Charter Rolls, 1226-1257, p. 390. 

"Northumberland Assize Rolls (88 Surt. Soc. publ.), p. 413 ; and new History 
of Northumberland, vol. vn, p. 418. 

11 Inq. post mort., 49 Hen. m, No. 18, now catalogued as Chancery Inq. post 

32, No. 4. The inquisition is printed in the new History of Northum- 
berland voLvu, p. 422 n. Cf. Calendar of Inquisitions, vol. i, p. 194, and Excerpta 
ex Rotulis Fimum, vol. n, pp. 425, 426, 523. 

14 Northumberland Axsize Rolls, p. 351. 

15 Calendarium Genealogicum, p. 298. 



THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. O 

manor of Framlington to his younger son, Alexander de Esling- 
ton; 16 a conveyance subsequently contested by his heir. 17 

John de E'slington n was born on the 3rd May, 1248, 18 and 
was already married at the time of his grandfather's death. 19 
On attaining his majority he did homage for his lands, 20 but, 
unfortunately, had disputes, and some litigation, about the 
Framlington property, with the king's escheator and with his 
uncle, Alexander de Eslington. In this connexion inquiries or 
inquisitions were held at Framlington, 21 on the Sunday after the 
25th April, 1281, and at Whittingham, 22 on the Sunday before 
12th March, 1283/4, in consequence of which he seems to have 
abandoned his suit against his uncle. 23 He died about the year 
1292, the inquisition on his death being taken at Eothbury, three 
weeks after Easter, 1293, when it was found that Robert de 
Eslington I was his son and heir, of the age of 22 years and 
upwards. 24 

Little is known of Robert de Eslington i, or of his wife 
Christina or Christiana, daughter of Sir William Riddell, 25 who 
long continued his widow, and was living in possession of her 
dower in the month of October, 1349. 26 

16 Gal. Inq., Hen. in, p. 228. Calendarium Genealogicum, p. 138. 

17 Northumberland Assize Rolls, p. 233. 

18 Inq. post mort., 49 Hen. in, No. 18. 

19 Calendarium Genealogicum, p. 115. 

20 Inq. post mort., 8 Edw. i, No. 38. 

21 Inq. post mort., 8 Edw. i, No. 38. Writ dated 16 Sept., 1280. 

82 Inq. post mort., 11 Edw. I, No. 12. Cf. Calendarium Genealogicum, p. 323. 

3 Northumberland Assize Rolls, p. 233. 

-' Inq. post mort., 21 Edw. i, No. 23 d. Writ dated 27 March, 1293. 

25 Grant by John de Eslington, knight, to Robert his son and heir and to 
Christiana, daughter of Sir William Ridel, and to their heirs in libero maritagio of 
an annual rent of 100?. in the town of Eslington. Witnesses, dominus David de 
Coupland, dominus William Herun, dominus Robert de Maner', dominus Robert 
de Glantone, John de Bromtone, Hugh de Haysend, and others. Court of Wards 
and Liveries, Ancient Deeds, P.R.O., Box 40, No. 35. 

** Inq. post mort., 26 Edw. in, first numbers, No. 45. 



G THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 

On the 2()th of May, 1327, Robert de Eslington n did fealty. 27 
Relief of his lands was pardoned on account of the great damage 
he had sustained through the Scottish wars, but subsequently the 
claim was revived, and by a writ under the Great Seal, issued on 
the 20th of February, 1333/4, his lands were distrained for relief 
from the first to the ninth years of Edward in. 28 Taking advan- 
tage of the king's visit to Newcastle, he sought, and, on the 20th 
of February, 1335, obtained, licence to crenelate his house 
(mansum suum) at Eslington. 29 In 1346 he revived his claim and 
attempted to prove his right to lands in Thrunton which, in the 
time of king John, had belonged to his ancestress, Alina 30 [wife 
of Alan de Eslington n] adducing a pedigree almost identical 
with that set out by his father in the years 1310 and 1312, 
mentioned above. He seems to have been married twice, having 
by his first wife an only daughter, Christina, wife of William 
Delaval, and by his second wife, Elizabeth 31 (who for second 
husband married Sir John Heron, knight) besides two daughters, 
named Elizabeth and Isabel, an only son, George, who only 
survived him by three days. Robert de Eslington 11 died 
on the 7th of October, 1349. His seal, two bars, in chief three 
roundels (?), remains attached to a receipt given, in 1347, as One 
of the Collectors of the Aid, in a Lay Subsidy Roll. 32 An 
inquisition on the death of Robert de Eslington n was held at 
Whittingham on the 17th January, 1349/50, when it was found 
that he held two parts of the manor of Eslington in fee, and a 
third part in reversion after the death of his mother, Christina, 

27 Inq. post mort., 26 Edw. ill, first numbers, No. 45. 28 Ibid. 

29 Pat. Rolls, 9 Edw. in, pt. 1, m. 35. Bates, 'Border-Holds' (Arch. Ael., 
2 ser. xiv), p. 9. 

30 De Banco Roll, A.D. 1346, roll 347, m. 247. 

31 In 1350 Elizabeth, widow of Robert de Eslington, had assignment of her 
dower, viz. : lands in Eslington, Edlingham Wood, lands in Whittingham, Thurs- 
ton and Barton. Inq. po*t mort., 24 Edw. m, Appendix no. 9. 

3V Lay Subsidy Roll, Y? 8 , Public Record Office. 



THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. f 

who was wife of Robert de Eslington, his father, deceased, 
Christina holding it in dower of her said late husband. Chris- 
tina, aged sixteen, Elizabeth, aged fourteen, and Isabel, aged 
twelve years are his daughters and heirs. 33 

Subsequently, in an inquisition after the death of ' George, 
son and heir of Robert de Esselyngton, deceased,' who died, under 
age, and the king's ward, held at Newcastle-upon-Tyne on Monday, 
13th August, 1352, the jurors, after finding that he only survived 
his father three days, and died on the 10th October, 1349, say 
that : He died seised of the manor of Eslington and of common 
of pasture for his cattle, and cattle of his tenants of Eslington, 
and of digging peat on the moor of Edlingham, and taking ten 
cart-loads of wood in the wood of Edlingham, and of the service 
of John de Eslington of a moiety of a knight's fee from his lands 
in Framlington. The said manor of Ellington is held of the 
king in chief by service of 4^. of silver payable to the escheator 
yearly, and 16s. ' le stokelade' of Bamburgh. Elizabeth and 
Isabel are his sisters and heirs, aged thirteen years and eleven 
years. 34 

The findings of the two inquisitions being conflicting, the 
sheriff was ordered 011 the 1st November, 1352, to summon 
William de la Yale, husband of Christina, daughter of Robert 
de Eslington, and Christina herself, to appear in the court of 
chancery to show cause why the lands of George, son of the said 
Robert de Eslington, should not be divided between Gilbert de 
Heron, husband of Elizabeth, and Elizabeth, and Isabel (the other 
daughter of Robert de Eslington), there being no mention of 
Christina in the inquisition taken after the death of their 

33 Inq. post mort., 26 Edw. in, first numbers, No. 45, now catalogued as 
Exchequer Inq. post mort., series 1, file 435, No. 1. Writ dated 12 Nov., 1349. 

34 Inq. post mort., 26 Edw. in, first numbers, No. 45, now catalogued as 
Exchequer Inq. post mort., series 1, file 424, Nos. 1 and 2. (Other places are men- 
tioned in the inquisition. ) 






8 <u S 



no " - 



d S .sSaJcSs-i'S^p^S 



s* 
*S 



Hl^I'alf 

&*% -S go 




H -jlM |1 




ilHil 

jra 

MJlli 



* 



S o > *ti -S 
.?, ? o ^ 



gitr 






3.93 



is 

W of 

<N 

CO^ 



Ba 



of 
nockb 



tle 
Ba 



the 
sone 



~ 



II 



II 

^^! 



ft! 



S^ 



n? 

II! 
I s ! 

-Hi 



* o sT s" 
^J s 
3gli 

8?' 






. 
ll 



-^ . 

13*5:3 

t(H "" <^ . 

Cb o g^g eu 



. . - 5, 

d fl^s-e 

.5 o > iC 

^ 



.s^<5 



II 



! 












. 



w .Sw 
^ 1^ 



jl|il 



d"tfi 

i*sf 

tl *^ 



1 



!. Sc 

' 



^ S 6 
H 







lll 



lll! 



o 



10 THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 

brother. 35 An explanation of the apparent discrepancy may 
have been, and probably was, that Christina was a daughter of 
Robert de Eslington n, by a former marriage, and that the two 
younger daughters were uterine sisters of George de Eslington, 
whose heirs, by the legal doctrine then followed, they would be, 
as the only sisters of the whole blood. Be this as it may, Chris- 
tina Delaval 36 is not again heard of in connexion with Esling- 
ton, 36 * and Elizabeth Heron, who was an undoubted coheiress, died 
apparently without issue before the year 1362, when the surviv- 
ing sister, Isabel, then widow of Robert de Bowes, conveyed four 
sixth parts of her property to Donald de Heselrigg, the remain- 
ing two sixths having possibly been in the possession of her 
mother, as her widow's thirds or dower. 37 

85 Inq. post mort., 26 Edw. in, first numbers, No. 45. 

36 Christina (or Christiana), daughter and ultimately co-heir of Sir Robert 
de Eslington, knight, was married before 6 Dec. , 1 352, to Sir William Delaval of 
Seaton Delaval, knight, and died on the 20 July, 1364, leaving issue two sons, 
William who in 1387 claimed the third part of Eslington as heir to his mother 
and John. Cf. Delaval pedigree, new History of Northumberland, vol. IX, p. 168. 
Ma But on the 12th of July, 1387, Sir Aymer de Athol and others were 
appointed to enquire into the rival claims of Joan, widow of Sir Donald de Hesil- 
rigg, knight, on the one side, and William, son of Sir William Delaval, knight, 
and Christiana, his wife, on the other, to a third part of the manor of Eslingtonj 
and a third part of the moieties of the towns of Whittingham, Thrunton and 
Barton. An inquisition was taken and it was found that Elizabeth, widow of 
John Heron, had held the premises as dower of Robert de Eslington, her first hus- 
band, the reversion being in the said William Delaval and Christiana, his wife, 
who was daughter and heir of the said Robert de Eslington and his first wife, 
Isabella. Calendar of Pat. Rolls, 1385-1389, p. 384. 

31 Since the above account was written Mr. Dendy has called my attention to 
entries on De Banco Rolls for 1355, roll 382, m. 172 d, and for 1356, roll 384, m. 236, 
of an action brought by Robert de Bowes and Elizabeth his wife, plaintiffs, against 
Robert de la Vale, chivaler, and William his brother, and others, defendants, 
regarding the wardship of Isabella, daughter and heir of George de Eslington. 

Isabella de Eslington, whether she were daughter of George de Eslington, as 
alleged in the De Banco Roll, or nixter, as asserted in the text, married Robert de 
Bowes and, as a widow, was defendant in a (friendly) action in 1363 brought by 
Donald de Hesilrigge. De Banco Roll, 412, m. 24 d ; see post, pp. 54, 57. 



THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 11 

The available evidence is insufficient to assign his proper 
place in the pedigree to that John de Eslington who, on the 28th 
of May, 1312, was appointed by Edward n to be constable of the 
castle of Bamburgh, and who was taken prisoner at the battle of 
Bannockburn on the 25th of June, 1314. 38 He may have been a 
younger son of John de Eslington n, but more probably a son of 
that gentleman's uncle, Alexander de Eslington. If he were the 
latter then he may have been father of that Thomas de Esling- 
ton, whose sister and heir, Constance de Eslington, sold her lands 
in Framlington, on the 25th of June, 1354, to William de 
Routh. 39 

THE SECOND PERIOD, 1362-1542. 

Although it has not been satisfactorily proved that the new 
proprietors of Eslington derived their origin from Hazelrigg in 
the parish of Chatton, not far from Belford, it is not improbable 
that they did so. The pedigree of Hasilrigg entered at Camden's 
Visitation of Leicestershire in 1619, begins with a certain Simon 
de Hasilrigg, to whom, as is stated, Edward i gave the manors of 
Yetholme Corbet and Yetholme Manor ( ? Mains) ; 40 to this semi- 
mythical gentleman Camden gives a son, also named Simon, whom 
he styles * lord of Haselrigg.' 41 Dismissing these assertions, the 
earlier notices of the family remaining in the records shall be 
shortly set out. In the Pipe Rolls for Northumberland there 
appear the names of William Herselrig in 1187, 42 William Hesel- 

38 Cf. Bates, ' Border-Holds' (Arch. Ad., 2 ser. xiv), p. 243. 

39 Robinson Charters (Arch. Ad., 2 ser. vol. xxv), p. 69. 

Camden, Visitation of Leicestershire (2 Harl. Soc. publ.), p. 15. 

41 On 15 Feb. 1318/9, there was a commission issued to try Simon de Heselrig, 
with a large number of Northumbrians, who were charged, by the earl of Richmond, 
with having raided Aldborough and other manors in Yorkshire. Cal. Pat. Rolls, 
1317-1321, p. 359. 

42 Pipe Rolls, A.D. 1187- Hodgson, Northumberland, in, iii, p. 42. 



12 THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 



"9 44 



briggie in 124S, 43 and, again, William Heserlrith in 1272,' 
which entries may possibly relate to this family, but as the sur- 
name does not occur in Testa de Nevill, no weight can be attached 
to these isolated notices. 

In the fourteenth century, however, there are notices which 
may confidently be applied. 

William de Hesilrig on the 25th March, 1315, obtained a 
grant from Richard Kellawe, bishop of Durham, of lands and 
tenements at Cambois in Bedlingtonshire, which had formerly 
belonged to Thomas Chaunceler, to hold to him and his heirs. 45 
Of this grant he obtained, 16th November, 1316, from the king 
at York, an inspeximus and confirmation. 46 He was dead be- 
fore the 14th March, 1318/9, 47 when his son, John de Heselrig, 
petitioned the king for redress. He stated that his late father, 
William de Heselrig, had acquired the manor of Akeld in Glen- 
dale from Nicholas de Graham (died 1306), and Mary, his wife, 
(a minor in 1292), who was grand-daughter, and eventually one 
of the coheirs of Robert de Muschamp ; that at his father's death 
he was a minor, that he entered on the estate, was peaceably 
seised for two years, when Henry de Prendirgest unjustly 
disseised him. 48 

This John de Hesilrygg, or Hesilrig, an active soldier, had a 
share in the capture of Gilbert de Middleton (in 1317) ; he was 
also present at the ' descomfiture ' of Stirling (in 1304), where 
he not only lost horses and armour, valued at 200 marks, but was 
taken prisoner, held in captivity for two years, and only re- 

43 Pipe Rolls, A.D. 1248. Ibid. p. 217. 

44 Pipe Rolls, A.D. 1272. Ibid. p. 296. 

15 Bishop KeJlawe's Register, Rolls edition, vol. n, p. 1295. 

4<i Col. Pat. Roll*, 1313-1317, p. 566. 

47 That is if the date 14 March, 1318/9, be correct, but a William de Heselrig 
was a knight of the shire for Northumberland in the parliaments of 1320 and 1321 . 

4H Inq. ad quod damnum held at Newcastle. Col. Doc. Eel. Scot, ed Bain 
vol. in, p. 120. 



THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 13 

leased by the payment of a ransom of 200 marks. On regaining 
his liberty, he found he was ' brought very low,' having lost the 
profits, for five years, of his lands in Northumberland, worth, it 
would seem, 40 marks per annum ; about the year 1319 he peti- 
tioned the king for recompense for the 600 marks at which he 
estimated his losses. 49 He was again a suppliant in 1329 for the 
restoration to him of the fourth part of the manor of Akeld, which 
the king's escheator had seised when Sir Henry de Prendregest 
joined the Scots. 50 

In 134G another William de Heselrig was in possession of the 
vill of Fawdon, near Newcastle, one third part of Gosforth, one 
sixth part of Kenton, and apparently a moiety of Dinnington. 51 
In 1349, 1356, and 1369 he, or another of the name, was an 
attesting witness to deeds relating to Plessey. 52 In 1350 Thomas 
de Heselrigg, son of Symon de Heselrigg, was party to a deed, 
and about the same year, Thomas de Heselrigg, lord of Hesel- 
rigg, William, son of Symon de Heselrigg, Thomas, son of 
Symon de OSeselrigg, John de Heselrigg of Sheepwash, with 
others, were mentioned in another deed, also relating to the 
manor of Plessey. 53 The fact that the name of Thomas, son of 
William de Heselrig, is placed in remainder to that estate, sug- 
gests that he was a kinsman of Eoger de Widdrington, who 
acquired Plessey about the year 1350. 54 

On the 20th of November, 1360, the king, in consideration of 
the good services of William de Heselrig, in the Scottish wars, of 
the losses he had sustained therein, and also for WL paid by 

49 Inq. ad quod damnum held at Newcastle. Gal. Doc. Rel. Scot. ed. Bain, 
vol. in, p. 128. 

50 Ibid. p. 180. 

51 Feudal Aid*, vol. iv, pp. 57, 59, 62. At the same period Thomas, son of 
Thomas de Hesilrig, held the vill of Hesilrig (in Chatton) and the villsof Fowberry 
and Coldmartin. Ibid. pp. 66, 74, 75. 

5 - Hodgson, Northumberland, n. ii. pp. 337, 339, 346. 
53 Ibid. pp. 339, 340. 51 Ibid. p. 252. 



14 THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 

him, granted to him and his heirs lands at South Weteslade, 
long before escheated by John de Weteslade, who had joined the 
Scots together with Gilbert de Middleton. 55 This William de 
Heselrig was a brother whether elder or younger does not 
appear of Sir Donald de Heselrigg, who by merit and influence 
obtained marks of royal favour. The latter took to wife a damsel 
of the chamber of good queen Philippa, sometimes described as 
Joan de Wauton, but more correctly Joan de Bredon. On the 
25th of June, 1359, she had a grant for her life, by letters patent, 
of 10/. per annum, charged on the issues of the county of North- 
ampton, 56 of which grant, she, on the 20th July, 1377, being 
then wife of Donald de Heselrig, obtained an inspeximus and 
confirmation. 57 

About the year 1362, Donald de Heselrigg 58 purchased Es- 
lington from Isabella, widow of Robert de Bowes, under the 
terms disclosed in an inquisition taken in Newcastle on Thurs- 
day, 7th April, 1401, and gave her a recognisance, for 1000 
marks, dated 17th August, 1362. 59 After completing his pur- 
chase, Sir Donald conveyed the property to Sir Thomas Surtees, 
knight, Hugh Westwick, and Edmund Heselrigg, in trust for 
himself and his wife in conjunct fee, and for the heirs of 
Donald. 60 

" Col. Doc. Rel. Scot, ed Bain, vol. iv, p. 13. 

58 Col. Pat. Roll*, 1377-1381, p. 11. 5: Ibid. 

58 In an inquisition ad quod damnum held at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 20 October, 
1362, the jury say that : It is not to the damage or prejudice of the king or of 
others if the king grant to Donald de Heselrigg and Joan his wife, licence to retain 
to themselves and their heirs, a moiety and a third part of a moiety of manors 
named, which they had acquired without obtaining the king's licence, from Isabel 
who was wife of Robert de Bowes, the said Isabel having held them in chief. 
Iiiq. post mort. 36 Edw. in, second numbers, No. 5. 

19 Col. Doc. Rel. Scot. ed. Bain, vol. iv, p. 17. 

* Cf. Inq. post mort., 2 Hen. iv, No. 41, of which an abstract is given on 
p. 13, post. Cf. Col. Doc. Rel. Scot. Bain, vol. iv, p. 79. 



THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 15 

Donald de Hesilrigg was appointed a commissioner of array 
for the North Riding of Yorkshire, 1st July, 1377. 61 At the 
assizes, 3rd December, 1378, he brought an action against Sir 
William Heron, knight, and John Heron his son, whom he 
charged with breaking his house at Whittingham, felling and 
carrying away his trees, depasturing his corn and grass, there 
and at Thrunton, and with assaulting his servants. 62 

Donald de Heselrigg died on the Sunday after Easter, 1385, 
leaving William Heselrigg, his brother and next heir, aged sixty 
years. 63 Under the settlement mentioned above, Joan, or 
Joanna, his widow held Eslington for her life. 64 She also held 
Brotherwick under similar conditions. 65 She used her influence 
at court to obtain, 2nd July, 1389, ' in consideration of her good 
services to the king's father and mother,' a grant for life of 20 
marks a year out of the issues of the county of York, and also 
remission during her life of the following charges out of Esling- 
ton, viz : of 41. per annum for the farm of the vill, 14d. a year 
for cornage, 3s. a year for suit to the county court, and of 16s. 
a year payable to Bamburgh castle for truncage. 66 A well- 
dowered widow, dame Joan, lived until the 21st December, 1400, 
when she died at York. By her will, made on the 1st and 
proved on the 31st of that month, she left many legacies of money 
and jewels to her friends, chaplain, and servants, and also to 
the convent of Yarm and other religious foundations in York- 
shire. 67 As will be seen from the following abstract of the 
inquisition taken at the castle of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, on 
Thursday, 7th April, 1401, John de Wauton was her heir: 

61 Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1377-1381, p. 39. * Ibid. p. 311. 

63 Inq. post mort., 35 Edw. in. second numbers, No. 33. 

64 Cal. Doc. Bel. Scot. ed. Bain, vol. iv, p. 79. William de Heselrig was a 
knight of the shire for Northumberland in 1375 and 1377. 

65 Cf. new History of Northumberland, vol. v, p. 255. 

66 Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1388-1392, p. 71. 

67 Joanna de Heselrigg's will is printed in Test. Ebor., I (4 Surt. Soc. publ.), 
p. 265. 



16 THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 

The jurors found that Robert de Esselyngton was formerly seised of the 
manor of Esselyngton and a moiety of the vills of Whityngham, Throunton 
and Barton, and took a wife named Elizabeth and had issue George, 
Elizabeth, and Isabel. At the death of Eobert the premises descended to 
George his son and heir, who died childless, and the premises descended to 
Elizabeth and Isabel, his sisters and heirs, as appears in the inquisition held 
after his death. Afterwards the said Elizabeth, widow of the said Eobert, 
married John Heron, knight, and after the death of the said George she 
obtained as dower, in the chancery of Edward in, a third part of the 
premises with reversion after her death, to the said Elizabeth and Isabel 
as sisters and heirs of George. Afterwards Isabel granted to Donald 
Hesilrygge, a moiety of the two parts of the manor of Esselyngton, and a 
moiety of the said vills by fine levied in the court of Edward in, and also the 
reversion after the death of Elizabeth, wife of John Heron, of the moiety 
belonging to Isabel, of the said third part of the premises ; by virtue of which 
fine John Heron, husband of Elizabeth, atturned to Donald. Donald 
[Hesilrygge] granted his said moiety to Thomas Surtes, knight, Hugh 
Westwyk and Edmund Hesilrygge, and John Heron atturned to them. 
Thomas [Surtes] Hugh [Westwyk] and Edmund [Hesilrygge] granted by 
charter their said moiety to the said Donald [Hesilrygge] and Joan his 
wife, and the heirs of Donald, and John Heron atturned to Donald and Joan. 

Afterwards Elizabeth, sister and other heir of George, died seised of her 
moiety of the premises which on her death descended to Isabel as her sister 
and heir, Elizabeth having died childless. Isabel granted the same, by fine 
levied in the court of Edward in to Donald [Hesilrygge] and Joan and the 
heirs of Donald, and John Heron atturned to Donald and Joan. 

Joan [PJohn] Warton holds of Donald [Hesilrygge] and Joan, as of the. 
manor of Esselyngton, lands in Framlyngton by service of 40<i. yearly, the 
reversion of the lands, after the death of John, belonging to John Midylham 
and Ealoner his wife and the heirs of Ealoner as in her own right. 

The said Elizabeth, wife of John Heron, died and her third part reverted 
to Joan [Hesilrygge] to hold for life after the death of Donald. 

Donald died childless and William Hesilrygge was his brother and heir, 
to whom Thomas Hesilrygge is son and heir aged thirty years and more. 

Joan [Hesilrygge] died seised of the whole manor of Esslyngton in form 
aforesaid, held of the king in chief by service of six marks payable to the 
sheriff and 16.?. to Bamburgh castle for truncage. 

She died seised of the moiety of the vills of Whityngham, Throunton 
and Barton held of the king in chief by service of 40c?. yearly payable to the 
sheriff. 

The premises are worth yearly clear, 40s. and no more nowadays on 
account of the destruction of the Scotch. 

She died seised of a yearly rent of 40c?. from lands in Framlyngton 
which John Warton holds for life with reversion as above said. 



THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 17 

She died on the feast of St. Thomas Apostle in December, 2 Hen. iv 
[21 Dec., 1400]. John Wawton is her kinsman and heir, aged thirty years 
and more. 68 

Sir Donald Heselrig's brother William was born circa 1325 
and, as already mentioned, possessed property at Dinnington, 
Fawdon, Gosforth, Kenton, and at South "Weteslade. He was 
knight of the shire in 1375 and again in 1377, 69 and by letters 
patent, granted 1st July, 1377, was appointed to be a com- 
missioner of array for Northumberland. 70 He was alive in 1389, 
when he and his son, John Hesilrig, were appointed, by William 
Swinhoe, to be his attorneys to put Sir George Heron, knight, 
into possession of premises in Newcastle. 71 Whether the father, 
William, or the son, John, died first, has not been ascertained, 
but in the inquisition taken 7th April, 1401, Thomas Hesilrygge, 
aged 30 years and upwards, was found to be son and heii of 
Thomas, as Thomas was brother and heir of Donald, and there- 
fore under the provision of the various family settlements, was 
seised of Eslington. His name appears in the list of the f ortalices 
in Northumberland in 1415, as owner of the tower of Eslington. 73 

Through a fortunate marriage with Isabel, eldest daughter 
and coheir of Margaret, wife of Sir Eoger Heron, Thomas Hesel- 
rig (or his son), obtained the manor of Noseley in Leicestershire, 
which ever since has remained in the possession and is the seat 
of the family. 74 

68 Inq. post mortem, 2 Hen. iv, No. 41. Writ dated 30 Jan. 1400/1. 
* A William de Heselrig was also knight of the shire in 1320 and 1321. 

70 Col. Pat. Rolls, 1377-1381, p. 38. 

71 Welford, Newcastle and Gateshead, vol. I, p. 210. 

73 Bates, ' Border- Holds,' p. 17. 

74 Noseley, an ancient possession of the family of Martival, on the death in 
1329 of Roger de Martival, bishop of Salisbury, passed to his sister Joyce, wife of 
Robert de Sadirigton, whose daughter and sole heir, Isabel, became wife of Sir 
Ralph Hastings. Of this marriage their was issue an only child, Margaret, who 
married first Sir Roger Heron and second Sir John Blacket. By her second 
marriage she had no issue ; to her first husband she bore three daughters and co- 
heirs, Isabel, Margaret, and Elizabeth, of whom the eldest, Isabel, became wife of 
Thomas Heselrigg of Eslington. Cf. Nichols, Leicestershire, vol. n, p. 740. 

3 SER. VOL. VI. 



1# THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF 

Thomas Hesilrig of Eselyngton died 15th October, 1422, and 
in the inquisition taken at the castle of Newcastle-upon-Tyne on 
19th February, 1422/3, 75 it was found that : 

The said Thomas died seised of the manor of Eselyngton held of the king 
in chief by service of six marks yearly, payable by (sic) the sheriff and 16.s. to 
Hamburgh castle for truncage. It is worth yearly, clear 60*. and no more on 
account of the sterility of the country and the devastations of the Scotch. 

He was seised of moieties of the villa of Whittyngeham, Throunton and 
Barton, likewise held of the king in chief, by service of 40d. yearly payable 
by (fie) the sheriff. They are worth yearly, clear, five marks, and no more 
for the causes aforesaid. 

Thomas died 15th October last. Thomas Hesilryg is his son and heir aged 
fifteen years and more. 76 

The heir was born at Eslington on Michaelmas day (29th Sept- 
ember), 1407, and the same day was baptized at Whittingham 
church with such pomp and circumstance as served him in good 
stead when he was called on to prove his age at an inquisition 
taken within the castle of Newcastle on the 22nd March, 1428/9. 
Amongst the people assembled in the church for the ceremony, 
or who had good cause to remember the occasion, was Tames Buk, 
who that day, hunting the stag in the forest of Eothbury, was 
run by the quarry, and struck to the ground, his left arm being 
broken. 77 

In an inquisition taken on the death of the famous Roger 
Thornton of Newcastle, who died 3rd January, 1429/30, in the 

75 Exchequer Inquisitions, series 1, -^f-- Of' fnq.pofit mort. 1 Hen. vi. No. 18. 

7H No explanation can be offered of an inquisition concerning Concealed Lands 
taken at Haltwhistle on Tuesday, 30 Sept., 1442, when it was found by the jurors 
that : John Hessilrige ' of Nelsay ' died seised of a moiety of the manor of Whit- 
tingham and Thronton and Berton and also of a moiety of Glaunton and 
Eslington held of the king in chief, by service of a hawk of a year old or half a 
mark. The moiety of the manor of Whittingham is worth yearly, clear, 20. The 
manor of Throunton is worth yearly, clear, 10. The manor of Berton, ' ten marks. 
The moiety of the manor of Glanton 10. The said John died 4th June, 1432. 
Robert Hessilrige is his son and heir, then aged six years and more. The manor 
of Eslington is worth yearly, clear, 10. Inq. post mortem, C. volume 19, No. 4. 

''' Inq. post mortem, 7 Hen. vi, No. 83. Arch. Ae/., 2 ser. vol. xxn, p. 124. 



THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTOX. 19 

enumeration of his great possessions, it is stated that he held a 
moiety of the manor of Great, or Long, Benton, of which Thomas 
Hesilrigg held South Weteslade by certain services there set 
out. 78 

4 Thomas Hesilryg, esquire,' died 21st September, 1467, and 
in the inquisition taken at Alnwick, 30 April, 1468, it was found 
that:- 

He was seised of the manor of Eschlyngton and of moieties of the vills of 
NYhvttyngham, Thrownton, and Berton, and by charter, shewn to the jurors, 
dated 3rd March, 1454/5, granted the premises to John Collenwod and Robert 
Collenwod, son of the said John, in fee. John Collenwod has died and Robert 
now holds the premises with reversion to William Hasylryg, son and heir of 
Thomas. 

The said manor is held of the king in chief by service of six marks 
yearly payable to the sheriff, and 16^. to Bamburgh castle for truncage. It 
is worth yearly, clear, four marks and no more on account of the destruction 
by the Scotch. 

The said moieties are held of the king in chief by service of 3-s. 4(7. yearly, 
payable to the sheriff, and is worth yearly, five marks and no more, for the 
cause aforesaid. 

Thomas [Hasilryg] died 21st September last. William Hasylryg is his 
son and heir aged thirty years and more. 79 

William Hesylrigge died 25th February, 1478/4, and in the 
inquisition taken after his death at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, on 
14th December, 1476, it was stated that: 

He enfeoffed Robert Staunton, Thomas Staunton, John Gebley, clerk, and 
Edmund Hesylrigge of all his lands, to the intent that they should enfeoff 
hi* right heir thereof, when he should come to the full age of twenty one 
yoars. The jurors say that this enfeoffment was made through fraud and 
collusion in order that the king might be excluded from the wardship of the 
heir. He died 25th February, 1473/4. Thomas Hesylrygge is his son and 
heir aged twelve years and more. so 

In an inquisition taken after the death of William Hesyl- 
rigge, for lands in Leicestershire it is stated that: 

7H Welford, Newcastle and Gatexhead, vol. i, p. 284. 

79 Inq. pott mortem, 7 Edw. iv, No. 2o. Writ dated 10 Oct., 1467. The 
inquisition also accounts for lands in Leicestershire. 

h Inq. post mortem, 16 Edw. iv, No. 26. Writ dated 12 Nov., 1476. 



2Q THE MEDIEVAL OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 

William Hesylrigge, son of Thomas Hesylrigge, esquire, married 
Elizabeth Staunton, daughter of Thomas Staunton, esquire, the marriage 
settlement being dated Thursday, 13th July, 1458.81 

Thomas Heselrig m was born circa 1464, and became an 
esquire of the body to king Henry vm. 82 No record has been 
found of visits to his Northumbrian estates and, very probably, 
when not on duty at the court, he resided at his Leicestershire 
home at Noseley. In the list of Northumbrian holds, drawn up 
in 1509, it is stated that Eslington, belonging to ... Heselrig, 
and inhabited by Eobert Collingwood, was suitable for a garri- 
son of twenty horsemen ; 83 and when Leland visited Northum- 
berland about 1538, he wrote in his note-book that Hasilrig of 
Northamptonshire (corrected, in the margin of the MS., but in 
another hand, to Leicestershire) held in the county, lands worth 
50/. per annum, and that at Eslington he had a ' pratie pile,' in 
which one of the Collingwoods dwelt, who had the oversight of 
the said Mr. Hasilrig's lands. 84 In Bowes and Ellerker's well- 
known ' View of the Castles, etc., in the East and Middle 
Marches,' drawn up in 1541, it is stated that ' at Elslyngton ys a 
toure with a barmekyn of the inherytaunce of one . . . Hesle- 
rygge, esquier, and in the tenor and occupaco'n of Eobt. Col- 
lingewood, esqui r , who kepeth the same in good repac'ons.' 85 In 
the following year, 1542, Bertinus Haslerigg, with the consent of 
his son Miles Haslerigg, sold his property of Eslington, Whit- 
tingham, Thrunton, and Barton, to his tenant (and brother-in- 
law) Eobert Collingwood. 86 

81 Inq. post mortem, 14 Edw. iv, No. 25. 82 See Appendix i. 

83 Bates, ' Border-Holds,' p. 24. 8 Ibid. p. 25. 85 Ibid. p. 43. 

w Feet of Fines, Northumberland, Easter Term, 34 Hen. vm. 

1463. March 14. Pardon for life to John Collanwode, esq., and Robert his 
son, farmers of the manor of Estlington, of a yearly rent of 41. 16*. 8d. from the 
said manor, which they are bound to pay to the king, viz., 42. to the sheriff of 
Northumberland and 16.?. Sd. to the receiver of the king's castle of Bamburgh, and 
of all arrears of the same. Gal. Pat. Rolls, 1461-1467, p. 269. 



THE LATER OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 21 

With the alienation of Eslington this review of the history of 
the Heselrigg family should have ceased, were it not that some 
indefinite interest in the estate seems to have been retained, 
and, in the middle of the seventeenth century, claims were set up 
by Sir Arthur Heselrigg which led to some litigation. 

Bertinus, otherwise Bartholomew, Heselrigge of Noseley, the 
seller of Eslington, having survived his eldest son, died 30th 
July, 1565. An inquisition was taken at Corbridge on the 31st 
March, 1566, when it was found that: 

The said Bartholomew [Heslerigge] and Miles Heslerigge, his son and 
heir apparent, were seised for life of lands in Fawdoun, Keynton, Est 
Brunton, West Brunton, Dunyingtoun, Weiteslade and Blackeden, county 
Northumberland, of the yearly value of 281. with reversion in fee simple to 
Miles. 

Miles died 18th November, 1544,, and Bartholomew remained seised of the 
premises for life with reversion to Thomas Heslerigge, son and heir of Miles. 

Bartholomew [Heslerigge] died 30th July last, and the premises remained 
to the said Thomas, who is now seised thereof, and is aged 24 years and more. 

The premises in Kynton, Fawdoun and Bruntoun Est are held of Lionard 
Dacre, esquire, as of his manor of Whalton by service of socage and 12rf. rent. 

The premises in Weitslade and Blackden are held of Thomas Lord Dacre, 
as of his manor of Morpethe by service of socage and rent of 6d. 

The premises in Dunyngton are held of Thomas Earl of Northumberland, 
as of his manor of Metford, by service of socage and 4d. rent. 

The premises in Brunton West are held of Henry Earl of Westmoreland, 
as of his manor of Bywell, by service of socage and 7d. rent. 87 

He was succeeded by his grandson, Thomas Heselrigg iv, 
who, dying on the 31st May, 1600, was buried at Noseley. By 
his wife, Ursula, daughter of Sir Thomas Andrews of Char- 
whelton in Northamptonshire, he had issue a daughter, and an 
only surviving son, also named Thomas. 

Thomas Heselrigg v was educated at University College, 
Oxford, at which he matriculated in 1582 at the age of 17. He 
was knighted by king James i on the 19th of June, 1608, was 
high sheriff of Leicestershire in 1612, was created a baronet on 

87 Inq. post mort., C. volume 143, No. 70. Writ dated 13 Nov., 1565. 



22 THE LATER OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 

the 21st August, 1022, and represented his county as knight of 
the shire in the parliaments of 1014 and 1624. He died at the 
age of sixty-six on the lltli January, 1029, and was buried at 
Xoseloy under a magnificent tomb, rich in heraldry, and with full 
length effigies of his wife and of himself. The epitaph records 
that he was ' trusted with the places of the greatest honor and 
power in the county,' whilst his wife ' adorn'd her family with 
fine cloth of her owne spining.' 8 * 

Sir Thomas Hesilrigg, knight and baronet, died at Alderton, 
Northamptonshire, on the 20th January, 1029/30, and in the 
inquisition taken at the castle of Xewcastle-upon-Tyne, on the 
21st August, 1032, it was found that: 

The said Thomas [Hesilrigg] was seised of the manors, townships and vills 
of Fawden, Dunington, East Burneton, West Burneton and Weytslade, a 
fourth part of the vill of West Burneton, a moiety of the manor of Thronton, 
two husbandlands in Blackden and certain lands within the vill of Kinton. 
(Also of lands in the counties of Northampton and Leicester.) 

In consideration of a marriage to be had between Arthur Hesellrigg, then 
son and heir apparent of the said Thomas, and Frances Elmes, one of the 
daughters of Thomas Elmes of Greenes Norton, co. Northampton, esq., for 
3,000/., marriage portion of Frances, by fine in Easter term 22 James i and by 
indenture to limit the uses of the fine dated 10th April, 1621, between the said 
Thomas Hesellrigg and the said Thomas Elmes, Arthur Hesellrigg and 
Frances Elmes, and Thomas Dacres, knight, and William Elmes, esq., Thomas 
[Hesilrigg] conveyed the premises to Thomas Dacres and William Elmes in 
trust to the uses specified ; as to the premises in Northumberland to his own 
use for life, and then to the said Arthur Hesellrigg, and his heirs male, and on 
failure of such issue to his [Thomas's] own right heirs. 

The said Thomas [Hesilrigg] died 20 January, 1629/30, at Alderton, co. 
Northampton. 

The manors of Fawdon and East Burneton and the lands in Kenton are 
held of the manor of Whalton, in socage, by a yearly rent of 12e7. and are 
worth, clear, I2d. 

The manor of Weitslade and lands in Blackden are held of the manor of 
Morpeth, in socage, by a yearly rent of 6c7. and are worth clear 6r/. 

The manor of Dunington is held of the manor of Mitford in socage, by 
yearly rent of 4<7. and is worth, clear, 4rf. 

8S Of. Nichols, Leic&terxhire, vol. n, pp. 753-755, where the tomb is figured, 



THE LATER OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 23 

The manor of West Burneton is held of the manor of Bywell, by yearly 
rent of 7cL, and is worth yearly 7d. 

The moiety of the manor of Throunton, is held of the king in chief, by 
knight service, by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and is 
worth yearly, clear, 2,s>. 

George Collingwood of Dawdon, co. Durham, esq., and George Collingwood 
his son have taken the issues of the premises in Northumberland, since the 
death of Thomas [Hesilrigg], by what title the jurors know not. 

Arthur Hesellrigg, baronet, is son and heir of Thomas, and at the time of 
his father's death, was aged 22 years and more. 89 

Sir Thomas Heselrigg was succeeded by his eldest surviving 
son, Sir Arthur Heselrigg, second baronet, the great man of the 
family. As excellent biographies are accessible in Mr. Welford's 
Men of Mark, the Dictionary of National Biography, etc., nothing 
need here be said of his career. A man of great influence in the 
Commonwealth, he availed himself of the opportunity afforded 
by the delinquency of Cuthbert Collingwood of Eslington, to set 
up a claim to Eslington, Whittingham, Barton, and Thrunton. 
An account of some of the things which happened is given in a 
contemporary manuscript preserved in the British Museum, 
printed (it is believed for the first time) in Appendix n. 

In May, 1656, the Collingwoods and their trustees obtained 
judgment in their favour in the Court of Common Pleas. 90 

Sir Arthur Heselrigg died a prisoner in the Tower on the 
7th January, 1660/1, having, in the words of his epitaph, ' in- 
joyed this portion of his life in the times of greatest civill troubles 
that ever this nation had. He was a lover of liberty and 
faithfull to his country.' 91 His body was carried to Noseley, and 
was buried there under a splendid tomb, his effigy being placed 
between those of his two wives. His son and successor, Sir 
Thomas Heselrigg, by deed dategl 15th July, 1663, released his 
claim on Eslington. 92 

89 Inq. post mart., C. volume 466, No. 99. Writ dated 5 July, 1632. 

90 Documents in the possession of the Rev. W. Greenwell. 

91 Monumental inscription at Noseley. 

92 Documents in the possession of the Rev. W. Greenwell. 



H 



-< v ""d 

^ I 






o 

H 
O 
ft 



ES 



^-4 

fl 



CO 



.2 



S 2 






ARM 
WILLI 



a 



5 

I s - 

8g 



2* 



fi 

WJ-3 



^8 

!SO 

lj 

si 

-I* 



3 



11 







^S > ^ 

nn ^ ^ 






. , .^ 

K I - w S -S >* o 5 

^3 c6 fl X! -H ^ . 

o> o eu -TH 6 

n3 A,,, T3 -'tz 

^2 rrt ,fl 9) rrt ^^* 



O rtf 0> .2 



4^ t"*2 

* 05 . 



w .s 

^pgl 
^ a 2 a 10 ^ 
1 .1^*1 ."HS 

ill illy 






a a,- 



00 



saafi 

H H 



S 3 



llsll 






3 1 a 
S S 



Ii 



o 53 . R M > 

s-ss^-s 
* s-a ^ 

2-^ 

W L, ^, 4, 

W <* 



g 



Heselrigg III. of Eslin 
n and heir, was 12 ye 
is father's inquisition w 
uire of the body to 
umental Inscription 



; . aj w ^ 

jltSs 




a d .2 ^ a 
gi^sl 

5 - <U W gj 

S b^-C2 JS 



aT t-i d ^ 

|lll 



, 
so 
his 
o R 
on, 
ly, 



at B 

f!l 

Jo X 

^SIF 

Hii 
*iW3 

^^^3^3 SH .^ > 

*!2w 



inus, 
rtram 
ir ; w 
iles, so 
llingw 
ngton, 
nq. p.m 



a 



Be 
he 
Mi 
Con 
ningto 
(I 






PQ^ 

^"8 

d-d 



Bridget, 
married 
Horton, 



03 ^J 

S 



.2 



i 



111- 



5 H 'o bo 



&o a 

if I 



III 



pll 



CD 



w 12 o 

I s ! 

"Is" 



-S 



fl r^J *3 rr- 0> S" 1 

ll^ll,^ 

^ Q) CJOcO ^ 

^^ " ^ a3 ^" ** 



Hi II 11 ill 






^-'k^ B Q^ 

w ii^ll 



o^ o g 






rt , t 1 ^ ^r\ 

i! eS O a> i - -^ vi 

'5^ g^ 

8||^M 1 



. n 



111 III 



- 



- 






B Q? > 1 I 1 



.ft 



THE LATER OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 27 

THE THIRD PERIOD, 1542-1715. 

The origin of the Colliiigwoods who acquired the fee simple 
of Eslington in 1512 is not well ascertained. An early mention 
of the family is to be found in Feudal Aids, where it is recorded 
that in 1'54() William Collaynwode, or Coulanwode, and Alice, 
his wife, held lands in Wooler in right of the said Alice. 93 And 
in the La ing collection of charters in the university of Edinburgh 
there is a deed given on the 4th of September, 1450, under which 
John Collenwode was to give seisin to Roger Folbery of all his 
lands and tenements in the town of Folbery. The seal is still 
attached to the deed, but unfortunately the charges and legend 
are defaced. 94 . 

As an elaborate pedigree of the family of Collingwood of 
Eslington and of Dalden in the county of Durham which latter 
estate was obtained by Sir Cuthbert Collingwood, grandson of 
the purchaser of Eslington, in marriage with Dorothy, daughter 
and coheiress of Sir George Bowes of Dalden, knight is given 
by Mr. Surtees, 95 it is only necessary to say that after having to 
compound for their estates confiscated for delinquency during the 
Civil War, 96 they lost them, irretrievably, by adhering to James 
n, and by supporting his son in the Rebellion of 1715. The 
Eslington and Whittingham estate was purchased in 1718 by 
Sir Henry Liddell, third baronet, of Ravensworth. 97 His son, 
Sir Henry Liddell, the fourth baronet, took down the mansion of 
the Collingwoods, and on, or near, its site built the present 
house, which in its original form was completed by the year 
17-30. 

! " Feudal Aids, vol. iv, pp. 64, 65. 
1(4 The Laing Charter*, ed. Anderson, p. 34. 
" a Surtees, Durham, vol. I, p. 7. 

96 Of. Royalist Compositions (111 Surt. Soc. publ.), pp. Ki8-170. 
UT The particulars of the estate as exposed for sale by auction 13 Feb., 1718, 
are reprinted by Mr. D. P, Dixon in his Whittingham Vale, pp. 97-99. 



28 THE LATER OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 

APPENDIX I. 

In a document preserved amongst the Harleian manuscripts 
there is a valuable, but somewhat discursive, account of the 
family of Heselrigg. 98 

Simon de Hasilrigge lord of Wateheale [Weteslade] and West Brompton 
[Brunton near Gosforth] co. Northumberl. ' cui rex E. j. dedit maneria de 
Yetham Corbet et Yetham Manne, 1280,' had issue: 
Simon ; and he : 

W m H who mar da. and h. of Sir Eob. Esselington and had : 

Tho. who mar da. and coheire of Sir Roger Heron and had : 

Tho 8 Haselrigge; who esp. Margaret da. and h. of Jo Becker and 
Margaret his wief da. and h. of Eaphe Hastinges and Isabell his wief da. and 
h. of Robt. Sodingham als Sodington and of his wief da. and h. of Mortinet. 
And Tho. Haselrigge and .Margaret Becker had: 

Wm H. of Nosley co. Leic. mar. Eliz. da. and h. of Tho. Stanton of 
Stanton Herold, co. Leic. Margaret an other sister mar. to Villiers and 
Eliz. another to Sir Will m Tundrll k*. And the said Jo. (sic) Hasilrigge and 
Eliz. Stanton had issue John, Robert, who mar. Eliz. sister to Robert Shirley 

K*.; Kath. mar. to Ashby of Quenby another to S r Ric Neale, 

Kt. ; and 

Tho. Hasilrigge was one of the Esquiers of the Body to H. vm, 1535, and 
was brother to the said John and Robert H. He mar. Luce da. of Tho, 
Entwisell & Edith his wief da. sister (sic) to Ric. Bracebridge of Kingesbury. 
And the said Tho. & Luce had issue, Bertram, in lief 1563, Millicent mar. to 
Walter Keble of Humbston co. Leic. Edith mar. to John Thorney, Anne to. 
Edw. Catesby, co. Rotel. 2 da. Harald mar. to David Willyams of Aburgavenny 
& Eliz. to Tho. Collingwood. 

And the said Bertram mar. Anne da. & coh. of S r Hen. Southill of 
Stoberston co. Leic. and had: 

Miles Has. of Nowesley who mar. Bridget da. of Tho. Griffin of Braybrook 
co. North'ton. She after mar. Will Lane of Colesbrook co. North'ton. By 
Miles the 1 husb. she had Edw. H., in lief 1605; Tho. in lief 1605; & Mary 
mar. to Edw. Rouse, co. Wigorn. 

And Tho. mar. Ursula da. of Sir Tho. Andrewes of Winwick co. North- 
umbr. & had Tho. H. of Noseley, in lief 1626 ; & Mary. 

And Tho. mar. Fr. da. & h. of W Gouges of Alderton co. North'ton esq. 
& had Donalus heire; Jo. 2; Tho. 3; Rob. 4; W> 5; son, Anthony; Anne 1- 
Mary 2 ; Frances 3 ; Jane 4 da. 

And the said Edward Haselrigg esq. [mar.] Anne' da. of Tho. Nicholls 
co. Northb. and had Edw. slain in Fletestret Lo. 1604. Francis 2 ; Tho. 3 ; 

98 Brit. Mus. Harl. MS., 1187, folio 101, 



THE LATER OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 29 

Awston 4; Mary mar. to Hen. Newdigate, Frances, Bridgett [mar.] to 
Tho. son of Jo. Alcock of Sibertoft co. North'ton, Eliz. [mar.] to Forster co. 
North. Ane [mar.] to Tho. Hunt and Susan to. ... 

And the said Edw. esp. Frances da. & heire sed quere of W m Broccas of 
Thodingworth co. Leic. And had Barty us Ha. of the same, in lief 1614. 

[Here follows an attempt to blazon the arms which the Hesel- 
riggs of the period were entitled to quarter, and the following note 
added at a later date : ' In S*. Clement Danes Church, London, 
is a monument of Heselrigg with these arms, crest [drawing of 
arms] and inscription : Bartinus Heselrigg armiger capetaneus 
militiae Leicestrensis hie sepultus qui obiit 4 Maii 1634.'] 

APPENDIX II. 

A shorte relacion of the passages betweene Sir Arthur Heslerigg and Mr. 
Collingwood as alsoe Mr. Stapleton99 on behalfe of the Common Wealth, 
touchinge the Title of the Mannour of Eslington and other Lands in 
the County of Northumberland beinge an Introduccion to the late 
unparraleld ryotts there about his takinge and deteyninge possession 
of the said Mannour in a hostile manner.' 

Theis Mannours and Lands ever since the time of Hen. 6th have byn in the 
Collingwoods possession and in H. 7th tyme was a Marriage betweene them 
and a daughter of Heslerigg and purchaste from Heslerigg by Collingwood 
in the 34th of H. 8th and dyeinge seized in fee found in the Collingwoods by 
Offices for 5 descents since the purchase, and before that purchase found 
but after left out of all Heselrigg's offices. 

That Notwithstandinge Sir Arthur's father had in the Court of Wards 
upon his Oath disclaymed all title to the premisses and sett forth a good title 
in the Collingwoods yet sir Arthur takinge the Advantage of his great power 
when hee was Comander in Cheiffe in the North procured a Tryall upon 10 
dayes notice att Newcastle upon Tyne before Mr. Justice Puleston then Judge 
of Assize and a Verdict for a Messuage and 5 acres parcell of the premisses. 
But Collingwood before the Tryall applyed to Sir Arthur and told him that 
by reason of the late Warres hee had neither Counsell nor Evidence nor could 
procure them att soe short a Warninge. All which was made out upon Oath 

99 Brit. Mus. Sloane MS. 972, folio 23. Mr. Stapleton, whose Christian name 
was Robert, may be identified with some probability with Robert, second son of 
Bryan Stapleton, of Mitton, Yorks., born circa 1618, educated at St. Edmund's 
Hall, Oxford ; M.P. for Boroughbridge in 1639. Of. Dugdale, Visitation of York- 
shire, ed. Clay, vol. i, p. 177. 



JJO THE LATER OWNERS OF ESLtNGTOtf. 

att and after the said Tryall but yet could not gett a stopp thereof nor 
obteyne a New Tryall therein and though the estate was then under 
Sequestracion for the supposed delinquency of Collingwood yet was not the 
Commonwealth made party or privy to the said Tryall nor by any Order 
Consentinge thereunto. And a writt of Errour being brought upon the said 
Verdict hee procured the Act to passe against all writts of Errour alleadging 
this care when hee moved the act in the Parliament. Upon which Verdict for 
5 acres Sir Arthur procured a Committee of his Fellow-members in the yeare 
1644 by their order to take off the Sequestracion and give him possession of 
the wholle Estate beinge severall Mannours and Towneshipps and above 
[tpace leff] Thousand acres and worth 500?. per annum although Collingwood 
att his greate chardge by Counsell made appeare to them the Carriadge att the 
.said Tryall and that the Verdict was but for 5 acres and that the wholle 
depended not upon one Title and how much the interest of the Common 
Wealth was concerned and therein urginge it to bee against the practizes of 
all Courts and tymes to give possession of any more then what was 
recovered. 

Upon this order hee tooke and kept the possession of the wholle untill that 
Collingwood beinge putt into the 3d. Act for Sale for flyinge from the then 
fury of the Scotts into a Garrison (though never otherwayes in armes) in the 
yeare 1653 a discovery was made by one Overton of theis Mannours as the 
Estate of Collingwood but unjustly withheld from the Common Wealth by 
Heslerigg and a title was made out to the Trustees for sale of delinquents 
estates on the behalfe of the Common Wealth which beinge presented by them 
to the Commissioners for removinge obstruccions upon solemne hearinge and 
debatinge the busines before them by Counsell on both sides they adjudged 
and declared that there was a good title in the Common Wealth, but in, 
respect of the former Verdict they ordered a New Tryall att the Common 
Pleas barr to bee had upon the matter of right betweene Heslerigg and the 
Trustees upon Collingwood's title. 101 

Accordingly in Easter Terme 1656 a Tryall was there had by a Jury of 

Northamptonshire a County of Sir Arthurs owne naminge by agreement with 

the Trustees and all of them Knights and Esquires and persons of knowne 

worth and integrity (amongst whom the Lord Cleypoles father was one) and 

after a longe and solemne debate a Verdict was given against Sir Arthur's 

itle and Sir Arthur havinge solemnly promised and engaged to the Trustees 

:o acquiesce in this Tryall Mr. Stapleton (with an intent of procuringe some 

maintenance for the many children of Collingwood) bought the 

01 1656. April 24. The Treason Trustees notify the Committee for Seques- 

.f trial in Common Pleas about Eslington, Whittingham, etc., between 

athbert] Collingwood and Sir Arthur Haslerigg, and advise them to defend the 

States t therein. Welford, Royalist Compositions, p. 170 (111 Surtees Soc. 



THE 1ATER OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 3l 

discoverer's interest and then purchast of the said Trustees the said Mannours 
and Lands, paid in his first moyety and had theire Order to receive possession 
and rents and all the Tenants thereupon attorned except one or 2 att most 
whereby hee had a quiett possession. 

But Sir Arthur forgetting his Engagement to the Trustees to acquiesce in 
the said Tryall beganne to prosecute multiplicity of accions and by all wayes 
possible to obstructe Mr. Stapleton in his said purchase and combininge with 
one Ogle Tenant to the house and demeasnes of Eslington (whoe served as 
foreman of the Jury att Mr. Stapletons Court) the said Ogle and his Complice 
with pistolls cocked and swords drawne forcibly thrust Mr. Stapleton's 
servants and agents out of the house and kept and still keepes the same for 
Sir Arthur in a warlike posture whereupon Mr. Stapleton applyed himselfe to 
his highness whoe was pleased to referre it to the Lord Charles Howard and 
others to examine and certify the particulers to his Highnes with their 
opinion. 

And they callinge the parties before them the 10th of August last certified 
the matter of fact to bee truth and that in theire opinion it tendeth much 
to the prejudice of Mr. Stapleton's interest. 

That though Sir Arthur had notice of this peticion to and refference 
from his Highness yet hee the 15th of the said moneth of August came to 
Eslington attended with armed men and noe sooner alighted from his horse 
but imediately hee beganne to threaten the Tenants of Eslington with killinge 
theire cattle and burninge theire houses unles they would acknowledge him 
for Landlord and become his Tenants and pay him Rent and called them all 
rogues. To which one of the Tennants reply ed they were honest men tellinge 
him if hee should doe all unto them that he threatened and not leave them 
worth a groate hee would begg to my Lord Protectour on his knees for 
Law against him. Whereupon Sir Arthur replyed ' My Lord Protectour, My 
Lord kis&e my arse.' 

On Munday next after beinge the 17th of August hee sent about 20 men 
horse and foote armed with swords and pistolls firelocks musquetts and pikes 
out of Eslington house which hee hath made a garrison and did then and 
there with force of armes in a violent manner seize of 55 beasts of William 
Reeds of Clinch one of Mr. Stapleton's Tennants in Eslington Lordsliipp and 
brought the said goods towards Eslington house neare which place Sir Arthur 
and his sonne and one Thomas Ogle all armed with swords or pistolls mett 
them and the Tennants followinge the said goods the said armed persons 
wounded John Smith one of the said Tenants and beate others of them and 
deteyned the said goods forcibly. 

About an hower after the takinge of the said goods one Mr. W T illiam 
Clennell Mr. Stapleton's Attorney and agent hearinge thereof (unarmed and 
in a very peaceable manner) went to demaund of Sir Arthur the reason of these 
proceedings whoe answered Mr. Clennell that Mr. Stapletou had noe right 



32 THE LATER OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 

there and holdinge a double pistoll in his hand (divers of his Company beinge 
armed with the like weapons) said to Clennell that was att his service and 
inquired for Mr. George Collingwood wishinge hee were there and then (said 
hee) wee shall have the blood of gentlemen for the blood of gentlemen the 
said Wm. Clennell replyed in a very peaceable manner that he came not with 
any intent to fight but hoped the Comon Wealth would make good theire 
interest in that estate it beinge conveyed by theire Trustees of Drury-house. 
Sir Arthur then answered that those Trustees would sell any man's estate 
but neither warrant title nor give possession. 

Sir Arthur then asked Wm. Clennell if hee did intend to ryde and 
proclaime the fayre att Whittingham hee replyed that hee did whereupon 
Sir Arthur told him in a most passionate manner 'I will ryde the fayre or 
leave my blood upon the place ' and to make his wordes good Musquetts pikes 
and other armes were brought to him to Eslington house in the night time 
hee had alsoe forces out of the Countye of Durham and from Hexamshire 
from Fawden Lordshipp, Mr. Wm. Hesleriggs Tennants of Swarland, Mr. 
Henry Ogle's Tenants of Eglingham (late Captaine of the Militia Troope) and 
divers of the Militia Troope under his Command. In all to the number of 
200 or thereabouts most of them horsemen with pistolls in theire holsters and 
swords by theire sydes and amongst them severall officers of the Garisons of 
Barwicke ; with theis forces well appoineted in a warlike manner in the night 
tyme with such a Truncheon as a Generall uses in his hand hee marched to 
Whittingham and by the breake of day had possest himselfe of the markett 
place and drawne upp his forces in a fightinge posture (theire Cloakes beinge 
tyed crosse theire shoulders) either to receive or give a chardge (to the greate 
Terrour and amazement of the country people that came to the said fayre 
upon theire occacions) refusinge to quitt the place untill the Twoe next 
Justices of peace came and read the proclamacion and required all those that 
came to ride the said fayre to departe. Mr. Stapletons agents with their 
tenants and neighbours beinge there alsoe in a defensive manner to make 
good the purchasours right to the said fayre the wholle mannour of Whit- 
tingham beinge intirely in theire possession then and for above Twelve 
moneths before and the yeare before in a very quiet and peaceable manner 
ridd and proclaymed the said fayre accordinge to Ancient Custome. 

Since this tyme Sir Arthur hath continued to keepe a considerable 
number of armed men in Eslington house whoe ryde upp and downe the 
country armed to the greate terrour of all the people in the Neighbourhood, 
with whiche armed men hee hath driven and impownded all Mr. Stapleton's 
Tennants Cattle till everyone of them have replevined them twice or thrice (to 
the number of 60 replevined att least) theire Cattle standinge in the Foulds 
nights and dayes before hee would release them to the utter undoinge and 
rume of many of the said Tenants within the said Lordshipp. Also the said 
Sir Arthur with his said forces hath driven and impounded some of the said 



THE LATER OWNERS OF ESLINGTON. 33 

tenants goods in the night tyme and in a violent manner hee hath attempted 
to lead away theire corne others hee hath forcibly thrust out of theire 
houses seized of theire goods therein and kept armed men in theire houses 
untill restored by the Justices and Sheriff. 

Hee hath in like manner driven the Tennants Cattle out of the grownds 
they pay Mr. Stapleton rent for and kept them forcibly on theire neighbours' 
grownds adjacent, untill a longe tyme after that they were restored by 
the Sheriff as aforesaid. 

Alsoe the said Sir Arthur with the forces aforesaid hath brought cattle 
of his owne unto the grownds of the said Mr. Robert Stapleton att Whit- 
tingham and there forcibly kept them and when the Tennants had impounded 
the said Cattle (beinge sheepe) hee refused to replevin them but sent a con- 
siderable number of armed men horse and foote first in the day tyme and 
then in the night tyme with white marks in theire hatts and swords drawne 
whoe knockt downe the Watchers of the Pownd broke the Pownd and 
violently rescued the said cattle and tooke them from thence and beate and 
wounded divers of the said Tennants whoe thereupon have byn ever since 
and yet are forct to leave theire Employments and watche theire goods day 
and night to preserve them from the like outrages of the said Sir Arthur and 
his armed men soe kept by him in his Garrison of Eslington aforesaid and hath 
this Michaelmas terme arrested many of the Tenants and still continues his 
violence upon them and theire goods to the greate ruyne and impoverishment 
of them theire wives children and famylyes. 

[Endorsed : ] Sir Arthur Haslerigg and Collingwood touching the Manor 
of Eslington Northumberland. 



3 SER. voo. vi. 



34 



II. A PEDIGREE OF WIDDEINGTON OF CHEESEBUEN 

GEANGE. 
By J. C. HODGSON, M.A., F.S.A. 

[Exhibited 28th July, 1909.] 

INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 

Although an admirable pedigree of the family of Widdring- 
ton of Widdrington castle is given in the Eev. John Hodgson's 
History of Northumberland, in which work, as well as in the new 
History of Northumberland, pedigrees of several cadet lines may 
be found, no readily accessible pedigree* is forthcoming of the 
family of Widdrington of Cheeseburn grange, whose most 
illustrious son was Sir Thomas Widdrington of Gray's Inn, 
Speaker of the House of Commons in the time of the Common- 
wealth. 

Biographies of Sir Thomas Widdrington may be found in 
Mr. Eichard Welford's Men of Mark, the Dictionary of National 
Biography, etc., etc.; and the Free School at Stamfordham, 
which he endowed, still exists as a memorial of his benevolence. 

The Widdringtons of Cheeseburn grange, like other North- 
umbrian and Scottish families during the Civil Wars, divided 
themselves between the opposing camps, and whilst Sir Thomas 
was high in the counsels of the Commonwealth, his next brother, 
Sir Henry Widdrington, was as ardent on the king's side, and 
was obliged in 1646 to compound for his estate as a delinquent. 
This division of opinion made no breach in brotherly relations, 
and Sir Thomas, having out -lived his only son, after settling 

* There is a very good pedigree in Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, 
4th series, vol. in. p. 158, communicated by Major Skeet, with which the present 
pedigree is in substantial agreement. 



WILLS. 35 

large estates on his four surviving daughters, gave his paternal 
inheritance at Cheeseburn grange to Sir Henry, from whom it 
has descended, without any alienation, to his descendant and 
representative, Mr. Edward Biddell-Blount, now of Cheeseburn 
grange. 

The writer desires to express his obligation and thanks to 
Mr. Eiddell-Blount for giving him the fullest and unrestricted 
access to his muniments. 

EVIDENCES. 

15 Sept., 1663. Will of (Sir) Thomas Widdrington of Cheeseburn grange. 
' Mindful of my mortality and desirous to set my house in order before my 
death.' ' To be buried without the least of funerale pomp by the discretion of 
my executor, and if my departure out of this world be in or near London, then 
my mind is that my body be interred in the church of St. Gyles-in-the-Fields, 
as near the bodyes of my late dear wife and of my dear daughter Dorothy, as 
conveniently may be.' ' It having pleased God, the all wise and merciful Lord 
God, to take to his mercy my only and dear son Thomas, he being then near 
the age of 20 years.' .... Confirms settlement made after son's death, dated 
July, 1663, of the manors and estates of Hambleton, Yorks., etc., etc., upon 
daughters, etc. ; remainder to my second brother, Henry Widdrington, etc. 
Confirms certain provision for the maintenance of a schoolmaster at Stam- 
fordham 'where I was borne.' 

My two younger daughters, Mary and Ursula, not yet married : I give the 
custody and tuition of the said Mary to my Lord Fairfax and to my daughter 
Frances, wife of Sir John Ledgard of Ganton, and the custody, etc., of my 
daughter Ursula to my brother Ealph Widdrington, doctor in divinity, and 
my daughter Katherine, wife of Robert Shafto, esq. To my said four daughters, 
Frances, Katherine, Mary and Ursula, the rings, plate, etc., of my late dear 
wife, their good and religious mother. To my cousin, Francis Philipson of 
Elvett, 51. To my uncles, Mr. Henry Fairfax of Oglethorpe, and Charles 
Fairfax of ' Menston,' esq., each a gold ring. To my late servant and kinsman, 
Thomas Swinburn, 51. Executors, my four daughters, Frances, Katherine, 
Mary, and Ursula. Supervisors, my Lord Fairfax, my sons-in-law Sir John 
Ledgard of Ganton, bart., and Robert Shafto of Whitworth, my brother-in-law 
Henry Arthington, and my brother Doctor Widdrington. My cousin John 
Rush worth of Lincoln's Inn, my brother Nicholas Widdrington, and my servants 
Robert Alder and Robert Ayscough, to assist my daughters. To my brother, 
Ralph Widdrington, 10Z. per annum out of the tithe of Chester-le-Street. To 
my nephew, William Widdrington, son of my brother Henry, 101. To my 



36 A PEDIGREE OF WIDDRINGTON : 

grandchild, Dorothy Ledgard, 200/. To my friends, John Archer, serjeant-at- 
law, and William Ellis, esq., Eeader of Gray's Inn, each a ring. To my school- 
fellow, Walter Strickland of Flamborough, esq., a ring. 

My purchase of Whitchester, my lands at Costley and Cowpen, and my 
messuages in the city of York, to be sold. My lands in Cheeseburn grange, 
Nesbitt and Ouston to my two younger daughters, Mary and Ursula, for three 
years. To my grandchildren, John and Thomas Ledgard, and Mark Shafto, 
all my books and MSS., except such books on divinity and history as my 
daughters shall select. To the poor householders of the city of York, 101. 
To the poor householders of Berwick-on-Tweed, 101. To the poor people of the 
parish of Stamfordham, where I was born, IOL To the poor of the parish of 
Heddon-on-the-Wall, 51. To my brother, Henry, IOL, and a debt of 10QL due 
by him to me for stock of mine when he first farmed Nesbett. To my brother, 
Nicholas, IOL To the children of my brother Eowland, deceased, IOL apiece. 
To my sister, Pepper, IOL To my nephew, Anthony Dodsworth, the only child 
of my sister Eleanor, deceased, IOL To my two brothers-in-law, Cuthbert 
Pepper, esq., and Mr. Anthony Dodsworth, 51. apiece. To my niece, Margaret 
Pepper, IOL To Lady Fairfax of Ashton, a gold ring. To my sisters-in-law, 
Lady Selby, Lady Craven, Mrs. Arthington of Arthington, Mrs. Hutton of 
Popleton, and Mrs. Ursula Fairfax, each a gold ring. 

13 Sept., 1664. Will of Sir Henry Widdrington of Cheeseburn grange, 
knight. ' If my departure out of this world be in, or near, Northumberland, 
then my mind is that my body be interred in the church of Stannerton, where 
my dear wife is interred.' Eecites settlements made by late brother, Sir Thomas 
Widdrington, knight, serjeant-at-law, of Cheeseburn grange, dated respectively 
the 10th and llth July, 1663. My eldest son, William Widdrington. To my 
second sonne, John Widdrington, now, or lately, in the East Indies, 4001. To 
my son, Ealph Widdrington, 1001., together with my lease of the messuage or 
grange called Catchburne, held of the earl of Carlisle. To my son, Edward 
Widdrington, 400L, when 22 years of age. To my son, Thomas Widdrington, 
400/., when 22 years of age. To my son, Eobert Widdrington, 400/., when 22 
years of age. To my son, Lewis Widdrington, 400/., when 22 years of age. 
To my son, Patricius Widdrington, 400/., when 22 years of age. To my 
daughter, Mary Delaval, now wife of William Delaval, of Dissington, gent., 
1001. To my daughter, Margaret Whitehead, wife of Nicholas Whitehead, 
gent., 1001. To my son, William Widdrington, my lease of the summering 
ground in the parish of Symondburn, held of the earl of Northumberland. 
Executor, my son, William Widdrington. Supervisors, my brother Ealph 
Widdrington, John Eushworth, esq., my cosen, William Swinburn, gent., and 
Edward Collingwood, gent. 

20 July, 1674. Edward Widdrington of Blackheddon, esq. Whereas I am 
possessed by lease from the earl of Northumberland of 2 pts. in 3 ps. to be 
devided of certaine lands in the high lands in Tindall called Woofe Keilder 



WIDDRINGTON WILLS. 37 

Stoupe, White Kielder, Keilder Hay and other names for 21 years yet in being. 
I give the same to my dear wife, Elianer Widdrington; also 400. now in the 
hands of my brother, Wm. Widdrington, esq. Whereas my brother Ealph 
Widdrington is now possessed of a 3d. part of the aforesaid lease, he to hold it 
dureing the whole terme yet to come. My loveing friend, Allen Swinburn, 
esq., executor in trust for my wife. My will is that 201. be given to the poore 
of the parishes of Stannerton, Hugh, Bitchfield, and Owston, and 30Z. to the 
poore at the discrecion of my executor. Proved at York. 

20 March, 1687/8. Will of Kalph Widdrington of Christ College, Cam- 
bridge, and Lady Margaret reader of divinity in the university. My 
library to be sold by my executors, and the price thereof added to my ready 
money to be laid out in the purchase of an inheritance or rent charge : such 
inheritance or rent charge to be held for their respective lives by my nephews, 
Ralph Widdrington of Cheeseburn grange, esq., son of my brother, Sir Henry 
Widdrington, deceased; Henry Widdrington of Hertford, esq., and his son, 
Henry Widdrington ; and after their deaths to the Master, Fellows, and Scholars 
of Christ Church. To my niece, Ursula, countess of Plymouth, only surviving 
daughter of my brother, Sir Thomas Widdrington, 200/. To Mr. Thomas 
Linford, rector of St. Edmond's in Gracious (sic) street, my scarlet gown, 
robes and hood, and Stephen's Greek Testament. My copyhold house at 
Fordham to my nephew, Henry Widdrington, and then to the Master and 
Fellow of Christ College. To my sizar, Thomas Kandall, 51. To my nephew, 
Patricious W'iddrington, my better chariot. To my nephew, Christopher 
Pepper, my pocket watch with a silver case. To my niece Mary Widdrington 
of Hertford, my Dutch cabinet, my pewter, brass, etc., at Fordham. To my 
nephews, Kalph and Henry Widdrington, my pictures in my chambers in the 
college, etc., they executors. 

24 July, 1688. Will of Kalph Widdrington of Cheeseburn grange, esq. 
Recites settlement, dated 12 Sept. 4 James n, made between himself and John 
Widdrington, his eldest son and heir apparent since deceased, etc. To Margaret 
Widdrington, ' my now wife,' certain rooms, etc., at Cheeseburn grange for her 
life, my lesser silver tankard, six silver spoons, six silver forks, two silver 
porringers and two silver salts, 4 pillowbeers, 4 table cloaths, 4 side board cloaths, 
4 doz. napkins, and a horse with grazing and hay for same. To Martha 
Widdrington, widow of my brother Robert, 10Z. per annum. To my brother, 
Lewis Widdrington, 201. per annum. To my nephew, Henry Widdrington, son 
and heir of my said brother, Robert, 2501. in satisfaction of the like sum left 
him by his late father and deposited in my hands for his use. To the bayliffs 
of the Free schoole of Morpeth, 51. per annum out of Nesbitt. ' I give and 
devise to tenn preests each of them 20s.' Residue to William Widdrington, my 
son and heir apparent. He executor. 







2 



^H P5 



^ 



a 



ish of Stamfo 
n, 14th Febru 
nd of York ; 
House of Com 
iried in the ch 
uly, 1664 (e). 



" M-l ^ I-H 



si 



,8'O r d P S ^ 

a ^-. s 




f*1!j4*j] 

- s :i2**3g 

- l|fJI43j 

-iilgi:-Ti3 

-i|^ a .iiiai 
liiiJtl- 

^ o t>o ji' .* ~ *-" ,2 

g S ( fJ 3 .-^ M ^ 

fi 



p q <u ^^ . 

Wj^ 



^^ I 

S D 






J03 









a 










W 



*il|iyj|,"!fll|!Wili 






. 



55 



*. , 

>> *L. 



dX 



~.S 



X 



If illil! 

" ^ O* ,OC^^ 

"S <u ^ oT 5P 



.2 



fl'C 






II 

g-d 
[Vj O 



S*P 

fi 



T3 a 
S'S 



-T O5 O >!( C^ 
>s 9 1<* C< t- 

^^o co jg co co 

,j ,5 



^1111^ 11 

w ^p 8 * -a'1 S-s 

CO f^ -r -rH ^ C6 ^ SH 

^SS l&S BS| 




4 fl 

JTn c 



are 

3 v 



. .a 

' 



o o 



S3 



o-d 



O o 

H 

II .A 



&-g 

n ! 

K^ O 



2 



is H li4*5^ 

rd 






41 



III. EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 
RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 

1308 TO 1558. 

By FREDERICK WALTER DENDY, a vice-president. 
[Read on the 25th November, 1908.] 

The plea rolls of the Court of Common Pleas, or, as they are 
more commonly called the ' De Banco Rolls,' in which are 
recorded the particulars of the litigation carried on in this 
court, extend in an almost unbroken series from the reign of 
Henry in to the present day. In bulk they far exceed that of 
any other series of the public records and the contents are both 
valuable and varied. The Court of Common Pleas or Common 
Bench (whence the rolls derived their name) claimed exclusive 
jurisdiction over land. They extend from 1 Edward i (12T2) to 
25 Elizabeth (1582). After that date these proceedings were 
formed into a distinct set of rolls known as the ' Recovery Rolls.' 

There are 987 De Banco Rolls, each roll consisting of several 
hundred skins or membranes. Mr. Scargill Bird in his Guide to 
the Public Records states that ' the Rolls of Common Law proceed- 
ings, although full of invaluable information, are too bulky to 
invite the attention of the genealogical inquirer and the absence 
of complete indices renders an exhaustive research almost 
impracticable.' Mr. Walter Rye, in his Records and Record 
Searching, says that the general contents of the Banco Rolls ' are 
from their immense bulk and chaotic arrangement utterly sealed 
to you unless you by chance get a reference to the roll and skin. 
The frequently inserted advertisement that a certain record 
agent has an " index " to these De Banco Rolls is misleading. It 
is absolutely impossible that any one man could index a tithe of 
them in a long lifetime. He can have an index to his notes and 
extracts only.' 



42 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

A somewhat eccentric but very industrious antiquary, General 
Plantagenet Harrison, spent many years in making extracts 
from these rolls for his never completed history of Yorkshire. 
At his death his note-books were purchased by the Public Record 
Office. At my instance Mr. Craster kindly inspected them and 
he found that although most of the extracts related to Yorkshire, 
some of the note-books contained also extracts which relate to 
the county of Northumberland. These extracts are in volumes 
vn to xn of the ' Notes.' 

Some of these extracts, namely, those for the reign of 
Edward i, are comprised in a complete abstract of De Banco Rolls 
relating to Northumberland for that reign which is amongst the 
volumes of historical manuscripts in the library of the duke of 
Northumberland at Alnwick castle. The subsequent extracts, 
commencing with the beginning of the reign of Edward 11, I 
have had copied, and our members, Dr. Lawrence Adamson and 
Mr. Richard Welford, have generously contributed the greater 
part of the cost of the copying. 

I now place the items thus extracted before the society for 
its consideration. Much of the information they give has not 
before been published, and I think I am correct in saying that 
they throw new and valuable light on the history of nearly every 
ancient family and considerable estate in the county of Northum- 
berland. There are many evident mistakes and mis-spellings. 
Some doubtless occur in the rolls themselves, others have prob- 
ably been made by General Harrison in transcribing them, and 
others again by the copyist of General Harrison's notes, which 
are written in a very illegible handwriting. It has been found 
impracticable to correct these errors except at a too costly 
reference in every case to the rolls. The main thing is that 
eference is given in each case to the original entry, and where 
complete and accurate information is desired the rolls should be 
searched and the entry more fully abstracted. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1308-1311. 43 

[In the following extracts the word ' volume ' refers to the volume of 
General Harrison's notes. The letter ' R ' means ' Roll/ the letter s m ' means 
the membrane of that roll, and the letter ' d ' refers to the dorso, or back 
of the roll.] 

[FROM VOLUME vii.] 1308. 

R. 169, m. 241 d. Elizabeth uxor Alexander de Hilton, plaintiff ; John Ryland 

defendant. 
R. 169, m. 102. Thomas Mauclerk, plaintiff ; Roger de la Quisine, defendant. 

Land in Horseley juxta Felton. 
R. 169, m. 57 d. Robert de Laton and Nicholas fil. John de West Hawkeswill, 

exors. test. William de Hawkeswill, plaintiffs; Alexandei de Bollesdon, 

defendant. Plea of debt. 

R. 169, m. 194 d. John fil. John de Alburwyk and Robert de Paxton, plain- 
tiffs ; Robert de Bellingham, defendant. Land at Alburwyk. 
R. 169, m. 113. Aleanora, wife of Alex, de Balliolo, plaintiff; John de Britann. 

com. Richmond, defendant. Manor of Bywell. 

1309. 
R. 178, m. 177. Hugh Lovel, plaintiff ; Cecilia Brakenbiri, defendant. Land 

in Ederiston. 
R. 178, m. . John de Britann, conies Richmond by Will, de Ottelay, attor. 

suit., plaintiff; Agnes uxor Hugo de Balliolo, defendant. Land in 

Wodehorne. 
R. 178, m. 514. Idem John de Britan., plaintiff; Alianora, uxor Alexander de 

Balliolo, defendant. Land in Brothersete and Bywelle. 

1310. 
R. 181, m. 87. Robert de Herle, plaintiff; William Comyn, parson of the church 

of Ovyngham, defendant. Debt, 291. 
R. 181, m. 302 d. Hugh Stedman and Isabella his wife, plaintiffs; Roger fil. 

Thomas le Fleshhewer de Alnewyk, John de Taillour and John de 

Shilbottle, defendants. 

R. 181, m. 302 d. Cecilia de Brakenbiry, plaintiff ; Hugh Lovel, defendant. 
R. 182, m. 454. John fil. Adam de Middelton, and Oda his wife, by John de 

Middelton, attor. suu., plaintiffs; William de Brakenbury, defendant. 

Land in Middelton juxta Beleford which Hugh Lovel claims as his 

right. 

1311. 
R. 184, m. 230. Andrew de Smetheton and Margery his wife, plaintiffs ; 

Gilbert de Otteleye, defendant. Tenements in Alneham and Bidlesden. 
R. 187, m. 95. Robert Badde de Morpeth, plaintiff ; Walter Rede and Cecilia 

his wife, defendants. Land in Morpeth. 
R. 187, m. 139. Simon fil. David de Coupland, plaintiff ; David fil. Thomas 

Baxtere, defendant, Tenement in Coupland. 



44 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

R. 187, m. 226 d. Thomas Mauclerk, plaintiff; John de Barton and Margaret 

his wife, defendants. Land in Horseleye. 
R. 188, m. 296 d. Wm. de Herle, Isabella, wife of Robert de Herle, executrix 

of Robert de Herle, plaintiffs; William Comyn de Bogham, parson of 

church of Ovyngham, defendant. Debt, 2QL 6s. Sd. 
R. 188, m. 296 d. William de Herle, Isabella, wife of Robert de Herle, executrix 

of Robert de Herle, plaintiffs ; William Comyn, executor of John Comyn, 

late earl of Buchan, defendant. Debt, 271. 13s. 4d. 

1312. 
R. 190, m. 166. John de Aleynsheles, plaintiff; Robert de Hilton, and Alicia, 

wife of Walter de Whithill, defendants. Land in Gysenes. 
R. 190, m. 166. Alicia, wife of Walter de Whithill, by Richard de Pykering, 

her attorney, plaintiff; John fil. Walter de Whithill and Richard de 

Wetewang, defendants. Land in Dunstan. 
R. 190, m. 217. John de Wolloure, plaintiff; Robert fil. John fil. Robert 

Siwardson de Wolloure, defendant. Land in Wolloure. 
R. 190, m. 434 d. Alan de Swyneburne, plaintiff; Richard de Swyneburne, 

defendant. 

1313. 
R. 198, m. 76 d. Richard fil. Ralph and Isabella, his wife, plaintiffs ; William 

fil. William de Denum, and Isabel, his wife, defendants. Manor of 

Meldon. 
R. 201, m. 477. Agnes, wife of Alexander de Swynburne, plaintiff ; William 

fil. Alexander de Swynburne, defendant. 
R. 201, m.69d. Peter fil. William de Middelton, plaintiff; John de Eure, 

guardian of William fil. Andrew de Kirkeby, defendant. Land in 

Totwyth.l 

1314. 
R. 206, m. 603 d. Simon de Thwangton,2 prior of Tynemouth, plaintiff ; 

Mariota, wife of Hervey de la Hay, defendant. Messuage in Newcastle- 

upon-Tyne. 

1315. 
R. 209, m. 96. Robert de Faudon and Walter de Wassyngton, by Robert de 

Haukswell, his attorney, plaintiffs; William de Hoghton, and Maria 

his wife, defendants. Land in Hoghton juxta Whitcasin.3 
R. 209, m. 214. Simon Warde and Alicia his wife, John de Oggle and Agnes 

his wife and Thomas de Belsowe and Maria his wife, plaintiffs; Ralph 

Buteturt and Johanna his wife, defendants. Land in Shilvyngton. 

1 Query, whether this entry, although entered under Northumberland in 
General Harrison's notebook, refers to that county. 

- His name is given in Kellawe's Register as Taunton, 3 Whitchester, 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1312-1331. 45 

1323. 
R. 248, m. 301. Robert fil. John de Conyers, plaintiff; William de Herle, 

defendant. Manor of Benrigge. 
R. 248, m. 311. Robert fil. John de Conyers of Stubhous, plaintiff; William 

de Herle, defendant. Manor of Benrigge. 

1324. 
R. 252, m. 174 d. Richard de Emeldon, plaintiff; Peter Brakenbery de Laton 

and Cecilia, his wife, defendants. Rents in Est-dicheburn. 

1326. 
R. 264, m. 600. Alexander fil. Robert de Hilton, plaintiff; Edmund de 

Craucester, defendant. 
R. 264, m. 383 d. Roger Dawessone, plaintiff; John de Glanton and Robert 

de Dychard, defendants. Land in Angram. 
R. 264, m. 265 d. Richard de Wykeston, plaintiff; Margery, daughter William 

fil. Maurice de Heburn, defendant. Land in Heburn. 

1327. 
R. 268, m. 74 d. William fil. Robert de Denum, by Roger de Blaykeston, his 

attorney, plaintiff ; Thomas de Karlisle de Novo Castro, defendant. 6L 

debt. 

1328. 
R. 272, m. 128 d. Robert de Maners, plaintiff ; John Florison de Etale and 

Adam Waselesegh de Brankeston, defendants. Account while bailiff 

in Etale. 

1329. 
R. 277, m. 199. Edmund le Botiller, by John Woderowe, his attorney, 

plaintiff ; William de Lyham, defendant. Manor of Lyham which 

Robert le Botiller, senior, and Constance, his wife, gave to Robert le 

Botiller and Agnes his wife. 

R. 277, m. 199. Alexander fil. Robert de Hilton, plaintiff; Edmund de Crau- 
cester, defendant. Manor of Renyngton and land in Gysyens which 

Thomas Randolf gave to Alexander de Hilton and Elizabeth his wife. 
R. 277, m. 128. Roger Fabian, plaintiff ; Thomas fil. Thomas de Fetherston- 

haugh, defendant. Land in Redepeth. 
R. 279, m. 175. William de Wessyngton, by Roger Blaykeston, his attorney, 

plaintiff; Walter de la Launde, defendant. Manor of Colepottes.4 

1331. 
R. 284, m. 345. Cristiana, wife of Peter de Eland, by John Rede, her attorney, 

plaintiff ; Emma, wife of William de Eland, defendant. Land in 

Hye-calverton. 
R. 285, m. 254. Gilbert de Mynster, plaintiff; Gilbert de Slely, defendant. 

Trespass in Bywell. 

4 Colepitts is an ancient holding in Slaley. 



40 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

R. 286, m. 287. Robert fil. John Comyn, claims land at Thurton, Newbrugh, 
WhesleyS and Thesyde. 

R. 286, m. 106 d. Thomas fil. John de Forset, plaintiff; John de Forset, de- 
fendant. Manor of Hertes-heved juxta Angerham.6 

R. 287, m. 32. Lodowic, bishop of Durham, by Roger de Blaykeston, his 
attorney, plaintiff; John Darcy le Cosyn, defendant. Manor of Werk 
in Tyndale. 

R. 287, m. 424. Richard fil. John Conyers, plaintiff ; Galf r. Conyers, de- 
fendant. Manor of Hogh juxta Esshet.8 

1332. 

R. 288, m. 338 d. Alina, wife of Adam de Hetton, by Thomas de Wolloure, 
her attorney, plaintiff; Thomas Aldressone, defendant. Land in 
Wolloure. 

R. 288, m. 338 d. Alina, wife of Adam de Hetton, plaintiff; Thomas Alder de 
North Middelton, defendant. Land in Wolloure. 

R. 288, m. 338 d. Alina, wife of Adam de Hetton, plaintiff; Thomas fil. 
William de Ford, defendant. Land in Wolloure. 

R. 288, m. 338 d. Gilbert fil. Robert de Umfreville, plaintiff ; Archibold 
Duglas, defendant. Manor of Faudon.9 

1333. 

R. 293, m. 353. Roger Mauduit, chivaler, plaintiff ; Richard Conyers, de- 
fendant. Land in Esshet. 

R. 293, m. 380. John Hameby, son and heir of Robert Hameby, plaintiff ; 
Lady Matilda de Thorny B , defendant. 84L debt. 

R. 294, m. 192. Thomas de Fetherstonhalgh, senior, plaintiff ; Robert Solace, 
defendant. Land in Fetherstonhalgh. 

R. 296, m.56. Thomas de 'Musco Campo, plaintiff; W T illiam de Preston, 
defendant. 2001. debt. 

R. 296, m. 451. Robert fil. Richard de Walyngton, plaintiff; John Ibbotessone 
de Fenrother, defendant. Land in East Walyngton. 

1334. 

R. 297, m. 160. Gerard de Wyderyngton = 



John de Wyderyngton, ob. s.p. Roger de Wyderyngton, brother and heir of John. 
R. 297, m. 279. Roger de Woderington, plaintiff; Robert de Helniesley, 

defendant. 
R. 297, m. 219 d. John fil. Adam de Menevill, plaintiff; Richard Gibbeson 

and others, defendants. Trespass at Whittinstall. 



4 Query, Whinotly. 

K Hartside on the Breamish, parish of Ingram. 8 Now called Eshot Heugh. 

9 Faudon in the parish of Ingram. 



TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1332-1336. 47 

R. 299, m. 210. William Tayleboys, chivaler, plaintiff ; Robert Tayleboys, 

defendant. Trespass in Hodespeth. 
R. 299, m. 278. William de Paxton and Margery, his wife, plaintiffs; Richard 

de Blackeddon, defendant. Land in Blackeddon, of which Robert de 

Redeware, father of Margery, was seised. 
R. 300, m. 478 and 156 d. Thomas de Fenton, plaintiff; John Deen de Prest- 

wyk, defendant. 
R. 300, m. 335 d. Lucia, wife of Thomas Wilkynson de Wolloure, plaintiff ; 

John Webbester, defendant. Land in Wolloure. 

1335. 

R. 301, m. 18. William fil. William de Acton de Novo Castro, plaintiff; John 
Warde, chivaler, and Amicia, his wife, defendants. Tenement in 
Newcastle. 

R. 301, m. 286 d. Robert fil. John Comyn de Ulseby, plaintiff ; Roger Sutheby 
de Ulseby, defendant. 

R. 301, m. 149 d. Alicia, wife of Simon Warde, plaintiff ; Robert de Oggle, 
defendant. Manor of Shilvyngton. 

R. 301, m. 25 d. William de Paxton and Margery, his wife, plaintiffs; Richard 
de Blackeddon, defendant. Lands in Blackeddon. 

R. 302, m. 112. Gerard de Wyderyngton, miles, plaintiff; Roger fil. Gerard 
de Wyderyngton, and Elizabeth, daughter of Richard de Acton of New- 
castle, defendants. Manor of Colewell and lands in Gunwarton. 

R. 304, m. 335. Roger fil. Richard de Hereford, and Johanna, his wife, by 
Hugh de Brandon, their attorney, plaintiffs ; Bertram de Mounboucher 
and Alicia, wife of Guischard de Charron, by William de Heppiscotes, 
defendants. 

1336. 

R. 305, m. 247. Robert de Maners, plaintiff ; Hugh Sotymull, defendant. 
Manor de Etale and tenements in Hethpole. 

R. 306, m. 45 d. Robert de Insule de Wodeburn, by John de Nickele, his 
attorney, plaintiff; Robert de Lambeton, William de Lambeton, 
William Boton del Bure, Robert Shepherd, Robert fil. Adam de Wotton, 
John del Cote, Roger Shepherd, Walter Berger, and John Forester, 
defendants. Trespass at Thornton juxta Hertburn. 

R. 306, m. 23 d. Nicholas de Dalton = 

Alicia, daughter and heir == 



Will 



r illiam, son and heir. 

R. 307, m. 14. Gilbert fil. John Dawessone, plaintiff; Richard de Acton, 
defendant. Assault at Newcastle. 



48 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

R 307 m.258d. John de Felton de Hoghton, plaintiff; John Dickeson de 
Tynedale and others, defendants. Trespass at Hoghton yuxta 
Kouchester. 

R 307, m. 258 d. William fil. John de Lilleburne, and Elizabeth, daughter 
of William Heyron, by John de Mickeley-e, plaintiffs; John de Lille- 
burne and Kath., his wife, defendants. Manor of Benleye. 

E 308 m. 16. John de Lilleburne and Katherine, his wife, plaintiffs; William 
fil. John de Lilleburne, and Elizabeth, daughter of William Heyron, 
defendants. Manor of Benleye. 

E. 308, m. 539 d. William Taileboys, chivaler, plaintiff: Walter Tailboys, 
defendant. 

1337. 

R. 310, m. 1 58. de Widdrington == 



John de Widdrington, ol). s.p. temp. Ed. ir. Roger de Widdington, brother and heir. 
E. 310, m. 216. William fil. William de Vescy de Neusum, and Alicia, his 

wife, plaintiffs; Thomas de Baumburgh, defendant. Tenements in 

Baumburgh. 

R. 3 1 0, m. 87. Lucas Tailboys = 

William Tailboys, chivaler. 

R. 311, m. 216. William fil. William de Vescy de Newsham, plaintiff; Thomas 
de Baumburgh, defendant. Tenements in Bamburgh. 

1338. 
R. 313, m. 302 d. Roger fil. Walter de Holthale,iO plaintiff; Thomas Bake- 

ster, defendant. 1 mill in Coupland. 
E. 314, m. 54. Eobert de Conyers de Hubhouse, plaintiff ; William Hunter 

and others, defendants. Trespass at Crumclyf,H value 201. 

^ E. 314, m. 115 d. John fil. Henry, plaintiff ; Alianora uxor Robert de Um- 
fraville, defendant. Land in Nadirton,l2 which William fil. William 
Heroun gave to Michael fil. Thomas de Rihill. 

1339. 
R. 318, m. 291 d. Johanna de Coupeland, by Hugh de Brandon, attor. suit., 

plaintiff; Roger de Hothale, defendant. 1 messuage in Hothale.lO 
R. 319, m. 115. Alianora uxw Robert de Umfraville, plaintiff ; Gilbert, son 

and heir of Robert de Umfraville, defendant. Land in Nedirton. 

10 Howtell. Cronkley. 

'- Netherton in Coquetdale. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1337-1343- 49 

R. 319, m. 229 d. William de Hagerston and Editha, his wife, plaintiffs ; 

William fil. John de Bradefeld, defendant. Land in BollesdonlS of 

which Thomas de Littelwhite, kinsman of Editha, whose heir she is, 

was seised. 
R, 319, m. 155 d. Margaret uxor Robert de Clifford, plaintiff; John Walke- 

fare, chivaler, and Eufemia, his wife, defendants. Land in Elyngeham. 
R. 319, m. 196 d. Odinel de Develston, plaintiff; Nicholas de Louther de 

Novo Castro, defendant. Account of moneys. 

1340. 

R. 321, m. 403. Alan de Fenwyk, plaintiff; Marmaduke de Lumley, defendant. 
R. 323, m. 198. Robert fil. Robert de Umfreville, by John de Birtley, his 

guardian, plaintiff; John de Herlawe, clerk, defendant. Accounts. 
R. 324, m. 114. William fil. Roger Heron, and Isabella, his wife, plaintiffs; 

William de Middelton, person, ecclie de Ford. Manor of Ford. 

1341. 

R. 326, m. 202 d. Thomas Ughtred, miles, plaintiff ; Waleranus de Lomeley, 
mayor of Newcastle, and the corporation of the said town, defendants. 
100 marks debt. 

R. 327, m. 311. Gerard de Woderyngton, plaintiff; John de Denton, defend- 
ant. Manor de Wodehorne and Newbiggyng. 

R. 328, m. 265 d. Thomas fil. Robert de Umfraville, plaintiff; John de 
Herlawe, defendant. Account of moneys. 

R. 328, m. 261 d. Alianora uxor Robert de Umfraville, plaintiff; Gilbert, son 
and heir of Robert de Umfraville, earl of Angus, defendant. Land in 
Nedirton. 

1342. 

R. 331, m. 151 d. Thomas fil. Robert de Umfraville, plaintiff ; John de Her- 
lawe, defendant. Accounts. 

1343. 

R. 333, m. 416. Roger de Woderyngton, plaintiff; William de Tyndale, de- 
fendant. Trespass at Farnhalgh. 

R. 334, m. 28. Robert de Oggle, plaintiff; John Alayn de Wakefield and 
Johanna, his wife, defendants. Manor of Twysill. 

R. 334, m. 395. William fil. William de Swynburne, plaintiff; John de 
Swynburne, defendant. Chollerton. 

R. 334, m. 426 d. Walranus de Lumleye by John de Gaynesburgh, plaintiff ; 
Hugh de Sadelyngstanesi* and Agnes, his wife, executors of the will 
of Hugh de Hotham, defendants. 

13 Bowsden, near Ford. 14 Settlingstones, near Hexham. 

3 SEE. VOL. vi. 4 



5Q EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

E. 336, m. 695. William de Acton, junior, plaintiff; Robert Hewetson and 
others, defendants. Trespass. 

E. 336, m. 622 d. Thomas de Shaftowe by Adam de Hayton, his attorney, 
plaintiff ; Eobert Galoun de Spyndeliston, and Maria, his wife, Eobert 
de Trockelawe, and Margaret, his wife, John Curteys and Idonia, his 
wife, John Donne and Maria, his wife, William Frisel de Magna Bab- 
yngton, Agnes fil. William de Shaftowe and Eobert fil. Thomas de 
Shaftowe, defendants. Land in Parva Babyngton, which Eichard 
Bataille gave to William de Shaftowe and Isabella, his wife and their 
heirs. 

1344. 

E. 337, m. 175. John de Menevill and William, his son, and others, by 
John de Menevill, junior, attar, suu., plaintiffs; Eobert Darraynes, 
defendant. 

E. 337, m. 346. 

de Swethop = Alina de Swethop was seised of land in Killum and Palston ls 

Anicia, daughter and heir = Will, de Boulton. 

E. 339, m. 247 d. John fil. Gilbert de Oggill, plaintiff; Eva uxor John Crag 
of Newcastle upon Tyne, defendant. 1 messuage in Newcastle. 

E. 340, m. 519. William de Muschamp, temp. Edw. i.= 



Stephen de Muschamp, son and heir = 

I 
William de Muschamp, son and heir == 

I 

Thomas de Musco-Campo, son and heir, who claims for Michael de Pressen 
and Gilbert de Frewyk lj land in Middelton juxta Belford of which 
William de Musco-Campo his great grandfather died seised. 

1345. 
E. 341, m. 183. John de Fenwyk, plaintiff ; John fil. Nicholas de Eland and 

Eobert, brother of said John fil. Nicholas, defendant. 
E. 342, m. 250. Adam de Walton, plaintiff; Eichard de Conyers, defendant. 

Account of moneys. 
E. 343, m. 102. John de Lilburne, miles, plaintiff ; Thomas de Muschamp, 

defendant. 200 marks debt. 
E. 343, m. 186. Galf rid de Mowbray, chivaler, plaintiff ; William de Swyn- 

burne, chivaler, defendant. Account whilst he was bailiff of the 

town of Newcastle and receiver of money for said Galfrid. 

15 Kilham and Paston, near Kirknewton. 16 Query, Trewick or Fenwick. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1344-1347. 51 

R. 343, m. 303. Juliana uxor Adam Page, plaintiff; James, master of the 

hospital St. Mary del Westgate, defendant. Messuage in town of 

Newcastle. 

1346. 
R. 346, m. 165. Maria de St. Paulo, Countess of Pembroke, and Adomer de 

Atholl, plaintiffs; Edmund de Impyngton and Edmund fil. Edmund 

de Impyngton, defendants. Debt of 100Z. 

R. 347, m. 247. Alina was seised of lands at Throunton, temp, king John === 

r~ ~T~ ~T~ 

William, son and heir, Elie, brother and heir, John, brother and = 
ol. *.p. oh. *.p. heir 



Alan, son and heir = 
John, son and heir == 

Robert, son and heir == 

I 
Robert de Eslyngton, chivaler, son and heir. 

R.348, m. 194. William de Boulton, clerk, plaintiff; Robert, son and heir 
of Richard de Wetewang, Nicholas de Skelton, and Adomar fil. and 
hered. Thomas Heryng, defendants. Debt 9Z. 6s. Sd. 

R. 348, m. 330 d. Sir William Heron, knight, to whom Robert Heron, parson = 
of the church of Ford, gave the manor of Ford, temp. 
Edw. i. 



Walter Heron, son and heir == 

Emeline, daughter and heir == John Darcy 



John Darcy, son and heir. 

1347. 
R. 352, m. 439. Richard fil. John Turpyn, plaintiff ; John de Houghton juxta 

Heddon on the Walle and John, his son, defendants. 
R. 352, m. 537 d. Elizabeth uxw John de Coigners, Peter de Fenwyk and 

Elizabeth, his wife, plaintiffs ; claim for part of the manor of Clifton,!? 

which Richard le Coigners gave to William de Graystok. 

17 Clifton, near Morpeth. 



52 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

1348. 
R. 353, m. 349. Thomas de Hertewayton == 

Juliana = William de Fenwyk was seised of lands at Hertewayton. 
William de Fenwyk, son and heir = 

John de Fenwyk, son and heir = Alicia 

Thomas de Matfen, son and heir. 

R. 355, m. 517. John de Somerville and Roger Salvayn fit. George Salvayn, 
militis, plaintiffs; Philip, brother and heir of Roger de Somerville, 

militis, defendant. Land in Crauncemore,l8 which Marmaduke de 
Gryndale claims. 
R. 355, m. 331 d. Robert Vescy de Halywell, plaintiff; Roger fil. John fil. 

Robert de Halywell and Robert, brother of the said Roger, defendants. 

121. debt. 
R. 355, m. 281 d. Adam Spraygroul de Esshyndon, plaintiff; John Hannesone 

de Witton juxta Hertburn, defendant. Assault at Tynemouth. 
R. 355, m. 269 d. Robert de Maners, chivaler, plaintiff; Thomas de Standen 

and Margaret, his wife, defendants. Tenements in Middleton juxta 

Baumbrugh. 
R. 355, m. 186 d. Roger de Wyderyngton, brother to Gerard de Wyderyng- 

ton, chivaler, plaintiff; Isabella uxor John de Fissheburne, defendant. 

Plea of debt IQL 
R. 355, m. 186 d. William de Graystok, chivaler, plaintiff ; Richard Conyers, 

defendant. Manor of Clifton. 19 
R. 355, m. 149 d. John de Coupland, plaintiff ; Robert Archer, defendant. 

Land in Mindrome. 
R. 355, m. 25 d. William de Gunwarton, plaintiff; Alexander Dykeson, 

William Cokkeson and others, defendants. Trespass at Chesterhop in 

Redesdale. 

[FROM VOLUME vm.] 1351. 

R. 364, m. 44. Robert Wendont, plaintiff; Henry Taylboys and Alianora, 
his wife, daughter and heir of Gilbert de Borughdon, defendants 101. 
debt. 

R.365,m.97. Robert Coigneyers de Stubhouse, per attorney, plaintiff; 
Alan de Menyll, defendant. Land held in soccage. 

'" Gngemoor. ' Clifton, near Morpeth. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1348-1353. 53 

R. 367, m. 78 and 228 d. William Heron, chivaler, and Isabella, his wife, 
Roger Heron, brother o'f said William, Roger Heron, son of William, 
John Heron, Walter Heron, Thomas Heron, Robert Heron, Andrew 
Heron, son of William, John Sampson, Thomas de Musco Campo, and 
others, plaintiffs; John Lilleburn, chivaler, defendant. Tenements 
in Ford, Kyrmerston,20 Croucum,2l Bayrmore,22 Dichand. Ulcestre, 
Warenford, Unthank, Wolloure, Hethpole and Heddon. 

1352. 
R. 368, m. 12. Adam de Egliston and Constancia, his wife, plaintiffs; John 

de Egliston, defendant. Manor of Est-burnton. 
R. 368, m. 12. Thomas de Fencotes, chivaler, plaintiff; William de Bowndon, 

defendant. 
R. 368, m. 12. Thomas de TJmfreville, plaintiff; John Yperlying and Isolda, 

his wife, defendants. 60 sol. in West Whelpyngton. 
R. 368, m. 54. Prior of Tynemouth, plaintiff; William Faukus de West- 

bakworth, defendant. 20 marks debt. 
R. 368, m. 141 d. de Lasceles = 

David de Lasceles = Matilda, aunt and heir to John == 



I I 

John de Lasceles died seised of lands Isabella, daughter and heir = 
in Ellynton, s.p. 

Matilda Darreyns, co-heir of John de Alicia, daughter and coheir == 
Lasceles 

Elena, daughter and heir, and coheir of John de Lascelles = John Wendout. 
R. 369, m. 68. Rad. Surteys, by his attorney, plaintiff; John de Kylvyng- 

ton, defendant. Rents in North Gosford. 
R. 369, m. 75 d. Order of the sheriff to evict Robert Warde de Croft super 

Tese and others to satisfy a debt of 40. due to John de Eaton, parson 

of the church of Wermouth. 

1353. 
R. 374, m. 196 d. John de Coupeland and Johanna, his wife, plaintiffs ; Peter 

Crabbe and Agnes, his wife, defendants. Tenements in Palston.23 
R. 375, m. 122. Alan o' the Bowes, hermit, plaintiff ; William Freman de 

Whikham and Isolda, his wife, defendant. 
R. 375, m. 122. Thomas Gretheved, plaintiff; Thomas de Sokepath de 

Alnewyk, defendant. 

20 Scremerston. 21 Crookham. - Barmoor. 

s Pas ton, near Kirknewton. 



54 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

R. 375, m. 122. Gilbert de Umfraville, earl of Angus, plaintiff; Elizabeth 
de Rodum and others, defendants. Trespass at Herbotille. 

R. 375, m. 126. Gilbert de Umfreville, son and heir of Robert de Umfreville, 
plaintiff; Robert fil. Thomas de Swynburne, defendant. Manor of 
Gunnarton. 

R. 375, m. 58 d. William de Presfen and William fil. Roger Muschamp, 
plaintiffs; William del Strother and Matilda, his wife, and Robert de 
Orde and Alicia, his wife, defendants. Manor of Tynedeleye.24 

R. 375, m. 58 d. John de Coupland, plaintiff; John fil. Robert Archer de 
Kyllome and Isabella, his wife, defendants. Manor of Kyllome. 

1354. 

R. 377, m. 102. Henry le Scrop, chivaler, plaintiff; William fil. Roger de 
Halywell, William fil. Robert Vescy, John Todde, Roger Todde and 
others, defendants. Trespass at Haliwell. 

R. 378, m. 188. William de Bolton de Swethop, plaintiff ; Roger de Wod- 
eryngton, brother to Gerard de Woderyngton, defendant. 10 marks 
debt. 

1355. 

R. 380, m. 191. Order to the sheriff to distrain the lands of Gilbert de Um- 
freville, earl of Angus, John de Umfreville, and Will, de Acton. 

R. 381, m. 97. William de Tyndale, plaintiff; William fil. Adam de Rede, 
defendant. 60 sol. debt. 

R. 382, m. 108. Alexander de Hilton, chivaler,, and Matilda, his wife, 
plaintiffs; Robert de Falderley, defendant. Goods at Benewell. 

R. 382, m. 179 d. Robert de Bowes and Elizabeth, his wife, plaintiffs ; Robert 
de la Vale, chivaler, and William, his brother, and others, defendants. 
Regarding the wardship of Isabella, daughter and heir of George de 
Eslyngton. 

1356. 

R. 384, m. 236. Robert de Bowes and Elizabeth, his wife, plaintiffs ; Robert 
de la Vale, and William, his brother, and others, defendants. Regard- 
ing the wardship of Isabella de Eslyngton. 

R. 387, m. 171. John fil. John de Barton, by Roger de Fulthorp his attor- 
ney, plaintiff; Gilbert de Minsteracres and Richard Ronald, defend- 
ants. Land in Bywell, which John de Corbrigg gave to Robert de 
Barton and Isabella, his wife. 

1357. 
R. 389, m. 19. Robert Wendout, plaintiff ; John de Lilleburn, clerk, and 

William fil. William de Rodum, defendants. 110 sol. debt. 
R. 389, m. 19. Nicholas de Rodum, plaintiff ; John Lambe de Blakallerton.,25 

defendant. For account while bailiff. 

24 A farm in Ellingham township. 25 Black Callerton. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1354-1359. 55 

R. 391, m. 21. William Gretheved, burgess of Berwick on Tweed, by Gilbert 
de Ellewyk his attorney, plaintiff; Adam Person, Richard Fairpage, 
Laurence Walker and others, defendants. 4>2l. debt. 

R. 391, m. 21. John Proctur de Bothale, plaintiff; Richard de St. Quintin, 
parson of the church of Bothale, defendant. 100 sol. debt. 

R. 391, m. 226. Gobyon == 

Hugh Gobyon gave to Roger his Roger Gobyon of North -horsleye= 
brother land in North-horseleye 



Alicia, daughter and heir = 

I 
Maria, daughter and heir = William de Prestwyk. 

R. 391, m. 166 d. William de Hepiscotes, plaintiff ; John Chabyngton, William 
Alicesson de Camhous, John Nedirton, John Davy, Robert Chollerton, 
Hugh de Warton, William fit. William Henrisson, defendants. Tres- 
pass at Heppiscotes. 

R. 392, m. 21. Robert Norays, plaintiff; Richard de Castro Barnardo, and 
John fil. John fit. Guidoms, defendants. 

R. 392, m. 214. David Gray, plaintiff ; Richard fil. John de Woderyngton, 
defendant. Trespass at Westtheuynton,26 Hil. 33 Ed. m, and see 
m. 250. 

1358. 

R. 393, m. 197. David fil. David de Strabolgy, earl of Athol, by John Rous 
his attorney, plaintiff; Roger de Woderyngton, defendant. Account 
while bailiff in Mytford. 

R. 396, m. 305. John de Stryvelyn, chivaler, plaintiff; Alexander de Fether- 
stonhalgh, defendant. 

1359. 

R. 397, m. 127 d. Adam Baret, chivaler, plaintiff; Gilbert fil. Roger de 
Wolsingham, defendant. Land in Wolsingham given to Gilbert on 
his marriage with Aybella, daughter of John de Blak-heddon. 

Aybella = Gilbert,^. Roger de Wolsingham 
Matilda, daughter and co-heir Agnes, sister and co-heir = 

Emma de Rowe, daughter and heir, who claims v. Robert Fenwyk. 
R. 398, m. 116 d. David fil. David de Strabolgie, earl of Athol, plaintiff; 
Roger de Woderyngton, defendant. Account while bailiff. 

'* West Chevington. 



56 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

R 399 m. 93. Edmund de Esshet and Thomas de Gretham, plaintiffs; Thomas 

do Fenwyk and Johanna, his wife, and John fU. Alan de Fenwyk, 

defendants. Land in West-burnton. 

1360. 
R. 404, m. 307. Gerard de Woderyugton, chivaler, plaintiff; John fil. Richard 

de Thirlewall, defendant. 20Z. debt. 
R.404, m. 307. John de Walyngton, plaintiff; Idonia, daughter of Adam 

Gynour, and Margery, daughter of Thomas de Rodoum, defendants. 
R. 404, m. 353d. Hugh de Sadelyngstanes, plaintiff; John fl. Thomas de 

Menevill, defendant. Manor of Estappiltreley.27 
R. 404, m. 245 d. Richard Baker and Alicia, his wife, plaintiffs; Agnes, wife 

of William de Hereford, defendant. Messuages in Novo Castro super 

Tynam. 

1361. 
B. 405, m. 116 a. John fil. Richard del Hay, plaintiff; Robert fil. John de 

Insula de Wodeburn, defendant. Land in Gosforth south. 
R. 406, m. 295 d. Nicholas de la More fil. and heir William de la More, 

plaintiff ; Ralph de Thirkelby and Cecilia, his wife, defendants. Manor 

de la More in Wrytele. 
R. 407, m. 95. William Slegh and Johanna, his wife, executrix of Adam fil. 

Stephen de Acton, plaintiffs ; John, son and heir of Adam fil. Juliana de 

Dokkewra, defendant. 201. debt. 

1362. 
R. 408, m. 65. Abbot of York, by his attorney, plaintiff ; Thomas de Rokeby 

juxfa Egleston, junior, Thomas de Blenkansop de Helbec and Adam de 

Wymmerslayde Rabeigh, defendants. 
R. 408, m. 133. Matilda, wife of Alexander de Hilton, militis, plaintiff ; 

W T illiam Moraiour, defendant. Gl. 10s. debt. 
R. 409, m. 171 d. John de Coupland, plaintiff ; John de Strivelyn, chivaler, 

and Jacoba, his wife, defendants. Manor of Myndrum. 
R. 410, m. 207 d. Robert de Warthecop, parson of church of Wessyngton, 

plaintiff; William Mallesone de W T essyngton, John Robynsone, Anable- 

sone de Wessyngton, and John Pisbusk de Wessyngton, defendants. 

20 marks debt. 

1363. 
R. 412, m. 136. David de Strabolgy, earl of Athol, plaintiff ; Adomar de 

Athol, chivaler, defendant. 
R. 412, m. 152. John de Strivelyn, chivaler, plaintiff; Hugh de Dacie, 

Andrew de Laton, Robert Symson, Rouland Henryson, Thomas Dobson 

and others, defendants. Trespass in park at Bothe castle. 28 

27 Apperley, near Bywell. - 8 Bewcastle. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1360-1364. 57 

R. 412, m. 152. Alicia, wife of Richard Jonson de Wodryngtori, plaintiff; 

Richard de Treland, executor of William de Hambustan, defendant. 
R. 412, m. 155. William Heron, chivaler, plaintiff ; Simon de Rede, Thomas 

Johanson, Robert Johanson, John Richardson, William Gibbeson and 

others, defendants. Trespass at Shittlyngton. 
R. 412, m. 180 d. Patrick de Middelton, plaintiff; William fil. William 

Dykenson and his wife, defendants. Land in Middleton Morell. 
R. 412, m. 180 d. Patrick de Middelton, plaintiff; Johanna, daughter of 

Roger Thomasson de Middelton Morell, defendant. 1 messuage in 

Middelton Morell. 
R. 412, m. 180 d. Patrick de Middelton, plaintiff ; William Dykenson de 

North Middelton, defendant. Land in Middelton. 
R. 412, m. 180 d. Robert del Jole, plaintiff; Fergus fil. Adam de Scotia, and 

Cristiana, daughter and heir, John de Haukewell, defendants. 
R. 412, m. 152 d. Henry del Strothre, plaintiff ; John Rouland, William de 

Ford and others, defendants. 
R. 412, m. 152 d. Robert Haulay, chivaler, and Beatrice, his wife, plaintiffs ; 

Cecilia, wife of John fil. Henry, defendant. 
R. 412, m. 136 d. John fil. Alan de Fenwyk, plaintiff ; Thomas de Fenwyk, 

defendant. Account while bailiff. 
R. 412, m. 24 d. Donald de Hesilrigge, plaintiff; Isabella, wife of Robert de 

Bowes, defendant. Manors of Esselyngton, Whytyngham, Throunton 

and Barton. 
R. 413, m. 28. Elizabeth, wife of Robert de Eslyngton, chivaler, plaintiff ; 

Isabella, wife of Robert de Bowes, defendant. Manors of Eslyngton, 

Whytyngham, Throunton and Barton. 

R. 413, m. 130. Thomas, son and heir of Thomas fil. Thomas de Heton, plain- 
tiff; William fil. Alan de Heton, defendant. Manor of Chevlyngham. 
R. 413, m. 221. Johanna, wife of William de Graystok, plaintiff ; John 

Dykson de Stanton, Ralph Cheseman de Stanton, John fil. Roger de 

Stanton and others, defendants. Trespass at Horseley and Morpeth. 
R. 414, m. 220. Robert de Warthecop, parson of church of Wessyngton, 

plaintiff ; William Cuthbert de Berneston, John -Robynson de Wessyng- 
ton and others, defendants. Debt. 
R. 415, m. 25. Adomar de Atholl, chivaler, plaintiff; David de Strabolgy, 

earl of Atholl, defendant. 20 marks debt. 

1364. 

R. 413, m.153. Richard de Castro Barnardo, archdeacon of Northumberland, 
plaintiff : Divers persons, defendants. For trespass. 

R. 418, m. 215. Alexander de Neville, plaintiff; Robert Clerk, defendant. 
Account while bailiff. 



58 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

1365. 
R. 419, m. 194. Johanna, wife of John de Coupland, plaintiff. David de 

Strabolgi, earl of Atholl, defendant. 
E. 420, m. 169. Thomas de Fenwyk and Johanna, his wife, plaintiffs ; John 

fil. Alan de Fenwyk, defendant. Manor of Walker. 
E. 420, m. 229. David de Strabolgy, earl of Atholl, plaintiff; John de Eu're, 

chivaler, by Thomas de Hexham, his attorney, defendant. Manor of 

Kirklawe, etc. 
E. 421, m. 107. John de Thirlwall, executor of Richard de Thirlwall, plaintiff ; 

John de Twysilton (?) and Alicia, his wife, executors of John Prentis, 

defendants. 
E. 421, m. 198. Johanna, wife of John de Coupland, executor of John de 

Coupland, plaintiff; David de Strabolgy, earl of Atholl, defendant. 
E. 421, m. 545. Patrick de Midelton, plaintiff; William fil. William Dykon- 

son, and Alicia, his wife, John fil. Roger Thomasson de Midelton, and 

William Dykonson de North Midelton, defendants. 
E. 421, m. 520 d. Thomas de Musco Campo, plaintiff ; Robert de Umfraville, 

chivaler, and William Berhalgh, defendant. Custody of Manor of 

Clenhull, which said Thomas claims until the lawful age of Walter, 

son and heir of Thomas de Clenhull. 
R. 421, m. 297 d. Johanna, wife of John de Coupland, plaintiff ; Thomas fil. 

Roger de Heliat,29 defendant. Manors of Wyk, Neweham, Wollore, 

Creswell, Akild, etc. 
R. 421, m. 118 d. Johanna, wife of John de Coupland, plaintiff ; David de 

Strabolgy, earl of Atholl, defendant. 20/. debt. 

1366. 

R. 425, m. 517 d. Thomas de Gretham and Edmund de Esshet, plaintiffs ; 
Thomas de Fenwyk and Johanna, his wife, and John fil. Alan de 
Fenwyk, defendants. 

1367. 

E. 426, m. 242 d. Robert de Euer, by Thomas de Hexham, his attorney, 
plaintiff; Richard Dickson de Mitford and others, defendants. Plea 
of debt. 

E. 427, m. 130 d. William Philip, plaintiff; William de Newehagh, defend- 
ant. Assault at Newcastle-upon-Tyne. 

1368. 
E. 430, m. 392. William Philip, plaintiff; William de Newhagh, defendant. 

Assault at Newcastle. 
E. 431, m. 86. Eobert Conyers, chivaler, executor of Goscelin Surtays, 

plaintiff ; John de Eton, burgess of Newcastle, defendant. 

, Heley. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1365-1372. 59 

1369. 
R. 433, m. 467. Robert Conyers, chivaler, executor of Goscelin Surtays, 

plaintiff; Robert Conyers de Stubhouse and Elizabeth, his wife, 

defendants. 
R. 435, m. 286 d. Richard del Pele and Ivetta, his wife, plaintiffs, John de 

Denom de Unthank, defendant. Land in Middelton and Belford. 

1371. 
R.441, m. 268. William Huchounson, plaintiff; Adam Shepherd de West- 

welpyngton, executor of Hugh Shepherd, defendant. 
R. 441, m. 123d. Robert Claveryng and Johanna, his wife, by William de 

Soulby, his attorney, plaintiffs ; Thomas de Blenkansop and Margaret, 

his wife, defendants. Land in Lengeton, Monylawes and Coupeland. 
R.444, m. 62. Alan de Rokeby, plaintiff; Robert de Halywell, John Rose de 

Morpeth and Maria de Asheburne, defendants. 
R. 444, m. 453. Thomas Surtays, miles, and others, executors of Robert de 

Hilton, militis, plaintiffs; Alexander de Merk, executor of Richard de 

Wynchecombe, parson of the church of Whitbu[rn]e, defendant. 60/. 

debt. 

1372. 

R. 445, m. 386 d. Thomas de Frysmares seised of a messuage in Newcastle ; = 
gave same to Peter, his son and heir 



I I 

Peter de Frysmares, ob. s.p. temp. Ed. u. William de Frysmares, his brother = 

r~ HT 

Matilda, co- = John, fil. Robert del Alicia, co-heir = John de Newbiggyng. 
heir Castle 

R. 445, m. 269 d. Richard Gretheved and Agnes his wife, plaintiffs; Richard 
Gretheved, defendant. 

R. 445, m. 253 d. Adomar de Atholl, miles, plaintiff ; William Matson, de- 
fendant. Account while bailiff in Felton. 

R. 445, m. 253 d. Robert /U. Ralph de Neville, miles, plaintiff ; John de Dene, 
William de Dene, and Donald Couhird, defendants. 20L debt. 

R.448, m. 398. Walter fil. Thomas de Forset, plaintiff; William fil. John 
Heron, chivaler, defendant. Manor of Hertesheved, which Thomas de 
Forset gave to Walter de Forset and Melore, his wife. 

R. 448, m. 298 d. Alexander de Prendewyk = 



J | 

Nicholas de Prendewyk, to whom he gave = Elene, daughter of John de 
land in Alnewyk Hertwayton. 



Alexander de Prendewyk, son and heir == 
Emma, daughter and heir = John Alder. 



(50 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

1373. 

R 449 m 311 Katherine, wife of John de Lilleburn, militis, plaintiff; 
Johanna, wife of John de Coupland, defendant. Land in Wollore. 

R 449 m 421 d. Robert de Umfreville, chivaler, and Alianora, his wife, and 
Bertram Monboucher, chivaler, and Christiana, his wife, by Hugh de 
Westwyk, their attorney, plaintiffs; Thomas Surtays, chivaler, Donald 
de Hesilrigg, chivaler, William de Hesilrigg, brother of said Donald, 
and Edmund de Hesilrigg, brother of said William, defendants. Manor 
of Coldwell or Caldwell. 

R. 450, m. 169. Nicholas de Hynghowe, plaintiff; John Heron, defendant. 
Rents in Branton, which William de Bekwyth gave Nicholas de 
Puncharden. 

R. 450, m. 186. William Heron, chivaler, Roger Heron, chivaler, Thomas 
Heron, John Muschamp, John de Dychant, Robert de Nevill and Mar- 
garet, his wife, Henry de Heton and others, plaintiffs; Johanna, wife 
of John de Coupland, Richard Darundell fil. com. Arundell and Surrey, 
Edward de St. John, Thomas de Lodelowe, mttiles, David de Hanemere 
and John de Kyngesfeld, defendants. 

R. 450, m. 357. John de Selby, by William de Helton, his attorney, plaintiff ; 
Alan Whitheved and Henry de Wyngham, defendants. Land in Aln- 
ham and half the manor of Bidelsden. 

R. 450, m. 257. Henry de la Vale == 

Hugh de la Vale, to whom his father gave land in Benwell, temp. Ed. I. == 
Robert de la Vale, son and heir = 

William de la Vale, son and heir == 

I 

Henry de la Vale, son and heir, who claims said land as kinsman and 
heir of Robert. 

R. 450, m. 434. Isabella, wife of William Mennyll, plaintiff; Alexander de 

Neville, archdeacon of Durham, and Thomas de Carrowe, defendants. 

Third part manors of Whitonstal, Neweland and Fairhill, also m. 359, 

Mich. 47, Ed. in. 
R. 451, m. 185. Richard Gretheved and Agnes, his wife, plaintiffs ; Richard 

Ankirsmith, defendant. 60 sol. debt, also m. 321, Hil. 48, Ed. in. 
R. 451, m. 604 d. Robert de Umfreville, chivaler, and Alianora, his wife, 

and Bertram Monboucher, chivaler, and Cristiana, his wife, plaintiffs; 

William Heron, chivaler, defendant. Land in Gunwarton. 
R. 451, m. 522 d. William de Clauston, miles, plaintiff; Robert de Claveryng, 

defendant. 601. debt. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1 3 73-1375- 61 

R. 451, m. 416 d. 

Gerrard de Woderyngton gave the manor of Colewell to Roger de = 
Woderyngton and Elizabeth, his wife, and their heirs 



Roger de Woderyngton, temp. Edw. in. = Elizabeth 

r~ ~T~ 

Alianora, ~ Robert de Umf reville. Cristina, = Bertram Mounboucher, 
co-heir co-heir chivaler. 

Said Robert and Bertram claim said manor against Thomas Surteys and others. 

1374. 
R. 453, m. 322. William Mennyll == 



Isabella, daughter and heir = William de Laton. 

Thomas Mennill, Alexander de Neville, archdeacon of Durham, and Thomas 

de Carrowe, plaintiffs ; William de Laton and Isabella his wife, 

daughter and heir of William Mennyll, defendants. Third part manors 

of Wittonstal, etc. 

R. 453, m. 390. John fil. William Heron, chivaler, plaintiff; Constancia, 

wife of William de Musco-Campo, defendant. 
R. 453, m. 422 d. Henry de la Vale de Seton, plaintiff; Robert de la Vale de 

Newsham, chivaler, and Idonia, his wife, and William fil. Robert de 

la Vale, defendants. Half of manor of Newsham. 
R. 453, m. 300 d. Adam Robynson de Bradford, plaintiff ; Robert de Auke- 

land, defendant. Depasturing cattle at Bradeford. 

R. 455, m. 116. Thomas Surteys, chivaler, plaintiff ; John Hussber, defend- 
ant. Account while bailiff in Bamburgh. 
R. 456, m. 516. William Marie, plaintiff; John Litster, defendant. For the 

abduction of Alice de Butelston30 his servant at Newcastle. 

1375. 
R. 457, m. 464. Alesia, wife of John Spryng, chivaler, plaintiff; Gilbert de 

Cabery, defendant. 5 marks debt. 
R. 457, m. 443 d. Robert de Claveryng, chivaler, and Johanna, his wife, 

plaintiffs; Johanna, wife of John de Coupeland, custodian of the lands 

and heir of Thomas Bakester, defendant. Land in Coupeland. 
R. 458, m. 66. John Robinson del Hugh, plaintiff ; John Broket, defendant. 

Depasturing cattle at Stanfortham. 
R. 458, m. 427 d. William Heron, miles, and others, plaintiffs; Robert Neville 

de Bagby, son and heir of Hugh Neville de Bagby, defendant. 67/. 

debt. 

80 Biddleston. 



62 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

E. 460, m. 96. Adomar de Atholl, plaintiff ; Hugh Sampson, William Hay- 
sand and John Huchensdn, defendants. 20L debt. 

R. 460, m. 366 d. John de Paxton, plaintiff ; John Spendelove de Morpeth, 
defendant. 40 sol. debt. 

1376. 

R. 462, m. 432. John de Paxton, plaintiff; Thomas Lax, Thomas Todde de 
Heton, and John Hunter de Heddon, defendants. Plea debt. 

434 d. Thomas de Trewyk, plaintiff; Nicholas Eaymes, defendant. 
Trespass at Bolum. Hilary 51 Edw. in (number wanting). 

1377. 

R. 467, m. 129. William Gascoigne and Richard, his son, plaintiffs ; Robert 
Oliver, burgess of Newcastle, and others, defendants. 107. debt. 

1378. 

R. 469, m. 165. Gilbert de Umfreville, earl of Angus, plaintiff ; Robert fil. 
Hugh de Ovyngton, defendant. Detention of cattle. 

R. 469, m. 277. Adomar de Atholl, plaintiff ; Robert Williamson, Adam 
Henryson, John Henryson, Robert Robynson de Cleveland and others, 
defendants. Trespass. 

R. 472, m. 246. Nicholas de Carrow, plaintiff; Thomas, bishop of Durham, and 
Thomas de Gretham, defendants. Right of presentation to the church 
of Ryton. 

1379. 

R. 473, m. 74 d. William Heron, chivaler, plaintiff; John, son and heir of 
Robert de Maners, defendant. The marriage of said John, which apper- 
tains to said William by the demise of John de la Mora, sometime 
husband of Elene de la Mora, to whom Edw. in demised the same, 
the said Robert holding of him by military service. 

R. 476, m. 200. Thomas Robynson de Callerton, John Robynson de Callerton, 
and others, plaintiffs ; Robert Bent, defendant. Trespass in Caldecotes. 

1380. 
R. 478, m. 373. Thomas Philip de Newcastle upon Tyne, plaintiff; John de 

Sesterne de Lyn, junior, defendant. Account while receiver of moneys. 
R. 478, m. 377 d. Alexander Surteys, plaintiff; John Andrewe and Thomas 

Falconfeld, defendants. Detention of cattle. [Also R. 495 m 61 d 

1384.] 
R, 480, m. 498. Thomas Philip of Newcastle, plaintiff; John Sisterne of Lyn, 

junior, defendant. Account while receiver of moneys. 
R. 480, m. 280 d. William de Skargill, chivaler, by Hugh de Wombwell, his 

attorney, plaintiff; John de Lakynby, defendant. Taking goods etc 

at Bothele. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1376-1385. 63 

R. 480, m. 275 d. John de Lilleburne, chivaler, plaintiff ; Eobert del Temple 
and William, his brother, defendants. For taking oxen and cows at 
Reveleye. [Also R. 482, m. 328 d, A.D., 1381.] 

1381. 
R. 482, m. 76. John Maners, plaintiff ; Robert de Clavering and Johanna, his 

wife, defendants. Waste lands, etc., in Ethale. 
R. 483, m. 20 d. John de Bridlington, plaintiff; John fil. Stephen de Belassise, 

defendant. Depasturing cattle at Scolitelgarth. 

1382. 

R. 484, m. 96. John Heron de Thornton, Walter Heron, and Edward Heron, 
executors of William Heron, chivaler, plaintiffs; John Heron, senior, 
chivaler, defendant. 60?. debt. 

R. 484, m. 232. Thomas Philip de Newcastle, plaintiff ; John Sisterne, de- 
fendant. Account of moneys. 

R. 487, m. 138. Adomar fil. Adomar de Atholl, militis, plaintiff ; William 
de Hoghton and John Dawson, defendants. Detention of cattle. 

1383. 
R. 488, m. 21. Alicia Halywell fil. Robert Vescy, by William Halywell, her 

attorney, plaintiff; William Browne, defendant. A deed which he 

unjustly detains. 
R. 488, m. 111. Ralph Bacon of Greystok, plaintiff; William de Chestre and 

Margaret Gray, defendants. Manor of Dodyngton, which John de 

Greystok gave to Ralph fil. William and his heirs. 
R. 490, m. 404 d. Robert del Temple and William, his brother, plaintiffs ; 

John de Lilleburne, chivaler, defendant. Detention of cattle. 

1384. 

R. 492, m. 67. Adam Stedeman, by William de Halywell his attorney, plain- 
tiff ; William Wilkynson de Middelton, defendant. 40 sol. debt. 
[Also R. 495, m. 50.] 

R. 492, m. 67. Isabella, wife of Richard Tempest, chivaler, plaintiff; John 
Heron, senior, chivaler, and others, defendants. Depasturing cattle 
at Heton. 

1385. 

R. 495, m. 642 d. Alexander Cressewell and John de Middelton, executors 
to John Belasys, and John Drewes and Alicia, his wife, co-executors, 
plaintiffs; Gilbert Pratyman and John Skilton, defendants. 100 sol. 
debt. 

R. 497, m. 414. William de Hilton, chivaler, plaintiff; John Cambhowe de 
Haukeswell, Richard Benet de Haukeswell, and others, defendants. 
Depasturing cattle at Shilbottle, Stanfortham and Hough. 31 

31 Stamfordham and Heugh. 



64 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

R. 499, m. 70. Bertram Monboucher, chivaler, and Cristiana, his wife, and 
Conan de Ask and Alianora, his wife, plaintiffs ; William Chekyn, John 
Robynson, Eichard Eogerson, Eoger de Colepottes and John Shepherd, 
defendants. Waste in lands demised to them for a term of years in 
Magna Whityngton. 

1386. 

R. 500, m. 135. Alexander Cressewell and John de Middelton, executors of 
John Belasis, and John Drewes and Alicia, his wife, plaintiffs ; Gilbert 
Pratyman, defendant. 100 sol. debt. 

E. 500, m. 12 d. Adomar de Atholl, plaintiff; John Lawson de Bywell, exe- 
cutor of John Lawson, defendant. 4Z. debt. [Also E. 508, 1388, m. 12 d.] 

E. 501, m. 241. John Broket and John Pace, plaintiffs ; Eobert de Clifford 
and Jacoba, his wife, defendants. Manors of Harnham and Blak- 
hedeley, etc. 

1388. 

E. 511, m. 375 d. Elizabeth, wife of Thomas de Percy, junior, chivaler, and 
John de Halsham and Philippa, his wife, plaintiffs ; John de Lincoln 
and Walter Topclyf, defendants. Castle and manor of Mitford, and 
castles of Framlington Est, Aide worth and North-mylborne. 

1389. 
E. 513, m. 50. John Barnaby, plaintiff ; Eobert Paget, defendant. 20 marks 

debt. 

1390. 
E. 517, m. 274. John de Fenwyk, chivaler, plaintiff; Henry Smythson de 

Middelton, and others, defendants. 13?. debt. 
E. 518, m. 269. John Maners, chivaler, and Alicia, his wife, by William de 

Soulby, their attorney, plaintiffs; John de la Vale and Margaret, his 

wife, defendants. Half the manor of Newsom. 
E. 518, m. 269. John Maners, chivaler, and Alicia, his wife, plaintiffs ; 

William de la Yale, chivaler, defendant. Fourth part of manor of 

Benewell. 

1395. 
E. 537, m. 160 d. William de Huddeswell and Simon del Chambre, by 

William Halywell, their attorney, plaintiffs ; Alan Shroude de Richmond 

and John Langelathorp de Richmond, defendants. 53s. 8d. debt. [Also 

R. 538, m. 266 (1395).] 
R. 539, m. 541. Thomas de Claxton, plaintiff; John del Yate, defendant. 20Z 

debt. 

1397. 

R. 545,m.67d. John Dykson, plaintiff; William Nicolson de Brankeston, 
defendant. 10 marks debt. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1386-1398. 65 

R. 545, m. 45 d. William de Homaldon, plaintiff; Thomas de Claxton, armiger, 
defendant. 121. debt. 

R. 547, m. 21. John de Fenwyk, miles, plaintiff; John Shaftowe, defendant. 
20 marks debt. 

R. 547, m. 21. Thomas Heron, plaintiff; Peter de Hedlam de Gatisheved, 
defendant. 61. debt. 

R. 547, m. 436 d. Adomar de Atholl, chivaler, plaintiff. Robert Mury, de- 
fendant. Account of moneys. 

1398. 
II. o4.s, in. 21. John Dykson, by Robert Darcy, his attorney, plaintiff. 

William Nicholson de Brankeston, defendant. 10 marks debt. 
R. 548, m. 44. Roger de Baynbrigg, plaintiff ; William Bird de Beverley, 

defendant. Assault at Newcastle upon Tyne. 
R. 548, m. 45. John Coket de Newcastle upon Tyne, plaintiff; Thomas 

Morley, chivaler, defendant. 100 sol. debt and a second suit for 20/. 

debt. 
R. 549, m. 95 ; and R. 554, m. 320, 1399. 

Robert de Lysle was seised of the advowson of the church and manor of 
South Gosford, in his own right, in fee, and presented William 
Masham to said church temp. Henry m., which he afterwards 
gave to 

Robert de Lysle = 

Otewele de Lysle, in free marriage with == Isabella 



and he was seised thereof, and on the 
death of William Masham presented 
Otewele, junior, to said church 



Facounberge 



Robert, son and heir === 
Nicholas, son and heir == 
John, son and heir = 
Robert, son and heir == 



Robe 



rt Lysle, chivaler, who claims against Thomas, bishop of 
Carlisle, right of presentation to church of South Goseford, 
vacant by the death of Otewel de Lysle. 

R. 549, m. 121 d. and 21 d. Roger de Baynbrig, plaintiff; William Bird de 
Beverley, defendant. Assault at Newcastle. 

9 SflR. VOL. VI. 5 



60 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

1399. 
R. 552, m. 98; and R. 577, A. D. 1405. 

Robert de Clifford entailed the manor of Ellyngeham, 4 Edw. m.= 



Cri 


Robert de Clifford = 


Andrew Roger John 


1 
Robert de Clifford = . 


1 1 
John Thomas 


= de Heton 


. 1 
stiana, daughter and co-heir, who 
claims said manor, then a widow 


I 
= de Clesseby = 



Henry de Heton, chivaler, kinsman and co-heir of Robert,,/?/. Robert, /?/. Robert. 

R. 552, m. 319. Nicholas de Threwold, executor of Halnathus de Halnaby, 
miles, and William de Dent and Johanna, his wife, co-executors with 
Nicholas, by William Ullathorne, their attorney, plaintiffs ; John Trawe 
of Newcastle, defendant. Account while bailiff. Also R. 554, m. 188. 

R. 553, m. 419 d. Richard Cliderowe32 and Elizabeth, his wife, plaintiffs; 
Richard Tempest, miles, defendant. 1 messuage 'in Newcastle, which 
John de Sacra Insula, vicar of the church of Berwyk super Twede, 
John de Hasylrigge and John de Werk gave William de Swynowe and 
Elizabeth his wife, and their heirs. 

William de Swynowe, temp. Edw. m. Elizabeth. 



J t | 

William, son and heir, Elizabeth, sister and heir, = Richard Cliderowe. 

o'>. *-p- plaintiff. 

R. 553, m. 134 d. Henry de Boynton and Elizabeth, his wife, executors of 
John de Felton, chivaler, plaintiffs ; William Page, defendant. 40 sol. 
debt. 

[PROM VOLUME ix.] 1401. 

R. 562, m. 62 d. Henry de Percy, chivaler, plaintiff; John de Thirlwal, de- 
fendant. 81. debt. 

R. 563, m. 95 d. William de Mitford and Richard de Mitford, executors of 
Hugh de Mitford, plaintiffs; Margaret, wife of Richard Scotte of 
Newcastle, defendant. 15J. debt. 

1402. 
R. 564, m. 458 d. John Wilkynson de Tynemouth, plaintiff; John Maners, 

chivaler, and Alicia, his wife, defendants. Concerning the goods and 

chattels of said John. 
R.565,m.21. Roger de Thornton, mayor of Newcastle, plaintiff; John 

Lyster de Carliolo, junior, defendant. 101. debt. 

3 ' Clitheroe in Lancashire. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1399-1405. 07 

1403. 
R. 568, m. 68. Gerard Heron, chivaler, plaintiff; John Eryngton and Henry 

de Cleseby, defendants. 10/. debt. 
R. 568, m. 520 d. John de Fenwyk = Elizabeth = Robert Herbottle. 

1st husband. 2nd husband. 

R. 571, m. 517 d. William de Mitford, plaintiff ; John Barnaby de Balliolo 

in Oxon, defendant. 20Z. debt. 
R. 571, m. 21 d. Alexander Mitford = 



John de Mitford, plaintiff. Plea of debt. 
1404. 

R. 572, m. 43. Alan Fenwyk, plaintiff; Robert de Ogle, chivaler, de- 
fendant. 101. debt. 

R. 573, m. 64. William Chesman, plaintiff; Elizabeth, wife of John de 
Fenwyk and John de Eston, vicar of the church of Ponteland, exe- 
cutors of John de Fenwyk, defendants. 19?., which they unjustly 
detain. 

K. 573, m. 263. Walter Dun, plaintiff; William Chatour de Heppelle, Philip 
Lang de Cloghfeld and John Nobylson, defendants. 9 marks debt. 

R. 573, m. 263. Peter de Hounton, plaintiff; Thomas Wodecok de Bowes, 
defendant. 5 marks debt. 

R.. 573, m. 263. Peter de Hounton, plaintiff; Thomas Forster de Wenslawe, 
defendant. 60 *ol. debt. 

1! . 573, m. 263. Peter de Hounton, plaintiff; John Emelay, defendant. 60 
W. debt, 

R. 573, m. 263. William Smyth de Emildon, plaintiff; William Gretword de 
Neweton, defendant. 40?. debt. 

R.573, m.64d. Robert Harbotell, esq., plaintiff; Elizabeth, wife of John de 
Fenwyk, miles, defendant. 40?. debt. 

I{. 574, m. 368 d. William de Stapelton and Maria, his wife, executors of 
William Vispont, plaintiffs; John Maghane de Langle, defendant. 40 
W. debt. [Also R. 575, m. 408, A.D. 1405.] 

R. 574, m. 461 d. John Maners, chivaler, and Margery, his wife, plaintiffs; 
William Kok, abbot of Alnewyk, Robert de Ogle, chivaler, John de 
Wyderyngton, chivaler, and Robert de Clifford, defendants. Lands 
in Ilderton, Rodome and Broxfield. 

1405. 

R. 576, m. 190. Alan de Fenwyk, plaintiff; Robert de Ogle, chivaler, de- 
fendant. 10?. debt. 

R. 578, m. 378 d. Ralph de Eure, chivaler, plaintiff; John de Wytheryngton, 
chivaler, and Robert de Ogle, chivaler, defendants. 100 marks debt f 



Cg EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

R. 579, m. 208 d. John de Mitford fil. Alexander de Mitford, plaintiff; John 
de Hodley and Julia, his wife, defendants. Tenements in Ponteland, 
Kallerton Vallance,33 and Parva Eland and common of pasture for 12 
oxen in the park and insula de Eland-halle. 

1406. 

R. 580, m. 298. John de Mitford, miles, plaintiff ; William de Stapleton, de- 
fendant, 66.s. 3d. debt. 

R. 580, m. 238 d. Roger de Thornton, plaintiff; Thomas Griffith, defendan! . 
Manor of Wytton super Aquam and half the manors of Stanyngton 
and Benton. 

R. 583, m. 448. William Whitchester, plaintiff; Richard Goldesburgh, chivaler, 
and Johanna, his wife, defendants. Manors of Calverdoun, Brandoun, 
Bideleseden,34 and Duxfeld,35 which Robert de la Yale, miles, gave to 
William de la Yale, his son, and Agnes, his wife, and their heirs. 
Robert de la Yale = 



Wil 



illiam de la Yale, temp. Edw. m. = Agnes 

Henry de la Yale, son and Agnes, sister and Alicia, sister and = 
heir, oh. n.p. co-heir co-heir 

William Whitchester, son and heir, the plaintiff who recovers seisin, etc. 

1407. 
R. 584, m. 258 d. John de Mitford fil. Alexander de Mitford, plaintiff; John 

Callerton, executor of Roger Henryson, defendant. 

R. 584, m. 221 d. Thomas Tunstall, chivaler, and Johanna, his wife, plaintiffs ; 
William, abbot of Alnwyk, defendant. Cattle value 100Z., which he 
unjustly detains. 
R. 585, m. 153. 

Roger de Horseleye, miles, entails manor of Ullcester, temp. Edw. u.= 

Thomas, son and heir, = Roger de = Elena Margery = Roger de Weston, 



temp. Edw. in. 



tog 

Ho 



orsley 



i r 



chivaler. 



Thomas, son and heir == Roger de Horsley, jun., the defendant = Johanna 
John de Horseleye, son and heir, the plaintiff. 

33 Callerton Darrayns, now Darras HaJl.. 

31 Biddleston. 35 D ukesfield in 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1406-1412. 69 

R. 585, m. 503 d. Ralph, baron of Greystoke, plaintiff ; Margaret, wife of 
Alan de Fenwyk, chivaler, Thomas Gray de Heton, chivaler, John de 
Fenwyk and John Folbery, defendants. Custody of the lands and heir 
of Alan de Fenwyk until his lawful age said Alan held his lands of 
said baron, by military service. 

R. 586, m. 324. John de Horsleye, son and heir of Thomas de Horsleye, son 
and heir of Thomas de Horsleye, son and heir of Roger de Horsleye, 
plaintiff; Roger de Horsleye, senior, and Elena, his wife, and Roger 
de Horsleye, junior, and Johanna, his wife, defendants. Trespass. Also 
R. 603, A.D. 1411. 

1408. 

R. 591, m. 551. Alexander Fetherstonhalgh, plaintiff; William Kneshawe de 
Redlehall, defendant. Trespass at Fetherstonhalgh. 

1409. 

R. 593, m. 337 d. Roger Fulthorp and Elizabeth, his wife, plaintiffs ; William 
fit. William Whitchester, defendant. Third part manor of Duxfeld and 
two parts of the manors of Seton de la Vale, Dissyngton and Callerton. 

1410. 

R. 597, m. 398. Thomas de Karliolo entails the manor of Swarland, = 
8 Edw. m. 



Alicia, daugh- = Nicholas, fiL Richard de Acton, seised of said manor in 
right of his wife and his heirs male. In default remainder 



ter and co- 
heir. 



to Elizabeth, sister of said Alice, and her heirs male. 



till 
Elizabeth, daugh- Johanna, daugh- Cecilia, daugh- Custancia, = 
ter and co-heir, ter and co-heir, ter and co-heir dan. and 

ob. s.p. ob. s.p. ob. s.p. co-heir 



Richard Gretheved, son and heir, who claims v. Thomas, fil. John, Jil. 
William Hesilrigg de Donyngton. 36 

1411. 
R. 600, m. 44 d. Thomas fil. Hugh de Mitford, plaintiff ; John Haydon de 

Newcastle, defendant. 40 sol. debt. 

R. 602, m. 100 d. John Maners, plaintiff ; John Wetewod de Wetewod, John 
Whorlton de Wollore, John de Wollore and Alexander Reffeley,37 de- 
fendants. Taking goods, etc., at Hamyldou.38 

1412. 

R. 604, m. 340 d. William de Whitchester, chivaler, plaintiff; Richard de 
Soureby and Robert de Soureby, defendants. Trespass at Gosford. 

3J Dinnington, near Newcastle. 3r Reveley. 3H Homildon, near Wooler. 



EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 



TO 

1413. 



. 

Forcibly taking goods, etc., at Fenwyk. 

R 610 m.Sld. Anthony de St. Quintin, rector of the church of Forde, 
plaintiff; John Maners and John de Fenwyk de Gunwarton, defendants. 

18 marks debt. 

1414. 
R. 612, m. 377. George de la Vale, plaintiff; John Huchonson de Seton in 

the Vale, defendant. 106-s. Sd. debt. 
R 612 m. 40 d. and R. 614. William Lambeton, junior, plaintiff ; 

Wryght de Hexham, defendant. Concerning a bridge at Heyden brigge. 
R. 614, m. 351. Richard Arundell, mil?*, plaintiff; John Fox de Dichand, 

esq., defendant. 4>l. debt. 
R.615,m.556d. Robert Whirley, prior of St. Oswald de Nostell, plaintiff; 

John Stanton de Sunderland..39 husbandman, and others, defendants. 

Depasturing cattle. 

R. 615,m.21d. John Norton, plaintiff; Gilbert Vaux de Thornburgh, yeo- 
man, and others, defendants. Depasturing cattle at Corbrig. 

1415. 
R. 617, m. 432 d. John de Marton, esquire, plaintiff ; Robert Conyers and 

Johanna, his wife, defendants. Manors of West Brompton and Kyne- 

ton and land in le Rawe in Esshet and Thristerton. 
R. 617, m. 91. Robert More (?), clerk, plaintiff; John Bertram, chivaler, and 

Isabella, his wife, defendants. Half the manor of Benwell. 
R. 617, m. 472. Richard Goldesburgh, chivaler, plaintiff ; Thomas Elmeden 

de Elmeden, co. Durham, gentleman, defendant. For forcibly entering 

house at Newcastle and taking a chest containing deeds, etc. 
R. 617, m. 531. Edward Maners, plaintiff; Alexander de Fetherstonhalgh, 

defendant. 2QI. debt. 
R. 617, m. 386 d. Richard Heron, plaintiff ; Walter Stabbe de Forde, laborer, 

defendant. Account while bailiff in Alberwyk. 
R. 617, m. 220 d. Robert Umfraville, miles, and William Lambton, junior, 

plaintiffs; John Clerk, citizen and merchant of York, defendant. 40L 

debt. 

1416. 
R. 620, m. 196. Agnes, wife of Patrick Hodham, executor of Patrick Hodham, 

plaintiff; Robert Coke alia* Robert Rollewod, of Newcastle, 'coke/ de- 
fendant. 9 marks 6*. 8<7. debt. 

39 North Sunder land in the parish of Bamburgh. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1413-1419. 71 

R. 620, ra. 196. Agnes, wife of Patrick Hodham, executor of Patrick Hod- 
ham, plaintiff; William Coke of Newcastle, yeoman, and Isabella, his 
wife, defendants. 9 marks 6s. 8d. debt. 

R. 620, m. 449. Robert Thorley, plaintiff; John Cliderowe, Thomas Tron 
and John Warkeworth, defendants. Castle and manor of Mitteford, 
castle of Framlyngton, fist-aide worth, Northe-mylborne cum Ponteland 
and hamlette de Liteland [Little Eland] and elsewhere. 

R. 623, m. 332 d. William, prior de Hexhain, plaintiff; Richard Fetherston- 
halgh de Fetherstonhalgh, gentleman, defendant. 4-L 2s. debt. 

R. 623, m. 332 d. William, prior de Hexham, plaintiff; James Don de Temple 
Thornton, yeoman, defendant. 60 sol. debt. 

1417 

R. 627, m. 497 d. William Johanson and William Lambeton, plaintiffs; 
Thomas Horsley of Newcastle, defendant. 4L 12,*. 4(7. debt. 

1419. 

R. 632, m. 298. Agnes de Hibburne, plaintiff; Richard Boteler de Ravens- 
worth, co. York, yeoman, defendant. 40 sol. debt. 

R. 632, m. 298. John Dolphamby, plaintiff; John Lawe de Newcastle, de- 
fendant. 40L debt. 

R. 632, m. 375 d. Richard Goldesburgh, chivaler, and Johanna, his wife, 
otherwise called Johanna de la Yale, late wife of William de Elmeden, 
plaintiffs ; Roger del Thornton, burgess of the town of Newcastle, de 
fendant. 100 sol. debt. 

R. 633, m. 299 d. Robert Heryson and Elena, his wife, plaintiffs; John 
Fenwyk de Fenwyk, esq., defendant. 5 marks debt. 

R. 633, m. 299 d. Robert Heryson and Elena, his wife, plaintiffs; Robert 
Lysle de Newcastle, chivaler, defendant. 6 marks debt. 

R. 633, m. 169 d. Robert de Umfreville, miles, plaintiff ; Alan Beck de Hexham, 
mercer, and Johanna, his wife, defendants. Chattels value 10L, which 
they unjustly detain. 

R. 635, m. 58. Robert Conyers, miles, plaintiff ; Katherine Rokpotte, executor 
to the will of William Rokpotte de Newcastle upon Tyne, defendant. 
Waste in lands, which Katherine holds for life in Brompton and 
Koynton.40 

R. 635, m. 594. Edmund Hastyngs, miles, and William Cromevell, miles, 
plaintiffs; Henry Percy de Atholl, mile*, and Robert Thorley, de- 
fendants. The castle and manor of Mitford and 6 denar. rent in 
Mollesdon. 

R. 635, m. 443 d. Prior de Tynmouth, by William Halliwell, his attorney, 
plaintiff; Robert Dykson de Weperden,4l yeoman, defendant. 10 
marks debt. 

40 Kenton. ll Wooperton, near Eglingham. 



70 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

1420. 

E. 636, m. 211. John Wodryngton, miles, plaintiff; Thomas Daweson de 
Captheton, husbandman, defendant. 71. debt. 

R. 636, m. 211. John Wodryngton, miles, plaintiff; Henry Novelle de 
Bainburgh, yeoman, defendant. 8 marks debt. 

E. 636, m. 79 d. John fil. Alexander de Mitford, plaintiff; [no defendant 
given]. Plea of debt. 

E. 637, m. 60. Thomas Holden and Elizabeth, his wife, plaintiffs ; William 
Collinwod, defendant. Third part of manor of Duxfeld. 

1421. 

E. 640, m. 267 d. William de Mitford and Richard de Mitford fil. Hugh de 
Mitford, executors of Hugh de Mitford, plaintiffs ; Thomas Ilderton de 
Ilderton, co. Northumberland, esq., defendant. 50 marks debt. 

E. 642, m. 415 d. Henry Percy de Atholl, chivaler, plaintiff; William de 
Mitford de Mitford, gentleman, and John de Mitford, gentleman, de- 
fendants. A chest of deeds, writings, etc., which they unjustly detain. 

E. 642, m. 415 d. John Maners, executor of Thomas de Chestre, plaintiff ; 
John Ovyngton de Ovyngton, gentleman, Walter Eichardson de Naf- 
freton, yeoman, defendants. 100 sol. debt. 

1422. 

E. 645, m. 37. Eobert Umfreville, chivaler, William Elmedon, chivaler, 
William Tempest, chivaler, and Eobert de Swinburne, junior, plaintiffs ; 
Simon Weldon of Weldon, gent. deft. Services due to the fee at Weldon. 

E. 647, m. 214. John Burcestre and Elizabeth, his wife, plaintiffs ; Elizabeth, 

wife of William de Whitchestre, chivaler, defendant. Two parts of 

manor of Benwell, which, with the other third part, Johanna de Ryil and 

Walter de Wessyngton gave to John//'. Robert de Whitchestre and his heirs. 

Walter de Wessyngton = Johanna de Ryil 



i 
= Robert de Whitchestre 



John de Whitchester, seised of the said manor in tail, temp. Edw. n. = 

Henry, son and heir = 

( 
John, son and heir = 

I | 

John, son and heir, ob. s.p. William, brother and .heir = 



| 

William de Whitchestre, = Elizabeth, the Elizabeth, sister and = John 

defendant heir, plaintiff Burcestre 

and they recover, etc. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1420-1423. 73 

R. 647, m. 214 d. John Burchestre and Elizabeth, his wife, by Roger Pogden, 
plaintiffs; Elizabeth, wife of William de Whitchestre, chivaler, de- 
fendant. Manors of Duxfeld and Brandon, and 8 marks rent in 
Braunton, half the manor of Bitlesden and 2 parts manor of 
Callerdon. 

Robert de la Yale = 



William de la Vale = Agnes 

i 



Henry, son and heir, ob. s.p. Alicie, sister and heir == John de Whitchester. 
William, son and heir = 



William, son and heir, = Elizabeth, Elizabeth, sister and = John Burcestre. 

ob. s.p. defendant heir, plaintiff. 

R. 647, m. 213 d. John Burcestre and Elizabeth, his wife, plaintiffs ; Eliza- 
beth, wife of William de Whitchestre, chivaler, defendant. Manors 
of Seton de la Vale and North Dissyngton, which John de Seton gave 
to Robert de la Vale and his heirs. 

1423. 

R. 648, m. 198 d. Thomas Surtees, chivaler, sheriff of Northumberland, plain- 
tiff; Adam Killyngworth de Killyngworth, esq., Thomas de Middelton 
de Cheuelyngham, gentleman, and John Tomson de Killyngworth, 
yeoman, defendants. 10?. debt. 

R. 649, m. 423 d. John Brompton, plaintiff; John Scarlet de Worlyng in 
Cantebr., merchant, defendant. 10 marks debt. 

R. 650, m. 129 d. Thomas Holden and Elizabeth, his wife, plaintiffs; Roger 
Woderyngton and Elizabeth, his wife, defendants. Third part manor 
of Brandon, 61. rent in Brampton, and half the manor of Bydelesden, 
which they claim as the dower of said Elizabeth, wife of Thomas 
Holden. 

R. 651, m. 167. Thomas de Myddelton, esq., plaintiff; William Cateryk, vicar 
of the church of Cheuelyngham, defendant. For cutting down trees, 
etc., at Cheuelyngham, value 40 sol. 

1424. 

R. 652, m. 452. Liellus fil. Agnes de Kirkton, plaintiff ; Nicholas Heron and 
Katherine, his wife, defendants. Manor of Bokyngfeld and land in 
Bokyngfeld, which William Heron, miles, fil. Roger Heron, militis, gave 
to Jordan fil. Agnes de Kirkton and his heirs, default, remainder to 
Ordinello fil. Agnes de Kirkton, and brother of said Jordan and his 
heirs, default, remainder to said Liello and his heirs. 



74 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

Roger Heron, miles = 

I 
William Heron, mile* = 



Agnes = cle Kirkton 



I 

Jordan, ob. s.p. temp. Ordinil, ob. *.p. Liellus, who claims, and 
Rich. II. he recovers. 

R. 653, m. 304 d. Richard Goldesbrugh, miles, and Johanna, his wife, by 
Roger Pogdene, his attorney, plaintiffs; John Burcestre, esq., and 
Elizabeth, his wife, defendants. Third part of manors of Duxfeld and 
Brandon, 8 marks rent in Brampton, and half the manor of Bydelesden, 
as the dower of said Johanna. 

R. 653, m. 359 d. William Armeston, plaintiff; Thomas Middelton de Cheu- 
elyngham, esq., W T illiam Bolton de Alnewyk, yeoman, Thomas Nevylle 
fil. Henry Nevylle le Cheuelyngham, yeoman, defendants. For 
assaulting Peter de Tynnemonth, a tenant and servant to the king. 

R. 655, m. 80. John Babyngton de Babyngton, plaintiff; John Heynyng de 
West Matfen and Alicia, his wife, defendants. Land in Lityl 
Babyngton. 

1425. 

R. 656, m. 278. John Conyers and William Hardyng, plaintiffs ; John Lambe 
de Wolsyngton, husbandman, defendant. Depasturing cattle at 
Newebygging of the More. 

R. 658, m. 273d. Stephen Robynson, plaintiff; John Henryson de Stanton, 
senior, and John Henryson, junior, and others, defendants. Depas- 
turing cattle at Stanton, damages Wl. 

1426. 

R. 662, m. 173 and 190. William Claxton, chivaler, plaintiff ; William Soulby 
de Beverley, Bailley, defendant. 10/. debt. 

1428. 

R. 671, m. 475 and 279 d. William Lambton, plaintiff; John Lang de Parva 
Rile, yeoman, defendant. 201. 10s. 8d. debt. 

1429. 

R. 673, m. 494. William Lambton, plaintiff; John Child de Newcastle, mer- 
chant, defendant. 20L debt. 

R.675,m.409d. Edward Maners, executor to Alianora de Middelham 
; Margaret Middelham de Alnemouth, widow, defendant. For 
torcibly taking goods and chattels. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1424-1437. 75 

1430. 

R. 679, m. 388 d. William Lambton, plaintiff ; John Donne de Netilworth, 
co. Durham, yeoman, defendant. IU. 14s. debt. 

1431. 

R. 680, m. 39. Roger fit. Roger Thornton, senior, executor to Roger Thorn- 
ton, senior, plaintiff; John Hauk de Kirkeleventon, co. Ebor, husband- 
man, and others, defendants. Debt. 

1432. 

R. 684, m. 12 d. Roger Thornton, executor to Roger Thornton, senior, plain- 
tiff; [defendant's name not given]. Plea debt. 

R. 685, m. 370 d. Prior of Tynemouth, plaintiff; Richard Fetherstonhalgh de 
Fetherstonhalgh, esq., defendant. 40 sol. debt. 

1433. 

R. 689, m. 396 d. William Bowes, miles, plaintiff; John Lokewode de Sutton 
sub Whitstonclyffe, co. Ebor, yeoman, defendant. SI. 10s. debt. 

R. 689, m. 396. Roger Wodryngton, plaintiff; Thomas Scot de Belford, hus- 
bandman, defendant. For assaulting John Petygreeve, servant of the 
said Thomas at Belford. 

R. 690, m. 210. John Lancaster, plaintiff; John Wra de Newebygging, 
yeoman, defendant. 40 sol. debt. 

1434. 

R. 692, m. 100. John Maners de Ettale, miles, plaintiff; Maria, wife of 
John Beer, otherwise Maria Johnson, late wife of William Johnson de 
Berington, defendant. Rents unjustly detained. 

1435. 

R. 696. m. 125. Robert Claxton, esq., plaintiff ; Henry Percy, earl of North- 
umberland, defendant. Manor of Develleston. 

1436. 

R. 701, m. 217 d. Robert Lambton, plaintiff; Robert Olivere de Chester in 
the Strete, co. Durham, fyssher, defendant. Trespass at Heydenbrigg. 

R. 703, m. 413 d. Robert Umfraville, miles, and Rowland Tempest, esqr., 
plaintiffs; Rowland de Thirlwall de Thirlwall, esqre., defendant. 4 
marks debt. 

1437. 

R. 704, m. 332 d. Walter Tailboys, by Richard Duffeld, his attorney, plaintiff ; 
John Ellerker, Thomas Santon, Richard Bevyngton, John Erthe, 
chivaler, and John Hardyng, defendants. Lands, etc., in Alwenton, 
Clenhill, Bydleston, Boroudon, Scharbarton, Thirnham, Angreham, 
Netherton, Roneley42 and Tokkeston,43 which Henry Asty, John de 

42 Branly. 43 Togston. 



76 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BAtfCO ROLLS 

Harbrugh and Eichard Ovyngham gave to Thomas de Umfraville, 
senior, and his heirs, male, default, remainder to Thomas de Umfra- 
ville fil. Johanna fil. Adam de Eodham and his heirs, male, default, 
remainder to Robert fil. said Johanna fil. Adam and his heirs male, 
default, remainder to the right heirs of Gilbert, late earl of Angus. 

Adam de Rodham = 

I 

Johanna, daughter and heir = Thomas de Umfreville, senior, temp. Rich. n. 

Thomas de Qmfreville, ob. s.p. temp. Robert de Umfreville, ob. s.p. temp. 
Rich. ii. Rich. n. 

Walter Tailboys claims as heir to said Gilbert, earl of Angus, viz., as son of 
Walter, son of Alianora, daughter of Elizabeth, sister to said earl, and he 
recovers, etc. 

R. 706, m. 423 d. Eobert Herbotell, miles, and Thomas Herbotell, plaintiffs; 
Edmund Selby de Forde, gentleman, and John Colenwode de Etall, 
gentleman, defendants. 16 marks debt. 

E. 707, m. 604. William Elmedon, chivaler, plaintiff ; Thomas Rawelyn de 
Budill, husbandman, John Yonghusband de Budill, junior, husband- 
man, and others, defendants. Depasturing cattle at Neuton juxta 
Corbrigg and consuming corn and grass value 100 sol. 

E. 707, m. 407 d. John Lambton and Eobert Lambton, plaintiffs; Eichard 
Broun de Chester in the Strete, defendant. Trespass at Haydenbrigg. 

1438. 
E. 711, m. 419 d. John Fenwyk, senior, and John Fenwyk, junior, plaintiffs ; 

Eoger Fenwyk de Harle, gentleman, defendant. 6 marks debt. 
E. 711, m. 419 d. William Eure, miles, plaintiff ; Eoger Wodryngton de Her- 
botell, esq., defendant. 100L debt. 

William Eure, miles, plaintiff; John Lilleburne de Shaweden, esq., 
executor of Thomas Lilleburne, defendant. 201. debt. 

1439. 
E. 712, m. 456. John Midelton, esq., plaintiff; Eoland Thirlwall de Thirlwall, 

esq., defendant. Depasturing cattle at Thirlwall, damage 201. 
R. 713, m. 195. William Lumley, miles, plaintiff; John Travas de Tetford, 

co. Lincoln, gentleman, defendant. Account of moneys. 
R.713,m.338d. Henry Fenwyk, chivaler, plaintiff; John Legh de Isale in 

co. Cumberland, chivaler, and others, defendants. Plea debt 
R.714,m.51. Robert Woderyngton, plaintiff; William Horsbroke' late of 

Ayden, yeoman, defendant. Depasturing cattle at Ayden, damages 10 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1437-1444. 77 

[FROM VOLUME x.] 1439 (continued). 

R. 715, m. 238. John Norton and William Johnson, plaintiffs; John Dicson 
de parva Callerton, senior, yoman, and John Dixon de parva Callerton, 
junior, yeoman, defendants. Depasturing cattle at parva Callerton. 

1440. 

R. 716, m. 172 d. Eobert Herbotell de Preston, miles, and Thomas Herbotell, 
plaintiffs ; Edmund Selby de Furde, co. Northumberland, gentleman, 
and John Colenwode de Etall, gentleman, defendants. 16 marks debt. 

R. 717, m. 199. 

John Eryngton de Whytyngton, senior, gentleman, 18 Hen. vi. (1439) = 



John Eryngton de Whytyngton, junior, gentleman, 18 Hen. vi. (1439). 

1441. 
R. 720, m. 267. William Eure, miles, plaintiff; Roger Wydryngton de Her- 

botyll, esq., defendant. Wl. debt. 
R. 720, m. 267 d. Nicholas Rodom, plaintiff; John Laton de Est-harlsay in 

Cleveland, yeoman, defendant. 10 marks debt. 
R. 722, m. 203. Ed. Carre, plaintiff; Thomas Pottes, late of Chapton, mason, 

defendant. 10 marks debt. 

1444. 

R. 733, m. 139. 

William Yngowe, by John Yngowe, his attorney, plaintiff ; Thomas = 
Hasylrygge, defendant. Manor of Donyngton, 44 which William Bekwith 
gave to Nicholas Punchardon for life, remainder to Robert, son of 
said Nicholas and his heirs, default to Cristiana, daughter of the said 
Nicholas, seised temp. Edw. m. 



Robert de Punchardon, ob. s.p. temp. = Cristiana, sister = Ingowe 



Edw. in. 



and heir 



Nicholas, son and heir = 

Thomas, son and heir = 

f~ 
William Yngowe, son and heir, plaintiff. 

R. 735, m. 65. William Todde, plaintiff ; John Herryson de West Lilburne, 
yeoman, defendant. For forcibly taking a mule at West Lilburne, 

" Dinnington, near Newcastle. 



7$ EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

1445. 

R.739,m. 71 d. Robert Elsyngton, plaintiff; John Laton de Saxhow, co. 
York, gentleman, Nicholas Laton, late of Dodyrhow, co. York, gentle- 
man/ and Thomas Moreslawe, late of Newcastle, gentleman, defendants. 
5 marks debt. 

1446. 

E.742, m. 77. Eobert Hansard, esq., plaintiff; John Buirestre, miles, and 
Elizabeth, his wife, defendants. Manors of Seton de la Vale, Duxfeld, 
and North Dyssyngton and Nigra Calverton. 

1447. 

R. 744, m. 70 d. William Bowes, miles, plaintiff ; John Ovyngton de New- 
castle, junior, merchant, John Ovyngton of said place, senior, mer- 
chant, and others, defendants. 24?. debt. 

R. 747, m. 395 d. Henry Fenwyk, mile.*, plaintiff ; Robert Forster de Fylton,46 
yeoman, and others, defendants. False imprisonment at Hartwraton. 

R. 747, m. 395 d. Henry Fenwyk, mile*, plaintiff; John Herryson de Ray (?), 
yeoman, and others, defendants. Cutting down trees at Calchirsyde. 

R. 747, m. 268 d. Robert Claxton, esq., plaintiff; John Heron, late of Forde, 
esq., and John Heron, late of Chipchesse, esq., defendants. 140?. debt. 

R. 747, m. 268 d. Elizabeth Boynton, wife of William Boynton, son and heir 
of Henry Boynton, miles, plaintiff; Christopher Boynton de Sudbury, 
co. York, esq., defendants. 40?. debt. 

1451. 

R. 763, m. 280 d. Robert Maners de Etall, plaintiff; Gerard Maners, de- 
fendant. Lands in Shotton.47 

R. 763, m. 280 d. George Burell, plaintiff ; Thomas Carre, late of Langton, 48 
senior, gentleman, Thomas Carre, late of Langton, gentleman, Andrew 
Carre, late of Langton, gentleman, John Carre, late of Chilbourne,49 
gentleman, George Carre, late of Yeverne,50 gentleman, and Edward 
Carre, late of Newcastle upon Tyne, gentleman, defendants. Assault 
at Carram. 

1453. 

R. 769, m. 190. Robert Claxton, miles, plaintiff ; John Thomson, late of 
Humbyldon, yeoman, and John James of same place, yeoman, and 
others, defendants. 20?. debt. 

R. 769, m. 190. Nicholas Blakston, armiger, plaintiff ; William Hardyng de 
Newcastle, esq., defendant. 11. debt. 

1454. 

R. 772, m. 451. Robert Maners, esq., plaintiff; Ralph Percy, late of Alnewyk, 
miles, John Lilburne de Shawden, esq., Thomas Hagerston de Hager- 
ston, esq., and William Muschance de Baremore, esq. 20?. debt. 

46 Filton, in the parish of Thockrington. 47 Shotton, near Kirknewton. 

4!t Now Lanton, near Kirknewton. ln Chibburn. 50 Yeavering, 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1445-1456. 79 

1455. 
R. 778, m. 298 d. 

Thomas Middylton, plaintiff; William Ogle, defendant. Messuages and 
lands and third part of the castle and vill de Chevyllyngham in 
Chevyllyngham, Frickilton, and Hartlowe, together with other mes- 
suages and lands, and two parts of the said castle and vill which Thomas 
Heton, mile*, gave to Thomas his son in fee tail 



Thomas Heton, seised in fee tail by the gift of his father, temp. Edw. n. 

i i i 

Margaret, daughter and Johanna, daughter Elizabeth, daughter 



co-heir, seised of 
eighteen messuages 
and third part castle 



and co-heir, seised and co-heir, seised 

of third part said of third part castle 

castle and lands and lands 



Thomas Middylton, son and heir, plaintiff, who claims his mother's share. 

R. 779, m. 587 d. Richard Hansard, esq., plaintiff; Patrick Fetherstonhalfe 
de Haute weswill, gentleman, George Fetherstonhalfe de Haute wesill, 
gentleman, defendants. 40 sol. debt. 

1456. 

R. 780, m. 442 d. Robert Maners, esq., late sheriff of Northumberland, 
plaintiff; John Lilburne, esq., and Edward Lilburne, gentleman, both 
of Shawden, defendants. 40. debt. 

R. 780, m.295d. John, prior de Tynmouth, plaintiff; Eoland Thirlewall de 
Thirlewall, esq., Robert Mosegrave de Royall, esq., Richard Stokall de 
Stanehall in Knarisdale, gentleman, John Chatour de Whetell, yeoman, 
and Thomas Smyth de Haydenbrige, yeoman, defendants. 20 marks 
debt. 

R. 780, m. 82 d. William Bowes, miles, plaintiff; William Benet de Kyneton, 
gentleman, defendant. 601. debt. 

R. 780, m. 82 d. Thomas Neville, miles, plaintiff ; Ealph Neville, earl of North- 
umberland, defendant. Manors of Bywell, Bolbek and Styford, and 
lands and fishery in the river Tyne in Bywell, Bolbek, Styford, Ovyng- 
ton, Neuton, Acorn, Mikle Bromle, la Bathehouse, Mynsteracres, etc., 
held of the king in capite. 

R. 781, m. 200 d. Robert Maners, esq., late sheriff of Northumberland, 
plaintiff; William Shaftowe de Babyngton, yeoman, and others, de- 
fendants. 40Z. debt. 

R. 783, m. 371 d. Richard Baynbrigg, gentleman, and William Gaunt de 
Ebor, merchant, plaintiffs; William Rothvyn de Newcastle, merchant, 
defendant, 201. debt, 



80 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

1457. 

K. 787, m. 633. John Harbotell fU. John Harbotell, and Thomas Harbotell 
'fil, John Harbotell, executors of John Harbotell, plaintiffs ; [no further 

entry]. 

1458. 

E. 788, m. 379. John Burcestre, miles, plaintiff; John Wodryngton, late of 
Wodryngton, esq., and others, defendants. Cutting down trees and 
depasturing cattle at Neusam and Blythsnoke. 

K. 788, m. 170 d. and 32 d. Robert Maners, junior, esq., and Thomas Maners, 
esq., plaintiffs; Richard Baynbryge de Brauncepath in the bishopric 
of Durham, esq., defendant. Detaining 6 horses, 5 mules, etc., at 
Oursgares.51. 

E. 789, m. 163. Robert Maners, junior, esq., and Thomas Maners, esq., 
plaintiffs; Richard Baynbryge de Brauncepath, in the bishopric of 
Durham, esq., defendant. Detaining 6 horses, 5 mules, etc., at 
Oursgares. 

1459. 

E. 795, m. 21 d. John, prior de Tynmouth, plaintiff ; Roland Thirlwall de 
Thirl wall, esq., John Chatoune alias John Chator de Whetell, yeoman, 
defendants. 20 marks debt. 

1460. 

R. 799, m. 282 d. John Hudeleston, esq., plaintiff ; John Fenwyk de Walyng- 
ton, esq., defendant. Forcibly entering close at Fenwyk. 

R. 799, m. 282 d. Thomas Colte, plaintiff ; Robert Lylburne de Bamburgh, 
gentleman, Alan Temple de Bamburgh, yeoman, George Temple de 
Bamburgh, yeoman, and others, defendants. Depasturing cattle at 
Bamburgh. 

[FEOM VOLUME xi.] 1463. 

R.807, m. 92 d. John Eltham, plaintiff; Thomas Lambeton de Lambeton, 
co. Durham, esq., defendant. 121. debt. 

R. 809, m. 21. Thomas Hoo, esq., Thomas Fulthorpe, esq., John Martyn, 
John Benet, Robert Whitwell and John Andrewe, plaintiffs; John 
Burcestre, miles, and Elizabeth, his wife, defendants. Manors of 
Ceton de la Vale, Duxfeld, North Dissyngton and Nigra Caluerton. 

1464. 

R. 811,m.55 d. Robert Rodes, plaintiff; Richard Aldeburgh, late of Aide- 
burgh, co. York, miles, and Thomas Forsett, rector of the parish church 
of Catton, co. York, defendants. 40?. debt. 

1465. 

E. 814, m. 182 d. William Laweson, plaintiff ; Thomas Baxter and Johanna, 
his wife, defendants. Land in Bywell. 

51 Overgrass, near Felton, 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1457-1477. 81 

1466. 

R. 818, m. 215 d. Ralph Graystoke, miles, de Graystoke and de Wemme, 
plaintiff; Thomas Weltden de Weltden, gentleman, and others, de- 
fendants. Depasturing cattle at Newebigging super le More. 
R. 819, m. 170. Thomas Hagirston de Hagirston, esq., and Robert Hagir- 
ston, esq., plaintiffs; Thomas Forster de Eddirston, esq., defendant. 
661. 13s. 4rf. debt. 

1473. 

R. 845, m. 21. Robert Comyn, by Leonard Knyght, his attorney, plaintiff; 
John Hydwyne, late of Shelhall,52 yeoman, defendant. Land in 
Sleley and Shelehall, which said Robert claims as his right and 
inheritance. 

1474. 
R. 850, m. 356. Oliver de Sutton = 

Margerie = John Haryngton, temp. Edw. ill. 
Robert Haryngton, miles = 



Robert, son and heir, ob. s.p. Margaret, sister and heir = Braunspath 



William Brauns- 
path, miles, ob. 
s.p. 


\ 
John Brauns- 
path, miles, 
brother and 
heir, ob. s.p. 


Thomas, 
brother 
and heir, 
ob. s.p. 


Johanna, = 
sister and 
heir 




Howell 



John 



Howell, son and heir of Johanna. 

1476. 

R. 857, m. 194. John, prior of Tynmouth, plaintiff; William Lawson of Cram- 
lyngton, gentleman, defendant. Chattels value 40L and a certain 
written obligation unjustly detained. 

R. 860, m. 316. Agnes Rodes, executrix of Robert Rodes, late Robert Rodes, 
esq., plaintiff; Richard Clervaux, late of Croft, co. York, esq., de- 
fendant. 101. debt. 

1477. 
R. 864, m. 111. 

Edmund Craucestyr, = Margeria = Ralph Carre, who claims his wife's 
first husband dower in the lands of her first husband 

in Craucestyr, Warmedene, Bednell, 
Bambrugh, Spyndlestane, Bodell, and 
Dickeborne. 
52 Shiel-hall in Slaley. 

3 SER. VOL. VI. 6 



8 9 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

R 864 m Hid. Ralph Hylton and Elizabeth, his wife, by Thomas Danby 
hTs attorney, plaintiffs; William Folbery, defendant Third part of 
manor of Folbery and lands as the dower of said Elizabeth. 

1480. 

R 874, m. 584. Robert Blytheman, plaintiff; William Fenwyk de Herterton,53 
gentleman, George Fenwyk de Herterdon, gentleman, James Fenwyk 
de Walyngton, gentleman, Archibold Fenwick de Rotherley, gentle- 
man, defendants. Assault at Hertborne. 

R 874 m. 584. John Lumley, dericus of the church of St. Marie de Jesmonde, 
by John Wyvell, his attorney, plaintiff; John Cok de Newcastle upon 
Tyne, merchant, and Richard Merton, late of Jesmond St. Mary, 
yeoman, defendants. Taking goods and chattels at Jesmond. 
R.874, m. 584. Roger Thornton, miles, and John Thornton, executors of 
Roger Thornton, esq., plaintiffs; John Heron, late of Acorn, gentle- 
man, defendant. 1(M. debt. 

1482. 

R. 881, m. 470. Richard Musgrave de Hertley, esq., plaintiff; John Wyder- 
yngton de Chipchase, esq., defendant. 100Z. [debt]. 

1487. 

R. 902, m. 410. John Graystoke, plaintiff ; Richard Scot de Mitford, yeoman, 
defendant. Cutting down trees at Morpeth. 

1493. 

R. 924, m. 73 d. Thomas Lambton, by Thomas Rokeby, his attorney, 
plaintiff; William Anderson, defendant. Land in Threpwode and 
Haydenbrygge. 

1496. 

R. 935, m. 263 d. Roger Hastyngs, esq., plaintiff; William Lilburne, late 
of Neweton, gentleman, defendant. Depasturing cattle at Roger 
Roughlee.54 

R. 936, m. 63 d. Nicholas Ratclyff and Isabella, his wife, plaintiffs ; John 
Swynburne and Johanna, his wife, defendants. Third part of manor 
of Heton, and land in Keresley and Mountlawe,55 which they claim 
as the dower of said Isabella. 

R. 937, m. 296. Richard, bishop of Durham, Roger Fenwyk, esq., and John 
Laynge, dericus, at the suit of John Irton, esq., George Lamplough 
and Nicholas Lamplough : the right of presentation to the church of 
Angrame, now vacant, and they say that Alan Heton, miles, was seised 
of the manor of Angrame and the advowson of said church, in fee, and 
that he presented William Eland, dericus, to said church temp. Rich. n. 

53 Harterton. 5l These places are in the parish of Edlingham. 

55 Moot-lawe, near Kearley in Stamfordham. 




- 

-i e 





bo 



ill 

lill 



l 



l-s-s? 
























,s -g.s;S,|- 

HJillillli 

d-C3.S_, 2*1 O 03 S c3 u 



>J 

a > 
S S3 



fi 

.88 



I 



j-g 

Is 

OJ tJO 

|3 

as 



s 



84 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

1501. 

E. 958, m. 45. Cristofer Peirson, clericus, executor of William Bolron, and 
Ralph Bank and Elizabeth, his wife, co-executor, plaintiffs; Kobert 
Todde, late of Horsleyburn in Wardale, co. Durham, yeoman, defend- 
ant. 61. 13s. 4d. debt. 

1502. 

E. 959, m. 210 d. William Hilton, milts, and Eobert Hilton, his son, plain- 
tiffs; Thomas Weltden of Newcastle, merchant, John Weltden de 
Weltden, esq., Thomas Weltden of Newcastle, merchant, and William 
Eames de Harnam, gentleman, defendants. 71. debt. 

1503. 

E. 966, m. 257 d. William Hilton, miles, plaintiff ; Eouland Harryson, late 
of Knarysdale, husbandman, Matthew Harrison, late of Knarysdale, 
husbandman, Christopher Harrison, husbandman, and others, defend- 
ants. Forcibly entering Close at Holhouse in the parish of Knarysdaylle. 

1504. 

E. 968, m. 407. John Mordaunt, miles, plaintiff; John Middelton, esq., son 
and heir of George Middelton, son and heir of John Middelton, militis, 
defendant. Land in Hooleraa, Hoolhous, Mosforth, Warneford, Bam- 
burgh, Dunstane, etc. 

1506. 

E. 976, m. 405. Thomas Caere de Dacre, miles, plaintiff; William Heron, esq., 
defendant. Eight of presentation to the church of Forde. 

William Heron was seised of the manor of Forde and the advow- 
son of said church, in fee, and he presented George Heron, clericus, to 
said church temp. Henry vn and afterwards by deed dated 13th April, 
19 Henry vn (1504) gave said advowson to said Thomas Dacre. 

1507. 

E. 982, m.646d. Bertram Younghusbond and Isabella, his wife, alias 
Isabella Bewyk, plaintiffs; Thomas Surteys, late of Dodyngsayle,56 
co. Durham, esq., defendant. 100?. debt. [Also E. 683, m. 21 d. 1508.] 

1508. 

E. 985, m. 80. William Davell de Newcastle, merchant, plaintiff ; Guichard 
Harbotell, late of Preston, esq., son and heir of Ealph Harbotell, 
militia, defendant. 40J. debt. 

E. 895, m. 82. John Middelton and Isabella, his wife, who was wife of John 
Swynburne, esq., by George Emerson, their attorney, plaintiffs; 
William Swynburne, defendant. Land in Captheaton, Chowerton, 
Towyk, Doddyngton, and Ennerton, which the plaintiffs claim as 
dower of said Isabella. 
R.985,m.85. Ealph Hebburne de Hebburne, esq., plaintiff; George Mus- 

chance, late of Bermour, esq., defendant. WOl. debt. 
56 Dinsdale. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1501-1526. 85 

[FROM VOLUME xn.] 1509. 

R. 988, m. 237 d. Nicholas Turpyn, plaintiff; Gerard Blynkensop, late of 
Belleroer,57 gentleman, defendant. Forcibly entering close at Whit- 
chester and Hydwyne and taking 7 oxen and 2 horses. 

1512. 

R. 11, m. 64 d. Robert Macrell, plaintiff; Thomas Elderton, late of Elder- 
ton, miles, defendant. 4/. debt. 

1516. 

R. 32, m. 569. Margaret Delavale, widow, plaintiff: William Lysle de Ogle, 
miles, Thomas Lisle de Ogle, gentleman, and Otewell Lisle de Temple 
Thornton, gentleman, defendants. Forcibly entering close at Horton 
and depasturing cattle. 

1517. 

R. 10203, m. 21 d. Francis Hastyngs, esq., son and heir of Roger Hastings, 
militis, plaintiff; Robert Dormer, defendant. Manor of Edlyngham. 

1520. 
R. 10304, m. 226. George Harryson, plaintiff; John Harryson, late of Har- 

lough, junior, yeoman, defendant. Assault at Morpeth. 

R. 10304, m. 799. Henry Anderson, plaintiff; William Vyncent, late of 
Cowton, co. York, gentleman, defendant. 119s. IQ$d. which he owes 
and unjustly detains. 

1524. 

R. 45, m. 379. John Marley, late of Gybsyde, esq., plaintiff; John Hedworth 
de Harrerton, co. Durham, esq., defendant. 200?. debt. 

1525. 

R. 76, m. 381 d. Robert Brandelyng, executor of John Brandelyng of New- 
castle, merchant, plaintiff; William Ellerker, late of Woderyngton, 
miles, and Margery, his wife, administratrix of the goods, etc., of Henry 
Wodryngton, militis, who died intestate, defendants. 30Z. debt. 

R. 76, m. 381 d. Robert Brandelyng, executor of John Brandelyng of New- 
castle, merchant, plaintiff; Robert Fenwyk of Cheloyne,58 C o. North- 
umberland, gentleman, and Matilda, his wife, executors of Roger 
Wodryngton de Wodryngton, esq., defendants. 40L which he unjustly 
detains. 

1526. 

R. 96, m. 277 d. John Lumley, esq., and Mabilla, his wife, plaintiffs; Thomas 
Fenwyk, late of Lytell Harle, gentleman, defendant. 4 horses and 4 
score sheep, belonging to said Mabilla before her marriage, which the 
defendant took at little Harle. 

* Bellister. 58 Query, Chibburn. 



86 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS 

R. 96, m. 272 d. John Fetherstonhaugli of Stanhope, in the bishopric of 
'Durham, esq., plaintiff; Bartram Jeklowe (?) of Newcastle upon Tyne, 

merchant, defendant. 91. 6s. 8d. debt. 

R. 16, m.268. Francis Hastyngs, esq., plaintiff; James Lawson, defendant. 
Manor of Matfen west. 

1529. 

R. 10607, m. 639 d. John Fenwyke de Wallyngton, esq., plaintiff; George 
Fenwyke, late of Fenwyke, gentleman, and George Turpyn de Qwyt- 
chester,59 gentleman, defendant. 100L debt. 

1530. 
R. 47, m. 441. John Delavale, miles, plaintiff; Cuthbert Shafto de Shafto, 

gentleman, defendant. Cutting down trees, value 10?. 

R. 78, m. 518. Robert Brandlyng, executor of John Brandlyng of Newcastle, 
merchant, plaintiff; Margery Ellerker, late of Wederyngton, widow, 
executrix of Henry Wederyngton de Wederyngton, militis, defendant. 
60L debt. 

1532. 

R. 58, m. 432. 

John Carlell seised of lands in Hasand, Wytteslade, Cram- == Alianora, daughter 
lyton, Blakden and Wyfkastheles in right of his wife of John Blakke co 



Johanna seised in fee tail = Christopher Thrylkeld who claims in right of his wife. 

1535. 
R. 7 10, m. 332. Robert Delavale, miles = 



\ 
John Delavale, to whom his father gave lands at Seton= Margaret, daugh- 

TV~I i.. r__ -i j _.c i i i i . , A -r , -, 



Delavale in fee tail, and of which he was seised, temp. 
Rich. ii. 



ter of John de 
Mytford. 



Elizabeth, daughter and heir = 

James, son and heir = 

I 



John, son and heir = 



John Delavale, miles, son and heir, who claims ?;. Thomas Margery = William 
Lramlyngton, defendant, 6 messuages and lands in Ogle. 

Seton Delavale. 

59 Whitchester in the parish of Heddon. 

89 This is an undoubted mistake in the name of John Carliol's wife. She was 
Eleanor, daughter of Lawrence Acton. See Arch. Ad., 3rd ser. vol. i, p. 159, 
and the authorities there referred to. 



RELATING TO NORTHUMBERLAND, 1529-1549. 87 

1537. 

R. 510, m. 636. Cristof er Metf ord, executor of Nicholas Metf ord, plaintiff ; 
Thomas Fenwyk of parva Harle, gentleman, defendant. 40 sol. debt. 

1538. 

R. 811, m. 88d. Leonard Metcalf, and Agnes his wife, by John Wilkynson, 
his attorney, plaintiffs; Edmund Crofte, defendant. Land in Little 
Ryell and Morpeth. 

1540. 

R. 411, m. 265 d. Richard Bowes, esq., and Elizabeth his wife, plaintiffs; 
John Roddom, defendant. Land in Wolloure. 

1542. 

R. 512, m. 854. Anna Lysle, widow, who was wife of Humphrey Lysle, militis, 
plaintiff; Robert Lisle, esq., Anna Lisle, widow, who was wife of 
William Lisle, and Percival Lysle, gentleman, and Anthony Fenwyk, 
gentleman, and Humphrey Lysle, gentleman, defendants. Dower, etc. 

1544. 

R. 213, m. 173 d. William Swynborne, son and heir of Johanna Swynborne, 
Agnes Grene, and Elizabeth Cowdale, plaintiffs; Cuthbert Shaftowe, 
husband of Isabella Shaftowe, defunct, defendant. 20 messuages, 1 
coal mine, and land in Benwell and Brynkley, which belonged to Roger 
Bertram, father of said Johanna, Agnes, Elizabeth and Isabella. 

R. 313, m. 412 d. William Kyllyngworth == 



Willi 



liam Kyllyngworth, seised of land in Byker in fee tail male = 
Henry, son and heir == George, second son == 



John, son and heir, ob. s.p.m. William, ob. s.p. Richard, brother and heir == 

John Kyllyngworth, kinsman and heir male to John, the son of Henry. 

1547. 

R. 11, m. 413d. William Grene, plaintiff; John Harryson of Wykeham, co. 
Durham, yeoman, and Richard Harryson of Wykeham, yeoman, 
defendants. 4L debt. 

1548. 

R. 619, m. 96 d, James Rokebye and Johanna, his wife, plaintiffs; Marmaduke 
Tunstall, miles, defendant. 1 messuage and land in the town of 
Newcastle upon Tyne. 

1549. 

R. 912, m. 536. Cuthbert Ogle and John Ogle, executors to Marcus Ogle of 
Eglyngham, plaintiffs; William Harryson, clericus, defendant. Right 



88 EXTRACTS FROM THE DE BANCO ROLLS. 

of presentation to the church of Bothall. Kobert Ogle, miles, lord 
Ogle was seised of the manor of Bothall and the advowson of said 
church, and he presented Cuthbert Ogle to said church, temp. Henry 
vin, and is now living at Bothall. By deed dated 31 July, 1528, he 
gave 1 acre of land and said advowson to George Lawson, and George 
Lawson, son and heir of the said George, presented the said William 
Harrison, etc. 

1550. 

R. 518, m. 217 d. Thomas Gowre, esq., and Anna his wife, William Conyers, 
esq., and Kath. his wife, and Peter Slyngesbye and Johanna, his wife 
plaintiffs; Cristofer Marshall, defendant. Manor of Buttle and 
messuages and land in Buttle, Spyndelston and Awnwyck. 

1551. 

E. 811, m. 229. Cuthbert Horseley and Elizabeth his wife, plaintiffs ; Lance- 
lot Manfyld, defendant. Messuages and land in Bollom. 

1552. 

R. 115013, m. 266. John Fitzwilliam, esq., and Elizabeth his wife, plaintiffs; 
Richard Musgrave, miles, defendant. Land in Ulleston, alias Owston, 
in Allendale, and manor of Owston. 

R. 115013, m. 474 d. Johanna Rokeby, widow, and James Rokeby, executor 
of James Rokeby, plaintiffs; Thomas Hylton de Tynmouth, miles, 
defendant. Touching a certain indenture of agreement. 

R. 215, m. 213. Robert Lawson and Margery, his wife, plaintiffs ; Henry 
Lawson, defendant. Manor of Skremerston. 

R. 215, m. 213 d. Roland Madyson and Maria his wife, plaintiffs ; William 
Madyson, defendant. Land in Harnam. 

1553. 

R. 316, m. 880. Walter Fenwyk and Baldwyn Fenwyk, gentlemen, executors 
of Margaret Fenwyk, widow. 

R. 518, m. 179 d. Anna Thomlynson, widow, Roger Metcalf and Thomas 
Bates, plaintiffs; John Harbottell, defendant. Land in Esshett. 

1555. 

R. 417, m. 124. Nicholas Eryngton, esq., plaintiff; William Burgh, miles, 
lord Burgh, defendant. Manor of Newburgh. 

R. 417, m.69d. Robert Lawson, esq., and Margery his wife, plaintiffs; 
John Golyghtley, defendant. Land in Emeleton and Dunston. 

1557. 

R. 215, m. 1110 d. Ralph Fenwycke, esq., plaintiff; Christopher Fenwycke 
of Fernelowe, gentleman, defendant. Depasturing cattle at Fernelowe, 
damages 20Z. 

1558. 

R. 316, m. 214. Arthur Darcy, miles, and Maria his wife, plaintiffs ; John 
Swynburne, esq., defendant. Manor of Ellington. 



Plate I. 



Arch. Ael, 3 ser., VI. 




OCTAGON TOWERS, ALNW1CK CASTLE (See note, page 177). 



From a Photograph by Mr. W. Parker Brewis, F.S.A. 



89 



IV. THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: AN 
INDEX AND ORDINARY TO 1666. 

By Mr. C. HUNTER BLAIR. 
[Read on 25th August, 1909.] 

'Behold the eagles, lions, talbots, bears, 
The badges of your famous ancestries.' 

This index is an attempt to collect into one list the arms of 
Northumbrian families and of the officials connected with the 
defence and administration of the county from the beginnings of 
armoury in the later half of the twelfth to near the end of the 
seventeenth century. For nearly one hundred and fifty years, 
before the latter date, armoury has ceased to be of much arch- 
aeological interest, it is no longer to be relied upon as a guide 
to the genealogist, nor is it of great use to the student of history. 
I have brought it down so late because it seemed desirable to 
include the heralds' visitations, the last of which was made by 
Sir William Dugdale, Norroy King of Arms, in 1666. The 
names in the index have been taken from the various county 
histories, and other publications and records enumerated on 
pages 96-97. The capital letters immediately following the names 
refer to these authorities. The arms are derived from the rolls 
and books of arms, seals, records, manuscripts and heralds' 
visitations given on pages 98 and 99. The capital letters within 
brackets refer to these. 

In a list covering nearly five centuries and containing so 
many names and references it is possible that some names may 
have been omitted and some mistakes made, but every care has 
been taken to make it as complete and dependable as possible. 
It is not necessary to discuss the trustworthiness of the armorial 



90 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 

authorities quoted, that of the early and mostly contemporary 
rolls is unquestionable, but the local compilations known as the 
Carr MS., the Craster tables, and the Northumbrian roll, 
are not to be relied upon for the earlier arms. These have 
generally only been used when they were corroborated by 
other authorities. Considerations of space prevent me giving 
reasons for ascribing, possibly doubtful, arms to certain families. 
In a few cases where the evidence did not appear conclusive the 
blasons are in italics. For the arms of the mayors and sheriffs 
of Newcastle-upon-Tyne I have been obliged, for want of a better 
authority, to rely largely upon the Carr MS. 

The seals, attached to authenticate charters and documents, 
are the best and earliest authority for arms; for our northern 
shields we are fortunate in having the splendid collection 
preserved in Durham treasury, supplemented by that of the 
Rev. W. Greenwell. These seals have been largely used, 
though, as they do not show the colours, I have only blasoned 
from them when other evidence failed. Some of them 
which are the only authority for the arms given, or which are 
of interest for other reasons, are reproduced from photographs 
on plates vm, ix, x, and xi. The antique gems, strange mon- 
sters, and conventional devices of stars, crescents, flowers, etc., 
which appear on the early seals do not concern us here, except 
a certain class of punning devices which later became the 
canting arms of their users. 

Thus the device of four ' merles ' sitting upon the branches 
of a floriated design, used by the first and second Roger Merlay, 
becomes for the third Eoger the three flying ' merles ' placed 
paleways on his shield. Later he adopted the barry shield of 
Stuteville, encircling it by a border of his own arms. The 
seven flies on the noble seal of Thomas Muschamp (see plate 
vm) become the three butterflies of their later shield. The 
three cups of Walter Audre are represented by the single chalice 



INTRODUCTION. . 91 

of his armorial seal (see plates vin and ix). The floriated 
cross-like device of vetch pods used on the seals of William and 
Eustace Yesci possibly develop into the cross patonce of their 
later shield. The splendid and solitary heron standing on the 
seals of Jordan and Ralph Heron (see plate vin) becomes the 
famous Northumbrian shield of three herons, borne in many a 
fierce border fight. The hedgehog of Heriz becomes the fess 
between three hedgehogs of Claxton. The salmon badge of Orde, 
reminiscent of their origin on the banks of Tweed, developed 
into the three salmon placed paleways on their shield. The same 
device of Surtees, telling of their source on Teesside, did not 
survive into armorial times ; they then used the ermine shield of 
Brittany with the arms of Baliol in the quarter. These ex- 
amples might be multiplied, but enough have been given to show 
how the devices of these early seals sometimes developed into the 
hereditary shields of armorial times. 

In its chief characteristics the armoury of Northumberland 
does not differ from that of English armoury in general. Cant- 
ing arms are the most numerous, followed by lions and eagles 
and the simple designs of the chief ordinaries combined with 
charges lending themselves to boldness and simplicity of design, 
easily to be distinguished on surcoat and shield in the press of 
battle. With the end of the Wars of the Roses and the coming 
of the Tudors, our northern art of heraldry, as elsewhere, decays. 
The crowded shields, with overcrowded chiefs and ordinaries, ill- 
balanced and badly drawn, came to Northumberland as to Eng- 
land generally; upon these shields comment is useless. They 
can be found by the curious in this index. 

As I have said, canting arms are very numerous in North- 
umberland. By ' canting' is meant arms in which the charges 
upon the shield form a pun upon the name of its bearer. The 
following are a few of the most interesting. Richard Acton 
bears acorns powdered on his lion shield (see plate xi), the 



92 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 

orle of Baliol, possibly by its shape, suggests the baily of their 
castle ; Beal, remembering when the monks of Lindisf arne hived 
their bees on Behil, bears three bees; Bilton bears billets; 
Cornyn carries sheaves of cummin (see plate ix) ; Bacon bears 
a boar, his own name telling of its destined fate; Cartington 
bears his cart wheels, not knowing that they were to be called 
St. Catherine's wheels by later heralds. Craster betrays his 
northern origin and Northumbrian accent by placing a ' craw ' 
in the quarter of the famous shield of the earls of Essex. The 
great family of Corbet do not disdain the common corbie-crow. 
The allusion is lost when Drayton sings of ' A raven set on 
Corbet's armed head.' A dolphin leaps upon the shield of 
Dolphanby ; Armorer typifies at once his name and its origin by 
bearing arms in armour; Featherstonehaugh pluckily bears 
three white feathers on his blood red shield; Hazelrigg takes 
the familiar hazel leaves of his hedge rows wherewith to em- 
blason his silver shield ; Lucy bears three lucies silver on a red 
shield; Horsley carries three horses' heads, sometimes rased at 
the neck, with wild and tossing manes, sometimes cut off straight, 
trimly groomed, and securely bridled; three lambs stand on 
the shield of Lambton ; three pears are borne by Peareth ; swines 
heads by Swinburne; and three whelps by Whelpdale ; whilst 
Gosebeck and Goswick are not ashamed of the homely goose, and 
Haukyn bears three hawks. 

Another class of canting arms alludes not to the name of the 
bearer, but to the name or situation of his manor. Thus Denum, 
lord of Meldon, bears three 'mells' or mallets on his shield; 
Hebburn, living under the beacon on Ros castle, bears three 
blazing cressets ; Elwick, being ever in sight of the numberless 
water fowl of the Fames, carries one of them on his shield. 
Another group of similar origin is to be found in arms borne 
in allusion to the bearer's office or profession, sometimes called 
'arms of office'; of this class we have in Northumberland the 



INTRODUCTION. \)o 

forester's horns borne by Bellingham, Dodsworth, Forster and 
Topcliffe, the gerfalcons of Hanville, and the horse shoes of 
Marshall. 

Another series of arms largely evident in Northumberland 
are those called 'derivative,' that is, arms derived from the shield 
of a feudal superior of whom the bearer held his lands in fee, 
or from one with whom he was connected by blood, or allied by 
marriage. 

Such shields were differenced from the original either by 
changing the colours or by adding subordinate charges. In 
Northumberland there are four great groups of these arms de- 
riving from the orle of Baliol : the cinquefoil of Umfraville, the 
bars of Grey and the quarterly shield of Fitz Roger, these four 
series are illustrated in the four coloured plates n, iv, v, and 
vii. These may be named the great series of the feudal arms of 
the county, but in addition there are smaller series and single 
derivative shields, which are noted, as they appear, in the index. 
Mention may here be made of the sheaves of Comyn borne by 
Devilstone, Boltby, Tyndale, Blenkinsopp and Swinburne. The 
bougets of Ross of Wark, themselves derived and differenced 
by change of colour from those of Ross of Hamlake, appear on 
the shields of Ilderton, Lilburne, and possibly of Proctor and 
Elrington. The cross patonce and the plain cross of the Vescis 
were adopted by their successors of A ton. The former has left 
its memory in the crosses borne by Latimer, Lamplough and 
others ; the latter possibly appears on the shields of Coupland 
and Hertlawe. We probably owe many of the cruciform 
charges on the shields of the five northern counties to these 
originals. 

The engrailed cross of Ufford, earls of Suffolk, is repeated, 
changed in colours, upon the shield of Raymes. Thirlwall 
differenced the canting arms of Swinburne by placing a chevron 
between the swines' heads. The cushions of the lords of Grey- 



94 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND : 

stock appear on the shields of Redman and Button. The rings 
of Vipont earls of Westmoreland, are reproduced in the arms of 
Lowther, Musgrave and Cromwell. The fret of Huddleston, 
lords of Millom, is charged differenced in colour upon the shields 
of Fleming, Harrington, Maltravers and Salkeld. The bars of 
Multon of Gilsland are the chief charges in the arms of Mul- 
caster and Denton. The azure lion of Percy was not connected 
with Northumberland till the beginning of the fourteenth cen- 
tury, and though thereafter it becomes the most famous shield 
in the county, it arrived too late to influence Northumbrian 
heraldry. The ' fesse engrele/ or fusils in fess, of their earlier 
shield belonged to Yorkshire, and is reproduced with various 
differences in many of the arms of that county; in this index 
it appears on the shields of Plumpton, Yavasour, Pinckney, 
Ferlington, and probably on the Northumbrian shields of 
Alnham and Wendout. The well known and beautiful Percy 
badge of the silver crescent most likely accounts for the crescents 
of Ogle and Farnacres. 

The study of the armoury of Northumberland brings to our 
remembrance the stormy past of this northern march and 
borderland. From the time of the first Edward to the union of 
the crowns in 1603, its history is one long record of wars and 
forays. 

When the rest of England was enjoying and developing the 
arts of peace, the blasons on the shields, banners and pennons 
of the knights and squires of Northumberland still ' sparkled 
abroad in the plains ' they still ' fought with such weapons as 
they had/ either to defend the land against some inroad of the 
Scots or themselves to carry fire and sword over the border. 

Whilst our Northumbrian armorials thus appeared so con- 
tinuously on the field of battle, the decorative side of armoury 
was not forgotten, as the shields carved upon the gate towers 
and battlements of the castles at Alnwick, Bothal, Chillingham 



INTRODFCTIOX. 95 

and Warkworth testify. Used in this manner they told of their 
owner's honours and dignities, and spoke of his friendships and 
alliances. 

Blasoned in their proper colours they were also used to 
beautify the walls and windows of our halls and churches. Ex- 
amples of the former may still be dimly seen on the walls of the 
great hall in Belsay tower, and of the latter in the windows of 
the churches at Ponteland, Bothal, and St. John's in our own 
city. 

This list of shields brings vividly before us the romantic and 
famous deeds of some of their bearers. The indented chief of 
Grlanville summons to our memory that misty morning of July, 
1174, when Ranulph of Glanville, the great soldier and lawyer, 
and his band of northern knights, amongst them Odinel of 
Umfraville, Bernard of Baliol, William of Estuteville and 
William of Yesci, riding furiously from Newcastle to the relief 
of Alnwick, besieged by the Scots, came unawares upon William 
the Lion, took him prisoner there, and peace reigned on the 
border for many years. The sable cross of Coupland recalls the 
squire of Northumberland, called John Coupland, who took 
David of Scotland prisoner at Neville's Cross and rode off with 
his captive to a castle called 'Orgulus ' (Ogle), swearing that he 
would give him up to no man save only 'the king of England, 
his lord.' 

We should like to have seen the noble armoury on the 
banners and pennons displayed on the walls of Newcastle-upon- 
Tyne at the Lammas tide of 1888, when Harry Hotspur and his 
brother, Ralph Percy, assembled there the feudal array of the 
north, and 'the town was so full of people that they wist not 
where to lodge,' for the Scots were abroad ' burning and exiling ' 
the country so that ' the smoke thereof came to Newcastle/ 
We should like to know the blasonry of Hotspur's pennon, won 
then by Earl Douglas at the barriers of our city and carried off 



96 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

by him towards Scotland ; the cause of the deed that ' was done 
at the Otterburne.' We remember the banners of Hotspur and 
his English knights, impatiently held in check at Homildon 
Hill, while the English archers struck down the chivalry of 
Scotland under Earl Douglas the Tine-man ; and Hotspur had 
a bloody revenge for Otterburn. The crescents and lucies of 
Percy bring to our recollection the pillar on Hedgeley moor and 
the heroic death there of Sir Ralph Percy, who, dying, boasted 
of his loyalty to the Bed Eose, ' I've saved the bird within my 
breast.' But to recall all the battlefields upon which Northum- 
brian arms have been displayed, from Bannockburn to Flodden 
Field, or all the ballads celebrating the heroic deeds of their 
bearers, were too much to attempt. It is hoped that enough has 
been said to make interesting the armorial history of our county, 
and to increase our love for 

.... 'the lordly strand of Northumberland, 
And the goodly towers thereby.' 

NOTE : My thanks are due to Mr. F. W. Bendy and Mr. H. H. E. Craster 
for much useful advice and assistance. The generous interest of the former has 
enabled me to reproduce the four coloured plates of derivative shields. I am 
indebted to the Eev. Wm. Greenwell for permission to use his catalogue of 
seals preserved in the treasury of the Dean and Chapter of Durham; to Mr. 
K. C. Bayley for granting me facilities to inspect and photograph them; to 
Mr. W. Parker Brewis for photographs of the gateways at Alnwick, Bothal 
and Lumley castles. Mr. E. G. Hatton has given me great help in drawing 
the four plates of coloured shields, and I have found the MS. copy of Glover's 
ordinary, belonging to Mr. M. Mackey, most useful. 

ABBREVIATIONS AND EXPLANATIONS. 

Histories of Northumberland and other authorities to which the capital 
letters, immediately following the names in this index, refer: 

W. The Natural History and Antiquities of Northumberland by John 

Wallis, M.A. 

H,N. History of Northumberland, by Rev. John Hodgson, M.A. 
H.H. History of Northumberland, by John Hodgson Hinde. 



ABBREVIATIONS AND EXPLANATIONS. 97 

N.C.H. History of Northumberland (County History Committee). 
R.N.D. History and Antiquities of North Durham, by Rev. Jas. Eaine. 
R.W. History of Newcastle and Gateshead, by Richard Welford, M.A. 
T.N. Testa de Nevill; Hodgson's Northumberland, part in, vol. i; and 

Arch. AeL, 2nd series, vol. xx. 

F.A. Inquisitions and Assessments relating to feudal Aids with other 
analogous documents preserved in the Public Record Office, 
vol. iv, 
A. A. Archaeologia Aeliana. 

V. Heralds' Visitations of Northumberland ; 1575 MS. copy in the 
Library of the Society; 1615, edited by Geo. W. Marshall; 1615 
and 1666, edited by Joseph Foster. 
L.S. List of Sheriffs for England and Wales compiled from documents in 

the Public Record Office, no. ix. 
M.P. Members of Parliament; return ordered to be printed by the House 

of Commons, March 1878. 
T.A. History of the Borough, Castle and Barony of Alnwick, by George 

Tate, F.G.S. 
D.B.R. Extracts from the De Banco Rolls relating to Northumberland, 

Arch. AeL, 3rd series, vol. vi. 
C.D.S. Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland preserved in the Public 

Efcord Office. 
D.S. The Dodsworth Manuscript, copy in possession of County History 

Committee. 

W.M. Knights and men at arms in the retinue of Sir John Cromwell and 
Sir Robert Umfraville, earl of Angus, when wardens of the 
Marches in 1320, Proceedings of Society of Antiquaries of 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 3rd series, vol. iv, p. 21. 
O.B. The Official Baronage of England, by J. E. Doyle. 
H.A. Refer to the heraldic authority which assigns the arms quoted to 
that Northumbrian family but to which I have been unable to find 
any reference in the above authorities. 

Rolls of arms and other authorities to which the capital letters in the 
i o brackets at the end of the paragraphs of this Index refer. 

A. The ' Dering ' roll published in the Reliquary, vol. xvi. 

B. Glover's roll of Henry in, edited by George J. Armytage. 

C. Cotgrave's roll of Edward in, edited by Sir N. H. Nicholas. 

D. Camden's roll of Edward i; The Genealogist, 1879. 

E. St. George's roll of Henry in and Edward i; Archaeologia, vol. xxxix. 

F. Charles's roll of Henry in and Edward i; Archaeologia, vol. xxxix, also 

edited by George J. Armytage, 1869. 

3 8ER. VOL. VI. 7 



98 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

G. Glover's Ordinary, manuscript copy in trick belonging to Mr. M. 

Mackey. 

H. Eoll of the battle of Falkirk ; Reliquary, 1875. 

I. Powell's roll of Edward in; not published. 

K. Poem of the Siege of Caerlaveroclc (1300), edited by Thomas Wright, 

1864. 

L. Eoll of the second Dunstable tournament; Coll. Top. et Gen., vol. iv. 

M. Nativity roll of Edward i; The Reliquary, 1875. 

N. Parliamentary roll of Edward n, edited by Sir N. H. Nicholas, 1828. 

0. Roll of the battle of Boroughbridge ; Genealogist. 

P. Grimaldi's roll of Edward m; Coll. Top. et Gen., vol. n. 

R. Second roll of the siege of Calais ; Notes and Queries (1875). 

S. Eoll of Eichard n, edited by Thomas Willement, 1834. 

T. Military roll of Henry vi; Wai ford's Antiquarian Magazine. 

W. Roll of the siege of Eouen by Henry v; Notes and Queries (1881). 

X. Jenyn's roll ; The Antiquary, 1880. 

Y. Jenyn's Ordinary; Walford's Antiquarian Magazine. 

C.M. The Carr Manuscript, 41 Surtees Society Publications. 

C.T. The Craster Tables; Arch. Ad., 2nd series, vol. xxiv. 

S.D.T. Seal, Durham Treasury. 

E.L. The Elizabethan roll, 41 Surtees Society Publications. 

M.R. Book of arms in trick belonging to Mr. M. Mackey; it appears to be 

a variant of Jenyn's roll. 

N.H. A System of Heraldry, by Alexander Nisbet. 

N.O. Northumbrian roll; The Genealogist, N.S., vols. vn-ix. 

N.R. Northern roll; Arch. Ad., 3rd series, vol. n. 

P.A. Papworth's Ordinary of British Armorials. 

S.B.M. Catalogue of Seals in the British Museum, by W. De Gray Birch. 

S.G. Seals attached to deeds belonging to Rev. Wm. Greenwell. 

S.S. Plates of Seals in Surtees's History of Durham. 

V. Heralds' Visitations of Northumberland. 

V.D. Heralds' Visitations of Durham, edited by Joseph Foster. 

V.Y. Heralds' Visitations of Yorkshire, edited by Joseph Foster, and 36 

Surtees Society Publications. 

XV. A fifteenth century roll of arms; The Ancestor. 

XVI. A sixteenth century roll of arms; Arch. Ad., 3rd series, vol. in. 

The small numerals after names refer to the notes printed after the 
Ordinary. 

The small letters refer to notes at foot of each page. 

Italics indicate that the arms, though probably borne by the family for 
whom they are blasoned, are doubtful, there being no direct evidence for them, 



THE INDEX. 99 



THE INDEX. 

ACLUM, WILL. DE. F.A. 67. Gules a maunch and an orle of cinquefoils silver 

[G.] 
ACTON! ( O f Newcastle). N.R.H.A. Gules a fess ermine in chief a label of three 

points. [N.E.] 
ACTON, LAWRENCE. E.W. i, 292. 1. Silver a saltire gules on a chief sable 

three bezants. [C.M.] 2. Silver a lion rampant within a border 

engrailed sable. [N.E.] 
ACTON, WILLIAM. N.C.H. vn, 368. Device a cross within a circle between 

four lions rampant. [S.D.T. a ] 
ACTON, RICHARD. N.C.H. vn, 368 powdered with acorns .... a lion 

rampant. . . . [S.D.T. b ] 

ACRES. G.H.A. Silver a fess between six fleurs-de-lis sable. [G.] 
ADDERSTONE. N.C.H. i, 221. Azure three martlets and a border engrailed 

silver. [M.R.] 
ADDISON. V. 1666. Sable a chevron silver between three eagles displayed 

gold. [Y. 1066.] 
ALDEBURGH. W.M. Azure a fess silver between three crosses crosslet gold 

[G.] 

ALDERS. F.A. 89. Azure on a bend silver three billets azure. [V. 1615.] 
ALLGOOD. N.C.H. in, 300. Silver a cross engrailed gules between four molets 

azure, on a chief gold three roses gules. [N.O.] 
ALNHAM. N.C.H. i, 88. Azure a fess indented of five fusils gold a baston 

gules. [Y.] 
ALNWICK. G.H.A. Paly azure and gold on a chief gules three crosses patty 

gold. [G.] 

ALNWICKS. T.A. i, 274. Silver a mill-rind cross sable. [T.A. i, 394.] 
ALTON, SIR JOHN DE. W.M. Gules a cross flory silver. [G.] 
AMUNDEVILLE*. H.N. in, iii, xvm. (Silver) two bars (gules) and in chief 

three molets (sable). [S.D.T. ]. 
ANDERSONS. V. 1615. Quarterly : I and 4, gules three oaks trees silver with 

gold acorns ; 2 and 3, gold on a chevron gules between three birds' 

heads rased sable three acorns slipped silver, on a canton sable three 

martlets silver. [C.M.] 
ANDERSON. V. 1615. Vert three bucks lodged silver with gold horns. 

[V. 1615.] 
ANDERTON. N.C.H. in, 64. Sable three shacklebolts silver. [G.] 

a Misc. Charters, 4760, A.D. 1334. (PI. VTII, no. 4.) 

b 1-1 Spec. no. 116, A.D. 1334. (PI. XT, no. 4.) 

c 1-16 Spec. no. 54 : s, RADVLFI - p . MVNDEVIL. (PI. ix, no. 8.) 



100 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND : 

ANO.BTOK. M.P. 1322 ..... on a ehevron .... three .... (undecipher- 

Al , GM ;^ S?1. n, i, 324. Quarterly : 1 and 4 to. Hens 



. , , . 

ranl pant ____ , 2 and 3 (silver) a fess dancetty (vert). [D.S.] 
AP GEIFFZTH EHES. H.N. n, i, 316. Gules on a fess dancetty silver between 

six lions gold three martlets sable. [S.] 
APPEBLEY. H.N. in, i, 214. Silver a chevron between three pine apples gules. 

APPLEBY, S'IR 'EDMUND. W.M. Azure fourteen martlets gold. [I.] 
ARCHBOLD. N.C.H. vn, 373. Silver a lion between six fleurs-de-lis sable. 

[Alnwick church.] 

ARCHER^ H.H. 303. Silver three arrow heads gules. [GL] 
ARGYLE, ALAN or. C.D.S. m, 647 ..... a lymphad ---- within a border 

wavy . . charged with garbs. [S. iUd.~\ 
ARMORER^ N.C.H. i, 390. Gules a chevron between three arms in armour 

silver. [V.1615.] 
ARUNDEL, EARL or. F.A. 63. Quarterly: 1 and 4, gules a lion gold, Fitz 

Alan; 2 and 3, cheeky gold and azure, Warenne. [O.B.] 
ARUNDELL. N.C.H. n, 243. Sable six ' hirondelles ' (swallows) silver. [G.] 
ASHENDON, JOHN DE.7 C.T.H.A. Silver a lion rampant gules. [C.T.] 
ASLAKELY. H.N. in, iii. Azure a fess between three martlets silver. [G.] 
ASKE, CONAN DE. F.A. 81. Gold three bars azure. [P.] 
ASK, RICHARD DE. N.C.H. m, 64. Gold three bars azure. [G. e ] 
ASKEW. P.A.H.A. Sable a fess gold between three asses passant silver, manes 

and hoofs gold. [P-A.] 
ASTELL. V. 1666. Gules a leopard within an orle of crosses crosslet gold. 

[V. 1666.] 

ASTON. G.H.A. Sable a saltire silver. [G.] 
ATHOL, SIR AYMERT^. H.N. n, ii, 43. Paly gold and sable on the centre 

pale, for difference, a leopard gold. [V. 1575.] 
ATKINSON. E.W. n, 515. Gules on a chief daneetty silver three molets sable, 

a gold crescent for difference. [C.M.] 

ATTEWELD. H.N. in, iii, 336. Silver three leopards' faces azure. [G.] 
ATON.S T.A. i, 406. 1. Gules a cross patonce silver, [N.] 2. Sable a cross 

gold. [O.] 

AUDRE. T.N ..... a chalice .... [S.D.T. f ] 
AVENAL. T.N. Silver a fess between six rings gules. [G.] 

d Misc. Charters, no. 6882. (PI. xi, no. 3. ) 

e Also S.D.T. 4-9 Spec. nos. 5 and 6 : SIGILLVM . RICARDI . DE . ASKE. 

f Engraved in R.N.D. p. 130, App. S.D.T. 3-1 Spec. no. 62. (PI. ix, no. 4.) 

The device of three cups is on a seal belonging to Rev. Wm. Greenwell. 

(PI. vin, no. 3.) 



Arch. Ad 3 Ser. Vol. VI. 



Plate 2. 



Northumbrian Derivative Shields, 

BALIOL SERIES. 



Plate I 




JUliol 



Bertram ot Jttitforb. 



Bertram ot Jtothal. 




THE INDEX. 



101 



AYNESLEYQ. H.N. 11, i, 293. Gules on a bend silver three molets azure, a 
cinquefoil gold for difference. [V. 1615.] 

BABINGTON. F.A. 56. Silver ten roundels gules. [N.] 

BABTHOBPE. N.C.H. n, 202. Sable a chevron gold between three crescents 

ermine. [G.] 
BACON. N.C.H. vi, 235. Silver a boar azure, on a chief gold two molets 

azure. [N.O.] 

BALIOL.IO. N.C.H. vi, 72. Gules an orle silver. [B.] 

BAMBUBGH. N.C.H. v, 386. Silver on a chief sable a lion passant silver. [G.] 
BANKES, JOHN. M.P. (1625). Sable a cross gold between four fleurs-de-lis 

silver. [G.] 

BARET. H.N. n, ii, 372. Silver a fess between three molets sable. [V. 1666.] 
BARKER. R.W. n, 450. Sable a bat displayed silver on a chief gules three 

cinquefoils gold., a molet for difference. [C.M.] 
BARDULF, HUGH. L.S. (1198). Azure three cinquefoils gold. [B.] 
BAHROWE. H.N. in, ii, 213. Yair four bars gules on a canton .... six 

bezants. [C.T.] 

BARTON. D.B.E. (1356). Silver a bend wavy sable. [S.] 
BARTRAM. R.W. i, 292. Gold an orle azure, a crescent sable for difference. 

[C.M.] 

BASSET.H F.A. 60. Gold three piles gules, a border azure bezanty. [G.] 
B ASSET, l la N.C.H. ix, 319. (Silver) two bars (azure) in chief three chaplets 

(gules). [S.G.] 

BATAILL. T.N. Gules a griffin gold. [G.] 
BATES. V. 1666. Sable a fess engrailed between three dexter hands bendways 

silver. [V. 1666.] 
BAXTER. V. 1666. Silver on a bend azure three stars gold over all a baston 

sinister gules. [V. 1666.] 

BAXTER.12 A.A. xix, 230. Vert three sitting squirrels silver. [G.] 
BAXTER. P.A.H.A. Gules on a bend silver four eagles displayed vert. [P.A.] 
BKADNELL.13. A.A. xiv, 19. Azure three bougets sable. [C.T.] 
BEAL. R.N.D. 203. Silver three bees sable. [E.L.] 
BEAUMONT.I* F.A. 79. Azure floretty and a lion rampant gold, over all a 

baston gobony silver and gules. [M.] 
BBAUMOND. Ancestor, v, 177. Azure a fess silver between three leopards' 

faces gold. [XV.] 

BECHE, DE LA. N.C.H. i, 272. Vair silver and gules. [G.] 
BECKWITH. D.B.R. (1373). Silver a chevron between three hinds' heads 

gules. [G.] 
BEDFORD, JOHN, DUKE or. A.A., xiv, 15. Quarterly France (modern) and 

England, a label of five points, the two dexter of Brittany, the three 

sinister of France. [O.B.] 
BEE. R.W. i, 313. Silver three bees and in chief a crescent sable. [C.M.] 



102 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND! 

BEK, ANTONY. T.A.n,411. Gules a mill-rind cross ermine. [K.] 
BEKERING. F.A. 59. Cheeky silver and gules a bend azure. [JN J 
BELL H.N. n, ii, 290. Gules on a chief silver three bells sable [G.] 
BELGRAVE. V. 1615. Gules a chevron ermine between three voided lozenges 

. ii, 112. Silver a chevron gules between three fleurs-de-lis 



azure. [Gr.] 

BELLINGHAM.IS F.A. 73. Silver three bugle horns sable. [G.] 
BELTON, DE. H.H. 303. Silver on a bend sable three bells gold. [G.J 
BENLEY' D.B.R. Silver a fess between three garbs sable. [G.] 
BENNETT. V. 1666. Azure on a fess gold, between three denii lions silver, 

a cannon sable, between two roundels sable. [Grant. 8] 
BENTON. H.H. 303. Silver three salt-ires engrailed sable. [G.] 
BERKELEY, MAURICE DE. C.D.S. m, 444. Gules crusilly paty and a chevron 

silver, a label of three points azure. [K.] 
BERRY, RICH. DE. F.A. 53. Silver a cross between four martlets within a 

border sable. [G.] 

BERTRAM OF BOTHAL. T.N. Gold an orle azure. [N.] 
BERTRAM OF MITFORD. T.N. Gules crusilly and an orle gold. [B.] 
BEVERLAY. M.P. (1402). Silver a chevron sable on a chief sable three bulls' 

heads silver. [V.Y.] 
BEWICK. V. 1666. Silver on a fess indented of five fusils gules, between three 

bears' heads rased sable, five molets silver. [V. 1666.] 
BICKERTON. N.C.H. vii, 100. Silver on a chevron sable three pheons silver. 

[G.] 

BIGOD. H.N. in, iii, 58. Gold on a cross gules five escallops silver. [E.] 
BIGGE. P.A.H.A. Silver on a fess engrailed between three martlets sable 

three rings gold. [P. A.] 

BILTON. T.N. Silver a chevron between three billets sable [N.O.] 
BINCHESTER. H.N. iii, ii, 300. G ules a chief embattled silver. [G.] 
BINGFIELD. N.C.H. iv, 223. Silver a chevron between three martlets azure. 

[N.O.] 
BIRD. R.W. i, 325. Silver three demi birds azure rising from wreaths gold 

and gules a crescent sable for difference. [C.M.] 

BIRTLEY. S.D.T.H.A ..... a tree erased over all a fess. . . . [S.D.T.sl] 
BISHOPDALE. R.W.i, 198. Bendy gold and gules. [M.R.] 
BLACKBORROW. H.H. 394. Gold a lion sable armed gules. [N.O.] 
BLACKETT. H.N. n, i, 258. Silver on a chevron between three molets sable, 

three escallops silver. [C.M.] 

* See Herald and Genealogist, iv, 95 ; and shield in St. Nicholas's cathedral. 
8' Misc. Charters, 6577, A.D. 1319 : s. JOHIS DE BYBTELEY. Misc. Charters, 
no. 91, A.D. 1362, has no fess. 



Arch. Ael, 3 ser., VI. 



Plate III. 




THE GATEWAY OF BOTHAL CASTLE (See note, page 178). 



From a Photograph by Mr. W. Parker Brewis, F.S.A. 



THE INDEX. 103 

BLAKE. B.N.D. 316. Silver a chevron between three sheaves sable on a 

canton azure a fret gold. [P. A.] 
BLAKEBUBNE. W.M. Paly silver and azure. [E.] 
BLAKISTON. E.W. i, 350. Silver two bars and in chief three cocks gules. 

[G.] 

BLENKINSOPP.IS W. n, 7. Silver a fess between three sheaves sable. [G.] 
BLUNT. E.W. n, 251. Barry wavy sable and gold. [G.] 
BLUNVILLE. L.S. (1208). Quarterly indented, per fess, gold and azure, a 

bend gules. [G.] 
BOLBEC. T.N. Vert a lion rampant ermine. [B.] 

BOLLESDON. K.N.D. App. 136 six lozenges. . . . [Seal ibid.'] 

BOLINGBBOKE, SIB J. C.D.S. in, 992. Azure a fess silver between three lions 

gold. [G.] 

BoLTBY.i? W. n, 39. Silver on a fess sable three sheaves gold. [P.A.] 
BOLTSHAM. P.A. 9 H.A. Gules three birds bolts silver. [P. A.] 
BONKLLLE, ALEX DE. C.D.S. in, 685 three buckles .... [S. ibid, n, 

540.] 

BOOTH. M.P. (1411). Silver three boars' heads erect rased sable. [V.D.] 
BOBDOTJN, SIB J. C.D.S. 11, 1107. Gules three ' burdens ' pileways silver. 

[N.] 

BosouDON.18 F.A. 71. Silver three cinquefoils sable. [N.] 
BOBOUDON, SIB GILBEBT. H.N. 11, i, 6. Gules on a bend silver three cinque- 
foils sable. [N.] 

BOSVILE. W.M. Silver a fess indented of five fusils gules. [X.] 
BOTECOMB. H.H. 303. Sable three escallops in pale silver. [G.] 
BOTELAND. N.C.H. iv, 364. Gules two bars ermine. [G.] 
BOTILEB, LE. D.B.R. (1329). Gules crusilly silver a fess cheeky silver and 

sable. [L.] 

BOULTON. W.M. Silver on a bend sable three eagles gold. [Segar.] 
BOULTON. S.S. (Silver) on a chevron (gules) three leopards (silver). [S.S. xi, 

26.] 

BouTFLowEB.i9 A. A. xxni, 269. Vert a chevron and in chief three fleurs-de- 
lis gold. [N.C.H. vi, 167.] 

BOWES. 20 H.N. n, i, 78. Ermine three longbows paleways gules. [S.] 
BOWES. V.D. 40. Ermine three longbows paleways sable, in chief three 

roundels gules, on an escucheon ermine two bars vert. [V.D.] 
BOWET. N.C.H. in, 64. Silver three reindeers' heads cabossed sable. [X.] 
BOWTH. Ancestor iv, 243. Silver crusilly fitchy and three horseshoes sable. 

[XV.] 

BOYNTON. H.N. in, iii, 262. Gold a fess between three crescents gules. [S.] 
BOYVILLE, WM. DE. C.D.S. n, 15. Quarterly gold and sable a lion passant 

gules in the quarter. [E.] 
BRABANT. H.H. 394. Gules on a fess gold three lions' heads azure. [N.O.] 



104 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND : 

BRACKENBURY. D.B.E. (1309). Silver three chevrons braced sable. [G.] 
BRADFORD. 21 F.A. 68. Silver on a bend gules three martlets silver. [G.] 
BRANDLING. W. n, 268. Gules a cross flory silver, an escallop silver in the 

quarter. [G.] 
BRANKSTON. R.N.D., App. 138. Device, a pair of ' branks ' between a crescent 

and a star. [S. ibid.'] 

BRAY. L.S. (1528). Gules three bends vair. [G.] 

BRANDON. A.A. xix, 230. ... on a bend . . . three, . . . [Seal, ibid.'] 
BREWERE. L.S. (1223). Barry wavy gules and silver. [G.] 
BRIDGES. R.W. n, 435. Silver on a cross sable a leopard's head gold. [G.] 
BRIGHAM. E.W. i, 388. Silver a saltire engrailed vert. [G.] 
BRITTANY, JOHN, EARL or. N.C.H. vi, 71. Cheeky gold and azure, a canton 

ermine and a border gules. [O.B.] 

BROMWYCH. H.N. in, i, 86. Gold a lion rampant sable. [G.] 
BROWN. R.W. i, 295. Gules a chevron between three lion's paws rased silver 

within a border silver, over all on a chief silver an eagle displayed 

sable, a molet sable for difference on the chevron. [C.M.] 
BROWNE. M.P. (1586). Sable three martlets gold between two flaunches silver 

each charged with a lion passant sable. [G.] 
BRUCE. A.A. 3rd ser. i, 115. Gold a saltire and a chief gules. [B.] 

BRUNTOFT. H.N. in, i, 221 a lion rampant. . . . [S.S. xi, 33.] 

BULMER. N.C.H. v, 351. Gules billety and a lion rampant gold. [N.] 
BUCKTON. G.H.A. Silver a buck leaping sable. [G.] 
BURCHESTER. F.A. 82. Silver three lions' heads rased sable. [G.] 
BURDON. A.A. 3rd ser. i, 119. Azure three hautboys and three crosses 

crosslet gold. [G.] 

BURGH. H.N. n, ii, 44. Azure three fleurs-de-lis ermine. [G.] 
BURGHDON, SIR GILBERT. C.D.S. in, 151. (Silver) three cinquefoils and a 

border engrailed (sable). [Seal ibid.~] 
BURNETT. V. 1575. Gold in chief three ' burnet ' leaves vert in base a bugle 

horn sable stringed vert. [V. 1575.] 
BURNTON, THOS. R.W. i, 108 a chevron .... between three griffins 

[S.G.] 

BuRRELL.22 A.A. xiv, 34. Silver a saltire gules between three leaves, on a 

chief azure three battle axes gold. [V. 1575.] 
BUSTON. N.C.H. v, 215. Azure a lion rampant ' rcnuardant ' aold armed oules. 

[N.O.] 
BUTELER. V. 1666. Azure on a chevron between three covered cups gold, 

three crescents gules. [V. 1666.] 
BUTETORT. D.B.R. (1315). Ermine a saltire engrailed gules, a label vert. 

[N.] 
BUTEVILLAIN. G.H.A. Silver a fess between three crescents gules. [G.] 



THE INDEX. 105 

BYWELL. M.P. (1336). Device, an anchor. [S.D.T. h ] 

BUZBY. K.W. i, 380. Silver a saltire couped gules, a ring gules for differ- 
ence. [C.M.] 

CAMBO. H.N. n, ii, 5 on a cross .... four crosses crosslet .... in 

the dexter chief a crescent ... in the sinister a molet. . . [S.D.T. 1 ] 
CAMERA (CHAMBRE). H.N. in, i, 55. Silver on a chief indented gules a lion 

passant gold. [G.] 

CAMVILLE. E-.W. Gosforth. Azure three lions passant silver. [N.] 
CARBONEL. T.N. Gules a cross silver, a border engrailed gold. [S.] 
CAREY. R.N.D. 30. Silver on a bend sable three roses silver. [G.] 
CARLIOL. R.W. i, 331. Silver on a cross sable a molet silver. [C.M.] 
CARLILE, SIR WILL. G.H.A. Gold a cross patonce, a rose gules in the quarter. 

[G.] 

CARLILE. G.H.A. Gold a cross patonce gules. [G.] 

CARLILE. P.A.H.A. Silver a cross between four lions rampant gules. [P. A.] 
CARNABY.23 F.A. 84. Silver two bars and in chief three roundels azure. [X.] 
CARR.24 W. ii, 473. Gules on a chevron silver three stars sable. [E.L.] 
('ARR.25 R.W. i, 325. Silver on a bend sable between three Cornish choughs, 

three lions' heads rased silver. [V. 1575.] 
CARREU. H.N. in, ii, 326. Gold three lions passant sable. [K.] 

CARROWE. D.B.R. (1373) a cross moline. . . . [S.D.TVl] 

CARTiNGTON.26 F.A. 70. Gules a fess between three wheels silver. [G.] * 
CASTRE. N.C.H. ix, 249. Azure an eagle displayed barry silver and gules. [X.] 
CASTLE. R.W.. i, 301. Per fess indented sable and gold, in chief a castle gold, 

a crescent gules for difference. [C.M.] 

CAux.27 T.N. -Sable a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis silver. [R.N.D. 225.] 
CAVENDISH (EARL or OGLE AND DUKE OF NEWCASTLE). H.N. ii, i, 386. Sable 

three bucks' heads cabossed silver. [O.B.] 
CAUNTON, JOHN DE. L.S. (1311). Gules two bars silver and in chief two molets 

silver. [N.] 

CERP. F.A. 83. Vert a stag passant silver and a chief gold. [V.Y.] 
CHAMBERS. R.W. i, 303. Gules a chevron between three cinquefoils gold. 

[G.] 
CHAMBERS. P. A. 516 H.A. Gules on a chevron between three cinquefoils gold, 

three cranes azure. [P.A.] 

CHAPMAN. R.W. in, 1. Per chevron silver and gules, a crescent counter- 
coloured. [E.L.] 
CnARLTON.28 W. ii, 57. Gold a lion rampant gules. [C.T.] 

h Misc. Charters, 5360, A.D. 1340. 

j Misc. Charters, 6911 : s WILLI DE CAMBOV. (PI. x, no. 13.) 

11 Misc. Charters, 458. 



106 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND : 

CHABRON. H.N. n, ii, 260. Gules a chevron between three escallops silver. 

[N.] 

CHARTRES. C.D.S. n, 175. Ermine a fess gules. [P.A.] 
CHARTNEY. H.N. in, i, 168. Per chevron gules and silver three crosses crosslet 

countercoloured. [G.] 
CHATER. R.W. n, 46. Per bend dancetty azure and silver three pierced 

cinquefoils countercoloured. [C.M.] 

CHAUNCY. P.A.H.A. Gold a chevron engrailed gules. [P.A.] 
CHESWICK. T.N. Gules a bend wavy silver. [N.E.] 
CHIRDON. R.W. i, 293. Ermine two bars gules over all a cross crosslet gold. 

[C.M.] 
CHOMELEY, RICHARD. L.S. (1494). Gules two helmets silver in chief, a sheaf 

gold in base, between the helmets a fleur-de-lis within a crescent 

ermine. [XVI.] 
CLARENCE, GEORGE, DUKE OF. H.N. m, ii, 385. Quarterly France, modern, 

and England, a label silver each point charged with a canton gules. 

[O.B.] 
CLAPHAM, CHRISTOPHER. L.S. (1513). Silver on a bend azure six fleurs-de-lis 

gold (2, 2 and 2). [G.] 
CLARKE. R.W. i, 301. Silver on a bend gules, between two swans, three 

roundels silver. [C.M.] 

CLAVERiNG.29 N.C.H. v, 29. Quarterly gold and gules a baston sable. [K.] 
CLJVERING, SIR JOHN. N.C.H. v, 29. Quarterly gold and gules a baston sable 

and a label vert. [N.] 

CLAXTON.SO F.A. 84. Gules a fess between three hedgehogs silver. [G.] 
CLENNELL.SI F.A. 71. Gold three voided cinquefoils sable. [N.R.] 
CLOVELL. E.L.H.A. Gules a chief silver. [E.L.] 
CLIFFORD, RICHARD DE. S.S.H.A. (Silver) a fess between three eagles displayed 

(gules). [S.S. x, 25.] 
CLIFFORD (Ellingham).32 N.C.H. n, 229. Silver three eagles displayed gules. 

[S.D.T.*] 
CLIFFORD (Jesmond). H.N. n, iii, 27. Cheeky gold and azure a fess gules. 

PL] 

CLITHEROE. R.W. i, 235. Gules three covered cups gold, within a border en- 
grailed gold. [G.] 
COCK. R.W. in, 269. Azure a roundel silver between three cocks silver, 

wattled gules armed sable. [C.M.] 

COKFELD. W.M. Silver a saltire engrailed sable a label gules. [0.] 
COLE. R.W. in, 262. Silver a chevron engrailed between three scorpions 
sable, on a chief azure three fleurs-de-lis gold. [C.M.] 

k Misc. Charters, 5165, and 4-2 Spec. no. 24. 



THE INDEX. 107 

COLLINGBOURNE. G.H.A. Quarterly gold and azure, a cross patty counter- 
coloured. [G.} 

COLLINGWOOD. N.R.H.A. Silver three stags' heads cabossed gules. [N.E.] 
COLLINGWOOD (Eslington).33 W. n, 500. Silver a chevron between three stags' 

heads rased sable. [V. 1666.] 
COLLINGWOOD (Great Ryle). W. n, 508. Silver on a chevron, between three 

stags' heads rased sable, three cinquefoils gold. [V. 1666.] 
COLLINGWOOD (Bolton). Y. 1575. Gules three stags' heads couped silver with 

gold horns. [V. 1575.] 

COLLINGWOOD. 34 G.H.A. Silver three chevrons sable on each five bezants. [G.] 
COLONIA. R.W. i, 27 a chevron .... between three trefoils .... 

[S.D.T. 1 ] 
CoLViLLE.35 N.C.H. i, 181. Gold a fess gules in chief three roundels gules. 

[N.] 
COLVILLE. R.N.D. 218. (Gold) a fess between three mill-rind crosses (gules). 

[S.D.T.m] 
COLVILE. G.H.A. Silver three chevrons sable each charged with five bezants. 

[G.] 

COLWELL. N.C.H. iv, 292. Silver three crosses paty gules. [P. A.] 
CoMYN.36 H.N. m, i, 48. Gules three sheaves gold. [E. m l] 
CONSTABLE. H.N. in, ii, 247. Barry gold and azure. [Y.] 
CONYERS, LORD. 37 N.C.H. i, 380. Azure a maurich gold, a ring sable for 

difference. [S.] 

CONYERS, ROGER DE. R.N.D. 362. Azure a maunch ermine. [I.] 
COOKE. R.W. n, 358. Silver three bends sable, in chief a crescent sable for 

difference. [C.M.] 

CoRBET.38 H.N. n, ii, 112. Gold three ' corbies.' [E.] 
CoRBRiDGE.39 R.W. i, 122 a stag's head .... between the horns a 

cross. [S.D.T. n ] 

CoRNHiLL.40 T.N. Device, a sheaf of corn. [S.D.T.] 
CosiNS.41 W. n, 252. Ermine a chevron engrailed (sable). [N.O.] 
COTTIM, RALPH DE. H.N. ii, ii, 36. Barry silver and azure in chief three 

buckles gules. [F.] 

CoupLAND.4ia A.A. xxv, 173. Silver on a cross sable a molet silver. [S.] 
COUCY, EARL or BEDFORD. H.N. in, ii, 377. Barry vair and gules. [O.B.] 

1 2-15 Spec. no. 18, A.D. 1369 : >f SIGILLV : JACOBI : DE : COLONIA. (PI. xi, 

no. 7.) 

m 4-1 Spec. no. 16, A.D. 1243 ; see also R.N.D. App. 133. 
1 4-1 Sacr. no. 15 : { s' DOMI .... is CVMIN. (PI. ix, no. 10.) 
1 Misc. Charters, 245 : JOHANNIS DE CORBEIG. 
1 3-1 Spec. no. 69 : { s' WILEY DE CORNHALE. 



108 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

COULSON. A.A. 3rd ser., i, 72. Silver on a bend gules three fleurs-de-lis silver. 

rc* TVT ~i 

COVENTRY. H.N. n, i, 284. Sable a fess between three crescents silver. [X.] 
CBAMLINGTON. W. 11, 270. Barry silver and azure in chief three rings azure. 

[G.] 
CBAMMEVILE. H.N". n, i, 370. Gules an inescucheon and a border moletty 

silver. [O.] 
CBASTEB. N.C.H. n, 177. Quarterly gold and gules, a ' craw ' in the quarter. 

[X.] 
CBAWDEN. H.N. n, i, 252. Gold a bend between two cotises sable and three 

boars' heads, a border gules. [P. A.] 
CBEPPINGE, JOHN DE. L.S. (1304). Gules billety gold and a lion rampant 

silver. [N.] 
CRESSWELL.42 F.A. 84. Silver on a bend sable three bulls' heads cabossed 

silver. [XVI.] 
CBESSWELL. F.A. 84. Gules three roundels silver each charged with a squirrel 

gules, sitting and cracking a nut. [G.] 
CBEYK, WALTER DE. M.P. 1335. Silver a bend azure between two cotises wavy. 

[L.] 

CROMWELL, JOHN. 43 H.N. 11, i, 356. Gules six rings gold. [N.] 
CROMWELL, EALPH. W.M. Silver a chief azure over all a baston gules. [E.] 
CUTHBERT. R.W. n, 336. Silver a covered cup gules within an orle of eight 

roundels gules. [C.M.] 

DACRE. H.N. n, ii, 373. Gules three escallops silver. [N.] 

DACRE OF THE SOUTH (Fiennes). N.C.H. iv, 400. Azure three lions rampant 

gold. [G.] 
DALDEN.44. F.A. 75. Silver a tross patonce gules between four martlets vert. 

EX.] 
DALTON.44a F.A. 64, M.P. 1413. Silver three lozenges gules each charged with 

a saltire silver. [G.] 

DARCY.45 F.A. 61. Azure crusilly and three cinquefoils silver. [N.] 
DABBEYNs.46 N.C.H. vi, 187. Silver on an orle gules eight escallops gold. 

P-] 

DAUBYN. F.A. 72. Gules a fess indented of five fusils silver. [X.] 
DAVELL. K.W. n, 407. Gold two bars sable. [C.M.] 
DAVISON. R.W. in, 190. Gold a fess wavy between six cinquefoils gules. 

[C.M.] 
DELAVAL, SIB HUGH. N.C.H. ix, 206. Ermine two bars .... over all a bend 

. . , . [S.D.T.] 
DELAVAL, ROBERT. N.C.H. ix, 165. Barry ermine and .... over all a bend 

. . . . [S. i&tW.o'] 

01 Misc. Charters, 1469, A.D. 1287 : * SIGILLVM SECBETI. 



THE INDEX. 



109 



DELAVAL. T.N. Ermine two bars vert. [X.] 

DELAVAL. G.H.A. Ermine three lozenges azure. [GT.] 

DENNY, EDMUND DE. M.P. 1346. Gules crusilly gold and a saltire silver. [G.] 

DENUM.47 H.N. n, ii, 15 a fess between three ' mells . . . . 

[S.D.T.P] 

DENT. V. 1575. Silver on a bend sable three lozenges ermine. [V. 1575.] 
DENT. R.W. n, 29. Sable three lozenges ermine. [C.M.] 
DENTON.48 H.N. in, ii, 369. Silver two bars gules in chief three cinquefoils 

gules. [G.] 

DEVILSTONE. T.N. Silver on a fess sable three sheaves gold. [G.] 
DiCHEND.49. F.A. 64. Ermine two bars gemell and a chief gules. [X.] 
DIXON. R.W. n, 304. Silver a roundel between three ' D's ' sable. [C.M.] 
DOBSON. V. 1666. Silver a fess nebuly gules between six fleurs-de-lis sable. 

[V. 1666.] 
DODSWORTH. N.C.H. v, 403. Silver on a chevron, between three bugle horns 

sable, three bezants. [V.Y.] 

DOLPHANBY. H.N. ii, ii, 82. Vert three dolphins paleways silver. [G.] 
DONCASTEB. N.C.H. in, 64. Gules a castle silver. [G.] 
DONINGTON. N.C.H. in, 64. Paly silver and azure on a chief gules three 

bezants. [G.] 
DOWNING, SIB GEORGE. M.P. 1660. Barry of ten silver and vert over all a 

griffin gold. [P. A.] 
DOXFORD. F.A. 59 and 76. Silver on a bend sable three quatrefoils silver. 

[N.R.] 
DORSET, MABQUIS OF (GBEY). H.N. m, ii, 171. Barry silver and azure in chief 

three roundels gules. [O.B.] 
DOUGLAS, WILL. DE. C.D.S. ii, 265. (Azure) three stars (silver) in chief. 

[S. ibid. 237.] 
DBAPEB.SO R.W. m, 187. Azure a chevron ermine between three pierced 

molets gold. [V. 1575.] 
DBEUX, EABL or RICHMOND. H.N. ii, ii, 180. Cheeky gold and azure, an 

ermine quarter and a border gules. [C.] 
DBUMMOND, JOHN oE.soa C.D.S. ii, 416. Gold three bars wavy gules. [N.H. 

i, 61.] 
DUDLEY (DUKE OF NOETHUMBEBLAND).SI O.B. n, 658. Gold a forked tailed 

lion rampant vert, a crescent for difference. [O.B.] 
DURESME. W.M. Silver on a cross gules five fleurs-de-lis gold. [N.] 
DuBHAM.52 A.A. 2nd ser. i, 30. ... a fess . . . between two crescents in chief 

. . . and in base a pierced molet .... [Seal Ibid.'] 
DURHAM. G.H.A. Azure crusilly and three crescents silver. [G.] 

P Misc. Charters, 4748, 4749 and 6364 ; Misc. Charters, 3475, 3498 omit the 
fess ; see also S.S., pi. u, no. 32. 



HO THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

EDEN. E.L.H.A. Gules on a fess silver, between three sheaves gold, three 

escallops sable. [E.L.] 

EDLiNGHAM.53 N.C.H. vn, 101. ... a lion rampant .... [S.G.4] 
EDON. B.W. m, 40. Azure three helmets gold, in chief a crescent silver. 

[C.M.] 
EGLINQHAM. G.H.A. Gold a molet gules on a chief indented gules two molets 

gold. [G.] 
EGLISTON. D.B.R. (1352). Silver a cross sable, a fleur-de-lis gules in the quarter 

[G.] 

ELAND.54 F.A. 57. Gules three demi leopards gold. [V. 1615.] 
ELAND. 55 G.H.A. Vert a stag's head cabossed silver, between the horns a 

cross paty silver. [G.] 
ELLEBKEB, SIB WILLIAM. L.S. 1522. Silver a fess between three bougets gules. 

[G.] 
ELLINGTON. N.C.H. n, 227. Gold six rings sable, on a chief silver three 

molets sable. [G.] 
ELLISON. E.W. n, 215. Gules a chevron silver between three eagles' heads 

rased gold, a crescent sable for difference. V. 1666. 
ELLiNGHAM.55a G.H.A. Silver a fess gules between three eagles displayed 

sable. [G.] 
ELMHAM. N.C.H. in, 64. Silver a fess gules between three eagles displayed 

sable. [G.] 

ELMEDON. M.P. 1427. Silver on a bend sable three crescents silver. [G.] 
ELRINGTON. N.C.H. vi, 210. Sable three bougets silver. [E.L.] 
ELWICK. F.A. 87 a water fowl .... and in sinister chief two crosses 

.... [S.D.T. r ] 

ENGLEYS, SIB JOHN. G.H.A. Sable three lions rampant silver. [G.] 
EBBINGTON (Beaufont).56 N.C.H. iv, 183. Silver two bars and in chief three 

escallops azure. [X.] 
EBBINGTON (Houghton). V. 1575. Barry silver and gules in chief three cin- 

quefoils sable, a molet for difference. [V. 1575.] 
EBBINGTON (Bingfield). N.C.H. iv, 227. Barry silver and gules on a chief 

azure three bezants. [XVI.] 
ESHET. F.A. 73 a cross .... between four (undecipherable). . . . 

[S.D.T.a] 
ESHET. F.A. 73. Barry of six gold and gules in chief three cinquefoils azure. 

[N.O.] 
ESLINGTON. H.N. m, i, 44. Silver two bars and in chief three molets azure 

[N.E.] 

i Deed in possession of Rev. Wm. Green well. 

r Misc. Charters, 3441, A.D. 1335 ; see also R.N.I). 262. 

8 1-10 Spec. no. 37, A.D. 1356. 



THE INDEX. 



Ill 



ESPEC, WALTER. H.H. 223. Gules three roses silver. [Dugdale's MS., 39 fo., 

136 B.] 
ESSENDON. H.N. in, i, 164. Gules on a cross silver five crosses crosslet gules. 

[V. 1615.] 
ESSINDON, JOHN DE. D.S. 45 on a bend .... three cinquefoils. . . . 

[Seal ibid.] 

ESSINGTON. E.W. i, 429. Gules a ring between three 'S's ' gold. [C.M.] 
ETHERSTONE. N.C.H. i, 221. Silver on a bend cotised sable three martlets 

gold. [V. 1615.] 
EuRE.57 F.A. 80. Quarterly gold and gules on a bend sable three escallops 

silver. [F.] 

FANNEL. G.H.A. Silver a bend gules within a border sable. [G.] 

FARNACRES. H.N. m, ii, 349 three crescents. . . . [S.D.T.*] 

FARNELAW.57a Swin. Chart., D.S. 45 three sprigs of a tree. . . . [Seal 

ibid.] 
FARNEBT. E.W. in, 48. Paly silver and gules on a fess sable three rings gold. 

[C.M.] 

FARENDON. T.N. Gules three cinquefoils gold. [S.] 
FAUSsiDE.57b C.D.S. n, 415. Gules a fess gold between three bezants. [N.H. 

n, 218.] 
FAWDON. N.C.H. v, 329. ... a pair of shears . . . within a border engrailed 

.... [S.D.T.u] 
FEATHERSTONEHAUGH.57C w. ii, 16. Gules a chevron between three feathers 

silver. [C.T.] 
FELTON.SS N.C.H. vii, 121. Gules two lions passant silver within a double 

tressure flory counterflory gold. [S.] 
FENCOTES. N.C.H. in, 30 on a chevron engrailed three 

cinquefoils .... [S.D.T.*] 

FENROTHER.ssb S.D.T. Barry of ten, an orle(?) ... at the centre. [S.D.T.* 1 ] 
FENwiCK.59 H.N. ii, i, 254. Silver three martlets gules on a chief gules three 

martlets silver. [S.] 

FERLINGTON. H.N. ii, ii, 34. Sable a fess indented of five fusils gold. [G.] 
FissEBTiRN.60 N.C.H., iv, 276. Gules a dolphin silver. [F.] 
FIENNES. M.P. 1645. Azure three lions rampant gold. [G.] 
FITTON. H.N. ii, ii, 262. Silver on a bend azure three sheaves gold. [S.] 
FITZ ALAN, BRIAN. L.S. 1228. Barry gold and gules. [H.] 

* Misc. Charters, 7009, A.D. 1341 : * s. JOHIS D' FAENACRIS. 

u 3-10 Spec. no. 67, A.D. 1370. 

v Misc. Charters, 3682, 3857, A.D. 1365 ; see also S.S., pi. ii, no. 25. (PI. x, 

no. 14.) 
vl 1-8 Spec. no. 13, A.D. 1381. 



112 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

FITZ GEOFFREY^ H.N. ii, i, 278 N. Silver a fess between three popinjays 

vert. [Ibid.] 
FITZ HUGH. N.C.H. v, 253. Azure three chevrons interlaced and a chief gold. 

[N.] 

FITZ MAIN. N.C.H. n, 292. Device, a wild boar. [Seal ibid.'] 
FITZ MARMADUKE, SIR Kicn.eob N.H.A. Gules a fess between three popinjays 

silver, a baston azure. [N.] 
FITZ MICHAEL. L.S. 1260. Sable a cinquefoil within an orle of martlets silver. 

[P.A.] 
FITZ ROGER (Warkworth).Gl N.C.H., v, 25. Quarterly gold and gules a baston 

sable. [H.] 
FITZ ROGER, RALPH (Ditchburn).62 N.C.H. n, 276. Vair on a chief (gules) a 

cross patonce (silver). [Seal ibid.'] 

FITZ SIMON. H.N. 11, ii, 34. Sable a fess between three crescents silver. [R.] 
FITZ WALDEVE. N.C.H. vn, 96. ... a lion rampant . . . between three ears 

of corn. [S.D.T.] 
FITZ WILLIAM (Morpeth). H.N. n, ii, 273. Barry silver and azure three 

chaplets gules. [K.J 

FITZ WILLIAM (Mitford). H.N. n, ii, 41. Lozengy silver and gules. [M.] 
FLAMMAVILLE. T.N. Silver a maunch azure. [S.] 
FLEMING. R.W. i, 22. Gules fretty silver a label vert. [X.] 
FORD. R.N.D. 304. Gules two bends vair silver and azure and a canton gold. 

[G.] 
FORESTER DE CORBRIGG. S.D.T. ... on a fess . . . three hunting horns . . 

. . [S.D.TX] 
FORSET. H.H. 303. Silver on a bend sable three stags' heads cabossed silver. 

[G.] 
FoRSTER.63 N.C.H. i, 156. Silver a chevron vert between three hunting horns 

sable. [V. 1666.] 
FOSTONE. W.M. Silver on a chevron engrailed sable three crescents silver. 

[G.] 

FOWBERY. W. ii, 487. Vert a stag at speed silver with gold horns. [C.T.] 
FOWLER. R.W. ii, 339. Silver a falcon's head rased between three molets 

gules. [C.M.] 

FRAUNCEYS. W.M. Gules a saltire between four crosses crosslet gold. [G.] 
FRISEL. D.B.R. (1343). Silver six roses (fraises) gules. [G.] 
FRISELLE, WILL. C.D.S. m, 828. (Silver) a bend between six 'fraises' (gules). 

[S. ibid.-] 
FRESBORN, RALPH. W. n, 389. Sable a bend gold between two dolphins silver. 

[N.O.] 

,"..'i) / ' . .v .'/< : ; . I . .' 

w Misc. Charters, 469 and 470, A.D. 1370. 



Arch. Ael 3 Ser. Vol. VI. Plate 4, 

Northumbrian Derivative Shields. Plate II. 

FITZ ROGER SERIES. 




SRtbfcringion. 







JEibbleten. 



THE INDEX. 113 

FBIVILLE, SIB BALDWIN. W.M. Gold a cross gules ' a les mascles de ver. 

[N.] 

FuLTHORPE.64 H.N. in, ii, 380. Silver a mill-rind cross sable. [S.] 
FYSHEB. E.W. ii, 358. Per chevron, silver and azure three fish-hooks counter- 
coloured, a molet gules. [C.M.] 

GALON. F.A. 88. ... a chevron . . . between three crosses moline. . . . 

[S.D.T.*] 

GALWAY. M.P. 1340. Azure three lozenges gold and a chief gold. [G.] 
GAMBOE. E.W. n, 392. Silver on a fess gules three bezants. [C.M.] 
GAVESTON, PIEBS DE. H.N. in, ii, 394. Vert six eagles displayed gold. [N.] 
GENEVILL. P. A. Gold two bars azure between three crowns gules. [P.A.] 
GEYVELESTONE, DUNCAN. C.D.S. in, 469. . . . two chevrons .... [S. ibid.'] 
GIBSON. K.W. in, 51. Azure three storks rising silver, in chief a molet gold. 

[C.M.] 

GLANTON. T.N. Azure a chevron between three crosses patonce silver. [G.] 
GLANVILLE. L.S. (1185). Gold a chief indented azure. [Y.] 
GLOUCESTBE, SIB WALTEB. W.M. Silver three lions rampant gules a border 

indented azure. [0.] 
GOBION, HUGH. 65 L.S. (1292). Barry silver and gules a label of five points 

azure. [F.] 

GOLDESBOBOUGH. D.B.R. (1406). Azure a cross patonce silver. [M.K.] 
GOSEBECK. H.N. 11, ii, 333. . . . three geese . . . [S.B.M.*!] 
GOSWICK. E.N.D. 182. Vert a fess between three geese silver. [N.E.] 
GOUBLEY. H.N. in, ii, 308. Silver on a cross moline sable five stars gold. 

[G.] 
GOWEB. D.B.E. (1549). Barry silver and gules over all a cross patonce sable. 

[G.] 

GBAHAM.66 N.C.H. i, 378. Silver on a chief sable three escallops gold. [G.] 
GBAPEB. N.C.H. vii, 391. ... on a bend .... three lozenges .... 

[S.D.S.] 
GBAS, SIB WALTEB. W.M. Azure three lions rampant gold, a chief silver. 

[A.] 
GBAYSTANES, JOHN DE. M.P. (1295). Device, a sword between two birds. 

[S.D.T.y] 
GBEEN. E.W. i, 404. Silver on a cross engrailed gules five crescents silver, on 

a chief azure three bezants. [C.M.] 
GBEEN. A. A. xiv, 17. Azure three bucks passant gold. [G.] 

x Misc. Charters, 6160, 6161, A.D. 1358: SIGILLVM HVOONIS DE GALON. 

(PI. x, no. 11.) 

*' S.B.M. in, 185 : s. x BADVLFI * DE * GOSEBEC * 
y 2-3 Sacr. no. 7, A.D. 1246. 

3 SEB, VOL. VI, 8 



114 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 

GREENE. V. 1666. Silver on a fess azure between three roundels each charged 

with a griffin's head rased silver, a griffin passant between two escallops 

gold. [V. 1666.] 

GBENDON. H.N. m, i, 57. Silver two chevrons and a border gules. [G.] 
GRENviLLE.67 N.C.H. ii, 229. Vert on a cross silver five roundels gules. [G.] 
GEETHED. D.B.R. (1372). Vert on a fess gold three cinquefoils gules. [G.] 
GREY, RICHARD. C.D.S. i, 230. Barry silver and azure. [B.] 
GR*EY (Horton). W. n, 486. Barry silver and azure on a bend gules a bezant.- 

[V. 1575.] 
GREY (Backworth). N.C.H. ix, 41. Barry silver and azure on a bend gules 

three bezants. [V. 1666.] 
GREY (Heton). 68 R.N.D. 326. Gules a lion rampant within a border engrailed 

silver. [I.] 
GREY, SIR THOMAS. 68a R.N.D. 326. Gules a lion rampant, a border indented 

silver and a baston azure. [M.] 
GREY (Bitchfield). V. 1666. Quarterly: i and iv, Grey of Heton; n and m, 

Grey of Horton. [V. 1666.] 
GREY (Kiley). V. 1615. Grey of Heton with a martlet for difference. [V. 

1615.] 
GREY (Wooperton). N.R.H.A. Gules a chevron between three lozenges gold. 

[N.R.] 

GREYSTOCK.69 H.N. ii, ii, 373. Gules three cushions silver. [F.] 
GULDEFORD, SIR JOHN. N.H.A. Silver two bars gemelle sable. [N.] 
GUNSTON. V. 1575. Per saltire gold and gules, the gules fretty gold. [V. 

1575.] 
GUNWARTON. N.C.H. iv, 320. ... a lion rampant guardant .... [D.S. 

45*1.] 

HADHAM. W.M. Silver a bend between six buckles azure. [Y.] 
HAGGERSTON.70 R.N.D. 224. Azure on a bend cotised silver three billets sable. 

[G.] 

HALEBURTON.70a H.N. m, i, 53. ... a bend. . . . [C.D.S. n, 187*2.] 
HALIDEN. H.N. in, ii, 10. ... on a chevron, . . . between three birds, 

. . . three boars' heads couped. ... [S.S. ix, 20.] 
HALL. R.W. i, 294. Gules three dogs' heads rased silver, with sable collars, 

a crescent gold for difference. [C.M.] 
HALL. R.W. n, 184. Silver a fess engrailed between three gryphons' heads 

rased sable, a crescent gold for difference. [C.M.] 
HALL. C.T. Gold a chevron between three demi lions azure, on a chief gules 

three roundels silver each charged with a molet sable. [C.T.] 

vl S. RADVLFI DE GVNNEWARTON. 
y2 S. HENRICI DE HALIBVRTON. 



Arch. Ael 3 Ser. Vol. VI. Plate 5. 

Wj Northumbrian Derivative Shields. Plate III. ||| 

GREY SERIES. 




THE INDEX. 115 



HALL. N.O.H.A. Silver a fess engrailed between three gryphons' heads rased 

sable. [N.O.] 
HALLIWELL. R.W. i, 110. Gold on a bend gules three goats passant silver. 

[G.] 
HALSHAM. D.B.R. (1386). Silver a chevron engrailed between three leopards' 

heads gules. [G.] 
HALTON.71 W. n, 133. Silver two bars and in chief three roundels azure. 

[X.] 

HALUTON. H.N. m, i, i. Gules three stags' heads cdbossed gold. [F.] 
HALT. K.W. n, 373. Per bend gules and gold on a chief azure a demi eagle 

gold. [C.M.] 
HAMPTON, ROBERT DE. L.S. (1272). Silver a fess cheeky gold and azure 

between six martlets gules. [R.] 

HANSARD. H.N. in, ii, 360. ... a chief . . . over all a bend . . . [S.D.T. 2 ] 
HANSARD, GILBERT. H.N. in, i, 203. Gules three pierced molets silver. 

[M.R.] 

HANVILL. N.C.H. v, 253. Azure a dance between three gerfalcons gold. [N.] 
HARBOTTLE.72 F.A. 78. Azure three ' hair-bottles ' bendways gold. [G.] 
HARBOTTLE. F.A. 78. Silver three escallops gules. [G.] 

HARCLA. C.D.S.m,773. Silver a cross gules a martlet sable in the quarter. [M.] 
HARDBREAD. R.W. i, 402. Silver two bars and in chief three crosses crosslet 

gules. [C.M.] 
HARDING. 73 N.C.H. i, 326. Gules three running greyhounds gold with azure 

collars. [G.] 
HARDING. R.W. i, 303. Sable a chevron between three keys, a border 

engrailed silver. [C.M.] 

HARRINGTON. L.S. (1515). Sable fretty silver a label gules. [G.] 
HARTLAW.73a N.H.A. Silver a cross gules. [N.] 
HASTANG, ROBERT DE. C.D.S. in, 535. Azure a chief gules over all a lion 

with a double tail gold. [E.] 

HASTINGS, JOHN, LORD. H.N. n, ii, 42. Gold a maunch gules. [N.] 
HASTINGS. N.C.H. vii, 130. Silver a fess gules between three maunches sable. 

[T.] 

HASTINGS, SIR RALPH. H.N. ii, ii, 240. Silver a maunch sable. [S.] 
HAUDENE. C.D.S. n, 415. ... a saltire between four roses or cinquefoils 

.... [Ibid., App. m, 251.] 
HAUKYN. M.P. (1309). ... a chevron . . . between three hawks ... a label 

of three points .... [S.D.T. a ] 
HAULEY. H.N. in, i, 86. Azure a saltire, engrailed silver. [S.] 

z 2-11 Spec. no. 16: >f SIGILLVM * GILEBERTI HANSABT. 

Misc. Charters, 4109 a , A.D. 1334 : SIGILLVM HVGONIS HAVKYN. (PI. x, 
no. 22.) 



116 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 

HAUSTED. G.H.A. Silver a chief cheeky gold and azure. [G.] 

HAVERINGTON. M.P. (1341). Sable fretty silver. [I.] 

HAT, DE LA. A.A. 2nd ser., 78. Silver three escallops bendways gules between 

two bastons sable. [G.] 
HAYNING. E.W. i, 341. Azure a horse's head rased silver, on a chief silver 

three molets sable. [C.M.] 
HEADLAM. E.W. i, 311. Silver three hclly leaves, a crescent for difference. 

[C.M.] 

HEBBURN. A.A. XVHI, 32. Silver three cressets sable. [N.E.] 
HECHAM, HUGO DE. E.W. i, 54. ... a chevron . . . between three . . . 

(undecipherable) within three wreaths. [S.D.T. b ] 
HEDLEY. G.H.A. Gules a chevron between three falcons silver, beaked and 

legged gold. [G.] 
HEDWORTH.73b R.W. ii, 101. Silver an escucheon sable within an orle of 

cinquefoils gules. [G.] 
HEIGHTON. E.W. n, 25. Silver a chevron between three popinjays gules, a 

molet for difference. [C.M.] 

HEPPESCOTES, ALAN DE. M.P. (1346). Seal armorial but charges not decipher- 
able. [S.D.T.c] 
HEPPLE. H.N. in, ii, 400. Ermine an orle and a border engrailed gules. 

[G.] 
HERBERT. H.N. n, ii, 532. Per pale azure and gules three lions rampant 

silver, a border gobony gold and gules. [V.Y.] 

BERING. 74 N.C.H. n, 343. Device, a herring between a cross and a fleur-de- 
lis. [S. ibid.'] 

HERLE.75 F.A. 54. Gules a fess gold between three shovellers silver. [G.] 
HERON (Bockenfield). N.C.H. vn, 361. Gules a chevron between three herons 

silver. [S.] 
HERON (Chipchase). W. n, 47. Gules three herons gold and in chief a cross 

crosslet gold. [S.] 

HERON. (Ford).76 E.N.D. 304. Gules three herons silver. [N.] 
HERON (Meldon). H.N. n, ii, 16. Gules a fess between three herons silver. 

[G.] 
HERTWAYTON. H.N. u, i, 279. Vert a fess between three stags' heads cabossed 

silver. [G.] 

HESELRIGG. F.A. 87. Silver three hazel leaves vert. [N.E.] 
HESELRIGG. N.C.H. vn, 395. Silver a chevron between three hazel leaves 

vert. [E.L.] 

HETON.77 F.A. 77. Vert a lion rampant and a border engrailed silver. [X.] 
HEWICKE. H.H. 303. Vert six bezants. [Y.] 

Misc. Charters, 6614, A.D. 1308 : s. HVGONIS DE HECHAM. (PI XT, no. 2.) 
1-3 Spec. no. 5, A.D. 1334: s' ALANI DE HEPPISCOTES. 



THE INDEX. 



117 



HEWORTH. M.P. (1441). Silver a saltire between four molets pierced gules. 

[X.] 
HILL. R.W. n, 7. Sable a cross couped silver, in chief two birds flying gold. 

[C.M.] 

HILTON. 78 F.A. 62. Silver two bars azure. [F.] 
HINDLET. N.C.H. vi, 159. Sable a griffin silver. [Ballard Roll.] 
HoDSHON.79 R.W. i, 370. Per chevron embattled gold and azure three 

martlets countercoloured. [C.T.] 
HOLDEN. M.P. (1423). Silver a chief azure over all a bend engrailed gules. 

[G.] 

HOLGBAVE. A. A. xiv, 295. Ermine an escucheon gules. [G.] 
HOME, GEORGE, EARL OF DUNBAR.BO H.N. n, i, 77. Vert a lion rampant 

silver. [P.A.] 

HOPPEN. N.C.H. i, 244. ... a lion rampant ... [S. ibid.'] 
HOPPER. N.C.H. vi, 296. Silver three roses gules. [P.A.] 
HoRDEN.81 H.N. n, i, 278. Gold a fess vair silver and azure between three 

falcons vert. [V. 1666.] 

HoBSLET.82 H.N. n, ii, 104. Gules three horses' heads rased silver. [V. 1666.] 
HORSLET (Milburn). H.N. 11, i, 335. Sable three horses' heads rased silver. 

[N.O.] 
HORSLEY (Scran wood). 82a H.N. n, ii, 104. Gules three horses' heads couped 

silver bridled sable. [N.R.] 

HORSLEY (Thernham).83 F.A. 72. Silver three pierced cinquefoils sable. [S.] 
HORSLEY (Ulchester). F.A. 64. Gules three horses' heads silver bridled gules. 

[XVI.] 
HoRTON.saa N.C.H. ix, 245. . . . three bars . . . over all on a bend . . . 

five . . . (perhaps ermine spots). [S.G. 01 ] 

HOTHAM. M.P. (1477). Gold on a bend sable three molets silver. [G.] 
HOTON. F.A. 71. Gules a fess between three cushions silver. [X.] 
HOWARD. H.N. n, ii, 281. Gules a bend between six crosses crosslet fitchy 

silver. [S.] 

HowBURNE.83b F.A. 87. Device, a lion passant. [R.N.D. 115.] 
HOWDEN. F.A. 82. Gold on a bend sable three molets silver. [G.] 
HUDDLES-TON. D.B.R. Gules fretty silver. [N.] 
HUNTERCOMBE. N.C.H. i, 381. Ermine two bars gemell gules. [H.] 
HUNTLEY. R.W. n, 110. Gules on a bend silver three leaves vert, a crescent 

for difference. [C.M.] 

ILDERTON. F.A. 71. Silver three bougets sable. [X.] 

ILK. V. 1666. ... on a fess . . . between three escallops ... a lion passant 
... [V. 1666.] 

cl See pi. ix, no. 2. 



118 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

ILLBIGH. G.H.A. Ermine two chevrons sable. [G.] 
INGHOW H.H. 303. Silver three roses gules. |>-J 
INGR!!' X.H.A. Ermine on a fess gules three escallops silver. [X.] 

V 1615. Gules a fess between three shovellers silver. [V. 1615.] 
J^r R.W/i 309. Silver a jay vert, beak and legs gules, a crescent upon a 

molet for difference. [C.M.] 

JENISON V 1615. Azure a bend gold between two swans silver [Y . It 
JESMOND, LAM O..B4 L.S. (1261). Barry silver and azure in chief three 

JOHNSON^ Sll. S^ -ble and azure, a saltire silver charged with 
five cocks sable between three naming towers and two spears saltire- 
ways in base gold. [C.M.] 

KELLAWE. N.C.H. vi, 351. ... an escucheon . . . within an orle of six 

escallops. . . . [S.D.T.] 

KELLY W.M. Silver a chevron between three billets gules. [G-J 
KENDALL. G.H.A. Silver a bend indented vert between two cotises gules. [O.J 
KENTON. E.W. i, 33. Sable a chevron between three cinquefoils gold. [G.] 
KiBBLESwoBTH.84a N.C.H. vi, 351. . . . four batons in pale .... ?* J 
KILLINGWORTH. V. 1615. Silver three cinquefoils sable pierced gold. [b.J 
KiLLTNGWORTH.85 S.G. (Silver) two bars (sable) and in chief three pierced 

cinquefoils (sable). [S.G.di] 
KILLINGHALL. A.A. 2nd ser. n, 76. Sable a chevron between three ' keelmgs 

(codfish) silver. [E.L.] 

KIRKBBIDGE. G.H.A. Silver a saltire vert. [G.] 
KIBKBY, JOHN DE. L.S. (1296). Silver two bars gules on a canton gules a cross 

moline gold. [S.] 

KIRKTON. H.N. in, ii. Gules three bars ermine. [Y.] 

KNOLLYS, SIR EGBERT. Ancestor, iv, 232. Gold a lion rampant silver, a border 
engrailed silver. [XV.] 

KNUT, RICHARD. L.S. (1288) three bars . . . and in chief three 

roundels. . . . [S.D.T. 6 ] 

KYME, EARL OF. H.N. 11, i, 6. Gules crusilly and a chevron gold. [E.] 
KYNGESTON. R.N.D. 314. Sable a lion rampant with a forked tail gold. [N.] 

LACY.86 N.C.H. v, 467. Sable a chevron between three stags' heads cabossed 

silver. [V.Y.] 
LACY.87 G.H.A. Wavy ermine and gules. [G.] 

<l 3-6 Spec. no. 17: Hh SIOILLVM KICA . . . Dl. (PI. ix, no. 5.) 
dl Deed in possession of Rev. Wm. Greenwell. (PI. x, no. 12.) 
e 3-1 Ebor. no. 2. 



THE INDEX. 119 

LAMBTON, WILLIAM. L.S. (1426). Sable a fess between three lambs passant 

silver. [G.] 

LAMPLOUGH. D.B.R. Gold a cross flory sable. [S.] 
LANCASTER, DUKE or (JOHN or GAUNT). N.C.H. n, 200. Quarterly France 

(ancient) and England over all a label of Brittany. [S.] 
LANCASTER, EARL OF (EDMUND CROUCHBACK). F.A. 70. Gules three leopards 

gold, a label of France. [P.] 
LANCASTER. N.C.H. vi, 226. Silver two bars gules, on a quarter gules a 

leopard of England. [E.] 
LANGTON.SS M.P. (1394). Gold a lion rampant sable, bleeding at the shoulder 

gules. [X.] 
LANGETON, DAVID. C.D.S. in, 612. ... a squirrel sitting erect .... [S. 

ibid.-} 

LANGWORTH. A.A. xiv, 16. Silver three dragons' heads sable. [G.] 
LASCELLES, ROGER. H.N. in, ii, 334. Silver three chaplets gules, a border 

engrailed gules. [Y.j 

LATON.89 N.C.H. vi, 192. Gold a cross moline gules. [S.] 
LATIMER. H.N. in, ii, 333. Gules a cross patonce gold. [K.] 
LAWRENCE. 90 C.T.H.A. Silver a cross engrailed gules on a chief gules a lion 

passant gold. [C.T.] 
LAWSON. N.C.H. vi, 96. Party silver and sable a chevron countercoloured. 

[V. 1666.] 
LAWSON. 91 R.N.D. 237. Silver a chevron between three martlets sable. 

[V. 1575.] 
LEDGERT. R.W. in, 240. Silver a bend between six molets gules, a martlet 

for difference. [C.M.] 

LEIGHTON. M.P. (1572). Quarterly per fess indented gold and gules. [P. A.] 
LEMINGTON. N.C.H. VTT, 164. Azure fretty gold, on a chief gold a lion between 

two molets gules. [G.] 
LETEWELL. H.N. ii, ii, 101. ... a cinquefoil . . . and a chief [S. 

ibid. 4.] 

LETHAM. H.N. in, i, 83. Gules a cross ermine. [G.] 
LEWEN. N.C.H. vi, 148. Silver a bend embattled gules over all in chief a 

portcullis azure. [C.M.] 
LET, DE LA. 92 N.C.H. i, 178. Gold a fess embattled between six martlets 

gules. [X.] 

LEYBURN. H.N. in, ii, 395. Gold six lions sable. [Y.] 
LIDDELL. R.W. ii, 386. Silver fretty gules on a chief gules three leopards' 

faces gold. [C.M.] 

LILBUBN. W. ii, 489. Sable three bougets silver. [S.] 
LiNDESAY.93 A.A. xiv, 56. Gules a fess cheeky silver and azure. [X.] 
LINDESAY, SIR PHILIP. 93a N.H.A. Gold an eagle displayed purple. [N.] 
LISLE. 94 N.C.H. vii, 255. Ermine a lion rampant azure. [G.] 



120 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

LISLE P.A.H.A. Gules a leopard silver crowned gold. [P.A.] 

LISLE, SIB GEEAED. G.H.A. Gules crusilly gold, a leopard silver crowned gold. 

LOCKWOOD.' B.W. i, 360. Gules on a bend gold three padlocks azure. [C.M.] 

LONDE. G.H.A. Azure fretty silver and a border gold. [G.] 

LoEAiNE.95 H.N. n, i, 246. Quarterly sable and silver a cross countercoloured. 

[G.] 
LOVEL. D.B.R. (1309). Silver a chevron sable between three wolves' heads 

rased gules. [G.] 

LOWES. H.N. n, iii, 337. Gules a wolf passant silver. [G.] 
LOWTHEE. W. n, 133. Gold six rings sable. [Y.] 
LUCKEE. F.A. 67. Silver an orle sable. [G.] 
LucT.96 F.A. 55. Gules three ' lucies ' paleways silver. [I.] 
LUDHAM, SIE JOHN. W.M. Silver three inescucheons sable. [N.] 
LuMLEY.97 F.A. 57. 1, Gules six birds silver. [G. f ] 2, Silver a fess gules 

between three popinjays. [S.] 
LUMLEY, SIE ROBEET. N.H.A. Gules on a fess, between three popinjays silver, 

three molets sable. [N.] 
LUMLEY, WALEEAN. R.W. i, 72. ... an inescucheon . . . over all on a bend 

. . . three molets .... [S.D.T.'l] 
LYHAM. N.C.H. vi, 246. ... a fess . . . between three bears .... [Ibid. 

Note.] 
LYTHEGEEINS, JOHN. L.S. (1274). Gules an orle silver over all a bend gold. 

[X.] 
LYTTLEBUBY, SIE HUMPHEEY. W.M. Silver two leopards gules on a bend vert 

three eagles gold. [N.] 

MADDisoN.98 R.W. in, 19. Silver two battle axes saltireways sable. [G.] 
MAGNEBY, HUGH. C.D.S. i, 199. Silver three bars sable and a maunch gules. 

[P-] 

MALEVILLE. C.D.S. 11, 415. ... a fess . . . [Seal ibid., App. in, 149.] 
MALLABAE. H.N. 11, iii, 329. Gold a chevron gules between three nettle 

leaves. [N.O.] 

MALEFANT. C.D.S. i, 559. Silver on a chief sable a lion passant gold. [G.] 
MALTEBY. H.H. 303. Silver on a bend gules three sheaves gold. [V.Y.] 
MALTEAVEES. G.H.A. Sable fretty gold. [O.] 
MAN. V. 1666. Sable on a fess, between three goats passant silver with gold 

horns, three pellets. [V. 1666.] 
MANNEES.99 R.N.D. 211. Gold two bars azure and a chief gules. [M.] 

f Also seal, Misc. Charters, 6267, A.D. 1343. 

fl 3-9 Spec. nos. 44, 47, and Misc. Charters, 4109 and others ; see S.S., pi. xi, 
no. 5. 



Arch. Ael., 3 ser., VI. 



Plate VI. 




EAST GATEWAY, LUAU.EY CASTLE (See note, page 179). 



From a Photograph by Mr. W. Parker Brewis, F.S.A. 



THE INDEX. 



121 



MANWERING. M.P. (1640). Silver on two bars gules three molets silver, two 

and one. [G.] 
MAR, COUNTESS OF. C.D.S. n, 549. Azure a bend between six crosses crosslet 

fitchy gold. [N.H. i, 127.] 

MARE, DK LA. H.N. m, ii, 280. Gules a maunch silver. [H.] 
MARISCO (MAREYS). N.C.H. n, 11. Barry wavy ermine and silver. [G.] 
MARLEY. R.W. in, 317. Silver on a chevron between three martlets sable, a 

molet gold. [C.M.] 

MARSHALL. N.C.H. i, 395. . . . three horseshoes .... [C.D.S. n, 539.] 
MARSHALL. V. 1575. Silver a chevron vert between three crescents gules. [G.] 

MARSHALL, rector of Eothbury (1361). ... a cross [S.D.T.s] 

MARTON. D.B.R. (1415). Silver two bars gules. [M.R.] 

MATTHEW, TOBY. A. A. xix, 235. Silver a lion rampant sable. [G.] 

MAUBURNE. W.M. Masculy gules and ermine, on a quarter azure a cross 

moline gold. [X.] 

MAUDUIT. N.C.H. vn, 339. Ermine two bars gules. [0.] 
MAULEY.99* F.A. 64. Gold a bend sable. [H.] 
MAULEVERER. N.C.H. i, 183. Sable three running ' leverers ' silver with gold 

collars. [G.] 
MAUTALENT. N.C.H. v, 398. Gold a lion dismembered gules. [N.H. i, 286.] 

MENEVILL. N.C.H. vi, 192. ... a cross engrailed [S.G. h ] 

MENEVILL, THOMAS. N.C.H. vi, 192. ... a cross engrailed .... within a 

border engrailed .... [S.D.T. 1 ] 
MENTETHE, JOHN DE. C.D.S. in, 737. ... a fess cheeky with a label of five 

points . . . and over all a bend .... [S. ibid, u, 538.] 

MERINO. N.C.H. n, 311. Silver on a chevron sable three escallops gold. [G.] 
MERLAY.IOO H.N. n, ii, 375. Barry silver and gules with a border azure ' et 

merlots d'or en le bordur.' [B.] 
MBRLAY. H.N. n, ii, 375. (Azure) three ' merles ' flying, paleways (gold). 

[S.D.T.U] 

MEYNELL. N.C.H. i, 378. Azure three bars gemell and a chief gold. [E.] 
MIDDLEHAM.IOI R.N.D. 182. Azure on a bend silver three escallops gules. 

[S. ibid.'] 
MIDDLETON. H.N. ii, i, 353. Quarterly gules and gold a cross patonce silver 

in the quarter. [E.] 
MIDDLETON, GILBERT. 102 N.C.H. ix, 103. Quarterly (gules) and (gold) a stag's 

head cabossed in the quarter. [S.D.T.^] 

* Misc. Charters, 3952, A.D. 1361 ; see S.S., pi. xi, no. 27. 

1 Deed in the possession of Rev. Wm. Green well. (PI. x, no. 3.) 

I 3-18 Spec. nos. 15 and 18. 

II See S.S., pi. xi, no. 22, 4-2 Spec. no. 38. 

la Misc. Charters, 4049 and 5053, A.D. 1317: * s 1 GILBEBTI DE MEDELTV . 
See also S.S., pi. x, no. 22. 



122 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 

MILBANK. E.W. in, 350. Gules a bend ermine on a canton gold a lion's head 

rased gules. [C.M.] 

MILBUBN. C.T.H.A. Sable a chevron between three escallops silver. [C.T.] 
MILBUBN. E.W. in, 209. Sable a fess between three escallops silver, a crescent 

gules for difference. [C.M.] 

MINOT, ROGEB. L.S. (1299). Gules three helmets silver. [X.] 
MiTFOBD.103 H.N. n, ii, 45. Silver three moles sable. [XVI.] 
MITFOBD (Seghill). W. n, 269. Silver a fess between three moles sable. 

[XVI.] 
MITFOBD (Ponteland). H.N. n, ii, 46. Silver a chevron between three moles 

sable. [XVI.] 
MITFOBD (Newcastle). V. 1666. Silver on a fess, between three moles sable, 

three escallops gold. [V. 1666.] 
MONBOUCHEB. F.A. 62. Silver three pitchers gules within a border sable 

bezanty. [K.] 
MONKTON. Ancestor, iv, 241. Sable on a chevron gold, between ' iii merlettys ' 

gold, three pierced molets. [XV.] 
MONTAGU. F.A. 66. Silver a fess engrailed of three fusils gules and a border 

sable. [S.] 
MONTFOBT, SIMON DE (EABL OF LEICESTEB). N.C.H. n, 16. Gules a lion 

rampant with a forked tail silver. [B.] 

MONTFOBT, PETEB DE. N.C.H. vn, 411. Bendy of twelve gold and azure. [D.] 
MODEBBY. M.P. (1384). Sable a bend gold on a chief silver three escallops 

gules. [G.] 
MOBAY, WILL. DE. C.D.S. ii, 414. (Azure) three molets (silver). [Seal ibid., 

App. in, 205.] 

MOBDAUNT. N.C.H. n, 90. Silver a chevron between three stars sable. [G.] 
MOBE. H.H. 395. Azure on a chief indented gold three molets gules. [N.O.] 
MOBPETH. E.W. i, 395. Barry of twelve silver and gules on a border azure 

eight martlets gold. [C.M.] 
MOBPETH, JOHN DE a chevron . . . between three roundels .... 

[S.D.T.*] 

MOBELL. H.N. ii, i, 303. Gules a bend gold. [G.] 
MOBESBY. H.N. in, ii, 366. Sable a cross gold, a cinquefoil silver in the 

quarter. [I.] 
MOBTON. H.H. 361. Quarterly ermine and gules in the second and third 

quarters a goat's head rased silver. [E.L.] 
MOBVILLE. H.N. in, iii. Azure powdered with fleurs-de-lis and fretty gold. 

[G.] 

MOBWICK. N.C.H. v, 350. Gules a saltire vair silver and sable. [G.] 
MOSTON. P. A. Sable three bars silver in chief three plates. [P. A.] 

k 2-2 Sacr. 3 b , A.D. 1344 : s' JOHIS DE MORPITH. 



THE INDEX. 



123 



MowBRAY.104 H.N. in, ii, 369. Gules a lion rampant silver. [N.] 
MOWBRAY, JOHN. Ancestor, iv, 241. Gules a lion silver, a border gobony gold 

and silver. [XV.] 

MULCASTER. V. 1575. Barry of eight silver and gules a bend azure. [V. 1575.] 
MULTON. H.N. n, iii, 365. Silver three bars gules. [B.] 
MUNDEVILE, SIR RICHARD. W.M. Azure fretty gold a label gules. [O.] 
MuscHAMP.105 R.N.D. 266. Gold three bars gules. [G.] 
MuscHAMP.106 F.A. 65. Azure three butterflies silver. [XVI.] 
MUSGRAVE. F.A. 56. Azure six rings gold. [I.] 

NESSFIELD. H.N. in, ii, 326. Silver on a chevron, between three stars sable, 

three fleurs-de-lis silver. [G.] 

NEVLLL.l06a F.A. 61. Gules a saltire silver. [B.] 
NEVILL, JOHN (EARL OF NORTHUMBERLAND). O.B. 649. Quarterly : 1 and 4, 

gules a saltire silver a label gobony silver and azure a crescent sable 

for difference (Nevill); 2, silver a fess indented of three fusils gules 

(Montagu) ; 3, gold an eagle displayed vert armed gules (Monthermer). 

Over all on an escucheon of pretence: Quarterly: 1, Bradstone; 

2, Inglethorpe ; 3, De la Pole; 4, Montagu. [O.B.] 
NEWDIGATE. M.P. (1572). Gules three lions' paws rased silver. [G.] 

NEWENHAM. C.D.S. ii, 1180. ... a lion rampant [S. ibid.'} 

NEWTON. N.C.H. vi, 257. Sable two shin bones saltireways silver. [N.O.] 
NICHOLSON. K.W. in, 15. Silver on a pale sable three martlets gold, a molet 

for difference. [C.M.] 
NIXON. R.W. i, 337. Silver a saltire gules between four X's sable, a molet 

for difference. [C.M.] 
NORMANVILLE. H.N. in, i, 76. Silver on a fess doubly cotised gules three 

fleurs-de-lis silver. [X.] 

NORREYS. W.M. Azure billety and a cross moline silver. [Y.] 
NORTON. M.P. (1562). Azure a maunch ermine over all a baston gules. [G.] 
NORWELL. M.P. (1588). Gold fretty gules and a chief azure. [G.] 
NuNwicK.107 H.N. m, ii, 27. Sable an eagle displayed gold. [Y.] 

OGLE. 108 F.A. 83. Silver a fess between three crescents gules. [S.] 

OGLE (Bothal). A.A. xiv, 285. Quarterly : 1 and 4, silver a fess between three 

crescents gules (Ogle); 2 and 3, gold an orle azure (Bertram). [S.] 
OGLE (Eglingham). Quarterly: 1 and 4, Ogle; 2 and 3, Bertram; over all on a 

chief azure six rings gold. 
OGLE (Ellington). V. 1575. Quarterly: 1 and 4, Ogle; 2 and 3, silver an 

escucheon azure on a chief azure six rings gold over all a bend silver. 

[V. 1575.] 
ORDE.IOS T.N. Sable three salmon paleways silver. [E.L.] 



124 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

OBMISTON, ALAN. C.D.S. n, 70. Silver three pelicans 'in their piety' gules. 

[N.H. i, 354.] 

OSBORNE. M.P. (1640). Quarterly ermine and azure a cross gold. [G.] 
OTTELEY. D.B.R. (1311). Silver three lions' heads rased and a border engrailed 

sable. [G.] 

OVINGTON. E.W. i, 315. Silver three roundels sable each charged with a 
crescent gold. [C.M.] 

PALSLEY. R.W. n, 31. Silver a fess between three pierced molets azure. 

[C.M.] 

PARIS. H.N. m, ii, 396. Sable crustily and a chevron silver. [Y.] 
PARK, DEL. H.H. 303. Sable an eagle displayed silver within a border azure. 

C Y -] 
PARR. N.C.H. ix, 81. Silver two bars azure a border engrailed sable. [G.] 

PATRICK, EARL or DUNBAR.HO N.C.H. vn, 104. Gules a lion rampant silver 

within a border silver charged with roses gules. [H.] 
PAULIN. M.P. (1405). ... on a chevron . . . between three cinquefoils . . . 

three arrow heads .... [G.] 
PAXTON.lloa C.D.S. n, 416. Silver two chevrons sable between three molets 

in pale gules. [N.H. i, 108.] 

PEARETH. N.C.H. n, 409. Gules three pears gold. [N.O.] 
PENRETH.UI M.P. (1347). Silver on a chevron sable, between three popinjays, 

three pears gold. [G.] 

PENYCOK, HUGH DE. C.D.S. 11, 415. Silver a bend azure between three hunt- 
ing .horns sable. [N.H. 11, 424.] 
PEPADY. E.W. i, 299. Gold on a chief engrailed silver a popinjay, between 

two molets sable, a crescent gules for difference. [C.M.] 
PERCY.H2 F.A. 66. Gold a lion rampant azure. [H.] 
PERCY, SIR HENRY (HOTSPUR). T.A. n, 154. Gold a lion rampant azure a 

label of three points gules. [S.] 
PERCY, SIR RALPH. T.A. n, 154. Gold a lion rampant azure, on the shoulder 

a molet gold. [S.] 

PERCY. G.H.A. Gold a lion rampant azure over all a baston gules. [G.] 
PIERSON. C.T.H.A. Azure a chevron between three feathers silver, in chief 

three roundels silver. [C.T.] 

PINCKNEY. G.H.A. Gold a fess engrailed of five fusils gules. [G.] 
PIRITON. H.N. 11, ii, 196. Gold a pear tree fructed gules. [E.] 
PLESSIS. H.N. n, ii, 295. ... a lion rampant .... [S. iUd.~\ 
PLUMPTON. H.N. in, i, 82. Azure a fess indented of five fusils gold, on each 

an escallop gules. [Y.] 
POTTS. N.O.H.A. Azure two bars gold over all a bend sable. [N.O.] 

sa H.N. in, i, 68. Gules a bend silver between two cotises 

gold. [Y.] 



THE INDEX. 



125 



PBKSSEN.113 M.P. (1313). Gold three sheaves gules. [G.] 

PRESFEN.IU N.C.H. n, 322. (Azure) three butterflies (silver). [S. iUd.~\ 

PRESTON. G.H.A. Gules two bars indented the upper of five fusils the lower of 

three fusils silver. [G.] 

PROCTOR. E.L.H.A. Silver three water bougets gules. [E.L.] 
PUDSEY, HUGH, EARL OF NORTHUMBERLAND. O.B. n, 644. Per saltire gold and 

silver a cross paly azure. [N.O.] 
PUNCHARDON. M.P. (1297). Sable ten roundels silver. [F.~| 

RADCLIFF. W. n, 43. Silver a bend engrailed sable. [G.] 

BANDOLF. D.B.R. (1329). (Silver) three cushions (gules). [S.D.T.*!] 

RAWE. R.W. n, 283. Gules on a cross silver five roundels gules, a molet gold 

in the quarter. [C.M.] 

RAWLING. C.M.H.A. Sable three swords paleways silver. [C.M.] 
RAYMES. F.A. 81. Sable a cross engrailed silver. [G.] 
RAYNTON. H.N. in, i, 67. Azure a chevron gold between three towers silver. 

[N.H.] 

REDMAN. R.W. i, 267. Gules three cushions ermine. [S.] 
REDMERSHILL. M.P. (1382). Sable a chevron gold. [G.] 

REED. 115 H.N. n, i, 136. Gold a chevron between three sheaves gules. [N.O.] 
REED. V. 1615. Gold on a chevron, between three sheaves gules, three ears 

of corn silver. [V. 1615.] 
REEDE. R.N.D. 179. Silver a dragon gules on a chief azure three fleurs-de-lis 

gold. [Proceedings, 3rd ser. in, 244.] 
REVELAY. R.N.D. 221. Silver a chevron engrailed gules between three voided 

molets azure. [C.T.] 

REYGATE, WILL. DE. H.N. in, ii, 329. Silver a bend engrailed azure. [Y.] 
REYNELL, SIR THOMAS. M.P. (1625). Silver masoned and a chief indented 

sable. [P.A.] 
RKYNOULD. R.W. i, 132. Sable a chevron between three wolves' heads rased 

silver. [G.] 
RHODES. R.W. i, 429. Silver per fess, in chief a running greyhound and in 

base three rings gules. [Shield in St. Nicholas's cathedral church.] 
RICHARDSON. R.W. i, 321. Sable on a chief silver three lions' heads rased 

sable, a crescent for difference. [C.M.] 
RICHMOND, PETER DE. N.C.H. in, 30. ... on a saltire . . . between three 

birds .... three crosses crosslet fitchy [S.D.T.*2] 

RIDDBLL. N.C.H. iv, 284. Silver a fess between three sheaves azure. [G.] 
RioDELL.116 R.W. i, 410. Gules a lion within a border engrailed silver. [G.] 

kl Misc. Charters, 4826. 

'-* 4-16 Spec. no. 2, A.D. 1356: s' PETBI DE RICHEMVND. 



126 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 

EIDEL, WILLIAM. C.D.S. in, 115. (Gules) a lion rampant and a border 

indented (silver). [Seal ibid.'] 

RIDELL. K.N.D. 324. Barry wavy ... and a chief .... [S.D.T. 1 ] 
RIDESDALE, SB. DE. G.H.A. Gules a leopard silver. [G.] 
RIDLEY. H.N. n, iii, 339. Gules a chevron between three hawks silver. 

[C.T.] 

RIDLEY. H.N. 11, iii, 323. Silver on a mount vert a bull passant gules. [G.] 
RIDLEY. H.N. n, iii, 327. Gules on a chevron, between three falcons silver, 

three roundels sable. [V. 166.6.] 

RIDSDALL. R.W. i, 377. Silver a fess between three sheaves azure. [C.M.] 
ROBARTFIELD. G.H.A. Gold two chevrons gules. [G.] 
ROBSON. V. 1575. Gules three swines' heads couped silver. [V. 1575.] 
ROCHESTER. C.T.H.A. Gold a fess between three crescents sable. [G.] 
ROCK. N.C.H. n, 124. Gules on a rock a bird silver. [P. A.] 
RODDAM. W. ii, 461. Gules on a bend ermine three pierced cinquefoils sable. 

[E.L.] 

ROGERS. V. 1666. Silver a fleur-de-lis sable and a chief gules. [V. 1666.] 
ROKEBY, SIR THOMAS. L.S. (1405). Silver a chevron between three rooks sable. 

[S.] 

ROPER. V. 1575. Per fess silver and sable a pale engrailed and counter- 
coloured and three goats' heads rased sable with gold horns. [V. 1575.] 
RosEDEN.li6 N.O.H.A. Silver on a fess gules a lion passant silver, between 

three arrow heads sable. [N.O.] 
RosELES.117 N.C.H. v, 348. ... a lion rampant . . . and a label of five 

points. . . . [S.D.T. m ] 

Ros. T.N. Gold three bougets sable. [B.] 
Ross. N.C.H. i, 380. Azure three bougets gold. [Y.] 
ROUTHE, AMAND DE. W.M. Silver on a bend cotised sable three molets silver. 

[X.] 
RUDA, DE. Y. 1575. Silver on a chevron sable, between three stringed bugle 

horns gules, three voided lozenges gold. [V. 1575.] 
RUSSELL. R.W. n, 42. Silver on a chief gules three bezants, a molet charged 

with a crescent for difference. [C.M.] 
RUSSELL, SIR FRANCIS. L.S. (1575). Silver a lion gules on a chief sable three 

escallops silver. [G.] 
RUTHERFORD. V. 1575. Silver an orle gules in chief three martlets gules. 

[G.] 
RYBAUD. N.C.H. 11, 339. Silver a chevron between three roundels gules. 

[M.R.] 

1 41 Spec. nos. 37 and 38, A.D. 1230. (PI. ix, no. 6.) 
1-5 Spec. no. 21. A very rudely engraved seal. 



THE INDEX. 



127 



RTHILL. T.N. Silver three lions rampant gules. [Harrison's History of 
Yorkshire, 166.] 

SABRAHAM.HS H.N. in, ii, 330. Silver a bend embattled counter embattled 

sable. [G.] 
SADELYNGSTANES, HUGO DE. M.P. (1338). 1, ... a cross voided .... 

between four fleurs-de-lis [S.D.T. n ] 2, ... a chevron . . . 

between three lions' heads .... [S.D.T.o] 
SANDERSON. E.W. n, 23. Paly silver and azure on a bend sable three rings 

silver. [E.L.] 

ST. MAUR. N.C.H. ii, 85. Silver two chevrons gules and a label vert. [N.] 
ST. PAUL. H.N. m, i, 72. Silver a lion rampant with forked tail gules, 

crowned gold. [P. A.] 

ST. PETER. H.N. n, ii, 81. Silver a bend sable and a label gules. [G.] 
ST. QuiNTON.119 N.C.H. v, 467. Gold a chevron gules and a chief vair. [M.] 
SALKELD. V. 1615. Silver fretty and a chief gules, a ring for difference. 

[C.T.] 

SALKELD. N.C.H. n, 140. Vert fretty silver, a crescent for difference. [G.] 
SALVEYN. H.N. in, ii, 293. Silver on a chief sable two molets gold. [N.] 
SAMPSON, HUGO. H.N. in, i, 86. Gold a cross flory sable. [G.] 
SAPY, ROBERT DE. H.N. in, ii, 296. Silver on a bend azure between two 

cotises gules, three eagles displayed gold. [M.R.l] 

SAVYLL. H.N. m, ii, 325. Silver on a bend sable three owls silver. [S.] 
SAWYER, SIR EDMUND. M.P. (1627). Azure a fess cheeky gold and sable 

between three sea-pies silver. [G.] 
SAXTON, ROGER DE. H.N. in, i, 108. Silver three wreaths bendways gules 

between two bastons sable. [G.] 
SAXBY, THOMAS. G.H.A. Barry gold and azure on a bend engrailed sable, 

between two cotises gules, three escallops gold. [G.] 
SAYER. A. A. 3rd ser. i, 86. Gules a chevron between three sea peewits silver. 

[E.L.] 
SCHILVINGTON. C.D.S. in, 1440. An open right hand fessways (not armorial). 

[S. ibid.-} 

SCOTT. R.W. i, 379. Gold three lions' heads rased sable, a molet for differ- 
ence. [C.M.] 
SCOT, ADAM. S.D.T. ... a bend . . . and a label of five points .... 

[S.D.T.P] 

n Misc. Charters, 3389, 3616 and others : s' HUGONIS DE SADELISTANES. (PI. x, 

no. 18.) 
Misc. Charters, 3738, 5068, A.D. 1360 and 1361: s' HUGONIS DE SADELYNG- 

STONES. 

1 Misc. Charters, 4238, A.D. 1317. (PI. x. no. 23.) 
p Loc. xxvn, no. 9, A.D. 1338 ; see S.S., pi. xi, no. 30. 



128 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 

SCOT, JOHN. D.S. ... on a chevron . . . between three cinquefoils . . . 

three crosses. . . . [D.S.Pl] 
SCOT, NiCHOLAS.ll9a E.W. i, 53. ... a chevron . . . between three escallops 

.... [S.B.M.] 
SCOT, EICHABD. S.D.T. ... on a bend . . . three crosses moline ... a label 

of five points. . . . [S.D.T.a] 

SCEEMEKSTON. T.N. A device of five stars. [R.N.D. 236.] 
SCROPE. F.A. 83. Azure a bend gold. [S.] 
SCBUTEVILLE. H.N. in, i, 54. Gules a bend dancetty between six martlets 

silver. [V.D.] 
SCURFIELD. A. A. xi, 266. Gules a bend dancetty between six martlets silver. 

[V.D.] 

SEGBAVE, SIB J. C.D.S. n, 1331. Sable a lion silver crowned gold. [N.] 
SELBY.120 W. n, 509. Barry gold and sable. [I.] 
SELBY. R.N.D. 315. Barry ermine and sable, in chief three molets sable. 



SEMPELL. R.W. i, 373. Silver a chevron cheeky gold and azure between three 

bugle horns sable a crescent for difference. [C.M.] 
SETON, THOMAS DE. N.C.H. in, 30. ... a fess . . . between three birds . . . 

within a border engrailed .... [S.D.T. r ] 

SHAFTOE. F.A. 86. Gules on a bend silver three molets azure. [B.] 
SHEFELD, JOHN DE. L.S. (1305). Gold a fess between three sheaves gules. [Y.] 
SHEBWOOD. V. 1666. Silver a chevron between three molets gules. [V. 1666.] 
SILKSWOBTH. N.C.H. vi, 191. ... a lion rampant ..... [S.D.T. 8 ] 
SIMPSON. R.W. n, 425. Per bend gold and sable a lion rampant counter- 

coloured. [C.M.] 

SKABGILL. D.B.R. (1380). Ermine a saltire gules. [S.] 
SKELTON. N.C.H. vi, 146. ... a fess engrailed . . . between three molets 

.... [S.D.T.t] 
SKIPTON. N.C.H. in, 64. Purple on a chief indented silver a lion rampant 

purple. [G.] 

SLAVELEY. N.C.H. in, 140. . . .an eagle displayed ..... [S.D.T.u] 
SLINGSBY. D.B.R. (1550). Gules a chevron gold between in chief two leopards' 

heads and in base a stringed bugle horn silver. [G.] 

P 1 STGILLVM JOHANNIS SCOT. 

' Misc. Charters, 6167, A.D. 1368 : s' RICARDI * SCOT. 

r Misc. Charters, 3528, 3547 and others ; see S.S., pi. xi, no. 31. 

8 Misc. Charters, 6597, A.D. 1325. 

Misc. Charters, 1885, A D. 1354 : SIGILLVM NICHOLAI DE SKELTOVN. (PI. x, 

no. 15.) 
u Misc. Charters, I486: s. WILLI D' SLAVELY. 



THE INDEX. 129 

SNOW. R.W. i, 365. Silver three roundels gules, a molet azure for difference. 

[C.M.] 
SOKPETH. N.C.H. vn, 412. ... on a bend . . . three billets. . . . [S.V. 

1615.] 
SOMERVILLE^ ROGER DE.121 H.N. ii, i, 315. Barry gules and silver on a border 

azure eight martlets gold. [Y.] 
SOMERVILLE, PHILIP DE.122 H.N. ii, i, 315. Azure crusilly fitchy and three 

eagles displayed gold. [G.] 
SOTHERON. R.W. n, 366. Silver a chevron between three branches of southern- 

wood, a crescent for difference. [C.M.] 
KS. N.C.H. vn, 109. Silver three bars gules. [G.] 
SPKNCER. G.H.A. Azure a fess ermine between three eagles' heads rased 

^ilver. [G.] 
SPRING, HENRY.ISS N.C.H. i, 33. Azure an orle silver. [Y.] 

TOPE, JOHN DE. M.P. (1360). Quarterly, ermine and gules, the gules 

charged with four rings. ... [S.D.T. V ] 

STANTON, SIR HENRY. W.M. Silver a bend embattled sable. [X.] 
STAPLETON. H.N. m, ii, 291. Silver a lion rampant sable. [Y.] 
STKVKNSON. R.W. i, 338. Silver on a bend gules three martlets gold, a cross 

crosslet sable for difference. [C.M.] 
KETT. R.W. i, 384. Silver three stocks of trees rased sable, a molet for 

difference. [C.M.] 
STOREY. G.H.A. Per fess silver and sable a pale countercoloured and three 

storks sable. [G.] 

STOTE. N.C.H. iv, 383. Gules a lion rampant erminois. [V. 1615.] 
STOTT. R.W T . n, 241. Gules a lion rampant with a forked tail silver, a crescent 

for difference. [C.M.] 

STRAHOLGI, EARL OF ATHOL. F.A. 63. Paly gold and sable. [E.] 
STRANGEWAYS. R.N.D. 228. Sable two lions passant paly silver and gules. 

[G.] 

STRATHERNE, MALISE, EARL OF. N.C.H. i, 395. Gules two chevrons gold. [D.] 
S-rROTHER.124 H.N. ii, i, 254. Gules on a bend silver three eagles displayed 

vert. [S.] 
STROTHER (Fowberry). W. n, 487. Gules on a bend silver three eagles 

displayed gules. [N.O.] 
STROTHER (Jesmond).l24a A. A. 3rd ser. i, 117. Gules on a bend silver three 

eagles displayed vert within a border engrailed (silver?) [C.D.S. iv, 

no. 49.] 
STRYVELYN. F.A. 54. Sable crusilly fitchy and three covered cups silver. 



v 1-7 Spec. nos. 23 and 25, A,D. 1361 : SIGILLVM JOHIS : DE : STANHOP. 

3 8KB- VOL, VI. 9 



130 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

STUART (EARL or NEWCASTLE). O.B. in, 123. Quarterly : 1 and 4, azure three 

fleurs-de-lis gold, on a border gules eight buckles gold (Aubigny); 

2 and 3, gold a fess cheeky azure and silver, a border engrailed gules 

(Stuart); over all on an escucheon silver a saltire engrailed between 

four roses gules (Lennox). [O.B.] 
STUTEViLLE.125 H.N. ii, ii, 42. Barry silver and gules a lion rampant sable. 

[B.] 

SuRTEES.i25a T.N. Ermine on a quarter gules an orle silver. [X.] 
SWINBURN. N.C.H. iv, 309. Gules three swines' heads silver. [B.] 
SWINBURN. N.C.H. iv, 309. Silver on a cross gules five sheaves gold. [G.] 
SWINBURN, SIR ADAM. G.H.A. Silver a swine's head within an orle of crosses 

crosslet fitchy gules. [G.] 
SWINBURN. N.C.H. vn, 132. Per fess gules and silver three cinquefoils 

countercoloured. [S.] 
SWINBURN, SIR WILL. G.H.A. Silver on a chief gules three cinquefoils silver. 

[G.] 
SWINHOE. R.N.D. 184, 237; N.C.H. n, 124. Silver three swine passant sable. 

[X.] 
SWINHOE (Cornhill). XVI. H.A. Sable a swine's head silver with gold tusks. 

[XVI.] 
SWINHOE, WALTER. C.D.S. iv, 276. (Silver) three swine within a border 

engrailed (sable). [S. ibid.'} 

SWYKE. V. 1575. Ermine three voided lozenges conjoined in fess. [V. 1575.] 
SYWARD. C.D.S. n, 963. Sable a cross flory silver. [H.] 

TAILBOYS. F.A. 73. Silver a saltire gules on a chief gules three escallops 

silver. [S.] 
TALBOT. H.N. in, ii, 305. Gules a lion rampant and a border engrailed gold. 

[B.] 
TEMPEST. R.W. in, 227. Silver a bend engrailed between six martlets (storm 

finches?) sable, a crescent gold for difference. [C.M.] 
TEMIEST, SIR RICHARD. I25b C.D.S. in, 1567. ... a chevron . . . between 

three martlets .... [S. ibid.~] 
TEMPLE, ANTHONY. M.P. (1502). Silver on a chevron sable five martlets silver. 

[G.] 

TENANT. R.W. ii, 497. Gules a tent silver. [C.M.] 
TEY. G.H.A. Sable on a bend silver three crosses crosslet gules. [G.] 
THIRLWALL. I25c H.N. n, iii, 144. Gules a chevron between three boars' 

heads silver. [X.] 

THIRKELD. N.C.H. v, 467. Silver a maunch gules. [G.] 
THORNBURGH. H.N. in, ii, 404. Ermine fretty and a chief gules. [X.] 
THORNTON, !25d F,A. 81, Sable a chevron and a chief indented silver. [T.] 



THE INDEX. 131 

THORPE. G.H.A. Cheeky gold and gules on a fess silver three martlets sable. 

PL] 
THROPTON, JOHN DE. S.D.T. ... a fess . . . and in chief two lions' heads 

rased .... [S.D.T. *] 

TIBTOT. H.N. in, ii, 372. Silver a saltire engrailed gules. [L.] 
TILLIOL. F.A. 84. Gules a lion rampant silver over all a baston azure. [X.] 
TISON. N.C.H. v, 417. Vert three lions rampant silver, crowned gold. [V.Y.] 
THOMPSON. R.W. i, 355. Per fess silver and sable, a fess embattled between 

three falcons countercoloured, a ring for difference. [C.M.] 
TOCKETT. N.C.H. v, 466. Silver a lion rampant azure over all a baston gules. 

[V.Y.] 
TOPCLIFFE, ROBERT DE.126 H.N. in, ii, 364. ... a chevron . . . between two 

hunting horns in chief ... in base a molet .... [S.D.T.*] 
TOWNSEND. H.H. 332. Azure a chevron ermine between three escallops silver. 

[G.] 
TREWicK.127 H.N. ii, i, 364. Quarterly silver and gules over all a buck's 

head cabossed and pierced through the nose with an arrow gold. 

[V. 1615.] 
TRBWICK, THOMAS DE. H.N. n, i, 364. Barry .... in chief three roundels 

.... [A.A. 3rd ser. i, 116.] 

TRUSSELL, SIR WILL. G.H.A. Silver a fret gules bezanty. [G.] 
TUGHALE. F.A. 68. Ermine on a fess .... three martlets .... [S.D.T.y] 
TUNSTALL. T.N. Sable three combs silver. [W.] 

TURPIN. F.A. 85. Gules on a bend silver three lions' heads rased sable. [G.] 
TT RBERVILLE. F.A. 77. Cheeky gold and azure a fess ermine. [R.] 
T\VENGE.l28 H.N. in, ii, 361. Silver a fess gules between three popinjays. 

[H.J 
TWYSILL, WILLIAM DE. S.D.T. ... a fess .... within a border .... 

charged with roundels .... [S.D.T. 2 ] 
TTES. N.C.H. n, 11. Silver a chevron gules. [H.] 
TYLER, SIR WILLIAM. L.S. (1491). Sable on a fess gold, between three cats 

passant, a cross moline between two crescents gules. [G.] 
TyNDALE.129 F.A. 55. Silver on a fess sable three sheaves gold. [I.] 
TYNDALE. G.H.A. Silver a fess gules between three sheaves sable. [G.] 
TYNDALE, THOMAS DE (Newcastle). S.D.T. ... a double headed eagle 

displayed .... [S.D.T. a ] 

w Misc. Charters, 4570, and Loc. xxVm. no. 2, A.D. 1345 : s' JOHANNIS . DE . 

THROPTON. 

5-3 Elemos. no. 3(d), A.D. 1367. 

Misc. Charters, 3645: s. BOBERTI : DE : TVGHALE x (PI. x, no. 21.) 
4-1 Spec. no. 40, A.D. 1344. 

a Misc. Charters, 4785, A.D. 1280 ; 4961, A.D. 1301 : *% s' THOME DE TYNDALE. 
(PI. x, no. 17.) 



132 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 

TYRWHIT. A. A. 2nd ser. i, 64. Gold a chevron between three birds (tirwhits; 
sable. [D.S.] 

UFFORD. H.N. m, i, 84. Sable a cross engrailed gold. [O.] 

UGHTBED. N.C.H. HI, 30. Gules on a cross patonce gold five pierced molets 

gules. [S.] 
ULCOTES.130 T.N. Paly of thirteen . . . within a border . . . charged with 

thirteen roundels .... [S.D.T. b ] 

IlMFBAViLLE.131 T.N. Gules crusilly and a cinquefoil gold. [H.] 
UMFRAVILLE, SIR GILBEBT. H.N. n, i, 6. Gold a cinquefoil gules and a border 

azure charged with ' ferrs ' (horseshoes) gules. [B.] 
UMFBAVILLE, SIB INGRAM. F.H.A. Gules an orle ermine, a label of five points 

azure. [F.] 
UMFBAVILLE, SIB EOBEBT, K.G. (Redesdale). H.N. H, i, 6. Gules crusilly and 

a cinquefoil gold over all a baston azure. [S.D.T. ] 
DMFBAVILLE, SIB THOMAS (Harbottle). S.D.T. (Gules) crusilly and a 

cinquefoil (gold) over all a baston engrailed (silver). [S.D.T. d ] 

VALENCE, EARL OF PEMBROKE. H.N. 11, ii, 41. Barry silver and azure an orle 

of martlets gules. [B.] 

VALOIGNES. N.C.H. i, 270. Paly wavy silver and gules. [X.] 
VAUX, JoHN.132 M.P. (1306). Silver a bend cheeky gold and gules. [Y.] 
VAUX. N.C.H. iv, 202. Device a cross patonce. [ibid. 203.] 
VAVASOUB. H.N. m, iii, 46. Gold a dance sable. [H.] 
VEBNON. D.S. (Gold) a bend (azure) a label of five points. [Seal D.S.] 
VESci.133 T.N. 1, Gules a cross patonce silver. [B.] 2, gold a cross sable. 

[F.] 

VILLIEBS. N.C.H. vm, 200. Silver on a cross gules five escallops gold. [G.] 
VIPONT. H.N. n, iii, 59. Gold six rings gules. [M.] 

WALDEVE. N.C.H. vn, 96 a lion rampant .... [S.D.T. 6 ] 

WALL, DEL. M.P. (1420). Gold and azure a fess embattled between three 

fleurs-de-lis all countercoloured. [G.] 

WALLis.134 H.N. n, iii, 83. Azure a bend embattled silver. [G.] 
WALLES. C.T.n.A. Silver a chevron sable in base four voided quatrefoils 

gules. [C.T.] 
WALLINGTON. H.N. n, i, 253. Silver a .chevron between three martlets gules. 

[V. 1666.] 

1 2-6 Spec. no. 19 : ^ SIGILLVM PHILIPI DE VLCOTES, (PI. ix, no. 3.) 
4-3 Pont. no. 9, A.D. 1368 : s' ROBERTI DE VMFRAVILL. (PI. x, no. 9.) 
Misc. Charters, 5480: SIGILL THOME VMFRAVILLE. (PI. x, no. 10.) 

B 3-2 Spec. no. 5 ; J SIGILL IOHANNJS FILJJ WALDEVJ. (PI, jx, no, ].) 



Arch. Ael 3 Ser. Vol. VI. 

Northumbrian Derivative Shields. Plate IV. 

UMFRAVILLE SERIES. 



Plate 7. 




BmfntbiUe. 



< hxmta0 Bmfratoille. it Robert EmfrabiUe. 




ir (iilfort ^tirrabxm. OTUntull. 



THE INDEX. 



133 



WARD, SIMON LE.l34a C.D.S. in, 419. Azure a cross paty gold. [N.] 
WABDE. E.W. i, 296. Azure a cross patonce gold, a molet for difference. 

[C.M.] 

WABENNE, WILLIAM, EARL. L.S. (1212). Cheeky gold and azure. [K.] 
WABMOUTH. V. 1615. Silver on a bend between two lions rampant azure three 

pierced molets gold. [V. 1615.] 

WATEBHOUSE. M.P. (1601). Gold a pile engrailed sable. [G.] 
WATEBTON. H.N. in, ii, 383. Barry silver and gules and three crescents 

sable. [X.] 
WATSON. E.W. 11, 39. Silver on a chevron engrailed sable, between three 

martlets vert, three crescents gold, a molet sable for difference. 

[V. 1666.] 

W T AUNCY. H.N. ii, i, 395. Silver on a cross sable five lions gold. [P. A.] 
WAUTON. H.N. in, i, 70. Silver a chevron sable. [N.] 
WEATSLED. H.N. in, ii, 376. Per chevron silver and azure three voided 

lozenges oountercoloured. [C.T.] 
WELDON.135 V. 1575. Silver a cinquefoil gules, on a chief gules a demi lion 

rampant gold. [G.] 
WELTON. E.W. i, 306. Gold a lion rampant dismembered gules, a molet for 

difference. [C.M.] 

WELLES. F.A. 84. Gold a lion rampant with a forked tail sable. [H.] 
WENDOUT. M.P. (1344). Gules a fess dancetty gold. [P.A.] 
WESsiNGTON.l35a H.N. in, ii, 300. Silver two bars gules in chief three molets 

gules. [G.] 
WESTON. N.C.H. i, 202. Gules crusilly fitchy gold a lion rampant silver over 

all a baston engrailed sable. [I.] 

WESTON, SIB JOHN. W.M. Silver a fess sable, a border gules bezanty. [N.] 
WETEWOOD. A. A. xiv, 39. Silver a fess wavy azure in chief three molets 

azure. [E.L.] 
WETWANG. N.C.H. n, 189. Silver a chevron azure between three lions' paws 

rased gules, on a chief sable three escucheons gold. [V. 1615.] 
WETWANG.136 N.C.H. ii, 90. Gules three cressets silver. [M.E.] 
WHALTON. N.C.H. in, 64 on a chevron .... three birds 

[S.D.T.*] 
WHABTON, LoBD.137 H.H. 367. Sable a maunch silver within a border gold 

charged with eight pairs of lions' paws rased saltireways gules. [XVI.] 
WHELPDALE. H.N. n, ii, 498. Silver three running greyhounds gules with 

gold collars. [E.L.] 
WHELPINGTON. E.W. i, 295. Gules on a chevron silver a crescent sable in 

base a molet gold, a chief vair gold and gules. [C.M.] 
WHITCHESTEB. A.A. xiv, 16. Party indented gold and vert. [N.E.] 

Misc. Charters, 2218 ; see S.S., pi. xi, no. 35. 



134 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 

WHITE. E.W. n, 159. Silver three cocks' heads rased sable combed and 

wattled gules a crescent for difference. [C.M.] 
WHITFIELD. H.N. n, iii, 100. Silver a bend between two cotises engrailed 

sable. [G.] 

WHITFIELD. E.W. in, 28. Gold two bends engrailed sable. [C.M.] 
WHITHILL. D.B.E. (1312). Ermine a bend indented of five fusils sable. [G.] 

WHITLEY. H.N. n, iii, 69 three ears of wheat .... [S.D.T.s] 

WHITTINGHAM. E.L.H.A. Silver a fess azure over all a lion rampant gules. 

[E.L.] 

WIDDBINGTON. F.A. 76. Quarterly silver and gules a baston sable. [I.] 
WIGTON. C.D.S. i, 332. Sable three molets and a border indented gold. [K.] 
WILKINSON. E.W. ii, 312. Sable a chevron between three whelks gold, a 

crescent for difference. [C.M.] 
WILLEY. Y. 1615. Party ermine and gules three chevrons counterco loured. 

[E.L.] 

WITTON, EGBERT DE.138 N.C.H. m, 64. Sable a water bouget silver. [G.] 
WOLLORE, DAVID DE. M.P. (1338). Gules three teasels gold. [G.] 
WOOD. N.C.H. i, 331. Azure on a bend silver three fleurs-de-lis sable, each 

charged with three bezants. [G.] 

WOTTON. H.H. 303. Silver a saltire engrailed sable. [G.] 
WRAY. N.C.H. vii, 173. Azure on a chief gold three martlets gules. [G.] 
WROTHE. M.P. (1572). Silver three lions rampant gules, a quarter sable fretty 

gold. [G.] 
WYCHARD. C.D.S. n, 175. Azure a chevron silver between three martlets 

gold. [P.A.] 
WYCLIFF. V. 1575. Silver on a chevron sable, between three crosses crosslet 

sable, three bucks' heads cabossed silver. [V. 1575.] 
WYLSTROPPE. H.N. in, ii, 224. Azure a chevron between three leopards silver. 

[Y.] 
WYRCESTRE. N.C.H. iv, 276. Silver on a chevron between three lions' heads 

rased gules crowned gold, three bezants. [P. A.] 
WYRKESWORTHE, WILL. DE. N.C.H. m, 64. Device, St. Andrew on his cross 

the ground powdered with vine branches and grapes. [S.D.T. h ] 

YELAND. T.N. . . . two bars . . . and in chief two molets .... [S.D.T. 1 ] 
YETON. H.N. m, ii, 367. Gold a bend sable. [G.] 

* Misc. Charters, 3979, A.D. 1312 ; * s WIL . . . . M . . : DE : 

WHETLAYE. (PI. X, no. 24.) 

11 Misc. Charters, 4213 and many others : * SIGILLVM WILLELMI BE WIRKES- 

WOBTH. 

! 2-2 Elemos. nos. 3, 4 and 5. (PL x, no. 2.) 



TOWNS AND MONASTERIES. 



135 



YOUNG. V. 1666 on a chevron three roundels in chief two 

cinquefoils .... [V. 1666.] 
YOUNGHUSBAND. N.C.H. i, 188. Silver on a bend sable three griffins' heads 

rased gold, on a chief azure three roundels silver. [C.M.] 
YOBK, EDMUND, DUKE OF. H.N. m, ii, 263. Quarterly France ancient and 

England, a label of three points silver each charged with three roundels 

gules. [O.B.] 

ZOUCHE, EOGER LE. N.C.H. in, 65. Azure ten bezants gold. [L.] 

The following probably bore arms, but their shields are, at present, unknown : 



AKELD. A. A. xxv, 172. 
BIKER. T.N. 

BITTLESDEN. H.N. in, i, 152. 
BOLAM. H.N. n, i, 333. 
CALVELEY. H.N. in, i, 90. 
EMBLETON. C.D.S. n, 415. 
EMELDON. A. A. 3rd ser. i, 60. 
FRISMARISCO. M.P. (1302). 
GAMELTHORPE. N.C.H. vn, 404. 
GAUGY. N.C.H. n, 229. 



HORNCLIFF. L.S. (1328). 
MORISLAW. R.W. i, 296. 
PRAT. H.N. m, i, 5. 
RETHEBY. L.S. (1307). 
SHOTLINGTON. H.H. 303. 
SWEETHOPE. M.P. (1300). 
TOGSTON. T.N. 
VISCOUNT, LE. N.C.H. 11, 11. 
WARNHAM. N.C.H. i, 213. 
WHARTHON. N.C.H. vn, 392. 



WHYTENHAM. H.H. 374. 



TOWNS AND MONASTERIES OF NORTHUMBERLAND. 

ALNWICK : Device of St. Michael standing upon the dragon and thrusting a spear 
down its throat. On his left arm a shield charged with the cross patonce 
of Vesci. Legend, "fr s' COMVNE i BVBGI : DE i ALNEWIKE J 

BERWICK UPON TWEED : Device : Obverse, a chained bear in front of a tree upon 
which two birds are seated all in a tressure flory counterflory. Legend, 

fr VNK : VILLE : BERWICI EDAM. Reverse, The Father 

seated holding a cross in front of him, upon which is our Lord ; legend, 

'I" BENED .... SANCTA : TRIN (D.T. Misc. Charters, 5983, A.D. 

1330). The later seal has an escutcheon of France and England quarterly 
on either side of the tree, and above all under a canopy a king seated. 
The legend is SIGILLI : MAIOBATVS : VILLE : BERWICI : SVPER : TWEDAM. 

CORBRIDGB : Device a plain cross between four human heads. (D.T. Misc. 
Charters, 460; A.D. 1233.) Later seals have the cross flory and an 
ornament at the intersection. (D.T. Misc. Charters, 463 and 476, A.D. 
1452.) 




ALNNVICK. 




COKBRIDOE. 




BERWICK-ON-TWEED. 
SEALS OF TOWNS OF NORTHUMBERLAND. 



THE ORDINARY. 137 

MORPETH : Barry silver and gules over all a tower triple towered gold, on a 
border azure eight martlets gold. (Grant by Norroy King of Arms, 1552. 
The shield is that of Sir Roger Merlay with the castle for difference ; 
see note 100 for its origin. ) 

NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE : Gules three castles triple towered silver. (It is not 
known when this shield was granted. William Flower, Norroy King 
of Arms, granted a crest and supporters in 1575. The motto was added 
later, probably after the defence of the town against the Scots in 1644. ) 

Only two of the monasteries in Northumberland appear to have used an 
armorial shield : 

HEXHAM : Azure a saltire gold (the cross of St. Andrew, to whom the church 
was dedicated). 

TYNEMOUTH : Gules three crowns gold (the shield attributed by later heralds 
to St. Oswin, king of Deira, who it is said was buried there). 

THE ORDINAEY. 

BARS INCLUDING BARRY. 

Ermine two bars gules ... ... ... Mauduit 

Ermine two bars gemell gules ... ... ... .. Huntercombe 

Ermine two bars vert Delaval 

Gold two bars sable ... ... ... Davell 

Gules two bars ermine ... ... ... Boteland 

Gules two bars fusilly silver ... ... ... ... ... Preston 

Silver two bars azure ... ... ... ... Hilton 

Silver two bars azure and a border engrailed sable ... Parr 

Silver two bars gules ... ... ... Marton 

Silver two bars geniell sable ... ... ... Guldef ord 

Gold three bars azure Aske 

Gold three bars gules ... ... ... ... Muschamp 

Gold three bars wavy gules ... ... ... ... ... Drummond 

Gules three bars ermine ... ... ... Kirkton 

Silver three bars gules ... ... ... Multon ; Soules 

Barry gold and azure Constable 

Barry gold and sable Sclby 

Barry gold and gules ... ... ... Fitz Alan 

Barry silver and azure ... ... ... Grey 



138 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 



Barry vair and gules 

Barry wavy ermine and silver 

Barry wavy ermine and gules 

Barry wavy gules and silver 

Barry wavy sable and gold 

Barry gold and azure on a bend engrailed sable between 

two cotises gules three escallops gold 

Ermine two bars gemell and a chief gules 

Gold two bars azure and a chief gules 

Gules two bars silver and in chief two molets silver . . . 
Silver two bars and in chief three escallops azure 

Silver two bars and in chief three molets azure 

Silver two bars and in chief three roundels azure 

Silver two bars and in chief three crosses crosslet gules.. 

Silver two bars gules and in chief three molets sable . . . 

Silver two bars and in chief three molets gules 

Silver two bars and in chief three cocks gules 

Silver two bars gules and in chief three cinquefoils sable 
Silver two bars gules, on a canton gules a cross moline 

gold 

Silver two bars gules, on a quarter gules a leopard of 

England 

(Silver) two bars and in chief three pierced cinquefoils 

(sable) 

.... two bars .... and in chief two molets .... 
(Silver) two bars (azure) in chief three chaplets (gules) 

Azure three bars gemell and a chief gold 

. three bars . . and in chief three roundels . . 



Coucy 

Marisco 

Lacy 

Brewere 

Blunt 

Saxby 

Dichend 

Maners 

Caunton 

Errington 

Eslington 

Carnaby; Halton 

Hardbread 

Amundeville 

Wessington 

Blakiston 

Denton 

Kirkby 
Lancaster 

Killingworth 

Yeland 

Basset 

Meynell 
Knut 



Barry ermine and sable and in chief three molets sable Selby 

Barry gold and gules in chief three cinquefoils azure . . . Eshet 

Barry silver and azure, in chief three roundels gules ... Adam of Jesmond 

Barry silver and azure in chief three buckles gules ... Cotum 

Barry silver and azure in chief three rings azure ... Cramlington 

Barry silver and gules on a chief azure three bezants ... Errington 

Barry silver and gules in chief three cinquefoils sable . . . Errington 

Barry silver and gules, a label of five points azure . . . Gobion 

Barry silver and azure in chief three roundels gules . . . Grey 

Sable three bars silver in chief three roundels silver . . . Moston 

Vair four bars gules on a canton six bezants Barrowe 

Barry wavy . . . and a chief Bidell 

Barry .... and in chief three roundels Trewick 



THE ORDINARY. 

Barry of twelve silver and gules on a border azure eight 

martlets gold ... ... .... ... Morpeth 

Barry gules and silver on a border azure eight martlets 

gold ... ... ... Somerville 

Barry silver and gules, a border azure charged with 

martlets gold ... ... ... ... Merlay 

Azure two bars gold over all a bend sable Potts 

Ermine two bars gules over all a cross crosslet gold ... Chirdon 

Ermine two bars . . . over all a bend ... Sir Hugh Delaval 

.... three bars . . . over all on a bend . . . three 

(arrow heads) Horton 

Silver three bars sable over all a maunch gules Magneby 

Barry silver and gules over all three crescents sable . . . Waterton 

Barry silver and gules over all a cross patonce sable ... Gower 

Barry silver and azure over all on a bend gules a bezant Grey 

Barry silver and azure, on a bend gules three bezants ... Grey 

Barry of eight silver and gules, a bend azure ... ... Mulcaster 

Barry silver and gules, over all a lion rampant sable ... Stuteville 

Barry of ten silver and vert over all a griffin gold . . . Downing 

Barry silver and azure, an orle of martlets gules ... Valence 

Barry ermine and . . . over all a bend ... Robert Delaval 

Silver on two bars gules three molets silver, two and one Mannering 

Gold two bars azure between three crowns gules Genevill 



139 



Sable a bat displayed silver on a chief gules three cinque- 
foils gold ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Barker 

Silver a boar azure on a chief gold two molets azure ... Bacon 

Silver on a mount vert a bull passant gules ... ... Ridley 

Gules three running greyhounds gold with azure collars Harding 

Gules a leopard silver, crowned gold Lisle 

Sable three running ' leverers ' silver with gold collars Mauleverer 

Silver three running 'whelps ' gules with gold collars ... Whelpdale 

Azure a lion rampant guardant gold, armed gules ... Buston 
Azure floretty and a lion rampant gold, a baston gobony 

silver and gules ... ... ... ... Beaumont 

Ermine a lion rampant azure... ... ... ... ... Lisle 






140 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 



Gold a lion rampant azure 

Gold a lion rampant azure over all a baston gules 

Gold a lion rampant gules 

Gold a lion dismembered gules 

Gold a lion dismembered gules, a molet for difference . . . 

Gold a lion rampant sable 

Gold a lion rampant sable armed gules ... 

Gold a lion rampant sable, wounded on the shoulder 

gules 

Gold a lion rampant with a forked tail sable 

Gold a lion rampant and a border engrailed silver 
Gold a lion rampant with a forked tail vert, a crescent 

for difference 

Gules a lion rampant erminois 

Gules a lion gold 

Gules billety and a lion rampant gold 

Gules a lion rampant and a border engrailed gold 

Gules a lion rampant silver 

Gules billety gold and a lion rampant silver 

Gules a lion rampant with forked tail silver, a crescent 

for difference 

Gules a lion rampant with a forked tail silver ... 
Gules a lion rampant silver over all a baston azure 
Gules crusilly fitchy gold a lion rampant silver, a baston 

engrailed sable ... 

Gules a lion rampant silver, a border gobony gold and 

silver 

Gules a lion rampant and a border engrailed silver 
Gules a lion rampant and a border indented silver and a 

baston azure 

Gules a lion rampant silver, within a border silver, 

charged with roses gules 

Per bend gold and sable a lion rampant counter- 
coloured 

Silver a lion rampant azure over all a baston gules 
Sable a lion rampant with a forked tail gold 

Sable a lion rampant silver crowned gold ... 

Silver a lion rampant gules 

Silver a lion rampant with a forked tail gules, crowned 

gold 

Silver a lion gules on a chief sable three escallops silver 

Silver a lion rampant sable 

Silver a lion rampant sable 



Percy 

Percy 

Charlton 

Mautalent 

Welton 

Bromwych 

Blackborrow 

Langton 

Welles 

Sir Robert Knollys 

Dudley 

Stote 

Arundel 

Bulmer 

Talbot 

Mowbray 

Creppinge 

Stott 

Simon de Montfort 

Tilliol 

Weston 

John Mowbray 

Grey of Heton ; Eiddell 

Sir Thomas Grey 
Patrick, earl of Dunbar 

Simpson 

Tockett 

Kyngeston 

Segrave 

Ashendon 

St. Paul 
Eussell 
Matthew 
Stapleton 



THE ORDINARY. 



141 



Silver a lion between six fleurs-de-lis sable 

Silver a lion rampant and a border engrailed sable 

Vert a lion rampant ermine 

Vert a lion rampant silver 

Vert a lion rampant and a border engrailed silver 
. . . . a lion rampant .... 



.... a lion rampant guardant 

.... powdered with acorns ... a lion rampant . . . 
.... a lion rampant . . . between three ears of wheat 
Azure three lions rampant gold ... 

Azure three lions rampant gold and a chief silver 

Azure three lions passant silver 

Gules two lions passant silver, a double tressure flory 

counter-flory gold 

Gold three lions passant sable 

Gold six lions rampant sable... ... 

Per pale azure and gules, three lions rampant silver a 

border gobony gold and gules 
Sable two lions passant, paly silver and gules 
Sable three lions rampant silver 

Silver three lions rampant gules 

Silver three lions rampant gules, a border indented azure 
Silver three lions rampant gules, a quarter sable fretty 

gold ... ... ... 

Vert three lions rampant silver crowned gold 

.... three lions rampant quartering (silver) 

a fess dancetty (vert) ... 

Gules a leopard silver 

Gules crusilly gold, a leopard silver crowned gold 

Gules a leopard within an orle of crosses crosslet gold ... 

Gules three leopards gold, a label of France 

Gules three demi leopards gold 

Silver two leopards gules on a bend vert three eagles 

gold 



Archbold 

Lawrence Acton 

Bolbec 

Home 

Heton 

Waldeve, Silksworth, 

Hoppen, Edlingham, 

Roseles,Plessis,Brun. 

toft, Newenham 
Gunnerton 
Richard Acton 
Fitz Waldeve 
Lord Dacre of the 

South; Fiennes 
Sir Walter Gras 
Camville 

Felton 
Carrew 
Leyburn 

Herbert 

Strangeways 

Sir John Engleys 

Ryhill 

Sir Walterde Gloucestre 

Wrothe 
Tison 

Thomas Griffith 

Sr. de Kidesdale 

Sir Gerard Lisle 

Astell 

Edmund Crouchback 

Eland 

Sir Humphrey Lyttle- 
bury 



Silver three moles sable 



Mitford 



142 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 



Vert a stag at speed with gold horns 
Azure three bucks passant gold 

Vert three bucks lodged silver with gold horns 

Vert a stag silver and a chief gold 

Silver a buck leaping sable . . . 
Vert three sitting squirrels silver ... 

Silver three swine passant sable 

Gules a wolf passant silver 

Gules a griffin gold 

Silver a dragon gules, on a chief azure three fleurs-de-lis 

gold 
Sable a griffin silver 



Fowberry 

Green 

Anderson 

Cerf 

Buckton 

Baxter 

Swinhoe 

Lowes 

Batail 

Eeede 
Hindley 



Azure a bend gold 

Azure a bend embattled silver 

Cheeky silver and gules a bend azure 

Ermine a bend indented of five fusils sable 

Gold a bend azure (a label of five points) 

(Gold) a bend (azure) 

Gold a bend sable 

Gules a bend gold 

Gules a bend wavy silver 

Silver a bend engrailed azure 

Silver a bend cheeky gold and gules 

Silver a bend gules, a border sable 

Silver a bend embattled gules over all in chief a 

cullis azure 

Silver a bend sable, a label gules 

Silver a bend embattled counter embattled sable 

Silver a bend embattled sable 

Silver a bend engrailed sable 

Silver a bend wavy sable 

Gules a bend ermine on a canton gold a lion's head 

gules 

Sable a bend gold on a chief silver three escallops 

Gold two bends engrailed sable 

Gules two bends vair and a canton gold 

Gules three bends vair ... 

Silver three bends sable, in chief a crescent sable 

Bendy of twelve gold and azure 

Bendy gold and gules 



port- 



rased 
gules 



Scrope 

Wallis 

Bekering 

Whithill 

Vernon 

Haliburton 

Mauley ; Yettoii 

Morell 

Cheswick 

Reygate 

Vaux 

Fannel 

Lewen 

St. Peter 

Sabraham 

Sir Henry Stanton 

Eadclifl 

Barton 

Milbank 

Moderby 

Whitfield 

Ford 

Bray 

Cooke 

Peter de Montfort 

Bishopdale 






THE ORDINARY. 



143 



Per bend dancetty azure and silver three pierced cinque- 
foils counter-coloured ... 
Per bend gules and gold, on a chief azure a demi eagle 

gold 

Azure a bend gold between two swans silver 

Gold a bend between two cotises and three boars' heads 

sable, a border gules ... 

Gules a bend silver between two cotises gold 
Azure a bend between six crosses crosslet fitchy silver . . . 
Gules a bend between six crosses crosslet fitchy silver... 
Sable a bend gold between two dolphins silver ... 
Gules a bend dancetty between six martlets silver 

Silver a bend between six buckles azure ... 

Silver a bend azure between two cotises wavy azure 
Silver a bend between two cotises engrailed sable 
Silver a bend azure between three hunting horns sable 

stringed gules ... 
Silver a bend engrailed between six martlets sable, a 

crescent for difference ... 

Silver a bend indented vert between two cotises gules ... 
Silver a bend between six molets gules, a martlet for 

difference 

. . . . a bend between six ' f raises '... 

Azure on a bend silver three billets azure.!. 

Azure on a bend cotised silver three billets sable 

Azure on a bend silver three escallops gules 

Azure on a bend silver three fleurs-de-lis sable on each 

three bezants ... ... ... ... 

Gold on a bend sable three molets silver 

Gules on a bend ermine three pierced cinquefoils sable 
Gold on a bend gules three goats passant silver ... 
Gules on a bend silver three eagles displayed gules 
Gules on a bend silver three eagles displayed vert 
Gules on a bend silver three eagles displayed vert, a bor- 
der engrailed silver 

Gules on a bend silver four eagles displayed vert 
Gules on a bend silver three leaves vert, a crescent for 

difference 

Gules on a bend silver three lions' heads rased sable ... 
Gules on a bend silver three molets azure ... 
Gules on a bend gold three padlocks azure 
Gules on a bend silver three cinquefoils sable 
Silver on a bend azure six fleurs-de-lis gold , 



Chater 

Haly 
Jenison 

Crawden 

Prendergast 

Mar 

Howard 

Fresborn 

Scruteville; Scurfield 

Hadham 

Creyk 

Whitfield 

Penycok 

Tempest 
Kendall 

Ledgert 

Friselle 

Alder 

Hag'gerstone 

Middleham 

Wood 

Hotham ; Howden 

Rod dam 

Halliwell 

Strother of Fowberry 

Strother of Wallington 

Strother of Jesmond 
Baxter 

Huntley 

Turpin 

Shaf toe ; Aynesley 

Lockwood 

Sir Giles Boroudon 

Clapham 



144 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 



Silver on a bend azure three sheaves gold Fitton 

Silver on a bend azure three stars gold, a baston sinister 

gules Baxter 

Silver on a bend gules three fleurs-de-lis silver Coulson 

Silver on a bend gules three martlets silver Bradford 

Silver on a bend gules three martlets gold, a cross cross- 
let sable for difference Stevenson 

Silver on a bend gules three sheaves gold Malteby 

Silver on a bend sable three bells gold Belton 

Silver on a bend sable three bulls' heads cabossed silver Cresswell 

Silver on a bend sable three crescents silver Elmedon 

Sable on a bend silver three crosses crosslet gules . . . Tey 

Silver on a bend sable three eagles gold John de Boulton 

Silver on a bend sable three griffins' heads rased gold on 

a chief azure three roundels silver ... Younghusband 

Silver on a bend sable three lozenges ermine Dent 

Silver on a bend sable three quatrefoils silver Doxf ord 

Silver on a bend cotised sable three martlets gold . . . Etherstone 

Silver on a bend cotised sable three molets silver . . . Amand de Routhe 

Silver on a bend sable three owls silver Savyll 

Silver on a bend sable three roses silver Carey 

Silver on a bend sable three stags' heads cabossed silver Forset 

.... on a bend three .... Brandon 

.... on a bend .... three billets Sokpeth 

.... on a bend .... three crosses moline .... a 

label of five points ... Richard Scot 

.... on a bend .... a lion passant .... a label of 

five points Adam Scot 

. . . . on a bend .... three cinquefoils .... ... John de Essindon 

. . . . on a bend .... three lozenges Graper 

Silver on a bend azure between two cotises gules three 

eagles displayed gold Robert de Sapy 

Silver on a bend, between two lions rampant azure, three 

pierced molets gold Wai-mouth 

Silver on a bend gules, between two swans, three 

roundels silver Clarke 

Silver on a bend sable, between three Cornish choughs 

three lions' heads rased silver . Carr 



BIRDS. 

Gules on a rock a bird silver 

Gules six popinjays silver 

Silver three pelicans in their piety gules 



Rock 

Lumley 

Ormiston 



THE ORDINARY. 



145 



Azure a roundel silver between three cocks silver 
Gold three ' corbies ' ... 

Azure an eagle displayed barry silver and gules 

.... an eagle displayed 

.... a double-headed eagle displayed .... 

Azure crusilly fitchy and three eagles displayed gold ... 

Gold an eagle displayed purple 

Gold an eagle displayed purple, a baston gobony silver 

and azure... 

Sable an eagle displayed gold 
Sable an eagle displayed silver a border azure ... 

Silver three eagles displayed gules ... ... 

Vert six eagles displayed gold ... 

.... three geese 

Gules three herons silver 

Gules three herons gold, in chief a cross crosslet gold . . . 

Silver a jay vert beak and legs gules 

Azure fourteen martlets gold... 

Azure three martlets and a border engrailed silver 

Sable three martlets gold between two flaunches silver 

each charged with a lion passant sable 

Silver on a pale sable three martlets gold, a molet for 

difference 

.... three flying ' merles ' paleways 

Azure three storks rising silver, in chief a molet gold . . . 

Sable six swallows silver 

Silver three demi birds azure rising from wreaths gold 

and gules ... ... ... ... 

.... a water-fowl .... in the sinister chief two 



crosses .... 



Cock 

Corbet 

Castre 

Slaveley 

Thos. de Tyndale 

Somerville 

Philip de Lindesay 

Symon de Lindesay 

Nunwick 

del Park 

Clifford 

Piers de Gaveston 

Gosebeck 

Heron 

Heron (Chipchase) 

Jaye 

Appelby 

Adderstone 

Browne 

Nicholson 
Merlay 
Gibson 
Arundell 

Bird 
El wick 



BOUGETS. 



Azure three bougets gold 

Azure three bougets sable ... ... ... ... ... Beadnell 

Gold three bougets sable ... ... ... ... ... Ros 

Sable a bouget silver ... ... ... ... ... ... Witton 

Sable three bougets silver Elrington ; Lilburn 

Silver three bougets gules ... ... ... 'Procter 

Silver three bougets sable ... ... ... ... ... Ilderton 

CHECKY. 

Cheeky gold and azure 

Cheeky gold and azure a canton ermine and a border 
gules 



3 SER. VOL. VI. 



Warenne 

John, earl of Brittany 
10 



146 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

Cheeky gold and azure a canton ermine and a border 



gules 



CRESCENTS. 



Azure crusilly and three crescents silver . . . 
. three crescents .... 



Dreux,earlof Richmond 



Durham 
Farnacres 



Gules three cressets silver 
Silver three cressets sable 



CRESSETS. 



Wetwang 
Hebburn 



CHEVRON. 

Ermine a chevron engrailed sable 

Gold a chevron engrailed gules 

Gules crusilly and a chevron gold 

Sable a chevron gold 

Sable crusilly and a chevron silver 

Silver a chevron gules 

Silver a chevron sable ... 

Party silver and sable a chevron counter-coloured 

Ermine two chevrons sable 

Gules two chevrons gold 

Gold two chevrons gules 

Silver two chevrons and a border gules 

Silver two chevrons gules and a label vert 

Silver three chevrons braced sable 

Azure a chevron between three crosses patonce silver ... 
Azure a chevron ermine between three escallops silver ... 

Azure a chevron between three leopards silver 

Azure a chevron silver between three martlets gold 
Azure a chevron ermine between three pierced molets 

gold 
Azure a chevron gold between three towers silver 

Gold a chevron between three sheaves gules 

Gold a chevron gules between three nettle leaves 

Gold a chevron between three birds sable 

Gules a chevron ermine between three voided lozenges 

gold 

Gules a chevron between three cinquefoils gold 

Gules a chevron between three arms in armour silver ... 

Gules a chevron between three boars' heads silver 



Cosins 

Chauncy 

Kyme 

Redmershell 

Paris 

Tyes 

Wanton 

Lawson 

Illeigh 

Stratherne 

Robartfield 

Grendon 

St. Maur 

Brackenbury 

Glanton 

Townsend 

Wylstroppe 

Wychard 

Draper 

Raynton 

Reed 

Mallabar 

Tyrwhit 

Belgrave 
Chambers 
Armorer 
Thirlwall 



THE ORDINARY. 



147 



Gules crusilly paty and a chevron silver, a label of three 

points azure 
Gules a chevron silver between three eagles' heads rased 

gold, a crescent for difference 
Gules a chevron between three escallops silver ... 
Gules a chevron between three feathers silver 

Gules a chevron between three falcons silver 

Gules a chevron between three hawks silver 
Gules a chevron between three herons silver 
Gules a chevron gold between in chief two leopards' 
heads and in base a stringed bugle horn silver . . . 
Gules a chevron between three lozenges gold 
Gules a chevron between three sea peewits silver 
Sable a chevron gold between three crescents ermine ... 
Sable a chevron between three cinquefoils gold ... 
Sable a chevron between three whelks gold, a crescent 

for difference 

Sable a chevron silver between three eagles displayed 

gold ... ... 

Sable a chevron between three ' keelings ' silver 
Sable a chevron between three escallops silver ... 
Sable a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis silver 
Sable a chevron between three keys and a border en- 
grailed silver 

Sable a chevron between three stags' heads cabossed sil- 
ver 

Sable a chevron between three wolves' heads rased silver 
Silver a chevron between three martlets azure ... 
Silver a chevron cheeky gold and azure between three 

bugle horns sable 

Silver a chevron gules between three fleurs-de-lis azure 
Silver a chevron engrailed between three leopards' heads 

gules 

Silver a chevron engrailed gules between three voided 

molets azure 

Silver a chevron between three billets gules 
Silver a chevron between three hinds' heads gules 
Silver a chevron between three martlets gules 
Silver a chevron between three molets gules 
Silver a chevron between three pineapples gules... 
Silver a chevron between three popinjays gules ... 
Silver a chevron between three roundels gules 



Berkeley 

Ellison 

Charron 

Featherstonehaugh 

Hedley 

Eidley 

Heron 

Slingsby 

Grey 

Sayer 

Babthorpe 

Kenton 

Wilkinson 

Addison 
Killinghall 
Milburn 
Caux 

Harding 

Lacy 

Reynould 

Bingfield 

Sempell 
Bellasis 

Halsham 

Revelay 

Kelly 

Beckwith 

Wallington 

Sherwood 

Apperly 

Heighten 

Bibaud 



148 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 



Silver a chevron sable in base four voided quatrefoils 
gules 

Silver a chevron sable between three wolves' heads rased 
gules ... 

Silver a chevron between three billets sable 

Silver a chevron between three martlets sable 

Silver a chevron between three moles sable 

Silver a chevron between three rooks sable 

Silver a chevron between three sheaves sable on a canton 
azure a fret gold 

Silver a chevron between three stags' heads rased sable 

Silver a chevron between three stars sable 

Silver a chevron vert between three crescents gules 

Silver a chevron vert between three hazel leaves 

Silver a chevron vert between three hunting horns sable 

Silver a chevron between three branches of southern- 
wood vert 

Silver two chevrons sable between three rnolets in pale 
gules 

.... a chevron between three crosses moline 

.... a chevron between three hawks and a label of 
three points 

.... a chevron between two hunting horns in chief 
and in base a molet ... 

.... a chevron between three leopards' heads .... 

.... a chevron between three roundels 

.... a chevron between three trefoils 

.... a chevron between three escallops .... 

.... a chevron between three martlets 

Silver on a chevron gules three leopards silver 

Silver on a chevron sable three escallops gold 
Silver on a chevron sable three arrow heads silver 
Silver three chevrons sable on each five bezants 

Silver on a chevron engrailed sable three crescents silver 

Silver on a chevron sable five martlets silver 

.... on a chevron engrailed .... three pierced 

cinquefoils .... 

.... on a chevron .... three [undecipherable] 
Gules on a chevron silver three stars sable 

.... on a chevron .... three birds 

.... a chevron between three griffins 



Walles 

Lovel 
Bilton 

Lawson 
Mitford 
Eokeby 

Blake 

Collingwood 

Mordaunt 

Marshall 

Heselrigg 

Forster 

Southeron 

Paxton 
Galon 

Haukyn 

Topcliff 

Hecham 

John de Morpeth 

Colonia 

Nicholas Scot 

Eich. Tempest 

Boulton 

Mering 

Bickerton 

Collingwood; Cuthbert 

Colvile 
Fostone 
Temple 

Fencotes 

Angerton 

Carr 

Whalton 

Burnton 



THE ORDINARY. 



149 



Azure on a chevron between three covered cups gold 

three crescents gules ... ... ... ... ... Buteler 

Gold on a chevron gules, between three birds' heads 
rased sable, three acorns slipped silver, on a can- 
ton sable three martlets silver ... ... ... Anderson 

Gold on a chevron between three sheaves gules, three 

ears of corn silver Keed 

Gules on a chevron silver, a crescent sable in base a 

molet gold, a chief vair gold and gules Whelpington 

Gules on a chevron between three cinquefoils gold, 

three cranes azure Chambers 

Gules on a chevron between three falcons silver three 

roundels sable ... ... ... ... ... ... Kidley 

Per chevron embattled gold and azure three martlets 

counter-coloured ... ... ... Hodshon 

Per chevron gules and silver three crosses crosslet 

counter-coloured ... ... ... ... ... Chartney 

Per chevron silver and azure three voided lozenges 

counter-coloured ... ... ... ... ... Weatsled 

Per chevron silver and gules a crescent counter-coloured Chapman 

Per chevron silver and azure three fish hooks counter- 
coloured ...... ... ... ... ... ... Fysher 

Sable on a chevron gold between three martlets gold 

three pierced molets Monkton 

Silver on a chevron, between three lions' heads rased 

gules, crowned gold, three bezants Wyrcestre 

Silver on a chevron sable between three stringed bugle 

horns gules three voided lozenges gold ... ... De Ruda 

Silver on a chevron sable, between three crosses crosslet 

sable, three bucks' heads cabossed silver Wycliff 

.... on a chevron .... between three birds .... 

three boars' heads couped ... ... Haliden 

.... on a chevron .... between three cinquefoils 

.... three arrow heads ... ... Paulin 

.... on a chevron .... between three cinquefoils 

.... three crosses John Scot 

Silver on a chevron between three bugle horns sable, 

three bezants Dodsworth 

Silver on a chevron sable between three popinjays three 

pears gold Penreth 

Silver on a chevron engrailed sable between three mart- 
lets vert, three crescents gold, a molet sable for 
difference Watson 



150 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 



Silver on & chevron, between three molets sable, three 

escallops silver ... Blackett 

Silver on a chevron between three stags' heads rased 

sable, three cinquefoils gold Collingwood 

Silver on a chevron between three stars sable, three 

fleurs-de-lis silver Nessfield 

Silver on a chevron between three martlets sable, a 

molet gold Marley 

Gold a chevron between three demi lions azure, on a 
chief gules three roundels silver each charged with 
a molet sable Hall 

Gold a chevron gules and a chief vair ... St. Quinton 

Azure three chevrons interlaced and a chief gold ... Fitz Hugh 

Azure a chevron between three feathers silver, in chief 

three roundels silver Pierson 

Silver a chevron engrailed, between three scorpions sable 

on a chief azure three fleurs-de-lis gold ... ... Cole 

Vert a chevron and in chief three fleurs-de-lis gold ... Boutfiower 

Silver a chevron sable, on a chief sable three bulls' 

heads silver Beverlay 

Gules a chevron between three lions' paws rased silver 
within a border silver, over all on a chief silver, 
an eagle displayed silver a molet sable for differ- 
ence Brown 

Silver a chevron azure between three lions' paws rased 

gules on a chief sable three escucheons gold ... Wetwang 

Sable a chevron and a chief indented silver ... ... Thornton 

.... on a chevron .... three roundels .... and in 

chief two cinquefoils .... ... Young 

. . . . two chevrons Geyveleston 



Azure a chief gules over all a double-tailed lion gold 

Ermine fretty and a chief gules 

Gold fretty gules and a chief azure 

Gold a chief indented azure 

Gules a chief embattled silver 

Gules a chief silver 

Silver a chief azure, over all a bend engrailed gules 

Silver a chief azure, a baston gules 

Silver a chief cheeky gold and azure 

Silver fretty and a chief gules a ring for difference 

Silver a fleur-de-lis sable and a chief gules 



Hastang 

Thornburgh 

Norwell 

Glanville 

Binchester 

Clovell 

Holden 

Sir Ralph Cromwell 

Hausted 

Salkeld 

Rogers 



THE ORDINARY. 



151 



Silver masoned and a chief indented sable 

.... a chief .... over all a bend 

Azure on a chief indented gold three molets gules 

Azure on a chief gold three martlets gules 

Azure fretty gold, on a chief gold a lion between two 

molets gules 
Gold a molet gules, on a chief indented gules two molets 

gold ... 

Gold on a chief engrailed silver a popinjay between 

two molets sable 
Gules on a chief dancetty silver three martlets sable a 

crescent for difference 

Gules on a chief silver three bells sable ... 
Paly silver and azure on a chief gules three bezants 
Purple on a chief indented silver a lion rampant purple 
Sable on a chief silver three lions' heads rased sable, a 

crescent for difference ... 

Silver three martlets gules on a chief gules three mart- 
lets silver 
Silver on a chief gules three bezants a crescent on a 

molet for difference 
Silver fretty gules on a chief gules three leopards' faces 

gold 

Silver on a chief indented gules a lion passant gold 
Silver on a chief gules three cinquefoils silver ... 
Silver on a chief sable three escallops gold 
Silver on a chief sable a lion passant silver 
Silver on a chief sable two molets gold 
Silver on a chief ^able a lion passant gold 
Vair on a chief gules a cross patonce silver 



Sir Thos. Keynell 

Hansard 

More 

Wray 

Lemington 
Eglingham 
Pepady 

Atkinson 
Bell 

Donington 
Skipton 

Richardson 

Fenwick 

Russell 

Liddell 

Chambre 

Sir Will. Swinburn 

Graham 

Bamburgh 

Salvayn 

Malefant 

Ralph fitz Roger 



CROSS. 

Azure a cross pa ty gold Simon le Warde 

Azure a cross patonce gold Warde 

Azure a cross patonce silver ... ... ... ... ... Goldesborough 

Azure billety and a cross moline silver ... ... ... Norreys 

Gold a mill-rind cross gules ... ... ... ... ... Laton 

Gold a cross patonce gules ... ... ... ... ... Carlile 

Gold a cross patonce gules, a rose gules in the quarter... Sir Will. Carlile 

Gold a cross flory sable ... ... ... ... ... Lamplough 

Gold a cross sable ... ... ... Vesci; Aton 

Gold a cross flory sable ... ... ... ... ... Sampson 

Gules a cross ermine . Lethani 



152 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 



Gules a mill-rind cross ermine 

Gules a cross patonce gold 

Gules a cross patonce silver 

Gules a cross flory silver, an escallop silver in the quar- 
ter 

Gules a cross flory silver 

Sable a cross engrailed gold 

Sable a cross flory silver 

Sable a cross gold, a cinquefoil silver in the quarter . . . 

Sable a cross engrailed silver 

Silver a cross gules 

Silver a cross gules and a martlet sable 

Silver a mill-rind cross sable 

Silver a cross sable a fleur-de-lis gules in the quarter . . . 

Silver three crosses paty gules 

.... a cross 

. . . . a cross engrailed .... ... 

.... a cross moline .... 

Silver a cross couped silver in chief two flying birds gold 
Silver on a cross engrailed gules five crescents silver on 

a chief azure three bezants 

Silver a cross engrailed gules on a chief gules a lion 

passant gold 

Gules a cross silver and a border engrailed gold ... 
Sable a cross gold between four fleurs-de-lis silver 
Silver a cross between four martlets within a border 

sable 

Silver a cross engrailed gules between four molets azure, 

on a chief gold three roses gules 

Silver a cross patonce gules between four martlets vert 
Silver a cross between four lions rampant gules ... 
.... a cross .... between four fleurs-de-lis .... 
.... a cross .... between four lions passant .... 
.... a cross engrailed .... within a border engrailed 

.... a cross between four .... 

Gold on a cross gules five escallops silver 

Gold a cross gules ' a les mascles de ver ' 

Gules on a cross patonce gold five pierced molets gules... 

Gules on a cross silver five crosses crosslet gules 

Gules on a cross silver five roundels gules, a molet gold 

in the quarter 

Silver on a cross gules five sheaves gold 



Bek 

Latimer 
Vesci; Aton 

Brandling 

Sir John Alton 

Ufford 

Syward 

Moresby 

Kaymes 

Sir Michael Hertelawe 

Sir Andrew Hertelawe 

(Harcla) 

Fulthorpe, Alnwick 
Egliston 
Colwell 
Marshall 
Menevill 
Carrowe 
Hill 

Greene 

Lawrence 
Carbonel 
Bankes 

Kichard de Berry 

Allgood 

Balden 

Carlile 

Sadelyngstones 

Acton 

Thomas Menevill 

Eshet 

Bigod 

Friville 

Ughtred 

Essendon 

Rawe 
Swinburne 



THE ORDINARY. 



153 



Silver on a cross gules five escallops gold ... 
Silver on a cross gules five fleurs-de-lis gold 
Silver on a cross sable a molet silver 
Silver on a cross sable a pierced molet silver 
Silver on a cross sable a leopard's head gold 
Silver on a cross sable five lions gold 
Silver on a mill-rind cross sable five stars gold 
. on a cross .... five crosses crosslet 



the dexter chief a crescent .... 

molet 

Vert on a cross silver five roundels gules 



in the sinister a 



Azure a fess indented of five fusils gold, a baston gules 
Cheeky gold and azure a fess ermine 
Cheeky gold and azure a fess gules ... 

Ermine a fess gules 

Gold a fess engrailed of five fusils gules ... 

Gold a dance sable 

Gules crusilly silver and a fess cheeky silver and sable 

Gules a fess cheeky silver and azure 

Gules a fess ermine and a label of three points ... 

Gules a fess dancetty gold 

Gules a fess indented of five fusils silver ... 

Sable a fess indented of five fusils gold 
Silver a fess azure over all a lion rampant gules ... 
Silver a fess indented of five fusils gules ... 
Silver a fess engrailed of three fusils gules 

.... a fess 

.... a fess cheeky .... a label of five points and over 

all a bend .... 

Gold a fess gules in chief three roundels gules ... 
Silver a fess wavy azure in chief three molets azure 
.... a fess .... and in chief two lions' heads rased 

Azure a fess cheeky gold and sable between three sea 
pies silver 

Azure a fess ermine between three eagles' heads rased 
silver 

Azure a dance between three gerfalcons gold 

Azure a fess silver between three leopards' faces gold ... 

Azure a fess between three martlets silver 

Azure a fess silver between three crosses crosslet gold ... 



Villiers 

Duresme 

Carliol 

Coupland 

Bridges 

Wauncy 

Gourley 



Cambo 
Grenville 



Alnham 

Turbervill 

Clifford 

Chartres 

Pinckney 

Vavasour 

Botille 

Lindesay 

Acton 

Wendout 

Daubyn 

Ferlington 

Whittingham 

Bosvile 

Montagu 

Maleville 

Mentethe 

Colville 

Wetewood 

Thropton 

Sawyer 

Spencer 

Hanvill 

Beaumond 

Aslakeby 

Aldeburgh 



154 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND : 



Azure a fess silver between three lions gold 

Gules a fess between three cushions silver 

Gold and azure a fess embattled between three fleurs-de- 
lis all counter-coloured 

Gold a fess embattled between six martlets gules 

Gold a fess between three crescents gules 

Gold a fess wavy between six cinquefoils gules 

Gold a fess between three mill-rind crosses gules 

Gold a fess between three sheaves gules 

Gold a fess vair silver and azure between three falcons 
vert 

Gold a fess between three crescents sable 

Gules a fess gold between three bezants 

Gules a fess between three hedgehogs silver 

Gules a fess between three herons silver 

Gules a fess between three popinjays silver, a baston 
azure 

Gules a fess gold between three shovellers silver 

Gules a fess between three shovellers silver 

Gules a fess between three wheels silver ... 

Per fess silver and sable a fess embattled between three 
falcons all counter-coloured ... ... 

Vert a fess between three geese silver 

Vert a fess between three harts' heads cabossed silver . . . 

Sable a fess between three lambs passant silver 

Sable a fess engrailed between three dexter hands bend- 
ways silver 

Sable a fess between three crescents silver 

Sable a fess between three crescents silver 

Sable a fess between three escallops silver a crescent 
gules for difference 

Sable a fess gold between three asses passant silver 

Silver a fess between three pierced molets azure 

Silver a fess between three sheaves azure 

Silver a fess cheeky gold and azure between six martlets 
gules 

Silver a fess between three bougets gules 

Silver a fess between three crescents gules 

Silver a fess between three crescents gules 

Silver a fess gules between three eagles displayed sable 

Silver a fess gules between three eagles displayed sable 

Silver a fess gules between three maunches sable 

Silver a fess gules between three popinjays 



Bolingbroke 
Hoton 

Wall 

de la Ley 

Boynton 

Davison 

Colville 

Shefeld 

Herden 

Rochester 

Fauside 

Claxton 

Heron 

Fitz Marmaduke 
Herle 
Jackson 
Cartington 

Thompson 
G os wick 
Hertwayton 
Lambton 

Bates 
Fitz Simon 
Coventry 

Milburn 

Askew 

Paisley 

Riddell ; Eidsdall 

Hampton 

Ellerker 

Ogle 

Butevilain 

Ellingham 

Elmham 

Hastings 

Thwenge 



THE ORDINARY. 



155 



Silver a fess gules between three popinjays 

Silver a fess gules between three popinjays vert 

Silver a fess nebuly gules between six fleurs-de-lis sable 

Silver a fess between three rings gold 

Silver a fess sable and a border gules bezanty 

Silver a fess gules between three sheaves sable ... 

Silver a fess between three sheaves sable ... 

Silver a fess engrailed between three gryphons' heads 

rased sable 

Silver a fess between six fleurs-de-lis sable 
Silver a fess between three molets sable 
Silver a fess between three moles sable 
.... a fess between three bears .... 
.... a fess .... between three birds .... and a 

border engrailed .... ... 

.... a fess .... between two crescents .... in 

chief and a pierced molet .... in base 

.... a fess engrailed .... between three molets . . . 
.... a fess .... within a border .... charged with 

roundels .... 

.... a fess .... between three mells 

Azure a fess indented of five fusils gold on each an 

escallop gules ... 
Cheeky gold and gules on a fess silver three martlets 

sable 

Gules on a fess gold three lions' heads azure 

Gules on a fess dancetty silver between six lions gold, 

three martlets sable 
Ermine on a fess gules three escallops silver 

Ermine on a fess .... three martlets 

Paly silver and gules on a fess sable three rings gold ... 

Silver on a fess gules three bezants 

Silver on a fess sable three sheaves gold ... 

Vert on a fess gold three cinquefoils gules 

. . . . on a fess .... three hunting horns 

Azure on a fess gold between three demi lions silver a 

cannon between two roundels sable 
Gules on a fess silver between three sheaves gold, three 

escallops sable ... 
Gules on a fess, between three popinjays silver, three 

molets sable 



Lumley 

Fitz Geoffrey 

Dobson 

Avenal 

Weston 

Tyndale 

Blenkinsopp ; Benley 

Hall 

Acres 

Baret 

Mitford 

Lyham 

Seton 

Durham 
Skelton 

Twysill 
Denum 

Plumpton 

Thorpe 
Brabant 

Ap Griffith 

Ingram 

Tughale 

Farneby 

Gamboe 

Devilstone ; Boltby ; 

Tyndale 
Grethed 
Forester de Corbrig 

Bennet 
Eden 

Sir Robt. Lumley 



156 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 



Sable on a fess gold between three cats passant, a cross 
moline between two crescents gules 

Sable on a fess between three goats passant silver with 
gold horns, three roundels 

Silver on a fess doubly cotised gules three fleurs-de-lis 
silver 

Silver on a fess indented of five fusils gules, between 
three bears' heads rased sable, five molets silver... 

Silver on a fess engrailed between three martlets sable 
three rings gold 

Silver on a fess azure, between three roundels each 
charged with a griffin's head rased silver, a griffin 
passant between two escallops gold ... 

Silver on a fess gules a lion passant silver between three 
arrow heads sable 

Silver on a fess between three moles sable, three escal- 
lops gold 

.... on a fess .... between three escallops . ... a 
lion passant 

Per fess gules and silver three cinquefoils counter- 
coloured 

Per fess embattled sable and gold in chief a castle gold 
in base a crescent gules 

Per fess silver and sable a pale counter-coloured and 
three storks sable 

Silver in chief a running greyhound and in base three 
rings gules 

Per fess silver and sable a pale engrailed and counter- 
coloured and three goats' heads rased sable with 
gold horns 

Silver a fess between three crescents gules quartering 
silver an escucheon azure on a chief azure six 
rings gold over all a bend silver 

Silver a fess between three crescents gules quartering 
Bertram and over all on a chief azure six rings 
gold 



FISH. 



Gules a dolphin silver 
Vert three dolphins paleways silver... 
Gules three ' lucies ' paleways silver 
Sable three salmon paleways silver ... 



Tyler 

Marr 

Normanville 

Bewick 

Bigge 

Greene 

Roseden 

Mitford 

He 

Swinburne 

Castle 

Storey 

Rhodes 

Roper 

Ogle of Ellington 

Ogle of Eglingham 



Fisseburn 
Dolphanby 
Lucy 
Orde 



THE ORDINARY. 



157 



FLOWERS. 

Gold a cinquefoil gules and a border azure charged with 
horse shoes gold ... ... ... 

Gules crusilly and a cinquefoil gold... 

Gules crusilly and a cinquefoil gold, a bastou engrailed 
silver 

Gules crusilly and a cinquefoil gold, a baston azure ... 

Sable a cinquefoil within an orle of martlets silver 

Silver a cinquefoil gules on a chief gules a demi lion 
rampant gold 

Azure crusilly and three ciuquef oils silver... 

Azure three cinquefoils gold ... 

Gold three voided cinquefoils sable ... 

Gules three cinquefoils gold 

Silver three pierced cinquefoils sable 

Silver three cinquefoils sable... 

Silver three cinquefoils sable, pierced gold 

Silver three cinquefoils and a border engrailed sable ... 

.... a cinquefoil .... and a chief 

Azure three fleurs-de-lis gold on a border gules eight 
buckles gold, quartering Stuart, over all, on an 
escucheon Lennox ... ... ... 

Azure three fleurs-de-lis ermine 

Gules three roses silver 

Silver three roses gules 

Silver six roses (fraises) gules 

Gules three teasels gold 



HEADS. 
Silver three cocks' heads rased sable, combed and wattled 

gules 

Gules three dogs' heads rased silver, sable collars 
Silver three dragons' heads sable 
Azure a horse's head rased silver on a chief silver three 

molets sable 

Gules three horses' heads rased silver 
Gules three horses' heads couped silver bridled sable . . . 
Gules three horses' heads silver bridled gules 
Sable three horses' heads rased silver 

Silver three leopards' faces azure ... 

Silver a falcon's head rased between three molets gules 
Gold three lions' heads rased sable . . 



Sir Gilbert Umfraville 
Umfraville 

Sir Thos. Umfraville 
Sir Bobt. Umfraville 
Fitz Michael 

Weldon 

Darcy 

Bardolf 

Clennell 

Farendon 

Horsley 

Burradon 

Killingworth 

Sir Gilbert Burradon 

Letewell 



Stewart, earl of 
Newcastle 
Burgh 

Walter Espec 
Hopper; Inghow 
Frisel 
Wollore 



White 

Hall 

Langwath 

Hayning 

Horsley 

Horsley 

Horsley 

Horsley 

Atteweld 

Fowler 

Scott 



158 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 



Silver three lions' heads rased and a border engrailed 

sable 

Silver three lions' heads rased sable... 

Gules three stags' heads couped silver with gold horns... 

Gules three stags' heads cabossed silver 

Sable three bucks' heads cabossed silver 

Silver three stags' heads cabossed gules 

Silver three rein-deers' heads cabossed sable 

Vert a stag's head cabossed silver between the horns a 

cross paty silver 

.... a stag's head cabossed .... between the horns 

a cross 

Sable a swine's head silver with gold tusks 

Silver a swine's head within an orle of crosses crosslet 

fitchy gules 

Gules three swines' heads silver 

Gules three swines' heads couped silver 

Silver three boars' heads erect rased sable 



Otteley 

Burchester 

Collingwood 

Haluton 

Cavendish 

Collingwood 

Bowet 

Eland 

Corbridge 
Swinhoe 

Sir Adam Swinburne 

Swinburne 

Eobson 

Booth 



Azure an orle silver 

Ermine an orle and a border engrailed gules 

Ermine on a quarter gules an orle silver 

Gold an orle azure 

Gold an orle azure a crescent sable for difference 

Gules an orle ermine a label of five points azure ... 

Gules an orle silver 

Gules crusilly and an orle gold 

Gules an orle silver over all a bend gold 

Silver an orle gules, in chief three martlets gules 

Silver an orle sable 

Silver on an orle gules eight escallops gold 



Spring 

Hepple 

Surtees 

Bertram 

Bartram 

Ingram Umfreville- 

Baliol 

Bertram 

Lythegreins 

Butherford 

Lucker 

Darreyns 



Paly gold and sable 

Paly gold and sable on the centre pale a leopard gold . . . 
Paly gold and azure on a chief gules three crosses paty 

gold 

Paly silver and azure 

Paly silver and azure on a bend sable three rings silver 

Paly wavy silver and gules Valoignes 



Strabolgi 

Sir Aymer de Athol 

Alnwick 

Blakeburne 

Sanderson 



THE ORDINARY. 



159 



Paly of thirteen .... and a border .... charged 

with thirteen roundels .... Ulcotes 

Party indented gold and vert Whitchester 

Party ermine and gules three chevrons counter-coloured Willey 



QUARTERLY. 

Quarterly ermine and azure a cross gold ... 
Quarterly ermine and gules the second and third quar- 
ters charged with four rings .... 

Quarterly ermine and gules in the second and third 

quarters a goat's head rased silver ... 
Quarterly gold and gules a baston sable ... ... 

Quarterly gold and gules a baston sable and a label vert 
Quarterly gold and gules on a bend sable three escallops 

silver ... ... ... ... 

Quarterly gold and gules a ' craw ' in the quarter 
Quarterly gold and sable, a lion passant gules in the 

quarter 
Quarterly gules and gold a cross patonce silver in the 

quarter 

Quarterly gules and gold a stag's head cabossed in the 

quarter 

Quarterly sable and silver a cross counter-coloured 
Quarterly gold and azure a cross paty counter-coloured 
Quarterly silver and gules over all a buck's head 

cabossed and pierced through the nose with an 

arrow gold 

Quarterly silver and gules a baston sable ... 
Quarterly indented per fess gold and azure and a bend 

gules 

Quarterly per fess indented gold and gules 
Quarterly France and England a label silver each point 

charged with a canton gules ... 

Quarterly France (modern) and England, a label of five 
points the two dexter of Brittany the three sinis- 
ter of France ... ... ... 

Quarterly France (ancient) and England a label of three 
points silver each charged with three roundels 
gules 

Quarterly France (ancient) and England over all a label 
of Brittany 



Osborne 
Stanhope 

Morton 

Fitz Eoger; Clavering 

Sir John Clavering 

Eure 
Craster 

Boyville 
Middleton 

Gilbert Middleton 

Lorraine 

Collingbourne 

Trewick 
Widdrington 

Blunville 
Leighton 

George, duke of 
Clarence 



John, duke of Bedford 

Edmund, duke of York 
John of Gaunt 



160 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 



RINGS. 



Azure six rings gold 
Gold six rings gules 
Gold six rings sable 
Gules six rings gold 
Gules a ring between six S's gold 



Musgrave 
Vipont 
Lowther 
John Cromwell 
Essington 



Gold six rings sable on a chief silver three molets sable Ellington 



SALTIRE. 

Azure a saltire engrailed silver 

Ermine a saltire gules 

Ermine a saltire engrailed gules a label vert ... 

Gold a saltire and a chief gules 

Gules crusilly gold and a saltire silver 

Gules a saltire silver, a label gobony silver and azure a 
crescent sable for difference ; Quartering Montagu 
and Monthermer, over all an escucheon of 
pretence. Quarterly : 1 Bradstone, 2 Inglethorpe, 
3 de la Pole, 4 Montagu 

Gules a saltire between four crosses crosslet gold 

Gules a saltire silver 

Gules a saltire vair silver and sable 

Sable a saltire silver ... 

Party sable and azure a saltire silver charged with five 

cocks sable between three naming towers and two 

spears saltireways in base gold 
Per saltire gold and gules, the gules fretty gold 
Per saltire gold and silver a cross paty azure 

Silver a saltire engrailed gules 

Silver a saltire couped gules, a ring gules for difference 
Silver a saltire gules on a chief sable three bezants 
Silver a saltire gules, on a chief gules three escallops 

silver 

Silver a saltire between four molets pierced gules 
Silver a saltire gules between four ' X's ' sable, a molet 

for difference 

Silver a saltire gules between three leaves vert on a chief 

azure three battle axes gold 

Silver a saltire engrailed sable and a label gules 

Silver a saltire engrailed sable 



Hauley 

Skargill 

Butetort 

Bruce 

Denny 



John Neville, earl of 

Northumberland 
Franceys 
Neville 
Morwick 
Aston 



Johnson 
Gunston 

Pudsey, earl of North- 
umberland 
Tibtot 
Buzley 
Lawrence Acton 

Tailboys 
Heworth 

Nixon 

Burrell 
Cokfeld 
Wotton 



THE ORDINARY. 



161 



Silver a saltire vert 

Silver a saltire engrailed vert 
Silver three saltires couped and engrailed sable 
.... a saltire .... between four cinquefoils 
.... on a saltire between three birds . . . . 
crosses crosslet fitchy .... 



three 



Kirkbridge 
Brigham 
Benton 
Haudene 

Peter de Richmond 



MISCELLANEOUS CHARGES. 

Silver three arrow-heads gules 

Silver two battle axes saltireways sable ... 

Silver three bees sable 

Silver three bees and in chief a crescent sable ... 

(Jules three bird bolts silver 

Azure three ' hair-bottles ' bendways gold... 

Ermine three long-bows paleways gules 

.... three buckles 

Gules three 'burdens' pileways silver 

A /are three butterflies silver 

Gules a castle silver 

.... a chalice .... 

Silver three chaplets gules and a border engrailed gules 

Silvor three chaplets bendways gules between two bas- 
tons sable ... 

Sable three combs silver 

Silver a covered cup gules within an orle of eight 

roundels gules ... 
Gules three covered cups gold within a border engrailed 

gold 

Sable crusilly fitchy and three covered cups silver 
Gules three cushions ermine ... ... ... ... 

Gules three cushions silver ... ... 

Silver three cushions gules ... 

Gules three escallops silver 

Silver three escallops gules 

Sable three escallops in pale silver ... 

Silver three escallops paleways gules, between two bas- 

tons sable ... ... 

Ermine an escucheon gules 

Gules an escucheon and a border moletty silver 

Silver an escucheon sable within an orle of cinquefoils 

gules .'.. 

Silver three escucheons sable 



Archer 

Maddison 

Beal 

Bee 

Boltesham 

Harbottle 

Bowes 

Bonkille 

Bordoun 

Muschamp; Presfen 

Doncaster 

Audre 

Roger Lascelles 

Roger de Saxton 
Tunstall 

Cuthbert 

Clitheroe 

Stryvelyn 

Redman 

Greystock 

Randolf 

Dacre 

Harbottle 

Botecomb 

De la Haye 

Holgrave 

Crammeville 

Hedworth 

Sir John Loudham 



3 HER. VOL, vi, 



11 



162 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 



.... an escucheon .... over all on a bend .... 

three molets 

.... an escucheon .... in an orle of six escallops 

Azure fretty gold and a label gules 

Azure powdered with fleurs-de-lis and fretty gold 

Azure fretty silver and a border gold 

Gules fretty silver 

Gules fretty silver and a label vert 

Sable fretty gold 

Sable fretty silver 

Sable fretty silver and a label gules 

Silver a fret gules bezanty 

Vert fretty silver, a crescent for difference 

Azure three hautboys and three crosses crosslet gold . . . 
Azure three helmets gold, in chief a crescent silver 
Gules two helmets silver in chief a sheaf gold in base 

between the helmets a fleur-de-lis within a crescent 

ermine 

Gules three helmets silver 

Silver three horns sable 

.... three horse shoes 

Silver crusilly fitchy and three horse shoes sable 

Gold in chief three ' burnett ' leaves vert in base a bugle 

horn sable stringed vert 

Silver three holly leaves a crescent for difference 

Silver three hazel leaves 

.... three ears of wheat 

Azure three lozenges and a chief gold 

Ermine three lozenges azure 

Ermine three voided lozenges conjoined in fess 

Lozengy silver and gules 

Sable three lozenges ermine 

Silver three lozenges gules each charged with a saltire 

silver 

.... six lozenges 

.... a lymphead .... within a border wavy charged 

with garbs .... 

Masculy gules and ermine on a quarter azure a mill-rind 

cross gold 

Azure a maunch ermine 

Azure a maunch ermine and a baston gules 



Lumley 

Kellawe 

Sir Rich. Mundeville 

Morville 

Londe 

Huddleston 

Fleming 

Maltravers 

Haverington 

Harrington 

Trussell 

Salkeld 

Burdon 

Edon 



Chomeley 

Minot 

Bellingham 

Marshall 

Bowth 

Burnett 

Headlam 

Heselrigg 

Whitley 

Galway 

Delaval 

Swyke 

Fitz William 

Dent 

Dalton 
Bollesdon 

Alan of Argyle 

Mauburne 

Conyers 

Norton 



THE ORDINARY. 



163 



Azure a maunch gold, a ring sable for difference Lord Conyers 

Gold a maunch gules Lord Hastings 

Gules a maunch silver ... ... ... de la Mare 

Gules a maunch and an orle of cinquefoils silver ... Aclum 
Sable a maunch silver within a border gold charged with 

eight pairs of lions' paws rased saltireways gules Lord Wharton 

Silver a maunch azure ... Flammaville 

Silver a maunch gules ... ... ... Thirkeld 

Silver a maunch sable ... ... ... ... Sir Kalph Hastings 

Azure three molets silver ... ... ... Wm. of Moray 

A /nre in chief three molets silver Wm. of Douglas 

Gules three pierced molets silver Gilbert Hansard 

Sable three molets and a border indented gold ... ... Wigton 

Gules three lions' paws rased silver... ... ... ... Newdigate 

Gules three pears gold... ... ... ... ... ... Peareth 

Gold a pile engrailed sable ... Waterhouse 

Gold three piles gules and a border azure bezanty . . . Basset 

Silver three pitchers gules and a border sable bezanty. . . Monboucher 

Azure ten roundels gold (bezants) ... ... ... ... Zouche 

Gules three roundels silver, each charged with a squirrel 

gules, sitting and cracking a nut ... ... ... Cresswell 

Sable ten roundels silver Punchardon 

Silver a roundel between three ' D's ' sable Dixon 

Silver three roundels gules, a molet azure for difference Snow 
Silver three roundels sable each charged with a crescent 

gold ... ... ... ... Ovington 

Silver ten roundels gules ... ... ... Babington 

Vert six bezants ... ... ... ... Hewicke 

Gold three sheaves gules ... ... ... Pressen 

Gules three sheaves gold ... ... ... ... ... Comyn 

Sable three shacklebolts silver ... ... ... ... Anderton 

.... a pair of shears .... within a border engrailed 

.... ... ... ... ... ... Fawdon 

Sable two shin-bones saltireways silver ... ... ... Newton 

Sable three swords paleways silver ... ... Eawling 

Gules a tent silver ... ... ... ... ... ... Tenant 

Gules three oak trees silver with gold acorns ... ... Anderson 

Gold a pear tree fruited gules Piriton 

Silver three stocks of trees rased sable ... Stockett 

. . . . a tree erased ... ... John de Birtley 

.... three branches of a tree Farnelaw 

Yair silver and gules Beehe 



164 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 



DEVICES. 

An anchor 

A wild boar 

A pair of branks 

A cross patonce 

A herring between a cross and a fleur-de-lis 

A lion passant 

An eight rayed flower 

A sheaf of corn 

Five stars 

A sword between two birds 

St. Andrew on his cross, the ground strewn with vine 

branches and grapes 

An open right hand placed fessways 



Bywell 

Fitz Main 

Brankston 

Vaux 

Herring 

Howburne 

Fitz Ealph 

Cornhill 

Scremerston 

John de Graystanes 

Wyrkesworth 
Schilvington 



INDEX TO THE ORDINARY. 



Charge. 
Bars, including Barry 
Bars, and in chief 
Bars, and over all 
On Bars 
Beasts- 
Bat 


Page 
137 
138 
. 139 

139 

. 139 


Charge. 
Birds- 
Cocks 
Corbies 
Eagles 
Herons 
Jay ... 


Page 
144 
... 145 
... 145 
... 145 
... 145 
... 145 


Boar 
Bull 


139 
139 


Martlets 
Storks 


... 145 

..'. 145 


Dogs and hounds ... 
Lions 


139 
140 


Swallows 
Bougets 


... 145 
... 145 


Leopards 
Moles 


141 
141 


Cheeky 
Crescents 


... 145 
146 


Stags and bucks 
Squirrels 
Swine 
Wolf 
Griffin and dragon ... 
Bend and bendy 
Per bend 


142 
142 
142 
142 
142 
142 
143 


Cressets 
Chevron 
Chevron between ... 
On a chevron 
On a chevron between 
Chevron, and in chief 
Chief 


... 146 
146 
.. 146 
... 148 
... 149 
... 150 
150 


Bend between 
On a bend 
On a bend between 


143 
143 
144 


On a chief ... 
Cross 
Cross, and in chief... 


... 151 
151 
... 152 



INDEX TO THE ORDINARY. 



165 



Charge. Page 

Cross between ......... 152 

On a cross ... ... ...... 152 

Fess 153 

Fess, and in chief ... ... ... 153 

Fess between ... . ... 153 

Onafess ...... ... ... 155 

On a f ess between ...... ... 155 

Fish ............... 156 

Flowers .............. 157 



Heads 

Cock's 

Dog's ...... 

Dragon's .. 

Horse's ... 

Leopard's ... 

Falcon's 

Lion's ... 

Stag's 

Swine's ... 
Orle 

Paly and per pale 
Quarterly 
Rings 
Sal tire 



157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
157 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
159 
160 
160 



Persaltire 160 

Saltire between ... 161 

Miscellaneous Charges. 

Arrowheads 161 

Battle axes 161 

Bees 161 

Bottles 161 

Bars .161 



Miscellaneous Charges. Page 

Butterflies 161 

Castle 161 

Chalice ... 161 

Chaplets 161 

Combs .. 161 

Cups ... ... 161 

Cushions ... ... ... ... 161 

Escallops ... 161 

Escutcheons ... ... ... ... 161 

Fretty 162 

Hautboys 162 

Helmets 162 

Horseshoes 162 

Leaves ... ... ... ... ... 162 

Lozenges ... ... ... ... 162 

Maunch 162 

Molets 163 

Paws 163 

Pears 163 

Pile 163 

Pitchers 163 

Roundels 163 

Sheaves... ... ... ... ... 163 

Shacklebolts 163 

Shears 163 

Shin bones 163 

Sword 163 

Tent ... 163 

Trees 163 

Vair 163 

Devices... ,. 164 



166 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND : 



NOTES. 

1 This is the differenced shield of the Actons of Warwickshire and Wor- 
cestershire (G.), with whom the Northumbrian family was not connected 
(A. A. 3rd ser. i, 121.) It seems impossible, in view of the various and 
different shields given in the text, now to determine their correct family 
shield, if indeed they ever had one. 

Each member of the family appears to have adopted different bearings. 
The evidence of the seals is conclusive, so far as their users are concerned, 
and one is inclined to give considerable weight to the early e Northern Eoll ' 
(A. A. 3rd ser. n, 174), which distinctly ascribes the ermine fess to 'Acton of 
Newcastell,' who perhaps imagined a connexion with the better known west 
country families. 

2 Derived from the shield of Robert of Sokpeth, who in 1341 sealed with, 
on a bend three billets (V. 1615). N.O. (Genealogist, N.S., vol. vii) gives 
for Alder of Prendwick, silver a cross between four rooks flying sable. 

3 This shield was borne by William of Alnwick, bishop of Norwich, 1436- 
1449 (Blason of Episcopacy, 63), in memory probably of bishop Bek, lord of 
Alnwick between the Vescis and the Percys. G. gives for ' Alnwick/ gold a 
cross sable, the entire arms of Vesci. The common seal of the town of Alnwick 
shows the ' great archangel Michael ' slaying the dragon, his shield em- 
hlasoned with the cross patonce of Vesci. (T.A. i, 99. See Seal, p. 136.} 

4 The charges are the same as borne by Washington. Early seals used 
by both families bear the device of a lion passant (seals in the collection 
of Eev. W. Greenwell). This similarity of device and arms points to -the 
common origin of the two families. 

5 The quartering was granted, 1 Edward vi (1547). 

5* Legend ' s' THOME DE GRIFFITH.' The colours of the quartering are 
taken from the Thornton shield blasoned in XVI, where it is quartered for 
Griffith. 

5b A seal of Eobert Archer in the possession of the Rev. William Green- 
well has a chevron between the arrow heads. 

6 V. 1575 omits the chevron. 

7 This shield is blasoned in the rolls for Ashendon of Kent. 

See p * 8hie ! d 1S bl A a 7 8 ned in a window i* the chancel of Ponteland church. 
See Proc. Soc. Anhq. Newc. 3rd ser. m, 55. 

8 The arms of Vesci assumed by Gilbert of Aton. The original shield 
o A ton was barry gold and azure on a canton gules a cross flor/silver (G ) 
See A.A. 3rd ser. in, 237, and T.A. i 394 



NOTES. 167 

9 The differenced arms of Shaftoe. 

10 This shield is possibly canting adopted as a play upon their name from 
the similarity of the charge to the ' ballium ' of a castle. The shield appears 
with many differences in the various rolls. The following are some of the 
chief: 

In F. ' Alexndr Baillol/ silver an orle gules. 

' William Bailloll,' gold an orle azure a label of five points gules. 
' Ingram d'Bailloll,' gules an orle ermine. 

In B. ' Hugh de Ballioll/ de goules oue ung faux escochon d'argent oue 
ung escochon d'azur oue ung lion rampat d'argent Coronne 
d'or en la Corniere. 

' Eustace de Balioll,' d'azur au faus escocheon d'or crusule d'or. 
In G. ' Baylioll,' gold an orle vair a label of five points gules. 
In all the principal charge remains, the distinction is change of colour or 
powdering by small charges, marks of cadency are unknown. See seals, 
N.C.H. vi, 48. 

11 For the many differences used by this family see Dugdale's 'Ancient 
Usage in Bearing Arms ' and roll N. 

11 This shield is blasoned for Sir William Basset in N. The seal is 
wrongly described in A. A. 1st ser. n, 279. 

12 A seal attached to deed of 1577 shows three squirrels. XV makes 
the squirrels gold. 

13 N.O. gives for this family, sable three codlings paleways silver; a 
more likely shield if the name is derived from the fishing village of Beadnell. 

14 Quartering azure three sheaves gold (Comyn). (See Garter plate.) The 
brass of William Beaumont (ob. 1507) bears quarterly, 1, Beaumont; 2, Comyn; 
3, Phelip; 4, Bardolf (O.B. i, 147). See also A. A. 2nd ser. i, 24. 

15 See A. A. 3rd ser. in, 276. G. gives for Sir Roger Bellingham, silver 
a bugle horn sable stringed gules. 

16 E.L. gives, gules three sheaves within a border engrailed gold. The 
sheaves derive feudally from those of Tyndale, and they in turn from Comyn, 
by whom they would be adopted in canting allusion to his name. G. gives 
also, gules six rings gold a border engrailed silver, derived from the Viponts 
through Musgrave. 

17 N.O. gives the canting shield, azure three pheons (bolts) gold. The 
shield given in the text is that of Tyndale, whose heiress married Eichard of 
Boltby. See A.A. 2nd ser. x, 42. 

18 Probably derived feudally from the cinquefoil of Umfreville. See also 
A.A. 3rd ser. n, 174, 177. In 1302 Sir Walter Burgdon, sheriff of Lanark, 
seals with three pierced cinquefoils (C.D.S. n, 1321). 



168 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

19 N.O. gives gold in chief three fleurs-de-lis sable. 

20 Adam de Bowes seals with, a fess charged with three crosses fitchy 
between three crosses moline. See Surtees, Durham, seals, pi. x, no. 37. 

21 C.T. and V. 1615 give, azure on a bend silver three martlets azure. 

22 V. 1615 places a lion's head rased between two battle axes on the chief. 

23 The original arms of this family appear to have been a bend flory 
shown on seal attached to a deed of 1387 (V. 1615). See also A.A. 2nd ser. 
xiv, 315 and note ; ibid. 3rd ser. i, 128, and in, 267. 

24 V. 1615. Carr of Woodhall quarters this shield with Errington. 
25C.M. makes the lion's head gold. V. 1666 blasons, ' pards' heads' 

rased gold. 

26 A.A. xiv, 397, mentions a seal of 1452 shewing these charges, which are 
probably canting. See also the visitations. 

27 This shield is doubtful. P. A., quoting no authority, gives it for 
4 Coucy.' G. makes the chevron gold for ' Sr. de Cause of Norfolk/ In 
Durham Treasury (4-3 Ebor, no. 15, A.D. 1177) a seal of Hugo de Calz bears a 

lion + SIGILLUM HUGONIS DE CALZ. 

One of Adam de Cauce (2-5 Ebor., nos. 19 and 20, A.D. 1398 and 1407) bears 
a bend charged with three roses between six crosses and the legend 

SIGILLUM ADE DE CAUCE. 

28 See Herald and Genealogist, vi, 120 : and The Genealogist, vn, 74. 

29 See A.A. 3rd ser. m, 286. 

30 This shield appears to be derived from the canting device of Heriz, 
who on a deed of 1244 to William of Claxton sealed with a hedgehog (Fr. 
' herison '). (Deed in Rev. Wm. Greenwell's Collection.) A seal of Leonis of 
Claxton (D.T. Misc. Charters, 5803) bears the same device with the legend 
LEONIS DE HERIIS. A series of seals in D.T. bears the shield in the text, one of 
Robert of Claxton of 1474 omits the fess. See also Surtees, Durham, seals, 
pi. x, no. 15. 

31 Possibly derived from the Umfraville cinquefoil. N.O. gives to them 
the curious shield, azure a dexter hand clothed with a sleeve and holding a 
truncheon silver. See also shield carved in Alwinton church. 

32 This shield does not appear in the rolls, but P. A. blasons as in the 
text. For the shield as borne by Richard Clifford see under Ellingham. 

33V. 1575 assigns to this family, silver a chevron azure between three 
stags' heads sable, each holding a leaf in the mouth. C.T. omits the leaf. 
The ancient shield appears to be the stags' heads cabossed gules as given by 
N.R. and G. 



NOTES. 169 

34 There appears to be confusion between Collingwood and Colville in this 
shield. G. gives the same shield for Cuthbert Colvile of Northumberland, for 
whom it is also blasoned in XV. 

35 For interesting note on Colville shield see N.C.H. i, 179. G. gives the 
additional shield, silver a cross paty gules. 

36 Probably adopted in canting allusion to the name, the charges being 
sheaves of ' cummin.' 

37 For note on this ancient shield see 41 Surt. Soc. publ. 48n. An early 
seal is depicted in Surtees, Durham, seals, pi. vi, no. 11. A seal of 1186 has 
an arm clothed with a sleeve, but not on a shield. A seal of William 
' Cosneris ' bears the device of an arm clothed in a sleeve with a long lappet 
hanging from the wrist and holding a fleur-de-lis in the hand (D'Anisy's 
Charles Normandes, pi. ix, no. 12). A seal of ' Thome de Cosneris ' shows a 
similar device, but the arm is clothed with a rudder shaped lappet at wrist, 
there is no fleur-de-lis, and the field and lappet are powdered with crosses 
crosslet (ibid., pi. ix, no. 13). Both these seals are early twelfth century. 

38 The number of ravens, canting ' corby/ varies in the rolls from one to 
six. See A. A. 3rd ser. n, 175. Sir Nicholas Corbet seals in 1390 with a lion 
rampant (H.N. n, ii, 117, 118n), probably to note his descent from earl 
Patrick. G. Blasons a similar shield for 'Corbet/ gules a lion rampant 
guardant gold. 

39 A seal of 1386 (D.T. 4-5 Spec. no. 21) bears a fess between three birds 
in chief and in base three . . . (undecipherable) ; the legend reads s. HUGONIS 

DE CORBBIGE. 

40 G. gives for ' Cornhill,' an arm bendways gules issuing out of the 
dexter chief. 

41 G. blasons ermine with the chevron party gold and sable. 

4l a In 1359 John de Coupland seals with a shield bearing a cross ; crest 
a goat's head, ' s' JOHIS DE COUPLAND ' (C.D.S. in, 308). Seals, pi. x, no. 5. 

42 See A.A. 3rd ser. m, 295. 

43 John Cromwell married Idonea, daughter and heiress of Robert Vipont, 
whose arms he appears to have adopted differenced by change of colour. 

44 For seals, see Surtees, Durham, seals, pi. x, nos. 22 and 23. 

44 A seal in the collection of Rev. Wm. Greenwell bears the same charges 
and for crest a ram's head. Seals, pi. xi, no. 8. 

45 See A.A. 3rd ser. in, 244. 

46 Derived from the orle of Balliol. A seal of Guy Darreyns of 1298 has 
six escallops on the orle. Surtees, Durham, seals, pi. n, no. 19. 



170 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

47 The arms are borne in canting allusion to their manor of Meldon. The 
shield in the text is from the seal of Edmund Denum, A.D. 1340. The seal of 
William Denum omits the fess (D.T. Misc. Charters, 3475, 3498, 3516). A seal 
of John Denum, A.D. 1324, bears the very different arms of a fess charged with 
three popinjays; legend SIGILL JOHANNIS DE DENUM (S.D.T. 1-3 Spec. no. 44). 

48 G. also gives for this family, three molets gules in chief. In 1332 John 
Denton seals with a bend engrailed between six leaves or acorns (seals, pi. xi, 
no. 6). (S.D.T. 1-1 Spec. no. 103.) In 1357 John de Denton seals with three 
bars (Dods. MS., vol. xlv). 

49 Derived from the arms of Huntercombe, their feudal superior. 

50 C.M. gives both the chevron and molets silver. A seal of 1642 (A. A. 
2nd ser. xix, 238) has some undecipherable charges on the chevron. 

SOaSee also Foster, Feudal Arms (82), for monumental slab in choir of 
InChmahone church. 

51 C.M. ascribes the same shield to Robert Dudley, sheriff of Newcastle 
in 1586. 

52 G. blasons for 'Durham,' azure crusilly and three crescents silver. Y. 
blasons for 'John de Duresme,' gules a fess engrailed silver. 

53 Deriving from the lion of Gospatric. A seal of John of Edlingham 
given in Dods. MS., vol XLV, bears three bars dancetty. 

54 See Proc. Soc. Antiq. Newc. 3rd ser. in, 55. 

55 G. does not assign this shield to the Northumbrian family, but it has 
an interesting likeness to the similar charge borne by the Trewicks, Gilbert 
Middleton and Corbridge. See A. A. 3rd ser. i, 127 ; and S.S. pi. x, no. 22. 

55* The same charges as borne on seal of Richard Clifford. It is possible 
that the three eagles were borne by the Gaugys. The use of the name of 
their northern manor in G. makes it not improbable. 

56 Errington of Ponteland differenced with a crescent charged with a 
molet and quartered Eland and Mitford (V. 1666). Errington of Denton bore 
the undifferenced shield (V. 1615). 

57 B. gives the bend uncharged for ' Roger le Fitz John de Eure.' 

57 From transcript of Swinburne charters in possession of the County 
History Committee. Legend s' JOHANNIS FARNE . . .AW. 

57b A seal of Nicholas has the device of a tree with four branches, 
s' NICHOL' D' FAVSIDE (C.D.S. n, App. in, i, no. 2). 

57o In 1346 piers de Fethirstanhalghe seals with six feathers paleways 
three bending to the dexter and three to the sinister (C.D.S. in, 266). Seals, 
pi. x, no. 7. 



NOTES . 



171 



58 Both Sir William Felton (first) and Sir William Felton (second) were 
much employed in the Scottish wars. Sir William (first) was constable of 
Roxburgh and Linlithgow castles. Sir William (second) was sheriff of Box- 
burgh as well as constable of that castle. The Scottish tressure with which 
they encircled their lions would be adopted to signalize this connexion. The 
south country family bore the lions ermine and without the tressure (J.), 
sometimes they were golden crowned. See R.W. and the Garter plate of 
Sir Robert Felton. 

58b A roughly executed seal, evidently meant to be armorial, but the 
charges are curious and uncertain. 

59 For the quarterings and differences used by the various branches of this 
family see V. 1615, 1666. A seal of Thomas Fenwick attached to a deed of 
1356 bears three roundels, each charged with three birds within a border 
(S.D.T. 1-4 Spec. no. 17). 

60 A seal of Simon de Fisburne (A.D. 1259) bears the curious canting 
device of a burn with fishes running in it (S.D.T. 1-8 Spec. nos. 38 and 39). 
Compare with this the similar device on a Swinburne seal (41 Surt. Soc. publ. 
xxxm). 

60a See seal engraved in Liber de Mdros, n, pi. n, no. 5 (Bannatyne Club 
publications). 

60b Seals, pi. ix, no. 7. 

61 For early seals of this family see N.C.H. v, plate, p. 24, and Surtees, 
Durham, seals, pi. vn. 

62 In F. ' Rauf le Fitz Roger ' bears this shield without the cross on the 
chief. In the same roll the shield in the text is carried by ' Rauf le fitz 
Barnard/ 

63 For the quarterings and differences used by the various Northumbrian 
families of this name see V. 1615, 1666. G. blasons for the Northumbrian 
family, silver a chevron gules between three hunting horns vert. See also 
A. A. 3rd ser. in, 263. 

64 See also S.D.T. Misc. Charters, 4720, 4970, a cross moline, legend 

S' BOOEBI D* FULTHORP. 

65 See also S.D.T. 4-12 Spec. no. 17 A.D. 1303; and 3-13 Spec. no. 29, 
A.D. 1303. Lord Ogle quartered for Gobion, bendy of six gold and azure a 
leopard silver on a chief gules three saltires silver (41 Surt. Soc. publ. n). 
This shield is blasoned for Sir Hugh Gobyon in G. Its origin is not apparent, 
but it may safely be said that it was not borne by Sir Hugh Gobyon at the 
end of the thirteenth century. 

66 A seal of David Graham has three escallops on a field powdered with 
crosses crosslet fitchy (D.T. 3-3 Fine., no. 23). 

67 The shield borne in later years by this family (see A. A. 3rd ser. i, 113). 
A seal of Nicholas Grenville bears the device of a running panther like animal 
with tail curved over back (D.T. 4-2 Spec. no. 7). 



172 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND : 

68 See also seals engraved in Surtees, Durham, seals, pi. vn, no. 8; and 
pi. ix, no. 9. The crest is a ram's head. 

68 The author of Scalachronica. 

69 Fitz William of Grimthorpe, who succeeded to the barony, adopted the 
name of Greystock, but continued to bear the arms of Grimthorpe, for which 
see under Fitz William. 

70 For note on this shield see R.N.D. 224 and 225 n. Also A.A. 3rd ser. 
in, 289. N.R. makes the billets gules, X. gives them azure. 

7Qa Gold on a bend azure three voided lozenges gold ; their later arms 
(Nisbet's Heraldry, i, 100). 

71 In the same roll ' John de Halton ' bears, silver two bars azure and 
in chief two escallops gules, the charges being the same as on his seal of 
1319 (V. 1615, 1666). 

72 See A.A. 2nd ser. iv, 215; ibid. 3rd ser. i, 122; and m, 263. 

73 See Surtees, Durham, n, 250-251, for charter exhibited to heralds in 
1575 referring to this shield. 

73 So borne in this roll by ' Sire Michel de Hartlow.' ' Sire Andrew ' 
bears the same shield, ' a un merelott de sable/ 

73b This shield was adopted after their marriage with an heiress of Darcy. 
Their earlier shield was, on a bend three quatrefoils (S.S. pi. xi, no. 4). 

74 In D'Anisy's Chartes Normandes a thirteenth century seal of Robert 
Hareng bears the device of a herring placed fessways but not on a shield 
(pi. xvi, no. 8). 

75 See also seal, Surtees, Durham, seals, pi. 11, no. 34. S. blasons gules 
a chevron between three drakes silver for 'Robert Herle.' 

76 The earlier colours appear to have been azure and silver (B., E. and M.). 
In N. ' Sir Odynell Heron ' bears the field silver and the herons azure. See also 
Surtees, Durham, pi. n, nos. 13 and 14; and seals, pi. vni, no. 1. 

77 gee seals, A.A. 2nd ser., xxv, pi. v, nos. 3, 4 and 5. G. blasons for 
' Alayn de Heton/ vert a lion rampant silver. 

78 See Surtees, Durham, seals, pi. x and pi. ix, no. 11. Also A.A. 3rd 
ser. i, 121. 

79 See also A.A. 3rd ser. i, 127. 

80 Derived from the lion of Earl Patrick, from whom the Homes claim 
descent. The vert of the field probably alludes to their lordship of Greenlaw. 
For quarterings blasoned by this earl see Nisbet, Scottish Heraldry, i, 273. 

81 So quartered by Fenwick of Wallington. 

82 C.T. blasons, vert a horse passant silver. See also A.A. 3rd ser. 11, 177. 
82i n 1318 Roger Horsley seals with the device of a horse's head and 

neck bridled; not armorial (C.D.S. in, 607). 

83 See A.A. 3rd ser. m, 282. Also ibid, n, 177. 

83 The charges on the bend are very indistinct they may be arrow heads, 
or possibly ermine spots. Seal, pi. ix, no. 2. 



NOTES. 



173 



83b A seal in D.T. with legend 4 SIGI IOHANIS DE HOWBUBN bears a fleur- 
de-lis of unusual form. Seals, pi. vin, no. 8. 

84 See A. A. 3rd ser. i, 114. 

84a Richard of Kibblesworth's father gave Wolviston, ' per baculum/ the 
batons on this shield have evidently some reference to that. 

85 Attached to a deed of 1556, but the seal is fourteenth century. 

86 V.Y. blasons for Lacy of Folkton a purple lion with a border gobony, 
a shield which looks suspiciously like an invention of the later heralds 
derived from the purple lion of Lacy, earl of Lincoln. The shield given in 
the text is blasoned for Folkton. 

87 G. blasons this for ' Lacy of Northumberland.' I cannot trace the 
family. 

88 The blason is ' Thomas Langton de Wynyard port d'or a une leon 
rampand de sable nafre sur le spaule devant.' A seal of 1435 shows a lion 
rampant (S.D.T. 4-9 Spec. no. 23). 

89 See also S.D.T. Misc. Charters, 5570 ; and 3-7 Spec. no. 5. 

90 N.R. blasons for ' Lorens,' silver a leopard sable crowned gold. See 
also 41 Surt. Soc. publ. xi. 

91 A seal attached to a deed of 28 Feb., 1370, bears a chevron between 
three martlets, legend s' JOHIS FIL LAURENCII (S.D.T. Misc. Charters, 469). 

92 For various seals of this family in D.T. see N.C.H. i, 178n. 

93 An early thirteenth century seal of Sir David de Lindsey has an 
eagle displayed but not on a shield. The family afterwards adopted the 
shield blasoned in the text, possibly derived from the Stewart fess (Laing, 
Scottish Seals, Supp. p. 105, and pi. vi, fig. 1). 

93i n the same roll Sir Simon de Lindesay differences this shield with 
a baston gobony silver and azure. 

94 See A. A. 3rd ser. in, 262. In D. MS. Robert de Insula seals with 
ermine a cross, and Peter de Insula with three escucheons. 

95 V. 1666 blasons, silver five lozenges conjoined in pale azure in the 
dexter chief an escucheon azure, quartering Strother and Marley. See also 
Deed Poll of Sir Lambton Loraine in library of Society of Antiquaries of 
Xewcastle-upon-Tyne. 

96 In B.E. and F. the lucies are gold. 

97 A seal of Marmaduke Lumley of 1343 bears six popinjays (D.T. Misc. 
Charters, 6267). See A. A. 3rd ser. in, 246, and Surtees, seals, pi. x, no 9. 

98V. 1615 blasons the later shield, silver on a chevron between three 
martlets sable three molets gold. See also grant by Sir Will, le Neve; Norrey 
(41 Surt. Soc. publ. L). 

99 In 1515 Thomas Manners, earl of Rutland, was granted a piece of the 
royal arms in place of the red chief, namely, quarterly 1 and 4, azure two 
fleurs-de-lis gold, 2 and 3, gules a leopard gold, 



174 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 

99a See seals, pi. ix, no. 12. 

100 The seal of Roger Merlay (i) shows a floriated device with four ' merles ' 
(blackbirds) upon the branches, the seal of his son bears a similar device, 
whilst that of the third Roger is armorial bearing three flying merles 
paleways (4-2 Spec. no. 38), SIGILL ROGERI DE MERLAI (see also H.N". n, ii, 
374, 375; and Surtees, Durham, seals, pi. n, no. 22). The shield in text is 
that of Stuteville in a border of Merlay. 

101 So blasoned in Durham Cathedral cloisters. 

102 Compare with this the similar charge borne by Corbridge, Eland, and 
Trewick. See Surtees, Durham, seals, pi. x, no. 22 ; and S.D.T. Misc. Charters. 
5053. 

103 See A.A. 3rd ser. m, 286. 

104 Seals of John Mowbray in D.T. bear the lion within an engrailed 
border, s JOHIS FILI WILLI MOVBRAY (Misc. Charters, 3421, 3453, 3454, etc., A.D. 
1348 to 1366). 

105 See A.A. 3rd ser. m, 289. 

106 See S.D.T. 3-1 Spec. no. 56 bearing seven flies, SIGILLUM TOME DE 
MUSCHANS (seals, pi. VHI, no. 5). See also seal engraved in Liber de Melros, n, 
pi. x, no. 2; showing four flies saltireways, legend SIGILLUM ROBERTI DE 
MUSCAMPO. 

loea For seals see Surtees, Durham, seals, pis. vi and vm. 

107 See also S.D.T. 3-1 Spec, v, i, no. 20, an eagle displayed. 

108 A seal of Sir John Ogle of 1348 bears three crescents and the field 
powdered with crosses (D. MS.). 

109 An early seal bears the device of a salmon (R.N.D. 248). 

110 I n Walford's Roll, temp. Hen. m, ' Le Countee Patrick gules un leon 
rampant d'argent.' 

H0 a R.N.D. App. 68, David Paxton seals with an eagle displayed. 

111 C.M. blasons for Penreth of Newcastle, silver three chevrons braced 
gules on a chief azure a lion passant silver a sable crescent for difference. 
A seal of Thomas de Penreth of 1356 bears a cross between (undecipherable). 
(S.D.T. 1-4 Spec., no 68). 

112 For the ' Early Heraldry of the Percys ' see A.A. 2nd ser. iv, 157, T.A. i, 
413. A.A. 3rd ser. in, 233. For seals see Surtees, Durham, seals, pis. vii, vm 
and ix. 

H2 a R.N.D. App. 79, Henry Prendergest seals with ermine three bars on 
a quarter a crescent -I- s HENRICI DE PRENDIRGEST. Ibid. p. 97, a bend cotised. 

SIGILLV' HENRICI DE PRENDERGEST. 



NOTES. 



175 



113 See also shield on Chillingham castle, A. A. xiv, 301. 

114 The shield of Muschamp of Barmoor. 

115 An early seal bears the canting device of a chevron between three 
' reeds ' (Pror. Sac. Antiq. Newc. 3rd ser. I, 31). 

116 The arms of Grey of Chillingham, but they appear to have also been 
borne by the Riddells. See next entry seal of William Ridel. 

H6a This shield is on a tombstone in Lesbury church for Henry Roseden 
of Bilton, 1746/47. 

117 In F. 'Joan Roselos ' bears silver ten roses gules, 
us See also A. A. 3rd ser. i, 67. 

119 See A. A. 3rd ser. m, 253. Also S.D.T. Misc. Charters, 3619, 4900, and 
others, A.D. 1311-1319. The charges as in the text, crest John Baptist's head 
in a charger, s JOHIS DE sco QUINTINO. Engraved in Surtees, Durham, seals, 
pi. x, no. 28. 

H9 In C.D.S. in, 622, the chevron is charged with five molets. 

120 The number of bars varies from eight to sixteen. 

121 The arms of his father-in-law, Roger de Merlay. 

122 See also S.D.T. 2-2 Pont. no. 13, A.D. 1340, s PHI SOMERVILLE DE 

WYCHYNOVEM DNI. 

123 See also S.D.T. Misc. Charters, 4089 and 4463. SIGILLUM PENRICI DE 
HOCTUN. The shield is derived from that of Baliol Henry Spring was an 
executor of John Baliol. (See seal, p. 183). 

124 A seal of Henry Strother, sheriff 1364, bears three towers and at centre 
the arms of Strother (S.D.T. Misc. Charters, 4182). 

I24a Seals, pi. xi, no. 9. 

125 In 1318 John de Stuteville sealed with, barry of fifteen a lion rampant 
(S.D.T. Misc. Charters, 254; seals, pi. x, no. 20). 

125 The quarter bears the arms of Baliol. A seal (D.T. 2-1 Ebor., no. 14) 
bears the badge of a salmon; compare with badge of Ord, the one connected 
with Tees, the other with Tweed. 

I25b The crest is probably an owl ' s' TEMPEST.' 

I25o A seal attached to a deed of 1346 shows a chevron between three 
boars' heads couped, ' s' RICHARDI DE THIRLWALL ' (C.D.S. in, 1459). 

!25dSee seal in possession of Rev. W. Greenwell. Seals, pi. xi, no. 1. 

126 Arms denoting the office of forester. G. gives for Topcliffe, party 
silver and vert three crescents countercoloured, probably derived from the 
crescent badge of the Percys. 

127 See A.A. 3rd ser. i, 116, 



176 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

128 See fine seal in Eev. Wm. GreenwelFs possession. See pi. ix, no. 7. 

129 See also seals D.T. Misc. Charters, 468 and 5261. 

130 A very interesting seal, showing the early pear-shaped shield; the 
pales and border are quite narrow, the roundels like nail heads, and the whole 
has a very constructional appearance. (See seal, pi. ix, no. 3.) 

131 A seal of Eichard Umfraville bears the device of a large cinquefoil 
and is not armorial (S.D.T. 1-3 Spec. 25; seals, pi. vin, no. 7). The form and 
number of the crosses appear to have varied greatly. The seal of Sir Eobert 
Umfraville and that of Sir Thomas have crosses patonce. Probably these 
differences arise from the individual taste of the artist; the cinquefoil and 
orle of crosses were important, their exact form and number a secondary 

matter. Robert Umfraville, sheriff (1372), seals with 
a triple towered castle with an archway in the centre 
and within the arch a pierced cinquefoil (S.D.T. 
1-1 Sacr. 19). 

132 A seal in D.T. (4-3 Sacr. no. 2) bears a bend 
^ SIGIL JOHIS DE WAYS. G. also gives the cheeky 
bend for Vaux of Northumberland. 

133 For an account of the Vesci armory see T.A. I, 
390. The seal in the margin is that of John Vesci, 
one of the competitors for the crown of Scotland. It 
bears a plain cross and a label of five points 4- SIGILLVM 
JOHANNIS DE VECI. (Chapter House Documents, 
no. 18.) 

134 This shield is also given for Wallis of Knaresdale in N.O. 
I34a His seal, described C.D.S. in, 401, is ' a cross moline.' 

135 See also S.D.T. Misc. Charters, 6175 and 6176, A.D. 1342. s' SIMONIS 

DE WELTUNA. 

I35a See note under Amundeville and pi. x, no. 16 for seal. 

136 The differenced shield of Hebburn. 

137 See A.A. 3rd ser. in, 249. 

138 See also S.D.T. Misc. Charters, 4613, A.D. 1283. A shield from which 
fleurs-de-lis project and bearing three piles over all a bend. 




THE OCTAGON TOWERS AT ALNWICK CASTLE. 177 



NOTES ON THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 

THE OCTAGON TOWERS AT ALNWICK CASTLE. 

Plate i, facing page 89. 

These towers were built c. 1350, by Henry, the second lord Percy of 
Alnwick. The remarks of Mr. C. J. Bates upon the shields at Bothal castle 
(Arch. Ad. 2nd ser. xiv, 288) apply equally to Alnwick ; there, as at Bothal, 
they were not put up out of ' family pride nor to represent phantom ancestors/ 
but living men, and were all shields actually borne in the middle of the 
fourteenth century. To interpret them aright we should remember that 
Henry Percy, the builder, was ' ever a fighter/ a man of war and of affairs, 
from his youth employed almost continuously in fighting the Scots and in 
administering the northern march. He was scarcely the man to speculate 
in genealogical myths or to seek to commemorate 'phantom ancestors/ Such 
speculations belong to a later age. On other northern castles, Bothal, 
Lumley, Hilton, we have the shields of real living men, the friends and 
relations of the builders. It seems reasonable to suppose that this was also 
the case at Alnwick. These shields, therefore, represent Henry, lord Percy's 
feudal lord, his friends the great barons in high command in Scotland and the 
north, his relations and the lords and knights associated with him in his 
life-work on the northern march. I blason them as follows : 

In the centre : 

Quarterly France and England. The shield borne by Edward in after 
1340. 

On the west tower reading from right to left : 

1. England with a label of five points of France, for Henry, earl of 

Lancaster, whose daughter Mary was the wife of Henry Percy's son. 

2. Azure on a bend silver cotised gold, between six lions rampant gold, 

three molets gules pierced vert, for William Bohun, K.G., earl of 
Northampton, constable of England and warden of the marches (1351). 

3. Sable a lion silver crowned gold, for John, lord Segrave, grandson and 

successor to John, lord Segrave, the warden of Scotland in 1310. He 
was captain of Berwick and warden in 1346. 

4. Cheeky gold and azure a fess gules, for Robert, lord Clifford, whose 

daughter Imania was the wife of the builder. 

5. Silver a cross sable, for John Coupland, warden of the marches with 

Henry Percy and sheriff of Northumberland in 1351. He held with 

3 SER. VOL. vi, 12 



178 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 

Sir Peter Mauley, the barony of Wooler in 1346. His shield is usually 
blasoned with a molet on the cross, but his seal (1357) does not shew 
this charge. (See pi. x, no. 5.) 

6. Gold a bend sable, for Peter, lord Mauley. He held the barony of 
Wooler in 1346 and was one of the great men of his day, holding high 
command in Scotland and on the marches. His seal is illustrated on 
plate ix, no. 12. 
Shields on the east tower reading from left to right : 

1. Cheeky gold and azure, for John of Warenne, earl of Surrey, Sussex 

and Warenne and earl of Stratherne in Scotland. 

2. Gold a lion azure, for Henry, lord Percy. 

3. Gules crusilly and a cinquefoil gold, for Gilbert of Umfraville, earl of 

Angus, lord of Prudhoe, Redesdale and Harbottle. His son Eobert 
married Margaret, eldest daughter of Henry Percy. 

4. Gules a lion rampant silver, for John, lord Mowbray ; he was with lord 

Segrave at Berwick in 1346, and associated with Henry Percy in 
Scotland and on the northern march. 

5. Gules a saltire silver, for Ralph, lord Neville of Eaby, whose wife was 

Maud, third daughter of Henry Percy. He was one of his chief com- 
panions in arms in Scotland, and commanded one of the wings of the 
army at Neville's Cross. 

6. Gold a fess between two chevrons gules, for John, lord Fitz Walter, 

whose wife was Eleanor, fourth daughter of Henry Percy. 



GATE TOWER AND SHIELDS AT BOTHAL CASTLE. 

Plate in, facing page 102. 

Mr. C. J. Bates, in Arch. Ad. 2nd ser. xiv, 288, et seq., has explained these 
shields so fully that further comment upon them is needless. I am^inclined 
to think that the shield on the west turret which he assigns to Delaval should 
be ascribed to Mauduit of Eshet, and the cross which he blasons for Gilbert 
Aton I think is more likely to be for John Coupland. The molet with which 
Coupland's cross is charged in the ordinaries does not appear on his seal, 
and though he does not come into prominence till after Neville's Cross, that 
is not too late for his shield to appear here, and he was thereafter one of the 
most distinguished of Northumbrian knights. If I am right, the blason for 
these two shields is: 

Ermine two bars gules, for Mauduit of Eshet. 
Silver a cross sable, for John of Coupland. 
For blasons of the remaining shields see Arch. Ad. 2nd ser. xiv ? 288-290- 



BOTHAL CASTLE AND LITMLEY CASTLE. 179 

EAST GATEWAY, LUMLEY CASTLE. 

Plate vi, facing page 120. 

The castle, of which this gateway is one of the most impressive features, 
was built by Sir Ralph Lumley, first lord Lumley, who, in 1389 had licence 
from bishop Skirlaw to rebuild his castle at Lumley, to embattle and to 
crenellate it; three years later Richard n confirmed this licence. The 
armorials, displayed over the doorway, are contemporary with the building, 
and are very beautiful examples of heraldic art at the time when that art, 
in England, had reached its highest point. 

For the student of armory they are particularly interesting because of 
the helmet, mantling and crest by which each shield is surmounted. The 
helmets all face to the dexter, are all of the same closed circular type with 
short dagged mantling covering the back. The crests face forwards with the 
helmets, those of king and earl stand on caps of maintenance, the others sit 
firmly down on the helmet, seeming almost to form part of it. The crest 
wreath only appears on the helmet of Hilton, that being the only crest that 
requires it for constructional purposes. 

The shields set up here, as at Alnwick, Bothal and Hilton, are those of 
actual living persons, nearly all closely related to the builder either by blood 
or marriage, and all intimately connected with him in his official life. Stand- 
ing above all, dominating all, the royal arms of England appear, representing 
the feudal lord of all, king Richard. Sir Ralph was Richard's man, and lost 
his life in an obscure skirmish in the streets of Cirencester, in a futile attempt 
to restore that unfortunate monarch to his throne. 

Directly below the royal shield are placed the armorials of the builder 
himself. On the dexter side are the arms of Percy and Grey of Heton, on 
the sinister those of Neville of Raby and Hilton of Hilton. 

The blasons are as follows : 

1. Quarterly France (ancient) and England with the lion crest of England 

standing on a cap of maintenance, for Richard n. 

2. Silver -a fess gules between three popinjays, the crest of a popinjay stands 

on the tips of two horns which arise from either side of a cap of main- 
tenance above the helmet, for Sir Ralph Lumley. 

These are the modern arms of Lumley, being the arms of Thweng, 
blasoned for 'Marmaduk de Twenge' in B, and adopted by the Lumleys 
after the marriage of Sir Robert Lumley (ob. 1338) with one of the co- 
heiresses of Thweng. The earlier arms of Lumley were gules six 
popinjays silver so blasoned for them in Glover's Ordinary. A seal 
of Marmaduke Lumley, attached to a deed of 1343, bears the six pop- 
injays (D.T. Misc. Charters 6267). The first appearance of this, their 
favourite bird, is on the seal of Matthew Lumley. It shows him 



180 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 




riding" in civil dress, with his head turned back looking at the 
popinjay which he carries on his right hand. (D.T. Misc. Charters 
5301 and 3-2 Fine. no. 3.) 

The seal in the margin is that of Sir 
Ralph attached to a deed of 1387- The 
legend is s' BANULPHT DE LUMLEYE (Ex- 
chequer Treasury of Receipt Miscellanea, 
no. 46-1.) 

3. Gold a lion rampant azure. The crest of a 

lion, with drooping tail, stands on a cap of 
maintenance, above the helmet, for Henry 
Percy, first earl of Northumberland. He 
was uncle by marriage to Sir Ralph, who 
served under him on the marches in 1386 
and at Berwick in 1391. 

4. Gules a lion rampant within a border 

engrailed silver. Crest a ram's head, 
for Sir Thomas Grey of Heton, whose widow married Sir Robert Neville, 
brother of John, lord Neville of Raby (Surtees, Durham, iv, 158), and 
whose son Thomas was born at Alnwick castle in 1384 and married 
Alice, daughter of Ralph, lord Neville. He was therefore nephew by 
marriage to Henry Percy, earl of Northumberland. 

5. Gules a saltire silver. Crest a bull's head rising from a cap of maintenance, 
for Neville of Raby. Sir Ralph Lumley was the ward of Ralph, lord 
Neville (Surtees, Durham, 11, 162), and married Eleanor, daughter of 
John, lord Neville, by Maud, daughter 
of Henry, lord Percy of Alnwick, and 
sister of Ralph, first earl of Westmor- 
land. The seal of John, lord Neville, 
in the margin is attached to a deed of 
1384, belonging to Rev. Wm. Green- 
well. It is very similar to the shield 
at Lumley castle, except that the cap 
of maintenance is absent and the hide 
of the bull's neck forms the mantling. 
The legend reads s : JOHIS : DE : NEVILE : 
DOMINI :DK:RABI. The letters B.B. 
on either side of the helmet probably 
stand for Bulmer. The crest also may 
be a memorial of the same name. 

Silver two bars azure, the crest, upon a wreath, represents the head of 
Moses horned, for Sir William Hilton, baron of Hilton, and the builder of 




6, 



DERIVATIVE SHIELDS. 181 

Hilton castle. I cannot find any relationship between the Hiltons and 
Lumleys, and this shield is probably set up to represent a personal 
friendship and comradeship in arms. In 1385-86 Sir William Hilton 
served at Berwick under Henry, earl of Northumberland. (C.D.S. 
iv, 334.) 

I am indebted to Mr. W. Parker Brewis, F.S.A., for the following note 
on the horns of Moses : ' Although horns are now an attribute of the Devil, 
they were in early times an attribute of honour, and a symbol of force or 
power. Thus when Moses descended from the mountain, where he had had 
a personal interview with God, he (Moses) is depicted as having horns. 
In the Revised Version of the Bible, Exodus, chapter 34, verse 29, has "The 
skin of his face shone," but the Hebrew word here rendered "shone" should 
be literally translated "sent forth beams or horns." 

' In this connexion it must be remembered that the sun god Bacchus is 
represented as horned, and is a counterpart of Moses, having the same 
attributes. The infant Bacchus was confined in a chest by order of the 
king of Thebes and thrown into the Nile. It is also related in the Hymns 
of Orpheus that Bacchus had a rod with which he performed miracles, and 
which he could change into a serpent at pleasure. He passed the Bed Sea 
dryshod at the head of his army, he divided the waters by a touch of his 
rod, and by the same mighty wand he drew forth water from the rocks. 
He is also called the law-giver, and his laws were written on two tablets 
of stone. There are other points in common, and it is clear that Moses and 
Bacchus had a common origin in Dionysus, who was a sun god allegory. 
The gods were originally personified representations of the most prominent 
phenomena of nature, and if we examine their characteristics we find that 
they melt into each other, and at last into one or two of the principal 
phenomena, usually those of the sun, expressed in a variety of ways and 
by a multitude of fanciful names.' 



NORTHUMBRIAN DERIVATIVE SHIELDS. 
Plate n, facing page 100. 



This shield is blasoned for John Baliol (06. 1268) in Glover's roll of Henry 
in. For the many differences used see note 10 p. 167. For seals see N.C.H. 
vi, 48, and for pedigree, ibid. pp. 72 and 73. 



182 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 




BERTRAM OF BOTHAL. 

Richard Bertram, son of William Bertram of 
Mitford and his wife Hawis Baliol, was the first lord 
of Bothal. This shield is first blasoned for his 
descendant, Sir Robert Bertram, in the roll of Edward 
n. The seal in the margin is attached to a deed of 
1346 belonging to the Rev. Wm. Greenwell. The 
legend is s' ROBERTI BERTRAM. 





BERTRAM OF MITFORD. 

William Bertram, first lord of 
Mitford, married Hawis, daughter of 
Guy Baliol. This shield is first blasoned 
for Roger Bertram (oh. 1241) in Glover's 
roll of Henry in. The seal in the 
margin is attached to a deed in Durham 
Treasury (1-12 Spec. no. 13). The 
legend is -b s' ROGERI BERTRA . . . 

NI . . MIDFORD. 



INGRAM UMFRAV1LLE. 

This shield, first blasoned in Charles's roll 
(1295), is differenced by the label from that of 
Ingram Baliol. His seal in the margin has a label 
of three points only ; the legend is * s' INGRAMMI : 
DE : VMFRANVILE (Chapter House uncatalogued 
seals, tray 10). His exact relationship to Baliol 
is unknown, but he was Ingram Baliol's heir 
(C.D.S. n, 1060 and 1096). He was one of 

the distinguished men of his day. He was at Norham when Edward i 
adjudicated upon the claims to the Scottish throne, and at the castle of 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne when John Baliol did homage (C.D.S. n, 660). He was 
sheriff of Roxburgh in 1299 and ambassador to France in 1302. 




DERIVATIVE SHIELDS. 183 

HENRY SPRING. 

The connexion of Henry Spring of Houghton with the Baliols is not 
known, but in 1270 he appears as one of the executors of John Baliol. (See 
D.T., Misc. Charters 4089 and 4463). His seal in the 
margin is attached to the latter document and bears the 
legend ' 4siGiLLVM : HENRICI : DE : HOCTVN.' 

JOHN LYTHEGREINS. 

This is clearly the Baliol shield differenced by the bend, 
but why it was used by Lythegreins I cannot say. There 
may have been some blood relationship, marriage, or feudal 
connexion to account for it. He was a man of consider- 
able importance in his day, but he appears and disappears, 

and of his family or descendants nothing is known. He was sheriff of 
Northumberland in 1274. In 1291 he was appointed by Edward i, along 
with William of Lincoln and Thomas of Fisseburn, to examine the records of 
the Scottish Treasury and other places to discover evidences alleged to exist 
by the count of Holland, a claimant for the Scottish throne (C.D.S. n, 516, 
526). In 1300-1307 he was one of the king's justices in the north (C.D.S. 
n, 1972). 

LUCKER AND HEPPLE. 

These shields are both blasoned in Glover's Ordinary. Their connexion 
with Baliol I cannot trace, and it may be only my guesswork which connects 
them with that family. 

DARREYNS. 

This differenced shield of Baliol may only have been adopted as a sign of 
feudal connexion, but it is likely that they were connected by blood with 
the Baliols. They held the manor of Whittonstall from the latter by a 
quarter part of a knight's fee (N.C.H. vi, 177). 

Plate iv, facing page 112. 

PITZ ROGER AND CLAVERING. 

There seems little doubt that this famous quarterly coat of gold and of 
gules was originally borne by Geoffrey of Mandeville, first earl of Essex. 
It was adopted with various differences by his descendants and relations by 
marriage, the Says, Beauchamps, Veres, and Fitz Rogers. Roger fitz Richard 
married Alice de Vere, and the shield here illustrated is first blasaned for 



IS-I 



THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND I 



their son Robert fitz Boger in Charles's Roll. His seal shows the quarterly 
shield and baaton (N.C.H. v, 25; A.A. 3rd ser. i, 125, Geoffrey de Mandeville, 
by J. II. Round, p. 392). This shield is first attributed to Clavering in the 
poem of the siege of Caerlaverock, where it is borne by John, ' Ky de Claver- 
iughc a sin-noun, ' differenced by a label vert. In the roll of Edward n, 
Alexander Clavering places three silver molets on the bend. 



This surname was adopted from the Fitz Roger's manor of Eure in 

Buckinghamshire by two of the younger sons of John fitz Robert of 

Warkworth. 

The shield is first blasoned for ' Roger le fitz 
John de Eure ' in Glover's roll of Henry in, with no 
escallops on the bend. The shield, illustrated with 
the escallops, is blasoned in the Nativity roll for 
1 Sir John de Eure ' (see his seal, pi. x, no. 19). 

The seal in the margin is that of Hugh of Eure, 
third son of John fitz Robert and his wife Ada 
Baliol. As both he and his elder brother Roger bore 
the undifferenced Fitz Roger shield it would seem 
that the escallops were not adopted till the next 
generation by John of Eure, lord of Stokesley. It also 

appears that all the sons of the above John fitz Robert used the surname 

of Eure. 




WIDD'EINGTON. 

In 1268 Robert fitz Roger gave Linton to John of 
Widdrington, reserving service (41 Surtees Soc. publ. 
i xxvn., N.). ' This shield, differenced by change of 
colour, would be adopted to show the feudal connexion. 
t is first blasoned in Powell's roll of Edward in. The 
seal in the margin is attached to a deed of 1357, in the 
possession of the Rev. Wm. Greenwell. 



CHASTER AND MIDDLETON. 










DERIVATIVE SHIELDS. 185 

TREWICK. 

At the visitation of Northumberland in 1666 this shield is blasoned as 
one of the quarterings of Fenwick of Wallington. In the Craster tables it 
is blasoned silver and azure, and is probably derived from the quarterly 
shield of Middleton. 

The stag's head cabossed appears on a number of shields in the district 
around Matfen. See shields of Gilbert Middleton, Corbridge and Eland. 
(See also Arch. Ad. 3rd ser. i, 116.) 



Plate v, facing page 114. 

RICHARD GREY. 

Richard of Grey was sheriff of Northumberland in 1236, and also had the 
custody of the castles of Bamburgh and Newcastle-upon-Tyne (C.D.S. i, 1323). 
This shield is blasoned for him in Glover's roll of Henry in. 

ADAM OF JESMOND. 

For note on this shield see Arch. Ad. 3rd ser. i, 40 and 114. Additional 
evidence of Adam's connexion with Richard Grey is found in Cal. Pat. Rolls 
(1247-58), p. 141. Under date 6 June, 1252, Richard Grey and others are 
granted protection whilst on the king's service in the islands of ' Gereseye 
and Gernseye.' The like protection is granted to. ' Adam de Gesemue ' and 
others ' gone with the said Richard de Grey.' 

GREY OF HORTON IN GLENDALE. 

The exact connexion of this family with the bearers of the original barry 
shield I do not know. Some relation there must have been, as this is clearly 
a shield differenced from the simpler one of Richard Grey. In 1259 a Richard 
Grey held lands in Nesbit (C.D.S. i, 2148) and in Planche's roll of Henry in, 
Richard of Grey bears the shield here illustrated. It is blasoned for Grey of 
Horton in the visitation of 1575. 

GREY OF NEWCASTLE AND BACKWORTH. 

This shield is not in the rolls of arms. It is blasoned in a pedigree at 
Herald's College (N.C.H. ix, 41) and with ' three bars ' (evidently in error) at 
Dugdale's Visitation of 1666. In the pedigree there given William Grey of 
Hebburn, co. Durham, from whom the family of Newcastle and Backworth 
descended, is stated to have been a younger son of Grey of Horton. 



186 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND: 



The reasons for assuming this shield to be derived from that of Grey are 
stated in Arch. Ael. 3rd ser. i, 121. 



HALTON AND CARNABY. 

There is no direct evidence that this shield is derived from Grey, but John 
of Halton appears to have been connected with Adam of Jesmond, for whom he 
was sheriff substitute in 1263. He succeeded him as sheriff in 1266 (see Arch. 
Ael. 3rd ser. i, 115; C.D.S. n, 2421, 2451). It is first blasoned for ' Robert de 
Halton ' in Jenyn's Ordinary, where ' John de Halton ' also bears it, but with 
two escallops gules in chief. The shield here illustrated is carved upon the 
east wall of Halton tower. It is blasoned in Jenyn's Ordinary for William 
Carnaby by whom it was adopted upon succeeding to the manor of Halton. 

ERRINGTON. 

The Erringtons were related by marriage to the Carnabys, whose shield 
they differenced by placing escallops in chief in place of roundels. It is first 
blasoned in Jenyn's roll for 'John de Erington.' 

ESLINGTON. 

I have included this shield in this series, as it appears to be of similar 
elation but it may only be a chance likeness, as I am unable to trace anv 

to account for "' Jt is blasoned in 



CRAMLINGTON. 



Plate vii, facing page 132. 

UMFRAVILLE 



DERIVATIVE SHIELDS. 



1ST 




is ' the devil can do nothing and flies from it .... if a man carries it about 
with him no venomous beast can harm him ' (Sowerby's Botany, m, 198, 
quoting- Platearius). 

The shield illustrated is first 
blasoned in Charles's roll, where the 
cinquefoil is pierced. It is borne 
unpierced in the Falkirk roll. 

The seal in the margin is that , of 
Gilbert Umfraville, earl of Angus 
(ob. 1308) ; the legend is s* GILB'TI 
D'VFBAVILL' COMES D'ANGVS' (Chapter 
House, detached seals [D] 9). Note 
the indentation of the leaves and 
centre of the cinquefoil, for artistic 
purposes, which is probably the origin 
of the pierced cinquefoil. The field is 
crusilly paty not crosses crosslet. 

SIR THOMAS UMFRAVILLE. 

This shield is ascribed to Sir Thomas Umfraville of Harbottle in Harl. 
MS. 1481, fo. 75. He was son of Robert, second earl of Angus, and of his 
wife Eleanor. His seal, attached to a deed of 1373, is illustrated on plate x, 
no. 10. It shows crosses patonee and a deeply engrailed bend. 

SIR ROBERT UMFRAVILLE. 

He was brother to the above Thomas and died in 1379. His seal, attached 
to a deed of 1368, is illustrated on plate x, no. 9. The very thin baston 
and the shape of the crosses on this seal are noticeable. 

GILBERT UMFRAVILLE. 

This shield, blasoned in Glover's roll of Henry in, is the earliest shield of 
the Umfravilles appearing in the rolls of arms. It suggests the probability 
of an earlier shield, gold a cinquefoil gules, from which all the later shields 
here blasoned are derived, but of which we have no record. The horse shoes 
point to the office of marshal! and probably allude to some such position filled 
by Sir Gilbert. 

BURRADON AND HORSLEY. 

The three shields of the Burradon family illustrated on this plate probably 
are derived feudally from the cinquefoil of Umfraville. The similarity of the 
Christian name of two of their bearers to those of Umfraville points to some 
relationship in blood. The marriage of Gilbert Burradon with Elizabeth 



188 THE ARMORIALS OF NORTHUMBERLAND : 

Umfraville did not take place, according to Hodgson (n, i, 6) till quite the 
middle of the fourteenth century. In 1302 Sir Walter Burradon seals with 
three pierced cinquefoils. The bend shield of Sir Gilbert is blasoned in the 
roll of Edward u (c. 1310) and that of Sir Gilbert with the border is from his 
seal attached to a deed of 1323. The family of Horsley, who held Thernham 
under the Umfravilles, used the same shield with the cinquefoils pierced. 

CLENNELL. 

This shield, given on the authority of the late Northumbrian roll, is 
rather doubtful. It is included here, as it appears to be based upon the 
cinquefoil of the lords of Harbottle. 

SWINBURNE. 

In 1268 William Swinburne was granted the manor of Chollerton by 
Gilbert Umfraville, and this shield was used by the descendants of the above 
William. 



NORTHUMBRIAN SEALS (PLATES VIII-XI). 

D.T. refer to seals in the Treasury of the Dean and Chapter of Durham. 
W.G. refer to seals belonging to Rev. Wm. Greenwell, D.C.L., etc. 

PLATE VIII. 

1. Jordan Heron. SIGILLVM: IORDANI: HEIRVN. [D.T. 2-12 Spec. no. 11.] 

2. Robert of Amundeville. SIGILL ROBERTI DAMVNDAVILL. [W.G.J 

3. W alter Audre. SIGILL VALTERI DE AVDRE. [W.G.] 

4. William Acton, s. WILLELMI DE ACTVN. A.D. 1342. [W.G.] 

5. Thomas of Muschans. SIGILLVM . TOME . DE . MVSCHANS. [D.T. 3-1 Spec 

no. 56.] 

6. Alexander Epplingden (Kellawe). SIGILL ALEXANDR! DAPLIGDEN. A.D. 

". Richard Umfraville. [D.T. 1-3 Spec. no. 25.] 

3. John of Howburn. SIGILL IOHANIS DE HOWBVRN. [D.T. 2-1 Spec. no. 34.] 

PLATE IX. 

o n iti Waldeve. SIGILL IOHANNIS FILII WALDEVI. [D.T. 3-2 Spec, no 5 1 

3. Philip of Ulcotes. [D.T. 2-6 Spec, no 19 ] 

Roger Audre. [D.T. 4-16 Spec. no. 124 ] 

ichard of Kibblesworth. [D.T. 3-6 Spec. no. 17 ] 
b. Jordan Ridel. A.D. 1230. [D.T. 4-1 Spec. no. 38.] 

Karmaduke Thweng. A .D. 1227 [W G 1 

Ralph Amundeville. [D.T. 1-16 Spec. 'no. 54.] 



Arch. Ael., 3 ser. VT. 



Plate VIII. 






C H. Blair, phvto. 



NORTHUMBRIAN SEALS. 



This plate given by Mr. Edward Hunter. 



Arch. Ad., 3 ser., vi. 



Plate IX. 




NORTHUMBRIAN SEALS. 



This plate given by Mr. Edward Hunter. 



Arch. Ael.. 3 ser., vi. 



Plate X. 








-m 

sF 



i 



0.1 

C. H. Blair, photo. 







NORTHUMBRIAN SEALS. 
This plate given by Mr. W. Robertson Heatley. 



Arch. Ael, 3 ser., vi. 



Plate XI. 




C. H. Blair, photo. 





NORTHUMBRIAN SEALS. 
This plate given hy Mr. Richard Welford. 



DESCRIPTION OF PLATES, VIII-XI. 189 

9. John Lumley. [W.G.] 

10. John Comyn. [D.T. 4-1 Sacr. no. 15.] 

11. William Latimer. A.D. 1260. [D.T, 1-5 Spec. no. 5.] 

12. Sir Peter Mauley. A.D. 1369. [Exchequer K.E. Accounts, - ? no. 18.] 

PLATE X. 

1. Walter of Edlingham. A.D. 1286. [W.G.] 

2. William Yeland. A.D. 1346. [D.T. 2-2 Elemos. no. 5.] 

3. William of Meneville. A.D. 1357. [W.G.] 

4. Robert Ogle. [In the library of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle- 

upon-Tyne.] 

5. John Coupland. A.D. 1357. [Exchequer K.E,. Accounts, If. t no. 9.] 

6. John of Carrow. A.D. 1369. [W.G.] 

7. Peter Featherstonehaugh. A.D. 1346. [Ancient Deeds L97, Record Office.] 

8. Walter Swynhow. A.D. 1379. [Exchequer K.R. Accounts, - 7 _3_ j no . 1.] 

9. Robert Umfraville. A.D. 1368. [D.T. 4-3 Pont. no. 9.] 

10. Thomas Umfraville. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 5480.] 

11. Hugh Galon. A.D. 1358. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 6160.] 

12. John Killingworth. A.D. 1556. The seal is of the 14th century. [W.G.] 

13. William of Cambow. A.D. 1289. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 6911.] 

14. John Fencotes. A.D. 1365. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 3857.] 

15. Nicholas Skelton. A.D. 1354. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 1885.] 

16. William Wessington. A.D. 1376. [W.G.] 

17. Thomas Tyndale. A.D. 1286. s' THOME DE TYNDALE. [D.T. Misc. 

Charts. 4785.] 

18. Hugh Sadlingstones. A.D. 1349-1355. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 4126 and others.] 

19. John of Eure. s' IOHIS DE EVRE DOMI. . . . [D.T. ; detached seal.] 

20. John Stuteville. A.D. 1318. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 254.] 

21. Robert Tughale. A.D. 1339. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 3645.] 

22. Hugh Haukyn. A.D. 1334. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 4109*.] 

23. Robert Sapy. A.D. 1317. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 4238.] 

24. William of Whitley. A.D. 1312. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 3979.] 

PLATE XI. 

1. Roger Thornton. A.D. 1439. [W.G.] 

2. Hugh Hecham. A.D. 1308. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 6614.] 

3. Robert Angerton. A.D. 1369. [D.T.] Misc. Charts. 6882.] 

4. Richard Acton. A.D. 1334. [D.T. 1-1 Spec. no. 116.] 

5. Common Seal of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. A.D. 1369. s' MAIORAT VILLE : 

NOVICAST: SVP TINAM AD CAVSAS. [D.T. Misc. Charts. 6882.] 

6. John Denton. A.D. 1332. [D.T. 1-1 Spec. no. 103.] 

7. Jacob Colonia. [D.T. 2-15 Spec. no. 13.] 

8. John Dai-ton. A.D. 1415. [W.G.] 

9. William Strother. A,D. 1359. [Record Office, Ancients Deeds A6148.] 




VIEW FROM THE SOUTH-WEST, 








VIEW FROM THE NORTH-EAST. 
RUINS OF THE CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEND. 



191 



Y. THE CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEND, 
NORTHUMBERLAND. 

By W. H. KNOWLES, F.S.A. 
[Read 23rd February, 1910.] 

To-day the importance of Wallsend is consequent upon the 
quality of its coals, and the universal reputation of its ship- 
builders to construct the largest ships afloat. Almost two 
thousand years ago it was known to the Romans, as its name 
implies, as the eastern extremity of the great Wall and the site 
of the station of SEGEDUNUM. A thousand years later the Normans 
had established themselves at Newcastle, Tynemouth and else- 
where, and within a quarter of a century of William's conquest, 
refounded the monastery on the site of the Saxon foundation at 
Jarrow. Thereafter the church at Wallsend was dependent on 
and associated with the monastery. 

The site of the church is to the east of, and at some distance 
from, the modern town. It is perched on an eminence, sur- 
rounded on the south and west sides by a deep ravine, known 
as the Burn-closes, through which the Wallsend burn flows 
eastward on its way to the Tyne, which it enters at Willington, 
almost a mile distant. The little church must have been a 
conspicuous object at the time of its foundation, and the prospect 
from it to the south an extensive one, consisting of broad grassy 
slopes, with vistas of the river Tyne in the middle distance and 
the tower of Jarrow church beyond. 

Mrs. Montague, the ' blue stocking,' who hired Carville hall 
in 1758, while Denton hall was being repaired, says that she 
' had a very good land as well as water prospect. We see from 
our windows the place where once lived the Yenerable Bede/ 



192 CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEND. 

In 1770 the attractions of Wallsend are further remarked in the 
AiitMoffraphy of the Rev. Dr. Alexander C.arlyle, who was on a 
visit to his brother-in-law, John Erasmus Blackett, then living 
in Pilgrim street, opposite the house of his relative, Sir Walter 
Blackett, Carlyle writes 'We arrived at Wallsend, a very 
delightful village about four miles below Newcastle, on the 
road to Shields, where Mr. Blackett had a very agreeable house 
for the summer. There were other two gentlemen's nouses of 
good fortune in the village, with a church and a parsonage 
house. Next day, the 1st of May, was so very warm that I with 
difficulty was able to walk down to the church in the bottom of 
the village, not more than two hundred yards distant.' Even 
to-day the village green is a pleasant contrast to the din and 
turmoil of the shipyards. 

The earliest references to the site of the church at Wallsend 
are contained in two charters, one of them a grant of Walcher, 
bishop of Durham, of 1074, and the other of bishop William 
de St. Carilef of 1082. In the former, bishop Walcher, when he 
saw that the monks of Jarrow (after the Danish invasions) wished 
to restore their destroyed habitations, granted to Aldwin 1 the 
vill of Jarrow with its appendages, viz., Preston, 2 Monkton,- 
Heworth, Hebburn, Westoe, and Harton, that they might be 
able to complete their work and live without want. In the later 
charter bishop St. Carilef granted to the Benedictine monks, 
whom he had settled at Durham, two vills on the farther side 
of the Tyne, namely, Willington and Wallsend, 3 and, in addition, 
confirmed to them whatever bishop Walcher, his predecessor, 
gave to them, namely, the vills of Jarrow, Preston, 4 Monkton, 
Heworth, Hebburn, Westoe, and Harton. As Wallsend is not 
mentioned in Walcher's grant, it is apparent that it formed part 
of the original possessions of the congregation of St. Cuthbert 

l Symeon. Dun, 1. (Rolls Edit.) i, 110. 2 Now Simonside.-Ed. 

3 Feodarium Prior. Dunelm. (58 Surt, Soc. publ.) 3 p. x li. 4 



CHUBCII OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEND. 19'> 

of Durham, and that Carilef, when he turned the congregation 
out of Durham in 1082, replaced the seculars by the Benedictines 
previously settled at Jarrow, afterwards proceeding to divide 
between himself and the Jarrow monks the old endowments of 
the congregation of St. Cuthbert amongst which Wallsend is 
numbered. 

As bearing on the date of the erection of the church, and 
proving its existence in the middle of the twelfth century, an 
undated charter of Henry the second 5 (1154-89) may be 
remarked. In it, reference is made by the monks at Durham 
to Wallsend and its chapel (cum capella sua) and "Wellington 
with its appurtenances. Several charters also of bishop Pudsey 
could be cited about 1155 in which, as a witness, the name occurs 
of Alan, priest of Wallsend. Among these charters is the grant 
made to Durham by Ralph de Gaugy of the church at Ellingham. 
The frequency of the name suggests that Alan may have been 
of the bishop's council. A bull, c. 1180, from pope Urban to 
Grermanus, prior of Durham, confirms to him inter alia the church 
of Wallsend. 6 

In the Jarrow account rolls 7 are several entries relating to 
Wallsend, including one of 1347 wherein the master of the house 
at Jarrow accounts for 4. received from William de Tynemouth, 
chaplain, for the fine of the chapel of Wallsend, leased to him 
for ten years. In 1369 and for several years thereafter, 8 the 
monks of Jarrow were in receipt of 13s. 4d. from the chapel of 
Wallsend. An entry in 1408, 9 contains the statement that ' noth- 
ing is received from the altarage [offerings to the altar, Easter 
oblations, etc.] and profits of the chapel of Wallsend, because the 
chaplain has received the whole profit there in place of his 
stipend ' ; and in the roll for 1432 10 it is set out that nothing is 

5 Feodarium Prior. Dunel. (58 Surt. Soc. publ.), p. Ixxxiv. 

6 Hist. Dunel. Scrip. Tres (9 Surt. Soc. publ.), Ivii. 

7 29 Surt. Soc. publ. 31. 8 Ibid. 51, 56, 59. 9 JUd. 83. 10 IUd. 98. 

2 SER, VOL. VI. l^ 



194 CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEND. 

received from the fisheries on the north side of the water of Tyne, 
nor from the small tithes and oblations of the chapelry of 
Wallsend, because they are assigned to the maintenance of the 
chaplain thereof. Presumably the cell of Jarrow had the great 
tithes and leased out the small tithes instead of paying a stipend, 
the chaplain at Wallsend receiving the minor fees or dues in 
return for a fixed annual rent of one mark. 

The halmote rolls 11 record an order made in 1379 wherein 
* it is enjoyned on all tenants of the vill on the one part, and 
on William the chaplain, that none gainsay another for the 
future, under pain of payment of half a mark.' The cause of the 
order is not indicated, but it is sufficiently clear that the chaplain 
and his neighbours possibly encountered each other on commer- 
cial affairs after the manner of the prior of Tynemouth and the 
good people of North Shields. 12 In the rental roll of the bursar 
at Durham is an entry dated 1539, from the chaplain at Wallsend, 
'fora cottage and garden nil because they are waste.' 13 

The church continued to be used until 1797, when Mr. 
William Clark conceived the idea of repairing it, but selling the 
estate to Mr. Anthony Hood, he relinquished the project 14 ; 
dilapidation followed, and the ruins gradually diminished. ^ 
Their extent in 1843 is shewn by the late G. B. Richardson in a 
drawing in the possession of the society. In 1869 only the 
porch and the west gable existed as depicted by a photograph 

11 Durham Halmote Rolls, i (82 Surtees Soc. publ.), 155. 

12 New History of Northumberland, vol. vm, 289. 

13 Feod. Prior. DuncL, 306. 

14 Mackenzie, History of Northumberland, n, 464. 

15 Services were conducted in a schoolroom after this for a number of years 

, indeed, the bishop of Durham threatened to excommunicate the church- 
; the parishioners thereupon procured an act of parliament for the 

edific SuCTS ^^ t0 Willin e ton ' ^ foundation stone of this 

e was laid 10th November, 1807, and it was dedicated on 27th April 1809 



196 CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEND. 

in our Proceedings, and at the time of the reparation recently 
undertaken, the porch alone was visible. 17 

In the autumn of 1909, the churchwardens and overseers 
determined to restore the fragment remaining, to excavate the 
site of the church, to collect the gravestones lying about in the 
open space and to provide for their reception and preservation 
within an enclosed area. The execution of this work has resulted 
in the recovery of the plan of the church, and of other interesting 
discoveries which are recorded below. 

From Wallsend the approach to the churchyard is by a series 
of flights of steep stone steps. The church is a simple parallel- 
ogram, and measures externally 52 feet by 22 feet 6 inches. 
It comprised an aisleless nave and chancel, with a south 
door, which, fortunately, still exists. The details of this door 
sufficiently indicate that the building was erected about the 
middle of the twelfth century, and is confirmatory of the docu- 
mentary evidence which proves its existence previous to 1155 
(See the plan.) 

The side walls incline to the east, the width of the chancel 
being 15 feet 5 inches, and of the nave at the west end 17 feet 
5 inches. The length of the chancel is 11 feet 10 inches and of 
the nave 30 feet 8 inches. Excepting about the south door the 
walls are not more than two or three feet above the floor level 
1 possess no architectural features: nor did careful search 
over the area of the chancel furnish foundations of a previous 
*ure, or eastern termination of different width or form 

16 Proc. Soc. Antiq. Newc., 2 ser. i 22 



t- 

observed the church brilliantly led %?"* t , """ " i h 11 and 
his curiosity he saw a number of ha, / recklessl y f <rd to satisfy 

about a corpse. How Lord Llal I'r Tf " ^ P re P ara 0" f charml 
dispersed the company and tTe after rlt I ** ^ ** aSSembl r 
Hoot, l^ndary DM, ion r 395 68ult ls set * Richardson's TWe 



CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEND. 



197 



The chancel walls are of varying thickness, that on the north 
being greater than the adjoining nave wall. The wall contain- 
ing the chancel arch is 2 feet 8 inches in thickness, and the width 
between the jambs of the arch 5 feet 7 inches. 

The walling enclosing the south nave door remains to a 
height of 14 feet. The door is semi-circular in form, of two 
orders, the inner one is unmoulded and continues to the floor 




FIG. 2. THE SOUTH DOORWAY AND SOUTH-WEST ANGLE OF NAVE. 

without impost or base. The outer order is moulded with an 
angle roll, and a double-quirked flat hollow on the face. The 
arch springs from a chamfered and quirked abacus or impost, 
carried on a detached angle shaft, of which the capitals only 
remain. The latter are worked on a long stone with a double 
scallop to the south and interior faces. An incised line follows 
the semi-circular faces of the scallops, the cones of which are 



198 



CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEND. 



divided by a rude leaf. The shafts and their bases have long 
since been destroyed. The rear-arch is without mouldings. In 
the west jamb (fig. 2) there are several stones larger than the 
rest, one of which is holed and may previously have served 
another purpose. They appear to be re-used Roman material 
similar to stones which occur in the churches at Corbridge and 

Chollerton, which, like 
Wallsend, are near to 
Roman stations. In the 
north nave wall are the 
chamfered jambs of a 
built-up door opening, and 
at the east end of the same 
wall the straight joints of 
an opening of which there 
is no indication on the 
exterior. Fragments of 
plaster cover the faces of 
all the walls, including the 
openings just mentioned. 
The circular paved plat- 
form on which the font 
stood was uncovered, and 
in the north- west angle of 
the nave (see the plan, 
fig. 1) are four holed 

post stones, possibly intended to secure the framework of a light 
screen to enclose a vestry space. Some flagged pavement 
occupies the area between the north and south doors, the central 
nave aisle and the chancel. The three grave covers indicated on 
the plan were also discovered and are described below. 

In the fourteenth century the west gable was strengthened 




FIG. 3. THE SOUTH DOORWAY. 



CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEND. 199 

by the erection of diagonal buttresses, the lower courses of which 
now remain, including two plain weathered offsets (fig. 2). The 
square buttress on the north nave wall is of later date, and is 
not bonded into the walling. 

The projecting porch was added in the seventeenth century ; 
a flat chamfered arch spans the opening and springs from a 
moulded impost. In one of the drawings by the late G. B. 
Richardson a panel is shewn above the arch, but this has long 
since disappeared. 

The shape of the nave, a double cube on plan, the indications 
of the great height of the walls as compared with the width of 
the nave, and the narrow opening of the chancel arch are all 
characteristic features of the striking and impressive work of the 
early Norman period. The church, which would in Norman 
times be lighted with small round headed windows, placed high 
in the walls, seems to have been of the severely plain type, 
suited to the exposed position which it occupied. If any archi- 
tectural feature of value adorned the fabric it is strange that no 
fragment, excepting a few pieces of double chamfered mullions 
of late date, have survived. The distant and detached position 
of the site has not availed against local depredation. The 
masonry generally is of squared stones, roughly coursed, that on 
the west gable being the best of the early work. The diagonal 
buttresses and the south elevation of the added porch are of 
ashlar courses. In the south wall of both nave and chancel the 
stones are somewhat smaller and the wall bears the appearance of 
having been more or less rebuilt. 

Remains of contemporary churches of like extent to that of 
Holy Cross are not uncommon. One of similar dimensions once 
existed at North Grosforth. 18 Another with a nave of equal width 
and possibly area, is St. Mary's, Jesmond, 19 and a third example 
in the little Norman chapel at Seaton Delaval. 

18 Arch. Ael., 2nd ser. ix, 20 19 Arch. Ad., 3rd ser. i, 144. 



000 



CHUkCU OF I'HE HOLY CROSS 




FK;. 4. - THE FONT. 



The bowl of the font now at St. Peter's cln irch, 
(fig 4), was obtained in 1891 from Carville hall It is said, 
with great probability, to have belonged to the church of the 

Holy Cross. It is octagonal 
shaped on plan, with curved sides 
moulded on the top edge, and 
measures 2 feet 6 inches in diameter 
and 1 foot 9^ inches in height. 

In the graveyard are quite a 
number of eighteenth century 
memorials; 20 several of, them re- 
present descendants of the perse- 
cuted Huguenots who were con- 
strained to leave Lorraine, and 
engaged in glass making from 
1620 on the banks of the Tyne. 
Among the additional gravestones recently brought to light, 
are three in the chancel, shewn on the plan (fig. 1). That 
marked 1. is to George Hewbanke, 21 who lived at Carville 
hall, the inscription is surmounted by a shield with arms: 
Three chevrnns interlaced, on a chief three annulets, and crest : in a 
wreath a dragon's head; 2. The inscription within a border is 
to Francis George llaine, ' cumtime ' minister 22 ; 3. Is to Richard 

20 Copies of the epitaphs and the position of the stones have been carefully 
recorded on a plan now with the churchwardens of St. Peter's. 

21 The Burial Place of George Hewbanke, Master & Mariner, & Elizabeth, 
his wife. She departed this life, September ye 24th, 1710, in the 57th 
year of her Age. He had issue by her 7 Children, three whereof survived 
her (viz.) John, George and Sarah. In Papworth, arms are given for Ewbank, 
and are emblazoned : SaUe three chevrons interlaced gold, in a chief gold three 
annulrl* xoW?. Burke gives a similar shield for Ewbank. co. Durham, with 
sable roundels on the chief in place of the annulets. He gives the crest in a 
coronet gules a dragon's head gold. 

22 Francis George Raine, clarke, and cumtime Minister of this church with 

. wife Margaret and ... September, 1625 ........ ther daughter 

Depted the 25 of July, 1626,' his wife was daughter to Richard Stotte, merchant. 



CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEKD. 201 

Hindmarsh, and others. 23 Another stone with a coat of arms : 
A lion passant between two escallops, one in chief and one in base, 
and crest : a hand grasping a dagger, records the burial place 
of Joseph Bonner, 24 a merchant adventurer, who died in 1757, 

23 Richard Hindmarsh dyed ye 12 day of November 1667. Elizabeth his 
wife dyed ye 6 day of January 1675. Elizabeth ye wife of John Hindmarsh 
who departed this life 16 of Aprill : Anno Dni. 1702. John Hindmarsh He 
dyed ye 1st November 1707 aged ninetie years. Richard Hindmarsh Esq. 
who departed this life ye 15 of Aprill : Anno Dni. 1703 aged 58 years. 

24 I n memory of Joseph Bonner who died Febry. the 12th 1757 aged 62 
years. Also Elizabeth his wife who died August the 4th 1762 aged 60 years. 
Also Elizabeth their daughter who died June the 5th 1740 aged 19 years. 
And likewise is Interred here the Remains of Isabella Swan Grand-Daughter 
of the above Joseph Bonner who Departed this life the 22nd of June 1780 
aged 15 years. 

In 1907, Mr. J. C. Hodgson, F.S.A., contributed some 'Epitaphs in 
Wallsend Old Churchyard ' to the Society's Proceedings (3rd ser. in, 58). 
Additions to this list are the three described above and the following : 

1. ' The burial place of John [Hails]on and M[ary] his wife. Mich[al] their 
Son, died January 19 th , 1786, aged 30 years. Margaret, their daughter, 
died 28 of March, 1781, aged 38 years. Also [the above] named John 
[Hailsjon departed [January 16th] 1791, aged [60 years].' 

2. E 

I A 
1731 

3. ' In memory of William Parker, late Tide [Surveyor of] Howdon Dock, 
who [departed th]is Life, July 17 th , 1793, aged 67.' 

4. In memo[ry of] William [Young], late of Wal[lsend], who died 
D[ecember 18th, 1802, aged 81].' 

5. ' .... Elizabeth Mann of Wallsend, .... Farmer, John Mann, son of 
the above, died May 9th, 1782, aged 11 years, Elizabeth Mann, wife 
of the above Joh-n Mann, died July 13th, 1783, aged 38 years. The 
above John Mann died Oct. 15th, 1789, aged 58 years. Elizabeth 
Mann, daughter of the above John and Elizabeth Mann, died Feb. 7th, 
1790, aged 21 years, Also Two of their Children died young.' 

6. ' In memory of Mary, wife of John Robinson, ShipWright of Howdon 
pans, Also of their children, viz., Joseph and Will m ., who both died 
in infancy in 1791, and John, who died in infancy in 1793. The above 
named Mary Robinson departed this life May 10th, 1797, Aged 28 years. 
Alice Robinson, died March 15th, aged [4 years]. Also the above John 



JO,' CUUECI1 OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEND. 

aged 62 years, from whom was descended the wife of Cuthbert 
Ellison of Hebburn, grandfather of the present Lord 
bourne. 




FIG. 5. COMMUNION PLATE. 



Robinson, died at Norfolk, in Virginia, Sepr. 12th, 1801 : aged 33 years, 
also John Robinson, son of the above John Robinson, died Septr. 12 th , 
1803, aged 4 years.' 

7.' Here lyeth ye body of Ambrose Bunn, who depted this Life, May ye 
12th, 1689.' 

8.' [Here lieth] the body of R. T. Watson [husband of] Dorothy Watson 
[who died] November [1st, 1778, aged 57] years. [Also the above 
Dorothy, who died 19 November, 1768, aged 74 years.]' 



CHURCH OF THE HOLY CROSS, WALLSEND. 203 

Two pieces of seventeenth century communion plate of 
silver are in use at the modern St. Peter's church, one a cup, 
possibly of Newcastle make, and the salver, most likely of 
foreign manufacture (fig. 5). The salver, probably made for 
secular purposes, is 11 inches in diameter. It has two hall 
marks: (i) a castle and (ii) the maker's initials, I.H., with 
a star over. Its wide border of admirable repousse work is 
decorated with flowers and foliage, amid which are four panels 
with figure subjects representing the seasons. 25 

During the excavations six coins were found : (1) A sixpence 
of Edward vi, with m.m. a tun, in very bad condition; (2) a 
turner of James vi of Scotland, 2nd coinage, 1623; (3) small 
copper coin of 1G42, with 3 lilies on reverse, probably French ; 
(4) a ' cart wheel ' penny (1797) of George in ; (5) a Nuremberg 
jetton or abbey piece, with ship on one side and a shield on 
other; and (G) an indecipherable copper coin. 



25 For description of the communion plate see Proc., 2 ser. in, 244. 



205 



VI. COKSTOPITTJM : REPORT ON THE EXCAVATIONS 

IN 1909. 

By E. H. FORSTER, M.A., F.S.A., and W. H. KNOWLES, 
F.R.I.B.A., F.S.A. 

I. INTRODUCTION. 

Work began at Corbridge in 1909 on July 1 and was con- 
tinued till the beginning of October, or, if the fortnight 
required for * filling in ' be included, till the middle of that 
month. During the three months the excavators were able to 
examine thoroughly the ground lying between the area explored 
in 1908 and the modern road from Corbridge to Beaufront and 
Hexham, which probably coincides approximately with the 
northern limit of the Roman occupation. They also found time 
to work out some details of the granaries and fountain which had 
been left unfinished in the preceding autumn. 

The results obtained are striking and important, though they 
differ markedly in character from the results of 1908. In that 
year we uncovered a broad and well-made street, and by the side 
of it, elaborate, extensive and even massive buildings, the 
granaries, fountain and so-called ( forum,' which surpass in many 
respects all previous discoveries of the kind in Roman Britain, 
while the interest of the buildings was enhanced by one or two 
notable inscriptions, a sensational hoard of late Roman gold 
coins and several noteworthy pieces of sculpture. As we moved 
away north from this fertile quarter, we entered a different 
region. The buildings found in 1909 were small and poorly 
built and, with one exception, ill-preserved : one or two of them 
had plainly been destroyed within the Roman period. Only 
two could be assigned, with any approach to certainty, to a 
definite use. One of these was a granary resembling the two 



20fi REPORT OX THE T99 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITTTM . 

granaries unearthed in 1908, but smaller and less finely con- 
structed : its erection dated perhaps from the earlier part of the 
second century, and it had been destroyed before the fourth 
century (site xiv). The other the only well-preserved building 
in the whole series served apparently as a bath-house in the 
later age of Corstopitum (site xvn). The rest were confused and 
puzzling structures, generally showing signs of successive re- 
building, but in their existing form practically unintelligible. 
Even their positions were irregular, and little trace could be 
found of definite streets. Plainly the northern side of Corstopi- 
tum, so far as it has been yet uncovered, never contained build- 
ings of great importance or solidity. 

In contrast to this poverty we have many single finds to 
record which deserve full notice. Close to the bath-house just 
mentioned was a clay-built furnace or forge, remarkable for a 
huge 'pig' of raw iron which was found standing upright in 
the middle of it. This ' pig' weighs upwards of three and a half 
hundredweight, and is doubtless the largest single piece of 
Roman iron yet found in Britain. Its use is open to doubt. It 
has been thought by some that iron ore from neighbouring iron- 
stone outcrops was brought to Corbridge to be there smelted and 
that this 'pig' is one of the results. Others prefer to suppose 
that the ironstone was smelted where it was dug up, and that the 
' pig ' was utilized at Corbridge as an anvil in a smithy. What- 
ever the truth and we hope to be able to say more next year 
the find indicates iron-smithying of some sort at Corbridge, and 
cannot fail to throw light on ancient metallurgy in England. 

Another interesting structure was a curious aqueduct, formed 
of a stone water-channel laid on a substantial clay embankment. 
This was found to have supplied the water for the fountain in 
the latest Roman period and, though a somewhat rude work, 
deserves attention as a novel form of water supply. The water 
was brought, doubtless, from the rising ground north or north- 



REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITTTM. 207 

east of Corstopitum, but the site of the spring-, the line of the 
channel from it to the beginning of the aqueduct and the nature 
of the channel whether stone or an earthen bank or wooden 
landers on trestles remains to be determined later. 

A third structural discovery was made in front of the two 
granaries uncovered in 1908. Here, facing the main street, we 
were able to trace the bases and lower parts of the columns of 
two massive porticoes, one for each granary. Each portico had 
four columns, which presumably supported a pediment, and the 
whole fitted in well with the general scale of the granaries. The 
porticoes, like the granaries, seemed of different dates and bore 
marks of restoration in certain places. 

Besides these single structural finds, evidence was accumu- 
lated to throw light on the development and character of Cor- 
stopitum. In the first place, the assured beginning of its history 
was thrown back some fifty years. Beneath the granaries and 
also beneath site xiv, Samian and other potsherds were de- 
tected at a considerable depth, and these potsherds may be 
ascribed with reasonable certainty to the age of Agricola. With 
the potsherds were a few postholes, and in them the remains of 
posts, showing that as we might expect the earliest Romans 
at Corstopitum made use of wood for some at least of their 
buildings. Less sensational discoveries have been made in 
respect to Corstopitum chronology during the second and follow- 
ing centuries. But we are beginning to feel our way towards 
a more definite sequence of buildings and periods, and to lay the 
foundations of a relative, if not of a positive, chronology. It is 
interesting, too, to note that the demolition of the great building 
on site xi was due, at least in part, to Romans of the third or 
fourth century seeking building stone. 

The small finds of the year also claim a word. Coins have 
been numerous, if less overwhelmingly plentiful than in 1908, 
and a larger proportion of them than hitherto belongs to the first 



208 REPORT OX THE T 9 9 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM I 

and second centuries. Samian ware has also been abundant, and 
included the almost wholly new element of first-century fabrics : 
on the other hand, the East-Gaulish or German products which 
occurred to some extent in 1908 were almost wholly absent in 
1909. Of individual objects the most noted, if not the most 
noteworthy, is a terracotta mould found on site xiv which has 
become popularly associated even in Punch with the name and 
fame of Mr. Harry Lauder. Its more serious aspects are dealt 
with below (p. 224). Notice is also due to a small Anglo-Saxon 
urn, from site xiv, and a piece of a sword scabbard of a kind 
which was in use on the other side of the North Sea in the 
fourth or fifth century. These fit in with the two Anglian 
fibulae and beads found in 1908, and may belong to the same 
grave. 

The excavations were again superintended by Mr. E. H. 
Forster, while Mr. W. H. Knowles again undertook the planning 
and measurement of the buildings and structural remains. 
Mr. Forster was also assisted by Prof. Haverfield, Mr. H. H. E. 
Craster, Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, Mr. G. L. Chees- 
man, Fellow of New College, and Mr. J. P. Bushe-Fox, who 
were resident in Corbridge for large parts of the season. Other 
friends gave valuable assistance. It is only by abundance of 
helpers that the many activities involved in an extensive excava- 
tion can be adequately provided, and while it is indispensable 
that one competent archaeologist should give personal and con- 
tinuous supervision to the actual digging, it is equally necessary 
that others should be present to share in the supervision of special 
buildings and pits, and to record and classify the mass of objects 
found. 

The illustrations contained in the present report are taken 
from photographs by Mr. Bushe-Fox and Mr. J. P. Gibson, and 
from drawings by Mr. Knowles. 

The work will be resumed in July, 1910, on the portion of 



THE GRANARY PORTICOES. 209 

Corstopitum which lies directly east of the area explored in 1908. 
This portion includes the hitherto unexcavated part of the great 
building on site xi. It is therefore certain that the work will 
he difficult and costly, hut it is hardly less certain that it will 
reveal important structural remains and yield very valuable 
results. 

II. THE GRANARY PORTICOES. 

The chief event of 1909 from an architectural point of view 
was the discovery of a pro-tetrastyle portico before the south 
front of each of the granaries (fig. 1). The bases remain in situ, 
with the exception of the westernmost column of the west 
granary portico, where only the square plinth is left. The east 
granary portico had a projection of nine feet six inches (fig. 2). 
Its colonnade consists of four columns ; the bases of the two outer 
columns are at the level of the earliest road, and may be con- 
sidered as original and contemporary with the main building : 
the others rest on foundations large enough to have carried 
columns of the same design, but the surviving bases are of a 
different type, and seem to indicate a later restoration. The 
outer columns have a plinth three feet eight inches square by 
twelve inches in height, with a circular moulded double torus 
thirteen and a half inches high : the latter is rudely worked, 
and the members, being of similar section and undivided by 
fillets, lack refinement. The shafts, which measure two feet 
six inches in diameter, are composed of built-up courses of 
masonry, four inches in thickness, and have been covered with 
a coating of cement, of which some traces remained. The 
middle columns have bases formed of single stones, the shafts 
measuring only one foot eleven inches in diameter. If we are 
right in regarding this portico as contemporary in origin with 
the east granary, it is not unlikely that these two columns 
were damaged at the time of a disaster which occurred perhaps 

3 SBR. VOI(. V\, 14 




SECTION ON LINE B.B. 





ELEVATION PROM WITHIN. 







uy^-i^>- 1 r 
III I 








PLATf 


HJ 


,:; 







ENTRANCE 



PLAN. 



COR5TOPITUM: 
PORTICO TO 
EAST GRANARY 




WHKNOWLES. MEN5 ET DEL 1909: 



FIG. 2. 



THE GRANARY PORTICOES. 211 

in the reign of Commodus, and we may conjecturally ascribe 
their restoration to Septimius Severus. 

The colonnade of the west granary (fig. 3) projects only 
eight feet six inches. But it will be seen from plate xxn of 
the report for 1908 that the south wall of this granary is in 
advance of the south wall of the neighbouring building, so that 
both colonnades are approximately in the same line. The portico 
of the west granary is at the level of the middle or second period 
road, which envelopes the bases of the outer columns of the other 
portico : the foundations have been carelessly laid, and the whole 
structure is certainly of later date than the building to which 
it was attached. The discovery of a silver coin of Commodus at 
a level slightly lower than the foundations of one of the columns 
perhaps gives a clue to the date of the portico, which may have 
formed part of an extensive restoration carried out under Severus. 
Such a restoration might have included a considerable amount of 
rebuilding in the granary itself, and would thus help to explain 
the puzzling features mentioned in last year's report.* 

The bases of the west granary columns are single stones and 
similar in section to the two middle bases of the east granary 
portico. But the columns are only one foot seven and a half 
inches in diameter: their intercolumniation is also irregular, 
the space between the side columns being five feet nine inches, 
as compared with nine feet ten inches between the two centre 
columns. Probably this was for the purpose of facilitating access 
to the loading platform. Between the two westernmost columns 
was what appeared to be a couple of rough steps, leading down- 
wards towards the granary, the upper surface of the higher step 
being about on a level with the lower surface of the adjacent 
gutter-stones of the latest (probably fourth century) street, which 
thus formed a third step. 

* Arch. Ael., 3 ser., vol. v, p. 308 et seq. 



CORSTOPITUM PORTICO TO WE5T GRANARY 




ELEVATION FROM WITHIN 



"JSiptTE'iTfd UATrRoAcT 



'STEP 
"Ki^l 




FIG. 3. 



THE GRANARY PORTICOES. 213 

In the course of our excavation the three successive street 
levels, with the drains belonging to each, were clearly exposed. 
They will be best understood by a reference to the plans and 
sections (figs. 2 and 3). The earliest and second period streets 
had covered drains ; the street of the latest period has been 
bounded by an open channel, composed for the most part of re- 
used material, in part, at least, brought from the large building 
on site xi. One or two of the stones in which the channel had 
been cut, still retained the rock-faced projection characteristic 
of the masonry found on that site, and in many other cases the 
projection had been chiselled away, but the original arris was 
clearly distinguishable. 

As will be seen from figs. 2 and 3 the columns of the two 
porticoes, or such parts of them as then remained, had been used 
as supports for the roadway of the latest and highest street, this 
roadway had been further strengthened between each pair of 
columns by large flat stones, placed on edge in a nearly upright 
position and backed with clay. It was necessary to remove these 
stones in order to expose the columns. 

A further examination was made of the loading platform of 
the west granary. This appeared to be of later date than the 
main building and may be contemporary with the portico. In 
the course of this operation the masonry of the whole of the 
south front of the granary was exposed, and an opening, one 
foot ten inches in width, with checked jambs and sill for a timber 
door-frame, was discovered at the point marked D on the plan 
(fig. 3). The sill had been below the level of the original floor of 
the granary, and just above the level of the earliest street ; and 
the opening had been at some time walled up without removal of 
the timber door-frame, which had rotted away, leaving a few 
small fragments adhering to the masonry. 



214 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITTJM : 

in. SITE vni. THE 'FOUNTAIN': FIRST CENTURY AND OTHER 

REMAINS. 

A considerable space was excavated immediately to the south 
of the tank of the ' fountain.' Clean sand was reached at a depth 
of ten feet below the present surface, and the tank was found to 
rest on a clay and cobble foundation placed on the surface of the 
road running to the north, the lower side of the stones being 
five feet below the present surface. Just to the south, and at a 
lower level, were the remains of a wall about two and a half feet 
thick, which was traced for a distance of about fifteen feet. Its 
extent roughly corresponded with the front of the tank : the 
portion remaining was one foot six inches in height, and its 
foundation level was three feet four inches below the bottom 
of the tank, or rather more than eight feet below the present 
surface. From this wall a cross wall of the same thickness ran 
south for about eight feet, and was then cut away to permit a 
drain to cross in continuation of that passing in front of the east 
granary (plate xxi, report for 1908, and section of the porticoes 
in the present report) ; the west side of the cross wall lined with 
the centre of the ' fountain.' There was some trace of the clay 
and cobble foundation of another cross wall running parallel to 
that just mentioned, about in a line with the west side of the 
tank. 

Below the foundations of these walls, and resting on the clean 
sand, was a layer, one foot eight inches thick, of mixed earth 
containing evidence of a still earlier occupation. Several pieces 
of decorated ' Samian ' of shape 29 (first century) were found at 
or near the lowest level, as well as fragments of other wares which 
appear to be of first century date. Nine post holes, which must 
have belonged to a timber structure of the same period, were also 
discovered. Of those situated to the west of the cross wall, a 
row of three was carefully excavated and measured. Their 



THE FOUNTAIN, ETC. 215 

depth when excavated was about two feet, but some of the upper 
part was necessarily removed in the process of discovery, and it 
seems likely that their original depth was two feet six inches, 
and that their tops, which were surrounded by a burnt layer, had 
been about on a level with the foundations of the walls just de- 
scribed. The holes, which were pointed at the bottom and pene- 
trated some inches into the clean sand, measured as follows: 
North hole, three inches north and south by two inches ; centre 
hole, three and a quarter inches north and south by two inches ; 
south hole, three and a half inches north and south by two inches. 
Small fragments of wood were found adhering to the sides of the 
holes. Three other postholes were found to the east of the cross 
wall, two of them being close to the line of that wall, and one of 
these under a drain which will presently be described. These 
two were of larger size, that under the drain measuring seven and 
a half inches north and south by seven inches east and west. 

A somewhat complicated system of drains was found in this 
area. Further investigation will be necessary before it can 
be thoroughly understood, as during the past season the task of 
finishing the northern part of the field made it advisable to do 
less than was desired here, where work will be possible in the 
future. It seems probable, however, in the first place, that even 
after the final raising of the street level in front of the granaries, 
the fountain remained in use, and that there was a slope from the 
north side of the street to the front of the tank. This certainly 
suggests that the stretch of walling shown on the plan in the 
report for 1908 and fig. 2, just to the south of the south-east 
corner of the east granary, was not the remains of a forecourt to 
that granary, as was at one time supposed, but formed a boundary 
or retaining wall on the west side of this sloping access to the 
fountain. The wall in question, to judge by its construction and 
the level of its foundations, is of late date. Up to the present 
no trace has been found of a corresponding wall on the east, but 



RfcPOKT ON THfc 1 909 fcXCAVAflONS At CO&StOtlTttM t 

on this side the ground, for the reasons above stated, has not 
yet been thoroughly explored. 

The drain belonging to the earliest street level in front of 
the granaries passes under this retaining wall. Two and a half 
feet to the east, it is joined by the drain from the north, into 
which, as observed in 1907, the outlet of the 'fountain' tank 
had flowed. From the point of junction the drain curves south- 
wards, and then runs straight, at an acute angle with the 
direction of the street, for twenty-eight feet, till its line is cut by 
that of another drain at a somewhat higher level, which comes 
from under the south-east angle of the ' fountain ' tank : possibly 
the latter drain ran into the former, but, with so much heavy 
stonework to be removed, it was necessary to postpone further 
investigation. To the east of the junction with the drain from 
the north, the construction of these drains was comparatively 
poor. With regard to the masonry foundations discovered in 
front of the < fountain/ there is not sufficient evidence to show 
their original extent or purpose; they may have formed part of 
a building erected here after the timber structure was destroyed 
and before the main street was laid out. This, however, is merely 
a suggestion, and the point may be further investigated, if the 
investigation which must necessarily be expensive, is considered 
to be worth the cost. 



An important question, on which some light has been thrown, 



west cr-mar 1-1 y Wltn tne Portico of the 



THE WATERCOURSE. 217 

lias yielded fragments of two inscriptions by the same legion. If 
we consider the workmanship, we cannot well put the ' fountain ' 
earlier than Severus, and the quality of the work is not in- 
consistent with an even later date. If the existence of a sloping 
approach from the late period street level can be satisfactorily 
established, it would seem that the ' fountain ' remained in use 
practically up to the end of the Roman occupation, and this 
agrees with the level of the watercourse at the point where the 
stones were found in position. 

IV. THE WATERCOURSE. 

In cutting a trial trench to the north of site xiv, an embank- 
ment of 'day and rough masonry, with a slight batter to both sides, 
was found and followed for some distance to the north and south 
(see plan, fig*. 18). It ran in a somewhat irregular line for about 
one hundred and seventy feet, the remains being of the average 
height of about three feet, and for this distance the masonry, 
five to six courses in height, was backed on the west side by an 
embankment of clay about five feet in width. This clay was 
yellowish in colour and of moderate quality, less tenacious than 
the blue clay used in the foundations of the buildings of the 
earlier period. To the south, the last twenty feet of the retain- 
ing wall lined up with a gutter or watercourse composed of 
channelled stones averaging twenty-two inches in breadth and 
a foot in thickness, with a channel about nine inches wide and 
four deep : it appeared to have had a covering of large flat stones, 
but of these only two were found in position. This watercourse, 
which had a fall from north to south, was traced southwards to 
a point opposite the middle of site xn : beyond this the stones 
had been removed, but a continuation of the line exactly coin- 
cided with the top of the sloping retaining wall discovered in 
1908 on the east side of the east granary.* The latter wall faces 

* See Arch. AeL, 3 ser. vol. v, p. 344, and report, p. 40. 



218 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

the west, but on examination it was found to be backed on the 
east side by clay of a quality very similar to that of the clay 
embankment already mentioned, and it seems probable that it 
supported the southern end of the watercourse which, presum- 
ably during the later period of the occupation, carried the water 
supply to the ' fountain.' 

To the north the retaining wall discovered in 1909 is broken 
away near the north-west corner of the building on site xvn, 
but it appears to have been continued as a mound of clay and 
stones, shown on the plan by a dotted line, over the filled-in 
ditch and so in a straight line northwards till it butts up against 
a line of kerb-stones, or possibly the foundations of another re- 
taining wall running east and west about eighteen feet from the 
hedge: three channelled stones were found lying in the soil at 
various points adjacent to the line indicated, and two others were 
found just to the west of the clay bank near the point at which 
the retaining wall is broken off beside site xvn, while a broken 
channelled stone was found close to the same bank during the 
excavation of the building on site xiv. All these stones were of 
similar dimensions to those found in situ. 

The question of levels, unfortunately, is not free from diffi- 

culty. The present surface to the north of site xvn is lower than " 

the level of the stones found in position. The latter have sunk 

m several places, owing to their being laid on made ground of 

varying hardness; but their covering stones seem to have been 

a a level with the latest surface of the street between sites xi 

m, which is probably not earlier than the middle of the 

rth century. If, as has been suggested, the watercourse 

Tied water by gravitation southwards, it is necessary to sup- 
pose h at m th hern part Qf .^ courge ^^ Btm / P 

ted on an embankment of some height, and that their level 



, SUrfa - This, how- 

eve!, appears to be not impossible, since the area to the west of 



THE WATERCOURSE. 219 

the line seems to have been unoccupied during the later period, 
and an embankment of the necessary height would naturally be 
levelled or removed when the land was brought under cultivation, 
if not before that. 

Another difficult question is the way in which the water 
reached the point where the remains of this watercourse cease. 
The sharp drop of the ground northwards at about the line of 
the hedge precludes the idea that it was brought directly from 
the north. But there is at the present day a good source of 
supply at Milkwell farm, to the north of the modern village and 
distant a little more than half a mile from the north-east corner 
of the area excavated in 1909,* or Ay don burn may have been 
tapped at some point where a sufficiently high level could be 
obtained. In either case the supply would approach the town 
from the east, or a little north of east, and it is perhaps not an 
unfeasible suggestion that the kerb upon which the * fountain ' 
watercourse abuts may represent the southern edge of an em- 
bankment carrying the main aqueduct, which here threw off a 
branch to the south and passed on to the western quarter of the 
town. This, however, is a suggestion only. We must wait for 
further light until the ground east and west of last year's area 
is excavated. 

The watercourse to the 'fountain,' if such it be, appears to 
be of comparatively late date, though it may have been preceded 
by an earlier aqueduct. It is clear, in the first place, that at 
the date of its construction the building on site xiv was practi- 
cally destroyed ; and the coins and other objects found in this 
building tend to show that it was probably erected in the first 
half of the second century, while its remains had become covered 

* The line from these springs to the suggested embankment would pass the 
spot in the angle between Cow lane and the Stagshaw road, where channelled 
stones were found in situ some years ago. The levels are said to be favourable for 
a watercourse following this route. 



220 REPORT ON THE 1 909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM. 

with two to three feet of earth before the clay embankment was 
carried over its site. It is also clear that at the same date the 
building on site xvn was still standing, as the line of the water- 
course is diverted to avoid it: the coins found in this building 
range from Gallienus (A.D. 260-268) to Gratian (A.D. 375-383). 
Six coins of the first half of the fourth century were found beside 
the retaining wall of the watercourse, and of these one Urbs 
Roma (A.D. 335-337) and one of Constans (A.D. 340-342) were 
found on the bed of clay. These facts, taken in conjunction with 
the level of the channelled stones found in situ, tend to show 
that the watercourse was constructed, or more probably recon- 
structed, in the fourth century. 

v. SITE xiv. 

The northern part of this site (fig. 5) had been occupied by 
an oblong rectangular building, measuring externally fifty-four 
feet by twenty-three. Except at one or two points towards the 
west end, practically nothing of it remained above the foundation 
course, and the east end was traced by the clay and cobble 
foundation. The clay was blue and very tough, and waterworn 
cobbles had been used, some of them being of fairly large size.' 

At. the foundation level the building had been divided in- 
ternally into six compartments of approximately equal size by 
cross walls two feet thick, resting on clay and cobble foundations 
In each compartment there had been three masonry pillars, about 
two feet square, on foundations of the same kind : two of these 
1 ars were standing to a height of about three feet, while many 
had entirely disappeared but could be traced by means of the clay 
cobbles It is to be noticed that the space between the 
rthernand centre pillars is in every case less than that between 
he centre and southern. As the compartments measure in- 
ternally only slx teen feet by six, it is fairly clear that they cannot 



222 REPORT ON THE 1 909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITTTM. 

represent separate rooms into which the building was divided ; 
for in that case the masonry pillars would only form a useless 
obstruction. It is probable that some of the cross walls and all 
the pillars were of no great height, and that they supported a 
raised floor, similar to those of the east and west granaries, but 
arranged on a different system : the space beneath this floor may 
have been ventilated by openings similar to those found in 1908, 
but unfortunately there was no point at which the outer wall re- 
mained standing to a sufficient height to show whether such 
openings had originally existed or not. There were the remains 
of what appeared to be a buttress opposite the north end of the 
first cross wall from the west, and traces of something similar 
were found opposite the south end of the same cross wall. On the 
whole it seems likely that we have here the remains of some 
kind of storehouse or granary erected in the first half of the 
second century. The top of the clay and cobble foundation was 
from six to seven feet below the present surface, and no late 
coins were found on the site, except in the surface soil ; of the 
coins which occurred at a lower level seven were minted under 
Trajan and ten under Hadrian, five are earlier than Trajan, and 
the only coins later than Hadrian are two of Antoninus Pius and 
one of Severus Alexander. 

The building was almost completely destroyed and its 
materials to a large extent removed during the Roman occupation 
gh the site may have been occupied for some outdoor purpose 
ter the destruction, as two or three small areas of flag pave- 
ment were found at from eighteen inches to three feet below the 
present surface. The lower part of the site was covered with a 
ttum about three feet thick, consisting largely of lime and 
'oken stones, surmounted by a thin layer of burnt bones, which 
lv noticeable in the eastern half : above this was about 



Vj ^VV^X x V x 




> 

X 



z 

ID 

E 
O 

in 






224 REPORT ON THE 1 909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

The site, down to the foundation level of the building, yielded 
a considerable amount of ' Samian ' and other pottery, the 
' Samian ' including no fragments that could be assigned to an 
earlier date than the second century. The other minor finds 
included a few bronze fibulae, an engraved stone from a ring, 
bearing a figure of Mars, two small lamps, one bearing the stamp 
FORTIS, both of which occurred in the upper soil, and about 
the usual quantity of small objects of iron. 

The most noteworthy object discovered was a baked red clay 
mould, measuring five and three-quarter inches in length, three 
and three-quarter inches in breadth, and about three-quarters of 
an inch in thickness, for the production, presumably on pottery 
of local manufacture, of a figure in relief, four and a half 
inches high. The illustration (fig. 6), on the opposite page, is 
reproduced from a photograph of a cast taken from the mould. 
The figure is that of a bearded male, clad in an undergarment, 
possibly of skin or hide, which falls over the right knee and may 
have been fastened by a brooch on the left shoulder, and a 
shorter upper garment, apparently of some textile fabric, which is 
fastened by a brooch on the right shoulder and falls a little below 
the waist. His legs and feet are bare, and on his head he wears- 
a hat or helmet, terminating in a large round knob. His right 
hand rests on the handle of a curious crooked club, which may be 
intended to represent a piece of roughly trimmed tree-branch. 
On his left arm he carries an oblong and apparently convex 
shield, on which is incised a line forming a segment of a circle 
and extending from the upper to the lower right-hand corner : 
the space so enclosed is ornamented with incised circles, and 
about the centre of it is shown the boss of the shield, which 
appears to be more or less conical, with a flange at the base. The 
position of this boss, which appears to be nearer to the right than 
to the left edge of the shield, might perhaps indicate that the 
shield had two bosses ; but on the whole it seems much more 




FIG. 6. ROMANO-BRITISH GOD (?). 



3 SBB. VOL. VI, 



15 



226 REPORT OX THE 1 909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

likely that the artist did not possess sufficient .skill to show the 
proper perspective, and that he has placed the boss in the centre 
of the part of the shield visible to the spectator. To the left of 
the left leg of the figure is a representation of an eight-spoked 
wheel. The mould has evidently been made from a modelled 
figure, and has been touched up with a graving tool. In style 
and workmanship the figure bears a strong resemblance to that 
which appears on two fragments of dark-grey pottery found in 
1908 on site xn, at a point not many yards distant from site xiv.* 
On the subject of this figure professor Haverfield thus 
writes : 

' The figure shewn by the mould seems to represent, or to be based on a 
representation of a figure of a Romano-British god, though here, as in so many 
minor classical remains, the line between a religious figure and mere ornament 
is not easy to draw. We have a warrior armed with a metal cap on which the 
fitting of the plume and crest is plain, a shield shewn perhaps in half that is, 
in barbarous perspective and a crooked stick, to which I can cite no parallel. 
IP addition, he is accompanied by a wheel which is a well known and familiar 
Celtic religious emblem. The fragments found in 1908 represent part of a 
similar figure, differently capped and armed with a brandished axe. A similar 
mould, but more classical in style and art, has been found in London, and is 
now in the Guildhall Museum. The plaques made in such moulds were, I 
imagine, affixed to the outsides of large vases and similar surfaces, in the 
manner of reliefs d'aprfique, but I have no definite facts to quote in this 
respect.' 

A yet more important feature of site xiv was a pit containing 
first-century relics. In excavating the eastern end of the build- 
ing it was found that while the clay and cobble foundations of 
the four cross walls nearest the west end rested on, or very near 
the undisturbed sand, to the east of the fourth there appeared to 
be a sharp dip. Accordingly, that end of the building was 

rfully examined, though this necessitated very heavy work 
and the results gave ample compensation. It was found that the 
n-y pillar in the south-east angle of the building had sunk 

* See Arch. Ael., 3 ser. vol. v, p. 116. 



Arch. A el., 3 sen, vi. To face p. 226. 



Plate XII. 




no, GA. 

ROMANO-BRITISH MOULD IN THE GUILDHALL MUSEUM. LONDON 

(See opposite page.) 



The block lent by Prof. Haverfield. 



SITE xiv. 227 

about two feet below the level of its neighbours, and it became 
evident that it had been set over a filled-in rubbish pit. This 
pit, when cleared, was found to be six feet six inches in diameter, 
and the bottom of it was fourteen feet six inches below the 
present surface : the original surface level, of the date when the 
pit was dug, was found at a depth of ten feet, and the pit pene- 
trated the hard gravel at a level two feet one inch lower. 

Besides a quantity of bones, the pit contained fragments of 
a decorated * Samian ' bowl of shape 29, and about two-thirds of 
& decorated bowl of shape 30, both of which may safely be re- 
garded as first-century work. With these were found a few 
fragments of grey and buff wares closely resembling specimens 
found by Mr. James Curie at Newstead in the earliest fort ditch. 
Mr. Curie has examined the pottery found in this pit and else- 
where at Corbridge at low levels, and agrees with the conclus- 
ions expressed in this report as to its early date. The pottery 
will be more fully described in a future report. 

Another pit was found and cleared, a few feet to the north 
of the pit just described. At the original surface level, which 
was here about nine feet below the present surface, this pit was 
about six feet-in diameter, but it diminished in width as it went 
down, coming almost to a point at the bottom, which was twelve 
feet six inches below the present surface. Probably it had been 
only partially dug; certainly, nothing was found in it but one 
small piece of plain * Samian ' of an early shape. 

The area immediately to the south of the building just de- 
scribed appeared to have been an open court or yard. One or 
two small patches of rough flag pavement, found about eighteen 
inches below the surface, probably belong to the latest period of 
the occupation. A stretch of wall, about twenty-four feet in 
length and two in thickness, found on the west side in line with 
the west wall of the building to the north, appeared to be of 
earlier date, as its foundations lay between five and six feet 



228 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

below the present surface. On the east side was a fragment, 
fifteen feet long, of a covered stone drain : no more than this 
fragment was found, and possibly we have here the remains of 
an earlier watercourse, the rest of which was destroyed when the 
later watercourse was constructed on the clay embankment at a 
higher level. 

The soil covering this area was very black and particularly 
rich in small finds, including a number of bronze fibulae, a bronze 
ring with a small stone showing a figure and a larger bezel- 
stone engraved with a figure. 

The pottery included pieces of a small vase of black ware 
with incised ornament, which appears to be of Anglo-Saxon 
origin. One of these pieces was found inside a small, cist-like 
receptacle at A, near the southern edge of the site. This re- 
ceptacle measured two feet three inches by one foot six inches ; 
its sides were formed of fiat slabs of stone, and its bottom was the 
hard gravel which here forms the subsoil. Its contents were 
quite miscellaneous and plainly fortuitous : they included the 
piece already mentioned, a few fragments of ' Sainian ' and other 
Roman pottery, a large knife, several lumps of rusted ironwork, 
and many bones pig, sheep or cattle most of which had been 
broken for the purpose of extracting the marrow. To the east 
and north-east of the spot, iron objects and pieces of what ap- 
peared to be thin bar iron were abundant, and suggested that 
some kind of smith-work had been carried on there. In this case 
the stone receptacle may have been a small cooling or tempering 
tank, though it cannot easily have been made watertight. 

VI. SITE XV. 

This site included a considerable space of ground adjacent 

to the west hedge of the field. Traces were found in it of a 

continuation northwards of the street dividing sites x and xn 

om sites ix and xm, but the remains were meagre and most of 



SITES XV AND XVI. 229 

the cobble pavement had been removed. A paved street was 
also found running westwards, about at right angles to the line 
of the street already mentioned. The only building remains 
discovered were those of a roughly circular kiln or furnace, about 
six feet in diameter, constructed of stones put together with clay, 
and showing strong signs of burning. The rest of the area was 
carefully trenched, and was found to be covered with disturbed 
earth which increased in thickness towards the west, reaching a 
depth of seven feet six inches close against the hedge ; but though 
it produced some coins and a fair quantity of pottery and other 
small objects, no traces of buildings were discovered, and it 
seems probable that in Roman times this was an open space. 

VII. SITE XVI. 

This site, measuring about ninety feet by eighty, lies immedi- 
ately to the north of site xi, and was found to be in a state of 
almost hopeless confusion, due not only to post-Roman digging 
for stone, but also to the fact that in Roman times there had 
been at least three occupation levels, and the buildings or other 
structures of the different periods had not occupied the same 
sites. The lowest foundations discovered were those of a rect- 
angular building, one of the chambers of which was twenty-five 
feet square, the north wall being continued on either side : at 
the north-east, where shown on the plan, there was walling at the 
same level and of similar construction, rough flagged pavement 
also occurred where indicated. These foundations were on a 
level with the foundations of the north wall of the building on 
site xi, about seven and a half feet below the present surface, and 
the two buildings had been separated by a paved street sixteen 
feet in width. The northern part of the site had also been 
occupied at an early period, but no definite trace of any building 
could be found. Near the north-west corner a small rubbish pit 
was discovered. 



230 REPOKT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITTTM : 

About the middle of the site, and at a higher level than the 
foundations already mentioned, were two rough stone structures, 
approximately circular in plan and about four feet in diameter, 
resting on made ground : possibly they may have been tanks or 
vats of some kind, but there was no indication of their having 
been made water-tight. A little to the south-east of these were 
the remains of a circular building, measuring fifteen feet in 
internal diameter; the foundations were about three feet below 
the present surface, and the walls, which remained standing to a 
height of from one to two feet, were two feet in thickness and of 
poor quality. Nothing was found in the interior of the building 
which gave any clue to its use. Between this and the square 
building, at B on the plan (fig. 13), was a small cist or cistern 
20 inches by 13 inches by 15 inches in height with flagged sides 
and bottom. To the east and north-east of this building was a 
stretch of wall-foundation, running north-east and south-west, 
and not parallel or at right angles to any other foundation on 
the site; it was broken away at either end, and its level was 
about the same as that of the foundations of the circular 
building. Just below the present surface a stone channel or 
drain, evidently of the latest period, was found crossing the 
southern part of the site : about seventy feet from the eastern 
limit of the reserved area it was joined by a similar but smaller 
drain from the north, and about thirty feet further to the west 
it curved southwards and had apparently passed along the street 
between sites xi and xn, but it was broken away before the curve 
was completed. The sides were composed of fairly heavy stones, 
and the bottom was of earth or gravel : one or two heavy cover- 
ing slabs were found in position. 

Pottery was fairly abundant on this site, and some fragments 
of decorated ' Samian ' of shape 30 came from the lowest level 
these, however, do not appear to be of quite so early a date as 
the bowl of the same shape found in the rubbish pit on site xiv 



SITE XVI. 



231 



A silver coin of Galba came from the small rubbish pit, and one 
of the rough tanks produced a coin of Nero and a silver coin of 




FIG. 7. COBSTOPITUM. SCULPTURED PANEL. |. 

Julia Domna. A considerable number of coins, ranging from 
Vespasian to Marcus Aurelius and including nine of Trajan, came 
from the low levels or the earth just above them : a number of 



232 REPORT Otf THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITtTM ! 

later coins were also found, beginning with Septimius Severus 
and ending with Gratian, but these were all found within three 
feet of the surface. 

The most remarkable object found on this site was the sculp- 
tured panel (fig. 7), measuring sixteen inches in height and fifteen 
and a quarter inches in breadth, which was discovered a little more 
than a foot below the surface near the south side of the circular 
building. It bears a representation in relief of two draped 
female figures of unequal size : the larger figure, on the right, 
is seated, and in her right hand, which rests on her lap, she 
holds a round or oval object, the nature of which is not clear, 
while her left hand, which is raised to the level of the face, 
grasps an upright rod or wand, which seems to have had some 
sort of ornament at the top ; on her right is a pedestal, or 
possibly an altar, on which is perched what may possibly be a 
cock. The other figure, which is standing, appears to be a 
representation of Fortune ; in her right hand she holds a rudder, 
and in her left a cornucopia, which rests against the left shoulder. 

VIII. SITE XVIII. 

Of this site, which may most conveniently be taken next, 
there is little to be said, as much the same confusion existed 
here as was found on site xvi. The remains of a small oblong 
building, measuring internally seventeen feet six inches by 
twelve feet, were traced, and as the floor level was over four feet 
below the present surface, it may be of comparatively early date, 
but nothing was found to throw any light on its character. A 
little to the west of this were the remains of a wall of very poor 
masonry, with a buttress on the east, and on the west, near the 
north end, some flag pavement and the remains of a trough made 
of flat stones. A coin of Antoninus Pius was found by the base 

this wall at a depth of four feet, but the only other coins un- 
earthed were one of Constantius n (after A.D. 350), two of Valens 



SITES XVIII AND XVIt, ETC. 238 

and two of Gratian. These were all found less than two and a 
half feet below the surface. 

IX. SITE XVII : BATH-HOUSE AND FURNACE. 

This site (fig. 8), lying to the north of sites xiv and xvm, 
produced more definite and interesting remains. Close to the 
eastern side of the watercourse embankment was a building 
measuring originally forty-six feet from east to west and eigh- 
teen feet from north to south : the main walls were two feet in 
thickness, and remained standing to an average height of two 
feet, the foundations being three feet ten inches below the 
present surface on the north side and two feet eleven inches on 
the south. The interior of the building had been divided into 
three rooms, that to the east measuring fourteen feet by nine 
feet six inches, and the others about fourteen feet square, and 
each room had been heated by a pillared hypocaust, the furnace 
for the whole building being at the west end, while the hypo- 
causts were connected by a single opening through the party wall 
between the west and centre rooms, and two openings in the 
other party wall. The pilae were very roughly built of stone, 
except in the case of a few in the east room, where single stones 
had been used, and their foundations, as well as the floor level 
of the hypocausts, were about ten inches above the foundation 
level of the main walls. Only a single broken flagstone of the 
flooring was found, but there were many fragments of the upper 
layer, which seems to have been of hard white cement, faced 
with opus signinum of good quality. The flue, by which the 
heat passed through the west main wall, had been faced on both 
sides, and probably also turned, with what at first sight ap- 
peared to be flat bricks ; but on further examination they proved 
to be flanged roofing tiles : in some cases the flanges had been 
broken off, but in others the space between the flanges had been 
filled up with cement. 



SITE XVII I BATH-HOUSE AND FURNACE. 235 

At some date subsequent to the original construction of the 
building important alterations had been made. Apsidal ad- 
ditions had been constructed on the north sides of the east and 
west rooms, the new walls, which are of fairly good masonry, 
being butted against the original north walls, a portion of which, 
where it adjoined the chord of the eastern apse, was found to have 
been removed down to the foundation level. This apse (fig. 9), 
which is twelve feet in width and projects eight feet, had a 
flagged floor, without hypocaust, with a fillet of opus signinum 
at the junction of the floor with the inner face of the wall, not 
only on the semicircular side, but also along the chord, where 
presumably there had been a low wall dividing the apse from 
the east room, and so forming a tank or bath, having an outlet 
by a pot pipe drain through the east side of the curved wall. The 
level of the floor of this tank was about a foot lower than what, 
so far as could be calculated, must have been the floor level of 
the main building. In the case of the apse added to the west 
room, the original main wall had been pierced and the hypocaust 
extended as shown on the plan. This apse was fourteen feet 
wide, with a projection of eight feet. 

About the centre of the main east wall a buttress of solid 
masonry, nine feet long and four feet thick, had at some period 
been added, probably because the walling of the building showed 
signs of slipping ; and there was evidence that in Roman times 
the ground here sloped towards the east. At the other end of 
the building the stokehole seems at some date to have been 
enlarged : two side walls were built of poor masonry, about in 
line with the original north and south walls, and two blocks of 
similar masonry were added near the main flue of the hypocaust. 
Possibly this may have been done for the purpose of increasing 
the heating power and for the support of water cisterns by 
making a triple furnace in place of a single one : at any rate 
the heavy black deposit of the stokehole covered the whole space 



SITE XVII : BATH-HOUSE AND FURNACE. 237 

between the side walls, just to the west of the blocks of masonry 
in question. 

An examination of the south wall of the original building 
showed traces of a slightly splayed doorway with recesses for 
jambs, which had opened into the centre room but had subse- 
quently been walled up. More doubtful traces of another 
walled-up doorway were found about the centre of the south wall 
of the west room. In either case the sills had been removed and 
it was difficult to determine exactly the sill level. It could not, 
however, have been as high as the level of the tops of the pilae, 
and this may possibly suggest that the building in its original 
state had no hypocaust. Indeed, it is possible that the hypo- 
causts were introduced when the apsidal additions were made, 
and that the tile-faced flue through the west wall was of later 
date than the wall itself. This latter conclusion is not at all 
improbable in itself, as the blocks of masonry, which prolong the 
flue after its passage through the main wall, did not appear to 
be bonded to the wall. 

The doors mentioned, if they in fact existed, seem to have 
opened upon a walk or terrace along the south front of the build- 
ing, where we found both traces of cobble pavement and about 
forty-eight feet of stone gutter, broken away at each end. Near 
the south-east corner of the building, and nine feet to the south 
of its south wall, a long stretch of wall, about two feet thick 
with a footing on the south side, was discovered and traced in an 
easterly direction for eighty-six feet : probably it had also ex- 
tended farther towards the west, but beyond the point shown on 
the plan no trace of it was to be found. At its east end another 
wall was butted against it at right angles, and appeared to be the 
boundary of a paved road or path, but sixteen feet from the 
point of junction this second wall made a return to the west, and 
at the end of about another sixteen feet was completely broken 
away. It seems possible that the longer wall may have been the 



238 REPORT ON THE 1 909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

retaining wall of a terrace forming a continuation of the walk 
in front of the main building, but trenches cut through the area 
to the north of it failed to produce any evidence bearing on the 
point. 

The coins found inside the building were all of comparatively 
late date; they are seven in number, ranging from Gallienus 
to Gratian. A silver coin of Vespasian was found on the gravel 
on the south side of the building, at a depth of four feet, and a 
silver coin of Titus occurred at a depth of about four feet outside 
the west apse, but these cannot be taken as proof of the early con- 
struction of the 'building, though there may well have been some 
kind of occupation before its erection, as on the north side three 
and on the south four feet of made earth was found below the 
foundations of the main walls before the clean sand was reached. 
Pottery was not abundant on this site, but from the interior of 
the building came a large number of fragments of what have been 
termed 'hand-bricks,' and appear to have been used as stands 
for pottery in process of manufacture, either during the drying 
previous to firing, or in the kiln. These objects have apparently 
been made of brick-earth burnt hard : most of them have been 
more or less barrel-shaped, the barrel being slightly thickened 
at the lower end, with a roughly chamfered flange at each end 
and a flat, roughly circular surface at top and bottom ; and each 
has a cylindrical hole pierced through its axis. The dimensions 
taken from an average specimen are as follows: Height, four 
and a half inches ; diameter of upper surface, three to three and 
a quarter inches; diameter of lower surface, three and a half 
inches; diameter of barrel, two and an eighth to two and a half 
inches ; diameter of hole, three quarters to seven eighths of an 
inch.* 

* In his book on Vinovia (London, 1891), the Rev. R. E. Hoopell mentions 
the discovery on the floor of the circular hypocaust at Binchester of ' a number of 
objects of terra cotta, made exactly after the fashion of a modern bobbin ; that 



SITE XVII: BATH-HOUSE AKD FURNACE. 239 

Heavy signs of burning were found in the angle between the 
north of the building and the west side of the east apse, and a 
further investigation of the adjacent ground was made, which 
resulted in the discovery of remains which appear to be those 
of a bloomery or furnace for smelting iron (figs. 8 and 10). The 
body of the furnace was roughly circular, with a diameter of 
nine feet three inches over all and five feet three inches in- 
ternally, and it was divided from the exterior face of the eastern 
apse of the building by a space of two feet : on the west side 
the circular wall was interrupted by an opening about eighteen 
inches wide, narrowed at the bottom to ten inches, from the 
sides of which two straight wing walls had been carried in a 
westerly direction for about four feet, forming between them 
a fairly acute angle, as shown on the plan. The remains of 
the enclosing wall were constructed of rough stones, put 
together with clay, which, where it appeared at the joints on 
the inner side, had been burnt hard and to a bright red ; at 
the exterior joints the clay had been turned by the heat to a 
dull red, and was still fairly soft. The bottom of the furnace 
appeared to have been formed by the hard natural gravel, but 
there were traces of a ring of clay round the base of the wall. 
The fire seemed to have been situated in the very jaws of the 
opening, where there was a thick deposit of black burnt matter, 
containing many fragments of charcoal (see figs. 8 and 10). 

Some fragments of ironstone, a good deal of broken up lime- 
stone, and a few pieces of slag were found in the immediate 
neighbourhood of the furnace, but the most important object 
discovered was the large lump of iron shown in fig. 15. The 
lump is three feet four inches long, seven inches square at the 

is, of a reel, intended for receiving, by winding, thread or yarn. There were 
seven or eight of them, none of them quite perfect, but several very nearly so. 
They are about six inches in height and about three inches across at the ends. 
They are perforated also throughout their entire length. ' 



K 




SITE XVII I BATH-HOUSE AND FURNACE. 241 

thicker end, and about four and a half inches square just above 
the rounded foot : the thicker end is ragged, and that part of 
the metal appears to have small fragments of slag embedded in it ; 
its weight has been calculated at about three and a half hundred- 
weight. The lump was found standing in the soil in a nearly 
upright position in the centre of the circular part of the furnace, 
with the rounded thinner end resting in a hollow in the gravel 
which had apparently been formed by the weight of the iron. 

So far as we are aware, this is the largest mass of iron, pre- 
sumably of Roman manufacture, which has yet been discovered in 
this country, and several points have already been raised in 
connexion with it. In shape and size it resembles the pigs made 
at the iron furnaces near Bellingham in the North Tyne valley 
about sixty years ago, and also, we are informed, the ' single- 
run pig' which was in former times produced in Sussex. Pro- 
fessor Louis, however, takes a different view with regard to the 
furnace, the lump of iron, and the ' hand-bricks.' His report 
is printed on page 265, but only as a statement of one side of a 
highly controversial question. It is hoped that a mass of expert 
opinion may be obtained on the subject during the present year, 
and that the matter may be more fully dealt with in the next 
report. 

It seems fairly clear that, at any rate after the addition of 
the two apses, the building was used as a small bath-house. Some 
difficulty, indeed, arises from the fact that no trace was found 
of vestibule or dressing-rooms or latrines, but their apparent 
absence is not wholly without precedent, and it is possible that 
in the present case they may have been of wood. On the other 
hand, the fragments of 'hand-bricks,' which with the exception 
of two pieces found just outside the west end, occurred only 
within the hypocaust, may just possibly mean that at a still later 
period the bath was abandoned and the building used as the dry- 
ing room of a potteiy. The mould found on site xiv (fig. 6, p. 225) 

3 SER. VOL. VI. 1 6 



242 REPORT ON THE 1 909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

suggests that pottery was locally manufactured ; drying by arti- 
ficial heat is a not uncommon practice in pottery-making, and 
is, indeed, not infrequently used to-day in brickmaking in the 
north of England. Here it may have been resorted to in conse- 
quence of the climate. This suggestion, however, is merely 
offered in default of a better explanation. It must be admitted 
that the absence of anything resembling a pottery kiln is against 
it. 

X. SITE XVII, WEST. 

This site adjoined site xvn, being separated from it by the 
watercourse embankment. It had originally been occupied by 
a buttressed building, eighteen feet four inches in width on the 
interior and of uncertain length (fig. 13) : the east wall was in line 
with a stretch of wall found further to the north, which had been 
carried across the filled-in ditch ; but as the farthest point at 
which this latter wall was traced and even there no return was 
found was one hundred and twelve feet from the south-east 
corner of the building, it is not likely that they are parts of the 
same structure, though there were strong traces of a clay and 
cobble foundation connecting them : it may be noticed that the 
southern portion of the wall has a footing on the east side 
whereas the northern stretch has none. It is perhaps safer to 
put down the latter part as a boundary wall used in connexion 
with the building, or a reconstruction of the building, at a com- 
paratively late date. A reconstruction or alteration of some 
kind seems certainly to have been made. The cross wall, nine 
teet north of the original south wall, must be an addition, as 
it spanned the remains of the east wall, leaving a narrow opening 

ram adjoining the east wall and beneath the portion of the 

wall winch projects beyond it, and there were also traces 

f another foundation a little further to the south, not at right 

angles to the east and west walls; but the eviden e obtain t 



SITES XVII WEST AND XIX. 243 

was meagre and confused, and afforded no clue to the nature of 
the building or the purpose it had served at any period of its 
existence. The four coins found on the site Nerva, Trajan, 
Faustina n, Tetricus n are too few to date the building. A 
fair amount of ' Samian ' and other pottery was unearthed here, 
but the finds included nothing that could be dated as earlier than 
the second century. Perhaps the most noteworthy object was 
a barbed bronze fish-hook, about half an inch in width, with a 
shank of square section, about an eighth of an inch thick, ter- 
minating in a loop of flat metal. 

XI. SITE XIX. 

This site, which lay to the north-east of site xvn, had been 
occupied by an almost square building, measuring about seven- 
teen feet square on the interior, with an apse on the north side, 
measuring seventeen feet across the base and projecting five feet. 
The walls were fairly massive, being two feet six inches thick, 
but the stones were very roughly dressed and the masonry poor : 
the ends of the apse wall had been bonded into the main north 
wall (fig. 13). The floor was of plain gravel, and there seemed to 
have been a depression or shallow pit near the north-west corner. 
About the centre of the west side was an opening five feet wide, 
which appeared at one time to have been arched : indeed, on the 
south side the springers and two voussoirs of the arch remained 
in position, though all traces of the north side had vanished. 
As the arch sprang practically from the foundation level, the 
crown would not have been high enough to form a doorway ; on 
the other hand, it is rather too large for a furnace flue, and we 
detected no trace of a hypocaust within the building. The apse 
is irregularly placed and its interior space was very small. A 
considerable amount of burnt clay was found in this part of the 
building, and this may suggest that the apse formed some kind 
of kiln or oven. 



244 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM. 

The opening- on the west side had been, probably at a late 
period, blocked by a rough wall which formed one side of the 
flue leading from a small furnace to a little hypocaust, of which 
very fragmentary traces remained on the west side of the main 
building; a few pieces of box-tile were found in this quarter. 
About twelve feet to the east of the north-east corner of the 
main building was a small receptacle, measuring sixteen inches 
bj fourteen on the inside ; the sides were formed of slabs of stone 
two inches thick with a gravel bottom and showed strong traces 
of burning. 

As to the purpose of the building, there was no evidence to 
justify any positive conclusion, though its position and the 
roughness of its masonry would harmonise with the idea that it 
was of an industrial character. Here again the scanty coins 
give us no guidance. Only four two of Marcus Aurelius, one 
of Salonina, and one of Constantine n (A.D. 337-340) were 
found within the building, from one to two feet below the 
surface. 

XII.- -THE NORTH DITCH. 

In following the stretch of wall to the north of site xvn west, 
we observed that one part of the foundations had sunk. Search 
was accordingly made below this part, and the existence of a 
ditch was proved by a series of cuts at frequent intervals carried 
right across the field (figs. 11 and 13). This ditch varied a little 
in contour, and averaged about twelve feet in width and four and 
a half feet in depth from lip to lip of the original surface, the 
bottom being at an average depth of eight feet below the present 
surface. Near the west side of the field it made a slight bend 
towards the south, and the configuration of the ground in the 
next field makes it probable that this bend is increased further 
to the west. 



I 







246 REPORT ON THE 1 909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

No trace was found of any rampart. But the ditch had 
evidently been filled up in Roman times, and the material of a 
rampart, if any existed, would naturally have been used for 
that purpose. The ditch itself produced practically no pottery 
or other objects ; in one cut there was a deposit of black matter, 
apparently sewage. In cut iv (figs. 11 and 13), on the new 
surface formed by the filling-in, was a deposit of charcoal and 
above it a quantity of partially burnt shale. 

XIII. -THE NORTH AREA. 

The space between the line of the ditch and the north hedge 
of the field yielded a considerable amount of evidence of occupa- 
tion, or perhaps of use rather than of occupation, in Roman 
times. Only one small fragment of walling was found, but 
several stretches of cobble pavement lay within a short distance, 
of the present surface, and running nearly parallel with the 
ditch was the kerb or foundation of an embankment which has 
already been mentioned in section iv. This kerb is laid upon 
made ground, and it appears probable that the brow of the north 
slope was gradually pushed forward during the course of- the 
Roman occupation ; but the existence of the slope was clearly 
proved by cuts close to the present hedge, and the foot of it was 
marked by a peaty deposit, which lay about eight feet below the 
present surface. It has been suggested that this slope was in 
fact the scarp of another ditch, but the bottom of the peaty 
deposit, so far as it could be traced, was flat, or still sloping 
slightly downwards, and in the absence of any trace of a counter- 
scarp it seems more probable that the slope was a natural one, 
with marshy ground at its foot. Immediately to the north of 
the hedge is the Corbridge and Beaufront road, and the field 
on the farther side, extending from the road northwards to the 
Cor-burn lies at a lower level, and is still rendered swampy by 



Arch, AeL, 3 ser. vol. vi. 



Plate XIII. 



MIONS 1909! 



TO CORBRIDGE 




51Tt XI : 

THE FOR.UM.? 



1 



T 



.MAHX3H 




THE NORTH AREA. 



247 



heavy rains. Although the question needs further investigation, 
it seems at present to be probable that in the direction we have 
reached the limits of the Roman town, and that on the north, as 
on the south, the lines laid down in Maclauchlan's survey are 
approximately, though only approximately, correct. 




FIG. 12. 



248 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT COBSTOP1TUM : 



THE COINS. 

BY H. H. E. CBASTEB, M.A. 



Although the excavations of 1909 produced no find of coins 
so remarkable as the hoard of aurei unearthed in the preceding 
year, numerous coins were discovered in the course of the season. 
The total number amounted to over four hundred and fifty, as 
compared with nearly eight hundred (apart from hoards) found 
in 1908. The decrease is mainly due to the absence of intact 
buildings, like the granaries, from the year's field of operations ; 
for it is on the floor of such buildings that coins are apt to be 
particularly numerous. What is chiefly noticeable in the year's 
finds is the large proportion of coins of the first and second 
centuries. Putting aside forty coins which could not be identi- 
fied (many of them ases of the first two centuries), and between 
sixty and seventy coins of barbarous fabric, 1 there are, among the 
remaining 353 coins, 136 prior to Septimius Severus and 217- 
coins of later date ; a proportion of seven to eleven as compared 
with a proportion of one to eleven for 1908. Here the numis- 
matic evidence is in accord with that furnished by the pottery, 
early specimens being much more numerous than in previous 
years. 

The prevalence of coins of the Flavian emperors, now for the 
first time found in any number at Corstopitum, favours, though 
it cannot be taken to prove, first-century occupation. The 
following table summarises the finds of coins, earlier than 
Severus, made in the whole course of the excavations : 

1 Two English halfpennies one of William in and one of George n-were 
also found, but no other post-Roman coins. 



NOTES ON THE COINS FOUND. 249 

Denarii. Sesterces. Dupondii. Ases. 

Republican coins 2 

Mark Antony ... 8 

Augustus ... 1 

Nero 2 

Galba 1 

Vespasian 91 16 

Titus 1 32 

Domitian 4416 

Nerva 151 

Trajan 14 19 10 7 

Hadrian 5 19 4 2 

Sabina ... ... ... ... 1 

Pius 5 11 5 9 

Faustina i 322 3 

Faustina ii 1512 

Marcus Aurelius 3 2 1 3 

Commodus ... ... ... 5 1 1 

The evidence of coins is more satisfactory for fixing the ter- 
mination than it is for establishing the commencement of occupa- 
tion. A coin of Arcadius with SALVS KEIPVBLICAE reverse, a type 
not used by the moneyers of Maximus, appears to carry the 
occupation up to and after 388 ; for, though it is rash to draw 
inferences from a single coin, the present example is simply the 
latest in a consecutive series ; and its evidence is supported by 
the presence of coins of Valentinian n and Arcadius bearing the 
slightly earlier reverse VICTORIA AVGGG. It follows that the 
gold hoard had been deposited in its hiding place, or had ceased 
to be added to, three or four years before Corstopitum was finally 
abandoned. 

A full list is given below of all coins earlier in date than A.D. 
260 found in the course of the past season. References for fuller 
description are made to Babelon's Monnaies de la Republique 
Romaine (cited as B) and to Cohen's Medailles Imperiales, second 
edition (cited as C). In place of the old classification into silver 
and first and second brass, the coins are given the values which 



250 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

they possessed in the Roman monetary system denarius (D), 
sesterce (S), dupondius (Du) and as (As). By way of explanation 
it may be stated that the dupondius and the as, usually con- 
founded under the title of 'second brass/ are distinguishable, in 
the case of coins of reigning emperors, by the character of the 
head on the obverse ; and that the emperor's head is radiated on 
the dupondius and laureated on the as. The figures within 
square brackets show the number of examples of each type. 

To catalogue in full, year by year, all the coins of the second 
half of the third, and of the fourth, centuries, found in the course 
of the season, may be thought unnecessary. The long list printed 
in the report for 1908 will serve to indicate the emperors, types, 
and mints represented ; and these are likely to recur, as they 
recurred during the past year, with slight variation. Examples 
of the common types of the fourth century GLORIA EXERCITVS, 

VICTORIAE DD. AVGG. Q. NN., FEL. TEMP. REPARATIO, GLORIA ROMANO- 

RVM, and SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, depend for their interest upon 
the proportions in which the various mints and issues occur. A 
detailed classification of last year's finds would add little, if any- 
thing, to the knowledge given to us by the previous year; and 
the further examination of fourth century coins can therefore be 
safely deferred until a later stage in the excavations, when the 
results can be summarised with less labour and with greater 
certainty. The second table is therefore confined to those types, 
later in date than A.D. 260, which have come to light in the course 
of 1909, but have not been previously met with at Corstopitum. 
A word may be said on the subject of mints. Up to the time 
of Gordian in the bulk -of the currency was minted at Rome, and 
it is still open to doubt whether there were provincial mints in 
western Europe regularly operating before his reign. With 
more material to work upon, it may become possible to assign to 
local mints certain types of frequent occurrence on British sites, 
but rare in other parts of the empire. Thus eight ases of the 



NOTES ON THE COINS FOUND. 251 

reign of Pius were found at Corstopitum in the past year, of which 
three bore the BRITANNIA reverse struck in 155 ; and this fact 
supports the theory recently advanced by Mr. F. A. Walters, 
upon the evidence of a hoard found at Croydon, that the BRIT- 
ANNIA 'coins were minted in Britain. 2 Another case in point is 
provided by a rare, and possibly unpublished, denarius of Ves- 
pasian, with cos. ITER TR. POT. reverse. Out of nine denarii of 
Vespasian found at Corstopitum we get three examples of this 
type. 

The supply of coins minted at Rome comes to a sudden stop 
with the death of Claudius Grothicus, a circumstance probably 
due to the establishment of mints at Trier in 273 and at London 
in 287. From this time onward, as might be expected, the 
British and Gallic mints hold the field. Coins from Tarraco in 
Spain are not uncommon, but, with one exception, they all fall 
within the years 260 and 270. Aquileia is represented by coins 
of Valentinian i, and of that emperor only. On the other hand, 
there is a constant though small infiltration of coins from Siscia 
in Pannonia. 

As was pointed out in the last report, copper coinage, as repre- 
sented upon this site, becomes rare under Marcus Aurelius ; and 
sesterce, dupondius and as are not met with at all after the reign 
of Commodus. Similarly the denarius aeris instituted by 
Aurelian and the follis introduced by Diocletian, are almost 
wholly absent. The reason for this gap in the coin-series is 
probably the same in both cases. It is not necessary to suppose 
that the debasement of the copper coinage under Constantine, 
or the conversion of a silver into a copper coinage under 
Grallienus, was accompanied by any systematic withdrawal of 
the heavier types of copper coin then in circulation, although an 
instance of such an order exists in Honorfus's and Arcadius's 

2 Numismatic Chronicle, 4th ser., vol. vu, pp. 359-363. 



252 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

rescript of 397. 3 Without any specific enactment natural causes 
would operate to send the good coins across the frontier or into 
the melting pot; for Gresham's law is more potent than the 
rescript of any Roman emperor. 

At both these epochs the reduction in weight of the copper 
coinage was followed hy unlimited government issues ; and on 
both occasions the government was unable to check the uttering 
of forged coin upon a large scale. The presence of a consider- 
able amount of base money of the Oonstantinian period is one of 
the features of the Corstopitum coin-series, as it is of the Con- 
stantinian hoards found upon the Rhine frontier. 4 Probably in 
either instance the forged coins are not barbaric imitations which 
have found their way across the frontier, but are the work of 
provincial forgers who found a happy field for their operations on 
a frontier garrisoned by a large army ; for in such a district an 
extensive copper currency would be required for trade purposes. 
It has yet to be proved that any of the so-called barbarous coins, 
found at Corstopitum or elsewhere on the line of the Wall, are 
of post- Roman date. 

It is more difficult to account for the survival of the heavy 
copper coinage of the second century. Possibly this may be found 
to be due in part to local causes. The first period of occupation 
of Corstopitum may be taken to close with the rising in North 
Britain in the reign of Commodus. It was succeeded by a raising 
of the level of streets and buildings, possibly under Severus, 
which would have for one of its results the burial of stray coins 
of earlier date under two feet of soil. There is no reason for 
supposing any similar disaster to have overtaken the town 
between the reigns of Severus and Gallienus. Consequently, it 

Centenionalem tantum nummum in conversatione publica tractari prse- 
cipimus, majoris pecunire figurations submota.' Codex Theodosianus, ix, 23.2. 

1 Hettner, ' Romische Munzschabzfunde in den Rheinlanden ' in Westdeutsche 
Zeitschrift, vol. vn, p. 129 ; Maurice, Numivnatique Constantinieime, pp. cxx, 425. 



NOTES ON THE COINS FOUND. 



253 



may be argued, it is natural for the debris of the first occupation 
to provide a coin-series ending with Commodus ; while there 
would be less likelihood of coins being lost during the earlier 
part of the second occupation, and the copper coins then current 
would be driven out of circulation by the monetary changes of 
Gallienus. 

Among the issues of the London mint there are several new 
minor varieties which will be collected and illustrated in a sub- 
sequent report. One is of sufficient interest to be noted here. 
The occurrence of Christian emblems upon the coinage of Con- 
stantine the Great is a subject which lias attracted considerable 
attention, 5 but numismatists have hitherto failed to establish the 
existence of such marks on the products of the London mint. 
'Au,cun signe chretien,' writes M. Maurice, the leading living 
authority upon Constantinian coinage, ' ne parait avoir ete 
frappe d'ans 1'atelier de Londres.' 6 

London, like other western mints, issued, between the years 
-317 and 324, coins bearing on the reverse the inscription 
VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC. PEEP. Two victories place a shield upon 
an altar. The face of the altar is ornamented, on some examples, 
with a lozenge set between four points, on other examples with 
a crown. In the past year a coin of Crispus with VICTORIAE 
LAETAE PRINC. PER?, reverse was discovered at Corstopitum, 
having upon the face of the altar a crown, and, within the crown, 
an equilateral cross. It bears the London mint mark p LON. 
A coin with an exactly similar reverse, but having upon the 

5 Garrucci, ' Des Signes de Christianisme qui se trouvent sur les monnaies de 
Constantin et de ses fils,' in Revue Numismatique, 2nd ser., vol. XI ; Madden, 
' Christian Emblems on Coins of Constantino I,' in Numismatic Chronicle, 2nd ser., 
vol. xvn ; Voetter, ' Erste Christliche Zeichen auf romischen Munzen,' in 
Nnmismatische Zeitschrift, vol. xxiv. 

"Numismatic Chronicle, 3rd ser., vol. xx, p. 138. 



254 REPORT ON THE I 9 O 9 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

obverse the head of Gonstantine n (Cohen 219), is in the British 
Museum. 7 No other example of this variety is known to exist. 

Here, then, we have direct evidence that Christian symbols 
were used in the London mint in the reign of Constantine, and 
that, too, at a time when they had not yet been introduced at 
Rome or into the three Gallic mints of Trier, Lyons and Aries. 
The little coin constitutes an interesting, if slight, addition to 
our knowledge of Romano-British Christianity. 

One other coin found last year deserves to be specially men- 
tioned. This is a Greek medal struck at Hadrianeia in Helle- 
spontus in the reign of Septimius Severus. It is in bronze, 
weighs approximately 423 grains (27'4 grammes) and measures 
37 millimetres (1'45 inches) in diameter. On the obverse it has 
a laureated and draped bust of Severus facing to the right, with 
the inscription AVT KAI A CEO CEOVHPOC HE. The reverse 
presents a river-god reclining under a tree. His right arm 
rests on an urn ; his left hand is placed on his left knee. Fac- 
ing him, and standing to the left, is Hermes, holding a purse 
in his right hand and a caduceus in his left, and having a chlamys 
depending from his left shoulder. Behind Hermes is a dog (not 
a goat as stated in the British Museum catalogue). The in- 
scription round the reverse records the name of the local magis- 
trate, EO MHNO<J>ANOVC TEIMOKP APXA. In the exergue is the 
name of the town in which the medal was struck: AAPIANEQN. 
(See fig. 12A on opposite page.) 

7 Reproduced in Numismatic Chronicle, 2nd ser., vol. xvn, plate i. No. 5. Two 
other examples of the VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC. PERP. reverse with London mint- 
mark should be noted here. Both .specimens are stated to have the equilateral 
cross on the face of the altar, apparently without the crown. One, bearing the 
head of Constantine i (Cohen 635), is noted by Hardouin,. ' Numismata Seculi 
Constantiniani,' Opera Selecta, 1709, p. 478 ; the other bears the head of 
Constantine n (Cohen 224), and is described by Tanini, Numismatum Imperatorum 
Romanorum Supplementum, 1791, p. 289. These two .coins cannot now be traced, 
and their ascription to the London mint must therefore rest upon the authority of 
Hardouin and Tanini. 



A GREEK MEDAL FOUND. 255 

There are several known examples of this type. One, now 
in the British Museum, not so well preserved as the present 
specimen, was noted by Sestini as long ago as 1720, 8 and is de- 
scribed in the British Museum catalogue of Greek coins under 
the head of Hadriani in Mysia. 9 Since the publication of that 
catalogue Mr. G. F. Hill has shown that numismatists have con- 
founded two distinct towns in Asia Minor Hadriani in Mysia 
and Hadrianeia in Hellespontus ; and that the type in question 
belongs to Hadrianeia. 10 




FIG. 12A. GRECO- ASIATIC MEDAL OF SEPTIMIUS SEVEBUS. 

These large Greek imperial bronzes were not a normal cur- 
rency, but were struck to commemorate some local festival, and 
bear the name of the magistrate who defrayed the expense of its 
celebration. 11 It follows that such a medal could not have made 
its way from Asia Minor to Northumberland in the ordinary 
course of circulation, since it is a far cry from Hadrianeia to 

8 Lettere e dissertazione numismatiche di continuazione, part vin, p. 16, no. 6. 

9 Wroth, Mysia (British Museum Catalogue of Greek Coins), *ub Hadriani, 
no. 7 ; plate xvn, no. 9. 

10 Journal International d' Archeologie Numixmatique, vol. i, pp. 241 et seq. 
The type is no. 17 in Mr. Hill's list. 

11 George Macdonald, Coin Types, pp. 160-166. The writer is indebted to 
Mr. Macdonald for assistance in the description of this coin. 



256 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

Hadrian's Wall. In all probability it was brought to Corstopi- 
tum by some soldier or trader who attended the festival which 
the medal commemorated possibly by one of the soldiers who 
accompanied Severus to Britain upon his Caledonian campaign. 12 
There are very few well-authenticated cases of the discovery 
of Greek coins in Britain, although several other examples of 
Greek imperial medals exist in local museums. A medal of 
Pius, from Magnesia in Ionia, was discovered in Carlisle in 1857 
by workmen engaged in making a sewer, and is now in the Tullie 
House museum. 13 In the same collection are two medals, of 
Antinous and of Aurelius and Verus respectively, which are said 
to have been found in Carlisle or the district, but there is no 
corroborative evidence of the place of this discovery. A medal of 
Elagabalus, struck at Ephesus, with the figure of Tyche and the 
legend E^ECION A NEOKOP&N on the reverse, is believed to 
have been picked up on or near the Lawe at South Shields some 
years before that Roman station was excavated ; 14 it is now in 
the South Shields museum. In addition to these bronze medals, 
a billon tetradrachm of Gallienus, from Alexandria, now in the 
possession of Miss Greenwell of Corbridge, deserves mention as 
having been probably found at Corstopitum. The medals of 
Pius and Severus have alone been noted at the time of their 
discovery and have thus acquired an authenticity superior to 
that of the other examples. 



'- For other examples of Greek Imperial medals found at a distance from the 
city of origin see Pick in Numixmatisc'ke Zeit*chrift, vol. xxm, pp. 84 et seq. 

13 Described and engraved in Bruce, Roman Wall, 3rd edition, p. 333. 

14 Transactions Tyneside Naturalists' Field Club, Vol. vii. (1877), p. 127 ; 
Arch. Ael., 2nd series, vol. x, p. 310, note. The coin is No. 304 in the British 
Museum Catalogue of Greek Coins, Ionia, p. 91. 



TABLES OF COINS FOUND. 257 

COIN TABLES. 

TABLE I. 

ROMAN REPUBLIC. 
MAN. ACILIUS GLABRIO (B.C. 54). 

SALVTIS, laureated head of Health; rev. in VIR VALETV. M. ACILIVS; Health 
feeding serpent and leaning on column ; Babelon 8. [1 D.] 

C. CASSIVS LONGINVS (B.C. 42). 

c. CASSI IMP. LEIBERTAS, veiled head of Liberty ; rev. LENTVLVS SPINT. ; sacri- 
ficial instruments; B. 18, Cohen 3; eastern mint. [ID.] 

TRIUMVIRATE. 

MARK ANTONY (B.C. 31). Legionary coins. 

ANT. AVG. m viRR.p.c., praetorian gallery; rev. LEG. xvi; B. 126, C. 48. [1 D.] 
Same obverse; rev. LEG. xvii; B. 127, C. 49. [ID.] 
Same obverse; rev. LEG. xix; B. 133, C. 55. [ID.] 

EMPIRE. 

AUGUSTUS (B.C. 27 A.D. 14). 
Head r., behind it an augur's baton ; rev. illegible. [1 D. ] 

NERO (A.D. 54-68). 

NERO CLAVD. CAESAR AVG. GER. P.M. TR. p. IMP. P.P., bare-headed; rev. s.c., 
Victory 1. with shield; C. 292; Lyons mint. [1 As.] 

GALBA (68-69). 

IMP. SER. GALBA CAESAR AVG., laureated head r.; rev. SALVS GEN. HVMAN. ; 
C. 238. [1 D.] 

VESPASIAN (69-79). 

IMP. CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG. ; rev. cos. ITER TR. POT. ; Fortune seated 1., 
holding branch and caduceus ; specimen in British Museum and one found 
at Corbridge in 1908; date A.D. 70. [2 D.] 

Same obverse; rev. PON. MAX. TR. p. cos. n; Victory standing 1. on prow of 
vessel; C. 359; A.D. 71. [ID.] 

IMP. CAES. VESPASIAN. AVG. P.M. TR. P.P.P. cos. ui ; rev. ROMA s.c. ; Rome stand- 
ing 1.; C. 419; A.D. 72. [IS.] 

IMP. CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG.; rev. PON. MAX. TR. p. cos. vi; female figure 
seated 1., left arm resting on chair; C. 371; A.D. 75. [ID.] 

IMP. CAESAR VESPASIAN. AVG. . . . ; rev. VICTORIA AVGVSTI S.C. ; Victory 1. ; 

variety of C. 607 ; Lyons mint. [1 As.] 

3 SER. VOL. VI. 17 



258 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM I 

IMP. CAES. VESPASIAN. AVG. cos ; rev. AEQViTAS AVGVST. s.c. ; Equity 1. 

[lAs.] 

Illegible (Vespasian or Titus) [6 As.] 
DIVVS AVGVSTVS vESPASiANvs ; rev. s.c. on buckler supported by two capri- 

oorns; C. 497; A.D. 79. [ID.] 

TITUS (69-81). 

T. CAES. IMP. AVG. F. cos. vi. CENSOR; rev. illegible; A.D. 77-8. [1 Du.] 
Same obverse; rev. illegible. [1 As.] 
Illegible. [2Du.] 
Illegible. [1 As.] 

DOMITIAN (81-96). 
IMP. CAES. DIVI VESP. F. DOMITIAN. AVG. P.M. ; rev. TR. P. COS. VIII. DBS. Vim. 

P.P.S.C. ; Pallas fighting; C. 581; A.D. 82. [1 As.] 
IMP. CAES. DOMITIAN. AVG. GERM. cos. [XL] ; rev. illegible; A.D. 85. [1 S.] 

IMP. CAES. DOMIT. AVG. GERM. P.M. TR. P. XI. J rev. IMP. XXI. COS. XV. CENS. 

P.P.P.; Pallas fighting; C. 269; A.D. 91. [ID.] 
IMP. CAES. DOMIT. AVG. GERM. cos. . . . CENS. PER. P.P.; rev. illegible; 

A.D. 85-95. [2 S.] 
Same obverse; rev. FORTVNAE AVGVSTI s.c.; Fortune 1. with rudder and 

cornucopia. [1 As.] 

Same obverse; rev. Moneta (?); Standing 1. [1 As.] 
Same obverse; rev. illegible. [1 As.] 

IMP. CAES. DOMIT. AVG. GERM. P.M. TR. P. XV.; T6V. IMP. XXII. COS. XVIII. CENS. 

P.P.P.; Pallas fighting; C. 282; A.D. 95-96. [1 D.] 
Illegible. [1 D.] 
Illegible. [2 As.] 

NERVA (96-98). 

IMP. NERVA CAES. AVG. P.M. TR. P. COS. II. P.P. ; rev. FORTVNA AVGVST. C. 59 ; 

A.D. 96. [ID.] 

IMP. NERVA CAES. AVG ; rev. Fortune or Equity standing 1. [2 S.] 

Same obverse ; rev. illegible. [1 Du.] 

TRAJAN (98-117). 
IMP. CAES. NERVA TRAIAN. AVG. GERM. P.M. ; rev. TR. POT. COS. II. S.C. ' Piety 1 ' 

C. 613; A.D. 98. [1 As.] 

IMP. CAES. NERVA TRAIAN. AVG. GERM.; rev. P.M. TR. P. COS. III. P.P.; Peace 1. 

with olive-branch and cornucopia; C. 222; A.D. 100. [ID.] 

IMP. CAES. NERVA TRAIAN. AVG. GERM. P.M. ; rev. TR. POT. COS. [ill.] P.P. S.C. ' 

Fortune seated 1. ; C. 637 ? ; A.D. 98-100. [1 Du.] 

Same obverse, radiated bust; rev. TR. POT. cos. mi. P.P. s.c.- Victorv 1 cf 
C. 640; A.D. 100-101. [1 Du.] 



TABLES OF COINS FOUND. 259 

Same obverse; rev. illegible. [IS.] 

IMP. TRAIANO AVG. GBR. DAG. P.M. TR. p.; laureated bust ; rev. cos. v. 

S.P.Q.R. OPTIMO PRINC.; Kome holding Victory and spear; C. 

A.D. 104-110. [1 D.] 

Same inscription; rev. Victory standing 1.; C. 76. [IB.] 
Same inscription; rev. Peace firing spoils; C. 82. [ID.] 
Same inscription; laureated head; rev. Equity standing 1. ; C. 86. [ID.] 
IMP. TRAIANO AVG. GBR. DAG. P.M. TR. p. cos. v. P.P.; laureated bust; rev. 

S.P.Q.R. OPTIMO PRINCIPI; Mars with spear and shield; kneeling captive; 

C. 377; same date. [ID.] 
Same inscription; laureated head; rev. Valour with spear and parazonium; 

C. 402. [ID.] 
Same inscription ; laureated head ; rev. Peace with caduceus and cornucopia ; 

C. 412. [1 D.] 

IMP. CAES. NERVAE TRAIANO AVG. GER. DAC. P.M. TR. P. COS. V. P.P. ; laureated 

bust ; rev. S.P.Q.R. OPTIMO PRINCIPI s.c. ; Rome holding Victory and spear ; 

C. 383; same date. [2 S.] 

Same inscription; laureated head; rev. Peace standing 1.; C. 406. [IS.] 
Same inscription ; laureated bust ; rev. Fortune standing 1. ; C. 477. [1 S.] 
Same inscription; rev. Trajan on horseback; C. 504. [1 S.] 
Same inscription; rev. the Circus Maximus; C. 546. [IS.] 
Same inscription; radiated bust; rev. Fortune (?) standing 1. [1 Du.] 

IMP. CAES. NERVAE TRAIANO AVG. GER. DAC. P.M. TR. P. COS. VI. P.P.; rev. 

S.P.Q.R. OPTIMO PRINCIPI s.c. ; in exergue ALIM. ITAL. ; Abundance standing 

1.; C. 10; A.D. 112-117. [2 S.] 

Same inscription; but in exergue ARAB. ADQVIS. ; C. 34 or 37. [3 S.] 
Same obverse; radiated bust; rev. EELICITAS AVGVST. s.c.; Felicity 1. with 

caduceus and cornucopia; C. 146. [1 Du.] 
Same obverse; rev. illegible. [1 S.] 

IMP. CAES. NER. TRAIAN. OPTIM. AVG. GER. DAC. ; rev. [PARTHICO P.M. TR. P. 
COS. VI. P.P. S.P.Q.R.]; A.D. 116. [ID.] 

Illegible. [1 S.] 
Illegible, [1 Du.] 
Illegible. [1 As.] 

HADRIAN (117-138). 

IMP. CAESAR TRAIAN. HADRiANVS AVG. ; rev. P.M. TR. p. cos. in. ; Mars marching 

r.; C. 1072. [ID.] 

Same inscription; rev. Rome seated 1.; C. 1098. [ID.] 
Same inscription ; in exergue SALVS AVG. ; Health seated 1. ; C. 1353. [1 D,] 

IMP. CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG. ; rev. PONT. MAX. TR. POT. COS. III. S.C. \ 

Rome seated 1.; C. 1187. [IS.] 



260 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

Same inscription; rev. Abundance standing 1., holding ears of corn and 

cornucopia; type not included in Cohen. [2 S.] 
Same inscription; in exergue PORT. RED.; Fortune seated 1.; C. 759. [1 Du.] 

IMP. CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG. P.M. TR. P. COS. III.; rev. MONETA 

AVGVSTI s.c. ; Moneta standing 1. ; C. 973. [2 S.] 
Same type, radiated head; C. 976. [1 Du.] 
Same type; radiated bust; C. 977. [1 Du.] 
HADRIANVS AVG. cos. in. P.P. ; rev. AEQVITAS AVG. s.c. ; Equity standing 1. ; 

C. 125. [1 S.] 

HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS ; rev. cos. in.; Eome standing 1. ; C. 346. [ID.] 
Same inscription; rev. Seven stars and crescent; C. 465. [ID.] 
Same obverse; rev. cos. in. s.c.; Health standing r.; C. 370. [1 Du.] 
Same obverse; rev. s.c.; Diana standing 1.; C. 1367. [IS.] 
Illegible. [2 S.] 
Illegible. [1 As.] 

ANTONINUS PIUS (138-161). 

IMP. T. AELIVS CAESAR ANTONINVS; rev. illegible; A.D. 138. [1 As.] 
ANTONINVS AVG. PIVS P.P.; rev. MONETA AVGVSTI s.c. ; in exergue cos. ii.; 
Moneta standing 1.; C. 561; A.D. 139. [1 As.] 

ANTONINVS AVG. PIVS P.P. TR. P. COS. III. ; rev. AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG. PII F. 

cos.; head of Pius on obv., Aurelius on rev.; C. 15; A.D. 140. [1 D.] 
Same obverse; rev. IMPERATOR n. s.c.; Bona Fides with 'ears of corn and basket 

of fruit; C. 426; A.D. 140-143. [IS.] 
Same obverse; rev. SALVS AVG. s.c.; Health feeding serpent and holding 

rudder; C. 715; same date. [IS.] 

* m date Ve 7s rCV ' SECVRITAS AYG - S '- ; Secur % standing 1.; C. 780; same 

:.; Genius with branch and 

?. cos. in 
1 
rev. LIBERTAS cos. 

; rev. LIBERTAS cos. 



-me 
-ted 



ANTONINVS AVG. PIVS P P TP n 

Ending,, C. 546 / sa^'date ^ D 
=nption illegible; rev. Mars marching r. [ID.] 



TABLES OF COINS FOUND. 261 

Inscription illegible; rev. Victory 1. [ID.] 
Illegible. [1 Du.] 
Illegible. [2 As.] 

FAUSTINA i (died 146). 
DIVA FAVSTINA; rev. AVGVSTA; Ceres standing 1. with ears of corn and torch; 

C. 78. [1 D.] 
Same inscription; rev. Vesta standing 1. with palladium and sceptre; C. 109. 

[ID.] 

Same, inscription; rev. Piety standing 1. by an altar ; C. 124. [1 D.] 
Same obverse; rev. AETERNITAS s.c.; Eternity standing 1., raising r. hand and 

holding sceptre; C. 29. [2 Du.] 
Same obverse; rev. illegible. [2 As.] 

FAUSTINA ii (died 175). 
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA; rev. IVNO; Juno standing 1., at her feet a peacock; C. 120. 

[ID.] 
Same obverse; rev. HILARITAS s.c.; Hilaritas 1. with palm and cornucopia; 

C. 112. [1 S.] 
Illegible; rev. female figure standing 1. [1 As.] 

MARCUS AURELIUS (138-180). 
AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG PII F. ; rev. COS DES. Il(?). [ID.] 

AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG. PII F. cos; rev. Hilaritas (?) standing 1. [1 Du.] 
M. AVREL. ANTONINVS .... rev. Pallas standing 1. [1 S.] 

[M. ANTONINVS AVG. TR. P. XXVII.] ; rev. SECVRITAS PVBLICA IMP. VI. COS. III. 

s.c. ; Security r. crowning herself and holding palm; C. 584; A.D. 173. 
[lAs.] 
Illegible. [2 As.] 

COMMODUS (166-192). 

COMMODO AVG. FiL. GERM. BARM. ; rev. PRINC. iv VENT. ; Commodus standing 1., 
behind him a trophy; C. 609; A.D. 175. [ID.] 

M. COMMODVS ANTONINVS AVG.; rev. LIB. AVG. V. TR. P. VII. IMP. IIII. COS. III. 

p.p.; Liberty standing 1. ; C. 311; A.D. 182. [ID.] 

M. COMMODVS ANTONINVS AVG. PIVS. J [rev. TR. P. VIII. IMP. VI. COS. IIII. P.P. 

s.c.]; Jupiter standing 1.; C. 877; A.D. 183. [1 Du.] 

L. AEL. AVREL. COMM. AVG. P. FEL. ; rev. P.M. TR. P. XVII. IMP. VIII. COS. VII. 

p.p.; Victory marching 1., in the field a star; C. 568; A.D. 192. [1 D.] 

SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS (192-211). 

IMP. CAB. L. SEP. SEV. PERT. AVG. cos. ii. ; rev. BONi EVENTVS ; Bona Fides stand- 
ing 1. with basket and ears of corn; C. 68; A.D. 194. [ID.] 

L. SEPT. SEV. PERT. AVG. IMP. in.; rev. LIBER PATRI ; Bacchus standing 1., at 
his feet a panther; C. 301; A.D. 194. [ID.] 



2(>2 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

SEVEBVS PIVS AVG; rev. PONTIF. TB. p. xin. cos. in.; female figure seated 1., 
holding patera and cornucopia; new and unpublished variety; A.D. 205. 
[ID.] 

IULIA DOMNA (died 217). 
IVLIA AVGVSTA; rev. DIANA LVCIFEBA; Diana standing 1., holding torch; 

C. 27. [ID.] 

Same obverse; rev. PIETAS AVGG.; Piety sacrificing 1.; C. 150. [ID.] 
Same obverse; rev. VESTAE SANCTAE; Vesta 1. holding patera and sceptre- 

C. 246. [ID.] 

CABACALLA (197-217). 

M. AVB. ANTON. CABS. PONTIF.; rev. DESTiNATO iMPERAT. ; sacrificial instru- 
ments; C. 53; A.D. 197. [1 D.] 

ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS; laureated bust r.; rev. MATER DEVM; Cybele seated 1., 
between two lions, holding branch and sceptre, and resting left elbow 
on drum; new and unpublished variety; A.D. 198-200. [1 D.] 

ANTONINVS PIVS AVG.; rev. VOTA SVSCEPTA x.; Caracalla standing 1. by lighted 
altar; C. 688; A.D. 202. [ID.] 

GETA (Augustus 211-212). 

IMP. CAES. P. SEPT. GETA PIVS AVG.; PONTIF. TR. P. ii. cos. Genius standing 1 by 
altar; C. 140; A.D. 210. [ID.] 

JULIA MAES A (Augusta 218-223). 
IVLIA MAESA AVG.; rev. PVDiciTiA ; Chastity seated 1.; C. 36. [1 D.] 

SEVERUS ALEXANDER (222-234). 



" 



Same obverse; rev. illegible. [ID.] 

JULIA MAMAEA (Augusta 222-234). 
MAMAEA AVG; rev. PJETAS AVGVSTAE; Piety standing 1.; C. 48. [1 D.] 

TABLE II. 

LIST OF TYPES SUBSEQUENT TO A.D. 260 NOT PREVIOUSLY FOUND AT CORSTOPITUM. 

GALLIENUS. 

* VICTOEIA AV - -< 



TABLES OF COINS FOUND. 263 

GALLIENVS AVG.; rev. DiANAE CONS. AVG.; Deer 1. looking back; [mint-mark 

6 ;] Rome mint; C. 156. 

GALLIENVS AVG.; rev. DIANAE CONS. AVG.; Antilope moving 1.; [mint-mark 
xi]; Rome mint; C. 165. 

SALONINA. 

SALONINA AVG.; rev. PIETAS AVGG ; Piety seated I.; C. 84. 

COB. SALONINA AVG. ; [rev. FECVNDITAS AVG.] ; C. 40. 

CLAUDIUS II. 

IMP. c. CLAVDIVS AVG. ; rev. iovi STATORI ; Jupiter standing 1. with sceptre and 

thunderbolt; Rome mint; C. 124. 
IMP. CLAVDIVS AVG. ; rev. FIDES EXERCI. ; Faith standing 1. holding two 

standards; mint-mark xi; Rome mint; C. 87. 
IMP. CLAVDIVS AVG.; rev. P.M. TR. p. ii. cos. P.P.; Claudius standing r., holding 

sceptre and globe; Rome mint; C. 216. 
IMP. CLAVDIVS AVG.; rev. APOLLiNi CONS.; Apollo standing 1. holding laurel 

branch; mint-mark H; Rome mint; C. 25. 
IMP. CLAVDIVS AVG.; rev. viBTVs AVG.; Valour standing 1. ; mint-mark* u; 

Siscia mint; C. 318. 

POSTUMUS. 

IMP. c. POSTVMVS P.F. AVG.; rev. ORIENS AVG.; Sun hastening 1.; mint-mark (in 

field) P; Lyons mint; C. 213. 
IMP. c. POSTVMVS P.F. AVG. ; rev. FIDES EQViT. ; Faith seated 1. holding patera 

and standard; mint-mark (in exergue) P; Tarraco mint; C. 59. 
IMP. c. POSTVMVS P.F. AVG.; rev. VIRTVS AVG. (?). 

CARAUSIUS. 

IMP. c. CARAVSIVS P.F. AVG. ; re.v. PAX AVG. ; Peace with vertical sceptre ; mint- 
mark LLI ; London mint; Webb 139. 
ML 

IMP. CARAVSIVS AVG. ; radiated and cuirassed bust r. ; rev. VICTORIA AVG. ; 
Victory moving 1. ; no mint-mark; new variety. 

ALLECTUS. 

IMP. c. ALLECTVS P.F. AVG.; rev. LAETiTiA AVG.; galley; mint-mark _! ; 

c 

Colchester mint; Webb 119. This coin was found in 1908 but was omitted 
from that year's report. 

S I A 
Same obverse ; rev. PAX AVG. ; Peace with vertical sceptre ; mint-mark ~J ; 

MSL 

London mint; Webb 38. 

Same obverse ; rev. VIRTVS AVG. ; galley ; mint-mark CL (new variety of mint- 
mark) ; Colchester mint ; Webb 186. 



204 REPORT ON THE 1 909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM : 

CONSTANTINE I AND CONTEMPORARIES. 

(a) LONDON MINT. 

I * 

IMP. MAXIMINVS P.F. AVG. \ rev. GENio POP. ROM. ; mint-mark - - ; struck in 

PLN 

copper; C. 69; A.D. 309-313. 
CONSTANTINVS AG. ; cuirassed bust with laureated helmet r. ; rev. VICTORIAE 

LAETAE PRINC. PERP. ; two Victories placing shield on altar ; on the face 

of the altar a lozenge; mint-mark PLN; C. 633; A.D. 317-324. 
FL. CL. CONSTANTINVS iVN. N.C. ; radiated and cuirassed bust 1. ; same reverse ; 

on the face of the altar a crown; mint-mark PLN; C. 219; A.D. 317-324. 
FL. IVL. CRISPVS NOB. CABS. ; laureated and draped bust r. ; same reverse ; on 

the face of the altar a crown within which is a cross; mint-mark PLN; cf. 

C. 152; A.D. 317-324. 
IMP. CONSTANTINVS MAX. AVG. ; cuirassed bust with laureated helmet r. ; same 

reverse but cippus in place of altar; mint-mark PLN; new variety; cf. 

C. 640; A.D. 317-324. 

(6) TRIER MINT. 

IVL. CRISPVS NOB. CABS. ; laureated and cuirassed bust 1., holding spear over 

shoulder and shield ; rev. BEATA TRANQVILLITAS ; mint-mark STR- ; C. 22 ; 

A.D. 320-324. 
CONSTANTINVS AVG. ; laureated head r. ; rev. CAESARVM NOSTRORVM VOT. x. ; 

mint-mark STR; C. 34; A.D. 320-324. 
FLAV. MAX. FAVSTA AVG.; rev. SPES REiPVBLicAE; Fausta holding the two princes 

in her arms; mint-mark TTR ^ ; C. 15; A.D. 324-326. 

(c) ARLES MINT. 

CRISPVS NOB. CAES. ; laureated head r. ; rev. CAESARVM NOSTRORVM VOT. v. mint- 
mark TA; C. 30; A.D. 320-324. 

CONSTANTINVS AVG. ; laureated head r. ; rev. D.N. CONSTANTINI MAX. AVG. VOT. 
xx. ; mint-mark p *, A ; C. 123 ; A.D. 320-324. 

(d) TARRACO MINT. 

IMP. CONSTANTINVS MAX. AVG. ; cuirassed bust with laureated helmet r. ; rev. 
VIOTORIAE LAETAE PRINC. PERP. ; on face of altar + ; mint-mark ST C 640 
A.D. 317-324. 

(e) SISCIA MINT. 

IVL. CRISPVS NOB. c. ; laureated head r. ; rev. CAESARVM NOSTRORVM VOT. x. ; 
mint-mark ASIS -sfe. ; C. 44; A.D. 320-324. 

CONSTANS. 

D.N. CONSTANS P.F. AVG.; rev. FEL. TEMP. REPARATio ; emperor standing in 
galley holding phoenix and the labarum; mint-mark TR; Trier mint- C 9- 
A.D. 347-350. 



METALLURGICAL NOTES. 265 

MAGNENTIUS. 

D. N. MAGNENTIVS P.F. Avo. ; bareheaded bust r. ; behind head A; rev. GLORIA 
ROMANORVM ; the emperor galloping r. ; mint-mark TRP ; Trier mint ; C. 20. 

Same obverse; rev. VICTORIAE DD. NN. AVG. ET CAE.; mint-mark AMB; Amiens 
mint; C. 68. 

VALENTINIAN I. 

D. N. VALENTINIANVS P.F. AVG. ; rev. RESTiTVTOR REiP. ; emperor standing hold- 
ing labarum and Victory; mint mark SLVG; Lyons mint; silver coin; 
C. 18. 

VALENTINIAN II. 

D. N. VALENTINIANVS P.F. AVG. ; rev. VICTORIA AVGGG. ; mint mark PCON; Aries 
mint; C. 46. 

ARCADIUS. 

D. N. ARCADIVS P.F. AVG.; rev. SALVS REiPVBLiCAE ; the emperor 1. dragging a 
captive; mint-mark illegible; Sabatier 41. 



METALLURGICAL NOTES. 

BY HENRY LOUIS, M.A., D.SC., A.R.S.M. 

The most interesting object found was a block of iron (see fig. 
15) 3 feet 4 inches long by 7 inches square at one end, which 
was rough and rather spongy, tapering down to about 4^- inches 
square at the other end, which was well rounded. In order to 
get samples for metallographic examination, pieces were cut out 
with chisels and hack saws ; underneath a superficial skin of hard 
rusty scale, about J inch thick, the metal was found to be quite 
clean, sound, soft and tough ; to obtain samples for chemical 
analysis, inch holes were drilled about 10 inches from the 
smaller end and 2 inches from the edge of the block; for the 
first 1J inches the metal was clean and sound, but on drilling 
deeper, the interior of the bar was found to be honey-combed 
and spongy. Only the outer sound portion of the metal was 
subjected to a complete analysis, which gave the following 
results : 



266 REPORT ON THE 1 909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM I 

Carbon 0-061 per cent 

Silicon /V 7' 

Manganese NiL 

Sulphur 0-008 per cent 

Phosphorus 0-063 per cent. 

Silica in the form of slag 0-32 per cent. 

The inner spongy portion of the block contained 0*14 per cent. 

of carbon. 

The microstructure showed characteristic grains of ferrite, 
with the planes of separation of the crystals very well marked. 
Some of the grains of ferrite show a well denned series of parallel 
lines running across the crystals. The outer edge of the sample 
shews a small quantity of pearlite between the grains of ferrite ; 
there are also numerous patches of slag, generally elongated in 
the direction of the longer axis of the block. 

I have little doubt that this block was made by welding 
together comparatively small lumps of iron produced by a direct 
reduction process in small charcoal fires ; there is no reason why 
the ores employed may not have been the local black-band iron- 
stones of the Carboniferous Series, some of which outcrop in this 
part of the country. The block of iron was probably used for 
an anvil, and I am inclined to think that the iron was probably 
smelted in the woods, probably near the outcrop of a seam of 
ironstone, and was brought into the Corbridge settlement to be 
there worked up and forged into various articles; the anvil 
block would in that case have been used for such forgings. I 
believe that the furnace (see figs. 8 and 10), close to which this 
block was found, was a smith's fire used for making forgings, 
and was not an iron smelting furnace ; I have come to this 
conclusion because there are no indications of any tuyere holes 
near the base of the furnace. This view is supported by the 
absence of any slag, such as would necessarily be produced 
abundantly in smelting operations. There seems no good reason 



METALLURGICAL NOTES. 



267 



why the practical Komans should have brought their ore and 
charcoal into the township to smelt them there, instead of 
erecting smelting works on a more 
convenient spot, as the condition of 
the country seems to have been peace- 
able enough to allow them to carry 
on their smelting in the woods. The 
short earthenware pipes found abun- 
dantly, and some of them near the 
anvil block, are evidently tuyere 
nozzles ; they were probably made 
here to be taken out to the smelting 
works, and were very likely used in 
the forge also. 

One of the large iron nails found 
here was examined : it contained 
0'045 per cent, of carbon, and was 
practically pure ferrite, showing a 
little pearlite on its outer edges. 
This seems to point to iron made by 
a direct process in a small charcoal 
fire in the presence of a rich slag, 
when pure ferrite would be produced ; 
this, if heated repeatedly in a char- 
coal fire for forging into a nail, 
would probably absorb some carbon, 
producing a little pearlite near its 
surface. 

It is interesting to note that a 
quantity of small coal, evidently 
obtained from one of the coal-seams 
in the Mountain Limestone series, 
was found lying on one of the Eoman FIG - 15. -BLOCK OF IRON, 3' 4" 




LONG. 



268 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITTTM I 

pavements ; the nearest outcrop of such is about a couple of miles 
from Corbridge, and from the position in which the coal was 
found, it is difficult to avoid the conclusion that it was brought 
in by the Romans for use in the township. There is, however, 
nothing at all to shew that it was used for metallurgical purposes, 
and the purity of all the iron found would appear to preclude the 
possibility of its having been so employed. 

A very interesting find was a mass of oxide of iron, the outer 
surface of which presented all the appearance of chain mail ; it 
was found on analysis to contain a great deal of organic animal 
matter, losing 20 per cent, on ignition ; the analysis of the ignited 
matter was as follows : 

Iron 61-90 per cent. 

Phosphorus 0-86 per cent. 

Insoluble matter 8-00 per cent. 

A good deal of iron was present in the form of ferrous oxide. 
This analysis seems to point conclusively to this really being a 
piece of chain mail, and that it was buried enclosing animal 
remains whether human or not it is impossible to say : we 
know of no natural product that would correspond to the above 
composition, and it is almost certain that this mass was produced 
by the oxidation of metallic iron. The organic matter was probably 
the source of the phosphorus found in the analysis, as iron contain- 
ing so much phosphorus could not have been forged into chain. 

Several leaden bullets have been found, evidently hammered 
into shape, and probably used for throwing from slings or cata- 
pults ; one of these gave on assay oz. 14 dwt. 9 grs. of silver. If 
this lead had been smelted from the local lead ores, it would 
probably have contained a good deal more silver than this, 
hence I have little doubt that this lead had been submitted to a 
process of desilverisation before being worked up into a bullet. 

All the above analytical and micrographical work was done 
in the Metallurgical Laboratory of Armstrong College by my 
assistant, Mr. H. Dean, M.Sc., A.R.S.M. 



269 



SMALLER FINDS (EXCEPT COINS). 

BY T. HAVERFIELD. 

A complete catalogue of the smaller finds made at Corbridge 
in 1909 would fill a volume of Archaeologia Aeliana and at the 
end perhaps serve no sufficient purpose. We content ourselves, 
therefore, with a brief summary which will emphasize only the 
most important points. 

i. STONE. 

No inscribed stones were found in 1909. But one or two 
more fragments of the Pius monument came to light. One bit 
added A to the last line : with the aid of another, Prof. 
Bosanquet and myself were able to fit the right-hand top corner 
together, with the result that the mark taken as at the end 
of line 1 appears to be the end of line 2 and possibly not a letter 
at all.* Of carved work in stone we have a complete relief in a 
triangular- topped frame, resembling the front of a shrine, 
showing perhaps Aesculapius and Hygieia (fig. 7, p. 231) ; a 
torso of Mercury (fig. 12, p. 247) ; a boar, badge of the twentieth 
legion, of which we have other signs at Corbridge, and a 
crudely-chiselled ' idol,' if it be not rather a jeu d' esprit. 
Notice is also due to a stone ball, more like a ballista missile 
than a weight, on which the device ^ is deeply scored. 

II. POTTERY AND OTHER EARTHENWARE 

(1) Samian pottery was exceedingly and indeed inconveniently 
abundant. Nearly twice as much was found as in 1908, and 
some of it was remarkable as belonging probably or certainly to 
an earlier date than previous discoveries. Most of the Samian 
seemed to come from one or other of the Gaulish factories. 
Some seems German, but this was rarer than in 1908. 

* Arch. AeL, 3 ser. iv, 263; Eeport (overprint), 1907, p. 59. 



270 REPORT ON THE 1 909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM I 

Of the Decorated Samian, 8 pieces belonged to form xxix. 
These occurred in a pit under the small granary and in a deep 
cutting sunk in front of the large granaries. In both cases we 
plainly tapped the earliest stratum of Corstopitum, and as in 
each case form xxix was proportionately well represented, we 
may assume that it was still in common use in the first period 
of the existence of the place that is, as we should naturally 
think, in the age of Agricola. Form xxx was represented by 
about 40 pieces, some of them almost certainly of the first 
century. Form xxxvn defied counting. Only a small fraction 
all of it of form xxxvn bore stamps. The potters repre- 
sented were : Advocisus (4 specimens), Albucius (3), Cinnamus 
(12 but some doubtful), Doeccus (1), IANVF (1 certain, 1 doubt- 
ful), Justus, Paternus (4 or 5), while 5 specimens were mere 
fragments. All these potters, so far as we can date them, seem 
to belong to the second century. 

Plain Samian ranged over many forms. The familiar xxxi 
and xxxui were naturally far the commonest, but xxvn was 
represented bv some 93 pieces, xxxvni by 100, XLV by 65, while 
small globular vases were not rare. Other forms which 
occurred comparatively seldom were xvin (once only), xx, xxxn, 
xxxv and xxxvi (not always distinguishable), XL, XLIII, LXXII, 
LXXIX, LXXX, and those numbered by Ludovici Bb, Be, Sm, Tc, 
Tg. We met also a few forms to which we have as yet found no 
recorded parallels. Incised Samian also occurred, but only a 
small quantity. The stamps .on the plain Samian numbered 
nearly 400, including fragments. One may be cited for its 
early date, LOGIRNI, found in the early pit on site xiv. Some of 
the pieces bore graffiti of which the most intelligible are 
Minerv . . ., probably a dedication ; Firm . . . ; Viator ; Attiani. 

(2) Of other, coarser, wares there was an abundance not to 
be described in these pages. We may note some specimens of a 
hard grey ware with rude barbotme decoration found in the pit 



Arch. AeL, 3 ser. VI. To face p. 270. 



Plate XIV 





CORSTOPITUM : FIGURED SAMIAN WAKE. 



SMALLER FINDS (EXCEPT COINS). 271 

of site xiv and found elsewhere in first century deposits, and a 
face-urn much broken of the type of which a Lincoln example 
bears the inscription D(e)o Mer curio. Mortaria (pelves) were 
naturally common. They grouped themselves principally into 
two types corresponding to the two types found in the pottery 
store in 1907. These types may be ascribed to the second 
century. A few specimens resembled rather a type which is 
sometimes dated to the late third or fourth century. 

(3) Of earthenware other than pottery, there were several 
interesting finds. The 'Harry Lauder ' mould has been noted 
at pp. 224 et seq. Here we may record a lamp stamped FORTIS and 
therefore datable ; eight more examples of ' cheese-squeezes/ of 
which several specimens have occurred here previously ; some 
candlesticks of the usual shape ; parts of two ' Gaulish ' statuettes 
in white clay, one of Cybele, the other of Mercury, both executed 
in good classical style. 

III. METAL. 

Of iron we have to notice the bar or anvil already described 
(p. 265), and a multitude of lesser pieces, less alike in size and 
in importance, calthrops such as were found in 1908, more arrow- 
heads of various types, and the like. A piece of chain-mail, 
found in 1908, but omitted accidentally from our last report, 
may also be here included. Of bronze much was found, but 
most of it was sadly perished. The fibulae seemed to belong 
chiefly if not wholly to the second and early third centuries. 
One interesting piece was a small horse-fibula with traces of red 
enamel. Interesting, too, is a fragment of pierced work, 
perhaps intended to be sewn on a leathern belt or the like, with 
the letters OMNTA vos. Similar pieces have been found at 
Aldborough and on the German Limes. They are quite different 
in style and form from the common bits of pierced work with 
VTERE FELIX and the like. 



272 REPORT ON THE 1909 EXCAVATIONS AT CORSTOPITUM. 
IV. ANGLO-SAXON REMAINS. 

A separate notice may be due to two bits of ' Anglo-Saxon ' 
work, to be put beside the two fibulae and beads discovered in 
1908. One is a small urn found near a stone cist (if cist it was). 
The other is a long slender mount for a sword-scabbard. It is 
cast, no't hammered, and consists of a narrow flat bar raised in 
the centre to form a long loop : through this loop was passed the 
strap by which the scabbard hung from the belt. Similar 
scabbard mounts occur, as Mr. A. T. Leeds, assistant curator in 
the Ashmolean museum, has pointed out with the confirmation 
of Prof. Montelius, who has seen the object among the earlier 
Danish peat-moss finds. They are, for example, represented by 
over 100 examples in the deposits at Thorsbjerg in Slesvig and 
Yimose in Fyen, but are absent from the later finds of Nydam. 
They seem to belong, as Prof. Montelius has argued, to the 
beginning of the fourth century, while the Nydam finds are 
later than A.D. 400. They were doubtless made in Danish 
lands, and are uncommon, if not indeed almost unknown, in our 
islands. Whether our specimen be due to a mercenary or a 
pirate, or to a visitor who was indifferently the one or the other, 
is a problem which belongs rather to the domain of Puck of 
Pook's Hill. 



273 

VII. OBITUARY NOTICE OF THE LATE EEV. JOHN 
WALKER, RECTOR OF WHALTON AND HONORARY 
CANON OF NEWCASTLE. 

By J. C. HODGSON, M.A., F.S.A., vice-president. 
[Read on the 27th July, 1910.] 

On the 22nd of June death deprived this society of one of its 
most esteemed members the Rev. John Walker, rector of 
Whalton. 

Mr. Walker became a member of the society on the 25th of 
March, 1891, and although his professional and social duties 
did not permit him to attend the monthly meetings with regu- 
larity, his personality and genial presence made him welcome to 
his fellow members whenever he was able to do so. For a time 
he was a member of the council. 

Born in the parish of Gigg, near Bury, Lancashire, on the 
10th of February, 1837, Mr. Walker was educated at St. Bees 
College, was ordained deacon in 1865 on a title given him by the 
Rev. John Reed, vicar of Newburn, Northumberland, and was 
admitted to priest's orders in the following year. After serving 
in the diocese of Durham for five years he became curate of the 
parish church of Stockport in 1870, but subsequently returned to 
Northumberland and became curate of Ponteland in 1876 and of 
Whalton in 1878. Two years later he was presented to the 
rectory of Whalton, the advowson of which has been in his wife's 
family since the reign of queen Elizabeth. Here the remainder 
of a full and useful life was spent, and here he died. 

There was apparently no limit to Mr. Walker's activity. 
In 1878 he became a free-mason, in which society he attained 
high masonic rank. In the same year he became a member of 
the Berwickshire Naturalists Club, of which he was president in 
1897. In 1882 he became poor-law guardian in the Castle Ward 
Union. In 1887 he was appointed honorary secretary of the 
Church Extension Committee of the diocese of Newcastle his 

3 SER. VOL. VI. 18 



274 OBITUARY NOTICE OF REV. JOHN WALKER. 

services in that capacity and to the diocese in other ways being 
recognized by his bishop, who, in 1897, made him an honorary 
canon of Newcastle and in 1902 rural-dean of the deanery of 
Morpeth and in 1900 he succeeded the late Mr. C. B. P. Bosan- 
quet as honorary secretary of the Poor Law conference for the 
four northern counties. 

As was right and proper, Mr. Walker took an intelligent and 
sympathetic interest in his own parish church, and he was ever 
ready, not only to describe its features, but to extend to this 
society a warm welcome to his house and a genial hospitality. 
Only last year he procured the printing by the Durham and 
Northumberland Parish Register Society, of the registers of 
baptisms, marriages and burials of Whalton from the year 1661 
to 1812. But great as was his interest in archaeology, his love 
of horticulture was yet deeper, and never perhaps was he happier 
than when pacing his old and beautiful garden and explaining 
his methods of treatment of rare plants ; Et disputavit super 
I ignis a cedro .... usque ad hyssopum quae egreditur de pariete. 

It is to be regretted that Mr. Walker did not more frequently 
contribute to the transactions of this society, but the following 
archaeological papers written by him have been printed : 

Report of a Meeting of the Berwickshire Naturalists' Club at Morpeth for 

Belsay, 2 June, 1897, with notes on Gubeon, Ogle, etc. History of 

Bernrickshire Naturalist*' Club, vol. xvi, p. 137. 
Report of a Meeting of the Berwickshire Naturalists' Club at Kelso for the 

Head of Bowmont Water, 30 June, 1897. Ibid., p. 149. 
Report of a Meeting of the Berwickshire Naturalists' Club at Morpeth for 

Kirkwhelpington, 28 July, 1897, with notes on Kirkharle. Ibid. , p. 152. 
Report of a Meeting of the Berwickshire Naturalists' Club at Reston for 

Dowlaw, Fast castle and Coldingham Moor, 25 August, 1897. Ibid., 

p. 158. 
' Address delivered to the Berwickshire Naturalists' Club at Berwick, October 

13, 1897.' Ibid., p. 133. 
On 'The Midsummer Bonfire at Whalton,' read before this Society, 25 

November, 1903, and printed in Arch. Ael., 2 ser., vol. xxv, p. 181. 
Description of 'Whalton Church,' delivered 5 Aug., 1908, and printed in the 

Proceedings, 3 ser., vol. in, p. 269. 



Arch. Ael, 3 ser. vi. To face p. 274. 



Plate XV 




THE LATE REV. JOHN WALKER! 
RECTOR OF WHALTON AND HON. CANON OF NEWCASTLE. 



INDEX. 



[NOTE. A star following a figure denotes that the word occurs more than once 
on the page.] 



A 



Acomb, etc., manors of, 79 

Acton of Warwickshire and Worcester- 
shire, differenced shield of, 166 ; 
Adam, son of Stephen de, 56; Cecilia 
de, 69; Constancia de, 69; Eleanor, 
daughter of Lawrence, 86n ; Eliza- 
beth de, 69 ; daughter of Eichard of 
Newcastle. 47; Johanna de, 69; 
Nicholas, son of Eichard de, and 
wife Alicia, 69; Eichard de, 47; 
arms of, 91 ; William de, lands of, to 
be distrained, 54; William de, son of 
William, of Newcastle, 47, 50 

Advocisus, a Eoman potter, 270 

Agricola, xi; potsherds of age of, 207 

Akeld, manor of, 58 

Alayn de Wakefield, John, and 
Johanna his wife, 49 

Alberwyk [Alburwyk~|, bailiff in, 76; 
suit concerning land at, 43 

Alburius, a Eoman potter, 270 

Alburwyk, John, son of John de, 43 

Aldeburgh, Eichard, of Aldeburgh, 
mile*, 80 

Alder of Prendwick, arms of, 166; 
John, 59 ; wife Emma, 59 ; Bobert, 
35; Thomas, de North Middleton, 
46 

Aldressone, Thomas, 46 

Aldwin, 192 

Aldeworth, etc., action respecting, 
64 ; East, action respecting, 71 

Aleynsheles, John de, 44 

Alicesson, William, de Camhous, 55 

Alnham, suit concerning land, etc., 43, 
60 

Alnham, arms of, 94 

Alnwick, seal of town of, 135, 136, 
166 ; besieged by Scots, relief of, 95 ; 
suit respecting houses, etc., in, 88; 
inquisition held at, 19 

Alnwick, abbots of, Eobert Kok, 67; 
William, 68 



Alnwick castle, shields of arms on 
the octagon towers at, 94, 177 ; ex- 
tracts from the de banco rolls at, 42 ; 
discoveries at, x 

Alnwick, William de, bishop of Nor- 
wich, shield of arms of, 166 

Alston, coins found in quarry near, 
xviii 

Alwinton, etc., action respecting lands 
in, 75; church, shield of arms in, 
168 

Amundeville, 176 

Anablesone de Wessyngton, 56 

Anderson, Henry, 85; William, 82 

Andrewe, John, 62, 80 

Andrews, Ursula, daughter of sir 
Thomas, of Winwick, etc., 21, 25 

Anglian fibulae, 208; urn from Cvrsfo- 
pitum, 208, 228, 272 

Angus, Gilbert de Umfraville, earl of, 
54*, 62, 76; Eobert de Umfraville, 
earl of, 49 

Ankirsmith, Eichard, 60 

Annual report, ix 

Apperley, east, manor of, 56 

Apsley. Elizabeth, daughter of sir Ed- 
ward, of Worminghurst, 26 

Archer, John, gift to, 36 ; de ' Kyl- 
lome/ son of Eobert and Isabella, 
54; Eobert, 52; a seal of, 166 

Armeston, William, 74 

Armorer, arms of, 92 

Armorials of Northumberland, the, 
89 ; index to the, 99-135 

Arms and armour, E. C. Clephan's 
collection of, x 

Arms, derivative, 93; of Hesilrigg, 24 

Arthington, Mrs., of Arthington, be- 
quest to, 36 ; Henry, 35 
I Arundell, Eichard of, son of count of 

Arundell, 60; Eichard, miles, 70 
I Asheburne, Maria de, 59 
! Ashenden of Kent, 166 
i Ashby, Thomas, of Quenby, and Katli- 

erine his wife, 25 
i Ask, Conan de, and Alianora his wife, 64 



276 



INDEX. 



Asty, Henry, 75 

Athol, Adomar de, chivaler, 51, 56, 57. 

59, 62, 64, 65 ; Adomar, son of, 63 
Athol, David de Strabolgy, earl of, 

PC CO 

Aton, arms of, 93; Gilbert de, 166 
Attianus, a Roman potter, 270 
Audre, Walter, arms of, 90 
Aiikeland, Robert de, 61 
Ayden, action for depasturing cattle 

at, 76 
Ayscough, Robert, 35 



Babyngton, Parva, suit concerning 
land in, 50, 74 

Babyngton de Babyngton, John, 74 

Bacon, arms of, 92 

Badde, Robert, de Morpeth, 43 

Bainbridge, see Baynbrigg 

Baker, Richard, and Alicia his wife, 56 

Bakester, Thomas, 48; lands, etc., of, 
61 (see also Baxter) 

Balance sheet, treasurer's, xv 

Baliol [Balliolo], arms of, 92, 93, 167, 
175* ; Ada, 184 ; Agnes, wife of Hugh 
de, 43; Alianora, wife of Alexander 
de, 43; Bernard de, 95; Hawis, 
daughter of Guy, 182 ; John, shield 
of arms of, 181; executor of, 183 

Bamburgh, bailiff in, 61 ; actions re- 
lating "to lands, etc., in, 48*, 81, 84; 
action for depasturing cattle at, 80 ; 
castle, custody of, 185 ; ' truncage ' 
to, 2, 19 (see also Baumburgh) 

Bank, Ralph, and Elizabeth his wife, 84 

Baret, Adam, chivaler, 55 

Barhill fort on Antonine Wall, photo- 
graphs of, xx 

Barmoor, tenements in, 53 

Barnaby, John, 64; John, de Balliolo 
in Oxon, 67 

Barnard castle, see Castro Barnardi 

Barnard, Rauf le fitz, shield of arms 
of, 171 

Barnardi, Castro, see Castro Barnardi 

Barton, manor of, 57* 

Barton, John de, and Margaret his 
wife, 44; John, son of, 54; Robert 
de, and Isabella his wife, 54 

Basset, sir William, seal of, 167 

Bates, Thomas, 88 

Bath house at Cor*topifum., 235 



' Bathehouse, le/ 79 

Baumburgh, Thomas de, 48* (see also 

Bamburgh) 

Bavington, see Babyngton 
Baxter, Thomas, and Johanna his 

wife, 80 ; David, son of, 43 (see also 

Bakester) 
Baynbrigg [Baynbrig, Baynbrige], 

Richard, 79; of Brancepeth, 80*; 

Roger de, 65* 
Beadnell, 167 ; lands at, 81 ; ' drengs ' 

of, 1 

Beal, arms of, 92 
Beauchamps, arms of, 183 
Beaumont, Lewis de, bishop of Dur- 
ham, 46; William, arms of, on 

brass, 167 
Beck de Hexham, Alan, mercer, and 

Johanna his wife, 71 (see also Bek) 
Beckwith, see Bekwyth 
Beer, Maria, wife of John, 75 
Bek, bishop of Durham, lord of Aln- 

wick, 166 (see also Beck) 
Bekwyth, William, 77; rents given 

by, 60 
Belasis [Belasys, Belassise], John, 

executors of, 63, 64; John, son of 

Stephen de, 63 
Belford, land in, 59 
Bellingham, iron furnaces at, 241 
B'ellingham, arms of, 93 ; Robert de, 

43 ; sir Roger, arms of, 167 
Belsay tower, shields of arms on, 95 
Belsowe, Thomas de, and Maria his 

wife, 44; John, 80 
Benet, Richard, de Haukeswell, 63; 

William, of ' Kyneton/ 79 
Benley, suits concerning manor of, 48* 
Benrigge, suit respecting manor of, 45* 
Bent, Robert, 62 
Benton, etc., action respecting half 

manor of, 68; Long, held by Roger 

Thornton, 19 
Benwell, 54; gift of lands in, 60; 

actions respecting manor, etc., 64, 

70, 72, 87 
Berger, Walter, 47 
Berhalgh, William, 58 
Bertram, John, chivaler, and Isabella 

his wife, 70 ; Robert, of Mitford, 4 ; 

sir Robert, of Bothal, seal of, 182; 

William, first lord of Mitford, seal 

of, 182; married Hawis Baliol, 182 



INDEX. 



277 



Berwick-upon-Tweed, seal of town of, 
135, 136 ; bequest to poor of, 36 ; sir 
Thomas Widdrington, M.P. and 
recorder of, 38; John de Sacra 
Insula, vicar of, 66 
Bevyngton, Eichard, 75 
Bewcastle, trespass in park at, 56 
Bewyk, Isabella, 84 
Biddleston, actions respecting manor, 
etc., 43, 60, 68, 73-75 (see also Butel- 
ston) 

Bilton, arms of, 92 
Bird de Beverley, William,, 65* 
Birtley, John de, 49 
Bitchfield, bequest to poor of, 37 
Black, see Blakke 
Blackett, John Erasmus, 192 ; [Blacket], 

Margaret, wife of sir John, 117n 
Blackgate, Newcastle, adapted for a 

library, xi 
Black Heddon, actions concerning land 

in, 47*, 55 
Blackheddon, Aybella, daughter of 

John de, 55 ; Richard de, 47* 
Black Hedley, action respecting manor 

of, 64 

Blair, C. Hunter, on the armorials of 
Northumberland, 89 ; Eobert, gift of 
bronze * yetlings ' dredged out of 
Tyne, and other objects, to museum, 
xviii, xx 
Blakke, John, Alianora, daughter of, a 

mistake, 86 and n 
Blakston, Nicholas, arm., 78; [Blay- 

keston], Roger de, 45*, 46 
Blenkinsop, arms of, 93; [Blenkansop] 
de Helbec, Thomas de, 56, and Mar- 
garet his wife, 59; [Blynkensop], 
Gerard, of ' Bellercir/ 85 
Blytheman, Robert, 82 
Blythsnoke, etc., action for cutting 

down trees at, 80 
Bockenfield, action respecting manor 

of, etc., 73 
' Bodell,' lands at, 81 
Bolam, suits respecting houses, etc., 

in, 62, 88 

Bolbek, etc., manors of, 79 
Bollesdon, Alexander de, 43 
Boltby, arms of, 93; Richard de, 167 
Bolton, William, executor of, 84 ; ' de 
Alnewyk/ 74; ' de Swethop,' 54 (see 
also Boulton) 



Bonner, Joseph, gravestone of, 201 

and n 

Bothal, action respecting goods taken 
from, 62; castle, shields of arms on, 
94, 177, 178; church, shields of arms 
in windows of, 95; Richard de St. 
Quintin, parson of, 55 (see also 
Buttle, Bodell) 

Botiller [Boteler], Edmund le, 45; 
Richard, de Ravensworth, co. York, 
71; Robert le, sen., and Constance 
his wife, 45; jun., and Agnes his 
wife, 45 

Boton del Bure, William, 47 
Boroudon, etc., action respecting 

lands in, 75 
Bo rough bridge, Robert Stapleton, 

M.P. for, 29n 
Borughdon, Alianora, daughter of, 

Gilbert de, 52 
Boulton, William de, 50, 51 
Bowes, Adam de, seal of, 168; Alan o* 
the, hermit, 53; Dorothy, daughter 
of sir George of Dalden, 27; Rich- 
ard, and Elizabeth his wife, 87; 
Isabella, wife of Robert de, 57; 
Robert de, and Elizabeth his wife, 
54* ; William, miles, 75, 78, 79 
Bowes and Ellerker's 'View of the 

Castles/ etc., 20 
Bowndon, William de, 53 
Bowsden, suit concerning land in, 49 
Boyd, William, his map of Newcastle, xiii 
Boynton, Christopher, de Sudbury, 
78; Elizabeth, wife of William, 78; 
Henry, 78; Henry de, and Elizabeth 
his wife, 66 

Bracebridge, Edith, 25 
Bradefeld, Wm., son of John de, 49 
Bradford, action respecting depastur- 
ing cattle at, 61 

Brakenbury [Brakenbiri, Brakenbery], 
de Laton, Peter, 45 ; Cecilia de, 43*, 
45 ; William de, 43 
Brancepeth, see Braunspath 
Brandling [Brandelyng], John, of 
Newcastle, merchant, executor of, 
85*, 86; Robert, 85*, 86 
Brandon, actions respecting manor of, 

etc., 68, 73*, 74 
Brandon, Hugh de, 47, 48 
Branley (?), etc., action respecting 
lands, etc., at, 75 



278 



INDEX. 



Branton, action respecting rent in, 60 

Braunspath, Johanna, 81 ; John, miles, 

81; Thomas, 81; William, miles, 81 

Bredon, Joan de, damsel to queen 

Philippa, 24 ; will of, 24 
Brewis, W. P., on the horns of Moses, 
181; gift of friction matches, xviii 
Bridlington, John de, 63 
Brinkburn priory, x 
Britan', John de, count of Richmond, 

43* 

Brittany, ermine shield of, 91 
Broket, John, 61, 64; Mabilla, daugh- 
ter of, 24 

Brome, Thomas de, 70 
Bromle, Mikle, etc., manors of, 79 
Brompton, actions respecting waste, 
etc., at, 71, 73 ; west, action respect- 
ing manor of, 70 
Brompton, John, 73; [Bromtone], 

John de, witness to a grant, 5n 
Brothersete, suit relating to land in 

43 
Broun de Chester in the Strete, 

Richard, 76 

Broxfield, suit respecting lands in, 67 
Brunton, east (see east Brunton); 

west, lands in, 56 
Brynkley, houses, etc., in, 87 
Buchan, John Comyn late earl of, 44 
Budle, see Bodell, Buttle 
Buk, James, 18 

Bunn, Ambrose, tombstone of, 202 
Burcestre [Burchestre], John, and 

Elizabeth his wife, 72-74, 78, 80* 
Burell, George, 78 
Burgh, William, mile*, lord Burgh 

88 

Burradon, Gilbert, seal of, 188- mar- 
ried Elizabeth Umfreville, 187; sir 
Walter, seal of, 188 (see also Bor- 
ughdon, Boroudon) 
Burradon and Horsley, shields of, 187 
Burgdon, sir Walter, sheriff of Lan- 
ark, seal of, 167 

Butelston, Alice de, abduction of, 61 
irt, Ralph, and Johanna his 

Butler', Elizabeth, widow of sir John 

(see also Boteler, Botiller) 
"little/ suit respecting manor of, 88 
Byermoor colliery, old document relat- 



Byker, land in, 87 

Bywell, actions respecting manor, etc. 
43*, 45, 54, 79, 80 

C 

Cabery, Gilbert de, 61 

Caerlaverock, poem of siege of, 184 

* Calchirsyde/ action for cutting down 
trees at, 78 

Caldecotes, action for trespass in, 62 

Callaly, Anglian thane of, 1 

Callerton [Calverdoun], actions res- 
pecting manor of, 68, 69, 73; High, 
suit respecting land in, 45; Black, 
etc., manors of, 78, 80 ; Parva, action 
for depasturing cattle at, 77 ; Dar- 
rayns, etc., action respecting tene- 
ments in, 68 

Callerton, John, 68 

Calthrops, etc., found at Corsfopitum, 

Cambois, lands in, 24 

Cambhowe de Haukeswell, John, 63 

Cambridge, bequest to Christ church, 

37 
Captheaton, suit respecting land in, 

Carham, an assault at, 78 
Carlell, Johanna, 86; John, seised of 
lands in Hasand, etc., 86; and wife 
Alianora, 86 

Carlisle, Thomas, bishop of, claims 
presentation to South Gosforth 
church, 65 

Carnaby, William, arms of, 186; suc- 
ceeded to manor of Halton, 186 

Carr MS., 90 

Carr [Carre], of Woodhall, 168; 
Andrew, late of Langton 78- 
Edward, 77, 78; George, late of 
Yeavermg, 78; John, late of Chib- 
burn, 78; Ralph, and wife Margery 
81; Thomas, sen., late of Langton' 
78 

Carrow [Carrowe], Nicholas de, 62- 
Thomas de, 60, 61 

Cartington, arms of, 92 

Carville hall, 191 

Castle, John, son of Robert del, 59 

Castleshaw, discoveries at, xii 

Castro Barnardi, Richard de, arch- 
deacon of Northumberland 55, 57 

Catchburne grange, bequest of 36 



INDEX. 



279 



Cateryk, William, vicar of Cheuel- 

yngham, 73 
Catesby, William, of Seton, Eutland, 

Anne, wife of, 25 
Catton, co. York, Thomas Forsett, 

rector of, 80 

Cauce, Adam de, seal of, 168 
Chabyngton, John, 55 
Chain mail found at Corstopitum, 271 
Chambre, Simon del, 64 
Charles n, a bodle of, presented, xx 
Charlton, Thomas, presents old deed, 

xx 
Charron, Alicia, wife of Guischard de, 

47 
Chatour, John, of Whetell, 79, 80; 

William, ' de Heppelle/ 67 
Chekyn, William, 64 
Cheseman, Ralph, de Stanton, 57 ; 

Robert, rector of Ingram, 83; 

[Chesman], William, 67 
Chest, an inlaid, presented, xix 
Chesterhope in Kedesdale, action for 

trespass at, 52 

Chester-le-Street, tithe of, 35 
Chestre, Thomas de, executor of, 72 
Chevington, West, trespass at, 55 
Child de Newcastle, John, merchant, 

74 
Chillingham, manor of, 57; action for 

cutting down trees at, 73 ; castle, 

79; shield of arms on, 94, 175; 

church, William Cateryk, vicar of, 

73 
Chollerton, 49; grant of manor of, 

188 ; church, re-used Roman material 

in, 198 

Chollerton, Robert, 55 
Chowerton, suit respecting land in, 84 
Cinnamu*, a Roman potter, 270 
Clague, T. Maltby, gift of lantern 

slides, etc., xviii 
Clauston, William de, 60 
Clavering [Claveryng], Alexander, 

arms of, 184; Robert de, 60; and 

Johanna his wife, 59, 61, 63 
Claxton, arms of, 91 ; Robert, 75, 78* ; 

seal of, 168; Thomas de, 64, 65; 

William de, 74 ; seal of, 168 
Cleaseby [Clesseby], Cristiana de, 66; 

Henry de, 67 

Clennel, custody of manor of, 58; ac- 
tion respecting lands in, 75 



Clennell, shield of arms of, 188; Mr., 
31, 32; [Clenhall], Walter, son of 
Thomas de, 58 

Clerk, John, merchant of York, 70; 
Robert, 57 

Clervaux, Richard, late of Croft, 81 

Cliderow, John, 71; Richard, and 
Elizabeth his wife, 66 

Clifford, Andrew de, 66 ; Cristiana de, 
66; John de, 66; Margaret, wife of 
Robert, 49; Richard, shield of arms 
of, 168 ; seal of, 170 ; Robert de, 66, 
67; and Jacoba his wife, 64; Roger 
de, 66; Thomas de, 66 

Clifton, near Morpeth, manor of, 52; 
claim to part of, 51 

Coigners, Elizabeth, wife of John, 51 ; 
Richard de, 51; Robert, de Stub- 
house, 52 (see also Conyers, Cos- 
neris) 

Coins, Roman, discovered at Corsto- 
pitum, 207, 220, 222, 231, 232, 238, 
243, 244; H. H. E. Craster on, 248 
et seq. ; late, presented, xviii, xx 

Cok, John, of Newcastle, merchant, 82 

Coke, Robert, alias Rollewod, of New- 
castle, 70; William, of Newcastle, 
and Isabella his wife, 71 

Coket, de Newcastle, John, 65 

Cokkeson, William, 52 

Coldwell, manor of, 60 

Colepitts, Slaley, suit respecting 
manor of, 45 

Colepottes, Roger de, 64 

Colhngwoods, of Eslington, 27 ; and 
Dalden, pedigree of, 27; com- 
pounded for their estates, 27; sold 
same, 27 

Collingwood [Collenwod, Collanwode, 
Colienwode, Colenwode, Colayn- 
wode], Mr. v. sir Arthur Heslerigg, 
29 and n, 30?i; Cuthbert, of Esling- 
ton, delinquency of, 23; sir Cutn- 
bert, and wife Dorothy, 27; George, 
32 ; of Dawden, co. Durham, 23 ; 
John, 19; pardon to, 20n; lands of, 
in Fowberry, 27; John, ' de Etall/ 
76, 77; Robert, 19, 20; Eslington 
sold to, 20 ; pardon to, 20n ; Eliza- 
beth, wife of, 25 ; William, 72 ; and 
Alice his wife held lands in Wooler, 
27 

Colte, Thomas, 80 



280 



INDEX. 



Colvile Cuthbert, of Northumberland,, 
shield of, 169 

Colwell manor, gift of, 61; suit con- 
cerning 1 , 47 

Comyn, arms of, 92, 93; arms derived 
from, 167; John, earl of Buchan, 
44; Robert, 81; son of John, 46; 
Richard, 46; Robert, de Ulseby, son 
of John, 47; William, of Bogham, 
parson of Ovingham, 43, 44* 

Conyers, Galfrid, 46; John, 74; 
Richard de, 50, 52; son of John, 
46; Robert, 58, 59, 71; and Johanna 
his wife, 70; Robert de, de Hub- 
house, 48; and Elizabeth his wife, 
59; Robert, son of John, de Stub- 
house, 45*; William, and Katherine 
his wife, 88 (see also Coigners, Cos- 
neris) 

Cookson, see Cokkeson 

Corbet, arms of, 92; sir Nicholas, 
arms of, 169 

Corbridge, arms of, 174; seal of, 135, 
136 ; inquisition at, 21 ; action for 
depasturing cattle at, 70; church, 
re-used Roman material in, 198; 
vicar's pele, repaired, xii (see 
also Corstopitum} 

Corbridge [Corbrigg], family, arms of, 
170; John de, gift by of land in 
Bywell, 54 

Cornhill, arms of, 169 

Corstopitum, x, xi; report on the 1909 
excavations at, 205; pig of iron dis- 
covered, 206, 240; granaries at, 207, 
209; description of, 209; earthen- 
ware at, 207, 224, 227, 230, 243; 
coins at, 207, 220, 222, 231, 232, 238, 
243, 244, 248 ; pre-conquest urn from, 
208, 228; 'fountain/ etc., at, 214;' 
watercourse, 217; Gaulish figure, 
208, 224; fibulae, etc., 224 (?); 
intagli, 224; lamps, 224; pottery, 
etc., found at, 269; calthrops, etc., 
found at, 271 ; graffiti from, 270 ; 
chain mail, 271; 'kiln or furnace at, 
229; sculptured panel, 231, 232; 
bath-house, etc., 233; 'hand-bricks,' 
238 ; latrines, 241 ; north ditch, 244 ; 
figure of Mercury, 247 

Cosneris, Thomas de, shield of arms 
of, 169; William, shield of arms of, 



Costley, lands at, 36 

Cote, John del, 47 

Couhird, Donald, 59 

Council and officers for 1910, xxii 

Coupland, lands in, 59; custody of 
lands in, 61 ; suit concerning tene- 
ments, etc., in, 43, 48 

Coupland [Coupeland], arms of, 93, 
95; dom. David de, witness to a 
grant, 5n; Johanna de, 48; wife of 
John de, 58*, 60*, 61; John de, 52, 
54, 56, 78; seal of, 169; Juliana, 
wife of, 53; Simon, son of David de, 
43 

Coward, see Couhird 

Cowdale, Elizabeth, 87 

Cowpen, devise of lands at, 36 

Crabbe, Peter, and Agnes his wife, 53 

Crag, Eva, wife of John, of Newcastle, 
50 

Cramlington, manor of, etc., 86, 186 

Cramling-ton, family shield of, 186; 
[Cramlyngton], Thomas, 86 

Craster, lands in, 81 

Craster tables, 90 

Craster, arms of, 92; [and Middle- 
ton], shields of arms of, 184; 
[Craucester, Craucestyr], Edmund 
de, 45*; and wife Margery, 81 

Craven, lady, bequest to, 36 

Creswell, manor of, 58 

Cressewell, Alexander, 63, 64 

Crofte, Edmund, 87 

Cromwell, arms of, 94; John, and wife 
Idonea, 169 ; [Cromevell], William, 71 

Cronkley, see Crumclyf 

Crookham, tenements in, 53 

' Crumclyf,' trespass at, 48 

Curteys, John, and Idonia his wife, 50 

Cuthbert, William, de Berneston, 57 

Cybele, a clay statuette of, 271 

D 

Dacie, Hugh de, 56 

Dacre, Thomas, de Dacre, 84; sir 

Thomas, 22 
Dalton, Nicholas, 47; daughter Alice 

and grandson William, 47 
Danby, Thomas, 82 
Darcy, Arthur, and Maria his wife, 

88; Emeline, wife of John, 51; John, 

son of, 51; le Cosyn, John, 46;' 

Robert, 65 (see also Dacie) 



INDEX. 



281 



Darras hall, see Callerton Darreyns 

Darreyns, shield of arms of, 183 ; held 
Whittonstall manor, 183; Guy, seal 
of, 169 ; Matilda, 53 ; Robert, 50 

Davell, William, of Newcastle, mer- 
chant, 84 

Davy, John, 55 

Dawson [Dawessone], Gilbert, son of 
John, 47; John, 63; Roger, 45; 
Thomas, de Captheton, 72 

De banco rolls, extracts from, relating 
to Northumberland, 41 

Deeds, old, etc., presented, xx, xxi 

Delaval, Wallsend chapel scene of ad- 
venture of a lord of, 196 

De la Vale, Agnes, 69 ; Alicia, 68, 73 ; 
Elizabeth, 73, 86; George, 70; 
Henry, 60, 68; de Seton, 61; Hugh 
de, land given to, 60; James, 86; 
Johanna, 71; John, 86; and Margaret 
his wife, 64, 86; Margaret, 85, 86; 
Robert, 54*, 60, 68*, 73, 86; de 
Newsham, and Idonia his wife, 61 ; 
William, 54*, 60, 64; and Agnes his 
wife, 68*, 73*; and Elizabeth his 
wife, 73 ; son of Robert, 6l ; William 
of Dissington, and Mary wife of, 39 

Dendy, E. W., extracts from the de 
banco rolls, relating to Northumber- 
land. 41 

Dene [Deen], John de, 59; de Prest- 
wyk, 47; William de, 59; and 
Johanna his wife, 66 

Denton hall, 191 

Denton, arms of, 94 ; John de, 49 ; seal 
of, 170 ; and wife Margaret, 83 

Denum [Denom], lords of Meldon, 
arms of, 92; John, seal of, 170; de 
Unthank, 59; William, seal of, 170; 
son of Robert de, 45 ; son of William 
de, and Isabel his wife, 44 

Devilstone, arms of, 93; [Develston], 
Odmel de, 49 (see also Dilston) 

Devices, punning 1 , 90 

Dichand, tenements in, 54 (see also 
Dychant) 

Dickeborne, lands at, 81 

Dickson [Dickeson, Dicson], de Tyne- 
dale. John de, 48; John, jun., de 
Parva Callerton, 77; Richard, de 
Mitford, 58 (see also Dyckson, etc.) 

Dilston, action respecting manor of, 75 
(see also Devilstone) 



Dinnington, manor of, 77; property 
at, 17 

Dissington, etc., action respecting two 
parts of manor of, 69; north, manor 
of, 78, 80; action respecting, 73 

Ditchburn, east, suit respecting, rents 
in, 115 (see also Dickeborne) 

Dixon, see Dickson, Dyckson 

Dobson, Thomas, 56 

Dockwray, see Dokkewra 

Doddington, suit respecting land in, 
84 

Dodsworth, arms of, 93; Anthony, be- 
quest to, 36; of Stranton, Eleanor, 
wife of, 38 

Doeccus, a Roman potter, 270 

Dokkewra, John, son of Adam, son of 
Juliana de, 56 

Dolphanby, arms of, 92 ; John, 71 

Don [Donne], James, de Temple 
Thornton, 71; John, and Maria his 
wife, 50; of Netilworth, co. Durham, 
75 

Donations to museum in 1909, xviii- 
xxi 

Doner, Thomas, rector of Ingram, 83 

Dormer, Robert, 85 

Douglas, earl, ' the Tineman,' 96 (see 
also Duglas) 

Drengs and thanes, difference between, 
1 

Drewes, John, and Alicia his wife, 63, 
64 

Dudley, Robert, sheriff, of Newcastle, 
shield of, 170 

Duffeld, Richard, 75 

Duglas, Archibald, 46 

Dukesfield, near Slaley, manor, 78, 80 ; 
actions respecting, 68, 69, 73, 74 

Dun, Walter, 67 

Dunstan, suit respecting land in, 44, 
84, 88 

Duresme, John de, arms of, 170 

Durham, cathedral cloisters, shields of 
arms in, 174; treasury at, seals in, 
90 ; bishops of, Lewis de Beaumont, 
46 ; Bek, lord of Alnwick, 166 ; Pud- 
sey, 193; Richard, 82; William de 
St. Carilef, 192; Thomas, 62; 
Walcher, 192; Thomas de Hatfield, 
xxi ; archdeacon of, Alexander de 
Neville, 60, 61 

Duxfield, see Dukesfield 



JS'J 



INDEX. 



Dvchant, John de, 60 

Dye-hard, Robert de, 45 . _.. 

Dykenson, William, son of William, 

Dykeson, Alexander, 52; [Dykson], 
John, 64, 65; de Stanton, 57; 
Robert, de Woperden, 71 (see also 
Dickson) 

E 
Easington manor, an inlaid chest. 

from, xix 

East Brunton, manor of, 53 
Eaton, John de, parson of Wermouth, 

Ederiston, suit concerning land in, 43 

Edlingham, manor of, 85 

Edlingham, John de, seal of, 170 

Eglingham, tenants of, 32 

Egliston, Adam de, and Constancia his 
wife, 53; John de, 53 

Egypt, antiquities from, etc., pre- 
sented, xviii 

Eland, Little, actions respecting ham- 
let of, etc., 68, 71; hall, action 
respecting common of pasture in 
park of, 68" 

Eland, arms of, 174; Cristiana, wife of 
Peter de, 45; Emma, wife of Wil- 
liam de, 45; John, son of Nicholas 
de, 50; Robert, son of Nicholas de, 
50; William, clericus, of Ingram, 82 

Elderton, Thomas, miles, of Elderton, 
85 

Ellergill, Henry, rector of Ingram, 83 

Ellerker, John, 75; Margery, of Wed- 
eryngton, 86 ; William, of Woderyng- 
ton, miles, and Margery his wife, 85 

Ellingham, manor of, 66; suit con- 
cerning land in, 49 ; grant to Dur- 
ham of church of, 193 

Ellington, suit respecting manor of, 
88 

Ellis, William, reader of Gray's Inn, 
36 

Ellison, Cuthbert, of Hebburn, 202 

Elmedon, Johanna, wife of William de, 
71 ; Thomas, de Elmedon, co. Dur- 
ham, 70; William, 72, 76 (see also 
Emeldon) 

Elmes, Frances, daughter of Thomas, 
of Greens Norton, Northants., 22, 
26; William, 22 



Elrington, arms of, 93 ; Robert, 78 

Eltham, John, 80 

Elwick, arms of, 92; [Ellewyk], Gil- 
bert de, 55 

Emelay, John, 67 

Emeldon, Richard de, 45 

Emeleton, suit respecting land in, 88 

Emerson, George, 84 

Eimerton, suit respecting land in, 84 

Entwistle, Thomas, and Edith his wife, 
25; Elizabeth, wife of, 25; Lucy, 
daughter of, 25 

Errington [Eryngton], of Denton, 
arms of, 170; of Ponteland, 170; 
John, 67 ; John de, shield of arms 
of, 186; John, sen., de Whytyngton, 
jun., 77; Nicholas, 88 

Erthe, John, 75 

Eshot [Esshet], suits respecting lands 
in, 46, 70, 88 ; Heugh, suit respect- 
ing manor of, 46 

Esshet, Edmund de, 56, 58 

Eslington, the medieval owners of, 1 ; 
drengs of, 1 ; grant of rent in, 5/t ; 
manor of, 29, 57*; sold by Hasle- 
riggs, 20 ; ancient tower of, 2 ; 
owner of, 117 ; inhabited by Robert 
Collingwood, 20; old house taken 
down, 27; Georgian house at, 2 

Eslington, shield of arms of, 186; Alan 
de, 51; i, married Beatrice de Fram- 
lington, 1; n, 2; married Alina de 
Flammaville, 3; in, 3, 4; and wife 
Emma, 4; Alex, de, 5; Alina, 51; 
Elias de, 3, 51; Elizabeth, wife of 
Robert de, 57 ; Isabella, daughter of 
George de, wardship of, 54*; John 
de, 51* ; i, 3 ; n, 3, 5 ; death of, 5 ; 
Robert de, 51*; Robert de, i, and 
wife Christiana, 5; in, 3; William 
de, 3 

Eston, John de, vicar of Ponteland, 67 
Estuteville, William de, 95 
Essex, earls of, arms of, 92 
Etal, bailiff in, 45; suits concerning 
manor of, 47; waste lands at, 63; 
castle repaired, xiii 
Eton, John, a burgess of Newcastle, 

58 

Eure, Bucks, manor of, 184 
Eure [Euer], Hugh de, seal of, 184; 
John de, 58; lord of Stokesley, arms 
of, 184; guardian of William de 



INDEX. 



283 



Kirkeby, 44; Ralph de, 67; Robert 
de, 58 ; arms of ' Roger le fitz John 
de/ 170, 184; William, 76*, 77 

Ewbank, arms of, 200 (see also Hew- 
banke) 

Exchange of publications, xxxiv 



Fabian, Roger, 45 

Fairfax, lord, 35; lady, of Ashton, 
bequest to, 36 ; Charles, of Menston, 
bequest to, 35; Frances, daughter 
of Ferdinando, lord Fairfax, of 
Cameron, 38; death and burial, 38; 
Henry, of Oglethorpe, bequest to, 
35; Mrs. Ursula, bequest to, 36 

Fairhill, suit respecting third part of 
manor of, 60 

Fairpage, Richard, 55 

Falconfeld, John, 62 

Falderley, Robert de, 54 

Farbridge, Mrs. Margaret, xix 

Farnacres, arms of, 94 

Fames, water-fowl of the, 92 

' Farnhalgh/ suit concerning trespass 
at, 49 

Fauoonberge, Isabella de, 65 

Faudon, Robert de, 44 

Faukus, William, ' de Westbakworth,' 
53 

Fawdon, lordship, 32; suit respecting 
manor of, 46; property at, 17 

Featherstonhaugh, arms of, 92 (see 
also Fetherstonhalgh, etc.) 

Felton, William Matson, bailiff of, 
59 

Felton, John de, chivaler, executors 
of, 66; de Ho,ghton, 48; sir William 
(i), constable of Roxburgh, etc., 171 ; 
(ii), sheriff of Roxburgh, 171 

Fencotes, Thomas de, chivaler, 53 

Fenton, Thomas de, 47 

Fenwick [Fenwyk], 70; manor of, 83; 
action for forcibly entering a close 
at, 80 

Fenwyk, Alan de, 49, 67*, 83; Alia- 
nora, 83; Anthony, 87; Archibold, 
de Rotherley, 82; Baldwyn, 88; 
Elizabeth, 83; daughter of George, 
of Brinkburn and his wife Alice, 26; 
wife of John de, 67* ; George, of Fen- 
wyke, 86 ; de Hertyrdon, 82 ; Henry, 



76, 78*; Sir Henry, 83; James, 'de 
Walyngton,' 82; Johanna, 83; John 
de, 50, 52, 64, 65, 67* ; executors of, 
67 ; John, and Elizabeth his wife, 
83; sen., 76; jun., 76; son of Alan 
de, 56-58; de Fenwyk, 71; son of 
Alan de, 58; de Gunwarton, 70; 
de Walyngton, 80, 86; Margaret, 
wife of Alan de, 69; granted 
advowson, etc., of Ingram, 83; 
executors of, 88; Maria, 83; 
Peter de, and Elizabeth his wife, 
51 ; Ralph, 88 ; Robert, 55 ; of Chib- 
burn (?), and wife Matilda, execu- 
tors, 85; Roger, 82; de Harle, 76; 
Thomas de, 57; a seal of, 171; and 
Johanna his wife, 56, 58* ; of Little 
Harle, 85, 87; Walter, 88; William 
de, and wife Juliana, 52; William, 
son of, 52 ; ' de Herterton/ 82 (see 
also Frewyck) 

Ferlington, arms of, 94 

Fernelowe, action for depasturing 
cattle at, 88 

Fetherstonhalgh, suits respecting land 
in, 46 ; trespass at, 69 

Fetherstonhalgh [Fetherstonhalfe], 
Alexander de, 55, 69, 70; George, of 
' Hautewesill,' 79; John, of Stan- 
hope, 86; Patrick, of ' Hautewes- 
will/ 79; Piers de, seal of, 170; 
de Fetherstonhalgh, Richard, 75; 
Thomas de, sen., 46; son of Thomas 
de, 45 

Fishburn [Fisburne,Fisseburn, Fisshe- 
burn], Isabella, wife of John de, 52 ; 
Simon de, seal of, 171; Thomas de, 
183 

Fitz Roger, arms of, 93 ; and Claver- 
ing, arms of, 183 

Fitzwilliam of Grimthorpe, 172; John, 
and Elizabeth his wife, 88 

Flammaville, Roger de, 3; Alina, 
daughter of, 3 ; William de, 3 

Fleming, earls of, 94 

Fleshhewer, Thomas le, of Alnwick, 43 

Florison, John, de Etale, 45 

Folberry, John, 69; Roger, 27; Wil- 
liam, 82 (see also Fowberry) 

Forcett, Yorkshire, x 

Ford, manor of, 84 ; gift of, 51 ; suit 
respecting, 49; tenements in, 53; 
church, action respecting right of 



presentation to, 84; George Heron 
presented to, 84; "rectors, Kobert 
Heron, 51; William de Middelton, 
49 ; Anthony St. Quintin, 70 

Ford, Thomas, son of William de, 46; 
William de, 57 

Forester, John, 47 

Forsett, Thomas, rector of Catton, co. 
York, 80; son of John de, 46; 
W T alter de, and Melore his wife, 59; 
son of Thomas de, 59 

Forster, arms of, 93; Kobert, de 
Fylton, 78; E. H., and another, 
report on 1909 excavations at 
Corbridge, 205 ; Thomas, ' de Eddir- 
ston,' 81; ' de Wenslawe/ 67 

FORTIS, on lamp, 224, 271 

Fortune, figure of, 232 

Fowberry, action respecting third part 
of manor of, 82 (see also Folberry) 

Fox, John, de Dichand, 70 

Framlington, action respecting castle 
of, etc., 71; lands in, 2; inquisition 
held at, 5 ; east, action respecting, 
64; Long, x 

Framlington, Margaret de, 4 ; Wil- 
liam de, 2 ; his daughter Beatrice, 2 

Freman, William, de Whickham, and 
Isolda his wife, 53 

Frewyck (? Fenwick or Trewick), Gil- 
bert de, 50 

' Friction matches,' xviii 

Frisel, William, ' de Magna Babyng- 
ton,' 50 

Frysmares, Alicia, 59; Matilda, 59; 
Peter de, 59; Thomas de, seised of 
a house in Newcastle, 59; William 
de, 59 

Fulthorp, Roger de, 54; seal of, 171; 
and Elizabeth his wife, 69 ; Thomas 
80 

G 

Galoun, Robert, ' de Spyndeliston,' 

and Maria his wife, 50 
Gascoigne, William, and son Richard, 62 
Gaugy, arms of, 170; Ralph de, grant 

ny, Uo 

Gaunt, William, of York, 79 
Gaynesburgh, John de, 49 
Gebley, John, clerk, 19 
Germanus, prior of Durham, papal 

bull to, 193 



Gesemue, Adam de, 185 
Gibbeson, Richard, 46; William, 57 
Gill, E. Leonard, presents coin, xx 
Gilsland, x ; ' King's stables ' at, xii 
Glanton, John de, 45; Robert de, 3; 
Idonea, widow of, 3 (see also Glon- 
ton) 
Glanville, arms of, 95; Ranulph de, 

95 

Glasgow Archaeological Society, x 
Glontone, dom. Robert de, witness to a 

grant, 5n 

Gobyon, Alicia, 55 ; Hugh, gift of land 

in ' Northhorseleye,' 55 ; sir Hugh, 

arms of, 171; Maria, 55; Roger, of 

' North horseleye/ 55* 

Goldesburgh, Richard, 70; Johanna 

his wife, 68, 71, 74 
Golyghtley, John, 88 
Gorges, Frances, daughter of William 

of Alderton, 26 
Gosebeck, arms of, 92 
Gosforth, Heselrig property at, 17; 
trespass at, 69; north, rents in, 53; 
ruined Norman chapel at, 199; 
south, land in, 56; advowson of 
church and manor of, 65 ; presenta- 
tions to, 65; an ancient deed relat- 
ing to Haddrick's mill at, xx 
Goswick, arms of, 92 
Gowre, Thomas, and Anna his wife, 

88 

Graffiti found at Corstopitum, 270 
Graham, David, a seal of, 171; Nich- 
olas de, 24 

Grangemoor, land in, 52 
Gray [Grey], arms of, 93; of Chil- 
lingham, arms of, 175; of Horton in 
Glendale, shield of arms of, 185 ; 
of Newcastle, etc., shield of arms of, 
185 ; David, 55 ; Richard de, shield of 
arms, 185; sheriff of Northumber- 
land, etc., 185; Thomas, de Heton, 
chivaler, 69; William, of Hebburn, 
co. Durham, 185 

Graystok [Graystoke, Greystock], 
Johanna, wife of William de, 57 ; 
John, 82; Ralph, 81; baron of, 69; 
William de, 52 ; gift to, of manor of 
Clifton, 51 
Great Whittingtoii, action concerning 

land at, 64 
Green, see Grene 



INDEX. 



285 



Greenwell, rev. William, seals in pos- 
session of, 90; gfift of Eoman 
inscriptions from Lanchester, etc., 
xviii 

Grene, Agnes, 87; William, 87 

Grenville, Nicholas, a seal of, 171 

Gretham, Thomas de, 56, 58, 62 

Gretheved, Richard, 59, 69 ; and Agnes 
his wife, 59, 60; Thomas, 53; W T il- 
liam, a burgess of Berwick, 55 

Gretword de Neweton, W T illiam, 67 

Greville, Dorothy, 26 

Grey, see Gray 

Greystock, see Graystock 

Griffin, Bridget, daughter of sir 
Thomas, of Braybrook, 25 ; her hus- 
bands, 25 

Griffith, Thomas, 68 

Gryndale, Marmaduke de, claimed 
land in ' Crauncemore/ 52 

Guidoms, John, son of, 55 

Gunnarton,manorof,54; [Gunwarton], 
suits concerning lands in, 47, 60 

Gunwarton, William de, 52 

Guyzance, suits respecting land in, 
44, 45 

Gynour, Idonia, daughter of Adam, 
56 



Haddrick's mill, Gosforth, an old deed 
relating to, xx 

Haggerston [Hagerston, Hagirston], 
Robert, 81; Thomas, of Hagerston, 
78, 81 ; William de, and Editha, his 
wife, 49 

Hailson, John, gravestone of, 20ln 

Haliwell, trespass at, 54 

Halliwell, see Halywell 

Halnaby, Halnathus de, executor of, 
66 

Halsham, John de, and Philippa his 
wife, 64 

Halton, Anglian thane of, 1; manor 
of, 186; tower, shield of arms on, 
186 

Halton, John de, arms of, 172; sheriff 
substitute and sheriff of Northum- 
berland, 186; Robert de, arms of, 
186; and Carnaby, shield of arms of, 
186 

Haltwhistle-burn, discoveries at, x, xii 



Halywell, Robert de, 59; Roger, son 
of John de, 52 ; William, 63, 64, 71 ; 
son of Roger de, 54 

Hambletori, 1'orks, manor, etc., of, 35 

Hambustan, William de, 57 

Hameby, John, son of Robert, 46 

Hanemere, David de, 60 

Hanlay, Robert, and Beatrice his 
wife, 57 

Hannesone, John, de Witton, near 
Hartburn, 52 

Hansard, Richard, 79; Robert, 78 

Hanville, arms of, 93 

Harbottle, trespass at, 54 

Harbotell, Guichard, of Preston, 84; 
John, 88; son of John, 80; Robert, 
67 ; Thomas, son of John, 80 (see also 
Herbotell) 

Harbrugh, John de, 76 

Hardyng, John, 75; William, 74; of 
Newcastle, 78 

Hareng, Robert, seal of, 172 (see also 
Heron) 

Harnham, action respecting manor of, 
64 

Harrington, arms of, 94; John, 81; 
Robert, 81* 

Harrison [Harry son], Christopher, 84; 
George, 85; John, jun., of ' Har- 
lough,' 85; of ' Wykeham/ co. Dur- 
ham, 87; Matthew, of Knarysdale, 
84 ; ' general Plantagenet/ his ex- 
tracts from the public records, 42; 
his history of Yorkshire, 42; 
Richard, of ' Wykeham,' co. Dur- 
ham, 87; Rowland, of Knarysdale, 
84; William, dericus, 87 (see also 
Henryson, Herryson) 

Hartburn, Northumberland, action for 
assault at, 82 

' Hartlow, sire Michel de,' arms of, 
172 

Harton, 192* 

Hartside, suit concerning manor of, 46 

' Hartwraton,' 78 

Hasand, lands in, 86 (see also Hay- 
send) 

Haslerigg, Bertinus, sold Eslington, 
etc., 20; Miles, 20 (see also Hesilrig, 
etc.) 

Hastyngs, Edmund, 71; Francis, 86; 
son of Roger, 85 ; Sir Ralph, and 
Isabel his wife, 117 n ; Roger, 82 



286 



INDEX. 



Hatfield, Thomas de, bishop of Dur- 
ham, a grant of, xxi 
Hauk de Kirkeleventon, John, 74 

Haukewell [Hawkeswill, Haukswell], 
Cristiana, daughter of John de, 57; 
Nicholas, son of John de West, 43; 
Robert de, 44; William de, 43 

Hay, John, son of Richard del, 56; 
Mariota, wife of Hervey de la, 44 

Haydonbridge, etc., actions respecting 
land in, 82; respecting bridge at, 
70; respecting trespass at, 75, 76 

Haydon de Newcastle, John, 69 

Haysend, Hugh de, witness to a grant, 
5/ ; William, 62 

Hayton, Adam de, 50 

Hebburn, 192*; suit respecting land 
in, 45 

Hebburn [Heburn], arms of, 92; 
shield of arms of, 176; Margery, 
daughter of William de, 45; Ralph, 
of Hebburne, 84 (see also Hibburne) 

Heddon-on-the-Wall, x; bequest to 
poor of, 36; tenements in, 53 

Hedgeley moor, 96 

Hedlam de Gatisheved, Peter de, 65 

Hedwin, see Hydwyne 

Hedworth, John, of ' Harrerton,' co. 
Durham, 85 

Heliat, Thomas, son of Roger, 58 

Helmesley, Robert de, 46 

Helton, William de, 60 

Henry the second, an undated charter 
of, 193 

Henryson, Adam, 62; John, 62; de 
Stanton, sen., 74; jun., 74; Roger, 
68; Rouland, 56; [Henrisson], Wil- 
liam, son of William, 55 

Heppiscotes, trespass at, 55 

Heppiscotes, William de, 47, 55 

Hepple, Anglian thane of, 1 ; shield of, 
arms of, 183 

' Herald,' a female Christian name, 25 

Herbotell, Robert, 67, 76; de Preston 
77 ; Thomas, 76, 79 

Hereford, Agnes, wife of William de, 
56; Roger, son of Richard de, and 
Johanna his wife, 47 

Heriz, arms of, 91 

Herlawe, John de, clerk, 49* 

Herle, Isabella, wife of Robert de, 44* ; 
Robert de, 43; seal of, 172- William 
de, 41*. 45* 



Heron [Heryng, Heyron, Heroun, 
Herun], arms of, 91; Adomar, son 
of Thomas, 51; Andrew, 53; Edward, 
63; Elizabeth, daughter of William, 
48* ; Emeline, 51 ; George, clericus, 
presented to Ford, 84; Gerard, 
chivaler, 67; Isabel, 117?i ; John, 53, 
60; sen., 63*; son of William, 61; 
late of Acomb, 82 ; late of Chipchase, 
78 ; late of Forde, 78 ; de Thornton, 
63 ; Margaret, 117?; ; Nicholas, and 
Katherine his wife, 73 ; Richard, 70 ; 
sir Odynell, arms of, 172 ; Robert, 53 ; 
parson of Ford, 51 ; Roger, 53*, 60 ; 
and Margaret his wife, 117 n ; Thomas, 
53, 60, 65; Walter, 51, 53, 63; Wil- 
liam, 57, 60*, 61-63, 84; seised of 
manor of Ford, etc., 84; sir William, 
51; W T illiam, son of John, 59; son of 
Roger, 73, 74; and Isabella his wife, 
49, 53; son of William, 48; dom. 
W 7 illiam, witness to a grant, 5n (see 
also Hareng) 

Herryson, John, de Ray, 78; de West 
Lilburn, 77 ; Robert, and Elena his 
wife, 71* (see also Harryson, Henry- 
son) 

' Hertesheved,' manor of, 59 

Hertlawe, arms of, 93 

Hertwayton, Elene, daughter of, 59; 
Juliana de, 52 ; Thomas de, 52 

Hesilrig [Hasylrygge, Heselrigg, Hesyl- 
rigge, Hesilrigge], 19; property at 
Gosforth, 17 ; account of family of, 
28; arms of, 92; of Eslington, pedi- 
gree of, 24 et seq.; arms, 24; Anne, 
25; Anthony, 25; sir Arthur, bt., 21, 
22; and Mr. Collingwood, 29, 30n; 
died in tower, 23, 26; buried at 
Noseley, 23; wife Dorothy, 26; n, 
marriage articles of, 22; sir Arthur 
Grey, bt., of Noseley, 26; Bertinus 
alias Bartholomew, of Noseley, 21 ; 
inquisition on death of, 21; and Anne 
his wife, 25; Donald de, 57, 60; and 
wife Frances, 26; sir Donald de, 24; 
wife Joan de Bredon, 24; Edith, 25; 
Edmund, 19, 24, 60; Edward, and 
wife Anne, 25; 'Herald,' 25; Eliza- 
beth, wife of William, 25 ; John de, 
24*, 25, 66, 117; captured at Stirling, 
24; Katherine, 25; Mary, 25, 26; 
Miles, 21, 25; and wife Bridget, 25; 



INDEX. 



287 



Millicent, 25 ; Robert, 25* ; and wife 
Elizabeth, 25; sir Roger, and wife 
Margaret, 117; Simon de, 28; 
Thomas, 24, 77, 117; baptized at 
Whittingham church, 18; married 
Isabella Heron, 24, 117 and ;; ; inqui- 
sition at Newcastle, 18, 118; death 
of, 19, 118; n, 24; wife Mabilla, 24; 
in, 20, 25 ; wife Lucy, 25 ; iv, death 
and burial of, 21 ; Ursula, wife of, 21, 
25 ; Thomas, son of John, of Din- 
nington, 69; sir Thomas, bt., 21; 
death of, 22 ; buried at Noseley, 22 ; 
inquisition on death of, 22; 2nd bt., 
23; 3rd bt., and wife Elizabeth, 26; 
4th bt., and wife Frances, 26; 
Walter, 25; William, 19, 24, 25, 60; 
marriage of, 20 ; lands of, in Gambols, 
24 ; commissioner of array for North- 
umberland, 17 ; his tenants of Swar- 
land, 32; inquisition on death of, 19 

Heslop, R. O., presents old railway 
ticket, xix 

Hethpool, suits relating to tenements 
in, 47, 53 

Heton, actions respecting third part of 
manor of, 82 ; for depasturing cattle 
at, 63 

Heton, Alayn de, 83; arms of, 172; 
seised of Ingram manor, 82; Alina, 
wife of Adam de, 46*; Elizabeth, 
79; Henry de, 60, 66; Johanna, 79; 
Margaret, 79 ; Thomas, 79 ; Thomas, 
son of Thomas de, 57; William, son 
of Alan de, 57 

Heugh, bequest to poor of, 37 ; action 
for depasturing cattle at, 63 

Hewbanke, George, of Carville hall, 
gravestone of, 200 and n 

Hewetson, Robert, 50 

Heworth, 192* 

Hexham monastery, seal of, 137 ; Wil- 
liam, prior of, 71 

Hexham, Thomas de, 58* 

Heynyng, John, de W T est Matfen, and 
Alicia his wife, 74 

Hibburne, Agnes de, 71 

High Callerton, see Callerton High 

Hilton castle, shields of arms on, 177 

Hilton, shield of arms of, 186; Alex- 
ander, son of Robert de, 45*; and 
Elizabeth his wife, 43, 45 ; Alexander 
de, 57; and wife Matilda, 54, 56; 



Robert de, 44, 59, 84; William de, 
63, 84* (see also Hylton) 

Hindmarsh, Richard, gravestone of, 201 
and n 

Hoctun, Henry de, seal of, 175 

Hodgson, J. Crawford, ' On the 
Medieval Owners of Eslington,' 1; 
obituary notice of rev. John Walker, 
273; pedigree of Widdrington of 
Cheeseburn grange, 34 

Hodham, Agnes, wife of Patrick, 70, 
71 

Hodley, John de, and Julia his wife, 68 

' Hoghton juxta Rouchester,' suits res- 
pecting land in, 48; action relating 
to trespass at, 48 

Hoghton, William de, 63; and Maria 
his wife, 44 (see also Hoctun, Hough- 
ton) 

Holland, count of, a claimant for Scot- 
tish throne, 183 

Holden, Isaac, and the lucifer match, 
xix; Thomas, and Elizabeth his 
wife, 72, 73 

Holhouse, action for entering close at, 
84 

Holthale, Roger de, 48 ; son of Walter 
de, 48 (see also Howtell) 

Holy Island, a ' bodle ' from, pre- 
sented, xx (see also Sacra Insula) 

Holywell, see Haliwell, Halywell 

Homaldon, William de, 65 

Home, arms of, 172 

Homildon, near Wooler, 69 

Homildon Hill, 96 

Honorary members, xxiii 

Hoo, Thomas, 80 

' Hooleran,' action respecting land in 
84 

Horns of Moses, 181 

Horsbroke, William, late of Ayden, 76 

Horsley, trespass at, 57 ; near Felton, 
suit concerning land at, 43, 44; 
north, gift of lands in, 55 

Horsley family, arms of, 92; held 
Thernam, 188 ; Cuthbert, and 
Elizabeth his wife, 88; Roger, 
seal of, 172; John de, 68; son 
of Thomas de, 69; Margery, 68; 
Roger de, entailed manor of Ulcester, 
68; sen., and Elena his wife, 68, 69; 
jun., and wife Johanna, 68, 69; 
Thomas de, 68; of Newcastle, 71 



288 



INDEX. 



Horton, action for forcibly entering 

close at, 85 
Hotham, Hugh de, 49 
Houghton, John de, and John his son, 

51 (see also Hoghton, Hoctun) 
Hounton, Peter de, 67* 
Housesteads, Roman lime-kiln at, xii 
Howell. John, 81 
Howtell, suit concerning a house in, 

47 (see also Holthale) 
Huchenson [Huchonson, HuchounsonJ. 

John, 62; ' de Seton in the Vale, 

70; William, 59 
Huddoswell, William de, 64 
Huddleston [Hudeleston, HuddilstonJ. 

lords of Millom, arms of, 94; John, 

80; and wife Maria, 83 
Hudspeth, action for trespass in, 47 
Hunter, John, de Heddon, 62; Wil- 
liam, 48 

Huntercombe, arms of, 170 
Hussber, John, 6 
Button, arms of, 94; Mrs., of Popleton, 

bequest to, 36 
Hydwyne, etc., action for forcibly 

entering close at, 85 
Hydwyne, John, late of Shelhall, 81 
Hylton, Kalph, and Elizabeth his wife, 

82; Thomas, 'de Tynmouth,' 88 
Hynghowe, Nicholas de, 60 



Ibbotessone, John, de Fenrother, 46 
Ilderton, etc., suit respecting lands in, 67 
Ilderton, arms of, 93; Thomas, de 

Ilderton, 72 (see also Elderton) 
Impyngton, Edmund de, and Edmund 

his son, 51 
Ingram, manor of, 82 ; suits respecting 

half of, 83; respecting lands, etc., 

at, 45, 75 ; action respecting right of 

presentation to church of, 82 ; rectors 

of, 82, 83 

Ingoe, see Yngowe, Hynghowe 
Insula, Robert de, seal of, 173; 

' de Wodeburn/ 47 ; son of John de, 

56 ; Peter de, seal of, 173 
Intagli found at Corstopitum, 224 
Iperlyng, see Yperlyng 
Iron, 'pig' of, discovered at Corsto- 

pitum, 206, 240 
Irton, John, 82; and others, grant of 

moiety of Ingram rectory to, 83 



Jacson, Robert, de Horton, and Alicia 

his wife, 70 

James, John, of Humbledon, 78 
IANVF, a Roman potter's mark, 270 
Jarrow, monks of, 192; grant of vill 

of, 192 

Jarrow account rolls, 193 
Jeklowe (?), Bertram, of Newcastle, 

merchant, 86 
Jenison, Barbara, daughter of sir 

Ralph, of Elswick, 39 
Jesmond, action for taking goods, 

etc., at, 82; St. Mary's, a ruined 

Norman chapel at, 199 (see also 

Gesemue) 

Johanson, Thomas, 57 ; William, 71 
Johnson, Maria, late wife of William, 

75; Robert, 57; William, 77 
Joiners' Company of Newcastle, pre- 
sents coats of arms, xix 
Jonson de Wodryngton, Alicia, wife of 

Richard, 57 
Jole, Robert del, 57 
Justus, a Roman potter, 270 



Karliolo, Alicia de, 69; Thomas de, en- 
tailed manor of Swarland, 69; de 
Novo Castro, 45 
Keeble, Walter, of Humberston, Milld- 

cent, wife of, 25 
' Keilder Hay,' in Tyndale, 37 
Kenton, action respecting waste at, 

71 ; Hesilrig property at, 17 
Kepier hospital, grant to, presented, 

xxi 

Keresley, action respecting land in, 82 
Key, a 'bronze, etc., presented, xviii 
Kibblesworth, Richard de, arms of, 173 
Kilham, manor of, 54 ; land in, 50 (see 

also Kylham) 

Killingworth, see Kyllingworth 
Kirkeby, William, son of Andrew de, 

44 

Kirklawe, manor of, 58 
Kirkton, Liellus, son of Agnes de, 73; 
Ordinellus, son of Agnes de, 73, 74 
Kirton, Jordan, son of Agnes de, 73, 74 
Kneshawe, William, ' de Redlehall,' 69 
Knowles, W. H., 'On the Church of 



INDEX. 



289 



the Holy Cross, Wallsend/ 191 ; and 

another, report on 1909 excavations 

at Corstopitum, 205 
Knyght, Leonard, 81 
Kok, Robert, abbot of Alnwick, 67 
Kyllngworth, Adam, de Kyllyngworth, 

73; George, 87; Henry, 87; John, 

87; Richard, 87; William, 87*; 

seised of land in Byker, 87 
Kylvyugton, John de, 53 
Kyneton, action respecting manor of, 

70 
Kyngesfeld, John de, 60 



Lacy, earl of Lincoln, arms of, 173; of 
Folkton, arms of, 173; of Northum- 
berland, arms of, 173 

Lakynby, John de, 62 

Lambe, John, ' de Blakallerton/ 54; 
de Wolsyngton, 74 

Lambton, arms of, 92; John, 76; 
Robert de, 47; Robert, 75, 76; 
Thomas, 82; de Lambeton, 80; Wil- 
liam de, 47; William, 71, 74*, 75; 
jun., 70* 

Lamplough [Lamplogh], arms of, 93; 
George, 82, 83; Nicholas, 82, 83; 
Thomas, seised of Weteslade manor, 
83; wife Alianora, 83 

Lancaster, John, 75 

Lanchester, Roman inscriptions from, 
presented, xviii 

Lane, William, and wife Bridget, 25 

Lang, John, ' de Parva Rile/ 74; Wil- 
liam, ' de Cloghfeld/ 67 

Langelathorp de Richmond, John, 64 

Langton, Thomas, of Wynyard, arms 
of, 173 

Lasceles, David de, 53; Elena, 53; 
John de, 53; his lands in Ellington, 
53 ; Matilda de, 53 

Latimer, arms of, 93 

Laton, Andrew de, 56 ; John, de East 
Harlsey, 77; de Saxhow, 78; Nicho- 
las, of ' Dodyrhow/ co. York, 78 ; 
Robert de, 43; William de, 61; and 
Isabella his wife, 61 

Launde, Walter de la, 45 

La we, John, of Newcastle, 71 

Lawson, Catherine, daughter of Wil- 
liam, of Little Usworth, 38; George, 
and George his son, 88; Henry, 88; 

3 HER. VOL. vr 



James, 86; John, of Bywell, 64; 
Robert, and Margery his wife, 88* ; 
\Villiam, 80; of Cramlyngton, 81 

Lax, Thomas, 62 

Laynge, John, dericu*, 82 

Ledgard, Dorothy, 36 ; John, bequest 
to, 36; sir John, of Ganton, and wife 
Frances, 35 ; Thomas, bequest to, 36 

Legh, John, de Isale, co. Cumberland, 
76 

Leicestershire, inquisition concerning 
lands in, 19 

Leland's visit to Northumberland, 20 

' Lengeton/ land in, 59 

Lesbury church, tombstone in, 175 

Liddell, sir Henry, 3rd bt. of Ravens- 
worth, bought Eslington, etc., 27 

Lilburne, west, 77 

Lilburne [Lilleburne], arms of, 93 ; 
Edward, of Shawden, 79 ; John de, 
50, 53, 54, 63; and Katherine his 
wife, 48*, 60; de Shaweden,' 76, 78, 
79; Thomas, executor of, 76; Wil- 
liam, son of John de, 48*; Kath- 
erine his wife, 48 ; late of Neweton, 82 

Lincoln, John de, 64; William de, 183 

Lindsey, sir David de, seal of, 173; 
sir Simon de, arms of, 173 

Linford, Thomas, rector of St. Ed- 
mund's in Gracechurch Street, be- 
quest to, 37 

Lisle, Anna, widow of William, 87; 
Otewell, f de Temple Thornton/ 85; 
Thomas, ' de Ogle/ 85; Robert, 87 
(see also Lyall) 

Litster, John, 61 (see also Lyster) 

Littelwhite, Thomas de, seised of land 
in ' Bollesdon/ 49 

Lodelowe, Thomas de, 60 

Loffirni, a Roman potter, 270 

Lokewode, John, de Sutton sub Whit- 
stonclyffe, 75 

Lomeley, W T aleranus de, mayor of New- 
castle, 49 

London, Guildhall museum, rude figure 
in pottery in, 226 ; ' St. Edmund's in 
Gracious Street/ rector of, 37 

Loraine, sir Lambton, deed poll of, 173 

Louis, prof., 241 

Lovell, Hugh, 43* 

Lowther, arms of, 94; [Louther], 
Nicholas de, de Novocastro, 49 

Lucker, shield of, 183 

19 



290 



INDEX. 



Lucy, arms of, 92 

Ludlow, see Lodelowe 

Lain ley castle, shields of arms on, 
177, 179 

Lumley, John, and Mabilla his wife, 
85; John, clerk, of St. Mary's, Jes- 
mond, 82; Marmaduke, 49; seal of, 
173; Walran de, 49; William, 76 
(see also Lomeley) 

Lyham, suit respecting manor of, 45 

Lyham, William de, 45 

Lylburne de Bamburgh, Eobert, 80 
(see also Lilburn) 

Lysle, Humphrey, and Anna his wife, 
87; John, 65; Nicholas de, 65; 
Otewele de, and wife Isabella, 65; 
jun., presented to South Gosforth 
church, 65; Percival, 87; Eobert de, 
seised of advowson of South Gos- 
forth chapel, 65 ; de Newcastle, 71 ; 
de Ogle, William, 85 (see also Lisle) 

Lyster de Carliolo, John, jun., 66 (see 
also Litster) 

Lythegreins, John, seal of, 183 ; 
sheriff of Northumberland, 183 

M 

Macrell, Eobert, 85 

Madyson, Eoland, and Maria his wife, 
88; William, 88 

Maghane, John, de Langle, 67 (see also 
Maughan) 

Mallesone, William, ' de Wessyngton/ 
56 

Maltravers, arms of, 94 

Mandeville, Geoffrey de, earl of Essex, 
arms of, 183 

Maners, Edward, 70, 74; Gerard, 78; 
John, 63, 69, 70, 72; and Alicia his 
wife, 64*, 66 ; and Margery, 67 ; son 
of Eobert de, marriage of, 62 ; John 
de Ettale, 75 ; Eobert de, 45, 47, 52 
Eobert, 78, 79; sheriff of Northum- 
berland, 79; jun., 80*; ' de Etall ' 
78; [Maner], dom. Eobert de, wit- 
ness to a grant, 5n; Thomas, 80*; 
earl of Rutland, arms of, 173 

Man field, x 

Manfyld, Lancelot, 88 

Mann, tombstone of, 201n 

Markham, sir Eobert, of Sedgebrook 
bt., and Mary his wife, 38 



Mar ley, John, of Gybsyde, 85; [Marie], 
William, 61 (see also Merley) 

Mars, figure of, on intaglio, 224 

Marshall, arms of, 93;. Christopher, 
88 

Martival, family of, 117/t; Eoger de, 
bishop of Salisbury, 117ft, 

Marton, John de, 70 

Martyn, John, 80 

Masham, William, presented to South 
Gosforth church, 65 

Matfen, manor of, 83 ; west, suit 
respecting manor of, 86 

Matfen, Thomas de, 52 

Matson, William, 59 

Mauclerk, Thomas, 43, 44 

Mauduit, Eoger, chivaler, 46 

Maughan, Eichard, 70 (see also 
Maghame) 

Meldon, manor of, 170; suit respect- 
ing, 44 

Melsonby, x 

Members, honorary, xxiii; ordinary, 
xxiii 

Menyll [Mennyll, Mennill], Alan de, 
52; Isabella, 61; wife of William, 
60; Thomas, 61; William, 61 

Menevill, John de, 50; and William 
his son, 50; John, son of Adam de, 
46; son of Thomas de, 56 

Mercury, figure of, 247; a clay statu- 
ette of, 271 

Merlay, Eoger, arms of, 90; seal of, 
174 (see also Marley) 

Merk, Alexander de, 59 

Merton, Eichard, late of Jesmond St. 
Mary, 82 

Metcalf, Leonard, and Agnes his wife, 
87; Eoger, 88 

Metford, Christopher, 87; Nicholas, 
executor of, 87; William de, 72 (see 
also Mitford) 

Mickeleye, John de, 47, 48 

Middelham, Alianora de, executor of, 
74; Margaret de Alnemouth, 74 

Middleton, Anglian thanes of, 1 ; 
land in, 59; near Belford, suits 
relating to land at, 43, 50; tene- 
ments in, 52 ; Morell, lands, etc., in, 

Middleton [Middelton, Myddelton], 
Craster and, shields of, 184; Gil- 
bert, arms of, 170; Gilbert de, cap- 



INDEX. 



291 



ture of, 24; John de, 43, 63, 64; 
John, 76; and Isabella his wife, 84; 
son of Alan de, and Ada his wife, 
43 ; son of George, 84 ; Patrick de, 
57*, 58; Peter, son of William de, 
44; Thomas de, 73; Thomas, 79; 
' de Cbeuelyngham/ 73, 74; Wil- 
liam de, rector of Ford, 49 

Milburn, north, action respecting, 71 

Mindrum, manor of, 56; land in, 52 

Minsteracres, etc., manors of, 79 

Minsteracres, Gilbert de, 54 

Mitford, actions respecting castle and 
manor of, etc., 64, 71*; Roger de 
Woderyngton, bailiff of, 55 

Mitford, Alexander, 67 ; Hugh de, 72 ; 
executors of, 66; John de, 67, 68, 
72; son of Alexander de, 68*, 72; 
Richard de, 66, 72; Thomas, son of 
Hugh, 69; William de, 66, 67; de 
Mitford, 72 (see also Metford, Myt- 
ford) 

Molesden, action respecting rent in, 
71 

Molyneux, Caryl, viscount, Anne, 
daughter of, 39 

Monboucher [Mounboucher], Bertram, 
47; and Cristiana his wife, 60*, 61, 
64 

Monkton, 192* 

Montague, Mrs., and Carville hall, 191 

Monylawes, land in, 59 

Moot-lawe, near Stamfordham, land 
in, 82 

Mora, John de la, and Elene his wife, 
62 

Moraiour, William, 56 

Mordaunt, John, 84 

' More, de la, in Wrytele/ manor of, 
56 

More, Nicholas, son of William de la, 
56; Robert, 70 

Moresby, Christopher, seised of 
Walker manor, 83; and wife Eliza- 
beth, 83 

Moreslawe, Thomas, late of Newcastle, 
78 

Morley, Thomas, 65 

Morpeth, seal of town of, 137 ; bequest 
to free school of, 37; suits concern- 
ing land in, 43, 87; trespass at, 57; 
for cutting down trees at, 82; for 
assault at, 85 



Mosegrave, Robert, of ' Royall/ 79 

Moses, the horns of, 181 

Mosforth, action respecting land in, 

Mould, Romano-British, 226 

Mousen, drengs of, 1 

Mowbray, Galfrid de, 50*; John, 
arms of, 174 

Mulcaster, arms of, 94 

Multon of Gilsland, arms of, 94 

Mury, Robert, 65 

Muschamp [Musco Campo, Muschance], 
of Barmoor, shield of, 175 ; Con- 
stancia, wife of William de, 61; 
George, of Bermour, 84; John, 60; 
Robert de, seal of, 174 ; Stephen de, 
50; Thomas de, 46, 50*, 53, 58; 
shield of arms of, 90 ; William de, 
50*; son of Roger, 54; of Barmore, 
78 

Musgrave, arms of, 94, 167 ; Richard, 
88; ' de Hertley,' 82 (see also Mose- 
grave) 

Mynster, Gilbert de, 45 

Mytford, Margaret, daughter of John, 



N 



Neale, Richard, and wife, 25 

Nedirton, John, 55 

Nesbitt, land at, 36, 185 

Netherton, suits concerning land in, 
48*, 49, 75 

Neville's Cross, David, of Scotland, 
taken prisoner at, 95 

Neville [Nevylle], Alexander de, 57; 
archdeacon of Durham, 60, 61; Ralph, 
earl of Northumberland, 79 ; Robert 
de, and Margaret his wife, 60; de 
Bagby, son of Hugh de, 61; son of 
Ralph de, miles, 59; Thomas, 79; 
son of Henry, de Cheuelyngham, 74 

Newbiggen, etc., suit concerning 
manor of, 49 ; 'of the More/ actions 
for depasturing cattle at, 74, 81 

Newbigging, John de, 59; Alicia his 
wife, 59 

Newbrough, etc., claim of land in, 46 

Newburgh, suit respecting manor of, 
88 

Newburn, x 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, seal of, 137; in- 
quisitions at, 18, 19, 22 ; mayors of : 



292 



INDEX. 



Waleran de Lomeley, 49 ; Koger de 
Thornton, 66; bailiff: William de 
Swynburne, 50 ; sheriff : Eobert 
Dudley, 170; Eobert Oliver, burgess 
of, 62 

Newcastle, suits concerning tenements 
in, 44, 47, 50, 51, 56, 59, 87; gift of 
a house, 66; actions for forcibly 
entering house at, 70; for assaults 
at, 47, 58*, 65* 

Newcastle castle, custody of, 185 
Newcastle churches, etc., St. John's, 
shields in windows of, 95; St. 
Mary's, Jesmond, John Lumley of, 
82 ; St. Mary del Westgate hospital, 
James, master of, 51 
Newcastle Joiners' Company, xix 
Newcastle and Carlisle railway, paper 

tickets used on, xix-xxi 
Newehagh, William de, 58* 
Neweham, manor of, 58 
Newland, suit respecting third part of 

manor of, 60 

Newminster, charter to, 4 
Newsham, actions respecting half of 
manor of, 61, 64; for cutting down 
trees at, 80 

Newton, etc., manors of, 79 
Newton, near Corbridge, action for 

depasturing cattle at, 76 
Nichols, Thomas of Hardwick, Anne, 

daughter of, 25 
Nicholson [Nicolson], Martha, 39- 

William, de Brankeston, 64 65 
Nickele, John de, 47 
Nobylson, John, 67 
Norays, Robert, 55 

North Mvl borne, action respecting, 64 
Northumberland, the armorials of 89 
el *eq. \ index to the, 99-135 ; extracts 
trom the c/r banco rolls relating to, 
41; seals of towns in, 135-137-' 
knights of shire for, 17; commi&l 
sioners. of array for, 17; Richard de 
Castro Barnardo, archdeacon of, 57 
sir Thomas Widdrington, M.P. for, 
38 ; sheriffs : John Lythegreins, 183 ' 
Richard de Grey, 185; John de Hall 
ton, 186 ; Robert Maners, 79* ; Henry 
SSfiTVr 1 ^ Thomas Surtees, 73; 
Robert Umfraville, 176 
Northumbrian churches, re-used 
Roman material in, 198; roll of 
arms, 90; derivative shields, 181 



Noseley, Leicestershire, manor of, 117 ; 

owners of, 117 and n 
Nostell, Robert Whirley, prior of, 70 
Novelle de Bamburgh, Henry, 72 
Norton, John, 70, 77 
Norwich, William de Alnwick, bishop 

of, 166 
Nydam finds, 272 



Obituary notice of the late Rev. J 

Walker, 273 

Ogle [Oggle], arms of, 94; lord, arms 
of, 171; Cuthbert, 81; presented to 
Bothal church, 88; Henry, his ten- 
ants of Eiglingham, 32; John, 87; 
son of Gilbert de, 50; John de, and 
Agnes his wife, 44 ; Mark, of Egling- 
ham, executors of, 87 ; Robert, mile* 
lord Ogle, seised of Bothal manor' 
88; Robert de, 47, 49, 67*; and 
Johanna his wife, 83; Thomas 31; 
William, 79; and wife Mary, 86 

Oliver, Robert, de Chester in the Strete 
75; a burgess of Newcastle, 62 

OMNIA vos, a fragment of pierced 
metal work from Corstopitum, 271 

Ord [Orde], badge of, 91, 175 ; Robert, 
and Alicia his wife, 54 

Ordinary of Northumbrian arms, 137- 
165; index to the, 164 

Ordinary members of the society xxiii 

Oswin W. F., presents old silk um- 
brella, xix 

' Gilbert de > 43 ' WilHam de, 



Otterburn, 96 
Overgrass, 80 
Ovingham, William Comyn de Bog- 

ham, parson of, 43 44* 
Ovyngham, Richard, '76 
Ovington, etc., manors of, 79 
Ovington [Ovyngtou], John of New- 

castle, sen. and jun., 78; of Ovyno-- 

ton, 72; Robert, son of Hugh, 62~ 
Owston in Allendale, suit respecting 

manor, etc., 88; bequest to poor of, 

P 

Pace, John, 64 

Page, Juliana, wife of Adam, 51; Wil- 

liam, 66 
Paget, Robert, 64 



INDEX. 



293 



Parker, William, gravestone of, 201n 

Paston, Northumberland, land, etc., 
in, 50, 53 

I'aternii*, a Roman potter, 

Paxton, David, seal of, 174; John de, 
62*; Robert de, 43; William de, 
and Margery his wife, 47* 

Peareth, arms of, 92 

Pearson, see Peirson, Person 

Pedigrees of Collingwood, 27; Hesel- 
rigg of Eslington, 24 et seq.; Wid- 
dringtons of Cheeseburn Grange, 34, 
38 et seq. 

Peel crag, Roman Wall at, xii 

Peirson, Christopher, dericus, 84 

Pele, Richard del, and Ivetta his wife, 
59 

Pembroke, Maria de, St. Paulo, count- 
ess of, 51 

Penreth, Thomas de, seal of, 174 

Pepper, Catherine, wife of Cuthbert 
of Farnton in Silksworth, 38; 
Christopher, bequest to, 37; Cuth- 
bert, bequest to, 36 : Margaret, 
bequest to, 36 

Percy, arms of, 94; Elizabeth, wife of 
Thomas de, jun., 64: Henry de, 66; 
earl of Northumberland, 75; de 
Atholl, 71, 72; Ralph, late of Aln- 
wick, miles, 78; sir Ralph, death of, 
96; earl, death of, ix 

Person, Adam, 55 

Petygreeve, John, assault on, 75 

Philip [Philyppe], Thomas, 70; of 
Newcastle, 62*, 63; William, 58* 

Philipson, Frances, of Elvett, bequest 
to, 35 

Pickering, see Pykering 

Pieroebridge, x 

'Pig' of iron discovered at Corstopitum,, 
206, 240 

' Pillowbeers,' etc., bequest of, 37 

Pinckney, arms of, 94 

Pisbusk, John, de Wessyngton, 56 

Plymouth, Thomas, earl of, and Ursula 
his wife, 38; Ursula, countess of, be- 
quest to, 37 

Plumpton, arms of, 94 

Pogden, Roger, 73, 74 

Ponteland, etc., actions respecting 
tenements, etc., near, 68, 71; church, 
shields of arms in windows of, 95, 
166; John de Eston, vicar, 67 



Pontop, Thomas de, 4; Johanna, 

daughter of, 4 
Potters' names found at Corstomtum 

270 

Pottes, Thomas, late of Clapton, 77 
Pratyman, Gilbert, 63, 64 
Prendirgest, Henry, 174 
Prendewyk, Alexander de, 59; Emma 

de, 59 ; Nicholas, held land in Aln- 

wick, 59 ; Elene his wife, 59 
Prentis, John, 58 
Presfen, William de, 54 
Pressen, Michael de, 50 
Preston (co. Durham), 192* 
Preston, William de, 46 
Prestwyk, William de, and wife Maria, 55 
Proctor, arms of, 93; fProctur], John 

' de Bothale/ 55 

Pudsey, bishop, charters of, 193 
Punchardon, Cristiana, 77*; Nicholas 

de, 77; rents given to, 60; Robert 

de, 77*; Thomas de, 77 
Pykering, Richard de, 44 

Q 

Quisine, Roger de la, 43 

R 

Railway tickets, old, xix-xxi 

Raine,- Francis George, minister of 

Wallsend, tombstone of, 200 and n 
Ramsey, George, of Bewick, Mary, wife 

of, 39 
Randall, Thomas, sizar of Christ 

church, Cambridge, 37 
Randolf, Thomas, 45 
Ratcliffe, John, seised of Matfen 

manor, 83; and wife Anna, 83; 

[Ratclyf], Nicholas, and Isabella his 

wife, 82 

Ravensworth, Yorkshire, x 
Rawe, le, action respecting land in, 70 
Rawelyn, Thomas, de Budill, 76 
Raymes, arms of, 93; of Aydon, ban- 
ner of, presented, xviii; Nicholas, 

62; [Rames], William, ' de Harn- 

ham/ 84 

' Recovery Rolls,' the, 41 
Rede, John, 45 ; Simon de, 57 ; 

W T alker, and Cecilia his wife, 43; 

William, son of Adam de, 54 
Redeware, Robert de, seised of land 

in ' Blackeddon,' 47 



294 



INDEX. 



Redman, arms of, 94 

Kedpath, suit respecting land in, 45 

Reed, see Rede 

Reffeley, Alexander, 69 

Renington, suit concerning manor ot, 
45 

Report for 1909, annual, ix; treas- 
urer's, xiv 

Reveleye, actions for taking cattle 
from", 63; [Ronely], respecting land 
in, 75 

Richard, Roger fitz, 183 

Richardson, John, 57; Walter, de 
Naffreton 72 

Richmond, JohndeBritann', count of, 43* 

Riddell, Christiana, daughter of sir 
William, 5 and n; Thomas, of Swin- 
burne castle, Mary, wife of, 40; 
[Ridel], William, seal of, 175 

Riddell-Blount, Edward, of Cheese- 
burn grange, 35 

Rihill, Michael, son of Thomas de, 48 

Robinson [Robynson], Adam, de Brad- 
ford, 61; John, 56, 64; tombstone 
of, 201n; de Callerton, 62; del 
Hugh, 61 ; de Wessyngton, 57 ; Rob- 
ert, de Cleveland, 62; Stephen, 74; 
Thomas de Callerton, 62 

Robson, J. Stephenson, presents old 
inlaid chest, xix 

Roddam, Anglian thanes of, 1 ; suit 
concerning lands in, 67 

Roddam [Rodham, Rodom, Rodum, 
Roddom, Rodoum], Adam de, 76*; 
Johanna, daughter of, 76*; Eliza- 
beth de, 54; John, 87; Margery, 
daughter of Thomas de, 56; Nich- 
olas de, 54, 77 ; William, son of Wil- 
liam de, 54 

Rodes, Agnes, executrix of Robert, 81 
Robert, 80 

' Roger, Rauf le fitz,' seal of, 171 
' Roger Roughlee,' 82 
Rogerson, Richard, 64 
Rokeby [Rokebye], Alan de, 59; 
James, 88 ; and Johanna his wife 
87, 88; Thomas de, 82; jim., 56 
Rokpotte, Katherine, 71; William, de 

Newcastle, executor of, 71 
Rollewod, Robert, of Newcastle, cook, 70 
Roman coins discovered atOorstomtum 
202, 220, 222, 231, 232, 238, 243, 244^ 



Roman material re-used in Northum- 
brian churches, 198 
Roman Wall, visit to, x 
Romano-British mould, Guildhall 

museum, 226 
Ronald, Richard, 54 
Rose, John de, Morpeth, 59 
Roseden, Henry, of Bilton, shield of 

arms of, 175 

' Roselos, Joan/ arms of, 175 
Ross of Hamlake, arms of, 93; of 

Wark, arms of, 93 
Roth bury, x ; inquisition at, 5 ; forest 

18 

Rothvyn, William, of Newcastle, 79 
Rouland, John, 57 
Rons, John, 55; [Rouse], Mary, wife 

of Edward, 25 
Rowe, Emma de, claimed land in Black 

Heddon, 55 
Roxburgh, constable of, 171 ; sheriff of 

171, 182 

Rudd, A. J., presents old deed, xxi 
Rushworth, John, of Lincoln's Inn, 35 
Ruthven, see Rothvyn 
Ryal, Little, land in, 87 
Ryil, Johanna de, 72* 
Ryland, John, 43 
Ryton, x; action respecting right of 

presentation to church of, 62 

S 

Sacra Insula, John de, vicar of Ber- 
wick, 66 

Sadelyngstanes, Hugh de, 56; and 
Agnes his wife, 49 

Sadington, Robert de, Joyce, wife of, 
117/t 

St. Carilef, bishop, William de, a 
grant of, 192 

St. John, Edward de, 60 

St. Paulo, Maria de, countess of Pem- 
broke. 51 

St. Quintin, Anthony de, rector of 
Ford, 70; John de, arms of, 175; 
Richard de, parson of Bothal, 55 

Salkeld, arms of, 94 

Salvayn, Roger, son of George, 52 

Sampson, Hugh, 62 ; John, 53 

Sanderson, George, of Temple Healey, 
Elizabeth, wife of, 40; Richard 
Burdon, death of, ix 

Santon, Thomas, 75 



INDEX. 



295 



Says, arms of, 183 

Scarlet, John, de Worlyng, 73 

' Scolitelgarth,' action for depasturing 

cattle at, 63 
Scott [Scot, Scotte], of Newcastle, 

Margaret, wife of Kichard, 66; 

Richard, de Mitford, 82 ; Thomas, de 

Belford, 75 

Scotia, Fergus, son of Adam de, 57 
Scots, destruction by, 19; besieged 

Alnwick, 95 
Scottish throne, count of Holland, a 

claimant for, 183 
Scremerston, suits respecting manor of, 

88 ; tenements in, 53 
Scrop, Henry le, chivcder, 54 
Seals, collections of, 90; of towns in 

Northumberland, 135-137 
Seaton Delaval, manor of, etc., 78, 80; 

action respecting, 69, 73; grant of 

lands at, 86; ruined Norman chapel 

at, 199 
Selby, Edmund, de Forde, 76, 77 ; lady, 

bequest to, 36; John de, 60 
Sergeant, John, de Newebyggyng, and 

Alicia his wife, 70 
Seton, John de, 73 
Settlingstones, see Sadelyngstanes 
Shafto [Shaftoe, Shaftowe], arms of, 

167 ; Agnes, daughter of William de, 

50; Cuthbert,de Shafto, 86; husband 

of Isabella, 87 ; John, 65 ; Katherine, 

wife of Robert, of Whitworth, 35; 

Mark, bequest to, 36 ; Robert, son of 

Thomas de, 50; sir Robert, and 

Catherine his wife, 38; Thomas de, 

50; William, of Bavington, 79; 

William de, and Isabella, his wife, 

50 
Sharperton, etc., action respecting 

lands in, 75 
Shepherd, Adam, de West Whelping- 

ton, 59; Hugh, 50; John, 64; Robert 

47 ; Roger, 47 
Shilbottle, etc., action for depasturing 

cattle at, 63 
Shilbottle, John de, 43 
Shiel-hall, etc., action respecting land 

in, 81 
Shilvyngton, suit concerning manor of, 

47 ; respecting land in, 44 
Shirley, sir Ralph, 25 
Shittlyngton, trespass at, 57 
Shroude de Richmond, Alan, 64 



Simson, see Symson 

Sisterne, John, jun., de Lyn, 62*, 63 

Siwardson de Wolloure, Robert, son of 

John, 44 

Skargill, William de, chivaler, 62 
Skelton, John, seised of Fenwyk manor, 

83 ; and wife Johanna, 83 ; Nicholas 

de, 51 ; [Skilton], John, 63 
Slaley, etc., action respecting land in, 

81 (see also Slely) 
Slegh, William, and Johanna his wife, 

Slely, Gilbert de, 45 

Slyngesbye, Peter, and Johanna his 

wife, 88 
Smetheton, Andrew de, and Margery 

his wife, 43 
Smith [Smyth], John, 31; Thomas, of 

Haydon bridge, 79; William, de 
j Emildon, 67 

Smythson, Henry, de Middleton, 64 
Societies exchanging publications, 

xxxiv 
Sokpeth, Robert de, shield of, 165; 

Thomas de, ' de Alnewyk,' 53 
Solace, Robert, 46 
Somerville, John de, 52; Philip, seal 

of, 175 ; heir of Roger de, 52 
Sotymull, Hugh, 47 
Soulby, William de, 59, 64; ' de 

Beverley/ 74 
Soureby, Richard de, 69; Robert de, 

69 

Southell, Anne, daughter of Henry, 25 
South Tyne, old deeds relating to land 

in, xx 

Spendelove, John, de Morpeth, 62 
Spindleston, suit respecting houses, 

etc., in, 81, 88 

Spraygroul, Adam, de Esshyndon, 52 
Spryng, Alesia, wife of John, 61 ; 

Henry, seal of, 175; of Houghton, 

executor of John Baliol, 183; seal 

of, 183 

Stabbe de Forde, Walter, 70 
Stamfordham free school endowed, 34; 

bequest to poor of, 36; actions for 

depasturing cattle at, 61, 63 
Standen, Thomas de, and Margaret his 

wife, 52 
Stannington, etc., action respecting 

half manor of, 68 
Stanton, action for depasturing cattle 

at, 74 



296 



INDEX. 



Stanton, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Thomas, her marriages, 25; John, 
son of Roger de, 57 ; de Sunderland, 
70; [Staunton], Robert, 19; Thomas, 
19; Elizabeth, daughter of, 20 

Stan wick, x 

Stapleton, Robert, son of Bryan of 
Mitton, Yorkshire, M.P. for 
Boroughbridge, 29 and n ; William 
de, 68 ; and Maria his wife, 67 

Statutes of the society, xxxvi; addi- 
tion to, xlii 

Stedeman, Adam, 63; [Stedman], 
Hugh, and Isabella his wife, 43 

Stephenson, Mrs. Margaret, xix 

Stokall, Richard, of Stanehall in 
Knaresdale, 79 

Strabolgi, David de, earl of Athol, 56- 
58; David, son of, 55* 

Strickland, Walter, of Flamborough, a 
bequest to, 36 

Strivelyn, John de, 55, 56; and Jacoba 
his wife, 56 

Strother [Strothre], Henry, sheriff of 
Northumberland, seal and arms of, 
175; Henry del, 57; William del, 
and Matilda his wife, 54 

Stuteville, arms of, 90; John de, a 
seal of, 175 

Styford, etc., manors of, 79 

Surtees [Surteys, Surtays], arms of, 
91; Alexander. 62; Goscelin, 59; 
Ralph, 53; Thomas, 59-61; sheriff 
of Northumberland, 73; of Dinsdale, 
84 

Sutheby, Roger, de Ulseby, 47 

Sutton, Margerie de, 81*; Oliver de, 
81 

Swarland, manor of, entailed, 69; 
tenants of, 32 

Swethop, Alina de, seised of land in 
Kilham, etc., 50 

Swinburne [Swynburne], arms of, 92, 
93; Agnes, wife of Alexander de, 
44; Alan de, 37, 44; John de, 49; 
John, 88; Isabella, wife of/ 84; 
Johanna, wife of, 82; Mary, daugh- 
ter of sir John, of Black Heddon, 




a3*, 84; shield of, 188; held manor 
of Chollerton, 188; Mariona his 



wife, 83; son of Alexander de, 44; 

son of Johanna, 87; son of William, 

49 
Swinhoe [Swynowe], Elizabeth, 66; 

William de, and Elizabeth his wife, 

66; William, 117 
' Syde, the,' claim of land in, 46 
Svmson, Robert, 56 



Tailboys [Taileboys], Lucas, 48; Wal- 
ter, 48, 75, 76; William, 48* (see 
also Taylboys, etc.) 

' Tallage,' 2 

Taillour, John de, 43 

Taylboys [Tayleboys], Henry, and 
Alianora his wife, 52; Robert, 47; 
William, 47 

Tempest, Isabella, wife of Richard, 
63; Rowland, 75; Richard, 66; 
William, 72 

Temple, de Bamburgh, Alan, 80; 
George, 80; Robert del, 63; Wil- 
liam 'del, 63 

Thanes and drengs, difference between, 
1 

Thernham, held by Horsleys, 188 (see 
also Thirnham) 

Thirkelby, Ralph de, and Cecilia his 
wife, 56 

Thirkeld, see Thrylkeld 

Thirlwall, action for depasturing cat- 
tle at, 76 

Thirlwall [Thirlewall, Thirlwal], arms 
of, 93; John de, 58, 66; son of 
Richard de, 56; Richard de, 58; 
seal of, 175; Rowland de Thirlwall, 
75, 76, 79, 80 

Thirnham, etc., action respecting 
lands at, 75 (see also Thernam) 

Thomasson de Middleton Morell, 
Roger, 57, 58 

Thomlynson, Anna, 88 

Thomson, John, late of Humbledon, 
78 (see also Tomson) 

Thorley, Robert, 71* " 

Thorney, Edith, wife of John, 25 

Thornton, nea.r Hnrtburn, action for 
trespass at, 47 

Thornton, shield of arms of, 166; 
John, 82; Roger de, 68, 75*, 82; 
burgess of Newcastle, 71; mayor of 
Newcastle, 66; executors of, 82; 
inquisition on death of, 18 



INDEX. 



297 



Thorny B . . ., lady Matilda, 46 
Threepwood, etc., action respecting 

land in, 82 

Threwold, Nicholas de, 66 
' Thristerton/ action respecting land 

at, 70 

Throckley, drengs of, 1 
Thrunton, manor of, 57*; lands in, 3, 

51 

Thrylkeld, Johanna, wife of Christo- 
pher, 86 

Thurton, etc., claim of land in, 46 
Thwangton, Simon de, prior of Tyne- j 

mouth, 44 
Todde, John, 54; Kobert, of Horsley- , 

burn, Weardale, 84 ; Roger, 54 ; 

Thomas, de Heton, 62; William, 77 j 
Topcliffe, arms of, 93, 175; [Topclyf], 

Walter, 64 
Togston, etc., action respecting lands, ; 

etc., at, 75 
Tomlinson, W. W., presents old rail- j 

way ticket, xx 

Tomson, John, de Killyngworth, 73 
Totwyth, suit concerning land in, 44 
Towyk, suit respecting land in, 84 
Travas, John, de Tetlord, co. Lincoln- 
shire, 76 

Trawe, John, of Newcastle, 66 
Treland, Bichard de, 57 
Trewick, arms of, 170, 174; shield of, 

185; Thomas de, 62 (see also ! 

Frewyck) 
Trockelawe, Eobert de, and Mary his 

wife, 50 

Tron, Thomas, 71 
Tunstall, Marmaduke, 87 ; Thomas, 

and Johanna his wife, 68 
Tur, William de la, 4 
Turpyn, George, de Qwytchester, 86; 

Nicholas, 85 ; Eichard, son of John, 

51 
Turvill, sir William de, Elizabeth, 

wife of, 25 

Twysill, suit concerning manor of, 49 
Twysilton, John de. and Alicia his 

wife. 58 
Tyndale, arms of, 93, 167; William de, 

49, 54 
Tyne, objects from the, presented, 

xviii ; dale, South, old deeds relat- 
ing to property in, xx 
Tynedeleye, manor of, 54 
Tynemouth, x; repairs at, x; monas- 



tery, seal of, 137; priors, 53, 71, 75, 
79 ; John, 80, 81 ; Simon de Thwang- 
ton, 44 

Tynemouth [Tynnen outh]. Peter de, a 
servant of the king, action for 
assault on, 74; William de, 193; 
Wallsend chapel leased to, 193 

U 

Ufford, earls of Suffolk, arms of, 93 

Ughtred, Thomas, 49 

Ulchester, manor of, entailed, 68; 
tenements in, 53 

Ullathorne, William, 66 

Umbrella, an old, presented, xix 

Umfraville [Umfreville], arms of, 93, 
167 ; Alianora, wife of Eobert de, 
48*, 49, 61; Elizabeth, 188; Gilbert 
de, 48, 54, 187; son of Eobert de, 
46, 49; earl of Angus, 54, 62; seal 
of, 187; lands of, to be distrained, 
54 ; Ingram de, seal of, 181 ; at Nor- 
ham and Newcastle, 181; sheriff of 
Eoxburgh, etc., 181; John de, lands 
of, to be distrained, 54; Odinel de, 
95; Eichard de, seal of, 176, 186; 
Eobert de, 58, 70-72, 75, 76; and 
Alianora his wife, 60; sheriff of 
Northumberland, seal of, 176; son 
of Eobert, 49; sir Eobert, seal of, 
176, 187; Thomas de, 53, 76*; son 
of Eobert de, 49*; sir Thomas, seal 
of, 176; of Harbottle, seal of, 187 

Unthank, tenements, etc., 53 

Urban, pope, a bull of, 193 



Vaux of Northumberland, arms of, 
176 ; Gilbert, de Thornburgh, 70 

Vavasour, arms of, 94 

Veres, arms of, 183 ; Alice de, 183 

Vesci [Vescy], arms of, 93; device on 
seals of, 91; John de, seal of, 176; 
Eobert, de Holywell, 52; William 
de, 95; son of Eobert, 54; William, 
de Newsham, son of, 48*; and 
Alicia his wife, 48 

Viaf'tr, a Eoman potter, 270 

Villers, , Margery, wife of, 25 

Vincent, see Vyncent 

Vipont, arms of, 167 ; earl of West- 
moreland, arms of, 94; Idonia, 
daughter of, 169 



298 



INDEX. 



Vispoiit, William, 67 
Vynceut, William, of Cowton, co. York, 
85 



W 



Walcher, bishop of Durham, grant of, 
192 

Walkefare, John, chivcder, and Eufe- 
mia, his wife, 49 

Walker manor, suit concerning, 58; 
Christopher Moresby seised of, 83 

Walker, John, of Stockton, inventor 
of the 'friction match,' xviii ; Rev. 
John, obituary notice of the, 273; 
Lawrence, 55 

Wallis of Knaresdale, shield of, 176 

Wallsend, church of the Holy Cross 
at, 191; lease of, 193; used till 
1797, 194; scene of adventure, 196; 
re-used Roman material, 198; grave 
covers at, 198; font of, 200; 18th 
century memorials, 200 ; communion 
plate, 203; coins found during ex- 
cavations at, 203 ; Alan, priest of, 
193; repairs to church, xii 

Walton, Adam de, 50 

Wallington, east, suit respecting land 
in, 46 

Walyngton, John de, 56; Robert, son 
of Richard de, 46 

Warde, Alicia, wife of Simon, 47; 
John, chivaler, and Amicia his wife, 
47 ;\ Robert, de Croft, 53 ; Simon, and 
Alicia his wife, 44 

\Varenford, tenements in, 53 (see also 
W a me ford) 

Wark in Tyndale, suit respecting 
manor of, 46 (see also W r erk) 

Warkeworth, John, 71 

Warkworth castle, shields on, 95 

Warmdene, lands at, 81 

Warneford, action respecting lands 
at, 84 

Warthecop, Robert de, parson of Wes- 
syngton, 56, 57 

Warton, Hugh de, 55 

Waselesegh de Brankeston, Adam, 45 

Washington, arms of, 166; Robert de 
Warthecop, parson of, 56, 57 ; [\Vas- 
syngton], Walter de, 44 (see also 
Wessyngton) 

Watson, R. T., tombstone of, 202 



Wawton, John, 17 

Wearmouth, John, de Eaton, parson 

of, 53 

Webbester, John, 47 
Wederyngton de Wederyngton, Henry, 

executrix of, 86 (see also Wodering- 

ton, Wyderington, etc.) 
Weetslade, see Weteslade, Wytteslade 
Weldon, Simon, of Weldon, 72; 

[Weltden], John, de Welteden, 84; 

Thomas of Newcastle, merchant, 

84; de Weltden, 81 
Welford, R., gifts to museum, xviii, 

xix 

Weltun, Simon de, seal of, 176 
Wendout, arms of, 94; John, 53; 

Robert, 52, 54 
Werk, John de, 66 
Wessyngton, Walter de, 72*; William 

de, 45 (see also Washington) 
Westoe, 192* 

Weston, Roger de, chivaler, and Mar- 
gery his wife, 68 
Westwyk, Hugh de, 60 
Weteslade, manor of, 83; south, Hesil- 

rig property at, 17 
Wetewang, Richard de, 44; Robert, 

son of Richard de, 51 
Wetewod, John, de Wetewod, 69 
Whelpdale, arms of, 92 
Whelpington, west, 53 
' Whesley/ etc., claim of land in, 46 
Whirley, Robert, prior of St. Oswald 

de Nostell, 70 
Whitburn, Richard de Wynchecombe, 

parson of, 59 
Whitchester, lands at, 36; action for 

forcibly entering close at, 85; suit 

respecting land in Hoghton, near, 

44 
Whitchester [Whitchestre], Elizabeth, 

wife of William de, 72, 73*; Henry 

de, 72; John de, 72*, 73; son of 

Robert de, 72; William de, 68*, 69; 

son of William, 69 

Whitehead, Nicholas of Boulmer, Mar- 
garet, wife of, 39; [Whitheved], 

Alan, 60 

White Kielder in Tynedale, 37 
Whitelaw, Alexander, present of 

photographs, xx 
Whithill, Alicia, wife of Walter de, 

44*; John, 44 



INDEX. 



299 



Whittingham, drengs of, 1 ; fair at, 
32; an inquisition at, 5; manor of, 
57* ; lands in, 3 
Whittington, Great, see Great Whit- 

tington 

Whittonstall, manor held by Dar- 
reyns, 183 ; action respecting, 60, 
61 ; trespass at, 46 
Whitwell, Robert, 80 
Whorlton de Wooler, John, 69 
Widdrington, of Cheeseburn grange, 
a pedigree of, 34, 38; Barbara, 39*, 
Catherine, 38, 39; n, 38; Dorothy, 
38 ; Edward, bequest to, 36 ; and wife 
Eleanor, 39; of Blackheddon, will of, 
36; bequests by, 37; wife Eleanor, 
37; Eleanor, 36, 38; Elizabeth, 39, 
40 ; Frances, 35, 38 ; Henry, and wife 
Eleanor, 40 ; of Hertford, 37* ; n, 38 ; 
in, 38, 39 ; iv, 39 ; sir Henry, 34, 37 ; 
of Cheeseburn grange, will of, 36 ; 
bequests by, 36 ;" of Blackheddon, 38 ; 
compounded as a delinquent, 38 ; 
death and burial, 38 ; wife Mary, 38 ; 
Katherine, 35; Jane, 39; John de, 
37*, 48; bequest to, 36; gift of 
Linton to, 184; seal of, 184; n, 39; 
Lewis, bequest to, 36 ; of Cheeseburn 
grange, 38; his wife Catharine, 38; 
his descendants, 38 ; n, 39 ; death of, 
39; Margaret, 37, 39; Martha, widow 
of Robert, bequest to, 37 ; Mary, 35- 
40; of Hertford, 37; Mary Anne, a 
nun at Bruges, 39 ; Nicholas, 35, 38 ; 
free of Newcastle Merchants Com- 
pany, 38; Patrick, 39; bequests to, 
36,37; Pepper, bequest to, 36; Ralph, 
bequests to, 36; D.D., 35, 38; of 
Cheeseburn grange, 37 ; will of, 37 ; 
bequest by, 37 ; of Christ church, 
Cambridge, will of, 37 ; bequests by, 
37 ; n, 39 ; in, 39 ; death, 39 ; iv, 40 ; 
his death, 40 ; and wife Anne, 40 ; 
Robert, bequest to, 36; and wife, 
Martha Nicholson, 39; Roger de, 48; 
Rowland, bequest to children of, 36; 
of Farringdon Without, London, 38; 
arms of, 38; Thomas, 38; death, 38; 
in, 39; iv, 39; sir Thomas, 37; 
speaker of House of Commons, 34, 
38 ; biographies of, 34 ; endowed 
Stamfordham school, 34, 38; will 
of, 35; bequests by, 35; of Cheese- 



burn grange, 38; death and burial, 
38 ; wife Frances, 38 ; Ursula, 
35, 36, 38 ; William, 30, 37 ; bequests 
to, 35, 37; of Cheeseburn grange, 
etc., 39; death and burial, 39; wife 
Barbara, 39; children, 39; n, and 
wife Ann, 39 (see also Wederyngton, 
Woderyngton, etc.) 

Wilkynson, John, 87; de Tynemouth, 
66; Lucia de Wolloure, wife of 
Thomas, 47; William, de Middelton, 
63 

William the lion, king of Scots, 95 

Williams, David, of Abergavenny, 
' Herald,' wife of, 25 

Williamson, Robert, 62 

Willington, 192; a reference to, in a 
charter, 193 

Winchoombe, see Wynchecombe 

Wingham, see Wyngham 

Witton, see Wotton, Wytton 

Wodcock, Thomas, de Bowes, 67 

Woderowe, John, 45 

Woderyngton, Alianora, 61 ; Cristina, 
61; Gerard de, 49, 56, 61; Henry, 
administratrix of, 85; John, 72*; of 
Wodryrigton, 80; Richard, 55; 
Robert, 76 ; Roger de, 49, 54, 55, 75 ; 
bailiff of Mitford, 55 ; and Elizabeth 
his wife, 61*, 73; de Herbotell, 76; 
de Wodryngton, executors of, 85 (see 
also Widderington, W'yderyngton, 
etc.) 

Wolloure, John de, 44 ; Thomas de, 46* 

Wolsingham, gift of land in, 55 

Wolsingham, Agnes de, 55; Gilbert, 
son of Roger de, 55; wife Aybella, 
55 ; Matilda de, 55 

Wolviston, gift of, 173 

Wombwell, Hugh de, 62 

Woodcock, see Wodcock 

Woodhorn, etc., suits concerning manor 
of, 49 ; land in, 43 

' Woofe Keilder Stoupe/ in Tyndale, 36 

Wooler, manor of, 58; actions concern- 
ing lands, etc., in, 44, 46*, 47, 53, 60, 
87 (see also Wolloure) 

Woollascott, Martin, of Woolhampton, 
Anne daughter of, 40 

Wotton, Robert, son of Adam de, 47 

Wra, John, de Newebygging, 75 

Wryght, Thomas, de Hexham, 70 

Wyderyng-ton [Wytherington], Gerard 



300 



INDEX. 



de 46, 47, 52; John de, 46, 67: de 
Chipchase, 82 ; Roger de, 46*, 47, 52 ; 
de Herbotyll, 77 (see also Widdring- 
ton, Woderyngton) 

' Wyfkasthel.es,' lands in, 86 

' Wyk,' manor of, 58 

Wykeston, Richard de, 45 

Wymmerslayde Rabeigh, Adam de, 56 

Wynchecombe, Richard de, parson of 
Whitburn, 59 

Wyngham, Henry de, 60 

Wytteslade, lands in, 86 

Wytton super Aquam, action respect- 
ing manor of, 68 

Wyvell, John, 82 



Yate, John del, 64 

Yngowe, John, 77 ; William, 77 

York, abbot of, 56; city, lands in, 36; 
bequest to poor of, 36; sir Thomas 
Widdrington, recorder and M.P., 38 

Yorkshire, General Plantagenet Harri- 
son's history of, 42 

Young, William, gravestone of, 201n 

Younghusband, Bertram, and Isabella 
his wife, 84 ; John, de Budell, 76 

Yperlyng, John, and Isolda his wife, 
53 




BRASS TICKET, NEWCASTLE, NORTH SHIELDS AND TYNEMOUTH RAILWAY, 
IN BLACKGATE MUSEUM. 



301 

Ipublications of tbe Society of antiquaries 

OF NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE, 

MOST OF WHICH ABE TO BE HAD AT THE CASTLE, NEVVCASTLE-UPON-TYNE. 



ARCHAEOLOGIA AELIANA ; or, Miscellaneous Tracts relating to Antiquity. 

4 Vols., 4to. Vols. I. part ii. 15s. ; III. i. 12s. 6d., ii. and iii. 10s. each ; IV. 

i. 10s., ii. iii. and iv. 7s. 6d. each. Index to Vol. I., Is. 6d. 
ARCHAEOLOGIA AELIANA. Second Series; 8vo. To Members: Parts 1-5, 

7-13, 5s. each ; 6, 14-24, 7s. 6d. each ; 29, 32, 37, 39, 42-51, 10s. each ; 27, 

12s. 6d., 25, 30, 31, 33, 52-62, 15s. each (the other parts are out of print). 
ARCHAEOLOGIA AELIANA. Third Series, small 4to ; vols. I. to V., 

buckram. To Members, 21s. (except V., 30s.) 
PROCEEDINGS, Vol. I. (Second Series), a few numbers left, at 6d. each. 

Vols. II. (except 24, 2s. 6d.) III., IV., V., VI., VII., VIII., IX., and X., 

and 3 Ser., Vol. I. -IV., 3d. a sheet (many numbers are out of print.) 
LAPIDARIUM SEPTENTRIONALE ; or, a Description of the Monuments oi 

Roman Rule in the North of England ; folio, half-morocco, gilt top. One 

copy, seven guineas ; parts 1, 3, and 5, 12s. 6d. each. 
LAPIDARIUM MAP OF NORTHUMBERLAND. By H. MACLAUCHLAN. (Out 

of print. ) 
THE PIPE ROLLS, or Sheriff's Annual Accounts of the Revenues of the Crown 

for the Counties of Cumberland, Westmorland, and Durham, during the 

Reigns of Henry II., Richard I., and John. Royal 8vo. A few copies, 

21s. each. 
CATALOGUE OF THE LIBRARY belonging to the Society of Antiquaries, 

inclusive of the Manuscripts, Drawings, Prints, and Maps, 8vo cloth, 2nd 

edition, a few copies left. To Members, 2s. 6d. 
CATALOGUE OF THE INSCRIBED AND SCULPTURED STONES of the 

Roman Period belonging to the Society, preserved in the Black Gate 

Museum. 8vo, cloth, 2nd edition. (Out of print.) 
NORTHUMBRIAN MUSIC. -NORTHUMBRIAN MINSTRELSY; 8vo (out 

of print). SMALL PIPE TUNES, separately, 8vo, paper covers, Is. 
BUCKS' VIEWS OF NORTHUMBERLAND AND DURHAM (except 

Durham City), (Second Reprint of). (Out of print.) 
REMNANTS OF OLD NEWCASTLE. Royal 4to, paper covers ; parts 1 and 2, 

all published, 2s. 6d. each. 
BRAND'S HISTORY OF NEWCASTLE, Index to, by the late W. DODD, 

price 2s. 6d. 

BOURNE'S MAP OF NEWCASTLE (reprint). (Out of print.) 
HEDDON-ON-THE-WALL ; THE CHURCH AND PARISH. By C. J. BATES. 

A few 4to copies left, 5s. each. 
GUIDE TO THE CASTLE OF NEWCASTLE. By the late Dr. BRUCE. (Out 

of print. ) 
THE CASTLE OF NEWCASTLE, a Short Descriptive Guide to the Black Gate 

and Keep (5th edition), price 6d. 

RICHARDSON'S MEZZOTINT OF ST NICHOLAS'S CHURCH, NEW- 
CASTLE (reprint from the copperplate belonging to the Society). Out of 

print. 
THE RECENT DISCOVERIES IN THE ROMAN CAMP AT SOUTH 

SHIELDS, by the late DR. BRUCE. Separate edition. 8vo, paper covers. 

To Members, 2s. 6d. each ; to others, 5s. 



PUBLICATIONS (Continued) 



OF ANTIQUARIES OF NEWCASTLE, at Newcastle, in August 1884. 
8vo, paper covers ; illustrations. (Separate edition.) To Members, 2s. 6d. ; 

O t UNT er C)F S 'THE ROMAN WALL PILGRIMAGE OF .1886 8vo 
Numerous illustrations. (Out of print.) Of that of the Pilgrimage of 1906 
a few conies in sheets, may be had, at 2s. each copy. 
MEETING IN YORK AND SOUTH-EAST YORKSHIRE, 1889. 8vo. (Out 

THE BORDER HOLDS OF NORTHUMBERLAND. By C. J. BATES. Vol. I., 

with numerous illustrations. 4to (out of print) ; 8vo (separate edition) (out 

GENERAL^INDEX TO TRANSACTIONS OF THE SOCIETY, in 3 parts, 

paper covers, price 5s. 

DINSDALE PARISH REGISTER ; a few copies 8vo, in sheets, 3s. 6d. per copy. 
ELSDON PARISH REGISTER. In sheets, 6s. 

ESH PARISH REGISTER ; a few copies 8vo, in sheets 3s. 6d. per copy. 
WARKWORTH PARISH REGISTER ; 4 parts, 6s. 
CATALOGUE OF EXHIBITION OF SILVER PLATE OF NEWCASTLE 

ASSAY ; a few copies left, 5s. each. 
THE TOWN WALLS OF NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE, by the late Sheriton 

Holmes. A few copies, price Is. each. 

REPORT OF THE EXCAVATIONS AT AESICA, &c. Price 5s. 
REPORT ON THE EXCAVATIONS AT HOUSESTEADS (Borcovicus) 

ROMAN CAMP. Separate edition of 50 copies, with frontispiece and large 

plan, a few copies left, 6s. each. 

MORPETH AND BOTHAL, ) 

TvwtfvrnTTTW ( a few c P ies of each m P a P er covers > ls ' 6d " 

lxWJfiMUUl.Il, > per copy. 

BARNARD CASTLE, ) 



Meetings are held on the last Wednesday of every month, in the Castle of 
Newcastle upon Tyiie. The chair taken at 7 o'clock. 

The Archaeologia Aeliana will be delivered (free of postage) to every Member 
who is not in arrear of his Annual Subscription, which is due on the 1st January 
in every year. In case of any omission in punctual delivery, Members are requested 
forthwith to inform ROBERT BLAIR, Harton Lodge, South Shields, to whom also 
communications for the Archaeologia Aeliana may be addressed. 

As many numbers of the Proceedings are out of print, Mr. BLAIR would be 
thankful for any duplicates which members may have in their hands. 

Contributions of Antiquities, especially of local objects, for the Black Gate 
Museum, will be thankfully received by Mr. RICHARD OLIVER HKSLOP, M.A., 
F.S.A. (Princes Buildings, Akenside Hill, Newcastle), or by Mr. PARKER BREWIS 
(2 Grosvenor Road, Newcastle), the Curators of the Society ; or by Mr. JOHN 
GIBSON, the Attendant at the Castle. 



N.B. It is requested that notice be given to ROBERT BLAIR, one of the Secre- 
taries, SOUTH SHIELDS, of any errors, changes of address, or deaths. All 
communications for the Treasurer (Mr. R. S. NISBET) to be addressed to 
8 GROVE STREET, NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE. 



Archaeologia aeliana 



N79A6 

ser.3 

T.6 



PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE 
SLIPS FROM THIS POCKET 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 
LIBRARY