(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Area and Population of Each Division of Each Presidency of India, According ..."

This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 
to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 
publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 

We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 



at |http : //books . google . com/ 




Digitized by 



Googl( 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



•^ Digitized by 



GoogI( 






SELECTIONS 



FROM THE 



RECORDS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF INDIA, 



FOREIGN DEPAETMENT. 



No- covin. 



EEPORT 



OF THE 



POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION OF THE RAJPUTANA STATES 



FOB 



1884-85. 




^ttbli0heib bp ^ttthoritg. 



OALCUTTA: 
PRINTED BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OP GOVERNMENT PRINTING, INDIA. 

1885. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



REPORT 



OF 



THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

OF 

THE RAJPUTANA STATES 

FOR 

1884-85. 



Part I. 

No. 107 P., dated Mount Abu, 12th September 1885. 
jp>ofl,_CoLOKBL SiE Edward Bbadfobd, K.C.SJ., A^ent to the Qovemor General, Bajputana, 
To — The Secretary to the Qovernment of India^ Foreign Dbpabthbkt. 

I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Political Adminis- 
tration of the States of Rajputana for the year 1884-85. 

2. "During the year under review death carried off one of the most distin- 
guished of the Rajput Chiefs. His Highness Maharana Sujjan Singh, G.O.S.I., 
of Meywar, whose health had been failing for the past three years, was seized with 
epilepsy in December last, and expired on the 23rd of that month at the early 
age of 24. He succeeded to the gadi in 1874 and was entrusted with full 
powers two years later. During his short reign of eight years the late Chief did 
much for the prosperity of Meywar, and ever displayed an intelligent and 
active interest in all measures calculated to benefit his subjects. 

3. Sujjan Singh having died childless, the choice of his successor, subject 
to the approval and sanction of His Excellency the Viceroy and Governor 
General, lay with the nobles and officials of the State, and their unanimous 
election of Putteh Singh having received the necessary ratification, that Chief 
was formally placed upon the gadi in March last. The new Ruler of Meywar 
is a man, 36 years of age, of intelligence and high character. In view of his 
inexperience in administration, it was at first considered desirable to require 
the Maharana to consult the Resident in Meywar, and be guided by his advice 
in all matters connected with the government of the State ; but Futteh Singh 
applied himself with such diligence to official business, and displayed such 
high capabilities, that I was lately able to support Colonel Walter's suggestion 
that the restriction should now be withdrawn, and the measure has received 
the sanction of His Excellency the Viceroy. 

4. The recent troubles in the Soudan and the complications on the North- 
West Prontier supplied the Chiefs of Rajputana with an opportunity for 
displaying their loyalty, of which they, one and all, quickly and spontaneously 
avsdled themselves. In offering their assistance^ they placed the resources of 
their States unreservedly at the disposal of Government, and they have received 
through His Excellency the Viceroy a most gracious message of thanks from 
Her Majesty the Queen-Empress. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



2 EEPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

5. The march of reform in Eajputaua contiiiues unchecked, and slowly but 
surely many changes of importance are being introduced. The year 1884-85 
witnessed the abolition of transit dues in Bhurtpore and Kerowlee, and the 
opening of the Pali-Jodhpur Railway, while an inspection of the reports from 
the several agencies discloses a general though varying progress in matters 
sanitary, judicial, and educational. Much attention, too, has been devoted to 
works of public utility, such as internal communications and irrigation schemes, 
and the measures adopted for the suppression of crime have been attended for 
the most part by improved results. 

6. Ijast year I referred to my wish to see established a system whereby 
young native officials might become qualified to hold those posts in the State, 
to fill which it has so often, in Rajputana, been necessary to call in foreigners, 
and I am happy to say that what may be considered the first step in the right 
direction has now been taken. From several of the leading States well-edu- 
cated youths have been deputed to the Punjab, and elsewhere, for thorough 
training in various departments of civil and revenue administration. Jeypore 
has already four representatives under instruction at the Dehra Dun Forest 
School, and the Resident is in correspondence with a view to arranging for the 
despatch of several other young men to the Punjab, for practical tuition in 
the duties of Patwaries and Kanungoes. Dr. Stratton also hopes that a con- 
tingent may shortly be sent to Roorkfee to be grounded in Civil Engineering 
at the Government College there. 

From Marwar, four youths have been sent to the Punjab to learn survey- 
ing, and several boys from the school at Ulwur are now prosecuting their 
studies at Lahore and Agra, while one has been entered at the Agricultural 
School at Saidapet, Madras. 

An example having thus been set, and a start made, I am full of hope 
that every State in Rajputana may, before many years, be enabled to recruit 
its official class from a well-qu$lified body of its own subjects. 

7. Bikanir affairs, though still requiring careful attention, have now 
happily ceased to cause immediate anxiety. The Political Agent's report 
describes in detail the manner in which the various departments of the adminis- 
tration have been reconstructed, and my march through the State at the close 
of 1884 showed me that real progress had been made. Much of course still 
remains to be done, and the Maharaja does not yet render the Political Agent 
the hearty co-operation and assistance which I should wish to see given him, 
but I believe that the tide of reform has now really set in, and I trust that, 
with careful management, a recurrence of the complications which recently 
necessitated intervention may be regarded as out of the question. 

8. The dispute in connection with the succession to the Boara estate in 
Meywar, which was finally settled by the aetive employment of Durbar troops, 
was reported on last year, and I need here only mention that Kesri Singh,* the 
claimant, and his brother, who had been kept under surveillance for about a 
year, were recently set at liberty on security by the present Maharana, and 
that there appeairs no reason to anticipate further trouble on this score. 

TOUE. 

9. The difficulties which led to the employment of British troops in 
Bikanir in the preceding season had happily passed away, but I was anxious 
personally to examine the working of the recent reforms, and accordingly on 
leaving Ajmere at the close of November, I first directed my march towards 
that portion of my charge. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE RAJPUTANA STATBS POB 1884-86. 3 

Passing near the Jeysulmere border, I was met by the Maharawul Beri 
Sal, who accompanied my camp for some days, and after a short halt at Bikanir, 
where I had several interviews with the Chief, the incidents and results of 
which were described in my letter No. 38-P., dated the 24th of February 1885, 
I turned my steps eastward, and passed along the Jeypore-Punjab border. As 
already reported I had the satisfaction of finding that the police arrangements 
on the frontier were working excellently, and I was glad to take the oppor- 
tunity of renewing my acquaintance with the Rao Rajas of Sikar and Khetri, 
to each of whose capitals, as well as to the homes of all the Chief Thakurs, 
I paid a flying visit. 

10. Marching by Namowl in Patiala, I entered TJlwur early in January, 
and was met on the border by the Maharao Raja and the Political Agent, who 
accompanied me in my tour through the State. 

On leaving XJlwur, I passed through Bhurtpore and was enabled personally 
to inspect the outlying XJlwur villages, a proposal for the exchange of which, 
with similar detached portions of Bhurtpore, has been recently submitted for 
the approval of His Excellency the Viceroy and Grovemor General. 

The Maharaja of Bhuitpore marched with me through his own State, and 
also through Dholepore to Kerowlee. 

11. During my stay at Dholepore, I discussed with the Maharaj Rana and 
the Political Agent the financial position of the State, I was sorry to find 
that there was a considerable debt, and that a new loan was advisable. The 
young Chief was, however, most earnest in his promises to pay the strictest 
attention to economy, and I trust that he will succeed in liquidating his liabi- 
lities. The new loan was proposed as facilitating final repayment of the debt, 
by wiping out smaller claims and collecting the whole under one head. Its 
entertainment will in no way interfere with the regular instalment on account 
of the Government loan. 

12. At Kerowlee I halted for a couple of days, and then proceeded to Tonk, 
where I was met by Colonel Muir, and spent some days in scrutinizing the finan- 
cial condition of the State with that officer and the Nawab. I regret that the 
administration, which has been fully reported on elsewhere, cannot be regarded 
as on a satisfactory footing. 

From Tonk my camp returned to Ajmere, but I continued my tour by d&k 
and visited Deoli, Boondee, Kotah, Jhallawar and Pertabgurh, finally proceed- 
ing to Oodeypore to conduct the installation of the Maharana Futteh Singh. It 
had been my intention to reach Oodeypore vid Banswara, Dungarpore and 
Kherwara, but as I should have been passing through this country at the time 
of the Holi festival, some difficulty was anticipated in making the necessary 
arrangements, and the project was reluctantly abandoned. 

Jeypore and Jodhpore I visited by rail, and had thus the advantage of 
meeting all the principal Chiefs in Rajputana. 

GENERAL CONDITIONS. 

13. The rainfall throughout Rajputana was generally above the average, 
though somewhat unevenly distributed, A long break in July and August 
caused considerable anxiety in many districts, but this was allayed by a heavy 
downpour in the latter part of August and early in September, which was so 
violent as to cause considerable damage, notably in Jeypore and Kishengurh. 

1a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



4i REPORT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

The crops were generally well up to the average, the rabi being remarkably 
good, while the kharif sowings, had they not suffered from the abnormally 
heavy fall in August and September, would probably have produced a bumper 
harvest. 

14i. The depression in the opium trade continues, and considerable tracts, 
which are usually under the poppy, were consequently allowed to lie waste. 

15. Political oflBcers were invited early in the year to direct the attention 
of their Durbars to the system of storing green fodder in silos, and in many 
States of Eajputana experiments were made and generally with success. When 
on tour I personally inspected silos at Jhalrapatan, XJlwur and Oodeypore, and 
the grass which had been laid up in them was readily eaten by cattle. The 
zemindars will now be encouraged to make experiments of a similar nature, 
and I trust that ere long the value of ensilage will be thoroughly appreciated in 

^ these States. 

16. In consequence of the heavy rains in August and September, fever was 
very prevalent during those months, and cholera also showed itself at Kerowlee 
and Tonk, and in some villages of Jeypore, The visitation at Kerowlee was 
attended with much loss of life, but it cannot be considered as entirely matter 
for regret, as the eyes of the Chief and his officials have now been opened to 
the necessity for sanitary precautions, and measures have been adopted which 
will, I trust, render improbable a severe recurrence of the pest. 

17. The attention of the Jeypore Durbar has lately been directed to the 
garnet mines in that State, and a careful inspection was recently made by Mr. 
Tellery, the Engineer in charge of the Gas Works, Jeypore, with the result that 
it has been decided to resume mining operations. In addition to garnets, which 
are procurable in large quantities, beryl, aqua marine, rock crystal and talc are 
likewise found in these districts, and the Resident is full of hope that the enter- 
prise, on which the Durbar is about to embark, may be attended with profitable 
results. 

18. Last year I reported that I had discussed with several Native Chiefs 
the advisability of taking special precautions against famine, and I am gratified 
to find that Colonel Muir has been enabled to report that measures of prepara- 
tion have been recently undertaken by the Maharao Raja of Boondee. 

The Chiefs of Rajputana are awaking to the responsibilities which the 
wants of their subjects may impose upon them, and should famine unhappily 
come upon us, I trust that the States under this Agency will be found by no 
means unprepared to meet it. 

19. A statement marked I showing the meteorological observations taken 
in Rajputana during 1884 is appended. 

OPIUM. 

20. The price of opium rose slightly in Meywar, but it is mainly to the 
fact that dealers found themselves compelled to realize even at a loss that the 
Resident attributes a considerable increase in the trade. Oyer 7,000 chests 
were weighed out at the Chitor scales, and these are the highest figures regis- 
tered since 1877-78. A daring attempt at smuggling, which was detected and 
frustrated, is minutely described in Colonel Walter's report. 

The trade is still very depressed, throughout Rajputana, and the various 
administration reports show that heavy loss has been entailed on the cultivators 
of the drug, more especially in Eotah and Jhallawar ; the fact that the revenue 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB RAJFUTAKA STATES FOB 1884-86. 



5 



actuals in the former State were over B 34,000 below the estimates is 
mainly ascribed to this depression, and in Jhallawar the poppy crop suffered 
severely from the tail and frosts of February and the high winds of April, and 
the trade in the drug shows a marked falling off. 

SALT. 

21. The salt agreements with the several Bajputana States have worked 
satisfactorily. The supply has been everywhere equal to the demand, and no 
complaints have been made of hardship being caused by high prices. 

22. The Besident, Eastern Bajputana States, mentions the alteration 
effected by mutual agreement between the Durbiars of Jeypore and Jodhpore in 
the Salt Treaties of 1869 and 1870, by which each State is guaranteed a pro.por- 
tion of the royalty on excess sales of salt at the Sambhur Lake, irrespective of 
the place of manufacture. The approval and sanction of the Governor General 
in Council was accorded to this mutual arrangement. 

23. The new agreement entered into with the Sirohee Durbar is described 
by Colonel Powlett, and the free admission of Government salt has produced at 
once a fall of price and an increased trade. 

BHILS. 

24. The Bhils have continued remarkably quiet. In Meywar an excep- 
tionally good harvest has, as usual, been attended by a diminution in crime. 
Two more schools have been opened and are fairly well attended, and the whole 
of the Bhil district will be ultimately included in the general educational 
scheme now in course of establishment in Meywar. 

25. On the occasion of my visit to Oodeypore for the purpose of installing 
Maharana Futteh Singh, I impressed upon His Highness both publicly and pri- 
vately the importance of carefully considering the best method of dealing with 
the tribe, and I was glad to find the Chief prepared to take up the subject. 

26. The Besident, Western Bajputana States, reports that Dewalati, where 
the Bhils were formerly especially troublesome, has been quiet and orderly. 
The chief village, Lohiana, has been razed to the ground, and the Durbar has 
built a fort about a mile from its site, round which a village is already springing 
up. Colonel Powlett anticipates for the district a prosperous future. 

JUDICIAL AND POLICE. 

27. The following statement gives the number and nature of the cases 
adjudicated upon by the International Courts of Vakils in Bajputana during 
the year 1884 : — 





THB Fbbson. 


Meywar. 


Jeypore. 


Harirar. 


Harowtee. 


Total. 


Offbncb sagainst 












Murder . • • 


• • . 


2 


1 


2 


1 


6 


Assault with wounding . 


. • • 


... 


i 


•• 


1 


3 


Assault 


. 


... 


8 


... 


... 


3 




Total 


2 


6 


2 


2 


12 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



6 



BEPOBT OB THE FOLITICAIi ADHINISTBATION 





Meywar. 


Jeypore. 


Mmww. 


HwowtM. 


TotiU. 


Offences against Fsofebtt. 












Highway robbery with aggravated circum- 












stances . . . • . 


1 


2 


..' 


... 


3 


Highway robbery without aggravated cir- 












cumstanees ..... 


8 


5 


11 


2 


21 


Gang robbery with aggravated circum- 












stances 


... 


• . • 


... 


1 




Gang robbery without aggravated circum- 








C 2 


11 


stances ...... 


... 


9 


• • 


^ 




Theft with aggravated circumstances 


2 


2 


• •■ 


... 


4 


Theft without „ >, . • 


1 


21 


10 


18 


50 


Cattle-lifting 




16 


10 


15 


41 


Dacoity •,.... 


7 


2» 


57 


6 


98 


Arson ...... 


• • 


..• 


, . 


1 


1 


Burglary . . 


... 


... 


S 


1 


4 


Criminal breach of trust 


... 


... 


2 


• •• 


2 


Poisoning ...... 


• • « 


1 




• *. 


1 


Miscellaneous 


4 


12 


12 


IS 


41 


Total 


18 


96 


105 


58 


277 


GRAND TOTAL . 


20 


102 


107 


60 


289 



As compared with last year there is an increase of eight in the number of 
offences against the person, the figures being 12 against 4. 

As regards offences against property, the Meywar Court has dealt with 18 
cases this year against 21 last ; Jeypore 96 against 122 ; Marwar 105 against 
78 ; Harowtee 58 against 36. The total number of cases in the four Courts is 
therefore 277 against 257 last year. The chief increase is observable in the 
MarwarCourt. 

The subjoined statement indicates the number of appeals instituted and 
disposed of by the Upper or Appellate Court between the 1st of January and 
the 31st of December 1884. Of the 63 cases appealed, the decisions in 19 
were confirmed, in 7 revised and in 10 reversed, leaving 17 undisposed of at the 
close of the year. 



— - 

AasKCT. 


Pending 

at the 

beginning of 

the year. 


Institnted 

during the 

year. 


Total. 


■8 
g 

! 


1 




Bemaining 
at the close 
of the year. 


Meywar .... 
Jeypore .... 
Marwar .... 
Harowtee .... 


1 

2 
8 

7 


6 

16 

9 

9 


7 
18 

n 

16 


i 

8 
2, 
7 


1 

a 
a 

2 


1 
8 
8 
8 


8 
5 
6 

4 


Total *. 


IS 


40 


63 


19 


7 


10 


17 



28. The annual report of the working of the Bajputana-Malwa Railway 
Police is heing separately submitted to Government. The office of the Superin- 
tendent was held throughout the year by Mr. R. E. Acklom. 

During the year under review, the Achnera-Muttra Branch Railway was 
handed over to the North-Western Provinces Government, and consequently 
the total mileage imder the Rajputana-Malwa Railway police supervision fell 
from 1,020 to 1,000. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB lULJFUTANA STATES FOB 1884^. 7 

As mentioned in the last report, the head-qnarters of the police were 
remoTed from Jeypore to Ajmere. 

29. The Superintendent of Police disposed of 173 criminal cases, most of 
which were of a trifling nature and call for no special remarks. There were 
no serious cases of obstructing or tampering with the line. Accidents in 
connection with the working and running of trains numbered 200 in all. Of 
these 101 were cases of running over cattle, due in the main to want of proper 
fencing. The Deputy Agent, Bombay, Baroda and Central India and Bajputana- 
Malwa Bailway, has been addressed with a view to the completion of the 
fencing in of the entire line with all possible speed. 

80. The Notification of the Government of India in the Foreign Depart- 
ment, No. 99-I.J., dated the 27th of April 1881, investing the Governor 
GeneraPs Agent in Bajputana with the powers of a Local Government 
for the purposes of the Criminal Procedure Code (Act X of 1882) within the 
limits of the railways traversing the Bajputana Agency, was cancelled with 
effect from the 22nd of March 1884. 

By Foreign Department Notifications Nos. 2392-1. and 3259-1., dated 
respectively the 25th June and 28th of August 1884, the Superintendent and 
the Assistant Superintendent, Bajputana-Malwa Railway Police, were invested 
with the powers of Magistrates of the Ist and 2nd class, respectively, within 
the limits of the railway under their charge. 

31. Under Poreign Department Notification No. 1915-1., dated the 28th 
of May 1884— 

I. — ^Every Political Agent in Bajputana was appointed a District Magis- 
trate and Sessions Judge, and authorized to exercise the powers 
of a Court of original jurisdiction as laid down in the Code of 
Criminal Procedure for the trial of warrant cases by Magistrates 
within the limits of his Agency, and also for the trial of those 
cases cognizable by a Court of Sessions. 

II. — ^The Agent to the Governor General in Bajputana was invested 
with the powers of a Court of Sessions and High Court, as 
described in the Criminal Procedure Code in respect ci all offences 
over which the Political Agents in Bajputana exercise the above 
jurisdiction. 

The above notification, however, is not applicable to cases concerning 
European British subjects or persons charged jointly with European British 
subjects. 

32. By Poreign Department Notification No. 759-1., dated the 4th of 
March 1885, the Assistant General Superintendent (for the time being) of 
Operations for the Suppression of Thuggee and Dacoity in the Upper Bajputana 
Sub-Agency was invested with the powers of a Magistrate of the 3rd class 
under sections 12 and 37 of Act X of 1882, and with the powers described iu 
section 206 of the said Act, to commit persons for trial to the Court of Sessions 
for any offence triable by such Court. 

GBIME. 

33. Principally no doubt as a consequence of the good harvests a marked 
decrease in crime is observable. The diminution is most noticeable in Mey war, 
where heinous crimes have fallen from 302 in 1883-84 to 206 in 1884-85. In 
Kotah and Boondee, where dacoities were frequent in 1883-84, only 9 and 2 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



8 REPOET OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTEATION 

cases occurred in the year under note, as against 17 and '8 in the preceding 12 
months. Generally indeed throughout Bajputana this crime appears to have 
been much less common than in former years. 

34. The rules for the suppression of dacoity, reported on by the Resi- 
dent, Western Raiputana States, last year, have worked well, and Colonel 
Powlett considers that a still greater measure of success may be anticipated 
for them. 

35. Two instances of attack on Goyernment mails are reported from 
Marwar, but in neither was loss incurred. In the Sironj district of Tonk in 
Central India, a runner en route from Sironj to Gwalior was attacked, and 
both he and his escort , (1 sepoy) were wounded, and the bag was carried off, 
but ultimately recovered with the loss of one small parcel only. In the case 
of mail robbery reported last year, the responsibility was finally attached to 
Jeypore, and compensation has been made by that State. 

36. No cases of infanticide have been brought to light during the year 
under report, but from Banswara comes intelligence of two instances of witch- 
swinging. The Durbar is actively endeavouring to repress the crime, and has 
succeeded so far that nearly all the actors in the first crime have been captured 
and punished. 

37. The freebooter Salji of Lohiana, whose escape from Jodhpore was 
related in paragraph 31 of my last year's report, died in the Danta hills close 
to Lohiana in February last. He had been for months leading a wretched life 
in constant danger of capture, and his band of followers ]^ad been reduced to 
a mere handful ; the few who remained true to him to the last were betrayed 
immediately upon his death. The prime mover of disturbance having been 
removed, it is hoped that the district will now be readily reclaimed to order. 

38. My tour this year having led me along the Punjab-Rajputana 
frontier, I was enabled to submit to Government a report that the border 
was apparently in a much more settled condition, and subsequent information 
tends to prove that the surmise was correct. 

THUaGBB AND DACOITY. 

39. The departmental distribution of the districts remains unchanged. 
The reports under review show the work of the sub-agencies for the calendar 
year 1884. 

XTFPEB BAJPUTANA. 

40. Captain Talbot held charge of the office of Assistant General Superin- 
tendent from the 1st of January to the 18th of February, Colonel Law from 
the 18th of February to the 23rd of March, Dr. Stratton from the 23rd of 
March to the 10th of April, and Lieutenant R. D. C. Davies from that date 
to the close of the year. 

41. Twenty-four dacoities were reported during the year, three being 
discovered by the Agency, and the balance brought to light by the Native 
States Police. 

One hundred and thirty-six cases, involving a loss of nearly 3^ lakhs of 
rupees, and committed between 1872 and 1883, were certified to by confessing 
prisoners during the year 1884 ; 79 of these have been duly authenticated, and 
the remainder are under investigation. The Native States reported five cases 
of poisoning, but the Assistant General Superintendent was unable to procure 
any evidence in regard to them. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE EAJPUTAKA STATES FOB 1884-85. 9 

The year under review opened with 60 prisoners for disposal ; 2 of these 
were released unconditionally, 14 on security, 1 died, 8 were transferred 
to Jodhpore, 21 committed to the Sessions Court, and 11 remained under 
examination at the close of the year. 

Of the 24 prisoners committed for trial, 7 were convicted, 7 released on 
security and 5 unconditionally, 1 died and 4 were awaiting trial on the 31st 
of Decemher 1884. 

42. On the whole, crime appears to have diminished, a fact which may 
be ascribed to the good order which now reigns in Bickaneer, the activity in 
suppressing dacoity displayed in Jodhpore, and perhaps above all to the 
excellence of the harvests. 

LOWER BAJPIJTANA. 

43. Charge of this Sub- Agency was held for periods varying from 17 to 
145 days by the following officers ; — 

Captain J. H. Newill, 
Captain E. A. Eraser, 
Captain T. C. Pears, 
Lieutenant C. Herbert, 
Captain W. H. C. WyUie. 

44. Twelve dacoities were reported from Sirohee, and 38 from Marwar, 
as against 18 and 34 respectively m the year 1883. 

The loss to property is estimated at B5,601, as compared with over 
25,000 ; and an equally satisfactory decrease in violence connected nvith dacoity 
is noticeable, 3 men only having been killed and 6 wounded, as against 4 killed 
and 22 wounded in the previous year. One prisoner remained for trial at the 
close of 1883, and one man was arrested during 1884 ; both were committed for 
trial, with the result that the first accused was released for want of sufficient 
evidence to procure conviction, and the second sentenced to five years' rigor- 
ous imprisonment. 

46. The decided progress thus observable is chiefly attributed by the 
Assistant General Superintendent to the energetic measures taken by the 
Resident, Western Bajputana States. 

EASTERN BAJPUTAE A. 

46. Colonel H. P. Peacock held charge of the Sub- Agency throughout the 
year, during which 31 dacoities were reported, and 4 persons implicated therein 
arrested. The plundered property is estimated at about fi27,600. 

1 hirty-five cases of dacoity not previously reported on were brought to light 
in 1884^ of which 27 have been authenticated, and 8 are under investigation. 

Three cases of drug poisoning are also recorded, and 6 persons were killed 
and 32 wounded in affrays with dacoits. 

On the Ist of January 1884, 2 prisoners remained under examination in 
this Sub- Agency, 36 others were arrested during the year, and 6 received on 
transfer. The total of 43 were disposed of as follows : — 

Released on security . . . . .16 

„ without security . . ... 7 

Transferred ....... 1 

Confined in local jail ..... 1 

Committed .18 

4.S 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



10 RBPOAT OP tHri PbLPMCAL ADMINISTKATION 

Of the 18 pet&otis eoinfiiitted, 10 wefe convicted, 1 acqtiitted, and 1 died. 
The other 6 remained for trial at thiB close of the year. 

47. Colonel Peacock's report shows that the States under his jurisdiction 
continue, in the majority of cases, to exert themselves actively towards sup- 
pressing dacoity. 



Digitized by VnOOQlC 



OF THE RAJPUTANA STATES FOE 1884-85. 11 



Part n. 



MOaHIAS. 

48. Major N. 0. Martelli resumed charge of his appointment of SuperiA- 
tendent of operations for the control of Moghias in Eajputana and Central 
India on his return from 3 months' privilege leave in May 1884, ai^d his 
toDure was not subsequently broken before the close of the year. 

His reports on the working of his office up to the 30th of September 1884 
and 3l8t of March 1885 have already been submitted to Government under 
cover of this office letters No, 3604 G., dated the 5th of December 1884, 
and No, 1278 G., dated the 28th of May 1885, respectively, and shpw that 
most satisfactory progress has been made. 

49. During the year under report, Major Martelli visited Jeypore, Ajmere, 
.Abti, Sujat, Sambhur, Nimbahera, Ohoti Sadri, Puahkar, Jodhpore, Nagore, 
Merta, Bilara, Jaitaran, Raipur, Nawa, Parbutsar, Kuchawan, Maroth, Ulwur, 
Oodeypore, Kumalgurh, Shahpura, and Chitor in Eajputana. 

Since April 1884, 3,396 new Moghias haye been brought on the re- 
gister; the total number is now 6,252, and the land in their possession 
86,621 bigahs, as against 20,625 held by them last year. The progress is 
most marked in Marwar, where 3,127 Baoris have been provided \vith 60,431 
bigahs. 

The Jeypore Durbar is likewise displaying considerable interest in the 
movement, and I trust that during the present year the Moghias in that State 
will be brought thoroughly imder control. 

A comparison of the report for the half-year ending on the 31st of March 
1885 with that for the previous 6 months leads to the supposition that Major 
MarteUi's successor will not find his registers increase as rapidly as they did in 
the past year, but Captain M. J. Meade will find abundant employment in 
supervising those Moghias who are already on his rolls, and in encouragix^ 
them to persevere in the honest life which they hav^ been assisted to enter 
upon. 

BOUNDARY SETTLEMENT. 

50. During the year under review fair progress has been made in the settle- 
ment of disputed boundaries. 

Captain Jennings' employment on the Jhallawar and Central India border 
came to an end on the 24th of September 1884 Previous to his departure, 
however, he completed the demarcation of the whole of the eastern boundary 
of Jhallawar, some 25 miles in length, marching with Gwalior territory. 

51. On the Jhallawar-Indore frontier Captain M. J. Meade disposed of 17 
disputes, but in 4 of these cases an appeal has been presented by Jhallawar 
against the Boundary OflGlcer's decision. 

62. Captain T. C. Pears, Assistant to the Agent to the Governor General, 
was deputed, with effect from the 26th of October 1884, to continue the 
demarcation of the Meywar-Tonk border. He worked till the 11th of April 
1885, when he proceeded on furlough to Europe. During this period 46 dis- 
putes were disposed of, and 37 miles added to the line of settled boundary. Of 
these cases, 7 were decided by Punchayet, 23 by mutual agreement, and 16 by 
the Boundary Officer himself, whose decision in 11 instances has been accepted 

2a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



12 BEPORT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

by both parties. Among the number not so concurred in is one relating to the 
ownership of the village of Ulsipura, the dispute concerning which was of 
T€lry long standing. 

63. Mention was made in last year's report of the desire of the Maharaja 
of Jeypore for the appointment of a British Oficer to settle boundary disputes 
between his own and adjoining States. In accordance therewith, Lieutenant- 
Colonel E. Temple, 2nd-in-command|of the Meywar Bheel Corps, was, on return 
from furlough, nominated to undertake the duty. He comnienced work on the 
26th of December 1884, and succeeded in marking off the Shamilat area at 
Sambhur, held jointly by the Jeypore and Jo(|hpore Durbars, from the portions 
proper to those States. But this was all he had time to accomplish, as in Peb- 
ruary he was recalled to Kherwara to assume command of his regiment from 
Colonel ConoUy, whose health obliged him to proceed somewhat unexpectedly 
to Europe on medical certificate. 

54. In Marwar, Captain W; Loch settled the boundaries of 855 khalsa and 
jagir villages, while the Resident himself employed a portion of his cold wea* 
ther tour in defining a length of 30 miles on the Marwar- Jeysulmere border. 
In Mullanee 338 boundary disputes were decided, and the boundaries of 61 
villages, out of a total of 400, were demarcated. 

55. Seventeen boundary disputes are now rife in Sirohee ; arrangements 
have, however, been made since the close of the year under review for the settle- 
ment of these cases, but a detailed description is postponed inasmuch as the 
present report treats only of events during the year 1884-85. 

56. In Bickaneer a boundary dispute of 40 years' standing between a 
khalsa and jagirdar village was settled through the arbitration of the Political 
Agent, Captain Talbot, who has recently reported that there are very few other 
cases now existent. 

EDUCATION. 

67. The annual report of the Mayo College, Ajmere, printed copy of which 
is appended, shows the number of pupils on the rolls to be 74, which is the 
highest total yet attained. There were 13 admissions to the College, and 1 1 
withdrawals during the year. 

An examination of the distribution roll gives the following results : — 

BAJPIITANA. 

Boys. 

Bickaneer ..•••»••• 4 
Jeypore . • • • • • • • .10 

Jhallawar 4 

Kerowlee 1 

Kishengurh . . . • • • • .1 

Kotah 7 

Marwar ••..*•..• 10 

Meywar 5 

Pertabgarh. . . • • • • ' . .1 

SiTohee • • ••..••• 1 

Tenk 8 

Ulwur ••.•••••• 6 Boys.) 

— 58 

Ajmere 12 

Central India 1 

Benares •••••••'••• 1 

Punjab 2 

Total . . 74 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE RAJPUTANA STATES FOR 1884*86. 



13 



The general conduct of the boys continues excellent, and beyond three 
mild cases of chicken-pox, there has been no sickness worthy of the name. 

The only change in the curriculum is to be found in the allotment of more 
time to the study of English colloquially. 

The average attendance, &c., is compared in the following table with the 
corresponding figures of last year, and the results are encouraging : — 





1888-84. 


1881-85. 


On the rolls 

Present ........ 

Sick . 


6813 

58-37 

1-38 


7061 
59-80 

•74 



58. During the year under report, the Mayo College Public Works Divi- 
sion was abolished, and the duties formerly discharged by the Division have 
devolved upon the Principal. 

59. His Highness the Maharao Raja of Ulwur has supplemented his 
original gift of R10,000 by a further donation of R2,000. 

60. The receipts and expenditure compare with last year's figures as 
follows : — . 



• 




1888-81. 


1881-86. 


R a. p. 


R a. p. 


Receipts 


• •••••. 


29,881 13. 8 


85,097 12 1 


Expenditure . 


* * * .* .* 
Balance 


28,898 5* 6 


32,660 14 5 




983 7 9 


2,586 18 8 



To this balance must be added a sum of Rl,054-4-2, which was standing to 
the College credit in the Ajmere Treasury on the 1st of April 1884, so that the 
total balance at the close of the year amounted to B3,691-l-10. 

61. In Eajputana generally the educational progress noted last year is 
continuing slowly but surely. 

Jeypore and Ulwur maintain their position as the States which devote 
most attention to this subject. The number of pupils on the rolls of the 
Jeypore College continues to increase, and has now reached 1,012, the daily 
nttendance averaging 659. Six of the nine unsuccessful candidates for the 
Calcutta University First Arts Examination in December 1883 were admitted to 
re-examination in May 1884, and on this occasion three satisfied the examiners. 
The date of the Calcutta University Examination having been altered from 
December to April, Dr. Stratton was unable to note the present year's results ; 
and a similar remark applies to Ulwur, whence six pupils presented themselves 
for l^st April's examination. 

62. Colonel Euan-Smith's report contains the satisfactory intelligence that 
Bhurtpore and Kerowlee are awakening to the need for educational reform. In 
the latter State a good primary school has already been established at the capital, 
and the Bhurtpore schools will, it is hoped, be shortly brought under the 
periodical inspection of a qualified officer. 



Digitized- by 



GoogI( 



14 EBPOET OP TAB POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

la Eotah 6 new schools have been opened at Nizamat head-qu^^rters, and 
in Tonk and Jhallawar similar actiyity is being exhibite4. 

In Mey war an elaborate scheme for establishing schools throughout the dis- 
tricts is in course of preparation. It is fully described in Colonel Walter's report, 
and I was glad during my visit to Oodeypore to find that the project had received 
the ready support of the Maharana. 

In Bickaneer, educational interests have had to give way to matters of more 
immediate importance, but they have not been lost sight of, and Captain Talbot 
has promised to draw the Durbar's attention to the question during the present 
y^M- 

POST OFFICE. 

63. The Postal Department has shown considerable activity during the year 
1884-85 : 13 new offices were opened, the most important of which was that at 
Bickaneer, and the total number now established in Rajputana is 102. 

The experiment at Bickaneer has proved a great success, and is highly ap- 
preciated ; daily postal communication is maintained, the mails being conveyed 
by camel d&rk from Sujangurh vid Bidasar, a distance of 80 miles, and the office 
is reported to be doing a brisk business, while other offices will, it is hoped, be 
shortly opened at the Nizamat head-quarters. 

Postal extension in Marwar has been elsewhere noted on. 

The estimated number of articles of all descriptions delivered through the 
post during the year was 183,267, as compared with 163,366 in 1883-84. 

The total distance over which mails were carried on lines open on the 31st 
of March 1885 was 2,047 miles, and the method of transport was as follows : — 
By rail , • • . • , . 662 miles. 

„ mail-cart « . • • .• .• > ^^ >> . 

„ camel ,...•• 80 „ 

„ runners . . . . . •. 1,^45 „ 

The Beawar Post Office was converted into a con^bined Post and Telegraph 
Office, and earned a good revenue. 

LOCAL CORPS. 

64. The Merwara Battalion and the Deoli Irregular Force were inspected 
during the year under report by Brigadier-Geaeral R, R. Gillespie, O.B., 
and Colonel 0. S. Heathcote, C, B., who successively commanded the Nusseer- 
abad Brigade. The Erinpura Irregular Porce was inspected by Brigadier-General 
H. fl. James, Commanding the Deesa Field Brigade, and the Mey war Bheel Corps 
by Major-General A. Carnegy, Commanding the Northern Division of the Bombay 
Arnay. 

66. The reports on the whole were satisfactoTy. The musketry returns 
show a great improvement in the efficiency of the Merwara Battalion and of 
the Deoli and Erinpura Fprces. The figure of merit of the Merwara Battalion 
on the date of the last inspection (26th of December 1884) we^s 132*106^ and 
out of 523 men who had fired, 405 were mar]^smen. 

66. The Government of India's recent grant of free passes by rail to repre- 
sentative teams of the local corps in Rajputana and Central India, when pro- 
ceeding to compete at the Rajputana and Central India annual Rifle Meeting, 
is highly appreciated, and will, it is confidently hoped, afford valuable encourage- 
ment to good shooting, and thus tend to promote the efficiency of the corps in 
this important particular. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE BAJPUTANA STATES POE 1884-86. 16 

67. The propoBal to brigade the Deolee Irregular Force and the Merwara 
Battalion with the Nusseerabad garrison during the past cold season was aban- 
doned under the orders of the Ooyemment of India. 

68. In December last, Lieutenant-Colonel P. W. Boileau returned from 
furlough and took over command of the Deolee Irregular Force, which had fallen 
vacant on the retirement from the service of Colonel C. H. Clay. lieutenant- 
Oolonel E. Temple was recalled from boundary duty and appointed to officiate as 
Commandant of the Meywar Bhil Corps on the 20th of February 1885, vice 
Lieutenant-Colonel A. ConoUy, proceeded on furlough to Europe on medical 
certificate. The head-quarters and a strong detachment of this corps was present 
atOdeypore in March last, at the installation ceremony, and I was much pleased 
with their soldier-like appearance. 

69. During the cold weather I also had an opportunity of inspecting the 
three other local corps in Rajputana, which, one and all, struck me as being 
in a remarkably efficient and satisfactory condition. 

The Meywar Bhil Corps has now been equipped with Snider rifles, and 
has been placed under the Bombay Military authorities for purposes of 
musketry instruction. 

RAJPtTTAKA-ltALWA VOLXTNTEEE EIPLE C0EP8. 

70. The second annual report of the corps opens with the extremely satis- 
factory intelligence that the strength, which now stands at 636, has risen 
nearly 20 per cent, during the year ending on the 31st of March 1885. 

No less than 222 new members were enrolled, and of the 117 who resigned, 
the majority did so on transfer to other lines. 

71. The year under review has witnessed considerable changes in the 
arrangement and distribution of the various companies. Owing to certain 
alterations in the disposition of the railway staff, the head-quarters of " E " 
Company (late " C ") have been transferred from Sabarmati to Abu Eoad, and 
*' G ** Company at Khundwa has been broken up, its members having joined * E * 
Company at Mhow, whither the locomotive shops were removed in February 
last. 

Sergeant-Instructor Morrell from Khundwa is now actively engaged in the 
formation of a fresh company at Sirsa on the new Rewari-Eerozepore branch, 
and a second additional company has been organised at Ajmere by the enrol- 
ment of a strong contingent from the Carriage and Wagon Factory staff. 

72. The lettering and disposition of the companies, as revised in conse- 
quence of these changes, compares as f oUows with last year's detail : — 

1883^41. 1884-86. 



A.' 




B. 


•Ajmere. 


c' 


SabarmatL 


D. 


Bandikui. 


E. 


Jeyporeu 


P. 


Mhowt 


G. 


Khundwa. 


H. 


(Non-exiBtent.) 



A.- 


) 


B- 


>• Ajmere. 


c. 


) 


D. 


Bandikui. 


E. 


Abu Road. 


F. 


Mhow. • 


Q. 


Sirsa. 


H. 


Jeypore. 



73. The capitation grftnt was drawn for 541 members of the corps, as 
against 625 in the preceding year, and these figures would have been higher 
but for the fact that a large number of lately joined recruits had no time to 
qualify .as " efficients " before the close of the year. 



Digitized by VnOOQl^ > 



10 EEPORT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

For a similar reason many others who were enrolled late in the year were 
unable to pass as " extra efl&cients/' for they were constrained to fire their annual 
course with little or no previous practice, and hence failed to attain there- 
quired standard in musketry. The returns show 119 efficients and 422 extra 
efficients as against 54 and 472 last year, and in view of the smaller proportion 
of members entitled to the higher rate, the capitation grant for the current 
year is estimated at R 14,795, as compared with & 15,273-8-0 actually received 
in 1883-84. In the light of the above explanation, however, this falling off 
need not be regarded as discouraging. 

74. The average attendance at drill has risen considerably, and although 
the figure of merit (110-26) is slightly lower than that recorded in 1883-84, 
such a result is the reverse of surprising when the. large proportion of new 
members is taken into consideration. 

75. The interest taken in musketry shows no sign of abatement, and 
no less than four new rifle ranges will shortly be thrown open to the corps. 

The Raja of Rutlam having generously offered to build one at his own 
expense, a site has been selected near the Hutlam Railway Station, and the 
work is being rapidly carried on. In an equally liberal spirit the Sirohee 
Durbar placed rent-free ground at the disposal of the members of the corps at 
Abu Road, and a new range has already been completed there. Similar activity 
is being displayed at Sirsa, where a site has been granted by Government, 
and at Ajmere land for a second range, in a position more convenient for the 
members of B and Companies, is being applied for, and the Commandant 
is in communication with the Municipal authorities regarding it. A new range 
will be commenced there as soon as the land is sanctioned, and terms of pur- 
chase or compensation settled. 

76. The annual inspection of the corps was taken as imder : — 

A B and C. Companies at Ajmere, and D and H at Bandikui and 
Phalera, by Brigadier-General Heathcote, Commanding Nusseerabad Brigade, 
on the 26th and 27th March;* F Company at Mhow by Lieutenant-General 
Sir R. Phayre, Commanding Mhow Division, on the 17th idem; and the detach- 
ment at Neemuch by Colonel C. E. Stack, Commanding the station ; E Com- 
pany at Abu Road and Mount Abu by Major H- Collingwood, Commanding 
Mount Abu Sanitarium, on the 21st and 23rd of March. 

The present strength at inspection parades reached a total of 359, and thus 
showed an increase of 12 per cent, on that of the previous year, 

77. With a view to ensuring more favorable weather, the Annual Prize 
Meeting was held in November instead of in March as in 1883-84, 

The average shooting was good, but, probably on account of the short 
interval between the meetings, the subscription list showed a falling oflF of near- 
ly R600, only R2,859 being collected as against R3,437 on the previous 
occasion. 

78. lieutenant-Colonel W. S. S. Bisset resumed command on return from 
furlough on the 23rd of December 1884. 

Major Jacob's subsequent retirement has occasioned general regret, and 
that energetic oflScer is undoubtedly a heavy loss to the corps. 

Captain J. J. Jones, Commanding B Company at Ajmere, still shows a 
good example by keeping his company in a high state of efficiency, and himself 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



or THE BAJPTJTANA STATES EOB 188486. 17 

attending parades so frequently. He was present at 98 parades during the 
past year, besides giving the greatest encouragement in getting up picnio 
parades and taking about 100 members from the Ajmere Companies to attend 
a brigade parade at Nusseerabad in March last. 

Captain Wheatley continues to discharge the duties of Adjutant with great 
zeal and activity, and he enjoys a well-merited popularity in the corps. 

SANITATION, VACCINATION, DISPENSARIES, AND JAILS. 

SAKITATION. 

79. A general, if somewhat unequal, advance has been made in sanitation 
by the Native States, and this advance is shown Hot only by an increasing 
anxiety for cleanliness in cities, but also by the introduction of improvements 
in jails and dispensaries. The sanitary movement is most apparent in XJlwur, 
Jeypore, Kerowlee, Jodhpore and Jhallawar, and has even made itself felt 
in Bickaneer. 

The importance of vital statistics is not as yet recognised in Native 
States, and the efforts made by the Superintendent-General of Dispensaries 
and Vaccination to obtain the information asked for by the Surgeon-General, 
in accordance with Statements I' to X of the Standard Series, have met 
. with but little success. It has, moreover, been decided that it would be 
impolitic to press for the submission of returns as elaborate as those asked for, 
but hopes are entertained that, as time goes on, the advantages to be derived 
from the acquisition of this kind of knowledge will be better appreciated, and 
that it may then become possible to organise a staff for the collection of these 
statistics in each State. 

VACCINATION. 

80. The number of successful vaccinations rose from 107,919 to 132,506 
(22 per cent.), the increase reported in 11 out of 16 States being most con- 
spicuous in Jeypore. The average number of persons vaccinated by each 
vaccinator was 1,943, which is higher by 25 per cent, than the number re- 
gistered in the previous year, but the percentage of success in primary vaccina- 
tion, 92, is lower by 2 per cent. The expenditure was larger by nearly 4i per 
cent., the increase being chiefly shown under the head of " Travelling allowance,'* 
but the average cost of each successful case, 16 pie, was less by 3 pie than 
in 1883. 

The establishment remained the same as in the previous year and numbered 
74 vaccinators. 

DISFENSABIES. 

81. Three new dispensaries were opened during the year (in Kerowlee). 
The total number of these institutions in Native States on the 31st of Decem- 
ber 1884 was 69. 

The number of in-patients (4,381) is nearly the same as for 1883, but 

the out-patients (324,918) increased by more than 14 per cent. A rise in 

• The three dispeoBariee opened ^^^ ^^ number treated took placc m 13 States and 

during the year are excluded. 47* dispcusaries, a fall being showu in two states 

and 19 dispensaries. 

The most noteworthy circumstance in the medical history of the dis- 
pensaries for the year is the large increase in the number of cases admitted 
for malarious fever. The same percentage, 18, on the total number of cases 
was recorded in 1881, when a heavy rainfall was registered in most parts of the 

S 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



18 REFOBT OF THE POLITICAL ADMIKISTBATIOK 

province. The increaBe is shown in all the States but one (Pertab^rh) and 
in 62 of the dispensaries, and occurred in Kotah and Jhallawar, where it rained 
less than usual, as well as in Bhurtpore and Ulwur, where the fall was abnormally 
heavy. 

The number of cases of cholera recorded in the weekly returns was 2,278, 
of which 1,056 or 46 per cent, proved fatal. Seven States suffered more or less 
from the disease, which was much more severe than in 1883, and caused a 
greater mortality than in 1882, when a larger number of persons was attacked 
by it. As far as can be ascertained, it first broke out about the middle of May 
and finally disappeared on the 23rd of October. 

Five hundred and fifteen major operations were performed at the different 
dispensaries, and of these 12 proved fatal. There were 439 operations and 15 
deaths in 1883. The minor operations increased during the year by 5 per cent. 

The expenditure was slightly in excess of that for the previous year, and is 
accounted for by the opening of threemew dispensaries. The average cost of each 
case treated, 44 pie, was 6 pie less than in 1883, while the average expenditure 
on each diet, 16 pie, was lower by one pie than in the previous year. 

JAILS. 

82. In the 13 jails from which returns are received, the daily average 
number of prisoners was 3,020 against 2,695 in 1883. The total number of 
admissions to hospital and the average daily sick were higher by 16 per cent, 
and 12 per cent., respectively, while the mortality rose from 33 to 45 per mille. 
Excluding cholera, however, which may be regarded as exceptional, the death- 
rate was 37 per thousand, and this is not a high ratio considering the amount of 
sickness caused by malaria among the general population. 

Of the eight jails, in each of which the daily average number of prisoners 
exceeded one hundred, that at Jhalrapatan, where no death occurred, was the 
healthiest, and that at Jeypore the most unbealthy, the mortality in the latter 
being 75 per thousand (or excluding cholera 60 per mille). There are five small 
jails in which the average daily number of prisoners aggregated 837. In two 
of these (Sirohee and Shahpoora) there were no deaths during the year, but in 
three, Dholepore, Tonk and Kerowlee, the mortality reached the high ratio of 
117, 9b, and 88 per mille; but if deaths from cholera be excluded, these ratios sink 
to 106, 16, and 76. The total number of deaths in these three jails was in 
Dholepore 11 (1 from cholera), in Tonk 6 (5 from cholera), and in Kerowlee 7 
(1 from cholera). Cholera appeared in five jails, and caused 24 deaths, 12 of 
those occurring at Jeypore and 5 at Bhurtpore. Malarial fever contributed 
39 per cent, of the cases treated. 

Extensive alterations were made in the Kerowlee jail during the past 
year ; minor improvements have been effected in several of the other prisons, 
and plans are now being prepared for a new jail at Odeypore. The Dholepore 
jail, which has been much improved of late years, was somewhat over-crowded, 
but otherwise in a good sanitary condition. 

Endeavours have been made to obtain the information asked for by the 
Sui^eon-Qeneral according to Statements XIV and XV of the Standard Series, 
and the required statistics have been supplied, for the most part incorrectly, 
from eight jails. It is hoped that Statement XV will be furnished for 1885 
by all the jails, but as several of the Durbars have evinced a decided reluctance 
to afford information regarding the cost of their prisons, it is improbable that 
these statistics will be readily supplied for some time to come. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB HAJPTJTANA STATE FOB 1884^. 19 



Part ni. 
PTTBIIC WOEBS. 

BZPEimiTtJBE DUBINO THE YEAB. 

83. The total reported outlay upon Public Works in the province, exclu- 
sive of expenditure on Irrigation in Ajmere and Merwara, vras R28,35,653. 
The distribution of the expenditure is given below : — 

IMPEBIAL. 

S 

Military Works 1,40,694 

Civil Buildings, Roads and Services ..... 2,29,867 

INCOBFOBATED LOCAL FUKDS. 

Civil Buildings^ Roads and Services 14,633 

COWTBIBXJTIONS. 
JODEPORE BAILWAT. 

First section up to Pali, working of open line . . . 89,609 

Second section np to Luni 1,26,131 

Third section up to Jodhpore 4,00,596 

Cantonment Fund, Nusseerabad 12,468 

Ditto, Deesa 61 

Other contributional works 65,035 

- State works, Meywar 2,09,836 

Ditto, Marwar 1,52,635 

Ditto, Jeypore, for 12 months ending 31st December 

1884 9,23,249 

Ditto, Ulwur 2,03,845 

Ditto, Kotah 3,08,265 

Ditto, Jhallawar 1,55,379 

Ditto, Dholepore 46,343 

Ditto, Kerowlee 7,407 

Total . 28,35,553 



The previous year's expenditure vras R27,56,882 or a little less than that 
of the year under report. These figures tend to prove that the Public Works 
are making favourable progress in the more important Native States under 
this Agency. 

MILITARY. 

NirSSEEBABAD. 

84. The only important work in the province which was in progress and 
executed during the year, was undertaken to increase the supply of water for 
the Nusseerabad Cantonment from the Danta reservoir. 

The sanctioned estimate for the work was R.2,81,716, the total outlay 
R2,83,581, and the expenditure of the year R22,873. The head-works were 
originally commenced in December 1875. 

As it was anticipated that the water from the Danta tank would fail dur- 
ing the hot months, a supplementary project for bringing in additional water 
from the Bhir tank by connecting the latter with the Danta tank, was sanction- 
ed for R22,967, inclusive of R6,187 contributed by the Cantonment Pund Com- 
mittee. This connection has also been completed, and a good water-supply for 
the Nusseerabad Cantonment has been thus secured. Water will be drawn from 

Sa 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



20 REPOET OP THE POLITICAL ADMnaSTEATION 

the Danta reservoir as long as it can proyide it, and when its storage is exhaust- 
ed, which it generally will be about the middle of April, the Bhir tank will be 
indented on. 

An extension of this system of water-supply to the Nusseerabad Bazaar is 
now under consideration, and the Cantonment Committee are ready to provide 
the necessary funds. 

In August last, one of the Royal Artillery barracks at Nusseerabad was 
struck by lightning, and six men were killed. To prevent the recurrence of 
such an accident, proposals have been submitted for supplying the barracks with 
lightning conductors, and the work will be carried out as soon as funds are 
available. 

The relaying of the roofs of six blocks of married quarters was completed 
during the year at a cost of about R12,800, of which about R800 were spent 
during the last 12 months. 

At Deesa, stalls to accommodate eight elephants were completed during the 
year at a total cost of R,5,226. 

At Abti, buildings for the Commissariat Department, including a well at 
Abti Road station, were constructed at a total cost of K6,lB8. 

The Government of India, on reviewing the inspection report of the Mey- 
war Bhil Corps for the year 1882-83, expressed an opinion that an armourer's 
shop was required at Kherwara, and this building was completed during the 
year under review at a cost of about R2,460. 

CIVIL BUILDINGS. 

FOBEIGK STATES, IKCLUDING MAYO COLLEGE WOHEa 

85. Mayo College main building : — 

H 
Amount of sanctioned estimate • • • • 8,81^696 

Total expenditure 8,81,293 

Expenditure of the year * • . . • . 637 

A few minor works only were carried out in connection with tliis building 
during the year, under the direct supervision of the Principal, assisted by a 
subordinate of the Public Works Department. The CoUege is now practically 
complete. 

The Native States boarding-houses and all contributioiaal works pertainiDg 
to the Mayo College were also placed directly under the Principal, id be dealt 
with in consultation with the Durbars and Political Oficers concerned. 

ULWXm GATEWAY,. MAYO COLLEGE. 

This is a gift by His Highness the Maharao Raja of Ulwur, who has paid 
R10,000 into the Treasury for the purpose. The work was coniimenced in the 
previous year, and is now well advanced towards completion. Progress has been 
slow on account of the delay in procuring cut stone, 

86. Of civil buildings of lesser importance in progress or commenced 
during the year, those requiring passing notice are : — 

I — ^An oflGlce and out-buildings for the Superintendent-General of Dis- 
pensaries and Vaccination in Rajputana at Abu ; 
II — A post office near the railway station at Bandanwara ; 
III — ^Enclosure and improvement of the old cemetery at Deesa ; 
IV — ^A new court-house at Abti ; and 

V — Additional accommodation for the Telegraph Office and establish- 
ment at Abti. 
All these were completed, or nearly so, during the year. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE RAJPTJTANA STATE FOR 1884-86. 21 

COMMUNICATIONS. 

FOBEIGN STATES. 

87. A revised estimate of R82,982 on account of the new hill road from 
Momit Abti to the Abti Road Railway Station, which is in course of construc- 
tion, was sanctioned during the year. 

The total outlay on account of the work has been R83,388, the expend* 
iture of the year being R16,080. 

A causeway across the nullah in the first mile of this road was built at 
a cost of Rl,129, on an estimate separately sanctioned. 

LOCAL OR CANTONMENT FUND WORKS. 

88. Rupees 10,906 were sanctioned for a new school-house at Nusseerabad. 
The building was commenced during the year, and R5,108 were spent upon it. 

A serai for the accommodation of native travellers was also constructed at 
Nusseerabad at a cost of Bl,151. 

METWAR. 

89. Public Works Department expenditure in Meywar for the year 1884-85 
reached a total of R2,09,336. 

Rupees 60,518 (including B4,506 spent by Mr. Monckton, Executive Engi- 
neer, Irrigation Department, in laying out canals from the Rai Samand Lake) 
were spent on works executed by the Durbar Engineer; the balance of 
Rl,48,818 was disbursed on account of works executed locally by a R&j official, 
of which no details have been furnished by the Durbar. 

The Oliitor road and the bridge over the Bagun River, mentioned in former 
reports, have both been completed, and are now open for traffic. 

The Eklingjee road has been greatly improved by the construction of 
revetment walls and parapets. 

The excavation at the north end of the bund of the great Deber Lake, 
designed to irrigate the lands below it, has at length been finished. 

The commencement of the proposed road from Oodeypore vid Gogoonda 
towards the railway at the Rohera Road Station, alluded to last year, was 
delayed in consequence of the project to lay a railway from Chitor trid Nath- 
dwara to Oodeypore. The services of Mr. Campbell Thomson, of the Railway 
Department, were placed at the disposal of the Meywar Durbar for the purpose 
of surveying the route proposed for the line, a task which he had nearly com- 
pleted at the close of the year. 

On the resignation of Mr. Monckton, Executive Engineer for Irrigation in 
Meywar, Mr. Campbell Thomson took over that officer's duties in addition to 
his own. 

JODHPOBE. 

JODHPOBE RAILWAY FBOM JODHPOBE JUNCTION ON THE MAIN 
BAJPTJTANA-MALWA BAILWAY LINE TO JODHPOBB CITY. 

90. This branch consists of three sections : — 

L — Jodhpore Junction to Pali (19 miles). 
II. — Pali to Luni River (25 miles). 
III. — Luni to Jodhpore City (20 miles). 
Trains were already running on the first section at the commencement of 
the year ; the second section was opened for traffic in June 1884, and certain 
works connected therewith, which were unfinished at that time, were completed 
shortly after. The construction of the third section was commenced in May 
1884, and the whole branch was declared open in March 1885. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



22 KEPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

The total expenditure on departmental works in this State was R5,18,97l, 
of which R39,608 were spent on the working of the open line, R3,26,728 
on the construction of the extensions to Luni and Jodhpore City, and 
Rl,52,636 on other public works. Of the latter sum, E89,531 were laid out 
on the Bal Samand and Jodhpore City canal, which very important work is 
approaching completion. Last rains it contributed a large supply of water to 
the city tanks. 

JEYPORE. 

91. The Public Works Department report of this State, which is separate- 
ly submitted by Lieutenant-Colonel Jacob, the State Executiye Engineer, is as 
ever full of interest. The change introduced last year, whereby the returns 
refer to the calendar and not the financial year, has been adhered to, and the 
present report gives the figures for the calendar year 1884- 

The expenditure during this period rose to nearly H9|- lakhs, exclusive of 
SI iV lakh incurred by the " Imarat '* Department of the Durbar. 

It is worthy of notice that this expenditure of 9J lakhs is the largest ever 
incurred by the Jeypore State Public Works Department since its formation. 

There are two points of special interest in the past year's report. One 
is the introduction of portable railways on important irrigation works, where a 
large quantity of work had to be done in a limited time. The experiment has 
proved a success, and has fully answered all expectations. The other is the pro- 
jection of a scheme for a metre-gauge railway between Jeypore and Kotah vid 
Chatsu, Niwai, Sewai Madhopur to the River Chambul, avoiding the States of 
Tonk and Bundi, though it would still pass close enough to tap them. There is 
little doubt that the line would pay a fair return, for one end would tap the 
large salt dep6t at Sambhur, and the other the extensive grain tracts of Eotah 
and Harowtee.. The length of the line would be 106 miles, and its cost, includ- 
ing two large bridges over the Banas and the Chambul, is estimated at about 
25 lakhs of rupees. 

The Albert Hall in the Ram Newas gardens, mentioned in last year's report, 
is making rapid progress; The expenditure on it during the year was R73,534i. 

Last year it was mentioned that the water- works at Jeypore occasionally 
failed to give the city a sufl&cient supply, and Colonel Jacob now reports that, 
in order to remedy this and secure a certain and adequate storage, various mea- 
sures were adopted, including the construction of a sand bund, 61 feet high, in 
the Amani Shah, in effecting which many difficulties were met with, owing to 
the loose sandy nature of the banks and bed of the river. 

The report on the gas-works is again full of detail and very interesting. 
Much credit is due to Mr. S. J. Tellery, the Superintendent, for his incessant 
efforts towards reducing the cost of production, and this year considerable mea- 
sure of success has rewarded him. It is now proposed to extend the gas lights 
in the city by attaching pipes and fittings to about a thousand shops, and this 
without any further alteration or additional expense. This measure would not 
only conduce to the comfort of the people and improvement to the city streets, 
but would also bring in considerable profit to the State. 

IBBIGATION. 

92. The following is a brief abstract of the expenditure and income under 

this head : — 

fi 

Expenditure incurred during the year . . . . '8,11,440 

Revenue realised for the year ending on the Slst 

August 1884 1,25,780 

The revenue derived from irrigation on account of the period since August 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE B^JSITTANA STATB POE 1884-86. 



23 



1884 is not included in the income, and will probably add 8:1,00,000 to the 
above-quoted revenue. 

The following statement tends to prove that irrigation has been successfully 
developed in Jeypore, at once to the great enhancement of the State revenues 
and to the undoubted advantage and contentment of the cultivators : — 



Year. 



1868 

J.OOv •••••••• 

1870-71 . 

1871-72 

1872-73 • . 

1873-74 

1874-7B ' . 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1879-80 

1880-81 

1881-82 

loo2-8t> •••••••• 

1883 (nine months) ...... 

1884 

Total 



Amoant expended. 



in 

28,858 

22,77e 

44,529 

68,019 

63,590 

62,690 

70,452 

2,26,038 

1,52,668 

1,26,218 

1,20,766 

1,28,588 

l,4i,765 

2,88,624 

1,67,207 

8,11,440 



19,59,441 



Reyenae realiied. 



s 



4,837 

5,6£S 

16,921 

6.448 

10,61.9 

22,590 

22,207 

22,200 

66,814 

80,085 

65,205 

1,40,256 

1,61,941 

1,25,730* 



7,50,001 



OENEBAL. 

93. There is ample evidence in this and in Colonel Jacob's own report of 
the extent of the field under that oficer's charge, and of the great responsibi- 
lity and incessant labour attaching thereto. The energy and zeal which 
Colonel Jacob has devoted to the discharge of the manifold duties entrusted to 
him by the Durbar are best evidenced by the very satisfactory outcome of his 
labours. 

ULWUE. 

94. This State spent on public works a sum of R2,03,846, the distribu- 
tion of which is shown below : — 

fi 

Buildings 1,24,248 

Roads 36,256 

Bunds and tanks 17,393 

Workshops 22,124 

Establishment 7,741 

Miscellaneous 2^083 

ToTiX . 2,03,845 

Of the buildings under construction at the close of the preceding year^ the 
following were completed : — 

1. His Highness's private railway station. 

2. House for the Agency Surgeon. 

3. Stables for His Highness at the Motee Doongri. 

Buildings commenced and completed during the year were — 

1. Barracks at Nangaon. 

2. Stables at the Agency. 

^ This is op to Aogost 1884 onl/ ; adding income up to 8tst Decern bar 1884, this sum would rise to about 
»2^,78a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



24 EBPORT OP THE POLITICAI4 ADMINISTRATION 

When the year closed the following huildings were in progress : — 

1. Barracks for Khas Palton. 

2. Fern house. 

8. Baradari at the Motee Doongri. 

4. Stud stablcB. 

6. School of Industry. 

6. Temple at Benares* 

BpADS. 

95. The roads under construction were — 

1. Ramgurh-Perozepore road (7 miles). 

2. Umran-Ghazika Thana road (19 miles). 

3. Kathumar Kherli Railway feeder (lU miles). 

Tour miles of the first have heen metalled, and the earth-work of the 
remaining three miles completed ; of the second, the earth- work, bridges and 
causeways have heen finished, and preparations made for metalling. 

The earth- work of the i:ailway feeder to Kherli Station on the Rajputana 
Bailway has heen completed. 

At the capital a new road to the Motee Doongri was commenced, various 
improvements and repairs were executed, and particular attention was paid to 
planting and maintaining trees along road-sides. 

BUIl^DS ATSTB TANKS. . 

96. A tank was built at Kathumar. The Khizarpur bund was nearly com- 
pleted, and various repairs were undertaken. Though the major portion of the 
total outlay appears to have been on works at or about the capital, the attention 
paid to roads and bunds evinces a desire on the part of the Durbar to meet the 
wants of the districts. 

KOTAH. 

97. The total expenditure was R3,08,265, distributed as shown below : — 

ft 

Civil buildings 69,938 

Communications •••••••• 95^463 

Irrigation works •••••.•• 55^956 

Miscellaneous public improvements 21^715 

Repairs 48,598 

Establishment 16,595 

Total . 3,08,265 

This is a trifle more than the sum spent during the preceding year, which 
was R3,07,906. 

The outlay on original works was mainly devoted to the completion of 
works already in hand. 

BUILDIKGS. 

98. Of the works mentioned in the last report, those still in progress 
were — 

1. Late Maharao's Chuttri. 

2. Serai at Kotah. 

The serai was sufficiently well advanced to adniiit of a portion being thrown 
open for public use. 

Works started during the year and under construction are — 
!• Gun-shed at Kotah (nearly finished). 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB EAJPTJTANA STATE FOE 1884^. 25; 

2. Second set of stud lines^ the masonry of which is finished^ and roof now under 

construction. 

3. Restoration and completion of the city walls at Eotah, 

These more important buildings, &c., cost JftlO^OOO, and several smaller 
works were commenced and completed to meet the requirements of the admi* 
nistration.' 

BOADS. 

99. The Borda GhAt causeway on the Purwan River was completed before 
the rains at c^ cost of Jft27,778 for the full length of 2,300 feet. The principal 
works begun during the year under this head were— 

1. Parbutti crossing on the Kishen Gunj roadj length 1^550 feet* Estimated cost 

ft28,761. 

2. Mundawar Oh&t road, length about 4 miles. Estimated cost B29,480. 

The gh&t road was open for carts in January 1885, though dressing and 
widening in some places remained to be done. This road supplies a much-felt 
want by affording a second outlet for cart-traffic between Harowtee and Malwa, 
the only outlet hitherto available over the dividing range for a length of 50 
miles being that through the Darra pass. 

A fair-weather road, 27 miles in length, was in progress to connect the 
Mundawa Gh&t on the north with the border crossing on the Purwan River, 
The total length completed up to date is— 

Metalled roads • , » « « , ^ • 75^ miles. 
Fair-weather roads « « 90^ „ 

About the capital several improvements were, undertaken, the principal 
being the laying out of public gardens below the bund of the city at a cost of 
R17,038 ; this was nearly completed at the close of the year, 

IBBIGATIOir WOBKS. 

100. The Parbutti scheme was completed at a total cost of R2,89,520, 
and the Aklera tank, mentioned in the last report, begun. The Executive 
Engineer hopes to close the dam this year, and irrigate from it next cold 
weather. The works are estimated to cost R59,769. Irrigation from the 
Parbutti canals is yet too much in its infancy to afford any criterion for judg- 
ing of its ultimate prospects, of which, however, the Political Agent speaks 
hopefully. 

The progress noted testifies to a lively interest on the part of the admini- 
stration in the prosecution of works of public utility, both at the capital and in 
the interior. 

JHALLAWAS. 

101. The expenditure on public works during the year aggregated 
Kl,55,379, distributed as shown below : — 

B 

Civil buildings 47,000 . 

Communications . . • • • ' . • • 50,400 

Miscellaneous improvements •.••... 2,592 
Irrigation •••.•••••# 7,567 
Miscellaneous* • • ' • • • • « # . 5,951 

Repairs . , . 27,209 

Establishment » 14,560 

Total .1,55,879 

This total exhibits a falling ofiE of R50,249 from the total outlay of the 
preceding year. 

4 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



2d EEPOET OF THB POLITICAL ADHINISTRATION 

BUILDINGS. 

102. The following buildings, which were unfinished in the previous year, 
have been completed : — 

1. Becord-Toom, Bevenae head^quarters. 

2. Ohatoli Thana. 

8. Aklera Dispensary. 

4. Pach Pahar Dispensary. 

6. Chaichut Tbana. 

6. Lines for Bhadur Pulton. 

7. Additions to jail, Jhalrapatan. 

Besides the above, there were several smaller works commenced, some of 
which were completed during the year, whilst others were in progress. 

BOADS. 

103. A new fair-weather road, including masonry crossings to nullas, from 
Ameta to the Parwan — ^a little over 10 miles in length — ^was commenced and 
well advanced towards completion by the close of the year, at an estimated cost 
of Rll,707. 

Two masonry causeways over the large streams mentioned below, and 
crossed by this road, were sanctioned and completed under separate estimates : — 

Estimate. 
& 

1. Chappee river causeway, 870 feet long, paved throughout with 

openings to pass off the cold weather flpw . • • 7v^l2 

2. Purwan river causeway, 1,085 feet in length and of similar 

design 17,884 

The causeways on the Kali Bind and Ahu rivers, mentioned in last report, 
were also finished during the year. 

ZBBIGATION WOBES. 

104. Of irrigation works, the Sladila Tank, alluded to in last yearns report, 
was completed, and some irrigation took place from the channels. 

His Highness the Maharaj Rana has expressed a desire to extend village 
tank irrigation, and the Executive Engineer hopes to meet His Highness' wishes 
by preparing some projects to supply this want. 

DEOLEFOBE. 

106. The total public works expenditure in this State was B46,343 
against B58,209 in the previous year. Twenty-six wells with 83 " laos " for irri- 
gation purposes have been constructed at a cost of B7,575. 

The new masonry bund near Ohandpore, built to store water for His 
Highness the Maharaj Sana's new Kothi, has been further heightened and 
extended. 

The foundations for His Highness the Maharaj Bana's No. I Eothi on 
the hills near Chandpore ware concreted, and are now ready for the superstruc- 
tion of masonry. 

No. II Kothi, on a lower level than the one above referred to^ has reached 
the plinth level. 

A metalled road from near Furani Chaoni leading to the two Kothis is 
nearly finished, and the total cost of the Kothis, bund, and road is estimated at 
R16,830. 

The Unes for the Telingan Fultans were under construction, but have not 
been entirely completed. 

The work on the Mandir and Cenotaph in memory of His Highness the 
late Chief of Dholepore was carried nearly to completion during the year under 
review. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE EAJPTJTANA STATE F0& 1884^. 27 

A house for the Executive Engineer, with out-offices, was nearly completed 
at a cost of B15,6d7* 

The sandstone quarries were worked very satisfactorily, a train-load of 
broken ballast, averaging 8,000 jcubic feet, being supplied daily to the East 
Indian Railway. The sale of dressed stone has increased steadily. 

EESOWLEE. 

106. During the year 1884*85 a new Public Works Department was estab- 
lished in this State. 

On sanction having been accorded by the (Government of India to a mini- 
miun of R45,000 per year being set aside from current State revenue for 
expenditure on public works, the services of Mr. C. E. Housden, Executive 
Engineer, were, at the request of the Council, placed at the disposal of the 
Durbar in January 1886. 

Mr. Housden has, since his appointment, made a tour of inspection through 
the country with a view to ascertaining its capacity for the construction of new 
tanks and roads. He has already prepared estimates for several works, and 
has been actively employed on some that were sanctioned by the Durbar, and 
on such as were previously in process. 

The Council have further sanctioned certain urgently needed public works, 
which will be carried out during the year, at a cost aggregating R62,500. The 
most important of these works is the Hindown«£^x>wlee road, the want of 
which has been seriously felt. Its construction will join Kerowlee with the 
railway as soon as the Jeiypote Durbar have finished the continuation through 
their territory. 

KAJPUTAN A-MALWA EAUWAT. 

107. The Bajputana-Malwa Eailway was handed over to the Bombay, 
Baroda and Central India Bailway Company on the 1st of January 1885, and 
as it has now passed entirely into private management, and become an integral 
part of the Bombay, Baroda and Central India system, any notice of its work* 
ing would be out of place in this report* 



ia 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



28 &EPOET OF THE POLITICAli ADICIKISTEATIOK 



Part IV- 



BEVIEW OF TEE BEFOBTS OF THE FOUTICAL AGENCIES. 



HEYWAE AGENCT* 

OODEYFOBE. 

108. Lieutenant-Colonel C. B. Euan-Smith, C.S J., officiated in charge of 
this Agency for three months from May 1884, during the absence on privilege 
leave of the permanent incumbent, Colonel C. K. M. Walter, who was present 
in his charge during the remainder of the year under review. 

The State suffered a heavy loss by the death, on the 24th of December 1884, 
of the promising young Chief, Maharana Sujjan Singh, 6.C.S.I., during whose 
reign many important reforms and improvements were introduced in Meywar. 
The circumstances attending his demise have already been fully reported on, 
and I need only here note with great satisfaction the auspicious maimer in 
which his successor's reign has opened. Maharana Futteh Singh made a most 
excellent impression upon me during my visit to his capital for the purpose of 
conducting his formal installation, and I am full of hope that his reign will 
fulfil the bright promise of its opening days. 

In the matter of harvests, the past year has been exceedingly fortunate ; 
the rainfall was considerably above the average, the kharif and rabi crops were 
both excellent, and they were moreover gathered and stored without loss or 
damage of any description. 

The public health at Oodeypore is reported to compare favorably with the 
returns of previous years ; the dispensaries and hospital were well attended, and 
there has been a considerable increase in the number of vaccinations. Flans 
have been made out for the erection of a new jail on a suitable site, and the 
Resident hopes that the building wiU shortly be commenced. 

The new Maharana has already confirmed the grant of a piece of land, rent- 
free, for a hospital, which his predecessor had contemplated bestowing on the 
United Fresbyterian Mission, in recognition of the medical services rendered by 
the Reverend Mr. Sommerville, and Dr. Shepherd is about to erect a large and 
commodious hospital thereon. 

The finances of the State are in an eminently satisfactory condition ; the 
income for Sumbat year 1940 ending on the 80th of June 1884, amounted to 
about 264 lakhs Government rupees, while the expenditure was but little in 
excess of 22 lakhs ; the resulting balance amounting to over 4,40,000 rupees. 
The expenditure included about 2 lakhs of rupees on account of public works. 

The opium trade during the twelve months under review was brisker than 
it has been for many years ; and in consequence of the rise in price, a larger 
area was brought under cultivation last season, and a considerably larger 
outturn is looked for. A daring attempt at opium-smuggling was detected in 
November last, and the ringleaders of the gang have been made over to the 
District Magistrate, Ahmedabad, for trial. 

Salt was generally slightly cheaper than in the previous year, and the 
small town duty known as " mapa *' formerly levied upon it having been dis- 
continued, it is now perfectly free from tax throughout the State. 

One of the first actions of the new Maharana was to go thoroughly into 
Mr. Wingate*s Revenue Settlement scheme, and after being carefully instruct- 
ed in all its details. His Highness gave his formal sanction to the introduction 
of the proposed rates, and fixed 20 years as the period of the settlement* Mr. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE BAJPTJTANA STATE POE 1884-85. 29 

Wiagate's note on his elaborate scheme forms one of the appendices to the 
Eesident's report, and I share Colonel Walter's confident hope that the measures 
introduced on the 1st of July 1885 will prove of real and lasting benefit to the 
ryots. 

Mr. Monckton's remarks on the progress of irrigation in Meywar, which 
are given verbatim by Colonel Walter, show how thoroughly the Durbar appre- 
ciates the importance of supporting schemes of this character. 

The only change in the administration since last year is the election to the 
Mahad Baj Sabha of an additional member in the person of Maharaj Muddon 
Singh, the head of the Shukhtawut branch of the Sesodias, which was not for- 
merly represented at the Council Board. It is extremely satisfactory to note 
that the Maharana has lost no time in applying himself with great diligence 
to the transaction of State business. Rai Mehta Punna Lai has already received 
the thanks of Government for the good services rendered by him at the time of 
the late Chief's demise, and I need only here once more endorse the high 
encomium passed on him by Colonel Walter, 

The judicial statistics for the year under review show a very satisfactory 
decrease in serious crime. The Government mails have not suffered from inter- 
ference or violence of any kind. 

There has been a considerable increase in the number of scholars on the 
rolls of the Maharana's school, and a scheme for the extension of education in 
Meywar is now under discussion, and will, it is hoped, shortly be organised. 
For this purpose a sum of two lakhs of Oodeypore rupees was on the death of the 
late Chief set aside in lieu of wasting large sums on feeding Brahmins, as had 
been done on the demise of his two immediate predecessors. This money will 
be devoted to establishing schools and dispensaries in the districts, which will 
be named after the late Maharana, and the provision thus made will be further 
augmented by the proceeds of a light cess, which , on Mr. Wingate's sugges- 
tion, it has been arranged to levy on the land revenue settlement. The 
Maharana has guaranteed that no other cess wiU be exacted, and that a maxi- 
mum of one anna in the rupee shall not be exceeded, while the families of 
all land occupants paying the land revenue chargeable with the cess under 
notice will have free use of all educational and medicinal advantages, which 
may accrue from the expenditure of the fund, of which the sum thus raised 
wiU form a part. Colonel Walter has advised the devotion of the original two 
lakhs to building purposes, while ordinary expenses will be met by the income 
from land revenue.. 

The proposal to construct a branch railway from Chitor to Nathdwara, 
and the steps already undertaken towards surveying and preparing the ground, 
having formed the subject of a separate correspondence, no further mention 
need here be made of it than the fact that Colonel Walter embodies in his 
report a large portion of the Executive Engineer's note on the survey of the 
proposed line. 

Forty-six border disputes, representing a boundary line of 37 miles, were 
settled during the cold weather by Captain T. C. Pears on the Meywar-Tonk 
border. 

The B/Csident was unable to pay his usual visit to the Bhil country, but he 
reports that crime has been scarce, and the season has been an unusually good 
one. In addition to the two schools mentioned in last year's report, others 
have been opened at Bara Pal and Paduna, and all four are fairly well at- 
tended. 

The Bhorai fort has been completed. No case of witch-swinging has 
occurred during the past 12 months, but in November last a party of men 
escorting cloth to Saloomber were attacked by a band of the notorious Mina 
robbers of the *' Chappan.'' One of the escort was killed on the spot, and one 

H 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



30 BBPOET OF THE POLITICAL ADMINI8TBATI0N 

of the robbers died of wouads received iu the struggle. This happened near 
the hamlet of Miran, and on intelligence of the occurrence reaching the Naib 
Hakim of Lassaria, he proceeded thither and arrested the offenders, who were» 
however, rescued by the inhabitants of the surrounding *• pals.'* This daring 
outrage roused the Durbar to activity and a strong police force was at once 
sent to the scene of the disturbance, where they succeeded in making severa 
important arrests, and in gaining valuable information about the ringleaders 
in this and other robberies. Large, rewards have been offered for those of the 
chief actors who escaped capture, and the prompt action of the Durbar has had 

an excellent effect upon the people of the district. 

The disturbance in connection with the succession to the Boora estate, in 

which the Durbar troops were compelled to storm the city, has been already 

fully reported on, and needs here nothing further than an incidental reference. 
The Resident's tour during the past cold weather was curtailed owing to 

the necessity for his presence at the capital on the death of the late Maharana. 

HILLY TBACTS. 

109. lieutenant^Colonel E. Temple took over command of the Meywar 
Bhil Corps, with the duties of Political Superintendent of the Hilly Tracts, on 
the 26th of February 1885, from Colonel A. ConoUy, who was compelled to 
proceed to England on medical certificate. The rainfall at Eherwara and 
Kotra was above the average, and the crops, as a rule, were good. No ease of 
mail robbeiy or witch*swinging came to notice, and 11 out of 12 border disputes 
between Dungarpore and Banswara were settled by a Border Court. 

A new kamdar has been appointed at Jura, who has so far earned Golone! 
Temple's good opinion ; and the Rao's son, aged 19, now takes a share in the 
management of affairs. An affray which occurred near Kadur Mai in March 
is still under investigation, and will be noticed in a future report. 

The Bunna of Panurwa is said to manage his estate well ; he is rep&rt* 
ed to have attempted to exercise an illegal influence ovar the Umria estate 
by endeavouring, on the murder of the late Thakur, to oust the Thakur's 
nephew in favor of his own brother. The Durbar, however, interfered, and the 
Bunna's rights in regard to Umria have been clearly laid down. The mur- 
derer of the lata Thakur is still at large» but the Besident hopes he may yet be 
securedt 

DTJirOABPOaE. 

110. The Maharawul of Dungarpore continues to conduct l^e administra- 
tion of his estate to the entire satisfaction of his subjects. 

BAXrSWABA AND PBBTABGUBH. 

111. Lieutenant W. Evans-Gordon assumed charge of the duties of As- 
sistant Political Agent, Banswara and Fertabgurh, on the 16th of April 188^, 
and his tenure has so far been unbroken. 

The rainfall at Fertabgurh was only 25*21 against an average of 38-87 for 
the five preceding years. The crops, however, were exceedingly good, and the 
general health, both here and in Banswarsi, excellent. A post office and school 
have been established at Fertabgurh during the past year. The Bhils have 
been quiet, and the Maharawul has continued to conduct the administration 
satisfactorily. 

Colonel Walter notices a marked improvement in the report on Banswara, 
where an exceptionally heavy rainfall was attended by a corresponding cheap- 
ness in grain. 

Two cases of witch-swinging occurred during the year, but it is gratifying 
to note that nearly all the offenders in the first case have been captured and 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OT THE &AJPI7TAKA STATE POB 1884-85. 81 

punished, and that the Durbar is active in its endeavours to root out this 
horrible crime, 

WESTERN BAJPUTANA STATES AOENCT. 

112. Colonel Baylay officiated in charge of this Agency during the absence, 
on three months* privilege leave, of the Resident from the 26th of October 
1884. During the remainder of the year Colonel P. W. Powlett was present 
in his charge. 

The most interesting portion of the present report is that which deals with 
the extension and opening of the railway ; the line from Pali to the Luni was 
thrown open for traffic in June 1884, and the extension to the capital in March 
1885 ; the Resident reports that the cost of both these extensions will be well 
within the estimate. The line has paid a dividend for the whole year of 6 per 
cent., but since its completion as far as Jodhpore, i.e.^ for the three weeks 
preceding the submission of the present report, it was paying at double that rate. 
In view, however, of the fact that this was the busy season of the year, Colonel 
Powlett estimates the profit for the future at 6 per cent, per annum. 

The measures reported on last year for the suppression of dacoity have 
worked most satisfactorily during the past 12 months. The system adopted is 
to vigorously hunt down those actively concerned in recent dacoities, while 
extending an amnesty to the rank and file of the old gangs ; merely keeping them 
under supervision on condition of their making full confession, and giving any 
required information. The criminal tribes and all marauding villages are also 
made the subject of special attention, and are carefully watched, while the track- 
ing rules and the responsibility of jagirdars and vUl ageheadmen are strictly 
ei^orced. The Resident reports that the effect of this action on the part of the 
Durbar has been distinctly good, and he notes an enhanced sense of security on 
the Jeysulmere frontier, and in other formerly unsettled districts. 

Sana Salji of Lohiana, who escaped last year from Jodhpore, where he was 
under surveillance, died in Eebruary last, and his death has removed one of 
the chief causes of disquietude ; his son, who is now at the Mayo College, is to 
receive an estate of equal value to his patrimony ; but the title of Rana of Lohiana 
has been abolished, and the village itself raz^ to the ground. 

The harvests of 1884-85 were above the average, and the rainfall was IQT 
at Jodhpore, as compared with 12^ registered during each of the preceding 
two years. 

A Municipal Committee, with Dr. Adams as an adviser, has been started 
and is actively engaged in improving the sanitation of the capital. . Cholera made 
its appearance during the year in^Paliand Sojat, but the pest was happily not 
of a violent type. 

• There were two attacks on postal runners during the year, but in neither 
case did the ihails suffer. 

MABWAB. 

113. The Maharaja visited Calcutta during the past year and had interviews 
both with the late and present Viceroys. 

No changes have occurred among the leading officials connected with the 
adminLstration, which is reported to have gone on improving. 

The most important measure of the year has been the definition of the 
criminal powers enjoyed by the leading jagirdars, and a final arrangement has 
been arrived at by the Durbar and its feudatories, by which the latter are 
divided into three grades with powers of imposing imprisonment and fine varying 
from six months to one month, and from B500 to 100, with competency to 
decide civil suits up to Bl,000, 500, and 300 respectively. Appeals will lie in 
the Sirdar's Court as long as it is under the superintendence of Lala Hurdial 
Singh, and subsequently to the Makhma khas. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



82 EBPOET OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION ' 1 

The Imperial Postal Service has received important additions, and the 
Director-General has agreed to establish offices at the head-quarters of each 
pergunnah. The Durbar is to enjoy the privilege of sending its official corre* 
spondence at service rates. 

An officer has been appointed to the special superintendence of criminal 
tribes and police, the latter being formed from a portion of the standing army. 

The Moghias are reported to be rapidly settling down, but the Minas, though 
giving more time to agricultural pursuits, are still an object of apjprehension to 
the Resident as being under no direct special control. 

Colonel Powlett considers the condition of the Jeysulmere border satisfac- 
tory, and reports that the number of old residents in the 24 Sakra villages, who 
are now cultivators, has increased 26 per cent., while a considerable body of out- 
siders have applied for land in them. The boundaries of these villages have 
now been demarcated on three sides, and one of the great checks to agriculture 
thereby removed. The southern border is likewise tranquil. 

The Courts appear to have done good work during the year under review, 
and it is satisfactory to note that the affairs of the bankrup tjagirdars have 
now been arranged. 

The revenue from the 1st of April 1884 to the 31st of March 1885 was 
R37,98,537, which Colonel Powlett believes to be the largest ever collected. 
The expenditure, however, was less satisfactory, as exclusive of sums spent on 
redemption of debt, it amounted to over 39 lakhs, thus exceeding the budget 
estimate by 13 lakhs ; of this, somewhat over 3^ lakhs was on account of railways, 
but the Kesident fears that the balance of more than 9 lakhs represents un* 
necessary and unprofitable outlay. The Musahib Ala has, however, specially 
pledged himself to check expenditure during the current year, and it is hoped 
that he will succeed in doing so. 

On the departure on furlough in April 1884 of Mr. P. T. Hewson, C.8., 
charge of the Customs Department was taken over by Captain Loch. The 
income suffered from a decreased demand for sugar, owing to the non-celebra« 
tion of Hindu marriages, but benefited by an extraordinary export of " til " — 
the gross revenue amounting to over 11^ lakhs. 

The most important change introduced is the substitution of judicial 
stamps for the tax formerly levied on executed decrees. 

The land revenue settlement was also in the hands of Captain Loch, and 
this officer carried out an assessment of the khalsa villages. A regular revenue 
survey of these estates is now in progress, and on its completion a settlement 
for a term of years will be made. 

Boundary settlements have been ftctively carried on, and 855 villages have 
been demarcated. 

The expenditure on public works, exclusive of the railway, slightly exceed- 
ed 1^ lakhs, of which sum over B89,000 were spent on the Balsamand and 
City Canal, which latter is now nearly completed. 

MULLANEE. 

114. During the past year, 388 boundary disputes have been settled, and 
61, out of a total of 400 villages, demarcated, 

SntOHEB. 

115. This State has been quiet, and its finances are in|a flourishing condition. 
A new and very satisfactory arrangement has been made in regard to the salt, 
whereby the Durbar is now to receive R9,000 annually instead of 18,000 
maunds of salt at half duty, on condition that Government salt is freely 
admitted. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE EAJPTJTANA STATES FOB 1884-85. 83 

Part V. 



JEYSULMEBS. 

116. The Eesident met the Maharawul on the border during the past year. 
He reports that few complaints reach him from this quarter, but information 
is obtained with difficulty. The revenue for last year is said to have been 
Rl,74,088, and the expenditure Rl,25,761. 

EASTERN RAJPUTANA STATES AGENCT. 

JEYFOBE. 

117. Dr. J. P. Stratton has continued in charge of this Agency. 

The rainy season was of an exceptional character, the rainfall being scanty 
for the first three months, and profuse in the fourth. Up to the end of August 
but 10*47 had been registered, as compared with 21'', the average of the pre- 
ceding 13 years. The month of September, however, more than restored the 
balance, by contributing 14!'73 as against the average of 278. The cold- 
weather showers were somewhat light, and the year closed with a registered 
total of 25' 88, or about f inch more than the average fall of 13 years. The 
abnormal distribution of the rainfall exercised no bad effects at the capital, 
but in the south-west, towards and in Kishengurh, and in the north-east 
districts of Jeypore itself, the exceptionally heavy and prolonged downpour 
converted many level tracts into sheets of water, and considerable damage was 
done to roads and railways, travelling by the former being actually stopped, 
while railway communication with Bombay was interrupted for two days. 

The crops fortunately suffered little, the monsoon sowings having been 
parched during the unusually dry weather, and being only locally injured by 
the succeeding heavy rains. Jowar, it is true, was much damaged, but the 
average outturn of the kharif , though not up to the mark of a good year, did 
not sink to the level of a bad one. 

The dry-season crops, on the other hand, were distinctly benefited by the 
peculiarity of the monsoon, the heavy fall late in the season providing such a 
store of moisture that the rabi harvest proved excellent, and but for an 
unfortunate prevalence of cloudy weather in February and March, would have 
been exceptionally good. 

As might be anticipated from the meteorological history of the year, the 
general health suffered, fevers and small-pox being specially rife, while cholera, 
though by no means general throughout the districts and limited to a small 
number of cases at the capital, was rather sev^ere in several villages. 

His Highness the Maharaja paid a visit to Agra in November to bid fare* 
well to Lord Ripon, and in January he proceeded to Calcutta to meet His 
Excellency the new Viceroy, taking advantage of both excursions to attend at 
Bindrabun, where His Highnesses mother is residing. In March the Chief 
proceeded to Oodeypore on a formal visit of condolence to the new Maharana. 

At the close of the year. His Highness came forward with a most liberal 

offer of assistance to Government in view of contingencies on the North- West 

Frontier : the offer was couched in the most generous terms, and the Maharaja 

has received through Lord Dufferin an intimation of Her Majesty the Queen- 

' Empress's grateful recognition of his loyalty. 

The constitution of the Jeypore Council remains the same as that elabor- 
ately described in the Besident's last yearly report, and but one change, and 

6 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



84 EEFOBT 07 THE POLITICAL ABlilNISTBATION 

that of a temporary nature, has occurred during the past year, — ^Pundit Moti 
Lai, one of the two Revenue Diwans, having heen promoted to officiate in the 
place of Thakur Simbhu Singh of the Revenue Department, who has been 
compelled to take lengthened leave of absence. 

The institution known as the " Petitioners* Audience Day " has been main- 
tained, and gives great satisfaction, the Maharaja in Council hearing all peti- 
tions presented in accordance with certain simple rules, and passing orders 
thereon either immediately or on the next following occasion. 

During the temporary promotion of Pimdit Moti Lall, Lalji Mai has been 
appointed to the Acting Diwanship of the eastern districts in. revenue matters. . 

Good relations continue to exist between the Maharaja and his feudatories, 
the outstanding accounts between the Chief and the Raja of Khetri haye been 
worked out during the year, and I would also notice with satisfactioA the wise 
liberality which has marked the Maharaja's action in remitting the long- 
standing debts due to the State on account of depredations committed many 
years back in Shekhawatti. 

Externally, the relations of Jeypore both with the British Government 
and other Native States remain cordial and amicable as usual. 

Pundit Maharaj Kishen has continued to do excellent work as Judicial 
Officer in the Council, and has so greatly reduced the numjber of cases pending 
in his department, that he will now, it is hoped, have some leisure for revising 
the rules and inspecting the District Courts. For the first time the Resident 
is able to give figures showing the number of criminal cases dealt with by the 
principal Criminal Courts during the 12 months ending 31st March 1885, and 
the results testify to the thoroughness of their working ability — a remark which 
applies equally to the administration of civil justice. Comparatively few 
crimes of a heinous nature have come to. notice during the past year, dacoity 
and poisoning being now apparently rare. 

No robbery of Government mails has occurred since the submission of my 
last report, and this is specially matter for congratulation when it is remem- 
bered that very large quantities of bullion and valuables are in constant transit 
through the wild and formerly dangerous districts of Shekhawatti ; the respon- 
sibility in regard to the one case of robbery reported last year was finally 
adjudged to attach to Jeypore^ and the State has accordingly paid compensa- 
tion. 

A party of freebooters attacked and robbed a camel-cart on the Tonk road, 
but several members of the gang were subsequently captured, and part of the 
lost property recovered, while compensation has been awarded for the rest. 

Two instances of village frays are reported ; the first, resulting in the death 
of one man, was between the two divisions of the feudatory Kha^dela Raj 
about the erection of a building on a disputed piece of ground. Enquiries 
failed to fix the responsibility on either side, and both parties were accordingly 
fined and bound over to keep the peace. The second case was a quarrel in 
regard to damage alleged to have been caused to crops by stray cattle, and 
occurred between the villagers of Radail and Kherla Jamaidpura, one man 
being killed and twelve wounded. It was again found impossible to trace specific 
acts to individuals, but as it was proved that the Radail party were the aggres- 
sors, eleven of them were specially fined, a general fine imposed on the village, 
and heavy recognizances for future good behaviour exacted from both parties. 

No instances of sati were heard of during the year. 

The city police are reported to have been much more successful in repress- 
ing theft since the appointment of the new Kotwal ; and as an illustration of 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



07 THB BAJPUTANA STATES POE 1884^. 85 

their actmty, Dr« Stratton meotions that during the great Jain Fair held at 
Je3rpore in February, when he estimates that 60,000 visitors were assembled, 
complaints of theft were remarkably few, and in the majority of those occur- 
ring, the culprits were seized and the stolen property recovered. The district 
police also continue to do excellent work. 

The jail is well managed and answers its purpose, but as it has been found 
somewhat small, the question of its enlargement is under consideration. 

No important criminal cases and no civil cases whatever came before the 
Besident in his capacity of Magistrate of the railway jurisdiction. 

The record of the year, together with observations and enquiries made 
during his tour in Torawatti and Shekhawatti, enables Dr. Stratton to report 
that the police arrangements made two years since are working most success- 
fully on both sides of the frontier, and that the border is now at rest. 

A no£ed outlaw, Thakur Lai Singh, who escaped from confinement in the 
Hissar Jail, was captured last year by the Assistant Superintendent of Gerai, 
and ultimately sent to Gurgaon for trial on a charge of dacoity committed in 
that district. 

The Extradition Agreements both with the British Government and neigh- 
bouring Punjab States continue to work satisfactorily, and similar arrangements 
were entered into during last year with Bhurtpore and Kerowlee. 

The revenue and expenditure for 1884-85 are not yet known, as the Jeypore 
financial year ends in the month of Bhadon (August-September); the actuals for 
the Sumbat year 1940 (188S«84) up to the 22nd of August 1884 were— 

B 

Bevenue 52,27,868 

Expenditure 48,07,441 

Surplus • . . . 4,20,427 

In spite of the general remission of transit dues referred to last year, the 
customs duties yielded an increase of over B 36,000, and the improvement, which 
was chiefly in export dues, shows, as the Resident remarks, a healthy condition 
of trade. An error in the apporticmment of the compensation granted by 
Government on account of the closure of salt works was rectified during the 
past year, and Article VII. of the Salt Agreement of 1879 amended accordingly, 
while an amicable compact was also arrived at between Jodhpore and Jeypore 
for sharing the royalty on extra manufacture of salt by Government at the 
Sambhur Lake. 

A proposition to depute a small number of well-educated Jeypore youths 
to the Punjab for thorough training in every detail of district work has been 
submitted to the Maharaja, and Dr. Stratton has no doubt that the Chief 
would gladly avail himself of permission to adopt the scheme. 

Colonel Jacob has submitted a separate report on public works, and the 
Resident only briefly touches upon the main points of interest. The expendi- 
ture amounted to slightly under 9^ lakhs, over a third of which was devoted to 
irrigation. 

The Bund of the Tori Sagar, which was referred to last year as one of the 
two great irrigation works in progress, will probably be closed in time to catch 
the waters of this year's monsoon ; while that of the Buchara Sagar will, it is 
hoped, retain some 30 feet this year and be completed ere next. 

A start has been made towards forest conservancy by sending four youths 
to receive a thorough training at Dehra Dun Porest School, and the Maharaja 

5a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



86 REPORT OP THB POMTIOAL ADMINISTRATION 

has consented to employ a trained Eorest Eanger and to apply to Goyemment 
for the services of a superior Porest Officer for one season. 

The hirth and death rolls at the capital, where alone registration is in 

force, show an increase of ahoat 37% and 8% respectively, as compared with 

the average of former years. Nearly half the deaths were due to fever, but 
cholera accounts for only 62. 

Dr. Hendley on his return from leave resumed charge of the medical 
institutions of the State in October last. The total number of patients treated 
was 84,791, or an increase of over 9,000 as compared with last year. A total 
of 306 deaths from cholera was recorded in the districts, 300 occurring to the 
south-east, and 6 at Bandikui. 

Vaccinations showed an increase, and of the cases examined over 92% 
proved successful. 

The number of students on the rolls of the various schools were — 

Maharaja's School . . . . \ . . 1,012 

Nobles' „ 38 

SaDscrit College 217 . 

the numbers in each case being an increase on those registered last year. At 
the close of 1885 there were 10 Jeypore boys at the Mayo College, Ajmere. 

KISHENGTIRH. 

118. The late downpour of rain was specially prolonged and heavy in 
Kishengurh ; most of the village tanks burst their bunds, and even that at the 
capital was breached. The monsoon crops suffered as well from the early 
scarcity as from the subsequent excess, but the spring crops of 1886 have 
turned out better. 

His Highness the Maharaja paid a visit to the late Maharana of Oodeypore 
in April 1884, and subsequently paid a second visit to that IState in February 
1885 to offer his condolences to his successor on the death of Suj jan Singh. 

His Highnesses mother died in September last, while in November a son 
and heir was bom to him. At the close of the year the Chief placed the entire 
resources of his State at the disposal of Government in view of frontier com- 
plications. 

The Maharaja's Private Secretary, Pundit Goverdhan, a man of high intel- 
ligence, has lately been made an additional member of the State Council. 

The year under review has been a quiet one in every sense; there has 
occurred no attack on Government mails and no instance of sati or other 
serious crime. 

The monsoon of 1883 was reported last year to have been unfavorable, and 
the natural effect has been a fall in revenue which for the year 1883-84 
(August to July) only reached B2^70,34l, thus showing a decrease of over 
B30,000. The expenditure was B24,886 less, and the entire resultant surplus 
was devoted to liquidation of debt. 

Cholera has been unhappily prevalent, but no exact statistics are to hand. 
The dispensary maintained by the United Presbyterian Mission treated 3,198 
patients. 

The State school bears 89 scholars on its rolls. 

LAWA. 

119. The Resident has no matter of special importance to report in con- 
nection with this small Chiefship, which in common with its more important 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE RAJFUTANA STATES FOB 1884-85. 87 

neighbours suffered considerably from the unequal rainfall. There is an adop* 
tion case pending in the family, but it is hoped this may be submitted for the 
decision of a Punchayet, subject to the approval of the Agent to the Governor 
General. 

The finances of the estate are in a sufficiently flourishing condition to 
admit of the allotment of £23600 from surplus in hand for the repair of the 
tank at Lawa which has been damaged by the floods of recent seasons. 

BHU&TFOBE AND EEBOWLEE AaENCT. 

120. Colonel 0. B. Euan-Smith, C.S.I., held uninterrupted charge of the 
Agency throughout the year, during three months of which, friz., from May to 
August, he also officiated as Resident in Mey war. 

BHURTFOBE. 

121. The rainfall was above the average, but was unfortimately unevenly 
distributed, and, as in other parts of Kajputana, the abnormally heavy storms 
of August and September did much damage, breaching bunds and roads, sub- 
merging large tracts, and causing widespread sickness. Notwithstanding this, 
the kharif crop was distinctly good, and the rabi harvest better than had been 
known for years. 

There was no instance of cholera during the year, but violent fever caused 
by the malaria arising from the stagnant water was very prevalent throughout 
Bhurtpore. 

The number of schools open in the territory has fallen from 176 to 172, 
but it is satisfactory to note that the Maharaja has accorded his ready consent 
to a scheme for the periodical inspection of the schools in Bhurtpore by a quali- 
fied educational officer of the Imperial Establishment. 

Thirteen dispensaries give medical relief in the State, and the returns 
show that their aid is amply apjpreciated. The vaccination returns are equally 
satisfactory. 

The jail is reported to be fairly well kept, and the Durbar's returns show 
that both Criminal and Civil Courts are remarkably active, and no instances of 
serious crime have come to light. 

In July 1884, the Maharaja abolished all transit duties save those on 
opium, bhang and intoxicating drugs, and in recognition of this liberality he 
received a kharita of thanks from His Excellency the Viceroy. 

The dispute with Ulwar as to the water rights of certain villages is now 
in a fair way to being amicably settled by the interchange of the outlying 
Ulwar villages for a corresponding portion of Bhurtpore territory, the details 
of which are now being arranged by the revenue officers of the two States. 

The Extradition Rules with Jeypore, Ulwar, and Kerowlee are reported to 
be working more smoothly, and have been renewed for another year. 

The returns show the finances to be in a healthy condition, and internal 
trade is good. 

In November 1884 the Maharaja received a visit from the Conunander-in- 
Chief , Sir Donald Stewart, at his capital ; and in the same month he himself 
proceeded to Agra to meet Lord Eipon, to take leave of whom and to welcome 
the in-coming Viceroy the Chief, accompanied by the Political Agent, paid a 
visit to Calcutta in December. 

In February His Highness had the honor of entertaining the Duke and 
Duchess of Oonnaught, who stayed four days at Bhurtpore; and in April he 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



88 BJIPOKT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTBATION 

received througli the Agent to the Governor-General and Viceroy a message of 
thanks from Her Majesty the Queen-Empress in recognition of his action in 
placing at the disposal of Government a force of 600 fully equipped cavalry, 
in view of contingencies on the North- West Frontier. 

Kunwar Ram Singh, only son of His Highness, was married in April with 
all the ceremonies due to his rank. 

There has heen no change in the administrative hody of the State, alid His 
Highness continues to personally superintend all State husiness without the 
assistance of a Kamdar. 

KEBOVLEU 

122. Of the entire rainfall of 29^-33 (which was some h" below the average), 
over one- half fell in September, and the bajra and jowar crops suffered con- 
siderably in consequence. Generally, however, both the kharif and rabi 
harvests were exceptionally fine, and both food and forage have been cheap 
throughout the year. 

A severe epidemic of cholera, almost entirely confined to the capital, broke 
out in mid July, and did not disappear until mid September. Four hundred and 
thirty-five cases were registered, of which 180 proved fatal. Fever was likewise 
very prevalent during the year. In consequence of the severity of the visitation 
of cholera, the attention of the city population has been attracted towards sanitary 
reform, with the result that a Municipal Committee has been formed under the 
presidency of the Rao of Hadoti. Funds are provided by the imposition of a 
Chimgi tax on grain, and the Committee has already displayed great activity. 
The town is now kept perfectly clean, and roads, wells, tanks, &c.». within 
municipal limits are being improved and repaired. 

A stimulus has also been given to educational matters, and a good primary 
school, with an average attendance of 224 children, is now in working train in 
the city under the management of three qualified, native teachers, whose ser- 
vices were obtained from the Educational Department of the North-Western 
Provinces. A branch school has also been opened at Machilpore, and similar 
establifihments at other pergunnah head-quarters will shortly be arranged for. 

The State Council has been strengthened by the addition of a new member 
in the person of Jemadar Mahomed Fazl Basul Khan, and the administration 
has been conducted to the entire satisfaction of the Political Agent. 

As the revenue settlement, which has been in force for the last three years, 
expired in June last, the Deputy Collector was instructed to prepare a fresh 
scheme. In so doing he has succeeded in contenting all parties ; the scheme, 
which has been readily accepted by the ryots, is generally identical with the 
former settlement, though yielding an increase of some B2,000 per annum, and 
is to remain in force for five years. 

The accounts for the year cannot yet be made up> but Colonel Euan-Smith 
notes that the estimates will be seriously affected by the cessation of Hindu 
marriages during the past year, and the introduction into the calendar of an 
extra month not provided for by the Council in preparing their budget ; and he 
anticipates a consequent reduction in the instalment payable on account of the 
State debt. 

Pundit Nand Lall was appointed in June 1884 Judge of the Civil and 
Criminal Court, and by the consequent release of Muhammad Rashid-ud-din 
Ehan, the State Council has become an actual, as well as nominal, Court of 
Appeal. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE EAJPUTAKA STATES TOR 1884-85. 39 

The returns show that the work of the Court has under the Pundit's man- 
agement progressed most satisfactorily. 

Government having sanctioned the setting aside of K45,000 per aimum on 
account of public works, the Kerowlee State Coimcil applied for the services 
of a qualified Engineer, and Mr. C. E. Housden, who was selected for this post, 
took up the appointment in January last. He is now engaged in drawing up 
an exhaustive memorandum on the capabilities of the State for the construction 
of tanks, &c. ; his report on the work commenced, carried out, and projected up 
to the end of the official year, is given verbatim by the Political Agent. The 
metalled road from Hindaon to Kerowlee was commenced in March, and Mr. 
Housden contemplates its completion by next June ; this road will undoubtedly 
prove a great boon to the public, and will save a long and tedious detour. I 
naay note that the Jeypore Durbar have also commenced work on that portion 
of the road which lies within Jeypore territory. 

The jail has during the past year been almost entirely rebuilt, and is un- 
deubtedly greatly improved. The head-quarters and local dispensaries have 
been well attended, and are evidently highly appreciated ; and a small hospital 
is now in course of construction. 

Three petty dacoities occurred at the Sheoratri Fair in February, but serious 
crime has on the whole been rare. 

The rules for the mutual extradition of criminals made with the neighbour- 
ing States are working more smoothly, and their operation has been extended 
for a further period of 12 months. 

The Amargurh Estate continues to be weU administered, and over three- 
fifths of the small outstanding debt of fi 5,213 was liquidated during the year. 

The Executive Engineer is superintending the construction of a new bund, 
estimated to provide 660,000,000 cubic feet of water at a cost of about B17,000. 
B10,000 has been borrowed on account of this work with my consent, and the 
balance represents the cost of labor which the Thakur's subjects will give free 
of cost. 

With the usual exception on account of opium, &c., the Kerowlee State 
Council in December last abolished transit dues of every description, and they 
have received an intimation of His Excellency's satisfaction at their enlight- 
ened and liberal action. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



40 REPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 



Part VI. 

HABOWTEE AND TONK AGENCY. 

123. Colonel W. J. W. Muir held charge of the Agency throughout the 
year. 

The rain-fall was ahout one-third helow the average, a heavy fall in 
August caused some damage, but a good and well-distributed fall in September 
was favorable to the.rabi operations, though the failure of the winter showers 
caused the out-turn to be poor. 

Health generally was good with the exception of an outbreak of cholera 
in Tonk during August and September, which carried off nearly 200 people. 
The Bame disease also made its appearance in the Aligurh and Sironj districts, 
and in Kapran of Bundi, but happily its ravages were but slight. Measles 
caused a heavy mortality among children in Tonk during March. 

The grass crop was everywhere below the average, but grain crops were 
fair, and the current rates lower than they had been for years. 

The three States under this Agency made loyal offers of help to Govern- 
ment in view of the recent events in the Soudan and on the North- West 
Frontier. The Durbars are likewise assisting in the preparation of contribu- 
tions to the London Colonial and Indian Exhibition, 1886. 

BOONDEE. 

124. His Highness the Maharao Raja is gradually withdrawing from an 
active share in the administration, in favor of the Maharaj Kunwar. The 
latter is a boy of promise; his father associates him with himself in all business, 
and great pains are being taken with his education. The income of 10 khalsa 
villages has been set aside to provide for the Mahartio Raja's two younger sons. 

There has been no change in the system of government or in the officials 
of the State. Kamdar Pundit Ganga Sahai continues to conduct the adminis- 
tration, and enjoys the full confidence of his Chief. 

Customs yielded R89,500 during the past year, a sum which would 
have reached higher figures but for a falling off in the opium trade. With 
effect from March of the present year, certain changes have been introduced 
in the tariff, and the remission of export duty on grain has been continued for 
another year. 

The accounts for Sumbat 1940 are said not to have been regularly mad 
up, but the estimates for the current year fix the income at B5,48,427 and 
expenditure at R6,23,744. The deficit is to be ascribed to a falling off in 
land revenue due to the alienation of certain jagirs on behalf of members of 
the family and to a fall in prices. 

Police arrangements are unchanged, but the officials have displayed greater 
energy, and only two dacoities are Reported as against eight in last year's report. 
In one of these a man believed to have been a BhU of Bijolian in Meywar was 
shot. 

A special officer was appointed by the Durbar during the year to endea- 
vour to trace the perpetrators of the previously mentioned dacoities : his efforts 
have been rewarded by the arrest of seven offenders. 

Better arrangements have also been set on foot for the protection of the 
main road through the State, a course rendered urgently necessary by the 
transit of large quantities of valuables through the post. 



Digitized by 



G<30gl( 



OP THE RAJPTJTANA STATES FOR 188i.8o. 41 

I am glad to notice that the jail has at last received the attention it so 
pressingly called for : and the Chief's action, in accepting the proposals for the 
improvement of the road, and in consenting to set aside a sum for keeping 
it in order, is also matter for congratulation. 

The final settlement of the long-standing disagreement with the Kapran 
Maharaja forms a further satisfactory point in the present report. 

TONK 

^ 125. I have already reported on the grave dissatisfaction which the finan- 
cial condition of the State has occasioned, and still does occasion, me, and need 
here only add that the out-look hy no means assures me that any distinct 
improvement is to be anticipated. His Highness is, however, full of promises 
of reform, and Colonel Muir reposes considerable confidence in his pledges of 
retrenchment : it remains to be seen whether these pledges will or will not bear 
fruit. It appears that the deficit for the current year cannot be estimated at 
much under 5 lakhs. 

The numerous changes in the various departments are severally treated on 
by the Political Agent, and call for no special comment from me. I am, how- 
ever, hopeful that Mahomed Najjaf Khan will be able to reorganize the judicial 
work, and place it on a more satisfactory basis than that it has hitherto occu- 
pied. 

Progress in education appears to continue, and the Durbar is displaying 
considerable activity in this direction. 

The dispensary maintains its excellent reputation, but it is matter for 
regret that no action has been taken with regard to completing the new jail 
buildings, or improving the general sanitation of the city. 

The kharif crops appear to have been generally somewhat poor, but the 
rabi afforded an average yield. 

Two dacoities occurred in the Tonk district, and one each in Nimbahera 
and Sironj. In the latter case the mail bag for Qwalior was carried off, the 
runner and the sepoy escorting him being both wounded. The contents of the 
bag with the exception of one small parcel were, however, recovered. 

Several boundary disputes between Nimbahera and Meywar, and Sironj 
and Raghogurh, respectively, were settled during the year by Captains Pears 
and Masters. 

The Nawab's eldest son, a youth of 8, with two first cousins, joined the 
Mayo College in November 1884, and two others have recently followed this 
example. The number of Tonk boys at the College is now 10. 

SHAHPOOBA. 

126. The Raja Dhiraj, after an interval of five years, paid two visits to Oodey- 
pore to wait on the Maharana as a feudatory. The first visit was paid in Sep- 
tember 1884, and the second in January, 1885 with the object of offering homage 
to the new Chief of Meywar. 

Babu Ram Jewan continues to carry on the duties of Eamdar with enei^y 
and good judgment. 

The past year's budget shows a balance of slightly over S;56,000. 

I regret to note that the difficulties arising from the heavy transit duties 
levied by the Meywar Durbar have not been modified by any concejssions from 
that State. 

6 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



42 ERFORT OF THE POLITICAL ADMnaSTBATION' 

The settlement of khalsa and jagir villages continues, and enquiries hare 
been set on foot with the object of improring existing tanks, and supplementing 
them by the construction of new ones. 

The State has been entirely free from dacoities during the year under 
notice. 

THE MEENA EHERAE AND DEOLL 

THE KHEBAB. 

127. The Political Agent reports continued progress in the settlement of 
the Hilly Tracts. 

DSOLL 

12& The rain fall at Deoli was considerably below the average, but the 
general health of the district was good. 

The Agency dispensary has continued to do excellent work, and the 
Harowtee International Court of Vakils disposed of 60 cases during the year. 

ULWUR AGENCY. 

129. The fall of rain in June gave rise to hopes of a good kharif , but the 
subsequent three weeks of dry weather and high winds caused some apprehen* 
sion ; the recurrence of rain at the end of July, however, saved the crops, 
though considerable damage was done owing to its late continuance. The total 
fall was above the average, but the kharif from the above-mentioned c^use was 
on the whole indifferent. The lateness of the rains, though destructive to the 
kharif, proved beneficial to the rabi^ and a bumper crop resulted. 

Eever was prevalent after the rains, but there was no epidemic of any 
description. 

During the year His Highness the Maharao Eaja had the honor of enter- 
tainhig Their Royal Highnesses tile Duke and Duchess of Connaught, His Ex- 
c^ency the Commander-in-Chief, the Maharaja of Jodhpore (twice), and the 
Maharaja of Fatiala. The Chief also paid a visit to Agra in November to take 
leave of Lord Ripon. 

In the early spring of this year, the Chief came forward with specific and 
general offers of aid to Govemmentj both in the Soudan and on the North- 
West Frontier. 

No change in the Council occurred during the twelve months just elapsed, 
and tills body, as well as the various Judicial Courts, continued to transact busi- 
ness actively and satisfactorily. 

No cases of mail robbery or dacoity came to notice during the year. 

The Political Agent in his capacity of Magistrate of the railway jurisdic- 
tioii had but five unimportant cases to dispose of. 

The extradition agreement between the Durhar iiid the Punjab States 
worked without a hitch, and it is hoped that arrangements of a similar nature 
will shortly be concluded with Bhurtpore ; as regards Jeypwe the relations in 
this oonnection still leave much to be desired. 

The dispute between XJlwur and Bhurtpore regarding the irrigatioin of four 
outlying Uhrar villages will, it is believed, be shortly settled, both States having 
agreed to an exchange of territory. 

The education report is satisfactory, and shows an increase in the number 
of scholars and average attendance* The course adopted by the XJlwur Durbar, 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE BAJPTJTANA STATES FOR 1884-86. 43 

of selecting qualified students from its own schook for appointments in the 
State, offers a great stimulus to the scholairs. 

The total expenditure on puhlic works exceeded 2 lakhs, being some R36,000 
higher than that of last year. 

Great attention is being paid by the Durbar to nmtters connected with 
sanitation. 

Tuccavi advances were given whenever applied for, and of the total sum 
of R85,341 allotted, 847,000 was spent on wells. Over 2,200 new cultivators 
settled in the State during the past year — a fact which bears the best of testi- 
mony to the happy and prosperous condition of the laboring classes. 

The actuals for 1883-84 show a total revenue of B,23,ll,928, or R73,763 
less than the estimate — a discrepancy which is explained by the fact that large 
remissions and suspensions amounting to over Rl,68,000 had to be made on 
account of the failure of the crops in 1883-84. The expenditure reached 
R20,09,547 as against the estimate of R28,627 less, and the difference is 
similarly explained. The amount invested in Government paper from cash 
balances has now reached 20 lakhs. 

The Political Agent spent 100 days on tour during the cold weather, and 
reports most favorably on the contented condition of the people and the active 
and intelligent interest manifested towards his subjects by the young Chief. 

NIMBAKA. 

130. The cotton of the kharif crop of 1884 abnost entirely failed, and the 
other crops also suffered. The late fall of rain, however, enabled the zemindars 
to bring an abnormally large area under wheat and barley, and a good rabi 
crop was expected. 

The yoimg Haja is still at the Mayo College, and Babu Gulab Singh, 
Eamdar, continues to conduct the administration satisfactorily. 

The actuals for 1883-84 showed an income slightly in excess of 26,000 
rupees with an expenditure of about 17,000. 

EOTAH AGENCT. 

131. The Political Agent, Colonel C. A. Baylay, proceeded on privilege 
leave on the 29th of August 1884, nnd being subsequently appointed to officiate 
for the Resident, Western Bajputana States, did not resume charge of his own 
duties till the 30th of December 1884, the current work during his absence 
having been discharged by Major H. B. Abbott, Political Agent, Jhallawar, in 
addition to his own duties. On the 24th of March 1885, Colonel Baylay pro- 
ceeded on furlough to Europe, and Captain Curzon Wyllie was, appointed to the 
vacancy. 

The Council of the State remains unchanged and continues to carry on its 
work satisfactorily. 

The actuals for 1883-84 gave the following results : — 

Revenue • 22,86,917 

Expenditure 19,81,978 

or R34,458 and R35,850 respectively below the estimates; the decrease in 
revenue being accounted for by the continued depression in opium, and the 
abnormally low price of grain. The estimate for the current year is — 

fi. 

Revenue 23,08,875 

Expenditure 20,48,476 

6a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



44 REPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

the expenditure including an increase of half a lakh allotted to public works, 
while a sum slightly exceeding 3i lakhs has been deposited for payment of the 
last item of the State debt. 

The new assessment, which was begun in 1876, has now been completed 
at a total cost up to the end of March of just under 4 lakhs, and it is calculated 
that it will produce over a lakh per annum of additional revenue. 

The staff of the Civil, Criminal, and Nizamat Courts has renlaiued unaltered, 
and judicial business appears to have been eflSciently conducted. 

The police appear to have worked well, and there is a decided decrease in 
crime ; no case of murder was brought to notice, and dacoities have fallen from 
17 to 9. 

The jail is thoroughly well kept, and the prisoners are carefully looked 
after. 

Eive new district schools at Nizamat head-quarters have been established, 
and are said to be well attended. 

The general health was good, and the Kotah Municipal Committee have 
done much to improve the sanitary condition of the city. 

The rainfall only amounted to 19 inches, or 9 inches less than in the pre- 
vious year, but the favorable distribution of th€f fall compensated in a* great 
measure for the deficiency in quantity, and both kharif and rabi ciops were up 
to the average. The prices of grain in Kotah city were very low. 

The demand for water from the newly-opened Parbutti canal fell short of 
what was anticipated, but this is accounted for by the depression in the opium 
trade, and the consequent check to the cultivation of the poppy. 

A large tank now in course of construction at Eklera deserves notice, as^ 
when completed, it will supply most valuable aid to irrigation. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB EAJPUTANA STATES FOR 1884r.85. 45 



Part VII. 



JHALLAWAB AOENCT. 

132. With the exception of two months' ahsence on privilege leave, during 
which lieutenant-Colonel Baylay officiated for him, Major Abbott held charge 
of the Agency throughout the year. 

The average rainfall at Jhalra Patun for the nine preceding years had 
been 32*68, but during the 12 months under review it only reached 27 63. The 
fall was, however, well distributed, and proved sufficient for agricultural pur- 
poses, the kharif crops being fair, while with the exception of the opium, which 
suffered from the storms and cold of February, the rabi harvest was good. 

The general health was excellent. Education has received considerable 
attention, and it is intended shortly to affiliate the Chaoni School at the capital 
to the Calcutta University. 

' The five dispensaries are reported to have done good work, and there has 
been a marked increase in vaccine operations, 92 per cent, of which were declared 
isuccessful. 

The jail has been greatly improved, and now provides excellent accommoda* 
tion ; the health of the inmates was remarkably good during the year. 

Both civil and criminal justice appears to have been satisfactorily carried 
on, and an improvement in the working of the Tehsil Courts is noted. 

Crime has decreased and but seven serious cases are reported : four o£ murder 
one of culpable homicide not amounting to murder, and two dacoities. 

Traffic in salt shows an improvement, but trade generally shows a decided 
falling off, especially in opium, rice, and sugar. 

Fourteen boimdary disputes between Jhallawar and Indore were decided 
during the year by Captain M. J. Meade, Boundary Settlement Officer, 

His Highness the Maharaj Rana made three tours in the districts during 
the 12 months under notice, and from mid December to mid February he was 
travelling about India, visiting both Bombay and Calcutta and many other 
places of interest and importance. 

His Highness's Council, the constitution of which has remained unchanged, 
conducted the administration during the Chief's absence. 

Four Jhallawar youths are now students at the Mayo College. 

BICEANEER AGENCT. 

133. Captain A. C. Talbot continued to hold charge of this Agency 
throughout the past year. 

The country has been perfectly quiet, and the relations between the Chief 
and his Sardars have been unbroken by any untoward circumstance. 

The most important matter remaining on hand at the commencement of 
the year was the settlement of the " rekh," or tax for exemption from military 
service : for this purpose the whole of the Thakurs both Tazimi, and petty, were 
summoned to the capital, where the question was most fully discussed with the 
Durbar officials, satisfactory progress was made, and the Political Agent is now 
able to report that but one ease in each class still remains for decision. The 
Maharaja made many concessions, the most important of which were that the 
present settlement should be a permanent one, and that the fine leviable on 
succession to an estate should not exceed one year's "rekh." 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



46 RBPOKT OP THE POLITICAL ADMlNISTEATION 

The ring leaders in the late rebellion have been punished with discretion by 
the Durbar, three of them having been forced to hand over their estates to their 
heirs, while the fourth will not be reinstated for six years, and then only if his 
conduct in the interim shall have proved satisfactory. A small money fine 
has also been imposed in perpetuity on the estates of the more conspicuous 
rebels, while 4,000 bigas of Bidasar have been made ** khalsa " as a punishment 
for the extreme effrontery of the ex-Thakur. 

In order to provide a tribunal in which all might have confidence for the 
disposal of cases in which the Durbar and the Thakurs and their ryots were 
concerned, a Thakurs' Court was, with the Maharaja's consent, established, and 
is constituted of Thakurs and officials under the presidency of a foreigner. The 
jurisdiction of this Court was subsequently limited ta cases in which Thakurs 
and their ryots only were parties, on account of the necessity which arose for 
introducing some special machinery to deal with claims for the restoration of 
villages under the arrangement of 1869. This subject had formed a prominent 
feature in the demands of the disaffected Thakurs, but when it was again 
brought up in the Thakurs' Court, the Ijlas khas, which is the Court of final 
reference, invariably dismissed the claims, and at the close of the year it was 
found advisable to establish a special committee composed of two foreigners to 
enquire into and report on the facts of each case. Pundit Kalka Pershad, a 
retired Punjab Settlement Officer, has rendered excellent service as President of 
the Thakurs' Court, and is also a member of the Special Committee. 

During the year under review, a very important administrative change has 
been effected by the abolition of the Central Civil and Criminal Courts at 
Bickaneer, and the establishment of four Nizamats at Bickaneer, Sujangurh, 
Beni, and Suratgurh. The change has already proved a great convenience to the 
public. These Courts exercise the same powers as that for which they were 
substituted, and appeals lie as before to the Council. 

The Customs Department has undergone thorough and sweeping reform, 
and now in lieu of various internal and external cesses levied at the capital, on 
the frontier, and in numerous villages, one fixed rate has been established, 
which is levied once for all at the frontier. The new rates are based on those 
^ in force in^Marwar, and the interests of the poorer classes have been carefully 
attended to, by remitting arbitrary taxation on the conunon products of the 
country, 

Munshi Sohun Lai has been hard at work collecting information with a 
view to introducing a revised scheme of land revenue, and Captain Talbot hopes 
that in the khalsa land, at any rate, an enhanced rate per biga may shortly 
tajlce the place of, and sweep away, the many petty cesses which are now so 
troublesome to the zemindars* A rough land measurement is also in progress, 
and when completed will enable the Durbar to deal with the numerous applica- 
tions for grants of land which have lately been received from cultivators in 
British territory. A Code of Revenue Bules has also been drawn up, and is now 
in course of printing for publication. 

Munshi Sohun Lai deserves great cre^t for his untiring exertions, which 
have already removed many abuses^ and have won him the deserved confidence 
of the zemindars. 

The karkhanas, or fixed establishments, have now been brought under 
efficient control, and a check has been imposed on the old system of waste and 
peculation. 

The rain fall at Bickaneer was well up to the average, and it was only in 
the centre and north-west of the State that it proved at all deficient; rain- 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE EAJPUTAKA STATES FOE ] 884-86. 47 

gauges have now been introduced in each tehsil, and more accui^te m^sure- 
ments may be hoped for in future. The long break which followed the first fall 
in mid June caused considerable anxiety which the late July rains dispelled, 
but the grass had already suffered irremediably. The crops were, however, 
on the whole fully up to the average, the bajra being especially good. The 
winter rains were satisfactory, and the rabi crops much benefited thereby. 
The floods in the Ghuggar were heavier than had been known for years, and 
much water ran uselessly to waste in the sand-hills near Ellenabad : the Lieute- 
nant-Governor of the Punjab has, however, deputed a surveyor to this district, 
and it is hoped that some means may be devised for utilising the flood water to 
the advantage of British and Bickaneer territory alike. 

The accounts for Sumbat 1940 (ending March 1884) are now complete, 
and show a total income of a little over 13 lakhs, with an expenditure slightly 
exceeding 12. Taking into account, however, sums repayable on account of 
loans, there was an actual deficit of about R10,000, which would have been a 
considerable surplus, but for the abnormal expense incurred in suppressing the 
Thakurs' revolt, most of which expense was originally defrayed by the Durbar^ 
though a moiety will be eventually recovered from the implicated Sardars. 

The returns of the working of the various Courts are satisfactory, and 
refliect considerable credit on the various officers connected with them, and 
more especially on the Diwan, on Munshi Sohun Lai, and on Pundit Kalka 
Pershad. 

In June of last year, Government sanctioned the appointment of a 2nd 
Class Civil Surgeon at Bickaneer, and the post was first filled by Surgeon C. 
Adams, who, however, was forced to proceed on medical certificate early in 
November ; the officiating appointment remained vacant till March 1885, when 
it was filled by Surgeon P. D. Pauk, I. M. S. 

The dispensary in the capital has done good work during the year, and 
there has been a slight increase in the number of vaccinations. It is proposed 
to establish dispensaries at the three district nizamats ; additions are being 
made to that already existing at Bickaneer, and a small Agency hospital will 
also be built. 

The general health has been good, und beyond the usual fever in the rains, 
there appears to have been but little sickness. 

The system of border police reported on as established last year has worked 
efficiently, and with markedly beneficial results; the first Superintendent, 
Thakur Dooley Singh, has been dismissed on account of irregularities, and the 
post is now filled by Sungut ffingh, kte erf the Punjab Police. 

An Imperial Post Office was opened experimentally at Bickaneer on the 
1st of July 1884, and the result has proved such a boon to the people, that the 
Durbar has consented to the establishment of Post Offices at all important 
towns in the State, and the matter is now under the consideration of the postal 
authorities. 

Two more Bickaneer boys, the Thakiuw <al Sidmukb and Jasana, joined the 
Mayo College during the past year. 

Captain Talbot was on tour for a period of 93 days during the last march- 
ing season, and visited the head-quarters of every Tehsil in the State except one, 
all necessary information concerning which he was able to collect without 
actually going to it. 

The Political Agent closes his report with a strong expression of praise on 
behalf of Diwan Amin Mahomed, which I can myself most conscientiously 
support. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



48 REPORT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

liHOLEPOEE AGENCY. 

134. Colonel T. Denneby continued in charge of the Agency during the 
year. 

Thirty inches of rain, an amount considerably above the average, were 
registered, and the crops were good throughout the State. Over 7^ lakhs were 
realised from land revenue, nearly half a lakh of which was on account of 
, arrears from the preceding year. . 

The State quarries are reported to have been worked satisfactorily ; the 
demand for stone for building purposes shows a steady increase, and the rail- 
way indents on account of ballast continue. 

The Political Agent gives at length the result of the enquiry into maafi 
tenures conducted by himself and the Council at the Maharaj Rana's request. 

It appears that the land held under these grants exceeded 44,000 acres, and 
represented a revenue value of nearly one lakh of rupees. Over 25,000 acres have 
now been confirmed as permanent, and over 13,000 as temporary grants : the 
balance of 6,445 acres, equivalent to an estimated yearly value of R10,900, 
have been resumed by the State, no right, title, or justification for its tenure 
being discoverable. 

Colonel Denneby notes that appeals against the decisions arrived at have 
been few and unimportant. 

The yearly instalment of one lakh (with interest amounting to H20,000) 
on account of the Government loan was punctually paid. 

The obligations of the Durbar in respect to the salt agreement are said to 
have been strictly observed ; one unimportant case of smu'ggling was detected 
and punished, and the Political Agent believes that this crime is practically 
non-existent. 

The Criminal Courts appear to have worked well, and the reports show a 
decrease in crime. The police have been generally successful in establishing 
the identity of criminals, but have frequently failed in arresting them. The 
various serious cases that occurred are minutely described by Colonel Dennehy. 

The relations of the Durbar with the neighbouring States continue satis- 
factory. 

The Maharaj Bana paid a visit .to the Maharaja of Bhurtpore in November 
1884, and in February 1885 the latter Chief accompanied me on my march 
through Dholepore to Kerowlee. 

Twenty-foiur thousand three hundred and ninety patients were admitted to 
the dispensaries at Dholepore, Bajakhera, and Bari during the year, being an 
increase of over 4,000 as compared with the number of cases treated in 1883-84. 

The attendance at the schools shows a falling off, which Colonel Dennehy 
ascribes to the large amount of sickness which prevailed in the hot weather, 
and the consequent necessity for keeping the boys at work in the fields. 

In November 1884, the Maharaj Rana, attended by the Political Agent, 
proceeded to Agra to wait upon Lord Ripon, and in February 1885 he had the 
honor of receiving a visit from Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess 
of Connaught. 

The State Council remains unchanged. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB BAJPTTTANA STATES IVB 1884^. 



49 



i 
SI 





aj 




o 


^^ 


<54 




Ob 


00 


o 


o 


CO 


lO 


O 


O 


rH 


\ 




q 


•wipui 


o 


O 


CO 


I 


ip 


QO 


o 


o 


o 

• 


o 


o 


o 


t* 


• 




a: 




o 


O 


O) 




!?• 




b 


b 


o 


b 


b 


b 


b 
oa 


• 






Od 


T" 


Ob 




? 


»o 


Ob 


lO 


kO 


o 


QO 


00 


oa 


00 






•uuaw 


\a 


f^ 


«> 


I 


iH 


b 


6a 


CO 


oo 


b« 


7^ 


^ 


b- 


00 








00 


Ob 


00 


• 


00 


oc 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


QO 


00 


QO 


t* 




H 




























00 


























, 










s 




Ob 


04 


CO 




CO 


^• 


00 


oo 


t^ 


00 


QO 


CO 


!>. 


00 




s 


'maaimiif 


c5^ 


b» 


6b 


• 


lb 


•^ 


lb 


Tfi 


b 


rH 


b 


•^ 


oa 


<^ 




o 


* 


QD 


t* 


t^ 


" 


t* 


t^ 


CO 


lO 


lO 


lO 


lO 


QO 




QO 




g 




























t^ 


• 


































5 




O 


• 


lO 




00 


lO 


Qp 


O) 


00 


rH 


QO 


r^ 


oa 


ltd 








— 


CO 


b 


• 


00 


3C 


rH 


oo 


o« 


b 


©» 


b 


b 


1^ 


• 




*aiQui;xii|^ 


o 


o 


o 




00 


00 


Ob 


00 


00 


00 


00 


^ 


o 


oa 


< 






^-H 


f-l 


l-H 
























GO 






























r^ 




Cd 


































H 


































:^ 






^ 


lO 


Ob 




Ob 


00 


1^ 


'^ 


QO 


"^ 


O) 


30 


t^ 


r^ 








l^ 


'^f^ 


CO 




o 


CO 


i-l 


l^ 


CO 


CO 


HI 


t^ 


CO 


oa 






•av9|i( 


o» 


^-H 


O 


• 
• 


i-H 


f-i 


^ 


^ 


lA 


lA 


-* 


00 


^ 


CO 








06 


6a 


6a 


• 


6a 


b 


6a 


b 


Ob 


b 


b 


b 


oa 


b 








oi 


Oi 


ot 




O) 


Ol 


O) 


O) 


Ol 


Ol 


Ol 


oa 


oa 


oa 
































CO 






00 


-* 


r^ 




Tjl 


00 


r* 


Oi 


00 


o 


o 


oa 


oa 


o 




• 


o 


00 


oa 




o 


CO 


r-i 


en 


^ 


lO 


CO 


oa 


S 


5 




s 


'tnncaiainr 


Tf< 


O) 


r^ 


• 


&i 


o» 


»p 


la 


CO 


^ 


• 


'? 




2 


•'* 


6a 


6a 


Ob 


• 


6b 


6a 


6a 


b* 


b 


b 


Ob 


b 


b 


b 




OS 




o) 


^ 


ot 




O) 


ot 


ot 


ot 


c^ 


o^ 


oa 


oa 


oa 


oa 




£ 




























30 






o 


^ 


00 




r^ 


lA 


^ 


ktd 


r^ 


Ol 


o 


00 


ltd 


o 








-^ 


PH 


00 




iG 


ot 


5 


Ol 


oa 


oa 


o 


CO 


00 


00 






*uinuiixii|v 


CO . 


ot 


1^ 


• 


• 


Oi 


ltd 


o 


lO 


lO 


rf 


I-H 


00 








Ob 


6a 


6a 


• 


Ob 


6a 


6b 


b 


b 


b 


b 


b 


CO 


b 








o» 


ot 


ot 




Ol 


ot 


r>l 


ot 


ot 


o« 


oa 


Ol 


oa 

00 


oa 
































CO 






^ 

^ 




o 


1-* 


o 


t^ 


o 


00 


O 


o 


o 


ltd 


o 


O 


oc 






•wqoui 


o 


^ 


»p 


oa 


kO 


00 


o 


o 


9 


r^ 


o 


O 


lb 


• 




« 




o 


6 


(b 




6a 

rH 


b 

CO 


b 


b 


b 


b 


b 


b 


o 








t* 


CO 




00 


l^ 


oa 


,^ 


CO 


Ob 


CO 


Oi 


Ob 


'? 


00 








































•a«a|^ 


"* 


o 


• 


00 


QO 


t^ 


00 


eb 


00 


f^ 


t* 


b 


lb 


b 




• 




l^ 


00 


" 


CO 


CO 


CO 


QO 


QO 


lO 


lO 


ltd 


t* 


CO 


CO . 




s 

1 




























t* 






«p 


CO 




00 


o 


00 


©^ 


'^ 


-wa 


o 


00 


p-H 


op 


CO 












• 
















• 








2 


'mutniaiie 


^ 


p» 


• 


r^ 


'^ 


t 


b 


'^ 


b 


b 


b 


oa 


lb 


oa 




8 




CO 


t* 


• 


CO 


CO 


CO 


lO 


lA 


ltd 


"^ 


CO 


ltd 


lO 




M 




























CO 






^ 


rH 




00 


tP 


fH 


ot 


'^ 


00 


o^ 


'^ 


^ 


f 


<p 














• 








•^ 


















•mnaiiXKK 


00 
30 


Ob 

00 


: 


CO 




CO 


kb 




CO 


CO 
CO 


b 

CO 


b 


oa 




D 






























00 




n 


































< 






eo 


ot 






o«i 


t* 


QO 


© 


rH 


lO 


oa 


00 


oo 


Tfl 








Oi 


»-H 






o 


»o 


t^ 


o 


O) 


o 


<M 


rfl 


^ 


t^ 






*a«dj^ 


Oi 


oa 


• 


• 


op 


00 


O 


r^ 


rH 


rH 


o. 

• 


o 


o 


1^ 








lO 


lb 


• 


• 


o 


lb 


b 


b 


CO 


b 


QO 


QO 


rH 


b 








O) 


9) 






e) 


e) 


ot 


Gi 


©I 


Ol 


oa 


©a 


QO 


oa 




p| 




























oa 




1 


r^ 


Ob 






?o 


00 


\a 


t* 


ot 


oa 


QO 


-^ 


CO 


CO 




1 




s 


00 






CO 


CO 


-^ 


e^ 


o 


t* 


oa 


«M 


00 


t^ 




'uumiiiii^ 


tb 


oa 


; 


• 


00 

lb 


oa 
lb 


rH 

b 


b 


oa 

^ 


rH 

b 


o 

CD 


rH 

b 


• 


o 
b 




M 




G4 


04 






«M 


m 


EM 


©1 


&i 


o* 


c># 


o* 


QO 


oa 




^ 




























rM 






eQ 


































o 


O 






-* 


OD 


O 


00 


rH 


o« 


oi 


CD 


rH 


f^ 








3? 


tc^ 






GO 


OS 


rH 


eo 


QO 


-f 


CD 


/^' 


t^ 


^ 










OS 


* 


• 


DO 


GO 


i-H 


rH 


^-t 


I-H 


o 


O 


-^ 


o 






'a]iiaitx«|^ 


«b 


*h 


• 


» 


lb 


lb 


4 

CO 


b 


b 


lb 


b 


b 


b 


b 








04 


Ol 






o« 


Ol 


04 


ot 


Oi 


Ol 


oa 


oa 


CO 

oa 


oa 






• 








• 
■ 


• 
■ 




• 




• 
• 


• 


• 
• 


• 


• 




















». 










< 


P4 ■ 






• 
* 




> 
■ 




* 
• 


* 
• 
• 


< 

• 


• 


• 


• 
* 


• 
■ 
• 


■ 

m 




< 






^ 




' 


• 


■ 


• 


■ 


« 


■ 


• 
in 


■ 


J 










DO 




<h 


p^ 


*% 


«^ 


•^ 


^ 


•^ 


oo 


*% 


* 










QO 


:; 


S 




s? 


>! 


ii 


■* 




00 


»\ 


^ 










r^ 










it 




l-i 




^^ 








■ 








< 










s 

1 


J 


3 

o 


1 


S 


1 


1 







Digitized by 



GoogI( 



so 



BECORT OF THE POLITICAL ASUIKISTBATIOK 



1 



O 






IS 






^ 

Sd 

cs 

•^ 



■a 
i 

o 

.§ 
J* 

£ 
I 



.f 



IS 



m 



*89qoiq 



•U!99fl 



*aiiiiinaT|^ 



*ainm|XB||| 



*I1«8]( 



'inninnii^ 



o G) lO 

o ^th O 

o o >h 









o ■ 



la GO 

O .-H 



o 
o 



op 
o 



o 
o 



o 

o 

6 



-? o 



00 



00 



s 



QO OO 



i« 






QD 



00 
00 



00 



o 

00 



o 

6i 






^ 

t^ 



o 



QD 









00 



o 

i-H 



o ■■ 



QO 






Ob 



o 

00 



CO 

00 



QO 



00 



o 

00 



CD 



00 

-<* 
CO 

OO 






QO 



O 
o 

00 



QO 



00 



QC 



00 



QO 

m 

00 
OO 
G« 



00 
CM 



OO 



t^ 00 

t^ CO 



OO 

on 



00 



lA 
OO 



(51 

o 



o) 



QO 

-* 
ac 

OO 



OO 
30 



O 

o 



00 



(»9 

OO 



in 
do 

00 

00 



on 

o 

00 



00 
00 

o 

00 



O rp 
QC OO 
OO 00 



s 



o) 



OO 
OO Oi 






OO 



lA 

CO 

00 
<M 



OO 

op* 

00 



Ot 00 

00 t*. 

on OO 

01 04 



op 

00 



o 
-^ 

Qp 
OO 

CO 



*iiinniix«||[ 



QO 
'?' 

00 



QO 

CO 

ob 



09 QO 

OO I— I 

i) ob 



QO 

00 00 
G) O) 



00 

^* 
CO 



00 
OO 



o 

OO 



OO 
OO 
QO 

5o 



<^ 00 

QO OO 
QO ^ 



00 



00 
04 



QO 

OO 

Ip 

on 



*B9cpnx 



o 
o 






1^ OO 

r^ OO 



O 
O 



O 

o 



o 
o 



00 

o 
o 



© 

o 



o 
o 

o 



*aii9|{ 



*ainainii|| 



o 

OO 



OO 



1^ o 
OO OO 



OO 






o 

00- 



lO OO 
QO QO 



s 



o 
xa 



00 



00 



00 



00 



OO 

00 



o 



00 



QO 



00 00 



00 



o 

00 



CO 



o 

QO 



iro 






*iniicn]XTi|^ 



•w»W 



*uiQinniip| 



OO 



o 



o 



o 

o 



o 

OO 



00 

00. 



00 
00 



G) 

00 



QO 
OO 



QO 

op. 

00 



OO 



I-H CO 

^ 00 

OO 00 

Gl O) 



OO 00 

00' ci>. 

O) Gl 



00 
Qp 

OO- 



00 



00 

OO 

on 



OO 
00 



CO 
00 



00 OO. 



00 



00 



QO 

00 



OO 

o 



CO 
00 



xa 

QO 

91 



o 

00 



O OO 
op r^ 

OO 00 



QO Ol 
op CO 
00 00- 



00 

-^ 

OO: 
o* 



00 



Qp 

ob 



o 



o 

00 

OO ob 



QO 

do 

Gl 



*tniiiiiiTB|^ 



o 
op. 
db 



dc 

G4 



o« 00 

do do 

G) G) 



o 

Qp 

do 

G2 



do. 

Gl 



00 
00 



00; 

Gl 



OO 

G) 



G« 

o 

Oil 



oc 

OO 

do 

Gt 



OO 



00 
dr* 



QO 
G2 

d) 

CO 



QO 
G) 

00 



oc 



CO 



QO 

do 

Gl 



do 

Gl 



00 
Gl 












p 






^ 

< 






Ct4 

&2 









S 






z 


•t 


5 


on 


5 


2 


M 


i' 

8 


%4 

E 


r 


1" 


^ 




J 




1 




J 



t 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



■Of IHB BAJtPUTAlTA STAXE8 70S 1884^. 



51 



1 



.1 






.1 



i 

.I" 



I 



'saqoox 



o 



on 



00 2 g 

rH f^ 40 

<b -^ 00 



lb 



o 

o 



o 
o 






o 
o 



© 

o 
o 



•uwni 



t* 

t* 



GO 



o 
o 

lb 

QO 



3i 



^mmnnrip^ 



'mnaipni|i{ 









00 

to 






«0 



*n«a|^ 



oil 



\0 



CO 
CO 



IN- go 






-00 



o 
©I* 



CO 

o 



oo 

QO 



o 

Od Ob 



CO 



00 

kp 

Ob 



o» 



*inamiinj( 



kO o 

00 CO 

oo oo 

02 oi 



oo 
02 



oo 



30 



00 



l-H »0 






Oi 



0» Cd 

02 G2 



o 

02 



t^ 00 

oo l-H 



o» 

C4 






■xnnmixvjg 



o4 o 

Ob <30 

02 ol 



GO 

90 
O) 



QO 

00 

do 
o) 



Cfi 



QO 
Ol 



o 

l-H 



l-H Cp 

Ol 



6d 



o» 

Ol 



0B> 
Ol 



Od- 
ol 



Ob 

Ol 



S 



'saqoaj 



Troaj^ 



'nxmnioiK 



o 
o 



o 



o 



oo 
Od 



00 



op 
kb 



2 

o 



00 o 

^ o 
6 o 



CO 



o 
o 



o 
o 



00 



oo 

00 



^H GO 



00 



oo 
00 



Ob 



o 

00 



Ol 

QO 



O 



CO 



6b 



»b 

CO 



'inniiiizvK 



o 

o 



oo 

o 



Ol 

O 



o 
oa 

00 

Ob 



Ob 



o 
o 

o 



Ob 
00 



00 



o 
o 

00 



lO 

«o 



oo 

CO 



Ol 



-www 



•mnaitniii 



*amni|XBK 



•^ GO 

t^ Ol 

l-H O 



Ol 



Od 
Ol 



OB> 

ol 



ol 00 

oo iO 
Ob Ob 



00 

Ol 



00 

ol 



% 



Ob 
ol 



Ol 

6b 

Ol 



00 
CO 
00 

6b 6b 
ol ol 



oo 



o 



Ol 

CO 

a> 

Ol 



00 

o» 

6b 

Ol 



00 



o 

i I 



SB 



1 I' I •3' 



^ « 



♦? ■< 




7a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



62 



BEPORT OF THB POLITICAL ADMINISTEAMON 





)£ 




o 


o 


CO 


ltd 


e^ 


on 


o 


CO 


^-4 


on 


o 


on 


00 






< 


'S9({onj 


o 


o 


t* 


^ 


on 


r* 


o 


r^ 


o 


lo 


o 


o 


00 


• 




^ 




o 


o 


f-l 


00 


kO 


I-H 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


on 


' 




(H-Jt) 


tP 


o 


Oi 


I-H 


oo 


o 


CO 


on 


CO 


CO 


CO 


lO 


oo 


I-H 






00 


I-H 


xO 


Oi 


t^ 


oc 


s 


CO 


Ob 


CO 


Ob 


\o 


la 


on 








o» 


o 


Od 


oo 


«* 


00 


t^ 


CO • 


CO 


CO 


00 


00 


oo 






ni»H[ 




•»* 






00 
















Cb 


oc 




E 




























Ob 






(H •▼ 01) 


t^ 


« 


CO 


t^ 


t* 


«^ 


t^ 


l>. 


t^ 


Oi 


T}< 


CO 


c 


-H 




1 




s 


Ob 


o« 


CO 


'^ 


oo 


la 


t^ 


»o 


on 


00 


on 


lA 


on 




aincDini|i|[ 

• 


oc 


oo 


00 


t^ 


t^ 


l^ 


t^ 


CO 


lo 


^ 


la 


t* 


CD 
00 


t^ 


































H 


(K-as) 


00 


kO 


-Ifl 


Oi 


CO 


l^ 


00 


i^ 


t^ 


»o 


t^ 


fe^ 


la 


Ob 


as 




o 


Oi 


00 


Ob 


on 


f-H 


Od 


00 


l^ 


00 


^ 


00 


kO 


on 






o 


o 


o 


o» 


Od 


a 


00 


00 


e^ 


t^ 


00 


Ob 


r-t 


Ob 




mnmixv]^ 


1— 1 


rH 


1— ( 




















I-H 




:3 








































































55 


O 


00 


Od 


00 


Od 


»o 


'^ 


lO 


•^ 


c; 


Ob 


lA 


Ob 






•H -a '^) 


CD 


CO 


*o 


o 


00 


la 


o 


00 


la 


00 


00 


Oi 


on 


00 






00 


• 


#-H 


I-H 


I-H 


on 


la 


lo 


CO 


CO 


%o 


-* 


i>- 


OO 






nwK 


6o 


00 


oo 


00 


00 


ao 


00 


00 


00 


oo 


00 


00 


o 


^ 






o^ 


on 


O) 


Ol 


on 


on 


on 


on 


on 


on 


on 


on 


rP 






! 




























00 








00 


^ 


CO 


lo 


o 


I-H 


to 


I-H 


on 


^ 


CO 


o 


Oi 


t^ 






o 


:S 




lO 


Tjl 


I-H 


o 


S? 


o 


00 


kO 


"* 


oo 


on 




'mntniaiji 


• 


oo 


o 


a 


o 


o 


on 


k£d 


00 


oo 


00 


<?* 


do 




i 




00 


00 


00 


t^ 


00 


oo 


00 


00 


oo 


ao 


oo 


00 


Ob 


on 






O) 


G« 


»l 


©I 


on 


on 


on 


en 


en 


on 


on 


on 


00 






m 




























00 










92 


00 


Od 


06 


o 


00 


Ob 


CD 


I-H 


I-H 


o 


I-H 


la 


^ 


1 






o 


QO 


00 


^ 


lo 


on 


00 


:r 


o 


Od 




00 


kO 


>s 






'innoinrepi[ 


la 


« 


Oi 


Ol 


QO 


Tf« 


9 


CO 


00 


i^ 


t* 


CD 


on 


00 








c» 


s 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


on 


oo 


00 


00 


OO 


"^ 


on 




SB 




o^ 


O) 


Ol 


on 


on 


on 


O) 


on 


on 


on 


on 


00 






o 


00 


ot 


CO 


»o 


o 


o 


t^ 


o 


00 


o 


o 


CO 






4 


'BTqOHJ 


o 


Tf< 


Ol 


rH 


o 


•^ 


o 


p-rf 


o 


l-« 


o 


O 


Ob 


• 
• 




Q^ 




o 


o 


©^ 


Od 


-^ 


CD 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


SJ 








o 


Oi 


CO 


Od 


t* 


r~ 


00 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


I-H 


o 






(•wa9) 


lO 


o* 


00 


on 


oo 


X> 


on 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1>- 


JO 








fc^ 


I-H 


t^ 


on 


lO 


\a 


*o 


kO 


o 


Ob 


r^ 


t^ 


t^ 


tJ< 






«WW 


a 


o 


a> 


a> 


00 


00 


QC 


r* 


t^ 


CO 


t* 


00 


o 


00 




i 




































o 


CO 


CO 


00 


00 


t^ 


a 


o 


o 


<-, 


O 


o 


00 


O) 


Q 


O 


(•w -a 01) 


00 


r- 1 


CO 

• 


00 


00 


9 
CO ' 


CO 


o 


o 


on 


00 


o 
o 


o 

1^ 


00 


^ 


lunmraii^ 


00 


Od 


Od 


00 


CO 


00 


oo 


t* 


CO 


CD 


CO 


00 


Od 


t^ 


I 


fi 


































o 


Od 


CO 


CO 


I-H 


o 


I-H 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


eo 


^ 


» 




(H T 9) 


Oi 


o« 


00 


o 


iO 


<?^ 


t* 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


iO 


o 






^ 


CO 


oo 


00 


t^ ■ 


c* 


C^ 


kO 


on 


lO 


on 


I-H 


on 


I-H 




mninixvK 


t* 


00 


00 


00 


t^ 


t^ 


t* 


CO 


.»o 


*o 


iO 


t^ 


00 


t^ 






1— 1 


^ 


CO 


t* 


s 


§ 


00 


-^ 


o 


»o 


00 


00 


00 


^ 








lo 


•^ 


oo 


<M 


CD 


t« 


00 


CD 


CO 


1^ 


'^ 


ks 






•nww 


00 


00 


^ 


oo 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


oo 


00 


on 


00 




j 


Ol 


ot 


on 


O) 


on 


on 


on 


on 


on 


on 


on 


on 


00 


on 




• 


. 


. 


. 






. 


















•ranraiaim 


. • 


I 


• 


• 


2 


• 
• 


• 
• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




































'iniiniix«]ii{ 


?:•::::::::: 


• 


: 








• 
• 
• 
• 
• 










• 






0k 




, • 




• 

1 


Aybbage 








• 


















to 

00 
















oo 

00 

i-H 


5 


•* 


^ 


s 
■8 

< 


i 




1 


1 


00 






• 










1 

<1 


1 


s 


1 


1* 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




• . 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



07 THE EAJPUXAKA STATES FOB ISSl^S. 



63 









1 

,5 


■ o 


lO 


O) 


t^ 


»-H 


>o 


o 


o 


<5l 


f-l 


o 


© 


© 








o 
o 


o 
o 


1—4 

CO 




I-H 


OS 

lb 


o 
6 


o 
o 


o 


— < 

o 


o 
o 


cp 

o 


91 


• 




M 

1 




































§g 




oo 


'* 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o* 


© 




i 


GO 


00 
CO 


o 


eo 


o 

CO 


o 




<b 




^H 


o 
o 


o 
o 


CO 


<b 






s 


00 


Od 


OS 


Od 


00 


oo 


t^ 


CO 


i« 


CO 


CO 


CO 


cS 


!>• 




j-^,v 




1 


o 


o 


kO 


00 


CO 


30 


«« 


o 


Ol 


o 


o 


o 


lO 








o 
o 


o 
o 


CO 




00 


o 


rH 


o 
o 


o 


o 
o 


o 


© 
o 




! 




l-H 








I-* 


















Oi 






»i 


i 


1 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


pH 


o 


o 


t^ 


o 


© 


^ 






o 


o 


iO 


00 


»-< 


e) 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


ITS 


• 




ac3 


s 


o 


o 


O) 


CO 


CO 


00 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


oo 


• 


• 


no. 


^ 


























<M 




3 




1 


s 


o 


o 


^ 


»o 


o 


00 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


s 


© 


lo 




6 




o 


o 


o 


CO 


fc^ 


la 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© " 


I 


^ 




6 


o 


o 


&l 


i-H 


lO 


oo 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o« 


• 


c 












i-H 


















©1 




o 






































A . 




Od 


Ol 


o 


o 


o 


f-l 


o 


o 


^ 


oi 


o> 


•^ 


© 


00 


3 




i 




oo 

CO 




00 






o 

00 


o 
CO 


00 


1^ 


o 


© 
oo 






1 


s 


00 


Od 


Od 


00 


X) 


fc» 


QD 


iO 


CO 


CO 


t* 


© 


t^ 


.ft. 






































M 


s 


• 


• 


* 


* 


: 


: 


• 


• 
• 


• 
• 


: 


• 


• 


I 


• 
• 


••• 




PQ g 


:? 






























•0 


' J 








"~~^^ 






'■~~'^— 








_ 




















o 


t^ 


00 


OS 


CO 


OS 


o 


o 


t^ 


o 


o 


© 


CO 




•^ 

^ 




1 


1 

►5 


o 
o 


o 
o 




00 

GO 


OS 


op 

kb 


o 
o 


o 
o 


6 


o 
o 


o 
o 


© 
© 


OS 
3D 


i 


1 


m 












• 






















2<u- 
































'^ 


2 


S 3 


% 


»o 


»o 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


oo 


-^ 


CO 


^« 


OS 


23 


^ 


o« 


1 




|i 


00 


o» 


Oi 


OS 


00 


00 


00 


t* 


CO 


QD 


CO 


00 


00 

© 


00 


:a 






CO 


00 


CO 


e^ 


o^ 


CO 


© 


i^ 


©^ 


I-H 


Oi 


OS 


\a 


22 


-§ 




^i 


1 


o 


6d 


00 
00 


oo 


00 


00 

oo 


OS 


I-H 

OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


© 

OS 


CO 
00 


© 

OS 


1 




» s 


91 


O) 


ot 


Ol 


ot 


G^ 


Oi 


Gl 


C4 


e) 


O) 


ot 


o« 


00 


Ol 


s 
^ 


















• 























——'^-^—^-' 




o 


»-< 


00 


o) 


CO 


o) 














© 






^ 


i 


o 


o 


CO 


t^ 


o 


'^ 




, 


. 


• 


. 




*p 


• 


s 




1 


t 


o 


o 


^ 


la 


CO 


CO 


• 


• 
• 


' 


• 


• 


• 
• 


CO 


• 


•0 




rH 


»H 




























II 


.1 


o3 

i 


































Is 


d 
8 


• 
• 
• 


• 


• 
• 


• 


p 


i 


: 


• 
• 


• 




i 


I 


• 
• 


• . 11 


«<o 
































^ 






lO 


i^ 


o 


CO 


A 


00 


00 












CO 


o 


•*»» 




la 


d 
S 


oo 


oo 

00 


00 


CO 


CO 
00 


• 
30 


o 

OS 


: 


• 


: 


• 


• 


CO 


00 
00 


I" 




P3 


o< 


o* 


©^ 


o) 


Q< 


Ol 


O) 












© 


o4 


J 








o 


I-* 


»o 


iO 


o 


CO 


o 


^ 


o 


"* 


o 


© 


5 




^ 


■ 


^ 

^ 


4 


o 
o 


l-l 
o 


on 


o 


CO 




o 

• 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 


o 

© 


© 

• 

© 


I-H 


• 


*<5 ' 




pe 


3 






























5> 




































X 




iO 


o 


o4 


t*- 


t^ 














Oi 


t^ 


© 


.^ 


Od 


s 


i 


Oi 


^ 


rH 


liJS 


o* 




«o 


I-H 


CO 


o 


o 


ot 


-* 


"^ 


$ 


^ 


^ 


QO 


oa 


o 


*rp 


• 


CD 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


ot 


*§ 


f^ 


a^ 


s 


oS 


OQ 


s 


06 


s 




00 


t* 


CO 


CO 


t- 


00 


o 

OS 


00 


^ 


i^ 
































^ 4 


i 


• 
• 


• 


• 
• 


: 


* 


• 
• 




m 
m 


> 


: 


p 


; 


1 


• 11 

* H 


i 




ffi M 


33 




























1 








• 


• 


■ 


' 


« 


• 


■ 


m 


■ 


* 


• 


* 




H 




































% 










■ 


■ 


■ 


* 


* 


'■ 


« 


* 


• 


* 


i 


« 












• 


- 


■ 


- 


« 


■ 


» 


■ 


m 


■ 


■ 


♦ 


* 


f 


< 












s 


:£ 


s 


•* 


1 






1 


or 

00 




5 














1 


& 
s 


1 


1 


< 


s 


1 


1 


1 


J 


1 







Digitized by 



GoogI( 



62 



REPORT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 



a 











)K 




o 


O 


CO 


ltd 


t^ 


on 


^ 


OO 


F-4 


ot 


o 


09 


00 






< 


•wqoui 


© 


o 


t^ 


^ 


Ol 


r^ 


o 


I-H 


o 


iO 


o 


o 


oc 


I 




^ 




o 


o 


fl 


00 


lO 


1-4 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


® 


to 

04 


' 






-^ 


o 


Oi 


»-< 


00 


o 


CO 


ot 


CO 


CO 


CO 


lO 


00 


rH 1 






(h • j t) 


00 


^ 


iO 


Oi 


l^ 


oc 


-^ 


CO 


o^ 


CO 


Ob 


i2 


to 


04 








Oi 


o 


Od 


OO 


«* 


00 


00 


r^ 


CO • 


CO 


CO 


00 


00 


00 






^^K 




•-* 






00 
















Gb 


oc 




(4 
































(•H *▼ 01) 


fc^ 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


t* 


i^ 


t^ 


r^ 


t^ 


Oi 


'^ 


CO 


c 


-H 




s 




S 


0^ 


s 


CO 


'^ 


OO 


la 


t^ 


la 


Oi 


00 


Ol 


to 


o) 




a 

EH 


ainiintn||[ 

• 


OO 


00 


t^ 


t* 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


lO 


kO 


to 


t* 


CO 

00 


t^ 




00 


la 


-ifi 


9* 


CO 


l^ 


00 


l^ 


t* 


»o 


fe^ 


t^ 


to 


Ob 






(•H-J9) 


o 


o^ 


00 


^ 


Ol 


i-H 


Oi 


00 


t«« 


00 


-^ 


00 


to 


09 






o 


o 


o 


o> 


o» 


a> 


00 


00 


e^ 


t^ 


00 


Ob 


rH 


Oi 




araniixviif 


rH 


r^ 


»— H 




















f-< 




4 














• 


























































kO 


o 


00 


^ 


00 


Od 


ftO 


'^ 


la 


•^ 


il 


a» 


iO 


Ci 






•H -a f) 


<» 


CO 


iO 


o 


00 


lO 


o 


00 


lO 


00 


^ 


ot 


00 






CO 


(M 


#-H 


»— H 


1— t 


o« 


ko 


lO 


CO 


CO 


to 


•* 


l>- 


OO 






w»K 


00 


00 


OO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


OO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


o 


ot 






(M 


©^ 


O) 


Ol 


09 


Ol 


ot 


O) 


Ol 


O) 


Ol 


o« 


^ 


































00 


• 




M 


































H 




QO 


"^ 


CO 


kO 


o 


I-* 


lO 


rH 


o) 


^m 


CO 


§ 


a> 


b» 




s 




o 


'^ 


CJ' 


iTd 


Tjl 


r—i 


o 


? 


o 


00 


lO 


00 


<M 




•nmmraiu 


Ol 


00 


o 


Od 

• 


o 

■ 


o 


O) 


%a 


00 


00 


OO 


O) 


00 




O 




00 


OO 


00 


r^ 


00 


GO 


00 


00 


OO 


an 


OO 


6c 


6d 


91 




S 




« 


ol 


Ol 


Ol 


Oi 


09 


ot 


ot 


ot 


Ol 


o) 


o* 


00 
































00 






c» 


00 


Oi 


Cfc 


o 


OO 


Oi 


CO 


I-H 


I-H 


o 


i-H 


to 


^ 








o 


QO 


00 


^ 


lO 


o) 


00 


cr 


o 


Od 




OO 


to 


to 






-ainaiixiip|[ 


la 


00 


Oi 


Ol 


00 


Tp 


CO 


CO 


00 


l^ 


t* 


CO 


©^ 


00 








00 


^ 


00 


00 


OO 


00 


00 


on 


00 


00 


00 


OO 


tH 


09 








O) 


O) 


O) 


G« 


O) 


Ol 


91 


G« 


Ol 


©^ 


09 


OD 






. 




o 


00 


o) 


CO 


^ 


o 


o 


t^ 


o 


00 


o 


C2 


CO 






1 


-•aqonj 


o 
o 


o 


e>4 
09 


1— 1 
6i 


o 




o 
o 


6 


o 
o 


rH 

o 


o 

• 

o 


o 
o 


Ob 


• 








o 


a 


CO 


Oi 


t^ 


»>- 


00 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


I-H 


o 






('K 'd 9) 


la 


Gi 


00 


Oi 


OO 


9P 


G« 


© 


o 

• 


o 


o 


o 


fc^ 


JO 








r^ 


i-H 


r^ 


Gi 


*o 


la 


lO 


»o 


o 


o^ 


1^ 


t* 


^« 


Tfl 




i 


«WW 


Od 


O 
r-t 


os» 


os» 


00 


00 


oc 


r* 


t^ 


CO 


t* 


00 


5 


00 




o 


00 


00 


QO 


00 


r^ 


Ob 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


O) 


fi 


o 


(•K -a 01) 


00 


r- 1 

lb 


00 


00 


00 

• 

to 


o 


CO 


o 


s 


o 

O) 


OO 


o 
o 


o 

I-H 


OO 


^ 
^ 


1 


lunmraii^ 


00 


Od 


Od 


00 


CO 


00 


OO 


l> 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


s 


t^ 
































§ 






o 


o» 


CO 


CO 


l-H 


o 


I-* 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


eo 


^ 




(H T 9) 


Oi 


Oi 


00 


o 


to 


O) 


t^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


to 


o 


< 






CO 


CO 


00 


00 


t^ 


c^ 


c^ 


to 


Ol 


lO 


O) 


t^ 


O) 


I-H 


'A 




mniiiTx«]{ 


^• 


00 


00 


00 


t* 


t* 


t* 


CO 


to 


kO 


lO 


t^ 


to 

00 


t^ 






f-i' 


O) 


CO 


t* 


00 


5S 


00 


-^ 


o 


»o 


00 


00 


00 


^ 








lO 


•* 


OO 


<M 


ot 


CO 


t* 


00 


CO 


CO 


1^ 


Tfl 


to 






•nfBK 


00 


OO 


00 


OO 


00 


00 


OO 


00 


00 


00 


OO 


00 


Oi 


oc 




flj 


Ol 


Oi 


Ol 


Ol 


91 


O) 


O) 


o) 


04 


O) 


O) 


O) 


Tj< 


Q9 




1 




























00 






1 


'nnranaiK 


• 


: 


: 


• 
• 


• 


• 
• 
• 


• 
• 


• 
• 


: 


• 
• 
• 


• 


• 


• 
• 


: 




































•ranmixuw 


?:•::::::::: 


• 


' 


, 




• 
• 










• 














i 


< 






• 
• 
• 












• • 




(• 


g 


•» 


s 


H 


< 






00 
00 


5 


•* 


2 


^ 


5 

1 


u 


i 


1 


00 


^ 














1 

< 


1 


s 


i 




< 


1 


1 


1 


M 


2 






• ^ 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



07 THB EAJPUTAKA STATES FOR 1881-85. 



53 



o 



IS 

•I; 



•I 
,1 
I 





§ 


J 


• o 


lO 


Od 


t*- 


p-H 


\0 


o 


o 


Ol 


1— 1 


o 


o 


^ 




o 


o 


>-H 


lO 


1— « 


a 


o 


o 


Tf< 




o 


o 


• 




0^ 


Q 


o 


o 


00 


t^ 


<o 


la 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


• 
































c^ 










































GO 


'^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






ei 


o 


i 


00 


00 
CO 


o 
lb 


eo 


o 

CO 


o 
da 




o 

CO 


1?* 




o 
o 


o 
o 


CO 


dD 




a 


00 


o» 


Od 


Od 


00 


00 


l>. 


CO 


lO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Oft 


t* 


1 1 




i 


o 


o 


)0 


CO 


CO 


ao 


o« 


o 


©I 


o 


o 


o 


lO 




^-5 


1 


o 
o 


o 
o 


C9 


qp 


00 

lb 


O 




o 
o 


10 

o 


o 
o 


o 
6 


o 
o 




• 


52 


bs 


9 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


1— 1 


o 


o 


t^ 


o 


o 


'^^i 




p4* 


o 
o 


o 
o 




00 


<b 


do 


CO 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
6 


o 
o 


iO 

da 


• 


3Q0. 




M 


























©» 






1 


1 


o 


o 


"^ 


kO 


o 


00 


00 


o 


o 


o 


8 

o 


o 


lO ^ 






o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
di 




kb 


da 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


Oft* 

d» 


: 




1^ 








l-H 


















<M 




6^. 

g 3 




Ob 


09 


o 


O 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


©^ 


o* 


2 


o 


00 


'3 


i 




CO 


o 


do 


o 


d« 


o 
do 


o 
cb 


o 
do 


1^ 


o 
CO 


o 
do 


"? 
b* 


b* 


s 


00 


Od 


o:> 


oo 


JO 


t* 


CO 


»o 


o 


CO 


t* 


OS 


t* 


sd 


fl 
































^H 


s 


• 


. 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• II 




n 3 


S9 




























1 








o 


fc^ 


00 


a> 


w 


Oft 


o 


o 


t^ 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


1 






^ 


o 


o 


00 


00 


Od 


CO 


o 


o 


r^ 


o 


o 


o 


Oft 






F 


















• 














H 


,X3 


o 


o 


o) 


CO 


lO 


kO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


ac 


• 




p^ 


s 


























r-H 


• 


A 




»-l 








I 






















• 

2 iS 
































< 


SP 


8 


iO 


kO 


t^ 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


'^Jl 


CO 


t* 


Oft 


52 


'* 


o« 




,§9 


00 


0& 


oa 


o» 


00 


00 


00 


t- 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


00 

Oft 


00 






« 


00 


00 


t^ 


Od 


CO 


o 


fc^ 


O) 


l-l 


04 


Oft 


lO 


00 




6d 


s 


o 




00 


fc^ 


t^ 


00 


f— 1 


i-H 


o» 


ot 


f-* 


o 


CO 


9 




S B 


§ 


O) 


o 


GO 


00 


00 


00 


05 


Oi 


Oft 


o 


Oft 


OS 


00 


Oft 




n 9 


^ 


0>> 


ot 


Oi 


M 


o« 


o< 


e« 


o« 


Ol 


O) 


09 


09 


00 


o< 








o 


»-H 


00 


ot 


CO 


o) 














Oft 








1 


o 
o 


o 
o 


oo 


1?* 


o 

CO 


•* 

QD 


; 


• 
• 


I 


• 
• 
• 


i 


• 
• 
• 


d) 

CO 


• 
• 


Bj 
P 


































6 ' 


. 
































11 


s 
8 


• 
• 
• 


• 


• 
• 


: 


» 


• 
• 


: 


• 
• 


• 




I 


• 


• 
• 


• 


P 








































lO 


ta 


o 


00 


Oft 


00 


00 












CO 


s 




n 9 


S 


Ob 

oo 


Qp 

do 


CO 


00 


CO 

do 


do 


o 

6ft 


• 


• 


: 


• 


• 


'^ 


op 

00 




;^ 


O) 


O) 


O) 


ot 


O) 


Ol 


e« 












o 


Ol 








o 


rH 


la 


^ 


o 


CO 


o 


-^ 


o 


'^ 


o 


o 


^ 




■ 


§ 


J 


o 
6 


o 


o» 

• 
Oil 


o 


CO 

©3 


o« 


o 

• 
o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 


o 
o 


o 

• 

o 


1** 

d« 


.- 


6S 


04 


l-i 






























H 




lO 


CO 


Oi 


Ir* 


€<» 














Oft 


t* 


o 


cu 


1 


O) 


t^ 


l-H 


kft 


04 




CO 


1^ 


CO 


o 


o 


<?* 


-* 


T^ 


s 


c» 


<o 


o« 


o 


TP 


• 
• 


• 

CO 


t^ 


CO 


r« 


00 


CO 


o 


s 


Ha 


h 


GO 


Od 


o:> 


Oft 


30 




00 


fc* 


CO 


CO 


^- 


00 


§ 


00 


H 


1 


• 
• 


• 
• 


• 
• 
• 


• 


• 
• 
• 


• 
• 
• 


• 


• 


• 
• 
• 


: 


• 


• 
• 


I 


• 
• 
• 




« s 


94 




































• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


' 


• 


• 




• 


































^ 








^ 


• 


, 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


>A 


2 
































< 


fifl 


































^ 








• 


• 


■ 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


^ 


< 








•* 
oc 
oo 


s 


:i 


^ 


5 


1 


:i 


5 

J 




oc 

00 

1 


ft 


5 












1 

< 




i5 


'3 

Ha 


1 


cS 


1 


1 




1 

^ 


1 







Digitized by 



GoogI( 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



POLITICAL APMINIBTRATIOK OF RAJPUTANA STATES FOE 1834-85. 85 



HETWAK EESIDENCY ANNTIAL EEFOBT FOB 1884*85^ 



. No, 12.P., dated Udaipur, 28th May 1885. 
Prom— CoLONBL C. K. M. Waxtbe, Resident at Meywar, 
To — The First Assistant Agent to the Governor-General in Bajputana. 

I have the honor to submit the Administration Report of the Meywar 
Residency for 1884-85, together with the reports of officers in. local political 
charge of States. 

ILLNESS AND DEATH OF MAHABANA SUJJUN SINGH, G.C.S.L 

Mention has been made in the annual reports for the past three years of the unsatisfactory 
state of health of the late Maharana Sujjun Singh. His condition, however^ was not such 
as to cause serious apprehension. His Highness went on a visit to Jodhpur in October^ in the 
hope that change of air and scene might prove beneficial, and returned to his State in the 
beginning of the month of December 1$84« 

% I met him whilst out on my tour on the Srd of that month and had two interviews 
with him. I thought him looking exceedingly ill, but he was cheerful, and anticipating much 
benefit from the cold weather which had then set in. 

8. On the evening of the 11th idem, I received a telegram from Udaypur informing 
me that the Maharana has been seized with an epileptic fit ; I at once returned to the capital 
which I reached on the night of the following day. The Maharana had recovered from the fit 
and was under the medical charge of the Residency and Mission Surgeons, Dr. Ffrench MuUen 
and the Revd. Dr. Shepherd, and although in a critical condition, it was hoped that he might 
rally and be restored to health. 

4» I saw him daily. He was in a very weak condition and his mind was never suffici- 
ently clear to enable me to say more than enquire after his health and speak a few kind words 
to him. 

5. At 3 P.M. on Tuesday, the 28rd of December, I visited him with the Revd, Dr. 
Shepherd ; he was then in an excited condition, and I saw a great change in him. The same 
evening at about 6-SO an urgent message was brought from the palace that the Maharana had 
again been seized with an epileptic fit. I at once proceeded to the palace with Mr. Wingate, 
Settlement Officer, Meywar ; we found the Maharana on his bed in a court-yard open to the 
skies whither the two doctors had had him removed in order to obtain the benefit of a thorough 
free circulation of air. Fit succeeded fit.' He never recovered consciousness and died at 
11-20 P.M. 

6. I with the doctors and Mr. Wingate remained in the room with the dying man until 
the end; with us were his own personal attendants, the Chief Minister and a few others, 
whilst in another court-yard outside, "but close by, sat His Highnesses father and a large crowd 
of people. It was a remarkable sight and one giving rise to reflections as to the great change 
that has taken place in the feelings of Natives towards Europeans within the last few years. 

7. When the attendants of the preceding Maharana, Simbu Singh, saw he was dying, ten 
years before, the doctors were requested to withdraw, but on the present occasion all seemed to 
look to us for orders. I myself actually gave the signal to lift the dying man from his bed in 
order that his last breath might be drawn on the bare ground according to Hindu custom. 

S* On the death of the Ruler of Meywar in 1874, it was with difficulty that the then 
Political Agent, Colonel Wright, restrained some of the ladies from attempting to break out of 
the zenana in order that they might become Satis with their Lord and Master. On the present 
occasion, although all necessary precautions were taken, no thought, I believe, of Sati occurred 
to any members of the zenana; but when intelligence of the loss they bad sustained was 
conveyed to them early in the morning, «uoh a wail of sorrow burst forth tiom the inmates of 
the ladies' apartment as only those who have heard it could imagine. 

9. Early on the morning of the 24th, the body of the late Chief arrayed in full court 
dress* and covered with jewels was carried forth in a kind of Sedan chair in a sitting position 
to the place of cremation about ^k miles from the palace, all the Sardars, officials, priests and 
servants following on foot accompanied by almost the whole of the inhabitants of the city. 
It was not until evening that all returned as every man had to be shaved and to bathe after 
the cremation ceremony was over* 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



66 REPORT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

10. I had remained at the palace throaghout the day^ and it was not until late at night 
that a sncoessor to the gadi was appointed in the person of Futteh Singh, a distant connection 
of the late Maharana, a descendant of the fourth son of Maharana Sang Bam Singh the 
Second. 

11. According to ancient custom in Mejwar there is no interregnum ; the ^aiis cannot 
remain vacant. At the death of a Ruling Chief the city gates and every shop are closed and 
neither can he opened and therefore no food obtained until the order is given by the successor. 
When the new Ruler is selected the Rao of Bedla^ the second noble in the State (to whom this 
privilege belongs), places on him four pieces of jewelry in accordance with the ancient custom 
of the Meywar House, and then petitions that the city gates may be opened, shops unclosed 
and the ^'Nobuf (or big kettle drum) be beaten as usual. 

12. Maharana Sujjun Singh was born in A.D. I860, so that he was only in his twenty- 
fifth year when he died. He succeeded to the gadi in 1874 on the demise of Maharana 
Simbu Singh (who also died at the early age of 27) and was entrusted with full powers in 
1876. 

13. In this brief period of eight years^ Maharana Sujjun Singh had done much for the 
improvement and prosperity of his State, and I do not suppose that Meywar was ever more 
prosperous than at the time when death called its Ruler away. 

14. Of the more important works commenced under his rule the following may be men- 
tioned :^ 

The Revenue settlement which is first approaching completion. 

The thorough examination of all the large lakes and tanks of Meywar with a view to their 

increased utilization for purposes of irrigation, and the selection of sites for new 

tanks and wells. 
The revision of the Customs Department which resulted in the abolition of an enormous 

number of petty dues and the retention of duty on only ten articles. 
The revision of Courts of Justice, and establishment of the *^ Mend Raj Subha,'' a Court 

presided over by the Maharana with its members selected from the leading nobles 

and officials of the State. 
The opening up of the country by new roads. 
The pacification of the Bhils and the establishment of a better system of government 

amongst these wild people. 
The improvement of the police especially in the city of Udaypur itself. 
The construction of a large public garden at the capital. 

15. A few months before his lamented death the late Maharana decided to construct a 
ine of Railway from Chitor to Nathdwara and from thence on to the " Debari,'' where there 
is an opening through the hills into the valley where the capital is situated. The survey of 
this line was being carried out during the period of his last illness and death. 

SUCCESSION OF MAHARANA FUTTEH SINGH. 

16. Although unanimously elected by the nobles and officials of Meywar to succeed the 
deceased Chief, Futteh Singh only became Ruler of Meywar on receipt of the sanction of 
His Excellency the Viceroy to the election. The new Maharana was formally placed on the 
gadi by Colonel Bradford, C.S.I., Agent to the Governor-General, on the 4th March 18»5, 
and is now carrying on the government of the country with the assistance of the Resident. 

17. Maharana Futteh Singh was bom in 1850 and is now therefore in his S5th year. 
He has a son, bom a year ago, and a daughter now six or seven years of age by a former wife 
who died. 

The Maharana is a shrewd intelligent man, bears, and has borne from his early youth, an 
irreproachable character, and will, I trust, prove a really good Ruler. 

All he wants is experience which he is gaining daily. He is most earnest in the discharge 
of his duties, very popular amongst all classes, and a most thorough sportsman. 

SEASON OF 1884-85. 

18. The rains began at Udaypur on the 20th of June. From the 22nd of Ji^e to the 
18th July there was a break and some fear of damage to the kharif crop was anticiputed, but 
ultimately the fall proved considerably in excess of the average. By the rain guage kept at the 
Residency the total was 32-66, of which 4*32 fell in four days of June, 9*66 in twelve days of 
July, 11*40 in eleven days of August, and 7*28 in twenty days of September. The fall in the 
city was an inch and seventy-nine cents in excess of that at the Residency* As has been noted 
in former reports, this is generally the case every year; the city being nearer the hills is, 1 
fancy, the cause of the excess fall. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



DHwiiTa 

Kotra . 

Eherwam 

U^aypQT City 

Chitor 

Serara 

Eamaigarh . 

Ssran Belmagra 

Bhilwara 

Jehaipar 

SiidriChota . 

Udaypur Besidenqy 



OF THB RAJPUTANA STATES POR 1884-86. 57 

^OQ* '2?**' ^^* '^ *^® maigin is given the return of the 

rainfall at 12 different stations in Meywar. The 
heaviest falls recorded are^ at Kumalgarh in the 
Aravalli hills 4487 and at Saran Relmagra^ one of 
the districts of Central Meywar^ 44*63, whilst the 
lowest measure was 17*67 at Serara, the head- 
quarters of the Bhil country to the south of the 
capital. Taking it altogether over- the whole 
district of Meywar the rainfall was an exceedingly 
abundant one. 



39 


68 


82 


64 


34 


46 


26 


83 


17 


67 


44 


87 


44 


63 


23 


13 


24 


43 


27 


68 


32 


66 



CBOPS. 

80. The outturn of the kharif and rabi harvests was excellent ; both were gathered with- 
out injury of any kind. The opium crop was very good and plentiful. 

21. The price current of wheat, barley, and Indian-corn during the year under review is 
given in Appendix A to this report. 

Never before, so far as can be remembered, have these cereals been so cheap, a result 
largely due, no doubt, to plentiful and opportune rains during the two past seasons and to con- 
sequent bumper harvests. 

PUBLIC HEALTH. 

22. The Residency Surgeon reports as follows regarding the public health of Udaypur : — 
"The health of the city during the year under notice has been good on the whole. Out 

of a population of 38,000 there were 984 deaths, showing a death-rate of 26 per thousand, 
which compares favourably with previous years. 
There were only 4 deaths from small-pox. 
The number of births was respectively — 

Mussulmans . . • • • . • ,183 
Hindus 413 

Total . . 596 

The sanitation of the city was well looked after, and the streets kept fairly clean. 

VACCINATION. 

There were 3,301 cases of vaccination performed as against 2,899 in 1883 : the percentage 
of success was 95 per cent. 

JAIL. 

The average daily strength during the year was 264. There were 12 deaths, giving a 
mortality of 45 per mille. 

DISPENSABIES. 

The dispecsary was well attended; during the year there were 13,716 new cases (out- 
patients) treated, as against 10,179 in 1883. There was also an increase in the number of 
in-patients, viz., 7^5, as against 666 in the previous year. 

The daily attendants of in and out-patients averaged 173 for the whole year; 26 major 
and 1,045 minor operations were performed successfully. 

UDATPUE JAIL. 

23. Oreat exception was taken to the building used as a jail by the Superintendent- 
General of Dispensaries and Vaccination in Rajputana during his late visit to Udaypur. No 
doubt the buDding is by no means what it ought to be, but a death-rate of 45 per mille would 
not seem to condemn it as unhealthy. It has been long intended to erect a new jail, and Mr. 
Thomson, £ngineer-in-Chief , whose services have been placed at the disposal of the Meywar 
Darbar for the survey of the Chitor- Udaypur line of Railway has kindly undertaken to make 
a plan and estimate for a new prison in the Kishen Morilla or small fortalice on the south-east 
side of the city. The fortalice is on high ground, is not far distant from the Infantiy lines, 
the site is an exceedingly healthy one, and water, it is believed, can be laid on from the I^chola 
Lake. 

8 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



68 REPOET OF THB POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

HOSPITAL FOE WOMEN. 

I hope that the new building will be commenced very shortly. 

24. The number of both in and out-patients who attended this hospital under the superin- 
tendence of the lady doctor during the year was 1884, an increase of 179 over last year, I am 
informed by Mr. Lonorgan that patients come to the hospital with much more confidence and 
less fear than a few years ago ; there is not that dread of European medicines and treatment which 
before existed. Patients ^^owcome in from outside villages for treatment. There is still, however, 
difficulty about midwifery cases, such are only brought to the hospital, or the lady doctor 
called in, when the " Dhais '^ of the city have worked all the mischief they can, and the 
patient is at the very last stage, when little can be done after the fearful maltreatment they 
receive at the hands of the ignorant women who attend then. Out of four such cases during 
the year three proved fatal, only one recovering. 

MISSION HOSPITAL. 

25. The mission hospital under charge of the Revd. Doctor Sommerville, who was relieved 
early in December by the Revd. Doctor Shepherd, the permanent incumbent, who had been 
absent on furlough, continues to relieve large numbers of patients, and without in any way 
interfering with the Maharana's hospital under the medical charge of the Residency Surgeon 
does much good and is a most j>opular institution; its popularity is mainly due to the character 
and ability of the very excellent man who have held charge of it. 

26. In recognition of the medical services rendered to His Highness by the Revd. Doctor 
Sommerville, the late Maharana issued orders for a piece of land being given rent-free to the 
mission for the purpose of erecting a new mission hospital near the grain market, the most 
populous part of the Udaypur City. The grant was not complete when the Maharana died, 
but the present Chief at once confirmed the same, and the land has now been made over to the 
mission, and Doctor Shepherd is about to erect a large and commodious hospital, which will, 
doubtless, prove an immense blessing to the people of Udaypur and of Meywar generally. I 
thus prominently mention the fact of this gift of land for a hospital as showing how much the 
late and present Maharanas appreciate the work of the officers of the mission, who are univer- 
sally respected not only in the city, but in the State generally. 

FINANCES OF THE STATE. 

27. It is with satisfaction that I am able to report that the Finances of the State are in a 
very satisfactory condition. 

28. The income for the Sambat year 1940, which ended on the 80th of June 1884, was Uday- 
pur Rs. 33,48,33813.9 equivalent to Government Rs. 26,46,906-8 and the expenditure Uday- 
pur Rs. 27,89,116-6-11 equivalent to Government Bs. 22,04,837-8, thus leaving a balance 
of income over expenditure of Udaypur Rs. 5,59,220-6-10 or in Government currency Rs. 
4,42,069. 

29. Amongst the revenue items, that for the land including the district of Merwara 
(Udaypur Rs. 84,480) amounted to Rs. 17,70,948 of Udaypur currency, whilst the income 
from Customs was Rs. 10,25,295-3-6. Prom this, however, has to be deducted the amount which 
the Darbar receives from the British Government on account of salt, viz, Rs. 2,58,610-7 of 
Udaypur money, thus leaving the actual income from customs Udaypur Rs. 7,66,684-12-6. 

30. The ordinary expenditure for Sambat 1940 was Udaypore Rs. 23,67,432-13-7, extra- 
ordinary expenditure Udaypur Rs. 4,21,683-9-4. 

31. A sum of Udaypur Rs. 2,16,391-13-3 was expended on public works under the 
supervision of the Durbar's own officers, Mr. Williams and Mr. Amba Lall. 

OPIUM. 

32. During the year under report 7,199 chests of opium were weighed at the Chitor scales, 
as compared with 6,137 chests during 1888-84, thus sho wring an increase of 1,062; these are the 
highest figures reached since the year 1877-78 and for many years previous. The amount of 
duty realized by the British Government was Rs. 46,79,350. This increase in the disposal of 
chests was due partly to a slight rise in the price of opium, but mainly to the traders being 
obliged to realize their capital and sell even at a loss. 

33. Owing to the slightly improved price of the drug, a larger area was sown this last 
season with opium and the crops have been gathered without damage. The outturn is likely 
to be considerably in excess of that for last season. 

34. A rather daring attempt to smuggle dry opium from Udaypur into Kathiawar was 
detected in November last. The case was at once investigated by the Durbar and reported by 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB EAJPXTTANA STATES FOR 1884.86. 



59 



me to the Commissioner of Customs^ Salt^ Opium^ and Abkari^ Bombay^ and to the Deputy 
Collector Salt, Opium, and Abkari, Ahmedabad, pending whose replies the accused were detained 
as prisoners eventually. At the request of the abovementioned officers^ the ring-leaders were 
sent to Ahmedabad to be made over to the District Magistrate tliere for trial. 

36. The cunning way in which the opium was being smuggled, as described briefly below, 
shows that the men were no novices in their profession. When arrested they were mounted 
on camels, with riding saddles having the usual (to all appearance) '^gudeW or pads under- 
neath. When, however, these '* gudelas^^ were examined they were found to contain opium 
carefully put away in balls, each '^ gudeV' containing only about 10 seers of opium, so that 
no bulk would be visible and the *' gudelas'' would bear the appearance of ordinary saddle 
pads. 

86. In this manner, several m aunds of the drug would have been smuggled into Eathia- 
war, if the attempt had not been detected here. 

87. The question of export of opium from Dungarpur, referred to in paragraph 9 of 
Colonel Templets report on the political superintendence of the Hilly Tracts, is under the 
consideration of the Commissioner of Customs, Salt, Opium, and Abkari, Bombay, with whom 
I have been for some time, and still am in correspondence on the subject, and I hope, with 
Colonel Temple, that the matter will soon be satisfactorily settled. 

It seems to me, however, that the opium grown in Dungarpur is not generally appro- 
ciated or there would not be the difficulty that the Darbar now finds, and which they attribute 
to the closing of the direct route to Ahmedabad in obtaining purchasers for it. If this is 
really the case, the matter will soon right itself, and the cultivators will give up growing the 
drug. 

SALT. 

88. The following table shows the average price of salt during the. year in the States 
under this Residency :^ 



Districts. 



Bate per Government 




Udajpnr 

Country ronnd Eherwara 
Ditto Eotra . 
Dnngarpnr 
BauBwara . • 
Pertabgarh 



89. It will be seen that this commodity was somewhat cheaper in almost all districts than 
during the previous year. 

Treaty obligations have been strictly adhered to and the sums assigned to the Meywar 
Darbar under agreement have been duly disbursed. 

40. A small cess known as '^ Mapa'' or town duty had been levied on salt in various 
places in Meywar. The sum was so small that exception was not taken to it when the salt 
treaty was made, but it was found that this duty was extending. On my representing the 
matter to the Durbar, orders were issued to discontinue the levy of '' Mapa/' so that saJt is 
now free from any cess at all throughout the State. 

BEVENXTE SETTLEMENT. 

41. As soon as opportunity arose after the succession of the present Maharana to the 
gadi Mr. Wingate placed before His Highness his report on the revenue settlement of Central 
Mey war^ and the subject was discussed on several occasions with the Maharana, the Settle- 
ment Officer, the Members of the Maharana's Council, and the officials of the State. 

42. After having had everything explained to him, and being made acquainted with the 
rates proposed by the Settlement Officer, and the estiihated revenue, the Maharana gave his 
formal sanction to their introduction, and fixed twenty years as the period of settlement com- 
mencing from the Darbar new year (Ist July 1885) Sumbut 1942. 

8a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



60 BEFOBT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

43. As far as I am able to judge^ the rates are favourable to the ryots, and if, as will surely- 
be the case, advantage is taken by the zemindars of their twenty years' lease, to bring the 
large quantity of waste land now existing under cultivation and to extend irrigation by the 
construction of wells and tanks, considerable advantages will accrue to them, as well as to the 
State. 

44. The intention originally was to have the first settlement for fifteen years, but there 
was, no doubt, that the ryots looked for a longer lease, and it was thought on the whole advisable 
to extend the term to twenty years^ and in fixing this period I think the Maharana has acted 
wisely. 

45. Whilst I write Mr. Wing^te is engaged in making known the new rates in the Par* 
gana of Basmi. On the whole they have been received in a fairly favorable manner. Nearly 
fifty villages have already accepted them, and I feel sure that as the rates become more widely 
known, the advantages of the settlement cannot fail to be appreciated. 

46. The Settlement Officer, however, has many difficulties to contend with, for the culti. 
vators of Meywar are utterly uneducated and as a consequence are suspicious to a degree 
and never before having had so much trouble taken on their account by any one as the English 
Settlement Officer is now taking, they probably think there is something detrimental to them 
lurking behind and require to have every item of the settlement minutely explained before, 
agreeing. A less painstaking officer would never have su^xseeded in overcoming all the difficul- 
ties met with, bat from the first Mr. Wingate has determined to succeed, and now success is 
crowning his efforts. 

47. If received in lime, Mr. Wingate's remarks on his work will form an appendix to this 
report. 

IBBIGATION. 

48. The Government of India having sanctioned the retention of Mr. Monckton's services 
for a further period of one year for the purpose of making a thorough inspection of all existing 
lakes and tanks, a work he was unable to complete last season, that officer has been busily 
engaged on this duty during the year under review. At my request he has written a short 
account of his work which is here given. 

49. ''During the year 1884-85 I inspected 41 tanks and sites for proposed tanks. Some of 
these were in the Sahran and Rashmi districts, but the greater part were in the district of 
Bhilwara. 

50. ''The northern part of the latter district requires tanks greatly, as the rainfall is gene- 
rally small ; many sites which were otherwise suitable were found to be on porous ground. 

51. "I spent some time in investigating the project of canals to be taken out from the 
Khari nadi. It has long been thought that some of the A jmere district might be thus watered. 
It was found, however, that irrigation could not be carried out ia this manner on the Meywar 
bank, and that the construction of a dam across the river would probably damage the land 
below by diminishing the springy in the wells. A separate report was made on the subject. 

52. "A sum of money was sanctioned for the repairs of the weirs of the lake at Rajnagar. 
These weirs were in a very bad state; there were several gaps which allowed the water to be 
imnecessarily lowered by two feet. The repairs are now being carried out. 

53. "It was proposed to raise the weirs three feet, so that the surplus floods of wet years 
might be retained for use in dry years, but this was not sanctioned by the Darbar. 

54. "Two small canals out of the same lake are now in process of construction ; it is hoped 
that they may be completed before the rains. Their lengths are about three miles and four 
miles respectively. On one of them a large nala has to be crossed by an aqueduct, about 110 
yards in length, *the bed of the nala consisting of sand, the foundations are being built on 
weUs, the sinkage of which presents some difficulty^ owing to the quantity of water met with. 
This IS apparently due to the late floods of last rains: in 1884 the water was about six feet 
lower, and there never has been known to be so much as there is this year. 

55. "The earthwork of these canals has been done by employing each coolie as a petty con. 
tractor. The work was measured and paid for every day. This involved a considerable amount 
of trouble, but by this means large numbers of willing labourers were collected where at first only 
three or four men could be got by the use of some compulsion. The rates paid for earth*work 
have been low, though they included the pay of the necessary petty establishment. A little work 
was done by contractors, but they demanded such high rates that it was found much cheaper 
not to employ them. The work is not so neatly done as contractors accustomed to such work 
would have done it, had there been any such men, but it is sufficiently good for the purpose. 
About two miles of earth-work remain to be done. The canals are expected to pay from 15 to SO 
percent.*' 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE RAJPUTANA STATES FOR 1884-86. 61 

66. With regard to the raising of the weirs of the lake at Rajnagar three feet^ the Darbar 
did not sanction the proposal as it was thoaght that damage might ensue to the ornamental 
buildings below the bund which would probably be submerged. The two canals, which are 
being constructed at a cost of Rs. 20,000, will be most useful irrigation works. A large amount 
of laud will be brought under cultivation by their means and an exceedingly good return is 
looked for on the capital expended. 

57. Mr. Monckton, before leaving Meywar, submitted an interesting report on the subject 
of '* irrigation in the Mey war State/' a copy of which is annexed to this report. I shall be 
exceedingly glad if it could be printed with the rest of the papers, and, if possible, that I 
might be supplied with some spare copies. 

68. The schemes proposed by Mr. Monckton will now be examined by the Darbar, and 
it IS intended to expend a certain sum of money annually on the construction of these useful 
works. 

ENSILAGE EXFEBIMENT AT UDATPUB. 

69. In the month of October last a silo was dag in the Maharana's garden and stocked 
with beautiful dhoob grass collected from the garden itself. The experiment was carried out 
by Mr. Storey, Superintendent of the Maharana's garden, and was very successful. 

60. On the 21st of February the silo was opened in my presence, the grass at the top had 
a brown colour and emitted a rather strong smell, but not nearly so offensive as I have read 
of in other accounts of opening silos. The garden bullocks at once ate the grass freely in pre- 
ference to the dry fodder they had been accustomed to, but our own horses would not touch 
the food. 

61. The silo was visited by a number of native gentlemen, but I cannot say that they 
seemed to appreciate the system. The outturn of dhoob grass in the garden was very large 
this year, and that not put into the silo was made into hay and stacked, and the hay was as 
sweet, good, and nutritious as hay well secured in England. 

62. The question is, I think, whether or not such hay, the grass beipg out at the proper 
time, is not more suited for feeding cattle, horses, &c., than the ensilage. 

63. The great error committed by the natives of India is, as far as I can judge, that they 
do not cut their grass and store or stack it until all the nutriment has gone out of it. 

64. For ensilage the material must be cut and deposited in the silo whilst it is green ; if 
the same process were observed in cutting grass, making hay of, and storing it at the same time 
as the grass would be placed in a silo, I am of opinion that the former would be preferable to 
the latter. 

65. In India, where the weather is so favorable to making hay, I can see no great advantage 
in storing grass below ground to storing it properly made in stacks. 

In a country like England, where the weather is so uncertain, no doubt silos must prove of 
great advantage, but in India I do not think that they are likely to answer. 

66. A ocgpy of Mr. Storey^s report on the subject is annexed, marked B. 

ADMINISTSATION. 

67. The Administration continues on the same footing as before with the exception that 
an additional member has been added to the '^ Mahad Raj Sabha'' in the person of Maharaj 
Muddun Singh of Bhinder, the head of the Shukhtawuts, a branch of the Sisodias which was 
not before represented in the Council. 

68. In my last year's report under this head I mentioned that work in all the different bran, 
ches of the Administration had fallen greatly into arrears owing to the illness of the Maharana 
and his inability to attend to business, and for the same cause these arrears very largely 
increased during the year under report. 

69. In the interval between the death of the Maharana and the receipt of orders from 
His Excellency the Viceroy, confirming the election of the present Chief, I presided daily over 
the Council composed of Members of the ** Mahad Raj Sabha'^ and large number of arrears 
were disposed of. 

70. The present Maharana has since his accession to the ^adi worked very hard. He 
has two meetings of the Council daily ; and thrice a week, at his own request, I sit with him to 
help in deciding the more important cases. 

71. In a short time I hope all arrears will be cleared off. Once this is done there will be 
no difficulty, if the Maharana continues as active as he has hitherto shown himself in disposing 
of all cases as they arise. 

72. Advantage has been taken of the presence in Udaypur of all the great Feudatories of 
the State to dispose of cases amongst themselves, and between them and the Darbar, many of 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



62 BEPOET OF THH POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

which have been pending for years. The Maharana was very anxious that I should take up these 
cases during the time I was carrying on the Administration, as he anticipted much trouble from 
them; but time did not allow of this and I am.glad to be able to report that all the most impor- 
tant cases have been cleared of^ and in a way, I believe^ satisfactory to all. 

73. In last year's report I brought to notice the good services of Rai Mehta Punna Lalji^ 
the Durbar's chief officer. During the trying time of the illness and death of the late Maha- 
rana and the election of the present Chiefs his services to me and to the State were simply 
invaluable. 

74. I received much cordial assistance too from the leading Chiefs and officials of the 
State ; indeed I may say that one and a,ll, at rather a critical time> did their best for the true 
interests of the State, and evinced their loyalty to the British Government by the cordial way 
in which they supported me during the brief period in which I carried on the Administration. 

JUDICIAL STATISTICS. 
(1) Criminal Cases. 

76. The annual return of criminal cases, as furnished by the Darbar, will be found as Appendix 
C to this report. 

76. Compared with the previous yearns figures a notable decrease of crime is perceptible 
all round) but especially in the more heinous offenoesj as will be gathered from the few parti- 
culars noted below :^ 

1883-841. 1884-85. 

Dakaity 16 13 

Highway robbary 97 74 

Murder 67 45 

Woundiog 29 19 

Saioide and attempt at Boidde 78 48 

Abortion .....••• 15 7 

77. No case of infanticide has been reported during the year. The number of cases dis* 
posed of out of a total of ^,092, (including those pending from the previous year) was 1,248, 
while work in 1883-84 shows 1,268 cases decided out of a total of 1,967. Thus the outturn 
of work during the year under review has been a good deal below the average, but this was 
mainly due to the inability of His late Highness through continued ill-health to attend to 
business. 

78. The special police officer appointed by the Darbar has done good service, and has 
brought to light several cases during the year. The principal Sardars of the State have each 
agreed to appoint a special officer from their estates to assist the Darbar Police, to report all 
cases, and to do all in their power to trace out criminals. 

(2) Civil Litigation. 

79. Particulars under this head received from the Darbar from Appendix D to the report 
and a comparison with last yearns statistics shows the result to be satisfactory. 

80. The number of cases admitted was 618, against 670 in 1883-84. 

81. Cases of debt fell from 327 to 214 and betrothal disputes from 25 to 18. 

82. Adoption and caste disputes from 7 to 4 and miscellaneous cases from 173 to 137. 

83. A large number of debt cases appears to have been disposed of leaving the compara- 
tively small balance of Bs. 1,98,830 in dispute at the dose of the year, against 3,26,014 the 
year before. 

84. There was a falling-off, however, in the settlement of other cases, a result also, no 
doubt, due to the illness of the late Chief. 

(3) Appeals. 

86. Appendix E shows the result of appeals to the " Mahad Raj Sabha '* or Chief Court 
of Meywar as reported by the Darbar. It will be seen that there were in all 741 civil and 525 
criminal appeals for disposal, as compared with 659 and 449 respectively last year. The num* 
ber decided was 384 civil and 292 criminal, leaving 857 and 233 pending at the end of the 
year. 

86. Of the 384 civil appeals heard, the orders of the lower Court were upheld in 254, 
reversed in 98, and revised in 32. 

87. Of the criminal appeals disposed of, viz., 292, the lower Courts' decisions were confirmed 
in 133 cases, upset in 54, and revised in 105. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE KAJPTJTANA STATES FOE 1884-86. 63 

(4) Court of Vakils 

88. Appendix F is a statement of work performed by the Court of Vakils daring the 
year. 

89. The total number of cases for disposal^ including a balance of 10 from the foregoing 
year^ was 30 against 25 in 1883-84. 

Of .these 80, 14 cases were decided^ leaving 16 pending at the close of the year. 

90. In 1883-84, 16 cases were decided out of a total of 25, so that the working of the 
Court during the year was rather below the average ; some of the cases, however, were long and 
intricate ones taking up more of the Courtis time than usual, and this accounts in a great mea- 
sure for the apparent decrease in the outturn of work. 

91. Twenty fresh cases were instituted during the year as described in Appendix G. This 
return, I regret to say, includes £ murder cases, and in fact shows a general increase, as con- 
trasted with last year's statistics in the number of heinous offences. On the other hand, however, 
it is satisfactory to note that '' cattle -lif ting '' has no place in the record of the year's crime. 

92. The total amount paid as compensation was Udaypur Bs. 2,140-9-6 and Imperial 
Rs. 431 against the insignificant sum of Udaypur Bs. 78 last year, and a fine of Bs. 250 
(Government Currency) was inflicted, fines in 1883-84 totalling Bs. 500. 

98. There ^ere in all 7 appeals to the Upper Court, in 3 of which the Lower Court's deci- 
sions were upheld and in 1 reversed, 3 remaining pending at the close of the year. 

Safety of Gtovenuneiit Mails. 

94. There is nothing to report under this head. There were no robberies, in fact no inter- 
ference of any kind with the Government mails, during the period under notice. 

JaiL 

95. The number of convicted prisoners in jail during the year was 249. Of these 97 were 
under sentence for murder and 24 for dakaiti. 

96. There were 101 under-trial prisoners in confinement, 4 of whom were charged with 
murder and 25 with dakaiti. 

97. The above information has been suppUed by the Darbar, a translation of whose return 
will be found as Appendix H to this report. 

98. It is to be hoped that the number of prisoners under trial will be considerably reduced 
during the present year. 

The Maha Sana's School. 

99. From 5th May 1884 the post of Head-master has been held by Mr. Hazari Lai, 
formerly Head Clerk of the Executive Engineer's OflSce at Abu, whose services have been lent 
to the Darbar. 

100. The number of pupils on the rolls at the close of the year under review was 593, as 
compared with 398 in 1888-84, thus showing an increase of 195. There was an improvement 
also in the average daily attendance, the figures being 322*81 for the previous year and 342*45 
for 1884-85. 

101. The percentage of attendance was 6325, while last year it reached 72*93. This 
falling-off is, however, due chiefly to the death of Maharana Sujjun Singh, which prevented 
several pupils from attending for a long period. 

102. The average number of pupils on the rolls shows a considerable increase, viz,, 541*38 
as against 442*93. This average is the highest yet attained since the establishment of the 
school. 

103. Prom the figures given below it will be seen that except in Persian the number of 
dtudents learning different languages shows an improvement : — 

English . • 

Sanskrit 

Hindi 

Persian 

Urdu 

104. The total expenditure during the year amounted to Bs. 7,927-3 against 10,713-10-9 
last year. This decrease is due to the fact that the present Head-master draws a much lower 
rate of salary than his predecessor, as also to the increased number of pupils attending the 
institution as noted above. This latter cause, however, has necessitated the entertainment from 



1883-84. 


1884-86. 


. 63 


144 


. 12 


32 


. 841 


479 


. 82 


18 


. 52 


64 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



64 REPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

the beginning of the official year 1885-86 of a second master to teach English^ on a salary of 
Rs. 80 per mensem^ and the employment of one of the students as monitor. 

105. The average cost of educating each pupil fell from Es. 20-6 in 1883-84 to Rs. 
14-12-10 this year^ a result also to be attributed to the reduction in the Head-master^s pay and 
to the increased number of pupils. 

106. A grant of Rs. 408 per annum for scholarships and Rs. 60 for prizes was sanctioned 
by His Highness the late Maharana in September 1884^ and this will, it is hoped, tend greatly 
to the improvement of the school. 

107. His Highness the Maharaja of Jaipur, when on a visit to his capital lately, gave a 
donation of Rs. 1,000 to the institution, the interest of which is to be applied annually to the 
distribution of rewards to tw« deserving boys and one girl of the school. 

108. His Highness the Maharana distributed the prizes to the school on the 16th March 
, 1885 with the usual ceremonies. I was present on the occasion with several of the Sardars and 

the members of the School Committee. 

PROPOSED EXTENSION OF EDUCATION IN METWAB. 

109. The subject of extending education all over Meywar is now under consideration, and 
a complete scheme will shortly, it is hoped, be organized. 

110. At the death of the late lamented Maharana it was decided, instead of throwing 
away such large sums of money as had been done on the occasion of the death of the two pre- 
vious Chiefs in* feeding Brahmins, &c., to set aside a sum of two lakhs of rupees of Udaypur 
Currency, equal to one lakh, fifty-seven thousand four hundred and eighty rupees of Imperial 
currency, for the purpose of establishing schools and dispensaries or hospitals in the districts, 
and that all these institutions should be called after the late Maharana " Suj jan School '' or 
♦* Sujjan Hospital.'' 

111. It has been arranged by Mr. Wingate, the Settlement Officer, to levy a cess of half 
an anna in the rupee of land revenue for the first seven years of the settlement, of three-fourths 
of an anna for the second seven years, and of one anna for the remaining six years. 

1 12. This will produce a gradually increasing income, as the scheme develops, and a sum 
sufficient to give Meywar a complete system of schools and dispensaries. 

113. This cess will fall very lightly on the ryots owing, I quote Mr. Wingate's words, 
**to the wise moderation His Highness the present Maharana has exercised in permitting 
me to fix the demand at an amount which seems to me equitable and which will permit the 
resources of the agriculturists, I hope, rapidly to cope with the large waste areas and dormant 
facilities for irrigation which open so prosperous a future to Meywar." 

114. A guarantee has been given by the Maharana that no other cess will be levied 
during the term of settlement, and that the limit of one anna in the rupee will not be exceeded, 
and that the families of land occupants paying land revenue chargeable with this cess will have 
free use of any dispensaries, schools, or other local benefits that may be secured, while moderate 
fees will be fixed for all who m^ke use of the benefits without having contributed towards 
them. 

115. I may add that this scheme will owe its success (if success, as I feel sure, attends 
it) to Mr. Wingate who, on hearing of the proposal to invest a capital of two lakhs of rupees 
for the purpose of endowing schools and hospitals, drew up the scheme which I have sketched 
above and recommenced the levy of the cess. 

116. This will enable us to erect really good buildings for schools and dispensaries with the 
capital sum of two lakhs, whilst the income derived from the cess on land revenue will cover all 
expenses, and it is hoped leave a surplus for other useful works in the districts. 

MATO COLLEOR 

117. The Darbar reports that five boys from the Meywar State have attended the Mayo 
College during the year. 1 have been using my best endeavours to persuade the principal jagir- 
dars to send their sons to the College, but as reported last year education is very little thought 
of in this State. If, however, the general scheme already alluded to proves successful, perhaps 
the higher class of nobles will take more interest in the subject and begin to see the advantage 
of education for their own sons. 

PUBLIC WOEKS. 

1 1 8. The report under this head has been sent to the Secretary to the Agent to the Governor- 
General in the Public Works Department. The total amount expended during the official year 
was Udaypur Rs. 2,64,810-11-9, equivalent to Rs. 2,09,336 of Imperial currency. The amount 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE KAJPUTANA STATES POB 1884-85. 66 

entered x^iA.er head of the Finances of the State was the expenditure for the Sqmbut year 1940^ 
from Ist July 18S3 to 30th Jane 1884, the Darbar official year. 

PROPOSED RAILWAY. 

119. Although orders for the construction of this line have not yet been given, I am very 
sanguine that th^ work will be shortly commenced. Mr. Thomson^ the Engineer-in-Chief, who 
was only appointed on the 1st November lh84, has completed the survey of the line and sent in 
his final report with detailed plans and estimates and has furnished me with a short note on the 
subject which I give verbatim. 

120. ^* The line has been set out, and the survey and estimates completed for 51 miles (to 
Nathdwara Road Station ) : and for the remainiog 22 miles to the proposed terminus (8 miles 
from Udaypur) the ground has been carefully examined and the location fixed. The branch to 
Nathdwara, which the original scheme included, has been abandoned, and a metalled road will 
be made instead from Nathdwara Road Station to Nathdwara, a distance of five miles. 

121. The line throughout the 51 miles is easy, and with the exception of one rock cutting in 
the S2nd mile the works will all be light. From the junction with the Kajputana-Malwa Rail- 
way near Chi tor to Nathdwara Road Station there is a rise of nearly 500 feet, and consequently 
a considerable length, pf the line will be on gradients varpng from 1 in 150 to 1 in 1^500, the 
total length of level portion being between 14 and 15 miles. 

122. The estimate amounts to Rs. 23,330 per mile, which includes Rs. 3,500 per mile for 
rolling stock and Rs. 12,750 for ballast and permanent way. For the latter it is proposed to 
obtain new steel rails from England as no second-hand rails are available in India and this 
necessarily increases the cost of the line. Taking the same receipts per inile for goods traffic as 
on the Jodhpur line, and the passenger traffic receipts on the calculated number which will trave^ 
over the Udaypur line, there will be a net profit of' over 5 per cent on the estimated capital 
outlay.'' 

1 23. The line, if constructed, has, I feel sure, every prospect of success, for it will not only 
pass through the richest portion of Meywar and thus serve a number of large towns and villages 
but a considerable income may be looked for from the passenger traffic of pilgrims to the famous 
shrine of Nathdwara, that of Bwar-ka-Nath at Kankroli, distant only five miles from the pro- 
jected Railway, and Eklinji a shrine sacred to Mahadeo, whilst the Jains will utilize the Rail- 
way for the purpose of bringing them many miles nearer to the famous temple of Rakab Deo 
situated on the Kherwara road, forty miles south of Udaypur, The line will also pass close to a 
spot called '^ Matri Rund,'' a sacred place on the bank of the Bunas river, where a large fair is 
annually held. It will also open up the marble quarries of Rajnugger and pass close to those 
of Mandulda, where very good stone for building purposes is found. 

metwar-tone border. 

124. Captain T. C. Pears, Assistant*Agent to the Governor-General in Rajputana, was 
engaged settling boundary disputes on this border from 26th October 1884 to 11th April 1885 ^ 
or a little over six months. 

125. During this period he disposed of 46 cases representing a boundary line of about 37 
miles. 

126. A list, with details of the cases decided, forms Appendix I to this report, from which it 
will be seen that 7 disputes were decided wholly or partially by Punchayet, 23 by mutual 
agreement and 16, including one case resettled, by the Boundary Officer himself. 

127. Captain Pears reports that in cases 34 to 44 inclusive settled by himself the Tonk 
Motamid filed *' razinamas,^' and the Meywar Motamid informed him that he did not intend to 
appeal, and that pillars were being erected. 

128. Captain Pears has worked exceedingly well and has been able to settle a large num. 
ber of disputes. It is satisfactory to notice that half of the cases were settled by mutual agree- 
ment. I am very anxious that the whole of the boundary, which often gives much trouble to 
this office, shoald be defined as soon as possible, and I hope an officer may be able to take the 
field early in the cold season for the purpose. 

FOREST OPERATIONS. 

129. I have nothing to record under this head this year. The hills in tbe immediate 
vicinity of the capital, which are used as shooting preserves by His Highness, are conserved to a 
certain extent. 

9 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



66 BEFOET 07 THE POLITICAL ADMIKISTBATIOK 

BHEEL HATTEBS. 

ISO. I regret that I have been unable to pay my nsnal visit to the Bheel country daring 
the year under report^ but there has been very little crime, the season has been an unusually 
good one^ and the Bheels in consequence have prospered. 

BHEEL SCHOOL. 

181. There are now four schools in the district, viz., at Jawur, Bara Pal, Puduna, and 
Rakabdeoj all of which are fairly well attended. The schools at present are merely rudiment- 
ary ones^ but the district will ultimately be included in the general system of education for 
Meywar. 

BHOBIA FORT. 

182. The Bhorai Fort has been completed. It is a strong well-constructed building and 
will serve to remind the Bheels of all future times of their rash attempt to subvert the Darbar 
authority in 1881. 

183. I am very glad to be able to record that no attempt at witchswinging has occurred 
since the compact made with me by the Bheels of the Mugra district, as described in the Annual 
Report for 1882-83. 

MUaRA HAEIH. 

134. The Mugra Hakim, Oovind Singh, continues to give satisfaction. 

PLUNDEBINa EXPLOITS BT KEENAHS OF THE CHAPPAN AND THEIB 

PUNISHMENT. 

135. Some of the Bheels, or as they call themselves Meenahs of that part of the country to 
the east of the Raj Samund Lake, have long been notorious for their plundering propensities. 
This tract, wild and hilly, is separate from what is called the ^' Mugra^' and is known as the 
" Chappan.'' 

136. In November last two or three Rajputs and a man named Birda of Bumbura were 
escorting a consignment of cloth from Bumbura towards Salumber. The party was attacked 
by Diala Balla and others of the Miran hamlet of the Dewul Pal ; Birda was killed and Diala^ 
one of the attacking party^ so severely wounded by the escort that he died soon after. 

137. On intelligence of the occurrence reaching the Naib Hakim of Lassaria, he, with a 
party of armed men, proceeded to the abovementined hamlet in search of the offenders and 
arrested them ; upon this the " Kilki^' was sounded, a large number of the inhabitants of the 
surrounding Pals collected, attacked the Naib Hakim and rescued the prisoners. 

188. This was too daring an act to be lightly passed over, and a strong force was sent out 
by the Darbar. The result was that several arrests were made^ and by means of the men thus 
captured a clue was obtained to the chief actors in the various cases of robbery that had been 
committed, and severe punishment has been meted out to all who have been caught, whilst for 
the arrest of those still at large rewards have been offered. The action taken by the Darbar 
has had the best effect and has, for the present at all events, instilled a wholesome dread into 
the minds of the people of that part of the country, which is now quite peaceful and quiet* 

DISTURBANCE IN CONNECTION WITH THE SUCCESSION TO THEBOARA 

ESTATE. 

139. The disturbance connected with the succession to the Boara estate on the death of 
the late Bawat Udot Singh in February 1884 has been so fully reported on that it is only neces- 
sary to mention it here as one of the chief occurrences of the year under report. 

140. The late Bawut desired that his successor should be his nephew, named Kesri Singh, 
but he had been informed during his lifetime that this could not be ; the rightful heir to the 
estate, which had been originally Crown land, and had been bestowed by Maharana Jowan 
Singh as an act of favor on the second son of a former Maharaj of Bhindar, being a younger 
brother of the present Maharaj of Bhindar. 

141. When Udot Singh died, an attaching party, as is always the custom, was sent by 
the Darbar to Boara. Kesri Singh, the would-be heir, refused admission to this party. He was 
dealt leniently with for a long time, but as he continued contumacious, a force had to be sent 
by the Darbar to coerce him. 

142. Even after the Darbar troops had arrived before the place, every effort was made to 
induce the youth to yield, without having recourse to force, but in vain. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB BAJFUTANA STATES 70S 1884^. 67 

143. At 6 on the mornmg of the 6th of April the place was attacked and the fight lasted 
until 11 A.M.; there was considerable loss on both sides^ but Kesri Singh, with his principal 
adviser, was taken prisoner. Suitable punishment was meted out to all concerned. The only 
person who escaped the reward of his deserts was a man named Girwar Singh, to whose evil 
advice it was due that Kesri Singh refused to obey the just orders of the Darbar. This 
individual took care to keep out of the way of danger, and from a distance urged Kesri Singh 
not to give in, and has ever since been spreading false reports regarding the action of the 
Darbar. 

144. At the death of the late Maharana it being customary on such occasions to release a 
number of prisoners, several of the men, who had been sentenced to various terms of imprison- 
mnent connected with this case, were released on giving security for future good conduct. Only 
those most guilty have been detained to serve out their full terms of imprisonment, and when 
Kesri Singh and his brother (the latter was very severely wounded in the attack) had been 
under surveillance for a year, the present Maharana, taking pity on their youth, and consider- 
ing that their acts were due more to the ill advice they had received from others than to their 
own natural instincts, has allowed them to go free on the security of the Bawut of Bansi for 
their future good conduct, and on condition that they will not, without permission, leave the 
capital. 

TOUB OF RESIDENT. 

145. Owing to the lamented death of the late Maharana rendering my presence at Uday- 
pur necessary, I was unable to undertake my usual cold- weather tour and only visited Chitor, 
Bhilwara, and Mandel, when I was recalled to Udaypur, as explained in the early part of this 
report. 

HILLY TEACTS. 

146. Colonel Conolly was compelled to proceed to England on medical certificate at the 
end of January lb86 and was succeeded by Lieutenant-Colonel E. Temple on the 25th of 
February as Officiating Commandant of the Mey war Bhil Corps and Political Superintendent, 
Hilly Tracts. His report with that of the Second Assistant is annexed. 

BAINFALL AND CBOFS. 

147. The rainfall both at Kherwara and Kotra was above the average, and the crops were 
veiy good. Opium and mhowa are said to have largely failed, howevier, owing to cloudy 
weather. 

148. The price of all food grain was very low, Indian-corn selling at 42 seers for the 
rupee. 

149. No case of mail robbery or of witchswinging had occurred during the year under 
report. 

150. A Border Court was held for the disposal of suits between Dungarpur and Bans- 
wara, at which 11 cases were settled and one left pending. 

151. Nothing has been done to the Kherwara-Kotra Road owing to want of funds for the 
puipose. 

EOTBA. 

154. The Jura debt to the Meywar Darbar has been further liquidated by the payment 
of a sum of Rs. 4,073. 

153. Great complaints are still made of the incapacity of the Rao for managing his estate. 
With my sanction a new Kamdar has been appointed, of whom the Second Assistant reports 
favourably. 

154. With the Rao's consent, his son, a boy of 18 or 19, is now associated with him in the 
management of afEairs. 

155. An unfortunate occurrence occurred at Kadurmal, in the Jura district, in March last, 
which resulted in the death of a Jura sepoy, and three Bheels, besides several wounded. The 
case is still under investigation. The Rao of Jura avers that he sent out his men to arrest 
some offenders, and that they were attacked by the Bheels with the above result. The Bheels 
tell a different story, 'which, ii proved true, would seem to point to unnecessary violence on the 
part of the sepoys. 

PANUBWA. 

156. The Runna of Panurwa is well reported on by the Second Assistant, and I believe he 
is managing his affairs well. When, however, the Thakur of Umria was killed last autumn 
the Runna endeavoured to place his brother in possession, notwithstanding that the murderedi 

9a 



Digitized by 



Googl( 



'68 BBPOBT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

Thakar had a nephew^ who, in accordance with Hindu law, was the proper person to sdcceed. 
The matter was referred to the Darbar^ who after due enquiry confirmed Chutter Singh^ the 
nephew of the murdered man> in the succession. 

157. The Bunna of Panurwa^ it appears^ has always had the right to exercise a certain 
amount of jurisdiction over Umria^ and the Darbar have directed that the present Thakor 
of Umria should be subordinate to him in such measure only*as has hitherto been customary. 

15S. Although the murder of the Thakur occurred in September last^ I regret to say that 
the chief criminal has not yet been captured. 

159. The Thakur had been to a village to arrest some Bheels accused of cattle-lifting; 
having effected his object he was returning to his home when he was surrounded by a party 
of Bheels and killed. I have every hope that the man who fired the fatal arrow will yet be 
brought to justice : others are under arrest. 

OOHNA. 

160. The Bao of Oghna continues to manage his affairs well and his estate is in a pros* 
perous condition. 

161. The usual Border Courts have been held. » 

DUNGAEPUE. 

162. The report of Dungarpur under the able management of its loyal and popular Ruler 
isj as usual^ favourable. 

163. The question of the export of opium from the State is still under consideration, Men^ 
tion has been made of this subject under the head of Opium '' in the report for Mey war. 

164. After the submission of his report, Lieutenant- Colonel Temple forwarded me copy of 
a letter from Mr. Patterson, Officiating Deputy Superintendent, Survey of India, who, on Major 
Cart-er's departure to England on sick leave, took overcharge of the Survey party, thanking him 
and the Maharawul of Dungarpur for the aid all his survey parties had received throughout the 
season. Mr. Patterson adds '' the arrangements made by the Dungarpur Darbar have been 
very good indeed, and all throughout His Highness the Maharawul, I am glad to say, has 
taken a personal interest in the progress of the survey.^' 

165. I regret that I have been unable to visit Dungarpur this season, but Colonel Euan- 
Smith, when acting for me during my absence on privilege leave, drove across to Kherwara and 
Dungarpur in July last being absent altogether five days. 

BANSWAEA AND PEETABGARH. 

166. Lieutenant W. Evans-Gordon assumed charge of the appointment of Assistant Poli- 
tical Agent for Banswara and Pertabgarh on the 16th of April 1884 and has held charge 
throughout the year. 

167. For the reasons given in an early part of this report I was unable to visit these two 
States. 

PEETABGAEH. 

168. The rainfall at Pertabgarh was only 25'21 against 87'61 last year. The average 
rainfall for the past five years, not including that now under report, was 88-87 f , so that the 
fall this year was 13*66 f below the five years' average. At Chota Sadri, which is the district 
of Mey war near Nimach and bordering on the State of Pertabgarh, the fall was 27*63. 1 believe 
in Malwa, of which Pertabgarh may almost be said to be a portion, the rain was generally defi- 
cient during the year under report. 

169. Notwithstanding the short rainfall, however, the crops must have been exceedingly 
good, for the average price of wheat was 23 seers 3§ chittaks against 14 seers lO^^chittakslast 
year; Indian corn, 83 seers 13^ chittaks against 23 seers 11^ chittaks; and gram 31 seers 8} 
chittaks, whereas last year's average wa& only 19 seers 4f chittaks. 

170. The health was good in both States and the working of the dispensaries is favour* 
ably reported on. 

171. A post oflSce has been established at Pertabgarh, a want long required. 

172. The Maharawut has set on foot a school at Pertabgarh. 

173. Lieutenant Evans-Gordon makes favourable mention of the management of the 
jailt 

174. The Maharawut continues to manage the affairs of his State well. He has lately 
appointed a Kamdar, a Muhammadan, who was formerly the Vakil attached to this Residency. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB BAJPTTTANA STATES FOB 1884.86. 69 

I am afraid he is hardly the man for the post, but so long as the Maharawut himself looks 
closely into affairs the appointment of a Kamdar is not of so much importance. 
176. The Bheels have been quiet and have given no trouble. 

176. All the Border Courts with t^e exception of one were held during the year. 

177. Lieutenant Evans-Gordon also disposed of several boundary cases. 

178. It is satisfactory to learn that although the rules for the extradition of offenders be- 
tween the two States of Banswara and Pertabgarh have not been applied, yet the feeling be- 
tween officials on the border is more cordial, and the Bheels on both sides have been unusuaUy 
quiet. 

BANSWABA. 

179. The report annexed on affairs in Banswara is altogether more favourable this year. 
The new Kamdar, in spite of ill health, is doing well and has, apparently, gained the confidence 
of the Maharawul. 

180. The rainrall was heavy, being 50*22 against 34*12 last year, and grain has been 
considerably cheaper than it was in 1883-84, the average price of Indian-corn being o^er a 
maund for the rupee. 

181. Two cases of witchswinging are reported during the year. Fortunately the wretched 
victim in both cases survived trying ordeal, and in the first nearly all the criminals have 
been captured and punished. 

182. The Darbar is doing its best to put down this vile crime. 

ASSISTANT POLITICAL AGENT. 

183. I have every reason to be perfectly satisfied with the way in which Lieutenant Evans- 
Gordon has carried on his duties during the year. He joined Lis appointment without having 
had any previous experience of such work. He has succeeded in gaining the confidence of the 
Chiefs of both States and his frequent visits to Banswara are, I see, being productive of much 
good. One great obstacle in the way of permanent reform in the very backward state of 
Banswara has been the want of a good Kamdar, and the constant change of the Political OfiS- 
cer in charge. If the Kamdar's health allows of his remaining on in his present position and 
Lieutenant Evans-Gordon continues to take the great interest in his work that he has 
evinced during the year under review, I am very hopeful that still more favourable reports of 
Banswara may be looked for each year. 

(Sd.) C. K. M. Waltbb, Colonel, 
Besident, Meytaar. 



No. 24iO-B., dated Camp Rasmi, 3rd June 1885. 
From-^A. "Winoatb, Esq^ C.6., CLE., Settlemenl Officer^ Meywar^ 
To^The BendetU, Meywar. 

I have the honor to furnish a note on settlement operations for the year 1884-85, and to 
apologise for the delay which has been caused by my desire to watch the result of the yearns 
work before reporting upon it. 

On the return of the Settlement Officer from privilege leave the assessment of the two 
central zillahs of Meywar was commenced. These zillahs were chosen as being the seat of the 
general disturbances in 1880, when measurements were in progress, and the centre of the 
Jat population, whose independence of thought and action has from time to time obliged 
the Government of the day to retrace its steps. The settlement of the Jat pargannas 
once effected ensures that whatever difficulties may hereafter be met with there will be no or- 
ganised opposition. Towards the close of 1884 the rates and' assessment for each village had 
been worked out and the results tabulated and compared with the collections of the last quarter 
of a century divided into suitable periods, and with the figures for the former settlement which 
broke down about tien years a^^o. Just as the report was ready for submission His High- 
ness the late Maharana fell ill, and from that date a considerable time intervened until 
the present ruler was invested with power. Delay too was necessary owing to the want 
of familiarity of the new Maharana with the details of the work, and it was important to the 
future of any settlement in a Native State that the final decision on each main point should be 
the intelligent and voluntary act of its ruler. His Highness gave to a somewhat bulky report 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



70 KEPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINTSTHATION 

and a mass of figures much painstaking attention, and the settlement proposals had also 
the advantage of the approval of the Minister, Rai Panna Lai Mehtaji, and of the Zillah 
Hakims. As soon as the general scheme was sanctioned, the new account for each asami 
was made out for the pargana of Basmi, which was selected as an important and re- 
presentative district for experiment. Meanwhile a code of settlement rules with new forms of 
accounts as an appendix was prepared, and after full discussion was approved of. It 
now only remained to fix the term of settlement and to sign the papere. When the Settlement 
OflScer first came, five years was considered a long term; subsequently the views 
of those in authority extended to ten and twelve years, and eventually the late Maha- 
rana agreed to 15 years. At his final interview with the present Maharana the Settlement 
Ofiicer asked permission once more to re-open the Question and to ask for a term of 20 years, 
the period he has from the first endeavoured to secure. The Maharana heard him with 
patience, but said he would reserve his decision. A few days afterwards, in the presence of the 
Besident, the Maharana directed the Minister to afiix his seal to the papers, and in reply to 
a question from the Resident stated that he had fixed the term for years. Next day 
the Settlement Officer left Udaypur and was joined in camp at Rasmi by the Minister, Rai 
Panna Lallji. The rules were read and explained and the rates generally announced to the 
assembled patels and influential people of the parganna, and they expressed themselves satis- 
fied. The work of announcing to each landholder the amount he would have to pay was next 
proceeded with and continued for three weeks, individuals requiring more explanation and 
detailed information than will probably be necessary in future when it is seen there is no cause 
for suspicion. Meanwhile Rai Panna Lall, Mehtaji, employed the time in visiting other large 
towns in the two zillahs, explaining the rules and preparing the way for the Settlement Officer. 
When the detailed announcement of the accounts was finished, the patels were once more 
assembled, and diflSculties which had arisen were discussed with them by the Minister and 
Settlement Officer. There will be a good many petitions to inquire into, but on the whole the 
objections are not more than might be expected, and the general feeling was expressed that the 
settlement was a fair one. The opportunity has been taken to instruct the Haki m, a very 
intelligent, active, and zealous officer, to whose assistance much of the success attained has 
been due, and his establishment, in the details of the rides for working the settlement and in 
the new system of accounts. The rules embrace the privileges and duties of patels and give them 
a more recognised and responsible position than they have hitherto enjoyed, while His High- 
ness has sanctioned their remuneration by a percentage on the land revenue in addition to 
remitting a s|)ecial tax to which they were subject. All cases connected with land or paid by 
those holding land have been abolished, and only such taxes retained as are levied from non- 
agricultural classes. The subject of village expenses was also brought before the patels, and 
they have agreed that a clause be added to the settlement rules limiting such expenses to a 
fixed percentage calculated on the village revenue. In a country where innumerable privi- 
leges exist by the open or secret favor of officials, high and low, many of which are now to 
the great satisfaction of the majority swept away, a certain amount of individual and occa- 
sional, class hostility must be expected. Pains have been and will be taken to protect all just 
claims and to avoid undue enhancement of individual accounts, but when all is done there 
must be a residuum of discontent from which a settlement in a district for any length of time 
under British management would be free. 

Another important step for the welfare of his people has also been taken by His Highness in 
sanctioning a cess at the rate of half an anna per rupee of land and sayer revenue for the first 
five years of the settlement to rise to three-quarter anna during the next five years and to one 
anna during the last ten years. The proceeds of this cess are to be devoted first to the 
establishment of a dispensary at each head-quarter town and of as many schools as possible 
in each pargana and afterwards to such local works as the pargana patels in panchayat 
may wish to carry out. Considering that hitherto no expenditure worth mention in this 
direction has been undertaken except at the capital. His Highness has marked the beginning 
of his reign by a policy that cannot fail to bring him the grateful attachment of his people. 
This cess has been put before the patels of the various parganas, and has been so readily 
accepted that it shows the cess meets a widely recognised want. The moderation which His 
Highness exercised in fixing the demand alone made such a cess possible. 

It is too early to speak of the success of any of these measures, but intended as they 
honestly are to promote the well-being of Meywar, they cannot but tend to bring the Govern- 
ment more into harmony with the people and eventually to convert Meywar from a backward 
into a most advanced state. Should such a result happily follow the endeavours now making, 
the credit will be due to Rai Panna Lall Mehtaji, a Minister of the first rank in intelligence 
and integrity of purpose vnth great talent for administration and remarkable tact in govern- 
ment. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE BAJPUTAKA STATES FOR 1884.85. 71 

EEFOET OK IBEIGATION IN THE HETWAA STATE. 

NECESSITY FOB IBBIGATION. 

Agriculture in Meywar depends greatly on irrigation^ as the rain is often de6cient in 
quantity and in many years does not fall at the time ivhen it is needed. Moreover^ the slope of 
the country is so great that most of the rain runs off very rapidly instead of sinking into the soiL 
In most parts of the State valuable crops cannot be raised without irrigation. 

BAINFALL. 

The amount of rainfall varies very much in the different districts. Udaypur and the 
Hilly Tracts appear generally to have most rain ; Jahajpur and Bhilwara the least. A rain 
gauge has been kept at Udaypur for some years^ but gauges were only supplied to the Hakims in 
1883^ so as yet there is not much available information from which the quantity of water likely 
to enter any tank can be calculated. An additional gauge is required at Hurra, there being none 
nearer than Bhilwara, a distance of 37 miles. Pander would be a better place for a gauge than 
Jahazpur is, for the latter place is situated between hills which must undoubtedly affect the 
rainfall. 

For many years before 1875 the large tanks never filled : this shows that there was a long 
period of scanty rainfall, but unfortunately there were no rain gauges established then. 

Published reports on the tanks in the Ajmere district show that only 2^ or 3 inches on an 
average run off into the tanks. 

WELLS. 

Wherever there is a good supply of water in the ground and where rock is absent, there 
many wells are to be found, as for instance along the large weirs. At a distance from the rivers 
there is much less water, so that the wells can only be worked for a few hours each day, and 
rock is nearly always met with. Where the rock is soft a new well may not coat much money, 
but in most places there is hard rock and excavating is very expensive. 

TANKS. 

In such places tanks are preferable to wells. The nature of the country makes tanks possi- 
ble in most villages. The ground slopes rapidly and there is generally rock just below the 
surface of the ground ; hence rain runs off without much loss from absorption. As the rainfall has 
varied from 14 inches in 1877 to 42 inches in 1875, it is obviously desirable to store up all the 
rainfall possible, so that the excess of wet years may make up for the deficiency in dry years. 

For this reason large tanks holding 2 years' supply of water are greatly preferable to those 
which only hold one year's supply, and which are dry when water is most wanted. 

OLD TANKS. 

The necessity for tanks seems to have been well understood in former times. Besides those 
which still hold water, there are an immense number out of repair and the sites of numerous 
very old tanks long since silted up and abandoned are marked in many districts by half oblite- 
rated mounds. Most of these tanks undoubtedly failed for want of outlets for the surplus 
water. Heavy rain caused the bund to be overtopped and broken through. As the accident 
always occurred at the height of the rainy season, the means of retaining the water requisite for 
the crop for that year was generally lost. If the injury to the bund was not repaired in time 
the loss of a second crop was the result ; and this rendered inevitable the dispersion of that 
part of the population which subsisted on t^e produce of the irrigation. 

In the hilly parts of the country good situations for bunds can often be found and the 
gnvpy of water can generaUy be depended on. A considerable depth of water can also be 
obtained in the tank, and hence there is much less loss from evaporation than is the case in the 
large shallow tanks of the plains. The population of the hilly tracts are apt to give trouble in 
bad years, and the construction of tanks would do something to quiet them, as has been the 
ease in Merwara. The expenditure on the construction of the works would be distributed 
among them by utilising their labour, and their crops would not be altogether dependent on 
the rainfall, while the cattle would be saved also. 

It is not likely, however, that much profit would be obtained. The area of land suitable 
for irrigation below the tank is usually small, being confined to the sides of the valley; and 
the channels would be liable to damage from the cross drainage during the rains. Less 
revenue is also obtainable from each bigha of hill land than from each bigha of plain land. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



93 BEPOBT OF THJ& POLITICAL ADHIKI8TBATI0N 

TA19KS IK THE PLAINS. 

Tanks in the plains may be made by damming up nalas ; but it would often be necessary 
to make bunds at the sides as well as at the lower end of the tank. Such tanks require masonry 
walls where the force of the water is greatest. 

On the sloping ground between every two rivers tanks require bunds on three sides, and 
catchdrains to collect the water. Catchdrains are not at all expensive to make and might be 
inade use of in most places ; hitherto they have scarcely ever been made. 

The great defect of most tanks in the plains is that they cannot be made deep enough to 
hold water for two yeara, and therefore in a famine they afford little or no protection to the 
fields, though the wells below them may supply more water than they would if the tank had 
not existed. 

TANKS FILLED FBOM BIVEBS. 

Wherever there are many khalsa villages near one another, it might in some cases be 
worth while to build a dam across a river or large nala and. to dig a canal to fill the tanks. If 
this were done, tanks might be made on high land which at present can seldom be irrigated at 
all, and where there are in many places hundreds of bighas of very good soil, now producing 
only mukka or dhak jungle. Even in a very dry year there must be usually some little water 
flowing down the rivers ; this would be intercepted by a dam, over which heavy floods would 
pass. Such dams might have to be moveable, instead of solid so as to prevent silting up the 
river above. 

As the channel required to fill the tanks would have to be very large in order to carry off 
the greatest possible amount of water during the shoi:t time for which the floods last, it is evi- 
dent that the nearer the tanks can be made, to the dam the shorter the channel will be, and the 
less the expense. If a lake can be formed on the river itself to store up the water, it will be 
best of all. For the purpose of irrigation only from the tanks very small and inexpensive 
channels would suffice. 

It may perhaps be possible that such a dam could be made at some points on the Banas 
near Nathdwara, the canal going in the direction of Jasma and Chitor, and watering the 
whole country between the Banas and Birach. Among the low hills near Kotaria there may 
perhaps be sites for tanks resembling the Sasera tank, and which could be filled from the dam. 
If a site for a very large reservoir could be 'found on the upper part of the Banas, irrigation 
ttiight be possible duiing the hot season and in famine years. 

In the country towards Kheroda tanks could probably be made and filled with the water 
which escapes from Udaisagar ; but there is no khalsa land there. 

There is a very large area of khalsa land about Sahran which could be watered from the 
' Chandrabagha, either by making a lake at Lawa or by making new tanks below Lawa and 
filling them from the river. 

In the district of Jahazpur there is much high land in want of water, and where there ia 
at present no means of filling tanks it might be possible to fill them by damming up the 
Shahpura nala or the river I^otari. In the latter case the dam would have to be made near 
Mandal, where there are several sites between the railway bridges and Meja where there is rock 
across the bed. Between Meja and Kiratpur there are natural dams where the water falls 
several feet. At Malikhera a little water was still flowing at the beginning of June 1884. 

In the Hurra pargana of the Bhilwara district there are several thousand bighas of land 
which cannot be irrigated from wells, as there is very little water obtainable and hard rock to 
be cut through. If the water of the Khari Nadi could be drawn out of the river at some point 
above Garur, there are several places where large tanks could be made for storage purposes, 
such as Shumbugarh, Ghaghera; and Taswaria. 

In taking water from rivers to fill tanks, it would be necessary to be careful not to take 
too much water, as otherwise the villages lower down the river would suffer, the seja in their 
wells failing on account of the lowness of the river ; and especial care would have to be taken in 
the case of the Khari Nadi as many of * the villages belong to A jmere. However, as nearly 
all the water of this river is supplied by the drainage of Mey war, there seems to be no reason 
why the Darbar might not abstract part of the water. 

TANKS IHFBOVED WELLS BELOW. 

Wells situated below tanks contain more water than they would if the tanks did not exist 
and they do not run dry so soon in famine years. The larger the tank is the more the wells 
are benefited. The lake of LMaisagar appears to supply the wells for many miles towards the 
Dhebar, and it also causes the Berach river to flow for a larger time than it otherwise would. 
The Lawa lake, before it burst, supplied wells as far as Sahran. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB BAJPUTANA STATES FOR 1884-86. 73 

LEAKING FBOM TAKKS. 

Under the bands of many tanks much water leaks making the ground below wet and useless 
and causing the increase of '^ usar/' In some cases many bighas of land are thus rendered unfit 
for cultivation, nothing but Khajur trees thriving; examples of this are found below the tanks 
at Dabok Nauganli, Nandsa, and Mandal^ and outside the walls of Udaipur. The land could 
.easily be drained by cutting a deep ditch parallel to the bund^ and draining o£E the water which 
collects in it. This water could often be used for irrigation. 

FBESENT STATE OF TAKKS. 

The tank bunds generally are not in good condition. Masonry walls are generally found to 
have trees growing out of.them, particularly banyan andpipal trees. The Bari tank has a large 
tree in the rear wall. The Dhebar rear wall has many, and the leakage which took place from 
the front wall in 1875 was from cracks and holes caused by tree roots. The rear wall of the 
Bajnagar dam is covered with trees ; the front of the Kankroli dam has been damaged by the 
bushes which have lately been cut down. At Lakhora, near Gangapur, the wall has been 
thrown down by the trees, and this is the case at many other places. 

As regards the earthwork the villagers are in the habit of driving their cattle and carts 
over the bunds until gaps are formed ; when af tetwards a flood occurs the water pours through 
the gap and makes a breach. The bunds may have been strong enough originally, but as they 
have never been properly repaired they are now mostly in a dangerous condition. When a 
tank has burst, the land in the bed of the tank is often cultivated and the cultivators object to 
the repairing of the bund as this land would be submerged. 

Every wet year some tanks burst and others are only preserved by strenuous exertions on the 
part of the villagers who have to watch night and day on the bund as was the case in 1884 at 
Shumbugarh, Pargana Hurra. Many other bunds are so weak that they are only preserved by 
keeping the tank only half full ; in these cases of course little use is derived from the tank. 

ADVANTAGES TO BE EXPECTED FBOM THE AEFAIBING OF OLD TANKS AND 

THE CONSTBUGTION OF NEW ONES. 

As before stated there are many parts of the State where the hardness of the rock and the 
want of water renders the construction of wells impossible. These tracts must be watered from 
tanks, if they are ever to produce valuable crops. The land revenue cannot be much increased 
without irrigation. 

The revenue derived from water rates alone would in most cases probably not be very large, 
generally from 4 to 8 per cent. But this would not be the only advantage to be derived. The 
amount of produce having been increased by irrigation, and the harvest having been rendei«d 
more certain than when everything depended on the rain falling when wanted^ the cultivators 
will receive profit as well as the Darbar. They will then indirectly increase the revenue by con- 
suming taxable articles. They will be able to sell crops for export; they will themselves have 
a better supply of food, by which their health will become improved. It is also certain that as 
the cheapness of food increases crime decreases. 

The cattle would also be benefitted by a better supply of water, and there would be much 
more straw available as fodder. The oxen would thus be kept in better condition and would be 
less liable to disease. 

COST OF TANSS. 

The cost of tank work in the State is rather high. Contractors will not do earthwork 
except at high rates, and then they do the work badly. Masonry is not expensive when stone, 
lime, and wood are obtainable near the work, but the cost of carting is most expensive. 

The cost of tanks depends very much on the amount of assistance given by the villagers. 
In most villages the people are so anxious to have tanks made that they will either give a part 
of the cost in money or will give their labour at low rates. They would generally give assist^ 
ance in carting stone and lime, and in this way the cost of the work would be very greatly re- 
duced. On account of this the rate of masonry work has been taken rather low in sotne of the 
estimates. 

WASTE WEIBS. 

There are some tanks where the masonry weir is not required, where the water can escape 

without doing damage at the end of the bund, or through some natural outlet : but in all other 

cases a large waste weir is indispensable. It is true that weirs are often very costly to build, but 

a tank is not safe ^without one, it must burst the first wet year. Hundreds of tanks have 

10 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



^4 EBPOBT OP THB POLITICAL ADMIKISTBAl^OK 

failed for this reason. Khemli is one. The Bari taink Yerj nearly bursb in 1875 and its bund 
WBf gire way when it very wet year oomesy or two rather wet years insaoeession ; it cannot be 
eonsidered safe. If the watej overtops a wall whieh has earth behind it, ihe earth is quieUy 
waidi^ Mnf, alid ih^ wall is then overthrown, being too thin to stand by itself. 

8LTTIC£S« 

All tanks should have some kind of sluice, tiarge tanks should have proper masonry 
sluices with iron or wooden doors to lift up. Cutting the bund for irrigation should not be 
allowed, as breaches are likely to take place and the cut is never filled up properly. 

JPBESENT MODB OF CONSTBIJCTIOK OF BV18DB. 

At present bonds are made very badly. The ground is not cleared of g^rass or biuiisii 
the earth is thrown up id elods and is dug from places close to the bundsi so that in the rains 
omeh of the earth falls back again into the ezcavatiun^ The masonry face wall is generally to^ 
thin to support the earth behind ; in the course of time it befnds forward, crackef^ and falls doiflu 
There are often no sufiScient foundations : sometimes the waU is built on the surface of the 
ground, and there is at least one instance in which the wall has been built over a tree which was 
lying on the ground and which was not removed. 

The old bunds, on the other hand, are generally moch thicker than necessary. 

PBOFEB KOBE OF OONSTBUOTIOIT. 

In the case of i^tthen bunds the ground must first be cleared of long gtwM and bushes. It 
is well td plough the ground or to dig a trench about 3 feet deep in the centre of the bund filU 
ing it in again afterwatdsi The earth should be deposited in thin layers, and should be beaten 
dowU, and if possible watered, i&ll clods being broken. The inner slope of the bund should be 
as long as possible. The top of the bund should be at least 3 feet above the highest level of 
the water. It is well to have a puddle wall When possible, extending well into the ground. 

In raising old bunds steps should be cut along the slopes, and the new earth well rammed ; 
othetwise it will slip off. Sometimes a thin wftU can be built in the centre of the bund to pre- 
vent leakage. If a facie wall is built, it must be thick enough to support the earth. Bunds 
made of masonry only i^equire great CiM in building. 

dtT£S FOtt snsw tiAfias la££s. 

Qood sites for large lakes are not easily found. There is one at Oouta near Mangalgarh ; 
the area of the lake would be about the same as that of Udaisagar or 2 square miles. Lawa 
is another site* Other sites might no doubt be found, but not without some searching. 

The large Usar pkdns are generally very flat and might in some cases be turned into large 
tanks, as for instance at Ghaghera and Taswaria in pargana Hurra. 

If their water supply is deficient, it might be possible to torn in a nali^ Sudi tanks Would 
generaUy be xatber shallow, but not more so than Mandal lake. 

TANKS FOBMED BY BIVEB DAMS. 

In Ajmere and Merwara Colonel Bixon found .it of great benefit to form long pools by 
building dams across rivers. The water is confined to the river bed, and its width is therefore 
sm^, although the length may be a mile or mote ; and the iictual quantity of water held up is 
iUBuffici^nt to supply much land if used for direct irrigation. But it appears to keep up the 
spring kvel iii the neighbouring welli^ in a marked degree. Buch a pool is filled by the first 
shower ef rain ; as the witter percolates into tiie soil and thus feeds the wells near> the pool is 
rolled by every storm^ At thd^end of the rain^ it is iuU> and there is some water all threogh 
the year. The quantity of water whidi the glround near absorbs must be great and this is stored 
up in the soil where it cannot evaporate aad gradually finds its way into tiie WeUs. 

StMli pools wotuld be ekti«mfely uMful tor watering tcattle $ theie would alwajrs be some witar 
near the bund, and the cost of the dam would not be great. There is one such dam whidi is 
very successful, at the small jagir village of Kag Madar in the hills near Dilwara. 

. intMBAuiTUBa of khalsa and jaoi& laud. 

A very large proportion of the land of the State belongs to jagirdars; and the Idialsa 
villages are not found in compact blocks, but intermingled with the jagir land. l%is is a very 
great obstacle in the way of any compnSxensive scheme of irrigation. It constantly happens 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



01* THE BAniJTAf(Jk STATES FOE 1884^. 7^ 

tliat wkere tbereis a good site for a tauk in a klialsa yillage the land below it is jagir and 
mee tersar Jagirdars are often willing to pay for water rapplied from tanks belonging to the 
Parbar^^but it would be necessary to make definite arrangements in every case. As the water 
rate obtainable from jagirdars is much lower than that obtainable from khalsa land^ irrigation 
fichesnes i^t would pay well in khalsa land would often be unprofitable in jagir land, 

ANNUAL FSTTY BEPAIBS. 

It is most desirable that all tanks should be repaired where necessary every year just before 
the rains/ (Tanks properly made and taken care of should be quite s^e from bursting. But 
if in the bund there be rat holes or white-ants' nests^ or if irrigation cuts have been made 
through it; ,or temporary sluices made of hollow palm trees put in and allowed to decay, or if 
the gaps made by the passage of carts and cattle have not been filled in, breaches are likely to 
take place. 

Any damage done during the rains should also be repaired at once. AH this can be done 
iby the villagers, but they will not do it unless they arotcompelled to by some persons in autho- 
;rity. It is no use spending money on tanks unless this is definitely arranged for. 

Where the villagers require loans for repairs of tanks, and where there is no doubt that the 
imcmey will be recovered, the loans should be giveoi without delay : otherwise from want of 
means of irrigation, the people will leave the villages and the revenue will diminish ; and when 
this has taken place, the people who remain will be too poor to repay a loan if ofEered at a 
future time. 

Tanks which are not at present broken, but are in great danger of being so, should be 
repaired before much new work is undertaken, for while they can be made safe for a compara- 
tively small sum if spent at once, they cannot be repaired if once broken without a much 
larger expenditure ; and meanwhile all the revenue derived from irrigation wiU be lost Ex- 
penditure on such repairs should not be considered as money spent with a view .to profit,. but 
as necessary to prevent loss. 

In the case of new villages formed in places where wells cannot be made cheaply, small 
tanks, even if they are not very profitable for' irrigation, would be of the greatest use for the. 
cattle, and without them it may be diflSqult to induce people to remain. 

The districts which suffer most from want of water are Jahazpur and the Hurra pargana 
of Bhilwara, -and the greater' part of future expenditure on tanks should be incurred there. 
But the first work to be .undertaken should be the repairs of the Kangni tank. 

COBK MILLS. 

la all towns containing a number of soldiers or pilgrims, or having bazars where ipany 
traders or Buojarae come from a distance, it would pay to erect small '^ panchakkis'^ or ijiills to 
grind com, provided that water power was available. Such mills would cost about one hundred 
rupees, and uto «) simple that they can be repaired by ordinary villagers. They would be 
iworked by the water flowing out.of the irrigation sluices of tanks. There are many such mills 
pn the canals at Delhi and Cawnpur and other places. Each mill grinds about 40 maunds 
lUdaypuri per day, and is let to contractors at rates of Rs. 7 to 12 per month. One such mill 
swill be built near .Kankroli.on the canals .which are being made out <^ -the Baesamand. 

WATBB SmPPLY. 

The larger towns might with advantage be supplied with water in pipes where large tanks 
are available. This might be done at Jahazpur, if the new tank were built. For Udaypur 
the Bari tank could probably supply good* water, 

. . QAUGES ON LAKES. 

As very little i^ really fcnown as to what proportion of the rainfall may be expected to 
,Tttn off -a dwinage iirea into a taqk, it is extremely desirable thit during the rainy season 
gauges should be observed every day. By this means the quantity of water escaping over 
?the waste weirs can be calculated,, aud also the quantity required to fill ^e tank, find the 
tamonnt lost by evaporation, &c. 

There is a gauge fixed on the Udaypur lake at one ^nd of the bridge. It wg^ts re- 
rpainting, A^gauge .should^be &Eed at the Baj^amand. . .A wn gauge is required there; also. 

\^JJ '7 1QQK •(^•) M. J- MONCKTON, 

SSrdJprtl 1885. ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

10a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



76 



BEFOItT OF THE FOLITICAL ABMIVISTSATIOK 









jg- 




0QHi 


"^ 


HM 


««• 


-4M 


-^w 








«4^ 


HW 












1 


• 


S^ 


c! 




o 

•—1 


»— 1 


O 




t*- 


0!| 


00 


o> 


C*« 


O 






jj 


S 


J 
































S 


O 


































IlO 


^ 


00 


o) 


'?i 


— < 


O) 


i-H 


CO 


OO 


'^ 


«d 


a> 


t 




^ 


M 


c 


o) 


ot 


O) 


O) 


oi 


O) 


91 


O) 


Ol 


Ol 


Ol 


Ol 


Ol 




(4 




» 
































o 




w 
































V 

^ 






































































H 




2 














'^^ 


^91 




-4# 




P^M 








Q 


if 


t«- 




o 


-<*» 

f^ 




to 


•—1 


»— 1 




•* 


fc^ 


00 


ol 


OO 

rH 






1 


o 






































00 


aO 


^ 


P-H 


p^ 


o 


^ ' 


r-t 


<-^ 


04 


CO 


't** 


00 


« 








1 


Ol 


G^ 


t>* 


o* 


Ol 


o) 


Ol 


©1 


<M 


04 


Qi 


ot 


Ol 


^ y 








H 




































-3 


HM 








^Bi 


-4M 


-^m 






«t? 




-«■ 












1 


JW 


05 


; 


; 








C3b 


Ol 


^ 


^ 


00 


1^ 


2 






15 


g 


































^ 


^O 


i£3 


i« 


lO 


lO 


lO 


^ 


00 


o 


(— • 


« 


la 


1^ 






M 


c 


f^ 


tA 


Qi 


e» 


^ 


O* 


04 


oi 


m 


o3 


03 


OT 


&z 


«i 




(^ 




1 
































1 






































i 
































3 






^■4 


MM 


^H 








-♦J' 


H" 


-*^ 




-0» 




1 








t* 




00 


^ 


! 


; 


" 


1-^ 


1X3 


oo 


rH 




^ 


^ H 






1 


e 


































eo 


i£S 


^ 


-« 


%n 


lO 


la 


iS 


**• 


00 


Ob 


22 


^ 


^ 


**< 

1 Vi 






1 


<»* 


o* 


^ 


Gt 


fU 


Oi 


o% 


Dl 


<5I 


Oi 


Ol 


00 


CO 


GO 






<2 






























^ 'S, 






1 


••^^ 


'HPI 


■^» 


«fp 


«M 


p4# 


-** 


r*< 




-^ ' 








HH 


a ? 






1 




i£3 

F1 


1— 1 


» 


i£3 


0% 


o* 


oo 


lO 


»-H 


P-H 


t- 


* 


OO 


APPEND 

Price Ourr 




1 


s 






























1 


i-H 


^1 




oD 

■^ 1 


CO 

(—1 


1— t 


as 


a 


154 


I-H 


oa 




Oi 


-* 


k 


P 


































s 




.- 








-^* 


*«• 


i?il<» 


«^ 




H» 


-4* 


Hs« ' 


.«4 


-at 


^ 




1 


o 


CO 


eo 


c» 


1— 1 


OS 


lO 


^ 


X 


PH 


I-H 


o 


CO 








1 


s 


































lo 


t« 


t^ 


t^ 


t-- 


QO 


00 


00 


a& 


O 


^ 


Ol 


-* 


00 , 








1 


r^ 


rH 


1^ 


1— 1 


i"* 


1— 1 


f^ 


^1 




oa 


09 


ot 


Ol 


oi 




• 


J 




t 

1 


1 

J3 


00 

go 


• 
• 

• 
* 

00 

i 

i2 


GO 

CO 
♦-a 


• 
• 

1 


i 

• 
m 
m 

CO 
3D 

1 


■ 
m 
m 
m 

9 

00 

»-* 

13 


* 
• 
• 

00 

< 


5 

00 
f-H 

1 


00 

I 


• 

« 
■ 

oo 

r^ 

i 

.£1 


3 

00 

rH 

1 


OD M 

J— f 

1 

■s 

03 










■& 

kO 


o5 




00 


-3 


CO 


1 


1 — I 
CO 


■B 

to 


00 


1 


S 












f-i 


5 


f-l 


5 


pH 


^ 


1—* 


5 


1— » 


s 


(—1 


a 


rH 


s 


1 










s 


1 


S 

11 


43 


4^ 


1 

r-f 


J5 

1— i 


rH 


rH 


1 

rH 


J3 
- 

rH 


pH 



10a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



0I> THE BAJPUTAKA STATES FOB 188486. 



77 







1 


-4M 














HM 






cqN> 


^ 






a» 


« 


»o 


»o 


O 


-* 


00 


^ 


fi 


GO 


QO 






• ^ 






I-I 


PH 


I-I 1 


r^ 
















1 


6 
























































.1 


^ 


00 


«^ 


lO 


lO 


-^^ 


la 


QO 


GO 


Oft 


l^ 


Oft 


r^ 


i 


1 


CO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


o) 


Ol 


^ 






























5 




J 














HM 


HW 






HM 


-e 






a 


QO 


00 


«0 


QO 


OO 


QO 


O) 


l^ 


00 


lO 


QO 


r^ 




^ 


r^ 


I-I 






rH 










f^ 






t^ 


e 


'i 




























1 


n 


00 


s 


00 


S 


S 


kO 
00 


S 


00 


00 


00 


s 






J 








•-4M 


•m 


HP 






HM 


lO 


HW 


? 






1 


QO 


rH 


I-I 


-^ 


o 

rH 


Ot 


00 


f^ 


OO 
rH 


rH 


-* 




1 


g 




























^ 


^ 


Oft 


Oft 


00 


QO 


»o 


QO 


Oft 


Oft 


lO 


O) 


rH 






S ' 


QO 


00 


s 


00 


00 


00 


00 


OO 


CO 


00 


OO 


Ol 


g 




* 




























J 


-4N 






HM 




^4» 


Hot 




Hi* 




H^ 


SIS 


« 




J 


« 


QO 


00 


r-H 


QO 


00 


ot 


.<x> 


T»* 


QO 


QO 


rH 




i; 


g 




























S3 






























^ 


QO 


t^ 


^ 


CO 


xO 


00 


iO 


00 


00 


S 


i-H 


O 




iH 


1 


00 


00 


oo 


00 


OO 


CO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


O) 






1 


H^ 


^4M 


-4# 


-4# 




0QKf 


r*" 


eohf 




^4N 




^ 






'S 


Ot 


QO 


00 


l^ 


Oft 


©1 


Ol 


la 


Oi 


kO 


#— 1 








rH 










f-^ 




r^ 


^4 




r^ 




1 


§ 


























^ 


to 


lO 


kO 


OO 


OO 


'^ 


S 


QO 


QO 


iO 


ot 


^ 


1 


i 


ot 


04 


O) 


Ol 


ot 


Ol 


M 


Ol 


O) 


O) 


r^ 


H* 




1 


























































1 


0qK> 

Oft 


• 


0qK> 
Oft 


H« 


H* 


3? 


• 
• 






• 
• 


^ 


i 




§ 


e 




























Si 






























J 


^ 


IS 


•* 


s 


00 


CO 


iO 


kC 


QO 


iO 


f-H 


^ 




1-1 


1 


(»l 


©1 


O) 


ot 


Ol 


©I 


O) 


ot 


Oi 


ot 


p^ 




d' 


1 


















• 
• 
• 
• 
• 




• 

• 

• 

lO 

QO 
1^ 


• 

• • 
rH 




J 






00 

1 


QO 

1 


1 


fH 


l-H 


iO 

00 
00 

rH 


kO 

1 


00 
00 


00 
OO 


> 

< 


1 








1 


o 

00 


1 


■8 
SO 


1 


-8' 

rH 
00 


1 


1^ 


a 

i 


1g 

1—1 

eo 












11 


5 

1 

I-I 


l-H 
f*4 


5 

QO 
rH 


rH 

s 

rH 


1 

rH 


9^ 

s 


5 

rH 




3 
1 

rH 







a i 



i 



I 



;^ 






ii 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



76 



BEFOBT OF THE POLITICAL ABMIVISTSATIOK 



§1 



21 



I 



1 

1 ^ 


1 
1 


6 


• 




^ 


o 




-4M 

»— 1 


-4e« 

O 




t*- 


09 

*— • 


00 


o> 

l-H 


t^ 


«D 


e' 

1 




«*^ 

O) 


00 






91 


91 




00 
Ol 


00 
Ol 


S 


Ol 




^ 


- 


00 


!>. 




O 


1— < 


rH 


to 


#-4 


rH 


l-H 


^ 


K<» 


-4M 
00 


O) 


CO 


1 


00 


00 




•-1 




o 




r^ 
O) 


»-H 


s 


OO 
Ol 


Ol 


00 
Ol 


^ 




1 


1 


-*• 


a& 


' 


• 
• 






#-4 


<» 


O* 




^ 


CO 


l-H 


lO 


1 


s 












kO 


QD 


00 
91 




00 


CO 

00 


lO 

00 


ot 




j 


I* 


l-H 


-*• 
00 


00 


: 


: 


: 


Oil 

»— 1 


-*• 
kO 


-4# 

00 


r-4 


-*< 


« 


« 


1 


00 


















s 




Ol 

OO 


OO 


s 


^ 

s 

p 
^ 


1 

1 


1 

6 


-#* 


1-^ 




^ 






-** 

01 


-** 

00 


l£S 






t- 


« 


00 


M 






1— f 


CO 


QO 




l-H 


oa 




1»^ 

Ol 


Oil 




lO 
Ol 


a 




I 


O 


so 


OS 




LC3 






2* 


30 




1-H 


-** 

o 

(-H 




**- 


1 




1^ 

(—1 








CO 


◦0 
ifH 




OS 

1— 1 




ol 


oi 


3 


OO 
Ol 




1 




00 

1 

QQ 


• 
• 
* 

00 
QO 

1 

« 
1 


00 

r-l 

s 


00 

i 


i 

I—I 
' pH 


(3D 

i 

o 
fH 


so 

I- 

•-» 

fH 


00 

l-H 

1 

a 

1— ( 


• 
• 
• 
* 

00 
< 

■5 

i-l 

s 


00 

rH 

1 

«D 
i-t 


30 

QO 

i 

1 

l-H 


■ 
m 

m 
« 

go 

1 

s 

to 

fH 


• 
■ 

V 

• 

r 
CO 

l-H 

1 

l-H 

S 

■s 

1 


* 

• 
* 
• 

i 

6 

-s 

^H 
n . 



10a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE BAJPTJTAKA STATES TOB 1884^. 



77 









d 

Jt 


-^ 














HP« 




0QK> 


M. 
$ 








3 


9d 


^ 


^ 


^ 


O 


-^ 


CO 


'^fl 


fH 


GO 


« 








« 






rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


















s 


s 




























































B 


J 


eo 


^ 


xO 


lO 


<«^ 


kO 


«0 


00 


o> 


l^ 


2 


rH 




! 

►1 


1 


t» 


GO 


QQ 


00 


«> 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


o) 


O) 






j 














HM 


HW 






HM 


«e 




D 
S 




j 


€0 

rH 




« 


« 


OO 


«0 


o< 


l^ 


00 


I-H 


00 


r^^ 




^ 


s 


g 






























^ 


©I 


04 


5 


QO 


$ 


5 


kO 

00 


00 


^ 


iO 

00 


00 
OI 


s 








£ 
































i 








HM 


•m 


HB« 






HM 


to 


HM 


f 








1 


ao 


1-^ 


f-4 


'^ 


o 

rH 


ot 


OO 


rH 


OO 
rH 


rH 


-* 






f,- 






























1 


u 






























E 


^ 


Ob 


Oft 


00 


CO 


^ 


to 


O) 


Oft 


to 


OI 


rH 








s 


«Q 


oS 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


O) 




^ 




£g 




























5 


































Jj 


^M 






He* 




^4» 


•^ 




HB» 




H^ 


se 




W 




1 


CO 


QC 


00 


i-H 


« 


00 


o< 


00 


^ 


« 


« 


rH 

rH 


« 




1 


s 






















































o 
































r? 




^ 


^ 


to 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


»o 


00 


&0 


00 


00 


s 


rH 


O 




4H 


s 


so 


OD 


00 


oo 


OO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


OI 








1 


























3 






1 


-4* 


-^H' 


-4# 


H« 




CON" 


r^ 


0qK> 


V 


HN 




^ 


So 






«D 


E>« 


«0 


00 


^ 


Cft 


O) 


OI 


»o 


OI 


kO 




22 








rH 




r^ 






rH 




rH 


r-H 




rH 


fe 




1 


g 


























*% 




























la 




1 


J 


lO 


i£i 


lO 


QO 


OO 


'^ 


S 


CO 


« 


lO 


el 


-* 


£ 




i 


o* 


OJ 


O) 


O) 


o^ 


O) 


M 


OI 


OI 


OI 


rH 


g 


Fj 




1 


























^ 
































1 




1 




; 


0qK> 

Oft 


H« 


H* 


00 

r^ 


• 




eohf 
OI 


: 




i 


a 




ii 


g 
























, 


































S 




i 


s 






S 


s 


s 


OI 




ol 


lO 


rH 
OI 


^ 






'rf 


Tl 
















• 
• 
• 
• 
• 


• 
• 
• 
• 
• 




• 
• 
• 

•a 

l-H 


• 
• 

rH 






1 




rH 

1 


QG 
00 

i 

o 

CO 


1 
1 


1 
■8 

00 


30 

rH 

1 

■a 


■8' 

00 


00 

00 

1 


00 
00 

1 
1 


00 
00 

rH 

1 

s 

1 


kO 

00 
OO 
rH 

f— t 

00 


< 


1 










r-« 


3 


l-H 


^ 


fl 


5 


rH 


5 


rH 


3 














5 

1^ 


rH 


4S 


1 


s 
■s 


rH 


4i 


rH 


rH 


QO 

rH 







Digitized by 



GoogI( 



78 EEPOET OF TELE FOLlTICAIi Ai}MIKI8TSAT!:OK 

APPENDIX B. 

Opening of a Silo in tie Sujjun Niwmi Gardens, Udaypur. 

Having read various accounts of Silo es^riments and having been supplied hj the Besi. 
dent^ Meywar, with printed correspondence on the subject, I was induced to try one here and 
on explaining the snotter to His Highness the late Maharana he at once approved of it. We 
had a splendid crop of Hurialee grass (dube) this year, which enabled me to carry out the experi- 
ment. I first intended packing the g^rass in a puoka built tank, but owing to the unusual 
heavy faU of rain I was unable to make it water-tight and so gave it up and dug a pit on the 
side of a Uttle hill about 10 feet above water level. I dag the pit 82 feet long 1 6 feet wide 
and 6 feet deep. 1 had no idea the quantity of' grass a pit of this dimension would hold 
until I began to fill it. I had 217 men cutting for two days, 16th and 17th of October, and 
on the 18th carried the grass up, weighed one maund and -put it in a box cart with both ends 
out, it held a maund exactly and then bulked the remainder. When the' two days' cutting was 
packed in, it looked very little when tramped down, so covered up the grass with mats and 
had to begin to cut again on the 19th with 96 men, so the total number of hands cutting was 
SIS for three days. The mats were lifted and the g^ss carried up on the 20th morning, and 
packed in. I had the grass well shaken, quite even all over the floor from the very bottom, 
and continued till filled with as many men as could conveniently stand in the pit tramping it, 
so that they could not press it any more. I sent up to the palaoe for an elephant to give it a 
finishing touch. The huge animal almost sunk a foot in it and kept walking round amusing 
himself^ throwing the grass at the men till he could not press it any tighter. I had bamboo 
mats placed on the top of the grass and put a layer of perfectly dry «oil sifted fine on the top 
to a depth of two feet. I have read of plastering the top with wet soil whidi I consider does 
not answer the purpose so well as the dry earth, for this reason that should a crack open, th^ 
dry soil would fill it up of its own accord and exclude air, whereas a plaster of wet soilds 
almost sure to open and remain so. On the whole I put 4 feet of soil and had it well beaten. 
I visited the pit daily for a month, but not a crack was to be seen. I may mention the gfrass was 
cut after the rains and was packed quite green containing all its own natural ^sap, and on tiie 
21st it was completely finished and sealed up» It remained so from .21st October till 21st of 
February, so that it was sealed up for exactly four months. 1 opened it in the presence of 
Colonel Walter, the British Resident ; A. Wingate, Esq., Hevenue Bettlement 06S6er, and a f ej^ 
other gentlemen who take an interest in Silos. The grass had a very alcoholic smell, and was 
very brown to the depth of an inch on the top.; but when rshaken up to the sun and air for :a 
little, it soon lost most of its strong smell. The grass under was .very fine and pronounced by 
all the gentlemen present to be one of the most successful Silos that they had heard of. I >may 
mention that our garden bullodcs are in fine condition, .and they eat the ensilage in preferense 
to the jungle grass they have been used to get. The quantity of grass placed in the Silo was 
567 maunds; I am feeding all our bullocks on the ensilage except one that is getting the usual 
jungle grass, and will be able in the course of a month or so to see which of the animals are in 
best condition. 

(Sd.) t. H. Stoebt, 
.iftfidt., Sujjun Tfiwaa ^Gardens, Udaypur. 
The Wa May 1885. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OV TSLB BAJPTTTANA VtkTEB 70K ]fi8i-86. 



7fi 






o 



o 
toco 8 >oco 



S 



: : I : 



eo = 



s 



eO^O^fHCOO^rHOOrHCOO 



00 S 






i : 



^! 



COl:^ G9 



f-« Cd iH r-l 



I 



I 



I 

V 
1$ 



a 



& »<S 






2 ^ 
, 00 '*^ "S ^ 

1 



s 



%s 



5;Sg- 



fHlOCOiH lOfH 09 O 
iH G4 i:^ : 00 






i : i : 



1 



S 






G4 lOOiH 04 



o 



A o^g «<=>•« 



o 
S 



1 s 



^ 



9S9 



t^eood oo^oQC 



QDOO lOI:^ 






p, «o^ 



1 



4 



Sqo 



sssgs"- 



fHfe«0(|Ofe« 



^rH r-4 



00 
09% 

S| 



00 09 
d> 

S 



s 



CO 
00 

if 
'■I 



-g 



H8 



§ 



si 

-I 






"ojii»fwb; 



r 



I I -g 



tec 



i lis* 



3 

IS 



£^ 






«8 



0)03 



^«ecD«»QOOOrHOiieo'^io «>i:^ooo» 



.-I 



S 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



80 



SEPOET OP THE POLHICAX ASHIKISTBATION 



g 



% 






I 

8 



& 



s 



d 



^<^ <M ffi 
QQ «0 1^ 



t^ CA CQ ft^ 
^ 09 C3 



13 



s 



§1 






I 



» 

r 

8 



i 



(3 






s — i= — W 

QQ (:« IM 



"S — W 



O 99 to 



cS ^ 



p3 



8. 



kO 



■^ 8 S S 



4 






I 



4 

(3 



Ob 

8 

00 

o> 

pH 
kO 

o" 



t 



4 



5 



I 



S 



8. 



8 



0» 

Ob 

8 



O 



IS 



4r^ ^ <Q 

lO n Q4 



i3 



^ A 00 

S ^ -" 



^ S5 a s 



01 



3. 



1 


• 


e 


1 


aT 


!^ 


H 


.$ 


^ 

^ 


1 


s 





M 



^ 






00 

l-H 



P4 



o 



A g 



o 

00 



I 



o 

M 

M 

I 



3^3 



■^gi — gr 

00 lO 






i I 



i I 



g 

} 



^ 



i 

s 



J 



I 



.1 I 



1^- 






00 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE BAJPUTANA STATES FOR 1884-86. 



81 






•I 
■8 



<« 



n 

■<^ i 

% .1 

I 









i^ 

« 



a 






TTlOi aNVHO 



TTiOX 



'upnR ung p -^iigga PiQJJ 



■wiidquiis jq giwj«3 lutUij 



^IFFm J" g^^i^a "'°>Jd 






'Viiuipq^sf^ moi^ 



^uara^JWlsa »l^^t:uj,t ^*°jj 






^itiiiTil^ mcu^j 



undzuq9(* utuj j 



*qiB^^6tun^ cttc^jj 



'gjnt^jufn unoi^ 



•^jiqug moJii 



-GJOumuqH raoi^ 



■j'B^ufiia Lwtw^i 



■luifiuu uioji^ 



'qjuJ$iitpus|q; oiaij; 



■up«g i^o^lO tuoj J 



^ttiwAinqa ™o^d 



'qtti^i^vg moi^ 



-qjvBxu^tqQ moi^ 



'VAJif) tnoj^ 



'^UOQ lUUimUQ J®«10 moJJ 



*v^&3 \mo J^HO ""^^ 




S 

A 

H 



TTJiOX 



*T|oa iip^s mojj 



-^ttjipq^^U niOJ,J 



"-eom n ^aamatna^ jjH tmnoH, ^^^ 






ajoningqil ttiQjj 



*ijpi*S I^OHJ gt^t.l 



^iBMiyqtl "AOJ^ij 



■iptiirq^ moJj 



'HinifjoiTqQ moj^ 



-!jjnoo «AJi|} Jaoig 



■^Qoo i"fitrimu3 PVIQ ^"^^ 



•!»4Tioo iui.1 l^iqD «i<»*^.a 



S 

5 



P 



g 



to 



§ 



lO 



I - 



t ^ 



I ^ 



I ^ 



I .- 



s 



^ 



1 s 






w 

m 



g 



s 



I 



t 



•OK l»IJ»8 



11 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



80 



BEPOBI OF THE POLITICAL ADM1NI8TBATI0N 






P< B 



S) 



P 



s 






I 



M 

I 



cB 






S3 ^ S 



S 



4 






I 



g«>. -^ «0 « fs! 



O sq lo 



^ i-H 



pS 



8. 



g 



<fe ^ ' 



8 






m o 



& 
d 



r} 



i 



99 



a 



I 



o 

9 









P4 ^ 

5 



& 



CO 



& 



3 S S 



^ ^ 



00 M 01 



P4 



o 



3 g 



3 



3^2 



X 



to 






I 



Q 



o IS 



I 
I 



•I 



I pS 5 J a 



e - 






s. 



8. 






I 



s 



s 

ff-4 






s 



CO 



«- 



CO 



00 

to 



o 

0» 



o 



i 



f-i C9 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE EAJPTJTANA STATES FOR 1884-86. 



81 



i 






I 
1 



Pi 

5 



n f 

» 3 
S 4 



I 
6 






a 



Tvaxu aNvso 



TTiOX 



'upitg ung fo ^^irtBg oiojj 



•uittdipnig |0 a^i»4Ba P*oJ|J , 



gitoCifl |o «»iH8a *"*HJ 






'«i«Mpq!(«^ moj^ 



•!^uamiJtwi9q anim^x uioi^ 



•^»0 !>aaui9[^;9g Xaiipunoa axai^ 



•uiiini^ caojj 



undzvqap otojj 



■qjvJSiBiun^ mojj 



•ojoqouig moAj 



•vjiqvg moij 



*9ionmvq3 nioJj 



•jBJfhiuCBH P^Q-'J 



*Tinros moij 



•qjH^l^pavH aiojj 



•up«g poqo 0104 J 



•«iBM[tqs moia 



•qwvqvg moj J 



•qjB&io(jiqO ^^"^ 



■«MJi{) raoj^ 



>inoo pmimHO J^IHO ™<" J 



•iljnoo K*?0 J®?^v) "*<"«S 



•Tfjiox 






-^aamgjBdan oidiPQX '"Q^'t_ 



""-( ^aemaanggro oapun 99^«4«g mo^" 



■oionainqa moij 



♦icoBBa caoJJ 



-qjii3n«putiw moij 



•upiis noqo "'QM 



-uvMitqs uioj J 
•q«jiiq«S no'.i 



•qj«8i<niqO HKMii 



•«^noo «AiiO ""^^J 



•tjjaoo lOTimuo joiqo nioij 



•V^oD n^lD J^J'IO '"^'^ 






a 



§ 



8 



I ^ 



' ,^ 



i ^ 



CO 



s 



«0 



•OK I»!ias 



9 



S 



o 



s 



s 



s 



i 






i 



-3 

a 

a 



11 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



82 



SER>ET OV THS POUTIOAL ABMXKniRATIOK 



i 

•3 



a 
ft? 



a 

2 

OQ 

3 


^ 

A 


•oraox 


s 


s 


s 


•ui«Mpq(jH|j mox^ 


^ 


^4 


-^uatu^JvdeQ oidmdx luoa j 


M 


09 


*BJdn|^ cnojj 


M 


fH 


•qjB3[Btanx woj^ 


M 


«l 


'^ 


'eaoqaui^ aioij 


Gd 


09 


■* 


iuiq«g ai04j 


e 


fH 


t* 


'ajoaumq^ moi^ 


« 


09 


•j«^«u[fi}{ aiaij[ 


e9 : 


•• . 


•lOlSVH oioij 


ws 


tt 


00 


•qj«8pipa«]ii raoaj 


A 


« 


s 


*HP«S ?^oqo uiojj 






^ 


•«*^lPia ™«»iJ 


2 


•* 




•qwvqvg mojj 


!3 




s 


•qjw&CKuqo raoij 


S 


i 


& 


•HMJJO TOMJ 


00 


«o 


s 


rjJBOo liuimuo jaiqo «MJ 


: 


ft 


£; 


•!>«w>a u^K) ^no wo^ 


s 


: 


s 


Q 

PN 

1 


•nviox 


i 


3 

»H 


1 


Tjpug una ™<"J 


- 


^ 


«uof!a "04J 


^ 


: 


IH 


fUHMpq^v^ moj^ 


CO 


04 


to II 


•;u9ai!|j«aaa aidinax uiojj 


« 


09 


to II 


*)uaui3S«aiiui jopuQ Ba()i^83 aio4^ 


: 1 


^ II 


•ao^O ^uamaW^S ^wpunog raoj^j 


2 


: 


s II 


'jodzuqaf ouoij 


rt. 


: 


^ 


-qjBjEllBnias ai04j[ 


o 


09 


^ 


'MoqoaiH moi^ 


•0 


« 


» 


•vjiqvS mojj 


•H. 


09 


3 




'aioumvqx oioaj 


«o 


fH 


t^ 




-j«8«nE«g moaj 


M 


^ 


to 




•lairaHmo'J 


1-1 


vH 
fH 


8 


, 


1l«ai«puBK «»<»« 


0» 


to- 


5 


•up«8 poqo mojj 


t> 


ol 


a 


•wiMnqa moia: , 


,s 


^ 


S 


•quvqvgnuMj 


04 


s 


8 


•qj««iO!»iqO moj^ 


S 


09 


S 


•VMJiQmcu^ 


00 


s 


S 


•tjinoo TBaTinuo ptqg moi^ 


2 


g 


g 


•s^JwoO IHK) i»RO «<Md[ 


S 


: 


s 


i 


• 

• 
• 

1. 


• 

• 
• 

• 


• 






•on pweg 


f^ 


09 


1 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



(0F ^BX IKAJPUXAKA STATES HOB. ISSAM. 



.88 






J 


"IfJ^^x 




a 


s 

m 


-ii4ttdq¥t|g mcKi^ 


■ 


IH 


-«J9Mltl^f I^OJ^f 


^ 


: 


^4 


'H0Jna«H raoj^^ 


1 


es 


l> 


■«PBJipir>>i|4 moj^ 


on 


t> 




'^U9mqj«de(| ^[dm^x ^^>F 


1 « 


m^ 


la 




* 


e« 


ts 


'03^0 *^^''**W^S £nip[[Uo^ mQij[ 


1 




! t* 


•il^yiriivmn^ tnojj^ 


•* 


^ 


1 hs 


'Uiqug aicuj 


<o 


: 


1 00 


"^joumvq^f otojj^ 


n 


^ 


^ 


*JBilB^fVi^ tuoij 


1 ^ 


^N 


&t 


*nnf^;i moJJ 


1 


«« 


09 


*qjii^[ifpii«t^ moj^ 


t 


03 


« 


*u|FB8 lioqonioj^ 


1 « 


oq 


1 OD 


*^aitJ&^tT[^ moj^ 


s 


lO 


3 


-qttiiiiHiS moj^ 


p4 


ID 


o 

04 


"qjttiKi^iq^ aiouj[ 




^ 


^ 


■«AJ|Q SMU^ 






09 


^ia(j3 t'^'^'nJD J"IH'J <"*^^ 




p4 


• *%mo2 IxAio py^io moj^ 


QE3 
O 
CM 


: 




1 
2 

en 

1— I 
Q 


i 

^ 1 


nyXOl OKTHft 


3 


i 


1 


**irMj, 


3 


i 




'MBMpqiuis]; inojj^ 


: e< 


i-4 


*;iKMn|.n?il»Q -:^i'IiTi,ij^ uioj^j 


m* 


^* 


'eofflO ^nomai-wag ^Hpnnog niojj 


^ 


: 


w 


*qjB^«inii^ mojj 


00 


. 


•TJTT^wsi mo J J 


1 T 


^ 


- 


'ajoutuvq^ moo^i^ 


1 f 


^ 


t-i 


-TinHHYT ni^iJv'l 


1 


^ 


*qjiJ(Hpn9i^ ni(M^ 


^ 


■* 


'HF»S noH3 «it»^ 


p4 


flt 


« 


"wiMinqa ^w*^ 


t 




1-4 


-quvq^ mojjf 


: 


00 


'qj«^<];[q3 mtuj 




« 


« 


■iiMJif) max^ 


■ 


la 


ia 


*^iaQQ inaiittUQ |Btq3 moij 






s 


*^noo fTA^j j9Tq^ racwj 


s 


: 1 


8 


1 

g 

1 

• 


4i 
« 

m 
m 
m 
m 

i 


• 

* * 

« 


V • '" 






•oitP!^ 


i-T 


en 





GO 



11a 

Digitized by VnOOQlC 



84 



SEPOKT OF THE POLITICAL ADHINI8TBAII0K 
APPENDIX F. 



Statement tkomnji the working of the Meywar International Court of Vakilt during the fear 

1884-85. 





1 








s 
|| 

1 

te 


ToUl iteoutii of dMt m 


ArpiitA TO Unu CoirmT, 






2. 


be 










. 


BlKklH. 


i 




f 


i 


ll 

14 






1 


i 


1 


1 


1 




1 


ID 


w 


w 


aud impej-iil Ra. 431,* 


3 


£ 


? 


8 


jr»?. 


1 


a 


* And ft nne of Imperil 


























Rfi, UO tropoud Id oub 


M 




■ -«~ 
























eM«. 



(Sd.) C. K. M. Waltbe, Colonel, 

Besideni, Meywar, 



APPENDIX 0. 

Abitract siatement of tie number and nature of the caeee adjudicated by the Meywar Court of 

Vakih during 1884.85. 

Offences. No. 

Against person (mnider) 2 

Dakaiti with woanding 2 

„ without wounding . • • 6 

Highway robbery with wounding 1 

„ „ without wounding , » 8 

Theft with wounding ••....« 2 

„ without wounding . 1 

Cattle-lifting ' . . IfU. 

MisoellaneouB • . • 4 

Total . 20 

(Sd.) C. K. M. Waltib, Colouel, 

JResideut, Meywar. 



APPENDIX E. 

Jail Return for 1884^5. 



i 


. 










a 










^ 


1 


s 




1 














1 

e 


1 


Terms. 


» 


1 


' 


1 

i 


s 


1 




c 
o 

i 

S3 

2 

< 


1 


1 


S 
1 

1 


i 
1 


a1 


1 


^ 


1 


^ 


^ 


^ 


lul 


M9 


1 month 
3 months 
6 months 
Uyesrs 

2| M 

8 ,» 


"i 

8 


1 

16 




"i 


"i 


M. 


's 

2 

6 

"i 


1 




'.;: 


••• 


"i 
"i 


"i 


'i 
"i 


"i 

"i 


TO. 


... 


"i 


•M 






?:: : 


6 
12 






Z 


... 


... 


"i 


... 




"'. 


... 


... 


z 


Z 


*7 


... 


... 


'i 


... 






6 /• 








... 


... 


... 


..• 


... 




... 


... 




... 




... 


... 


... 


... 


... 






5 : : 


4 

8 






... 


... 




1 
1 


... 




... 


8 




•- 


... 


8 


... 


... 


... 


*.. 






ii ; 


18 
1 
14 


... 




... 


... 


... 


2 


... 


"i 


... 


••. 


*•' 


... 


••. 


... 


... 


.V. 


1 








16 ». 


1 


.■• 


... 


... 


— 


... 


... 


... 


... 






... 


•*. 


••• 


... 


••• 


... 


... 


... 






forfif. : 


2 
80 


... 


• M 


.. 


... 


::: 


1 


::: 


... 


::: 


::: 


::: 


::: 


::: 


::: 


::: 


!!! 


*** 


::: 


101 


M9 


vr 


84 


81 


1 


1 


... 


18 


1 


1 


... 


8 


2 


1 


2 


24 


... 


... 


8 


24» 



The foUowhig is the distribution scoording to crimes of the 101 nnder-trisl prisoners— 

Mnrder ..41 Wounding . • 1? I Sheltering criminsls 

Bobbery . . 9 
Theft • • 22 



Embezsleme&t 
Dftksiti 



2 

20 



Rebellion 

Assaolt 

Fnuid 



Total 



8 
4 
12 

1 

loi 



K. M, Walter, Colonel, 

Resident, Meywar. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE EAJPUTANA STATES POE 1SB4M. 8B 

APPENDIX L 

List of Cases decided by Captain T. C. Pears, Boundary Settlement Officer, Meywar^Toni Border. 





Tovx, 


Mnwj^ 




IhRixoa, 






1^ 












BaM^iM* 














K 


Name of Tflligt* 


Kunfl a! riUsp. 


UUe. 


Flu-lDnf, 


P«t, 






Sarthal 


Oaland 






207 


Ponchayet, 




MewM 


Udepura 




••• 




640 


Ditto. 




Ditto 


Gada 








420 


Settled by Captain T. C. Pe»i. 
Ditto ditto. 




Ditto 


Dharana 




... 




652 




Navabpon . 


Galund 




i 




844 


Punohayet. 




Okhalut 


Ditto 




... 




631 


Matual agreement 




Phaohar 


Ditto 




1 


••* 


492 


Ditto ditto. 




Ditto 


Maira 




... 




199 


Ditto ditto. 




Ditto 


Bamnia 








187 


Punchayet 




Satkanda . 


• Ditto 




1 




504 


Ditto. 




Ditto 


Samri 




1 




590 


Matual agreement. 




Ditto 


Amrana 




1 




529 


Ditto ditto. 


18 


Ditto 


Baulia 




1 




182 


Ditto ditto. 


U 


Mangrol 


Ditto 




1 




64 


Punohayet. 


16 


Karunda • 


Charlia 




1 


••* 


492 


Matual agreement. 


16 


Ditto 


Sindbari 








403 


Ditto ditto. 


17 


Piplia 


Charlia 








69 


Ditto ditto. 


18 


Sand 


Macharla Ehera 




... 


... 


601 


Ditto ditto. 


19 


KUDOJ 


Ditto 




1 


4 


659 


Ditto ditto. • 


20 


Ditto 


Chigsi 




1 


•.. 


494 


Ditto ditto. 


21 


Raulia 


Amrana 




... 




65 


Ditto ditto. 


22 


Sakwara . ^ . 


Bora 








865 


Ditto ditto. 


28 


Ditto 


Sarlai 




... 




454 


Ditto ditto. 


24 


Rupa Eheri 


Ditto 








25 


Ditto ditto. 


26 


Hashmntganj 
Nahargarh 


Chigsi 




"i 




9 


Ditto ditto. 


26 


SajaKheri . 




1 


... 


246 


Ditto ditto. 


27 


Ditto 


Derwas 




... 




209 


Ditto ditto. 


28 


Hashmatganj 


Jintawal 




... 




169 


Ditto ditto. 


29 


Sakwara 


Ditto 




... 




45 


Ditto ditto. 


80 


Eaisarpura • 


Angoria 




1 




466 


Ditto ditto. 


81 


Nahargarh . 


Hora 








868 


TriputtahB not fixed. BesetUed. 


82 


Maria 


Charlia 




... 




219 


Mutual agreement. 


88 


Rand 


Sawa 




"i 




8 


Punohayet. 


84 


Chanpakheri 


Jetawas 




... 




280 


"\ 


86 


Ditto 


Gangagada . 




... 




120 




86 


Ditto 


Amarpura . 




... 




410 


Settled by Caplain T. C. 


87 


Ditto 


Amoda 




.•• 




624 


' Pean. 


88 


Ditto 


Baiawar 




... 




551 




89 


Ditto 


Gateri 




... 




180 


M. F. Feet. 


40 


Naharghar . 


Antri 




2 




184 


Settled by Captain 
T. C. Pears . 1 112 


41 


Achalpura 


Ditto 




... 




840 


\ 


42 


Ditto 


Tifldair 




... 




270 


(Settled by Captain T. C. 


48 


Ditto 


Baiawar 








260 


C Pears. 


44 


Ditto 


Buchia 




... 




180 


) 


45 


Palri 


Lasrawan 




... 


... 




Settled by me. Triputta not 














fixed. 


46 


AUipur 


Pofl6688ion 


... 


... 


... 


SetUed by me, 




Tot»] 


I 


87 


... 


821 





C. E. M, Walter, Colonel, 

Resident, Meywar. 



No. 109.G., dated Kherwara, 13th April 1886. 
JVom— LiBUT. CoL. E. TimplBi Officiating Politieal Superintendent, EUly Tracts, Meywar, 
To-^The Besident in Meywar. 

I have the honor to submit the Annnal Administration Report of this Superintendency for 
^ year 1884-85. 

2. Colonel A. Conolly, the Political Superintendent, Hilly Tracts, was obliged to leave Eher- 
wara for England on medical certificate on Slst January last, and on his departure made over 
charge to Lieutenant G. A. Collins, Officiating Second Assistant Resident, Meywar, from whom, 
on my return from boundary duty, I received charge on the 26 th February last. 

8. I append a statement marked A, by Surgeon W. W. Webb, officiating in medical charge 
of the Meywar Bhil Corps, containing dispensary returns and statistics on the health of the 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



86 



EBFOET OP THB POtLHIOAL AIXNUKISTBATION 



regiment and station. The general health was but fairly good^ chest affections and fever 
being more prevalent than usual^ which was probably owing in a large degree to an abnormal 
amount of moisture during the monsoon. 

CROPS. 

4. The rainfall was most unusaQy large^ being 82*77 inches^ falling 61 days of the year, 
and resulting in well-filled tanks and wells. The crops in consequence, both kharif and rabi, 
were singularly excellent, though the opium and mahowa crops of the present season has largely 
failed, owing to the cloudy shies of the last six weeks. Food is cheap and plentiful, as shown 
by the following rates which prevailed at the end of the year. 



DOdSiiA^VtrBL 



Wheat 

Barley 

Bice 

Indian-corn 

Gram 

Qhi 

Sait . 



fSeers. 


Ch. 


2-1 


... 


80 


«M 


16 


• •. 


43 


.•• 


28 


• .. 


1 


10 


U 


8 



KHBBWABA. 



Mn. 


(Jh. 


as 


12 


87 


8 


16 




42 


•8 


82 


8 


1 


12 


11 


4 



per Bapee. 



CRIME. 

5. There have been no cades of mail robbery or witch-swin^ng during the past year. A 
serious affray occurred in the beginning of March during the temporary absence of the officers 
and Bhil Corps, between certain Jawas and Ehalsa Meywar Bhil Pals, for which a fine has 
since been imposed on the principal offending Pals. 

BOBDEB COUBTS. 

6. A l^order Court was held at the end of March 18^6 at Bhelora by Lieutenant tT. 
Evans-Gordon, Assistant Political B.esident, and myself, for the settlement of cases betwieen 
Dungarpur and Bans^^ara^ at which 11 cases were disposed of, resulting in an award in &vor 
of Dungarpur of Rs. 171. "One case was postponed. 

BOADS. 

7. Contrary to the anticipiations expressed in last yearns report, the road between Kherwara 
and Kotra has not, I regret to say, been improved, owing to the want of funds. This much 
needed improvement would economize the lives of the regimental camels, and do away with 
the great reluctance diown by owners of hired ones to tiie employment of their animals on that 
route. 

KETWABBHILCOBPS. 

8. The regiment was inspected in the middle of December by Major-Oeneral A. Camegy, 
Commanding the Northern Division <^ the Bombay Army, who expressed approval of its 'state 
and efficiency. Shortly before the inspection, the armament of the regiment had been altered 
from muzzle-loading Enfield to breech-ldading Snider rifles, and the issue of the valise equip- 
ment has now been sanctioned by Government, which will place the regiment more on an equal- 
ity in smartness and general utility with the other Local Corps in Rajputana. The regiment 
was represented at the Rajputana-Central Lidia Rifle Meeting at Augur in February, where^ 
notwithstanding the very recent change of armament, some prizes were carried off. The regi- 
ment was present in the beginning of March at Udaipur on the occasion of the installation of 
His Highness the present Mahai^na^ at whose desire a special review of the regiment was held 
three days later. 

DUNOABPUB. 

' 9. The finances of this State appear to be in the same favorable condition mentioned in 
last year's report* .A ^tement, marked B, is ^)pendedj setting forth the work done in the 
Civil and Criminal Courts of the State during; the Sumbut year 1940, which showa a decided 
improvement on the return furnished in last year's report 

The issue, on pptyment, qJE two smooth-bore 9-»pounder guns, as sanctioned by Qt)veniment, 
has recently been made to the Maharawal much to His Highnesses gratification. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



GB THB BAJPTTTAKA. SSAXBS lOB 1€84^ 



87 



The principal public works nndertaken during the year has been the rebuilding of a highly 
ornamental water palace on the edge of the 6aib Sagur Lake; the structure. is composed of 
elaborately carved work in marble and stone from original designs by. the Maharawal himself ^ 
representing a fantastic collection of objects from natural history. 

The subject of the exportation and sale of opium grown in this State^ referred to in last 
yearns report^ is still a matter of difficulty^ entailings coAiparativelys a considerable loss to the 
revenues of this small State, but it is hoped that eventually this difficulty will be settled to the 
satisfaction of the Chief. 

The Baneshwar Annual Fair was held in February^ and although the business transacted 
did not equal that of last year, which was q]ciite exceptional, yet it was on the whole a succass 
and well attended; Rs. 2,95^945 worth of merchandize was brought to the Fair, of whiobBs. 
2,59,123 worth was sold. 

The Topographical Survey operations in this State have been continued during the Uist 
field season under the superintendence of W. H. Patterson, Esq. 

BHOOSIA CHIEF JAWAS. 

10. The revenue of this State has amounted to Be. 21,859, and the expenditure has been 
Rs. 15,159, leaving a balance of Bs. 6,200 towards liquidation of the State debt. All the minor 
creditors have now been paid ofi, and the balajM^e of the debt stiU due, amounting to Rs. 
11,581-8-6, is entirely confined to two creditors. 

PARA, HADRE, CHANE, AND THANA. 

11. Respecting these States there is nothing of importance to record. 

EOTBA. 

12. I enclose Ideutenaot O^ A« Collins' jSaport on the Kotara District. Th^ chief points of 
interest will be found in paragraphs 6, 7, 8, 9, 18, and 16. 

A. 

KAertParaJDispeHsarf. 

Total attendance during the year 

Out-patients ..• ••• ... 

In-patients ... 

Principal causes of sickness were as f oUows :— 



2,075 

2,048 

27 



Tear. 


Vera. 




Chest afl^otioni. 


ByBenteiy and 
diarrlioea. 


Skin diteMM ud 
nkm. 


1^ and 1885 . 


668 


868 


168 


120 


836 



Health of the regiment— Fairly good. Principal causes of sickness in the raiment 
were as follows :— 



Tev. 


Fem. 


Gninea-worm. 


Cheat afleotioM. 


vken. 


Injnziea. 


1884 aad 1886 .. 


i6» 


68 


27 


61 


49 



Health of Station. Fairly good. 

Khxbvaiia, ^ 

im Ajtnl 1885. S 



(S.) E. Tbkf£B, Limt^Col., 
Offg. Foia. Svpdi., HiUy TraeU, lUeymr. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



88 



BEFOST OV TKB FOUTICAL ADUINISTBATION 



B 

Setum of Casei imiUuted at Dungarpur during ike Samiatjfear 1940, i.e., from lit July 1883 
to 30th June 1884, iAowing tie number eetiled and remaining. 



Mentha. 


TUvmbaat 
erimiiMl cmm. 


Mamlwr 

of ciTUCMtl. 


Settled. 


Bemaining. 


•MA 


July 1883 . 
Aug^uat 1883 
8e]^mber 1883 . 
October „ 
November ^^ 
December „ 
January 1884 
February ,, 
March „ 

X : 

June „ 






52 
64 
62 
62 
44 
88 
44 
SI 
29 
46 
40 
50 


30 
45 
23 
24 
28 
19 
20 
8 
13 
21 
26 
88 


64 
62 
68 
68 
42 
87 
81 
21 
28 
80 
29 
24 


18 
37 
17 
28 
80 
20 
83 
18 
14 
87 
87 
64 




Total . 


624 


295 


484 


353 


887 



Khsrwaba, 
13tA April 1885. 



E. Temple^ Lieut.-Col., 
Offg. FoUl. Supdt., Hilly Tracts, Megwar. 



Statement showing tie tour of tie 1st Assistant Resident, Megwar, during tie gear 188435. 



Kame of Offioer. 


DATil88i. 


Plaoi. 




BnCABKB. 


From 


To 


From 


To 


Lient-Col.A.ConoUy. 

Lient. G. Collins . j 
laent-GoLE. Temple. 


1ft March . 

2l8t do. 

22Dd Jnne . 

26th October . 

5th Febmary 
1885. 

27th Febroary 
1885. 


6th March . 

28rd do. . 

18th Jnly . 

80th October . 

26tb Febmary 
1885. 

28th Febmary 


Eherwara . 
Ditto 
Ditto . 
Ditto 
Ditto 

Ditto 


Snmera 
Deri-Para . 
Udaypnr 
Dnngarpnr . 
Kotra 

Udaypor 
Total . 


6 
8 

27 
5 

21 

2 


On Border Conrt dnty. 
On pnblie dnty. 
Ditto ditto. 
Ditto ditto. 
On Border Court dn^. 

On pnblie dnty. 




64 


N. B.-Colonel Conolly 
wai prevented partly by 
Ul health and parti/ l^ 
iin accident disabling the 
Adjatant of the regiment 
from going on tonr in 
the district as mnch as 
nsnal. 



Khbbwaba^ 
aSti April 1S85. 



E. Tbmplb, Lieut.^Col., 
Offg. Poltl. Supdt., Billg Tracts, Meywar. 



No. 76-0., dated Koir&» 3rd April 1885. 

JVom— LiSTTTBKAKT (1. A. C0LLZN8, Officiating Second Asnstant Resident, M^gtoar^ 
Ib^LiBUTSNANT-CoLOKiL E. Tbmplb^ Political Superintendent, Hillg Tracts, Megtoar. 

I have the honor to submit the Annual Report on the Kotra district for the year 
1884-86. 

2. The meteorological observations for the year are as shown on tiie attached sheet 
marked A. 

S. The past year at Eotra^ as far as the cantonment is concerned, has been tolerably 
healthy. There has been a good deal of dysentery, however^ and fever (one case of typhoid)^ 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE EAJPUTANA STATES POR 1884-85. 89 

but this was evidently due to the heavy rains of last year, and to the extremely deficient 
drainage of the cantonment. This last question has however been gone into, and sanction for 
fis. 200 to carry out the drainage to the north of the cantonments has been obtained*. 
I have, however, only at present half done the work, as my long absence from Kotra at 
. Kherwara prevented my carrying on and completing it before the end of the last oflScial year. 
However, what I have done will prevent the water from being able to stagnate above 
and percolate through the soil into the only well in cantonments from which alone 
drinking water is obtained, thus rendering it unhealthy, and I should think being to 
some extent the reason for the dysentery and prevalent fever. Much however remains to 
be carried out. I have also obtained from you the sanction to spend Rs. 100 from 
station funds on opening out and cleaning a second well ; this will be done in a very few days, 
and I will order one well to be used by the detachment only, the second being given for 
the sole use of the inhabitants of the bazar, and cantonments (exclusive of the detachment) for 
drinking and other purposes. The half hutting allowance lately allowed to the Meywar Bhil 
Corps will enable me to have the sepoys lines vastly improved, and the air will be able to circu- 
late more freely through them and add to the health and the comfort of the sepoys, 
and the strict orders I have given with regard to the cleanliness of the cantonments will, I 
trust, have good effect. 

4. The rainfall during the last year was especially good, and all the crops both autumn 
and spring, have been first class, especially the latter. Rice might have been better, 'but as the 
good rainfall came late, this was not sown early enough, and a good deal of it did not 
ripen* The Kotra School is in a very fair state. Some of the children of the inhabitants of 
the cantonments go steadily to it, as also do the newly enlisted recruits, and some old soldiers, 
but I have failed to get any outside Bhils to send in their children. The newly elected Thakur 
of Umria was taught in the school for a short time, but he soon left it off, preferring, I 
believe, the instruction of some man he has got at Mari. 

5. The Rohera Kotra Road suffered terribly from the heavy rains of last year, the 
repairs of it are being carried out, and I hope during the present hot season to make such 
improvements that it will not suffer so much again. The nullahs at Jher and Ehujuria 
I had repaired last May, the former by a saucer drain, and the latter by a stone bridge, at a 
cost of Rs. 40 (and Rs. 35), respectively, and I am glad to say that the late heavy rains have 
not in the least injured either. I shall therefore in this way make all the nullahs along the 
road passable ; as they are, they remain almost impassable for months after the yearly rainfall, 
from the fact of water remaining in them and cattle constantly crossing and recrossing. The 
continuation of the road from Kotra through Manpur, Soam, and Babilwara to Kherwara, 
will| if the estimate for it is sanctioned, be the greatest boon to the Bhils and others. I think 
it will open out the traffic to a great extent, and the civilizing influence it will have on the 
Bhils will be very marked^ as has been the case along the road from Kotra to Rohera. 

JAORA. 

6. The debt of the Rao of Jaora to the Darbar of Udaypur has been reduced during the 
last year tb Rs. 2,000. 

I regret to say the disposition of Yarawar Singh, Rao of Jura, and his capabilities for the 
administration of his State cannot be favourably reported on. His one great desire has been 
to pay off this debt to the Darbar and get the financial management of his little dominions 
handed back to him. During the last year, his endeavours have succeeded in enabling me to 
repay Rs. 4,073; he has, however, had the drawback of having, a weak useless man as his 
Kamdar, whom I have some months ago reported officially to you, and whom I have been 
endeavouring to get changed. The establishment of the Rao is too excessive, and after 
meeting him on my return to Kotra, and speaking to him on the subject, I got him to fully 
enter into my suggestions for a reduction. This has been already commenced and I have got, 
I trust, a well-read clever man to come as the Head Kamdar of the estate. I hope very shortly 
to further reduce his establishment by the dismissal of 10 sepoys. 

7. The ignorance and incapability of the late Kamdar has, I fear, had the worst effect on 
the Bhils of the State. At the last Border Court at Kotra, cases were decided against Jura, 
simply because the Mahi Kantha complaints had g^t as far as the Munserim and no further, 
and of course had not been enquired into, and more than one reminder had been sent from 
this office calling attention to them. I trust, however, that all this will be in future much 
changed. 

8. The two cases involving loss of life for the settlement of which I met Major Salmon 
in March 1884 at Pasina, I regret to say, were not settled in a satisfactory way. This year, 
however, they were both brought again before Colonel Phillips during the late Border Court 

18 . - 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



90 REPORT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

held at Eotra laat February/ and I am glad to be able to report that both were amicably settled 
and all parties went away contented. These were the eases mentioned last year between 
Saimoli (Meywar) and Saimulia (Guzerat) and between Buja (Meywar) and Kalikankdr 
(Guzerat). 

9. A sad affray, however, took place at KodurrauU on the 19th of last March between 
about 25 sepoys of the ftao of Jura and some Bhils of Kodurmuli. I will, however, make no 
further mention of this as the case has been fully enquired into and has been forwarded on to 
you for orders. 

10. I have during the last year, with Colonel ConoUy^s consent, made arrangements by 
which both Bhuttia and Holia, who had not been re-arrested when I sent in my last Adminis- 
tration Report, came in to me to my Camp at Pudmaton and there gave securities for the 
payment of their debts and for good conduct in future, and were permitted, on doing so, to 
once more have their complete freedom. 

11. The health in the Jura district has been generally good. Some deaths occurred at 
Mangule in February, which, from reports brought in, seemed to me to resemble cholera. As 
this village is only some four miles from the Koira Cantonment, 1 had to take steps to prevent 
the sickness from spreading to it, and I am glad to say it disappeared without moving out 
of the village of Mangule, where four men died, and others were taken very ill, but recovered. 

12. It is impossible to estimate the area of the ground put under cultivation, as the 
land is in no way measured out, but this year cultivated land has been of much more extent 
all over the Kotra district than formerly owing most probably to the good fall of rain last year. 

13. The Rao of Jura, who has admitted that he never has checked Munserim's accounts, 
and in fact knows nothing of his estate and the management of it, has agreed to uUow his son, 
Seo Singh, a boy of some 18 or 19 years of age, to help him. It was for this reason that I waa 
most anxious to procure a Kamdar of some acquirements and experience, as I thought that if 
the* young heir could see how satisfactory it was to do his work well, and saw how things were 
managed by a man of experience and knowledge, he might be more eager to learn and more 
eager to give up the present state of idleness and ignorance in which he lives. He is a smart- 
looking sharp boy, and has not got that fatal weakness to which his father is so addicted, viz., 
the inordinate passion and love of opium, the curse of very very many of the inhabitants o{ 
this district. Ebramhim, the new Kamdar, is a man of 15 months^ office experience, and has a 
thorough knowledge of Persian, and knows English and Nagri character. He is a man of 
some 25 or 30 years of age and seems to be in appearance a smart man, and I trust that he will 
use his best efforts to improve the Jura State in every way. 

06HNA. 

14. I cannot report more favourably on the Rao of Oghna than I did last year. His State 
is in the same flourishing condition, and 1 hear he has started a school at Oghna to which all 
the children of the village are sent to receive their education. I was unable to visit it during 
my tour through Oghna this year, as 1 was so suddenly ordered to Kherwara on Colonel 
Conolly's proceeding on furlough on medical certificate. I*)o sickness has been reported in this 
district. The remark about the cultivation, made under the heading *' Jura,'' applies also to this, 
and the Panurwa districts. 

PAWUBWA. 

.15. The Chief of this district has during the last year continued to give the greatest' 
satis&ction to me. He has taken the management and the administration of the Panurwa 
State completely into his own hands ; all the former complaints of tyranny have entirely dis- 
appeared, and many of the Bhils who had left their homes have gone back to them, and new 
houses are springing up. The efficiency of his work and the care and interest he takes in his 
BhUs may be illustrated by the following fact. At the late Border Courts his Kamdar appeared 
with correspondence as complete as what 1 have in my own office. Every Mahi Kantha claim 
had been most carefully enquired into with the result that the Runna of Panurwa has not to 
pay anything to Mahi Kantha and himself receives some Rs. 800 from that district. Another 
most satisfactory report was made to me some time ago by the Meywar Vakil of ' Kotra by 
which I heard that the 'Runna of Panurwa had started a school for the education of the Bhils. 
I asked the Ruhna about it and heard from him that he had started a school at Nowagong, i 
place where there are only Bhil and Grassia inhabitants. If he can only entice the Bhils to 
send their children to this school to learn to read and to write, the advantages of sxich a step 
will be very great . . 

16. I regret to say that the Thakur of Umria was murdered by his Bhils last October, 
and that the niutderer is still at large. On the death of the late Thakur, the Rao of Oghna laid 
a claim to the Umria district. The Runna of Panurwa^ however, brought forward very strong 
proofs that the district had always been under his superintendence and the records in my office 
heJped to substantiate them. The district was therefore declared by Colonel Walter to belong to 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB EAJPUTANA STATES TOE 1884-85, 



91 



the Runna of Punurwa. I fear it has been greatly mismanaged by the late Thakar and I am 
doing my best to make arrangements for its future proper administration. The Thakurate is 
very heavily in debt^ and the newly elected Thakur will require all the assistance he can get io 
Enable him to pay them off. 

17. The Bunna of Panurwa is very anxious that I should use my endeavours to bring the 
relations between him and his subjects, the Thakur of Adiwas^ on a more friendly and favourable 
footing. This will^ however^ be a matter of great difficulty as the Thakur of Adiwas was, in 
former days^ a claimant for the gadi of Panurwa at the time when the present Kunna's late 
father, Rui^na Bhawani Singh, was brought in from Oghna. The ill-feelings which then arose, 
though cooled, have not cleared away. I will however do my best to effect the Runna^s wish 89 
soon as I have settled the Umria district on a more satisfactory footin<^. 

18, Herewith are forwarded sheets B and C showing respectively the cases brought to the 
notice of the Second Assistant during the year and those settled at the last Border Courts 
which assembled at Kotra on the I6th of last February, and for which Colonel Phillips, Acting 
Political Agent, Mahi Kantha, joined me, and a statement of the tour of the Second Assistant 
during the year 1884-85, 



Mean temperatnre 
of the year. 


Botteit month and 

its mean 

temperature. 


Coldeet monih and ' 

its mean 

temperature. 


mWo daUy 
range. 


. Extreme daily 
range. 


Total rainfall. 


Number of 

davM in whioh 

rain fell. 


7»-5l 


89'(a 


Pebruarj. 
6S66 


.19-26 


.80 


40.66 


68 



B 

The following is an abstract of the cases including those settled by Border Courts which 
have been brought before the Second Assistant during the year : — 









MaTWAB. 


8IB0HI. MBi;WAB. 


HAUI KANTHA, MEYWAB. 


Deeeription. 


Settled. 


Pending. 




SlSOHI PLAIITTXFr. 


MarwAB Plaivtiw. 


Mahi Kmitl 
Plaibtifb. 




SetUed. 


Pending. 


Settled. 


Pending. 


Settled. 


Pending. 


Settled. 


Pending. 


Harder . , , 
Abduction . 
Highway robbery 
Gi^ous hurt 
Assault . . . 
Theft . » 
CatUe theft » 
ICIsoellaneoaa 
Dakhun. • 
Anan • 






... 
•.• 

1 
1 
1 
7 


8 

* 

"i 

8 

10 


"i 


"i 
"i 


.«• 


*.'.! 


8 

"i 
"i 

6 

• 14 • 
. 10 . 

• "i 


"i 
"i 

t 
•r 


a 

6 ' 
6 

. ;i- 

. 11 
1 


"i 
"i 

8 




Total 


L . 


10 


19 


1 


8 


... 


...r 


. 88 . 


.7 . 


48 


6 



Jf«y«ar.~Tha three easea of murder shown as pending are the late affray at Kodurfial in Jura ; the murder of the Ute Thakur of 
Umria by 1^ Bhils ; and the old blood feud between the Tillages of Surra and MarL With Colodd Phillips' kind asslstanee I hare got lU 
the Surra Bhila who moyed into Guerat to eome to Kotra, and the ease will be settled "before "a looal*panehayet which will assemble oa 
the 9th of this month. 

MaM gaaOa.— The two murder cases have been mentio ne d in my report, ridf paragraph's. 

jr«ywar."The aoousation of "dakhun," or witeh-swinging, was brought before the Baroda Court and'not prbred; therUore dismissed. 

C 



Statement si 


ofcing the tour of the Second Aesistant at Kotra during the year 1884-65. 


Month. 


DATS 1884. 


PXAOl.* 


•1 




From 


To 


From 


To 




March, • . • 

April •. . .' k 
Mny «... 

September . . . 
Ootober . , . 

January ' • • • 
Do. • , . 

Do. • » • 
February , , 


7th 
13th 

87fh 
let 
8ih 

181 

1st 
14th 

S7th 
6tli 


'• 9tli 
d 

8lBt 

leth 

8l8i 

80th 
16th 
11th 

95 

9th 

seut 
aoth 

a6th 


[Kotra 

Do... . 
Do.. 

I Kherwara . 
Do., . 

Udaipur . 
Kotra 

Oghna 
Kherwara • 


• 
UmriaMedi , 

Bagohur 
Pudmatoa . 

Marl . , 
Udaipur • 

Kotrm . 
Jura and Ogh- 

na 
Kherwara 

Kotn , • 

Total . 


86 

1? 

4 

9 
18 

8 
80 
130 


Visited the Umria district. 

. Inspected the new ri>ad. 
To enquire Into the demonstration against Mijor 

Salmon. 
Xnoulry into the mu^r of late Thakur of 

On public duty. 

Ditto. 
Ditto. 

Colonel Conolly proceeding on furlough on 
medical eertUloate 
Settled the Meywar-Mahi- Kantha border oasef 
at Kotra Cantonment/ 



G. A. Collins, LieuL, 
Second Aeett, Heeident, Meywar^ 
12a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



g2 



EBPOET OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 



No. 147, dated Camp Banswara, 7th April 1886. 

JVom— LixuTBiTANT W. Etans-Gobdon, Assistant Political Ageni, Banswara and Pertahgarh, , 
2b— CoLONSL 0. K. M. Waltss, Besident in Meywar, 

I have the honor to submit the Annual Report on the States of Banswara and Partabgarh 
for the year 1884-85. Included in the report are brief memoranda concerning the Thakurate 
of Eusalgarh. 

t. Ckange of officers. — On the 16ih April 1884 I took over charge of the oflSce from 
Lieutenant-Colonel Roberts, 

3. Rain-fail. — The monsoon proved a good one, though some anxiety was felt in Partab. 
garh for the kharif crops, in June and July, owing to a long break in the rains. The sub- 
joined table shows the fall during the year, as registered at Banswara and Pertabg^rh : — 



Vonthg. 


Banswank 


Partabgarh. 


May 1884 


loB. 



7 
18 
12 
13 

a 


CtB. 

82 
88 
86 
85 
63 
81 


Ins. 



2 

4 

6 

10 

1 




cts. 
16 


June ,,.....••••• 


31 


July „ 


18 


Ancniiit -.....-...-. 


20 


September „......•••• 


81 


October ^ 


20 


Noyember ........... 




December „....--.-.. 


65 


January 1885 . 




Total 




4 


60 


22 


25 


21 



4. Crops. — Both kharif and rabi crops were excellent and plentiful ; prices in both States 
have been abnormally low. 

The following table g^ves the average price of gprain in the districts during the year :— 





B^iraw.^ 


PABTABe4SK. 


Montba. 
















Wheat. 


Mukkl. 


Gram. 


Wheat. 


Makld. 


Gram. 




Sr. ch. 


Sr. ch. 


Sr. Ch. 


Sr. ch. 


Sr. ch. 


Or. ch. 


April 1884 . ..../. 


20 10 


86 4 


86 4 


18 7 


28 - 4 ' 


28 6 


May ,.....•.. 


S3 12 


40 


40 


19 1 


W .13 


30 


June H 


24 6 


38 10 


40 


19 8 


24 8 . 


30 


July 


26 8 


40 


40 


19 10 


26 10 ' 


28 11 


Auguflt „ 


27 8 


37 8 


37 8 


20 4 


26 2 


26 15 


September „ 


26 


30 


86 


21 12 


30 8 


81 9 


October „ 


27 8 


35 10 


35 


22 10 


37 3 


81 8 


Noyember „ 


29 6 


43 10 


38 10 


26 


41 10 


81 10 


December „ 


30 10 


47 8 


41 4 


26 


88 7 


82 15 


January 1885 


33 2 


50 


40 10 


27 5 


39 14 


84 2 


February „ 


36 4 


51 4 


40 


28 15 


41 10 


82 


March „ 


35 


62 8 


45 


29 4 


43 7 


40 10 


Average 


28 4A 


41 14i 


39 1) 


.23 3} 


33 13i 


81 Si 



5. Health. — The public health has been good^ no epidemic having occurred. 

6. Disjfensariee. — The dispensaries at Banswara and Pertahgarh continue to be well 
attended by and popular among the people. The Hospital Assistant at the former place^ Polo 
Bam, is especially deserving of credit for the energy and success with which he carries on his 
duties. 

At Eusalgarh there is a private dispensary, maintained at the expense of the Rao., The 
Assistant, however, is a useless person, and it is under contemplation to establish a Government 
Dispensary here. ... 

7. Post Office. — The Banswara Post Oflice continues to work and to pay well. 

The long-felt want of a post office at Pertahgarh has at length been supplied. The 
prejudice in favour of the old Brahmani Dftk has been overcome, and a Government sub-office 
establii^hed. It was immediately appreciated by the people, and began paying a good profit 
from the first n\onth. 

TRANSIT OF OOVEBNMENT MAILS. 

8. The mails have travelled unmolested throughout the year. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE EAJPUTANA STATES POB 1884-86- 



b3 



SCHOOLS. 

9. The Maha Rawat of Pertabg^rh has consented to the establishment of a good school in 
his capital. A suitable building has been set apart^ and the necessary arrangements are now 
being made for the establishment of the institution on practical lines* 

In Banswara, signs of an educational movement are not wanting. In the town itself a 
large number of children, are taught reading, writing, and accounts. Similar schools exist in 
several outlying villages, as also in the Jaghirs of Garhi and Arthana, and the Thakurate of 
Eusalgarh, They are, it is true, of a most elementary character, but are not to be despised on 
that account. 

JAILS. 

10. Considerable improvements have been made in the jails of both Statos. The advance 
in this respect made in Pertabgarh is especially commendable. The prisoners are fairly housed, 
well clothed and fed. The jail is thoroughly clean, and the condition of the prisoners, who 
are employed entii*ely extramurally, is satisfactory. The same remarks may be applied to 
Banswara^ where the present Minister has interested himself in this behalf. 

FORESTS. 

11. The valuable and extensive forests of both States are left entii*ely uncared for. In 
Pertabgarh the Chief is alive to the danger of denudation and to the great annual loss and de- 
struction occasioned by fire. 

The frequent and close intercourse with his subjects, and his constant presence in the 
remotest parts of his territory, should enable the Maha Rawat of Pertabgarh to approach this 
matter without danger or di£Sculty. His subjects have the utmost confidence in him a most 
necessary factor in any contemplated steps towards forest conservation. I have been in corre* 
spondence with the Principal of the Forest School at Dehra Dun, in view to procuring the ser- 
vices of a competent native forest ofBcer. 

In Banswara the question should be approached with great caution^ and not without having 
first gained the conBdence of the Bhils. 

It is. of great importance to both States that something should be done. 

Forests always seem inexhaustible till they become exhausted, and in parts even of Bans«- 
wara the want of firewood is already beginning to be felt, which is least among evils that must 
follow from carelessness in keeping up a proper proportion of trees. » 

IRBIGATION. 

12. In Pertabgarh liberal concessions are granted to ryots who open wells. Several new 
wells have been started during the year. 

Nothing to further irrigation has as yet been done in Banswara. A large portion of the soil 
in this State, however, yields two full crops without any artificial water-supply. 

BOADS. 

18. The main roads between Banswara, Rutlam, Pertabgarh, Kusalgarh, and Dungarpur 
are in good order and practicable for wheels during the dry weather. 

THE BHIL8. 
14i. The Bhils have been quiet during the year and have given no trouble. This desirable 
state of things is doubtless due to the excellence of the past two seasons. This has been a 
powerful inducement to the Bhik to take to agricidtural pursuits. 

BOBDEB COUBTS. 

15. With the exception of Bhopawar, all the Border Courts were held during the year. 

16. I met the Political Agent, Western Malwa^ on the 7th December, for disposal of cas^s 
pending since 1879. They were as follows :— 

Banswara versus Batlam . • • . .20 



Butlam „ 
Kusalgarh „ 
Batlam ,, 
Gwalior „ 
Pertabgarh „ 
Butlam ,, 
Pertabgarh „ 
Eusalgarh „ 
Sailana „ 
Gwalior „ 
Sailana ,, 



Banswara 

Rutlam 

Kusalgarh 

Pertabgarh 

Qwalior 

Pertabgarh 

Piploda 

Sailana 

Kusalgarh 

Banswara 

Banswara 



45 
16 
24 
5 
1 
6 
1 
9 
1 
1 
1 

Total ISO 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



.®4 EBPOBT 01 THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

17. I held a Border Court between Kusalgarh and Banswara in December last. The 
number of oases disposed of is given below : — 

Banswara versw Kutalgarh ,.,•.•, 4 . 
Kasalgarh „ Banswara 15 

Total 19 

18. On the 7th February 1885 I met Mr. Tounghusband, the Assistant Political Agent 
Rewa Kantha, at Salluka-Pat in Garhi, for the disposal of cases pending since February 1884* 
They were as follows :-— 

Simth versus Chilkari • • • • • • • .31 

„ „ Banswara • . • • • • • .12 

„ M Kusalgarh ......... 3 

Cbtlkari „ Santh 9 

Banswara ,, „ ...•••.. 2 

Lonawara „ Eusalgarh •,.••••• 1 

Total 68 

19. On the 80th March 18^5, I met Colonel Temple^ Political Superintendent^ Hilly 
Tracts, Meywar, for the disposal of crises pending since 1883. They were as follows : — 

Dung^rpur verfu* Banswara 9 

Banswara „ Dungarpur • t • * • . 3 

Total 12 

20. Owing to the absence of the Political Agent, Bhopawar, on leave, the long-pending 
Border Court had again to be postponed during the current year. 

BOUNDARIES. 

21. In October 1884, the Assistant Political Agen£ was deputed to take up certain cases 
pending between Banswara, Rutlam, and Kusalgarh. 

Great difficulty was experienced, and delay caused, in procuring a good Surveyor. 

From the 5th to the 25th January was occupied in settling an extensive dispute concern- 
ing the Ranga Hill. This case had been given trouble since 1870. It was intended to conti- 
nue work during the hot weather, but the survey being urgently required by the Revenue Dew 
partmentj this had* to be abandoned. Three cases were completed. 

BUIiES FOB THE MTTTTTAIi EXTRADITION OF GBIMINAL8. 

These rides have how been in force for two years. It does not appear that they have ever 
been applied. .There can be no doubt, however, that the effect of their ii^troduction has been 
good; that the feeling between officials on the Uanswara-Pertabgarh border is more cordial; 
and that the Bhils^ on either side, have been unprecedentedly quiet.. 

WITCHSWINGINO. 

23. Two cases of witchs winging occurred during the year, neither of which termi- 
nated fatally. In the first case the criminals have nearly all been arrested and punished. The 
second has only recently been reported, and no arrests have as yet been made. 

INFANTICIDE. 

24. Withi reference to Government Resolution on the subject^ no cases have been reported 
during the year. 

BANSWABJL 

• THE JfflNISTEB. 

25. The new Minister, Rae Bahadur Jowala Pershad, whose appointment was noticed in 
the last report, has now been in office for a year. 

I regret to say that his health has not been good, and that the sphere of his influence 
has hereby been much contracted. .He has not, as was hoped, been able to travel and use his 
experience in settling the Bhils ^and improving the system and income of the land revenue. He 
has, on the other hand, gained the entire confidence and support of the Maharawal, and 
exercises an influence over him', which is* wholly for good. He has, while getting affairs into 
his hands, wisely refrained from frightening the Chief with innovations, but will now, I trust 
take steps for the gradual improvement of the Administration. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



: OF THIS SAJPUTANA STATES FOU 1884.85. 90 

THB GIVIIi AD2CINISTBATIOV. 

26. The reforms immediately needed to better the financial position of the State, which 
is at present far from satisfactory, are improvements in the collection of land revenue and a 
better system of abkari. There caa be no doubt that as the revenue is at present collected, far 
less money reaches the Darbar Treasurer than is justly due. A few trustworthy and capable 
oiBcials would doubtless increase the revenue without any enhancement of rent. The present 
system of abkari too, while partly embracing the objections which follow JErom taxing liquor 
in a Bhil State, brings no compensating return to the Darbar. 

Here, as elsewhere, the difficulty of finding among local officials' trustworthy persons 
capable of carrying out reform is experienced. On the other hand, the Maharawal is bitterly 
opposed to the introduction of a foreign element. 

JUDICIAL ADMIinSTBATION. 

27. With regard to the administration of justice. Civil and criminal cases are disposed 
of with &ir regularity by the local Courts. Great difficulty is, however, experienced in cases 
where the subjects of the Jaghirdars are concerned, or when an offender has taken refuge 
within the territory of one or other of them. 

THE FEUDATORIES. 

28. I have become personally acquainted with all the Thakurs and Jagirdars of 
the State. They seem generally contented, and all express satisfaction with the present 
regime, save the Garhi Rao, who is inclined to be troublesome. 

It having been clearly proved that the Thakur of Bhimsor, in spite of repeated warnings, 
had screened certain persons concerned in a case of witch-swinging, one of bis villages has 
been, at my instance, attached for a period of three years by the Darbar. This step has had 
a good effect. 

TEE OOVEBNHENT LOAN. 

29. The last instalment of deferred tribute has been paid, and the first instalment of the 
Government loan has been received during the year. 

FERTABGABH. 

SO. This State continues to be well administered by its popular ruler. • 

VISITS AND OCCURRENCES. 

31. The Maha Rawat twice visited Nimach during the year» He also went to Pushka 
fair for the purchase of horses. 

On the 27th February, Colonel Bradford, C.S.I,, Agent to the Govempr-Qeneral in 
Bajputana, rode over from Nimach and spent the day at Pertabgarh, returning the same 
evening. 

It was a matter of great disappointment to His Highness that this visits which had long 
been looked forward to and prepared for, was of so brief a character. 

TEE MINISTER. 

82. In December last, the Eamdar, Shunker Lai, who had been idle and indifferent, was 
dismissed, and a Mussalman, named Mahomedi Beg, formerly Vakil to the Resident, Meywar, 
appointed. There is nothing special to recommend this appointment, Mahomedi Beg having 
no particular administrative experience or capacity. The Chief, however, looks closely after 
affairs himself. 

REVENUE AND EXPEDINTURE. 

8S. The most recent return received is for the Sambat year 1939 or A.D. 1884-88. For 
this period the income under the different heads was Bs. 2,62,342. This is exclusive of a 
sum of Rs. 10,936 still due and realizable. The expenditure is given as Rs. 2,70^076. 
There was, therefore, an actual deficit of Bs. 7,734, which was met by borrowing. If, how- 
ever, the sum of Rs. 10,936, still due, be taken into account, the revenue amounts to 
Bs. 2,73,278, and shows a surplus of Bs. 3,202. 

EUSALaARH. 

34. The Assistant Political Agent visited Kusalgarh in December. The administration 
has been satisfactory and calls for no remarks. 

The eldest son of the Rao, Udai Singh, travelled to Bombay in February 1885, 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



06 BEPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

FESIOD SPENT IN CAMP AND PLAGES VISITED. 

85. A period of 144 days was spent in camp up to the end of the official year, thst isy 
from 9th to 18th May 1884, and from 19th November 1884 to Slst March 1885. 

The following table 'shows the number of times each important place was visited :*— 
Pertabgarh ..•...*.. Twice. 



Banswara 

Khandu 4 4 
Garhi 

Eusalgai-h • 
In addition to the above, al 



8 times. ' 
. . . 8 „ 
. . . 8 „ 
• Once, 
the important villages belonging to Banswara and the 
jagirdars were visited at least once, and personal acquaintance with the latter was made by 
the Assistant Political Agent. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB BAJFTJTANA STATES POB 1884.86. ' 97 



WESTEB17 BAJPTJTAITA STATES BEFOBT FOB 1884^5. 



No. 3P., dated Jodhpore, the 28rd April 1885. 

J^Vom^-OoLovBL Pbbct W. Powlbtt, Besident, Western Bqfjmiana SMei^ 
Jb—The Firti Ainstant Agent to the Qovemar General, Sajputana, 

I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of Western Rajputana for 1884-85. 
2. I was on three months' privilege leave from 25th September 1884, during wliicli time 
Cdonel Baylaj officiated and carried on the work of the Residency with success. 

SEASON. 

S. The harvests of 1884-85 have been above the average, and the country is well provided 
both with grain and fodder. The rainfall was 16^^ in the city and nearly W at the Resi- 
dency. 

SANITATION. 

4. A Municipal Committee under the guidance of Doctor Adams has been set going. 
Latrines are being built, and an improved conservancy establishment has been appointed. The 
Committee meetings are fairly well attended by traders and officials. The confinement of dogs 
is kept up, and only a small number are left at liberty. 

5. Cholera visited the towns of Pali and Sojat during the past year. It was not of a 
very virulent type. 

KAHASAJAH'S VISIT TO CALCUTTA. 

6. His Highness the Maharajah of Jodhpore visited Calcutta last December, and had 
interviews with His Excellency Lord Ripon and His Excellency Lord Dufferin. 

MARWAB. 

ADMIN ISTBATION OF THB STATE. 

7. Maharaj Partap Singh, C.S.I., continues the Chief Minister of the State with Lala 
Hardial Singh as Secretary. There have been no changes in the higher offices. 

8. The administration of the State has gone on improving, and it has not been found neoes- 
saiy to introduce many foreign officials, except for the temporary .purpose of the survey. 
Their introduction, even with this object, did not take place until the impossibility of carrying 
out the survey, except by means of foreigners, was demonstrated. However, patient efforts to 
instruct a body of young Marwaris in surveying, wliich is the basis of a good official education, 
are being made. The son of Pandit Sheo Naraen, a young man of high attainments, has gone 
to the Punjab, where Colonel Wace, Settlement Commissioner, has kindly undertaken to put 
him through a course of official instruction. Other young Marwaris will probably follow 
him. 

9. The chief measure of the year has been the definition and regulation of the civil and 
criminal powers of the principal JigM&re. The necessity of some such measure was dwelt on 
by Colonel Eeatinge in the Annual Administration Report for Rajputana of 1867-68, pages 18, 
19, though the possibility of carrying it out by mutual agreement between the Chiefs and the 
nobles did not then exist. Negotiations between the Darbar and the Jagirdars regarding 
the arrangement lately made were rather protracted, and at one time some warm feeling wa« 
excited. The final terms, however, were, I believe, accepted by both parties without any 
sense of dissatisfaction. They provided that there should be three grades of powers as fol- 
lows :— 

Ist yro^.— Power to imprison for six months and to fine up to fiSOO. To decide civil 

suits up to B1,000. 
8nd grade. — Power to imprison for three months and to fine up to filSO. To decide civil 

suits up to B500. 
dfd ^info."— Power to imprison for one month and to fine up to filOO. To decide civil 

suits up to B300. 

10. Appeals are to lie to the Sirdars' Court as long as it is superintended by Lala Hardial 
Singh, but aft«r his departure to the Mahkma Khas or Maharajah's Court. This was specially 
asked for by the Jitgirdfirs, and is a proof of the confidence they have in Lala Hardial Singh. 

IS 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



98 BEFOBT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTEATION 

11. It was stipnlated that each JfigircULr Invested with powers should send a writer to the 
Sirdars' Court to be instructed in some simple rules of procedure ; and the authority of a 
Jdgirdar to try cases was not to be recognized until his writer had passed a satisfactory examina- 
tion and seen some oases tried. Eleven Jagir officials have undergone this examination 
successfully, and the Rao of Kuchaman^ who in intelligence and sagacity is first among the 
Jfigirdars of M&rwar^ has had his Court at work for some weeks^ and has submitted his first 
monthly statement of cases, 

12. Another measure calculated greatly to promote the improvement of administration is 
the extension of the post office. The Director General has agreed to establish post offices at 
all the Farganah head-quarters of which 12 are at present without them. The Darbar is to 
be allowed to send its official correspondence at service rated, and the regularity and rapidity 
of communication which will thus be secured cannot fail to be of great value. Hitherto the 
Darbar has abstained from using the Imperial post^ and has depended to a great extent on 
Eassids. 

13. A third reform is the consolidation of the work of settling and supervising criminal 
tribes, maintaining order and controlling the Police, which will be formed out of a detached 
portion of the present army. For this purpose Lala Kishori Lai has been appointed Superin- 
tendent of Criminal Tribes and Police, and rules for his guidance have been drawn out. 

14. Last year I had to record, as an incident which to some extent must embarrass the 
administration, the ffight of the Bana of Lohi&na from Jodhpore, where he had been under 
surveillance. The efforts to arrest him were not successful. Although he did not go more than 
two days^ journey from Lohidna, and was for two months stationary with a party of eight or 
nine people, no one gave information of his precise whereabouts, notwithstanding the large 
reward offered for his apprehension. At the beginning of February he died after an illness of 
some weeks in the Danta hills ; and his small body of faithful followers were then at once be- 
trayed and brought to the police post at Lohiina, where I examined some of them. As no 

* outrages had been committed by the party, they were pardoned for assisting the Bana and 
settled down. Bana Saljee left a son of 13, who, greatly against his father's wish, was sent to 
the Mayo College in December 1882. He will receive an estate equivalent in value to his 
patrimonial one, and he will bear the title of Bana, but he will not have Lohi&na, lest old 
traditions and associations should assert their force and the seeds of trouble be sown again. 

KB7EESSI0N OF CRIME. 
thebhUiS. 

16. Dewalfiti, the district of which Lohi&na was the chief village, and in which Bhils 
were specially troublesome and .Th£kurs specially patronised crime, has continued orderly. 
Lohiina no longer exists. Its houses have been all levelled. The Darbar has erected a sub- 
stantial masonry fort about a mile distant. Bound this fort the village of Jaswantpura is 
springing up^ and the security it promises is attracting wealthy persons from neighbouring 
villages. Jaswantpura will probably grow into a prosperous town. 

BAOREES OR M06HIAS. 

16. The progress of the Baorees has been very marked during the past year, thanks to the 
exertions of Captain Martelli and a few B&j officials working under his directions. Trust- 
worthy statistics showing what has been done will^ I hope^ soon be prepared. 

MINA8. 

17. With regard to the Mmfis I am not quite so well satisfied. I was in hopes that they 
had been brought complei(ely under control, but there is reason to believe that at least one gang 
has lately been out to plunder. This shows there is much remaining to be done, although the 
land cultivated by Min&a has been greatly extended during the past year. Never before was 
such an expanse of corn crops seen in Oodw£r, and much of it is in the hands of Minis* 
However, as long as gang^ go out, the condition of the tribe is unsatisfactory. I trust that 
next year the Besident may have to record a great improvement in the supervision of the 
Minis, which cannot at present be called systematic as is that of the Baorees. 

NORTHERN BORDER COUNTRY. 

18. The Kfomkh£nis, a criminal tribe of this region, have, I believe, been brought under 
more complete control than has before been attained. I hope to speak about tiiem more fully 
next year. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OT THE EAJFUTAllA STATES TOB 188i^6 99 

JETSALHEB BORDER. 

19. Here I consider things yery satisfactory. The 24 S&kra villages are taking more and 
more to agriculture. The number of old residents who are now cultivators is about 25 per 
cent, greater than it was a year ago^ while> as an indication of the prevalent sense of security, 
150 outsiders (Jats^ Bishnois, &c.) have applied for land in the 863m villages. 

SO. The two great checks on agriculture are predatory habits and disputed boundaries. 
The first have been effectually restrained in the Sikra villages, by the measures specified in the 
last report, and during the cold weather I succeeded in getting the boundary of the S^Lkra 
villages demarcated on three sides. So that the second great hindrance to cultivation was in a 
great degree removed. About three-fifths of this boundary line was between S4kra and Pokam. 
The remainder between S£kra and Jeysalmer. 



BAaRIS. 

21. The settled portion of this tribe continues to cultivate quietly. 

80T7THERN BORDER. 

a. In the south where Boyfitra was formerly a trouble there has been little crime, and 
cultivators driven by anarchy from the country have been returning. 

28. The tranquil state of the country has rendered leniency to the Boyatra^ Th&kurs pos- 
sible. The old outlaws are to reside at Jodhpore, their sons are to be educated, and to get 
their shaies in the estate after the lapse of seven years. They lose the grazing tax (gin), a 
particular grazing ground (jor) and their old dwelling-place, which is now the Raj Thana; but 
they receive an allowance, not before conceded, oq account of the salt which they are not now 
allowed to make. 

COURTS. 

24. There has not, I think, been any relapse from the improvement in the Courts spoken 
of last year. 

25. As few changes as possible have been made; indeed the only real changes in judicial 
procedure have been the reduction from 20 to 12 years of the period of limitation for civil 
suite, and the introduction of stamps. The rule of •limitation itself has long been current, 
though it has not, I believe, been strictly observed. It was renewed in 1883, and 12 months 
allowed within which to institute old suits. After the lapse of this period, on the representa^ 
tion of the money-lenders, it was extended for one month, and again for two months, so that 
there were two periods of grace. With regard to general procedure the rules issued, which the 
bdkims have to know, are comprised in a sheet of foolscap. 

EHAS MAHAEAHA. 

26. The principal Court which hears appeab from the Sirdars and Appellate Courts is the 
Ehas Mahakama, over which Maharaj Piurtap Singh presides. The regular members are 
Mahta Byje Singh, Pundit Sheo Narain, and Lala HardiiLl Singh; the latter does not assist 
in the decision of appeals from his own Court further than giving explanations where needed. 
The organisation of the Court is much improved, and cases are now heard and settled with 
comparative rapidity and regularity. 

SIRDARS' COURT. 

27. This Court continues to work well under Lala Hardi&l Singh and Pundit Jiwanand. 
It is first of alia Court of conciliation. It endeavours in various ways to effect a compromise 
between the parties, and there is no doubt that in this it is eminently successful. In only 2 
per cent, of the cases was there an appeal. Punchayets were employed in 28 out of 1,{)82 cases. 
Of these Punchayets 16 were appointed by the parties themselves. 

28. Forty-one bankrupt Jagirdars have been enabled to look forward to freedom from 
their liabilities, their debts having been placed in train of liquidation. On an average some- 
thing more than' half the income of his estate is assigned to the bankrupt Jagirdar to enable 
him to live in comfort and pay the lUj dues. A schedule showing the amount of his debts 
and the number of years of liquidation is then published, and he is pronounced incapable of 
incurring fresh debt till all he owed has been paid off. 

ISA 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



100 BEFOBT OF THE POLITIGAL ADHINISTRATIOK 

APPELLATE AND SESSIONS COUBT. 

29, Kabi Raj Mor&r D&n continues to preside over this Court, and I think the Court has 
improved. It has decided 222 cases in appeal^ and 155 submitted to it for sanction^ besides 89 
original cases, and only 47 remain unsettled. 

CIVIL COURT. 

SO. The Civil Court is still under Mahta Imratl&l. I hear no serious complaints of it^ 
and it is clearing off the accumulated cases of many years. There were 2^882 pending at the 
beginning of the year^ 2,014 instituted, and 8,789 settled. 

FOUJDABI OR MAGISTRATE'S COURT. 

31. Munshi Makhdum Baksh remains Foujdar. I continue to hear his Court well spoken 
of • He has decided 2^514 cases, and the number pending, which last year was 1^408^ is now 
1^852. The Foujdar has an assistant who decides many small cases. 

HAKIMS' COURTS. 

82. The Parganah Courts have certainly improved in some degree^ tiieir progress depends 
upon the maintenance of supervision. 

JAIL. 

88. The number of prisoners in the jail is 474. Their castes are as follows :— 

Bajpnts 80 

B^ris or MoghiiSs 60 

Min^ ". 40 

Bhils 28 

Brahmins 85 

Mahajans 20 

Chakan 22 

Jats 25 

Badhs 19 

Mnsalmanf 53 

Naeks .10 

Miscellaneous under 10 in number each 82 

84. The jail accommodation has been improved during the past year, and efforts are made 
to check the unnecessary detention of prisoners. 

35, The system of recovering the cost of prisoners' food from them has been abolished at 
a sacrifice to the Darbar of about filO^OOO. I consider this a very beneficial measure^ for the 
cost of their food was often exacted from poor people unconvicted of any offence^ and ill able 
to pay for their confinement. 

SEVENUE AND EXPENDITURE. 

86. The revenue between 1st April 1884 and 81st March 1885 was H87, 98,687. This, I 
believe, to be the largest ordinary revenue (that is a revenue unswelled by special collections 
for marriages and such like) ever collected. 

87. The expenditure was, deducting redemption of debt and nominal items, H89,02,082. It 
exceeded the estimate by 18 lakhs, but about S8,66,000 was on account of railways. This 
however still leaves an excess over estimate of more than nine lakhs, the greater part of which 
represents, I am afraid, unnecessary and unprofitable expenditure. 

88. It may seem after the experience of the last three years absurd to make budgets at all. 
But the Musahib Ala has specially pledged himself this year to check expenditure, and I think 
he is really anxious to do so. The establishment of a treasury and a better system of account 
will facilitate the execution of his intentions. He desires that three-fourths of the increase 
of revenue brought about by improved administration, an increase amounting to several lakhs, 
should be devoted to abolishing debt, forming cash balances, and promoting reforms and 
Public Works. 

CUSTOMS. 



89. Captain Loch, who since Mr. Hewson's departure has been in charge of the Customs 
Department, has not permitted a relapse into efvil ways. The income has been injuriously affect- 
ed by the diminution in the consumption of sugar, due to a temporary religious cause, and it has 
been greatly benefited by an extraordinary increase in the export of *' til.^' 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB BAJPUTAKA STATBS FOB 1884-85. 101 

40. The gross revenue was fil 1^29,846 ; the budget estimate fill,ll,7S8. 

41. The important changes have been a redaction of the export duty on wool from fil-4 to 
10 annas a maundy commencing from 1st October 1884, and the raising of the opium duty from 
B80 to lOOy beginning from 1st February 1886. Opium is now only too cheap, and the public 
cannot complain of high price due to enhanced duty. Transit duties on articles carried by the 
Jodhpore Railway (intoxicating drugs excepted) have been abolished. 

42. The Bikanir and Jeysalmer import duty on opium collected in Marw&r amounted 
to fi39,0SS and £13,509 respectively (see last year's report). 

8TAKFS. 

43. The introduction of judicial stamps in lieu of a heavy tax on executed decrees has, 
combined with the improvement in the Courts, resulted in producing a stamp revenue which 
last year exceeded the decree tax by more than a lakh of rupees. The large amount of the 
stamp income was exceptional, and was due to the enforcement of the rule of limitation. The 
cost of stamps required by the Courts is somewhat less than that exacted in British territory. 

LAND REVENUE AND SETTLEMENT. 

44. Captain Loch, in addition to his other onerous duties, took charge of the land revenue 
last year, and made a summary settlement of the khdlsa villages. The assessment amounted to 
£7,58,902. A regular revenue survey of those villages is in prog^ness, and will be completed 
within the next 12 months. A settlement for a term of years will then be made. Seventy-five 
villages have been completely surveyed. 

45. The boundary settlement has gone on well. Eight hundred fifty-five villages, khalisa 
and jagir, have been demarcated, and all the disputes connected with them settled. Captain 
Loch has induced some J%ird&rs to demarcate their villages without his aid, which I consider 
extremely satisfactory. 

PUBLIC WOEKS. 

46. Exclusive of railway expenditure, Mr. Home spent Bl, 62,684 on Public Works. Of 
this B89,531 was spent on the Bfilsamand and City Canal. This very important work is now 
approaching completion. Last rains contributed much water to the city tanks, 

RAILWAT. 

47. Both railway construction and railway traffic management have prospered under the 
direction of Mr. Home, who has no assistant. The extension from P&li to the Luni was opened 
in June 1884, and that from the Luni to Jodhpore in March 1885. The cost of these exten« 
sions will be largely under the estimate, when all the works are completed. 

48. For the whole year the line has paid on its open parts 6 per cent. Since the line was 
open to Jodhpore, that is for three weeks past, it has been paying at the rate of 10 per cent.^ but 
then this is the busy season ; 6 per cent, for the whole year may be expected. 

MALANL 

49. The settlement and demarcation of village boundaries has progressed fairly well during 
the year. Three hundred and thirty-eight boundary disputes have been decided and 61 village 
out of a total of 400 demarcated. Civil and criminal justice is fairly well though rather 
roughly administered. I attach a statement. There was only one case of dacoity during the 
year. One hundred and eighteen cattle thefts and 92 other thefts occurred. 

SIBOHL 

50. There has been no serious trouble in Sirohi during the past year. The boundary dis- 
putes, however, remain unsettled, and the friction between Chief and Thiknrs continues. The 
Courts are, I believe, improved owing to the attention given to them by His Highness the Rao, 
assisted by Mr. Milap Chand, a well educated official recently employed. 

61. The revenue is very prosperous ; for the three years ending June SOth, 1888, it had been 
rapidly increasing. The accounts for 1882-83 puts the revenue at Bl,46,268, the expenditure 
atBl,56,860. 

62. From the 1st April 1884 a new agreement with regard to salt came into force. In- 
stead of 18,000 maunds of salt at half duty, the Darbar is now to receive B9,000 annually on 
condition that Government salt is freely admitted. The result has been very satisfactory. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



102 KEPOBT OF THB POLITICAL ABHINISTBATION 

The salt sales at Abu road and Rohera, which for the 2nd half of 1883 averaged 871*50 mannds, 
were for the 2nd half of 1884 1,620 maunds, while the price, formerly B 8-4, had fallen to 
fi2-5-6. 

JETSALMEB. 

68. I again met His Highness the Maha Bawal of Jeysalmer on the border last cold 
weather. He has appointed Mahta Nath Mai Diwan, bnt I doubt whether any substantial 
improvements have been introduced. Information from the Darbar is very difficult to get. 
The revenue is said to have been Bl,74,08^, but nearly fid8,000 of this was exceptional, being 
marriage contributions. The expenditure is said to have been fil,25,761. Few complaints 
reach me from Jeysalmer. 

SUFFBESSION OF DAGOITT. 

54. The Court of Vakils convicted and punished 46 dacoits during 1884. The average 
annual number of convictions for dacoity during the last three years is 57. The average convic- 
tions for dacoity and robbery for the preceding three years was four, 

65. Three years ago the attention given to dacoity suppression caused greater regularity 

in the Darbar reports. 

In 1881 76 daooitifls were reported. 



„ 1883 40 H .. 

56. The diminution has thus been continuous. 

57. The reported value of the plunder was :— 

In 1881 B 21,023 > 

„ 1882 t, 36,345— The loss in one case was said to have been B18,00a 
,» 1883 „ 7,118 

58. In addition to the 46 dacoits convicted and punished^ 22, chiefly E£emkhiinis, have 
been convicted and released, or are to be released on security. In a country like M£rwfr, 
where whole classes have been addicted to dacoity, it would appear expedient practically to 
pardon those who years ago committed dacoities, but who are now disposed to lead an honest 
life. All such, not leading dacoits, who now voluntarily surrender themselves and make a full 
confession, are tried and convicted before the Court of Vakils, and then, on furnishing secu. 
rity not only for good behaviour, but for their appearance when wanted, they are allowed to go 
to their homes, where a certain degree of surveillance will be exercised over them by the 
Superintendent of Police and Criminal Classes just appointed. 

59. Briefly put, the system of dacoity suppression in Marwfir now is — 

(1) to hunt down vigorously those concerned in recent dacoities ; 

(2) to exempt from imprisonment, but not from conviction and surveillance, thom 

offenders whose exemplary punishment would be of less value to dacoity sup- 
pression than the information they are ready to give if encouraged ; 
(8) practically to grant an amnesty to the rank and file of the old gangs, but to regis, 
ter and supervise them ; 

(4) to provide for, protect from oppression, and to watch with care all the criminal 

tribes, such as Min&a, Bhfls, &c., and all marauding villages such as Sdkra, 
Bararwa, &c.; 

(5) to prevent the tracking law becoming a dead letter ; 

(6) to enforce the responsibility of Jagirddrs and village heads. 

60. Dacoity suppression has certainly been advanced. But the ground gained may at any 
time be lost by indifference or by the mismanagement or lax management of the criminal tribes. 
Indeed, until the superintendence of the Minas is on a better footing, I shall regard the pre. 
sent good behaviour of the criminal tribes as very unstable. 

61. There were two attacks on runners carrying letter mails during the year, but in 
neither case did the mail bag suffer. 

TaUB. 

• 

62. I was 50 days at Abu and 76 days elsewhere on tour. I visited Phalodi, Bap, in 
Jeysalmer, Pokaran, Sdkra, Balmer, 6ud&h, Bhinmal, old Lohi&na, Sirohi, Sojat, BiUtra, Jaitiran 
Nim£j, B&epur, Ndwa, M&rot, Kuchawan, and Bararwa. The most noteworthy fact I noticed 
was tiie ' disappearance of complaints of dacoity and theft on all the borders where formerly it 
was so rife. 

NOTICE OP OFFICERS. 

68. Mr. Hewson went on furlough in April 1884, making over the customs office to 
Captain Loch, who has not only maintained the efficiency of the department, and administered 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE EAJPUTANA STATES FOR 1884^85. 



103 



ihe land revenue in addition to his proper duties as settlement oflScer^ but has always been 
ready to offer his assistance in emergencies. 

64. Doctor Adams has specially exerted himself in the cause of vaccination and sani. 
tation. 

65. The services of Mr. Home^ who single-handed has managed the open railway^ 
extended the line to Jodhpur, and acted as Executive and Superintending Engineer of other 
important works^ and who has done it all with economy and efficiency, are greatly appreciated 
by the Darbar. 



Natire of cues. 


CaMspend. 

izi^lrom last 

jear. 


Caaeare- 

cdTed daring 

the year. 


TOfAK. 


Caaatdia- 

poaedof 

during the 

year. 


Caaea 

remaining 

orer. 




(Mmiiial cases 

Civil oases 

Claims on account of land- 
ed property 

Miscellaneoui 


163 

208 

88 
164 


864 
216 

9 

86 


627 

418 

92 
240 


418 
800 

18 
147 


109 
118 

74 
98 


68 persons were convicted and 
sentenced to imprisonment, 
and 114 fined. 



Statement showing the working of the Mdrwdr International Court of VahiU during the year 

ending Sht March 1885. 



▲exsoT. 



Western Bajpntana 
States Besidency . 



I? 






41 



u 



I' 



112 



168 



I 



107 



35 






46 



TOVAL AMOVm 
07 SBOaiBS. 



JSt. a. p. 
6»609 11 



ApPSALS to HieKBB CODBT. 



18^ 

m 
111 



ah 

m K 



1 



Statement of the number and nature of eases adjudicated by the Mdrwdr International Court of 
Vakils during the year ending 31st March 1885. 



Pbbiod. 



Quarter ending SOth 
June 1884 

Quarter endinir SOth 
September 1884 

Qnarter ending Slst 
DwMmber 1884 

Qnarter ending Slst 
liarohl885 . 



Total 



56 



I 

I. 






11 






10 



I 



10 



15 
85 
31 
26 
107 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



POLITICAL ADHINISTSATIOK OF THE EA JPTJTANA STATES FOB 188MS. 



106 



EASIEBN SAJFTJTAKA BEFOBT FOB 1884-85. 



No. i7 a., dated Jeypor, 20th April 1885. 
J^Wmmt-^. p. Stbatiof, Esq^ Bendeni, Etutern Bajputama SMeif 
Th^Tke First Asiittafii Agents Qovemor OtMral, for Bajputana» 

I have the honour to sabmit^ for the information of the Agents Oovemor-GFeneralj and 
Government, the Annual Beport of the Eastern Rajpntana States Agency for 1884-86. 

I-INTBODnGTOBY AND GENEBAL. 

STATES AND OFFICEB IN GHABGE. 

1. There has been no change of Political Officer daring the year in this darge, which 
comprises the States of Jeypur and Kishengarh, and the Chiefship of Imwo. 

jEsnnEL 

SEASON AND RAINFALL. 

2. As natoral in a territory near the water-parting of India, without any great retentive 
basin, and with sand as the prevalent soil, except to the east and south, the rainfall chdms 
the first attention. 

This, as registered at Jcgpwr, is shown in the subjoined table, compared with the average 
of previous years : — 



Month. 


FUlinUBMI. 


vtowUTMn. 




April 1884 








«•• 


•23 




May . • . 








M« 


•86A 




June n • 








1-76 


4*00^ 




July n . 
Angnst n • 








812 
S-68 


«-13H 


The iMvriest fall on any day was 
3'33 inches registered in die 24 honra 
np to 10 AM. on 1st September 


September » . 








U-78 


»78A 


October » • 








••• 


•27 




November ^ • 








•IS 


•llA 




December n • 








•01 


•87*. 




Jmuas 1885 








•52 


•26H 




February „ . 








«•• 


•22 




Hardh „ . 








•02 


•09 






TOTA] 


i» 


26-88 


2611rt 





These figures show the peculiarities of the season, viz., a monsoon, seanty in the first 
three months, and profuse in the fourth ; cold weather showers rather light and late ; and a 
total fall for the year a little over the normal average, but very abnormally distributed. 

Thus, as compared with the average of each month respectively, the fall in June was less 
than half; in July, the proper month for he^vy rain, less than a third; and in August less by a 
twelfth ; while in September it made up with a down-pour more than five times greater. 

For nine days, from SOth August to 7th September 1884, there was at the Capital, Jeypur, 
almost continuous rain ag^^gating 18*70 inches ; but in many parts, both in this territory and 
beyond it, the rain was heavier and more prolonged. 

This was the case both to the south-west in the direction of Kishengarh, and in the eastern 
and north-eastern districts of Jeypur itself. 

FLOODS. 

8. In the central parts around the Capital there was no threatening even of a Jlood; but| 
in both the directions just noticed, the latter rains, thus exceptionally heavy and prolonged. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



104 KEPOET OP THE POLITICAL ADMIKI8TBATI0N 

proved more than the loosest sofl could imbibe^ or the biggest channel cany off at once ; wide 
tracts of level oonntry became continuous sheets of water, tanks overflowed, and in sundry 
instances burst their bunds ; long stretches of road and railway embankment were swept away ; 
travelling by unbridged Toads came to a stop, and even railway communication with Bombay 
was interrupted for a couple of days. 

EHABIF GBOFS. 

4. Fortunately the Crops were less affected than might have been supposed. 

Those of the moMoon sowings had, up to August, been rather parched, so the earlier part 
of the September down-pour was to their advantage,, and though they afterwards suffered from 
its continuance, especially in low-lying lands, yet the damage was not universal, either as regards 
all localities, or every kind of produce. 

In Shekhawati, in the north of Jeypur, fairly good rain had fallen earlier; and^ in 
the deep loose sand of that region, the heaviest fall seemed all to the good. 

Although the monsoon crops, especially jawar, thus undoubtedly suffered much in many 
places, yet^ taking the whole territory and the various kinds of produce, their outturn in the 
KKarif or Autumn Harvest, if not up to the mark of a good year, scarcely sank to the level of a 
bad one. 

BABI CBOPS. 

6. As regards the Dry Season Crops, the peculiarity of the monsoon was distinctly favour- 
able^ because the heaviest rain, coming so late, provided in the porous soil of these parts 
a store of moisture which was of the utmost value for the cold-weather sowings. 

The Babi or Spring harvest has consequently been a capital one, and would have been 
exceptionally good but for the frequency of cloud during February and Mardb, when clear and 
bright sunshine best suits the ripening grain. 

GENEBAL HEALTH. 

6. As regards the General Health during the year, details are given in the separate report 
of the Medical Officer, which is noticed in a later paragraph, but some general points may be 
mentioned here. 

Few seasons, abnormal in any way meteorologically, are healthy ones, and last year was 
no exception, as fevers and small-pox were more than usually prevalent, and cholera, though 
not general throughout the Jeypur territory, and occurring only in a limited number of cases 
at the Capital, was rather severe in several villages. 

NOTICEABLE EVENTS OF YEAB. 

7. Among the Frominent incidents of the year connected with Jeypur may be noticed— 
(1) His Highness the Maharaja's visit to Agra in November 1884* to bid farewell to 

His Excellency Lord Ripon. 

(5) His visit to Calcutta in January 1885 to see His Excellency Lord Dufferin. 

(8) On both the above occasions His Highness visited Brindaban where his mother i& 
residing. 

(4) His Highnesses going to Udaypur in March 1886 on a visit of condolence 
on account of the death of the late Maharana Sujjan Sing. 

(6) At the close of the year, in view of contingencies on the Northern Frontiers, 

the Maharaja cordially placed the resources of the State at the service of 
Government in whatever way the Agent, Governor-General, might consider most 
suitable and effective, remarking that in former times, in the service of the 
Empire, his predecessors and people were no strangers in those northern regions. 
It may be remarked that the Maharaja's frequent journeys to distant places have rather 
cramped his opportunities of visiting and inspecting the districts of his own State. 

n.— THE JETPUK GOVEENMENT. 

THE COITNOIL. 

8. The constitution of the Council, in its several departments,"^ was so fully. detailed 

in the two last reports that it need 

The only temporary change has 

2, ^^^f^^^^^' been in the Kevenue Department 

owing to the illness of Thakur Sim- 

3. MUitary, FfH^%^^^i^eUa»$ouiJ)0par§meiU9. ^^lu Sing, who has required length- 

ened leave of absence, during which 

Pandit Moti Lai, one of the two Revenue Dewans, has been promoted to officiate in his pla<)e. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB BAJPUTA^A STATES FOB 1884^. 107 

The institution, mentioned in last Report, of a Petitioner's Audience Dag once a week, 
when the Maharaja in Council personally hears petitions presented in accordance with 
certain simple rules, and either then, or on the next occasion after inquiry, passes orders, 
has continued to be much appreciated, especially by all the poorer classes. 

OFFIOEBS NEXT BELOW COTJKOIL. 

9. Among the Offices next below tie Council there come, in Revenue Matters, those of the 
two Dewans, respectively of the Eastern and Western Divisions of the Jeypur territory, under 
whom the Nazims or District Officers perform their functions. 

During Pandit Moti Lai's officiating in Council, Lalji Mai, formerly Vakil at Abuj 
has been appointed to the Acting Dewanship of the Eastern Districts. 

In the Judicial Department, the stage below the Council is the Appeal Court, which has 

jurisdiction in both civil and criminal cases. 

• 1. ThakiirEaghnath8ingr,of AchroL j^ comprises three Judffes* who, as shown in 

2. Baba MaheDdar Nath Sen, .. . • i j t -vt i.i j i. £ 

8. MouWi Hyat Ali. the margin, include a Jeypur Noble, and two oi 

the more regularly educated official class, res* 
pectively a Hindu and a Musulman. 

Below this again the Department branches into the separate Civil and Criminal Courts. 
Under the third or Militarj/, 8fc., Department, the most important offices are those of 
the Bakhshis, as below : — 

Bakhshi Fauj, the present officer being Masrur Ali Khan. 
Bakhshi Kilajat — Kuar Rup Sing. 
Bakhshi Jagir — Thakur Zorawar Sing. 
These are respectively the chief officers of the troops, the forts and the Jagirdars' levies. 

BELATIONS WITH FEUDATOBIES. 

10. Relations with Feudatories. — This subject in its several aspects was noticed so fully in 
the last two Annual Reports, that it is needless to repeat particulars here, the more so as 
the good relations last reported still continue. 

During the year the accounts between the Darbar and the Raja of Khetri, which had not 
been made up for a number of years, and amounted on both sides to a high figure in 
lakhs, were worked out and balanced leaving a moderate amount due from the Raja. 

In this connection the settlement of another old afEair may be mentioned. A score 
of years ago when many Thakurs of Marwar were in outlawry, they obtained occasional 
shelter with their connections or friends in Shekhawati of Jeypur, and the latter State was there- 
upon held responsible for sundry depredations of the outlaws. Awards amounting to 
B68,42t5 were paid on this account by the Jeypur Darbar, which directed the money 
to be recovered from the Jagirdars and others in &,ult. 

This was 18 years ago, but the late Maharaja Ram Sing never enforced the recovery : 
meantime the original culprits had mostly died, their estates had in some instances been divided, 
and the present holders naturally pleaded non-liability and inability. 

Practically recoveries, after such lengthened inaction, could not have been attempted with- 
out much mischief, but, in old ways of thinkings it seemed useful to keep the demand still on 
the books, to be worked, at pleasure or opportunity, as a screw on individuals. 

Fortunately the young Maharaja took a sounder view of the matter, kinder for his feuda- 
tories, and really better for himself and his influence with them. Finding the Finance Depart- 
ment moving for the recoveries, he formally wiped out the demands^ at the same time warning 
all concerned that any such awards in future would be promptly levied from the parties 
in fault. 

EXTERNAL BELATIONS. 

11. External Relations.'^These with the British Qovemment are always cordial, and with 
other Native States amicable as usual. 

in.-JUDICUL. 

TBAINED JTJDIOIAL OFFICER. 

12. As ast report described the duties which were fully occupying the time of the trained 
Judicial Officer in Council, Pandit Maharaj Kishen, and the record of the year just ended runs 
in the same lines, they need not be detailed again. 

From a memorandum of the principal matters dealt with during the two years since his 
services were borrowed from the Punjab Oovernment, it appears that, on his arrival in April 
1883, there were 816 cases pending in the Judicial Department of the Council, while now at 
the end of March 1885, the number is 362. 

14 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



TkQS EEP0E1P Ot TM I^dLfrfCfAL ADMti^lSf ^fft)y 

With the current judicial buBmesff off the Council thus fcettei* in hattd Aow, it will be more 
possible in future for the Pandit to glvef Glome attention to revising ruled and inspecting Diiil 
trict Courts, * 

JUDICIAL STAT1STI0S--CBIMINAL ANi> CIVIL, 

IS. Judicial Statistics hsLye not hitherto been available^ but the following figures show the 
number of Criminal cases dealt with in the Principal Courts in the twelve months ending Slst 
March 1886 :— , , 

C»8ef GoMflleft 
dlfl^MMed off. pending. -^ 

rai:gdaii Adaktr. . / . 4360 285' 

Appellate Court, Criminal Side . 2»443 64* ^ 

' Council, Judioiia Department (Crimlnirt) . 2;690 206 



Regarding Civil Justice it may be noticed that the final disposal of civil [equally with 
criminal] cases when coming before the Council on appeal or otherwise^ is aided and expedited 
by the presence of a trained Judicial Ofiicer. ^ 

The following are the corresponding' statistics of civil oases : — 

Cases Cbmb left 
dlepofledot pending. 

DewaniAdalat 946 90 ^ 

Appellate Court, Civil Side 362 109 

Council, Judicial Department (Civil) 1,300 156 



HBINOirS OFPENCBS-DAKAITI. POISONINO. 

14. Heinous. Offences.T- Alihongh of course every year a large number of offences of various 
grades occur throughout the territory, yet the past year was on the whole a quiet one, both on 
the frontier and in the interior of the State, with comparatively few cases of a serious nature 

to notice. 

Thus, when the technical definition of dakaiti, as involving a gang of five or more persons, 
is adhered to, only five cases are reported under that head. Three cases of poisoning in tb^ 
districts, and as many in the city also occurred. 

Cases affecting people of other territories come before the Court of Vakils and are men- 
tioned further on. i 

SAFETY OF GOVEBiniiEKT MAILS. 

' 15. Safety of Government Mails, — No robbery of mails occurred in Jeypur [or in 
Kishengarh] during the year. There is always, however, a degree of risk, requiring the post- 
runners to be escorted, especially on some lines through Shekhawati, on which, in consequence 
of its money order and other operations, the Post Office is frequently transmitting large 
imoxmts in cash or valuables, which thus offer considerable temptation to lawless classes. 

As regards the case mentioned in last report in which a mail robbery occurred in Jeypur 
limits, and the tracks were traced to the Lohani Border, this OflSce had finally to adjudge the 
responsibility as being on Jeypur, which paid the compensation accordingly. 

BOBBEBY OF CAMEL CABT FASSENGEBS. 

16. A Camel Cart was attacked and its passengers robbed, on the Tonk road by a party, 
several of whom, including some servants of the Transit Company, were afterwards arrested 
and convicted. Part of the property was recovered, and compensation has been awarded fortb^ 

rest. • 
VILLAGE FBAYS. 

17. Of Village Frays two instances came to notice. * 

One was between the two divisions of the Feudatory Khandela Raj, about the erection of 
a building on a disputed spot, and resulted in one man being killed. As it was found impos- 
sible to fix the responsibility on either side exclusively, or on individuals, both parties were 
• heavily fined, and bound over to keep the peace. 

Another occurred between the villages of Badail and Elherla Jamaidpura, about damage 
to crops by trespassing cattle, and in it one m^ji was killed and a dozen wounded. In this too it 
was a general melee, in which particular acts could not be proved against individuals, but as 
it was established that the Radail villagers were the aggressors, 11 of them were specially 
6ued, a general fine imposed on the rest of the village, and all were bound over in heavy recog- 
nizances for future good behaviour. . . . j 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP TH8 BAJFUTAITA 6TATS8 VOK 1884*85. 109 

gmOlAh OWWENOIK, SATI, rSMALS IKrAKTICIDB. 

18. Spifiial Ofences. — No instance of Saii occurred, and no Female Infanticide was heard 
of, but in regard to the latter offence, although prohibition, ai^d punishment on detection, are 
operative in ltd repression, yet so long as the custom remains of marrying girls only into 
higher families, and of then spending &r beyond the parents' means, t.^ ., so long as the incen- 
tive is maint^ned, it cannot be trusted that the crime is altogether and permanently extinct. 

» 

JTEYPUR OITT 70LICB. 

19. In respect to the Police in its two branches, viz.j respectively for the City and the 
Districts, the CUy Police has been much more successful in keeping down thefts since the 
appointment of a new Kotwal [Oulab Khan] as mentioned in last Report. 

In illustration may be mentioned the Great Jain Fair held here in February, when many 
thousands assembled for a fortnight, during which scarcely any thefts occurred, and, it is said, 
none without discovery of the thief and recovery of the property. 

JEYFUB DISTRICT FOLIOE. 

20. The Bietrict or Oirae Police is certainly effective for all the larger work of preserving 
order, dealing with breaches of the peace, and hunting up open offenders. Its effectiveness in 
these respects arises^ in great part, from the energy and activity of the Superintendent, Kuar 
Narain Sing, on whom^ and whose subordinates a good deal of miscellaneous work in the dis- 
tricts is often thrown. 

. As he has a great deal of moving about the districts, to which movement indeed and his 
consequent knowledge of the people, much of his success is due, there is urgent need for an 
assistant to have charge of his office at head-quarters. 

. JEYPUR CBNTRAL JAIL. 

21. Jeypur Central Jail. — This, although constructed before the latest ideas on Prison 
Architecture were developed, answers its purpose very well. Its arrangements as regards 
ventilation and sanitation are horn time to time improved, and it is kept thoroughly clean by 
the Superintendent, Mr. Williams. It is regularly visited by the Residency Surgeon, and 
annually inspected by the Inspector General of Dispensaries, &c., in Rajputana. 

The chief point requiring notice is that it is generally over-full, owing to its having to 
accommodate under-trial prisoiiers as well as those already sentenced, and to the latter includ- 
ing short, as well as long-term convicts ; but the subject is under consideration. 

The health returns are noticed farther on in the Medical Section. 

RAILWAY JURISDICTION. 

22. Railway Juriediction^^^Dxirmg the- calendar year 1884, seven original cases came up 
in the Criminal- Department, tnj?.;-*- ... 

'■ Theft 2 

Abetment of theft 

Fraudulently attempting to pass counterfeit Queen's coin 

. Voluntarily* cauBin^j^ hurt • . * . .*.•.• 

Beinflf members of an unlawfol assembly ' . *. *. '. . - . 

Trespass • . - . * . ' . • . . ' . . • * • . . . • . 

Total Cases 7 

None of them were serious or involving danger to life. 

Of 15 persons tried in these cases, eight were convicted, four being sentenced to rigorous 
imprisonment, thtee to fines, arid one to whipping.' Of the defendants three were European 
British subjects, of whom two were among the fined, while one was acquitted. 

The average.duration of each trial was 2'5.3 days. No case was left undisposed of at the 
end of the year. 

Of the sentences two were appealed against, but both were sustained. 

One appeal from the decision of the 2nd Class Magistrate came before the Court, but the 
sentence, was upheld. 

No Civil cases came up in connection with Bailway limits. 

THEFTS AT BAHiWAT STATIOKS. 

28. Some thefts from houses at Bailway stations have occurred, vib., tiVo at Dhankia and 
.one at Sail Station* The thieves were not found, or the property recovered. The Bailway 

14a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



110 BEPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTEATION 

officers^ considering the tlli^ye8 to be people of the district^ wish compensation from the State, 
while the Darbar attribute the offences to men who were working under Railway people, and 
who in some instances then absconded. 

The former view requires discrimination in each instance, as the tendency under it might be 
to render the Railway police less careful, owing to all practical responsibility being thus trans- 
ferred outside their limits ; while the latter view involves corresponding scrutiny, lest outside 
thieves should come to harass the Railway stations with impunity. 

In the first of the Dhankia cases, a suspected man in custody of the Railway police com* 
mitted suicide by throwing himself under an advancing engine. 

THAGI AND DAKAITI DEPARTMENT, 

24. Tkoffi and Dakatti, — ^A report of procedure in this Department is furnished to the 
General Superintendent for each calendar year. Copy of that for 1884 is appended marked A, 

Altogether 33 persons were brought under trial, of whom 17 were convicted, 9 were 
acquitted, and two died, leaving thus 6 whose cases were not concluded at the close of the 
year, 

COURT OF VAKILS, 

{^5. International Court of FaMls, — The cases coming before this Court comprise— « 

(1) Charges against individuals in thagi, dakaiti, or other criminal cases of an inters 

jurisdictional character ; and 

(2) Claims against territories for compensation in criminal cases, in which the offenders 

have not been arrested, and the sufferers are residents of other jurisdictions. 
During 1884 the work before it has been as follows: — 

Cases from previoas year • • ^ t • « f • » • 22 

Nflw riuuM i offences against person 8 

jxew cases ^ ^ property 99 , . 107 

Total casxs t 129 
Number disposed of « » « . ^ 102 

Pending at dose of year •«•••»«* , t 27 

Number of persons arraigned, iooluding the 33 of the Thagi and Daikati Departr 

ment •,..••.••,•,, 66 

Number convicted, including the 17 of the Thagi Department • « • t 21 

^fiTgregate claims ..•••,•••#,« J?47,690 
Total decreed •«••••••*•••„ 3,747 

Fines inflicted »•.•••».•«,.,, 571 

The sentences passed on individuals^ apart from awards or fines recoverable mostly fron^ 
the territories found responsible, were— 

Imprisonment for 14 years •••••• ^ «, ^ 2 

12 „ 1 

n 10 , 4 

19 9, 7i, 7 and 6 years, one each •••••, 4 

„ 5 years •,*•».,.., 6 

T. D. prisoners , 17 

Imprisonment for 7 years « « • t • • t « « • 1 

6 ., , . . 1 

n 6 months •••••••• ^ 1 

3 .1 t . 1 

Other prisoners « 4 

Total siKTiKCxn , 21 



UNADJUSTED AWARDS OF COUBT OF VAKILS, 

26, Unadjicsted Awards, — ^When awards of the Court of Vakils are not paid in proper time 
by the responsible States^ the amounts are advanced hy the Residency Treasurer whose aoooonts 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE. EAJPI7TAKA STATES POE 1884-85. Ill 

Bhow the following: oatstandiDg amounts inclading interest, at the end of March 1885, as com- 
pared with Bl 0,795- 12-9 at the close of the previous year.— 

R a. p. 

Jeypar » t » » • » • • » ^ » , 893 9 6 

Kisbengarh , , , , 6,644 11 1 

fiikanir , , , • 417 12 8 

Took 261 11 

Dholpnr » . » 436 8 2 

Ulwar . , 6 13 8 

Kerauli • , t 360 2 

Bharatpor »...»••.»»., 69 2 10 



Total , 8,469 6 11 
Of this total B6,905-2-4 are of more than one year's standing. 

CRIMINAL CLASSES, MINAS, MOGIAS. 

27. Criminal C%im««.— When the year is described as quiet it means here that the Minag 
have been so. 

As the police becomes more efficient, especially on the frontier, raiding propensities are 
checked, and the tribe has to turn more to agriculture and service. The successful activity of 
the Thagi and Dakaiti Department during the last few years, in tracing former dakaities, and 
hunting up the members of each gang, has also aided effectively in deterring from new enter- 
prises. 

In the interior of the State, however, in certain localities where Minas abound, a good deal 
is still needed, both for the due protection of scattered hamlets and cultivators, &c., and for the 
judicious management of the tribe. 

Mere punitive measures alone, though easy to be ordered by administrative offices, and 
sounding strong, are not sufficient for good management, and indeed, if applied without the 
discrimination learnt from local experience, often do harm where good was intended. In other 
oases again the leniency springing from rigid adherence to rule irrespective of the peculiarities 
of the people to be dealt with, is equally hurtful. 

The present Superintendent of the Jeypur District Police, owing to his duties taking him 
constantly round the districts in close contact with the people, necessarily knows more of the 
Minas than any comparatively stationary officer can, and it would be well, therefore, if the 
functions of the Superintendent were somewhat expanded in connection with them. 

The Baorii, or Mogia9 as they are called, where settled outside their original home in Mar- 
war, are fortunately not nimierous in Jeypm:. They are registered in the manner desired by 
the Superintendent of operations for the control of the Mogias, and in the case of those who 
have not already the means of honest livelihood in land or service, steps are taken to provide 
them therewith, and as far as possible^ to enforce their maintaining themselves by honest 
labour. 

Some doubtless have still the original plundering proclivities of the tribe, but the majority 
of the Mogias settled here are scattered cultivators and watchmen, on whom the bold Baori of 
Marwar looks down as altogether degenerate, 

JEYPUB AND PANJAB BOBDEB« 

28. Jeypur and Panjab Frontier. — The record of the year, a tour in the Frontier Jeypur Dis. 
tricts of Torawati and Shekhawati, and communication with officials there, including some of the 
Panjab side, enable me to report that the Police and other arrangements made a couple of years 
ago on both sides are still working successfully. No serious cases, such as used to be frequent^ 
have occurred, and the frontier has in fact been at rest. 

Some points for improvement of course remain in the watch and control of the lawless 
classes and the working of the tracking rules ; but with the better feeling now prevalent on the 
part of the principal District Officers on both sides of the border, these improvements should bo 
gradually worked out, 

CAPTITBE OF NOTED OUTLAW, 

29. Capture of a noted outlaw, — Lai Sing, a Thakur, who had committed many plundering 
offences in Jeypur, and was an escaped prisoner from the Hissar Jail in the Panjab, was captured 
last year after some fighting. 

Jaswant Sing, Assistant Superintendent of the Jeypur Oend or District Police, was on a 
round of inspection with a sowar, when he reached a village, some huts of which were in a blaze. 
Learning that Lai Sing and his brother Moti Sing had just left, after setting them on fire, Jas- 
want Sing gave chase, and presently came up with the outlaws. Shots were exchanged, but 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



•112 BJBPOBT 07 THS TQLmCAJj ADMIKX8TEATI0N 

. Jeswant SijQg'is weapon was the better j and so perhaps was his aim^ as the result waa that, aft(9r 
some skirmishing, both outlaws were hit, Moti Sing mortally so, while Lai Sing was secure^ 
He was brought into Jeypur, where after treatment he was tried and convicted on several charges^ 
being then, however, at the request of the Deputy Commissioner of Gurgaon sent there for 
trial on a charge of dakaiti committed in that district. 

EXTRADITION. 

SO. Extradition of offenders between British and Jeypur territories is conducted satia> 
factorily under the Treaty on the subject. 

With the Panjab States of Patiala, Jhind, Nabha and Loharu agreements for the same 
object have now been working for some years. 

Similar agreements with Bhartpur and Kerowli have been in force for the last year, 
though not much acted on as yet. 

IV.-LAND, FINANCE, AND COMMEBCE, ftc 

LAND BEVENUE SETTLEHENT. 

31. A few years ago a survey was ma4e of the khalsa lands, and particulars of them were 
' recorded, since which time further material also has been collected preparatory to making a 

settlement of the Land Revenue for 10 or 15 years. 

Although^ on the lines hitherto kept in view, viz.^ chiefly regarding average yield and 
present capabilities, such a settlement will be somewhat of a summary nature, i.tf., without the 
elaborate precision of a minutely scientific survey and assessment, yet there can be no doubt 
that, even by the simpler arrangement, much good may be done both to the cultivators and 
to the State. 

The former would be relieved of the recurring yearly trouble, delay, and loss in getting 
the State deinand or share settled, and the latter would reap the benefit of the larger amounts 
' for which the zamindars would almost certainly contract, if assured of continued possession for 
10 or 15 years without interference or alteration of demand. 

REVENUE AND EXPENDITUBE. 

32. In Jeypur the financial year ends in the middle of Bhadon month, ix.^ August-Sep- 
tember, not till which time are the collections from the rabi harvest, and the making up of 
the year's accounts, complete. The Revenue and Expenditure of 1884-85, therefore, cannot yet 
be stated, but the revenue is expected to be above the average, while the expenditure also can- 
not be small, as there has been speeial outlay on certain public works, and the Maharaja has 
had to make several journies, as e.ff. to Agra, Calcutta, and Udaypur, &c. 

The actual figures for the Sambat year 1940 or 1883-84, t.^., up to 22nd August 1884, 
•are stated as follow : — 

Revenue 62,27,868 

Expenditure 48,07,441 

Surplus 4,20,427 



CUSTOMS DUTIES. 

33. The Customs duties yielded £17,39^602 in place of B7,0S,51& realised in the previous 
,year. As this rise of £136,086 was notwithstanding the remission of all transit duties^ except 

on opium and intoxicants in April 1884, i,e., during the latter half of the Jeypur financial year, 
which. remission reduced the transit duty income by some E83,000, the improvement, which 
was mostly in Export Customs, shows a healthy condition of trade, especially in Jeypur produce* 

SALT COMPENSATION. 

34. The Salt Agreements with Government have been working as hitherto satisfactorily. 
An error in the apportionment of compensation for closure of salt works was rectified last 

year. In Article VII of the Salt Agreement of 1879 fi3,000 annually were assigned to the 
Thakur of Kachor. But it was found that several of the works entered originally by our Salt 
Officers in his name really belonged to others, so that the proper distribution of the amount is 
now BI,854 to the Kachor Thakur, B1,000 to the Thakur of Khur, and B146 to the Bhumias 
of Belanta. 

SALT BOYALTY. 

35. An amicable agreement was arrived at between Jodhpur and Jeypur for sharing the 
'Royalty on extra manufacture of salt by Government at the Sambhar Lake. Hitherto our Salt 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



dip TSE BAJPIFTAKA STATES FOE 1884-86. llSf 

Departiiiieii^ had felt rather hampered by the arrangement under the Treaties of 1869 and 1870/ 
by which thfe Royalty had to be paid according to the locality of manufacture, so that in. order' 
to give each a reasonable advantage in the extra operations^ it had to scatter the manufacturei^ 
irrespective of where the best facilities for it might exist. 

. To remedy this and to prevent either State losing a suitable share of the advantage, should 
ihe Salt DepartTient concentrate its operations more in one division of the Lake than another,^ 
1^ was mutually agreed that wherever the exces^ is manufactured, the total Royalty should in" 
future be divided in the proportion of five-eighths to Jodhpur and three-eighths to Jeypur. 



QABNET AND OTHEB MINES. 



.4 



86. Last report mentioned the garnet industry at Jeypur and the intention to have the 
mines in this State examined, instead of trusting mostly to garnets brought from other terri- 
tories to be cut and disposed* of here. 

1^ This has now been done. Mr. Tellery, the Engineer in charge of the Gas works^ who 
had of late years developed the trade from a few thousand rupees annually to over half a lakh, 
was sent out to examine certain mines, which, through asserted boundary disputes with Jagir- 
dars, had been left untouched, except by stealth, for a loog period. 

After their clearance from rubbish and water, a formation was reached yielding garnets 
of such quality and quantity as to make the mining amply remunerative. 

Besides garnets [yielding, when cut in a certain form, the carbuncle] there are found in 
the State various other minerals of value^ such as beryl, including aqua marine, rock crystal, 
and talc, &c., &c. 

The localities of these latter are also being examined, and the Darbar has decided to have 
the garnet mines, and any others which may prove remunerative, 'worked under Mr. Tellery's 
supjervisioD. 

Developing these mineral resources not only does good to the State revenue, but supports 
. several hu^?dred lapidaries at the capital in cutting the stones before export. 

MINES AT EHETBI, Ac. 

87. During my tour in Shekhawati, I had an opportunity of seeing several of the old 
mines at Khetri apd ebewhere, which yield or used, to yield copper and cobalt ore, and mate- 
rial from which sulphates of copper, iron and alum are produced. 

Of late years working had almost ceased, owing it was said mainly to untractable inbursts 
or accumulations o£ water as well as rubbish. The mines are partly in the hills and partly in 
the plains. As regards the former, the diflSculty of removing the water had apparently been 
exaggerated, as it seemed that adits driven at a proper level would &cilitate the removal both 
of water and rubbish; 

Ofily one small copper-smelting furnace was working when I v^as there, but, froth the 
9timulas given by examining the mines and such advice for simple mining improvements as 
eould be suggested during a brief visit, two other furnaces have since been started again. 

Although from the economy of modern scientific manufacture on a large scale in Europe 
ahd elsewhere, little profit can be had from the sulphates, yet copper will always command its 
price, and the cobalt ore, as much as can be obtained, is highly valuable, and there seems na 
doubt that by simple measures within even the present means of the Raja of Khetri, e>., with- 
out, expensive European staff and machinery for survey or working, the condition of the mines 
can be ascertained, and probably the production of copper and cobalt largely and profitably 
increased. 

When the mines have been opened out better and cleai'ed as muc^ as can be done by local 
means at small cost, and even with this recouped more or less by the material obtained, there 
wiU then be better ground for judging how far expensive surveys and explorations are .needed 
and justified ; and by that time also the Khetri Chiefship may be free of debt, and able to lay 
out money more largely if it can be done with advantage. 

The minerals already named are not the only ones found in the Khetri estate.. In 
^e village of Fiprona, at one place on the hill side, the gravel mixed with the soil consists of 
garnets; and elsewhere in the territory fragments of rock containing^ metallic gold have beeUj 
^ound.- , 

, Indeed, the whole of the Khetri tract, some 20 miles by 10, is most interesting mineralon 
Really, and well woirth proper examination wherever this can be arranged for. 

HYDBAULIC COTTON PBESS. 

I 38. The^ intention- mentioned last year of encouraging the Cotton Trade here by estab- 
lishing a Steam Hydraulic Press has been proceeded with. The engine and one press are 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



114 EBPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

now almost ready, and a second press to be worked by the same engine, is being set up. The 
whole, with the necessary builings, &c., will soon be completed in readiness for the next 
cotton season. 

TBAINma OP YOUTHS FOB CIVIL DISTBIOT DUTIES. 
89, A proposition for the deputation to the Pan jab of s. iew educcUed youtAs horn tiie 
Native States to be praetically trained in every detail of DistAct work from the duties of a 
Patwari and Elanungo upwards, has been communicated to the Maharaja, and there is no doubt 
that permission to send some Jeypur youths for the shove purpose would be a great boon, of 
which His Highness will gladly avail himself, 

V.-PUBLIC W0EK8, COMMUNICATIONS, POEEST, &c. 

PUBLIC WOBKS EXPENDITUBE. 

40. Regarding Publie Worts, Colonel Jacobs the State Engineer, submits his detailed 
report separately, and hence a comparatively brief notice will here suflBce. 

As the accounts from all the outlying works up to the end of March cannot be made up 
by the time the Agency Report is called for, I therefore give Colonel Jacob's figures of the 
Expenditure for the calendar year 1884 :— ^ 

a a. p, > Ma. p, 

cOri^nal , 92,064 15 6 

BaildingB . ^ ^Repairs ,...,.. 81,661 7 I 

1,«3,726 6 6 

. . r Original ....... 16.237 12 6 

Commumoationfl .[Repairs 52.954 9 8 

i 69,192 6 2 

Irrigation . 3,11,440 9 

Miscellaneons public improvements 63,964 12 2 

City water works 82,469 8 11 

Gasworks 47,629 9 6 

Cotton Press 1,03,816 4 9 

Imarat works 68,403 1 4 

Establishment 31,119 10 6 

Works for other States, &o 21,486 12 8 



Total . 9,23.248 8 7 



BUILDINGS-ALBEBT HALL-OOTTON FBESS. 

41. Among Buildings in progress^ the Albert Hall in the public gardens holds the first 
place. The roofing has been completed, and the removal of scafEolding, &c., now enables much 
of the beautiful carved marble. work in the interior to be seen. During the current year it is 
hoped that some of the rooms may be ready to receive part of the Museum collections. 

As mentioned in my Report for 1882-83, Colonel Jacob is, in this structure, doing much 
more than merely building a handsome hall— he is training a number of workmen in architec- 
tural art. 

Of structures of a more strictly utilitarian character, those erected for the Cotton Press 
occupy a convenient position near the Railway station. 

COMMXnnCATIONS-JETPnB AND SIWAE MADHOFITB ROUTE FOB 

BAILWAY. 

42. Under the head of Communication, the most important matter engaging attention has 
been that of connecting the south-eastern districts of the territory, in the direction of 
Siwae Madhopur, with the Capital and the Rajputana Railway at the Jeypur Station. 

Along the Jeypur and Tonk metalled road up to Newae, which is 42 miles south of Jey- 
pur and near the Tonk fiorder, the country is open and well known^ but south-east of this, to 
Siwae Madhopur, it had to be freshly examined and surveyed. 

Passing beyond Newae and near Isarda and Sopura, a capital rock crossing for a bridge 
over the Banas River, where it is comparatively narrow^ was found, and after this an easy line 
by Chaut-ka-Barwara to Siwae Madhopur^ 4Z miles from Newae, or 84 from Jeypur ; and 
thus &r a survey has been miade. 

Some i^2 miles farther is the Chambal River on the frontier of the grain-producing terri- 
tory of Kotah, to which frontier, after some farther examination of the country to ascertain 
tho best course, the survey can be extended. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE EAJPUTANA STATES FOR 1884.86. 115 

After full consideration of the existing roads and tracks in relation to traffic, and the 
capabilities of road carriage for cheap and heavy produce over long distances, it does not seem 
worth while to make a mere road, whether metalled or not, between Newae and Siwae Madho- 
pur, or the frontier beyond, but the question is altogether different when a Railway from the 
Capital of Jeypur to its south-eastern districts by that route is held in view. 

A line from the Capital via Newae to Siwae Madhopur and the Kotah Frontier, would 
traverse some of the best districts of Jeypur at right angles to the Rajputana Railway. It 
would serve Tonk traffic, and also skirt the Bundi State. It would have, for carriage, Sambhar 
salt close to the Jeypur terminus, and Kotah grain at the other, besides being at this point 
close to Gwalior territory whence even now a good deal of oil-seed comes through the Jeypur 
State to the rail at Dansa. 

A narrow-gauge line, with these advantages, and constructed on the economical principles 
of the Jodhpur Railway, should have good prospects of proving remunerative, and of being a 
valuable feeder to the Rajputana Railway. 

^Joining the latter thus at the Capital, Jeypur, it would face an open country to the north 
for easy direct extension into the Shekhawati portion of Jeypur, whenever desired, which 
facility of considerable further development it could not have if it were to join the Rajputana 
line further east, e.p., at Dansa, as in that direction the country to the north is comparatively 
hilly and difficult, and foreign territory is soon reached. In times of famine the value of a north 
and south line carrying Kotah and other grain through the heart of Jeypur and Shekhawati 
could not well be over-estimated. 

The matter has reached this stage, viz., it has been found that an easy line can be economi- 
cally made, with every prospect of greatly benefiting the territory at all times, but especially 
during periods of famine, and of proving a valuable feeder to the Rajputana Railway, as well as 
of paying a fair or perhaps even a high rate of interest on economical construction. It is now 
under consideration of the Darbar. 

HINDAUN AND KEBAULI HOAD. 

48. The Kerauli State, situated between the Rajputana and the Gwalior Railways, has 
hitherto been cut off from both by want of roads. The nearest point to Kerauli on any exist- 
ing metalled highway is Hindaun in Jeypur, from which the route leads north to the Manda- 
war or Hindaun road station of the Rajputana line. 

As Kerauli wished a road to open up its Capital to that point, Jeypur has readily co-operat- 
ed by sanctioning [in March 1885} R28,000 for that portion of the Hwdaun-Kerauli Road 
which will be in this territory. • 

IRRIGATION. 

44. Irrigation in Jeypur, as remarked in previous reports, is both popular and profitable. 
Seeing the urgent need of it in the sandy soil, tho great advantages already reaped from 

storage reservoirs and canals, and the various localities favourable for operations still inviting en- 
terprise, one cannot but hope that this branch of public works, which has been so successfully 
prosecuted by Colonel S. S. Jacob, the State Engineer, may go on extending and prospering, 
till every part of the territory where irrigation works are possible shall be enriched as many 
tracts have already been. 

The two largest works now in progress are the Tori Sagar in the south-west and the Buch- 
ara Sagar in the north-east of the State. Both will be noble lakes. The bund of the former is 
expected to be closed immediately so as to retain the waters of the coming monsoon [of 1885], 
while that of the latter is partially built up to retain some SO feet of water this year, and will 
be completed before the monsoon of 1886. 

CITY WATER WORKS. 

45. The City Water Worhy drawing their supply from the Amani Shah stream, have, 
since their construction, had such an ever-growing drain on them, that during the last two or 
three years in the hot weather when the demand is greatest and the water in the channel lowest, 
the supply has been critically near running short, even though husbanded to the extent of clos- 
ing the city pipes for some portion of every twenty-four hours. 

As other expedients for increasing the supply had proved insufficient, it was last year 
resolved to construct a bund across the channel a little above the pumping station, so as to check 
and store the monsoon discharge, with an outlet near it for the escape of any excess in the rains, 
and to control by sluices, opening into pipes, carried through a tunnel, any flow from the reser- 
voir found desirable at other times. 

The bund will contain seventy- two lakhs of cubic feet of earthwork, and as this amount is 
required within a comparatively limited space, it might have been difficult to get it all done in 

15 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



116 REPORT 01* THE FOLniCAL ADMINISTBA.TION 

a single dry season, but for Colonel Jacob's use of* tramways and hand wagons, in place of 
ordinary cooly labour with baskets. The progress thus made, however, by the end of March 
shows it can easily be completed before the rains of June or July. 

The effect, so far produced, in checking the waste of the scanty dry season flow, has already 
removed the fear of water scarcity in the city during the oncoming hot weather [of 1886], 
and thus gives good ground for hope that, when the reservoir stores every year what now runs 
oft in the monsoon, the full object of the water works will be attained, and an abundant supply 
for the city ensured at all times. 

It is satisfactory also to find that though the dry season flow has now been stored to a 
depth of some ten feet at the end of March, there seems no appreciable loss in the sandy channel 
two or three miles farther down where small irrigation bunds have [this year lb85J supplied 
water to the spring crops as usuaL 

aAS WORKS. 

46. Regarding the Gan Works, in which Mr. Tellery has introduced many improvements 
tending to simplicity and economy, the principal point of interest is, that, on the application of 
the Railway authorities, the station at Jeypnr has now been lighted by gas to the manifest con- 
venience of the public and the Railway employes. 

RAILWAY FSNCINa. 

47. Of the whole length of the Rajputana-Malwa Railway in Jeypur [and Kishengarh] 
territory, a considerable portion is still uufencedy and instances of cattle being run over are fre- 
quent, generally without damage to the rolling stock and line, but not always, as in one case, 
in which a buffalo was said to have charged a train, the engine and some vehicles were derailed, 
and landed upside down at the foot of a low embankment. . 

The only effective precaution can be complete fencing, as although orders are issued to 
villagers to keep their cattle away from the line, it is impossible to watch each straying animal, 
and many cattle are owned by Railway subordinates, who naturally graze them near the locality 
of their employment. 

TEIiEQRAPH EXTENSION. 

48. In connection with our main lines of Telegraph, there seems to be an opening for econo- 
mically constructed lines of wire to some of the large towns of Shekhawati, where are the 
homes of many rich Seths and merchants who have business-houses in Calcutta, Bombay, and 
other great centres of commerce. 

POST OFFICE. 

49. Turning to the Imperial Post Office nothing new has to be noted except the proposed 
establishment of a short connecting line from Mandawa to Jhunjhun in Shekhawati for the 
runners on which the Darbar has agreed to provide the usual escort. 

As already mentioned, there has been no mail robbery this year in Jeypur (or in Kishengarh). 

FOREST CONSEBVANCY. 

50. Towards Forest Conservancy a start at least has now been made. Four well-educated 
youths from the Jeypur College were sent in October (1884) to the Dehra Dun Forest School, 
where they are to go through a regular training in practical forestry for two or three years. 

The Darbar has also agreed to employ for three years a Trained Forest Ranger, and to ask 
Government for a superior Forest OflScer forone season to inspect localities and draw up a suit- 
able scheme, which the Ranger can then put in operation, and which will be eventually carried 
on by the Jeypur youths from the forest school. 

Considering the arid and bare character of this part of the country, and the great number 
of trees which are annually cut for fuel, carpentry, and buildings, or which dry of themselves, 
the results of which are seen in the increasing scarcity and dearness of wood of all kinds, the 
urgent importance of a system of planting and preserving trees can scarcely be over-orated. 

JEYFIJB STUDENTS FOB BXJBEII COLLEGE. 

51. ft the importance of public works, especially irrigational, in Jeypur be considered, it 
seems very advisable that, as has been done for the forest branch, so for the Engineering 
Department also some well educated Jeypur youths should be sent, at the cost of the Darbar, to 
ike Rurki College^ there to qualify in engineering. Their deputation would be considered as 
scholarships gained by merit and proficiency in general learning here, and their subsequent 
employment by the Jeypur State would be a welcome reward for qualifying efficiently at 
Rurki. 

As compared with having to call in outsiders, there are obvious advantages in employing 
the natives of a State in the various, branches of its service, provided they are properly qualified. 



Digitized by 



Googl( 



OF THE RAJPTJTANA STATES FOR 188485. 117 

The subject has been brought to the notice of the Maharaja, and measures will doubtless 
be taken as soon as convenient for Jeypur to send suitable youths, and for Burki to admit them, 

NEED OF ETTBOFEAir ASSISTANT ENGINEER. 

52. In view of the magnitude and variety of public works in this State, another point 
merits notice, as mentioned indeed, in my report two years ago, viz., the need of a European 
Assistant Engineer. 

Colonel Jacob, by his organising power, and his careful training and supervision of subor- 
dinates, is able to get inexpensively done by native subordinates an extraordinary amount of 
important work, such as in British territory would employ a costly European staff. 

So long as the single oflBcer has health and strength and is present, all goes well, notwith- 
standing the permanent heavy strain ; but need of change or leave must come some time, and 
it would then be difficult for a stranger to take up at once and guide the threads of sq extensive 
and diversified a chaise. 

In the interests of the State itself, as concerned in public works of such magnitude and 
variety, and in justice to the officer who has so successfully conducted them single-handed, a 
European Assistant Engineer is really called for, 

VL-VITAL STATISTICS AND MEDICAL AND METEOEOLOGICAL 

INSTITUTIONS. 

BIBTHS AND DEATHS AT CAPITAL. 

63. As the Residency Surgeon submits separately a detailed report, merely a few leading 
points need here be given. 

The births and deaths at the Capital, where alone registration is in force, were as follow, 
the population being a little over U lakh. 

Biitbs. DeatliB. 

In 1884 ^^ fi'626 

Average births of 4 previous years 8,283 

Average deaths of last 10 years 6,296 

The increase being so considerable, in the figures both of births and deaths, suggests that 
some part of the difference, especially in regard to the former, may be due to registration being 
now more complete than formerly. 

But the death-roll of 2,487 from f^ver, 484 from small-pox, 52 from cholera, and 518 from 
diarrhcea, besides 2,085 from other diseases, shows that the year, which was meteorologically 
irregular, was also an unhealthy one. 

CITY CONSERVANCY. 

54. In the direction of City Conservancy, a little lias been done in the way of experimental 
latrines, which, if found satisfactory, can be increased in number. The physical circumstances 
of sandy soil, level ground, and scanty water, point to a dry system of conservancy, and this is 
so far favoured by the fact that night-soil from the city is already largely used as manure by 
the cultivators in the neighbourhood. 

MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS-OPPICEBS IN CHARGE-TOTAL TREATED. 

65. The Medical Institutions of the State are in charge of the Residency Surgeon, in which 
post Dr. Owen officiated up to 26th August 1884, followed by Dr. Martin for a short time 
after which Dr. T. H. Hendley, returning from furlough, resumed charge of his duties on 26th 

October. 

The total patients treated at the several hospitals and dispensaries in 1884 were 82,841 
out-patients, and 1,950 in-patients, or in all 84,791, this being an increase of 9,078 over the 
previous year. 

CHOLERA. 

56. Prom Cholera 858 deaths are recorded in the medical returns, viz.^ 52 at the Capital, 
of which 88 were in the city and 14 in the jail, ranging from July to September, and 306 in 
the districts, of which 6 were at Bandikoi to the east of the Capital, and 800 in the districts to 
the south-east, occurring from May to August. 

At Bandikoi the first case occurred on 23rd May [1884] in the person of a traveller 
from Mathura, where the disease was prevalent. This traveller fell ill in the traiu and on arrival 
at Bandikoi Station died on the platform, from which his body was taken to the Raj Bazar 
outside the station, preliminary to cremation. Two other passengers from Mathura, apparently 

15 A 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



118 REPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATIOy 

companionfl of the firsts also went to the bazar, where speedily they showed signs of the disease 
and succumbed, after which three people of the place, near where the sick travellers had been 
sheltered, were attacked and died. 

The Railway has, on the border of the Bandikoi Station, a couple of hospital sheds for 
cases in which isolation is advisable, and the Darbar has decided on the establishment of a dis- 
pensary in Madhoganj, the Raj Bazar, situated a little way from the station. 

In any case, however, the taking cholera patients from the Railway station to an adjoin- 
ing bazar or village appears most inadvisable. 

To the other parts of the territory the disease appeared to have come from Kerauli farther 



JAU. HEALTH. 

67. The figures for the /ai7, taken from the Medical Report, are, average of daily strength, 
exclusive of lunatics, children, &c., 814, of sick 65*56, and number of deaths 60, Of the lat- 
ter 14 were from cholera, and of the remaining 46, a number were due to serious illness con- 
tracted before admission to jail, which cases, therefore, do not strictly belong to jail mortality 
as their first admission was rather to the jail hospital, than to the jail itself. 

The prisoners do a good deal of outdoor labour, which certainly agrees with the majority, 
and probably aids in keeping them healthy and strong even though at times rather crowded in 
the jail wards. 

Indoor work of various kinds employed an average of 288 and yielded a profit of fil,68S. 

VACCINATION, 

68. Faeeinations during 1884 numbered 53,178, which is a great increase over previous 
years. Of those cases which could subsequently be examined by the Superintendent, 92'23 per 
cent, were found successful. 

COST OP MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS AND VACCINATION. 

59. The cost of tie Medical lustitufions and Faccination [apart from that of buildings] was 
B27,03S ; besides this the Medical Officer's allowance, the pay of the Native Assistant Surgeon, 
and the cost of Ofiice and contingencies, amount to R] 5,144, but the first of these items 
includes fi600 on account of the Meteorological Observatory. 

METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATORY. 

60. Regarding iAi^ Meteorological Observatory, which is one of the most complete in India, 
and furnishes a daily teleg^m to the Meteorological Reporter to Government, there is nothing 
new to record. The cost to the Darbar in 1884 was R2,564 including fi600 for superin- 
tendence. The numerous and elaborate instruments were maintained in good order, llie 
institution is under the charge of the Residency Surgeon. 

VII-EDUCATION, SCIENCE, AET, AND AECHJEOLOGT. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS AT CAPITAL. 

61. Details of the Jeypur Educational Institutions at the Capital for the year 1884-85 
[April — March] are given in the Appendices B and C, and hence a brief r^ume will suffice 
here. 

The Maharaja's College at Jeypur had 1,012 students on its rolls and an average daily 
attendance of 659 as compared with the figures of the previous year, 979 and 683. 

In the English Department the enrolled and average numbers were, respectively, 890 and 
814; in the Hindi and English Division 212 and 145, and in the Urdu and Persian Section 
849 and 200. 

Formerly the time for the Entrance and Fmt Arts Exnminaiione of the Calcutta University 
was in the beginning of December, but last year [1884J it was postponed until the middle of 
April 1885. As this report is being written before these examinations have been held, the 
result must come within next year's report. 

Of the students who had been unsuccessful in the First Arts Examination of the previous 
year in December 1883, six were re- admitted to examination in May 1884, and of these three 
passed, making, with the three originally successful, altogether six for 1883-84. 

Four students were sent up for the Munshi Examination [Persian] of the Panjab Univer- 
sity and one of them passed. 

The College stafE consists of 15 teachers for English, 13 Moulvis for Persian and Urdu, 
and 5 Pandits for Hindi. The expenditure, including prizes and scholarships, &c., was 
B24,132. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE EAJPUTANA STATES FOB 1884-85. 119 

Among the oiier inititutions at the Capital, the NobUif seAool reckoned S3 on the rolls, 
with an average attendance of 14, at a cost of B4,SS9. 

The 8an9crit College rolls showed 217 and an attendance of 155, the cost being B7S16. 

The Chandpole Branch School, 61 on the rolls, and average of 48, at a cost of K289. 

There are 9 Girl^ Schools in the Capital and suburbs, having 60S on the rolls, an average 
attendance of 529, and costing fi6,413. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS IN DISTRICTS 

62. In the DistrieU there are 44 Siate ScAooh'^ith 1,007 scholars, four-fifths of whom 
are Hindus, and one-fifth Musalmans. 

Besides these there are 4S2 Indigenous Elementary Schools with some 8,500 scholars. Of 
these little institutions three-fourths afford instruction in Hindi, and one-fourth in Urdu, 

MAYO COLLEGE. 

6S. At the Mayo College for Chiefs and Nobles at Ajmer, there were 10 Jeypur students at 
the close of the year in March 1 886. 

EXAMINATION AT HEAD-QUABTEBS. 

64. An miproved system of examination of the higher classes in the Maharaja*s College ws^s 
under consideration, but the difficulties and drawbacks in getting Examiners &om ia distance 
led to the attempt in that direction being given up. At present the Calcutta University 
Examinations and their results afford the chief stimulus and test both for teachers and taught 
in the higher classes. 

INSPECTION IN DISTBICTS. 

65. The District Schools of the State are, however, undoubtedly in need of stricter and more 
effective inspection than now exists, as also of greater uniformity in text booksj and better faci-- 
lities for their supply. 

SCHOOL OF ABT. 

66. At the School of Arts the number on the Rolls was 84, and the average attendance 78. 
The expenditure was B2S,119, but of this S1S,037 were recovered by sales. 

Much care is constantly needed to guard against Europeanising the orientisd designs, to 
preserve and develop which is so desirable in' an Indian School of Art. 

The plan of placing the school under a' Committee like that for the Museum, and with the 
Principal for its Executive Member, has not yet been carried out^ but there is much need for 
some arrangement of the sort. 

MUSEUM. 

67. In the Museum great improvements have been made in the arrangement and display 
of the numerous objects of interest, in which rather arduous work Mr. Tellery, one of the mem- 
bers of the Committee, gave the most effective aid. 

It is hoped that during the oncoming year some part of the Museum collections may be 
accommodated in the Albert Hall as it approaches completion. 

ILLUSTBATED *' MBMOBIALS OF JETPUB EXHIBITION." 

68. Four large and handsome volumes of illustrated *^ Memorials of the Jeypur Exhtbi- 
iion'* by Dr. T. H. Hendley, Residency Surgeon and Honorary Secretary to the late Exhibi- 
tion, have been published at the cost of His Highness the Maharaja, who, besides presenting 
a copy each to Her Majesty the Queen-Empress, His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, and 
Her Majesty's Secretary of State for India, has liberally placed, at the disposal of the Govern- 
ment of India, twenty copies for distribution to Public Institutions in India, firitain, the 
Colonies, and Foreign countries. 

He has also had the pleasure of personally presenting copies to Their Excellencies the late 
and the present Viceroy. 

The work, which is in four volumes Imperial Quarto, comprises 849 permanent photographs^ 
42 colored illustrations, and 120 pages of letter press, with specially designed oriental borders 
and initial letters, &c. 

While constituting a permanent record of the Jeypur Exhibition of I8HS, the beauty and 
value of the publication testify at the same time to the munificence of His Highness the 
Maharaja of Jeypur, the high character of Indian Art, and the care and labour of Dr. Hendley. 

AROHJBOLOGY. 

69. In respect to Archaology^ mention was made last year of the orders issued to prepare 
lists of all ancient remains in the territory^ but there is nothing fresh to report on this occasion. 



Digjtized by 



GoogI( 



120 REPOKT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTEATION 

VIIL-MISGELLAN£On& 

MILITARY, 

70. The Military Department presents nothing new to record. The troops, besides con* 
stituting a reserve for the maintenance of order, when threatened on any important scale by 
turbulent classes or feudatories, perform also most of the functions of police, as regards holding 
posts, and furnishing guards and escorts, &c. 

Among the men employed or available, there is abundance of excellent material, but train- 
ing is quite defective, and the worn-out condition of the old smooth-bore muskets has been 
noticed in former reports. 

BOUNDARY GASES. 

71. The most important Boundary case dealt with during the year was the demarcation of 
the Shamilat area at Sambhar, which is jointly held by Jeypur and Jodhpur and had to be marked 
off on either hand from the limits respectively of Jeypur and Jodhpur Proper. This was done 
by Lieutenant-Colonel E, Temple, who was specially deputed for the purpose. As regards the 
land portion of the boundary, matters were amicably arranged by both parties, but Jeypur has 
some objections to the boundary indicated across the lake. 

A few other disputed boundaries with adjoining States still remain for settlement. 

SURVEY. 

72. The revised Surrey of the Capital and environs of Jeypur has been actively prosecuted 
and is now just completed, so that possibly the sheets may be published next autumn [1885] . 

ENSILAGE. 

73. Some experiments in Ensilage have been made, but the pits have not been opened 
when this report is being written, and it is feared tlie fodder was put in when rather too far 
advanced and dry. The result of the present trials when learnt will, however, be a guide for 
future operations. 

JAIN FAIR. 

74. A great Jain Mela or religious fair was held at Jeypur for a fortnight in February 

March 1885 for the first time since 1864, when one was held at the old Capital Amber. 

Great numbers of Jains, mostly of the Saraogi sect, but including also numerous Oswals 
came from neighbouring territories and from the Jeypur districts, probably aggregating fifty 
thousand, though popular estimate put the total much higher. 

There were in all 11 raths or carriages for the conveyance in procession of their representa- 
tion of the deity or of saints, of which four were brought from other territories, viz,, two from 
Touk, one from Alwar, and one from Ajmer, while the other seven belonged to Jeypur. 

Immense pavilions were raised, forming temples at one end, while the greater part of the 
covered area was for the nightly congregation of thousands to hear the Jain religious books 
read. There was also a great pavilion for friendly discussion on religious subjects. 

By day crowds of respectable men, Women, and children streamed in all directions to see the 
sight o£ Jeypur and its environs, with the utmost order and good humour prevailing. 

Everything passed off satisfactorily. No sickness broke out, and scarcely a theft occurred 
the few articles taken in one or two instances being fortunately recovered, and the culprits 
secured at once-* thanks to the effective arrangements of the police. 

TOUR. 

75. In this charge with head-quarters at the Capital of the principal State, and a railway 
to the Capital of the other [Kishengarh], tours are somewhat differently circumstanced from 
the position occupied in charges without such rail«ray facilities and comprising a number of 
States, the Chiefs of which cannot, therefore, be visited, or their administration seen, without 
extensive touring. 

Last year a good deal of movement was required to long distances, as the Resident had 
to proceed to the Rajputana Agency Head-quarters in connection with salt negotiations, and 
to Agra and Calcutta with the Maharaja on his visits, respectively to Lord Ripon and Lord 
Dufferin. 

Within these territories the Resident visited Kishengarh in the south-west of the char^ 
giving it six days ; Sambhar to the west, one day ; Bandikoi, Mandawar, and Mowa in the 
east and north-east, altogether 4 days; Torawati and Shekhawati to the north and north-west 
23 days, visiting Samod, Ajitgarh, Buchara, Nim-ka-Thana, Khetri, Singhana, Gudha, Ude- 
pura, Raghonathgarh, Sikar, Rewasa, Chaumu, and other less important places giving each 
a day or more. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE BAJPUTANA STATES FOR 1884-65. * 121 

Altogether the distaDoes travelled aggregated 4,212 miles, viz., 3,842 by mil and 870 
by ordinary marches, and involving an absence of 99 days, i. e., above three months, from head 
quarters of Jeypur. 

During the tour opportunity was taken of visiting the Buchara Lake works ; the curious 
and abundant warm spring half-way up the hill side at the western opening of the Ganesir 
valley, which latter was a perfect oasis of spring crop verdure in the midst of hills ; a pro- 
mising site for the bund of a new lake a little east of Paprona ; the old copper and cobalt 
mines near Khetri and Babai ; the point at Jodhpur-Sonari where tradition says there was 
formerly a weir on the Kantti River for the irrigation of Shekhawati before that province had 
even acquired its present name; the long disused and sunken mines on the hill side near 
Uilepura ; and various other points of importance and interest. 

DEATH OF BAWAI. BUEY SING. 

76, Raiioal Bijet/ Sing of Samod^ an old and trusted Noble of the Jeypur State, who held 
the post of guardian of the present Maharaja during his minority, died on the night of 17 th 
December 1884 without male issue. A question which arose as to the youth to be adopted is 
now before the Darbar for settlement. 

DEATH OF EUAH FBITHI SING. 

77. It is only right to notice the death of Kuar Priihi Sing, eldest son of the Thakur of 
Bagru, a leading Jeypur Noble. He was one of the earliest and most distinguished students 
at the Mayo College at Ajmer, where he acquired and assimilated much of a liberal education 
both Indian and English. 

A young Thakur of high position and prospects, he was yet ready to apply himself to 
any duty, and though he had still to acquire experience, his natural intelligence and honorable 
disposition, together with his education and application, made him really an excellent officer for 
any business euti*usted to him. 

In view to his acquiring experience for higher employment, he was for a time appointed 
one of the Judges of the Civil Court, in which capacity he did a large amount of good work. 

But he was of delicate constitution, and after a rapid decline died of consumption on 27iih 
January 1885. 

Through his natural and acquired qualifications he was a young man of exceptionally high 
promise, and by his premature death Jeypur lost the first of a rising class of educated Nobles, 
who will, it is to be hoped, be well qualified to serve the State in future with all the zeal, and 
more than the knowledge, of their sturdy ancestors. 

EISHENGABH. 

SEASON AND CHOPS. 

78, The 9ea9on in this State has been already alluded to in writing of Jeypur. The heavy 
rain in the latter part of the monsoon was very prolonged, so that the majority of the village 
tanks burst their embankments. Even that of the large tank at the Capital was breached, as 
the water, besides flooding the escapes, rose a couple of feet or more over both the bunds. 

In the absence hitherto of measurement at Kishengarh, the precise rainfall there cannot 
be stated, but as a gauge has lately been provided, particulars may be expected in future re- 
ports. Evidently the monsoon in this territory, while of the same character as at Jeypur, had 
its preculiarities more marked, and the heavy rain near its close still more continued. 

The monsoon crops of 1884 suffered from deficiency of rain at first and from excess after- 
wards, the harvest being reported lighter than usual in the case of Indian-corn, jawar, bajra, 
rice, and cotton. The spring crops of 1885 have, however, turned out better. 

In this State the revenue of the rain crops is taken in cash on the measured area cultivated, 
while that of the spring harvest is taken in a share of the produce. 

NOTICEABLE OCCUBBENCES OF YEAB. 

79. Among noticeable occurrences may be mentioned— 

(1) His Highness the Maharaja's visit to Udaypur in April 1884. 

(2) Death of His Highnesses mother on 15th September 1854. 

(3) Birth of a son and heir to His Highness on 2nd November 1884 [an elder son 

and daughter had previously died]. 

(4) His Highness going to Udaypur in February 1885 to pay a visit of condolence 

on the death of the late Maharana Sujjan Singh. 



Digitized by 



Googl( 



122 RBPORT Of THE POLITICAL ADMINI8TBA.TI0N 

At the close of the yeatr the Maharaja^ hearing of frontier contingencies^ expressed his 
desire to aid Government to the utmost of his power in whatever way the Agents Governor- 
Generalj might consider the resources of the State could best be utilised. 

THE COUNCIL, 

80. To the Qmneilf composed of several leading Thakurs and the oflScial Heads of Depart- 
ments, the Maharaja has lately added his Private Secretary, Pandit Goverdhan, a man of much 
intelligence and a resident of Kishengarh, who has a good knowledge of English and has held 
the Secretary's post since 1869. 

An attempt to associate with the Council, on certain occasions, non-offlcial members- of 
the community [«. e., other than Thakurs who, as holding Jagirs, are servants of the State] 
was not successful, as the nominees represented that when they were thus called away from 
their own business it was a serious inconvenience to them. 

JUDICIAL. 

81. In Judicial matters there is nothing special to record. As regards Criminal occur- 
rences the year was a quiet one, and in Civil cases settlement is effected mostly by Panchayat. 

No attack on Government Mails occurred,' and no Sati or other special crime came to 
notice. 

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE. 

82. While this report has described the season and harvest prospects of our official year 
April=March 18S4-85, it can only state the Revenue for the local financial year Sombut 
1940 from August 1883 to July 1884. 

Last report mentioned that the monsoon of 1883 had been an unfavorable one. The only 
crop which turned out well was the Indian-corn, but the general result o£ the harvests is seen 
in the diminished income, which is stated at R £,70,341, as compared with that of the former 
year, rw., R8,07,117. 

The Expenditure was R24,885 less, and the whole of the surplas thus left was devoted to 
the payment of debt 

TANKS. 

83. As communications are well provided for by the railway, and the Nasirabad and Deoli 
Road, the principal Public Works here are connected with village tanks, a large number of 
which have been constructed in the territory. Two more were added during the year, but 
the majority were seriously damaged by the floods of September 1884 and will require much 
money and labour to repair. On the tank at the Capital the Maharaja at once set to work to 
build up the breached embankment more strongly than before, and 1 had the whole circuit 
surveyed in view to having the flood outlets widened as much as possible. 

TELEaBAPH INTEBBUPTION. 

' 84. Respecting the Telegraphy the only point to be mentioned is that, on 2nd December 
1884, when opium messages were coming from Calcutta, an attempt was made on the borders 
of Kishengarh and Ajmer to stop communication by twisting together the telegraph wires 
which follow the line of railway, but nothing was heard of it in this Office, or at Kishengarh, 
till the middle of February, when the locality was described as in Kishengarh. Inquiry there- 
on elicited nothing except that the site of the mischief, so far as could then be learnt on the ■ 
spot, was a little within Ajmer limits. 

GENERAL HEALTH, CHOLERA^ DISPENSARY PATIENTS. 

85. As regards the general health of the people, the chief point noted is the prevalence 
of Cholera, but precise figures are not available. 

At the Dispensary maintained by the U. P. Mission 3,198 patients were treated, and 
apparently the institution is appreciated, as the Mission Report credits voluntary fees from 
Her Highness the Maharani and one of the Thakurs of Kishengarh. 

SCHOOLS. 

86. Apart from indigenous schools for Hindi in the capital and principal villages, of 
which statistics are not given, the State School at Kishengarh, in which Persian or Urdu 
as well as Hindi is taught, had 89 scholars on its rolls, vnth an average daily attendance 
of 77. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE EAJFUTANA STATES POB 1884-85. 123 

TBEE PLANTING. 

87. During my visits to Eishengarh in the last and previous years, I have discussed with 
the intelligent young Maharaja various matters of public improvement which he has readily 
i^ppreciated. 

Among the subjects has been ForeH eonservanef, and he informs me that he has acted on 
the suggestion to have nurseries [preparatory to planting out] established at several suitable 
places, and to control, as far as possible, the indiscriminate cutting of. jungle. 

SCREW COTTON PRESS. 

88. To facilitate the cotton export trade 9k Screw Press has recently been established 
at Kishengarh near the Railway station. 

LAWA. 
MONSOON CROPS, A^o. 

89. There is nothing on this occasion of special interest to report regarding this small 
Chief ship. The Monsoon, as elsewhere, was chiefly concentrated in its last month, and on the 
good soil here prevailing the crops rather suffered from the final drenching. 

A sum of fil 0,OuO is invested in Oovemment 4 per cent, paper, so that the Government 
tribute of B225 annually is always safe, besides which, now that the estate is' free of debt, 
its income is ample for all legitimate expenditure. 

ADOPTION CASE. 

90. There i& an adoption case pending in the family. Ram Sing, one of the brotherhood, 
having no son, wishes to adopt a relative, but another of the brotherhood claims the adoption 
for one of his sons as being, he says, nearer. It is, however, hoped that the matter may be 
preliminarily arranged by a Panchayat subject to the approval of the Agent, Governor- 
General. 

TANK REPAIRS. 

91. The outlet of the tani at Lawa has been damaged by successive years' outflow, 
entailing risk of its being cut deeper and lowering the whole water level. To remedy this 
B2^500 have been assigned from the surplus in hand, and Colonel Jacob will have the work 
properly executed. 



16 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



124 EBPOET OP TttB tOLETlCAL ADlilKlSTRATlON 

AFPEHBIX A. 

Annual Heport on the operations for the suppremon of Tiapi and Dahaitifor the year 18S4* 

There were four cases pending at the close |of the twelve months ending 81st December 
188S, a;kid 20 cases were institated durii!ig the year tmder report, involving the trial of 88 persons 
inclusive of the offenders awaiting trial at the close of th^ preceding year. 

Of the 20 dakaits produced during the year, six were arrested in Jeypur, one in Ulwur, two 
in Bikanir, three in Hissar, two in Luharui one in Indore^ one in Fatiala, one in Shajehanpur 
and three were voluntary surrendenk 

Of the foregoing, eight were reddents of Jeypur^ six of Bikaniri two of Ulwur, two of 
Shajehanpur, one of Luharu, and one of Hissar« 

Of the number committed for trial, inclusive of the pending cases, 17 were convicted, 
nine acquitted, two died before their trials were concluded, and five remained undisposed of at 
the close of the year* 

The sentences awarded in the cases of convictioa were as f dilow :^ 

Imprisonment for 14 jean 8 

Ditto 12 ^ . 1 

Ditto 10 » > . . . 4 

IMtto 9„ 1 

Ditto 7i „ 1 

Ditto 7 „ 1 

Ditto 6 „ 1 

Ditto 5 o 6 

Total .... 17 



Thefe were four cases of appeal to the Uj^r Court, the sentences in two of which were 
confirmed, and the result of the remaining two have not yet been communicated to this Office. 

The relations between the officials Of the Thagi and Dakaiti Department and those ^f thie 
Native States have been cordial and satisfactory. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF TEX BAJFUTANA STATES 70S )S84-8S. 



125 



^ 
S 
S 






2 



a 

a I 
g " 

I ^ 

P^ CO 

•2; 



^ 






I* 



9 

3 
.1 



^ 
-^ 

i 






I 





h 




A. 


CO 


0<l 


99 


r4 




int 


a 


a 


00 


S 


iH 




*fo^t 




M 


fH 


^ 


^ 




k 


QC 


P 


s 


eo 




• 






s^ 


CO 


o 


O 


o 




j 


i 


tf 


00 


s 


o 


00 






1 


oc 


5- 


! 


1 


i 




s 






M 










i 


», 




o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
Q 






S 


*>< 


QC 


8 


s 


;{ 


: 




s 






«^ 


»H 








H 
















fti 


CO 


o 


o 


o 






«r 


« 


^ 

^ 


3 


e 


09 






1 


QC 


s 


g 


§ 


i 










«> 




*t 


09 




■ 


' 




s 


^ 


tC 








a, 


CO 


o 


o 


O 




s 

5 


^ 


OD 


HI 


o 


09 




oe 


04 

eo 


s 


1 


1 




M 




M 


^ 


ti 












09 


09 


3 






o 


•IpniH 




04. 




: 




M 
















5 
















% 

4 






s 




& 


S 




2- 


liaota»s 






: 


r^ 






H ^ 
















a5 




















" 










25 


•oiqwv 




:; 


': 


: 


^ 




go 


















•npin 




i 


iH 


: 


o " 




S5 


'a«isj9j 




i 


cm 


• 


s; 




J 






£2 


£2 








1 t» 


•vn^aa 




s 


00 


'' 










o> 


3 


S 


5 




•Ma«pa9;;« Xipip enji»Ay 




8 




»-i 




«« 


nfxox 




O 


S 


09 


S 




^ 






















^^ 










• 
















•89dii«d 




09 


: 


: 


• 




gH 
















^» 
















e H 

3S 


*8ini9«ViqO 




00 


: 


z 


: 




11 




















»o , ' 


eo 


' 


00 






•strepaoioqiiH 




g 




: 






n 
g 






s 


s 


t^ 


S 




2 


•anpiijH 




s 




09 






•paqsiiqiriao aaq^ 




i 


i 


1 


1 




^ 




^ 


pH 


•^ 


^ 




5 




rt 


1 

.(S 


1 


1 








. 


, 


, 


• 






1 




1 


• 


• 


j 

A 




¥ 


h 




r- 


t 


' 1 


T5 

§ 

n 




o 

1 




^ 

•^ 


1 

t 


1 


1 


















16 


A 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



,126 



BEFORT OF THE POLITICAL ASHINISITBATOK 



i 

1 



S3 

I 

In. 










sii 










^ 










*ndBiI qij»$ Mnjiwa 


6 


, 


. 


, 


> 


a 


^ 


m « 


.. 




-apd JO ^mra [vmnit #awa4T 


■ 


• 


- 


- 




- 


- 


* 






«t 










d> 














(i^ 










.O 












j 


tl 










3 












H 








r 


; 




J 


: t 








QC 










^4 








' 
















^ 
























^ 










1 


^ 


^ 










O 










1 


It 


^ 


J 


: 


: 


: 


3 


; 


1 : 


* 


I 


^ 


& 


QC 










8 












ft. 










'#' 




1 


ff 






li 


tf 










o 








. 




















































^ 


4 










1 














ft, 










o 












1 


d 


: 


; 


; 


> 


3 


; 


^ ; 


- 






H 


c« 










3 










^^" 


t^ 










o 












-sl 


o 


* 


; 


: 


: 


3 


: 


I ■ 


: 


. 


t 


IE 1 


DC 










i 


































o 
























iS 


U 


^ 
d 

, ^ 


= 


I 


: 


# 


# 


1 


1 i 


; 


* 




A. 










o 












1 


ci 


^ 


^ 


_ 


• 


a 


• 


^ ^ 


_ 














• 




• 










o 


Qt 










s 










ShJ 


'qail^na 




N 


o 


: 


: 


; 


: 


: t 


; 


in 

r-4 


t, ^^ 
























S?"" 
























s-« 


IIIIB^ 




: 


: 


t 


: 


* 


: 


; 1 


: 


: 


fl. ^ w 














































p fe ^ 


71IW1BS 




f 


; 


* 


; 


I 


' 


* 2 


! 


• 


°5| 


-npifl 




9 


s 


: 


^ 


: 


: 


: ■ 


: 


s 


'TP^iH 




s 


3 


«o 


s 


n 




£ S 


s 


1 






i 


r* 


m 


13a 


lO 


to 


« kD 


J^ 


i 


'4ailt^t£&)|l XlfTp &^MXSA.Y 




f-^ 


kO 


nH 


04 


«4 


«! i-l 


p-l 


■iimuom iHfu am tio 




o 


S 


s 


3 


S5 


s 


S 2 


s 


i 


st|dnd JO jaquitiii MuaAY 




CO 
















!s 


*^10X 




i 


l-l 


s 




S 


s 


£ S 


s 


1 


d-> 
























E^S 


■■ail^iq:} 




■-H 


« 


'^ 


; 


; 


: 


: I 


; 


» 


s^s 














































IS 


'BVTpaiiioqwpt 




s 


iH 


04 


^ 


la 




d -* 


; 


s 


'topQlH 








s 


« 

CQ 


n 


^ 


g s 


s 


i 






lO 


lO 


^ 


^ 


:* 


■* 


IN ^ 


« 








% 


S 


§ 


S 


s 


5 


S § 






1 




1 


. 


■ 


< 


-s 


1 


•1 




« 


3 




i 


1 


i 


1 


1 


4J 


1 " 


T3 






Q 


Q 


^ 


h 


fid 


= » 


rt 








■< 






w 


C5 


5S 


^ s 


P^ 








■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


' 


1 


* 1 


' 












t^ 






pd 


_f- 














h 






u 


tf 






M 






• 


^ 






£C 


i» 


g 




1 




-§ 


s 


td 
^ 


s 


^ 


i 


1 ? 


cij 




1 




^ 






cB 


^ 


1 


<S e 


g 












Q 




1^4 




e? 


D» 




1 




g 


g 


1 


1 




1 


^1 






I 






6 


!Q 


<n 


m 


o 


o 


< s 


a 


. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE RAJPUTANA STATES FOB 1884-85. 12*7 



BHUBTFOBE ANB KEBOWLEE BEFOBT FOB 1884-85. 



No. IP., dated Kerowlee, IBth May 1885. 
^roffi— LiBUT.-CoL. C.B. Euan-Smith, O.S.I., Political Agents Bhurtpore and Kerowlee^ 
To— The First Assistant Agents Oovernor- General, Majputana, 

1 have the honour to submit the usual Annual Administration Report of the Bhurtpot*e and 
Kerowlee Agency for the official year 1884-85. 

2. During the year under notice I have held continuous charge of this Agency. In May 
1884 I was appointed to officiate for three months as Resident in Meywar without prejudice to 
my duties as Political Agent, Bhurtpore and Kerowlee. The head-quarters of this Agency with 
the office were therefore for the time being removed to Udaypur, from whence they returned 
in August 1884. In March 1885 I was ordered to Bawal Pindi on special duty in connection 
with the Darbar held there for the reception of His Highness the Amir of Afghanistan. 

BHUETPOEE. 

WEATHER AND CROPS. 

5. The rainfall for the year was plentiful and was above the average. Owing, however, 
to the very heavy fall that took place in the months of August and September 1^84, 8'79 
inches in August and 16*60 in September, much damage was done. Large tracts of country 
remained submerged for weeks, and the bunds of tanks and public roads were breached all over 
the territory. Great sickness was <»used by the vast area of stagnant water, and violent fever 
was everywhere prevalent. The kharif crops was, however, very ^ood, and the rabi crop has 
been the best known for many years."^ ' The entire rainfall was 8220 inches as against 31'93 
inches in ordinary years. 

HEALTH. 

4. The general health has, as above stated, not been good. Violent fever has been epidemic. 
Bhurtpore, however, escaped the visitation of cholera which for a time was so prevalent in 
Kerowlee. 

GENERAL RETUBITS. 

. 5. The usual annual returns have been received and are attached to this report. The 
Political Agent^s Office has, however, no means whatever at its disposal for testing their correct-* 
ness'or otherwise, or for forming any opinion as to the results to be gathered therefrom should 
they be correct. If taken as correct, they serve to indicate a satisfactory state of the finances 
and a vigorous judicial, educational^ and general administrative agency. They are forwarded 
as received from the Native Government, but they are by no means guaranteed as being 
correct. 

EDUOATION. 

6. The number of schools now sustained by the State is now set down 17i as compared 
with 176 returned in the last Administration Report. Four new Sadur Schools have been opened 
and eight have been abolished during the year. The total annual expenditure on education 
throughout the State is set down at fi£3,888-lS-6. The number of teachers is given as 230, 
and the gross total of students as 8,912, of whom 2,524 attend the Halkabundi Schools. 
Arrangements are being made under the orders of the Agent to* the Governor-General to 
provide for the periodical inspection of the schools in Bhurtpore in conjunction with those of 
the other Native States by a duly qualified Educational Officer of the Imperial Government. 
The necessity for this pointed out in last year's report was brought 'to the notice of His 
Highness the Maharajah, and he readily accorded his consent to this being arranged for. 

MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 

7. There are 18 dispensaries in the State kept up at an annual reported cost of B 13,284-0-9 
(which includes the cost of vaccinating operations) as against B 13,5 15-9-9 last year. B6ii,785 
out-door and 4,000 in-door patients are returned as having received medical relief during the 
year. There were 14,379 cases of vaccination, of which 13,560 proved successful. 



* Since writing the above, I bate received a kyfiat from the Bbartpore Darbar in.'oriDing me that His Highnen tbe 
Maharajah baa remitted ^6,10,569 arreara of reyenue, and that it ia in contemplation to make atill farther remiuioni, 
many of these arrears were of very old standing. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



128 REPORT OF THB POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

JAIL. 

8f The usual jail returns are attached. There were 11 deaths out of a total nnmber of 
494 prisoners^ or at the rate of 2'22 per cent. The year under notice was less healthy than the 
preceding year. The jail is kept in a fairly clear and good condition, 

JUDICIAL COUBTS. 

9. Judging only frotn the returns furnished by the Darbar, the administration of justice 
in Bhurtpore is very satisfactory as far as celerity of decision is concerned. Of a total of 
9^713 criminal cases^ 9,597 were disposed of during the year, leaving only 116 still under ad-* 
judication; while in the Civil Courts 1,172 cases were settled out of a gross total of 1,256, leav- 
ing 84 cases still upon the file. Of the criminal cases, 34 were upon appeal, and of the civil 
cases 21. No capital punishments were inflicted during the year. No information is given as 
to how many cases were appealed against successfully or otherwise. 

BAILWAY JUBISDICTION* 

10. There is nothing to record under this head. There were no civil or criminal prose- 
cutions, and no instances of obstructions being placed upon the line. The relations between the 
Darbar and the Railway officials have been generally satisfactory. The proposal to purchase 
the ground on which the Bhyusa Station on the Aehpeyra Railway is situated was again made 
to His Highness the Maharajah, but again negatived. Unless the matter is deemed of im- 
portance by the Government of India, His Highness does not wish to disturb the existing 
arrangement under which he receives an annual rent of fiI60-lU-S from the Railway authori- 
ties for the land so occupied. 

CBIME. 

11. No instances of serious crime have been reported during the year, 

SALT, 

12. The conditions of the salt agreement are rigidly observed. The old salt works and 
the salt districts of Bhurtpore generally have been regularly inspected by the officials of the 
Imperial Government who have found nothing of which to complain. 

TBANSIT DUTIES. 

13. In the month of July 1884, the Maharajah of Bhurtpore generously abolished all tran«- 
sit duties throughout his territory save only those levied on opium, bhung, and intoxicating 
drugs. In recognition of His Highness^ liberal and public-spirited action he received a kharita 
of tiianks from His Eiccellency the Viceroy. 

BOUNDABIEa 

14. The dispute as to the water-rights of certain Ulwar villages situated in Bhtirtpore terri- 
tory, which was noticed at some length in paragraph 13 of last year's annual report, is now in 
progress of satisfactory settlement owing to the good offices of the Agent to the Oovemor- 
(Teneral, Colonel Bradford having induced the Maharajah of Ulwar to consent to the ex- 
change of these villages against other equally valuable portions of Bhurtpore territory. This 
was the only way in which this long-standing dispute could have been terninatedi. Dietaik as 
to the exchange are now in course of being arranged between the Biev^nue officials of tke two 

States. 

XZTBADITION. 

15. The operation of the rules for the mutual extradition of criminals between the State of 
Bhurtpore and those of Jeypore, Ulwar, and Kerowlee has been mutaally -extended by the States 
concerned for another year. The rules are now working more snoothiy than they did at first 
Demands for the extradition of criminals on frivolous and untenable gromnds are less frequest, 
and the quarrels between the Native officials less virulent and vexing. 

The discrepancy in the operations of the rules in Jeypore noticed in last year's report has 
been remedied. 

infahticibe. 

16. There have been no cases of infanticide in Bhurtpore 

FINAKGES. 

17. The statement of receipts and expenditure attached to this report shews a very healthy 
state of the finances. Trade throughout the State is in a normally healthy condition. Food 
has been plentiful and cheap during the whole of the year* 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OT THE RAJPTTTANA STATES FOR 1884-85. 129 

AJAN^KUBJUl BTFITD. 

18. In September 1884, the Revenue authorities brought to my notice the great damage 
that had been caused to the British yillagers in the Fattehpore-Sikri District owing to ti^e 
imtimely opening of the sluices and subsequent bursting of portions of the Ajan*Kurka Bund. 
I at once interviewed the Maharajah on the subject, who promised to do all in his power to pie« 
vent the recurrence of the evils complained of , and who eousented to the inspection and survey 
of the bund by a duly qualified English Engineer. Mr. C. E. Housden^ Civil Engineer, 
Kerowlee^ has been deputed and is now engaged on this work. His report will be submitted 
to the Maharajah in due course with the view of His Highnesses causing the alterations, kfy., 8cc., 
that may be recommended therein, to be earned out with as little delay as possible, 

MISCELLAKEOUS. 

19. In November 1884, Bhurtpore was visited by His Excellency the Commander-in- 
Chief Sir Donald Stewart and stafE. 

In the same month, the Maharajah, accompanied by the Political Agent, proceeded to Agra 
to visit His Excellency the Viceroy the Marquis of Ripon, 

In December of the same year. His Highness, accompanied by lieutenant-Colonel Euan- 
Smith, proceeded to Calcutta to take leave of the outgoing Viceroy the Marquis of Ripon, and 
to welcome his successor the Eari of Dufferin, with whom the Maharajah exchanged visits. 
Subsequently, His Highness went on a pilgrimage td Jugganath-Fiiri returning to Bhurtpore 
on tiie 11th January 1885. 

On the 16th January 1865, His Highness prooeeded to the borders of his territory to meet 
the Agent to the Governor-General who was on tour, and with the PoUtical Agent accompanied 
him through Gopalgarh, Nagur, Akheygarh, Bayana, Rudawul,and Roopbas to Dholpore, from 
whence he proceeded with the Agent to the Governor-General by Ban and Sir Muthra to 
Eerowlee. 

Both at Dholpore and Eerowlee His Highness was received with the greatest cordiality 
by the reigning CWefs with whom he exchanged the customary visits. 

In February 1885, His Highness was honoured by receiving at his capital tiheir Royal 
Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Connaught, who, accompanied by a large party, made a 
stay of four days' duration, enjoying during that time the excellent wild-fowl shooting |or which 
Bhurtpore is famous. 

On the occasion of hoirtilities appearing to be imminent between England and Russia, 
His Highness telegraphed, through the Agent to the Governor-General, to the Viceroy placing 
500 fully equipped cavalry at the service of the Imperial Government. For this act His 
Highness received^ through the Agent to the Governor-General, from the Viceroy a message 
expressive of Her Majesty the Queen-Empress's cordial appreciation of the liberal and loyal 
spirit displayed by His Highness. 

In the monthof April 1884, His Highnesses only son Kowur Ram Singh was duly married 
with all state ceremonials to the daughter of a zemindar of S^appairah in the Aligarh district. 

Theie has been no permanent change in the adminiatrartive personnel of the .State during 
the year. His Highness the Maharajah conducts the entire business of the State, and 
nothing whatever is done without his knowledge. There is no Kamdar. During the year 
His Highness engaged for a time the services of Pandit Rutton Lall, a Deputy Collector of 
the North- Western Provinces, to look into the revenue administration. Pandit Rutton Lall 
does not, however^ tremain ipermanently in the Bhurtpore service, and will shortly resume his 
duties in the North-Westem Provinces. 

.On the occasion of the Maharajah's absence from Bhurtpore, the charge of the Sitate has 
always been vested in the hands of Rukshi Samul Singh, formerly Eamdar, who has carried on 
the duties very successfully. 

POIiITICAIi AGENT^S TOUR. 

SO. During the year the Political Agent visited the districts of Koomheir, Deeg, Gopal- 
garh, Nagur, Akheygarh, Rudawul, Roopbas, Bhosawur, Weir, Bhurtpore, and Bayana. 
The condition of the people was generally found to be satisfactory, save only in the districts of 
Koomheir and Deeg, where the entire stoppage of the salt manufacture has occasioned perma* 
nent distress and want. 

The soil of these districts is not adapted to agricultural purposes, and nothing can make 
•up to the people *f or 'the loss sustained by the stoppage of the salt works. 

The services of a qualified Engineer, who should be constantly on tour in the State, appear 
to be urgently required. There is no one to inform the Maharajah of the local wants of ryots 
liu such matters as the repairs or construction of tanks and wells, the mending of roads, &c , 
'8co; I have spoken to His Highness on this subject, and trust that he may before long consent 
to the employment of an Engineer. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



130 



REPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 



MEDICAL SUFEBVISIOir. 

21. In the same way the services of a commissioned Medical Officer for this Agency are 
very requisite. There is now a very large number of dispensaries established in Bhurtpore and 
Kerowlee^ which work practically without skilled or responsible supervision. Assistant 
Surgeon Bholanath Biswas, Rai Bahadur, stationed at Bhurtpore, has done all that he can to 
render these institutions practicably useful in Bhurtpore, but he is about to take his pension, 
and even if this were not the case the services of a Medical Commissioned Officer would for 
many reasons be required. I am addressing the Agent to the Governor-General separately on 
this very important point. 

BHITRTFOBE VAKIL. 

22. Pandit Bishen Lall has been in attendance on me as vakil of the Bhurtpore State 
during the whole of the preceding year. I can but repeat the hearty commendation which I 
recorded concerning this gentleman in my last year's annual report. He continues to deserve 
my warm acknowledgments for the entirely satisfactory way in which he performs his duties. 



EEBOWLEE. 

WEATHER AND OBOFS. 
28. The rainfall during the year was 29-S8 inches, and, though not up to the usual average 
of 34'5, was sufficient for all agricultural purposes, and filled the whole of the tanks and wells 
in the State. Of the entire fall of 29*88 inches, no less than 14*74 fell during the month of 
September. This excessive fall in one month caused considerable damage to the jowar and 
bajra crop which otherwise was unusually fine. Both the kharif and rabi crops have been 
finer than any known for years, producing general content among the population of the State. 
During the whole year food and forage have been cheap and plentiful. 

HEALTH. 

24. A severe outbreak of cholera, which was almost entirely confined to the city, took 
place during the year. It commenced on the 13th July 1884, and the last case was registered 
on the 15th September 18H4, after which latter date the disease entirely disappeared. There 
was an aggregate number of 435 cases, of which 180 proved fatal. Every endeavour was made 
to check the progress of the disease, and Hospital Assistants T. Romaie and Bhowany Singh 
were indefatigable in their exertions among the sick. Their efforts are deserving of warm 
commendation, and their services were greatly appreciated by the people. Fever was very 
prevalent during the year. 

MUEICIPAI. ABBANGEHENTS. 

25. The severity of the outbreak of cholera above noticed called imperatively for stringent 
measures being taken for the effectual cleansing of the city and the introduction of sanitary 
measures. The nobles and leading officials and merchants of the city were induced to interest 
themselves actively in the matter. Munshi Sheo Narain, the Secretary to the Agra Muni- 
cipality, was invited, and came to Kerowlee and explained the main lines upon which the con- 
templated arrangements for the improvement and cleansing of the town should be carried out 
and in a short time a Committee with members .selected from all the various castes in the 
town, and with the Rao of Hadoti as President, and Hospital Assistant Bhowany Singh as 

Secretary, was formed and was work- 
ing under rules and conditions very 
similar to those which govern the pro- 
ceedings of the Municipal Committee 
in large towns in British India. Funds 
for municipal purposes were provided 
for by the imposition of chungi tax on 
grain, cheerfully agreed to by all 
classes. Prom this and other sources 
the estimated annual income is H20, 720 
with an estimated annual expenditure 
of ftl7,915 as per margin. The inci- 
dence of taxation per head per annum 
for municipal purposes amounts to less 
than 4 annas. Since its formation the 
Committee have met regularly^ and 
their operations have been attended 
with much success. The town is now 
regularly cleansed and is quite clean 



SeeeipU. 



1. Chnngi 

2. Fines 

3. Manare 

4. Baildinga 

5. Dispeoi 

6. School 

7. Gardens 

8. Naaool 

\). Canji house 



JBxpendiiure, 

1. Chnngi establmhrnent . 

2. Committee ditto 
8. Municipality ditto 

4. Buildings .... 

5. Dispensaries 

6. School .... 

7. Gsrdens .... 

8. Canji house 



AmoQiit. 



7,000 

100 

800 

1,500 

1,900 

1,780 

7,500 

540 

100 



20,720 



150 
988 
8,572 
2,000 
1,900 
1,780 
7,600 
25 



17,915 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE EAJPUTANA STATES FOB 1884r85. 131 

The inhabitants have commenced to understand and to concur in and assist all that is being done 
for the general good. Roads, wells, tanks, &c., &c., within so-called municipal limits are being 
looked after and repaired, and a general improvement is everywhere visible. 

EDUCATION. 

26, Simultaneously with the measures for the improvement of the city above noticed, the 
question of providing a really good primary school in the capital was taken up and satis- 
factorily dealt with. Three duly qualified native school teachers were obtained from the Educa- 
tional Department of the North- Western Provinces ; a suitable building was provided in the 
heart of the city to be used as a school ; and all classes were invited to send their -children to 
be taught gratuitously. There is now a total average, of 224 children daily attending 
the school where they receive sound primary instruction, and this number is daily on the 
increa&e. Some 42 boys learn English. The school'is placed under the ^neral management of 
the Municipal Conmiittee. Overseer Mr. Abdul Majid has acted as Secretary to the school 
since its commencement, and has rendered great service by the zeal and intelligence with which 
he discharged his duties. 

Another branch primary school has been opened at Machilpur, and this will be shortly 
followed by the establishment of schools in the head-quarters of other pergunnahs. 

As the sons of Jadu Rajputs will not attend a public school where boys of all castes and 
denominations have* free admittance, it is intended shortly to open a self-supporting institution 
for such youths at Kerowlee. The number attending it would probably not exceed 50. 

ADMIiriSTRATION. 

27. The administration of the State has as usual been conducted by the State Council un- 
der the general supervision of the Political Agent. The Council has been strengthened 
advantageously by the admission of a new member in the person of Jemadar Mahamed 
Fazl Rasul Khan. The Members of the Council have one and all discharged their onerous 
duties to my entire satisfaction. As to the personal qualifications of each, I can only refer to 
my last year's report. 1 have nothing to add to, or detract from, what I then wrote. Munshi 
Maliomed Rashid-ud-din Khan has been relieved of the judicial duties formerly imposed upon 
him, a separate Judge having been appointed in the person of Pandit Nund Lall, as will be 

noticed hereafter. 

BEVENUE. 

28, Deputy Collector Sheikh Amanut Hosein continues to render excellent service to the 
State, of which the Revenue administration could not be in more trustworthy or e£5cient hands. 
During the year the revenue has been paid with punctuality and has been collected without 
diflBculty. The outstandings are very small amounting only to ft4,999-8-0. The three years* 
summary settlement being about to expire in June 1^85, it became necessary to arrange either 
for the renewal of the settlement or the adoption of other measures for the collection of 
the revenue. The Deputy Collector made a tour throughout the whole of the territory, and, 
with the concurrence of the Council and myself, has now concluded another settlement with the 
ryots for five years, commencing from July 1885 (Sumbut 1942). 

The terms on which this settlement has been mutually arrived at are nearly the same 
as those embodied in the previous settlement. The teachings of actual experience have 
been taken as a guide either to reduce or slightly increase the revenue demands of the State. 
Under the new settlement which embraces the entire Khalsa territory of the State, with 
exception of seven villages, the annual increase of revenue is set down at Rd,47 7-9-9 against a 
decrease of Stl,163-3-d. There is a further decrease in the revenue expected to be realised 
from the seven villages not included in the settlement which will amount to fi314. This 
will leave a total increased balance of fi^,000-6-6. The readiness with which the ryots have 
agreed to the new settlement proves alike their satisfaction with the rates demanded, and their 
appreciation of the comfort of having a fixed and regular assessment payable without the inter- 
vention of middle men. 

FINANCE. 

29. The forecasts as to the income and expenditure of the State for the past official year 
have not been realised in two important particulars. The cessation of all Hindu marriages during 
the year has seriously affected the income derived from the Customs Department ; while 
the addition of an extra month named Jaith to the native year which was not provided for by 
the Council in the preparation of their Budget has caused a corresponding increase of expendi* 
ture in the disbursing departments. As the accounts of the year cannot be made up for 
four months, it is impossible to say how far these causes will affect the financial condition of the 
State ; but it may be anticipated that they will necessitate a very considerable reduction to be 
made in the instalments payable on account of the State debt. 

17 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



189 BEPO&T OF THE POLITICAL ADHIKISTBATION 

STATB DEBT. 

SO. At the eommencement of the current native official year^ a sum ol B 1,20^000 bearing 
interest at 6^ per cent, was due to the native banker. Under ordinary circumstances this would 
have been paid o£E at the rate of S75^000 per annum with interest. 

In November 1884, however, the Government of India accorded their sanction to a proposal 
submitted with the approy^ of the Agei^t to the Governor General, that in order to prpvide 
money for the construction of profitable and other public works throughout the 3tate, tbiQ aip- 
nual instalment of debt should be reduced from B75,000 to B30,000, thus settipg free ^hd 
sum of B45,00b for the purpose above noted. Under this arrangement the rate pf interest 
on *th6 money, the payment of which to the native banker waa thus tp be deferred^ wa8 ^ l^ 
raised from 6i to 8 per cent. 

After ^he collection of the kharif income a sum of B45,Q00 was aoeordingly set (iside 
for expenditure pn public yrorks. It cappot be ascertained until the end of the current p^^tivp 
p65cial year how far the finances of the ^tate will admit of the payment of the instaUQeQt of 
B80,000 due to thp natiye banker. 

JUSTICE. 

81. Pandit Nund Lall was appointed Judge of the Civil and Criminal Court at Eerowlee, 
vice Munshi Mahomed Bushid-ud-din Khan, in Jime 1884. He has carried on his duties in 
the most satisfactory manner, his decisions have met with general approbation, and he has 
b^un to introduce many much needed petty reforms into the working of the Tehsil and other 
Courts. By his appointment and by the consequent release of Mahomed Bushed-ud-din Khm 
from his functions as Original Civil and Criminal Judge, the State Council has now become an 
actual as well as a nominal Court of Appeal, and the blot on the administration brought to 
notice in my last year's report has been thus removed. 

The Criminal and Qiyil Judicial Betums are appended herewith. At the close of the offi? 
cial year there were but 14 criminal and 9 civil cases pending ; on the eriminal ^de 486 eaeee 
were decided during the yearj and on the civil side 71. Seven decrees remained unexecuted 
out of a gross total of 65i. 

Of the 486 crimimal cases 5 were appealed against 1$ the State Council with the foUow- 
ing results : — 

Confirmed 1 

Beversed 1 

Modified 2 

Pending 1 

5 

On the civil side the appeal return is as follows :— ?- 

Appealed 6 

Confirmed 1 

Reversed 2 

Modified 1 

Pending • . 1 

5 

In the Tehsil Courts, 270 criminal cases were instituted, of which 257 were disposed of, 
leaving IS pending at the end of the year. One hundred sixty-seven civil cases were heard 
before the same Courts, of which only 11 remained undisposed of. 

In the Bevenue Department, 1,542 cases were instituted before the Deputy Collector at 
Kerowlee. Of these 1,455 were disposed of, leaving 87 still for hearing. 

There were 7 cases appealed against the decision of the Deputy Collector to the State 
Council, of which S were confirmed, 2 reversed, and 2 remained pending. 

In the Tehsil Courts, lOd petty revenue cases were instituted, of which 90 were settled and 
IS remained pending. Of these 6 cases were appealed, S were confirmed, 1 reversed and 
2 remained pending. 

FUBLIO W0B£8 DBPABTMENT. 

3j&. In this Department of the State there has been a very marked improvement d^aring 
the year. Owing to the sanction accorded by the Government of India to a mininnntT^ outlay 
of B45,00O a year being set aside from current revenue for expenditure on public works,, 
the Council applied for the services of a duly qualified Engineer to be placed at the disposal 
of the State. Mr. C. E. Housden was selected for this duty, and took up his appointment as 
Executive Engineer of the Eerowlee State in January 1885. His report is attached herewith. 
A list of the more pressing public works that have been sanctioned by the Council, of which 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB BAJPUTANA STATES POE 1884-86. 138 

the eoBt aggregate B&ilySOO^ id also attached. In addificm to this, large taccavi adVanoes 
continue to be made by the Counoil to zemindars for the ooxtetmction of wells. In this way 
€kff oount^ and revenne have greatly benefited.- 

Mr. Honsden is also engi^di n drawing np an e^Lhaastive report as to the capabilities 6!E 
the State with reference to the construction of tanksy wellsy and other profitable works of irri- 
gation, roads, &c,, &c. Mr. Housden's deputation has been of the greatest advantage to 
Kerowlee : the zeal, energy, and ability with which he discharges his duties are very marked, 
and are thoroughly appreciated by His Highness the Maharajah and the Members of th^ 
Council no less than by myself. 

Mr. Housden writes as follows :— 

Reports on Public Works and improvements carried out in the Kerowlee State from April 1883 to the end 
of the qfficial year ending 31st March 1885, by Mr, 6. S. Housden, Executive Engineer, 

In January 1885, I was deputed to prospect and initiate public works and improvements 
in the Kerowlee State, and, in accordance with instructions, took over provisional charge of the 
works then in progress. 

I joined at Kerowlee on the 15th of January, and since then have been employed in pros* 
pecting for public works and improvements, in exaijaining works carried out by the Overseer 
before my arrival, in preparing and submitting reports and estimates, and in supervising the 
works in progress when I arrived, and which have been since sanctioned. 

These are noticed at greater length in paragraph 4 of this report, ^or the present I pro- 
ceed to a review of the work done by the Overseer since his arrival in 1888-84. 

The first work he was engaged on was the preparation and submission of a report on the 
requirements of the State in the way of new tanks and wells, repairs to old tanks and wells, 
and improvements to communications. 

The report submitted by him deals mainly with new tanks and wells and repairs to a few 
old wells and tanks. 

I have visited and exainined almost every one of the sites reported on, the result of my 
exaoiLination is that the cross sections of sites for new tanks taken by him were fairly accurate 
and to be depended on ; but ^hat he had in most instructions under-estimated the cost of the 
proposed dams and over-estimated the revenue to be derived from them. 

The^ general result I haVe airived at is that tanks cannot be e^cpected to pay on the average 
more thim about 7 per cent., as will be shewn in my detailed report now under preparation. 

The Overseer^s report was, therefore, to a certain extent a misleading one. It was never- 
theltos-ii veiy us^lonein pointing^out tiiat thielre was a large field' for improvements, and 
the fact that he had- examined and reported on sites for 69 tanks in all parts of the State will 
diew that a considerable amount of trouble had been taken by him in prospecting the country. 

The only works commenced by him needing any special notice are-^ 

(i). The' Nynea>*ki-Gwari Tank.^ The cost of this' tank wto under-estimated, instead 
of Bli^,000 the cost will be something more like B20,000. 

An unfortunate mistake was also made in the selection of the site for the dam, by which 
the area to be irrigated from the tank has been considerably curtailed. The tank will, when 
finished, be a good one with a bed area of 4,800,000 square feet, and a mean depth of about 
10 feet, giving a total capacity of 48,000,000 cubic feet, or about sufficient for 800 bighas. It 
is likely to fill well every year. 

The area commended is 400 bighas, and some more land can be brought under cultivation 
by the construction of a duct not allowed for in the sanctioned estimate. 

The tank even, if does not pay very well, will still be a great boon to the neighbourhood 
» where in the summer months no water is to be met with for miles. 

The cost is by no means excessive. Should a revenue of B3 per bigha be hereafter 
realised, the yearly income from the talik would be Bl^SOO or, say, fi 1,000 after deducting 
Qost of up-keep. This would give a return of 5 per cent, on the money expended on it. The 
tank' may therefore, as « whole,, be pronounced a success. 

(ii). Repairs to tanks at Markapiira and Chain* 
Markapnra l,77i 16 ^6 P^- These were repairs to old tanks ; cost as per 

Chainpnr 936 9 10 margin. {■ 

The repairs have been well carried out, and a return of 17i per cent, on the former and 
* 10 per centv on the latter will probably be ultimately realised. 

MANAEHinEt WELL. 

This was sunk for drinking purposes. The site selected is not a good one, it would have 
bdesk better to have fixed on a site below the bund. 

17 a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



134 EEPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMIKISTEATIOK 

The well does not contain sufficient water to last throngh the summer^ and an attempt is 
now being made to secure a further supply by deepening the Well. 

It is cut through rock^ and this accounts for the apparently excessire cost. In reality 
the well is a cheap one. It is now 38 feet deep^ diameter 12 feet. 

The diameter is excessive^ as the well is required for the drinking purposes only and is all 
in rock. ^ 

The total sum disbursed by the Overseer from April 1883 to February 1885 was 
£42^389-14-9^ inclusive of the salary of the sanctioned establishment^ which for the period 
under notice amounts to fi3^994<-b-4j leaving the total cost of the works and repairs carried out 
at 838,395.9-5. 

The proportion of establishment to expenditure is as 400 to 88,400 or 10 to 100, i. e., 
10 per cent. 

As a general rule, I have found that the work done has been well done and at fair rates. 
Errors of judgment may occasionally have led to the work costing more than it should have 
done. I have at the same time much pleasure in placing on record my opinion arrived at after 
careful examination and due consideration of all the circumstances in each case, that during the 
time Overseer has had charge of the public works of the State, he has worked conscientiously 
and honestly, and that the State has received a fair return for the sums spent by him. 

Work done by the Public Works Department during the official year 1884-85. 

I pass now to a consideration of the work done during the official year 1884-85, i, tf., from 
1st April 1884 to 31st March 1885. 

COUNCIL BUNGALOW. 

This was completed during the year at a cost of fil,682-8-7. The work has been well 
done. 

BIBWAS BOAD. 

A bridle road was made from the Agency to the Kerowlee-Hindon Road, which it joins near 
the Birwas Ghat, at a total of fi201-7-9. The length is 4-5 miles. The road is much used by 
the public. 

KETALLED BOAD, HINDON TO KEBOWLEE. 

Owing to the difficult nature of the ground to be passed over, the necessary examination of 
the ground and survey operation took some time, and work was not commenced till early 
in March 1885. 

The earthwork ought to be finished in May. The metalling will probably not be done 
till June 1886 ; when completed, this road will be a great boon to the public, as at present carts 
cannot ply between Kerowlee and Hindon without making a long detour round by Baroda 
over a very sandy track. 

The estimated cost of the 8i miles in Kerowlee is ft38,966, or B8,882 per mile. 

AGENCY OFFICE. 

Thatch renewed and verandah added at a cost of S457-11-5. 
Nynea-ki-Qwari Tank. Already noticed. 

JAIL AND DISFENSABY. 

A hawalat built at a cost of £2,233-10-10, a latrine built at a cost of S278-6-1, other 
additions and improvements estimated to cost S4,280, are now in progress. 
Manakhur Well already noticed is to bo deepened. 

NIBHEBA GHATI. 

Completed at a cost of Bl,1 53-0-6. A great improvement, and fully appreciated by the 
Bunjaras and public generally. Much used. I was stopped one morning for half an hour 
owing to a block amongst the ascending and descending bullocks. Proposals for widening it 
will be made in my General Report. 

EAILA-DEVI BOAD. 

The first two mile^ of this road are now being metalled and improved. The expenditure to 
the end of March has been Bl,399-9-2, the ^timated cost is fi8,6£6. The road will be ready 
for use after the rains. 

EAILA-DEVI EOOND. 

Sanctioned amount of estimate B4,475. Of this sum fi2,000 to be utilized on the mostly 
emergent and pressing repairs which are now in hand and will be finished before the rains. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE EAJPUTAIIA STATES FOE 1884-85. 135 

MAINDEI CBOSSIirGS. 

Two culverts are now being made over the Maindki Nullah to the west of Eerowlee 
city. They are estimated to cost 946S each ; they will be very useful during the rains. 

DABBA SLUICES. 

The Dabra Tank was built without a sluice ; this is now being supplied at an estimated 
cost of ftl,500. 

AMEBGABH TANK. 

This has only just been commenced on (28th March 1885). It is being built for the 
Thakur of Amergarh, and is estimated to cost fil 6^927. 

It will probably ultimately pay from 10 to 17 per cent. 

Theie is no land below the tank^ all the cultivation will be carried on in the bed. 

In connection with the works noted on above^ the following estimates and reports have 
been prepared and submitted during the year-— 

By the Executive Engineer . 

R 

No. 1. — ^Repairs to Kaila-Devi Eoond 4,475 

„ 2. — ^Bailding a road dam across the Nullah of Maindki crossings .... 463 

M 3.«— Erecting a ward for in-door patients at the Kerowlee Dispensary • . . • 3,326 

„ 4. — Constructing a tank to the south of the village of Amergarh 16,927 

M 5. — Completing the Njnea Gwari Tank 20,069 

„ 6. — Supplying a sluice and irregation channel to the bund at Dabra . • • • 8,492 

„ 7. — Improving and metalling first two miles of Kaila Road 8,626 

„ 8. — Constructing a metalled road from Jeypore frontier to Eerowlee . . • • 33,966 

,y 9.— 'Bandwa Nullah crossings « 6,303 

„ 10.— Constructing a bridge over Panchua River ........ 16,076 

„ 11. — ^Re-huilding portion of the Amergarh Fort . .9,180 

„ 12. — Imergent repairs to Maidpura Bund 1,992 

„ 13.— 'Alterations to the hund at Dolutpura 5,601 

,, 14.— Repairs to two tanks to the east of Mandrail . 369 

,, 15. — Making a cut to lead the wat^r of the Nullah flowing to the west of the Mandrail 

into the tank close to the city on east . . . ... . . • ^64 

„ 16. — Constructing a well at Karanpur . . ' , 150 

», 17. — Constructing a well for irrigation at Dangaria . 484 

By Overseer Abdul Majid. 

R R 

Jail 3,185 and 4.280 sanctioned. 

Dispensary •..*... 

Council Bungalow 

Agency Office ...... 

ManakhurWell 

Jail Privy 

Stables 

Council Bungalow doors ..... 

' Agency Office doors 

School . . 

Revenue Office repaired 

Hindon Road 

Maidpura Tank ...... 

Kalyanpur Tank 

Eaila Koond 

Kaila-Devi Road ...... 

Maindki Roads^ &o* 312 and 658, revised — sanctioned* 

Tn addition to the supervision of the works mentioned, and the preparation and submission 
of the plans and estimates referred to above, I have, accompanied by Overseer Abdul Majid^ 
visited the greater part of the State and made surveys for tanks and wells required by the 



and 1.001 


do. 


1.390 


do. 


276 


do. 


764 


do. 


289 


do. 


359 


do. 


861 


do. 


106 


do. 


100 


do. 


50 


do. 


51,269 not approved. 


1,881 since* revised hy ExeoQ* 
tive Engineer. 


3,304 same* remark. 


4.588 


do. 


49,960 not approved. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



186 



BEPOBS OW TEE POI#ITICAlL iLDMlNISTBATION 



villagers, or which have recommended ihemfldyes to ttie. Tbese will be all incorporated in my 
General Report, which I hope to sabmii before the Ist of Juae 18S5. It wiU suffice for the 
present to state that the general results arrived at aore^^ 

{i) that there are at least two very good sites for the construction of large reservoirs, 
each capable of storing oirer 300 milHone cubic feet of water and calculated to in 
time pay over ZO per cent. ; 
{it) that there are numbers of sites for smaller tanks (over 100 have beeB noted) 

which should yield a return of from 5 to 15 per cent, (average 7 per cent.); 
{iit) that there are several old tanks and wells which can be repaired or renewed at a 

comparatively small cost, and should of course pay well ; 
(iv) that there are acres of land at present lying fallow or only cultivated during the 

kharif where the construction of new welU should pay; and 
(a) that the great difficulty anticipated in the successful development of the State is 
the dearth of cultivators : 
The construction of tanks and wells and improved means of communication with light 
assessments will doubtless in time attract men. 

There are parts of the State, however, where the prigsent inhabitants are able and willing to 
at oncfe take up land reclaimed or improved, and in consequence the contemplated improvements 
can in such places be taken in band at once« 

The Jeypore Durbar, it may be noted, have cofflratoced Work on the Hindon-Kerowlee 
Boad from their side of the frontier, having liberally sanctioned A28,000 for this important 
line of communication. 

It is anticipated that the entire earthwork of th& whole- road will be* finished before the 
commencement of the rains. 

SS. Extensive measures have been^ in progress dtring th^ y^itr for theimproveineift of the 
jail, many portions of which have been almost entirely re-built.- SurgeoA'-Majolr Spencer on his 
recent tour of inspection expressed himself as much pleased^ with the improvements effected not 
only in the sanitary and other arrangements, but also ia the food and diet of the innsoners. A 
pensioned Darogah, named Abdul Latif, from the Agra Central* Jail, a man of excellent 
character, has been appointed Native Superintendent of the Jail. Under his supervision many 
reforms have been introduced in management and discipline, and the prisoners are being taught 
many useful industries. The general health of the prisoners has been good. The daily 
average number of sentenced prisoners in jail has been 75. There have been 5 deaths during 
the year. 

DISFBirJSAaillSL 

84. The Head-Quarters Dispensary is largely attended, and is' being much enlarged 
and improved. A small hospital for in-door patients is also being constructed. Mr. Thomas 
Bomare and Bhowany Singh have been the Hospital Assistants in attendance during the year, 
and both during the cholera epidemic and since have rendered excellent service. They 
are both very popular with the people. During the year a fourth dispensary has been opened at 
Machilpur with a full staff of assistants and supply of medicines and instruments. 

These local dispensaries are greatly appreciated by the rural population who attend them 
in large numbers. 

The total number of patients that have received relief during the year is as follows :— 















Ditpeniuies. 












In-door. 


Outdoor: 


TOIAI. 


Eerowlee 


« 


278 


7,000 


7,278 


8apotra. 


....... 


... 


2,668 


2,658 


Mandrail 


....... 




1,812 


1,812 


Maohilpur 


Qbavd Total 

r-: TT^. =r^ ■■ - "ly 


3 


3,043 


3,046 




281 


14j^3 


U794 



Vaccination is successfully carried on throughout the province: Of 2,382 cases, 2,041 proved 
successful. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB RAJPUTAKA 8TATBS TOE 1S84.85. 137 

CBIHS. 

85. There have been very few iostances of serioas crime daring the year. Theie was one 
case of seemingly deliberate patricide in the city in the month of December 1884. It appeared, 
however, on enquiry that there was grave reason to doabt whether the murderer was responsible 
for his actions. His mind was deemed to be affected, and he consequently escaped capital 
punishment. There were 3 petty dakaities which took place at the time of the Sheoratri fair* 
in February 1886, apparently committed by the same gang responsible for the outrages 
reported last year. No clue has been obtained as to the identity of the robbers, notwithstanding 
that all efforts were made to this end. 

IITFAKTICIDE. 
56. There has been no case of infanticide during the year. 

SZTBADITION OF OBIMHTALS. 

37. The opemtion of the rules for the mutual extradition of criminals has been extended 
for a further period of 12 months by the Kerowlee State Council and the Durbars of Jeypore, 
Pholpore and fihurtpore« The rules would work smoothly, and efficiently enough did the 
native officials on either «ide of the frontier limit themselves to carrying out their provisions to 
the letter. They will> however, persist in putting their own ;interpretation upon them 
which varies with each particular case, and so defeats the object for which the rules were 
drawn up. Matters in this respect are, however, working more smoothly, and the rules, even .as 
at present utilised, conduce to a better state of affairs for the surrend^ of criminals than that 
formerly in vogue. 

FBUIT CULTIVATION. 

38. With the exception of oRinges and pomegranates no fruit of any kind has ever been 
cultivated in Kerowlee, the soil of which has, nevertheless, shown itself singularly adapted 
for the cultivation of all kinds of fruit trees, flowers, and vegetables. 

The Council, with the view of introducing the more common varieties of Indian fruit trees, 
obtained [a large consignment of peach, apricot, apple, peas, loquat, plaintain, graft, 
mangoe, guava, pomaltoe, {aloocha, aloo-bookhara, falsa,, bilice from Saharanpur, which 
have been planted out under the superintendence of a trained gardener obtained from the same 
place, who remains to look after their cultivation. In the same way endeavours are being 
made to introduce the cultivation of the potatoe on a considerable scale. The experiment will 
be carefully reported upon later. 

SILOS. 

39. Experimental silos have been constructed at the head-quarters of the various per- 
gunnahs, their object and advantages being carefully explained to the zemindars. One made 
in the Political Agent's compound last September has just been opened. The contents were 
found to be in excellent order, and bullocks eat the stored ensilage heartily. The silos in the 
districts will shortly be opened, and every endeavour made to induce the people generally to 
adopt this cheap and useful method of storing forage, which ought to be specially useful in 
Kerowlee where during the rainy season grass can be obtained in enormous quantities. 

AMEBGABH. 

40. The administration of this small estate continues to give very satisfactory results. Of 
the remaining balance of debt, fi5,213, recorded last year, S3,294 have been paid off during 
the year, leaving a balance of fil,919 still due against the estate. 

A new bund calculated to hold up 560 millions cubic feet of water is now in course of 
construction under the superintendence of the Executive Engineer. The work is calculated to 
cost ftl6,927 of which H10,000, have been borrowed with the sanction of the Agent to the 
Governor General. The remaining sum represents the cost of labour which will be furnished 
gratis by the subjects of the young Thakur of Amergarh. The Thakur's residence at 
Amergarh is also going to be re-built 

OOOMITT DEBTS AT SIEBOWLEE. 

41. Of the fi7,240-5-9 due on this head at the close of the preceding year, 113,670-7-6 
have been paid off, leaving a balance of B;3,5 69-14-3 still to be coUected. 

TRANSIT DUTIES. 

4i. In the month of December 1884, the Kerowlee State Council aboUshed, with my con- 
currence and the Agent to the Governor General's approval, the whole of the transit duties levied 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



188 BEPOBT 07 THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

on merchaDdise of all description passing throngh the State limits^ save only those levied on 
opium and intoxicating drags which have been retained as heretofore, and in the case of opium 
has been slightly increased from fi4 to fi6 per maund. This liberal action of the Council was 
approved of by His Excellency the Viceroy^ and it was intimated to the Council that His 
Excellency had received the intelligence of the abolition of the transit duties with much 
satisfaction. 

IflSCELLANEOUS. 

43. The boy Moti Pal, nephew of His Highness the Maharajah/ still continues at the 
Mayo College, Ajmere. He is benefitting much from the training and education received 
there. Two young lads, brothei-s, the sons of the Thakur of Fattehpur, will also be sent to the 
Mayo College at their father's expense next term. 

The health of the Maharajah continues excellent. 

My relations with His Highness are of a very cordial and friendly character. 

In February 1885, Colonel Bradford visited Kerowlee in the course of his annual tour, 
entering the territory on the 4th February 1886 and quitting it on the 9th of the same month. 

Colonel Bradford remained two days at the capital and had several interviews with His 
Highness. The Maharajah of Bhurtpore accompanied Colonel Bradford to Kerowlee from 
Dholpore and exchanged visits with His Highness the Maharajah of Kerowlee. 

FOIiITICAIi AGENT'S TOUB. 

44. During the course of the year the Political Agent visited the Maehilpur^ Mandril^ 
Utjut, Testa, and Huzoor Tehsils. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OV THB SAJPUTANA STATES POB 1884-8S. 
APPENDIX A. 

Annual Statement of Temperature and Rainfall at Bhartput for the gear 1884-85, 



139 



MonBi. 



April 1884 

May 

Jane 

July 

Augnst 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 1885 

February 

March 



Daily average for the yeiir 



TncpsmATUBa* 



94-60 
10212 
10803 
96 25 
87-74 
88-28 
85 

7770 
68-12 
67-64 
69-89 
84-48 



86-85 



84-60 
92-51 
97-01 
89-61 
8516 
8i-88 
7909 
69-06 
61*64 
68-42 
61-85 
75-60 



78-69 



i 



89-60 
97-81 
98-84 
92'98 
86-45 
86-53 
82-04 
78-38 
64-88 
66-53 
65-60 
79-99 



82-02 



BAXnAKL. 



8 
16 



82 



I 



18 
47 
60 
79 
60 



12 
25 

20 



21 



Total rain fall for 
the year. 



APPENDIX B. 

Comparative Statement of Price-eurrent of principal Food-graim in the City of Bhartpur 

during the years 1883^4 and 1884-85. 



MovfBa. 



April 
May . 

Jane 

Jnly 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 



Wheat. 



S. C. 
21 
20 14 
18 1 
18 13 
16 



17 
17 
17 
17 



18 11 
18 10 
18 11 



1889-84. 



Barely. 



S. C. 
80 
80 9 
28 4 

27 4 
22 9 
24 8 
22 9 

22 15 

23 7 
23 11 
23 9 

28 11 



Jowsr. 



S. C. 
28 4 
28 4 
27 4 
21 11 
20 



22 
22 
22 
22 



22 11 

22 11 

23 8 



Gram. 



S. C. 
29 8 
28 
26 

26 4 

21 8 
28 7 

22 11 

27 7 
22 7 
22 11 
22 15 
24 11 



1884^. 



Wheat. 



8. C. 
18 7 

18 7 
17 11 

17 11 

19 8 

18 15 
18 11 
18 6 



19 
19 
20 



19 8 



Barely. 



S. C. 
24 11 

24 3 

22 15 

23 2 
26 7 
26 8 

25 8 

28 12 

26 14 

29 8 
81 
80 8 



Jowiir. 



8. C. 

23 8 

28 8 

21 

22 8 
22 8 
22 8 
22 8 

28 8 

29 12 
29 12 
82 7 
80 3 



Oram. 



8. C. 
22 8 
20 18 
20 10 
20 11 
22 11 
22 8 
22 7 

22 14 

23 6 

24 9 
24 11 
24 2 



APPENDIX C. 

Statement ehomng the work performed by the Criminal Courts of the Bhartpur State during 

the Sambat year 1940, 







i 


1 
1 










No. 


NuEB o* CoTrat. 


o 


1 


1 


1 


•s 


s 






Q 


o< 


'^ 


H 


Q 


o« 


1 


Magistrate of Bhartpur . . . . 


Appeal . . 


2 


27 


29 


27 


2 


2 


Do. do. .... 


Original 


18 


1.170 


1,188 


1.171 


17 


3 


Subordinate CourU 


Do. . . 


80 


8,055 


8,085 


3,087 


48 


4 


Magistrate of Dig and Mewat 


Appeal . 


..• 


5 


6 


5 


... 


5 


Do. do. ... 


Original 


... 


1,515 


1,515 


1,515 




6 


Subordinate Courts 


Do. . 


14 


8,419 


8,483 


8,390 


43 


7 


Deorhi 

Total 


Do. . 


... 


458 


458 


452 


6 




... 


64 


9,649 


9.713 


9,597 


116 



18 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



140 



ESPOET OF THE POLITICAIi ADMINISTBATIOK 



APPENDIX D. 



SluUmenH showing the work performed by the Civil Courts of the Bhartpur State during the 

Sambat year 1940. 



No. 


Namx 0* COVK. 


Description o( 

CttM. 


Pending 

from iMt 

year. 


iDftitated. 


TotiL 


DIepoeed 
of. 


Peodlng. 


1 


Judge of Bhartpur 


Appeal 




10 


10 


9 


1 


2 


Do. do. 


OriKinal 


52 


470 


522 


488 


89 


8 


Subordinate Courts 


Do. 


88 


288 


271 


249 


22 


4 


Jndge of Dig and Mewat . , . . 


Appeal 


... 


11 


11 


11 


■•■ 


6 


Do. do. 


Original 


... 


169 


159 


159 


.«. 


6 


Subordinate Conrtfl 


Do. 


U 


252 


263 


248 


20 


7 


Deorhi 

Total 


Da 


•*• 


20 


20 


18 


2 




• 


96 


1.160 


1»256 


1,172 


84 



APPENDIX E. 

Statement showing the receipts and expenditure of the Bhartpur State for the Sambat year 194[): 



No. 



Bbcxipis. 



Land revenue 

Other items of income from other 
parganas 

Saltpetre . . . . 

Adminstration and Public Depart- 
ment . . . . 

Customs 

Public Works Department 
Mint 



Total 
Tadcavi and oth«r Uant 



GsAimTbTAL 



AmottQt. 



S a. jp, 

• 17,26,067 8 8 

4^73,177 12 
and 79 gold mohurs. 

4,172 8 

28,452 5 9 

2,85,987 10 8i 

5,691 1 8 

1,258 11 8 



25.24,807 4 2i 
and 79 go)d mohurs. 
1.50,752 9 8 



26,75,569 18 5i 
and 79 gold mohurs. 



No. 



17 



EXPUDRUBS. 



Land reveniito with parganas 
Customs 
Administration and Pable De- 
partment • . • 
Boad and Irrigation Works 
Other Darbar establishments 
Public Works Department 
Army .... 
Civil List 

Religious and charitable grants 
Pensions 

Police .... 
Education 
Medical services 
Stationery 

Foreign services — Vakils 
Mbcellaneous 



Total 

Taocavi and other advances 

OsASD Total 



Amonnt. 



X a. p. 

1,47,822 10 6 

20,028 11 6 



55,724 4 9 
61,297 1 6 
6,89,261 5 3 
1,97.610 8 6 
6,74,639 6 
2,08 986 2 
1,49,177 11 
33,850 10 
1,22,267 16 
28,888 18 
13,284 
2,867 4 
22,254 
92^78 6 9 
& 126 geld mohufs. 



23,64^962 10 
& 126 gold mobius. 
1,43,195 9 



26,08,17 7 11 6 
& 126 gold BHibuia. 



APPEKDIX P. 
Annual Return of Schools in ihe Bhartpur State for the Sambat year 1940. 



NiBes of Schools. 



Bhartpur College 
Sewur Cantonment Scb oo 
Tebsil Schools 
Halkabundi Schools 
Visitors 



pes 



TotAX. 



1 
1 

12 
158 



172 



DDABTMBn An> Anflvsuroa. 



52 



52 



128 

20 

827 

183 



658 



i 

n 



168 

76 

587 

2,841 



3,172 



30 



30 



•31 



878 

96 

914 

2,524 



3,912 



k: 



20 

4 

40 

165 

1 



230 



Annnal 
expenditure. 



R a. p. 
23,338 13 6 



23,338 13 6 



BXKABBS. 



Four new Sadur 
schools were open- 
ed and 8 abolished. 

Eight students were 
employed as teach- 
ers and 1 as an 
apprentice in the 
IjUui Khas. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



01" TBB UAJPtJTANA STATES POB 1884^8. 



Ul 



APPENDIX 0. 

Annual Return of Hotpitalt and Dispensariei in the Bhartpur State for the year 1S84. 













1 

! 






Ho. 


Names of Hospitals and Dispensaries. 


1 


1 


1 


j 


i 


Ob 


Anonal expenditure, 

iQclading salariee^ 

medicines, kc. 


1 

2 

8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 


Unab Hospital • 
Sewnr Jail Hospital 
Bbartpnr Dispensary 
Dig Dispensary , 
Kama Dispensary 
Pabari Dispensary 
Qopalgarh Dispensary 
Akbeygarb Dispensary 
Bbosawnr Dispensary 
Weir Dispensary . 
Bayana Dispensary 
Bupbas Dispensary 
Ucbein Dispensary 


^» 


, • 


16 
3 

10 
8 
8 
2 

a 

3 


5,1^9 

18,776 
7,408 
4,948 
4,417 
2,491 
1,681 
6,705 
8,586 
8,244 
4.174 
2,196 


1.122 
794 

... 


704 
699 

... 
••• 


174 
81 

205 


166 
24 

189 


81 
11 

42 


48 
29 

77 


\ R a. p. 
\ 18,284 9 
/ 




Total 
Vaccinating operations 


62 


68,785 


1,916 


1,408 






6 


14,879 


18,660 
Success- 
ful. 


819 
Failed. 


... 




... 


... 






= 


TOTAl 


J • 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


.... 


... 


18,284 9 



AFPENLIX H. 

Bhartpur Jail Return for^ the Sambat year 1940. 











HimDlTB. 


MUHAXXASAVS. 




Tnocs ov iMnaoMnin. 




J 






. 




1 








OBAin» 
Total. 




o 


1 


i. 


a 


3 


1 


i. 


^ 


3 






& 


^ 


& 


U 


H 


^ 


& 


O 


^ 




ForHfe 


4 


2 


... 


... 


« 1 


1 








1 


7 


„ 17 years . 

>} 16 n 

« 14 ,, 








1 

1 


i 


::: 


::: 


* 1 

2 


i 

1 








i 

1 


1 

1 
8 


» 12 » 








1 


... 


••« 


•.. 


X 


... 










1 


,. 10 .. . 
8 „ 








1 

1 


*•• 


... 


••• 


1 

1 


1 

1 








i 

1 


2 
2 


•I o » 








6 

10 

8 

20 


' 1 

••• 

"i 


... 


••• 
.•• 

••• 


6 
1 

10 
8 

22 


3 

i 








8 
3 
1 


9 
1 

18 
3 

23 


»f ^ »» 
$9 1 ye" 








8 

3 

18 


••• 

2 


... 


... 


8 

3 

20 


••• 
... 

1 


§•• 






1 

i 


9 
8 

21 


„ $ montbs 






26 


1 


•.t 


•/• 


27 


8 


1 






9 


36 


Under 6 » 






60 


4 


... 


.•• 


54 


9 


... 






9 


63 






TOTAJ 


' 


163 


18 


t.t 


... 


166 


80 


2 


... 


... 


82 


198 



APPENDIX I. 

Cgmparaiive Statement ahowing the increase and decrease of that branch of revenue derived from 
customs in the Bhartpur State during the Sambats 1939 and 1940. 



DXSCXITTIOV Of TsAtno. 



Imports 
Exports 
Transit 



Traffic 



InternaL 



Total 



Income for Sambat 
1939. 



S a. p^ 

86,928 5 6i 

38,496 Hi 

6,643 8 5 



60,666 14 4i 



1,41,619 18 8i 



Income for Sambat 
1940. 



X 9. p, 

40,955 4 6 

83,708 12 

6,183 9 6i 



61,076 7J 



1,30,917 10 8i 



Decrease. 



iff. p. 



4,792 4 llf 
1,369 14 lOi 



9,681 13 8i 



16,734 1 6i 



Increase. 



* a. p. 

6,081 14 111 



6,031 14 llf 



18a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



142 BEPOST 01 THE POLITICAL ADMIXISTRATIOir 

APPENDIX J. 

Annual Statement of Temperature and Rain/all at Kerowlee/or tie year 1884SB. 



MoVTBt. 



April 1884 
May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

December 

January 1885 

Febmary 

March 



Total 



TimsEAfuxa. 



HazlniQiB* 



106 
106 
102 
90 
93 
86 
77 
66 
70 
76 
93 



llinimuB, 



80 
88 
84 
88 
80 
78 
70 
66 
68 
64 
68 



Men. 



90-53 

98:62 

94*83 

90-07 

8636 

84-63 

80-22 

70-40 

60-87 

6184^ 

62*60 



BUWAUn 



loehM. 



8 
7 
8 

14 



29 



6 

4 
12 
81 
74 

S 



31 



APPENDIX X. 

Comparative Statement of Priee^current of principal Food-graine in the City of Kerowlee, during 

the years 1883^4 and 1884^5. 



• 


* 


1888-M. 








1884^. 








MoaniB. 




1 






























Wheat. 


Barley. 


Jowar. 


Gnm. 


Wheat. 


Barley. 


Jowar. 


Oram. 




S. 


C. 


a c 


S. 


C. 


8. 


C. 


S. 


C. 


S. 


c. 


S. 


C. 


S. 


C. 


April . 




19 


10 


28 12 


28 


12 


28 


12 


18 


3 


24 


6 


26 





22 





May . 




19 


6 


26 14 


26 


14 


26 


8 


18 


3 


26 





23 




22 


8 


June 




19 




26 14 


26 


14 


26 


10 


18 


4 


23 


8 


23 




21 


14 


July 




19 




25 10 


26 


10 


26 


6 


18 


12 


26 


10 


23 




22 


10 


AoguBt . 




16 




21 14 


21 


14 


21 


14 


21 


4 


26 


4 


23 


12 


22 


8 


Beptember 




18 




27 8 


27 


8 


30 





20 





23 


14 


26 


14 


28 





October • 




18 




26 14 


26 


4 


26 


4 


20 


3 


27 


11 


26 




23 


16 


November 




18 


12 


26 14 


26 


4 


28 


2 


20 





82 


8 


32 


8 


28 


12 


December ^ 




18 


12 


26 14 


26 


4 


28 


2 


21 


4 


32 


8 


32 


8 


31 


4 


January . 




18 


8 


26 14 


26 


4 


26 


4 


21 


9 


23 


12 


SO 


16 


23 


2 


Febroary 




18 


2 


27 8 


26 





26 


14 


20 


6 


31 


4 


80 





22 


8 


March . 




17 


8 


26 14 


26 





26 





19 


6 


31 


4 


30 





27 


13 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



or THE RAJPUTANA STATES FOB 18S4-85. 



143 



a 



1 



CO 



I 



*. 






•^ 

^ 



§ J 






1^ 
I 
I' 









H 
M 



g 
o 






I 



*£lllp09J 



*jopM0dsKI 



•mox 



'fOMinO 



■tnoxiy 



*Jtofpa0j 



•JO pOBOdB^a 



•mox 



'^TOlilip 



'SJRaxiY 



•floipna^ 



g :2' 



>S^ 



^ ,HlO (H iH 



•JO pawdsia 



Ti^ox 



inaxmo 



'snojiy 



-flaipoaj 



*}o pasodBKI 



•mox 



')txaxjni3 



•sivdxiy 






a^^ass 



s 



ss^gss 



00 :■* :H 



CO 00 O 1-4 00 
00 M '^J»'*iH 






00 :on.H : 



lA^cooo 



O O) 00 l> 00 



s 



a :N :•-« 



*ss ns ^ 'o •H 

lllsl' 



I 



*^ 



St 



•s 

I 









1: 

1* 

I 



.r 



I 

00 



I 



1 1 
1 1 



0»^0<l^ 



gs^s~ 



SS' 



gS*|* 



«eo :^ : 

fH • 



ig 



S 



s 



llllt 






Digitized by 



GoogI( 



UA 



BEPOBT OT THB POLITICAL ADIOKISTSATIOK 



APPENDIX N. 

statement thowity the working of the Civil and Tehtil Court* of the Kerowlee State from 

April 18S4 to 3ht March 1885. 



let 





1^ 


^ 






D18PO8SD OT. 




li 


DncMonOE oi Cms. 


^ 


11 


1 






1"^ 


1 


1 


1 




p. 


i 


1" 


Civil Cottbt. 








• 










Suite exoeediiigR5,000 


... 


1 


1 


••• 


... 


... 


... 


1 


Do. B1,000, bat not exceeding B5J00O . 


••• 


8 


8 


1 


1 


... 


2 


1 


I>o. B600 do. B1,000 . 


1 


8 


8 


2 


... 


• a. 


2 


1 


M. B250 do. 11500 . 


... 


4 


4 


2 


... 


1 


8 


1 


De. BlOO do. B250 . 


8 


7 


9 


8 


1 


8 


7 


2 


Do. B50 do. BlOO . 


8 


11 


14 


9 


.«• 


8 


12 


2 


Do. Bl do. B60 . . 


1 


8 


4 


2 


1 


1 


4 


... 




1 


41 


42 


28 


11 


2 


41 


1 


Total 


8 


72 


80 


47 


14 


10 


71 


9 


Tbesil Coubts. 


















Suit! not n^m^^ng ^fO 


U . 


166 


167 


118 


17 


21 


156 


11 


GxAVD Total 


19 


228 


247 


165 


81 


31 


227 


20 


APPENDIX 0. 








Statement shotcing the work performed hy the Kerowlee Bevenue 


CourtJ 


rom hi April 1884 to 


3hf. JJarch 1885. 










IVtVlT UTXD • 


o 

1 




as 




Natuu ov Cash. 












A.neara. 


Current. 


TotiO. 


§- 














S 




& 




ArwarB of revonne 


li 


. . 89 


50 


43 




7 




ComplaintB concerning revenne 


10 


214 


224 


213 




11 




Cofltoms 


9 


411 


420 


414 




6 




ForoBt 


6 


62 


68 


64 




4 




Garden* 


... 


82 


82 


81 




1 




MifcelUneons 


61 


687 


^ 748 


690 




58 




Total 


97 


1,445 


1,542 


1,456 


87 





APPENDIX P. 

Coniparaiive Statement showing tie number of loys and tkeir daily average attendance in the 
Kerovjlee School during 1883-84 and 1884-85. 



DEPARTMENT AND ATTENDANCE. 


NO. OF TEACH- 
EBS. 


DEPARTMENT AND 
ATTENDANCE. 






Hivsi. 


PBSSXAir. 


TOIAXr. 








EVOLXBH. 




TlAB. 


^ 


^5 


f£ 


1^ 


t 


h. 


£ 


h 


Bxvabkb. 


. 


s 


1 
■s 

i 




1 
1 


il 




P^ 


i 

1 


4 






188S-84 . 


80 


22-82 


66 


58-67 


95 


76-89 


2 


2 


... 


... 


...-. 


Detail of boys reftdioff 
English. 


18B4^ . . . 


178 


10019 


128 


11478 


301 


223-97 


8 


2 


1 


42 


36-90 


25 boya from Persian and 
17 from Hindi attend the 
English Department. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE EiUPUTANA STATES FOB 1884>85. 



1^5 



1 



00 

•♦A 



■4 



^ 



I 



I 

-I 



§ 

I 



•» 

i 

































1 










11 














3 










*-^p-/ 














8 










1^ 














ii 










fl! 
























•41 














nn*! japafl 


^ 








<-< 






-^ 


3 














1 




*lTaiox 


S 


CD 


a 


fe* 


• 


t-4 


s 


«t 


s 


§1^ 
















































i 


*»tTOai 


rt 


'' 


r-t 


^ 


^ '■ 


^ 


^ 


: 


2 


■»mt 


S 


CO 


S 


■0 


I '* 


F-l 


s 


m 


s 


•tI*!D 


; 


: 


I 


i 


: : 


i 


: 


: 


: 








r-l 


i-H 


<-l 


01 






T-4 


ei 


'l-H 


» 




■TTlOX 










; : 


: 






g 



























fi 


viron^ 


: 


: 


: 


; 


: : 


« 


: 


; 


^ 


tf 


3 






















S3 
Q 

a 
-at" 


a 


■»iiw 


I 


; 




r 


: : 


: 


: 


I 


■ 


1 


, 


■epns 


*^ 


: 


: 


: 


: I 


i 


: 


; 


t* 


•ilTOlBd 


s 


2 


€» 


01 


: : 


i 


I 


w 


S 


IHTD 


CO 


; 


: 


; 


I ; 


; 


: 


: 


IP 


S5 
























< 




-DtTOiai 


: 


: 


; 


; 


« * 


: 


: 


: 


^ 




1 






















*c«re 


iH 


«-4 


04 


: 


* ~ 


- 


1-4 


t 


ta 


i 


■tfTOX 


IS 


2 


s 


9 


I * 


iH 


s 


^ 


§ 




'fljraiaj 


m 


I 


-^ 


M 


» - 


: 


«D 


: 


a 


^ 


1 


*BFH 


^ 


0> 


s 


t* 


: ^ 


f-« 


rH 


^ 


S 




'HAO 


ID 


: 


; 


• 


: : 


r 


: 


! 


ID 








OO 


00 


CO 


F^ 


rH 




i-t 




CD 


u 




TTXOX 






ei 






: 




: 


l-H 


























tj 


'flllOISJ 


QD 


T 


: 


! 


; : 


: 


: 


; 


«D 


Si>4 
























h 


1 


^»I*1C 


«9 


QD 


s 


IP-I 


: r^ 


: 


f-4 


^ 


S 


i SH 


u 




p^ 
















m^ 


< 






'!wa 


® : ; I : : : ; I 


to 




^ 


^^ 


l> 


go 


m 


w* 


M 




94 






'^TTIOX 




P4 


iH 




* 




^ 


' 


i> 


J 

4 


^Iimo£ 


oa 


; 


iH 


M 


; ; 


: 


«D 


: 


Ip4 


fcj 


q 
























< 


-aitpt 






S 


CO 


; « 


t-i 


a 


: ! 


8 


r 

OQ 


TWO 


■ 


: 


: 


: 


» • 


: 


^ 


i 


^ 








* 


* 


■ 


• 


. 


. 


. 


» 


^ 






f 


• 


i 


1 


i 


1 ^ 

^ 


I 


■ 


• 


^ 






J 


'' - 


1 




^ 


J 1 


1 


" 


* 








8 

1 


1 


1 


1 
1 


1 


1 i 


1 
1 


• 


1 










B 


S 


^ 


1^1 


fr> c^ 







_g 










«e 


» 


P4 


ao 


10 l> 


p^ 


^ 


^ 










k 




ffii 


9 


« Q 


1 













•1 


1 


1 


1 


■§ 1 


P 


1 




• 








P 


^ 


<«s 


< 


^ < 


< 


N 


S 





Digitized by 



GoogI( 



146 



BEPORT OF THE POLITICAL ADMIKISTEATION 







ocil 



: w ^ 
• ©It* 



^CO CO CO 00 

(v 00 00 a> o 

28^ 8" 



0» 
CD 



S^O 0> Od CO 
Q Od 00 O CO 



O CO! 



Q»)0 N iH t* 

eo oo'iH o* 

f-l©| OQ 



00 



I 




Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE SAJPTJTANA STATES POB 1884.85. 



147 



CO 



it 



8 

5. 



CO 



I 









•^ 
V 









^ 











* 


a 


o 


« 


00 




« 


o 


« 


s. 


^ 


tf 


iH 


t« 


t« 


o 




o 


ie 


to 




^ 


QC 


•H 


' 1 


^s 


1 


: 


1 




fH 
1 


aM«9)oa«qiniiii 




iH 


»^ 


:. * 


04 


: 


t* 


09 


2 








»« 


A 


o o 


t* 00 


00 


O 


s 


CO 


«* 






^ 


«' 


lO 


0» t* 


o to 


to 


t* 


t» 


00 


1-4 






^ 






^ 


^ 










w4 




1 


QC 


l-« 


I2 


S. 2 

• 


1 


1 


1 


1. 


1 


•Mvo JO i0qiniiK 




l-l 


<N i-i 


CO ^ 






s 


g 


CO 








c^ 




o 

i 


CO CO 


0» 


CO 


09 


o 


09 




i 


1 


« 


. 


a 


O f4 


t» 


to 


iH 


o 


•-< 


i 


1 


QC 






1 s 


& 


09 
11 


^ 


§ 


1 


•wnojOAqoinij 




: 


r^ : 


»- M 


iH 


-^ 


- 


• ^ 


s 






©1 


A 


o 


e> o 


CO 


O 


o 


o 


o 


s 

1 




S 


■a 


0€ 




1 • 


2 2 

3 S 






09 

2 




•* 
1 


Q 










s 


iH 








8" 




S 


^ 




^ 


o 




•^ O) 


o 


o 


i-i 


CO 


l> 




s 


J^5 


1 


« 


00 


• • 


- a 


l> 


o 


« 


04 


00 




1 


r 


^ 


QC 


04 
0« 




1 i 


CO 


s 


1 


1 


1 




£ 






















•atio |0 aaqmiiM 




^ 


^ : 


04 a» 


g 


iH 


'^ 


^4 


to 












• 








04 


e» 


lO 


S 




a« 




o 


o 


CO 


CO 


© 


O 


o 




>? 


•J 


0€ 


• 


'' 1 


o 


vH 


o 


09 


s 

i 


09 




i 
















^ 




M 


•MvojoJMiaraK 




: 


: ^ 


• • 


00 


2 


a 


s 


S 








^ 


CD 


o o 


t^ a» 


CO 


o 


'♦ 


CO 


o 






i 


« 


i-« 


00 "«* 


O CO 


l> 


t« 


04 


00 


s 




H 


•< 


0€ 


1 


H i 


09 O 

s. 1 


1 


1 


04 


1 

f4 


1 


•KW«0|Oj9qtinix 




04 


e« oil 


« a 


M 


lO 

IH 


s 


s 


5 






©1 


O 


o • o 


od eo 


o 


CO 


09 


OJ 


o 


Q 




^ 


n* 


.M 


eo -* 


-* 04 


00 


09 


t* 


09 


W9 


H 


H 


§ 








•-• IH 




iH 




s 






S 

M 


^ 


fit 


1 


g i 


i i 


1 




i 


i 


§ 


ft 


5 






^ 


04 rH 


04" 


11 




;^ 


'^ 


58" 


% 
























•-^ 




'SMtojo aaqanx 




^ 


04 04 


04 -eo 


2 


2 


9 


g 


«-4 






si. 


0» 




o CO 


cc 


CO 


•H 


09 


o 
























IH 






*i 


«' 


lO 




i-i o 


lO 


A 


l-« 


o 


lO 




Si 


< 


OS 


*-4 


: : 


§ 1 


.2 


lO 


^, 


s 


s 




' 






8' 










s 




g 


•wno JO iaqcnnN 




iH 


; : 


rH -* 


04 


lO 


09 




s 








• 


r • 


• 


' 


• 


• 


• 


• 










4a 
















^ 




• 


S ' g 


' 


* 


• 


1 


• 


»4 




!3 


. 




_« ^ 


^ s^ 


8" 


rf 


■d 


g 




8 


5 
1^ 




1 * s 


4 4 


4 


4 




^ J 


H 




1 


1 


1 

M 


1" i 

5g ^ 


S 8 


s 


« 




TkH8] 

not exceed 


O 








2 


S' a 


^ 


4 




S 










s 


S 










a 










1 




cc 


X 










% 





19 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



148 



BEPOET OP THE POLITICAL ABMIKZSTBATIOK 
APPENDIX V. 



Statement showing f-Ae Receipt's and Eirpendilure of the K&rowlee State for the fret nine months of 
the Mative Financial Sambat year 1941 or A. D, 1884-85. 



8 
9 
'lO 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 



24 



Becei^ta. 



Opening balance from 
last year . 



Total 



Lakd Bbybnub. 

Cnrrent reTonue 

Local cesses 

Tributes from Estates 

Tributes from minor 
holders 

Dewani Earoh Import 

Bemmption 

Qardens 

Total 



Othib Bbcbipts. 

Oostoms 
Forests 

Contract, Abkari . 
Contract, Tobacco 
„ Batchers 
Mint • 
Judicial 
Nasool 
Kaxla shrine . 
Stamping weights 
Second marriage impost 
Heavy fines . • 
Fines from absentees 
Miscellaneons 
Salt agreement • 
Pnnchayet cases . 
Arrears 

Total 

Opening balance from 
hwtyear • 

Total of itbicb 1 to 7 

„ „ „ 8to24 

Carried oyer 



Estimate for 

the whole 
year 1884-85. 



J? a. p. 
15,000 



15,000 



2,98,138 

1,694 

23,573 

4,853 

502 

8,222 

1,600 



1,80,658 4 r 

1,546 3 ( 

17,794 

8,403 8 

452 8 

2,443 3 6 

891 12 9 



8,83,577 



70,000 

6,000 

1,600 

1,100 

180 

20 

5,000 

700 

8,000 

Nil 

NU 

500 

4,000 

3,000 

5,695 

Nil 

10,000 



1,15,795 



15,000 
3,33,577 
1,15,795 



Actuals for 

9 months of 

1884-85. 



J? a, p, 
5,133 4 3 



5,133 4 3 



2,07,189 7 3 



45,676 11 

4.105 9 

1,244 

704 

180 

10 2 

4^493 8 6 

233 8 

Nil 

188 6 

NU 

680 7 

8,127 13 3 

1,862 11 6 

5,694 15 

Nil 

19,198 1 8 



87,399 13 3 



5,133 4 3 
2,07,189 7 3 
87,399 13 8 



Expenditure. 



Arrears 



Total 



Palagb. 

Kitchen A wardrobe 

Purchases . 

Betel leayes 

Gifts or rewards 

Festivals . » 

Presents or retnm 
presents . 

Guests • 

Excursions . 

Belations of Chief 



Total 



Abvt and Adkinis- 
tbation. 

Army 

Council 

Judicial Department 

Bevenne Department 

Account Department 

Treasury . 

Vakils 



Total 



Estimate for 

the whole 
year 1884^. 



Ji a. p. 



14,220 

1,000 

1,060 

1,500 

5,925 

500 

1,000 

3,000 

19.375 



47,580 



1,27,187 « 

8,410 

11,201 

14,775 

2,896 

1,385 

1,650 



1,67,504 



Actuals for 

9 lionths of 

1884^. 



J? a. p. 

860 7 8 



860 7 3 



11,860 15 

425 11 9 

548 8 9 

1,477 4 6 

4,039 

69 3 9 

1,164 18 9 

1,115 8 6 

16,802 2 3 



36,908 4 8 



84,547 14 8 

5,779 

7,002 18 

9,364 6 

1,888 10 3 

922 10 9 

1,009 8 8 



1,10,514 14 6 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB SLAJPUTiiKA STATES FOB 1884.86. 



140 



S^atemeni slowing ike Beeeipts and Eapendilure of the Kerowlee State for ti^ fir.*t nine montH 
of tie Native Financial Samdat year 1941 or A. D. 1884^5--^ ntiuueci. 



i 


Beoeipts. 


Eatimate for 

the whole 
year 1884^. 


Actuals for 

9 months of 

1884^85. 


;z; 


Hxpenditiize* 


the whole 
year 1884-85. 


Actuals for 

9 months of 

1884^. 




Bronght f orwwd . 








Othxb Fixed Ebtab* 
libhirnt. 














17 


TTfiVifnM and Balds 


1»550 


1.054 9 










18 


Pandits . 


2,653 


1,777 18 










19 




17.676 


11,688 18 9 










20 


Poet Office . 


190 


109 8 










21 


Jail ... . 


2,727 


2,946 18 9 










22 


School 


1,900 


1,089 14 9 










23 


Dispensaries 


4,900 


2,628 14 










24 


Customs 


8,245 


5,314 4 6 










25 


Workshops 


4,267 


3,895 9 










26 


Horse Stables . 


13,578 


9,488 10 9 










27 


Elephants • 


6,030 


3,411 8 8 










28 


Camels 


1,750 


1,058 12 9 










29 


Bnllocks . 


3,525 


2,390 1 3 










30 


Hunting Establishment 


3,870 


2,358 6 6 










81 


Commissariat • 


1,188 


689 8 ft 










32 


Forests ... 


2,892 


1,755 9 










38 


Gardens . 

Total 

Public Wobks. 


8,452 


6,207 13 ft 




85,393 


57,249 9 8 
















84 


Buildings . 


9.000 


6,372 8 9 










36 


Boads 

Total 

MlSCBLLANXOtrS. 


1,500 


360 8 




10,500 


6,732 5 9 




■ 












36 


Stationery • 


1,600 


1,099 8 8 










37 


Lighting . . . 


1.100 


1,099 5 8 

1 










88 


Trayelling allowanoes . 


8,000 


1,884 8 9 










88 


land . . . 


800 


470 8 










40 


Fort expenses . 


3,450 


8,766 ft 










41 


Charities . 


17,000 


11,814 18 ft 










42 


Neota (marriage pre- 
sents) 


500 


222 7 










48 


Uniform • 


IfiX 


Ifil 










44 


Pnnohayet oases 


500 p 


490 8 ft 










45 


Compensation to iagir- 
dars under Salt Agree- 
ment 


895 


ft9415 










46 


Pension 


4,480 


2.997 13 8 










47 


Sundries . 


1,000 


478 4 ft 










48 


TJnforseen expenses • 


6,000 


ft,398 14 9 










48 


Interest on debt 


10,000 


6,412 1 




OarriedoTer . 






50 


PoUiioal Agency and 
Establishment . 

Total. . 


14.000 




8,954 18 




64^125 


45.783 14 8 



19 a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



150 



BBPOBT 07 THE POLITICAL ABMINISTllATIOK 



Statemeni thawing the RecelpU and Expenditure of the Kerowlee State for the first nine months 
of the Native Financial Sambatyear 1941 or A.JD, iS8^-6@— concluded. 



i 


Ifeceipts. 


Estimate for 

the whole 
year 1884^. 


Actuals for 

9 montiis of 

1884-85. 


1 


Ezpenditore. 


Estimate for 

the whole 
year 1884^. 


Aotnalsfor 

9 months of 

1884^. 




Brought forward 
GEAND.TOTAL . 


4,64,872 


2,99,728 8 9 




Abbbabs . 

Total of itiks 1 to 
9 . . . . 

Total of itekb 10 to 
16 . . . . 

Total of itxhs 17 to 
83 ... . 

Total of itxhs 84 to 
85 ... . 

Total of itbhs 86 to 
50 ... . 

GBAND TOTAL . 


47,580 
1,67,504 
85,886 
10,500 
64^125 


860 7 8 

86,996 4 8 

1,10,514 14 6 

57,249 9 8 

6,782 5 9 

45,738 14 8 




8,75,102 


2,58,089 7 8 



APPENDIX V. 

Rough foreeatt of probable expenditure during the next six months on Public Works in the Kerowlee 

State. 



DMcriptioB of Work. 



Eotimatod unoimt. 



Bbmabks. 



Jail and Dispensary 
Maindki crossings . 
Hindon-Kerowlee Bead 
Nynea-ki-Qwari Band 
Eaila-deyi Eund 
DabraTank . 
Kaila-devi Bead 



Gbahd Total 



i? a. p. 

4,000 

1,000 

26,000 

5,000 

4,500 

6,000 

8,000 

62,600 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB BAJPUTANA STATES FOB 1884-86. 



151 



HABOWTI AND TONE AGENOT BEFOET FOB 1884-85. 



Bandl. 

Tonk. Sbahpon. 

If eeoA Kherar. 



No. 14P., dated Tonk, 30th June 1885. 
JFV^m— LiBurBNAKT-CoLovBL W. J. W. MuiB, Political Agent, Hmt'owti and Tmk, 
To — The Firtt Aisistant Agent to the Governor' General in Bajputana, 

I have the honor to submit the Annual Report 
of the States of this Agency for the year 1884-85. 



MOSTHS. 


DeoU. 


Tonk. 


Sbabpnia. 




In. 


Cte. 


In. 


eta. 


In. 


eta. 


April 1884 .. . 


... 


... 


... 


... 




... 


May 








18 




6 


... 


20 


June „ 






% 


4 


8 


19 


8 


60 


Jaly ,. , 






11 


6B 


7 


67 


• 6 


86 


Angut M 






6 


70 


6 


11 


6 


10 


September,, 






8 


68 


6 


96 


8 


20 


.October ,. 








8 




... 


... 


81 


Norember „ 






... 


... 


... 




... 


... 


December „ 






... 


... 


... 


41 


... 




Janiux7l886 






... 


... 


..• 


11 


... 


7 


February „ . 






... 




... 


... 


... 


... 


Mttoh ,. 






... 


... 


23 


40 


... 


... 




Total 


I . 


83 


18 


23 


74 



6ENEBAL. . 

BAINFALL AND CBOPS. 

2. The rainfall of the year as given on the margin was not quite two-thiids of the 

average^ and was insufficient for tanks and 
wells, which in consequence were not filled. 
Field operations began with the first good 
fall in June, and though subsequently re- 
tat-ded for a time were recommenced in July. 
In August the falls were somewhat heavy, 
causing damage to such of the Indian-corn 
as was on low ground. The rain in Septem- 
ber was good and general, and allowed of 
the rabi operations being carried on success- 
fully. The total failure^' however, of the 
usual winter showers, and frost judt as grain 
was about to form, interfered with the growth, 
the outturn as a rule being below the average. 
In the Tonk district of Aligarh the rainfall 
is reported to have been very scanty, where- 
by the crops were much injured. 

HiSALTH. 

8. The general health throughout the year was everywhere good save in Tonk, where 181 
deaths occurred from cholera in August and September. The disease also appeared slightly 
in the Aligarh and Sironj districts of Tonk, and in the Elapran one of Bundi. Measles was 
everywhere prevalent through the cold weather, and the mortality among children especially 
in Tonk in March very severe. 

CBOPS. 

4. The area brought under cultivation in both crops was slightly in excess of the past 
year. Both crops were as a rule, save in the Aligarh district, where they were poorer, avera^re 
ones, though some products were slightly injured by frost and the absence of the Christmas 
showers. Opium owing to blight was a 10 to 12-anna one. In the the Tonk Central India 
districts the crops were good ones. 

6. The grass crop was everywhere below the average. 

PBICES. 

6. The prices of food-grains throughout the year are given in Appendix A. They are 
cheaper than they have been for many years, and at times there was but little sale. This 
doubtless accounts for the marked decrease in crime. 

OFFEBS OF SEBVICB. 

7. All three Chiefs with characteristic loyalty placed themselves and the resources of their 
States at the service of the British Government in connection with events in the Soudan and 
on the Afghan border. Each had commenced to collect and arrange for carriage when events 
rendered this unnecessary. 

LONDON EXHIBITION. 

8. All three States are assisting in having contributions of their arts and manufactures 
prepared as exhibits for the London Colonial and Indian Exhibition of 1886. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



152 BEPOST OF THE POLITIOAL ADMIKISTBATIOK 

BXJNDL 
HIS HIQHNESS TBE MAHA&AO BAJA AND FAMILY. 

9. His Highness the Mahafao Raja was somewhat ailiug in health in the rains and cold 
weather^batonarecent visit I found him, though ageing, hearty and well, and riding as erect as 
ever. His Highness, however, is gradually withdrawing from that direct control wliich has distin-' 
gnished his reign, and occupying himself more and more in his family and religious duties. 
The administration is largely left to the Minister, important matters alone being submitted 
for orders. In December His Highness had the pleasure of a visit From Professor Peterson of 
the Bombay University, who was travelling through Harowti in search of manuscripts, and 
in February of receiving Sir Edward Bradford on his way to Kotah. In the end of March 
His Highness, accompanied by his entire family, started for Keshorai Patau for the purpose of 
bathing during the eclipse, subsequently making a lengthened tour through the northern portion 
of the State. His Highness has during the year so far consented to forego established proce- 
dure as to affix his signature to kbaritas. 

10. His Highnesses eldest son Maharaj Knnwar Eaghobir Singh is a Sne, manly young 
fellow of between 15 and 16, who while pursuing his studies takes a recognized part in affiurs. 
Be has continued and iSnished the '' Lagho-Ko-mudi'^ and ** Amar-Kos,'' and commenced the 
" Mannu SumirtL ^^ Urdu, which was again deferred for a year, is once more spoken of, but as 
he has been well grounded in Sanscrit and it is a question of either Urdu or English, I have 
suggested the latter — a view in which His Highness informs me he concurs, especially as it is 
in consonance with the Maharaj Kunwar^s own wishes. The year has largely been devoted to 
the completion of his education in field sports, a very essential portion of every Rajput's 
training, under his elder (natural) brother Kunwar Arjan Singh, who is devoted to such pur- 
suits, and to whom their father had entrusted him. His first two tigers were killed in March-* 
an event celebrated with the usual presentation of nazars. His establishment and expenditure 
are now quite distinct. In official matters he receives the reports of the troops, while various 
minor miscellaneous questions are submitted to him by the Minister. He is further associated 
by his father with himself in all consultations, with a view to gaining a gradual insight into 
State affairs. It is very pleasant to watch the perfectly natural though respectful manner of 
the son to the father, and the relations between them. 

11. The education of the two next sons, aged 18 and 10, is being carefully carried on. 
With a view to forming a fund for them on coming of age, the income of the jagirs, which 
were last year apportioned to them, has since July 1884 been separated from the State 
receipts. 

THE ADMINISTBATIQN. 

12. The administration is carried on by the Kamdar Pandit Ganga Sahai, who, notwith- 
standing reports persistently circulated to the contrary during the year, appears to possess his 
master's full confidence. He is not popular, as he retains everything, even to the pettiest 
details, in his own hands, is determined and unflinching. The great object, o| the Adminiatia^ 
tion is economy, which is strictly enforced to give effect to the Chiefs desire to form a provi- 
sion for his family. 

13. For the first time for some years no change has been made in the system of adminis- 
tration or the officials. These are the same as given in last report. 

SEVENUB. 

14. Of the 486 khalsa villages of the State 246 were, as mentioned list year, leased for 
Bs. 2,47,645 (not Rs. 2,45,445). l)f these, ten of the value of Rs. 19,253 have during the 
year been withdrawn on account of the Chiefs second and third sons, while the leases of 
eight, n^presenting Rs. 21,919, have been thrown up, leaving 228 yielding Rs. 2,06,473. 
Twenty-five villages have, on the other hand, been farmed for Rs. 15,217, making a total of 258 
villages leased for Rs. 2,21,690. Twenty-one villages have been allotted to the eldest Kunwaraui 
and two sons, leaving 212 under direct management. with an income of &«<. l,7S,31o. 

CUSTOMS. 

15. The customs in Sumbat 1940 ending 8th July 1884 are exhibited i|s yielding 
Rs. 89,500, a sum which would have been exceeded had it not been for the falling.off in the 
opium trade. Since March 1885 the following changes have been introduced in the tariff : 

English Cloths.— From Rs. 2 per maund to one anna per Rupee. 

Import,-^' <^ Sugar, spices metals, and") 

> From Rs. 1-4 to Rs.. 3 per maund. 
dried fruits. j 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE BAJFUTANA STATES FOB 1884-86. 



163 



Export. Opium.— From Re, 7 to Rs. 10 per maund. 
Trtmnt. Grain, — From Annas 2 to Anna 1 per mannd for 1 year. 

The remission of export duty on grain bas owing to its cheapness been continued for 
dfi6ther year. 

EHABI COMPENSATIGIT. 

16. The Darbar has not yet arranjred for the grant of compensation to its Sardars and 
Jagirdars (with the exception of Eapran) for the loss of their khari dues. It is promised that 
this shall now be done. 

MINT. 

17. No money ol any description was coined during the year at the mint. 

THE FINANCES. 

18. The accounts of the State for Sumbat 1940y ending 8th July 1884^ have not, it is 
said, been ycft regularly made up. The estimate given shows an income of Rs. 5,48,427, and 
an expenditure of Rs. 6,43,744, or a deficit of Rs. 75,317. The land revenue is stated to have 
sunk to Rs. 4,00,000 consequent on the alienation of jagirs to the eldest son's Rani and the 
second and third 66ns find to the fall in prices. 

JTTDICIAI.. . 

19 The following is a statement furnished of the work performed by the several Courts :-^ 



COUBM. 


Bemainiug. 


Instituted. 


TotaL 


Decided. 


Pending. 


Panchayefc 


•. • • • 


••• 


134 


134 


92 


42 


Tehf a Pargana 


. 


16 


551 


667 


518 


64 


Kacheri Niyiio . 


Total 


16 


1,387 


1,408 


1,289 


114 




82 


2.072 


2,104 


1,894 


210 



POLICE. 

20. Police arrangrements are unchanged. More activity, however, has been exhibited by 
the ofBcials, and this, aided largely no doubt by the cheapness of food, has led to a decrease 
of crime. Only two dakaities occurred against eight last year. Both were attacks on villages. 
In the one, propei-ty to the value of Rs. 1,470 was carried ofE by 80 armed men, one of whom 
believed from liis dres^^ and shoes to have been a Bhil of Bijolian in Meywar, was shot when 
retiring; in the other, property valued at Rs. 450 by 15 men who where tracked to a Meywar 
village. 

21. The representations of this office on the subject of last year's dakaities induced the 
Darbar to appoint a Special Officer, Rahim Beg, to try and trace the perpetrators. He has worked 
hard and well, and in the face of many difficulties secured the arrest of seven, subjects of 
Meywar. Another notorious Meywar offender, by name Sirrii, a Meena, was traced by him to 
a secluded village of the Kotra district of Indore, but escaped. Owing to the absence of co- 
operation on the part of the Jehazpnr authorities action in the serious Bhami dakaiti case 
has been very much impeded. 

22. More efficient arrangements have also been decided on for the protection of the main 
road through the State, a measure which was very much required for the ordinary safety of 
travellers, but wbiofa the amount of silver and other valuable articles now carried by the Gov- 
ernment post has brought hom« to the State. The posts are to be increased from 9 with 50 
sepoys to 19 with 66 sepoys aud of 20 sowars. Some of these are already in course of con* 
atruction. 

THE JAIL. 

23. The strong remonstrances made to the Darbar regarding the disgraceful condition of 
the jail have once more placed it on a proper footing. The building, which was selected and 
arranged by myself in 1869-70 to secure the prisoners' quarters fit for human beings to live 
iOj is ojfen and airy ; and on my late visit I was glad to find it clean and the occupants cared for. 
A portion of the small upper corner forming the women's ward was being coverd in, but is very 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



1E4 



BEPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMIKISTRATIOIT 



Prlwmers. 


Hen. 


Women. 


Total. 


Life 

Term 

Under-trial . 


la 

48 
8 


8 
18 

••• 


18 

61 

8 


Total . 


61 


21 


82 



• Ri. 71,689. 



confined. Outside^ bat in a corner of a garden a row of ma* 
sonry latrines has been erected. On the Slat March 1886 
there were 61 men and 21 women in confinement. The 
average monthly number through the year had been 99. 
Five Brahmin prisoners now cook for the Hindus^ instead of 
as previously each man for himself. The garden had^ I was 
sorry to find, l^een again leased instead of having been made 
over as promised to the prisoners for raising vegetables* It 
will however be retained for thera in the future. 

PUBLIC WOBKS. 

M. The embankment of the new tank in the valley to the north- west of the capital, 
mentioned as completed in the last report, has been raised 8 feet. The lower embankment, 
about a mile to the south of the town, has been finished at a cost of Rs. 6,506. 

THE HIGH BOAD. 
26. The plans, sections, and estimate* of the 37 miles of the Nasirabad, Deoli, Bundi, and 
Eota road falling in Bundi territory, so kindly prepared by Mr. Miles, 
Executive Engineer, Kota and Jhallawar, were early forwarded to the 
Darbar. Mr. Miles' suggestions, which were most considerate, were strongly endorsed by this 
ofiSce. These were that the Rs. 6,000 or 7,000 guaranteed annually should be spent gradually 
in building causeways across the nallas, which are so serious an obstacle in the rains, and that 
a capable person should be entertained for th^ work. To assist this new employe Mr. Miles 
further offered to supervise the construction of the first causeway. These proposals were first 
agreed to, but subsequently modified, and a commencejnent has been made on the Mej Nadi. 
On my recent visit, however. His Highness informed me that he would accept Mr. Miles' sug- 
gestions in their entirety, especially the employment of a qualified person, there being none in 
the State. It was also agreed that a small sum should annually be allowed to keep the present 
track passable. 

EDUCATION. 

26. No progress has been made as regards the regular establishment or conduct of the 
Baj School at the capital. It was not till January that an English teacher was (as had been 
decided in the previous year) engaged, but the incumbent, a F. A. Babu, resigned and left with- 
in a month. An official of the Judicial Kacheri was appointed to take his place. On my 
recent visit, there were, I was informed, 188 boys present, 6 were studying English and 19 
Persian. Of the remainder, who were in the Sanscrit and Hindi classes, it incidentally trans- 
spired that a large number had only been got together within the few days preceding my visit. 
There are said to be 11 district schools with a total of 528 scholars, the II teachers drawing 
from 6 to 8 local rupees per mensem each. 

SANITATION, 

27. Nothing has, I regret to say, been done in the way of sanitation in the capital, 
beyond the erection of 2 pucca latrines, which for all practical purposes might have been left 
unbuilt. 

DISPENSARY. 

28. A building in the town has during the year been set apart for a dispensary to which the 
Native Doctor, Hakims, and Baids in the employ of the State have been in common attached 
with an establishment. The expenditure for the year is given as Bs. 2,959. 

THE KAPBAN CHIEF. 

29. Last year's report mentioned that the Maharaja of Eaprau had submitted himself 
unreservedly to the Darbar, and was again in attendance at the capital. It was not, however, 
till the end of July that a settlement was concluded with him in all details, the expedient of 
granting the Maharaja a permanent lease of the Darbar's dues being resorted to to solve some 
of the difficulties. The fourth of the Kapran receipts were leased for Bs. 11,001, and the 
Customs and Katti dues for Bs. 400, making a total of Bs. 11,401, or, deducting Rs. 100 as 
compensation for Khari right, Bs. 11,801,' payable in two instalments. The arrangement of 
this unfortunate disagreement, which had been existing so long, is a matter of sincere con- 
gratulation. 

BOUNDABY DISPUTES. 

30. Eight boundavy disputes exist between Bundi, and Kota and Tunk. One of the 
latter, that between the village of Bishenpura of Bundi and those of Parla and fiansla of th« 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB &4JPUTANA. 8TATBS K)B 188435. 155 

Tonk district of Aligarh has been the subject of considerable local feeliiig| The two States, 
after some difficulty ou the part of Bundi, consented to try and decide the case mutually, the 
28th January being fixed for the meeting. Bundi, however, failed to send its two represent* 
Atives till the 1st April, when after a month's fruitless stay the conference broke up. 

THB GBOPfr 

31. The rain crop was an average one, save Indian-corn, which, owing to excess of rain in 
August, was damaged. The area brought under cultivation in the spring crop was slightly 
less than usual owing to absence of timely rain. The crops were slightly under the average, 
save opium and gram which are stated to have been twelve-anna ones* 

FBECAUTIONABY MBASUBBS. 

82. As a portion of the measures decided on for meeting years of scarcity 8 5,000 maunds 
of grain are being collected in a building especially erected under the Palace, while 40,000 
maunds of grass (a half-year's supply) have been stacked. A similar quantity of the latter 
will be stored next year, and a full year's stock thus maintained in the future. The first 
annual instalment of Bs. 8,000 towards the formation of a famine fund has been set aside 
during Sambat 1941 ending 27th July 1885. * 

TONK. 

HIS HIQHNBSS TJSB NAWAB AND FAMILY. 

83. His Highness the Nawab has enjoyed excellent health. During the year His 
Highness's &mily was increased by one son (born on the 29th June 1884) and three daughters, 
thus making a total of five sons and ten daughters. In November 1884 His Highness placed his 
eldest son Muhammad Abdul Hafiz Khan, then almost eight years of age, at the Mayo College. 
Two first cousins S.S. Abdul Sami Elian and Muhammad Ishmail Khan, sons of S.S. Abdul 
Bahim Khan and Muhammad Said Khan, accompanied him, thus raising the total number of 
boys in the Tonk House to eight. Their bright happy faces, improved health and good pro- 
gress were a source of great pleasure on their return to their homes, and His Highness has 
induced two others of his brothers, S.S. Abdul Hamid Khan and Abdul Wahab Khan, to send 
their sons on the summer opening of the College. The number of Tonk boys now is thus ten. 
Sahibzada Abdul Alim Khan, the eldest son of the Minister and a first cousin and brother- 
in-law of His Highness the Nawab, who passed out of the College last year, has continued his 
studies in English and Law, first with Mr. Beid, the Principal of the Ajmere Oovernment 
College, and later, under our own Ajmere officers with the object of fitting himself for a 
service under Government, an object in which, I hope, he will succeed. 

84. On the news of the death of His Boyal Highness the Duke of Albany being 
received at the Capital on the 6th April 1884, His Highness, as a mark of respect and regret, 
had 81 minute guns fired, and the bazaars and State offices closed ; the former for one, the 
latter for four days. 

07FBB 07 SBBVICB. 

85. On the 19th March 1884 His Highness addressed kharitas to His Excellency the 
Viceroy and the Agent to the Oovemor-Oeneral, placing in connection with events in the Soudan 
and Central Asia himself, his family, his troops and the resources of his State at the disposal 
of Oovernment, and expressing in very cordial terms his loyalty to it. In reply. His High- 
ness received a kharita from His Excellency stating that he had communicated His High- 
nesses ofEer, which had gratified him much, to Her Majesiy^s Government, and had been 
graciously commanded by the Queen-Empress Herself to convey to His Highness Her 
cordial acknowledgments. The delivery of this kharita, which was a source of great pleasure 
to His Highness, was made the occasion of a public Darbar. 

86. In the middle of February 1885 His Highness had the pleasure of receiving at 
Tonk the Agent to the Governor-General, who remained for three days« 

7INANGB& 

37. The atEairs of State have been the subject of special attention during the ye^r. 
Previous reports have mentioned the very unsatisfactory condition of the finances with their 
large annual deficits, and the injurious results arising to the general administration theretrum. 
Every endeavour has been made to secure the consideration of His Highness the Nawab to 
tiiis state of things, and to the establishment of some well-marked distihotion between State 
funds and His Highnesses privy purse, but the expenditure has been more and more lavish. 
In this respect the Fasli year 1291, ending 8th June 1884, was perhaps worse than its prede- 
oessors; but it was. not till September I learnt from the Minister how much further the State* 

20 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



166 



BEPOBT OF THE POLITICAL ADICIKIBTEATIOK 



B«o«iptt. 



Land rerenae 
MiMeUaodoat reeeipta 

Total 



Bs. 

9,06,878 
8,83,465 

12,40,848 



ExpOkditim. 



His HighneM the Nawab, ex* 

Nawab and family • 
Ezpenditore 



Liquidation of debt 



Total 



Total 



Bs. 

2,70,686 
6,69,408 

9,40,094 

2,52,000 

48,249 

12,40,898 



Ss. 

RntlamSeth 2,96,187 

Mnthra „ 2,72,911 

Indortf „ 8,02,676 

Old clums admitted after enqnirjr . 1,48,295 
MisoeUaneoni 1,64,724 

Total . 11,79,748 



had become involvedi and the fresh loans which had had to be raised. In October accoidingty 
I proceeded to Tonk^ and have since, with a view to assisting the Nawab atid his Minister, 
made it my head-qnarters. Allotments amounting to Bs. 6,44,688 had been made on the 
revenues of the current year (Fasli 1292 commencing 9th June 1884) in part payment of the 

(MangniRamBhabatSin^BoUnm. claims of the three principJ creditors,* 

• Seths ] Badha Eishen Gobind Dast. Muthra. ^hjie in order to meet the current ezpendi- 

(Gonerf.da« Kieh-nji, Indore. ^^ ^ ^^^^^^^ ^ ^^ borwwed f rom 

the same three firms in equal shares, payable in fixed monthly instalments. No attempt had 
been made to effect retrechments, and the nominal budget estimate for the year anticipated a 
deficit of As. 4,12,682. His Highness however, with a view to obtaining exact iitformation 
on which to initiate reforms, direncted a full enquiry into the existing income, expenditure, and 
debts, public and personal. This did not commend itself to many of His Highnesses advisers, 
and it was only after several months that it was in a measure completed. Various reductions 
and resumptions were effected, but these were disappointing. Such as could be introduced 
during the year were calculated to reduce the deficit to Bs. 3,52,172. An estimate of income 

and expenditure, based on 
the results arrived at, was 
prepared as a general guide 
for the future, to come into 
force from the beginning of 
Fasli 129S(28th June lb85). 
It is given in Appendix B, 
and may be epitomised as 
per margin. The debts, 
public and personal, on the 
close of the Fasli year 1291, 
ending 8th June 1884, so &r 
as could be ascertained, were 
found to be Bs. 11,79,748, 
or, including Bs. 1,46,089 
for which villages were 
mortgaged to the Butlam 
and Muthra Bankers, to Bs. 
18,26,782. 

88. During the visit of the Agent to the Governor-General in February, His Highness 
spontaneously bound himself in writing to abide, until the entire obligations were liquidated, by 
the arransrements and general estimate of expenditure decided on ; to incur no further debt, 
public or private ; to bestow no landed property or cash aUowance on any one ; to separate 
State from personal expenses ; to limit his private allowance to Bs. 86,000 per annum, and to 
remove certain persons from the charge of State establishments. 

39. It was not, however, 
till May 1885, or nearly a 
year after its close, that the 
actuals of income and expend- 
iture for Fasli 1291, euding 
8th June 1884, were obtain* 
ed. These are given in Ap- 
pendix C, and as summarized 
on the margin show a deficit 
of Bs. 5,87,848, the whole of 
which save Bs. 15,486 is 
entered in the statement of 
the debts already given. 

40. With regbrd to its successor Fasli 1292 just closed, the Minister, I regret to say, informs 
me that the reductions effected during it will be more than counterbalanced by the outstand- 
ing balancies in the districts, which, owing to the depression in the opium and the grain trade, 
will, it is feared, amount to at least Bs. 64,000, and by extra unforeseen expenditure amount-, 
ing to Bs. $(5,000. If to these be added Bs. 50,000 on account of interest on current loans 
(making n total of Bs. 1,89,000), the estimated deficit for the year 1292 will amount to Bs. 
4^1,172. 

41. His Highness the Nawab is, I believe, really endeavouring to act up to the ndes he 
hai laid down for himself, and his Minister Sahibzada Muhammad Ubedulla Khan, C.S.L, is 



laooma. 




Bzpenditim. 


Land revenne 


. 8^0,041 
. 8,72,626 

. 12,02,666 
. 5,^7,848 


Hi8 Highnets the Nawab, ex- 

Nawab and OMDily 
Expenditure 

Total 

Inti^Kst 64,476 
For liqoidaiaon of 
debt . . 6,80,725 

Total 


Be. 

8,18,060 
8^2,268 


Tottl 
Losni ... 


1M6,818 

6,46,201 
17,90,814 


Total 


. 17«90,6U 

1 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB KAJPtTTiLHA. STATES K)B 1864^. 



157 



making every effort to face, wd meet the preeent difficulties. Further retrenchments and 
measures for the relief of the State are being considered* The expiry with Fasli 1292 (27th 
^une 1886) of the 21 years' lease of a number of villages, and the enhanced sums they are ex- 
pected to realise on being re-let, will in some degree assist. No satisfactory arrangement of the 
$nances will, however, be practicable till the present financial year is altered from the Fasli one 
ending in June and July to one ending on Sanwan Sudh Poonum— -August, the date up to 
which the accounts are actually made up, and the results of th^ revenue of the spring cr<>p 
obtained. This re-arrangement I hope His Highness will sanction. 

42. There have been numerous and repeated changes during the year in the personnel of all 
the Departments and Courts at head-quarters^ and at the present time most of the more important 
posts — the Judgeships of the Criminal and Civil Courts, the charge of the Girai and Police of 
the Tonk District, the Command of the entire District Troops, and the charge of the various 
State establishments, &c., have beeli confided by His Highness the Nawab to two of his brothers, 
S.S. Abdul Sahim Khan and Muhammad Ishak Khan. 

JUDICIAL. 

43. There has at different times been considerable complaint as to the administration 
of justice, and the removal of Sahibzada Muhammad Khan, a straightforward energetic 
officer, has been a loss, though the dismissal of an up-country Moulvie, who as Judge of the 
Civil Court had made himself notorious, was on the other hand hailed as a public relief. In 
conformity with the Nawab's special request for a Muhammadan gentleman, experienced in 
judicial work, as Head of the Department and Appellate Court, the services of Muhammad 
Najjaf Khan, a retired Extra Assistant Commissioner of the Punjab and highly spoken of, 
have been obtained. This gentleman having joined, it is hoped that a distribution of the 
Various State appointments will be made. The Courts, with the exception of the Muham- 
madan religious law one, are now located in a central building prepared for them in Amirgun je. 

44. The following is a return furnished of the work performed during the year : — 



Conrti. 



Remaining 
firom 



Initttnted. 



Total, 



Deoidfid, 



Paidlnf. 



Mabammadan Law 
Nijabat . 
ApiKsai . 
CiTil 

JadicUl • 
Bcveone . 



86 
21 
62 

817 
49 

148 



678 



146 
45 

134 
2,009 
U65 
1»164 



4^763 



196 
2^26 
i;)14 
1,807 



162 
29 

128 
1,916 
1,216 
1,176 



80 
87 
78 

410 
98 

182 



5,441 



4,611 



880 



DAKAITIES. 

45. Four dakaities occurred during the year in the State against six of last year, 
will be referred to in the separate notices of the several districts. 



These 



THE JAIL. 

46. No further progress has again, I regret to say owing to want of funds, been made in 
the new jail, which remains in the same unfinished state. From the commencement, however, 
of the Fasli year 1293, opening 28th JuQe 1885, a sum of Bs. 20,000 is to be allotted annually 

for its completion. The prisoners have consequently remained 
in the old rectangular enclosure, which has maintained the 
unhe^thy character of its site, both in and after the rains. 
In the end of August cholera appeared, five prisoners suc- 
cumbing, but owing to prompt removal the further spread 
of the disease was prevented* On the close of the year there 
were 77 prisoners. The daily average was 59*45 males and 
8*47 females. They are employed in the manufacture o€ 
Durries and Moonj-rope, and in ordinary labor. 

20a 





1fal«. 


Female. 


ToUl, 


Term 

Under trial . 


20 
48 
12 


1 

1 


20 
44 

18 


Total . 


76 


2 


77 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



158 BBPORT OF ^HB POLITICAL ADMIKISTEATIQN 

PUBLIC WOBKS DEFABTHSNT. 

47. Be. 30^986 are entered as having been spent on Public Works^ and may be roughly 

Bt. dtstribated as margin. His Highness the Nawab has decided 
^•Higbnew'spriTate . 1M66 that in the future Rs. 10,000 shall be annually devoted to 

' RoadB '. ! ! .* ^'i50 roads and buildings for his own use, that Rs. 1£,000 shall be 
MisoeUaneous . . . 4^986 expended for similar works exclusively for the public use, 

and that Rs. 10,000 shall be set apart for works, such as tanks, &c., for the improvement 

of the districts. 

MINERAL BIGHTS. 

48. As surmised in last year's report^ Mr. H. Ascher on being refused an extension to 
25 years of the seven years' lease of certain mining rights, which he had obtained in the State> 
threw it up, and was refunded the first year's payment he had made of Rs. 1,300. 

OT78TOM8. 

49. The Customs arrangements of each district, which were carried on separately under 
the Amils, have since March 1885 been placed under one official, Syud Abdul Rahman, who 
has been directed to enquire into the di&rent tariffs existing in each. 

MINT. 

50. Rs. 6|4 13 were coined by a Sahukar of the capital, but though only a quarter of 
ih» regular dues was charged loss was suffered. 

EDUCATION. 

51. Owing to the exertions of the Principal of the Central High School, Syud Raschid- 
ud-din, and the encouragement afforded by His Highness the Nawab and the Minister, con* 
siderable progress has been made in education at the Capital. The Sardars' eiass, which has 
risen from 8 to 1 3, has been separated from the school, and is to be accommodated in an upper 
room to be erected over the present building. The Central School itself has been sub-divided 
into five Departments — Anglo-Vernacular, Arabic, Persian, Urdu, and Hindi. The numbers 

• Mnhammadans . • . . 148 ^° *^® register have increased from 162 to 800,* of whom 
Hindus . . . 150 125 are learning English and Vernacular, 42 Arabic, 82 Per- 

Christiane .... 2 ^^^ gj ^rdu, and 50 Hindi. The average daily attendance 
has risen from 124 to 140. Rs. 10 per mensem have been granted by the Darbar for Scholar- 
^lips, and Rs. 10 per mensem for slates and books for the poorer boys. Two Scholarships of 
Rs. 3 each have also been given by the Minister and the Principal, while two silver medals have 
been established by the Darbar and the Principal. The two branch schools formed as feeders 
in the Hindu town and Amirgunje have also done well, the daily average attendance of the 
one having been 67, and of the latter 82. In both, English and a Vernacular, Persian, and 
Hindi are taught. Twoof the Mullanis, who teach Muhammadan girls, have been induced 
by the grant of Rs. 5 per mensem to place their 30 scholars under the superintendence of the 
Principal. The girls are taught the Koran and some elementary Urdu books. Rs. 100 per 
mensem also are at his su^^gestion to be placed at the disposal of the Principal from Fasli 1293 • 
(commencing 28th June 1885) to be distributed as grants-in-aid among such of the Maktabs 
in the Capital as will place themselves under his supervision and act as feeders to the Central 
School. It is further contemplated to open a State School at the head-quarter town of 
each district, and a scheme is under preparation. In consideration of the ability and energy 
displayed by the Principal in his duties, of which it is a pleasure to me to bear witness, the 
Darbar has raised his pay to Rs. 200. 

52. A weekly newspaper called the Hadiyat-nUAkhbar was started by the Darbar on 
the 6th September. All returns, lists, and papers required for the State are now printed at the 
Printing Press, where ptivate work is also taken in. 

SANITATION. 

53. No action has^ I regret to say, been taken in regard to the sanitation of the Capital^ 
but the subject is now really under consideration. 

THE DISPENaABY. 

54. The dispensary has maintained its good reputation under Hospital Assistant Pirbha 
Lai. He is much respected and does not restrict bis efforts to his patients, endeavouring to 
obtain public attention to the more glaring sanitary defects. The total number of out*door 
patients is given as 13,056, and of in*door ones as 277. Of the latter, 219 were cured, 32 left, 
15 died, and 6 remained under treatment. 11 major and 1,204 minor operations were perform* 
ed ; 1,849 children were vaccinated, 30 operations being unsuccessful. • 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB RAJPUTAKA STATES FOB 1884-85. 159 

TONK DI8TBICT. 

65. Proceeding to notice the several districts separately^ both cro|>8 in Tonk were average 
. ones save jowar^ the staple product of the kharif which was considerably above^ and wheat 
which was slightly under the ordinary. 3,183 bighas of waste land were brought under culti- 
vation. 
Imports • • Bs. 82,161 &6. The ' Customs receipts of the district are given as Rs. 
Exporte . . „ 80.088 57,017, of which Rs. 3,183 were remitted. 

Transit . • », ifOov 

57. Two dakaities occurred, both on travellers :— one by a band of ten dakaits, when 
property to the value of Rs. 335 was plundered and four men were wounded ; the other by sii^ 
dakaits, when property worth Rs. 49 was carried oS and one man wounded. 

▲LIQABH DISTBICT. 

68. In the other home district the rainfall was again scanty. The rain crop was poor 
and the spring crop average, save opium which was a ten-anna one. The general health was^ 
^TQod save 30 deaths from cholera: 4,174 bighas of waste land wera broughfc under cultivation. 
Syud Muhammad Said, the Amil appointed last year, was superseded by his subordinate, the 
Peshkar Anwar-ud-din, a brother-in-law of Muhammad Yusuf, the Mir Mun^hi. There are 
seven boundary disputes pending in the district, three with Jaipur, three with Bundi» and one 
with Indargarh. The Parla-Bisheupura one with fiundi has already been referred to in para^ 
graph 3U. 

59. The total Customs receipts amounted to Rs. 2,576. 

NIMBAHEBA DISTRICT. 

60. In Nimbahera the rainfall was not seasonable. The rain crop was below the average. 
The spring one above, especially opium, wheat, gram, massur, linseed, and mustard. The 
general health was good. 

61. There has been a good deal of complaint from the cultivators of the district during 
the year against the local authorities. 

62. One dakaity occurred in the village of Amia, when property to the value of Rs. 3,067 
was, it is said, carried off and one man wounded by a gang of some 70 dakaits. 

THE MOGHIAS. 

63. The total number of Moghias is given as 135.^ 27 cases (5 of theft, the others of 

absence of leave and the likes) were brought against them, 

*42 Women. ®' which 25 were proved and 1 is pending; 804 bighas of land 

23 Boys. were cutivated by them, yi^l(]ing an outturn of 1301 maunds. 

^ ' The five years for which land was granted them free of rent 

expires this year when the usual dues will be levied. Rs. ],851-15-6 were due on the close 

of last year as arrears on account of tuccavi, and Rs. 1 6-8-0 have been further advanced 

during the year. Tiie total cost of the charge and maintenanoe of the members of this tribe, 

including the share of the Superintendent's salary, came to Ks. 2,442-12-0. 

EA880DE. 

64. The question of the exchange of this Indore village for one or more in the Parawa 
district is still pending, the Tonk Darbar expressing inability to decide on any village to 
offer, till first furnished with full particulars of the area, income, and capabilities of Kassode. 

BOUNBABY DISPUTES. 

65. Forty-three border disputes between this district and Meywar were decided by Captain 
Pears. Among three subsequently settled up to May 1885 was the louj-standing and much 
vexed one of Alsipura. 

CHAFBA DISTBICT. 

66. The rains in Chapra were abundant, jowar and cotton being injured. The other 
rain grains, as also the spring crops, were bumper ones, save opium, which was a 15-anna one. 
The general health was excellent. 

67. A dam for irrigation purposes has been commenced across the Parbatti in the lands 
of the village of Anandpura. 

68. The Darbar has suggested that advantage should be taken of the present negotia- 
tions for the exchange of the Indore village of Kassode with a Parawa one (see paragraph 64), 
to effect an exchange at the same time of the Indore village of Balda, which is situated in 
the heart of the Chapra district, with another one or ones of equal value in Parawa. 



Digitized by 



Google _ 



160 BEFOBT 07 THI POLITIOAL ADMIKISTBATIOir 

FABAWA DIfiTBIOT. 

69. The rainrall in Tarawa was good. The rain cn^ was up to^ bat the spring ooe 
below^ the average. The general health was good* 

SIBON J DISTBICT. 

70. The rainfall was exeessivei the rain-crop save Indian-corn beiog injured hj it. The 
spring crop was an average one^ save opium, which was a 12-anna oue. Thirteen applications 
were received for the establishment of villages under the rules for the ocoupatToo of the district 
mentioned last year; 1,787 bighas of waste land were cultivatedi and 22 wells dug; 42 persons 
died of cholera, but otherwise the general health was good. 

71. The mail bag which left Bhelsa for Owalior on the 2Srd October was carried oC 
by a band of 8 men, the runner and Raj sepoy escorting it being both wounded. All the 
contents save a small packet were recovered* 

72. A dispensary, an institution long urged by the Political Agent, Bhopal, was opened 
with some ceremony on the 12th October, His Highness the Nawab^s birthday. The cost of 
establishment and maintenance has, however, been recovered from the residents. 

7S. A new fair, lasting 15 days, was this year instituted at Sironj in the beginning of 
January. Gt>ods to the value of Bs. 41,608 were, it is said, brought by the traders of neighs 
bouring States. » . . 

74. The boundary dispute of Xa&rai, Amai, Karaiya^ Onarsi, and Raghogarh of Sironj 
with Sheopura of Raghogarh was decided during the year by Captain Masters of the Central 
India Horse against Tonk, and has been appealed. 

SHAHPUBA. 

THE BA JA AND FAMILY. 

75. The Raja has enjoyed good health during the year. In May 1884 he was visited 
by his nephew, the Maharaja of Kishengarh, who spent three days at Shahpura when re- 
turning from Udaipur. The visit was a pleasure to both, and has since been returned. In 
September, after a lapse of five years, the Raja proceeded to Udaipur to attend as a feudatory 
of Meywar on the Maharana, remaining till the end of November. During the cold weather 
he made a tour through both portions of the Chief ship, but .was twice interrupted, once by 
the ' sad news of the death of Maharana Saj jan Singh, when it became necessary for him to 
return to Shahpara to perform certain ceremonies, and again in the end of January when he 
again went to Udaipur to offer his homage to the new Maharana. The ChiePs eldest son is 
now nine years of age and continues his lessons in Hindi and English; the latter under Mrs* 
Floyd, to whom he owes so much and whose serious illness during the latter part of the year 
has been a source of general regret. Miss Floyd, who teaches the Raja's eldest daughter, has 
meanwhile taken her place. The boy as I wrote last year is gentle and affectionate, but not 
naturally bright. The Kamdar tells me from his own experience teaching him is most up* 
hill work. The younger son of five has not yet began lessons. On the 15th June 1884 the 
younger Rani presented the Raja with a third daughter. 

THB KAMDAB; 

76. Babu Ram Jiwan, the Kamdar appointed in Februaiy 1884, continues to realise 
the expectations formed of him, and brings to bear tact, judgment, and energy on his duties. 

JAQIBDABS. 

77. The relations between the Jagirdars and their Chief have, it gives me much pleasure 
to mention, been in every way satisfactory. The Panchayet constituted for the settlement of 
disputed boundaries between khalsa and jagir villages has decided five. Those between 
jagir villages have also been made over to it. The separate Panchayet for the settlement of 
the Thakwar's debts has, I regret to say, done little, the creditors having largely induced them 
not to move in the matter. Advice and judicious pressure, however, will I hope see the work 
carried out. 

FINANCES. 

78. Appendix D gives the receipts 

C^SS^Jf.:^Sf. fS^^'Z^'^ *°. 4& «»d diabursemente for S«mb.t 1940, 

fi«oeipu » 8.19,848 ending 5th September 1884. Epito- 

^Qi^ 2^,894 mized as per margin, they show a ba- 

Dislmnenwati • 207i876 lance of Rs. 56,019, of which Bs^ 

56,019 33>^1S l^ftv^ 1>^Q transferred to the 



BalftDC« 



Chiefs private fund. 



Digitized by 



GbogI( 



OP THE BAJFUT^NA STATES FOE 1884-86. 161 

CUSTOMS. 

79. The same oompIaintB continue as to the heaviness of the doties levied by the Meywar 
State on the nine classes of taxed g^oods landed by the Railway. The policy is a most short 
sighted one, as it is simply prohibitive and compels the people of British Shahpura to take ' 
over these classes of goods from the Railway Station of Barl in British territory, ti miles 
distant^ instead of from the Bnpaheli Station in Mejrwar, 19 miles distant 

BETfilTUE. 

80. With the exception of one village Rajpura the villages of the State are under Eham 
tahsil management. Successful endeavours are being made to establish new villages, 
and during the year SO families have immigrated, while ten more have promised to come once 
tbe rains commence: 8,415 bighas of hitherto untilled land in British Sliahpura have been 
brought under cultivation, yielding an income of some Be. 4,876. 

TANKS. 

81. A systematic efEort ha^, I am very glad to say, been made during the year to as- 
certain the condition of existing tanks and of sites for new ones. Much fertile land lies un- 
cultivated in both portions of the Chie&hip owing to want of water, for except in the villages 
bordering on the Ehari and Mansi streams the wells are deep and costly and the springs so 
scanty as to hardly irrigate more than five or sixbigahs. Two surveyors were entertained, who 
in company with the tahsildars carefully inspected the various sites, making brief reports on 

and estimates of the repair or construction of 

^ _, ^ ^ ^ . ,?!:*^ each. These were in turn visited by the Chief 

BefMdr of old tanki . . 8,878 a^d Eamdar Oik the tour. Bs. 16,362 are being 

GontiDgencies .... 886 gpent as per margin, of which Rs 7,207 are being 

Total . 16,808 expended by the Chief himself on villages held 
' by him as his private allowance. A great difficulty, 

however, has been experienced in procuring the necessary labor. 

JUDICIAL. 

82. The Courts appear to work well and the files to be carefully kept. There is however 
an evident inclination on the part of the Kamdar to insist too much on tie observance of the 
details and niceties of our procedure, which are neither applicable to nor understood in such a 
homely part of the country. But this I hope will soon right itself, especially with the intro- 
duction, as is proposed, of some simple procedure rules. Appendix £ gives the work of the 
year. 

88. Police arrangements were fair. There were no dakaities against six last year, and 
only 2 cases of robbery, both of which were comparatively unimportant. Of 24 cases of theft 
in 14 months in the town of Shahpura, the property was traced and recovered in 16. 

84. The number of deaths from accidental causes, principally from falling, into wells, 
was very larger having been 40. 

THE JAIL. 

85. The jail is maintained in good order, and on my late visit was clean and well kept. 
The average number of prisoners during the year was 49*60 against 52'86 in the year previous 
Of the former ll'SO were females. 

MOGHIAS. 

86. During the year 12 Moghias with 18 women and 27 children claimed to be settled in 
the Chie&hip, which notwithstanding its protests was finally found by the Superintendent of 
Moghias to be responsible for them. Of these and the number previously established, 21 men 
with IS women and 23 children decamped, not without fault it is considered on the part of the 
local authorities. With deaths and changes there now remain 64 men, 53 women, and 72 
diildren, all of whom the Chiefship reports have been furnished with land on reduced rates and 
bullocks. 

BDUCATION. 

87. Progress has been made in education, though only since the end of the year. In 
February 1885 a student of the Ajmere College was entertained as Master of the School at 
Shahpura. The daily attendance is now given as 200, all of whom learn Hindi, Ofography, 
Arithmetic, and Indian History, and 25 English as well. 

88. The Oirk' School, which consisted of a few of the Chiefs chakranis, taught by one 
of the school teachers, was re-organised about the same time. A Punditani, who had been 

brought up in the Ajmere Female Normal School, 
a SK' ^5 c£& ^^ ««^^ i" *« Government School at Kadera, 

and whose husband belonged to the Chiefship, was 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



162 



BEPOUT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINI8TBATI0K 



engaged on Bs. 10 per mensem. A separate house was secured, and the numbers on my late 
visit were 26. Five have commenced " Bidijankur'' while the rest have learned the alphabet 
and figures. The sight was a very interested one. 

89. Two district schools were opened in Phulia and Dhanope in addition to the one 
opened last year at Kothiyan. The numbers are given respectively as 64, 86, and 81. The 
teachers are ex-pupils of the Shabpura School. Hindi and Arithmetic are taught in all, and 
History and Geography as well in the last. Half the expenses are borne by the villagers. 

POST 07FICB. 

90. An application was made to, and has since been granted by the Postal Department 
to have the postal line to Shahpura taken vid Sumia Bailway Station instead of via Bhilwara. 
This arrangement, while accelerating the passage of the mails by nearly a day, will cause a 
saving to Grovernment in the pay of a runner and the crossing charges of streams in the rains. 

DISFEN8ABY. 

91. The dispensary had an average daily attendance of 7*50 in and 72*16 out-door, and 
3 40 jail patients : 698 children were vaccinated^ 436 of the operations being successful. 

92. The general health was good. * Some little small-pox and a good deal of measles. 

93. The rainfull was unseasonable, injuring considerably the Indian-corn on which the 
people depend. Owing to absence of winter showers, blight, and hail the spring crop was a 
poor one, save barley, the staple product, which g^ve an average yield. 

BNSILAGB. 

94. Two silos were, in accordance with the suggestions of the Agent to the Governor- 
General, prepared in September last. On one being opened in the beginning of April, it was 
found that the grass save for some six inches at the top was good, and was readily eaten by 
cattle. The other has not yet been opened. The two cost Eg. 16 and contained 10 000 
bundles of some three chittacks each. Further experiments will be tried this year a little 
earlier in the season. 

THE MEENA KKERAR AND DEOLL 

THSKHEBAB. 

96. The tract is continuing to progress slowly and surely in order, though matters 
which often come to light, connected and unconnected with it, show that the old elements of 
evil are still present. The arrangements mentioned in my last report as instituted In April 
1884 for the control of the Meywar portion haVe on the whole worked well, but the two 
Loharis, Gadoli, and the villages immediately about them have maintained their evil reputa- 
tion. Bundi Meenas having on some occassions been apprehended armed in other States, the 
Bundi Darbar appointed an officer specially to disarm them. The work was carried on from 
August till March, arms being only left with parties of known respectability, or who could 
funish security for their behaviour. No case of female infanticide was detected, the result of 
the monthly reports furnished by the three States for the year being as follows : 





Sex. 


HlTWAB. 


Jaipitb. 


BWDI. 




















BIrtliB. 


DeftthB. 


Births. 


DMtbs. 


Births. 


DmihB. 


BoyB 




84 


17 


12 


7 


25 


7 


Qirls 




74 


28 


11 


4 


26 


9 



DEOLI. 

96. The rainfall at Deoli was only 28-13 inches. Most of the wells in consequence became 
very low in the hot weather, and there was for a short time a scarcity of water. Sanction 
however, has been obtained to have them deepened. The general health was remarkably good. 
One sporadic case of cholera occurred in the Agency lines, and 16 cases of small.pox among 
the regimental followers. 

97. The Agency Dispensary under Drs. Whitwell and Harington and the Agency School 
• Cured 69 ^^^® Continued to do well. In the former, 81 

B«Weved 18 in-doof* and 2,805 out-door patients were treated. 

Died . ; . . 2 and 10 major and 103 mmor operations per- 

BemainiDg .6 formed. One thousand and fifty-one persons 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE BAJPUTANA STATES P0& 1884-85. 163 

were vaccinated in Deoli and the neighbouring villages^ 69 operations being unsttccesefal. The 
average daily attendance in the Agency School was 46. 

JUDICIAL. 

98. The nsnal judicial statements^^ showing the working of the Harowti International 

Court, are attached. Sixty cases were disposed of , 
• Appendice.F.anda. j^^^^ y ^^ ^^^ gj^ ^^ ^^ ^j^^ ^^ ^,^^ ^^^ 

The average duration of each case was 43^ days owing to the delay in the production of 
witnesses. 

99. Of the 17 cases appealed^ the decisions in five were confirmed, in three revised, and in 
one reversed. The result in the remaining eight is not yet known. 

100. The aggregate amount sued for as compensation for property plundered was 
Ks. 14,758-9-9. Of this property to the value of Bs. 407-14-0 was recovered, and compensa- 
tion to the value of Bs. 1,474-2-11 awarded. 



»1 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



164 



SEFOST 01 THIS FOLITIOAL ADMINISTEATIOK 



^ 



s 

I 

1 












g 
£ 






I 



I 



I 



li 



I 



I 



i 
I 



^nej^^S coej^^ 



^ 9 00 00 flO 



^OQOOOQO ^2^S^ 



^ 00 o o o 

s 3 a 9 « 



^OOO'^OQO <«COt^0J0« CDOiHCDO 



OOOOOOO CO00'« 



od S3 8 8 ^ & 



s & 



iH p -* O O 



3 S 01 00 oS CO flO 






OOOOO OOCDCIIQO 



O M O CD 00 






< ''^ O 00 o 



u s 



QQ 00 



CO 00 O "« 



09 00 ^ 00 



S iji 9 i S 



s ; a s s s s 



u 2 ® 2 * 
oQ S; 9 S S 



a p t« o 



o <« 00 00 

s s s s 



o •« 



a s 



QQ Oil 



^ S 2 S 

09 00 00 



a a 



^OCD 1000100009 



t« CD O -^ Q CO lO 

09 0$ 09 09 09 09 09 



CJ • 3 O 00 

cd S q! S & 



<ooo'4io^ <eao«ed'« 



^SS ssssss 



Q 09 00 00 00 
00 $9 9 S S 



CD^OO a»0909'«0» 



rS O G ^ "9 O '«9O09OO 009000910 

00*0900000000 SooSeooi iHeiSe90i 




Digitized by 



GoogI( 



07 THB BAJPUIAKA STATES 70B 1884^85. 



165 



AFPEITDIX B. 

Putwe SttimaU of Becnptt and JH»6ur»em«itf« of fie Tonk State, 



Vo. 


Beeelpte. 


ABMiint. 


No. 




Anonat. 






Bs. 


Bs. 




Ordinarjf. 


Bs. 


I 


Land revenue 


. 892,760 




I 


His Higbness's personal allowance 


86,000 


II 


MisL do. 


• 


14,118 


9,06,878 


II 


Ex-NawaVs do. 


69,000 






lU 


Aasesaed taxes 






47,884 


III 


Allowance to members of family 


1,65,68a 


IV 


CostomB . 






1,22,265 


IV 


State and personal espenaes 


1,88^74 


V 


Stamps . . • 






9,575 


V 


AdmiDistration • • 


2,00,928 


VI 


Judicial • '. . 






21.510 


VI 


Troops . • • 


2,50,0U 


VII 


Nazarana 






28,120 


vn 


PubUc Works . . . , 


S6/X» 


VIII 
IX 


Mint • . 
Abkari . . . 






107 












5,889 


*•• 


Total Ordinary 


9,4(M)04 


X 


Profit in Tz^easuiy 






22,000 


... 






XI 








21,000 


... 




2.52,000 


XII 
XUI 


IfisoeUaneons . 
Reeumptioiiof jagiif 






17,075 
44150 




For liquidation of debt • 

Total 

Balance 

Grand Total 








vm 


11,92,094 
48,240 








12,40,848 






ToW 


. 


12,40,848 



APPENDIX C 

Stqtem^t thawing the actuals of Income and Expenditure of tie Toni State for Faeli year 

1291, ending 8tk June 1884. 



Income. 


Amount. 


Ezpenditoze. 


Amoont. 

• 


Ordinof 
lisnd Bevenue indudiuj 
Assessed taxes • 
Customs • • 1 
Stamps • • i 
Judicial • 
Nazarana • • 
Mint 
Abkari 


BT Arrei 


ars t 


Bs. 

8,80,041 

46,469 

1,21,679 

10,404 

17,198 

46,851 

104 

. . 5,149 

21,260 

40,185 

48,571 


Ordinary. 

His Higbness^s personal allowance . 

Allowance to ex-Nawab • • 

Allowance to members of His Higbness's 
famUy 

Army 

Administration 

State and personal expenses . 

Public Works . • • • . 

Total Ordinary 

Interest 

Debts Uquidated • . . . 

Grand Total 


Bs. 
58,051 
70,700 

1,84,299 

2,56,485 

. 2,07,919 

8,20,085 

47,874 


Profit in Treasury 
Miscellaneous • 


11,45,813 


Total Ordinal;] 
SxtraordUutrg, 
Beeoyered from Indargar « 
Loan • • • ' 


r • 11,87,846 

. . 14,820 
. . 6,87,848 


64,476 
5,80,725 


TftfA 


I . 17,90,614 
1 . 17,90,514 




Oranc 


I Tots 


17M514 



21a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



166 



EEPOET or TiB POLITICAL ADMINISTRATISN 



Appendix J). 
Statement showing the reeeipls and disbursements in tie Bhahpura State for Sambats 1940 ending 

5th September 1884. 



Details. 



Balanee in hand on 6th September 1883 . Bs. 88,478 

Deduct transferred to private treasury Rs. 20,068 ) „» 091 

Ditto arrears unreaUaed . . „ 18,888)^^;^ 



Ihoohb. 



Actuals 
for 1940. 



Bs. 



44,652 



Lass Bjevjui/ji. 



Arresn 

Current Rs. 1,62,860 ^ 

Unrealised Bs. 2^091) 

Custom 

Abkari 

Jagirdars and Bhom 

Patail and Fatwaris 

Chowkidari , 

Judicial 

Salt compensation • 

UlsceUaneous 



9,799 
1>28,759 



Total 



Details. 



1,88,558 

18,938 
4,099 

14,621 
8,212 

2,290 
18,670 

6.004 
19.050 



2,63,894 



Tribute . . 

Pemonal and family expenses 

Stiible and dephants • 

Grass .... 

Gardens .... 

Civil establishments . 

Troops and police . • 

Public works 

Tanks . • * . 

jHila .... 

School • • • ' . 

Dispensary 

Charityl • • 

Grauts . . • • 

Guests and festivals • 

furniture and ornaments 

Journey expenses * 

Miscellaneous 



Total 
Balance on close of year 



DiSBVB-' 
BBMEVT. 



Actuals 
for 1940. 



Bs. 

16,291 

23,278 

18,026 

3,531 

3,975 

22,301 

26,590 

8,757 

9,155 

2,068 

1,081 

2,066 

6,565 

8,074 

14,267 

11,419 

4,265 

81,173 



2,07,875 
56.019 



2,63^4 



Appendix E- 
Statement of eases decided by the Shahpura Court in 1884-85. 





Oaxoz«i.L. 




Ck>UBt8. 


Pending 


Institatsd. 


Total. . 


Disposed 
ot. 


Remain- 
in*. 


Pending. 


Institut- 
ed. 


Total. 


Disposed 
of. 


Bcmain. 
tog. 


Criminal 


92 


669 


751 


684 


67 


«. 


••* 


• •• 


>0» 


• •• 


Ciril .... 


426 


1,036 


1462 


1.077 


385 


M« 


•«. 


«*• 


... 


M* 


Si 


pRevenne . 
























97 


844 


441 


327 


114 


• •• 


«.t 


••• 


... 


M* 


Criminal ; 






















^e, 




18 


128 


146 


124 


* 22 


2 


27 


29 


27 


3 




Civil 


3 


6 


9 


9 


*•« 


7 


24 


31 


19 


18 


Revenue of Judg- 
















• 






a 


^ ment. 


8 


5 


8 


4 


4 


• .• 


. - . 


•«• 


«•* 


... 


Total 


639 


2,178 


2,817 


2,225 


692 


.9 


. 61 . 


60 


46 


U 




















, 




" 



Appendix F. ... 

Statement slowing^ the foorUng of the Haraoti International Court of Yahils during the year 

1864M. 





1 


1 




1 


? 




« 


AmALS TO JizamB Cousts. 






i 






" 












« 


3 




■s 


1i 


^ 


i 


^ 


t 














AanroT. 


S.jj 


1 




1 


1 


•3 


? 


1 


1 












•BiXABn, 




1- 


!.' 


1 


it 


^8 


•3 


r 


to 
1 


•^ 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 




Haraoti ond Tonk Inter- 


* 










s 


^ 

^ 














Stolen property 


nationai Conrt from 1st 












So 


.5 






• 










April. 1884 to 8l8t 
Mareh 1886 . . 


8 


64 


«7 


«0 


7 


^ 


*- 


6 


11 


7 


6 


8 


1 


8 


at Bs. 407-14. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE BAJPUTANA STATES FOU 1884-85. 



167 



Appendix Ot. 

AbHrael Staiement of the number and nature of caiet adjudicated hy the Haraoti and Tonk 
International Court of FakiU during the year 1884^. 



Cbdcu. 



Against persons. 



Murder 

Aflsaolt with wounding 



Against property. 



Highway robbery with aggravated ciroumstanceB 

Ditto ditto without ditto ditto 
Gang robbery with and without aggravated circumstances 
Theu with aggravated cireumstanoes 
Ditto without ditto ditto .... 

Cattie-lefting 

Pf emeditated dakati 

Arson • • . . 

Burglary . . • 

Counterfeit coining 

Poisoning ...... 

Miscellaneous 



Total 



Ko of CAMS from 
iBt April IBM, 
toSltt March 
1885. 



18 

15 

6 

1 

1 



13 



60 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



BfiPOKT OF THB POLmCAL ADICIKIBTBATIOK, &C., TOE 1884^. 169 



ULWAB A&ENOSr BEFOBT FOB 1884*85. 



No. 168-P^ dated Ulwar, 28ih Apiil 188$. 
I^wtt^LiMvmAXT-CoLonL H. P. Pxaoooe, Political Agtnty Vhoar^ 
Tih^Tks Firtt Amttane Jgmi to the Oovemor^Genaral in SaJjnUauth 

1 have the honor to suhmit the Annual Eeport of the III war Political 
Agency for the year 1884-86. 

aBBVBAX. SBMABK& 

&• The notable events were as follows :— 

I.— In March 1885 His Highness the Maharao Raja was gazetted a Lieutenant^olonel 
in the British Army. This honor has much pleased His Highness and his people. 

II.— In April 1884 His Highness the Maharao' Baja paid a visit to his father-in-law at 
Jamnagar, and had thus an opportunity of seeing that part of India which was left nnvisited 
in his previous travels. His Highness visited the Baj Kumar Collegej and made the acquaint* 
ance of the Thakur Sahib of Bajkot^ the Jam of Nawanagarj and of Colonel West, the Resident^ 
Eathiawar. 

Ill.-^In May His Hig^ess went to Mussurie and made a stay there of about four 
Weeks. 

IV. — In November His Excellency Sir Donald Stewart honored His Highness with a 
visit to his capital. 

V. — Towards the end of November His Highness went to Agra to take leave of His 
Exoellency the Marquis of Ripon and was much gratified with the kindness shown to him by 
His Excellency. 

YI.— Hifi Highness the Maharaja of Jodhpur paid two visits to Ulwar. And early 
in March 1885 His Highness the Maharaja of Patiala, accompanied by his brother, and the 
principal officials of the State visited Ulwar. These distinguished guests met with eYerj atten- 
tion and hospitaUty. 

VII. — Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Connaught for the third time 
honored the Maharo Raja by staying some days in Ulwar. 

YIIL — His Highness the Maharao Raja offered one hundred riding camels for the Soudan 
bnd placed the entire resources of his State at the disposal of Governmant. 

UI.A8.KAMIL. 

3. His Highness the Maharao Raja continues to hear petitions once a week, and always 
presides at the " I jlas-Kamil/' frequent sittings of which take place. Some ten oases were 
decided in '^ Ijlas-Elamil'' during the year. His Highness evinces a great desire for deepatek 
in the conduct of business, a fact which has good effect upon all departments. 

OOUKOUi. 

4. There has been no change in the Council. The arrangement mentioned in last report, 
by which the Dewan Lala Sri Ram, M. A., has a seat in Council, has been attended with the 
happiest results. The work of the Council which is multifarious is carried on smoothly and 
with promptness, at the same time, no trouble is spared in order to arrive at a sound judgment 
upon all questions. In fact, it is the aim of the Couneil to win respect by the justness of its 
decisions. The relations between the Dewan and the other Members of Council are most friendly, 
and the Dewan has by his tact and influence instilled into the other members a greater inter- 
est in their work than has hitherto been displayed by them. 

Seven hundred and ninety-seven judicial cases were decided in Counial op to the end of 
March 1885, and only two civil appeals stand over. Miscellaneous papers connected with the 
several departments to the number of 28,678 passed through the Council. 

Jagir cases, numbering 326, came before tixe Council, of which only 7 remain unsettled. 
To obviate the great difficxdty often attending the decision in jagir adoption cases an old 
role passed by Maharaja Banni Singh has been re-instituted^ namely, that no adoption would 
he recognized unless due notice (£ it was given to the State at the time of niiaking it- 
There are now 200 jagir villages, in the State fioniiahing 489 jagir hones. His Hij^ 
ness shows great oonsideiatioa to his jagiidan. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



170 



REPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 



JUDICIAL. . 
CIVIL. 

6. [Ajppendix A.)—T!h& number of cases disposed of during the year was (S^SOl^ involving 
Bs. 1,95^83:2 as against 8^515^ involving Bs. 1^95,484 in the preceding year. Of these 2jl65 
were decided by the Civil Judge and 1^36 by Tahsildars. There were 114 appeals from the 
decision of the Civil Judge and 38 from those of the Tahsildars. Owing to the accumulation 
of arrears it has been found necessary to strengthen the Civil Judge's Court by the appoint- 
ment of two assistants. Pandit Birg Nath (son of Pandit Shimbbu Nath, Kaj Engineer), who 
has recently passed the Pleaders' Examination at Allahabad, has been selected to fill one of these 
appointments. 

CfilMINAL. 

{Appendix B. C.) — The number of cases investigated was 4,422 invplving 5,111 persons, 
as against 4,176 involving 4,418 persons in the preceding year. Of the 6,111 persons brought 
to trial, 3,073 were convicted and punished as follows :-~ 

407 

1,834 

97 

6 

729 

3,073 

The following comparative statement gives the number of offences under each class brought 
to notice during the past three years : — 



Imprisoned 
Fined 
Whipped . 

Dismissed from service 
To furnish secavitj 





Class L 


Class II. 


Class III. 


Class IV. 


Class V. 


Class VI. 


Tkabs. 




|! 


1 




Si 


II 


1882 "". . 


3 


80 


7 


1,196 


2,271 


254 , 


1883 0. 


4 


27 


2 


1,421 


2.302 


25S 


1884 


2 


43 


1 


1,689 


2,439 


8M 



This statement shows a considerable increase in minor offences, but these cannot with any 
degree of certainty be tr^ed to any particular cause. 

There were two very complicated murder caoes, and the a^x^used had to be discharged for 
want of sufficient evidence against them. Since last report the Foujdar Munshi Rushk Lai, 
in consequence of age and constant illness, has retired on a pension of Ks. 200 a month. This 
liberal pension was conferred upon the Munshi in appreciation of his long and valuable services 
to the State. 

The senior Tahsildar of the State, Shaikh Wajid Ali, has been appointed Foujdar^ and from 
his antecedents there is every likelihood that he will prove a success. 

6. The criminal tribes in Ulwar are well matched^ and the instructions issued by the 
Superintendent of Moghias are being attended to. 

INFANTICIDE. 

7. No cases of infanticide were reported during the year. 

HAIL BOBBERIES. 

8. There have been no mail robberies during the year. 

DAKAITL 

9. The head-quarters of the Eastern Bajputana Agency of the Thagi and Dakaiti Depart- 
ment are now at Ulwar. This Agency has received gpreat assistance from the Darbar. No 
dakaities have occurred in Ulwar during the year. 

BXTBADITION. 

10. In extradition cases the Darbar^s relations with the Punjab States are all that could 
be desired; with Jaipur they are such that there is still room for much improvement^ with 
Bhartpur there are indications that they are improving. It is only fair to the Darbar to say 
that they are always ready to give cordial and friendly co-operation in the extradition of crimi- 
nals^ and that the cause of strained relations cannot therefore be laid to them. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



07 THE EAJPUTAKA STATES FOE 1884-86. 171 

RAILWAY JUKISDICTION. 

11. Five oases involving five persons were tried :— 

3 of theft, 

1 ofassaalty 

1 of false declaration of gooda. ^ 

Of the five persons concerned, one was released, two were sentenced to imprisonment^ and 
two were fined. 

The greater part of the line in Ulwar territory remains unfenced, and in consequence cases 
of cattle trespass have been reported. These cases are inquired into and the offenders are punish- 
ed if it is found that proper precautions have not been taken. 

BOUNDABY AND OTHEB DISPUTES. 

12. The dispute between Ulwar and Bhartpur regarding the irrigation of four Ulwar 
villages will, it is hoped^ now be settled, as both States have agreed upon an exchange of 
villages. 

EDUCATION. 

IS. {Appendix i>.)-~The number of schools remains the same as in last report, namely 114 
(100 for boys and 14 for girls). The number of students has increased and stands at 5,252 
(boys 4^918 and girls 334), against 5,080 (boys 4,749 and girls 331) of the previous year. 

The percentage of institutions to number of towns and villages is 6*59 ; that of scholars 
to population of a school-going age is 9'87 against 9*55 of previous year. The monthly average 
number of scholars during the year was 5,059 (boys 4,734 and girls 325), against 4,899 of the 
previous year; and the daily average attendance was 4,199*80 against 4,078*93. 

The total expenditure was Bs. 39,931; school cess and fees realized Rs. 19,410, against 
Bs. 38,744 and Bs. 19,481 respectively of last report. Owing to the change in the date of the 
Calcutta University Entrance Examination, the result of the examination is not yet known ; 
six boys from Ulwar have gone up for this examination. During the year 26 students have 
• obtained employment, viz.^ IS in Ulwar and 8 elsewhere. The policy of employing in Ulwar 
students educated in tiie State schools is being strictly followed. Some Ulwar students are 
prosecuting their studies in the Lahore and Agra Colleges for higher examinations. One student 
has been sent to the Agricultural College at Saidapet, Madras. Mof ussil students wishing to 
study in the High School, Ulwar, receive allowances and live in the boarding-house of this school. 
Inspection duty is carried out by Inspectors who are constantly on the move. During my cold- 
weather tour I visited some 40 schools and found them well attended and that generally speak- 
ing the masters were efficient. 

HATO COLLE&E. 

Including the Baja of Nimrana there were six Ulwar boys at this College. Thakurs 
Madho Singh of Bijwar aud Durjan Singh of Jaoli left the College in 1884. The former has 
been appointed to learn the work of the Criminal Court on a salary of Bs. 125 a month ; and 
the latter is prosecuting his studies in the High School. The report of the progress of the boys 
at the College is satisfactory. 

PUBLIC WOBKS. 

14. The total expenditure on Public Works was Bs. 2,08,845 against Bs. 1,68,967 of last 
year. Many roads are under construction and repair, and the expenditure under this head 
was Bs. 36,256. 

Great attention is being paid to the planting and care of trees along roads. 

Full particulars of the year's work of this department will be found in the report to the 
Secretary to the Agent to the Governor-General in the Public Works Department. 

Pandit Shimbbu Nath, Baj Engineer, has constructed a pukka tank near the Bailway 
Station at his own expense. This work is much appreciated. 

SAKITATION AND MUNICIPALITIES. 

16. Although the sanitary state of Tahsil Towns is steadily improving, yet no marked 
improvement in this direction can be traced in villages. The Darbar are fully alive to the 
importance of this question, and there is no doubt that by steady perseverance on the part of 
officials sanitation will gradually be observed in villages. 

There are five cities having Municipalities in the State. The Ulwar Municipality is 
specially wortty of notice. Its income is large, and is expended after paying regular charges, 
in paving streets, and upon all works for the convenience of the people and the safety of 

property. 

22 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



172 BEPOBT OP THB POLTHOAL ABMINISTEATIOK 

Minor disputes regarding booses and landed property in the town are decided by Members 
of tbe Committee. Appeals from decisions of Municipal Committees are heard in the CoundL 

Octroi duties are levied in eight places in the State. Cotton and salt have been exempted 
from this duty. The income from this source is expended chiefly in maintaining chowkidan, 
in sanitary arrangements^ and in lighting of towns. 

MILITABT DEFABTMENT. 

16. The duties of this Department are carried on by Bakshi Muhammad Inajrat XJUah 
Khan and Thakur Surtan Singh of Thana. At the close of 1884 the Ulwar army oonsisted of— 

I. Artillery-«S89 men and 10 guns. 
„ 49 Horses. 

,f 100 Bullocks. 

f, SI Camels. 

II. Cavahy— 1,468. 
m. Infantry— 1,039 Regular, and 

2,256 Fort Garrisons and Irregulars. 
The total expenditure on the army was Rs. 6,48,869. 

The incidence of taxation on account of the army upon every individual sabject is abrat IS 
annas per annum. 

HARVESTS, CULTIVATIOK, AJTD TUCGAVI ADVANCED 

BABI CROP OF 1883-84. 

17. This crop was Ysry much below die average owipg to there not havipj; beep any 
winter rains. 

KHABIF OF lSB4k. 

The rains in June 1884 set in at the right time, and gave promise of a good season^ ibey 
stopped however for about three weeks during which period high west winds prevailed* Croe- 
pects became bad, but the rains setting in again about the end of July saved tiie crops. The 
nunfall was much above the average, and as it continued till very late in the season considnrabie 
damage was done to the crops which were in ear. The kharif on the whole was not up to 
expectation, and might be reckoned as an eleven-anna crop ; grass and fodder ^crope wese ^eijr 
good. 

BABI OF 1884-86. 

The late rains of 1884 were most beneficial for this crop, and the outturn is better than 
has been seen for some years ; in fact the crop may be termed a bumper one. 

It is hoped that the rabi outturn of 1886 will considerably make up for the deficiency of 
the 1884 crops, on account of which suspensions and remissions, amounting to Rs. 1,68,809, 
hadtobemade. 

NSW CITLTIVATORS. 

During 1884 two thousand two hundred and nine cultivators have settled in Ulwar. 
Many of these are people who left the State during the famine of 1877-7S. 

TUCGAVI ADVANCES. 

During the year Rs. 88,341 were advanced to the people without interest. Of tbi^ sum 
over Rs. 47|000 were spent on wells. 

FRIGES CURRENT. 

18. {Appendix j^.)— The prices of food-grains ruled much lower than in -the preceding 
year. 

SALT. 

19. Vigilant supervision is exercised to prevent the manu&ctune .of salt. The average 
selling price of salt throughout the State was .14-^^ seers per rupee. 

TOURS. 

20. During the cold season I made a thorough tour of the State, and I can certaiuly report 
that as a rule all classes appeared happy and contented. Of cburse here and there complaints 
reached me, and I generally found that those with good grounds were already before the Darbar' 
for redress. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB aAJPTTTAKA BZATBB KM 1884^. 



173 



The TftliaUaro luid other Tahsil officials are mostly efficient men^ and if the present super, 
yisioii oontinues the bad hands will soon be marked and got rid of. The murder cases (men* 
tioned under Criminal) were perhaps not very successfully handled, although with the evidence 
before them tiie Darbar could not have [arrived at any other decision (in the case the file of 
which I saw) than that they arrived at. 

What I heard during my tour regarding these cases led me to the conclusion that the police 
were in fault. The Darbar are quite alive to the harm done in allowing heinous crime to go 
undetected and will take measures which will at all events insure greater activity on the part of 
the police of all grades in future. 

His Highness the Maharao Raja was virith me during part of my tour. I spent 100 
days on tour. 

AOENT TO TEE GOVESNOB-OENEBAL. 

21. Colonel Bradford^ Agent to the Governor-General, paid a short visit to Ulwar in 
September 1884> and in January 1886 made a tour in Ulwar. On this latter visit Colonel 
Bradford entered the Ulwar territory from Karnal (Patiala) and was met on the border by His 
Highness the Maharao Baja. ' 

His Highness remained in camp with Colonel Bradford throughout his tour in the State, 
which lasted till the 16th January. 

In the village Dumroli, in which Cobnel Bradford encamped on entering Ulwar territory. 
His Highness had a tank ooostrooted in commemoration of the event. 

FINANCE. 

22. In Appendix E will be found the actuals for 1882-83, the estimates and actuals for 
1888-84, and the estimated income and expenditure for 1884-86. 

The following is an abstract of these accounts >- 





jLrtittiiteisaMa 


AotdaliftriMljei. 


Brtlnat«tel884^. 


Inoome 

Expenditare^ Ordinaiy 


Bt. 

2A,18»270 
19,8^769 


Bi. 

28,11.928 
20,09,547 


Bt. 

24,27.180 
19,71,140 


DQfpltIS •••...•• 

Sxpenditare, Eztnundinaiy 


7.946 


8^2,881 
9.944 


'4^68^040 


NetSnnliit 

Befldt 

Loaof 

OMliB«liiMe . ^ -. . . • . 


4,19,We 
iWMS 


2^487 

• •a 

ii6i88,684 


4^5^040 
'2439.664 



The inoome of the year was Bs. 23,11^938, or Bs. 78,762 less than the estimate. This was 
owing to suspensions and remissions of revenue, necessitated by bad harvests. 

BZPSVDIT UKB. 

The ordinfl;ry expenditure exceeded the estimates by Bs. 28,627 ; this excess was chiefly 
<ywing to Public Works. 

BSTIXAiPSS. 

The income of 1884-86 has been estimated at its normal figure, JKs. 24,27,180, and with 
present prospects if nothing untoward happen this sum should be realized without difficulty. 
The expenditure has been estimated at Bs. 19,71,140. 

This will show a surplus of income over expenditure of Bs. 4,66,040. 

CASH BAXiANOB. 

The cash balance is estimated at Bs. 24,89,564. Of this amount His Highness has invest- 
ed 20 lakhs in Government paper, and hopes to inveH a further sum of 4 lakhs during the 
year, which will bring up the income from interest to one lakh of rupees per annum. 

HISCELLANEOUS. 

28. A Steam Hydiaolic Cotton press has been established in Use proximity of the Bailway 
'Station by Seths Hannukh Bai and Oovind Bam of Khurja^ A' brisk trade has consequently 
sprung up in Ulwar and in the neighbouring towns and villages of Jaipur, Bhartqrar, and 
Eerosepilr (Ourgaon). 

22a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



lU 



REPOBT OP THB POimCAli ABtflKISTBAnON 



The merohants who come to Ulwar on account of this business buy for exportation large 
quantities of til (oil seeds) ^ guwar (a species of pulse), and other produce. This press has bene- 
fited the public of Ulwar in many ways. One class has perhaps suffered, although no pressuiB 
is brought to bear upon the zamindars to sell their cotton exclusively to the press, namely, the 
village shop-keepers, who in former days had the monopoly as it were and used to purchase all 
the cotton and export it to large cotton markets. 

SILOS. 

In compliance with a circular received from the Agent to the Govemor-General on the 
subject, the experiment of silos was made in several parts of the State, a separate report of 
which will follow as soon as particulars are received. 

COMMISSABIAT, ACCOUNTi AND NAZUL DEPABTHENTS. 

The Commissariat, ^the Account, and the Nazul Departments have been overhauled and 
placed under good systems of management. 

HEALTH* 

24. Fever was prevalent after the rains, but there was no epidemic of any description 
during the year. 

Particulars of dispensaries, vaccination, and of the jail are supplied by the Agency Surgeon* 

NIMRANA. 
HABVEST AND TUCCAVI ADVANCES. 

26. The rabi of 1883 was far below the average. The gram crop entirely failed for want 
of rain, and the yield of wheat and barley was very poor. 

KHABIF OF 1884. 
Cotton failed completely in all but three villages, and the outturn of joar and bajra was 
below the average. 

RABI OF 1884. 
The rain that fell late in the season enabled the zamindars to sow gram very extensively, 
and the area under wheat and barley exceeds that of previous years. The crop will be a good 
one. 

Tuccavi advances were given whenever asked for. 

JUDICIAL. 

Seven civil and sixty-seven criminal cases against 14 and 73 of the previous year were dis^ 
posed of. There were no serious offences. 

SCHOOL. 

The number of boys attending the school was 42 against 39 of previous year. Of these 7 
are the sons of cultivators. 

ACCOUNTS. 

In Appendix O will be found the estimated and actual income and expenditure for 
1883-84, and the estimates for 1884-85. An abstract is given below : — 





1683-84. 


188M8. 




Estimate. 


AotnalB. 


^M*Tmtfl. 


Income Ordinary . ••••.. 
„ Extnordinary 


Bs. a. p. 

29,656 
100 


Bi. a. p. 

' 26,988 12 
103 14 9 


Bi. a. p. 

29,174 
600 


Total IvooHB . . . . 
Expenditoxe ....... 


28.755 
19,169 


26.092 10 9 
17,878 1 8 


29,674 
19,491 


Sttbplus . • • • 
CbwhBaUmce 


9,586 
21,447 6 5 


8.714 9 6 
20,575 14 11 


iai83 
80.758 14 11 


Total 


81,088 6 6 


29,290 8 6 


40,941 14 11 



During the year a further sum of Bs. 10,000 has been invested in Government 4^ per 
cent paper. The total sum now invested is Bs. 20^000. 

I have visited Nimrana three times during the year. Colonel Bradford^ Agent to the 
Oovemor-Oeneral, visited Nimrana in January 1886. 

Babu Oulab Singh^ ELamdar^ continues to work satisfactorily and to deserve confidence. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB R4.JPUTANA STATES FOR 1884^. 



176 



liit 0fAfpendiee9 attaehed to He Annual Report of He Ulwar Political Agency for the year 

1884^. 

A. STATBlfiVT OV ClYIL JUSTICB. 

B. Sl C. Statxxbntb of Cbikikal JusTXck 

D. Bdvcational Gxvkul, Tablb I. ' 

D2, Ditto II. 

Dd. Ditto III. 

D4. DiT^ IV. 

D6, Ditto V. 

Dd. Ditto VI. 

1>7. Ditto VIL 

B. Statixbnt of Pbiobs Cubbbnt. 

F. Ditto Rbobipts & Disbubsbxbkts. 

G. Ditto of thb Nivbana Estatb. 

H. P. Peacock Lieutenant^CoUmei^ 
Political Agent. 

APPENDIX A. 

Statetneni of Civil Cases instituted and disposed of during He year 1884.' 





GLOSBOV1888. 


1884. 


TOCAL. 


PlBPOSSO OV DUBXVa 
1884. 


Piirsnro at CLora 
OV1884. 




No.«( 


VlllMOf 

eaaee. 


No. of 
easM. 


Vftlueof 
oaaee. 


No. of 
oaatB. 


Yftlneof 
oaies. 


No. of 
euoB. 


Value of 


No. Of 

CMOS. 


Value Of 
cases. 


Gvil Court 
TkhsOdar'i Court. 


668 

60 


Ba. 
79,801 
1,080 


Bs. 

2,422 

1,168 


Bs. 
1,96,148 
. 21,447 


. Bs. 
2,986. 
1,218 


Rs. 
2,76,944 
22,467 


Bs. 

2,166 

1,186 


Bs. 
176,186 
20,646 


Rs. 

820 

82 


Bs. 
1,00,768 
. W21 


Total 


ei8 


80,821 


8,690 


2,17.690 


4,208 


2,98,411 


8,801 


1,96,882 


902 


1,02,679 



^aiement (f cases appealed from Tahsildat^s and other Courts to the Court immediately superior. 





Pendfngst 
theeloee 
of 1868. 


Instituted 

duriDff 

1884. 


Total. 


Conflno. 
ad. 


Bevised. 


Bevereed. 


SetUed by 
Puneh- 
ajet 


OoiD|m>- 
mieed. 


Difmis. 
eed. 


Pending at 
thedoie 
of 1884. 


Civil Court 
flteteCooncU 


6 
23 


88 

91 


88 
114 


12 
66 


9 
26 


6 
5 


1 
4 


1 
8 


8 

1 


7 

16 


Total . 


28 


124 


162 


68 


84 


10 


6 


9 


4 


22 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



ite 



BE^B^ 0» fBl irasmCAL ADlflNXSI&ATXOir 






S3 



r 



"pMtAooM £|j»dcad JO 9«aioiBy 



*wi09i i)i9d(Md JO fmioiBt 



• • 



■M WM l^jadoid i|9|i(i& Of jaqoniK 



pM»A09 « 

jaamn kt ^ 



Twpnt RM i^ivdojd ipnin ni mqma^ 



*noimoQ e|f)8 Mojaq iwpi jvpna 



•pMddy |o fiDoo M0j8q !«« wpofl 



•jvpfnoj MOjaq pip) jrapa/| 3( 



•jipHfipi «KU9q I»W wpttfl 



ill 



•IWEOO 



'NflOd }o ^poitno vi 



'|«]i) JO ^aomaoaaonnoo 
^«»W» ••»? •?•» •*••? "JO ^odstp 



8spu9q)0 



'(tanpooo p6o8 Jo| X))iiu>ofl oa|J 99 p9 
-J9pjo raouod ia]pn[9ii|) p999|Aaoo J9qmDfi 



1»o««H^ 



S 



lO 09 f-4 



Tioanooomsi^ 



*1«9ddY JO ^JQOD Xg 



*j«ini*oi^'a 



"aipiQOiXfl 



•ftfi) 00 vnd Xnvn^ot xoqvniK 



»i 



l«|i«fiK>iniiiporaoiOH '^ 



•1«|i| txopq peu*|ititi| Jlo pOdtoM *pOKI 



1= 



^■••^ •fl ^"PWUl! 



'lajfinu) Xq p«A|9999 



*JtoX !!•«( JO ptto 9« 8ii|pa«d 



•s s 



I 
I 






1 

I 



•p9ai«^qo 
IVA iiono]Aao9 i(0Yi|A HI MfO JO a9qmiii{ 



'pov^or^kn 



■1V9X oq) Soiiiip uo|7«8);MAa| i9pira 
^il^rnojq- pin noX miO)A9Jid u\ po^odOH 



*lfdX 911) 

Snimp p^iimTOM ii»eqoA«qo| p9tiod9H 



f 



^ fH w* 



%D r^ ffH f-4 



CI 

I" 



•isqaiBS m«B 



S4 

I I 



5 






% Is 



■J 
o 












g t|5||^|S 



.9 ' 

3 

B " 

I- 



I' 



si s a 



3 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



•• s % s s 



OF THB BAJFUTAHA 87AKSB fOS 1884^. 



ItT 



S93 



ocTrt" ' 



i : : : I 



$5 SgS 
:« iee6i> : : : 



z : : : : 



: : 



:S $ 



II I I 



•a :' 



: :»' 



: :fi« 



:Aeo 



« :»-» : 



I i 



•aa 



^11 






III :•* :o» 



i i "-^a 



fHMlp 



• :8§ 



SSS 



:::::! 



:3§ 



:S8 



-4'^«Q0gg 



ass •■* 



:iHM 



fH^MOOVg^ 



ti 



'5 S|| ••"S 



-^ 18' 



:•"* 



i-iedfHfH^c 



fH^MOD^M 



F4<4ieiiao^M 



11 



g. 



>-|| 



:S" 



-H|g 






a^a ««•-» 



'il 



-g s|| ««': 



S 






III "H^-^ 



it 1- • 

I 8e 



•a 

tec 
a 



2 8 A • • fe • • -• « 

fi * 8 i ^ 



J** ^ 



la I 



ti^illii i; I 






si •§•&£ 

IS Jee 



lIlJII^Illl 



:§ :§r§li 



§ 



i 



S 9 



9 IS 11 ^; 

IS n 



99 



aoO)OiH« 



SS s a SS 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



178 



SE^BT OP THB POUTIOAL ABUIKIST&ATIOK 



I 






t 

r 



Is 

li 

IS 

•«8 



•s 






i 

I 



I 



•panioaM X^odoidjo^anoiDY 



•xn\o\9 X)X9d<Md JO 9000107 



*P919AOO 

•9J V9A X^jodoad qoiqM O] ieqtanf{ 



*oa(09S BtM X^9doid qo|qM O] iaqoinii 



Tioonoo 0)«)8 oiojaq \m\i% Mpa^i 



*X«addf |0 yooQ aaojaq };e[x% npaa 



•acp(tio J ojoj9q itm wpoxi 



-u«pi{Bq«x djojsq xm% idpo^ 






•n«aao 



•90HOd|oXpo»inooi 



•l«]D JO )n»uiaoa8aiuioo 
a99j« ••oq? 'p9ip *-g •; JO pqwodstp OBiiuaq^O 



(lonpaoo poofl loj X^imo^e OAfS 09 pa 
•jiapio taouad J8aipiiioa{) pa^opkaoa aaqomK 



s 

fig 

01 

O 



'iiooziH ^ 



Tj 



ipanoo 9i»;8 ^8 



•XBaddyjo^niooIs 



•XVpZQO J Ig 



•M»pn«r»x ^ 



•I«W «o »w^ Al«^^ ioqomii 



•Iim ^iioq^iM paevaiaH 



•|ilH wojaq paiiajsowq 10 podvoia 'peKI 



i 



'naX 9q} oiq^lii 



•iajsou; Xq peA|aaaH 



•iwX iwt JO paa ;>» aaipaaj 



•paoiv^qo 
ntk ooROlAooo qowM ai swio jo ioqomn 



•p9»»aiP»AOI 



•«aX oqi aojinp aon«8j^AOi 
wpoti iqSooiq poti wax anoiAaid a| pa^iodag 









11^ 



: ! 



: s : 



;oo : 



:ao : : 



*itqoniK I«paS 



«H : :« ^ 



«^ -H 



• S SS :8 



•^-^ 



: 1 



:iHiH 



••" gs*a as 



t>N 



««, ggMOO 3 .»; 



»-« 5§8"a 8«S 



^ € I II 

* 'g • i i • • • I • *5 

. 9 -. ^' ^ •« .-2 J ^ a 







9 



S|«S S :g 9 



s 



S 3 



gs«a sgas 9 



I 



*•* S8*a 3*5 s 



Is 



I 



60 






§s s 



s s& SS8S3 as 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



07 THB AAJ7TJTi.N4 STATES lOS 188A^, 



179 



g Ri 



5 



^ 







•laipntj 


S 


i : ::!!:::::: i ; : :::::: : : : : : 


00 


*9a9cin|i| 


t» 


•!:!:::::::: 5 : 5 :• ! i"^ : : : : : : : : : : 


9 


•pov>mioofinox 


s 


.0«^ ^^^-^^J3j3 ..•g|^O5;gO-«5J*«8g*0« ^g5 


1 


•MlAJMOIQIJpMITIIISia 


a 


: ::::: 2 :::::::::::: : : : i : : : : : : : : 


« 


•painMxa^lwa 


X 


i ;:::::!:::::::::::::::::::::::::: : 


: 


•tm99innoqpen«dxs 


» 


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::! 


: 


•p«ld|iui 


n 


:::::::: : : : : : : : i It:::: : : : : 


Ss 


1 

8 


Tlox 


s$ 


: z*^ :::::: :^* : :*855 : :«8g'^-'-»"-|l&^ :^ :5I« 




•SMdU008 


8 


:::::::;::::::{:<:::::::::::!::':::: 


: 


^M94uooS 


3 


::::::*::::*'::::::::::::::::::::::: 


to 


•W^lMOOt 


S 


:::: 5 ::::::::::::::'':: i i'^ ::::::::: : 


N 


•8Mdiuo9 


5: 


: : ::::::: : : : ^'^ 5 : •S '• i :^* 


1 




TUQI 


S 


.^•^ .^^- .^ ^«D ^^ .fe-^'saga'^-'^ j-s:* :sa :«- 


s 


••TOJOj 


s 


i :;;::;::•:>•::•:•:;::;:::::::•:<• < 


: 




3 


ttmifi 


s 


:::::":::::::: i ::::::}:::::::::::: : 


r-* 




txml 01 


a 


:" : : i i ! : 1 • :" • J » : i J : 5 i : • : : : : i : • • : ■ ! i 


to 


1II9X9 


9 


: i : 1 : i :" 1 : •" : ; • J r :" • r : J i :• 1 • •"'" ! : • 


fl 




5 


'MMlf 


*i4 


i ! 5 : • ! • 5 • I 5 : r i i ; • •*■"" : i I :!•::"" |" i 





•tmXf 


s 


r*- : r- r : : = : J : J : =- : : r :• • 5- I : :- i = 1 


00 


' 


•»Xi 


01 


::"! = •:!:!:":::"• i""** : T • :" : •'" f : 


s 


tqiaomo 


OD 


r 5 5 : • : : S : :" = : :"" r :88 : r T" : :"" i' = 


a 


•iq^Qomg 


•• 


:•:: z • S •::::::•«-=• i"*::* i :=• :"" :«- 


§ 


•(»in9iwi) XifinoM 


« 


!!:::£ S M • : : : : Hi : • ■ : : : : : 


g 


•nwannoD)-ov*P»IP 


la 


:• •: : S 5 : : : 


1 


tfi9a»9«18 "fit nwnioo) 
j^m no lad Iinra^ov 
•iMMiadjo -ON WOi 


^ 


"sa-*— "— S8*— |g-'«g|g«"a«-"gs<«>8sa8s 


3 


•ij onraioo) iwvinqo 
nm aono|A«oo qoiqm 
m MMO JO -on i«a<M 


m 


I : : : 


! 


; -ai wrao jo -o^ ^oj; 


OT 




S 


■I 


[>3 


w» -ON rn»8 


i-i 


'""""••-"•saasaaassaaTaaaasfesaasaas 


• 

1 



J 


•sT i^ 


^1 


4 ^ 


II 


Lieu 
Pol 


•» 


Q^ 


§ 


-4 


«s 


p: 


» 


i 



23 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



180 



BOBTOBer OF' THS POIJTXCAL. AlXBlXNIfiTBATION 



< 









II 



§ 

P 
Q 



•I 
I 

I' 



9ft 







11 


• 




11 II 










s£ 


ss 


s 


|rf ill 


0) 


s; 


^ 


S 


II 

3*8 


»o 


CO 




A 


li 


S 


83 






1 


1 


il 




09 


: : 


: 


-• 


i 


: 


^B 


















cug 




M 




. . 


. 


, 






5 


•pwuwpv 






' * 


■ 


" 


• 


'• 


•tuon 


^ 




O fH 


3 








•im!|inioiiqndJomox 








M 


" 


• 


• 




g 


l-ai 




- 














If 

»4 •« 


i^ 


s 




: : 


: 


'- 


• 


: 




















S-j 


















8" 




0» 




• . 


. 


, 








^ 


|l 






" * 


" 


• 




• 


s 




















1 


1' 


^1 


OD 




3" 


s 


fH 

3 


8 


^ 


go 

1 


It 










M* 




of 


It 


** 




2S 


s 


I: 


i 


1 


s 


g o 


III 


« 




• : 


: 




; 


i 




si 


IS 








• 








-^3 






■ 




- 


: : 






u 












[ 








» ■ * 


- ■ 


• • 








• • S 


■ 


' ^ 






i 


.. ^ 


^ 


. 1 




* 


i 

i 

i 




§ . 








s 


3 


1^ 


" 






33 


P 


■ 


s 


■» 








1 


•1 

1 










II 


1 














«>3a 


CD 














*i».-l 


t* 














«« 


^ 
























^ 






■ ■ 








1 


■a 




.|l 






i 








Jl 






g 








'-a 


OD 






1 


^ 






2 


t^ 






f:^ 


% 












PS 














5 


to s 












-4 


^1 i 


M 










s 












^ 


1 
§ 






&> 


• 




'1 






1 








31 
















f 3- 1 














« 



■S 



1 

a 

9 



t 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



'OF TBE HJiflWl^eL tflPA'MS IfCftL i98i^. 



181 



§ 



P4 

SI 



o 
I 

< 

i 

I 






St 



I 



"s. 



at 



00 00 



*nioouwn4oi]|c 



>«dd« put 0Ji4]iijm| 



*4iqpipia 



idpiu^oqog 



^oofioodiai 



•noROWKI 



•ApudAiaa 



si 



•"5 



Pa 



'fiooqog 
aaq^oiiY 



a^nnwi. 



fiooqag 



^eiooqog 
Xi«pao9»s 



•103 l«1IO|B 
•M}OJU 



*8aJB9|10D 



§ § 



I § 



S 



S 






5 



S 9 



I 






^8 

0-8 



^S ||| 

Ss.1 



13 



[1 1;_^ 

9 g o^J^ 



11 



'■§S 






s 



I 




23a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



182 



BEPOBT OF THX POUTIOAL ASMINISTBATIOM 



1 



o 



^ 

2 

> 

B 






I 












55 



«^ 

















1 


1 






1" 














1 










1 ^ 


> 


















g 
















J S 


















i - 


J 
















^s .s 


a 
















*3 » 


o . 


, 














1 1 


S| 


















rl 
















.!■ i 


II 
















'i 8 


S| 
















U 

'^l-? ^ 
















I 


1^ 1 

Jill 

iB .2 1 


II 

••- 






















. 4- 


















' 












ooa 


«o 












^ 




a 




. ^ 


, 










, , 


, 


• , 


• • 


, 


o 




^ 


■» 


■ • 


' 


: : 




t»<o 


3 


I I 


s 


• 




2 


n 
















00»l 


kO 














ki 


'tiooqrtfl 


























1 


H it 




*• 


; : 




: : 


: 


: : 


: 


: : 


• 


: 


: : 


: 


o 


iJ B 


























' 


^ 


fi m 










J 


1 












1=1 


mo 


■«Iiwqog 




» , 


, 


■ m 


^ 




^ 


, • , 


^ 


, 


, , 


, 


g 


[fi »f 


aamjwx 


* 


' ' 


" 


' ' 


' 


: : 




• • 


' 




• " 


• 


§ 


^- 














O04 


Oil 














Jl 


••loonog 


•o 


: : 


: 


• • 


: 


•Ht* 


00 


: : 


: 


: 


: : 


: 
















O^ 


^ 




































525 


»49 














00 *• 


eo 














o * 


Xivpaooagi 


•« 


• • 


: 


: : 


: 


«s 


CO 


: : 


: 


• 


: : 


: 


b] 










1 


» o 


^ 












s 






























OS 


eg 


niao|iMj(uj 


00 


: : 


: 


: : 


: 


: : 


: 


: : 


: 


'• 


: : 


: 


h9 


5o 




























^ 


Is 


•aaaanoo 
any 


M 


: : 


: 


: : 




: : 


• 


: : 


" 


' 


! ■ 


: 










• ■ ■ 


•• si ■ 


1 • 


*• 


ill 

<^l 










1 • s 

^^ 1 

IJ 


I • g || g 

II 11 


II 3 
11 ^ 

II 


1 










3B 


SS S3 


55 


• 










1i 


II 13 


t% 




55 










GO 


uo 


« 


■4A -43 








^ 


m 


: 1 

i 


it 


^ 


6B 

• 










I 




t- 


1 




s 










i 






S 




> 










It 


1 { 


i 


1 




5 

B 

3 










^ 

i 

^ 




1 




1 




•1 




1 


» 


< 


1 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE &AJFUTAKA STATES FOB 1884^. 



183 






Is 



4 

2 

Q 



f 



I 
I 









N 
M 

n 


« 












Hi 
If 




S 


: 


: 


: 


: : : : 


: 


|5 


: 


: 


: 


: :• : : 


: 


§ 


: 


: 


: 


: : : : 


: 


•■mpoiBoqfK 


g 


: 


'- 


I 


: : : ! 


' 


•rapaiH 


g 


: 




: 


ill': 


: 


•■nepBi«lD »MJ»N 


s 


: 




: 


: : : : 


• 


*einiiBuna pen luvodojnia 


s; 


: 




: 


? : : : 


5 


88 -. 




s 


: 


: 


: 


:'.:': 


: 


•ea«naOTx |B0|i»8iii3 v 


IS 


: : : : : : : 


: 


•wi«na 


s 


: 


: 


: 


• : : : 


: 


•qowK VI8 no inioqas jo i«|Ox pnwB 


s 


: : : ; : : : 


i 




•Boo^QIDsai JO iB^oj. pnwo 


1 a 


; 


: 


: 


: : : *: 


• 


1 

1 


1 

5 
1 

8 

A 

i5 


P 




ss 


: : : : : : : 


~r 


'iwX eq) JBa]jnp Xiqioom 
81(09 eq) uo Aqmna eSwdAy 


S 


: 


: 


: 


: : : : 


i 


•qowK 1918 oo eiioa 
eq^ no exBioqDg jo aeqawK 


s 


: : : : i : : 


i 


•■aoim^l^sai jo jaqmnN 


2 


: ! : : : : : 


: 


Aided bf the Depart, 
ment or by Local Fund 
or Municipal Board. 


•eoirapnanv ^im •^•»^Y 


»« 


•: 


: 


: 


: i : : 


3 


•a«aX eqi iuiinp Xiq^uooi 
enoa aqi ao i-qiu a eiluaAV 


« 


: 


5 


: 


: I : I 


: 


•qswwK W18 no eiiox 
eq^ 00 sjieioqog jo leqomK 


S 


: 


: 


: 


: : : : 


: 


•raopntnfloi JO J«»o«»K 


;5 


: 


: 


: 


: ! : : 


'- 


i 

1 

1 

s 

B 


1 


•eowpa9»»«Xn»P»««»AY 


S 


: 


: 


: 


: : : : 


I 


•«eI«wa»finpItiniiom 
■ROH »il» «« ieqmaa eStaaAy 


a 


: 


: 


• 


: : : : 


: 


8q» no MBioqog jO JwqmoK 


;:3 


: 


: 


: 


: : : : 


: 


fnonn^peai }0 JtequmN 


o 


t 


: 


• 


: : : ! 


: 


^ 




A 


: 


: 


: 


: ; 5 : 


: 


•jveX eqiilniinp Xiaiaooi 
tnoH oq> aojaqraau •JhweAy 


CO 


: 


5 


: 


i : : : 


: 


eqi no MnoR^ |o '•qoinS 


e» 


t 


: 


: 


: : : : 


I 


•■nopn^WroijoiequinK 


<D 


: 


: 


: 


: : : i 






-oompae^lB Xflup e^weAy 


to 


: 


: 


. : 


: : : : 


t 


•x»eXeqialannpX|qiiioai 
■Iioa oqino laqnwn »aw8Ay 


:* 


: 


: 


: 


: : i : 


: 


eq) no bjwiom*8 JO »q»«ON 


m 


• 


: 


: 


: : : : 


• 


-raopmiwai «> Ji*qwwM 


«« 


■•. . 3 . . . 1 1 


: 




1 


- 


• 

• 
• 

1 

i 


1 


I 


^. . . . 

ll ; : : 

a? 


1 




•jiouToaax umiiuia 





Digitized by 



GoogI( 



184 



BEPOET OF THE POLITIOAL ABMINISTBATION 






^ 


W 

^ 


8 


^ 




•va 


1 


•2 


1 


Co 


hH 




M 


5j 


hH 


S 




U 


6 


E^ 


;z; 






^ 


N 


'S 


h:; 


S 


P3 


c 


H 


■s 


^ 


i 


iz; 


•« 


O 


§ 


P 


•T 


«j 


<a 


Q 


c8 


H 


5 



6 



as 

iU 
Ml 

I" 8 
I&4 

58 



' ^ = M M 



*BlRp9lU01{«]| 



•ropajH 



•wwi^'HRD •AW«K 



'Brnifung pov fla«9dojiig[ Si 



2 : » 



5 I . 2 I 






S s 



MM 









m o z M 



*9JBtQJ9ini| iwfQOViuo^ y 



*eJ9«n£a«i fvofsnio y 



•vu^oa 



*ilM«K %'IS no uvioqog }0 («|0f pmuo 



*iao|;a)[^Bir[ jo pi^o^ pmuo 



I 



5|S 



1-21. 

KM ^ 



'eoa«pa9)!(« Xlfvp eJBvaAy 



*j«9X eq; JBofjmp Xfqiaoin 
•nOH oq) no idqoxn I a^lfudAy 



•qojrew ;flI8 no snoH 
eq^ no aroioqag }0 idqoin j^ 



'■ooii^n^nsni }o laqino j{ 



'oompodnv ^ir^P oSwaAy 



*j«ai! eq) Sajjnp iCiqiaom 
snoH oq^ no aaqoina aSwOAy 



•qoa»fl ^818 no ti|oa 
eq^ no uvioqag jo JdquraM 



*gao)9Ti)|Viai Jo J9qamN 



*9aa«pa»^« Xiprp o^uoAy 



*n9£ oqi SaiiTip X[qiaoca 
snoa oq^ no JaqniQa dJStuaAy 



'qoj«K ^'IR no buo^ 
eqi no aivioqog jo jaqmax 



*8aonn;i;8ai }o i9qaiti|i 



*9oa«pa»^9« Xn«p 9J9«j[dAy 



'jraaX aq^ Xovinp Xiqiaom 
>noH oq) no joqoma 9i8u9Ay 



•qoCTK »8iB uo BiiOH 
oq; no 8i«(oqag }o iaqura^ 



•Buonn^f^sai JO joqam^ii 



*aoci«pq9;)« Xiivp •i8«i9Ay 



'xnt 9q) Jiajjmp Xiq^oom 
■noH 9q) no I9qniaa di8«i9Ay 



•qojran ^818 uo §xioa 
aq) no fxvioqog jo J9qara^ 



*8xio);ni)l)flai jo J9qaia|i 



fc : s; 



s 8 



I 



= I 



U ■: 



§ ^ 



I 



S 8 



S : = I 8 , 



2 » 



S t : i 



g « 



g i 



- I 



a 18 

04 



2 

of 

i 

s 



. I. 



>■ H 



1 

e 

01} 

& 
I 



I 



I 



5 

O 

I 



II 



'TTSUnO 'AOUTOAOa lOOHOg 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



or THE BAJPTO&KA STATES' FOB 1S84^. 



185 



11^ 

•s-i 
1° 



! : i 



I « 



II 



2 : t • : 




*Trxou8 'jKOMToaoa looaog 






: I 



It It It 

g^ S^ gS 

IhiE^ »>ta frih 




Ij 









g^ 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



184. 



SEFOET OF XBE POUTIOAeL AI»aNISTKATION 



8 



o 
< 
O 

s 

o 
Q 



IS 



§ 



I' 



1 






1 


s 












lir 

m 

1*5 




IS 




: : 


: 








£ 


i ; = = 1 : 


: I 






rs 


: : : : 


: : : 


: 




g 


S S 


: ' 


i 




§ 


•snpiiiH 


g 


s 1 


: g 


1 


1' 


1 




s 


• : : : 


• 


: : 


: 




i« 


; i ; M = 1 : : M 


||BSS 


•9atnJBu»i itfooBiuoA V 


» 


§ § 


■•: U 




!'• 


1 


*a8«o^a«[ (vaiBSBio y 


» 


i I ■ i ■: • : 


*: 


•vn«aa 


s 


g ; 


: : 


§ 




: 


-qojvK )'ie iu) uvioqdg jo iv}0^ pmuo 


^ 


= !- 


■: ^ 


1 


1' 


1 


-iDo^^n^nrai JO \v%o% punio 


ss 


^ o 


: S 


« 1 


s « 


"-2 


1 

H 

S 

i 


& 

s 

i 

I 

m 

m 

g 


P 


■eoavpaa))V i[t^ d^uoAy 


s$ 


: : : : 


: 


: : 




"ni9£ Biti amjtip Xfiiiaoca 
■UCTi am no jitquiTii a^vaaAy 


s 


: : : : 


; 


: : 




^HMoi^ l«tG ao snoH 


A 


: : : : 




: : 


: 


'BUdiininfrai jo jaqmn^ 


2 


: : : i I i 


: : 




111 


■e^Dvpnaiin l^vp oSuaAy 


?: 


: : : : 


: 


: : 


: 


i»noy aqi ttu j^qiuua dJ8iu9Ay 


s 


: : : : 




: : 




R^JUfTIHlEnotiioa 
sitl no tuiiEoq^t^^ jo jaqumH 


lO 


•1:1 


i 


: : 


: 


■tnoj^niiTiicii JO a9qamN 


2 


: ■ : : 






: 


e 

M 

s 

'4 

1 

§ 

1 


1 

|| 

1 


•woBpaa^^B XjpiP 9^w9Ay 


09 


11 


J 


o 
5 


i^ 




•X99l 9m J9auap X[iiiaoai 


91 


^! 


• ^ ^ 




§ s 


1 


•qojBK^BigaoBiios 
sq^ mo flJBioqog jo jeqranx 


- 


s s. 


: g 


1 


g 8 


1 

01 


•saonn^usni P »qa»nil 


s 


" s 


: *^ 


8 


5 - 


s 


III 

n 


'•ompad^TB Xipip o^BaoAy 


O 


: : = : = 




: 


'1991 »q^ aoijnp Xiqiaoui 
fln<*H ®qt ^0 Joqoina adBJ9Ay 


00 


^ . . M . 


I : 


: 


•qojBu 1818 no snoH 
oq) no MBfoqog jo jaquran 


t« 


: i : : 




•: 1 


: 


•saopninsai JO J»qninN 


• 1 : ■ • ! 




• : 


if 

c F 




-* 


: : : : 




•• i 


: 


•jwaX 0q» aaimp Iiqinom 
BjiOH 9V(% no jaqmaa aJ^dAy 


<* 


. : ; ; 


: 


: : 


: 


•qoiBW »8i8 no snoa 
9X[% no siBioqog JO jaqaro^ 


09 


: : : : 


: 


: : 


: 


•snouninsai jo wqrann 


« 


1 : = : = 


i 1 : : 


: 






i 

s 

s 

c3 




1 j| 
' 1 


• • 

• • 

& > 

1 


H 


II 
II 


•a 

1 




*1TSUK0 


•JIOUTO 


AOa lOOHOg 





Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE BAJfTO&KA STATES' FOS 198i^. 



185 






I! 



I ; 




"irxoug 'jKouToaoa looaos 



&■ 

I 
1 

ll 






: I 



n It It 

8^ §8 gS 

IhiE^ »>&( frtPki 



I 



5 

3 

1 



I 

a- 



d 



I ^ I ^ & 

•5 3 S S" 5 



ij 



o So 

a g, 
a '^ 



§■ 



°3 



s 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



186 



BEPORT 09 THB POLITICAL ADHINI8TBATI0N 



$ 






.9 






ti 






s pa "S 






"firnnii 



■vTsox<urrKO 



»q|onY 



"waj 



*paii^ picl|Ofini]f 



iMBeo JO w^«i [tool 



••noaMH ivpoiAoxj 



•wox 



*B9Mnoi i»q)0 pm i^iwau&opaa 



•aondiioeqng 



*l»9^ 



•l»V>x 



n 



^a *B8omogaoq)optra«(ii9mi[kOpaa 



•aofi^diiMqng 



'8MJ 



•ptiB J i«dp|imK 



ta 20 Win IKMHI 



**iLiiaA08 i«{oniAaij 



5 I 



^ 



•mox 



■flsomoB joi|f pm t^ooiiuiopiia 



•nopdiJBMqng 



•■wj 









••naoA0H •»«>S •^W'M 



'•aoiiios jiq^o put B^mouftopiia 



la 

|1 



•mox 



-uof^diJOtqDg 



•■wj 



•pjw>a iwipimiK 



'MSMO iO S8!|«I IWO7 



*3QaeA0H I«pa|Aoij 



•mox 



'seonos Mq^o pa* s;ii»inMopaa 



*ao|idii9Bqns 



•»ej 



•paQj pid{0|im|i 



•198MO 10 sa9«n I<ooi 



'•noaAOH [vioiqAaid 



)» 






•. n 



I 



I : 2 ¥ 



S 2 



n •» 



II 



I § i 



•4 •» 



: S3 



• • • 11 

I . .. f 

1 t I I 

< w o <S 



-.Saw 



'AOUToaaa umiAUEii 




I 



^ n b 



iTvuno *xouT9flaa iookos 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB EAJFUTANA STATES FOB 1884-85. 



187 



: i t 



: i 



I : 



:' ! 



2 : 



i : 




I : 



::l :i: i:s 



: : ! : : : : 



i : 



i : : : 



. . S . . $ ft — T 

: : 5 : : J : 



5 & 






s 



: S 



i ! 



i : : i 



:::<:: 



s. .1 






! i 



: ! 



: S 



! I 



T7 



TTTT 






: : : s : 



::::::: : 



::!:::: 55 



: : : : 



: : : : : 



III 5 z 



} 



I... 



J "8 I S I J a I 
II siflll 



i 9 i^> 



s r ^i 



-ifiOMiQ 'HOUToaaa looHog 




« s I 1 I 

^ I I I 31 






ft 
^ 1 

If I 



I 



?S-8 



« a 



Iplill 

i is 8| s5 

■U il si ii : 



u 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



188 



BEPOST OJf THE FOLlTICAli ASHIKISTBATtON 



S5 

i. 

I, 



O 

I 

I 

% 

& 

P 



•a 
i 






3 






1^ 



•0 

I 

3 



MO 



1^ 



I 






: : I 



:5S : 
:oco 5 






I 

1 
i 



- ft 

^ M ^ ^ 5 H 






5^ SI. 



« -< _ 

8 5^ 

an w 






^1 



is^ 



: : : : :SS : 
: : : : r^^S • 

• • • • •CQ CQ • 



:rHO 

:coco 






: : 



2 






3 
^ 






:S^ 



I 



00 



^ noD rti M ^ 












no enoa WR no sndQd jo aaqom^ 



:aoc4 



i[ooii3S jciMqainjii 



i 
I 



^kO 



o 

09 



J SI S ^ J S 

:li:S||iJi|i|i 






I I -S 

.s « .s S»s 8 

a> c Q> fl « 



o 

m 
& 

A 

O 



1 ^ 






1 -g 3 

lis 

;zi <i ^ 









I— • .s 



1 











e^9 



c4 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



Of TH2 BAJFUTAKA STATES FOS 1884-86. 



189 



:§. 



$3 






s 

09 



00 
CO 






GO 

:o 

CO 



S 



:S 2 : 



:8 : : 



00 
r-t 

CO 



s 



8 



00 

CO 



8 



o 

CO* 






00 

5% 



: eo I 



s 



^ 



:53 



00 



CO 

So 



CO 
00 



s 



00 
04 









s 






•8 : 



CO 



CO 



@ 



8' 



=8 : 



CO 



:8 



8 






CO 






5 



CO 
kO 



.:S : 



8 



Oil 

CO 



to 



00 
04 






'■\ 



kO 



0i 
us 






of 



:8 



8 



09 



09 



09 

kO 

kO 



1^ 



:qo : 



3 




I 






J 


• 


• 


s 






QQ 




•s 


1 


1 


.1 


S 






s 






o 







I 

I 

8 

I 



I 



I 



i 



fl^ 



EH 



1^ I 



s s 



pi,^ 



iB^. 






ll'Jiliiti 





I 



24a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



190 



BEFOBT OP THB FOLITIOAL ADUINISTBATION 



o ^ 
ft i 

as 

o 

I 



' Bg ^p umuwum i 



'BlipiIIQ 



*Btrei!^suq3 9Ar^«l{ 



-na pire medoin^ 



I : 



^ 



& 



s : : 



2 



ino^ 



^B^aepn!jg e^BAUj 



•Bnor^i^r^iizx jeq^ 



*8i[oi!^ii^j!^8nj popiy 






;3 

5 
S 

2 



I 



§ 



'm<>x 



S 

-4 
ft 

o 





P 



•s^uopu^g n'^l^d 



*giijaii^n:^pBaj lOTpQ 



•snot^imi^Biii pepty 



japan sixoii^i^ciBizx 



I : : [ : : 



; : I 



1 



«0 



8§ 



•WOX 



•BHOI^I^C^Bni le1{!^3 



•Bnopim^sni papiy 



•oSvmna OT^qnd 



I 



a 

•g 
e 



f 



I 



I 




iH d e5^>o*«t 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



or THE KAJPUTAITA STATES KOB 1884-8S. 



191 



s i 

o 
o 



I 

I 



P .1 



I 






e 
1 

I 









*aonoiwQ8Qi 
onqnj no |uwg i«dp{aiip| pa« 
pmm ivoog JO Mimpoadxa t«»ox 









: s : Si! 



! : i : : : 



i : 



'•ao))vp 
B io raoued e^tu^j 



•pwofl punj i»»o»i a 



-!»ii9ia!Knda(i eiix S 



'Maiiios 
4eq)o pm a^twouftopas 



tnoRdiJogqns 



'•wj a 



•puaipwo*! a 



•pKlpiTOH S 



t^ouJB ]«{oa{Aaia m 






X[q)W>m iiiOH 8iw 
ao jtaqoma •SuOAy 



•qoiiH 

t«tc «o "iioa »q^ 

no sjffioqog jo jaqnniK 



•roonmiliano -ON 55 



•IP' 



»ni3rai ofiqiid «o aroi 
ig pnnj i»»oa moj. 



IB 



Is 

si 



*8ao|)«p 
-osm JO laouMl »9«AiJa 



: : i 



: H 



•p«oa iwipiunm I 2 



■)iNiiiV«<Iec[ 9qx S 



taoinos 
wq^opm •^mou&opiia 



*ii0})diioeqn8 



-t : 



:l : 



•8WJ I o» ( : : 



•9%wuS tsdpTvnn | oo 



I : : 



•flMMO JO safVH rK»l 



f^awLS IBpiXlAOlcI 



-pa09!»« Xnip o»uoAy 



«jra»X 9q9 Saviap 
Xiqi^Qom •iiOH oq^ 
ao jtqmna oMiOAy 



- I 



! s i 6 ! *: : 



no Mipqos JO MqnroK 



•rooi wpwri |0 'OK 



! I I 



^ = ^ M: : 



: ! 



! ! 







'SOUTOAOa UtmAUIil 



Mnuiif) 'Aoufoaos vooaog 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



192 



KEFOftT OT TBB POUTIOAIi ADMIBISIS^TIOK 

., = : = = = : J 




Digitized by 



GoogI( 



Oy THE EAJPTJTANA STATES FOB 1884-86. 



193 



la 



S3 



I 
I 






I 

■fe. 



« 

•^ 



S ; 



Pi 



•0 

{ 

1 

.1 



I. 



















'4m 








■^ o> a> 


to 


rl 04 rH 


rH 


^ 


5 -* 


04 


rH 




, 


S 


■H 


iH 


P-* 


iH 


■H »H 








J 


a a a 


S3 


s » a 


^ 


9 


s s 


09 


S 




o o g 


a 


00 t* *> 


fH 


a 


to lO 


lO 


0> 




I 


09 09 iH 
M 04 09 


s 


S 3 8 


a 


s 


s s 


HI 
09 


' a 




•§ 


















tH 




















-• 


t« O O 


o 


CD lO 00 


s 


00 


CO CO 


CD . 


a 




1 


s a a 


s 


a s; S 


& 


s 


s s 


09 


a 




« « s 


Oi| 


■« o «• 


s 


-* 


CO » 


iH 


»H 




1 


00 00 ^ 


00 


s g s 


Oi 


^ 


0> ^ 


5 


^ 




1 


IS S »H 


IH 


•H 


tH 


•1 iH 


rH 


rH 






r4 r4 09 


A 


« to ■* 


00 

IH 


0» 


"> s 


3 


S 




J 


s s; s; 


S 


a §■ s 


a 


s 


S 2S 


SS 


S 




» O IH 


04 

fH 


s s • 


s 


s 


tH f-l 


■* 


lO 




1 


S S S 


SS 


ass 


s 


04 


a a 


a 


a 


1 


»^ 




















oq •« O 


'^ 


o> g •H 


04 


l> 


o •* 


'* 


09 




^ 


i-l fH tH 


iH 


iH ^ 








rH 


IfH 




1 


s; ^ s 


S 


s s a 


S 


s 


3S as 


S 


S 




to 00 lO 

fH 


09 


CO eo 00 


o 


eo 

1-4 


a • 


S 


• 




^ 


S 8 2 


iH 


55 s a 


00 


5 


a s 


& 


00 

rH 






»^ H ^ 


09 


« ^ « 


$ 


« 


e, ^ 


A 


^ 






f-l fH 


iH 


iH fH 




fii^ 


rH 








1 


S ^ S 


SJ 


S 2; ^ 


^ 


S 


SS s; 


^ 


to 

04 




»4n 


*4M 


•4n 


t 


.^M 


HN 


Hn 


MM 






O iH O 


o 


" " a 


CO 


rH 00 


CO 


f-» 




*tm 


^ i? ^ 


s 


ass? 


a 


a 


s s; 


SJ 


a 


1 


•5 




















•4n 




HN »4n #4r 




HN 




HN 


HV 


"* 


, 


« r^ Oa 


01 


-^ a a 


a 


■^ 


CD 04 

1H 


-* 


t> 




^ 


S SS S 


s 


s s; s 


s 


S 


s a 


S 


a 




« go e« 


oo 


gr « 1? 

1-4 


04 


^ 


3 * 


«o 


a 




^ 


S S 5 


s 


s a s 


S 


04 


a a 


00 


00 

IH 




• • • 

• • • 














a 
s 


a 
















s 




. . . 














H 

1 




April 

May 

June 


►» 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


a ^ 


1 




1 , 







4 oi <S 


!^ 


^ 


A ^ 


14 





•s ^ 
s ^ 



I 



« 



S 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



194 BEFOBT 07 THB FOLITIOAL ADMINI8TBATI0K 

AFFEN 

Siaiement showing the Aetual Receipts and Diebunements/or the Sumbat yean 1939 and 1940 





«^ 


1868-84 


18846S. 




Aetoalfl. 


ErtlmatflS. 


Aotoali. 


Ertimatos. 


I.— LAND EBVB. 

NUB. 

1. ABXXAB8 . 

Current Bevenne 


16,817 
19,24,696 


2027,198 
8,44817 


6,000 
19.00,000 


19,98,790 
8.58,900 


1.806 
18.87,640 


1937,117 
8,46,046 


20,000 
19,00,000 


20,09,880 
8.77300 




19,41,018 


19,06,000 


18,88346 


1930,000 


S. OlBDBKB 

8. Canals . 
4. FoKBSTDnw— 

Camel gnuing . 

Bftmbooe 

Gnrhkaptani . 


18.615 
19,600 

1,600 
2,100 
6,779 


16,000 
20,000 

1,400 
2.100 
6,000 


14307 
18367 

1,856 

2,104 
6,218 


15,000 
20,000 

1,500 
2,100 
6,000 




9,879 

16,828 

12,661 
252 


9,600 


8,672 


9,600 


6. Tbibutb . 

Fluobi 
BAgwbach 


18.000 

18,000 
290 


17,699 

14,988 
278 


18,000 

14,000 
280 




12,918 


18,209 


16366 


14380 


7. Stoitb Quabbieb 

Talbaoft . 
MucelUneoufl . 


4,187 

2,162 
7.611 


8,000 

2,000 
8,000 


2,427 

1,999 
9,645 


2.600 

2,000 
8,000 




9,768 


10,000 


11,544 


10,000 


II.— SEWAIJUMMA 

9. C17BTOM8 . 

10. Abkabi . 

11. COFPIB MlVBS . 

12. JUDIOXAIr— 

Fines 

Fees, a?il Court 

Stamps • 


1,11,806 

6,668 

258 

9,822 

16,897 

6,941 


1,26,000 

4,000 

800 

10,000 

16,000 

6,000 


135.000 

4,668 

280 

10,176 

11312 

6,859 


135.000 

4,000 

800 

lOlOOO 

12,000 

6,000 




81,160 


82,000 


27347 


28,000 


18. IBOK PUBVACBS . 

14. IVTBBBST, &0. . 

15. SatdtobovPat. 

16. Nazxtl 

17. ADTAirOBB BBOOT* 

EBBD— 

Toocayi . 
Hisesllaneoiis . 


4,840 
81,861 
18,687 

8,278 

26,481 
96,065 


6,000 
60,000 
20,000 

8,000 

20,000 
80,000 


8314 
45,670 
16,282 

8^887 

12.886 
92,089 


4,600 
84,000 
16,000 

6|000 

20,000 
80,000 




1,22,486 


1,00,000 


1.04,847 


1,00,000 


18. MnoBLLAvaoim— 

Post Office 

Jail 

Cattle Farms . 
i HisoeUaneons . 


1341 
8,660 
8,069 
8,988 


1,600 
8,000 
8,000 
2,000 


1347 
8,088 
8,747 
2^296 


2,000 
8,000 
4.000 
2^000 




13,298 


9,600 


11,073 


11,000 




«M 


••• 


••1 


••• 


Cvriedofv 


28,78^16 


28,47,690 


22,78,062 


28,87,180 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



07 THS BAJFUTANA STATES FOA 1884^. 

DIXF. 

{A.D. 1882^ »nd 1333-84) and (He Budg«t Ettimatefor Sumbat 1941 {l.V. 1884-65). 



195 





1888^. 


1883-84. 


1WM5. 




Aotoalt. 


EsUmitet. 


Aotamls. 


Ertlmatet. 


1. Pat.aob Expbb* 


X 


Ji 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


PITUSB — 

Ehawas Chelas . 


41,894 




40,000 




40,627 




40.000 




Kitehen . 


81,679 




80.000 




29.523 




80,000 




Mahi Sigha 


18,287 




19.000 




18.621 




19.000 




ShiUrkhana . 


18,671 




16,000 




18.262 




15.000 




Tothakbaiia 


78,828 




80.000 




1,18,241 




80,(K)0 




Palkikhana 


8.835 




8.300 




3.413 




8,300 




SUlabkhana 


8,590 




6.000 




6,527 




6,000 




Hasbalkhana . 


1,277 




1,200 




1,268 




1,200 




Wrestlen 


1,641 




1,600 




1,838 




1,400 




Bartankhana 


871 




600 




642 




600 




Ice-pits . 


2,341 




2.200 




2.407 




2,200 




Harakaras 


7.809 




7,200 




7.003 




7.600 




Qanijankbaoa . 


1,320 


2,10,298 


1,300 


2,07,800 


1,361 


2.43,122 


1,300 


2,06.400 


# 










2. &rABLB8— 


















Riding . 


81,926 




80,000 




62.736 




66,000 




Carriage . 


25,934 




25.000 




35.485 




26,000 




Breeding Stad . 


22,981 


1,30,841 


25,000 


1,80,000 


23.638 


1.11,864 


25,000 


1,16,000 












8.BLBPHAKT E8- 


















TABLIBHMBKT . 


... 


80,780 


••• 


80,000 


... 


88,388 


*•• 


80,000 


4. Bttllogk Estab- 


















LISHMBNT— 


















Rutbkhana 


22,068 




22,000 




22,936 




22,000 




Uarikhana 


10,067 


82»186 


10,000 


32,000 


10.726 




10,000 












83,662 




82.000 


6. Cambl Ebtab- 


















LISHMXITT 


••• 


18.102 


..• 


18.000 


••• 


19.708 


..• 


18,000 


6. Cattlb Fabms . 


••t 


4,884 




6,000 


... 


6,124 


... 


5,0C0 


7. Administbativb 


















Ebtabiishmmt— 


















Hazuri 


9,492 




10,000' 




11.792 




11,600 




State Council . 


21,061 




20,000 




17,819 




18,000 




Manshikhana . 


8,616 


84^168 


8,700 


88,700 


2,901 


82,612. 


8,000 














82,600 


8. Bbvbkitb akd 


















FllTANOB— 


















l4ind Revenue 


















Office . 


11,846 




11,600 




12,207 




12,000 




TahiiU . 


54^033 




64^766 




66,296 




66,000 




TiamberdarsSper 


















cent on land 


















revenue 


66,297 




66,000 




62.616 




66,000 




Kanungo Huqs 


8,983 




9,800 




10,693 




10,000 




Patwari p . 


81,666 




88,000 




81,681 




82,000 




Remissions 


4,841 




4,000 




2,861 




6,(KK) 




Audit Office 


6,769 




7.000 




7.236 




7,600 




Treasury . 


8,678 




8,600 




8,686 




8.600 




Commissariat . 


9.231 




9,600 




12,629 




10,000 




Nazul . 


1,604 




1,600 




2,831 




2.000 




Copper mines . 


86 




86 




231 




100 




Iron works 


826 




850 




879 




400 




Querries • 


608 


1.88.263 


6U0 




818 


1,92,867 


800 










1,90,700 






1,98,400 


9. Judicial— 


















Court of Appeal, 


6,240 




6,240 




6,240 




6,240 




Civil Court 


6,343 




6.000 
18]b00 




6.698 




6,500 




Criminail Court . 


12,348 






18,210 




12,000 


• 


Bstabluhment of 


















Superintendent 


















of Police 


1.611 




1,600 




1,608 




1,600 




Tbannas, &c. . 


60,081 


76,628 


60,000 


76,840 


60,336 


76,987 


60,000 


76,340 












10. Abmt- 


















Wnr Office 


7.105 




7,200 




7,473 




7,600 


. 


Artillery . 


80,496 




81,000 




81,041 




82.000 




Port Garrisons . 


1,23,266 




1,20,000 




1,22,260 




1,20,000 




CaVHlry . 
Kbns Chowki . 


2,07.111 




2,10.000 




2,11.938 




2,10,000 




21,4^8 




21,600 




21,326 




21,000 




PuttehPattan . 


62,199 




63.000 




64,871 




66,000 




Kbas n . 


20,629 




20.600 




20,574 




21,000 




Bakbtawra,, 


21,334 




21,000 




21,386 




21,000 




Resalab NRqdi . 


23.402 




23.500 




23,229 




23.500 




Camel guns 


4,670 




4,600 




4,630 




4,600 




Irregular com- 


















panies . 


29,628 


6,41.117 


29.000 


6.41,200 


29,642 


6,48,869 


20,000 


5,46,600 








■ 




Carried over . 


••• 


»** 


... 


... 



25 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



196 REPORT? OF THB POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

Statement showing the Actual Beceipts and BUbursements for the Sumbat years 1989 and 1940 



Brought forward 



School Fcind 
Dispeiisiiry 



Total Tkookb . 
Refunded hy TahttUs 



Cash haUnce at ooni- 
mencement of yoHT 



Qbakd Total 



1882-83. 



Actuals. 



28,73,516 



20,087 
19,668 



1883-M, 



EstimAtM. 



39,755 



24^13,270 
4,079 



24,17,340 



13.09.928 



23,47,6 



Actuali. 



1884-85. 



19,000 
19,000 



37,27,277 



38,000 



23.85,690 



23,85.690 



17,88,563 



41,19,253 



22,73,062 



19,568 
19,298 



Estimates. 



88,866 



23,11,928 
7,624 



23,19.452 



17,83,568 



40,58,015 



28,87,180 



20,000 
20,000 



40,000 



24,27,180 



2^27,180 



20,88,524 



44,60,704 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OV THK BAJPUTANA STATES FOB. 188i^. 197^ 

(AD, 1882^3 and 1383-84) and tie Budget JUtlimaU/or Sumiat X941 {A.D. 1884-85). 





1862-88. 


1883^4. 


1884^. 




Actttalfl. 


Estimates. 


Actaala. 


EsiimatM. 


Brought forward • 

11. MiSOBLLAVBOTO— 

Imtiazies . 

Kabeshwars 

Ehag-navis 

Postal establiah- 
ment 

Uiscellaneoas em- 
ployes . 


••• 

19,362 
1,249 
1,127 

2,396 

4.188 


... 

28,817 
68,484 

1.68,967 

19,261 
20,847 

85,447 

27,197 
9,022 

86,206 

12,666 
1,81,187 

16,108 

66,666 

19,86,769 

7,946 


J? 
••• 

19,000 
1.250 
1,160 

2,400 

4,000 


J? 
••» 

27.800 
87,000 

1.76,000 

19,400 
21,780 

24.000 

28,000 
9,000 

86,600 

22,000 
1,76,000 

22.600 
69,000 
19.80,920 
*•• 


19,476 
1,307 
1,241 

2,612 

2.307 


J? 

26,843 
86,267 

2,03,846 

18,614 
20,616 

26,880 

26.810 
8,571 

87.629 

22,126 
1,68,441 

10,264 

67,769 

20,09.647 

9,944 


20,000 
1,300 
1,200 

2.600 

8,000 


28,000 
40,000 

1,90,000 

19.600 
20,800 

24,000 

27,000 
10,000 

90,600 

29,000 
1,65,000 

i8aoo 

70,000 
19,71,140 
••• 


12. Teite Ain) Clo- 
THnra Dbfaxt- 

VBNT 

Farashkana 


18.331 
40,163 


22,000 
15,000 


19,125 
17,132 


20,000 
20,000 


13. Public WoBzs— 
BuildiDg « 
Roads . 
Bonds . • 
Workshops 
Establishments . 
Miscellaneons . 


1,09,147 

19.452 

9,391 

21.648 

7,738 

1,691 


1,00,000 

30,000 

10,000 

25,000 

8,000 

2,000 


1,24,248 

36.256 

11,393 

22,124 

7,741 

2,0S3 


1,00.000 

40.000 

20,000 

20,000 

8,000 

2,000 


14. WORTtBHOM— 

Mistrikhana 
Chapperbandi . 
Gurhkaptani 
Bi«h« . 


1,891 
9,648 
2,481 
6,231 


1,900 
9.000 
2,500 
6,000 


1,753 
9,214 
2,517 
6,030 


2,000 
9,000 
2.500 
6,000 


16. Jail 

Printing Press . 


19,661 
786 


21,000 
780 


19,826 
690 


20,000 
800 


16. GABDBira . 
Canals * 


23,392 
2,065 


22,000 
2,000 


24,202 
1,678 


22,000 
2,000 


17. PolitioalAqbh. 
or . 

18. Vakils . 

19. ChaBITABLE AKD 

Bbligioub en- 
dowments 
Festivals . 


84,666 
639 


85,000 
600 


87.008 
621 


90,000 
600 


20. Gifts, Rbwabds, 
&o.— 

On marriages . 
On deaths 
Miscellaneous . 
GuesU . 


892 

76 

9,713 

2,384 


6,000 

2,000 

10,000 

5,000 


462 

95 

14,387 

7,231 


2.000 

2,000 

15,000 

10,000 


2L Adtajtcbs— 
Tuccavi . 
Miscellaneous • 


77,488 
1,03.654 


76.000 
1,00.000 


82,166 
76,286 


80,000 
75,000 


22. MlSOBLLANEOTTS— 

Carriage-hire, Ac 
Batta 
Books, &c. 
MisceUaneous . 


636 

766 
727 
13,979. 


600 

1,000 

1,000 

20,000 


809 

652 

1,247 

8,166 


600 

1,000 

1.600 

10,000 


28. SoHOOis . 
Dispensaries 


38,609 
27,957 


89,000 
80,000 


40,348 
27,421 


42.000 
28,000 


Total Obdinaby Ex- 

PENDITUBB . 

Adjustment of 
accounts with 
TahsUs . 


••• 


*** 
••• 


*.* 


••• 


Cash Ba^anob . 




19,98,714 
17,83.668 


••• 
••• 


19,80,920 
21,88,338 


••• 


20,19,491 
20,88,624 


••• 


19,71.140 
24^89,664 


GSiin>^TOEA£ . 


••0 


87,27.277 


••• 


41,19,253 


... 


40,68,016 


... 


44,60,704 



26a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



198 



BEPOET OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTEATION 



ooooooooooo oooo 
OOOQOOO oooooo cooo 



^ oS ^ «-^ 09 CO -^ 03 kO ® iH M <0 CO 



r^ >0 



I 



oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 
OeQoceooppQiQ 

Qi-lfHS50iOOQQCO 

Oo»e9^f--i lOoaooQ 



o ■* 

3? cT 



s 



I 

'. 8 

5^ 






S 



^ Oft0)cocoocoo3000 00 oeocco 

({ <0 00 CO CO kO »0 '^ 00 O '^ «o to -"^ Ol o 



cococecoo»e»coooco 
eoodcooooito^ooos 

»oS0D«r-iAOt«^ 
1-^09019 ^OOdCO 



^ OOOOOOOOOOO 

Q* ooooooooooooo 

^ S8S§S§SgSS8 SSg 

»H oa>i-iiH iH;o^o»udCDiH M ^ « 



oooo 

oooo 

t^o 



oc oooooooo 
oooooooooo 

8328828888 

ocoo^-^SSoobSi 



00 le 
eo lo 



o to 

O lO 

I $ 



I 



•a 






1% 

u 






-I 



n^ S ^ V & 

P^O CO pH &- fci 



■as 



I 



« 

g -I 

ZL - 3 'p ^ -a or; 






r-t«eo-*iOCOi>»ajOr-<^ 






§ 


1 


s 


1 


§- 


^ 


(!3 


3 


3 




^ 





I 



s 



|3 



oooooooooooooooooooooooo 
OOOOOOOO oooooooooooooooo 
<^5S£S®S'^!Ji*'*S:2^S*<5®2S04>fioop5iO 



s 



3 op <: 



o o 

o o 



OieooootpotoQaooooooosoooooocQ 
o9iHOoooOkOiH'«oe9oe9o<ioc»oodo90a>fHiHoo 



4 § 



04 fH fH I-4 00 to 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

S8883g-'S5*-8SS3*»885l'»'»8g8S 

CC eO ,H ^ fH^ 



o c» 

i S 



lO o 



SS 8 



o 

Oil 

S 



8 



.1 
•I 



1 



a 



5 



I 










>^^ORSUDOO«Shi 






^' 



- s J 



'^i* 

J 



oSVio 



-•riiitJ-orillr 

S o S.s «^-a'3 «8 P*-15 



0* 






s 



I 



CO t^ 00 o> d iH eq eo -4* lo CO t<^ 00 o) o* iH 91 09 -^ lo 

^,Hff-lf-|fHfHiHrHrHlHW0l0ie«OIM 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



or THE RaJPUTANA states fob, 1884-86. 199 



KOTAH AGENCY BEFOST FOK 1883-84. 



No. l.P., dated Eotah, 12th June 1886. 

From— Captaiit W. H C. Wtllib, Political Agent, Kotah, 

To — The First Assistaot Agent to the Governor-General in Rajputana. 

I have the honor to submit the annual report on the Administration of the Kotah State 
for the 12 months ending on the Slst March 1885. 

During the year under notice Colonel Baylay held charge of the Ageucy from the Ist 
April 1884 till the 29th August 1884f, on which latter date he proceeded on privilege leave^ was 
afterwards appointed to officiate as Resident of the Western Rajputana States^ and did not 
resume charge of his appointment at Kotah until the SOth December 1 884. 

In Colonel Bajlay's absence Major H. B. Abbott, Political Agent of Jhallawar, carried on 
the current duties of the office in addition to his own. 

Mj connection with the State only commenced on the 14th April 1885, on Colonel Baylay's 
proceeding on furlough to Europe. 

No change has been made in the constitution of the Council since the last report was sub- 
mitted, and the different members have continued to perform their duties satisfactorily, 

FINANCE. 

2. The following figures show the ordinary revenue and expenditure for 1883-1884 : — 

Estimate. Actuals. 

Revenue 23,21,376 22 86,917 

Expenditure 20,17,828 19,81,97B 

It will be seen from the above that the actual ordinary income find expenditure fall short 
of the estimate by Rs. 84,458 and Rs. 35,850 respectively. 

The decrease in the former is attributable to the continued depression of the opium trade 
and the abnormally low price of grain which have told heavily on the cultivators and rendered 
it difficult in many instances for them to pay the State demaud. 

EXTKAOSDINABT EXPENDITURE. 

Exclusive of the liquidation of debt, there was only one item of extraordinary expenditure, 
amounting to Rs 13,000, in connection with the marriage of Maharaja Rai Singh, which took 
place on the 17th June 1884. 

The estimate for the current year 1941 Sambat ending on the Slst July 1885 is — 

Re. 

Ordinary Revenue 23,08,875 

Ordinary Expenditure 20,48,476 

being thus nearly the same as for the preceding year, with the exception of an increase of 
Rs. 50,000 allotted for Public Works. 

DEBTS. 

3. Rs. 3,58,070-10 have been pleaced in deposit in the treasury for the liquidation of the 
last item of the State debt, as explained in this office letter No. 1-F., dated 25th August 
1884. 

LAND SETTLEMENT. 

4. The revenue assessment of the 15 Nizamats or Pargunnahs initiated in 1876 has now 
been completed, and collections on the new basis are being made in IS of them. 

The new assessment is calculated to be equivalent to an increase of about 5^ per cent all 
round on the previous demand, and it is expected to produce about Rs. 1,00,134 additional 
revenue. 

The cost of the settlement operation up to the end of March last was Rs. 8,95,487, of 
which Rs. 9,415 were spent on the survey. 

It has lately been deemed advisable to re-assess the Nizamats of Barodh and Digod, as 
their settlement in 1877 by Munshi Niaz Ahmad, the then Superintendent of Settlement, only 
included the area under cultivation. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



200 



BEPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 



COUNTS. 

5. The working of the Criminal, Civil, and Nazim's Courts, which were presided over by the 
same officers as last year, calls for no special remark. 

A considerable decrease in criminal cases and a slight increase in the number of civil suitjs 
is apparent from Appendices C and D. 

POLICE. 



Culpable homicide 
Attempt to murder 

^^^s }K^ : : 
■^'^ IS : : 

Attempts at Suicide • 

F«>--K{mbt : : 

GrievouB hurt . 

Buying or dispoBing of personf 

Abduction 

Causing miscarriage 

Escape from custody 

Buying or disposing of stolen property 

Arson .... 

Counterfeiting coin . • 

Other crimes • • . 



Total 



6 
4 

9 

25 

66 

858 

29 

"i 

9 

• 1 

16 

6 

4 

8 

6 

2 

666 

1,108 



The marginal statement of offences 
committed during the year 1884-85 
indicates a decrease in crime, the cases 
reported aggregating 1,108 as against 
1,233 in the previous years. 

No murders or cases of infanticide 
are known to have occurred. 

Only nine dakaitis were brought 
to notice as compared with 17 in 
1883-84, the property stolen being 
valued at Rs. 269 exclusive of 45 
head of cattle. These figures, when 
Contrasted with those of previous 
returns, will be found satisfactory. 



GARDENS. 

6. A large public garden has been laid out with considerable skill by Colonel Baylay below 
the bund of the Gordhanpura lake, which when finished will form a favorite resort for holiday- 
makers from the city. The expenditure under this head up to the 31st March 1884 amounted 
to Bs. 15,000 and a good deal yet remains to be done. .Some mango, fig, and peach trees im- 
ported by Colonel Baylay into several of the older Raj gardens are beginning to yield an 
abundant outturn, which in excellence of quality will compare favorably with the best fruits of 
Shaharanpur. 

JAIL. 

7. The total number of prisoners in 1884-85 rose to 485 from 458 the previous year, the death- 
rate for the 12 months being 11*08 against 8*04 in 1888-84. There were no escapes and no 
e2)idemic outbreak occurred. 

Considerable progress has been made in the manufacture of carpets, the sale rates being 
about 50 per cent less than those charged in the Ajmere Jail. 

STABLES. 

8. Two sets of breeding stables have been erected, with an open paddock in front, on a 
capital site not far from the Agency house at a cost of Rs. 19,456. 

The brood mares now number 28. 

Twelve foals were dropped during the year, 4 colts and 8 fillies. 

There are 3 stallions on the roll^ 1 Waler and 2 Arabs. 

EDUCATION. 

9. The Kotah City School continues to afford a good elementary education under the 
management of Babu Jodii Nath Ghose; the daily average attendance was 370 boys. 

Five new district schools have been opened at the head-quarters of the following Niza- 
mats : — 

Anta, 

Ladpura-Eaithun, 

Khanpur, 

Mangrol, 

Sangod, 
The daily average attendance being 322. 

MEDICAL INSTRUCTIONS. 

10. Surgeon Y. Harington held medical charge of the Kotah and Jhalkwar Agencies 
from 25th April 1884 until 5th September 18b4, while Dr. Crofts officiated as Civil Surgeon at 
Ajmere : 6,583 children were vaccinated during the cold weather with a percentage of successful 
cases of 91*78 at the low cost of 1 anna and 5 pies each. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE EAJPUTAKA STATES FOB 1884-85. 201 

HEALTH. 

11. Generally speakings the health of the population was good ; much has been done to 
improve the sanitary state of the city of Kotah, and the Municipal Committee presided over by 
Pandit Bamdial, Member of Council, deserve credit for their exertions in this respect. 

KOTEIS AND PXINAETH. 

1£. In accordance with the instructions contained in Secretary to the Government of 
India ^Foreign Department) letter No. £353-1., dated 23rd June 1884, the work connected 
with the Eotris and the Punarth was placed in the hands of His Highness the Meywar on SOth 
July 1884. The new arrangement has answered fairly well. 

MAYO COLIiEQE. 

18. Apji Amar Singh of Palaita and Sangram Singh and Anand Singh, Maharajas of 
Sangod, sent their sons to the Mayo College at its opening after the vacation in July 1884, 
the number of boys in the Kotah House being thus increased to 7. 

Apji of Palaita has expressed himself to me as greatly pleased with the progress his son 
Onkar Singh, a youth of IS years, has already made at the College. 

SAINFALL AND CHOPS. 

14. The fall of rain was considerably below the average, only 19 inches being registered as 
compared with 38 in the previous year. Although the tanks and wells suffered somewhat, 
the rain fell opportunely, and the harvests, both kharif and rabi, left little cause for complaint 
as already explained ; the depression in the opium trade has seriously affected cultivators throw- 
ing much land out of plough which was formerly devoted to the poppy. It is to be hoped 
that in time the cultivation of sugar-cane will find more favor with the people, who in many 
instances might recoup themselves in this manner for the loss they have now sustained. What 
is really needed to better the condition of the agricultural classes is the opening out of the 
country by improved means of communication with markets in British India. The following 
table shows the low rates at which grain was selling on the 15th May 1885 in the Kotah city i-^ 

Wheat . 

Barley . 

Jowar • 

Maccai . 
Gram 

IBBIGATION. 

15. The opening of the Parbutti canal was reported last year ; its disti-ibutaries now cover a 
length of 91 miles. 

The demand for water has not been so great as was anticipated owing to a fair rainfall 
and the check given to the opium cultivation. 

A large tank is being constructed at Eklera near Eishengunj at an estimated cost of 
Rs, 59,769. This is the only other important irrigation work now in hand. 

16. I regret to say I am unable to furnish accurately the information called for in the 
Agent to the Govemor-Generars Circular letter No. 2842-G., dated 15th September 1884. I 
Jim, however, informed that Colonel Baylay spent the greater portion of last cold weather in 
eamp and visited most if not all the Nizamats* 



Bs. a. 


P- 




1 4 





per maund. 


1 





ditto. 


12 


9 


ditto. 


12 





ditto. 


1 





ditto. 



Digitized by 



Googl( 



202 



KEPOAT OF THE POLITICAL ADMIKISTRATION 



S 



V 

^ 



1^ 






§8 



9 
•^ 



Co 



s 






I! 



1^ 



4 



c to 
o t-- 



OOOOOOOO O OOOO OOOPQOOO ooo 
OOOOcnOOO 00 Oi-^ O O OOO MOPOQ 9 QOO 

rt ® U5 « — 3 O ^ r^ t* " ^ " - 



CO 3£ -* 5^ 1^ i> iv £5 rt ® u5 « - S 6 ^ r^ <ft « 6 M w ^ ^ « ?j 

O O afc O 3J "T' Oi O QD m — ^ -*^ lO 5^ O >J W w *i5 © SO^ ,J5 ^ 55 r^ ..■: : 

1:^ ffl 30 W Cl ^ ^ -^" l> t- Q W iQ O' 5C ^ « X' *Q PJ -^'' ^ ^^ ^ -^ lO 



oo o 

N ^J 5 

r^ .■: t» 



i3 



OO 

1> 35 



O 44 O ^ O ^ M O t^ 
O «0 O kS 91 ^ «*• O OQ 



0>«3^^Oa0«O-^«3«OOO 

<nidi^»o>-4oae9^wOQD004Ka 

i-^ M 1^ ipj r-4 

K ^ CO |> »ra 3C O 3 "CO Ci ^ t^ C|_ » X t* 04 ?1 ^ isa ^-H lyS ^ I— 



o o -»• 
« ^ '^ 

^ xs o 



OOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOtCOO 



p, OO o 

J OC*3 O 

t*. rt o o Q ao o '^' 2 5d o 00 

r-l 00 5j *- fiO r^ r^ 

PS .-» 



pl 



o o OO o oooooo oo OO ooo 

MiF^OOOOOWOOOOOOOO '^OO 

00 tfl C I 







m 

Is 



'S 



Of 



J' 



:i 



a 



111 









li"? 



1.1 



o n 
«1 



, "g O flj » 'C c „ „ 

-la " ■- 3 o,^ a ^ 



O 






4 ? 

i " 



£© 
<] 



.5PS: 

^s 



^ft.2 

^ H 



? ^ 



Oi o 



Is 

S ^ 
at iH 



V 



III III 



00 0) O «^ 09 00 



2 
Tag 

■si 

I- 



si 






&, 
d 



OOO 

ooo 

8*11 



o 

o 

ID 



O O oo oo O oo OOO OOOOO OO < 

OOOOOOO O OOOOOOOOO O O ( 

5 o iS q 5 q ft J 5_ q ^^ e^ 5^ o^ m o_ ip li 5_ a *< 
o Ps" "j' o" ifl '^^ ^ ifj in «" o' ^ CO 



&4 
d 



la o O 

'^ MO 
M MO 

^ Q ^ 

M_^ O 

«oS5f^ 



Osi>Oi 



t^00Oip-l< 



lia^O£>ffiCDeQiaO 
^et#ot^(0-^e9-*fca^ps«o ogownt* » 



■Ml 




4 



ooo 

ooo 



gsS 



o ooooooooooooooooooo 

O OOOdOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

S 8 



o 

o 







I 

S^ ?f = S V 
b £bi qO ^ S 



1 



4l 



£3 



5 -r Si g ^ ^ p g ** ^ i i 'm ^ 
g35 S^ Si g g I :0:2^|^ ?e 



TS s S a K i; ■ 



^ 



i 



eo^ hd ^ j>000>0'^ 



to ^fcO tc r>t» 3S 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE BAJPVTANA 8TATBS FOS 1884-86. 



203 



o ooooc coooooooooooooo oooo 

O COOOOO t<l'«0000<^OI>00000000 oo 

oo©Q^ogojg5gg : 






M CO t 



M coxot^eocotoQO 

CO i-tkOlOO^kOOO- - 



CO «0 Ud CO o o^ 



ooo 
ooo 



OJ o t> 

o wa — 



ooooo 
ooooo 

^ 9 2 $ o 

to O^O O CO 

00 1-4 






o eoc»e900 ooo-4a»oooooooooo'^aoao«oo 
m r4ooi>coe(iMOO-<4«'«oeiO wdoooooo oocooo 



oooo ^OOOiH 
OiHO OC0H>Of-t 

iH iH -H 

iH i-H t* Oi eo -^ Q CO 

o> o .i^ oa o^o> o 23 
f-rNoo" oooo^o"^ 

00 iH ©^ 



o 

11 

l1 
00 



o 
o 



§ i 

00 od 



Ol> 
O"* 



o 

00 

iH 

l1 

s 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOQ 
0eOQOOMOOOSSJO'*Ol>OOOOOOOOOOO 



QOO 

ooo 



ooooo 

OOOOO 



^ o ^ ■* — t^ -* 

CM >f rt ^ to ^ ■^ 
iM ii> ffi *n r^ lO 



2 ^ £! rJ £IB ^ S? S 



fiO^gCi^ 




a 



^s 



I 



e a; c 
TO ^ 



O 



El 






J !3^ 



.3 



be 



.1 

p3 



"S t* m» ■£- bf : ?* ^ 



1 1 



.1 



o 

> 



Cip^pS 



•I .-c . • 

a -g 

f 1* ^ ■£■. i; _ 

O ^/ !> C^ 5^ O 












1^ IHst^l^ 






'33 







m < rj-^.:^:Q 



5.?Sc 









4 



» 

94 









l3 



«^ s 



Si; 

H 

H 



o 



S h 3 



-^ 
3 2 ^^ 



t s 



1 



U3 « t* 3C 0> O -< IN 00 "* »0 COt^ 
94 04 04 04 04 00 CO 00 CO 00 CO 00 CO 



5 p 



(^ 
w 



I 



I 



%Q 






Digitized by 



GoogI( 



204 



KEPOST OF THE FOLITICAL ADMHTXSTBA.TION 







g 


f.^ 




00 


so 




iM 




(NH 


^ 


CO 


051 






1 li^ 
















Pi 1 


fp-l 


<-H 






J 










m 










































-rf* 


lO 


oa 1 






00 


CO 


Ol 


I-H 


O 








^4 


O 


m 


ta 










lis 


^ 


m 








^ 


Ol 




o^ 




■ 










C50 




































b* 




























-i 


o 


GO 


CO 










^ 


'ff 


t^ 








^ 




qQ 














tp 


















■ 


p 


* 


























a 












• 


i 


i 












* 












' ^ 


o 
















^-^^^ 










•s 


§ 


-T3 


1^^ 


1^ 


G* 










Pi 


11 


to 




^ 


s 


s 


o» 


1—* 


eg 














« 




^ 


I 


> 










• 


« 
• 
■ 


• 










3 




^ 
























5 




















































3 




•^ 


OCJ 


^^ 


^ 






CO 


«o 


r- 


to 


o 






1 


Ol 


^ 


CO 










^ 


lo 


^ 




1 




J— 1 




r-< 




i 
• 










04 








J 
























^ 
































« 




















':j 




^ 


00 


'J^ 




i-i 


OO 


t* 


eo 


t* 


ea 




>H 


1 




ia 


^ 










«o 


t- 


sry 




§ 


s 




est 








. 






03 




'Js 


























^ 


























'•A 


1 


-^ 


DO 


r-- 






0< 


«:> 


(M 


,-H 


QO 




1 


<^ 


to 


lO 










lO 


CO 


rH 


• 


2 


Oi 




CM 




• 










CO 


m 














• 












H 


N 


i5 






















s 


:§ 
V 
























g 






K5 


id 




« 


r^ 


- 


CO 

i-H 


^ 


1— 1 
0« 


5. 


1 


|5 


* 


































• 


• 




































"S^ 


























%> 


























1 




, 










^ 


* 






. 




« 


























•« 


























**• 


























V 




- 










* 


■ 






* 




8* 


























t 




1 










o 


a 

o 






s 




:S 




■a 

a 






_ 




ii 


o 

1— i 






1 




8* 

i 

•5. 


1 


1 
a 






1 






CO 

0^ 












1 


1 






! 




8 


6 










na 

5 


i 


1 






Q 




-8 


-S 










eo 










H 


o 


a 
o 




o 
o 

30 


t 








-*5 








o 


o 




























o 


4 












s 


^ 






bo 


^ 


^ 


1 


























» 












o 


Pi 






l.^ 






n 












1 


^ 






S 


o 




f 












1 


1 






i 


Q 


a 


1 












1 .*^ 


-pp- 






tft 






MH 












1 s 








i 






! 












'C 


'C 






J 






J 














O 


u 






Q 






cS 













GO 



^ 






•fen - » 

Sal 
s « 

3 ^ 

o 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



or THB BAJniTANA STATXS FOB 1884-86. 



205 



1 



05 



V 

-^ 



■I. 






1 

1 



CO 



I 



^1 

So 



1 



5^ 



T«W*oiP»d 



*p*))|nb9« M p9Si«1lO0fa 



*p«)o;Aao3 



•p«»Miir 



I : 



4 



o o 



O 

O 



P. 



o 0» 

o .10 

o 






s 



09 






00 CD 
tHO 1-1 



o 
o 



: :i-i«g^ : : : : :» 



MOO oossA ^oo^-^od focnmt 



CO 000)^0 ^o«oo<««H z^^Oitnt^ 



:fHio<oeo : fH ^^ 



'panpiiqo 
oaoifOfAvoo qo|qM a) sMfto 



'9881 qoAK 9"I8 vo Saipnod Mtto 



*I«!i9 <4 9i(ftu>iq Bono 



»«o «Doot^oo oo«fHt«eii '«e«ooo«QO 
: M 10 iH • : ^ 



3 



: eo o e« : ih 



tiooqko 

00 



'peiiodoj oooojK) 



. 04(0 go4 : i-i 



^0010 09; 



•I 



hit Hi- 







3J P J 5 -s I p3 



^ 10 fD t«oo AO^o«eo^idto 

,H ff-l f-4 (-1 fH fH iH 



3 



s 



»9 

I 



J* 


1 


•S 


5. 


^ 


^1 


Q. 


K» 


a 

•« 


I 


•4 


•25 

<5 


H 




^ 




• 






S 









s 



525 




H 


^0 


c 


Q^ 


< 


Go 




'•H 


ij 


« 


<l 


If 


(J 

l-H 


^ 


a 


-<5 


^ 




A 


S5 


H 


^ 


g 


g5 


M 





26 A 
Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



206 



BEPOBT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINI8TEATI0N 



P 
H 



1^ 



I 

S3 



3J 



^ 



1 






Si 



•0 









5 

to 



g-s 



1 . 

s ^ 



30 0& 






O 






a 



^ 



1 
a 

I. 

s 
3 



oi 



Tfi CO 






o 

on 



CO 
00 






CO 






GO 



1 



I 

OQ 



I 



r-H Oi 
CO 



O 



r-H O^ 






CO 






CO 
CO 






CO 



CO 



o ^ 

I— I CO 



QO 



e) 



Qi 30 

kO CO 






I 



O 






o) 



^ QO 



CO 



00 



CO 



Od 

o 



QO 
CO 



o 

rH 



00 
CO 
CO 



00 



CO 



CO 









Od 



3 

P 
O 

O 



o o 
o o 
o o 



a 

■AS 



^ 



O 
O O O CO 

o o o 

0> O CO OD 



03 

o 






I 



IS 

1°- 

d 



•73 



lO l-H 



a 

1 
i 







bo 

a 

s 



o 
o 

CO 

p^ 

bo 

a 

C) 

CJ 

H 

o 

d 



GO 



O 



1-4 ^^ 

U4 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



07 THE KAJPXJTANA STATES FOB 1884-85. 



207 



i 



1 



€10 



•0 






•^ 

^ 

^ 



»1 

o 

a 
pa 















•♦A 

HA 



CO 



H 



i 

e 
8 



} ;o -oji 



JO -on 



lateo JO 'OK 



I 



JO -oil 






s s 

00* 



00 

o 



#1 

CO 



to 



•« 9 



iS 



o 

iH 
00 

I 



o 

kO 



s 



•» s 



o 
kcT 



s 



P^ I 



CO 
00 



09 



o 

iH 
CO 



s 



s 



00 



o 
* o 



9 



S 



8 

0) 



s 



00 

o 

a" 



o 
o 
o 



00 

S I 

00 

§ 



s 



00 

o 



P4 

CS 



%o 

00 

s 

0»" 



JO -oil 



•TOO! 



•pO^mRBIII 



•W8l n'dy ^ai ao aaipoa 



i 



CO 
04 



?s 



I 



CO 



s 



& 



a" 



i3 

bo 

a 



s 



i3 



I 



s 



I I 



pS i 



d 

X 



CO 



i-a « 

r 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



208 



BBPOET OF THB POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 



Pm :s 



I 

CO 



^ 

^ 






M 






:! 






.•0 

IS 

*^ 






^ 















III f 








a 

a 






1 ii !l 


1^ 




•IWHXwpan 


a ■ 1 


IS 


• 




s 


]^ 9 S S; 


- s 


S 


ss 




























i • 


•01TO9J 


lO 


•• 


^ M fH « 


: » 


8 






•»i«re 


f-» 


s 


S S $4 s 


" S 


i 














M 


•DAK) 


fH 


: 


: 5 : r 


; : 


fH 






P9 
< 


•mox 




s 


5 3^: 


•H 


§ 


^ 














i 

i 

as ' 


1 


•eriaiaj 




: 


•9PIK 


:::::::! 


: 




















A 

M 




•9rBra9j 


o 


CO 


'*•':: 


•H 


ss 














» 








to 


o 


m ^ t* 




rH 


1 


^ 


'S 


•9I«K 


Oi 


00 


CO 04 : 


: : 




•IIAK) 


1^ 

04 








iH 


■ 


• • a • 


• • 






















^ 


• 


•eiwwa 


s 


z 


I I '. I 


I I 


• 




s- 














•gpiK 


09 


: 


fH tH : : 


: : 


** 




•Wox 


3 


s 


S 3 S S; 


^ & 


1 






•^ 


o 


to «9 vH 04 


»H to 


§ 


iJ 


e 


•9lTOI9^ 


•-f 


fH 






< 


i ■ 














•9I«K 


§ 


CO 

to 


S 3 S S 


« a 




•iwo 


S 


: 


5 ': : : 


: • 


04 
04 






A 


09 


00 to 04 c^ 


09 


1 


n 


THOX 




to 


00 iH 




^2 


■^ 












»j 


•91tra9i 


04 


to 


«•-•:: 


: : 


g 


^S 


g 


















•9r»ii 


s 


5; 


8 S « - 


09 


1 


K&i 
















9S 

•< 
















•IIAIO 


to 


• 


: : : : 


: : 


to 


1 


•I*V)I 


S 




S f! s s 


^ g 


i 


OS 


J 


•9tinB9a 


04 


to 


04 00 •-• 04 


f* to 


iH 
04 




i 

s 














•91«W 


s 


c» 


g SS! g S 


« « 


g 


















-wo 


t» 


'• 


: : 1 


; : 


1> 






• 


i 


ml 


• • 


i 




M 




iH 


^ • 


H 










^ to t* «H 


rH 






1 


• 


? 


1 1 1 1 


*2 • 






8 


^ 


ij 


1 1 1 1 

sill 


1 . 

^ - 






m 


a 


a 


^ 5J. ►» ►* 










CO 


CO 


rl 00 to t^ 


o ^ 












1 

£3 


1 


i a a a 


1 -^ 
^ 1 





<3 "s 



^^ 






TO 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



09 THB EAJPUTANA STATES FOB 1884^5. 209 

APPENDIX G. 

Return ikowing the number of Boys in tie Schoole of tie Kotak State during the year 1884S6. 







NVKBBB 09 


BOTl. 




1 






















i 

1 

5 


a 


^ 


a 


1 




& 


RlMABEM. 


Kotah City School 


46 


irs 


81 


807 


662 


870 


10 




ViLLAOB Schools. 


















1. Ant* 




10 




60 


60 


87 






2. Baran 




46 


.•* 


12 


118 


72 






S. KaithoD 




11 


8 


83 


97 


76 






4. Ehanpur 




••• 


.«. 


48 


48 


86 






6. Mangrol 




••• 


... 


62 


62 


82 






6. SaDgod 


••• 


... 


... 


80 
692 


80 


70 






Total 


46 


246 


84 


1,017 


692 


18 





Kotah Politkul Aoihot, 
Tie 12th June 1885. 



] 



(Sd.) W. H. C. Wylub, Captain, 
Political Agent, 



APPENDIX H. 

Obeervaiione of the Thermometer and Barometer and the Rainfall registered at the Kotah 

Dispensary. 











BABomTia. 




TKiufomriB, 


Baivva&u 


18B4.8S. 


Hazlmnm. 


Hinimiun. 


Umn. 


1 


a 


1 


1 




ADrill884 


2913 


28*98 


29-05 


91 


88 


86 






Miy ., . . . 




. 


29-04 


28*79 


28-91 


104 


98 


96 




7 


June „ . . . 




• 


28*96 


28*68 


28*88 


104 


86 


97 


2 


88 


^^y ",00/ • 






28*87 


128*60 


28*77 


100 


88 


98 


8 


89 


AagniBt 1884 « 






28*98 


128*67 


28*79 


98 


86 


86 


6 


98 


September 1884 . 






28-99 


28*66 


28*86 


89 


81 


86 


6 


89 


October 






^•22 


28*87 


2910 


87 


80 


88 






November „ 






29*24 


2909 


29*17 


88 


70 


74 






December », 






29-27 


29*18 


29-22 


70 


60 


66 




77 


January 1886 






29*88 


2909 


29-21 


76 


^ 60 


97 






February ^ 






29-22 


2908 


29-12 


77 


61 


69 






March „ 


29*26 


29-06 


29K)9 


98 
1,071 


69 


83 


.#• 


... 


Total 


849*46 


846-60 


848-12 


910 


986 


18 


98 


Average 


29*12 


28-88 


2901 


89 


76 


82 




.•• 



PouticalAobnt's Offigb^^ 

KoTAH^ 

' The 12th June 1886. 



(Sd.) W. H. C. Wtllib, Captain, 
Political JgenL 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 









K 



SEPOET OP THE POLITICAX ASMINISTEATIOK, &C., POE 1884-86. 211 



JHALLAWAB AGENCY BEFOST FOB 1884-85. 



No. 92.G., dated Jhalrapatan, 18th Jnlj 1886. 

JFV^w— Majob H. Wtlib, Folitical Agent, Jhallawar, 

To^The First AsiUtant Agent to the Governor- General for Bajpuiana. 

I have the honor to submit the Administration Report of Jhallawar for the official year 
1884.85, 

8. During the year under notioe Major H. B. Abbott held charge of thi« Agency, except 
from the 10th May to 9th July, when he was upon privilege leave, and Lieutenant-Colonel 
Baylay acted for him. 

WEATHEA AND CAOFS. 

5. The rainfall for the year was rather below the average. The entire fall, as registered 
at the Chaoni of Jhalrapatan, was 27*68 inches, as against 32'68 inches, which is the average 
of the last nine years. 

4. The rainfall is now registered at five stations, three of which are in the mof ussil ; from 
these it would appear that the greatest quantity of rain fell at Pachpahar, but for all practical 
purposes it was fairly distributed through the State, and was sufficient to meet all agricultural 
requirements. 

6. The outturn of the kharif crops was generally fair ; and, excepting opium, which was 
^lightly damaged by hail and frost in February, and by high winds in April, the rabi harvest 
has been good. 

HEALTH. 

6. The weather has been generally seasonable throughout the year, which has been 
remarkably free from epidemics. The public health indeed may be said to have been excellent ; 
there was slight malarious fever as usual immediately after the rains, but it was not very 
severe, and did not continue long. 

EDUCATION. 

7. Fair progress has been made in this Department, a better stafE has been provided for 
the Chaoni School at Jhalrapatan, and steps have been taken to raise it to the status of a high 
school of the North-Western Provinces. A Matriculation class has been formed, and the entire 
system of the school is being re-organized, in order to affiliate it to the Calcutta University. 
Primary education is also steadily progressing in the mofussil. Mr. Dammi Lall Chowbey> 
B.L., was appointed by the Maharaj Rana last September as Inspector of Education, in place 
of Mr. Syam Sunder Lall, whose duties as Private Secretary to Uis Highness were considered 
sufficient to occupy all his time. 

MEDICAL AND VACCINATION. 

8. There are five dispensaries in the State, two at the capital and three in the district. 
All are now provided with suitable house accommodation. The Agency Surgeon's report, 
which has been submitted departmentally, shows that good work has been done during 
the year. 

9. The number of vaccine operations has increased from 8,888 in 1888-84 to 4,954, of 
which as many as 9% per cent are reported to have been successful. All the dispensaries are 
well supplied with medicines and surgical instruments. 

JAIL. 

10. There is only one' jail, and that is at the Chaoni. The daily average of the prisoners 
has been 186, as compared with 184 in 1888-84. Some additions and alterations have been 
made to the jail building, with a view of improving its ventilation and increasing its accommo- 
dation. Both these ends have been attained, and the accommodation is now m«>re than suffici* 
ent for the average number of prisoners. 

11. In the Jail Dispensary the average number of sick prisoners was 976, and the gene- 
ral health of the inmates of the jail was remarkably good; only two deaths occurred during 
the year. 

27 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



212 EEPORT OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

COUETS. 

12. In the Appellate Courts there has been a slight decrease in the number of civil cases* 
principally on the Appellate side^ but on the criminal side there has been an increase in both the 
original and. appellate cases^ whilst there is a considerable reduction in the miscellaneous work^ 
which the Appellate Court attributes to the improved working of the Criminal Court. 

13. In the Civil Court there were in all 883 cases taken in hand, involving Ks. 1,18,127, 
against 801 cases involving claims to the value of Rs. 1,56,136, the average of the last five years. 
This falling-off in the value of claims has, of course, caused the Court's income to suffer, and has 
been variously ascribed to the unpopularity of the Court, and the depression in the market. 

14. A fair amount of work has been done in the execution decrees, although the Court 
complains of great slowness in the procedure, and want of hearty co-operation from the other 
Departments and Tahsil Courts. ' 

16. The work of the Criminal Court has been commended for its system and despatch, 
because a large percentage of its decisions has been upheld on appeal than heretofore, and the 
Appellate Court in comparatively few instances has had to interfere in the way of supervision. 

• 16. The' working of the Tahsil Courts may be said to be improving. In the Civil Depart- 
ment, the proportion of -the number of cases disposed of has increased from 86 per cent, to 92 
per cent. There is however still much room for improvement in the quality of the work. In the 
Criminal Branch the Tahsil Courts show rather better results than on the civil side. 

CRIME. 

17. From the statement of offences which has been received it appears that the amount of 
crime has been numerically below the average. 

18. Of the more serious offeilces there have been— 

Marder • .... 4 cases, 

Calpable bdmioide not amounting to mnrder • • 1 case, 

Dakaiti • .... 2 oases. 

19. Both the cases of dakaiti occurred in the Shahabad district, which, in addition to 
. being largely composed of jungle itself, is surrounded on two sides by extensive jungles in 

Gwalior territory. N otwithstanding this disadvantage it is gratifying to mention that the 
whole amount of property plundered has been recovered. 

20. There have been no cases of opium smuggling during the year, nor has any capital 
punishment been inflicted. 

INFANTICIDE. 

21. There have been no cases of infanticide during the year. 

EEVENUE COURTS. 

22. The greater number of cases tried by the Revenue Courts were in connection with dis- 
putes between the manotidars (recognized money-lenders) and the assamis. Claims of proper- 
ty rights are remarkable only for their absence, ^cepting in the Patau tahsil, where litigation 
seems to be finding favor with the ryots. 

23. Very considerable quantities of land, amounting to 8,760 bighas of irrigated and 
42,808 of unirrigated land, appear to have changed hands during the year. This is ascribed 
principally to two causes, viz,, destitution and consequent desertion of former holders, and the 
partition of joint holdings. 

SALT. 

24. The import and transit of salt show an improvement over the last year. No case of 
salt smuggling has been brought to light. 

TRADE. 

25. There has, I regret to report, been a decided falling-off in trade generally, except in 
'* gur ''; the decrease is particularly noticeable in opium, rice, and sugar. 

26. With regard to corn of all kinds it has been found that in the present wretched state 
of the roads communicating with the Railway carriage is so expensive that it does not pay to 
export grain, notwithstanding the fact that the Darbar has made considerable reductions in the 
Customs dutiesj on purpose to meet this difficulty. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE BAJPUTANA STATES FOE 188486. 218 

THE MATO COLLEGE. 

27. Four young gentlemen from this State are now scholars at the Mayo College. 

PUBLIC WOEKS. 

28. Mr. Miles^ report has, as usual, been forwarded separately, through the Secretary to 
the Agent to the Governor-General in the Department Public Works. In it will be seen an 
account of the projected improvements in Irrigation. 

SETTLEMENT. 

29. The land revenue survey settlement was practically completed during the year, and 
a report on it submitted by Major Abbott to the Agent to the Governor-General before he 
proceeded upon furlough. 

BOUNDARY SETTLEMENT. 

EXTEBNAL. 

80. Captain Meade was appointed Boundary Settlement Officer last November, and decided 
14 cases between this State and Indore. 

INTERNAL. 

81. Of internal boundary disputes there were 52 cases pending from 1883-84, 2 more were 
instituted during the year under report, 14 cases were decided, and 40 were still pending at the 
close of the year. 

STUD. 

82. His Highness the Maharaj Rana takes a considerable interest in horse-breeding, and 
has set a gdbd example to his people by allowing his brood mares to be branded, thus entitling 
them to be served by Government stallions. 

S3. A fine Norfolk Trotter has been sent here from the Balugarh Depot, and although he 
was not here for the whole year, yet the result of his presence may be said to have been satis- 
factory. 

34. Mule-breeding has also been started. 

ENSILAGE. 

86. The Maharaj Rana has made an experiment in a small way in ensilage. The outturn 
was on the whole good, and the cattle that were fed on it improved in condition and in the 
quantity of milk they gave. More extended operations will be tried this year. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

36. During the year His Highness the Maharaj Rana made three tours through the States 
and from 15th December 1884 to the 17th February 1886 he was travelling in India accom- 
panied by Lieutenant*Colonel Herbert. When in Calcutta he exchanged visits with the Viceroy 
and when in Bombay with His Excellency the Governor. 

37. The Members olE the Council of the Maharaj Rana have remained unchanged -during 
the year. During His Highnesses absence from the State they conducted the current duties of 
its administration. 

38. The Political Agent visited the Shahabad district last November, and made a tour 
through the Chow-Mehla and part of Central Jhallawar during January. 



27a 



Digitized by VnOOQlC 



214 



BEPOET OP THE POLITICAL ADMINI8TEATI0N 






§ 



e 



Si 






^ 












-Jotpnaa 


s sr 


s 


1 


i 

a 

n 


'l»li>X 


i f 


1 


*saOdtiv||,4»ciffm 


s § 


9 


^•9»l£»^ p ttqf [l»I3 


■* 


-* 


<»}i||9ddY 


!i S 


s 


'imiJtio 


1 


s 




*Ii»0X 


S i 


g 


*inoatwn33*Tis 


% s 


i 


»W«MP JO UOftUEMXa 


. • 


M 


•»|t[pddf 


5 3 


s 


TtniauO 


g 


i 


1 


•W-888I 


S S 


s 


-dSvjsAV 


3 S 


§ 


3 

q 
m 

1 


s 


-mox 


^ S 


i 


*snffiJMn«>BIS^ 


g § 


s 


'S»»£30p JO aortiuMn^ 


m- 


la 


'•liipddv 


^ !§ 


s 


^[laiJiJO 


§ 


§ 


T«^Ji 


Si i 


■Bnoamn^'^'^K 


i 2 


i 


1 


i 


-BBajsap JO nonnMia 


« ; » 


*B9«I|»^? 


IP 


s >' 




'praiSiJO 


1 . 


i 


*Jn|pu3i 


s s 


s 








1 


Criminal 

CSril 


1. 






J 

«5 



-^ 



s -^ 






33 



3:2 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



I 



OP THB SAJFTJTANA STATES FOB 18M-8S. 



215 



CD 



I 



-a 



is 

•5 

« 

.r 

.r 

•I 









te 



1^ 



1 



1 



h 



88 

a 






•s 

11 



I 



t^ 



2 

P4 




•moi 


•»tt9WIJ 


S 


8 ZZ»'86 




-aJNMAY 


s 


9 C9»'g» 




•futouo 


•»n9M4J 


g 


8 zc^'es 




•a»U0Av 


& 


4 6 SO'IV 




-.itKlX 


0M«O AnpUMl 

■ao|AMd jO 9no 


•faasMj 


' 


'9MfU9XY 


a 


9 t 06l*f 




s 

s 

» 


1op««)dtjpi»»ox 


•%u»tM^ 


g 


6 Wl'U 




■aJSuaAy 


1 


9 8 W9^l'l 




s 

1 


•mox 


laawij 


p^ 


8 f 800 




*99U9AY 


o» 


9 9 888*1 




*9OKUII0 


'^uasdu 


s 


B f IM 




■oJHueAy 


00 


01 » Wl'l 




•*i|pa»a 


•»TO9Md 


fH 


6 




'oSviaAy 


F^ 


4 80S 




g 


•Wox 


■^UMMd 


g 


6 6 898'^ 




*a2u9AY 


S 


I II 818*88 




•^awmo 


•*U999jy[ 


i 


6 f fes'e 






s 


8 81 if^gi 




•«aipn9d 


•»TO99J[J 


s 


8 f 898*11 




'9J9I9AY 


9 


t 91049*^ 




1 


•WOX 


ntt999ij 


§ 


8 8 IfflQ 




•9fl«I9AY 


i 


9 I e06'9Z 




'^iiajuno 


'%W»MI^ 


s . 


6 01*8^88 




•9»M9AY 


i 


4fI*C9 




•auipaaj 


•»U999Id 


9 


9 8 809*08 




■9JiU9AY 


•H 
•H 


I 888*88 




fi 


•TOOX 


*91I989Jd 


8 


6 8 Z8l*8I*l 




•9ftU9AY 


§ 


9 8[ 081*99*1 




'^munO 


nn99aij 


i 


6 11890*98 




*9J»M9AY 


§ 


f 9 9f8'0l*l 




•JM 


i 9RI moji Aiipiwi 


•»a999J« 




81 8i»*88 




'9AU9AY 


: 


t 8 I6i'» 












1 

1 

a 
S6 


2 





tt 
ja 



8 

«5 



GO 



< ^ 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



216 EEPOBT OP THE POLITICAL ADHINISTRATION 

Statement ehowing working of Execution of Decrees in tie Jhallawar Civil Court for 1884^5, 



INSTITUTED. 



Pivviva. 



M7 



286 



CuBB ura. 



428 



466 



Tos^. 



646 



761 



DISPOSED OF. 



Pbvszvo. 



ClTBBXVT. 



i 

I 



167 



234 



240 



I 



SIS 



TOSA.L. 



407 



648 



PENDING. 



Out ov lis* 
tbab'8 pbrdxho 

C1.BBS. 



60 



CUBBBVT. 



180 



TOTA.L. 



164 



Comparative Statement of the working of the Criminal Courts Jhallawar^ for the year ISSd^SB. 

Afpba.le]> AGiiVR. Ufhbu}, Mosivtbs. Bbtkbsbd. PBTDnro. 

Average. Present. Arerage. Present Arersge. Preeent. ATenge.^ Present. ATersge. Present. 

SoBses 11 S 6 ... S SSI... 



AYBBA^GB (Of VITB TBABS). 


PBvnnro. 


Pbbsbvt (188466). 




Pending. 


Inatitated. 


Total. 


Disposed of. 




1883-84. 


Institated. 


TotaL 


Disposed of. 


P«ndlng. 


229 


1.16 


1,64B 


1.460 


100 


145 


1^ 


1,466 


W 


181 



Comparative Statement of tie working of the Jhallawar Tehtil Courts, Civil and Criminal tide* 

for 1884-85. 

AntALBDAOAxvit. Ufhbui. Mopiy nro. Bbtbbs bd. P »iranrq, 

ATsrage. Present. ATexags. Present. AmBge. Present. ATerage. Present. Average. Present 

Cirll . S 10 . .« 4 1 S 1 8 ... 1 

Criminal. 43 68 14 S77 70 91SU 



• 




ATBBl.eB. 




pBin>i««. 




188466. 


















M 








s 














fi • 












.S 


1 

1 


& 




< 




1 


t 


I 

5 


IS . 

1 


CirU 


197 


917 


1,114 


040 


174 


216 


666 


881 


726 


165 


Criminal .... 


171 


1.J86 


1,466 


1»261 


196 


196 


1,330 


1,634 


1,416 


Hi 



Jhalrapatan, •> 

The Ibth July 1885. ) 



(Sd.) H. Wylib, lUajor, 

Political Agent. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



07 THE BAJPTJTAKA STATES POS 1884 86. 



217 



I 



i 



I 



te 

J 

n 
? 






1^ 






I. 



I 



« 
^ 



O 



5^ 



li 



I 



i 



§ 



a s" 



CD 






I 3. 

" 1-1 



CO 

to 



s 



.3 S 






1^ «i 



s 



.s 
s 



s 












OQ Q 

CO* of 






-« CO 



4 S 






4 S 



I 



»5 t* 






-3 



4 s 
S3 ^ 



CD 



•3 P. 

a 8 



8 S" 






to 



4 S 



0) 

09^ 



I 


« 


& 


%, 


s 


& 



I 



i 



I 



'3 CO 



•a A 



I 



4 S 
a -^ 



4 I 
a 2^ 



» lO 



4 i 
a «" 



98 

II 



I 






-3 R 



9 

0<f 






*• 

3 



.3 



^ 



I 















•3 le 

a «* 



a 



s 



i 



t 



*3 d 



CO 

s. 



•3 S. 



I 



I e 



e 

n 






00 
CO 



I S- 



kO 



a 



I 



CQ 



W IN 

C*4 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



218 



BEPOET OF THfi POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 



si 

00 






*&» 



?? 



Ik 



I 






1 



1 



1^ 



s 



04 

O 
H 

CO 

pa 



•l«lox 



•wmij 



■1103 



•mox 



ill 

--as 




'WIIUJ 



•^103 



•moi 



•MnM 



•9«OD 



•3 



I 



WOX 



•MTinj 



•«?10D 



•mox 



•wnnj 



•iioo 



•moi 



•■»]ina 



•iioo 



•rnox 



•wiuii 



■1100 









•mox 



•wnni 



•■1103 



THOX 



•»niu[ 



••WOD 






•IHOX 



•M«no 



IkH 



^ 



o 

B 

s3 



s 






^ |q ^ 



I 
I 

I 



5- 






i; 


r 


> 






^ 


s 


1" 


>4 


'fi* 


^ 




w 


•*» 




•*^ 




o 




A. 


^ 





< s 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB BAJPUTAKA STATEB 70B 1884^ 219 



BIEANIB AGENGT BEFOBT FOB 1884-85. 



No. 8-P., dated Bikanir, 16th May 1885. 

JWm— Captaiit a. C. Tixbot, Political Ageni, Bikanir, 

To^Tke First AMiittani Agent to the Ootfemar-Geueral in Bajpuiana. 

I have the honor to submit the AnTiiial Administration Beport of the 
Bikanir Agency for the year 1884-86. 

8IBDAB8. 

&• The belief expressed in last year's report that the misunderstanding between the 
Maharaja and his nobles might be regarded as at an end has been fully warranted by the ex* 
perience of the past twelve months, during which the country has been perfectly quiet and no 
attempt of any sort to question the authority of their Chief has been made by those who were 
lately in arms against him. 

8. With the restoration of order the first point claiming attention was the settlement of 
the rekh, or commutation for military service payable by the Thakurs> as this had been the 
ostensible cause of their dissatisfaction audit was obviously desirable to set the question at rest 
once for all. Many of the malcontent Thakurs came to terms with the Darbar within a few 
days of their submission, but a large number of the petty Thakurs who had held aloof from 
active participation in the rebellion and were merely waiting to see what would happen before 
committing themselves to ^ bargain with the Darbar had still to be dealt with. Each of these 
was invited to fiikanir where he discussed with the Darbar otiicials in the fullest manner the 
conditions of the arrangement to be made with him. These discussions lasted some months, 
for many cases had to be settled and each Thakur was anxious to obtain more favorable terms 
than his neighbour; but I satisfied myself in each case that the agreement signed in my 
presence was purely voluntary and that no pressure had been employed to compel a heavier 
payment than each Thakur considered himself able to make. In order to put an end to the 
disputes which revision of the settlement had more than once produced the Maharaja agreed to 
a request of the Thakurs that it should now be permanent and not liable to enhancement in 
future. Another point of importance to the Thakurs was decided by the Maharaja's giving 
his consent to the fee on succession to an estate being in future one year's rekh instead of its 
exceeding that amount as had often previously occurred. Various cesses which were formerly 
levied in addition to the rekh were abolished, and only those which are tokens of homage due 
to a feudal superior and common in all Rajput States were retained ; they were specified by 
name in the Sanad granted to each Thakur by the Darbar, and it was also provided in that 
document that no other cess should be levied. The limit of possible increase on the settle* 
ment of 1869 was fixed by the Darbar at 8 annas per rupee, but this was only reached in a 
very few instances, and llie average rate has been 25 per cent in the case of Tazimi and 12^ 
per cent in that of petty Thakurs ; in some cases there has been a decrease on former pay- 
ments where these were admittedly too high. Where the increase exceeded 25 per cent it 
was made progressive : thus a Thakur who agreed to an increment of 6 annas pays 4 
annas of this now and the remainder five years hence : similarly any excess over six annas is 
not due for ten years. In return for the concession of permanence it seemed only fair that 
the Darbar should be allowed to reap immediate benefit from any increment agreed upon up to 
25 per cent. By the end of May, I was able to report that the settlement of the rekh had been 
virtually, completed as 4 only out of 47 Tazimi Thakure and the same number out of 184 petty 
Thakurs' estate remained for disposal. There were at the time special reasons, which have 
since disappeared, for delay in dealing with these cases, and practically one only in each clase 
has now to be decided. Among the four Tazimi estates one was in dispute between two 
claimants to the succession, and when this had been decided the rekh presented no difficulty. 
The other three belonged to ringleaders in the late disturbances, and in their absence it was 
not expedient to fix the rekh ex parte, particularly as the Darbar was managing the properties. 
Circumstances have now enabled the Darbar to restore the management of these estates to the 
families of the present holders, so that this objection no longer holds good, and in two of them, 
viz. Bawatsar and Mahajan, satisfactory arrangements have been made : Jasand alone still 
holds out for more liberal terms than the Darbar is prepared to give. Among the petty 
Thakurs, one whose rights to a revenue-free village is disputed is the only person whose rekh 

has still to be settled. 

28 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



4. In coDBidering the punishment to he awarded to the ringleadersj the Darbar showed a 
wise discretion in not pressing for any measure of confiscation^ whereby the State might be 
benefited at the expense of their families. The object was to make the punishment as much 
as possible personal tq the oSenderff> and acpprdingly tl^e th^e Tl^ku^s who had been tempora- 
rily removed from the State, viz., Mahajan, Bidasar, and Jasana, were required to surrender 
their estates to their nearest heirs who were formally installed in their stead : they will also 
reside out of Bikanir for five yeaa^ from the date of their renapval> and on their return will be 
required to remain at the capital during the Maharaja's pleasufe. The ez-Thakur.of Mahajan 
is now living at Jeysulmere oq the guarantee of the Maharawal^ while the ex-Thakur of Jasana 
is at Jaipur on similar conditions, which, it is believedj will shortly be proposed and accepted 
in the case o£ the ex-Tbakur of Bidasar. Rawat Banjit Singh of Bawatsar, the fourth ri{ig« 
leader, who was under surveillance for a year at Bikanir, will be placed in possession of his 
estate six years hence should his conduct have l]|een satisfactory : in the meantime he is re. 
•quired tq live at Bikanir. The Thakqrs of Sandwa and Nokha were under sorveillanee for 
six. and thrpe months respectively, but have nqw regaine4 charge of their estates. As a pennv 
n^t iqark of the consequences of (jisloyalty, a small fine of Rs. 50Q, equiv^ent V> ^^ n)kh c| 
two hq^ses, has been in^poaed in perpetuity on the estates of Mahajw, Jasana, and Bawatsftr. 
in the case of Bidasar, where the resistance of the ex-Thakur was prqlonged to the Jast, this 
fine has taken the shape of th^ cession of 4,000 bighas of land to be added to the adjacent 
khalsa viilasre of Daril^a^ where the Darbtir troops were so long encamped. At the ordini^fy 
rate in tb^t 4i^trict of lis. 12 per 100 bighas, thfi rent of thie^ lan4 is rather less in money value 
than the rekh of two l^orses, bqt according tp Rajput ideas the punishment is, as it should be, 
more severe. 'On the Sandwa estate the rekh of a^e horse has be^ imposed : the anioun^ o{ 
the fine on the Nokha Thakur needed revision and hfus not yet been finally determined, llie 
Darbar aqted wisely in o^ering an ampftsty to all others whether Tazimi or petty Thakura who 
had joined the combination^ and their punishment was confined to the payment of a portion of 
the Eouz kharch or war indemnity which the Darbar in accordance with Rajput custom cUumed 
the right to levy from them. In view of all the circumstances of the case the Gt)vernment of 
India determined that the cost of the British expedition, vis., Rs. 24^820-14-11^ and the expense 
which the Darbar had incurred in keeping troops in the field for Si months, amounting to 
Rs. 1 1 5,402-9*6 j shpuld be shared equally between the Darbar amd the Thakurs : the latter had 
thus to pay Rs. 70,114-12-2^. It was arranged that out of this sum Rs. 40,000 should be 
levied, in amounts proportionate to the rekh, from the estates of the four ringleaders, and that 
the balance should be recovered in a similar manner from the other Thakurs known to have 
taken part in the disturbances. 

5. I had repeatedly assured the Thakurs that any claims, they might prefer against, the 
Darbac after submissipn to its authority and the settlement of their rekh would be duly e^r 
quired into, but for several months npne of them appj^rent^y car^ to avail themselves of my: 
assistanpe. At the same time I made qareful enquiri^ into the various points in dispute witl^ 
the general result that although there w^re many administrative defects of which the Thaki^ra 
no lea^ tban other subjects of the Maharaja might fiurly oomplain they had no special grievancee 
as a olasa : many of their demauda, such for instance aa. a. claim, to exercise civil and criminal 
jurisdiction within their own estates, to be consulted on the appointment of tahsildaro, and to 
have no Darbar thanas located within their estates, were dearly inadmissible. These enquiries 
moreover established a strong, presumption that the connections and ryots of the Thakurs had 
in some respects quite as much ground of complaint against their relatives and masters as the 
latter bad against the Darbar^ and that much would have to be done before their mutual rela- 
tions could be placed on a satisfactory footing. In order to relieve the Council of moie work 
than it could conveniently accomplish and to provide a tribunal in which all might have^ con- 
fidence for the disposal of the many cases in which the Darbar, tha Thakurs, and their ryots 
were concerned, it was determined with the Maharaja'« approval to establish ^ 'Riakur's Couct^ 
consisting of Thakurs and officials under the presidency of a foreigner, and similar to that in, 
operation at Jodhpur. At first this Court took cognizanca of all cases in which thevintecesta oi 
eHher the Darbar, the Thakvus? or their subordinates were, concerned, but it now bsors. only 
those to which the. two last-named cksses are parties. The reason fi>r introducing a ohajigewaa 
the need of some special maehrnery for dealing with claims for the restoration o£ viUages 
resumed by the Darbar, and not restored according to the arrangement entered into by the bta 
Maharaja in 1869. ^ese claims had been considered some years ago by a Committee.o£ Darbar 
officials presided over by the Maharaja's father, but their decisions had not given satisiactina 
and the subject formed a prominent feature, in the demands of the disaffected Sardars.; the 
question was not revised by them during the first few months after their submission, probably 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OV ¥BS EAJl»Uf AHA Bl^A^SS TO& 1884-85. 331 

fipfmi a widi to Me kow xiatters would him OQt, bat as the Thak^ftr hegm to feel eobfidemkf 
in the Court established for their benefit^ they reBiewed their claims tb these Tillages. The 
dedsions o£ the Court hotreter wete not final and had ixf be ref<§rred firi6t* to the C6fineil and 
•Tentually to the '' Ijlas khas^ '* wh^re on one ^lea df aiio^h^r all such claiids were rejected. 
Complaints to which this procednre natarallj gaye tise led to an examination of iHe facts of 
wBTeHl of the rejected claims with the result that tbe#e atpipeared to be g^ood gprounds fo/ a 
tiiorough investigation of the whole queition^ and at the visit Of the Agent td the Oovern^^- 
General to Bikamr in December lasti it was arranged that this efnqtdry sfaotild be held by a 
Special Committee^ composed of two foreigners^ and thus not likely to be biassed in favotir o( 
either party. The Committee received instructions to ascertain the facts in each case sub- 
mitted to them and to forward a report on each to His Highness the Mahanya and myself, 
if our' opinions coincide the case will be finally disposed of ; if they differ, it will be referred, 
to higher authority. All cases affecting Darbar interests, havii^ been eliminated from the 
jurisdiction of the Court, it was no longer necessary to retain officials as members and these 
are now Thakurs Lall Singh of Churu, Kandhlot, and Chinumun Singh of Khuri Bidawat : the 
former is universally respected by all classes, and the latter has been chosen as the best repre- 
sentative of the most numerous and important clan in the State. The President of the Court 
is Pundit Ealka Pershad, a retired settlement official, whose services were obtained through the 
good offices of the Punjab Government and have proved of great value. He is also member 
of the Special Committee above referred to, his colleague being Seth Nemi Chand formerly 
Civil Judge and now in charge of the Customs Department. All these questions connected 
with the Sardars have been so fully reported upon in the course of the year that I have not 
thought it necessary to give more than an outline of them here. 

ADMINISTKATION. 

6.- iifehta Chog Miill tind !6hatti Hookm Singh having retired from the Council in 
Odtol^er la*t, under circumstances already before Government, their places were filled by 
Maharaj Bhiv Singh, a'near relative of the Maharaja and much respected by the people, and 
Seth Milaf Chand, head of the Customs Department. A slight stroke of paralysis unfor- 
tunately deprived the State of Maharaj Bhiv Singh's services for some time and his health 
has again become somewhat impaired, but I hope that in the course ci a fews months it will 
be sufficiently restored to enable him to resume his seat. The Council has been further 
istrengthened by the nomination of Mangal Chand Bakiba, son of a former Minister, and of 
Mnnshi Sohan Lall, head of the Revenue Department, as an additional member. 

7. One important administrative change effected during the year has been the abolition 
of the Central, Citil, and Criminal Courts at Bikanir and the creation of four Nizamuts at 
Bikuir, Sujangarh, Beni^ and Suratgarh, with similar powers in judicial matters to those 
exerciaed by the Courts which they have superseded. The ineonveniences of the former 
system by which the judicial work was unduly centralised^ parties and witnesses had to travd 
great distances, and much delay in the disposal of eases took place, will now be in a great 
measure obviated it is hoped. Appeals from the decisions of the Nizamat Courts will lie as 
they did under the former system to the Council with a second appeal to the Ijtas Ehas, so that 
practically four Courts have been substituted for one and justice should be cheaper, speedier, 
and nearer the homes of the people than it has been. 

8. A radical alteration in the method of collecting custosM duties came into force with 
the commencement of the Sambat year 194£ (17th March 1885). Formerly these duties were 
collected at Bikanir City, at nearly 150 outposts in the districts, and through Commission 
Agents in some 500 other villagers : they varied every where in amount, being highest at the 
capital, and comprised not only those .received by the State, but also numerous miscellaneous 
ces8es assigned to institutions and individuals* and chiefly paid by the poorer classes. There 
'were what may be termed both external and internal duties ; the former levied on goods for 
or from abroad, the latter both on goods which had paid the external duty and were being 
disposed of in the districts, and on all country produce which could not be taken from one 
tehsil to another without pacing toll to the State. The hindrances to trade and the annoy* 
ance to individuals by the accumulation of petty cesses were considerable ; so the Darbar, 
encouraged by the success of a similar experiment in Marwar, determined to equalise the rates 
on the same articles throughout the the State, to collect the duty once for all at the 
frontier, and to abolish all taxes on internal trade, also all miscellaneous cesses. The 
effect on the poorer classes of increased duty in the districts was minimised by remitting 
it on the commoner products of the country usually consumed by them, by enhancing the 
rates on luxuries which they do not use, and l\y abolishing a number of other taxes not 
connected with the Customs but troublesome to the people. The new rates were chiefly 
based on those in force in Marwar, but were so adjusted as to provide sufficient funda to 

28 a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



222 BEPOBT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

pay the necessary extra eetablisliineDt, also oompensation to the privileged classes who claimed 
it in retnm for surrendering rights of exemption^ and to enable the State without loes to 
itself to sweep away a number of vexatious taxes. When these objects have been secnredi 
the rates will be lowered and the number of dutiable articles reduced so far as may be com* 
patible with financial safety. I have given merely the outlioes of this scheme as it has been 
already fully reported for the information of Government. Seths Milap Chand and Nemi 
Chand, both of whom have held this important charge at various times during the year, 
deserve much credit for their diligent and upright management of the department, and for 
the care with which they worked out the details of the new arrangement. 

9. There has not been time as yet to mature any comprehensive scheme for improving 
the present revenue system, but Munshi Sohan Lall was absent for nearly six months in the 
districts, and during this extended tour collected a mass of useful and interesting information 
regarding the condition of the zemindars, and the details of the system in force, with its 
numerous and varied cesses, which will be of the greatest assistance to the Darbar. It is hoped 
that it may be possible to introduce some more uniform rate of assesssment in khalsa land, or, 
at any rate, to substitute an enhanced rate per bigah for the many petty cesses which are 
troublesome to the zemindars and expensive to collect. The first step towards any fresh 
arrangement is to ascertain the Extent of holdings more accurately than it is now known, and 
for this purpose amins are at work in the Hanomangarh, Saratgarh, Bahadera, and Bajgarh 
Pai^fanas preparing a rough measurement of the cultivated and waste land : their labours will 
probably be finished in the course of five or six months and the Darbar will then be in a posi- 
tion to deal with the numerous applications for grants of land that have been received from 
cultivators in British territory. Amongst other matters that have engaged attention I may men- 
tion that a code of revenue rules has been drawn up and is being printed for publication : it is 
based on the codes in force in Ulwar and Jhallawar with modifications suited to this State. It 
contains in addition rules regulating the fees payable on adoption, the devolution of property 
of persons dying without issae, the pasturage of Raj herds, whether camels or cattle, and much 
miBcellaneous matter useful for the guidance of district officiak. It would be tedious to enu- 
merate the many abuses detected and improvements introduced as a consequence of Munshi 
Sohan Lall's tour of inspection, and this is the less necessary, as in doing so I should be re- 
capitulating the substance of a report recently submitted. I may say, however, that real pro- 
gress has been made reflecting much credit on Munshi Sohan Lall, who has also acquired the 
good-will of the zamindars by his painstaking and courteous method of working. If these 
efforts are not relaxed, confidence in the stability of the new administration will increase, and 
with it we ma^r hope to see, to the manifest advantage of the State, a rapid influx of population 
into the northern parganas, where the soil is good and there is much unoccupied land. 

10. The condition and efiBiciency of the karkhanas or fixed establishments, such as public 
works, stables of all kinds, workshops, &c., which were formerly under separate and irre- 
sponsible management, were fully enquired into by a Committee, and as a result of this enquiry 
they were placed under the charge of one Superintendent who has been able to check much of 
the waste and peculation that went on under the previous system. Statute labour or *^ begar,'' 
by which the Darbar made a nominal saving in the prices, but really paid dearly for the 
quality of much of the work done in these karkhanas, at the expense too of much inconve- 
nience, if not hardship, to the labouring classes, has been abolished and free labour with free 
trade in the materials supplied to the Darbar by brick and tile-makers, potters, &c., has been 
introduced. 

WEATHER AND CBOF& 

11. Fully an average quantity of rain, vis., 10*92 inches was recorded at the Bikanir 
Observatory during the year, and I suspect that in most of the districts a larger fall took place, 
though in the centre and also in the north-west of the State it was deficient. Bain-guages 
have now been procured for each tashil, and I hope that the Darbar will receive more accurate 
measurements than the number of fingers' breadths that rain has sunk into the earth, which 
has hitherto been the standard in the districts. At Oujner, some 20 miles from Bikanir, where 
is the only tank of any size in the State, there was a heavy fiood on the 19th June, and more 
rain was said to have fallen than had been known for 40 years. Many wild pig and donkeys, 
and a few bullocks were carried away and drowned while some damage was done to the garden. 
After a good fall in the districts, beginning on the 17th June, there was a long break which 
lasted for fully a month and considerable anxiety was felt. Towards the end of July, however, 
this was relieved, but the grass had suffered too much from the long drought to recover itself 
completely and the crop was everywhere moderate, in some parts scanty. In the neighbourhood 
of the city the drought was most marked, 2 inches only having fallen up to the 20th July, and 
the subsequent fall came too late to help the grass ; fortunately this belt of insufficient rainfall 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



0? THB BAJPUTAKA STATES POB 1884^6. 228 

did not extend very far roand the city, though there were similar areas between Dungai^rh 
and Sardarshehr in the centre and again between Suratgarh and Anupgarh in the north-west: 
this latter tract has been peculiarly unfortunate, no rain to speak of having fallen there for 
two years, and it presented a very desokte appearance when I marched through it in the cold 
weather as most of the villagers had gone with their flocks and herds in search of pasture into 
Bahawalpur territory. But while the rain thus held o£E too long to permit of a heavy crop of 
grass being secured, it was quite suflScient for the crops which in some parts, particularly the 
south-eastern portion of the State, were above, and on the whole may be said to have been fully 
up to the average. In some districts the moth-pods did not fill, but the bajra was in most 
places a superior crop, especially towards Sajangarh, where the rainfall was particularly good. 
There were good winter runs in the northern parganas by which the rabi crops, where sown, 
were much l^nefited, but except in the vicinity of the Ghuggar a very small area is prepared 
for spring crops, as the sandy soil is not thought favorable for wheat cultivation, and irriga- 
tion is too expensive to be largely employed. The floods in the Ghuggar were heavier than 
had been known for years owing to an abnormally heavy rain&U in the Himalayas, where the 
river rises : the floods, however, did not pass beyond Tibi, and besides the natural obstruction 
caused by a thick growth of '^pauni^' grass in the bed of the stream which ought to be 
eradicated. Much water ran uselessly to waste among the sand-hills near EUenabad in the 
Sirsa district. His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor of the Punjab has been good enough 
to depute a surveyor to inspect the river channel and devise some means of utilising the flood 
waters to the advantage alike of British and of Bikanir subjects. 

FINANCES. 

12. I submit with this report the completed accounts for Sambat 1940, which ended on 
87th March 1884. They show a total income of.Bs. 13,07,787-12-8 with an expenditure of 
B.S. 12,17,048-8-9. The cash balance was thus Rs. 90,739-3-6, but of this sum Bs. 61,111- 
12-S represent deposits subject to repayment, and if we take into account the sum of Bs. 4,000 
borrowed from the Maharaja there was an actual deficit of Bs. 10,372-8-9. But for the heavy 
expenditure incurred in suppressing the revolt of the Thakurs this small deficit would have 
been a considerable surplus, and as it is will be much more than met by the half-share of the 
total expenses incurred in the expedition which is to be recovered from the Thakurs hereafter. 
These accounts have been drawn up in the form, hitherto followed by the Darbar and also 
adopted by me in sending up a special statement of the receipts and expenditure from Sambat 
1930-39 which series they complete* The accounts for Sambat 1941, or 1884-85, from which 
date the new administration may be considered to have commenced will be shown, with some 
advantage in point of clearness of detail, under the different heads which it was decided to 
adopt in framing a budget estimate. 

15. There is. a large amount of debt nominally- outstanding, but it must be some time 
before its real extent can be ascertained. As desired by the Government of India, the matter 
is receiving attention. 

WOBEma OF THE COURTS. 

IJLAS KHAa 

14. This, the highest Court in the State, is presided over by His Highness the Maharaja, 
to whom all cases beyond the powers of the Council to settle finally or appealed against its 
decisions are submitted by the Dewan as the chief executive ofiBicer of the State. The Ijlas 
Khas passed final orders in 27 cases and disposed of 104 appeals in the course of the year. 
The Council had to deal vrith 70 civil, 56 criminal, 99, revenue^ 76 Thakurs' Court, and 66 
Customs cases requiring confirmation or modification of decisions passed by Subordinate Courts, 
and it also disposed of 54 civil, 41 criminal, 55 revenue, and 20 Thakurs' Court appeals. 

16. The returns for the Civil, Criminal, and Bevenue Courts have been made out as if 
these Courts had continued to exist up to the close of the year ; the Nizamats were established 
so late in it that it was not worth while to compile a separate record of the cases disposed of 
in them during a few weeks at the most, and such a return would have been useless for pur« 
poses of comparison as the Nizamats commenced work on different dates. These cases have 
therefore been added under their proper heads to those disposed of by the former Courts, and 
the separate record of each Nizamat will commence from the current year. 

CIVIL CASES. 

16. There were 741 cases pending at the beginning of the year, and 1,674 were instituted 
during the year; 1,831 have been disposed, and 584 are still pending. The execution of decrees 
at the capital is not as satisfactory as could be wished, and until this has been put on a better 
footing and also until cases are more rapidly disposed of than they have been hitherto, there 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



224 BEPOBT 07 THB nHiITICAL AB]aKI8nti.TI0N 

will be 8omd hesitation in institatingf mite, the number of which ig oonmdeniblj left thiiti 
might have been expected now that the old system has bcfen abolished and justice i^ ftttaitial>l0« 
At the same time the large increase in Ck>urt4ees^ vig,, Rs. 24j49S«9-9j as compared With 
Os. 14^997-1-6 in 1889«84^ shdws that the Courts geuemlly Are nowmotfe freely Mo.rted to 
than they were« 

CBIMIKAIi OASB8. 

17. From the return submitted it appears that 1,047 cases were pending at the commence- 
ment of the year and that Itfl^Z more came before the Courts during its oouree. Of the*l 
3^069 cases, 2^718 were disposed of, leaviog a balance of 851. Out of 1,1 £6 persons arrested only 
654 were punished, showing that arrests have been made with some want of caution: in the 
graver offences the proportion of convictions to arrests seems to have been very small i al^ the 
amount of property recovered compared to that stolen does not indicate much activity on the 
part of the police. The number of dakaities reported to this office has been four, while the 
number shown in the return is six. The Darbar has been addressed on the points noticed. 

BEVEKTJE CASES. 

18. There have been in all 2,321 cases instituted during the year, add 1,860 of tiiese hatre 
been settled. These cases have chiefly related to claims to villages or their beadmansbip and 
disputes about boundaries, land, and payment of rent< A great chatnge for the better is notice* 
able in the manner in which this portion of the Revenue Officer^s duties has been carried otIC 
since Muushi Sohan Lall's arrival; formerly Bikanir was thronged with petitioners who had 
been for months endeavouring to obtain a settlement of their oases ; now^ thanks to the regu- 
larity and method introduced by Munshi Sohan Lall, they do not number one-twentieth part of 
the former crowds. 

THAKXTE'S COUBT. 

19. In this Court, which commenced its sittings on 7th June 1884, 572 cases in all have 
been instituted and 208 had been disposed of at the close of the year. In explanation of this 
comparatively small number it may be observed that the Court only sits three times a week as 
the President has also to attend the special committee* Munshi Sohan Lall was President for 
about two months and a good many cases were settled during his incumbency : on his depar* 
ture on tour the two original members Thakur Bijey Singh of Bajpura and Devi Dhan Mundra 
disposed of a few cases ; but it was not until Pandit Ealka Pershad's arrival towards the middle 
of December that work was again taken up in earnest. On the formation of the special cotti* 
mittee the member who represented the interests of the Darbar, viz,, Devi Dhan Mundra, retired, 
and the Thakur of Khnri took his place. Thakur Bijey Singh of Bajpura deserves no little 
credit for having come forward to undertake a troublesome duty at some personal incon- 
venience; hecontinued to givehis services for several months until private a&irs compelled him 
to resign in February last when he was succeeded by the Thakur of Churn. The special com- 
mittee has to dispose of 1,159 cases in all, of which 111 are for the ownership of villages, 27 
concern land and the remainder consist of miscellaneous claims against the Darbar. 

DISPBNSABT AND YACCIlfATIONS. 

20. In June 1884 the Oovernment of India sanctioned the appointment of a 2nd class 
Civil Surgeon and the post was conferred upon Surgeon C. Adams, M. B.^ B. A., and L. L. B. 
This officer was however compelled to proceed to England on medical certificate early in the 
following November and the officiating appointment remained vacant until the 18th March 1885^ 
when Surgeon P. D. Pank, I.M.S., received charge of it. The dispensary in Bikanir City was 
attended by 4,976 out-patients and 81 in-patients, while 194 prisoners^in the jail were also under 
treatment during the year. The cost of the dispensary was Rs. 2,102-11-11. The number of 
vaccinations was 463, a slight increase on the figures of last year. It is proposed to establish 
dispensaries at Sujangarh, Reni, and Suratgarh, which are the~» head-quarters of the District 
Nizamats, and in the ensuing cold weather attempts will be made to extend vaccination opera- 
tions. Additions to the dispensary buildings at Bikanir are being carried out, and a small Agency 
Hospital near the lines of the Political AgenVs escort will be built. 

HEALTH. 

21* The general health of the people has been good : a few cases of what appeared to be 
famine fever were reported from the neighbourhood of Ratangarh, and Hospital Assistant Kud- 
rat Ulla Khan was sent to the spot with medicines: the reports of the sickness however 
appeared to have been exaggerated, and with the* fall of rain it disappeared. As usual in the 
rainy season there was a good deal of fever in the Hanomangarh and Suratgairh parganas, and 
the establishment of a dispensary at the latter town will be a boon to the people, who are now 
dependent on a very limited stock of native medicines kept by a Hakim entertained by the 
Darbar at Hanomangarh. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



JAIL. 

U. Tbe namber of prisoners eonfified in the jail was t^OSi 9 j;».^ 191 men and It women. 
Of' the men 168 were Hindus and 33 Muhammadans and of the womea eight Hindus and foor 
Muhammadans. There were 19 life oonyiots, the balk of the jail population being short-term 
prisoners. A sum of Rs. 1 0,000 has been provided in this year's budget for increasing the 
jail aecommodation and work will be shortly eommenoed. Something was done last year 
towards providing women's quarters, but they still need improvement and this will not be lost 
sight of in making additions. In the Netasar Jail within the fort, in which Rajputs and persons 
of sjme position are confined, there were 27 prisoners. The sanitary arrangements of this jail are 
defective and will receive attention during tb^ ycart 

INFANTICIDE. 

23. The^ were no caseq of infanticide during the year, but as connected with this subject 
I may notice the frequency of attempts to procure abortionj, of which no less than 33 cases were 
brought before the Court with only 9 convictions, while there can be no doubt that many mor® 
escape detection. 

24. Another crime of undue frequency is the kidnapping and sale of children, and 11 cases 
ef this nature, are returned by the Criminal Court. The sale of female children as household 
slaves in the families of Thi^kurs was carried on practically without any prohibition on the part 
of the Darbar, and was, I believe, until recently very common; it is less so now that the Courts 
take cognizance of such cases, but it will be some time before an old custom of this sort can be 
completely stopped, 

BOBDEB POLICE. 

25. The system of border posts established at the beginning of last year has been main- 
t^ed throughout it, and there can be no doubt but that serious crime has in consequence 
largely dimu^ished. During thq cold weather I inspected every post in a distance of about 160 
miles from the Loharu border on the north to th^t of Marwar on the south, and the result of 
enquiries on the spot showed that in spite of various shortcomings, which will be gradually 
remedied I hope, these posts had been of much service in checking crime, though petty cattle- 
thefts still continued chiefly on the northern Shekhawati border. These will become less fre- 
quent as co-operation between officials on both sides of the border is fnrther developed, and a 
meeting which took place between the Shekhawati, Sikar, and Bikanir officials at Futtehpur, 
while the Agent to the Governor-Qenerars camp was there in December last, has I hope 
inaugurated a more cordial feeling on both sides. It became necessary to dismiss the Snper* 
intendent, Thakur Duley Singh, for various irregularities, and after some delay his place has 
now been filled by Semgut Singh, late Inspector, Punjab Polioe, who has brought with him 
excellent testimonials. 

POFNDAET DISPUTES. 

%6. Ai^ internal boundary dispute between the villages of Asan and Ajitpura, the former 
of which is kbalsa and the latter Thakur's property, was partially settled in my presence in 
January last by 4 Punches, and a Sir Punch appointed by both parties. They walked the boun* 
dary for some two out of the three miles disputed. Being then unable.'to agree as to the 
onward direction of th^ line they asked me to arbiti:ate, and I therefore marked out the re- 
mainder of the line. My decision aippeared to give satisfaction to both parties, who filed a 
written agreement to be bound by it, and a dispute, which is said to have lasted for 40 years, 
came to an end. There have been no '' External/^ disputes during the year, but a case now 
pending between Saronda of Bikanir and Bhojawas oC Marwa appears. likely to turn out a 
question of boundary, and may have to be authoritatively disposed of during tJie, next camping 
season unless ijb is amicaUy adjusted meanwhile* 

POST OFFICE. 

27. An Imperial Popt Office was opened experimentally at Bikanir, with th^ consent of 
^he Diif bai:, on the 1st July 1884, and has proved a great boon to the people who formerly had 
to pay i ann;^ additional ^er letter to the postal contractor. The experiment has proved veiy 
successful financially, I understand, and the monthly receipts f^om parcel's, commission on 
money orders, sal^ of ^tanoqps, &c., are sometiijies as high as Bs. 2,000. The Darbar has also 
consented to the establishment of Post Offices at all the important towns in the State, and I 
hope that advantage will shortly be taken of this offer as the matter is now engaging the 
attention of the postal authorities. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



226 BEFOBT OP THE POLITICAL ADHIKISTBATION 

28. I do not despair of seeing a cheap telegraph line constructed from the terminos of the 
Bajputana-Malwa Railway at Kuchaman road, through Sikar, Futtehpnr, and Batangarh, to 
Bikanir. With the co-operation of the Jaipur Darbar there should be no difficulty in goaran- 
teeing Government against any loss in' working this line, and in all probability such a guarantee 
would be merely a matter of form, for the line might be fairly expected to be self-supporting 
as it would pass through several important commercial towns ; without the assistance of Jai* 
pur^ Bikanir might hesitate to stand alone in giving a guarantee, but I trust that both 
Darbars will unite in promoting an undertaking of such benefit to their subjects. 

SCHOOLS. 

29. Owing to the pressure of other work educational matters suffered last year, and be- 
yond appointing a Master for the Urdu school at the capital, nothing was done ; but this year 
the question will I hope receive more attention, and possibly besides vernacular schools in the 
districts an English school at Bikanir may be established. 

MATO COLLEGE. 

50. The young Thakurs of Jasana and Sidmukh joined the College in December last, and 
there are now four Bikanir boys receiving instruction in it. The young Thakur of Mahajan 
and the son of the-Thakur of Rawatsar will, I hope, join the College at the close of the vacation 
if room can be found for them, but the accommodation in the Bikanir boarding-house is 
limited, and unless they can be lodged in one of the other houses they cannot, I fear, be received. 

MAHABAJA'8 ILLNESS. 

51. His Highness the Maharaja was confined to his room for about six weeks from the 
middle of July by an obstinate glandular swelling in his neck : after giving him a good deal of 
annoyance it eventually burst and His Highness quickly recovered. 

POLITICAL AGENT'S TOUE.. 

52. I left Bikanir on the 5th November 1884, and marched vid Dungargarh, and Mum- 
masar to Sirdarshehr and thence to Churn. From Chum I marched southward along the 
Bikanir- Jaipur border, inspecting the police posts and passing through the towns of Batan- 
garh and Ratangarh to Sujangarh. From thence I moved along the Bikanir-Marwar 
frontier, and having met the Agent to the Governor-Qeneral at Bhuggu marched with his 
camp to Bikanir, which was reached on the 10th December; starting again on the 15th idem I 
accompanied the Agent to the Governor-General in his march through Dungargarh, Bagal- 
desar, and Ratangarh to Futtehpur in Sikar ; from there my route lay through Churu ; Lohsua 
and Sankhu to Rajgarh, the police posts on the Shekhawati border north and east of Chum 
as far as Rampura, being visited en route. From Rajgarh I passed through Ajitpura and 
Sidmukh to Bahadera ; from thence to Nohas, Bukkurka, Jasana, and Rawatsar to Tibi. At 
Talwara, one march from Tibi, I met Mr. Ogilvie, C. S., Deputy Commissioner, Hissar, and with 
him inspected the sites of two disputes between the Bikanir and Sirsa zamindars relative to 
the disposal of the flood waters of the Ohuggar river. One result of our meeting has been the 
deputation of the Surveyor referred to in paragraph 11. From Tibi I marched to Hanomangarh 
or Bhatner, and thence vid Suratgarh to Ahohgarh in the external north-west of the State, re- 
turning to Bikanir on the 5th February 1885 vid Mahajan and Lunkaransar. My tour extend- 
ed over 93 days, and in the course of it I visited the head-quarters of every tahsil in the 
State except Reni, which however is amalgamated with Chum so that I was able to ascertain 
at the latter town all that it was necessary to know about the Reni-Chum tahsil. 

COUNCIL. 

SS. I have already mentioned the good work done by some of the principal officials, and 
it only remains for me to refer to Dewan Munshi Amin Muhammad as deserving of the highest 
praise for the firmness and integrity with which he has discharged the very difficult and re- 
sponsible duties of Dewan of this State to the satisfaction of all classes brought into contact 
with him. His services have already been brought to the notice of the Agent to the Governor. 
General in various reports, and I am glad to have another opportunity of testifying to their 
value. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB EAJPUTANA STATES FOR 1884-86. 227 

OFFICE ESTABLISHMENT. 

34. I have every reason to be satisfied with the manner in which Mr. Jamshedji Aderji, 
the Head Clerk, has performed his duties. Lala Piari Lall, the 2nd English Clerk has been 
particularly usefal, from his knowledge of the Hindi of this part of the country, in preparing 
translations of accounts and other papers in that language received from the Darbar. The 
vernacular work has been efficiently performed by the Mir MuQshi, Kishen Lai, who has fully 
justified the recommendation he brought from the Ulwar Agency, Anand Samp, the Naib 
Munshi, has also worked well and diligently. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



228 



BEPOBT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTBATION 

Statement ihowing Receipts and Expenditmre of the Bikanir 



BlCBim. 



No. 



9 
10 



11 
12 

18 



14 



16 



Pvticolan. 



Arrears of Snmbat 1989 

Land revenue inclnc^ng rekh . . . . 

Ceflses — 

a. Singoti and Ghowdar-bab (tax on animals and 

Cnowdries). 

b. Tali-bab (tax on laden animals) 

c. Pancharai (Qi-aziog-tax) . . • . 

Total 



Gardens 

Cnstoms 

a. Fees for weighing goods (Takii and Eiali) 
h. Cesses collected at city gates 
0. Tax on stone and lime 

d. Income from fairs .... 

Total 

Salt 

Excise . 

Mint (assaying) 

Judicial — 

a. Conrt-feea 

h. Stamps 

e. Fines ...... 

Total 

Talab (Processes) 

Begistration-fees — 

a. Sales of Raj land and chowtb aemin 
5. Adoption "Kbola" .... 

Total 

Snccession-fees, "nazarana" 

Escheats "Gaiwal." 

Sales— 

a. Unclaimed animals .... 
i. Ghiyai ...... 

Totad 



Taxes 
a. 
h. 
e, 
d. 
s, 

/■ 
t 

i. 

J- 
k, 
I. 



on trades and castes, &c. — 

Tax on sig ji-bumers . 

,, oil-makers 

„ weavers 

„ dyers . 

„ cobblers (Begors) 

„ sweetmeat-makers 

„ batchers 

„ masons- . 

„ carpenters 

„ tailors . 

„ firework-makers 

^ ivory bangle-makers 

„ Charans, Bhats 



Total 



Miscellaneoas taxes— 

a. On grass (in Snjangarh) 

b. „ hides 

c. „ gambling 

d. ,t time-barg^ns . . . . 

e. „ rain-speculations .... 

Carried oyer 



Total of each head 
and sab-head. 



X, a. p, 
2,89,102 1 8 
6,16,530 15 9 



10,854 18 6 

7.187 U 
9,621 12 9 



27,514 8 8 



8S2 9 6 



2,71,984 10 6 

14,148 18 6 

5,121 

767 1 

299 11 9 



2,92,316 4 9 



27,346 7 

2,736 8 

22 11 



14,997 1 6 

2,769 2 3 

24,030 7 9 



41,796 11 6 



4,702 8 8 



27,096 2 
3,977 8 



81,073 10 



24,771 7 8 
1,84.1 4 3 



854 2 6 
60 



914 2 6 



11,107 

676 

207 

501 

64 

6,804 

25 

59 

66 

4 

15 

83 

20 



10 

4 



15 9 

6 



14 9 



4 
12 






12 6 




18,628 15 8 



166 8 

872 9 

8,490 15 

654 6 6 

2,256 11 8 



Obavv Total* 



X, a. p. 
2,89,103 1 8 



BUCABU. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THS BAJPITTANA STATIS VOB 188445. ^29 

SMefor tie year Smmbat 1940 (A. D. 1888-84). 



Ezran iTo bb. 



Serial 
No. 



1 

2 

8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

18 

14 

15 

16 

17 



18 



19 



20 
21 



28 



Ptttkolan. 



Temples 

Charities 

Modikhana 

Oanges-water EstaUishmeiit . 
Wardrobe, jewels, and jhsjharkbana 
Payments bj His Highness'l orders 
Sent for bj His Highness 
Rewards and gifts 
Pay of Army and Establishment 
Stationery ..... 

VakiU,Ac 

Tent Establishment 

Public Works .... 

Stamps 

Gunpowder. .... 
Decri-es (Punchsyet) 
K«sids (Messengers) 



Purchases — 

a. Purchase of grass 



c. 

e, 

/. 



of fuel 
of bullocks 
of camels 
of horses 
of hides 



Total 



Miscellaneous — 



m. Miscellaneous 

h. Rent of Jagir at Fateabad 

e. Expenses at fairs 



Total 



Exchange and interest . . . 

Supplies ........ 

Expenses incurred on account of Mahajan and Bida* 

sar expedition. 
Arrears of pay due previous to Sambat 1989 



NBT BSFBlTDlTrRB 



EXTBAOBDINABY. 

Arrears of pay, &c., for Sambat 1939 

Refund to Saridars on account of excess rekh paid in 

Sambat 1939. 
Recoverable advances ...... 



Deposits— 

1. Jasana ...... 

2. Bidasar 

8. Mahajan 

4. Rawatsar 

5. Sandwa ...... 

Total 



Total Extraordinary Expenditure 



Total Ezpekditttiue 



Cash balance 



Total 



Total of each head 
and sob-head. 



R, a, p. 



21.224 

62,880 

1,93,562 

2,616 

90,284 

2,447 

32,086 

65,110 

2,80.795 

2,660 

21.720 

9,436 

76,554 

121 

2,428 

643 

1.613 




6 

4. 

11 

9 



1,843 
769 

1,635 
614 
144 



6 8 

1 8 

2 
18 8 





16 





18 8 

1 9 

6 

8 9 

6 6 



46,687 4 6 

869 16 3 

853 

1,913 

369 18 

2,010 9 



62,703 9 9 



60,022 8 9 
269 11 
145 4 



60,437 2 9 



11,996 9 

883 9 6 

1,26,214 14 8* 

1,620 10 9 



10,88,889 8 8 



23,411 11 6 
71,238 7 3 

29,262 18 6 



4,806 8 



1,28,209 6 



Obavd Tos4&. 



a. j>. 



10,88,889 8 8 



1,28,209 6 



12,17,048 8 9 
90,789 8 6 



13,07,787 12 8 



* This expenditure 
was first stated 
tobefil,15,402. 
9-6, and the 
Thakur's share 
of Fouj Ehurch 
was calculated 
accordingly. 



S9a 
Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



230 



BEPOET OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTBA.TION 

Statement showing Beceipts and Estpenditure of the Bikanir 



BBCBUfS* 



8«riAl 
No. 



16 

17 

18 



19 
20 



21 



PBrtiooItn. 



Brought forward 
MisceUftDeoiu taxes— «oji^. 

/. On opiam 

y. „ heliograph 

*. „ lighting 

t. „ marriages 

j. „ 2nd marriages .... 
k. For support of stray animals 

Total 

Exchange and interest ..... 
Repayment of loans 

Percentage — 

a. On sales of grass .... 

b. I, ,, of cloth .... 

Total 

Bent of Darhar houses 

Officials' perquisites ..... 

a. Perquisites of Eotwal .... 

b, „ of Surveyor (Qi^dhar) . 

Total 

Miscellaneous 

Nominal income of Samhat 1940 



Total nominal and actual receipts 

Deduct unrealised balances of 1940 

Net income of Sambat 1940 



EZTBAOBDnriBY. 

Refund of advances . • , 



Deposits— 
From Jasana • 
„ Bidasar . 
„ Mahajan 
t, Rawatsar 
„ Sandwa . 



Total of each head 
and rab-head. 



J?. a. j7. 



1,117 
615 
806 
816 



7 8 
2 6 



655 2 
1,076 1 



11.427 8 



11,665 10 9 
866 12 



198 3 3 
926 



1,123 3 8 



1.887 7 



10,479 11 

984 6 

40 



11,504 



81,843 10 



11,10,840 6 6 



Total 



Amount borrowed from His Highness the Maharaja . 

Unexpended balance of pay, &c., due at the close of 
Sumbat 1940. 

Total 

Gbakd Total 



Total Net and Extmordinary Income of Sambat 1940 



12.379 3 



29.216 13 3 

1,811 8 3 

19,810 10 3 

13,313 8 6 

1,265 4 3 



66.417 12 6 



40,000 
17,960 12 9 



67,960 12 9 



1,35,747 12 3 



Qbavb Tosi&. 



o. p. 



11,10.840 


6 


6 


18,99,942 
2,27.903 


7 
7 


9 
9 


11.72.040 









1,35,747 13 3 



13.07,787 12 3 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE BAJPUTA17A STATES FOB 1884-85. 
SUUfwr ike year Sambat 1940 {J. D. i889^— oonduded. 



281 



■o. 



FutiMlMt. 



Total of «obh«id 
wdfob-hoiid. 



Brought f ocward 



Total 



J^. a, p. 



QnuntvtUt, 



J^. «. f> 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



282 



BEPOET OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 



I 



o 



00 






-Js 



o 
1 

I 

S 

I 
1 

'T3 



cS 



1 



i 

9 


^ -8881 


: f 


: 


: : 




8' 

s 

1 


0) peiJdjBuiJtx 


: : 


: 


: : 




•pwiA9a 


i : : 


: : 


: 


•petidAOH 


I M : 


fH : 


M 


'panugnoo 


: : 




s = 


S 


1 


•l^oi 


i: : 1 


1 kO . 


IS 


•pewnroi 




: 


g : 


kO 


•jgnipuej 


: : 


■ 


i : 


: 


S' 
1 

QD 
03 

s 




:0<i 


M j 




*H 


8' 

S 

a 


*»vnioo jaq^o 
0} paxiajflQux 


;i-l 


fi j 


00 : 




•pwjAaH 


:« 


CO 1 


(0 09 


00 






: 


l>09 


« 


•panuynoo 


-* 




^•° 


s 


8 
3 


•r»)ox 




s 


ga 


s 


•p»;nni8ai 


' ^S 


CO 


s§ 


s 


•anipuaj 


: : 


: 


: I 


: 


g 

> 


ipdy Ifll ao fluipaaj 


:« 


eq 


SSpH 


-* 


8 

S 
1 


•B^inog jamo 
0% pajjojsaojx 


:•-• 


f-4 


: : 




-pBBiiea 


«2 


s 


§2 


2 


•pesjaAan 


09 04 


-* 


ooo 


00 

l-l 


•patoiBaoo 


i '"^J 


§ 


ss 


& 


.3 


'Wox 


00 ^ ^ 


g 




5: 


•pe^n^UBui 


1 «5 


s 


i ss 


CO 
CO 


. -JBaipnaj «* 5 


t^ 


C0U3 


M 


a 


IVidV 481 no ftiipaaa 




: 


CO 09 


00 


g 

o 

Q 


•Bijmoo jaq^o 
o; pduajBuvJX 


! : 


: 


: : 


J 


•p^BIAOH 


:M 


M 


gja 


<s 


•pasiaAaa r-i oo | "^ 


09 10 


t* 


*p<>iiijipaoo 


MO 


00 


^^ 


^ 


s 


•r»;ox 


eOfH 


3 


S5 


s; 


j-pa^n^WBoi 


00 a> 


09 

iH 


:SS 


s 


•auipaaj 


:« 


09 


09 CO 


00 


h4 
> 
6 




:oo 


CO 


^%o 


a> 


O 

a 

M 


•B>ino3 jaqio 
0^ paxiajBOBJX 


: : 


: 


« : 


09 


•peBiAaa 


cot^ 


s 


22 


s 


•pasaaAaa 


1-* iH 


Oi) 


:Oi 


A 


•pouugaoo 


0)C0 


09 

iH 


§a 


g 


M 
6 


•Wox 


00 rH 


s 


gs 


3 


, -pa^ninaai 




0* 


89 


S 


•aoipaaj 


M : 


09 


^^09 


cc 








Cases for con- 
firmation 
Appeals . 


1 


Cases for con- 
firmation 
Appeals . 


1 















i 








m 








M 








i 


(i;oa» 


• 




•? 




1 






.•*fH 


a» 




2- 


^ pHiH 




5^ 


"I:? 


1 


On 


1 






>«< 






f< 








1 

«0 


|li 


S| 


1 


>H 








00 








c^ 


• 






cs 


c 






1 


1 




fH 


s 


E-» 






?»i 


i-j 






a 


11 


•S 3 


s 


4 


§1 














^ 


II 


^1 


3 


•J: 


•R"! 


CO 


00 


a 


&s 






il 


H 






1 


h 


sa 


9 


-S" 


«=! 






•g 


^ 






1 


s 


09 0) 


|H 


f 


»ot* 

1-4 rH 


s 


f;s 


§ 






.?a 








O 








0) 


1 


§g2 


o 




1 


r-it* 




.§ 






"S" 














'S 


^ 


§5 


to 

fH 




St^ 


-* 


•2* 


6 


^ 


09 


'W 








1 




^.• 






e 




l^i 


^5 


S 


"^ 




S2 


fH 


f-* 


HO 


s 


g »j 








• 








1 


c 


1 


82 


s 




o 

M 
M 


i 

a 


§2. 


fH 


Ci 


n 
s 

D 


*^ 






•S" 


§:d 






1 






3i 


fH 


. 






■ 
















H 
















II 


. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



or THE KA.JPUTANA STATES FOB 1884^. 



288 



S3 
§8 















6 
I 

1 

I 
1 






1 




































M 


































■ 


































4 


































S 


































•pajdAoo 




. 


. 


s 


t 


1 














CO 




• 


i 


'9J vtU*' JO *0K 




































Ck. 




CD 


o 




o 


o 








o 






a» 




00 









fH 


o 




o 


^ 








o 






o 




40 


*p9J9A09N Xy»4 


0) ! 


























•-• 


: 


iH 


-ojd JO ^aaomy 




1 


s 




Si 

rH 


1 








8 






' i 


'• 


1 
















l> 


















" 


-onidaiwwjooK 


: 


• 


•H 


s 


: 


s 


•H 


: 


'' '• 


•: 




'' 


00 


00 


: 


5 

(0 




sv. 




o 


o 




O 


o 








o 




o 


0) 




0> 


-paiapoQid X^jdd 






o 


00 




00 


0> 








kO 




00 

* 


09 




CO 


•Oid JO ^anomy 




i 


i 




s 

•H 


i 








§ 




»H 
00 


= t 




1 










tH 






« 














f^ 




II 






tH 






09 


09 


-* 


M 








09 




»i4 


•H 




lO 




•[»W»pnn 




'■ 


^ 










: 


J ; 


s 




: 




: 


: 






a 


to 


eo 


lO 


s 


8 


s 


00 


09 l> 


00 


s 


•^^ 


00 


« 2 




1 


1 


•pwTOiea: 














fH 














•H 








































































s 




fH 






-* 


A 


S 


8 


00 

fH 


-^ s 


-* 


A 


^ 


fH 


s 




i 


6 


•poqaianj 




: 


: 






»H 


9^ 














: 00 


: 


£ 


. . . 




































fH 


lO 


00 


|H 

iH 


S 


S 


^ 


s 


" s 


** 


:$ 


00 


kO 


00 09 




s 




•pa^sajuv 






























• 


IH 


-pdpivMv ^oam 


i-l 






00 


-* 


s 


g 


•H 


iH Oil 

rH 


00 


• 


lO 


fH 


s 




s 


-qfqnnd qoiqM 




I 


s 
























• 


^ 


ni 898*0 lO'Ofl 






























■ 






•H 


^ 


09 


a 


lO 


?f! 


SP 


•^^ 


00 


04 


lO 


09 


00 


CO ^ 


s 


^4 


•OT8t ipdy »8i 














04 














09 


^ 


ao ^^ipaad wno 


















* 














00 




pH 


C4 


^ 


s 


s 


g 


1 


00 


" u 


a 


s 


A 


00 


s s 


^ 


00 


•jopeedBjp^ewo 












00 














9. 


S: 


t^ 






























^N 




09 




Oil 

•H 


00 


ss 


5 


s 


3 


o 


s 


- a 


IH 


3 


»H 


s 


s s 


^ 


1 


•moi 












•* 


00 














r- 


S 






























"^ 




OJ 


•pa»iHR8 


t* 




CO 


04 


S3 


S 


1 


Oil 


•H fH 


lO 


9 


A 


CO 

IH 


M CD 

^1 o> 


F 


09 

23 


-nj Bdsvo JO o^ 
































S- 


Ijjdy »8i no aui 


lO 


eo 


ss 


S 


•-4 


s 

^ 


iH 


|H 
fH 


IH 


CO 


•H 

09 


09 




s s 


s 


1 


•pnodsasvap *ox 
































3 




. 


§3 




. 


. 






. 


, . 


, 




, 














'S 


































D 
































• 


a 




' 


• 






• 


• 


• 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




• 


•J 




• 


• 






• 


• 


• 




. 


. 


. 


• 


, 


1 


• 


g 

1 




• 


• 






• 


• 


• 




'5* 


1 


• • 


• 


i4 

1 




1 


i 


s 


1 

r 


< 


1 

1 


1 


1 

CO 


-1 

.s s 


•g 


1 


i 


1 


Anon 

Other offences . 


s 


H 




tH 


Oil 


00 


"* 


« 


CO 


t* 


00 


a o 


^4 


09 


00 


-* 


lO CO 


t<« 




o 


















^ 


fH 


fH 


•H 


tH 


fH ^ 


r4 









































Digitized by 



GoogI( 



234 



BSPOBT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTBATION 



I 

HA 

I 

<^ 



I 



1 
1 



3 






V 










pa 








Pending on 

1st April 

1885. 


00 O) lO 00 t^ ^ QO 00 i-l 0% 00 •^ »« T^ O) T^ r-f 30 
O) 00 r-H ^ O) CO 

• • A2 

• • «^ 

• • 


•-4 


i 

a 

P 

s 

i 

1 


fell 


•^ '^ Ol t^ i-l f-l t^ r^ r^ ^ Ol r-H iO 
»0 00 o« ^ »^ 

• • • a • • • 

• • • • • • • 

• • • a • m m 


P-4 


1 


fc^O Oi-* 0*» ^ OOO « 1-4 ,H i-l 00 
0« CM 


o 

1— I 


1 

si 


Od 00 fe^ CO p-l Gl 00 r-4 CO 


o 


i 


CO X 00 t^ Od CO <^ K^ <o Ol O "^ O) 00 -^ t^ BO 
1-^ OJ 00 "^ ^ lO 

•-• : : : •-• 

* • • 


^ 


1 


fe^ 00 CO O) lO Od t« t^ O) 00 t^ 93 Ol ^ O) 00 «o 
Ol P^r-t "^ 00 t^ T}» 

: : :«^ 

• 


CO 

o 




i 

4 

4 
B 

i 

•4 
O 


1 


P^0O0OOie*»O&00t^COO»^O00OOl«O^0OG0O» 
O)000diOO9iOO)04 r-iOolrHrHrH ^ 
i-H ^ 00 PH Ot^ 


1— • 

1 


1 

a 


OOCOfc^'i^'^QO%OOi'^0050*XQOi-40ao«OOflOr-H 




^ 


2.- 

8*^ 


OO r^ BO 00 00 »-l '^ Oi CO «0 CO Oi O fc* Pi t* Ol 0» 00 
aOCOOOBOrHX^-i'-^ OCi-^ r-H 

• 
• 
• 


1 


1 




• 

Hi 


Claim to villages 

Boundary disputes 

Chowdhrat 

Disputes regarding '' Bakam^' 

Division of property 

Land disputes • 

Settlement of accounts • 

Injury to fields 

Cattle grazing 

Stray cattle . . . 

Mutation of names 

Tanks and wells • 

Zemmdari cesses • 

Kiglits in drinking water 

Claim for subsistence ullowance 

Village Expense Fund dispute 

Division of grain 

Kight of preemption 

Customs 

Miscellaneous disputes • • , 






c 




i-«oioo^)0«Ofr«ooG&0'-<o)ooT^iOcot«ooado 

r-i rH r- 11 ^ i-j fi f-1 F-< PH Ol 





Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE BAJPUTANA STATES POB 1884-86. 



235 



Return of Casei insiUuted and disposed of in tie Thakur^s Court at Bikanir during tie year 

ending on the 31st March 1885, 



Fo. 



1 

a 

3 
4 
G 
6 
7 
8 
B 
10 
11 

la 

IB 
14 
15 



Hfttnreol Cmm* 



Tillage cUim , i , 
Latid diipuU) • i t 
Boundary diipate . • 

Settlenient of Acoonnti , 

« fiakftm" aod " PcshlMhi/' 4c 
Disputes about drinking-water 
In jnrj to Mdt . ■ 
YUlagG Expense Fond dbpnt« 
Adoption . 
Yalnatioti ot oropa 
DiTision of prop«rtj 
Cfhowdhrafc t 

DlviMon of villag« 
Cattle fraxltig * 
Miicellaneoai ea«ci 

T0TA14 



Ho. or qxflB«. 






£6 
63 
8S 

7 
26 

2 



197 



5 



126 

145 

5 

€0 
6 
2 

4 

a 

4 

a 

1 

19 



875 



-3 
I 



162 
210 

38 
7 

86 
7 
2 
8 
4 
8 
4 

10 
2 
1 

17 



572 



No. OV 0ASX8 DIBPOSBO OV. 



15 

16 



12 

1 



46 



43 
23 

2 

7 

1 



82 



13 
21 

1 
6 

1 



46 



I 



I 



£ 



I 

i 



14 
4 
2 



25 



I 



95 
144 

86 
8 

56 
4 
2 
2 
4 
2 
2 

10 

i 
1 

8 



864 



Statement of Cases instituted in, and disposed of by, tie Special Committee from 1st April 1884 to 

31st March 1885. 















How DIlFOaSD ov. 


i 














Ko. 


Hatveof Cum. 




1 


1 


5 


j 


1 


i 


1 


1 


•< 
S 


1 


Ownership of villages . 


• • • 


... 


111 


HI 


... 


••• 




... 


••• 


111 


2 


Land , 


• • • 


- 


27 


27 




;•• 




.., 


*•• 


27 


8 


Rekh Bakam 


• • • 


••• 


1 


1 


••• 


••• 




■•• 


».• 


1 


4 


Miscellaneoas debts, &o. 


• t • 
TOTlli 


• •• 


20 


20 


6 


... 




1 


... 


14 




*•* 


159 


159 


« 


.*• 




I 


... 


153 



80 
Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



236 



tiEXOSiT 07 THB POLITICAL ADMINIST&A.TI01T 



I 






I 



•itaioi 


g--..»««ao*,««^*oogg«-9.-. 


1 


TtWaapon 


mto m tH •« 


»H 


::::::::: ; : : : : : 


THuorni 


:::::::::;•:::::::;: 


: 


•nonoiBZ 


fH .H 
• ••.••••>■•••• • ••. 

.....•••&..•■. • ... 

■ ..•.•.•C.«.a. • ••. 


01 


•■qfnoni g 





09 


fqjnomf 


..:.. 


'• 


•■q|iioin» 


^ , . *'.,.**, .'^'^ .****.'■ .•^ 






•HfH 


09 


•«aXx 


•^ . . .^^ . . . .^^^ .^^^ .... 


' 9 


•iteXft 




I 


•weXIl 


^ ^ ; , , M ©no ^ ^ 


A 


•max 8 


... ^ ... . 




•aneXIs 





•H 


'uiaXs 


^^ . . .^ . . .'^ . .•^*' . . .*. 


00 • 


•sawXf 


»H ^ ^ ^ _e^ ^ 


» t 


- 1 ■ — ■ 

'uvaXff 


«*» ; i^*^ ;^ : :^ :::::::: : 


A 


•iltoX9 


i-I.Hi-H^^^_^,^^ "H 


"*. 


•araaXx 


0909 '*.'^.'^.'^.. , 


iH • 


»xwXb 


•-' ...:::*':::::::;:::: : 


•00 


•eneXe 


^ ^ I : : i : i :: i i ::•::: : 


•H 


•siwXoi 


04 

:::::::;*--'Ji?2«-: 


e<i 


•MiaX ZT 


"::::::::::::::::::: 


Od 


•M»9XfI 


":::";:::•:: = •::: I •: 


%a 


•ogiioj 


S :->::::::: J :::::::: : 


s 


1 . 




1 


' 


Murder • 

Dakaiti . 

Poisoniog 

Thagi . > 

Forgery ... 

Rebellious conduct 

Dharna . 

Highway robbery 

Disobedience 

Abortion 

Rape 

Mutibitioxi 

Abduction 

Burelary . 

Theft of property 

Theft of cattle . 

Grievous hurt . 

Suicide 

Sale of children . . 

Embezzlement « 


si 


^^•«^««i>««gMgg2jg3J.g2g 





'1:1 
I" 






I 



I 



cpi* 



a. 



S8|S| 



s 
5 



ll 



1^ 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



] 



or THE BAJFUTANA STATES VOtt 188i^. 23*^ 



i)&OLFOB£ AGEKCt KEl^OST FOS 1884-85. 



No. 3.P., dated Dholpar, SOUi May 188((. 
J^vKi^-CoLOHBL T. DiNHBi^T, Political Ageni^ Dholpur, 
Ih^The First AuiHant to the Agemt to the Oovermor-Ghneral Jbr Bc^fpfttana. 

I haVe tbd honor to submit the Administration Report of the Dholpnr State for the year 
1884.85. 

RAINFALL. 

2. The rainfall for the entire State was SO inches, which is considerably above the 
average. 

CROPS. 

The area nnder cultivation showed a large increase on the previous year; the crops 
were everywhere good, 

LAND EEVENUE. 

3. Thd amotmt of land revenue realised was Bs. 7,29^487 (seven lakhs twenty-nine thou- 
sand four hundred and eighty-seven rupees) including a sum of Rs. 44,000 (forty-four 
thousand rupees) of the arrears of 1883-84. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

4. The report on the Public Works Department of the State has been forwarded 
by Mn Gahan, Executive Engineer, direct to the Secretary to the Agent to the Governor- 
General in Rajputana in the Public Works Department, 

STATE QUARRIES. 

5. The State quarries have been during the year worked very satisfactorily under 
the orders of the Executive Engineer, Mr. H. H. Gahan, to whom Bis Highness the 
Maharaj Rana and the Darbar have again speciaUy requested me to convey their cordial 
acknowledgments. 

6. The demand for stone for building purposes has been steadily increasing. 

The supply of ballast to the East Indian Railway has been continuous, and the 
requirements of the Railway are such that a maintenance of the contract for several years to 
come may be confidently looked for. 

LAND MAAFI. 

7« I am now in a position to supply the exact figuree showing the details of the result of 
the enquiry into the land maafi tenures in the State. 

8. This enquiry was, as reported at the time, undertaken at the request of His Hic^hness 
the Maharaj Rana, by the Council of Dholpur and by me ; the oodolusions we arrived at have 
been ratified by His Highness and the Darbar, 

The appeals and petitions for revision of our decisions have been few and unimportant. 

9. The land held in maafi tenure was found to be comprised in 1,761 grants, real or suppo- 
sitious. 

In 41 cases one entire village or several villages was or were held by ui individual or by 
a religious institution. 

* In 1,720 cases the area held was less than an entire village. 

The amount of land thus alienated from the State revenue at different times had reached 
a total of 44,506 acres, the estimated revenue of which would amount to over Rs. 95,100 (Ru* 
pees ninety-five thousand) per annum. 

A large proportion of these alienations took place during the Government of the late Chief 
Maharaj Rana Bhogwant Singh. 

10. The results of our inquiry have been as follows :-— 

45,467 (twenty-five thousand four hundred and sixty-seven) acres have been confirmed to 
permanent religious endowments, and in hereditary payment or reward for State service. 

7,721 (seven thousand seven hundred and twenty-one) acres have been confirmed to different 
individuals for approved service in the State during the pleasure of the Chief. 

iiO A 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



S38 SEPOBT OP TRE POLITICAL ADHIKISTBATION 

5^873(five thousand eight hundred and seventy-three) acres, with an estimated value of 
Bs. 11,740 (eleven thousand seven hundred and forty rupees) yearly have been confirmed for the 
lives only of the present recipients, 

5,445 (five thousand four hundred and forty-five) acres, with an estimated value of Ss. 
10,900 (ten thousand and nine hundred rupees) yearly, having been found to be held without 
any justification, right, or title, have been resumed by the State. 

The inquiry was conducted throughout with the utmost leniency, and with an earnest 
desire to interfere as little as possible with existing claims. 

Doubt%l cases were decided in favor of the maafidar, and wherever even & shadow of a 
reason was shown the grant was confirmed for life to the present holders; possession for twenty 
years was, in the absence of any other proof, held to be sufficient to justify this privilege, 

12. A complete statement of the fact elicited and the final orders in each case have been 
registered in £nglish in a simple tabulated form, and indexed copies of these registers and 
indices are kept up in Urdu and in Hindi in the Baj offices. 

13. The advantage derived by the State from this inquiry, if taken in connection with the 
previous cash maafi iuvestigation, amounts to an immediate gain of Rs. 17,000 per annum, 
while the prospective increase of revenue will, within the next few years, reach a yearly sum of 
Rs. 34,400 (thirty-four thousand and four hundred rupees), 

GOVERNMENT LOAN. 

14. The yearly instalment of Rs. 1,00,000 (one lakh), with rupees 20,000 (twenty 
thousand rupees) interest, has been paid by the State and credited to Oovernment by a book 
transfer of the amount of the Government salt contribution, and a remittance in cash of the . 
balance to the Agra Treasury. 

SALT AGREEMENT. 

1 5. I have had every reason to be satisfied with the steps taken by the Darbar to ensure 
the observance of its obligations to Government under the salt agreement during the year under 
report. 

The enquiries made by the officials of the Customs Department of the Government of India 
also, I have been informed, cqnfirm this view, 

16. One case of smuggling is reported to have occurred, in which a chamar was convicted . 
of having illegally in his possession li seer of Khari salt; he was fined Rs. 10 and the salt 
was confiscated. 

17. The amount of salt known to have been imported during the year into the State was 
21,197 maunds, as compared to 25,497 maunds during 1883-84. 

I am still of the same opinion as stated last year. I have no reason to believe that the 
consumption of salt has diminished, and I am convinced that smuggling or illicit manufacture 
does not exist here. 

The facilities now afforded at the Agra Cantonment Railway Station have no doubt induced 
most travellers to Dholpur to make at that station small purchases of salt for family consuiinp. 
tion. 

The price of second class Sambhar salt has been for the whole State Rs. 3 and 5 pies per 
maund, or 13 seers and 3 chittacks for the rupee, slightly cheaper than last year. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND POLICE. 

18. Nineteen hundred and seventy-four (1,974) cases came before the Criminal Courts of 
the State in 1884-85. 

Nineteen hundred and thirty (1,930) cases are reported as disposed of, while 44 were pend- 
ing at the close of the year. 

19. The returns show a diminution in the number of crimes reported. 

Heinous crimes have decreased from 97 to 79 ; there is also a further decrease of cattle, 
thefts, which are 46 as compared to 59 in 1883-84. 

20. The decrease in the number of serious ofEences is a matter for congratulation, for the 
police have not proved efficient in dealing with the crimes that did occur. 

Of the 79 heinous ofEences reported convictions were obtained in 37, or 48 per cent. 
In thirty-one cases proof was forthcoming against offenders whose arrest the police did not 
succeed in effecting. 

In all 86 per cen{ of heinous crime was detected. 

Two cases were found to be false and in nine cases no clue was discovered* 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE &AJPUTANA STATES FOR 1884.85. 230 

Five individuals of notorionsly bad character were made to furnish security for good 
behaviour. The punishment of whipping was inflicted in 19 cases, 

21. I am constrained to remark that the police have been very unsuccessful in securing the 
punishment of offenders concerned in heinous crime j they have generally succeeded in establish- 
ing the identity of the perpetrators, but have generally failed in arresting them. 

The proposition which arrests bear to the number of persons concerned is only 466 per 
ceat' and the proportion of convictions to arrests is only 64 per, cent. 

The failure of the police in this respect was most <;onspicuous in cases of robbery, of cattle* 
theft, of theft with house-breaking, and of theft of property valued at more than Be. 100« 

These factp have been brought prominently to the notice of the Ds^bar. 

CASES OF MUBBEB. 

Hi I have to note the details ef one ca^e of murder which was reported in 1888-84, and 
of three cases which occurred during the year under rej)ort. 

IstCase. 

This crime (see 3rd case, paragraph 22 of last year's report) was committed by Aklay 
Brahmin and a party of six of his friends who carried off by force the daughter of Hurbuns 
Brahmin, after shooting one of her relatives who tried to oppose them. Four of the reported 
culprits were arrested last year; the remaining three were arrested in 1884-85. 

Of the seven, two died before the case was decided ; two were convicted ; and three were 
released for want of adequate proof, 

2nd Case- 
In consequence of the revival of a long-standing .feud, between Zora Singh, the Karinda 

of Thakur Durjan Singh of Bilanni, and Th»kur Maksudau Singh of the same village, two 

relatives of Maksudan Singh, Anegh Singh, and Sarwat Singh, shot and killed Zora Singh at 

Mauzah Khannote, 

The criminals, who had apparently made all preparations bef (Mrehand for escape^ at once fled 

before mea^res could be taken for their arrest. 

No certain clue to the place of their coiicealment has as yet been discovered. 

Their property has been placed under sequestration and every effort is' being made by the 

Darbar to effect their capture. 

Maksudan Singh, Arjun Singh, and Gobind Singb, who although not found to be actually 

concerned in the crime, are believed to have cpnnived at, and assisted in the escape of the 

offenders, have been placed under arrest and their'conduct is under enquiry, 

3rd Case. Dakaiti with Murder. 

A party of seven men of " Persadda's'' band of Mauzah Gorekha, Gwalior, plundered the 
house of Bamlal Bakal of Mauzah Sarani Sihera. 

The dakaits after killing the servant of the Bakal and wounding Ba^mlal himself, who 
collected a party to resist them, succeeded in getting away unharmed. 

The offenders are known, but the police have not as yet succeeded in effecting their 
capture. 

4th Case. Theft with Murder, 

Five men of the band of '' Pershadda'' (of Mauzah Gorekha in Gwalior) entered at night 
the enclosure of Ganesha Teli of Mauzah Sheregarh, and succeeded in carrying off three of 
his cattle. Ganesha, becoming aware of what was being done, at once pursued the thieves, and 
snatching a sword from one of them he killed him, dispersed the others, and recovered his 
cattle. 

Unfortunately the old father of Ganesha, whom he had sent to rouse the neighbours and 
bring assistance, came suddenly upon one of the thieves who was making his escape, and was 
killed by him. 

The arrest of the criminals has not as yet been effected. 

Ganesha has been conmiended and rewarded by the Darbar for his conducL 

DAEAITL 

23. The house of Jisukh Bania of Mauzah Bipperpur was also plundered by 10 men of the 
band of " Pershadda." 

The criminals got clear away with their plunder and have not yet been arrested. 



Digitized by 



;GoogI( 



240 BBPOBT or THB tOlATtOAL ABMXKtBTBATtOK 

The 2SemindarB of the neighbotiring Dholptur villages df Lohari and Sakatpor^ ad well ag, 
those of Bipperpur itselfi who failed to assist in refifisting the dakaits and in opposing their 
Yetreat, have been called to account and fined by the Darban 

24. I note that ** Pershadda, '^ who has long been a proclaimed offender otL accotint of the 
crimes he has eommitted in thi9 State^ made indirect overtures in 1883 to Hia Highness the 
Maharaj Bana, offering to surrender himself and to enter into engagements not to commit, or 
allow, his band to commit, any crime in the Dholpor State, provided iiiat a free pardon waa 
assured him for all his offences of past years. 

In reply His Highness caused him to be infonned that he wt)nld gnnrantee hint a fair trials 
for his former offences, but would enter into no engagement that pardon should be extended to 
him. 

This is doubtless the cause of the late persistent activity of '' Pershadda " and his band* 
Bis Highness is determined to spare no effort to effect the capture af thi^ notorious offen« 
der. 

BOBBEBT. 
1st Case. 

25. Hiralal.and Gobindram were proceeding with their friends to Mauzah SingaoU Ehurd 
in Uajakhera to uttend the marriage ceremony of the son of HiralaU 

They were stopped on the way by a party of six men^ who robbed them of property valued 
atRs. 481. 

The robbers have been identified as belonging to Mauzah Buar Barwai in Owalior. 
One of the six has been arrested and convicted. 

2hd Case. 

A Chamar of Mauzah Dhanaoli going to Mauzah Nyapur Was met by three men and strip- 
ped of his clothes and whatever property he had with him. 

The total loss amounted to a value of Rs. 7-8. No clue was obtained to the thieves. 

GENERAL W0RKIK6 OF THE STATE POLICE. 

26. On the whole the police^ although fairly successful in detection of crime^ have failed in 
effecting the arrest and conviction of criminalB. 

SINDIA STATE RAILWAY POLICE. 

27« On the Sindia State Railway the following cases were reported :— ^ 

TAe/L — Six cases Six persons concerned ; two arrested^ two convicted. 

Knowingly having pouession of slolen property, — One case. One person concerned; one 
arrested; one convicted. In one other ease a chacge u.nder this section was made^ but was 
subsequently withdrawn by the complainant. 

ffouse-breaiing. Two cases. Two persons concerned; no arrests or convictions. 

Cattle ire^pa^s. ^^One case. One person concerned^ one convicted. 

In all ten cases were reported^ in which ten persons were concerned^ four persons were con- 
victed. Six cases were either not detected^ or the criminal evaded arrest. The amouut of 
property stolen was Rs. 878 and ie^nnas 7, of which^ property to the the value of Rs. 180 and 
annas 15 was recovered. 

No accidents occurred on the line during the year: 

The Railway Police have had more cases than in previous years, and they have not been so 
successful in dealing with them. 

RELATIONS WITH NEIGHBOURING STATES. 

£8. The relations of the Darbar with the neighbouring States of Gwalior, Bhartpur, and 
Kerauli have been satisfactory. 

The Maharaj Rana paid in November 1884 a visit to the Maharaja of Bhartpur at his 
capital, and in February 1885 His Highness of Bhartpur accompanied Colonel Bradford to 
Dhol'pur, and marched as the guest of the Maharaj Rana through this State with this camp to 
Kerauli. 

I am glad to think these Chiefs, who are such near neighbours and connections, should 
have thus begun a cordial interchange of hospitality and friendship. 



Jail. 



JAIL. 

49. On the let April 1884 forty-eight prisoners were undei going sentence in the Dholpur 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB BAJPTJTANi. fiTATBB TOB. IBS4M. 241 

Sevaoty^teyen were admitted daring the year^ making, altogether 125^ of wliom &d were 
released on completion of sentence and 11 died; leaving a toi^ of 56 pnaoners remaining 
in jail on the Slst March 1885. 

SO, The number of deaths of pi^oners was large, but was not attribntable^ I think> to any 
special unsanitary condition of the jail or to the neglect -of any precaution there. 

There was a great deal of sickness, fever, dysentery, and cholera everywhere in the State 
during the past year, possibly brought on by the heavy and continuous rains which succeeded 
the comparatively dry seasons of the fouc previous years. 

DISPENSABIES AND VACCINATION. 

81. In the Dispensaries of Dholpur, Bajakhera, and Bari 24,890 patients were admitted 
and treated during the year. 

This is an increase of over 4,000 cases on 1888-84. Each of the three native doctors 
deserves credit for the way in which he has worked. 

The untiring devotion to his duty of Hospital Assistant Janki Persaud during the preva- 
lence of the cholera epidemic (which lasted from May to September) was beyond all praise. 

Janki Persaud performed his general duties of supervision with marked ability and success. 

82. In the months of January, February, and March, during the absence of Janki Persaud 
with the camp of Her Highness the Senior Maharani Saheba on pilgrimage to Jagannath 
Puri, Hospital Assistant Wazir-ud-din from the Agra Jail officiated in charge of the head- 
quarters at Dholpur. The zeal and efficiency shown by Wazir-ud-din has elicited an expression 
of marked approval from His Highness the Maharaj Rana. 

88. The number of vaccine operations was 7,396, a decrease of 187 on last year. The 
fluctuation is^ I think^ not of serious importance^ as I believe the work to be well and honestly 
done. 

84. The State Jail and Dispensaries were visited, and the vaccination operations in villages 
inspected in the beginning of 1885 by Dr. Spencer Deputy Surgeon.-Qeneral, Bajputana, whose 
Camp accompanied that of the Agent to the Governor-General in his tour through the State. 

86. The total cost of dispensaries and vaccination for the year amounted to Rs. 4,798. 

SCHOOLS. 

86. The attendence during the year under report at the schools shows a falling ofE 
from the numbers of boys entered in 1888-84. The decrease amounts to 74 for the eight 
schools of the State. 

This is due to three causes-* 

1#^.— The general and severe sickness which prevailed during the hot weather and rains 
of 1884. 

2nd. — ^The fact that although the amount of cultivation in the kharif months was abnor- 
mally large, the number of hands for work in the fields was, owing to this sickness, much 
smaller than usual, and all through the agricultural classes boys were kept away from school to 
assist in the fields. 

3rd.— The entire absence of returns from the Mania Tehsil School, the Master of which as 
noted in the renaarks of the statement annexed, chose to leave without permission or notice, 
carrying with him, or destroying before his departure all the returns of the school. 

It is much to be regretted that the average of attendance during the past year should have 
been thus so largely and injuriously affected, but the effect is only temporary, and could jiot, 
under the circumstances, have been avoided. 

87. In November 1884 the Maharaj Rana, accompanied by the Political Agent, had the 
honor of meeting at Agra the Marquis of Ripon, Viceroy and Governor-General of India, and 
of visiting and being visited by His Excellency. 

In January 1885 Colonel Bardfoi^, Agent to the Governor-General for Rajputana, visited 
Dholpur with his camp on his tour of inspection, and marched through the State to Kerauli. 

The ceremonies, salutes, and Peshwai usual on the occasion of a visit of the Agent to tha 
Governor-General were observed. 

In February 1885 Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Connaught honored 
the Maharaj Rana by a visit to Dholpur as guests of His Highness. 

The visit was entirely private and unoflScial, and honors and salutes were by desire of the 
Doke of Connaught, dispensed with except on the occasion of the arrival and departure of Their 
Royal Highnesses. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



242 BBPOBT'OF THE POLITICAL ADIflNISTRATlON 

The Senior Bani Saheba, C.I.^ of Dholpur went with a small camp in the beginning of 1886 
to visit Jagan nath Pari^ and other places of pilgrimage. Her Highness was absent during the 
months of January^ Febroary^ and March. 

S8« The members of the Council of His Highness the Maharaj Bana were for 1884-85 
the same as in the previous year^ viz.^^ 

(1) Thakur Bechu Singh, C.I.E., 

(2) Lala Sundar Lai, ^ 
(8) Lallu Lachman Singh. * 

39. The Administration has been carried on during the year on the 'same lines as before 
reported, and the kindly, honest, and manly cha^racters of the Chief affords a sure promise of a 
just and happy rule in the future. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB SAJPITTAMA STATES FOK 1884.8(. 



248 



S 









V 



;» 

e 



I 

V. 

as 






'ii»I0|i iiiMojd io raiv]^ 



'pMdAOO 

•« antio JO laqoiiiK 



i»{0|t aniw JO iaqnnii S 







of 



^ ; 



I 






3 



i 



: § » I I § 



S 



'Xifobua pmr \v[J!\ 
lopmi Xn*nio« taipmj 



I^IMUt^O^ 



•poninboy 



•p»|0|Aao3 



-|N»98auY 






lO 00 



M 00 eo 



m j 09 ^ 

m rl f-l 



- s 



*paiuaoiioo mi 09 pModdng 



aapon Xn«ii|ov Soipua^ 



•80U« oa 'p9909)»p »ox 



•p»nfnb0Y 



•« 2 S 



S S 



S 



S 



S 



»M1«J 



•(9 poi *« "f 
■onmiooio i«|oi) peioa^aa 



••1»»8 



ndiowa 0i|) o) Jiaiiab[ 



n8]9iO£ o| Sii|]Baoi 
-9q «l«vi n aivaiuifjo 
HupilN P^iqtiqo jowj 



•ptWAHoO 



*8 ptn I ■naraioo jo iv^ox 



'fl8-f88l Soi^np P9UD0OO 



■jraaX 9t*i JO ooatjig 



o 

s 

I 



i 



ffH •i4 ^ M 



3 



00 le M 09 



f-4 t« M 



a 



0« 09 0» 



r4 ^ ^ 01 ^ 



a 



8 



09 iH ffH p^ 



9 



A 00 01 00 



8 



^ 



1 

I 






I "8 a 



I 






5 » 

ill 



i 



I 



H 



ffH Oil 00 



le CO t« 00 oa o ^ 



81 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



244 



REPOET OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 



APPENDIX B. 

Jiehirn of Dholpur Jail from 1st April 1884 to Sltt March 1885. 





Namber of pri- 
soners in Jail on 
the 8l8t Blarcb 
188. 


is 

52 


1 


•s-g 


§1 
III 


BlMABKS. 


Imprisonment for life . 

Prifloners stfntenoed to impriflonment 
from 5 to 14 years . 

Prisoners sentenced to imprisonment 

Prisoners sentenced/o impritonment 
for a year .... 

Prisoners sentenced to imprisonment 
.under a year 


6 

9 

15 

10 

9 


Tl4 

15 
10 
62 


8 
SO 

20 
61 


1 

1 
10 

10 

47 


4 

B 
30 
10 
14 


3d prisoners were employ- 
ed on extramural labor. 

23 prisoners were employ- 
ed on intramural labor. 


Total 


48 


77 


125 


69» 


66 


• Of these 58 were re- 
leased on completion of 
sentence and 11 died. 



APPENDIX C. 

Return of Bholpur ScJwolifor 1884 85 from 1st A^ril 1884 to 31st March 1885. 







NlTMBBS OV SOHOLAM. 


i 




Monthly expendi. 
Ut«. 




HlADB. 


5 


i 
1 

a 


a 


Expendituw in- 
curred daring tht 
year. 
















Bs. a. p. 


Rs. a. p. 




Dholpur City School .... 


19 


60 


87 


106 


7 


106 4 


1,230 




Old Chaoni Branch School . 


... 


27 


28 


65 


2 


80 


860 




Mama Tehsil School .... 


••• 


No return 


^» 










Bajakhera TehsU do. 


«■• 


25 


23 


48 


2 


20 8 


246 




Bari do. do. . 




31 


68 


99 


2 


22 8 


270 


6 


Baseri do. do. . 


... 


... 


26 


26 


1. 


8 8 


102 


7 


Kolari do. do. . 


... 


... 


22 


22 


1 


6 8 


78 


8 


A.ngai do. do 

Total 


... 


... 


84 


34 


1 


6 8 


66 




19 


133 


238 


890 


16 


199 12 


2,852 



' ■"" ^/SSfLliSt Ji?S5.''iH'i? ^^"^^ ^f • " ^^'^J? *PP^' ^ *^« *^*^i* ^ **l^l»9 ^^«»«- Oa wmonstranoe being nude to him 
this aocoant he left withoat permusiou or notice taking with him or destrojhig th?papera or retoms of tSwTSjhoS! 



Dholpub Agbnct, 
Tie 30ih May 1885. 



1} 



(Sd.) T. Dbnneht, Colonel, 
Folitical Agents 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB BAJPTTTANA STATES TOR 1884-8*. **^ 



BEFOBT ON THE HATO COLLEGE, AJHEKB, FOB 1884-85. 



Kames of new idmimons. 



No. 105, duted Ajmeve, Irt May 1886. 
JVoM— Major Wiluaic Loch, Principal of the Mayo College, Ajmere, 
To-^Tke Firei Assistant Agent to the Oovemor-Qeneral in Eajputana. 

I have the honor to submit, for the information of the Agent to the Govern- 
or-General and Chief Commissioner, a report on the Mayo Cpllege for the 
past year (1884-85). 

2. The number of pupils on the College roll, according to my last report, was 08. Thir- 
Number of inipils at iMt report. teen new boys joined during the year under report making a 
AdmiBBiont daring the year. total o£ 81. 

The withdrawals during the year were 7, thus leaving 74 remaining on the college list, 
Withdrawala. which is the highest number ever attained, and which I hope 

Nmnber of boys remaining on niay be viewed as indicative of the increasing prosperity and 
college roll. popularity of the institution. 

8. The names of the new boys who joined are as 
follows : — 

1. Muhamniad Karamat-ul-lak Elhan, third eon of Muhammad Hafiz-ol-lah Khan of Tonk. , Joined 7th 

July 1884. 

2. Jai Singh, Thakar of Salpnr, Alwar. Joined 7th July 1884. 

3. Mor Singh, Thakur of Deolia, Ajmere. Joined 6th August 1884. 

4. Muhammad Shumah-ud-din Ali Khan, Nawab of Eumharbay, Ajmere. Joined 15th September 1884. 
6. Onkar Singh, second son of Apji Amar Singh of Palaita, Kotah. Joined 10th November 1884. » 

6. Muhammad Abdul Hafiz Khan, eldest son of His Highness the Nawab. of Tonk. Joined 24th November 

1884. 

7. Bhawani Singh, brother of the Thakur of Sangod, Eotah, -Joined 4th December 1884. 

8. Sagat Singh, son of the. Thakur of Jasana, Bikanir. Joined 8th December 1884. 

9. Muhamlnad Abdul Sami Khan, nephew of His Highness the Nawab of Tonk. Joined 10th December 

1884. 
10. Muhammad Ismali Ehan, nephew of His Highness the Nawab of Tonk. Joined 10th December 1884. 
' 11. Debi Singh, Thakur of Sangod, Kotah. Joined 18th December 1884. 

12. Hari Singh, Thakur of Sidhmukh, Bikanir. Joined 30th December 1884. 

13. Mul Singh, Maharaj of Dattigaon, Central India. Joined 28th January 1884. 

. , , , 4. The boys who left the College were :— 

Names of withdrawals. *' ^ 

1. Karan Singh, son of the Bao of Bedla, Meywar. Left on attaining his minority. 

2. Durjan Sal, Thakur of Bilouni, Dholpur. Left also for the above reason. 
3! Muhammad Hidayat-uUah Khan of Tonk. Withdrawn by his father. 

4. Takht Singh, Rao of Barwarra, Jaipur. Left at the desire of the Darbar. 

6. Bijaya Singh, Thakur of Gagaru, Jaipur. Left also for the above cause. 

e! Sultan Singh, Thakur of Marot, Marwar. Lefli on account of advanced age. 

7. Sheo Singh, Thakur of Khera, Meywar, who being a petty jagirdar subordinate to Bedla was compelled 

to leave owing to financial difBculties in meeting the necessary College expenses after the departure 
of the Rao's son. 
Distribution of the College roll on 5. The College roll is now divided as follows :- 

1st April 1885. 

Ajmere . . • • -12 boys. 

Benares i " 

Bikanir i " 

Central India . • • ' li " 

Jaipur 2 " 

Jhallawar i " 

Kerauli i " 

Kishengarh J " 

Kotah 7 w 



Marwar . 

Meywar . 

Pertabgarh* 

Punjab 

Sirohi 

Tonk 

Ulwar 



Total 



10 


boys 


6 


« 


1 


II 


2 


I* 


.1 


M 


8 


** 


6 


»f 


74 boys. 



6. Accommodation still exists in the Jhallawar, Kotah, Marwar, and Meywar houses, which 

I am led to hope may be filled in part during the ensuing 
Vacancies still remaining. year. 

7. The States remaining now unrepresented are those of 
States remaining unrepresented. ganswara, Bhartpur, Bundi, Dholpur, Dungarpur, and Jeysal- 

mere. 

»1a 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



246 BBPOET or THE POLITICAIi ADMINISTRATION 

8. I am glad to be able to report the prospect of two new boys joining from the Kerauli 

State, and I am not without hope that the son of His High- 
Rpogpect of new boy. joining. ^^ ^^^ ex-Amir of Kabul may be permitted to join the 

institution also during the ensuing autumn. 

9. It is with pleasure I am able to report increased punctuality in the return of the boys 

from their summer vacation on the 7th of July last year. 
Betnm from Tacation. 

On the opening day there were 44 boys present, being an improvement of 7*13 per cent, 
on the previous year's attendance. 

10. The conduct of the boys both in and out of College has been on the whole most satis- 

factory, and I would specially bring to notice the conduct cf 
Maharaj Zaiim Singh, brother of His Highness the Maharaja 
of Jodhpur, who has for the third time been selected fer the Good-conduct Prize since its 
establishment in 1881. The winner of this reward is, as previously reported, chosen by the 
boys themselves, subject to my own concurrence. The uuinterrupted good behaviour of 
Maharaj Zalim Singh has been fitly appreciated by the boys in their selection of him again for 
the past year. 

The conduct of the following boys is also worthy of special report :— - 



Kanwar Gaj Sineh of Bandanwara. 
Tika Balbir Singh of Faridkot. 
Thakur Earan Singh of Jobnlr. 
Thakur Lachman Singh of Bagsnri. 



Eanwar Bijaya Singh of Delwara. 
Thaknr Phal Singh of Para. 
Maharaja Madhav Singh of Gainta. 
Maharaja Man Singh of Fatehgarh. 



11. The health of the boys has been excellent, three mild cases of chicken-pox being the 

only sickness worth recording. In each instance the boy was 
immediately isolated, and all fear of contagion reduced to a 
minimum. The daily average number of sick was *74 against 1*38 of last year. 

12. In the daily average number of boys on the coUege roll there is a considerable 
DaUy average number of boys on improvement, the number being 70-64 against 64*12 in the 

College roll and present at College. preceding year. There is also an increase in the number of 
boys present in College, the daily average being 59*30, whilst in 1883-84 it was 58*37. 

18. There has been no change in the College ciirriculum with the exception of more time 
0,jj^^^^^j having been allotted to the instruction of colloquial English. 

14. I beg to attach a Progress Report (Appendix E) for the terms commencing 4th 

p^^^^^ January, and ending 24th December 1884, and I would pro- 
minently bring forward the following boys as having worked 
with much industty and perseverance :•— 

Maharaj Zalim Singh of Jodhpnr. Kanwar Jai Singh of Kotara, Zotah. 

Kaowar Gai Singh of Bandanwara. Thaknr Sham Singh of Raghnnathgarh, Ajmere 

Thakur Lachman Singh of Bagsnri. Bana Zorawar Singh of Lohiani^ and Kanwar 

Kanwar Bijaya Singh of Delwara. Rip Mai Singh of Riyan/ 
Eanwar Dalpat Singh of Manadar. 

15. The prizes for 1888, which had been withheld at the request of the boys su9 mentioned 

Prijos. ^^ paragraph 15 of my last year's report, I considered undesir- 

able to retain further, and the ceremony of their distribution 
took place on the closing day of the last term. 

In reviewing the prize list for that year {vide Appendix P. attached to this report) I 
would solicit the Agent to the Govemor-Qeneral's favorable commendation towards Kanwar 
Gaj Singh of Bandanwara, to whom I had the pleasure of presenting His Excellency the 
Viceroy's gold medal. His conduct at all times and in all places is most exemplary. This 
boy also received a prize for English, one for History and Geography, and the fourth the 
holiday task prize. 

To Thakur Bijaya Singh of Gagaru and Kanwar Zorawar Singh of Dudiali, who have 
both left the College since, five prizes were awarded to each. 

Maharaj ZaUm Singh of Jodhpur, Sahibzadah Muhammad Abdul Kuddus Khan of Tonk 
and Thakur Sham Singh of Raghunathgarh, gained four prizes eaoh. 

Thakur Lachman Singh of Bagsuri was the winner of three and each of the foUowini? 
boys obtained two rewards :— ^ 

Thakur Durjan Singh of Jaoli (since left the College). 
Thakur Sawai Singh of Chamrawali. 
Rao Sheonath Singh of Ahmet. 
Kanwar Bijaya Singh of Delwara. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE KAJPUTANA STATES POK 1884-86. 247 

^EAnwar Dalpat Singh of Manadar^ and 

Tbakor Daulat Singh of Khora. 

One prize was also awarded to each of the following boys :— 

Sahibzadah Muhammad Abdul Alim Khan of Tonk (since left the College' , for Persian. 

Thakur Madhav Singh of Bijwar (also left the College)^ for Historjr and Geography. 

Kanwar Birbhadra Singh of Benares^ for English. . 

Thakur Phul Singh of Para^ for the holiday task. 

Thakor Simbhu Singh of Awa and Kanwar Jai Singh of Kotara^ both for athletic 
g^ames. 

Thakur Debi Singh of Palwa, for English. 

Thakur Kalian Singh of Pansal^ for the same subject. 

Thakur Bijaya Bahadur Singh of Piplaj^ for Hindi. 

16. During the year under report {i.e.f with effect from July 1st, 1884) an important change 

occurred in the organization of the Public Works System 
PQblic Work. Department. ^^^j^ j^ ^iQen in force since 1871, by the abolition of the 

Mayo College Public Works Division, and the transfer of all works, both Imperial and contribu- 
tional, to the charge of the Principal of the College. 

This although devolving considerable extra work on that officer gives him a further in- 
terest in his present most interesting work, and to me personally the additional duties are 
most engaging. 

The pay of the small establishment which it is necessary to retain is first met from contri. 

butional works, a charge of 12 per cent, on all outlays of 
Imperial Workf. Imperial Works being refunded by the Public Works Depart- 

ment. 

17. The Mayo College is complete, and I venture to hope that circumstances may permit 
Government Bundings, The Mayo of the building being opened with a suitable ceremony in the 

College. course of the autumn. 

18. The quarters for the Head Clerk and Accountant, Riding Master, and Hospital Assist. 

ant remain in the same incomplete state, but prior to the opening 
Quarters for College Officiak. . ^f ^jj^ College, I hope that the small court-yards containing the 
necessary out-houses may have been provided. 

^ , -, , 19. The Ptok Roads are in fair order. 

Park BoacU. 

20. The repairs done last year to the facing wall of the racket court have not proved satis- 

factory, and I fear that until the vertical stone slabs origin. 
Contributional Works. ^^Ij erected and clamped together with an iron girder be entire- 

CoUege Building.. Racket Court j^ removed, all patching will be useless. I hope I may be in 
a position to dismantle the above work and substitute chisel-dressed stone. 

21. The Kotah Residence is almost completed, and the wall for which the Darbar kindly 

sanctioned an outlay of Rs. 800 is being pushed on. 
Durbar Buildings. Eotah Besidenee. 

During the course of the year two members of the Kotah Council visited the College, and 
certain additions, which they recommended for the comfort and convenience of the boys and 
th^r followers, met with the approval of the Political Agent, and the necessary plans and 
estimates are in course of preparation. 

22. The additions to the Tonk Boarding-house have been 
Tonk Residence. finished, and are a very great improvement. 

23. The Dholpur Residence has not been commenced, but 
Dholpur Besidenoe. I g^j^ daily expecting the supply of the necessary funds. 

a. The Jodhpur Durbar has again considered the convenience of the Marwar pupils and 

generously sanctioned the construction of a new wash-house 
Jodhpur Residence. j^j, ^j^^ boys, and additional out-houses and retiring accommo- 

dation for their servants. The original servants' quarters have been further improved by the 
provision 0:6 slab flooring round the court-yard enclosure. The Boarding-house itself has also 
had slight improvements added to it. 

25. The Meywar Darbar has kindly sanctioned in the Udaipur Residence the substitution 

of red sandstone slabs for the terrace flooring in the upper 
• TJdaipur Besidenoe. ^^^ j^^^j verandahs; and the replacement of the present 

stucco jalis by stone ones. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



248 BBPOET OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTEATION 

T?«ti«,ate8 for two more permanent improvement which His Highneae the late Midiarawa 
deaixTtot^^ r-S. by reqnes? of U.e Resident, be shortly submitted for favorable 

consideration* « j • v 

26 OfthelSbiffhaaandUbivswasoflandreinainingtobeaxKimredasrepo^ 

26. Of the lb bignaa ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ 1883.84,1 bigha and 9 biswas and a weU 

College Grounds. have been purchased at a cost of Rs. 870, and a sum o£ R8.906 

has been expended in levellmg the ground and fencing in the entire extension. 

27. The Alwar Gateway is steadily progressing, and although the date of its anticipated 

completion is passed, thera is a considerable quantity of 
Alwar Gateway material ready for use, and steps have been taken to ensure>he 

early supply of the remaining stones required for its construction. 

Our apologies are already due to His Highness the Mahatao R«aof Alwar for the non- 
completion of the work by this date, but I trust within a few months I may be in a position to 
send a satisfactory report to His Highness. 

28. The section of the temple remains, I regret to say, still uncommenced, as I am sorry 

to state all my endeavours to purchase the required land at nor 
The Temple. ^^^^ ^ reasonable but at a liberal cost have failed, and I fear 

there is but little hope of the ownfer coming to terms within a reasonable period. 

29. Their Highnesses the late Maharana of XJdaipur, the Maharajas of Jaipur and 

Kishengarh, and the Rajah of Paridkot were amongst out 
ViritofB. visitors, the above list being further supplemented by Lord 

Randolph Churchill, who with Sir Lepel Griffin inspected the institution with the greatest 
interest, and expressed their pleasure in the most cordial terms. 

80. I have the greatest pleasure in reporting the further 
®^*^ handsome gift of Rs. 2,000 by His Highness the Maharao 

Rajah of Alwar as supplementary to his already most liberal present of Rs. 10,000, which is 
being expended, as mentioned above, on the approach gateway. With the help of this addition- 
al sum, several improvemente in the original design have been effected, and some unavoidable 
extra expense formerly incurred covered. 

81. I have the honor to attach a statement showing the 
^"^^^^ financial working of the institution during the year under 
Income for the put jeBi. ^^^^ ^^^ (Appendix G) . 

82. The total receipts during the year amounted to Rs. 
Total BeoapU. 85,097-12-1, against Rs. 29,881-18-8 of the last year. 

88. Of this amount, Rs. 5,050-9-9 are the sale proceeds of Government promissory notes 
Extraordinary Beceipt to meet Special for Rs. 5,100 sold to meet the payment of a special gratuity 
Gratuity. of Rs. 5,000, thus leaving the normal receipts at Rs. 30,047-2-4 

Amonnt of N<»iDal BeoeiptB. the details of which are herewith subjoined : — 

(a) The interest on the Endowment Fund notes amount. 

Interest on Endowment Fund Notee. ^ ^ ^^ 25,121-0-8 against Rs. 24,905-9-8 in the last year, 

the increase being due to the purchase of promissory notes for Rs. 7,200, as mentioned in my 

last report, and the sale of Rs. 5,100 during the latter* portion of the late financial year as 

Specified in the preceding paragraph* 

(b) The contributions consist of a subscription of Rs. 50 per annum levied from each 
Contributions from Natiye States and boy for (i) the maintenance of the Subordinate Medical 
Private persons. Establishment (Hospital Assistant and Dresser); (ii) the pay 

of the Racket Marker, Lawn Tennis boys, &c., &c.; and (iii) the supply of all class books, school 
stetionery, playthings of every description, as well as all medicines (including surgical instru- 
mente) that may be requisite for the boys themselves and their followers. 

Under this head is further entered the receipts from sale of -class books and stationery 
purchased by boys or others for private use. 

The total receipte of these two items amounted in the year under report to Rs. 8,726-1-8, 
against Rs. 8,654-11-6 in 1888-84, the increase being due to an increase in the number of boys. 

{c) The Conservancy and Garden Receipts reached Rs. l,20o 
Conserrancy and Garden Beceipte. ^^^ ^ ^^ 1,012-9-6 of last year. 

84. The Balance in the Ajmere T;«asury on the 1st April 1884, was Rs. 1,054-4-2, adding 

to which the year's receipte, extraordinary and n<»*mal, vig 
Total Assets of past year. j^ 85,097-12-1, made the total a?sete available for expenditur^ 

amount to Rs. 86,152-0-8. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE RAJPUTAKA STATES POE 1884.86. 249 

35. The expenditure during the year amounted to Rs. S2,560«14*5, against Rs. 28,898«5»6 in 

1888-84, the increase being chiefly due to the abnormal pay- 
Actual expenditure, ^^j^^ ^jf gg^ g^QOQ ^^ account of the gratuity previously 

specified. 

86. Deducting the above expenditure from the total assets a balance of Bs. 3,591-1-10 

remains in the Ajmere Treasury as per certificate attached and 
Baknoe on Irt April 1886. ^^^^ Appendix H. 

AdditioDB and alfteratioufl to ertab- 87, The following additions and alterations were made to 
lithment. ^^ establishment during the year :— 

(a) Owing to the resignation of the Second Master, Mr. J. M. Carter, funds were 

rendered available for the entertainment of two new masters and the saving of 
Rs. 200 per mensem under head '^ Masters and Teachers.'' 

(b) The services of a master temporarily entertained as reported in paragraph 36 b. of 

last year's report were permanently sanctioned. 

{e) Under the head " Servants " there was an increase of 3 Oate-keepers, 1 Chowkidar, 
1 Watchmaker, and 1 Waterbearer, necessitating an additional monthly charge 
of Rs. 28 in the aggregate. 

{d) Although there was no increase in the '* Police Guard Establishment, " an extra 
expenditure of Rs. 3-6 per mensem was caused in consequence of the enhanced 
salary of Constables from Rs. 6 to 7, involving an additional contribution towards 
their pension. 

(e) Under head " Conservancy and Garden Establishment " new appointments of 1 
Gardener on Rs. 8 per mensem, 2 Bhistis on Rs. 12 and 6 respectively, 1 
Gardener, 2 Conservancy Coolies, and 2 Sweepers on Rs. 5 each, as well as an- 
increase in the pay of 1 Bhisti from Rs. 8 to 6 are shown. These additions 
amount to Rs. 54 monthly. 

(/*) The return of 3rd Class Hospital Assistant Guhbur Singh from leave caused a de- 
crease of Rs. 80 per mensem in the Book, Play, and Medical Fund Establish- 
ment, his locum tenens having been a Native Doctor of the 1st Grade. 

^ ^ , ^ 88. The estimated receipts for the year • 1886-86 amount 

Eabmated receipt, for ensuing year. ^^^^^^^^^ 

The following are the alterations when compared with last year's budget :— 

(a) An increase of Rs. 260 under '' Contributions " in consequence of an increase in the 
number of boys. 

(i) An increase of Rs. 400 under head *^ Conservancy and Garden Receipts " in conse- 
quence of the income derived from the land purchased out of the savings from 
the Mayo Memorial Fund, and therefore, 

(c) A corresponding decrease of the same amount occurs under the head '' Interest on 

Mayo Memorial Fund Government Securities. " 
(i) From the '' Interest on Government Securities " a deduction of Rs. 204 has been 
made, being the amount of interest accruing from the value of the notes sold. 
^Brtin«t. expenditure for ««aing ^^ ^^ estimated expenditure amounts to Es. 87,776. 

(a) A decrease of Rs« 1,000 under head '^ Salaries and Establishment^" when compared 
with last year's budget^ is due to the additions and alterations in the estabUsh- 
ment> as explained in paragraph 87 of this report. 

\p) The contingent charges are unchanged. 

iu«^ Imnerial Works. ^^' I beg to attach a statement (Appendix E)^ showing 

zpeodi ore on penai ^^ expenditure on Imperial Works in the Mayo College 

during the year under report. 
41. Appendix L contains in detail the transactions on accoxmt of contributional works 
IViinflactiona on acoonni of contri- from 1st July 1884^ the date of their transfer to the Frinci- 
bntional work*. pal of the CoUege, to the end of the financial year. 

liUt of appendices. The following appendices are attached :^ 

A.-— List of pupils in the Mayo College on the 27th March 1885. 
B.— Examination marks from January to December 1884. 
C— Class marks from January to December 1884. 
D.^— ^Holiday task marks for vacation 1884. 
i;..i.Progress report from 4th January to S4th December 1884. 
Fif— Prize list for 1888. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



25.0 REPORT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINISTRATION 

O. — Comparatiye statement of income and expenditure during 1884-85 and 1886-86. 

H. — ^Treasury Officer's certificate of balance in the Mayo College Fund on 81st March 
1884. 

J.— 'Budget estimate of ordinary income and expenditure for 1 886-86. 

K.— Statement showing expenditure on Mayo College Imperial Works during 1884-85^ 

L. — Statement of transaction on account of contributional works from Ist July 1884 to 
SUt March 1885. 

. 43. In again bringing to the Agent to the Oovernor-OeneraPs favorable notice the con- 
Ser * f th taff tinned excellent services of Mr. J. W. D. Johnstone^ the 

Head Master^ it is with great regret that I have to report the 
conclusion of tliat geirtleman's service with the Mayo College. During the 8i years that it ha6 
been my pleasure to be associated with him I have received at all times his uninterrupted and 
cordial assistance. 

In his new appointment of Principal of the Residency College at Indore^ to which he was 
nominated from the let of February, he carries with him the undivided good wishes of the entire 
College. 

(a) — I have much pleasure in testifying to the very conscientious manner in which Mr. J. 
M. Carter performed his duties during his service of nearly nine years at the Mayo College. 

His resignation of the Second Mastership was accepted with efEect from Ist January 1885. 

{b) — In tendering my thanks to the other members of the Educational Staff for their co* 
operation during the year^ I would specially mention Pandit Sheo Narain apd Munshi Sheo 
Pratap^ for the zeal and pleasure with which they executed much extra work which I demanded 
of them on several occasions. 

{c) — I would also thank Babu Amar Sin^^h and Munshi Ram Chandra, the MokiamidM 
attached to the Meywar and Tonk Houses respectively, for their ready assistance in teaching 
during the absence of any master on the permanent staff due to sickness or any other unavoid- 
able cause. 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THB BAJTXJTANA 8TATB8 POE 1884-85' 



261 



_^ ^ « 00 qo 00 00 Op 00 



222S2S2222Sa2222S 22 2252222222222222222 



JS 



5J8- ^. .9,^ 

^ O >^ 'tJ 'O i-a TS tJ ^ 



a o'd gjjft^ -b . |)d I 3 



-~6 o 






_^_^C'^^<«^'^-«A *» .*^ •*•» -^t *^ -4^ .ta ^*» '^ 



.2 

-I 




^4 






I gl'J i cJ o <5-344 






•.a 



I 



.-a 



-a 

a 

11 



L-l- 



d 

bill's -S 
^36-3 I g^ 

^ ad d je^-S 

5 cgcg ^nSg 



6 

" OS 

•5? 

OS 










2222£:NSH2^S2SSe3rtSpH(M «rH «««-.-Hrtr^-4-Hrtr-.^rHrt«rH-,^ 



4 

•1 J -it- 

.1 i,--B. 

* d o 1^ 

^.5: ^ cu . .^ffi . 

1 1 nni-^^tii-re.i ^a ^* |i3 ill 'fii ^ 



I 



-a, 

a 



— - boVc -^ ^ c .5 -^ vs? ^ r7i ^ -c a3 ^ 






-a 






a.5S»''^.sg^^ssp^ 



23r^13|»|s5 



g^ ea •* ^ 






^4Ncg£cgocZsSoSH2Qas 



^(N0QTfOC0t*00C»O;Hg23»22t^2 




Digitized by 



GoogI( 



262 



BEPOKT OF THB 70LITIOAL ADMIKIBTBATION 



2S GO OO OO go 00 c 
00 00 00 00 00 00 c 



2SSSS9S<^ SSS9SSS9SSS ooooodaoSoo^SSSS^xS^Sjo 

300000000 OD 00 00 W 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 W 00 00 00 00 00 00 CO 00 00 00 00 00 



I 

1^ 



i 



I OB -AS 

>^ 00 



I 



l<4£6 



t:* T^ ^ to :S :5 5 
e a b^oooooi 

G4 C4 CO CO C4 (N ^ 






1^ 



.-^ o5 ^ "^ t* t* ?o ^ ^ ^ ^ 5g S S S « 




o 

J §2 2 § 



s lit 

•'^ rii 



■i. 






(jq"^CCC0C0'^»O^O1»Hi-i^CO Oii-iOOt^CO'*"^ 04>OO^»-l(MOi'^0000C0000S«-i00C0 
i-« rH i-l ^H r-l f-H f-H ^H i-l 1-4 r-l <-! ^ rH ^ r-l f-< i-l f-l rH i-l ^ rH iH i-l i-l i-l ,-» ,H 



I 






OS'S 



-S S 5 ^ d.2a 
' 0-1 






g 5 s o o i_i^ 



sl-s 






^^ !r. 






4 -2 fl M 



j«< e 



08 



mSc3 



I 






a 

cs 



e8 
Jrt ^ • • • 

•• • -i • • I^s-^i • i • • •■el„'S 

• • -^ • • • • • - -S^ ^ • ^ •• • J SmJ -^ ^ • • « i 

o^S "rf355 *»S « 2A« 2 .* « * 2 SS !5.S a .S =? = *?- ja J - gate's 

s .2 s.s ft g.ss s-g s« o s S fc o S"! s-g.s c> o=l -J-«"-!?a x-jf ^ „• 

I - S § ' 
w • •J'S • -g •« • -S 

M 3 • -.24 • •" -ffi • • §d • • • 






1 


%" 


§ 


•!S> 


o 


^ 


1 


n 




8 


•«' 


h) 


.& 


s 




;3 


«i; 



^ 



'T3 



i* 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE EAJBUTANA STATES POjE .188«6. 



nriQ DM tMtrji nioi ojmo 



8 



£ 



§S2 
32 



) Oft l> r^ <D ^ to 



Si 



» eo CO 



^ 



£ 



IS 



•Mild 



•onox 



pot ■pjgg H>QC2 Ji9qaiao0(i 



*f88l 



>88i 'qw pw 'qw 'qu ^n»r 



•W8I 
*qi« pw *qiW *pa« qoww 






£ 



I 






O.;0 00 



8 



.O CD CO *^ t^ »o '^ 
•^ "^ I-* CO « »-l •-• 



aOQQCO ^CD:$ 00 



»o eo -g 
coco g 



5- 



8 



8 SS3 ^^SSSsSSjs 



SCO ^ 
%a 00 



N O ^ fc* 

*«*< 0) M eo 

CO •-» iH iH 



S%S9 






'N 



'WMlMd 



•c 



•TTXOX 



Sop 99 CO 
^ CO »H 



r» ^ o 00 CO « li 

00 ^ O) t^ O) O) CO 






•W8l 'qiW 
pot 'pj83 'pees joqmaood 



8 S: 



f«8I 
npflj pot «qjf« 'pjgg jraqoioo 



S MM 






kO \0 00 oo CD ''^ 00 
CO « ^ JS iH 1-^ 



f88i 'qw pw» 'qw 'qiii ^cnr 



•W8I 
'q^K puti 'qiw 'pnK qax«H 



S 3 



>kO kO 09 69 O 
I 04 00 Osl 04 ^ 

a 



O lA 0) CO 



fc*. CO t» CO »o '^ -S 



'ixraj 



•TTIOX 



\0 09 CO r-i 



00 CO <« t^ 03 '^ 04 
04 Q O 00 CO I-- -^ 
CO ^ 03 04 04 04.04 



•^ ^ 04 
CO"* ^ 



•W8I 'q^w 

pot •P'S? *P^8 aaqtodoaa 



•W8I 
'qig« pnB 'q^f? *pittf iaqcnaQ 



•W8I *q»6 pw *qw '^M k^£ 



8 00 "* 



O 1^ r-l P 



o ^oo^» 



S 



O 00 CO 04 CO O 
O t* •-< t» 00 0> 



f88I 

*mn pw» 'vw *p°«2 qwji 



'CZMd 



TTXOX 



f88i *q^w 

pot 'pJK 'paw loqraaooa 



f88I 

•q»« pwi 'q^frK 'P'sz wqo^oo 



f88i 'qw pu« *q?8 •qiii ^i^r 



*fS8l 
'qWZ pa» *q^t8 *P^Z qareH 



S 8 O 04 



gg882ggj 



SO) Oi 
04 04 



£ 






8 04 00 -^ 
CO fr«eo 

fH 00 CO CO 



CO IO CO OD ^ 0) • 

i> ^ T^ H^ 00 lo < 

t> « CO lO kO -^ ' 



04 00 CO 
04 kO X 



ii.- 



kO ^ Q UO kO t^^ 

CO 00 O X to 04 O 
04 iH 04 '^ r^ iH f-4 



, ^ ^ pH "S — fl ^ 



i-it* -^ CO CO Oi rH 
OJkO kO ^ CO 04 ^ 
^ pH — 04 iH r-i iH 



0) ph ^ iH p^ ph — ^ i-« 08 r^ i-i i-i 






P? I 










SSS& 



giSSjj 



$^S4S4 



^ CO 00 Oi 

'-> 04 t»kO 

« CO CO 09 



^; 



s«Sjs 



s 
£ 



> CO 3> kO 
» ^ kO kO 
i Od CO lO 



CO O CO 00 
00 04 1^ O) 
04 04 — iH 



t^ 00 C* 5 

04 1-1 ce 



<^ 04 to p^ 

as22 




CO I * w ^ -3 -S 

•fllslll 



.5.5 t«« 
00 00 .5 5 

82 A 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



254. 



EEPOET OP THE POLITICAL ADMINISTEATION 



esno IOC bzitji ttiox ojctio 






o 

Q 

5 

I 



'una 



•1T40X 



. f98T 'qwg 
pav'piss 'pugs laqoiaoaa 



f88l *q»« 
pn *iow 'PAW ioq<noo 



•f88l 'qw pw "qig *qW X|i»f 



'tpDipire 'qitS 'pojg qaJBR 









CDud<^ 09 94 ^ f-l 1-1 O fl» 



£ 



s 



CO 00 c 



!SS> 



COO 






T— I- 



«Nffl r^'^Ca r^^r* 

333 SS39S2i 



CO ^ to (O eo S 



s ^ 



.«OiH ^ 

•t«-oo<o 



i 



9SSoOko9iO 9 






8j <^ O) eo<« CO 
uCOOOC^COcO 



S9S 



-TT-.I ^ 



§• 



t* Ift ^ Q ■* lO ^ 



& s 



SS9 



-'IS- 



o » ^ -^ ^ o 



*at|4j 



-8 

9 

1 



£ 

S 



E 



^ 

ss 

IS 



nTWl 



§ 






"wei *q)w 
pew 'piss 'pass Mqin909a 



•tS8I 'q^a? 
pot nuig 'piCT i9qo;oo 



•f88I •qw pn» 'q^s *qu Anf 



•q^gs poi "mts 'pagj qoi«n 



H 
O 

-»< 
& 

O 



imj 



•Tfxox 



•f88i 'qiw 

pat *pifz 'pass laqaiaood 



f«8l 



f 881 'qw pan 'qw 'qu Aof 



•f88l 
«qi9S pot «qiw 'paK qoJVR 



fej 



*azi«j 



•ITIOX 



pa« 'pigx •pui.g jdqui«09a 



•t88l 
'^MZ pa» 'qjtg 'pjgs jeqoiOQ 



'W8I 'qiepOT *qw *qu xinr 



•l'88l 
'q;w pwi 'q>w 'pas? qw^W 



*pa[pj«Mi» mu^ G^ 



3 



^ Q m 91 <f] 5* o 

M ^ ^ pH t£J 31 5 



CO « . 



> Q » ED 04 ^ ; 

^ rH rH rt ^ 



CO CO CO M O^ iH^ 



S -s 



M 3^S^3^ 



*• oot»»o O 00 ® 

iH 00 0<) f-t PI iH g 



5 1 

1. 



99^ 



*9?§S5SS| 






CO t^ S ^ 00 eo ko 
v-« eo ^ ^ eo 09 f-i 



So OQ CO "«* o 
-^ M ^ CO 04 



iSS S$93SS3 



CD 04 O) O 04 04 
*JCC O »0 lOO 
00 CO 'H' CO CM 04 



01 

o 

CO 



9S 



• t* sC CO (-> 



-2. 



o^ioo oeoeoo4i>o4i 
fcfc« 2J Oi oa Oi »o P^ < 

CO 04 04 CO fH i-x 04 04 04 < 



sss &;S4;s;S9i 



tj 04 OOOi 00 -* « 

00 -* Oi o Oi « >; 



3 



4i 

a 



04 OOO 



:i 



jS i>o c 



3 



3$; 



•t >9co « oj 04r*k 
to CO iH JS oi>oo e 



00 ^ eo o "^ 00 ** 
o ^ ^ ^ »H t» ^ 



3 



S$SS§Si 



•c 

a. 



£ 



O "^ 
ti 00 
"^ CO 



00 CO t» V -* 00 00 







3 00 04 >* lO .C -• 

04 C4 ^ p« iH "S 



s -2" 



QOOOQO ScoScoSkO^ 

^<^^ r-l 04 CO O) l> 00 « 
j-Pjob CO t> O »0 <» 04 JS 



i-l 04 



8 SSSSSf 

•-• N « p^ pH g 



§ 4 






:|- 



040404 p-«O4O4fHf^r-ii-^«0 



•-«00 09 00 B 04 CO 00 t^ 
-^ O ^ "* 04 O «0 



S SSBSaS i S S?s eS|s?£2 



^ S 22 



^1 



o o ^ 
coco 

s as 



.5 g ^ CO 00 c 2 






« a 
•-9 3 

1^ 


Q 


OfJ 


•p^ 


3 


ws 


:§ 


O 


•g 


.n 


► 


i-a 


"S 




tea 






1" 


•S 




Hit 




'O rt 


p 




PH 


Q 






*^ '^ "^ -^ 

mi • 



£ :e J -j-s a jg p 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF TEX lUJPUTANA STATES FOB 1884-85. 



265 



I 



3 






I 

1 

15 

a 



^^-f^WflOi>r 



s 



t^ {M 0d tp ^ to in 1^0 p4 4?:i m 3> 

c: tc m ■* * 'r so 1-- »a --n>- ^ 

CSl ^ ^ ifH i-I r* ^4 



s 



K^i 









s 



^ -I B 5 e 3 S 3 



— -2 ^ « • 



g*®2JS'"iii'5 



S 



t^ CO O Od 00 Cil t^ l> Q ^ 04 '^ Q •«» 



S 









S 



I 



CO o o 
eo CO »i 



5?SSSSSSS?5o 






00 



-I 



8 



CD ^ ^ O) 



>^ *- ^. ^- iH t^ O OO 





8 0i ^ 00 lo •* -^ ^ "^ CM -^ M A lo <4i ^ ea 

aoooi>^aoooaoMtoa)^ ^ ig^^^3 



-I s 






eoa»0).ao4«o.o^o . . 



St*»^ CO 



co'*c*»ooocccg^Q, 



^5SSSSSSS2^^5 



I 2 2 i 2 2 2' 
•g A o S S S 2 









to lO f-4 kO -^ o 
(O V (O t« Ud ^ 



Oieoi^-io^oooo 

CQ Oi»Ot*Q O ^ 'H 



s 

CO 



)C0 '^ 



M C4 04 iHOQ 



s 



A — ec 00 loot^t^oo ^4 09 eo 00 
^.floSf aoat*oot*^*<ocooo»-5 



SOO Q CO t^^ CO l> to CO AOOO O » 

f-4 ko 00 00 o CO iH c^ 00 i> CO fiH eo »5 

iH 1-1 rH iH r-l .^ ^ ^ iH i-l ^ 



'8 

^.asi s s s 

^ C -^ -AA -ta -U ■*> 



8 



Se0Qt^'*QOJiO'«*»OCO g 
i> ^ 00 "* ^ 00 ©« j> 01 eo I 



• z -ri *' •*» • 



§KDGt*ai 1-1 ^ CO t> 0& r: CO 2 «* 



^ — 



^ ^ .*a *a *» 



l^g| 



2 2 



I 



Sgg^gsla'^ 



8 



M3 — e«iHaD-is«os»o^'5S« 



I 



6 B » § 



o 



•SKf i 
wj.5 eg 









•SSI'S =s 






J3 — tii S -5 



fi f c;^ ^ 1^ 



i •— **' H .S — •#- ^. -« 



. . .g . . 
h 

-; iZ .= ^-' » «^ •* 




^ GO 

i :? 

o g 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



256 



BEPaaT OF THS) POLITICAL l^tCXNISXaATIOK 



AIOPBN 

Class Marks from January/ 



SM<rSANOB CLASS, 



TvLL Maxkb 



1 Kalim Singh of Jodhpfr, Mu#ftr 
S Karan Singh of tlohnir, Jeypore . 
S Birbhadra Singh of Beaarea. 



I0LAS8. 



Full Mxsks 



1 Gi^ Singh of Bandanwaita. Ajmere 
S Laehman Sinch of BagsnYi, Ajmere 

5 Bflaliaramad Inarat-olla Khan, of Tonk 
4 Sawai Singh of Chumrawali. Alwar . 

6 Balbir Singh of Faridkot, Piu^jab . 

6 Phal Singh of Para, Alwar . 

7 Dip Singh of Qarhaiwur. Bikanir . 



UPPEB II GLASS. 



Full Mxbks 



1 Mokand Singh of Nimrana. Atwar 
t Sangram Singh of Para. Ajmere . 
S Jawahir Singh of Baniana, Joy pore 
4 Eann Singh of Bedla, Mejrwar . 



LOWER II GLASS. 



Full Masks 



1 Bijaya Singh of T)elwara, Meywar 
S Batan Singh of Batiiia, Marwar . 
8 Man l^ingh of Karoni, Ajmere 

4 Sheonath Singh of Ahmet, Meywar 

5 Mangal Sln^h of Pokurn, Marwar 
e Bimbha Singh of Awa, Marwar . 



Ill CLASS. 



Full Ma.bk8 



1 Hnhamniad Abdnl-knddua Khan, of Tonk 
a Dalpat Singh of Manadar, Sirohi . 

3 Jai Singh of Kotara. Kotah . 

4 Haruath Sini?h of Para, Ajmere . 

6 Chandra Singh of Junia, Ajmere . 
e MadhaT Singh ot Uainfa, Kotah . 

7 Daolat Singh of Khura. Alwar 



IV CLASS. 



Full Mabkb 



1 Udava Sfngh of Karii, Jeypore 

z Takht Singh of Dhanoda, Jhallawar 

3 Duq'an Sal ol Bilouui, Dholpur . 



V CLASS. 



Full Marks 



1 Sham Singh of Batrhnatlurarh, Ajmere 
I Bhawani Singh of Fattebpur, Jhallawar 
8 Debi Singh of Palwa. Ulwar 
4 Man Singh of Fattehf^arh, Kishengarh 
6 Abbaya Singh of Mangal, Jhalliwar 

6 Snltan Singh of Nimera, Jeypore . 

7 Muhammad Abdul liashid Khan of Touk 

8 Gnman Singh of Pipalda, Kotah . 

9 Mokand Singh of Parli^Jeypore . 
Galab Singh of Chanod, Marwar . 

Sheo Singh of Khera, Meywar 



YI CLASS. 



Full Masks 



\ Sheo Shingh of Bharanwda, Jeypore . 
a Sigan Sinirb of Nimera, Jeypore . 
8 Zorawar Singh of Lohiana, Marwar 
4 Udaya Singh of Danta, Jeypore . 
6 Muhammad Abdul Latif Khan of Tonk 

6 Dorjan Sal of Kotra, Jhallawar 

7 Bijaja Bahadur Singh of ^iplaj, Ajmere 

8 Banjit Singh of Pranhera, Ajmere 

9 Md. Mumtaz Hooaein Khan of Pataodi, Panjab 

10 Pirtbi Singh of Pertabgarh .... 

11 Share Singh of Indergarh, Kotah 

12 Abhaya Singh of Rajpuru, Bikanir 
18 Onkar Singh of Palaita, Kotah 

14 Dhonkol Singh ol Nimri, Meywar 



YII CLASS. 



Full Mabxb 



1 Pratap Singh of Khachariawas, Jeypore 
a Qopal Singh of Kharwa, Ajmere . 

3 Bir Mai Singh of Kiyan, Marwar . 

4 Moti Pal of Kerauli .... 
6 Oobind Singh oi KhachariaWas, Jeypore 

6 Jodh Singii of Ganerao, Marwar . 

7 Hiiaya Singh of Riyan, Marwar . 

8 Pabu Dan of Dhanlcholi, Marwar . 

9 Muhammad Knramat-ul4ah Khan of Tonk 

10 Kalian Singh of Pansal. Meywar . 

11 Jai Singh of Salpur, Alwar . 

12 Mor Singh of Dcolia, Ajmere 

15 Md. Shums-ud-dcen Ali Khan of Kumhar Baya, Ajmera 
14 Mubammad Abdul Hadz Khan of Tonk 

16 Sagat Singh of Jasana, Bikanir '. 

16 Muhammad Abdul Sami Khan of Tonk, 

17 Muhammad Ismail Khan of Tonk 

18 Bhawani Singh of Sangnd, Kotah 

19 Debi Singh of Sangod, Kotah 

20 Jai Singh of Gulran, Meywar . 



ENQLISE. 



060 

616 
676 
662 



760 

678 
668 
614 
474 
646 
642 
627 



670 



478 
407 



607 
616 
418 
303 

197 



670 

601 
41B 
418 
838 
337 
409 
303 



612 
687 



760 

648 
60A 
641 
641 

672 
414 
612 
328 
600 
403 



U40 

806 
794 
666 
1019 
1000 
774 
635 
614 
358 
1076 
878 



670 



790 

706 
647 
639 



840 

748 
671 
674 
487 
667 
872 
697 



630 

666 
626 

668 



640 

610 
696 
442 
470 



420 

401 
376 
833 



680 

866 
364 
413 
291 
404 
287 
4U0 



390 

367 
319 
360 



390 



363 
235 
1»6 



Absent. 





^ 


»^ 


te 


71 


3 


*» 


•^ 


420 


680 


267 


609 


359 


663 


84J 


312 


620 


760 


483 


705 


384 


657 


379 


666 


297 


438 


376 


674 


870 


6<»4 


.143 


178 


890 


670 


384 


646 


369 


616 



390 



381 
336 



Abs. 



431 


216 


630 


390 


660 


368 


608 


319 


616 


S32 


^ 


179 


327 


19S 


447 


282 


307 


178 


840 


620 


706 


417 


684 


410 


840 


620 


64«) 


416 


637 


424 


665 


409 


64'i 


406 


660 


391 


60» 


315 


632 


352 


426 


284 


645 


377 


403 


276 


1260 


780 


911 


667 


917 


637 


673 


373 


1153 


686 


1036 


620 


837 


606 


821 


497 


742 


478 


564 


417 


1200 


734 


866 


260 



670 

560 
513 
413 
182 
361 
Absent. 



390 


67(1 


106 


601 


867 


473 


3S4 


399 


227 


284 


217 


311 


204 


464 


161 


189 


620 


700 


496 


736 



620 



139 
4U2 
297 
309 
361 
216 
180 



680 

374 
672 
5U 
217 
Aba. 
184 
493 
489 
405 
365 
331 
Absent. 

Mot joined. 
Absent. 



660 



390. 



352 
287 
1-20 
211 



Abs. 



Abs. 240 197 
280 329 202 
217 281 2o4 
246 377 202 
Abs. 241 141 
276 146 
188 219 122 
618 
Not joined. 
172 I 228 I 132 
Not joined. 

Not joined. l 

Not joined. | 

Not joined. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 



890 
216 



670 



277 
41 
128 
179 
Absent. 
81 I 150 
84 



Mato College^ Ajmeee ; 
The 1st May 1885. 



} 



620 



610 
476 



610 



696 
659 



710 



710 
Abs. 



Absent. 



610 

604 
39U 
484 
4iJ2 
600 
462 
Leare. 



480 

472 
206 
Absent. 



480 

471 
423 
172 
321 
351 



480 

422 
4l»4 
363 
1.'j3 
111 
411 
222 



720 


800 


686 


761 


658 


696 


642 


594 


266 


612 


427 


421 


369 


841 


B. 


411 


640 


690 


476 


676 


414 


484 



080 



610 

622 
Absent. 



610 


690 


462 


665 


460 


635 


349 


395 


373 


417 


397 


294 


56 


198 


640 


690 


610 


663 


400 


619 


451 


489 


316 


211 


313 


106 



Absent, 
266 203 



608 



760 


64) 


606 


617 


644 


400 


635 


514 


410 


5156 


490 


460 


631 


641 


434 


428 


352 


315 


400 


373 


3o7 


493 


248 


135 


422 


296 


203 


290 


287 


265 


304 


8U3 


204 


760 


696 


828 


620 


021 


438 


645 


625 


547 


4K) 


529 


641 


280 


633 


648 


287 


328 


358 


422 


436 


589 


451 


206 


438 


150 


281 


420 


392 


378 


620 
Absent. 


208 1 


200 


1 405 


1 


104 


388 



800 



606 

476 
463 
658 
479 
312 
381 
330 
299 
281 



670 



667 
618 



640 

690 
400 
497 
371 
279 
424 
433 



480 



468 
284 



480 

476 
480 
301 
317 
350 
243 



480 



462 
395 



267 
205 



610 
608 



366 
391 
412 
379 
260 
292 
265 
206 
227 



Absent. 



496 

412 
856 
2()1 
305 
292 
220 

77 
871 
238 

23 
110 

31 

12 



24 



632 

664 
409 
516 
488 
355 
167 
261 
302 
320 
290 
167 
86 
61 



999 

709 
735 
763 
724 
587 
667 
683 
687 
603 

466 
667 
276 
162 



660 

686 

896 

673 

477 

310 

146 

324 

Abs. 

431 

296 

176 

107 

68 

11 



832 

e95 
601 
626 
337 
512 
615 
408 
437 
612 

860 
466 
413 
162 



644 

604 

432 

690 

457 

377 

247 

396 

Abs. 

457 

357 

297 

185 

156 

106 

68 

49 

62 

36 

7 



6260 

4082 
4073 
2177 



6200 

6610 
4467 
4763 
3638 
4193 
3661 



4640 



3636 
1416 



4620 

4100 
4121 
3013 
2012 
1769 
1311 



4610 

3973 
3863 
3711 
2322 
2192 
2310 
2031 



6160 



6361 
1711 



5624 

4427 
4171 
1206 
4161 
3677 
3390 
3128 
2679 
315-i 
2116 



7976 

5630 
5673 
6082 
5406 
472H 
4930 
4722 
4528 
4258 
3305 
2997 
1514 
689 
828 



6012 

3337 

3130 

29d7 

3360 

2174 

1977 

1811 

1857 

1718 

1498 

971 

492 

287 

117 

98 

49 

62 

36 

7 



SSCOND LAN 



210 

200 

198 
182 



860 

209 
888 
219 
166 
123 
164 
190 



220 

141 
216 
184 



220 

167 

134 
155 

78 



220 

173 
148 
176 
201 
164 
159 
110 



218 



188 
188 



230 

192 
164 
130 
200 
208 
139 
213 
145 
136 
196 



270 

268 
244 
106 



40O 

266 
892 
217 
216 
193 
136 
324 



270 

217 
268 
245 



270 



170 

168 
164 
138 



260 

180 
257 
147 
124 
97 
87 
229 



160 



170 

114 
160 
182 



230 

203 

219 
143 
168 

96 
143 

60 



170 



117 
113 
122 
Absent. 



I 



260 

243 
227 
197 



890 

819 
876 
266 
242 
161 
260 
62 



210 



184 -i 
236 



I 

OQ 



200 



200 
180 



890 

277 
266 
203 
202 
220 
208 



210 

210 
189 
Aba 



SiO 

278 
340 
223 
132 
160 
128 



Lear*. 



200 



160 
106 
Absent. 



150 



183 
181 
180 
129 
Absent. 
121 64 



170 

164 

114 

128 

Abs. 



330 

290 
245 
260 
286 
261 
269 
160 



290 



248 
253 



270 

193 
161 
263 
212 
236 
192 
377 
197 
171 
210 



180 

166 
128 
152 
159 
146 
137 
96 



180 



240 

216 
186 
177 
61 
110 
Absent, 



170 

62 
188 
145 
127 
124 
160 

76 



151 
167 
Absent. 



280 

247 
224 
210 
223 
204 
253 
128 



220 
211 



200 

198 
170 
79 
146 
124 



220 

208 
181 
181 
99 
91 
205 
123 



210 



204 
Absent. 



Absent. 



264 

110 
168 

75 
241 
260 
200 
136 
120 
228 
259 

84 



100 



330 

176 
267 

72 
292 
322 
219 
182 
194 
300 
312 

66 



160 


160 


260 


210 


153 


166 


238 


209 


117 


141 


163 


167 


107 


40 


161 


190 


136 


131 


221 


155 


130 


104 


158 


123 


78 


78 


198 


118 


187 


144 


182 


106 


96 


87 


159 


124 


121 


81 


129 


110 


113 


86 


166 


143 


242 


190 


820 


260 


160 


108 


252 


216 


152 


129 


223 


182 


86 


162 


286 


286 


174 


62 


106 


171 


232 


Abs. 


2:23 


179 


174 


88 


236 


197 


146 


130 


224 


96 


1.37 


136 


248 


112 


214 


162 


262 


218 


227 


90 






63 


92 


lis 


160 1 



Absent. 

Not joined. 
Absent. 



Abs 
146 
156 
127 

Abs. 
126 
130 
81 



210 



ISO 



120 
106 
70 
66 
98 
81 



116 

149 

166 

176 

113 

134 

140 

166 

Not joined. 

87 I 41 1 18 

Not joined. 

Not joined. 
Not joined. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Ditto. 
Absent. 



180 

84 
101 
126 
72 
87 
96 
120 
Abs. 
101 



100 

•184 

179 

19 

141 

168 

116 

18 

89 

144 



Absent. 
110 I 147 



1211 



160 

188 
147 

78 
127 
141 
105 

86 
106 
126 

22 
142 

68 



220 



167 
199 



220 

182 
176 
167 
161 
119 
38 



240 

218 
188 
228 
206 
180 
Aha 
U6 



220 
197 



280 



178 
185 
200 
134 
136 
93 
128 
119 
122 



260 

138 
163 
236 
138 
160 
208 
178 
179 
225 
Abs 
)41 
191 



180 

143 
114 
170 
116 
116 

68 
126 

91 
166 

79 
128 
189 
168 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THE BAJPHTAXA STATES FOB 188485. 



&7 



DK C. 

to December 1884. 



OUAGB. 



£ 



MATHEMATICS. 





. 


1 


1 


s 


•9 


•^ 


h 


840 


840 


838 


886 


266 


254 


214 


197 


960 


406 


828 


847 


800 


287 


297 


286 


224 


294 


146 


209 


267 


204 


233 


263 


250 


860 


160 


220 


215 


291 


194 


264 



•^ 


t 


■3 





^ 


< 


290 


800 


168 


859 


185 


278 


104 


189 


240 


870 


281 


856 


172 


804 


152 


258 


181 


262 


187 


224 


105 


277 


44 


70 


260 


880 


186 


258 


182 


274 



HI8T0BT ANOeBOGBAPHT. 



s 


1 


j 


•S 


i 


•^ 


h 


S 


*i 


M 


270 


220 


180 


200 


220 


269 


214 


180 


144 


210 


209 


166 


116 


176 


163 


176 


186 


97 


164 


81 


180 


290 


100 


160 


250 


159 


270 


187 


148 


230 


188 


242 


179 


145 


ViO 


88 


167 


98 


104 


126 


100 


153 


121 


92 


131 


102 


195 


126 


80 


170 


128 


145 


95 


119 


170 


147 


217 


m 


57 


^ 


100 


210 


180 


180 


170 


150 


203 


124 


124 


167 


118 


150 


89 


108 


116 


182 


160 


116 







ll 



270 

270 
Abs. 
enU 



aeo 

904 
807 
261 
211 
150 
104 
176 



240 



194 
220 



240 

211 
197 
182 
140 
90 
69 



240 



227 
214 
163 

90 
ent. 

70 



260 
827 



190 

189 
171 



180 

212 
276 
160 
100 
67 
129 
187 



210 



183 
120 



210 

193 
181 
159 
138 
113 
89 



210 

200 
167 
199 
171 
177 

104 



210 
198 



300 

185 
201 
277 
134- 
239 
242 
23a 
196 
274 
ent. 
170 
246 
87 
142 



20O 

153 
147 

198 
142 
183 

68 
153 
abs. 
176 
103 
135 
120 
197 

25 



270 


220 


248 


217 


202 


174 


251 


1S6 


217 


186 


163 


141 


224 


146 


176 


192 


160 


142 


142 
Abe 


124 
lent. 



250 



198 
251 



272 
177 
217 
176 



131 
258 
161 
105 



.160 

129 

U8 

160 

104 

114 

85 

134 

aba. 

127 

76 

114 

84 

155 

80 

24 

29 

27 

44 

4 



1.940 

1,876 

1,518 

865 



8»040 

9,188 
2,769 
1.858 
1,560 
1,275 
1,334 
1.178 



1,920 

1»472 

1.675 

551 



1,920 

1.616 

1,435 

1,333 

882 

556 

415 



2,090 

1,776 
1.636 
1,766 
1.640 
1.485 
1,173 
990 



1,998 

1,792 
698 



2.000 

1,831 
1,450 
1.613 
1,666 
1,397 
1307 
1,620 
1,247 
1,132 
1,024 



2,396 

1,621 

1,711 

1.666 

l,8e6- 

1.887 

1,766 

1,538 

1,498 

2,211 

888 

1,040 

815 

248 

271 



1,560 100 



1,030 

1,189 

1.173 

1,114 

942 

842 

955 

561 

839 

378 

766 

412 

660 

105 

24 

29 

27 



250 

212 
176 
174 



180 

146 
120 
132 
101 
167 
147 
185 



190 



148 
93 



237 
197 
187 
219 
259 
165 
138 
160 

90 
250 

77 



abs. 

.118 

130 

67 

abs. 

97 

89 

111 



190 

188 
163 
118 



220 

156 
197 
137 
135 
150 
90 
161 



860 

148 
193 
156 



260 



820 



820 
287 



360 



860 
824 
Abacnu 



860 

304 
265 
216 
241 
Absent. 



236 
155 
102 



210 

246 
213 
174 
abs. 



380 

858 
323 
245 
100 
163 



186 


99 




Absent. 


210 


180 


130 


180 


102 


110 


30 


129 


157 


95 


110 


119 


156 


80 


82 


77 


128 


65 


64 


80 


165 


120 


90 


112 


174 


90 


92 


98 


134 


67 


60 


52 


210 


130 


130 


190 


162 


106 


128 


184 


118 


90 







920 

806 
198 
199 
247 
216 
233 
Leave. 



820 

268 
97 
Absent. 



820 

302 
235 
106 
196 



160 

154 
121 
87 
67 
75 
122 
116 



160 

156 
Absent. 



840 


400 


826 


833 


270 


346 


214 


253 


122 


271 


174 


100 


171 


168 


e. 


184 


870 


400 


260 


296 


258 


261 



870 


400 


802 


581 


307 


330 


282 


295 


1^8 


• 240 


280 


141 


26 


99 


170 


200 


152 


167 


188 


162 


110 


165 


114 


75 


77 


99 



180 
166 



190 
186 



816 



284 
199 
159 
229 
244 
143 
157 
256 
103 
296 
71 



196 



184 
112 
138 
134 
160 
169 
76 
116 
62 
165 
52 
Absent. 
Not joined, 
absent. ' 



170 

119 
143 
134 

89 
abs. 

48 
123 
131 

89 

. 74 

107 



220 



111 
155 
56 
78 
105 



130 

72 
54 

06 
20 
60 
53 
45 
90 



130- 

76 
90 

125 
67 
72 
90 
81 

abs. 
40 



195 

Not Joined, 

92 I 126 I 41 

Not joined. 

Not joined. l 

Not joined. ' 

Not joined, 

Ditto 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 



190 

185 
119 
114 

66 

91 
103 
-125 
135 

61 

37 I 



100 

168 
134 
19 
104 
146 
115 
IS 
66 
62 



Absent. 
87 I 68 
102 



174 

146 

110 

150 

126 

107 

133 

53 

48 

58 

42 
61 



168 

128 

115 
59 
75 

132 
97 
29 

161 
46 
14 
46 
60 
4 



204 

151 
158 
172 
139 
145 
157 
126 
105 
119 



240 



175 
200 
142 
211 
193 
179 
179 
144 



Absent. 
117 



214 

162 

134 

180 

98 

173 

101 

107 

154 

65 

94 

48 

112 



175 
208 
114 
161 



280 

207 
129 
187 
109 
142 

84 

96 
abe. 

66 
179 

80 
127 

27 
6 



860 
814 



880 

841 
313 
231 
301 
154 
262 
197 



860 



260 
187 



860 

336 
847 
268 
251 
240 
161 



160 

184 
142 
126 
62 
109 

94 



160 
156 



190 


210 


180 


180 


190 


160 


186 


200 


160 


140 


160 


106 


82 


147 


139 


130 


141 


123 


111 


174 


91 


106 


141 


125 


165 


164 


131 


160 


151 


115 


60 


140 


122 


163 


187 


146 


116 


116 


64 


65 


123 


80 


91 


112 


78 


190 


200 


118 


61 


101 


96 


128 


133 


98 


77 


112 


98 


97 


182 


84 


96 


104 


109 


61 


45 


81 


26 


18 


4 


7 


45 


35 


124 


160 


94 


55 


73 


93 


74 


51 


45 


143 


94 


90 


47 


58 


66 


72 


68 


79 


126 


182 


63 


84 


66 


52 


82 


abs. 





202 
144 
166 
105 
179 
177 
146 
160 
124 

147 
199 
156 
168 



248 

190 

159 

215 

119 

192 

154 

141 

abs. 

126 

200 

128 

120 

74 

54 

32 

29 

21 

18 

8 



2,890 

2.818 

2,070 

772 



8,030 

2.721 
2,386 
1,972 
2,087 
1,519 
1,867 
U02 



2,040 

2,065 

1,958 

618 



2,940 

2,665 
2,472 
1,865 
1,381 
957 
567 



1,680 

1,214 

1,166 

1,004 

756 

1,014 

723 

840 



1,540 

1.391 
801 



1,656 

1,157 

1,210 

1.253 

835 

1,125 

909 

262 

759 

717 

585 



1,981 

1,731 

1,357 

1,369 

1.192 

1,396 

1,228 

1,123 

1,284 

840 

785 

825 

637 

270 

355 



1,714- 

1,075 

1,044 

1,166 

694 

995 

896 

681 

767 

404 

752 

891 

520 

127 

60 

32 

29 

21 

18 

2 



810 



210 
189 



860 



250 
216 



200 



290 
aba. 



230 

820 
167 
137 
150 
155 
185 
LeaTe. 



120 

114 
87 

Absent. 



absent. 



260 


870 


242 


218 


229 


231 


180 


168 


82 


143 


134 


116 


162 


118 




188 


160 


190 


184 


.170 


85 


la 



190 


210 


180 


190 


170 


120 


176 


111 


120 


151 


116 


1U2 


76 


• 94 


122 


113 


93 


62 


79 


94 


60 


129 
Abse 


44 

nt. 


abs. 


29 
68 



180 

124 
146 
111 
147 
110 
159 
86 



190 



148 

188 



210 

171 
150 
166 
152 
106 
172 
98 



210 



180 
157 



100 

98 
68 
77 
63 
80 
76 
42 



130 



absent. 



190 



117 
74 

118 
89 

108 
40 



180 
180 



180 

186 
155 

81 
122 
113 
158 

65 



190 
168 



120 


160 


83 


119 


74 


107 


12 


60 


83 


77 


65 


91 




U 


160 


190 


140 


158 


148 


148 


116 


126 


41 


120 


36 


105 


144 


J 


00 


107 


160 


170 


169 


108 



190 

167 
151 
110 
98 
87 
88 



190 

178 
174 
146 
114 

66 
Absent. 

68 



Absent. 



100 
188 



880 



80 
800 



880 

821 

206 
174 
138 
72 
MS 
189 



170 



170 

164 
125 
03 
97 
101 
64 



170 

168 
146 
141 
118 
96 

97 



160 
159 



8.080 

1.047 

1.435 

708. 



12.110 

11,618' 0,608 Priie. 
9,096 7,511 
4^507 8.781 



8,050- 1 14,220 



8,711 



1.800 ' 12,388 

1,761 11,383 8.604 

1,233' 0,825 6,900 

l.lOSri 8,260 6,80K 

1,150 8.137 5,722 

1.255 8,0971 5,604 

878 6,847 4^111 



M70 1 10,970 

1,314 0,181 , 
847 6.015 7,906 
458 8,037h 2.768 



8,860 



1,470 

1,200^ 
967 
716 
617 
412 
249 



lO^OSO 



0.881 0,023 Prize. 
8,99.V 8,214 
6.927 6,326 
6,492; 5,015 
3.684 8,364 
2k572 2,349 



1,510 0^760 

1,196 8,159 

1,265 

1,044 
995 

800 



8,869 



7.932, 8.116 
7,525| 7.710 
6.713 6.853 
5.441 5.574 
817 5,023 5,140 
697 I 4.558 4.676 



190 

05 
186 
124 
121 
was in 

79 I 
153 

82 I 
was in 
186 1 



210 


180 


180 


190 


160 


188 


207 


160 


122 


104 


111 


155 


145 


40 


163 


118 


178 


85 


101 


157 


125 


180 


197 


135 


128 


94 


41 


115 


135 


173 


104 


158 


101 


69 


88 


136 


12^ 


124 


132 


132 


6tb class. 


29 


37 


33 


3tt 


104 


44 


78 62 


42 


84 


50 


77 


129 


83 


178 82 


76 


66 


41 


38 


78 


70 


111 54 


67 


78 


65 


56 


63 


48 


6tb class. 


43 


22 


44 


44 


62 


83 


200 


128 


102 


184 


106 


05 


Abs 


ent. 



1.580 

1,416 
391 



1,666 

1,148 

1,289 

1,162 

1,033 

286 

684 

777 

614 

298 

945 



11,228 

9,959 9,868 
3,001 3.678 



^"Do not read these labjecls. 



10.745 



8.420 
8,194. 
7,986, 
6,485 
6.290 
6,087i 
5,299 
5,299, 
4,679 



12,352 

8,8iJ2 
8,741 
8,117 
8,054 
8.011 
7,924 
7t 
7,310 
7,309 
5.038 
4.862 
2.966 
1.207 
054 



7,060 
7,836 
7,626 
7,430 
6.036 
5.863 
5,665 
4,931 
4,981 
4.354 



7.190 
7,076 
6.571 
6.520 
6,486 
6.415 
5.077 
5,918 
5.917 
4,078 
3.936 
2.401 
977 
772 



8,276 

5,442 
5,363 
5,326 
5,168 
4.111 
8.715 
3,480 
8,188 
2,961 
2,628 
2,128 

1.424 1.720 
974 1.176 



6.575 
6,480 
6.435 
6,244 
4,967 
4.488 
4,204 
3,8521 
8.677 
3,176 
2.571 



282 
124 
107 
lOO 
08 
18 



340 
148 
129 
120 
118 
16 



William Loch, Major, 

Principal, Mayo College. ^ 

Digitized by VnWI^QlC 



268 



BEPOBT OF THE POLITICAL ADMINI8TBATI0N 



-^ ^ O 



r^ ^n Q 1^ lO 

^ <c S u» la 



1$ 



\^ 



|8SS 



P4 



gsasiii 



$09 •#nr4 '#«9eoo<e4M«4 a»M 



8S S«S SS2SSSS S^ 



$23 



33! 



f-4 "^QiOq 



SS'^SSS 



» 9 'S s ^ 






■J 



I 



QO «oeo 



09 "^ O 00 oq m 10 

f-4 « O t^ £^ 00 oa 



1:8 









sss 



t^ 33 t^ 
H P4 rH 



11 IslBiS 



on aowMootot^ 



iop4 SSSSSm'8 



ko 2 ooooo^cD 



So ^"oioOQim 

q5 pH «i r^ f^ *-« 



I 



I 



t 



I 



I 



04 09rH09 c£eo5^«M«M e^J-< 



ssss 



in ^ i-i M rHi^ N 



8S SSS SSSSSSS 



§S S!S8 



CQ CO ^ CD t* QO eo 
00 £^ 10 O 10 kO 00 



-III 



Qa0O;ji 

o Oft « » •^oeCqne eiq-^ ni ^ ladvd o|i 

1^ 



8 



eqco S 

OOtHTJ 

I 



lO'^io eo 04 00 



8S SSSSSSS 



> ^ moi>t2iOf-4 eo 



1^ 

OS 
H 



I 

111 
-at! 









OQ 



III 



ss:§ 







(19 

3 



• •■ w X ^ 



^ I J< Et-g 

:n* 4 ^ ^ .S *2 

fHMOO'^IOtO 







Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB BAJPUTANA 8TAT18 POB 1884-85. 



269 



I § 






Q0« t^tt' 












51 



3 



8S 



00 P3 HP rH P3- *^ -^ 

te rt n gi ■+ ifl ph 
03 e QO ^ n ci ai 






So |^3*5C^MOJ»ft 



^ ag M ^ vi <-i 



■IqdMSo90 pun £io^«tH P*^ ^^" °CI 






10^ « S/ 






5 -« 



^ 



SS 3 



§S S 



la « n ^ ^«Q 



r-* O ^- £K *a t^ » 
r;^ M-^ M O *a O 

04 m 01 ^ I--1 <^ p^ 



go os^iM^io^ta 



So ^ O C& ^ Q lA 1^ 



r^ IS tjT} Q a 

&i -^ 00 35 i; 

^ 4P4 n PH 



lii ^ 



S to 3 



H«»o^coa5ua 
^ <-; -^ w T* 1- t> ji 

«0 (?3 « 33 rt H 



^ f-f 0^ ■»• OD ?9 OS «o n « 90 
^ W (M ^ ^ r-, r- 1-1 S 55 f^ 



ga3D»JSt^&i,iCD^fcO 



l^ofqav iti{i tt| %a9 jodrnt o^^ 



*re o ^ a> 1^ -- t-- 1^^ 

« 0^ !-( 0^ rt rt M Ol 



piqi ui ^^ i&dvd 0^ 



is 



1^ 



8ta *-* 



O CQ S 



.1 



S&SSS*=SS!3 






8g Wifii — aoiojs!30o*i« 
tfs flO *o tjQ o tP oCJ 'O ifj -r &| 



III! 



GSI ^ t>. 3:3 ^ t^ ! 






ss 



CO 
GO 

fc: 



•ll 



I 



I 

III 

o o^ 

•d J3 ^ 

II? 
Hi 



3 
o 



1^1 1 

Ei.Ss*i«*.a.2-3 

^ ^ e c^' « < 

fH M eo <« 10 <D ^00 0» O 



1^ 

•is 
.§■« 

H.S 



n 4 



P ^; 



T C' 



'S S 2 'S 






111 






1 



Ha 00 

c .9 .5 J -goTS 



§ 2 £ ff c g 'J* S 



00 



fHMOO^lOlD 



^ :9 <^ -2 S M -^ 3 
^00 AO«-ieq e9<4i 



£ a 5 J 



•a 



{i^ pe; »^ £ » o o ;3i3 ; 

<H M 00 ^ lO CD t« 00 C 

Digitized by ' 



9P 



<1 ^ 

o »*^ 
U 

o 






'4oogI( 



860 



KEFOBT OP THE POLITICAL ADMIKI8TKATI0N 






^ o o 



..If. 







^1 

II 



o ^ o 



I 






\^m& 



f 









{.fi^ac 






1 



a 




5 

2 






s 

^ 






SI 






■< 
p 

I 



I 



.1 



t 






la' 



i 



la. 



A 






5" 






*S o >. d d Q ^« 



=15 



1 






9 O O ».J; 5 p 



^aa 




\a 



laaaai 







s o o 



{Hi 



f 



a^Jaa 



•45 



I 



s 



4- 






I 



°d^ **5=S d 



Ci4 



r 



"S 



I 



1 

9) 



iaiai 



s 



.2,2 o*t3 3 a 



S 






iF 









I 



s 




•a 



o3 



§-3SS !^ 







Mtnco^ 









«S s W «M J o 
:I^S||| 






-5 r -2 ^ .9 * i 




Hfc3 



Digitized by Vrr 



OOgI( 



OF THE SAJPTTXAKA STATES EOS 1S6M6. 



261 



|i^i||ii'|i ih^^hitm 



t 



r 



>• >• >• 5 ^ 



e-a • rt "53 _i '5 .rt "S '^S 




I 
■f 

I 

I 

1 

a 



I 

a 




§&&&&& 

< 









,1 



{? 1*^ 



li 



S i U ^ t " <• Sri JJ i 




Hi 



^1 



aaii 



\a^i& 







ggeg 





^^ 



^i^ If|l4'^i| 







.9.a.s.s 

o o o o 






^ 




a 



_,jll| a^^^ii^^ 



9 



•1 



fc.(S| 






.1 



r > 



■s 4 



if" 



■(? t^ 






■c8 






S £ 



fc"! t" 



QQ 



II t 
^ a.B 






9 ti O 3 



■='9.. 



fHM00^l0CDfi«Q0a»O 



Cm 

aQQQQD 



■••••I • 

• . . . ••s 

i .11 
a lll?3| -^ •ill Sal i 

llilll'^llliilli 

•inM^iow *> 00 e> o f4 01 a» -« 







oQ a 



a-S)^ 



P a^Z. o S«» d a S 










It 

34 



GO 



c r-i oq eo <<« ud CO 

iH iH i-« m 1-1 d iH 



fH iH Kl 01 



m 



<5 >H 

5^ 



S 



Digitized 



gVjOogle 



262 



REPORT 07 THE POLITICAL ASMIKISTRATION 



O 



g 



S3 






a r 

.r 

B 






(S 



I 



ffi d 

': 2 



i 



■^ ** S 3 



s s s s s 






s s s 



I 



s . 



1 



I 



s s s s s < 






_ 2 S 






.- s 



1 .5 



B 



4 



s • 

S ^ 






-< = « -T bd 

'i fe: r ""^ 

^ «** ^ tf. ^ -^ 






I 

I 









5^ 00 



8 
I-' 



-^3.5 



|isl-l 

^ C P <fl ; ^ 



121 






•si-j. 

a *4 is 
S P 

«Zhh 



2 
- • • • • S 

a II ill 







^^ "a-S 2°° 

^ ^ « eS cS ^ 

M !rf ^ ^ ^ -^ 

'3 « a s s 2 

•fi -^ K^ l^ 1.^ 5P 



0-5? Ill® 



5 Js'ijseS 



1 



Ha 1 

CO J ^ o 



oJ P e8 eS Q ^ 



wWrT--* 






£lC£S8tC 






fc '-'In^S 



1 l|ii:?l^ 






^t^ 



'3 ^ 






3:3 1 i 




J 



III 



C t S S ft 




8 S 



it-* i ■ s 

2g.|:g|5:SS 



P .^ v^ ^ ^ 

PCU gjSoItJHg 






9^ 



U 

H 
W 
> 



M 



o 
o 

H 

p 

I 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OF THB lUJPUTAKA STATES FOB 1884^. 



263 



i 


1 




t s «£ 


^'^ 


o 






(l4 





•s I 



s r s s ff £ 






e 



s5 . 



•c 














5-*tt -^ ^O 



^-a' 

•&:"• 



el 



GO 



OQ 08' 




|s: S 53 S3 S S 



g« 



I 



OQ 

a 



5; S s s 5 - 

S S P S f 

JcS c'3 rt g c 



s 


ii 


^ 


li 


1 






'^ 


J 


:ia 


•« 


•s's 




.flJd 


-id. 


CiO&O 


bo 

a 


.as 


1 


QQOQ 









" .2 •« ja 



III 



S fi S S t 



&! 



1^ P QD Eh P^ ^ c» do 






;3 






» 









S S X 



•s 



g 

" 2 
tog 



M 

s 

o 



g 

a 

O 



O 



I I 



a 



i4 

I 











fe 


© 


l-l 




1 


^ 


.8 


< 


^ 


iJ 




^' 





< ^ 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



264 



BBFOBT OF THE POLITICAL ADHINI8TBATI0K 



II 



|^ 



31 

a* 



H 

1 



A 









aOtC 



mi 



A 



«^i-lf-4 r-if-H 



S to S S CO s s s ^ 



i-i ^ CO «^ 0^)^© t^ 10 00 < 



>coc 



3 



10 

04 



s 



i 




a 



u 
^ 



8 






-2 



^ rt "S? r: ? 



-I 

B g « 



t3 



o 









^i' 



<^ 



»o :co 
« : 



.1 



(3 



S 



g 




»4 



I 

o .5 

a 



5« 



5^ 



I 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



OP THE RaJPTJTANA StATB« TOR 1884.86. 



265 



APPENDIX H. 

Treaiury Officer^s certificate of balance in tie Mayo College Fund on 3Ut March 1886. 

I hereby certify that the balance in the Ajmere Treasury at the credit of Mayo College 
Fond this day is Rs. 8^591-1-10^ three thousand five hundred and ninety-one^ anna one^ and 
pies ten only. 

Ajmere Treasuet, ") (Sd.) Ajodhia. Psbshad^ 

The 1st April 18S5') Treasury Officer, JJmere. 

APPENDIX J. 

Budget Estimate of Ordinary Income and Expenditure of Mayo College, Ajmere, for the year 

1885-66, 



Ebtivatsd Bbobipt. 


1885-86. 


ESTIMATBD EtPBITSITORB; 


188l^-8a 


Details. 


Amount 


Total. 


Details. 


Amount. 


aV>taL 


XIX. EDUCATION. 

IVOOXB FBOM ElTDOWMBirP. 

Interest on Government Secnrities 


Bs. 

24,990 


Bs. 
24,990 

8,600 
1,200 


XXIL EDUCATION. 

Salaiubs. 

Allowance to Medical Officer 

Head Master . . • . 

Masters and Teachers 

DriU Masters . . . . 

Clerks 

Servants . • • , . 
Police Guard .... 
Conservancy and Garden Establish- 
ment 

Book Play and Medical Establishment 

CONTINGENT CHABGES. 

Stationery 

Purchase and repurs of farnitnre 
Travelling allowance 
Pension and absentee charges • 
Miscellaneons . . . . 
Conservancy of garden and^rronnds . 
Book Play and Medical stores . 

Library 

Prizes and rewards 

Total 


Bs. 

600 
6,000 
5,700 
1.080 
1,440 
1,240 

455 

2,510 
710 


Bf. 


CONTRIBUTIONS. 
From Natire States and private persons. 


8500 






1,200 


19,786 


MISCELLANEOUS. 
Conservancy and garden produce 


200 

800 

800 

1,480 

800 

1,500 

2,310 

600 

600 






8/MO 


■» 


... 




... 


29,690 




Total 


27,776 



Mato College, Ajmere; > 
The 1st May 1885. i 



(Sd.) William Loch, Major, 

Frincijhil, Mayo Collie.' 



APPENDIX K. 



Statement showing tie Expenditure on Imperial Works in the Mayo College, Ajmere, during 

1884^. 



•8 


ISua ov WoBK. 


Total lanotioned 
Estimate. 


Expended np to 

30th Jane 1884, 

by Executive 

Engineer, 

Militaiy Works 

and Bo'ids 

DiTiaion. 


Expended from 
July 1884 to 
8lBt March 

1886 by Prin. 

eipal. Mayo 

CoUege. 


Total expended 
np to 81st 
March 
1886. . 


BSXABKS. 


1 
» 
8 


OiiazvAL WosES, Cxvis Buiu>ar«s. 

Mayo CoUere Main BuUdlng , 
New shed for 8ub-DiTi8lon . . . 
New road croseing Mayo College Park 
from north to sonlh. 

Bbtaibs to Civil Bunnivas. 

BnildingB. 
Anaual r^rs te Park Boads . 

Tools and Plant . . . '. 


Rs. a. p. 

8,81,096 
aooo 

1.995 


Bs. a. p. 
8,80.091 11*7 


Bs, a. p. 

1,>66 4 8 
200 
499 ,7 4 


Bs. a. p. 

8,81,846 16 10 
800 
489 7 4 


The apparent exoess 
expenditure over eeti* 
mate In work 1 is cover- 
ed by ralue ot materials 
at site 


4 
ft 


1,078 
1,787 


0072 9 
167 8 6 


604 4 
IJW'9 8 


1.071 8 1 
1.736 12 8 


« 




24 14 


84 


68 14 





Mayo College, Ajmebji;') 
The 1st April 1885. j 



(Sd.) William Loch, Major, 

Principal, Mayo College, 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



266 



BEPOBT OF THE POLITICAL ADUINISTBATION 






s 

e 






1 



i^ 



1 



S5 






»^ 






1 

in 



Q "^ 



1 









I, 



3 



r 






^ 
•^ 









IS 



I 









H^ 



&. o 



X 






«l 



#-^ F-l *-* 

*^ Jt> » r-i 3> &> 

I 



W ; 






c4 oaiib-o^r^(Ciotf]««DN«^«aiHOeoG0ajNOi'4Oia 

oS OiNa)OJ:*«OOOTMt*«i-<«00tQmiP3^'^O^O*Jit^ 



^ ioia^Or4F^^iHOOOOoooooi;a<DO£^^rHOQo 

d fH r^ r^ M i-H ^ 

J lia 10 CO pi ^ S.1 ^ OQ 'r? *t: 3D lO 1M 04 CO l> i-H lO 02 ^^ 

^t>i:^a5 Hess oo^m^m cO i-^ i-t O i^ 






OCDCO 
t-l 






£ 

^ 




I 



JO '0^ Itiuog 



to 



4 

03 



o 
o 

-IS 



oooooooo 

<90OOOOOOO 



-^ M t* an '^ -Tp 00 lO 
■ 03 CQ n ^ » O 



O 

o 









^ kO kO rH O rH iH <0 t-l 



. 'HCOOS'*flOOOOJ 
OB kO kO 0> iH 



00 

Oft 

il 



Jl 

ol 

i'-"n 

^ J-c-s 

^ p, OS ^ > 

...., ■•••I Jill 111 

S -g .-ti J5 .25 c *^. '5 p ^jft* ft-'S.ti fcS'^ «3« 

<! M <J a cTo SM<J fiQopL,-<J 0?S WWW 

fHei|OQ^iocot>aoodO'-o4eO'^<ocoi>ao3)Q'-i'Mco<Tfio 

iHr-ir-liHr-lp-liHf-ir-lrHMe^e^eiC^eQ 



I 



I 



!^ 



.9. 



^ 









h3 

.J 

a 

o 



^^ 



«) 

g 



Digitized by 



GoogI( 



Digitized by 



GoogI 



Digitized by VnOOQlC 

J