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Argot and Slang 

A NEW 
FRENCH AND ENGLISH DICTIONARY 

OF THE 

CANT WORDS, QUAINT EXPRESSIONS, SLANG 
TERMS AND FEASH PHRASES 

USED IN THE HIGH AND LOW LIFE OF OLD 
AND NEW PARIS 

BY 

ALBERT BARRERE 

OPPICIER UE l'iNSTRL'CTION PUBLigUB 



NEJV AND REVISED EDITION 



LONDON 

WHITTAKER AND CO., WHITE HART STREET 

PATERNOSTER SQUARE 

i8Sq 



PREFACE. 



The publication of a dictionary of French cant and slang 
demands some explanation from the author. During a long 
course of philological studies, extending over many years, I 
have been in the habit of putting on record, for my own 
edification, a large number of those cant and slang terms 
and quaint expressions of which the English and French 
tongues furnish an abundant harvest. Whatever of this 
nature I heard from the lips of persons to whom ihey are 
familiar, or gleaned from the perusal of modern works and 
newspapers, I carefully noted down, until my note-book had 
assumed such dimensions that the idea of completing a 
collection already considerable was suggested. It was 
pointed out to me, as an inducement to venture on so 
arduous an undertaking, that it must prove, from its very 
nature, not only an object of curiosity and interest to the 
lover of philological studies and the public at large, but also 
one of utility to the English reader of modern French works 
of 6ction. The fact is not to be ignored that the chief works 
of the so-called Naturalistic School do certainly find their way 
to this country, where they command a large number of readers. 



I 

I 



IV 



Preface. 



These productions of modem French fiction dwell with com- 
plaisance on the vices of society, dissect them patiently, often 
with power and talent, and too often exaggerate them. It is not 
within my province to pass a judgment upon their analytical 
study of all that is gross in human nature. But, from a 
philological point of view, the men and women whom they 
place as actors on the stage of their human comedy are 
interesting, whatever they may be in other respects. Some of 
them belong to the very dregs of society, possessing a language 
of their own, forcible, picturesque, and graphic This language 
sometimes embodies in a single word a whole train of philo- 
sophical ideas, and is dashed with a grim humour, with a species 
of wit which not often misses the mark. Moreover, these 
labourers, roughs, street arabs, thieves, and worse than thieves 
— these Coupeaus, Bec-Sal^s, Mes-Bottes, T^ntiers — are not the 
sole possessors of a vernacular which, to a certain extent, is the 
exponent of their idiosyncrasies. Slang has invaded all classes 
of society, and is often used for want of terms sufficiently strong 
or pointed to convey the speaker's real feelings. It seems to 
be resorted to in order to make up for the shortcomings of 
a well-balanced and polished tongue, which will not lend itself 
to exaggeration and violence of utterance. Journalists, artists, 
politicians, men of fashion, soldiers, even women talk argot, 
sometimes unawares, and these as well as the lower classes are 
depicted in the Naturalistic novel. Now, although the study of 
French is daily acquiring more and more importance in Eng- 
land, the professors of that language do not as a rule initiate 
their pupils — and very naturally so — into the mysteries of the 
vernacular of the highest and lowest strata of society, into the 
cynical but pithy and humorous jargon of the voyou from the 
heights of MonlmartreorMdnilmontant, nor even into thelisp- 



Preface, 



ing twaddle of the languid gommeux who lolls on the Boulevard 
des Italiens. Hence English readers of V Assommoir and other 
similar works find themselves puzzled at every line, and turn 
in vain for assistance to their dictionaries. The present volume 
aims at filling the vacant space on the shelves of all who read 
for something besides the passing of an idle hour. An Engiish 
slang fguivaUnt of the English rtndering has been inserted 
whenever that was possible, and because the meaning of a 
lenn is better conveyed by examples, as many quotations as 
the limits of the Dictionary would admit have been reproduced 
from different authors. 

A fe^e words on the manner in which the work has been 
compiled are due to the reader. In order to complete my own 
private information, specially with reference to old cant, I have 
drawn as freely as seemed to me legitimate on works of a similar 
character — Michel's, Dclvau*s, Rigaud's, Lor^dan Larchey's 
excellent Dictionnaire Historique d^Argpt^ '^\\zxx€s Pari sis men ^ a 
very complete work on French argot rendered into German. 
But by far the most important portion of my collection has 
been gathered from Vidocq*s productions, Balzac's works, The 
Memoirs of Monsieur Claude^ formerly superintendent of the 
detective department in Paris, and from other works to be men- 
tioned hereafter. To an inspector of the detective force in 
Paris, Monsieur Lagaillarde, I am indebted for many of the 
terms of the phraseology used by the worthies with whom his 
functions have brought him in contact 

Again, newspapers of both countries have also brought in 
ibcir contingent, but the most interesting sources of information, 
as being the most original, have been workpeople, soldiers, 
pickpockets, and other malefactors having done their •* time," or 
likely to be " wanted " at a short notice. The members of 



vi Preface, 

the light-fingered gentry were not easily to be got at, as their 
natural suspicions precluded their realizing at once my object, 
and it required some diplomacy and pains to succeed in en- 
listing their services. In one particular instance I was deprived 
of my informants in a rather summary manner. Two brothers, 
members of a family which strongly reminded one of E. Sue's 
Martials, inasmuch as the father had mounted the scaffold, the 
mother was in prison, and other members had met with similar 
accidents, had volunteered to become my collaborators, and 
were willing to furnish information the more valuable, it seemed 
to me, as coming from such distinguished individuals. Un- 
fortunately for the Dictionary the brothers were apprehended 
when coming to my rendez-vous, and are now, I believe, far on 
their way to the penal settlement of New Caledonia. 

I have to thank numerous correspondents, French and 
English officers, journalists, and artists, for coming to my 
assistance and furnishing me with valuable information. My 
best thanks are due also to M. Godefroy Durand for his 
admirable etching. 

As regards the English part, I am considerably indebted to 
the Slang Didionary published by Messrs. Chatto and Windus, 
to the History and Curious Adventures of Bampfylde* Moore 
CareWy King of the Mendicants^ as well as to the various journals 
of the day, and to verbal inquiries among all classes of people. 

I have not attempted, except in a few cases, to trace the 
origin of words, as an etymological history of cant would be 
the work of a lifetime. 

It is somewhat difficult to know exactly where to draw the 
line, and to decide whether a word belongs to slang or should 
be rejected. I have been guided on this point by Littr^, and 
any terms mentioned by him as having passed into the language 



Preface. 



VII 



I have discarded. I have introduced a small number of what 
might be termed eccentricities of language, which, though not 
strictly slang, deserve recording on account of their quaintness. 
To the English reader I need not, I trust, apologize for not 
having recoiled, in my desire for completeness, before certain 
unsavoury terms, and for having thus acted upon Victor Hugo's 
recommendation, " Quand la chose est, dites le mot." 



AUTHORITIES 
CONSULTED AND QUOTED. 



About (Edmond). Trente et Qua- 

rante. Paris. 
Almanach Chantant, 1869. 
Amusemens i la Grecqtu ou les 

Soirees de la Halle par an ami 

de feu Vade. Paris, 1764. 
Amusenuns rapsodi-poitiquis, I773- 
Apothkairt {t) empoisonn/f dans les 

Maistresd'HostelauxHalles. 1671. 
Audtbrand (Philibert). Petits Mrf. 

moires d'nne Stalle d'Orchestre. 

Paris, 1885. 
Balsac (Honor^ de). La Cousine 

Bette. — La demiere Incarnation 

de Vautrin. — La Physiologic du 

Manage. — Les Chouans. — Le 

Pire Goriot. Paris, 1884. 
BanvUlt (Theodore de). La Cui- 

siniire po^tique. 
Bffnmtain {VavX). L'Opium. Paris, 

x886.— An Tonkin. Paris, 1885. 
Boutmy (Eugene). Dictionnaire de 

l*Argot dcs Typographes. Paris, 

1883. 
Brantomt (Pierre de). Vie des 

Dames galantes. Paris, 1822. 
Canltr. M^moires. Paris. 
Cajrlus (Comte de). Les Ecosseuses 

ou les CEufs de P^ues. 1739. 



Ckampfleury, La Mascarade de la 

Vie parisienne. 
Ckaiilhn (Auguste de). Poesies. 

Paris, 1866. 
Cim (Albert). Institution de De- 
moiselles. Paris, 1887. 
Citrons (les) de Javottc. Histoire 

de Camaval. Amsterdam, 1756. 
Claude. M^motres. Paris. 
Courteline (Georges). Les Gidt^s 

de TEscadron. Paris, K. D. 
Daudet (Alphonse). Les Rois en 

Exil. Paris, x886. 
Debans (Camille). Histoire de tons 

les Diables. Paris, 1882. 
DeUourt (Pierre). Paris Voleur. 

Paris, 1887. 
Dtlvau. La Langue Verte. Paris. 
Drapeau {le) de la ntire Duchesne 

contre les fScheux et les intrigants. 

Paris, 1792. 
Duhut de Laforest. Le Ga^ 

Paris, 1886. 
France (Hector). Le Roman du 

Cure. Brujcelle5,i877. — L'Homme 

qui tue. Bruxelles, 1878.— 7V/> 

face de Par devant Notaire. 

Bruxelles, 1880.— L'Amour au 

Pays Bleu. Lx>ndres, 1885.— -Le 



Amikoritus CamstdUd amd QmoUd, 



Psnsy 3K. D- — Les Ta-c&-F«c(^ 
de LoDdres. Firs^ 1SS5.— La 
Fttfaqoe Albioo. Parts. 1885. — 
LesXidtsdeLoodres. I^xis,iSS> 
Sam le Baznocs. Pans* iSS£l 
— .An^dardaPnvcfesBrociZuds. 
Puis» 1S86. — Loodzcs xHssoc. 
Puss. iSS6l — La Pocel^ de 
T^Ksa. Pux5» 1SS7. — L'AEnee 
dc John BoO. Pu^ iSS?.— A 
Tnrcn I'E^i^Be. Pans, 1SS7. 

FrSindt (Elk), la Vk de Pans : 
Soade pi aoc c sqa e ct pntaqae da 
natevr. I^Hs, i$7& 

Frimm (Gasxare). ATcntares da 
Coload Roochooot. Puis. iSS6. 

£«A0nigM (Emtk}. Moosaenr Lecoq. 
Fkzis, 1SS5. 

CmUitr (TbeophOe). Les Jevne- 
FruKC. Fuis» 1SS5. 

GararwL Les Gens dc Paris. Puis. 

Gimm (F.V Recx«atioQs philolo- 
SiqtMS. FuiSt 1S5S. 

Ctmmtt (Charics Dubois de). Le 
Troapier td qu*U est 4 cbenL 
Fuis,i$6a. 

CiS (Andi«X X^ Mase i BibL 
Puis» N.]>. 

<nwiv«ri (E. deX 1^ FiUe £lisa. 
iVis. 

OwkAu/, Le Vice puni oa Car- 
touche 

(^/. Le pttts beurtttx de tons. 
Paris. l$S& 

ihkg^ (Vktw), Le dernier Jour 
dNinCondunne, — LesMisenbles. 
— CUttde Uueux. 

ihmi*n{,K.\ MonBacne. 

//i(VfaMJU« Le« Sivun Vataid. 
M«nht« Writ. 



K^ (£.). La Joie des Panvres. 

Paris, 1SS7. 
LMTzk/j (LorcdanV DictioanaiTc 

His£oriqce d'Ai^got. Paris, 

1S81. 

(A.). Le MOliooderOa- 
Paris, 18S7. 
Lt Jargsm «■ Lamp^ge de FAr^ 

r^jrmu, Eptnal, N. D. 
Le Rcmx (Philibert Joseph). Dic- 

tiocnaire oomiqiK, satjriqoe, 

critjqac, bnricaque et proverbiaL 

Ltoo, 1735. 
Lnvy (Charics). GoiboUard cC 

RintnJW. Paris, K. D. 
La Prom&rts (Emrres PoiHqma du 

Capitaau Lasfkrise* 1599* 
Mace vG.). Mon premier Crime. 

Paris. 18S6. 
Mtkaam (Paul). Mesdames de 

Caear-Vcdant. Paris, 1886. 
MaL}t (Hector). Baccara. Paris, 

iSS6w 
Aferlim{LeoB^ La Langue Verte dn 

Tfoapier. Paris, 1886. 
J/ju-ic/{Fraxidsqae). Diet. d*Argot 

on Etodes de Philologie compart 

snr r.Aisot. Paris, 1856. 
Afkkel (Lottise). Les Microbes 

hnmains. Paris, 1886. 
Maiihrt (Jean Baptiste Poquelia). 

(EuTTCS. Paris. 
Ai9tmier (Henri). L'Execution. 
At^mtaigme (Michel de). CEuvres. 

1835. 
iVm&x/ (Edgar). Comebois. Paris, 

18S4. 
Afmtime (Adrien de). La Com^e 

des proverbes. 1633. 
Af9milhm{Y.). Declaration d 'amour 

d'an imprimeor typc^mpbe i.une 

jeone brocheuse. Paris, 1886. 



l^^^Hj^E 


^^H 


^^T Autlwrities Consulted and Quoted. xi ^^^ 


VlUGnc/ (Gustave). Chansons popu- 


ScarrvH (Paul). Gigantomachte. ^^^| 


latres. Paris, 1S76. 


Paris, 1737. ^^1 


Hiiard (Charles). De quelques 


ScAc// (Aurclicn). L'Kspril du ^^H 


ParUianisme» populairvset autres 


Boulevard. Paris, 1S87. ^^H 


l>oculion&. Parts 1876. — Curio- 


S<nna (Julicn). Une Cnboiiiie. ^^H 


^^^^E^tcs de KEtymologie rran9ai5c. 


Paris, 1886. ^^M 


^^^P!ans. 1S6J. 


Sinv7t (Alfred). Au Pays des ^^^H 


^^fSpdicr (Charles). CEavres. 


Roublards. Farts 1SS6. ^^^B 


^^K F^sardiOMa {U). 2756. 


Sue (Eugene). Les Mystires de ^^^| 


^H /WIv^Dcnis). Le Sublime. 


Paris, ^^^1 


^^T ^Mr/Zftf-M^N.]. L'argoldc* Nomailcs 


TalUmant ties K^ux. Historiettcs. ^^^H 


1 dr la Basse • Brctagne. Paris, 


Paris 1835- ^^1 


L^ 1886. 


Tardieu. Etude mMlco-Iegale sur ^^^^ 


^H jr^MflU (Francois). (£uvrvs. Paris. 


Ics attentats aux morurs. ^^^H 


^M flsfrwiittrs {ta). Paris, 1 756. 


Taxil ( Ltfo). H istoire de la Prosti- ^^H 


Jiiihf'tn'XiutiUoMXK noaveau Vad^. 


Paris N. D. ^^^H 


Paris, 1821. 


Thco'Criit, Nos Farces \ Saumur. ^^H 


JfifA//iH (Jean). La Chanson des 


Paris, 1884. ^^B 


Cbchx. Paris, N. V.—he Pav^. 


VUlocq. Memoires. Paris, 1829.— ^^^| 


Plhs.l&S6.— l^Glu. Paris, N.n. 


Les Volcars. — Les rrais Myst^rcs ^^^H 


— La Mcr. Paris. |886.— Le* 


de ^^H 


MoTts biaarres. Paris, N, D. — 


Vilh9i (Fninfois). CKuvres com- ^^^H 


Braves Gens. Paris. 


pl{:tcs. Paris, M. D. ^^H 


A!g^iu/d (Lucien). Dictionnaire 


Zff/a (Emile). Nana.— L'Assommoir. ^^^^ 


d'Argot modcme. Paris, 1881. 


— Au Itonhcur des Dames. Paris ^^^| 


Xigpibcckf. Memoires. 


1SS5.— UTerre. Paris, 1 88 7. ^^H 


1 

Amirvcrtk (W. Ilonison). Rook- 


DkktHM (Charies). Works. ^^^k 


wood,— Jack Shcppard. 


Fielding (Heniy). Amelia.— The ^^^| 


Samj/yiJfMo&re Carrw (The His- 


Mistory of the Life of the lalc ^^H 


tor7 and Curious Advenlurcs of). 


Mr. Jonathan Wild the Great. ^^^| 


London, n.u. 


^^1 


Br^m< { Richard). Joriall Crew ; or. 


Greenwood (James). The Sc%-cn ^^^H 


The Mcny Bt^ars. 1652. 


Curscsof London.— Dick Temple. ^^^H 


CAatto anJ WtrtJus. The Slang 


—Odd People. ^^1 


Dictionarr. London, 1885. 


i/arman (Thomas). Caveat or ^^^| 


^H JXnw ( r. Lewis O.). A Supple- 


Worening for Common Cursetors. ^^^^| 


^^f mentary English Glossary. Ixio- 


London, 1568. ^^^H 


^ don, 1881. 


1 



Xll 



AuihontUs Consulted and Quoted, 



Horsley (Rev. J. W.). Antobio- 
grmphy of a Thief, MacmiUatCs 
Magatint^ 1879.— Jottings from 
Jail. 1S87. 

Ktng5Uy{C\x»x\tA\ Westward Ho ! 
1855.— Two Years Ago. 



Lytton (Heniy Balwer). Paul 
Clifford. — Ernest Maltnxvers. 

Pascoe (C, E.). Every-day Life in 
our Public Schools. London, N.D. 

Sims (G. R.). Rogues and* Vaga- 
bonds. 



LaNcUion* 

Ixt yii Parinmne, 

La Vie Populaire, 

Le ClairoH. 

Le Cri du Peupk, 

VEcho He Paris, 

VEvinement. 

Le Figaro. 

Le Gauiois. 

UGUBlas, 



V Inter mediaire des Cherckeurs H 

Curieux. 
Le Journal Amusant. 
Li Pire Duchhu, 1793. 
Le Petit Journal. 
Le Petit Journal pour tire. 
Le Radical. 
Le Tam-Tam. 
Le Voltaire. 
Paris. 
Paris Journal, 



Punch. 
Pun. 

The Globe, 
Funny Folks* 



Juay. 

The Bird o* Freedom. 
The Sporting Times. 
Evening News, 



Popular Songs and Pieces of Poetry. 



Barrh-e {VicTTt). Le Boeuf rouge et 
le Bceuf blanc. 

Baumaine et Blondflet. Les Locu- 
tions vicieuses. 

Ben et ttfferville. 0u*s qu*est ma 
Pip'lette. 

Bois (E. du). C'est Pitanchard. 
-De la Bastille k Montpamasse. 

Burani et Buquet. La Chanson du 
Gavroche. 

Carri. J'ai mon Coup d'feu. 

ClAnent, Chanson. 



Dans la chambre de nos abbh. 
Denneville, UneTourn^ede Lurons. 
Gamier (L.). Y a plus moyen 

d'rigoler. 
La Chanson du Bataillon d'A/rique, 
Lamentations du portier d'eti face. 
Mttginn (Dr.). Vidocq's Song. 
Ouvrard. J'suis Fantassin. 
Queyriaux. Va done, eh, Four- 

neau I 
The Leary Afan. 
The Sandman's H''eddinz* 



INTRODUCTION. 



Argot p€n-adc« the whole of French society. It may be heard 
everywhere, and it is now difficult to peruse a newspaper or open a 
new novel without meeting with a sprinkling of some of the jargon 
directs of the day. These take their rise in the slums, on the 
boulevards, in workshops, barracks, and studios, and even in the 
lobbies of the Houses of Legislature. From the beggar to the 
diplomatist, every class possesses its own vernacular, borrowed 
more or less from its special avocations. The language of the 
dangerous classes, which so often savours of evil or bloody deeds, 
of human suiTering, and also of the anguish and fears of the ever* 
(racked and ever-watchful criminal, though often disguised under 
a would-be humorous garb, cannot but be interesting to the philo- 
sophcr. " Everybody," says Charles Nodicr, '* must feel that there 
b more ingenuity in argot than in algebra itself, and that this 
quality is due to the power it possesses of making language hgura- 
live and graphic. With algebra, only calculations can be achieved ; 
wnth argot, however ignoble and impure its source, a nation and 
society might be renovated. . . . Argot is generally formed with 
ability because it is the outcome of the urgent necessities of a class 
of men not lacking in brains. . . . The jargon of the lower classes, 
which is due to the inventive genius of thieves, is redundant with 
sparkling wit, and gives evidence of wonderfully imaginative 
powers." 

If criminals are odious, they are not always \'ulgar, and a study of 




^ rETi- •^"— ■=- assneL '±1; Tiiii3 nf -v-x A^ 
r 1 t=t; ant inia ti z sr^^ nf brlHir: 
n^Er — — ^t"— icT .lE sams Ea:^ nisi f:r- 









■»-.»*. ,MC .1. a— f. 



-T%g-r — -rrr^ra* ctsiei nt ^e zazos- c^* ird 

*. ^ '"s* r>=sxin:r Bare r? ^mrsCEnss. tbe 3.«^- 
-rj j s ^ 's. TT^ Tt?r oas. r*:'!^ •a«r^:c5. bet 






TC:ra» • s ar ir::feai. inaccijsc trc^^st. wiiout 

i =esrttuTs »-^=^ w ^'-^ iJT iicaEjiei ro be con- 
^r.rsfec^tni:'- C5 -'■x-J^micrT 33=5: rjesds change 
re'.7.ne saniiar ix 2ixcsi6s:s. i^i »e tad in U 
.*., ; — ife cmnnis ^-le is t *t a 2jLt rrrolatioa. In 
7W7 «3u 3Mi& X sac JB^s^^ belong to tbe 



Introduction, 



XV 



lowest, most contemptible stratum of society, but its study, if 
looked upon as an outcome of the intellect, presents important 
features, and sj-noptic tables of its synonyms might prove interesting 
to the linguist." 

The use of argot in works of any literary pretensions is of modem 
introduction. However, Villon, the famous poet of the fifteenth 
century, a xuiuH^n whose misdeeds had weltnigh brought him to 
the gallows, as he informs us ; — 



Je 9UH FnuiQou, doot ce me poise, 
Ntf de Paru emprls Ponihatac, 
Or, d'ua« corde d'une lotse, 
Saura mon col que mon cul poise— 



\'illon himself has given, under the title of Jargon oh Jobelin Ht 
MatJirt Francois Vilion^ a series of short poems worded in the 
iargon of the vagabonds and thieves his lioon companions, now 
almost unintelligible. 

In our days Eugfrne Sue, Ralzac, and Victor Hugo have intro- 
duced argot in some of their works, taking, no doubt, Vidocq as an 
authority on the subject ; while more recently M. Jean Richepin, in 
his Chanson ties Gucux^ rhymes in the lingo of roughs, bullies, 
vagabonds, and thieves ; and many others have followed suit, 
lialzac thus expresses his admiration for argot : " People will per- 
haps be astonished if we venture to assert that no tongue is more 
energetic, more picturesque than the tongue of that subterranean 
world which since the birth of capitals grovels in cellars, in sinks of 
vice, in the lowest stage floors of societies. For is not the world a 
theatre? The lowest stage tloor is the ground basement under the 
stage of the opera house where the machinery, the phantoms, the 
devils, when not in use, are stowed away. Each word of the lan- 
guage recalls a brutal image, either ingenious or terrible. In the 
jargon one does not sleep, *on pionce.' Notice with what energy 
that word expresses the uneasy slumbers of the tracked, tired, 
suspicious animal called thief, which, as soon as it is in safety, 
sinks down and rolls into the abysses of deep and necessary sleep, 
with the powerful wings of suspicion constantly spread over it — 
an awful repose, comparable to that of the wild beast, which sleeps 
and snores, but whose ears nevertheless remain ever watchful. 



acvi 



Introduction. 



EverytUflf >• fierce in this idiom. The initial or final syllables 
of verdt, iKe words tbexnselrcSf are harsh and astounding. A 
womaa is a Urgmt. And what poetry ! Straw is ' la plumt dt 
Bcauc/* The word mtdnight is rendered by douxe piombes crosunt. 
Does DOC that make ooc shudder ?" 

Victor Hugo, after BaUac, has devoted a whole chapter to argot 
in his MisirakUs, and both these great authors have left little to be 
said on the subject Vicior Hugo, dealing with its Protean character, 
writes : ''Argot being the idiom of corruption, is quickly corrupted. 
Besides, as it always seeks secrecy, so soon as it feels itself under- 
stood it transforms itself. . . . For this reason argot is subject to 
perpetual inmsformation— a secret and rapid work which ever goes 
on. It makes more progress in ten years than the regular language 
in ten centuries." 

In spite of the successive revolutions referred to, a number of 
old cant words are still used in their original form. Some have 
been, besides, more or less distorted by different processes, the 
results of these alterations being subjected in their turn to fresh 
disguises. As for slang proper, it is mostly metaphoric. 

A large proportion of the vocabulary of argot is to be traced to 
the early Romance idiom, or to some of our country patois, the off- 
springs of the ancient Langue d'oc and Langue d'oil. Some of the 
terms draw their origin from the Italian language and jargon, and 
were imported by Italian quacks and sharpers. Such are lime 
(/AiV/). fourline [thief)y macaronner {to inform ^j^ainst^ rabouirx 
Idtvt'f), rif (Jirf)t escarpe (f/nf/, murderer)^ respectively from lima, 
Ibrtano, macaronarc, rabuino, ruffo, Scarpa, some of which belong 
to the Romany, as lima. The German schlafcn has given schloffer, 
and the Latin fur has provided us with the verb aflurer. Several 
are of Greek parentage : arton {brtad)^ from the accusative oprov ; 
omie (/i«*^/). fro"* "P>''C ; pier {to drink), piolle {tavcm)^ piou 
{itmnk\ from miXv. 

The word argot itself, formerly a cant word, but which has now 
gainfd admittance into the Dictionncdrt dt tAcadimie, is but the 
corruption of jargon, called by the Italians " lingua gerga," abbre- 
viated into " gergo," from which the French word sprang, — gcrgo 
i\<^\{ bemg tlcrived, according to Salvini, from the Greek \xp6^ 
{taitid). Hence lingua gerga, sacred lanjcua^e, only known to ibe 



Jntroditction. 



XVII 



tnittated. M. Ctfnin thus traces the origin of argot : lingua hiera, 
then lingua gerga, il gergo ; hence jergon or jargon, finally argot. 
Other philologists have suggested that it comes from the Greek 
Afj^^ idler ; and this learned deriv:ilion is not improbable, as, 
among the members of the " argot " — originally the corporation of 
pedlars and vagabonds — were scholars like Villon (though there 
exists no evidence of the ward having been used in bis time), and 
runaway priests who had, as the French say, " thrown the cassock 
to the nettles.*' M. Nisard» however, rejects these derivations, and 
believes that argot comes from argittus^ pointed, cunning. It 
scctns, in any case, an indubitable fact that the term argot at Brst 
was applied only to the confraternity of vagabonds or **argotiers,'' 
and there is no evidence of its having been used before 1698 as an 
appellation for their language, which till then had been known as 
"jargon du matois" or "jargon de Vargol." Grandval, in his 
Vtct puni ou Cartouciuy offers the following derivation, which must 
be taken for what it is worth. 

Mau & propo§ d'argot, dil alon Ltmo«in, 

Ne m'appreiulnc-voui pas, voos qui partei laua, 

D'od caie bttte Unguc a pru ton orifiinf ? 

— De U vtllc d'Ar(0«, et jc I'ai lu dan< Htnc, 

l«poDdtt Balasny. Lc grantl Agunemnon 

Kii flcurir dam Argoi crt eloquent j*r|Eaii. 



— Tu dU *rai, Ralagny, rrpril aJors Cartouche ; 
Uau cctte lansuc sort d'unc phu vicille wuchc, 
Et j'lu lu iiuclquc pan, datu un certain buutjuin 
P'arsot tradiiii en srcc, de grcc mU en lalin. 
El iJcfi^iM en fran<;aU, que Jason et Th£ft^, 
Hercute, Philoactc, Admitc, Hylaa, Lync^, 
Castor, Pollux, OrphJe et Unt d'autrcs htfroa 
Qui trimfrtml pincer la toboo 1 Coldios, 
Dans le tiavire Arg^a, pendant leur \oa% voyage, 
luvciUirent entre eux ce sublime luigagc 
A6n de mieax iromper le roi Culchidiea 
Et que de leur projct i] oe toupconnM ricn. 

Eofin toui les doubleurt d« la richc toison, 
IH leur navire Argo lui donairent le nom. 
Amis, voici quelle eu ton tftynologie. 

A certain number of slang terms proceed from uniform and 
tematic alterations in the body of the French word, but these 
tods do not seem to have produced many expressions holding 
a prnnancnt place in the dialect. Snch is the " langage en lem," 



XVIU 



Introduction. 



mach oscd by buccbers some forty years ago, but now only koown 
to a few. But a very small number of words thus coiAcd hai 
passed into tbe main body of tbe lingo, as being too yaxffhj^ 
and because ai^ot has a general tendency to brevity. 

The more usual sufi&xcs used are mar, anche, inchc, in, ingue, o, 
orgue, aille, i^re, muche, mon, mont, oquc, ^ue, igue, which give 
such terms 



^picemax for 

boutanche — 
amincemincbe — 

burlin > 

burlingue i 

catnaro -^ 

bonorgue — 

voozaille — ' 

m^ti^re — 

petmuche — 

cabcnnon ^ 

gilmont — 

loufoque — 

cham^gue — 
mjzigue 



spider, 

boutique, 

ami, 

bureau, 

camarade. 

bon, 

vous, 

me, 

pet, 

cabaret, 

gilet, 

(ou, 

chameau. 



— me. 

The army has furnished a large contingent to slang, and has pro- 
vided us whh such words as colon (co/cmrf) ; petit colon {/iVufenani' 
cchmf) ; la femme du regiment {Big drum) ; la malle {prison) ; un 
bleu {rtcruiS) ; poulet d'lnde {sUiif)^ and tbe humorous expression, 
sortir sur Ics jambes d'ua autre (/£» be confimd to barracks, or to 
the guard-room ). 

Much-maligned animals have been put into requisition, the fish 
tribe serving to denominate the Paris buUy, that plague of certain 
quarters. 

With the parts of the body might be formed a complete or- 
chestra. Thu5"guiure" stands for the head; *' flutes" for legs; 
"grossc caisse"for the body; "trompette" does duty for the 
lace, *'mirliton" for the nose, and ** sifflet" for the throat. 

The study of the slang jargon of a nation — a laxiguage which is 
sot the expression of conventional ideas, but the unvarnished and 



Introduction, 



XIX 



rude expression of life in its true aspects — may give us an insight 
into the foibles and predominant vices of those who use it 

Now though the French as a nation are not hard drinkcis, yet we 
must come to the conclusion — in the face of the many synonyms of 
the single word dnink, whilsl there is not one for the word sober — 
that Parisian workmen have either a lively imagination, or that 
they would scarcely prove eligible for recruits in the Blue Ribbon 
Army. Intoxication — from a state of gentle inebriation, when one 
is "aJlum^,^ or "elevated," to the helpless state when the "poivrot," 
or "^ Ittihingion," is " asphyxitf," or " regularly scammered," when he 
can\ '* see a hole i n a Udder/' or when he *' laps the gutter " — has no 
less than eighty synonyms. 

The French possess comparatively few terms for the word 
tnooey ; but, in spite of the well-worn saying, "Tor est une chim^re," 
cr the insincere exclamation. '* Tor, ce vil m(5tal ! " the argot vocabu- 
shows as many as fifty-four synonyms for the ** needful." The 
liih arc still richer, for Her Majesty's coin is known by more than 
hundred and thirty slang words, from the humble "brown" 
(halfpenny) to the "long-tailed one" (bank-note). 

Though there is no c\'idence that the social evil has a greater 
hold on Paris than on London or Berlin, yet the Parisians have no 
less than one hundred and tifty distinct slang synonvTns to indicate 
the different ^-aricties of " unfortunates," many being borrowed from 
UDCS of animals, such as "vachc," "chameau," '*biche," &c. 
of the other terms are highly suggestive and appropriate. 
wc have "omnibus," " tleur de macadam," "demoiselle du 
"autel de besoin," the dismal "pompe funcbre," the 
ible '^pailLisse de corps de garde," and the '^grenier h coups 
sabre," which reflects on the brutality of soldiers towards the 
ones. 
For the fuad the French jargon can boast of about fifty represen- 
tative sLang terms, some of which have been borrowed from the 
;etable kingdom. Homage is rendered to its superior or govern- 
powcTs by such epithets as " boussole " and " Sorbonne," and 
a compliment is paid to its inventive genius by the term, " la boite 
i surprises," which is, however, degraded into " la tronche" when 
it has rolled into the executioner's basket. But it is treated with 
still more irreverence when deprived of its natural ornament,— so 



XX 



Introduction. 



that a man with a bald pate is described as having no more ** pail- 
lasson i la porte," or " mouron sur la cage." He is also said some- 
times to sport a " tete de veau.*' 

Grim humour is displayed in the long list of metaphors to describe 
deaths the promoters of the slang expressions having borrowed 
from the technical vocabulary of their craft. Thus soldiers describe 
it as *' ddfiler la parade," for which English military men have the 
equivalent, " to lose the number of one's mess ; " " passer Tarme i 
gauche;" "dcscendre la garde,'* after which the soldier will never be 
called again on sentry duty ; "recevoir son d<5compte/' or deferred 
pay. People who are habitual sufferers from loolhache have no 
doubt contributed the expression, "n'avoir plus mal aux dents;* 
sailors, "casser son c&ble " and "dt5ralinguer;" coachmen, "casser 
son fouct ; " drummers, '* avaler ses baguettes," their sticks being 
henceforth useless to them ; bilUard-players are responsible for 
"d^visser son billard ;" servants for " difchirer son tabher." Then 
what horrible philosophy in the expression, " mcttre la table pour 
les asticots I " 

A person of sound mind finds no place in the argot vocabulary ; 
but madness, from the mild state which scarcely goes beyond 
eccentricity to the confirmed lunatic, has found many definitions, the 
single expression " to be cracked " being represented by a number of 
comical synonyms, many of them referring to the presence of some 
troublesome animal in the brain, such as *'un mousiique dans la 
bo!te au sel " or *' un hanneton dans le plafond." 

Courage has but one or two equivalents, but the act of the coward 
who vanishes, or the thief who seeks to escape the clutches of the 
police, has received due attention from the promoters of argot. 
Thus we have the highly picturesque expressions, '* faire patatrot," 
which gives an impression of the patter of the runaway's feet ; "se 
faire une paire de mains courantcs," literally to make for oneself a 
pair of running hands ; " se ddguiser en cerf," to imitate that swift 
animal the deer ; " fusilier le plancher," which reminds one of the 
quick rat-tat of feet on the boards. 

To show kindness to one, as far as 1 have been able to notice, is 
not represented, but the ace of doing bodily injury, or fighting, has 
furnished the slang vocabulary with a rich contingent, the least 
forcible of which is certainly not the amiable invitation expressed 



In traduction. 



XXI 



in the words of the Paris rough, " viens que j'le manj^c le nez !"* or 
"fiumrfrote tcs abattis qucj'te drfmolisse !" 

What ingenuity and precision of simile some of these vagaries of 
langxiagc offer ! The man who is annoyed, badgered, is compared 
to an elephant with a small tormentor in a part of hi» body by which 
he can be effectually driven to despair, whilst deprived of all means 
of retaliation— he is then said to have " un rat dans la trompe ! " 
He who gets drunk carves out for himself a wooden face, and "se 
scutpter uncgueule de bois " certainly evokes the sight of the stohd, 
stupid features of the 'Mushington/' with half-open mouth and lack- 
lustre eyes. 

The career of an unlucky criminal may thus be described in his 
own picturesque but awful language. The '^p^gre^iM/V/"), or "es- 
carpe " (murderer)^ who has been imprudent enough to allow him- 
self to be " paumtf marron " {caught tn the act) whilst busy effecting 
a *^ cboppin " {theft\ or committing the more serious offence of 
"fairc un gas & la dure" {to rob wiih 7//Wc/rr^), using the knife 
when " lavant son linge dans la saignanie " {tnurd^rifig)^ or yet the 
summar}' process of breaking into a house and killing all the in- 
nutes, "faire unc maison enti^re," will probably be taken by "U 
roassc" {pfilic^), first of all before the " quart d'oeil " {police wagiS" 
traic\ from whose office he will be conveyed to the d(5p6t in the 
**panicr \x salade" {prison van), having perhaps in the meanwhile 
spent a night in the " violon " {celts at the police statio/i). In due 
time he will be brought into the presence of a very inquisitive person, 
the " turieux," who will do his utmost to pump him, *' entraver dans 
5CS flanches," or make him reveal bis accomplices, " manger le 
morccau/or, again, to say all he knows about the affair, "d^biner le 
true** From two to six months after this preliminary examination, 
be will be brought into the awful presence of the " l^on " [president 
4f/ assise lourt}^ at the "carr^ des gerbcs/' where he sits in his red 
robes, administering justice. Now, suffering from a violent attack 
6(**^ihnc^ (cAarg-e), the prisoner puts all his hopes in his " par- 
nilia <faltique" {witnesses /or the defence)^ and in his "mddecin" 
\fmms£{)y who will try whether a " purgation " {speech/or the de/enct) 
iritl not cure him of his ailment, especially should he have an attack 
of *^rcdoublement de fi^vre"(««i/ char<^e). Should the medicine 
be ineffectual, and the "h^iteurs opinants'' {Jurymen) have pro- 



xx» 



i^afwduetiM. 



ficnaced i^^Kt ^sm^ ^ ksres the " plancbe au pain ^ {har) to re> 
turn whcocv ht cane, m tbe ^ hdpital " {prison), which he will only 
lMiv««lKa*C*^*CA^)- ^"' should he be "un cheval de re- 
tour • {M lfm^\ be wiU probably be given a free passage to go 
" se Uvcr Its pie^ dans le grand pr^ ' {it iramsp^rUd) to ** La 
Nouvclte " [A'flr Cdiidtma), or " Cayenne les Eanx ; " or, worse 
siiU, be may be left for some time in the " boite an sel ' {c^ttJtmned 
cttt) at La Roqoette, attired in a " ligotante de rifle " {strmt waist- 
cru/\ attended by a " mouton " (sp^), who tries to get at his secrets, 
and now and then receiving the exhortations of the " ratichon " 
(print). Ax an early hour one morning he is apprised by the 
" maugr^c " {Jir^rfor) that he is to suffer the penaJty of the Uw. 
After ** la toilette *' by " Chariot " {cviiin^ cf iJu hair fy tMc txtat- 
iionfr\ he is assisted to the " Abba>-e de Monte-4-iegrel " (^»a//pii'tu\ 
where, after the " sanglicr " (^priest) has given him a final embrace, 
the " soubrcttes de Chariot " {execn(ionrf*s assidmmts) sebe him, and 
make him play " 2i la main chaude " {M cctMa), Chariot pulls 
a string, when the criminal is turned into "on \xt^* {is rxratfe^ 
by being made to "^ternuer dans le son* {^ gmH ^ timt dj. His 
•'machaboc" {remmMs) is then taken to the "champ de na\<ts" 

For the following 1 am indebted lo ihe coonesyof the Rev. J. W. 
Horsley, Chaplain to H. M. Prison, ClerWenw«ll, who, in his highly 
interesimg Prison Xotes makes the following remarks on thie^'cs:* 
slang : " It ^^^ ■<' antiquity, as well as its vitality and power of 
growth and development by constant accretion ; in it are preserved 
many words interesting to the student of language, and from it have 
passed not a few words into the ordinary stock of the QtieeD*s 
Knulisb. Of multifold origin, it is yet mainly derived from Romany 
or K'P^y Ulk, and thereby contains a large Eastemelement, in which 
old Srtnucrit rooti may readily be traced. Many of these words 
would be unintelligible to ordinary* folk, but some ha^'e passed into 
common speech. For instance, the worxls bamboozle, daddy, pal 
(coinpanion or friend), mull (to make a mull or mess of a thing), 
hoi>h (ffum llie l'ersian),are pure gipsy words, but hare found some 
lodging, If not a home, in our vernacular. Then there are siirrirab 
(not AlwAyndfthc fittest; from the tongue of o«rTcDB»ic ancestors, 
>o iHal t)r. Latham, the philologist, says ; ' The thieves of Loc^don ' 



Introduction. 



XX m 



(and he might still more have said the professional tramps) * are 
the conservators of Anglo- Saxonisms.' Next, there are the cosmo- 
politan absorptions from many a tongue. From the French bouilli 
we probably get the prison slang term 'bull' for a ration of meat. 
Chat, thieves' slang for house, is obviously chdUau. Steel, the 
familiar name for Coldbath Fields Prison, is an appropriation and 
abbreviation of Bastille ; and he who 'does a tray' (serves three 
months' imprisonment) therein, borrows his word from our GalHcan 
neighbours. So from the Italian we get casa for house, filly {Ji^iia) 
for daughter, donny {donna) for woman, and omec {uomo) for man. 
The Spanish gives us don^ which the universities have not despised 
as a useful term. From the German we get durrynacfcer, for a 
female hawker, from dorf^ ' a village/ and tmchgehen^ * to run 
after.' From Scotland we borrow dutis^ for clothes, and from the 
Hebrew skofuU for base coin. 

•"Considering that in the manufacture of the domestic and social 
slang of nicknames or pet names not a little humour or wit is com- 
monly found, it might be imagined that thieves' slang would be 
a great treasure-house of humorous expression. That this is not 
the case arises from the fact that there is very little glitter even in 
what they take for gold, and that their life is mainly one of 
miserable anxiety, suspicion, and fear ; forced and gin-inspired is 
their merriment, and dismal, for the most part, are their faces when 
not assuming an air of bravado, which decei\'es not even their com- 
panions. Some traces of humour are to be found in certain euphe- 
misms, such as the delicate expression * fingersmith ' as descriptive 
of a trade which a blunt world might caTtmit o( A pickpocket. Or, 
again, to get three months* hard labour is more pleasantly described 
as getting thirteen c lean shirts, one being ser\'ed out in prison each 
week. The tread-wheel, again, is more politely called the ever- 
lasting staircase, or the wheel of life, or the vertical case-grinder. 
Penal servitude is dignified with the appellation of ser\'ing Her 
Nfajesiy for nothing ; and even an attempt is made to lighten the 
horror of the climax of a criminal career by speaking of dying in a 
horse's nightcap, /.^., a halter." 

The English public schools, but especially (he military establish- 
ments, seem to be not unimportant manufacturing centres fnr slang. 
Only a small proportion, however, of the expressions coined there 



k^ 



XXIV 



Intn^uctxou. 



I 



appear to bare been adopted by the general slang-talking public, as 
inost are local terms, and can only be used at their own birthplace. 
The same expressions in some cases have a totally different signifi- 
cation according to the places wbere ihey are in vogue. Thus 
gentlemen cadets at the **Shop,* i./., the Royal Military Academy. 
will talk of the doctor as being the " skipper," whereas elsewhere 
" skipper "* has the si^icaiioa of master, head of an esublishment. 
The expression ** tosh,* owkmIbs bath, seems to have been imported 
by students frocn EtoA^ Harrow, and Charterhouse, to the "Shop," 
where '*to tosh* mea&s to bathe, to wash, but also to loss an 
obnoxious indivMul nrto « cold bMh, adTantage being taken of 
bis being ia foB wrifcrm. A w o rt i tr e xp re ss ion connected with the 
forced appttcaftioa of ootd water at tbe above esublishment is 
tcnned " chilbat mp«C * ^ £tOtt» a peoalty enibrced on the nen- 
boys of SHifiRf % SMif «■ |Mb&c» vith the aberaative (according to 
the Bvmyim ttiff ^ ^m^ ^*Uk SOtmU of C £. Pascoe) of 
drifdcioc a. MMdMW ■ MUWR of si4l mad boer ; the corresponding 
penah^ oaik»«ACMte«f thftamml of safaftowue*' snookers" at 
the K. M« JjooJNiyoartKic— rift soie few ycow ago of splashing 

at ibeir heads. 
duty or other to 

of writing out 

, of a master. 

is ooffTvpted into 

of "***^ cocn- 

«p aiMi 

c^ of a ooqwraL 

fcr fried 

L*fcr»rfiaei;*^mse- 

Mbe 

to^nS^otthe 

his 

« a swot : ~ amd at 

%dHp*«r iMtrtiber 



than wish ^tH 
whoR laMQr cmM mi ov^ 



^^Pi^W Wf wA^f% OMV% WlW 













A>'. ♦** 



Cant, Fifteenth Century. 



XXV 



Fifteenth Century. 

LE JARGON OU JOBELIN DE MAISTRE 
FRANgOIS VILLON. 



BALLADE IIL 



S PELICANS, 

Qui, en tous temps, 
ATsncez dedans le pogois 

Goarde piarde, 

£t SUT la tarde, 
Desbouiacz les povres nyois, 
£t poor soustenir vostre pois, 
Les dappes soat privez de caire. 

Sans faire haire» 

Ne hault braiere, 
Mais plantez ils sont comme joncz, 
Four les sires qui sont si longs. 

Souvent aux arques 

A leurs marques, 
Se laissent tons desbooser 

Pour nier, 

Et enterver 
Pour leur contre, que lots faisons 
La fee aux arques respons. 
Vous niez deux coups, ou bten troys, 

Aux gallois. 

Deux, ou troys 



Mioeront trestout aux Trontz, 
Pour les sires qui sont si longs. 

£t ponrce, benars 

Coquillars, 
Rebecquez vous de la Montjoye 

Qui desvoye 

Votre proye, 
Et vous fera de tout brouer. 
Pour joncher et enterver, 
Qui est aux pigeons bien cher ; 

Pour rifler 

Et placquer 
Les angels, de mal tous rondz 
Pour les sires qui sont si longs. 

Envoi. 

De paour des hurmes 

Et des grumes, 
Rassurez vous en droguerie 

Et faerie, 
Et ne soyez plus sur les joncz, 
Pour les sires qui sont si longs. 



TRANSLATION. 

Police qnei, yrho at all times drink good wine at the tavern, and at night empty poor 
Mmpkton*' pones, and to provide for your extortions silly thieves have to part with their 
Booey, without complaiaiag or clamouring, yet they are planted is jail, like so many 
reeds, to be plucked by the gaunt hangmen. 

Oftentimes at the cashboxcs, at places mwked out for plunder, they allow themselves 
to be despoiled, when fighting and resisting to save their confederate, while we at* 



XXVI 



Cantf Sixteatih Century, 



pnctiung our art* oo the hiddm cofficr*. Yon maVe two or three onaels on the boon 
cotnpaniont- Two or three will mark them nil for the gatlow*. 

Heoce, ye simple- minded vagaboads, turn away from the gallows, which gives you the 
colic and will deprive you of all, thai you may deceive and ural what is of »o much valae 
to the dupes, that you may ootwit and thnuh the police, so eager to briog you to the 
scaffold. 

For fcaf of the gibbet and the beam, exert more cunning and bt more wily, aad be do 
longer in prlaon, thence to be brought to the acaffold. 



Sixteenth Century. 

SONNET EN AUTHENTIQUE LANGAGE 
SOUDARDANT/ 

(^Extnut des Prtmihres (Euvrts Poiiiques du Capitains Lasphnu,) 

AcciPANT ' du marpaut ' la galiere ' pourrie^ 
Grivolant' portc-flambc' cnfile le Irimart.' 
Mais en dcspit de Gillc,' 6 gcux, ton Gtroaart,* 
A la mftte '° on lura '* ta biotte '• conic. " 

Tu pcux gourd pioller '* mc crcdant " cl mnrfie '• 
Dc rornion," du momc t^' et dc roygnan " criart, 
Dc I'artois blanchcmin."* Que Ion riflant diouait''* 
Nc rive" du Courricr randrumelle gaudic." 

Ne roncc point du sabre ^* an luion '' du taudis, 



1 Lansage wndardant, ulditri Uttgt. 
> Acdpant./afTeceiram. 
S Marpaut, kett. 

* Oalicre. mart. 

ft Grivolaoi, n».mt/»r n s^ldttr- 

fl Flambe, tu-crd. 

T Trimart, ra*d, 

■ GiUC) M^mufifr a runaway. 

* Girotiart. patron. 

1* Mette, ■wimt'tMppi momimg; tJkigtts* 
mtttincpiait. 
't Lura. will ste, 
1> Ifiutte, ttttd. 
II Conie. dead. 



u Gourd piuller. drink kemivxly, 
'* Me credant,_/%r me croyant. 
'< Morfie, eai. 
" Omioa, ca/cn. 
1' Morne, mutta». 
*• Oygnan,/ff»- oignon. 
^ Aitois blanchemin, tvAite tread. 
** RiDant chouarl.^fr^yrM/. 
so Rive, fr/rrt ta coititm. 
" Andrumctle gmA'xc, jt*lty girl . 
>* Ne roncc point du kabre, d9 not lay 
iht iti'ck on. 
^ Miont iey, waiter. 



Cant, SLxtcenih Century, 



XXVII 



Qui n'aillc an Gftulfaraalt,' gergonant dc tnis,' 
Que son jouroal ' o flus * nVinpoupe U fouillousc.' 

N'enibiant* on rouillarde,^ el de noir roupillant/ 
Sar la gourde rrctille.' et sur le gourd volant, '° 
Aiosi tu DC luras r«ccolante tortouse.^^ 



Sixteenth Centxiry. 



DIALOGUE BETWEEN A HEADMAN IN THE 
CANTING CREW AND A VAGABOND. 

{Fr»m TMamas HarmafCs CatttU or Wareningfor Common Cursdors^ 
vulgarly coiled yagaiotus, 1568.) 



^ 



Uf-rixfti j'ifan. Bene Ltghtmans" to thy quairomci," in what liplten'* 
hasi ihou lypped " in ihU darkcman*,'* whether in a lybbege " or in the 
ttrtimmel ? '* 

/loge, 1 coDcbcd a hogshead *' in a Skypper ^ this darkemans. 

I towTe" (be strummel trine" upon thy nachbet" and Tog* 



Mm. 



with a gage of bene 



Jf^. I saye by the Salomon " I will lage it of 
bous^ ; ^^ then cut to roy nose walch." 

Why, hast thou any lowre** in thy bonge** to bouse?*' 



* Ccrfotwnt de Icfti*, r^M*//«iWN/- ^ 
t. 

a J««fMl >««fcr/4M*. 
« O fla*. 9^P^k a/tmwth. 

* S\mpiMptXAto\u\\»M^jilItkj^ktt. 

* l>r*«<llb«Mil, net traif*Utmg. 
f HDoniu^ drinJu. 

* tW notr roaptllftot, sUe^m£ <•/ nlgAt. 

* Gourde frvuUc, tkiek strm*. 
l« VoUnt, riMfr 

• * TortooM. rvj^e. 

M Upkcn, A#*ur 
U Lypf*d, *Uft. 
la ttarkraani, nigkl. 



17 Lybbege. ^^. 

*• Sinimncl, ttmn: 

1' Coacit*4»hotthtMA,laydnen/«alM;^. 

** Skyppcr, htim. 

** I towre, / Mv. 

» Trine. kaMf. 

» NjKhbet, M/. 

'^ Toftman, fM/. 

'* Salomon, mm^. 

J* Lage il of, tw/r iV «»^ 

^ Cage of bone boute, fuMri tf g»*4 
drink, 

n Cut to my aoM watch, amy wJkat y*H 
fviii l9 M/. 

"• Lowrc, rman^, 

** Bonge, fiMTtt, 

» To boute, to Jrimk. 



xxvin 



Cantt Sixteenth Century. 



Jltge. But a fUgge,' a wyrt,* and a make' 

Man, Whf, where is the kene ' that hath the ben bouse ? 

/*fffr. A bene mort * hereby at tlic sijjnc uf the prauncer.' 

Afan, I cut! it is quycr^ bous«» I bousd a flagge the lost darkmani. 

Kff^f. But bouse there a bord." and thou shah haue bencshlp.* Tower 
ye yander is the kene, dup the gygger,'" and maund *' that is bene &hyp. 

AfoM. This bouw is as bcnship as rome bouse.'' Now I tower that 
ben bouse makes oase nabes. " Maunde of this morte what ben pecke ** is 
in her ken. 

A»^. She bos a Cacling chete," a grunting chetc," mflF Pecke," 
Cassan,'*and poplarr of yaninu** 

Man. That is bcnship to our watche."* Now we haue well bousd, let 
Yt strike some chctc."* Yonder dweUeth a quycr cuffen," it were benship 
tomyll" hym. 

^fljK. Now bynge we a waste ** to the hygh pad»'* the niffmanes ** 
is by. 

Man. So may we happen on the liannanes,'^ and dy tlie Tarke,** or 
to the quyerken " and skower quyacr cnunpings,*** and so to tryning on the 
chates." Gerry gan," the ruffian*" dye the." 

/!o^. What, stowe your bene," cofc," and sut benat wydds,"' and 
byng we to rome Tylc," to nyp a bongc ;" so shall wc haue lowre for the 
boMing ken,*'' and when wc byng back to the dcuscauycl," wc wvU fylc he - 
Mine duddes " uf the Ruffem ans^*' or myll the ken for a la^e ol Uudcs,"" 

1 f'\MggK, £rtmt. 

• Wyo, /€mHy. 
1 Make, Ma^ptmny. 

« Ktne, hMiMt. 

• Bene mort, Kooti 

• Prauncer, htfru. 
T Qiiyer, 6aJ. 
Uoril, tkiiting. 

• Itcneship, tjtalUni, 

10 Dup ihe ^gger. f/ra tkd dscr. 

11 Maund, «i>. 

12 Kotiic l>ousc. tifint. 
)^ NflAc nab««, dmnkm ktod, 
M Pocke. Miwr 
la Cacling <:hete,/»»A 
I' Gruniing chetc, pif. 
II Ruff pecke, Aih-M. 
IS Ci^^"i ek*n*. 

IS PopltfT of r>nun. mitk ^^rridgt, 
W Tu our watcbe,/irr mm. 
II Strike some chete, iUaU umtiMing. 
2> Quyu cuffcn, matittraU. 
3d Myll. nh. 



^ Byng* wc a waste, kt w mmmf. 
>9 Pad. rvod, 
M Ruffinaoci, tB«w/. 
ST Hannaacs, fiWikr. 
M C\y the Tarke, ^ wJii//fd. 
*• Quyerken, friten. 
^ Skower quyacr cram[HngK, 6*thflckUJ 
vmt* Mis amd/tttn-t. 
*1 Chatc*. [AiUmrt. 
" Gerry gau, koidyamr tamgmt, 
** Rnffian, dtvit. 
M aye the, UA* tkn. 
>• Stowe your twBc^ h^td f9mr ft»m> 
•■ QeX%,gmd/tlUvo^ 
>r Sut t>cnai wyddi, t^t^k btttrr w*rdt. 
9" Kotne v\\v. L^mdan. 
** Nyp a boofc, cut mpurtt, 
<o ttouung ken, mkkoum. 
*' Dcuaeauyd, c»umtry. 
* ■' Uuddes litum claikst. 
*'' Kuffcmans. kfd^a. 
** Laggc of dudo, farvwt ^chikn. 



Canty Seventeenth Century. 



XXIX 



Seventeenth Century. 

DIALOGUE DE DEUX ARGOTIERS.^ 

l'on folisson' et l'autre maling&eux,* qui se rencontrent 
juste a la lourdb* 1>*une vergne.* 

{Extraii du Jargon de rjr^t,) 

Le MaliMgreux. La haate ' t'aquige ^ en chenastre " sante. 

Lt Poiissou, Et t^ziire ' aussi, fanandel ; ^^ oil triinardes "-tu ? 

Zx Afalmgreux. £n ce pasqaelin *' de Berry, on m'a ronscailU " que 
tmcher " ^tait chenastre ; et en cette vergne fiche-t-on la thune " goiude* 
ment?" 

Lt JWisscH. Qaelque peu. pas guire. 

£e Malingreux. La rousse *^ y ^t-elle chenastre? 

Lt PoiisscKL Nenni ; c*est ce qui me fait ambier " hors de cette vesgne ; 
car si je n'cusse eu du michon,^' je fusse cosni ^ de £um. 



1 Arcoticn, member$ 9/ tkt "coMtifif 



* PblUsoo, hm^-miUud beggar, 

> Malinyeux, wuumtd »r skk beggar. 

* Loordet/w/r. 

* Yergne, tenm. 

* La hftote, Oe Almigktf. 
T Aqutfe. kee^. 

* Chcnutre, /w^ 

* TCziitt, tkee. 

10 Fanandel, c^mrmde. 



11 TnmMiAvSt going. 

1* Pasquelin. country, 

IS Rouicaill^, toid. 

1* Tnicher, to beg, 

IS Ficfae-t-on la thune, i/tf/A/^/nvoAivt. 

10 Gourdement, muck. 

IT La rousse, the Police, 

IS Ambier, /v. 

19 Michon, moiuy, 

^ Cosni, died. 



XXX 



Cant, Sei*£tit€enth Century, 



Le Maiingrtux. Y a-t*il ud castu ^ dana cette vergne. 

Le Poll t son . J asp in.' 

Le Maiin^enx. Est-il chenu?* 

Le Polmon. Pas guere; les pioles* ne son! que de frelille.' . . , 

Le Malmgreux. Veiix-lu vcnir prendre dc la morfc* ct piausscr* ovcc 
m^iere * en une des pioles que tu m'as rou&caillees ? 

Le PoiissoH. W iCy a ni ronds,' ni berplU,'^ en ma felousc;^^ je vais 
piauKscr en quelquc grcuossc.*" 

Lf Afalmgrcux. Encore que n*y ayez du michon, nc laissez pas de v«iir, 
car il y a deux menses '' de ronds en ma hcane/* et deux omie<i '^ en mon 
guculard," que j'ai egraill^es *' sut le trimar ; ** bions '" le» laire rifTodcr,** 
veux-tu ? 

Le PoiisseH. Girole," et bent soit le grand havre,'* qui m*a fnit rencontrvr 
u chcnastre occasion ; je vais me rifjouir ct chanter une petite chanson. . . . 

JLe Afaiingreux. Si tu vcux Iriracr '"* dc compagoie avec ro«iire, nous 
aquigeruns grandc ch^re," je sais bicD aquif>er les luques,'' engrailler ramie, 
casscr la hane aux fr^mions," pour epouser la fourcaodi^e,^^ si quelques 
rovaux ** me mouchaillenl.*" 

Le Poiisson. Ah ! le havre garde mifziirc, je ne fus jamais ni fonrgue ** 
ni doublcux.*' 

Le Malingreux, Ni med^ nan plus» je roascaille " tous les luisans *' 
au grand havre dc I'oraison. 



I Jaspin, ^j. 

• Piolcft, roams, 
ft FnilUle, straw. 

• Morfc, /i»W. 

T Piauiwr, to tlt^p, 

• »1^zitr«. w/. 

S Rondk, hMi/fenct. 

" Felousc.Av**/. 

1> Mendes, dovn. 
•* Hcnnc. ^urtt* 
** Ornie*. htm. 
« CueuL»rd, ttsilUt 
ir EgnUlto. koJud, 
UTriaiAr.rmiW: 



IB nioas, letKtgs, 

•^ RifToder, ceok, 

» Girole, s^bt it, 

» Havic, God. 

» Trtmer, t» otalk. 

M AquigerDtu grande chtic, wUt Uv* 

** Aquigcf les luqucs, prtfnrt picturtt. 

M CaucT U hanc aux Tr^inioufc, xttat 
Pmrui at fairs. 

^ Epouiet U routcandifcre, /« tkrmu 
anMjr th* MtffUn ^re^rtjr. 

n Rovaux, polict, 

V Mouctuillcni, ttt. 

» Fourpic, Ttceivtr ttf it»Um pr^ptriy, 

1 Doubleux, ikitf. 

" J« rauscaillc. i fray. 

K* Tuui les iuiMiu, rvtry day. 



Cantt Seventeenth Century. 



XXXI 



Seventeenth Century, 
ENGLISH GIPSIES* OATH. 



yEjctratt from Bampfyide- Moore Carew, King of the MendUamtu\ 

When a fresh recruit is admitted into this fraternity, he is to take the 
follow tng oath, ttdministercd by the principal maunder,' after going through 
the annexed form : — 

First a new name is given hira, by which he is ever after to be called ; 
ibct), itAnding up in the middle of the assembly, and directing his face to 
the dtmbcr damber, or principal man of the gang, he repeats the following 
oiUh, which is dictated to him by some experienced member of the 
fraternity : — 

** X, Crank CuSn, do swear to be a true brother, and that I will in all 
things obc)* the commands of the great tawny prince,' keep his counsel, and 
not divulge the secrets of my brethren. 

*' I wUl never leave or forsake the company, but observe and keep all 
the limes of appointment, either by day or by night, in every place 
whatever. 

'* I will not teach anyone to cant ; nor will I disclofe any of our 
myVerics to them. 

** 1 will take my prince's part against all that shall oppose him, or any of 
BSa accoiding to the utmost of my ability ; nor will I suffer him, or anyone 
belonging to us, to be abased by any strange abranis,' rufiics,* hookers,' 
poiliarde.'s' swaddlers/ Irish loylcs,' swigmen,* whip Jacks," Jarkmen," 
bawdy baskets,'* dommcrars, " clapper deacons/* patricoes," or cur- 
tails ;" but 1 will defend bini, or them, as much as I can, against all other 
outliers whatever. I will not conceal aught I win out of libkins,'^ or from 



* Maiiod«r, Bttgw, 

a Tawny priaoe, PHmce Prig, the kemd 

*tkggiftin. 

S Abmns, kmlf-nAktd hfgjgitrs, 

* Itaibo. U^X'^r* vtJu Juun the otd 
aoUHer, 

* Uooltcn, tkirprt tvh* Ug if* iht day- 
H^ «<*^ tte»i at nigkt/rom ikafa vtitk 

e Falliardcs, wrnggrd htgx^rt. 
I S«*dakr«, Jriik RamMM CatkaliiS 
mkoffttemd emtptrritn. 

* TtPjki^ i*gt»r* withp€dlar'ifmck. 



' Swigmcn, ^ggan. 
10 Whip Jacks, ^egr^rt wke sAmm thd 

tMi^nntcktd tailor, 

■I* Jorkmcn, Uamtd bfggmn, hogging- 
Utter tMH^ttors. 

>» Bawdy baskets, /nu/rV«r«j. 

1> Doramcran, dumb 6t^art. 

1* Clapper dggeons, teggart ^y hirtk. 

*ft Pauicoes. tkMt wMe perform the 

marriage (frtmeny. 

10 Curtails, ttcond in commtamd, with 
thart ctff4dk. 

^t Libkiai, lodgingt. 



^'^ 



xxxn 



Cane, Eightcmth Ccntitry. 



the mflinans, ' but will presenre it for the Use of the company. Lastly, I 
will cleave to my doxy,* wap' stiffly/^ and will bring her duds,* mar- 
gery praters,' gobblers,* grunting cheats,' or tibs of the buttery," or any- 
thing else I can come at| as wionings for her wappings."" 



Eighteenth Century. 
JERRY JUNIPER'S CHANT. 

{Frwn Ainsworth*i Rookwood,) 

I N a box "• of the stone jug " I was bom, 
Of a hempen widow'* the kid" forlorn, 

Fake away ! 
And my father, as Fve heard say. 

Fake away ! 
Was a merchant of capers gay, 
Who cut his last fling with great applause, 
Nix my doU pals, fake away I'* 
To tlie tunc of hearty choke with caper sauce. 

Fake away t 
The knucks" in quod" did my schoolraen^^ play, 

Fake away 1 
And put me up to the time of day, '" 
Until at last there was none so knowing, | 
No such sneaksman" or buigloak^ going, 

Fake away ! 



I Rufliauuu, hmhtt tr Vf^fid*. 

» Doxy, mistrrts. 

> Wap, tfi li* vfiik a awMMi. 

I I>ii<U. clotkts. 

A Margery praterf, kema, 

a Gobbler*, dticka. 

T Gruaiioft theaw, pift. 

* Tib* of ttio buUery, gMtt. 

U WappingS ttitian. 
>0 Box.f///. 
It Stone jug, NeW£Mit. 
1' Hempen widow, wotman vtk0tt kmM» 



" Kid, (hiU. 

i* Nix my doll pal«, &ke away I nner 
mind.Jrimtlx, ivcrkav^f! 

<* Knucks, tkinftt, 

!• Quod, /riV^w. 

^f Scboolfnca,y<r//#tM<)/'/4rftiji^. 

^* Put me up to the time of day, m4uU m 
knt^oing on* o/me, iavgkt mi tkkvimg. 

'" Sneaksman, skafU/trr, 

M fiuzgloak, //r>/«cir/. 



Cant, Eighteenth Century, 



XXXUI 



Fogies* and fiawnies' loon went their way, 

Fake away 1 
To the spout ' with the sneezers * in grand array. 
No dummy hunter' had forks so fly,' 
Ko knuckler so deftly could fake a cly,' 

Fake away I 
No slourd hoxter* my snipes * could stay, 

Fake away ! 
Kone knap a reader " like me in the lay.*' 
Soon then I mounted in swell street*higi), 
Nix my doll pals, fake away t 
Soon then I mounted in swell street*high, 
And sported my 6ashest toggery," 

Fake away ! 
Fainly resolved I would make my bay. 

Fake away ! 
While Mercury*5 star shed a single ray ; 
And ne'er was there seen such a dashing prig," 
Nix my doll pals, fakt away ! 
And ne'er was there seen such a dashing prig. 
With ray strummel faked " in the newest twig," 

Fake away ! 
With my fawnicd fomms** and my onions gay,''' 

Fake au-ay \ 
My thimble of ridge,'* and my driz keroesa,*' 
All ray togs ^ were so niblike ** and plash." 
Readily the queer screens " I then could smash.^* 

Fake away ! 
But my nuttiest blowen," one fine day, 

Fake away I 



« Jv^ta^tiOt k*ndkmkie/%. 
s FawBHs^ fi'v 

^ SoBCMn, smmff'hajrti. 

S Fokl M Rr» f^'^ mimhltjh§£rrt. 

> Ko iLSBckkr »o deftly could fake a 



S Shmd boater, auidt p^kti hmttontd 



u Uy. nHffT, 'a^v- 



« FluhrM toggery, Ant mtrnd* t/atket 

W PriK. /*/>/ 

1* Strummd failed, kair dtrtuJ. 

14 Twig.yoxAfcjw. 

*• KAwnied famins, hanJi h<jrn<«Utii. 

1' Onton«, stmtt. 

1* Thimble <A ridge, gold mnUk. 

» Drit Venieu, ikiH wiik tmu/ritL 

** Tofi*, fhtket. 

'I XiWAike^/atkiffiuM*, 

a PUfth.yfw. 

*> Queer *cntta^/ergttl *9tn, 

M Souub, /tfjr. 

^ Nuttiest \Aowca,/avowrHr firt 



XXXIV 



Cant, Eighteenth Century, 



To the beaks* did her fancy man betrajTp 
And thus was I bowled at last, 
And mto the jug for a lay was cast. 

Fake away 1 
But I slipped my darbies* one mom in May, 
And gave to the dubsman' a holiday. 
And here I am, pals, merry and free, 
A regular rollicking romany.* 



Eighteenth Century. 
CHANSON. 

{ExiraUdu Vice Puniou Cartouche, l^t$.) 

Fanandels* en cette PioUe* 
On vit chenument ;'' 
Arton, Pivois et Criolle' 
On a gourdement.* 
Pitanchons, faisons riolle '** 
Jusqu'au Jugement. 

IdcaUle " est le Theatre 
Du Petit Dardant;" 
Fon9ons i ce Mion" fol^re 
Notre Palpitant.** 
Pitanchons Pivois chen&tre" 
Jusques au Luisant.'* 



) Beaks, magisiraUs. 
S Darbies kandcuffs. 
3 Dtibsman, tumiuy. 

* Romany, fT>fX> 

< FanandeU, comradts. 
^ PioUe, Aamst, tavtm. 
f Chenumentr uv//. 

ArtoD, pivois et criolle, bnad, wiiu, 
undmtmi, 

* Gourdementf iupitnty. 



W Pitwichoiu, faisons rioUe, Utut drink, 
amtttt guntlvet. 

11 Idculle, ktrw. 

l> Peut Dardant. Cupid. 

u Fonjons "k ce Mion, Ut «u give tkit 
he,. 

1* Palpitant, ktart. 

18 Chenltre, good. 

i* Luisant, day. 



Cant, beginmng of NineUmih Century. xxxv 



Beginning of Nineteenth Century. 
VIDOCQ'S SLANG SONG. 



En roulant de veigne en vcrgne* 
Pour apprendre ^ goupiner,' 
J'ai rencontrtf la mercandi^re,' 
lAnfa malura dondaine, 
Qui du pivois solisait,* 
Lonfa malum doi^^. 

J'ai rencontr^ la mercandi^re 
Qui du pivois solisait ; 
Je lui jaspinc en bigome ; ' 
Loofa malura dondaine, 
Qu*as tu done a morfiller?* 
Loofa malura donde. 

Je lui jaspinc en bigome ; 
Qu*a5 tu done k. morfiller ? 
J'ai du chenu^ pivois sans lance.* 
Lonfa malum dondaine, 
£t du larton savonn^ * 
Lonfa malum dond^. 



■ Vcrfne, temn. < Morfiller, to tat mnd drink, 

S GovfNner, to steal. T Chenu, good. 

9 licrcazidiire, tradeswotiun. * Lance, water. 

* Z>a pivob soliuut, »fU im/. • Larton savonntf, wAit* bread, 

* Jatpiae tn bigontc, ««r im eant. 



xxxvi Cant^ beginning of Nineteenth Century, 



1 Ix>tiTde, door, 
' 'i'oaiiuolc, kty, 
S lieu, b€tL 

* Koupiller, to tltrp^ 

* j'enquillei I «nt*r, 
A Cambriole. room, 

7 Entifler, to marty. 

* Kembroque, tot. 



J*ai do chenu pivois sans lance 
£t da larton savonn^, 
Une lonrde ' et nne tournante,' 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Et on pieu * pour roupiller * 
Lonfa malura dond^. 

Une lourde, une toumante 
Et an pieu poar roupiller. 
J'enquille' dans sa cambrtolc,* 
IxHifa malura dondaine, 
Esp^rant de rentifler,^ 
Lonfa malum dond^. 

J'enquille dans sa cambriole 
Esp^rant de Tentifler'; 
Je rembroque ' au coin du rifle,' 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Un messiire " qui pion9ait,*^ 
Lonfa malura dond^. 

Je rembroque au coin du rifle 
Un messiire qui pion^ait ; 
J*ai sond^ dans ses valladcs,^* 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Son carle " j'ai pessigue,'* 
I^nfa malura donde. 

J*ai sond^ dans ses volladcs. 
Son carle j'ai pesstgu^, 
Son carle et sa tocquante,^' 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Et ses attaches de c^,'* 
Lonfa malura donde. 

Son carle et sa tocquante, 
Et ses attaches de ce, 



• Rifle, >fm 

10 Meui^, man. 

11 Pion^att, was tlee^ing. 
" ValUdei , pocktu. 

1' Carle, moiuy. 

>« Penicutf. takon. 

1* Tocquuitc, wmUk. 

t< Auachcs de c<, Milvtr btutln. 



Cant^ beginning of Nineteenth Century, xxxvii 

Son conUnt ' et sa montante,* 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
£t son combre galuche '' 
Lonfa malura donde. 

Son coulant et sa montants 
Et son combre galuche. 
Son frusque/ aussi sa lisette/ 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
Et ses tirants brodanchcs,* 
Lonfa malura donde. 

Son fnisque, aussi sa lisette 
Et ses tirants brodanch^s. 
Crompe/ crompe, mercandi^re, 
Lonfa malum dondaine, 
Car nous serions b^uilles/ 
Lonfa malura dond^ 

Crompe, crompe, mercandier^ 
Car nous serions bequilles. 
Sur la placarde de vergne,* 
Lonfa malura dondaine, 
II nous faudrait gambiller," 
Lonfa malura dond^. 

Sur la placarde de vei^e 
II nous faudrait gambiller, 
Allum^" de toutes ces largues/* 

Lonfa malura dondaine, . 

Et du ^r^" rassemblc, io.^y, . 

Lonfa malura donde. 

AUum^ de toutes ces largues 
Et du ti^pe rassembl^ ; 
Et de ces chariots bons drilles,^* 

< Conlant, chain. « Biquill^, kanged, 

s Mootuue, brttcMfs. 9 PUcarde de vngae, /u&Itc /iacf, 

* Combre gmluch^, tactdhmi. Vi Gambiller, t& dance. 

* Fniaqoc, cami. It AUum6i, startd at. 

* Liactte, wm ia t c em i . H Largues, vM/mtn. 

* Tizanti hrodancto, m^rvidtred xtpek- 1* Tr^pe, crowd. 

h^t. U Chariots bons drilles, j'a/fy tkieva. 

7 Craoipe, rtm mvmy. 



xxxviii Cant, beginning of Nineteenth Century. 



Loafii malum dondaine, 
Toas ftboalant^ goupincr. 
Lonfa malura doode. 



Beginning or Nineteenth Century. 

THE SAME SONG \-ERSIFIED BY WILLIAM MAGINN. 

As from ken* to ken I was goin^ 
DtHHg a bit GO the pnggii^ lay,* 
Who should I me«C bai a jolljr bIov«n,* 

Tol k>l, lol lol, to] derol ay : 
\\'bo should I meet hot a jolly btowcn. 
Who was fly* to the time o* day ?* 

Who shoald I meet but a jolly blowen. 

Who was fly to the time of day. 

I pattered in Aaah,^ like a covey* knowing 

Tol lol, Ac. 
" Ay» bub or grubby.* 1 say.- 

I pattered in flash like a covey knowing 

•* .\y, bub or gmbby, I saty." 

" Lots of gatter." " quo" she, " are flowic^ 

Tol lol, ic. 
Lend nte a lift in the £imt!y war.*^ 

" Lots of gatWr," quo' she, " are ffowinj^ 
Lend me a lift in the &mily way. 
You mav have a cnb ** to stow ia. 

Tol lol. 4c. 
Wekome, my pal,** as the Sowers ia Miv." 



^ 



3 Kfs. imf^ kamm. * C-'^ry. «■«». 






Cant, beginning of NitteUenth Century, xxxix 

" Yoa mmy have a crib to stow in, 
Welcome, my pal, as the flowers in Hay.** 
To her ken at once I go in, 

Tol lol, &&, 
Where in a corner out of the way ; 

To her ken at once I go in, 
Where in a comer out of the way. 
With his smdier * a tmmpet blowings 

Tol lol, &C., 
A r^ular swell cove ' lashy ' lay. 

With his smeller a trumpet blowing, 
A regular swell cove lu^y lay. 
To his dies * my hooks' I throw in, 

Tol lol, &&, 
And collar his dragons * dear away. 

To his dies my hooks I throw in, 
And collar his dragons dear away. 
Then his ticker^ I set a-going, 

Tol lol, &C., 
And his onions,* chain and key. 

Then his ticker I set a-going, 
With bis onions, chain and key ; 
Next slipt off his bottom do'ing, 

Tol lol, &c, 
And his ginger head topper gay. 

Next slipt off his bottom cloHng, 
And his ginger head topper gay. 
Then his other toggery ' stowing, 

Tol lol, &C., 
All with the swag " I sneak away. 

Then his other toggery stowing. 
All with the swag I sneak away. 

1 SmeHcr, MMf. ^ CotUrhitdracoiis,/a>EvAuf«tvnri^fw: 

' SwcQ oorr% fetttlemmn, dat»dy. ' Ticker, waiek. 

> l.asfa7, drumk. * Onions, tttUi. 

4 ClaK%,^i*ts. * Toggery, fA^^AM. 

ft Uooki,>fvrrv. ^o Swag./Zwrn^. 



xl Cant, beginning of Nineteenth Century^ 

Tramp it, tramp it, my jolly Uowcn, 

Tollol, &C., 
Or be grabbed ' by tbe beaks' we may. 

Tramp it, tramp it, my jolly blowen. 
Or be grabbed by the beaks we may. 
And we shall caper a-heel-and -toeing, 

Tol lol, &c, 
A Nev^te hornpipe some fine day. 

And we shall caper a-heel-and-toeing, 
A Newgate hornpipe some fine day, 
With the mots * their ogles * throwing, 

Tol lol. &c.. 
And old Cotton ' hnmming his pray.' 

With the mots their ogles throwing. 
And old Cotton humming bis pray. 
And the f<^le-hunters ^ doing, 

Tol lol, &C., 
Their morning fake ' in the prigging lay. 

S Grabbed, taktrt. ^ OldCoaon, /Mf0rdimmrfr^Armx^'- 

s Beaks, ^/ice 0ffictrt, * Hummiig his pny, s^rim^ ^rmyert. 

* Ogles, €]tet. a Momias fake, tmontimg tkuving. 



Cant, Nineteenth Century. 



xli 



Nineteenth Century. 

AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A THIEF IN 
THIEVES' LANGUAGE. 



Bv J. W. HORSLEY. 

Chaplain of //. M. Prison^ 

CUrkenwcll. 

I WAS bom in 1853 at Stamford 
Itill. Middlesex. My^ pareols re- 
moved frooi there to Stoke Ncwitig- 
toa, frhen t was sent to an infant 
■cbooL Some time aftcrwAnls I was 
taken by two paU (companions) to 
an orchard to cop (steal) some fruit, 
me being a mug (inexperienced) at 
ihc game. Tliis got to my father's 
exrs. When 1 x?cnl home he set 
about me «ilh a strap until he was 
tired. He tttoughi that was not 
cBou^ bat tied me to a bedstead. 
You may be »ure what followed. I 
(ot loo^ lied a blanket &i>d acoun- 
tcfpaoe together, fastened it to the 
bedsSeaJ, and let myself out of the 
window, and did not go home that 



Translated 

INTO THE Language of 

French Thieves. 

Je siiis ne en 1S53 k Siamfurd Hill, 
Middlesex. Mes parents, de hgo, 
all^rent se pioUr ^ Stoke Newinglon, 
et Ton m'envoya h. une e'colc malcr- 
ncUe. Peu de temps apr^ deux de 
mes fanandeh me raenercnt ^ un 
verger pour ^«i^A/> t'cs It jits, mats 
je n'ctais qu'un sinvt a ce Jiatuh<, 
Mon dab apprit la chose, ct quand 
je rcntoiai h la ca^notte il nie rr/iia 
utu purfft avec une courroieyHj^u'd 
plussoif, Pensant que ce nVtait pas 
as&ez, il me tigpta au pitu. Yous 
vous doutcz de ce qui arriva. Je 
me d^barrassai des ligoUs, attachai 
un emharroj k une couverture que 
je fixai au pUu, el je me laissai glis- 
ser par la vanterne, Je nc rappH' 



xlii 



Cant^ Nineteenth Century. 



nightf but met my two pals and 
dossed (slept) in a haystack. Early 
next morning my pals said they 
knew where we could get some toke 
(food), and took me to a terrace. 
We went down the dancers (steps) 
to a safe, and cleared it out. Two 
or three days after I met my mother, 
who in tears begged of me to go 
home ; so I went home. My parents 
moved to Clapton, when they sent 
me to school. My pals used to send 
stiffs (notes) to the schoolmaster, 
saying that I was wanted at home ; 
but instead of that we used to go 
and smug snowy (steal Hnen) that 
was hung out to dry, or rob the 
bakers' barrows. Things went from 
bad to worse, so I was obliged to 
leave home again. Tliis time I 
palled in with some older hands at 
the game, who used to take me a 
parlour-jumping (robbing rooms), 
putting me in where the windows 
was open. I used to take anything 
there was to steal, and at last they 
told me all about wedge (silver* 
plate), how I should know it by the 
ramp (hall-mark — rampant lion ?) ; 
we used to break it up in small 
pieces and sell it to watchmakers, 
and afterwards to a fence down the 
Lane (Petticoat Lane). Two or three 
times a week I used to go to the 
Brit. (Britannia Theatre) in Hoxton, 
or the gaff (penny music-room) in 
Shoreditch. I used to steal anything 
to make money to go to these places. 
Some nights I used to sleep at my 
pals' houses, sometimes in a shed 
where there was a fire kept burning 
night and day. All this time I had 



quai pas h la nicAe cette fufgw-/^ 
mais j'allai retrouver mes deux 
fanandes et je pioncai dans une 
meule de foin. Au matois mes 
fanandeU me bonnirent qu'ils eono- 
braient oil nous pouvions tuqmgtr de 
la tortiilade et me men^rent k une 
rang^ de/fia/fj. Nous d^gringolons 
ltS£rimpaiUs, Nous <m3ar<Amj dans 
nn garde-manger et nous le rinfons. 
Deux ou trois reiuis apr^, je me 
casse U muJU sur ma dabuche, qui, en 
chiaiatU, me supplie de rappliquerh 
la mche^ ce que j'ai fait. Mes parents 
alors ont d^m^nag^ et sont alWs i 
Clapton. Alors on m'a envoy^ k 
r^le. Mes camerltuhts ba/an^aient 
des latagms au maltre dVcoIe disant 
qu'on me demandait k la nuAe, mais 
au lieu de cela nous allions dijlorer 
la pietouse ou rincer les bagneles des 
lartonniers. Les choses allirent de 
mal en pis et je fus oblig^ de redl- 
carrer de la nicfu. Cette fois je me 
mis avec des fanandes plus affran- 
chis, qui me menaient avec eux rin- 
eer les cambriollest me faisant tnquil- 
ler par les vantemes ouvertes. Je 
tnettais la pogne sur toute lAcamelole 
bonne k grinchir, et enfin ils me 
firent entraver tout le true de 2a 
bla$tquette^ et comment je la reconO' 
brerais par la marque ; nous la 
frangissions en petits morceaux et 
nous la fourgattions chez des bO' 
guistes et ensuite chez un fourgue 
qui demeurait dans la Lane. Deux 
on trois fois par semaine je suis alM 
au Brit, de Hoxton ou au beugiani 
de Shoreditch. Je grinthissais n*im- 
porte quelle camehte pour affurer 
de la thune afin d'aller k ces endroits. 



.ant. Nineteenth Century, 



xliii 



CKspcd the hands of (he reelers 
(police), but one day I was taken 
icK robbing a baker's cart, and got 
twcnt)r*one days. While there I 
made pals with another one who 
cainc from Sboreditchi and promised 
to meet him when we got out. which 
I did, and we used to go logelfacr, 
and tell the other pals at Clapton. 



At lost one day we was at St. 
John's Wood. I went in after some 
wedge. While picking some up off 
the uWc I ftijjhleneti a cat, which 
upset a lot of pUlcs when jumping 
out of the window. So I was taken 
and tned at Marylebonc Police 
Cocutand sent to Kellham Industrial 
SchooL I had not been there a 
month before I planned with another 
boy to guy (run away), and so we 
did, but was stopped at Brentford 
and took back to the school, for 
wluch we got twelve strokes with 
the birch. I thought when I first 
went there that I knew a great deal 
•boot thieving, but I found there 
was some there that knew more, and 
I used to pal in with those that 
knew ihe most. One day, while 
talking with a boy, he luld me 
be was going home in a day 
orsob He said his friends was going 
to claim him out because he was 
more than sixteen >'ean old. When 
my friends came to see me I told 
them that they could claim me out, 



Des sor^fSf je /iiortfah dans Us 
pichs de mes fanandeh, quelquefoi* 
sous un hangar ou il y avalt un Hf 
qui riffodait Jot-ne ct sorgut. Ce- 
pendant, j'avais echapp^ aux fiifues 
de la rijiftte^ mais un reiuis j'ai eti 
pomoijtU pour avoir rmc^ unc hag^* 
noU de Uirtonnur et enjiiuqui pen- 
dant vingt et un reiuis. Lago j'ni eu 
pour anuirre un autre qui venait de 
Shoreditch et je lui ai promis un 
rendez-vous pour quand nousserions 
dcfourailUs; alors noussommes dcve- 
nus amarres d'aitaques et nous avons 
laissd les autres u^ia it Clapton. 

Enfin, an jour nous nous trouvions 
& St. John's Wood et j'etais i soulcver 
dt ia blanqMttt. Pendant que jew//- 
taii la popte destus^ je eotfuai te tnfk 
un greffier qui fit degringolcr un ta£ 
de mffrjianies en sautant j^r la van- 
terne. Dc ccltc fa^on, je fus parna' 
qn^f mis en gcrbenunt au tarr^ des 
grrlies de Marylebone et envoye au 
pcnitcncier de Feltham. Y avait 
pas une marque que j'y etais que je 
me prcparai avcc un autre kfaire la 
eavtiie. Apres avoir decarr^^ nous 
filraes engrailUs i Srentford el ««- 
flacquh 3u pi^nitencier ou Ton nous 
donna dou/e coups de la verge. Je 
croyais, quand j'y avai« etc eit/ou' 
raiiU tout d'abotd, que j'etais ua 
p^e bicn affranchu Tnais je trouvai 
\k des ctXfuerluehii qui en teno&raUnt 
plus que m/sifftu ct j'avais pour 
amarres ceux qui ctnient le* plus 
warMl/ei. Un re/tn'j en jaspinant 
avec un gosselin^ il me jacte que 
dans un tuisant ou deux il allait 
rappiiquer a la niehe. \ 1 me honmt 
que ses parents allaient le r^clamcr 



xliv 



Cant, Nineteenth Century. 



and with a good many fair promises 
that I would lead a new life if they 
did so. They goi me out of the 
school. When I got home I found 
a great change in my father, who 
had taken to drink, and he did not 
take so much notice of what I done 
as he used. I went on all straight 
the first few moons at coslcring. 
One day there was a *' fete " at Clap- 
ton, and I was coming home with 
my kipsy (basket) ; I had just sold 
all my goods out. I just stopped to 
pipe (see) what was going on, when 
areeler came up to me and rapped 

(said)t "Now, , you had better 

go away, or else I shall give you a 
drag (three months in prison).*' So 
I said *' all right ;" but he rapped, 
** It is not all right ; I don't want 
any sauce from you nr else I shall 
set about O^c^O y"^ myself." So I 
said, ''What for? I have done 
nothing ; do you want lo get it up 
for me ? '* Then he began to push 
me about, so 1 said I would not go 
at all if he put his dukes (hands) on 
me. Then he rammed my nut (head) 
against the wall and shook the very 
life out of nje. This got a scuff 
(crowd) round us, and the people 
ask him what he was knocking me 
about for, sohesaid, ** This t!« young 
just come home from a 




schooling (a term in a refonnatory). " 
So he did not touch me again ; so 
I went home, turned into kip (bed) 
and could not get upfortwoorthree 
days, because he had given me &ach 
a shaking, him being a great power- 
ful man, and me only a little fellow. 2 
still went on all straight until things 



parcequ'il arait plus de seize hris- 
quis, Quand mes parents sont 
venus me voir Je leur dcnnis qu'ils 
pouvaient me faire d^fourailUr^ et 
leur ayant fait de belles promesses 
de ren^acur s'ils y consentatent \\% 
m'ont fait d/fouraiUfr. Quand j*ai 
ahouU ^ la kasbaht j'ai trouvt^ da 
changcmcnt chez moni/a^quis'etait 
mis a sc poivrtr^ ct il n'a pas fait 
autant d'attention que iThahitoHgue^L 

dant les premieres ntarqurs comne 
marchand dcs quatre saisons. Un 
rriuis il y avait une ffte k Clapton et 
je rafipliquais avcc mon panier. Je 
vcnais de lavcr loute ma camclcle et 
de m'artL'ter pour rechasifr ce qui se 
passait quand un rousstn nbouU a 
moi ct me homtit^ •'AUons, d^* 
campe d'ici, ou je te mits h Vombrt 
pour trois marques'* Je lui honnis 
•' c'cst bien;'' mais il me jacU^ 
"C'est pas lout 9a, tiche de filer 
doux, autrcment je tc posse h. tra- 
vers tocquarxlemmt,*^ Que je lot 
fi&ttm'Sf "Pourquoi? Je n'ai rien 
fait ; c*cst une querclle d'allcmand 
que vous me cherchcx Ml." Alors it 
sc met a me r/^Ur dts potnshs et je 
lui dia que je ne le suivrais pas 
s'il me harponnait. Alors il me 
Sonne la tranche centre le mur ct me 
secoue toiquardement. Le tr^ 
s'assemble autour de noutaiUes et 
les^wi^j lui demandent pourquoi il 
mebousculc. Alors, qu'il dit, " C'cst 

Ic jcune qui vient de sortir du 

pcni tender.** Puis, il me laisse tran* 
quille, de sorte que j'ai rafptiqtt/ i. 
la rtkfu, et je me suis mis au pucier 
oil je suis rcst^ deux ou trois reiuii. 



Cant^ Nineteenth Century, 



xlv 



foc very dear at the market, I bad 
been down three or four days run- 
siag, and could not buy anything to 
camadeaner(xhilting)ou[of. Scone 
morning I found I did not have more 
thuimcaser (fire shilling) for stock- 
pieces (stock -money). So I thought 
to myseU, -»Wh«tsha]l I do?" I 
said, ** I know what 1 will do. I will 
go to London Bridge rattler (rail- 
way) and take s deaner ride and go 
« wedge-hunting (stealing plate)." 
So I took a ducat (railway ticket) 
for Sutton in Surrey, and went a 
wedge- hunting. I had not been at 
Socion very long before I piped a 
&Urey (wmnt) come out of a chat 
(house), to when she had got a little 
way op the double (turning), I 
pratled (went) In the house. When 
inside I could not &ee any wcilgc 
lyii^ about the kitchen, so I screwed 
my Dttt in the washhouse and I 
p^xd three or fonr pair of daisy 
roots (boots). So I claimed (stole) 
theov and took off the lid of my 
kipsy and put them inside, put a 
doth errer ihem» and ttien put the 
Ed on again, put the kip^ on my 
back as though it was empty, and 
gnyed to the rattler and took a brief 
(ticket) to London Bridge, and took 
the daisies to a Shcncy (Jew) down 
the gaff, nnd done (sold) them for 
thirty blow (shillings). 



The next day I took the rattler to 
Forest Hill, and touched for (sue* 



car il m^arait karponnS toeqttardt' 

ment, lui qui ^lait on grand bahuf 
el moi un pauvrepetit^w<r//«. Tout 
a marche chotuittrntnt pendant 
quelque temps mais la camelote est 
devenue tr^ cbere au march^. Depuis 
trois ou quatre reluis je n'avnis pas le 
moyen tTabloquer de quoi affunr un 
shilling. Alors un nluis jc me suis 
aperju que jc n'avai* pas plus de cinq 
shillings comme funds de commerce 
et je nie suis demande: quel true cst- 
ce que je vais maquilla-'i Je me 
hoHHu, je connais bien moix^aitche. 
facijuigeraiU rcuiantvifAc London 
Bridge pour un shilling et je tUcherai 
a> metfn la pogm sur de la Nan- 
gH€tte, Alors jc prcnds une &rhm 
pour Sutton en Surrey et je me 
mets en chasse pour la hianquefte, 
Y avail pas longtemps que jVtats 
\ Sutton quand yailume une 
cambrousih-e qni dharrait d'une 
piolt. Dts qu'elle a toume le coin 
de la rue, '^emharde dana la pioU. 
Une fois dedans je n'ai pas rt- 
motKhi de blanqneUe dans la cui- 
sine, et, pasi^ant nta sorbonne dans 
rarriire-cuisine, j'ai mouchaiiU iroxn 
ou quatre paires de ripatom, J'ai 
mis la pogne dessus, et Otant le cou- 
vcrcle de men panier, je Ics y ai 
plaquii avec une piece dVtofTe par 
dcssus et j'ai remis le couvercle, puis 
j'ai //ii^<' man panier surmonoiu/euj^' 
comme s'il etait vide, et je me suis 
cavalJ jusqu'au nntlant I'if; acqmg^ 
nn billet pour London Bridge, port^ 
les ripaioHs iL anyoutn prcs du beu- 
giant zx/ourgui pour trcnte shillings. 
Le lendemaia j'ai aiquigi le rou' 
lant w/jusqu'i Forest Hill, et j':u 



xlvi 



Cant^ Nineteenth Century. 



ceeded in gdting] some wedge ind i. 
kipty full of clobber (dothes\ Vou 
may be sure thisgave me a liiUe pluck, 
90 I kept on at the old game, only 
with this difference, that I got more 
pieces for the wc«lgc. I got three 
and a sprat (51. &/.} an ounce. But 
afierwards I got 31. 91^., and then 
four blow. I used lo get a good 
many pieces about this time, so I 
usefi to clobber myself up and go to 
the concert. But though I used to 
go to these places I never used to 
drink any beer for some time after* 
watd«. It was while using one of 
those places I first met a sparring 
bloke (pugilist), who taught me how 
lo spar and showed me the way to 
put my dukes up. But after a time 
I gave him best (left him) because 
he used to want to bite my ear (bor- 
row) too often. It was while I was 
with him that I got in company with 
some of the widest (cleverest) people 
in London. They used to use at 
(fre(|uenl) a pub in Shorcditch. The 
following people used to go in there 
— toy-getters (watch -stealers), mags- 
men (conridcnce-trick men), men at 
the mace (sham loan offices), broads- 
mcn (card -sharpers), pcter-claimcrs 
(box -stealers), buMcrs and screws- 
men (burglars), snide -pitchers (ut- 
tcrcrs of false coin), men at the duff 
(passing false jewellery), welshers 
(turf-swindlen), and skittle-sharps. 
Being with tht:s nice mob (gang) you 
may be sure what I learned. I went 
out at the game three or four times 
■ week, and used lo touch almost 
every time, I went on lilce this for 
very near a stretch (year) without 



mil la p^gne sur dc la Uanquttie et 
un panier plein de /rin^ues. Bien 
s&r,oeIam*adonneanpcu decouroge, 
alors j*ai continue le meme Jiatufu 
avec cette difference seulement, que 
j'ai affmr^ plus d'lUiArr pour la 
blanqu*tt€. On m'en a fonci trob 
shillings sixpence I'once. Mais apr^ 
j en ai eu trois shillings ncuf pence, 
et puis quatre shillings. Yaffurau 
pas mol de gattos a cette epoque, de 
sorte que je mtftnujsaiscMauatement 
pour alter au beu^oMt. Mais si 
j'allais i ces sorles d'endroits, je ne 
putais jamais de moussante. C'est 
ace moment et dans un de ces endroi is 
que j'ai fait la connaissance d'un 
lutteur qui m'a appris la boxe et i 
me servir de mcs louckts, Mais peu 
aprH, je I'ai t&cM parcequ'il me 
coquait trop sou vent des coups di piid 
dans Us Jamba, C'est en sa com- 
pagnie que j'ai fait la connaissance 
dc quelqucs-uns des pipti les plus 
marhllcs de Londres. lis frc- 
quentaient un cahemton de Shore* 
ditch. Ceux qui y allaicnt <ftaicnt 
dcs grinchisseurs de bogttes^ des ami* 
rtcaiMs, des guinals A la numqw, 
des greci^ des XHiitreusUrs^ dcs grin' 
chisseurs au frU-frac^ dcs pas^eurs 
de galettt h la manque, des voleius 
A la brc^HilU, des bookmakers i 
ia manque^ et des grimhes joueurs 
de qullles. Etant avec cciic gironde 
ga$i£/j vous pouvei imaginer ce que 
j*ai appris. J'allais furbinrr tio'u, ou 
quatre fois par quart de marqut^ et 
je nJussissais presque toujours. J'ai 
continue ainsi pendant pr^ d*une 
brisqui sans clre enfiU. Une negu4 
que jetais avec \&/auaMdes, j'ai itt 



Cant^ Nineteenth Century. 



xlvii 



bring nagged Ci^ppr<^ci^^)' 
Ooe night I wu with the mob, I 
got canon (drunk), this being the 
first time After this, when I used 
to go to concert -rooms, I used to 
drink beer. It was at one of these 
places down Whitechapcl I palled 
in with a trip and stayed with her 
ontiJ t got smugged. One day I 
w«s at Btackbeath, I got very near 
canon, and when I went into a 
pUce I claimed two wedge spnons, 
and was just going up the dancers, a 
alavey piped the spoons sticking out 
of my skyrocket fpockel), so 1 got 
smugged. While at the station they 
asked me what my monarch (name) 
waa. A reeler came to the cell and 
CfOK-lddded (questioned) me, but I 
was too wide for him. I was tried 
at Greenwich ; they ask the reeler if 
I was known, and he said no. So I 
%ras tent lo Maidstone Stir (prison) 
for two moon. When I came out, 
the trip I had been living with had 
sold the home and guyed ; that did 
not tnToble me much. The only 
thing that spurred (annoyed) me 
was me being such a flat to buy the 
borne. The mob got me np a break 
(ooltection), and I got between five or 
six foont (ftoTcreigns), so I did not 
go out at the game for about a moon. 
The first day that I went out I 
vent to Slough and touched for a 
wedge kipsy with 120 ounces of 
wedge in it« for which I got nineteen 
({«id (lorereigns). Then I carried on 
a nice game. I used to gel canon 
wcry night-. I done things now 
what 1 should have been ashamed 
to do before I took to that accursed 



poivrt pour la premiere fots. Et 
aprea 9a, quand j'ai <fle an beugtant^ 
y^i fii/anck/ dc la moHSsanU. C'est 
\ un de ces endroits dans White- 
chapel que je me suis eoU/ avec une 
largu€, et jcsuis resltf avecdlr jusqu*Ji 
ccquej'ai ete tnfourailU, Un re^ 
tub, j'etais k Blackheatb, je me suis 
presque/iViTtV/i', et imhardant dans 
une fioitf j'ai p'inchi deux pochts 
de//J//r. Je grimpais le liv^fuds, 
quand une cambrou^ifri a rimoi4ck^ 
les cuillers qui sortaient de tax pro- 
fonJe^ c'cst commc ceU que j'ai ete 
P^maquL Au bttH^ on m'a de* 
mandc mon centre. Un roussf est 
vcnu i la doite et m'a fait U jot' 
tanttf mais j'ai et^ trop martoUc 
pour m/raivr. J'ai etc mis en sape^ 
tfUHi ji Greenwich ; on a demande 
au rousse s'il me conohrait et il a nf- 
pondu nihtrgue. Alorsonm'aenroye 
a la motte de Maidstone pour deux 
marqutj. Quand yzi etc et/jourai/U, 
Wiargue avcc qui je vivais avail tout 
iav^ et s'Uait fait la J^hinttte^ mais 
ccia m'ctait egal. La sculc chose 
qui m'a ennuye, c'est que j'avals ^te 
assez sinve pour abh^tur le fourbi. 
La gatue m'a fail une mancht et j'ai 
eu de cinq a six sigH£s^ de sorte que 
je n'ai pas rappHqui au lurbtm pour 
pr^ d'une marque. 

Le premier rtluis At ma gu^rison 
je suis alle h, Slough et j'ai $oulevi 
un panicT, qui contenait tso onces 
de bianquettt^ pour Icquel j'ai re^u 
dix-neuf livrcs sterling. Alors 
j etaisbien h la marre. J'^tais/wif 
toutes les sor^tiej. J 'ai maquilU des 
/lunches alors que j'aurais eu honte 
de faire si je ne m'etais pas mis 



xlviii 



Canty Ntneteentk Century, 



drinks It was now that t got ac- 
c)uaintcd with the use of twirls 
{skeleton -keys). 

A little time after this I fell (was 
taken up) again at St. ^fa^y Cray 
for being found at the bock of a 
house, and got two moon at Bromley 
Petty Sessions as a rogue and vaga- 
bond ; and I was sent to Maidstone^ 
this being the second time within a 
stretch. When I fell this time I had 
between four and live quid found on 
me, but they gave it me back, so I 
was landed (was all right} this time 
without them getting me up a lead 
(a collection). 

I did not fall again for a stretch. 
This time I got two moon for as- 
saulting the reelers when canon. For 
this I went to the Steel (Uastile — 
Coldbath Fields Prison), having a 
new suit of clobber on me and about 
fifty blow in my brigh (pocket). 
When I came out I went at the 
same old game. 

One dny I went to Croydon and 
touched for a red toy (gold watch) 
and red tackle (gold chain) with a 
large locket. So I took the rattler 
home at once. When I got into 
Shoreditch I met one or two of the 
mob, who said, '* Hallo, been out 
to-day? Did you touch?" So I 
said, "Usher" (yes). So I took 
them in, and we all got canon. 
When I went to the fence he bested 
(cheated) mc because I was drunk, 
and only gave me ;^8 l&i, for the 
lot. Sc the next day I went to him, 
and asked him if he was not going 
to grease my duke (put money into 
my hand). So he said, "No." 



i pitamktr ^unUmtttt. C'est 
alors que j'ai appris Ic true des 
caroubUs. 

Feu apr^ j*ai et<f emhtUU de nou- 
veau k St. Mary Cray pour avoir ^le 
Pi^ derricre une pi&le ct j'ai eti 
gtrbi k deux marquts au juste de 
Bromley comme ferlampifr et puro' 
tint puis j'ai eie cnvoy^ k Maidstone 
pour la seconde fois dans la brisgue, 
Quand j'ai (?te emhalU^ j'avais de 
quatre k cinq ugttes sur mon ffmasse^ 
mais on me les a rendus, de sorte que 
j'ai pu cetle fois me passer de la 
mancht, 

Je n*ai pai ete tmbalU pendant une 
brisque, Cctte fois, j'ai ct^ lapJ k 
deux marquts pour avoir refili utu 
voU aux rousses pendant que j'etais 
pion. Onm'aenvoye,pource^am'^r, 
k la Steel, J 'avals des fringues 
(Calt^ue et environ cinquante shil- 
lings dans xnti/oufJiouse, Quand j'ai 
(/(tar/-*' j'ai roppHqiU mt true. 

Un TffuiSf je suis all^ k Croydon 
et j'ai frn't un tcgue de jonc et une 
bride de Jonc avec un gros mffdaillon. 
Puis j'ai flcyw/^dare-dare le roulamt 
vif. Quiuidj'aid/vw// a Shoreditch, 
je suis tcmbe en frinu avec deux 
pigret de la game qui m'ont honni^ 
"Eh bicn, tu as turhini cc luisant^ 
as*tu/(ii/quelquechose?" Alorsqucje 
jade, " Gy,** Puis je les ai emmen^s 
et nous nous sommes lom piqui U 
blaire, Quand je suis alle chcx le 
fourgat il m'a re/ait parcequc j'etais 
poivre et m'a abouli sculcment 
£% lOj, pour le tout. Alors le lende- 
main, je suis alle k lui et lui ai de- 
mandtf s'il n'allait pas mc/aneer du 



■ 



Cant, NintUentk Century. 



xltx 



ThcQ he uirl, **I will give 70Q 
Aootber half-ft-quid ; " and satd, 
•• Do fttiybod;, but mind they don't 
dojroo." So I thought to myself, 
** AH ri^t, my lad ; yoa will find 
me as £ood as my m&ster," and left 



ihne after that affair with 
tW fence. CDC of the mob said to me, 
** I have got a place cut and dried ; 
win you come and do it?" So I 
sahI, " Yes ; what tools will you 
want?" And he said. "We shall 
waul some twirU and the stick 
(crowbar), and bring a neddie (life 
preserrer) with you." And he said, 
" Now doD*i Slick me up (disap* 
poini^ ; meet me at six to-night." 
Az su I was in the meet (trysiing- 
place), and while waiting for my 
pal I had my daisies cleaned, and I 
piped tbe (ience that bested me go 
aIo<^ with his old woman (wife) 
and his two kids (children), so 1 
tlKmgbt of his own words. " Do any- 
body, Irat mind they don't do you." 
He waa going to the Sarrey Theatre, 
so when my pal came up I told him 
all about it. So we went and screwed 
(broke into) his place, and got thirty* 
two ()tu(l, and a toy and tackle which 
be had bought on the crook. Wc 
did not go and do the other place 
after t)ut. About two moon after 
t)ti« the same fence fell for buying 
two finns (j^5 notc»), for which he 
got a stretch and a half. A little 
while after this I fell at Isleworlh 
fof being found in a consen'atory ad- 
joining a parlour, and got renumded 
«l tbe Tench (House of Detention) 



mithvH. llrepond, ''AT^^i*^." Pais 
il ajonte, " Jc vais itffMcer un autre 
demi-jj^," et aussi, •' Mhtf tit Ai- 
/eau Ics sirtva, mats nc te laitse pat 
memr en bateau,** Je me suis dil, 
**Chff$teite^ ma vieillt bramkt ; tu 
me trouvcras aussi nmrioiU que mon 
maltre," et je I'ai quitle. 

Quelque temps apres ce ftamkt 
avec le four^t une des fcisses de la 
g^nce me fhmnit^ " J'ai \xxi pou/'ord 
mmrri^ veux-tu en itrc?" Que je 
Jul bomm's^ " <7/, de quelles tU^<s 
as-tu bcsoin?*' II mc jattt, "ll 
nous faut des rvtsignols et le sucrtiU 
pom me ; lu apporteras un tonmc 
fU/." Ilroe J(mniV.*'Neme/J<->i/pas 
au bon moment, nous nous rencon* 
trerons ^ i\x flow bit ccttc nagiu** 
Six plombes croiSKiitnt quand j'at 
ahotd^Vk>x rendez-vous,etenaitcjHlanC 
mon fantuuie je foisais cirer mes 
ripatpNi, quand j'ai mou^haiUi le 
fourgue qui m'avait tf/ait qui se hat' 
Uidait avec sa fesu et ses deux 
m6mes. Alors j'ai pense ii ce qu'il 
m'avait bonni^ '* Afhie Ics sirtves en 
Aj/aw mais ne laisse pas gourtr 
thigut.^* n allait \ la misi^h^ue de 
Surrey, alors, quand mon pofeau 
aSouie, je lui digueulanie tout le 
Jianehe. Puis nousyf/t;«j U liutrimt, 
nous tfiquitlons dans Xxpiott et nous 
mtttans la pogtic lur trente*<Icux 
si^es, sur un l>ogf*e et une bride que le 
fourgue arait ableqtus <1 la marnfue. 
Kous ne sommes pas alles aux autres 
endroiis aprei cela. Deux marques 
apris, ce w,kTi%t fntrgue a ^(e poisii 
pour avoir abloqui deux fafiots de 
cinq livres sterling, et sapl i une 
ian^ et six marifues. Feu dc temps 

d 



d«A Nineteenth Century. 



for nine days, bat iKtther SnufTy 
(Reeves, the identifier) nor Mac 
(Macintyrc) knew me, so t got a 
drag, ADd was sent to the Steel. 
While I was in there, I sec the 
fence who we done, and he held his 
duke at me as much as to say, " I 
would give you something, if \ 
could ; " but I only laughed at him. 
I was out about seven moon, when 
one night a pal of mine was half 
dninki and said something to a 
copper (policeman) which he did 
not like ; so he hit my pal, and I 
hit him in return. So we both set 
about him. He pulled out his staff, 
and hit me on the nut, and cut it 
open. Then two or three more 
coppeis came up, and we got 
smugged, and got a sixer (mx 
months) each. So I see the fence 
again in Stir. 



On the Boxing-day after I came 

out I got stabbed in the chest by a 
pal uf mine who had dune a school- 
ing. We was out with one another 
ftU the day gelling drunk, so he 
took a liberty with me, and I landed 
him one on the conk (nose) ; so we 
had a fight, and he put the chive 
(knive) into me. This made me 
sobcr,so I askctl him what male him 
such a coward. Sie said, *' I meant 
to kill you ; let me kiss my wife and 
child, and then smug me." Bat I 
did not do thau This made me a 
little thoughtful of the sort of life I 
was carrying on. I thought, " What 



apr^ j'ai ^t^ tmbatU i Isleworth 
pour avoir et^ pi^ dans une serre 
voisine d'un jMirloir et remis ^ la 
Tench pour neaf rtluis^ mais ni 
Snuffy ni Mac ne me ^onobraient, de 
sorte que j'ai ete laf^ k trois 
marqua et maladeW la matte. Pendant 
que j'y etais, j'ai vu Ic faurgut que 
nous avions re/ait, et il a tendu la 
PiMce de mon c6lc commc pour 
donnir, " Jc tc ftfileraisune purge si 
je pouvais, " maiscela m'a fail ri^oUr. 
J'etais giti^ri depuis environ sept 
marquts quand une sargue, un de 
mcs fahanJes, qui clail poivre, jMtf 
quelque chose h un rvussin qui ne 
I'ayanl pas h. la baune^ I'a fonn/et 
moi j'ai s&tm^ le roussm k mon tour. 
Tous deux alors nous lui avons tra* 
vailU le cadavre. II a lire son bdton, 
m'a sonniXt citron et me I'a fendu. 
Alors deux ou trois roussins sont 
arrives, nous ont tmhaJUs et nous 
avons ete gerhes ii six marqu/s. De 
sorte que j'ai re\'u le Jourpte au 
ch&tWH. 

Au Boxing-day apres ma gnhi- 
ron, un de mcs fanandei m'a refiU 
un coup de biH<t dans le hari' 
cot, II avail <*ic deji enfourmlU 
ViVkCoiUgc. Nous nous ^tions W/ddVi 
tout le iuisartt en nova patvraffamf, 
de sorte que m'ayant manque de re- 
spect, je lui ai coUJ une cHdtaign^ sur 
le morviam. Nous nous sommes em- 
paigrt^s et il a jouc du suriu. Cela 
m'a degrise et je lui ai demand^ 
pourquoi it s'ctait montrc aussi lichc, 
II me bonnit, ** Je voulais CejtOHHir. 
Laisse-moi aller S44cer la pammt k 
mx largue et mon mSme et fais>moi 
embailer.^' Maisjen'ai pas voulu. 



Catit^ Nineteenth Century. 



li 



ifl should have be«n killed tbent" 
BiKt this, like other things, sooa 
puMd Away. 

After the plice got well where I 
wu chived, roe and another screwed 
s place at Sioke Kewington, and 
we got some squeeze (&ilk) dresses, 
and tW)-> sealskin jackets, and some 
ochcr things. We tied them in a 
bundle, and got on a tram. It ap> 
pean they knew vcxy pal, and some 
ncten got np too. So when I piped 
then pipe the bundle, I put my 
duket on the lails of the tram and 
dropped off, and guyed down a 
double before you could &ay Jack 
Robinson. It was a good job I did, 
or else I should have got bggcd (sent 
to penal servitude), and my pal 
loo, because I bad the James (crow- 
bar) U)d screws (skeleton keys) on 
me. ' My pal got a stretch and a 
hair A day or two afler this I met 
the fence who 1 done ; so he said to 
BC, "We have met at last" So X 
sud. 'MVcU, what of that?" So 
heididt " What did you want to do 
ne for ? " So I said, " You must 
remember you done me ; and when 
I spoke to you about it you uid, 
* Do anybody ; mind ihcy don't do 
That shut him up. 



I went to Lewisham and 
a lot of wedge. I tore 
sp m.j madam (handkcrchicO and 
lied the wedge in small packets and 
pat them into my pockets. At 
Bicbopsgate Street I left my kipsy 
at a barbrr's shop^ where I always 



Ccla m*a fait r^B^chir ua pcu au 
genre de vie que je menais et je me 
dis, *'J'aurais bienpu etrer^rtf/iA'." 
Mais bientot je n*y pen&ai plus. 

line fats gueriducoupded/M(-^, nous 
avoQS refiU U luctrime d'uac /iif/^ a 
Stoke Ncwington, et nous avons 
grinchi des rubes de lycnttaise et 
deux jaquettes de peau de phoque ct 
d'autre cameloU. Nous en avons 
fait on pacsm et nous avons pris le 
tram. On conobrait mon/aMamde, 
paraltil> et des rotissts y montent 
avec tteuiaiiia. Quand jc vois qu'ils 
rcmoucheni Ic pacsin^ jc mets mes 
agrafes jur Ic/ifu d'appui du tram, 
jc saute, je fat's patatrot au coin de 
la rue et je cours encore. C'est 
b^e pour moi d*avotr agi ainsi 
autrement j'aurais hi gtrf*^^ boihasst 
et mon fanande aossi parcequc 
j'avais \c Jacques et les earoubl^s sttf 
m^igM. Mon fanandi a etc saj>/ i 
une tan^ et demie. Un rt/uis oa 
deux apres, jc me casse le mujte sur 
Icfourgat que j'avais refait, et il me 
jactt, "Tc voili cnBn ! '* Je lui 
reponds, " Eh bicn, ctpuis aprcs?" 
** Pourquot ni'as-tu refait ? " dit- 
iL Et je lui reponds, **Kapix:lle- 
toi que tu as refati rrufm gniasse, et 
quand je ten a\ja£t/\xi m'as r^ndu^ 
* Mh%e en Mteau qui lu voudras, 
mais ne te laisse pas tnforuir.'' " Et 
cela a coup^ la chique & siiigtu, 

Un jour je vais it Lewisharo et je 
grinchU un lot de blanqutttt. Je 
dcchire mon^/af/M, jefais dcs pctits 
pacsinsAtX^ blanqtutte ctjc Xa^plaque 
dans xsx^ profandes. A Bisbopsgale 
St je depose mnn panier dans la bou' 
togiu d'un mtrlan oii je le kissaif 



Hi 



Canty Nineteenth Century. 



left it when not in use. I was Eoing 
through Shorcditch, when a rcclcr 
from Hackney, who Jtnew me well, 
came up and wid, ** I am going to 
run the rale over (search) you." 
You could have knocked me down 
with a fcalhcr, u»e knowing what I 
had about me. Then he said, " It's 
only my joke \ arc you going to 
treat me?" So I said "Yes," and 
began to I>e very saucy, saying to 
him, "What catch would it lie if 
you was to turn me over?" So I 
took him into a pub which bad a 
back way out, and called for a pint 
of stout, and told the feeler to wail 
a oiinule. He did not know that 
there was an entrance at the back ; 
so I guycilup to Hoxtonto the mob 
and told them all about it. Then I 
went and done the wedge for five* 
and -twenty quid. 

One or two days after this I met 
the recler at Hackney, and he said, 
" What made you guy ? " So I said 
that I did not want my pals to see 
me with him. So he said it was all 
right. Some of the mob knew him 
and had greased his duke. 

What I am about to relate now 
look place within the last four or 
five moon before 1 fell for this stretch 
and a half. One day I went to 
Surbiton. I see a recler giving me 
a roosting (watching me), so I began 
lo count my pieces for a jolly (pre- 
tence), but he still followed me, so 
at last I rang a l>cll, and waited till 
the slavey came, and the recler 
waited till I came out, and then said, 
" What are you hawking of? " So 



toujoursquandje ne m'en serrais pas. 
Je traversais Shoreditch, quand un 
rous$€ dc Hackney, qui me iOH&hrmt 
bicn, abcuU et Jadt^ ** Je vais te 
rapioUr,'* j 'a vais la frousse en 
pensant & ce que j'avais sur mon 
gniassi, Alors 11 me Ivnm'f, "C'est 
unc Imlterie domt ; est-ce que tu nc 
vas pas me nnur Us crothets /" " Je 
lui jacttt " ^J'l" et je me mets k 
biagwr aveclui, lu'idisant, '* Quelle 
bonne prise, si vous me fouilliez ? " 
Je Temm^ne alors dans un cahfrmcm 
qui avail unc sortie de derriere, jc 
demande une pinte de stout, et je 
dis au rousse d'attcndrc une broquilU. 
II nc (oncbrait pas la lourdr de der- 
riere ; alor? je me la tin jusqu'i 
Hoxlun et j'apprcnds aux ftiimnd<s 
ce qui s'l^tait passd. Puis je 
fourgue la blanqtutte pour vingt-cinq 
Uvrei. 

Un on deux rctuii apr^, je tomfn 
enfrimt arec la rifietu ^ Hackney, 
et it me /fff/^, *' Pourquoi I'es-tu 
dSinJf** Et jc lui rcponds que je ne 
voulais pas que mcs/tinatuirs mc re- 
mowfVff/ensacompagnie. Quelqnes 
pfpti de la^H^f le cff$tobraimt ci lui 
avaient_/^Mf(/du mUhon. 

Ce que je vai^ racontcr maintc- 
nant a cu lieu dans le courant des 
quatre ou cinq nmrquei avant mon 
sap^mmt a une htigt et d«mic. L'n 
rtiuis je vais & Surbiton. Je rt- 
mou€he une rifitttt qui mc />oire<m- 
tait. Je fais la /Vrmrde compter mon 
(arUf mais il roe pr^nd en /Hatutt, 
A la fin je tire une retettiissiwUt el 
j'altends que la iarbine abeuUf le 
roHsse attend que je dkarre et me 
Jacttf "Qu'cst-c« que vous vendex 



Cant, Nineteenth Cattury, 



liii 



t ff«icl, **t am nol hawking any- 
thing ; I am baying bottles." So he 
said, •' I thought you were hawking 
without ft licence." A* soon aa he 
got round a double, I guyed away to 
HAldcn and touched for two wedge 
teapots, and took the rattler to 
Waterloo. 

One day I took the rattler from 
Broad Street to Acton. I did not 
touch there, but worked my way to 
Shepherd'} Bush ; but when I got 
there I found it so hot (dangerou^i)* 
because there had been so many 
lykes (dogs) poisoned, that there was 
a recler at almost every double, and 
bdls posted up about it. So I went 
to ibe Uabridge Road Station, and 
while I wa» waiting for the rattler 
I took a religious tract, and on it 
was written, *' What shall it profit a 
man if he gain the whole world and 
lo»e his owTi soul ? " So I thought 
to myself. What good has the money 
doDe me what I hare had ? So in- 
stead of getting out at Brondesbury. 
I rode on to Broad Street, and paid 
the di&rence, and went home, and 
did not go out for about a week. 



The Sunday following when I 
went to Uxbridge Road, I went 
4lown a lane called Mount Pleasant, 
at Clapton ; it wa<» about six o'clock. 
Down at the bottom of the lane you 
ooold get a fine view of Waliham- 
stow ; K> while 1 WIS leaning against 
the rails I felt very miserable. I 
wia thinking about when I was at 
Fekham. I thought I had threw 
away the only chance I had of doing 



done?" Et je r^ponds, "Je ne 
vends rien ; j'achcle des bouteilles." 
Ilmedit alors, "Jecroyaisque vous 
faisiei Ic commerce sans patenle." 
Anssitdt qu'il a toum^ Ic coin, je 
vais4 Maiden et je/ri>deux thciircs 
dc pi&trt^ puis yoiifuist U roulant 
pour Waterloo. 

Un jour ytu-guige U rou/an/ de 
Broad Street ii Acton. Aa^m, jene 
/ais rien, el je continue ma route 
jusqu'i Shepherd's Bush ; mats 
quand j'y ^AfaU je trouve qu'il y 
avait tant Ae pet & cause de tous Ics 
(ambvurs qu'on avait empoisonn^s, 
qu'oQ avait mis unerf^//^ prcsquei 
chaque coin de rue et des habitles 
partout. Alors je ^*ais Jk la station du 
roulant dc Uxbridge Road, et pen- 
dant que jc poireoittais pour le rott' 
/jH/}c prcndsune brochure rcligieusc 
et il y avait ca/t' dessus, ** A quoi 
bon acquerir le monde cntier si Ton 
doit pcrdre son dme?" Et jc me 
Jiu-ti, A quoi m*a scni le carme que 
j'ai tiffurit Et alors au lieu de dc- 
•iccndrc a Bromlesbury, je continue 
ju^qu'a Broad Street et '^ahtnitt la 
tliflk-rvnce. Jc rappliifui hi la lO^iHctU 
d*oh je ne diiarre pas d'un ^uart dt 
marque. 

Le dimanche d'apr^ en nllant k 
Uxbri«lge Road, jc degringolc une 
ruelle appellee Nrount Pleasant, a 
Clapton; il ift&it i peu prcs six 
piombts, Au fond dc la ruclte on 
avait une vue magnilique de Wal- 
tbamstow; done pendant que je 
m'appuynisconire la pa]is.-vailc j'arais 
da papiltons nuin dans ta sorhonnt, 
Je pcDsais au temps ou j'clais 4 Fel- 
tham. Je voyais que j'avais perdu 



liv 



Canty Nineteenth Century, 



belter ; and ts 1 stood thinking, the 
bells of St. Matthew's Church l>cgan 
to play a hymn-tune I had heard at 
Fcltham. This brought tears to my 
eyes : this was the first time in my 
life thai I thought what a wretch I 
was. I was going home vcr)* riown- 
cast, when 1 met sume ]>a]s, who 
said, "Why, what is the matter? 
you look miserable." So I said, 
*' I don't feel very well." So they 
said, •* Arcyou cominglohavesome- 
thing to drink ? — that will liven you 
up." So I went in with them, and 
began to drink very hard to drown 
my thoughts. 



Monday morning I felt just the 
same as 1 always did ; I felt ready 
for the old game again. So I went 
to Hoxton, and some of the mob 
said to me, *' Why, where have you 
been the last week or so— we thought 
you had fell?" So I told them I 
had t>cen ill. 

I went out the next day to Maiden- 
bead, and touched for some wredge 
and a po^e (purse), with over live 
quid in it. 

A tittle while after (his I went 
with two pals to the Palace at Mus- 
well Hill; the races were on. So 
when we got there, there was some 
rcclers there what knew me, and my 
pals said, " Vou had better get away 
from here; if we touch you will take 
your whack (share) just the same." 
So I went and laid down on the grass. 
While laying there I piped a recler 
whom I knew ; he had a nark (a 



la seule occasion que j'avais de 
rengi-ader et nftanl li a rcrtechir, 
les rttentissantes de la rampante 
de Saint-Matthew se mirent k 
jouer un hymne que j'ax'ais enlendu 
jt Feltham. Ceci me 6t baxtr det 
dignots : pour la premiere fois de 
ma vie jc jade ^ mhigue^ (^ucl miser- 
able tu cs ! Jc rapp/ii/uais t\ fn nit-he^ 
en paumant ma piuma, qunnd je 
tombe en frime de deuxyiimrHt/w qui 
hcHHiiseHt, "Eh bien, qu'est-cequ'il 
ya; \\iasvj\tiaif bobtneite?** Alora 
]ejacte, " Jcsuis/wywarty." " Alor* 
viens avec nous te rincer la dalU^ ^ 
te rogaillardira." Jc suis alle avec 
eux, et j'ai commence it pkUr d*at' 
taqMt pour noyer le chagrin. 

Le lumli matin d'aprcs, je me suis 
senli comme ^'habi/onpu et prfet k 
rappliquer au turbin. Je suis ftlle k 
Hoxlon, et quelques-uns de la^Kcr 
m'on\. /ait la Jaatancff *'Eh bicn, o6 
as-tu etc {Kndant tous ccs rduh — 
nous pensions que tu t'etais fait em' 
l*aiUr f " Je Icur rifponds que j'avais 
etc liv^ftard. 

Lelcndemain jesuisall^il Maiden- 
head. J'aiyiuydela^/aH^jtf/Zret une 
JUxhe qui conlcnait plus de cinq 
sigtus, 

Peu apr^, je suis all^ avec deux 
fananJrls a Muswell IliU o{i H y 
avait des courses. Quand nousatller 
y avons Jh^aU^ il y avait des ronssins 
qui me ccncbrnient et m€%/aHaMi/tT 
mcjacfen/, " Tu fcr.iis micux de tc 
cavaier; si nous ritifpnt, tu auras ton 
fade tout de m£me." Alors j'allai 
me plaqufr sur ITierbc. Pendant que 
j*y etais, je remouckewvi rausu que je 
cenfi&rau, 11 ctait accompagne d'une 



Cant, Nineteettth Century. 



iv 



I 



* 



Ts spy) with him. So I 
wcDl anti looked about for my two 
pais and told them to look out for 
& and his nark. About an hour 
tfier ibis tbey cime to me and woke 
me op. and they said, ** Come on, we 
have hjd a lucky touch for ft half 
century in pap " (j^SO in paper, i.f. 
notes). I thought they was only 
kidding 'deceiving) at Arst, so they 
said, ** Let as guy from here, and 
you will sec if we are kidding to 
you.** When we got into the ralllcr 
they showetl me the pap; y^'^t there 
b was, fifly quids in double Anns 
{j^io notcb). We did them for 
j£9 lar. each to a fence. 

I took tJie rattler one day to Rei- 
gtte and worked my way to Red 
IlilL So I went into a place and 
■» snme clobber hanging up, so I 
tbot^ht (o myself, I will have it and 
take the raltlcr home at once; it will 
paf an expense. So while I was 
looking about 1 piped a little peter 
(parcel). \Mien I took it up it had 
an addrcM on it, and the address 
waft to ibe vicarage ; so I came out 
and asked a boy who lived there, and 
he «Lid ** Vcs," but to make sure of 
it I went back again. This time I 
lookcil to the clubber more closely, 
and I see it was the same as clergy* 
men wear, so 1 left il where it was, 
I alwap made it a rule never to rob 
a dcrgyman's house if I knew one 
to live (here. I could have robbed 
scTctal in my time, but I would not. 
Sol took the mltler to Croydon and 
tovcheti for some wedge, and come 
home. I u«ed to go to Henley most 
year when the rowing matches 



ri/tetf*. Jt cherche alors mes deux 

/7«rt«rtVrel leurdis **Acrfsto^ atten- 
tion ^ S. et i sa riJUne ! " VoKf/awde 
apris, environ, ils ahmilmt vers 
mAigvff mVvcillcnt, et me Jftffm/, 
*^Abomif, nousavons harbcti sckpitte, 
nous avons a^qui^^ cinquante livres 
en/i^r." Je croyais qulls me fol- 
laient des vannes mais ils me jacttHt, 
" Dhsihfts iTicigo et tu verras si nous 
tc gotirrons.^^ Quand nous nous 
sommes plaquh dans le ronlant vif 
ils m'ont nioiitr^ \t% faffes ; gy, \\y 
avail bien cinquante sigiies tv\fi\ffa 
dc dix livres. Nous les avons /ai«/r 
pourj^9 lor. i Mn/our^i. 

Je prends un Jorne le roulant pour 
Reigate et je trimarde jusqu'4 Red 
Hill. Puis yftttbardi en unc fio/g et 
jc rcnuuM'he des hamais suspendus. 
Jemc^of/r, je vais les/ajfr/rel acquigtr 
au5sit6tlen7N/nH/;ceIftcouvriratoutes 
mcs depenses, Alors en gajinant 
par ci par \k je remouche un petit 
fmcsitt. Je mfis la pogm dessus et je 
reluque une adresse. Celle du cur^ 
Alors je dkarre et je dcmande k un 
^jifsi ce n'est pas un ratichon qui nr- 
mcure/flji7'"^,"qu'ildiL Maispour 
qu'il n'y ait pas d'erreur, je retourne. 
Celle fois, je gnjine de plus prfes le 
hamau, jc vois que c ctajt celui d'un 
prctre, et alors je I'al laiss^ oii il 
(itait. J'ai toujoun eu soin de ne 
jamais harboter une tambriolte de 
prctre quand je savais que e'en etait 
une. J'aurais pu en barbcter mais je 
n'ai pas voulu. Alors j'ai pris le 
roulant vif pour Croydon, j'ai effa- 
rouihi dc la blaftqtutttr el rapphquf 
J la kasbah, J'allais k Ilcnley 



IW 



Cantt Nintteniih Cmtury. 



was on which usol to represent Ox- 
ford and Cambridge, only it tised to 
be l)oy5 instead of men. The day 
ihe Prince of Wales arrived a! Ports- 
mouth when he came home from 
India, me and two pals took the 
rattler from Waterloo at about half- 
past six in the morning. When we 
got to Portsmouth we found it was 
very hot, there was on every comer 
of a street bills stuck up, *' Beware of 
pickpockets, male and female," and 
on the tramcars as well. So one of 
my pals said, "There is a rccler 
over there who knows me, we had 
belter split out " (separate). Me 
and the other one went by ourselves ; 
he was very tricky (clever) at getting 
a poge or a toy, but he would not 
toucli toys because we was afraid of 
being turned over (searched). W'c 
done very well at poges ; we found 
after we knocked off we had between 
sixty or seventy quid to cut up 
(share), but our other pal had fell, 
and was kept at the station until the 
last rattler went to London, and 
then they sent him home by it. 
One day after this I a^kcd a screws- 
man if he would lend me some 
screws, because I had a place cut 
and dried. Uut he said, "If I lend 
you them I shall want to stand in " 
(have a share) ; but I said, '* I can't 
stand you at that ; I will grease your 
duke, if you like." But he said, 
"That would not do;*' so I said, 
"We will work together then;" 
and he said, ** Yes." So we went 
and done the place for fifty - five 
quid. So I worked with him until 
I fell for this stretch and a half. 



presque chaque berge pendant lei 
nfgattes qui ctaient comme celles 
entre Oxford ct Cambridge, seule- 
raent c*etait des gvssrs au lieu de 
gvfu-ej. Le rrlut's oil Ic limpri de 
Galles a dhmUk Portsmouth quand 
il a renquilU des Indes, trUxigue el 
deux ftJHandes, nous avons tuifuigi 
le PVH/ant vtf vers six ptomhex et 
Irente hfoquUtes au matois. Quand 
nous avons dhjaU k Portsmouth nous 
avons trouv^ qu'ilfaisait tres chaud; 
il y avait aux coins dcs tiimei des 
babilUs^ " Prenez garde aux tilous, 
m&les et femellcs," et aussi sur les 
trains d£ va^he. Dc sortc qu'un de 
xm^fanandisjactt^ " 11 y a un $-oussin 
iabago qui conobre mon gniasse^ et il 
vaut micux nous scparer." Mhigut^X 
I'autre nous nous dihinom de notre 
c6ie ; il n'etait pas tr^s marhlU pour 
faire ^xncjifocht ou Mnbagtu, mais il ne 
voulait \tAi griuihir de boguis parce* 
qu'il avait Ic tafiX'kiTerapiofJ. Nous 
avons eu de la bate pour les m^r- 
ningues ; nous avons trouv^, aprcs 
avoir turbin^^ que nous avions de 
soixante i. soliaute-dix sigues bifadrr^ 
mais notre autre fanandt avait ete 
pigit\. garde au bloc jusqn'au dernier 
rouiant vif pour Londreft, puis ren- 
voye chez lui par ce rouLint. Un 
rc/uisaprhs ce_//*i«M^, je dcmnndc k 
un iaroubUur s'il voulaic me pretcr 
des caroubUs parceque j'avais un 
poupard nourri. Mais Wbonnit, "Si 
je les prcte, je vcux monfade. " Que jc 
reponds, '*Czfzit nib dam mesb/o(s, 
mais je te carmerai tout de meme, 
situPaJiJ/aAtfnw." Maisqu*ilj4tf/jm!f, 
" Ca fait nib dans ma biots aussi." 
Alors je Jtutt, *' Nous turbintroru 



Cant, Nineteenth Century, 



Ivii 



He WAS very tricky at making tvrirU, 
sod QMd to supply tliem all with 
tools. Me and ihe screu-^man weot 
to Grave*«n(i and I found a dcsd 'an 
(uoinhabitcd house), and wc both 
went and turned it over and got 
tbtngf out of it which fetched a$ 
fany-ihre« quid. We went one day 
to Ehlh ; I went in a place, and 
»hen I opened the door there was 
a great tyke (dog), laying in front of 
the door, so I pulled out a piece of 
indding (liver prepared to silence 
dog») atki threw it to him, but he 
did not move. So I threw a piece 
morv, and it did not lake any notice ; 
lo I goc close up to it« and found 
it waa a dead dog, being stuffed, so 
I done the place for tome wedge 
and three overcoats ; one I put on, 
and the other two in my kipsy. Wc 
went to Harpcnden Races to sec if 
we could find some dead 'uns ; we 
went on the course. While we was 
there we saw a scufl^ it was a flat 
that had been wehhed, so my pal 
laidr ** Pipe his spark prop " (dia- 
osood pin). So my pal said, ** Front 
ne (cover me), and I will do him 
for it.'* So he pulled out his madam 
and done him for it. After we left 
the coorte, we found a dead 'un and 
got a peter (ca^bbux) with very near 
a centary of quids in it. Then I 
orried on a nice game, what with 
the trips and the drink I very near 
went lolmy (mad). It is no use of 
OK telling you every place I done, 
or else you wUl think I am telling 
yoa the same things over again. 



ensemble," ct il me rtntaste •'^." 
Alors nous avons rirtc4 la fifiu et 
acqttigi cinquantecinq si^es, J'ai 
/Mr^fW enKuite nvec lui puis j'ai ixi 
fifff el Xf?// k ccs dix-hutt marques, 
II ctait trts mariotU pour maquiiler 
les caroubles et il foumts»iit des 
alintt i toute la ^nce. Mhigue et 
Ic (aroubleur nous sommes alles a 
Gravesend oil nous avons trouve une 
pioU vide. Nous avons embardi 
dedans et I'avons rim^ cc qui nous 
a afur^ quarantctrois sigtus. Nous 
sommes allcs un re!uis i Erith. 
J'ai <rwf/M///^dans Mticfio/r, et quand 
J'ai d^b&ili la lourdi il y avait ua 
gros tambour couchc devant, de 
sorte que j'ai tire de ma pro/ondc un 
morceau de bidocht et je la lui ai 
bahittcee^ mais il n'a pas bougt*. Je 
lui en ai jele un autre morceau mais 
il est reste tranquillc. Alors je 
m'approchc et je vois que c'ctait un 
cab cmpaillt^. J'ai rind la piotc pour 
la blanquttte et trois UmpUs^ j'en 
ai ptauisi un et ptaqui les deux 
autres dans mon panier. Nous 
sommes alles ensuite aux courses de 
liarpcndcn pour voir m nous pouvions 
trouver despuf/ej sans /oHspt^ ; nous 
allons sur la piste. Pendant que 
nous y sommes, nnui! remou^hims 
une ti^u, c'ctait un ^tust qui venait 
d'etre TtfmU alors mon Janandt me 
jacte^ '* (7a^n/soni:pingle. Couvre- 
moi, et je vais la lul/atrf." Alors 
il tire son blavin et la lui poisa, 
Apr^ avoir quitte U piste, nous trou- 
voiis MQz pioie vide et noy^s, faisouj un 
enfant qui contenait une centaine de 
sigues, A partir de ce jour je me 
suis mis ^ la ri^lade et ^ force 



Iviii 



Cant, Nineteenth Cetitufy, 



I will now tell you what happened 
the day before I fell for this stretch 
and a half. Me and the screwsman 
went to Charlton. From there we 
worked our way to Blackheath. I 
went in a place and touched for some 
wedge which we done for three 
pounds ten. I went home and 
wrung myself (changed clothes), and 
met some of the mob and got very 
near drunk. Next morning I got 
up about seven, and went home to 
change my clobber and put on the 
old clobber to work with the kipsy. 
When I got home my mother asked 
me if I was not a going to stop to 
have some breakfast? So I said, 
"No, I was in a hurry." I had 
promised to meet the screwsman 
and did not want to stick him up. 
We went to Willesden and found a 
dead *un, so I came out and asked 
my pal to lend me the James and 
some twirls, and I went and turned 
it over. I could not find any wedge. 
I found a poge with nineteen shil- 
lings in it. I turned everything over, 
but could not find anything worth 
having, so I came out and gave the 
tools to my pal and told him. So 
he said, " Wasn't there any clob- 
ber?" So I said, "Yes, there's a 
cartload." So he said, "Go and 
get a kipsy full of it, and we will 
guy home." So I went back, and 
as I was going down the garden, 
the gardener it appears had been 



d'aller avec les chamigues et dtpitan- 
ther^ je suis presque devenu louffoque. 
II est inutile de vous raconter toutes 
les phUs que j*ai rinchs^ ce serait 
toujours la m^me histoire. 

Je vous raconterai maintenant ce 
qui est arrive juste la veille du rclms 
ou j'ai i\.i enfourailU pour dix-huit 
marques. Mhigut et le cetrot^leur 
nous allons ^ Charlton. De ia^ 
nous //7>«flr(/<7«j jusqu'i Blackheath. 
yenquille en une/w/? et '^effarowhe 
de la blanquetu que nous fourguons 
pour trois Hvres dix. Je rappliqtu h 
la niche et je change de fringues, je 
rencontre quelques fanandes de la 
gance et je me poivrotte presque. Le 
lendemain matin je me leve vers 
st^Xpiombes pour changer de/h'ngua 
et je me peausse du vieux hameus 
pour aller turbiner avec le panier. 
Quand je rapplique d la nuJu ma 
dabuche me jeute de roster pour la 
refaite Ayx matois, J e boHnis," Non, 
yai d nu patiner" J'avais promis de 
rencontrer le grinchisseur au fric- 
/roc et je ne voulais pas Rancher, 
Nous sommes alles ^ Willesden et 
j'ai trouvc une/zioArsans personne, de 
sotte que j*en suis dkarrf et j'ai de- 
mande ^ monfanandei de me preter 
\e Jacques et des caroubles^ j'ai ren- 
quilli et j'ai cherche la eamelote, 
Je n'ai pas trouv^ de blanquette, 
J'ai trouve une filoche avec dix-neuf 
shillings. J'ai tout retoum^ mais je 
n'ai trouve rien de schpille de sorte 
que j'ai dkarri. J'ai reJiU\fi& cdhus 
iL mon fanandel et je lui ai dit le 
flancke, Alors, qu'il jade, " N*y 
avait-il pas defringues ? " Et je lui 
r^ponds, *' Gy, il y en a une char- 



Cant^ Nineteenth Century, 



li 



IX 



pat there to watch the house, so he 
said, •* What do you want here?" 
So I said, " \Miere do you speak 
to the scrrants ?" So he said, 
•'There i$ not anyone at home, 
they are all out." So be Mid, 
•* What do you want with them ?" 
So T said, **Do you know if they 
have any bottles to sell, because the 
servant loid me to call another day ? " 
So he said, " I do not know, you 
had better call another time." So 
I said, ** AU right, and good day to 
faxm." I had hardly got outside 
wlMa be came rushing out like a 
man balmy, and uid to me, ** You 
most oooe back with rne." So I 
said, "AH right. AVhat i$ the 
matlef?" So when we got to the 
door he sud. " How did you open 
ihU door?" So I said, " My good 
fellow, you are mad ! how could I 
vpcn it ?" So he said, " It was not 
upeo balf-an-hour ago because I 
tncd it.** So I said. " Is that any 
RaaoQ why I should have opened 
k?" So he said, ** At any rate you 
wiD have to come to the station with 



The station was not a stone's 
throw from ihc place, so he caught 
hold of me, so I gave a twist round 
and brought the kipsy in his (ace, 
and gave him a push and guyed. 
He followed, giving me hot beef 
(calling *'6top thief"). My pal 
along, and I said to bitn, 



rel^e." Alors, qu*il dit, ** Aequigts- 
en plein un panier el liJNnonr-noViS, " 
Je retoume, et conimc je dh/alais le 
long du jaffier^ Varroteur dt vet' 
douze qui paralt'il, avait H^ piaqui 
lago pour faire le gaffft me bonnit^ 
" Qu'cst-ce que tu maquiUts id^V 
Je r^ponds, ** Oil peut-on parlet aux 
tarbiHs r " Et il dil, *' II n'y a pcr- 
sonne i la maison, ils sont tous 
sortis. (^ue Icur voulez-vous ? " et 
je lui reponds, "Savez-vous s'ils 
ont des boutcillcs k vendrc, parcc* 
que la scrvanlc m'a dil dc rcvcnir?" 
'*Je ne sais pas, revcnct un autre 
jour." *• C'est lien," que jc lui dis ; 
**je vous souhaite le bonjour." 
J'avais k peine d/carri qu'il ahttie 
commc un louffoqut et rae ja^tt^ 
*' Vous allci rcvcnir avec moi." Jc 
lui dis, "C'csl bien, mon brave; 
qu'est-ce qu'il y a?" El quand nous 
abcuhtis JHxU la lourde il jacte^ 
" Comment avex-vous fait pour 
ouvrir cetle porte?" *'Mon brave 
homme," lui dis-je, *' vous ^tes fou, 
comment auniis-je fait?" Alors il 
/or/*, •• Elle n'ctait pas ouvcrte il y 
a une dcmi>hcurc, car je I'ai essayee 
pour voir." Alors je bcnnis^ *' Est- 
ce une mison pour que je I'aie 
ouYcrle?" Et Wja/Uj *' Dans tous 
les cas, vous allcz m'accooipagner 
au postc de police." 

Lc Moc ctait \l deux pas, alors il 
me met la louche au coias ct je pirou- 
ette en lui rfjititnt un coup de panier 
sur le cifrcti ; puis je lui re^ie unt 
pouju ct \^ fais patiUrot, II me suit 
en gueulaut J la (hunlit, Mon 
fanande me suivait ct je lui l*ottms^ 
" Dcffcnds-moi contrc cc fante^ il 



Ix 



Cant, Nineteenth Century. 



'* Make this man leave me alone, 
he is knocking me about/' and I 
put a half-James (half-sovereign) in 
his hand, and said, " Guy." As I 
was running round a comer there 
was a reeler talking to a postman, 
and I nished by him, and a little 
while after the gardener came up 
and told him all about it. So he 
set after me and the postman too, 
all the three giving me hot beef. 
This set other people after me, and 
I got run out. So I got run in, and 
was tried at Marylebone and re- 
manded for a week, and then fuUied 
(fully committed for trial), and got 
this stretch and a half. Marylebone 
Is the court I got my schooling 
from. — From MacmUlai^s Maga^ 
sine, Octobtr^ 1 879. 



TCit passe h trovers ;" je refile it son 
gniasse un demi-souverain dans sa 
louche et je lui dis, " Crompet 
crompeV^ Commejetoumaislecoin, 
il y avait un flique qui jactait avec 
un facteur, je le depassc en faisani 
la paire^ et peu apris Varroseur de 
verdouze aboule et lui delnne le true, 
Alors, il me (avaU avec le facteur, 
tous les trois gtieulant h la chienlit. 
De cette fa9on, d'autres pantis se 
mettent k me r^yf/^rr et je suis/»^. 
On m^embaiUf on me met sur la 
planche an pain a Marylebone et on 
me remet k huitaine, alors ffcrbi k 
une longe et six marques. Maryle- 
bone est le carr^ oil j'ai cte ^er^ au 
eol/t'gi'. 



M 



I 



Ab«die,abadis./Ci>iievcs'),(rtmi/, 
"push." Accordine lo Michel 
this word i% dcrivril from the 
lulian mbbadia, aJffty. 

^Mtiqiuuit ftur la placmrde, j'ai rcm- 
WoAttC Ml abMlis do raboin.— ViDocQ. 
(f '«r« rw^Mtimr tk» /mNu- tqumrt I taw a 

Abmjoues^ / //. (popular), /a<y, 
" chops." Properly cAa/j. 

Abalobe (popular), astouHitetf, 
^Uiiiuti, or " flabbergasted." 

Abascurdir (thieves'), to kill. Pro- 
perty fe ajtotmif. 

Abati (obiolete). ^///^c/ (Michel). 

O* m traoW iiTi hotninr h'wriblcmcnl 
mmtiii . . . OQ avoit attach^ >ur lui uoe 
cWe porant ci-git I'Abaly. — Journal ku- 

Abatis, abaitis. m. //. (popular), 
kauJi anJ Jttt, Proper sciue, 

A baa lea pattea T Lei as-ta pmprea, 
icttlaiDcnt. tcs absttu, pour lacrr ce ooraage 
roaef-E. ViiiAW. 

Avoir Ics — canaille*. /IffAotv^Mrr^, 
fMeiam hamUs and feet, <ii*'\xt\\t 
cra&bcrh and mutton ti&ts." Nu* 
nierole les — , fU ^reak every botu 
in ycmr b^y. 

Abat-jour, m. (popular), peak of a 
c^ ; — dcs quinquels, eytlid. 

Abat-reluit [thieves'), shade for the 
efts. 

Abattage, m. (popular), much work 
work quukiy done; seven 



scolding. Of '* bully-ragging ; " «r- 
tion of thrmving down ofu's cards 
at baitarat wAi'n ei^ht or time are 
scored. Venic ik 1' — , sale of luares 
spread out ou the pavemeist. 

Abattoir, m. (thieves'), cell at the 
prison of La Rotfuette occupied by 
prisoners under sentence of denth ; 
corresponds to the Newgate '•salt- 
box." It has aUo the meaning 
of gamtHg-hense^ or '* puniing- 
shop." Properly a sUujhter' 
house. 

Abattre (familiar), en — , to do much 
Tvork, or to ** sweat." 

Abbaye,/. (thieves'), kiln in whick 
thierej and vagrants seek a refuge 
at night ; — rufTanie, 'warm kiln ; 

— de Monie-i-regrel, the scaffold, 

Mon p2rc a ^pous^ U veuve, tnoi jc me 
retirv a TAbbaya d« Monic Ji-rcgrct. — 
Victor ,Hvco, S-e drmitr Jrur tftim 

Termed formeriy * ' I'abbaye de 
Montc-i-rcbours;" (popular) — de 
Saint-pjcrre, the scaffold^ n play on 
the words "cinq-pierres," the 
guillotine being erected on five 
flagstones in front of La Koquette ; 

— de Mjls bougres (obsolete), a 
prison ; — des s'otfre a lous, house 
of illfame^ or "nanny-shop." 

Abbesse, f, (popular), mistress of 
a house of Hi -f ante ^ ** abbess.** 

Abcis, TO. (popular), the possessor 
e/a bloated face* 



A bilardiser — A bsinthe. 



Abilardiser. to mutilaie a man 
as Chanoine Fulbert mutilated 
AbSlardt the lover of his daughter 
or nieee Wloise. The operation 
is termed by horse-trainers " add- 
ing one to the list." 

Abiquer (popular), to feed. Lite- 
rally to give a billful. 

Abiqueuse,^ (popular), ttv/Mwr^^/ 
landlady of an hotel, 

Abloquer, abloquir (thieves*)* to 
buy ; to acquire, 

Abonni (familiar), ^tre ~~ an 
guignon, to experience a run of 
ill-luck. Literally to be a sub- 
scriber to ill-luek. 

Aborgner (popular), s* — , toscruti- 
nize. Literally to make oneself 
blind of one eye by closing or 
" cocking "iV. 

Aboti (popular), clumsily adjusted 
or fitted, "wobbly," 

Aboulage, acri, m. (popular), 
plenty, 

Aboulie (popular), in chUdbed^ 
** in the straw," 

Aboulement, m. (popular), ac* 
couchement, 

Abouler (popular), to be in child- 
bed, "to be in the straw;" to 
give, to handover, to *'dub." 

Pigres et barbots aboulez des p^pettec . , . 
Aboulcz tons des ronds ou des liquettes 
Da vieux grimpani^ brichetoa ou vie- 
quins. 

Le Cridu PeupU» Feb., 1886. 

Tocome^ "to crop up." 

Et si ttfziff tient ^ sa boule, 
Konoe ta largue, et qu'elle about* 
Sans limace nous canibrouser. 
KiCHBPiN, La Chanson det GuemXm 

Abour, m, (thieves'), sieve, 

Aboyeur (popular), crier or sales* 
man at public or private sales; 
man employed at the doors of puff' 



ing shops or theatrical booths to 
entice people in, " barker ; " man 
who is constantly clamouring in 
words or writing against public 
men ; man in a prison whose 
function it is to call prisoners. 

Abracadabrant, adj. (familiar), 
marvellous, or "stunning. " From 
Abracadabra, a mag^c word used 
as a spell in the Middle Ages. 

Abraqu£, adj. (sailors'), tied; spliced, 

Abreuvoir, m. (popular), drinking^ 
shop, or " lush - crib ; '* — k 
mouches, bleeding wourui. 

Abruti, m. , a plodding student at 
the Ecole Polytecknique, termed a 
" swat " at the R. M. Academy ; 
stolid and stupid man ; — de 
Chaillot, blockhead, or "cabbage- 
he»l." Chaillot, in the suburbs 
of Paris, hasrepeatedly been made 
the butt for various uncomplimen- 
tary hits. 

Abrutir (familiar), s* — , to plod at 
any kind of work. Literally /* 
mkke oneself silly, 

Abs, abbreviation of oAr/if/Af. 

Absinthage, m, (familiar), tht 
drinking or mixing of absinthe. 

Absinthe, / (familiar), faire son — , 
to mix absinthe with wetter. Ab- 
sinthe k\z hussarde is prepared by 
slowly pouring in the water; 
**VAniiizone" is mixed in like man- 
ner, but with an culjunction of 
gum ; "la panach^ is absinthe 
with a dash of gum or anisette ; 
" la puree " is prepared by quickly 
pouring in the •miter. Faire son — 
en parlant, to sptt when talking* 
Heure de V — , the hour when that 
beverage is discussed in the cafh^ 
generally from four to six p,m. 
Avaler son — , see Avaler. 

Absinth^, culj. (familiar), inioxi* 
catedon absinthe. 



A bsiniker — A char. 



Abtinther (familiar), s* — , ta drink 
mknmt^t ; tpbt* €9m/irmtd tippUr 
0fabsinth4. 

Abiinthcur.w. (familiar), a(/rm-t(-r 
ef AhiiHtke ; om who makfs it a 
pntcHce of gttting drunk on a/>- 

Absinthier, or absintheur, 01., 
TtiAjL-T ,"f Absinthe. 

Abfttnthisme, m. (fainiliar), %latt 
cf tvdy .!«./ mittd rattlting from 
rxceiirtt drinking 0/ ahsin/Af. 

Absorber (famUiar), (0 tat and 
drink a jp-fdt deal, to "pii/Ic." 

Abvorplion,/., annuai teremtony at 
tk* Ef^'U Pi^yteehmque, at the 
tiMt 0/*rhicA the leniivs, or **an- 
iim*, ifrr enter/aimed 6>y the 
mnrfy-jofitedt termed "melons" 
C' »ookct% •' at the iio}^i Afiii' 
tmry Aeademy). 

Jicabit, m. (popular), the petton ; 
tie U»fy ; health ; temper. Eire 
de boQ — , io enjoy sound health. 
Un etnnge — , on odd huntQur, 
or "strange kidney." 
Acacia», «., fairc ks — , ta -unslk 
4r- rf/nv, aecordin^ to the nutom 
of fmskicnahU Partsittnt, tn the 
*• Attk des Aeaciat" Jrom the 
P»rU'M<isUot to La Caneorde, 
Ac*Ufourchonner (popalar), s* — , 
to get astride anything. 

Accaparer [familiar), quclqu'un — , 
t^ wumcpoifu a perian. 

Accent (thieye*'), signal s^ven by 
fitting' 

Accentuer (popular), scs gcslcs— , 
t^ /prze ,% i*cx OH the ear ; in other 
iefi&«. " to warm the wax of one's 
ear ; " /* gwe a klsm, or "bang." 

Ao MM oifCS. m. pi. (theatrical), 
^^i^ properties^ or " props." As 
aqauificative it is used dispani* 
gineljr, thui, Viandc d' — , vin 
3' — , eure meat and wme of tad 
ptatity. 



Accoerer (tkicvcs'), to arrange. 

Accolade (popular), smart box on 
the ear, "buckhorse." 

Accommoder (ratniliar), qudqu'un 
a la sauce piquantc, to hentsct'erriyt 
**to doulilc up;" io nuike one 
smart under irony or reprinukes. 
Might he rendered by, to sit upon 
one with a zrngeance ; — au beurre 
noir, to beat hia*k and btue. 

Accordion, m. (popular), opera* 
hat. 

Accoufler (popular), s* — , to squat. 
From the word coufRes, e^^tton 
hales, which may be conveniently 
u»ed a« &eats. 

Accroche-coeurs (familiar). Pro- 
perly smalt iurl fu'isted on the 
temp/e,oT*'kiif,-c\ir\." Cadsapply 
that name Io short, crooked whis* 
kers. 

Accrocher (popular), un paletot, 
to tell a falsehood, or ' ' iwack up ;" 
— un Mildat, to tonfine a toldter to 
darraris, *' to roost." S' — , Iff 
come to bloicsy "to come to '«igger- 
heads.*' (Familiar) Accrocher, to 
pawn., "to pop, to lumber, to 
blue.** 

EtM-vouft enrrtf quclquefois danit un da 
ce« nomlirrux iMireaux de pr£t ciu'on dtf. 



np»e 



AUftM soiifc le nom de ma tante f 



Non. Taol micux pour vou>. Cela pmuve 
qu« vouf n"avc7 jiimitn e» besom d'y ac- 
crorlirr vut bibeluis el que votrc mrntre 
n'a jamais reiartic de cinquantc fratiu. — 
Fii£tiA(XT. Ln I'lede Farij. 

Accrouer. See Accoufler. 

A Chaillot ! (popular), an energttie 
invitation to make oneself seane ; 
an expression of strong disapprmnil 
coupled unth a daire to see one 
turned 07tt of doors. 

Achar (popular), d'— , abbrevia- 
tion of acharncment, with steadi- 
ness of purpose, in an unrelenting 
manner. 



A cheUr — Affres* 



Acheter (po]^ular)| quelqn'un — . 
to turn one into ridkuU^ to make a 
foot vj om, 

Achetoir, wr., achetoires, f. ph 
(popular), monty^ *' loaver. ' 

Acceurer (popular), to do anything 
with a unll^ to " wire in." 

Acoquiner (popular), s' — , used 
di>pani!4ingly. to kitp company^ 
to lite with one, 

Acr6 (thieves'), s/rou^t "spry," 
violettt : siimce! "mum's ihe 
word ! ' he careful f *'shoe lea- 
ther I •* 

Acree, aerie, w. (thieves'), mis- 
trust ; — done I hold your ton^u I 
** mum your dublwr I '* Oe tau' 
twus. From acrimonie. 

Acteur - guitare (theatrical and 
journalistic), a<7<?/' 7trho has only 
ont string to his 6ow ; actor who 
elicits appiauit in lachrymose scenes 
only. 

Actionnaire.m. (literary), rrrt/wAjwj 
man easily decctvrd. Proper sense, 
shareholder. 

Adjectiver (popular), tc abuse, to 
**»Ung." 

Adjoint (thieves'), executioner's 
assistant. 

Adjudant, m. (military), tremper 
un — , to dip a piece of Irrtad in the 
^rst, and consequently the mttre 
savoury tiro'h yielded by the ** pot 
aufeut " n praetice i$tdulged in by 
cooks. 

Adjuger (gamesters'), une banque 
d vin operateur, tocheat^ to "bite," 
at cards. 

Adroit, adj. (popular), du coude, 
fond of the i>otile, or skUfuI in 
"crooking the elbow." 

AfT, affe, / (popular), eau d' — , 
/Trfm/K. or " French cream." See 
Tord-boyaux. 

I^ v'lk I'cnn^e, c'est dc I'eau d'alTe 
(eau de-vie}, etle est tcuie mouchique celle- 



Aflafre,/.{ihievcs'),/n7>t*^c//mwr; 
projected theft or swindle, ' ' plant ;" 

— juteuse, prof table transactionj 

— miire, preconcerted crime or 
theft about to becammiited. (Fami- 
liar) Avoir son — , to have re- 
ceived a "settler;" to be com* 
pletely drunk, or *' hoodman;" to 
hazv rrccrird a mortal vvntnd, in 
other wonls, **to have one's goose 
cooked.*' (Popular) Avoir une 

— cachee sous la pcau, to be Prtg- 
ftant, or " lumpy. ' Fairc 1* — k 
quelqu'un. toktll, " to do for one," 

Affaler (popular), »'— , /«?/;//, "to 
come a cropper." 

T'« rien poivre, to ne ii«n« pluc sur tes 
fumeroiis ■ . . . tu vat t'alTilcf. — RirHic- 
n«, Lf PtKv4. 

Affe. See Aff. 

Afiistoler (familiar), to arrange, to 
dress. M.il a^istule, badly dcnte, 
badly dressed. 

Affluer (thieves'), to deceive, to 
"cram ;" t9 cheats lo " stick ;" /o 
swindle^ to "for." From ii fluucr. 

AfTourcber (sailors'), sur ses ancres, 
to retire from the servia. Pro- 
perly to moor a ship each ivay. 

Affranchi (thieves'), convict who 
has *' done his time ; " one who 
has ceased to be honest ; one wha 
has been induced to bean accomplice 
in a crime. 

Affranchir (gamesters'), to saz't a. 
certain card at the cost of another; 
to initiate one into the tatties of 
card-sharpers; (thieves') to ctt' 
rupt ; to teach one dishonest prac- 
tices ; — un sinve avec de Taubcr, 
to corrupt a man by dint of money ; 

— un sinve pour grinchir, to put 
an honest man up to thiet'ing. 

Affrea,/.//. (popular), upbraiding, 
" blowing up." Pro|»er sense, 
t2ff}Hia. 



Affur — A imant. 



Affar. affure, «. (ibicveii), pro- 
iftdu prcjiis. Avoir de 1' — , to 
htve mffMfr. 

QitaAd je vots mon %ffan 

r« M» toujour! par^, 

1>U ^u* ^raihl crcuf du moflde 

J« v*u k U pcDkiDdc 

Four voui dofitwr du fnus. 

ViDOCQ. 

r«|;e, «. (thievM*), prxttih of 
'iai^, •• regalajs," or " swag." 

Affurcr, afTQter (thieves'), to d€- 
OiVX ; to matt profits ; to procure ; 
— dc I'auber, to make monrt: 

En cu^P'"*"* cocaine p on n'ofTure pas 



AfKt ithitvcs* and popular), etre 
d*—t to /v a^fff niMntMg, or **■ 
downy cove ; " to /i* wiJe awakr, 
or *'to he one who knnws what's 
o'clock, * A r — , on the -watch, 

AffAter (thieves'), to liefehe, to 
nM/^4. "Irt click ; '* to whip w/, 
"' to nip ; " /^ wa^e tmlav/ul pro- 
fits ; — *ei pincrlles, /o w^/-t, to 
**u^ the hoof; " to rww, to **1ce 
il, P'^IP*'^ *ense, to shnrpcn. 
S* — le sifflct, to drink, to ''whet 
oocs whistle." 

Ayaceur (^porttng), one who sets a 

tM$m^' ^tn^^ "butloncr." 

AgMnitT lp<iouUr)» to titke, to eafck, 
•' to grab ; ' — une cUque, to re- 
tmr a /vr oM tAt ear, "to gel 
ooc't ear's wax wamied." 

A^te»/ (thieves'), crockery . 

K^t^t (popular), to be thrashed, 
" tjnncd ; " to be caught, 
•*a*bbed." 

A(CD0UtlI6c,/. {joaTnali%ti'),proiti- 
tmtetrhoie jpAia/it^ii best deseribed 
ty the appa'iatioH itself, 

AcobiUe Ithieves'], implements, 

"jJts." 
Afotiir (pipuUr), /* abuse vehe- 

wientJy, to "bully-rag," or "to 

baitl over the cooU." 



Agout, M. (thieves'), drinking* 

liiiter. 
Agrafe, /• (poputar), hnttd, 

"picker," '•dooks,"or'* dukes." 
Agrafer (thieve** and cads'), to 

sersc, to '* grail J '* to orrest, "lo 

pull up," or " lo smug.'* 
AgT^ntent, w. (thentricat , avoir dc 

r — ^toobtain apfltttne. (Populnr) 

Se pousser dc l'— , to amnse one- 

self. 
Agripper (popular), fasfite secretly, 

to steai quiiKly, to *' nil). *' S* — , 

to come to bhnvs, "to slip into one 

another." 
Agfuicher (popular), to allure, de* 

coy, " to button j *' to quicken, to 

excite. 

II fiitbit lui (aire comprentJrc qu'ellc 
■guicfac la soif du petit, en rcmp^hvit de 
Imik.— kicHenH, Lei CIm. 
Agui^er (popular), to ttau, '* to 

badger." 
Ahuri, m. (popular), de Chall- 

lot, block-head, "cabbage-head." 

See Abruti. 
Aide-cargot. cantetfi servant* 
Aides. See Allcr. 
A1e<ale, m. (popul.ir), omnibus. 
Aiguille, / (mililary), k tricofer 

les cdtes, nvord, "loasiing-fork ;" 

(thieves') key, or "screw ;" card 

vtade to protrude from a pink for 

cheating^ *' old genlleman." 
Aiguiller (card -sharper?'). la breme. 

to make a nuirk or notch on a card. 

Aile,^. aileron, m, (popular), arm, 
or " bender." 

Aille, iergue, orgue, ucbe, rnf- 
fixes Hsed to disguise any vntrd. 

AiUe (familiar), fallait pas qu'y — . 
it is all his own fault, he has no- 
body to thank for it tmt himself. 

Aimant, »i. (popular), faire de 
r — , to make a fnssy shotv of af- 
fected friendliness through inte- 
rested mottles. 



Aimcp — A ia va-U-fairc-fic/tc, 



AimEf {popular), i crtdit, to enjoy 
the gratuitous gvcd graces of a kept 
woifnifi. Aimer comme scs pciils 
boyniu, to liiMt Oft PMe^ "to love 
like ihe apple of one's e>'c." 

Air, m. (popular), &e donner de 
1'—, se poiisser de 1'—, jouer la 
fillc de V—, to rttn a'.vay, to 
•' cut and run." Sec Palairot. 

Airs. w/. //. (popular), clre ^ plu- 
sieiirs — , to be a hypocrite^ doubU' 
Joieii person y '* tnawworm." 

A la balade (popular), chanleurs — , 
itinerant sinj^ers, "chaunlers." 

A la barque, street cry of mussel 
lOitermoHgers. 

A la bonne (popnlar), prendre 
quelquediose — , to take any- 
tkut^ gooii-humoureMy, Avoir — , 
to love^ to like. 
Je peUe contre )e qoart cTtBil de mon 

qitartier qui ne m'n (nu \ la bunnc. — 

A la carre (ihtevcs'), degringoler 
— , to steal from shops ; kind of 
theft eommittid frtHcifitlly fy 
nvmcn -who pretend to be shopping; 
**shoplifnng." 

A 1ft clef (familiar), an expletive. 
Trop de zcle — , too much %eal by 
half. From a muMcal term. The 
expression is used sometimes with 
no particular ineaning, thus, II y 
auradu champagne — , is equiva- 
lent to, II y anra du cliam* 
pagne. 

A la corde (popular), logement 
— , Iffw lodging-home^ where the 
lotigers sleep with their heads on a 
rope^ which is let down early in the 
nwniing. In some of these the 
Iwlgera leave all their clothes with 
the keeper, to ensure against Iheir 
being stolen. 

A la coule {popular), etre — , to be 
eomrrsan/ with. 
S'tt avnit ivi au cuurant. \ U coutc, il 

Burait «u que le i>rc(iiier true du comclot, 

cV«c de )i.'<(ablir iiu cccur mCme ilc la foulc, 

— RtCHftPtN. 



Eire — , tc be happy ; oi one's ease ; 
comfortable. Je n'etois pas — , / 
felt very uncom fort able. 

A la flan, i la rencontre, or 4 
la dure (thieves'), fabriqucr un 
gas — , to attack and rob a person 
at nighty " to jump a cove. ' 

A la grive ! (thieves* an<l cads*), takt 
eare! "shoe leather 1 " Cribler — , 
tociillout "pol/ie/" io"givehot 
beef." 

Par ctMitretcmps raa lar^uc, 



Pour gr^nRer %e* vxladcs, 

Knoivjiic iliiri* un ratle, 
Scrl dc* Mcuc« k foL*on ; 
On U crililc h U gn^-e, 
Jk m'la donnc ci m'oqww, 
Etle c&t punitmfc tnarun. 

MfHtaire» ,ie I'idoe^, 

A la manque (thieves'), fa5oi«, or 
fafelards — , forged bank a4>tes, 
"queer soft." Avoir du iK»snon, 
or de la galctle — , to be penniiisi^ 
Elrr — , uQi to be trustiis,rthy ; ta 
betray. 
P&» un de roiii ne Kra pour te dab k la 

manque. — UAt.2AC. 

A la papa ((wpular). iptietly, SiO^vly, 

A la petite bonne femme (popu- 
lar), gtisscr — , to slide squcUiirtg 
on onis heels* 

Alarmiste (thieves^), xiHdch-*logt 

" tyke." 

A-la-six- quatre-deux (popular), 
in disorder ^ *' nil at sixes 'nd 
sevens t" anykanv^ •'helter-skel- 
ter." 

A la sonde (cads'), ftre — , to b< 
cunnings -UfiJe awake, " fly." 

Va, la mftm', tniqur el n'fais pak four. 
Sou ricn marioUe et II la tuitide '■ 

KlClisriN, C*aMJ<*H det GueMJ, 

A la tienne Etiennet (popular), 
your health f 

A la va-te-faire-fiche, anrho:v, 

Un bcrct nature, camp<f t>ar une main 
pa)-«ai)nc. ^ la va i«-fiire-fiche, uas ar- 
ri^fc-pctitrfe de pittorcMtue. — KlCMitriH. 



Alines^AUiK 



kXhtktM^f. pL {thieves'), /rtj/r, im- 
fkmtmtSt '*jilis." Properly 
t ko t mAktrs" tnt'is. 

Alcntolr. w., roralcn(our(thievet*), 
mii^hbcurhi.'^t vicinity. 

A reftbrouffe fihievcs'), faire un 
coop — sur un pantre, ta ileal a 
pcektt'hook front a pcrsvn who has 
6em teen te enter a bank^ or other 
jinaniiit! atalUiihment, The ihicF 
vaichrs his opporlunily in the 
neighbourhood of such establish* 
mcnts, and when operating keeps 
bi&baQil concealed under an over- 
coal which he beani on his arm, 

Aligpcr (freemasons'), to lay the 
eltfih. S' — , in soldicri' language, 
tafitkt a tlHel TiHtk rutfrjf. The 
ctprcuion is useil ftUo hj civi< 

>A.linea]t»te, m, (literary), wril^ 
who li fetui of short f-ant^raphs, 

AUemand. m. (jjopuhir), peigne 
d'— . tkeJOHr finf^x. 

Aiter (familiar). & Bougiva), in lite- 
lary nicn'v (variance, is to write a 
mewtpafer arttefe of ho interest for 
tkt ^meral puMe ; — it la cour 
ds lides is snfj of a utarrieJ 
mrmat* who haj one or more levers ; 
— ma pol, to piek up liomitioes 
fp^m tkoH tfhiih rtmain o/tcr the 
P^*per mmmter has been dtstnbuted 
/# tke plt^yers ; — au sAfnin, to 
ipenJ/tefiy trne's aipifal, an allu- 
sion to the colour of gold ; — en 
Belgi<iae u Si\i»i of a cashier \oho 
Mt$ tn'th the cask-b^x, or of a 
Jinatttitr \fh0 makes off with the 
tm9mr of hts clients ; — se faire 
fichc, to go to the tietwe ; — se 
faire foulre has the same meaninj^, 
tut r.'f'm to a rather mort fonibte 
tm-ttmsiim yet ; — $e faire lanlaire, 
/* n r.» the dcuee. Allez vous faire 
Acne, or foutre ! go tothedeuee, or 
•* jrmj be hanged I " Je lui ai dil 



d'— se faire lonlaire, I sent him 
about his business. Aller son petit 
bonhommc de chetnin, to do any- 
thing^ without any hurry, ivithout 
heedinj^ interruptions or hin- 
drances. On avail beau hii crier 
d'arr^ter, it ollait toujours son petit 
bonhomme dc chcmin. (Fami- 
Har and popular) Y aller, to begist 
anrfhin^. Allons-y 1 let us begin / 
let us open the ball ! now for busi- 
ness. Y ollcr de quelque chose, /* 
iOHtrikute ; to pay ; to Jnrnish, 
Y — de son argent, to pay ^ " lo 
stump up." Y — d'une, de deux, 
to pay for one or two bottles of 
liquor, Y — de sa larmc, to shed 
a teary to sho^v entotion. Y — 
cain^cnt, todo anything wttlin^^ 
oriskly. Allons y gaiment ! let us 
look alitit ! (Popular) Aller a la 
chasse avec nn fusil de tnile, to 
gv a hej^ing, " lo cadge." An 
allusion to a bepgar's canvas 
wallet. Compare Ihi^ with the 
origin of the woid "to beg,'* 
which is derived from ''bag;" 
— k Tarchc. to fetch money ; — k 
niort, to deny^ a play on ilie words 
** Niort," name of a town, and 
" nier,"todeny ; — a ses aHaires, 
to ease onese//, " to go to Mrs. 
Jones' ;" — au persd is said of 
street -walkers who ply their trade, 
Thi» expression may have its 
origin in the practice sometimes 
followed by this claivs of women 
of carrying a small basket as if 
going lo the fruiterer's; — au 
trot I J said of a prostitute loalk- 
ing the street in grand attire^ or 
'• full fig; " — ou vicc» to mate 
on/s resort of places where immo- 
rality is rife ; — voir dcliler les 
dragons, to go without dinner. 
The lCngli>h have the expressions, 
*' to dine out," used by the lower 
classes, and ** to dine with Uuke 
Humphrey," by the middle and 
up]»er. According to ihe Ufang 



AlUs doftc^AUnmetU, 



Dictionary the reason of Ihe latter 
saying; is as follows : " Some 
visitors were inspecline the abbey 
where ihe remains of Humphrey, 
Duke of (jlouccsler, lie, and one of 
them was unfortunately shut in, 
and remained there soius while bis 
companions were feasting at a 
nei|^hbouring hostelrj'. He was 
afterwards said to have dined 
with Duke Humphrey, and the 
saying eventually pa-sscd into a 
proverb." Allcr aux pruneaux is 
said of the viftim of a practical 
joke phyed in hospitals at the ex- 
pense of a nrtv pati^nt^ ivho^ Itein^ 
sent at the cohcIusioh of a meal to 
request another patient to furnish 
him with the customary dessert^ 
gets bolstered for his pains; — 
oil le roi va a pied, to f^o to the 
latrines, or *' chapel of ease;" 
(printers') — en galilcc, or — 
en gcrmanie {a play on the words 
*'Je remanie," I overrun), to da 
some oz'emtnning in a piece of 
composition ; (soldiers*) — k 
I'astic, to clean one^t equipment ; 
(sporting) — pour Targent, to hack 
one's oroM horse; (musicians') — 
a<i carreau, fo seek an engagt- 
ment. An allusion to **Ia Rue 
du Petit • Carreau,"a meeting- 
place for musicians of Ihe lowest 
class, an*) musical conductors. 
(Thieves*) Aller k coml>ergc, to go 
to confession with a priest ; — i, 
la rctapc, ia waylay in order to 
murder; — chci Fualdes, to 
share the Inioty, ''to nap the regu- 
lars." Fuald^s was a rich banker, 
who was murdered in circtim- 
stances of peculiar atrocity. 

AUez done (familiar), et — , akind 
of flourish at the end of a sentence 
to emphasize an assertion. Allcz 
done vous laver (popular). It off^ 
go to "pot;" — V0U5 asscoir, 
"shut up 1" 



Alliances, / pi, {thieve*'^ JUff^- 
cuffs, " bracelets." Propcrlf 
wedding-rings, 

Allonger (familiar), to pay, to 
'* fork out : " — les radis, to pay. 
"to shell out;" (military) — 
la ficelle or la courroie, to make 
an addition to a penalty. S' — , to 
fallt to *' come down a cropper." 

AUume, w., confederate who makes 
sham Inds at auctions^ a "hullon." 

AlIumA (thieves'), stared at. 

Sur la pLtcarde de Vcrgne 
II nous faudrmit sambiller, 
Allum^ de louto ecu largucf 
Et du trcpc ranAcmbltf. 

Mimfiirtt de I 'ijocy. 

Allumer (thieves'), to look, " to 
stac," to see, or ** to pipe;" 
to keep a sharp look-out ^ to watch, 
"to nark." 

Si le S()iiclciir avatt eu tanlAt une larfue 
comrot fnoi pour atlumer, il n'aurait paa 
tl4 mouchtf le surin daiu lavmlofr du 
grinche.— E, SvtL, Afyitfrti de fan's. 

Allumer le mi&ton, to scan ones 
features ; — scs clairs, to look at' 
tentively, "to stag ;" (prostitutes') 
— son p^l role, son gai, to get highly 
excited. (Theatrical) Allumer, to 
awake interest or enthusiasm 
among an etudience .* (popular) to 
allure pttrchasers at fa»r stalls, or 
the public at theatncal booths or 
" ga fls " by glowing accou nts. I n 
coaclimen.H* parlance, to whip, ••to 
flush." (Familiar) S'— , to be 
slightly intoxicated, "fresh;" eX' 
cited by women*! aJluremtnts ; 
brought to the proper pitch of in* 
terest by card-sharpers or salesmen* 

Un autre cnmpire gasne encore un coup 
dc dix franck cetic foU. Ta p^cne I'allune 
de pliuen plus.— RiciiEriH. L« Pax^. 

Allumette,/ (popular), avoir son 
— , to be tipsy, "screwed." The 
successive stages of this degree of 
intoxication arc expressed by the 



AUunuiUs — Amazone. 



<{umtirying tenni, "rondc." '*de 
AMckana de vin,'* **de cam- 

AUumettes,///. (popular), arms^ 
"Irn.Icrt." 

Allomeur, in., C9nfedtra(e at aMC- 
h\>H rofntt (sec Allume) ; fAt^/ 
vuhp f^ti ^^rkmen i$ito a itatf of 
inr^xu alien an fiiy Jay, afUr 
wJtH'h tkty art setn konu^ and 
</ of their earnings t*y his con- 
■tattt, the *^ nifneusa*' ami 
'•//■i«'fli//rt»r//'or "bug hunlers;" 
imhiimg {heat uMo playi as if ht 
ant if tkt general pul*li( ^ and 
fpAtf 0tkeru'ise sets a f^me g^ng^ 
A " buiioner," or •* decoy-duck." 

AUumeure, m. pi. (military), de 
gaz, lancers. An allusion lo their 
wcapoD, which hai some rnem- 
blance with a lamp-lighter's rod. 

AUumeuse, ^, -aMman who seeks to 
en fi.e passrrS'by into patrofiiting a 
k^HSi cf ill fame. 

AUnanacfa, m. (popular), des 
vinft-cinq mille ailre&acs. girl or 
■Pnwww 0f dtssohite eharncter^ 
•' public ledger." Sec Gadoue. 

Alpaga. alpag. m. (iKjpuIar), coat^ 
**tos»" or "Benjamin." 

ASpaiguc (popular), clothing, "log- 
gei^," coai, " Benjamin." 

Alphonse (familiar), man wha pto* 
/.I .',- prestituta, ill-treats them 
tfrcn, anJ lives ^ their earnings, 
" (jcRiioncr." These worthies go 
alio by The names of " dos, bar» 
l»cau, chevalier de la [^uicbct 
iti2rIoii,'\S:c. See Poisson. 

Alphonaiatne (familiar), the (ailing 
tfan AlphcHs^. 

Alpion \g%aimcti\manu'hff cheats 
at eiirtts^ ant who ** bites." 

Alt^que (Lhicves*), manly, " spry." 
hismJs^ffte, cxcfllent, "' nobby," 
Krom altui. 



Amadou, m., amadouc, / 

(thieves' and tramps'), substance 
with which vagalvm/s rub their 
faces to gizv themselves a sickly, 
WTel<heti appearance. 

Lc% t jgnu« imminent avec lenirci letin 
apprentu pour leur appmiiln; !i cx^rcer 
t'ausot. Prctnicrcment, Icur cnwignctu a 
acquiscr de rainiidoue de plu»ieun sorte». 
I'une avcc dr I'herbe qu'oii nomine iklairv, 
pour serviraux fruic»-iQi}ouji.— Z.r /itrroM 
Jtr Argot, 

(Popular) man zvith an in- 
^amma&le heart. 

Amadouage. m. (thieves'), mar- 
ria^e, " buckling." 

Amadouer, s'— (thieves' and 
tramps*), to paint or otherwise- 
make up one's fact Ttn'ih a view to 
tlccritnng people. 

Amandes. / pi. (popular), de 
pain dVpicc, black teeth, fnv auti 
far between. 

Amant (prostitutes'), de carton. 
lover of no importance^ a poor lover 
in both senses : — de occur, ont 
who enjoys a kept jtvuiatt's affec- 
tions gratis, one who is loved for 
*' lozfc,'* not money. 

Amar, amarre, m. (thieves'), 
friend, *' pal," or "Hen cull;" 
— d'attaque, staunch friend. 

Amar-loer (Breton canl), rope 
whiih has served to hang one. 

Amarrer (thieves'), to act in such a 
manner as to deceive, to lay a 
*' plant." Properly to moor. 

Amateur (in literary men's par- 
Lince), writer who d,ies not exact 
payment for his productions ; (in 
officers' slang) a cri-ilian ; an 
oj^er who gizYS h imielf Utile 
trouble in his profession f who takes 
it easy ; (familiar) wan who 
makes a Hiring by playing at cards 
with people unaNe to leaz'e their 
homes. 

Amazone,/. (lhieves*),^^a/<f rori/- 
sharper. 



lO 



A mbassadeur — A ncie$t. 



Ambassadeur^ w. (popular), sMoc- 
maki-r, "Miob;" (in gay girls' 
*Iflnu) (1 bully. See Poisaon. 

Ambes, /. //, (thieves*), /rf/» 
"gambs." 

Ambier (thieves'), to ftie^ ** to 

pike." See Patatrot 

Et mcri^ dc haf>p«r Ic taiHis ei ambicr 
le p)i» guiirJemciit vxtwible.— /<ifyw» */* 
FArgot. it gi't i'ff„ and r*m mnaty Mt/mti 

Anbrellin (Breton cant), son. 
Ambulante. /. (thieves'), female 

who is at OMif a hamkft\ a ihUf, 

and a prostitute. 
Amcndier, m. ((hcalrical), fleuri, 

stage manage* ^ '* daddy.'* A play 

on ihc wunl amende, a fine^ the 

connection being obvious. 
Amener (popular), s' — , to come^ to 

f^i to. Lc voili qui s'amcne, 

here he comes. 

Am^ricain (thieves'), eoufedtrate of 
a thiff Tt'ho gt*cs by the name of 
JartiiHier. TIic pair induce a 
fciinplcton lo dig at the foot nf a 
tree for a buried treasure, when 
they rob him of his money ; a 
rtviuMer who pretends hi has Just 
returued from Amrriia ; (fa- 
miliar) a diink, sonielhinf^ bt- 
t^i'<en grog and punch. Fairc 
IVieil — , to srrutinize frith search- 
ittggiame. Oeil — , rye -.L^ith pur* 
poseiy amorous, "killing," txpres- 
siiin : also a wry sharp eye, 

Am6ricaine, vol & I* (see Char- 
riage). 

Ami (thieves'), expert thuf, "gon- 
nof ; " — de collfrge, prison 
chum. 

Amicablement (popular), in a 
friendly manner, affatiauixtcly. 

Aminche, aminchemar, amin- 
chcmince, m. (thieves'), /nVW, 
•• ben cull ; " — d'aff, accomplice, 
"aialUmiin." 



Amis, m, pi. (popular), comme 
cochons, " thick ** friends. 

Amiteux, oi/J. (popular), friendly^ 
amiabli'^ gentle. 

Amocher (popular), to bruise, t9 
tU-lre.it, \o "manhandle." S' — 
la gueule, to maul one another^s 
face, lo " mug " one another. 

Amorc6, adj. (popular ),/«/«» A a/, 
garnished. 
Via ciu'e«l richement amnm^ j*«n luift 

moi-mcnic ^tMubl— RiCHeriN- 

Amoureux (popular), hun£hb<tek, 

or ' ' lord ; " — <Ie careme, a timid 

lever. Literally a " Lent lover." 

(Printcr.s'J Papier — t f^P^r that 

bhts. 
Ampafle, «/. (thieves'), cloth. 
Amphi, m. (students'), abbreviation 

of amphilhcitrc, lecture room. 
Amphibie (typographers'), typO' 

graphcr who is at the s«ime time a 

printer and reader, **donkcy.'* 
Amprefan (Breton caut), a Iffto, 

insu/titrg expression, 
Amusatif, otlf. (popular), atnusiug, 

funny, 
Amuscr (popular), s* — a la mou- 

tnrde, to neglect one's duty or work 

for trifieSf tomfooleries. 
An, w. (thieves'), litrt^ measurtfor 

wine. 
Anarcho, m., anatrhtst, 
Anastasic,/, literary and theatric 

lal official ceHsorship. 

Anchois, m. (popular), yeux bord^ 
d' — , eyes '^vith inflamed eyelids, 

Anchtibler (thieves'), to appre- 
hend, to "nab," or "lu smug." 

Ancicn, ancienne (I'teasants'), 
father, mother. " Ancien '' at 
the military schools is a student 
U'ho has been through the twoyears* 
iourse. In the army, a soldier 
who has saifed one term of ser^cg 
at least. 



A ndt'riigtu — A rise. 



Andetlique, m fpoputar), a tfirtyor 
faui-mcmthtJ man. Properly « 
tm^ hth mstJ hy scavetigtrs, 

Andoasc, m. (thieves*), fhe dtt^Jt. 

Alon 1< nipin «n colcir. jtira ijue »M 
ama(UU JAOuu du tnitbeun tlan* HJti 
pipe! ^u'm Icur tichcrait ce'>t coup^dc Kibre 
Mir 1 J t«>vw«. — y .» v'" '^ ^^ l^t- 

Andouille, / (popuUr), a man 
d'naiti ef rtn/zyT, a "muff." 
ProjHrrly .Afffrt.'in^T. Fair* I' — , 
t» /t'av tAc /aV. Gmnil dcpen- 
deur d'anilnuille^, ont loha pnfers 
go^ cktrr la u\*rk. 

VtoMtrM aiuai den bsu-U-Benmc, da tajiv 
•It^uiltcS. 

Fkin^iiu, <u<T-pois. grandt dtfpendeun 

(l'aAd'>u3l«, 
Qui dvM tutu lc» cabarets onl \ai Icur je 

ilutt. 

El qm oe foot JAnuus ocuvre de leurs dix 



RjCHiriM. LmMtr, 

(Cod -fishers*) Amlouille, wht4 
tiffSeing to xta'VMird. 

Angaucbe, or angluce, f. 
ithicvcs*), ,(•«»". Tortillcr de 
X — , to rat gvotf. 

Ange-^ardien, m. (popular), mnn 
r.'^»ij/ crt/.jw^' h to see Jrunl-nra's 
A<*me ; muiJtm insiJe it chemi.^rt/e. 

Anglais, m. < familiar), vrrxiitar, 
"dun;" ff/'FW 'vlic keeps a nns- 
trtsi ; acare/ully mmie ufi lUtmmy 
puretl in ikopi, U a a e 1'—, is 
iAtd of a her it -whUh shows blood. 
AngUU i prunes, voyagcurs a 
pruoes, prudeHt traveiiers, who, 
Mf>,<' aware of the iotig price asked 
/(frjrnit at restaurants^ arr satisfied 
with a/nv plums: (cabmen^') — 
de canon, an expression of ion- 
tftnpt applied to a stingy *' fare" 

Anglaise^ / (mountebank V). the 
thare of each partner in the husi- 
avii .' the expense! of each guest at 
m tteaL (Popular) Dan&er i V — , 
iff priictiee folhisted by girls who 
frrtr*id to gs> to the hail of the opera, 
mmd stop at a restaurant xuhere 



they await clients, Fairc une — , 
to pay one's share in the rixkoning; 
iilso a favourite game of loafers. 
One of the players lo*iscs all ilic 
pence of the party ; thoM; which 
turn up heads ur tails ax the case 
may be, are his ; another player 
adjudges to himself ihe taiN, and 
so on with the rest. Filer, or 
pisAcr & r — , to give ihe slip^ to 
take '* French leave.*' 

Angluce, or angauche, / 

(ihieves'), goose, 

Angoulimc, / (thieves*), themaath, 
"muns." From "cngouler," to 
s-.fallow, Se caresser 1' — , to eat 
and arink, to take " grub and 
bub." See Mastiquer. 

Anguille,/. (thieves'), Ivlt. Pro- 
perty eel; (familiar) — de btiisson, 
snake. 

Anis, m. (popular), de 1' — ! rx- 
elatuation expressive of refusal, 
may be rendered by '* you be 
hanged !" See NfefleS, 

Anisette,/ ([>opu1ar},debarbiUoni 
uttter, or " Adam's ale." 

Anjez (Breton cant), /;M^r. 

Ann doouzeg abostol (Breton 

cant), twelve o'tlock. Literally 

the t-ioetve apostles, 

Annoncicr, sh. (printers'), com- 
fositor of advertisements ; also 
man who belongs to an advertising 
Jirm, 

Annuatre, m, (military), passer 
1' — sous le bras, to be promoted 
aifoniing to seniority. 

Anonchali (popular), discouragrd, 
east dcntnt^ "down in ihe mouth." 

Anquilieuse, f, (thieves*), female 
thief who conceals stolen property 
betioem her legs. From '* quilles," 
a slant; ^t^''"> ^'^^ '^^' 

Ante,/ (popular), <irm, " bender.** 
Faire le paiiler k deux aiises^ /« 



12 



A ntif — A quiger. 



fvaik with a woman ou each arm, 

to play (he '* samlwich." 
Aniir, m., antiffe,/ (thieves'), a^■l 

c/u^ihttfT- Pailre 1'—, to ivaik, 

to **pB»i I he hoof;" to McHve, 

" |o kid ; " to disumbU ; U> J/y, 

to "narV." 
Antiffer (thieves'), to tnttr^ to walk 

in : to u»>i/Jt, " lo pad the hctof." 
Antlffle (thieve**), (kurek. Batlrc 

I'—, A* be a hyfidcritf, "maw- 

wiiim." 
Antiffler (lhicv«'). to be marrUd 

in ifmrcM, *' to he biicklcd." 
AmiUes.///. (thieves'), ttstkles. 
Antipatber (popular), to ahomi- 

nau. 
Antique, iituitnt of tht Ecole Poly' 

ttihnit/Hf who Ans eompltted the 

t titular ioune cf studits. 
Antonne, entonne, / (thieves'), 

(hufih. 

Au nwiin qUAOil novifc noon lavotu, 
Vainw la cruQtc de parfund. 
|)iyk» let uitoanr* tTimordonv, 
Uu oust crMX dc ccft ralichontL. 

CAoMSfim 4* CA r^t. 

Antroler, entroUer (thieves'), to 

(itrryawaw "lo chuff." 

Uo di cc> IiiiMUiv, ua morcandter aHx 
dtmRndeT la (liiinc \ un piticl, ct le rupin 
tic litl 6*.'ha i(uc flouti^re : ilmouchiilU dc« 
urnio de IiaiIc qut mortiaicnt dii firvnu tn 
la iotir ; alun if fi' ha de u)n ulire *ur Ia 
ironche li une, tl I'abukourUu Ia mci dan« 
DOM BtMuUrd 0t rcDirolte.— ^#y«rxvf> «// 
lArfH. 

ApascUner (thieves'), »*— , /<» get 
ttstd ti>^ a^tiimatiud, 

A perpfcte (thieves'), /iir/;». GcrW 
^ —, fc bf sfHt/Tiitd to NhoI servi' 
tudtjor ii/*» tab* a *Mifcr." 

Apic (thieves'), jC*"'/"'; f)*. "(Uy- 
liyht, ••t;Uxier,"or"oi;lc." 

Aplatir (famihu), quelqu'un, to 
Ikrash umndiv^ ** to lick ; " to re- 
dm* onit arjfHmrnti to mought, 
•' to noiijilus." Properly to 
JUtim, 



Aplalisaeur, m. (familiar). He 
pieces He six liards — , em who 
is cnrr /ar/u'u/nr ; onr rvho a/- 
tachts unJuf im/ortatue to trtji^s. 

Aplomb, m. (popular), circ d' — , 
to be strongs sound, " jjame." 
Rclut^uer d' — , to look ttrai^kt in 
the Jace, 

Aplomber (thieves'). /tfj^M d/^r- 
ioH t'j one's toolnets. 

Aponich^ (popular), seatal. 

Apoplexie, / (popular), de tem- 
plier, n Jit of at>oNejry brought on 
by e.nasivi dnnMing. From the 
snying, Boire coronie on tem- 
plier. 

Apotbicaire, m. (popular), sans 
sucrc, "workman with but fno fools I 
tradesman ttn'th an insu^cient 
stock in trade. 

Ap6trea (thieves'), /tngtrs, or 
"fuiks." 

Appeler (theatrical), azor, to hiss, 
or "to goose." Literally to 
whistle a dog, Azor, a common 
name for a dog. 

Appuyer (theatrical), to let scenes 

doTim. 

Aquarium, an assembly o/ frorti- 
tntei' bidlies, or "ponces." From 
their being denominated maque< 
rcaux, mackerels, 

Aquicher (thieves'), to decoy^ «/- 
lure. 

Aquiger, quiger (thieves' and 
cods'), to steal, "to lift;" to 
wound ; to beat, " lo wallop;** to 
makf, or " to ftike ;" — les 
brumes, to mark eards/orekeatin^, 
or to " stock broads. It means 
also to takf^ to procure, to find, 

IMvalont done dani ccltc ptole 

Ou no s •()uitirfoni nol«. 

El *an» d^Undcr iioi pouclwvnft 



A qnilitt — A rgott*. 



»3 



Aquilin (populAr). faire son — , to 
Jtauf, or " to hang one's )alch- 
pftfi ; ** to turn tip an/s HOst. 

Arabe, m. (popuUir). sin-a^^ uh- 
rt!tnttftj( fi-limv, or •'tartar.'' 

Araipnie. /. i(Mipular), binfit with 
a i\tr^ ^y-wneei .' — de bas- 
tringuc, JemaU halntuce of Itnv 
dait*-iitg katit ; — de comptoir, 
ctmnttr jumper , or " knight of the 
ymrd ; ' — de Iroltoir, dtaltr at a 
staii, or in (he open air. Avoir 
unc — dans le plafomU to be 
crackeiit to hatt **a bcc in one's 
bonnet." See Avoir. 

Arbalite, /. (ihicves'), tueJk-trosi : 
— d'aiitonne, de chique, de 
prianle, ^hurch-^ross, 

Arbi, arbico, m. (annyK Arab, 

Arbif, w. (thieves'), vioUnt man, 

Arcaaien. arcaaineur, m, 
(ihicTcs'), thre/ who employs the 
txrfat (which we); a i>ej^r who 
ca/Is on pft^p/e ; <unnimg^ man, 

Afcal, w. (thieves'), montcr un — , 
t» vrite a letter from priiou to a 
tksJting for an iuti-atu-e in 
om n tuppoied buried treasure 
«fulir4, later on, is to be pcintrd 
out to the donor. From arcane, 
mystery^ hidden thing. 

Arcavot, m. (Tew traders'), false' 
hjoJ. 

Arche, / (popular), aller K V — , to 
fetek mumey. Femlrc 1' — , to 
weary, ••lo bore." 

ArcbicubCp m., student who has 
(%*mplited his three yeari tourse of 
study iit the Erele Normale^ an 
institution where professors are 
trained for university profcssor- 
shJM, and which holds the first 
ranlc among special Kbools in 
France. 

Archipointu, m. (LhicTes'),<iii(3r^A- 



Archisuppot de rargot (old cant). 
learned thief anh-thief ' * gonnof." 

Le* uchinippAu de I'arKOt «ont les plus 
savants, \t% (lUit tiaSile» m.nrppaiix de (ou- 
tline i'Arfcot, i\y\\ i>o(it de* dottier* d^flaiich^t^ 
et quclqucA mlicbunv de lc« courciin Qui 
enseigncnt Ic joriron it rouscAiller bisornc. 
— t.t J a Tfwi ke CA rgrt. 

Architecte de TUnivers (free- 
masons*), the Deity, 

Ar^on (thieves'), sij^ of rero^ition 
made by passing the thumb dorvn 
the right cheeh and spitting at the 
same time. 

Si c'Aoiem des amw dc Pamin, je poiir- 
ni& flic fiiirc T«<:nnn.-)llre nvtu de^ pantrcc 
nouvcllcincnt Altranchia (d» ^y^nt qui 
font leun premieres armesj, j'auraii bua 
fiiirc rarqon.— Viix>C(j. 

Ar^onner {thieves'), to make one 
speak out; to speak, or '* to patter." 

Arcpincer, arquepincer (thieves' 
and popular), to take, or "to 
collar ; to seite, or " to grab ; '* 
— I'omnibus, to catch the *bus. 
Veuillez — men ansc, /ny take 
my arm. 

J'ai promis dc reconobrer tons les crin- 
chi4»«urs ct d« let faire arquepincer.— 

Ardent, /«. (thieves'), eandle, or 
'• gtira." Fauche-ardcnts,XMi»^W'j. 

Ardents, m. pi. (thieves'), eyes, or 
•' glaciers." See Quinqueta. 

Ardoise, f (popular), htad^ oi 
" tibby ; " hat, or " tile." Avoir 
r — , to haveeredit, or ^'jawbone." 
An allusion to the slate used for 
drawing up the reckoning, 

Arga, m. (thieves'), shareof booty, or 

" snaps." 

Arganeau. m. (thieves*), a link 
connciting two etmviits* irons. 

Argot, m. (thieves'), animal : fool, 
or "go along;" thieves* brother- 
hood, or "family men." 

Argot£ (thieves*), one who tajr» 
claim to being xoitty. 



A rgotier — A rrangemaner. 



Argotier, «. (thieves'), mi of th£ 
h other hoed of thitvfi^ or *' family 
man." 

Argousin, m (popular), foreman^ 
or " boss." 

Arguche, m. (thieves*), mn/, or 
•* flash ; " a fool^ dunee^ or ** go- 
along." 

Arguemine,/ (thieves'), hand^ or 
•'famm." 

Aricoteur, w. (thieves'), t^secu- 
Hotter. 

Ariato, m. ior aristocrat (|>opular), 
a man in comfortabie ciratm' 
stances. 

Aristocrate, m., an appellalion 
given by prisoners to one of their 
UHmKT xvhose meiins alloio him to 
ottiim victuals from the cantten, 

Arlequin (popular), broken victuals 
of every description mixed up and 
ret%iiled to poor people. The word 
has passed into the language 
Auircfoi^chcz Paul Ntquct 
Fumatt un vastc baquet 

Sur U devanture. 
Pour ua ou deux *o%u, je crou^ 
On y plongcait la deux doigtft 

I>eux, it I'Aveniure. 
Lei (neu les pluk difffrenU 
£uicnl til. mt\i%, crrmnU, 

Saru coulcur, sua rorme, 
Et Ton j>£chait nknn fotiiller, 
Auui bien un vieux wulier 
Qu'une truth inormc. 

AictiKfiN, La Chansen dtt 
i^vetLK. 

Arme, / (military), passer 1' — k 
gnuche, to dit^ * * lo lose the number 
of one's mess." See Pipe. 

Armee roulante,/. (thieves'), for- 
mcr]y jptN_^ of coftvicts chained lO' 
gether which used to make its way 
by road to the hulks. 

Armoire,^ (popular), ^ glace, the 
four of any card : head ; (militarj') 
— a poils, soldiers' knapsack^ or 
" scran bag." An allusion to the 
hairy skin tliat covers or covered 
soldiers' knapsacks. 



Amac, m. (thieves'), h. V — , xuitk 
premeditation . 

Amache, / (|iopular), deceit ; trea- 
chery. Eire h V — , to be cunning, 
widc'Owake, a ** deep one ; " to 
dtcfitt, and not allow oneself to he 
deceri-ed. 

Amacq, amache, m. (thieves'), 
dttectixyCy informer, *'nark." 

Amaud, m. (popular), avoir son — « 
ilre — , to be in a Lad humour, 
lo be *' nasty." 

Amauder (popular), to grumble. 

Amelle (ihieves'), the tmtm of 
A'oucn, From La Kenclle, a 
small river. 

Amellerie,/, (thieves'), rouenntn'e, 
printed cotton. 

Amif, m. (thieves'), policeman or 
detective. Also denominated 
" hec de gaz, bourriquc, cicrgc 
flique, laune, pcste, vache." In 
English cant or slang "crusher, 
pig, copper, cossack, nark." 

Arpagar, m. (thieves*), the t^am of 
At-pagcn^ near Pitris. 

Arpettc, m. (popular), apprentice. 
Arpion, m. (thieves' and popular), 
fcot, '* trotter ; " toe. 

Moi. il'marcbef ^ n'me (out pa* I'trac 
J'ai Tarpion plu« dur que doi cluut. 

RicHei-iN, ChaiMM del Gtuux. 

Arpions. m. pi. (thieves' and popu- 
lar), toes^ 
Arquepincer. See Arcpincer. 

Arquer (popular), s'— , to be bent 
dirum through age. 

Arracher (thieves'), du chien- 
dent, to be on the look-out far a 
victim (chiendent, dogs^ ^<wf) ; 
(popular) -~ son copeau, to work, 
*' lo grind " (coi)cau, shaving). 

Arrangetnaner (thieves'), to cheat, 
or **lo stick." 



A rr anger — A rtilUur. 



15 



ArraBger (swindlers'), le« pantrrs, 
U ckeat thefmhlU hy mtans of tkt 
tkre(--(arj tritk or ofhrr swinMing 

Anan^enr. m. (gamesters'), one 
wkt utj a ^ttJNT going, or " but- 
looDer.*' 

Azrttcr (funiliar), les frais. to put 
r.V/ to any prvceniin^i . ( I^cs 
frai^. tk£fe<for a game j/biUiards. ) 

Airitrc-lrain, m. (fami]i.ir), the be- 
Jki»^,(M "lochas." SecVasiataa. 

Aniver premier (sporling), ta he 
tkt winner. Used figuraiivcly to 
<icnote superiority of any kind over 
othen. ArriverboD premier, **io 
bcai hollow." 

Arrondir ^popular), se faire — Ic 
globe, fe Mcame frrgnant, or 

•• lumpy." 

Ok «'a Cut arrondtr el'globc, 
Oa a *a p'rit* twitK. & c'quj voU .... 
Kk ! bvD, ^3 prouv qu'on n'ru pa« d*bou. 
Gill, La Mmu ti Bwi. 

Arrondissement, m. (popular), 
che Micu d' — , tvoman in an 
advttmed itage of pregnancy, 
"iunnpT," or wtth a '* white 
awcUmg." 

Arrosage, m. (popular), aeticn of 
lirinking^ cf '* having scmeihing 
dan>r. " 

Anoser (gaineslers^, to ttake re- 
^vaxe^iyon the same card ; to make 
repeated setcrifices in money ; (mili- 
tary) — vex, gaions, treating one's 
comrades on 6eing made a non* 
tfmmistiimed oj^er, " paying for 
one's footing ; " (familiar) — un 
Cfcancier, to sett/e smaJi portion cf 
dehe. 

AiToaeun m- (thieves'), dercrdouze, 
gftrdemtr, or '* master of the 
Verdouxe. for verdure. 



Arsonner (thieves*), to vvtrhaul 
poekefs, to "frisk," or "to rule 
over." 

ArsouiUe, m. ((amUIar), a man 
foul in language, a tow cad, a " rank 
outsider." '1 he expitssion hak 
iKisscd into the languacc. Milor 
1' — , a rith man wUTt eccentric^ 
law tiislei. The appellation waa 
first given to Lord Seymour. 

Arsouiller([x)pular), synonymous oi 
enguculcr, to "jaw, to "slang." 

Arthur, w., a ivouU'he lady-killer ; 
also synonymous of Amant de 
cceur, which see. 

Arthurine. /. )popuIir), a girl oj 
indifferent character, a " Poll." 

Articnaut, m. (popular), coiurd* — , 
^e/Ue -hearted. 

.... Cttur d'artichaut, 
Cett man aenra : un' fcuillt pour lout 

I'monJe. 
Au jour d'au}ouri]*hiu. j*Kobe t» blrvnde ; 
Aprifr^'nuin, c'est 1a brun*. qu'i nt'faut. 
Gill. 

Artiche, m. (ihiercs*), retirer I* — , 
to pick the pockets of a drunkard. 

Article, m, (familiar), faire 1* — , to 
puff Mf, "to crack up." (Prin- 
ters') Payer son — quatrc, to pay 
for ott/s footing. An alluiiion to 
some item of a code of regula- 
tions. tPi>puIar) Port^ «»ur 1' — , 
one of an amatory disposition. 

Articlier, w/,, one whose spAialitJ is 
writing tte^vspaper arfnles. 

Artie, artif, artiffe, lartie, larton, 
m. (thieves'), ^/Ait/; — de Meiilan, 
white bread i — dugros GuiU.iumc. 
broton bread ; — de guinnut, 
mcmldy bread. 



Kcout«t marques et mion*. 
Valine La cnmtc ile parfund 



AfTOCoir, m. (thieves'), coup d'- 
« giois of wine ; a ivatenng-pot. 

Arsenal, m. (thieves'), arsenic. 



aime rwlie. j aimc U cne, 
auBC la CTuOie de parfond. 

ChoHMam dt F Argot. 



Artilleur (popular), drunkard; one 
skilful in '.vorking the "canon," 
or glass of zvine at wineshops ; 



i5 



Artis — Asfic. 




or ^ b pwcc faamide^ 

— de U piece 

aUo. em 

lag. 

Aitis, H. (ibirvcs*). Ungage de 1'—, 




AftiMe, MIL (pepaUr), veterinary 
MjMi. **v«C ; * i/tmJtkrifi UaJ. 
wmg m €mrria3 Hfit ; szctt/<cr ; com* 

Alton. See Artie. 

AftS«Ma, mu IUuctcs'), guarj or 

•Mhr «f •iaml urvitudt d/f6t^ 

•r"ae»cw. • 
Art nqr^I (freemasons'), yrr^ 



As, m. (popoUr), etie 4 V — , to ht 

^trt if «**, " hanJ op ; " a/ a 

«r tmff^ ta bt at taSIe, 

Mv^ViM. Un — de 

MlAer's knapsack^ thus 

fnok ii5 shap« ; a i'^vm 

mn kllusion to the red 

boows of liis uniform. (Thieves') 

As Se emrreau, the riMvm of the 

Lifium »f //fttMir, wAuA is rrd, 

IFBmihar) Ftchu cocnme V — de 

piaiM. uwtJk a ti$tmut/y built fomt, 

wmfy^ttMtL As de piqae meant 

luiltil) • mftn of no consequtrnce, 

of DO intellectual wonh. 

Atiaw (thieves*), ta matt stupid, 

A«p«fM «onl*e,/. (popular), tvrr 

M^bmhf p*-rt9n ; "sky-scraper," 

or *'Ump-(Ki*i.'* 

Atph«lte. M. tfamitiar). polirT — , 

tt ''iwn.C*' '* tkf l^amittMrds, 
Asphyii*. *('/. (popular), Jead^ 

Asphysier (jM^piilarK to drink \ — 
Ic j»crroqurt, /♦' drink m ginst ef 
^Aumkf, (rren, like a parrot ; 
- un pienol, A* dnni a gUss of 
wAUt tMM/. Pierrot, a panto- 
mimic chancier, with face painted 
vhite, aad coalume to match. 



Aspic, m. (popular], a sinnderrr, 
an allusion to "aspic," a :v/vr/ 
(thieves') a miser, or " hunk&." 

Aspiquerie,^ (popular), ca/nmny. 

Aaseoir (popular), s' — , to faU. 
Envoycr cjuelqu'un s* — , u* threw 
one doTi'tt, to ttience^gtt nd of one, 
Allez vous — , shut wA go to 
" pot" (an allti&ion to the custo- 
mary intimjition of the jtid^ to a 
witncs.s whose examination is con* 
eluded). S' — sur Ic bouchon, to 
sit en mother earth . S ' — sur 
ane1qu*nn, to silence one, sit n/vn 
Aim. S' — sur qucl'iuecho^e, to 
attach but siight im/torttiNie to d 
thing, 

Asscaseur (gamesten*). pfayer. 

Asseyez-vous desaos el tf\i* ^a 
finisse I (familiar), siicme himt 
sit upon him ! 

Aftsiette, /. (popular), avoir V — «a 
beurre, to be lutJiyt /otitmate im 
life. 

Asais, m. (literary), elerks^ or " quill 

drirers." 

Ob ' c'«t alora qu'il fmt pUindK . . . 
tes malhcureuB qu'uo tnrul •£<ScatlUre 
courbc uir un bureau . , . . c'cnal<inqu*U 
convient de w Ivnentrr sur le wan dcs uul 
— RicHCriN, Le Pavi. 

Aasiftter (thieves*), to brine tiaua/r 
to a prisoner /rom outritte. 

Aasoci^e, f. (prinlera*), mon — ^ 
my ivife, my " old wouian." 

AftSommoir, m, (familiar), mime of 
a utne-sAop at Bdlti-iHe, and 
mUrA is now common to all 
lam ^mhing-shops. From as- 
sommer, to hnoeJk over the head, 

Astec, w. (faratllar). stunted and 
-ctakly person^ or " barber'* cat:" 
(literary) a wah, despicahU ad- 
versary. An ailu^on to (he 
Mexican dwarfs. 

Ascic, m. (thieves'), xtet/^ sword, 
or "poker" (from the German 



I 

I 

4 



Astkot — A itrapage. 



17 



uich) ; (soldicn') a mixturt of 
ftf^-day for the fttrbiihing of tht 
iratt fxturei ^f itjuiprntnL AJlcr 
k r — , to clean onis iqttipmmt^ 

AsUcol, M. f popular), vermuelli ; 
mtittrrts of a buHy or thUfy '* mol- 
litbct J " — de cercueil, ^ass of 
JWr- (a pUy on ihc words " vcr 
«D<1 •*bicre,"aslicol being ^JUsh- 

Ail>qujcc or attiqne, m. (mili- 
Ury), (ifaning th€ equipments* 

A«tiquer (popular), to beaty or **to 
lo-wcl ; " to ttait. Literally to 
f^ir, to furbiih^ S' — , to kavt 
angry nvruEr, at a prfiniit to a set 
ts ; t*f fg^. Litcmlly to make 
omatif Heat^ or "smug." 

As-tn fini, or as-tu fin! tes 
inaaiiies ! u^^ds implying that 
m ptT%cns endeavours to eonvinee 
or to detent another Aax't failed. 
TTie exprewion coircsponiis in 
some dcfiTce 10 " Walker ! " 
••No go !^' "What next?" 

A table (ihievfci'), »e mettre — , or, 
caiscr du sucre, to confess a erutu. 

Atelier (ftectnasons*), piact of meet- 
img. 

Atic^. adj. (thieves* and popular), 
iff, or ' * laid up ; '* stri^Jten , rutned^ 
Cr *• cracked up." 

Ati^er (Uiiercs* and popular), to 
a^^tndf to strike^ " la dump." 

^^tonie* crocbuB, m.pl. (familiar), 
myrJeriotu eiUfTteHtj ofmutital jym- 

Atouaer (convicts'), toencouragr, to 
me;gr, ** to kid on.'* 

Atoiit, m. (thieves* and popular), 
ea mr tgt, or " wool ; '' selfpossei* 
si/m : s i^low, or " w ipe ; " stomaeh ; 
wtoney, or •' rhino ; ability. Pro- 
per meaning trumps. Avoir de 
r— , toktntpluik, or •• spunk j" 
Ar Aai»e a strong arm. 



Tu m'u donn^ !■ bonne me^urc, lu «s 
□Q c>det qui a dc t'atout. — E, Sl'k. OVm 
£MV* tnt a govd thmihifgfjfom art a itrong 
ckmp,i 

Le plus d* — , a kittd of nin$tdUtig 
game played at lata eaf/s. 

Atout \ (popular), exclamation todt' 
note that a Slow hat taken eject. 

Attache,/, love tie, 

Attacber (thieves'), un bidon, /« 
inform against one, "to blow 
the gaff; " 

Attaches,///, (thieves'), buckles ; 
— brillanles diamond buckles ; ■— 
de gratousse, lace shirt frill ; — 
dc CCS, breuhts buckles. 

J'ai fait sticr un chjne. 
Son auberg j'ai cngani^. 
Son auberg et u ttk^uante, 
£.t MS attach'* dc c^sl. 

V. Hugo, Le Dernier Jour 
t£um Condaimni. 

Attaque, d* — , resolutely^ smartly. 
Un homme <1* — , a resolute man^ 
one who is game. Elred' — ^toshoio 
energy, resolution, Y allerd' — , to 
set abviii anything with a wili^ 
smartly^ as if one meant business. 
{ Popular) D'altJique, wtf//n/, severe, 

Vlan 1 v'l^ I'vcnt qui m'fUJie eun'claquc 
Fait vraimerK un (loid d'aitaquc, 

KlCHIPrK. 

Attelage, m. (cavalry), un bon — , 
a couple of good fr tends. 

Attendrir (familiar), »* — , to have 
reached that stage of intoxication 
when one is '* maudltn." 

Attiger. See Atiger. 

Attignoles,///. (popular), /rrjfVffl 
la mode de Caen (tripe ^cwed 
with herbs and seasoning). 

N'impone o\i nout o<:>u« enipfttons, 
D'arlrtiuii>«, tl'bnfTc cl d'togAloni, 
Quc'qu foL> d'uuLUM ct d'aitiKiioles. 

KlCHEflM. 

Attrapage, m. (familiar and popu- 
lar), seirre scoldings sharp critt- 
eismf ptarrdf fight^ **miU;" 
C 



18 



A Urap€—A uvergnat. 



(military) — du premier num^ro* 
serious auel. 

Attrapc (popular), i Ic rappeler, 
tninH you remember i 

Attraper (popular), io scoUi^ " to 
jaw ; " — I'oignon, to receive a 
ht(nv intended for another : to 
have to pay for others^ reckoning. 
S'— , to ahise^ to "slang" one 
another. Sc fairc — , ta^^t icoMed^ 
ahuted, "blown up." Atlraper le 
haricot, or la firve, to have io pay 
for others. An allusion to one 
who find* a l»ean in his share of 
the cake at the "feie dcs rois," or 
Twelfth night, and who, L>eing 
proclaimed king, has to treat the 
olhergucsl*. (Journalists') Altra- 
per, to sharplycridcise or run do7on 
a person or hterary product lan ; 
(theatrical) to hiss, or *' goose ; " 
(actors') — le lustre, to open ^inde 
fine*s tMOHth ; to make a fruitless 
attempt to give emission to a note, 

Attrape-science, m,^ printer's a/- 
prcttttce^ or *' devil." 

Attrapeur, m. (Ilierai^), a sharp or 
scHrriloHS critic. 

Atlrimer (thieves'), to take, to 
*' nibble ; " to seize, to " grab." 

Attriquer (thieves'), to buy ; to buy 
stolen clothes. 

Attriqueur, m., attriqueuse, / 

(thieves'), rtctiver of stolen clothes, 
"fence." 

Auber, w,, a sum of moneys **pile." 
A play on the word *' haubert," 
coat if wat/, an assemblage of 
'* [Dailies" meaning *' meshes ' 
or "small change." Compare 
the expression, Sons sou oi 
matlle. 

Aumone,/ (thieves*), volcr & V — , 
stealing from a jeweller^ who is 
requested to exhibit small trinkets, 
some of whit- ht ba'stg purloined, are 
troHsmitted to the hand of a <■*>«- 



federate outside who prdends to ask 

for alms. 

Aumonier, m. (thieves'), a thief 
ztho operates as described abtn/e. 

Au prix ou est le beurre (fami- 
liar), at the present rate of prices 
of things in general, 

Aure, or haure (thieves'), le grand 
— , God. 

Aiis, m. {i\\o\>mca*s)t perplexed pur- 
chaser iL'ho leaves tuithout buying 
anything, 

Austo, m. (soldiers'), gvard-room^ 
cells, " Irish theatre," "mill," or 
"jigger." 

Autan, M. (thieves'), hft, attia 
(old word hautain, high). 

Autel (freemasons'), table at xvhich 
the master sits ; (popular) — de 
bcsotn./r(Mr//M/^, or " bed-fagot ;" 

— dc plume, bed, " doss." 

Auteur, m. (familiar), father or 
mother, "governor, "oi "mater;" 

— heurricr, unsuccessful author 
whose rvorks are sold as turapping- 
pap^er for tradesmen. 

Autor (familiar and popular), jouer 
d* — , to play cards without pro* 
posing. Travaillcrd' — et d'achar, 
/tf 'oork with energy, 

Autor, d' — (thieves'), in a peremp 
lory manner; deliberately. 

DU done, fouHinc, la prcnuesc foi« que 
nonx tiDUvcrotii la Ptffhuite, (aut remniencr 
d'oaior. — EuuixB Sle, 

Autre, adj. (popular), cet — chien, 
thtit chap, litre 1' — , to be Jtiped, 
or " bambooslcd ;" to be the loiter ; 
the mistress. L' — cole, appella- 
tion given ly Paris stuaents to 
that part of the city situated on the 
right bank of the river. Femme 
dc 1'— cole, woman residing in 
that part of Paris, 

AuvergTiai, w. (popular), avater 
1'—, to take communion. 



A uverpin — A voir. 



19 



Awctpin, ■«, (popular), math-t of 
Aaaerguf, Appellation given to 
caaoBassiottSuires, charcoal -dea- 
lovwateT'CarTicrs, &c. , who geoe- 
nBjr haul from Auvergne. 

Dt vous trouver«j Ics lab- 

tcnus pA( dc4 Ativrriiins 

d clMrbonnier», Katitca 

aiMu, poneun dou, 

to, froaew% axlken. — 

Aovcfpiocbes. m, pi. (popular), 
clmauje skMi usually worn by 




(pofmlar), petits oignons, in 
^ra-raie styU, exitUtnuy. Eire 
— pdiu otseaux, ta be comfort- 



lire (pnKinen*), prisoner aft- 
me */ tm'omt, or *' fag." 

AvaU (popular), avoir — le p^pin, 
itStfoxsnamf, of 'Mumpy.* An 
aBbmor to the apple. Avoir — 
vac chabe perccc, fo Matt an 
^fhuitv breath. Avoir — un 
sdbcc to hf stiffs " to hare swal- 
lowed a poker." Avoir — le bon 
Dim en caloiie de velours, to 
Anr twmtlevrd tome excellent food 
0rtHiU. 



It Mujonn k patron 6o*t terniiiier <u 
hapte bar un hum cngucAm et tatisfoic 
Oiaaa » il a**a ■t'ali le ban Dieu en cu* 
fcot dm velour*,— RiCHBriM, Le Par^. 

AvalcT (thieves*), le luron, to 
metre tie Host at communion. 
(Popular) Avalersacuiller ; safour- 
chettc ; » gaiTe ; sa Uui|^e ; 
tes bagoetics ; to die. In uihcr 
wortlv " to lay down one's knife 
aad fork ;" '* to kick the bucket ; " 
** to croak ; " ** to stick one's 
ipoon in the wall," &c ; — son 
mma ain, /gVt/r'jwiJJft/, "toget ihe 
aidk ; — son absinthe, to futagood 
Jme «*f iome disagreeable mailer. 
(Familiar) Avoir Vair de voulotr 
to«l — , to look as though one were 



going to do mighty things ; to look 
savtjgr and threatening, 

Avalc-toul-cru, m. (popular). 
braggart, or " swashliuckler ; " 
(thieves') thief who conceals jewels 
in hit mouth. 

Avaloir, m. (popular and thieves'), 
throat, " peck alley," or "gutter 
lone." 

Avantages. m, pi., avant-cceur, 
IN., avant'inaizi, /., avant> 
poBtes, m. //., avant-scfcnes, 
/. pi. (popular and familiar), 
bosoms, *' Charlies," *' dairies," 
or "bubbie*." 

Avantageux. ad/, (popular), con- 
fcnicnt, roomy. Des souhers — , 
easy shoes, 

Avantcourrier, m. (thievei'), 
auger. 

Avaro, m. (popular), damage. 
From avarie. 

Avergot, m. (thieves*), egg. 

Avertineux, at/j. (popular), 0/ a 
fujpitious, gruff disposition ; of a 
forbidding tispcit. 

Avocat bicheur, m. (printers*), 
biukbiter ; (thieves') public prate- 
cutor. 

Avoine, f. (military), brandy. 
(Popular) Avoir cucure V — , to 
have still on/s maidenhead. 
(Coachraeiis') Donner 1' — , to 
whip; to thrash^ or " flush." 

Avoir (popular), k la bonne, to 
like, to love, '* to be sweet upon ; " 

— cainpo, to have leave to go out ; 

— cclui, for avoir I'honneur de ; 

— dans Ic nei, to have a strong 
dislike for a person or things 
(familiar) — dans le ventre, cecjuo 
quelqu*un a dans le ventre, wkat 
stuff one is made off: (popular) — 
de ce qui sonne, to be well off; in 



9& 



A voir. 



other words, to have pienty of 
beans, baUast^ rhino,, the need' 
fnf, blunt, btistUy dust^ <oqI^ oof^ 
stump)\ brass, tin ; — dc la 
chance au baionnct,/ii be unlufky, 
\jt jcu de bdtonnet is ihe game of 
nap the cat ; — de la glu aux 
mains, to steals '* to nibble ;*' — 
de la ligne, to have a nice Jif^re ; 

— dc I'anis dans unc ecopc : 
\\\ annis — , didn't you 7cish you 
may f^t it ; — de I'as de Carreau 
dans le dos, to be humjtbacked ;—' 
des as dans son jeu, to have an 
adi>aHtage, to be Iu(ly» to have 
"cecum;" — des mots avccquel- 
qu'un, to fall out with one, to have 
a tiff'tvith vne ; — des mots avec la 
justice, to be proseiuted ; — des 
mots avec Ics scrgots, tohax^e some 
tiisagrefmeHt with the police ; — des 
orufs sur Ic plat, fo htn/j biacii eyes, 
* ' to have one's eyes in mourning ; " 

— des pctits pois k ccosser en- 
semble, to httr>e a hone to pick with 
one : — des planches, to be an ex- 
oennteed aetor : — du beuirc sur 
la tcte, to have some misdeed on 
one's t'OHScienee ; — du chicn, to 
f>ossessdaih,**gOi" — ducbiendans 
le ventre, fo hai^ pluck, endurance, 
or *'stay;" — du pain sur la 
planche./tfArttYd competemy ; — du 
poil au cul, to possess courage, or 
^'\i&c\i\t,^'enerfiy; — duptombdans 
Taile, to be wounded ; — du sable 
dans les yeux, to feci sUrpy ; — 
du toupel, t9 have audacity, cool 
imptuience ; — fumi^ dans une 
pil)e neuve, to be tipsy, or '* ob- 
luscate*! ; " — la flcmme, to be 
afraid; to feel la^^ or *' Mon- 
dayish ;" — I'arcbe, to hnx'e credit^ 
or "jawlione;" — Tassiette au 
licurrc, to be fvrtumile in life ; — 
la cuissc gaic is said of a female 
of lajc tnoi ttis ; — le pot de cham* 
bre dans la commodt.*, ta have an 
offensive breath ; — le caillou de- 
plume, le coco deplum^, to be 



bald, fo hat'C "a bladder of lard ;" 

— le casque, to fancy a man ; — 
le compas dans I'aril, to possess a 
sharp ^e, with respect to judging 
of distance or quantity ; — le 
front dans le cou, to be bald, or 
"stag-faced;" — le net crcux, 
to be clerer at foreseeing, guessing; 

— le pouce long, to l>e ikilful, to 
ie a ** dab " at something ; — le 
trac, to be afraid, *' funky ;" — 
les calots |>oches, to hatie black 
eyes ; — I« c6tcs en long, to be 
liizy, a '* burainer ; " — restomnc J 
dans les talons, dans Ics mollets, | 
to be ravenous, x-ery '* peckish ;" 

— I'etrenne, to be the first to do, 
or be done to, to haz>e the " wipe 
of;" — le sac, to be wealthy, or 
" well ballasted ; " — mal au 
hxichel, tohaz'C the stomach acke, or 
'* bolts : " — mal aux clievcux, to 
hoT'C a headache caused from over' 
night potations ; — mange de 
I'oscillc, to be sour - tempered, 
peevish, or "crusty;" — sa 
coielette, tn Ihealrical Ian?uj^, 
to obtain great applause ; (|>opu- 
lar) — sa poinic, to be slightly 
tipsy^ *' fresh ; " — son caillou, 
to be en the verge of intoxication, 
or "muddled ; ' — son coke, to 
die ; — son cran, to be angry ^ 
•' to have one's monkey up ; " — 
son pain cult. Properly to have 
an income, to he provided for. 
The exprcsbion is old. 

Venie, grcile, gelle, j'ai mon pxin coiL 
VlLLOH. 

(Also) to he sentenced to death ; 

— sun sac de quelqu'un, to be 
tired of one ; — nn coup de mar- 
teau, to (>e crocked, "queer;" i 

— un fc'icre dans la casemate, or I 
un policliinclle dans Ic tiroir, fo \ 
be pregnant, or " lumpy ; " — un 
poil dana la main, to feel laty ; — 

un put de chaiubic sous le ne^, to 
have an offensive breath ; — un 



Avoir — Asor, 



21 



» 



nX dflns la (rompe, to feet irritiitedy 
prfft^oked^ exasperattd^ •* bad- 
gered ; " — une chambre ^ loucr, 
/« b€ €ictntrict even to insanily ; 
**lo hare apartments lo let ;" to 
be minus onr tMlh ; — une crampe 
au pylure, to be b/essrtf with a good 
appctik^ or ** twist ; '* — one table 
o^bdce dftns rcstomac, to hax*e an 
tstraardinary afpttiti ; — vu le 
loop I J said of a girl who has l>em 
seduced. En — la farce, to be 
able to procure a thinj;. Potir 
detu. sou* on en a la farce, a penny 
vuiii grt it for you* En — sa 
cUquc, /* kiitr eaten or drunk to 
exeejj, to have had a " lighlencr/' 
Avoir une belle presse is said of 
am a/tor or author who is lauded 
by the press. 

Avoir (popular and familiar), la 
boulc (Mlraqu^ ; le cuco fek- ; le 
Irognon detraquc ; un a.siicot 
dam la noisette ; un bceuf gras 
dans le char ; un cancrelat dans 
la boulc ; un hanneton dans le 
reservoir ; un hanneton dans le 
plafond ; un mou&tique dans la 
bulte au sel ; un voyageur dans 
Toranrbus ; une araignce dans le 
plafond ; une ccrevisse dans la 
tourtc ; une ccrcvisse dans le vol- 
au-vent ; une grcnouille dans 
Toquanum ; une hirondcllc dans 
Ic solivcau ; une Mar^illaiMr dans 
le kiosquc ; une puooisc dons le 
ooulHet ; une boruuic dona I'or- 
oioire k glace ; une trichine dans 
le janibutuicau; une saulcrelle 
dons La giiiiare — Parbian expres- 
lioQs which may l>e rendered by 
tff be mad, or cracked, crany^ touched^ 
to have rats in the upper story ^ a 
bee in one's bonnet^ a tile ioose^ to 
Aorv apartments to let^ to be loron^ 
in the upper storey ^ to bt off one's 
ehmmp, <£rv., 6v. L'— encore, 




Kigaud says, *' Avoir ce qu'une 
jeune fiUe doit perdre ^ulement 
le jour dc son mariage. " 

Avoir, n* — , pas de toupet, to shffw 
cool impudence ; (popular) — pas 
inventc le fil h. coupcr le hcurre m 
said of a man of poor abihty^ not 
likely '*lo set the Thames on 
fire;" — pas le cul dan* une 
jupe, to be manly^ or *'spry ; " — 
paii »a langue dan» sa poche, to 
have a muly ton^te; — rien du 
c6t^ gauche, or sous le teion 
gauche, to be heartless ; — rien 
dans le ventre, to be devoid of abi- 
lity ^ to It made of poor stuff ; 

— plus sa grille d egout, — plus 
sa piece de dix ronds is satd of 
Sodomites; — plus de chapelure 
sur le jambonncau, — plus dc 
crin sur la bro5^e, — plus deiil sur 
la bobine, — plus de gazon sur le 

J)re, — plus de mousse sur te cail- 
ou, or sur la plate-bande, — plus 
de paillosson a la nortc, to be bcUd^ 
or ** to have a bladder of lard," 
'• tobestag-faced,"&c. ; (thieves') 

— pas la irouille, le fluban, or le 
trac, A? have no fear. 

AzoT, m. (popular), dog ; (military) 
knapsack, or "si;ran-bag" (an 
allusion to the hairy covering 
of soldiers* knapsacks). Eire a 
cheval sur — , to shoulder the 
knapsack. Tcnir — en laissc is 
said of a discharged soldier who 
onleavingthe barracks, wtth a viero 
to shewing that **j4sar" is no 
longer his master, drags Him ig- 
nominiously along the ground at- 
tached to a strap. (Theatrical) 
Appeler, or sifHer — , to hiss, or 
**lo goose." 

Qu'etfce que c'cii ? Est-ce qu'oD apftelU 
Aiot 1—Mm$^ Pkitipon. 



«2 



Baba —Bachotteu r. 



B 



6aba,/ri:^'. ^popular), Jumh-fottttJeJ, 
ahaskdi, *' blue," or " flabber- 
gasted." From ebahi. astouiuitd. 

Babillard, m. (thieves'), ronfessor ; 
hook ; nnus/ktper, GrifTonneur de 
— , jourHaiist. It also means a 
petition. 

Ma lar^c part pour VcrsaiUet, 
Aux pinlH d'ui Majc^tij, 
Kile lui fonce on liabillard 
Pour m'fiiirc d^rouriiiUer. 

V. Huc<\ Ormirr Jfiur tTun 

Babillarde, / {thieves'), watch^ or 
"jerry;" Utter^ ** scrccvc," or 

"si iff." 

BabtlUudier, m, (thieves'), hoek- 
leiUr. 

Babille./ See BabilUrde. 

Babiller (thieves'), ta rtad. Pro- 
perly to prattUy to chatter. 

Babines, /. //. (popular), moaih^ 
■•muizlc." S'endonncr par Ics — , 
to eat voracwttsty^ "to scorf." 
S*en lecher lea — » to enjoy in ima* 
gination any kind of pleas ure^ past 
0r in store. 

Babouine, /. (popular)* mouih^ 
•*ralt!c-lrap/' "kisser," " dub- 
ber," or " maw." See Plomb. 

Babouiner (popular), to eat. 

BaCf for baccarat or baccalau- 
rial. 

Ce »vrait bien 1e diable a*i1 porvenait & 
orsatiiKr de petit* hmcs & U raiBocrie. — 
ViVftT-KicoUAKD, Le Trifiot, 

Bacchantes (thieves'), the heard ; 
but more especially the whiskers. 



From a play on ihe word bdche^ 
OH awnings covering. 

Baccon, i». (thieves'), /If, or "sow's 
baby ;" pork, or "sawney." 

Bachasse,/ (thieves'), ^<yt//tJ^r; 
convict settlement. 

BAche, / (thieves' and cads'), tap^ 
or " tile ; " stakes ; hed, or "doss." 
Se mcttrc dans la — , to go to M, 
Rache, properly a cart ttlt or an 
awning. 

Bacheliire, /, female associate of 
students at the Quartier Latin^ 
the headquarters of the University 
of Fratue. Herein are situated 
the SorbonnCf College de France, 
Ecole de Medecinc, Ecole de 
Droit, &C. 

BAcher, pagnotter, or percber 

(thieves' and popular). Se — , to 
go to bed. 

Bachot, m. (students'), haceafau- 
r/at, or examination /or thedegrte 
of bachelor of ar/x or science con' 
jerredbythe Unitrrsity of /•'ranee. 
Eire — , to be a bachelor. Faire 
son —, to read for that examitux- 

tiOH, 

Bachotter, m, (students'), tutor 
who prepares candidates for tht 
haccalaut/at, a ' ' coadi, ' or a 



Bachotter (sharpers'), to nvindlt at 

billiards. 

Bachotteur, m. (sharpers'), a con- 
federate of blacklegs of a four game 
of billiards. The " l»achottcur '* 




BdcUr — Bagou, 



23 



• 



arranges the game, holds the 
slakes, &r., pretendiDg meanwhile 
to br much intcrestcfl in the vie* 
tini, or " ptjfcan." His a.s.wciatcs 
aie 'M'cnijx)rteur,"or "buHoncr," 
who** fuiKTtions con^lit in enter- 
ing into conversation wi(h the in- 
lentlcd victim and enticinc him 
into playing, and " la bctc, ' who 
feigns to he a loser at the outset, 
so as to encourage the pigeon. 

Bftcler, boucler (thieves'), i6 shyt^ 
to arrtit. Baclez la lourde ! 
thul the tioor I '• dub the jigger." 
(Popular) Bacler, to f'ut, loHatf. 
Boctee-vous \k \plaie your itlf there I 

Bacreuse, / (popuJar), pocket. 
From CTCUse, derp^ 

Badaudiire,/, the tribe of hndautis^ 
ptopie whose intettst is mvakened 
(ty the most trijUng events or 
thinp, rtttJ who stop to gtt/>e unnt- 
deringiy at mth events or things. 

Parmi tous le« tuudjiim* de la snnile 
tedauOibe uariMciine, qui cU Ic ^vs du 
Bonde oil I Ml CO ir-iuvc |e plu«. |>anni 
•ous tn lliocun, itichcun de lcmp« . . . 
bayeun JUS (rues. — Kichkkih, t.r t^avt. 

Badigeon, m. (popular), /ti/«/m^(y" 
fii//<ue ; paint fort he/oie, "slap. ' 
Sc coUcr du — , to puint one's 
/ate, " to stick on slap." 

B«dtg«onner, la femme au |)uits, to 
lie, "to cram." An allusion to 
Truth supposed to dwell in a well* 
S« — , to paint one^s/aee* 

BAdigoinces,///. (poptilftr), tips^ 

mouth, *• maw." Joucr dcs — , 
or se caler les — , lo ear/* 10 grub." 
S'rn coller par le« — , to have ct 
JUI, "to stodge," See 
[astiquer. 

Badingutste, bading&tcux, ba> 
dingouin, badingueusard, ba- 
dingouinard, terms of ccntrmpt 
applied tc Botuipartisis. " Uadin- 
^et." nickname of Niipolcon HI., 
wAt the name of a mason who lent 



bim his clothes and whose cha- 
racter he assumed to effect his es- 
cape from fort Ham, in which he 
was contine<l fur conspiracy and 
rebellion against the government 
of King Louis Philippe. 

Badouillard, m., badouillarde, 
/. (popular), nuiU and /etnale 
habitues of lino fancy bails. 

Badouille, / (popular), henpecked 
husband, or " stangey j " fool, or 
•Siuffer." 

Badouiller (popular), to fret^uent 
Imv pnttlit hiilis; to wander nlvtU 
without a settled purpose, "to 
Ecaumutler ; " to have drinking 
revels, '* to go on the booze." 

Badouillerie, / (popular), dissi- 
paieii MOiie oj lizing. 

Baffre,/. (popuLir), a hlo7o in tht 
frtct wtth thefist^ a ** bang in the 
mug. " 

Bafouiller, (popular), fo jabih'r ; 
to splutter ; to sputter. 

Bafou'llcur, bafouilleux, m., 
bafouilleuse,/, one ii'ho sput- 
ten. 

Bagniole, / (popular), carriage^ 
'* trap," or '* cask." 

Bagnole, f. (popular), diminutive 
of bagne, convict settlement, hulks; 
xoretcUcd room or house, or " crib ;" 
costenftflttger's hand - bar/ouf, 
" trolly," or "shallow." 

La maigre Kabde . . . aue lc« boooes 
frmmcK pouskcni Jcvjiiit ellc« dant leur 
bafoolc a bnu.~KlciiEriN, Le /*<tt^. 

Bagou, bagoOt, m. (familiar) 
(lias pasM^l into the language), 
fuility of speech (used disparag- 
ingly). Quel — mes amis ! well, Ar 
is the one to talk ! Avoir un tier —, 
to have plenty of Jaw, 

On «e lai«4 bicntAt a!ter 3t la j«ie nvivte 
ftant ctsM au bocoui du vi«uic. qui n'avait 
jamaia 6tt aunu lamrd.— Kichrpik, L» 
Gtm. 



H 



Ba^ouiard—BaissUr. 



(Thieves') Bagou, namtt "mon- 
niker," " moDarch.'* 

Bapoulard, m. (popular), a very 
talkative many a " clack-box/* or 
'* mouth-all-raighly." Ccst un 
fanieux — , " He's the bloke to 
slam." 

Bagouler (popular and thieves'), 
to prattle^ to do the " Poll Par- 
rot ; " to ghe OHf'i name, or " dub 
one's monniker." 

Bague,/ (thieves*), name^ " mon- 
niker/' "monarch/" 

Baguenaude (thieves* nnd catls*), 
pockety "cly," '•*ky-rocket." or 
*• brigh ; " — k src, empty pocket ; 
— ronflante, p<k:ket fuli of money. 
Fairc la retoume deshaguenaudes, 
to rob drunkards who go tQ sleep 
on btnches. 

. . . Vne bamte de filoiic, vaurienmarant 
fvvaitl^ left bagiicnkudes dans U foule.^ 
KiCHEMX, LtPmte, 

Baguenots, m. pi. (|)opalar}, faire 
Ie% — , to piek jwketSt *' to fake a 
cly." 

Baguettes,///. Properly rods, or 
drtim-i/iiks, (Mili(ary) Avaler ses 
— , to die. (Familiar) Bacuetlcs de 
tainlK'ur, thin legs ^ipindTe-skaiiks ; 
litttk ktiir. 

Bahut, m. (popular), furniture^ 
"marbles." rTo^cx\y large dresser , 
or frets ; (cadets') — special, M*:- 
mtiitary school of Saint-t-yr ; (stu- 
dent*') — ^aXKme\, piitrrnal Aouse. 
Bahut, a crammers establishment ; 
college, or boarding-school. 
Kiix, In pauvres pctitsgalericn^ lis con- 

tinucnt ^ vivre cntre lc» mim Icprcut du 

tahut.— RiCHEfiN, Le t*ave. 

Bahui£ (Saint-Cyr carlcts'), ceci 
est — , that is smarts soldier-like, 
Unp trnue hxhwite, smart dress or 
appearance. 

Bahuter (Saint-Cyr cadets'), to 
crtaJe a disturhaneej •' to kick up 
a rowj " (schoolboys') to go from 



one educatii^Hal tstaklishment to 
another. 

Bahuteur, m., one fond of a 
*' row ;" un't/lyschcrlar ;pupil:cho 
patronizes, ■willingly or not, diffc 
rent educational establishments. 

Baigne - dans- le • beurre (popu- 
lar), Tvomens* bully, or "pen- 
sioner." An alluMon to " niaquc- 
reau," or mackerel, a common ap- 
pcllaiiun lor such creatures. See 
Poiason. 

Baigneuse, /. (thieves* and cads'), 
head^ ur "block," "canister," 
"nut." See Troncbe. 

Baignoire A bon Dieu,/ (caJOi 
chalue. 

Bailler au tableau (theatrical), to 
hai'e an insigntpcant p^art tn a 
new play. 

Terme d« couli«Av» qui Vnppticjue Ji an 
act«ur, qui voii au tfit^itan u mise en 
r^ptflitlnn d'ime ii ^e dan^ Uqtiel c tl n'a 
qu'un bout d« rAlc— A. Uoi/..ma«d, Lm 
I.,tH£Mc th^troU. 

Baimbain (Breton cant), /vAi/tfri. 

Bain dc pied (familiar), the over- 
/lore into the saucer from a cup of 
coffee or ^ass of brandv ; third 
help of brandy after coffee, those 
preceding being " la rincette " atid 
"la surrincelte." 

Bain*Marie, m. (popular), a per- 
son with a mild, namby-pamby 
dtjt>osition allied to a weakly con- 
stitution, a " sappy "yi-Z/fTa*. 

Bain qui chauffe, m. (popular), a 
rain cloud in hot wesUher. 

Bai8er(popuIar), lacamarde, ladies 
" to kick the bucket," " to snuff 
**;" (gamcslers') — le cul de la 
vicille, not to score, to remain at 
"love." 

Baissier, m., man on * Change who 
speculates for a pill itt the funds, 
"bear." See Haussier. 



Baite — Balaycr. 



25 



Bftiie, /. (thieves'), home^ "crib." 

Bajaf, m. (popular], a stout^ pit- 
tik^n^maft, Gros — , "forty guts," 

Bajoier fpopulor), to chafier, '* to 
gabble.*' 

Bal, w. {mxWxATy), extra drili {c&WeA 
a '* hoxter " mt the Royal Military 
Academy). 

Baladagc, balladage, m. (popu- 
lar), chanicurau — , strttt singrr, 
•'street pitcher.*' 

Balade, ballade, / (popular and 
famili.-ir), Tcalk^ stroll^ lotnige^ 
" mikiiijj." Canot dc — , plea- 
turt AffO/. Faire une — , se payer 
aoe — , to toMr a tva^k. Chaiiteur 
4 la — , itinerartt sinj^, *' chaun- 
ter.** (Thieve**) Balade, or hatlade, 
/kv^;aUocal)ed *'fouillousc.pro- 
fondc, valade," and by En^liiih 
rogues, ** sky-rocket , cly, or brigh. " 

Balader ^thieves*), ta ekoote ; to 
itek, (Pupular) Se — , to take a 
waJk ; to stroll ; •'to mike ;" to 
make eff ; to run away^ ** to cut 
otw's lucky." Sec Pataerot. 

Baladeur, m. (popular), cm who 

Baladeuse* /. (popular), woman 
nnfi rrn heart ft*r ^wrkand who is 
fot%4 ir/ itiiy stroUing about. 

BaUi, m, (Hawkers'), police ofictr^ 
or grmdartiu^ "cniiihcr;" (mili- 
tary) — i plumes, plunui of 
tkaJka. (Popular) Balai,M<-A;j/ 7/wj- 
ffr iramcar at ni^ht, Uonner du 
— a quelqu'uu, to drive otte 
mtsiy, 

BaUnccment, m. [clerks'), liis- 
miuai, ** the sack." 

Balancer ^popular), to thrcno at a 
^ufamfe ; — quelcju'an. to dismiss 
fi^m one's empioynent, " to give 



the sack ;'* to get rid of one ; to 
make fun of one ; to koax,^ ** to 
bamboozle ;" (thieves') — la rous- 
caiUante, to speak, or " to rap ; '* 

— sa canne is said ^ a vagrant 
•who takes to tkiez'in^, of a convit-t 
who makes his escape^ or of a ticket- 
of-ieave man who ttreakt bounds ; 

— salargue. to g>t rid of one s mis- 
tress, "to bury a Moll;" — ses 
alinr«, to turti honest ; to forsake 
the bnr-^hxrs impUments for the 
nntrderers knife; — ses chasses. 
to gau about, " to slag ; " — si>n 
chiffon rouge, to talk, " to wag 
one's red rag ; " — une lazagne, 
to send a letter, " screcve, or 
'Stiff." 

Balanceur, m. (thieves'), de braise, 
money ehattger. An allusion to 
the practice of weighing mone)*. 

Balancier, m. (popular), fairc le — , 
to wait for otte. 

Balancoir,balanfon,m.(thieve.s'), 
ivindow-lfar, 

Balinqoire, / (familiar), fh, 
" flam ; " nonsense ; stupid joke. 
Envoyer &. la — , to get rid of one , 
to inviie on* to make himself scarce t 
or to send one to the dettee, 

Balanf on, m. [thieve^'), iron ham- 
mer ; wintiow-bar. 

Balandrin, m. (|>opular), parrel 
made up in canvas ; a imall ped- 
lar* s pack, 

Balauder (tramps*), iff heg, " to 
cadge." 

Balayage, iw. Properly rtveeping ; 
usc>l Jiguratively wholesale getting 
rid of On devrait fiirc un ba- 
layage dans cellc aLtmini^^tralion, 
there ought to be a wholesale dis- 
mitsa/ of officials, 

Balayer Uheatricai), les planches 
to he the first to sing at a con- 
cert. 



26 



BalayeZ' moi-^ — Balthazar, 



Baiayez-moi-^A, w. (popular), sw- 
avoaV drtss, LitemUy yott juit 
s\»€rf thai away. 

Balcon, i*». (popular), il y a du 
monde, or il y a quelqu'un au — , 
OH alimUn te VftU-fitvthpcd 
breasts. 

Balconnier, m., orator who makts 
a practice of cu/drfisntg the crvwd 
/rem a ifolcony, 

Baleine,/ (popular), disreputable 

corame unc — , to laugh m a stlly 
manner with mouth wide open 
Itke a whafe's. 

Bativerneur, tn. (popular), monffer 
of " twatldle," oj tomJooUries^ of 
"blarDcy." 

BftlUdc, /. (popular), allcr faire 
unc — ^ la lune, to eau oneself. 

Balle, / (thieves'), iflrrf/; affair; 
opportunity, fa fait ma — , that 

just suits me. Manqacr sa — , to 
miss one's opportunity. Faire — , 
to he fasting. Faire la — , to act 
according to instructions. (I*opu- 
lar) Ualle, one franc piece ; face^ 
"mug;" head, "block." II a 
unc bonne — , he has a good-na^ 
tured locking face, or a grotesque 

face. Rond comroe — , is said of 
one who h'js eaten or drunk to 
excess ; of one who is drunk, or 
'Might. ''^ Un blafard de cinq 
haXXa^afitfe franc piece. (Familiar) 
Knfant dc la — , Otfor's child; actor; 
one who is of the same profession 
as his father. (Prostitutes') Balle 
d'amour, ham/sumcfaie. Rude — , 
energetic coun/enajtce, with harsh 

features, Balle de coton, a iloiit 

with the fst, a "bang,- "wipe." 
"one on the mug," or a "cant in 

the gills." 

Ballomanie, _/C, mania for balloon- 
iitg. 



Ballon, «. (popular), glass of 
heer : the behind, or •* luchas." 
Enlcvcr le — i quelqu'un, to 
kick one in the kinder part of the 
body, "to toe one's bum," "to 
root," or " to land a kick." En 
— , in prison, " in quud." Sc 
donncf du — , to wake a drtu 
bulge out. .Sc l&cher du — , to 
make off r,ipidiy, " to bnuh.** 

Ballonni, otlj. (thieves'), impri- 
soned. " in limbo." 



Ballot, «. (tailors' 
work. 



sto;pct-e of 



Balloter (tailors'), to he outofttork^ 
"out of collar;*' (thierea*) /0 
thrtnv. 

Bal-museite, m., dancing /dace 
for workpeople in the suburbs. 

Le* bsU-miuctte au plutcbcr d< bois 
qui tonoc commc un lyinpAnon k>us In 
ialons lambuuruiaat Ib bourrce inuiilag- 
luude . . . que la muictcc rempln de ton 
chant acrcile.—RiCiiKi'iM, Le Fm-e. 

^alocbard, balocheur, m. (popu- 
lar), iffte who itiles abottt town eare~ 
lessly and merrily. 

Aunt jluHc I'clitc et Ics chan, 
Aux fcignoiiti et aux galupien. 
Et j'luts I'roi 6ts, Haluchardt, 
Da Balochards qui vx-t-^ picdk. 

RiCNKPiN, Gueux dt Pmwia. 

Balocher, (popular), to be an 
habitu^ of dancing halls ; to he- 
stir oneself; to fish in troubled 
waters ; to Aat-e on hand any un- 
lawful business ; to moiv things ; 
to hang them up ; to idle aboui 
carelessly ami merrily, or "to 
mikc." 

Balots, m. pi. (thieves*), lips. Se 
graisscr Ics — , to eat^ "logrub." 

Balouf (popular), very str^ng^ 
"spry." 

Balthazar, m. (familiar), aplentiful 
meal, "a tightener." 



Baliidwn — Banque. 



V 



Baluchon, m, (popular), /an-^/j or 
*'pcicr." 

Bftfnbmo,bambochmo, m. (popu- 
lar), trrm of cndaxrmtnt for a 
€hiU. 

Bamboche, a^j. (popular). £tre — . 
ta 6c ttpiy, or " to be screwed." 

Banban, m. and/t (popular), hme 
f<rjffn^ *'dol and go one ; " smalt 
itunted ptricn, "Jack Sprat." 

Banc, w. (convicts*), camp btd ; 
(I'arisians') — dc Terre-Neuve, 
that part ofthi Boulevard A-fttv^/i 
tht MadtlHne and JWte ^int' 
Dfnii. Probably an allusion to the 
ladies of fishy character, termed 
"inorucs," or (odjiik^ who cruise 
about that part of Paris, and aplay 
on the word Tcrre-Ncuvc. AWt- 
fomndlamft where the real article 
is fished in large quant itic!;. 
(Milit.i.ry) Pied de — , str^iartt. 
See Pied. 

Baacal, m, (soldiers'), (avalry 
ni^rd. 

Et, je roe sem fier, ingambe, 
D'un plumd >ur niuii colboc, 
D'un Dancal, ct du flic Hac 
Ilf« cc mac Km lur ma jambe. 

A. UK CHATILUtK. 

B*nde. Properly cushion of bil- 
liard table. Collcr snus — , to 
g€t OMt in fl_/ij, in a '* hule." 

Bande d'air, /, [theatrical), yW'n/ 
painied blue so as to represent tht 
sky. 

Bande noire, /^, a gangofswind- 
Urs who procure goods oh false 
pret^n<es and nil them bilow their 
value^ "lung tirm." 

La Bande Noire comprises four 
categories of swindlers working 
jointly ; *' le courtier i la mode, 
who, by means of false references, 
gets himself ap]:>ointed as agent to 
important firms, generally wine 



merchants, jewellers, provision 
dealers. He calls on some nmall 
tradesmen on the verge of bank' 
ruptcy, denominated " ]>etits fai- 
san.s, ' or '* frcres dc la c6tc," and 
offersthcm atavery low price mer- 
chandise which they are to dispose 
of, allowing him a share in the pro- 
fits. U'he next step to be taken is 
to bribe a clerk of some private 
information office, who is thus In- 
duced to give a favourable answer 
to ail inquiries regarding the sol- 
vency of the *' petit faiian." The 
courtier a la mode also bribes 
with a like object the doorkeeper 
of his clients. At length the 
goods are delivered by the victi- 
mized firms ; now steps in the 
"fusilieur'' or "gros raisan,"who 
obtains the merchandise at a price 
much below value — a cask of wine 
worth 170 francs, for instance, 
being transferred to him at less 
than half that sum— the sale often 
taking place at the railway goods 
station, especially when the ** |>c- 
tit faisan ' is an iinagiimry indi- 
vidual represented byadoorkeeper 
in confederacy with the gang. — 
TranilaUd from the " R^ubliqnt 
Fran^aise * HfWspaPir, February^ 
1886. 

Bander (popular), la caisse, to ah- 
icond with the cash-box. Properly 
to tighten the drum ; — I'ergol, 
to run oivay, *' to crush." 

Bannette (popular), apron, 

Banniire,/ (familiar), etre en — , 
io be in onis shirty in one^s " flesh 
bag." 

Banque, /. (popular), faisehood^ 
intpositioH^ "plant." (flawkers*) 
La — , the p*ijfit*g up of goods ta 
allure pun ha^m : the Cfinf rater ^ 
nity of mountebanks. (Showmens*) 
True dc — , pa iTHK^rd which obtains 
Oiimission to bocths or raree-shows. 



2S 



Banquet — Barhot. 



(Printers') Banquc, pay. La — a 
fouaill<^ expreisis that pay has hetn 
tit/erred. Eire bloque a la — , or 
faire — bltchc, io rectivt uopay. 

Banquet, w/. (freemasoas'), tiinntr^ 

Banquette,/, (popular), tkhi. 

Banquezingue, m. (thieves'), ffan- 
ker^ " rag-:>hup cove." 

Banquiste (thieve^*), om xtfho pre- 
pares a rmndling operation. 

Bapt^me, m. (popular), htaJ^ 

Baquet, jw, (popular), zmsh^r* 
woman ; — iiisulenl, satru mean- 
ing (an allusion to ihe impudence 
of Parisian washerwomen) ; — de 
science, cobbkr^a tub. 

Barant, m. (thieves*), f«//«-, brodk. 
From the Celtic baranton, j'oiiU' 
tain. 

BaraquCf _/"., disparaging epithet 
jvr a house or tstabliihment ; 
(•lervanls') a house whtrc masters 
are strict and particular ; a 
"shop ;" newspaper of whiih the 
editor is strict '.eith respect to the 
produetious ; (schoolboys*) cup- 
board; (soldiers') a service stripe ; 
(sharpers') a kind of swi^ufHttg 
game of po^L 

Barbaque,or bidoche,/.(popular), 
mcat^ or "carnish.*' 

Barbe,/. (students'), /ri"i«/rrtwr<4- 
mg. (Popular) Avoir de la — is 
said of anything old, stale. (Thea- 
trical) Faire sa — , to make money. 
(Familiar) Vicille — , aid-fashioned 
poliliiiaH. (Printers') liarl>e, m- 
toxiattioH, the different stitgrsofthe 
hatpy state being " le coup de iea»" 
" la barbe simple," *'la barbe in- 
digne." Prendre une — , to get in- 
toxicated, or "screwed." (Popular) 
Barbtf, women's buJly^ or "pen- 
I loner." 



Barbe A pouz, w., an insulting 
expression especially used by cab* 
hies, tfitanj lousy beard. Also a 
nickname given >omclimcs to the 
pioneers in the French army on 
account of their long benrds. 

Barbeau, w. (popular), frostiiuU*t 
bully. Properly a Imrhel, 

Barbeaudier (thieves'), (/fltfrjtc/yVr ; 
turnkey, " dubsnian," or "jigger 
dubber;" — de castu, hospital 
overseer. Concerning this ex- 
pression Michel says : Cette ex- 
pression, qui nous est donnee par 
le Dictionnaire Argotique du Jar- 
gon, a eie formce par allusion k la 
iisane que Ton bou dans les h6pi- 
taux, tisane assimilcc ici i la bi^re. 
Fn effet, barltatiJier avait autrefois 
le sens de brasseur, si Ton pcul du 
moins s'en rap|>orter i Roquefort, 
qui ne cite pas d'excmple. En 
voici un, malheurcuscmcnt pcu 
concluant. TaU-loi, puiain de 
barbauOier: Le coup d'^jeil purin. 

Barberot, w. (convicts'), barber, a 
*' strap.'* 

Barbet, w. (thieves'), the derdf, 
"old scratch," or "nifiin." 

Barbichon,»r.(nupuIar), rnt^ffifr. An 
allusion to the long beard gene rally 
»portcd by the fraternity. 

Barbille, barbillon, m., girPs 
bully, youn^ hand at the business* 

Barbilloni, m. bl. (popular), de 
BcaucCf xfgetalles (Bcauce, for- 
merly a province) ; — de Va- 
renne, turnips. 

Barbot, OT. (popular), duck ; girts 
hully^ "ponce." Sec PoisBon. 



Barbotage — Bassiuer, 



29 



(Tb wve*') Vol 4U — ^pock€r-t>ickiMg^, 
or **btiz-faking." Faire (e — , to 
fifk poct^ti^ " to bui," or ** to 
fakcacly." 

Barbotage, jw., fkrft, "push." 
From barboter, to UttbbU, 

Barbote, /. (thieve*'), searthmg cf 
prtsonirs on thdr arrival at (hi 
pruon^ " turning over." 

Barboter (thieves'), to uarch on tkt 
fersom, " to turn over ;'* to steal, 
'• to clift ; '* to purloin goods and 
ull tMem ; — Ics poches, to pick 
pctktts, *'tohui;" (familiar) — la 
caiss«. to appropriate the contents 
0/ a cashfH>x, 

Barboteur, m. (thieves'), de cam- 
panic, wi^fA/ thirf. 

Barboiicr, m., seartker at prisons* 

Barbotin, m. (thieve*'), thr/t ; prp' 
iHds of salt of stcleti £VodSt 
••twng." 

A^te Qion dernier Imrbotio, 
J'ai fluqu^ ihi poivrc ^ la rouue. 

RlCHKMN, 

Barbue,/ (thieves), /rw. 

Bar-de tire, m, (thieves'), Aose, 

Baril de moutarde (cads'), hreeck. 
See Vaaistas, 

Barica (militnr}), enough (from the 
Arabic). 

Baron, m. (popular), de la crasse, 
snan ill at ease in garments which 
art not snittd to his station in li/e^ 
«W whick in consequence give htm 
an awkward appearance. 

^ATTC^f (thieves'), needle; (popu- 
lar) compter k la — , primitn't 
mtedfof reckoning by making dashes 
am m uate, 

Bair6. adj, (popular), dull--ifitted^ 
"cabbage-head," 

BuTVT (popular), to leave off wark; 




ta relinquish an umlertaking ; to 
scold. Se — , to make off^ ** to 
mizzle ; " to conceal oneself. 

Barres, / //. (popular), jaws. Se 
rafraichir les — , to dritik^ "to wet 
or whet one's whistle." 

Barrique,/. (frccmosont'). decanter 
or bottle. 

Bas (i)opuIflr), tie bufrel, a person 
or thing of no consci^uence ; — de 
plaronu, — du cul, short person. 
VicLX — de buflTcl, oU coquette. 

Basane, or bazane, / (popular), 
ji/«, or "huff," Tjinncr la—, to 
MrajA,*'toian."(MJliiary)TaiI!er 
une —^istomakt actrtatncontemp- 
tuous gesture the nature of which 
may best be described as follows : — 

Vn id, quatrejours de salle de police, 
ordre du »iiuft^mcicr X ... a r^Pondii b 
ce KMu-ofhcicr en lui Utllaot unc oazanc : 
U mun appl'qptie sat la braffuetle da pan- 
talon, cl lui fauani dtfcriro unc convcnioci 
& gatiche, avcc le poucc dout pivot,— 
Qtu'ttii by I.. AiBHUN, Lit LanctK Vtrft 

,yBas-bleuisme, m. (literary), matt/a 
for Tvriting. Used in reference 
to those of the fair sex. 

Bascule,/ (popular), ^i(V^///f a 

Basculcr (popular), to guillo- 
tine. 

Bas-off. w. (Polytechnic School), 
under-officer. 

Basourdir(thieves'),^9<(vr«'4<^STWff; 
to stun ; to kill, " to give one bis 
gruel." See Refroidir. 

Basse,/, (thieves'), the earth, 

Bassin, m., basslnoire,/ {(xm\- 
\\tk.T)f syperla/ifcly ditU person^ a 
bore, 

Bassinant, adf. (familiar), dull^ 
annoying, bonng. 

BaBSiner (familiar), to annajft to 
bore* 



30 



Bassinoire — Bdtons de chaise. 



Bassinoire,/.. largt wauH^ "tur- 
nip." See Bassia, 

Basia [popular), etutu^; no men. 

From the Spanish. 

Bastima^e (thieves*), ttw*, 
"graft." 

Bastringue, m. (popular), law Jan- 

'*rurapui;" (prisoners*) ayfi^JJ'*'^'/ 
saw used by prisoners for cutting 
through iron 6ars. 

Baatringueuse, / (popular), fe- 
male habituie of bastringucs, or 
loip (iancing-saiooHS. 

Batacltn, m. (popular), set of tools ; 
(thieves') hcnse - breaking imJ*U- 
ments^ or "jilts." 

J'ni dfjti pr^par^ toai mon batadao, Im 
fauB«e% clefs K>at es&ay^cs. — Vidocq, Mi- 
w$u>irrs. 

Bataille, /I (miliUiy), chapcau en 
^, eoeked hat worn crosnviie, 
Chapcau en colonnc, the opposite 
of** en balaille." 

Batard, m. (popular), heap of any- 
thing. 

Bate,/ (popular), £ue de la — , to 
be happyt fortunate^ to have 
"cocum." 

Bateau, m. (popular), menercn ^, 
to nuiitdle^ to deceive. Mooter 
un — , to impose upon ; to attempt 
to deceive. 

Bateaux, m. pi, (popular), shoes^ 
" carts ;'• large shoes ; shoes t/uxt 
let in water, 

Batcaux-mouches, m. pi. (popu- 
lar), large shoes, 

Batelic, /. (popular), eonccurse of 
people. 

Bath, or bate (popular), /«r^/ ex- 
eeUent ; tip-top ; very nielL The 
origin of the expression is as ioh 
lows: — Towards 1848 some 
Bath note-paper of superior qua- 



lily was hawked about in the 
streets of Paris and sold at a low 
price. Thus *' papier bath" be- 
came synonpnous of excellent 
paper. In a short lime the qualify- 
ing term alone remained, and re- 
ceived a general application. 

Un fouUrd tout neuf, cm qu'il y a de pliu 
bath !— RrLHEMN. 

C'est rien — , that is excellenit 
*' fizzing." C'est — aux pommet, 
it is ddightfuL (Thieves') Du —, 
gold or siiver. Faire — , to arrest. 

Batiau, m. (printers'), jour du — , 
day on rohich the compositor makes 
out his account for the week. Par- 
Icr — , to talk shop. 

Batif, m. (thieves'), bative, batl- 
fonne,/., new; pretty, or *'dim- 
ber." La fee est balive. the girl 
is pretty, she i> a " dimber 
mon." 

Battmancho (Breton), wooden 

shoes. 

Bfltiment (familiar). £tre du — , 
to be of a certain profession. 

Bfltir (popular), sur le devant, to 
have a large stomach; to have 
something like a "corporation" 
growing upon one, 

B&ton, m, (thieves*), creux, 
musket, or "dag;" — de circ, 
leg; — de r^lisse, police officer^ 
" crusher, •' "aipper, ''or " reeler;" 
/nVj-/, or "devil dcxlger; "(mounte- 
banks') — de trcmplin, leg. l*ro- 
pcrly tremplin, a spring board ; 
(familiar) — n^erdeux, man whom 
it isnot easy to deal with, who cannoi 
be humoured ; (thieves') — rompu, 
ticket of -leave coHVtit who has brO' 
ken bounds. Termed also "canne, 
trique, tricard, fagot, chcval de 
retour." 

BAtons de chaise, m. pi. (popu- 
lar), noce de — , grand Jolli^a- 

tion, " AaP^ iin " nP «( Kn^U 

down.' 



flare up,** or " break 



Batouse — BaudrouilUr, 



31 



B«tou5e. batotue, / (thieves*). 
ccmsis : — toute iMLttante, new 
eant-as. 

Batousier, ;//. (thieves'). w^ai>^r. 

Battage (popular), lu, " gag :*' im- 
fciitwn ; joke; humbug; damage 
tif Any article, 

Battant, m.(lbieyes'),AA2ry, "pan- 
Icr;" stomach ; throaty *' red 
lane;" tongu^ "jibb." Un bon 
— , a tttrnthle tffagHf. Se pousscr 
dans le — , to dnnJi, **to lush." 
Fairc (rimer le — , /tf eat, 

Battante, / (popular), Mi, or 
•'ringer.** 

Battaqua, jr. (popular), slattemiy 
womnn, dowdy. 

Balteric, / (popular), actum of 
lyings cf deceiving^ "cram ; 
the teeth, throat, and tongue ; — 
douce, joke, (Freemasons*) Bat- 
lerie, applause, 

Balteur, m. (popular and thieves'), 
//a^, deeeh'er; — d'antif, thief 
who tnformt another of a likely 
" job ; ' — de beurre, stockbroker; 
— dedig dig, thief who feigns to 
he seized ivUh an apoplectic fit in a 
thop so as to facilitate a confede- 
rate's operations by drawing the 
attention to himself ; (pupular) — 
dc ficmme, idler. 

Battoir. m. (popular), hand, *' flip- 
per ; " large hand, ** muUun fibt." 

Battre (thieves'), to dissemble ; to 
deceivt : to make believe. 

}lc t inqui^te |ia&, jc hattrai s bien que 
ftdtfliie le plus nului de nc pas ne crotre 
vmbftlU pour ile bon. -Vidocq. 

Bittrea lftParisicnne,/tfcAA7/, " to 
do ; " — ^ mort, to deny ; — 
oomtois, to play the simpleton ; to 
act in confederacy ; — de I'teiJ, to 
be dying ; — entifle, to be a confe- 
derate^ or **sialtsman ; " — Job, 
to dtisembie ; — t'antif, to -walk, 
••to pad the hoof ; " to play the 



spyt " to nark ; " — morosse, to 

call out "^Stop thief!" "to give hot 
beef ; " — en ruinc, to visit. 

DHllef ou oarqunif sont dcs voldatu qui 
. . . battcni en mine lea enti/TeA et turn 
les crcux des vergaei.—Le JargeM 4a 
r Argot. 

( Popular) Battre la muraille, to he so 
drunk as ** not to be able to see a 
hole in a ladder," or not to be able 
**to lie down without holding 
on ; " — ia semelle, to play the 
vagrant ; — le beune, to speculate 
on ^Change ; to be*' fast ; ' todis* 
semble ; — le briquet, to be knock' 
kneed ; — sa Acme, or Hemme, to 
be idle^ to be '* niggling ; " — son 
quart ij said of prostitutes who 
■walk the streets. I>es yeux qui »e 
batient en duel, s^nintingeyes^ or 
"swivel-cycs." S'enbattrcrccil,la 
paupi^re. orlcs {esses, not to care a 
straw. (Familiar) tialtrcsonplein, 
to bt in all the bloom of beauty or 
talent, *'in full blast ;" (military) 

— la couverte, to sleep ; (sailors') 

— un quart, fo invent some plau' 
sibte story; (printers') — le bri- 
quet, to knock the type against the 
composing-stick when in tJu cut of 
placing tt in, 

Batture. See Batterie. 

Bauce,bau5se,m.(nopular),ma//<r, 
emt>loyer, "boss : ' (thicves'l rw4 



(thieves ) rwk 



ri>i':tf«,'*rag-sp]awger; ' — fondu, 
bankrupt employer^ '* brosier." 

Bauceresae, /. (popular), female 
employer. 

Baucher (thieves*)i *« — . to deride; 
to make fun of 

Baucoter (ihievcs*), fo teate, 

Baude, /. (thieves.'), venereal dis- 
ease. 

Baudrouillard, m. (thieves'), /r/^'- 

tive. 

BaudrouiUer (thieves'), to decamp^ 
** to make beef." See Patatrot. 




3^ 



Baudrouiller — B^carre. 



Baudrouiller, or baudru, vi* 

(thieves'), ivhip, 
Bauge. /. {thieves'), Hx^ ehesi^ or 

"pctrr;" Ac//>', "tripes." 
Baume, m. (popular), d'acier, xz/r- 

j^cons" niui dentists* inslrnmcuts ; 

— de porte-en-terrc,/tfwtf«. 
Bausser (popular), to vtcrJk, "to 

graft." 
Bavard, m, (popular), harriiter^ 

/itu'vrr, "green bag;" (military) 

puntthmcnt ieaf ih a soldUrs 

book. 
BavardCf /. (thieves*), mouthy 

" muns," or " bone box." 

Une main autour dc son colas et I'aDtre 
daa«> bii l>avartle pour lui sniucpioccr le 
chiRon rotigc — £. SuB. 

Baver (popular), fo tatk, "to 
jnw ; " — dcs clig^ol!^ to Ttvffi, 
" to nap a bib ; ' — sur quel- 
qu'iin, to jryVrti (7/ t*/ onr, to ba^k- 
lift, Bavcr. also to chat. The 
exprejuion is old. 

Verwz-y, vnrlcu, cHamberifcre*, 
Qui >CAyex ki bien )» maniiro, 
£a dikani mainie bonne bave. 

ViLLOM, i5ih Century. 

Baveuz, m. {vio^\x\a.x), omwAo Joes 
not kntr.v what he is talkittfr about, 

Bayafe, w, (thicves'),;»/j/o/, •*bark- 
ing iron." or "barker." 

Bayafer (thieves'), to shoot. 

Bazar, m. (military), house of ill- 
fame^ "flash drum;" (servants') 
hoHse where the master is par- 
titular^ "crib;" (popular) any 
house : (prostitutes ) furniture^ 
" marbles ; '* (students ) ioiiegeor 
schooiy "shop." 

Bazarder (popular), toseUoffany^ 
things especially one's furniture ; 
to barter ; (military) to pillage a 
house ; to wreck it, 

Bazenne,/ (thieves*), tinder. 

B6, m, (popular), iincker- basket 
which ragpickers sling to their 
shoulders. 



Biar, adj, (j^opular), laisser quel- 
qu'un — , to leave one its the lurch. 

Beau, w;., old term for swell ; ex- 
— , suptrannuated swell. 

Beau blond (thieves*), a p&etieai 
appellation for the sun, 

Beauce,/ (thieves'), plume de — , 
straw, or "slrommel." 

Beauce, m., beauccresse, /, .r^- 

rond-hnnd clothes-dealers of tht 
Qunrti^r du Temple. 



m, (thieves'), ^/r» 



Beauge, 

"gilts." 

Beausse, m, (thieves'), wealthy 
man, **rag-5pla»-ger," orofwivha 
is "wcil-breccheJ;" 

B6bi, m. (popular), stunted man; 
feumle dancer at fancy public balls 
in the dress of an injant ; the 
dress itself; term of etuiearment, 
Mon gros — ! darling I ducky t 

Bec,m. (popular), mouth, '*maw;" 
— sale, a thirsty mortal. ClaqucT 
du — , fo be fasting, "to be 
bandied." Kincer le — bk quel- 
qu'un, to treat one to some dnnk. 
Sc nncer le — , toufet one^s ivhisfle, 
Tortillerdu — , to eest, *' to peck." 
Casser du — , /*> h<n<e an ojensii-e 
breath. Avoir la rue du — mal 
pavee, to hait an irregular set of 
teeth. Ourler son — , to fmsk 
one^s Uf>rk. (Sailors') .Se calfa- 
ter le ~,ta e,U or drink, "to 
splice the mainbrace," (Thieves') 
lice de gaz, liourrique, Bique, 
ciergc, amif, peste, laune, vache, 
Poiice-ofUcer or detectii'e, " pig," 
"crusher," *'coppcr,"*"cossack,*' 
"Dark,"&c. 

Bicane,/ (popular), steam engine, 
" pufhng billy;" small printing 
machine. 

B^carre ix the latest titU fwr Pari- 
siam dandies; and the term is 



B/casse — Belie. 



33 



ftlso used to replace the now well- 
worn cxptcMiou "chic." Tl»c*'b<i- 
CAiTC " must be ^ave aod sedate 
after the English model, with 
short hair, high collar, small 
moustache and whi&kers, but no 
beard. He must always look 
thirty years of age ; mukt neither 
dance nor affect the frivolity of a 
floral buttoa-hulc nor any jewel- 
lery ; must shake hands simply 
with ladies and gravely bend nis 
head to gcnllcmcn. " Hecarre— 
being translated — is * natural ' in 
a musical sense." — Grnf<Ati\ yan. 
3, 1886. The French dandy goes 
also by the appellations of" coco- 
de», petit crevd, pschulleux," &c. 
See Gommeux. 

Bicasic,/. (popular), ^Md/r ^O*. 

Eh ! va done, grande b^caue 1 

Becfigue decordonnier.m. (popu- 
lir), fpwr. 

Bftchage, m. (familiar), sharp cri- 
tktsm, 

B^cher (familiar), to criticite^ to rttn 
trfcwMy (popular) /ipi^ii/, "to bash.'* 
Se — , tojight^ ** 10 have a null." 

BCcbeur, m. (thieves*), /v^jr, 
" m^mj^r ; '* J*'ffc (finstruithn^ a 
mmUmlc -ivhaic functions are to 
mMAt^utacaify and txamine a pri- 
»»mtr bt/ore fu ti sati up for trial. 
AvocaC — t public fnfsecuior. 

Btebeuse, /. (thieves*), female 

tkirf. 

Becot, m. (popular), mvuth, "kis- 
fccr ;** JtiJJ, *' bus." 

B^coter (popular), to kiss ; to 
ffndltt '• to lirkyioodlc." 

Becquant, m. (thieves'), ckiiken^ 
" cackling cheat," or ** beaker." 

Becquetsncc, f, (popular), food^ 
••gnib." 



Becqueter (popular), to eat, *' tu 
peck." 

Dis-iloDC ( viens-rn becqueter? Arrive 
clnmpiii t Je paie ud cajdoo tie la boutciUe. 
— Zov,A. 

Bedon, m. (popular), ^^//y. 
*• tripes," or ** the corporation." 

Bidouin, m. (popular), AarsA man, 
or "Tartar;" one of the iard- 
sharper tribe* 

Bcek (Breton), xvoif. Gwelet an 
cuz ar beck ij e^ittiiaient to elle 
a vu le loup, that is, sht has lost 
her MaiJ<nheud. 

Befleur, m., beffeuse,/ (popular), 
deceii'^r, one who " puts on." 

Big^e,/ (thieves'), oats; also ab- 
breviation of bczigue, a certain 
game of cards. 

Biguin, m. (popular), head^ 
**nut ;*'a/a»w;>'. Avoir un — ^pour 
quclqu'un, *' to fancy someone, 
** to cotton on to one. ' 

Beigpne, f. (popular), cuff or blow, 
"bang.*' 

B41ant,/«. (tbievei*), Mr</, "wool- 
bird." 

BeUt, m. (horse-dealers'), sorry 
horse, * ' screw. " 

Belette, / (popular), ftfty-centime 
piece, 

Belg:e, /. (iiopulai), Belgian clay 
pipe, 

Belgique (familiar), filer sur — , to 
abscond tuith contents of cash -bffx, 
is said also of absconding fraudu' 
lent bankrupts^ who generally put 
the Belgian frontier between the 
polite and their own persons, 

Bilier, m. (cads'), cuckold, 

Bellander (tramjjs'), to beg, "to 

cadge. " 

Belle, yi [popular and familiar), at* 
tcndrc sa — , to wait on^''\ oppor- 



34 



Bhtard — BerdrndUard. 



tumty. Touet U — , to play a 
third anadfcisnte ^wa La per- 
dre — , ic lose a game which -was 
censiiierfd as good as won ; to lose 
an eptortuniiy. (Thieves') Eire 
servide — ^ to be imprisoned through 
mistaken identity ; to be the vic- 
tim of a false accusation. {Poj^U' 
lar) Belle a la chandelle, /., ugly ; 
^ de umX, fetftale habituu of balls 
and cafJs ; (familiar) —- petite, a 
young lady of the demi-monde^ a 
*' pretty horsc-brcakcr." 

B^nard, m. (popular), breeches, 
'* kicks," or "sit-upons." 

Binef, m., for hin^ct, profit. 

B^nivole, m. (popular), yoimg doc- 
tor in hospitals, 

B£ni-coco (mililajy), ctre de la 
tribu des — , to be a foci. 

B*ni-Mouffclard(popular),</HW/«T 
of the Quartier Mouffetard^ the 
abode of rag-pickers. 

B^nir (popular), bas, to kick one in 

the lower part of the back^ ** to loe 
one's bum," ''to root," or *' lo 
land a kick;" (popular and 
thieves') — des pieds, /p Af hanged^ 
** to cut caper-sauce," or ** to be 
scragged." 

B^niaseur, m. (familiar), one who 
puts on a dignified and solemn air, 
as if alfout to give his blessing, and 
mho delifers platitudes en virfnet 
(5rv. ; one who makes fine but 
empty promises ; political man who 
professes to believe, and seeks to 
make others believe , that everything 
is for the best. An historical illus- 
tration of this i.s General Changar- 
nier thus addressing the House 
on the very eve of the Coup d'Etat 
which was lo throw most of its 
members into prison, " Repr<f- 
senlanls da peuple, d^Iiberez en 
paUl" 



Bcnolt, m. (popular), woman* t 
bully, *' ponce." See Poisson. 

La vrai* vinii. 
Cest qu' lei Beoaitt lonjoim Itchent 
Et s'cnisscnt les balots. 
Vive eul' bat^llon d' la guiche, 
Cest nuu« <|u'est Ie& Aa\. 

KlCHKriN, Ckanji^m dtt Gutux. 

Benoiton,m.,benoltonne,/.f/<v/// 
eccentric in their ways and style of 
dress. From a play of Sardou's, 
La Famille Ben^ton, 

Benoitonner, /ii liiie and dress after 
the style of the Brno f tons (which 
see). 

Benottonnerie, /^ style and ways 
of the Benaitotu. 

Beq, m. (engravers'), work. 

Biquet, m. (shoemakers'), patch of 
leather sewn on a boot ; (wood 
engraven) small block ; (printers*) 
a composition of a few lines ; pajtr 
prop placed under a forme. 

B6queter (popular), to eat^ "to 
peck," or ** to grub." 

B^quiUard, m. (popular), •pA/ma/r, 
old "codger;" (thieves') execu- 
tioner. 

BdquUlarde, / (thieves'), guillo- 
tine* 

B^quille, /. (thieves*), gallows, 
*' scrag." Properly crutch. 

Biquilli, m. (thieves'), hanged per- 
son, one who has •* cut caper 

sauce." 

Biquiller (popular), to hang; t» 
eat, *' to grub." 

B^quilleur, m. (thievesOi execu- 
tioner ; man who eats, 

fierce. Chcval qui se — , horse which 
rocks from side to side wher$ trot- 
ting, which ** wobbles." 

BerdouiUard (^xipular), man with J 
fat jHsunch^ *' forty gut*," 



Birdou ille — Beurlot 



3S 



BerdouiUe, / (popular), Mly^ 

Txi y>oufli <i^* harirots oqc t'u !» bcr- 

Bcrge, /., or longe (thieves'), 
y^iir; ont yearns impnsonnitHtt 
" wretch." 

tire, / (popular), sweftkeart, 
* poll ;" last i:arti in a fack, 
linaono, biricain (thieves'), siUy 
Jrtl^w miily dW-cir/t/, a •'flat," a 
goilong." 

ider (popular), /<» lounge 
to mike;" tega the round 

teii th* ytine'sh^ps in tkt nfigh- 

rlinede commerce,/ (thieves'), 

ifsmims fUrk. 

Scrlu. w. (thieves'), blind, or 
" hoodaun." From avoir la bcr- 
lue. to itt double. 

Berlue, /. (thieves'), blaHiet, 
•' woolly." 

Bernard, w. (popular), aller voir — , 
or tiler voir comment se portc 
madame — . to easeomsd/^ ** logo 
Mt». Jones.'* 

Is, m. pi. (popular), p0Ue- 
cheeks." 

Iquer (popular), to go truuty 
a(V4 /Me itt tent ion o/MOt returning. 

Bcrri. m. (popular), rag-piiJUf's 

liVift. 

Berry, m. (Ecole i'ol]-technique), 
/aftgve tunic, 

telo. m. (thie^'cs*), one-franc 





id, m. (familiar), a rtvindler 
Wk9is svpindlediy Mil ti?n/ed(rfTtes, 
■m^ ^tt as a eati-paw of other 

Berxiliut, jh. (college), watch, 

Bceoin, m. (popular), autel de — , 
of iUfamey or *' nanny - 



BesouiUe,/ (thieves'), helt. From 
beui, Italian, smaJd com kept in 
a belt, 

Bessona, m. pi. (popular), the 
breasts. *' dairies. Prowerlv 



breasts^ 
twins, 



dairies. Properly 




Bestiasse,/. (popular), arrant fo^; 
dtdlard^ "buffle-hcfld." 

BAte, / and adj. (thieves'), eonft- 
derijfe tn a swindle at billiards. 
Sec Bachotter. (Popular) — \ 
bon 1 >icu, harmless person {mo- 
pctly lotly-bird) ; — i corncs,ytf nfr ; 
lithographic press ; — k deux fins, 
walking-stick ; — k pain, a man ; 
also a man who kerps a woman ; 

— commc scs pieds. arrant fool ; 

— contme chou , extremely stupid ; 
very easy ; — cpaulee, girl who 
has lost her maidenhead (this 
expression has passed into the 
language). Une — rouge, an 
advanced Republican, a Radical. 
Thus lermMl by the Conser- 
vatives. Called also " democ- 
soc." 

B^tises./. //. (popular), question' 
abU, or " blue,^' talk, 

Bettander (thieves'), to beg^ " to 
mump,*' or "cadge." 

Bctterave,/. (popular). drunkanPi 
nose^a nose with ** grog blossoms," 
or a "copper nose,' such ns is 
possessed by an "adinir.nl of the 
red." 

Beuglant, m. (familiar), low music 
hall ; music hail. 

Beugler (popular), to weept *' to nap 

one's bib. 

Beugne,/ ( popular), W:>tt*, "clout," 
" bang." or ** wipe." 

Beurloquin, m. (popular), proprie- 
t<»r of boot warehouse of a very in* 
ferior sort, 

Beurlol. m. [x>Q^\^^i\% shoemaker in 
a small way. 



Bickerie — Bigard^. 



37 



Bicherie, f, (familiar), tJu xvorld of 
" bichc**' or "oxottus." Haute 
— , Mr uvrJJ of fashiQnahU pnn- 

Cctt a oil ... OD vtut d^filer arec uq 
(rod-frnu dc ^otc. la haute ct U ba^»e bi- 
chent CO qii^te li'unc pmic. quicrcn) qucm 
ilevtirci. — FkSdallt, Ln i'u li Paris. 

Bichon, «., term of endtamient, 
Mon — ! darling, (HopuJar) Un 
— , a Sodomist^ 

Bicbonner coco (soldiers*), tc 

Bichon*. m. /A (popular)t shoes 
with fiffU'S, 

Bichol, M. nhiev«'), hijh0p. Pro- 
bably from ihe Rngliih, 

Bidachc,/ Sec Bldocbe. 

Bidard, m. (popular), Intky. 

Bidet, w, (convicts*), string which. 
is i&Mtrrviii so as to tnable pri- 
iumtri to send a tetter^ and receive 
Ike artsuvr by the st^me means. 

Bidoche. or barbaque,/ (popu- 
lari. mcitt, '* bull;" (military) 
fieze fff meat, 

Bidon de zinc, m. (mililary), biock' 
Aeiid. fiopcrly a can^Jlask, 

Bidonner (popular), to drink freely^ 
•Mo swig ;" (sailors') — i la 
dmbuse, to drink at the contemn 
•' to ipiice the mainbracc." 

Bie iDreloncAnt), 6eer ; iMfer. 

Bicn (pojfular), pans^* intoxicated, 

'**crewcd." Mon — ^wy husband^ 

or '* ol(i man ; " my wife, or " old 

wcBRta." Etre du dernier — 

aircc, (9 Iff on the rttost intimate 

iermfjnth. Eire — , to /r tipsy^ 

** iCTCwcA." E.ifc en train de — 

^fe, tc U eating. Un homme 

— . Wke temwe — , meam a person 

^ tkt mid4lt class; well-dressed 



Bier (thieves'), to go, 

II* entrcnt dans le crvux. douhlent de Is 
batuun, dn limes, de I'uiie et puis douce- 
ment happent Ic taillU ct blent allrndrs 
ceux qui sc puriiuent sur le grand trimu'. 
— Le Jfirgim d* tA rgvL 

Bi^re,/. (popular), domino box, 

Biffe, /. (popular), ragpieiker^ 

ttade, 

Biffer (popular), to ply (he rag*- 
pickers trade ; to eat greedily, 
" to wolf," 

Biffclon, m. (thievcV), letter, 
'* screcvc," or "stiff;'* (popular) 
counter-mark at theatres. Donncr 
sur le — , to read an indiitrnent ; 
to give information as to tlU 
Priioner^s character. 

Biffin, or bifin, m. (popular). *ag- 
picker^or '* Ixinc-grublxrr ; " afoot 
soldier, or " wobbler," hi» Knap- 
sack hcini; n^t-similalrd to a rag- 
picker's basket. 

Btff're, m. (popular), /W, '•gnib.** 
Passer i — , to eat, Pawer 4 — & 
train express, to bolt t-oion one's 
food^ •' lo guizle." 

Bifteck, m (popular), Ji maquart. 
Jilthy, " chalty " individual (Ma- 
quart is the name of a knacker) ; 
— de chamarcu<e, JiiU snitsage 
(chamareu&e, a "u-orkt tig girl) ; — 
de grisctte, J^at sausage. Kaire 
du — , to strike, ** 10 clump ;" to 
ride a hard trotting horse, lohick 
sometimes makes one's breech ra-w. 

Bifteckif6re, adj., that which pro' 
cures one's living, oni's '* bread 
and cheese." 

Bifurqu6. At the colleges of the 
University students may, after the 
course of '* iroisiime," take up 
science and mathematics instead 
of continuing the classics. This 
is called bifurcation. 
Bigard, m. (thieves'), hole, 
Bigard6 (ihieven*), fnerteii. 



38 



Bi^ — Binww* 



bliHkhead^ "go along ;" (////V, or 

"gull." 
Bigome, m, (ihieves*), jaspiner or 

rouscaillcr — , to ta/k taut, ** to 

pallet flasiL" 
BiKomeau, m. (popular), folice 

officer^ or " crusher ; " marinty or 

••jolly." 
Bigomiau, m. (popular), ntUnt of 

Auvergne, 
Bigomion, m. (popular), y«i/jMM>(/, 

" !;uack up." 
Bigoter [thieve*'), to play the rt- 

ii^ious hypocrite. 
Bigoteur, m. (thieves'), devoutper- 

son. 
Bigotter, (popular), /iv/rdv. 
Bigrement (familiar), a forcible tx- 

prcssioii, CJr/rcOT*'/)', ** awfully." 
Bijou, m. (popular), broken I'icluais, 

or " manablins ; " {freemasons') 

badge ; — tie logc, badge ■worn on 

the left side; — de I'ortlre, 

emblem. 
Bijouter (thieves*), te steal JetoeU. 

Bijouterie,/ (popular), moneyed* 
vanced on iva^es, " dcad-horsc." 

Bijoutier, m., bijoutiire, f. 
(popular), retailer of ** arlequins " 
(which see) ; bijoutiersurlegenou, 
en cuir, shoetftajter, or "snob." 

Bilboquet, m, (popular), person 
with a lar^ hemi ; mun -who is 
made fun of; a laughing-stock ; 
a litre bottle of wine. Bilboquet, 
properly cup and ball* (Printers') 
sundry jr/tallj\>bs. 

Billancer (thieves'), to serve otu^i 
full term of imprisonment, 

Billancher (popular), to pay, "to 
fork out," "toRhcU out. 

BlUard, m. (popular), dcvisser son, 

to die, or " to kick the bucket." 
BiUe. / 

•' pieces 



(thieves), money, ox 
(from billon) ; (po- 



pular) head, "Hbbj-," "block," 
"nut," '* canister," "chump,* 
"costard," "attic." &c. ; — i 
chdtaigne, grotesque head (it is 
the practice in France to carve 
chestnuts into grotcw|uc headn) ; 

— de billard, bald pate, " bladder 
of lard ; " — de Ixeuf, chitlerling. 

Billemon, billemont, m.(thieves*)t 
bauk-nole, "soft," "rag," or 
"flimsy." 

Billeoz (Breton), money. 

Bdlcozi (Breton), to pay. 

Biller (thieves'), to pay, " to dub.'' 

Billet, m. (popular), direct pour 
Charenton, absinthe taken neat. 
Prendre un — de parteirc, to fall .^ 
"to cornea cropper." Jc vousen 
fous or fichc moil — , / assure you it 
is a fact, " on my Davy," " *pon 
my sivvy," or *' no flies." 

Billez (Breton), girl ; peasant ««• 
man. 

Bince, w.(thieve5'), *;fyt. "chive.** 

Malheur aux pantrck dc province, 
Souvctit lard^ {i'nn coup de bincc, 
L« micheton au se uuv&ii. 

RiCHHriH, Gurux de Paria. 

Binellc,/. (popular), bankruptcy. 

Binellier, w. (popular), bankrupt^ 
"brosier." 

BincUophe, / (popular), //wm///- 
Icnt biitikruptcy. 

Binctte,/: (ramiliar),/ac-^ "phi«;** 

— ii la dciiastrc, gloomy face. 
Prendre la — i qurhju'un, to 
take oue^s portrait. Quelle sale 
— , what an ugly face ! a regular 
" knocker face." Une dr61e de 
— , ifuecr face. 

Binomes, chums ^forking toother 
at tke Ecole Polytechni,fue. It 
is customary for student*, to pair 
off for work. 

Binwio (Breton), male organs ^ 
generation, Litetally tools. 



Eigne — Blafarde. 



39 



t 



I 



Biqae, /. (popular), old kcrte; — 
el bouquc, kirma^krfidite (equiva- 
lent to "chivre et bouc "). 

Birbade, birbasse, birbe, bir- 
bette, birbon, m. atid adj. 
(thieves' and popular), eld ; ^d 
man ; fi/d u>ofnan. 

Birbassier. See Bibasaier. 

Blrbe (popular), o/dman, old " cod- 
ger ; (thieves') — dab, grand- 
fiUhtr. 

Birbette, n. (popular), a very old 
man. 

Biribi, m. (thievet*), short crmo^ar 
MJtd by houubrtaktrs^ "James," 
•*lhe stick," or •* jemmy," 
Termed eIao "pince monseigneur, 
rigolo, I'enfant, Jacques, sucre de 
pomror, dauphin." 

Birlibi, m. (thieves'), ^amt played 
by nvindiing gambltrs wiih wal- 
nuf sheUs and dke. 

Birmingham (ramiJiai), rasoir de 
— (superlative of rawir)* ih^rc, 

Bisard, m. (thieves'), bellows (from 
bisc, wtnd), 

BUcaye (thieves'), BieStre^ a prison. 

Biscayen (thieves'), madmaH^ om 
vAff is '* balmy." (Bicetre has a 
depot for lunatics.) 

BiachofT, m. drink prepared wiih 
y»kite UfiHe, lemon, and sugar. 

Biscopcorviscope, / (cads'), r<r/. 

Lb viacDpc tn airiire et la trombinc au vent, 
L'wjJ nvlou, il enm chez le stn^ue. 

KiCHsriK, Cmtux <le Paris. 

Biser ( rimiliar), to kiss, 

Bismarctt, coiileur — ^brmvn colour; 
— en colcrc, — malade, are 
tvfifiMS shades of brcrvn. 

Bistnarcker (gamesters'), to mark 
twi£* ; io appropriate by Jnir or 
fsul means, Il is to be presumed 



this is an allusion to Bismarck's 
alleged summary ways of getting 
possession of divers territuiies. 

Bisquant, ad;, (popular), proivk- 
l"g% 'in»tying. 

BiBsard, m. (popular), broufn bread. 

Bistoumi, m. (popular), huntittg 
horn. 

Bistro, bistrot, nu (popular), land- 
lord of xvine-shop, 

Bitte et bosse (sailors'), earoHsittg 
ejcelama/ioti. 

Lait^e arrivifr f voiles lnqi uc*, el rem- 

(>li!>«ci Ics trauiaroru. voui kutres ' Toiit ^ 
ft Doce I Bitte cl bosw !— RtCHEflN. L^ 
Ciu. 

Bitter cuirass^.m. (fomilinr), mix- 
ture of bitters and eurafoa. 

Bitume, m, foot-pofement. De- 
moiselle du — , streetwalker, 
Fairc Ic — , to toaik the street. 
Fouler, or poUr Ic — , to saunter 
on the bouleifanl. 

Bitumer is said of uront^M wAo 
walk the streets, 

Biture, /. (familiar), excessive in- 
dulgence in food or drink, " scorf." 

Biturer (popular), sc — , to indulge 
in (I " biture" (which see). 

Blackboulage, m. (familiar), black* 
bulling. 

Blackbouler (familiar), to bhukhall. 
The expression has now a wider 
range, and is used specially in re- 
ference to nnrctumef! candiilates 
to ParlinTnciit. L'n blackboule 
du suffrage universcl| an unre- 
turned candidate. 

Blafard (cads'), silver coin. 

II avait vu Muter une pi^e de cent «ous, 
Se cosrum au trottoir dans un bruit d« 

lymbulen, 
Un ic\i damluiit ncur, un bUfard de cioq 

ballcs. 
KicHRrm, Ckansfin des Gutms. 

Blafarde (cads'), dtath^ 




40 



Blagtte — Blanchir. 



BUgue, /. Literally facility qJ 
iptt<ky not of a xtry high order ; 
talk; humbug; fw ; chaff ; joke. 
Avoir de la — , to have a ready 
tomgw. K'avoir que la — , to ot 
a facile utterer of empty words. 
Aroir la — da metier, fa be an 
adept in shmoivg off knaivled^ of 
things re/ating to one's profession. 
Nou« avons fait deux lieures 
de — , we talked together for 
two hours. Pas de -^ ! none of 
your nonsense i let us be serious. 
Pousser une — , to cram up ; to 
Joke. Sans — , / am not Joking. 
Une bonne — , a good Joke ; a good 
story, Unc roauvaiac — , a bad, 
ill • natured joke ; bad trick. 
Quelle — , what humbug! what a 
story t Nc faire que des blagues is 
said of a literary man whose pro^ 
ductions are of ;w importance, 
(Popular) Blague sous 1 aisselle I 
no more humbugging I I ant not 
Joking! — dans le coin ! yo-ti'^^ 
apart ; seriously, 

Blaguer (familiar), to chat ; to talk ; 
to joke ; not to be in earnest; to 
draw the long'bffzv; to quiz^ to chaffs 
ti humbug one^ " lo pull the leg;" 
to make a jaunty sho^f of courage, 
Tu blagues lout le temps, ^-im/ talk 
all the time, II avait fair de 
blaguermais il nVtait pas \ la noce. 
he made a show of braven-, but he 
liNSS far front being comfortable. 

Blagues & tabac, /. (popular), 
withered i>osoms. 

Blagueur, blagueuse (familiar), 
humbug; story-teller; one xvho 
rails at^ scoffer, 

Blaichaxd (popular), elerk^ or 
** quill-driver.'* 

£c le« ouvrierc en vidaot it midi aae 
bonne choline, la tro|fne allumtfc, lei r«- 
Cardi tounanU, ac moqueiu dc^ difjct^, 
de* btaJchvds.— Rich art N, Lt I'avi. 

Blair, blaire, m. (popular), nost^ 
"boko," "tmcUer,"^ "snorter," 



or "conk." Se piquet le — , to 
get tipsy. See Se sculpter. 

Si les pmp* ii Hen . . . 
Ont rdroit dc k'piqiier I'hiairc, 
Moi qu'ai toujour* ^ fatrc . . . 
J'peux boire un coup d'bteu. 
RicHEi'iN, Ckatuon dtt Gueux. 

^Uireau, m. (military), recruit, or 
"Johnny raw ; " a broom ; foolish 
young man who aspires to literary 
honours and who squanders his 
money in the company ofjoumo' 
listic Bohemians. 

Blanc, m. (popular), street-walker ; 
white wine ; white brandy ; one* 
franc piece. (Printers') Jeter du 
— , to interline. (Thieves') Nctrc 
pas — , to have a misdeed on one's 
conscience ; to be liable to be 
**wantctl." (Military) Faire faire 
— k quelqu'un de sa bourse, to 
draitf freely on another's purse ; 
to live at another^s expense in a 
mean and paltry manner^ ** to 
spunge." (Familiar) Ulanc, one 
of the legitimist party. The 
appellation used to be given in 
1851 to Monarchists or Bona- 
parttsts, 

Enfin pour terrntiier I'hifttoire, 
De mon bfruf blaoc nc paHons plui. 
Je veux le tncncr i la Toire, 
A qui le *eut pour dix icu*. 
Gc ijuetiiuc *it\. fail-il raflTaire, 
Je le djnne pour pcu d'ar|[ent. 
Car Je >ali qu'en France oa pnfflre 
L« rouge au blanc. 

PlHKkR Babukr, i8jt. 

Blanchemont, m. (thieves'), pivois 
(Ic ■ — , white wine. 

Blanches, / J>1, (printers'). The 
tlifTerciit varieties of type are: 
** blanches, gnuses, maigrcs, aJ- 
longees, noircs, larges. ombr^, 
icrlces, I'AnglaLse, I'Amcricaine, 
La gro&5e Nurmande." 

Bianchi, adj. (popular), mal — , 
fugro^ or •* darkey." 

Blanchir (journalists'), to make 
many l^reaks in one's manuscript, 
much fresh-a-litting. 



G 



1 



Blanchissctir — Blonde. 



41 



BUnchisseur, m, (popular), bar- 
rister ; j literary ) om zvko f ovists a 
wtamiicri^f. ■tvkogijti it the proper 
Utti^ry Jotm. 

Blancbisseuse de tuyaux de 
pipe ^popular}, variety of proUi- 
tttie. See Qadoue. 

BUnc-partout, m. (popular), /oj- 
tfy-itvi'j Ivy. 

Hiti K<n^nlcm<at coonu »ou» le oom 
de Eii« oAuce, de^ijtn^ sucm sous le nom 
d< t>ljin<. fhtttvjt, Ic palroanet e<it cc petit 
\miHt tl'NoDintc que Tcm rriHT>nt(x cnvinm 
iMU k> ciitq ccnU pu.— KicHBriN, Lx 

BUnca, m. pL (familiar), d'Eu, 
partitans of the IfOrUatts family; 
— d'Espftfpie, Car lists. 

BUnC'VOain, m, (popular), man 
ighose fHn<tions ionstst in IhroxtHng 
P^is^med meat to wandering Jogs. 

Blanquette, / (ihieves'), silver 
coin; silver plate. 

U tin d« B ftoche onte couveru d'ar- 
gci4 ■( deux montn* d'oc qu'il \k»9 lur Ic 
fa^don. 4u> ballet lout ccla, ce n'c«t 



pu \hti, l«s boBues d'Orient et la bUiii- 



ttc. all;>fu aWule du culr— Vtix>ci), 



BUnquctter (ihicvc**), te tilver, 

Blmnquettier (ihievei'), silverer, 
BUrd. or blavard, m. (tliieves*)i 

thoTML 

BUsi, c, aiiu (thicvM*). swollen* 
From the (jcntian blaj>en, to blow, 

BUve, blavin, m. (ihieve*'), hand- 
itrchief, " muckin^er" (from Ihe 
old word blave, hlut) ; necktie, 
'•ncckinger," 

BUvin. «. [\)\\^\n\ poeket pistol, 
''pop*.** An allusion to blavin, 
ftkH'handkenhief 

BUviniste^ m.ificixoit^^pickpoeket 
p'^o .iri'Ofef hts attention to hand- 
kerihie/j^ '*stook hauler." 

BU, \>H battu. w. (popular), 
mtatey^ " Joavcr." 



Bliebc, otlj., middling: ixid ; ttgly. 
Faire banque — » not to get any 
pay. Faire — , to make a " bad " 
at a fame^ suth as the game of 
Jives Jor instance. 

Bleu, m. (military), reertiit^ or 
** Johnny raw ; ** neiv-cottirr at the 
cavalry school of Saumur ; 
(thieves') cloak; also name givett 
to Republican totdicrs by the loya- 
list rebels of Brittany in 1 793. 
After 1815 the Monarchists gave 
the appellation to Ronaparttsts. 
(Popular) Petit — , red ruine. 
Avoir un coup d' — , to he slightly 
tipsy^ "elevated." See Pom- 
pette. 

Qtuuid j'tiflle un ca.non . . . 

C est paa pour faire I'pantrc. 

C'cftt qu' J ai plu& d'ctruc au ventre . . , 

Apris un coup d'blea. 

RiCHBCiK, CMoHSfiH du CyeHJt. 

(FnmiHar) Bleu, adj. astounding; 
incrtdible ; hard to stomach, £n 
£-trc — ; en baillcr tout — ; en 
rester lout — ^ to he stupefied^ 
much annoyed or disappointed , 
*' to look blue ;" W be suddenly 
in a great rage. (Theatrical) 
Eire — , to be utterly worthless. 

Bleue (famillnr). clle est — cclle-U; 
en voili une dc — j jc la Irouvc — , 
refers to anything incredible^ dis- 
appointing, ann*fying, hard to 
ttomack. Une colerc — , violent 
rage. 

Bltzimarder (theatrical), to imitT' 
rupt an actor. 

Bloc, m., military cell, prison, 
"mill," "IrUhlhealre/"'jigger." 

Blockaus, m, (military), shako. 

Blond, tn. (popular), beau — , man 
who is neither fair nor handsome; 
(thieve**) the sun. 

Blonde,/, (popular), bottle of -.vhite 
wint ; sweetheart, or *' joiner ;" 
glass of ale at certain cajh, 
' * brune " being the denomination 
for porter. 



Bioqu^- — Beeuf, 



Bloqu6, adj. (printers'), ctre — k 
la banque, io receive no pay, 

Bloquer (military), A> imprison^ 
confine ; (popular) to sett ^ to for- 
sake ; (printers') to replace tem- 
porarity one tetter hy another^ to 
me a *' turned sort. 

Bloquir (popular), to utt. 

Blot, m. (popular and thieves'), 
price; affair; concern in anything; 
share^ or "whack." C"* '^"'^ '^o" 
— , Ma/ iuits me. Nib dans mcs 
blots, that is not my affair ; that 
does not suit me. 

L'lurbin c'est bon [>oiir qai qu'est mouctie, 
A tnoi, il fait nib dann mes blots. 

RrcHBfiN, C4a«if<nt dtt Gurujc, 

Bloumard, m., blounne, /. (popu- 
lar), fiat, '•lilc." 

Blouse, / (familiar), the working 
classes. Mettre quelqu'un dans la 
— , toimprisen^ or cause one to fail 
into a snare. Une blouse is 
properly a billiard pocket. 

Blousier, m. (familiar), fOi/, 
" rank outsider." 

Bobe, m. (thieves'), twi/rA, "tat- 
tler." Fairele — , toeaseadrttnkard 
of his UHitch, •' to claim a canon's 
red toy." 
Bob^cbon, m. (popular), head, 
"nut." Se monler Ic — , /i? ^ 
enthusiastic. 
Bobelina, m. pi. (popular), A«»/f, 
*• hock-dockies," or "trotter- 
cases." Sec Ripalons. 
Bobinasse, /. (popular), head, 

"block." 
Bobine,/ (popular), /;«, "mug** 
(old word bobe, grimace), Une 
sale — , ugly face. Plus de fil sur 
la — . See Avoir. Se licher dc 
la — i quelqu'un, to laugh at one. 
Un cocber p&ue, je rAppclle, 
£t jlui dU : dites done rami ; 
V*li deu« franc*, j'prends v«t' bcrllnc 
Conduixi-moi Fare Monceau. 
Deux tfnrK« ' ti> I'fiche* d'ma bobine, 
Va dooc, eh ! fourncui ! 

fmriiiMM StMg, 



Bobino. Sec Bobe. 

Bobonne, for bonne, nursery- 
maid; servant girl, or "slavey." 

Bobosse, /. (popular), humpback, 
"lord." 

Bobottier, m, (popular), one who 
complains apropos of nothing. 
From bobo, a slight ailment, 

Boc, m. (popular), 4<;w;r0/i7/'/iffr^, 
"nanny-shop." 

Bocal, m, (popular), lodgings, 
" cnb ;" stomachy "bread ba,sket." 
Sc collcr quclquc chose dans le 
— , to eat. Sc rincer Ic — , to 
drinkf "to wet one's whittle." 
(Thieves') Bocal, /(iMr, glass, 

Bocard, «. (popular), raft; house 
of ill-fame^ " nanny-shop ; " — 
panne, smalt coffee-skop. 

Bocari, m, (thieves'), tfu toum tf 
Beaucaire, 

Boche, $n. (popular), rake^ "rip,** 
" molrowcr, or "beard splitter." 
Tete dc — , an expression applied 
to a dull-witted person. Literally 
wooden head. Also a Get man, 

Booker (familiar), to drink bocks, 

Bocotter, to grumble ; to mutter. 

Literally to bleai tike a bocquotte, 

goat. 

Bocque, boi^ue, m. (thieves'). 
watih^ "tauler." 

Bocson (common), htmse of ill- 
fame, "nanny-shop;** (thieves') 
lodgings, "dossing-ken." 

MoQtron ouvrc u lourde, 
Si (u veux que j'aboulc 
£t (jiautkc en tun bucKm. 

Vioocg. Mimaim. 

Bceuf, m. (popular), king of play- 
ing cards ; shoemaker's workman, 
or journeyman tailor^ xur.o does 
rough Jolts. Avoir son — , to get 
angryy " to nab the rust." Eire 
le — , /d work without profit. Se 
mettre dans le — ^ts be rodwedm 



Bixufier — BoUro. 



43 



tinnMs/aru/f,an allusion to bceuf 
bouilli, very plain fare. (Printers') 
Boftif, iompositioa of a few linn 
4eni for an ahuntet, Btruf, ndj. 
citrasfrdinary\ " stunning;'* enor- 
moHS ; synonymnus of "chic " at 
the Ecole Saini-Cyr ; (cads') pUa- 
saut, 

Boeufier, m. (popular), man of 
(hoUric disposition, otu pront **lo 
nab hi» rusl." 

Boffeie./., ^fl-r oa the ear, "buck- 
htjr^c* From ihc old word butTct. 

Bog. orbo^e,/ (thieves'), nw/M ; 

— en joDC, — d'oiienl, ^W(/ 
tpotck, " red 'un." or '* red loy;" 

— en platre, stiver watcA, "while 

£aiAu|uc ta linace, 
m bogne, ms Ittuquex, i«s na«MA. 
VltX>CQ. 

Boguiste (thieves'), watehmaiker, 

Boire (printers')* de Tencre is said 

tone who on joining a party of 
n compitinioHs finds ail the 
tiifuer Mas brftt disposed of. He 
will then probably exclaim, 

E»t-cv que voua croyes que je vait boire 

(Familinr) — dans la grande tasse, 
to be arctenfd ; (actors') — du laii, 
tfiohf'iiHtxpphuse ; — une goutle, 
Sc be hisseit, ** to be goosed." 

Bois, m. (cads'), pourri, tinder; 
(ibievcb') — loTtu, vine. (Thea- 
txkal) Avoir du — , or mettre du 
— , to have friends distributed kert 
and there amvnff the speitators, 
whose applause ejcdtes the enthu- 
siasm of the amiitHce. Literally 
faptnenfuel. 

Boisseau, m. (popular), shako; tali 
hat, "chimneypot." For S}*nonyms 
lec Tubard ; litre wine bottle. 



Boissonner (populai), /# drink 
heavily^ '* to swill." 

Boisflonncur (popular), assiduous 
frequenter of wine-shop, a 'Mush- 
ingion." 

Boissonnier (popular), one who 
UrinMs heaviiy^ a •* liuhington. '* 

Boite, f. (familiar tiXiA popular), 
mean house, lodj^n^houie, or re- 
s/iiurant : trodtinff est,tUishment 
mattof^td in an UHhusinessdike 
manner; one' s employer^ s establish- 
ment ; '*i*orkshop ; (rammer's es- 
tablishment', disorderly household; 
carriagr, or " trap ;" — & comes, 
hat or cap ; — k dominos, coffin^ 
" cold meat box ;" — it ga/, sto- 
mach ; — i surprises, the head of 
a learned man ; — i violon, (o£in; 

— an scl, head, ** tibby ;" — aux 
cailloux, prison^ "stone-jug;" 

— d'echantillons, latrine tttb ; 
(thieves') — a Pandore, box con- 
taining soft Kuix for taking im- 
prints of keyholes ; (military) 
gnardroom, "jigger;" — aux 
rctlcxions, cells, Boulotter de 
la — , coucher i la — , to get fre- 
qnently locked up. Grosse — . 
prison. (Printers ) Boltc,/ri«/^*j 
shop, and more particularly one of 
the inferior sort. 

"Cest one botte," dit un \Hcu)i >in(e : 
" il y a toujour* m*che, mai* hA*4»rJ ! au 
bout dc U quuidJiie, Imu<{uc U^hc." 

Fa ire sa — , to distribute into 
one's ease. Pilleur de — , or 
fricoteur, one who takes on the sly 
type from fellow cemj>ositors case* 

Boiter (popular), des caloCs, /« 
sqwnt, to be "boss-eyed;" 
(ihicvcs') — des chais**s, to si/itint, 
to be " squinny-cyed." 

BoUro, m. (familiar), a kind »f 
ladys hatf Spanish fashion. 



44 



Bolivar — Bonique. 



Boliv«r, OT. (popular), kat^ "tile," Bondieusardisme,/, bigotry. 



Bombe,/! (popular), wine nuasi*re^ 
about half a litre ; (miliUry) — 
de vieux oinl, bl^Ucr cf lard, 
Gare la — I look out for tquaits ! 

Bombi, m, (popuUr), hunchbatk^ 
"lord." 

Bon, man ta U rclitd oti in any 

ciri um stance ; on f who is "game ;'* 
man wanted by the police, Eire Ic 
— , to lye arretted, or the rij^ht uuin. 
Vous ctcs — vous ! you amuse 
•me! well ^ that's good ! (Printers*) 
lioTiy proof xuhich bears the author^ s 
intimtUioH^ ** bon k tirer," /or 
press. Avoir du — , to hen-e some 
composition net entered in one*s 
aaoMnt, and reserved for the next. 
(Familiar) Bon jeane huniiiie, 
candid youn^ man, in other terms 
greenhortt ; [ popular) — pour cadet 
is said of a dull paper, or of an 
unpleasant tetter ; — sang de bon 
sang, mild oaf h elicited by astonish- 
ment or indiptatiott. (Popular 
and familiar) Eire des bons, to be 
ail ri^htf safe. Nous arrivons A 
temps, nous sommes des bons. 
Le — cndroit, posteriors. Donner 
un cou]J dc pied juste nu — en- 
droit, to kick one's behind, lo 
•'hoof one's bum." Arrivcc — 
premier, to :iuipass all rivals, 
"to beat hollow." 

Bonbon, w. (]>opular), pimple. 

Bonbonnifrre, /. (popular), latrine 
tub ; — a filous, omnibus, 

Bonde (thieves'), central prison. 

Bon-Dieu (soldiers*), /Vtfr</. (Popu- 
lor) II n'y a pa* de — , that is, 
il n'y a pas de — qui puisse 
empcchcr cela. (CouvtcLs') C>hort 
diarv of fatigue parties at the 
hulks. 

Bondieusard, m, (familiar), bi^ ; 
dealer in articles us4d for worship 
tm churches* 



Bondieuserie, /, article $tjed for 
worship; dealing in such articles. 

Bonhomme, m. (thieves'), saint. 
(Familiar and popular) Un — , an 
individual, %.^'' pa.xxy." Mon — , 
mygood/ellotv. Petit — dechemin, 
see AUcr. 

Bonicard. m., bonicarde, / 

(thieves'), cfd man, old woman. 

Boniface, m. (popular), simple- 
minded man, ** flat," or *' green- 
horn." 

Bonifacement (popular), wiM 

simplicity. 

Boniment, m. (familiar), puffing 
speech of quacks, of mountebonkst 
of shopmen, of street vendors, of 
three-card 'trick sharpers, and 
generally clap-trap speech in re- 
commendation or explanation of 
anything. Kicliepin, in his 
Pave^ gives a good specimen of 
the " boniment " of a " maquil- 
leur de brcmes," or three-card- 
trick sharper. 

Accroapi, les doicis tnpotant troii cartel 
au ras du tol, le pit en I'air, Ic* yeux (Un- 
xanU, un \-oyou en chapeau melon RUpii 
son boniment d'une voix i la fots tralnante 
et volubilc : . . . . Cc^l uiui qui perdt. 
Tant pire. mon p'tit ptre ! Kiuiif, Ic tuo' 
qnier I Cncve un tour, moo amour. V'lil 
le coeur, cochon de bonheur t l.""eM pour 
fintr. Mon fond, qui «c fond. Trifle qui 
ngnc CajTua, c'eU le bagnc. Oxur, 
da bcurre, pour Ic voyeur, rrifie, c'est 
Ubac ! Tabac pour p<ipa- Qui qu'ea 
veuif Un pcu, raon ncveu • I^ ir'li. I..C 
trifle gatpic ! (..e cqeiir pcid. Le au- 
reau pcrd. Voyc* la dan«e ! Ca recom- 
mence. Je le metfi lli. II ci»t ici, mnri. 
Vou« all«-j bient Mo) aii»i. Elli; pa>ue. 
Clle depa&M. C'cst mot qui tr^paise. 
hcbut ! . . . Reeardei bien t Ccm le coup 
de chien Pasi^ ' C'»t aMe* I Enfonrf! 
II y ■ viiigt-ctnquc francs au jcu ! &.C. 

Bonique, m. (thieves'), white-haired 
old mam. 



Bonir — Bordelier. 



45 



Bonir (ihieves*). to talk ; to my, ** to 
patter ;" — au ratichon, to coh- 
jiru to a priest. 

Lc danlAtit nfr^utl.iit vei lombes, 
Luhre iJ buDi&vtil ftux (i^onJ-u, 
Vou4 gnJ^Ir/ cooime un Kuichemard. 
Kkhlpiih, Ckans-Mt dti CMtujt. 

Boni&seur, m., one who makes a 

* • ItunimenC ** (which see) ; (thieves') 
bitrrisler ; — de la bate, witneu 

Jar the defenee, 

Bon jour m. (thieves'), voleur au — , 
bonjourter, or chevalier griinpaiit. 
thitj who, at an early kour^ enters 
a k^Mse or hpttl, walks into a 
rMm, and appropriates any suit' 
dWr artitle. If the person in bed 
wakes up, the rogue politely 
ft{K3|ogi&e% for his ptcicnded error. 
Other thieves of the same descrip- 
tion commence operations at din- 
ncr-lintc. They enter a dining- 
room, and seize the silver plate 
laid out on the table. This is 
called "goupiner & la dcsscrtc." 

Bon motif, m. (familar). Faire la 
cour a une fille pour Ic — , to 
make iai-e to a girlwith honourable 
intentions. 

Bonne, adj. (familiar), amusing; or 
tki reverse. EUe est bien — , what 

• good joke ! what a Joke I EUc est 
— , ceUc-14 ! aW/, it is too bad ! 
wkainrxtf (I'opular) Etrcaia— , 
U U loved. Etre de \a. —, to he 
Imky, Avoir i la — , /o liki. 
Bonoe fortanche, Jemale lootk- 
stsyer; — grace, doth used by 
iaUors as wrappers. 

Bonnet, m., socrti covenant among 
frinttrs. 

Ecpic* de ligue offeiuivc et d^fetiklve 
^a< lonDeni uuelquc* compokiteurs cdd- 
pltfjr^ d«puil luoificinpt ddU4 Line maiujn 
M 1|IU one lous, pour Auui difc U ictc «qu» 
fa mtee boBOCt. Ricn de motns frAlcn)<l 
q«c fa bconcc 11 fall U pluic et Ic beau 
doa* ua atelier, diunbuc la nuct 



en p«Ke ^ 1e* iravaui !«« plun avantaceux 
& ceux qui en font putie. — £.. BoUTMV, 
A rgvt ttrt Tjptfgraphtt. 

(Thieves') —carr^,/iw^, or"cove 
with the jazey ; " — vert & jjcr- 
pile, om sfHtaued to penai ieni- 
tudejor HJe^ or " lifer ;" (popular) 

— de coton, lumbering, weak man^ 
or " sappy ; " mean man^ or 
"scurf; — de nuit sans coifTe, 
man of a melanchoiy disposition^ 
or '* croaker ;" — d'cv^«^uc, rump 
of a fowly or '* parson s nose. " 
(Familiar) Bonnet, xntaU iitx at 
theatres ; — jaunc, twentyjranc 
coin ; (militar>) — de |HjIice, 
recruit^ or '* Johnny raw." 

Bonneteau, w., jeu dc — , card- 
sharping game ; three^ard tricM, 

Bonncteur, jw., card-sharper^ or 

*' broadsman." 

Bonnichon, m. (popular), working 
girl's tap. 

Bono (popular), good, middling. 

Bona, m. (military), lasonneriedes 

— de tabac, (iionical) trumpet 
call for those conjined to barracks. 

Borde (cocoltcs*), ftre — , to have 
renouHced the pleasttres of laie, 
"sua jponte," or otherwise, Litc- 
nUly to be lying in bed with the 
bed clothes tucked in. 

Bordie, /. (familiar and popular), 
unliKU'pil abseme. Tircr une — , 
to absent oneself for some amuse- 
ment of a questionable character ; 
togo^'ou the booze." 

Im paie de (rande quinuine emplUuit 
fa troCtoJr d'onc botucuUdc dc guuapeun 
dnuat UM bonl^.— Zvla. 

Bordee de coups de poingx, rapid 
delivery ofbiows^ or " fibbing. 

Bordel, m. {\to^\x\^T),smailfaggoi ; 
tools ; — ambulant, hackney cocuh. 

Bordelier(popuIar}./iAr/inr, "mol- 
rower," or "mutton-monger." 



4« 



Borg9ie — BoucJier. 



Borgnc, m. (caHb'), hreech, or 
*' blind check;" a^e 0/ canis ; 

— de cceur, au of HiortSy " pig's 
eye." 

Borgner (cads*), to look, 

Bor^iat (popular), ont'tytd man, 
*• boss-cycd." 

Borne devieux oint,/ (popular), 
bladder of lard. 

Bo& (Brelon)i weH ; weii dotul 

Boftco, boscot, boacotte, stunted 
man or woman ; hi*nt:hha<k, 

Bo8«e,y; (ramiliar)t txcenive eating 
and drinking I excess of any kind, 
Se doniier, sc flanqner une — , to 
get a goodjillt " a tightener." Se 
Taire des bijsses, to nmustr oneself 
amaiingly. Sedonner, sertanquer 
une — de rirc, to sflit with 
laughter. RouIcT sa — , to ^ 
alon^. Tonibcr sur la — , to 
attack, to *' pilch into." 

BosseUrd, m. (ratnUiaf), silk hat, 
*'nle.'* 

Bosser (popular), to laugh ; to 
armue oneself 

Bossmar, »/. {thicvci'], hunehdack, 
••lord." 

Bossoirs, m. pi. (sailors'), bosoms. 
Gabaril sans — , thin breasts. 

Botte, f. (popular), dc neuf jours, 
or en gatte, boot out at the sole. 
Tours, literally days, thinks. Du 
JUS de — , kieks. (Sailors') Jus dc 

— premier brin, mm of the first 
quality. 

Hotter (popular), to suit. Ca me 
boUc, that fust suits me, fust the 
thing for me. Rotlcr, to kitk one's 
briAh, or ** to toe one's bum," 
•* to root," or " to land a kick. " 

Bottler (popular), m/ vho u fond 
of kicking. 



Bouant.m. (cads*),/;i;',or*'angcL" 
From boue, mu*i. 

Boubane,/ (thieves'), wig, *' peri- 
winkle. " 

Boubouar (Breton), ox; tattle in 
general. 

Boubouerien (Breton), threshing 

maihine, 

Boubouille (popular), bad cookery, 

Bouc, m. (popular), husband whose 
wife is unfaithfui to him^ % 
"cuckold."' Properly he-goal; 
(familiar)^j;-(/ff« chin, "goatee." 

Boucan, to., great uproar, 

"shindy." 

J'ai nu troupe, je dbtribiie les rAles, 
J'oq^nKeiaclaijtie. . . . J 'tfiablis la conire* 
pATtic pour les lateiTuptiotu et le buucan. 
— MACft. 

(Popular) Donncr un — it quel- 
qu'un, to give a blow or '* clout " 
to one. 

Boucanade, / (thieves'), bribing 
or " grea-sing " a witness. Coquer 
la — , to bribe. Literally to treat 
to drink. In Spain wine is in- 
cloMrd in guatjtkins, hence the 
expression. 

Boucaner (popular), to make a 
great uproar ; to stink. 

Boucaneur, m. (popular), one fond 
of women, who goes '* molrow- 
ing," or a '* mutlon-mongcr." 

Boucaniire, / (popular), woman 
too fond of men. 

Boucard, m. (thieves'), shop, 
"chovey." 

Boucardier. m, (thieves'), thief 
who breaks into shops. 

Bouche-roeil, m. (prostitutes*), a 
five, ten, or twenty'fram piece. 

Boucher (thieves'), j«r^i'o«r, "nim- 
gimmcr ; " (familiar) — un trou, to 
pay part of debt ; (popular) — 
la lumiere, to gn-e a kick tn the 



Bouc/u-trou — Bou^re. 



47 



W 



i 



hrttfk^ "to hoof one's bum," or 
**lo land a kick." Lumi^, 
properly tou^h-hglt, 

Bouche-trou» m. The best scho- 
lars in aJl Univenily cotleges are 
ijlownl to compete at a yearly 
examination called *' grand con- 
cours." The '* boache-trou " is 
one who acts aa a substitute for 
anyone who for some reason or 
other find* himself prevented 
from competing. (Literary) Litt- 
rmry pr^uttion used as a make- 
sht/i ; (theatrical) acter whose 
fvmttfCHi art t9 Oft at a sul'sti- 
ttttt *n a cast of emrr^m^y. 

Bouchort, m. (thieves'), furse, 
•• skill," or **poge ;'* (popular) a 
ji>0mn{^r brother ; botiie of wing 
xpiih a u.<axeilcork ; quality^ kind, 
"k^lney." Etrcd'un bon — . /« 
he an amusing^ good-humoured 
yfaWflflr, or a ** brick." S'asseoir 
fiur le — , tosii on the bare ground. 

Bouclape, m. (thieves'), handtuffs^ 
or '* biacelcts;" bonds ; imprison- 
ment* 

Boueli (thieves')) imfrUonedt or 
••slowed." 

Boucler (tbievcsO, *• t^nt* "to 
dob;" to imprison. Boudex la 
lourde 1 shut the door! 

Boode xoxc, am. (thieves*), broken 
bread. 

Bouder (literally to be ruJty) ii 
said of a pttiyer who does not ioll 
for fresh demtnoa when he has 
ik^ eptian of dmng S6 ; (popular) 
— a rouvrage, to be lazy ; — au 
feu,/tf ihtnufear ; — aux dominos, 
Xp be minus setxral teeth, 

Boudin, m. (thieves*), boit ; 
stsmack. 

Bonding, m. (familiar), nc///, or 
••mashcf," At the time the ex- 
pre^iion came into use. dandies 
sported tight or horsey-looking 
clothes^ which imparted to lite 



wearer some vague resemblance 
with a boudin, or tar^ saus<jgr. 
For list of synonymous expres- 
sions, see Gommeux. 

BoudinB, m. //. (popular), /;/ 
fingers and hands, 

Boueux, m (popular), scavenge r. 

Bouffard. m, (popular), smoker. 

BoufTarde, / (popular), ///«■, or 
"cutty." 

BoufTarder (popular), to smoke, 
to •* blow a cloud." 

BoufTardi6re, / (popular), an 
estaminety that is, a cn/f where 
smoking is alloUKd ; chimney. 

Bouffe,/ (popular), boxon theear, 
" buckhorsc.*' 

Bouffeda-BAlle, m,^ gormanditer^ 
or '* stodger ; " man with a fat^ 
Puffed'itp^ dumpiirtg face. 

Boufler (military), la botte, to be 
bambootied by a wjmin, in what 
circumstances it is needless to say. 
(Popular) Bouffer, to cat. Se — 
le nci, to fight. 

BoufiTcter (popular), to chat. 

BoufTeur, m. (popular), de blanc, 
prostitute's bully, " (pensioner ; *' 

— dc kilom^trt:s, a nickname 
for the *' Chasseurs de I'in- 

ccnnes," a picked body of rijiet 
who do duty as skirmi'hers and 
scouts, attd who are noted for their 
agility, 

BouSFiasse, m. (popular), man with 

faff puffcd'up cheeks. 
Bougie,/, (popular), u^ai king-stick; 

a blind man's stick; — grasse, 

caud/c. 

Bougre, m. (popular), stalwarf and 
plucky man, one who is " spry ; " 

— k poils, daunt/est, resolute man. 
Bon — , a goodfello^v, a *' brick.'* 
Mauvais — , man of a snarling, 
evil-minded disposition. The word 



48 



Bougrement — Boaiendos, 



is used often with a disparaging 
sense, Bougre de cochon, you 
dirty pig; — de serin, v«# ass. 
Littre derives the word bougre 
from Bulgarus, Bulgarian, 'Hie 
heretic Albigeois, who shared the 
religious ideas of some of the Bul- 
garians, received the name of 
*'bougres." 
Bougrement (popular), txtremely. 
C'est — difficile, it is awfully 
hard. 

Boui, m, (popular), home of ill- 

foftte, *' nanny-shop." 
Bouiboui, bouisbouis, m. puppet; 

small theatre; law music-hatl ; 

ga mbling place. 

Bouif, m. (popular), conceited 
"priffiish" person; bad work' 
man. 

Bouillabaisse (popular), confused 
medley of things, people^ or ideas. 
Properly a Provencal dish made 
up of all kinds of fish boiled toge- 
ther , with spicy seasonings garlic, 

Bouillante,/ (soldiers'), sotip. 

Bouillie, / (popular), pour let 
chats, unsuccessful undertaking. 
Faire de la — pour les chats, 
to do any useless thing. 

Bouillon, m. (familiar and popu- 
lar), rain ; unsold numbers of a 
book or newspaper; financial or 
business losses ; — aveugle, thin 
broth ; — de canard, water ; — de 
veau, mild literature ; — d*onze 
heures, poison; drowning; — 
gras, sulphuric acid (an allusion 
to a case of vitriol •throwing by a 
woman named Gras) ; — pointu, 
bayonet thrust ; clyster; — qui 
chaufle, rain*cloud. Boire le — , 
to die. (Fishermens*) Bouillon 
de harengs, shoal of herrings. 

BouiUonner (popular), to suffer 
pecuniary losses consequent on the 



failure of an undertaking ; to have 
a bad sale ; to eat at a bouillon 
restaurant. 

Bouillonneuse, /, female who 
prepares bouillon at restaurants. 

Bouillote, / (popular), vieille — , 
old fool, "doddering old sheep*s 
head." 

Bonis, m. (thieves*), whip. 

Bouiser, to whip, "to flush." 

Boulage, m. (popular), refusal; 
snub. 

Boulange,/, for boulangerie. 

Boulanger, m. (thieves'), charcoal 
dealer; the devil, '*old scratch," 
or "Ruflfin." Le — qui met les 
damnes au four, the devil. Remer- 
cier son — , to die. 

Boulangers, m. pi. (military), 
formerly military conviits (an 
allusion to their light*coloured 
vestments). 

Boule,/. (popular), head, " block." 
Avoir la — detraquee, k I'envers, 
to be craxy, " wrong in the upper 
storey." Boule de jardin, bald 
pate, "bladder of lard;" — de 
Siam, grotesque head; — de singe, 
ugly face. Bonne — , queer face, 
*' rum phiz." Perdre la — , to lose 
one*s head. Boule de neige, negro ; 
— rouge, ^y girl of the Qitar- 
lier de la Boule Houge, Faubourg 
MoeUmartre. Yeux en — de loto, 
^^e eyes. (Military) Boule de 
son, loaf bread. (Thieves') Boule, 
a fair; prison loaf ; — de son 
^tame, white brei^; — jaune, 
pumpkin. 

Bouleau, m. See Bilcherie. 

Boule-Miche, m., abbreviation of 
Boulevard Saint-Michel. 

BoulendoB, m. (boule en dos), 
(popular), ^f^/ff/AiK-^, or "lord." 




Bouler — Bourbon. 



49 



I 

i 



Bouler (popular), to thraxh^ "to 
whop ;'* to dffit at a ji^tntf, to de- 
rtnv, to takt in. Envoyer — , to 
lentf to the deuce (old word 
houlcr, to roll alort^), 

Boulet, m. (popular), l*ort ; — a 
cxAt%, 4 queue, melon ; — jaunc, 
fumfkm, 

Boalette, /. (pnpular), de poiv- 
rot» huHfk of gra^s (poivrol, 
slang term Tor druHiard), 

oaleur, m., bouleuse, / (ihea- 
tncal), a*t0r or actress tvho talis 
the f^rt of absetiiees in the per- 
/(fttuan^e. 

Bouleuz, m. (popular), skittle 
flayer. 

oulevarder, to be a frequenter of 
lK{ Boidn'ards, 

oulevardier, m., one tcho /re- 
pien/s the B>>«levards ; joumalut 
IbIv •> afrtquenter of the fioule- 
ttnd cafe's. Esprit — , tt'ttd of 
vH pemltar to the Boulevardiers. 

Boulevardiire, / (familiar), /rw- 
titutt of a better class who jval/ts 
tJke Bouiefards. 

ttop-.i- ^ -t du «oir la Boutevar- 

4kf« ^ • icl \ Br^baat avcc la 

n^ul*r,' v dun taJaocier dc 

|W>dolC.— t'A' L .NiAIIALIN. 

Bonlin, m. (thieves'), ki^e. Caler 
del bouliiu aux lonrdesi Ui bcre 
m the doors. 



BooUne,/. {sv'miWcri'), co/lectton of 
"break." or "lead." 



Bouliner (thieves'), to bore Ao/es in a 
Bwrj'/ or s'Uitters ; to steal by means 
ef ike .itfffe process. 

toultnE^er (thieves*)i l^ '''«'■ / 
/# eonJuet an affair ; to manaty. 
.Se — , tt> kntnf hofic to conduct 
oneself ; to behave. 
Boaloire, / (popular), bent/lin^- 
gretn. 



Boulon, m. (thieves'), vol au ^, 
theft by means of a rod and hook 
passed through a hole iu the 
shutters. 

Boulonnaise (popular), ^V/ of in* 
different character who xiurlhs the 
Bois de Boulogne. 

Boulots, m. (popular), round 
jha/\:i beans. 

Boulotter (thicveV), to assist a foni- 
rude : (popular) to be in tyoti 
health ; to be prosperous ; to eot, 
"to grub;" — dc la galcitc, to 
sfftul money. 

El tout k monde m dixpcrM. vivemen!, 
excepttf let- irpis omptre* et Ic tnOnae, qui 
rcntreiit (i'lin i>ac trnnfiuille Aaxw ParU, 
pour y fricolcr rargcnl de^ imbeciles, y 
Doutoticr la B^eltsdcftsinvcs.— KlCHtPiN, 

Eh I bien, ma vieille bmnche \ 
comment va la place irarmeft ? 
Merci, 9a boulottc. Well, old cock , 
hmv are you ? Thanks, I am all 
rishf. 

Boum ! a high-sounding, nngittg 
word bawled out in a graz-e key by 
caf^ ivititers in order to emphasize 
their call for coffee to the attendant 
whose special duty it is to pour it 
out. Vcrsez d I'as I Bourn ! 
This peculiar call wns brought 
into fashion by a waiter nf the 
Cafe de la Rotonde at the I'abi); 
Royal , whose stentorian voice 
made the fortune of the establish- 
ment. 

Bouquet, m. {cad&')t giftt present. 

Bouquine, /, Ivard grown on tht 
chtMy or '•goatee." 

Bourbc,/ (piipuIar),/A/ hospitalef 
*'i,t Maternit^:' 

Bourbon (popular), nose, '*boko.*' 
From net k la Hourbon, the 
members of that dynasty being 
distinguished by prominent thick 
noses verging on the aquiline. 



50 



Bourdon — Bourrt-coquins, 



Bourdon, m. (thieves'), pjvstifufe^ 
" burner ;" {printcre*) wrds left 
out by mistake in composing. 

Bourdonniste, m, (printers'), one 
in the habit of making bourdons 
(which sec). 

Bourgeois, m. (thieves*), forbourg, 
a large village. Lilrrally man of 
the middle class. The peasants 
give this appellation to (he Inwns* 
people; acoachman tohi5**fare;" 
workmen and servants to their 
employer ; workpeople to the 
master of a house; snldiers to 
civilians ; artists and literary men 
use it contemptuously to denote a 
man with matter-of-fact, unartistic 
tastes, aliK) a man oulsiJe their 
profession ; the anarchists apply 
the epithet to one who duc» not 
share their views, (Popular) Mon 
— , my husband, '*ray old man," 
Ehl dites done, — , / sny, gover- 
nor. (Oflficers'} Se tnet»re en — , 
to dress in plain clothes, in 
"mufti." (Familiar) C'est bicn 
— , iV is vtt/gar^ defoid of taste. 

Bourgeoisade, /, anything, whe- 
ther it be deed or thought^ which 
sat'otirs of the bourgeois^ ways ; a 
z'nlgar plfttitnde. The bourgeois, 
in the di>paraging ftcn&e of the 
tenn of course, is a man of a 
singul&rly malter-of-fact, .setlish 
disposition, and one incapable of 
being moved by higher motives 
than those of personal interest, 
ills doings, his mode of life, all 
his surroundings bear the stamp 
of mn unrefine<1 idiosyncrasy. 
Though s staunch Conservative 
at heart, he is fond of indulging 
in a timid, mild opposition to 
Government, yet he even goes so 
far sometimes as to send to Par- 
liament men whose views are at 
variance with his own, merely to 
^ivehimselfihepleasureof 'Meach- 
mga lesson" to the "powers that 



be." A roan of Voltairian ten- 
dencies, yet he allows his wife and 
daughters to approach the perilous 
secrecy and the allurements of the 
confessional When he liapj«m 
to be a Republican, he rants 
furiously about equalitv* yet he 
protests that it is a shocking stale 
of affairs which permits of his 
only son and spoilt child being 
made to serve m the ranks l)y 
the side of the workman or clod- 
hopper. By no means a fire- 
cater, he is withal a bloorlihirsty 
mortal and a loud-tongued Chau- 
vinist, but as he has the greatest 
respect for the integrity of his 
person, and entertains a perfect 
norror of blows, he likes to see 
others carry out for him his pug- 
nacious aspirations in a practical 
way. 

Bourgeoise,/. (popular), the mis- 
tras of a house or establishment. 
Ma — , my wife, "my old 
woman." 

Bourgeron, m, (popular), small 
glass of brandy; (soldiers') a 
civilian. Properly a kind of short 
smock frock. 

Bourguignon (popular), the sun. 

Bourlingue, m. (iwpular)), dis- 
missal ^ '• the sack." 

Bourlinguer, to dismiss; to gel 
OH with difficulty in life. From a 
naval term. 

Bourlingueur, m. (popular), moj/rr, 

" l>oss ; " foreman, 

Bourrasque, /. (thieves'), raid by 
the police. 

Bourreau des crAnes, m. (mili- 
tary), bully^ fire-eater. 

BouTTC-boyaux, w. (popular), tat* 

itig-house^ "gnihbing crib." 

Bourre-coquins, w. //. (popular), 
beans. iJeans form the staple 
food of convicts. 



Bourre-de-soU — Bout 



51 



Bourre-deBo*e, f, (cads'), kfpt 
^rl, "polL" 

Bourr^ e . / (popular), hustling^ 
*' hunch." 

Bourrcr (fa,miHar), en — une, to 
imake a ptpiy *' to blow a cloud. " 

Bourreur, m. (thieves*), de 
pegr«, /ma/ caih ; (printers') — 
oc lignes, ^ompesH&r ef the bcty 
farf of a (^ompojitioH, a task 
generally eninisted lo unskilled 
€ompo»ilors unable to deal with 
more itiiricaie work. 

Bouniche, /. (popular), Mockhfaii^ 
" cabbage - head. " Properly 

Bourrichon. m. (popular), hcati. 
See Tronche. Se monter, or se 
charpenterlc — , ta^ttn-tain itnm^ 
iUuit^m, to be too sangume. 

Bottfricot I popular), c'est — , that 
i9*Mts to (h( itim4 thing; it is ail 
tht iomc to me, 

Bourrier, m. (popular), *//W, tfung. 

Bourrique, /. (popular), toumcr 
en — , te hiorm stufnJ^ or erozy. 
fain toumcr quclqu'un en — , to 
malu 0Ht rrasy by dint of boi/ger- 
dng #r twgering. Get enfant est 
toujour: a me tourmcnier, tl me 
fera toun»er en — , this u,tughty 
tkilduHH drive me mad. (Thieves 1 
BuOfiKjuc, informer^ "nark;'' 
also pdae officer. 

Bourriquc k Robespierre (popu- 
lar), cnrnmc la — , corresponds 
10 the iiiintle like blazes, Saoul 
corame la — , aivfutly drunk. 

Botirter (^>opnlar), se — x to go to 
bed, to get into the ** doss." 

BQOTSicoter (familiar), to speculate 
in a smitdl uvty on the st<xks. 

Boarsicoteur,/.. boursicotier, m. 

(familiar), specutator in a small 
may. 



Boursicoti6risme, m. (familiar), 
occupation of those who spectttate 
OH * Change. 

Boursillonner (popular), /o "club" 
for expenses by each contributing a 

small sum. 

Bouscaille,/. (thieves'), mud. 

Bouscailleur, street 'rwerper, sea- 
fcnger. 

Bouse, / [popular], de vacbe, 
spinach, 

Bousillar (popular), to work rapidly 
but carelessly and clumsily, 

BousiUeur (popular), careless^ 
clumsy workman, 

Bousilleuse (popular), tiv/nan who 
is careless of her belongings ^ who is 
the rrverse of thrifty, 

Bouain, m. (popular), upnnir^ dis- 
turbanccy rrw, "shindy;" driuk- 
ing-shop, '* luih-crib ; " house of 
il/famct '* flash drum." 

Bousineur (popular), an adept at 
creating a disturbance. 

Bousingot, m. (popular) wine-shop, 
•• lush - crib ; Republican or 
literary Hohemian in the earlier 
years of Lottis Philippe. 

Bous«ole,/.(faniiIiar), heeuiy brains, 
Perdre la — , to lose one's heati, 
"to be at sea ; " to become mad, 
(Popular) Boussole de refroidi, o*- 
de sinye, a Dutch cheese. 

Boustifaille, / (familiar), pro- 
viiioHs^food, "grub." 

Bouslifailler, to dit plentifully. 

Bout, m, (tailors'), flanqner son — , 
to dismiss from one's employment. 
(Military) Bout dc cijjare, short 
man; (jwoular) — de cul, shortper* 
son, or " forty foot ;" — d'bomme, 
de femmei undersized person, or 



52 



Boutanche — Brancard. 



*'hopo* my thumb;'* — coup<?, 
kind of (heap a'^r 'anih a dipp<d 
end. 

Boutanche, / (thieve**), shep^ 
" chovey." Courtaud de — , shoP' 
marit a " knight of the yard.*' 

Bouteille, / (popular), nart, 
"boko." Avoir un coup de — ,to 
^f tipsy. C'e&ila — kVcnctciisaid 
0/ any Mysterious^ incofHprehen- 
sibU affair. (Printers') Unc — i 
encre, a printing ntahlishmmt ^ 
thus <atUd on account oft/u diffi- 
culty of drawing up accurate ac- 
counts ef author^ eorrectionj. 

Bouteme,/ (popular), ^uu-ir/ roj^ 
containin^Jewels exhibited as trites 
for the itnnners at a ^me of dice. 
The {fame u played at fairs with 
eight dice, loaded of coarse. 

Boutemier, m., bouterni^re, /. 

proprietor of a l^utcme (which 
see). 

Boutiqae, /, used disparagin^y to 
denoleone s employer's office; news- 
p^per offices ; disorderly house of 
business ; clique. Esprit de — , 
synonymous of esf^t de corpSy but 
used disparagingly. Eire dc la — , 
to he one of to belong to a political 
cliifite or adminixtration of any 
description, Montrer loutc sa — , 
rV said of a girl or woman "who 
accidentally or otherwise exposes 
her person. Paclcr — , to talk 
shop. 

Boutiquer (popular), /l^i/t? anything 
with rc/MC/iinie ; /•» do it badly^ 

Boutiquier, m. (familiar}, narroui- 
min-fed or mean man. Literally 
shopkeeper. 

Boutogue, / (thieves*), shop^ or 
•'cliovcy.*' 

Bouton, /«. (thieves'), master key ; 
{[KipMlar) twenty 'franc piece; — dc 
guilK^fve-francgolJ-piece ; — de 
pieu, bugt or ** German duck." 



Boutonner (familiar), to touch with 
the foil ; to aiiHoy^ to hore. 

Bouture, f. (popular), de putain, 
low, insulting epithet, which may 
be rendered by the equally low 
one, son of a bitch. Bouture, slip 
of a plant. 

Boxon, m. (poptilar), brothel, or 
"nanny-shop. 

Boyau, m. (popnUr), rouge, hard 
drinker, or " rare lapper. ' 

Boye, m, (thieves'), wanier, or 
"Woke:'* convict who performs 
the functions of executioner at the 
convict settlements of Cayenne or 
Neiu Caledonia. 

Brae, m. (thieves'), name, "mon- 
niker," or " monarch." 

Braconner (gamesters'), to cheat, 
or 'Mo l>ilc. ' Properly to poach. 

Brader (popular), to sell articla 
dirt cheap. 

Braillande, braillarde,/ (thieves')^ 
draioers. From the old word 
braies, breeches. 

Braillard, /w. (popular), //r^z/jm.C**', 
or " street pitcher," According 
to \\ic Slang Dictionary y the latter 
term applies to negro minstrels, 
ballad -singers, long-song mcn^ 
men " working a board " on which 
has been painted ^'arious exciting 
scenes in some terrible drama, &.C. 

Braise, / (popular), money, 
"loavcr.*^ See Quibus. 

f'ai pu d'bniUe pour me fend' rl'ua Viut, 
aj tnf me d'u& meultf cau' & cinq, 

KiCHSflN. 

Braiser (popular), to pay, " to 

dub." 

Braiseur (popular), man who is 
very free with his money. 

Brancard (popular), superannnnted 
gay tivman. 



Brancards — BricoU, 



53 



Brancards, m. //. (popular), hantU^ 
or *• dappers ;" Ugi, or "pins; " 
— dc laine, UKak or tamt iegi. 

Vn po»eur qui rcot me la fnire \ la re- 
drew*, que ct% deux f1dte« n^kdMv* par 
*vu*daD»1a Lanc«ilu puii»n'«v«icnt jamai* 
paiti unc feniDie, je me CDonais ca brau* 
c^rcl« dc damn, c'eii pai fa du touL — 
^1 *c4, .Voth Fremur Crime. 

Branche, / (popalar), friemi^ 
** male." Ma vieille — , vld fel* 
few! '*old cock I" (Familiar) 
Avoir de la — , to have tU^aiu^^ 
"da*h." 

Brancher (thieves* and catU'), to 
tV'<;T. " to perch," nr "roost." 

Brandillante, brandiUeuse, / 

(thieve**), btiif or " ringer." 

Branlante. / (popalar), ittafth^ or 
"ticker." 

Branlantes, /. //. (popular), »ld 

runt I unk, 

Branque, m, (thieves'), donkey^ 

•' niuWe.** 

Bras, brasse, adj. (ihtcvcs*), lar^. 
Kroiii bt3!»e, a fathom. 

Bnter (thieves'), des faflfcs. U 
/lf."<hs9tnt<nts^ Id "screcve fakc- 
;" ti» forge iHiuJc'Hetft, or to 
; i^uccr-sufl." 

Brasset. m. (thieves'), hig^ stout 

Brave, m. (popular), shoemaker^ or 
*• *nnb.** 

Brtchet. m. (popular), stoinach, 

Brechctetles, /. , a kind of German 
iokij M//TI at bcershtfps. 

Breda>strcet, the quarttr of Notrt' 
O^mede-Loreite patronized by 
tt V men vf the dftn i • niande (the Par i $ 
Timlico, or St. John's Wood). 

Bredoche,/ (popular), centimt. 

Brcdouille, / (popular), chevalier 
•1c la — t ^^ whogoit out shooting 



on Sr/ndiiys in the pur/ieus oj 
Pan's. From reveuir brcdouille, 
to return with an empty insg. 

Breloque, / (popular), a dock. 
Properly loatch trinket. 

Br&me, m. and f. (popular), vendor 
of iountermarhs at the do(>r of thea- 
tres. Unc — ,yl (rhievei'), //tfy/n^ 
^a?'i/,*'flai,"or"broad"(bremeisa 
flat lishjM^Armw/). Une — depac- 
quelins, geoi^aphital map. Ma- 
quiller les brtines, to haniiU cards, 
to piay at eards, " to fake btoads;" 
to mark cards in certain itrayi^ to 
con struct them on a cheating prin* 
iipU, *' lo stuck briefs." Maquil- 
leur de hriroes, card-shnrper^ or 
" broadsman," generally one 
whose spkicsliii is the thret'Card 
triek. 

Le perdaot, bt^c, crUpe ses pmne«. Let 
compares t'approchcnt au mot^uUlcur de 
bftnieti (tripoteur de carlct), qui a'cftt r«- 
Icrd, avec UD dclair Inauvai^ dan* *ck yeux 
tcrncs ... il »e recule el tiffie. A ce 
>ii;nal arrive un go*.**, ca conrant, qui crie 
d'unc vui.i alj^uc : Pet I v*Uk la ruuiae ! 
U^canillonii t—KlcuBriN, Lt Fmvi. 

(Prostitutes') Une brtinc, ca/T/rfr- 
livcred by the police to registered 
prostitutes, FiUeen — » registered 
prostitute, 

Br«meur, «. ((hicvcV), card player, 
** broad faker." 

Br^mier, m. (thieves'), ntanufcw 
lurer of playing cards. 

Br^silien, w. (popular), xoeallhy^ 
generous man, *' rag-splawger." 

Bricabracologie, art of dealing im 
or collecting brie-tt-brac or knich- 
inoiks. 

Bricard, m. (popular), staircase. 

Bricbeton, m. (popular), bread; 
— d'atlaque,/>«/*-/(J««t//t'<j/. 

Bricole, f. (popular), small, odd 
jobs thai only procure scanty pro* 



54 



Bricohr — Brindczin^ue, 



Jits, Vro^xiy a shoiifder-shap used 
bv costentutngrrs to drtttv their 

iHirrows, 

Bricoler (popular), to fnalx an 
e^ort ; to giz'f a j^wd /«// / to do 
anythiHg in a hurried and clumsy 
moHntr ; to carry on somt iiffair 
in a not over straightforvmra way. 

Bricoteur. m. (popular), man who 
•.i'ili undertakt any kind of wcrk^ 
any mndryjohs. 

Bricul, bricul*, w. (thieves*), /WlrV^ 

inspat^r, 

Bridaukil (thicTes*), gold loatch 
chain, ** redgc sUng," or "red 
tackle.** 

Bride, f. (thieves'), n^/ch chain, 
•Slang ; " convict's chain. { Popu- 
lar) Vieillc — , xvorthtesst dis- 
carded object ; term of conUmpt for 
individuals. 

Bridi (thieves*), shackled. 

Brider (thieves*), to shut, "to 
dub;" to fasten on a fetter^ or 
'*wife." 

Brif (Breton), bread. 

Briffe. / (jwpular), /«»./, "belly 
timber ;" breatty **totumy.'* Pas- 
ser k — , to eat, *' to grub.'* 

N'iniporteod nouA nout cmpatons 
D*MTlcquin>, tl'bnfTe ct O'roKBtont. 
KlCHEi-lM, L'h^tiuaH dtM Gtuux. 

Briffer (popular), to eat, " to grub." 

Brigadier, m. (popular), taker's 
Joreman. 

Brigand, m. (i^opular), tertn of 
friendliness^ Vicux — , you old 
Stamp i 

Brigant, brigeant, m. (thieves'), 
hair^ or "strommcl." 

Brigante or bringeante, f. 

(thieves'), Ti'/>, or " periwinkle. 

Brigcjnts or bringeante. m. pi. 

(thieves'), Aa/r, "thatch." Ternie<i 
also " tifs, douilles, douillaids." 



Brigeton , brichcton (popular), 
bread, '* tommy." 

Brig-fourre, m. (military), briga- 
dtcr fourrier. 

Brignolet, m. (popular), bread, 
" tommy." 

Brillcr (ihieves*), to hght. 

Brimade, ^ (military), cuphemisfn 
for bullying ; pv.ictical and often 
cruel jokes perpetrated at the mili' 
tary school of Saint- Cyr at the ex- 
pense of the new/y-jonied, termed 
"melons" ("snookers" at the 
R. ^f. Academy), such as to>s- 
intj one in a blanlici, lopethcr 
with boots, spui^ and )>rU!>heK, 
or lr>ing him by a mock court- 
martial for «ui)ie siippobcii oJTcnce. 
An illustration with a vengeance 
of such practical joking; iKcurrwl 
some years ago at an English 
garrison town. Some young 
officers packed up a colleague's 
traps, without leaving in the 
rooms a particle of properly, 
naile<l the boxes tn the noor, and 
laid a he-goat in the bed. On the 
victim's arrival Ihcy left him no 
lime to give vent to his indignant 
feelings, for they cast him into a 
6sherman*s net and dragged him 
downstairs, with ilie result thai 
the unfortunaie oiticer barely 
esca]>cd with his life. 

Brimer. to indulfft in brimades 
(which see). 

^/terinde, / (popular), tall, lanky 
womait ; landhrd of a ifine shop. 

• Brindezingue, tn. (thieves'), tin 
case if very smttll diameter eon- 
til ining i$nplements, such as a 
fine steel sa\u or a xoatch-spritig^ 
which they secrete in a peculiar 
wanner. Says Uclvau: — 

Comnteni arrivcnl-it» \ «>u>lr>ire eel in* 
«ntinen( flc d^.ivran(.c aux invcMigatiota 
Ikb ptuA minutieu-«» des ]iculien> *. Cut ea 



Brindezingues — Brodanchir. 



qu*n Taut ilcmuMier i M. )« docteur Am- 
WoM 'IahJicu qui a fait unc dtud^ sjMfciale 
d«« maMlMS d< b ga)ne naturvlle d« cct 

(Mmintcbanks*) Eire en — , to he 
rutHfJ, a bankrufty '* cracked 
up." or "eo"« *o smash." 

Brindezinguet, m. //. (pnpulnr), 
ctrc (lan5 Ics — , /tf ^^ inioxkateJ, 
f-'ruin an old word Itrindtr, (oast, 

Bringve. m. (nopubr), breads or 
'• M.»ft tunitiiy. ' Mettre en — , to 

Brio, luv. (ramiliar). Properly a mttsi- 
<At tttm. Figuratively, Parlcr, 
ecrire avcc — , to sptak or ivrite 
With ifirit, in Joshing style. 

Brioches,///. (popular). Literally 
jCrvsj uuitake. Figuratively, Faire 
OCA — , /» ieaii a ttisorJer/y life, 

Briolet, m, (pripnlar), Mm, tour 
3i*jM/, that is, ** vin dc Urie." 

Briquemann, bhquemon, m. 
fnitliiary), eerfalry srvorj. 

B iquemon, m, (ihicves')i titiJer 

Brisac, m. (popular), mrf/rss fhilH 

Mfh^ Hart his ihthes, 
Brmicqae, m. (jiopular), noise; 

M^isy man. 

^firisant, m, (thieves'), tfte wimi, 

firiscard or britque, m. (military), 
tfA/ soi'iirr loith Ung-serviec stripes. 

B.is*. / (<4iiIors'), i faire plier le 

pMUCC, VtoIrHt ^ 
ouilte. nvj/ winJ. 



faire pi 



grcn. 



Briser (printers'), to rense working. 
(I'opiilat) Sc la — , to go auHiy^ 
''to n.ialc.'' See Patatrot. 

Brtseu'. m. The "briseurs" (gens 
qui >e la brisent), accordini; to 
Vid'X'^, are natives of Auvcrgne 
who i>a-^* ihcmseWes offfor trades- 
men. They at first gain the con- 



fidence of manufacturers or whole- 
sale dealers by paying in cosh for 
a few in>tignificant ordei^, and 
swindle them afterwards on larger 
ones. The goods, denominated 
**brisees,** arc I hen sold much 
under value, and the unlawful 
proccedsare invested in Auvcrgne. 

Brisque, f. (thieves*), jvar, or 
"stretch. 

Brisques.///. (gambler**), M^ a« 
antl figures in a pack of tards, 
U hen a player possesses all these 
in his game he is said to have 'Ma 
triomphe ; " (military) stripes. 

Brisure, / (thieves*), sxvindU^ or 
'* plant ; " (printers') t^mtorary 
cessation of work. Grande ^, 
total stoppage of work, 
Au Rappel, la pige dure ux hcurcs avec 

une bribure d'une dcmi-heure 'x dix ticure*. 

Brobichej m. (popular), centime. 
Brobuante, /. (iliieves'), ring^ 
"fawney." 

Broc, m, (thieves*), farthings or 
*'fadKe.** 

Brocante, m. (popular), old shoe. 

Brocanter (familiar), to ke pottering 

ahimt. 
Broche,/ (tradespeoples*), note of 
htindf or " stiff.'* 

Broches, / pi. (popular), teetk, or 
*' head rails." 

Brochet, w/. (popular), pit of the 
stonuuh^ for brechet ; lo&meu's 
bully, or " ponce." 

Brocheton, m, (popular), yonng 
bully. 

Brochure, /. (theairical), printed 

pUy, 

Brodage, w. (thieves*), ^vriting. 

Brodanchcr (thieves'), to write; 
to emi'ft^fder. Tinints brodanches, 
embroidered stoctingi. 



56 



Brodancheur — Broutenr sombre. 



Brodancheur,w,(tlueves'),t('r/7^r; 
— en cnge, scribe toMo for a 
€onsidcr{}fioii 'tifiU vmitrtnkt tQ 
do an tiiiteraie fft-san's ci>rtr' 
spondenct (termed ecrivain pub- 
lic); — a In ptaqur.aux macaruns, 
or a la cymbale, notary puidic (an 
allusion to the escutcheon placed 
over a notarj-'s dour). 

Brodi, ;;/. (thieves'), vtrlon. 

Broder (thieve**), to write : — sur 
Ics pitts // said of a }^imtster icho^ 
fittz-iH^ knt (1 colU'ij^e a small 
ttt/» of money, t/aiws a hr-jfr 
ami}tint than is due to htm. 

Brodcrie,_/i (thieves'), writing. 

PiLK lie brtiHcrie, par cxvinptc, tu con- 
naik Ic pniverbe, le> ^crit.> uiiit des miln, 
rt Ic» jmxulo KiM dc» fcmcllc*.— Viuotfj, 

Brodeur,///.(th)cvcs'), writer; also 
a ^a wester who tlaitns a larger 
sunt than is due to him. 

Broque, m. (ihievcs'l. farthing. 
11 n y a in ruiicK, iii ticiplis, ni 
bri>quc en ma fclouse. I haven't 
got a sou, or a farthings in my 
fth-A-.t. 

Broquillase, m. (thieves'), theft 
whtiu tonststs in suhtituting paste 
diamonds for the genuine articie 
^vkhh a jnocUer aispiays jor the 
supposed pun hiisfr*s iiis/ectian, 

Broquille, / (theairical]. nothing. 
L'scil in the cxpressiun, Ne pas 
dire line — « not to know a siiigie 
Tiktn/ of otitis p>iit ; (ihieve^) 
a ringt or *' fawney ; '* a minute. 

Broquilleur, m., broquiUeuse. / 
(thieves*), thief who robs jetit Hers 
by substUnting paste diamonds for 
the gtrnuine •which are sho\t'n to 
him as to a iumA'fide purx'haser. 

Brosse (poimbr), no ; nothing; — 
[loui lui ! he thait't havcnnyf 



Bfosser (famiiiar), se — le venire, 
to go without food^and^ in afgura- 
tivf sensft to be compefled to do 
without something. 

Brosseur, m, (artists'*, one who 
paints numerous pictures of very 
targe dimensions. Rul>ens was a 
*' hro*iseur ; " (military) fiatterer^ 
one who ** sucks up." 

Brouce, / (popular), thrashing, 
" whopping." 

Brouf, m. (codA^hers*), icirtd bloW' 
ing from the main. 

Brouillard, m. (]^>opular), cha&ser 
Ic — , to have a morning drop of 
spirits^ '*dewdrop." Eire d«ns 
le — , to be •* fuddled," or tipsy. 
Fairc du — , to smohe, " lo blow 
a cloud." 

BrouiUe, /., series of pettifogging 
€ontrivan*es which a iawytr brings 
into piay lo squeeze as muck proft 
as he can out of a /aw affair. 

BrouilU, adf. (rniniliar), avcc la 
monnaic, /tViM//«j, "hard up;" 
— ftvcc )»a blanchi»eusc, 'oith 
linen not altogether of a snoti*- 
71'hite appeiirame ; — avcc I'urtho- 
graphe, a /-aJ speller. 

Broussailles, /. //. (popular), 
itre dans les — , to be tipsy, " ob- 
fnscaied." See Pompetle. 

BrouiB, m. (Snint-Cyi school), 
jpeeih. From the name of a pro* 
(ciisor who wxs a good ctocu* 
tionist. 

Broule, / (popular), breads 
" tommy." 

Brouter (popular), to eat, " to 
grub." The expression is used by 
Villon, and is scarcely slang. 
Item, .\ Jean Raiuycr, je dunne . . . 
Tons lea joun une lalemoure (t'<«i<-), 
Pdur brouier ei fourtcr ia iiiiMii«. 

Brouteur sombre, m, (popular), 
desptmding, melancholy man, 
*• crimkcr. " 



Broycur de noir en chambre — Bdcherie. 



57 



Broyeur de noir en chambre 

tfiMiilMrl, liternry man who 
wnui t>/f m<laM£ho/y !hcmej, 

Bruant (Breton), eock ; t^. 

Bruaniez (Bieton), hen. 

Bruge, m, (ihievcs"). ioclitniih. 

Bnigerie,^, locksmith^i sko^. 

Bn^lage. m. (fanitlinr), thf a^t of 
<Vi«^- milled^ " going lo soiasli.* 

Brtllant, w. (thieves*), /rr; Meertk, 

Brflle,w/.rt#i(/a<//. {popular). /ji7i/»r 
*y JM undertaking; (raniiliar) 11 
doii Je t'lirgcnt |>ar1out il e>t — 
. djiii \e pays, Jie mi'a truney lo 
r:rry/H»(r, his credil is ^ne. Ce5*t 
ILD arlicie — , an arttde which tiiU 
no lofi^tr sell. L'cpiciei est — , 
/ * t fuses any mat-e i redit. 

* icn — , a pjlitidan 

:. .j.i,:tutis ^ne. Un autcur 

— , an author who has spent him- 
sei/^ mo ton;ftr in tfo^ie. Unc fille 
hftXcK, a^iri who in spiteo/ajsidu- 
fus uttenduMte at fvi/is, ^c.^ has 
tied to of'ttiin a hushand, Unc 
_ kflaire brillec, an uniuaessful uH' 
'^'frtahing; or spoilt by bad mana^- 
mrift. C n acteur — , an aetorwho 
for some reason or other can mo 
ioHgrr Jind JavoHr with the publii, 

BrOl^^ /" ifirtpular), tetfere thrash- 
; hurried and ttnlaW' 
■ /lt eon/rat ts. 

BrQler rthealrical), k la mmpc 
»j j.iJJ c/ an actor teho performs 
«r tf he Kv/-t aJottf, and witkuut 
ri^ird to the (ommoH success of 
A'Vi ^'" ^" colleagues ; — du 
vazt to obtain applause. { Popu- 
'br) linil«r, abWcvialion of bruler 
Ift cervcllc, to tt/<nv one's brains 
omt. Faiii Ic raort ou jc te brulc, 
i/miV titd^t Iff / ^''"'' youf' brains 
0i0i, En — unc, lo smoie^ "to 
bltfira cloud." (Thieves') Bralcr Ic 



p^griot, fo obliterate all traces oj a 
theft or crime. Nc — rien, to 
suspect nothing. 

Brftleur, w. (tl)eotrica3), de plan- 
ches, spirited acton 

Brusquer (gamesters*), la marque, 
to mark mare points than have 
been scored^ when playing cards. 

Brutal, m. (familiar), cannon. 

Brutifier (popular), to make one 
stnpid by dint of upbraiding or 
badgering him. 

Brution, m. (students'), cadet of ike 
^' Prylan/e Miliiaire iU la Plkhe;* 
a Guveriimenc school for ihe sons 
of officers. 

Brutium, w.. ^^ Pry tank Mihtaire 
de la Flkhe," Krom Brutus, pro- 
bably on account of the strict 
discipline in that establishment. 

Brutus, tfi. (ihicvci'), Brittany. 

Bruyances, /. //. (familiar), great 
pnjing up in newspapers or otker- 
urise. 

Bu, ndj. (iraputir), in lii/nor^ 
" tight." Sec Pompette. 

Eh ben f oui, j'-^uts bu. El put«, quoi ? 
(^ue qu'vou* m'vDulu. nicMieum d'la 

K&t-c'qLic yuuK n'jumez pak comme moi 
A votis r>ocer U carffikrousM ? 

KlCHCriN, Z« Lk»HM9H tUs CueHM, 

BQche,/. Literally Ax; (tailors') 
article of clothing. Collcr sa — 
au greic> to remit a piece of-^vork 
to the master. Temps dc — , xvork' 
time. ( Popular) Buchc, lucifer 
match ; (thieves') — flambonte, 
or plombonlc, lucifer match. 

BQcher (familiar), to ivork hard, 
•*lo sweat;" to belabour, **lo 
lick." (Popular) Sc — , to flgh/, 
*' lo slip into one nnolher." 

BOcherie, /. (popular), /igkit 

"mill." 



Bt^^m 



58 



Biicheur — Buveur d'encre. 



Bacheur, m. (ramiliar)t one who 
works hardt " a swat." 

Buen-retiro, m, (fainUiar), prh'ote 
place of retirement; (ironically) 
latHmSy or " West Central." 

Buffet^ m, (popular), avoir le — 
garni, to have had a hearty meal ; 
— vide, to be fastin}^^ to have 
nothing in the "locker." Bas de 
— , see Bas. Remuuleur de — , 
organ -grimier, 

Buif, m. (military), shoemaker, 

Bull-Park, m. (students'), Burner's 
dancing-rooms^ situated near the 
Luxembourg, f»itronized by the 
students of the Quartier Latin, 
but invaded, as most places of a 
similar description now are, by 
the protectors of gay girls. 

Buquer (thieves*), to commit a 
robbery at a shop under pretence of 
asking for change : (popular) to 
strike f a corruption of the slang 
term bficher. 

Vous avez dit dans votre tnterro£atoire 
devant Monsieur le Juge d'instruction : 
j'ai buqii^ avec mon marteau. — Gaxtttt 
Het Trihunaux, 

Bureau arabe, m, (soldiers* in 
Algeria), absinthe mixed with 
*' orgeat," a kittd of liquor made 
with almonds. 

Burettes,/, pi. (thieves' and popu- 
lar), pistolSi '* barking irons.** 
Literally /4/a/j. 

Burlin, burlingue, m. (popular), 
office ; desk. For bureau. 

Chez I pir' Jacob pour le jour de » Kte, 
A son burlingue il voulait i'envoyer. 

La franc*. 



Busard, m., buse, /, buson, m, 
(familiar and popular), duH^ sl<nVt 
thick'zvitted man, '"blockhead." 

Bustingue (thieves'), lodging house, 
** dossing ken." 

Bute, butte, or bute k regret, f. 
(thieves'), guillotine, Monier ^ la 
— , to he guillotined, 

Buti, a^lj. (thieves*), gjtUlotinetl ; 
murdered. See Fauche. 

I1& I'ont but^ ^ coiip« de vingt-detix. — 
E. Sue. {^i'hey killed kim by stahbing 

Buter (thieves'), to kill, togttdlotine; 
to execute. 

On va te buter, il cut depuis deux inbis 
gerb^ "k la passe.— Balzac. [He is going 
to be exccutett, he was sentenced to death 
two months ago.) 

Buteur (thieves'), murderer ; execu* 
tioner. See Taule. 

Butin, ffi, (soldiers'), cqitiptncfit. 

Butre (thieves'), dish. 

Buvailler (popular), to drink little 
or slcnvly. 

Buvailleurorbuvaillon, m. (popu- 
lar), a man who cannot stand 
drink. 

Buverie,/ (common), a beerhouse, 
termed brasserie. From llie old 
word beuverte. 

Buveur d'encre, m. (soldiers'), any 
military man connected -with the 
administratioft ; clerk, or '* quill- 
driver.'* 

L'expres&ion de buveurs d'encre ne 
s'appliq^ue strictement qu'aux engag^ 
voiontaires qu'on emploie dans les bureaux, 
oil ils ^happent aux rigueurs du service, 
souspr^tcxiequ'ilsontuneniain Mi|>erbe. — 
F. DE KEiFFENUERO, La I ie de i,u7^tis>m. 



C — CaboL 



59 



C, «. (popular), ctre un — , to bt an 
arrant foot. Euphemism for a 
coarse word of three letters with 
which the walls are often 
adorned ; — comrae la lune, ex- 
tremely stupid. 

9« (popular), ^tre — , to be the right 
sort. C'est un peu — , thai^s excel- 
lent, "fitting. Avoir de — , to 
he wealthy. (Familiar) (^a manque 
de panache, it lacks finish or dash. 
Elle a de — , she has a fully well- 
developed Jigure. 

Cab, m. (abbreviation of calx>tin), 
contemptuous expression applied 
to actors ; third-rate actor, or 
•' surf." 

C«b, cabou (thieves' and popu- 
lar). </ty, "tyke." Le — jaspine, 
the dog barks. 

Cabande, /. (popular), candle, or 
"glim." Estourbir la — , to blow 
the candle out. 

Cabas, m. (popular), old hat. Une 
mere — , rapacious old jvoman. 
Properly, cabas, a woman s bag. 

Cabatser (popular), to chatter, to 
gabhle ,• to delude, or * ' bam- 
boozle;" to steal, "to prig." 

Cabasseur, m. (popular), KandtU- 
manger ; thief, " prig." See 
Grinche. 

Cabe. m. (students'), third year 
student at the Ecole Normale, a 
higher training school for pro- 
fessors, and one which holds the 
first rank among Colleges of the 



University of France ; (popular) 
a dog. See Cabo. 

Cabermon, m. (thieves'), -wine- 
shop, "lush-crib." A corruption 
of cabaret. 

Cabestan, m. (thieves'), p<^iee 
inspector ; police o^cer, "crusher," 
" pig," "copper," or " reeler." 

Cabillot, m. (sailors'), soldier, 
" lobster." 

Cftble & rimouque, m. (fisher- 
mens'), tow'line. 

Souque I attrape ^ carguer I Piare k 

ramarre ! Et souque ! 
C'cst 1« coup des haleurs et du cfible i 

rimouque. 
La ouU ouli oula oula tchalez I 
Hardi ! lea haleurs, oh '. let haleurs, halez t 
RiCHefiN, La Mer. 

Cabo, m. (popular), dog, or " buf- 
fer." Michel derives this from 
clabaud, a ivorthless dog, and L. 
Larchey from qui aboie, pro- 
nounced qWaboie. Le — <lu com- 
missaire, the police magistrate's 
secretary. See Chien. (Military) 
Eleve — , one who is getting 
qualified for the duties of a cor- 
poral. 

Cabocbon, m. (popular), blow, 
" prop," or " bang. 

Cabonte, or camouflc, /. (mili- 
tary), candle. 

Cabot, m. (common), third-rate 
actor, or "surf;" term of con- 
tempt applied to an actor. Abbre- 
viation of cabotin. Also a dog. 



6d 



Cahotlnage — Cador. 



Cabotinage, m, (familinr), lift of 
hardihiPs which mcit actors kavt 
la iiif f^fare they ncquire any rt- 
puttUion, 

Cabotine [faniiliftr), bad actren ; 
stroUmf; tutreiSy or one u>ho Mongs 
to tt tmu/v (f** barn slomiers." 

Caboliner{fniiuIiar),/tf*rrf//;o//iWi'' 
aitor ; to mi.x with catiotin!) ; to fall 
into their way ofitving, which is 
riol exactly a "proper " one. 

Caboulot, m. (familinr), stutiii taf^ 
■ti'hert iustomcrt an xcaited up^n 
by g^rls ; small eafi where the 
sptKmhte is the retailing of cherry 
braftiiy^ absinthe, and yt^^eet //- 
tfucrs ^ l^estsortoftcine-shop. 

Cabriolet, m., shifrt repe or strap 
with u double loop tijfixed^ ma>ie 
fast to a eriminaTs wrists^ the 
extremity being held by a polite 
officer ; small box for labels ; 
woman's bonnet. 

Cabrion, m. [^Tihl^*), putnterxvith- 
cut titlentt or " dauber ; *^ practical 
joker. In ihc Mysthes de /-arts 
of Eugene Sue, Cabrion, a painter, 
nearly drives the doorkeeper 
Pipclet mad by his pracUcal 
jokes. 

Cachalot, m, (sailors'), old saihr, 
old • * tar. '* Properly spermaceti 
whale. 

Cache-foUe, wi. (popular), drawers ; 

false hair. 
Cachemar, cachemince. m. 



(ihieves'). cell, "clinch, 
cacliul, black hole. 



From 



Cachcmire, pt, (popular), c/oitt ; 
— d'osicr, rag-piiker's xoicker 
basket. 

Vote! left liifljnk qui pasawnt, le crochet 
au |x>ing ct Ick pantTcs tantcrnes »oRI re- 
Cucillir>dan«lcCA4:>)«niin:d'o»ier. — KtciiB- 
v\s, Lt i\vi'*. 

Cachemis^re (fainiliat), cosU Imt- 
tonni t$p to the chin to cottteal the 
alK-mce of linen. 



Cachemitte, / (thieves'), celty 

"clinch." 

Cachcmuche. See Cachemar. 

Cachcr (popular), to eat, ** to grub." 

Cachet, m, (thie%-ca* and cads'), 
de la R<SpubIique, the mark of 
one's hcd on a person^s face, a 
kind of farewell indulged in by 
night nifEans, especially when the 
victim's pockets do not yield a 
satisfactory harvest. (Familiar) 
Le — , the fashion y "quite the 
thing." 

Et ce n'cst pas tui qui poricrait de* 
ganu ven-pomme tt le c«chel ^cait de l«s 
porter *»ng dc tKruf. — P. MahalIK, 
Mtsdmmti U* Cetur t'vttint. 

Cacique, m., hc'jd scholar in a 
divisicH at the Ecole Normale. 

Cadavre, m. (familiar and populai), 
i>odv ; a secret misdeed^ *'askclc- 
ton in the I[x:ker j " tangible pro^f 
of anything. Grand — . tall man. 
Se met Ire quclquechorw dans Ic — , 
to cat. See Mastiqucr. 

Cadenne, / (thieves'), chain 
fastened round the neck. La 
grandc — was farnurly the name 
given to the gong of convicts which 
Tivnt from Parts to the hulks at 
Ionian. 

Cadet, m. (thieves'), crowliir, or 
"Jemmy." Tcnnc<l flI»o **i'cn- 
faiit, Jacques hucre dc poiiimes, 
biriU, rigolo ; '* (popular) breech. 
Baistir — , to be guilty of <OHtemp- 
tibk nuan actions ; to be a luk- 
spittle. Baiiic — \you be hanged! 
bon p<iur — is said of any 
worthless object or unpleasant 
letter. 

Cadichon. m. (thieves'), watch^ 
"J err)'," or "red toy." 

Cador (thieves'), di^g, "tyke;" — 
du commissairc, secretary to the 
" iommissaire de police^ ' a kind 
of police Magistrate. 



CadoidlU — Ca isson . 



6l 



Cftdouille, / (sailors'), rattan. 

Effanf^ dc nt pa* rtccvou dc cnupi de 
Ckd«uillc, il^ s^loigneot & reculoni. ci Icurs 
proatenniions nc s'utCteot pliu.— fioNNC- 
TAiK, Au TemJkim. 

Csdran, m, (popular), ifn'ecfi, or 
" bum ; " — lunairc, janu rneau- 
§ft^'. Sec Vaaisias, 

Cadratin^ m, (printers'), fcf ^J^ 
or *' Move pipe ;" (police) sta^ of 
datftivts : (jouraausts') epccry- 

Cafard, m. (military), offietr ^ivho 
nt.jkts himtilj unpicasant ; a busy- 
boJy. 

Cafarde./ ((hicves*), mooit, •'parish 
lanicrn ; ' rv/. 

Cafarder (popular), to be a hj-po- 
criif^ a '* mawworm.'* 

Cafi. PI. C'est un peu fort dc — , it 

it really too itad, toming it too strong: 
Prendre son — , to laugh at, 

Cafetitre. /. (ihieves' onrl cads*), 
keiuj\ "cani*tcr." Sec Tronche. 

Ca5ot, m.t u*tak (offef, 

CafouiUade(boatincns'),Aa</r^^u*f'N;^. 

Cafoutlleux, m, (popular), csp^ce 
<lc — I hiockhiodt *• bally boun- 
der!" 

Cage, f. (popular), werkshdp with 
^•ai/ roof; phjoH, or " stone jug ; " 
— k chapons, monastery ; — i 
jaca&scs, nunnrry ; — ii pimlets, 
dirty. Marrow room, ** a. hole ; '* 
(pnntcn') -workshop, 

Cageton, m. (thieve&*)» may-Vug, 

Cagne,/. (popular), wrrtcheti horse ^ 
or " screw ; " worthless dog; lazy 
ftrtom ; police officer^ or '* bobby." 

Cagnottc,/ (familiar), ntoneyhxiH 
v^ieh is deposited each player* s con- 
tnbtition to the exptnies of a game. 
Faire one — , to deposit in a money- 
hoJi the tfmmttgs of players whieh 
«FV to he invested to the common 
aJnuUagie of the whole party. 



Cagou, m. (thieves'), rogut who 
operates single • handed ; txj^ert 
thief ^ or *'gonnof,*' who takes 
charge of the education of the un- 
initiated after the manner of tht 
old Jew Fagin [see Oliver Tudst) ,• 
a tutor such as is to be met Tvith in 
a "buz napper's academy," or 
training school for thieves ; in 
oldtn times a limtf^ttatit of the 
** grand Cocre," or king of rogues. 
Ttic kingdom of the "grand 
Cocre " was divided into as many 
districlsasthcrcwcrc "provinces" 
or counties in France, each super- 
intended by a "cagou." bays 
Le Jargon de f Argot : — 

Le cagou du DaAqa«Iin d'Anjoii iV«olut 
dc sc vcfiecr dc lui ct dc lui jouer i^uclque 
tour cbenaire. 

Cahua, m. (French soldiers' in Al- 
geria), coffee. Pousse — , brandy. 

Caillasse,/ (popular), stones. 

Caill^ [thieves'}, /M. 

Caillou, m. (popular), grotes^ie 
face ; head^ or *' block ; nose^ or 
" b«iko ; *' — deplume, hald head, 
or "bladder of lard." N'avoir 
plus de mousM sur Ic — , to be bald, 
" 10 l>e stag-faced." 

Cailloux, m. pt. (popular), petits 
— , diamonds. 

Caiman, M.(KcoIe N'ormale school), 
usher. 

Caisse, /. (popular), d'epargne, 
mouthy or "rattle-trap;" (fami- 
liar) — dcs xcpiWvs, Jund for the 
hrihing of joumaliits ; — noire, 
secret funds at the disposal of the 
Home Set retary and Prtfat of 
Police, Battre la — , to puff up. 
Snuver la — , to appropriate or air- 
scond with the eontents of the cash- 
box. 

Caisson, m, (fnmiliar), head^ "nut." 
Sc fairc sauter Ic — , to blow one's 
brains out. 



62 



Caiabre — Caloiitu 



Calabre, m. (thieves'), scurf, 

CaUin, m. (thieves'), wiw-ynrwrt'. 

Calancfaer (vagrants*), ta dit, "to 
croak." Sec Pipe. 

Calande (thieves'). xmx/>, lounge. 

Calandriner (popular), le sable, to 
Int a u*ret(he*it pov<rty'itrickeH 

Cale, / (uilors*), »e tester [a — , to 
tat anj drink. Sec Mastiquer. 

Cale, cat^e. adj.^ ^ro^zU fro/'/ttJ 
w/,- (popular )tt«//iJ^ " wilb plenty 
of the needful." 

Calebasse, / (popular), ktaJ, or 
"cf^oa-nul.*' (Jninde — . /a//, 
t &i»t^ badly attired 'foman, Vcndrc 
la — , to reveai a secret. 

Calebassca.^. (popular), tar^ soft 
brrajti. Literally ^urds. 

CaUge,^ (thieves'), ktf4 woman. 

Calence, /. (popular), dearth of 
xacrk. 

C9\tT{\to\i\x\jLT\to do; to do nothing; 

to he cut o/work^ or "out of col- 
lar ; " to strike work ; — IVcolc, to 
piay the tmant, Se -=■, to eat. 
Sc — Ics amygdales, to eat, "to 
grub." (Thieves') Cttler dei* 
hfNiHns aux lourdes, to bon holes 
in doors. 

Caletcr (popular), to decamp, ** to 
hook it. ' See Patairot. 

Caleur (i^vopulnr), lazy vork man, or 
* • shiccr ; " man out of work ; hut- 
hr : waiter (from the German 
kcllncr). 

Calfater (sailors'), se — le bee, to 
eat. Literally to caulk, 

Caliborgne. Sec Calorgne. 

Calicot, m. (familiar), i/ro/VrV^sj/rV- 
tant, or ** counter jumper." 

Ca.icoie, rweelheart, or '* flame,'* 
of a *' knight of the yard." 



CaUforrucQ (popular), n\k, '* worth 
a lot of tin. * Sec Monacos. 

C4Un, m., tmaU tm fotentmn vhtek 
the retailers of coco carry on tkeir 
backs. Coco is a cooling draught 
made of liquorice, lemon, and 
water. 

Calino, Iff, (familiar)p ninny ; one 
eapahte of the most enormous 
" bulls." 

Calinotade,/., saying of a calino 

(which sec). 

Calintlca, / (popular), heeches, 
or " hams," or ** sil-upons." 

Callot, m. (thieves'), scurry. 

Callots, m. ft. (old cast), variety 
of tramps. 

Lncalloti vxit cenx tjui Mnc leignenx 
vfritaUck on »iiitrcrAiu : le« unt el Ics 
auUc^ trucfaent tant aux entiffe^ que dAos 
l« vcrgncs. — L« Jar^n de CA rft. 

Calxne et inodore (familiar), ctre 
— , to assume a decorous appeat* 
ance. Soyez — , behave yourself 
'L'ith decorum ; do ftot beflurrieJ. 

Calombe. See Cabande. 

Caloquet, m. (thieves'), hat ; 
crourn. See Tubard. 

Calorgne, adj. Ipopular), one-eyed, 
"boss-eyed," or ** seven sided." 

Calot, tn, (thieves'), thimble; wwA 
nut shell; tyc. Properly /«r^ 
tnarhle, Boiter dcs cafot^, ta 
squint. Keluqucr ties cftlois, to 
gate, " to stag." 



La buucli' pi 



eft mouni, 

Its p'tit' que lev ralntv 

RiCHKt-IX. 



Calot, clothier^s shopman, or 
'* counter-jumper ; " over-particu- 
lar, troubuicme customer, 

Calotin, m. (familiar), priest ; em 
of the Clerical party. 



Calotte — Camelot, 



63 



Calotte, / {familiu). eler^, Le 
rcgimenl de la — , the tom/mny of 
the /aiiitj. 

Calottie, /. (rodfUhen')* toorm- 

CAtvi^e, or clavifne, / 
(ihtevci'), vine. 

Calvin, or clavin, «. (thieves'), 

Calypso,/ (popular), Cure sa — , 
to ikiyw off, to poH~ 

Cam,/! (thieves'), lampagne dc — , 
country^ or *' drum." 

Caraarade, m. (popular), dc pioncc, 
MfeUirw ; (mililary) ret^me-ntai 
kair-dr£ssgr. (Familiar) Bon petit 
— it said ironically of a ioi- 
itttpdr H'Ao dots otu an ill turn, 
or t.'anders one. 

Camarde, /, (thieves'), d^ash, 
lliiscr la — , to die. Sec Pipe. 

Cammrder {thieves'), to dte. 

Camai'luche, m. (popuUr), com- 
raJt, ** mate." 

Camaro, m. (popular), comrade^ or 
•'male." 

Carobolcr (popular), to fall down, 

C«mbouis, m. (military), d/VM^'/^r- 
xiu i.srpt. Properly (art grtast. 

Cambtiau. cambrieux, m. (popu- 
lar), a.j/, or "tile." SecTubard. 

Carobriole, f, (thieves'), room, or 
•' crib ; " jA*?/, or " swag. 

Cv, IklirniU-T, i[y nntiK remouchons 
Tt« routltarilct rl la oriole 
Qui ptufumc u canbriole. 

RtCHETIK. 

Caml>rioIc de milord, stimptmaus 
apartment, Rincer unc — , to 
flmnder a room or sAofi, 

Cambrioleur, m. (thieves')^ tAief 

vAo operates in apartnttnts ; — It 
la flan, thi^fof thatdacription who 
tftrtUa ai t-andom, or on **spec." 



Cambriot, w. (popular), ^r/, 
"tile." SceTubard- 

Cambroniser, euphemism for em- 
mcrder (which sec). 

Cambronne ! euphemism for a Inw 
but energetic expression of refusal 
or contempt, which xs said to 
have been the response of General 
Cambronne at Waterloo when 
called upon to surrender (see Lts 
Atii^a('lei,hy\'. Hupo). Sterne 
says, in his Sentimental fcurney, 
that *' the French have three 
words which express all that can 
be desiied— 'diablel' ' peste !'" 
The third he has not mentioned, 
but it seems pretty certain it must 
be the one spoken ofalMve. 

Cambrouse. / (popular), a taw- 
drily-iiressed servant ffirl ; a semi' 
prof essiimnl street -toolker, "dolly 
mop;" (thieves') (ountry,sulmrhs. 

Cambrouser (servants'), to get en- 
gaged as a niiUd'SentJHt. 

Cambrousien, m. (thieves'), pea- 
sant, or "joskin." 

Carabrousier, m. (thieves*), ^wm/O' 
tAi^f. 

Cambroux, w. (thieves'), servaru ; 
waiter. 

Cambuae, f. (popular), Aouse, or 
"crib;" sailors canteen; vine- 



Cam61ia, m,,J^fpfuroman {La Dame 
attx CarrUlias, by A, Dumas 
fUs). 

Camelot, m. (popular), tradesman ; 
thief; Aawker of any articles. 

Le camelot, c'cst le Ponsicn pur i»n% . . . 
C*e«t lui qui %'end les quesroiik, l*s joueu 
notiveaiu, Iex drapcaux aux jnun dc fete, 
la immortelles aux jourk tic deuil, le« verrc* 
DOircu aaix jours d'^cliDM . . . des carter 
truupareate* »ur le Ikmlevard et des 
imafCft pjeuws aur U ^\a*x du PAnthduo. 
— RjCHirtN, Lt Fwni. 



64 



Camehte — Canard. 



Camelote, / (popular), prostitute 
of the Itfutest dassy or '•draggle- 
tail ; " (thieves') — grincnie, 
stoitn property. Etre pris la — 
en pognc, or en pied, to he emight^ 
'*jiai;raHte t/elifto" with the stolen 
property in Mis possession . Laver 
la — , to seil stolen property. 
Prendre la — en pogne, to stcai 
fivm a person's hand. 

Cameloter (popular), to sel! ; to 
cheapen ; to he^; to tramp. 

Camerluche or camerluche, m. 
(popular), (omrade, or "mate." 

Cam^onner (popular), to conduct ; 
to Uad about, 

Camisard, m. (military), W<i/rrr ^ 
tlu ' * Jiataiiien d'Afrique^ " a corps 
composed of lilieralcd military 
convicts, who, after having under- 
gone iheir sentence, are not sent 
l>ack to their respective regiments. 
They arc incorporated in the Ba- 
taillon d'Afriquc, a regiment doing 
duty in Algeria or in the colonies, 
where they complete their term of 
service ; — en bordee, same 
meaning. 

Camisole, / (popular], waistcoat^ 
or " hcnjy." 

Camoufle,/ (ihieves'), description 
of erte's personal appearance ; 
dress; light or candle^ *'glim." 
La — s'estourbe, the light is going 
out. 

Camouflement, m, (thieves*), dis- 
guise, 

Camoufler (thieves'), to Uam ; to 
adult enUt, Se — , to disguist one- 

}t me catnouHe nt p^ican, 
J Ai du pclUrd it la t>Kn*»M;. 
Vive la bmpaffne du cam ) 

Krnbpih. 

Camounet, in. (thieves'), eandlc- 
stick. 



Camp, m. (popular), ficher !c — . to 

tliTiantp. Lever Ic — , to itrtke u*ork. 
Pi'^uer unc romance au — , ta 

skip. 

Campagne,/. (pro8titutc^■), allcr 4 
la — , to bt imprisoned in Saint- 
Lazare,adJp^t/or prostittitf.<i found 
ty the police without a regist ratio* 
card, or sent there for sanitary 
motives, (Thieves') Barboteur He 
— , night thief. Gardens de — , or 
escarpes, hightvaymen or housC' 
breakers who pretend to br pedlars, 

Campe,/ (cads'), yfiVA/ ; camping. 

Camper (cads'), tojiee, *'to brush." 

Camperoux. See Cambroux. 

Camphre, m. (popular), brandy. 

Camphrier, m. (popular), retailer 

of spirits ; one who habitually gets 

drunk OH spirits, 

Campi (cads'), expletive, Tant pig 
— ! Sij much the worse ! 

Camplouse,/ (thieves'), country, 

Camuse./ {\.h\cycs% carp ; death; 
Jlat-nosed, 

Can, m. (popular), abbreviation of 
canon, glass of wine. Prendre 
un — 5ur le comp, to haze a gfast 
of -wine eU the bar, 

Canage, m. (popular), death-thr^es, 

Canailladc, f, (popular), offenee 
against the Icnv, 

J'ni fait beaucDup de folles dans ma 
jetincMie ; m.ii« au coun d unc eiii«lencd 
accitlenti5e el ■lecmi&ue, ie n'ai iim \ me 
reprocher unc »utc canailUdc— MacA. 

Canaillon, m. (popular), viciix — , 
old ctirmndgeon. 

Canard, w. (familiar), newspaper ; 
chn'onet ; (traiucar drivers') horse, 
(Popular) Bouillon de ^, tvater. 
(Thieves') Canard sans plumes 
bulPs piiile^ er rattan used Jot 
convicts. 



Canardir — Cantonade. 



65 



Cuiardcr (popular), (a take in, *' to 
bamboozle;*' to quiz, "to carry 

OT." 

Canardier, m. (populflr), jour" 
miiliif; vemti^ of newspapers; {joor- 
nali»t»*t om who contocts "ca* 
nartis,' or false news f (printers') 
nnt'f paper compositor. 

Csnanc, m. (popular), simpieloa^ or 
" flat." 

Canasson, m. (popular), Aorse^ or 
"gee;'' old'Jashiened tvantan's 
hennet. Vieux — I old feilffit} / " old 
cock:" 

Caacrc, w. (fishenncns.*), |u<« He — , 
Umdsmmtt or " lan<l-lubber." 
Cancrc, properly y*»Kw deviL 

Cancrelal, m. (popular), avoir un 
— dans la l>oulc, to be cra^. For 
other kindretl expreuions, sc« 
Avoir. Cancrelat, properly ^a- 
keria*, or American cockroach. 

Cane,/, (thieve*'), deaih. 

Caoelle,/. (thieves'), the town o/ 

Corit. 
Cancr (tliieres'), ]■ p<fgrcane, to 

sfmn*. Caner, pruperTy to shirk 

damger. 

Caneson. See Canasson. 

Cancton. m. (familiar). iHsigniJi- 
tAnt HTU'ipaper. Tcrmetl also 
•*irtiUe acchou." 

Caaeur, m. (popular), poitrocn, or 
" cow babe. * 

Canicbe, m. (popular), ^r^rri/Z^rm 
fer a dfiff, I'ropcrly poodle, 
Tennefl also ** cal^c, cabot." 
It also has the st^ification of 
gfeeitttiej, an allusion tu the dog, 
MDcnJIy a poodle, which acts as 
ibc blind man's piide* (Thieves') 
Caaich«, a we pmvidcd leith 
kmmdits^ compared to a poodle's 



Caen'* f- (police and thieves'), sur. 
tritUfue exercised by the pttlict on 



the tnotteTTicnts of liberated convicts. 
Also a iihtrated cowvict who has a 
ttrtain to7tm assigned him as a 
place of residence^ and U'hich he is 
not at liberty to leaTc, Caster sa 
— , to tfreak l*Qunds. Une vieille 
— , or une — , an old offender. 
(Literary) Canne, dismissal, the 
*' sack.' Offrir une — , to dismiss 
from oiu's employment, *'to give 
the sack." 

CaDOn, m. (popular), glass of wine 
drunk at the bar of a wine-shop. 
Grand — , the fifth of a litre 
of wine, and petit — , half that 
quantity, Viens prendre un — 
su' I' zinc, mon vieux lig, I say, 
fildfeliozvt come and have a glass at 
the bar. Se bourrcr le — , to eat 
to excess, " to scorf." 

Canonner (popular), to drink 
wine at a wine-shop; to bean habi- 
tual tippler, 

Canonneur, m. (popular), tippler, 
a wine bibber, 

Canonnier de la pi^ce humide, 
m. (military), hospital orderly, 

Canonnifere, /. (popular), the 6e- 
hind, or *' lochas." Sec Vaaia- 
tas. Charger la — ■, to eat^ "to 
grub. " (Jargou&ses dc la — , 
ve^taNcs. 

Cant, m. (familiar), shew of false 
virtue. From the English word. 

Cantaloup, m. (popular), fool, 
"dufler." or "cull." Properly 
a kind of melon. 
Ah ^ ! d'oti sort-tl done cc csntaloup. 
Rica ND, 

Cantique, m, (freeraasoos'), bae- 
dutntilian song. 

Canton, m. (thteres*), prison, or 

"stir." For synonyms see Motte. 

Comtc de — , jailer, ** dubsman," 

or "jigger-dubbcr." 
Cantonade./. (literary), (fcrirc ^ la 

— , to write produetiens tohich are 



66 



Caniomtier — Capsule. 



net read hy the publk, From a 
thcatricnl cx])rtfssioQ, Parler ii bi 
— , /(' i/Vd-t to an inmsibU persou 
btkind th€ stents., 
Cantonnier, w. Uhievcs'), ^rrVwirr, 
one in "quod." 

CanuUnt, adj. (ramtluir), tedious^ 
tiresome., *' boring." From C3- 
nulc, a clyster-pipe, 

Canulariuixi, m, (Ecolc Kormalc), 
ordeai n/ticA new pufnh have to 
gv tkrouj^h^ sueh as passing a utock 
examinaiioH. 

Canute, f. (popular), tediitus man, 
bore. Canulc, properly speaking, 
is a ch'sler-pipe. 

Canulcr (popular), to annoy, to 
bore. 

Canuleur. See Canule. 

Caoutchouc, w. (popular), clown. 
Properly india-mbUr, 

Cap, m, (thieves'), ehief ii.*arder at 
the hulks. (Familiar) Doubler le 
— , to^ a roundabout xcay in order 
to az'Otd Meeting a crtiiitor^ or pass* 
ing be/ore his door, Doublcr Ic 
— des lempfites, to clear safely the 
1st or I yh of the month, when cer- 
tain payments are due. Duublcr 
le — du terme, to be able to pay 
one^s rent when due> Doubler un 
— , to be able to pay a note of hand 
^vhen it Jails due. 

Capahut, / (ihieves'), voler k la 
— , to murder an atcomplite so as 
to xet possession of his share of tht 
bi'ofy. 

Capahuter. See Capahut. 

Cape.yC (thieves'), handwriting. 

Capet, m. (popular), //<j/, or "lilc." 
See Tubard. 

Capine,/. {\.h\evc%\ inkstand. 

Capir (thieves'), to write, or "to 
scrceve." 



Capiston, m. (military), captain : 
— becheur, an officer who acts as 
public prosecutor at cottrts-martial. 
Termed also "capilaineb^cheur." 

Capitaine (thieves'), stotk-joblper ; 
fnitncier ; (niiUtarv) — bechcur, 
see Capiston ; — Be la soupe, an 
ojicer ii'ho has never been under 
fire, 

Capitainer (thieves'), tob<a stock- 
Jobber. 

Capital, m. (popular), maidenhead. 
Villon, fifteenth century, terms it 
*^ccincture." 

Capitole, «/. (schoolboys*), formerly 
the block hole. 

Capitonn£e, adj. (jKipuIar), is sold 
of a stout tcoman. 

Capitonner (popular), se — , to 
grgr^o stout. 

Capttulard, m. (familiar and yo^iX' 
\^.x)ytermof(Onttmptappliedduriu^ 
the ivar of 1870 to those '.oho -ioere 
in favour of surrender. 

Caporal, «,, tobacco of French ma- 
nufacture, 

Caporalisme, m. (familiar), pipe- 
clayism, 

Capou, m. (popular), a scribe 
who rentes letters for i/lifcrafe 
persons in return far a fee. 

Capoul (familiar), bandeaux k la 
— , or dcs CapouU, hair bntshed 
lozv on fortheadt fringe^ or "toffs." 
From the name of a celebrated 
tenor who some twenty years neo 
vrasagreat favourite of the public, 
especially of the feminine iH>rtion 
of it. 

Caprice, m., appellation ^vcn hy 
ladies of the demi-monde to their 
iaz'ers ; — s^rieux, one who keeps 
a girl, 

Capaule, / dwpular). hat with nar- 
$ ow niH ; infantry shako. See 
Tubard. 



Captif — Carer. 



67 



Captif. «f. fpopu1.tr), abbreviation 
*>f ballon c.ipiif. Enlever le — , to 
ktik 0tu ttt tht kind quarttrr^ ' ' Lo 
i.>ot." 
Capucin, m. (sportsmcn^s), har^, 
Capucine,/. (familiar onrl popular), 
ju'icju'ik la iroisiome — , <omf*UUljf^ 
"■wfiilly.'* Klrc paf jus<ju'i la 
troUieme — , to bi qnUe iirunk, or 
" ploughed.** Sec Pompctte, 
S'cnnuyer — ,&c.,/^y^" Awfully " 

Caquer (popular), /* ku€ oneself, 
Sec MouscalUer. 

Carabine, / Ipopubir), sweetheart 
of a '*ciirabin,' or mtdkai stu- 
dent ; (mililor)-) :*'At/. 

Carabini, mff (popular), eTcessivf, 
;-uv>«/. Un mai dc tele — , a 
•s-ioJent keatiatke. Une plai&an- 
tcrie carnbince, a spiiyjokf. 

Carabiner (inUitary), les cdtes, to 
tkrojh. Sec Voic. 

Carabinier, m. (popular), de la 
Faculie, e/iemist, 

Caimfe,/, (cads'), throat, or *'gui- 
I«T tane ; '* vwnthy or "mug." 
KnucMrr dc la — , to have an offcn- 
five f<^etjth. 

Carambolage, m. (popular), to/- 
lu$9H ; genera/ set-to ; cpittan, or 
•* chivalry." Vroiictly euMHouift^ 
at ^tf/urds. 

Caramboler (popular), to tome info 
eofhtwn vitk anythinf^ ; to strike 
tttc penons (tt one bicnv ; to thrash 
a persim or tevernl persons. Also 
ciwrrtporid* to ihc Ijiiin futuere. 
The old poet Villon tcnncil this 
"cbcvaulchcr," or " fairc Ic bas 
aie«tier." and Rabelais called it. 
••fairc la bttc i deux dos." 
Properly *' cararabolcr " signifies 
to m,jJt-e it innnoH at Mtiards. 

Cannt. m. (thieves'). t>oan/ ; square 
pieee of "tvooJ, A corruption of 
carrt. tenure. 

C«r«ntc,/ (thieves'), ta^le. 



Carapata, m, {\i0^n\ii.x), pedestrian ; 
har^te ; (cavalry) recruit^ or 
"Johnny raw." 

Carapater (popular), to rt$n, **(o 
brush." Se — , to run away, or 
** to slope." Lilerally, couhr k 
pattes. See Patatrot. 

Caravane, /. (popular), tnrvellinj^ 
show, ox " slang.'* Des cara- 
vanct, iez'e adventures. Termed 
also ** cavalcades.'* 

Carbeluche, m. (thieves'), galice, 
sUi: hat. 

Carcagno. or carcagne, m. 

(thieves'), nsurer. 
Carcagnotter (iliievcs*), to de a 

nsurer. 

Carcan.w. (popular), wwrM/f«^tfrfrf, 
or ' ' screw ; ' opprobrious epithet ; 
Xaunt w^mian ; — i crinoline. 
street-UHslker. Sec Gadouc. 

Carcasse^ (thieves'), e'lats de — , 
loins, Cfarcassc. in popular Ian- 
guage, body^ or " bacon." Jc vaU 
(e dffsoiscr la — , /'// breetk every 
hone in yomr body, 

Carcassier. m. (ihealrical), detftr 
playwright. 

Carder (popular), to claw ont'sfa^e, 
Pruj>erly to card. 

Cardinale, / (thieves*), mmw, or 
"parish lantern." 

CardinalcB,y! //. (popular), menses. 

Cardinaliser (familiar), &e — la 
figure, to blush, or to get /lushed 
through drinking. 

Care,/, (thieves'), /Ai« of com rai- 
ment. Vol h. la — , sec Careur. 

Carfrnne, m, (popular), amoureux 
dc — , timid or platonic lover. 
Literally a Lenten lot'er, une who 
ia afraid of touching flesh. 

Carer (thieves'), to conceal , to steal. 
Sec Careur, Se — , to seek ihellsr 



68 



Careur — Carreau, 



Careur, or voleur i la care, m, 

(thieves'), thief who rohs a money- 
changer under pretence of offering 
old coins for saie^ "pinchcr." 

Carfouiller (popular), to thrnst 
deeply. 

II dtfliWra . . . pour Mv(»r I'il lui c«r- 
fouill«;rait )e cceur avec son tfp^ ou f'il se 
bornerait \ lui crever tes yeux.— Figaro. 

Caige (thieves'), pack, 

Cargot, m. (military), fan/<f»i man. 

Carguer (sailors'), ses voiles, to 
retire from the service. Properly 
to reef sails, 

Caribener, or carer, to steal **4 
la care." See Careur. 

Caristade, / (printers'), relief in 
$noney ; charity. 

Carle, m. (thieves'), money, **lour," 
or * * pieces, " 

Carline,/ (thieves'), death. 

Carme,m. (popular), large fiat loaf ; 
(thieves') Wi>ffO', '* pieces." See 
Quibus. On lui a grinchi tout 
le — de son morlingue, the con- 
tents of his pttrse have been stolen, 
Cnrme i Testorgue, or \ I'estoque, 
base coin, or '* sheen." 

Carmer (thieves'), to pay, " to dub. " 

Camaval, m. {^G^xAz.x),ridicuiously 
dressed per sof I, "guy." 

Came,/, (popular), worthless horse, 
or "screw;" opprobrious epithet 
applied to a ivoman^ strumpet; 
7voman of disreputable character, 
" bed-fagot," or " shake." Etre 
— , to be lazy, 

Carottage, m. (popular), chouse, 

Carotte, /. (military), medical in- 
spection ; — d*cpai!;seur, great 
chouse. (Familiar) Tirer une — 
de longueur, to concoct a far-fetched 
story for the purpose of obtaining 
something from one, as money, 
leavi of absence, ^, (Theatrical) 



Avoir une — dans le plomb, to 
sing out of tune, or with a cracked 
voice ; (popular) to have an offen- 
sive breath. Avoir ses carDites 
cuites, /tf ^ (/<rai/. (Thieves') Tirer 
la — , to elicit secrets from one, 
"to pump" one. 

II s'agit de te fatre arrctcr pour etre 
coaduil au d^pSt ou lu tireras la orotte 
k un grinche que nous allous etnballcr ce 
•oir.— ViDOCQ. 

Carotter (familiar), I'existence, to 
live a wretched, poverty-stricken 
life; — & la Bourse, to specuhte 
in a small way at the Stock Ex- 
change ; (militar)') — le service, 
to shirk one's military duties. 

Caroublage, m. (thieves'), picking 
of a lock. 

Carouble,/ (thieves'), skeleton key, 
"betty," or "twirl." 

Caroubleur, m. (thieves'), thief wha 
uses a picklock, or " screwsman ; " 
— i la flan, thief of this description 
who operates at haphazard ; — au 
fric-frac, housebreaker, " panny- 
man," "buster, "or "cracksman.'^ 

Carquois, m. (popular), d'osier, rag- 
picker's basket. 

Carre, f. (thieves'), du paquelin, 
the Banque de Fratice. Mettre k 
la — , to conceal. 

Carri, m, (students'), second-year 
stutient in higher mathematics ; 
(thieves') room, or lodgini;s, 
" diggings ; " — des petiie& 
gerbes, pylice court ; — du rebec- 
tage, court of cassation, a tri- 
bunal which revises cases already 
tried, and which has power to- 
quash a judgment. 

Carreau, m. (popular), de vitre, 
monocular eyeglass. Aller au — , 
see Aller. (Thieves' and cads'> 
Carreau, eye, or "glazier;" — 
brouille, squinting eye, or "boss- 
eye ; " — ii la manque, blind eye., 
Affranchir le — , to open one's rye,. 



Carrcaux brouilUs — Cascaret. 



69 



Carrcaux brouilUs, vr. //. (popu- 
lAr\ h*n»i( of Ul'fiinu^ or "nanny- 
ahup." Such toubli»hraeni& which 
arc under the surveillance of the 
police authorities have white- 
washed wiuduw*panes and a num- 
ber of Ta&[ dimensions over ihe 
street cntnuicc. 

Carrie,^ (popular), nwffli, "crib." 

CarrcfouT, m. (popular), des ^ra- 
ic», d (TOising of the fanbour^ 
AtoMmartrc, a dangerous one on 
account of the great tiofiic. 

Carrer (popular and thieves'), sc — « 
to eenctal oneaif ; to run tfwffy, 
"to brush >" — de la dcbine, to 
improve %me's circumitanus. 

Carreur, m. (thieves'), recfiver of 
!,'oJfm XfOi/s, " fence." Termed 
al)0 •' fourguc." 

Canaude, /', (tliieves*), fnnUr's 

Cartaud£ (thieves*), /n'rrft^. 

Can«uder(tliicvcs'), to print, 

Canaudlcr (thieves*), /'Vw/^r. 

Carte, /. (i>opuUr), femme en — , 
street -iiHiiker whose name it dffwii 
im the books of the police as a rej^s* 
tereti prostitute. Revoir la — , to 
tvri'/, or '* to caMiaile," " to cast 
up accounts," ** to shoot the cat." 
(Cardsharpcrs') Maquilicr la — , 
tu handle cards ; to tamper with 
iards^ or " to stock broads.*' 

Carton, m. (gamesters*), playing- 
iord, or *' broad." Manier, 
thpuirr, grai«Aer, travnillcr, pati- 
oer le — , to play lards. Ma- 
4fuiller le — , to handle eards, to 
ttiMptr with ean/s, or ** to stock 
bruadv" 

CanonDemenn, m. pi. (Hteraiy), 
mmMMuripts consigned to oblivion. 

Cartonner (gamesters'), to t'lay 
tani*. 



Cartonncur, «., one fond of cards, 

Cartonnier, w. (popular), clumsy 
worker; card-player. 

Cartouche, / (military), avaler sa 
— , to diey *• to lose Ihc number o( 
one's mcs";," Dcchirer la — , to 
eat. See Mastiquer. 

Cartouchiire k port^es, /, pack 
of prepared cards which m-ittdlers 
keep secreted utuier tfuir waistioat^ 
'* books of briefs." 

Carucbe, / ((hieves'}. prison^ or 
"stir." Comte dc la — , jailer, 
or "dubsman." See Motte. 

Carvel, m. (ihieves'), boat. From 
the Italian caravclla, 

Cas, m. (popular), montrcr son — , 
to make an indecent exhibition of 
one's person, 

Caaaquin,m.( popular), Ajt«w<>MA?(^', 
or ** apple cart," Avoir quelque- 
chosc dans Ic — , to f>e umasy ; 
ill at case in body or mind. Tom- 
bcr, sauter sur le — a quclqu'un, 
to give one a beating, " to give one 
Jessie." Grimper, t anner, travailler 
le — , to belaoour^ '* to tan." Sec 
Voie. 

Cascader (familiar), interpolating 
by an tutor of mutter not in the 
play J to lead a fast life. 

Cascades,///, (theatrical), /i«<-i- 
ful imptvvisationi ; (familiar) 
tccentrte prtKtedings ; jokes. Faire 
des — , to live ajast tije. 

Cascadeur (theatrical), actor who 
interpolates in his part ; (familiar) 
nutn itTith no earneitntis of pur^ 
Post'y and xvho consequently can- 
not be trusted ; fast man. 

CascadeuBC,/ (familiar), /i.'f^r/ 
or woman. 

Cascaret, m. (thieves'), two-frane 
coin. 



70 



Case — Casser. 



Case, canie, orpiole,/ (thieves'), 
rooni; ioUgings, "diggings," or 
"hangs out; (popular) house; 
any kind of lodgings^ " crib." Le 
patron de la — , tht head of any 
establishnuntt the landlord^ Ihe 
occupier of a house or apartment, 
(Familiar) N'avoir pas de case 
judiciaire JL son dossier is said of 
one who has never been competed 
of any offence against ihe law* 
The "dossier" is a record of a 
man's social standing, containing 
details concerning his age, pro- 
fession, morality, &c. Every Pa- 
risian, high and low, has his 
"dossier'^ at the Prefecture de 
Police. 

Ciiaimir, m, (popular), waHtcoaff 
"benjy." 

Casin, m. (familiar), /a?/ a/ billiards. 

Casinette,/ (popular), habitude of 
the Casino Cadet, a place some- 
what similar to the former Argylc 
Rooms. 

Casoar, m., plume of skaho, in 
the slang or the students of the 
Saint-Cyr military school, the 
French Sandhurst. 

Casque, m. (popular), hat, "tile." 
See Tubard. Casque kauvent.ra/ 
with a peak ; — k meche, cotton 
nightt'ap. Avoir du — , to have 
a spirited, persuasive delivery ; to 
speak ttfith a quack^s coolness and 
facility. An allusion to Mangin, 
a celebrated quack in warrior's 
attire, with a large helmet and 
plumes. This man, who was 
always attended by an assistant 
who went by the n.nme of Vert-de- 
gris, made a fortune by selling 
pencils. Avoir le — , to have a 
headache caused by potations ; to 
have a fancy Jor a man. Avoir 
son — , to be cotnpUtely tipsy. See 
Pompette. 



Casquer (popular), to pay^ or '* to 
fork out ; " to fall blindly into a 
snare ; to mistake, 

Casquette, / (familiar and popu- 
lar), money lost at some game at a 
cafi. Une — i trois ponts, a 
prostitute'' s bully^ or *' ponce," 
thus termed on account of the tall 
silk cap sported by that worthy. 
See Poisson. Eire — , to be 
intoxicated. See Pompette, (Fa- 
miliar) Eire — , to lidvc vulgar 
manners, to be a boor, *' roly-poly." 

Casqueur, m. (theatrical), specta- 
tor who is not on the free list. 

Cassant. m. (thieves'), walnut tree; 
(sailors') biscuit. 

Cassantes,/ //, (thieves'), teethe 
or *' head-rails ; " nuts ; walnuts. 

Casse, f. (popular), chippings of 
pastry sold cheap. Je t'en — , 
fhaPs not for you. 

Casse-gueule, m. (popular), sub- 
urban ditncing-hail ; strong spirits, 
or "kill devil." 

Cassement, m. (thieves'), de 
pone, housebrecJting, *' cracking a 
crib." 

Casser, (thieves*), to eat, "to 

fub ; " — du Sucre, or se mettre 
table, to confess ; — du sucre, or 

— du Sucre k la rousse, to peach, 
" to blow the gaff ; " — la hane, 
to steal a purse, '* lo buz a 
skin ; " — sa canne, to sleep, or 
"to doss;" to be very ill; as a 
ticket • of' leave man, to break 
bounds ; to die ; — sa ticelle, to 
escape from the convict settlement; 
(popular) — un mot, to talk; 

— du bee, to have an offcfjsive 
breath ; — du grain, to do nothing 
ofivhat is required ; — du sucre 
sur la tete de quelqu'un, to talk 
ill of one in his abscftccy to back- 
bite ; — la croustitle, to eat, "to 
grub ; " — la guculu ii une nc- 



Casstrolagt — Cauchemardant. 



71 



gft«K, to drink a bouU &f iiiitt ; 
^ la gutrulc k un enfant de chntur, 
f» drink a hoiilc ef xvine (red- 
capped like achori«lcr); — la mar- 
milc. to quarrti wilk ong'j bread 
0md ihitse ; — Ic cou ^ un chat, 
te tat ^ rabbit stcio ; — Ic cou k 
nnc ncgresMi ta distusj a b^tU ef 
witu ; — sa pipe, son cable, 
&0Q cracboir. or M>n fouct, i^ die, 
"lo kick (he bucket," *' to croak." 
Sec Pipe. Casscr son ucuf, /v haie 
a uttstarri.t^ ; — ion pif, /<» 
sJ^ft "lohaveadose ofbalmy ;" 
— fc>n lacctf to hieakoffon/s ton- 
mtftiam m'tA a mtj/ress, **to bury 
ft mull ; " — une roue de deiriere, 
to jptnd purt of a Jtie-franc piece. 
Se la — , i^g^* awayy to move off^ 
"to hook U." Sec Palatroi. 
N'avotr pas casse la paUi- a cuco, 
to h< duU-wiiled^ or " soft." (Fa- 
milUr) A tout — , tremtndous : 
an'/mt. Une noce a tout — , a 
rart foiUfieation^ *' a ilarc-up," 
Of '• break -down," Un potin k 
lout — , a tremendous row, or 
•Shindy." 

Casacrolage. m. (thieves'), inform- 
tMj( a^viHs/ an acfompHte. 

CaiBerole. / (thieves'), informrr^ 
or "Iwz-man ;" spy, or **nark ;'* 
ptiice offiitT^ or *'coppcr." Sec 
Poti'tabac. Caticrolc. proiti- 
tmtc, or ■* burner." Sec Gadoue, 
Covp de — , dennndafioH, or 
'* boning." Passer ik —, to bt 
v^vrmfdagaJMit. ( Popular) Casse- 
role, namegixfen to the HSpital du 
Afidi. Passer i — . «e Passer. 

CftSftcur. m. (thieveV). de portcs, 
i*«////-i'U>fr, •* busier, "or^screws- 
mao ; *' — de sucre i qualre sotis, 
wuiitary totrvict of tht Algerian 
' • eomp^gnws de dizcipUne, " <kiefiy 
»wkpicyed at itent-hreaking. The 
*'comp*gnie» de discipline," or 
|ftifiUhmrnt companies, consist of 
all Ihc riff-raff of the army. 



Cassine, f, (popular), properly 
imati (ountry-h0use ; /touse xvkere 
the muster ts strict ; wo'kskop in 
wkieh the xvark is srr-ere. 

Cassolette, / (popular), ckamher 
utensil, or "jerry;" siai'engrrs 
tart ; moutJk, or " gob." I'lomber 
de In — , /J Aaife an offettsive breath. 

Cassurc, /. (theatrical), joucr une 
— , to perform in tht character ef 
a T-ery old man. 

Castagnettes, / pi. (miliUry), 
bicxvs with the fist. 

Caste, / (old cant), de charrae^ 
otu-fourth of a crown. 

Castor, or castorin, natfal officer 
who shirks going out to sea, or ont 
in thearmy xvho is ax'erse toieavitt^ 
the garrison, 

Castorin, m. (popular), hat-maker, 

Castoriser is said of an officer who 
shirks sea duty, or xvho tikes to 
make a long stay in some pleasant 
pirrisoH tanvn. 

Castrox, m. (popular), cap^fn. 

Castu, m. (thieves'), hospital. Bar- 
bcauilicr de — , hospital director, 

Castue. m. (thieves'), prison, or 
"stir." See Motte. C urate dc 
— ^ jailer, or "jigger-dublKr." 

CataplasTTie, m. (popular), au rnus 
tpttuiih ; — de Vcnise, blow, 

"clout." 

Calaplasmier, m. (popular), kaS' 
pitai iiUcndant. 

Catapulteux, catapulieuse, adj, 

(\x>\>u\aT), beattttful ; marpellous. 
Une fcmmc — , a ma^ijicent uw- 
ma/i, a " blooming tart." 

Catiniser (popular), se — t ttbe in 
a fair u>ay ef becoming a street- 
Vfolker, 

Cauchemardant (popular), tire- 
jcf/ic^ annoying', "boring." 



73 



Cauchemarder — CattrUr. 



CwK^MBarder (popular), /ff AMMtf^*, 

Caaac.y. (funilUr), grasse, cast t'n 
m tmvl ofjtutiit offering piquant 



Catnotter (ramiliar), U chat fami- 
liarly in a small circle. 

CavmlcAde, f, (popular), love in- 
frigyc. Avoir vo des cavalcades 
is uiiJ of a tuoman who has had 
many lifers, 

Cavale, /. (popular), flight. Sc 
paver une — , to run trvay^ or " !o 
crush." ScePAtatrot. (Thieves') 
Tortiller une — , to form a flan 
for ticaping from priion. 

Cavaler (thieves* and cads*), qucl- 
qu'un, to annoy one, to " rile" 
him, Se — , to make cff^ "to 

fuy." Fur li&t of synonyms see 
'atatrot. Sc — au rcbcciagc, 
to pray for a new trial in the 
** Cour de Cassati^n.^* This coun 
may quuh a judgment fur the 
Blighlest flaw in the procedure, 
such aK, for instance, the fact of a 
witnes«> not lifting his right hand 
when taking the oath. Se — 
chcr au rcbectage, to pray for a 
commutatiott of a sentence, 

Cavalerie,/ (popular), grosse — , 
man who loorks in the sewerSt a 
"rake-kenneL" An allusion to 
his high hoots. 

Cavi, w. (popular), rfw/rf,or "gull;'* 
cat's-fsiw. 

Cavie,/ (thieves'), chnnh. 

Cayenne, m. (popular), suburban 
cemetery ; suburban far tory ; work- 
shop at a distance from Paris. 
Gibier de — , scamp^Jatt-bird. 

Cavenne-les-eaux, m. (thieves'), 
the Cayenne depH for transported 
convicts, 

C6, m, (thieves'), silver. Attaches 
de — , stiver buckles, Bogue dc 



— , silver watch^ "white 'un." 
Tout de — , very teefl. 
Ccla me gftne (theatrical), vords 
used by actors to denote anything 
tL'hi*h inttrfetes tmth the impres* 
sion they seek to produce by certain 
tirades or by-play. 

Celui (popular), avoir — de ..., 
stands for avoir I'honneur de ..., 
to have the honour to ... , 

Censure,/ (thieves'), passer la — . 
to repeat a crime. 

Centiballe, m. (popular), centime. 

Balle, a franc. 

Central, m. (familiar), /w/// of the 
*^£cifle Cent rale,*' SL public engi- 
neering school ; telegraph o^ice of 
the '* Place de la Bourse.^* 

Centre, m, (thieves'), name^ " mo* 
narch or monnikrr." Also a 
meeting- place for malefactors, Un 
— a Vestorguc, a false natue, or 
"alias." Un— d alieque, a t'cal 
name. Co«|uer son — , to give 
one's name. (Familiar) I^c — de 
Eravite, the behind, or *'»cat of 
honour.*' See Vtraistas. Fcrdre 
son — , to be tipjyy '* fuddled." 

Cenlrh, adj. (|K>puIar), is said of one 
who has failed in business^ "gone 
to smaiih." 

Centrier, or centripite, m. {m'Al- 
X^ry), foot soldier, *' Iwctle-crusher 
or wobbler ;'' (familiar) member of 
the " Centre*' party (Consetfative) 
of the //ouse^under Louis Philippe. 
The House is now divided into 
"extreme gauche" (rabid radi- 
cals) ; •*gauche"(advanced repub- 
licans); ** ccntrc-gauchcrs " (con- 
servative republicans); "centre" 
(wavering members) ; " centre 
droit" (moderate conservatives); 
"droite" (momirchisls and cleri- 
cals) ; "extreme droilc " (rabid 
monarchists and ultramontane 
clericals). 



Centriot — Chaises, 



73 



: 



Centriot, w, (ihreves*)^ nickname. 

Cercte. m. (thieves'), siiver coin, 
(Familiar) Pincer or rallraper au 
demi — t to ee/ne h/Vh on€ un- 
owares, i0 caUA, "to nab" 
Aim. From an cxprcuion used 
in fencing. 

Cercucil, w. (students'), ^/ast of 
httr. A dismal play on the word 
•* biere," which has l)Oth signifi- 
cations of beer and cofftn. 

Cerf, m. (popular)^ injured hushanA^ 
t'r cuikoid. Se deguJBcr en — , to 
d,44tntp : to run axfay : to he off in 
a ••jitfy." See Patatrou 

Cerf-volant, m. {lh\evn), fenui/t 
thief who strips children m play in 
the public gardens or parks. A 
play on the words " cerf-volant," 
kite, and "voler," to steal. 

Cerise, /. (popular), mason of the 

SubutbM. 

Cerises7C//,(militaTy), monter en 
marthantl de — , to ride ixuily^ 
^vtth toes and ell>c7vs out, and all 
ffa heap, like a man with a I'aiket 
on his arm. 

Ceriaier, m. (popular), soiry horse. 
An allusion to the name given to 
small bones which used to carry 
cherries to markcu 

Cemeau, m. {Wits^ry), yonng giri* 
Properly //vM uhUmU, 

CertificatB, m. pi. (military), de 
bciis*-, long-service strifes. 

C'est (printers*), & cause des 
mnuclies, sneering reply. 

Ek \ du diMC, companion, poun]iini 
n'r»-in pa« %enu ^ U bolie c« tnsiin T 
L'littrv r«poT)d par c« coq-&-l'in« : Ceu >t 
raxii* lIbs mouchet. — Buui MV. 

Cet ( popular), aut'chicn, that/eller! 

Chabannaia, m. (popular), noise; 
r^T" ; fhtaihing. Kiclicr un — , to 
thresh, " to wallop." »ce Voie. 

Cbabrol, m. (popular), mixture of 
hrctk and tvine. 



ChaCal, m. (militor}'). Zouave. 

ChafTourer (popular), se — ytoelaw 
one another. 

Cbafrioler (popular), se — & quelque 
chose, to Jind pleasure in some- 
thing. 

Chahut, m, (familiar and popular), 
eccentric dance, not in favour in 
resptdable society, and in which 
the dancers' toes are as often on a 
level with the faces of their partners 
as on the ground ; uproar, 
" shindy," general t^narrel. Faire 
du — , to make a noitCt a distur- 
t*ance. 

Chahuter (familiar and popular), to 
dance the chahut (which see) ; to 
ttpset ; to shake ; to rock ahout. 
Nous avons etc rudcracnt cha- 
hutcs, loe u*ere dreadfully jolted, 
Ne cluhutc done pas commc ^^ 
keep still, don't fidget so, 

Chahutcur, m. (popular), noisy ^ 
restless fello^v ; one who dances the 
cliahut (which see). 

Chahuteuse, / (popular), hab/tu/e 
of low dancing- saloons. Also a 
girl leading a noisy, Jast life. 

Chaillot (popular), i — ! ^ to the 
deuce I a — Ics gSneurs ! to the 
deuce "with l*ores f Ahuii dc — , 
blockhead. Eiivoyer k — , to get 
rid of one ; to send one to the 
deuce. 

ChaSne,/ (popular), d'oignons, /^m 
oj cards. 

Chainiste, w. (popular), maker of 
gold chains. 

Chair, /. (cads*), dure ! hit him 
hard! smash him! That is. Fats 
lui la chair dure ! (Pupular) 
Marchand de — humainc, keeper 
of a brothel. 

Chaises, f. pi. (popular), mnnquer 
de — dons la salle Ji manger, to 
be minus severai teeth. Noce de 



74 



C/iaicH r — Chanddle. 



t»atons dc — , grand joUificatUn^ 
or " flare-up," 
Chaleur ! (popular), exclamcUion 
tjcpressnt cf contempt, dUbduf^ 
JisafpinHimentj rnffck aJrutratioH^ 

Chaloupc, / (popular), woman 
with dress bulging trut. (Studctits*) 
La — ora^eusc, n furious sort of 
enman. The caocan is an cccea- 
Iric dance, and one ofrather Ques- 
tionable character. See Chanut. 

Cbalouper (students')^ t» dame th* 
al-ovf. 

Channailler (popular), des dents, to 
ent. 

Chambard, m. (Ecole Polytech- 
ni"iuc), Oif of smaskins^ thf fumi- 
ttire and deilroyin^ the tffeits of 
the Hfwly-jcine^i students, 

Chambardcment, w. (sailors*), 

mrrthnnv ; destruction. 

Chambarder (Kailon*), to hustle ; 
to smash. At the Kcole Polytech- 
nique, to itnash, or create a diS' 
turbanee, 

Chamberlan, «, (popular), work- 
*uan who iivrks at home. 

Chambert, hi. (thieves'^, om rvho 
talks too much ; one ^oho lets the 
cat out of the 6a g, 

Cbambertcr (ihieves*), to talk m 
an indiscreet manner, 

Chambre, /. (thieves*), de sOrete, 
the />risoH of La Concier^rie. La 
— des pairs, that part of the dt'p''t 
reserved for convicts sentenced to 
pentil servitude for life, 

Chambrer (swindlers'), to lose; to 
steal; to "claim." See Grin- 
chir. 

Chambrillon, m., small urvant ; 
younx *' slavey." 

Chameau, m. (popular), cunning 
man who impous on his /fiends ; 



f'rtoflax morals ; prostitute ; — 
deux bosses, prostitute. Ce — 
de. . -t insulting expression appiitii 
to either sex. 

t de U potrooBc que Nana 
■ une autre ouvritre, ee 
\j6omc, qui vcnait dtt 



Coapeau app 
■ it chanwau 



e par une autre ournire, ce 

E:iil ctianwau de \j6omc, qui vcnait dtt 
cher \es ficurs pour faire U nocv. — ZuLA, 



L'Aftommair. 

Chameliers, m. pi. (mililarr), nami 
formerly gitvn to the old • \^^n'des. " 

Chanap, m. (ramiliar). char/ifia,pte, 
" fii," or "boy;" (popular) — 
d'oignons, cemetery ; — de navels, 
cemetery xchere executed criminals 
are interred. 

Chanaporeau, jm. (military), hevt* 
rage concocted with coffee^ mili^ and 
some alcoholic liquor, hut more 
generally a mixture of coffee and 
spirits. From the name of the in- 
ventor. 

L« douro, je fc gardais pnTci^uscmenl, 
aVAitt gnnd «nin d« ne pas reniamcr. 
J euks« \mHiti jcflncf uii lung moH de 
champorcBu cc d'ab&ioihe. — Hbctok 
Francs, Sout te Bum&us. 

Chan^ard, m. (familiar), lucky 
man, 

Cbancellerie, / (popular), meltre 
en — , to put one tn "chnncerv." 

Chancre, m. (popular), mi/.*> with a 
lorge appetife^ a ** grand paunch." 

Chand, chandc (popular), abbre- 
viatiun of marchand. 

CkandeUer, m, (populnr), nose^ 
** buko," "snorter," or " smeller." 
For synonyms see Morviau. 

Chandelle, / (militar)-). infantry 
musket ; sentry. Eire conduit 
enlrc ouatre chandcllcv to ht 
marc hen off" to the guard room ^ 
four men ami a corpora/. La — 
brOIc, it is time to go homr. Faire 
fondrc une — , to dn'nk a i-otlle of 
wine. Glisser en — . to slide with 
both feet close together, 

Mnn galopin fite coinmc une fl^cha;. 
Quelle aiaAfice I quelle si&ce aicn.e ! 'iao> 



Changer — Charge*. 



n 



Xtx In piffle joint<i, en cKandellc : lantOc 
•ccfoupi, fdiajint U peiiie l»oni»« femine. — 
Km. MKriM, Lt i'avi. 

Changer (popttlnr], wn poisson 
d'rau, or s« olives d*eau, to void 
ufjtif, " ro pump ship.*' See 
La sea ill er. 

Changeur, m, (thieves'), ehthtW 
fiho ptxrvides thUrts wifA a dis- 
/utii : rague ttko approl*natet a 
ftrw mvreoat from M* /o/V^ 0/ a 
AoMJe or r/uA, ami Uavts his eld 
^it in exckan^. Also thief who 
if^alt piatf, 

Chanoine, m., chanoinesse, f. 
\\\{\c\Ki>'\, ptrscn in good lirctim- 
if.in.cj, ptu uvr/h red/firtj^ ; — de 
Montc-a-regTct, ont scMtttwed to 
deaih ; old offender. 

Chantage, m. (familiar), extorting 
moftr/ bythrffitt of disihiures ton- 
ferMtft^ a jpiilly oition reai or j«/- 
/oW, "jobbery." 

Chanier (familiar), to pay manty 
vnaer threat of being exposed. 
Y\\Tc — quclqu*un, to <xto*t 
mton^ from one under threat of 
txpesure; to extort "socket 
noficy." (Popniar) Faire — unc 
gamtne, to thrash one^ " to lead a 
daocc" Sec Voie, 

Chanteur, m. (thicven*), Jugr d'tH' 
ii'utiion, a ma^stmte who inivs- 
:t^-i:i> <i (A.U before trinl ; (fami- 
luir I man who seeks to extort money 
iy fkteatinin-^ peopie withe-xposure. 
'iliCfe are dillercnt kirifls of chan- 
tms. Vidocq terms "chan- 
tcvrs *' the journalists who prey 
on actors fearful oriheir criiici.sm ; 
thofe who demand en-iiinoub 
prices for letters containing family 
Kcrets ; the writers of biot;iaphi- 
caJ notices who offer them at so 
inuch a line ; those who entice 
people intoimmoral placet and who 
cujci hush-money. The celebrated 
murderer Lacenairc was one of 



thisclass. ChanteurdcIaChapellc 
Sixtine, «■«««*/*. Mailrc — , skU- 
fill chantcur (which see). 

Chantier. m. (popular), embatrais- 
mitit, "lix.'* 

Chaparder (mililaiy), to ioot ; to 
steti/, *' to prig." 

ChapeUe^ /. (familiar), e/ii/ite. 
Termed also "petite chapelle;" 
(popular) iviHO-shiip, or *' lush- 
crib." Kairc — , is said of a wo- 
m*in who lifts her dress to -oarm 
her limbs by the fire. K£ter des 
chapctlcs, toj^the round of setKra/ 
loine-shops, with what result it is 
needless to say, 

Chapelure. / (popular), n'avoir 
plus (je — !.ur le jambunneau, to 
/v biildt '*to have a bladder of 
lard." See Avoir. 

Chapi, m. (popular), haf,0T "tile." 
Sec Tubard, 

Chapiteau, m. (popular), head, or 
" Mock." Sec Tronche. 

Chapon, w. (popular), monk. Cage 
k chajwns, Monastery. Des cha- 
pQns dc Limousin, chestnuts. 

Chapaka, m. ([wpular), Ao/, or 
" tdc." See Tubard. 

Char, m. (familiar), numt^rot^, tab. 

Charcuter (popular), to amputate. 

Charcutier (popular), clumsy it'ork- 
nittH ; iurgeony "saw'.jones." 

Chardonneret, m, (thicvei»'), gen- 
darme. An allusion to his red, 
while, and yellow unifonn. Pro- 
perly a gold/itkh. 

Charenton, m. (popular), absintht* 
The rirpcit for lunatics l*eing at 
Chorentun, the allusion is ob- 
vious. 

Chari^^, O'iJ. (popular), tipsy, 
•Might." .»ieePompette. (Coach- 
men's) Etrc — , to have a "^fare.** 



76 



Cfiarger — Charrtage. 



Charger (coachmen's), to take up a 
"fare;" (prostitutes') to find a 
clutit ; (cavalry) — en ville, to go 
to town. 

Charier (thieves*), to try toget infor- 
mation, "to cross-kid." 

Charieur (thieves'), he who seeks to 
worm out some information. 

Charlemagne, m. (militar>'), sabre- 
bayonet., 

Chariot, m. (popular and thieves*), 
the executioner. His official title 
is *' Monsieur de Paris." Sou- 
bretles dc — , the executioner^ s as- 
sistants, literally his lad/s maids. 
An allusion to *Ma toilette," or 
cropping the ranvict's hair and 
cutting oiT his shirt collar a few 
minutes ' before the execution. 
(Thieves') Chariot, thief; — bon 
drille, a good-natured tfuef. See 
Grinche. 

Charmant, adj. (thieves'), scabby. 

Charmante,^ (thieves'), t>A. 

Charmer (popular), les puces, to get 

drunk. See Sculpter. 
Charogneux, adj. (familiar), ro- 

man — % filthy novel. 

Charon, charron^ m. (thieves'). 
See Ch&rrieur. 

Charpenter (playwrights'), to write 

the scheme of a play. 
Cbarpentier, m. (playwrights*), he 

who writes tJie scheme of a play. 

Cbarretie, /, (popular), en avoir 
une — , to be quite drunk, to be 
*' slewed," See Pompette. 

Charriage, m. (thieves'), swittii/e; 
— k I'Americaine is a kind of 
confidence trick swindle. It re- 
quires two confederates, one called 
•* leveur" or "jardinier," whose 
functions are to exercise his allure- 
ments upon the intended viclim 
without awakening hissuspicions. 
When the latter is fairly hooked, 



the pair meet — by chance of course 
— with *' rAmericain,"a confede- 
rate who passes hiniscK off for a 
native of America, and who offers 
to exchange a large sum of gold 
for a smaller amount of money. 
The pigeon gleefully accepts the 
proffered gift, and discovers later 
on that the alleged gold coins are 
nothing but base metal. This 
kind of swindle goes also by the 
names of " vol %. rAmericaine," 
" vol au change." Charriage a la 
mecanique, or vol au perc Fran- 
9ois, takes place thus : a robber 
throws a handkerchief rounda per- 
son's neck, and holds him fast half- 
strangled on his own back while 
a confederate rifles the victim's 
pockets. Charriage au cofTret : 
the thief, termed "Americain," 
leaves in charge of a barmaid a 
small 1x}x filled to all appearance 
with gold coin ; he returns in the 
course of the day, but suddenly 
finding that he has lost the key of 
the box, he asks for a loan of 
money and disappears, leaving the 
box as security. It goes without 
saying that the alleged gold coins 
are nothing more than brand-new 
farthings. Charriage au pot, an- 
other kind of the confidence trick 
dodge. One confederate forms an 
acquaintance with a passer-by, 
and l>oth meet with the other 
confederate styled **rAmt'ricain," 
who offers to take them to a house 
of ill-fame and defray all exjwnses, 
but who, being fearful of getting 
robbed, deposits his money in a jug 
or other receptacle. On the way 
he suddenly alters his mind, and 
sends the victim for the sum, not 
without having exacted bail- 
money from him as a guarantee 
of his return, after which both 
scamps make off with the fool's 
money. Swindlers of this descrip- 
tion are termed *'magsmen" in 
the English slang. 



Qtarricr — Chdteau-Campkhe, 



7? 



Cbarrier (Ihievc**), to rufindU tme 
omt of his mon/y hy miiUading 
itatcnioUs. See Charriage. 

Charrieur, m. {tbiev«'), thUf -.vko 
tmfioys the mode trrnud charriage 
(which sec) ; (onftiifrate who pin- 
Hdij card$karpers with pfgttotu j 
— He villc, n robhrr trA*t first 
maixs his victims iniettjihU by 
dntjp, and then plututrri thtm, x 
" rJrummer ; " — carobrousicr, 
itinerant ^uatk ; clutnsy thief . 

Chartreuse. /C (popular), de vidan- 
jjcur, smail measure of wine. 

Chanron, «. (iheairical). faire le 
— , u said of act (frs tvho place them- 
seivrs in a raw in frot^ of the foot- 
lights, 

Cba«on, m. (thieyes'), rin^^ 
" fawncy." 

Chj8«e,/. (popular), aller i la — 
AM\)3ix\v\\oti,togoa-fshiMi^. Foulrc 
une — , to scold vehemently^ "lo 
hauil over the coals." 

Ch4iae,/(ihicvcs'), eye, "gtaiicr." 
Babncer, boiler dcs chdsscs, to be 
vne-cyeii, "bo«w-eyed;" lostfutnt. 
Sc fouire I'apotre dans la — , to be 

wtiitaken, 

Chasse-brouillard (popular), a 
drop of spirits ; n dram to keep the 
dump oHl, a "dcwdrop." 

Chasse-coquin, m. (popular), f^en- 
darme ; iV*//^, "bumble;" bod 

■wine. 

Chasselas, m. (popular), wisu. 

Cba&semar, m, (popular], for chas- 
seur. 

Cha8«e-marie,Mf. {military), fA*ij* 
tenrs dAfrit^ue^ a body of light 
(jViilry. 

Cbasse^noble, m. (thieves'), gen- 

darmtt 
Chasscr (popular), an nlat. to be a 

parasite^ a "quillcr; ' — des re- 



luils, to weept " (o nap a bib ;** 

— le hrouillard, to hnvea mornim^ 
dram oj spirits, or a **dewdrop ; ' 

— Ics mouches, to be dymg. See 
Pipe. (Thieves* and cads') 
Cha^ser, to flee ^ "to guy." See 
Patatrot. 

Gn'ft dit pet, inferrorapt iin tecoiuj vojrou 
qui lurvieni, t'W un Acrgot i]ui s'unlne . . . 

cKaMaJnk t— KiCHIIPIN. 

D'occase, abbrevialion of d'occa- 
Mon, secondhiind. 

Chassis, m. (popular), eyes, or 
"fKrepers." Fermer ics — , to 
sitep. 

Chassue,/ (thieves'), «<ifrt7/, Chas, 
eye of a needle, 

Chassure,/ (thieves'), wine, 

Chasublard, «. (popular), priest, 
ill "devil dotlger." 

Vit-oo un Kill roy&Jifle, un *eul cafot. 
un will ch»ubtA(d, prcrxlrc lu ftnne& pour 
la difcnK du iifine ct dc I'aotrl ?—<,'•. 
GiriLLKMOT. Lg Mot ifOrdrr, SepL 6, 

Cbal. m. (thie\-es'). tumX-ey, "dubs- 
uan ;" (popular) slater, fi-oin his 
spending half his life on roofs like 
cat*. Avoir un — dans la gout- 
titre, to be hoarse. 

Chfltaigne, f. (popular), box on the 
ear^ or " buck-horse." 

Chataud, chataude, adj. (popular), 

greedy. 

ChAteau, m. (popular), brAnl.tnt, 
person or thin:^ aluHjyf in motion. 
(Thieves') Chiltcau, prison; — 
dc rombrc, rouritt settlement. Un 
elcve du — , a prisoner. 

ChAteau-Campiche (familiar and 
popular)^ derisive appellation for 

Cblteau-Camp^chc (familiar and 
popular), dtrisive appellation for 



Ciirr>rm — CkaussoK/ur. 



jTrcikuJi Ad 



OannuIlASC wa. rmsytlLan, ml 
uue* e ' - ice Vol as poivricr. 

CtKomller ±excnc3Z\, le pahitc, 

:s .3XZU- mut.% sman-^ xx txmduMCt; 
thjnwiar* — lis dees, &f thrash, 
" :u lick."* 
CSutfrnnXEear (sunxliar), aux «« 
' CuTV^T vm bydxztrrs eamtrhfxiuds 

M :r ^n .A'<*r "^ wuaMSBMxU^kz 
US sucxeti. 

QtamL ^uy. axJm. (popular), <m- 
m:n^: rreeiiv ; mje awake, or 
".-iy:" ki^-prkoL II Ta — , 
4tf i^- 2x/^ dSRxiif aJAc/ kii cxn 
aucrczts. Etie — , ta Icck zintk 
a-tft < »/ <7«r. (Familiarj L*n — , 
am irukusiast ; ftur^k man. 
11 fen — . ruver, '* when ihe devil 
isbU:i-i.~ Qaand Tous me reretTcz 
u fen — , you -will turver see me 
afftiin. Etre — de la pence, la be 
fond jf -women, to be a *' beard- 
'splitter.'* (Artists') Faire — , to 
emtioy very warm tints after the 
style of Rembrandt and all other 
colourists. { Popular and thieves') 
Cbaud I quick ! on ! 

Chaad, chand \ poor le maogenr. S (aut 
I« <Ie«r^*er. — E. SvE. 

Chaudron, m. (familiar), bad piano. 
Taper kur Ic — , to play on tkt 
piiino. 

Chaudronncr (popular), to buy 
secondhand articles and sell them 



Cbaudronnier, m, (popular), 
secondhand • clothes man; (mili- 



sa a.i.iBi-:a to 



CfaaxxfuUoa popular), ::jidr. 

Chan<fr-[*-coachc -TiTtiniarw m-nt 
wia Jjcvr xvlT iii am^ysrt : ken- 
pedud ijusamt, it " scan^sy." 

Chjroffcr i popular'. It hnr, tj sHni 
idJTiSy. "cogprcle-" See Rincer. 
(FaoLliari Chaafleronartijfe, n-e 
piece, £s a^^jatd a as is iJi:i:i 
t/u emtimsiiism a/oM andirmce ; — 
see atEi':re, tj pmik erisiSy an 
mmdcrtakix^ z — one plice. '^ :e 
Cisnzasjtm^ fsr a ffasi. Ca va 
cfaaaner. there -wril «■ a h:tn-ht. 
OtaaJterdes eccheresv t; encjura.'e 
bidding at an OMctijn. 

Chauffcor, at. fpopaUrK man SL-i^ 
instis'ls It/e into conzer^aticn or in 
n company ; fjrmerly, under the 
IHrectoire, cm af a gtn^ if bn- 
gands iska extcrted money frcm 
People by burning the feet cf the 
victims. 

Cfavsmir (thieTe$*>, to lj:e, 

Cbaossette (thieves**, rin^ fastened 
as a distinctive baJ^e to the Ug of 
a convict who has been chained up 
for any length of time to another 
convict, a punishment termed 
"double chaine." 

Chanssettcs, f pi. (inili:ar>-^, 
gloves ; — russes, -wrapper for the 
feet made of pieces of cloth ; 'popu- 
lar) — de deux parois^es, odd 
socks. 

Chaasson, m. (popular), old prosti- 
tute, Putain comme — , regular 
whore, ^Ballet girls') Faire son — , 
to put on and arrange one's pumps. 

"LaU9«z-iDO(dofic, jesuisenreUrd. J'ai 
encore mon oustic et moa ctuussoa a faire. " 
Autrencnt, pour ceuz qui dc sent pas de 
la boutique, il me rv»te encore ^ m'habilter, 
^ me *->>*"«*r et i me faire ma tete." — 
Mahaun. 

Chanssonner (popular), to kick. 



Okmuvntisf^ — CktvaL 



79 



Chinvvntsae, m. 




Ctief. ML (■aSttrrJw abbreroskia of 
— i <' i inl -<iei Im'u cbcC fwmrtrr^ 
mmttr-^^rftami m the jiiwaflj. 

a* « li i i wi/ / (tlUeres*) — d'at- 

Tonedako "ploBber, tnmiUotcr, 
tcpocisser. fooetter. 



I 



Chcfninte^. (popular), 4«/, ** dum- 

ChemiK, / (popaUrK i\n dan* 
U — dc qoclqn'an, t» Ar r«<- 
^amti'v ict.'k tmt, l9 ht " thick as 
Koj« "' wr/A erne. (Thieve*') Che- 
msc de cooseiUcr, stoitn Hnm, 

ChemiMs,/ /tJL (popaUr), compter 
set — , ^p T^mjt, or *' lo cascade," 
Ad allasion to the bending po*- 
lure of a man wbo is tiuttokd 
with the lilmeDt. 

Chcaitre, adj, (thieves*), ^aerf, 

exiciiritt, " nobby. - 

lj> est de qooi £mi« ua ^CMltre tkkitqtiet 
»^k: c^ci rr-uiiUtdt* pkiDw d« ptv t« ei du 

Chtec. a*. <thieTes*), M«nr, or 
••cot*;* — affirancht, tkuf, or 
•'fla^h cove." For synunyus 
see Grinche. Fairc sucr un — , 
t/ km .r m-utf " lo give a cove his 

CheaiUon, at. (popular), mglfgiri, 

Cbcnique, or chnic, m, (r<opulai), 
^ranJy, '• French cream. 

Cbeniqaeur, m$, (popular), Jrimifr 

Chenoc, a,(/. (ihiercs*), taJ; good- 
J*r^-n*thiHg oid felltno. 



Chenu, aJs. (thte«TS*)» rxcriUwt, 
*-Dobby.'^ rroperir*^. tt^Awrf 
iy sgt : — pinHS» emtUmS «K«r ; 
— rduit. ^omdmmrmimx: — »«P«*» 

Kfa'm^-'.Xk diac i Mifi far f 



£t ^ti UrtMi ■•««■■<. 

VlDOC^ 

Cheaumeni (popnlar), tvit' wtH; 

Cher (thieves'), se cavaler — , Ar 
^<v4»«r/ fuicUy, ^ "e»r."* See 
Pa la trot. 

Chirance,/ (ihiev«*),*treen— ,(!# 
/i/ M/Ai'n'(t//ii^ or ** canon." 

Cherche (popular), a-VAmi/, or 
*Move." Hire dtx i — » i» ^ Am 

Chcrchcr (popular), la gneolec. 
iff be a /OJ-ius/r, a *' quillcr.** 
(Familiar and popular) Cfaercher 
despouxi la tete de quelqu'un, 
t^ jmJ fault wUk 9n4 tn ftuile 
PrtUxts ; U try atul fasttm om d 

Chores! (thieves'), cfftirmfft ! €k*fr 

up I nfzfrtaydie! Villon, 15th 
century, has *' there lye," mj«yjus 
c^uHtt nance. 

Chetard, m. (thieves'), friicm, or 
"stir." Srt Moltc. 

Chitif. m, (popular), mas*m*i ^y. 

Chculard, m. (jxipular), gmrmoM' 
di:^r, *• grand-pauucli." 

Cheval, nv. (popular and ihievcs*), 
de rctour, oU efitHder ; rttwnutt 
or raapcd cvnvift i<nt hak to the 
(ctnut stttUmntt* Termed aUo 
"Irique, caniie." 

Me voiti done cheval de relaur. on ra« 
renci k Toulon, ceiic foU anc Ic* mcumu 
veiti.— V. Ht'co. 

(Military) Cheval de Tadiudant, 
camp kdi 0/ cell; (famiUar) — 
qui la connalt dans les coins, a 



Chevalier — Chevronni. 



Literally skilful at 
At corners. (Popular) 
Fmv «o«» — de corbillard. to put 
tm « fmmiy imk ; /# /^iv i>H4self 
0mtmt^ mr$ ; to bluster, or, as 
the AMcncus say, ** to be on the 

•K. (popalar), de la 
kutcVt k^spual assistant ; —~ 
4rberippe,Mf</;or "prig." See 
GnAchc. Chevalier de la man- 
c^cne, ArfwPMJ/;— dc la palnle, 
9m toA« MVTiij a card printini^ 
Mft I ['wf ; — de I'aune, shopman, 
«ff " knight of the yard ; " — de 
Mica, de lapis vert, gnmester ; — 
4«b«def, ttfcmtm'j htiljfy or "pcn- 
sioDer." See Poisson. Chevalier 
dv cmchct. rag-pick^Tt or '* bone- 
fnib)>cr ; " — du lansquenet, 
fmmiUm£ cheat wAo has recourst 
%§ tkf ctu^ sharping trick denomi- 
mmltti "le pom" (which we) ; 
— dulttstre, " clnifu^ur,'* that is, 
MM who is paid for applaudm^ at 
tk^Afres; — du prinlcmps, or de 
Tordre du priniempi, sH'y fellow 
wJk^JtaHftrs his hutton-hcle to makt 
it 9ppt9r that he has the decoration 
0/ tit '*UgioH iTHonneur;'^ — 
^mpant, see Voleur au bon- 
jour. 

Ghevau-Uger, ///. (familiar), ultra- 
CcHser-KtUive of the I^^timist and 
Cltrxcal party. The chevaulcgere 
were formerly a corps of house- 
hold cavalry. 

Chevaux, m. pi. 'popular), ik 
doubles wimcllcs, /f^. Compare 
ihe ErlgIl^h expression, *' to riJe 
Shank ':• mare, or i»ny." 

Chevelu, adj. (familiar), art — , 
litterateur — . poiile —tOrtt lite- 
rary man ^ poet of the ** hole ro- 
mantiqut" cf -which tlu chief in 
literaiute was Victor Hugo, 

Cbeveu. m, (familiar), difficulty; 
trouble; hindrance ; hitch, \6i\k 



le — , ay, there* s the rul; J'ai 
on — , / haz/e some trouhlc on mv 
mind, reason for uneasiness. II 
y a un ^ dans son bonhcur, 
there is some trouble that mars his 
happiness. (Popular) Avuir un — 
pour un bomme, to fancy a man, 
j Theatrical) Cheveu,M»iiM/(*«/wwrt/ 
jumHin/^ of words by transposition 
of syllables. This kind of mistake 
when intentional Rabelais termed 
'*tfquivoquer." 

En rauliix deux ou troi» miri^in mrdenU 
dont il Uv>AiX cnmger auttunes fois Ics 
hommcs ct Ic9 fcmmu e( Icur faivHit penlrv 
conlcnance 2k recdite. Car tl dtkait i]u'U 
n'y avail qu'une antiMrophe entre femiiMi 
roUe & la mc*A« ct femme motJe k la fcuc. — 



RABBLAta, FaHtafrmtt. 

See al«j (Ein'res de Rabelais 
(Gamicr's edition), /'antagritel, 
page 159. 

Cheveux. m. (familiar and popu- 
lar), avoir mal aux — , to hax-e a 
headache caused by ot'ernii:'ht po- 
tations. Faire des — gris k queU 
qu'un, (0 troitble one, to gtve 
an.xtety to one, Se faire des — 
blancs, to fret ; to feel annoyed 
at being made to wait a long time. 
Trouver des — a tout, to fnd fault 
■jinthez'er^thing. (Mililar)) Passer 
la main dans Ics — , to cut oae'x 
hair. 

Chevillard, m, (popular), butcher 
in a small "way, 

Chevilles, /, (popular), /rw/ po- 
tatoes. Termed ** greasers " at the 
R. M. Academy. 

Ch*vinelle./ (popular), darling. 

Q.hhvTt, f (popular), golwr sa — , 
to get angry, to bristle up, " to lose 
onc*« shirt," '* to get one's mon- 
key up." 

Chevron, m. (thieves'), fresh of- 
fetice ajjainst the law. Properly 
military stripe. 

Chevronni, m. (thieves'), «^ of- 
fender, an old "jail-bird." 



Chevrotin — Chtanann, 



8l 



Cbevrotio, aJj, (popular), irritabit, 

"cranky," •'touchy.'* 
Cbiade, / (schoolboys^), Attstltng, 

Cbialler (thieves*), /« iquaU ; to 

ah I c'cst pAS palas. — 



Ban. tu cmal 

KlCHKI'IN. 



work. 



Chiarder (schoolboys'), to 
" 10 sweat.'* 

Chiasse,/. (popular), avoir la — , to 

iuffer from aiarrhaa^ or "jerry- 

go-njmblc." 
Chibis, w. (thieves'), faire — , to 

tscaptfrom prison ; to dicamp^ ' ' to 

euy." Sec Patatrot. 



J'avsU Ift frouiK 



yak (kit cKibuL 
Da pHfcctandcrs dc pARlin. 
A Pant ID. mince dc poiin 1 

On y fQonAlt ma £arf>mu&ji«. 



Chic, M. (English slang), "ttlng 
t2ing,"or "slapup," The word has 
almij&t ceased to be slang, but we 
thought it would not be out of place 
ID a work of this kind. (Familiar) 
Chic^m'jA; thgamt; dtuh; spirit. 
Ur« Temoie qui a Ju — , unc robe 

3oi a du — , a stylish woman or 
r«j, Cct actenr jouc avec — , 
this o<toT plays m a spiritid 
wtanmcr, (jTa manque de — , ■'/ 
•nftN/j JojA, is commonploff. 
Poorri de — , most eifsant, 
"nobby." C^xcknatk; origTHoJity; 
JMfiMcr. II a le — , lu has the 
hmath. II a un — tout particulier, 
hi has a manner quite his own. II 
a le — nitUtairv, he has a soldier- 
•Vr^ isppearame. Peindre de — , 
furc de — , cfcrirc de — , to paint 
er 'j^rtie tvifh imagiitative power, 
Aom/ tDithoHt muih regard for oicu- 
racy, 

Vou> o uygj pcut-«tre que J*tDvente, que 
\t trade d inugiruktioa cc que je (au de 
cUc ccttc kccoode ne.— Ki^tiirLN. 

Cbiccbique, adf^ excellent, "fizz- 
ing;" dajhingf stylish. Un pckin 



— , well-dressed, riih man. Un 
homme — , a nuin of fash ion ^ a 
well-dressed one ^ a well-to-do man. 
Un — homroe, a good, excellent 
man. 

Chican, m. (thieves'), hummer. 

Cbicandard. See Chicard. 

Cbicander (popular), to d,snce the 
" Chietird step." Sec Chicard. 

Chicane, /. (thieves'), grinchir k 
la — , stealing the purse or watch 
of a person while standing in front 
of him, but with the haek turned 
towards him — a feat which re- 
quires no ordinary dexterity. 

Chicard, m. (popular), bujffbon cha- 
racter of the carnivtit, tn fashion 
from 1830 to 1S50. The first who 
impersonated it was a leather- 
seller, who invented a new eccen- 
tric step, considered to be exceed- 
ingly '*chic;" hence probably his 
nickname of Chicard. His '* get- 
up" consisted of a helmet with 
high plume, jackboots, a flannel 
frock, and large cavalry gloves. 
Pas — ^ step invented by M, Chicard, 

Chicard, cbicancardo, cbican- 
dard, adj., superlative of *' chic,** 
*' tip-lop," "out and out," "slap 
Up,'* "tzing tzing.*' 

Chicarder, to dance the Chicard 
step. See Chicard, 

Chic et centre, toamitig which 
mountebanks address to one an- 
other, 

Chiche ! (popular), an exclamation 
exfressn'e of defiance. 

Chickstrac, m. (military), refuse, 
dung, excrement. Corvee dc — , 
fatigsu duty for swerptng away the 
refuse, and especicUly for emptying 
cesspools. 

Chicmann, m, (popular), /ai7pr. A 
great many tailors in Paris bear 
Cicrmanic names \ hence the ter* 
niination of the word. 

o 



82 



Chicor^e—Chiffonnier, 



Chicor6e, /. (popular), c'est fort 
de — , it is really too bad! Ficher 
de la — , to reprimand^ •* to give 
a wigging." Faire sa — , is said 
of a person with affected or 
" high-faluliD " airs. Nc fais 
done pas ta — , don't grit yourself 
swh airsj " come off the tall 
grass," as the Americans have it. 

Chi6, adj. (popular), tout — , " as 
like as two peas." 

Chie-dans-reau, m. (military), 
sailor. 

Chien, m. and ad/, (popular), noye, 
sugar soaked in coffee. (Jouma- 
lists*) Un — perdu, short news- 
paper paragraph. (Schoolboys*) 
Un — de cour, school us her ^ or 
"bum brusher." (Military) Un 
— de compagnie, a sergeant major, 
Un — de regiment, adjutant. 
(Familiar and popular) Le — du 
commissaire, police magistrate's 
secretary. The commissaire is a 
police functionary and petty magis- 
trate. He examines privately cases 
brought befure him, sends pri> 
soners for trial, or dismisses them 
at once, settles then and there 
disputes between coachmen and 
their fares, sometimes between 
husbands and wives, makes per- 
quisitions. He possesses to a cer- 
tain extent discretionary powers. 
Avoir du — , to possess dash^ go, 
'* gameness." Ilfaut avoir du — 
dans le ventre pour resister, one 
must have ivonderful staying 
poiocrs to resist. Avoir un — pour 
un homme, to be infatuated with 
a man. Faire le — , is said of a 
servant who follo^vs with a basket 
in the wake of her mistress ^ingto 
market. Rester en — de fiaience, 
to remain immovable^ like a block. 
Se regarder en — de faience, to 
look at one another without utter- 
ing a word» Viquer un — , to 
take a nap. Dormir en — de 



fusil, to sleep with the body doubled 
up. Une coiffure k la — , moi/e of 
wearing the hair loose on the fore- 
head, (Military) Un officier — , a 
martifut. 

Chiendent, »/., arracher le — . See 
Arracher. 

Chier (popular), coarse word ; — 
dans la vanette, to be too free and 
easy ; — de petiles crottes, to earn 
little money; to live in poverty ; 

— des carottes, to be costive; 

— des chasses, to weep^ "to nap 
a bib ;" — du poivre, to fail in 
keeping one's promise ; to abscond ; 
to vanish when o»ies services or 
help are most needed ; — sur i'ocil, 
to laugh at one ; — sur, to shazo 
great contempt for ; to abandon, 
Ne pas — de grosses crottes, to 
have had a bad dinner^ or no 
dittner at all. Vous me faites — , 
you bore me. Un gueuleton k — 
partout, a grand feast. Une mine a 

— dessus, a repulsive countenance. 
(Printers') Chier dans le cassetin 
aux apostrophes, to cease to be a 
printer. 

Chieur, m. (popular), d'encre, 
clerk^ or "quill-driver." 

Chiffarde, /. (thieves'), suvunons ; 
pipe. 

Cbiffe, /. fpojmlar), rog-picking ; 
tongue^ *'red rag." 

Chifferlinde, / (popular), lx>ire 
une — , to drink a dram of spirits. 

Chifferton, m. (popular), rag-picker, 
** bone-grubber," or "tot -picker." 

Chiffon, m. (popular), handkerchief 
"snottinger ; ' — rouge, tongue, 
" red rag. " Balancer le — rouge, 
to talk, *' to wag the red rag." 

Chiffonnage, m. [populax), plunder 
of a rag'Picker, 

Chiffonnier, m. (thieves'), pick* 
pocket who devotes his attention ta 
handkerchiefs, " stook-hauler ; " 




Chiffornion — Chiqnemcnt. 



85 



man of disordtriy habits, (Literary) 
CliifTonnicr de U double coUine, 
hadpott. 

CbifTornion, m. (popular), rilk 
kitndkireki€j^ or lUk *• wipe" 

Cbiffonin, m. (popular), rag-pkhr^ 
"Iwinc-grubbcr, or "lot-pickcr." 

Cbignard, m. (popular), inveterate 
^umbUr^ *' rusty guli." 

Chigner (popular), /* xveep^ •* to 
nxp a biU. " 

Chimique, /. (popular), ludfer 
matik. 

Chinage. See Chine. Vol au — , 
ieiltHg fiated tnnluts Jor the 
genuine artult. 

Chincilla (popular), grey^ or " pep- 
per ftod salt " hair. 

Chine. Aller k\% —^ to piy the 
tmJ{ (j/'diineur (which sec). 

Chiner (military), to slander one ; 
to riihrn/e one : (popular) toworJk ; 
/* go in quest of good bargains ; to 
buy fnrmtMre at sates and resell 
it ; to ftylltfw the pursuit of an old 
(iothes man ; to ha^vk ; to go about 
tkt couHt/y buying heads of hair 
from peasant girls., 

Chinear. or tnarg^ulin, m. 

(thieves*), one roho gvs about the 
country buying heads of hair of 
peasant girls, (Military) Chineur, 
iUnderer ; (popular) raMit-skin 
mam; marine store dealer; worker; 
Jk0»ker of cheap stuffs or silk 
Jkamdkerehiffs. 

F: i^nifie travAilleur, et 

«l<- . . Mai* re mot 

•e ■ . cr panicbliiremcQl 

V»« '■•uT' tNigrmfrii. . . . 

} >ut tribui^ Paris. I.'itnc 

Ikl-'i: -.tj aui«dn« qui >c heri««e 

eiirt u iiijrt M^iut-ert et le pctll lira* d« 
ta SciDv, ct notammmt rue det AtiKlJua. 
1,'aiurc okhe en tiaut tie Mtfntlmontanl, ct 
a 4oan£ Atitrefou son nom i U rue dc la 
Ow*. . . . 

Lm chineiin ftont, d'aillcart, dci coknu 
€1 MM dcs Pubiciii de Dunjince. Cti»jue 



gAi^mcion vient id chcrchcr foriune, cc 
k'efl reiounte eusuiu tui pays.— Richrpin, 
Le /--p/. 

Chinois, m. (popular), an indi* 
vidual, a "bloke." a *'covci" 
proprietor of toffi-e-house ; (fami- 
liar) term of friendship ; (mUi- 
tary) term of contempt applied to 
civilians^ hence probably the ex- 
pression *'pgkin, * civilian. 

Chinoiscric, / (familiar), quaint 
joke ; intricate and t^uatnt proce- 
dure or contrivance. 

Chipe,/ (popjlar),/r/;$y/«^. From 
chiper, to purloin, 

Chipelle, / (popular), trifU; no- 
thing; Leshtan 'twrnan^ that is, 
one with unnatural pxisions, 

Chipie. / (familiar). Literally jj'/r/ 
or Xi>oman unth a testy femfer, a 
"brim." Kaire sa — , to put on 
an air of supreme disdain or 
disgust. 

Cbipoteuse, / (popular), capri- 
eious woman. 

Chiquandar. See Chicard. 

Chique. See Chic. 

Chique. f. Properly quid of tobacco, 
(Popular) Avoir sa — , to be in a 
bad humour^ *'to be crusty," or 
"cranky." Avoir unc — , to be 
drunktOT "screwed." See Pom- 
pctte. Ca le coupe la — , t/iat's 
disappointing for you t that "cuts 
you up." Coller sa — , to bend 
one's head. Couper la — k 
quinze pas, to stink. Poset sa — , 
to die ; to be still. Pose la — ct 
fais Ic mort ! be still! shut uf>l 
hold your row! (Thieves') Chique, 
chunh. 

Chiqu6 (artistV), smartly executed* 
Also said of artistic uvrk done 
guickiy xvit/iout preidously study* 
ing nature. (Popular) Bicn — , 
tifell dressed, 

Chiquement, with chic(whichsee). 



84 



Chiquer — Chouia. 



Cbiquer (familiar), to do anything 
tn a nup^nor manner ; to do artU' 
tic iivri- with more bnHianty than 
ateuracY ; {popular) to thrath, 
*'lo wallop, ' see Voie ; /i» en/, 
** to gruh," sec Masttquer. 
Se — I to/ight^ *• 10 drop into one 
anollicr.'* 

Chiquer centre or battre k niort 

( thieves'), t9 deny out's guilt, 

Chiqueur, w. (p4}pular)» giutlon, 
"stodger ;" (artists*) an artist 
who paints with smartws% or one 
■;i'ho tirau'S or feints withont study- 
tn^ natur€^ 

Chirurgien^ w. (popular), en vieux, 

(ohNtr. 
Chnic. See Chenique. 
Chocaillon, ///. (pnpular), femait 

in\:-pirker ; female drunkard^ or 

" luihington." 
Chocnoao, chocnosof, chocno- 

sogue, koscnofr, txeeUent, te- 

nitjrkai'le, hriUiant^ "crushing,'' 

'* nobliy," *' lip-lop," *' fizzing." 
Chocolte, /I (ra^-pickers'), marrerw 

Ifciie ; (thieves') /<)pM, 

Chol^ra^ w. {jKjpular), sw orstnc- 
•xvorker ; bad meat, 

Cholet, m. (popular), white bread 
of superior quality. 

Cholette, / (thieves*), kal/a litre. 
Double — , a Hire. 

Choper (poptil.nr), to steal, ** to 
prig." See Grinchir. Old word 
choper, to touch anything, to make 
it fall, Se laisser — , toalloxv one- 
self to be eaught, to be'' nabbed." 

Chopin, m. (thieves'), theft; stolen 
offjict ; blow. Faire un — , to 
commit a theft. 

Chose, adj. (familiar and popular), 
/■// at ease ; sad: embarrassed. II 
prit un air — , he looked sad or em- 
barrassed, Je mc sens lout — , 
I feel ill at ease ; queer. 



Chou ! (thieves' and cads'), a warn- 
ing cry to intimate that the police 
or p>eople are eomtng up. Termed 
also *' Acrcsto T' 

Choucarde, f. (miliary), wJieti' 

btirriTi'. 

Choucbouter (familiar), tofendle, 
•*to lirkyloodli: ; " to ipoii o$ie. 
From chuuchou, darling. 

Chou colossal, m. (familiar), a 
s( he me for nviudling the public by 
ftil*ulous accounts of Juture promts. 

Choucroute, / (popular), tete or 
mangeur dc — , a German. 

Choucrouter(popul.ir), /«7 t-fi/zdu^- 
krant ; to sp<ak Ueruian. 

Cboucrouteur, choucroutmann,^ 
m., German. 

Choueite, chouettard, chouet- 
taud, lulj., good : fine; perfect^ 
"chummy,'' "real jam," **inie 
marmalade." C'cst ricn — , that's 
Jirst-cltsss I Que] — temps, what 
spfettdtd wather! Un — regi- 
ment, a crack regiment, (Dis- 
paragingly) Nous itommes — , it* 
are in a fine pickle. 

Chouette, / and adj. (thieves'), 
eire — , to be caught. Faire uue 
— , to piny at billiards against twa 
other players. 

Choueilement (popular), finely; 
perfectly, 

Cbouez (Breton), house ; — doue, 
church. 

ChoufRic (popular), bad ^oorkman. 
In the German schutlick, cobbler, 

Chouffliquer (popular), to work in 
a clumry manner, 

Chouffliqueur, m. (popular), bad 
uvrkman ; (inililary) shoetnaker^ 
*'snob." 

Choufretez(Breton),/«r/J^rwiz/^^/A 

Chouia (military), gently. From 
ihc Arabic. 



Ckouii — Cintihne, 



8S 



Cbouil (Breton), work ; insect. 

Chouila (Breton cant), to ii>orJi ; to 
i'-'j^l many thildrtH. 

Chouiftta (Breton), to work uitk a 

Choumaque (popular), tkoemaker. 
From ihc German. 

Cbourin, for surin (thieves'], knift^ 
" chive." 

Si j*M pas I'rond. moD tarin bounce. 
Mot, c'ot dsn> W tanK qu*]'aunM« truqu£. 
Vai« qoand on fnit «uer, pnmaqu^ ' 
Mifujc VAui boufTer du blaac uu'du ruiice. 

Chouriner, for auriner (thievb'), 
to httfe^ " to chive." 

Chourineur, rj/., for surineur 

i(fi tvcs"), am M'ho usfs the knife ; 
in.'.Jrir. *'I>c Chmirincur " isonc 
«.f the characters of Eugj;ne Sue's 
Mjsf^ts tie Piiris. 

C'housa [Breton), to eat, 

C'housacta (Breton), /W. 

Chretien, iuij. (popular), mixed 
utf/t HHtter^ "baptiacd." 

Chretien, m, (popular), viande de 
— , hnman jUsk, 

Chrysalide, /. (popular), old co- 

ifmette. 

Chtibes, /. //. (popular), ifootSt 
-huck-dockics." 

Chybre, m. (popular), sec Flageo- 
let; lartist^') member of the In- 
xfu'ut iie J-rante, 

Cbyle. m. (familiar), se rcfaire le 
— , to katt a good meal, a 
"tightener." 

Cibicbc, / (popular), cigarette. 

Cible. / (popular), \ cou[>5 de 
piols brteth. Sec Vasistas. 

Ciboulf, / (ptipular). head, or 

" block/* Se« Tronche. 
CiJre iUgant, m. (familiar), ckam' 
pa^u, *' fi/." or "boy." 



Ciel, m. (fishcrmens*), jc — plumant 
»es poules, clouds. 

Lcs nLiaKe«, c'etait IccicI pliimani4c«poule«, 
Ec la foudrc en dr.lab. Michel ca»Miit ks 

II appclait le Tcnt dii tud comemu*ra«, 
Cclui du nortl coniani. de t'oum tNt>e & 

Srenuuille, 
e fturoit rbrouf, celui de lerrc an- 
douilW. 

RlCHBPIN, Z.« Mer. 

Cierge, m. (thieves'), polUe officer, 
or "reefer." For synonyms see 
Pot-itabac. 

Cig, w.. cigale, or tigue, /. 

(thieves'), gold coin ^ or "yellow 
boy." 

Cigale, / (popular), frtnaie street 
singer. Froperly grasshopper ; 
aUo cigar. 

Cigogne,/ (thieves'), tke " Prefec- 
ture de Police " in Paris ; tkt 
Palais de Justice ; cottrt of justice^ 
Le dab dc la — , the public prost^ 
ctttor ; the prefect of police. 



i' 



e monie i la dKogDc. 
n mc certx !t Ia grolie, 
Au up, et pQUf douce a>i«. 

ViDOCQ. 



Cigue,/ (thieves'), abbreviation of 
cigale, tiuenty^franc piece. 

Cimaise (painters*), faire sa — snr 

quelqu'un, to shotv up one's own 
gocfd qualities, wktrtker real or 
imaginary^ at the expense of am- 
other* s failings, in other words, to 
preath for ont's own .kapel. 

Ciment, m. (freemasons'), mmtarj, 

Cingler (thieves'), se — le blair, to 
gti drunk, or "canon.** 

Cinq-il-sept. m., a kind of tea 
party from five o'clock to sei'tn in 
the fashionable wortti. 

Cinq-centimadas, m. (ironical), 
one*s0U cigar. 

Cintiime, m. (papular), high cap 
generally '.vom hv wonun^s ^nllies^ 
or *' pensioners. 



86 



Cintrer — Claqucr, 



Cintrer (popular), fohoU ; (thieves*) 
— en pogne, to stiu koid of ^ to 
at^thatdf or " lo »intig." See 
Piper. 

Cipal, m. (popular), abbreviation of 
gardc-municipaU The ** t^arde 
muntcipale " is a picked body of 
old soMiers whn furnish guards 
ana perform jjoIIcc funclions at 
theatres, official ceremonies, police 
courts, i;c. It cnnsisis of infantry 
and cn^nlry, nixl \s in the pay of 
the Paris inuniciixil authorities, 
mo-.i of the men having been 
non-co[Dini>!>ionc(l officers in the 
army. 

Ciragc, w. I |-opiiUr). />r,ns*, " soft 

sawder," "butict." 

Cire,/'., voleur a la — , ro^e who 
itfo/s a sihrr jork or spoon at a 
rtJtawaHtt anJ makes it adhert 
und^r thi tabie hy meam of a piae 
of soft wax. When charged with 
tnc theft, he puts on an air of in- 
jured innocence, and asks to be 
seaichcd ; then Icavcit wiilii ample 
apologies from the master of the 
restaurant. Soon after a confedc- 
rale enters, takini^ his friend's 
former ^at at the table, and 
pocketing the booty. 

Ciri, m. (popular), ne^o. From 
circr, to Idnrk sko<j. 'I'crnied alsvo 
** boUe it ciragc, bamliouU, boule 
de ncigc, billc de pot au feu." 

Cirer (popular), to f raise; tojfaiter, 

"lo t>uiier." 

Cireux, m. (popular), one 7t>ith in- 
jliimed eyelids. 

Ciseaux, w. pi. (litcrarj-). travailler 
»i coups dc — , to <omptle. 

Citi, /. (popular), d'aniour, gay 
girit ** bed-ingot." 

Je l*»i traii^ commr cite le in<?Titait. Je 
Tai app«i^f«i^aate,ct!c d'amour, cbeniUe, 
DUKhine li ))lAisir.— M ac£. 



Citron, m. (ihealricaU. squeaky 
«(V/; (thieves' and cads') M^ head^ 
"nut," or •*chump." Termed 
also '*tronchc, sorlwnne, poire, 
cafetiere, irognan, ciimuille." 

Cttrouille, /., citrouillard, w. 
(military), dragoon ; (thieves') 
heoii^ "mil," or "tibby.'* 

Civade,/. (thieves'), o>Us. 

Civard, m. (popular), /V7f/w»T. 

Cive,/ (popular), ^fljj. 

CUirs, M. i»/. (thieves'), ow, or 
•'glancre.' See Mirettes. 

Soufflcr scs — , to sleep, lo *'do«s," 
or to have a *'dosc of the balmy." 

Clairti, / (|Kjpular), light ; beauty. 

CUmpiner (popular), to idlea'vut ; 
to loMMge ahitvt Imtly^ *' to mike.** 

Clapoter [popular), to tat^ "to 
gnib." See Mastiquer. 

Claqui, m. and adj. ([Kipular), 
dead, dead mart. La boile nux 
claques, the AUrgue^ or t^aris 
detid'hoHSe, \jt jardln des claques, 
the cemetery, 

Claquebosse, m. (popular), house 
of til fame, or " nanny-Hhop." 

Claquedenta, m. (popular), house 
of ill'faine^ *' nanny -shop ; " 
gnming'house^ or "punlingshop ;'* 
l<nv eating house, 

Claquefaiai, m. (popular), r/iirrm^ 

ntitn, 

Claquepalins, ni. (popular), miser' 

able ilipihod person. 

Vencc *i moi. cliiqucp.ittnK, 
I^xgvieieux, jautuni de mu^tte, 
CUmpins, loupcufK, voyous, catint. 
RtCHBI-IN. 

The early French poet Villon uses 
the word "dit^uepatin" with the 
same signification. 

Claquer (familiai), to die^ " to 
cru.ik ;" to eat ; to sell; — 8C« 



Claques — Clous. 



8; 



I 



neubles, to sell one*s fHmiiure; 

— du bee, to b€ z>rry hungry 
without any muatu of satufyin^ 
ffiwV crtxviHg/or food. 

Claques, / //. (familiar snd popu- 
lar), une fii;ure a — , /ace ivith an 
impuJtnt expression that invites 
puniskmmf* 

CUrinetle, /. (military), de cinq 
pieds, muiJsa, /ormtrly "Brown 

CUsse. /. (popular), un — diri* 
i^cant, laid ironiially of ont oj tht 
ufp^r ittisses. 

Clavin, m, (thieves'), mail ; grapes, 

Clavine,/ (thieves'), vim. 

CUviner (thieves'), to tiai/; to 
j^ather grapes* 

CUvineur, m. (thieves'), x'ine- 
drc-Ser. 

Clavinier, m. (thieves'), nail- 
mtuker. 

Clef, /. (familiar), i la — . See A 
ia. Pcnlre sa — , to suffer from 
eotiu or ••bolt5." (Military) La 

— du champ de manoeuvre, tmagi- 
mitry ohjett vhtch recruits are re- 
queitett by practical Jokers to go 
and ask ef the sergeant. 

Cliabeiu, ni., expression used by 
ibe prt&oncrs of Saiut-Lazare, 
*/** tor. 

Cliche, /. (popular), diarrhaa^ or 
•' jerry-go«nirable." 

Cliche, m. (familiar), commonplace 
unttHie reaJy made ; common- 
place metaphor ,- welt'ivom plati- 
Imde. (Printers') Tirerson — ^tobt 
always repeating the same thing. 

Client, M. (thieves'), victim, or in- 
tended victim. 

Clipner (military), des orillcts, to 
squint, to be '* boss-eyed." 



Clignots, m. pi. (popular), <>•«, 
"peqwrs." Bavcr des — , to 
weep, *' to nap a bib." See 
Mirettes. 

Clipet, m. (thieves'), voice. 

Clique, / (popular), scamps or 
" bad egg ; "diarrhaa, or "jerry- 
go-nimble." (Military) La — ^ the 
s^uad of drummers and buglers. 

Exempts de wrvice, ib excrcrnt ftfn^- 
nletxicnt unc profcAUon quclmnqtie (bar- 
bier, lailleur, ajustcur dc gujirc^, etc.) qui 
leur rapportc quclqun b^n^fice«. Ayant 
aiini plus tic temiJ<t cl plut il'iirjfcnl it d^ 
peiucr que Icurs caniaxadci, i\% orit um 
nfpuutton, a&«cx bien jiulili<!« d'aillcun, 
d« b;iixibochcurm ; dc Ul, ce nom de clique 
cu'on leur dunoe. — La Z4UtgMe t'rrtt du 

CliquetteB, / pi. (popular), ears, 
or "wattles." 

Clodoche, m. (familial), descrip- 
tion of professional comic dancer 
Vfith extrtwrdinarily supple legs^ 
such as the Girards brothers, yf 
Alhambra celebrity, 

Cloporte, m. (familiar), door'kreper. 
Properly :ooo^ilouse, A pun on 
the words cKjI porte. 

Clou, m. (military), guard-room ; 
cells, *'jiggcr;" Intyonet, Coller 
au — , to imprison, ** to roost." 
(Popular) Clou, baj^ icorkman ; 
pawnshop, Mctlrc au — , to fiawn, 
to put *' in lug." Clou de girofle, 
decayed black tooth, (Theatrical 
and literary) Lc — d'une piirce, 
d'un roman, the chief point of 
interest in a play or novels lite- 
rally (2 natl OH which the whole 
fabric hangs, 

Clouer (popular), to imprison^ " to 
run in ; to pcu/tty "to blue, to 
spout, to lumber," 

Clous, m, pi. (popular), tods. 
(Printers') Petits — , type. Lcrer 
les peiits — , to compose. {}A\\\' 
tary) Clous,yiw/-W{//V«, or"mud» 
crushers." 



88 



Coaguler — Cocotterie. 



Coaguler (familiar), se — , ta get 
dntnk. Sec Sculpter. 

C6bier, m,, htap of scUt in salt- 
marshes, 

Cocanges, /. pi. (thieves'), wo/- 
nitt-shelh. Jcu de — , g^*^' <*/ 
mnmiiers at fairs, 

Cocangeur, m. (thieves'), Jw/^/Z^r. 
See Cocanges. 

Cocantin, m. (popular), business 
agrnt acting as a fiiedium between 
a debtor and a creditor. 

Cocarde,/. (popular), head. Avoir 
sa ^, to be tipsy. Taper sur la 
— , is said 0/ xvine which gets tntc 
the head. 

Ma Jnie et Burtout I'petit bleu 
Ca m'a uptf $ur l« cocatrde \ 

Parisaam S^ng. 

Cocarder (popular), se — , tc get 
tipsy. See Sculpter. 

ToDt »c pa&sait tris gentiment, on £uit 
gai, il n« TalUit luu maintcnani sc cocarder 
cijchonnrmcnt, *i Ton voulait respecter le» 
damet — j!oLA, 1,'Atsommair. 

Cocardier, m, (mililaxy), ntilitary 
man passionately fond of his pro- 
Jesstott, 

Cocasserie,/. (familiar), strange or 
grotesque sayings writing, or deed. 

Coche, / (popular), fttt, red-faced 
ifitman. 

Cochon, m. (popular), de bon* 
heur ! (ironicaJ) noituk! Ca n'est 
pas trop — , that^s net so bad. 
C'esl pas — du toul, Mo/'i X'cry 
nice. Mon pauvre — , je ne Ic 
dis que ^a I my poor fdlfftv, you 
are tnfor iff Etre — , to be /exid. 
Se conduire comine un — , to /v- 
hat'e in a mean, despicable v-ay. 
Soigner son — , is said of one who 
lives too well. Un costume — , a 
suggestive dress, 

Cochonne, / (popular), lewd girl. 
(Ironically) Elle o'est pas jotte, 
mats clle c»t si codmnne t 



Cochonnement. ativ. (popular), 
in a disgusting mantier. 

Cochonnerie. /. (popular), any 
article of food having pork for a 

basis, 

Cocfaonneries, / pf, (popular), 
indecent talk or actions. 

Coco, m, (military), horse. La 
botte h. ^, trumpet call for stables , 
(literally) La boUe de ioin a coco. 
( Popular) Coco, brandy ; head. 
See Tronche. Avoir le — de- 
plume, to be bald^ or to hare a 
•' bladder of lard." For synony- 
mous expressions, tee Avoir. 
Avoir le — fcM, to be cracked, 
" to be a little bit balmy in 
one's crumpet." For sjmonyms 
see Avoir. CoIIe'tot 9a dans le 
— , or passe-loi 5a par le — , 
tat that or drink that, Devisser 
le — , to strangle. Monter le — , 
to excite. Sc monter le — , to get 
excited; to be too sanguisu. 11 a 
graissc la palte h. — , is said of a 
man ivho has bungled over sfftne 
a fair. (Familiar) Coco <fpilcp- 
tique, champagne ivint, "fix," 
or ' * boy." 

Cocodfctc, /. (familiar), stylish 
woman always dressed according 
to the latest Jashion^ a "dasher." 

Cocons, m. pi., stands for co-con- 
scrits, first'term stuttettts ai the 
Ecole Polytechttique, 

Cocotle, /. (popular), term of ew 
dearvient to horses. Allons, hue — I 
pull up^ my beauty] (Familiar 
and popular) Cocoite, a more 
than fast girl or rtfomjiu, a 
" pretty horse-breaker," see 
Gadoue ; (theatrical) addition 
made by singers to an original 
theme, 

Cocoiterie,/ (familiar), the woriJ 
of the cocottis. See Cocottc. 



Cocovieilits — Collage. 



89 



Cocovieillet, /. //. , name ghm hy 
fash'.onabU young ituim of the 
ariUocrtuy to their old'fashiontd 
Hdcrji who return the amipUment 
hy dubbing them **cocobO[.Les.'* 

Cocufieur, m. (poputnr), one luko 
iu/tjos^ thai w, one who lays 
htmself open to being ealled to 
auoHMi by OH injured husbanJ as 
ike courts p<3ndcnt in the dn-orce 
iOUrt, 

Coenne, or couenne, / (thieves'), 
dc Iftrd. brush. (Familiar and 
popular) Couenne, stnpid man, 
du*ue. 

Coere, ni. (ihievea*), le grand — , 
formerly the king 0/ rogues. 

Csur. m. (popular), jeier da — 
sur le carrcau, to tvfftit. A pua 
on (lie words "hearts "and "dia- 
monds " of cards on the one hand, 
avoir mal au — , to fcei sick, and 
"caiTcaa,"_^!«iriw^, on the other. 
V'alcl de — , Iffver. 

Ccsur d'artichaut, m. (popular), 
p*tin or ji^offutn tvitk an infant- 
tmabl€ heart, 

PaHlaKon, qooi I otEur d*Bnichaui, 

Ce«t mum genre; un' leuillc (wur tout 

An )our d'aiijC'urd'Inji J'gobe la blonde ; 

Aprts d nuiin, cm la bruo' qu'i m'faut. 

GtLL, Im AfiuwA Biii. 

CofiBcr (thieves*), abbreviation of 
escoffier, to killf •* lo cook one's 

graeL" 

Coffin. «.» peitiliar kind of desk at 
the Ecole Polyteahniijue, From 
the inventor's name, General 

Co^ac. m. (thieves'), gtndarme or 
peiiie offiier, "crusher." "cop- 
per." or "reeler." See Pol-k- 
tabic. 

Co^ade. /, or cojne (ihieres*), 
gcnJa r merits 



Cognard, «., or cogne, gendarme 
and gendarnttrie ; p»iice o^eer, 
*' copper." 

Cogne, m. and /. (ihicvcs*), la — , 
the police. Un — , rt police o^ter, 
or"rccIcr." See Pot-&-tabac. 
Also brandy. L'n noir dc trois 
ronds sans — , a three-halfpenny 
cup of coffee n/iihoui brandy, 

CoifTer (popular), to slap; to deceive 
om's Atisband. Se — dc quel- 
qu'un, to take a fancy to one. 

Coin, M. (populor), c'cst un — sans 
i, Aeis a fool. 

Coire (thieves'), farm ,■ chief. 

Je rcncontrai des camarsde* c]ui avaicnc 
au:kM fan leur tcmp« ou c«v«e Irur ficelle. 
Leur cotre mepropon d'etre dcs leiin. oa 
fftisait la ^nuM bouloMt sur le triinar,— 
V. Hugo. 

Col, m, (familiar), cass^, dandy, 
or "masher." Se pousser du — , 
to aisume an cur of selfimpor* 
tance or conceit, "to look gump* 
lio«s ; " to praise oneself up. An 
allusion to the motion of one's 
hand under (he chin when about 
to make an important statement. 

Colas, colabre, or colin, m. 
(thieves'), «^f--6, or "scrag." Faire 
suer le — , to strangle. Kafrakhir 
le — , to guillotine. Rofralchir 
means to trim in the exnrcssion, 
" KafroJchir les cheveux. 

Colback, m. (military), raw recruit^ 
or "Johnny raw." An allusion 
to his unkempt hair, similar to a 
busby or bearskin cap 

Colin. See Colas. 

CoUabo, m. (literary), abbreviation 
of collaborateur. 

Collage, ffi. (familiar), living ax 
husband and wife in an unmarried 
state, 

L'urw aprfct rauire— en camarade— 
C'eM rupin, mais I' caWiffi, bon Dim t 
Toujuurs la iiicm' chiitineu!i' de picu ! 
M'cn parlei pas ! Ca m'ncnd nuUde. 

C\i.l., La Mhu A BiU. 



90 



Collant — Coltiger. 



Un — d'argent, the action of a 
wman who lives with a man as 
his wife from mercenary motives, 

O^'ait kIoh la manic de ce corruptcur 
de mineurcs, le itceau avec lequel il cimen- 
tait ce que Madame Coraette appelait, en 
terme du metier, ses collages d'araent \ 
Mim*im de Monsieur Clau J*. 

Collant, m. (familiar), is sat J of one 
not easily got rid of; (military) 
lirawers. 

Collarde, m. (thieves*), prisoner^ 
one ** doing time." 

CoUe,/ (students'), w^i/y tfr ff/'Art' 
periodical oral examinations tO 
prepare for a fined examination^ 
or to make up the marks which 
pass one at the end of the year. 

College, m, (thieves'), prison, or 
**stir." See Motte. Un ami 
de — , a prison chum. Les col- 
leges de Pantin, the Paris prisons. 

CoU6gien, m, (thieves'), /n>0»^. 

Co\\tT{siu^t.i\\%% to stop one's leave; 
to orally examine at periodical ex- 
aminations. Se faire — , to get 
plucked or " pIough«l " at an ex- 
amincUion. (Popular) CoUer, to 
place ; to put ; to give ; to throio ; 

— au bloc, to imprison^ " to run 
in;" — dcs chkta\gneSf to thrash, 
"to wallop." Sec Vole. Se- 
dans le pieu, to go to bed, Sc — 
une biture, to get drunk, or 
"screwed.'* See Sculpter. 
Colle-toi \h., place yottrself there, 
Colle-toi 9a dans le fusil, mt or 
lirink that. Colle-toi 9a dans la 
coloquinte, bear that in mind. 
(Military) Collcr au bloc, to send 
to the guard-room. Collez-moi ce 
clampin-li au bloc, take that la^ 
bones to theguard-room. (Familiar 
and popular) Se — , to live cu man 
and wife, to live "a tally." Se 
faire — , to be nonplussed, S'en 

— par le bee, to eat to excess, " to 
scorf.** S*en — pour, to go to the 



expense of, Je m'en suis collrf 
pour dix francs, I spent ten francs 
ever it, 

ColUtiner (thieves'), to collar, to 
apprehend, "to smug." See 
Piper. 

Colleur, m. (students'), pt-ofessor 
whose functions are to orally ex- 
amine at certain periods students 
at private or public establishments ; 
man who gets quickly intimate or 
" thick " with one, who "cottons 
on to one." 

Collier, or coulant, m. (tliieves*), 
cravat, or " neckinger." 

Collignon, m. (popular), eabhy. An 
allusion to a coachman of that 
name who murdered his fare. The 
cry, " Oh^, Collignon ! " is about 
the worst insult one can offer a 
Paris coachman, and he is not 
slow to resent it. 

Coicmbe, / (players'), queen of 
cards, 

Colombi, adj, (thieves'), inoun. 

Colon, m. (soldiers'), colonel. Pe- 
tit — , iieutenant-cohnel. 

Colonne,/ (military), chapeau en 
— , see Bataille. (Popular) 
N'avoir pas chie la — , to be devoid 
of any talent, not to be able to set 
the Thames on fire. Demolir la 
— , to void urine, ** to lag." 

Coloquinte, f. (popular and 
thieves'), head. Avoir une 
araignee dans la — , to be cracked, 
or " to have a bee in one's lin- 
net." Chariot va jouer a la boule 
avec ta — , Jfick Ketch will play 
skittles with your canister. 

Coltiger (thieves'), to arrest; to 
seiu, to " smug." 

Ce&t dans la rue du Mail 

Ou j'ai^t^ coltifi^ 

Par trois coquins de railles- 

V. Hugo, Le Demirr Jour 
dun Condamnf. 



^ 



Col tin — Comprendre, 



91 



Coltin, m. (popular), strength. 
Properly shcuUfi-sfrap. 

Cottiner (popular), ta ply the truiie 
cf a porter ; to *iraxv a hiimt-<art 
hy means of a sKoHltier-strap, 

Coltineur. m. (popular), mnn wAo 
dfau'i a hand-Lartwith a shouUet- 
strap. 

Coltincuse (popular), yS-wa^ tvho 
dees rou^h worJt. 

Comberge, comb-rgeante, /. 
Ithievcs'), confeision. 

Comb«rger (iliievcs*), tortckon up; 
ta ton/est* 

Combcrgo (thieves'), confesnonal. 

Comblance, /. (thieves'), par — , 
nUo the bargain. 



Tai fail i»ar comblance 



/ImIc (arjiuecap^. 

ViDOCQ. 

Comble, combre, combriau, 
combrieu, w. | thieves'), halt 
*Milc." i>ee Tub*rd. 

Combne. / (thieves'), one/ratu 

pttce. 

Combrier, m, (ihieves*), h<it-maier. 
Combrieu. See CoiT;ble. 

Combrousier, «/. (thieves*), pea* 
laru, or " clod." 

Combu»lihle, w. (popular), du 
— ! e-xtiaNiathn useU to ur^Y out 
0Ht On ! go it ! 

Come, m, (thieves*), formerly a 
f^ard on board the ^-UUys* 

Comidie, f. (popular), envoyer d 
la — , to diifniss a workman J'gr 
■vxint of tvork to gh-e him. Ltre 
i ta — , to it oiitofu-ork^ *' out of 
collar.'* 

Comestaux, «, pi, (popular), for 
CMnic«til'lea, articles 0/ food, 
••|okc." 



Comite, f. (popular), vagrant, 
tramp. Filer la — ^, or la sorgue, 
to sleep in the open air, or "to 
skipper it." 

Coiriques, m. pi, (theatrical), 
jouer Ics — habillcs, to rrptxsatt 
a fcmie character in modern cos- 
tume. 

Commander (thieves'), k cuire, 
to send to the scaffold, 

Commandile, f. (printers'), 01:0- 
cititto/i of iivrkmen who join to- 
gether fof the perfarmnme of any 

Comme if (popular), ironical for 
comnie il faui, genteel. T'aa rien 
lair — ! What a su'ell ypu look^ 
oh crikey t 

Commisiaire, m, (popular), //«/ 
or pitihrr of wine. An athi>ion 
to the black robe which jKilicc 
magistrates wore formerly. Le 
cabal du — , the police magistrate's 
secretary. See Chicn, 

Commode, /. {thieves'), chimney. 
(Popular) One — \ deux ressorts. 
d vehicle, or " trap." 

Commanard, or communeux, 

m., one of the insurgetits of 1S71. 

Communique, m, (familiar), offi- 
cial fommnniiation to newspapers, 

Comp. See Can. 

Compas, m. (popular), ouvrir le — , 
to 'walk. AiloiiKer le — , to wall 
briskly. Fermcr le — , to stop 
•UMilkistg, 

Complet, adj. (popular), ctrc — , 
lobe quite drunk, or '*ilewed," 
(Familiar) Etre — , to he petfutly 
rtdteulous. 

Comprendre (thieves*), la — , to 
steal, "to ciaim." See Grin- 
Cllir. 



Compte — Conservatoire, 



Compte (popular), avoir $on ^, to 
U tipn't or "screwetl;" to (/fV, 
•* 10 snuff it." Son — est bon, 
he is in for it. 

Compter {musicians'), dcs payses, 
ta iUep ; (popular) — ses chemises, 
to iK'Hiit, ** to cut up accounts." 

Comte, w. (thieves'), de caniche, 
or dc canton, jitHor, or "jigger 
dubber;" — de ca£tu, hospital 
suptrintendent ; — de gigol-fin, 
ont who likes to live well. 

ComtoiB, adj. (thieves'), batire — » 

to diiSfmbU ; to play thr fool. 
Conasse, or connassc, f. (prosti* 
tutcs*), a stuptd or tuoiiesl woman. 
Elle» vantent loir tavoir-faire. ellei re- 
procheol n leurs caourade* leur impifritie, 
ct Icur dutineat Ic num de c'inav\e, ex* 
pre».\ion par laquelte ellc« di^Mgnent ordi- 
luircmcnt unc (cmme honncte, - pAREhT- 
DL'CHATRt-KT, Df Im J^r>»iitmliffn. 

Condi, m. (thieves'), mayor ; dcmi 
— , alilerman ; grand — , prefect ; 
— Iranc, cormpt ma^slrate. 

Condice,/. (thieves'). r<yr/« ufhi<h 
coHvUts are confined on their pas ' 
sa^ to the coHviet sittUmetUs. 

Condition, f. (thieves'), house^ 
"diggings," or *' hangs out." 
Fairc unc — , to break into a 
hffuse^ *' to crack a crib." Filer 
une — , to ivatch a house in virtv 
of an intended burglary. (Popu- 
lar) Aclicler une — ,loleadaMew 
mode o/hfe, to turn over a »trw leaf 

Conduite, /. (popu)ar), fairc la — , 
to drive a^vay and thrash. Fairc 
la — de Grenoble, /*► fut one out 
of doors. 

Cone,/ (thieves'), death. 

Confirmer (popular), to box on/s 
ears, ** to warm the wax of one's 

ears." 

Confiture,/, (popular), excrement, 

Confiturier, m. {pQp\x\tkT)fSeavemgrr, 
" rakc-kennel. ' 



Confortable, m. (popular), ^/oj/^ 

beer. 
Confrere, m. (popular), de U lune, 

injured husband. 

Coni, adj. (thieves'), dead, 
Coniller (popular), to seek to escape. 
Conil, rabbit. 

Conir (thieves'), to conee>tl ; to kill ; 

** to cook one's gruel." Sec Re- 

froidir. 
Connais (popular), je la — , no 

nnosfor me ; do you see auyjipeen 

in my eye f you donU take an 

old bird with chaff. 

Connaissance,/ (popular), ma — , 
my mistresi^ or sweetheart, my 
*' young woman." 

Connaitre (popular), le journal, to 
he toell infomud ; to know before- 
hand the menu of a dinner; — le 
numero, to possns experience ; — 
le numero de quelqu un, to be ac- 
quainted with one's secrets, one's 
habits. La — dans les coins, to be 
knowing, to knoiv what's o'clock. 
An allusion lo a horse clever at 
turning the comci^ in the riding 
school. 

Reffardet-le pxitir, te ipvrocho qa'x U 
coniiait daiu la coins — RtCHBriM. 

Connerie,/ (popular), /ft'/«i action 
or thing. From an obscene word 
which has the slang signiHcaiion 
oifool. 

Conobler (thieves'), to recognize, 

Conobrer (ihieves'), to know. 

Conscience./ (printers'), homme 
de — , fypffgrvpher paid by the 
day or by the hour. 

Conscrar, camcTit^ m ,first-ter/n 

student at the '' Ecole Norm ale,** 
a higher training-school for unrver* 
si/y professors. 

Conservatoire, w. (pop«Url,;^<ra'/i. 
shop. Elive du — de la VillcUe, 
wretched singer. Ijl Villelle U 



C^mservcs — Coqu age. 



93 



: 



the revene of a fashionable quar* 
ter. 

ConeerveB,/. {thcatrical),tfA///fl>'T. 
AKo frn^nients of human (ttih 
whH'h Am'£ Af«r« ikrown into the 
jfioftj or rhfrr by tnurdfrers^ and 
wkith, whtft founds arc taktn to 
iht " iVfor^t" or taris dead- 

hOHSt, 

,U vicnft d« pff>jparer pour lui tcs con- 
•crvct (?c« ■torccaox de chair humninc), 
To* tler^nut Juxih cl Ia t uiv«c Ak% 5uunih- 
PciCk (l'o» retrtniv^ dat]» l'<f|[out de U Kue 
Jacob vt U cuiuc rcpecti^e au pool des 
3ainU>Pir«s). — MacA, Man t'rtmitr 
Crimr. 

Consigne* /. (miliiar)), jk gros 
grains, imprisonment in thf «lls. 

Consolation./ (popular), brandy; 
rtnndlmg gamt played by card' 
sharpers, by mranj ofa^eendoth 
thalKttiinto imail numbered spaces i 
and due. 

Console,/, (thieves*), gatm flayed 
by card'sharpers er *' broailsmcn " 
at races and fairs^ 

Consoler (popalor), son cafe, to 
add brandy to one's coffee. 

Conter (mililar)). Contc ccia au 
pertiiquter des Zouavci, / do not 
beiine y.^u, 'MeU that to the 
Mannes." Le perruq uicr des 
Zouaves is an imiiginar)' imii* 
vkiual. 

Cootre, m, (popular), pfnying for 
drtnk at a rn/e. 

Contre-allunieur, m. (ihieves*), 
spy employed by i Aleves to ba^le 
the pot ice f/vj. 

Conlrebasse, / (|>opular), breech. 
Sau'rr sur la — , to kick one's be- 
AinJt '* to loc one's bum,"*' to 
root," or " to land a kick." 

CentrC'Coup, m. (popular), de la 
boIte,ytfr//M(»fl, or " tioss." 

CoQtreficher (popular), s'en — , 
/o care not a stratc, not a 
"hang." 



Contre-marque, / (popular), du 
Pire-Lat-haise, St. Heiemt medat, 
Tho&e who wear the medal are 
old, and k* P^rc-Lachaise is a 
cemetery in Paris. 

Contrfile, wi, (thieves'), formerly 
the fnark on the shoulder of con- 
victs who had been branded. 

Controler (popular), to kick one in 
the face. 

Convalescence,/, (thieves'), sur- 
veillance of tht police OH the niove- 
mrnti of tUket-ofleave mtn. 

Cop, /. (primers*), for "copic," 
manuscript. 

Copaille, / (cads'), Sodomist. 
Termed also '*lantc, coquine." 

Cope, /. (popular), overcharge for 
an article ; action of '* shavint; a 
customer." The Slang t>ic- 
tionary says that in England, 
when the master sees an oppor- 
tunity of doing this, he strokes 
his chin as a signal to his assis- 
tant who is serving the customer. 

Copeau, m. (popular), artisan in 
jcvalzforl: (properly copeaux, 
shat'in^s) ; spittle, or " gob." 
Arracherson — . See Arracher. 
Lever son — , to tal^b, " to jaw," 

Copeaux, m. pi. (thieves'), house- 
breeU'ing, "screwing or cracking 
a crib." An allusion to the splin- 
ters resulting from breaking a 
door. 

Copie, /! (primers'), de chapclle, 
copy pf a loork given as a praent to 
the typographers. (Figuratively) 
Faire de la — , to beukbite. Pisscr 
de la — , to be a prolific writer. 
Pi&seur de — , a prolific writer ; 
one ivho tvrites lengthy^ diffuse 
newspaper articles. 

Coquage, w. (thieves'), informing 
agatmt one, or " blowing the 
gaff." 



94 



Coquard — Cornant, 



Coqu *rd, m. (thieves*), eye^ or 
**g!a=ier." S'en tamponner le 
— ^not to care a fig. SeeMirette. 

Coquardeau, m. (popular), hen- 
pecked husband^ or *' stangey ;" 
man easily duped^ or "gulpy." 

Coquer (thieves'), to watch one's 
mo7>ements; to inform against otUy 
••to blow the gaff." 

Quand on en aura refroidi qtiatre ou 
cinq dans les pr^ux les autres toumeront 
leur iansue deux fois avant de coquer la 
pigre.— E. SOE. 

Also to give ; to put; — la 
camoufle, to hand the candle ^ **to 
dub the glim ;" — la loffilude, to 
give absolution ; — le poivre, to 
poison^ " hocus ;" — le taf, to 
frighten ; — le rifle, to set fire to, 

Coqueur, «. (thieves'), informer 
who warns the police of intended 
thefts. He may be at liberty or 
in prison ; in the latter case he 
goes by the appellation of "co- 
queur mouton or ** musicien." 
The " mouton " variety is an in- 
mate of a prison and informs 
against his fellow-prisoners; the 
"musicien" betrays his accom- 
plices. Coqucurdebille, OTa««*Atf 
furnishes funds, 

Coqueuse, female variety of the 
*' coqueur." 

Coquillard(popu1ar),<)'^. S'entam- 

ponner le — , not to care a straw, 

*' not to care a hang." 
CoquiUards, m. pL (tramps'), 

tramps who in olden tit/us pre' 

tended to be pilgrims* 

CoquiUards sont les pterins de Saint- 
Jacques, la plus grande panic sont vtfri- 
tables et en viennent ; -mats il y en a au&si 

aui truchent sur le coquiltard. — X,* Jargon 
t CA rgot. 

CoquiUon, m, (popular), louse; 
pilgj-im, 

Coquin, m. (thieves'), informer, 
"nark," or "nose." 



Coquine, /. (cads'), Sodomist, 

Corbeau, m. (popular), lay brother 
of "la doctrine chretienne," 
usually styled " frtrcs ignoran- 
tins." The brotherhood had fcr- 
merly charge of the ragged schools, 
and were conspicuous by their 
gross ignorance ; priest^ or "devil 
dodger ;" undertaker' s man. 

Corbeille,/ (familiar), etuhsurear 
ring at the Bourse where official 
stockbrokers transact business, 

CorbiUard, m. (popular), i deux 
roues, dismal many or "croaker;" 
— (I noeuds, dirty and dissolute 
womaHy or "draggle-tail ;" — des 
loucherbem, cart which collects 
tainted meat at butchers stalls. 
Loucherbem is equivalent to bou- 
cher. 

Voici paKser au g»lop le corbillard des 
loucherbem, I'lnimonde voiture qui vient 
ramasser dans les bouchcrics la viande 
gSt^c.— RiCHEpiN, Le fai-f. 

Corbuche, /. (thieves'), ulcer ; — 
lophe, false ulcer. 

Corde, / (literar)-), avoir la — , to 
find true expression for accurately 
describing sentiments or passions. 
(Popular) Dormir i la — , is said 
of poor people who sleep in certain 
lodj{ings 'iuith their heads on an out* 
stretched rope as a piilow. This 
corresponds to the Lnglish " two- 
penny rope." 

Corder (popular), to agree^ to get on 
" swimmingly " together. 

Cordon, m. (popular), s'il vous 
plait ! or donnez-vous la peine 
d'entrer ! large knot worn in the 
rear of ladies' dresses. 

Cordonnier, m. (popul.ir), bec- 
figue de — , goose. 

Coraage, m. (thieves'), bad smell, 

Cornant, OT., comante,/ (thieves* 
and tramps'), ox and cow, or 
"mooer." 



\ 




Corttard — Cosaque. 



9S 



Corn»d, m. (iladcnts*). taire — * /* 
kci.}' a iCutttn/ in a corner. 

Come,/, (popular), stamack, 

Comemuseux, m, (codfishers*). 
(ke iculk xvikJ. 

Comer {.\\i\tv^\tohrtatkt hetrHiy ; 
u stink. La eric corne, tiu tiMxt 

Comet, m. ^popular), threat, *'eul- 
icr-lanc** Collc-loi 9a dans I — » 
siLitii'iTw that ! N'aroir ricn dans 
Ic — , to be /cutin/^t *' to be ban- 
died, "*' to cry cupi»oaid-" Comet 
d'cpices, CapUihin, 

I) «e vouliJt coDverttr; U bia trvuver un 
cbenitrc C'>niet dVpicc, ct r>:>u»:3illa ^ 
wtokt^ ^\i\\ voulsit quitter Ia rciigmii \tri- 
iCBdiK pour aitnincr iA cathoUquc — Lt 
Jmirj;»m de rA»x*t. 

Comiche, / (popular), hat, or 
*'ttle," see Tubard; (students*) 
the mthlary schiTci 0/ SaiMt-Cyr. 

Comicfaerie./ {popalar)i aonsftise; 
Jcohsh action . 

Comichon, m. (students'), tandi- 
da/{ preparing far the KcoU 
Mt.ii.iirt de Haint-Cyr, Literally 

Comiire,/ Ohieres'), cfftv-shed, 

Comificeiur, m. (popular), iajurtd 
hui^itnJ, 

Corps de pompe, m., staff of the 
Sttut Crr schoo/t and that of the 
tckoifl Qf <az>alry of Saummr, 
Saint-Cyr is the French Sand- 
huntt. Sauuiur Is a training-school 
where the best riders and most 
vicious horses in the French lumy 
are ^cni. 

CoiTCGteur, m. (thieres'), /fif««/r 
\eho ployf tht spy, or *' natk." 

Coireipon dance, / (popular), a 
rmatk taien at a wifte-ikop whiU 
waiting for an ommi/ruj ^'conr- 



Corridor, m. (familiar), thrjoJ, Se 
hnccr le — , to drink, ••to wet 
one's whistle." See Rincer. 

Corsi, aij. (common). pror>eTly ur 
said of Tciite H'itk fuU hiMfy. Un 
repas — , a plentt/ut meal, or a 
**lighlencr." 

Corserie./ (familiar), a set ofCtr* 
siciin Jeltitives in the service of 
Napoleon It I. According to ^fon- 
sieur Claude, formerly head of the 
detective force under the Empire, 
the chief membcR of this secret 
bodyguard were Alessandri and 
Griscelli. Claude mentions in his 
memnir-; the murder of a detec- 
tive who had formed a plot for the 
nvsa&sination of Napoleon in a 
mysterious house at Auteuil, where 
the emperor met his mistresses, 
and to which he often used 10 re- 
pair disguised as a lacquey, and 
riding iKhind his own cainage. 
Griscelli slabbed his fellowdelcc- 
livein the back on mere suspicion, 
and found on the body of ihe dead 
man papers which ^ave eviiiencc 
of the plot. In reference to the 
mysterious house, Mon-ucurOaude 
says : — 

L'emp«rFur t'enRafflmA li bien pour certe 
nouvcllc Ninon que rimp^mrice en prit 
ontbras'. La duchc^JM: alon .... loiia 
mm pctilc iiiAiMja d'AuteuU que le s^"*^*^' 
F1«ury avail choi^ic pour scrvir At rcmlci- 
V0U5 clandettm aux amourt de vki nultrc 
— M^mciret dt M^msievr Ctaudt. 

Coraet, m, (popular), pas de — I 
sweet sixteen ! 

Corvie,/ (prostitutes'), oiler k la 
— , to ztfalk the strre*, une — 
being litcrallv an ^rdMHs^ dis- 
agreeahU work. 

Corvette,/, (thieves'), a jfriW^^/tf^, 
rascaHy Alexis. 

Formovum pajilorCorydoaardebit AIuIb, 
Delicuik douiiiu. .... 

Cosaque, m. (familiar), stove. 



96 



Cosser — Coitac, 



Cosscr (lhiev«'), to take; — la 
hanc, to take a purse, ** to bur a 
skin." 

wOStel, //J. (popular), prostitute's 
buily, "ponce." See PoiBSon, 

Costume, m. (theatrical), faire 
un — , to applaud an actordirectty 
he makes his appearance on the 
stage. 

Cote,/! (lawyers'), stolen gooiis cr 
money ; (spurting) tAe ifettin^. 
FrtTt' dc la — , t/Oi khrokrr^ s clerk. 
Hay on C6te, which »ce. La— G., 
purloining of articles of small value 
by notaries' clerks when making an 
inventory. Literally, la cote j'ai. 

Cote, / (thieves'}, de bccuf, 
sworj. Frere de la — , see 
Bande noire. (Familiar) Eire^ 
la — , to be in needy circumstances^ 
•'harclup." (Sailors') Vieux frerc 
la — , eld chum^ mate, 

C6t^, m. (theatrical), cour, right' 
hand side scenes ; — jardin, left' 
hand side scenes. ( Familiar) C5te 
des caisstcrs, the station of the 
••Chemin de for du Nord," at 
which absconding cashiers same' 
times take train. 

Cdielard, m. (popular), tu^on. 

Cotelette, / (popular), de me- 
nuisicr, de pcrruquicr,orde vachc, 
piece of Brie cheese. (Theatrical) 
Avoir sa — , to obtain applcutse. 
Emporteur 4 la — , see Em- 
porteur. 

COie-nature,/ (famUiar), forcOte- 
Ictlc au nature!, grilled chop. 

Coterie,/, (popular), fAww. Eh! 
dis done, la — I /say, old chuml 
Coterie, associaiion of workmen ; 
company. Vous savez, la p'lite 
— , you kmnv, chums I 

Cotes,/. //. (popular), avoir les — 
en lung, to be /asy, to be a '* bum- 
mer." LitenLlly to have the ribs 



lengthwise, ivhich would mnk^ ont 
lazy ai turning about. Travajller 
les — i quelqu*un, to thrash 
one, to give one a "hiding." See 
Voie. 

Cdtier, m. (popular), extra horse 
harnessed to an omnibus when 
going up hill ; al&o his dnver, 

Cotiire, / (gambling cheats'), a 
pocket wherein spare cards are 
secreted. 

Aiuii fcc promit-il dc faire agir avcc plui 
d'adm&e, plus d'acharnement, les roli, \vK 
aconu et les a» qu'tl tciuit en nServe dans 
iAcCuirc—M/metrtsti^AfoMtitMrCt-tudf. 

Cotillon, m. (popular), crottc, 
prostitute, "draggle-tail." 

11 itait coureur . . . . U adorait Ic co- 
tillon, ci c'cit poiir moi un cuiillon croiltf 
qui a caairf %a. pcrlc — MACd. Mj» i'rf 
mier Crimf, 

Faire danscr Ic — , to thrash one*i 
wije. 

Coton, m, (popular), bread or fooif 
(allusioa to the cotton-wick of 
lamp) ; quarrel ; street-pght ^ 
dtjjiculty. 11 y aura du — , there 
will be a fight ; there will be much 
difficulty. Le courant est rapide, 
tl y aura du — , the stream isiuuft^ 
tot shall hcrve to pull with a will. 

Cotret, m. (popular^, ius dc — , 
thrashing with a stick, or *' lar- 
ruping;" might be rendered by 
"stirrup oil. Des cotrcts, legs, 
(Thieves*) Cotret, eenz'itt at the 
hulks ; returned transport, or 
"lag." 

Cotte, f, (popular), blue canvas 
working trousers, 

Cou, m, (popular), avoir le front 
dans le — , to he itald, or to have 
** a bladder of lard." See 
Avo r. 

Coaac, m. (popular), priest, or 
"dcvil-dodgcr.** 



Cotiche— Coup. 



97 



Coucbe (popular), a quelle heurc 
qu'on te — } a hint to out to maJit 
ktmsetf uane. 

Coucher (popular), k Ia cordc, to 
sUtp in ctrtain lino lo'i^iitj^'housts 
M'ith the fund rtitin^ on a ropt 
stretched across the room^ a "two- 
jKniiy rope;" — dans le lit aux 
pots Tcrts, to sUtp in the fieUs, 
J»< — bredouille, to go to b(d with' 
cmt amjr suf/rr. Sc — en chapoiit 
to go to beU with a full belly, 

Coacou, iM. (popolAi), wateh^ 

Coude. m. (popular), Uchcr le — , 
so iemt one, ^eneraily when re- 

r tiled to do so* Lache mui le — , 
off, ieave me a/one. Prendre sa 
permUsion sous bOD — » te do wi/A- 
out permission. 

Conenne, f, (popular), skin, or 
"butT;" fool, or "duffer;" 

— "Ic Urd. brush, Gmtter, racier, 
or rattuer la — , to sAofe. Grat- 
ler la — i quelqu'un, ti> /tatter 
omtt to give htm "soft sawder;" 
to thrash one. E&t-tl — ! what 
sn as 1 1 

Couenncs, /. //. (popular), yfaMj" 
ehetks, 

CouilU. m, (popular)f Av/, ^ock- 
ketsd, "cabWafic-head.^ 

CouUles, / //. (popular), avoir des 

— au cul, to be energetic, nianlyt 
"to have spunk." 

Couillon, m. (popular), poltroon ; 
Joolisk with the sense of abashed, 
ereslfailen. II resta tout — , he 
MM/ooiish, The word is u»ed 
Also in a frieodly or jocular man- 
Ber. 

Couillonnade./ (popular), rh/iVir- 
Itfus affair ; nonsenie. 

Couillonner (popular), to show 
csntMiriiice ; to shirk danger, 

Couinonnerie,/ (popular), eowar- 
dice; ncnjeruical ajair ; take in. 



Couiner (popular), to tuhiutper; t» 

hesitate, 
Coulsge, w., coule,/ (familiar), 

waste ; snutll purlcimng by set' 

vants, clerks, h*c, 
Coulant, m* (thieves'), milk. 

Coulanle, / (thieves'), leuuee, 
(Cads') La — , the river Seine. 

Coule,/. (popular), ^tre ^ la — , to 
have mastered the routine of some 
busittess, to be an/nainteJ with all 
the ins and outs; to be comfortable ; 
to be defer at ei-ading dtfficu!ties ; 
to be insinuating ; to connit'e at, 
Mcttre quelqu'un a la — , to in- 
struct one in, to make one master 
of the routine of seme business. 

Couler (popular), en — , to lie^ 
** to cram one up," La — douce, 
to live comforfal'ly. Se la — 
douce, to tale it easy, 

Couleur, /. (popular), He ; box oh 
theear^oi "buck -horse." Mon- 
tcr la — , to deceive, *Mo bam- 
boorle," Eire a la — , to do thmgi 
well. 

Couleuvre, /. (popular), pregnant 
or "lumpy " nvman. 

Coulisse, /, (familiar), the set of 
coulLi&ien. See this word. 

Coulissier, m. (familiar), unofficiai 
yolfber at the Bourse or Slock Rx- 
change. As an arljcclive it has the 
meaning of connected with the back 
scenes, as in the phra&e, TJc* in- 
trigues coulissieres, back-scene in- 
trigues. 

Couloir, m, (popular), mouth, or 
"rattle-trap;" throat, or "peck 
alley." 

Coup, IM. (popular), secret process ; 
knack; dodge. II a le — , ^ has 
the knack, he is a dad at, II a un 
— , he has a process of his own. 
Un — d'arrosoir, a drink. &c 
fianqucr un — d^arroftoir, to get 
tipsy, or ** screwed " Un — de 
H 



98 



Coup, 



boutdlle^ itUoxk(UioH. Avoir son 

— dc bouteillc, to bt intoxicated^ 
"to be booty." Sec Pornpeile. 
Coup dc chancelleric, action ofi^et- 
tin^a /nan' s h^-ai/ '*inloch:incc'ry" 
that \bj to get an opponent's head 
firmly under one's arm, where it 
can be pommelled with immense 
power, and without any possibility 
of immediate extrication. Un — 
dc chten, a tussle ; di£icuUy. Un 

— d'enccnsoir, a 6ioiu on the 
nose. Un — de feu, a slight in- 
toxication. Un — de feu de so- 
cict(f, compute intoxication. Un 

— de figure, hearty pua/, or 
"tigtitcner" Un — dc four- 
cheuc. Jijixinj^ rt<v fmgtri into 
an opponent's eyes* Un — de gar, 
a gCiss ofzoine. Un — de gilquin, 
a siiip. Un — de pied de jumenl 
or dc Venus, a venerea/ diseasf. 
Un — dc Rnguse, action o/Uaznn^^ 
one in the lurch ; an allusion to 
Marshal Marmont, Due de Ka* 
guse, who betrayed Napoleon. Un 

— dc tampon, a W<nc', or*'bang;" 
hard shove [tampon, buffer). Un 

— de temps, an accideftt ; hitch, 
Un — de torchon, a fight ; re- 
volution^ Lc — du lapin, /SwijA- 
ing blow or crowning misfortune ^ 
the straw thcU breaks the cameVs 
back ; treacherous Ufay of gripping 
in a fight. 

Cnup fcroce que m donnent de temps en 
tempt In ouvners dnni tcun batturei. II 
coniiiAlr ^ utiMr Knn advcnuire, d'unr main 
par Ics le^ticulcs, dc I'autrc par la gorge. 
«l a tirer dant les deux sens : celut qui est 
•aisi et tir^ ainki n'a jxu rri^mc lc tcoips de 
ncommandcr kon &mc \ Dieu. — Oklvau. 

Coup du medecin, glass of wint 
drunk after one has taken soup, 
Un — dur, unpleasantness^ un- 
foreseen impedimetft. Attrapcr 
uo ^ de sifop, to get tipsy. Avoir 
son — de cna&selas de feu, de 
picton, or de solcil, to be half 
drunk, *' cle%-atcd.'* Sec Pom - 
pette. Avoir son — dc rifle, to 



be tipsy^ *' screwed." Conner le 

— de pouce, to gife short weight ; 
to strangle, Faire le — , ormonter 
le — i quclqii'un, to deceive, to 
take in, '* to bamboozle " one. 
Se donncr an — dc tampon, or 
de torchon, to fight. Se roonter 
le — , to be too sunguine, to form 
illusioHs. Valoir le — , to be worth 
the trouble of doing or robbing. 
Voir le — , to foresee an event ; to 
see the dodge. Le — dc, action of 
doing anything. Le — du canot, 
going out rowirtg. Coup dc bleu, 
draught of wine. Avoir son 

— de bleu, to be intoxicated, or 
" screwed. '* Pomper un — de 
bleu, to drink, 

Faut ben du charbon . . . 
Pour chsufTcr la machine, 
Au va-nu-pieds qui chine . . . 
Faut 4on p'tii oiup d'blcu. 
RtCHlu-iN, Chaisam det Gtuux, 

(Thieves') Coup i rcsbrouffe surun 
panlre. Sec Faire. Un — d'acri, 
extreme unction. I-c — d'Ana- 
tole, or du pire Francois. See 
Charriagc 4 lam^canique. Un 

— de bap, treacherous bljw. Le 

— de bonnet, the three-card trick 
dodgv. Coup de cachet, stabbing, 
then drawing the knife to and fro 
in the wound. Un — de casse- 
role, informing against one, 
"blowing the gaff.* Le — de 
manchc, calling at people's houses 
in order to beg. Un — dc radin, 
purloining the cofttenfs of a shop- 
till t generally a wineshop^ "lob- 
sneaking." Un — dc roulotte, rob- 
bery of luggage or other property 

from vehicles. Un — dc vague, a 
robbety ; action of roi>bing at ran- 
dom without atty ceriaiuiy as to the 

profits to be gained thereby. (Mili- 
tary) Coup de manchftic, certain 
dexterous cut of the sword on the 
wrist which Puts one hors de com* 
hilt. (Familiar) Un — de pied, 
borrowing money, or "breaking 
shins." English thieves call 14; 



Coupailton — Courbe, 



99 



"biting the ear." Un — de 
pUtolet, some noisy or scandalous 
procteding catcuiatcd to attract 
atunticn, Le — de ^oxi^ finish- 
ing totuh, Se donner un — de 
fion, to gd oneself tidy i ship-shapf. 

Cot Mk qu'on «e donoe )e coup de fion. 
On rcuangk Ics chcvaux, on amnge Ics 
p>4ueuj{e» et le4 luibuts, on ^pouMCUtt 
t«> botfea, on retrouiAc %es muiuUtzhes et 
Oti drape nuMcstucujicincnt In pli» dc soa 
bonxHik— H. Francs. L' Homme qui tut. 

(Servants') Le — da tablier, 
giving notiii. 

Coupaillon, m. (UiIon*)t vnskil- 
Jul cutter. 

Coup de travervin, m. (popular), 
se foutre un — , to sUep. 

Troia hcurvs qui aooii'Dt. Faut que j'np- 

plt<{ac, 
S'rait (OS trop tdt que j'pionn un brin ; 
C'<iucyraa m foul'ua coup d'tnvemo 1 
Bwn*uir. 

GiLi^ Z.d Mutt i Bibi. 

CoQp de trottinetf m. (thieves* 
and cads*), hik. Filer un — dans 
I'oignoa, to kick one's behind^ or 
•' 10 IOC one*s bum, " to root," or 
"to land a kick."* 

Coupe^. (thieves'), poverty. (Popu- 
Ur) Tirer sa — , to nvim. 

Coupi, adj\ (printers*}, to bi with' 
out money. 

Coupe-ficelle, m, (militaiy), artil- 
Ury artificer. 

Coupe-file, m.y eard deirt'tred to 
Jumtionaries^ which enables them 
to cress a procession in a crowd. 

Coupe-lard, m. (popular), kni/e, 

Couper (popular), to fall into a 
mart ; to accept as correct an as- 
strtion -which is ttot so ; to believe 
the statement of more or less likely 

facts ; — dan* Ic pent, or — dans 
it ccinturon. to rwaiiow a fib^ to 

fail into a snare. 

Vidocq dii comme ^ qull vient da prC, 



qu'il voudrait trouver des amis poor soa- 
piner. Les aatret coupent dans le pont 
(donnenc dant le panDcauX— Vidocq. 

Couper la chlque, to disappoint ; 
to mash ; — la guculc \ quinze 
pas, to stink ; — la musette, or le 
silflel, to cut the throat ; — \c trol- 
toir, to place one in the necessity of 
leaving the pavement by walking 
OS if there were no one in the taay, 
or when walking behimi a person 
to get suddenly in front of him ; 
(military) ~- 1 aUa, or Ja verte, to 
drink absinthe, Ne pas y — , not 
to escape ; not to avoid ; to disbe- 
iieve. Vous n'y couperer pas, you 
will net escape punishment. Je 
nV coupe pas, / don't take that tn, 
(Coachmen^*) Couper sa micbe, to 
die. Sec Pipe. (Gambling cheats') 
Couper dans le pont, to cut a pack 
cf cards prepared in such a manner 
as to turn up the card required by 
sharpers. The cards are bent in 
a peculiar way, and in such a 
manner that the hand of the player 
who cuts must naturally follow 
the bend, and separate the pack 
at the desired point. Thi» cheat- 
ing trick is used in England as 
well as France, and is termed m 
English slang the "bridge." 

Coupe-sifBet, m. (thieves'), knifet 
"chive." Termed also *'lingrc, 
vingl-deux, surin." 

Courant, m. (thieves*), dodg^ Con- 
naUrc le — , to be up to a dot/ge. 

Courasson, m. (familiar), one 

whose bum^ of amativeness is well 

developed^ m other terms, one too 

■fond of the fair sex. Vieux — , 

old debauchee^ old *'rip." 

Courbe, f. (thieves'), shoulder ; 
— de mame, shoulder of mutton, 

Lcs irarnui!«C4 des cagoa* ont loin d'al- 
hiTTKr le nnc et faire rifloder la criolle ; lei 
uns 6ch«nt une ocnirbe de otome, d'autret 
un morcmii dc comant, d'aiilrcs unc ikhinc 
de baccon. !« autres d» oraie« el dca onii- 



ICX) 



Con reitr — Cracker, 



Coureur, wi. {thieves*), d'aveugles, 
a wreteh who robs Mmd men of 
the kalf-pfnu given them by cha* 
ritabie ptifpte. 

Courir (popalar)» qaelqa*un, to lore 
one, Se la -^y to run, to rum 
mvav, ** to slope.** For synonyrns 
see Patatrot. 

Courrier, m. (thieves'), de la pre- 
fecture, priion van J or "black 
Maria.** 

Court-4-pattes, ot. (military), /w/ 
artilleryman, 

Courtaud, w. (thieves'), shopman, 
or "counter jumper." 

Court-bouillon, w. (thieres*). le 
grand — , the sea, •'briny," or 
*• herring pond." Termed by 
English sailors " Davy's locker.'* 
Court-bouillon properly is wa/er 
vfith different fy'nas of hirh m 
tohiekfish is boiied. 

Courtier, «, (thieves'), & la mode. 
Sec Bande noire. (Familiar) 
Courtier marron, kind of unojidai 
stockjobber, an otitsidert or " kerb- 
stone broker.** 

Cousin, m. (thieves*), eardsharper, 
or ** broad sman; " — dc Moise, 
husband of a dissolute woman, 

Cousine, f. (popular), Sodomiit ; 
— de vcndange, dissolute girl fond 
of the ^vine-shop, 

Cousse, / (thieves'), de casta, 
hospital attendant, 

Couteau, m. (military), grand — , 
cavalry srvord. 

CoOter (popular), cela coflte une 
peurct unecnviedecourir, nothing, 

Couturaaae, / (popular), semp- 
strest ; foekm^irked or '•cribbagc- 
faccd " iwman. 

Couvent, «, (popular), lajque, 
brothel^ or "nanny-shop.'* 

X^ 49 eat tin lupanar. Ce couvent lalquo 
Wl oooDU dau le Quonicr Latin «otii k 



d^nomlniitian de : La Botte de Pailte. — 
Mac 6, Mot Premier Crtme. 

Couvercle, m. (pouuLor), hat, or 
"tile." SceTubard. 

Couvert, w, (thieves'), silver fork 
and spoon frotH whiih the initials 
have been obliterated, or whieh 
haze been " christened." 

Couvcrte, /. (military), bittre U 
— , to sleep. Fa ire passer i la — , 
to toss one in a blanket, 

Couverture, /. (theatrical), noise 
moiie purpostly at a theatre to pre' 
vent the public from noticing somf 
thing wrong in the delivery of 
actors. 

Nou» appclan* coiivertura le brait qu« 
nou& rauctns dans la ullr pour counir ua 
impair, un [utaqu^, une faute de inncais. 
— P. Maiiauk. 

Couvrante, / (popular), cap, or 
" tile.*' See Tubard. 

Couvre-amour, m, (military), 
shako. 

Couvreur, m. (freemasons'), door^ 
keeper. 

Couvrir (freemasons'), le temple, 
to shut the door, 

Couyon. See Couillon. 

Couyonnade, / See Couillon- 
nade. 

Couyonnerie, / See Couillon- 
nerie. 

Crabosser (popular), to crush in a 
hat. 

Crac. See Cric. 

Cracher (popular), to speak out; 
— des piices de dix sous, to be 
dry, thirsty; — dans le sac, U b^ 
guUlotintd, to die; — ses dou- 
blures, to be consumptive, Ne pas 
•— sur quelquechose, not to ob* 
jtct to a thinc^ to value it, "not 
to sneeze at.'^ (Musiciins') Cra- 
cher son embouchure, to die. See 
Pipe. 




Crac/tcir — Creux, 



lOI 



Crachoir, m. (popular and thieves'), 
moHtfi, or " bone-box." See 
Plomb. (General) Jouer du — , 
to speaJi, 'Mo rap/' *' to palter." 
Abuser cJu — , is said of a vtry 
tidkative person loho mgrosus alt 
the coHversatiom, 

Crampef yi (popular), tirer sa — , to 
jUe, "tocnish." See Patatrot. 
Tirer sa — avcc la veuve, to be 
guiUotimJ. 

Cramper {popular), sc — , fo run 
tfjray. See Patatrot. 

Crampon, m. (familiar), bore ; one 
not easily got rid of. 

Cramponne toi Quguase ] (popu- 
Ur, ironicalj, prepare to be as- 
tounded. 

Cramponner (familiar), to force 
one' I compuny on a person ; to bore. 

Cramser (popular), to dit» 

Cran, m. (popular), avoir son <^, 
to be angry. Faire un — , to make 
a mote of something ; an allusion to 
the custom which bakers have of 
reckoning the number of loaves 
furnished by cutting notches in a 
piece of wood. Lachcr d'un — , 
to leave one suddenly. 

Crine, adj, (popular), _fine, 

CrAnenient (popular), superla- 
tively. Je suis — content, I am 
superlatively happy, 

Crftner (popular), to be impudent, 
threatening. Si lu crones, je tc 
nmasse, none of your eheek, else 
rU give yoH a thrashing, 

Crapaud, m. (thieves'), padlock; 
(niiiitaiy) diminutive man; purse 
in Xifkich soldiers store up their sav- 
irrp ; — scrpenteux, spiral rvcket. 
(Popular) Crapaud, ehild, "kid." 

B«n. Rioi, c't'extsleacfr-U m'ttoomme t 

iVoutlrau poH^dcr un chapciiij. 
'est mimcnt temps d'dcv air nn bomme. 
I J'— w plein I'do* d'etre un aapitud. 

AicNETiH, CkamMon det Cveux, 



Crapoussin. ni, (popular), smalt 
man; child, or "kid.'* 

Crapulos, crapulados, m. (fami- 
liar and popular), one-sou cigar^ 

Craquelin,m. (popular), /(dr. From 

craque, fb, 
Crasse, /. (familiar), mean or 

stingy action. Haron de la ^, 

&ee Baron. 

Cravache, / (sporting), ^trc k la 
— , to be at a whip's distance. 

Cravate, / (popular), de chanvre, 
noose, or '•hempen cravat;" — 
de couleur, rainbow; — verte, 
women's butly^ "ponce." See 

PoiSBOD. 

Crayon, m.^stochbroket^seterJL The 

allusion is obvious. 

Creature,/, (familiar), strumpet. 

Cr&cbe, / (cads'), faire une tournee 
i la — , or ^ la chapclle, is said of 
a meeting of Sodomists, 

Credo, m. (thieves'), the gallows. 

Crftpage, m. (popular), a fight ; a 
tussle. Un — de chignons, tussle 
between two females, in which they 
seize one another by the liair and 
freely use their nails. 

Crftper (popular), le chignon, or 
le toupet, to thrash, '• to wallop." 
See Voie, Se — le chignon, Je 
toupet, to have a set to. 

Cripin, m. (popular), shoemaker, 

or "snob.*' 
Cripine, / (thieves*), purse, 

"skin,"or"pogc." 

Cr*s (thieves*), quickly, 

Crcspiniire (oMcant), much, 

CreuBe,/ (popular), throat, "gut- 
ter Unc." 

Creux, w. (thieves*), house; lodg^ 
i$igi, **diggings," "ken," or 
"crib." (Popular) ^ovi —, good 
voice. Fichu — , loeak voice. 



rii'^HJiiniiiiiw'iifi"'' ' r 



I02 



Crevaison — Criolle, 



Crevaison, f, (popular), death, 
Faire sa — , to du. Crever, to 
duy is said of animals. See 
Pipe. 

Crevant, adj, (swells*), boring to 
death ; very amusing. 

Que u Toiu les interroget mr le bal do 
b nuit. Us voui r^pondront invari»bleinent, 
C^tait CKvant, parole d'honneur. — Ma- 

HAUM. 

Crevard (popular), stiliborn cMld» 

Crevi (pc^ular), dead, (Familiar) 
Petit — , swells or "masher." 
See Gommeux. 

Crive -Cairn, m, (popular), man 
who volunteers as a soldier, 

Crever (popular), to dismiss from 
one^s employment ; to wound; to 
kill ; — ]a sorbonne, to break 
one's head, 

Mait c'qu'est triite, htflas I 
. Cest qu* pour crever & coups d'boUO 
Des gens pas palas. 
On vous cDvoie eo ptfnicbe 
A Cayenne-les-caux. 
RiCMKPiN, Ckanttm dts Gueux, 

Crever la pi^ce de dix sous is 
said of the practices ofSodomists; 
— la paillasse, to kill, 

Verger,_ il creva la paillaue 
A Monseigneur rAruievdque de Farii. 

The above quotation is &om a 
'*complainte" on the murder of 
the Archbishop of Paris, Mon- 
seigneur Sibour, in the church 
Sainte-Geneviive, by a priest 
named Veiger. A complainte is 
a kind of carol, or dirge, which 
has for a theme the account of a 
murder or execution. (Familiar) 
Crever I'oeil au diable, to succeed in 
spite of envious people, Tu t*en 
Krais — , expressive of ironical 
refusal. It may be traiulated by, 
"don't you wish you may get 
it ? " Se — , A? eat to excess^ " to 
scorf." 
Crever A (printers*), to step compos- 
ing at such attd such a liste. 



Crevette, / (popular), prostitute^ 

"mot." 
Criblage, criblement, «. 

(thieves'), outcry^ uproar. 

Cribler (thieves*), to cry out ; — k 
la. gtivCf to give a •warning call ; to 
can out ** shoe-leather ! " to call out 
** police I thieves!" "to give hot 

On la crible ^ la grive, 

Je m' la donne et m'cMiutve, 

£Ue est pomm^e maron. 

ViDOCQ. 

Cribleur, m. (thieves'), de fnisques, 
clothier; — de lance, water- 
carrier; — de malades, tnan 
whose functions areto call prisoners 
to a room where they may speak 
to visitors; — de verdouM, a 
fruiterer, 

Cric, or cricque, m. (popular), 
brandy^ called "French cream" 
in English slang. Faire — , to run 
away, " to guy." See Patatrot. 

Cric ! (military), call given by a 
soldier about to spin a yarti to an 
auditory^ who reply by a " crac ! '* 
thus shaming they are still awake. 
After the preliminary cric ! crac 1 
has been bawled out, the auditory 
repeat all together as an introduc- 
tion to the yam : Cuiller ^ pot \ 
SouS'piedsdeguetres 1 Pour Ten- 
fant i naltre I On pendra la ere- 
maill^re I Chez la meilleure canti- 
niirel&c.&c. 

Cric-croc I (thieves*), your health ! 

Crie, or criirne,/ (thieves'), meat^ 
"carnish." 

Grin, m. (familiar), £tre comme un 
— , to be irritable or irritated, to 
be '* cranky," or " churopish." 

Crinoline, f, (players*), ^uecn of 
cards, 

Criolle, / (thieves*), meat, '* car- 
nish.*' Morfiler de la — , to eat 
meat. 



Criollier — Crottard. 



103 



: 



CrioHier, w. (thieves'), huUker. 

Clique, m. andf. (popular), ^/■aM./y; 
an tJacttlatioM. Je veux bien que 
la — mc croque si je bois une 
goutte eo plus de quatre litres 
par jour! iwu^/Ar "jiggered"?// 
MrmM mert than four litres a dap t 

Criquer (popular), se — , fo run 
dn-av, "to slope." SeePatatrcl. 

Cria de merluche, m.fi/. (popular), 
frightful htni'Ung ; loud com - 
plaxnU. 

Cristalliser (students*), ta idle abcut 
mt it sunny place. 

Croc, abbreviation of escroc, 
nvindUr. 

Croche, / (thieves*), hand, 
"famble,"or"daddlc." 

Crocber (thieves*), to ring ; t^ piek 

a iotky "to screw," (Popular) 
Sc — , to fight. 

Crocodile, m. (familiar), crediicrt 
i^r ,iun ; ujufxr ; foreign $tudent 
at the military sehool of Saint- 
Cyr. 

Crocque, m. (popular), sou. 
Croc*, m. £l. (popular), tettA, 
"gTindcis. 

Croire (familiar), que c'est arrtv^, 
to Uiieve too implicitly that a 
thing ai-tts ; to have too good an 
Qfrnicn of oneself. 

Croisant, m. (popular), VHUsteoait 
or "bcnjy." 

Croissant, m. (popubr), loger rue 
du —, to be an injured hustand. 
An allusion to the horns. 

Croix,/ (popular), sixfrane piece. 
An allusion to the cross which 
certain coins formerly bore. Ac* 
cording to Eugene Sue the old 
clothes men in llie Temple used 
the following denominations for 
ooios : pistoles, ten francs ; croix, 
tix francs; la dcml-croix, three 



francs ; Ic point, one franc ; Ic 
tlcmi-poinl, half-a-franc ; le rond, 
half-penny. CroU de Dieu, alpha- 
i>et^ on account of (he cross at the 
beginning. 

Crome, or croume, m. (thieves* 
and tramps'), credit^ •'jawbone," 
or "day.'' 

Cromper (thieves'), to save ; to nm 
ati'ayy *' to guy." See Patitrot. 
Cromper sa sorbonne, to save one*! 
head. 

Cromjiir^potato, From the German 
gnind bime. 

Crone,/ (thieves'), wooden platter. 

Crdn^e,/ (thieves'), //u/C^t/w//. 

Croquaillon, m. (popular), 6ad 
sktlch. 

Croque. See Crique. 

Croquemitaines, m. pi. (military), 
soldiers who are sent to the punish- 
ment companies tu Africa for 
having wilfuJly mm med themselves 
in order to escape military lervtce* 

Croqueneau, m. (popular), new 
sht>€ ; — vcrneau, patent leather 
shoe. 

Croquet (popular), irritahU man. 

Crosse, / (thieves')! receitvr of 
stolen goodsy or '* fence ; " pubiie 
prosecutor. 

Crosser (thieves*), to neeive stolen 
goods ; to strike the hour. 

Quand douxe plombd cTO«ji«tit, 
lies piyrca s'cn rctourncDt, 
Au upis de MoatroD. 

ViDOCQ. 

Crosseur, m. (thieves'), Sell-ringer. 

Crossin. See Crosse. 

Crotal, m., student of the EcoU 
Polytechnique holding the rank of 
sergeant. 

Crottard, m. (popular), fiftt p9v 
ment. 



!04 



Crotte d'Ermite — Citit. 



Crotte d'Ermite, / {thieveaT, 

baked pear. 

Crottin, m. (military), scrgent de 
— , noH-xommisswned officer at the 
fitvalry school of Saitmur. Thus 
tcrrined because he it often in the 
slablcs. 

Croumier (horse-dealers'), ^fftf*r*r 
a^ent pf questionable honesty^ or 
om who is ' ' wanted " by the police, 

Croupionner (popular), to tivijt 
iyn/s loins ahi>Ht so as to caust onts 
tltess to hilge out. 

Croupir (popuUr), dans le battant 
is said of undigesttd foo^, which 
imotnvytiences one. 

CroustUle, / (popular), casser un 
brin de — , to have a snack. 

Croustiller (popular), to eat, "to 
grub.'* Sec Mastiquer. 

CroQte, /. (popular), s'enibeter 
comme unc — de pain derriire 
une malle, to /eel desperately dull. 

CroOteum, '//. (famihar), collection 
0/ " ctoiilcs,*' or vw/kless pictures. 

CroClon, m. (artists'), /<jxw/rr de- 

void of any talent, 
Crodtonner (artists*), to paitU 

worthless pictures, daubs. 

Croyex (popular), 9a et buvez de 
t'eaUi expressicft used to deride 
credulous people. Ulerally be- 
licve that ana drink xttatcr. 

Cm (artists'), faire — , see Faire. 

Crucifier (familiar), to grant one 
the decoration of the Li^&n of 
Honour. The expression is 
meant to be jocular. 

Crucifix, or crucifix k ressort, m. 

(thieves'), pistol^ *' barking iron." 

Cube, ffi., student of the third year 
in higher mathematics (math<:- 
matiques spcciales) ; (familiar) 
a rt'^lar idiot. 



Cucurbitac^, m. (familiar), a 
dune I. 

CueiUtr (popular), le persil is said 
of a prostitute walking the streets. 

Cuiller, /. (popular), hand, or 
"daddle." 

Cuir, m. (popular), de brouette, 
'zi'ood. Escarpin en — de brouette, 
uHfOiien shoe, Gants en — de 
poulc, iaiiies* glazes made of fine 
shin* Tanner le — , to thrash, 
"to tan one's hide." 

Cuirassi, m. (popular), urinaU. 

Cuirasser (popular), to make 
"cuirs," that is, in conversation 
carrying on the wrong letter, or 
one which does not form part of a 
word, to the next word, as, for 
instance, Donnez moi z'en, je 
vais t'y m'amuser. 

Cuirassier, m. (popular), one who 
frequently indulges in **cuirs." 
Sec Cuirasser. 

Cuire (popular), se faire — , to Si 
arrested. See Piper. 

Cuisine,/, (thieves'), the Pr/fecture 

de Polite ; (literary) — de journal, 
all that concerns the details and 
routine arrangrnifni of the matter 
for a nctfspaper. (Popular] Faire 
sa — a TalcoDl, to indulge often in 
brandy drinking. 

.yCuisiner (Ijierary), to doy to concoct 
some injetior literary or artistic 

usjrk. 

^^uisinier, m. (thieves*), spy^ or 
" nark ; ** delcti^ie ; barrister; 
(literary) newspaper secretary, 

Cuisse, f. (familiar), avoir la — 
goie is said of a -womau who is 
too fond of men. 

Cuit, adf (thieves'), sentenad, 
condemned^ or "booked;" dom 



Cuite — Cymbale. 



105 



Cuite. f. (popular), intcxiration. 
Sc fUnqaer une — , to gtt dntHk, 
or •'screwed." 

Cul, m. (popnlar), stupid feUtnv, 01 
"duffer; " — tl'ane, Uockhead ; 
— dc plomb, i/ott' man, or " bum- 
mer ; eUrk^ or "quill-driver;" 
tucman "who awaits clients at a 
eqfi i — goudronne, sailor^ or 
"tw ;" — lev^, ga»u af&arliat 
ffkick two players art in tea^t to 
tmindlr the third ; — rouge, W- 
ditr vn'tA rtd pants ^ or "cherry 
bum ; " — tcrreux, peasant j elad- 
kcppcr. Monlrcr son — , to be* 
tome a ^nkrttpt, or ' ' brosier. " 

Culasses, / p/. (military), revue 
des — mobiles, monthly m^dital 
tnspti-tian. CulftSiC, properly tke 
I'rrcck o/a gun, 

Culbutant, w., or culbute, /. 
(thieves'), breeches, or "hams." 
Tcnned also *' fusil ji deux coups, 
grimpants." Esbigner le chopin 
daufi sa culbute, to <<?ncml stolen 
Pt operty in one's kreeckts, 

Culbute, / (thieves*), breeches. 
(Popular) La — , the circus. 

Culerec, f. (printers'), composing 
stick which is filled up. 

Culotte, m. (popular and familiar), 
maney losses at cards ; txcesi in 
anything^ txpeaally in drink. 
Grosse — , rtgtdar drunkard. 
Donner dans la — rouge is said 
of a womtiH liho ij too fond of 
ioldiirs' attentions.^ of one who has 
an aftcuk of* scarlet fever." Se 
flanquer une — , to sustain a loss 
of a game of cards ; to get intoxi* 
eatsd. (Suidemt') Empoigner 
une '^t to hse at a g>^me, and to 
kax< in coHscifuenu to stand all 



round. (Artists*) Fairc — , exag- 
geration of Faire chaud (whiui 
see). 

Culotii, adj. (popular), hardened * 
soiled ; seedy; red, &'c. Etrc— , 
to haz'C a seedy appearance. Un 
ncjE — , II red nose. 

Culotter (popular), se — , to get 
fipiy ; to have a 7i*om-out, seedy 
appearance. Se — dc la tcte aux 
picds, to get completely tipsy. 

Cumulard, m, (familiar), official 
■who holds several posts at the same 
time. 

Cupidon, m. (thieves'), rag-picker^ 
or *' l>onc-grubber." An ironical 
allusion to liis hook and baskeL 

Cure-dents (familiar), venir en — , 
to come to an evening parly rtnth' 
out having been invited to the 
dinner that precedes it. Termed 
also " venir en pastilles de Vichy," 

Curette.y; {a\\\i\.^vf), cavalry s^vord. 
Manier la — , to do sword exercise. 

Curieux, m. (thieves'), magistrate, 
**btak,"or " queer cuHin." Also 
j'uge d' instruction, a magistrate 
who investigates cases before they 
are sent up (or trial. Grand — , 
chief Judge of the assit* court. 

Cyclope, m. (popular), behind, or 
'* blind check." 

Cylindre. m. (popular), top hat, or 
"stove-pipe;" see Tubard ; 
body, or "apple cart." Tu t'en 
fcrais p<5ter le — , is expressive of 
ironical refusal ; '* don't you wish 
you may get it." 

Cymbale, /. (thieves'), moon, or 
'* pari'ih lantern ; *' (popular) 
escutihrort pfuced over the aoor of 
the house of a notary. 



io6 



Da— Dale. 



Da (popuUr), mon — , my faihery 
"my daddy," Ma — ^mymothtr^ 
" my mammy." 

Dab, dabe, m. (thieves*), faik^r, 
or "dade;" master; agoii, 

Mercure seul tu adoreras, 
Comme dabe de reotrottement. 

VlDOCQ, 

I-e — dc la cig(^;ne, the pro- 
cureur ghiJrcti, or public pro- 
secutor. Grand — , ^^g* 
Ma Urgue T»art pour Versailles . . . 

Pour m'faire aififourailter. 
Mais grand dab qui se fi&che, 

Dit par mon caloquet, 
Jit lerai daoser ane danse 
Oil i n'y a pas d'plancher. 

V. Hugo. 

Dabe, m, (popular), d'argent, spe- 
culum, (Prostitutes') Cramper 
avec le — d*ai^ent, to he subjected 
to a compulsory medical examina- 
tion 1^ a peculiar nature, 

Dabirage, m. (popular), talking^ 
"jawing." 

Dab£rer (popular), to talk, " to 
jaw." 

Dabesse, / (thieves'), mother; 
quun. 

Dabiculc, m, (thieves'),/^ mastet's 
son. 

Dabot, dabmuche, m, (thieves'), 
the prefect of police, or head of the 
Paris police ; a drudge. Formerly 
it signified an unlucky player who 
has to pay all his opponents, 

Dabueal, adj, (thieves*), royai, 

Dabuche, /. (thieves'), mother; 
grandmother, or " mami ; " nurse. 



Dabuchette, /. (thieves'), young^ 
mother ; mot her 'in-law. 

Dabuchon, m. (popular), father. 
"daddy." 

Dubuge, / (thieves'), lady, " bu- 
rerk.'* 

Dache, m, (thieves'), devil, • ' ruffin, " 
or " black spy ;" (military) hair- 
dresser to the Zouaves, a mythical 
individual, Allez done raconter 
celai— , tell thai to the ' 'Marines," 

Dada, m. (military), aller k — , to 
perform the act of coition, or " chi- 
valry." The old poet Villon 
termed this "chevaulcher." 

Dail, m. (thieves'), je n'entrave que 
le — , / do ttot understand, 

Daira, m. (popular), swell, or 
" gorger," see Gonsmeux ; fool, 
or "duflfer;" gttllible fclloxv^ 
"gulpy;" — huppe, Hch man, 
one with plenty of ' * tin. " 

Dale, dalle, / (thieves'), money, 
"quids," or "pieces, "see Quibus. 

Faut pas alter chez Paul Niquet, 

(^ vous coDsomme tout vot' pauv' dale. , 

P. DURAND. 

Five-franc piece ; (popular) /^roa/, 
or *' red lane ; " — du cou, mouth, 
" rattle-trap." Se rincer, or s'ar- 
roser la — , to drink, "to have 
something damp." See Rincer. 

J'ai du sable i t'amygdale. 
Ohtf 1 ho 1 buvons un coup, 
Une, deux, trois, longtemps, beaucoup f 
II faut s'arroser la dalle 
Du cou. 

RicHKPiN, Gueux de Paris. 





Dalzar — Dauffe, 



IPT 



DaUar, m, (popular), bretthfs^ 
" kicks,** '* sit-upons," or 
"kickiics." 

DamCi/ (popular), blanche, boUU 
ofwkiu wim ; — du lac, wopuxh 
cf indifferent character '.uho frt' 
pientj the furOeu-s of the Grand 
Jju ai the Bois de Bouhjpu. 

Darner (popular), nne (iUc, to seduee 
a girlt to make a woman of her. 

Danaldea, / (thieves'), £Eure jouer 
let — , to thrash a girt, 

DandQler (tbieves'), to ring; to 
ckimk. Le carme dandille dans 
ta fouillouse, the money chinks in 
kit pocket, 

DandinagCy m., dandinette, / 

(popular), thrashings *' hiding." 

Dandine./. (popular), W-rw, ' 'wipe," 
" dout/* " dip." " bang," or 
** CAM. " Encaisser des dandines, 
ta rtieivt blows. 

Dandincr (popular), toihrash, "to 
lick." See Voie. 

Dandinette. See Dandinage. 

Dankier (Breton), prostitute, 

Daaac. /. (familiar), du panler, um- 
imwftd profits on purehases, Flan- 
qiver unc — k quclqu'un, to thrash 
#r " bcW ** *«. See Voie. 

iDanser (popular), to lose money ; to 
/<ry, "to shell out," lll*adans«de 
ringt boJles, he haJ to pay ttvmty 
frames. Danser dcvant Ic bufTet, 
to hefuting^ '• to cry cupboard ;" 
— lout ieul, to have an offensive 
hrtath, Fairc — quelqu'un, to 
make one stand treat ; to make one 
pay, on "fork out;" to thrash, 
••lowalloji." See Voie. La—, 
iohethrashed ; to be dismissed from 
one's employment^ ** lo get the 
sack." 

[Danaeoj, m, (popular), turkey 



Dafdant, m. (thieres'), Un-e. 

Luynu^ csUmpilUit six plombe^ 
Mctiso roalait Ic trimard, 
Ec, iuMu'au fond du coqucman. 
Le dartlaot rtffaudatt m.-^ lumbes- 

UicHOPiH, GutMX de Farit. 

Dardelle,/. (urchins'), /mwy (gros 

sou). 

Dariole, f. (popular), slap or htaw 
in th^faee, *' clout," '* bang," or 
*' wipe," Properly a kmd of 
pastry. 

Darioleur, m. (popular], inferior 
sort of pastrycook. 

Daron. m.(thieves'),/a/A<r, "dade," 
or •' dadi ; " gentleman^ ** nib 
cove;*' — de u raille, or de la. 
rousse, prefect of police, head of 
the Parts police, 

Daronne,/ (thieves'), mother; — 
du dardant, Venus; — du grand 
Aure, holy Virgin ; — du mcc des 
mccs, mother of Cod. 

Dattes, / pi. (popular), des — I 
contemptuous expression of refusal ," 
might be rendered by ''you be 
hanged!" See NAfles. 

Elle u r'toumc, lui dit ; des daitcs I 
Tu pens t'fouiller vieux pruncau \ 
Tu n'tien» )iiuv Mir ten deux ptUies. 
Va done, ch [ fouriKau ! 

Farisiam S«Hf. 

Daube, /. (popular), cookj or ** drip- 
ping.*' 

Daubeur, m. (popular), btaeksmiik. 

Dauche (popular), mon — , my 
father ; tna — , my mother ; "my 
old man, my old woman." 

Dauffe, /, dauffin, dauphin, m. 
(thieves'), short cnr.vbar. Termed 
also '* Tenlanti Jacques, biribi, 
Sucre de pommes, rigolo," and 
in the language of English house- 
breakers, that is. the " busters and 
scrcwsnicn," '* the stick, James* 
Jemmy " 



io8 



Dauphin — D^order. 



Dauphin, w. [popular), ^V/*j hutly^ 
**ponce."see Poisson; (thieves*) 
shtrri crowbar usfdbyhouitbreakers^ 
'•jemmy/' 

David, M. (popular), jr7^ fa/. From 
the maker's name. 

Davone, / (thieves*), plum. 

De (familiar), sc pousser du — , 1o 
place tfu word ** de " before anis 
name to make it appear a noble- 
man's. 

Dfc, m. (popular), or — A. boire, 
driftkiit^ ^iajs. Dc I y€S* Pro- 
perly thimble. 

D^bftcle, /. (thieves*), nceoitchement. 
Properly breaking up^ collapu* 

D^bftcler (thieves' and popular), to 
a/>en ; to force open ; — la lourije, 
open the door. 

D^b^cleuse, f. (thieves* and popu- 
lar), wit/i^'^. Termed also *'latc- 
minette, \fadame Tire-monde." 

D^bagouler (popular), to speak^ "to 
jaw." 

D^balinchard, m. (popular), one 
who situnters lazily about. 

Diballage, m. (popular), un- 
dress ; getting out vf bed ; dirty 
linen, Etre flou<f or vole au — , 
to be grievously disappointed •with 
a woman's fgure when she divests 
herself of her garment s, Go^er 
au — , to appear to better advan- 
tage when undressed. 

Dibalter (popular), to strip. Se 
— , t« undress oneself 

Dibanquer (gamesters'), to ruin the 
framing bank, 

D6barboui11er (popular), \ la po- 
lasse, to strike one in theface^ " to 
give one a bang in the mug ;" to 
dear up same matter. 

D^bardeur, m., dibardeuse, f. 
(familiar), dancers at fancy balls 
drtssed as a d^bardeur orlumper„ 



Dcbarquer (popular), se — , io give 
tip; to relinquish anything already 
undertaken^ to *'cavc in. ' 

Debaucher (popular], to dismiss. 
Etre debauche, to get the sack. 
The reverse of embaucher, to en' 

D^becqueter (popular), to vomit, 
** to cast up accouou,*' " to shoot 
the cat" 

D^bectant (popular), annoying; 
tiresome; dirty; disgusting. 

D^binage, m. (familiar), slander- 
ing: running down. From de- 
biner, to talk tllf to depreciate. 

D6biner (popular), to depredate; 
— le true, to disclose a secret ; to 
explode a dodge, or fraud. 

Parbleti ! je n'ienore pu ce que peuvent 
diro Ie« blanueurs pour dcbincr k true de 
c«» fau&ws paysanDes. — Rjchwin, i* 

Se — des fumcrons, to run arvayt 
"to leg it." Sc — , to abuse one 
another J ** to slang one another ;" 
to run ari'ay, '* to brush," see 
Patatrot ; to grcivteeak. 

D^bineur, m., dibineuse, /. 
(popular), one who talks ill of 
people; one who depreciates people 
or things, 

Diblayer (theatrical), to curtail 
portions of a part; to hurry 
through a performance. 

A rOptfra, cfl soir .... on dcbla>'e K 
bnn raccovirci : voii« nvrz que d^bbiy«r 
uenifie tlcouiter.— P. Mjlualin. 

Dibloquer (military), to cancel an 
order of arrest. 

D^bonder (popular), to ease one- 
self; to go to " West Cenlral." or 
to the ** crapping ken." See 
Mouscailler. 

Dcborder (popular), to zvmit, "to 
cast up accounts," or *' to shoot 
the cai." 



D^boucUr — Dicarrer, 



109 



D^bouclcr (thieves*^, to open; td 
Ht a frisanrr at liberty, 

D^boucleur, m. (thievu'), de 
iourdes, a housebreaker^ ** bus- 
ier,** or ••screwsman." 

D£bou1er (popular), to bt broui^ht 
to childbed^ *' 10 b« in Ihe straw ; " 
to oTFTtr, or •' to crop up." 

Odboalonni (popular), etre — , to 
bt dMll-ivUteii^ or to bt a "dead- 
alive." 

Diboulonner (popular), la co- 
lonne ^ ({uelqu'un, to thrash out 
iouHiii)\ *' to knock one into a 
cocked hat." Sec Voie. 

D£bourr£ (horse-dealers'), cheval 
— , horse whuh sud'Unty Ions its 
jfffhy appearance artijicuilly im- 
parted by rastaily hcne-deaUrs. 

Dibourrer (popular), to edueatt 
ontt '* to put one up to ; ". — m. 
pipe, to ease oneseif, or " to go to 
the chapel of ea^e. " See Mous- 
caiUer. Se — , to become hurv- 
ittg,, **up to a dodge or two," or 
a'Mtary bloke." 

Dtbouscaillcr (popular), to black 
on^s boots, 

Dibouacailleur (popular), shot' 
blaek. 

Debrider (thieves'), to open; — les 
chasses, to open otte's eyes; (popu- 
lar) — la margoulclte, to eat, 
*• to grab." See Maaiiquer. 

'^i^iTi&oiT^m.{\\\\e\e$:),key; skeleton 
key, " screw," or •' twirl." 

Dibrouillard, m. (popular), one 
tvho has a mind fertile in raonrce, 
m contrivances to get om in the 
w^Hd, or to txtricatt himself out 
of dt^tUtirSj a '* mm mizzlei." 
Also used as an adjective. Lite- 
rally otu who^gets out of tht fog. 

Dibrouiller (theatrical), un rdle, 
to make enestlf thoroughly ac- 



quainted with the nature of one'j 
part before learning it^ to realizt 
fully the character one has to tm- 

personate, 

D6cadener (thieves*), fo tittchain. 

Decalitre, m. (jxipular), t<tp hat, 
*'stovc-pipc." Sec Tubard. 

D^campiller (popular), to decamp, 
'*to bunk." 

D^canailler (popular), se — , to 
rise from a state of abjection and 
pcverty. 

Dicanilloge, m. (popular), depar- 
ture; moving one s furniture ; — 
ii la manque, moving after miii- 
summer term. 

En jiiiUet Ic d^m^naEcroenl Ml un« fvtf. 
Mais CO octobre, n, i, oi, c'nt fiiii dc nrc : 
lo^difm^nagefnent est fun^bre et «'appcUe 
le deamilljtxe k la nuuuiuc— Richeiin, 

Decarcassi, adf (theatrical), is 
said of a bad play. 

D£carcasser (popular), qnelqu'un* 
to thrash out soundly, 'Mo knock 
one into a cocked hat." See 
Voie. Se — , to give oneself 
much trouble; to move about 
actively^ fussily, Decarcasse-loi 
done, rossaid ! look alive, yon 
laxy bones! Se — le boisseau, to 
torture otu's brains; to fret 
grievimsly. 

Dicarrade, / (thieves*), general 
scampering off; departure, 

Dicarre,/ (thieves'), release from 
prison, 

D6carrement, to. (thieves' and 
popular), escape. 

D^carrer (thieves'), to leave prison ; 
to run aioay, '*to guy." See 
Patatrot. 

Oo Ics emntine tous el pendant ce temm- 
U Ic f^euaanl d6cAm atcc son cunarmde. 

— ViDOCQ. 

Also to come out. 



tto 



Dicartonner — Diconvrir, 



Koiu ftlloni nou* cach«r dam TalMc en 
"ftc*. iHMit nrron* <McafTttr tv Bicanim.— 
K. Sub. 

DecAirer & la bate, /o escape; — 
chcr, tot^ rtleasid atttrhavmgdofu 
«w'i"iime;" — oebeMc, /<»*/«■ 
itintit wifAout triai ; — de U 
i;cA]r, /t/ ^ rtltasedontht itrmgth 
ff/ <i« i;r*/fr of diichargr, 

O^cartonner (popular), se — , to 
^nw old ; to grow wtak. 

D4catl» ttdj, (popular), no longer 
X'ouH^ or handsome / f<fdy^ faxitd. 
Kllc al'itir bien — ^ike has afadid, 
\0orm i»f>pearanct. 

O^catir (poptilar)^ se — , to get 
JjJtdt nvrn, teitty. 

D^cavage* m, [fainiliar), eirxum- 
staneei of a gamester who has lost 
all hu money, or who has 
'* tilcwcd " it. From d^cav<f| 
ruined gamester, 

PAcembrailUrd, m., opfiroMotti 
epithrt af>plifd to Bonaparttsts. 
An allusion to the coup dVtat of 
the and December, 1851, when 
I^uik NapoWon Bonaparte, then 
rrcMileni of the Republic, thiew 
into prtKon dissentient members 
of pDrliatnent and generals who 
refuned tn join in the conspiracj^, 
RhclleO Uic boulevards, shot down 
hundrcdii of harmlc&s loungers, 
nnd transported or exiled 50,000 
republicaiu or monarchisli. 

D*cembriBade,/,a«/7<-/j/w»Vffr/o 
the toup J't^faf of 2rtd Dfcembcr^ 
1S51. Sec DicembrailUrd. 

Dichanter (popular), to rncot'er 
from an error; to bi crestfallen 
after oh/s illusions hatft betn dis- 
pelled ; /* come down a peg or tuv. 

Diehard, wi. (popidnr), Hted^; ma^^ 
who is " hard u])." 

D^che^. (popular), neediness. Kirc 
en — , to <V ** hard up " for cash ; 
*• to be at low tide." 



Dicheux, OT. (popular), xun/r Mofiy 

*• quisby." 

D£chir6e. / (popular), elle n'etf 
pas Irop — , is said of a roomam whs 
is yet astractivt in spite ofjtears. 

Dichirer (miliury). de U toile, /» 
perform platoon firing ; — la 
cartouche, to eat. See Masti- 
quer. (Popular) Dechirer son 
faux-col, son habit, son tabher, 
to die, (Ironical) Ne posse — , 
to have a good opinion of oneself 
and to show it. 

D£claquer (popular), to open one's 
heof^ ; to maJte a clean oreast of. 

D£clouer (popular), to redeem ob- 
jects from pawn, to get objects 
"out of lug." 

Dico^oir, M, (popular), nosf, 
•' boko/' or " smeller." See 
Morviau. 

Dicoller (popular), to leave a place; 
to leave one s employment ; — son 
billard, /o t/i>. See Pipe. Se — , 
to fail ; to grow old, rickety ^ to 
die, *' to kick the bucket." 

Dicompte, m, (military), mortal 
-cound. Rcccvoir son — , to die ; 
see Pipe ; "to lose the number 
of one's mess." 

Dicors, vi, pi. (freeroasons*)* oma*^ 
ments, ifuignia. 

Dicoucheur (military), soldier who 
is in the habit of stopping an/ay 
loiihoMt feave, 

D^coudre (famtliar), en — , to fight 
either in a duelorwiih the natural 
weapopis. 

Dicouvrir (popular), la peau de 
quelqu'un, to make one say things 
which he would rather hone left 
unsaid; "to pump one;" "to 
worm " secrets out of one. 



Di^cra mponncr — Dtfrimousser. 



It 



I 



Dicramponner (familiar), se — , 
to get rid of a trou&itsome person. 

Pourqtioi u-je quitlf Paris? Pour me 
fMcmfflponncr tout ^ fait de eel imbecile 
<pa, panntf, dtfcavtf, commen^ait i me por- 
Cer UgtiiCTicKlCHEriH, Lm GJm. 

DAcrasser (popular), quelqu'un, 
/« carntpi onc^ '* lo put one up 
to $nun;" (prostilules*) — un 
hommc, $o cUan a man out of 
his money, and in thieves' lan- 
guage, to rob a man. See Grin* 
chir. 

Dicravater (popular), ses propos, 
to tue lan^tage of an cbjecttonabU 
fkameUr^ or "blue talk." 

Dicrocher (popular), to take articles 
mtt of pawn, or " oul of lug ; " 
(military) toshoot do^vn; (thieves') 
to steal haniikerchiefs^ ** lo haul 
slooks;" (popular) — un enfant, 
ta bring about a miscarriage ; 
(familiar) — la timballc. to be 
jortunaie^ or, as the Americans 
term it, **io get the cake," or 
"to j-ank the bun." An allu- 
sioo to the practice of hanging a 
silver cup as « prize at the top of 
a greasy pole. 

Cicrochez-moi-^a (popular), wc- 
man's bonnet ; old clothes dealer ; 
shop toerr secondhand clothes^ tr 
" band-me-Uowns," are sold. 

D^crottcr (popular), un gigot, to 
leave nothing of a leg of mutton 
buf the bare bone* 

D^ctUott^, m. (popular), bastJhru/tt 
" brosier." 

dedans ffamtltar), fourrer or met- 
Ire quelqu'un — , fo lock one up ; 
t9 impose upon one^ * ' to bam- 
boozle." Se met I re — , to make a 
wntj/ukr; to get tipsy. (Pofmlar) 
Voir en — , to be tipsy, applicable 
especially to those who hold soli- 
loqnies when in their cups. See 
Poxnpette. 



D^dfele, /. (popular), mistress. 

"moU." 

DAdire (thieves*), sc — chcr, io be 
at death's door. Properly to re- 
pent one^s crimes. 

Didurailler (thieves'), to remove 
prisoners' irons, 

D6falquer (popular), to ease one- 
self; to go to the "crapping ken." 
Sec Mouacailler. 

Difarguer (thieves'), to grow pal*; 
to be acquitted. 

Ddfarguetir, m, (thiev«s'), witness 
for the defence. 

Difendre (popular), sa queue, to 
defend oneself. 

Diffardeur, m. (popular), thief 
"cross cove." SeeGrinche. From 
de and fardeau, literally one who 
eases you of your burden* 

Difiger (popular), ton^arm. From 
de and figer, to coagulate. 

D£nier (popular), aller voir — les 
dragons, to go without a dinner. 
See Aller. (Military) D^filer U 
parade, ft? <//>, "lolosclhenumber 
of one's mess." See Pipe. (Popu- 
lar) Se — , to run away, *• to leg 
it.'^ Sec Patatrot. 

D£f!earir (thieves'), la picnuse, /o 
steal linen hung ottt to dry, '* to 
smug snowy." 

Diformer (popular), to break; to 
put out of gear. ]c lui ai df^form^ 
une quille, / broke one of his legs. 

Difouque. Sec Desfoux. 

Defourailler (thieves'), fo run, " to 
pad the hoof," or •*Io guy;" 
see Patatrot; to fall ; tt be rt' 
leased from jail. 

Difrimousser (popular), synony- 
mous with devJAngcr,^* peer into 
one's face. 



It 



D^frusqutr^D/gronpcr. 



M^* **lo ckfa^" Sec Oiin- 
due 

(hmlMTX ic — % «r 

AmK n « fe GOOD tOQt 

L^wfMfrMUL See 



cold 



bodccC s 



D lfl wr (wydbrX »e .-*> ? ***• 



Pip*:* 



(F« 



IMffobiUadt«/ (popular), vcmit; 

9tryh0dhfmr, ^'swiizle.** 
Mffonauide, /. (popular), tfifag* ; 



D4(Oittin«««> <^ (popular), tiu- 
m m m t t ** tiie sack ; ** nv/w. 

D4CMnm«r (popular), quelqn'un, 
* <4nM/ tfwr «w. Literally to dis- 
miu mi/hm m sUmUion ; to kilL 

Lauiciib. 
D^gor(«r (popular), /tp /ax, "to 

lurk out.** 
D4coltaf e, m. (popular), or/iVn ^ 

jmi^mjiy iw ; a/^tb/iH^ or dis- 

Msottftf (mUftary), /» ii//; (popu- 
Uf) M mrftut cmt; toJinJj to 

TWw* * ijuoi iImm 4|ii* J'd^coti* d^ns I'ooir, 
UitWt k c'i>utu, Ut-Uu »u I'trotloirf 
n I b«a. U-bal^ «N > l« nxiicMe. 



Degouler (popular), ip take away ; 
l»/aJ, "to come a cropper." 

D^poulinage, m. (popular), tn- 
ftrvr drmJt^ "swuiJc." 

D^ouliaer (popular), to drip ; — 
Of qa'oo a sur le cocur, to un- 



D^COnrdi, m. (popoUr), ironical, 
dMrnuyMlam^ "slick in the mud** 
P ropq J yit has the opposite mean- 
ing. 

D^^oQtatioD. / (popular), esprti- 
AMI o/diipist. Unc — d'homme, 
m di^mstittg fellfftv. The expres- 
»on u a favourite one of the street- 
walking tribe. 

I>*KO<it6, adj. (popular), ironical, 
N'etre pas — , is said of one -.oko 
exftresses a desire of obtaining some- 
thiftg considered by others to be too 
ffiski for him; a/so of one who 
pteks out for himself the most dainty 
bits. 

D^graisser (popular), to steals ** to 
prig," see Qrincbir ; — qucl- 
qu'un, to Jkcce one. Se — , to 
grow th in. 

D6grimoner (popular), se— , to be- 
stir oneielf ; to struggle ; to 
wriggie. 

D^gringiller (popular), to come out, 
Dcgringillons dc la carree, iet us 
leave the room. 

Degringolade, / (thieves'), thefl 
in a shop ; — ^ la flQtc, rohbtry 
committed by a strcet-toalier, 

Digringoler (thieves'), to steal, " to 
nim ;" — i la carre, to steal pro- 
perty from shops. This kind of 
robbery is practised principally by 
women, and the tliief is called a 
" bouncer." 

Dftgrossir (freemasons'), to eatve. 

D^grouper (popular), se — , /* 
stparate. 



D/gueularder — Denti-mondaine. 



"13 



I 



Digueularder (thieves'), to talk^ 
to iay, " to rap," Ne dcgueulorde 
p&ssur &a fiole, say ncthittg about 
nim, 

D^gueulas, d^gueulatift adj. 
(l>opnlar), annoying ; disgustiH!^. 

J'cofwbre I'truc ; 'I est d^guculas. — 
RiCHKMN. (/ know tAg tratit ; U is dls- 

Dtgueulfttoire, adj. (popular), dis' 
iptiUng; Tcpuhive. 

D^gueulbite, d^gueulbocheiod)*. 

(popular), disgusting. 

D^gueuler (popular), to sing, or 

"to lip." 

Di^eulis, m. (popular), vomiL 

D^guU, m, (thieves*), disguise. 

D6guiser (popular), se — en cerf, 
Ifi make off^ 'Mo bnish,"or "to 
leg it." See PataUot. 

Dije ti, adu (popular), xoeakly ; 

ugly. N etre pas trop — , to be 

still handsome, 
DijeQner, m. and verb (ix»pular), 

dc pcrrfK|Uct, bistuit dipped in 

wine; (military) — Jilafourdictte, 

to fight a duel. 

D6jos6phier (popular), to edueate^ 
not in the better sense of the word; 
•* lo put one up to snuff." An 
allusion to Madame Fotiphar's at* 
tenipis on Joseph's virtue. 

De U bourrache I (popular), ex- 
pressive of refusal ; might be ren- 
dered bv •'no_gpJ" '*you be 



tfT, 



blowed.'* See Niflcs 

D^USB. Com. (popular), theatre of 
tMt Dilassements Comigues, 

Dilacat et blond (popular), is said 
irom<ally of a dandy or *' Jemmy 
Jes&amy;" also of an effeminate 
feilffw who cannot bear pain or 
dixomfort, 

D^licoquentieusement (theatri- 
cal), marvellously. 



Dilige, / (popular), for diligence, 
public coach, 

Dftmancher (popular), se — » to be- 
stir oneself; to give oneself muck 
trouble. 

Dimaqoiller (thieves*), to undo, 

D£marger (thieves'), to go away; 
tomakeofft '* to crush," *' to guy." 
See Patatrot. 

Dimarquer (Iiterar>). to pirate 
ethers* productions^ or to alter one*s 
awn so as to pass them off as ori' 
ginal. 

Dimarqueur, m. (literary), delinge, 
literary pirate. 

D6m£aager (popular), to beeonu 
mad, or "balmy;" to die, "to 
kick the bucket ; " — ^ la doche 
de bois, de zinc or i h sonneite 
de bois, to move one's furniture 
secretly, the street door bell having 
been muj^ed so as to give no more 
sotmd than a wooden one, ** to 
shoot the moon ; '* — i la ficelle, 
to remove one* s fumitHre through 
a tfindow by means of a rope; 
— par la cheminee, to bum otters 
furniture on receiving notice to 
quit, so as to cheat the landlord. 

Demi-aune, /. (popular), arm, 
" bender." Tendre la — , to beg. 

Demi-cacheniirc,/. (ramiliar), i:r;9/ 
woman in a good posit iim, but who 
has not yet reached the top of the 

IcuJder. 

Demi-castor, f, woman of the 
demi-monde, a '* pretty horse- 
breaker," or " tartlet." See 
Gadoue. 

Demi-cercle, ptncer au — . See 
Ccrclc. 

Demi - lune (popular), rwiw/, 

'* cheek." 
Demi-mondaine, /. (familiar), 

woman of the demi-monde. See 

Oadouc. 

I 



114 



Demi-monde — DipuceUttr, 



Demi-monde, m. (familiar), the 

■UHjrlJ of the kt^^hrr class of kept 
womeHto/**^itiiy horsebreakers. " 

Demi-sel,denQi*poil,demi-vertu, 
/. tjKipular), ^xW who has lost her 
mnidtnheaJ, her " ceincture,*' as 
Villon termed it. 

Demi-stroc, m. (thieves*), half a 
" seller, " that is J one-fourth of a 
litre. 

D6moc-soc, m. (ramiliar), soeialut. 
An abbreviation for democrate- 
socialiste. 

Demoiselle,/ (popular), a r^-/dm 
measure for wim, half a ** mon- 
sieur;" hottltofwine. 

Demoiselles,/ [familiar), ces — , 
euphemism for gay ladies : — du 
bitumc, du Ponl Neuf, street- 
walkers, 

D^molir (literary), to criticise ttnth 
harshness, to run dmvn literary 
proiluetions ; {popular} to thrash 
soumtly, •' to knock into a cocked 
hat," sec Voie ; to kill. 

Demolisseur, »«. (literary), sharp 
aiui violent critic. 

Ddmorfilage (card 'Sharper^), set- 
ting right again cards which havt 
been marked, 

Dimorfiler, action of doing 6imoT- 
(ilapc (which see) ; also to have 
ones wounds cured, 

D6morsaner (thieves'), /^^iw into 
one^s arguments, 

Dimurger (thieves'), to leave a 
Plaie ; to he set at liberty, 

DenaiUe, m, (thieves'), Saint — , 
Saint-Denis^ an arrondissement of 
JMris. 

Dinicheur, m. (popular), de fau- 
vttles, one fond of UH)men, '* mut- 
lon*moiigcr." 

Dent, /. (popular), avoir de la — , 
tfi have preserved one's good looks ; 



/» ke still young, Mai de dents, 
hrve. N 'avoir plus mal aux dents, 
to be dead. 

Dentelle, / (thieves'), hank notes^ 
** rags, flimsies, screenes, or long- 
tailed ones." 

Diparler (popular), to cease talking; 
to talk nonsense. 

Dipartement, m. (popular), du 
bas rein, breech. See Vasistas. 
A play on the word Rhin. 

D£pendeur, m. (popular), d'an- 
douillcs. See Andouilles. 

D6penser (popular), sa salive, to 
talk, or ** to jaw away." 

D£piauter, dipioter (popular), to 
skin, Se — , to break one's skin ; 
to undress^ " to pecL" 

Diplanquer (thieves'), to remove 
stolen property out of hiding-place ; 
— son faux centre, to be comncted 
under an alias, 

DAplumer (popular), se — , to get 
bald. Avoir le coco deplume, to 
be bald, *'lo have a bladder of 
lard," or *" lo be stag-faced." See 
N'jtvoir plus. 

Diponer (popular), to ease oneself 
•*Io go to the chapel of ease." 
See Mouacailler. 

Diporter (popular), to discharge 
from a situation, **lo give the 
sack." 

D£pdt, m. (popular), d/pSt de la 
/Prefecture de Police. Caissc des 
depots el consignations, pla^e of 
ease, or '* crapping ken," 

Dipotoir, m. (thieves*), cenfes' 
siomil ; (popular) chamber pot^ or 
* ' jerry ; " strong box, or ' ' peter ; " 
house of ill-fame, or "nanny- 
shop." 

Dipuceleur, m. (popular}, de nour* 
rices, or de femmes eoceinles, 
ridiculoHt Lovelate, 



D^uii^Dhhahillage. 



IIS 



Diputi, m. (ihealricfti), free tkket, 

De quoi (popular), wtalth ; what 
M£xt f what do you mtan t 

Dirager (popular), to get paci/Ud, 
Generally used in ibe negative. 
U o'a pas encore d^rag^, He is ytt 
m a rage, 

D£ratll£, m, (familiar), dvw if^ ^of 

iost caste. 

DiraiiUr (ramiliar), /o /a//( MtfMj/ff/r, 
(cci-and- bull -story fashion^ 

Diralinguer (sailorsOt^^fir. Pro- 
perly to detach from the bolt rope. 
Sec Pipe. 

D^rondiner (popular), to fay, " to 
shell out.'* Sc — , to spend or give 
av.'ay on/s money. Rends, half- 
pence. 

Dirouler (thieves'), se — , to spend 
a lertain time^ not sperifed, in 
prison, "to do time.** 

Demure, m. (populnr), roue de — , 
fve-frane piece, Sc lever le — le 
premier, to get up in a bad hu- 
mumr. Used a« a preposition : 
(Printers') Derrifcre le po^le chcz 
Cosson, words used to evade re- 
pi)ing to an inquiry* 

D^sargenti, adj. (thieves'), in 
want of money. 

Qnaad on eU dfiArgeottf on «e la brome 
ct I on nc va pu sc taper un ftouper & I'triL 
— V|»Cy. 

D£sargot£, adj. (thieves'). 6tre — , 
t* bi shrewd, to be a** file," to be 
"fly."*»rd'Meai7bIoke." 

Disargoter (thieves*), to employ 

rUHHIMg. 

D^sarrer (thieves'), to fite, to 
'* guy," or "to make beef." Sec 
Patatrot. 

Desatiller (thieves'), to castrate. 
Horse- imtneni term the operation 
"adding one to the list." 



D'esbroufTe, or d'eabrQUf 
(thieves'), by force. Pesdller — , 
to take by force, Estourbir — , t^ 
knofk over the head. 

Uojnand messifrrv Tnuie • ■ • 
Lc nlani cur t'catrade 
D'nbrDufje I'estouibu. 

ViDOCQ. 

Desccndre (popular), quelqu'un, 
to shoot one, •* to pot ; '* to throw 
down ; — le crayon sur la colonne, 
to thresh, sec Voie ; — la garde, 
to die^ sec Pipe. (Theatrical) 
Descendre, to approach the foot- 
tights, (Sporting) Unchevalqui 
descend, Aorie against which the 
odds are decreasing, 

D£senbonnetdecotonner, to give 
elegance to. " I>e," and " en tK>n- 
net de colon," a nightcap. 

Disenflaquer (popular), se — ^ Uf 
amuse oneself (Thieves') Se — , 
to get out of prison ; to get out of 

trouble. 

D^scnfrusquiner (popular), se — , 
to undress, 

Discntiflage, m. (thieves'), separa- 
tion; diz'orce. 

Disentifler (thieves'), to separate; 

to divorce, 

Desfouque. Sec Desfonz. 

Desfoux, /. (popular), siik cap 
sported by icomen^s bullies. From 
the maker's name. 

Desgenais, a character of a eomeiy 
by Th. Barrih-e, Faire son — ea 
chambre, to play the moralist, 

Desgrieax, associate of prostitutes 
and swindlers. A character from 
Manon Lcscaut^ by I'Abbc 
Prcvost, 

Diahabillage, m, (literary), ill- 
natured criticism. 

Si I'on veut pauer un Joll quart (Theure 
on n'a qu^ faire juer un pcintrc connu uir 
un autre p«intr« dgalemcot connu. Quct 
d^ahabUU^Se I ncs amia, 



Ii6 



Dishabiller — D&oalide. 



Dishabiller (popular)^ i& thrash^ 
"to wallop.'* See Voie. 

Diaoler (thieves'), to thrato, 

Disosse, f. (popular), distress, 
Jouer la — , A? ot ruined., "cracked 
«P»" " go°« to smash." 

Ditossi, m^ (popular), very thin 
man; ruined man^ **brosier." 

Disotser (popular), quelqu'un, to 
pommel one. See Voie, 

Deatalie, /. (popular), prostitute^ 
or " bed-fagot.** See Oadoue. 

Dessaler(thieTes'),/<»</rtfzi;». (Popu- 
lar) Se — , to drink a morning 
^ass of white wine ; to drink f "to 
moisten one's chaffer." 

Dessous, ffi. (theatrical), tomber 
dans le troisieme, or trente- 
sixiime — , the expression is used 
to denote thai a play has been a 
eomplete fiasco. (Familiar) Tomber 
dans le troLsi^me — ^ to fall into 
utter discredit. (Thieves*) Des- 
sous, man loved for "love," not 
for mon^ ; a bully. 

Deasus, m, (thieves'), man who 
keeps a woman, the dessous being 
the said woman's lover. 

Deatuc (thieves'), €tre d*— , to be 
partners in a robbery ; to be in a 
"push." "I'm in this push." 
is the notice given by an English 
thief to another that he means to 
"stand in." 

Ditacbi, adj. (sporting), cheral— , 
horse which Jwps the lead. 

Detacher (thieves'), le bouchon, 
tostealawaCchj " to nick a jerry, " 
" to twist a thimble," or " to get 
a red toy." 

Ditaffer (thieves'), to grew bold. 
Dc and ta.Ufear. 

Ditailler (theatrical), le couplet, to 



sing with appropriate expression 
the different parts of a song; — 
nn rSie, to bring out all the best 
points of a part. 

D6taroquer (thieves'), to obliterate 
the marking of linen, 

Diteindre (popular), to die, "to 
kick the bucket," or "to snuff 
it." See Pipe. 

Diteler (popular), to renounce the 
pleasures of love* 

Ditoce, or ditosse, /. (thieves'), 
ill'luck ; poverty. 

D6toume,/ (thieves'), vol i la—, 
robbery in a shop^ or from the shop- 
window, generally committed by 
two confederates, the one engross- 
ing the shopkeeper's attention while 
the other takes possession of the 
property. 

DAtoumeur, m., d6toumeuse,/, 
thief who operates after the manner 
described under the heading of 
"Vol &la d*toume " (which see). 

D^traquer (popular), se — le trog- 
non, to become crazy, to become 
"balmy." 

Dette (thieves'), payer une — , to be 
in prison, to "do time." 

Deuil, ffs. (popular), demi — , coffee 
without brandy. Grand — , with 
brandy. (Familiar) II y a du — , 
things are going on badly. Porter 
le — de sa blanchisseuse, to have 
dirty linen. 

Deux (popular), les — saeurs, the 
^r«rA, or "cheeks." See Vasis- 
tas. (Thieves') Partir pour les 
— , to set out for the convict settle^ 
ment, "to lump the lighter." 

Divalidi, adj. (familiar), synony- 
mous of invalide, unretumed can- 
didate for parliament. 



Devant — Disque. 



117 



Devant« m. (popular), de gilct, 
xvi^mans breasts ^ "Charlies, 

D^veinird, m. (popular), unlucky. 

Un dc c«* ouvncra d^vdnordi, un dc cc$ 
invcnlcun en chombre, qui ont comjpi^ «ur 
It Coup (U CoTtcnc du tiouvej an. — Kiche- 



7. 



PavJ. 



Dftveine,/ (populmr), constani ill- 

Dividage, m. (thieves'), hngspetch^ 
or yarn ; walk in prison yard ; — 
i I'cslorgue, /«-, ** gag ; ' a^cwa- 
Han, Fairc des dcvidogcs, to 
make reitlafions. 

Divider (thieves'), to talk, "to 
palter:" — k I'estorguc, to lU; 
— le jars, to speak the cant of 
thieves, •' to patter flash ; " — une 
retentlssame, to bretik a bell; 
(popular) — son pcloton, to talk 
a great dial; to make a confession. 

Divideur, m., divideuse, / 
(thieves'), chatterer, "daclt-box." 

Diviergcr (popular), to seduce a 
maiden. 

Divirer (thieves* and cads*), /« imm 
rottnd. 

D^visser (popular), le coco, to 
strangle; — le trognon h qucl- 
qu'iin, to wring a person s neck. 
Se — , to go auHiy. Se — la 
p^tronille, to break one's head, 

DiviBseur, m, (popular), slanderer^ 
backbiter. 

Devoir (gay girls'), une dette, to 

have promtised a rendet'tvus. 

Divoyi, adj\ (thieves'), acquitted, 

Diable, m. (thieves'), instigator in 

the employ 9/ the police. 

Diamant, m. (theatrical), rviV-^^a 
pne qualiiy^ *' like a bell ; " (popu- 
lar) paring stone, 

Dibolata, dibuni (Breton cant), 
U fight t to thrash. 



Dlctlonnaire Verdier, m, (prin- 
ters') , imaginary dictionary of 
^'hich the nofne is shouted lotid 
Ufhenever one speaks or spells in- 
correctljr, 

Dieu (popular), le — termc, rmt 
day. II n'y a pas dc bon — , sec 
Bon. 

DifflcuUA./. (sporting), *tfe en — , 
is said of a horse which ran Just 
keep the start obtained at the cost 
OJ the greatest efforts. 

Difoara (Breton cant), to pay. 

Dig- dig, or digue -digue, m. 
(thieves'), epileptic fit. Battcur 
de — ^1 vagabond who pretends to 
be seised with a fit, 

Digonneur, m. (popular), iil-tem- 
peered man, a ** shirty" one. 

Dijonnier (popular), mmtard-pct. 
The best mustard is manufactured 
at Dijon. 

Diligence, / (popular), de Rome, 
tongue f or * ' velvet. " 

Dimanche (popular), or — apres 
la grand' mcsse, nez>er^ at Dooms- 
day^ or when the devil is blind. 

Dindonncr (popular), to deceive; 
to impose ufon^ *' to bamboozle." 
From dindon, a dupe^ a fool. 

Dindomicr, m. (thieves'), hospital 
attendant. 

Diner (popular), en ville, to dine off 
a small roll in the street. A philo- 
sophical way of putting \U 

Dinguer (theatrical), iobeouiofth€ 

perpendicular ; (popular) to walk, 
to lounge, Envoyer — , to send /# 
the deuce. 

Discussion,/ (popular), avoir one 
— avec le pav^, to fall fiat, "to 

come a cropper." 

Disque, m. (popular), breech, or 
"tocbos/' see Vasistas; also 



ii8 



Distingui—Donner, 



Distingui, 

bter. 



(popttlAr)i ^Awj of 



Dix-huit (popalar), shot made up of 
different ptu^s of oid cms. A plav 
on the words "deux fois neuf," 
^tnce new, or eighteen, 

Dixiime, m. (miliUry), passer an 

— regiment, to die. See Pipe. 
A play on the word " d&imer," 
to kill one in ten, 

Docbe,/ (thieves'), mother. Bolte 
^ — » eojjin, 

Doigt, m, (familiar), se fouirer le 

— dans I'ceiU or le — dans Tceil 
jusqu'au coude, to be grossly miS' 
taken. Etre de la soci^t^ du -^ 
dans Toeil, to be one of those tuHo 

form ambitious hopes not likely to 
be realiud. Name given after the 
Commune of 1S71 to a gnntp di 
Communists in exile who nad 
separated from the rest, and had 
divided among themselves all the 
future official posts of their future 
government — a case of selling 
chickens, &c, with a vengeance. 

Domange (popular), marmite JL — , 
•wagfftn which carries away the 
eontente of eesspools. Marmiton 
de — , scavenger employed at emp* 
tying the cesspools, Travaillerpour 
M. — , to eat. See Mastiquer. 
M. Domange is the name of a 
contractor who has, or had, charge 
of the cleaning of all Paris cess- 
pools. 

Dome, m, (thieves'). Saint — » or 
saindomme, tobacco, or " fogus." 

Dominer (theatrical), is said of an 
actor standing behind another who 
is nearer to thefootl^hts. It must 
be said, in explanation, that the 
stage-floor has an incline from the 
baac to the front of the stage. 

Domino-culotte, jr., the last do- 
mino in a playti^s hastd. 



Dominos, m. pi. (thieves'), jeu de 
— , teeth. Avoir le jeu complet 
de — , to possess one's set of teeth 
complete. Jouer des — , to eat. 
See Mastiquer. 

Comme tu joues des domincM (des dents). 
It te voir, on croirait que tu morfiies (mords) 
dani de la crignole (viande).— Vidocq. 

Donne,^ (gambling cheats*), la — , 
the act of skilfully skuj^ing a pack 
so as to leave underneath certain 
cards which the cheat resertes for 
himse^, 

Donner (thieves'), to look ; to see, 
•• to pipe ;" to peach, or ** to blow 
thegan;" — a la Bourbonnaise, 
to scowl at otie ; — du chasse k la 
rousse, to be on the look-out, " to 
nark," or " to nose ; " — du flan, 
or de la galette, to play fairly ; 

— sur le bufleton, to read an in- 
diciment ; — un pont k faucher, 
to lay a trap ; to prepare a snare 

for one ; to deceive one, "to kid ;" 

— une affaire, to give the informa- 
tion required for the Perpetration 
of a robbery. (Popular) Donner 
de la salade, to give one something 
more than a good shaking, see 
Voie ; — du cambouis k quel- 
qa'un, to make fun of one ; to 
play a trick; — du dix-huit, see 
Oonner cinq et quatre ; — du 
vague, to seek for on/s living ; — 
la savate, to give a box on the ear, 
or " buck-horse ; " — son bout, 
or son bout de ficelle, to dismiss ; 
to give the "sack;" (ironical) — 
des noms d*oiseaux, to be very 
loving; — cinq et quatre, to slap 
one with the palm, then with 
the back of the hand ; — un coup 
de poing dont on ne voit que la 
fiim^e, to give a terrific blow in the 

face, "a thumper." La — , to 
sing, "to lip." Se — de I'air. 
to go out. Se la — , to be off; to 
run cnuay, " to slope," see Pata- 
trot; also to fight, "to pitch into 
one another." (Familiar) Donner 



Donneur — Doucm r. 



119 



la migrBine ik une trte de boU, to 
be an inrufftrobU bare ; — ion 
dernier bon i. tirer, /* die; — de 
]a grosse atisse, to puff ut a book 
or trade article ; — du mUii to 
dismiss; (Samt'Cyr cmdets') — du 
vent, to bully. 

Donneur, m., de bonjour. See 
Bonjour. (Thieves') Donneur 
d'afTaires, maJefaetor 0/ an inven- 
tive genius who sug^sts to others 
plans 0/ robberies or ''plftnts." 

Donnez-Ia ! (thieve*'), look out! 
** shoe leather ! " Synonvmoos of 
"chou I " "acTesto I " *' du pet I" 

Dorancher (thieves'), to gild. 

Dormir (popular), en chien de fusil, 
to double onest'l/u/t when sleeping^ 
into the shape of an S ; — en gen- 
darme, to sleep with one eye open ; 
io sleep a *' fox's sleep. " 

Doma (Dreton), to get drunk, 

Domer (Breton), drunkard. 

Don dans I'auge, m. (popular), 
taty individual^ " laiy bones," or 
"bummer." 

Dort-en-chiant (popular), ex- 
tremely lazy man^ -with no energy 
•arhaiever^ with no heart for work, 
** a bummer." 

Dob, m. (general), woman's bully, 
"Sunday man ; " — d'azur, vert, 
same meaning. For synonymous 
terms see PoiBBon. Scicr le — k 
quciqu'un, to importune ; *' to 
bore 01M, 

Dote, / (popular), unpleasani 
thing, 

Dosaiire, / (thieves'), prostitute, 
*• buntcr,'^' sec Gadoue ; — de 
Mttc, arm-chair, 

Douanier, m, (popular), glass of 
absin/he. An allusion to the uni- 



form of custom house officen, 
which, like absinthe, is green. 
Termed also "un perroquei." 

Doublage, double, m. (popular), 
robbery. 

Double, m. (military), sergeant- 
major ; (popular) — six, negro. 
Also the tivo upper front teeth. 
(Thieves') Gras — , sheet lead^ or 
' * flap." Termed also ' ' saucis> 
son.* 

Doubler (thieves'), to steal, " to 
claim," or " to nick ; " (familiar) 
— un cap, to avoid passing before 
a creditor's door ; to be able to 
settle a debt or pay a bill when 
it falls due ; — Ic cap du termc, 
to be able to pay one's rent when 
it becomes due, to be able to clear 
the dreaded reef of rent day, 

Doubleur, doubleux, m,, dou- 
bleuse,/. (thieves'), thief, "prig,** 
see Gnnche ; — de sorgue, 
night thief. 

Doublin, in. (thieves'), ten-eentimt 
piece. 

Doublure,/, (theatrical), tutor who 
at a moment's notice is able to take 
the part of another ; (popular) — 
de la pi^ce, breasts, "Charlies." 

Douce, / (thieves'), silk or satin 
stuff, "squL-cw." (Popular) A 
1.1 — , gently ; pretty well. Com- 
ment qu'9a vaaujourd'hui ? mais, 
k ta — , haw are you to-day f pretty 
bobbish. La coulcr, or la passer k 
la — , to live an easy life, devout of 
cares, 

Doucette,/ (thieves'), a file. Aa 
endearing term for Oiat Tcry use- 
ful implement. 

Douceur,/ (thieves'), faire en —, 
to rob from the person without any 
violence, unth suai'ity, so to 
speak. Le metlrc en — , to extort 
property by dint of wheedling. 



120 



Dcuiliard — DrogutsU, 



DoQUlArd, m, (thicres' and popa^ 
lar), weaithy man^ **rag*5pUwger,* 
"rhinocenl," ont "weU-bd- 
Usted." 

Douillards, m, (thieves* and popa 
lar), hair, 

Vi«' la cahf ! J'ai pas d'cbaauettes ; 
Met rigmdifu font dcs riscuei ; 
Mes u» d'douilUrds m'Mrrecl d'chftpeui. 
RiCHKriN, CAmjuvh tits G* 



Douille./. (thieves' and popular), 
mpftfy, "pieces." See Quibaa. 
Aboule la — , "dub the pieces." 

Doniller (thieves'), to pay, " to 
dub; ** — da oArmx^togive moneys 
** to dub pieces." 

Douilles, / (thieves'), hair^ or 
"thatch;" — savonnccs, -white 
hair. Tenned also "tifs, douil- 
UrdSj plumes." 

Douillet, m., douillette, / 
(thieves'), hair^ " thatch ; " mam, 

Douillure, /, (thieves'), A^aJ §f 
hair. 

Douleur, / (popular), avaler or 
Strangle! la — , to dnnk a glass of 
brandv^ the great comforter it 
would appear. 

Douloureuse,/ (popular), reckon- 
ing at an eating-house. The term 
is expressive ofone's sorrow when 
comes the dreaded " quart dlieure 
de Rabelais.'' 

Douaae,/ (thieves'), yWvr. 

Doussin, m. (thieves'), Uad^ 

"bluey." 

Doussiner (thieves'), t» lint with 
leaJ. 

Ooux, m. (popular), da — • some 
siceet iiquor nuh as Chartraae, 
Curasao. 

Doverg^ (Breton), horse. 

Dragee, / (military), *«////, 
"plum." Drag^, properly sweet- 
rmat. Gobcr une — , to receive a 
httlUt, 



Dragons. See Aller voir defiter. 

Dragae, / and m. (popular), une 
— , tabUt implemfHts orpUtntofa 
eonjuror^ of a mountebank. 
(Thieves') Un — , surgeon, "nim 
gimmcr." 

Dragueiir, m. (popular), yuaet, 
" crocus ; " conjurer; moun/^' 
ianJt. 

Drap (popular), manger da — , to 
pLxyat billiards, to play ^ ^ spoof.^ 

Drmpezyif m.{Cntm»son5'),tervietee, 
Grand — , table-cloth. 

Drapeaux, m. (popular), swaddling 
clothes, 

Dregneu, parler en— , is to com' 
bin* this "uvrd with other xoords, 
••Je suis pris" becomes "Je 
dregue suidriguis pridriguis." 

Drille, or dringue, /. (popular), 
diarrhtra^ " jerry - go- nimble ; " 
(Lhieves')_^<'yrixw/i«-^. 

Drive (sailors'), ^tre en — , la be out 
on a spree, or " on the booze." 

Drogue,/ (popular), articU of bad 
quality^ "Brummagem arUcle." 
Mauvaise — , ill-natured man or 
woman. Petite — , wicked girl ; 
dtsreputable girl, "strumpet." 

Droguer (popular)^ to wait a long 
time ; (thieves') to ask /ok The 
term seems to imply that asking 
for is a tedious process, and that 
it is preferable to help oneself. 

Droguerie,/. (thieves'), a r^Mw/. 
That is, an unpleasant ta^k. 

Drogueur,m. (thieves'), dc la haute, 
cjcpert thief or swindler, " gon- 
nof." 

Droguiate, m. (thieves'), swindler ; 
sharper, "shark.'' Termed also, 
in English slang, "hawk," in op- 
position to the " pigeon " or vie* 
ttm. See Grinche. 



di^^ 



Droitier — Dynamitard, 



121 



Droitier, m. (ramiliar), mfmher tf 
the rigkty or ptonankist party in 
farltamrnt. Sec Cenlricr. 

Dromadaire, m. (popular), prtnti- 
tuff, or "mot. Formerly a 
veteran of the Egypt campaign, 

DrouillABse,/ (popular), diarrhoea, 
** jerry -go-nimblc,** 

Due, jw, (familiar), large earriaj^ 
whkA holds two people inside^ and 
kmj room for t-^vQ servants in front 
amihco behind; — de guiche, turn- 
kiy^ "dubsroan ;*' — de la panne, 
vuedy man ; — d'en fcce (ironi- 
cal), an allusion to an insigniH- 
cant man who is seeking to make 
a show of anduc importance or to 
give himself grand airs. 

Dace, m. (thieves'), secret signal 
agreed npon among sharpers. 

Duch£ne (pnpalar), pas<er i — , to 
get a tooth extraeted. An allusion 
to the name of a famous dentist. 

Duel, m. (popular), des ycux qui se 
batient en — , squinting eyts, or 
••swivel eyc«." 

Du gas, M. (luiilors'), my loiL 

Va bicn. On t'cmpUrm, du gas, 

Rejtond le capiuinc 

J'y fbomirat, t'y fournins 

Moi I'huile \ ta Untern*. 

Toi I'buil' de bras. 

RicKBPiN, Lm Mer. 

Dumanet (familiar), appellation 
gxtfen to a prrr:at< soldier^ annuers 
totk4 English " Thomas Atkins " 
Dumanet is the name of one of 
the characters of a play. 

Due, parler en — , art of disguising 
iforjs by means of the syllable 
"don." The letter n is substi- 



tuted for the first letter of the word 
when it is a consonant, added 
when ft Towel. The last syllable 
is followed by </«, which acts as a 
prefix to the first. Thus "mai- 
son " becomes *'naisondumai," 
** Paris" becomes *' Narisdupa." 

Dunik (Breton), ma%s. 

Dunon, parler en — , process simi • 

lar to the one called *' parler en 

dun " (which see). 

DuTj adj. and m. (poptdar), i la de- 
tente, or it la dc^vcrre, stingy, dote' 
fisted; ma n who is slow in paying his 
debts. Du — , spirits. (Printers') 
Etre dans sou — ^ to he tuorhing 
hard. 

Duraille, /. (thieves'), stone; pre- 
cious stone, ** spark." 

Dure, / (thieves'), stone ; the een- 
tral prison ; — it briquemon, i 
rifle, fiint. Voler quelqu'un i 
la — , to rob a man tt/ith violence ^ 
*' to jump a cove." 

Dur^me, m. (thieves*), cheese. 

Durillon, m. (popular), hump. 

Durin, m. (thieves'), iron. 

Duriner (thieves'), to tip with iron. 

Dusse. See Duce. 

Du vent (papular), orde la mousse, 
de I'anis, acs dattes, des navets, 
des n^fles, du flan, derisive expres- 
sions of refusal ; might \tc ren> 
dered by, " you be blowed," 
'* don't you wish you may get it," 
*' you'll get it in a hurry," &c. 

Dynamitard, m, (familiar), dymi- 
mtter, one who aims at regene- 
rating society by the free use of 
dynamite. 



122 



Eau — Eckassier. 




Eau, / (popular), de moule, a 
mixture of a little absinthe and 
a great deal of water* Marchand 
d* — chaude, or d' — de javelle, 
landlord of a wine-shop, 

Eau d'af, eau d'affe, /. (popular 
and thieves*), brandy^ or " French 
cream," from af, life, 

As-tu bu I'un d'af & c'nuttn ? Taf I'air 
tout drfile, est-ce que t'es maiade, ma mftre f 
— Caiicktsmt Patstard. 

Ka.xaitf.pl. (popular), £tre dans les 
— ^^lasses, to hold a high o^dal 
position. Les — sont basses, 
funds are law, funds are at '* low 
tide." 

Ebasir (thieves'), to knock down ; 
to murder, ** to cook one's 
goose." 

Ebattre (thieves'), s'— dons la 
tigne, to try and pick pockets in a 
crowds " to £ake a cly in the 
push." 

Eb6no, m. (popular), for ^b^niste, 
French poluher, 

Ebouriffant, adj. (common), ex- 
cessive^ astounding. Vous €tes 
ebourifTant, you are " coming it 
lather too strong." 

EcafouiUer (popular), to squash, 

Ecaill6, m. (popubir), prostitutes 
bully, or *' Sunday man." Pro* 
perly one vnih scales like those of 
a fish. An allusion to maquereaa. 
See Poisson. 



Ecarbouiller (popular), s' — , A? 
run away, " to bunk." 

Ecart, m. ^mbling cheats*), sleight 
of hand trick by which the cheat 
conceals an ace umier his wrist to 
use when convenient, 

Ecarter (familiar), du fusil, or de 
la drag^, to spit involuntarily 
when talking. 

Echalas, m. (popular), jus d' — , 
wine, (Thieves') Echalas d'om- 
nicroche, coachman of an om^ 
nibus, 

Echalas, m. pi. (popular), thin 
legs, "spindle-shanks," 

Joue des guibotles, prends tes Echalas \ 

tOD COU.— X. MONTltFtN. 

Echappi, m. (popular), de Charen- 
ton, crazy fellow (Charenton is 
the Paris depdt for lunatics) ; — 
d'H^rode, unsophisticated mnn, 
or "greenhorn," 

BcharpiUer (popular), se faire — » 
to get a terrible thrashings ** to 

fet knocked into a cocked hat." 
ee Voie. 

Echasses, /. //. (popular), thin 
legs, "spindle*shanks." 

Echassier, m. (popular), tall man 
with thin, long legs, or "spindle- 
shanks." 



Eckaudi^^Ecomtr, 



123: 



Bchaudi (popukr), 6tre — , to ht 
CK^tr^harged ; to bt Aeectd^ *' to be 
shaved/' 

Bchauder (popular), to chargr more 
for an artuU than the real frice^ 
"to ihave a customer." Properly 
to scaid^ According lo the Slang 
Dictionary (Chatto and Windus, 
18S5), when a London trades- 
man sees an opportanily of doin? 
this, he strokes his chin as a si^al 
to the assistant who is serving 
the customer. 

Echelle, f. (popnlar), monler & 
r — , to atcena tne ssaffold. Faire 
monter quelqu'un ^ 1' — , to gtt 
99H into a ragt iy tauirtg or had- 
^ring him, " to rile one.'* 

Echiner (familiar), to tritiHse 
shortly^ to run dram. Properly 
to thrash to within an imh of 
OfWs life, 

Bcbineur, m. (familiar), ^Harp 
critic. 

Echo, m, (popular), an encore at a 
place of entertainment, 

Echoppe,y. (popular), tforkshop. 

Bchoa, m. pi. (journalists'), reports 
on topics of the day. 

Ecboter, to write ** echos." Sec 
that word. 

Echotier, m. (familiar), Vfriter of 
" echos." See that word. 
Ind^pendsnnient dc la logc de Fauchcry, 
il y a Lxlk dc la r^tlociioa, Jc U dtrecttuo et 



dt I'MlaiinLunUoD, use baicnoirc pour sen 
•oiruie. une autre pour soa cchottcr, qu«trc 



Jgnoi 
Imtcuib pwu WK» rgport cw . — P. MahaLix. 

Bclaizm^, m, (general), money laid 
down OH a gaming table as stakes. 

EcUirer (general), to pay^ *' lo 
dub ;'* til exhibit money ; (gamc- 
aters') — le tapis, le velours, to 
stake : (prostitutes') to lock about 
in ijuest of a client. 

Eclaireur, m. (gamesters'), confede- 
rati of e^rd- sharpers. 



EcUircon, m, pt, (popular), large- 
protruding breasts. Properly 
scouts, 

Ecluser (popular), t9 void urine, 

"to lag.' 

Ecluses,///. (popular), Uchcr Ics 
— , to tveePt " lo nap a bib ; " to- 
void urine, ** to lag." 

Ecole priparatoire (thieves'), 
prison, "jug." A kind of com- 
pulsory •* Buz-napper's Academy, " 
or school in which young thieves 
are trained. 

Ecopage, m. (populai), blotv. 



bang," or "wipe 



"prop, "Dang.' 
collision; seolaing-, "bully-rag- 
ging ; " the art of calling on one 
just at dinner time, so as to get an 
invitation, 

Ecoper (popular), to drink. See 
Rincer. Properly to i>ale a boat, 
Ecoper, to receive a thrashing, 
" to get a walloping." 

Ecopeur, m. (popular), artful man 
who manages to get some small 
adrujHiages out of people without 
appearing to ask for them. 

Ecomage, m. (thieves'), vol i 
1' — , mode cf robbery which consists 
in cutting out a small portion of a 
pane in a shop-unndcnv, and draw* 
ing out articles through the aper- 
ture by means of a rod proi'ideil 
with a hook at one of its ex- 
tremities. 

Ecorn^, m. (thieves*), prisoner 
under examination^ or " cross 
kid ; '* prisoner charged wtth an 
offence, "in trouble. 

Ecomer (popular), to slander; to- 
abuse^ " to bully rag ;" (thieves') 
to break into ; — une boutanche, 
un boucard, to break into a shop, 
" tu crack a swag." 

J'aimeniA mieui Cure uier Ic cUne uir 
le jrnnd trisur, 4iu« d'dconier lei boucard^ 

— VlOOCy. 



124 



Ecornmr — Effaroucher, 



£corneur, m. (thieves'), puhlk 
frosecHtor. 

Ecomifler (thieves'), h. la passe, to 
shoot iiawH, 

EcosBais {popuUr], en — , without 
bretciui. 

EcOBSeur, m., secretary ; one 
whose futKtians art to peruse hi' 
ters. Properly shelter. The Pre- 
fecture dc Police employs twelve 
" ecosscurs," whose duty it is to 
open the daily masses of corre- 
spondence conveying real or sup- 
posed clues to crimes committed. 
{Globe Nnvspaper^ 1 836.) 

Ecoute, f. and verb (thieves*), ear^ 
"wattle," or "hearing cheat." 
(Popular) Je t' — , je vous — , 
just so .' / should think so ! 

Ecoute s*il pleut t (popular), be 
^ittetf hold your " row ! " 

EcoutiUes, f, fl. (sailors'), ears. 
Ouvrir ses — , to listen. Properly 
Aaichway* 

V es-tu, ma pedtc pouliotte, y cs-tuf 
A5>lu biea ouvert tes ccouiillcs? Te rap- 
pclle£-iu tout ca «t «ncorc ca ? — RiCHsriH, 
La Glu. 

Ecrache, /. (thieves*), passport ; 
— tarie, or & Teslorgue, f&rged 
passport. 

Ecracher (thieves'), to exhibit onis 

passport, 

Ecrasement, m. (thieves'), crowd, 
*' push," or "scuff." 

Ecraser (popular), un grain, to 
hetx'e a j^lass of wine at a wine- 
shop ; — unc boutcille, to drink a 
bottle o/wifu, 

Je viens voir ^ present u n'y aurait pa& 
moyen d'^raser un ^rain pendant qu'i tou 
totu en train dc foltchonner. — Tul'slot. 

Ecrcvisse, /. (popular), de bou- 
langer, hypocrite. Avoir unc — 
dans la tourte, or dans le vol-au- 
vent, to be craxy, " to have apart- 



ments to let." (Cavalry) Ecrc- 
visse dc rcmpart, /oat soldier^ or 
" bcelle-crusher." (Theatrical) 
Qualorzieme — , female super* 
numeraiy^ 

Ecrire (popular), i un juif, to ease 
oneselL "to go to the crapping 
ken. See Mouscaillcr. 

Ecrivasser (literary), to write in a 
desultory manner. 

Ecuelle, / (popular), plate. 

Ecume, /. (thieves'), de terre, tin. 

Properly foam. 

Ecumotre, /. (familiar), pock- 
marked face, ** cribbage face." 
Properly skimmer. 

Ecurer (popular), son chaudron, to 
go to confession. Literally to 
Siour one*s stewpan. 

Ecureuil, m. (popular), mem or 
boy whose functions consist in pro- 
peiling the wheels of engineers or 
turners. 

Edredon, m. (popular), de trois 
^^ds, truss of straw, (Prostitutes') 
Faire 1' — , to find a rick foreigner 
for a client. 

Vous me demandcrcc pcut-ftrc ce que 
riffnifie. faire I'^dredon. . . . L'eider est 
un oueau ejtotique au duvet pr^eux. . . , 
Avcc ce duvet on te fabrittue do cuuche* 
chaudes ct mocllcuset. . . . Le« etr;»jieeTa 
de di<tinction, qu'tlc vienoeot du Nord on 
du Midi, koni, cux aumi, dck ouenux dont 
Ici plumes bm£c« cnue de« m^iiu adfoitea 
et coreuantes n'oiit p(u moins dc valeur 
que le duvet de I'cider- — P. Maiialik. 

£f, m. (prostitutes'), abbreviation of 
effel. Faire dc V — , to sttow 
otuself to advantage. 

EfTacer (popular), to eat or drink, 
see Mastiquer; — un pint, <^ 
polish off the contents of a dish ; — 
une boutcille, to drink off a bottle 
of liquor. 

Effaroucher (thieves'), to steals 
'*to case," or 'Mo claim." See 
Grinchir. 



I 



Effet — Embandcr^ 



1 25 



Bffel (Ihcatrical), by-play^ or those 
partt of apiay whi/h are intended 
to produce an impression on the 
andietue. Avoir un — , to have 
to say or do something which iviH 
make an impression on the spec- 
tators, Coup«r un — , to spoil 
a feiiow-actot^s " effet " by dis- 
tractmgtht attention of the public 
from him to oneself. 

Effeis. «. //. (familiar), faire dcs 
— ile biceps, to shffw off one's 
strength, rairc dcs — dc pochc, 
to maJte a shew of possessing much 
money ; to pay, Faire dcs — de 
nuuichcttc, to exhibit one^i cuffs 
tn an affrcted manner by a ntovc' 
ment of the arm. 

EfTondrer quelqu'un (popular), to 
heat one to a jelly ^ "to knock one 
into a cocked hat" See Voie. 

Bgailler les brumes (gamcstors*), 
te spread cards out. 

Epard, m, (thieves'), faire 1' — , to 
keep the proceeds of a theft to one- 
lelf 

Egayer (theatrical), to hiss^ " to 
give the big bird ; " — I'ount, to 
hiss a play. Se faire — , to get 
hjssed, •' to get the big binl" 

Eglisier* m, (popular}, bigot, or 

'* prayer monger." 
Egnaffcr (popular), fa eutound, 
Egnolant (popular), astounding, 
Egnoler (p>opuIar), to astound, 

EgOUt, m. (popular), prima donna 
d' — ^female singer at low music- 
halli, or "penny gafTs." 

BgrmfiSgner (popular), to scratch, 

Egrailler (popular), to take. 

Egratign6e. Sec D^cbirie. 

Egreni, m. (journalists'), a kind 
of nra's paper fag. 

Egnigcoir, m. (ihievcs'), pulpit, 
"bum-box.'* 



Egruger (thieves'), to plunder^ to 

rijie, 
Kgyptien, m. (theatrical), had 

actor^ inferior sort of " cackling 

cove," 

Elbcuf, m, (familiar), coat, " tog." 
Electeur, m. (commercial travel- 
lers*), client. 

Elements, m, pi. (card -sharpers'), 
motuy, or "pieces." Sec Qui- 
bus. 

EUve, m. (thieves' and cads'), da 
Chateau, prisoner; old offender. 

El^ve-martyr, m. (cavalry), ong 
■who is training to be a corporal, 
and who in consequence has to go 
through a very painful ordeal, 
considering that French non-com- 
missioned officers have the iron 
hand without the velvet glove. 

Elixir, m, (popular), de hussard, 
brantiy. See Tord-boyaux. 

Eltrisa (Breton), to seek for on^s 
livelihoods 

Eltrix (Breton), bread, 

Emanciper (familiar), s' — , Iff take 
undue ftimiliitritics with woitun^ 
•Mo fiddle." 

Emballer (thieves' and popular), 
to apprehend ^ " to smug." See 
Piper. S'— , to get excited. 
Properly is saiil of a horse that 
runs away, 

Emballes, / //. (prostitutes'), 
fussy ^ showing off, Faire des — , 
to make afttss. 

Emballeur (thieves'), police-officer^ 
** copper," or "reeler." See 
Pot-*-tabac. Properly packer. 
Emballeur de refroidis, under- 
taker s man, 

Embaluctaonner(popular), to make 
up a parcel ; to urrap up, 

Embander (thieves'), to takt by 
force. 



EmbanUr — Emmilliarder, 



(^•fmUr), t9 vtander 
fmfm. 0mt^ mJf$tct ; ta prevaricaU ; 
■m iM^ 4 wmiktJkt; te tnter. J 'at 
^Udc U catt^Ci / enttred 



■». (thieves'), bed sheet. 
itaater) Mettre une fille dans 
f^ m mim* a ^iH, wiih the 

''^mufftuin-es. 

M. (popular), vieil 
«-k *ii JM; cLi curmudgwHj 
^moAJltnag old shecp*i bead." 

Knbtrtiftcolcur, M. (popular). 
mt^ mau^ or an expert at 
mmt ff d f img, ** sly blade." 

KwibiitrouUler (popular), ta em- 
^amtij; tc perp/ex, "to Hum- 
mujt.'* 

BmW^>n«i M. (thievea*), decet'f ; 
>6r4W, or "gag." 

KmbMmcr (thieves*), /# deeerve, 
" to »lick." 

Kmblimes, m. pi. (popular), des 
— , expression of disheiief ; uiighl 
l»e rendered by *'aU my eye 1 " 
See Nfefles. 

Btnboiter (theatrical], to abme^ 

Smbosser (sailors'), s* — , to place 

oHiself, Properly to Mh^ th4 

^roatiside to bear. 

fmboucaner (popular), to stink. 
Tcrrae<l also '*cas.&cr, plombcr, 
chelinguer, trouilloter. S' — , 
tojeei duil^ out of iffrts, *'tO have 
the blue devils," 

EmbrouiUardcr (popular), 5' — , u 
said 0/ a p<rson in that state of in- 
cipient intoxiiation that if ht took 
mote drink thr effects tfou/d become 
evident. See Sculpter. 

SmbroussBtUis, adj. (familiar), 
chcveun — , matted hair. 

£mbusqu6, adj. (military), soldier 
who by reason of certain functions 
is excused from military duties. 



Emich^, adj, (farniliar), slightly 
intoxuated, or "elevated." See 
Porapette. 

Em^cber (familiar), s'— >, to be in a 
fair way of ^ting tipsy. See 
Sculpter. 

Em^hllonner (popular), s' — , to 
become quite cheerjitlt or "cock a 
hoop," through repeated potations t 

E rxi igr6, fl*. ( popular), de Gomorr he, 
Sodomite. 

Emmailloter (thieves*), to dupe^ 

" to best ; " — un m&me, to pre* 
part a theft or othtr crime. Sy- 
nonymous of " engraisser un pou- 
parl." 

Emmailloteur,m.(popuUr], /a</i9r, 
" snip," *'stecl-bar driver," "cab- 
bage contractor." 

Emmanchi, m, (popular), j/trar, 
clumsy fellow^ "slick in the 
mud/' 

EmmargouUlis. m, (popular), ob- 
scene talk, or "blue talk." 

EmmaBtoquer (popular), s* — ^ to 
live tvell ; to eai to excess^ "to 
siodge." 

Emmerdement, m. (familiar and 
popular), a coan»e word ; grtot 
annoyance; trouble. 

E mmerder (general), a coarse 
word ; to annoy ; to bore. Also 
extremely forcibU expression of con- 
tern^. Properly to cover with 
excrement. The English have the 
word "to immicx^ ttt eoverufitk 
dung. 

J'emnierde la ccmr, je respects mesHoun 
le» jur^ — V. Hugo. 

Emmieller, emmoutarder (popu- 
lar), euphemism for Emmeraer 
( which see). 

Emmilliardcr (popular), s' — , or 
s'cmmillionner, to become prodi- 
giously rich. 



Emos — Emporteur. 



\%7 



Emos,/ (popular), abbrevialioa of 
Amotion. 

Emouver (popular), s* — , /« ikifi 
noisily about; to hurry, or "to 

look alive." 

CmpafTer (popular), to intoxicate. 
From paf, drunk. Sec Sculpter. 

Empaffes, / //. (thieves'), bid- 

clothes, 

Empailli, m. (popular), clumsy 
man ; slanu man^ Ituking energy^ 
'•«ick in the mud." 

Empaler (popular), to deuive one 
by false reprtstntationit **to bam- 
booilc." 

Empaouter (popaUr), to annoy; to 
bortt '*lo spar." 

Empaum6, adj. (popular), c*est— , 
tti done. 

Empaumer (popular and thiere&')> 
to apprthend^ "to smug.*' S« 
Piper. 

Empave, /. (thieves*), crossway. 

Etnptcheur (familiar), dc danser 
en nind, dismal man, wha plays 
the dog in the moHgert "mar- 

jor." 

Empereur, m. (popular), worn-out 
old shoe. 

Empierg^onncr (popular), s' — , to 
get entangled, 

MarKot daiu u cotte ct so bai 
RiciiKriN. CAmnSfH tier Gu^ux. 




dnpiSrage, w., empiffrerie, f. 
(popular), glut tony, " slo'iging. ' 

Empilage, ot., or empU (popular), 
theatiHg. 

Empiler (popular), fc cheat a/ a 

£u me. 

Empioler (thievcs')j to lock up^ ''to 
give the clinch." 



EmpUnquer (thieves'), to come up; 
to turn uPf *' to crop up, " 

EmpUtre, m. (card-sharpere*), de 
Thapsia, shirt front and collar. 
(Popular) Faire un — , to arrange 
one's cards ready for playing. 
(Thieves') Eniplilre, wax imprint 
taken for housebreaking purposes, 

EmpUtrer (oojiular), to thrash^ 
"to wallop. 8i tu cranes, jevais 
t'emplatrer, none of your cheeky 
else rii ghit you a beating. Sec 
Voie, S' — • /* tncumber otU' 
self 

Employ^, adj. (military), dans les 
caux grasses, clerk of the victual- 
ling department^ "mucker." 

Enoplflcher (tlUevcs'), to pillage, 

Empoignade,/ (popular), aSu/irf/, 
"row." 

EmpoigTier (literary), to criticist 
vigorously: (theatrical) to hiss, 
*' to give the big bird," 

Empoisonneur, m. (popular), tht 
tandlord of wine-shop. Teiroed 
also **ma&troquet, Iroquel, bis> 
trot." 

Empoivrer (popular), s* — , to get 
drunk, "lo get screwed." See 
Sculpter. 

Ennporter (thieves'), to rtvindU^ 
" to slick ; " (popular) — le chat, 
to meddle with xuhat does not con- 
cern one, and to get abused or 
thrashed for otu's pains. To act 
as Monsieur Robert in Moli^re's 
Le AIMectH maigr^ Lui, when 
he upbraids i^anarelle for beat- 
ing his spouse^ and in return gets 
thrashed by both husband and 
wife; 

Emporteur, m., xwindler who gets 
into convcrsa/ion ii/ith a stranger, 
gains his coNpdence, and takes him 
to a cafi -where two confederates, 
•Me bachoUcur" and "la Wte," 



TtnBfT-^^ 



128 



Emposeur — Endos. 



await him (see Bachotteur) ; 
— k lacOtelette, card-sharper wkc 
operates at restaurants, 

Emposeur, m, (thieves'), Sodomite. 

Empoti, m. (familiar), slow, clumsy 
moHf ** stick in the mud." 

Empousteur, m. (thieves'), swin- 
dler who sells spurious goods to 
tradesmen under false pretences^ 

Emprunter (popular), un pain sur 
la foum^, to beget a child before 
marriage ; — un qui vaut dix, to 
conceal onis baldness by brushing 
the hair forward. 

Emu, adj. (popular), slightly in- 
toxicatedf *' elevated." See Pom- 
pette. 

En (popular), avoir plein ses bottes, 
to be tired, sich of a person or 
thing. 

Enbohimer (familiar), s' — , to get 
into low society, 

Enbonnetdecotonner, s' — ^ to be- 
come commonplace in manner or 
way of thinking. 

Encaisser (popular), un soufBet, to 
receive a smack in the face^ or 
"buck-horse." 

Encarrade, /. (thieves*), entrance, 
Iiourde d' — , street door, 

Encarrer (thieves'), to enter, "to 
prat." 

Encasquer (thieves'), to enter, on 
"to prat" 

Pour gonfler ses valftdet 

Encasque dans un rade, 
Sert des sigues & foUon. 

ViDOCQ. 

Enceintrer (popular), to make a 
woman big with child. Abbrevia- 
tion of enceinturer, an expression 
used in the eighteenth century. 

Bnchetiber (thieves*), to apprehend, 
"to smug." See Piper. 



Encible (thieves'), together. For 
ensemble. 

Encloui, m. (popular), Sodomist ; 
man without any etifrgy. A term 
expressive of utter contempt, and 
an euphemism for a very coarse 
word. The literal English ren- 
dering may be heard from the 
mouths of English workmen at 
least a dozen times in a lapse of as 
many minutes. The French ex- 
pression might be rendered in less 
offensive language by "a snide 
bally fool." 

Qu'est-ce gu'il a \ m'«minoutard«r cet 
encioutf de singe ? cria Bec-Sal<£. — Zola, 
UAssommoir. 

Enclouer (popular), to take some 
article to the pawnshop ^ "to put in 
lug." " to blue," or " to lumber." 

Bncoliflucheter (popular), s' — , 
to feel otit of sorts ; to have the 
"blue devils.'- 

Encre, / (familiar), buveur d' — , 
clerk, or "quill-driver." 

Encrotter (popular), to bury, 
Crotte, mud, muck. 

Endicher (popular), to get one into 
debt, S' — , to run i?tto debt, 

Endormage, m. (thieves'), vol k 
V — , robbing a person who has 
ban made unconscious by means of 
a narcotic. The rogue who has 
recourse to this mode of despoiling 
his victim is termed in English 
slang "a drummer." 

Endormeur, m., thief. See En- 
dormage. 

Endormi, m. (popular), Judge, or 
"beak." 

Endormir (thieves'), to kill, "to 
give one his gruel," " to cook his 
goose." See Refroidir. 

Endos, m, (popular), the back. 




Endosse — Engantcr. 



129 



Endosse, or andoBse,/ (thieves'^ 
sfwmtier ; tnt^k. Kaboicr 1' — , to 
h<ai biack and blue. See Voie. 
Tapis d' — , shawl. 

Endroguer (thieves'), is said of a 
rogu£ who ^o<s about srtlring for a 
"job," quxrena quern Jcvaret. 

Enfant, m. (ihicves*), short crtrtv- 
i^ar usedby kouiebrtakers. Tcrmttl 
al^j "Jacf^ues, sucre de porame, 
ligulo, biribi, dauphin ; " and by 
Engli-xh rogues, * 'the stick, Jaincs. 
jemmy ;" strong box^ or* 'peter ;*' 

— de la matte, ette of tht <onfr{i- 
temity of thirvts^ or •'family- 
man." (Popular) Un — de 
chfjcnr, sttgnr Aw/I Un — de 
gibcrne, soiditf's chilJ. Un — 
de trenicsix p^res, a prosti- 
tuits offi^ing. (Familiar) Un — 
de la IniIIc, an actor's chiUi^ or ont 
•:eho follows the samu calitrtg as his 

father. 

Enfifr^, ta. (popular), S&domist , 
slow wojtt or "slow coach." 

Enfigneur, m. (popular and 
thiescs'), SodoMist. See Gousse. 

Enfilage, m. (thieves*), arrfst, 

Enfiler {^Q[iM\^x)^totakered-haMded; 
So Aait ionnedion ; — • dcs briqucs, 
to be fastings to he '* bandied;" 

— dcs peries. Sec Perlea, Sc 
faire —, tebe taught in the act of 
staiiing. 

Enflammes, m. pt. (military), sol- 
diers under arrat whose fondness 
for the fair sex has caused them to 
deiay their aitendame at barracks 
more than is eonsisteui with their 
Military duties, and has brought 
them into Inmbli', 

Enflaneller (popular), »' — , lo take 
a grog, •' a nightcap." 

Enflaquer (thieves'), lo seisii to 
apprehend, " lo smug." See 
Piper. J'ni entlaque le bogue 
et le moinin^c du pante, / laid 



hands oh the '* cotc's ** xtatck astd 
purse. 

Ym manqutf d'etre enRatjutf sax \t boulo- 
vard du Temple— VioocQ. 

S' — , to be ruining oneself. 

EnflAe, / (thieves'). Madder; skim 
'xi'hhh (ontams brandy or wine. 

Enfler (popular), to dristl\ *' to 
lush." See Rincer. 

Enfonci, Oilj. (familiar), ruined ; 
outwitted, ' ' done brown." 

Enfoncer (familar), to outwit one, 
** to do one." 

Enfonceur, m, (familiar), a busi- 
ness man or financirr who makes 
dupes; h^rsh critic; (thieves') 
jiuindler^ or * ' *hark ; " — de 
Aancheurs de gadtn, regus who 
robs of their halfpence players at 
the game called ' • Imuchon " {played 
tvith a cork and halfpence). He 
treads on one of the coins, which, 
by a skilful motion of the foot, re- 
mains in the intcr'»tices of his 
worn-out shoe. The ** business *' 
is, of C0UT3C, not a very profitable 
one. 

Enfouraitler (thieves*), to appre- 
hend^ "to smug;" to impruon^ 
'*to give the clinch." See Piper. 

Enfoumer (popular), to imprison^ 
' * lo give the clinch. " See Piper. 

Enfrimer (thieves'), to peer into 
one's f ice. 

Engagi, adj. (gamblers'), ^tre — , 
to luwe lost heavily at some ganu. 

Engager (sporting), totniera horst 
for a race. 

Engami, adj. (thieve**), enraged ; 
rabid. 

Enganter (thieves*), /pjrtVr/cj/i-a/, 
'* 10 nick," En ctrc cngantc, to bt 
Ih love with, 

Tai fiiit par comblance 
Gintnde larj^rcxp*^, . . . 
Vn iour k la Courtillc, 
J 'm en tfuu esgantj. 

ViDOcq. 



130 



Eitgtrbcr — Ensecr/ier, 



Engerber (thieves'), (o apprehend^ 
" to smug." From gcrbc, a sheaf 
9f<orn, See Piper, 

Engluer (thieves'), la chcvcche, H 
ai-rest a gang of nrgv^s* 

Engourdi, w. (thieves'), ccrpsf^ or 
"cold meat.'* 

Bngrailler (thieves*), t& eakh, to 
uiu : — romic, to tatch a Jowl, 
^neraHy by mtatis of a baited 
ha&k (old cant). 

Je kUi bten n<]niitcr les luqucn, cnKniller 
rornie. — Le Jarpm ttt tA rgat. (J know 
Aatv ii' prtp*\rt fittnrts, Umttck a/awl.) 

EngTAiner (impular), to arrhv, 
*' to crop up." 

Enpraiftser (thieveV), un pottptirt, 
to tnnk/ preparations for a theft or 
vtunier. Literally to fatten a 
(hill. 

Engrouiller (popular), s' — , to stick 
fast ; to be intrt^ untkotU attr^. 

Engueulade. enguculage, sync- 
nymou<. of EnguetUement. 

Engueulement, w. (popular), ff*^;«t' 
in any Ind choice lan^^ua^e. Also 
insults I'Vitn al'inriz'e and scurrilous 
jourualtst xuho runs dinvn public 
or literaiy men in expressions 
strongly saz-ouring of the gutter. 
Fair specimens of this coarse kind 
of pen warfare maybe found daily 
in at least one notorious Radical 
print, whicli would bethought ver>' 
lame by its habitual readers if it 
had not a ready stock of abuse at 
its disi>o«ial, the most ordinary 
beini; voleur, bandit, maqucrenu, 
sctlerat, pore, Iraitre, vendu, ven- 
tru, ventripoient, jouisseur, idiol, 
cretin, gatcux, &c., &c. 

Enguirlandcr (popular), to circum- 
vent. 

Enlev6, otfj. (familiar), spirited. 
Un article — , un discours — , 
spirited article or iptech. 



Enlever (theatrical), to play with 
spirit ; (general) — Ic ballon a 
quelqu*un, to kick one^ " to root." 
or "to land a kick." (Thieves') 
S' — , to t>c famished. 

Enleveur (theatrical), actor 'wlio 
plays in dashing, spirited style. 

Enluminer (popular), s' — , to be in 
the first stage of intoxication^ or 
"elevated." Sec Sculptcr. 

Enluminure, / (popular), state of 
slight intoxication. See Poni- 
pette. 

Ennuyer (popular), s*— , to be on 
the point of death. 

Enplaque, / (thieves'), police^ 
"the reclers." 

Enquiller (thieves*), to cornea! ; — 
une thune de camelotte, to secrete 
a piece of cloth under one's dress^ 
or between one*s thighs. Also 
to enter, • ' to prat. " 

J'enquine dans ta cambriote 
Etp^raat d« I'tati/ler. 

VlDOC^. 

Enquilleuse, /, female thief who 
conceals stolen property under her 
apnm or between her legs. From 
quille, leg. 

Enquiquiner (popular), to annoy^ 
" 10 spur." Is also cxprcisive of 
scornful feelings, Jc vous enqui- 
quine ! a hang for you I S* — , to 
f-eldulL 

Enrayer (popular), to renounce lov4 

and its pleasures. 

Enrhumer (popular), to annoy otte, 
to bore one, *'to spur." Termed 
also " courir quclqu'un." 

Enrosscr (horse-dealers*), to conceal 
the faults of a horse. (Popular) 
S' — t to get laxy, ot "Mondayish,'* 

Ensecriter (showmcns*), to nuite a 
puppet ready for the show by dress- 
ing it up, &^e. 



Ettsci^tu dc cimctitre — Entrer. 



»3i 



Enseicrne de cimetiire, / 
lihieves'), prUstt or "devil 
aodgcr." 

ensemble, m. (artistV), un module 
qui pose 1' — , a fnodtl who sits 
Jor tht zohote Jigure, that it, tcAo 
pans nudf, 

Bntablement, m, (popalar), shmJ- 

ders. 
Enlailler (thieves'), tokill one^ "to 

give one his gruel." Sec Re- 

troidir. 

Entame, / (popular), k toi 1*— ! 
yoH mai'c the first mwe t 

Entamer (thieves'), to make cru 

sfCtiJb ; to loorm out cru's secrets. 
Si le roue veul entamer tezigue» 
nib ilu true, if the magistrate 
tries to pump yon^ hold your 
tongue. 

Entauler (thieves'), to enter, " to 

prat." 

Entendre (popular), de come, to 
mistake a vjordfor another^ N' — 
que du vent, not to be able to 
maht head or tail of what one 
hears. 

Enterrement, m. (popular), apiece 
ef meat placed in a lump of breads 
or an apolo^ for a sandunch ; 
(familiar) — de premiere classe, 
gramf, but du/l ceremony. Is said 
also of the total failure of a lite* 
rary or dramatic production. 

Entervcr, or entraver (thieves'), 
to listtn ; to h<ar ; to understand. 
Que de baux la muraille enterve t 
tahe care^ the walls have ears ! (old) 

l^ nipin itortaot dehon vii cet ^rit, il 
le tut, nun il n'enicrvait qae flonti^re ; il 
demaiklA au rAiiirhoit <Je voo villagr ce qu« 
ccta voulut dtre mait il n'cntcrvait pas 
micux que fceiifert.— /.<■ Jttfxon de t'Argvt, 

Enliires,/ //. (thieves*), lentils^ 

Entiffer (popular), to enter ; 
(thieves*) to whetdh ; to adorn. 



Ah I ft! j'en d^fourmillc^ 
Ma lartrae J'enttfenu. 
rii fnii porter fnnlance, 
Et loulieTS caluch^ 

V, Hugo. 

Entiffle,/ See Antiffle. 

Entiffler (thieves*), to wheedle; to 
joali, or " to pad the hoof ;" to 
steal, "to nick,** or "to claim." 
See Crinchir. 

Entonne, / (thieves'), chureh. 
Ternjcd also *'chiquc." 

Enlonnoir, m. (popular), throat, qt 
•'peck-alley ;' — & paite, drink- 
in^ glass ; — de zinc, a throat 
which ii proof against the strongest 
spirits. 

Eatortilli, adj, (popular)i elum^^ 
awkward, gawky. 

Entravage, m. (thieves*), il/an'iff; 
understanding, '* twigging.'* 

Entraver (thieves* and cads*), to 
understand, *'to twig." J'en- 
trave pas dans tes vanne«, /don't 
fake tnat nonsense in^ I am not to 
be humbugged, "do you sec any 
green in my eye? " J'cnlrave pas 
ton flanchc, / cant understand 
what you are at. 

En traverse, /. (thieves*), at the 

hulis. 

Entrecote^ /. (popular), de bro- 
deuse, piece of Brie cheat, 
(Thieves ) EntrccAte, sword. 

Entree, / (popular), de Portugal, 
ridiculous rider : — dcs artistes. 



Entrefilet, m. (journalists'), short 
uc^vspaper paragraph. 

Entrclardi, m, (popular), a matt 
who is neither fat nor thin. 

Entrer (popular), aux qninie- 
vingts, to fall asleep. Les Quinze- 
vingus is a government hospital 
for the blind ; — dans la confrchr 



132 



Entripailli—Epinards, 



de Saint-Pris, io get married^ or 
'* spliced ;" — dans I'lnfanterie, to 
be pregnant ; — en itm^tit, to /y 
into a passion, *'to lose ones 
shirt." 
£ntripaill£, adj. (popular), stotit^ 
with a " corporation " in front. 

Entripailler (popular), s' — , to 
grow stout, 

Entroler, entroUer (thieves'), U 
carry away. 

II mouchaitia des ornies de balle qui 
mos^lateot du grena en la cour ; alors il 
ficha de son sabre «ur la tronche it nne, U 
rabasoardit, la met dans son gueuUrd et 
I'entrolle.— Z# Jargon de rArgot. {He 
saw sofftt turkey cocks which wen Recking" 
at tome com in the yard ; he then cut one 
«ver tke head with hit sword, killed itf 
put it in his wallet, and carried it ^.) 

Envelopper (artists'), to draw the 
sketch of a painting. 

Envoy£, adj. (familiar), bien — , a 
good hit! well said I 

Envoyer (general), & la ba1ai]9oire, 
& loustaud, k Tours, dinguer, k 
Chaillot, to send to the deuce, see 
Chaillot ; — en paradis, to kill^ 
" to give one his gruel ;" — quel- 
qu^un aux pelotes, to send one to the 
deuce. (Thieves') Envoyer quel- 
qu'un k Niort, to say no toonCt to 
re/use; — en parade, /o<ii'//. (Popu- 
lar and thieves') Se V — , to eat, 
•* to grub." See Mastiquer. 

Epais, m. (players'), _/fzv ami six 
of dotninoes. 

Epargner (thieves'), n' — le poitou, 
to he careful. 

N'tfpargnons le poUou, 
iPoissons avec aaresse, 
Meuiires et gonzesses, 
Sam faire de regoLlt. 

ViDOCQ. 

Epatage, m. (popular). See 

Epatement. 
Epatarament (popular), wonder- 

fully, "stunningly," 



Epatant, ipatarouflant, aJj. 
(general), wonderful ; wondrous, 
"stunning," "cru^jhing." 

Epate, /. (general), faire de 1'—, 
to show off. 

Epatement, m. (general), as- 
tonishment. 

Epater, ipataroufler (genernl), 
quelqu'un, to astound one, to make 
him wonder at something or other. 

Epateur, iw., Apatcuse, / (gene- 
ral), one who shows off ; one ~c/ii> 
tries to astound peo/U by shbii'iii^ 
off. 

Epaule, / (general), changer son 
fusil d'— , to alter one's opinion ; 
to cnange one's mind. 

Ep£e, / (popular), de Savoyartl, 
fisticuffs. 

£pic£, adj. (genera!), at an exa;^- 
geraied price. C'est diablement 
— , it is a long price. 

Epicemar, m. (familiar), grocer. 

Epiciphale, w. (students'), hat. 
See Tubard. 

Epicer (popular), to s(off at ; to de- 
ride. 

Epicerie, / (artists'), the world of 
Philistines, "non digni intrare.'' 

Epice-vinette, m. (thieves'), 
grocer. 

Spicier, m. (familiar), man drzw'd 
of any artistic taste ; mean, vulvar 
ffw« ; termed also *• commerfant ;■' 
(students') one who djes not take 
up classics at college. 

Epiler (popular), se f.iire — la 
p£che, to get shaved. 

Epinards (artists'), plat d'— , 
painting where tones of crude 
green predominate, (Popular) 
Ailer aux — , to receive money 
from a prostitute. 



"N 



Eptngh — Esbrouffeuse, 



133 



Epingle,/ (popular), »voir line — 
a son col, to kavc a giass c/xinne 
waitiMg- ready floured out for one 
at a neighbouring ■unnt-shoPi and 
paid for by a friend. 

Epiploon, m. (students*}, nicitit. 

Epitonner (thieves'), s' — ,togrievi, 

Epointer (popular), son foret, t» 
die, "to kick the bucket," or 
" to snuff it." See CaBBer sa 
pipe. 

Eponge, /. (general), paramour; 
drunkard^ or *' lushington ;" — i 
%oltis^, gui/i&ie man, "gulpin;" 
— d'ot, attorney, or * ' green bag. " 
An allusion to the lung bills of 
lawyers. 

Epoufifer (thieves'), h poume on 
one. 

EpouBC,/ (familiar), edition beige, 
mistress, or "tartlet." 

EpouBer (thieves*), la camorde, /» 
die, "to croak ;" — la fourcan* 
dicre, or la fouconniire, (0 throw 
away stolen property when pur* 
sued ; — la veuve, tc btexeeuied. 

Eprouv£, m, (thieves*), well'bt- 
hax'td eanvict who, after having 
"done half his time," i> recom' 
mended for a tickct-ofUax*€, 

Equerre, /.(popular), fendre son —, 
to run a-vay, *'to make tnickj.." 
See Patatrot. 

Erailler (thieves'), to kill one, "to 
cook his goose." Sec Rcfroidir. 

Eretntement, m. (familiar), fAa//, 
unfriendly criticism. 

Eretnter (familiar), to rtm doum a 
literary itvri or u literary man / 
to hiss an a^tor^ ** to give the big 
bird." 

Ereinteur, m. (familiar), icurriloui 
or sharp critic. 



Erini (popular), exhausted, spent, 

done lip, "grucUcd." 

Ergot, m. (popular), sc fendre I' — , 
ti^ run away, ** to make tracks." 
See Patatrot. 

Erlequin (Breton), frying-pan fot» 
frying pancakes. 

Ernest, m. (joamalists*), of^cial 
communication from ej^cial ^uar- 
ters to the press, 

Erreur,/ Y apasd* — ! a Parisian 
expression used in support of an 
ojstrtiott. 

Y a fw d'erreor, vm ; fmb oa hoooD^ 
Ud chouctl', tin tijc un rigolo. 

Giu- 

Ervoanik plouUio (Breton), t/<ra/^, 

Eb, m. (popular), for escroc, 
swindler, or ' * shark.** 

E8ballonner(popular),/0^/i]^auu^, 
•' to raitzle," See Patatrot. 

Esbigner (popular), s' — , to slip 
away, *' to mi rile." See Pata- 
trot. 

Esblinder (popular), to astound. 

Esbloquant, aeij, (popular), oj- 
tounding. 

Esbloquer (popular), to astound, 
S' — , to feel astonished. Ne vous 
esbloquez done pas comme ca, da 
not be to astonished, keep com, 

Esbrouf (thieves'), d'— , all at 
once ; violently ; by surprise, 

I>'eabfouf je I'MlOurbii.— ViDttC*). (/ 
tudJi-miy knocked him ^ver the keMt, ) 

Esbroufe, cBbrouffe, coup ii T — . 
See A resbrouCTe. 

Esbrouffeur, «. (thicvesOt ^hief 
who practises the kind of theft 
called'^Vol k I'esbrouffe'Xwhich 
sec). 

Esbrouffeuse, /, flash girl mU 
makes muchfuss> 



134 



Escaff—Esquinier, 



Escaff, ffl. (popular), kick in tki 
brtech, 

Escaffer (popular), to give a kick in 
the breech, " to root/' or " to land 
a kick." 

Escanne, / (thieves*), & T— , 
avoay / andtJu devil take the hind" 
most, 

Escanner (thieves*), to run atvay, 
or " to make beef." See Pata- 
trot. 

Escarcher (thieves'), to look on, 
" to pipe." 

Eicare,/ (thieves*), impedinutit ; 
obstacle ; disappointnuiU, 

Escarer (thieves*), to prevent, 

Escareur (thieves'), one who pre- 
vents, 

Escargot, m. (popular), slow, dull 
man, or " stick in the mud ;" 
vagrattt; — de trottoir, police 
officer, or •' crusher." See Pot-A. 
tabac. (Military) Escargot, man 
with his tent when cxunpaigning, 

Escarpe, m. (thieves'), thief and 
murderer ; — z6:igue, suicide, 

Escarper (thieves'), to kill. See 
Refroidir. Escarper ua zigue ^ la 
capahut, to kill a thief in order to 
TOO him of his booty, 

Escarpin, m. (popular), de Limou- 
sin, or en cuir de brouette, 
wooden shoe; — renifleur, leaky 
shoe, 

Escarpiner (popular), s'— , to 
escape nimbly ; to give the slip, 

Escarpolette,/. (theatrical), /ror- 
ticaljoke; an addition made to a 
part, 

Etcaver (thieves'). See Escarer. 

Esclot, m. (popular), wooden shoe. 

Escouade, / (military), envoyer 
chercher le parapluie de 1' — , to 



get rid of a person whose presemc 
is not desired by sending him on a 
foors errand, 

Escoutes, or icoutes, / //. 
(thieves'), ears, or " hearing 
cheats." 

Escrime, m. (military), cL-rk, 
** quill-driver." 

Esganacer (thieves'), to laugh. 

Esgard, or £gard, m. (thieves'), 
faire 1* — , to rob an accomplice of 
his share of the plunder. The 
author of this kind of robbery goes 
among his English brethren by 
the name of " Pol! thief." 

Esgour, adj, (thieves'), lost. 

Esgourde, esgouveme, es- 
goume, / (thieves'), car, or 
"hearing cheat,*' Debrider 1' — , 
U listen. 

Eapagnol, m, (popular), louse. 

Espalier, m, (theatrical), a number 
of female supcntumcraries drawn 
up in line. 

Espice, f (familiar), woman of 
questionable character. 

Esprit, m. (familiar), des braves,. 
brandy. 

Esque, m. See Esgard. 

Esquinte, m, (thieves'), abyss. 
Vol k 1'—, burglary, *'panny," 
"screwing," or "busting." 

Esquintement, m. (general), ex^ 
cessive fatigue ; (thieves') bur* 
glary, or " busting." 

Etqulnter (familiar), to damage; 
to fatigue ; (popular) to thrash ; 
see Vole; (thieves') to kill; 
see Refroidir; to break. La 
carouble s'est esquintee dans la 
serrante, the key has been broken in 
the lock, (Familiar) S'— , or s*— 
le temptframent, to tire oneself 
out. 




EsquinUur — Euigfwir. 



135 



Bsquinteur (thieves*), housthre/ikir^ 
"panny*nian," "screwsmiLn," or 
'* busier." 

Essayer (thealrical), 1e tremplin, 
tc act in an unimportant play\ 
'ivhick is given as a prtlimitMry to 
a more important one ; to be the 
Jirst to sing at a concert. (Sol- 
diers') Envoycr — une chcintse 
de saptn, to kilf. 

Es9ence,yC (general), de parapluie, 
water. 

BsBCs (popular), Oilrc dcs — , to 
reel about. 

Esauyer (familUr), les plitres, to 
kiss tfu face of a ftmalt whose 
cheeks are painted. 

EBfluyeuse./ (ramiliar), dc plalres, 
street-walker, bee Gadoue. 

Eatable,/ (thieves*), /to/, "bea- 
ker." 

Estaffier, m. (familiar), police 
o^cer ; (thieves') ca/. 

Estaflin, w. (popular), eai. 

Estaffion, m. (popiilnr), bloxo on 
the heQ<U *' Uing on the nut ; " 
(lhicvc8*}t-a/,*' long-tailed beggar." 

Estafiler (military), la frimousse, 
to cut on^sface with a svoril. 

Estafon, m. (oM cant), ca/vn. 

Estampiller (thieves'), to mark; 
ti' ihiruj (In reference to the hoar), 
Luy^ard estampillait six plombes, 
it uut sis o'ciock by the sun. 

Bstaphe,/ (popular), slap. 

Bstaphle, / (thieves'), foivl^ 
'* beaker," or *' cackling cheat." 

Estime (familiar), succ^ d'— , a 
lioubtful success. 

Estio, estoc, m. (ihicvcs'\ iHtellect^ 
ivit. ]I a de r — , he is clever, or 
"wide." 



Estomac, m. (general), coMraj*t, 
pluck, " wool."^ 

Estomaqu^, at//, (popular), or- 
toundcii^ •' flabbergasted." 

Estorgue, estoque. / (ihieve«'), 
falsehood. Cbas&cs i 1' — , sijuint- 
ing- eyes. 

Estourbir <thieve&'), to stun ; I0 
itll. 

Estourbisseur, m. (popular), de 
cIou:« du giroflc, dentist. 

Estradc,/ (thieves'), bonleoard, 

Lc fiUnt »ur reurade 
D'e&btouf je I'estourhii. 

ViDOCQ. 

Estrangouillade. / (popular), the 
iiit of strangling or garrotting a 
f/tan. 

Estrangouiller (popular). to 
sfrongie ; — un litre, to drink a 
litre of wine. 

Estropier (popular), te rat, "to 
grub." Propcfly ta maim. 

Estuque, nt. (ihievci*), short 0/ 
booty, or '•regulars." 

Estuquer (popular), tothrashy **to 
wallop." 

Elag^re, / (general), ftmaU as- 
sistant at restaurants who has tht 
charge of the fruit, &*c. ; bosom. 

Etal, m. (popular), bosom. 

Elalage, m. (general), vol k 1'—, 
shoplifting. 

Staler (familiar), sa marchandi«e, 
lo wear a very lexv dress^ thus 
shtmnng xtthat ought to remain 
covered. 

Etaini, adj. (thieves*), old offender. 
Boulc de son — , white bread. 

Etanche,/ (popular), avoir legou- 
lot en — , to U thirsty, or dry. 

Eteignoir, w. (general), large 
nose, or large '* conk ; " dull tier. 



136 



Eteindre — Etre. 



son. Ordre de 1*—, the order of 
Jesmts, (Thieves') Eteignoir, 
prefecture de police ^ palaU de jtts- 
ticCj or law courts^ 

Eteindre (popular), son gaz, to 
die, "to snuff it." 

Etemuer (popular), sur une n^- 
gresse, to dnnk a bottle of wifte ; 
(thieves') — dans Ic sac, or dans 
le son, to be guillotined. 

Pauvre petit Theodore ... il est bien 
gentil. C'est dommage d'tftemuer dans le 
son ^ son &ge.— Balzac 

Etier, m., a kind of trench dug by 
the salt-marsh workers. 

Et le pouce, et miche (popular), 
and the rest I Cette dame a 
quarante ans. Out, et le pouce ! 
This lady is forty years of age, 
VeSf and the rest I 

Etoftes, /. //. (thieves'), monev, 
"pieces." 

EtoufTage, m. (thieves'), thefts or 
" push ; " (popular), concealment 
of money on on^ s person ; stealing 
part of the stakes by a player or 
lookcT'On, 

EtoufTe, m, (thieves'), clandestine 
gaming-house* 

Etouffer (popular), to secrete money 
about one's person ; — un enfant 
de choeur, une n^gresse, to drink 
a bottle ojfwine ; — un perroquet, 
to drink a glass of absinthe, 

Etouffoir, m. See Etouffe. 

Etourdir (popular), to solicit; to 
entreat. Properly to make giddy. 

Etourdissement, m. (popular), i^- 
liciting a service. 

Etourdisseur, m. (popular), one 
•who solicits^ who asks for a service, 

Etrang&re, / (familiar), piquer 
r — , to allfftv one^s thoughts to wan- 



der from a subject, " to be wool 
gathering." Noble — , silver five- 
franc piece. 

Etrangler (familiar), un perroquet, 
to drink a glass of absinthe ; — 
une dette, to pay off a debt. 

Etre (gay girls'), i la campagne. to 
be confined at the prison of Saint- 
Lazare (a prisonfor women, mostly 
street-walkers). (Popular) Eire a 
la cascade, to be joyous ; — i I'en- 
terrement, to feel dull : — i la 
manque, to deceive; to betray; — 
k la paille, to be half dead; — k 
I'omhre, to be deati ; to be in pri- 
son; — h, pot et k feu avec quel- 
qu'un, to be on intimate terms 
with one; — argentc, to have 
funds ; — au «ic, to hcrve plenty 
of money; — bien, to be tipsy, or 
*' to be hoodman ; " — bref, to be 
short of cash; — complet, see 
Complet ; — crott<*, to be penni- 
less ; (familiar and popular) — 
dans le troisi^me dessous, see Des- 
80US ; — dans les papiers de 
quelqu'un, to be in one's confidence ; 

— dans les vignes, or dans la vi^e 
du Seigneur, /tf^frfn/M*; — dans 
ses petits souliei^, to be ill at ectse ; 

— de la bonne, to be lucky ; — de 
la fSte, to be happy, lucky ; — de 
la haute, to belong to the aristocracy; 
to be a swell ; — de la paroisse de 
la nigamderie, to be simple-minded ; 

— de la paroisse de Saint-Jean le 
Rend, to be drunk, or " screwed ;" 

— de la procession, to belons^ to a 
trade or profession ; — de I'F, see 
F ; — demat^, to be old; — A^?.- 
sow^, to be drunk ; — du bailment, 
to bclongio a profession mentioned ; 

— d'un bon suif, to be ridiculous 
or beuily dressed, to be a ** guy ; " 

— du 14* b^n^dictins tobeafool ; 

— en train, to be getting tipsy ^ see 
Sculpter; — exproprie, to die, 
see Casser sa pipe ; — fort auba- 
tonnet, see Batonnet ; — le 




Etrcnner — Expert* 



137 



Ixvuf, see B<Euf ; — paf, t0 he 
ttrunk^ see Pompetle ; — prcs 
de ses piices, to bt hard up for 
easA ; (sailors') — prisdansla ba- 
lancine, to be in ajix^ in a** hole ; " 

— vent deitsus or vent dedans, to 
bedrunft, see Pompettej (ihieves*) 

— HUT la planche, to be had -up be- 
fore the ma^strate ; — bien por- 

lant, to be at large; — dans la 
puree, — fauche, — raolle, to be 
penniless; (builies*) — sur le sable, 
to he without means of existence^ 
ikatisy witlwut a mistress. (Fami- 
liar) En — , to be a spy or dttec' 
tivc ; to he a Sodomist. 

Etrenner (general), to receive a 
tkriishin^, "to get a drubbing." 
tec Voie. 

Etriers, m. pi. (cavalry)t avoir les 

— trop courts is said of a man 
with bandy legj. 

Eirillage, nv. (popular), /ou oj 
tuancy. 

Etriller (general), to fleece^ " to 

s.bave." 

Etroite, /. (popular), faire V — , to 
h affectidy or *'high falutin ;" to 
play the pntde, 

Etron de mouche, m. (thieves')* 
'uHix, conveniently used for taking 
the impress of keyholes. 

Etnisque, aulj, (familiar), oldfas- 
h toned. 

El la sceur (popular), expression of 
refusal^ disbelief or a contemptuous 
repiy to insult mg leords* 

Vm fille «Vtait aavengnie avec ion 
Qinitnt, i la Doric d'un (jutringvc, I'appe- 
Unt <a]e m\i\t ci cocbon tnalad«. landU qua 
I'amani r^p^iait, " et ia Kcur?" hjii 
truuvcr autre cho*e. — ZoLA. 

Etudiant de la grive, m. (popu- 
lar), masoH. 

Etudiante, / (farailiar), student^ 
mistress, bis " larllcl.*' 



Etui, m. (popular), skin, or "buff;" 
— h lorgnette, C(j^«. (Soldiers') 
Etuij de mains courantes, boots. 

Evanouir (popular), s* — , fo make 
off, or *' to bunk ;" to dU. Sec 
Pipe. 

Evanouissement, jk. (popular), 

/'jjlit, 

Evaporer (popular), to steal ad- 
roitly, S'— , to vanish, " to mii- 
zlc." 

Eventail k bourrique> m. (popu- 
lar), j/iV^, or '* toco." 

Eventrcr une nigressc (popular), 
fo drink a bottle ofxvine. 

Ev£que de campagne, m. (popu- 
lar), a hanged person. From the 
expression, Benir des pieds, to he 
Aanged, and properly to bUss ttfitA 
one's feet. 

Ever goad he vugale (Breton), 
drunhinl. Literally dnuker of 
his ehildr fit's blood, 

Ezbalancer (thieves*), to tend one 
away ; to dismiss him. 

Excellent bon, m. (familiot), 
yonn^ dandy. 

Exicuter ffamiliar),s' — , to comply 
with a rtqtust ; to fulfil one' s pro- 
mise ; to pay unwiilingiy rather 
than othrrmu. 

Ezhiber (cads'), to look at, "to 
pipe." Nib de flanchc, on t'ex- 
hibe, stop your game, they are look- 
irtg at you. Exhiber son pru&ttcn, 
to run ffwwi'. 

Exhum6, m. (familiar), nrv//, 
"masher." An allusion to the 
cadaverouf^ appearance of most 
French ••mashers." See Gom- 
mcux. 



138 



Expliquer — FacUtrier. 



Bxpliquer (military and popular), 
s — , taught a duel; to fight, 

Sauf el' bandeau 
Qu'a s'coir chaqu* fots su' I'cDin d'la hure, 
Apris qu' nous nous Komm's expliqu^ 
C est pas qu' j'aim' y taper daiu I'nez ; 
Jlial 9a ; c'est cont ma nature. 

Gitx, La Muse A Bibi. 

Extra, m, (popular), good dinner ; 
guest at a military mess* 

Eztrait de pami, m. (popular), 
dirty servant ; slattern. 



Extravagant, m. (popular), ^/aj-j of 
beer of unusual size^ *' galopin '' 
being the appellation for a small 
one. The latter term is quite re- 
cent as used with the above signi- 
fication. According to the Diet. 
Comique it meant formerly a small 
measure for wine: — 

Galopin, c'est une petite mesure de vin,. 
ce qu'on appelle i^ Faru un demi-bctier.— 
Lb Koux. 



F, 6tre de 1* — (popular), that is, ^tre 
fichu, flamb^, foutu, fricass^, frit, 
fume, to be losty ruined, " cracked 
up," "gone to smash." 

Fabricant, m. (popular), de cul- 
butes, or de fourreaux, tailor, 
** rag-stabber. " Je me suis carm^ 
d'une bath pelure chez le — de 
culbutes, I have bought a fine coat 
at the tailor's. 

Fabrication,/ (thieves'), passer k 
la — ^1 orfitre fabrique, to Be appre- 
hended. Faire passer k la — , to 
apprehend. 

Fabriquer (thieves'), to apprehend, 
" to smug ;" to steal, " to claim ;" 
— un gas k la flan, i la rencontre, 
01 k la dure, to rob from the person 
with violence, " to jump ;" ^ un 
poivrot, to rob a drunkard. 

Fafade, / (popular), hectd^ or 
*' nut \'^face, or " mug." (Co- 
cottes') Se faire la — , topaintone^s 
face, in other words, " to stick 
slap " on one^sface. 



Face, / (popular and thieves'), a 
sou. 

Je ne donnerals pas une face de ta sor- 
bonne si Ton lenait I'argent. — Balzac. 

Face du Grand Turc, the behind. 

Face I an exclamation used luhen a 
smash of glass or crockery is heard, 
the word being the French render- 
ing for the exclamation "heads !" 
at pitch and toss. 

Facile k la detente (popular), is 
said of one who readily settles a 
debt, or opens the strings of his 
purse, 

Factionnaire, m. (popular), poser 
un — , to ease oneself. Relever 
un — , to slip out of a workshop in 
order to go and drink a glass of 
wine kept ready by a comrade at a 
neighbouring wine-shop. 

Facturier, m. (theatrical), one whose 
spicialitiis to produce songs termed 



Fadage — Fafiot, 



I3y. 



" couplets dc focture, ** for tht stage 
or music halls. 

Fadage, m. (thieves'), the act 9f 
sharing the plunder^ or *' cutting 
it up,**^ 

Fadard,fl/^.(j«(/OT,(pf>pular), (/<:«*/»', 
or " gorgcr." For synon}Tna sec 
Gommeux. 

Fade, «. (popular), a fop or cmf'ty 
swells a " dundreary ;" one^i share 
in the rerkoftin^^ or "shot;" a 
xt>orkman*s Vfoges, Toucher son 
— ^ to rfceh'e out' swages. (Thieves') 
Fade, a rogue" s share in the /^riKeeJs 
of a robbery^ or *' whack ;' moneys 
or "pieces.'* 

Puiftque ie ne I'at pluSf die, pas plus qua 
je n'ai du fade, Oiorlot pcui ai^uiwrr um 
ooupent, je nc rctpvtie plus ma tcte. — 
M^ithfirei dt MpHStntr Ciaudt, 

Fad6, atij. (popular), drunk, or 
" screwed. See Porapette. 
Eire bien — , ti> be quite drunk^ or 
" scammered ; " to hirae reeetvai a 

good share ; to be well trtated by 

fate. Is used also ironically or 
aorTOwfully : Me voiU btcn — I 
a had job for me I Here I am in a 

fate plight } (Thieves') Etre — , 
to have reeeived one's share of ill- 

gptten giiins ; to have had one's 
"whack." 

Fader (thieves'), to di-nde the hxtty 
among the participators in a rob- 
bery^ " to nap the reguUrs," or 
" to cut up." 

Fadeura, /, pi. (popubr). dca — I 
nonsense t ** all my eye ! " Con« 
ceming this English rendering the 
supplementary English Glossary 
says : *' All my eye, nonsense^ un- 
trtu. Sometimes 'AH my eye 
and Betty Martin.' The explona* 
tion that it was the beginning of a 
prayer, *0 mihi bcate Martinc/ 
will not hold water. Dr. Butler, 
when headmaster of Shrewsbury, 
. . . told his boys thai it arose 



from a gipsy woman in Shrews* 
bury named Belly Martin giving 
a black eye to a constable, who 
was chaffed by the boys accor* 
dingly. The expression muse 
have been common in 1S57, as 
Dickens gives one of the Brick 
Lane Temperance teslimoniaJs as 
from * Betty Martin, widow, one 
child, and one eye.' — Piihwick^^ 
xxxiii." 

Fafelard, m. (thieves'), passport ,- 
bank note, or "soft;" — i la 
manque, forged note, or " queer 
soft ; — d cmballage, warrant 
of arrest, 

Faffe, m. (thieves'), paper; — k 
roulotler, cigarette paper; bank 
note, or "soft." 

Fafiot, m. (popular and thieves'), 
document^ or " (akcment ; " shoe, 
or " trotter case." Sec Ripaton. 
Fafiot, bank note^ or " soft." 

Fafiot ! n'cntcndet-votu pu le bruisM* 
mem du pajiier de Mie! — Bal2ac. 

Fafiotganit^.^M^Mtfj'/.or "soft." 
An allu.siun to the signature of the 
cashier M. Garal, which notes of 
the Banque de France fonneily 
bore. 

Od iaveale tes> billets de buiqae, !« hajtoe 
In appclle titA fafiots garato, du Doni de 
Garat, le cai&ucr qui In Mgoc—BAUAC. 

Un — en bas ige, a one hundred 
franc n^ite. Un — fcraelle, afav 
hundred franc note. Un — lof, 
a false begging petition ; forged" 
certifiiatt^ or false passport^ "fate- 
ment." Un — mile, a one thon- 
sand franc note. 

Le billet dc miUc franco eni un rxfiot 
mSIc, Ic billet de ctiq celiU (raucft un faiiot 
femclle. — Bal2ac 

Un — sec, a genuine certifiiate or 
passport. Fabriquer de» fatiots, 
or du fafelard 4 la manque, t^ 
forge bank notes, "to fflke queer 
sofL" 



u*o 



Fajiotcur — Faire, 



Fafioteur, m. (thieves'), paper 
manufarturrr or merchant ;battk(r^ 
" rag-shop boss ;" writer; (popu- 
lar) cobbUr^ or "snob." 

Faflard. See Fafelard. 

Fagaut (thieves'), the word fiiut 
di&guised. II ne — deguculardcr 
sur sa fiole, wt must say nothing 
ai<cut him. 

Fagot, cotteret, or falourde, m, 
(thieves'), eoMvict, probably from 
his being tied up tike a bundle of 
sticks. Un — k perte de vuc, 
cn€ sentmced to penal servitude for 
life^ or *' lifer. Un — affr.nnchi, 
« itinerated ccnvia, or " lag." Un 
•^encAtape, an escaped /r/cm. (Fa- 
miliar) Un — , a candidate for the 
Ecole des £aux et ForHs^ a govern' 
ment traimng schooi/or surveyors 
of State forests and canais. 

Pagotin, m. (popular), vagrant^ 
tramp, *' abrahani - man,** or 

" pjky." 

Faiblard, m. (popular), siekiy ieoJk' 
ing, weak person. Called in Eng- 
lish slang " barber's cat," a term 
used in connection with an expres- 
sion too coarse to print, according 
to the Siang Dietiomsry^ 

Faignant, ot. (popular), eoufard. 
A corruption of faineant, idle 
fellow, 

Failli chien, m, (sailors'), stamp. 
Un — de terrien, a lubberly lands- 



Le baiean ra comme en riviere une gsbarre, 
Sdtu pci-w>nac au o>inp«s, ct Ic fnou>»c ^ la 

barre. 
11 fautlrait n'£tr« qu'tm fallU chieo de ter- 

ricD, 
Pour seindre en ce moincDi et se plaindre 

de ricn. 

RicHBpiK. ta^fer. 

Fatne,/. (popular), a sou. 
Fainin, m. (popular), a centime. 



Faire (general), /tfj/fliA "lopng.** 
Sec Grinchir. 

Non qii'ili d^l>oancni rien pQureolrcr, cw 

iU font 
Leur contre-marque aux £cns qui ■OT' 

tcnl. . . . 
RiCHaj'iK, La Ckanapu dts Cuemx. 

Faire son nei, to look rrestfalletiy 
to look '* glum ; *' — son bearre, 
to benefit by ; to make profits. 

W on'a asfiirf que Ic gifn^ral de Carpen- 
tnu avajt plm de quatre millions de rente. 
je ^une bien de rarsent, moi, mais j« 
feraw bien raoo beurre avec fa. — E. Mon- 

TEIL. 

(Thieves') Faire banque, to kUl^ 
sec Refroidir; — un poi^Tot, to 
pick the pockets or steal the clcHhes 
Q/"a</rKM/Y« mi7«," bug-hunting;" 

— des ycux de hareng, to put a 
fnan^s eyes out; — flolter un pante, 
to drawn one ; — du ragodt or 
rego6t, to talk about another^s ae- 
tionst and thut to atoaken the sus- 
picions of the police, 

Ne fau pas du rajEuflt sur ton dab 1 
(n'tfntUe pu let foupconi tur ton matcre t) 
dil tout bu Jacques Collia.-^ Balzac 

Faire la balle ^laslique, to go with 
an empty beUy, ** to be bandied." 
Literally to be as light as an 
india-rubber ball ; — la console, 
or consolation, mie of a series of 
card-sharping games, termed as 
foll<nvSt "arranger les pantrci," 
or ** Ijonncteau," " un coup de 
bonnet," or '*parfaite,'* '*flam- 
bott<^ auxrotins," or "anglaise;" 

— la bride, to stcol -Ufatch-gtitirds, 
•• to buz slangs ; " — la fuite, la 
jat jat, la pnire, le patairot, faire 
eric, faire vite, to run axtay^ '* to 
make beef, orio guy." ^cc Pata- 
trot. Faire la grande soulasse sur 
le trimar, to murder on the high' 
ifity ; — la gr^ce, or plumcr le 
pantrc, to entice a traveller from a 
railxoay station into a cafe, tvhert 
he is robbed tif his money at a 
sxi'indling game of cards ; — la 
retoume des baguenaudes, topiek 



Faire. 



Ul 



the pockets of a hitptns man^ " to 
fake a cly ; " — la souris, to rod 
steiUthUy^ "to nip ; '* — U tire, 
to pick poiketSy generaliy by nwanj 
of a pair of scissors delicaidy iit' 
sirttdt or a doublt-blibitd pen- 
kni/ct •• to fake a cly ; " — la lire 
4 la chicane, explained by quota- 
tion : — 

lU font la tire ii U chicane^ en toiimant 
kdoiicduiqu'ilsddpouiUcaL— Du Our. 

Faire la tortue, to go without any 
food ; — Ic barbot dans une cam- 
briolle, to steal property from a 
nw«, " todoacrib;" — lebobc, 
t0 Steal watches^ '* toy getting ; " 
— Tffgard, to retain for onese/J the 
proceeds of a robbery ; — le gaf, 
to watchy "to nark, to give a 
loasting, to nose, to lay, or to 
dick;*' — le lezard, to deeamp^ 
"to ^y," see Patatrot ; — le 
inorlinguc, to steal a pitrse^ "to 
bur a skin or poge ; " — Ic mou- 
choir, to stmi pocket-handhrckiefs^ 
called '• itook hauling, fogic hunt- 
ing, or drawing the wipe ; " — le 
pantrc, to play the fool ; — le rcn- 
dime or rendemi, to iwittdU a 
tradesman by picking up again 
from his counts a gold coin ten- 
eUred for payment ^ and making off 
wtJt both coin and change; — 
nonne is said of accomplices ^ or 
** jollies," -who form a small crowd 
so as to facilitate a thief s opera- 
tions ; — !a halle it quelqu'un, to 
carry out otiis instructiotts, 

V'ais *3 ballc ! (suls ms instructions), dh 
FiUIc-Soic, — Kau^ac, Lu Demirrt Incar- 
luUton de i'autrm. 

Faire son temps, to undergo a full 
term of imprisonment ; — sautcr 
la coupe, to place ^ by dexterotts 
manipulation., the cut card on the 
topt instead of at the bottom of the 
patit termed by English card- 
sharpers " slipping ; " — suer an 
ch^ne, to kill a man, ** to cook 
his goose." See Refroidir. Faixe 



sur Torgue, to inform against, •* to 
blow the gaff;" — un coup i 
reshrouffe, to pieh a person's 
pockets ivhile hustling him, *'to 
flimp;" — un coup d'etnl, /» 
steal property from a shop. A 
shoplifter is termed in English 
cam "buttock and file;" — ua 
coup de fourchelte, to pick a pocket 
by delicately inserting two fingers 
only; — coup de roulotte, ta 
steal property from a vehicle ; — 
im rancart, to procure information ; 

— une raaison cntitrc, to break 
into a house and to massacre all 
the inmates ; (artists*) — chaud, 
to use warm ttnts in a punting, 
after the style of Rembrandt and 

ether colourists ; — culotte, 

r6ti, comtaraiive and superlative 
of faire cLaud ; — cru, to me crude 
tints in a puture, for inslance, 
to use bine or red without any ad- 
junction of another colour ; — 
cuire sa mile, to employ z-erywarm 
tints in the painting if a picture ; 

— transparent, to paint in clair 

pbscurf or **chiaro oscuro;" 

lanteme, to exaggerate the *' chiaro 
Qscuro;" — grcnouillard or 
croustillant, to paint in masterly, 
bold ^ dashing style^ with "brio." 
The expression is used also in 
reference to the statuary art. The 
works of the painter Delacroix 
and those of the sculptor Preault 
are executed in that style ; — sa 
cimaise sur quelqu'un. See CI- 
maise. Faire un petard, ^ Aim/ 
a sensational pi, ture for the Salon. 
The SalomJ of H. Rtgnault, his 
masterpiece, may be termed a 
*• petard ; " — des crepes, to 
half a grand jollifcation, or 
"flare np;" (Ireeniasons') — 
feu, to drink \ (theatrical) — 
feu, to lay peculiar stress oh -uwrds; 
(mountebanks*) — la manchc, 
to make a eolUctioH of money among 
the public^ or " nobbing ; *' (popu. 



142 



Faire. 



lar) — li la redresse, to set one 
rights to correct one ; — danser un 
homme sur une pelle & feu is said 
of a woman who freely spends a 
man's money ; (familiar and 
popular) — briiler Moscou, to 
mix a large bowl of punch; — 
cabriolet, to drag oneself along on 
one's behind; — cascader, see 
Cascader ; — de cent sous 
quatre francs, to squander otte's 
money ; — de la musique, to make 
audible remarks about a game 
which is proceeding ; — de la 
poussiere* to make a great fuss, to 
show off; — de T^pate, to show 
off 

Ces jeunes troupien font de IVpate, des 
•«inbaiTas si vous aimez micux. — J. No- 

BfAC 

Faire du lard, to sleep ; to stay in 
bed late in the morning; — du 
suif, to make unlawfitl profits ySttch 
as those procured by trade assistants 
•who cheat their employers ; — faire 
& quelqu'un blanc de sa bourse, to 
draw freely on another's purse, to 
live at his expense, ** to sponge " 
on him; — flanelle, to visit a 
brothel with platonic intentions ; 
— godard, to be starving; — la 
place pour les paves h, ressort, to 
^pretend to be looking for employ- 
ment with a secret hope of not find- 
ing any ; — la retape, or le trot- 
toir, to be a street-walker; — 
I'ecureuil, to give oneself much 
• trotible to little purpose; — le 
plongeon, to confess when on the 
point of death ; to be ruined, "to 
DC smashed up ; " — mal, to excite 
contemptuous pity. Tiens, tu me 
fais mal ! ztv//, I pity you I lam 
sorry for you / Faire passer le 
gotit du pain, to kill, " to give 
one his gruel j " — patrouille, to 
go on night revels with a number 
of boon compamonsy ** to be on the 
tiles." 

Quatre jours en patrouille, pour dire en 
^folios bacniquet. — Cabarets de Paris. 



Faire peau neuve, to get nau 
clothes ; — petite chapcllc is said 
of a woman who tucks up her 
clot lies ; — pieds neufs, to be in 
childbed, or '* in the straw;" — 
pleurer son aveugle, to void urine, 
"to pump ship." See Lascailler. 
Faire saluer le polichtnelle, to be 
more successftd than others. An 
allusion to certain games at fair^, 
when a successful shy brings out 
a puppet-head like a Jack-in-the- 
box ; — sa Lucie, or sa Sophie, 
to play the prude, to give oneself 
conceited or disdainful airs ; — sa 
merde, or sa poire, to have self 
satisfied, conceited airs ; to take up 
an arrogant position ; assuming an 
air of superiority ; to be on the 
*' high jinks;" — sa tala is said 
of a talkative person, or of one 
who assumes an air of importance ; 
of a girl, for example, who plays 
the little woman; — ses pctits 
paquets, to be dying; — son Cam- 
oronne, an euphemism for a coarse 
expressUn, ** faire sa merde " 
{which see) ; — son lezard, to 
be dozing during the daytime, 
like a lizard basking in the sun ; 
— un boeuf, to guillotine ; to 
give cards; — suer, /t? annoy; 
to disgust, 

Ainsi, leur politique ext^mure, vrai ! ^a 
fait suer depuU quelque temps. — Zoi.a, 
/.'Assommotr. 

Faire un tassement, or un trou, 
to drink spirits in the course of a 
meal for the purpose of getting up 
a fresh appetite, synonymous of 
" faire le trou du Normand ; " — 
une femme, to succeed in finding 
a woman willing to give her 
favours; — son fendant, to 
bluster ; to nvagger ; to look big. 
Ne fais done pas ton fendant, 
"come off the tall grass!" (an 
Americanism). Faire une entree 
de ballet, to enter a room without 
bowing to the company. En — son 




Faire, 



'43 



beurre, to pHt to ^ood Hst^ to ^wsi 
projU, 

\.\. n ton moasicor est bien nipp^ <1^ 
cnanaelut un vicux paletot, Tea fow nwo 
iKurre.— ZuLA, L'Atxammotr, 

Xjo. — ii quclqu'an, to dtcmt^ 
** to bAmboozle " om, Faut pas 
in*U fairc ! may be rendered by 
•' I don't lake that in ; " ** no go ; " 
*' not for Joe ; " *' do you see any 
green in my eye ? " "Walker I" 

Vii»-l« t* taipe, va« lu t' f«irc, 
CrI1c-l& fauilnit pas mla fftire, 
Jtft-tu fiui te5 r«fons T ^ 
Celle-U notu 1a coooaiuonA ! 

Parixiam Stmg, 

La — <i, to ifek to impose upon hy 
an afftcted sho^o of sonu f^igmJ 
ientinwnt. La ^ i la pose^ to 
shffw off; to pQit, 

y yvanK malgr^ mo! ^ la gueiilc d/goAt^ 
<ttie f'raic un dcoulcnl. ou an pe>ftimiste au 
milicti dc cc mcli-mL-la. ... V nous la f'rait 
<liantrenicnt ^ la pou.— Trudldt, Cri du 

Iji — ik la raidcur, to put on a 
distant manner, to look "uppish." 
La — ci I'oscillc, to treat one in 
an off-hand manner; to annoy 
one, or " to huff;" fe play a 
scurvy trick ; to txargierate^ *'to 
come it too tttong.* According 
to Delvaa, the origin of the ex- 
pression is the following : — A cer- 
tain restaurant keeper used to 
serve up to her clicntii a mess of 
eggi and sorrel, in which the 
sorrel was out of all pro[x7rtion 
to the quantity of eggs. One day 
one of the guests exclaimed in 
di-sgust, "Ah \ cetlc foi*, tu nous 
la fais trop a I'oseitle 1" {rop**" 
lar) Se — caramboler is said of 
a woman who gives her Javours. 

Elle Mtitit tr^ bicn, mal^r^ son arachis- 
Mnwoc, f\\M la culbute dc «a pctilc, en 
tnin de >e fatre caranitKiler. renfofifait 
davanta|e . . . oiii. cc chameau d^narurtf 
lai eiDportait le demier morccau de loa 
iionnitctc.— Zola, LAtt^utmatr. 



Sc — rclicher, to get hissed. 

Ah t hien t quVIte it lait«At H'Tprendr« 
^ Ac fatre tclichcr dehor*, elk ^tatt aikre de 
son affaire. . . . XiH qu'clle rcntrAii. . . . il 
larcgardaitbicn en face, pour deviner si elle 
DC rappnrtail pas iinr «ourit«ttr IVril, unda 
cespetits baisert.— Zola, L'Astirmmutir. 

S'cn — cclater Ic pcritoine, or 
peter la sous -ventri ere, to eat 
or drink to excess, " to scorf." 
Tu ten femis peter la sous- 
ventriirc, or tu t'cn ferais mourir, 
expressive of ironical refusal ; dott^t 
you wish you may get it If or, aa 
the Americans have it, ** ^'es, in 
• hom." Se — baiser, or chopcr, 
to ^ abused ; to /v apprehmded. 
Sec Piper. Se — la debinetie, to 
run tfti-rtv, "to guy," " lo slope." 
See PaUtrot \a — belle, to ft 
happy ; to lead a happy life. Fairc 
des petils pains, du plat, or du 
bonimcnt, ti euh^ie : to try and 
persuade one into t'Oftplyins^with 
one's wishes ; (military) — Suisse, 
to drink at I by oneself at a cafJ or 
witxe-shop. The cavalry maintain 
that infantry soldiers alone are 
ca).>able of so hideous an offence; 
(printers') — banque bliche, to 
get no pay ; (Sodomists*) — dc la 
denlelle, the explanation is fur- 
nished by the following quota- 
tion : — 

Tanidi k« pln^ant dans une foute. . . , 
ill nnn-LMiUffnt \e% asM«tanu derrt^re rux 
en fatsani de U dcbtellc, c'est & dire en 
afcitAnl lei doigu croiMf^ derrirre leur dos, 
ou ceux qui M>nt devant ^ ('aide de la poti^ 
krtte, en leur faiuint •mlii un rurjM dur, 
le pliu souvent uo long bouchao qu'it« ont 
di'^poi^ dans leur paotaton, dc mntiietc X 
simiilcr ce qu'on devinc ct & cxciccr aiiiM 
lc> vru de ceux qu'iU ju[ent i^jtatle^ ile 
Ccder & Ifur appcL — TAtthirir, t.tutic St4- 
du^-lf£ntt jMr its AtUnttiii *iii At*mrt, 

(Card-sharpers') Fairc le Saint- 
Jean, to coH^ and spit as a si^'nai 
to confederates. 

L'invitalioa accepc^, Tamnrceur &tl it 
Sainr-Jean, c'c*i-Ji-dire qtraiieint d'line 
louii lubite, il led^Uiiirnc (»our cjipcctorer 
bntyammcnt. A ce Mgnal deux coropUca 



144 



Fais — Familihes, 



•e hSceni He <« rendre \ I'cndrott convenu 
d'avarKC — PlKRlTB DblCOUBT, Paris 1-'*. 
itur. 

P'airc le saut de coupe, by dexte- 
rous manipulntion to place the cut 
tant on the top, instead of at the 
bottom of the pack, " lo slip " a 
cartt I — la carte large, to insert a 
card somewhat larger than the rest, 
and easily recognisable for sharpers' 
eyes^ ihu card being calletl by 
Engli&h fiharpers **old gentle- 
nifto ; '* — le pont, cheating trick 
at cart/st by which any particular 
tard is cut by pt eviously cuftdHg 
ii by the fretsure of the hand, 
•' bridge ; — le filngc, to substi- 
tute ii card for another, ' * to slip " 
U; — la CArte k I'ccU, to prepare 
a <ard in such a manner that it 
shall be easily receptiaed by the 
sharptr* English card*sharpcrs 
■rrnnge canls into " concaves 
and convcxes" and *' longs and 
uliuits.' by culttnf; iii a peculiar 
manner, a "concave" or "con- 
vex" i» secured at will; {thieves' 
and cads') — la jaciancc, to talk; 
lo UMcsfion, or *'cfi»&-kid ;" — 
la Uourrique, to inform against, 
•' 10 blow tlic gaff.^' Lc curieiix 
lui A fait la jactance, il a en- 
tiAvc ct fait la bonrriquc, the 
jud^ examined him ; he allowed 
himxelf to be omtwiitedt and 
peoched. Faire le »aut, to leave 
xcifhcut ptyin^for one's rechonin^. 
Sc — eiililcr, to be apprehended, 
or ''smudged.'* Sec Piper. Sc 
■ — cnturcr, to be robfted, r-vindled ; 
to l^e ene*s money at a gamr^ or 
•* lo blew it." La — i rangTiillc, 
$a strike one with an ett'siin or 
handkerchief filled with sand. 



Ah * mdiu, dit-it, TDui mc I'avu fkiu k 
rftnmiilM.. . . L*»n2ut)le . . - e« cetie»r«o 
tamoW d«K rAdttirn d« buri^rc qui nt four- 



ail Auriine fii^cc de com'ictino, un« foit 
QU'oit «'«(! e5t »crvt. Etl« coo5t»te dans un 
noiirhoir mi't-n rwila apr^ I'arciir remi'li 
d« Icm. En tviMnt cctte tone de (iroiide 
pAr utt boat, loui lc poid« de U terra va k 



l'tutr« extr^mtt^ el forme une maMi« re- 
dourable. — A. LaL'uin, Z.€ MHUch dt 
t'Ourn/rg. 

Rabelais has the expression * ' don- 
ner ranguiUadc," with tlie signi- 
fication of to strike. (Military 
schools') Faire une brimadc, or 
brimer, to ill-treaty to bufly^ 
terrned '* lo brock " at Winchcitcr 
School. 

Fais (popular), j'y — , / am ivil- 
Itng ; I consent. 

Faisan, m. See Bande noire. 

Faiaander (popular), se — , of 
persons, to grino old, to become 
rickety ; of tilings to be decayed, 
worn out, ** seedy." 

Faisanderle,/, or bande noire, 
judndlittg gang composed of the 
" frtrcs de lac6te. ordelafloUe," 
denominated rcipcctit^ly '* grands 
faisans/*'*pctila faisans." "fusil. 
Icurs." Sec Bande noire. 

Faiseur d'oeil, m. (popular), Ltrje- 
lacu 

Faiseuse d'ang^es, / (familiaj), 
woman who miikes a liiing by 
baby-farming, or one -,vho pnk ures 
a miscarriage by unlawful prac" 
trees. 

Faitr*. adj. (thieve*'), lost; safe 
for a conviction^ "booked," or 
•• hobbled." 

Falot, m. (military), military cap. 

Fslourde, / (thieves'), a retumtd 
trcmsSsrt^ a *Mag ; " (players') 
double six of dominoes; (popn- 
lar) — cngourdic, corpse, •'coW 
meat." 

Falzar, m. (popular), trousers^ 
" kicks, tit - upons, hams, or 
trucks.** Sans — aulour de$ 
guibolles, tiHthout any tromerr, or 
with trffuscrs in tatters. 

PamiUires,/ pl.^ female prisoners 
employed as assistants at the prisom 



Fanai — Fare, 



»4S 



df Saint' Latarf^ atufv/Ae, in coh- 
sequencf^ art aUowoi mortfretdom 
than their fdlffW'Convicti, 

Fanal, m. (popular), throaty ''gut- 
ter lane." S'eclairer le — , to 
dnnk^ or ** lo wet one's whistle.** 
Sec Rinccr. CoUe-toi 9a dans 
1' — , tat or drink that. Alt^rer 
le — , t0 ntake Qne thirsty, 

Ccux'ci iminucnl que cellc oe^noioo a 
|M>ur but d'alt^rrr l« fioat et u pousMf 
simpl«rocnt li U coiuommAtioo.— -F. Ma- 

HALIK. 

Fanande, m. (thieves*), abbrevia- 
tioo of fanandcli m., tomrade^ or 
"pal." 

Vli te< Ctnand't qui radiaeati 
Ohc 1 Lu d' pochetiU. 

J. RjCHRTIN. 

Fanandel, m. (thieves'), tomrade, 
friend, "pal.'* 

Ce mot d« fknuid«l veut dire k la foU : 
frim, amis, camarades. Tous In volcun, 
lc« format*, les pmonnien lont Cuiandcls. 

—Balzac. 

Faner (popular). Men verre se 
fane, myxlass isempty. (Thieve**) 
Fourchc ^ — , horsemati. 

Fanfare, /, (popular), sale true 
pour la — ! exclamation of dis- 
gust, a bad loQk-out for nj / 

Fanfe,/ Sec Fauve. 

Fanfouiner (thieves'), totake snuff. 

Panfouineur, m., fanfouineuae, 

f* (thieves'), person who is in the 

habit of taking snuff, 

FantaboBset or fantaaboche, m. 

(milit-iry), infantry soldier^ 
" bceae-cnishcr," or " grabby." 

Fantasia, f, (familiar), noity prO' 
cecding more hriiliant than useful. 
An allusion to the fantasia of 
Arab horseinen. Donner dans 
la — , to be fond of noitUy sho^ving 
off. (Popular) Une -^i d whim, 
or" fad. '^ 

Fantaasin, m. (military), holster. 



Paoen (Breton), riddle. 

Faraud, m, (thieves'), ffntiUman, 
*' nib cove." 

Faraude, f, (thieves'), lady, or 

*• burcrk. ■ 

Faraudec, faraudette,/. (thieves*), 
young f^iri^ or " lunan." 

Farce, yC (general), en avoir la — , 
to be abU to froeure. Pour deux 
lous on en a la — , an ejc/vn. 
ditun of otu penny tvill procure 
it for you. Unc — de (umiste, « 
practiial joke, 

Vc«t-aa Hvoir d'oti rient I'origine de 
cette locution : une farce dc funitstct Elle 
provient de U naaiire d'opercr d'une battde 
de vtileun fumittes tie profeuion, ... lis 
montatent d&iti le« cheinin^«< pour d^va- 
liaer les appAnemenu dcacn* ct en fairc 
■onir le« oc)jet« let plus pr^cleux par left 
loits. — M4miftr€t de Momiemr Ciaude, 

Farceur, m, (artisu'), human ski- 
Uton lerx-ing as a mitdei at the 
Eiole des Beaux Arts, or the Paris 
Art School, thus called on ac- 
count of its being put to uk for 
pmctical joking at the expense of 
newcomers. 

Farcber (thieves'), for faucher 
dans le pont, to fall into a trap ; 
to allow oneself to be duped, or 
"bested." 

Fard, m. (popular), falsehood^ or 
" swack up." Sans — , imtlwut 
humhug^ "allsouare.** Avoir un 
coup de — , lo he slit^tly intoxi- 
cated, or "elevated.'* Sec Pom. 
pette. (Familiar and popular) 
Piqucr un — , ta redden^ to blush. 
Fard, properly rouge. Termed 
" to blow ^ at Wiuchesler School. 

Fardacb (Breton), twrrA/wj/w/^. 

Farder (popular), *c — , to get 
tipsy^ ** lo get screwed." For sy- 
nonyms see Sculpter. 

Fare, /, heap of salt in salt* 
marshes. 



44^ 



Farfadet — Fauc/ur. 



I 



Parfadct. m, (poinibr ukS duercs*), 

Aorif^ or "prad." 

Par-far, forre (pofniUruidthi«ves'), 
quickly^ in a ** brace of ftbakca." 

Farfouiller (popular), le — dans 
Ic tjinpin, to whisper in ont'i iar. 

Fargue, m. ^thieves'), load. 

Par^enient, m. (tbiercs*), load" 
itti^ ; dtf^ftlioft of a witness /or 
t/u proseiUtioH. 

Farmer (thieves'), to load. 

Si luuh Hct ikiztii* d« mftrchandiscs 

SrinchkCi (m voiu itcs chais^ <Sc mvckaa* 
it** W>W«).— ViDOCQ. 

Farguer & la dure, to pounce upon 
a person and rob fiim^ •* to jump " 
hiM. 11 fogaul farguer kU. dure 
le gontaris pour Ini degringolarer 
son l)obinarei, uv must attack tht 
fcllaio to eo-f him of his watth. 

Fargueur, ///. (thieve*;'), man who 
Ivads ; wttntss for the prosecu/ioH. 

Farjdole, / (prostitutes'), ftmali 
fompanifin. 

Faridon, / (popular), poverty. 
Etre a la — , to ii penniless, or a 
"quUby," 

Favineux, a.//, (popular), excellent, 
frst (lass, "tip top, out and out, 
clippine, slap up. real jarn, true 
iiinriuafailc, nap." 

Farnandel, for Fanandel (which 
see). 

Farrago, w. (literary), manuscript 
7i*ilh many alterations attd comc- 
tions, 

Fassolette, / (thieves'), handker- 
chief, "atook," or *' roadam." 

Fatigue, /. (thieves'), certain 
(imottnt of liiboitr tohich convicts 
hax'e to Jo at the penal sen-ititJe 
settle went. 

Fsubeit, m. (maiincs'), epaulet. 
Properly a mop. 



Faubourg, m. (popular), le — sonf> 
f ran K.the fautomrg Saint , Ma r'cttst , 
one of the poorer districts of Paris. 
Dctruire le — \ qoelqu'un, to give 
ame a kick in the breech^ **to 
root," '* to hoof one's bum,** or 
"to land a kick.* 

Pauchants, faucheux, m. pi. 

(thieves'), scissors. 

Fauch6, adj. (thieves'), etre — , 
6lre dans la parie, or frtre motle, 
to he penniless, or a •*qui$bv." 
Eire — , to be guillotined. The 
sj-nonyms arc : *'etre raccourct, 
eirc butc, mettre la ifitc i la fene- 
tre, ctcmuer dans le son, or dans 
le sac, i^pouser la veuve, jouer k 
la main chaude, embrasscr Char- 
lot, nioulionner son mufle dans le 
son, lirersa crampeavecla veuve, 
passer sa bille au glaive, aller i 
rAbbayedeMonte-a-rcgret, passer 
k la voyante, etre mccanisc, tire 
glaiv^f." 

Fauche - ardent, m. (thieves'), 
snujffers, 

Faucher (popular), le pcrsil, to be 
a street-walker. (Thieves') Fau- 
cher, to deceive, ** to best ; " to 
steal, *' to claim." For s)'nonym5 
see Grinchir. Fanchcr, /o ^niiV- 
lotine. Sec Fauchft. 

Auuit/lt IcA for^tt, les cit-^al^rient, ^x- 
aniincnl cctic m^caniqiic ... lis rappcileat 
toul i coup I'Abbajw de Monle-^-Keiiret I 
lU ^{iidient I'anglc Aiznx par le cnupjrtt 
d'acicr et Irouvpnt pnur en peindre I'aciion, 
le vcrbe fAuchcr 1— Balzac, La Der*iilre 
Imcarniitiim de y'autriN, 

Faucher dans le pont, to fall into 
a trap; — le colas, to cut one's 
throat ; — le grand pre, to be 
undergoing a term of penal servi- 
tude at a convict setllentent. The 
convicts formerly were made to 
work nn galleys, the long oar 
they plied being compared to a 
scythe and I he sea to a large 
meadow. Lcsoge, in hb Cil Bias, 



Fatichettes — Fcmme^ 



H7 



terms this " emoiicher la iner 
avcc un ^ventail de vingt pieds.'* 
Amore recent expression deacribei 
it as *'^crire ses meinoires avec 
une plume de quinze pieds." 

Fauchettea^ /. //. (popalar and 
ihicvri'), sdssors* 

Paucheur, m. (thieves'), thief wha 
stetzis watih • tkixtns^ "slang or 
!ackle^uiier ;'VxA-«/(4>wr, Pro- 
perly rtaper, KabcUis called 
him " Rouart," or fu who breaks 
rm (kt zvherl ; (journalists*) dandy. 
From hi3 peculiar gait. 

Faucheux, m. (thieves'), snss&rs ; 
(popular) man 'witk long thin Ugs^ 
or ** daddy long-legs." Properly 
a JieU spider » 

Pauchon, m. (populai), rttwrJ^ 
"loasiing-foik." Un — de satoo, 
a wooden sword. 

Faucbure, /. (thieves*), a cut itt- 
fluted by some sharp instrument 
or -Ufeafon. 

Fauconnier, m. (thieves'), eon/ult' 
mi e of the proprietor of a gaming' 

house, 

Faui»anle,/(ihieves'),yi/«Kamr, 
alias. 

Faussc-coucbe,/ (popular), man 
■without any energy^ a ** sappy " 
fellow, Pruperly a miscarriage, 

FMyi**e-'muncht,/,,/iitigue jacket 
Utirn by the stud/nJs nf the mtli- 
tary school oj Saint-Cyr, 

Fauve, /. (thieves'), snuff-box^ or 
•' snpc7.cr." 

Fauvette,/ (thieves*), 4 t£te noire, 

gendarme, 

Faux-col, m. (familiar), hemt of a 
^asi oft>eer. Garcon, irop d'faux- 
col bi la clef! Irattrr, too much 
head by half I 



Fidtri, «/. (popular), avoir an 

— dans la casemate, or on polt- 
chinelle ilans le liioir, to ivpreg- 
tutnt, or *' lumpy." 

F4e,/ (popular and thieves'), loif; 
young gtr/, or "titter." La — 
n'cst pas loffc, ff^e girl is nafooL 
Gaffine la — , look at the girl, 
"nark the titter." 

Fieaant, m. (thieves'), lover. From 
(ee, loT'e. 

Fiesante. / (thieves'), ntfeetheart, 

or "moll." 

F416, adj. (popular), avoir Ic coco 

— to be (rasy, to be ** a. bit balmy 
in one's crumpet." 

Filer (popular), ae — , to become 

crazy, 

Felouie, or fenouae,/ (thieves'), 
meadoic. 

Felouse, felouze, or fouillouse, 
/ (thieves'), pocket, or **cly;" 

— a jeun, empty po<ket. 

11 demuda k Kzi^re »'il n'svuc pu 
qttelifuc* liiqu» de •on babilUrd : il rtf- 
pondit qu'oui, et tnii la louche eu ui fctoiixe 
ct en tira nnfr, et U Acha su cornet dVpiccn 
pour la mouchailler.— iC# Jnr/yn tie iAr, 
jfo/. (/te aiJtrtJ kjm %okether hi had Amy 
ficturti frOMt kit hcok. itt i»itt ytt, amtt 
/»/ ku hiiMtt It his ^ket. Jmv imu eut, 
mrtd^wt it tff tAe/har to t«cM 4/.} 

Femme, /. (familiar), de Breda* 
gay girl, (^nartier Urcda is the 
Paris St. John's Wood ; ([Wpular) 

— au petit pot, rag-picker" s cott- 
sort; — de terrain, /oif prostityte, 
or ** dra^gle*tail. " See Qadouc, 
(Thieves and cads') Fcmmc de 
cavoi&i, dressy prostitute whefrC' 
qtunts the Boulr.'ard cafes ; (mili< 
lary) — de Tadiudnnt. tock'Up^ 
**J'Rfi""." or "Irish theatre;" 

— de regiment, big drum ; (fami- 
liar) — pur faubourg, is said of a 
lady -with highly polished manner, 
or ironically of one whose manners 
art anything but aristocratie. 



148 



Fiftasse — Fermer. 



Fenasse, /. (popular), mnn -ivitH' 
out r$urgy, a lazy man. Old word 
fen, Aa_y* 

Fendanle, / (thieves*), */*wr, "jig- 
ger." Termed also "lourde.' 

Fendait, w. (popular), bra^/^ri^ 
mia^girrer, or " swashbuckler." 
Termed formerly " avaleur de 
charretlcs fcrnfes." Faire son 
— , to bra^, to swa^^r^ to hok 
big, to htustit, "to bulldoxe" 
(American). Ne fais done pas 
ton — , ** come off the tall grass," 
as the Americans say. 

Fendre (thieves'), I'crgot, to run 
axuay. Literally to split the spur. 
The toes being pressed to the 
ground in the act are naturally 
parted. For synonyms, French 
and English, see Patatrot. 
(Card-sharpers') l-endre le cul ^ 
unc carte, to notch a card for 
cheating purposes ; (military) — 
I'oreille, to place on the ntired 
list. An allusion to the practice 
of splitting the ears of cavalry 
horses no longer fit for service 
and put up for auction, termed 
" cast " horses. (Popular) Fendre 
Tarche a quclqu^un, to bore cne 
to death* Literally to split one's 
head. (General) Se — , to give 
oneself or others an unusual treat. 
Jc me fends d'unc bouteille, / 
treat myself to {or I stand treat 
j^r) a bottle of wine. 

Zul t je aic feiuls d'un Kuppl^ment I . . . 
Victor, une iroiMime oonfiiure I— Zola, /f k 
B«Hk«tir dt$ Dahuu 

Se — & sVcorcher, to be very 
gmerous with ones money. 

Fenftlre,/. (nopular), bouchcr une 
— i quelqu un, to give one a black 
fye, *'to put one's eyes in half- 
mourning." Faire la — , is said 
of a prostitute who lies in wait at 
a window^ and who by sundry 
alluring signs seeks to entice 



passers-by into entering the house. 
Metlre la leie a la — , to be guillo- 
tined. An allusion to the passing 
the head through the lunette or 
circular aperture of the guillotine. 

FenAtriire,/ (popular), /rwi/i^K/* 
who* lies in \oait at a windvw, 
xvhence site invites passers-by to 
enter. 

Fenouse, or felouse,/ (thieve*'), 
meadffzv. 

F6odec, adj. (thieves'), urtptst. 

Tti ii repasser, m. (popular), shoe^ 
or " truiler-case." Sec Ripaton. 

Fer-blanc, m. (familiar), de — , 
worthless. Des rognurcs de — , 
inferior theatrical company. Ud 
i*crivain de — , author without any 
ability, ** penny-a-liner." 

Ferblantcrie, f. (familiar), decora- 
tions. 

Ferblantier, m. (naval), official, 

Ferlampier, or ferlandier, m. 

(ihieves'), bandit; sharper^ or 
*' hawk ; " thief or " prig ; " lazy 
humbug; roguey or "bad eg^." 
Ferlampie formerly had the signifi- 
cation q( dunce. 

Ferlingante,/. (thieves'), crockery. 
Ferloquea, / //. (popular), rags. 

Fermer (popular), maillard, to 
sleep^ ** to doss." An allusion to 
M. Maillard, the invcntpr of iron- 
plate shutters ; — son compos, to 
stop walking; — son parapluie, 
t» die. See Pipe. Fermer son 
plomb, son egouli or sa bolle, to 
hold on^s tongue. Ferme ta bolte, 
*'shut up!" "hold your jaw !" 
A synonymous but more polite 
expression, " Tnce is Lalin for a 
candle," is used by Fielding. 

'* Tace, madam," aniwcred Murphy, "is 
Latin for a candle : I com mend your pru- 
dence." — FitLuiNG, Amelia. 



Firoce — Fiacre. 



T49 



Piroce, m. and adj. (familiu), ftre 
— sur Tarticlc, to 6g strict. Pas 
— , rtiadf ef poor stuff. Un — , 
0Ht delated to his duty. 

Feir*. adj. (thieves'), £tre — ,/# U 
tockid up, or '* pul away," 

Ferrer le goujon (popular), temaJu 
cue ruHtllino the hatt. 

Fertange, or fertille,/ (ihicvea*}i 

straw, 

I'u e» un rude mioo : le mflme pantiooit 
n'cti pa.« tnaquill^ de fenitle Untqutn^ — 
V. Ht-GO, Lti Mhfru^tt. (Knr art a 
itMrnttrf ; a ckili «/ Parii it mat mutdg ^ 
9t*t j/ntw,) 

FertilUnte, / (thieves'). /fa/*«r; 
Pin ; taiL 

FertiUe, f. (thieves*), facf^ ot 
" mug ; straiCf or " stroromcL" 

Fenilliers, «.//. (thieves*), iw4«/. 

Fesae,/ (popular), woman, "laced 
mutton.' Ma — , my better half. 
Mo^asin dc ftsscs, brothel^ or 
"nanny-ihop." (Bullies') Fcsse, 
paramaur^ "moll." Ma — tur- 
bine, my girl is at work. 

Feaaer (popular), fo do a thing 
tfuukly ; — le champagne, to por- 
tals freely of champat'nf, **lo 
*wig »bam or boy." Kabclais has 
the expression. ** foueltcr un 
veric," to tois off the contmts 9j a 
glass to thi last drop. 

r<nicttc-mni cc vem galenicmcnt. — K A- 
AKLaiS, GargtiHlua. 

Feston (popular), faire Hu — , 
pincer un — , to reel aftoul ; to 
make tigzags under the inftueme of 
drink, 

»8toaiuige, m. (popular), reeling 
about under the injluenee of drink, 

Festonner dea guibolles (popu- 
lar), to reel aboui while in a state of 
intoxicativti, 

F**e, /. (popular), du boudin. 
Christmas, (Popular and thtcrcs') 



Etre de la — , /9 ^ lucky, "to 
have cocum ; " to have meoHS^ or 
/(7^ "well ballasted." 

Mot jc *uU loujoan de la ffte, J'ai tou^oari 
boKue ct boo radin. — Vioocij. 

Fetiche, m. (garoestets*), marker, 
or any object which temporarily re- 
presents the sum of money which 
has been staked at some gasne. 

Fen, m. (theatrical), faire — , to lay 
particular stress on uvrds ; (free- 
masons') to drink. (Military') Ne 
pas s'embeter or s'embrouiller 
dans les fcnxde file, to be iiidcpen* 
dent ; m^t to stick at tribes. ( Fa- 
miliar) Allumcr lea fcux, to set a 
ga*^ going, 

II ett tout et il n'eit rien danf c« Ccrcl* 
pschutt. Sa miuioo c«t d'allumer Id (cux, 
d'aii soa nom bien cooou ; rallumeur. —A. 
SiavKi*. 

Fcuille, f. (popular), de chou, ear, 
or *' wattle." Unc — de plaiane, 
a bjd cigar, or "cabbage leaf.** 
(Saumur school of cavalry) Une 
— , a proiiitute. (Familiar) Une 
— de chou, newspaper of na im' 
porta nee ; a worthless bond^ not 
marketable. Voir la — ^ I'enverSi 
to have carnal intercourse, is said 
of a girl who git>es her favours. 
(Military) Des feuilles de chou, 
infantry gaiters. 

Feuillet, m, (roughs.*), leaf of ciga* 
rette paper. Aboulc-nioi un ^ ct 
une brouettee d'allumcttcs, give 
me some cigarette paper and a 
match, 

Peuilletie, adj. (familiar), properly 
flaky, ^cmellc — , U'orM'Out sole. 
Termed also ** pompe aspirante.^ 

Parfots aus&I elle n'a que dcs botttnn 
fu«p«cle«, \ Kfnetlet reuiUcteck qui wMineni 
k TuphAlic Avcc une gaiclti iotcaipe»tivc. 

— THfiOPHILB GaLTIKS. 

Ffcve,/, atlrapcr la — . See At. 
traper. 

Fiacre, r/i. (popular), remiser soil 
— , to beeome sedaie^ well-behaved. 



ISO 



Fiat — FUroU 



FUt, ffi. (thieves')* trust; eonfi- 
detue, 

II y a aujourd'hut tant de raillei ct ds 
cuisinien, qu'il n'y a plus de fiat du tout,— 

ViOOCQ. 

Ficard, m. (thieves' and cads'), 
poiue offiar^ "crusher," **pig," 
"copper," " reeler," or "bulky." 
See Pot-A-tabac 

Ficeler (familiar and popular), /« 
do; to dress. Bien ficeH <orefully 
done; well dressed. 

VoiI4 nuunan Vauquer belle comnw an 
astre, ficel^ comme ime carotte.— 'Balzac, 
L* Pire Goriot. 

Ficelle, / (familiar and popular), 
dodge. Etre — , to be tncky, a 
"dodger." 

Cadet Rousscl a troit f(arf ons : 
L'un est voleur, I'autre est fripoD ; 
Le troUiime est un peu ficelle. 

CeuUt Rtnuset (ftn old song). 

(Thieves' and police) Ficelle, 
ehain or strap, (Police) Pousser 
de la — , to watch a thief; to pft 
him a "roasting." (Sporting) 
Un cheval — , a horse of very 
slender build, 

FiceUier, w. (popular), a tricky 
person who lives by his witsy " an 
artful dodger." 

Fichaiae, / (general), a worthless 
thing, " not worth a curse." 

Fichant, adj. (popular), annoying; 
tiresome! disappointing, 

Fichard, m. (popular), va t*en au 
— \go to the deuce I 

Fiche (familiar), va te faire — I go 
to the deuce I Expressive also of 
disappointment. Jecroyaisr^ussir, 
mais va te laire fiche ! / thought 
I should succeed, but no such 
thing, 

Bu pain de son < des sous de cuivre I 

Cest pour noiu vivre, , 

Mais va-t'-fair' fiche 1 
On nous prend pour des merlifiches. 
RicHBrm; 



Je t'en — 1 nonsense f nothing of 
the kind I II croit reussir je t'en 

— I Vous croye2 qu'il a tenu sa 
promesse? Je t*en — ! Fiche- 
moi le camp et plus vite que 9a, 
be off in double quick time, "sling 
your hook." 

Ficher (thieves'), to yawn ; — la 
coUe, to tell plausible falsehoods; — 
la coUe gourdement, to be an art- 
ful beggar; (popular) — la mis^re 
par quartiers, to live in poverty ; 

— la paresse, to be idle. 

Je fiche Im paresse, je me dorlote.— 
Zola. 

Se — un coup de tampon, to fight. 
Se — de la hole, or de la bobine 
de quelqu'un, to laugh at one; to 
seek to make a fool of him, (Mili- 
tary) Se — un coup de latte, to 
^ght a duel with cavahy swords, 

Fichtrement (general), very ; aw- 
fully. 

Fichu, adj, (general), put ; givefi. 
II I'a — i la porte, he turned him 
Pitt of doors; he has given him the 
"sack." Fichu comme I'as de 
pique, comme un paquet de linge 
sale, badly dressed; clumsily built. 
Fichu, capable, II est — de ne pas 
venir, he is quite capable of not 
coming at all, 

Ficbumacer (popular), for ficher, 
to do, Qu*est-ce que tu fichuma- 
ces? what are you up to? 

Fidibus, m. (familiar), pipe-light ; 
spiU. Loredan Larchey says :— 

Une communication de M. Fey assigne 
il ce mot une origine allemande. Dans les 
UQtversi^ de ce pays, les admonestations 
officiellescommcncent par les mots : Jidibus 
Va(i\u ^deliius) discipulis universitatis, 
&c. Les djlinquants qui allument par for- 
fanterie leurs pipes avec le papier de I'ad- 
monestattoo, lui ont donn^ pour nom le 
premier mot de sa premiirc figne. — Diet. 
Hitt. d Argot. 

Fiirot, «. (popular), stuik-upt 
"uppish." 




Ficvre — Filendk/u, 



151 



Fitvre, /. (thieves'), accis de ^ 
cerel>ralc, accusation on thccafitai 
cAiir^c ; Sfntctue of dtath. Rc- 
douhlcmcnt dc — , a^^fip-at'oting 
dnumstam£s or nrw char^f maa< 
a_gainst a prisoner rvKo is already 
en his trial. 

La Cigognc a la (ligrvtion itifficilc, i>ur- 
lout en (ait dc redoiiblcmem de Aivrt <rc'- 
vfUtion d'un nouveau fiic i charge. — 

IUL2AC. 

Fiferlin, m. (popular), soldiery 
**swaddy,'* or "wobbler." Krom 

Fifi, m. anil f, popular), un — , a 
scaztn^cr employ cit nt emptying 
cesspools, a * ' gold tinder ; " scnveu- 
gerscnsk in which the cantcnts cf 
(esspools are carried aioay, Unc 
— , a thin, skmny girl. 

Les piaoturenK^ et lc& fifia, le« crand* 
carcsBk ct Icb ba:ks<Mc ... In ruu^mcotnme 
au»i les enraK^ct qu'onl dono^ dtt arrhes 

W %*A\ tuviiii«.~TKt:BUlT, Z.< Cri dm Pgtt- 

pit, Sept., 1 866. 

Fi(i>lolo, /M. (popular), one who 
plays the JooL 

Fifloche, m. (popular), one more 
iktiful than the rest^ xvAo leads 
the quadrille nt a dancing hall. 

Fifiot, m. (militan), infantry sol- 
dier, "bcctlc-cruahcr," "gnibby." 

Figsriste, m. (ramiliar). Properly 
a contributor to the /•'igaro news- 
paper, and Hguraiively term of 
amtefiipt applied to unxcrtipulotts 
jonmaiists. 

Fi^nard, w., figne, /. (popular), 
the breech, or *' one-eyed cneck." 
:>ce Vasistas. 

Fignolade,/ (theatrical), /ra/«*fw/ 
trilling, 

Fignole,/ adj. (thieves*), pretty^ 
••dimbcr." 

Alors aboula du utri, 
Moare au briiant conime un cabri, 
Uoe fij{tiole jfOMclinc. 

RtcMcriN. 



Figuration,/, (ibealrical), staff 0/ 
supernumeraries t or "sups," 

Figure, /. (popular), the hreeck, 
see Vaslfttas ; sheep's kead^ 
Ma — , myself, ** No. I.'* 

Figurer (thieves'), to U in irons. 

Fil, m. (thieves'), de &oie, thief, 
*' pr'B- " i^cc Grinche. ( Popu- 
lar) Avoir le — , or connaltre le — , 
to know what one is about, '* to be 
up lo a dodge or two." N'avoir 

Iias invent^ le — a couper le 
)curre 1/ said of one who is 
n.ft pttrticularly bright, who is 
•* no conjurer." N'avoir plusde 
— sur la 1x>bine, to he oald, or 
•* stag-faced." Prendre ui\ — , 
to have a dram of spirits, a drop 
cf "something damp," or a 
•* drain." L'n vcrre dc — , aglass 
of brandy. Unc langiic qui a le— , 
a sharp tongtie. 

F'*^*gC( "'. (card-shaq)crs'), hand- 
Zing cards in such a manner that 
trumps will turn up ; juggling 
away a card as in the three-card 
trick, '* clipping ;" (thieves*) 
tracking otte, 

Filasse, /' (popular), mattress, 
hed, ' ' cioss i" a piece of roast 
beef. Se fourrer dans la — , to go 
to bed, to gt't into the '* kip." 

Filature, / (thieves'), jollowing 
stealthily a persim. Faire la — , 
or Idcher de la — k queU^u'un, 
/i» folloTv a person stealthily, to 
track one, "to nose." Prendre 
en — un volcur, to follow and 
watch a thief. (Familiar) Filature 
de poivrots, spirit-ihop patronized 
iy . ( %fii med drtmkards^ 

^^Filend^che, m. (thieves'), one of 
the vagabond tribe. 

Lonque j'occupais tnoa potU d< con- 
ni&uirc de police dAn« cc dangrreiu quar- 
licr, let habiianl« laiit |utrnicde«carn(re« 
d'Am^nqucformaicDt quatrecategoncidit* 



152 



Fil-en-double — Fille, 



tiDCtes : les Hirondelles, tes Romaoichels, 
Iti FUcndeches ec les Eafants de la loupe. 
•^Mimoirtt dt MoHsUur Cltutdt. 

Fil-en-double, m. (popular), lidnt. 

Fil-en-trois, fil-en-qu«tre, fiU 
en-six, m. (popular), spirits. 

Allons . . . un petit verre de fil en quatre, 
hUtoire de se velouier et de se rebMnber le 
tor»e.— Th. Gautieb. 

Filer (thieves'), to setal. See Grin- 
chir. Filer la comete, or la sot^e, 
to sieep in the open air ; — le 
luctr^me, to open a door by means 
of a picklocky " to screw ; " — 
une pelure, to steal a coat ; — un 
sinve, to dog a man, **to nose ; " 
— une condition, to watch a house 
and get acquainted itnth the ins 
and outs in view of a burglary. 

La condition ^tait fil^ d'avance. 
1« hgolo eut bicntdt cass^ tout ! 
Du gai plaJ&ir, iU avaient I'esp^rance, 
Quand on est pigre on peut paaser partout. 

From a song composed by Cle* 
ment, a bui^lar (quoted by Pierre 
Delcourt, I^aris Volettr, lS86). 
This poet of the " family men " 
was indiscreet enough, some days 
after the burglary described, to 
sing his production at a wine-shop 
frequented by thieves, and, unfor- 
tunately, by detectives also, with 
the result that he was sent over 
the water and given leisure time 
to commune with the Muses. 
(Sailors' and popular) Filer son 
noeud, or son edible, to go away ; 
to run away^ *'to cut the cable 
and run before the wind." See 
Patatrot. Filerunnoeud,/0f/ina 
yam. File ton nceud, ^ on with 
your story or your discourse, * ' pay 
away." With regard to the latter 
expression the Siang Diciumary 
says: — 

Fay-away . . . from the nautical plirase 
pay-away, meaning to allow a rope to ma 
out of a vessel. When the hearer comtders 
the stoty quite long enough, he, carryina 
out the same meuphor. exclaims, "bola 



(General) Filer quelqu'un, tofoU 
low one stealthily so as to watch 
his movements ; (popular) — la 
mousse, to ease oneself See 
Mouscailler. Filer le Plato, to 
love in aplatonic manner ; — une 
poussee, to hustle, " to ramp ; " 

— des coups de tronche, to butt at 
one's adversary with the head ; 

— une ratisse, to thrash, *'to tan." 
See Voie. (Theatrical) Filer une 
scj;ne, to skilfully bring a scene to 
its climax ; (caitJ -sharpers*) — la 
carte, to dexterously substitute a 
card for another, to **slip" a 
card, 

Une fois le saut de coupe fait, te grec a 
le coin d'y glisser uue carte large, point de 
repirc marquant Tendroit ou il doit Cure 
saucer la coupe au mieux de xes int^r^u. . ■ 
11 file la carte, c'est & dire il change une 
carte pour une autre.— Af/«r»m de Mon- 
tieur Ciautle, 

Filet de vinaigre, m. (theatiical), 
shrill voice, one that sets the teeth 
OH edge. 

Fileur, m. (police), man who dogs 
one, a " nose ; " (card -sharpers') 
one who dexterously substitutes a 
card for another, who "slips "a 
card ; (thieves') confederate of the 
floueurs and eroporteurs (which 
see), who levies a percentage on 
the proceeds of a card'Sharping 
sxifindle; person whofolloxvs thieves 
and extorts money from them by 
threats of disclosures ; detective ; 
(familiar) — de Plato, platonic 
lover. 

Fillaudier, m. (popular), one who 
is fonti of the fair sex, *' mol- 
rower." 

Fille, f, (familiar and popular), de 
maison, or — de toumeur, prosti- 
tute in a brothel ; harlot ; — en 
carte, street-walker whose name is 
in the police books as a registered 
prostitute. See Gadoue. Grande 
— , bottle of ivine, (Familiar) 
Fille de marbre, a cold'hcarted 



FilUtte — Fiacofts. 



'53 



tQurttian ; — dc plilre, harlvt, 
"mot." For list of over 140 
cynon)-ms see Oadoue. 
PUlelte,/ (popular), half a battle 
eftoine. 

Filoche./ (thieves'), ;»«(rj^, "skin," 
or '*poge." Avoir sa — kjeaiif 
/tf htpmnUess^ '• hard up." 

Filou. adj. (popular), w/Vy, " ap to 
a dodge or two." 

Filsinge,/, (thievcs*),/tf.fj silk. 

Fin,/ (thieves'), de la soupe, gtiU' 
iothu, See Voyanle. (Kamiliar) 
Faire unc — , /^ gft mamed, 
"spliced," or "hitched" (Ameri- 
canism). 

Fine,/, and adj. (popular), txcrt- 
ment, or " qiiaker," abbrc^'iation 
of" tine moutarde;" (familiar) ab- 
breviation of "fine champagne," 
^1/ quality of brandy. (Thieves') 
Etrc CO — iicgrcnc, to bg in great 
danger ; to he in an " awful fix." 
La raiUe (la i>oli<:«) »l IL . . . Je joue b 

ntikIo<5) Oa comi'dic) pcmr im finaadcl en 

fine pigrinc (un umaradc &. tuute extrtf- 

mit^jL — Balzac. 

Finette,/ (card-sharpers'), fl/«-^f/ 
xvherrin are secreted certain tards. 
II a lou» *on habit, lu dot d« »on pan- 
taloo, use pocbc tjiie fin«ttc. daoi laquelle 
il pbcc le« cartn non bttcaul^ct qu'il doit 
aunsiihirraux names — M^moiret ti€ Mon- 
gieurCtiitntf. 

Fiole, / (familiar), bott/e oftnine; 
(popular) head, or " tibby j " /arr, 
or "mug." J'ai soup^ de la — , / 
ktsve had enough ofyvu ; /wHIAave 
nothing more to do With you. Se 
ficher dc la — k quclqu^un^ to 
iaugh at one. 

On y connalt nu sarfcarouiM, 

Ma ftole, mull (>ir()ui r«(nMi«i*c, 

Me» caXaXi dc mec au gratin. 

KlCHcnH, 

Pour la — .\ quelqu'un,/7r one. 

Songet mi' 9a t'ra I'plui b«au jour dla 
eairicre d'l'njiru, loujour* tur la briche, 

?ui »'doniK (aot d'inal pour vo« fiolca.'— 
Kl'BLOT, L* Cridu Feupltt iS36. 



Sur la — & quelquVn, ahant one, 
(oncertting ofie. II fagaut ntf pas 
dcgueulartier sur leur — , -we mtist 
say nothing about them. 

Fioler (familiar and popular). t» 
drink ; — le rogome, to drink 
brandy, (Thicvesj FioIcr, A? J/fl« 
atone. 

Fioleur, m. (familiar and popular), 
one who is too fond ej the bottle^ 
*'a lushington. 

Fion, coup de — . See Coup. 
(Cads' and thieves') Dire — , to 
apologii/^ to beg one's pardon. 

Fionner (familiar and popular), to 
play the dandy. 

Flonneur, w. (familiar and popu* 
lar), one who plays thi dandy. 

Fiquer (lhiev«'), to strike ; to stab, 
"to chive." 

Fiquca,/ pi (thieves*), elothes, or 

"clobber." 

Fiscal, adj. (familiar), eUgani. 

Fish, m. (familiar), women's bully, 
or "ponce," generally called "ma- 
quereau," mackerel. For list of 
S)iionyms sec Poisson. 

.^/fissure,/ (popular), avoir une — , 
to be slightly eraty, " lo be a little 
bit balmy in one's crumpet." 

Fiston. m. (popular), term of tn* 
dtanttent, Mon— , my son ^ simny. 
Mon vicux — , old fellow. 

Flac, w. (thieves*), sa£k ; — d'al, 
trumey-bag ; bed, or " kip." 

FUche,/ (popular). See FUnche. 

Flacons, m. (popular), shoes, 
"trotter cases. See R>p&- 

tons. Dcfboucher scs — , to tak* 
offone^s shoes. 



154 



Fiacitl^Flauchen 



Flacul, tn. (thieves'), ^f/, or 
"kip ; " money-ba^. 

Le vioque a des flaculs plcins de bUI« ; 
»*il va k. NinH, il Taut lui nffauilcr tcs pa- 
turDDs. — ViDOCQ. VTfu old tnoH ktu baf 
fuit tff money ; i/ kt dtMttt it, we'UturH 

Flftfla, m. {fainiliflr and popular), 
great sktnt^ng off. Fairc uu — , 
to show off ; tojfaunt, 

riageolet, m. (ohsoleie), called by 
Horace catida suiax. 

Flageolets, m. (popular), /c^, 
'*peg5." Tenned also "fume 
rons, guibcs, guibolles.'' 

Flambant, m. artd adj. (military), 
artilttry t/tan, " son of a gun ; " 
(familiar and popular) ma^ifi- 
(Cfi/, "slap up, dipping, nap. 

y^Iambard, nt. (thieves*), dasr^r, 
Foinierly termed *'cheery;'* (fa- 
miliar and popular) one u-ko has 
daih ; one -who shows off, 

Tas d'ftambardi, las d'chicards, 
LcJ canoticn de la Seine, 
S<int partout, l)icu ("e^us, 
£t panout font du chahiit. 

Pttriiiam Song. 

Flambarde, / (popular), pipe. 
Termed "dudcen by the Irish j 
(thieves') candk^ or **glim." 

Flambe, /. (thieves'), stvord^ or 
'•poker/' Petite — , knife, or 
" chive." From Flamberge, name 
OTven by Kcnaud de Moniauban 
(one of the fuur suns of Aymon 
who revolted against Charle- 
magne, and who have been maile, 
together with their one chaiger 
Bayard, the heroes of chivalry 
legends), to his sword, nnd now 
u^ed in the expression, Meltre 
flambergc au vent, /fl draw. 

Flamber (mountebanks'), fo per-^ 
form ; (familiar and popular) to 
Hutkt a show I to shine. 

lU voulatcni flamber av«c I'argcnt vottf, 
\\\ ach«iai«ot des dfEfroqaes d'hit&ard. — E. 

Sue. 



Flambert, m, (thieves'), dag^tr. 
Termed "cheery" in the old Eng- 
lish canL 

Flambotter aux rotting (card- 
sharpers'), kind of swindling gamg 
at cards, 

FUm9ick,flani8ique,OT.(thieves'), 
fUmish. 

Flan, m. (thieves'), c'est du — , U 
is exeelUnt. Au — , // is true, 

A la — t at mndam, of "hippy 
go lucky.** (Popular) Da — I 
an fjaculation expressive of re* 
fusnt See Nifles. 

F]anchard,flancheur,n/.(ihieves*), 
cuntiitiff phyer ; one who heti- 
tates, who ('acts out, 

Flanche, «/. (thieves'), game of 
eards ; theft ; plant. Grande — , 
roulette or trente et un. Un — 
miir, preconcerted roblfry or crime 
for the perpetration of which the 
titm has (ome. (Popular) Flanche, 
dodge; contriz^ncc ; affair; Job. 
II connaU le — , he kfiaws the 
dodge. Foutu — ! a bad Job f 
C'est — I it is all right. 

Totijoundin inJiHlice*; niai«attendons ; 
c'est point fini c'flanchc 1^ — TULBLOT, /.* 
Cridu feupUt Mardi, iti£6. 

(Thieves* and cads') Je n'entrave 
pas ton — , ldon*t understand your 
gatne, " 1 do not twig," or, as the 
Americans say, "1 don't catch 
on." Nibdu — , on t'exhibe I //t*^ 
your game^ they are looking at 
you .' Si tu cs entile el si le 
curieux vcut t'cntamcr, n'cntrave 
pas ei nib de tous: les Ranches, if 
you are caught and the magistrate 
tries to pump you, do not fall into 
the snarey and keep all the **jobs" 
dark, 

Flanchcr (thieves'), to play cards ; 
(popular) to laugh at ; to hack 
cut; to hesitate; to dilly-dally^ 
*'to make danger" (sixlecnlb 
century). 



Flanchit-^Fihne. 



155 



FUnchet, «. (thieves'), share; 
participation in a theft. Foutu 

— , tad Job. 

Ce« un foutu (Lmchel. 
Douic lon^e« dc tirade, 
Pour uoe ngulide. 

VlDOOl. 

Flancheur, m. (thieves'), an w- 
Jarmer, a, *' nark ; " pne who backs 
cut ; a player ; (popular) — de 
gadin, one who takes fart iu a 
game played with a cork^ topped 
by a pile of halfpence^ which th£ 
players try to knock off by aiming 
est it with a penny, (Popalar and 
thieves') Knfonc cur de — degadin, 
poor wretch who makes a scanty 
living- by robbing of their half- 
pence the players at the game de- 
scrtlml aUwe, He places his foot 
on the scattcfed coins, and works 
it about in sudi a manner that 
they find a receptacle in the in- 
terstices of his tattered soles. 

FUne,_/C (popular), /i»*/««i. 

Flanelle, /. (prostitutes'), one who 
does not pay. (GeneraJ) Faire — , 
t9 visit a house of ill-fame with 
pljtonic intentions* 

Flanocher (popular), /# he laty ; 
to saunter latHy about ^ " to 
shooL'* 

Flanquage, m, (popular), jk la 
)H>rie, aismissai^ '* tlie sack." 

Flanque. See Flanche. 

Flanqucr une tatouille ((;enera)), 
to thrash, **to wallop." Sec 
Voie. 

Flaquadin, w. (popular), /0//rvffn, 
or '•cow's babe." 

Plaque, /. (cads' and thieves'), 
ladys reticule ; lump of £xt«- 
ment, or *'quakcr.** 

Flaquer (poimlar), to tell a fttse-^ 
Ai'od ; to ease I'Meself, '* to bury a 
quaker." Sec Mouscailler. 



V'li vol' fille que J' vou» ramine, 
£llc esi dans un cWict* ^tut, 
Pepuis U tMnrifcre du Maine 
£Ue a'i (iiit iiu'daquer dans st4 hx%. 
Pa^itiam Seng, 

Flaquet, m. (thieves'), /f^ Avoir 
dc la dalle au — , to have well' 
jUled pockets. 

Ftaquol, m, (thieves*)* eash-box, or 
" peter." 

Flasquer (thieves'), to ease oneself. 
See Mouscailler. Flasquer du 
poivTC ^ quelqu'un, to at^td one ^ 
to fly from one. J'ai flasque du 
poivrc k la roussc, J jledfrum tht 
police, 

Flatar, m, (thieves*), four-wheeler^ 
or *' growler." 

Flaup^e, flopie, /. (popular), mast 
of anything; crtra-a. Une — de, 
mueh, or " neddy." 

Flauper (popular), to thtjih, "to 
wallop." Sec Voie. 

FUche, roitin, or p61ot, m. 
(thieves' and czd^*'), fzccenlime 
eoin, or sou. 

FUmard, m. (general), laty t*r 
" Mondayiiih '* individual; pel- 
troon, or *' cow's babe." 

Flime, or flemme (general),yt«ir ; 
laziness. Loiedan Larchcy says : 
*' Flemme est une fomic aiidcnnc 
dc notrc ^egme. Cc nai pas 
douteux quand on vuit dire en 
Hcni _fit'ttte pour manque d'cnei-gie ; 
en Normandie ct en Suisse /ieume; 
en proven^al et en itallcn./^/wwd. 
Sans compter le Trraor de Brti- 
netto Latmt qui dit dcs le xiii* 
siccle : ' Flemme est froide et 
viciite.*" Avuir la — , to be afraid. 

(^a fiche jolimcnt la Rtine de pcnscr qu'il 
fatil reniDDicr li-haut . . . ei jouer 1— E. 

MuNTKlL. 

Avoir ta — , U be disinclmed for 

\i.'Ofk. 

AujoiinThui, c'cn pas qu*} 'ai la flemise. 
Jejure nics gratids dicuz non ({u'j'ai point 



156 



FUur — Fiouant, 



c'auudiL poil doat la main qu'on m'accuw 
d'tenip* en trmn* ci'avoir. — Taublot, La 
CriJu PfHjUf, SejH., 1886. 

Ballre sa — , to U idling, or 
"shooling." 

Fleur, f, (popular), de macadam, 
street'Waiker. See Gadoue. Fleur 
de mai, dc mari, virginity, (Card- 
sharper^') Vcrre en fleurs, a 
nvindling dodge at cards. See 
Verre. 

L« coup de carteB par leqoel oes mesiteura 
se concilicnt la fontine, est ce qa'oD apiwlte 
le verr« en flcurk. — ViDOcg. 

Fleurant, m, (thieves*), ncst^y ; 
(popular) thi hkind. See Va- 
sistas. 

Flibochcuse, /. (popular), fast or 
"gay "i'/>-/, "shoful pullet." 

Flic-flac, or fric-frac (ihievcs*), 
faire le — , to pick a lock, '*io 
screw," " to strike a jigger." 

Fligadicr, m. (thieves*), sou. 

Flingot, m. (grncral), buUhcr^s 
sieei ; musket. Termcid formerly 
*'baslon a feu." 

Flingue,/. (nautical), mmk<t. 

Flippe, / (popular), ^t/*'tfw/a«)'. 

FUquadard, m. (popular), folii^ 
0j^cer, "bobby/' or *' blue- 
botde.** Concerning the latter 
expression the Slang Dictionary 
gays ; — " This well-known slang 
term for a London constable is 
used by Shakespeare. In Part II. 
of A'ing Htnty /K, act ▼., 
scene 4, Doll Tcarsheet calls the 
beadle who is dragging her in, a 
' thin man in a censer, a blue- 
bottle rogue.' This may at finit 
&eem singular, but the reaM)n is 
obvious. T\xt beadles of Bride- 
well, whose duty it was to whip 
the women prisoners, were clad in 
blue." For synonyms of fliqua- 
dard sec Pot-i-tabac. 



Flique, m. (popular), cammts- 
xaire de poHce, or petty police 
magistrate; police officer^ or 
*' bobby." For synonyms see 
Pot-ik-tabac. 

Flopie. See PUup6e. 

Floquot, m. (thieves'), drawer, 

Flottant, m. (lhievcs*),/M; (popu- 
lar) ball paironiud by -M>men*s 
bullies. Literally a company of 
" poissons," or bullies. 

Flcttard, m. (students'), student 
prefanngfor the nai'al school, 

Flotte, /. (students*), monthly al- 
lawatue, A l>oy's weekly allow- 
ance is termed "allow" at Harrow 
School. (Popular) Eire de la — , 
to be one of a company. Des 
flottes, many; much^ '* neddy," 
(Thieves') La — , a gang ofswiH' 
dlersand murderers ■whtch existed 
towards 1825. 

La Flotle ftait compas^e de nirintirc« fa* 
mcux . . . ces cncmbnn dc la haute pigre 
travailLaient par boiida Wpar^et : Tava- 
coli riulien tfiait un tireur ds prcmiin 
f(m.-r(vulciirdcpi.chc^. . . - Cancan, Rn|utn 
Ct PuAc-Vinai^rc tSuicnt du aua.<uin«, du 
aunnturs d'tf'liie. . . . Lacenoire fnfqucn- 
taic la Flotte sans jamaU dire >on vtfriiablc 
nom qu'il gardait, en public — Ati/mtnrtt^U 
Mtntiieur Ciaude. 

Vendre la — , to inform against 
accomplices^ ** to turn sniich," 

Fiotter (popular), ta bathe. Termed 
at the R. M. Academy " to 
losh ;" to swim. (Popular and 
thieves') Faire — , to droum. 

Noui ravon& fait flutter aprts lut avnir 

grinchi la nifgrcsw qu'ellc portatt tious le 
bra*.— E. Sub. 

Flotteur, m. (popular)^ rwimm<r, 

FIou (ibicves'), abbreviation of 
lloutitri!, nothing. J'ai fait Ic — , 
/found nothing to steal, 

Fiouant, «. (thieves*), jfBmr(flouer, 
to swindle). Grand ^, high play. 



Flouckipe — Foetus, 



157 



Flouchipc, m. (popular), nmndier^ 
or *' shark.** From 6oucr and 
chipcr, to swmdU and to prig. 

Floue,/. (ihievcs*), cnnvd^ "push 
or scuff.** The anajfram of foulc, 
crmody or else from floucr, to 
swtHtiJtt through an auociaticoi of 
ideas. 

Flou^t adj, (general), i-whtdUd, 
tiUttt ittf "sold," *'donc brown." 

Alon. en deux moiv, it leur raconte la 
tccnr, le ln.it^ brOI^, TafTaire fUmh^ , . . 

— Ah ! Ij* drogue . . . J« suU flou^ . , . 
dit Scphura, — A. Dauoet. 

Flouer, /! (jjcncral), ta ehtat^ "to 
do," " to hilk ;" (thieves') to play 
tards^ playing Iwing, with ihicvcs, 
Kj-nonynious of cheating. 

S*)! y avoit dcs biines on pourrait flouer. 

— VlWKQ. 

Plouerie, / (general), swindle, 
•'take in," or "bilk.'* 

La fluueric ctt au vnl ce que ta coane 
CM ^ U m.irche : c'c«t le pmgrift, le pcr- 
fcctionncmcnl scienttfuiue.— Philikin. 

Floueur, m. (thieves'^ card-sharper 
who eutues country folks or stran- 
gers into a cafi tvhtrt, aitUd by 
confederates, ht robs them at a 
sudndling game of cards. 

Floumc. / (thieves'), voman, 
•' muslin,""* or "hay bag." 

Flouliire (thieves*), nothing* 



C'eu (lu'im lie ce« Uii«ian«. un marcan- 
dicf atUucmandcr Uthun« ^ un pipci ct le 
ru|Hancluiftchaquc rluutiirc- -tt /arzim 



tU t'A *t^t, (On* day a mtndicant wmt 
to mi /vr aims at a mmuii/H^ mmJ tk£ 
mmsttrgmvt Aim mothimt.y 

Flu (Breton), thrashing, 

Flubart, jw. (thieves'), y/ar. "funk." 
N'avoir pas le — , to be fearless^ 

Flume, adj, and m. (popular), ^rc 
— , to be phiegmalic ; slmiK 

Flfite, /. (familiar and popular), 
bottle of wine : glass of beer ; 
syringe. Fldtc ! go to the demei 



Ah I flflte !— Ah .' hi voif bien que }e 
fcml^w'— Pourquoif Tum'asdii "nflte I* 
— C>iii, flCite \ t\\\ ' tout or que tu 'v■^udra« ; 
mais 6che-mDi la palx. — £. Montbii^ 
CorMehci*. 

Joucur de — , hospital assistant. 
An allusion to his functions con- 
cerning the administering of clys* 
ters. (Military) Flute, cannon. 
Termed also " brutal, sifflet." 

FlQtencul, m. (popular), an apothe- 
cary^ or "clyster pil>e'" Spelt 
formerly Sutencu. The Diction- 
naire Comique hu the follow- 
ing :— 

Pctle ftoit du courteau dc boutique d du 
fluleacu.— /'jA*fx Comiquet. 

FlQter (familiar and popular), to 
drink. See Rincer. Fluter, /* 
give a clyster. The Dictionnaire 
Comifjue (1635) has the phrase, 
Se iaire ^ au dcnifcre, " fa^on 
de parler burlesque, pour dire, sc 
faire donner un lavement." En- 
voycr — , to send to the detne. 
C'est comme si vous flutiet, it is 
no use talking. 

FlQies, / /*/■ (popular), lej^s, or 
"pegs. Termed also fliites i cafe. 

Fort dc* flOtet el de la pioce. 
II tfuit rcipecu!, N&vet. 

RicHcriM. 

Astiqucr ses — , to dance, " to 
shake a leg." Jouer dcs — , /« 
run, ** to cut." Se tirer les — , /p 
run axtfay, **to hop the twig.** 
See Pal a trot. 

FlQtiste, m. (popular), hospitai 
attendant. 

Flux, m. (popular)^, avoir le — , /« 
be a/raid. Literally /i? be suffer- 
ing from diarrhata. 

Fluxion, f, (popular), avoir une 
— , to be afraid, " to be funky." 

Fcetus. «., first year student at tkt 
military school of surgtry. 



158 



Fogner — Forh-notre. 



Fogncf (popular), to tase otiael/^ 
to CO /i* M(f '• crapping ken." See 
Mouscailler. 

Foie, m. (popular), avoir du — , to 
bi ccura.cfous, j^iu<l!y, to have 
•' hackle." Avoir les foies blancs, 
to he a catvarj, a * • cow's babe. " 

Poin, m. (popular), fairc du — , to 
make a notse, *' to kick up a 
row ; " to hustU about ; to dance. 

Foire, / (popular and thieves'), 
acheler ii la — d'empnigne^ to 
ttealt "to claim." See Grinchir. 
Koire, faif^ and cmpoigncr, to 
seiu, 

Foiron, m. (popular), behind. From 
foire, diarrh<ta. Sec Vaaistas. 

Fonci, adj. (popular), u>eU off^ 
'»wcU ballasted." See Mona- 

C03. 

Foncer (familiar and popular), k 
I'appointement, to fumtsh funds 
{OictionnaireComit/ue). (Thieves') 
Foncer, to give ^ '* to dub." 
Et si terig ti«nt k la boale, 
Foncc u larguo ct qu'ellc aboule, 
Sftn» tiinace oout cambrouMr. 

KlCHEPIH. 

Villon (fifteenth century) uses the 
word with the signiticalion of to 
gii'e Money : — 

U. Scrvon* mnrchitns pour 1a pitance, 

pQur/rvctus xfmtnt, pour la paucc 

B. On y gaiKncmit *k\ dcspeiu. 

M. Ktdcfjnctrf It. nnime asteurance. 

Petite Toy. larjjc con«rience ; 

Tu n'y scej ritns et y aprcns. 

Diaitf^Mt dt Mrtiiturs iit Rfmtdf^afe 
et dt Baittntrnt. 

(Popular) Se — , tobegettingdmnkj 
or "muddled." Sec Sculpter, 

Fond (popular), d'estomac, thie^k 
icut. (Generall Eire 4 — de cale, 
ti» hepfnuHess^ " hard up. " Lite- 
rally to be dffivn in the hold. 

Fondant, ut. (popular and thie\'es*), 
butter^ or '*cow*s grease." 

Fondante,/, (popularand thieves*), 
slice c/ bread and butter. 



Fondre (popular), to grow thin ; — 
la cloche, to settle some piece nf 
btisiness. (Theatrical) Faire — la 
trappe, to lower a trap door. 

Fondri4re. / (thieves'), pock^i, 
'*cly," **sky-rockct,"or "brigh.'* 
Termed also "profondc, fouil- 
lousc, fnuille, four banal, bague* 
naudc. " 

Fonfe, /. (thieves'), suuff-box^ or 
"snecier." 

Fontaine,/ (popular), n'avoir plus 
de cresson sur la — , to be bald ; 
to have "a bladder of lard." 

Fonts de baptime, m. (jxipular), 
sc meUre sur les — , to he involved 
in business from 7vhuA one would 
liJ:e to back out. 

Forage, m. (thieves'), vol au — , 
robbery from a shop. A piece of 
the shutter being cut out, a rod 
with hook affixed is passed through 
the aperture, and the property ab- 
stracted. 

Foreaque, w/. (thieves'), tradesman 
at a fair, 

Forel, m. (popular), (^pointer son 
— , to die, " to kick the bucket." 
Fort;t, y>zo^r\y drill, borer. With 
respect to the English slang ex- 
pression, the Slang Dictionary 
says the real signilication of this 
phraie is to commit suicide by 
hanging, from a method planned 
and carried out by an ostler at an 
ion on the Great North RoacL 
Standing un a but:ket, he tied 
himself up to a beam in the 
stdblc ; he then kicked the bucket 
away from under his feet, and in 
a few seconds was dead. The 
natives of the West Indies have 
converted the expression into 
"kickcraboo." (Thieves') Forct 
de Mont-rubin, seioer. 

Forfit-noire,/. (ihicves*).a ehunh, 
a temple. Termed also " en- 
tonne, rampante," 



Forfante — Fouillcr. 



159 



Fotfante, / (ihicvcs'), hrttg^Hg^ 
Int; talk. An abbreviation of far- 
fan lerie. 

Forgerie, /. (popular), yS>/;cA<wi/, or 
••cram." 

Fort, aJj. (popular), en mie, /»/, 
"cmmmy;" (familiar) — cii 
th^me, <liVfr student, Tlic ex- 
pression is sometimes appi icd 
ironically to a man who is clever 
at nothing else than book-work. 
C'est — dc cafe, it is hard to 
Miew^ it is " coming it loo 
slrong.'* 

C'est un patirre maochot qut «'c*t »p- 

DTOctie dc U vierge. ... El vile a tflemiic ? 
Non, c'* «t \t bnu dii maochot qui « poui»^ 
—cllc c»t fori de c^i, ccUc-U !— K. &(um- 
TRIL. 

Fort*nche,/ (thieves'), y&r///»/. 

Fonifes, / //. (popular), /(»r///f<-a- 
ftoHS ratirii/ f'arist A favourite 
resort for workmen who go for 
nn outing, and a place which 
vngabonds patronize at night. 

i' couch' <iiie'qu'fow dxrii left rortifes J 
lai» vn ii*cnrhuni' <lii cervcax. 
I.'Irnd'ntain. on fail I'chat (|ui r'nifft, 
Kl rUbir CDurconime utv ncf il'v^au. 

RicHuriN. 

Fortification,/, (popular), fw^wMi 
0/ a billiard table, Eire proteg^ 
par les fortifications, to have one's 
bait under the cushion, 

Fortin, w. (thieves'), /<//rr. From 
fort, Strang. 

Fortlnitre, / (thieves'), pepper- 

box. 

Fosse aux lions,/ (familiar). A»jr 
at the opera occupied by men of 

fashion, 

Fossile, m. {VatnTy), a disrespectful 
epithet for the leanud members of 
the A:a*Umie Fran^aise. 

Fou, Oilj, (popular and thieves*), 
abbrevialion of foulu, lost^ dsnt 



Fouailler (familiar and popular), 
to miss one's effect ; to be lathng 
in energy ; to oack out ; to fail in 
business^ ' * to go to smash. 

Fouailleur, m. (popular), mi/ksopt 
a " sappy " /rZ/fftt/ ; a /ibertinef 
or -'rip." 

Fouataison, / (thieves*), stich ; — 
lingr^e, sword-stick ; — masiaree, 
loaded stick. 

Foucade, / (popular), sudden 
thought or action ; whim^ or 
"fad." Travailler par foucades, 
to work by Jits and starts. 

Fouchtra (fnmi)iar), natite of 
Auz'ergite^ generally a ecal retailer 
or xi-ater carrier. Fruui their 
favourite oath. 

Fouette-cul, m. (popular), school- 
master, or " bum brushcr." 

Fouettcr (popular), to emit a ftid 
smell ; — de la carafe, to have an 
offensive breath. 

Tout ceU M fond dant une bu^e de pe«- 
tilence . . , et, CDinme on dit dam c« mf>tid«> 
U, ^ nmue, ^b danse, ^a fmiette, ^a 
Irouitlottc, fa chctipottc, <n ua mot ^a pue 
ftrme.— kicHKriH, L* Faii. 

Fouetteuxde chats, m. (popular), 
a poor simpleton Tt^t/h no heart fi*r 
worl; "a sap or sap&cuIL" 

Foufiire, /. (thieve*'), u-atck, 
"tatler, toy, or thimble." 

Fouille, / (popular and thieves*), 
pikket^ " sky'rocket, cly." 

Fouille-au-tas. m. (popular), nj^ 
picker^ or "lot tinder.*' 

Fouille-merde, m. (impular), sea* 
xenger einploved in emptying 
itispools^ "gold Andcr ;" also a 
very inqinsitite matt. 

Fouiller (familiar and popular), 
pouvoir M — , to be comptUed to 
do without ; to be certain of not 
getting. Also expressive of ironi- 
cal refusal. Si vou:; croyez qu'il 



i6o 



FouiUes — Fourckctte, 



va v-ni.s prcter cellc somme, tous 
pouvrt vou* — , tf you nxkoH en 
Mis UnJing you that sum, you wiU 
havt to do without it, Tu peux 
Ic — , y^u shall mV haXH it ; you 
bt han^dl 

Miidiinir, (lalipivrrr-vout mcccptcr mon 
bra<T— lu peux le fouiller, cftlicotl — 1'. 

MAIIAt-tN. 

Pouilles, /. //. (popular), dcs — ! 
if ixpressivt of refusal ; may be 
rendered by the American "yes, 
in a horn. ' For synonyms see 
Nifles. 

Fouillouse,/. (thieves'), /(vX^/, or 
" cly. " The word is old. Rabe- 
lais has '*Plusd'aubcrtn*estoitcn 
foiiillouse." 

Fouinard, m. (popular), cunniHg, 
sly man; a tricky "dodger;" 
(ou'anl^ox "cow'sbabc." Termed 
in old French tapineux. 

Fouiner (nopular), to Jtlay the spy, 
or Paul Fry; to euape, "to 
mizzle. " 

Foulage, m. (popular), a^eat tieal 
of xcori\ inuih "graft or elbow 
grease." 

Poulard rouge, w. (popular), 
woman* s bully ^ " pensioner." For 
synonymous exprcsston& see Poia- 
son. 

Fouler (familiar), se la — ^to work 
hard. Ne pas se — le poignet, 
to take it easy* 

Pu tonncrre si Ton me repince ^ I'cn- 
cluinc ! voita cinti joiin qae jc me la foule, 
je puu bicii Ic lalAnccr . . . I'il nie &che 
un ahauge, ^c rcnroie & ChaUloL — Zola, 
ti'AiMommMr, 

Foultitude, / (popular), mauy^ 
muih, "neddy*' (Irish). 

Four, w, (familiar), _/Ij/7k'v. Faire 
— , to ht unsuicessful. Un ^ 
complci, a dead failure. (Thea- 
trical) Four, the upper part of th* 
house in a theatre. An allusion 
to the heatcJ atniosphcrp, like 



that of an oven ; (popular) 
throaty or "gutter lane." Chauf- 
fer Ic — , to eat or tiring. (Thifvei') 
Un — bannl, an omnibus^ or 
"chariot ; " a pa.-kel^ or "cly." 

Pourailler (thieves'), to sell ; to 
barter, "to fence." 

Fouraillis, m. (thieves'), house of 
a receiver of stolen property ^ of a 
"fence." 

Fourbi, w, (thieves*), the proceeih of 

stolen property ; (popular and mili- 
tary) more or less uulmtful profits 
on prot'isioHS and stores^ or other 
gwnij ; doi/^e : routine of the de- 
tails of some trade or profession. 

Puis il faiuiit sa toum^c. . . • rdiabliuaii 
d'un coup dc putafi ou d'une fccoumc la 
*>'m^iric d'ua jpKC ile lit, en vieux kvlilat 
Sort) dc& raiiK^ ct 'tui cuniuiit Ic fuurbi du 
metier. — G. Culrtelikk. 

Connaltre le — , to f>e wide-mmke, 
"to know what's o'clock." Du 
— , goods and chattels^ or " traps,** 
termed "swag" in Australia; 
furniture^ OTirt'dWc/, or "marbles." 

Voili ce que c'csit d'avoir tani de fourbi, 
dit un ouvner . . . lui ausd, il a dtJcncfoait^ 
. . . emportant louie u tmata clan<> una 
charrette 'a braii. — Kichrpin, /-c /'ai-/. 

(Popular) Fourbi, occupation, A 
ce — la on ne s'enrichit pas, etie 
does not get rich at thai eccupalion, 
at that game, 

Fourcandifcre,/ (thieves'), ^pouser 
la — , to get rid of stolen property 
by casting it away when pursued. 

Fourche A faner, f (thieves'), 
horseman. 

Fourchelte, /l (military), bayonet. 
Tiavailler a la — , to fight with 
cold iteel. (Popular) Marquer a 
la — , is said of a tradesman who 
draws up an incorrect aceuunty t4 
his own advantagey of course, 
(Thieves') Vol k la — , dexterous 
way of picking a pocket with lw$ 
fingers only. 



Fourchettes — Fourohi, 



\6\ 



Fourchettes,/. //. (popular), /«- 
gen, ' ' dooks ; " /ty;, ' ' pins : " 
— d^Adani, fin^n. Jouer des 
— , to run oTfdy, *' to hop the 
twig." Sec Patatrot. 



«. (thieves'), ox, or 




Fourchu, 
" moocr. " 

Fourgat,orfourga8Be,in. (thieves'), 
rt(eiv€r of stolen fftod St or *' fence." 

Le p^re \'c»ttain ^tait c« qu'oo appclla 
dan* f'arxot dev voleun un foiirgat (rece* 
IcurX — M^mciret dt Motuifur Cittudt. 

Pourgatte, / {\\\\cve%\ femaft re- 
cfiver pf stoUn goods ^ " fence." 

Vien« avec moi chex nui fonrgvtte, je 
suift ftOr fju'cllt nnus prfteraquaire ou cinq 
luntt de cioq ballci (pi^ci de cinq francs). 
— ViuocQ. 

Fourgature, /. (thieves'), stock ef 
stolen prof erty for sale, 

Fourgonnier, m. (ihieves*), canteen 
man at the transport settlement, 

Fourgue, m. See Fourgat. 

Fourguer (thieves'), to sell, or " to 
do;'' to sell or buy stolen property, 
** to fence." 

£Ue ne fottrffue que d« la bbnqnette. 
de* bogncs et ucs broquilles (ttle n'tcbite 
que de rarsenterie, da niotiirci ct dct bi- 

JOUS). — ViDOtQ. 

FourgueroleB, f, pi. (thieves'), 
stolen property, "swag." Laver 
les — , or la camcloile, to sell 
stolen property, 

Fourercjr, m. (thieves* and cads'), 

sell^, hawker; — de flanchcs, 

who goes about offering for 

prohibited articles, suck as 

c^atn indecent cards called 

cartes transparentes,^ or con- 

aband lucifer matches, the right 

if manvfaeture and sale of which 

ts a monopoly granted by gffiem' 

ment to a single company. 

Fourline, fourlineur.m. (thieves'), 

thief **pHg." For synonyms see 

Ormche. 



Fourliner (thieves'), to steal, "to 
nick ; " to pick pockets, *' to bui 
acly." 

Fourlineur, m. (thieves'), pich 
pocket, or *' buz-fakcr." 

Fourloure, m. (thieves'), sick man, 

Fourlourer (ihievcs*), to murder. 
See Refroidir. 

Fourloureur, m. (thieves*), mtnr^ 

derer. 

Fourmillanie,/ (thieves'), tfrtfrw/, 
••pu5h."or''^scufr." 

Fourmiller [s\\\t\c%^), to mar^^ about 
in a erovMifor the purpose of pick- 
ing pockets. Termed by English 
thieves "cro&sfanning. 

Pourmillon, m. (thieves'), market; 
— a gayets, horse fair ; — aa 
betirre, Stock Exchange, Literally 
mon^ markets 

Pourneau, m. (popular), fool, or 
"duffer;" zagithonJ who sleeps it% 
the open air; term of contempt. 
Va done eh I — t go along, you 
'•bally fooL" 

ilui dU : de t'voir j'tuis tiM, 
Ikis ]«* feux d'l'ainour ; dUco. 
Quoi, a'llit-cU' : t'a\ m^m' plus d'brmtH 1 
Vft done, vietu foumcAu f 

Muiie-kait Somf, 

Foumier, w. (popular), Vfaiter 
whose fund ions are to four out 
coffee for the customers. 

Fournil, m, (popular and thieves'), 

bed, " doss,'* or " bug walk.'* 

Foumion, m. (popular), insect, 

Foumir Martin (popular), to wear 
furs. Martin is the French equi- 
valent for Hniin. 

Fourobe,/. (thieves*), w^ia«/iii^ 
of convie^s clothes, *' ruling over. 

Fourobi (thieves'), one who has 
btrn searched, or " turned over.'* 



1 62 



Fonroher — Foutre. 



Fourober (thieves'), to search on 
one's person^ " to frisk," or " to 
rule over." 

Pourquer. See Fourguer. 

FouiTcau, m. (familiar), lady*s dress 
which fits tightly and shmus the 
figure; (popular and thieves') 
trousers^ ''hams, sit'Upons^ or 
kicks." Jemesuiscarmed'unbate 
— , I have bought for myself a fine 
pair of trousers. 

Fourr6e, adj. (thieves*)i pi^e — , 
coin which has been gouged ffui. 

Fourrer (familiar and popular)^ se 

— le doigt dans Toeil, to be mis- 
taken ; to labour under a delusion^ 

A la fin c'est vexant, car je voU dair, ib 
ont I'air de me croire mat ilcvie ... ah ! 
bien 1 mon peiit, en voil^ qui se fourrent le 
doigt dans focil.— Zola, Nana. 

Se — le doigt dans I'oeil jusqu'au 
coude, superlative of above. S'en 

— dans le gilet, to drink heavily^ 
••to swill." 

Fourrier de la loupe, m. (popular), 
lasy feliotOt or *' bummer ; " 
loafer; roysterer, "merry pin." 

Fourrures, /. //. (familiar), see 
Pays ; (fishermens*) plug used for 
stopping up holes in a boat, 

Foutaise, /. (popular), worthless 
things or *' not worth a curse ; " 
nonsense^ or "fiddle faddle;" 
humbug. Tout 9a c'esl d'la — , 
ihat^s all nonsense, "rot." 

Fouterie, J. (popular), nonsense, 
"rot." C'esl de la — de peau, 
thafs sheer nonsense. 

Foutimaceft foutixnaaser ([>opu- 
lar), to do tvorthless work ; to talk 
nonsense. 

Foutimacier, foutimactire (po- 
pular), unskilled workman or 
workwoman ; silly person, or 
"duffer." 



Foutimasaeur. See Foutima- 
cier. 

Foutoir (familiar and popular), 
house of ill fame, " academy ;" </m- 
reputable house ; — ambulant, cab. 

Foutre (general), a coarse expres- 
sion which has many significations, 
to give ; to do ; to have connection 
with a woman, &*c. ; — du tabac, 
to thrash. See Voie. Foutre 
dedans, to impose upon ; to ini- 
prison, 

£t 4u*& la 6n, le chef voutait m'fuut* de- 
dans, en dtsant que je commensals k I'em- 

bdttr. — G. COURTELINE. 

Foutre le camp, to be off; to de- 
camp, "to hook it." 

Chargez-vous 9a sur les ^paules et foutei 
le camp, qu'on ne vous voie plus. — G. 
COUETELINS. 

Foutre, to put ; to send. 

Pa'c'que j'aime le vin, 
Norn d'un chien ! 
Va-t-on pas m'fout' au bagne. 

RlCHBflN. 

Foutre la paix, to leave one alone. 

Vous refusez formellement, c'e&t bien en- 
tenduP'Formellement ! Foutez-nous la 

paix.— G. COURTBLINB. 

Foutre un coup de pied dans les 
jambes, to borrow money, " to 
break shins ; " — une pile, to 
thrash^ " to wallop." See Voie. 
Foutre la misere, to live in 
poverty. 

II ajoutait . . . que, sacn^i^ \ la gamine 
^tait, Bussi, trop jolie pour foutre la misere 
i son Sge.— Zola, L'Assommoir. 

En — son billet, to assure one of 
the certainty of a fact. Je I'en 
fous mon billet or mon petit tur- 
lututu, / give you my word 'tis a 
fact, " my Davy " on it. Ne pas 
— UD radis, not to give a pettny. 
N' en pas — un clou, un coup, or 
une secousse, to be superlatively 
idle. 

Ces bougres Ik sont tfpatants, ib o'en 
foutraient pas tine secousse h\ on avait le njal- 
heur de !«■( laisser faire.— G. Couktbline. 



Foiitrt — Fracasst*. 



tSj 



Sc — dc quclque chose, n^ to 
tare a ttruxa^ *' a hang/* /cr, Se 

— de quelqu'un, not to care a 
straw for om ; to iaugh at one ; /* 
make game o/one» 

Hein ? Bosc n'ot pu I^T Em cc qu'il 
M foul de moi, ^ U fio !— Zoui, jVama. 

Se — du peuple, du public, /a di$- 
regard^ to set at defianre peopU*s 
opinion ; to make game of peopie, 
he — par tcrrc, to fall, Sc — mal, 
to dress hadty. be — une partie 
de billard sur le torse, to play bil' 
iiardSt or "sjxxtf.*' Sc — an 
coup de tampon, to fight, S'en 

— commc de Colio Tampon, n^ 
to (are a straw. Sc — une bosse, 
to de anything, or indulgt in any- 
thing to fjieets. (Military) Foutrc 
au clou, to imprison^ *• to roost." 

Comme qa on i»ou» fout >u clou?— Ce« 
probable, tlil k bngadiet-— G. Colrtb- 
LIKK. 

Foutre t an ejeuulatitm of anger^ 
astonishmeHtt or used tu am ex- 

pletfx>e, 

AH ! 9^, foutre ! parlenx-vout? Etes> 
vou« uDc bnit«, oui ou aou T — G. Coubtk- 



FoutrcAU, «. (popular), rov;, or 
"shindy; " fghi. 

Oh ' il va T avoir tlu Toutreau, le com- 
Rundafii i'est frott^ l«i maiiu.— Balzac 

Foutriquct, m. (familiar and ]x>pu- 
lar), expressive of contempt : di' 
rninutrve man ; despuable adver- 
sary. The appellation was applied 
as a nickname to M. lliicrs by 
the insurgents of 1871. 

Foutro. w. (military), a^m^ /Ajjri/ 
in military hospitals. A hand- 
kerchief twisted into hard kooLs 
and termed M. Lcfouiro, is laid 
on a table, and taken op now and 
then to be used as an instmmenC 
of pUDi&hment ; any offence against 
M. Lefoutro being at once dealt 
with by an application of bis re- 



presentative to the outstretched 
palm of the culprit. 

Holte au J«u t par fordre du rot, je d^ 
cofuigne M, t^ouiro. . . . Voire nuio, 
coupable. L'intcrnelK tendit U main daa* 
Ittquelle Laffrappe lanfa k tour de bn» iroU 
^norsKt coups a« footro, acconip«gii& d« 
c« pBiuln ■acninirntclles : fauic faJte, 
Caote fc. payer, neo ^ rcdaincr, r^clamez- 
voust . . . Out, monsieur, je reclame. Eh 
bim, . . . c'rst pftTDtque vuui avcz levj lc« 
ycuK. . . . C^^cait une imnoliteAic It r(;i;anl 
d« M. Lefoatro, ct M. Lefoutro ne vcut 
pai qua voui lai fflanguiei de respect.— 
I'. CutRTKUNK, Le* Gaietfs dt t'Eu^ 
drom.. 

Foutu, odj. (general),/!*/ ,- made; 
had ; wretehed ; unpleasant ; 
mined ; lost^ ^c. 

La police \ dit-clk toute blancbe. Ah t 
nom o'un ctiien X pas dc cKance 1 . . . Bout 
foutucs !— Zola. A«im>, 



Foattt, given. 

Qu'est-ce aui m'a foutu un brigadier 
conime ^ ! V ous n'avo pas de home . . . 
d« Missa voire pelotoo daas Ba ^tat parciL 

— G. COURTELINK. 

n s'est — k rire, he bfgan to 
laugh. On lui a — son paquct, 
he got reprimanded; dismissed 
from his employmtnt^ or ' ' got the 
sack." Un bomme mal — or — 
comme quatre »ous, a badly dressed 
or elumsily built man. Un tra- 
vail mal — , clumsy work, C'cst 
un honime — , he is a ruined man, 
" on his beam ends." II est — , »/ 
isall up with him,** done (or.** Un 
— cheval, a sorry nag, a *' screw." 
Un — temps, wretthed weather. 
Une foutue affaire, a wretched 
business. Une foutue canaille, a 
sxamp. (Thieves') C'cst un — 
flanchct, it is a bad Job, an ttn- 
lucky ezent. 

Pouyou (theatrical), urchin; (fa- 
miliar) — ! you cad I you **s»idc 
baJIy bounder." 

Fracass*, adj. (thieves'), (/r^-zW/j* 
a coat. From un frac* a frock' 
coatf drets coat. 



t64 



Fracasser — Frangtiettkr, 



Fracasser (popular), quclqu*un, to 
abuse onCy ** to slang one ; " to ill' 
use one^ " to maa-haiidle." Litc- 
lally to imask. 

Fraction. / (thieves*), bursary, or 
"busting." 

J'ai priit du poison tant tiue j'ai pu, 
c'est vrai I Jam^U je D'ai coinmts de fnc< 
tioo \~MftHoirti Je Mamsitur Claude. 

Fracturer(ponular),sc la — ^torun 
away, "to hop the twig." See 
Patatrol. 

Fraiche,/. (thieves'), cellar. 

FraiB, adj. and m. (familiar and 
popular), ironical, good ; fine. 
Vous voilk — , here you are in a 
sorry flighty in a fixy in a 
*'hoIe/' C'cst lA I'ouvrflge? il 
est — 1 Is that the work f a fine 
piece of uiork / Arretcr les — , to 
stop doing a thing. From an ex- 
pression used at billiard rooms, to 
stop the expenses for the use of 
the table. Mellre quelqu'un au 
— , to imprison. Literally to put 
in a cool place. 

Fralin, w., fraline, / (thieves'), 
brother; sister; chuiUy *' Ben cull." 

Franc, adj. and m. (thieves'), ae- 
complieey or " stalUmaa ; " l<nv ; 
frequented by thieves ; faithful. 

Ce«t Jcan-I^Di«, un boa catinC ; loU 
trant]iiiUe, il cat franc. — VidOCiJ. 

Un — de maison, receiver of stolen 
property, or "fence;" landlord 
of a thieves* lodging-house^ or 
*' flash ken." Un — mijou, or 
mitou, a z-agibond sufferings or 
pretending to suffer^ from sonu ail- 
menty and toko mokes capital of 
such ailment. Mcssiere — , bour- 
pms or citiien. 

En raUant not f^ambades, 
Up graod mcstiire franc 
VouTant fiurc parade 
Scire un t>oguc d'orieni. 

VlDOCQ. 

(Military) Ccst — , well and good; 
that's ah right. 



Franc - carreau, m. (prisoners*)* 
punishment which canstitsin being 
compelled to sleep on the bare fioor 

of the cell. 

Francfilcr (familiar and popular), 
was said of those who left Paris 
duritig the war, and sought a place 
of sajety in foreign countries, 

II n'avait pas voulu francfilcr prndaDt le 
iicge,— E. MoNTKiL, CffnuMs. 

Franc-fileur, m. (familiar), oppro' 
briouf epithet applied to thou who 
left frame during the war, 

Franchir (ihievci'), to hiss. 

Francillon, m., francillonne, f. 
(thieves'). Frenchman : French- 
woman ; friendly. Lc baibaudicr 
de casta cst-il francillon ? Is the 
hospital director friendly I 

Franc-niitou, m. (thieves*). See 
Franc. 

Franco (cads' and thieves'), c*est 
— , it is ail right ; all safe. Gaf- 
finc lago, c'cst — , y a pas de 
tr6pe, look thcre^ it is au safe, 
there's nobody, 

Franfots (thieves'), la faire au pire 
— , to rob a man by securing a 
strap round his neck, and lifting 
him half-strangled on one*s shout- 
derSy while an accomplice rijies his 
pockets, 

Frangin, m. (popular and thieves'), 
brother; term of Jriendship ; — 
dab, untie. Mon vieux — , old 

fellow I "old ribitone 1" 

Frangine,/ (thieves' and popuUirX 
sister ; — dabuche, aunt. 

On U cornalt, la vache qui nou^ a fail 
Iraire ! C'c&t ta vierge d« ^.tint-Laxare, 
ta fruneine du meg I . . . 11 e«i in:ip ^ la 
Couie, Te frJingin I C*e*c an lour de l& 
fmnginc maintetiant jl avoir v>q aiout* — 
MiMoirtt dt Mensieur CtAudt, 

Frangir [thieves*)^ to break. 

Franifuettier, m, (thieves'), card- 
sharper, or '* broadsman." 



Fraon val-^Fricoteu r. 



i6s 



Frscnval (Breton), to exapt* 
Frapouille. See Fripouille, 
Frarpart, »«. (thieves'), pirc — , 
a hammfr. 

Frappe, /. (popular), a Vfotihias 
ftilow ; a scamp^ 

Unt fnppc d< BcauvaU qui voodnut 
plumrr tous les ru pliu. —Crt </m Ptu^U, 
iVUn. tBS6. 

Frappe • devant, m. (popuUr), 

sUiigi-hammrr, 
FratemeUadoB, or inseparables, 

»i, pi. (popular), a'^n soidatfw& 

for three ious. 

Fraudeur, m. (ihicvcs*), butcher. 
Frayau (popular), il fail — , ii is 

Fredaines,/^ pi, (thieves*), ttcien 
proptrty. 

Si tu vetix marcber en ^claircor vt vetur 
aVBC nou* juMjuc dans U me SaiM'S^bas- 
tico, oil nout alloM d^|>o«cr cofredftincsi 
tu aunj too fade.— Vit>ocQ. 

Frcgate,/. (popular), Sodomiti* 

Frelampier. S«e Ferlampfer. 

Frimillante. See Fourmillante. 

Frimion, m. (thieves'), vtWin. 

Frire (familiar), ct ami, lietHagcgut ; 
(thieves') — dc la c6tc, see 
Bande noire ; — de la roanicle, 
convict, (Military) Gros — , ati- 
rassier. (Sailors') Vieux — la 
cote, old chum. 

)t ftuift ton vIeux Trire la cdic, moi, tl Ja 
t'aime, Tuyoiu, bun uuig '. — Kichri'IN, L.a 

OiM. 

(Roughs*) Les freres qui aggri- 
chenl, th* dctectha. Les frires 
qui en gnilteni, rope dancers. Les 
freres qui en mouillent, acrobats; 
"en niuuiller "having the signiA- 
cilton of perfonning nome extra- 
ordinary leal which causes one to 
sweat. 

Frirot de la cagne, w. (thieves'), 

fttlffiv-thief^ or " family man." 



Freschteak. w. (military), pi§a wf 

meat ; itetc. 

Eh ! eh ! OQ te nonrrit bien id : . . . d'oJk 
ave«-votu tir^ ce frrschteakf 0& dtable a-t> 
il trouvtf ^ chaparder dc la viaodc, ca 

roMard ur— Hkctor FnAMca. Sou* k 
Bmmctu. 

Fressure, /. (popular), hearty or 
'*pantcr. Properly piuck er 

FritilUnte,/ (thieves*), //« ; taii ; 
dance. 

Fritille, fertillante. fertille, /. 
(thieves'), t/nrwt or *'strommeL'* 

Fritiller (thieves'), iff dance. 

Fretin, m. See Fortin. 

Friauche, m. (thieves'), /hief^ prig, 
or "crossman," sec Gnnche; 
coniict under a deaih-sentcfue who 
appeais. 

Fricasse (popular), on l*cn — ,«- 
pTcssii-e of tronicat rt/nsa/^ or, as 
the Americans say, "Yes, in a 
horn!" SeeNAfles. 

Fricassee,/ (popular), thrashings 
•* wallopping." Sec Voie. 

Fricaaser ses meubles (popular), 
te stH one's fumisure. 

Fricasaeur, m, (popular), spend- 
thrift ; libertine^ ox "rip." 

Fric-frac, wr. (thieves*), breaking 
oyVM, or " busting." Faire — , M 
break into, "to bust." 

Fricbti, m. (popular), stew with 
potatoes. 

Fricot, m. (popular), s'endormir 
sur le — , to reiojc one^s exertions ; 
to allow an undertaking to flag, 

Fricoter (military), to shirk gn^s 
milita ry dutks, 

Fricoteur (military), marauder ; 
anexirho shirks dtUy, who oniy cartf 
ahut good living. 



i66 



Frigousse — Frire un rigoh. 



FrieouBse, /. (popular), food^ or 
" prog ; " stiw* 

C^uut trop rjuan, fa prouTait 06 con- 
duuait t'amouT d« U fngouwe. Au rencart 
let gourmuidei ! — Zola, L'Atsommoir. 

Frigousser (popular), to eook, 

Frileux, m. (popular), ^lirtcm, 
"cow-babe." 

1^ luu un ferUmpier qui n'cit pu frileiu. 
—£. Sue. 

Frimage, m. (thieves*), appearing 
before the magistrate, or in presence 
ofap^secutor, for itUntifictUion, 

Frime,/ (thieves'),/ir«, or "mug." 

Avec un' frim' comm* j'en ai one, 
Un nuuiol sait trouver d'U ihune. 
RiCHKPiN, La Cfuuuon dtt Gueux, 

Moliire uses the word with the 
signification of grimace : — 

Pourquot toutes ces fiimes-U ^ — Le 
Mf/t/ectH malgri Lui, 

Frime k la manque, ugly face; 
face of a one-eyed person^ termed 
'* a seven-sided animal," as, says 
the Slang Dictionary^ he has an 
inside, outside, left side, right 
side, foreside, backside, and blind 
side. Tomber en — , to meet face 
toface^ (Popular) Une — ^ false' 
hood ; trick, 

Quelqnc frime pour se faire donner du 
I ah t il allait Be renseigner, et si ella 
! — Zola, VAstommoir. 



Frimer (thieves'), to peer into on^s 
face* Faire — , to place a prisoner 
in presence of a prosecutor for pur- 
pose of identifcation, (Popular) 
rrimer, tomakeaff>odappeaiance; 
to look well; to pretend. Cet habit 
frime bien, this coat looks well, 
lis friment de s'en aller, they pre- 
tend to go away. 

Frimousse, / (thieves*), figure 
card. (Popular) C'est pour ma 
^, that*s for me. Literally /A^* 
tiognomy. 



FrimouBser (card- sharpers*), to 
swindle by contriving to turn up 
the figure cards. 

Frimou8Beur(card-sharpers'),farrf. 
sharper^ •* broadsman. 

Fringue, / (thieves*), article of 
clothings ' • clobber." ( Popular) 
Les fringues, players at a game 
called *' Tours." These stand up- 
right in a knot at the centre of a 
cm:le, face to face, with heads 
bent and arms passed over one 
another's shoulders so as to steady 
themselves. The business of other 
players outside the circle is to 
lump on the backs of those in the 
knot without being caught t^ one 
called "le chien " or 'M'ours," 
who keeps running about in the 
circle. 

Fringuer (thieves'), se — , to dress 
oneself *'to rig oneself out in 
clobber." 

Fripe,/. (popular), /W, "prog." 
From the old word fripper, to eat ; 
cooking of food ; expense ; share tn 
the reckonings or *' shot ; " — 
sauce, eooky or " dripping." Faire 
la — , to cook, 

Fripier, m. (popular and thieves'), 
eook^ or ** dripping ; " master of 
an eating-house, of a *'carnish 
ken." 

Fripouille, f (familiar), rogue; 
scamp. From fripe, rag. Tout 
ce monde lii c'est de la — , these 
people are a bad lot. 

FriqucB,///. (thieves*), rags, 

Friquet, m. (thieves'), spy in the 
employ of the police^ "nark," or 
"nosc.**^ 

Frire un rigolo (thieves'), to pick 
the pockets of a person while em- 
bracing him, wider a pretence 0/ 
mistaken identity. 



Frischti — Frusqn iner. 



Frischti, m. (inililarj), dainty food; 

itr.v. 

Prist, m. (popular), y<fw', "shcney," 
or "mouchey." Termed also 
" youtre, picd-pUt, ga'iDad." 

Prisque. m. (popular), eold. 

Le rnM]ue du nuiio, qui ravigou le 
«f»g. qui cijigle la vie. — Richehk, L» 
/■.It-/. 

Pris8«nte. /. adj. (nilors*), uitk 
j^fttU vippUi. 

La mi n Mt pas toujoun r£chc c«n«c une 

ctrillt. 
Vois, die cMi douce, un pcu Irisumic. mais 

pai plus. 

RiCHiPiM, La Mtr. 

Pritcs, _/!//. (popular), forpommn 
de Icrre fritn, /riid potsUoti. 
Termed " greasers " at the R. M. 
Academy. 

Friturer (popular), /« cook, 

FrivoUste. 17/. (!iterar>')t light writir; 
contributor ^ for tHitanee ^ to a jour- 
nal cf fashion, 

Proisaeux, adj. (popular), traitor^ 
' ' cat -in - the - pan ; " standettr. 
From froUscr, to hurt eni$ 
feflimgs. 

Proliant, wi. (thieves'), ///im//-r/r; 
tiaitor, one who ** turns snitch." 

Froller (thieves'), sur la balle, to 
slamUr one. From the old word 
froler, to thrash^ to injure. 

Fromgibe, m. (popular), eheeu. 

Front, m. (popular), avoir le — 
dans le oiu, to ht htddy to he 
"stag- faced." 

Froteska,/. (popular), thnuMiu/r^ 
"tanning," or "hiding." Sec 
Voie. 

Frolin. m. (popular), billiards, or 

"spoof." Coup dc — , garne of 

hiUiards. Flancher au — , to play 
billtards. 

Frolte,/ (popular), Uth. 



Frottie, f, (familiar and pouular), 
thrashing, or " lickii^ See 
Voie. 

Cinq ou «ix imatclob de rAIfaalrtM fureni 
attaqoifa psr unc di»tn« dc tnatini dn 
Mar>'*-^'"* <* re^urcni une dcs plu* ve'o^ 
rabies ftuitit* dout on cAt oul parler »ur la 
c6le du Pacifique.— J. CLaatTia. 

Frotter (gamesters*), sc — au bon« 
hcurdequelou'uii. Thecxprcssion 
is explained oy the following quo- 
tation : — 

Le joaeur eM «upentilten>, Q crml an 
fftitrhc. Un boMM facne-t il, on voit dcs 
pontes ftchan»<s ftc grouper autour de lui 
pour lui toucher «a bo«u et m rrotieri too 
Lonhcur. A Vichjr, lc« Juucurt tonl nuinis 
dc paltcs dc iapin puur toucher d^iicate- 
tncni le do« de» hcureut du upU verc. — 
MimMrtt it* Mtnaitur Claude. 

Froufrou, m, (thieves'), master-key, 

Frouase, / (popular and thieved), 

diarrhati ; fear, 

ai fail chibia. J*avai% la froutse 
cs prtfreciatKiers de Paniin. 

kuHapiM. 



t: 



FnictidoriBer(familiar), tosuppress 
one's poiitieai adversaries by vio' 
lent means, ruek as tramportatix^n 
•wholesale. An allusion to the l8th 
Fructidor or 4ih September, 1797. 

Fruges, f. pi. (popular), more or 
less laxvfHl profits oh sales ly shop- 
men. English railway ticket- 
clerks give the naincnf '* flull " to 
profits accruing fium&hort change 
given by them. 

Frusquc,/. (popular), eoat, '* Ben- 
jamin." 

Frusques,///. (general), clothing, 
*'toggery," or "c!obl»er;'* — 
boulinccs, clothes in tatter*. 

On allaii . . . choim lea fruKjue* ches 
MiloD, uui avail des couumea moiiu bnl- 
lanta.— t. MuNTEIL. 

Frusquioer (popular), « — , to 
dress, "to rig* oneself out. 



1 68 



Fmsquineur — FutaiiU, 



Frusquineur, m. (popular), tailor, 
" siiipi, steel-bar driver, cabbage 
contractor* or button catcher." 

Frusquins.wi. //. (popular), clothei^ 
or "toggery. 

Fuir (popular)t laisscr — son Ion- 
neau, todk. For synonyms sec 
Pipe. 

Fum£, adj. (ramiliar and popular), 
to be in an awful fix ^ past praying 
for^ *' a gone coon." With r^nrd 
to the t-nglish slang equivalent, 
y^t Slang Dictiomryyscj^x "This 
expression is said to have origina- 
ted in the first American War with 
a spy who dre&sed biuiself in a 
racoon skin, and ensconced him- 
self in a tree. An English sol- 
dier, takinc him for a veritable 
coon, levelled his piece at him, 
upon which he exclaimed, * Don't 
snoot, ril come down of myself; 
1 know I'm a gone coon.' The 
Yankees say the Britisher was so 
* flummuxed ' that he flung down 
his musket and ' made tracks * for 
home." The phrase is prcttygenc- 
ral iu England. (There is one diffi- 
culty aljout tills story — how big 
was the man who dressed hmnsclf 
in a racoon kkin?) 

Fumer (popular), to snore^ *Mo 
drive one's pigs to market ;" — 
sans pipe et sarts tabac, to be 
•'rilea; /tj/ww/r. Avoir fume dans 
une pipe ncuve, to feel umaell in 
conse^ucnte of prolonged potaSiens^ 

Fumerie, / (popular), smoking^ 
"blowing a cloud." 

Fumeron, w/. (popular), hypocriUt 
** mawworm." 

Fumerons, m, pi. (popular), legSy 
•'pegs." 

Fumiste, m. (familiar), practical 
joker; humbug. Farce de — « 



practical Joie. For quotation se« 
Farce. (Polytechnic .School) Eire 
en — , to be in civilian*! clothes^ 
"in mufti." 

Fuseauz, m. pi. (popular), Ugs, or 
'* pins." Jouer des — , to run, 
'* to leg it." Sec Patatrot 

II juge qu'il c«l tempi de Jouer del Tu- 
seatii, niaib au moment ofi il le diipoM & 
gaj;ner plu< au pied qu'\ la tai«e . . . te 
carbon le taisit & la gorge.— VioocQ. 

FusAc,/. (popular), Iflcher une — , 
to be sick, •* to shoot the cat." 

Fuser (popular), /« emu ctusei/. 

See Mouscailler. 

Fusil, m. (popular), slamach ; — k 
deux coups, trousers ; — de loilc, 
vallet, Allcr k la chasseavcc un 

— de toile, to beg. Collc-toi 9a 
dans le — , eat or drink that ; put 
that in y-our * ' bread - basket. " 
Ecartcr du — , to spit involimiarily 
when talking. Se rinccr, sc gar- 
gariser le — , to drink, ** to swig." 
tScc RiDCer. Changer son — 
d'cpaulc, to change one's politico/ 
opinions, to turn one's coat. He- 
pousscr du — , to have an offensive 
breath. 

Fusilier (military), to spend money. 
Literally faire parlir scs holies, 
the last word having the double 
signification of bullets, francs; 

— scs invites, to give on/s guests 
a bad dinner ; — le pavrf, to use 
one's fingrrs as a pocket ■handker' 
chief; — le planchcr, to set off at 
a run ; — son [>frse, to spend one's 
money; (thieves') — le fade, to 
give one's share of booty ; to make 
one *' stand in." 

Fuiilleur, m. See Bande noire. 

Fulaille./ (thieves'), vieille — , old 
woman. 



Gabari— Gadotn 



r6g 



Gabari, m. (popular), puser au — , 
to iose a gatiti. 

Gabarit, m. (sailors'), My; breast; 
— sans bossoirs, brtast with thin 

bosomt, 

J'Aime pat bien «on galNirit uni btMAoin. 
Hue a plut6t lair d un motuuiIIoD que 
4 auite cho»«.— Rkhefin, Lm Gim. 

Oabelou, m. (common), a custom- 
house officer^ er one of the 
*' 0<tivC* 

Bras RoDge est cootrebaodier ... 3 s'cd 
vante au ncz dca fabelooa.— £. Sus, l^s 
Myittrti tie Pmris, 

Oicher (popular), serre, to v.'ork 
kard^ " to *.wcat ;'* — du grcs, 
to eau otuself. 

Gadin, m. (popular), eorkj shaiiy 
hat. Flanchcr au — , to play a 
gfimhlin^ kind of gixmr Tviih a cork 
and coim. Some halfpence being 
placed on the cork, the players 
aim in turns with a coin. A 
favourite game of Paris cads. 

Gadouard, m. (popular), scavenger^ 
a" rakc'kennel. * Fromgadouet 
street refuse or mud. 

Oadoue,yi (familiar and popular), 
prostittde. Properly street mud 
or refuse. 

Fik. mon fitfon, roule ta gadoue, moa 
bomtne. {a puc. — CatJfkum* pMMard, 

The slang terms for the different 
varieties of prostitutes are, in 
fnmihar and popular language: 
*' cocotte, dcmi-mondaine, hori- 
zontale, verticale, agcnouillcc, di- 
hanchcc. impure, petite dame, 



lorctte, cnm^Iia, boulerardiire, 
p6che ^ quinre sous, liclle petite, 
»oupeu&e, gtuc, lolo, biche, vieille 
garde (old prostitutt), fillc de trot- 
loir, gueuse, maquillec, ningle, 
pelican, pailletcc, laqueuse, cha- 
meau, membre de la carnvane, 
demi-castor, passe-Iacet, demoi- 
selle du Ponl-Neuf, matelas am- 
bulant, boulonnaisc (twf who plus 
her trade m the Bois de Bouiogne), 
crevetle, trumeau, tratneo&e, fe- 
netricre, trychine, cul crotte, 
omnibus, carcan a crinoline, 
picuvrc, pigeon voyageur.piqueuse 
detrains, marcheusc, morue, fleur 
de macadam, vache k lalt, came- 
lote, roulonte, mocrochcuse, gtf* 
iii&se,almaTiachdcstrente-^ixmille 
adresses, chausson, hirondeUe de 
goguenot, moclonneuse, mal 
peignee, persllleu&e, lard, blan- 
chisifuse en chemises, planche k 
boudin, galvaudcusc, poule, moa- 
cjuetle, poupec, fdle de tourneur, 
hlle de maison or a nuroero, bou- 
tonnicre en pantalons. fitle en 
carte or en brcme, Icselximbc, 
baleine, trainee, demoiselle du bi- 
tumc, vessie, Ijoule rouge {atu ^uho 
walks the Fattbourg Montmartre\t 
voirie, rivctte, fiUe i parties, 
tcrriire, tcrreuse, fcmmc de ter- 
rain, rempardcu»e, grcnier a coups 
de sabre, saucisse, peau. peau de 
chien.v^uvicnne.autcldebesoin, 
ctt^ d'amour, mangeusc dc viande 
cnie, des&alee, punaise, poli<iseuse 
de mats de cocagnc en chambre, 
pompe fun^bre, poHsseusc de 
tuyaux de pipe, pontonniirc, pont 



170 



Gaffe— GaiL 



d'Avignon, veau, vache, blanc, 
feuiUe, lanterae, magneuse, lip^te, 
chAxn^e, bourdon, pierreuse, 
marneuse, paillasse de corps de 
garde, paillasse k troufion, rou- 
leuse, dossiire, fille de barri^re; 
roulore, andre (old word), Jean- 
neton, taupe, limace, waggon, re- 
tapeuse, sommier de caserne, 
femmede cavoisi, prat, sauterelle, 
tapeuse de tal, ma^ee, torchon." 
The bullies of unfortunates call 
them "marmite, fesse, ouvriire, 
Louis, ponife, galupe, lais^." 
Thieves give them the appellations 
of " lutainpem, mSme, ponante, 
cal^e, panucbe, asticot, bourre 
de soie, pantume, nttiire, ronfle, 
eoipeuse, casserole, magnuce, 
rargu^pe,larque,menesse,louille.'* 
In the English slang they are 
termed: "anonyma, prettyhorse- 
breaker, demi-rep, tartlet, mot, 
common Jack, bunter, tiollop, 
bed -fagot, shake, poll, dolly- 
mop, blowen, bulker, gay woman, 
unfortunate, barrack*hack, dress 
lodger, bawdv basket, mauks, and 
quaedam " (obsolete), &c 

Qaffe, m. and f* (thieves'), sentry ; 

thief on the watch, or *'crow;" 

prison warder, or ** bloke." 

Le< gaffes (gardiens) ont ta vie dure. lis 

ttenaent war leun pattes comme des chats 

. . . ai je Fai manqu^ je ne me suis pas 

manqutf, nioi, je luix sdr d'aller ii la butte. 

—Mimoires tU MonsitHr Ciaudt. 

Gaffe \ gail, mounted police ; — 
de sorgue, night watchman ; — des 
machabces, cemetery watchman. 
Etre en — , faire — , to be on the 
watch, "to dick." 
Kiboulct ct moi, nous tftions reat^ en 
CafTe afin de donner I'^vcil ea cms d'aleite. 

— ViDOCQ. 

Grivier de — , soldier of the watch, 
(Popular) GAfCe,f.,iohe; deceit; 
tongue, or " red rag. Avaler «a 
— , to die, "to snuff it." See 
Pipe. Coup de — , loud talking, 
"jawing." Monter une — , to 



play a trtek ; to deceive, " to bam- 
boozle." " to pull the leg." (Fa- 
miliar) Faire une — , to take an 
inconsiderate step; to make an 
awkiaard mistake, " to put one's 
foot in it." 

Oaffer (thieves'), to toatch, "to 
dick ; " to look, " to pipe ; " — la 
mirette, to keep a sharp look-out. 
Gaffe les p^niches du gonse, look 
at that man^s shoes. Gaffer, ta 
cause to stand; to step. 

It fallait faire jsaffer un roulant poor y 
plonquer les paeans (il fallait faire station- 
ncr un fiacre pour y pbcer les paquets;. — 
ViOOCQ. 

Oaffeur, m. (thieves'), man on the 
watch, 

Gaffier, m. (thieves*), pickpocket 
who operates at markets ; warder 
in a prison or convict settlement, 
a "screw." 

Galliner (thieves' and cads'), to 
look a/, " to pipe." GafHne lago, 
la riflette t'exhibe, look there, the 
policeman is watching you, or, in 
other words, "pipe there, the 
bulky is dicking." 

Gafiler (thieves'), to listen atten- 
tively. 

Gaga, m, (familiar), man who^ 
through a life of dcbauchety, has 
become almost an imbecile. 

Gagnie, /. (popular), buxom lady. 

Gahisto, m. (thieves'), the dei-il, 
" ruffin,"or "darble." From the 
Basque giztoa, bad, wicked, accord- 
ing to V. Hugo. 

Gai, adj. (popular), ^tre — , to be 
slightly tipsy, or " elevated." See 
Pompette. Avoir la cuisse gaie 
if said of a woman of lax morality 
who is lavish of her favours. 

Gail, galier, m. (thieves'), horse, 
" prad." Vol au — , horse steal- 
ing, or " prad napping." 



Gaiiiard d trot's tritis — Galimard. 



171 



Oaillard A trois brins, m, (uilon*), 

able satJor ; old tar, 

J'fti tn%-3ill^, nung^i gsgo^ moa pain 

pamii 
Dc« gaillanls ^ iruik briosqui mcirmiuicni 

es inoubAc. 

RrCHCPlN, L» Ster. 

Gaillon. m. (popular and thieves'), 
horst^ '* prad, nag, or tit." 

Oai.loterie,/. (popular), jfaHi. 

Gaimar (popular), ffoi/y ; uHilingly, 

Allutw J — , Ut us look alive ; with 

a -u-'ili! 
Galapiat, galapian, galopiau, 

m. (popular), laiy j<ll^u.'y oc 

" bummer ; " street boy. 

Quelle rifEoIade pour k« gamins ! Et 
I'un do ce» caUpiai^ qui a pcui cue Mrvi 
chex de« HUtimoanques chtpe un cloirun 
ct Boufne dediiu un air dc fuire. — RicHa- 
riN, /.<■ }'€tvi. 

Qalbe, m. (ramiliar), elegance^ dash* 
Etrc Iruffe dc — , ta bi txtremely 
ilej^Htt JnskiH^t or " tsing 
tsirtji." Galbc, literally tlegmtu 
in the curve ofx*QUSy pillars, 

Oalbeux, adj. (familiar), tte^nt, 
daihing^ " tsing Ising." 

Galcrie. /. (familiar), faire — , /# 
be one of a number of lookers-on, 
Parlcr pour la — , to address to a 
person words meant in reality for 
the ears cf oth^rs^ or far the public, 

Galette,/. (fiopular), mcney^ ** tin." 
For synonym* see Quibus. Bou- 
lotler de la — , ta sp:nJ money. 
(Military school of Saint-Cyr) Pro- 
menade — , grnenil marching 
out. Sortie — , gtrntrai holiday, 

Oaleux, m. (popular), the master, 
or •' boil." Propcily one who has 
the Hch. 

Galfitre. m, (popular), idiot ; 
greedy fell<r.o, 

Ccncs il n'^inuit pu le« corbeaux, {a 
lui crevait \k orur de p(>«lcr «n sm ftuics 
k oet galf&irc*-ia qui o'en aviucnl pa> be* 
•oin pout M twiir k gMicr fraii.— Zola, 
V Attammmir. 



Galier, m, (thieves'), korse^ oc 
••prad." 

Galiire,/. (thieves'), mmrt, 

Oalifard. m, (popular), shoemaker^ 
or *'%nob;*' crm«t^(*ff)';(lhicves') 
»ne who is not yet an adept in ths 
art of thieving, 

Galifarde,/. (popular), shop-giH» 

Qalimard, m (artist!^'), se louche ! 
The expression is used in reference 
to a brother artist who extols his 
tfifn self or own productions. For 
the following explanation I am 
indebted to Mr. G. D., a French 
artist well known to the English 
public: — "Galimard sc louche, 
phrase que vous avez lue proba* 
blementdans lous les Rambuteau 
de Paris, a pris origiue dans 
notre ntclict Cognict. Galimard, 
un artiste de quclque talcnl, maJs 
qui se croyait un g«nie, trouvant 

3u'on nc s'occupait pas assez 
e lui, ccrivit sur Ic salon des 
articles fort bicn fails mais par 
trop sev^re& pwur les confreres. 
II avail mis au bas un psciido- 
rymc qudconque. Arrive au tour 
de sa famcuse Leda, il nc tarissait 
pas dVloges sur cette peinture 
vraiment mediocre. HcruII, qne 
ie coonaissais fori bien« d^couvril 
le pot aux rose^ Galimard clait 
son pronre pancgyriste ! J 'arrive 
it Patelier ct je dis : ' Galimard 
se fait jouir lut-m£me, c'est lui 
PaQteur des articies cd question.' 
De IJl, le famcuK * Galimard se 
louche ' expression maintenant 
consacrtfc lomqu'un artiste parle 
tropdelui-mcmc. Ufautajoulerque 
Jes mots fureut ecritsdans tous Ics 
Rambuteau duQuariierduTcmple 
puis, non seulement V PAri<«, mais 
par touie la France. L'empereur 
acfacla la Lcda aprcs unc trnta- 
live crimincllc dc la f>art d'un 
malfaiteur et sur la toile et sur 
Galimard. On fit une eoquctc ci 



V2 



Galioie — Gamhilles, 



Von d^couvrit que le milfaiteur 
n'clait autre que . . . GalimanJ. 
L'affaire en resta W. L& Lcda fut 
placec au Mu&ee du Luxembourgi 
aprcs cicatrisation ties coups dc 
poignard, bien eniendu,*' 

Oaliote, f. (thieves'), conspiracy of 
card-ihurpcts to nvindle a player. 

Galipoter (sailors'), to smear, 

GaUi'bflton, m. (popular), general 
Jight ; great roWy or " shindy." 

GaUi-trac, m. (popular), ^/rjwM, 
"cow's babe." 

Galoche,/. (thie%'es'), chin; (popu- 
lar) a game played with a cork and 
half pence. 

QalotiB, m. pt, (military), d'inih^- 
cile, long-service stripes. Arroser 
MS — , to treat ot»e*s comrades on 
being made a noit'cemmissioned 
officer; to pay for one s footing, 

Galopanie,/. (popular), diarrhaa, 

or " jerry-go-nimble." 
Galops, adj. (popular), i^m kttr- 

riedly, carelessly. 

Oaloper (popular), to annoy; to 
make unvtell. Ca me galope sur 
le sysi^me, or sur le haritoi, tt 
troHt'lcs me ; it makes me ill ; — 
une femme, to make hot lave to a 
woman. 

Oaloptn, w. (familiar), small glass 
of beer at cafes. Had formerly the 
signitication of smalt measure of 
wine. 

Galoubet, m. (theatrical), voice. 
Avoir du — , to possess a good 
voice. Donner du — , to sing. 

En Koinr, les fcu ! AlUquint vivement 
Ic clxrur d'cntr^. Du Koi^ubct ct de 
roiiemWe!— P. Makalin. 

Galouser (thieves'), taxing, "to 

lip." 

GaltoB, m. (sailors'), dixh. Passer 
k — , to eat. (Popular} Galtos, 
mtf/riy, or "pieces." See Quibua. 



Gallron, m. (thieves'), ytffl/. 
Galuche, / (thieves*), braid ; lace, 

Galuch*, adj. (thieves'), braided; 
la^ed. Combriot — , laced hoi. 

Galuchet, m. (popular), the knave 
at cards. 

Galupe, / (thicTcs' and popular), 
street-walker^ " bunter." See 
Gadoue. 

Le4 eaiup's qu'a dea ducatons. 
Nous rincect U d«Dt, aoui let hations. 
RjciiKriN. 

Galupier, m. (popular), man who 
keeps a " galupe/' Sec ihii word. 

Galure, galurin (popular), >&«/, or 
'*lile." Sec Tubard. 

Galvaudage, m, (popular), slan- 
dering of one's money ; pilfering. 

Galvauder (popular), to squander 
one's nh'Hey. Sc — , to lead a dis- 
orderly life. 

Galvaudeuse, / (popular), laty^ 
disorderly woman ; street •ivalker. 
See Gadoue. 

Galvaudeux, w. (popular), lazy 

vagahond^ or "ralT; ' disorderly 

felloiv ; bad workman. 
Gambettes, / //. [popular), legs. 

From the old word gambe, leg. 

Joucr dcs — , to run. See Pata- 

trot. 

Gambier, / (popular), cutty pipe. 
From llie name of the manufac- 
turer. 

Gambillard, w. (popular), aetttft, 
restless man. 

Gambiller (popular), to dance, *'to 
shake a leg." Is used by Moliere 
with the signification of to agitate 
the legs : — 

OuL de 1 e voir gambiller lev Jainb«s en haul 
devaat tout le mondD. — Monauur de Pamr* 
eeau£na£. 

Gambilles,/.//. (popular), fegStOr 

"pins." 



Gambillair — Garde, 



1/3 



Gambilleur, m. {tAmWiAT)^ /v/t'n'eitt 
fuack; {thieves') dancer j — de 
lourtoiue, ropt-daitctr. 

Oambilleuse, / (popular), girl 
•u-ho mata it a tracWt of attend' 
ing dancing halls. 

Gambriade,/ (ihicvcs*), danct. 

Game,/ (thieves'), hydrophobia, 

Gamelad (Breton cant), /tfm'if^rr. 

Gamcler (thieves'), to inform 
against one^ " to blow the gaff." 

GamcUe^ f (sailor^*), aax amours, 
mistrtss. (Popular and thieves') 
Attacher une — , to decampy to 
run away. See Patatrot. 

Gamme, /, (popular), thrashing, or 
" wallopping. Faiic chanter unc 
— , or raontcr one — ^, to thrash, 
•' to lead a dance." See Vote. 
The exprf-s&ion is used by 
Scarrun : — 

Avec Dame Judod a fcmme. 
Qui K>uveiit lui chante U game. 

Ganacbe, /. (theatrical), joaer les 
pere — , to prrform in the cha- 
racter ejf a foolish old fellow. Pro- 
perly gonaclic, an old fool^ *' a 
doddering old sheep's head." 

Gance, /. (thieves'), a gang, or 
•• mob. ' The Slang Dieticnary 
iays " mob " signihes a thief s 
immediate companions ^ as "our 
own mob. " 

Gandille, /. (thieves'), xivordt or 
"pcikef i '^dagger, or *'chc«ry;" 
Antfe^ or •'chtvc." 

Gandin, m. (familiar), dandy^ or 
•'masiher." Lileral'y a frequenter 
of the "Boulevard dc Gand," 
now Boulevard des Italiens. For 
Itiit *"tf iynonymoui expressions 
Kc Gommeux. (Second-hand 
clothcs-mcn's) Ci^rvXxtii fine words 
to attta<i purchasers. Monter un 
— , to entire a purchaser in ; to 
getacHitomer. (Tbieve»*)Gandin, 



a "job " in preparation, or quite 
prepared ; — d'alt^que, the in- 
signia of any order. Hi«ier un 
— , to deceive^ ** to kid," or *' to 
best." Sec Jobarder. 

Gandinerie, /, gandinisme, in. 
(familiar), /fl/TivWi/^'gandins or 
•'swelldom." 

Gandouse, j. (popular), m$id, 
dirt. 

Oannaliser (familiar), fa emlyalm. 
From Gani^al, name of a prac- 
titioner. The expression is little 
used. 

Oant, w. (popular), moule dc — , 
box OH the ear, I'ruperly inould 
for a glove, 

Ganter (cocotte*'), 5|, to he close* 
fisted i — SJ, to he open-hanJed. 

Gantiire,/ (familiar), dixteputahU 
establishment where the female 
assistants make a tho:v of selling 
gloves or perfumery, but where they 
re/ail anything but those articles. 

GantB de pied, m.pl. (military), 

'fooden shoes. 

Garden, m. (popular), k deuK 
mains, slaughterer ; — de bidoche, 
btttcher boy. (Thieves') Gar^nn, 
thiefy "prig. Un brave ^, ah 
expert thief. Un — de campagne, 
or de cambroufe, Mighrvayman, 
Termed formerly la the English 
cant "bridle-cull." 

\m. cognade & gayct servail le iripv pour 
Uiafecr Aboiiler uii< roulotle farfu^ d'un 
rauchon, tie Chatlot et de ion uutiin, ct 
d'uQ gar^fm lie cambrouge. — Vtoncv. ( Ths 

in order t9 e^em « fiiuuite/crm ra ^^ whitk 
c^ntiumed m ^n'ett, the ejcemtieHtr, ku 
misisttuit, aiut a kigktumywuM.i 

Gardanne, / (familiar), odd piect 
of silk. 

Garde, m, ernd f. (popular), na- 
tional, lot of baton rind. Gardes 
nalionaux, beans. (Familiari I'c- 
sccndre la — , to die, **lo kick the 




J 74 



Gard^-manger — Gamison. 



bucket" See Pipe. VieiUe— , 
suptrannuattd cocotu^ or ** pUycd 

out tan." 

11 nouvait ciler tel et tel, des noms, des 
g«ntilshomm*s de ung phw^ bleu qae le 
»icn, aujourdliui cullfs l^i^Uioictiiciit cl 
tru viiitfaits, ei pa& leni^ du loul, avec 
d; vnick rouHires, «vec des vieiIles-Earde> ! 
— RicHBPIN, La Ciy. 

Garde-manger, m. (popular), tMe 
bthind. Sec Vasistaa. 

Garde -proye (thieves'), wardrobe. 

Garder (familiar), se — Ji carrcau, 
to tak€ pncautions invicw offtUurt 
mishaps. 

Gardien, m, (popular and thieves*), 
ange ^, man who undertakes ta 
see drunkards home ; re^ue who 
offers to see a drunkard home^ 
Tvbs^ and sometimes murders him. 

Gari, adj. (popular), des voiturcs 
if said of a steady^ prudent man, 
or of one who has renounced a dis' 
reputable way of living, 

Gare-l'eau, m. (thieves'), chamber- 
pet^ or ** jerry." 

Gargagoitche, /. (thieves* and 
cads'), _/&<•<■, or ** mug." 

Oargariser (familiar and popular), 
se — , to drink, ** to wet one's 
whistle." For synonyms see 
Rincer. The expression is old. 

I>ODDei ordre que buvoan, \t vous prie ; 
«t faictes tant ijae nou» ayotu d« Vcau 
(raischcpourincg&rgamcrlcpaUt. — Raok- 
LAlSj FoMta^rttei. 

Se — le rossignolet, /# drink^ 
'*to have a quencher." 

Gargarisme, m. (popular), a t/rm-t, 
a " drain," or *' quencher." (Fa- 
miliar) Kaire des gargarismes, 
to trill when singing. 

Gargarousse, / (popular and 
thieves'), throat, or "gulterlane :" 
face, or "mug." (Sailors') Se 
suivcr la — , to eat ; to drink^ or 
•• to splice the mainbracc." 



Gargoine, / (populflr and thieves'), 
throat, formerly *'garcamelle ;'' 
mpwM, or "potato-trap. ' Termed 
formerly " potato-jaw," according 
to a speech of the Duke of Cla- 
rence's to M.-s. Schwcllenberg :— 

" Hold you yom potatn-jaw, my d<af.** 
cried the Duke, patting hct.—Sti//iemrH- 
tary Engttik Qlonmry. 

Se rincer la — , /o diink^ "to 
smile, to see a man " (American). 

Gargot, m, (familiar and popular), 
restaurant ; cheap eating-house. 
Some of the restaurants in Paris 
have two departments, the cheap 
one on the ground Roor, and a 
more respectohlc onu higher up. 

Gargouenne. See Gargoine. 

Gargouillade, /. (popular), rum- 
bling noise in the stomach. 

GargouiUe, gargouine, gargue, 
/. (popular), /ot-e ; mouth. For 
list of synonyms see Plomb. 

Gargousse, /. (5>ailors'), avcc le 
coeur en — , with sinking heart. 

Un' bri»e i fair' plier I'pouce, 

RiiE<> rtQO. riguinKO, 
Avvc le cccui en. gargousse, 
R>g<> Tigo, riji(uiiigo, 
Ab 1 riuuingueiie. 

J. RicHEMff, Ls Mtr. 

Gargaussea de la canonni^re 

(popular), turnips, cabbages, or 
beans. 

Garibaldi, m. (familiar), red frock ; 
sort of hoi. (Thieves') Coup de 
— , blow given by butting at one's 
stomach. 

GamafFe,/ (thieves'), ^rw. 

Gamaffier, m. (thieves'], farmer, 
or '• joskin." 

Garnir (popular), se — !c bocal, 
to eat, *' lo grub." Sec Masti- 
quer. 

Garnison,/ (popular), lice, "jprey- 
backed uns. 



Garno — Gai*/. 



75 



G&mo, m. (popular), lodging-house^ 
" dos&ing crib." 

OftSf m. (familiar ami popular), for 
gars, boy ; fiUmv, Grand — , tall 
(hap. Mauvais — ^xll-ttMperttifd- 
lotc. ( Roui;hK*) Gas de la grinche, 
/hiff. Faut pas frayer avcc 9a, 
c'est un — de la grinche, you must 
not keep company with the ftllow^ 
hr is a thiff. Un — qui flancbe. 
a hawker. (Thieves') Kabriqucr 
un — Ji la flan, jh la rencontre, or 
i la dure, to attack a man at night 
and rot* him, ** 10 jump a cove." 

Gftspard, m, (|M>pular), cHnmng 
felloiv^ or " sharp file ; " rat ; eat^ 
or *' long-tailed beggar." Con- 
cerning this expression there is a 
Inlclhat runs thus : A boy, during 
his first very short voyage to sea, 
had become so entirely a seaman, 
that on his return he had forgotien 
the name for a cat, and pointing 
10 Pu&s asked his mother " what 
she called that 'ere long-tailol 
beggar?" Accordingly, sailors, 
when they hear a freshwater tar 
discoursing too largely on nautical 
matten. are very apt to say, *' but 
how, mate, altout that Vre long- 
tailed beggar ? " 

GAteau, m. (jiopular). feuillet^, 
th^ out at the sole, (Thieves') 
Avoir du — , to get one^s share of 
booty, '* to stand in." 

Oflte-pite, m. (popular), retioubt- 
ablt wnstter. 

GAter (popular), de I'eau, to void 
urine, "to lag." Se — la taille, 
to Itcomte pregnant ^ or " lumpy." 

Oiteuse,/ (familiar), long garment 
worn over clothes to protect thetu 
from tht dust, 

GAtisme, m. (familiar), stupidity. 
Le — lilterairc, decaying state of 
literaturf. 

Gaucher, gaucbier, m. (familiar), 



memffer of the I^ft whether in tht 
Asifmbtec Naiionale or Senaie. 

GaudUle, or gandille,/, (thieves'). 
sword, or *' poker." 

Oaudineur, w. (popular), house 
decorator. Probably from gau- 
dir, to be merry^ house decora- 
tors having the reputation of being 
light-heart efl. 

Qaudissard, m. (familiar), eom- 
mercial traveller, from the name 
of a character of Balzac's ; practi- 
cal joker y Jovial Man. 

Qaudrioler (ramiliar), enuivalent 
to "dire dcsgaudrioles,' to make 
Jests of a slightly licentious charac* 
ter. 

Gaudrioleur, m. (familiar), cjv 
y^M(/(»/gattdrioler (which see). 

Qftufres,///. (popular), faire de» 
— , is said of pock-marked persons 
it'ho kist one another. Moule ^ 



— , pock-marked faeet or 
bagc-faced." 



crib- 



Gaule,/. (popular), d'omnicroche, 
omnibus conduetor. Une gaule, 
properly a pole. (Thieves*) 
Caulcs de schtard, bars ef m eeu 
tmndotv. 

GauU, m. (popular), cider, 

Gaux, m. (thieves'), lice, " grey- 
backed uns ;" — picantit, lice in 
clothing. Basourdir les — . to kill 
lice. 

Gave, adj. ami /, (popular and 
thieves'), drunken man, " lush- 
ington ; " stomach, 

Va encore k Tcavv. 

Da cidre il '«ut 

Plf in la gAve, 

iJu cidrr il Taut 

Plein 1 gAviut. 

RicHBpm. 
Etre — . to bt intojitated. See 
Pompctte. 

Gav£. «/. (thieves'), drunkard. 
Faire les gav^s, to rob drunkards i 



176 



Gavcau — Gens* 



f»^ "bug-liunting." (Popular) 
Gave, term of contempt appiieii tj 
rich ptcpU, From gaver, to glut, 

V a de« sens qui rs en upins. 
En omnmiu ct en tramways, 
Tou» cci conc's-lli. c'est do climpins, 
Dcs ricKards, dei muf 's, dct s%vt.^. 

Gaveau, m. (thieves'), tortiller ]e 
— , to kill om by stran^ulaiioH. 

QavioU. Sec Gavi. 

Gaviot, m. (popular), throat ; 
mcuth. Sec Plomb. Figura- 
tively itomcuk. 

MaK quoi \ ces rentrui sur Icurt picds 

M'peuvcot pliu supporter teur |savii>L 

KlCUEl'lM. 

Gavot. See Gav£. 

Gavroche, m. (familiar), Paris 
stnet boy, Faire Ic — , to talk or 
act as an impudent boy. 

Gay, aifj. (ihicves'), u^ly ; fueer, 

or '*nim." 

Gaye. See Galiote. 

Gayet, m. (thieves'), Apru, ot 
•*prafl." Tcnned also "gail." 
La cognade k — , mounted police. 
Dca gayets, rogttes who praxvi 
about the suburbs just outside tkt 
gates of Paris. 

Cctaieot d«i rAJeurt de bamir« . . . 
cVtaient des Kayets.— ^//mjrp» da Mfftt- 
suMr Clnuiit. 

Gai, m. (popular), allumer son — , 
to look attentitftlyy **\a stag," 
Kteindre son — , to steep, ** lo 
duss ; " to die, •' la snuff il. " See 
Pipe. pKndre un coup de — , 
to have a dram of spirits. 

Gazette, / (ramiliar), lire la — , /* 

tat nothing, 

Gazier, m. (popular), humbug, 

Gazon, m. (popular), wig, or "peri- 
winkle;*' hair, or " thatch," 
N'avoir plus de — sur la plate* 



(popular), Journey- 
Properly to groan 



bande, or sur le pr*^, io be bald. 
See Avoir. Se rati&ser le — , to 
comb one's hair. 

Gazonner (popular), se faire — la 
plate-bande, to provide oneself 
xvith tvig. 

Gazouiller (popular), to speak; to 
stng; to stink. 

Oh I la la ! ^ sazoiiillc, dit Ctfmence en 
w boucbant le iiei. — Zola. 

G6aDt, m, (thieves'), montagne de 
— , gallmvs, ** scrag," ''nobbing 
cheat," or the obsolete expression 
*' government sign-post." 

Geindre, m. 
Plan baker, 
heavi/y. 

Gendarme, m. (popular), red her- 
ring; mixture of zohite 'vine, 
gum, and water; ont'SOM eigar; 
pressing iron. 

Gin^ral, m. (popular), le — mac* 
adam, the street, or " drag.** 

G£neur, m. (familiar), l>ore. 

G6ni3sc,/ , -womancfladeharacter. 
See Gadoue. 

Giniteur, m. (popular), /tf/>^tfr. 

Genou, m. (familiar), bald pate. 

Genre, m, (faunltar); grand — i 
pink of fashion. C'est tout k ^it 
grand — , it is quite *' the" thing. 
Se donner du — , to assume 
fashionable ways or manners in 
speech or dress ; to look affected ^ to 
have " highfalatin airs." 

Genreux, adj. and m. (familiar), 
eiegant ; fashionable^ ** dasher," 
'* tsing Ising ; " one who gives 
himself airs. 

Gens, m. pi. (popular), ^tre de la 
socictc dcs — de lettrcs, to belong 
to a tribe of swindlers who eX' 
tort money by threatening letters^ 
"aocicclers." 



Gcntilhomme sous-marin—Gibier, 



^77 



Gentilhomme soua-marin, mu 
(popular), p*oitUHit'$ bHiiy^ 
' * ponce." For synonyms see 
Poisson. 

Georget, m. (popular), uaisi^caf, 

"bcnjy." 

Lcs rupincs et mAnjuuet leur fkhent, let 
atte» un jgcorget. Je» autre* une lime ou 
haul-de-tiix, tju'ilx cnlroltm au bjrbauijier 
lie caMu, ou W d'autrn qui Ics veulcnt ablo- 

aid tfhti gitf* them, jtrmt m u^aisUcat, 
fitAfri « tAi^i,ara ^I'r p/" ^rmitt, vikick 
tkry taJc* to ika kat^ital cvertttr, er ta 
ethers vik4 mrt wtlttmc ts buy thfm.) 

Gerbable, m. (Uiievcs'), finnmer 
',cho ij sure to bt convicUdt v/Ao is 
*■ booked." 

Gerbe, m, (thieves*}, fn'a/, or 
'* patter ; " seHUnce* Planque de 
— » assist ctrurt. Le carrC de» 

petite* gcrlies, thepolict court, 

Gerbi, (uij. (thieves*), stHimad^ or 
"bookctL" 

Co (lit qu'U vieat du bagnc ojk U £ lait 
jrarM \ 14 loDfCft (coadammi Ji 34 am). — 

Eire — i riocque, to be settUmcd 
to penal urvUttiie far life, or 
"settled." 

Gerbement, «. (thieve**), trial; 
called also •*sap€menl." 

I^ convenatioa roulait uir Ics camaradcK 
i)ui c'laimt iiu pre, >ur cciiv qui ^laieat en 
Kcrbctncnt Gugcmcni). — ViiKKtj. 

Oerber (thieves'), fo sentence, 

Te voiU pris par la Cigogne. avec cinq 
v%tU Qualifi^ uo» aiiusinait. dont le plui 
rtfcent oonceroe deux riche* bourgeots . , , 
lu scraa gerU 4 ta pane— BalXac 

Gerberie, / (thieves'), conrl »/ 
justue. 

Gerbier, m. (thieves*), yW^, or 
"beak;" barrister^ or "mouth- 
piece.** Mec des gerbicrs, eseiU' 
tiHur, 

Gcrbierres, /. //. (thieves'), ji«/rf- 
ton kejis, or *' screw*.*' 

Gerce, / (thieves*), y/i/e, or " mol< 



lisher ; ** mattress ; (popular) vxh 
man with ttnntitutfii passions, 
Un qui s'cst fait poisser la — ^ a 
Sodom i St. 

Germarkie, /., alter en — , See 
Aller. 

Germiny, m. (familiar and popu- 
lar), Sod(?mist. From the name 
of a nobleman who a few years 
ago was tried for an unnatural 
offence. 

Germ inyser (familiar and populAr}^ 
se faire — , to be a SoJomist. 

GemaRe,/. (thieves*), /ariw. 

Gemaflier, m. (thieves'), farmer, 
or "joskin." 

G6rontocracie, /. (familiar), «ar- 

ratu-mindedna s, 

Gisier, m. (popular), tAroat. Se 
laver Ic — , to dtink. 

Gesseur, m. (popular), /i«/v num ; 
eccentric man, a '*rum un'." 

Gesseuse, / (popular), ^rude i 
female who gives herself atrs. 

Gestes. See Accentuer. 

Get, geti, «. (thieves'], rttd^ cam. 

O — p, m. (popular), avoir du — , to 
httve good sense ^ •* lo know what's 
o'clock," **lo be up to a trick or 
two." 

Gi, or igy (thieves'), yes^ or ' ' usher.'* 

Qibasses, /. pi, (popular), large 
skinny breasts, 

Gibelotte de goultifere,/ (popu- 
lar), cut stexv. 

Gibeme, /. (popular), the behind. 
See Vasiatas. 

Gibier, m. (popular), i comrail- 
saire, uvman of disorderly or 
drunken habits; — de Cayenne, 
iHcorrigiUt Ihii^f or ** gallows' 
bird." 

S 



:. ■ r~ 



178 



Giboyer — Gtrafe, 



Giboyer, m. (literary)! journalist 
pf the -worst sort. From a play by 
Emile Augier. 

Gibus, m. (familnr), A,it, or "stove 
pipe." Sec Tubard. 

Gig;olette, / (popular), ^/r/ 0/ M/ 
/irtiv^ ordtrs who Uadt a more 
than fast life^ and is an assidnoui 
freq%tenter of low dancing-kalis* 



^ tu veux Jtre ma gignlctte, 

Pariaiam Hffft^, 



Moi, je Miai ton . 



Gigolo, ni. (popular), fast young 
man o/the lower orders, a kind of 
*' 'Arry," //// associate of a gigo- 
letle (which see). 

Gigot, fn. (popular), large thick 
hanJf " raulton fiat." 

Gigue et jon ! bacchanalian exchi' 
mation of sailors. 

Largue tVcouie 1 Bille et bosM ! 
Lvicue I'tfcDUie ! Gigue et jon \ 
Largue IVcuuie ! on *'y fout des bowes, 
Che> La mire Uarbc-en-joDC. 

KiCHsriN, iMiitr. 

Gilboque, m, (thieves* and cads'), 
hillinrds. Termed "spoof" ia 
ihc English slang. 

Gilct, OT. (popular), s'emplir le — , 
to eat or drink. Avoir le — 
double de tlanelle is said of one 
who has comforted himself xviih a 
plate of thick^ hot soup. The 
English use the term "flannel*' 
or ''hot flannel" for a comfort- 
ing drink of a hot mixture of gin 
aiid beer with nutmeg, sugar, 
&c. According to the Slang 
X)ictionary there is an anecdote 
told of Goldsmith helping to drink 
a quart of " Hannel " in a night- 
house, in company with George 
Parker, Ned Shuicr, and a de- 
mure, gravc-Iooking gcnllcman, 
who coutiaually introduced the 
words "crap," "stretch," "scrag," 
and **iwing." Upon the Doctor 
asking who this strange person 
might be, and being told his pro- 



fession, he rushed from the place 
in a frenzy, exclaiming, '* Good 
God ! and have I been sitting all 
this while with a hangman?" Un 
— & la mode, opulent breasts. 
(Familiar) Un — encGeur.at/aiK^, 
or " masher." 

Amantha, que Corbois avalt complete- 
menc perdur de vue, ^uit aux Buuffo eC 
foitait ta joic dcs gilcu on ctrur, — E. 
MOMTKIL. 

Gille, m. (popular), faire — , to run 
art.ii', "to slope," "boll." See 
Patatrot. The expression is old. 

lupin leur fit prendre le s&ut. 

£t coniraignit de faire ffille, 

Le grand Typhon juftiju en Sicile. 

SCARKDK. 

Faire — d^loge (obsolete), to de- 
camp, 

Gilmont, m. (thieves'), waisleoa/, 
or "benjy," 

Gilquin, m. (popular), coup de — , 
blow with the fist ^ a "bang," or 
" bifT" (Americanism). 

Gimbler (sailors'), to moan, Le 
vent gimblc, the wind moans^ 
roars. 

Bon ! qu'il gimbte lut qu'il voudra dans 

left tgrts I 
Nous en BvoQs trounti bieo d'autres au plus 

prfcs. 
Ce n'eM pas encore lui qui vem notre qnille. 
Sgufle, u)ufflc. iROD vicui I »ounic it goule 

^corqutUc I 

RlCHRPtN, La Mcr. 

Gin (thieves'), k son — , seef behold! 
This expression has been repro- 
duced in the spelling of my infor- 
mant, an a&soclate of thieves. 

Gingin, m, (ponmlcir)* good sense ; 
behind. Sec Vasistas. 

Ginginer (popular), to make one^i 
dress bulge out ; to ogle ; to flirt. 

Ginglard, ginglet, or ginguet, 
m. (popular), thin sour wine, 

Girafe, / (popuUr), grande — , 
petite — , spiral Rights of steps^ in 



Girofle — Glaviot, 



J79 



tkt Seiru Twhmming haths^ with a 
hwrr and tpper tanding serving' 

as dizin^ platforms. 

Girofle, adj\ (thicvci'), prttty^ 

"dimbcr.' Largue — , pretty 

girt, or *' dimbermort." 
Giroflehe,/. (thieves'), amiability, 
Oirofleter (pnpatar), to smart oneU 
face^ "to warm the wax of one's 

car." Synonymous of "donner 

du sucrc dc giroft<fe." 

Circle (ihieves'), expression of as- 
sent : so ff itf ** Uiher." 

It y K dcHT menses de roods en ma henn« 
«t -Icux iimic* en man Kuculord. que j'jti 
^,-r:tillcc« Mir le Irimar ; biotui Ics {mm rif- 
{Mier, veux tu ? — Giiole, «l him toil le (nnd 
havre qui m'A fait renrontrer u cheratrc 

nrt tw* 4MdH kml/PftKe in mv t^rtt tmd 
two hrnt in my xvatiet, wktek J Mart 
tlUfht 0m tlu rV4u/ : wewil taok fArtm, if 
jf*tM tiJtt f — CeTt4tinty, and SUixtit he the 
Aimic^ljr vhp -tmtt mu /Mil it with tuck 
« fitu ej [opd luck. ) 

Cironde. oiij. and /. (ihievcs'K 
^HtU ; pretty^ '* dimber ; " pr<(ty 
■woman or giri, " dimbermort." 
Abu a giri of had character^ a 
"bunier." 

Oirondin, m. (thieves*), timpU- 
minded f<Uo-,i\ "flat," or "jay." 
\jt — a Honoe, " ihc jajr hai been 
flapped." 

Girondine,/ (ihteve»*), handsomt 
yi'funz girl, or " dimbermort." 

Ohe, m. (popular), dans le — , 
somtthiHfcf tk* btst. An allusion 
lo glic k la noix, savoury moruiof 
Artf/. 

Gitre (thieves'), J have, 

Gitre mouchailk le UbilUnl.— i^r/cr- 
£»H d* tA*r*l. (/ Aa»g ttttk d ml tks 

Oivemer (ix>pular), to prowl ahoni 
at tii^/if. 

Civerneur. m. (j^opuKir), one who 
ptvujtj at night : (thieves') — de 
rcfroidiH, aiu who diives n hearse. 



Glace, f and m. (romiHar and 
popular), passer dcvant la — , fo 
tnjoy grtitis the favours of a pros- 
titnle at a brothel ; to pny for the 
reckoning at a caU» An allusion 
to the large looking'class l>ehind 
the counter. (Popuur) Un — , 
gltsss of wine. Succr un ■^ to 
drink a glass of wine. 

Glaci, adf (popular and thieves*), 
pendu, stteet lamps used tiil they 
were supericded hy the pretent gas 
lamps, A few are still to be seen 
in some lanes of old Parts. 

\jt% pendui glacdft, cc sont ces crofrfver- 
bire* ^ niiatrc f«ce» de vilw verie cairie* 
rnmme or* glacvs ■ . . ce *oni en rtfver* 
btrc* atxilu qui pendent au b^Ajt d'uiM 
c<v(le Accrochce 4 ua bn* de potcncc — 
RicHariN. L* PmvC 

GUciire pendue, / (thieves*). 
Sec Glace. 

Glacis, m, (ixtpular), se passer un 
— , to drink, '* to lake something 
dnrnp," or "lo moisten one ft 
chaffer." Sec Rincer. 

Gladiateur, m. (military), shoe. An 
ironical allusion to the flectncss 
of the celebrated racer Gladiateur. 

Glaire, / (popular), pousser sa — , 
totalis "tojaw." As-tu fini de 
poosser la — . don't talk so much, 
which may be rendered by the 
Americanism. " don't shoot off 
your mouth." 

Glaive, m. (freemasons'), earving- 
kfti/e ; (thieves') guillotine. Pas- 
ser sa bille au — , to be guiUotiHed, 
Sec Pauch6. 

Glaiver (thieves'), to gnillotine, 

Glao (Breton cant), rain, 

Glaou (Hrcton cant), firebrands. 

Glas, m. (popular), dull miJn vith 
a dismal sort of totipersatum, 
"cnukcr." 

Glaviot. w.{\yopu\AT),expeetoraiMmp 

or "gob." 






i8o 



Glaviotcr — Gobante, 



Glavioter (popular), t^ tjcp€(tdrat€, 

Glavioteur, m, (popular), man 
U'Ao expictorates, 

Glicr, glinet, m. (thieves*), devit^ 
"niffin." From sanglier, a wild 
bear. Lc — t'entroUe en son 
pasclin, the dfvii take you te his 

ai'ode ! 

Glissant, m. (thieves'), soap. 

Glisser (popular), to die^ *' to stick 
one's s[x)on m the wall," ** to kick 
the bucket,'' or "tosnuff it." Sec 
Pipe, 

Globe, m. (popular), head^ or 
*'nut," see Tronche ; stomach. 
S'cire fait arrondir le — , to have 
become pregnafit^ or "lumpy." 

Qlouglouter (popular), to drinky 
" to wet one's whistle." Sec 
Rincer. 

QlousscT (popular), to talk^ ** to 
jaw." 

Gluant, m. (cads' and thieves'), 
penis; baby^ *' kinchin." 

Panlt que j'tuis dab' \ ca m'eftbloquc 
Un p'tit ufif, \ mot I'MUud ! 
Ma rouchi* doit batt' la bcrtoqtic. 
Un gluaLDl, 91 n'f 'rut pa& mon bloC 

i^lCIUU'lH. 

Gluau, m. (popular], expectoration. 
(Thieves') Poser un — , to arrest^ 
*'to smug." See Piper, Gluau, 
properly a ttvi^ smeared aver with 
bird- it me. 

Qlutouse, f, (thieves*), facet or 

••mug." 

Gnac, m. (popular), ptarrti. 

Onaff^, adj. (popular), elutnsity 

done. 
GnaRe, f. (popular), bad throw. 

Apr^s — raffle, constant i/i'/uci.. 

GniafT, ni. (familiar), badiwrkman; 
writer or journalist of the worst 
descriNion ; (shoemakers') work- 
ing skoemakrr. 



G niaffer (popular), to work clumsily, 

Gniasse (cads' and thieves'), mon 
— , /, myself, " No. I." Ton — , 
thoHy thee. Son ^, he, him; /, 
myself, \}i\-—%afellffiv^ a "cove." 
Un bon — , a good feUenu^ a 
"brick." 

GnifT, adj, (popular), ce vin est — , 
that wine is clear, 

Gniol, gniole, gnolle, adj. (popu- 
lar), Silly ; dull-witted. Es-tu 
assc2 — I how sillyt or what a 
'* flat "^fftt are! 

On voulalt nuus mett/c V la manque poiur 
lui(nou» le fairc tivrcr), nous ne Kimmc* (ua 
tica gniol** !— UaLZAC. 

Gnognotlc, / (familiar and popu- 
lar}. The expression has passed 
into the language; thm^ if little 
worthy ** no great scratch." 

Ce farceut dc Me«-Uottes. ven U fin de 
Xixit avait eu I« true d'^poiiwr pour de 
vrat une djkme. tret dJcaiie d^jlt, m»\\ qui 
pCMM^ilali de bcAUx reslcs ; oh I une dAme 
do la rue dcs Marl/rs, paa de la snognotLe 
debarriferc.— Zola, L'Auommoir. 

Gnol Chy (popular), abbreviation 
o( UaiignolicS'CUchy. 

Gnole,/. (popular), slapy "clout," 
"wipe; or, as the American* 
have it, ** bitT." Abbreviation of 

torgnole, 

Gnon, m. (popular), blmt.^ '•clout," 
'* bang," or "wipe;" brtiise, or 
" n»)u^c." 

Gnouf-gnouf, m. (theatrical), 
monthly dinner of the actors of 
the Palais Hvyai Theatre. When 
ceremonious, the members are 
called, " (Jnouf-gnoufs d'Allc- 
magne;" when bacchanalian, 
" Gnuuf-gnoufs de Pologne." 

Go, parlcr en — , ts to use that syl* 
table to datptise words, 

Gobage, m. (popular), love. 

Qobante, / (popular), attractive 
womau. From gober, to like. 



Gobbe — Godard. 



i8i 



m. (thieves*), 



Gobbe. gobeloi, 

ck.ili.e. 

Gobelet, «. (thieves'), **« sous le 
— ^tobt in prison^ or *' put away.** 
Gobelin, m, Uhica-es'), thimUf. 
Gobclot. See Gobbe. 

Gobe-mouches, m. (thieves')! spy, 
" nark," ur " nose." 

Gobe-prune, w. Ubieves*), taihr. 
Termed aUo pique- poux, and in 
the English sUng a ''cabbage 
contractor," "slecl-bar driver," 
" buttou catcher." 

Gober (familiar nnd popular), U 
like : to Iffiii tcpinue. Jc teEol>e. 
)oupUait mt ; / Hkeyou. Gober 
la cne\Tc, or — son bceuf, to gtt 
*^"aO'* ** to get one's monkey up," 
" lo lose one's fchin," "to get into 
a *cot." Termed ** to be in a 
swot " at Shrewsbury School. Sc 
— . to fiaxt a kt^k ofini<m of one* 
sdf ; to ievi ow<ui/iec much. 

Non, non, pju de rabotint. Le vicux 
Bote ^laii toujoius gru ; IViUU&m sc go* 
tuti tn.'p.— Zola, .Van«. 

I-a — , tc bt the victim ; to halt to 
far for ethers ; to bt ruined ; to 
Mitf< a false axtertion, SjTiony- 
mou>, in the latter sense, of the 
oUi expreii&ion, "gober le mor- 
ceau." 

Mat« je nc m\\ pax homtnc \ p>bcr le 
fnorccau.— MoLl&KE, Etait ^tt Femmts, 

Cent p«s pluft lt>io, le cameloc ■ neon- 
menc^ wa true, apres avoir ri. avcc ton 
co[)ain, dei pantet qui la gobent ! — RlCHI- 
PIM. (A M^itdwtd itr^t /nrtkrr tke tkmrp€r 
again trist kit di*<ige, ajirr Imugkimg tmitk 
kn chum at tktfiAtt ivkc take it in.) 

Si nous cchouuni, cVst moi qui la 
gobe, tf we faii, / xkaii be made 
re^f>oititbie, 

Gobcson, w. (thieves'), $Muking- 
giasij or "flicker ;" cup ; ckalife, 

Gobct, (w, (popular), piere ef beef 
"a bit o' iMilI." Had formerly the 
signification of dainty bit. 



Laiise-raoi faire, nous en manaerom de 
bon« gobet* enwmbte. — HauikR(*chr, 
Crispin MiJectn. 

Qoheit diiifriierljt workman. Maa- 
vais — , sciimf, or " bad egg." 

Gobette, / (thieves'), drinking- 
^tast^ or "flicker." Payer la — , 
fo stand treat, 

Gobcur, w. (familiar), ereduhus 
mun, "flat." 

Qobicbonnade, / (familiar and 
popular), gorrftanditiug. 

Gobichonner (familiar and popu- 
lar), se — . to regale oneself . 

II s« >«ntit capable An plus grandes 
KlcheUt pour cootinuer b goblctiututcr.— 
Balzac. 

Gobichonneur, m., gobichon- 
neuae,y! (familiar and popular), 
gormandiur^ "grand paunch." 

Gobilleur, w. (thieves'), yV^fr //'/«- 
f/ruetu'ti , a Magistrate who in- 
structs lases, and prixnxtely ex* 
amines prisoners before trial, 

Gobaeck, w. (familiar), miser^ 
"skinflint," or "hunks'* One of 
the characters of Baliac's Com/dit 
Humaine. 

Godaitle./'. (popular), amusement ; 
indulgence in eating uptd drtnking. 

On doit travatller, 9a ne faic pas un 
doutc : »eulcmcn[ qunno on te irrvure avec 
Ae\ ami*, la politr«ke pa<>«« avant u^ut. 
Un d^r de gMlaille k« avail peu & pcu 
cHatottil)^ et cngourji* tous le» (luatr*.— 
ZouA, L.'At»ommniT. 

Godan, m. (popular), falsehotui, 
Connaftrc le — , to be ziade'Otfaket 
not easily dufed^ '* lo know what's 
o'clock.'* Monler un — & 
quclqu'un, to seek to deceive fine, 
or*'- best "rw/, 

Godancer (popular), to allow one- 
self to be duped, •* lo be done 

brown." 

Godard, m. (popular), a husbcmJ 
who has just become a father. 



1 82 



Godda m — Gomme, 



Goddani, or goddem, m. (popu- 
lar), Englishman. 

CEoinduni TAngUU.) Maintcnant, si- 
loDK jouer d«s bibelots . . . voUa un gotl- 
dam i|ui va y alter d'ftutajtt. — P. Mahaun. 

Godet, m. (popular), dnttking 
gloiu A common expression 
among tlic lower orders, and a very 
old one. 

Oodiche, adj. (famtCiar and popu- 
lar}, simple- mtnded^ foclish. 

Que tu «s done yodicbe, Tuinon, de 
vrtiir loiu 1» malini comme ^. — Ga- 
VAKNI. 

Godiller (popular), to he merry; 
to be (arfinlly exdted, 

Godilleur, m. (popular), man who 
is J<md of the fair //.r, a " raol- 
rower," or *' bcard-spliltcr." 

Oodillot, M. {popular), military 
shot. From the name of the 
maker ; (milicary) recruit, or 
** Johnny raw." 

Godiveau ranee, m. (popular), 
stingy man. 

To peux pcfuer m je le Iraite tk codi- 
VMU ranee cnaqtic fois qu'i) mc refute un 
petit cadcau. — E. Monteil. 

Goffeur, m. (thieves'), locksmith. 
From the Celtic goff, a smith. 

Gogaille,/. (popular), banquet. 

Cogo, m. (familiar), simple-minded 
man who invests his capital in 
sji'indling concerns f "gull; *' man 
easily fleeced, 

Quaod le* ellunieur* de THOtel des 
Ventes eurcnl jug^ Ic %o^*» en complei 
eutralncmcnt, il y cut un arr£l mumc&ian^ 
parmi [esencbtruii)tcrcu£ck.^A. Sihven. 

(Popular) Go^.^frwAtfrw, '*flal." 
The Lerm, with this signification, 
is hardly slang. Villon uses it in 
his Ballade de Villon et de la 
Crosse Jifar^ (15th century). 

Riant. m'a&»iet Ic |>oinx Bur mon uunmet, 
Gogo me dit, ct mc licrt Ic jamboL 



Gogotte, adj. (popular), spiritless ; 
weak ; haa. l*rom gogo. Avoir 
la vue — , to have a weak sight. A 
corruption of cocoite, disease of 
the eyes. 

Goguenau, gogueno, goguenot, 
m. (military), tin can holding one 
Itire, usedhy soldiers to make coffee 
or soup ; also howitier ; (mililary 
and popular) privy. Passer la 
jaml>e a Thomas — , to empty the 
prixy tub, Hirondelle de — , 
Iffiu street'-ivalker, or "draggle- 
tail." See Gadoue. 

Goguette, f. (popular), voctd so- 
ciety ; ivine-shop. Eire en — , to 
be merrily inclined ; to be enjoying 
oneself the bottle being the chief 
factor in the source of enjoyment. 

Gogl]etter(popular), to makemerry. 
From the old word guguette, 
amusement. 

Goguettier, m. (popular), mem- 
ber of a vocal society. 

Goinfre, m. (thieves'), precentor. 
An allusion to his opening his 
mouth like that of a glutton. 

Goiper (thieves'), to prowl at night 
for evil purposes t ''quxrens quern 
devoret." 

Qoipeur, m. (thieves'), night thief. 

Goipeuse, / (thieves'), prostitute 
7vho praiols aboiU the country. 
See Gadoue. 

Qoitreux, m. (familiar), silly feltmo; 
man J<rfcidofill intellectual pr^Hr, 
Synonymous of crtitin. 

Qoje (Urelun cant), well ; yes. 

Golgother (familiar), to gwe one- 
self the airs of a martyr. The 
allusion is obvious. 

Gomberger (thieves'), to reckon. 

Gombcux, adj. (popular), nasty. 

Gomme, /. (familiar), fashion ; ele- 
gance, "swelldom." La baule 



Commaise — Commcux, 



183 



— , tht ' ' pink " of fashion. Eire 
cle Ift — , to i>€ a danJyt a 
*' mubcr." See Gommeux. 
The term formerly tignified ex* 
cellence, and was used ipecially 
in reference to wine. 

MaU noa p«> d'un pareil irtfsor, 
Que celte MMVcraine gutnmff. 

Pmrtuuu det Mutn. 

Gommeuse, f. (familiar), tkffwily 
drentd girl or womam^ a 
"dasher.'"^ 

Gomroeuz, adj» and m, (familiar), 
Prttty ; dandy. 

C^uii cllc qui, pcur U prtnu^ fott, 
rccevoot un dc »c« amantt auiqutf des 
pacdt ^ la lite, cmprW, arf, fmlte. Urtf, 
AcmblAot, en deux mots, ucmp^ ckiu de 1a 

Kmmc arabiquc en duM>luiioo, avklt dit 
Ini : ungonuficux ^ L< pctit-Cfev^avait 
tin iucccucttr. — E. Muhtkil, Camthiis. 

The diflTcrent appellations coire- 
sponding to various periods are 
as follows : — Under Louis XIV., 
"mouchar, rauguet, petit -maitrc, 
laIon-rouj;c." After the revolution 
of 1793^ "muscadin." Underihe 
goveromcnt of the Uirectoire from 
95 *o '99, "incroyable, merveil- 
leux." Then from the Restoration 
come in succession, " mirliflor, 
^Icront, dandy, lion, fashionable, 
and gandin. Under the Third 
Empire, "cocodes, crcrc, petit- 
crcvcf. col-casse." From 1870 to 
the present day, "gommeux, lui- 
sant, poisscux, boudine, puhut- 
leux. exhume, gratinc, faucheur, 
and tin«IIy Iwcarre." The English 
have the teims "swell, gurgcr, 
masher," and the old expression 
•• flasher," mentioned in the fol- 
lowing quotation Irom the Eng- 
lish Supptem€Htary Glossary : — 

They are reckoned ili« fUitvcn of Um 
pUre, j-et everybody Uuehi at iboB for 
thttr am, afTrctationi, and lonuh graces 

and irapcrtiBences.— Maoamb o'AaMJkV, 

J>J*ry. 

The Sjw/afiM' termed a dandy a 



"Jack-pudding," and Goldsmith 
calls him a " nucaroai," **The 
Italians," he says, " are extremely 
fond of a dish they call macaroni, 
. . . and a& they consiiler this 
as the lummunt hcnu/ii of all good 
eating, so they figuratively call 
evcr^lhing they think elegant and 
uncummon macaroni. Our young 
travellers, who generally calch the 
fullies of the countries they visit, 
judged that the tille of niiwaroni 
was very applicable to a r/rrw 
feliorw ; and accordingly, to dis- 
tingxiish themselves as such, they 
instituted a club under this de- 
nomination, the members of which 
were supposed to Iw the standards 
of tmte. The infection at Si, 
James's was soon caught in the 
City, and we have now macaronies 
of every denomination, from the 
Colonel of the TrainM-l^ands 
down 10 the printer's devil or 
errand-boy. They indeed make 
a most ridiculous Hgure, with luts 
of an inch in the bum, tliat do 
not cover, but lie upon the head ; 
with about two pounds of Act it ious 
hair, formed into what is called a 
(lub, hanging down their shoul- 
ders, as white as a baker's sack ; 
the end of the skirt of their coat 
reaching not down to the first 
button of their breeches. , . , 
Such a figure, essenced and per- 
fumed, with a bunch of lace stick- 
ing out under rVi chin^ puules the 
common passenger to determine 
the things sex; and many have 
said, by your ItaiH^ madam, with- 
out intending to give offence." 

The Americans give the name 
of "dude" to one who a^>es the 
manners of swells. It may be 
this word originated from a com- 
parison between the tight and 
light-coloiired trousers sported by 
swells, and the stem of a pipe 
leiiued *' dudecn " by the Irisil. 



i84 



Gomorrhe — Gosselin. 



Compare the French expression 
^'boudin^,** literally x<iHMjv-/fJ6r, 
for a swell in tight clothing. 

Qomorrhe, w. (familiar^ un Emi- 
gre de — , Sodoikite. 

Qonce, gonse, gonie^M. (thieves'), 
tnam^ or "cove." 

OonceMe,gonjtease,/ (thieves*)* 
fM«Ma«> " hay-bag, cooler, or 
shakester." 

Ooncicr, or gonce, m, (thieves*), 
Moit, or "cove." 

QondoM, mJi. (thieves* and popu- 
lar), avoir Pair -^toitf^HL Un 
homme — , Ai^sAtmliitrtd mam, 

Oonfltt-bougres, m. (thieves*), 
i**Hs^ the staple food of pri< 
soners. 

Oonfler. See BaUon. (Popular) 
Se — , A? itf tUUti. 

Mob ntttt. c'<q«« ta 

Ot^M Ftm^* 17 Aodt, ttM. 

Se — le jaboc. A» l^i amcnttii, 

Tte «s oa Kvi ututttt c'csc vtw. hus* 

MMtTStL. 

OodsaM. a«. (thieves^ ■«», or 
*'o>w.'* Si le — fiut de ITttLr- 
nooazes, il bat le bnhnraTgoer 
«ians U vassxTH, i/ tkt mm cr 
mrt •fmi^^ me'^ tirtm Jkim im£f 

Q^»ar^ «L. (thKV«s'X aaoK. A 
fcxtt of coose. 

Oo«s«« «u (thMws' aai pofiklarK 



|j» %tf^ nxs <i<n oi*rtiih ks foaafia 
lint «t S?uc i«. ^ofr-JCtdT SB. am <ftK 



Mottt^ lur deiut tr&ejuu, rUltistre 

Tabario 
Affltuoit auirtfoUet Is nymphe et legonze. 
La Foktaink, Jtagob'm. 

Gonse k tfcailles, womett^s buUft 
"ponce.** See Poisson. 

Qonaier, or gadoulUe, m, (popu- 
lar), an ittdandualy *' eve. 

Qonaae, m. (police and thieves*), 
yw. "fiat." 

Vottt Ctes un soosse, nonsietir, mar* 
mar» le chrf k I agent poiteur da bijou, 
qu'il lui arn^ha aiusitAc. — Mitmtim J* 
Mtmutm' Cimmdt. 

Qonsease. See Qoncesse. 

Gorge, / (thieves'), a atse far 
impUmemts, 

OorgniAt, m. (pc^;xilar), dirty mam, 
a " diatty "JkUaw, 



Gose, i 
"red 
gosier. 



«. (pc^Hilar), thrxfot^ or 
lane." AbbreviatioD of 



Gosse, m. mmi f, (genenl), ckili, 
"kid." Ah! la&wtt gosse! 
pcaUe-t y ! Asseret - voos des- 
Stts ! cC qa* ca tinisse ! Tlu i«r^ 
nIkV c\Udt krm h4 djes s.fmam 
Sit m/%m kirn, ami Ut tker* Ar mm 
*mJ Jff'ii. This seemingly uzicha- 
ricable wish is often expressed in 
thought, if Dot in speech, in 
France, vheie many chtMren are 
petted and spoilt into insudenb^ 
tyrants^ 

Arm* rcoL^uK •iit fc> manvn <<«i piearc. 
MteeMoati^ f bnt * , o« cnxr^^c etceatire 






adr ^ a ai 



GowrHn. 



isa rncftcve 1 rtkerea : 









'Ossiline — Goujonner. 



Gosaeline,/. (popular and thieves'), 
young maiden. Fignole — ,pr<Hy 

Gossemar, m, (popular), ckiid, or 

" kid." A form of go&sc. 
Gossier, m. See Gonce. 

Got, w., for gan (thieves*), huit, 
or " gold-backed un." 

Goteur, m. (popular), whorf-mc>n- 
I'rr, •*rmitlon«mongcr, molrower, 
beard -spUiler, or rip." 

Gouache,/, (popular), Z*^, /4/- 
siognomy^ or " mug." See 
Tronche. 

Goualante, gouasante, / 
(thieves'), icn^ ; str<€t hatektr. 
Les goualantes avcc leurs bag- 
ntoles, the /iisu*iers Tuiih ihiir 
hanj'bamnvs. 

Goualcr (lUicves*), h sing^ "to 
"lip;** — A la chienlit, to cry 
cut tkitvtil In Uie slang of 
English thieves, ** to give hot 
beef." 

Goualeur, m. , goualeuse, /. 

(thieves'), itn^er, **chamer." 

Di< done, U pouilcii«c, est'Ce que tu ne 
vu pai nouf Kouater une dt te* kou>- 
lanies ?— E. StE, Z/i MytUrtt tU Varii. 

Gouape, /. (popular), lazintss ; 
drunkm ana disorderfy state ; 
fine who leaJs a Irsy fir disiolute 
iif« ; a rfprvbate ; tkUJ^ox "prig." 
See Griache. 

Gouaper (popular), to tfod a dis' 
onUrly life ; tfi pretel about iaiifyt 

'* to mike ; " to tramp. 

Gouapeur, gou4peur (general), 
iazy man ; vagabond ; deoauihee. 

Sans pa5ex, msb lime, plein de crott*, 
Auui rupio tfu'un plonucur, 
Un Kiir un gouCpeur en nbote 
Tombc CO (rime avec un volcur. 

VlDOCQ. 

Michel says, "Je suis convaincn 
que ta racioe de ce mot est gufpe. 



qui se A'xiguape en p3toi<.norniand, 
el qui vienl de wasp: pareil k 
rinsccte de cc noro, Ic gouepeur 
erre 9a et li, butinani pourvivre." 
Gouapeur, iivnira/ appellation 
given f^y laty prisoners to thase 

who TcvrJt, 

Qouapeuse./. (general), dissolute 
uxmta n frnd of good cheer. 

Goueper (popular), to UaJ the life 
of a gouapeur (which see); also 
to letul a itigrant life. 

J'ai ronifne un ItrouiUanl «!e wnivenir 
d'avoir ):<juc)>c lixn* tnon cti^nx\ct avrc un 
vieux chiifoniiier qui in'ukomnuii decoupa 
decroc. — E. Si E. 

Gouftpeur. See Gouapeur. 

Gouffier (obsolete), to eat, 

Gougnottage, m. (common). 
Kii;aiui says : *' Uonteuse cohabi- 
tation d'une femme avec une autre 
fcmmc." 

Gougnotte, /. (common). See 
Gougnottage. 

Gougnotter. Sec Gougnottage, 
Gouille,/ (popular), cnvoycr & la 

— , to summarily get ridaf abort ; 

to send a bore to the deuce, 

Gouillon, M. (popular), street boy^ 
or street arab, 

Goujon, ffi. (general), dupe, ot 
"gull \" girrs bully, or "Sunday 
man." For synonyms see Poia- 
»on. Un — d*hOpital» a leeth. 
Avaler le — , to die, "to snulf 
it." See Pipe. Ferrer le — , to 
eause one to fail into a tmp, to 
make one swallow the bait. Lacber 
son — , to vomit^ "to cascade," 
" to shoot the cat," or "to cast 
up accounts. " 

Goujonner (popular), to deeeive, 
"lo best," "to do." Lilcrally 
to mate one stvaJlow tA* bait liJte a 

gudgeon. 



i86 



Goule — Gourgandinage. 



Ooule, /. {popular}, throaty or 
"gutter lane r mtmth^ or " rattle- 
trap." Old form of gueule used 
io the expression, now obsolete, 
Faire p^ter la goule, U speak. 

Qoulot, m, (popular), mouthy or 
"rattle-trap ;" throaty or " gutter 
lane." Jouer da — , to drink 
heavily y " to swill." Se rincer le 
— , io driniy " to wet one's 
whistle." See Rincer. Trouil- 
loter du — , to have an offensive 
breath, 

Qoulu, m. (thieves'), a stove; a 
well. Properly greedy, glutton, 

Oottpinmge, m. (thieves*), work, 
"graft r thieving, " faking." 

Qotlpinc, / (cads* and thieves'), 
head, or "nut," see Tronche; 
(popular) quaint dress. 

Ooupini, adj, (popular), mal — ^ 
badly dressed. 

Ooupiner (thieves'), to steal, "to 
nick." See Grinchir. 

En roulant de Tcrgne en va^ne 
Pour ftpprendre il goupiner. 

ViDOCQ. 

Goupiner les poivriers, to rob 
drunkards; — & la desserte, to 
steal plale from a dining'room in 
the following manner : — 

D'uitfcs bonjourien ne le mettcnt en 
cunpigiie qu'aux approchn du diner: 
cenx-lfc taiiiisgnt le moincnt oti rarsenterie 
vient d'etre poi^ sur la uble. lU entreot 
et en un din d'oeil Us la font dUparaltre. — 

VlDOCQ. 

Goupiner, to do. 

La largue eat fine 
t-ellet bile est Public 



La largue eat fine . . . et que goupine* 
Balzac. 



ghn une 



Qouptneur k la desserte, w. 
(thieves'). See Goupiner. 

Qonpline,^ (thieves'), /m/. 

Gour, m. (thieves'), Jug; — de 
pivois, jugful ofttnne. 



Gourd, m. (thieves'), fraud; de^ 
ceit ; svnndling; (Breton cant) 
good; well. 

Oourdago (Breton csni), food. 

Gourde, /. (popular), simpleton, 
"aat." 

Qourdi, m, (popular), /»/, "flat," 

or "duffer." 
Qourdeinent(popuIarand thieves'), 

mmh , or, as the 1 rish say, 

"neddy;"f<rK. 

Ill piaussenc dans les pioles, moifient 



et pictent si gourdement, que toutime en 

.—'L.t Jarf^ndtl'Argo 
sletf in iht taverMs, eat and drink sm 



\to\xx6xiiBSiit.-~Lt JargendtVArrot. {Tluy 
tverMs, eat and drink t 
mmck that everythittg rtiounds with it.) 

Gourer, or gourrer (popular and 
thieves'), to deceive^ " to kid ; " to 
swindle, " to stick." The word 
is old. 

Pour gonrrer les pauvres gens. 
Qui leur babil veulent croire. 

Pamasse dts Muset. 

Se — , to be mistaken ; to assume 
a Jaunty, self-satisfied air, 

Cest la raison pourquoi qu' je m' goure, 
Mon gniasse est bath : j'ai uq chouctt* 
mouie. 

RicHsriN. 

Goureur, m. (thieves'), deceiver; 
eheaij or "cross-biier ;" — de la 
haute, swell mobsmen. Goureui^, 
rogues who assume a disguise to 
deceive the public ^ and who sell in- 
ferior articles at exorbitant prices. 
The sham sailor, with rings in 
his ears, who has just returned 
from a long cruise, and offers 
parrots or smuggled havannahs 
for sale, the false countryman, 
&C., are goureurs. 

Goureuse, / (thieves'), female 
deceiver or cheat. 

Gourgandin, m. (familiar), a man 
toofondofcocottes. Vieux — , old 
debauchee, old '' T\^.'' 

Qourgandinage, m. (popular), 
disreputable way of living. 



\ 



■■■ ■■ • ■w-.ifcy ^ y' 1? , 



Gourgandiner — Grain. 



1S7 



" 



Gourgandiner (popular), to had a 
dissolute iijt. I*rom guui^andine, 
a girl or 'atoman of lax m0rals. 

Oourganer (popular), ti> be in 
prison^ eating "gourganes" w 
beam, 

Oourgaud, m. (military), recruit 
or •' Juhnny raw." 

Gourgousaage, m» (popular), 

j;ntTnhling. 

Gourgousser (popular), lopumhle. 

Oourgouaseur, m. (popular). 
^rumbler^ or "crib bilcr." 

Gourt (popular), It son — , flensed. 
The wurd is old, Villon uses >t : — 

L'ho&tes«e fut bito k ton gourt, 
Car, ifUBud vuit k compter t'cioot, 
Lc ifignpur DC dist oncques moc 

Gouapin. or gousscpain, m. 
(popular), malicioMJ ureAin. 

11 m ttrm \m corpt d'an duil ; ** Ticas dil 

l*-. goue 
Au tn>vict. t»ci», void dc quoi fikirc un 

Japin." 
PuU il prti ton pem couteao de gtnuM- 

pBin, 
VipouxHa lc KTcflicr, cl lui fit ta loiletie. 
KiCHRMN, Ln CMaruem dgt Cnttix, 

Gousptner (popular), to wander 
lastly abou4^ "to mike." From 
gouspin, a mtiHcious urchin, 

Gousae, / (thcaincal), la — , 
monthly banqtut of the actors of 
the Vaudevdie Theatre. See Qos* 
sclin. 

Gousser (popular), to eat^ ** to 
grub." See Maatiqucr. 

Gousset, m. (popular), amifit. 
Properly fob. Avoir le — perce, 
io be penniless, '* to be a quisby.*' 
Kcpuu&ser du ■^, to emit a dis' 
apveabie odour of humanity. 

OoAt, m. (popular), faire pa^^ser, 
or faire perdre il quelqu*un le — 
du pain, tg kill one, " to cook 
one s goose." 



Goutte, f. (popular), marchand de 
— , retailer of spirits. (Familiar 
and popular) Goutte militaire, a 
certain dixeojc termed in the 
English slang "French gout," 
or "ladies* fever." 

Goutti^re, / (familiar), lapin dc 
— , d eai^ "long-tailed beggar." 

Gouvemement, «. (popular), 
mon — , my xvife, *' my old 
woman," or " my comfortable 
impudence. *' 

Goye, w. (popular), /«»/; dupe. 

Graffagnade, / (familiar), bait 
p\iititing. 

CraJfigncr (popular), to take ; t» 
seize, '* to nab ;" to scratch. 

GrafiFin, m. (popular), rag-ficher, 
" Imnc-grubbcr," or " tot*pickcr. * 

Graigaillc, / (popular), bread, 
" soft tommy, or bran." 

Graillon, m. (familiar), dir/y slat- 
ternly utoman. Thai is, one who 
emits an odour of kitchen grease. 

Graillonneuse,/ (popular), Hvwfl* 
who not being a iiiishrrn'omit/r 
Wttshes her linen at the public 
laundry. 

Grain, m. (familiar and popular)^ 
avoir ud — , to be slightly crazy, 
" 10 be a little bit balmy in one'a 
crumpet." Avoir un petit — , to 
be slightly tipsy, or "elevated." 
See Pompette. (Popular) Un 
— » fifty ~ce*ttime coin. Formerly 
a stiver croum. l-eger de deux 
grains (obsolete), an exprea«ioa 
applied formerly to eunucfis. Utk 
catholi<iue jk grot — (obsolete)^ 
the stgniticatioD is given by the 
quotation : — 

On Eppelle atholiqiie Ik etoi grain, u& 
liliertin, un hommc pcu dtfvoi. qui oe «a k 
leglis* que pttr tnaniint d'acquit.— La 



r88 



Graine — Grns. 



Oraine, f. (familinr and popular), 
lichagrw, t hie/ ^s offspring ; (fami- 
liar) — de chou colossal, grand 
prcmisei nuide with the object of 
nvindting credulous persons ; — 
gibcmc, soldiers chiid ; — d'<?pi- 
nards tpasdets of field-officers. 
Avoir la— dcpinanis, tobeafUlJ- 
officer, De la — d'ondouilles is 
said of a numUr of small children 
tn a group. 

Oraissage, m., or g^raisse, / 
(popular), mwiiri', '*dust," That 
wlijch serves ** to grease the 
palm." Sec Quibus. 

Oraisse,/. (popular and thieves'), 
/Htj/fr>', or " pieces. " See Quibus. 
(Thieves') \oIer ^ la graissc (for 
grctrc), to cheat at a game. AIm 
to obtain a han ef money on 
''brummagem" trinkets^ or paste 
dianioftds represented ax genuine, 

Vdler h la graiue : M faire pr£tcr kur 
dc5 lii'goO d'or ct ftur dc« diamaau qui n= 
wot que du cuixtc et du stratt. — VlDOCQ. 

Graisser (military), la mannitc, <u 
a uctMiomrr^ totrcnt one's comrades, 
** lopay foTonc'sfootiiig ;*' (gene- 
ral) — la pcau, to thrash, ** to 
wallop." See Voie. Graisser Ic 
train dc dcrricre, to give a kic/: in 
the behind^ " to toe one's bum ; " 
— les botles k quehprun, to help 
one; — Ics cpaules a quelqu'un 
(obsolete), to thrash one. 

Grai4«.rr le« Cpaules \ iiuelqu'un. pnur 
dtte, k biitunncr. L'c qui a fail dirr ausM 
dc I'huilc de cotrcl. ce<tt-a-dire. n« coupt 
de bdtoo-— Ls Rucx, DkS. Cfivtiqu*. 

Graisser les roues, to drink^ " to 
have something damp. " See 
Rincer. (Thieves') Graisser, or 
gressicr, to stttil, ** to nick." See 
Grinchir. 

Qraisaeur, m. (ihicves')^ catxl- 
sha/per, or " raagsraaa." 

Grand (police), chef, the Pr^fet de 
{\*ii(e i (popular) — tjonnet, a 



(>ishi*p : — carcan^ /a//, /aaJty 
girl. Also an oppiobriuus epithet ; 

— courbouillon, sea, or '*briny;** 

— lumignon, sun ; — singe, Presi- 
dent of the Republic ; (thieves') 

— coere, farmerly the king of 
mendicants; — mcudon, spy; 
dtteciive^ "nark;" — irimar, 
highuHjy, ** high toby ; " (mili- 
tary) — rronlant tropical, riding 
br^ches; (theatrical) — trottoir, 
st9ck of classical plays, 

Grande, adf, andf (popular), bou* 
i\'\\xc,pr^fc£turedeptdice ; — bleue, 
the sea, *' briny, or " herring 
pond;" — fillc, ^W/*-. (Thieves*) 
Grande, /«•**•/, or "cly," "sky- 
rocket," *'brifih." Tcnncd also 
•' profonde, fonillouse, louche, 
gueulardc." 

Grand' largue, adv. (sailors'), ex* 
celUnt ; iti:om parable. 

Grands, ndj, (theatrical), joucr les 

— coquets, to perform in the cha* 
racier of an accomplished, elegant 
man, (Cavalry school of Saumur) 
Les — hommes, the corridors in 
the school buiUUngi, 

Granik (Breton cant), hunger. 

Graoudgem, w. (thieves'), park 
butcher^ or '* kid lier." Faire un 

— a la dure, to steal satuages, 

Graphiqu^. adj. (thieves'), y{//A>', 

or "chatty." 

Grappin, m. (popular), hand, or 
" llipper." Metirc or poser le — 
sur L^uclqu'un, to apprehend one, 
or "to suiug " one. See Piper. 

Grappiner (popular), to seise; to 
apprehend, or "to sumg." See 
Piper. 

Gras, adj. and m. (popular), il y a 
— , there is plenty of money to Af 
got. Attraper un — , to get a 



Gras-doubie — Grhe. 



1S9 



sa>Uing, or *' wigE'ing." (Thieves' 
and cads') Gros, prhy. 

Gras-double, or saucisaon, m. 
(lliievcs'), sluet UaJ^ or ** moss.'* 
Ratis^r du — , to ileal Uad off tht 
roof's^ termed by EnglUh thieves 
••flying the blue pigeon." Porter 
du — au nioulin, to tnke stolen lead 
to a rrceitrt's, or '* fence." 

Gras - doutUer, m. (thieves*), 
plumber^ 

Grasae, / (thieves*), strong tox^ot 

'• pcicr." Thus called by rogues 
because it contains ••la, graisse," 
or the cask. 

Gratin, m, (popular), thrashing. 
Ketiler un — , to box ones ears. 
{V:y\x\\\\\T)Gx^\\t\,tiJ*'lcf of/as hion; 
sweilthm. 

Le PxHs extrvBiondain . . . 1e gratut, 
quoi I— P. Mahaun. 

GratiD^, m. (familiar), swell, 
•'masher." For synonymous ex- 
pressions sec Gomnieux, 

Gratis (popular), faire — , toborroxc, 
"to bite oite's ear/' or '* to break 
shins;" to lend. (Thieves') Eire 
— malade, to be in prison^ to bt 
*'pui away." 

Graton, m. (popular), ms^r. From 
grattcr, to scratth. 

Gratouille./ (popular), (VM. From 
giatter, to seraich^ to itch, 

Gratouse,/. (thieves*), lace. 

Gratous6, aefj. (thieves'), aJornti 
-with late. 

Grattc,/. (popular), Uck; unlmeful 
projiis 0j shopmen tm the snU of 
goods, something like the " llufT ' 
or profits on &hoit change by rail- 
way licket-clcrki ; lionus alltnoed 
to shopmen ; — couenne, barber, 
' * strap ; " — pave, loUerer seeking 
J or a hvingf one •' on the mooch. ' 



Grattie, / (popular), Sam, 
•'props." 

Gratte-papier. m. (familiar end 
popular), fierk, or "quill-driver ;" 
(military) non-tsfmmissi&tteii oJficcT 
J^Uttg the functions of clerk. 

Qratter (popular), to shaz*e ; to 
thrash, ** to wa)Iop." See Voie. 
Orattcr, to purloin portions of cloth 
given far the making of apparel ; 
to apprehend. Sec Piper. Cratter 
le papier, to write ; to be a (Urk^ 
or "quill-drivcr ;" — la couenne, 
to shave. En — , /a perform on 
tht dancing- t-opf. Les frcrei qui 
en grattcnt, rope-tlattcers. Grallcr 
les paves, to had a life ofpcferty. 

Grattoir, ^raton, m. (popular), 
rater. Passer au — , to getshmtedf 

or "scraped." 

Graveur sur cuir, m. (popular), 
shoemaker, "snob." 

Qrtce, /. (familiar), tht tribe »f 
carti- sharpers. Tomberdansla — , 
to becomt a card-sharper. Vol k 
la — , card rtvindle, (Thieves') 
Grece, or soulasse, rwimller who 
offers one a high profit on the 
ckangr of gold £o*ns, for which h4 
substitutes base coin when the dor 
gain has been struck, A variety 
of the confidence trick. Vidocq 
thus describes the mode of opera- 
ting of these gentry. A coiifcilc- 
rate forms an acquaintance with 
a farmer or counter tradesman on 
a visit to town. While the new 
pair of friends are promenading, 
they are accosted by another con- 
federate, who pretends to be a 
foreigner, and who exhibits gold 
coin which he wishes to exchange 
for silver. Subsequcnily the three 
adjourn to a nine-shop, where 
the pigeon, being entrusted with 
one of the coins, is requested t(x 
have it tested at a changer's, when 
he finds it to be genuine. A bar- 



tgo 



Gricer — GrenotdlU. 



gain is soon struck, and, when the 
thieves have decamped, the victim 
finds that in exchange for sound 
silver coin he has received a case 
full of coppers or gunshot. 

<3r£ccr (thieves'), to swindUat cards. 
From '* grcc," card'Sharper. 

Qrecquerie, / (familiar), tribe of 
eard'Sharpers, 

•Grfer (naval), se — , to dress oneself, 
" to rig oneself out." 

Creffer (popular), to he hungry, 
" tobcijandied." Jegreffe, orje 
d^lare, I am hungry, (Thieves') 
Greffer, to steal an objut by skil* 
fully whisking it up, " to nip. " 

<Greffier, m. (popular and thieves*), 
cat, or 'Mong'tailed be^;ar." 
From griffe, claw, 

Celt la dabuche Mtchelon 
I'a pomaquj son greffier. 



^ 



jui iacte par la ventenie 
(^ui le lui refilera, 
Ce dab Lustucru 
Lui dit : " Dabuch' Mich'Ion, 
AUei 1 vocre greSer n'nt pai pomaqutf ; 
II est dans le rouloo, 
Qni £ut la chasse aux tretons, 
Avec un bagaffre de fertange 
£t un faucbon de satou." 

Popular song of Cest la mire 
Muhd qui a perdu son chat^ in 
thieves' cant, quoted by F. Michel. 

Orcffique,/ (roughs'), the magis- 
tral and lawyers. 

Orefier (Bieton cant), cat, 

-Qr£le, m, andf. (popular), master, 
or " boss ; " master tailor. 

lis ne nous exploiteront plus en maitres, 
<<cs griles.— MacA. 

(Thieves') Grfile, row or fight, 
•* shindy." 

II va y avoir de la grCle, c'»t on raiUe. 
— E. Sue. 

(Popular) Gr€le, pockmarks. Ne 
pas s'etre a^ur^ contre la — , to be 
pockmarkedj or *' to be cribbage- 
iaced." 



Orilesse, / (popular), mistress of 
an establishment. 

Orelot, m. (popular), voice. 

Cest bien le son du grelot, si ce n'est pas 
la ftimousse. — Balzac. 

Grelot, tongue, or " red rag." II 
en a un — ! how he does jaw 
away, Faire peter son — , to 
talk, " to wag the red rag." 
Mettre une sourdine ^ son — , to 
keep silent, "to be mum." Mets 
une sourdine i ton — , donU talk 
so much, "don't shoot off your 
mouth " (Americanism). 

Orelu, orgrenu,ffi. (thieves'), ctfr/r. 

Qreluchonner (popular), to be a 
" greluchon," that is, the lover of a 
married woman, or of a girl kept 
by another ; or one who lives at 
the expense of a woman. Voltaire 
has used the word greluchon with 
the first meaning. 

Grenadier, m. (popular) , louse, 
" gr^." or " grey-backed un." 

Grenafe, grenasse, /. (thieves'), 
bam. 

Grcnier, m. (popular), k coups de 
poing, drunkard's wife; — k coups 
de sabre, soldier's looman ; — a 
lentilles, pockmarked face, or 
" cribbage face ; " — i sel, head, 
"tibby,' or "canister." See 
Tronche. 

Grenoble. See Conduite. 

Grenouillard, m. (popular), one 
fond of the water for the inside or 
outside. (Artists') Faire — , to 
paint in a bold, dashing style, 
after the manner of Delacroix. 

Grcnouille, /. (popular), woman. 
An insulting epithet ; (military) 
cash-box. (General) Emporter 
la — , to abscond with the cask-^ 
box. Manger la — , to spend for 
on/s own purposes the contents of 




Grenouiller — GrilUr, 



191 



thi c(%sk-box^ or fundi intrusted to 
ome's ktfpin^^. (Popular] Sirop de 
— , xvat^rf " Adam's aie." 

Grenouiller (popular), to drink 
tt'ottr. Had formerly ihe signi- 
fication oi to fretfttent ^oint-shops. 

QrenouilUre, /. (general), runm- 
tuiptfr hiith. La Grenouillcrc is 
the name of a well-known swim- 
ming e^labUxhment on the bank 
of ihc Seine at Chalou, a place 
much patrunized by **raasbcrs" 
and mure than fast ladies. 

Grenu, or grelu, m. (tliieves'). 
corn. 

Orenuchc,/ (thieve**), oats, 

Grenue, grenuse, f, (thieves'), 
jleur. 

Grfts, m. (thieves'), karse^ or 
••prad." Termed also •*gail." 

Orisiltonner (popular), to ask for 
tredHt "lick," "jawbone," or 
" day." 

Greasier (thieves'), to steal, "to 
nick." Sec Gnnchir. 

Grive, /. (thieves'), hirondelle de 
— , gendttrme. Executions for- 
merly look place at the Place dc 
Grcve in front of the Hutcl dc 
Ville, hence the expression, Des 
ai^ges dc — (obsolete), porters, 

Grdviste, w. (popular), workman 
0H strike. From grcvc, ttrike. 

Pu reslc, ta hande de grfviucs . . . n< 
viendnit plus X ceitc heure; quelque ob- 
ftucle avui (111 raridtcT, dn gctid.U'mei 
|icut 2uq. — Zola, OtrmiinU. 

Gr^zillon, m. (popular), /'«ri. 

Gribis, gripie, grippis, grippe- 
fieur (thieves'), miller, 

II y avait «n un c«rtala tourniquet uo 

K'\\>n qui ne fichait ncn que flouti^re bus 
aa pauvrea. — Lm Jar^am ds fArpit. 
(TMtrg utfd It iie tM m Cfrt/ttm mitt a mttlttr 
wA* H«r#r gmv4 Mmjttkimg to tXt ^m^rtkjr 



Griblage, criblage, m. fihteves'), 
shomty shouttnj^ ; (popular) caw- 
plaint^ grumbiinff. 

Grie. w., grieUe,/d<^'. (thieves'), 

ce/d. 

Griffard, griffon, m, (popular), 
crtA tiriffe, claw. 

Qriffarde,/ (thieves'), pen, 

opular), to seisf 

to take ; to purhin^ "to 



Griffer (popular), to seise ^ "to 

coll?** * '" fitt^ ' tjt AtA^riitim " t/\ 



GrifTeton, m. (popular), soldier^ 
or " wobbler.** From grive, 
grivier. a soldier, 

Griffleur, m. (thieves'), ehie/wardef 
in a prison t *' head screw." 

Griffon, m. (thieves'), umttr, 

Griffonnante, /. (thieves*), /V«. 
Gritfonner, to write a scrawl, 

OrifTonner (thieves*), to swear. 

Griffonneur, w. (thieves'), one who 
swears; (popular] — de t»bUlardt, 
journalist, 

Qrifler (thieves'), to take, "to 
grab." 

Grifon (Dreton cant), ddg. 

Grignolet, mr. (popular), breads 
•'soft tommy." 

Grignon, m. (thieves*), jud^^ 
*• beak." Probably from " grig- 
ner les dents.** /i^ sho^ one*s ttetk 
th reateningly^ or from ' ' grognon. " 

Grillie, adj. (familiar), absinthe; 
absinthe Ufitk sujptr. The sugar 
b held over the ginss nn a small 
grating (grille), until graiUulIy 
melted by the liquid poured over 
it. 

Griller (popular), quelqu'un, to lack 
up one, " to run in ; " to deceive 
otu (conjugal/y). En — une, fa 
tmoki a pipe or eigareite. En — 



192 



Grilleuse de blanc — Grlncker. 



unc K^che, t0 smoke a dgarette, 
Griller une bouffarde, to smoke a 
pipe. 

All KKrdicD de b paix . . . «a conugne 
lui dc'ftrnrl <le Mire et Ac fitmcr. Ki boire 

un vcrrc.ni Kriltcr liiicbotilfarde t VoiUla 
coniijjtic— .V«'/«tfiVM He Monutu^Ct<iHtit. 

Grilleuse de blanc./ (popular), 
ironcr. yrora grillcr, to toast^ 
to singt, 

Grimer (popular), to arrest. Sec 
Piper. Sc — , to get drftHk, or 
*'scrcvfcA'* Properly to paint 
ene^s /aee. For synonyms see 
Sculpten 

Grimoire, w. (thieves'), prnai 

code ; — mouchiquc, judicial 
documents; ait of indict wient. 

Grimoirier, w. (thieves'), dak of 
arraifns, 

Qrimpant, adj\ and m. ^thieves*), 

chevalier — , voleur au bonjour, 
donneur debonjour* or boiijourier, 
t^ief who enters a house, prttend- 
ing to be mistaken when disco- 
veredf and steals any property 
worth taking, { Popular) Un 
grimpanl, troissersy "sit-upons, 
or kicks." (Popular and thieves') 
I>cs grimpants. staircase ; steps^ or 
" dancers." (Military) Grand — 
tropical, riding breeches. 

Grimpe-chats, m. (popular), rwf, 

Grincbage (thieves*), for Qrin- 
chissage, which see. 

Un journal racontnti hjcr que TKiadt 
^It, du rcMc. un vrai arlUlc tn matiirc da 
EnnchAg«, appti<|ii^ au AjrA-Zf/lr.— PtajcRK 
ViNON, Ei'inwmmt ^w QNovcmbre, 1876. 

Grinche, w. and f, (thieves'), la 
— , dancing, Un — , a thiej, or 
••prie." 

L« Crinchc. Icnne d'orf^ot sicnifuutt 
voletir, a Mrvi d« liiro tt un jounuJ Moni- 
ttSiuH i^ui a Tait jpanUrc deux oumirDt au 
n)ol\ tie juin, 1848.— G. Ukcnbt, /Ijf/)kM^ 
imtrt lie U C9n¥ermtt*H et de tet Lettmrt* 



Noui &!oD« dix !l duuzc, 
Tous grincHct dc r cnom ; 
Nous Aitendionfr la «;or2ue, 
Vouliuii poi&i^r des bcgues, 
Fonr faJre du bitlun. 

VlDOCQ, 

Un -« de cambrouse, a highway* 
man. In the old English cant, 
"bridle-cuU." Other varieties of 
the tribe of malefactors go by the 

Epellations of "gtinchiwieur, 
gre, chevalier de la grippe, four- 
e, escarpc, poisAc, limousineur, 
charron, truqucur, locandier. van- 
tcmier, cambriolcur, caroubleur, 
solitaire, compagnon, deffardeur, 
pogne, tireur, voleur 4k la tire, 
doublcur, fil dcsoie, mion de boulc, 
grinchisseur de bogues, friauche, 
lirebogue, Americ^iin, jardinier, 
ramastiqucur, enfant de minuit, 
philosophe, philibcrl, voleur au 
bonjour, bonjouricr, philantrope, 
frere dc la monicle, garcon de 
campagne, garfon de cambrouse, 
tiretaine. enfant de la matte, 
careur, chcnc alTranchi, droguiste, 
&c. ; the English brethren being 
denominated *'prig, cracksman, 
cros-sniaii, sneaksman, moucher, 
booker. Hash cove, bug-hunter, 
cro&s - cove, buz - faker, stook- 
hauler, toy-getter, tooler, prop- 
nailer, area-sneak, palmer, dtags- 
man, lob-sneak, bouncer, lufly- 
prigger, thimhic-twister, gun, 
conveyancer, dancer, pudding- 
snammer, beak -hunter, zifT. drum- 
mer, buitock-and-file, poU-lhief, 
little snakeiman, mill-ben, a cove 
on the cross flashman, finder, 
gleaner, picker, tax-collector," 
and formerly **a good fellow, a 
bridle-cull" (highwayman). 
Grincher (thieves'), to rob. See 
Grinchir. 

Quatid ilf vfmt dccarrcr ddui les con* 
pautDcroni. Je grmchcrai )c «nve. II est 
«»ec uoe iareue. il ne criblera pas — E. 
Sua. \\¥'e'UMt0m tknm wktn tiuy com* 
0mt. rii n4 the cave. He is with « 
lu wiU Wft cry out.'i 



Grinchcur — Gnncliissage, 



193 



Grinchcur, m. (thieve**), ymmg 
thuf, or '*riff/' 

Grinchie, adj (thieves*), camelotte 
— , sfc/fft gpotis, "swog." 

Grinchir (thieves'), fo ste<ii. Rabe- 
lais in his i^aHta^ruil says of 
Fanur|*e : — *' Toutcsfuis it avoit 
suixante et troiiv maiiicrcs d'en 
truuvcr toujours a M>n besoing 
{{it rargrnt), dont la plus honor- 
able et la plu& commune estoit 
})ar fn^on dc larrccin furtivement 
aict." One may judge from what 
follows, And by the numerous 
varieties of " larrecin furtivement 
faict " dcscrir»ed under the head 
of " grinchissage," that the imi- 
tators of I'anurgc have not re- 
mained far behind in the art of 
filling their pockets at the expanse 
of the public. Some of the many 
expressions to describe robbery 
pure and simple, or the different 
varieties, are : — ' ' Mcttre la pogne 
dcssus, travailler, faire, dccrasser, 
rinccr, enlifHer, relircr Tartichet 
tavonncr, doublcr, barbottcr, 
graisser, dcgauchir, dcgraisser, 
cftaroucher, evapurer, Agrip- 
per* soulcveri fourmiller, filer, 
acheter a la fotre d'empoigne, 
P^er, goupincr it la desserte, 
sauter, marner, cabasser, mettre 
de la paillc dans ses souliers, faire 
le saui, secoucr, grcssier, faire le 
bobe, faire la bride, faire le roor- 
lingue, faire un poivrol, faire un 
coup dVtal, faire un coup de 
radin, rincer unecambriotle, faire 
la soulassc sur le grand trimar, 
ramastiquer, fourlourer, faire le 
mouchoir, faire un coup de rou 
lollc, (aire crippc-clicvillc," &c., 
&a The Lngli-sh synonyms are 
as follows : — *' To cop, to touch, 
to claim, to prig, ig wolf, to 
sraike, to pinch, to nibble, to 
citft, to collar, to nail, to grab, 
to jump, to nab, to hook, to nim, 
to fake, to crib, to ease, (o con> 



vcy, to buz, to be on the cross, 
to do the sneaking-budge, to 
nick, to fang." &c.. &c. 

Grinchissage, m. (thieves*), MiW>- 
inx ; thfft^ or " sneaking- budge.*' 
The latter enprcsAion is used by 
Fielding. 

Wild looked upon borrowing to be as 
good a_ way of ulcing ai any, and, ax he 
called it. tSe gemiwlekt kind of uteaking- 
bodge— FiRLD INC. JoMAtAan H'tU, 

he — a domicile is practised by 
rogues known under the following 
ilenominations : — '* Le l)onjou- 
rier,"see this word ; *'Iecambrio- 
leur," xoho operates in af^irtmeHts ; 
' * le caniubleur, " who effects an en- 
tratue ity means of skeieton keys ; 
** le chevalier du pince -linge," 
one who steuii iituii, ''snow- 
gatherer ; " " le dcmcitagcur,** 
who takes possession of artiites of 
Jumiture, descending the stair- 
case hackwa>-d$^ so that oh an 
emergency he may ai once make a 
shiTitf of ascending^ as if ke xvere 
bringing in furniture ; 'Megrin- 
chi&scur ^ la dc^serle," thief who 
enters a dining-room just after 
dinncT'time^ and lays hands on 
the piate ; *'le CTa:*-doul>lier," 
u*ho steais leoii vff the roofs^ who 
•* flies the blue pigeon ; " *• le 
malelassier," a thief who pretends 
t» repair and clean mattresses; •' le 
y9X\XteTi\^x" who effects an entrance 
through a windato, ' ' dancer ; " '* le 
voleur k la location, "a'Aff/rr/zw^x 
to de in guest of apartments to let ; 
••le voleur au recensemenl," uths^ 
pretemis to be an ojfiiial employeti 
in the census. Lc grinchissage i 
la ballade, or a la Iriniballade, 
thi thief makes some purchases, 
and finding he has not sufficient 
ntoney, requests a clerk to aceom* 
fany him home, entrusting the 
parcel to a pretended commis- 
sionnaire^ a confederate. On tkt 
toay the rogues suddenly vanish, 
O 



194 



Grinchissage, 



I 



Lc — i la broquille consists in su^ 
stiiuting sham jetv^Utfy f^r tht 
genuine articU when offtrtd for 
itupiction by the tradisman. Le 

— & la cane. Sec Carreur. Le 

— a la circ, puricining a sUvtr 
fork or spoon at a restaurant by 
making- tt adhtrt under the table 
by means of a piece of soft wax. 
After this prchmtnary ofteration 
the rogue leaves the place, gene- 
rally after havitsg been searched 
by the restaurant keeper ; then an 
aecomphce erttcrs^ takes his ton- 
ferferate's place at the table, and 
obtains possession of the property. 
Le — & la detoume, the thief 
secretes gvods in a shop while a 
confederate distracts the attention 
of the shopkeeper. TJie rogue who 
Uius operates is lermed in English 
canl a *' palmer." The thief is 
sometimes a female who baa in 
her anus an infant, who&e swad- 
dling-clothes serve as a receptacle 
for ihe stolen property. Lc — , or 
vol ^ la glu, takes place in churches 
hy means of a rod -with birdlime 
at one endy plunged through 
the slit in the alms box, termed 
Ironc ; the coins adhering to the 
extremity of the rod are thus 
Ashed out Le — , or vol h. 

I'Ara^ricaine, confiiience trick rob' 
kery. It is the old story of a 
traveller meeting with a country- 
man and managing to excliange 
the latter's wel]-51Jed pur:se for a 
bag of leaden coins. Those who 
practise it are termed "Amifri- 
cains," or " magsmcn." 

II K%s. att«u vieiiK qiie le rannile. I) a 
€\€ raoxilc mille (uU ! . . . Cc vul sursnnc 
rfuuit toujoun * il r^vutira lant qii'il y 
aura <le« timplcs. juH|u'k la c(>n»otuina> 
tion dc-v HiC-ilc^ — XtemoirtM dt Moruirur 
CiSM^le 

Le — a la niclasse, the rogta has 
a tall hat, -vith the inside of the 
trown be smeared with treacle, U'hich 
he suddenly places en the head of 



the tradesman, ptuhtng it far dcum 

mter his eyes^ and thus making him 
temporarily helpless (Pierre Del- 
court, Pans I'olenr). Le — a la 
qucte, stealing part of the proceeds 
of a collection in a church when 
the plate is being passed round, 
Le — , or vol a la reconnaiuanoc, 
consists in picking the pockets of a 
passer-by while pretending to re- 
cognize him and greeting hi tn as an 
old frirnd. Le — , or vol \ la tire, 
according to Monsieur Claude, for- 
merly head of the detective depart' 
ment, this species of theft it the 
classical one in which the celebrated 
Cartotdche, a kind of prench Jack 
Sheppard, was an adept. It con- 
sists in picking liHsisttvat pockets by 
meansof a pcsir of scissors ora double 
bladed penknife. Lc — , or vol 
& rcpalc, is high-class swinaling, 
it comprises *'le hnxlaqc," ** lc 
chantage/' " le negoce,'' and *' le 
vol oucautionncniciit." The first 
of these consists tn the setting-up of 
a financial establishment and open- 
ing an account for unxoary mer- 
chants, who are nuxde to sign bills 
in exchange for the swindlers* 
paper e*tdorsed by them, ti'hen 
these bills become due they are re- 
turned dishonoured, so that the vic- 
timised merchants aie responsible 
for the payrnent not only of their 
07m ncftes of hand hit those of the 
swindlers as -ivell. " Le chanlage " 
is extorting money by threat ofex' 
posure. The procee(ls.are termed 
in the English slang "socket- 
money." Kor full explanation see 
Chan'teur. " Lc ncgocc" is 
practised by English swindlers who 
represent themsehies as being the 
agents of seme zvell-known firm , and 
thus obtatn gifotls from continental 
merchants in exchange for ficti- 
tions bills. ** Le vol au cautiunnc- 
mcnt," the rogues set up a sham 
fituxneicU establishment and adver- 



Grinchissagi, 



195 



Siiefor a Mumbrr vf cJerksio 6t em- 
ployed by the firm on Ike condition 
e/Uavittga deposit as a guarantee. 
\Vken a large staff of o^eiais^ or 
rather pigeom, have heen founds the 
maMOgers decamp with the deposit 
Jund. Le — , or vol i. la roulolte 
or roulantc, the thief jumps om the 
lox of a vehicle temporarily left in 
the street by its tnoner and drives 
^ff at a gal/op. Sometimes the 
horse ahne is disposed of the veAirle 
^eing left in some out-of-the-way 
floie. The " roulolliers " also 
steal hawkers'' haud-bamnvs^ or 
"shallows." One of ihcsc rogue*, 
when apprehended, confessed to 
having stolen ihirty-three hand- 
barrows, fifry-lhree vans or carts, 
and as many horses. Sometimes 
the " rouloltier " will rob property 
from cnbs or carriages by climbing 
up behind and cutting the straps 
that secure the luggage on the 
roof. His English i-cprescn(ativc 
ii termed a ** dragsraan," accord- 
ing to Mr. James Greenwood. 
Sec The Seven Curses of I^ndott^ 
p. S7. Le — , or vol 4 resbrouffe, 
fifking the pockets of a passer-by 
while htistling him as if by aeet- 
denty termed "ramping." 1^ — , 
or vol h I'etoumcau, when a thief 
who has just stolen the contents of 
a till is making his escape, an ae- 
complice who is keeping utifih out- 
jia'e scampers off" m the opposite 
dirution, so its to baffle the pmxled 
tradesman^ whose hesitation allcws 
eif the rogues i^tintng ground. Le 
— , or v^ 4 i'opium, robbery from 
a tvrsen who has been drugged. 
7'he scoundrels who practise it are 
generally yewish money-lenders 
of the lowest classi who attract 
their victims to t/uir abode under 
p fete nee of advancing money. 
A rubber who Arst makes his vic- 
tim insensible by drugs is termed 
in the English cant a ** dmmmer. " 



Le — au boulon, stealing from a 
shop by means of a rod or wire 
passed through a hole in the shutter, 
"booking.'^ Le — » or vol ad 
cerf-volant, is practised byuvmen^ 
who strip little girls of their trinket s 
or ease them of their money or 
parcels. The little tncfims some- 
times get their hair shorn o^ as 
well. Le — , or vol au chatouil- 
Ittgc, a coMpfe of rogues pretend to 
recognise a friend in a man easing 
himself. They begin to tickle him 
in the ribs as if in play, mean- 
while ri/jing the pockets of the help- 
less viitim. Le — , or vol au colis, 
the thief leaves a panel in some 
coffee-house with the recommenda- 
tion to the landlord not to give it 
up except on payment of say twenty 
ftams. He then seeks a commis- 
siannaire simple-minded enough to 
be willing to fetik the parcel and to 
pay the necessary sum, after which 
the swindler returns to the place 
and pockets the money left by the 
pigeon. Le — , or vol au fric-frac, 
housebreakings or " crili-cmck- 
ing." Le — , or vol au gail or 
gayet, horse-stealing, or " prad- 
napping." Le — , or vul au grim- 
pant, a young thief or '* little 
snakesman," r//fff^r fm to the r^wf 
cf a house nnd/hnKosn rope-ladder 
to his accomplices beltKi; who thus 
effect an entrance. H'hen detected 
they pass themselves off for work' 
men engaged in some repairs. Le 
— , or vol au parapluic, a shop- 
lijter^ or " sneaksnian/* drops the 
stolen property in a hnlf-open urn- 
brelh. ile — , or vol au poivricr, 
consists in robbing drunkards 
who have come to grief Hoguet 
who ptottise it are in most cases 
apprehended, detectives being in the 
habit of impersonating drunkards 
asleep on benches late at night. I^e 
— au prix courant, or en plcine 
tripe, picking pockets or Harf-pim 



\()6 



Crinchisseur — Grippis. 



/« a ^rtfz«/, "cross-fanning." Le 
— , or vol au radin, tke landlord 
of a wine'Shop is requested to fetch 
a bottle of his best wine ; while he is 
busy in the cellar the trap which 
gives access to it is closed by the 
rogues^ and the counter, or **tsl' 
din," pushed on to it, thus impri- 
soning the victim, who clamours in 
vain while his till is being emptied. 
It also takes place in this way : 
the rogues pretend to quarrel, and 
one of them throws the other's cap 
into a shop, thus providing him 
with an excuse for entering the 
place and robbing the till, or 
*' pinching the bob or lob." Le 
— , or vol au raton, a little boy, a 
*' raton," or "anguille" (termed 
*' tool or little snakesman " in the 
English cant), tr employed in this 
kind of robbery, by burglars, to enter 
small apertures and to open doors 
for the others outside (Pierre Del- 
court, Paris Voleur). Le — , or 
vol au rigolo, appropriating the 
contents ^ a cash-box opened by 
means of a skeleton key. 

Le Pince-Monseieneur perfectionni, se 
poru aujourd'hui dans un ^tui k cisares 
et dans un porte-monnate . . . les vole(irs 
an rigolo ouvrent aujourd'hui toutes les 
-Mimoires de Monsieur Claude. 



Le — . or vol au suif, variety of 
card-sharping swindle, 

II i'opire par un grec qui rMe chex les 
marchandit de vin, dans les caffs borgnes, 
pour drfgoii-r, en hon suiffeur. une fri- 
mou&se de pante ou de daim. — Mimoires 
de Monsieur Claude. 

Le — I or vol au timbre, a tobac- 
conist is asked for a large number 
of stamps, which tke thief carefully 
encloses in an envelope. Suddenly, 
when about to pay for them, he 
finds he has forgotten his purse, 
returns the envelope containing the 
stamps to the tradesman and leaves 
to fetch the necessary sum. Need- 
less to say, the envelope is empty. 
Le — , or vol au tiroir, the thief 



enters a tobacconist'' s or spirit shop, 
and asks for a cigar or glass of 
spirits. When the tradesman 
opens his till to give chan^, snuff is 
thrtnvn into his eyes, thus making 
him helpless. This class of thieves 
is termed in the English cant 
** sneeze-lurkers." 

Grinchisseur, m. (thieves'), thUf^ 
or *'prig," see Gnnche ; — de 
bogiies, pickpocket who devotes his- 
attention to watches, a ' ' toy-getter, " 
or '*tooIer." 

Gringue, f (popular), bread, or 
'*soft tommy ;" food, or "prog," 

Gripie, m. (thieves'), miller. See 
Gribis. 

Grippe, f (thieves'), chevalier de 
la — , thief, or "prig." See 
Grinche. 

Grippe -cheville (thieves*), faire — ,. 
to steal, ** to claim." See Grin- 
chir. 

Grippe-fleur, gripie, grippis, m. 
(thieves'), miller. Termed "Grin- 
doff" in English slang. 

Grippe-Jisus, m. (thieves'), gen- 
darme. 

Parcequ'ils arretent les innocents et qu'ils 
n'ont pas meme ^pargnrf Jrfsuv— Nisakd. 

Grippemini, m. (obsolete), bar- 
rister, or " mouthpiece ;" lawyer, 
" sublime rascal, or green bag ;" 
extortioner. From grippeminaud, 
thief. 

Gripper (thieves*), to appnhend^ 
"to smug." See Piper. Rabe- 
lais uses the term with the signi- 
fication q{ to seize: — 

Parmy eulx rftgne la sexte essence, 
tnoyennant laquetle ils grtp).ent tout, d^- 
vorem tout et conchicnt lout. 

Gripperie, / (popular), theft (ob- 
solete). 

Grippis, gripie, grippe-fleur, m 
(thieves'), miller. 



"> 



Gris — Gros, 



197 



Gris, adj, aud m. (thieves'), li^ar ; 
wind; (popular) — d'offidcr, 
s/i^'hf intoxuation ; — jusqu*! la. 
IroUieme capucine, compUtdy 
i/rAffX-, ur 'Slewed/' Capucine, d 
mmkft band. 

Grisaille. /. (popular), sister fif 
fu^ny. An allusion lo th« grey 
cu^tume worn by &isiers of mercy. 

Crises. / pi. (general), en faire 
voir (ic — , lo lixtd one a hard Hfe. 

Griaette. Sec Bifieck. 

Grisoiter (popular), se — , ft gtt 
slightly drunk f or **elcvaiej." 
See Sculpter. 

Crispin, m, (ihievo1» miller. 

Grive, f, (thieves*)' army; milt- 
tary patrol ; warder, Cribler k 
\x — , to try out tAirtvs, *'to' 
whiddle beef." Synonymous of 
*' crier i la eartte." Uanuiis de — , 
uniform. Tapis de — , eanlren. 

Grivier, m. (thieves'), soldier, 
" swaddy, lobster, or red her- 
ring." Krom "gtivois," formerly 
a loldier of fordgyt troops in the 
servile of f'ranee. The word 
"grivois " itself seems to be a 
corruption of ''ffruyers," used by 
Rabelais, and signifying Swiss 
soldiery nntivcs of Gruyeres, serv- 
ing in the French army. Grivier 
de gafle, sentry ; — de narquois, 
deserter. Literally a banteriMg 
soldier. 

Grivoise, /. (obsolete), soldiet^i 
ttvMrh, ^rrisoH town prostitute, 
Termetl by the Englisn military 
••borrack-hack." 

GriwotK, c'eU i ft ire coorcuie, puUin, 
<MtMiuch4i^ avrniiiricre, dame suivoncc de 
I'arai^ ou (ibicT de cnrin-dr-nrde. une 
(arw & ttAmiA.—Di(tii*'*nttirt Cnni^ti*. 

Grobis, m. (familiar), faire du — , 
to look big (obsolete). 

El en faiiani du b*v1>** Inirdoan&it u 
Wofdidion. — Ra ^ala is. 



Grog au boeaf, m, (popular), broth. 

Orogne,/. (obsolete), faire la — , ft 
grumbUtto haiv '* the tantrums." 



Fain U cn>sne, pK»ir faire )a moue, 

Sendre la cMvre, faire mauvais viuigo. 
uder, groodcr, cire dc mauvaiK humcur, 



tre, faire mauvats viuigQ. 
aiK hu 
dddaigncf. — Dictiomn^trt Ctmifue. 

Qrognon, m. (thieves'), one about 
to be executed. Pmi>erly one 
V'ho /pitmbles, and rery naturally 
so, at the unpleasant prospect. 
The English equivalent is "gal* 
lows-ripe." 

Qroller (popular), to groud, ^ 
grumhle, Vto{tcx\y to croak. From 
the word grollc, used by Rabelais 
with the signification oferow. 

Gromiau, m. (popular), child, 
"kid." Termed also "gossc, 

loupiau." 

Qrondin, m. (thieves*], pig, " sow's 
baby," or *' grunting cheat." 

Gro8, adv. ami luij. (popular), 
coucher — (obsolete), to utter 
some enormity, Gacher du — , ft 
ease ontself. See Mouscailler. 
Gros cul, prosperous rag-pie ker ; 

— lot, venereal disease ; (familiar 
and popular) — bonnet, injluen- 
tialman ; high official^ *'big-wig ;" 

— nvimcro, brothel^ or "nanny- 
shop." An e5tabli.shmcnt of that 
description has a number of la^e 
dimensions placed over the front 
door, and window panes white- 
washed. (Thieves') Artie de — 
Guillaume, broxim bread. The 
expression, "du gros GuillAume," 
was formerly used by the Pari- 
sians. 

On appelte du gros Guillauoie, du pain 
dcstin^, dant Ics tnaiftan* dc campagrw, 
pour la Dourriture de» valcU dc cour.~Du 
gro« Guillaume, mot Paruien, pour dire 
du pain \y\s. du srui pain de m^nan, tel 

iue le mangcnt Tea paysana. — L.* Kot;x, 
>iit. Ccmifue. 



(Military) Gros bonnet, officer of 
hij^h ranJkt "bloke;" — frercs, 



193 



Crosse — Cuddre. 



— tolos, or — talons, the iuirm- 
giers : — legumes, Juld-offiars. 
A play on the words "epaulcllcs 
\ graincs dVpinards,"/A/irtj(]fwm 
of smrh offUers, The wnnl gros, 
considered as ihe masculine of 
"grosse," synonymous of "en- 
ceinte," was formerly used with 
the signification of imfyatient^ 
loHging, alluding to the uncon- 
trollable desires which are some- 
times manifested by women in a 
state of pregnancy. Thus people 
would express their eagerness by 
such lidiculous phrascft as, ^*Je 
suis gros de vous voir, de boire 
avcc vous, de le connattrc." 

GroBBe, adj, f. (popular), caisse, 
the hoHy, or "apple cart;'' — 
cavalerie, staff of scai'tngtrSy or 
"rake kennels," an allusion lo 
their big boots ; — culotte, drtmk- 
ard. (Convicts') Grossc cavalerie, 
scum cfthe hulks ^ desperate scoun- 
drels ; and. in theatrical lan- 
guage, supernumeraries of the 
ballet, (Tramcar conductors') 
Allcr voir les grosses l^tes, to 
drive the first morning car (o 
Bineau, this part of Paris being 
inhabited by substantial people. 

Qrossiot, OT, (popular), Person of 
gtXkl stitmling^ a "swell- ' 

Grotte, / (thieves'), the hulks. 
Gcrbe & la — , snttenctil to trans- 

rtatioHt or " lagged." Aller i 
— , to 6e transported^ "to 
lump the lighter." 

Grouchy, m, (printers'), petit — , 
one who is late ; small job, the 
composition of which has becfi de- 
layed. An allusion to the alleged 
tardiness of General Grouchy at 
Waterloo. 

Orouiller (sailors'), altrape h. ne 
pas — , mind you do net moz'e. 

Atlrape & ne pat Kroutller, 6t le vicux. 
. . . Tu perdraiK ton Bouffle it lui courir 
apribi.--KiCHiriN, La Cti. 



Groutllis-g^ouillot, m. (pnpular)^ 
J7(vir«, crcnuti, or "scuff." 

Grouin, m. (popular), face^ tit 
" mug." Properly snout. Se 
lecher le — , to kiss one another, 
Donner un coup de — (obsolete), 
to kiss, 

Groule, groulasse, / (popular), 
female apprentice ; smalt senmnt ; 
young " slavey," or " mar- 
chioness," 

Groumer (popular), to grumble, 

Qnibler (thieves*), to grumble: to 

gr<nt'l. 

Vous (niblei comme iin ^ichenurd.— 
RiCMEi-iM. {Vfiu^r^iui tike a Jaiifr.} 

Grue, _/C (familiar), more than fast 
girl ; kept ^coman, or " demirep ;" 
foolish, empty-headed girl cr rtv- 
man. 

Gruerie.y: [ramili.nr), stupidity, 

Grun (Breton cant), chin, 

Gruyftre, w. (popular), morceau de 

— , pockmarked jace, or " cribbage 

face. " 

Guadeloupe, / (popular), mouth, 
or "niiile-irap.' Charter pour 
la — , to eat. See Mastiquer. 

Guano, m. (popular), excrement^ 
or " quaker. ' An allusion to the 
guano of South America. 

Gu^douze, or guitouse, / 
(thieves'), death. 

Gueldre,/. (fishermens*), bait frt- 
pared with shrimps for the fishing 
ef sardines. 

\jL urtline e« jolie en onivani & Pair . . . 
Mnu pour aller U prendre tl faut avoir te 

ncz 
BougremeDC plein de poils, et de poilt 

goudronn6^ ; 
Car la goddre et la rogue avec quoi Too 

arroic 
Lei ceine« qu'on lui tend, ne fleurent point 

la Ta%c. 
Gueldre. lucz mortier de creveties, pan 

fraii. 

RicHRPiK, Z.« Mfer, 



GueUe — Guiuse. 



199 



Guelte, f. (shopmens'), pmenta^e 
alli'^ivea en sales. 

Quelter (shopmen*'), fo mttktaper' 
<tnta^ 9H sales ; to pay such fer- 
cfH/aj^r, 

Guinaud, m. (thieves*), wizarj, 

Gu^naude,/ (thieves'), witch. 

/. (thieves*), /mf^ 



Guenette 

"funk." 



Gucniltes,///. (familiarX trousscr 
ses — , to run away (obsolete), 
"totip one'i* rags i gallop^" 

Ceatil Ambtusftdcur de quUlcft, 
CroyO'inoi, iroiiKcx vot pieritllrt. 
ScAKKOM, Gigatttamathie. 

yOuenon,/ (popular), mistrtssof an 
^ iitahlishmentt the master oein^ 
" le singe." 

Gu^ri, Oiij. (thieves'), set at liberty ; 
free : the prison being termed 
•* hopilal," fljid imprisonment 
"malfldic." 

H^« ! il ut m&Iadc & Cnaclle (il t*t 
■rr^t^ ^ C'acn) . . . il a uiie fiivrechautJe 
(il e>t forument comprorais), rt vout, il 
l«nUquevousftusu<ri(librc)!— ViDocQ. 

Cuprite, /. (popular), k calotins, 
conjeznonal. Gucrilc is properly 
a snttry-box. KnAlcr la — (obso- 
lete), to run away. 

Gu£tri, m. (military), /nw/cr wAtf, 
Jcr some reason or iV4/^, kas to 
make the daysjournty on fov*> 

Gueulard| «r. (thieves'), hag ; 

walUt. 

Ill Irollcnt ordiiulrenienl i Icur ctt^ ua 
neulard avec une rouilUnJe puur mettrc 
i le pivoiv— JL* Jargcik de CArfot. {.They 

I (! 

L G"' 

■ ^ 

t 



r r.A fTot. 
ir tiat a 



irrcn 
gtneratti <»rry fy tktir tidt a w^iitt 
Vfilh m httl4 to keef th* wine im.) 

(Popular) Vn — , a stovf. Guca- 
jard, properly a gormanMur, 

Gueularde, /. (thieves'), pockety 
" cly." "sky-rocket," or "brigh." 
Termed also "fouillmise, louche, 
profonde, or grande." 



Gueulardise, / (populat), daiuty 

food. 

Gueule,/ (popular), d'empeigoe, 
paiate whicJiy by dint of constant 
application to the battle, has become 
proof against the strongest liquors ; 
Icud voice ; — dc raie, ui^iy phiz^ 
or ' ' knocker face ; " — de tourtCi 
stupi»i'looking ftue. Bonne ^-^ 
grotes<ft*e face. Crcvcr la — 4 
quclqu'un, to break one's head. 

Jc te vas crvvcr b cueulc— Althoksb 
Karr. 

Faire U — , /* mtUie a toty/acf. 
Faire 93. — , to gi->e oneself dis^ 
dainfui airs ; to look disgmted. 

Dit do'ic, Mario boo-bcc, ne foil pat ta 
Cuculc— Zola. 

Avoirde l.i — , to bf loHd-mouihed. 
11 n'a que la — , he is a humbug. 
Se chiqucr la — , Aj maul one an- 
other's face. (Military) Koule- 
mcnt dc la — , bctiting fa dinner. 
Se sculptcr une — de hois, togrt 
drunk, or " screwed." for syno- 
nyms see Sculpcer. 

GueuUe, /. (popular), howling; 
meal. Chcrchcr la —, to be a 
parasite, or "quillcr." 

GueuUes, /. //. (popular), ffb/ec- 
tiemable talk, or "blue talk." 

Gueuler (popular), comme un dne, 
to be hud-tongued ; (thieves') — k 
la chienlit, to cry out thiezesl #r 
police! "towhiddlebecf." 

Guculeton, m. (faniilinr and pvpa- 
hir), afecut, or "f-pread." 

Et l« ftrtiua M JOL-rrni pour tcrnr la 
nuifi d'un frire qui offraic iin fuei l:ton 
Cc'rufnd. — £. Montriu 

Ouculctonner (familiar and popu- 
lar), to feast. 

Gueuae, / (popular), mistress; 
prostitute, or "mot." See Qa- 
dooe. Courir la — , to be a whore* 
mffngrr, or " molrpwer." 



200 



Guaix — G tag-no title. 



Gueux, m. (popular), jMoii fxtti full 
of cfmrcoal used as a fo^t'-warmtr 
hy market wonwH^ crv. 

Uoe vieille femme ... est accroupie prH 
(I'un (juciix siir lc« ccndres duquet unc 
ca!e(iere ronruiinc — P. Mahalin. 

Gueux-gueux (obsolete), raseai ; 
the expres&iua being used in a 
friendly manner. 

Guibe(popular)./^j-; — 6 la manque, 
iitme hg; — de &alou, u-oodai 
Ug. Joucr (Ics guibes, to dance ; to 
run auHiy, " lo slope," Sec 
Patatrot. 

Guibole, or guiboUe. /. (popular 
aiid thieves'), /ty, "pin." 

Mais comment? Lui, si ddmoli, si mal 
gt6i it c't'heure, avcc u guibole boiieuM, 
ct >cs bra« rouill^, ct toiitc-t Ics avarici de 
M coaue en retraite, cumment pouirailit 
sabotder ce gaitlardl^ d'aplomb ct irapuT 
— RiciiiPiH, La Gin. 

Jouer ties guiboles, to run; to 
damt. 

Puis, le toir, on avail fichu oa hatthazar 
k tout cauer. et Ju«qu*au jour on avail jou^ 
d«» guiboles. — Zoi,A, L' A isommair, 

Guibon. See Guibonne. 

G uibonne,/. (popular and thieves'), 
Ug ; — carrec, ham. 

Mcsjamb'sMcitfail'&CDmm'deBtrombonet. 
Oui, mais j'sais tircr— gar' li-dettoui !— 
La savntc. aVec met guibonnes 
Comm' celt's d'un cuiard euJ' i|utn2e suua, 
RicHEPiN, La ChamoH d^t Cttfuji. 

Guiche, m. and f. (popular and 
thieves'), due de — , JaiUr, or 
"jigger dubber." From guiche- 
tier, jaiUr. Mec de la — .prosti- 
tute's buUy^ or "Sunday man.*' 
Thus lernicd on account of his 
kiss-curls. For list of synonyms 
see Poisson. l.>es giiiche*. kiss- 
curls. Termed in the English 
slang, ' ' aggerawators," or * * New- 
gate knockers." Regarding the 
latter expression the ^/«J«?/?*r//(J«- 
ary says : " * Newgale knocker,' 
ihe term given to the lock of 
hair which coslermongers and 



thieves usually twist Irack towards 
the ear. The shape is supposed 
to resemble the knocker on the 
prisoners' door at Newgate — a re- 
&cml)l.ince that carries a rather 
unpleasant suggestion to the 
wearer. Sometimes termed a 
'cobbler's knot,' or *cowlick.*" 
Trifouiller les guiches, to comb the 
hair. (Familiar) Chevalier de 
la — , prostitute's bully, or " pen- 
sioner.*' For list of synonymous 
expressions sec Poisson. Lc 
bataillon de la — , tht world of 
bullies. 

Et si la p'tit' poniPtnche 
Su' I'compi' des rouleaux, 
Gare au bataillon d'La Kukbet 
Ccst noLik qu'cst Ics dcv 

RtcHBPiir, 

Un — , a prostttute^s bully, 

Ce*i . . . un guiche, c'est'Ii-dire unjeunc 
homme aiix main* hlanrhr-«, ^ lac-ruchc- 
ccEUTf I'AdoQis det nymphcs des musettes 

Suandccn'cfttpasunetanle t . .. X^moititf 
e» crimes qui se commenent \ Paris est 
concue par le cervcau des pieties, eK^ut^ 
par les bras des chcTs d'attaquc et linie par 
des aasommcurs.— Z^j Mimcim de Mffn- 
litmr ClttNtte. 

Guichemar, gulchemard, gui- 
chemincc, guichemuche. nv. 
(thieves' and popular), jaiUr^ 
"jigger dul)l>er." For guicheticr. 

Guide, m, (thieves'), th4 prime- 
mover in a mMr,lrr, 

C'cst toujour! lc p<fgriof, le guide ou le 
loucheur qui devicnt il priori le chef d'at- 
laque responsible d'une aflTaire crimiuelle. 
— Sf/mfiirts lie JUanxirttr Cttuide. 

Guignard, m. (popular), ill luck. 

Guigne-4-gauche, m. (popular), 
si/uiutiftx' man, vr one with " swi- 
vel eyes." From guigncr, to scan. 

Guignol, m. (popular), jiMrt////wa/*if. 

Guignolant, adj\ (popular), un- 
lucky ; annoying. 

Guignonn6, adj. (popularj^ ^tre 
— , to be unlucky at a game. 



Guillotine skhe — Gy. 



30t 



/. (familiftr). 
To be transported 



OuilloUne s^cbe, 
trans portal ion. 

H expressed in the languAge of 
HnglUh rogues l^the Icrm •'light- 
ing the lumper. 



Ouimbard, m. (thieve^*), the van 
that convns triioneri to gaoL 
Called by English rogues " Black 
Marix" 

Guimbarde, / (popular). »{^r ; 
Tw'.v." heatf ; carria^ ; gooif-fo*'- 
ni>thiMg ti-oman. Properly y^w'/- 
Aarp. 

Out. une frmmc derail laroir ic re- 
loumer, tnais U ticnnc Bvtit loujoun iti 
tine KuimbArdc, un tiu. _Cc tcraitM faule, 
ft'ilt crevai«nl tur U pciiUe. — Zula* VAf 

Also c/tv/. 

Au monent Jusu tA douw plomhvs »« 
■Dnt d4cn>ch^cs ^ U gutmbkrdc <tc U lOlc. 

Coupcr U — k que)qu*un, ta cut 
otu short. 

Moo cei*c et surtoul non n'hknnsuc 
CottpePt U piimbsrde aax pliu foru. 
L. TuTKAi', Lt Tttp*geMr. 

Ouinal, m. (thieves'), usurfr;/ew ; 
•* sheney, Ikey, or moucncy." 
Termed also '*youlre, frise, pied- 
plat." Lc giand — , MoHt dt 
Pi/ti^ or gsvcmment piTivHbroking 
esti^tiikmetU. (Rag*pickcr»')Gai* 
rial, wholesale ra^-deater, 

Guinaliser (thieves'), to hi a umrtr; 
to fkni-n. It had formerly the 
signification ot to drcum<iie. 

Guinche,/. (popular), Uu> danein^ 
saloon in the suburbs^ or low ivine- 
shop. 

A ta poffte de cette guinche, aa tnunictpAl 
M dfewait Hir «e» orfoo dc cuir.— Huvs- 
HAK», Let Sinrt I'mtmrd. 

Ouincher (popular), to danee. Se 
— , tj dress oneself hurriedly and 
badly. 



Guincheur, m. (popular), /re- 
quenter of daneing laleans called 

•*guinchcs.*' 

Guindol, m. (popular), glass. Sif- 
flcr Ic — , to dn'mt, *' to wet one's 
whistle," or "to moisten one's 
cba0er." See Rincer. 

Guinguette,/ (ob«>lele),/u/^W. 

11 faudra que ]« m'en rctotirne it pied 
comme unc guinEiiette qui virnt de fouper 
en villc — Z.^ SAilte Jd* A'.WI'- Juurtt. 

Alao iffw ratOHmne. 

Ca doit s'maoKcr, U levrctifc 
St j'eo pinc« UDC \ Iiuu cUm ... 
J'U ftmi cuitc \ nu euin|[ucttc. 
J I'en fich'ni, moi. dc* pAl'iots t 

Da Cmatillon, P*Hkt. 

Ouirlande,/ (thieves'), chaintvAich 
secttres two convurts together. 

On api>f He ccite chatne ([uiHandc, par- 
ce<]ue, mnonuinc du pied b la ccinturc, oit 
ellc e»I fix^, elle ntuinbe en ri^crivant un 
dcmi-ccrde, dont I'autre extr^miti? est ral- 
tAch«c 'X U oeinlure du camaradc dc chalnc. 
— M. Cnai&TDrHK. 

Guitare, /. (familiar and popular). 
Mead, or "nut ; " monotonous say- 
ing ; well-u'cm plaiitHde. Jouer 
de la — , /tf ^ monototwus. Avoir 
une KautcTclle dans la — , to be 
(racked^ *' to have a lile !<x»e," or 
*' a bee in one's l>onnet.'* For 
the list of synonymous expressions 
sec Avoir. 



Gwammel (Breton cant), 
f net her. 

Gwilloik (Breton cant), wolf 

Gy. or jaspin (ihievcs*). yts^ or 
•'u-her.** Michclsays; "J'estimc 
que gy n'est autre chose que le y, 
pretniire lettre d'l'/n, qui rempla* 
cait ce mot latin dans certains actes 
deprocedure." 

Quo!, In reux mitiflcrt Ojrf— RlCHS* 
PIN. [yVkmt, jwu miMh togm ktmte f Yei f) 



202 



HabilU de soie— Halle. 



H 



Habilli de soie, m. (popular), an 
elegant term for a /u'', "sow's 
baby," or, in Lhe wards of Iii&b 
peasants, "the ginlleman that 
paj-s lhe rint." 

Habiller (popular), quelqu*un de 
taffeta*., to say ill-natnrrJ things 
of otu, fo '* backbite " hitn, to re- 
primand^ to slander^ to scold^ or 
"bully-rag." 

C'est tnoi qui votu I'a habilW de taffetas 
Doir.— A. DalIs, La Mirt fAntcdott, 
CknmtPHntttr. . 

S' — de sapin, to die. See Pipe. 
S' — en sauvngc, to strip oneself 
naked, to strip to the '* buflf," so as 
to be " in one's birthday suit." 

Habin, happtn, hubin, m. (old 
cant), (/f^', or "tyke;" — crgam^, 
or cngamc, rediid dog. 

lift irolknt ceiie craiue dans leur pu«u- 
lard, en uoe come, et quand Ics hubtns la 
ftcnteni, IK ne Icurdiscnt ricn, au contraircj 
iU Totit f£Ee \ ccux qui la Uotlcnt.— Z./ 
J Argon dt tArgfit^ 

A dog is now called by thieves 
"tambour, alarraiste." 

Habiner (thieves'), to bite. 

Habit, m. (populnr), noir, gentie- 
matit or "swell; " — rouge, an 
£nj^tiiAman. 

Let habtu rougn voalatent dan»<;r, 
Main nout les avont fail lauter 
Vivcnt let Sana-culottM. 

Mauricault. 

Etre — noir, to be simple-minded, 
easily duped^ to be a "Hal." 
(Thieves*) Un — vert, an official 
cf the ^* octroi " or office at the ^es 
of a town for the levying of dues on 



goods which are brought in from 
the outsitie. 

C'^tait de I'un de cei fou^, . . . oue les 
contretundieni, au nez et ^ la barbe dcs 
habiti vent, faitaient detcendre la nutt, 
dant let >oii(crrain«. lciir» rn;irchandi*e« 
pour les porter en villc ct \c\ afTranchir de 
\'<xMk>\.— Mimairei de Monsieur Ci»mHe, 

Habitants, m. pi. (popular), /rVr, 
" grey-backed un's.** 

Habitongue, /. {thieves'), for habi- 
tude, habit. 

Hacher de la paille (popular), to 
murder the French language. The 
English have the corresponding 
expression, ** to murder lhe 
Quren's English." AUo to talk 
in German, 

Haleine, f, (familiar), ^ la Domi- 
tien, crucllc, or homicide, offieH" 
sive breath, .'\ccording lo the 
Vict. Comique it used to be said 
of a man troubled with that incom- 
modity: U serait bon trompettc, 
parcequ'il a I'haleine forte. (Popu- 
lar) Kcspircr F — dc quclqu'un, to 
get at one*s secrets, "to pump" 
one, 

Halines,or alines,///, (thieves'). 
thirz'es' implements^ or "jilts." 
Alcnc signifies properly shoe- 
maker^s atvl. 

Haler sur sa poche (<;aiIors'), to 
pay, "toshell out." Hale r, pro - 
l[>erly to hauly to tow. 

Halle. /. (popular^ aux croiitfs, 
stomachy or " brc.id-baskct." 
Also baker's shop. La — aux 
draps, the hed^ "doss, or bug- 
walk," and formerly "cloth- 




HalUbarde—Hartng, 



201 



markel," ui exprcs&ioD used by 
Swift in his PoltU ConvfrsatUn: — 

_ MtM, your vUve ; I liopc your early 
riling will ilo vuu do hana ; I fiad ]ro« arc 
bu[ ju&t uut of ibe ciotb-tBATket. 

(JoumalUts*) La — au son, tkt 
harts CoHstrvatoire de Musique^ 
or national music ami dramatic 
academy. (BuUict') Un harbi«c 
de la — aax copeaux. a bully 
whose paramour bringt him inlmi 
scanty pro^y whosi ** busisuss** 
is slack. 

Hallebarde,/ (popular), tall^hadlv 
dressed tivmaH, a ** gawky guy.' 

Kalot, M. (popular), box on theear^ 
" smack on ihe chopji," 

Haloter quclqu'un |ihieve&*). to 
box on^t earSt * * to smack one*l 
chops ; " (0 ply the belltrofs, 

Hatoteur, m, (thieves'), vn$ fcho 
uses bellows ; one who blffios, 

Hatotin, m. (thieves'), bellotes. 
From holeter, to pant. 

Hancher (popular), se — , to put 
on a Jaunty lotrk ; to take up an 
arrogant position^ to be '*oo the 
hii;h jinks," or lo ** look big.'* 

Hane, /. (ihievc»'),/«r//, "skin," 
or *• pcgc.'* Teraied also 
" hennc. boucbon, morlingue, 
momif." 



11 m cocBcne la tnunontan«, 

A^vta avoir cus^ U hanne 

I>c ce gnuid xvt qui pread le toia 

IV )ut Jonoer cbuKc de loin. 

VEmb^rroMdt Im/tirt de ttfatuaire. 

Casser la — 4 quelqu'un, to 
steal someone's P*"'^t '* lo bur a 
akin." 

Hanneton, m. (ramiliar). mono- 
mania. Avoir un — dan» Ic 
plafond, to be craeied, or " to 
have a bee in one's bonnet." See 
Avoir, Saoul comme un — , 



eomplHdy drunk, " as drank aft 
Davy'i «m." 

" Davy's aow," The origin of 
this cxprevioa, according ta 
DavMS* Smpplmimtsty SstgUtk 
ClatMrr, u the foXUsmiag : — 
'' David Uoyd, a Welshman, had 
a tow with six Ic^ ; on one oc* 
caston he brought some friextds 
and a&ked (hem « hetbcr cbey had 
ever seen a sow like thai^ not 
knowing that in his abtrocc bis 
drunken wife bad turned out the 
animaJ, and gone to lie down in 
the sty. One of the party ob- 
icrved that it was the drunkest 
sow he had ever beheld.'" Other 
synonymous expreaions are, 
'* drunk as a drum, to be a wheel- 
barrow, sow drunk, dmnk M & 
fish, as a lord, as a piper, as a 
fiddler, as anu." 

Hannetonner (familiar), to hate a 
hobby zergiHg on momtmania, 

Happcr Ic taillis (ihicvc5'), A>/fi'/^ 
•'to guy." See Patatrot. cToro- 
pare with the expression, now 
obsolete, gagncr le taillis, which 
has the same signification. 

Happona le taillii, nn crie au vinaicrv 
sur ootuaillo^— iLr /mrgam it* fAr^. 
iThfv «rt "whiddlinic bccr,"«it^iM' mtmj^ 

guy.-) 

Happin. Sec Habin. 

Happiner. See Habiner, 

Harauder (popular), quelqu'un (ob- 
solete), to cry out after oncj to- 
Pumsue one with tnsulti. 

Hardi, adj\ (popular), i la soupe 
is said of one Tvho ts more ready /a 
eat than to fight. I ! ardi I couragt ! 
with a Will! go it! 

Hareng, m. (thieves'), faire des 
ycux de — ii r|ucl<|u'uii, foput out 
on/s eyes. (Printers'! Harengs, 
name given by printers to fellow* 
•tvorkers who do but Utile tvork. 



•04 



Hareng- Saur^Haussier. 



Hareng-Saur. m. (populir). gen- 
aarme ; a fuembtrofthe SotiHe dt 
Saint- Vimtnt de Pauly a rdigious 
association. (Ruuglw*) Piquer aoo 
pas He — , to dame. 

Hariadan Barberousse (thieves'), 
Jtitts Christ. 

II rieolatt malgr^ le Mnglier qui voulait 
lui fiurc becqueter H«nadAt) Bvbcraussc. 
— Vitiocg. 

Hartcander [{topular), to Jind fault 
'.i'tth om ab&ut triflei. 

Haricot, m. (jxtpiilar), body. Ca- 
valer, oi courir sur le — ^ A' 
amu^y^ to here one, **\o spur" 
uwc. (Thieves') Un — vert, a 
dumsy thief or one **not up to 
slum." Sc lavcr Ics haricols, to 
l*e transported^ or '* lagged." 
(Familiar) H6tel des haricots 
formerly the prison Jor undisci' 
plined nationai guards, Ihe staple 
food for prisoners there being 
liaricot beans. 

Harlcoteur» w. (thieves'), exeat- 
tioner. Termed "Houart" in 
the sixteenth century, that is, one 
ivho breaks criminals on the wheel. 

Harmonaria, m. (thieve**), M(wV, 
or '• row." Si le eoiisalte fait de 
rhannonar^il faut Irlialancarf^er 
dans la vassarcs, if ihe fellow 
makes any noise loili pitch him in^ 
to the water.. 

Harmonic, /. (popular), fairc de 
r — , tp make n noise, '* to kick up 
a row." 

Hsrnais, m. (thieves*), cards that 
hiti-e hen tampered toith^ or 
"slocked broads;" dcthes^ or 
"clobber;" — de grive, mili- 
tary uniform, l^vcr Ics — , to 
sell stolen clothes^ " to do clobber 
at a fence's." 

Harpe,/ (general), jouer de la — , 
to silly take liberties with a "womon 
iy stroking her dress, as Tartuffe 



Hid wlien pretending to ascertain 
the softncssof Elmirc'sdress. TT»e' 
expre&>ion is old; it is tc be met 
with in the Diti. Comiqne. 

Jouer de U harpc signifio^ouer dct auiot 
Bupr^ d'unc fctnmc, ni p^itmcr, lui touchct 
Is nattite, U fartiiuilltr, \m. cUtumer, la 
chatoui.Ur avcc lo doigu.— J. La Koux, 
DtQiiffHHtkift Comiqut. 

(Thieves') Harpe. prison-grated 
7i/indo'uf. Jouer <le la — , to be in 
prison, or **in qti.id." Pincer de J 
la — , to put oneself at a -ivindaw, I 

Harper (popular), to ca/ch, "to 
nab ; *' to seise, " to grab." 

Harp ions, m. pi. (popular and 
thieves'), feet, or " dew-beaters ; " 
hands, or "dukes." From the 
old word harpier, concerning 
which the Victionnaire Comiqm 
says : — 

Harpier. Pour voter ou friponner im- 
punvment, prcntlre gu cnlcvcr par fore*, 
commc lea harpiev 

Harponner (popular), to seisf, "to 
grab : " — locquardemenl, to lay 
rough handsoMf'togij'eonea shak- 
ing. 

Hasard ! orb! (printers'), ironical 
exclamation mcAnmg that hap* 
pens by chance, of course I 

HaiiB, oraUa, m.(5hopmciis'), appel- 
lation applied by shopmen to a per- 
son who, after much bargaining, 
leaves without punhasiug tmy' 
thing. 

Hausse-col, m. (militao*)* <'«'''- 
rid^e-hox. The expression has 
become obsolete. 

Hauasier, m, {fimiliar), a "bull," 
that is, one who agrees to puiehase 
stoci: at a future day, at a stated 
price, but who simply speculates 
for a rise in public securities to 
render the transaction a profitable 
one. Should stocks falf, the 




Hau5s%nannisation — HiroudelU. 



205 



" ball " U then called upon to pay 
the difference. The "bear" is 
the oppcKiite of the "bull," the 
former selling, the latter purchxt- 
ing — the one operating for a/;//, 
the other for a rise. They are 
respectively called 'Micbhaler" 
in Berlin, and **contremine" in 
Vienna. 

Haussmannisation,/ See below. 

Haussmanniser (fnmiliar), to puH 
daivn hoxtses whol(Sti!e^ after the 
fashion of M. Haus^mann, a Pre- 
fect of the Seine untlcr the Third 
Empire, who laid low many of 
the old houses of Paris, and 
opened some broad passages in 
the city. Corresponds in some 
degree to "boycoit." 

Haut-de-tire.jw. (thieves'), ^rftrA*-/, 
**haiiis, kicks, sit-upons." 

Haute, f. ami adj. (general), for 
haute »oct<Jt^, tkt ki^lur iiasi of 
any social stratum^ '*pink," 

II y ■ lorstte « lorclte. MademoiKlIc de 
Suni-PhanmoDd cute de U haute. — K 
FftVAL. 

La — hicherie, kigMer flast of co- 
fotfett tht iverld of "demi-reps." 
Un eKarpe de la — , a iwindUr 
wwviHg in good jociety. La — 
ptgre, rwcU moby and, used ironi- 
cally, ^od society^ Un restaurant 
de la — , a fashionable restaurami, 
a "swell ■ restaurant. 

Si nous nc soupom p«i daiu la haute, jc 
ae Mitjcuire oil nous irans^ceiubeun-ci. 

— G. DR NftRVAL. 

Hautocher (lliieves*), to auend; to 

rue, 
Haut-temps. m. (thieves'), f.^r 

autan, hft. 

Havre, or grand havre, m. 

(thieves*), Co<f. Literally tht 
harbour^ great harbour. Le — 
^aide m^zi^rei God protect mo. 



Heol ar blei (Rrcton cant), the 
moon. 

Herbe,/. (]x>pular), I grimper.yfw 

bosoms or shait/ders. This phnu»e 
is obsolete ; — it la vache, ilubt 
of eards. 

Quinte mangcuM portant son point dans 
lltcrbc \ la vache.— Zola, L' Aitcmmoir. 

}Ierbe satnte, absinthe. To all 
appearance this is a corruption of 
absinthe. 

HerpUs, m, (thieves'), farthing. 
Sans un herpli* dans ma (ouillouse, 
without a farthing in my p,\het, 

Herr, m. (general), a mu^ o/Zw/tw- 
trtmey one of position or talent^ a 
'•swell.'* 

Herae. /. (theatrical), lighting ap- 
paratus on thi sides of the stage 
tohich iiluminntesthoie partt whuh 
receive no light from thechanJeiier, 

Herz, or hers, m. (thieves'], master^ 
or " boss ; " gent/emaM, or ** nib- 
cove.** From the German hcrr, 

Higb-bicbery. /. (familiar), the 
Twrld offoshionab/e eocottes. 

Quelqae tupcrbe cr^turo de la high- 
btcmry qui tnlne son dDtnino k queueavec 
les Bin s«>uircrain« d'une maiqtiue d'auLre- 
foii. — P. MaHalin. 

Kirondeau, m, (tailors'), journey- 
man tailor who shifts from one 
employer to another. An allusion 
to the swallow, a migratory bird. 

Hirondelle,/. (familiar),/fiiffr Am/ 
plying en the Seine; (popular) 
commercial traveller ; joHmey^ 
man tailor from the country 
temporarily established in Pans; 
hackney coachman ; — d'hiver, 
reiaiUr of roasted chestnuts ; — de 
pont, vagrant who seeks a shelter 
at night under the arches of bridges; 
— du bitimenl, mason from thi 



306 



Hisser — Hotttriau, 



tountry who comes yearly to work 
in Paris. (Thieves') Une — , 
variety of z-a^idont/, 

L«« Htrondcltes, tes Rotnuilcheb han« 
YaicTit^ cutntne Ic* tJiijp«r«, rinirfrieur de 
itur\ •outcrntins mKindable^. Kotnuii* 
cheU et Hirondtrlles vcnaient y dormir, 
»(mper ei m^diier Iturscrimcft.— Jtf/MMrri 
dg Momieur Ctamtir. 

Une — dc potence, a ^emiarme 
(ol>rf3lete). 

Hisser (popular), to ^ve a •whistle 
call; — un gnndin. See Gandin. 

Histoires,/. //. (general), menses. 
Termed also "atiaires, cardinates, 
anglais," 

Homard, w. (popular), doorkeeper^ 
or scrz-nnt in red Itvery, (Military) 
spahis. Tt'C spahis, called also 
cavaliers rouges, are a crack corps 
of Arab cavalry commanded by 
French officers. There arc now 
four regiments of spahis doing 
duty in Algeria or in Tonkin. 

Homicide, m. See Haleine. 

Homme» m. (familiar), au sac, 
rii-h 'ntin, cue who is "well bal- 
lasted." Un — aftlche, a " sand- 
wich " matt, ihat is, a man bear* 
ing a back-and-front advertising 
boiird. Avoir son ieune — , to bt 
eirtnik, or "light.* See Pom- 
pette, (Thieves )Un — deIellrcs, 
for'^cr : — dc peine, ohi t>ffemia\ 
"jail-bird." (Printers') Homme 
d c bo j s, w •crkfitan wAa repairs 
wooden fixtures of formes in a 
printing shop. 

Homme de lettre?, or singe, m, 

(printers'), compojitpr. 

\jt cnmpoulcur c&l un lup^le au(|ucl on 
donnc la denomination de " un^c." . . . 
Pour votu e'Lilouir it thture une "matiire 
pleine" de moik ^utvoque« : " Cuunnan- 
<lj(e, bordereau, banque, impo«it)oii» " et 
cdAavcclaKravittf d'une" Mincrve." Fier 
du ranii quit occupe dann I'itniirimene, 
vc chevabcr du " compokteui " t'tiittiulc 



"homme de leltres," mau c'ent un "faux 
tiuD " qu'il a pht dans ka '*galtfe," car ds 
tous \c* ouvrages auitqiicN il a mil An 
**si£a.iiure> " ci qiiM pnftcnd a»oir "com- 
powt," il lui terail difficile de '* juitifier" 
one It^ne, &c. Scc.~/J^/aratiam d'amonr 
ttttm imfrimtmr topograph* A uiu jeune 
broihcMse, iBSfi. 

Hommelette, m, (popular), man 
drjoiJ of energy^ "sappy." 

Honnftte, m. (thieves*), the springs 

Honteuse, /, etre en — . See 
Lesbien. 

Hopital, m, (thieves'), prison^ or 
"stir." See Motte. A thief in 
prison is said to be '* malade," 
and when liberated he is, of course, 
* ' gucrt. " ( Popular) Goujon d*— , 
leech. 

Horizontale. / (familiar), prosti- 
tute^ or "mot;" — de grandc 
marque, fashionable coeotte* or 
"pretty horse-breaker." For list 
of over one hundretl and ihiny 
synonyms, see Gadoue. 

Horloger, m. (nopuhr), avoir sa 
monirc chez 1— , /j have one's 
7t>atcA at the paTtfn broke r*Sf ** in 
lug," or "up thcspoui." 

Horreurs, / //. (popular), broad 
talk^ or "blue talk." Dire des 
— , lo talk " smul.'* Faire des — , 
fo take liberties with Tvomen^ " lo 
fiddle," or "to slewthcr,"as the 
Irish have it. 

Hoato. or austo (soldiers' and 
thieves'), prison, or *'slir," see 
Motte ; (popular) house^ or 

" crib." 

Hotel, m. (popular), de lamodestie, 
poor lodgings ; — des haricots, 
priion, or *'jug." See Motte. 
Coiichcr a I' — de la belle etoile, 
tff sleep in the open air^ oh milker 
Earth, or " lo skipper it." 

Hottehau, hotteriot, m. (popular), 
rag-picker, or "loi-picker." From 
hottc, toieker basket. 



Honblon — Hurlubicr, 



Houblon, m. (popular). Mi. 

Houpe dentelie. /, (freemasons'), 
tifs of brothrrhoini. 

Housette, /, (thieves*), ^mV. or 
** tlaisy root," Tralne»cul -les 
housettes. a iaftfrdimaihm. 

Houssine, /. (thieves'), Jean de 
V — , stkk ; blud^on. 

Houste i la p«iUet {thieves'), oui 
\i'ifh him / 

Hubin, M. (thieves'), dog^ or 
•MyUe." 

Apris ii« leur^enfcif^neni Ii aquiffcr cer> 
la gruiidcnt.— Z.r Jarj^nn dt i'A rgat, 

^Ifubins, m. pt. (old caul), tramps 
who prttend to kavt bt^n bitten by 
rahik dfigf cr wolvex. 



palm." For synonyiru 9cc Qui- 
Dui. Pamper les huiles, ta drink 
wint to excess^ or ** to swill." 

Hull (theatrical), batire un — , /« 
cut a caper. (Familiar) Un — 
ressorts, a handsome^ uv// - aP' 
pointed two-karse tarriaf^. ( M i I i • 
lary) Flanqucr — ci sept, to give a 
man a fortnight t arrest, 

Y vx'x flanqu^ huii-«t-wpt I. cau«« que 
j'avais tfgar^ le boucban de vaoa moaique- 
lon. — G. CoL'BTELlHE. 

Huitres,y: //. (popular), de gueux, 
r nails ; (thieves') — dc Varcnnc«, 
beanj. 

Huttrifier (familiar), s' — , fa hecomi 
c^mmonploie and dull o/inteiUct, 
From huitre, figuratively a/ool. 



I 



Ltt hnbin* triment ordiaurcmcnt awe 
4IIU iiiq'j« oomnM iU bicnt k Siint-Hubert. 
—I.« Jitrf»9 dt r Argot. 

Sniiil Hubert was credited \rith 
(he fK)wer of miraculously curing 
hydrophobia. There is still a 
cli'irch in Belgium, not far from 
Arlon, consecrated to Saint Hu* 
bert, to whoM shrine rabid people 
(in more than one sense] repair 
to be curctl. 

Hugolfitre, m, (familiar), y^niZ/iirii/ 
admirrr of the worts of V. f/ugo. 

Hugrement (thieves'), mtuh^ or 
"ncddy '• (Irish). 

Huile. f. (general), vitu ; sttsficion ; 
— blunde, b^er ; — de bras, dc 
poignet, physical strength ; w&rk^ 
or ' ' clbiiw grease ; *' — de cotret, 
blows admimsftred with a stick ; 
might t>c rendered hy *'s:irrup 
oil. ' The Diet. Camique has ; 
" Huile de cotret, pour Lriu;is de 
baton, bastonnade. 

Qti'iU vinvk«-nt voiu ftf>lt«r Im ^pfeules 
<le rhuile de cotrci.— £•*« i^uUkftte. 

llaik de aiain«. mcney^ or "oil of 




Humecter (popular), »' — les anoTO- 
dales, la dalle du cou, or Te 
pavilion, to drinky **to wet one's 
whistle." For synonyms see 
Rincer. 

Huppi, ^j. (popular), daim — , 
rich person, one Jvha is "well 
ballasted." 

Hure,/. (popular), head, or " tibby." 
Properly wi/d boar's head. Sec 
Tronche. 

Hur^, adj. (thieves'), richt or "rag 
sp lawyer." 



208 



Hussard — Imbiber. 



Hossard, m. (popular), ^ qoatre 
roues, soldier cfthe train or army 
strvue corps. Elixir de — ^hrasuly. 
(Popular and thieves*) Hussard 
de la gnillotine, ^miamu on dtUy 
at executions. 

II est Tcnu pour uuiTer Madelone . . . 
maUcommeatf . . . lei husianU de la guil- 
kMiiie loat Ul— Balzac. 



Hossard de la vtuve, gmdanm on 
dttty at executions. 

Oai, c'est pour aniourdlini, les hussards 
de la Tcure (autre Dom, nom terrible de la 
mteanique) soot commandes.— Balzac. 

Hnst-mnft (thieves*), thank yot€ 
very much. 



Icicaille, icigo (thieves*), here. 

lenna (Breton cant), to decervct int' 
pose upon, 

lerchem (roughs*), to ease oneself. 
A coarse word disguised. It is of 
**back slang "formation, with the 
termination em. 

ler^e, parler en — , to use the 
word as a suffix to other words. 

Ignorantin (common), a "fr^e des 
Bcoles de la Doctrine chritienne.''^ 
Thus called on aca>unt of their 
ignorance. They are lay brothers, 
and formerly had charge of what 
were termed in England rf^ged 
schools. 

Igo (thieves'), here* La cham^e 
est — , the woman is here. 

11 (popular), y a de Tempile, or de 
Tempilage, there is some trickery^ 
unfair play^ cheating; — y a de 
Tempile, la peau alurs ! je me 
d^bine, they are cheating^ to the 
deuce then I fll go ; -~ y a des 
aretes dans ce corps-U, an 
euphemism to denote that a man 



makes his living off a prostitute's 
eastings, alluding to the epithet 
" poisson " applini to such crea- 
tures ; — a plu sur sa mercerie 
is said of a luoman with thin 
skinny breasts ; — tombera une 
roue de voire voiture is said of a 
person tn too high spirits, to 
express an opinion that his mirth 
will soon receive a datnper. (Thea- 
trical) II pleut 1 is used to denote 
that a play is a failure, that it is 
being hissed down, or ** damned.'* 

II eat midi ! (popular), an excla- 
motion used to warn one who is 
talking in the presence of strangers 
or others to be prudent and guarded 
in his speech. It also means i/V 
of no use, it is all in vain. 

lUico, m. (popular), grog prepared 
on the sly by patients in hospitals, 
an extemporized medicine made 
of su^r, spirits, attd tincture of 
cinnamon. 

Imbecile & deux roues, m. (popu- 
lar), bicyclist* 

Imbiber (popular), s'— le jabot, to 
drink, "to wet one*s whistle." 



TmmobtliU — Infect 



209 



Immobility, / (painters'), mer- 
ccnairc (tc I' — , model who makts 
a living by sitting to painters. 

Impair, m. (familiar), fiiire un — , 
tit matte a blundfr^ " lo put one's 
foot in it." (Thieves') Impair ! 
iMi out ! — , acre nous v'li nobles, 
lock cut, he en your guards we are 
rcfo^nized. 

Imperathce, /, for imperialc, top 

of i>us. 
Impure (popular), abbrevialtOD of 
imp4^*riaie, or tap of bus, 

Impiriale,/ (general), tuft of hair 
on the (kin. Fomwrly termed 
'* royale." The word has passed 
into the language. 

Importance (general), d* — , 
stroni^Vy vigenmi/y. J' te vas le 
mouchcT d' — , rit let fiim know 
a piete of my mind ; fit snttb him, 

Impot, m. (thieves'), autumn. 

>Impressionisme, m, (familiar), 
sckpol of artists Ufho paint nature 
Oicordtng to the *^ersonaJ impres- 
sion they reeeivi. Some carry the 
process too far, perhaps, for if 
iheir retina conveys to them an 
impression that a horse, for in- 
stance, is indigo or ultramarine, 
they will reproduce the image in 
Oxford or Cambridge bloc on the 
canvas. Needless to say, the re- 
sult is sometimes startling. 
Impressioniste, «., painter of 
the school called impression! smc 
(which see). 

Impure, / (familiar), kept wcman^ 
or '* demi-rep." For the list of 
kynonj-ms see Gadoue. 

Incommode, m. (thieves'), AwVrw, 
lamp-post. Properly inconvenient^ 
thieves being lovers of darkness. 

Incommod*. adj, (thieves'), fire 
— , to be taken reJ-handtd, to be 
"nabbed" in the aet. 



Inconobri, m. an*/ o^'. (thieves*), 
stranger; unknoton, 

Incroyable. m. (familiar), dandy 
u HtLr the Directotre at the end of 
the last eentury. The appellation 
was given to swells of (hat period 
on account of their favourite ex- 
pression, •' C'est incroyable !" pro- 
nounced c'est incoyable, accord- 
ing to their custom of leaving out 
the r, or giving it the sound of w. 
For synonyms see Gommeux. 

Indei (popular), iravailicr i l'— , 
to work at reduced wages, 

Indicateur, m. {gcncnX), spy in the 
p*tv of the police^ "nark. Gene- 
rally a street liawker, sometimes 
a thief. 

II y ■ deux cenres d'indicaieun : Ics in- 
dicaleurs sur place, lelt que let marchuKts 
de chalnes de tilrettf ct lea marctuuidi 
d'aiguilleft, btmbeluticn d'ttcouion, faux 
areucles, etc.. et lea indicatct<r» errariu: 
ourcTuuids de balais, faux intiimes, mu^i- 
cten% ainbuUnit : - . . II y avajt, soui I'cnt- 
pirc, des indicateur* ju«quc dant Ic Kaut 
commerce parisicn.— .V/twufV/i de Mvit- 
tintf Ctaudt. 

Indicairice, / (familiar), female 
spy in the employ of the polue. 

Indigent, m. (bus conductors'), 
t)utside pasunger c*n a bus. Thus 
termeil on account of the outside 
fare being half that inside. Indi* 
gent, properly pauper. 

Inexpressibles, m. pi. (familiar), 
from the English, trousers. 

Infantehe,/. (popular), entrerdans 
I'—, to become pregnant, or 
*' lumpy.** Compare with the 
Knglish expression "infantry,"* 
nursery term for children. 

Infect, Oil/, (general), utterly bad. 
The expression is applied lo any- 
thing. Ce cigare est — , that 
cigar is rank. Ce livrc est — , 
that book is worthless. Un — in- 
dividu, a contemptible imdtvidua/. 



210 



Infectados — Irrt^conciUabU, 



Infectados, m. (ramilinr), cktap 
<iS^f* '* cabbage leaf." 

Infirieur, adj. (popular), cela m'est 
— , that is all tht samt to mt, 

Infirme, w. (popular), ^/ww/y/W/iTO. 

lU Mjnn^reni tant bien que tnal cf\ in- 
firmn, ct lc» gcn> accounireot au tefkajc 
— L. CladF-U OmpdrmilUt. 

Ingrat, m. (thieves'), clumsy thief. 

Ingurgiter son bilan (popular), to 

die^ or "to snuff it" See Pipe. 

loodore, a*ij, (ramilior), soyez 
calmc el — , bt cool ; dofCt get 
excited ; be cnlm ; be decortms^ or, 
as the Americans say, *' puU jour 
jacket down." 

Inouisme. m. (ramiliar), ruisselant 
d' — , extraordtnarily fine^ good^ 
dusking^ ** slap up, or tzing 
Uing." 

Inseparables, m. pi, (familiar), 
ci^^ars sold at Jifteen cefttimes a 
couple. 

Insinuant, w. (thieves'), apothe- 
cary ; one wlio performs^ or used to 
perform, the " clysterium donarc " 
of Moliere. 

Insinuantc,/. (thieves'), syringe. 

Insinuation,/ (thieves'), clyster. 

Insolpe, *H. and adj> (thieves'), 
ittsoUfit, "cheeky." 

Inspecteur des paves, ///. (popu- 
lai), workman out of workx or 
"out of collar." 

Institutrice, /. (popular), femaie 
w/io keeps a brothti ; the mistress 
of an " academy." 

Instruit, adj. (thieves*), ctrc — , to 

ite tt skilful thief ^ a " B**"nof'" 
Inaurg^ de Romiliy, w. (popular), 

lump of excrement, or " quakcr." 
Inlcrloquer (soldiers'), to taik. Je 

vais aller en — avcc Je marchi. 

chef, J will talh amtt it to tht 

quartermaiter ser:*ettttt. 



Interver, entraver (thieves'), /* 
wtnderstand. Je n'entravc out Ic 
dail, I do not understanJ^ J don't 
"twig." Inlcrverdanslcsrannes, 
to allow oneself to be * ' stuffed up," 
to be *• bombooiled." 

Intime, m. (theatrical), man who is 
paid to applauii ai a thecxtre* 
rermed also *• romain." 

Intransigeant. m. (familiar), poli- 
ticiiin of extreme opinions who 
will not saetifife an iota of hts 
programme. The reverse of op- 
port uniste. 

Inutile, m, (thieves'), notary public, 

Invalo, m. (popular), for invalidc, 

pensioner of the * ' //S. el des Inva- 

lidei.^ a home for old or disahted 

soldiers. 

Invite,/ (popular), faire une — i 
I'as IS said of a tvoman who mahei 
advances to a man. 

Inviteuse,/. (general), vwtress ai 
certain cafh /cr»ii*i3f '* caboulots." 
Her duties, besides serving the 
customers, con<ii««i in getting her* 
self treated by them to any amount 
<'f liquor; hut, to prevent acci- 
dents, the drinks intended for the 
invileiise are generally water or 
some mild alcoholic mixture. The 
inviteuse often plies also another 
trade — that of a semi- prostitute. 

lot felis (Breton cant), /wrWaJfr of 
buckwheat flour. 

loulc'h (Breton cant), giddy girl, 

Iou1c*ha (BrctoD cant), to play tht 
giddy girl. 

Ip^ca, m. (mililar)'], le p4re — , the 
reginuntai surgeon. 

Irlande, / (thieves'), cnvoycr en 
^, to send anything from prison. 

IxT^conciliable, m. (familiar), m/w- 
ber of the oppoiUion under Napo- 
leon ill. 



Isgourde^Jalusot, 



%X\ 



2sp>urdi, /. (popular), /or, 
"wattle," or "luu.'' 

Isolag^c, m, (thieves'), ahamion' 
ment ; ttitxing m the iutrk, 

Isoler (ihicvci'), tpfffrsake, 

Isoloifi fff. (familiar), tc mettre 
sur r — , to forsakt on/sfruiuit, 

Italian (Breton cant), n$m. 

Ilalique, / (popular), avoir les 
jambet en — , to he hath/jr'UggttJ. 
Pincer son — , fo reei ahout. 



Itou, adv. (popalar), also, Moi — , 

I t0O. 

Itrer (thieves*), to Aovr. 
Jltre inoucfiai1I4 le babilUrd.— Ar 7«^ 

IvoircB, f. (popular), teethe 
"iTorie*. Faire un cfiet d' — , 
to short' on/s UftA^ ** to flash one'i 
ivories." 

Xzabel (Breton cant), brandy. 



Jabot, m. (popular), itomacA, or 
'• brcad-baiket." Meant for- 
merly Afortt Srmjt. Chouette — , 
fi'ne hnasts. Faire son — , to 
eat. 

Jacque, m. (thicTes')i a fw. 

Jacqueline, /. (soMien*), cavalry 

i Zi.'Ord. 

Jacques, w. (thieves'), crowbar^ 
"James, or the stick." (Military) 
Faire le — , /# manetmrrt* 

Jactance, / (thieve** and cads'), 
sp^etk^ talhtn^^ "jaw." Properly 
silly caiHcit. Caleter la — , to 
stop tnlkint, *' to put a clapt>er to 
one's jaw. ' Quelle sale — U a 1 
Jtato he dots talk I Faire la — , 
to talh, "to jawj'* to qtustian^ 
■or " cross-kid.' 



Jacter (popular and thieves'), to 
s/vaA, ** to rap ; " to cry out ; 
to standrr. Meant formerly to 
boast. 

Jacteur, m, (popular), sptaker. 

Jaffe, / (popular), soup ; box on tk« 
car. Kehler one — , to boj one's 
ears. (Thieves') Jaffea, chteks, 
or •'chops." 

Jafller, m. (thieves*), ganfem, or 
"smelling cheat.** 

Jaffin. m. (thieves'), gardener. 
Termed in English slang " master 
of the mint." 

Jaluzot. m. (general), umhrelta^ or 
•'rain-nappcr, mush, oi gingham.*' 
From the name of the proprietor 
of the " Printemps," who, being 
a wealthy man, said to hts shop- 
men that he had not the means to 



212 



J a mbe — }a n 'iliage. 



buy an umbrella. So goes an 
jdiolic »ong : — 

II n'a pM de Jahiwt. 
Ca *a oeo qudnd il ikit beau, 
MaU quatKl il lombc de I'cau, 
II est trempe juv)u'aux o*. 

J*mbe,/. (popuUr)^ de vin, intojci' 
tatioH. S*en aller sur uoe — , to 
drink only a giass or a bottU of 
wim. rlnieves*) Jambe en Tair 
(obsolete), the gallows^ "scrag, 
nobbing - cheat, or government 
signpo&t." (Familiar and popu- 
lar) Lever la — , fo dame the eatt' 
can, see Chahut ; is said also 
efa girt toko itads a fast, disrepu' 
table sort of life. Faire — de 
vin bad forroerfy the signification 
of to drink heavily^ " lo swill." 
t>H ce matin, mesateun, j'ai fait Jambe 

dcvtA.— La RArtNtiKB. 

Jambes de coq, thin Ugs^ " spindle- 
shanks.** Jambcs de coton, 2e€ak 
legs, Jambcs en manche de veste, 
bandy Ugx. (Military) Sortir sur 
les jftmb« d'un autre, to be confined 
to hanacks or to the guard*room, 

Jambinet, m. (railway porters*), 
coffee with brandy, 

Jambon, m. (popular), violin. 
(Military) Kaire un — , to break 
one's muskef, a crime sometimes 
punished by incorporation in the 
companies dedisciphne in Africa. 

Jambonneau, m. (popular), neplus 
avoir de chapclurc sur Jc — , to 
be bald. For synonymous terms 
sec Avoir. 

Jambot, m. (obsolete), fenis. The 
term is used by Villon. 

Jappf. /. (popular), prattling, 
•*jaw." Tab la — , hold your 
"jaw,'' "put a c]ap(»cr to your 
mu^','* or "don't shoot off your 
mouth " (American). 

Japper (popular], to scream, to 
squall. 

JardLn^ m. (popular), fairc du — , to 
i/ui:, " to Larry on." 



Jardinage, m. (popular), ruHnit^ 
down, slandering. 

Jardiner (thieves' and cads'), to 
slander ; to run down ; to quit. 

Lea goncicn qui Dout jardtacnt, 
r s'rwu vraiueat j'tc&. 

RicHsnK. 

Jnrdiner quelqu*un, to make 9M 
talk so as to eltcit Mis secrets from 
him, to " pump " one. 

Jardineur, m. (popular and thieves'), 
ntan who seeki to discover a secret ; 
inquisitive man, a kind of " Paul 
Pry.*' 

Jardtnier, m, (thieves'), see Jar- 
dineur; a thief who operates in 
the manner described at the word 
'*charriagc." 

JargoUe, or jergole, / (thieves'), 
//ormandy. 

Jai^oUier, m. (thieves'), a nativeof 
Normandy, 

Jargouiller (thieves'), to talk in- 
coherently. 

Jarguer (thieves'). See Jan. 

Jamaffe,/ (thieves'), garter, 

Jarrelifcre,/ (thieves'), toaichckain, 
or ••slang.** 

Jars, m. (thieves*), canty or "flash.** 
Devider, jaspiner le — , or jarguer, 
to talk cant^ "to patter flash." 
Entraver or cnicrvcr le — , to 
understand cant. The language 
of thieves is also termed " thieves* 
Latin, " as appears from ihefollow- 
ing quotation : — 

** Go away." I heard her aay, '* tfacra't 
a dear man," and then someirnnf; about 
a "queer cuffin," thai'i a jiiMice in (hete 
camera' thieuu' LAltn. — KiNGSUtV. ifVf/- 
ward Ha. 

Entendre le — had formerly the 
significatioa of/^ be cunning, 

Jarviltage, m. (thieves*), wffr.rjrt- 
tion ; dirt. An illustrious Fcg- 
Ushman, whose name 1 foiget, 



JarvilUr — f&usaUm. 



213 



pave once the definition of dirt as 
** matter in the wrong place." 

Jarviller fihieve**), to converse^ 
** 10 rap ; to dirfy. 

jAsante./ (thieves'), praytr^ 

Jaser (thieves'), to pray, 

Jaspin, or gy (thieves'), yts^ or 
"usher." 

Y B-t-il ua castu dans cctl« ver£ncl 

«j| Mi>i/t'tnt in tkh country 1 )'ri.) 

The word has also the meaning of 
Mo/, language^ "jaw." 

J'ai bicn quc'qu* put un camcrlache 
(^u'«M dab dans la maKittrat'inuclMk 
boa Jaspin esbtoque left badaudt. 

KiCHsriN. 

Jaspinement, m. (thieves*), bark' 
trig 0/ a dog. 

Jatpiner (thieres*). to folk, tosfeakt 
" to rap, lo patter. " Termed also 
"debagoulcr, dcvider, gazouiUcr, 
jacter, jardiner, haver, Icnir le 
crachoir ;" — higome, to tcJk in 
slangs •• to patlcr flash.'* Lccabe 
jasptne, the dog har^s. Jaspincr 
de rorgue, to inform agaiHslf *'to 
blow the gaff." 

Jaspineur, m. (thieves*]^ taikrr; 

orator, 

Jaune, m. (thieves'), sumitur ; 
(popular) brand}: Sec Tord- 
boyaux Jaunc.fto/i/, or "redge." 
Aimer avec un — d'cjcuf i> smd of 
a wemaM who dfcrivts herktubanJ 
or hvtr. An allusion to the al* 
leged favourite colour of cuckolds. 

Jaiinet, jauniau, or sigue, m., 

^td coin, "canary, yclIow-boy, 
goldfinch, yellow-hammer, quid, 
shiner, ginglc-boy." 

Jaunier, m. (popular), rttaiier of 
spirits. An allusion to the colour 
of brandy. 



Javanais (rannliar), kind of jargon 
fermed by disgyising words by 
means of the tetters of the syllable 
** av "properly interpolated ; tkiu 
"je I'ai vu jcudi," becomes " jave 
lavai vavu javeudavi." 

Arjot do BrMa oti la <ytlabe a», jd^ 
dans chaque sylLabe, hachc pour lea (mv 
faoes te ton et le mu des moU, idiome hi^ro- 
gljrphiquedumoadedesfilla qui luiptrmvc 
de M porter Ik rorcitlc — tout haul. — Db 
GOHCOtllT. 

Javard,*!. (thieves'), Ai-M/; (popu< 
lor) tattle-box. 

Javoter (popular), to prattle, 

Javotte, / (popular), tatthbox, 

Jean, m. (popular), de la suie, 
sweep; — guflre, peasant^ or 
•* clod ;" — houuinc, stick, or 
"toco." [Thieves') Un — de la 
vigne, a crucifix. 

Jean-b*te, m. (general), blockhead^ 
• • cabbage-head. ' ' 

Jean-fesse, or Jean-foutre (gene- 
rat), stamp. 

Jcanjcan, m, (familiar and popu- 
lar), simpleton. 

La blanchiiMniw ^tait all^ ROtHivcr 
ton ancicn ^poux aiinitAt que c« jeanjean 
dc Coupcau araic ronfl£.— Zola, ^Af 
*«mm*ir. 

(Soldiers') Jeanjean, recruit^ 
"Johnny raw." 

Jeanneton, /. (popular), servant 
ivrnck at an inn ; girl of doubtful 
morals, a "dolly mop. * 

Jcm'enfouliarae, m, (familiar), the 
philosophy of utter indifference. 

Aii«i, lui n'Aait-il di orl£anUee, 01 r^ 
pnbliaun, ai bonapartitte, il afBchait 1« 
*' iem'cnfooli»m« " qui aictuit lout k mgnde 
daccord.— J. SaauaT. 

J^rdme, m. (popular), stickt or 
•'toco." 

Jiruaalem (thieves'), lettre dc — , 
i^ter written from prison to make 



14 



Jisuite—Jobarder, 



a rc^ttesi of money. The PrtfrcC" 
lure dc poUcc, and consequently 
the lock-up, was formerly in the 
Kue de Jerusalem. 
J68uite» m. (thieves'), turkey-cock. 
This species of gallinacta was in- 
troduced into France by the 
Jesuit missionaries. Termed by 
English vagabonds " cobble col- 
ter. Engraillcr un — , to stca! a 



tnrkty^ 
chant. 



to be ft Turkey mer- 



Jisus, ffi. (thic*'cs'), i«inv<7i/ wa«, 
thieves considering themselves as 
nmch-injureU individuals. Grippe- 
Jesus, gendarme, (I'opuiar) Petit 
— , or k quatre sous, nexvlyborn 
infant, (bodomists') Ua — , a 
Mxiemist in confederacy with a 
rague termed "chantcur," whose 
spieialiti is to extort money from 
rich people with unnatural pas- 
jurns. 

he peninud qui, une fois d'accord avcc 
k chanieur pour duper ton douillard, de- 
vteot alon ion compare, c'«t-i-dire »oa 
J«fu» ) Tel e^t d6tiommi aujourd'bui le 
pcmUard exploiteur. — MimwirtM d* MoH' 
tieur Claude. 

Jet, m. (thieves*), ntusket, or 
"dag." 

Jetar, m. (military ), prison, " Irish 
theatre, or mill." 

J'ai ordrc du K>us*ofBcieT de Minaiac da 
t« (aire faurrer au jelar kltOt tcntxd. — G. 
COURTKLIMB. 

Jet6, adj. (popular), bien ^, or 
bicn gratlc, "well done, well metde^ 
handsome^ Etxe — , to be tent to 
the deuce, 

Jeter (thieves' and cads*), to send 
roughly cnvay ; to send to the 
deuce ; — avec perte et fracas, to 
bundle one out of doors forcibly ; 
— un coup, to look, **to pipe" 
Jettes-en un coup sur le pante, 
just look at thai "cove." Jeter 
de la grille, to summons, to re- 
guest in the name of the law ; — 
une mandole, to give one a bos 



on the ear,'* to smack one's chops." 
(Printers') Jeter, to assure. Je 
vous le jctte, / assure you it's a 
fact, ** my Davy on it." 

Jeter du cceursur carreau Cgene- 
rnl), or — son le»t, fo vomit^ " to 
cast up accounts, to shoot the cat, 
or to spew." Literally to throw 
hearts on diamonds, or to threw 
on^s heart (which has here the 
meaning of stomach) an the floor, 

Jeton, m, [popular), coin. 

Jeu de dominos, m. (popular and 
thieves'), J^/i^/Zc^M. Montrer son 
— , to sho70 one's teeth, '* to flash " 
oh/s "ivories." 

Jeune France (liierar^-)i««'W'i7«'<^ 
to young men of the ^* Ecole roman- 
ti^ue "in 1830—/^ '^ Byronian " 
school. 

lU ont fait de tno! un Jeuoe Ftance ac- 
compli . . . j'ai une ntie daos Ics chevctia 
^ l.;i Kaphndl . . . j'appclle bourfcoii ceujc 
ijui qnt \in col de cheinifcc. — I'h. Gautisr. 

Jeune hoinme, m. (familiar and 
popular), measure of wine of the 
capacity of four litres. Avoir son 
— , to be ^rwM>fr, "screwed." For 
synonyms sec Pompette. 

Tieos ta langae, lu as ion jeune bomme, 
nnipille duu ton coin.— E. MohTiiL. 

Suivez*moi — , ribbons worn in 
the rettr of ladies* dresses, or "fol- 
low mc, fads." 

Jlnglard. See Ginglard. 

Jiroble, adf, (thieves'), for girofle, 
pretty. 

Job, m, and adj. (popular), silly ftl- 
/tfTf, or "flat." Monterle — ,tode- 
«it-^, "to bamboozle. " Se monter 
le — , to entertain groundless hopes. 
Job is an abbreviation of jobaid. 

Jobarder (general), to deceivey to 
dupe, to fool one, " to bamboozle. " 
The equivalents for /o deeeive are 
in the different varieties of jargon : 
" mener en bateau, monter un 
bateau, donner un pom k faucher* 



Jobelhi—Joutr. 



215 



promcncr qnelqu'un, compter des 
mistoutlc^^, gourrer, afflucr. rouster, 
afluler, botilcr, amairer, bat t re 
rantir, emblcmer, metire dedans, 
cmpjumer, enfoiKcr, nllumcr, his- 
Bcrungandin.CDtortillcr, faircvoir 
]e tour, la faire k roMilIe, lefairtr, 
refairc au memc, faire ta barbc, 
fairc la qucur, Aanchcr, |ii|;connf r, 
juiflfer," &€. ; and in Ihc Knqlisli 
slang or cant, "to&tick, tu bilk, 
to do, to best, to do brown, to 
bounce, to take in, to kid, to 
gammon," &c 

Jobelin, m. (old word), jargon — , 
tant, 

Scrijeni ^ p^ed et k cheval, 
Vcnei-y d'ltmont rl d'Aval, 
L«ft hoir» du deffunct Fiihelin, 
Qui »cavc2 jnrgiKi ju^ielin, 

ViLtOH, L*j Rtpttut/ramckei de 
Frtutftiit I 'iilrn tt Je tet e»m- 
^a^n^ns, tjtHccoiury. 

Joberie, f. (txipular), nonstniCt 
" tomfoolery. ' 

Jobisme, m. {popular), /wrr/j'. 

Dewochcx ■ roultf comroe doiu »tir Ic* 
futntcn du Jobiune. — Bai-Xac 

Compare with the English ex- 
pression, "as poor as Job's tur- 
key;" '"as thin and as badly fed,' 
Bays the Shnj; DUtiouan\ '* as 
that ill-conditioned and imagioaiy 
bird." 

Jocko, M. (familiar), pain — , loafcf 
art eipHgat(d shape. 

Jocko. Min long & U mode depuU 18x4, 
annte oil w unge Jocko ^taut i la nodt.— 
L. Lakchbv, Zfici. Hut. ifAwfvt. 

JocrisBiade, / (familiar), stupid 
attton. JoCrisse, Simpietott, 

Jojo, aJj. and m. (popular), /re//)' ; 
Simpleton, Faire son — , to piay 
fhe/ooJ. 

Jonc,«i. (thieves*), jp/lt/, or*'redge.'* 
Eire sur Ics joncs, to be in prison, 
"in quod." Un bobe, or un bo- 
binol de — , a gold watih^ a " retl 
toy." 



Jonchcr (thieves'), to ^ild. 

Joncherie, / (popular), dtait^ 
swindle. The woid is old, 

Adonc Ic Peiuncicr vit bicn 
Qu'il y cut i|uelquc trompcric ; 
Quk<nd il eniendit te m»en, 
fl coctgBcut tiien U joncncne. 

ijih century. 
Joncheur, m. (thieves'), ^der. 

JonquiUe, adj. (popular), roari — , 
jM/urrd A$ts6and. An allusion la 
the alleged fisvourile colour of 
cuckolds. 

Jorne. m. (thieves'), diiy (Italian 
giomo). Kcfaile de — , hxakjast. 

Jose.m. (popular), biinl--ru>tf. From 
papier Joseph, trociu^ paper, 

Joseph, m. (familiar), ^vr-t7>/fM?Hx 
man, Fairc Ic or son — , to ^'O 
onesei/ virtuous airs. An allusion 
to the story of Madame Potipliar 
and Joseph. 

Je me ditalt atuu ; voit& un gailUrtl i]ui 
(ait Ic Jo«cph. II doit y avoir un« niiKin. 
—A. Ul'Mas riLA. 

Josephine, / (thieves*), skeleton 
key, or "betty." 

Te) gTinche •'arrftera Ik fair* le barboc 
dai» UQC cambnollc (4 volcr djuu UQ« 
chambre). S'il a oublt^ *a jos^phioc (fauue 
cle' ), jamaU il oe m iwrvtra de la juw!pbine 
d'lin autre dc pcur H'aitiApcr de» punaiws, 
c'c«t-il-dire de maiiquer Mm coup ou d'avoir 
aflaire & un mouchard . — ^l//»fwrr^ ^« At^i*- 
titur CUntde. 

(Popular) Faire sa — ^ is said 
of it woman who puts oh vir* 
ttious airs, indignantly tossing 
her heady or blttskin^ly (ostvug 
dawn her eyes, &*c. 

Jouasser (familiar), to play badly 
at a game or on an iHilrumrnt. 

Jouasson (familiar), peer player, 

Jouer (popular), a la. ronfle, or de 
I'orgue, to snore, " to drive one's 
pigs to market;" — dcs guibolles, 
to run away, **to 1^ il ; " see 
Patatroi ; — du cceur, to vomit. 



2l6 



Joujouter-^Juies, 



*• 10 shoot the cat; " (raiiiiliar and 
popular) — dc la harpc, to stroke 
a ^uoman^s dress as Tartuffe with 
£lmirf, or pt herwise to take certain 
liberties with her. See Harpe. 
Jouer dcs mnmliltulcs. to eat, " to 
gnib ; " see Mastiquerj — du 
Napoleon, to be generous xvith one's 
tnoney, *Mo come clown hand- 
some;" an allusion to napoleon, 
a twenty-franc toin ; — du Hfrc, 
to go un'thoui JiH->d ; — du piano 
is said of a horse which has a dis- 
united trot^ or of a man ivho is 
kuoek-knetd; — du poucc, to give 
money, *Mo fork ou! :*' to spend 
freely onis money. The expres- 
sion is old ; Villon usc5> it in his 
dialogue of Afessieurs de MalU- 
faye et de Baillei^ent, I5lh cen- 
tury : — 

M. Suig bieu, la fooo«»e 

M'b trop coukt^. U. Et pourquoy ? M. 
Pource. 

It. Hay \ hay 1 tout e&t mal compass^. 

M. Cotamcnt? D. Ouncjoucplukdupuulce. 

Jouer comme un fiacre, to play 
badly; — la fille de I'air, to run 
away, "to slope.'* See Patalrot. 
(Thcatricnl) Jouer^ ravant-scenc, 
to stand close to the foof lights 7vhen 
acting ; — devant les banquettes, 
to perform before an empty house ; 
(thieves*) — ^ la main chaude, to 
be guillotined. Literally to play hot 
cockles* Sec Fauch*. Jouer de 
la harpc, to i>e in prison^ or "in 

3uod ;" — du linvc, ordu vingt- 
cux, to knife^ or "to chive;" 
— du violon, to file iron bars or 
irons. 
Jouj outer (popular), to plav ; to 

frolic. 

Jour de la Saint Jean Baptiate, 

m. (thieyw'), execution day, or 
" wrj'-neck day." 

Joumie gourd (Breton cam),^W 
dtiy^s profits, 

Joumoycr (popular), to do nothing 
at alL 



JouBte, or juste (thieves')* ntar. 
From the old word jouxte, Latin 
juxta. Je trimardais jouste la 
lourde, / was passing (lose to the 
doer. 

Joyeupc, f, (thieves'), suvrd, or 
*' poker/' 

Joyeux, m. pi. (military), men of 
the * ' batailion d'Afriqut^^ a corps 
recruited with military convicts, 
who on being liberated serve the 
remainder of their term of service 
in this corps. 

Jubile, / (glove-makers'), pieces of 
glove skins, the perquisites of glove 
makers, 

Jubilc, pca« ^cooomts^ par VoMrnw 
guitier sur cellu qu'on lui a confi^ic* pour 
taillcr unc douznine de paires de gaati. — 
L. Lahckhv, Diet. Hilt. tfArgvt. 

Judas, m. (popular), barbe de — , 
red beard. Bran (le — , speckles. 
Le point de — , thirteen, 

Judasser (popular), to betray; to 
act as a " cat in the pan," or, in 
thieves' cant, " to turn snitch." 

Judasserie./ (popular), treacherotts 
sbiTW of friendship. 

JudAe,/. (thieves'), la petite — , Pr^ 
fecture de police, headquarters of 
th4 police, situated formerly in the 
Kue de Jerusalem ; hence the ex- 
pression. 

JugA, m. {prisonas*), young e^nder 
who has been sentenced tfi Oi ««- 
fined in a house of correction. 

Juge de paiK, w. (thieves*), stick ; 
a kimi of roulette at wine-shops ; 
(gamblcrb') pack of cards, or 
" book of broads." 

Jugcotte, / (popular), intellect, 

Jugulam, A^'. (popular), /THfiAKiiB^. 

Juguler (popular), to strangle; to 

bore ; to cry out. Scrungnitrugneu J 

que j' jugulais I darn if, / cried I 

Jules, m. [\ya^M\^T)j chamberpot, ot 



JumtUes — Kroumir. 



217 



"jerry." Allcr chcz — , to tast 
enaflf. (Military) Prendre, pin- 
ccr, or lirer les orcillc* ^ — , to 
tarry away the privy tub. Pa&ser 
la jounbe ^ — , to <mpty the afore- 
said tuh. Travailicr pour — , to 
eat. Des jules, sotJis. 

JumeUes,/. //. (popular), bnech, 

Juponnier, m. (commoo), om fond 
of thi petticoat. 

Jua, M. (familiar and popular). 
wine; — de biUon» tkrashm^with 
a stick ; — d'echala5,«iw; — de 
reglis&c, nc^o ; — de chapeau, 
toeakco^t-e. Avoirdu — -^ tobeeU- 
g>inty Jiuhing, Avulr du — de 
navel d.ins les veines, to he devoid 
9 f energy, ( Popular) J us, profits in 
htninest. Hanli \ du — dc bra.s 
»ww, vAtk a ifit/f my lads t 

£ncorv un tour au treiiil \ Hardi ! Du 
jiu dc bras ! 

RiCHEPiK, La Mtr. 

Se coller un coup dc — , to get 



drtmk. (Sailont*) Jus de cancre, 
iandiman, or ** land-Iublwr." Du 
— de botle premier briu, rum of 
the best quality. 

Jusqu'A la gauche (military), to a 
ipeat extent ; for a long time, 

VouftMrcfCocui^fjuwfu'kUi gauche . . . 
cVtatt K»n mcx cc "juMju'A U gauche.** 
one etprcttion de cawmc . ■ ■ qui ne si|> 
ni6.iit p^>> giand chmc . . . mai* pcrKmoi* 

liait I'^tCtlUL^— U. CUUKTEUME. 

Jusqu'A pluB soif (popular), t6 

excess. 

Juste, / (Ihicres*), the assises. 

Juste-milieu, m. (fAmiliar), tJke U' 
hind. Sec Vasifttaa. 

Juterde I'ceil (popular), to weep, 

S(<*rc« <Ie lourt«. n'juie done dm d' I'reil 
d'unc fa^onaukii inconjfnic. — (_•. Fri»ok. 

Juteux, adj. (dandies'), elegant; 
dashing. (Familiar) Aflfaire ju- 
teuse, profitable trantaitiJH, a 
"fat job." 



K 



Kibir, m. (militnrv), commander of 
a eorfs. From the Arab. Also 
colonel. 

Kif-kif (popuUr), a/ltke same, 

EapiOiloB qui vient 6t* Anibc», im- 
Mft^ UMirtocnl dans ratelier parqucUlue 
iiphtt ou quelque Zouave lypo^raphc 
Daiu te patoit altc^ncD. kif-lul Ufailie, 
MmbtaUe &.— Ijoi'tmv. 

C'c»t — bourico or bourriquo, $tis 
all the same ; it comes to the tame 
thing. 

Que tu disct comroe moi ou qu' tn dim 
fiu coBine moi ^a Tait jua' luMcif hour- 
ffiqaa.--G. CoiKiKi.fMK. 

Kil, TO. (roughs'), litre ofitfine. Je 



me suis IravcrwS d'un — , / ha»e 
drnnk a litre of wine. 

Kilo, m. (popular), litre of xvine ; 
fahe chignon,. Dt^poscr un — , to 
ease oneself, 

Klebjer (popular), to eat, 

Kolback, m, (popular), small ^ast 
oj brandy ; a large gtais ofwtnt, 

Koxnoff, adj. (popular), excelUnt. 

Krak, m. {^^xa'Xx^^)^ general collapse 
cf financial firms in Austria sonte 

years ago. 

Kroumir, m. (popular). wmM fel- 
low ; dirty or ** chatty " fellfftv. 



2l8 



L a — LiUhage, 



La* m. (ramiliar), donncr Ic — , to 

Labadens (ihcalrical), ohi school- 

DepuU le vaudevi(l« amu&anc de Labichc 
(I'afTiiirc de Ik Kne dc Lourcine) iiut a mu 
ce [rrmc \ la mode, il & prU, Avct: Ic proccs 
Bazaine, une valcur h»tohquc. (^uand 
K^Koier voului eu cfTei £trs min en la pr^- 
MDCC du mar^ctial, U tefii aniiancer atiui : 
" Dilo que c'cil un vicax Labadetu.* — 
LoHtoAN Lahchev. 

Labai^o (thieves'), is equtvalent to 

l.^-bas, yonder, Ganine — , In 
rirtette t'cxhibe, look ycndtr, thi 
spy has his tye oh you. 

LJl-bas (prostilules*), t/ie Saint- 
J^tare prison^ a pliice of confine- 
ment Jor prostitutes u'ho offend 
against the laxv^ or are detected 
fdying their trade without due 
atithoriuttioH of the police ; 
(ihieves*) tht convict setthment in 
New Caledonia or at Cayenne^ 

Laboratoire, m, (eating-house 
keepers'), the kitchen^ a place 
where focnl is often prepared by 
truly chemical proce&scs ; hence 
the appellation. 

L'absinthe ne vaut rien aprts 
diner (printers'), •words used rue- 
fully by a typo to express his bitter 
disappointment at finding, on rc' 



turning from dimur, thai he has 
corrections of his evm to attend to, 

Dan* cette locution, on jooe iur "I'ab- 
linihe," coHMdiriic conmic brcuvage ct 
commc planle. La plante pot^M« une m- 
vcur " anifcre." Avcc quel « *' inicrtumc ** 
le compagnon rcftiautd, bJcn dUpo*, te voit 
obligtf dc H " coller " sur le niarbrc pcur 
fairc un travail non pay<f. au moment oil il 
lie pro|K>uut de pomper avcc acharoenient. 
Dcji. coinme Pcrrciic, il avait ctcompl^ 
cet apres-dlnri produciif. — bvt'TMV. 

Lac, m. (thieves'), clre dans le — , 
to be very " hard up ;" to be in a 
JLt or in trouble^ in a '* hole." 
Mcttrc dans le — , to deceive^ ta 
make one fall tttto a trap, (Game- 
sters') Mcltre dans Ic — , to lose 
ail one's money ^ to have * ' ble wed " 
//. 

Au ccrcle. oCi la converution vient tie 
rouler »ur la mort tragitiue du rot d« Ba- 
viire, un pontc perd un lwii» au baccarat* 
en lirani ^ cinq : — ailom, dit-il d'un air 
r^iffi)^, encore un loui& dan-s le lu:\—JLt 
yoUmire, juio, 18I6. 

In the above quotation an allusion 
is made to Louis. King of Bavaria, 
who committed suicide. 

Lacets. m. pi, {thieves'), AflW-r«^» 
or "bracelets." Marchaml or 
solliceur de — , gendanne, 

LAchage. m. (popular), the act of 
Jorjakmg one. 



L dche — L aisser. 



219 



LAche, m, Ipopular)^ Saint — , 
iasy tvcrkmnn i ont who Hkfs to 
iotmge abcMit who is '* Monday- 
ish. Rifdtcr la pri^re de Saint 
— , ta lUep^ or " lo doss." 

LAcher (popular), les ^cluses, son 
ecureuil, or unc nniade, to void 
urinty or "lopumpship," Termed 
also "chancer ses olives d'cau, 
lascaiUer, eclus«r, faire le petit, 
changer son poisson d'eau, faire 
pleurer son aveugle, lancer, quim- 
pcr la lance, gater dc IVau, arroser 
les pis^^cnIit5 J " — une pastille, 
to brttik wind; (familiar and popu- 
lar) — d'un cran, to leavi om ; 
to rid him 0/ otu^ s presewt ; — la 
perche, to die ; — les ecluses. to 
VftePt to biubber^ ** lo nap a bil> ;" 
— le coude, to Utnt one atone. 

Ucher'Oouft done le conde avoc voire 
politique \ cria le zia^ucur. Limx Its av 
sa»^>toAtt, c'cti plus ngolo.— ZouA, L'Ai- 
Mtrmimeir. 

Ldcher le paquet, to diulae, 

Et Madame Lent, effrar^e. r^p^tant 
qu'ills cVtait mime plus tranquillc pour 
die, Hcha tout Ic pai|uet k ion frirc. — 
20iJt, VAti^mmoir, 

Lachcr la raousseltne, to snow, 

Lc ciel rcitait d'une viUine coulcur de 
plocnb, et la neige, anuLaA^ Ui-haut. coiffaii 
K <|tiartier d'une calotte de slace. . . . Gvr- 
vsiM kvail le nei en priantTe bon Dieu de 
na pas lAcher u mousieUoe tout de tuiie. 
— ZoLA, L'Auoinmtir, 

Ldcher une fcmme. to break off 
one^s coHHAtion with a mistress^ 
" to bunr a moll ;*' — an cran, to 
undo a button or ftuo a/trr dinner. 
Se — d'une somme, to spend re- 
luctnntiy a sum 0/ money. (Thea- 
trical) Lichcr la rampe, to die^ see 
Pipe ; (thieves') — un pain, to 
^Kva A/ffir, of "wipe." (General) 
Se — , Kigaud says: *' Produirc 
CQ society uo bruit trop pcnonocl." 

Lacromuche, m. (popular), wo- 
men*j buUy, or ** Sunday man." 



For synonymous expres&ions see 
Poiason. 

Lafarger (popular), to poison. Aiv 
allusion to tne celebrated Lafarge 
poisoning case. 

Laffe,/ (thieves*), soup. 

Lagad-ijen(Bretoncant),^/fw^<2w 
pi*<e, 

Lago (thieves*), thtre. GafEne — 
le ponte se fait la dcbinette, !ock 
there^ tk*. "cove" is running 

away. 

Lagout, m. (thieves'), water 
(" agout " with the article). 

Laigre,/. (thieves'), _/Ii*r ,- market. 
Michel says this word is no other 
than the adjective "alaigTe,"of 
which the initial letter has dis- 
appeared. 

Laine,/. (tailors'), tvork, ''graft.'* 
Avoir de la — , to have some ttfork 
to do. (Thieves') Tirer la — , tvas 
formerly the term for stealing 
{looks from the person ; hence the 
old expression lirc-laine, thief who 
stoU Cloaks. 

Lain^, m. (thieves*), sheep, or 
*' wool-bird." 

Laisie, / (thieves' ami roughs'), 
prostitute^ or '* bunter." See 
Gadoue. 

Laisser (familiar and popular), aller 
le chat au frouiage (obsolete], is 
said of a girl who allawx her- 
self to be seduced, who loses her 
rose; — tomber son pain dans 
la sauce (obsolete), to wtanage 
matttrs so as to get profit out of 
some tninsaetion ; — ses bottes 
quelque part, to die. The expres- 
sion is found in Lc Roux's Diet, 
Comique. Ijtisscr fuir son ton- 
neau, to die, " to kick the bucket." 
See Pipe. Laisser pisscr le 
merinos, to teait for on**s oppor- 



320 



Lait — Lane/, 



(unity. Sytionynious of Laisscr 
pisser le mouton. a proverbial 
saying. 

Ltit, m. (thieves'), ^ broder, ink. 
(Theatricalj Boire du — , to be ap- 
plauded. 

A peine le couplet est-il chant£. an mi- 
lieu des iippUiudls»ememit p-ny^, que Ditftry 
. . . sa!uc . . ■ tout Irs applaud i»scun . . . 
il n'cftt pas Ic seul, ce »^r-Ui, \ buire du 
lait, comtne on dit en style de ihidtrc — 
Mimeirtx da Mctuitur ClnuJt. 

I*alu9 (familiar), speecht or dis' 
couru. I'iquer uu — , to make a 
spttch. 

I«fcmbia8se,yi (popular), ni^. 

I-ame, /. (military), vieille — I old 
ehum ! 

Lamine (thieves*), Le Mans, a 

town. 

Lampagne du cam, / (thieves'), 
country, or •'drum. It is the 
word "campagne" itself disguised 
in the fQllowing way. The first 
consonant is replaced by the letter 
1, and the word is followed by its 
first syllable preceded by "du" 
(Richepin). English, thieves and 
gypsies have a similar mode 
of distorting words, termed gib< 
bcrish ; call«lalsopedlar'sFrencIi, 
St. Giles's Greek, and the Flash 
tongue. Gibberish means a kind 
of disguised language formed by 
inserting any consonant between 
each syllable of an English word, 
in wluL-h case it is called the gib- 
berish of the letter inserted ; ifF, 
it i* the F gibberish ; if G, the G 

fibberish ; as in the sentence, 
[ow do you do ? Howg dog youg 
dog? 

Lrampas, m. (common), throaty or 
"red lane." 

Pour I'hiitaire dc ^'Assurer de la quality 
<lu liquide et a'arroscr le lampa*. — 
Ladimik. 



Lampe, / (freemasons'), drinking* 

glass. 

Lampie, f. (thieves'), »/«/. From 
loniper, to gulp down. 

Lampion, m. (thieves'), Aat ; 
bottle ; — rouge, poiiee officert 
"copper, or reelcr. For syno- 
nymous expressions see Pot'A* 
tabac. 

Lampions, m. pi. (thieves'), cj'«, 
or " glaziers," see Mirettes ; — 
fumeux, inflamed eyes* Des — ! 
Dcs — ! a call expressive of the 
impaiienee of a ertnvd^ or rough 
elements of an audience, and made 
more forcible by stamping of feet. 

Lance, f. (popular and thieves'), 
watery or '* Adam's ale ;" raw, or 
"paraey." 

C'ect ga^< ! fwwi tervir ! six litres de 
vin I »ix litre* »an* Unccl — CatAJiumt 
Peitsard. 

This word is "ance" with the 
article. Michel says, *'anee\\cnX 
du tenne de la vieille germania 
espognole (Spanish cant) ansia, 

3ui lui-memc est une apocope 
'anptstia ; en effet [*eau etait un 
instnuncnt de torture fort employe 
autrefois." II tombe de la — , it 
rains. Lance, /Tiwwi; s/tannaker's 
arail. Chevalier dc la courte ^, or 
dc Saint-Crepin, shoemaker, or 
"snob." Duchcnupivoissans^-, 
mod wine witho%tt -water. L.ance 
had formerly thesame signification 
as Flageolet, which see. 

Lance, m, and adf\ (popular), agilt 
play of darners legs at dancing 
halts. 

Paul a un coup de pled \\ vainqueur 
ct Kigolelte un si vofupcueux fiaut de 
carpc 1 Left speciateun &'iiiteresMieat a 
cet assaut de lanc^ rigourcux.^ViTtr. 

(Familiar) Lanc^, slightly intoxi- 
cated, or " elevated." Sec Pom- 
pette. 




L ancequiner — Lansquine. 



221 



Lancequiner(populat), /0r<7i/i; /# 
Wi(p ; to void un'ru. 

Lancer (thieves'), fo void urin*. 
See LAcher. (Popular) Lancer 
soa pruiipcclus, to ogfr, 

Lanceur, m, (familiar), bon — , 
bookseller who it tlcfer at making 
Anown to tht public a new publica- 
tion^ '*iin tftouffcur " bein^ tkt r<* 
verse, (Police) Lanceurallumcur, 
a politidan^ fpmtral/y a jourtialist^ 
in the employ of the police of the 
T^ird Empire. His fuDctioas con- 
sisted in exciting people to re- 
bellion eilher by inflammatory 
speeches at public meetings or by 
Tiolcnt articles. 

Oo appclle allumeun, eo tenoei de police, 
les BgcoU provDCateun chorgiEK de %c meter 
■ux soci<fl<fs secretes, aux nanifcsiatiotu 
popuLirci. . . . Ludllunieun furent crii* 
M>ui I'cmpirc; iU dcvinitDi, m>us U dircc* 
tMnde M.La^ranfc, la Rcurdupanijrde la 
pr^fetrtttre. Cc ronctiunnoire fiit liu*in<mc 
. . . avcc un mnntn^ P. le metleur en ccuvre 
do OOlBplot dc I'Upcra'Comique . . . qui 
aboutit a cioquantc-Kpt arrestatioDS , . , 
ct fink par metire (ur la d^feruive tout 

Ciauae. 

Lanceuse, / (familiar), super- 
annuated eocotte who acts as the 
chaperone of a younger one* 

L^ncier, m. (thieves' and cads'), 
individual^ or *'cove." 

Que'qu' \'y Toutrai dant la trorapette, 
A C* laDoer-b, I'U rient vivanc ? 

RiCHBpm. 

Lancier du prefer, street-sweeper 
in the employ of the mumietpcl 
authorities. 

Lmncierv, m. pi. (popular), oui, le« 
— 1 nonsense ! " tell that to ihe 
marines]'* '* how's your brother 
Job?"or "do yoa see any green in 
my eye ? ** 

Landau 4 baleines, m. (popular), 
w«*rf//tf,'*mush, orroin-napper." 

Landemau. m. (familiar), name of 
a small toum in Brittany, II y 



aura du bruit dans — , is said of an 
insignificant event which will set 
going the tcugtus of people who 
have tMthing else to do. The ex- 
pression has passed into the lan- 
guage. 

Landier, m. and etdj. (thieves'), 
official of the octroi. The "octroi" 
IS the ofifice established at the gates 
of a tovn for the collection of a 
tax due for the introduction of 
certain articles of food or drink, 
(Thieves') Landier^ white. 

Landiire, /, (old cant), stall at s 
/air. 

On ui( (]UB le Landit tftalt une Toiix 
c^ibrc qui fee tcmit 4 Saiot-Deou.— 

iilCHKL. 

Landreux, adj. (popular), invalid. 

Langouste,/ (popular), xriw////#«, 
greenhorn, '• flat." 

Langue, / (familiar), verte, jlattg 
of gamesters. Also slang. The 
expression i» Delvau's. (Popular) 
Avaler &a — , to die^ ** to kick the 
bucket." See Pipe. Prendre sa 
— " des dimanches, to use choice 
language. (Familiar and popular) 
Une — fourr^e, lingua duplex, id 
est yuum basiis lingua lingua pro- 
miseetur (RiCAUD). 

Langulneur, nt, (popular), man 
whose functions are to examine the 
tongues of pigs at the slaughter- 
house to ascertain that they are not 
diseased. 

Lansquailler (thieves*). See Lat* 
caiLler. 

Lansque (popular), abbreriation of 
lansquenet. 

Lanaquinage, m. (thieves'), weep- 
ing, 

Lansquine,/ (thieves'), rain, or 
" pamy." 

Auui j'luit rai quaod la lansqalac, 
M'a ireznptf Tcuir, j'm'cMuie iVchioo 
Dam I'vcot qui pau« ct ratait joli. 
RjcuariM. 



222 



Lansquiner — Z apin. 



Lansqutner (thieves' and cads'), ta 
rain ; — dcs cbosscs, /* weep^ ' ' to 
nap a bib." 

Lanteoz (Breton cant), butter. 

Lanteme, / (popular), tinnJow^ 
"jump." Radouberla — , totalk^ 
to laifle. The expression is old. 
Avoir la — , or se taper sur la — , 
to Iff hungry^ " to be bandied, or 
to cry cupboard." Vieillc — , aid 
prcstittttf. See Gadoue, (Popu- 
lar) Lantemes de cabriolet, Uirgt 
£oss^ or;. 

Oh ! c'eft vrai I c'ai lu yetut comra« le« 
Untemei dc ion cdbriotet.— Gavarni. 

Lantimfcche, m. (popular), lamp- 
iighicr ; also a word equivalent to 
" thingumbob." 11 a file avec — 
pour mcncr Ics poules pisser, a 
dtrisivt reply to one inquiring 
about the whereabouts cfa person. 

Lanturlu, m. (popular), madcap. 

Laou Pbaraou (Breton cant), body 
iice. 

Lapin, m. (popular), apprentice. 
l3es lapins, shoes, or '* trotter- 
cases." (Familiar and popular) 
Lapin, a clever or sturdy Jelicnu. 
Ah ' tj et un lapin ! . . . lui disiatent 
loi» crux qu'il ahordait, il parall que tu 
Vieiu dc fairc une talneu^c dccuuvertc ! on 
parle de toi pour la croix !— £, Caaoriau, 
M. Lecoq, 

Etre en — , to ride by the tide 
of the coaehman. Un — de 
goutti^ie, fo/, or " iong-lailed 
beggar." Coller or poser un — , 
to deceive^ to take in, "to bi!k." 
It is said the expression draws 
its origin from the practice of 
certain sportsmen who used to in- 
vite themselves to dinner at some 
frientl's houge in the country, and 
repaid their host by leaving a 
rabbit as a compensation. The 
S/attg Dictionary says that when a 
person gets the worst of a bargain 
lie is laid '* to have bought the 



rabbit," from an old story about 
a man selling a cat to a foreigner 
for a rabbit. With reference to 
deceiving prosiiluics the act La 
described in the EogHsh slang as 
" doing a bilk, " 

Je VQU« dcmande pardon, mail tc vocable 
e»t crin»a.-rt£, " Pn«r tin l»pin " fut long> 
tempi une definition maU^iite, boonic do 
ulons oil Ton cjiunc. Mnintenant, eUe est 
:idini(e cntre gens de bonne compagnic, et 
Ic lapin ceuc, dans Ics mots, de bnver 
rhoiiDciet^— Maxims Bouchkron. 

U a fameux. or rude — , a 
strong fearless man, one u/ho ir 
"5pr>-," 

L'homme qui me rendra rjveuM pourra de 
vantcr d'etre un rude Uptn, — Gavarm. 

Also a man who begets manyehtl- 
dren. Volcr au — , or etouffer 
un — , w said of a bus conductor 
who sxvindles h is employers by 
pocketing part of the fares. Mon 
vieux — ! otdfellowl ** old cock 1" 
(Thieves') Lapin ferr^, mounted 
gendarme. (Printers*) Manger 
un — , /0 attend a comradds 
funeral. 

Cette locuUon vieni sans duute de oe 
que, ^ I'lMUC de U c^nfmonic fun^bre, let 
aMi&tanu k rifuni!>.uierit autrefou dan 
quelque restaurant avoiunnni le cimettira 
ct, en gui»e de tfpiu de funtfrailles, man* 
geaicDt un lapin plus ou muins authcnuque. 

^BOUTMV. 

Concerning this expression, there 
is an anecdote of a typo who was 
lying in hospital at the point of 
death, and who informed his sor* 
rowing friends that he would try 
and wait till the Friday morning, 
so that they miglit have all the 
.Saturday and Sunday for the fune- 
ral feast. 

Je t^bcrai d'aMcr ju9qu*k demato nlr 
. . . parceau* lea amis auraient ainsi sunedl 
et dimancnc pour bouliMter nion " bpiii." 
CeLk ne vnut'il pas Ic " pl:iuditc ! ** dc i'em- 
pcreur Augustc, ou l« " Uai&scx ie ndeau, 
la farce est jou^ 1" de ooire vieux Kab^ 

Utst— BOUTMV. 

(Familiar and popular) C'est le 
— qui a commence is said ironic 



L apiner — L argue. 



:23 



tally in allHiion to a different or 
fight betiiiefn a $tronf( man and a 
ttVdi on*, wMtn the latter is worsted 
and blanud into the bargain. A 
ctnoon of the late anise Gill» on 
the occanon of the assassination of 
Victor Noir by Pierre Bonaparte 
in the last days of the Third Em- 
pire, depicted the two phncipai 
acton in that mysterious affair 
under the features of a fierce bull- 
dog and a rabbit, with the saying, 
•'C*est Je lapinqui acommenc*?," 
for B text line. 
Lapiner (general), to cheat a frosti' 
tutt by not paying her her dues. 

Laqueuse,/. (familiarand popular), 
eocotte who walks in the victmty of 
tht Inke at the Bins de Bouiogm, 
bee Gadoue. 

Larantqai, m. (popular and 
iliicves'), hvO'franc coin* 

Larbin, w. (general), man-serz'ant, 
Jootman, "flunkey," or " bone- 
picker/' 

Le »avour«ux T.eS^AU . . . ancien ralct 
de pied aui Tuilcries, laiittatt voir le hideuJi 
Uibiu qu'il ^uit, flprc au nain et ^ U cur^«. 
—X Daudct, Z/j Kail /» EjtiL 

(Popular^ Larbin savonn^, knave 
of iards. 
Larbine,/ (popular), mmuV-j^itx^a/, 
"slavey." 

Lorbinerie,/ (familiar), set of ser- 
vants^ "nunkeydom, or flua- 
keyism. " 

Larcoitler, m, (old cant), one who 
yieldi too often to the prvrnptings of 
a loell-dtveloped bump ofamativt' 
nest, a *' beard-splitter." 

Lard, m, (popular), disreputable 
tooman ; mistress ; skin^ or body, 
Sauver son — , to safe on/t 
* ' bacon. " Perdre son — , to be- 
come thin. Faire son — , to put 
on a corueited look. (General) 
Faire du — j to lie in bed of a 



morming, (Thieves') Manger da 
— , to inform agiw$st, ** to turn 

snitch," 

Larda (Breton cant), to beat. 

Lardi, m. (popular), un — aux 
pommcs, mas of potatoes and 
bacon. 
Au pnx ot toot lea lard^ aux pumcnM 

aux trenie-neuf marmiua.— /aM.yw«*du 

b Juia, iBSo. 

Lard^e, / (printers'}, tom/>osifion 
fidl of italics and roman. 

Larder (obsolete), csplained by 
quotation : — 

Terma librc, qui ti(ntfie. faire le d^uit, 
se divertir avec uoe femtne.— La KutX, 
Vict. Cirmifue. 

(Popular and military) to pierce 
tenth a sword or knife. Se faire — , 
to be stabbed pr to receive a sxvord- 
thrust. 

Lardivea, ///. (prostitutcs*),ytmu/tf 
companions of prostitutes , 

Apr^ tout, mes tardives ne vnlcnt pas 
mlcuK <)u« moi et Icura megi valent Is 
panic que j'ai Idch^ parcequ'iJ tnemMc»L 
— Ai/mtfirrt d* Atatuitur CtAtutt. 

Lardotre, / (popular), sword^ or 
•' toasting fork. 

Large, adj. and m. (popular), il est 
— , mais c'est des cpaules is said 
iroMi tally of a close-Jistrd man. 
N'en pas mener — , to be ill nt 
ease ; crest-fallen, Envoyer (luel- 
qu'un au — , to send one to the 
t/euce. 

Largonji, m. (thieves*), cant, slanj^. 

Properly the word jargon dis- 
guisied by a process described 
under the hea!aing Lampagne 
(which sec). 

Largue, /. (popular and thieves'), 
imrmany ** hay*bag, cooler, shake- 
sier, or lace<l mutton." Concern- 
ing the word Michel says ; " Je 
Grains bien qu'une pcoaee obcc^e 



224 



Largiiep^^LatiH. 



n*ait preside JL la cication dc ce 
mol : ce qui me le fail soup^onner, 
c'est que jc Us, p. 29S Ju livrc 
d'Antoine Oudin, * Lx^er au laige, 
d*unc femmc qui n granri .... or, 
large so prononyaii laiguc ^ I'ita- 
iiennc ct ii rcspagnolc dis Ic xi\* 
siiclc.'" 

Deux mols av»imt suA. Ccs deux motn 
tfujent : voft Uireue» ct vcrtre aubcn, vo» 
femmes vt votre argent, le nfsumtf de toutcs 
ki afTectiont vnie* de I'hotiuni:.— 'Bal/ac. 

Lnrguc, mistress^ or *' poll ; " — 
d'alteque, handsome •uwman^ or 
*' dimlwrmort ;'* — en panne, 
farsaken woman^ or a " moll thai 
has been burictl ;" — en vidanpr, 
ftffutle in childbed, or "in ihe 
straw." Balancer unc — , to for- 
sake a mutnss^ " lo bury a moll." 
(Sailors') Grand' — , excellent^ 
"out and out.'* C'est Er.ind* — 
et vrai manner/ I'j "out and out," 
and tjuite saUor Hke. 

Largucp£, yi (tliicvcs')* /'Vi/i^w/f, 
or tkie/^s ivij'e^ *' mollishcr." 
Sec Gadoue, According to 
Michel this word is formed of 
lai|;ue, uvman, and puiain, 
wkvre. 

Lame du compositeur, f. 
(printers'), comma. 

Lamac, arnac, or amache, m. 
(thieves'), poiice cjicer, "copper." 
or " reeler." Rou&se Jk 1'—, de- 
tfctive. For sjnouymous expres- 
sions see Vache. 

Larque, f. {roughs'), -tfoman^ or 
" cooler ; " rtgisiered prostitute, 
A corryption of largue. See 
Gadoue. 

LaiTons, m, //. (printers'), odd 
puffx of paper wki^h adhere to 
sheets in the press^ producing 
*' moines " or blanks. 

Lartif. lartie. larton, m. (thieves*), 
breads "pantium." Termed also 
"britfe, broute, pierrediire, aiiit. 



arton, brignolet, bringue, boule de 
son, brichcton." 

Lartille A plafond, /. (thieves')*. 

pastry, 

Lartin, m, (old cant), ^ggar^ 
" maundcrer." 

Larton, w. (thieves'), breads 
"pnnnum;" — brutal, bia^k 
brtad ; — savonne, U'hite bread. 

Lartonnicr, nt. (thieves'), baker. 
From larton, bread. In the Eng- 
lish popular lingc» a "dough- 
puncher.'* 

Lascailler (thieves'), to void uritu^ 
•' to pump ship." For synonyms 
see LAcher. 

Lascar, m, (militar)-), boU^ devil' 
may-tare feUimu AUons, tne» 
loscars ! ««£•, boys .' 

Alorv i1 fA rrntlaii 1(4 maim, faitait dc«. 
'blagues, ricanait : Eh ! ch I mes lascars, il 
y a du Don pour le " chose," c* loir I — G. 

COUKTKLINK. 

The tenn is also used dispa- 
ragingly with the signiticatioD of 
bad soldiers. 

Li-de*Mi%, en arriire, \ droite. et k 
cauche . . . marchc \ A ros ^curies, laa 

de Uscan.— G. Col'KTslinb. J 

(Thieves') Lascar, yy/tm*. \ 

Tout les Uscars i raielier pounuent lur- 
biner il leur grtf. Moi, jen'avaJspaipIuslOc 
ledoilounie ^ mnn ouvrugr pour gngnoler 
men Ian if (pain) ou pour chiquer monliainU 
pcre (ubac), que le touctioo iftait f>ur tnoA 
dot pour mVcoper. — Atifnairts tt* MvH- 
iicmr Claudr. 

Las de cbier, m. (popular), grand 
— , big skulking fellcw wtthottt 
any energy. 

Laten (llrclon slang), tongiu, 

Latenni (Breton slang), to chatter, 

Latif, m, (thieves'), whitt Hntn^ 
" lully," or " snowy." 

Latin, m. (thieves'), lingo^ cant^ 
"flash, thieve*' I^tin." Tbcword 
meant formerly language. 



Latine — Lasagne, 



2JS 



Lfltinr^yi (studenis'), students mis- 
tress. From **Quanier Laiin/*a 
part of Pahs where ktudcnts 
mostly dwell. 

Latte,/ (military), cavalry sri'ord. 
Sc ficher un coup de — , to fi^t a 

Laumir (uld cam), to hstt " to 
blew." 

Laune, m. (thieves'), polici officer, 
or ** copper." For &ynun)moiLS 
cxpre!>si«ns sec Pot-A>tabac. 

Laure,/; (thieves'), Aro/^i^/, "nanny- 
.shop, or academy." Concerning 
the inmates of a clandestine csta* 
bh»hmcnt of that description in 
London, Mr. Junes GreeawooU 
.say.s : — 

They belong uturly and entirely to the 
drvil lo human «hape who own> ihe dcti 
(hat the wiclched harlot Icaroi lo call her 
"boinc" You would never drvara of the 
deplorable depth of her dcxtitutioit if you 
fnei her in her g«y attire . . . ^ic u alMO> 
lutely poorer than the meaxtciii beggar that 
ever whined for a cru»t. IIicm womea 
are known as "dreu lodger*." — '/'At Srven 
Cttrttt cf LonHfft. 

Lavabe, m. {popu\&r)tnoiefi/Aaiuf; 
theatre ticket at reduced price given 
to people who in return agree to 
apfiQitd at a given itgnai. 

Lavage, m., or IcsBive,/. (gene- 
ral), sale of Oftit property ; also 
sale of property at considerable 
loss. 

Barbel a'avait pu pr^vu ce lavage ; it 
CToyiut au talent de Luden — Hauac. 

Lavar^s (tliicvcfi^)^ for lavcr, to sell 
sfoUtt property. Nous irons i 
Uvares 1.1 camelote chcr ic four- 
l^ueur, we will go and ull the pro- 
Perty at the receiver' t. 

Lavasae, /. (popular), so%tp ; — 
senatoriale, ruk sonp ; 
dentielle, very rich soup. 

Lavement, m. (popuUr), au vcnc 
\^\\i^ glois of rank brandy ; (fami' 



pr6si- 



liar and popular), trouhlesome man 
or Itore ; (unHlary) adjutant. 

Lavcr (^jcneral), to spend ; to selK 

Vous avez pour quaranle franc* de loges 
ct dc billctv ii vriidre, ct ftuur •olxanie 
franc* de livrc:^ II bvcr au journal. — 

hKU-KQ. 

(Thieves') Lavcr la caoielotc, or 

les rouryuerolcs, to sell stolen pro' 
Perty, " lo do (he swag ;" — son 
lingc, to give oneself i//* after sen- 
feme has been passed m coHtuma- 
eiam ; — le lin^fedajis la saignonte, 
to kiil. 

Voici 'c pAntc qne j'ai alliimj devant la 
ferlampier (bandit) mU au puteau, — ll iiuc 
lavcr MHi hnge dans la baigtutnte. Vite ; k 
vox fturiii*, Ic* autre* \ Unc lu\% qu'il *efa 
refroidi, iju'on Ic portc i U cave. — Aft- 
m^rtM tit Mti/uieur C/sM't^. 

Sc — Ics pieds, sc — les pieds au 
dur, or au grand pre. fo he trans- 
portAi, "to be lagged," or "to 
light the lumper." (Popular) Sc 

— Ics yeux, to drink a glass of 
white wine in the morning, be 

— le tuyau, to drink, *'to wet 
onc'^ whistle." Va tc ~- \ gv ta 
the deuce ^ go to "pot!" Mod 
linge esc lav^ ! /am Oeaten, /owh 
I have the worst of it. (Cicneral} 
Lavcr, to sell. 

Lavette, /. (popular), tMgw, or 

"red rag." 

Lavoir. m. (cads'), confessional. A 
place wliere one's couscit'nce is 
made snow • white. ( Familiar) 
Lavotr public, newspaper. 

L*avoir encore (pupulai). Kile I'a 

encore, she has ytt her uiaideH- 

head, her rose has not yet betn 

piuckeJ. 

Lazagne, or lazagen,/ (thieves'), 

letter^ " screeve, or stiff." 

Go anpcUe la*agns, en Italics, une 

e»pice dc met* dc pAtc, ec Ton dU pro- 

vcrlknlemcnt "come le lasacne," cocniii* 

leiv la%asnc*, ni erMlroit nt mv«r*, pour dire, 

on Me «ait CT qtje c'ctU On cocnfMriMl ^ue, 

ifnoriuii* comntc i><> le <or>t pour la plupiut, 

lei giMUs «Mnt sppliqu^ cetie «Ji| 

Q 



226 




Lasaro — Letts, 



aux Iettn<, qui, d'aillcunt, tone loin d'itre 
toujour^ liMlitr^. II y ii aiiv^i des Iiwiet 
appelrfs "di loMcnc" — Micmbu. 

Balancer une — » tQ ivrite a letter. 

Laiaro,f«.(mil!tary)./r//o«/'shop 

tl tui avail ouvert la porte du cachot . . . 
«u food il •« moquait pa^ inal d'etre flonqud 
au Soizaao. — G. Col ktkli.se. 

Laxo-ligot, m. {[ioWfx)^ strap with 

a noost. 

Et Col-de-zinc, & I'aspect %\ raide, avait 
I'acilild du Mexicain pour jeler le U20- 
ligot, \tovkt entourcr d'un srul coup le corps 
et )e (Kiignet dc %on stjjet de fa^gn ^ cc que 
la nt.ii(i rettiit attacbcc & sa baachc. — AJ^- 
utffirrx dt Mi^muturdAitde, 

I^flzzi-lof, m. (thieves'), vetttrenl 
malady. Termed " French gout," 
or '* ladies' fever/* in the English 
shng. 

Liche-curi, m. (popular), bigot^ 

*' prayer* monger. 
Lichie,/ (artists'), //Ww/vm/Kw/^/y 

fiiinieJ. 

Legitime, m. nnd f. (fanilliar), 
husltattd, or •'oboleklo ;" wifcy or 
**tart," MangerM — ytosquander 
mte' s fortune. 

Legume, w. (military), gros — , 
Jield offieer, or "bloke." An al- 
lusion lo his riiaulets, termed 
"graine dVpinards.*' 

L^guraiste, m. (ramiliar), vt^ia- 
Han. 

Lcm. pnrlcr en — , mode of dis* 
Xniyittj; uvtds hy prefixing the 
letter **],"and adding the syllabic 
*'em " preceded by tbc 5rst letter 
of the word; thus "boucher" 
becomes " louchcrbcm." This 
moile v.as first used by butchers, 
and is now obsolete. See Lam- 
pagne. 

Lenquetr^, m. (thieves'), tAirty 
jous. Tlie word ** trente " dis- 
guised. 

Lentille, / (thieves*), grosse — , 
ptooM, "pariih lanteni. 



L6on, m. (thieves'), the presidrnt pf 

the assise court. 

Lermon, m. (thieves*), tin. 

Lcrmonnet (thieves'), U tin, 
Lesbien, m. (hlerary), formerly 

termed Ia>bin, explained by quo* 

lation : — 

Lcfcbin. poor dire un jcuac homow 00 
garv>(i <iui bcit dc tucubc ^ un autre et qui 
Mjunre iiu'on cnmmetie la six!oraie sar luL 
— Ls Roux, l>ki. Comiyttr, 

Lesbienne.yt (common). Rigand 
says : ** Kctnme qui suit les crre- 
ments de .S.ipho; ceilc qui cultive 
le genre de depravation altribue k 
Sapho la Lcsbicnne." 

Lescailler. See Lascailler. 

L4sibombe,orlAs6e,/. (popular), 
ptostttutr, or '*niol." Fur synony- 
mous expressions see Gadoue. 

Lesstvage, w, (popular), sdling 
of property ; (thieves') //rtK/m^, 

Lessivant, m. (thieves'), coumti^ 
or '• mouthpiece." 

Lessive, /. (popular), de gascon, 
doiikfhl cleanltness. Faire la — , 
to turn cue's dirty shirt-ecUar or 
cnffs on the elean side. (Literary) 
Faire sa — , to sell iooks sent to one 
by authors. (Thieves*) Lessive, 
speeeh for the defcme. The pri- 
soner compares himself to dirty 
linen, to be waidied snow-white 
l»y the counsel. 

Lessiver (thieves'), is said of a ktr- 
rister who pleads in behalf of a 
prisoner, Sc faire — , to be cleaned 
out at some ^ame, '• to have 
blewed one's tin," or *'lo Iw a 
muck -snipe," or in sporting slang 
a " muggins." 

Lessiveur, m. (lliicves*), eoutttel, 
or "mouthpiece." Literally ofU 
iL'ho icailtes. 

Letem (Breton cant), eye, 
Letez (Breton cant), courUrymam, 



Letezen — L icher. 



%ri 



Letezcn (Crcton cant), pancake. 

L«ttre, / (thieves'), de Jerusalem, 
l€tter wrifttn by a fruentr to 
samesme oultide the prison^ to re- 
quest thai tome money may be stnt 
him ; — <le couronae (obsolete)* 
eup. 

Levagc, m. (popular), nvinJU; 
iUfcessfut ^illanfry. 

Lcv6. aJJ. (general), had foimcrly 
the significalion of to he tratked by 
a hailijpwho has/oundonii wAtre^ 
aboMts. 

Levic, /. (popular), wh^UsaU 
i\trtst e/proitUutes. 

Live-pieds. m. (ihicve**), ladder; 
jt>ps^ or *' dancers." Embarder 
suf Ic — , to g9 d^mm the tteps^ 
*'lo lop down Ihe dancers." 

Lever (printers*), la letlre, or Ics 
pclils cloui, to iompost ; (jx»pular) 

— boutique* /* itt tip as a tradis- 
man, 

Un Toulouuia . . - je^ufte pemiTuier di- 
VOr< d'amhitlon. vini & Paris «» y 1*" 
bcHittqut 0« "** •*** **• voire aiijoij — 

Lcrer des chopins, /* find some 

proJUabte ttroke of businesi ; — la 
ianibe, to dame the (ancan ; —- le 
tmu, to be dissatisfied ; — le pled, 
l^ahuond; (ramiiiar and i>opular) 

— nne fcmme, to find a woman 
foilling to aiiord hir favours ; — 
quelcpieihuse, to stial something, 
" to wolf;'* (miliury) — les balu- 
chon-s tc x» (»««•»• ; (pmslitules*) 

— un miclic, to find a client^ ** to 
pick up a flaU" 

t*eveur, m. (popular), pickp^ket^ 
"huzcove/'SccGrinche. Leveur 
de femtiic*. a Don Gtafannt sn a 
small uH\y, or a "roolrower." 
(Printers') Ban — , skiUed typo- 
grapher, 

Vn km Icvciw cat «a vuvricr ^ui oom- 
■»c btcn et vitc— BouTMT. 



Leveuse,/ (familiar and popular), 
a ft ash girt. 

Levure,/ (popular), yf/i'^r. Faire 
la — , to run tniHsi\ ** to ske- 
daddle." "to mizzle." 

Lizard, m. (popular), an untrttst- 
worthy friend ; dog stealer. 

\jt l^nrd vole de^ chicni coiinuiU, dc* 
^paCbcub ct uirtoul dct levrettes. II a* 
livTv jamai* u proi^ taiu r«c«voir U wmtnc 
<±tK\MX*K.~AimMmMkdM LUhittur. 

Faire son — , to dou in the day- 
time like a lizard basking in the 
SUM, (Thieves') Faire le — , /* 
taJke to pght, •Mo make beef.** 
See Patatrol, L*n — , a traitor^ 
a*'smtcher." 

Lizardes, /. /A (printers'), white 
spaces, 

Raies blAitchM produites dicns la co«n- 
pcMiUoQ par la rcDCOflUc fortune d'c5pac«» 
pUctfe* les unci aii-(k»«otti <)« auircs.— 

BOUTMT. 

L^ine,/. (thieve**), (healing at a 
game. 

L6xiner (thieves'), to cheat, "to 
bite ;" to hesitatf, "to funk." 

LibretaiUeur, m, (familiar), a 
libretto xuriter of poor ability. 

Lice, /. (popular), lecherous girl. 
Literally bitch. 

Lichade,/. (popular), embrace, 

Lichance,/. (popular), Amr/ym^/, 
"tightener." From lichcr, equi- 
valent 10 lecher, to lick. 

Liche, f (popular), excessive tat' 
tag or drinking. Elt« en — , to 
be **tm the booxe." 

Licher (familiar and popular), to 
drink. *' to luih." Sec Rincer. 

II a licb^ tout' la bouicilW. 
Ritn n'ot mci< pour un uprar. 



228 



L tclteu r — L imonadc. 



Licheur* w. (familiar ami popular), 
gprmatuiiztr. The term is very 
old. 

Lichoter un rigolboche (popu- 
lar), to make a hearty »ual^ or 
"tightener." 

Lie de froment,/ (popular], €X' 
crementf or "quakcr." 

Liige, m. (thieves'), gtndarme. 

Lierchem (cads'), to ease oneself. 
An obscene word disguised. See 
Lem. 

Lignante,/. (thieves'), life, 

Ce moi . . . vieni dc la lijfnr, dite dc vie, 

3 tie In boKcniien» consuttAvcnt ttir la mam 
e ceux aiixguels lis disaient la boona 
avcD t ur«. — M icM KL. 

Lignard, nu (familiar and popular), 
foot-soldier of the line ; journalist ; 
(printers') compositor who has to 
deal only with the tody fart of a 
comfosition ; (artists') artist who 
devotes his attention more to the 
perfection of the outline than to that 
of colour ; (popular) rodfisher, 

Ligne,/. (artists'), avoir la — , tc 
have a fine profile. (Literarj*) 
Pechcr k la — , or lirer ^ la — , is 
said of a journalist who seeks to 
make an article as lengthy as/)os- 
sibie. (Popular) Pecher & la — 
d'arcent is said of an angler who 
eatcnes fish l>y means of a money 
baityOt the fishmonger's. (Printers') 
Liene a voleur, line conjoining 
only a syllable^ or a very short 
tvord, ivhiih mighf have been com' 
posed into the preceding line. 
L«> ligne* !i voleur font facUe* ^ recon- 
naltre, ct ctlcs n'ccliappcnt gu^rc ^ I'cril 
d'un corrcctcur cxcn.c, qui Ics ca^sc d'ar- 
dinaire itnpiloyatlcnienl.— BouTur. 

Ligorc,/. (thieves'), assiu couit, 
Ligorniau, m. (popular), hodman. 
Ligoi. See Ligotante. 
Ligotage, m. (police), binding a 

prisoner's hands by means of a 

tvpt or strap. 



Ltgotante, or Ugotte,/ (thieves*), 
rope, or strap ; bonds ; — de 
rifle, or riflarde, strait waistcoat. 

Ltgoter (police and thieves'), to 
bind a prisoner's hands by means 
of ropes or straps. 

Nul mieux que lui n« uvait prendre un 
mairaiteur utns t'atilmcr. ni lui mciire le» 
pouccttcs %3lv\% douleur ou le liji^oter »ans 
cffurt. — Memeirtt de J^fffntimr Liaude. 

Ligotte,/, (thieves'), rope ; string; 

strap. 

Lillange (thieves*), town of Lille, 
LiUois, m, (thieves'), thread, 

Limace, f. (popular), low prosti" 
tufe, or " draggle-tail ; '* soldier's 
wench, or ** barrack-hack,'* see 
Gadoue ; (thieves') shirty ** flesh- 
bag, or commission." From the 
Romany '* lima," according to 
MicheL 

Limacier, m., limaci&re, f.^ 
(thieves'), shirt - maker. From 
limace, a shirt, 

Limande,/ (popular), man matte 
cfpoorsittff; onewhoftm.ms. From 
Unuuide, a kind of sole (Esh). 

Lime, /, (thic^'es'), for limace, 
shirty or "commission*' in old 
Engl i sh cant ; — sourde, sly, under' 
hand man. The expression is old, 
and is used by Rabelais : — 

Mais, qui pit e^-t, lesoultrageorent e^'^xle- 
ment, lei ipp«liant» irop^iteux, brcKhe* 
Uciiti, ))bi>anr« ruu^uunulx, galoerv, i:hie> 
en-licts, averlana, litnca lourdes. — (jmr>' 
gantho, 

Limer (fnmiliAr and popular), ta 
talk with dij/iculty ; to do a thing 
slowly. Literally to file. 

Limogire, /. (thieves'), ehamber- 
maid. 

Limonade, / (popular), wafer, or 
"Adam's ale;" the trade of a 
'Miraonadier," or proprietor of a 
small cafi, Tomber, or se ptaquer 



L imonadier de post^icurs — Liqueur. 



229 



dans la — , iofail into the •water ; 
to he ruined, or " gone a mucker." 
(Thieves') Limonade,^rt«w/tw// 

— de Iin*t>rc, <hamf<agne. 
•* Linipre " U ine word " pnncc " 
di^^uiscd. 

Limonadier de poatirieura, m. 
(l«i|mlar), apfthr^ary. Formerly 
apothecaries iHrrformed the ** cly- 
sterium donarc '* of Moliere's 
MaiatU Imaginaire. 

Limoutin, or limousinant, m. 
(popular), maioft. It must be 
memioned ttut most of the Paris 
mawns haii from Limousin. 

Limousine,/, (thieves'), sheet leati 
on roofs^ or "flap." Termed 
aI:»o "Miucibwn. gnu-double." 

Limousineur, m. (thieves*), thief 
VL'haitealtskeet-leadrccfimg. Called 
atsu " volciir au gras>doubIe/' a 
** bluey faker," or one who " flies 
the blue piyeon." See Grinche. 

Linge, m. (familiar and popular), 
fairc des effels de — , to Uisptay 
one's body linen xmtk affeitation, 
Un bock sans — ^ or sans faux- 
col, a ^lass of berr without any 
head. A request for such a thing 
is often made in the Paris caf<^s, 
where the microscopic "bocks'* 
or "choppc*)" are topped by 
gigantic heads. Se pa3rcr un — 
conveoable, to have a styiiih mis- 
tress, an " out-and-out tart." 
(popular) Un — ^ regies, lu/fW^, 
shittemly tfoman. Kesserrcr son 
— , to die, (Thieves*) Avoir son 

— lave, to he caught, apprehended, 
or *'s.muKed." 

Lingi, adj. (popular), 6tre — , to 
have plenty of fine linen. 

Lingre, or lingue, m. (thieve**), 
knife, or "chive." From L.ingrcs, 
a inanufaciurmg town. The sy- 
nonyms are ** liiive, ircnle-deux, 
vingt-deux, chourin or sarin, 
scion, coupe - siiEet, plianL" 



Jouer du — , to ttabt " to slick, or 
to chive. " 

Lingrer, or linguer (thieves'), to 

stah, *• to stick, or to chive." 

Lingriol, m. (thieves'), penknife. 

Lingiiarde, f (popular), woman 
with a soft tongue, 

Lingue, «. (thieves'), km/g, or 
"chive." 

Linspr^, m. (ihievcs*), /rrwy. See 
Limonade. 

Linv*, m, (popular), loussem, 
twenty jom. 1 he words " vingl 
sous " distorted. Un — , afrane ; 
** un lenquclre '' being one frane 
and fifty (tntimes, or thirty sous, 
and'*unlaranl«|ue,"/wv/rai»4-j, or 
forty situs. These expressions are 
respectively the words un, trcntc, 
qua ran te, disguised. 

Lion, m. (familiar), dandy of 
1S40. Fosse aux lions, box at the 
opera occupied by men of fashion. 
For synonymous terms see Gom* 
meux. 

Lionnerie, f. (familiar), fashion' 

al'le world, 

Liptte, f. (popular), prostitute^ 
"mot,*' or" common Jack." See 
Gadoue. 

Lipette. /. (popular), mason. 
Termed also hgorgnioL 

Lipper (popular), to visit several 
wint-shops in succession, 

Liquette, or limace,/ (thieves'), 
shtrt, in old English cant "com- 
mission." Dccarrer lecculred'une 
— , to oblitcrau the marking of a 
shirt. 

Liqueur, / (popular), cache-bon- 
bon ^ — , dandy's stick-up collar. 
A malevolent allusion to scrofula 
abcesses 00 the neck. 



230 



Lire — Loger me du Croissatti. 



Lire {rn;niiliar), atix astres, to muify 
** 10 go wool-jjalhering ; " (fami* 
liarand popular) — Ic journal, tog^ 
without a timner ; — le Moniteur. 
to utiit fuuirntiy. (Piinlers') Lire, 
to note propowd alteratiom in a 
proof; — en premiere, to corrett 
the first proof i — en sccondc, or 
en Con, to conett a second proof on 
whkh the author has written **/or 
press." (Thieves') Savoir — , to 
haze one's 'oits n/'uut otte^ '* to 
know what's c/clock." 

Lisette, /. (thieves*), fonp waist- 
iO<U ; sii'ord^ or "poker.' 

Lisserpem (roughs'), to xmdurine. 
The word *' pisser" disguised by 
prefixing (he letter " 1," and add- 
ing the syllable'* em" preceded 
by the first letter of the ward. 

Ltstard, m. (journalist^'), one in 
favour of ^^ strut in de liste^" or 
mode of ifcting for the election 
tvholesale of all the representatives 
in parlutrticnt of a ^* d^partement,'^ 
For instance, the I'aris electors 
have to vote for a list of over 
thirty members. 

Lit, m. (popular), ftre sous Ic — , 
to be mistaken. 

Litbographier (popular), sc — , to 
fall, " :o come a cropper." 

Litrcr, or itrer (thieves'), to have. 

Litronner (popular), to drink wine. 

From litronr a wine mtnuure. 
Litronneur, »t. (popular), one who 

is too fond of the I'otlte. 

LittAraturc jaune (familinr), the 
so-toJUd Naturalist literature. 

Littiraiurier, ///. (familiar), a lite- 
rary man after a fashion. 

Livraison, /^ (popular), avoir une 
— de bois devant m porte, to 
have welldeveloped breasts, to be 
possessed of fine '* Charlies." 



Livre, m. (popular), des quatre 
rois, pa<k of cards^ '* book of 
briefs," or " Devil's books ;" — 
rouge, poliee re^tratioti book in 
whiih the names of authorized 
prostitutes are inscribed. Eire in- 
scrite dans le ~~ ruugc, to be n 
registered prostitute. ( Frce- 
niason&') Livrc d'archilecture, /«/- 
ger of alodge. (Sharpers') Lirre, 
one hundrcii fratus, 

Loa vihati (Breton cant), coffee, 

Locandier, //;. (thieves*). Called 
also " voIeuraubonjour,"MiV/'Td'>J* 
visUs apartments in the Morningt 
and who when caui^ht pretends to 
hazv entered the wron^ rooms by 
mistake. See Grinche. 

Loche, f. (popular), mou comme 
une ^, slow, phlegmatic, '* I.izy- 
bones." (Thieves') Loche, ear^or 
"wattle." Properly /oath or 
groundling. 

Locher (thieves*), to listen; (|>npu- 
lar) to totter, " to be groggy.'' 

Locomotive, /. (popular), great 
smoker. 

Lof, loff, lofTard, lofTe, m. (popu- 
lar), /on/, or '* bounder." **Lof " 
is the anagram of " fol." 

A lui le coq, . , . pour tnventer des enf 
blemu . . . ijuand j'y penM:, fallait-il aue 
je fuue loA* pour donncr dan> uo gooan 
parcil 1 — At/mi*iret dt i'idt\i/. 

Loffat, m. (popular), apprentice. 

LofRat, w. (popular), blockhead, or 

*'cabbagi:-hcad." 

Loffitude, /. (thieves*), stupidity ; 
nonsense. Uonibseur de loffi. 
tudes, nonsense-monger. SulUceur 

de loS\tu.d€s, faurfta/ist. 

Loge infemale, f. (theatrical)* 
box occupied by young men of 
fashion. 

Loger rue du Croissant (fami- 
liar antl popular), is said if ittt 



Logis du moutrot — Lorgnette. 



231 



inj'itint husbattd^ or "buck face." 

An alluMun to the horns of the 

moon. 
Logis du moutrot, m. (thieves'), 

f^iiii court. 
Loir, m. (thieves'), prison^ "slir, 

or Hastile.'* Sec Motle. 

Lokard (Breton cam), feasant. 

Loko (Breton cant), brandy. 

Lolo, w, (thieves'), chief, or "dira- 
ber dambcr ; " (popular) cocotte^ 
or "mot." See Gadouc. Kifi 
— , largt iron lylindtr in whith 
th€ contents of ctsspcots are carried 
away by the scm'cnf^ers. (Mili- 
tary) tiros loIo«, cuirassiers. 

Lombard, m. (popu)nr), commis- 
siotinaire of the '* Mont de Pi^'^* 
or government paxvnittg establish- 
ment, 

Lonce^6, m. (thieves* and cads'), 
wm«, •' cove ;" master of a koHse, 
"boss." The word gonce dis- 
guised. 

Lonceguem,/. {thieves'.ind cadi'), 
TivmiiH^ot "hay-bag;" mistress of 
a house, 

Lonp, iw. and adj. (popular), sim- 
tleton, greenhorn. Elcs - vous 
log^ ct nuurri ? Oul, Ic — du mur. 
Do wu get board and lotigiugf 
>V/, at my men expense. (Thieves') 
Long, stupid ; block hixut, or * * go 
along.". Abbreviation of long ji 
com prendre. 

Longchampa, «., a long corridor 
of w.c.^s lit the Bcole Polytech- 
nique ; (popular) a procession. 

Longe, f. (thieves'), year, or 
"Biretch." Tirer uue — , to do 
otte *'slrctch" i«/rrjt»«. 

Longi, a.lj. (popular), old. 

Longin, or Saint-Longing ac 

([xjpular), sluggitrd. 

Longine, qt SaJnte*Longine, /. 
(popular), j/uggisA v.'omaH, 



Longuette detrtfte,/ (thieves'), 
roll if tobacco t or *' IwUl of ft^us," 

Lophe, adj. (thieves'), false ; 
counterfeit^ *' flash." Un fafiot 
— , a forgai bani^noUf or *' queer 
screen." 

Lopin, M. (popular], spittle^ or 
•*gob." 

Loquc, m. (thieves*), parlcr en — , 
moilc of disguising uvrds^ The 
word IS prrccrlctl by the letter *'l," 
and the syllable preceded by Ihc 
first letter of the word is added. 
Thus "fou" becomes " lou- 
fot[ue." 

Loquee, / //. (thieves'), pieea of 

copper. 

Lorcef*^. (thieves'), old prison of 
'* Lti Force." La — des Inrgues, 
the prison of Satnt-Laiare, u/hm 
prostitutes and unfaithful wives 
are eonfned. 

Eh bicn \ sijc t« la roarraii k b lorcef<f 
deft Urctic« (Saint-Ljuarv) pour un an, U 
tciDjM dc toD gcfbemctil. — UAt-tAC. 

Lordant. See Lourdier. 

Loret, m, (pc^ular), l<rver of a 
lorctte. 

Lorette, /. (familiar), ntore than 
fast grrl, or '*mot," named after 
the Quartier Kotre Dame de /,»- 
rette^ the Pan's I^imlico. .See 
Gadoue. 

Lorgne, orlorgne-b*. m. (thieves'), 
i;tu-eyal man. In Enj*li>h slai^g 
** a seven-sided animal;" the ace 
of cards t or *' ptg'* eye." 

Lorgnette, /. (thieves'), teyAolf^ 
this natural receptacle for a key 
being conisiiJcrcd by Ihievvs as 
an aperture convenient only for 
nuiking inve«iIigatioii5» from the 
outride of a door. Etui a — , 
ffl^rt, or '*culd-mcat l>ox.'* Etein* 
dre ses deux lorgneltcs, to dost 
en^s eyes. 



23: 



Lorquet — Loupe. 



Lorquett m. {ixjpular}, mh. 

Lot, m, (popular), vcnenal dimae, 

Lou, or loup, m. (popular), faire 
un — , i0 sfoit a piti< ofxtcrk. 

Louanek (Breton cant), brandy. 

Louave, m. (thieves'), drunkards 

Lire — , to if druiik^ *• lo be 

canon." Faire un — , to rob a 
drnnkard. Rogucs who tlcvote 
Ihcir energies lo ihis kind of 
thieving are termeU ' 'bug-hLinters." 

Loubac, /;/. (popular), apprentice. 

Loubion, m. (iliieves'), bonnet or 
hat. See Tubard. 

Loubionnier, m. (tlur vcs*}, hat or 
l'0t\net maker. 

Louche, /. (thieves'), hand, or 
"duke. La — , the police, or 
** reelers." Ia — Ic renifle, /A/ 
police are trncivg hint, he is getting 

a •' masting. *' 

Louchie. / (thieves'), spoonful. 
From tuuclie, a soup ladle. 

LouchcT (popular), de la bouche, 
to have a eonstrairtcdt inssn- 
cere smile; — de I'epaute, to 
be a huniplKick, or a "lord;'* 

— de la jnmlie, to be lame. Faire 

— un hommc, to inspire a man 
•.fifh carnal desire. 

Loucherbem, m. (popular and 
thieves'), the word bouchcr dia* 
pulsed, see Lem ; butcher. Cor- 
liillnr'l des — , see CoibiUard. 

Louchon, m., louchonne, /. 
(l>nT)ulax), perscn who s^umts, one 
■n'itX "swivd-eycs." 

Louffer (popular and thieve*'), to 
JoiM, " 10 hzzle." i>i tu loufics en- 
core sans dire fion jc te passe jk 
iravers, if you *'fi«Ie" again 
without apologizing nith rash you . 

LoufBat, m. (popular), low cad. 
TcrmcH in the English slang a 
** rank outsider." 



Loufoque. adj. and ni. (popular 
and thieves'), mad^ or '•cracked, 
balmy, or one off his chump." 
The word fou disguucti by means 
of the syllable loque. See Loquc 

Si nosdocli' ^oiient moin« vi«tllc$, 
On Ic* fcrait plaiicr. 
Ma» ]» pauv' loiifoquei balaicnt 
Lcs gnu it'ooft Uia^es. 

Louille, / (thieves'), prostitute^ or 
*' bunter." See Gadoue. 

Louis,/ and m. (bullies'), une — , 
a bully's mistress^ a prostitute. 
Abbreviation of LouU X V. .women 
in bmlhets often powdering and 
drcRsing their hair l-ouis XV. 
fafthion. See Gadoue. 

J'coucS' que'qu'foi* sous dc4 votturei ; 
nlaift on altrap' du cambouw. 
J'veux f>ftit ch linguer la peimure^ 
(^uadJ j'ftuc' la {XNiinie ^ ma Loiiii. 

RlCHKrtK. 

(Popular) Un — d'or, lump t^ 
excrement^ or "quaker." 

Louiselte, /, old appellation of the 
guillotine, 

Louiza (Breton cant), water. 

Loup, m. (popular), mistake; debt ; 
creditor^ or *' dun ;" misjii, or piece 
of •work vfhick has been spoilt; 
(printers') lack of type ; debt ; cre- 
ditor. Faire un — , is to buy on 
credit. 

Lc jour da ta l<anque, 1« crtfancier ou 
"Iciup'* vieni quclqiicfoiv gunier vjn <W- 
biicur (nciui allii)ii« riirc sa prsic) & Li lortie 
dc t'aiclicT pour rcctamcr cc qui lui est dQ. 
<^uand l;t reclantaiion a lieu a I atelier, c« 

aui t\l dcvrnu ir^ rare, te> compoatenrm 
onnrni & trur caniarade et au crtfaader 
une " roul 'n^ic " accompagnde des cris : au 
loup ! au luup '. — Hot'TMV. 

Loupate, tn. (popular), the word 
" pou " disguised, a louse, or 
" grey-backc<i 'un/' 

Loup-cervier, iw. (familiar), //drjl- 
jobber. 

Loupe, /., laziness^ '•loafing." 
Camp de la — , x>agabomis* meet- 



Louper — L nisante. 



233 



or 



mg^plate. Chevalier de la — , a 
iazjf raMbler or gaii-ahout who f^s 
ahout pUasnre tftkini^. (Thieve**) 
Un enfant de la — , a van'tty 0/ 

Lci Eafanttfl* la toupe «t 1e« Fil«nd^chef 
Itabitaient de pr^r<jr«nce Text^rieur do car- 
film, letin foun Ii liri(iur« uu & pUllfc.— 
Mimairts dt Motuirur VlAtutt, 

I#ouper (jxipular), totdU about pl^a- 
surt sacking. 

Loupeur (popular), ArsK xvartman, 
or one M'ho u *' Mondayish." 

Loupiat, m. (popular), ^ozy^ 
" Mondayish,' workman ; 
grant, or "pikey." 

Loupiau. or loupiot, m. (popu- 
lar), M//^, or "kid." 

Loupion. m. (popular), hat^ "tile." 
Sec Tubard. 

Lourde, orlourdiire,/. (thieves'), 
liocr, "jigger." heeler la — , to 
shut the door^ ** to dub the jigger." 

Lourdeau, in. (thieves'), d^vU^ 
"niffin,"or *' darble." 

Lourdier, m. (popular), d!cvr<j6A^r. 

Lousse, _/*. (thieves'), country gcn- 
tiarvke or corf>s 0/ gentttir/turie. 

Lousses, m. pi, (cads'), dix — , 
Jiffy centimes. The word sous 
disguised. 

Loustaud, tn. {(h!eves*),^/xriMr, or 
"slir." See Motte. tnvoyer a 
— , to una to thedeucey ** to i>ot.*' 

Louter (popular). See Faire un 
lou. 

Louveteau. m. (frcernx'tons'), son 
0/ a freemason. 

Louveticr, m. (printers*), mnn in 
d€bt. 

Cc tenne cm priH en nauvaife p«r^ car 
te lyjK) auquel on I'applUjuc est cotitidtfrj 
cunimc fiii->^Lnt trup bga nuuche dc u dig- 
tme. — UoL'TMV. 



Lubre, tuij. (thieves'), disma!. 
Lubre coinme un guicbemard, as 
dismal as a turnkey, 

Luc, m. (popular), messire — , 
breech, or "lochas." *'Luc"U 
the anagram of ** cul." See 
Vasistas. 

Lucarne, /. (popuUr), -woman*! 
bonnet. 

Autrerou on ati^imiUit le rapuchon des 
moinc« i une fen*ir«. d'oii le proverhe : 
AiHet'Vou* de« gcni qui ne voirni le jour 
que par une renitre dc dr^tL— MiCHKL. 

Lucarne, tnonocutar eye-gtass, 
Crever t>a — , to brtah on/t eye* 

ghss, 

Lucques, m. pi (thieves'), ^<»fT*- 
menti. Porte — , pocket'loakf 
"dee," or" dummy. ''^ 

Lucr^ce, f. (popular), faire sa — , 
to put on a virtuous look. 

Luctrtme, m. (thieves'), skeleton 
//J', "screw," "Jack in the box," 
or " twirl." Filer le — , to open 
tt door by means of a skeleton-key^ 
" to screw." 

Lugna (Breton cant), to look, 

Luire, m, (old cant), brain, 

Luis, or luisant, m. (ihicves*), 
day. 

Je roascaille iou< les Ititsaru an craod 
haure de y<jni*tm. — teymn(9ii defAmt, 
{t/rajf tiaity tk« grt»t God af pp'^jMr.) 

Luisant, wr., see Luis ; (familiar) 
dandy, "masher." 

Void d'abonJ le ptchatt, le vlan. let 
lut»anu, comme tu>\\% le« no«ninoit» aujour- 
d'hui. — P. Uahalin. 

For synonymous terms see Gom* 
nieux. 

Lutsante. or luiaarde,/ (thieves'), 
moon, or " parish lantern ;" win- 
dow, or "jump." 



234 



Z uisard — Lyounatse, 



Luiaard, or luysard, pj, (thieres*), 
sun. I .iiysard c»tani|>illc six 
plombes, it is six ecfxk by tht 
sun, 

Luisarde, / (ihicves"), mecn^ 
" palish lantern, or Oliver." 

Lumjgnon, m. (thieves'), Ic prand 
— , sun. Properly lumignon is a 
tanlirn. 

Luminariste, m. (theatrical), lamp' 
lighier. 

Lunchcr (familiar], to Have lunch. 
From the English. 

Lune,/ (thieves'), ont franc ; — i 
douM quart icrs, the wheel on 
wh ich criminals were broken . 
(Familiar and popular) Lune, the 
behind. See Vasistas. Lune, 
iarge /nil face. Amnnt de la — , 
man with amatory intentions who 
frequently j^s out on nottnnmly 
but fmitUss *'caler\vauling" ex* 
Peditions. Voir la — , is said of a 
utaiden who is made a loowan. 

La petite a beau avoir de la dcnielle, elle 
o'en vcrra pas mains )a Iuqc par Ic meiiic 
trou que Ics autrcB.— Zijla, L Auommifir. 

Luni, adj. (popular), bien — , in a 
g\>od humour^ ivell disposed. 

Lunette, f (popular), d'approche, 
^uilhtine, VasMir en — , to 
take f/i, " to do ; " to harm, Etrc 
passe en — , to fail in business. 
Les lunette-i, postenors^ or 
"checks." (Popular) Lunettes, 
smalt fry. Jc vais k la chasie 
aux — , / am going tojish for 
small fry, 

Luque, /. (thieves* and mendi- 
cants'), cerfiftcate ; false ceriif. 
catCy or faJse ^tg^ng petition^ 
*' fakement ; " passport ; picture. 
Jc sals bicn aquigcr les luques, / 
knoju -well how to forge a certif' 
eatSt or /« makt up puturts. 



, fock 

** dummy." II seems probable 
that the terra •' une luque," a ptc- 
ture^ is derived from Saint-Luc, 
who formed the subject of the 
pictures used formerly by mendi- 
cants to ingratiate themselves 
with monks ami nuns, a«i men- 
tioned by Le Jargon de VAr^t, 

Luquet, w. (thieves' and roendi- 
cants"), forged certificate^ or faise 
bagging petition, "fakement.** 

Luron, m. (thieves*), avalcr le — , 
to partake of cdrntnunion. The 
term was probably, in the origin, 
" le rond," corrupted into its 
present fonn (Michel). 

Luslcrnante,/. (popular), mistr^ss^ 
or '* mall." 

Lusquin, m, (thieves'), charcoal, 

Lusquinea, /.//. (thieves'), ashes. 

Lustre, m. (thieves'), Judge^ or 
"beak." (Theairical) Chevaliers 
du — , men 't>ho are paid to ap* 
plaud at a theatre. Termed also 
*' remains." The staS* of remains 
is termed "claque." 

LuBtrer (thieves'), to try a pri- 
softcr, to have him in /or "pat- 
ter." 

Lutainpem,/ (thieves* and cads*), 
prostitute^ ur " bunier." See 
Gadoue. The term is nothii 
moie than llie word " putain 
distorted by means of the syllable 
'* lem." See Lem, 

Lycie, m. (thieves'), ;*mf7«, "stir, 
or Bastile." For synonyms sec 

Motlc. 

Lyc6en, m. (thieves'), prisoner. 
Termed also "dcve du chiteau." 

Lyonnaise, /. (popular), ji/i, 
'* floss." Eire k la — , to teear a 
silh dress. 



L"K 



Mabillarde — Mtuaronnage. 



23s 



M 



Mabillarde, /C (pnpularX girllead" 
ing a diiSfHuU life, an hahiluit of 
the Bai MahilU. Called ako 
'* gnie mabillarde." 

Mabillien, m., Mabillienne, / 
(popular), maic anJ /cmaU Mabi- 
Uth of the Bal Mahille^ a place 
much frequented by pleasure • 
seeking foreigners. 

Lc9 nuUltieaoes de iB6j w ^ubdiviKiit 
en plustcurs cat^orJes : U dutUe, la soli' 
uito, la KTue. — Let Affmfirtt tin Bal 

M a b o u 1, oiij. ^general), om 
'* cracUtKl/* or one with ** a screw 
loo&c." From ihe Arab. 

C'ett' y que t'ei iruiboul? A\\, I'chcf. — 
J'suis pa< maboul, que jc rrpondt. — G. 
COL'RTELIMC 

Mac, Nff. (popular)^ abbrevinlion of 
" maqucrcau," girFs hdly^ or 
••Sunday man." For synon)Tns 
see Poisson. llie term also ap- 
plies to any roan living at a 
woman's expense. 

Maca« f (popular), Misfreis of a 
bmt'tiy-house. Termed also "Mere 
Maca" or "macqucctfc/* Maca 
inifT^p a rich proprietress of a 
house of ill'fame. MacA^ /Ae J*an's 
A/orgtte or dead-house. From 
machabce. 

Macabre, m, (common). See 
Machabde. 

Macacbc (militar}'}, no ; — bono, 
no good. 

ADoK^ Ics dtux roascs. deboul!. ..— 
Pourquoi dooc Dun fiiui-v qii'oa m live T 



— Pour aller, reprit Tadjudantt caoaer ta 
glace d<-« nlircuvuir*. W tlcuitc, aftiicx 
cauW: dcbout t . ..— L>cboutairoi>hcures 
du maiinr Ab t macaciM.— G. Cuuktb* 

LINB. 

Macadam, m. (familiar and popn- 
lar), fairc le — , to walk to ami fro 
on the pa\'ement as a prostitute, 
Fleur de — , street-Wiilker. See 
Gadoue. Lc general — , the 
publie. (Popular) Macadam, sweet 
white wine of inferior quality. 

Oiex nous c'est tous le noir et bat plafmtd 
d'un baugcqiie lc« voyou» blafardu, couWur 
irie de vciu, font la vendani'r lU nnt 
pour vin dotik ct nnuveau lc liquide ap> 
Dcl^ inAcadam, tiiie Ixiue jauniifc fad«.-~ 
KicHai'iN, Lt fitv^. 

Macaire. m. (familiar and popular)t 
un Robert — , a s-windler, one 0/ 
the "swell mob." Robert Ma- 
caire is a character in a playcalled 
L*Auherge dts Adrttt, 

Macairiatne, m. (familiar), ar/frar^ 
referring to nuiftdiin^ operations, 

Macaron, m, (popular), huissier* 
kind of attorney ; ((liieves') in- 
fortner^ one ivha ** blows the gaff," 
a '*sniicher." 

Cel Komm« qui criait >i fort contrc ccux 
que lei ecns de vt Mirte (tuinmeni dc« ma* 
carons s e»t un de« prcmKn triU k table.— 
VlDocw- ( 7'knt ttry tmtn ii>ko eom^tntd 
t* mmih fif tkttf wham rmcA ft^f^ term 
traitL*n A^M Stem en* q/" Mr Jfrgt ft $»• 
form,) 

Macaronnage, m. (thieves'), in* 
forming against, *' blowing the 
gaff." 



536 



Macaronner — Macqucct'e, 



Macaronner (thieves*), to inform 
at^ittst, ** to blow the gafT," or 
** lo turn snitch." Se — , /tf rttn 
aithiy, 'Mo guy." See Patatrot. 
Macchoux, m. (popular), prosii- 
ttile's buUvy or ** Sunday man." 
See Poisson. 
Mac^doine, /. {engine drivers'), 

fuei. 
MachaM, adj. (popular), drunk. 
J'ai trop picttJ, je suis k moltitj — , 
J have inen drinking too much , / 
am half dritnk. 
Machab^e, m. (popular), gity f^'li* 
buily^ or *' ponce" \ see Pois- 
son ; fnv^ " mouchey, Ikey, or 
shcney ;" ho^ty of a drowtud person, 
Je ne vois d'auire oricine k cette cx- 
|ire«s.i(>n que la lecture du chap. xii. du 
dcujiiime li»Tr Hr* M;»c>iaWcii, (niiaencorp 
lieu aux messes dc% moris ; ou plutfit c'eat 
de 1^ que Mra venue U (l^n^ macabre, 
done rar^ot a conserve le touwntr.— M i- 

Case des machab^es, cemfUry, 
Lc clou dcs iDachaWcs, the 
^^ Aforgue^^^ or Paris dead-house^ 
Mannequin i machab^c«, hearse, 
(Thieves') Machahee, traitor^ or 
'* snitchet." Lucrally a corpse^ 
the inforiner in a prison, when 
detected, being £enerall>* mur- 
dered by [hose hi? iias belrayed 
by means of the punishment 
termed "accolade," which con- 
sists in crusliiiig him against a 
wall. 

Machaber (popular), to die, "to 
kick the bucket." See Pipe. 
Machabcr quclqu'un, to drmon 
one. Sc — , to drink. Je me 
suis machabc d'un litre, / have 
treated myself to a Hire bottle of 
linne. 

Machicot, m. (popular), bad, metm 
player^ or ctu who flays a "tin- 
pot pime." In the Conies 
d^Kutrapel^ a French officer at 
the siege of Chatillon is ridicu- 
lously spoken of o-s Captain Tin- 



pot — Capitaine du Pol d'Etaln. 
Tin-mt as generally UMd means 

worthless. 

Machin, iw. (general), expression 
used when one cannot re.otlect the 
name of a person^ " ihingunibob, 
or what's name." 

Machine, / (literary, artists*, 
theatrical), production. 

Ccia nt'cst hicn csnl .' tl n'ctt pas le icul 
& me ddviMjzer. Je lui chaoterai m " mA- 
chiiie" et it me Uuftftem tranquille.— J, 
Sermet, Ume Cabetin€. 

Grande — , drama. Moliere uses 
the word to describe an important 
afTair or undertaking : — 

J'ai des rcAsors tout prcts pour divenea 
machines. —^'f/^Mn^i. 

(Popular) Machine & moiilures, 
breech^ or " bum," sec Vasistas ; 
— a lisserpcm, urinal ; li&berpem 
being the word pisser disguised. 

MAchoire, f. (familiar and popu* 
lar), blot'khe<hi. (Literary) Vieille 
— , dnU^ old 'fashioned ^vHter ; 
i^torant man. 

L'oa arrivait par la fili^re d*^piib%ie<i qui 
inivenl : ci-devant, faux loupet, aile de 
pigeon, pcrruq^uc, <ftru»quc, mlchotr«, ga- 
nache, au dcnuer dcEre' de decrepitude, & 
repithite la plus inlxinanle, Bcad^micien 
cl mcmbrc dc I'lostttut.— Th. Gaiitiek. 

MacMahon, m. (dragoons'), head 
of a Medusa at top oj helmet. 

MacMahonnat, m., period iff 

Marshal MiicMahon's nifny at 
President of the RepMblic Every- 
body recollects the famous "J'y 
suis, j'y reste ! " of the Marshal, 
and Uambelta'ft reply, " LI faut 
se soumeltrc ou se demcltrc." 

Ma^on, IW. (popular), four-pound 
iMf; (freemasons') — dc pratique, 
mason : — de theorie, freemason ; 
(familiar) disparaging epithet op- 
plied to any clumsy worker, 

Macque, macquet. See Mar 

Macquecee. Sec Maca. 



J\[acrotag€ — Maif/artf, 



237 



Macrotage, or maquereautage, 
ra, (familiar and popular), living 
at a uvmau's e:tpenst ; used also 
figuratively to denote agency in 
some fishy business. 

Macroter (familiar and popular), to 
lift at a Ufoman^ s expense ; — unc 
affaire, to he the agentin sonu fishy 
buiititss. 

Macrotin, m. (TsmiHar and popit* 
lar), 0Mt living at a woman^s ex- 
fotje, "pensioner" with an un- 
meHtionahie prefix, j-aun^ buUy, 
yomig *' ponce.'* Sec Poiason. 

Maculature,/ (printers'), attraper 
u ne — , /iJ gtt tiru n *t, to get 
*' tight." Sec Sculpter. 

Madame (popular). Milord qu^- 
p^tc, iasy woman, who iikes to He 
tn btJ ; — Tircmonde (expres- 
sion used by Rabelais), or Tire- 
ejussc, midwife ; (shopmen's) — 
anivetf a female customer who 
eannot make up her mind^ and 
leaves vntJumt purchasing any- 
thingy after having made the uu- 
fffrtunate shopman display all his 
goods. 

Madeleine,^ (card-sharpers*), faire 
ftucr la — , to cheat, or *' bite,** 
Vfiih great difficulty^ 

Madelen (Breton cant), salt. 

Mademoiselle Manettc,/. (ponu- 
\zr)y portmanteau, or '* peter. 

Madrice, f. (thieves'), cunning. 
U a dc la — , he is cunning, 01 
" h fly to wot's wot." 

Madrin, roadrine^ adj. (thieves*), 
lunning, " leary, or fly to wot'i 
wot.*' 

Madrouillage.m. (thieves'). ^tfnj/>. 

Ma fiole (Ihievr**), me; niyself, 
"mynibs." Est<c que tu te riches 
de — ? are you laughittg at me f 




Mag^asin, m. (military), military 
school, *• shop " al the R. M. Aca- 
demy ; (popular) — de blanc, or 
de fcsses brothel. 

Magistrat'muche, /. (ihieves')^ 
magistracy. Un pant' de la — , a 
magistrate^ a ''beak." Termed 
*' queer cuflin'* in old cant. 

Magnaniire. / (ihicves*). de — , 
in order that, 11 fagaut dcWdcr 
la relent i^ante dc — i ne pas 
faire de lliarmonar^, ttv must 
break the bell so as not to make any 
noise* 

Magnie./ (thieves'), *njj///tt/r, or 
" burner. " See Qadoue. 

Magnes.yi/^/. (popular), 0/^-/a/iV/i, 
** high-fnluiin'* atrs. r'aire dcs 
— , to make cerenionits, As-tu 
fini tes — ? none of your airs t 
" stop bouncing 1 " / dont take 
that in t From mani^res. 

Magnette, / (thieves'), name, or 
"monarch;" — blague, false 
name, 11 fagaut la — bingue de 
magnanicrc que tu ne sois poga, 
you must take a false name lest you 
should be caught. 

Magneuse, magnuce, manieuse, 
/. (jwpuUr). Michclsa^s: "Fille 
dejoie, femme qui $e deprave avec. 
des individus de son sexc . . . 
quclque allusion malveillanie, ct 
sans doute calomnieuse, k une 
communaut^ rcligieuse. Jc veux 
parler des Mngneuscs, qui devaienC 
cc nom k leur foudairicc." 

Maguer (popular), se — , to hurry. 

Maigre, m. (thieves'), du — I 
silenee .' " mum your dubber." 
Also take care what you say, or 
" plant the whids." 
En vaio se d<nunche-i-il k faire Ic w'cne 

qui iJoit le sauver, du truigra 1 du emigre 1 

cric-l-il ^ me-ictc — ViDotij. 

Maillard, m. (popular), fermer — , 
to sleep, "to have a dose of 
balmy. ' Fermcture — , 'l**pp 



238 



Maillocher — Maladie. 



Z 



"balmy." Eire lerrass*! 
to ht extremeiy sleepy. In the 
above expressions an allusion is 
made to MaiUard, the inveulor of 
a peculiar kind of shutters. 

Maillocher (bullies'), U said of a 
bnlly who VhUches a proititutt to 
ste she does net setreU any part of 
her ttirrn'riifj, whifh are the afore- 
saiti ' ' pciisionct's " perquisites. 

Main, /. (ihitvo'), jouer i la — 
chauue, to ir i^tiihtined. An al- 
lusion to ihe posture of one play' 
ing hot cockles. Sec Fauche. 
(Popular) Achcter i la — , to buy 
for cash. (Familiar) Unc — 
pleine pour un honnete homme, 
a strong^ freshy comely country 
lass, (i'iayers'J Unc — , a set of 
tricks at inu'carat or lansquenet. 

Mains courantes, / //. (|)opular), 
ycf/, or " everlasting i^hiKS ; " 
shoes^ or " IroUcr-cascs. " So 
faire une paire de — i^ la mode, 
to run swiftly. See Patatrot. 

Maison,y^ (rnmiliar and popular), 
a parties, 3 Riming- ho use in ap- 
pearance, but in reality a brothel. 

L'n grand salon ctt ouveit it totjs lei 
amaleun; on risque gaUmmcni quelquc& 
louis . . . et cntre deux partic-'i on pa&s« 
It unc autre varitft^ d'cxndce dans unc 
chainbre ad hoc (Jucli|ue9-une« dc ccs 
auiuons, connues sou> Ic nom de " maisons 
4 pamct," fcooc le lupreme ilu genre. — 
Lbm Taxiu 

Maison de society, or 4 gros nu- 
mero, brothel^ **Ha%h-drum, aca> 
demy, buttocking-shop, or nanny- 
slion." Fille dc — , prostitute at 
a brothel. Mallresse de — , 
mistress of a brothel. M.nison dc 
passe, house of ficcommodaiion. 

Ud grand nombrc dc maiuint Ak pauc 
toot aoiM la coupe de la police. Ce sont 
del maiioas toltfr(!e& par radtntiUHtration, \. 

aui dies rcndcnt dc rrifqucni* »crvice« en 
cnon;ant Ici pnMtitu£c» inscnlcs i]ui vicn- 
Bcnt %y cacher. — DocTELR Jbannkl. 



(Military') Nfaison de campagne. 
«//j, "mill, or Irish theatre." 
Alter ^ la — dc campagnc, to Afrj 
imprisoned^ or "shopped." 

MaItred'6cole,m.(hor&cbrcakers*>, 
zvell-trained horse harnessed with 
a young horse which is being 
broken in. 

Mattresse, /*. (popular), de maison, 
mistress of a brothel ; — de piano, 
old or ugly tuoman who acts as a 
kind of factotum to cocottes. 

Major, m. (familiar), dc table 
d'hdic, elderly man with a military 
appearance, who acts as a protector 
to low gaming-house proprietors ; 
(Ecole Polylechniqitei^r// on the 
list ; — dc queue, last on the list. 

Mai (popular), blanchi, negrp^ 
•*darky, or snowball. " Un-^i 
gauche, a clumsy fellow. Une — 
peignce, a dissolute girl. (Thieves') 
Mai u\xcxc^ perjured witness. (Mili- 
tary) Avoir — aux pieds, to wear 
canvas gaiters. (Familiar) Avoir 
— aux cheveux, to hiize a head- 
ache caiised by prolonged potatiatts, 
especially when one is "stale 
drunk," which generally occurs 
after the "jolly dog" has taken 
too many hairs of the other dog, 
(Theatrical) Avoir — au geaou, ta 
be pregnant, 

Malade, m. ««</ mi), (thieves'), irt 
prison, "put away," When the 
prisoner leaves the " h6piial," or 
prison, he is pronounced '*gueri,** 
or free; (popular) -^ du pouce, 
idle, or ** Mondayish ; " stingi; or 
"clunch list." With a bad thumb, 
of course, it is difficuli to "fork 
oul, to down with the dust, to 
sport the rhino, to lip the bradsi 
or even to stump the pcwier." 

Maladie, yi (familiar and popular)^ 
de neuf moitt, pregnancy^ 
" white swelling." '1 he aliusioi 
is obvious. (Popular) Maladie l' 



Maiadroits — Manche. 



239 



^ 



an fffintiatioH efJisgusiwhith may 
b€ rtmiertdbr "rot !" (Tliieves*) 
Maladie, imprisonment ^ the con- 
vict being an inmate of "I'hopi- 
lal," or prison. 

Maiadroits, m. J>i. (cavalry), son- 
nerie des — , trumptt tail for 
infantry t/ri/i. 

MaUis£e, / (popular), faire 
lianver la — \l quelqu'un. tothrash 
one, •' lo lend one a dance." For 
synonyms see Voie. 

Ma1andr£uz, adj. (popular), rV/, 
" seedy, or hipped ; " ill at ease* 

Malapatte, m. (popular), clumsy 
r«.iM, "cripple.' Literally mal 
a la palle. 

Malastiqu^, m. (military), dirty; 
sitTvenly. 

Maldine, /. (popular), ^'^ pension 
bonri^oise" or hoardini^ house; 
boarding school. Literally a place 
where one does doi get a good 
dinner. 

Malfrat, m. (popularji scamps 
" twd egg." 

Malheurt (popular), an ejaenlation 
0jdi.iStist, "rotl" "hang it all!" 

Mattieur ! . . . Tiens, voiu preno du vent'e 
Ah! bon, chaleur I J'oomprendi I'tablcau! 
Ciu. 

Malingrer (thieves*), to suffer. 
From malingre, which formerly 
had the signification of ill^ and 
now means ivtakly. 

Malingreux, adj. (popular), ttfeak. 
In olden times a vanely o/memdi- 
eants. 

Maliflffmix tont cvuz qui out du matuc 
cm pLnir^, <lunl Ia (Juparl nv Mint iju'ca «i^ 
parciKc : iU irucheiit »ur 1 ciitiiTe. — Lc 
Jargon tie l'A*g\*t. 

Malle,/. (popular), faire sa — ,to 
die., " to kick, the bucket, to snuff 
it, to stick one's spoon in the wall." 



See Pipe. (Military) Malle, ibri6. 
«/, or "mill." 

Kn voili asMt, faut en finir ; tiui U 
peloton cotichera \ la nulle ce M>ir. — G. 

COUMTELINS. 

Malouse, / (thieves'), hox^ or 

"peter." 

Mal peasants (cleticnV), les jour- 
naux — , attriclerical neit'spapers. 

Les JoumaaK " m^l peounti" ne mln- 
quent jAmau de reUtcr cc» ckclanilrnt. 
Au»i, pour que la quantity ne puiue en 
itre conaue, I'archevcque ft auioru^ le< 
prSimdu dioce«c k ne pas poner la ton- 
»ure.— LAo Taxil. 

Mal-ras^s, m, fl. (niilitar)*). sap- 
pers ; thus called on account of 
their long beards. 

Maltaia, m. (popular), loja eating- 
Mouse^ a *' grub ken." 

Maltaise, or maltfcse,/ (old cant), 
gf>ld coin. According to V. Hugo, 
(he coin was used on board the 
convict galleys of Malta. Hence 
the expression. 

Maltousc, or maltouze, /. 
(thieves'), smuggling. Pasliqucr 
la — , to smuggle. 

Maltousier, «. (thieves'), tmug- 
glcr. 

Malvas, m. (popular), iraivr/. From 
the Provencal. 

Malzingue, m. (thieves'), landlord 
of ivine^shop ; wineshop. 

Allons, v«De2 cvter ud cram de ni^n. 
■^Nmu entriaiu chci te maliingoe U plus 
voi»in.— ViiwxTQ. iCumf am<i have m gla*$ 
ffwim.— t^^e entered thejint wine-tkop 

to.) 



Man (Breton cant), to hss, 

Manche, m, audf. (popular). Drf- 

Iwiwr scs bouts de — , to die, " to 
;ick the bucket." For synonyms 
see P»pe. (M-mntebanLn') Faire 
la — , io make a colUctiitn of 
money ^ or " break." 



Manckcttc — Manger. 



Xa TtPc dii barde fait U tnanchr. Elle 
promf^ne »a s^tulte de fcr-bUuii: devant lu 
tpectatcur*.— HrNKi Monnitk. 

From la buona, mancia of the 
Italians, says Michel, which has 
the sifjDi I'lcai ioti of (3 p-atuity 
^ allowed a workman or fjuitle, and 

•* jwesent " asketi by a prostitute. 
(Familiar and popular) l,e — , the 
piaster. Jamt>L's eii manches de 
vesic, tmndy A-^n. (Thieves') 
Fairc la — , to ba;. 

M'e^t aviit que vout avez noanqu'f le bon, 
t'autre torifue. Quni, Ic birbc qui avail 
I'air d« fairc U manche dan» l» gamafTcK 
et Ics pip<!*. — Viitrxg. (Atyo^iNWH is that 
jftfti mtiMrtt ihr riekt utnn tkt othtr mighf. 
H^ky, thi flM/eU0W wA<» /retentifH to i>€ 
lifggiitg in tlu/a-rmt and maMtieHs.) 

Manchettcr, / (military), coup de 
— , a ctrtaiH €lex'<r rtt'crd cut on 
the wrist. 

Uoe . . . deux . . . parcx ccIai•U^ c'est Ic 
coup de fluic Ah I Ah I pas Msec malin. 
\6uii le coup de manchetle ! Pif ! paf I 9a 
y ox. — H. r RANCK, L'Hommt ywi tut. 

p Mancheur, m. (popular), street 
lumhUr ; thus called on account of 
his livinc on the proceeds of "la 
manche, * or collection. 

Manchon, m. (popular), /ar^ Am// 
of hair. Avoir dcs vers dans son 
— , to have bald patches on one's 

htiUi. 

Mandarin, m. (literary), w/fff^'wary 
fersifn who serves as a butt for 
attacks. Tuer le — , to be ^i/ty, 
by thought f 0/ a had aetion. An 
allut>ioii to the joke about a ques- 
tion a^ lo one's willingness to kill 
a WL-nllhy man at a di^lniicc by 
merely pressing a knob, and 
afierwarJs inheriting his money, 

MandibulcB,/.//. (popular), jouer 
dcs — , tJ I'lit, " lo grub," See 
Mastiquer. 

Mandolir, /. (popular), sftuiel' in 
the fate, Jeter une — , /* give a 
smaek in the Jace, **to fetch a 



wipe in the mu<;," or, as the 
Americans have it, *• to give a 
bitTin the jaw." 

Mandolet, m. (thieves'), pistol^ 
" barking-iron, or pop." 

Manego (rtrctnn cant), handcnffSf 
or "darbies." 

Manette, f. (popular). Mudemoi* 
selle — , a portMonteau^ or 
"peter." 

Mangcoire, /. (jjopular), eaittt^ 
house, ** grubbing-crib." 

Manger (theatrical], du sucre, to 
be ophlaudtd: (militarj-) — ie 
mot d ordre, or la consigne, to for- 
get thi watchtmrd ; (popular) — 
de la misere, ordu ba'uf, to he in 

rerty^ to be a "*■ quisby ; " — de 
prison, to be in prison^ it$ 
"quod ;" — du fromage, or dtt 
bonif, to go toacomrade'sftmerai. 
An allusion 10 the repast, or 
"wake," as iho Irish term it, 
after the funeral ; — de la nierde, 
to be in a sttile of abject pctvrty^ 
entailing iill kinds of humiliations ; 
— du drap, or du merinos, to play 
billiards, or "spoof;" — le bon 
Dicu, to part ak£ of communion. 

Et c'cst du propre d'aller tnanger le boa 
Dicu en guigniuit Ics bonunes.— Zola. 

Manger le pain hardi (obsolete)* 
to act as servant ; — le poulet, 
to share unlawful profts ; — le pis- 
ftcnlit juir la racine, to be dead anti 
buried; — du pain rouge, ta 
make one^s Irving by murder and 
robbery; — la soupe avec on 
grand sabre, to be the possnsor of 
a very large mouthy like a slit made 
by a sword-cut ; — le ncz JL 
quelqu'un, to thrash one terribly ^ 
**to knock one into a cocked hat.'* 
Jc vnis ic — le ncz, a ianmdal' 
like offer often made ly a Parit 
rough to his a%h-crsary as a pre- 
liminary to a set'to, .Manger unc 
soupe aux hcrUs to steep in ttU 



Mangeur — Manon. 



24t 



I 



JUUs, Se — le nez, to fig^, 
(Thieves') Manger, to inform 
agaimf, *'to blow the gaff," or 
•' to tum snitch." 

Je voii bicD (]u'il y a p&rtnt nous unc 
CanAiUc qui a mane^ ; raiK-moi condiiire 
dcvonl le quart d'oeiC j* maogcrai auui. — 
ViDocg. 

MangcT le morcean, /« inform 
a^atHjr, " to tum &nitcb." 

Mai« t'rt Avertic, ne manfc paa le moff^ 
ceau, »iDoa giire ik lui '— VinoCQ. 

Mang<rr sur I'orgue, fa inform 
nf^nst^ ••to blow ihe KafT." Orgue 
hnshcre lhesi{;nilicatiunof pcrsiun, 
as in " roon orgue," /, myself 
" son or|;uc," Ar, himsrif; — sur 
que!qa*un, to inform against, 

Lv coquctir librc c«t oblif;B de pa«<*r «on 
cxikicDce danf Ic* orsie* lea ptui iifnoblci ; 
en relatioiu coiulantM avec les voleun de 

KrofcHion, doDt il e»i Tami. il t'ostocie ^ 
nin proj«t«. Pour lui ['>ui tM lion ' vol, 
escroquene, intcndtc, a*vurirut tncinc 1 
Qu'tsi ce i|uc cela lui fail? Pourvu qu'il 
puiuc *' mitnger " (denoncer) imt qurlqu'un 
el qu'il en tire ua Mn<6cc. —Mimotm d* 
CmMUr. 

Manger sur ton niere, to inform 
against an tucemfilite^ "to tum 
snitch against a pal ; " — du col* 
l^e, to be in prison, to It "put 
away ; " (familiar and popular) — 
la grcnouitlc, to appropriate the 
(OfttfHts of a eash'hox or funds 
entrusted to ones tare, 

Mangeur, m. (general), de blanc, 
wometC s imlty ^ "ponce, pensioner, 
petticoat's pensioner, Sunday- 
man." See Poisson for ay no* 
nyms. 

Lc paUlasMn ftait il y a ircDte am le 
"mangeur de blanc;" on ie d^icnait en 
17M toui Ic Dom " dliomme V quality" 
ei qiielmic^ anni5e« au|uravanl cciail un 
" gtelucnon." — Michel. 

Mangcnr de bon Dicu, At^v/, 
*' praycr-raonger ;" — de chou- 
croute, German; — dcnez.f/rtdrrf/- 
some^ savage man, I'aiis roughs, 
before a »et-lo, generally infurni 



their adversary of the necessity of 
disfiguring him by the savage 
words, *' II faui que jc te mange 
le net,'* Mangcur de frimes, 
hnmimg^ impostor ; — de pommes, 
it nafrt-e e>f Normandy^ the greaJ 
prfhard of Frante ; — de prunes, 
tailor, nr " snip." Termed also 
' * pique - prunes pique - poux.** 
(Thieves') Mangcur, informer; — 
de galelte, informer in the pay oj 
the polite ^ '* nark ; " (convicts') — 
de fer, eonvict ; (military) — 
d'avoine, thief; thict'ish fellow. 

Mangeuae de viande crue, f, 
(popular), /r(jj///«i'<-. For syno- 
nyms see Gadoue. 

Manicle, /. (thieves'), fr^re de la 
— , thief or '* prig." See 
Grinche. 

Maniires, /. pi. (popular), as-tu 
fini les — ? dim t he so ttuek- 
up ; none of your airs ! dont put 
it on so! ''come off the tall 
grass" (Americanism), or "stop 
bouncing." 

Manival, m. (thieves'), ehanoeU 
dealer. 

Manneau (thieves'), /, me (obso- 
Idc), now termed " niciigue, me- 
cigo, mczierc, mon gntassc." 

Mannequin, m. (popular), tnsig' 
ttificant^ eontemptible man, or 
"snot." The term may al^o be 
applied to a woman ; — ii re- 
froidis, or de macbabees, hearse. 

Mannezingue, m. (popular), land- 
lord of ifine-jhifp. Termed alK> 
'* mastroc, masiroquct." 

Pat Malcfflent une gbutte de eric & reettr* 
dans ma denii Uuw. La Maninet rn a 
achet^, cllc, pour quinzc tous chec le man- 
neziogue.— P. Mahauin, 

Mannezing^eur, m. (popular), 
habitu^ofufine-shops^ 

Manon, /. (popular), mistreu i 
iweetheartt or ** young woman." 



242 



Manquant^orti — MaquUlage, 



Maoquant-sorti, m. (popular), one 
who cannot umierstMid ajokt. 

Manque,/, (popular and thieves*), 
treachery. 

Gaffr^ Aait comme k plupwt des agents 
de police, uuf la manque (perfidie), boa 
«nfant, mais un peu licheur, c'est a dire 
Xoormaod comme une choueite. — ViDOCQ. 

A la — , to the ie/e, from the 
Italian aJla manca ; damaged; 
ill; bad. Etre i la — , to be- 
tray ; to leave one in the lurch ; 
io be short of cash ; to be ab- 
sent, AfTaire ji la — , Bad piece of 
business. Gonse k la — , ntan not 
to be relied upon^ who will leave 
4me in the lurch; traitor, or 
**snitcher." Faiiots, or faielard i 
la — ^ forged bank-notes t or " queer 
soft." (Popular) Un canotier & 
la — , awkward rmving man. 
Termed also " cafouilleux." 

Ecumeurs de calicot ! — Oh^ ! les cano- 
tiers k ta manque t— Viens que je te fas&e 
avaler u gaAe !— E. Momtbil. 

Une ballc k la — , face of a one- 
eyed man. 

Manquer le train, to loseoneU oppor- 
tunities in life, and consequently to 
be the reverse of prosperous. 

A dAute par un beau livre ; B k vinKt- 
cinq ans, expose un beau tableau. . . . Les 
mille obstacles de la boh£me leur batrent 
le chemin. . . lis resteront intcUigents, 
mais ... lis ont inanqu<! le train.— Tony 

RtVlLLON. 

Manquesse,/. (thieves*), bad cha- 
racter given to a prisoner on trial. 
Raffiler la — , to give a bad cha^ 
ractcr, 

Manuscrit beige, m. (printers*), 
printed copy to be composed. Ac- 
cording to Eugene Boutmy the 
ori^n of the expression is to be 
found in the practice which ex- 
isted formerly of entrusting Bel- 
gian compositors in Paris with 
printed copy only, and not 
manuscript, on account of their 
ignorance of the language. 



Mappemonde, f. (popular), ^ 
setnsj " Charlies, or dairies." 
Termed also " avant -scenes, oeuft 
sur le plat, avant-postes," &c. 

M aqua, / (bmiliar and popolar), 
otsolete, mistress of a brothel, 

Maquart, m. (popular), bidoche, 
or bifteck de — » horseflesh. From 
the name of a knacker. 

Maque. See Mac. 

Maquecie,/ (popular), mistress of 
a brothel. Called also "abbesse> 

Maquereautage. See Macio- 
tage. 

Maquereautin. See Macrotin. 

Maqui, m. (popular and thieves'), 
paint for the face, or complexion 
powder, ** slap, or splash." Met- 
tre du — , to paint on^s face. 
(Card -sharpers') Meltre du — , to 
prepare cards for cheating^ • ' to 
stock broads." 

Maquignon, m. (popular), kind of 
Jack of all trades, not honest ones. 
Properly horse-dealer; — k bi- 
doche, woman's bully, ox •* pen- 
sioner." See Poisson. 

Maquignonnage, m. (familiar and 
popular), cheating on the quality 
of goods ; making a living on the 
earnings of prostitutes. 

Maquignonnage, pour maquerellaKe, m^ 
tier dcs maquereaux et des maquerelles. 
qui font ntfgoce de filles de deluuche. — 
Cholikbes. 

Maquignonnage, swindling opera- 
tion. Properly horse-deal mg, 

Maquillage, m. (popular and 
thieves'), wori,oT *'eIbow-grease;*' 
the act of doing anything, *• fak- 
ing;" (card-sharpers') rarrf/Zaj'- 
in£ , tampering with cards, or 
•* stocking of broads ;" (familiar) 
the act of painting one's face. 

Elles font une prodtgieuse d^pense de 
comcstiques et de parmmeries. Presqus 



MaquilUe — Mardiand. 



243 



I 

f 



touta sc fanlent lc« )ou« ct \t\ livre« awe 
une nfclvetrf Bro«.itrB, Ouelquc*-unr« le 
nnircuwoi le« Miurdli et k bord doi pAU- 
ptircs livcc le chubon d'une ailluinelte Jk 
d«mi-brt)l<c. Ccfti c« qu'on appclU le 
" BtAquiUA^c" — LAu Taxii.. 

Maquill^e, / (ramiliar), harlat, or 
"mot." iAXewiWy fffu with painttd 
/ate. 

MaquUler (thieves'), M do, "to 
fake 1 " — lies caroableSi to manu- 
Jacturtfalu keys ; — Ics brumes 
to tamper uh/A cards^ ' ' to stock 
broads;*' to play eanis ; to cheat 
«/ eards ; — le papcUrd. to -write,, 
•*to screcTC ;" — son true, to 
prepare a dodge ; — un suage, to 
make preparatums for a murder. 
From (aire suer, to murder ; — 
— une catnhriole, to strip a room^ 
" 10 do a crib." The word " ma- 
quiller " ha> b& many different 
meanings as the corresponding 
term "tofaLe." (Popular) Ma- 
quiller, to do ; to manage ; to 
•work ; — le vitriol, to adulterate 
brandy. 

Vidlle drngue, tu u chant^ de litre I . . . 
Tu u>s, ce n'ckt pjs av«c moi ou'il faul 
nuu^uiller ion vitriol— Zola, L'Aaom- 
ft fir. 

Maquilleur, m., iniquilleute,/. 
{thieves'), eard'P/ayer ; eard- 
sharper^ or '* broadsinan. ** 

Maraille, / tthicves'), people ; 
7t.*orId, 

Marint, adj. (popular), laughable. 
Etrc — t to he miicuious. 

Marauder <conchmen'i), to take up 
Jtxres Tt'hm not aihtvcd to do so by 
the regulations ; refers also to 
** cabby " who has no lieeme^ 

Maraudeur,m. (familiar)»*'cabby" 
•mho piies hti treute -without a 
liieme^ 

Marbre, ««. ( joumaUsts*), MS. about 
t» be esmposed. 



Marcandier, m., marcandiire,/. 
(thieves'), tradetpeople ; also a 
tsiriefy of the mendicant tribe, 
"cadger. ' 

MarcAndieniontceux qui bient «vecune 
(TAnde hane X icur co«t(!, avcc un a»9C2 
chenautrc fni^quin, et un rabas sur \cs 
CDurbef, feiKtunC d'avoir ironve deft **• 
brwiix »ut Ic lrim«d qui Icui oni twirf leur 
michon louliinc. — Le Jitrft'n de fArjfPt. 
{JtfMrraiutien are thate ivhff /eurmey w/A 
s grtat fi*rit hy their' side, witk m f^etly 
gioA t*^ii. «Mt/ d clt>4tk an their $itaMldtr%^ 
pretending tluy km-e met X"ith rtfMert en 
ttU nM^ wkf kat^ iti>trm mil (heir mfimey.) 

MarcaSBin, m. (popular), x/^- 
board painter's assistant. Properly 
a young wild boar. 

Marcband, m. (familiar), desoupe. 
head of a boarding'Sthool ; (popu- 
lar) — dc larton, baker^ '• crumb 
and crust man, ma.Mer of the 
rolls, or crummy." Ternicil also 
" marchand cfe bricheton, or 
lartonnier;" — d'eau chaude. 
■* limonadier," or proprietor 0/ 
a eafi ; — d'eau dc javelle, 
isnnt'shop landlord ; — dc cerises, 
elumsy horseman, one who rides 
as if he had a ba.sket on 
his ann ; — de morts suhiteik, 
surgeon or queuky "crocus ;" — 
de somraeil, lo^igtng-house keeper, 
"boss of a doviing crib ;" — de 
patience, man wh^, having secured 
a p/aee in the long train 0/ people 
waiting at the door of a theatre 
before the doors are opened, and 
known as '* la queue," a/ltni»s 
another to take it for a eonsidera- 
lion. 

Si fattrnte e«t ItwiKoe . . . Ic% ptacc« 
•emni plii« chtrcx ; et comroe jc Ymi cn- 
tcTuJu air« un i^>ur 4 I'un de ce« curieux 
gaKnc-prtil : V'la Ic niQiide qui k'agace. 
chouvttr ' Y aim %ra* pour Ics morthiuid* 
dc patieace !— KiCKsriM, Le Fttv/. 

(Thieves') Marchand de tiretaine, 
night thief; — dc lacets, fonnerly 
a gendarme. 

Lc Evndirme a diff^rvntv nomi en aigof : 
quanu ii (vunuit lc vulcur.c'ctt un maf* 



244 



Marchande — MargouhtU. 



chand (1« Uceii; atund Q Vescorte, c'csc 
line lurondelie d« la Grftve ; quaml il le 
Bkcoe il rdchafaud. c'c»t Ic buuaxd de la 
gu illotioe. — 6 ALXAC. 

Un — de babillords, a book- 
tilitr, or an " ct cetera." (Mili- 
tary) Marcliand dc oiorts su- 
bites, profeisumal duellist^ a 
** fire-cater ;" — de puces, officiai 
v^ho has charge of the garrison 
Adding, The allusion is obvious ; 
(convicts') — dc cirage, captain 
of a ship. 

Eu<e que le moichind de cinge {etles 
ippclaien(ain.*il«commandAnt),nouflrusut 
pcurr— Humbert, Men BAgnt. 

(Jounuilists') Marchands de lignes, 
uuthors luho write for the sake of 
gain more than to acquire literary 
reputation* 

Je croit fermenient aue le joar ob n'au- 
nuent plus acc^ fc rAcad^tnic certains 
hommeA ifminenu qui oe font TMint de 
livrcft, e]le loniberait, de bonne heure, au 
niveau dc cettc corporalion de " nuirch&nds 
de liKnes" qu'on oomme la SociC'te des 
Gens de lettrcL — A. Dubrl'jcalo. 

(Military) Un — deinanons,<^('fr 
who looks Hi at ease in mufti. 

Marchande^ (popular), auxgosses, 
seller of toys ; — de chair humaine, 
mistress of a hrothel. 

Mftrche, m. (military), a terre, 
foot-soldier, "wobbler, beetle- 
cnnhcr, mud-cnishcr, orgrabby ;" 
— de flanc, repose ; sleep ; ~ des 
zouaves, soldiers whogv to metiical 
insptcdon are said to execute the 
aforesaid march ; — oblique indi- 
viduelle, the rallying of soldiers 
confined to barracks going up to 
roll call. 

MarchA des pieds humides, m. 
(familiar) , h petite Bourse^ or meet- 
ing of speculators after the £x- 
ehange has Inen closed. Takes 
place on the Boulevards. 

Marchef, m. (military), abbrevia- 
tion of niarcchal-dcs-logis chef, 
quartertHoster sergeant. 



Marcher (popular), dantles souliers 
d'un mort, to inherit a man's pro- 
p^ty ; — plan plan, to uxUk 
slowly ; — sur une affaire, to make 
a mull of some business. (Phnters') 
A] archer, to be of another's opiniim. 
Qn'cn Denser- vous? Je marche. 
IVhat Jo you think of it? /am of 
your opinion. (Thieves') Marcher 
dessus, to prepare a fvbSery, ot 
'* lay a plant.' 

MLvches du palais, / p/. (popu- 
lar), wrinkles oh forehead. 

Marcheuse,/ (theatrical), nfolking 
female supernumerary in a ballet. 

La marehcuse e«t ou tin racduncgrande 
beauU que m mire, fauMc ou vrai*. a 
vendue le jour ou clle n'a pu devcnir ni 
prcntier, ni second, ni truuiime nijct dc la 
danne. — Balzac 

L'cmplui des "marcheuses'* n'eziiue pas. 
dans Ic ballet, en Russie. Le pcrxmncl 
f^ininici t%\ eott^rrment compofi^ dc miJcu 

aui dansent ou miment, •elun let eaigeoces 
e la Htuation. — A. Bict;KT, Le RadicAi, 
iS Nov., 1886. 

(Popular) Marcheuse, zaricty of 
prostitute. See Gadoue. 

Lcurs fonc(ion« 1m plu* ordinaircs ♦onl 
de mter Ik La pone, a'indiqucr la niai«on, 
d accompojtner, de surveiller ei de donncr 
la main aux jeunes. On les d^i|;ne dons 
le public sous le nom dc mArcbcu^ea. — 
LtoTAXll. 

Marchis. See Marchef. 

Mardi s'il fait chaud (popular)^ 
neter (obsolete), «/ Doomsday, 
•' when tlic devil is blind.'' 

Mare, or mariolle, adj. (popular 
and thieves'), clever^ sharp, run- 
ning, " Icary," or one who is *' fly 
to woL's wot." 

Mar^cageux, mij. (popular), ceil 
— , eye with langtttd expression^ 
with a killing glance. 

Margauder {fniniliar), to rundown 
a person or thing. 

Margoulette, / (popular), nncer 
la — a queliju'un, to treat one <» 



Margotilin — Marlcu, 



245 



drink. Ucbrider la -^t to eat^ " to 
put one's norf in ihe manger." 
See Mastiquer. DcboUcr la — 
& quelqu'un, io damage one's iouH- 
ttnance. Metlrela — en compote, 
Mtpt-rhtive of above. 

Marcoulin, m. (coromercitl trft> 
vcllers'), tettiiUv. 

Margoulinage (commercial tra* 
vellcrs'), reUiitin^. 

Margouliner (commercial travel- 
lerV), to refitil, 

Margoulis, m. (popular), scanJal. 

Mar^erites, /. //. (popular), or 
— <ie cimetiere, 'A'hite hairs in 
the fie-ird. 

Margiiillier de bourrache, m. 
(thieve**), Jurymiin. This ex- 
pression is connected with **fi^rre 
chaurfe," ox areusationf borage tea 
being given to patients incases of 
fever. 

Marguinchon, / (popular), disso- 
luft gir!^ a '•regular bitch," 

Manage, m. (popular). & TAn- 
glftise, marriage of a (ouple wMo, 
dirtctty after thr eereMony, se^c 
rate and in'e apart ; — trAfriquc, 
or — h. la dctreropc, cohahitatioH 
of a ecu pie h'viit^^ as man and wif^, 
of a ftxttivho lilt "tally." From 
** peindre 4 la tl^rempe,'*/(»/ai«/ 
in distemper. Compare the Kng- 
lish expression, "wife in water- 
coloiiri," or mi*tress. 

Marianne,/ (i-"p»lar), la — ^ ike 
Aepui*/ie. (Thieves') Marianne, 
gitiiiotme. See Voyanle. 

Mariaase, m. (jH^puIar), scamps 
••ba-icgg." 

Marida, / (cads' and thieves'), 
married Tt/oniati. 

Marie • je - m'cmb^te (popular). 
(aire m — , to make many eere- 



monies ; to allffto oneself to Bt 
be^^ed repeatedly. 

Marieniange<mon-pr6t,/ (mili< 



tary), mtstress. 
spends my fay. 



Literally Mary 



Marin, m. (popular). dVau dotice, 
one who sports a river-boat ; — de 
U Vicrgc Marie, river or eanai 
bargee. 

Maringotte, f, (popular), mounter 
bank's shitW'Waggott^ or "slang." 

Mariol, tnarioUe, O'fJ. and m. 
(popular and thieves'), tunning, 
"downy, or fly to wot's wot." 

Mariolisme. m. (popular and 
thieves'), cunning. 

Mariolle, m. an(/<*<^'. (popularand 
thieves*), cunning, kmrttring m.tn, 
a deep or artful one, "one who 
has been put uptolhchourofday, 
who is fly to wot's wot." Termed 
also a "file," originally a term for 
a pickpocket, when to//e was to 
cheat and to rob. 

Ocii d'aatort, 00 a ^ dant Twis : 

i'wiis pailtiMOti ! c'm pu d'nu laate, 
e m'fais pa« pluft martnH* qu'un aut'c : 
Ion per' V^tAil : rEmp'reur auudi I 
Gtix, La Mujfd Bi^L 

Marionnette,/. (popular), soldier^ 
or "grabby/' 

Mail Robin (Breton cant), gtn* 

darmes, 

Marlou, m. and adj, (general), 
prostitute's buliv, '* ponce, or pcn- 
>iuner." See PotaaoD. 

L«et mariouft qui ioutiennent let filtei en 
drie. les insoumtfci du trofloir ct lea 
femaws dct maiMDs de bu ^lage, no m 
contetiteoC p«» de nuiconoer ecu miUheii- 
miMS ou'iU appclleni icur marmite, tear 
dabe : Ui dtftrouueai laiu cc»h lea pa»- 
Mnr« at aaMiaincnt pour t'tntracanir la 
main. — I-Ao Takil. 

Marlou, nfftniff^, "downy." 

La vticojie en arriere el la iromliin? an vent 
L'ceil martou, d enira chrt le i<ni[ue. 

RfCHartN. 



246 



MarfoupatU — Marot 



(Thieves') Le — dc Charlotte, thi 
exccn4ianer^ nicknamed Chariot. 

Marloupatte, or marloupin, ttt. 
(popular), proitilute" s butty ^ or 
'* pellicont's pensioner." 

Ce marloupitttc pAle et mlncc 
Sc nommail timplement Nav«t ; 
Mai< il vivait oinfti qu'un pnitCQ . • > 
n aiiiuit lc» fcminci qu'on rince. 

RiCHsriN. 

Marloupin, m. {popular and 
thieves'), prostitutes mate asso- 
date, "pensioner, petticoat* pen- 
sioner, Sunday m.'kn, prosscr, or 
ponce/' Sec Poi«son. 

Quand on paie en moniua' d'uDge 
Noui nui' mArtoupint, 
Le» kiU'& michctuns qki'a pas d'lin^, 
On lea pau' chez pamgi. 

RtCHiriH. 

Marlouaicr. See Marloupin. 

Marmier, m. (thieves'), skepfurd, 

Marmite,/ (huUics'), mistress of a 
butty. Literally JItsh-pot. The 
allusion is obvious, as the bully 
lives on the earnings of his aso- 
cial e. 

Un Aoulenciir Mtu %a marmile (sui nut- 
Itc&m) est UD otivncr uns travail, . . . pour 
lui lout e«t 1!>: fortune, bonlieur, amour, 
■ in n'eit pax profancr ce dernier mt>t que 
de lui dfMincr unc ai^ccption qucltofique 
fc IVenrd du Mutcneur.— iV/mc/m d* 
CanUr. 

Marmite de lerre, pr^tituit who 
does not pay her butty; — de 
cuivrc, one who brings in a good 
income ; — de fer, one who only 
brings in a moderate one, (Mili- 
tary) La — est CO deiiil, the fare 
is scanty at pre sent ^ ttiat is, th4 
flesh-pot it empty. 

Mormiton de Domang^e, m. 
(popular), scavenger ernplQyed in 
emptying eesspoots, or ' ' gold- 
finder." Domange was a great 
contractor in the employ of the 
dty authorities. 



Marmot, m. (thieves'), nourrir ua 
— , to make preparations for a 
robbery, " to lay a plant." lite- 
rally tofeedf to nurse a chitd, 

Marmottter, m, (popular), a iia/rttf 
of Savoy. Literally otte who goes 
about eskibiting a marmot. 

Marmouse,/ (thieves'), beard, 

Marmouset, m. (thieves*), ^esk- 
pot, Le — riifode, tfu pet u boil- 
ing. 

Marmousin, m, {popular}, chUd^ 
or •• kid." 

Marmyon, m. (thieves'), fUsh-poi^ 
and figuratively /««<■. 

Marne,/. (popular), faire U — , is 
said of prostitutes who protut ai*oul 
the river-side. 

Mamer (popular), to steals or " to 
nick." Sec Grinchir. M.irner, 
to work hard, "to sweat." 

Mameur, m. (popular), strong, 
active labourer. 

Mameuse, / (popular), prostitute 
of the lowest class who plies her 
trade by (he rizvr-side. See 
Gadoue. 

Maron. or marron, adj. (thieves'), 
caugttt in the act. 

Non, il n'est pan poviblc. diiait I'un ; 
pour prendre ainai "marofw" les volenn, 
il biut qu'il t'cnieDde avec eujc. — ViooCQ. 

Maron, or muron, salt. 

Maronner (thieves*), to faiL Une 
affaire TOAtonnic^ fruitless attempt 
at robbery* 

tl y a du rcnaud \ raffaire de la chique, 
elk ctt maronnJe, le dabc eat rercnu.— 
VtDOcg. ( Tiurt is some trouble about ike 
Jof> at the ckMrrh, tt hat /oiltH, /atker is 

Marot, Oiif (popular), cunning; 
"up to snuff, fine who knows 
wot s wot, one who has been put 
up !o the hour of day, one who 
knows what's o'clock, leary." 



Marotticr — Marqu/. 



H7 



Marottier, m. (ihicvcs*), hatvkrr, 
or '* bairow'inan •" pntlar traiti' 
/i'hj^ adauf tht country xdiing 
Stuffs^ fuckfrckif/s, ^c. , fo foun- 
try pfopU, Termed, in the Eng- 
lish cant, a " dudJer " or " duds- 
man." **In selling a watMcoat* 
piece," says ihc Slang DutioHiXry^ 
"which cost him pcrh.ips five 
shillings, for thirty shillings or 
two pounds, he would show great 
fear of the revenue ofttcer. and 
beg the purchasing clodhopper to 
kneel down in a puddle of water, 
crook his arm, ami &wear that it 
might never become straight if he 
told an exciseman, or even his 
own wife. The term and practice 
arc nearly obsolete. In Liverpool, 
however, and at the East-end of 
London, men dre^ed up as 
sailors, with pretendctl silk hand- 
kerchiefs and cigars, *only just 
smuggled from the Indie*,' are 
still to be plentifully found." 

Marpaut,orroarpeau,m. (old cant), 
man ; master of a house (obsolete). 

Pour n'ofTentcr poini le marpaut, 
Af\u qu'U DC face (Jrffaut 
Dc foDCCT ^ rAppointcment. 

L4 PmMqud dr la rtnctntrg /«r 
Cacut. 

The word was formerly used by 
the Parisians with the signification 
of/oolt greenhorn, loafer. 
Marpaud. Mot d« Pariit, pour sot, niai«t 
■i^nui, tMuUud.~LK Roux. Ditt. Co- 

Again, Colgrave renders it as on 
iU'fofVOHrtd scrub, a liltlr ugly, or 
twarthy wretfh ; also a lickorouj 
or sancy fellinu ; out that catches 
at "ivMa/ever daintus come in his 
leay. Michel makes the remark 
that morpion {crah-louse, a popu- 
lar injurious term) must be de- 
rived uom marpaut. 

Marquant, m. (thieves*), man ; 
master; chief of agangfOX "*X\ta* 



bcr dambcr ;" rvomtn's htlly, or 
"Sunday man," see Poisson ; 
tfrunkiuxit or one who grit 

" canon." 

Marque, f. (familiar), horizontale 
de grande — , fery fashionable 
locotte. Horifoniale de {letite ^, 
the ordinary sort ofcocottes. 

D^cidfmcnt jc nc ui> quelle ardeur 
giKrnirc a fouRI^ tur tiM honiontalMdc 

Srvitle iiun|ue et rte peitte inart|iie, mai* 
«pui> tin moi* nouk avon^ i rnrrgivtrrr un 
nuuvc.au combat kiiti>ulicr duiil cllci KXit 
U« h^roinu.— /.fAif-Mnr, Oct.. iSd6. 

(Thieves') Mart^ue, girU or 
"tiller;" ifoman, *' laccd mut- 
ton, hay-bag, cooler, shakester ;" 
prostitute, or *' bunter ;" month, 
or • ' moon. *' II a ct^ messiadien 
a six marques pour pcgrasse, he 
has been senferitcd to slx mouths* 
imprisonment for thejt. Six mar- 
ques, six months^ or '* lialf a 
stretch." Unc — dc ce. a thief*s 
wife. Termed, in old cant, 
*' autem-murt ;" aulem, a churchy 
and mort, uhmtan. Marque 
franche, or marquise, a thief^s 
female associate^ or *' moUisher." 
Concemingthis expression, Michel 
says: — 

Oq Irouvc dans rancicnne germanla ec- 
pagnolc " nurca, marquitla ci roaTqiiiu** 
avet! Ir «ent de "fenimc publique." — Did, 

Quart de — , week. Tirer six 
marques, to be imprisoneJ for six 
months, ** to do half a stretch, 
or a sixer." 

Marqu^. m. and adj. (thieves'), 
wamM, "moon." From theltalian 
marchese. Concerning this word, 
Michel says : — 

It n« faurait &r« douteux que c« nom 
nc wnt vvnu 1 cvitc diviuon dc Tannic, da 
I'lofinnitf p^riodtquc qu'uni le« " marquu " 
ou ftRime«, " Ion que la Lun«. pour cenir 
kA dieitc el vaquer ^ *ef ourificiiuont men* 
kirucllc^, fait roarquer lr» lnf(i» fiffnipins 
par ton rourrier, lequel pour e»cuMon o'a 
que ion imprcuioB riMic*. "— Di*t. d'A rgft. 



24^ 



Margue-ma! — Martin. 



(Popular) Elic ^, to have a black 
tvt, or "mouse." (Printers') 
Marque ^ la fcssc, tirtsomt^ gvtr- 
particular man. 

Marque-malj m. (printers'), om 
who rticivcs the joUos from tht 
printing machine ; (popular) an 
uffiy muM, one with a "'knocker 
face." 

Marquer (popuUr)^ k U fourchette 
rV said pf a restaurant or coffee- 
kotiu keeper who adds imaginary 
items to a biil : — Ic coup, to 
clink glasses tvhen drinking, llien 
— , to s/imo a jiood appearancty 
marquer mal bcinp the reverec. 
Ne plus — , is said of a moman 
xvko is past her prime ; that is, 
who DO longer lias her menses. 
fl'hieves*) Marquer, to have the 
appearance of a man m goO'l 
ciriuniitances. 

Marquin, m. (thieves'), hatorcnpt 
"tile." See Tubard. 

Marquis d'Argentcourt.ffj. (popu- 
lar), or dc la Bourse Plate, neeily 
and vain-glorious man. 

Marquise, /. (familiar), kind of 
mulled white claret ; (thieves') 
wifit or "rticlan." 

Nouiaitles pairone notre proie, 
A u manjuiM d'un turner, 
A toi d'uo coup d'arpion au proye. 
RtCHertH. 

Marraine,/. {x\\\t\^'), fenuxJe wit- 
ness. 

Marre, /. (popular), amusement. 
Etrc ii la — , to be joyously in- 
clined ; to amuse oneself. J'en ai 
pris line — , / have enjoyed mv- 
self 

Marrer (popular), sc — , to amuse 
oneself; to he amused. Peruser si 
je me marre ? Mince 1 Don't I 
get amused, just / 

Marron, ormaron, aij^. [popular)^ 
sculpt^, grotesque^ ugly face, or 



*• knocker-head." Cochcr — , 
" cabby " wtlhout a licence. Eire 
— ,to he taken inj *' bamboozled." 
(Military) Marron, report of an 
Oj^er who goes the rounds ; (prin- 
ters') clandestine print ; a\%o com- 
positor working en his own account 
at a printer's, who furnishes him 
with the necessary plant for a con- 
sideraiton, (Thieves') Paumer or 
pommcr — , to catch in the act^ 
red-handed. 

On U criblc \ U erive. 

Je m'la docine et ra'caqulve, 

tile est pommifc marrmi. 

ViDOCQ. 

(Thieves') Etrc scrvi — , t9 Ar 
ccutght in the act. 

Que Je mU Krrie marron au premier 
rae«ftiire que je Bnnchrrai si je lui ea ouvre 
simplement la ttoiiche.— ViDocg. 

Marronner,oTmaronner(lhieTes*), 
un grinchissage, to make an nt^ 
successful attempt at a robbery 
through lack of skill or due pre- 
cautions. Maronncr, to suspect* 

Je moronne que U roulotte de Pandn 
Trimedan* le ubri. — V. Hltgo, Let Mit^ 
tables. (/ SHt^ect thai tfu Paris wmtail- 
C9a,:h is f^otng through tht nwat/.) 

Marseillaise, /. (popular), short 
pipe, or " cutty," called "dudeen" 
bv the Irish. Avoir unc — dans 
le kiosque, to he " cracked." For 
synonyms see Avoir. 

F.nfin, pour tOr la p^^litique lui auim:; 
laurnif U t£{c I II a unc Mar«eil*aise 
le kicHquc. — Baumaitu tt BtomifUt. 

Maraouin, m. (popular), smuggirr' 
(miliiary) nutn'ne, or "joUy, 

UleraUy porpoise. 

Martin, m, (popular), foumir 
to xvear furs. "Martin" is tL 
equivalent of '* Bruin." Lc mi— 
Saint- Mar tin had formerly the 
sicitilication of iutoxictttion. An. 
allusion lo the sale of wine i 
fairs held on Saint Martin's day. 



Martinet — Masiiquer. 



!49 



Martinet, w. \\\\\^sts\^ pttniihment 
trvns usf'i at tkt ptnal strintud^ 
itUleffunts, Properly a (at-**-nitu 

t'Ttix. 

Martingalier. m. { gamblers*), ^wrf- 
sUr who iiiiaj^ifut he ii $H4t%ter of 
an inf^libU process for unnniH^. 

CMt on martingwlier. C'«*» ur» d<« ali- 
atncteun Ar^ quuitciscftce modcmc, qui 
K'imagineoi avoir irouv^ la marche inrxil- 
lible pcnir faire uuler l«« banqu**.— RtcuK- 

Martyr, w. (military), cerforai. 
Termed also ** diien tie I'cs- 
couadc.'* 

Mascolte,/, i^.tml'ler's fetish. 

Masquerenalezan (hor&c<)eater&'). 
tit puiHl a horse S0 as to darrot 
purchasers. Termed also **ma- 
qniller un gayct." Among other 
dishonest practices, horsedealcrs 
play improjter tricks with ftn 
animal to make hioi look lively: 
Ihcy •' Tig " him, the *' fig " being 
a piece of wet ginger placed 
under a horse's tail for the pur* 
pofe of making him appear lively, 
and enhance hii price. 

Massage, m. (popular), ivork^ 
•' graft," or " elbow grease/' 

Masae, /. (military), avoir la — 
complete, to possess a u>€lifilied 
purse. La — noire, mystenoHS 
cask'box, suppareJ^ t>y suspicious 
s^ditrst ta etuiose the proceeds of 
ttnliruful pn'/its made at the ex- 
pense of the nfiresaid by non-com- 
missioned offtcen entrusted with 
the fictuaJimg or clothing depart- 
ment, (Thieves' and cads') 
Masse, usfrk, ** graft," or "elbow 
grca&e. " 

Masser (popular and thieves'), to 
uvrk, *' to graft. '* 

Tn tais, j'dis 9) it ton copoin, 
Fa'c'i]uej*v«u qii'c'eu un Konc* qui boadi, 
Mai* cntrc nca-,, ntjn vicux lapin, 
J 'ai januuB mau^ qu'a I'wr I'coude. 

KlCHBKIN. 



Masseur, m, (popular), «-//svEfvrif* 

Mastar au gras>double, / 

(thieves'), fnirc la — , nr la (aire 
au mosiar, to stenl lead off roofs, 
"to fly the blue pigeon." 

Mastari, adj. (thieves'), ieadtn, 

Mastaroufleur, m. (thieves'), ont 
iL'ho steals lead, a ** blucy cracker. " 

Mastic, jw. (freemasons'), hrtnd or 
meat; (popular) d^W/. J'eter sur 
le — , to forsake w^k. (Thieves') 
Mastic, wrtM.or" cove ; " I pnnterV) 
longt entangled speeeh ; (theatricali 
patnting and oth^ntHse making- up 
one" s face. Faire son — , to paint 
one^s facCt " to stick slap on." 

Cest Veiuemble de ccs travaua de badi* 
geoa qui constitue Ic mastic. Va maHK 
conw:ietid<ux cxigc prit d'uae hcura d« 
(leiae. — P. Mahai.in. 

Mastiquer (popular), to eobhle ; 
(familiar and popular) to eof, 'Mo 
grub," "to yam." It seems this 
Utter term is connected with the 
word^am, the English name of the 
large edible tuber Dioiciyrta^ a 
corruption of the name used in the 
West Indies at the lm»e of the 
discovery, iniania or inkame. 
With regard to the expression the 
Slang Dictionnry says:— '* This 
word is used by the lowest class 
all over the world; by the Wap- 
ping sailor. West Indian negro, 
or Chinese coolie. When Ihc fort 
called the 'Dutch Folly,' near 
Canton, was in course of erection 
by the Hollanders, unde- the pre- 
tence of being inicmled for an 
hospital, tl»e Chinese observed a 
box containing miiskc * among 
the alleged hospital stores. • Hy- 
aw ! ' exclaimed John Chinamaui, 
' how con sick man yam gun ? * 
The Dutch were surpri-setl and 
massacred ilie same night." The 
synonyiiv^ for the term to e%it, in 



2^0 



Mastiqneur — Matkurin, 



thp various kinds of French slang, 
are the rulluwing : *'TortiUer du 
bee, becqueter, Wquiller, chiquer, 
boufTer, boulottcr, taper sur Ics 
vivres, pttancher, passer h. la tor- 
tore^ tortorer, se 1 envoy cr, casscr 
la croustille, briffer, brouler, se 
caler, sc cnlfater le Ijcc, metUc de 
I'huile dans la lampc, se coUer 
qiielque choM dans le fanatic dans 
le fusil, or dans letube, chamailler 
dcs dents, joiicr des badiyoinccs, 
joucr dcs dominos, dccliircr la 
cartriuclie, gobichonner, ciigouler, 
enguculcr, frilurer, gonfler, mor- 
fiailUcr, caclier, nc mcttre quelqiie 
chose daits le cadavrc, sc Icster la 
cale, se graisser Ics baluts, se 
caresscr lAngDulemc, fripcr, cf- 
faccr, travaillcr pour M. DomangCi 
ctapotcr, dchnder la margou- 
lelte, croustiller, diarger pour 
la Goadeloupe, tnivailler pour 
Jules, se faire le jabot, jouer des 
osanores. " 

MastiqueuFi m. (popular), cohbUr. 

Mastroc, mastro.ormastroquet, 
m. (popular), landiord of utne- 
shcp. Termed also " bistrDt» 
troquel. mannezinguei empoi- 
sonneur." 

Tout r<!c«inracnt, jVUt* i la Bourbe, alltf 

vuir 
Une fille. de qui chea un ouutroc, un toir, 
J'avau fait coniuuMaoce. 

Gill. 

Mata, m. (printers'), abbre\Tation 
of matador, sivaggrrn; one who 
'* bulldozes," as the Americans 

say. 

Matador, m, (popular), faire son 
— , tognr ontitlf airs ; to i't^iggrr^ 
to took *'boiiy." From the Spanish 
matador, btttl-killer. 

Mata§ot,m.(obsDlcte)^nff>',£'<r^7r- 
trie individual who amusts proplt 
by his anli(s. Rabelais used it 
with the signification of monkey^ 
monk : — 



Ci n'enirei pas, hypacritn, higats, 
Vieux malagou, mantcux, bounofl^ 

Matatane, / (military), gmani' 
room ; rr/Zx, "mill, jigger, or Irish 
theatre." 

Matelas, m, (popular], ambulant, 
street 'W€dk£r^ or " bcd-iagot." 
Sec Gadoue. 

Matelasser (popular), se — , is 
said of axooman who nuikis up far 
naturis nig^rdUness by padaing 
her boditf. 



m. (sailors' )p chum^ 



Matelot, 
male. 



Matelote, / (sailors'), trimer i I4 
— , to bt a sailor. 

Et de N^nics ju«iu'k Bordeaux, 
Trime \ la matelote. 
N'ayani qu'uD Ericot sur le do«, 
£1 pour Ktnd de culotie 
Le drap d'sa peaii. 

RicHBPiK, Lm ittr, 

Mateluche,m. (sailors'), ^d^jaii<7r. 

Mat^riaux, m. p!. (freemasons'), 
food, 

Matirielle, /. (gamesters'), ««'/ 
bread and cheest, 

£[ aJon, <fuel()ues malheurcnx pontes 
. . . K sont hvr^i au lerriblo travail qui 
confute ^ gagnrr arec lies cartek le pjia 
quotidicn, ce que Ics ioueiirs appelleiit ta 
maleneMe.— Bblot, Lt ' 
dame X. 



.• SoMckt de jV«- 



Matemelle, / (students'), mother^ 
" mater." 

Matburin, m. (sailors'), saihr^ 
" sah, or Jack lar." Termed also 
'* otter ;** wootlett man-o^-war, 
Parlcr — , iff speak the siang of 
sailors. 

Je ne suis pas de ctt vieux ft^ret premier 

brin 
Qui devant qu'6tre 0£> parlaicot ji ma* 

thunn, 
Au ventre de leur ffl^ apprenaxic ce lai^ 

Routani a ton rouUs, tanguant & icn taa> 



KaC«- 



RrCHE^IN. 



Matigfion — Masetie, 



251 

Maturbes, m. //. (thieves'), rf/»v, 
or '* ivories." Jouerdes — ,/<» /«/, 
"to grub." 

Maube, / (popular), Place — » 
for J^tiit A/au(>€»i, u low quarter 
of Paris. 

Maugrde, m. (thieves'), /Wrfrrwrp/ 
a /Prison. From nuugrccr, to 

Mauricaud, m. (thieves'), raM'^x, 
••peter." 

I) Taut lombcr sur ce mauricxud, ct »cloa 
mut ce n'etl [loi U chokc tin mijiicle la plu% 
fadic; — VloocQ. (»V mutt /itui tht (^sk- 
ht>x, mtid in my 0fmun it u M»t thd ioiiett 
Iking rM tJu wortJ^ 

Mauvaise (general), clle est — 1 
/«*/ j'tf^e! Iftid tnckl ** sawdust 
and treacle ! " www of tkatt 
** draw it mild 1 " 

Mauve, yC (popular), umbreUa of a 
nddish iotour, a kind of " ging- 
ham." 

Mauviette, f (popular), ribbon of 
a JecoratiffH in the button-koU. 

Mayeux, w. (popular), ht**upl'ack^ 
or "lord." Name given to a 
caricatured individual, a hump- 
hack, who ap}>ear& in many of the 
coloured caricature» uf 1S30. 
Maycux is a form of the old name 
Mahicu (Mathicu). 

Mazagran, «. (g;cncia]),f^ri«7iv«/ 
up in a gitiss at cajii^ or mixture 
of coffte ami wtUrr, 

Maxaro, or laxaro, m. (military), 
ce//s, "jigger, Iriih thcalie, or 
mill. 

Maze, f, (thieves'), abbreviation of 
AfasaSf a central prison xh Paris. 
Tirer un conge a, ta — , to sent a 
term of impruonment tn Matas, 

Maxette, / (military), rtcruif^ or 
Johnny raw ; " wti«. or " cove." 



(Thieve**) Les mathurins, diee^ or 
** ivories." (Popular) Mathurins 
plats, dominoes. 

Get objets doivent Icur noni d'arsot \ 
leur re<u«nit>Unce avrc Ic covtume dcs 
l'rintt»ire«, vulyairenirut aii))el^» Mjuhu- 
rios. qui chcz nc>u9 poriaicni uoe toutanc 
d* MfKc blanche, xur laquclte, quand iU 
sonaient. tU jei«ieac ua nucteau Doir. — 
Michel. 

Matignon, m, (thieves'), mesun^r, 

Matois, ormatouaa, m. (thieves*), 

Le cond^ de Nanterre ec un quart d'ail, 
Huvik d'un tripe de tjuiunien ftont aboul^ 
CO maluti ^ la taulc. — Vit»otg. {Tkt 
m«jf*r 0/ Namterr* and n e^Mimisniirt 
dt ^Uif, /giUfftd by a body 0/ poi*c*t 
Cftm4 ikii tmeming t» tkr kctite.) 

Matou, m. (popular), matt ivho is 
fend of the petticoat, Bon — , 
/i^r/m*', •* rattle-cap," or '* mol- 
rowcr." Literally a goo<^ tom- 
cat. 

Matraque, m, (Kildiers' in Africa). 
biuUffctm* 

Nout aviofu brOltf le pajri. Vout dire 
pounjuoi, j'cti tcraii bicn Co peine ; une 
poulc voliEc a un colon inllueni, un coup de 
mamquc aitfjlique par un UifiJiiuin ruind 
ttir la l£ie ii'un Juif vclcur ... el pif, paf, 
Ikoum, ooupi de futiK. obuv— Hacroa 

FrANCB, SOHI h fiu*HOUM, 

Matriculer (military), to steal ; 
said ironically, as ** le numero 
matricule," borne by a !>oldier's 
eficcts, is the only proof of owner- 
ship. Sc fairc — , to j^t puniskedf 
" to be shopped," 

MAts, m. pi. (thieves'), les deux — , 
the guillotim. See Voya&te. 

MatCe, / (thieves'), enfant de la 
— , thief a *• family-man." For 
synonyms see Grinche. Michel 
says matte is derived from the 
Italian matiis, foily ; so that 
"cnfants de la malte " ugnifies 
Iherally chtidren iffoiiy. 



2^2 



Mec — M/dfctn. 



Mec, or meg, m. (ihirvcs'),ffiajrw; 
cMuf, "dimber damber." 

Bnit*n, nice ! fKitoivi lui Ktn aftiirc ct 
renquilUins & la Uulc. je cane la p^frcnne. 
— VioocQ. {Brar'fi,ckiff,i4t»udi'>Ji''kini. 
and Ut tu rttum Jurme, I am dying c/ 
AuHgrr.) 

(Popular and tlueves*) Mec, 
women's bulty^ or " ponce." See 
PoisBon. Un — & la redresse, 
^ootiy siraif^hi/ot-tfard man. Le — 
des mecs, ///<• Almighty, 

Vo/onft. (lamnnc ... (I iic fanl pas jctrr 
\ »ei paturona Ic hicn que le mec des mecs 
nous envoic— V'luoctj. KfOotme, metktr, av 
wtuit nat ikri*t*' at onr/trt thw gvod things 
which tht Aimigkty umds mj. J 

Mec ilia colle forte, daperatemaie- 
J'actor ; — i, sonnetles, $Tch man^ 
"rag-splawger ;" ^dela giiiche, 
toormn s httUy^ or "ponce," sec 
Poisson ; — des gerbicrs, i-xtfu- 
tioHer ; — de la rousse, preftct of 
police ; [popular) — i la roue, one 
ti'ho is conzvrsant with the routine 
of a trade. 

Mecanicien, m. {popular}, execu- 
tioner's assistant. 

M*canique,y;( popular ),^/i7/(!/iw^. 
Charrier a la — , sec Charrier. 

Micaniser (ihieves'}, to guHlotine ; 
{popular) to annoy. 

Cuttpcau voolui Ic raitraper. PIu« »ou- 
vent qii'il »c lai&kat niifcanifcr par un ftAlc- 

tot.— Z01.A. 

M^chant, OilJ. (familiar and po^iu- 
lar), n'^lrc pas —, to be iHfertor^ 
of little value, "tame, no great 
scratch." Un livrc pas — , a 
•'tame" l't>ok. Unc plaisanierie 
pa* raechante, a dull Joke. Un 
caloquet pas — , a plain bonnet, 

M^che (popular), il y a — , it is 
possiNe. II n'y a pas — , it is im- 
possible. Tbisexpresiion has passed 
into the lant;uat;e. Kt — I and 
the rest! L'onihicnavex vous paye, 
dix francs? — tt m^che I J/ou/much 
did you pay't i'oenty francs f — Yes, 



and something ozvr. (Thieves') 
Etre de — % to go halves. 

On vou» oWira. J'»i irop envie d'ftre dc 
mJche.— V'iDOcg. (>'<ni ihatl ^ P^ytd. 
t have ioogrtnt » ariirr to go Amtxm.^ 

Also to be in confederacy, 

M'csl ti\U que lu tu de ntftcbe avec \ti 
riipin« potir nouc enit;l4mcr. — Vip>jCQ. 
{.Wy o^ini*m is tktttyef 'tm/ incom/edtracy 
with Ike twetit t« deceri'e ui.) 

Six plombcs ct — , Half-past 
six. { Printers') M^chc, 'oork. 
Chercher — , to seek for employ' 
ment, 

M^chi, m. (thieves'), misfortuiu. 
From the old French *' racschief," 

mischief. 

Michillon, m. {thieves'), ^JiarCtr ^ 

on hour. 

Mecq, m. (popular), prostitute's 
bully. See Poisson. 

Mecque, / (thieves'), mastf 
' ' cove : victim. 



or 



, victim. 

Midaillard, m. (artists'), artist 
tcho has obtained a mtdal at the 
Exhsbiltoft. 

Midaille, / (popular), jiTwr jfev- 
fra»c coin ; also called — de 
Saint-Hubert ; — d'or, twetity- 
franc piece ; — en chocolat, the 
Saint-lfelena medal. Called also 
" medaille de conimissionnaire," 
or *' con t re -marque du Pere-La* 
chaise.'* 



(popular), breech, 
— de flac, cul-dt' 



Midaillon. m 
see Vasistas 
sac^ or blind alley. 

Medecin, m. (thieves'), eounjel^ or 
*' mouth-piecc." It is natural that 
thieves should follow the advice 
of a doctor when on the point of 
entering the "hopital," or prison, 
where they will Mayas "maladcs,'* 
or prisoners, and whence they will 
i.ume out "gucris," or free. 



MMecine — Metter 



o3 



M^decine, /. (thieves'). d€fm<e by 
a (ounstt ; advice. Unc — (lam- 
bante, a piece of good advui. 

Collc/'Oicii cinqiianre b«llc* ct Jc vout 
coquc unc m^dccine Aambuicc. — vidoCQ. 
(7"!/ m* /i/ty /mtct, and 1' U gitu j*u a 

(Popular) M^decine, duil^ tire- 
some ft nort. 

MiBani, m. {ToWAtcTf), foot seUier, 
'* bccllc- crusher, or grabby." 

Meg, m. (ihicves'), chief, Le — 
des megs, GoJ. 

11 y a ua mot qui repmlt daot toutcs 
)c» langue* du confinent avec unc K»rte de 
puiuAticc ct (I'autorit^ mybitfrieute. C'cst 
le mot winfWMt ; t'Kctnar en fait u>n mac 

f|ui deuKRc le chef du clui . . . Tarfot en 
ait te m*£k et plus urd le meg; c'e«l 1 dire 
Dicu.— V, HvL.o, Let Jfis/rmdifs, 

M6gard, m. (thieves'), Aead of a 
gan:* of thieves^ or ** dimberdAm* 
ber/' 

Migo, m. (popular), balance in 
favour cf credit, 

'■A^ffc^t, M, (popular), end ef eiga- 
reite. 

Prt« des ih^ttw, dan* let gv^ 
Kolre lc9 arpinnt dr^ ^ergotiL, 
Cut moi que ^'cucille lei bouu d'cigare^ 
Let culou d'|Hpe ct Ic* m^ott. 

RiCHirif. 

M^gottier, m. (popular), one whose 
trade is to collect dear or cigarette 
e*t:lt, a " hard up. 

M^Usse,/ (popular), tomberdans 

la — , to be in great trouble^ or 

"hobble %"* to be rtitnaiy or '*to 

go a mucker." 
Milaason. m. (popular), clumsy, 

ou'kwiirti man, "a cripple;" 

dunce, or "flat." 
Mdl£. m, (popular), m/r/i#rr f/ani'- 

setle^ cassitf or abiinthe^ ^oith 

brandy. 

Melet. w.. melette, /, o/^., 
(Ihtcves'J* smalL 



Milo, m. (familiar and popular)* 
abbreviation ofmekdrame. 

Le boa |cro« m^o a fait vm tempc— 
Paris J»nmmL 

Melon, m. (cadets* of the military 
school of Saint-Cyr), afirU-term 
student. Called " snooker " at the 
R. M. Academr, and " John " at 
the R. M, College of Sandhurst. 
(Genera]) Un — , a dnnce^ or 
"flat." Termed "thick "at Win- 
chester School. 

Membre de la caravane, m. 

(popular), prostitute^ or '*mol." 
See Gadoue. Euphemism for 
** chameau." 

Membrer (military), to drill; to 

iMirk. 

Pousaant Acmeltemeot devant cux une 
broueue qu'ils avaient «.niu de Uu»er tfter- 
ocUenictit vide, t'arrfunt pour contcmpler 
. . . Ics cARULnulcft qui mcmbraieat- — G. 

COL'RTCLINK. 

^/ASinage k la coUe, m. (familiar), 
cphcd>itation of an unmarried 
couple, the lady being termed 
"wife in water-colours. ' 

Mendiant.m. (familiar), ji la carte, 
a begging impostor who pretends t0 
have been sent by a person wMost 
visiting card Me exhibits ; — & la 
lettre, begging- letter impostor ; ^ 
au taboc, beggur who prttends to 
pick t$p cigar ends. 

Mendigot, mcndigo. or mendi- 
goteur (populni), a variety cf the 
brotherhood of beggars that visits 
country houses and collects at the 
sametime information for burgiart; 
a "putter up." La fairc au 
mcndigo, to pretend to be begging, 

Mendigoter (popular), to beg, 

Men6e, /. (thieves'), dosen. tine 
— d'omichons, a doun chickens. 

Mener (militanr), pisser quel- 
ou'un, to compel one to fght a duel, 
(Popular) On ne le mine pas 



Menesse — Merde. 



piiscr, he has a wiU pf his own, 
cne can't do as one likes with him. 
N'cn pas — liirgc, to be HI at ease, 
or crest/aiUti, *'glura." 

Puis une (bi» la fumt^v diuip^, on veim 
one vingUinc d*aa«i&UQt» tur I'nuic, fou- 
dray<^ du coup cd n'enro'nant paslorsc— 
Trliblot, Cr-i du FtufiU. 

(Thieves') >rencr en bateau, to 
deeeive^ " to stick." 

Ccs pathuciKs, pire« ct fils de voleura, 
DC rMtcnt pm.% nioins fidclec ^ Iciir abomi- 
tuibfo li|pWe. lis n'in&trjUenl ta priffcc- 
ture que pour U mencr en bateau. — Md' 
mtfirti tit MoHtienr CUiuiU. 

Mencr en baienu un pante pour 
le rcfaire, to deceive a man in 
order to rob him^ *' to bamboozle 
a jay and llap him." 

Menesse, f. (thieves' and cads'), 
prostitute^ or "buntcr," sec 
Qadoue ; mistress^ ar "doxy." 

Men4tre,/ (thieves'), jw/. 

Mencusc,/ (popular), uvrann'/f^ 
entiees a passer-by to some back 
alley, xvhere he is robbed^ and some- 
times murdered, by accomplicu. 
Also too man whose ccUiing is to 
take eharge of babies^ and take 
them to some eountry place, where 
they are left to the care of a wet 
nurse. 

Mengin, or Mangfin, m. (familiar), 
poiilical or literary charlatan. 
from the name of a celebrated 
quack, a familiar figure of crovs- 
ways and squares in Paris under 
ihe Third Empire. He wasattired 
in showy cosiumc of the Middle 
AgcSj and spoiled a glistening 
helmet topped by enormous 
plumes. He feold pencils, drew 
people's caricalurca at a moment's 
notice, and was attended by an 
assistant known under the name 
of Vert-de*gris. 

Minilmontc, or MAnilmuche 
( popular), Mhtitmontant ^formerly 
on». of the suburbs of raris. Ac- 



cording to Zola, the word is 
curiously used in connection with 
the so-called sign of the cross of 
drunkards; — 

Councau te leva pour faire le ugne de 
croix aci pochards. Sur ta tile il pnmon^ 
MontperDaft*>e, ^ IVpaule droile M^nil- 
motitc, ^ r^paule gauche la Coumlle, au 
milieu ilii ventre llafcnolet, el dandle cmix 
dc rcstomac troii futi Lapia uut^. — X^'AS' 
t<^mmcsr. 

Menouille,y. (popular), money, or 

(hunge, 

Mentcuse,/ (thieves*), tongut^ or 
"prating cheat." Termed also 
'* le chiffon rouge, la batlante, la 
diligence de Rome, rou«catl- 
lante. " 

Menu. See Connaitre. 

Menuisier. See Coielette. 

Mcnuisiire,yi (popular), hngcoat. 

M£quard,or Tnigard,w. (thieves'), 
head of a gang; or *' dimber dam- 
ber." From nice, master, chief. 

Miquer (thieves'), to commatui. 
From meq, meg, chitf, head of 
giifigt Of *' ditnbcr damber." 

Mercadet, m. (familiar), vum who 
sets on foot bubble companies, 
swindling agencies y and other ^shy 
concerns. A character of Balzac. 

Mercandier, m. (popular), butcher 
who retails only meat of inferior 
quality. 

Mercanii, m., name given by the 
army tn Africa to traders^ g"*^ 
rally thievish Jews. 

CepcT>dani les tnercamis, d^iiantk d'ab- 
kinthc empoivmnc^ et de vin» frelatihi, e*- 
croc», banqucroutien, repru de iuMicc, 
marchand!! de lout acabiL — Hbctor 
Francis, Soui U Burnous. 

Merdaillon, m. (popular), contemp- 
tible man^ or "snoL" 

Merde, / (thieves'), de pie, fifty- 
centime piece, (Popular) Faire sa 
— » l'> S^"^'^ oneself airs, to took 



I 



Merdcux — Messe. 



2S5 



•' bolty.*' Dei ^mse ^^/ashicn- 
nbU Coots^ as purw xv^tM, with 
iargr lew hetls. Termed oIao 
**bot!ines i la mouget." 

Merdeux, m, (popular), scavengtr 
tmphytd to tmpty ctsspools^ "gold- 
finder ;" despicable mean feUout^ 
•'snot.** 

Mire, / (popular), abbcsse, mis- 
treu of a hrotktl ; — de petite 
fille, bcttle of jvitu ; — d'occaae. 
prjcttrtis who plays the part of a 
young proslituteU mother^ or a 
hfi^,ii!ar xvh0 fpes about with hired 
ehildren ; — aux anges, woman 
who gives shelter to forsaken chil' 
Hren^ and hires them out to men* 
dizantt ; (thieves') — au bleu, 
^ilhtine. Sec Voyante. (Cor- 
porations') Mere, innkeeper^where 
' ' compagnons, " <7r skilled artisans 
ef a (orportUion, hold their meet- 
tugs. The compaguons used to 
individually visit aU the towns of 
France, working at each pbce, 
and the long journey was termed 
*'tour de France." 

Merinos, m. (popular), man with 
an offensive breath, Manger du 
— , to play billiards t or "spoof." 

Mcrlander (po])ular), to dress the 
hatr. From merlan, popular ex- 
pression for hairdresser, 

Merlifichc, m. (thieves'), mounte- 
bofikf showman. Probably from 
'* merlthcque," used by Villon 
with the signification of marxel- 
has. 

Merlin, w, (popular), leg^ "pin." 
Un coup de passif dans le — , a 
kiik on the shtn, 

Merlou. See Marlou. 

Merlousier, merlousi&re, adj. 
(thieves'), lumting. La dabuche 
est mcrlousiire, the lady is eun* 
nmg. 



Merluche, / (popular), pou&serdes 
ens de — , to squall ; to seold 
vehemently. 

Merrif1aut£, adj, (thieres'), warmly 
clad. 

M6ruch£, /., m^ruchon, m. 

(thieves'), stove, frying-pan. 

M*ruch4e,/. (thieves'), stovefuL 

Merveilleux, m. (familiar), dandy 
of 1833. See Gommeux. 

A rarsDl-ftcinc >c pt^i^ajt un jenne 
merveilteux R^ium hvcc nonchaUnca an 
binocle (j'or tfmaitk. — Tm. Oautikb. 

The Slang Dietumary includes 
the word *• dandy " among slang 
expressions. It says : "Dxuidy, d 
y't?/, or fashioHoble nondescript. 
This word, in the sense of a fop, 
is of modem origin. Egan says 
it was 6rst u^ed in 1820, and Bee 
in 1816. Johnson does not men- 
tion it, although it is lu be found 
in all late dictionaries. Dandies 
wore stays, studied a feminine 
style, and tried to undo their 
manhood by all manner of affec- 
tations which were not actually 
immoral. Lord Petersham headed 
ihcm. At tlic present day don* 
dies of this stamp have almost 
entirely di&appeareil, but the new 
school of muscular Christians is 
not allogcthet faullless. The 
feminine of dandy was dandizctle, 
but the term only lived for a short 
season. " 

M6sJgo, miziire, m^zigue, 
(ihicvcs*), /, me, "dis child," as 
the negroes say ; — roulait le 
irimard, / was tramping aUng the 
roetd. 

Mease, /, (popular), filre & la — , 
tij be late. Nous avons et^ 4 la — 
de cinq minutes, t<v xvere five 
f/ttHiifa lale. (Thieves') La — 
du diable, examination of a pri- 
soner by a maglstratef or tria/. 



2S6 



Afessiadien — Mettre. 



an ordeal the unpleasant nature 
of which is eloquently expressed 
by ihe words. Termed by English 
rogues " cross kidment. 

Mesfliadico, ii<^'. andm. (thieves'), 
I'onvicfeJ, stntenaJ, *' booked." 
The epithet is applied lo one who 
has been compelled to attend *'la 
mcssedu diable," with unplea^nt 
cooseauences to himself. It est — 
\ six ber^aris plombes, he is in 
/or six years pruon^ "put away" 
for "six stretches;" — pour 
pegrasse, cenvicUd for stealing. 
"in for a vamp." II facaut la 
mogncKe blague dc maniagnerc 
que tu n'e&paga les pinde&ie dans 
le dintesse pour pegrassc, aulre- 
mvnt tu cs mesbiadicn et tu lavcra- 
gaa lea picds d'agnet dan« Ic 
grand pre, which signifies, in 
the ihieves' jargon oT the day, 
Ycu must take an alias^ so that 
you may rscafi^ the clutches of the 
poliee ; if not^ you -wUt be eonvieted 
ami transported. 

Messier, or messUre, m. 
(thieves'), man ; inhabitant, A 
form of rocii^re, a fool. Les 
mcssicrs dc cambrnuse, the eoun- 
try folk, or "clods." 

Messiirc, «. (thieves'), man; 
victim ; — de la haute, well-to-do 
Ptan, *' nib cove, or gentry cove j" 

— fianc, citixen ; individual^ or 
*'covc." 

Mesatre Luc, m. (familiar), breech, 
or *' Nancy." See Vaiistas. 

Mesure, / (popular), prendre la 

— dcs cotes, to thioih^ '* to 
wollop." 

Mithode Chev6, / (familiar and 
popular), playing billiards in an 
out-of'lhr^way fashion — with two 
atest for tnsteuiee, or by pushing 
the balls with the hand. 



Metier, «. (artists'), sktil in erecu~ 
tion ; clever touch. Avoir un — 
d'cnfer, to paint -wiih great manual 
skilL 

Mfctre, m. (familiar and popnIar)» 
chevalier du — , shopman, ** coun- 
ter-jumper, or knight of the 
yard." 

Metteux, w. (primers'), nutttur tn 
pages, or maJrer'up. 

Mettre (general), au clou, to pawn t 
"to put in lug," or '*lopopup 
the spout.*' An allusion to the 
spout up which the brokers Knd 
the ticketed articles until such 
time as they shall be redeemed. 
The spout runs from the ground- 
floor to the wareroom at the top 
of the house. English thieves 
term pawning one's clothes, '*to 
sweat one's duds." Le — , is ex- 
plained by the following : — 

Mo( librc, pour chevnuchcr, fatic le i£- 
duit. M divcriir avec one fcinme. Ce mot 
«*t Equivoque et nulicieux, car une pcr- 
Minne Iaii«-t-clle lomber vm baique ou 
son ganc ? On till, Miidefiuiiftclle, voulcc- 
vouK que je vous le ineuc? — La Rova^ 
I>ict. Comifme. 

Termed, in the language of the 
I'aris roughs, " mettre en prison.*" 
Mets 9a dans ta poche et ton 
mouchoir par dcssus, said of a 
blow or repartee, and equii'aleni 
to, take that and think over it, or 
digest it, or let it be a tvarnitig ta 
j-ow, " put that in your pipe and 
smoke it." Mettre i I'ombre, or 
dedans, to imprison, "lo give 
the clinch." Sec Piper. Mettre 
i I'ombre signides also to kilt, 
*' to cook one's goose ;"— du pain 
dans le sac de quelqu'un, to beat 
one^or to kill him ; — danslemille, 
to be successful, to have a piece of 
good luiky or "regular crow;" /# 
hit the right nail on the head, 

D'ubord. en panant. Taut y' n£slcr 
affaire » tnuit nnuiicb-.- eul' ng (jramooc 



MatbU — Mettlard. 



^57 



d' flnlniiMigeiutl, qua mi« <biM I'miUe en 
di«M qu' eul' Theatre de Pari-i Mrm n&- 
tunlidc ou qu'i nc »cra pu.— Thublut, 

Mcttrc quelqu'un dedans, to de- 
iiwe^ iQ cheat ome^ to outwit^ '• lo 
t^e a rise out of a person.'* 

A meuphor Trom Ay-fuhing. the silly 
fi»h riking to be caueht by ui Artificial fly. 
—Stunt Viftionary, 

Lc — & qudqu'un, to deceive ont^ 
'• to bamboozle *' one. 

\>M r«>te, c'est un fLknchc, vous voulet 
me le mettra . . . je U connais. — V. Hluu. 

t Popular) Mcltre la t£tc \ la fe- 
neire, to he gHitlotined. See 
Fauch6. Meure une pouiise, to 
strike^ to tkrttsk^ "to wallop;" 

— k pied, to dismiss from otus 
employ ttuHt temporarily or permo' 
nemily ; — quelqu'un dans la 
pominade, to oral one at a gttm^ ; 

— en bringue, to smash ; — des 
gants mr ses !iaUifi&, to put gloves 
Mi ; — la table pour les aslicots, 
to become food for the worms. See 
Pipe. Mettresotupres$e,/'i;/(TU'M, 
to put "in lug." Se — sur Ics 
fonts de bapicmc, to get involved 
in some dij/icfdty^ to U in a fix, in 
a '*hoIr." (Thealrical) Sc — en 
rang d'oij.'nons is said of actors 
who place themselves in a line in 

front of the foot lights. Kormcrly 
metlre en rang d'oignons meant /i? 
odmitoneintoacompaHyonanequai 
standing with the others. (Thieves') 
Mettre en dedans to break open a 
door^ " to strike a jigger ; " — la 
pognc des<iiis, to steal, "to nim," 
Fruin the uld English nim, to 
take, says the Slang Dictionary. 
Motherwell, the Scotch poet, 
thought (he old wont nim [to 
snatch or pick up) was derived 
from nam, nam, the tiny words or 
cries of an infant when eating 
anything which plea«cs its little 
palate. A negro proverb has lh« 
word ; — 



buckn man nam crab, 
Cr»l> n^m buckra nui. 

Or, in the buckra man's language, 

WSite man cat (for ttcal) the crab, 
And then crab cat the wliiie man. 

Shakespeare evidently had the 
word nim in his head when be 
ponrayed Nym, Metlre une ga- 
nicllc, to escape from prison. Se 
— & table, to inform against otu, 
"lo blow the gaff," "to nick." 
See Grincbir. 

En v'lll un fralheur »i la daronne ct les 
("mojine.* alUicnt »e meltrc 1 table. — Vj. 
vocO' ( That't M mu/ortmme \f the matlter 
nmd the sitten m/orui,) 

(Popular and thieves') Se — en 
bombe, to escape from prison, 

_ Mon rauuirit. . . . noiii noiu Mrninieft 
tir^ pour (aire la nocc Nou» Mjoinie* en 
bombe t Nout o'avofn plu> de brai** et 
nous vcnotu notu rcndre. — 6'« /ViiMwr. 

Mettrc sur la planche au pain, to 
put a prisoner on his trials '* in 
for patter ; " (military) — lc chicn 
au cran de repos. to sleep ; — le 
moine, tofastai a cord to a sleeping 
man's big toe^ and to teate him hy 
occasionally jerking it ; —left tripes 
au soleil, to kill, 

A force d'cntetMlre Je« phrawt romme 
ccllc»-ci : crcvcr la p.-ullaa»e. mettie les 
iripcs au Mlcil, tailladcr Ics cAici. brOler 
IcK yueules, ouvrir la pan-e, Je m'y tJtai* 
habitue et j'avaU fini par )c« troiivcr toutct 
iMtur<l]c&. — H. Fbamco. L'Hommt fhi 
Tmt. 

(Bullies') Mettre un chamegue k 
I'alignement, tosend a ivcman out 
to u-aJk the streets as a prostitute. 

Meuble, m. (popular), sorry-looking 

person. 

Meubler (familiar), to pad. 

Meudon, m. (thieves'), grand — , 
police^ the "reclers." 

Meulan. See Artie. 

Meulard, m. (lliicves*), ealf, lu 
old English cant " lowing cheftu" 

s 



258 



Meules — Mich^. 



Meules de moulin,/ pi. (popu- 

lar], tuth^ or "grinders." 

Meunier, nt. (thieves'), ncei-vrr^fst 
"fence." I'oTter au moulin is 
lo take stolen frof^crty to tht re- 
cerviTy *' to fence ihe swag." 

Meurt-de-faiixi, m. (popular), 
penny loaf. 

Mixiere,i7/^".,/rff/*.,aw</w, (thieves'), 
simpU-mtnded^ gHlUhlt. Elie - — , 
to be a •' cull or flat," The word, 
says Michel, derives its origin 
from iheconfidcnce-lrick swindle, 
when one of the confederates who 
acts the part of a foreigner, and 
■who pretends lo speak bad French, 
addresses the pigeon as *'mczitre " 
instead of " monsieur," 

Mot vDiiloirte faire de 1a peine ! plutAt 
€lre gcrbtf !t viocjue ( iug^ il vie); laut £tre 
bi«n m^iiire (nigaud) pour le luppoier. — 

VlDOCQ. 

Mezi^re, /, me^ myself. Le Havre 
protege — , Cod protect me. V w 
— , rt ** flni," name given by 
ihieves to thtrir 7'ietims. 

Depuis que nous nout somme* rcmii & 
«»carpef Ics mtfzi^res, il ne nous en eu paa 
toraM sou« ta poigne un auut chouette que 
celui-ci.— ViDOCQ. {Since «v ^fon a^am 
to kitt ik* Jialt, Vft kcfSen't had in tfur 
■cla-mt a rin/^lt one tu ritk mi that mtr.) 

M6zigue, m^zigo (thieves'), /, 

myulf, 

Auquel ens, c' «eriut pas Ion; : m^iisoe 
»it c" qu'y lui reM*raii \ faire.— TluuLOT, 
l.t Cri dm Peufie, 

Mib, or mibre, m. (street boys'), 
thingin whi^kotte excels ; triumph. 
C'est mon — , that's just what 
I am a dab at. C'est ton — , 
you II vezer do that ; that beat^s 
you holloTv. 

Michaud, m. (thieves'), head, or 
"libby, nob, or knowledge box." 
Fairc son — , to sleep, *' to doss." 

MichCf f. (popular and thieves'), 
lace^ or "driz." An allusion to 
(he holes in a loaf of white bread. 



Miche, or — de profonde, money. 
The term in this case exactly cor- 
responds to the EnglUih '* loaver,** 

Micb6. m. (general), elient of a 
prostitute. Literally one who has 
"michoD," ar mcney, who " forks 
out." 

Lics fillet iaol^es, toit en cane, vrit in- 
sounaiJiei . . . odi, par conire. k dcufT^- 
meet dVpfOuver touvcnl certains d^boiin. 
Le client n'e»t pan toujoun im "michrf*' 
cunMricncicux. — Lfto Taxii- 

Faire un — , to find a elient^ or 
** flat." Un — de carton, client 
who does not pay t«//, or who doet 
not pay at all. Un — scncux„ 
one who pays. 

Let femtncs appelleni "micMs Wrieux" 
left clicnii qui '* monteni " ei *' flanellci " 
ccux qui »e conlentent dc " ueloter " cl de 
payer un petit verre.— Leo Taxiu 

Concerning the language of such 
women Ltfo Taxil says : — " On a 
preiendu que toules les prostituees 
de Paris avaient un argot ou un 
jargon qui Icuretaitpacticulier. ., 
ceci n'est pas exact . . . nous avons 
vu qu'elles dt^signent le client sous 
Ienomde'miche,'levisiteurqui ne 
uiuute pas sous celui de ' flanelle.* 
Pour clles, les inspcctcnrs des 
mceur^ sont des 'rails,' un coro- 
mis&aire de police un * flique,' une 
jolic fille une 'gironde' ou une 
'chouelle,' une tllle hide un 
* roubiou^ ' etc. Ce sent Id des ex- 
pressions qui font partie du Ian- 
gage des souteneurs qui, eux, pos- 
sedent un veritable argot ; ellct 
en retiennent quclqucs mots et 
les mclcnt h, leiir con verbal ion. 
Quant aux prosliluces qui s'en- 
tcndent avcc les volcurs ct qui 
n'ont recours au liberlinape que 
pour cacher leur rcellc indubtrie, 
il n'est pas eionnant qu'ellesaient 
ndople le jargon de Icurs suppOts ; 
maisonne pcut pas dire que celan- 
gage soit celui des prostituees." 
(Ponular) Miche, fool. From 
Michel. It is to be remarked. 



Michel— MilU. 



259 



after Mnntaignc, Ihut many name* 
of men have been taken lu signify 
(he word fool ; Huch are GrardColas, 
Jean-Jean, and fonnerly Gautier, 
Blaise. (Photographcra*) Michc, 
<litnt. ( Familiar and popular) Ud 
vicux — , Oil plJ itfau. 

Tel, aa printcmpt, nn vieux mtch£ 
PmrMie en gaUnte toileite. 

Gill. 

Michel, m. (fishermen's), cassant 
ses n*uf<;, tkttnJir. (Military) Ca 
fait la rue — , ifs tkt sanit for 
everybody. 

Eh Vien, «i fy coupe pa», vUi tout, 
j'coucherai &U boIiccommelcscaraaradcA, 
d ^fera Unie Midiel. — O. Col^btklinb. 

Michelet, m, (popular), fairele — , to 
feelahoui in a eroded of uvmen^ not 

exactly with rigliteous intentions. 
Michel, mich6, or micheton, m. 

(popular), <licnt of & proititute^ 

Ellet tourncnt la t^ie et Jctant «ur cr t)-pe, 
Pat licutu kur cp>AuIc, un regard cun«ui, 
SonECDt : oh ! ki c ctAit un auche »^wtix I 
GlLL- 

Michon, m, (thteres*), money 
which procures a nitcbe, or a loaf^ 
•Moavcr." Sec Qui bus. 

C'«st c« qui me fait ambier hon de cette 
«CtgiM ; car \\ jo n'cuuc eu do niichnn je 
fusic cflni dc i»xa^—L«jArjcen dt i'Ar^'t. 

Foncer du — , to Five moneys *' to 
grease the palni.' 

Midi! (popular), /t» inU! II est 
— , a waming to ont to he on his 
piard ; I donU taki that in / 
" not for Joe !" II est — sonn^*, 
iV* J not for you ; it is smp^ssibU^ 

Faut pa« te figurpr comme ^ <]u' t'a<i 
rdntit dc t'collcr un bouc . . . i]uand tu 
»ctaA dc U ckuM, comme me vli. ^ 
■'pourrm ; ntau jucque-U c'est midi soomf. 
—0. CoyaTBLiKB, 

Mle./. (popular), de pain, louse^ or 
** grey-backed 'un;" (printers') 
thtn^cf iittUxratue, or "not worth 
a curse." Compositeur — de 
pain, an UHshtiM tompositor^ or 
<iumsy "donkey." 



Miel I (popular), euphemism for a 
coarser werd^ *'po to pot I " "you 
be hanged ! " C'est un — , is ex- 
pressive of satisfaction^ or is used 
ironically. Of a good thing they 
iay : " C'«t un miel I *' On enter- 
ing a cIok, stuffy place: "C'est un 
miel!'* Ofa desperate street fight: 
'* C'est un miel !" *'a rare spree !" 
" what a lark !" (Delvau). 

MietU ! adj. (popular), du sort, 
happy ; fortunate in hfe, 

11 n'^tait poj plus mielM du vort, il 
n'avait piu la vie plus en belle. — RiCHXfiii, 
La Giu. 

Mignard, m. (popular), /<rw p/mi- 
dcarment ; chitd^ or ** kid." 

Mignon, m. (thieves'), mistress, or 
'*molIishcr." 

J*avat« bonheur, ar^rat, amour tran- 
(luille, le^ jours te »uive maic nc k m- 
Kmble la-t. Mnn mignoo connamait I'an- 
elats, I allemand, trit bJen le franfaU, 
I'auvergna et rargot— /"ivwi a thief tiet- 
ttr. quated ly L Lmmkey. 

(Popular and thieves*} Mignon de 
port (obsolete), porter. Mignon 
had formerly the signification of 
foolish^ ignorant. 

Mignoter (popular), t^ fondle, "to 

forkytoodle." 

Mikel, m. (mountebanks'), Jupe^ or 

'•gulpin." 

Milieu, m. (popular), breech^ or 

"Nancy." 
Millards, m. /t/.(olil cant), in olden 

times a variety of the cadger tribe. 

Millard* font ecus qui ln>llent «ur Ictir 
andocie de gn» guculards : ila trucbcix 
plus aux charnp* iiu'aux verftxt, et «oM 
hall de» aotret argotier*. paire au'ila mor- 
ficot ce qu'iU nni t'>ut ^.KvAs.—Lf /mrwm 
de CArpat. {The *' miltarttt" art tfwse 
xvhf carry « htrg* Aty an their ha^k ; tkty 
beg IK the comntry tm pte/tremce te the 
ft'unu, ami art hated by their irrthna 
beiauM thty tat •U alame what they get.) 

Mille, m. aW/ (familiar), mettre 
dans le — , to meet with a piece of 
gooti luckf or " regular crow ; " to 



I 



26o 



MilU4angues — Ministre, 



he successful. One often sees at 
feirs a kind of m»;hine for testing 
physical strength. A pad is struck 
with the fi'sXf and a needle marks 
the extent of the effort, 'Me 
niille " being the maxiraum. 
(Thieves') Mille, tacmoHt or " bur- 
rick " (obsolete). 

Mille-langues, m. (popular), fa/Jka- 
tive person ; toiler, 

MiUe-pertuis, m, (thieves'), water- 
ing pot (obsolete). 

Millerie,/ (thieves'), /ttf/^O'. Thus 
termed on account of the thousands 
which every holder of a ticket 
hopes will be his. 

Millet, millet, m. (popular), i,ooo 
franc batik-note, r rem mille. 

Milliardaire, m. (familiar), very 
rich man, one who rolls on gold, 

Oest de cette epoque que date au 
jourd'hui sa fortune car il ett aujourdliui 
mUliardaire.— A. Sirvbn. 

Millour, fff. (thieves'), rich man, 
"rag splawger" (obsolete). From 
the English my lord. 

Milord, m. (familiar and popular), 
rich man; — rArsouitle, nick- 
name of Lord Seymour, See 
Arsouille. 

Les Folieft-Belleville . . . oti Milord I'Ar 
souUle engueulait les malius, cauait la 
vatssellc et boxait lea gar^ons.— P. Ma* 

HAUN. 

Mince, m. and adv. (thieves'), ntf/^> 
paper ; bank-note^ or " soft." 
(Popular) The word has many sig- 
nifications : it means, of course; 
certainly; much, 

Doii-tu comme Walder, 
Et comme la muscade, 
Te donncr mince d'air 
April ton efcapade f 

Rauinacrobis. 

Mince I no; certainly not. It is 
sometimes expressive of disap- 
pointment or contempt. Tu n'as 
plus d'argent ? ah ! — alors, you 



have no money? hang it alt 
then I II a — la barbe, he is 
completely drunk. Pensez si je me 
marre, ah I — ! donU I^ amused^ 
just I Aux plus rupins il disait — , 
even to the strongest he said^ "you 
be hanged! '* Mince de potin! ajine 
row / — de crampon I an anfu/ 
bore! — que j'en ai de Targent ! 
haven^t I money? of course /have! 
Ah I — alors I to the deuce^ thent 
Mince de chic, ^ass of beer. The 
ejaculation mm^ \ in some 
cases may find an equivalent in 
the English word rather ! an ex- 
clamation strongly affirmative. It 
is also used as an euphemism for 
an obscene word. 

Et moi sauciu', j'lu quand j'turbine. 
Mais, bon ung ! la danse s d^ine 
Dans I'coulant d'air qui boit ma sueur. 
Eux aut's, c'cAt pomptf par leur linge. 
Mine' qu'iU doiv' emboucanner I'singe. 
Vrai. c est pas I'linge qui bit I'bonheur. 

RlCHEPIN. 

Mine, / (popular), k poivre, lata 
brandy shop, 

Lui ^tait un bon, un chouette, un d'at- 
taque. Ah ! lut I )e singe pouvait m 
fouitler, i) ne retoumait pas ^ la boUe, il 
avail la flemme. Et il proposait aux deux 
camarades d'aller au Petit boniumimu ami 
/OMMT, une mine ^ poivre de la bamere 
Saint*I)enis, ou Ton ouvait du cbien tout 
pur. — Zola, L'Auommair, 

Une — k chier dessus, ugly face^ 
" knocker face." 

Qu*est-ce qu'il vient nous em . . , ieller, 
celui-1^, avec m mine it chier deuu^ — 

RiCAUU. 

Minerve, /C (printers'), small print- 
ing machine worked with the foot, 

Minerviste, m, (printers'), M/r7<'>i<^ 
works the Minerve (which see). 

Mineur, m, (thieves'), Manceau^ or 
native of Le Mans. 

Minik (Breton cant), small, 

Ministre (military), sumpter muu : 
(peasants') ass^ •* moke," or 
mule. 




Minois — Mircttes. 



261 



Minoit, m. (thieves'), nm^t or 

" conk " (obsolete). 

Minotaure, m. (familiar), ditavtJ 
husbond^ " ^tag face." The ex- 
pression is Balzac's. 

Jc Krai* te d«mi«r de M Paul de Koclt ; 
mitKjUurc, cotnmc dit M. de Boinc — Th. 

GALTlftM. 

Minotauriserquelqu'untfunilior), 
to jeduct one's wife. An allusion 
to the horns of the Minotaur. 

Quand une fcmmo e%t incont^uenle, le 
ptuii, vcrait, scion mm, minotaumifi. — Bai.- 
ZAC. 

Minson (Breton cant), bad; budly, 

Minsoner (Breton cant), ftuan. 

MinUingue. m. [popular]! landlord 
of win€'shop. 

Maif upritli, jugei d'mon embargo, 
I>epuik ce tciiip« die est toajoun pumpetle, 
£t chei I'minKinKue ell' croquc le irusot. 
Almamsch CJkMMtoMt, 1869. 

Uinuit,M.(thieves'),tt<^. Termed 
aUo, in different kinds of slang, 
** Bamboula, boule de neige, bolle 
a cirage, bille de pot*au-feu, mal 
hlanchi," and in the English 
slang, "snowball, Sambo, bit o' 
ebony, blacky." Enfant de — 
meant formerly fAie/. Enfants de 
la messcde minuit, «ays Cotgrave, 
*' quirestcrt of midnights masu ; 
nighi-xvnlking rakehtlU^ or such 
as haunt th<s< nightly rites^ ftot 
for any devotion^ hut only to rofi^ 
abusty or play tht knavcx with 
othfrsr 

Minzingue, or minxingo, m. 
(popular), litrtdUrti of ta^tm. 
Termed also monzlnguin, mind- 
Eingue. 

La [ihiloftopliie. vil niindfingtia, quaod 

gk ne ftcrvirait qu'3t trouvcr ion vio bon. — 
rAvih. 

Mion, m. (thieves'), child, or "kid ;" 
-~ de gooes&e, stfipling; — de 
Ixiulc, thie/f *'prig. See 

Grinche. 



Mipe, n$. (thieves'), faire ud — & 
quclqu'un, to outdrink one, 

Miradou, m. (thieves'), mirror, 

Mirancu, m. (obsolete), apothecary. 

Respect an capiuune Mirancu I Quit 
aillc fee cuucher aiUcun, car s'il s'avuoit d« 
joucr dc la Knnsu«. nous n'avons pat d« 
caiMSons pour Ten empjchet. — L'AfotJu- 
cmirt rm^iimtm/, 1 67 1 . 

Mirancu, a play on the words 
mire en cul, which may be better 
explained in Bcraldc's words, 
in Moli^re's Le Afalade Itnagi* 
noire : — 

Alicz, cnonKiear ; on Toh biec que toui 
n'avu put acx-oututn^ dc parlcr a des rt- 
ugea. 

Mirecourt, m, (thieves'), via/in. 
The town of Mircconrt is cele- 
brated for its manufactures of 
stringed instruments. Rigaud 
sayi that it is thus termed from a 
play on the words mire court, look 
on from a short distance^ tlie head 
of the performer being bent over 
the instrument, thus bringing his 
eyes close to it. 

Mire-laid, m. (popular), mirror. 
An expression which cannot be 
gratifying to those too fond of ad- 
mirinc their own countenances in 
the glafis. 

Mirettes, /. pi. (popular and 
thieves'), eyts, " peepers, ogles, 
top-lights, or day-lighu." Field- 
ing uses the latter slang term :— 

Good wnmin 1 I do not dm to be so 
treated, [f the lady %a.y% auch aaoUur 
word to me, damn mo, I will darken her 
day-liKhis.— FiaLOiNC, Amelia. 

In old cant eyes were termed 
"glazier*." 

Tour* out with your gtadert, I iw«ar by 

tba niflin. 
That we are auaolted by a queer cuffin. 
BroOHC, a JgtiiAi Crtw, 

Wliich means look out with all 
your tytSt I swtar by the devil a 



262 



Mirettr — Miroir. 



magutrate is coming. Mireites en 
caoatchouc, or en caouche, teit- 
scope; — glacccs, or en glacis, 
sptctatiesy or '* gig-lamps." Sans 
— , blind^ or "hoodman,'* 

Mireur, m. (popular), onc^oho looks 
on intently ; spy ; person employed 
in the immense utidergroittCi store 
cellars of the Holies to inspect p-O' 
visions by canJle-light. 

Dcux cenU bees d£ eaz jclairent c« 
cavea ^tgantesquc^, oil Too rencontre di- 
verses industries ft)Mfcialct. . . . Let " mi- 
reurt," qui pw»cnt \. la clukiuJelle une 
dtHicate rfvtsion dcs %ujeu. Lcs " prt- 
pumtcan dc fromages " qui font " jaunir " 
fc Chester, " picurer " le Rruyir*. " couler " 
lelirieou "piquer" le roquefuru-^E. FrA- 

tlAl'LT. 

Mirliflore, m. {ia.ia\\\^T),adaniiyof 
the beginningpf the present century. 
For synonyms see Oommeux. 
The term has now passed into the 
language with the Mgniticaiion of 
silly conceited dandy or fop. 

Not mi rli flora 
Vaudroieiit-iU cct honime & ressoru t 
CkoHions de Cottt. 

Concerning the derivation of this 
word Littrc makes the following 
remarks: "nyavaitdansl'ancien 
francais mirltfique^ alteration rie 
mirtpque; un peut Denser que 
mirliRore est une alkralion ana- 
logue oil Jlor ou ^eur remplace 
ftque : qui est cotnme une flcur 
mervcillcuse. Francisque Michel 
y voit une olteniliuii de milU' 
Jlenrs, denomination prise des 
bouquets dont se paraient les iM- 
gants du temps pass<f." It is 
more-probable, however, that the 
term is connected with ecu de 
mille-jleurst an cLixirof all flowers, 
a mixed perfume, and this origin 
seems to be borne out by the 
circumstance that after the Kevo- 
lution of 1793 dandies received 
the name of " muscadine," from 



muse, or musk, their favourite 
perfume. Workmen sometimes 
call a dandy '* un puant." See 
this word. 

Mirliton, m. (popular), nosi^ or 
"smeller." For synonyms see 
Morviau. Also voice. Avoir le 
— bouche, to htri'e a had rold in 
the fuad. Touer du — , to taik^ 
"to jaw; to htow c»e*s nose. 
>{irli(on properly signifies a kind 
of reed-pipe. 

Mirobolammcnt (familiar and 
popular), marzvllouslyt " stun- 
ningly.* 

Mirobolant, adj. [familiar and 
popular), excellent, *' slap-up, or 
scrumptious; " w<irir//o«j, " crush- 
ing." 

Eh > c'est U bande t c'm h fitmniw, la 
suiwrbe, rinvincible. & januu» triomuhamc, 
s^ui<aaieet miroboUnte bande du Jura. — 
Baitde dm Jura. Madame ett CmsfMrin. 

"Mirobolant" is a corruption of 

admirable. Another instance of 

this kind of slang formation is 
'* abalobe.** from abalonidi. 

Miroir, m. (card-sharpers*).d nf/>fi 
glance cast on the stock of a 
game of piquet^ or on the fr t 
cards dealt at the gawe f 
baccarat. A lricky**dodge" whu-.t 
enables the cheat to gain a know- 
ledge of his opponent's hand. 
(Popular) Un — & putains, sy- 
nonymous of bellitre, a handsjtm 
Imt vulgar many one likely to find 
favour with the frail sisterhood. 
Rigaud says : " Miroir ^ putains, 
joU visage d*homme h. la mani^re 
dcs t^tes expo<^es i. la vitrine des 
coiffeurs." The phrase is old. 

JHs-Ioi qu'uD mirnir 3> Dutain 
Pour domptcr le Fay» Latin 
Est un fort mauvats pcnoonax*- 

SCAkKOH. 



Mirgiiin — Mitard. 



263 



Fielding Ihus ex|>atiates OD the 
icadinciis of women to look with 
more fiivour on a handsome fiacc 
than on sui intellectual one : — 

How we must lament that ditpofition in 
thcie lovely creatures which leails them to 
pTcrcr in ineir favour ihou individuaU of 
the other ux who do not «eem intended hy 
naiure as to grot a mostcrpnece I ... If 
this be true, how melancholy m\\%x be the 
cunsideradnn that any ftinele beau, espe- 
cially if he have but half a yard of ribbon 
in his hat. shiill weish heavier in (he 9Cal« 
of female aflection than twenty Sir luuc 
Newtons \— Mr. JviKatkam H'ifJtkt Grtmt. 

Mirquin, m. (thieves*), wotnan's 
cap, 

Mifxatea,/.//. (thieves*), tarripgs. 

Mise, /. (prostitutes'), (ioire sa — , 
to pay a pr^tttuU hcrfet, or ' * pre- 
sent." (Popular) Mise i pietl, 
temporary or pcrmaiunt dtsmiisal 
from otu J employment, the * ' sack. " 

Mise-bai, /. (popular) strike cj 
work ; (servants ) cnst-eff elothes 
•u'hieh servantj consider as their 
Ptrquisiles. 

Miser (gamesters*), to stake, 

Et li je K"ffn' ce toir cinq \ ux mtUe 
fraoc^ au Unsqueoci, qu'eM-ccquesotuuilc- 
dU mille franc* de pctu pour avoir dt quoi 
ini»«r!— Hauac 

Miserable, m. (popular), eme half' 
penny g(ass 0/ spirits, **un mon- 
sieur" being one that will cost four 
sous, and " un pois&on " 6ve 
sous. 

Misloque,ormiiIocq,/ (thieves'), 
theatre ; play. Flanchcr, or joucr 
la — , to ait. 

Ah t ce que jc veva fiure, jc vcux louer 
la mislocq, — VicocQ. 

Uisloquier, m., mialoquiire, /. 
(thieves'), a£tor^ "cacklintj cove," 
or ** mug faker," and actress^ 



MisBtssipi, $tt. (popular)i au — , 
very far arvay, 

MistenflQte,/. (popular), thingum- 

Mistiche (thieves'), un — , half a 
* * setier, " or small measure ofwitu. 
Une — , half an hour, 

Miatick, m. {\\\\c\e%\forei^ thiff. 

Miatigris, or misti, w. (popular), 
knave of clubs ; appreutiee ta a 
house deeoraior. 

Miaton (thieves'). See Allumer, 
(Popular) Mon — , my ih>Vt *' my 
bloater." 

M istouf.or miacouffle,/. (popular), 
practical joke ; Kwiy trick, Faire 
unc — a quelqu'un, to paint l^ 
annoy one, 

Vnuf lui aarcz fait qoelqoe niictmf, vooi 
I'aurez mcnac^e de quelqiie puniiion, et 
alors —A. CiM, ftutUnticH JIc Drm^tttts. 

Coup de — , scurvy tritk hrervin^, 
Fairedes mistoufllcs, /^ feau, "to 
spur," to annoy one. (Thieves') 
Mistooffle k la saignante, trap 
laid far the purpose of murdirmg 
one, 

VoiUt irop loflctempe . . . que 1e vieux 
(De la fait au porte-tnonnate. II me fast 
ton 4ac. MaU . . . pa« de mittouffle \ la 
uignaote, je n'aime pa* ». I>u barb>ilage 
tafit qu'on voudra. — MemMret d* Mt>m- 
tieur Ctmmde. 

Miatron, m, (popular), a ^me of 
cards called '* trente et un." 

Miatronneur, m, (popular), awd- 
tenr ij/'* misitron '' (uhich *cc), 

Mitaine,_/! (thieves'), grinchisseuse 
a la — , female thief icho causes 
some property, la^e ji^rnerally, /# 
fall fri*m a shop counter, and by 
eerfaim mtoiions of her foot amveys 
it ta her shoe, where tt remains 
secreted, 

Milard. m, (police), unntlypfiscner 
(onJiueJ tu a punishment ceU 



264 



Mite-ati~logis — Moine, 



Mite-au-logis,y^ (popular), disease 
of tht (yes. A piny on the words 
mile and mylhoiogie. 

Mtteux, Qtij. (familiarand popular), 
is stuM of one poorly clad^ of a 
wreUhed-lookiH^ person^ 

Quand nous arriv&tncs ^ U po»da, on 
ne voulut pan nout teccvoir, I HubcrKiKte 
Duut trouvant, cantine dUait La Martinierc 
mon ompajjnon de route, ttop "mitcux." 
—Hector France, A traztrt C tt^snt. 

Mitraille,/ (general), /f'«<v,i-<j^/i-rj. 
The expression is old. This 
Icriin Kcms to be derived from the 
word *'mile," copper coin worth 
four ** oholcs," used in Flan- 
ders. 

Aaitrailleuse,/ (popular), etouffer 
line — , to iirink a glass of wine. 
Synonymous of *'boireun canon." 

Mitre. /. (thieves'), frisan, or 
• ' stir. Sec Motte. Mennt 
formerly itch, the word being de- 
rived from the name of a certain 
oiutiuent teniied "milhridatc." 

Mobilier, m. (thieves'), teethy or 
•' ivories." LilcnUly/Mrn^lfMr^. 

Moblot, m. (f&miliar), uset/ for 
Mobiie in 1S70, " La garde mo- 
bile " at the beginning of the war 
formed the reserve corps. 

Mocassin, m. (popular), shoe. See 
Ripaton. 

Moc-aux-beaux (thieves'), yi/tir/rr 
of La PUue Maubert. 

Moche, or mouche, adj. (popular 
:\iul thieves'), had. 

Mode,/ (swindlers'), concierge k 
la — , a doorkeeper who is an ac- 
eomp/it-e of a gang of nvindtcrs 
termed Bande noire (which sec). 

La '*band« noire" rfta.it — et est encore, 
car Ic dixiinie !k peine des tnembrc^ kotit 
arr£t^9— une formidable aj&ociaUon. ayaot 
pour sp^ciaiil^ d'cxploiter le cocnroercc des 
vini d« Paiui, d< la Bourgwne et du Bor- 
delais. . . . Pour duuiue aflairc, le cnurtier 
recevait dix francs. Lc conctcrse, dtfugni; 



iooK le nom tiizarre de concierge i la mods, 
nVuit pas moins bien rftribu^. II tauchoit 
dix rraacstf8alefiMnt.~^Ktf//«t'nr,tiAo0t, 

t686. 

Modfcle, m, (familiar), ^nrn^^fWA^r 
or grandmother. 

Modeme, /«. (familiar), young 
man of (he ** period ,*' in opposi- 
tion to antique, old-fashioned. 

Modillon, / (modistes'), a seeond 
year apprentice at a modiste's. 

Modiste, m. (literary), formerly a 
journaiist who souf;ht more to pan- 
der to the tastes 0} the day than to 
acquire any literary reputation, 

Moclleux, m. (popular), coiien, 
which is sofL 

Moclonneuse,/ (popular), /f»j/*. 
tute who frequents builders* jfordi. 
See Gadoue. 

Moignons, w. //. (popular), thick 
clujttsy ankles. The Slang Dic- 
tionary says a girl with thick 
ankles is called a " Mullii^r 
heifer" by the Irish. A stor>- goes 
that a traveller parsing through 
Mullingar was so struck with this 
local peculiarity in the women, 
that he determined to acc<>st the 
next one he meL "May I ask." 
said he, " if you wear hay in your 
shoes?" "Faith, an' I do," said 
the girl, "and what then?" 
'•Because," said the traveller, 
"that accounts for the calves of 
your l^s coming down to feed on 
iL" 

Moine, m. (familiar), earthen Jar 
filled tviih hot water, which does 
duty for a warming pan ; (prin* 
ters') spot on a forme which has 
not been touched try the roller, and 
7t'hich in consequence forms a Hank 
on the printed leaf. Termed 
'* friar" by English printers, (Po- 
pular) Metire le — , to fasten a 
string to a sleeping man's big toe. 
By jerking the siring now and 



Moine-lai — Mimi. 



265 



tlien the sleeper's slumbers ore dis- 
turbed and great aniu<.cmcol afTor- 
ded to the authors of the conlri* 
vance. This sort of practical 
ioking seems to be in favour in 
uarrack-rouuLK. Donncr.or bailJer 
le — , was synonymous of mcttre 
le — , and, used as a proverbial 
expression, meant t& btar HI luck. 

Moine-lai, m. (popular), (^d rniii- 
tary ftttsioner 70M has 6ci-0me an 
imbtfiU. 

Moinette,/. (thieves*), ifw«, moine 
liting a monk. 

Molie, m. (familiar and popular), 
vtan iitcrivcd by his wife. The 
Icrtn is old, for, »ays Le Koux, 
•'Moise, motsalirique, quisignitie 
cocu, homme \ qui on a planle 
des comes." 

Moiti^.y! (popular), tu n'es pas la 
— d'une beie, y«u are no fool, 

Oiii. \'r% nas la moJti^ d'une bflc Ut- 
<l«uu» aboulc Ics quaU-c rorkU. — G. CouK- 
TkLtNIL 

MoUnche, / (thieves'), ww/. 
From mol, so/t. 

Molard, m. (famUiarand popular), 
txpfxtoratiOH^ or "gob." 

Molardcr (familiar and popular), 
ti> exfictoratt., 

Moli^re, m. (theatrical), sceMtry 
which may be ujcJ for tht /Vr- 
Jrrmarui of any play of Moiiirt, 

Molle, adj. (popular arul thlevrt'], 
etre — , to bt p^nniUa^ alluding 
to an empty pocket, which u 
flabby ; '• to be hard up." 

MoUet, m. fpopuUr). M. Cliarlcs 
N i»Ard, tn his ParisianUmet i^u- 
iairts, says of the word. **Cftai 
de la panie poftirricure dc la 
jambe (the proper meaning), 
and he adds, *' Panie molle dc 
diverges aulres choiea." 
Voos DC cacbe> pM tout «o« ma\\m» djiit 



^ D*nrt plu4 qu*l puicr TLtu.— ^ /)#• 

Following the adage. '* Le latin 
rian« les mots brave rhonui?tct^,'* 
M. NifArd gives the following ck- 
planation of the above :— " H«rc 
sunt verba cuju&dam |Ktulantia 
muliercula; ad quemdam jam se- 
nescentem virum. coavalesccntem 
e niorbo, el camale opuA adhuc 
penes sc esse male jactantcm. In 
eo enim Thrasone mulieroso jiars 
isia corporis quam proprie vo- 
cant ' Mollct,' non -^oluni in tibia- 
lihu^ ejus inclusa cral, sc»l et in 
bracts, ubi, mutata ea toto forma, 
nil valebat nisi, scapho: Asnierioe 
instar, *k passer I'eau.' id est, ad 
meiendum. Sed, animadvcrtas. 
oro, sensual locutionis ' passer 
I'cau' a^qulvocum; hie enim unda 
transitur, ilUc cadem tronsiL" 

Mollusque, w. (familiar), marrauf- 
tftinded man ; rouiinfdovin^ man; 
huitre being a common tcrni for 

tifooi. 

Momaque, m. (thieves'), rkiid. or 
"kid." 

Momard, or momtgnard. m. 
(l>o[jular), ihild, or "kicl." 

Mdme, m. and f (jiopular and 



thieves'), thiid, ot 



•'o;: 



C«* milbmek corTotnpua, cm ■vonon* tUirti, 
C«U« tfouMa d'^gudi cot la Uvurv km- 



XH e« jinuid patii vlvani qui »*«up«ll< Paru, 
£1 t]ui •rrt o« tirKKbt au mumlc. 

ktCNKI'tN, 

Mi'inie nuir, ttudtnt at a pH^ift 
seminary, lliui lerinwl on ac- 
count of Ihcir cleilcal attire. 
Called also tiy thieve*. "Canneur 
du mec dm meca," afraid af God. 
Vnc — tXffHnjf woman ^ "tiller." 

Vm, la BtAat, « a'lato pm (uur. 

Run ana. 

XJne — , Of nWVmrrvMe. mittrrts, 
"blowen." (.'cal ma — .elleot 
rooAaaU c« suUi // is myj^H, tht 



2C6 



Mdtneuse— Monde. 



has money to-night, Un — d'al- 
lc»que, hanJjome yaun^ man. 
Taper un — , to commit a theft ; 
to commit infantUidt. 

Car ellc r^t en prison pour tin m^me 
quelle a (apd.— /^»-(»»* a tkie/'f letUr, 
fuottd by L. Latxkey. 

Madame Tire*in6nies, muhuife. 
Termed in the seventeenth cen- 
tury, '* madame du guichet, or 
portiere du petit guicbct." (Con- 
victs') Momc basiaud, cottvut who 
is a Soiiomiitf a kind of mule 
prostitute, 
Momeuse,/ Sec Mfimiire, 

Momicharde, f, (popular), littU 
^irl. 

Knvoie \c\ pctitrs . . . qa'clle* abaulent, 
Ics momicKftrilca !— LouiSB Micheu 

Momiire, f. (thieves'), midwife. 
Tenned also *' Madame Tirc- 
mOmes, Madame Tire-mondei or 
tate-minelle." 

MomEgnard, m. (popular and 
tliieves'), child, or '* kid ;" ba(>y ; 
— d'alieque, a ^ne child. 

Frmngine d'alt^uc, jc nicts I'lrgitemtDe 
fc la batbue, pour te boninr que cna lari;ue 
aboule dc mdmir uo momignard d'altcque. 
— ViDOCj. {My f tvs/ titter, t laJkt the 
ftm to tay tAttt -ry vn/t kai Juit xt'ttt 
hirth to aJiH€ thitJ.) 

Momig^nardage A Tanglaise, m. 

(popular), mtscarriage. 

Momignarde^ / (popular and 
thieves'], little girl ; youn^ giri, 

"litter." 

Me^ momignardes . . . allnns, c'ext dit, 
on rctutira Ic »ove. II fautckp^rer que U 
daronnc du grand Aure nous protcgcra.^ 
ViDOCO- {My littlt fiHi . . . ctnnr, it't 
stttiMi, tkr foal tkall he killrd. Lrt w 
koft tJu Italy yirgiH wtH protect us.\ 

MOmtr (popular and thieves'), to be 
delivered of a ckUd^ " la be in the 
straw," n»c Slang Dictionary 
says : ** Married ladieji are said to 
be in the straw at their accouche- 
ment." The phrase is a coarse 
metaphor, and has reference to 



farmyard animnis in a similar 
condition. It may have originally 
been suggested to the inquiring 
mind by the Nativity. M6mir 
pour I'aff, to have a miscarriaj^, 
Termeil also " casser son ccuf* 
dccarrer dc crac." 

Monacos, m. pi. (familiar and 
popular), money. See Quibus. 

Je vais te prouver ^ to! ct "k la grae, . . . 
que je aiiis encore bonne pour ganter del 
monaco«. Et allei-y !— Hectok faAMCK, 
Atartt QntHt'dd'yackt. 

Avoir dcs — , to be wealthy. 
Termed also *'ftre fonce, ^ire 
fuicquard, or duuillnrd ; avoir le 
sac, de Tos, des sou*;, du foin 
<lans ses bottcs, dc quoi, dcs 
pepettes, or de la ihiine; etrecali- 
fornien.'* The English synonyms 
being "to be worth a plum, to be 
well ballasted, to be a i^g' 
splawger, to have lots of tin, to 
have leathered one's nest, to be 
warm, to be comfortable. *' 
Abouler les — , to pay, " to fork 
out, to shell out, to down with 
the dust, to post the pony, to 
stump the pewter, to tip the 
biaiU." 
Monant, OT.,monantc,/.(ihievca'), 
friend. 

Monarque, ffi.(popular),/f*-^fl«f 
piece. Termed also "roue de 
derrifere," the nearly correspond- 
ing coin, a crown piece. Wing 
called in English slang a '* hind 
coach wheel." (ProNtitutes') Mo* 
narque, money. Kaire son — , tff 
haze found clients. 

Monde, m. (popular), rcDverse* 
guiili'tiHe. See Voyante. II y a 
du — au balcon is said ^ a 
woman uith larj^e breasts^ of ent 
toiM .j^K/rti/ "Charlies," (Fami- 
liar) Demi — , world of eocottei^ 
kept women. 

Dans ce qu'cm appelle le demi-monde il 
y a nomhie de tillcs en carle, Wriublcft 



Mottjicr — Monsieur^ 



267 



chevalien d'induMrie dr la )«unM»e el da 
Tamour qui, liica en riri^lc avcc la prefec- 
ture, tniiicnt joyeusc vie pendant quinrc 
anb CI ^tudt-Dt contiUmmciiL la (tolicc cor- 
rectioonclle.— Lie Taxiu 

(Showmen's) Du — , puklk who 
tntir the show. There may be a 
Jnrge concourse of people outside, 
but nu> " uiondc." 

Monfier (thicTes*), to Hti, 

Mongniasse(|xipularamIthievei')i 
OT^, '* my nibs. 

Mon linge est lavi (popular). / 
gtzr /«, *' I throw up the sponjje." 

Monnaie,y^ (popular), plus que 9a 
de — ! what /luJk I 

Mon ceil ! (popular), tsprttsiv* of 
rt/ksai or tiisbelitfy *' don't you 
wi!>h you may gel it ?'* or "do you 
sec any green in my eye?"* See 
NiScs. 

Monome. m. (students'), ymrh 
procfssion in singte fiU throuxh 
{t*tam streets of Paris of {atufi- 
dates to t hi govern mint schools. 

Monorgue (thieves'), /, myseif 

Monseigneur, m. (thieves*), or 
ptnce — , short crfftvbarxnth which 
househrfoiers forte open doors or 
safes. Termed "Jemmy, Jamcs,oi 
the stick." 

lU font Laater glebes CC scmir«« . . . 
avcc unc c<pice dc pied dc bicbe en fcr 
mi'tls ap^ellent cadet, monseisncur, oa 

pluflK. — C AN LBK. 

Monaeigneun&er (thieves'), to 
force t'p£H a dotjr, "to strike a 
jigger." 

Monsieur, m. (artists'), le — , the 
Prinfipal figure in a picture. 
( Popular) U n — , a iuvpenny 
glass of brandy ; afve'Sous giass 
pf wine from the bottU at a tvine 
retailers; — Vaulour, or t'cie 
Vautour, tht landlord ; also au 
usurer. 



Vmi« acconlcr un ncwveau delai pour I» 
capiiall . . . maift dcpuU Iroi« aoft . . . vooa 
n'avez pas sculcment pu railraper Ics in- 
tc'r^s. — Ah ! pire Vautour, ^ court ai 
vuc voa inttfrfts \ — Gavarni. 

Nfonsieur k tubard, a unll-dressed 
man, one who sports a silk hat ; 

— bambou, a stick, a gentleman 
whose services arc sometimes put 
in requisition bvdrunken workmen 
as an irresistible argument to meet 
the remonstrances of an unfortu- 
nate better half, as m the case o£ 
Martine and Sganarelle in Mo- 
litre's // Medfcin mal-^i lui ; — 
Leboa, a good sort of man, that 
is, OHf who readily treats others t» 
drink; — de Fitcscc, stuck-up 
man, with dry, sharp manner; 

— faardi, thtwind ; — Raidillon, 
or Pointu, proud, stuck-up man; 
(thieves') — dc I'AlTure, one who 
wins money at a game honestly or 
not ; — dc la Paumc, he who loses ; 
(theatrical) — Dufour est dans U 
sallc, expression used by an actor 
to warn another that he is not act- 
ing up to the mark and that he 
tvill get himself kissed^ or " get 
the big bird." (Familiar and 
popular) Un — & rouAaquetics, 
prostituted bully, or " pensioner." 
For list of synonyms see Poisson. 
Mojuiicur dc Paris, the executiotur. 
Formerly each large town hail its 
own executioner ; Monitieur de 
Rouen, Monsieur de Lyon, Ace, 
Concerning the office Balzac 
says: — 

Lcs SartMii, bourreaiix & Rouea pendant 
deux kifecick, avani d'jtre revctuft de la pr*- 
mierc cliarge du n«yaume, exifailaient d4 
pcre CO fits le* arrctt dc ta justice dcpuu 1« 
ircuiime uicle. II eu peu dc famillc* qui 
puiktcnt ofTrtr rexemple d'un o0ice ou d'uoe 
rK>l>leue coQMrv^ dc p^ic ca 6U pendaat 
sixsiidci. 

Monsieur personne, a nobody, 

(Brothels*) Monsieur, husband of 

the mistress of a brothel. 

Monsieur, avcc too tfpaiMe barbiche aux 
ptMli ton et Kris.— £. o« UoMCOVBT, Lm 
fitU Etim, 



26S 



Monstre — MontC'^-r egret. 



(Cads') Monsieur U carreau dans 
l'<x'i!, tUrisivt epithtt apptUd to a 
man with an ^yt-ffiass ; — bas- 
du-cul, TfMH with short leg%, 

Monstre. w., any words which a 
musiciftn temporarily adapts to a 
musical proiiudion composed by 
him, 

Monstrico. w. (familiar), ugly per- 
son, out with a *' knocker face." 

Montage de coup, m. (popular), 
the act of seeking to deceive oy miS' 
lecuiing statements. 

Mon vicux, entrc rous, 
Je n'coup* pas du tout 
X>ans c'taontase de coup ; 
Faut pu m'monter I'coup. 

Aug. HaKOV. 

Montag^nard, m. (popular), addi' 
iional hone put on to an omnibus 
going up hilL 

Montagne du giant, / (obsolete), 
gallawsy *' scrag, nobbing cheat, 
or government signpost.' 

Moniant, wt. and adj. (thieves'), 
breeches^ * ' Inicks, hams, sit-upons, 
or kirks." (Miliiary) Grand — 
tropical, ri^Unghreeches ; petit — , 
dratifers. (Familiar) Moninnt, 
term which is used to denote any 
thing which excites lust. 

Montante, / (thieves'), ladder. 
Literally a thing to climb up. 

Monte-A-regrct (thieves'), abbayc 
de — , the guillotine, Kormerly 
the gallvjvs. This name was 
given the scaffold because crimi- 
nals were attended there by one 
or more priests, and on account of 
the natural repugnance of a man 
for this mode of being put out of 
his misery. Michel records the 
fact, that at Sens, one of the 
streets leading to the market- 
place, where executions took 



place, still bore, a few years ago, 
the name of Monte • i- regret. 
Chanoine de — , otie sentemed to 
death. Termed also '*grognon," 
ox grumbler, Montcr i I'abbaye 
de — , to be guillotined, meant 
formerly to be hanged, to suffer 
the extreme penalty of the law 
on " wry-neck day," when the 
criminoJ before being compelled 
to put on the "hempen cravat," 
would perhaps utter for the edifi- 
cation of the crowd his ** lops, or 
croaks" ihat is, his last dyinj; 
speech. It is curious to note 
how people of all nations have 
always striven to di^;uise the idea 
of death by the rope by means of 
fome picturesque or grimly 
comical circumlocution. The 
popular language is rich in meta- 
phors to describe the act. In the 
thirteenth century jicople would 
express hanging by the term 
*'mcltreilabwc;" in the Bflccnth 
and sixteenth centuries an exe- 
cuted criminal was spoken of ai 
" vradangeant i I'eschelle, avoir 
collet rouge, crottre d'un demi- 
picd, faire la longue lettre, tom- 
ber du haut nial," and later on: 
'* Servir de bouchon, faire le 
saut, faire un saut surrien, donner 
un soufTlet k une potence, donner 
le moine par le cou, approcher du 
ciel h. reculons, danscr un bnuile 
en I'air, avoir la chanterelle au 
cou, faire Ic guct b, Montfaucon, 
faire le guel nu clair dc la lune L 
la cour des monnoyei." Also, 
" montcr h. la jamcw en Tair." 
Then a hanged man was **un 
eveque des champs" (on account 
of executions takmg place in the 
open country) " qui b^nit des 
picHs," and hanging itself, "une 
tlanse oil il n'y a pas de plancher," 
which corresponds to the expres- 
sion, '*io dance upon nothing." 
The poor wretch was also said to 



Monti'^-regret 



E69 



be **branche," a summary pro- 
ceeding ijcrformcd on the nearest 
tree, ano he was mode to " tircr 
Ift languc d'un demi-pictl." The 
poet Fran9ois Villon being in the 
prison of the Chaiclct in 1457, 
under sentence of death for a 
robbery supposed to have been 
commtited nt Rueil by himself and 
somecompanions, several of whom 
were hang^l, biit whose fate he 
luckily did not share, thus alludes 
with Rrim humour to his probable 
execution : — 



i: 



e uiu Fran^h. dont cc me poifcc, 
'€ de Parit enipri« l'on(hoi«c, 
C)r, (I'unc cordc d'une loi-w, 
Ssura mon col qnc mon cul potic 



When Jonathan Wild the Great 
is about to expiate his numerous 
crimes, and his career is sonn to 
be terminated at Tyburn, Fielding 
makes him say : '* D — n me, 
il is only a dance without music ; 
. . . a man can die but once. . . . 
Zounds I Who's afraid ? " Master 
Charley Bates, in common with 
his "pals," called hanging 
"scraggmg"; — 

•• H«1l coma lo be scracgtd, won't he ? " 
*' I don't know what \\\Xi means" rrplird 
Oliver. " Something in this wxy, o)d fel- 
ler," Hud C>tu-lcy. At he lud it. M*iier 
Baiet C4u]{ht up an end of hit neckerchief, 
«tid holding it etect in the air, dropped hi* 
bead on hi^ ^.hnuldcr. and jerked acuriouB 
sound thiough hib iccth; thereby intima- 
ting, by a lively patilominuc reproentaiion, 
that **»cniBipng " and haRging were one 
and the aama thinf. — DiciciiNS, OUvrr 

The expression i!i also to be met 
with in Lord Lytton's Paul Clif- 
ford:— 

*' btow me uihr, but that cove U a 
queer one I and if be doca not come to be 
scraaed," Mys I, "it vUl only b* becauM 
hclftuni a niity, aad Knc one of his 

Again, the same author puts in 
the mouth of his hero, Paul Clif- 
ford* the accomplished robber, the 



*• Captain Crank," or chief of a 
gang of highwaymen, a poetical 
simile, **lo leap from a leafless 
tree '*:— 

Oh I there never was life like the Robber's 

— to 
Jolly, and bold, and free : 
And il* end — why, a cheer froB the crowd 
below 
And a leap from a leafless ircc 1 

Venny- a- liners nowadays de- 
scribe the executed felon as *' tak- 
ing a leap into eiemitr ; " Eaicetious 
people say thnt he dies in a 
" horse's nightcap," »>,, a halter, 
and the \*uJgar Mmply declare that 
he is** stretched." Thedangerous 
classes, to express that one is 
being operateti upon by Jack 
Ketch, use the term *' to be 
scragged," already mentioned, or 
" to be topped ; '' and '• may I be 
topped 1 ' is an ejaculation often 
heard from the mouths of Londun 
roughs. Formerly, when the place 
for execution was at Tyburn, near 
the N.E. comer of Hyde Park, at 
the angle formed by the l^dg^t'are 
Koad and the top of Oxford 
Street, the ciimirutl brought here 
was said to put on the ** Tyburn 
tippet," i.f., Jack Ketch's rope. 
The Latins useil to describe one 
hange<l as making the letter t 
with his body, or the long letter. 
In Plautus old Slaphyla says : 
•* The best thing for me to do, is 
with ihe help 01 a halter, to make 
with my body the long letter," 
Modem Italians say of a manabout 
to be executed, that he is sent to 
Picardy, "mandatoin Picardia ** 
They also u&c other circumlocu* 
lions, "andare a Ix>ngone," 
** ami are a Fuligno," "Jar de* 
calci al vento, ** ballar in 
campoazurro." Again, the Italian 
*'truccante"(M;^), in his "lingue 
furbesche " {tant of thievfi\ says 
of a criminal who ascends the 
scaffold, the "spcrlunga. or fati- 



^270 



Monier, 



com** igaJ/ows), with the "mar- 
gherilA, or signorn " {_rajv) ad* 
justed on his "cuindo" («/r^) by 
the "cataion" ((*jr?f«/iVi#/r), that 
he may be considered as "aver la 
fune al guindo." The Spanish 
'• azor " {fMtr/, in Germania^ or 
Spanish cant), under sentence of 
a *'lristcia" {sentence of death), 
when about to be executed left 
tiie "angustia" {fnson) lo go 
to the gallows, or •' balanza," 
which is now a thing of the past, 
having been superseded by the 
hideous "garote." The Gennsn 
" broschem- blatter " (M/V/", in 
"rothwelsch," or German cant), 
when sentenced to death was 
doomed to the " dolm.*' or 
** nelle," on which he was ushered 
out of this world by the "cafflcr " 
{Gerr/uin Jack Ketch), 

Monter (popular), d'un cran, to 
obtain an appcintmetit superior 
to that one possesses already ; to be 
promoted; — j^ I'arbre, or i 
r^chelle, to be fooled. Alluding 
to a bear at the Zoological 
Gardens being induced to climb 
the pole by the prospect of some 
dainty bit which is not thrown 
to him after all Also to get 
an^ry^ ** to get one's monkey 
up;*' — en grainc, to grow old. 
Literally to run to seed ; — des 
coulcurs, le Job, or uu schtos-se, 
to deceiz'e one by false retraenta- 
tioHSt **to bamboozle; — une 
gamme, to scold, •'to bully-rug ;'* 
— un coup, to find a pretext ; io 
lay a trap for one. 

Celt des dainu hupptfs qui veuleat 
viontcr UD coup ^ un enueuu. — £. SUK. 

Monter le coup, or un battage, to 
deceive one by misleading state- 
ments. Ca ne prend pas, tu nc me 
monteras pas le coup, "No go," 
I am aware of ymtr practices and 
■•■ twig " your manaruvre, or 



"don't come the old soMier ovei 
me." Faire — i rechelle, to 
make one angry, " lo make 
one lose his shirt," Se — le 
bourrichon, or le baluchon, to fly 
into a passion about some alleged 
injustice. Also to be too sanguine^ 
io form illusums about one's 
abiliiieSf or about the suecess of 
some project. 

Oh I je ne me monte pis le bourrichoo, 
je tail que je ne fcrai pas dc vicux (».— 
Zola, l,'Au<>mmoir. 

Se — le coup, sc — le verre 
en dears, to form iUuitons. £s- 
sayer de — uu bateau a quel* 
qu'un, to seek to deceive one, 
"to come the old soldier " «*/»• 
one, (Thieves*) Monter un arcat, 
to jioindle, "to bite;*' — un 
gandin, to deceive, "to stick, or lo 
best ; " — un chopin, to make all 
necessary preparations for a rob- 
bery, "to lay a plant ; " — & la 
bulte, to be gui/lofined, 

Un jour, j'ai pri* mon nuriii pour le re- 
froidir. \\>ib% tout, root) r£re c'cK de 
monier 4 la butta.— iV/MM>Vf tfS* Mttuitmr 

Claude. 

Monter sur la table, /cfno^rac'/MM 
breast of it; to inform against 
one, " to blow tlie gaff." It also 
means to tell a secret, " to split.** 

While bU man l>eifig caught in ftomc fact 
(llic particuUr crime I've for^ottco), 
When he oiine to be hanged lor the act, 
Sptii, and luld tite whc-le t^ory to Cottoo. 
/M£ffttttfy Legtmd*. 

(Theatrical) Monter une partie. 
to get together a small number of 
tutors to gii'f out of Paris onf or 
t'vvo performances; (milil.iry) — en 
ballon, pn\ctii:aljcke at the expense 
of a nrwHomer. Duiing the 
night, to both ends of (he bed of 
the victim are fixed two running 
nooses, the ropes being attached 
hi^b up on a paiiiiioti by the side 
of the bed. At a given signal the 
ropes being pulled, the occupant 
of the bed finds himself lifted ia 



MonUur, 



271 



the air. with his couch upside 
down occasionally. 

Monteur, m. (theatrical), de partie, 
an tutor -whose spitiatUi is to gH 
Icj^Mer a fetv brother actors for 
tke purpose of performing out of 
t*7t'M ; ()>opular) — de coups, ordc 
gOfJans swinJUr ; one who is f on J 
of hoaxing peopie ; one who imposes 
en others, ''humbug." Concern* 
tng the latter term the Siang 
Dittionarv says: "A very cx- 
prca&ivc but slang word, synony- 
mous at one tinie with hum and 
haw. Lexicographers for a long 
time objected to the adoption of 
this term. Richardson utes it 
frequetitjy to express the meaning 
of olher words, Init, strange to 
say, omits it in the alphabetical 
flrrangcmenl as unworthy of re- 
cognition ! In the first edition of 
this wutk, 17S5 was given as the 
earliest date at whicn the word 
could b« fuiuid in a printed book. 
Since Ihen *humlHi^' has been 
Iraccd half a ccniuiy further back, 
on the titlc'page of a singular old 
jest-book, ' The Universal Jestn., 
01 a pocket companion lor the 
Wita : being a choice collection 
of merry conceits, facetious drol- 
leries. &c., clenchers, closers, 
closures. hon-motSf and humbugs, 
by Ferdinando Killigrew.' Lon- 
don, about 1735*40- The noto- 
rious orator Henley was known 
lo the mob as Orator Humbug. 
The fact may be learned from an 
illusttat ion in that exceedingly 
curious little collection of carica- 
tures published in 1757, many of 
which were sketched by Lord 
Boliiigbruke, Horace Walpolc 
filling in the names and cxplana- 
lions. HaliwcU dcscrilje:- hum- 
Inig OS "a person whu ImiiiA,' 
and cites Dean MiUcs's MS., 
«-hich was written about 1 760. 
In the la^t century the game now 



known as double-dummy wai 
termed humbug. Lookup, a noto- 
rious gambler, was struck down 
by apoplexy when playing at this 
game. On (he circumstance being 
reported to Foote, the wit said, 
' Ah, I always thought he would 
he humbugged out of the world 
at last I * It has been staled that 
the word is a corruption of Ham- 
burg, from which town so many 
false bulletins and reports came 
during the war in the last century. 
* Oh, that is Hamburg (or 
Humbug)/ was the answer to any 
fresh piece of news which smacked 
of improbabilitv. Grose mentions 
it in his Dictionary^ i7i^S; and 
in a little printed squib, published 
in iSoS, entitled Bath Characters^ 
by T. Goosequill, humbug is thus 
mentioned in a comical couplet 
on the title-page : — 

\Vc« Thre Ifalh Deiiirt hec 
HumbuE, Follic, anU Vahctcc. 

Gradually from this time the word 
bq;^ to assume a place in 
periodica] literature, and in novels 
written by not over - precise 
authors. In the preface to a flat, 
and most likelyunprofiiable poem, 
entitled Tht Keign of Numlmg, 
a Satire, 8vo, 1836, the author 
thus apologizes for the u^ of the 
word ; * I have used the term 
huftt/iug to designate this prin- 
ciple (wretched sophistry of life 
generally), considering that it is 
now adopted into our language as 
much as the words dunce, jockey, 
cheat, swindler, &c., which were 
formerly only colloquial terms.' 
A correspondent, who in a num- 
ber of Adi'ersaria ingeniously 
traced bombast to the inHated 
Doctor Paracelsus Bombast, con- 
siders that humbug may, tn like 
manner, be derived from Hom- 
berg, the distinguished chcnii'^t of 
the Court of the Duke of Orleans, 



272 



Montcur de coups — Morccan. 



who, according to the fullowing 
passage from ISishop Berkeley's 
Sirii^ was an ardent and success- 
ful seeker after the philosopher's 
stooc : — 



or thU there cannot be a belter proof 
Homocrc, 



than the cxpcrtmcnt of Monkteor 



who made ^old of mercury by iniroducing 
UbHi inio its pores, but at »ucn trouble uia 
eiipcnK that, 1 suppouc, nobody will try 
the exi erimcnt for profit. By thii injunc- 
tion of lisht and tnercury, both bodies be- 
came finer, and producctl a third different 
to either, to wit, real (old. For the truth 
of which fact I refer to tbc mcntotrs of the 
French Academy of Sciences.— Bbkkk- 
LBV, Worksr 

The Suppkmcntary En^ish Glos- 
sary gives the word *' humbugs" 
as the North-country term for cer- 
tain lumps of toflfy, well flavoured 
with peppermint. (Roughs') Mon- 
ler k cheval, to he suffering from a 
tumour in the ^nitt, a eonseifuence 
of venereal disease^ and termed 
poulain, foal; hence the jeu de 
mots ; (wine retailers') — sur Ic 
tonneau, to add water to a cask of 
wine, "to christen " it. Adding 
too much water to an alcoholic 
liquor is termed by lovers of the 
"tipple** in its pure stale, *'lo 
drown the mlUer. ' 

Monteur de coups, m. (popular), 
story-teller ; cheat, 

Monteuse de coups,/ {p>optUar), 
de£eitful woman ; otuwho '* bam- 
boozles " her lover or lovers, 

Montpamo (thieves'), Montpar- 
nasse. See Minilnionte. 

J'ai fla»«]ti£ du poivre li la rousse. 
tile ira de turnc en zamo, 
De M^nilmuche it Montpamo, 
San* pouvoir rctnouchcr man gniaue. 
KiCMEPIN. 

Montrcr (theatrical), la couture de 
ses bas, to break off a stage en^a^e- 
ment by the simple process of leaving 
the theatre; (familiar and popu- 
lar) — toutc sa boutique, to expose 
onis ^son. 



Ah \ rtcn . . . temetiet votre camiiole. 
Vojs uver. jc n'aime pas les ind&ences. 
Pendant que voiis y £tes, mootm loule 
vo«re bouuque. — Zola. 

Montre-tout, m. (popular), short 
faeket. Termed also " ne tc g^ne 
pas dans Ic pare." (Prostitutes') 
Aller a —y to go to the meduat 
examination^ a periodiioi and 
compulsory one^ for re^itered pros- 
titutes, those ivho ihirh it beinssent 
to the prison of Saint- JJitttre. 

Monu, m. (cads'), one-sou a'gar^ 

Monument, m. (popular), tall hat, 
or •' stove-pijie." 

Monzu, or mouzu, m. (old cant), 
looman^ s breasts^ Termed, in other 
varieties of jargon, "avant-postcs, 
avant-scines, oeufs sur le plat, 
oranges sur I'Aagire," and in the 
English slang, ** dairies, bubbles, 
or Charlies." 

Mora&se, / (printers'), /riw/za-f^w 
before the forme is finally ar- 
ranged; — final proof of a news- 
paper artiile. Also worJtmam jphi^ 
remains to correct sueh a proofs 
or the time employed in the work. 
(Thieves') Morasse, uneasiness ; 
remorse. Battre — . to make a hue 
and cry, **to romboyle," in old 
cant, or '*to whiddle beef." 

Morassier, m. {printeni'), one wh& 
prints off the lojl proof of a news~ 
paper article. 

Morbaque. m. (popular), disagree- 
able child. Sec Morbec. 

Morbec, m. (popular), a nariet^ 
of vermin which clings trnaciously 
to certain parts of the human 
body. 

Morceau, m. (freemasons')! d*ar- 
chiiecture, speech ; (popular) — 
de gmyere, pockmarked feut% 
" cribbage-face ; " — de saW. fat 
woman, Un — , a slattemiy gi^. 



Mord — Morningue. 



273 



(Thieves') Manger le — , i9 
piaihf ** to blow the gaff.'* 

Lc moTCtau to ne margens 
X>« cninte de (ombcr ao plan. 

Vinocq. 

(LUerary) Morceau de p&te fenne, 
heai^y^ dull produttion. (Artists') 
Faire le — , to paint dttaih skil- 
fitUy. (Militar)-) Lc beau temps 
tombe par morceaux, it rains. 

Mord (familiar and popular), ^ oe 
— pas, it's MO usf; no ^0. 

Mordante, /. (thieves'), jiU ; saw. 
The allusion is obvious. 

Mordre (popular), se faire — , to U 

reprimanded^ *' to get a wigging;" 
to ^et thrashed^ or "woUoped. * 

Moresque, yi (thieves'), i/an^rr. 

Morfe, /. (thieves'), nual ; vie- 
tttaltf or " toke.'' 

Veiur-tu Tcnir prendre de la morfe et 
piausser svec m^ire eo une tics pinles que 
IV m'a* jouMiaill^e J—Lt/ar^m ,it f Argot. 

Morfiante,/ (thieves'), plate. 

Morfigner. morfiler (thieves'), to 
do ; to tat, Vxoxn the old word 
morhcr. Rabelais uses the word 
morHaller with the !>ignificaLion of 
to eat, to gorp! omselj. 

La, lot la, c'«u ntorfiall^ ceU.— Rmie- 
LAIS, GitrgSMtiia. 

Morfiiler, or morfiUer (thieves'), (0 
tat, " to yam." 

Uo vieux fifiot qui ftVtalt fail raille pour 
owrftller. — Viik>cq. {_An eld eoMviet vha 
had tumtd spy to gtt a living^ 

Termed also morfier. Compare 
with mortirc, or morfiizare, to 
fat, in the lingue furbesche, or 
Italian cant. Se — le daidant, 
to /ret. Dardant, heart. 

Morgane,/ (old cant), soli. 

Celt dcs oranges, si tu demaodaii tJu 
ttl . . . de la moncaoe I mon fiU, {« coOte 
pas chef.— V I DOC "J. {Htrt art tcmt pc^ 
fat sMt ; Juit rtnt Oik /emit, imy htyl it't 



Morganer (roughs' and thieves'), tt> 
bite, Morgane le gonse et chair 
dace 1 Biti the eavel fitek inu 
him! 

Moficaud, wi. (thieves'), eoat ; 
tvine-dealef's wooden pitcher. 

Mori-larve, y^ (thieves'), /»M^un>/ 
face, 

Morlingue, m. (thieves'), money ; 
purse^ "skin." Faire le — , to 
steal a purse, " lo fake a skin." 

Momante, /. (thieves'), sheep/old. 
From mome, sheep. 

Mome, / and adj. (thieve^'), 
sheep, ox *' wool-bird." Termed 
"bleating cheat" by English 
vagabonds. Courbe de — , shoul- 
der of mutton, Mornc, stupid ; 
stupid man, " go along." 

Moniie,/ (thieves'), mouthful* 

Momier, momeux, or marmier, 
m, (thieves'), shepherd. 

Momiffer (popular), to slap one's 

/<ue, ** to fetch a i^ang," or "to 

five a biff," as the Americans 
ave it. Termed to give a '* clo," 
at Winchester SchooL 

Momifle, / (thieves'), money, or 

" blunt." 

When the slowcoach patucd. and the gcm- 
iQcn storm 'd, 
I bore the brunt — 
Aod lite only touad which my prave lipa 
form'd 
Waa ■■blunt"— Mill " Wont t" 

LoKD Lytton, PAulCtifftrd. 

Momifle tarte, spun<*HS coin, or 
"queer bit." KcHIcr de la — 
tarte, to pass off bad coin ; to be a 
" snide pitcher, or smasher." 
Properly mornifle has the signifi- 
cation of cuff on the face. 

Momifleur tarte, m. (thieves'), 
coiner, or " queer- bit faker." 

Morningue, or morlingue, m. 
(thieves'), money^ or " pieces ;'* 
purse. Faire le — , to pick a 



274 



Momos — Morviau, 



fwket. In the oM English cant 
•'to fang" apoikcf. 

O fthsme o* juMice ( "WAd !■ h&ng'd. 
For thaiten he a pocket fonc'd, 
While ufe old Hubert, and hit gaoff, 
Doth pocket of the nation faoE. 

KiKtJ}tKC./. iViU. 

Termed in mo<\trn Enelish cnnt 
" to fake a cly»" a pickpocket 
being C'llled, according to Lord 
Lytton. a ** buzz gloak : — 

The " emirenl hand " ended with — " He 
who iumptitiously accumttbtes bu«tle, U, 
in fan, nnthing better than a bun gloak.'— 
faulCtifferd. 

Porte —i purity "skin, or poge." 

Mornoa. «. (thieves'), mouth, 
*' bone-box, or muns." Probably 
from mome, mutton^ the mouth s 
most important function being to 
receive food. 

Morpion, /«. (popular), strong rx- 
/trisioM of {ontetnpi ; dtipicabU 
man, or **snot." Literally crab* 
hme. Also a hre, one who 
clings to you as the vermin alluded 
to. 

Morpionner (popular), is saU 0/0 
i'Oi t that j'ffu cannot get rid of, 

Morse (Breton cant), barley bread. 

Mort, / and adj. (popular), mar- 
chand de — subite, physician, 

"pill." 

Cest bien kdr le mfdecm en chef . . . 
tout lea marchandt dc mort cubtle vout 
cot de ces irgardt-li,— Zola, 

Lampc a — , confirmed drunkard 
•wh^si thirst cannot b€ slaked, 
(Familiar and popular) TJn corps 
— , an empty bottU, The English 
say, when a bottle has been 
emptied, ** Take away this bottle ; 
it has 'Moll Thompson's' mark on 
it." that is, it is M. T. An empty 
bottle ii also termed a "marine, 
or marine recruit.** "This ex- 
pression having once been used in 



the presence of an officer of 
Marines," says the Slang Die* 
tionary^ "he was at first inclined 
to take it as an insult, until some- 
one adroitly appeased his wrath 
by remarking I hat no offence 
could be meant, as all that it could 
pa<isibly imply was : one who had 
done his duty, and was ready to 
do it again. (Popular) Eau de 
— , brandy. See Tord-boy«ux, 
(Thieves') Etrc — , to be sentenced, 
" booked." liirondelle dc la — , 
getidarnu on duty at execulums. 
(Military school of Saint-Cyr) Se 
fairc porter (fltve-mort is to get 
plactd on the sick list. (Game* 
sters*) Mort, stakes whitk Aait 
been increased hy a cheat, who slily 
lays O/iditional money the moment 
the game is in his favour. 

Mortc paye sur mer,/ (thieves*), 
the hulks (obsolete). 

Morue,/ (popular), dirty, disgnH* 
ing woman. 

Vou» voyex. Fraii^oUe, ce panler d« 
frauci qu'on vous fan tmU francs ; i'en 
offre un franc, moi, ct la marchande tn ap- 
pcllc . . . Oui, nmdame, elle voui appeUe 
. . . monte !— Gavakni. 

Also prostittfte. See Gadoue. 
Grande — dc»«ilce, expression 
of the utmost contempt applied to a 
tfoman. Pe<Uar5 formerly termed 
•' morue," manuscnplSt for the 
printing of which Ihey formed an 
asj^ociation, "clubbed" together. 

Morviau, /«. (popular), nose. 
Termed also '*pil, bourbon, piton, 
pivase, bouteille, caillou, trompc, 
iniOfe, tubercule, tromjictte, naxa- 
rcih;" and, in linglish slang, 
" conk, boko, nub, snorter, 
handle, post-horn, and smeller." 
Leclter Ic — , to kiss. The ex- 
pression is old. 

Lecher Ic morreau, tnooicre de parlcf 
ironiqiie^ qui tignifie careuer une fcrame, 
la courttter, la Mtrnr. Uure raoiour. Hii 



Morviot — Mouckard. 



275 



de mJrac que l^her Ic p'uu'ui, baiscri iXrt 
aiaidu et aitachtf It une peiiosoc— Lb 
Rotrx, Diet. Comi^vt. 

The term "snorter " of the Eng- 
lish jargon has the corresponding 
equivnlcnt *'soffiantc" in Italian 

cant. 

Morviot, M. (popular), secretiim 
from thr muf<ms mcmbrant of tki 
noity '* snot." 

Datu Its veino d'c« •««!»'<»,_ 
Au )i«u d'ian^ il coul' du morviot. 
\\\ oat dci guiboU'i camm' Irur uick, 
Trop d'bidoche autour dct boyaus, 
Cl tarpioB plus moa qu' dti masuc 

RlLHKI>tN. 

Morviot, Urm cf conttmpt^ not 
quite so forcible as the English 
expression •' snot," which has the 
signification of contrmptibU indi* 
vidua!. Pelil — , iittli scamp, 

Moscou. m. (miliurj), faire brOler 
— , to mix a ztist bawl of punch. 
Alluding to the burning down of 
Moscow by the Russians them- 
selves in I Si 2. 

Mossieu k tubard, m. (popular), 
li'eii'dressed man, a. *' swell cove." 
Tubard is a si/Ji hat. 

Mot, OT. (popular), casser un — , to 
have a chat^ or "chin music," 

Mottc, f (jmcneral), pudnuia mu- 
iicrum. Tcmicil aUo *' chat," 
and formerly by the poets "le 
verger de Cypris. '* Lc Koux, con- 
cerning the expression, says : — 

La mottc de U sature d'une femne. c'esi 
propremcnt Ic petit boU louffu gui Karnit 

Formerly the false hair for those 
parts was termed in English 
*' mcrkm." (Thieves') Molte, 
etttt rat prison t or house of correc- 
tion. Ucgringoler dc U — , to 
come from such a place of confine' 
ftu-nt. The synonyms of prison in 
ditTerent varieties of slang are : 
"caslue, caruchet hopital, milre, 



chetard or jetard, college, grosse 
bolte. Tours, le violou, le bloc, 
bolte aux cailloux, tune^on, austo. 
mazaro, lyc^e, ch&icau, Uura" 
In the English lingo : ** stir, 
clinch, hostile, steel, sturrabin, 
jigger, Irish theatre, stoncjug, 
roill,** the la.<tt-naraed being an 
abbreviation of treadmill, and 
signifying by analogy /«><?«. The 
word is mentioned by Dickens : — 

•' Was you never on the mill ? " "What 
mill,- inqmrtd Oliver. " What mill? why 
the mill,— the mill as takes up so little room 
that itil work inside a •tacw-ju(.-~^jBrprr 
Tviitt, 

In Yorkshire a prison goes by the 
appellation of *' Toll-shop," as 
shown by this verse of a song 
popular at fairs in the East 
Kiding : — 

But if iwer he get ont ascan. 
And can but nit%c a frind. 
Oh I the divel may tak' toll-ahop. 
At Beverley town end I 

This "toll-shop" is but a varia- 
tion of the Scottish ** tulboolh." 
The general term "quod " to de- 
note a prison originates froiD the 
universities. Quod is really a shor- 
tening of quadrangle ; so to be 
quodded is to be within four walls 
KSiang Dtct. ). 

Motusdanal'entrepont! (sailors*). 
silence! "put a clapper to your 
mug,** or ** mum's the word. * 

Mou, m. (popular), avoir le — cnfltf, 
to 6e pregnant f or " lumpy." 

MoucbsiUer( popular and thieves'), 
/j/tj«, " to slag ;*' /tf /(Vi6 d/, " to 
pipe;" to see. 

J'itT« mouchailltf le babillard . . . Je n'y 
itre raouchailM floutifersdc vain.— Xx/tu^ 
gun d* CA tx»t* 

Mouchard, m, (popular), portrait 
hung- in a room; (popular and 
thieves') — ii bees, /amp-post, the 
inconvenient luminary being com- 
pared to a spy. Mouchatu, pro- 



276 



Mouckardi — Moiichique. 



perly //*>•, one who goes busily 
abuutlike a fly. It furmerly had 
the signification of dandy. 

A la fin du xvii'u^le, 00 donnail encore 
oe Dum auk pctiU-aiaitru iiui fr^qucn- 
uient Ics Tuilcncs pour ^'oir autuit que 
;x>ur dtre vug: C'est sur ce rameux th^ire 
des Tuileries, dit un tfcrivain dc IVpoque, 
tju'uitc bcaut^ luukunte fait &a prcnu^e 
cDlrccAu inondE. Uientdt Its "mouchan" 
de la iffAndc alltfe sont en campagne au 
bruit il'un vi<k4igc nouvcau ; ctiauua court 
en rrpaJire kcs yeux.— MlcHEL. 

Moucharde, / (thieves*), moon^ 
" parish lantern, or Oliver." 

Mail d(!j& la patraroue, 
Au clair dc U muuctiiirde, 
Noiu reluqoe de Icio. 

VlDOCQ. 

Xa — sc dtfbinc, th€ moon disap- 
pcars^ *' OUver is sleepy." 

Mouche,/!, ai^ljUWivri {general), 
foiUe, or polki officer; det active > 
Compare with the "raiickc," or 
spy, of German cant ; (thieves') 
muslin ; (students') — ^ miel, can- 
tUdate to thi EcoU Caitralt des 
Arts et Manujoihtrts^ a great en- 
ginetring sthw>i. Alluding to the 
bee embroidered in gold on their 
caps. (Popular) Mouche, bad^ai 
"snide;" ugly; stupid. C'est 
bon pour qui qu'est — , ii is only 
jit for '* flats." Mouche, ovo-fr, 

II a repani, I'mni soleiL Bravo I encore 
bien di5bile, bica pfilot, biea "mouche," 
dinut Oavruche. — Kichemn. 

Non, c'est q' j' me — , ironical 
negativi expression meant to bt 
strongly affirmative. Synony- 
mous of *' non» c'cst a' je loussc ! '* 
Vous n'avez ricn fail ? Non, c'est 
q' j' me — , you did nothing } oh! 
didn't I, Just! 

Mouchcr (popular), Ic quinquel, to 
kiiit "to do" for ont ; to strike, 
to j^ivi a " wipe." 

Allons, mouchc-lui te qutnquct. $a Tea* 
bnMUfera.— Th, Gautiul 



Moucher la clianilclle, to gix*t 
oneself up to sclifary pratticts ; 
to act Oicording to the priucipUs 
of Maithus with a viev> of not 
begettittf* children. For further 
explanation tlie reader may be 
referred to a work entitled Tht 
Fruits of Philosophy I — sa chan- 
dclle, to die^ " to snuff it" For 
synonyms see Pipe. Se — dan* 
ses doigts (obsolete), to be ciciytr^ 
resolute. Se faire — le quinquel, 
to get one*s hcaJ punched. (Game- 
sters') Se — , is said of attendants 
who, while pretending to make itse 
of their handkerchiefs, purloin a 
coin or ttvo from the gaming- 
tahie. It is said of such an at- 
tendant, who on the sly abstracts 
a gold piece from the .stakes t.iid 
out on ine table, U s'esl " mouche " 
d'un louis. 

Moucberon. m, (popular), zoaifer 
at a wirtc-shop ; child, or *' kid." 

Moucbes, / //. (popular), d'hiver, 
snow-Jlak^s. luer les — , /* 
emit a bad sinell, capable of 
killing even flies. Termed also 
tucr les — a quliize pas. (Thea- 
trical) Envoyer des coups tie pied 
aux — , to lead a disorderly Itje. 

Mouchettes, / pi. (popular), 
pocket-handkerchief '* snoilinger, 
or wipe." Termed "madam, 
or stock," by English thieves. 
Des — ! equivalent to du flan I 
des navets 1 des neflcs, &c., for- 
cible expression of refusal ; may 
be rcndeied by ** Don't you wish 
you may get it !" or, as the Ameri- 
cans say, "Yes, in a horn." 

Moucheur de chandelles, ttu 
(popular). See Mouchcr. 

Mouchique, adj. (popular aiwi 
thieves'), base, wortkUss, Ao^j 
" snide." 



Moiuhoir — Mou ilh^. 



CTtftail un' lODii' pju mouchique, 
C^taut un cirond tontieau, 
I.'anderliQiie. I'tiKlcrlvquc, 
L'andcrliqu' de Laixlemeau ! 

Gill. 

The English cant has the old 
ward *' queer," signifying base, 
ro^ibh, or worthless — the oppo- 
hiie uf **ruin." which signihed 
gnod andgenuine. "Queer, inall 
|»K>l>ability," says the Slang Dit' 
tionary^ "Ms immediately derived 
from llie cant language- It has 
been mooted thnt il came into use 
from a ' qu«re ' (?) being set be- 
fore a man's name; hut it is 
more Uion probable that it was 
brought into this cnuntry by ihe 
gipsies from Germany, where 
^urr signifies rroj/, or crooktd** 
(Thieves') Eire — i sa section, or 
& la sec, to be noUii as a bad cha- 
rtwtir at thi poh'ce o£ice of onrs 
district. The word " mouchique," 
says Michel, is derived from 
" inujik," a A'MXsiaM prasatit, 
which must hnve become familiar 
in 1815 to ihc inhabitants of the 
parts of the cotutry tDvadcd by 
Ihe Russians. 

Mouchoir« m. (popular). d'Adam, 
the Jiti^crs, used by some people 
as a natural handkerchief, 
"forks;" — de bteuf, meadmv. 
Termed thus on account of oxen 
having their nos*s in the grass 
when grazing: — de poche, piUol^ 
or "pups.'* (t'amitiarand popular) 
Fairc le — , to stent pc^ket-hand- 
kerrhiefs^ "to draw a wipe." 
Coup de — (obsolete), a box on 
the ear, a '* wipe in the chaps." 

Yo^ez le train qu'a m' fait pour un coup 
dc muucboir que jlui ai ioaa£,—Pom- 

(Theatrical) Faire le — , to pirate 
itnother author i prodttctitms. 

Mouchouar-godcl (Breton com), 
pistoi. 



Moudre (popular), or — un air, to 
ply a street organ. 

Mouf (popular), abbremtion of 
AhuffftarJ, the name of a street 
almost wholly tenanted by rag- 

flickers, and situate in one of the 
owest qnartersof Paris. Quarlier 
— niouf, the Quartter Atouffetard. 
La iribu des Beni Mouf-raonf, w- 
habitants of the Quartter Mouffe* 
tard. Champagne — , or Cham- 
pagne Mouffeiani, a /liquid mnuu- 
ftKtured by rag-pickers with rotten 
oranges picked oHt of the refnse at 
the ftalies. The fruit, after being 
washed, is thrown into a cask of 
water and allowed to fennent for 
a fevr days, after which some 
brown sugar being added, the 
liquid is Dottled up, and does 
duty as champagne. It is the 
Cliquoc of poor people. 

MoufHant^, adj. (popular), (om- 
fortatdy, warmJy ci'ad, 

Moufflet, m. (popular), chiU, or 
'* kid ; " urchttt ; apprentice. 

Moufion, m. (popular), pocket" 
handkerchief " snottinger, or 
wipe." 

Moufionner (popular), tob/oroone's 
nose. (Thieves') Se — dans le 
son, to be gui//otincd. Literally 
to biow oms nose in the bran. 
An allusion to an executed con- 
vict's bead, which falls into a 
ba&ket full of sawdust. Termed 
also ** ^lemner dans le son, or le 
bac." See Fauchi. 

Mouget, M. (roughs'), a sri*elt, or 
" gorger." Des peniches ^ la — , 
fashionable boatSt f now ivom^ 
with pointed tees and large square 
heels. 

Mouillante, /. (thieves'), cod ; 
(popular) soup. 

MouilU, atlj. (populnr), elre — , to 
be drunkf or *' tight." See Pom- 



27S 



Afou tiler — Mauler, 



pettc, Etre — , U be Jt/wrvn in 
etWs rtai character. Alluding 
to cloths which are soaked in 
water to ascertain their qiULlity. 
(Thieves') Etre — , to he well 
JtncncM to the police, 

Mouiller (popular), se — , todrink, 
" to have somethingdamp/'or as 
the Americans have it, " to smile, 
to see the man." The term is 
old. 

MoaiDee-voQt pour uicher, ou teichea 
pour mauiller. — Rabelais. 

Also to get sNgklly intoxicated^ or 
" elevated." (Theatrical) Mouil- 
ler ^, or dans, to receive a royalty 
for a play produced on the stage. 
Se — , to take pains in ont^s aii- 
ing, (Thieves') Se — les picds, 
to be transported^ " lo lump the 
lighter, or to be lagged." 
(Roughs') En — , to perfortn some 
extraordinary feat -with great ex- 
penditure of physical strength, 
Xes frires qui en mouUIent, euro- 
hats. (Military) Mouiller, t^ be 
punish^, 

Mouise,/ (thieves'), soup, 

Voni qui n'avei prohatilement tJaim 1e 
hauge que U mouUe de 'I'unetMfe Bic£trc 
votu devcz canncr la pfgrciiDe.-^VlooCQ. 

Moukala, m. (military), ryf/. 
From the Arab. 

Mouk^re,ormoucaire,/.(popular}, 
ugly woman ; girl of indifferent 
character ; {ywXiXArf^ mistress. Ma 
— » "y y^^**S " 'ooman.*' Avoir 
sa — , to have won the good graces 
of a fair one, generally a cook 
in the case of an infantry soldier, 
the cavalry having the monopoly 
of housemaids or ladies' maids, 
and sappers showing a great pen- 
chant tor nursery- maids. 

Moulard, m, (popular), superlative 
of moule, duHcCf or " flat." 



Moule, m, and f. (popular), une 
— , face^ or "mug, ' Also a 
dunce, simpleton, or *' muff." 

Poutex-moi 1a paix ( Viui« Jie« use 
coucnne el une moule . — G. Courtelikb. 

L< — a blagues, mouthy or 
** chaffer." Literally Mtf Aww^/^- 
box, Un — \ boutons, a tioenty- 
franc piece. Un — i claques, 
face with impertinent expression 
wkichinvites punishment. Tenned 
also — k croquignolcs. Un — k 
gaufres, or i pastilles, a face pitted 
with small-pox marks, *' crumpet- 
face, or cribbagc - face." \5n. 
moule &. gaufres is properly a 
"ioaffte-iron. Un — it poup^ 
(obsolete), a clumsily-built, awk- 
ward man. 

Ah ! ah * kh I Cj^nind lienSc ! a-t-il aa 
air jaune . . . dis done ch I c'muulc % 
poup<fc, qu' veux-(u fairc de cetle piquef 
^RicAf*n-gu euie. 

Un — imerde, heh'nd, "Nancy." 
For synonyms see Vasistaa. jOso 
a foul-mouthed person. Un — 
de gant, box on the ear, or *' bang 
in the gills." Un — de bonnet, 
head, or "canister." Un — de 
pipe k Gambier, grotesque face ^ or 
" knocker face." Un — k melon, 
humpback, or "lord." (Mili- 
tary) Envoyer chercher le — auK 
guiilemcts, to send a recruit en a 
fool's errand, to send liiin lo a*k 
the sergeant-major for the momJ 
for inverted commas, the joUe 
being varied by requesting him to 
fetch the key of the drill-ground. 
Corresponds somewhat to ending 
a greenhorn for pigeon's milk, or 
a pcnnyivorlh of stirrup-oil. 

Mouler (familiar and popular), un 
seoateur, to case onestlf by evacua- 
Hon, "loburj-aquakcr;" (artists') 
^ une Venus, same meaning. 
Artists term " gaionner," the act 
of easing oneselj in the f elds. See 
Mouacailler. 



Moulin — Mouscaiiler, 



279 



Moulin, t». (popular), de la halle 
(obsolete), tht piiiar^; 

Mais pour qui t'svcnir lu Iim' atcux (oa 

devoir, 
FaU r<Fgui»er ta langv' sur U picrra in* 

fir male. 
El puis j'tc f'nms louraer au moului dc la 

haUe. 
Ammsftmftu 4 im CuKfmr, 17A4. 

Moulin, hairdresser's shpp ; — & 
cafe, mitraiiUuse, Thus termed 
on account of the revolving 
handle used in filing it off. like 
that of a cofTee-mill. Also stmt 
orpin ; — k merde, j/ant/frtr ; 
— it ventf /he StAitid. SccVasis- 
tas. Concerning the expression 
Le Koux says : — 

Moulin L vent, pour cul, dcrriire. Mou- 
lin k vrot, parcequ'cn doone l'c«>M)r & t** 
vetiu par ccue ouv enure- lb. — Ificl. C9- 
mifut. 

(Thieves') Moulin, reeeivef^a, or 
"fence's," house. Termed also 
**maison du meunicr.*' Porter du 
gras-doublc au — . to steal Uisd and 
taiu st to a rteeiver of stoitn pro- 
perty^ ** to do blucy at the fence," 
(Pulice) Passer au — k caf^, to 
transport a prostitute to the eolonia. 

MouUnage, m. (popular), prtit' 
tling, *' clack." 

Mouliner (popular), to talk non- 
sense ; to praitU^ A term spe- 
cially used in reference to the fair 
sex, and an allusion to the rapid, 
regular, and monotonous motion 
of a mill, or to the noise produced 
by the {Middles of a water-mill, 
a " tattle-box " being termed 
moulin k paroles, 

Mouloir, M. (thieves'), mouih, 
'• bone-box, or muns ; " teethj 
"ivoriea, or grinders." 

Moulure,/. (popular), himp 0/ ex- 
crcmettt, or "quaker." Machine 
i moulures, ^r^rt*^, or *'Nanc)'." 
See Vasislas." 



Mouniche, f. (thieves'), uvman*! 
privities^ "merkin," according to 
(he S/itn^ Dktionary'. 

Mounin. m. (thieves'), ehild, or 
" kid i " apprentice. 

Mounine,/. (thieves'), tittle girl. 

Mouquctte, / (popular), cocotte, 
or " poll." See Qadoue. 

Aise« 1 Taifet ro* bees ! . . . k la porte 
In roouquetiCT !— P. MahaUK. 

Moure, / (thieves'), pretty face^ 
*'dimbcr mug." 

Mourir (popular), tu t'cD ferais — I 
u expressive of refusal. Literally 
if / f^ve yon what you UMnt you 
uvtt/d dte far Joy, See N6fiea. 

Mouron, w. (popular), ne plus 
avoir dc — sur la cage, to he bald^ 
or to sport "a bladder of lard." 
For synunyrooua expreauons see 
Avoir. 

Mouscaille, f. (thieves'), ejcctf 
mcnt^ or, as the Irish say, 

•* quaker." 

Mouscaiiler (thieves*), to ease one- 
self by evaeuation. "The synonyms 
are **mousscr,cntcrrcrson colonel, 
alter faire une ballade k la lune, 
mouler un scnateur, mouler une 
Venus, ^azonner, aller au numcro 
cent, deponer, fogner, flaquer, 
^crire k nn J uif, depo:»cr une i)cchc, 
poser un pepin, un fuctiomiaire, or 
une sentinelle ; envoycr une d^ 
pcche 4 Bisniark, Masquer, touscr. 
fairc corps ncuf, dcpoacr une 
medaille de pajiier volant, or 
dea Pays-Bas (obsolete), fnire 
dcs cordcs, niettre une Icttre a la 
poste, faire le grand, faire une 
commission, dcbuurrrr sa pipe, 
dcfalquer, larler^ faire une inou- 
lurc, allcr quelquc part, aller k 
ses affaires, allcr ou le roi va k 
pied, filer, iJIercheiJulesierchem, 
oiler ou le roi n'envoie pcrsonne. 



280 



Mouscailleur — Moutardier, 



flacfuader, fuscr, gdcher da gros 
galipoter, poiisscr son rond, filer 
ie cable de proue, falre un pru- 
ncflu, allcr ail liucn-Tclim, allcr 
voir Bernard, faire ronfler Ie hour- 
relet, la chaise pcrcce, or la chaire 
perc^c." In the English slang, 
* ' to go lo the West Central, to go 
10 Mrs. Jones, or to the crapping- 
ken, to the bog-house, to the 
chap<:l of case, to Sir Harry ; to 
crap, to CO to the crappmg^ca^, 
lo the coffee-shop, to Ihc crapping 
caislle," and, as the Irbh term it, 
'* to bury a quaker." 

Mouscailleur, m. (popular), sea- 
Vfnger tmplo)*ed in tmptying cfss- 

/wA, or " gold-finder." 

Mousquetaire gris. m. (popular), 
/<v/j(f, or "grey-l«cked 'un." 

Moussaillon, m. (sailors'), a sfiip- 
^/, or "powder-monkey." From 
mousse, shiP'iNiy. 

Mou88antet/;(popularandlhicves')i 
bt<r^ or "gatter," Un pot de — , 
a **5]uint of gatter.'' A curious 
slang street melody, known in 
Seven Dials as Bet tht Coaie/i 
DaugbUr^ mentions the word 
"gatter":— 

Hut when I (trove tny flame to tell, 
fiat's »)ie, " Come, stuw that patter, 
If you're a cove wot like* a gal, 
Vy dun't you stand koiiie jjatterf" 
In coune J iiutaatly complied, 
Two bhmmine quarts of poner. 
With Mv'ral go«s of Kin beside, 
Draiii'd Bel ine Coalcy's daughter. 

JMoussante mouchique, had^ fiat 
bt'cr, " swipes, or l)clly ven- 
geance. " 

Moussard, m. (thieves*), tfustHut 
da. 

Mousse,/, (popular and thieves'), 
exa'£mint ; wine. The word is 
old. Villon, B poet of the fifteenth 
century, uses it with the latter 
signi&catiuu. For quotation see 



Jouer du pouce. (Popular) De 
la — ! nonsense! **all my eye," 
or '* all my eye and Betty Martin." 
Is also expressive of ironical re- 
fusal ; "yes in a hora," as the 
Americans say. 

Moussecailloux, ot. (popular), iir- 
J'antry solHtcr^ "wobbler, or 
beetle-crusher." 

MouBseline, / (thieves*), whitt 
hread^ or " pannum," alluding lo 
a similarity of colour. Also 
prisoner's JefUrs^ ** darbies,*' 

Mousser (popular), /c ease oneself 
h- ctamation. See Mouscailler, 
Also to be wrofh^ " lo have one's 
monkey up." Kaire — quelqu'on, 
io make one angry hy "riling" 
him, 

Mousserie, / (thieves*), prixy^ 
"crapping-Kcn." 

Mousseux, adj. (Utcraiy), hyper^ 

boiie. 

Mousaue,/ (thieves'), fAcj/wwA 

Moustachu, nt. (familiar), man 
xvith moHitacht* 

Moustique, m. (popular), avoir un 
— dans la bofte au scl, to be 
*' cracked." "to haven slate off.'* 
For synonymous expressions see 
Avoir. 

Mout, adj, (j}opular)p/rtf//}', hamd- 
some. 

Moutarde,^^ (popular), excrement 
Baril i — , tne behind. For sy- 
nonyms see Vasistas. The ex- 
pression is old. 

En te lan^nt, U dtt : premU garde, 
je vise au baril de tnnutatdc. 

Ltt Suite du t'ifgilt travrsti. 

Moutardier, m. (popular), breerA, 
or " lochas." Sec Vaaislas. 

Et CD face t Je n'ai pas beiotti de iv* 
llLler loa moutardier. — Zula. 



Mouton — Mtdet. 



281 



* 



Mouton, m. (popular), mitttresj, or 
*' mot cart ; lgenera.1) pruontr 
who issetioifatck afellmv'prisofur^ 
and^ hy wittning his cottfidaut,, 
sefks to txtract in/ffrmaHoM ftvm 
himy a " nark.'* 

Comme tu «cni« Bu violon avani lui, il 
nc te doutera pu que tn o un moutoa. — 
VlDOCQ. 

Deux iarte« de coqueun sont k la devo- 
tion de In police : les coqueun libm, «t 
let coqtivun il^lprius auiremeat dit xaia\x- 
Um\.—Mim<'trtt de CoMitr. 

Moutonnailtc,yi (popular), mrwM'. 
Sheep will form a crowd. 

Moutonner (thieves' and police), 
tc pUy th* spy on follow-pHsentrs. 

Cclui qui est mouton court risque d'lire 

OTuni-Jn/ par le> cunipacnnn* . . . auu! la 
police pjuvient-fiUc nicmciit W dtfcidcr Ici 
volrun k mouioimcr leura cainiuades. — 

Moutrot, w. (thieves'), Pr/ff^t of 
p0lue. Le logis du — p th* Pit- 
ftiturt de Police. 

Mouvante, /. (thieves'), /<w-/-jj'^. 

Mouvemeni, m. (swindlers'), con- 
cierge tlans Ic — , doorkeeper in 
te,tp4e u-ith a ^nn^ of swindUrs, 
lor a description of which see 
Bande noire. 

Mouzu, w. (thieves'), woman's 
I'ltaUs^ *' Charlies, or dairies/' 

Mucbe, adj. and m. (prostitutes'), 
polite., timid young man ; (popu- 
lar) excelUtttf ptrftet^ "bully, or 
ripping." 

Muetle,/ (Saint-Cyr School), i/W/y 
exert ise in which endeti purposely 
do not make their muskets ring; 
This is done to annoy any un- 
popular instructor. (Thieves*) 
Muette, (onscieuce. Avoir une 
puce ^ la — , to feel apatt^ of rt' 
morse. 

Mufe, or muffle, m, ami adj. 
(thieves'), mason; (familiar and 
popular) ttuan felioxu ; mean. 



Son t>&ttuier t'^talt montrt! juve mofiB 

(lOur menaccr de la veodre, lunqu'cUa 
'avait qaittd.— Zola, NmuM* 

Mufe, icamp, cad^ " billjr 
bounder." 

Ellea restaient pitet. jeiant timplement 
un " luile mufe ! " dcrriire le dot de* mala- 
droitidoni Ic laloo tettr arrachait un volant. 
—Zola. .VamM. 

Mufr<ic, /. (popular), en avoir une 
vraic — , to Ite completely intoxi' 
cated. See Pompelie. 

Muffeton, muffleton, m. (popu- 
lar), young scamp ; masons ap- 
prentice. 

MufHeman (popular), mean fellow 

Mufflcrie,/ (popular), contemptibU 
action ; behaviour like a coo's. 

Mufle, m, (thieves'), se casser le 
— , to mea with. Termed also 
" tombcr en frime." 

Tel escarpe ou asnsdn ne C4ininetti« 
pat un crime un vcndrcdi, cm »'il t'c«t casitf 
le niutU devant un rattchon (pr£ue).— .1//- 
mairti de Mantieur Claude. 

Mufrcrie,/ (popular), disparaging 
epithet ; — de sort 1 curu my 

/uckt 

Muilar, / (thieves'), ftrc dans la 
— , to U inpn'jont or " iu quod.'* 

Mulet, m, (military), marine artil- 
lery man ; (printer^') compositor, 
or " donkey.^' " In the days be- 
fore steam machinervwasinvcnted, 
the men who worked at press," 
says the Slang Dictumary^ '* the 
pressmen, were so dirty and drun- 
ken a body that they earned the 
name of pigs. In revenge, and 
for no reason that can he dis- 
covered, they christened the com- 
positors 'donkeys.'" (Thieves') 
Mulet, dtxfU, 

Les meosnien, auui onl one toetow 
fa^fn de parler que (c* cousluner*. appe- 
lant laur a-ine Ic grand DiaUle, et leut mc, 
KaiiwQ. Kt rapponant leiir fnrine & ceux 
BuaqueU elle appartient. »i on Icur dcniande 
s'Ua «n OM poiat priofc plua qu'il nc Icur ca 



282 



Muraille — Musicwu 



&ut, Tehpondent ; Le gnnil Oiable m'ein- 
pone. M j'en m.y priiu que psir nuson. Alais 
pour tout ccU Us disent qu'iU oe dnrobcnC 
ricn, car od leur doonc. — Tabdubot. 

Muraille (famiiiar and popular), 
ballrc la — , to he dntnk atui to 
reel ahouit now in the gutter, now 
against Iht walL 

Murer (popular), jc te vas — ! PU 
knock you daivn^ or Vll double you 
up! See Voie. 

U il commrn^a Jk m'embmuer. Ma 
foil comme pour le vcrrc dc vin, il_ n'y 
avail pas de refui. II ue ni« dcplaitait 
pas, cTt homme, II vouhii tTi£me ra'habillcr 
avcc uiiechemi&edr «afemine. Mai» voici 
qu'U me propose de» cHdma que jc ne pou- 
vaift accepter, el qu'il me iDeoace de me 
murer si je dis un mot. — EcJui He Parii, 

MuTon, w. (tiiicves'), salt. 
Muronner (thieves'), to salt. 

Muronniere, /. (thieves'), sait- 

cellar. 

Musardine, f. (familiar), name 
given some forty years ago to a 
more than fast girl, or to a girl of 
indifferent character^ termed some- 
times by English *' mashers," a 
** blooming tanlel." 

On dit une mLiBardine, comrnc jadb 
on disait UDe loreue.— ALuiitic Skcono. 

The synonyms corresponding to 
various epochs are : — Under the 
Restaiiration '*femmeiiimable,"a 
term of little significance. In 
Louis Phiiipne's time, *Morclte," 
on account ol the frail ones mostly 
dwelling in the Quartier Notre 
Dame de Lorette. Under the 
Third Empire "chignon dorc " 
(it was then the fashion, as it 
still is, for such women to dye their 
hair a bright gold or auburn tint), 
or "coco<lelle," the feminine of 
**Q.<iZo6.h,t* yeungdandy. Kow-a- 
days frequenters of the Boulevards 
use the lenn "boudim^," " bou- 



dinc.b^carre.orpschutteux," being 
the latest appellations for the Pari- 
sian *' masher." Tlie term *' mu- 
sardine" must first have been ap- 
plitrd to fast girls frrciuentiug the 
ttals Musard, attendee at the lime 
by all the *' dashing " elements 
of Paris. '*In English polite 
society, a fast young lady,' says 
the Slang Dictionary, ** is one 
who a^ccts mannish habits, or 
nmkes herself conspicuous by some 
unfeminine accomplishment, talks 
slang, drives about in London, 
smokes cigarettes, is knowing in 
dogs and horses, &c. " 

Musie, m. (popular), le — des 
claques, the Moigne, 

MuseK, m, (popular), dunce, 
or '* flat ;" good-for-nothing man. 
Alluding to a muzzled dog who 
cannot use his teeth. 

Musette, y; (popular), rp/iv. Cou- 
per la ^ i quelqu'un, to siUnre 
one, '*to clap a stopper on one's 
mug ;" to eiU one^s threat, 

Musicien, ot. {ih\t\^\di<tionary: 
Viirietv of in/or mer,oi "sni teller;'* 
(familiar) — par intimidation, a 
street melcnliit who obtains money 
from people desirous of getting rid 
of him. 

Jf'y ai retrouv* auw le " mufttrien par 
intitnidaiion," Ihomme i li clarioctte, qui 
s'nrrete dcvuit Ics caftfs du boulevard eo 
faisant mine de porter !t ses Itvres le bee 
de soil iiiitrumetit. I^et cnnsommaieurt 
^pouvanUi &e hfitcnt de lui jctcr quclque 
monnaie aiin dVviter rharmonic. — Eus 
FR^BAti-T, La t-'ie d* Paris. 

1 1, however, occurs occasionally 
that people annoyed by the har- 
monists of the street havt; their 
revenge whilst getting rid of them 
without having to pay toll, as in 
the case of the •' musicien par 
intimidation." One day a French 
orli&t in London, who every day 



Mustqtie — Naser quelqUun. 



283 



WHS almost driven mad by the 
performances of a bond of green- 
coated German musicians, hit 
u^Kin (he fotlowinf; singular stra.* 
tagem. Placing himself at the 
window, and facing his tormen* 
tors, he applied a lemon to his 
lips. The effect was instantaneous, 
as through an association of ideas 
the mouths of the musicians began 
to water to such an extent that, un- 
able to proceed with their sym- 
phony, they surrendered the battle- 
field to the triumphant artist. 
(Popular) Dcs musiciens, btam^ 
alluding to the wind they gene- 
rate in the bowels. (Printers') 
Dc3 musiciens, targe number tif 
t&rrrctiotts made on the margin of 
^m_ Z^' / ^^^kilUd (omposiiors who 

^^H mre unabU to procttd 'Mtth their 

^^F work, 

m Musi 

f arti 

r 

Nageani, ornageoir, m, (thieves*), 
ph. 

Nageoires. /. //. (popular), iarge 
whiikcrs m the shape of pns ; arms, 
or *' benders ;" kanJs, or **fin5.'* 
Un monsieur a — , a prostitutes 
buliy, or *' pensioner.'' For list 
of synonyms see Poition. 

Naif, m. (printers*), enipioyer^ or 
"boss." ThecxpiesAion isscaiccly 
used nowadays. 

Le vieux prcuier resta Mul dtos Tim- 
primerie doat le maltre, autrcineni dit U 
" oatf,' vcnait dc mmuir. — Baljac. 

Narquois, or dritte, m. (old cant), 



Musique,/ (popular), second-hand 
artiiUt ; cad pieces of cloth sewn 
togethtr ; kind of penny foaf 



Tenncd also " fliilc." Also what 
remains in a glass ; (thieves*) «"«• 
forming; informers. 

tAdeuxiimc cUue, que Vtt voleun d^- 
tigneaC »oiu le non de mu«quc est com' 
poiite dc toui Id malfaiieurs 401, apris 
icur UTCsUtion, fc incttent ^ table (dC- 
nonccntX ~Ca h LER. 

Passer & la — , to be plated in the 
prfsttue of infornurs for tdtnti- 
fication ; (caid-sharpers') swind' 
hng at cards, 

Muaiqucr (card-sharners*), to mark 

a card with the naih 

Muaser (popular), to smelly 

Mutil^a, m. //. (military), salditrt 
of the pnuishnunt companies in 
Africa^ who are sent there as a 
peHoJty for purposely maiming 
themselves in order to escape mili' 
tary service, 

Mylord, m. (popular), hackney 
coach, "growler." 



N 



formerly a thievish or vagrant old 

soldi^. 

Drillo ou narquoU aoot des toldau qui 
Inichent la Aammr sous Ic brav et bkttcot 
en mine \ma entifTei cc toiu Id crcux dc« 
vercnes . . , ils oQt fail bonqucroule au 
gnnd coifecf oevculent puetre ««« tujcu 
ni le reconnaitre. — Lt Jnr^on Ut tArgvt. 

Porler — formerly had the signi- 
6catioD of tQ talk the Jargon of 
X'OgalvHfis. 

Nase, m. (popular), nose. 

Naaer quelqu'un (popular), '\% 
equivalent to "avoir quelqu'un 
dan.1 le ncz," to haz-e a strott^^ dis- 
like for one^ to abominate one. 



284 



Navarin — N^grcsse. 



Navarin, m. (thieves'), turnip; 
^popular] scraps of meat from 
butchrrs* stalls retaiUd at a lew 
price to poor people. 

Navet. m, (Tamiliar], hypocrite 
wtfh bland jbolished mannerSy a 
kind of Mr. PecksnifFj/tw/, </«««, 
or "flat," Lc cliainp dc navets, 
the cemetery. 

Jc ne lAJK pu Kulemcat k quel endroil 
du champ de oavets un a cnterr^ k pAUvre 
vieux, j'emii 10 dtfpdL— LuuisE Michkl. 

fFamiliar and popular) Avoir du 
jus de — d.uis Ics vcincs, to be 
lacking in energy', to he a *^ sappy. " 
iJes navets I an ejaculatien of re- 
fusoi. 

Ohi ' les gouUrnfec, oM ! d«* nav«ts I 

— 'H. MONNISR. 

AUo is expressive of incredtility^ 
impossiHlity, Sec N^fles. 

tl Taui avoir fait LroU ans dc Conscn'a- 
toirc pour nvoir parlrr . . . alon on *ait 
dociner aux mou Irur valeur ; niai» Mut 
Ccld ! , , .— De» navcti I— E. JUdntkiu 

I Artists'! Nttvets, rounded arms or 
legs showing ttc muscle* 

Navette, /. (thieves'), pedlar. 

Nazaret, m. (popular), large nose, 
or "conk." Sec Morviau. 

Naze, m. (popular and thieves*), 
fwj^,"smcllcr, orsmclling-chcat." 
The word is borrowed from the* 
Provencal. tor synonyms sec 
Morviau. 

Nazi, «. (popular and thieves), 
venereal disease y '* Venus' curse." 

Naziboter (popular), to speak 
ihrou^h the nose. J 'ai le mirlilon 
houchc, 5a mc fait — , / have a 
eold in the heady that makes me 
speak through my nose. 

Nazicot, m. (popular), tmaii nose. 
Sec Morviau. 

Nazonnant, m. (i>opu1ar), bigttoset 
"conk." See Morviau. 



Nefles,///. (familiar and papular), 
des — ! an expression of refiuai, 
or ejaculation of incredulity. 

11 paralt que cette vicrgc cM boone, 
boDoe ' — i qooi T— A tout. EUe fait des 
miracle* *u per be*.— Des nefle* ! — UOH- 
TBfL. 

Kindred expressions arc : " Des 
navets ! Dc Tanis 1 Tu aums de 
Tanis dans une ccope [ Du flan 1 
Tu t'cn ferais mourir ! Tu t'en 
fentin n<?ter la sotn-ventritre [ 
Mon ceU I Flflte 1 Zut 1 Et U 
SfTur? Des pits 1 I^ peau I 
Peau de noeud I De la mousse ! 
Du vent ! Des emblimes I Des 
vannesl DcsfouillesI Oni'enfri- 
cassc !" which might be rendered 
by, " Walker I All my eye 1 You 
be blowed ! You be hanged ] Not 
for Toe I How's your brolher 
Job? Don't you wish you may 
get it ? " &c.> and by the Ameri- 
canism, "Yes, in a horn." 

Neg, m. (popular), au petit croche, 
rag-dealer. K^, for n^ociant ; — 
en viande chaude, prostitutes 
bully, or *' pensioner. For Ihc 
list of synonyms sec Poisson. 

N£gociante. / (famdiar), uvman 
xvho keeps a $mall shop, and tvha 
pretends to sell gentlemen's gloves 
*r perfumery. When the pur- 
chaser tenders a twenly-lranc 
piece for jxiyment, "Do you re- 
quire change?" the lady asks 
with an inviting smile, the re- 
quired change being generally re- 
turned "en nature. 

Nfcgresse, / (popular), bottle of 
red wine. 
Allons. I;i mire, du piccolo ! et deui n^ 

greucA ik la foil, a'il vous plait. — Ch, Du- 
bois DK GlNrfSS. 

Une — morte, an f^pty hottU, 
one which has ** M. T.^ on il, 
r'.i'. , ** Moll Thompson's mark." 
Termed also "marine." 

Le tax de n(!;retsei murte* crandusait. 
Un cimctifere dc bauteUtcs.— 2ola. 



N^griot — Nen. 



2SS 



■ 



Etouffer, ^rcintcr nnc — , or ^ter- 
nuer sur une — , to tfrinJt a doffU 
of red wine, ** lo crack " i/. Ne- 
grcssc,/rti. 

Qu'U »'m content le vieui propritftaire, 
Otund il viendri pour toucher ton loyer, 
D'voir en entrant tout' la paill' pxr terrc 
Et Ici n<fgrca&'i i ms juob't uutiller. 

Faritian Song. 

Vi^^cssc, parrf/ mad* up in #«/- 
iAm ; (sailors') belt. 

N6^ot, iw. (thieves'), string box, 
•'peter ;" casket. 

Vous avei eniendu ma femme ct mes 
deux nomignardei (tilles) vous boontr (dire) 
(|a« l« n^srioi (coffrct) <uit graa ec qu u 
plombnit (pesut bcaucoup).-»ViDOcq. 

Ncig^c, /. (familiar and popular), 
boule dc — , nt^ro. Termwi also 
'* bamboula, bolte h. ciraj^e, bille 
de pot-au-feii, mal b)anchi,"and 
in tne English cant or slang, ** bil 
o* ebony, snowball, lily-white, 
d&rky, black cuss." 

Nonets, or n^nais, m. pi. (fami- 
liar), u^oman's breasts^ ''Charlies, 
dairies, or bubbies." Termed also 
" a\*ant -posies, avant -scenes, ni- 
chons, deux oeufs sur le plat ; " 
(popular) — de veuve, feeding 
boUie. 

Nep, m. (thieves*]t roieally Jew 
dtaling in t&Hnttrftit diamonds^ 
iham jnvtUiry^ or who seeks to 
sell at a high price the cross of an 
order studded with ^ass pearls or 
paste diamonds, 

Ne-te-g£nc*pa8-dan8le-parc, m. 
(familiar and popular), shi>rt 
Jeuttt. Termed also '* saute-cn- 
barque, pet-en-l'air, montretout." 

Net, ad/, (popular), un atelier — , 
a workshop labootd hy rvorkmait 
who forbid any of thdr ftliffwi to 
accept Tuork there. 

Netioyage, m. (popular), loss of 
all oHfs money at a gamt, or 



" tnucking-out ; " selling of prv 
ptrty ; robbing of property. 

Nettoyi, adj. (familiar and popu- 
lar), given up for dead^ * ' done 
for," or, as the Americans say, 
a **gonecoon ; *' dead, ^'settled;" 
robbed. Etrc — , ty) have lost alt 
one^s money at some game, * * to 
have blcwed it, or to be a muck- 
snipe." Also to be exhausted, 
done up, or " gruelled." La mon- 
naie est nettoycc, the money is 
gone, spent. 

De la jolie fripouille, le» ouvrirn ( Tou- 
joun en nocc. Sc fichant tie I'ouvrage, vou& 
ucbant itu b«au milieu d'unc comnLandc. 
rvparmissaoc quand Icur monnai* esc net- 
loyic — Zola. 

Nettoyer (familiar and popular), 
to sell ; to rob ; to clean out at 
some game, " lo muck out;" /* 
kill, *'to Ao** for one. Se faire 
— , to be killed. (Thieves') Net- 
toyer un bocart, to break into a 
house and strip it of all its valu- 
ables, *' lo do a crib," or to do a 
" ken-crack-Iay." Ncltoyer, w 
apprehend^ "losmug." 

Nez, m. (familiar and popular), 
disappointed look. 

Plus de parts de z&teauz ! II (aUail voir 
lenex dc Bochc— Zola. 

Prendre dans le — , to reprimand, 
'* lo give a wigging." Un — en 
pied de marmite, short nose with 
a thick end, Un — oil il picut 
dedans, turned-up nose, or "pug 
nose." Ncz paise ^ I'encaustique, 
nose wkich shinvs a partiality for 
potations on its owner^s part, or 
" copper nose. " Avoir Ic — sale, 
to be drunk, or "tight." See 
Pompelte. Avoir quelqu'un 
dans le — , to entertain feelings of 
dislike towards one. Faire son 
— , to make a wry face^ to hok 
"glum." 

On le moiiilla encore d'line toum^ g^nfr 
rale ; puis on aUa k la Pme tfiti rtntnr, ua 
petit bousincot ou il y avait un billard. 
Le chapetier fit un i&itaot kmi nei, parce 



286 



Nez-de-chieti — Nid, 



que e'ftah urn naiMn pu trbi propre. 1^ 
■chnick y valait uo fraoc le litre. — Zola, 
L 'A siammtffir. 

AToir le — creux, to le cunning, 
*'m be fly to wot's wot;" /* 
possess perspicacity t 

Oh ! die avait le ner creax, clle tavait 
dejk comment cela devait tounier. — Zou^. 

Mcttre son — dans Ic bleu, or 
se piquer le — , i& fft drunk. See 
Pompette. 

Lui K piqoait Ic net proprement, sans 
qu'ont'en apeifdi. . . . Le Jingueur an coo- 
trairr, devenait d^gcQtant, ne pouvait plus 
boiic urn »c mcttre daiuuo ^tacifooble.— 
Zola. L'Auommatr. 

Net de pompettea formerly meant 
drunkarJ^s nose^ like tliat of an 
"Admiral of the Red," with 
"grog blossoms." 

Nez-de-chien, m. (popular)^ mix- 
(ure of beer and brapuiy. Avoir 
le — , to be dnmJt* See Pom- 
pette. 

Niais, m. (thieves'), thief who re- 
pentSt or who has quaims of con- 
saeme. 

Nias, m. (thieves'), me, ''mynibs;" 
in Italian cant, *'monarco, ormia 
madre." C'est pas pour moa — , 
that'' J net for me. 

Nib, nibergue, niberte (thieves* 
and cads'), *ta ; not ; — dc braise, 
no money, C^z, fait — dans mcs 
blots, thai does not suit me, that^s 
not my game ; — du flanche I Uave 
off! "stow fakinKl" Nib du 
flanche, le gonse t'exhibe, Uave 
offy the man is iooking at you. In 
other terms, "stow it, the gor- 

tcr's leary." Nib dc tous les 
anches ! S'ils te foot la jactance, 
n'entrave pas dans leurs vannes, 
ne Dorgue pas. JCeep dark about 
■4ill our Jobs ; if they try to pump 
youx donU aiiovf yourseif to he 
taken in, do not (onfess. Nib au 
true, or — du true, hoid your 
tonguecibout any job, * ' keep dark. " 



(thieves*), nothing. 



Nib6 (thieves'), hold your tongue^ 
" mum your dubber j" enough, 

Niber (thieves'), to see, " to pipe;" 

to look, *Mo dick." Nibc U 
gontcsse, look at the giri^ or 
" nark the titter." Le rousse te 
nibe, the policeman is iooking at 
you, " the bulky is dicking." 

Nibergue 
"nix." 

E«t-ce que tu coupe* dans les r£ves, lot f 
Quoiqu'capeui fairedca rCvesf nibcrguel 
(ricD),— VlDOCQ. 

Niberte (thieves*), nothing, "nix." 

J'avaii balance le bogue que j'aTaU four* 
Iin<! et }e ne Utrais que niberte en valadca. 
— ViDocQ. U had tArvttfm away tht UHUfA 
fi'htck f had itcUn, mnii J had mcthittg in 
•ny ^keti.^ 

Nicdouille, m. (popular), dunce^ 
"dunderhead." 

Niche,/, (roughs*), house; heme. 
Kappfiquer k la — , to go home. 

Quand qu' all' nppliqu' i la niche, 
£c qu' noai sommes poivrott. 
Care au bainillon d'ta quiche, 
C'e&t noui qu'c&t les do%. 

RicJtfiriN, CActMjcM dtt Gmgnjr. 

A c*le — ! go home! 

Nichons, m. pi. (familiar), bosoms, 
or "Charlies." 

Nana ne fourratt plus de boules de papier 
daii» son corwgc. Des nichons lui ctaicnt 
venui.— ZoiA. 

Nid, ni. (popular), k poussi^re, the 
navel. Un pante saus — k pous- 
siere, Adam. According to a 
quotation in Mr. O. Davies' Sup^ 
plementary English Glossary^ the 
navel being only of use to attract 
the aliment in utero ma/tmo, and 
Adam having no mother, he had 
no use of a navel, and therefore 
it is not to be conceived he had 
any. Un — a punaiscs, a room 
in a lodging- house, where the bed 
is generally a mere " bug- walk. 



Nih'f — Nocer. 



287 



■ 



Un — de noirs, frietts* s^mi- 
nary, alluding tolhcir black vest- 
menu. 

Mi6re, or niert, «. (thieves'), in- 
iHviiiuaJ, " cove, blolte, or cull." 
The Americans say *' cuss." 

Cat le moment il n'y a ptts un nicrt 
daiis U trioK.— ViDoc<}. UfajittUutim^ 
mkrm tkfre't HahMiy en tAt wwut.) 

Niere, accomplice^QX " sttllsman." 
Manger son — , fo inform a^irtst 
an ix£ccmpiice, *' to turn rusiy and 
split," or ** to turn snitch." 
Cromper son — , to sav€ one's 
auonifilice. Un — ^ la manque, 
accomplice not to be trusted. Un 
bon — , a good feUovty or "ben 
core." Mon — , /, me^ "my 
nibs." Termed also mon — bo- 
bcchon. L'n — , fl clumsy fellmu, 

Nif, or nib (thieves'), nothings 
"nix;" no. Termed •'aclc" at 
Christ's Hospital or Blue Coat 
School. 

Mifcr (thieves'), to eeastt *' to stash, 
to stow, or to cheese." 

Migaudinos, m. (popular), sintfU' 
mtHdtd/ellow, or " flat." 

Nikol (Breton cant], meai. 

Ningle, / (literary), gay girl, 
"mot." See Gadoue. 

Niolle, or gniole, m, and adj. 
(popular and thieves'), dunct^ or 
"flat;">?^"A- 

Votif comjircnex qu« je nVuii pas ■! 
nioll« (belt) Uc doniicf mon centre (oom) 
pour mc fairt nctloyer p^r vos rouiMk (v- 
Titer par vot igenuX— Caki-X>* 

NioUe, old hat, 

Niolleur, jm. (popular), dealer in 
old hats. 

Niort, m. (thieves'), name of a 
foufn. Alier, or baltre k — , fo 
deny one's guilt. A play on the 
above name, and nier, to deny. 



Niorte, / [thieves'), JUih^ or 
*• comish." 

Nippc-mal, m, (popular), hadly* 
dressed man. 

Nique, /. (thieves'), €lrc — de 
mcche, to have no share in some 
evil deed. 

EUe e^t nique dc micbe (sant aucun« 
corapUcii^), rtfpondic Puiam d« la Biffe.^ 
Bauac 

Niquedoule. m. (thieves'), dHnee^ 
or *' go-along.** 

Ah ! oh t dit I'Fri*^. te yXk morte ! 
£1 rcrond niqu'doui' s'mit A [ilcurer. 
Kkiiki-ih. 

Nisco, or nix (popular), nothing^ 
**nix ; " no such thing. 

Kl moi I }e m'rn inui bredouiUe t Nisco I 
ma biche.— P. Mauaun. 

Nisco brolsicoto, no money, no 
"tin." 
Nisette, /. (thieves'), olive. 

Niveau, m. (popular), ne pai 
trouver son — , to ^e drunk, or 
" snuffy." Sec Pompctle. 

Nivet, m. (old cant), hemp. 

Nivctte,/. (old cant), hemp-fields 

Nix. See Nisco. 

Noble itrangfcre, /. (liierary), 
five-franc piece, 

Nobrer, or nobler (thieves'), W 
recogniae. Nous sommes nobles 
et files, we are retognited and fot- 
iau/ed, 

Noc, M. (popular), A/ofitArti^, "cal> 
bage-head." 

Noce, /. (popular), de batons de 
chaiietgroftdjolltficatioNtOT '*flare 
up." Also a fight between a 
married couple. Faire la — , /# 
lead a guy life ; to hold revels, 

Nocer. Sec Faire la noce; (popu- 
br) — en Pere Pcinard, to indmgt 
in solitary revels. 






288 



Nocerie — Noix, 



Nocerie. /. (popular), rcvth^ 
** boozing." 

Noceur, m, (popular), one who leads 
a ^y iife, a sort o/^*]Q\\y dog." 

Noceuse, /. (pupular), womaf$ of 
quesn'onabU ckaraeter who shoivs a 
partiality Jor ^Hjd chur, 

Hocher (popular), to ring. Noche 
la retcniissante, ring the beti^ or 

"jerk ihe tinkler." 

NoctambulCf m. (familiar), one 
jond oj rotdng aboi*t oh the Boule- 
vards at night. 

Noctambuler (familiar), to sit up^ 
or rove ahout at nighty ** to be on 

the tile*." 

Noctambulisme, m. (familiar), 
rtrutng about ai night. 

Nocud , m. (popular), sec Flageolet, 
Mon — ! an ejaculation of con- 
tempt or refusal. Filer son — , to 
go ttuay^ "to slope;'* to run 
awayt " to cut the cable and run 
before the wind," in the language 
of English sailors. Feau de — , 
see Peau. 

Nogue, / (roughi'), night, or 
** darkmans." 

Noir, m. and adi. (popular), coffee ; 
— de pcau de ncgrc, miserable 
Wrtif , an assistant of rag-pickers. 
Du — , lead, or " blucy. " Un — 
cle Irois roods sans cogne, a three- 
halfpenny cup of coffee without 
brandy. Pierre noire, slate. Un 
pclii pcre — , a tankard of vAne. 
(Familiar) Le cabinet — , an office 
in which the letters of persons suj' 
pected of being hostile to the govern' 
mertt vere opened previous to their 
being forwarded by the post o^ce. 

Le cabinet ooir, ftupprim>£ en 1830, fut 
rtftabli p«r le m>nirtr« des ftJTAJres ^trao- 
gcre-t. le pi!n^nil S^basiiani. . . . Lc cabinet 
noir ii'exisuii phisde notn sous I'Finpire ; 
il eii^iait dc fail aux Tuilerie». — Mim^ret 
de Mtnsttur Ltnitde. 



"La chambre noire, a eouneii' 
chamber where Napoleon III. re- 
cewed his agents and formed secret 
plans. 

Ce flit dani ce cabinet »ecrei que furent 
r&olu« la mnrt dc Kelch rt reul^vemrrit 
secret de5 premiers fomcnialeun du com- 
plot de rOptfra-Comique.— ;VjiM#i>Rr dt 
Aliffuitur CiAutU, 

Bande noire, a gang of stcindlers, 
ijee Bande. The Echo de Faris, 
August, 1SS6, mentions a gang of 
this description which formed a 
vast association and victimized 
wine niercbaols in all parts of the 
country : — 

Lei usocie's kc divisAient en quatre au^ 
^oric« : 1" "Le» Faisaiu;" a" " LcfiCour- 
tien il la mode." 3* " Le* Concierge* 
daiulc tnouyemcat;' 4*"Lcs Fuiilleurn." 
Les "Courtiers & la mode" tftaicnt dci in- 
dividus qat avaient rtfuKl i m faire ain^'er 
comme reprtsenlanu par des maitooi> de 
grcM. Let " t'oiuuu," pot l'intcnti£diairc 
OCX " courtiers, ** et avec la complauancc des 
"ctviciergesdans le mouvemeni,"ke £aisaieni 
falrc dn eiivuit dr piicr« de viiiv wjit en 
gare, M>it hk doniicilc Lcs " Fuulleurs" 
achetatent ce& piece« cle vtn \ vil priK ct IcS 
reveodaiem auui cher que po»uble. 

(Saint-Cyr School) Une uoire fon- 
taine, an inkstand. 

Noisette, /. (popular), avoir uti 
asticot dans la — , to be "cracked." 
For synonyms sec Avoir. 

Noix,/. (popular), e&cailleuxde — 
(obsolete), slow man, ** slow- 
coach." 
£t Dicu, qudt ucBtlleux de imx. 
Qui vcnex cy d« tout cottez, 
Ou, par la foy ijue je votu doys, 
IJ'unc gnoK pcUc dc bo]-% 
Vo» iroui de cul teront sctiu. 

/■'ttn* m^uvette. 

Unc coquille de — , a very small 

glass. (Military) Gauler des — , ta 
fence badly. An allusion to a man 

knocking down walnuts from a 

tree with a rod. 

A ce comptc-tik on ne doil pas faire de 
Braods progr^ en e5Cnmi:? — Eh ! jtKte> 
mcnl ... on a beau £tre cavalier et avoir 
toujoun le bancal au cOii ... on barboit* 
. . . OQ gauk des noix. — Dubois uu 
Cennes. 



NotH — Nourrice, 



389 



Nom, m. (theatrical), actor of noit^ 

"star." 

Bonrgoio preoul des ^ives d« Cod- 
•ervaiotrc pour accompaj^ner too "ftom,* 
i]ucIqii«foi« autki dcft cabouus dc provtnce. 

— Hi. MONTEIL. 

(Popular) Un — de Dieu, dts- 

parapn^ ef'itket^ the equivalent 
being, in English slaflgt "bally 
fellow." 

L'homme de chamhrc, ao caft I Port- 
I'y sues cc 00m d« Dim-Hi !— G. CoVRTft- 
UNB. 

Nombril (card -players"), de reli- 
gieuMT, the lur of lards^ or " pig's 
eye." {Tliicvcs') Nombril, noon. 

Nonnant, m., nonnante, /. 
(thieves'), /rirw^. 

Nonne, / (thieves'), abettor of a 
pukpocket. The accomplices press 
rountl the victim during the thteTs 
operations. The proceeds of the 
robbery pass at once into the 
hands of one of the "nonnes," 
called ••coqucur," or '•bob." in 
English cam. Ftire — , to fomt 
a tmaU crowd in the street so a.t 
to attract ii/Urs, and thus to 
fadtitate a pickfoikets operations. 
Those who thus aid a confederate 
are termed "jollies " in the 
English slang, 

Nonncur, m. (thieves'), accomplice. 
Termed by English t)»ieves 
"stallsman, or Phtlipcr." The 
" Philipcr " stands by and looks 
out for the police while the others 
commit a robbery, and calls out 
'• Philip 1 " when anyone ap- 
proaches. According to Vidocq, 
Uiere is a variety of "nonneurs 
who are merely in the service of 
other thieves. Their functions 
are to watch , to hustle the intended 
victim, and to make off with the 
valuables handed to them by their 
principaL The "nonneur** is 
not always rewarded by a share in 
the proceeds of the robbery ; he 



generally receives wages for the 
day proportionate to the profits 
obtained in the '* business." 
Manger sur ses nonneurs, to in- 
form against one* s accomplices^ **io 
blow the gaff, or to turn snitch." 

Lt quvt d'ocil lui jkbotu 
Man^e tur lea nonncure, 
Lui lire unc caroiie, 
Lui moniant la coulcur. 

ViiKKy, A1(m»irtt, 

Norsuer(ihieves' and cads'), to ou'h 
to a triple ; to eonjess. Si Ic 
cuiieux te fail lajactance n'entrave 
pas, ne norgue pas, Jf the judee 
examines you t do not fall into the 
snare, do not confess. 

Noaigues, ornousailles (lhieves*)i 
we^ ourselm, 

Notaire, m. (popular), bar of drink- 
in^-shop ; landlord of drinking- 
shop, "boss of lushing-crib ;•* 
tradesman ivho ail<nos credtt. 

Note,/ (dandies'), ^tredansla— , 
to he well up in events of the day; 
to be a ma9t of the "period." 

Notcr (Ilreton cadgers'), night. 

Notre, m, (thieves'), accomplice, or 
' ' stallsman ; " " one of our mob. " 

Nouet (Breton cant), diod drunk. 

Noueur, m. (thieves'), accomplice, 
or " stallsman." 

Noujon. m, (thieves'), />-*. 

Noune, or nonne, m. (thieves'), 
accomplice who follows in the jrake 
of a pickpocket and receives the 
stolen property, "bob." 

Nourrice,/. (thieves'), /<?wa/^ who 
purchases stolen property, or 
**fence." (Familiar ami popular) 
£t les roois de — (ironical), and 
the rest. Cettedamc a trente ans. 
£t les mois de nourrice I This 
lady is thirty years old. And the 
resit UndepuccleurdeDourrices, 
a simpleton ^ a "duffer;" a silly 
Lovelace, 



290 



Nourrir — Num/ro. 



Nourrir (thieves'), une nffaire, U 
ftrtcancert a Siheme /or a theft or 
murder. 

Nnitrrir line affaire, c'eU favour ea per- 
ftpccttre. en atcc»d»ni le momeni propke 
pour lex^-UlioD.— VlDOCij. 

Nourrir un poupanl, or un pou- 
pon, svnonytHQtu 0/^^ Qourrir une 
aHaire." 

Chacun donnait dlx-huil ans \ ce Kar^on 
qui devnil avoir noum ce putipoo (ctHn- 
p\o\i, prf pwf ce cnme) peodiuil un mou. 
— Balzac. 

Nourrisseur, m. (popular), eathtf^- 
house keeper, or '* Liois of a grub- 
bing-crib;" (thieves') thiej xoho 
a Ifnig time he/orehimd maka every 
preparation with the view 0/ com- 
mitting a robin ry &r crime. 

Lc» noums\eun pr^m^itent leur« coups 
dc longue main, et nc se hAurdent pan & 
cueitlir la poire avaot qu'eite a« wit ndre. 
— ViuacQ. 

Kourrisseur, hottubreaher who 
devotes his attentions to houses or 
apartments •whose tenants are away 
en It Journey, such houses Ixjing 
lernied " dead 'uns " by English 
"buster*." 

Ncusailles, or nouzaiUes 
(thieves'), tw, oursehes. 

Je cfoik que nous avoni il£ dowt^ par 
le chjne qui n'est etj(artf de chci noutaille* 
avri: iiie» t'ruviuiiu. — ViDOCQ. (/ tkimJe w* 
A^tt hetn imjermed agnimst hy the hmh 
tuho r*H aUHty jntm our ftmce with my 
eiotAei.) 

Nouveau jeu. m. (literary), new 
model ; new fashion. 

NouveauU, /. (prostitutes'), faire 
sa — , is to take to a fresh ' ' beat- '* 

Nouvelle,/ andadj. (raniiliar), a la 
main, short newspaper /Paragraph 
containing same more or lest witty 
aphorism or joke ^ *' lil-bil ; " — 
couche, the "coming" people. 
La — , the penai settlement of New 
'CaUdania. Passer a la — , to be 
tronxported^ ''tolumpthclightcr," 



or "to serve Her Majesty for 
nolhing." (Military) Faire une 
descenie sur de nouvelles cote*, a 
jen tie mots which has reference 
to the searching by imprisoned 
soldiers on the person of a comroilt 
whose first visit it is to the ceil, in 
order to get possession of any mtmty 
he may have secreted about him. 

II nw «cfnble que ca >coi la chair fnilclie 
par ici.— Moi dc meme : et tl m'e^ avis 
que nous alloas avoir Ji faire une " desccntc 
«urde nouvelles cdte^" — CKARLUi Ouboir 
DH Gk.mmu, Le Troupier tet fu'it est A 
chevat. 

Novembre 33, m. (military), oj^cer 
or non-commissioned o^tcer who 
strictly adheres to military regula- 
tions ; also a stnu which contains 
all kinds of condiments. 

Noyau, m. (military), recruit^ 
•' Johnnv raw." In llie slang of 
the workshop or prison, a new- 
comer. (Popular)AvoirdesnoyauXj 
ta hcrt>e money ^ or ** tin. " 

Nozigue (thieves'), us. 

T'as done uffe de nofifiuc t— ViDOCQ. 
(^ re yim then a/raid oj tts J) 

Nult,y. (journalists'), bourgeois de 
— , police ojicers, or detectives, in 
plain clothes, 

Mon ami d'Hcrvilly appelle ces terfeots 
de ville d^uisea de« " boiirceoiade nuit ;" 
rex]jrc%»ioncxt juste et com ique. — Feancis 
KNNr 

Numiro, m, (familiar and popular), 
on«, legs, or "'Sliankss niare." 
Prendre la voiture, or le train 
onzc, to uKtlk ; termed facetiously 
"pedibuscura jambis." Etred'un 
bon — , to be grotesque or duil, 
Grus — , brothel, "flash drum, 
academy, or nanny-shop." Thus 
called on account of the number 
of large dimensions placed over 
the front door of sucn establish- 
ments ; reco^izable also by their 
whitewashed window-panes. I^ 
— cent, the tKC. or "Mrs. 
Jones. ** A play on the word sent. 



Num&ot/^Oi'case, 



191 



Num^ro sept, rn^-picher^s kook^ 
Jc connais loii — (threateningly), 
/ knffw tvho you arc I This latter 
ejaculation seems to be an awful 
threat in the moutlus of Eni^U&h 
cads. Jc relicns ton — (ihrealen- 
ingly), y// ffo/ for^ft yput Uac 
filie k — , explained by quotation. 

II y a trois clacae« ii« prottitu^et : t* l«i 
litlcs k numdro va fUle« dc bonJel : z" lo 
fillet en ru-te ou fillcs )ftul<!e% | ]* In AlleA 
in*oumii£* ou fillcs cUndcsuDCA. — Lfto 

(Cocottes') Le — un, A^ who iutps 
AgirL 

(^ I'ainanl d'Amanda f . . . Oall Ah! 
mau, lu •«i«, cb^, c'c*t pas son oum^ro 
lut.— GmtviM. 

Num^roti, o^'. (familiar), char — , 
cab^ '*&holul, railler, or etqwIct.** 

El Mutant dan« un cbar num^rot^ vou« 
vous fcriu coaduire chcx ellc— P. Ma- 
HAUN. 

Num6rote tes 08 (popular), get 
ready for a gi>od thrashings or /*// 
trtaJt citry bene in y^ur hody^ 
words generally uttered previous 
to a Kt lo. Varied also by the 
amiable invitation. ** Viens qu« je 
te mange le iici ! " 

La rigolade tounuJi aux quer*11«s et 
au coiips. Un grand diabtc d^penaitlj 
fuculaii : *' Je imm te dtmulir, DuoaCrote 
tes OS I "—Zola. 



Nymphe. /. (common), giri of in' 
different <haracter ; — dc Guio^e. 
negresSf a female "bit o' ebony; 

— verte, abiinthe^ the beverage 
being green. 

N*y pas couper (military), to he 
eonfined in themiord room or cells^ 
•' to be roosted." Literally /* ^ 
prevented from shtrking one's 
duties, or deceiving one's sttperiors* 

Ah ! tu «t garde de nuit, fit iJ ; eh bien. 
aUeodft, moa vieux, tuii\3% t>a« y couper ! 

— <^uot, y cuupcrf Inirb k malheiircux. 
Mais I'autre <cuni«if de colire. I) beu- 

glait :— . . . LaiftAC faire, va, je va» I'dire ao 
migor, el lu n'y coupcrm* pat de lea itiun/e 
joura dc bolte !— G. Coliktkliki. 

Also to be prevented from taking 
adx'OHtagie of others^ ^"taking a 
rise out of them." Vous n'y 
coupcrez pas, /*// stop your ** little 
game." 

Ah ! hurla-t-il alon, vout faiiM d« Te*- 
pril I Eh bien, mon petit ami. allex vous 
rhabiller, je vuuk Ache mon billet tjiie voiu 
n'y oouperes pa>. — G. CouarauNK. 

N'y pas couper de cinq ans dc 
biribi, not to esiape five years* ser- 
vice in the '* Compagyties de disci- 
p/ine," or punishment (ompanies 
IM Afriea, 

Vou% ava beau ^re de h rtatu, illw, 
vouB n'y coiiperez paideoMi aiiade biribL 
— G. COUKTIILINE. 



Ob^liscal, or obilisqual, adj. 
(common), sfltndid ; wonderfuit 
imtrveUouSi *' crushing." 

Splendid*, avenglant, ob«luqual t Vn 
ban pour la De'ophylc.— P. Hauaum. 

Observasse, / (popular), remark. 
For observation. 



Obusier, «, (military), the hekinJ, 

Occaee,/. (general), opparlunitje. 

En ce bas monde, il dc taut jatnaU perdce 
de s'ainu>er.— £. MoMTatL. 



M *re d '— , pretended mother, 
(Popular) CEil d' — , g(*ist eye, 
iThieve*') Chaue d' — , glass eye. 



2Q2 



Occasion — (Eil, 



Oeeasion,/ (thieves*), ettHdle-stick, 

Occir (ranii)iar), used jocularly, /« 
kill, •'toputoncoutofhismisery." 

Occuper (thieves*), s* — depolilique, 
to tJctort money from persons by 
threats 0/ Jbcitfturet, 

Les hommcs oni ae livreot au genre d'e»- 
croquene dit cnanuise cl qui (Uo« Icur 
arsol, pr^tendenii.'occup«rde politique. . . 
Kpi^vulcnt VIII \ry hjbituiJcs vicicuac* de 
certain^ itidtviduft, pour lea atUrcr, par 
I'app^i de Icun passiom secritca, daiu dcs 

fnhy^Ki oil Wt. ran{onn«nt caiu peine leur 
ioii(eu*c fojblci**.— TabdiE-U, £tttte At/- 
dicfi-lf^U tur itx uttmtatt atijc fmamrt. 

Ochea, or lochcs,///. (popular), 
earst " wattles, or lugs." 

Ocr*as, m. pi. (Saint-Cyr cadeU'), 
shofs. 

Oculaire astronomique, m, (bil- 
liard players'), two haits tottihing 
one iiHi>tAer, or •' kissing.'* 

Odeur de gousset, /. (obsolete)^ 

money. 

(,^ (ail d'honi luron* qui ont 1'odrur du 

50IUSCC chenumcnt forte. P'alloit lea srugcr 
'la boune laiMusc— j^mmmmmj li ta 

Crtc^Mf, 1764. 

^il, m. [rnmil'mr and popular), 
amtfricain, sharp eye, 

Tu voU clair, ma vieille ! — Oh ! on 1 de 
ToeU.— L'lfdamericaJn t Quandaa ufaicla 
campac')* d'Afiique ! — E. Monteil. 

Taper dans 1' — , to take one's 
faney. CEil borde d'anchois, in- 
Jiamed eye ; — de hfxyxiy ^r'e/ratte 
piece ; — de yerre, eye'giass ; — 
d*occase. SeeOccase. CEil en 
dedans is nsed to express the 
duUy loik-lustre expression of a 
drunkard^ s eye. 

Prii d'abMathc— ftelon la louable habi- 
tude- Hurluret prtfiidait la c^r^inonie en 
M qiiaUi^ de capitaine commandant, le« 
potrnetH enfoutii dans Ica pochcs, t'oril CB 
OCdan*.— G. COURTIUNE. 

G-Iil en tirelire, eye with amorous 
expression ; — marecageux, eye 
itnth kiilin^ expression ; ^ qui 



dit rut, or merde, k Tautre, s^int- 
inff eye, '* swivcl-cyc." A V — , 
^atis. 

L'abM R. . . . qui »'yconnalL, traits un 
pen leseafaiititcuniiiie^apruK^gce Annette ; 
tl lea exploile : lis travaillcnt "a I'lril" 
pour un saUire au moint insigniftant et 
pour tine becqoct^ de rayo(s,acconipa4{n^ 
d'hofttieft de tempft en temps.— Fkamci* 
Ehnk* Le Sm^imt, 

Avoir r — , to have credtty *' tick, 
jawbone, or day.** Faire 1' — , ia 
ailovf eredit. Crevcr un — i 
quelqu'un, to refuse one credit, to 
refust him "ready gilt tick ;" to 
give one a kick behind, "10 loe 
one's bum," or " to land a kick.** 
L' — est creve, no more credit. 
The following announcement is 
sometimes to be read on shop 
windows : " Credit est mort ; les 
mauvais debileurs lui ont crcv^ 
I'oeil," which might be rendered 
by •* touch pot, touch penny." 

*' We know the aiuom of luch boui««,** 
continues he, " 'tis touch pot, touch penny.* 
— Gkaves. S/trttHot QmixtiU. 

Ouvrir V— de 20 francs, dc 30 
francs, &c., to give credit for 20 
francs, iS-f. Avoir dc V — , or du 
chicUf to hutjf e/egance, to iV"tsing- 
tsing." Fairedel' — iunefemme, 
to court a reoman. Mon — ! is ex- 
pressii'e of re f mat ; may he ren- 
dered by ** don't you wish yoti 
mayget tt !'* or the Amcncam-im, 
"yes, in a horn." See Nifles. 
Avoir de I*—, du cheveu, et de U 
dent is said of a woman who has 
preserved her good looks. Se niettre 
le doigt dans 1' — , to be mistaken, 
S'en batlre 1' — , not to cnre a 
straiu, a " hang. " Un tai>e k 1'—, 
a one-eyed fxsn, or a '•seven-sided 
animal,'* as 'Mie has an inside, 
outside, left side, right side, 
forcsidc, backside, and blind 
side." Taper dans 1'— k quel- 
qu'un, fo please one^ to suit one. 
Taper de 1' — , to j/'^, "to 
have a dose of balmy." Tortillcrt 



CEilkts — Otgnon, 



293 



or toomer dc I* — , to die, "to 
kick the bucket." Avoir un — 
au beurte noir, to kaz'e a bUuk eye, 
or eyes in '* half-mourning." 

Mftti it aMrcul nilit-L.-i'nriliaile, qui Ittail 
<C«Icnient raftche. Bitrt mvati un txil au 
bcurrs noir. qaclque coup de potng attrvptf 
la veUW.— Zola, L'An^mmoir. 

Dcs yrux au beurre noir, bituk 
tyes^ *'in mourning." The pos- 
sessor of IhcK is said in pugilistic 
slang to have his " peepers 
painted," or to have hia "glaziers 
darkened. " 

(Eillets, m, pi. (popular), eyts^ 
*' top lights, or peepers." Cligner 
dcs — , to wink. 

CEuf, w. (popular), head, or "nut." 
Cnsser son — , to have a mis- 
tarrtage. Un — sur le plat, 
twenty-Jht fmncs {a silver Jit'e- 
franc piece and a twenty-Jrane 
go/d com). Des oeufs sur le plal, 
bfciik eyes, or "eyes in mourning.*' 
Also imait breasts. 



N'allet pai m'dire aii'une fcmme qui n'a 

au'dcux ixufs tur te pl» jKo^ft Kur la place 
'armc«, pcul avoir unc fluxinn vraiictn- 



hUUe k unc pcrsonnc avanta^cc commc la 
camniandjintc T — CharLKS Lutov. Lt 
Colonet Kamatiti. 

Officier, «, (popular^ -working con- 
Jfitioner; assiitant waiter at a 
(iifi ; (gamcstcis') — dc tango, or 
de topo, eheat, *' lame cheater, or 
hawk.*' A ptay on the words 
"carte topographique;" (thieves') 
— de la manicle, swindler; (mili- 
Ur>) — de gu<Jrite, a private 
Mldier ; — payeur, eomrade who 
treats the compa ny to drtnk. 

Officieux, m. (ramilior), man-ser- 
vant. 

Ogre, PI. (popular), wholesale rag- 
dealer. Formerly one who kept 
am offiee for prmiding substitutes 
for those who, haz'ing dratt>n a ba*/ 
number at the conscription, had 
to sen-e im thi army ; usurer ; 



(thieves*) receiver of stolen /rw- 
perty, or * ' fence ; landlord of a 
wine-shop frequenled by thieves, 
or " boss ofcross-crib ;" (printers') 
compositor -who works by the day. 

Ogresse, / (thieves*), proprietress 
of a wine-shop fretfnenied by 
thieves, or ** crois-crib '" pn»prie» 
tress of a brothel. 

Oie, / (familiar), la petite — (ob- 
solete), preliminary caresses^ 
better explained by quotation. 

Cc Mnt Ie« petiies favcun qu'acoordsot 
let (etnnir^ h leiin anunM, romme pe<tl« 
haitcn tendrcm, altnuchcmenU ct autre* 
badineries, qui condui«ent inMmiblcinent 
plut loin. La petite oie, c'eat tiroprvment 
In prelude* dc TanKmr.'— La Roujt, Dkt. 
i. ffmiqtie. 

Oignei, m. pi. (popular), aux 
pet its — , excellently, in first-rate 
stylA. For aux pclits oignons. 

Oignon, m. (popular), money, or 
" blunt.'* For synonyms see Qui* 
bus. It has been uid that the 
term '* blunt " is from the French 
*' blond," sandy or golden colour, 
and that a parallel may be found 
in brown or browns, the slang for 
halfpence. This etymology, it has 
been said again, may be correct, 
as it is home out by the analc^ 
ofsimilar exprc^ions ; blanquillo, 
for instance, is a word U!«d in 
Morocco and southern .Spain for 
a small Moorish coin. The *'as. 
per " {atrnpitv) of Constantinople 
IS called by the Turks akcheh, 
/./., little white. It seems to me 
more probable, however, that 
the word is derived from blanc, 
an old French coin, or from the 
nature of the coin itself, which has 
a blunt circular eflge. Arranger 
aux petits oignons, to seold vehe- 
mently, " to bully-rag." Ch^ne 
d'oipnon^, ten of cards. Champ 
d'oignons, see Champ, II y a 
de I' — , there is much groaning 



Oiseau — OmnicrocJte, 



and ptashing of Ueth, An allu- 
sion to ihc team brought to the 
eyes by the proximity of onions. 
Pclcr dcs oignons, to scold, " to 
give ft wigging." (Familiar and 
pojnilnr) Knire quclquc those aux 
pelils oig^ons, to do iomtthtHg €X' 
tlUntiy^ in first-rate style. 

Vous lavez, die est coca&s« votre chanfton, 
et vou« I'afci dtftaill^ . . . aux pctiu 
oisnons !— E. Momtriu 

Un — , a Lirge watt-hy *' turnip." 

Oiseau, m. (popular), fairc V — , fo 
pUiy the foot. Aux ot^eaux, very 
fine, or very ^fiW, exceUent^ per- 
fect^ " out-aml-out, first-clasa. ' 

Ca m' paroti bicn tap<!. "aax oiseaux," 
mamtcUc. Fourrcx im p«u la main ruus 
rciti;>ci(;nr pour voir tmii I'fini dTouvrage. 
— Saimt-Firmin, Lt Galattt Savtiirr. 

The origin of this expression 
comes, no doubt, from certain 
bindings in fashion in the eigh- 
teenth century, which bore birds 
in the comers. People would 
say then, unercliure auxoi5«aux. 
Se donner des noms d' — , is said 
ironUaiiy of gushing levers tvAo 
give one another jond apftlla- 
ihm. Oi*«au dc cage, prisoner., 
"canary;" — fatal, rrint'. The ex- 
pression reminds one of Virgil's — 

Sxpe ilnutra cava pnnJixit ab ilicvcuroix, 

and of La Fontaine's — 

Un corbeau 
Tout \ I'heure annon^ait malbcur \ quelque 
oi«raii. 

Olive de savetier, / (popular), 
turnip. Sec Changer. 

Ombre, /. (general), prison, or 

".|u.k!." 

Kile svra condamne« dans la eerbcroent 
dcU PouraJIIc, ci (rlciifft pour rivilaiion 
aprts un an d'ombrc !~ Balzac. 

A r — , in prison^ in *'quod." 
Meltrc quelqu'un k V — , to kill 
one^ *' to do for one." See Re- 
froidir. 



Omelette, / (military), proLticat 
joke whi<h eonsists in turning 
topsy-turvy the h^l of a sleeping 
soldier ; — du sac, similar opera- 
tion performed on the contents of a 
knapsack. 

Ometcrc (thieves'), 1'—, to h'lt 
htm. 

Omnibus, m, (popular), ox-erflnff 
of litfuids on the counter of a wine- 
ship collected in a tank and re- 
tailed at a loto price ; glass hold* 
ing a demi-setier of tvine. On 
some wine-^hops in the suburbs 
may yet be seen the inscription : 
'* Ici on prcnd I'omnibus.* Un 
— , a prostitute, or " mot." Lite- 
rally one who may he ridden by alt. 
For synonyms =iee Gadoue. Om- 
nibus, extra usiiter at a restan- 
rant or cafi ; also one who loafs 
about the streets of /'oris without 
any visible means ofliz'eHkood. 

Omnibus, baltcur depttv^. i.-'e>L-Jt*dir«dcf 

Scn% que I'on nocoiitfc »uf tutu le$ point* 
« Pans comme tcs vc'iiciiIm doot ila 
porleni le nom, mali i^ui dilftretit d« ceux- 
ci en ce qu'iU n'ont ni cmileur, uieaftciane, 
ni lanicme pour indiqucr oil \\s vunl ct u'ob 
its viennenu— Paul. WAHAUtrr. 

Attendre 1' — , to itvu't for on/t 
glass to be filled ; (thieves*) — de 
coni, hearse ; — i p^gres, friscm 
van, or *' black Maria." 

Omnibusard, m. (popular), beggar 
•>vho plies his trade in omnibuses. 
He pretends not tu have suflficitnt 
money wherewith to pay his fare, 
and by a pitiful lale awakens the 
compassion of the passengers. 

Omnicochemar k la colic, m. 

(thieves'), bus driver. *l'hus cal1e<i 
bccauhe he seems t.tuck to bis 
box. 

Omnicroche,/. (lhic>es'),ffw«i'^«/j 
"chariot." Fairc I' — , to p*\k 
pockets in an omnibus, an opera- 
tion which goes among Fnglish 
thieves by the name ol "chariot- 



On—Orbite, 



^95 



Imiiing." Gaule d' — , bus driver 
TernwS also cchalos d' — . 

On (thieves'), k sa gin, here is ; — 
a lavares, tUunktn man. On 4 
HI gin on k lavar^s, hen is a 
drunken man. 1 have given the 
cxprcsstDD in my informant's own 
s)jellitig. {PupiiJar) On pave I 
uvrds which mean thai a eertain 
ttreei ix to he avoided for /ear of 
meeting a creditor. 

Exclanucion pttiorv«que qui eiprinu 
r^ffroi d'un d^biieiir am«fi^ jut lu^ard a 
9awcr daitMinc nicci^ «: trouvc un "lonp." 
I^ "irpo" tJeViieur fiil alor^ un e>rcu!t 

Plus ou moins lonj; pour cviter U rue o(i 
"on p»ve."— llouTMV. 

(Familiar and popular) On dirut 
du veau, ironifoi ejaculation of 

Ici-1>Ki, rhaniti tur tcrre 
Cbcrthc \ faire du nouveau ; 
Soil an ersm pour U guerre. 
Suit \ di^inler d<t I'cati. 
C'e que i'veujt fair* t\t pratique : 
Changer : "On dirait du vcau ** 
Par c<tie phra«e plu» <otrKi<iue : 
Va done, eh ! foumeau t 
A. QuevaiAL'x 

Onchets, m, //. (mih'tnry), partie 
tl' — , a duel. Oncbcls, properly 

spellieans. 

Ccit-lk-dire que tn cs dans rinterttion 
<l'eiiLam)!r unc ^ecocide partie d'oochel^, 
conB^ucmmcnt.— C Du»)i» ua Gbmkbs. 

Oncle, m. (popular), usurer^ 

Ce mot *^*irboH*e Tusure, c^imme dans 
la laosue pupulatre ma tame st([Oi6e le prct 
Kir cage. — Baliac. 

Mon — du pr6t, p4vtmhroktr's, or 
*' lug-shop.' (Thieves') Oncle, 
Jailer, or *'jiggcr-diibbcr." 

Onclesse, / (ihicves'l, Jailer's 

wife, 

Ondoyeuse, /. (thieves'), wash- 
kixnd ifiisin* 

Ongle, m. (popular), croche, miser, 
or " hunks. ' Avoir le& ongica 
croches. ta bt dectitfui^ not aver- 
serupulffus. 



Onguent, w. (old cant), money^ or 
"palm grease." See QuibU8. 

Onze (ramilior), du — gendarme, 
extra lar^ sisefar^cva, 

Se* vaftivs mains aux doigts tfcantfK, 
chauu^es de nnii pre«quc btancv, dont Ui 
potnture nc ocvnit point eire tntcncure & 
cc que Ton appclle raiiuli^einent Ou "onto 
gcodarme." — /.« Mut d'Ordrr. 

Op*, m. (l>ou!evards'), for Opera, 

Le premier bol de t'Op', ou. pour mieuK 
parl«r, le premier bal ma.sqiitf de l'< ip^ra, 
Ml Ic cnmnienrcmeni de Terc del plauir*.— 
MlHLlTON, Qil BLu. 

Op^rateur, m. (thieves'), exe^u- 
tiouer. 

Op^TCT {thieves*] t to gui/lotiu^. See 
Fauch*. 

Opineur hesitant, m. (popubr), 
Juryman. 

Opiumiate, m. (familiai), one tvho 
smokes opium. 

Oranger, m. (populai), uvmam*t 
breasts^ " Charlies, dairies, or 
bubbles." Termed aUo " oeufs 
sur la place d'arme^, avanl-posles, 
avant-sccues, ncnai&." 

Oranges,/ //. (popular), icochonsp 
po(aioesy " iipuds, or bog oranges." 

I^ pommc de lerre est au&utAi taltitfa 
par I'argot d'orangc \ cocliooft.— Uaijac. 

Potatoes are also termed "mur- 
phies," probably from the Irish 
national liking fur them. They are 
sometimes called •'Donovans,*' 
At the R. M. Aca<Icmy fried 
potatoes go by the name o| 
'* greasers." Des — sur lelag^re, 
Vfoman^s breasts, ** Cliarlies, bub- 
bles, or dairies.** 

Le* Kron Souris, dont Talnifc arait fttf 
KtimomnUfcU ReinedcsAmuoDe&.eu^ifard 
^ certatne opfralHia cfairurgicale qui lui 
avait enlev^ " une de* oraoce* d« km 
^ug^rc"— P. Mahauh. 

Orbite, m. (popular), se calfeutrer 
1'—, to close one's eyes. 



296 



Ordi nairt — Ontie, 



Ordinaire, m. (familiar and popu- 
lar), laup and boiltd Uef at a 
small r£itaura$ti. Les ordinaires. 



Ordonnance, f. (military), papier 
qui n'cst pas d' — , bank-notes. 
I) 'ordonnance, properly regulo' 
tion. The French soldier's pay 
does not, as a rule, enable him to 
have bank-notes in his possession ; 
hence the allusion. 

Ordonne (nopular), Madame J' — , 
is said of a wman wlw likes to 
order people about, of an imperious 
person, 

Quand %'live Madame J'ordoane, 
PcniAnd' son chocolac 
I>c[>«c)iec-voiu, U bonne, 
Sutlout n'cn biivcc pas. 

K&liv, i'utairt (ACnhimirt. 

Ordre, m. (military), copier I' — , 
to do fatigue duty. Military wags 
when detailed for fatigue duty will 
KometimcM say, ]>uintin(; (» their 
brooms, that they are going to 
copy the order. (Familiar) 
Ordre moralien, ironical appella- 
tion applied to the Conservative 
party by their opponents in 1S79. 

Ordur, w. (familiar and popular), 
gpld-plated brass. A play on the 
woids or, gold, and ordure, filth. 

Ordures, / pi. (journalists'), bolle 
aux — , special column in certain 
newspapers, resirvtd^of course, for 
^ofattons from hostile contempo- 
raries. (Popular) BoIieaux — ,M^ 
breech. See Vasistas. 

Oreillard, m. (popular), ass^ or 
*' moke." 

Oreille k I'enfant, / (familiar). 
avoir fait une — , ij said if a man 
who has done all that is necessary, 
in co-operation loith others, to be 
able to think that a child s paternity 
may be traced to him. 



Orffcvre, m, (familiar and popular), 
facetiously used for NIorphee. 
£tre dans les bras de 1' — , to be 
asleep, or ** in Murphy*t annt.*' 

Organe,/ (thieves'), hunger. 

Orgfue, m. (popular), jouer de I' — , 
to snore, '* to drive one's pigs to 
market." (Tliieves') Orgue, man, 
or '* cove." Manger aur V — , or 
jaspiner de I' — , to peach, to in- 
form, " to blow the gaff, lo turn 
snitch." Mon — , ton — , son — , 
Ac, /, thou, he, myself, fr**-. 
Parlcr en — , or en icrgue, en aillc, 
en nmche, to ditguise ivordi by the 
use of these words as su£ixes. 
•' Vouzierguc trouvaille bonorgue 
ce gigoimuche?" Dc you think 
this leg of mutton goodt A ques- 
tion put to a jailer by the cele- 
brated mgncCartouche— a Fiench 
Jack Shcppard and Dick Turpin 
put tngetlicr — with a view to as- 
certain whether his profcrred bribe 
was deemed sulhcient. 

Orient, w. (thieves'), gold, or 
" rcdge." Une bopue d' — , a 
goldivatch, or "red un." 

Kebouivf done ce itirrt, »e« maltajte* e< 
too pile »oat en uladc dam la valade de 
M>n croiaant ; p^ctUe I'orient avec ta four- 
chettc— Cawlkb. iL*otr at tluu man; 
hii ft>ld ceiu amii ckam£t nrt livtr in hli 
rvattlcfiat /«cket ; t^k* tw/ the gold with 
your Jingers.) 

OrI£Ancrie, /. (journalists^, strim 
of disparaging anecdotes or facts 
concernmg the Orleans fannly, 
and published under the above 
head in /Radical papers. 

OrUans, w. (thieves'), zinegar. 
An allusion to the vinegar manu- 
factories at Orleans. 

Omichon, m. (thieves'), ehiclettt 
"cackling cheat." 

Omie, /. (thieves' and beggars'), 
hen, "raargery prater;" — de 
halle, turtevheu, or "cobble 
colter " Engraillcr 1' — , to catch 



Oniitre — Ours. 



297 



a/&mf, generally by angling with 
3 hook and line, the bnit being a 
worm at snail. Termed " snag- 
gling " in the English cant. Kn- 
graillcr I' — de ballc, to steal tur- 
ktys^ to bt a ** Turkey merchant." 

Omtire, / {thieves'), hm-house, 
" cackler's ken." 

Omion, m. (thicvca*), <apoH, 
Orphclin, m. (popular), rt^'nr*^*/; 
— dc mumille, /««/ ofexcremtnt^ 
"quakcr." (Thieves) Orphclin, 
j^Usmith. Dcs orphelins, ^^w^'^ 
ihtrvtiy *' mob." 

Orpheline de Lacenaire (journa- 
lists'), prostitute of the BouUvard, 

Orphie, m. (thieves'), bif-d. 

Os (familiar and popular), monty^ 
'• oof, or stumpy." .See Quibua. 
With regard to the English slang 
expression, Mr. T. Ijrwis O. 
Davies, in his Sttpplementary 
Eugliih Gioisaty, says : " Stumpy, 
woney, that xvkuh is paid dawn oh 
the nail or stump." 

Reductd 10 despair, th«y rantoaied 
rh«m*elvci by th« payment of tixpcnce 2 
hcadf^ ofj to AdcFpc hik own figtimlive ex- 
presstDfi ID aJi lU native beauty : " till they 
wu reti'larly done over, and Ibrked <nu the 
Kumpy."— iit/firA// ly Bn. 

Called also ** p^ne," which 
corresponds to the Eton boys' 
term '* i)ec " for rnoncy, from 
pecunia. Avoir de I' — , to havi 
atimey, ta hojK the •'oof-bird." 
( Popular) Os a motrllc, a rrpulsri-e 
term Jor nose, ** conk, smeller, 
snorter, l»oko." hee Morviau. 
Faire juter V — i moelle, to use 
one's JiHgeri as a handkerchief. 
Causer les — de la t£te, to kissone 
heart Uy. 

Osanores, m. tl. (thieves'), teeth^ 
or " grinders. ' Jouer des — , to 
eat, " to gnib." See Mattiquer. 

Oseille, /. (popular), money^ 
" stumpy, or oof. ' See Quibus. 



Avoir mange de V — , to de in a 

dad humour^ to be ** snaggy." 
(Thieves') La faire & I' — , to do a 
jfood *'}oh.'* See Faire. (Thea- 
trical) Seines de I' — , scenes in 
7fhich the female supernumeraries 
make their appearance in very sug' 
^'Tstire attire. 

Osselets, m. pi. (thievcs'J, /ath, 
"ivories," or ** bones." 

Ostant (Breton cant), tridividual ; 
master of a house. 

Ostrogoth, m. (general), dwHt^ 
Also rude, rough fellow. 

Otage, m. (popular), priest. An 
allusion to the priests taken as 
hostages by the insurgents of 187 1 , 
and shot by (hem. 

Otolondrer (thieves'), to annoyt to 
bijre, *• to spur." 

Oiolondreur, m. (thieves*), tire- 
scnie man. 

Olro (Breton cant),/i;^. 

Ouater (painters'), to paint outlines 
with too much vagueness^ urithtfut 
vigour. Properly to pad. 

Oui (printers'), en plume ! fiddle- 
faddle ! (pnpulur) — les laiiciers I 
m>Hsense! " rot." 

Ouistiti, «., cnvoycr un — . to 
break off oilers canuei-tioH with a 
mistress, or, as the English slang 
has it, *' to bury a moll." 

l.orsqu'une liaiion coimneDce k le fit* 
ttgucr, il eovoie un de ■«« ouiktitu P. P. C 
U