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Full text of "The Architectural year book, University of Illinois"

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L 1 B RAR.V 

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or ILLINOIS 

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[1] 



To Joseph Corson Llewellyn 

In appreciation of his achievement as a success- 
I ful architect, and his service to the active student body 

i and to the development of the Department, the stu- 

! dents of the Architectural Department of the Univer- 

f sity of Illinois dedicate this volume. 



m 




[3] 



FOREWORD 

The function of a Year Book 
IS only partially fulfilled in the pub- 
lishing of a selected number of 
drawings and sketches of particular 
merit. 

As an annual publication, this 
issue of the Year Book is intended 
to cover briefly the activities of the 
Architectural Department as a 
whole, to serve as a book of refer- 
ence as well as a record of the year's 
work, and to include a short descrip- 
tion of courses as offered. 

It is with these purposes in 
view that we submit this book to its 
subscribers. 

— The Year Book Staff. 



14J 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

Edmund Jani:s |ami;s. I'h.D., 1-I..1)., President of the L'niversity 

College of Engineering 

Charles Ri'ss Richards. ll.M.E., iM.E., U.M.E Acting Dean 

IIakvf.v W'li.r.AUD Mili.kr, M.E Assistant Dean 

Department of Architecture 

LoRiNG Harvey Provine, U.S., A.E Acting Head of the Department 

Nathan Clifford Ricker, D.Arch Architectural History 

Newton Alonzo Wells, M.P Architectural Decoration 

Percy Ash, B.S., C.E., A.I.A Design 

W'lLLLVM Caldwell Titcomu, A.B., B.S Design 

Charles Richard Clark, B.S Construction 

Robert Taylor Jones, B.S Construction 

W'lLLLVM Mathews Hekkinc, B.P Freehand Drawing 

Joseph Mitchell Kellogg, M.Arch Design 

William Sidney Wolfe, B.S., M.S Architectural Engineering 

Ralph Stanley Fanning, B.S Design 

Wnj.L\M Macey Stanton, B.S., M.S Design 

Carl X'rtor Burger, B.Arch Freehand Drawing 

Eemuel Cross Dillenrack, B.A., M.A Design 

Ralph Edward Muehlman Design 

Winifred Feiirenkamp, B.L.S Librarian 




STUDY IX C L .\ Y 



\V. W. IIiil)l)aid 



[5] 



THE ARCHITECTURAL CLUB 




OFFICERS 

FIRST SEMESTER 

President, G. H. Thomas Second Vice-Pres., T. H. Buell 

First Vice-Pres., F. E. Dunlap Secretary, C. A. Gustafson 

Treasurer, Ed. Lerch 



SECOND SEMESTER 

President, II. G. Overend Second \'ice-Pres., F. E. Dunlap 

First Vice-Pres., M. S. Stephenson Secretary, R. K. Eawrence 

Treasurer, Ed. Lerch 



[6] 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



c. l. boeckemohle 
Miss D. Clayberg 
f. e. dunlap 
Ed. Hirt 
VV. W. Hubbard 



SENIORS 

C. A. Klein 

A. V. Lundgren 

Harry Owen 

E. Pihlgard 

F. Rounds 

J. P. RUSSETT 



E. G. SCHUAMDFRG 

D. C. Shuler 
R. H. Thiele 
G. H. Thomas 
L. N. Crawford 



R. E. Lawrence 
G. P. Lagergren 

P. T. ROCKEY 
H. L. GOGERTY 

J. C. Sherrick 
G. A. Ferguson 
G. W. Mahn 
Geo. Braun 
G. F. Keck 
L. E. Dunlap 
Tom Brown 
M. S. Stephenson 



JUNIORS 

D. H. Hamilton 
K. Hada 

R. M. LUEDER 

R. E. Grossman 
H. H. Lueder 
N. A. Kundsen 

C. A. GUSTAFSON 

R. S. Raaberg 
J. H. Fleming 
L. Bradley 
M. S. Jackson 

T. W. TOLMIE 



Ed. Garvey 
H. O. Bartlett 
G. W. Stoddard 
H. J. Barnes 
Ed. Smidl 
Ed. Lerch 
C. C. Lundeen 
Ed. Mullins 

M. ZlEGENHAGEN 
J. G. RiTTER 

H. G. Overend 
A. D. Little 



A. Lee 

H. G. Antenen 

J. R. Hodge 

R. E. SiPE 

J. H. Bell 
F. L. Lampert 
N. E. Wiedemann 
d. horwich 
H. Hoenke 
A. F. Hansen 



B. G. Webb 

C. Hutton 
H. Beidler 



SOPHOMORES 

W. B. Bloodgood 
L. J. Baker 
A. H. Ingwers 

C. C. Cress 
Kaufman 

E. J. Walsh 
L. L. Smith 

D. COMPTON 

L. E. Trickle 
H. L, Clark 



FRESHMEN 

Miss C. Tuttle 
F. R. Gilkey 
Wilbur Carter 



H. F. Vaughn 

G. H. Deuchler 

L. Gallivan 

H. Hovey 

R. E. Lindsey 

W. C. Thompson 

E. T. Blix 

N. E. Sheldon 

E. E. Newcomb 

S. W. Bliss 



A. N. Hexter 
William Stuhr 



[7] 



Architectural Year Book i 

1915-1916 



STAFF 

R. W. Leibsle Editor 

F. N. ViRELius - Assistant Editor 

W. \V. Hubbard Business Manager 

Assistants 
C. L. LuNDEEN L. N. Crawford 

J. P. RussETT M. S. Stephenson 

Ed. Lerch Assistant 1 lusiness Manager 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

H. G. Overend G. H. Thomas 

Prof. E. H. Provine 



MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

Cliairnian, Ed. Lerch 
Seniors, F. G. Rounds Sophomores, A. F. Hanson 

Juniors, T. W. Tolmie Freshmen, B. H. Beidi.er 



BLUE-PRINT COMMITTEE 

Chairman, F. G. Rounds A. S. Graven 



[8] 



THE DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE 

The instruction of the architectural department at Illinois com- 
]jrises two courses: architecture and architectural engineering. The 
primary aim of the course of architecture is to fit the student to conceive 
and design huildings which shall be at once thoughtful antl beautiful. 
The aim of the course in architectural engineering is to train the student 
thoroughly in the scientific determination and verification of structural 

methods. The subjects studied must be largely the same, but the emphasis | 

and method of treatment are and should be different. I 

The obligation of the department is to train leaders in architectural | 

i design. For leadership men must be given power to understand the ! 

I movement in which they are to take part, and knowledge less of specific ! 

[ practical types than of fundamental elements and principles. Such under- [ 

i standing demands familiarity not only with the history of architecture | 

I itself, but with general history, language, and a multitude of other subjects i 

I for which the four-year architectural course affords little scoi)e. Until i 

I the high school can furnish this training, two ways are open — to com- i 

I bine these liberal studies with the professional course, or to demand ( 

I equivalent work before entrance. So far, Illinois has followed the first j 

aiid more conservative method, making such increases in the liberal ! 

subjects as has seemed possible without lengthening the course. I 

Central in the work of the school is the direct instruction in archi- i 

tectural design. This is given at Illinois not onlj' by the .solution and i 
criticism of problems in design, but by constant parallel lectures, and 
research work in the library. The interrelation between actual practice 
in design and theoretical instrv.ction in elements and principles is perhaps 
closer than in many of the architectural schools, and is certainly one of 
the greatest sources of strength at Illinois. The sequence of lectures and 
problems is an orderly one, devised to secure a steady development from 

„ simple to complex, with attention focussed on one new thing at a time. | 

I In the first semester of the freshman year a course of general lectures | 

j on the principles and qualities of architecture is given, illustrated by a | 

I limited number of carefully selected monuments. At the same time in ! 

!the drafting room the student is introduced to the technique of archi- ! 

tectural expression, — instrumental drawing, freehanil drawing in line | 

and in light and shade, wash rendering, shades and shadows, and linear I 

perspective. .\11 these branches of technique are exercised from the start i 

on architectural forms. In the second semester begins the direct and j 

systematic study of these forms themselves. The classic forms are j 



[9] 



studied chiefly, both as those of our traditional heritage and those in 
which the principles are illustrated most simply. No fetish is made of 
the classic "Orders". The simpler forms — walls, mouldings, openings, 
and so on — are taken first, and the Orders are finally reached as certain 
very perfect solutions of the problem of the portico, which have shown 
also an unrivalled applicability for decorative uses. 

The work in design of the three later years is not divided into 
courses of fixed duration, but into six stages of a fixed degree of difficulty, 
through which the students advance in varying lengths of time, depending i 

on their ability and success. The first three grades are devoted primarily | 

to the study of the simple architectural units; the general elements of 
facades, — bays, pavilions, loggias, and so on ; the general elements of 
plans, — vestibules, porticoes, stairways, and other means of circulation. 
The three upper grades are devoted primarily to the study of composition, 
using these elements in the design of complete buildings of increasing 
extent and complexity. Problems are of two chief kinds ; rendered 
problems lasting several weeks, in which mature study is given and j 

somewhat elaborate drawings are made, representing the subject with [ 

essential co^mpleteness ; sketch problems of a week or less, in which an [ 

idea is presented in a more summary way. ! 



All these problems are competitive, baseil on a set of common require- ! 



ments to which each man must conform. The drawings are graded by 
a jury composed of all the instructors in design, avoiding any injustice 
through personal idiosynocrasy or favoritism. Immediately after the 
judgment, while the difficiUties of the problem are still fresh in mind, | 

the drawings are hung in the exhibition hall of the department to enable i 

the students to compare solutions and progress. 

The awards given in the problems in design are "Pass", which denotes 
an average standard of excellence, "Mention" and "Mention Com- 
mended", which denote successive degrees of distinguished excellence. 
For every e.xceptional work a still higher recompense, the "Medal", is 
given. 

Advancement from each grade to the next is dependent on the 
securing of a fixed number of points, the number obtained for any prob- 
lem depending on its lengtii and on the award received. A student 
obtaining an average award of "Pass" will advance exactly one grade 
in a semester. If he does not secure a certain number of ])oints in a 
semester, however, or succeed in completing the grade in the maximum 
time, he must fdrfeit all the points he has gained and begin the grade 
anew. A "point" or credit represents a certain fraction of the quantity 



[101 



of work required for a degree. The quality of that particular quantity 
I of work, indicated by the award with which the point was earned, is rep- 

i resented in percentage and averaged to secure the student's mark accord- 

I ing to the general marking system of the University. 

! The schedule of dates for the problems in design is carefully made 

up in such a manner that it is feasible, whenever the Department desires, 
to enter men in tlie national competitions held by the Society of Beaux- 
I Art Architects. In this way men may gain valuable experience and the 

I school may secure some data of comparison between its work and the 

I work of other agencies. 

The instruction in architectural design is supplemented as usual by 
extended work in freehand drawing, in construction, in architectural his- 
tory, business relations, and other professional subjects. .A very com- 
plete and effective course in specifications and working drawings is one 
of the strongest features of the curriculum. 




L-J 



i — I 



^-...^ 



• <#ifcA 



.\ S L' M -M E R C .\ .\I I> I N' T II E 
.\ D I R O \ D .\ C K S 
Grade V R. S. Thiele 

Mention Commended 



[U] 




ARCHITECTVRAL 
^^^ DESIGN ^^^ 




The organization of the work in Design is hased on the idea that 
efficient training involves the attainment of a certain degree of profici- 
ency, rather tlian the cloing of a certain amonnt of work. 

The course is thvided into six pages of advancement called grades. 
Work in all of these grades is carried on simultaneously, so that it is 
possible for the student to enter or complete any of them at any time, 
irrespective of their class. The normal time to complete them is three 
years; to the students completing them in less time special advanced 
work is open. 

The work consists of the solution of problems, supjilcmented by 
individual criticism, lectures, and library sketches. The first three grades 
deal generally with the elements of elevation, and plan ; the last three, 
with the composition of these elements of elevation and ])lans into com- 
plete buildings or groups of buildings. For the study and criticism of 
])roblems, the students are divided into groups or "Ateliers", and are 
])ermanently assigned to sej^arate quarters and to separate instructors. 




.\ u ic \ .\ I s s A X IF. r n u R c H , sin e e i, k v .\ t i o n 

Crade \'I Wm. C'rutcbfielil 

Mention Commended. 

[12] 




A C II I' R C il IN R E N A I S S A X C E ST V L E 
Grade VI E. G. Schaumbcrg 

Mention Cnmmended 



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(Irade VI 

Mention Cnrnmcndcd 



A LIILKCII IX K K X A I SS ANCE STYLE 



1 13] 



Wni. Crutchfield 




AN AUDITORIUM 



Grade VI 

Mention Commended 



ELEVATION 



C. A. Klein 




PLAN G K (I U N IJ !• I. IJ (1 R 
Grade VI C. A. Klein 

Mention Commended 



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P l> A N SECOND F I, O O R 
Grade VI C. A. Klein 

Mention Commended 



[14] 




PLYM 
FELLOWSHIP 




ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Architectural Year Book Committee desires to annoimce that 
the Plym Fellowship drawings presented in this number of the Year 
Book are for the year 191 5 and that the 1916 drawings will appear in 
the edition for next vear. 




A BAND STAND 
Grade II A. C. Zimmerman 

Mention 



[15] 




















I'Uccd First 



FIKSI 1 l.'KiK IM.A.X 



A. R. Braiidncr, lyl3 



I 



r-iT'-TrrTri r-IT-^-iTTTr'!-' 

pTiC— ' t— hrrri 

i_J Lfrl T^ 



F-^' 










I'laced l-'irst 



S E C O N D F I. O O K I' L A N 



A. R. Braiidner, 19U 



[16] 



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\ U lli.M..lmT. 'LI 




A F R A T E R N I T V II O U S E E L E V A T I O N 



Grade V 

Mention Commeti(iec| 



D. C. Schuler 














A F R A T E R N I T V HOUSE 
Grade V 
Mention Commended 



PLAN 



D. C. Sclniler 



1171 




rrrr 





A Si I i I ) ( ) I . ( ) 



.\ I: A K I S !•: I. !■: \ A I ID .\ 



Crade VI 

^^cntinIl Cuiiunciujed 



F. C. Koiinils 




"sA.Jw- ^ ^ i^J^ 



A sen I) U L () K !•■ 1 X E A K 'I S 
fJradc VI 
Mention Commended 

[IS] 



1' 1. A X 



F. C Rounds 




A SfllOOI, (il-- !•■ I X 1-; ARTS 
llradc VI 
Mention Commended 



!•: L E \' A r n I \ 



K. \V. l.cilisle 





MtB 



A sen on I. O I- !•■ I X E ARTS 
(Irade VI 
Mention t'nmmcnded 

119J 



P I. A \ 
R. \V, l.eibslc 




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Grade IV 

Mention Commended 



H. t;. UverenJ 




Grade IV 

Mention Conimciuitil 



AX A S S 1 U I A T I 1 1 X 1! r J 1 . 1 1 1 X I ; 



II. G. Hvcrend 



[221 




AN A S S 1 1 C 1 A l' I ( } N B I ■ I I , I ) 1 X ( ; 



(;r:ide IV 

Mention ( unlinL-nilcil 



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A .\ A S S II (_■ I A 111) X II U I I. 
Grade IV 
Mention Commended 

[23] 



) J 1 .\ ( , 



E. C. Mailii 




feCMbffif UITION S 



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CO'MPfllTM 



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mmiim 
CETIl 



5imm5 If AKuricim coh 
ssnK or A imm mia to ie 

fflO¥MASM0CALLEiTtt 



Tfi: MCDAL^nALLBC AWACDfD VO.TllL' WINNfP OP A 
COMPtTITlON iri AtCHITtCTVML DP.IlGn WHO itlALL 

ht Trie ioLVTioii cf Ttir t\)(Ow:ekj5 moBitn 

GIVEH OUTOrt tW 17, AtSD OPCri TO ALLSTVDffllS 

in Gims n.in.AHDs. 

rnii COMPtTlTIOH 5MALL BCCOflt AMAMMV/IL 
IN5TlTVT10rt or TRE A]i£_i;iTI:CTVWI- PtPAHTZ-ltnT 

AND -srtALL 5TAH:? A3 A y:c»ar,iT!ort orAWLlT/ 
iri AG(:tT!TtCTVRAL DrSIGN TW jVDGtntmctw 
PfipBLfM AND AWARD or Tilt (-irPALoftULBC /lADf 

•moar DiiAWiriu5 RrcriViHCi riR5T,.3tcoriD,TiiiHiA/i!) 
loviiTH /-iTimo/i^. 




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[24] 




PLACED FIRST 



Scarali Competition, 1915 



(I. H. Tliomas 




SCARAB MEDAL 



[25] 




E 



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•iJ-?-E?»fl>n.- 



■^■a:--::sl-lf^^i-V!t 



Grade 1\" 

Mciitiun Commended 



A. I'. Br.iwn 




jPn^"^ 



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•Ji-V-lir*aa-- 



■Tir«-jn*».-Plasi- 



A I I 1 \ II 1 1 1 i: L 



■4£«Ifi'(- 



Grade IV 

Mciitiun (."ommentlcd 



A. P. Brown 



127] 





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£28] 




Grade V 
Medal 



A SUM M ER CAM P 



C. A. Klein 



129] 




A S L' I'. W A V K X I' K A X C I'- 
3 Ildur Sketch J- \\'- B.iilcy 









tzi T'^ r~^ 




P I. A X S 



AX A r T n M ri IJ I I. 



S A I. E S K <) O M 



M. D. RcminKloii 



F. I.. C.ildmail 



130J 



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:ma-JMiJM- 







Grade IV 
Medal 



A .\ A r T I 1 M c ) It I I , i: SALES k I M 1 M 



F. 1.. Goldman 




A \ A I' T ( ) .M (.1 1! I 1. E SALES R O O M 



(Irade IV 

Mention Commended 



M. D. Remington 



\il] 



BOK^" 




Sophomore A. E. 
Mention Commended 



A SMALL GARAGE 



B. Thurud 




A S M A L I. (; A R A G E 



Sophomore A. E. 
Medal 



n. Vaughn 



[32] 












^ C I -A' ".:'-' 



tirade III 
Mcda! 



A T R E A T -M IC N T F U K A I, O D B V 



J. A. Carroll 




„^£j]^^t^3J4| 



A D O O E \' A ^ 
Grade II K. M. l.evider 

Mention Commended 




Ti*- *:;* 



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\ HANK n o n R 

(Jrade II R. S. Raabcrg 

Mention Commended 






•J, 
> 



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oS 




[35] 



j^ssj:;.:'*?^^*?; 








(Iraile II 
Medal 



A N O R 1 !•: N T A L I- U U iN 1 A I ,\ 



K. M. Wagoner 



[361 




A MOORISH KOUN'TAIN 
rlraile II G. P. Lagergren ("naile I 

Meiitiim Commended Medal 



A M A V S (> L K U M 



II. P. Buck 




A W 
Grade I 
Mention Commended 




A N K 



H. Jacobi 



A GUIDE POST 
Cade II E. V. Kratz 

Mention 



!37J 



ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING 



The work in Architectural Drawing prepares for tlie courses in 
Architectural Design by study of the technique of expression and the 
vocabulary of elementary forms. Instrumental drawing, freehand draw- 
ing in pen and pencil, wash rendering, linear perspective, and the cast- 
ing of shadows are exercises in the presentation of simple subjects, cul- 
minating in the classic order. 




A S T U U ^ 1)1' THE I n N T C ORDER 



Sophumore A. E. 
Medal 



("t. B. Townsan 



138] 



„v .. : .- ^j 




Soiihomore A. E. 
Medal 



A X i: N r u A \ I i; i u a c u l' k t o i" 1 1 1 1 .\ i ) k 



G. Keck 





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■■■Bscaa 




A P A V I L I O X 



Sophomore A. E. 
Medal 



E. T. Blix 



£39] 




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A X E X T R A X C E TO A COURT OF TI O X ( » U 



Sophomore A. £. 
Menlion C'nmmended 



G. TIartwell 




Sophomore A. E. 
Mention Commended 



A P A V I L I () X 



E. E. Cress 



141] 




A U E M O R T A L T A B F, K T 



Grade I 
Medal 



S. Meriwether 



[42] 



FREEHAND DRAWING 




PEXCIL SKETCH FROM P H O T O C R A I' II 

3 hour sketch J. C. Sherrick 



M3] 




E. L. StoullL-r 




.^^'m^: 

:-^^''-<.,-: 



..<^'- ■ 



P^'l*# 




;€ 



a. c. iviiii 



I) L' r II O (1 U S K E T C II 
S..i'li"rnc)re A. E. C. Ilartwell 

[HI 




L ii A k t o A i, 1' K .\ U i .s t. 6 



W. S. Kauffman 



[45] 





1,1, llriiklni 



E. L. Stouffcr 




E. E. Newcomb 




H. Barnes 



C II A R C O A I. D R A W I N n S 

[46] 





J 








C H A R C O A L I) R A \V I N G 



C. S. Bernard 



[4/1 




2 hour sketch 



i ■|i I mi'<'8hi]i*^jifc'' 

■ ir M j i i > tra H mWJ ia!y, 
PENCIL SKliTCU FROM P II () T O (I R A P II 



H. P. Buck 



[48] 



CONSTRUCTION 




A BANK SCREEN 
8 hour sketch problem 
Grade III W. \V. Hubbard 

Mention 



[49] 



■ ^2ZZ^ 




\\- I.I K K I X G D K A W 1 N G 



11. (I. Aiiitii.iii 



?0] 




W 1 1 R K I .\ <; 1) K A W 1 X ('. 



1511 



A. I'. Hmk 






JJililLi 




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Architect 



taAH. or JTWRWAY Of 

ATI ARClilTLCO Clv^T) 



WORKING DRAWING 



E. Stouffer 



[52] 




rr.'.-LLL'.NG FCL .-At '.V.vy.JOHtiCTON 



W I ) R K I \ I ; D R A W I X G 



S. C. Sherrick 



IS3] 




[5-11 




i *xxn cna-otc-c ;>itf Til' 1 ' 

1 | CvjaT*'^-sor*. CA -■■P ftjO fe-fc^ 



::M:t\k> f't-v^c," 



GRAPHIC S T A T I *. S 



C. A. Gustafson 



155] 




isr.i 




o-...-.i.,.t./- r»-gp—^-»-^ 



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TYPICAL LLLVAIIUN Oi JLWLLRY .STORL 



OVER SO.OOO STORE FRONTS IN SATISFAC- 
TORY USE TODAY IS CONCLUSIVE EVIDENCE 
OF THE POPULARITY OF 




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REFINED IN DESIGN 
CORRECT IN CONSTRUCTION 
CHEAP IN MAINTENANCE 
SIMPLE IN INSTALLATION 

K ^wnee r 

Manufacturing Company 

NILES *^^ MICHIGAN 



N I L E S , M i C h 



FAC TORIES 
3ERKELEY. CALIF. 



GUELPH. ONT. 



160] 



Mueller 

Colonial Self-Closing Faucets 

The favorite of all architects who give thought to 
the correct and economical selection of goods. 

When Your Time Comes 

You will he absolutely safe in 
writing "Mueller Plumbing Brass Goods Through- 
out" in your specifications. 

You will have the experience and judgment of the 
best architects in the country, and the reputation of a 
house that has made quality goods for 59 years to back you. 

H. MUELLER MFG. CO., 

Decatur, Illinois 
14S-149 \V. 30th St 
New York, N. Y. 



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San Francisco 
S89 Mission St. 



HALF lONES 
ZINC ETCHINGS 
AND COLOR PLATES 
for every 
UNIVERSITY 
REQUIREMENT 



Quick Service 
Be// 411 



No Delay 
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Champaign, Illinois 



LALLY 

COLUMN 

COMPANY 

OF CHICAGO 

Steel Shell concrete 

filled columns 

for buildings 

4001 Wentworth Ave. 
Chicago 



[61] 



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I That attractive 

I and uniform color 

I so desirable in ex- 

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l?»e Best that 
t^n Be Made; 




I work is easily obtainable by 



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CHICAGU-AA Cement 



Almost 20 years on the market 
with never a justifiable complaint 




Chicago Portland Cement Co. 

30 North LaSalle Street 
CHICAGO 



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A Hytex Cottage 

South Side 

Chicago 



Hytex 

The Stdnddrd of Qualiiv in BneK 



Xo small part of the attractiveness of this cottage is due t«i the 
soft browns and dark reds of the Hy-tex Chaldeans with which it is 
faced. The architect is not fully eciuippcd until he kiwxvs the 
artistic possibilities of Hy-tex. 

Hydraulic-Press BricK Company 

SAINT LOLIS 

BRANCH OFFICES IN Al_l_ THE PRINCIPAL CITIES 



WESTERN 
BRICK CO. 

Danvlile, 
111. 

Exclusive Manufactures 
of 

Stipple Texture 
Face Brick 

Samples and Prices of all kinds 
of smooth and rough texture 
Face Brick and Common Brick 
gladly furnished on request. 




YPI 

G. Broes Van Dort Co. 

20 W. Jackson Blvd-.'Chlcago 

Imporlers and Dealers 

in Books on 

Architecture and Art 
Industrial Designs 

Write us for quotations 
and information 



loJI 



Decatur Bridge Company 

ENGINEERS AND MANUFACTURERS 

STRUCTURAL STEKL FOR ALL PURPOSES 

Main Office and Works: DECATUR, ILL. 





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