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Full text of "Arizona business directory and gazetteer : containing the names and post-office addresses of all merchants, manufacturers and professional men in the territory of Arizona; territorial, county, city and town officers, a description of the different mining districts and the names of mining superintendents; also, a gazetteer of the counties, cities and towns, giving a full exhibit of their mineral, agricultural and manufacturing resources; with an appendix, containing the names and addresses of wholesale merchants and manufacturers in the city of San Francisco"

.«_. 



Di 



KCI 



Insurance Co 




W. F. HULUtN, Mbtixi, 

Prescott, Arizona. 



200,000.00 
365,410.37 

750,334.09 



Capitalist. 

veyor. 

ocqueraz & McKee, 



lliott & Son. 

erson, Merchants. 

B. R. 
jcqueraz & McKee, 



1. 



E, President. 



« .T.-ES, AGENT, 

Fhcenis, Maricopa Co., Arizona. 



W. A. SCOTT, Jr., AGENT, 

Tucson, Arizona. 

M. B. CLAPP, AGENT, CHAS. W. HILL, AGENT, 

Tombstone, Cachise Co., Arizona. Tempe, Maricopa Co., Arizona. 

JOSIAH CHAMPION, AGENT, 

Final, Final Co., Arizona. 



The Arizona Telephone Co. 



HEAD OFFICE, TUCSON, A. T. 

EXCLUSIVE AGENCY WITH. 

Pacific Bell Telephone Company 

FOR 

BELL TELEPHONES AND BLAKE TRANSMITTERS. 

Will Furnish Estimates, Build and Equip Lines of Any Length. 

Correspondence solicited with Mining Companies desiring 
Instant Communication between their Mines and Mills, 
and all others desiring Telephone lines. 

Constantly on Hand, Material Requisite to Fill any Contract. 

DR. C. H. LORD, JAS. H. TOOLE, GEO. H. BOWKER, 

President. Vice-President. Superintendent. 

PORTER'S HOTEL, 

ASA A, PORTER, Proprietor, 

LOCATED AT THE 



TUCSON, A. T. 



The proprietor having leased this new, commodious, and well ventilated 
house, and handsomely furnished it throughout, is now prepared to entertain 
guests in first-class style at all times. 

It is the Meal Station of the S. P. R. R. Co. at Tucson. A good hot 
breakfast and supper are ready on arrival of trains. The best the mai'ket affords 
is always to be found at this house. 

EXCELLENT WINES, LIQUORS, AND CIGARS. 
Board Furnished by the Day, Week, or Month, 

WITH OR WITHOUT ROOMS. 



Who desire the 

Greatest Vaeue for their Momy, 

Will secure this result by sending orders for 



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BACON & CO MPANY 

508 Clay Street, 

509 Sansome Street, 



MS FMANCISC©- CAt. 



The Reputation acquired by this Office, through a career of 28 

years on this Coast, for Promptness and Skill in filling 

orders entrusted to them, is second to that of 

no other Establishment in America. 



ARIZONA 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY 

AND 

GAZETTEER; 



CONTAINING THE 



Names and Post-Office Addresses of all Mer- 
chants, Manufacturers and Professional 
Men in tne Territory of Arizona ; 

TERRITORIAL, COUNTY, CITY AND TOWN OFFICERS. 

A Description of the Different Mining Districts and the 

Names of Mining Superintendents. 



Gazetteer of the Counties, Cities and Towns, 

Giving a full exhibit of their Mineral, Agricultural and Manufacturing Resources. 

WITH AN APPENDIX, 



Containing the Names and Addresses of Wholesale Merchants and 
Manufacturers in the City of San Francisco. 



W. C. DISTURNELL, 

Compiler and Publisher, 

S34 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

BACON & COMPANY, PRINTERS. 

l88l. 




Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1881, 

By W. C. DISTURNELL, 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, Washington, D. C. 



PREFACE. 



The compiler presents this work to the public with a feeling of confidence 
that a perusal of its pages will convince his patrons, and others interested in 
its contents, that no efforts have been spared to make it complete and reliable. 
In an entirely new field, such as is embraced in this volume, there are diffi- 
culties to contend with, not encountered in older portions of the Union. 
Among others, the want of reliable sources from which to obtain information 
needed, particularly in isolated and sparsely-settled sections, and also the 
indifference manifested by some to furnish information applied for ; which, in 
view of the great benefit works of this character are to new countries, by 
making known to the world their resources, and thereby accelerating immi- 
gration, ought to be given with alacrity. With proper efforts, however, these 
obstacles can, to a certain extent, be overcome ; and the compiler believes that 
he has so far succeeded as to be able to present a work which, for completeness 
and accuracy, will compare favorably with those of a similar character pub- 
lished in other sections of the Union . 

In conclusion, he would express his obligations to all who assisted him 
while engaged in collecting the necessary data and compiling the work : 
especially to Major Ben C. Truman, for the use of valuable information 
gathered during his travels in Arizona, and other courtesies extended ; to the 
editors of the various journals throughout the Territory, for many favors and 
the interest manifested by them in the success of the enterprise ; and to Myron 
Angel, Esq., of San Francisco, for important contributions. His thanks are 
also due to the numerous patrons of the work, for their liberal support ; to 
John Wasson, Esq., Surveyor-General, and C. P. Dake, Esq., U. S. Marshal, 
for official data ; and to Messrs. Bacon & Co., the printers of the volume, for 
its neat typographical appearance. 



INDEX 

Advertising Index 


TO CONTENTS. 


PAGE 

...44 
..44 
.. 45 
.. 45 


PAGE 

... 7 


Hualapai 

Humbug 

La Paz 

Magazine 


Topography and Kesources of 

ZONA 


Ari- 
... 9 


Historical Sketch 


... 9 


Mountains, and Timber Lands. 

Rivers 

Valleys 

Climate 

Agricultural Resources 

Pastoral Resources 

Mineral Resources 

Mining Districts 


... 11 
...14 
...15 
...16 
...18 
...18 
...23 
... 30 


Martinez 

Maynard . 

McMillen 

Mineral Creek 

Moor 

Myers 

Old Hat 

Oro Blanco 

Pajarito 

Palmetto 

Patagonia 

Peck 

Pioneer 

Poorman's 


...46 
.. 46 
...46 
...46 
... 47 
...47 
...47 
...48 
...48 
...49 
...49 
... 51 
.. 51 
...53 


Agua Fria 


... 30 


Ajo Mines 

Arivaca , 

Aubrey 

Aztec 

Big Bug 

Bill Williams Fork 

Black Canon, 

Black Hills 


...30 
...31 
... 31 
...32 
...32 
...32 
...33 
...33 


Saddle Mountain 

San Francisco 

San Pedro 

Santa Rita Placers 

Silver 

Silver Bell 

Silver Mountain 

Swisshelm 


.. 54 

...54 

...55 

.. 55 

...55 

.. 56 

.. 57 

.. 57 

. 58 


Bloodsucker 

Bradshaw 

Cachise 


...33 
... 34 

.. 34 


California 

Casa Grande 

Castle Dome 

Cave Creek 

Cedar Valley. 

Cherry Cre^ek 

Chiricahua 

Dos Cabezas 

El Capitan 

Empire 

Eureka 

Globe 


...34 
...35 
...35 
...35 
.... 36 
...36 
...36 
...36 
...37 
...37 
...38 
...38 
.. 38 


Tiger 


. . . 58 


Tombstone 

Trinity... 

Tonto Basin 

Tumac'acori 

Turkey Creek 

Turquoise 

Tyndall • 

Vulture Mine 

Walker 

Walnut Grove 

Warren 

Washington Camp 

Weaver, (Yavapai Co.) 


.. 59 
.. 64 
. 65 

...65 
.. 65 
.. 66 
.. 66 

...66 
.. 67 
.. 67 
.. 68 
.. 69 
.. 69 


Gold Camp 

Gold Mountain 

Green Valley 

Greenwood 

Harcuvar*. 

Harshaw. . , 

Hassayampa 

Helvetia 


...40 
...41 
... 41 
...42 
...42 
. .. 42 

...43 


Weaver, (Yuma Co.) 

Ruins of Tumacacori Mission. 

Mining Superintendents 

Quartz Mills 

Counties and County Officers. 
Apache 


.. 70 
.. 70 
.. 71 
.. 75 
.. 76 
.. 76 


Horse Shoe Basin 

Huachuca Mountains 


...43 
...43 



INDEX TO CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Cachise 78 

Gila , 80 

Graham 81 

Maricopa 82 

Mohave 85 

Pima 86 

Pinal 88 

Yavapai 90 

Yuma 92 

Indian Reservations 94 

Colorado 94 

Navajo 94 

Papago 95 

Pima and Maricopa 95 

San Carlos 96 

Ancient Ruins 97 

Arizona — How It Derived Its Name. 102 

Railroads 103 

Southern Pacific 104 

Atlantic and Pacific 107 

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe" 109 

Utah and Arizona 109 

Prescott and Thirty-Fifth Parallel. .109 
Maricopa, Phoenix and Prescott. . . .109 

Pinal and Pichaco 109 

Yuma and Port Ysabel 110 

Painted Rocks 110 

Time Schedule Southern Pacific 

R.R Ill 

Time Schedule Atchison, Topeka 

and Santa Fe R.R 113 

Stage Routes 115 

Bullion Shipments 117 

Population of Arizona 118 

Federal and Territorial Officers .119 
Register of Towns and Business 

Men 123 

Agua Caliente 123 

Agua Fria 123 

Agua Fria Valley 123 

Alamo Station 123 

Alexandra 123 

American Ranch 123 

Antelope Creek Station 123 

Antelope Station 123 

Antelope Valley 124 

Anvil Rock 124 

Apache Pass 124 

Arivaca 124 

Aubrey 124 

Bed Rock 124 

Benson 124 

Big Bug 125 

Bisbee 125 

Bradshaw 126 

Brigham City 126 

Bumble Bee 126 

Calabasas 127 



PAGE 

Camp Huachuca 127 

Camp Thomas 127 

Camp Verde 127 

Casa Grande 128 

Castle Creek 128 

Castle Dome Landing 128 

Catalina 128 

Cerbat 128 

Charleston 129 

Charming Dale 130 

Chino ' 130 

Chiricahua City 130 

Clifton 130 

Contention 130 

Cottonwood Spring 131 

Davidson's Spring 131 

Dos Cabezas 131 

Drew's Station 131 

Dripping Spring. 131 

Dudlcyville 131 

Dunbar Station 131 

East Phoenix 131 

Ehrenberg 131 

Emery City 132 

Empire 132 

Eureka Spring 132 

Flagstaff 132 

Florence 132 

Fort Apache 135 

Fort Bowie 135 

Fort Grant 135 

Fort Lowell 135 

Fort McDowell 135 

Fort Mohave 135 

Fort Verde 135 

Fort Whipple 136 

Galeyville 136 

Gila Bend 137 

Gillette 137 

Globe 137 

Granite Peak 142 

Greaterville 142 

Hackberry . 142 

Hardyville 142 

Harshaw 142 

Hassayampa 144 

Hayden's Ferry 144 

Hereford 144 

Iron Springs 144 

Junction 144 

La Noria 144 

Lee's Ferry 144 

Little Giant 144 

Luttrell 144 

Maricopa 145 

Marysville 145 

Maxey 145 

McDowell . 145 



INDEX TO CONTENTS. 





PAGE 


PAGE 


McMillen 


145 


Signal 169 


Mesaville 


146 


Silent 169 


Millville 


146 


Silver King 169 


Mineral Park 


146 


Skull Valley 169 


Mohave City 

Montezuma 


147 

147 


Snowflake 169 


Solomonville 169 


Moore's Station 


147 


Springerville 170 


Mountain Station 


147 


St. John 170 


New River Station 


147 


Stanton 170 


Norton's Landing 


147 


Summit Station 170 


Nugget 


147 


Sunset 170 


Oro Blanco 


147 


Sweet Water 170 


Overton 


148 


Taylor 170 


Pacific City 


148 


Tempe 170 


Pajarito 


148 


Tip Top 171 


Palace Station 


148 


Tombstone 171 


Pantano 


148 


Tonto Basin 183 


Parker 


148 


Tres Alamos...*. 183 


Pelton 




Tubac 184 


Phoenix 


148 


Tucson 184 


Pichaco 


154 


Vulture 197 


Pima Agency 


155 


Walker 197 


Pima Station 


155 


Walnut Grove 197 


Pinal 


155 


Washington 197 


Pinal Ranch 


158 


Watervale . . . 198 


Pine Springs 


158 


Wheatfield 198 


Polhamus 


158 


Whipple Barracks 198 


Prescott 


158 


Wickenburg 198 


Queen City 


165 


Willcox 198 


Reno 


165 


Williamson's Valley 199 

Yuma 199 


Richmond 


165 

165 


Riverside 


Arizona Classified Business Di- 


Sacoton 


166 


rectory 203 


Safford 


166 


Arizona Advertising Department.. 235 


Saint Joseph 


166 


San Francisco Classified Business 


San Carlos 


166 


Directory 259 


San Simon 


167 


San Francisco Advertising Depart- 


San Xavier Del Bac 


167 

168 


ment 305 


Sevmour 





IISTDEX TO ADVEKTISEME1ITS. 



ARIZONA. 



PAGE 

Ainsa Santiago 235 

Allis Solon M 236 

Antelope Copper Mhrng Co 244 

Arizona Citizen 239 

Arizona Democrat 247 

Arizona Gazette „ .253 

Arizona Journal 238 

Arizona Mail and Stage Line 74 

Arizona Miner 248 

Arizona Stage Co 122 

Arizona Telephone Co front of title 

Arizona Weekly Enterprise 255 

Bank of Arizona 246 

Bashford L. & Co. . . .margin of volume 

Bayer & Schwarz 239 

Bilicke C back cover 

Blinn L. W. & Co 240 

BonineE. A 256 

Brown G. E 252 

Buehman H. & Co 236 

Buflfum W. M 246 

Burns Frank H 238 

Campbell J. G 245 

Chillson L. D 235 

Colton E. F 237 

Dougherty J. W 246 

Duval C. J 240 

Eaton & Bailey 250 

Evans & Co 236 

Farrington R. E. & C^. 256 

Freyer Jere 256 

Ganz E front cover 

Gilmer, Salisbury & Co's Stage Line.258 

Goodman A 235 

Groff Charles F 236 

Gruber Jacob 237 

Harris T. S 242 

Heitzelman P 241 

Hereford & Zabriskie 205 

Herrera F. & Co 242 

Herrick & Lutgerding 252 

Hooper Wm. B. & Co. margin of volume 

Howe H. G 240 

Howe Rosa Mrs 251 

Hutchinson W. T 264 

Irvine E. & Co . . . .margin of volume 
Israel Salomon 241 



PAGE 

Joyner F. O .* 243 

Kellner E. F 249 

Kellner E. F. & Co 249 

Kerens & Griffith 257 

Kirwagen & Sines 245 

LevyD. & Co , 248 

Lewis Charles G 254 

Lord & Williams Co . . margin of volume 

Luke & Thalheimer 252 

Marcovich Peter. 240 

Mayr & Miltenberg 238 

McArthur J. M 243 

McLellan T. H. . . .' 255 

McNellv W. T 249 

Mercer T. Lillie 243 

Pascoe J. H 249 

Patch J. B 242 

Pearson R. C. 237 

Pinal Brewery 251 

Porter A. A front of title 

Prescott Mining Co 244 

Protopsaltis A. & C 238 

Reynolds George 253 

Rickard W. T.. . 241 

Roberts & Ryder 252 

Robinson Lewis 250 

Safford, Hudson & Co front cover 

Shull JohnT .....248 

Silver King and Globe Saddle Train . 121 
Southern Pacific Mail and Stage 

Line 257 

Sparrow F. A 239 

Spicer Wells 241 

Stwart J. W 243 

Swasey G. A 250 

Sweetland B. R. & Co 236 

Tombstone Academy 242 

Tombstone Foundrv and Machine 

Shop 242 

Townsend Bros 237 

Tucson Painting Co 237 

VanWagenen G. S 251 

Westmever F. W 251 

White Hugh & Co 234 

Williams A. P 245 

Wright & Bucksbaum 239 

Yorba J. F 235 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



SAN FRANCISCO, ETC. 



PAGE 

Adams & Carter 31*7 

Albion Brewery back cover 

Anderson C. L 260 

Automatic Sewing Machine 29V 

Bacon & Co front of title 

Barber C.J. &E. T 806 

Bay Soap and Candle Co 317 

Bergstrom John 292 

Boesch Emile 326 

Braverman Louis & Co 285 

Burkardt Max 294 

California Bellows Manuf. Co 262 

California Electrical Works 275 

Carolan, Cory & Co 306 

Cerf J. &Co 273 

Clabrough & Golcher 280 

Commercial Ins. Co., inside front cover 

Cook A. 282 

Cook H. N 263 

Crocker H. S. & Co 322 

DegenL. P 321 

Denniston E. G 316 

Dewey & Co 293 

Dixon & Bernstein 298 

Doe Charles F 307 

Domestic Sewing Machine Co. front cover 

Du RoseF. F 261 

Egerton Henry C 824 

Ettinger S 317 

Fulton Iron Works 170 

Garratt W. T ...311 

Ghirardelli & Danzel. .margin of volume 

Giant Powder Co 295 

Giller C. L 275 

Gladding, McBean & Co 316 

Golden State and Miners' Iron 

Works 284 and 307 

GranzH 278 

Gump S. & G 294 

Gundlach J & Co 303 

Hall Charles R 294 

Harmon S. H 288 

Harris, James & Co 323 

Hicks D. & Co front cover 

Hill Samuel 304 and back cover 

Hinckley, Spiers & Hayes 170 

Hodge Robert 269 

Hofmann Bros 324 

Hotel Del Monte (Monterey) 818 and 319 

Huntington F. A 305 

Jackson & Truman 315 

Jansen Alexander 301 

J esse & Drew 299 

Johnston W. D 260 

Juillerat A. E 291 

Jung J. C 321 

Keogh John 262 



PAGE 

Klemm Charles 262 

Kuhling A 301 

Kuner A 275 

Kunze 0. E 321 

Levy John & Co 310 

Linforth, Rice & Co. .inside back cover 

LongS. H 294 

Luckhardt C. A. & Co 260 

Lyons E. G. & Co 309 

Meussdorffer M 308 

Morris H. D 306 

Morrow & Strong 311 

Nathan B. & Co 3CS 

Ohmen W. H 316 

Orrick O. S 292 and 293 

Osborne D. M. & Co 259 

Owens John B 306 

Pacific Business College. . . .front cover 

Pacific Iron Works 326 

Pacific Saw Manufacturing Co 315 

Parke & Lacy 315 

Pendergast, Smith & Co 313 

Peterson L -. . . 321 

Plate A. J. & Co 296 

Preston & McKinnon 311 

Price Thomas 260 

Randolph & Co 308 

Rankin, Brayton & Co 326 

Renton, Holmes & Co 312 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 171 

Russell E. F. & Co 314 

Schmidt M. & Co 265, 288 and 304 

Schmolz William 300 

Shepman W. E 312 

Simpson A. M. & Brp 288 

Smith Francis & Co 297 

Southern Pacific R. R. Co 325 

Spring Menzo 309 

Standard Soap Co 298 

Stein C. W t 324 

Strahle Jacob & Co 263 

Taber, Harker & Co 280 

Teubner & Hoffman .314 

The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. . 

margin of volume 

Tubbs & Co 310 

Turner, Kennedy & Shaw 313 

Tustin W. 1 320 

Upstone John 310 

Wagner Joseph & Co 307 

Weed & Kingwell 314 

Wheeler C. Gilbert (Chicago) 

inside back cover 

White James F -. 312 

Wigmore John 309 

Willcox & Gibbs S. M. Co 297 

Williams J. B. (Oakland)..297 and 313 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



ARIZONA : 

Its Topography, Climate, and Resources. 



Arizona is bounded on the north by Utah and a small portion 
of Nevada, on the east by New Mexico, on the south by the Mex- 
ican Republic, and on the west by the States of California and 
Nevada. It extends from one hundred and nine degrees to one 
hundred and fourteen degrees and twenty-five minutes west lon- 
gitude, and from thirty-one degrees and thirty-seven minutes to 
thirty-seven degrees • north latitude, being about three hundred 
and twenty-five miles square. The estimated area is 111,950 
square miles, or about 72,000,000 acres. 

Since the conquest of Mexico by the Spaniards, the Territory 
of Arizona has been claimed first by Spain, and then by Mexico, 
till recent events gave it to the Great Republic. As early as 1540 
an expedition was sent by the Viceroy of Spain to examine and 
take possession of the country. That expedition found the Ter- 
ritory inhabited by Indian races of great difference in character. 
A portion of them lived in towns, built houses of stone or dried 
brick, cultivated the soil, and constructed irrigating canals, which 
required considerable engineering skill. Ruins were found by 
the first explorers, which indicated that at some previous time a 
still higher state of civilization had. existed. The large quantity 
of broken earthenware found at wide distances strewn over the 
country, the mounds of the Salt River Valley which appear to be 
remains of buildings similar to Casa Grande, the extensive ruins on 
the San Pedro, Rio Verde, Colorado Chiquito, and other places, 
are generally believed to be the remains of a people who existed 
here before any of the present Indian races. However that may 
be, it is certain that the Spanish found here the Papagoes, the 
Moquis, Zunis, and other pueblo Indians, who tilled the soil, and 
followed other pursuits in which only people of considerable civ- 
ilization occupy themselves. They also found savage tribes like 
the Apaches and Navahoes, who were constantly making raids 
upon the peaceful natives, and who for a period of over three 
hundred years kept up an incessant warfare with the whites who 
settled in the Territory. In 1848, by the Treaty of Guadalupe 
Hidalgo, all the Territory north of the Gila River then forming a 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & COA'^xX^^S^'^^\Lubrloallnfi Oils. 



10 ARIZONA. 



part of New Mexico was ceded to the United States. The Territory 
between the Gila and the present Mexican boundary was acquired 
in 1853 through the Gadsden Purchase. It might be questioned 
whether we should not have purchased the Territory from the 
Apache chief, Cachise, as he had perhaps the best title. These 
Indians had at this time succeeded in driving the Mexicans out 
of the country, only one place remaining in their possession — 
Tucson, a hamlet or mission of two or three hundred inhabitants. 
The United States Boundary Commission commenced its work 
in 1850, and its valuable reports furnish our first reliable informa- 
tion of the country north of the Gila. This was followed by a 
Pacific Railroad survey on parallel thirty-two. Several other ex- 
plorations and surveys were executed within a few years. To 
protect these surveys, the government had stationed in various 
places a considerable number of troops, who had, to some extent, 
checked the Apach.es. In 1857 a line of stages was started be- 
tween San Antonio and San Diego. In 1858 the service on this 
line was made semi-weekly, and it received six hundred thousand 
dollars per year from the government for carrying the mail. The 
time from San Francisco to St. Louis was twenty-two days. 

The Great Rebellion broke out in 1861, and up to this time 
slow but sure progress had been making in the Territory. Sev- 
eral new mining camps had been established, and some American 
machinery introduced. The rebellion checked and destroyed all 
this improvement. The Federal troops who were not taken pris- 
oners by Texan rebels abandoned the country. The stage line 
was discontinued. The citizens and traders, managers and work- 
men of the various mines all hurried to leave the Territory. The 
Apaches fell upon them along the highways and murdered many. 
The gambrinos from Sonora rushed in and plundered the mines, 
and broke the machinery. In 1863 Cachise, the Apache chief, 
boasted that he had conquered the Americans. On the 24th of 
February, 1863, Congress passed the act forming the Territory of 
Arizona. The Territory then segregated from New Mexico was 
about 126,000 square miles During the year 1866 an area em- 
bracing 12,225 square miles of the northwestern portion, was by 
an act of Congress, given to the State of Nevada. In 1864 the 
Territorial Government was located at Prescott, and constituted 
as follows: Governor, John N. Goodwin; Secretary, R. C. 
McCormick; Chief Justice, W. F. Turner; Associate Justices, 
"William T. Howell and Joseph A. Allyn j District Attorney, Al- 
mon Gage • Surveyor-General, Levi Bashford ; Marshal, Milton P. 
Duffield ; Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Charles D. Poston. 
The population at this time, exclusive of Indians, was only 600, 
but soon commenced to steadily increase, notwithstanding the 
unsettled condition of affairs arising out of struggles with Mexi- 
can gambrinos or mine robbers, and with the savages whom two 
years of success had rendered bold and defiant. Soon after the 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. ■»»».»-»«»*■•-**»*•» 



MAMFAOTUKiitts, } San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 11 

organization of the Territory, Gen. O. O. Howard was appointed 
special Indian Commissioner, and General Crook was given com- 
mand of the troops sent against the savages. He defeated the 
Apaches and Hualapais in several actions, and brought Cachise 
to terms. All the savage tribes were then placed on reservations 
where they are now kept under control, and no further trouble 
from them is anticipated. In 1872 the white population had in- 
creased to 10,743. From 1857 to 1861 many gold and silver 
mines had been discovered in the central portion of the Territory, 
the fame of which, now that affairs had become settled, began to 
attract prospectors from different sections, and the discovery 
of the Silver King, Stonewall Jackson, and other wonderfully 
rich mines in 1875, gave a still greater impetus to mining opera- 
tions. The discovery of the Tombstone mines followed in 1877. 
In 1880 the Southern Pacific Railroad reached Tucson from the 
west, and in March, 1881, the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe 
Railroad from the east formed a junction with the Southern 
Pacific at Deming, New Mexico, thus affording easy access from 
the Atlantic and Pacific States to this far-off and hitherto isolated 
section. The completion of these roads has resulted in a great 
increase of immigration, bringing capital and labor to assist in 
the development of the vast mineral resources of the Territory. 
The opportunities which mining countries offer for the immedi- 
ate use of capital, and the rapid accumulation of wealth, are much 
greater than those of agricultural districts, and the brilliant op- 
portunities here offered to those seeking investments in mining 
properties will no doubt be eagerly embraced, and thus quicken 
the slower process of creating capital. We may, therefore, now 
confidently hope for a rapid advancement like California and 
Colorado. All classes of immigrants will be attracted to this 
section, for here is an immense empty Territory offering homes 
and competence to a million inhabitants. Arizona has a good 
code of laws, which provides for an economical and efficient ad- 
ministration of the government, and a liberal system of common 
schools. The United States census, taken in June, 1880, gives a 
white population of 40,441. The increase since then has been 
considerable, probably not less than 10,000, so that we may now, 
in June, 1881, safely estimate the population at 50,000, exclusive 
of Indians. 

MOUNTAINS AND TIMBER LANDS. 

The Rocky Mountains on the east, and the Sierra Nevada 
Mountains on the west, seem to unite as they pass through Ari- 
zona and form the Cordilleras of Mexico. Extending from the 
northern boundary, and traversing the Territory in a southeast- 
erly direction to its southern boundary, is a belt composed of a 
succession of short ranges of mountains known by distinctive 
names, from some of which rise peaks having an altitude of over 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



WH. B. HOOPER & eO.{ T Te^n%u^sjMe E ^or}Wholesal8 Liquor Dealers. 



12 ARIZONA. 



10,000 feet above the level of the sea. This belt of mountain and 
table lands is about 150 miles in width, and embraces within its 
limits what may be called the mineral region of Arizona. Among 
the most noted of these ranges are the Santa Rita, Patagonia, 
Peloncillo, Huachuca, Chiricahua, Mule Pass, Dragoon, Whet- 
stone, and Santa Catalina, in the southeast ; the White Mountains 
in the east; the Pinal, Apache, Mazatzal, Mogollon, and San 
Francisco ranges in the middle and northern portions of the Ter- 
ritory; and the Hualapais, Peacock, and Cerbat ranges in the 
northwest. While many of the mountain ranges in Arizona are 
but sparsely covered with timber, there are others where may be 
found a heavy growth of pine, cedar, etc. In the northeastern 
portion of Yavapai County, just south of the Colorado River, is 
situated what is known as the Colorado Forest, comprising a large 
area which is covered with an excellent quality of white and yel- 
low pine suitable for lumber. Oak and mountain mahogany are 
also found in this section, the latter frequently growing to the 
height of thirty feet, and two feet in diameter at the base. This 
wood is very hard and fine-grained, and well suited for cabinet 
purposes. Cedar, juniper, wild cherry, and ash are also found 
here as well as in most of the forests in Yavapai. The Coconino 
Forest consists of many detached bodies of the same kind of 
timber, covering a large area in the northern part of Yavapai 
County, south of Marble Canon on the Colorado River. The 
great Black Forest covers all the ranges which lie between the 
various branches of Cataract Creek. This forest consists of pine 
and spruce, and most of the hard woods common to the temper- 
ate zone. 

The San Francisco Mountains, in the central portion of Yava- 
pai County, are covered with forests of pine, of excellent quality. 
This is considered to be the most extensive forest region in 
Arizona, and will supply an immense amount of good lumber for 
years to come. In the neighborhood of Prescott, the mountains 
are covered with a growth of pine and other timber, and several 
sawmills in operation here are turning out a large quantity of 
good lumber. The White Mountains, in Gila and Apache Coun- 
ties, are also covered with forests of different kinds of timber. 
Dr. Rothrock thus speaks of this region : " From the summit of 
the Sierra Blanca, looking eastward, mountains of less altitude, 
with valleys between them, rise, one beyond the other, for at 
least sixty miles, most of the area being valuable timber, grazing, 
and farming lands. There is enough pine timber on the Sierra 
Blanca alone to last the whole Territory for several years. The 
pinus ponderosa here reaches a height of seventy feet ; some firs 
are higher; the oak resembling white oak is branchy, closely 
grained, and solid." These may be said to be the great timber 
regions of Arizona, but there are other ranges throughout the 
Territory which are covered with a good growth of pine and oak. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. s 



JHA*lFA<TlKKits, X San Fraucisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 13 

In the Pinal Mountains is a large area covered with pine. Two 
sawmills located in these mountains are turning out sufficient 
lumber to supply the surrounding country. In Southern Arizona 
are several ranges, particularly the Huachuca and Chiricahua 
Mountains, where is found timber of different kinds in great 
abundance. The Santa Rita and Patagonia Mountains also afford 
a fair supply. The foothills of all the ranges referred to are cov- 
ered, more or less, with a growth of oak, ash, iron-wood, mesquite, 
juniper, etc., which makes excellent fuel. 

John Wasson, Esq., Surveyor-General of Arizona, in his report 
to the Secretary of the Interior, says : 

" The mountain land is generally covered with grass, on which 
stock fatten the year round. It embraces nearly all the timber of 
commercial Value, and substantially all mines of the precious and 
common metals. It contains many springs and small streams, 
with small tracts of rich land. Rocky and precipitous surfaces of 
comparatively limited extent exist, but, taken as a whole, the 
mountain land of Arizona is of incalculable value for minerals, 
timber, water and grass. There are no long and very well-defined 
mountain ranges, although the various broken parts might be 
treated as ranges, and for local purposes they have distinctive 
names. The fact is, the surface of Arizona is a succession of 
buttes and mountains, with extended table-land, and narrow, rich 
valley land between. A stranger to the merits of our mountain 
land, on first sight, naturally enough regards it as next to worth- 
less. The timber in many places is hidden in deep canons, aTid 
beyond sight about the summits, and, without toilsome examina- 
tion, is as superficially unrecognizable as are the mineral treas- 
ures hidden below the surface ; and it is a fact that, in most of 
the mountain land stretching from Mexico to British Columbia in 
this longitude, the most productive silver mines are found in 
mountains with the least vegetation, and of the most uninviting 
appearance. Estimated in dollars, our mountain land is of great- 
est worth, and for centuries, perhaps forever, they will be peopled 
by many thriving cities, towns, and smaller settlements, reaping 
above the average reward for their industry." 

The grandeur of the scenery in many of the mountain ranges of 
Arizona is unsurpassed. On the occasion of a visit by a party of 
pleasure seekers, including Congressman Springer, of Illinois, to 
Cave Creek, a romantic spot in the Chiricahua Mountains, the 
Galeyville Bulletin says : 

"In this region is a climate affording a perfect sanitarium of 
perpetual summer, and a wealth of natural scenery excelling in 
gorgeous beauty the most attractive resorts in Europe or 
America. 

" To the southeast, south and west, there towers nigh unto the 
clouds a thousand columns, peaks and domes, interspersed with 
massive structures resembling castles, from which steep declivi- 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO.I'^SSSS^aSSr }Cigars of all Kinds. 



14 ARIZONA. 



ties, studded with pine, in terraced sections merge from either side 
into a level valley of irregular width, through which the spark- 
ling waters of Cave Creek flow until lost in the sands of the 
broad acres of San Simon Valley. 

" The valley, on entering the mountain gorge, resembles one vast 
orchard, with now and then a towering pine to dispel the illusion, 
while along the base, at convenient intervals on either side, are 
numerous caves that have evidently, from their smoked condition, 
been the home of the Indian, and from which it took so many 
years of tedious warfare to dislodge them. 

" The scene, the magnificence of all its surroundings, so charmed 
Mr. Springer that he concluded to use his influence to have the 
entire Cave Creek region set apart as a public park, save and ex- 
cept the valley, where he believes, sooner or later, will rise a city 
of no mean proportions. To use the language of our distinguished 
visitor, ' I have made the tour of Europe, visited all the enchant- 
ing spots of Switzerland, crossed the Alps, and climbed the Pyre- 
nees, that I might view the places so appreciated by man, and 
returned home to find a spot more lovely, and attractive, and sub- 
lime than I had witnessed in all my travels.' " This description 
of the scenery in the Chiricahua Mountains will apply to the Hua- 
chuca, Patagonia, Santa Rita, and other ranges in different por- 
tions of the Territory. 

RIVERS. 

The Colorado River is the principal stream in the Territory. 
It enters Arizona on the north from Utah, runs southwesterly 
through Yavapai County, thence northwesterly through Mohave 
County to Nevada, forming a portion of its southern boundary, 
then turning due south, it forms the western boundary of Arizona, 
separating it from Nevada and California, and finally empties its 
waters into the Gulf of California, a hundred miles south of our 
line. This river is remarkable for the immense channel which it 
has cut through the rocks for more than six hundred miles of its 
length. Often the banks rise almost perpendicular, like a wall, 
two or three thousand feet. These deep gorges are called can- 
ons, the most noted of which are, Grand, Marble, Iceberg, Gray, 
and Limestone Canons. It is navigable for light draught boats, 
as far as El Dorado Canon, five hundred and sixty-one miles from 
the Gulf. The navigation is generally by stern-wheel steamers, 
which tow barges loaded with freight. The Little Colorado River 
gathers its waters principally in the eastern part of the Territory. 
It has many branches in Apache and Yavapai Counties, through 
which it runs in a northwest direction, and unites with the Color- 
ado. This stream and its branches are also remarkable for their 
long and deep canons. The Gila River, though second in size, and 
unnavigable, is the most important river in Arizona. It rises in 
New Mexico, runs in almost a direct west course across the Terri- 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. ^ 



MA¥UFAC'TUKEK8,1 San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 15 

tory, and joins the Colorado one hundred and seventy-eight miles 
from its mouth. It receives affluents from every county except 
Mohave. 

One hundred miles above its mouth, the Gila averages five hun- 
dred feet in width by three feet in depth, and has considerable 
velocity. This gives water enough to irrigate all the lands on 
on either side, suitable for agriculture. The banks are low and 
sloping, so that water may easily be taken from it in ditches. 
The principal affluents of the Gila are Salt River, and the San 
Pedro. The Rio Yerde is an important branch of Salt River, 
running nearly north and south, in Yavapai and Maricopa Coun- 
ties. It affords water power to a district rich in minerals, and 
there is considerable grazing and farming lands in its valley. 
The Santa Cruz is a small but important stream, which has its 
source near the Mexican line, runs north, and sinks into the earth 
near Tucson. Many millions of dollars in silver have been taken 
from the moutains along this stream. 

VALLEYS. 

The valley of the Gila is about 400 miles in length, lying east 
and west, on parallel 33, and extending entirely across the Ter- 
ritory. At Yuma, the foot of the valley, its altitude is 138 feet. 
Where it crosses the western boundary of the Territory, into New 
Mexico, it is 3,600 feet. With the various tributary valleys, it 
comprises the largest portion of agricultural land in Arizona. * Its 
position, altitude and gentle slope, gives it great importance as a 
railroad highway. The Southern Pacific Railroad passes through 
a portion of it, and in the future other roads will undoubtedly 
seek this route. The Salt River Valley is a tributary, lying north, 
from one to twenty miles wide, and sixty miles long. In this val- 
ley, surrounded by a good agricultural country, Phoenix is situ- 
ated. The San Pedro, in the southeastern part of the Territory 
is a long narrow valley, affording considerable farming land, and 
on its borders is a large amount of excellent grazing land. This, 
and the valley of the Santa Cruz must, in the future, become rail- 
road highways, connecting us with our sister Republic. The 
Santa Cruz Valley, commencing in Mexico, and running north for 
more than a hundred miles, was the centre of Mexican population 
during their possession of the Terrii ory. The valley is narrow, and 
affords but a small quantity of land, which can be used for raising 
grain. Skirting it are thousands of acres, suitable for cattle range. 
The Colorado Valley runs north and south, along nearly the en- 
tire western boundary. The banks of the river are so bluff and 
high in many places, as to render irrigation impracticable, without 
which the most of the soil must remain unproductive, but in the 
vicinity of Yuma are some exceedingly rich lands, which can be 
profitably cultivated. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Uf~* D UnnnnnAPn i Tucson & I'hcenix, A.T., EI Faao,) Sole Agents J. A. MILLER 
WITI . D. MOOper <X I/O. \ Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, f c.C. WHISKEY. 



16 ARIZONA. 



There are several hundred small valleys scattered through the 
Territory, lying between mountain ranges, skirting table lands, 
or carrying some small tributary to the rivers. Most of these val- 
leys are good agricultural lands, and some will raise crops without 
irrigation. Many of the latter class will be found in the White, 
Juniper, and San Francisco mountains. In the northwestern 
portion of the Territory, and but little known, are Prospect, 
Hualapai, Sacramento, Cedar, and Big Sandy valleys, and Juni- 
per Basin. In the central part are Aubrey, Williams, Round 
Ferguson, Big Chino, Agua Fria, Peeples, Kirkland, and Skull 
valleys. 

The valley of the Little Colorado, with its small tributaries, is 
estimated to embrace about 300,000 acres that may be adapted to 
agriculture by irrigation. It is settled principally by Mormons. 
The Rio Verde Valley extends from the Salt River Valley about 
150 miles northwesterly. It is generally narrow, from a few 
rods to a mile in width, and often presenting nothing but a rocky 
gorge or canon just wide enough to carry the river. The bottom 
land is rich, and as there is sufficient water to irrigate it, large 
crops are raised. The San Simon, Sulphur Spring, Sonoita, Baba- 
camori, Cienega, Arivaca, and Aravaipa, lying in the southern 
portion of the Territory, are all valleys of considerable size, carry- 
ing more or less water in brooks and springs, and afford in the 
aggregate a large amount of land which can be irrigated and 
farmed, and embracing many thousands of acres of excellent cat- 
tle range. 

CLIMATE. 

The climate of Arizona varies so much in different parts of the 
Territory that no general description would do justice to many 
localities. In the valleys and low lands the temperature varies 
from temperate to hot. On the mesas and mountains frdm tem- 
perate to cold. At some points of high altitude snow falls, and 
there are a few days during which the cold is uncomfortable. 
Travelers who are familiar with the climate of other portions of 
the Union and with that of Southern Europe, which is so gener- 
ally admired, speak in the most glowing terms of the climate of 
Arizona during the winter months. At this time of the year the 
weather is dry and warm, and the air so balmy as to be perfectly 
luxurious. Arizona would prove a sanitarium to those whose 
delicate constitutions force them to fly from the rigorous winters 
of the north to more genial climates. 

During May, June, and July the weather in the valleys is hot 
and oppressive, the direct rays of the sun being too intense to ad- 
mit of much work in the open fields. The atmosphere, however, 
is exceedingly dry, and the heat which in moist climates would be 
destructive to health is here borne without any evil effects. Min- 
ing sections are generally of higher altitude, and of course the 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 2SS$sis&&si£i 



BILLIARD TA RLE § 653 & 6V> Market. St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T.. v 



OILS AKD l'ALVTS. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 17 H 

heat is not so great. A large portion of the labor is underground, 
where there is less difference between winter and summer tem- 
perature, and nearly all may be carried on under cover ; so that 
the heat need never interfere with this industry. 

The climate is too dry, as shown by the limited number and 
size of the water courses to admit, under the most intelligent ap- 
plication of labor and enterprise, of its ever becoming a great agri- 
cultural State. Were all of the streams on a level with the gen- 
eral surface, they would not furnish enough water for the soil — 
the rainfall not being sufficient to supply them, and flowing as 
they do iu many cases in channels so far below the surface, they 
add no moisture to the soil, but serve only to overdrain it. 

The following results of observations taken in different years 
at prominent points in the Territory, will give a general idea of 
the temperature and moisture. At Fort Mohave, on the Colorado 
River, a decidedly hot place, the average temperature during the 
months of July and August, 1873, was 91°, and during May 
and June, 1874, it was 87.5°. The two coldest months for the 
same years were December and January, during which the average 
was 54°. For the year commencing July, 1873, the mean average 
temperature was 74.42°. The average rainfall at this place is 
about five inches ; altitude, 600 feet. 

Yuma, on the Colorado at the mouth of the Gila, is 155 feet 
above sea level. In 1880 the maximum temperature occurred in 
August, 111°; and the minimum in February, 25°. The mean 
temperature for the year was 70.2°. There was no rain except 
in December, when 0.74 fell. The average rainfall at Yuma for 
several years was a little over three inches. 

Phoenix, in the Salt River Valley, has an altitude of 1,800 feet. 
The maximum temperature here in 1880 was in June, 111° ; the 
minimum was in November, 24° ; the mean average for the year 
was 69°. The rainfall was in January 1.16, February 0.38, March 
0.26, April 0.15, Mav 0.00, June 0.49, July 1.18, August 0.72, 
September 0.67, October 0.20, November 0.00, December 1.61. 
Total for the year 6.82. 

Tucson has an altitude of 2,545 feet. The maximum tempera- 
ture in 1880 was in June, 110°; the minimum, in January, 14°. 
The mean temperature of the summer was 7i).6°, and of the win. 
ter months 55.5°. The total rainfall, five inches. 

Camp Grant is situated on the southwestern slope of the Gra- 
ham Mountains, in the eastern part of the Territory, south of 
the Gila Valley. It is 4,833 feet above the sea. During several 
days each year snow and hail falls. The mean temperature for 
the warmest month in 1875, June, was 80° ; and for the coldest 
month, January, 49°. The mean average for the year was 64°. 
The rainfall, 20.18 inches. 

At Camp Apache, which is located on the southwestern slope 
of the White Mountains, in latitude 33° 40'', the climate is ex- 



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Win. B. Hooper & hf^SSSSS^Se^ij^ Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



18 ARIZONA. 



trerae ; the range being from 20° below freezing point on the 
coldest nights of winter, to 104° on the hottest days of summer. 
The nights are always cool, even during the warmest weather. 
The altitude is 5,000 feet. The mean temperature in January, the 
coldest month, is about 27° ; and in July, the warmest, about 79°. 
The average for the year, about 56.5°. 

Prescott, the Capital of the Territory, is situated at an altitude 
of 5,700 feet. The cold during the winter is sometimes severe, 
but for most of the year the temperature is genial, and the climate 
remarkably pleasant and healthy. According to the report of the 
Signal Service officer, the range of the thermometer in July, 
1878, was 48° to 103°; in December of the same year, 4° to 67° ; 
in January, 1879, 4° to 68°; and in June, 1879, 39° to 97°. The 
rainfall for the year ending June 30th, 1879, was 11.31 inches. 

In th£ extreme southern portion of the Territory, in the Sul- 
phur Spring Valley, San Pedro and Santa Cruz Valleys, and the 
territory lying between them, the climate is represented as being 
particularly pleasant and healthy. In summer, during the hottest 
weather, the thermometer rarely rises above 95°; and in the 
winter, at an altitude of 4,000 feet, freezing point is reached only 
for a few hours at a time. All of the semi-tropical fruits and 
plants will be cultivated in this region. The average rainfall is 
about ten inches, which, though insufficient for raising crops of 
grain without irrigation, clothes the valleys and hillsides to their 
tops with a heavy growth of grass, for a large part of the year, 
besides affording to the streams sufficient water, carefully pre- 
served and applied, to render fruitful many thousands of acres. J. 
Ross Browne thus speaks of the climate in this section : " It was 
a luxury to breathe the air ; nothing more pure or invigorating 
could exist upon earth. The unclouded sky and glowing tints of 
the mountains, the unbounded opulence of sunshine which seemed 
to sparkle in atmospheric scintillations, inspired us with a perfect 
overflow of health and spirits, and it was no wonder we built 
many castles in the air, and reveled in dreamy regions of enchant- 
ment, in which the glittering silver mines of Arizona played a 
prominent part." 

AGRICULTURAL AND PASTORAL RESOURCES. 

Under this head the Surveyor-General of Arizona in his report 
for the year 1879, says : 

" Everything produced in the temperate zone, and many things 
native to the tropics, are successfully grown in Arizona. Wheat, 
barley, and corn are the leading grains. Irish and sweet potatoes 
flourish ; garden vegetables in general ; all the fruits of tree and 
vine ; and limited but successful experiments have been made in 
growing cotton and sugar-cane. 

" All the domestic animals and fowls are grown and are healthy. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. SS£*2%32C 



RLE S 653 A 655 Market St. 
K», ( San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. TV, Wholesale Groceries. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 19 

The several businesses of growing cattle, horses, mules, and sheep 
are assuming large proportions, and many blooded animals have 
been brought from abroad at large cost. Hogs do well. Choice 
ham and bacon are cured and preferred to the imported articles. 
The magnitude and permanency of mining in Arizona mustalways 
insure large home demands for local products, and therefore good 
prices w T ill prevail ; and in no other section of our common coun- 
try will the industries be more varied or better rewarded." 

Mr. Thomas Gardiner, publisher and proprietor of the Arizona 
Quarterly Illustrated, says : 

" The vast extent and richness of the agricultural lands within 
the bounds of this Territory have hitherto been in a great meas- 
ure overlooked ; but now that by means of railroad and other fa- 
cilities they are being better known, they will soon be more ade- 
quately appreciated, and there cannot be a doubt that ere long 
they will be rapidly taken up for cultivation and duly utilized. 
On both sides of the Gila and Salt rivers, and also of the Santa 
Cruz and San Pedro, there are great tracts of unoccupied land 
that could be irrigated and would yield amazingly, and two crops 
a year. The land, too, is so deep, rich, and strong as to require 
little labor and less manure, water alone securing almost all that 
is necessary to make it pour forth its produce in great abundance. 
Our tillage soils seem suitable for almost every kind of grain. 
Hitherto the chief crops have been wheat, barley, and corn, which 
do remarkably well." 

To illustrate what is being done in farming, we cannot do bet- 
ter than to give a description of Salt River Valley, selected from 
the same journal of date April, 1881 : 

This magnificent tract of as productive agricultural land as 
can be found in the world, is located in Maricopa County, in the 
central portion of the Territory, and contains somewhere about 
250,000 acres of the richest kind of alluvial soil, and of great 
depth, which yields most abundantly and regularly, almost any 
kind of crops, more particularly of wheat, barley, corn and alfalfa ; 
while sugar-cane, cotton and rice can also be very easily and prof- 
itably raised. Every kind of fruit grows readily, of fine flavor 
and luscious in quality. The abundant supply of water, easily 
carried through a great portion of the valley, by a system of 
ditches, from Salt River, always insures large returns to the farmer 
on either side of the river. On the north side, the Grand Canal is 
nineteen miles in length, the Maricopa sixteen, the Salt River 
thirteen, the Griffin six, the Farmer's eight and the Monterey four ; 
total, sixty-six miles. On the south side, the Mesa Canal is fifteen 
miles, the Utah eight, the Tempe fifteen, the San Francisco ten, 
the Prescott six ; total fifty-four — making in all one hundred 
miles of main arteries which are tapped on their course by innu- 
merable smaller ones. Doubtless this system has proved most 
advantageous to the farmer, as without the water, the lands 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. riCtffSS^^ 



20 ARIZONA. 



would be virtually worthless. But with all due deference to 
the owners of the various canals, a consolidation of interests, 
whereby the whole would be under one great company, or organ- 
ization, would likely prove more advantageous than the present 
methods to the country at large. The present system could be 
greatly improved upon, much expenditure saved, more land irri- 
gated and utilized at less expense to the owners, and in the long 
run, better returns realized by the company of stockholders. 
Thousands of acres now lying waste and unused, could be made 
to yield as largely as those now under cultivation. The soil is so 
rich and of such great depth and strength as not to require fertil- 
izing. The Indians have tilled and cropped some portions of 
these same lands year after year, for some three hundred years, 
and still they yield as good crops as could well be expected even 
from soil in a virgin state. 

M Cost of the various canals of this valley, and the approximate 
number of acres irrigated by each this year : 

Grand Canal, 3,500 acres ! $38,000 

Maricopa Canal, 2,500 acres 25,000 

Salt River Valley Canal, 2,500 acres 30,000 

Griffin Canal, 400 acres 15,000 

Farmers' Canal, 800 acres . . 35,000 

Monterey Canal, 400 acres 10,000 

"The above are on the north side of the Salt River, and the 
following on the south side : 

Mesa Canal, 800 acres » $10,000 

Utah Ditch, 500 acres 5,000 

Tempe Canal, 2,800 acres 25,000 

San Francisco Ditch, 500 acres 10,000 

Prescott Ditch, 300 acres 8,000 

Maddux Ditch, 100 acres 5,000 

Totals— 15,100 acres . .' $216,000 

"A fair average of the wheat crop is 1,100 to 1,300 pounds per 
acre, and of barley, 1,400 to 1,600 pounds per acre. 

W. Isaac & Sons, who have 1,150 acres in grain, all in a body, 
have had some remarkable yields. They first put in 200 acres 
four years ago, and have kept on increasing each year. Their 
average yield has been 2,000 pounds of barley per acre for four 
years ; but on fourteen acres the average was 2,800 pounds per 
acre the first year, and on twelve acres, 2,830 pounds of wheat 
per acre were produced. They experimented by planting four 
acres with eight pounds of wheat, ridged 2x2 feet, which yielded 
2,300 pounds to the acre." 

The valley of the Gila, extending entirely across the Territory, 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. ■ 



MASIFA€TIKKK»,( San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 21 

from a few rods to ten miles in width, affords an immense quan- 
tity of land which can be irrigated and cultivated. The remains 
of old irrigating canals prove that the valley has been used by a 
populous race for agricultural purposes. From Gila Bend to the 
Colorado River it is estimated that there are 500,000 acres suit- 
able for cultivation that could be irrigated by the Gila. The val- 
ley about Florence is equal in quality to the Salt River Valley. 
Some fine farms and orchards are found in this neighborhood. 
All the ordinary grains and fruits grow luxuriantly. From Camp 
Thomas to the boundary of New Mexico there are a number of 
tributary valleys to the Gila, such as Pueblo Viejo, Ash Creek, 
etc., which are said to contain at least 100,000 acres that can be 
irrigated and farmed. The valley of the San Pedro affords a 
large amount of good farming land, and water enough, perhaps, 
if judiciously collected and used, to irrigate a large portion of it, 
as the rainfall in this valley averages from 8 to 10 inches, and 
irrigation once in two weeks is found sufficient. At Tres Alamos 
is an orchard in which apples, figs, grapes, apricots, and peaches 
grow luxuriantly. Below this point are several ranches where 
good crops of wheat and barley are raised. 

The slopes and mesa land on both sides are covered with nutri- 
tious grasses most of the year, which renders it desirable for graz- 
ing purposes. Between the Galiuro Mountains and San Simon 
Valley is Hooker's large grazing ranch, where he keeps 5,000 
head of cattle and 500 horses. San Simon Valley and the Pelon- 
cillo Mountains bounding it on the northeast, afford thousands of 
acres of good grazing lands. There are no running streams in 
this vicinity, but water is abundant near the surface, and in some 
places gives the appearance of wet lands. The. Sulphur Spring 
Valley, lying between the Chiricahua and Dragoon mountains, 
derives its moisture from mountain brooks which empty into it. 
It is a long, wide valley, and covered with grass. The foot-hills 
on each side are also covered with a luxuriant growth, which 
makes this one of the finest cattle ranges in Arizona. What is 
said of these two ranges applies to most of the mountain ranges 
in Southern Arizona. They have more or less water, always suf- 
ficient for herds ; their foot-hills and slopes are covered with nu- 
tritious grass, and the climate is so mild that there is no danger 
from exposure at any time of the year. The Sonoita and Baba- 
comori are small valleys, with living streams running through 
them, which will afford some fine farms and orchards. The 
Santa Cruz affords considerable tillable land, and a large amount 
of good grazing land. Some parts of this valley have been culti- 
vated an indefinite length of -time, and without any manuring 
shows no deterioration in its productiveness. The valley of the 
Little Colorado furnishes some 300,000 acres of land capable of 
cultivation. The Mormons from Salt Lake have commenced sev- 
eral settlements, here. The valley of the Verde, though narrow, 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. pT^?i^^\S^}Winesaf all Kinds. 



22 ARIZONA. 



affords some excellent land, and abundance of water for its irriga- 
tion. It extends from Salt River northerly into Yavapai County, 
and in that portion of it there is considerable land under cultiva- 
tion. Skull, Agua Fria, Date Creek, Peeples, Kirkland, Walnut 
Grove, Hassayampa, Williams Fork, Big Sandy, Big and Little 
Chino, Round, and Aubrey, are all valleys of from one to five 
miles in width and several miles in length, which afford good 
farming land and water for irrigation. All through the mount- 
ains are innumerable small valleys, from fifty to several hundred 
acres in extent, which afford good farming and orchard land, 
while the slopes and mesas around them are excellent ranges for 
cattle and sheep. In the Upper Tonto Basin and Mogollon Mount- 
ains are many such valleys. 

The region of the San Francisco mountains in Yavapai County 
is thus described by Lieut. Beale : 

" It is the most beautiful region I ever remember to have seen 
in any part of the world. A vast forest of gigantic pines, inter- 
sected frequently by extensive open glades, sprinkled all over with 
mountain meadows and wide savannahs, filled with the richest 
grasses was traversed by our party for many successive days." 

Dr. Parry, also of the United States Exploring Expedition, says 
of this region : 

" We have in these elevated districts a climate favoring a growth 
of trees, a more equable distribution of rain and dew throughout 
the year, especially adapted to the production of nutritious grasses, 
and the cultivation of grain without resorting to the expensive 
processes of irrigation. These desirable climatic features are 
especially noticeable along the elevated slopes of the San Fran- 
cisco mountains, where magnificent pine slopes are agreeably 
interspersed with beautiful grassy valleys and parks, numerous 
springs and delightfully invigorating atmosphere." The White 
Mountains in the southern part of Apache County are thus de- 
scribed by Dr. Rothrock : 

" Arizona is, emphatically, a land of contrasts in scenery ; 
its tropical climate either parching the soil and vegetation or 
under a fair supply of water causing the flora to deck the 
surface with a luxuriaut covering of verdure. Nowhere is this 
statement more strikingly true than in the Sierra Blanca and 
the adjoining plains south. On the latter the ensemble of the 
vegetation is dwarfed and hardened from the aridity of the soil 
and rapidity of evaporation. In the mountains, however, dense 
forests alternate with well watered glades, covered with a luxuri- 
ant growth of grass and flowers. Between the ranges are well 
watered valleys, producing grass -enough for all the herds of the 
territory." 

When the extent of our mountain territory is considered, it 
will be seen that the number of these small mountain valleys 
reach thousands, and that their agricultural and pastoral resources 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. Kiift&g&ffiP4»£2£* 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., wh.ij.aw 



BOOT8 A\I» SHOES. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 23 

in the agregate perhaps surpass the resources of the large val- 
leys. 

MINERALS. 

The Territory of Arizona is pre-eminently mineral in its natural 
resources. No doubt it has sufficient arable lands to furnish a 
large population with all the grain, fruit, meat and dairy products 
required, and farmers will find these productions profitable, be- 
cause a ready market will be at their door. Many articles will, 
no doubt, be manufactured profitably for Hbme consumption, as 
our population increases ; still, we do not claim that Arizona is 
either a manufacturing or agricultural Territory. With the ex- 
ception of cattle and sheep raising, the conditions for successful 
farming on a large scale do not exist. In all countries, mining 
is an attractive industry, and in a new country, like this, where 
the land is open to all, where the prospector's pick may at any 
blow disclose the rich silver vein, and where so many have found 
fortunes, all other pursuits are sure to become secondary. The 
mineral region is not confined to a few localities, as in Colorado, 
or to a narrow belt of a few miles in extent, like the famous Corn- 
stock of Nevada, but on the contrary, it embraces the entire Ter- 
ritory, 325 miles square. Nowhere else in the world, has there 
been found so many veins of silver. Every range of mountains, 
and in some sections every ridge and hill discloses these veins. 
They have been found from the Mexican boundary to a point 
north of Prescott, a distance of 250 miles, and from the Colorado 
to the boundary of New Mexico. No limit can be given of their 
extent, and a catalogue of their locations would be a large volume 
of more than 100,000 records. 

The term mineral includes all the inorganic substances which 
are taken from the earth, such as clay for brick, granite and mar- 
ble for building purposes, etc., but we shall refer only, with the 
exception of salt and coal, to the metalliferous veins. 

The silver mines of Arizona were discovered and worked more 
than a hundred years ago, while Mexico, including our Territory, 
belonged to Spain. Excavations have been found which ap- 
pear to have been made at even an earlier date, and have been 
attributed to the Aztecs, and its not improbable that a part of 
the glittering mass of gold, silver and turquoise which excited the 
cupidity of Cortez and his followers, was collected in Arizona. 
Old Mexican traditions locate Arizuma, an Aztec name, signify- 
ing land of silver, in the valley of the Santa Cruz. Wonderful 
stories were told of the amount of gold and silver to be seen in the 
seven cities of Cibola, and expeditions were sent by the Viceroy 
of Mexico to find and seize the coveted treasure. Nothing was 
accomplished by these expeditions but the partial destruction of 
a peaceful, native race, who had made considerable progress in 
civilization. Afterwards, that order, whose piety and zeal have 



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24 ARIZONA. 



furnished throughout the New World, so many pioneers, the Jesuits 
began founding missions in this unknown land. Through one of 
these missions, located near the Santa Rita Mountains, the discov- 
ery of rich silver mines was made. A Yaqui Indian is said to 
have made the discovery in 1769. On, and immediately below 
the surface of the ground, pure silver in large pieces was found, 
many of which weighed twenty-five and fifty lbs., several 500 
lbs., and one mass is particularly spoken of, which gave 3 500 lbs. 
after being fused, and divided on the spot where it was discov- 
ered in order to remove it. A large population was immediately 
attracted to these mountains by this discovery, and the valley of 
the Santa Cruz became the center of active mining operations. 
The town of Tubac was probably the largest mining village. 
Within a circuit of fifteen miles around this town, one hundred 
and fifty silver mines were more or less worked. Other rich dis- 
tricts were found in this range of mountains, and worked at 
great profit, large quantities of silver being taken out and carried 
into the towns of Sonora. Seven years after the first discovery, 
the king of Spain, who had seized considerable of the treasure first 
taken out, decided that all the silver pertained to the private patri- 
mony of the crown, and that the mines in future should be worked 
for his special profit. This decree did much to discourage min- 
ing, although considerable was carried on more or less secretly by 
the Jesuits, but often entirely interrupted by the hostility of the In- 
dians. When the revolution in Mexico occurred, these missionaries 
were banished, and their property confiscated, then mining entirely 
ceased, and now, even the exact location of such mines as the Tuma- 
cacori, Salero, and Plancha de la Plata, the richness of which is a 
matter of record, is unknown. ..Recent prospectors claim to have 
rediscovered them ; whether or not they have done so, it is cer- 
tain that their search has been rewarded by new discoveries, which, 
in importance, may exceed those of old. 

In 1857, this Territory having been purchased by the United 
States, the Americans turned their attention to this rich silver 
district, and commenced work on several mines. During the next 
four years, many new mines were located. The rebellion caused 
a total cessation of work, and very little attention was paid to the 
mines in this section till 1875, when the discovery of wonderfully 
rich districts in the Pinal and Apache ranges of mountains, north 
of the Gila River, gave a new impetus to mining throughout the 
Territory. These discoveries were followed in 1877 by what 
appears to be a still more important one in the southeastern part 
of our Territory, that of the Tombstone mines, which have 
already given evidence of being among the richest in the world. 

The developments already made leave no doubt as to the perma- 
nency of the mines of Arizona. Innumerable ledges have been 
found containing rich ore near the surface, but in many cases as 
depth is attained the ores grow richer. The veins dive into the 



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LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 



25 



earth at all angles of inclination, giving us vertical lodes and 
blanket lodes, as they do in other countries. They pinch into 
narrow seams, give out, come in again, swell into large masses, 
the same as mineral veins all over the world. Every known vari- • 
ety of silver ore is found divided into the two classes, in reference 
to reduction, of milling ore and smelting ore, and these two classes 
are found in the same kind of formation with the same general 
differences as are recognized in other sections. The word fissure 
in its application to mineral veins is founded on a theory in regard 
to their formation by.no means generally accepted, and we think 
the tendency is to reject the theory and retain the word only as 
descriptive of a large and permanent vein. Still using it in its 
old sense, all the important mines here give, so far as they have 
been developed, the same evidence of being true fissure veins as 
the mines of Nevada and Mexico. No known case of giving out 
has yet occurred, though several mines which have paid from the 
surface have reached a depth of 600 feet. The large amount of 
float ore found here might be cited as an evidence of the perma- 
nence of the veins, indicating not only the length of time which 
nature has been tearing them down, but also the great period 
during which circumstances were favorable for their formation. 
Those who believe that mineral veins are the result of infiltration 
or segregation from, or near the surface, will be likely to consider 
the depth to which such veins might reach in a country which has 
been drained to so great a depth. Wherever a number of veins 
giving good promise have been found within a neighborhood of 
a few miles, the section has been formed into a mining district. 
These districts are of all sizes, containing from 25 to 2,000 square 
miles. Over eighty have been formed, and additions are con- 
stantly being made. They contain from 100 to 3,000 locations 
each. Every location indicates the appearance of ore in greater 
or less quantities, and we may thus obtain an idea of the vast ex- 
tent of country which is permeated by mineral veins in this Terri- 
tory. 

Gold. — Gold placers are found throughout every portion of the 
Territory. They have been worked by Mexicans for many years 
past, and a considerable number are still engaged in this branch 
of mining. The scarcity of water in many localities renders the 
washing of the earth on a large scale impossible, most of the work 
being done by individual effort, or two persons working together. 
A small shaft is sunk a few feet in depth to the bed rock, which 
is scraped, the earth sacked and carried to the nearest spring or 
stream and there washed. In this rude way considerable gold in 
the aggregate is taken from the placers every year. They yield 
from $1.50 to $3.00 per day, but occasionally a very rich spot is 
found and a much larger amount taken out. There are several 
sections where water might be introduced by canals, as on the 
placers of the San Francisco -and in the Horseshoe Basin south of 



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26 AEIZONA. 



the Gila, and in others water might be collected in reservoirs 
made by damming gulches or small streams, and sufficient ob- 
tained to wash the earth in paying quantities. The Santa Rita 
Mountains contain many gulches and small valleys where gold is 
found in paying quantities. Horseshoe Basin, now organized into 
a district called Gold Mountain, lying in the central part of Pima 
County, includes many thousand acres of surface diggings. In 
1862 placers were discovered near La Paz, a short distance east 
of the Colorado River, which have been more or less worked ever 
since. It is estimated that they yielded a million of dollars the 
first two years. Several of the mining districts around Prescott 
were first located on account of their placers, and some are still 
being worked, giving employment to quite a number of men. 
The Weaver District in the southern part of Yavapai County 
has a large area of placer diggings, where mining is now car- 
ried on. 

Surface diggings are also found in the Bradshaw Basin, Tonto 
Basin, White Tank Mountains, and in many of the ravines and 
gulches on the northern slope of the Salt River Valley. In Gra- 
ham County on the San Francisco River is a large scope of coun- 
try containing rich placers, and recently very rich deposits have 
been found in Maricopa County, near Seymour. When the extent 
of territory is considered which the above enumeration indicates, 
it will be seen that our placers must for a long time to come afford 
an important resource of gold production. 

The more permanent resource of gold will undoubtedly be gold 
quartz. These veins, like the silver veins, have been found in 
nearly every part of the Territory, the only limit so far being the 
limit of exploration. A large proportion of the mines of Yavapai, 
Pima, and Graham counties are worked exclusively for gold, while 
all the silver veins carry a greater or less per centage of this royal 
metal. 

Copper. — Copper ores are found in all parts of the Territory in 
quantities unequaled by any other portion of the United States. 
Perhaps nowhere else in the world has such immense ledges of 
high grade ores been found. They are of that class which is easily 
reduced by smelting, consisting of red oxides, gray carbonates and 
copper glance. The red oxides frequently carry pure copper, of 
which many large masses have been found. The ores carry so 
little gangue that only a small amount of labor is required in dress- 
ing them for the furnace, which is no inconsiderable consideration 
in their economical reduction. 

The Copper Queen in Warren District, near the town of Bisbee, 
has a ledge of over a hundred feet in width, all fine ore, yielding from 
twenty to sixty per cent, of copper. A thirty-ton furnace at this 
mine yields seven tons of pure copper per day, and the quality of 
the metal is equal to that of the well known Lake Superior copper. 
Six men have taken out of the mine and dressed ready for the fur- 



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MAHUFACTHKEKS, ( San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 27 

nace ten tons of ore in a day. The smelting is done with English 
coke, and yet we are told the profit is eight cents per pound on 
the copper. 

In the Santa Rita Mountains is another copper region now being 
explored, in which the ledges are said to be of immense size and 
equal in quality of ore to those of Bisbee. 

In the northeastern part of Pima County, in the Silver Bell Dis- 
trict, some very rich and extensive copper ledges have been dis- 
covered, and smelting works erected. In the western part of this 
county is another copper district, in the center of which are the 
noted Ajo mines, which were discovered and worked several years 
since. In the northern part of Yuma County is a large region be- 
tween the Granite Wash Mountains and Bill Williams Fork 
which affords copper ores. The Planet mines, situated in the 
northern part of this district, have yielded about 8,000 tons of cop- 
per. In Gila County, near the town of Globe, are situated the 
mines of the Old Dominion Company, which are remarkably rich. 
Other mines in this vicinity have large quantities of paying ore. 
Four smelting furnaces are in operation here On Cave Creek, in 
the eastern slope of the Yerde Mountains, is another copper dis- 
trict, in which there is an immense ledge said to average thirty- 
four per cent. East of Agua Fria Valley, Yavapai County, at the 
foot of the Black Hills, is an unexplored region of copper which 
promises to equal anything yet found in the Territory. It is said 
that hundreds of tons of good float ore may readily be gathered 
from the surface of the ground. At Riverside, Pinal County, 
smelters have been erected by the Pinal Copper Mining Company 
for the reduction of ores taken from their mines about six miles 
distant. 

The Clifton copper district, in the eastern part of Graham 
County, near the Rio San Francisco, has long been known. - The 
copper developments here are truly wonderful ; ledges from 30 
to 100 feet in width crop out of the ground for thousands of feet 
in length, and where they are cut by the canon to the depth of a 
thousand feet, the same quality and quantity of ore is exhibited. 
The ores are red oxide, gray and green carbonates, and copper 
glance. Smelting furnaces have been erected at the town of 
Clifton, and are now running on these ores. It will be readily 
observed from this condensed sketch of the copper regions that 
this metal is to become one of the large resources of the Territory. 

Coal. — Coal has recently been discovered in the eastern part of 
Pinal County, on Deer Creek. The vein, where prospected, is ten 
feet thick, and croppings have been traced several miles, giving 
evidence of a large coal field. The quality is said to be good. 
This discovery is regarded as most important, as it gives assur- 
ance of cheaper fuel for the smelting furnaces. Some three years 
ago coal was discovered in the Aravaipa Caflon, and it is quite 
probable that the Deer Creek coal field is extensive, going as far 



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WM. B. HOOPER & ro.{^,t£ h ^^ T ii2^}Wfe)l«8ah Liquor Dealers. 



28 ARIZONA. 



south as this point. Coal is known to be in various parts of 
Yavapai and Apache Counties. Near Fort Defiance, a vein is 
reported nine feet in thickness ; twenty miles west of the Moqui 
villages, two veins, one above the other, crop out in a canon, one 
eight feet, and the other four feet in thickness. A short distance 
from these, another vein is reported twenty-five feet in thickness. 
Immediately at the Oraybe, a large vein crops from the mt sa. The 
United States Exploring Expedition also reports coal in Mesa La 
Vaca and in the White Mountains near Fort Apache. These 
reports are considered reliable, and show the appearance of coal 
over a large extent of territory, and renders it altogether probable 
that when the northern portion of the territory shall become* ac- 
cessible a vast quantity of this mineral will be found. 

Lead. — Probably no other two metals enter as extensively into 
economical uses as lead and iron. The uses about the homestead, 
and in all mechanical constructions and in the arts, are so mani- 
fold and continuous, that the quantity required to supply the de- 
mand is almost beyond computation. These, with copper and 
tin, may be called the industrial metals. While gold and silver 
are valuable accessories in the arts and necessities, for currency, 
as well as for ornamental purposes, these metals are the sin- 
ews of all mechanical agencies — the indispensables. In social econ- 
omy, they represent the laborers and producers, while gold and 
silver represent the capitalists. Without lead and iron, the 
world would retreat to the age of wood and stone. These eco- 
nomical metals are the real precious metals, growing more precious 
the greater their quantity and the lower their price. Indeed 
much of their value depends upon their abundance and cheapness, 
as general use requires both conditions, and also insures a market 
at remunerative prices. Demand may sometimes fall behind sup- 
ply, and the article falls in price, this renders its application to 
many new uses, profitable. Fluctuations in demand and supply, 
as we have lately experienced in silver and copper, are likely to 
occur with any metal to an extent that will render for a short 
time, their production unprofitable ; such a period in the econom- 
ical metals is inevitably short, as the old demand goes steadily on 
and new ones are created, while the supply decreases. The price 
then rises or the means of production is cheapened, and in either 
case the industry prospers. A country which possesses large de- 
posits of these industrial metals, has a resource which lasts a long 
time, and gives employment to a large population. But a year or 
two ago our copper mines received but little attention, notwith- 
standing their richness was known. The price of copper and the 
expense of freight rendered its production unprofitable. Now we 
begin to see that the production of copper is to become immedi- 
ately one of our chief resources. No doubt a considerable time 
will elapse before we shall turn our attention to the manufacture 
of iron, the ore of which is abundant in many places in our Terri- 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. a 



XLJLX U F A< XL III; Mi. a», \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



. f 

TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 29 

tory, and yet not in such quantities as to attract attention, or offer 
superior or equal inducements over other sections of the Union 
east of us, where labor, transportation and capital are cheaper. 
But in regard to lead, we see no reason why its production, like 
copper, may not become, within a short time, an important indus- 
trial resource. The immense quantities which have been mined, 
in connection with silver, in Colorado, Utah and Nevada, have 
temporarily affected the market, and rendered lead mining un- 
profitable, but with a metal, the use of which is rapidly increasing, 
the demand will, in a short time, catch up with the production, 
and mining in it again become profitable, especially here, where 
it can be produced so cheaply on account of the unlimited quan- 
tity of good ore, and its production being made in most cases, 
incidental to the mining of silver. With lower rates of trans- 
portation, it would immediately become an element of calculation 
in many of our silver mines. Our smelting ores of silver are 
found in greater or less quantities in all the silver districts, and 
must afford large quantities of lead. Besides these, there are in 
many districts, immense ledges of silver smelting ores, of two low 
a grade for present work, which will become available when the 
production of lead shall also become an object. In the northeast- 
ern part of Castle Dome District, in Yuma County, there are im- 
mense ledges of lead ore, carrying a small amount of silver. 
These ledges are also found northward, in the Plomosa Mountains, 
and in the Cedar District of Mohave County, as well as in many 
other portions of our Territory. 

Iron. — No attention has been given to iron ores, for the reason 
that some time must elapse, and changes take place, in and around 
our Territory, before the production of iron can be made profita- 
ble. Good ore has been noted, however, in many sections, espe- 
cially in the Chiricahua Mountains in the south, and in Cave Creek 
District Maricopa County, where large bodies of hematite ore 
are found. Good ore is also mentioned in the White Mountains in 
Southern Apache, and in the District of the Rio San Francisco. 

Tin. — Small quantities of wood-tin, one of the best ores of this 
valuable metal, have been found in various localities on this coast. 
In Northern Mexico considerable float ore has been found of a 
kind generally termed stream- tin, from being found in the gravel 
beds of water streams. Some years ago the writer was shown a 
couple of handfuls of these nodules of stream-tin, which were said 
to have been found in Arizona. There is reason to believe that 
tin would be found here if prospectors were acquainted with the 
ore. Stream-tin is likely to be found in gold-washing ; but unless 
the attention of the miner is directed to it, the ore would be thrown 
aside with the other debris. It is found in small nodules from the 
size of a pea to the size of a man's fist, or larger. It is generally 
of a brown color, although all shades from gray to black are 
found. It has a smooth, hard surface, and feels like metal. On 



H 



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WM. B. HOOPER & CO.{ T ^a h 5Sfeii? , i£Ssr , '}Cioars of all Kinds. 



30 • ARIZONA. 



breaking one of these nodules it is likely to be found softer inside, 
and show concentric layers, like an agate. On account of its 
weight it will be found on the bottom of the sluice or gold pan. 
Wood-tin in the ledge or bowlder is frequently of a grayish color, 
with streaks of lead color and brown, and is not unfrequently 
mixed with little nodules of red. It often resembles sandstone, 
but its weight shows at once that it is metalliferous. The test is 
simple : Crush a small quantity of the suspected ore to a powder, 
mix with it cyanide of potassium, then cut a hollow in a piece of 
charcoal, put the substance in, turn the flame of a blow-pipe on to 
it, and if it is tin ore you will get small beads of pure tin. 

Salt. — Salt is found in springs and beds in the northern part of 
Mohave County, where there appears to be an extensive salt range 
running northward into Nevada. Salt springs and considerable 
deposits of salt are found on the Black River near the mouth of 
Canon Creek, in Maricopa County, and on a branch of the San 
Carlos, called Salt Creek. 

Limestone is found in various portions of the Territory, and 
especial mention has been made of it in the Chiricahua, Dragoon, 
and White Mountains, and also in Cave Creek District, in the 
northern part of Maricopa County. Large quantities of lime- 
stone and marble are also to be found in several localities on the 
Colorado River. Marble Canon, on the Colorado, in Yavapai 
County, is a gorge 2,500 feet in depth, which the river has worn 
down through a bed of marble several miles in length, and of 
every shade and quality. Gypsum is found in the Whetstone 
Mountains in Cachise County, on the San Pedro, and also near 
Sunset Crossing on the Little Colorado. 



MINING DISTRICTS. 



AGUA FKIA YAVAPAI COUNTY. 



This district, located in the southern portion of the county, 
east of the Black Canon District, contains gold, silver and copper 
mines, but they have not as yet been developed to any great ex- 
tent. It is said that rich discoveries have recently been made in 
this section. 

AJO MINES, PIMA COUNTY. 

These copper mines, which were discovered by Mexicans a long 
time ago, are situated in the western part of the county, forty 
miles south of the Gila River, and one hundred miles from Yuma. 
Shortly after our purchase of the Territory, they were opened and 
worked by American capital, the ore being hauled to Yuma, 



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San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 31 

through a desert country, and then shipped to Swansea or Boston. 
Although the ores were rich and abundant, yet this method 
proved so expensive that operations were suspended. 

ARIVACA, PIMA COUNTY. 

This district is in the extreme southern portion of the county, 
adjoining Oro Blanco District. 

The Heintzelman, a well known mine, was located and worked 
some years ago, but is now lying idle. It has a working shaft 
230 feet deep, and several prospect shafts from ten to fifty feet 
deep. The ore is a kind of zinc blende, and frequently of very 
high grade, giving assays as high as $4,000 to the ton, but it is 
exceedingly base, and has to be worked by the leaching process. 
This mine has yielded about $850,000. The Juiche is an old 
mine, which has a shaft down sixty-five feet, and some open cuts 
showing rich ore. The Consolidated Arizona Gold and Silver 
Mining Company, Mr. John McCafferty, Superintendent, employs 
from forty to fifty men. The working shaft is down 160 feet, 
and is surmounted by good steam hoisting machinery. Levels 
have been opened, and' a number of crosscuts run, which show 
ore said to mill $100 per ton. The company has erected a ten- 
stamp mill, which is now in operation. The Arkansas, belonging 
to Farr & Unthank, is being vigorously developed. The shaft is 
down 300 feet, and the vein, which at first was quite narrow, is 
widening out. At this depth it averages S400 per ton ; where it 
was first struck, it carried virgin silver, yielding from one dollar 
to five dollars per pound. This rich ore is being shipped to San 
Francisco for reduction. At the Lonjarina mine, ore is being 
extracted and worked in the Derre & Townsend mill. It is argen- 
tiferous galena, and averages eighty-five ounces to the ton. The 
Albatros mine is also being developed, and has a shaft down about 
seventy-five feet, all the way in good ore. There are many other 
promising locations in this district, among which may be men- 
tioned the Ortega, Tennessee, Vale of Ranja, Hombre, Plomosa, 
Union, Dos Amigos, Mentor, and Alpha. 

AUBREY, MOHAVE COUNTY. 

This is a large district in the southern part of the county, 
bounded on the south by Bill Williams Fork, and on the west by 
the Colorado River. The eastern part embraces the Hualapais 
range of mountains, in which, during the past ten years, a large 
number of silver ledges have been discovered. At present but 
little is being done in the district, the rich discoveries in other 
more accessible sections of the Territory having diverted atten- 
tion from this promising region. The noted McCracken Silver 
mine, located in the northeastern portion of the district, was dis- 



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Uf m D Unnnnr.JJ.Pn (Tucson & 1'hoenix, A.T., Kl Paso, ) Sole Agents J. A. MILLER 
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32 ARIZONA. 



covered in 1874 from eroppings which extended nearly north and 
south for a distance of ten miles. The vein at the surface is, in 
some places, eighty feet wide. The best milling ore of the 
McCracken averaged about ninety-five dollars per ton, although 
there were narrow streaks which were much richer. This mine 
has been worked to a considerable extent, and for a time yielded 
a large amount of bullion. The Signal and Palmetto are adjoin- 
ing mines on the same ledge, which have also produced a large 
amount. At the Peabody mine, ore is being extracted and worked 
in a twenty-stamp mill at Signal. 

AZTEC, PIMA COUNTY. 

This is an old district, lying east of the Tyndall and north of 
the Patagonia District, embracing within its limits the southern 
part of the Santa Rita Mountains. The general formation is 
granite, syenite, and porphyry. The mineral veins are numerous, 
and several of great width show distinct eroppings for long dis- 
tances. Evidences of mining which must have been done in olden 
times occur along these veins. Some of the rich mines worked by 
the Jesuits are supposed to have been located in this vicinity. The 
Aztec Syndicate, a large mining company, made this the center 
of their operations. The Sonoita Creek at a short distance affords 
plenty of water for milling, and wood is abundant — oak and mes- 
quite being found on the slopes and lower ranges, while higher up 
on the mountains is pine, which makes good lumber. Springs of 
excellent water are plentiful, and much of the surface is covered 
for several months in the year with fine gramma grass. No other 
district offers better facilities for mining than this. The gulches 
have all afforded placer gold, and a considerable district lying 
east is more or less worked in this way. Mr. Campbell, who rep- 
resents an Eastern company, is now engaged in opening some 
mines here, with excellent prospects. 

BIG BUG, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

Big Bug District is a short distance east of Prescott, adjoining 
the Turkey Creek District. The Bell, a silver mine, has a shaft 
180 feet in depth. The vein, which is thirty inches in width, 
carries smelting ore assaying as high as $160 per ton. The Po- 
land, Hamilton, Bullion, and Mountain Boy, belonging to the 
Stokes Mining Co., and the claims of the Valley Forge Mining 
Co., are also promising locations. 

BILL WILLIAMS FORK, YUMA COUNTY. 

This district, located in the extreme northwestern portion of 
the county, is bounded on the west by the Colorado River and 



TllB J. M. BmnSWiGk & BSlKB CO. MANUFACTURERS,! Van Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., wtaj»«.«A».wA M . 



AND I'AIVTS. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 33 

on the north by Bill Williams Fork, a tributary of the Colorado. 
During the excitement in regard to placer diggings in this vicinity 
several years since, considerable prospecting was done for gold 
quartz, resulting in the discovery of the Planet, one of the largest 
and best known copper mines in Arizona. It has been worked at 
different times to a considerable extent, yielding ore of a very high 
grade, from which several thousand tons of copper have been ex- 
tracted. There are many other rich veins of copper ore in the 
district, and when this region becomes more accessible they will 
no doubt be worked on an extensive scale. 

BLACK CANON, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This district lies immediately east of Humbug and Pine Grove 
Districts, on the eastern slope of the Bradshaw Mountains. The 
ledges in this section are almost exclusively gold-bearing ; the for- 
mation, slate and granite. The Valanciana mine, the oldest loca- 
tion in the district, was discovered in 1860 by Hutchinson and 
Carpenter. It has yielded about $45,000. The Iconoclast, owned 
by Wickenberg and Cochran, has a vein 1 6 feet wide, which aver- 
ages $25 per ton. As the ore is crushed by an arastra, only that 
which has been closely assorted is worked. This gives $100 per 
ton. The Clipper, owned by Curtis and Trotter, is also worked 
by an arastra, and yields $100 per ton. The Gillespie has a six- 
foot vein, which is said to average $40 per ton. Sufficient rock 
is taken out to keep two arastras running. The Nigger Brown 
mine, owned by John Anderson, has ore which pays about $25 
per ton. There are altogether about sixty locations in the dis- 
trict, many of which have been sufficiently prospected to prove 
that they possess good milling ore. No mills have yet been 
erected, all the ore being worked by the slow process of arastras. 
Wood is scarce, and lumber has to be hauled 25 miles. 

BLACK HILLS, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This district, located in a range of hills east of Prescott, is said 
to abound in gold and silver ledges, but they have not as yet 
been developed to any great extent. On the western slope large 
quantities of copper float of a high grade have been found, indi- 
cating the existence of extensive ledges of that ore. 

BLOODSUCKER, PIMA COUNTY. 

This district is situated in the foot-hills of the Bloodsucker 
Mountains, 45 miles northwest of Tucson. The mines were dis- 
covered and several locations made by D. B. Rea and others about 
January, 1880. The formation is granite, syenite, and slate, con- 
taining veins carrying both gold and silver, but gold predominates. 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



Int. B. Hooper & 8o.{ 1 ^a i 8Sfet;:i£Er}4Si. Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



34 ARIZONA. 



Springs of good water are found throughout this section, and 
wood, principally mesquite, is abundant. 

BRADSHAW, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

See Tiger District. 

BRON 

See Tombstone District. 

CACHISE, CACHISE COUNTY. 

This district is in the Dragoon Pass, on the northern end of 
the Dragoon Mountains, near the line of the Southern Pacific 
Railroad. The formation is granite, lime, and porphyry. The 
ores are mostly carbonates, containing both gold and silver. 
Several claims have been bonded to Eastern parties, who are now 
developing them. There is a fair supply of timber on the moun- 
tains, principally scrub oak ; and water for milling purposes can 
be obtained by sinking. 

CALIFORNIA, CACHISE COUNTY. 

This district is situated in the eastern part of the county, em- 
bracing a portion of the Chiricahua range of mountains. Its 
general altitude is from 5,000 to 6,000 feet, giving it a cool and 
healthy climate. The summit of the main range of mountains is 
covered with fir and yellow pine, furnishing lumber and fuel. 
Water of a good quality is obtained from springs and brooks, 
which are quite numerous in this section. Gayleyville, the prin- 
cipal town, is twenty-five miles from San Simon, a station of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. The rock formation of the mineral 
belt is metamorphic limestone, syenite, and porphyry. The ores 
are generally argentiferous galena, which have to be smelted. The 
silver is readily obtained as the ore carries its own flux. 

The Texas mine is opened by a shaft 150 feet deep, from which 
several prospecting tunnels have been run. It is said to have an 
eight foot vein of ore, which assays $100 per ton. There is a 
large amount of ore on the dump. The company have recently 
put up a smelting furnace, which is in active operation. The 
Continental mine has a narrow vein of black metal ore of very 
high grade. It is being extracted, sacked, and shipped to San 
Francisco. The Roman Beauty, another very promising mine, is 
being energetically developed, and bids fair to soon rank with 
some of the producing mines of other sections. The Hell mine 
has a shaft down 85 feet j the ledge at that point is 14 feet wide, 
and carries an 18 inch pay streak of high-grade ore. In addition 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TABLEf 653 & 655 Market St. 
9IA,VVFACTlIKEKii,t San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 



35 



to the above are the Cleveland, Hardshell, Bruce, Humming Bird, 
East End, Keystone, and other mines, which are being developed 
and yielding rich ore. 

CASA GRANDE, PINAL COUNTY. 

This is a new district, located near the line of Pima and Pinal 
Counties, thirty miles south of Casa Grande Station, at what was 
formerly known as Krohn's Camp. It embraces a portion of the 
Quijota Mountains. The formation is syenite and limestone. 
Carbonates predominate in the silver ores, in all of which the 
value of gold is about equal to the silver. The veins are large, 
with distinct croppings. On a number of locations rich ore has 
been found, but none have as yet been developed to any great ex- 
tent. There is plenty of iron wood, and mesquite for fuel, but 
water is scarce. 

CASTLE DOME, YUMA COUNTY. 

This is a very large district, in the western part of the county, 
bounded on the south by the Gila River, on the west by the Col- 
orado, and on the north by Silver District. Many of the mines 
in this section have been worked almost continuously since 1869, 
and a large amount of bullion in the aggregate has been extracted. 
At the present time there is comparatively little activity prevail- 
ing, on account, perhaps, of the rich discoveries in other portions 
of the Territory, which have monopolized general attention. 

At Castle Dome Landing, on the Colorado River, is located the 
smelting works of the Castle Dome M. & S. Co., who are engaged 
in the reduction of ore from their mine some miles distant. In 
addition to this, large quantities of ore are sent to San Francisco 
for reduction. The district contains both gold and silver ledges, 
and in some localities considerable placer gold has been extracted. 

CAVE CREEK, MARICOPA COUNTY. 

This district is located in the northeastern portion of the 
county, near the line of Yavapai. The mines were discovered in 
1875 by H. C. McDonald and William Hicks. The formation is 
granite and slate. Some of the ores are free milling, while others 
contain base metal, and are rebellious. Wood and water are 
abundant. 

The Panther mine, owned by a New York company, is taking 
out good ore, and are about to erect a forty-stamp mill. At the 
Galena Prince mine, owned by Philes and Chaney, a good quality 
of argentiferous galena is being extracted. Prospecting is going 
on in the Gold Hill, Maricopa, Phoenix, and Rackensack. The 
Golden Star Mining Company has a ten-stamp mill. In the 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. {^^KtSnss^fsfi^Sr-Hlluminatlng Oils. 



36 ARIZONA. 



southern part of the district are the Union, Gila Monster, Scar- 
let, Red Dog, and Deseret, in all of which good ore has been 
found. It is said that iron ore in large quantities has recently 
been discovered in this section. 

CEDAR VALLEY, MOHAVE COUNTY. 

This is one of the districts which was formed a few years ago 
during an excitement in silver mining in this part of the Terri- 
tory, consequent upon finding several rich mines. It is situated 
immediately north of the Aubrey District, and embraces in its 
eastern part the Hualapai range of mountains, which is undoubt- 
edly a rich mineral region. The district contains plenty of wood 
and water, thus affording facilities for successful mining. The 
ores are gold, silver, copper, and lead. 

The Arnold and Hibernia were at one time considered valuable 
locations. The Magendie and Gunsight have both produced good 
ore. There is one ten-stamp mill in the district. 

CHEERY CREEK, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This district lies near Fort Yerde, in the Black Hills. We 
have no particulars in regard to it exce])t that some large veins of 
copper ore have recently been discovered. The boundaries of the 
district are undefined. 

CHIRICAHUA, CACHISE COUNTY. 

This district, which at present is attracting considerable atten- 
tion, is located in the Chiricahua Mountains, about 75 miles 
northeast of Tombstone. The first discoveries were made in 1875 
by Jack Dunn, the famous Indian scout. The formation is prin- 
cipally limestone, carrying veins of argentiferous ore, which is 
easily reduced. Many locations have recently been made in the 
district, some of which are being energetically developed, and 
yield ore of a high grade. This section affords excellent facilities 
for mining, yellow pine and cedar for lumber, and oak and ash 
for fuel, being abundant ; and in addition to this, there is a good 
supply of water for milling purposes. The mountains rise to a 
height of 10,000 feet above the sea level, and are noted for the 
grandeur of their scenery. The foot-hills are covered with a 
luxuriant growth of grass, and the valleys and mesa lands at their 
base, thinly covered with trees, present the appearance of beauti- 
ful parks. 

CLIFTON, GRAHAM COUNTY. 

This justly celebrated copper district is situated on the San 
Francisco River, at a point some fifteen miles above its mouth. 

ins J. m. Brunswick « Bsikb COi MA.^ip^cvvRKaSii^si^FTSsco 8 . 1 ' 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T, Wholesale Dry Goods. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 37 

The developments of copper ore here are remarkable ; the veins 
are very wide, with distinct croppings, which can be followed on 
the surface a distance of three miles, and where broken into they 
appear more like quarries without any limit to the quantity of 
ore. At one point, where the canon cuts across the vein to a 
depth of 1,000 feet, the ore is shown in the same quantity and 
quality. The ores are red oxide, grey and green carbonates, and 
copper glance. These readily reduce into soft copper, equal in 
quality to that of any other portion of the world. The yield is 
from 20 to 50 per cent. 

The Longfellow and Copper Queen, owned by Lezmsky & Co., 
are unsurpassed by any upon the continent, and are being suc- 
cessfully worked. Seven miles of narrow-guage railroad connects 
the Longfellow miine with the reduction works at the town of 
Clifton. 14,000 pounds of copper per day is the usual yield of 
this mine. 

The Metcalf Copper Mountain, in the same district, might well 
be classed with mineral wonders. Extensive tunneling is being 
done here, but no ore is yet being reduced. Besides the above 
mentioned mines, there are hundreds of others located which 
must prove valuable when opened. 

The Placer gold mines, situated upon the San Francisco River, 
begin at the town of Clifton, and extend up the river 15 miles. 
The gravel on both sides of the river is gold-bearing, showing 
good prospects on the surface, while the bed-rock has shown some 
rich specimens of coarse gold. A Boston company is now making 
preparations to wash these placers by tne hydraulic process. 

DOS CABEZAS, CACHISE COUNTY. 

This district is situated in the eastern part of the county, on 
the northern portion of the Chiricahua Mountains ; most of the 
mines being worked are gold quartz. 

The Juniper is a gold ledge of great promise, from which con- 
siderable ore has already been taken, some of which yields over 
$100 per ton.' Ewel Springs joins the Juniper on the west; it 
has a shaft down 67 feet, and shows high grade ore. The Green- 
horn, Bear Cave and Galena Chief, in the same neighborhood, are 
also extracting ore of a good quality. The Silver Cave, owned 
by S. R. DeLong, has recently struck ore which assays as high as 
$500 per ton. There is one ten-stamp mill and six arastras at 
work in this district. 

EL CAPITAN, GILA COUNTY. 

This district is located on the south side of the Pinal Moun- 
tains, 18 miles south of Globe City, and contains two groups of 
mines, named the Pioneer and the El Capitan. They are some- 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. {^^^ T a^}W!nes of all Kinds. 



38 ARIZONA. 



times included in the Globe District. There is a plentiful supply 
of wood and water for mining purposes. 

The Pioneer, owned by George Scott, has been opened at con- 
siderable expense, and 55 tons of ore packed on mules to mills 
near Globe City, and worked. Packing the ore cost from $18 to 
$30 per ton. Milling cost $45 per ton. Still there was a margin 
left more than sufficient to pay the expenses of extraction. This 
will give some idea of the difficulty of mining profitably in dis- 
tricts where no facilities for reducing exist. The Pioneer South, 
an extension of the Pioneer, has three shafts and is yielding high- 
grade ore, which is shipped to San Francisco for reduction. The 
Great Republic, in the same group, is owned by D. Larry. 

In the El Capitan group are the Little Giant, National, Zuni, 
Farragut, Mohawk, etc., owned by S. A. Lowe ; the El Capitan, 
by Lowe & Anderson ; the Burns by Holt & Burns ; the Olym- 
pic, Topia, and Foote by Hardesty & Oury j Bullion Dust by 
Anderson & Curry, and several others. 

EMPIEE, PIMA COUNTY. 

This is a recently formed district in the eastern portion of the 
county. A number of locations have been made, and consider- 
able prospecting is now going on. The indications of developing 
good mines are said to be favorable. Among the most prominent 
locations are the Sunrise, Total Wreck, and Star mines. 

EUREKA, YUMA COUNTY. 

This district is immediately north of Silver District on the Col- 
orado River. It contains several mines on which a good deal of 
work has been done, and from which considerable ore has been 
extracted. At the present time, however, there is no activity 
there. 

GLOBE, GILA COUNTY. 

This is a large district, embracing what is sometimes called the 
McMillen District, which, it is claimed, was irregularly formed, 
and the Richmond Basin. It includes the Apache Mountains and 
the northeastern slope of the Pinal Mountains. The Pioneer Dis- 
trict bounds it on the west. This section of the country affords fine 
facilities for mining. The forests of pine and other timber fur- 
nish good lumber and wood for fuel, while Pinal Creek and other 
small streams furnish ample water for milling purposes. The 
ores are gold, silver, copper, and lead. Large, well-defined veins, 
with prominent croppings, are found throughout the district, and 
mineral float frequently covers the surface. The climate is mild 
and healthful. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. SEiiss&ssEEzniXigsxp 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., , ™ uuu 



BOOTS AKV SHOES. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 39 

The Richmond Basin is situated fourteen miles northeast of 
Globe, in a hollow plateau of the highest part of the Apache 
range. The mountains immediately back of it, forming the east- 
ern barrier, rise boldly in Alpine peaks hundreds of feet above 
the plateau. The prevailing rock in this section is porphyry, 
which forms the walls of the mineral veins, and gives assurance 
of their permanence. These solid rocks have been rent and torn 
asunder, and washed away, leaving the silver on the surface of 
the basin, where so many nuggets of the virgin metal have been 
found. In this basin are located the Mack Morris, Richmond, 
East Richmond, Silver Nugget, and other valuable properties. 

The Stonewall Jackson, belonging to the McMillen Mining 
Co., is a noted silver mine located on the northeastern slope of the 
Apache Mountains. It was discovered by Harris and McMillen 
in 1875, from float ore and croppings, some of which were exceed- 
ingly rich. This mine has furnished some of the richest and most 
beautiful specimens of silver ore ever seen. Native silver is 
found sometimes in single wires, sometimes in spiderweb-like 
forms, and again in pieces which look like fern leaves. It contains 
no gold. Uninterrupted veins of pure wire silver, many feet in 
length, run through the pay streak. 

The following extract from the report of this company for 
1877 will give an idea of the wonderful richness of some of this 
ore: "The main shaft was sunk directly on the vein of native 
metal to the depth of ninety feet, and showed a continuous vein 
of native silver from within ten feet of the surface to the bottom 
of the shaft, varying in width from two to six inches of solid 
metal. Intermingled through the metal is found yellow spar, the 
metal being closely encased in quartz from one to two inches in 
thickness, the quartz carrying more or less native silver and 
chloride of silver. In the bottom of the shaft the solid metal was 
four inches in width. 

The following result of ore shipped to San Francisco is taken 
from the same report : 10,693 pounds of ore returned a total value 
of $64,361.71, or an average per ton of 2,000 pounds, of $12,138. 

The working shaft is over 400 feet in depth, surmounted by 
good steam hoisting machinery. The mine has been explored 
about 600 feet in depth. Good ore is said to be found in the 
deepest workings. A large amount of ore was taken from the 
mine before the incorporation of the present company ; since the 
incorporation the production has been about $400,000. The com- 
pany owns a good ten-stamp mill, and besides has all the appli- 
ances necessary for working the mine. The office of the company 
is in San Francisco. J. K. Smith is Superintendent. 

The Mack Morris. The main shaft in this mine is now down 
350 feet ; it is surmounted by good steam hoisting works. Stope- 
ing is going on in the 300 foot level. The ledge is eight feet in 
width, and said to be improving with depth. Ore has been taken 



CHIRARDELLI S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm. B. Hooper & 60. {^.f&S^Ji&Sr'Wm & Gaudies at Wholesale. 



40 ARIZONA. 



from this mine that would mill $4,000 per ton. The company- 
owns a ten-stamp mill, which commenced running on the 1st of 
July, 1880, and up to the 1st of May, 1881, it had produced 100 
bars of bullion of the total value of $175,944.78. The office of 
the company is in San Francisco. M. A. Baldwin is Superin- 
tendent. 

The Alice. This is a silver mine which has been producing 
good ore for some time past. The mine is well opened, several 
levels have been run, in which stopeing is now going on, and it is 
reported that there is a large quantity of ore now in sight. The 
ore is being reduced in the Globe City mill. 

The Old Dominion. This company owns the Old Dominion, 
Keystone, New York, and Chicago copper mines. On the Old 
Dominion and Keystone there is now 185 feet of shaft and tunnel, 
all in ore. The tunnel has exposed a large body which can be 
extracted at little expense. On the New York and Chicago 
there are 230 feet of tunnel and cuts, showing an immense body 
of high-grade ore of green and blue carbonates, red oxides, and 
glance. The company has recently erected smelting works at 
Bloody Tanks, and will no doubt soon be shipping a large amount 
of copper. S. L. Burbridge is Superintendent. 

The Independence is a silver mine which has been well opened 
by shaft and levels. It is now yielding ten tons per day of good 
ore, some of it paying as high as $100 per ton. 

In addition to the above named the following mines in this dis- 
trict are now reducing ores and producing bullion : Silver Mines 
— Southwest extension of the Alice, Cox & Coplin, Stonewall No. 
1, Emeline, La Plata, Centennial, and Democrat. Gold Mines — 
Golden Eagle, Andy Campbell, Golden Nugget, Moffatt, Eureka, 
and the Munson and its extensions. 

The following mines are now extracting rich ore, and some of 
them have heretofore produced bullion : Fannie J., Capital, Blue 
Bird, Silver Bow, Big Injun, Red Cloud, Turk, Libby, Rescue, 
Champion, East Richmond, West Richmond, Silver Nugget, 
Irene, Miama, Quinn, Sherman, Orion, Great Eastern, Big 
Johnny, Shambone, Centralia, Metamora, Chromo, Hannibal, 
and Washington. Copper Mines — True Blue, Cadmus, Carrie, 
Tacoma, and Illinois. 

There are many other mines in the district which are being 
prospected and yielding more or less good ore. Among these 
may be mentioned the Julia, Fitz John Porter, South La Plata, 
Silver Fame, Golden Chariot, Red Robin, Chloride, Trojan, and 
Silver Joe. 

GOLD CAMP, CACHISE COUNTY. 

Gold Camp is situated in a small detached range at the south 
end of the Dragoon Mountains, about 11 miles from Tombstone, 
in an easterly direction. The formation is granite, containing 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. BHtt&airera'isff' 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 41 

many large veins of quartz, showing considerable free gold. The 
ores are not of high-grade, but they are quite uniform in their 
character, and the quantity being large they will undoubtedly 
pay when milling facilities shall be afforded. Juniper and oak 
are found in this section, and considerable is cut and transported 
to Tombstone. Water is scarce. Some capital has recently been 
invested by Eastern parties, who contemplate erecting mills. Quite 
a number of locations have been made, on some of which parties 
are now engaged in prospecting. 

GOLD MOUNTAIN, PIMA COUNTY. 

This is a district recently formed in the Horseshoe Basin, Qui- 
jota range of mountains, 65 miles west of Tucson. The range is 
in the shape of a horse-shoe, which gives name to the basin. The 
mines are dry placers, and were discovered and worked by Indians 
and Mexicans some fifty years ago. The Apaches in one of their 
raids killed most of the mining population, and the basin has re- 
mained vacant till within a short time. The mining is generally 
done by sinking a round hole or well to the bed rock, which in 
most cases is less than twenty feet. The richest earth is then 
selected and carried to the nearest water, a distance of about six 
miles, where it is washed. What are called dry washing machines 
are being tried here, but we have seen no report in regard to their 
success. The placers are said to be extensive, and if water could 
be obtained from the Gila River they would undoubtedly yield a 
large amount of gold. 

GREEN VALLEY, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This district, sometimes called the Verde, is situated in the 
southeastern part of the county, on the east fork of the Verde 
River, north of the Tonto Basin.- The Verde supplies water con- 
stantly, and there is a fine belt of timber and plenty of grass. 
The ores are gold and silver. 

The Golden Wonder is working four arastras on ore which 
yields an average of fifty dollars per ton. The shaft is now down 
one hundred feet, and drifts are running on a three and a half 
foot vein. 

The Excursion, located three miles from the Verde, has a shaft 
down sixty-five feet; at that point the vein is four feet, and 
assays $300 per ton. There is now 150 tons of ore on the dump. 
Judge Porter is the principal owner. 

The Zulu, located on Wild Rye Creek, has a shaft of sixty-five 
feet, and a four-foot ledge ; the ore is worked by arastra. The 
The American and Go wan, on the Verde, are now building a five- 
stamp mill. The Mammoth has a shaft down fifty feet on a three- 
foot ledge, from which is being extracted ore that yields forty-five 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO.{ T, ^ i iffSSSi^aS, p .r 'f Lubricating Oils. 



42 ARIZONA. 



dollars per ton. There are many other mines being opened in 
this district. 

GREENWOOD, MOHAVE AND YAVAPAI COUNTIES. 

This district is located partly in Mohave and partly in Yavapai 
Counties. The Burro Creek and its branches running through it, 
afford considerable water for mining purposes, and the mountain 
ridges afford an abundance of timber. There are numerous min- 
eral veins in this section, and as the country is much broken up, 
they are found running in all directions. The district is almost 
inaccessible, having but few roads or trails connecting it with 
centers of transportation and travel, while the whole territory in 
and around it is almost uninhabited. It occupies the center of a 
great mineral region, and no doubt contains hidden treasures of 
gold and silver which the pick of the future miner will bring to 
light. 

The Burro, Burro Extension North, and Burro Extension 
South, located on the same ledge, have a vein of ore from ten to 
twenty feet in width. Considerable work in running tunnels and 
sinking shafts has been done on these mines, and ore assaying 
from one hundred to five hundred dollars per ton, extracted ; 
other ledges in the same vicinity have yielded ore of a high grade. 

HARCUVAR, YUMA COUNTY. 

This is a large, unbounded district, situated on the northern 
slope of the Harcuvar Mountains. It is known to contain 
ledges of copper ore, and silver ores have also been reported. 
The section is comparatively unknown. 

HARSHAW, PIMA COUNTY. 

See Patagonia District. 

HASSAYAMPA, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This district, embracing Groom's Creek and Crook Canon, lies 
immediately south of Prescott. The Big Bug and Turkey Creek 
Districts bound it on the east, and the Walnut Grove on the 
south. It has an abundance of wood and water. The general 
formation is limestone and granite Most of the veins are gold 
quartz, many, however, carry argentiferous galena and sulphates, 
which require smelting; these are the widest. The veins in this 
section are generally narrow, but they carry very high-grade ores. 
More good custom mills would certainly prove remunerative, as 
most of the ores have now to be worked by arastras, or be closely 
assorted and hauled a long distance, besides, many of the veins are 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. «8ittS*g£g!£{ a >£!$£$£?- 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 43 

so narrow that they do not warrant the erection of machinery for 
their special reduction. 

The Victorine is a gold and silver mine, the ores of which are 
high-grade, and are being worked by an arastra. The Wakefield, 
owned by Hutchins & Behm, is also worked by an arastra. The 
ore pays eighty dollars per ton. The Palace, Curtis, Black Hawk, 
Berry and Gray Eagle are being prospected and promise well. 
The Minnehaha, owned by C. A. Behm, has produced very high- 
grade ore. The Providence is an extension of the Minnehaha, 
owned by Hutchins & Co., which has given good prospects in horn 
silver and green chlorides. On the Benjamin considerable work 
has been done ; some selected ores from this mine were sent to San 
Francisco, and yielded from $300 to $1,500 per ton. The Gov- 
ernor Fremont, owned by Fred Williams, is reducing pay ore by 
means of an arastra. The Canadian was opened several years 
since, and has been worked to a considerable extent. Some ore 
from this mine shipped to San Francisco, yielded $500 per ton. 
The Nevada, Adel, Happy Boy, and What Cheer, have all pro- 
duced high-grade ores. The Lone Star has now on the dump 
100 tons of good ore. Four steam arastras have recently been 
erected by the Jersey Mining Company, which are now reducing 
ore from the Harter mine. The Crook Canon mine, owned by 
W. M. Buffum, has been steadily worked since 1874. It has a 
shaft down 210 feet, and a good ten-stamp mill. The Consoli- 
dated Bodie has a good vein of smelting ore, from four to ten 
feet in width. The company is about to erect a smelter. 

HELVETIA PIMA COMPANY. 

See Santa Rita Placers. 

HORSE SHOE BASIN, PIMA COUNTY. 

See Gold Mountain. 

HUACHUCA MOUNTAINS, CACHISE COUNTY 

Twenty miles southwest of Tombstone, embracing what is known 
as the Hartford District, contains innumerable ledges of gold, sil- 
ver, and copper, from their base to the tops of the loftiest peaks, 
nine thousand feet above the level of the sea. The first discover- 
ies may be said to have been made in 1878, when the Wisconsin, 
Undine, I X L, and other claims were located. Since that time 
considerable prospecting has been done, resulting in the discovery 
of silver ores assaying as high as $600 to the ton ; also copper ores 
assaying as high as 65 per cent. Quartz ledges have also been 
found in Mormon Canon, Dublin Canon, and other places, show- 
ing considerable free gold. The formation is principally lime- 



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WH. B. HOOPER & GO. {^*J?5£&?*S&r-} Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



44 ARIZONA. 



stone and porphyry ; ores, galena and carbonates. In Monte- 
zuma Canon several locations have recently been purchased by 
the Neptune Mining Company, of New York, who are now erect- 
ing extensive smelting works at Hereford, on the San Pedro 
River, for the reduction of their ores. Timber of different kinds, 
including pine, oak, ash, walnut, maple, hemlock, and mesquite, is 
abundant, and on the east side of the mountain some wild black 
cherry trees are to be found. A large quantity of lumber and 
timber for building and mining purposes is transported to Tomb- 
stone. Water is plentiful, and rivals in excellence that of the 
Sierra Nevada?. The scenery in this section is magnificent, and 
the climate unsurpassed, there being no great extremes of heat 
or cold. 

HUALAPAI, MOHAVE COUNTY. 

This district is situated in the central part of the county, em- 
bracing within its limits a large portion of the Cerbat Range, 
which contains innumerable ledges of gold, silver, and lead, some 
of which have yielded very high-grade ore. This section was 
prospected as early as 1857, but the Indians were then so hostile 
as to prevent mining operations from being carried on to any 
great extent. Some years later, when the savages had been par- 
tially subdued, prospecting was resumed, resulting in the discov- 
ery of very rich ledges of gold and silver. Many locations were 
then made, and several mills for the reduction of ore erected. 
Among the prominent mines discovered and worked at that time 
may be mentioned the American Flag, New York, Mocking Bird, 
Fontenoy, and Metallic Accident, which yielded ore assaying from 
$100 to $500 per ton. Up to this time there have been about 
2,800 locations made in the district ; but the section being so iso- 
lated from the rest of the world has greatly retarded mining oper- 
ations, and at present but little work is going on. With the ad- 
vent of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, which is now fast ap- 
proaching, this section will no doubt rival many others in the 
Territory in the production of gold and silver. The climate' is 
exceedingly pleasant and healthful, and sufficient wood and water 
can be obtained for mining purposes. 

HUMBUG, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

Humbug is in the extreme southern part of the county, bounded 
on the north by the Tiger and Pine Grove Districts, and on the 
west by the Weaver District. The Humbug and Cottonwood 
Creeks run through it. The Tip Top Mining Company's prop- 
erty consists of 4,500 feet on the Tip Top ledge, and 1,500 feet 
on the Foy ledge. The Foy ledge has been prospected to the 
depth of 120 feet. The shaft on the Tip Top. is now down 550 
feet. Five levels have been opened and worked. The vein of 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. " 



MAST U FACTIJBEJtet, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 

H 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 45 

ore is narrow, which makes the mine expensive, a large force 
being required to keep a ten-stamp mill supplied with ore. The 
ores are chlorides, black sulphates, horn silver, ruby silver and 
native silver. The average value of the ore is $227 per ton. 
The mine has produced $1,100,000. Its stockholders have 
been assessed $170,000. The company has a White & Howell 
roaster and a ten-stamp dry crushing mill, located at Gillette, 
eight miles from the mine. The ore in the lowest level is said to 
be equal to any heretofore extracted. 

The Virginia, Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 is a silver location, owned by 
Messrs. Rodenburg, Suhr and others. On No. 2 a shaft has been 
sunk 147 feet and several drifts run. The vein is three and a 
half feet. Ten tons of assorted ores were recently shipped to 
San Francisco, which yielded $1,187.57 per ton. At the deepest 
point the ore is said to be improving. The Cross Cut, owned by 
Marks, Hutchinson & Thorn, has a shaft down 100 feet, and sev- 
eral cross cuts. The vein runs at right angles to the general 
direction in the district. It is from four to fourteen feet, and 
gives average assays of eighty-four dollars per ton. The Nevada, 
owned by the same parties, is a narrow vein, from five to fifteen 
inches, of very high-grade ore. A shipment from this vein sold in 
San Francisco for $1,575 per ton. The 76 is a silver mine, lo- 
cated a half mile east of Tip Top, which is being worked through 
three tunnels. The vein is from three inches to three feet in 
width. It works $300 per ton. The Isabella, owned by Fisher 
& Carpenter, has a four-foot vein. A lot of this ore worked $300 
per ton. The Rescue has just worked thirty tons of ore in the 
Tip Top mill, which gave $316 per ton. The Red Bird and Sil- 
ver Jack, owned by Messrs. Vernon & Co., both produce high- 
grade ores. The Swilling has milled ores which returned $400 
per ton. 

LA PAZ, YUMA COUNTY. 

This district is located in the northern portion of the county, 
about twenty miles northeast of Ehrenberg. It was organized 
several years since, upon the discovery of rich placer diggings in 
this section, from which a large amount of gold was extracted. 
Its remoteness from places where supplies can be obtained, and 
the scarcity of water for mining purposes has caused a suspension 
of operations for the present, but when by the means of railroad 
communication, this region becomes more accessible, no doubt 
mining operations will be resumed. 

MAGAZINE, MARICOPA COUNTY. 

This district, located in Cave Creek Basin, in the northern por- 
tion of the county, was organized in 1881. It contains the Red 
Rover, and other locations where excellent prospects have been 



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46 ARIZONA. 



obtained. The ledges are remarkable for their width and the 
prominence of their croppings. Quite a number of locations 
have been made, upon some of which work is being vigorously- 
prosecuted. The veins carry copper and silver. 

MARTINEZ, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This is a large district, in the southwestern portion of the 
county in which at present, but very little work is being done. 
It embraces the head waters of Date Creek / and also Date Creek 
Mountains. In it are ledges of gold, silver and copper, and also 
gold placer diggings. The Mayflower, Cumberland, and Arizona 
Miner are silver ledges, from which ore giving good assays have 
been obtained. Some ledges containing rich copper ore, have 
also been found. 

MAYNARD, MOHAVE COUNTY. 

This district is located in the central portion of the county, 
between the Hualapai District and the line of Yapavai county. 
It embraces within its limits, the Peacock Mountains, which are 
said to contain numerous ledges of good silver ore. In it is the 
Hackberry mine, which some years since yielded considerable 
rich ore. A ten-stamp mill has been erected on this property, 
but it is now lying idle. The inaccessibility of this region, and 
greater attractions elsewhere, has caused an almost entire suspen- 
sion of mining operations at present. Wood and water for min- 
ing purposes are abundant. 

GILA COUNTY. 

See Globe District. 

MINERAL CREEK, PINAL COUNTY. 

This district is situated in the southern portion of the county, 
near the Gila River. The first locations were made in 1875, by 
D. G. Chilson. The general formation of rock is porphyritic 
slate. The ores are chlorides of silver, carrying gold, silver 
predominating. They are generally of low-grade, but still it is 
believed that they can be milled at a profit. The Mineral Creek 
Mining Company have sunk a shaft eighty feet on their mine, 
and have a five-stamp mill partly erected. Good copper ore has 
been found in this section, and the Pinal Copper Mining Company 
has erected smelting works at Riverside for the reduction of 
ores from their mine. The Keystone Company have also found 
good copper ore, and are developing their ground. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Baike Co. E&iszs&ssigii 



K1LLIAKI) TAB L.E J 653*655 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES, 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 47 



MOOR, MARICOPA COUNTY. 

This district is situated about eight miles east of the town of 
Gillette. It was first discovered in 1877, by William Moor, who, 
with others, located some twenty different claims, and organized 
a district. The first discoverers claimed to have found a deposit 
of tin, but subsequent investigation proved that they were mis- 
taken ; several gold quartz claims, however, were found and 
worked to a considerable extent by means of arastras, paying 
very handsomely. The most promising of these mines are the 
Magna Charta, Gold Note and Plainwell, a group owned by 
Messrs. Nilson, Carpenter, and Hutchinson, of Prescott. The 
deepest opening on these claims does not exceed forty feet, but 
several show well-defined veins of gold-bearing rock, from three 
to six feet in width, averaging thirty dollars per ton. The dis- 
trict is very favorably situated, having a good wagon road run- 
ning through it, plenty of water, a first-class mill site, and consid- 
erable wood. On the north of this district are found copper pros- 
pects, but no developments have been made. 

MYERS, MARICOPA COUNTY. 

This district is located in the Esperanza Mountains, in the 
southwestern portion of the county. Gold was discovered in this 
section many years ago, but the silver ledges which are being 
worked were discovered in 1878. The Gunsight group, embrac- 
ing several gold and silver ledges, has been worked to a consid- 
erable extent, and a large quantity of high-grade ore extracted. 
Some sent to San Francisco for reduction, is said to have yielded 
from $700 to $1000 per ton. The company proposes to soon 
erect a forty-stamp mill. The Silver Girt, on an adjoining lode, 
has yielded some rich ore, but has not as yet been worked to any 
great extent. In addition to these mines are the McLellan, and 
other locations, where excellent prospects have been obtained. 

OLD HAT, PIMA COUNTY. 

This district is situated in the northeastern part of the county, 
about forty miles from Tucson. It embraces a portion of the 
Santa Catarina Mountains, which are covered with forests of 
pine and other timber. Springs of good water are numerous, 
and the climate delightful. Considerable prospecting has lately 
been done, resulting in the discovery of rich ores. The Apache 
Girl, one of the most prominent mines, is being vigorously worked, 
and yielding high-grade ore. The extension of this mine is also 
being worked with good success. The American Flag and Oracle 
have been developed to a considerable extent by shafts, the for- 



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Wm B Hnonep&Co f r - C8 - 



Tex., and Uuaymas, Mexico, J c. o. WHISKEY. 



48 ARIZONA. 



mer to the depth of 125 feet, showing good ore. The Kearsage 
and Imperial are also developing their mines, and the latter are 
crushing their ore in a Huntington mill, which has recently been 
erected. In addition to these are many other promising mines 
which are being vigorously worked. 

ORO BLANCO, PIMA COUNTY. 

This district is located in the extreme southern portion of the 
county, being bounded on the south by Sonora. The mines in 
this and adjoining districts were worked by the Mexicans many 
years ago. Some were remarkably rich, and gave Arizona a 
reputation for mineral wealth long before the territory came into 
our possession. In many places evidences of early mining are to 
be seen. When the Old Ostrich mine was opened some years 
since, the skeletons of the miners were found inside, and also 
small piles of ore ready to be carried to the surface, indicating 
that the workmen had been surprised and murdered by the 
Apaches. The district contains many rich ledges of gold and 
silver, some of which have been developed to a considerable ex- 
tent. The Warsaw mine has a large body of good ore, which 
improves as depth is attained. It is developed by a shaft 125 feet 
deep. The Silver Wing has a four-foot vein which presents a 
remarkable variety of ores, such as sulphurets of different colors, 
stephanite, chlorides, and gray carbonates, some of which are 
very rich. The Blue Wing is being vigorously worked and yield- 
ing good ore. The Arizona Southern Mining and Milling Co. of 
Philadelphia own several locations containing high-grade ore. 
The San Jose Co. have recently had some ore milled which yielded 
upwards of $1,000 to the ton. The Orion, Osceola, Yellow Jacket, 
and Dictator are excellent mines, and are being energetically 
developed. In addition to these, are many other promising 
locations too numerous to mention. This section of the Territory 
affords every facility for mining, wood and water being abundant 
and the climate delightful. 

PAJARITO, PIMA COUNTY. 

This district is located about 75 miles south of Tucson. The 
first locations were made in 1877, and the district organized in 
1880. About fifty claims have so far been sufficiently developed 
to prove that they have paying ores. The Pajarita Mining Co., 
incorporated under the laws of West Virginia, J. M. McArthur, 
Superintendent, are taking out ore which assays $100 per ton. 
The Gold Mountain Tunnel Co., C. P. Sykes Superintendent, are 
also developing their claims ; the formation is porphyry, ores 
principally chlorides. Wood and water are abundant. 



The J. Nl. Brunswick & Balke Co. WN-i^i^iSkir^^^ 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., WM - I " U,,WJ1 * 



OILS AM> PAIXTS. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 49 



PALMETTO, PIMA COUNTY. 

This district is situated on the western slope of the Patagonia 
Mountains, about twelve miles east of Calabasas. The ledges are 
not generally as large as those on the eastern slope, but contain 
ore of a very high grade. Wood for fuel and mining purposes is 
abundant, and water can be obtained by sinking. The Tempest 
mine, owned by Stockton and Sutton, has a four-foot vein, from 
which several tons of high-grade ore has been extracted. The 
Bullion, owned by Walker & Co., has a two-foot vein giving high 
assays. Some of this ore has been shipped to San Francisco, and 
yielded sufficient to pay for the developments thus far made. On 
what is called the Lewis ledge are several locations, promising 
well, which are now being developed by shafts. 

PATAGONIA, PIMA COUNTY. 

This district is in the southeastern part of the county, on the 
eastern slope of the Patagonia Mountains. It embraces Harshaw 
and Washington Camp, each with its group of surrounding mines. 
The district has a most salubrious climate, and an abundance of 
wood and water. The Hon. P. Hamilton, Commissioner for the 
Collection of Mineral Resources, gives the following description 
of this rich section of the Territory : 

' c He who bestowed on this region so uncouth an appellation as 
'Patagonia,' must certainly have had a depraved conception of 
the eternal fitness of things, for surely nothing could be less sug- 
gestive of the barren plains, ice and fogs, and gigantic savages, 
than this mountain paradise of Southern Arizona. Elevated 
about 7,000 feet above the level of the sea, its gently sloping 
mountains covered with a luxuriant growth of grass and crowned 
with oak and cedar, with beautiful lawn-like valleys lying between, 
it is the most delightful portion of the Territory that your cor- 
respondent has yet seen. Washington Camp is situated about 
nine miles almost due south from Harshaw, and less than four 
miles from the Sonora line. About three miles from Harshaw is 
a lovely little flat among the hills, where are the ruins of the 
smelting works of the Old Mowry Mine, owned and worked by 
Lieut. Mowry of the U. S. Army before the Civil War. A col- 
lection of adobe ruins is all that is left of what was once the 
liveliest mining camp in Arizona. The lofty brick chimney is still 
standing, a mournful monument to extinct enterprise and former 
active life. It is said that 400 Mexicans and their families were 
at one time employed at the mine and smelter. Ap iche warfare 
and civil war must answer for the destruction of this once pros- 
perous mining enterprise. The Old Mowry Mine is now owned 
by parties in Tucson, and nothing is left to tell the stranger in 



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50 ARIZONA. 



these parts of the untiring labors and unceasing efforts of that 
true friend of Arizona, Sylvester Mowry, save the legend on the 
capping of stone near the top of the chimney, * Mowry Silver 
Mine, 1861.'" 

At La Noria are located the smelting works of the Holland 
Mining Co., and at the same point the W. C. Davis Co. are erect- 
ing works of a similar nature. 

The mines of Washington occur in limestone and porphyry, 
and are generally immense bodies of low-grade carbonate and 
galena ore. The Davis mine has a shaft 150 feet, and is thor- 
oughly opened by crosscuts and levels, showing ore in places, 
twelve feet wide. About forty men are employed on the Ohio, 
which is producing large quantities of sulphuret ore. It is owned 
by the Washington Pool Co., which has a dozen other claims. 
The Belmont is one of the oldest locations in the district, and 
was worked during Apache times. It has a shaft down over 100 
feet, and has nearly thirty feet of low-grade ore. The Holland is 
also a large ore body. It has been under the management of 
Hon. J. K. Luttrell, but the attempt at smelting has not proved a 
success, and it is claimed that the ores need roasting and milling. 
Work has been stopped on this property for the present, but it is 
said will soon be resumed. The Silver Bill is also a fine looking 
property, which is now being steadily developed by Mr. Desloge 
for an Eastern company. There are scores of other mines in 
Washington Camp well worthy of mention, but space forbids. 
One thing can be said, the camp contains the largest bodies of ore 
yet found in Arizona. That it is low-grade cannot be denied, 
but with abundance of wood and the Santa Cruz River close at 
hand, they ought to be worked to a profit. 

On the high hills about a mile and a half south of Harshaw, is 
the Hermosa mine, an immense body of free milling ore carrying 
chlorides and horn silver. The ore is easily reduced, and five tons 
to the stamp is the average work of the mill. The mine is opened 
by shafts, drifts and tunnels. The ore body has been cut at a 
depth of over 300 feet by a tunnel 700 feet in length, which 
pierces the mountain from side to side, thus affording plenty of 
ventilation. West of the Hermosa is the Hardshell, on which D. 
B. Gillette, formerly of Tip Top, is now operating. Although the 
developments are as yet but slight, the ore body is fully as large 
as in the Hermosa, and is said to be fully as rich. Gillette's suc- 
cess in the mining line is still attending him, and it is nearly cer- 
tain that he has secured another bonanza fully equal to the Tip 
Top or the Hermosa. Nearly two miles west of the Hardshell is 
the Trench mine, now owned by Haggin and Tevis, of San Fran- 
cisco, but worked centuries ago by the Jesuit Missionaries. Some 
of the finest hoisting machinery ever brought to the Territory has 
been erected on the property, and the mine is being opened in a 
thoroughly systematic manner. The main shaft is down 300 feet, 



I IIB J. III. BrUnSWiCk & IjSIKB CO. MAJTIIPACTUKEKsJ San Francisco. *" 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 51 

and two levels have been opened. The Trench is a strong, well- 
defined vein, with good walls, and promises to become valuable 
property. The Alta mine, south of the Hermosa — on which there 
is a shaft 100 feet — is not being worked, but it is said will 'soon 
resume operations. These are the leading mines of Harshaw 
Camp, and they give employment to nearly 200 men, which makes 
it one of the liveliest in Arizona. In the way of wood, water and 
delightful climate, it is not surpassed in the Territory, and its fu- 
ture is most encouraging. 

The Hermosa Mining Company's mill is one of the most com- 
plete institutions of the kind on the Coast. Everything is done 
on the automatic principle, and but little manual labor is required. 
It is turning out at present from $60,000 to $75,000 per month, 
and is not running to its full capacity, owing to a scarcity of 
water. 

This company commenced working ore on the 20th of August, 
1880, with the following result. Yalue of bullion or silver bars 
produced from August 20th to November 30th, 1880, $275,654.49. 
Value of silver bars from November 30th to December 31st, esti- 
mated 190,000 ; total, $365,654.49. 

PECK, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This district lies southeast of Prescott and is bounded on the 
north by Turkey Creek District, and on the west by Walnut 
Grove. It contains gold and silver ledges, some of which are re, 
markably rich. The Peck mine, the most noted in the district- 
was discovered in 1865, and the richness of its ores created quite 
an excitement in the vicinity. A ten-stamp mill was erected, and 
the mine worked continuously for several years, yielding a large 
amount of silver. The Silver Prince, on a parallel lode, has also 
yielded a large quantity of high-grade ore. The Black Warrior, 
in the same vicinity, is also noted for its richness. In all of these 
mines are found beautiful specimens of wire silver. At present 
but little work is being done in the district, but ere long it will 
no doubt be the scene of active mining operations. A good sup- 
ply of wood and water for mining purposes can be obtained in 
this section. 

PIONEER DISTRICT, PINAL COUNTY. 

The largest and most important portion of this noted district lies 
in Pinal County, another portion overlapping into Gila and Mar- 
copa Counties. Upon the discovery of the renowned Silver King 
mine in 1875, a large number of prospectors entered this section, 
and many locations were made. Since then prospecting has been 
vigorously prosecuted, resulting in the discovery of many rich 
ledges of gold and silver ore. This district also contains ledges 



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52 ARIZONA. 



of rich copper ore, but as yet they have not been developed to any 
great extent ; in the near future ; however, it will no doubt be pro- 
ducing a large amount of copper as well as gold and silver. The 
mineral belt is about five miles wide, running the whole length of 
the district, a distance of about ten miles. On the mountains 
are found a good supply of timber for mining purposes, and 
Queen Creek and other small streams furnish an abundant sup- 
ply of water for milling purposes. The climate like that of other 
mountain regions in Arizona is unsurpassed. 

The Silver King. — This celebrated mine, discovered in 1875, 
is situated in a little valley on the southwestern slope of the Pinal 
Mountains. The discovery was made from croppings on the apex 
of a small hill, which had been left by the elements that denuded 
and carried off the sedimentary and basaltic rocks that at some 
previous time covered it and the valley more than a thousand 
feet in depth, as shown by the sheer precipice to the south. The 
formation incasing the vein is granite. The mine was first worked 
by an open cut on the top of the hill, the vein being sixty feet 
wide and of wonderful richness. It has produced some of the 
richest specimens of ore on record. Masses have been found of 
500 lbs. weight which gave 75 per cent, of silver. Assays of con- 
siderable quantities have given the contents at $20,000 per ton. 
The mine paid its way from the start, high grade ores being se- 
lected and sent at great expense to San Francisco for reduction. 
Up to January, 1880, the mine had paid in dividends $710,000. 
From May 5th, 1877, to December 31st, 1879, the product was 
$819,141.58. The dividends for the same period were $450,000. 
In the upper levels of the mine the ore was free milling ; but as 
the mine attaius greater depth the ore becomes rebellious, and 
that from the lower levels has now to be worked by the lixivia- 
tion process. The ore is no »v of great variety — native silver, sil- 
ver copper glance, antimonious fahlore, green, brown, and bla -k 
zincblende, peacock copper ore, galena, copper and iron pyrites. 
The gangue is heavy spar quartz and porphyry. The lowest level 
is now, January, 1881, 408 feet. The vein here has been worked 
from the hanging wall 36 feet in width, and it is said the foot 
wall has not been reached. On the 350-foot level the vein is 56 
feet wide. It is said that no level has yet been exhausted. The 
main shaft is now down over 700 feet. In January, 1881, the 
superintendent reports 2,000 tons of ore on the dump, which will 
work $200 per ton. 

The receipts for the year ending December 31st, 1880, were 
$586,886.68 ; expenses during the same period, $352,234.18 ; divi- 
dends, $75,000; cash on hand, December 31st, 1880, $159,652.50. 

The Windsor Mining Co. own several locations, among which 
are the Last Chance, Copper Top, and Mountain View. These 
properties have all been developed to a considerable extent, and 
are yielding a large quantity of ric'i ore. The compauy have a 



I (IB J, M. DriinSWIGK & DRiKB LOi MAVlFACTlKEKIS, { SauFraucisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 53 

five-stamp mill and furnace at Pinal City for the reduction of 
their ores, the yield from which adds materially to the stream, of 
bullion which is now flowing from this di>trict. L. Elmore is 
Superintendent. 

The Wide Awake Mining Co. own the Gem, a gold mine 
which has a four-foot ledge carrying high-grade ore. This com- 
pany have a ten-stamp mill on Queen Creek, near their tunnel. 
All the machinery is new, of the latest improved pattern, and 
will work about 18 tons of rock per day. It is said the ore will 
average about $45 per ton, and that it costs about $6 per ton for 
mining and milling. A. Showers is Superintendent. 

The Alice Bell Mine, situated about two miles from Silver 
King, is developed by a shaft over 100 feet in depth, from which 
several cross-cuts have been run. Ore of a very high grade has 
been found, resembling in many respects that of the Silver King. 
Good hoisting works have been erected, and the mine is being 
energetically worked. 

The Eastland Mining Co. own the Tilden Mine, which ad- 
joins the Silver King on the east. They have erected extensive 
hoisting works and are sinking a two-compartment shaft, which is 
now over 100 feet in depth, and progressing at a rate of about 
four feet a day. The engine is forty-horse power. 

The Pike mine is situated about half a mile north of the Silver 
King. It is developed to a considerable extent, and is yielding 
high grade ore. Equal in merit as regards ores or location to the 
last mentioned mine?, are the Lewis Consolidated, Surpriser, North- 
ern King, Silver King South, Bilk, and Mowry mines, all of which 
are being energetically developed. In addition to the above are 
the Belcher, Eureka, Webfoot, Union East, Union West, Tele- 
graph, Cedar Tree, James A. Garfield, Silver Queen, Athens, News 
Letter, Helpmate, Redeemer, London, Orphan Boy, Black Dia- 
mond, Emma, Silver Duke, Beebe, Columbia, Silver Belle, Marti- 
nez, Santa Maria, Pinal Chief, Blue Bird, Victoria, New Year, and 
others, which have been more or less developed, and from which 
good ore has been extracted. At Happy Camp, about three miles 
from Pinal City, is the Uncle Bill, Augustin, Leon, Lancing, Rock- 
land, Hard Scrabble, etc., which are now being worked and yield- 
ing good ore. 

POORMAn's, YUMA COUNTY. 

This new district, situated in the western part of the county, 
has recently attracted considerable attention, and prospecting on 
a number of locations is vigorously going on, notwithstanding the 
hot weather and the difficulty of obtaining wood and water. The 
latter obstacles can, however, be overcome by the erection of 
mills and furnaces on the Colorado River, and the construction 
of a wagon road from the mines to that point. The ledges in this 



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WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { Tu T c ^„? G ^ of all Kinds. 



54 ARIZONA. 



"'district .are large and well-defined, the croppings frequently stand- 
ing up for long distances, eight to ten feet in height. Float ore 
is found in great abundance, and with good facilities for reduc- 
tion, there is but little doubt that large quantities of it could be 
profitably worked. The ores are generally of a smelting quality, 
although free milling ore is also found. 

Considerable prospecting has been done on the Amelia, and 
recently the owners have commenced sinking a new shaft four by 
six feet, on the ledge. It is now down thirty feet, all the way in 
good ore, with about eighteen inches of fine galena, which will 
average 100 ounces to the ton. The company have erected a 
boarding-house and blacksmiths' shop and are now prepared to 
push developments vigorously. The Boston is an adjoining claim, 
on which a vein of high-grade chloride and sulphuret ore was 
recently discovered. The Diamond, a short distance off, is loca- 
ted on a ledge nearly parallel with the Amelia, and thirty feet in 
width, showing a six-inch vein of very rich ore. Opposite to the 
Diamond, at a short distance, is the Florence Caton, which has 
three ledges cropping out of the ground, in places, ten feet in 
height, and it is claimed that these croppings will all pay. 
The Luz is the north-east extension of the Diamond ; the crop- 
pings on this mine rise twenty feet above the mesa, and are thirty 
feet in thickness. In addition to the above, are the Brilliant, 
Russell, Myers, Hoodlum, and Thistle Dew, which are said to be 
valuable locations. 

SADDLE MOUNTAIN, PINAL COUNTY. 

This district is situated on Gila Canon, 50 miles east of Flor- 
ence. The first locations were made in March, 1880, since which 
time some work has been done on several mines, developing rich 
silver ore, carrying gold. A shaft 80 feet deep has been sunk on 
a claim bonded to San Francisco parties, in which the ore has 
increased in value as depth is attained. The formation is lime- 
stone. The ores are black sulphates. Some ore has been milled 
averaging $156 to the ton for pulp. About one hundred locations 
have so far been made. Timber is abundant, principally pine. 
Water can be easily obtained from the Gila river the year around. 

SAN FRANCISCO, MOHAVE COUNTY. 

This district is situated in the western part of the county, bor- 
dering on the Colorado River. A number of mines were located 
here a few years ago, and worked to some extent. The long 
distance to centers of trade, and the high rates of freight have 
been great draw-backs to this section, but on the completion of 
the 35th Parallel Railroad these evils will be remedied, and this 
section will take a new start on the road of progress. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. £&£*£%&££{' 



San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., "»~ u 



BOOTH A \ I> SHOES. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 55 



SAN PEDRO, GRAHAM COUNTY. 

This is a new district, situated in the western portion of the 
county. The Walston, a silver mine, has a shaft down eighty 
feet, and is extracting good ore. The Pioneer is also being vig- 
orously prospected, and taking out good ore. The Sample mine 
has a shaft 100 feet in depth. At this point a cross-cut exposes 
some ore which sparkles with virgin silver. 

SANTA RITA PLACERS, PIMA COUNTY. 

These placers are situated in what is known as the Helvetia 
District, about 55 miles southeast of Tucson. The principal 
mining camp in the district, known as Greaterville, is at an alti- 
tude of 5,000 feet above sea-level. About three miles west of 
the town in the Santa Rita Range is a peak known as Old Baldy, 
which is one of the highest in Arizona, being about 10.000 feet 
above the level of the sea. The hills and mountains are covered 
with oak, pine, and cedar, and the climate is delightful. These 
extensive placer diggings are very rich, and although they have 
as yet only been worked in a primitive manner, have yielded sev- 
eral hundred thousand dollars worth of gold. The lack of water 
prevents them from being worked to any great extent, except 
during the rainy season, when quite a large number of miners 
are busily engaged in washing the dirt. The Santa Rita Quartz 
and Placer Mining Co., have considerable ground which pays 
well for working. The district also contains many quartz ledges, 
which are being developed, and show rich ore. From three to 
six miles northwest of Greaterville are extensive and rich copper 
ledges, which when developed will no doubt yield a large amount 
of metal. 

SILVER, YUMA COUNTY. 

This district lies in the western part of the county, and is 
bounded on the west by the Colorado River, and on the south by 
Castle Dome District. The great heat and scarcity of water 
have undoubtedly been great drawbacks to the development of 
the mineral resources of this section, but owing to the rich dis- 
coveries which have been made, all difficulties will in time be 
overcome, and the Silver District forced to yield up its hidden 
treasures of gold, silver and copper. 

The Red Cloud is the most remarkable mine in the district. 
The croppings present a solid body of ore, standing up to the 
height of forty feet, and are 200 feet in length, and twenty feet in 
width, asssaying from fifteen to 4,000 ounces of silver to the ton. 
The average of the whole mass is about $100 per ton. It is said 
that three miners who arrived in Yuma with no other capital 



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56 ARIZONA. 



than a shot gun, which they put up as security for supplies, went 
into this district, where on the mesa at the foot of these crop- 
pings, they discovered in the soil, nuggets of pure silver, of which 
they gathered in a few days, $9,000 worth, and also located the 
ledge, which they sold for a handsome sum. The croppings are 
being taken down by means of a wide cut running lengthwise of 
the whole ledge. An incline shaft has been driven down on the 
hanging wall, 170 feet in depth, all in ore. At 130 feet a cross- 
cut shows the ore thirty feet in width, and as good as at the sur- 
face. A vertical working shaft is now being sunk. The present 
production of the mine is reported to be $50,000 per month. 

The Iron Cap mine has a shaft down 200 feet ; the vein at this 
depth is fifty feet wide, and said to be of the same character as 
that of the Red Cloud. 

The Chicago Company has large interests here, and is making 
arrangements to commence work. The Silent is a silver mine, on 
which a large amount of prospecting has been done in shafts, 
inclines and crosscuts. On the 193-foot level is a large body of 
low-grade carbonate, carrying a narrow vein of high-grade ore. 
The incline shaft is down 278 feet, at which depth ore is found 
which gives 200 ounces of silver to the ton. The Emma, on the 
same ledge, is extracting ore from a three-foot vein on the fifty- 
foot level. The Kiara is a silver mine of most excellent prospects. 
The croppings on this mine are wide and rich. The crosscut at 
a depth of thirty feet, shows twelve feet of carbonate ore which is 
said to give eighty dollars per ton. Silver Glance is being pros- 
pected and opened by a tunnel, which is now in 100 feet. This 
mine shipped some assorted ore to San Francisco, which yielded 
$1,000 per ton. The Black Rock and Pacific are represented to 
have large quantities of good ore in sight. The shaft in the 
Black Rock is down 100 feet. The Princess, Yuma Chief, Waco 
and Wilmington are also considered valuable locations. In this 
district are also found some immense ledges of lead ore, carrying 
more or less silver. 

SILVER BELL, PIMA COUNTY. 

Some years ago, an English company erected a smelter in this 
section and worked the copper ores of a mine called the Young 
America, but the enterprise did not succeed, and the ground was 
abandoned. New discoveries have been made, and a district re- 
cently formed. It is situated in the northern part of the county, 
about fifty miles from Tucson. The ores are gold, silver and 
copper. The veins are numerous, well defined and large. . 

The Abbie Waterman is a silver mine of great promise, which 
is being vigorously prospected by the owners, Messrs. Gates, 
Knox and Murphy. They also own several of the adjoining 
mines. The Amelia, owned by P. Woods, is being prospected by 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. £&»#?&££££{ 



ltll II V1C1» TABLE i 653 & 655 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 57 

a tunnel. It has a fine vein of carbonate ore. The Monarch 
shows a vein of copper silver glance, from five to twenty feet 
in width. There are many other silver locations, on which pros- 
pectors are now engaged, and from which ore is being extracted, 
but perhaps the greatest activity is in the copper group of mines 
around Pelton. The Old Boot, Blue Coat, and Southern Beauty, 
are described as forming a mountain of copper, similar in charac- 
ter to the Great Copper Queen mine at Bisbee. These mines 
belong to the Huachuca Mining and Smelting Company, of which 
Messrs. Scott, Zeckendorf and E. N. Fish are the principal own- 
ers. This company has a smelting furnace, and keep a large 
force of men at work. W. B. Scott is Superintendent. The Ari- 
zona, Pima and Mountain Chief are also copper mines, reported 
to show large bodies of good ore. A good many men are now 
employed at this camp, which gives it a busy, thriving appearance. 

SILVER MOUNTAIN, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

The following information in regard to this looality is taken 
from the columns of the Arizona Miner : 

"Silver Mountain is situated about fifty. five miles south of 
Prescott and twelve miles south of the Tiger. Running directly 
through the center of the mountain from north to south is the 
Mammoth, one of the largest mineral -bearing ledges yet discov- 
ered in Arizona. This monster vein crops out boldly for a dis- 
tance of more than three miles in length, and measures all the 
way from iifty to three hundred feet in width, bearing both gold 
and silver throughout its entire length and breadth. From the 
cro'ppings, ore giving high assays has been obtained. 

"Lying parallel with the Mammoth, on the east, is the Excel- 
sior, a vein 50 feet in width, carrying good ore. 

" On the west is the Great Western, owned by Kelly & Hutch- 
ins, an immense ledge of fine mineral-bearing rock. 

" Northeast of the Union claim lies the Mountain King, which 
is evidently an offshoot from the Mammoth, and is at least two 
hundred feet wide. There are several other large veins in Silver 
Mountain in the vicinity of the Mammoth, notably the Snow Ball, 
Huff, and the Buell." 

SWISSHELM, CACHISE COUNTY. 

The district is situated between Sulphur Spring and White 
River Valleys, in the southeastern part of the county, about fifty 
miles by wagon road from Tombstone. The first locations were 
made in 1878, since which time considerable prospecting has been 
done. The formation is generally limestone and quartzite. Ga- 
lena ores of the smelting varieties prevail, some assaying as high 
as 200 ounces of silver to the ton. On the mountains is some 



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58 ARIZONA. 



timber, principally a small growth of oak and juniper. Water is 
generally scarce, although in the White River Valley is a small 
stream which rises and sinks in different places. The altitude is 
4,700 feet. The climate is pleasant, with cool nights and refresh- 
ing breezes in the summer. The principal locations are the Mam- 
moth, Mountain Queen, Mountain Chief, and Whale, all of which 
have yielded rich ore. 

THE SIEREITAS, PIMA COUNTY. 

This district is situated about thirty-five miles from Tucson, 
and is reached by a good road over a level country, most of the 
distance. Water is found at a depth of ten or fifteen feet, and 
sufficient can now be obtained for prospecting purposes. Wood 
is abundant, the mountain sides being covered with a heavy 
growth of live-oak timber, while the mesas are thickly covered 
with mesquite and paloverde. The formation is slate, limestone 
and quartzite. The ledges are numerous and well-defined, with 
clearly marked walls, and are seen cropping out from the mesa 
with as much regularity as in the hills. The numerous remains 
of smelters and arastras, some of which have been recently util- 
ized, show that at no remote date, this district was the center of 
active mining operations. The Mexican miners were probably 
driven away by the Apaches. 

Mr. Hughes owns some mines which are being steadily devel- 
oped, and producing some very rich ore. The Continuacion, 
owned by Brichta, Meek & Co., has been opened in three places 
on the ledge, showing good ore in each shaft. The vein is four 
feet wide, inclosed by slate walls, the ore being argentiferous ga- 
lena, carrying a streak of high-grade copper. Many other loca- 
tions have been made, some of which are being vigorously devel- 
oped and yielding good ore. 

TIGER DISTRICT, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This district, situated in the southern portion of the county, is 
bounded on the north by Walnut Grove, and on the south by 
Humbug District. The first mining operations were in the placer 
diggings, which were discovered about twenty years since. Soon 
afterwards quartz ledges were also discovered and prospected to 
a considerable extent. The Tiger mine, from which the district 
takes its name, was discovered in 1871, and for a time vigorously 
worked, yielding ore of a high grade, which was sent to San Fran- 
cisco for reduction. In 1877 a three-compartment shaft was sunk, 
and good hoisting works and a mill erected. Since then it has 
produced a large amount of bullion. At present work on the 
mine is suspended, but no doubt will soon be resumed, when the 
camp will again present a lively appearance. In this district is 



The J. I¥l. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TAB LE( 653 <fc 655 Market St 
MAXlFA<Ti;ui;K8, I San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO.. Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 59 

located the Bradshaw Basin Mill, which is at work crushing ore 
from the surrounding mines. Mr. C. C. Bean, of Prescott, is the 
agent. In the neighborhood of the Tiger Mine are many other 
promising ledges that will no doubt soon be developed. The cli- 
mate of this section is delightful, and wood and water abundant. 

TOMBSTONE, CACHISE COUNTY. 

This district is located in the southwestern part of the county, 
between the Dragoon and Whetstone Mountains, the most promi- 
nent mines being about nine miles east of the San Pedro River in 
a low range of hills sometimes called the Tombstone Mountains. 
Several of these mines have already produced such a large amount 
of rich silver ore as to give this district the lead of all others, and 
to form an era in the silver production and material progress of 
the whole Territory. The climate of this section is temperate and 
healthful, the altitude being about 5,000 feet above the level of the 
sea. Wood and water are scarce, the most of the timber for min- 
ing purposes being brought from the Huachuca Mountains, while 
most of the water for drinking and other purposes is brought in 
pipes from the Dragoon Mountains, a distance of about eight 
miles. 

The first discovery of ore in the district was probably at the 
old Bronkow mine, referred to more particularly below. The 
first discovery, however, in what are generally called the Tomb- 
stone mines was made in 1877 by E. A. Scheiffelin, an energetic 
and intelligent miner, who sought to penetrate the fatal precincts 
of the Bronkow Hills, where already thr< e prospectors at different 
times had been foully murdered. On disclosing his intention to 
prospect these hills to some miners more timid than he, they in- 
formed him of the fate of the former prospectors of the ill-omened 
district, and suggested that the first work that he did there should 
be the erection of a tombstone, so that when the country became 
safe they could find his resting-place, and write his epitaph. These 
sad associations suggested to him the future name of the district. 
He however adhered to his resolution, and after a few weeks' 
prospecting disovered a rich ledge .of silver and gold, now known 
as the Lucky Cuss mine. Scheiffelin was subsequently joined 
by his brother and Richard Gird, both practical miners. In Febru- 
ary, 1878, they located the Tough Nut, Contention, and other mines, 
which have since produced a large amount of bullion. The Hon. 
P. Hamilton, Commissioner for the Collection of Mineral Statis- 
tics, etc., who recently visited this district, says : 

"The mineral belt of Tombstone extends about three miles east 
and west, and four miles north and south. The general character 
of the country rock is lime and porphyry, the former largely pre- 
dominating. Quartzite is found in some localities, and on the ex- 
treme western edge of the district a granite formation is encoun- 



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WI. B. HOOPER & SO. { T Te° x a?Gu n ^fs, T Me E i^ '} Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



60 ARIZONA. 



tered. The indications of eruptive agencies are found on every 
side, showing plainly that this country has been the scene of active 
natural disturbances in ages gone by. But although the country 
formation is not one to accord with the theoretical views of gentle- 
men learned in the schools, the vast ore bodies, rich in chlorides 
and horn silver, show this spot to have been one of Nature's grand 
laboratories in times when the earth was young. The ore bodies, 
as far as can be ascertained, have a general direction east of south 
and north of west, and nearly all have a dip varying from 60 to 
25 degrees. The ore is a free milling, composed mainly of chlor- 
ides and horn silver, with some carbonates. Some of the ores 
show a heavy percentage of gold, while nearly all carry slight 
traces of lead. The ore is easily reduced — about three tons to 
the stamp being the average at the different mills. The main ore 
channel is situated in the low hills which rise immediately south 
of the town, and has been traced and followed within the limits 
of the town site. Shafts have been sunk and drifts run under the 
houses, and the dull thud of giant powder cartridges makes the 
earth tremble with frequent explosions. The ore bodies of Tomb- 
stone district are large — varying from three to twelve feet — and 
their extraction is less costly than in any camp I ever saw. The 
ore is hauled to the mills on the San Pedro River, at a cost of $4 
per ton. Nearly 500 tons per day are now shipped, and the yield 
of bullion is close on to $500,000 per month. This is a good 
showing for a camp which did not drop a stamp until last April a 
year ago. 

"There are six mills on the San Pedro, with 125 stamps, besides 
one 5 -stamp custom mill at Water vale, about three miles from 
town, making in all 130 stamps now in operation in this district. 
It is almost certain that several new mills will be erected during 
the coming season. Eleven claims have put up hoisting machinery 
of the most complete and approved style — most of them having 
safety cages and every facility for the mining and hoisting of ore. 
The hillsides are dotted with these structures, and the shrill music 
of their steam-whistles wakes the echoes of the surrounding hills, 
and proclaims the dawn of a new era of civilization, progress, and 
prosperity, where hitherto solitude and savagery have held undis- 
puted sway." 

The Westeen. This mine, generally known as the Conten- 
tion, was purchased from the Scheiffelin Brothers and Richard 
Gird, by J. H. White, its present Local Manager, and W. E. Dean, 
its present President, for $10,000. A company was formed and 
incorporated in 1880, under the laws of California. The stock 
was divided into 100,000 shares at $100 each. The mine has been 
opened by two shafts, situated 500 feet apart and 400 feet in 
depth, and six levels run, one, 812 feet in length,. and the others 
from 50 to 100 feet. All these levels are in rich ore. The vein 
averages six feet in width and pays about $150 per ton. The work- 



Thfi J. M. Brunswick & Bsiks Go. SA^Fr^uKEitSi^stsstcof* 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. . 61 

ing shaft is a double compartment, four and a half by five feet. 
The steam hoisting works are of the best quality, and capable of 
working the mine to a much greater depth. The company has a 
twenty-five stamp mill, situated at Charleston, on the San Pedro 
River. Twelve consecutive monthly dividends of $75,000 each, 
have been paid by the incorporated company, and sufficient ore is 
said to be in sight to continue these dividends for a long time to 
come. 

The Tombstone Mill and Mining Company. This com- 
pany has eleven locations, several of which have been sufficiently 
opened to entitle them to the name of mines, and at least three 
have developed large bodies of rich ore. They are, however, in- 
cluded in one incorporation, prospected and worked by one man- 
agement, and their results unsegregated. This renders it difficult 
to give a particular description of any one of them, however 
much its rank may entitle it to a prominent position. These 
locations are the Lucky Cuss, Toughnut, Goodenough, Survey, 
Defense, West Side, Tribute, East Side, Owl's Nest, East Side 
No. 2, and Owl's Last Hoot. The first two were the first 
locations in the district. The Toughnut and Goodenough have 
been the two principal locations worked up to the present 
time. On these are seven shafts and many hundreds of feet of 
prospecting tunnels and crosscuts, which have developed an im- 
mense quantity of ore, which will be stoped as fast as required for 
crushing in the mills. Up to the present time, the prospecting 
tunnels have furnished most of the ore required, and but few 
chambers have been made. The ore runs from $35 to $500 
per ton ; at last report it was milling $144 per ton. The vein is 
very irregular in width, sometimes contracting to a foot or two, 
and then widening out into a mass forty feet wide. The ores 
are principally chlorides and carbonates, carrying about twelve 
per cent, of lead, native silver, horn silver, and polybasite are also 
found. The company has good steam hoisting works, ore bins 
and shops, in fact all the necessary appliances for the steady and 
successful working of this great property. It also has two mills 
on the San Pedro, running thirty-five stamps. Up to March last, 
$1,000,000 had been- paid in dividends, leaving in the treasury, 
$200,000, and seventy tons of ore were being hauled daily to the 
mills. Nearly 200 men are employed in the mine. The office 
of the company is in New York. George Burnham is President, 
and John A. Church Local Manager and Superintendent. 

The Grand Central. This mine is incorporated under the 
laws of Ohio, where one of its principal owners resides. The 
capital is placed at $10,000,000, in 100,000 shares; E. B. Gage is 
Superintendent. Active work commenced a little over fifteen 
months ago. The mill commenced crushing ore on the 1st of 
March, 1881. No dividends have yet been paid. The mine has 
been well opened by a main working shaft, and several prospect- 



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WM. B. HOOPER & ^J^^^^^^^^ of all Kinds. 



62 ARIZONA. 



ing shafts, and many hundred feet of prospecting tunnels and 
crosscuts. In making these prospects and opening three levels 
ready for stopeing, six thousand tons of fine ore have been mined, 
and are now being hauled to the mill. The main shaft is down 
400 feet. The largest development of ore is found in the 300-foot 
level, where it expands to the width of a hundred feet. The ore 
is of the same general character as that previously described ; 
somewhat softer and more easily mined and milled. It is estima- 
ted that between the floor of the 300-foot level and the surface of 
the mine there are 80,000 tons of ore which will mill $100 per 
"ton. Everything in and about the mine is now in complete work- 
ing order, with a new thirty-stamp mill, and large proceeds may 
be confidently expected. 

The Head Center. This mine is incorporated under the 
laws of California, with a capital stock of $10,000,000, divided 
into 200,000 shares. Thomas E. Farrish is its Superintendent. 
It has a double compartment working shaft, which is now down 
over 650 feet. Four levels have been opened and partially ex- 
plored ; the first, to the distance of 330 feet ; the second, 630 feet ; 
the third, 650 feet ; the fourth, which is the 410-foot level, 260 
feet. All of these levels disclose a large amount of good ore, 
similar in character to that spoken of in Contention and Good- 
enough. The company have just erected new hoisting works of 
the best style. It has a ten-stamp mill on the San Pedro River, 
and everything is now ready to commence a steady production of 
bullion. A strong flow of water has just been struck at a depth 
of 525 feet. 

The Vizina. is incorporated under the laws of New York, with 
a capital stock of $5,000,000, divided into 50,000 shares, 12,500 of 
which were set aside for working purposes. A small portion of 
these shares, however, has been sold, as the mine has not onlj 
paid all working expenses, but the purchase price also. The 
mine has three shafts, thirty-six, fifty-six and 380 feet respect- 
ively ; the latter is the working shaft, over which is placed good 
steam hoisting works. Only one level has been thoroughly ex- 
plored in this mine, and from this level fifteen tons of ore are 
shipped daily to the mill, which returns a yield of $1,200. A. 
H. Emanuel is Superintendent. 

The Sulphuret is incorporated under the laws of Pennsylva- 
nia ; capital stock, $5,000,000 ; number of shares, 200,000, with a 
paid-up working fund of $40,000. H. Disston is President, and 
Hank Smith, Superintendent. The mine is opened by two shafts, 
one 300 feet, and the other over 500 feet in depth ; the latter is 
a double compartment, and is intended for the main working 
shaft. Over it is erected first-class hoisting works. Two levels 
have been run, one at a depth of 150 feet, and the other at 350 
feet. In both of these levels some ore has been found. Rich ore 
has recently been found in a crosscut at a depth of 500 feet, and 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. Sft»*?&£££SS{' 



San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. L, MINING SUPPLIES. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 63 

at the same point a heavy flow of water rushed in, which has to 
some extent impeded developments. 

The Empire is incorporated in Boston where it is principally- 
owned. W. S. Pollard is President, and D. P. Pierce Superin- 
tendent. The shaft in this claim is down about 450 feet. The 
first level was opened at a depth of 200 feet, and several hundred 
feet of prospecting tunnels were run. A large body of ore has 
recently been found on the 400-foot level, which averages over 
$200 per ton, and from the winze on the 200-foot level a fine 
quality of chloride ore is being extracted. The vein on the 400- 
foot level is large and well-defined, carrying gold and silver. 
The silver is found in the usual shape of chlorides and carbonates, 
but the gold is free. 

The main shaft is well constructed, four by five feet double 
compartment ; the hoisting machinery is good and the buildings 
substantial. 

The Girard has a good double compartment shaft down over 
400 feet, and has erected steam hoisting works. Two levels have 
been opened ; the first at a depth of 150 feet, and the second at 
350 feet, showing a 4-foot vein of good ore. There are 600 tons of 
this ore on the dump, which is estimated to be worth $100 per 
ton. It is said there are several thousand tons of similar ore in 
sight. The company employs 25 men vigorously prospecting. 

The Wedge Consolidated. This property embraces two lo- 
cations of the usual size, trending northwest and southeast along 
the western slopes of the hill. It was incorporated in San Fran- 
cisco in January, 1881, on the basis of $10,000,000, divided into 
100,000 shares. It has been worked almost continuously since 
then. In April, $4,455.42 were realized from a small parcel of this 
ore reduced at the Head Center mill. The main incline shaft is 
now about 120 feet deep. The ore is an admixture of the black 
oxides of manganese, and other mineral crystalizations. There 
are now some 200 tons of ore piled on the dump at the mine, 
while a hundred or so tons more stand in sight in the 100-foot 
level, ready to be extracted. While much of this ore has given 
assay values of from $75 to $225 per ton, it is probable the aver- 
age will not overtop $90 per ton. 

The Grand Central South. This mine was incorporated in 
San Francisco in January, 1881, with a capital stock of $10,000,000 
divided into 100,000 shares, with $20,000 paid-up working capital. 
R. F. Morrow is President, and B. Frank Hall Superintendent. 
The mine has'two shafts 600 feet apart ; one is a prospecting shaft 
down over 150 feet, the other is a double compartment shaft over 
which hoisting machinery is to be placed. This shaft shows a 
number of bunches of good ore. 

The Mountain Maid. This mine, located within the limits of 
the City of Tombstone, was worked to a considerable extent by 
Mr. C. Bilicke, its first owner. It now belongs to an incorpor- 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



U/rvi D UnnnanAPft (Tucson & l'hcenix, A.T., El Paso,) Sole Agent* J. A. MILLER 
WlTl. D. nOUptJl Ot Oil. ^ Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, $ C. C WHISKEY. 



64 ARIZONA. 



ated company; capital stock $10,000,000. It has been developed 
by three shafts. No. 1 was sunk in low-grade ore from top to 
bottom. In No. 2, which is down 150 feet, some rich ore has been 
found. Shaft No. 3 is sunk on the Goodenough ground to the 
depth of 95 feet, and from this a tunnel has been run to the 
Mountain Maid ground, disclosing a vein of high-grade ore assay- 
ing $4fi0 per ton. 

The Tranquility, Contentment, Sydney, Bob Ingersoll, Flora 
Morrison, Hawkeye, Survey, Way-TJp and Arizona Queen, are 
mines of great promise, and are being energetically developed. 
In addition to these are the Grand Dipper, Stonewall, Gilded 
Age, Naumkeag, Cincinnati, Winfield, Gentile Belle, True Blue, 
Hercules, Blue Monday, Intervenor, Phoenix, Tombstone Consol- 
idated, Mamie, Junietta, Little "Wonder, Mesa Consolidated, and 
others too numerous to mention, which have been worked to a 
considerable extent, and are considered valuable locations. 

In the extreme western portion of the district near the San Pe- 
dro River are many promising mines ; among them the Bradshaw, 
which is developed by a shaft 300 feet deep. It has a vein of ore 
from two to six feet in width, carrying rich chlorides and horn 
silver. In this section is also located the old Bronkow mine, 
which on account of its interesting history is worthy of a notice. 

It was discovered twenty-two years ago by a celebrated Ger- 
man mineralogist of the name of Bronkow, who became inter- 
ested in the mineral resources of Arizona. He braved untold 
hardships and Indian dangers in opening this mine, only to fall a 
victim to the cupidity of his Mexican operatives, who murdered 
him for the first run of bullion extracted. The mine lay unoc- 
cupied from that time, till 1873, when it was relocated by a Mr. 
Duffield, who was soon after assassinated by another claimant. It 
was again located by a Mr. Rogers, who a few months afterwards 
was killed by the Apaches. Thus its three consecutive owners, 
along with fourteen operatives, came to an untimely end. This 
vicinity is strewn' with graves, and no wonder the miners believe 
an evil spirit guards the wealth of old Bronkow. 

The vein is large and well defined. The ore is argentiferous 
galena, the lead sometimes amounting to 50 per cent, of its bulk. 
It is easily reduced, the silver running readily with the lead from 
the smelting furnace. Assays give as high as $105 to the ton. 

TRINITY, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This recently formed district is located on Turkey Creek, some 
35 miles southea-t of Prescott. 

The Tuscumbia mine is opened by shafts, drifts, and tunnels in 
a thorough manner, and has considerable high-grade ore on the 
dump. The company is now building a ten-stamp mill at Gus' 
Springs. Trinity mine is supposed to be located on the same vein 



Thfi J. Nl. Brunswick & Balke Co. m T lvivi&vnSuHA M s^^n^o 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., «»'•»"-«»»««. 



OILS AND l'AI.VTS. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 65 

as the Tuscumbia, some two miles northward. The shaft on this 
mine is down 70 feet. At this depth three feet of good ore is 
found. Immediately north on the same vein is the Sultan, which 
is now being opened with good prospects, some of its ore giving 
high assays. In this vicinity are also located the Keystone, Ken- 
dall, Peerless, Alice, and Imperial, all of which are being opened, 
and show some good ore. 

TONTO BASIN, GILA COUNTY. 

This is a large section which has not as yet been regularly or- 
ganized into a district, but it has been prospected to a sufficient 
extent to prove that it contains many ledges of good ore. A 
shaft has been sunk on the Nash mine to the depth of about sev- 
enty feet, disclosing a ledge varying in width from two to four 
feet. Two arastras are in operation on this property, the ore 
yielding about sixty dollars to the ton. The Tonto Chief, 
May-be So, and several other claims, are also being developed 
with good prospects ahead. This section affords a good supply 
of wood and water for mining purposes. 

TUMACACOKI, PIMA COUNTY. 

Tumacacori, an old ruined mission, situated in the mountains 
on the west side of the Valley of the Santa Cruz, was, like Tubac, 
the center of extensive mining operations many years since. All 
over this section may be seen the evidences of old mining, and 
tradition says that near this place was located the Tumacacori 
mine of wonderful richness, from which the Jesuit Fathers, with 
a trained band of Indian miners, for a long time quietly extracted 
immense amounts of silver. A day came at last when the crafty 
Apache surrounded the mission, and left not a soul to tell the 
story of its destruction, or even to point out the location of its 
rich mines. A recent prospector claims to have found this old 
mine : but whether he has or not, the search in this rich mineral 
district, cannot fail to bring to light other mines perhaps as rich 
as Tumacacori. 

TURKEY CREEK, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This district lies southeast of Prescott, and is bounded on the 
north by Big Bug, and on the south by Peck District. The most 
noted mine in this section is the Goodwin, discovered in 1864, 
and named in honor of the person who was then Governor of the 
Territory. It has well defined croppings, which can be traced 
a distance of several hundred yards. Upon the original discov- 
ery there are two shafts sunk, one sixty and another ninety feet 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Win. B. Hooper & go. {^EFfi^'d^l J^ Blitz Milwaukee Beer. 



ARIZONA. 



in depth. In a tunnel run from one of the shafts, it is said ore 
was found assaying two hundred dollars a ton ; but work had to 
be suspended on account of a heavy flow of water which rushed 
in at that point. On the Homestead and Morning Glory ledges, 
near the Goodwin, very high-grade ore has been obtained. There 
are quite a number of other ledges prospecting well, which when 
developed will no doubt prove valuable ; wood and water are 
abundant. 

TURQUOISE, CACHISE COUNTY. 

This district is situated in a small detached range east of the 
Dragoon Mountains, about eighteen miles from Tombstone. The 
mineral veins are found in a general formation of limestone. The 
district received its name from the fact of finding old turquoise 
workings, which have been attributed by some to the Spanish ; 
while others believe they were worked by the Aztecs, who are 
known to have admired this gem. Some of these excavations are 
two hundred feet in length, and from ten to sixteen feet in depth. 
The silver ores are argentiferous galena, chlorides and carbonates. 
About one hundred and fifty locations have been made ; among 
which may be named, as most prominent, the Mono, Defiance, 
Dragoon, Elgin, Contention and Hidden Treasure. 

TYNDALL, PIMA COUNTY. 

This district is situated on the east side of the Santa Cruz Val- 
ley, adjoining the Aztec District, and embraces within its limits 
the lower ranges of the Santa Rita Mountains. It is one of the 
oldest and probably one of the richest mining sections in Southern 
Arizona. In every portion of it, especially at Tubac, the Haci- 
enda del Santa Ritas, and at the mission of Tumacacori, are to 
be found the remains of arastras and smelters, together with 
large dumps of ore slag, which proclaim this district to have been in 
former times the scene of extensive mining operations, in what 
was then Northern Mexico. It is at least sixty years since any of 
these works were used. The district affords sufficient wood and 
water for mining and milling purposes, and in the mountains is 
found a fine growth of pine timber. Among the most noted 
mines are the Mercer's group, owned by T. L. Mercer, Campbell's 
group, Neil's group, Megry's group, Josephine group, Baack & 
Casey's group, Devil's Cache, and the Arnold and Surprise mines. 

VULTURE MINE, MARICOPA COUNTY. 

This noted gold mine is located in the northwestern portion of 
the county, eleven miles east of Seymour. It was discovered in 
1863 by Henry Wickenburg, and worked continuously for several 
years. Two mills were erected at the town of Wickenburg for 
the reduction of the ore, from which a large amount of bullion 



The I M Rmne\A/ink 9 Rolfal Pn BILLIABD TABLE( 653 A 655 Market St. 
I IIG J. 171. DllllISYYiUK & DdilVC UU. MAXVFACTUKER»,1 San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 67 

was extracted. Through bad management on the part of those 
in charge, and hostility of the Apaches, the company were finally 
forced to suspend operations, and the property was sold for taxes. 
It was afterwards re-located, and by misrepresentations sold to 
Mr. Seymour of New York for a big price. This gentleman find- 
ing himself victimized, determined to see the speculation through, 
and went energetically to work to develop the mine. Water 
was carried through a six-inch galvanized pipe from the Hassay- 
ampa Creek to the mine, a distance of fourteen miles, and an 
eighty-stamp mill erected. These operations, it is said, cost Mr. 
Seymour $358,000. When the mill was started, it worked to a 
charm, and the daily profit from the working of the ore amounted 
to $1000, which, together with the sale of stock, soon reimbursed 
Mr. Seymour for the large amount expended, and left him in the 
possession of a fortune. The ore vein is an immense ledge of low- 
grade quartz, which is run through the mill without assorting. 

WALKER, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This district lies about 14 miles south of Prescott. It is five 
miles long and two wide, and contains over 200 promising loca- 
tions. The great want of this district heretofore has been reduc- 
tion works, which are now being supplied by the Lynx Creek 
Smelting Co., who are putting up a first-class 15 -ton smelter, 
with all the necessary appliances. Wood and water, two great 
essentials for successful mining, are abundant. The Accidental, 
one of the oldest locations in the district, of which C. P. Dake is 
Superintendent, is developed by a shaft 300 feet deep. The ore 
is worked in arastras, and yields from $30 to $130 per ton in gold 
and silver. C. Y. Shelton owns a group of mines which are highly 
spoken of, among which are the American Flag, Grey Eagle, Capi- 
tal, and Eureka. Considerable work has been done on the For- 
tune and Champion, from both of which good ore has been ex- 
tracted. The Hidden Treasure, owned by the Yavapai Mill and 
Mining Co., and the Pine Mountain, are also considered promising 
mines. 

WALNUT GROVE, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This district is situated south of Prescott, and is bounded on 
the north by the Hassayampa and on the south by the Tiger dis- 
tricts. It contains gold, silver, and copper ledges, some of which 
give high assays, but have not as yet been developed to any great 
extent. Wood and water are sufficiently abundant to afford good 
facilities for the reduction of ores. The Antelope Copper M. Co., 
incorporated under the laws of the State of New York, Townsend 
Cox, President, have recently erected a smelter for the purpose of 
working some promising properties belonging to them. The com- 
pany is represented by Mr. C. C. Bean, of Prescott. 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { T ^t?SS^^ar , HlluminatlnoOil8. 



68 ARIZONA. 



WARREN DISTRICT, CACHISE COUNTY. 

This district is situated in the southern portion of the county, 
about 35 miles south of Tombstone, embracing within its limits 
what is known as the Mule Pass Mountains. This section of the 
country was one of the strongholds of the Apaches, who for a 
long time stubbornly resisted all attempts to drive them from it. 
Here, locked in by rugged mountains, broken up by narrow and 
steep canons, these relentless savages found a natural fastness, 
from which they sallied forth in forays on the settlements of So- 
nora, stealing cattle and mules, and driving them in such numbers 
through the principal pass in the mountains as to give it the name 
of Puerta de las Mulas. The Mexicans often pursued the savages 
up to the mouth of this pass, but owing to the desperate resist- 
ance made, were never able to pierce it. When the Americans 
obtained possession of the Territory a determined effort was made 
to dislodge them j and where the Kucker mine is now located, oc- 
curred one of the last actions between the Apaches and our troops. 
Some ten years since, Major Brayton, while in pursuit of Cachise, 
the famous chief, encamped in these mountains a day or two, to 
rest his command ; and at this time George Warren, his guide, 
who had been an old miner, observed mineral float, and following 
it discovered the croppings of the now celebrated Copper Queen 
mine. He subsequently made an attempt to more thoroughly ex- 
amine the mines, but was prevented by the hostility of the Indians. 
In September, 1877, Warren, accompanied by I). B. Rea, and 
guarded by an escort of United States troops, again visited this 
section, and made a number of locations. During the same year 
Captain Jack Dunn, another pioneer scout and guide who entered 
the pass in pursuit of Indians, discovered and located the Rucker 
mine, which promises to be another copper bonanza. The Cop- 
per Queen was located in 1878 by J. Jones and J. S. Halcro, who 
did no work on it; and it was jumped by other parties, who finally 
sold it, together with the Copper King, to W. H. Martin & Co., of 
San Francisco, for the sum of $18,000. This firm commenced the 
erection of a furnace in July, 1880, and on the 15th of September 
the first bullion was shipped. Since July, 1880, the production 
has been as follows : 

Tons of ore smelted. Tons of bullion produced. 

August,.... 1880 114 33 

September, " 579 159 

October,.. " 801 210 

November, " 616 143 

December, « 748 171 

January, . . . 1881 .718 146 

February, " 158 

March,... « 152 

April,.... « 112 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. WSHiS^^SSti 



653 A 655 Market St 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



TOPOGRAPHY, CLIMATE, AND RESOURCES. 69 

The Hon. P. Hamilton, who has recently visited the mine, says : 

"The Copper Queen, as far as opened, is an immense mountain 
of ore, averaging over 20 per cent, pure c«>pper. , The claim is 
opened by over 600 feet of tunnels, cross-cuts, and winzes, expos- 
ing an ore body 160 feet in length, 120 feet in width, and over 
150 feet in thickness. From careful calculations it is estimated 
that over $2,000,000 worth of ore is already in sight. A large 
excavation has been made in the side of the mountain, and the 
ore is quarried out and wheeled to a shute which delivers it at 
the smelter, a few feet below. It will thus be seen that the cost 
of extraction is merely nominal, and Superintendent Williams as- 
sured your correspondent that, with his present facilities, he could 
work ore carrying six per cent, copper." 

The mine has recently been sold to a New York company for 
the sum of $1,250,000. An additional furnace with a capacity of 
30 tons is being erected. 

The Copper King adjoins the Copper Queen on the west, and 
will no doubt when developed yield a large amount of copper. 
The Neptune Mining Co. own nine or ten locations, and have ex- 
pended considerable money in opening up some of their proper- 
ties, which have been developed sufficiently to prove that they are 
very valuable. This company have recently surveyed a line for a 
railroad to Hereford, on the San Pedro River, where they are 
erecting extensive smelting works. The Atlanta and Belle Isle 
claims lie near the Copper Queen, and have found, in addition to 
their copper ledge, a large vein of carbonate of lead dipping in 
the opposite direction. Besides those mentioned above are the 
Twilight, New York, New Year, Galena, Richmond, Watson, 
Campbell group, Corbin group, and other mines which no doubt 
contain rich ore. The mineral belt in this district is about eight 
miles loDg and three wide. The ores, which are principally car- 
bonates, are found in large masses or chambers in a limestone for- 
mation. Wood for mining and other purposes is abundant, and 
there is a fair supply of water. There are many persons engaged 
in prospecting in this vicinity, which, together with the extensive 
operations at the Copper Queen, makes Bisbee, the central point, 
thriving town. 

WASHINGTON CAMP, PIMA COUNTY. 

See Patagonia District. 

WEAVES, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

This district is situated in the southwestern portion of the 
county, and is bounded on the east by the Tiger and Humbug 
districts. It is sometimes called Weaver No. 2, to distinguish it 
from another district of the same name in Yuma County. Both 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. i^SiSSS^aSS^} Wines of all Kinds. 



70 ARIZONA. 



were named after one of the pioneer prospectors of the Territory. 
The Hassayampa Creek and other streams afford a good supply of 
water for milling purposes, and the mountain ridges afford a fair 
supply of timber. The mines in this section are almost exclu- 
sively gold-bearing, there being many quartz ledges which pros- 
pect well, and also placer diggings which are being worked to a 
considerable extent, yielding from $1.50 to $3.00 per day. In 
Peeples Valley the Model Co. and the Bed Rock Co. have erected 
mills, both of which are steadily at work crushing good ore. The 
Emma mine has been developed by a tunnel 100 feet in length, 
and an incline 108 feet. The vein is argentiferous galena, carry- 
ing some copper, and is from three to four feet in width. It is 
said to assay from $20 to $500 per ton. The Lewis and other 
companies are also taking out good ore. 

WEAVER, YUMA COUNTY. 

This district is bounded on the west by the Colorado River, and 
on the south by Eureka district. It contains gold, silver, and cop- 
per mines, some of which were discovered more than twenty years 
ago, and have been worked at intervals ever since. Gold placers 
were discovered in this section by Capt. Paulin Weaver, which 
created considerable excitement, and it is said yielded a large 
amount of gold. The Colorado mine in this district has been ex- 
tensively prospected, and ore of a high grade extracted. At pres- 
ent mining operations are almost suspended. 



RUINS OF TUMACACORI MISSION. 

The ruins of the Mission of St. Joseph Tumacacori, are about 
four miles from the town of Tubac. The first mission erected, or 
established in this immediate locality, was consecrated at Tubac 
in 1750, and was called the Santa Gertrudes Mission. This build- 
ing was shortly afterward destroyed by Apaches. In 1751 a 
church was built upon the site now occupied by the ruins above- 
named. This edifice shared the same fate as that of the Santa 
Gertrudes Mission at or about the same time. In just fifty years 
afterwards a new church was erected, and the ruins of Tumaca- 
cori constitute what is left of it, it having also been destroyed or 
partially destroyed by the Apaches eighteen years after its conse- 
cration. The seeker after information will discover that the 
main building was at least one hundred feet in length by fifty feet 
in width ; that it was substantially and elaborately constructed of 
sun-burnt and kiln-burnt bricks, which were put together with a sort 
of cement and concrete ; that it was well timbered and well roofed, 
and surmounted by two domes. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. wmaGaRrvsKSBZ 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., W " UI, » U 



BOOTS AID SHOES. 



MINING SUPERINTENDENTS. 



71 



MINING SUPERINTENDENTS. 



* Indicates owner. 



ARIVACA DISTRICT, PIMA CO. 

Arivaca P. 0. 

* Albatross Long 

* Arkansas Farr & Unthank 

Arivaca Mill Co W. F. Witherill 

Cons. Arizona John McCafferty 

Lonjarina Myers 

*Tennessee J. H. Means 

AUBREY DISTRICT, MOHAVE CO. 

Aubrey P. 0. 
Peabody ' Hubbard 

BIG BUG DISTRICT, YAVAPAI CO. 

Big Bug P. 0. 

Stokes G. B. Schoonmaker 

Valley Forge A. C. Stedman 

BLACK CANON DISTRICT, YAVAPAI CO. 

Gillette P. 0. 

*Clipper Curtis & Trotter 

*Gillespie W. R Gillespie 

*Iconoclast. H. Wickenburg 

*Nigger Brown John Anderson 

* Valanciana Carpenter & Co. 

CACHISE DISTRICT, CACHISE CO. 

Tombstone P. 0. 

Gladstone M. P. Buffum 

Golden Star J. D. Martin 

*Mountain Hope Griffin & White 

CALIFORNIA DISTRICT, CACHISE CO. 

Galeyville P. 0. 

*Bruce Smith & Co. 

*Clyde Murray & Montgomery 

Continental Upshur 

Hell . . . , Painter Bros. 

*Roman Beauty Springer 

Texas Reed 

CAVE CREEK DISTRICT, MARICOPA CO. 

*Galena Prince Philes & Chaney 

Panther C. W. Cunningham 



CLIFTON DISTRICT, GRAHAM CO. 

Clifton P. 0. 

*Copper Queen Lesinsky & Co. 

*Longfellow Lesinsky & Co. 

DOS CABEZAS DISTRICT, CACHISE CO. 

Bos Cabezas P. 0. 

Adriatic J. J. Howard 

Baltimore Elmer Hill 

Bear Cave J. A. Hart 

Cincinnati A. P. Johnston 

El Dorado J. A. Hart 

Galena Chief Thomas Lannon 

Juniper John Casey 

Little Ida Richard Sigfried 

Mary Emma Henry Fitch 

Pioneer George Goss 

Pumpkin Charles Williamson 

Silver Cave S. R. De Long 

EL CAPITAN DISTRICT, GILA CO. 

Little Giant P. 0. 

*Boston S. A.' Lowe 

*Bullion Dust Anderson & Curry 

*Burns Holt & Burns 

*E1 Capitan Lowe & Anderson 

*Foote Hardesty & Oury 

*Great Republic D. Larry 

* Little Giant . . . . .S. A. Lowe 

*Maryland A. R. Young 

*01ympic Hardesty & Oury 

*Pioneer George Scott 

Pioneer South W. B. Hellings 

*Superior S. A. Lowe 

*Topia Hardesty & Oury 

* Young Putnam. . . .Putnam & Weeks 
*Zella Reed & Anderson 

GLOBE DISTRICT, GILA CO. 

Globe P. 0. 

Alice William Beard 

Alice, S. W. Extension. .E. C. Thatcher 

American Britton Bros. 

*Andy Campbell Johnson & Long 

Big Injun W. C. Jasper 

Blue Bird Frank Thompson 



Buffalo Gen. McDonnel 



CHiRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wn?. B. Hooper & Go. { 



Tucson* Phoenix, A. T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



}Teas & Bandies at Wbolesah 



72 



ARIZONA. 



Capital W. C. Jasper 

*Carrie Erland & Sturgis 

Centennial J. E. Palmer 

*Centralia Lawrence Bros. 

Champion L. J. Webster 

Cox and Coplin I. C. Coplin 

Democrat ». . W. A. Holmes 

East Richmond F. W. Wilder 

Emeline Jason L. Clark 

Fannie J W. C. Jasper 

Fitz John Porter .... James Anderson 

German Friend Charles Hayse 

Golden Eagle N. Palmer 

Golden Nugget. . . . G.A. Newton 

Hannibal Joseph Flournoy 

Independence W. C. Jasper 

interloper T. H.Mason 

I Irene I. H. Haskins 

La Plata M A. Baldwin 

Libby T. C Stallo 

Mack Morris M. A. Baldwin 

Munson G. A. Newton 

Old Dominion S. L. Burbridge 

*Petaluma Vail & Pascoe 

Quinn Q. C. Tubbs 

Red Cloud T. C. Stallo 

Rescue L. J. Webster 

Shambone James Wiley 

Silver Bow W. C. Jasper 

Silver Nugget Joseph Lennon 

*South La Plata Tracy & Bilderback 

Stonewall Jackson J. K. Smith 

Stonewall No. 1.. Joseph Chamberlain 

*True Blue Erland & Sturgis 

Turk T. C. Stallo 

* Unknown Britton Bros. 

Washington E. Faucett 

West Richmond M. A. Baldwin 

HARSHAW. 

( See Patagonia District.) 

HASSAYAMPA DISTRICT, YAVAPAI CO. 

Prescott P. 0. 

*Benjamin Curtis & Co. 

^Connecticut. . . .Nelson, Tinker & Co. 

Cons\ Bodie T. M Alexander 

*Crook Canon W. M. Buffum 

*Dauphin Joseph Dauphin 

* Golden Chariot Vanderbilt & Co. 

*Gov. Fremont F. Williams & Co. 

*Hundred and Ten.. Burton, Hughes&Co 

*Huntington .Wilson & Co 

Jersey W. C. Flint 

*Lone Star Group. . W. N. Kelly & Co. 

*Minnehaha C. A. Behm & Co. 

*Omaha C. A. Behm & Co. 

^Providence Hutchins & Co. 



* Vanderbilt Vanderbilt & Co. 

•Wakefield Hutchins & Behm 

HCALAPAI DISTRICT, MOHAVE CO. 

Mineral Park P. 0. 

Cerbat John Barry 

Fairfield W. H. Hardy 

Keystone B. H. Spear 

Lone Star B. F. Grounds 

HUMBUG DISTRICT YAVAPAI CO. 

Tip Top P. 0. 

*Cross Cut Marks & Co. 

*Don Pedro W. A. Rowe & Co. 

*Homestake Marks & Co. 

*Isabella Fisher & Carpenter 

*Last Chance Marks & Co. 

^Nevada Marks & Co. 

*Red Bird Vernon & Co. 

*Silver Jack Vernon k Co. 

*The 76 Urfer & Co. 

Tip Top George E. Webber 

*Virginia Rodenburg & Co. 

MAYNARD DISTRICT, MOHAVE CO. 

* American Flag Richards & Co- 

MINERAL CREEK DISTRICT, PINAL CO. 

Mineral Greek Minear 

Pinal Copper Co W. A. Bolanger 

MYERS DISTRICT, MARICOPA CO. 

Gunsight B. F. Bivens 

McLellan S. G. Williams 

OLD HAT DISTRICT, PIMA CO. 

* American Flag Haskell & Co. 

* Apache Girl Zimmerman & Co. 

*Kearsage McKay & Bruce 

* Oracle Haskell & Co. 

* Wiley Dodge Bros. 

ORO BLANCO DISTRICT, PIMA CO. 

Oro Blanco P. 0. 
Ariz. Southern M. & M. Co. .H. S. Searle 
Blue Wing E. S. Barker 

* B. & S E. W. Smith 

* Dictator J. Murray Bailey 

Orion J. H. Gratacap 

Osceola E. H. Cook 

*San Domingo Hoskins & Co. 

PAJARITO DISTRICT, PIMA CO. 

Pajarito P. 0. 

Gold Mountain C. P. Sykes 

Pajarito J. M. McArthur 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



nil.LIAKU TABLE f 653 & 655 Market St 
MA* UFACTU11ER8, * San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



MINING SUPERINTENDENTS. 



73 



PATAGONIA DISTRICT, PIMA CO. 

Harshaw P. 0. 

Alta J. K. Luttrell 

♦American Corbin Bros. 

*Cabinet Dill & Co. 

*Guajalote H. D. Bacon 

Hardshell R. F. Pixley 

Hermosa Covington Johnson 

Trench A. McGregor 

Luttrell P. 0. 
Holland J. K. Luttrell 

Washington P. 0. 

Belmont Thomas Yerkes 

*Chiquito E. Longbottom 

Continental E. Longbottom & Co. 

♦Dictator Joyner Bros. 

♦El Campo .Moraghan & Co. 

♦Knickerbocker D. B. Rae 

*Mark Twain H. N. Bragg 

Patagonia Thomas H. Selby 

*Pensacola George Campbell 

*Redoubtable Allison Bros. & Co. 

Santa Cruz Thomas H. Selby 

Silver Bill J. M. Desloge 

Washington S. M. Co. . P. S. Buckminster 
Washington S. & C. Co T. H. Selby 

PECK DISTRICT, YAVAPAI 00. 

Alexandra P. 0. 

Black Warrior T M. Alexander 

Peck William Hardy 

Silver Prince T. M. Alexander 

PIONEER DISTRICT, PINAL CO. 

Pinal P. 0. 

* Alice Belle. Ayers & Hodkins 

♦Athens CO. Brown & Co. 

♦Augustin Calhoun & Libby 

♦Bebee G. N. Sarrick 

Bilk M. A. Baldwin 

♦Black Diamond W. C. O'Boyle 

Cedar Tree George De Long 

Copper Top L. Elmore 

*Emma Duffy, Gorham & Co. 

Gem A. Showers 

♦Hard Scrabble. . ..Charles Lund & Co. 

♦Hell's Fire N. S. Berry & Co 

*Helpimate Plum, Steele & Co. 

James A. Garfield P. Connelly 

Last Chance L. Elmore 

♦Leon Charles Lund 

Lewis Cons Champion 

♦London Benton & De Long 

♦Monarch of the Sea Shields & Co. 

Mountain View L. Elmore 



Mowry M. A. Baldwin 

News Letter CO. Brown & Co. 

Northern King A. B. Lawaon 

Orphan Boy .John Botenben 

♦Pike CO. Brown & Co. 

♦Redeemer. ...'... .Plum, Yeager & Co. 

Silver King Aaron Mason 

Silver King South William Tuttle 

Silver Queen G. B. Stoutenburg 

Surpriser D. T. Elmore 

Telegraph T. E. Benton 

Tilden M. A. Baldwin 

Wide Awake A. Showers 

SAN FRANCISCO DI8TRICT, MOHAVE CO. 

♦Moss 0. Wright & Co. 

SANTA RITA PLACERS, PIMA CO. 

Greaterville P. 0. 

Santa Rita Q. & P. M. Co 

. . . .James H. Campbell 
Yuba E. B. Blanchard 

SILVER DISTRICT, YUMA CO. 

Silent P. 0. 

♦Black Rock Thomas Hughes 

Chicago T. D. MacLeod 

Emma A. D. Crawford 

Engineer G. W. Norton 

Iron Cap. ... J. C McDougall 

♦Klara T. D. MacLeod 

Nelly Kenyon W. Millar 

♦Pacific Thomas Hughes 

Princess G. W. Norton 

Red Cloud C L. Walter 

SILVER BELL DISTRICT, PIMA CO. 

♦Abbie Waterman. .Gates, Murphy & Co. 

♦Amelia .P. Woods 

Doxology T. M. Williams 

Huachuca M. & S. Co W. B. Scott 

♦Monarch .Wheatley & Co. 

Spring T. M. Williams 

True Blue T. M. Williams 

TIOER DISTRICT, YAVAPAI CO. 

Bradshaw P. 0. 
Tiger C.B. Foster 

TOMBSTONE DISTRICT, CACHISE CO. 

Tombstone P. 0. 

Arizona Queen Ward Priest 

Contention J H. White 

Contentment J. R. Farrell 

Empire D. P. Pierce 

Flora Morrison J. R. Farrell 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & C0.{ T Te£?« Oils. 



74 



ARIZONA. 



Gentile Belle D. Rich 

Gilded Age J. H. Todman 

Girard R. H. Upton 

Grand Central E. B. Gage 

Grand Central South B. Frank Hall 

Hawkeye '. Charles Slicer 

Head Center T. E. Farish 

Junietta Robert Bane 

Mountain Maid D. W. Baleh 

Phoenix G. L. Upshur 

Stonewall B. A. Packard 

Sulphuret H. Smith 

Sunset D. D. Moriarty 

Sydney Bullard 

Syndicate M. Co. of N.Y. . A. H. Stebbins 
Tombstone M. & M. Co. . . J. A. Church 

Tranquility H. Smith 

Vizina Cons A. H. Emanuel 

Way-Up J. S. Clark 

Wedge Cons W. B. Murray 

Woronco E. Dickerman 



TTNDALL DISTRICT, PIMA CO. 

Tubac P. 0. 

Baack & Casey's Group . . . T. H. Baack 

Campbell's Group J. H. Campbell 

Devil's Cache J. M. McArthur 

Josephine Group J. K. Brown 

Megry's Group Pasqual Megry 

Mercer's Group T. L. Mercer 



Neil's Group David Neil 

Surprise M. Co A. B. Casey 

VULTURE MINE, MARICOPA CO. 

Vulture P. 0. 
Central Arizona M. Co E. H. Saville 

WALKER DISTRICT, YAVAPAI CO. 

Walker P. 0. 

Accidental C. P. Dake 

American Flag C. Y. Shelton 

Daisey C. P. Dake 

Eureka C. Y. Sheltou 

Hidden Treasure J. H. Baker 

Pine Mountain N. L. Griffin 

WARREN DISTRICT, CACHISE CO. 

Bisbee P. 0. 

♦Campbell Group George Story 

*Copper King W. H. Martin & Co. 

Copper Queen B. Williams 

*Galena Bland k Blair 

Neptune M. Co William Herring 

New Year Phil. Gerrold 

*New York Duncan & Co. 

•Watson J. B. Watson & Co. 

WEAVER DISTRICT, TAVAPAI CO. 

Antelope Valley P. 0. 

Bed Rock Robert Collins 

Model R. C. Powers 



Arizona Mail and Stage Line. 

J. D. KINNEAR & CO., Proprietors. 



LOWEST STAGE RATES. 

Tombstone to Benson Daily. 

Tombstone to Charleston Daily. 

Tombstone to Huachuca Tri- Weekly. 
Tombstone to Harshaw Tri-Weekly. 
Tombstone to Contention City Daily, 
Tombstone to Bisbee Tri-Weekly. 

Chartered Coaches can be had at Benson for Tombstone and 
Return by Giving Two Days' Notice. 

Fastest Tim© and Best Stock. 

OFFICE WITH WELLS, FARGO & CO., TOMBSTONE. 

MARSHALL WILLIAMS, Agent. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. wmtBMBSXinsxsss^ 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 




QUAKTZ MILLS. 


75 


QUARTZ MILLS. 








Gold 




NUMBBB 


LOCATION, 


NAME OF MILL. 


OWNERS. 


or 

SlLVKB. 


POWBB. 


or 

Stamps. 


Caohisb County. 












Charleston. 


Corbin. 


Tombstone M. & M. Co. 


Silver. 


Steam. 


20 


«« 


Gird. 


Tombstone M. & M. Co. 


** 


Water. 


15 


Contention City. 


Contention. 


Western M. Co. 


U 


Steam. 


as 


« • « 


Grand Central. 


Grand Central M. Co. 


•' 




80 


•I ii 


Head Center. 


Head Center M. Co. 


•' 




10 


Dos Cabezas. 


Pioneer. 


Pioneer M. Co. 


Gold. 




10 


Emery City. 


Boston. 


Boston* Arizona S.«fc R.Co. 


Silver. 




25 


Huachuca Mta. 


Perini's. 


V. Perini & Co. 






5 


Watervale. 


Hopkins. 


Hopkins Mill Co. 


Silver. 




6 


Gila Oouhtt. 












Globe. 


Champion. 


Champion M. & M. Co. 


Silver. 


(.Steam. 


2 


" 


Globe City. 


Globe City M. & M. Co. 


" • 


" 


5 


" 


Golden Eagle. 


Golden Eagle M. Co. 


Gold. 


u 


10 


u 


Irene. 


Irene M. Co. 


Silver. 


H 


10 


" 


Silver Era. 


Silver Era M. Co. 


** 


<( 


5 


•* 


Townsend. 


Townsend M. & Co. 


u 


«« 


5 


McMillan. 


Stonewall Jackson. 


McMillen S. M. Co. 


(< 


" 


10 


Miami. 


Miami. 


Estate of Jos. Bateman. 


** 


•• 


10 


Mineral Creek. 


Mineral Creek. 


Mineral Creek M. Co. 


" 


M 


5 


Richmond Basin. 


Silver Nugget. 


Silver Nugget M. Co. 


M 


" 


5 


Stanton. 


Mack Morris. 


Mack Morris M. Co. 


M 


" 


10 


Tonto Basin. 


Mazatzal. 


Mazatzal M. Co. 


" 


<t 


2 


MabioopaGounty. 












Cave Creek. 


Golden Star, 


Golden Star M. Co. 


Gold. 


.Steam. 


10 


Phoenix. 


Grand Canal. 


Jett & Powell. 


** 


M 


5 


Vulture Mine. 


Vulture. 


Central Arizona M. Co. 




<« 


80 


Mohave County. 












Cedar Valley. 


Cedar Valley. 








10 


Cerbat. 


Barry. 


John Barry. 


Silver. 


Steam. 


5 


El Dorado CaSon. 


Lincoln. 


Lincoln 8. M. Co. 


u 


" 


5 


Hackberry. 


Hackberry. 


Hackberry M. Co. 


" 


M 


10 


Mineral Park. 


Breon & Spear. 


Breon & Spear. 


" 


" 


5 


<< M 


Welcome. 


L. 8. Welcome. 


" 


<« 


5 


Signal. 


McCracken. 


Peabody M. Co. 




" 


20 


Pima County. 












Arivaca. 


Arivaca. 


Arivaca Mill Co. 


G.&S. 


Steam. 


10 


• * 


Cons. Arizona. 


Cons. Arizona G.& S.M.Co. 


" 


" 


10 


«« 


Derre & Townsend. 




" 


" 


10 


Harshaw. 


Hermosa. 


Hermosa 8. M. Co. 


Silver. 


<i 


20 


Old Hat. 


Imperial. 


Imperial M. Co. 


" 


" 


2 


Pinal County. 












Pinal City. 


Seventy-Six. 
Silver King. 


Windsor M. Co. 


Silver. 


Steam. 


5 


ti ii 


Silver King M. Co. 


•' 


" 


20 


Queen Creek. 


Gem. 


Wide Awake S. M. Co. 


" 


" 


10 


ii .1 


Wheeler & Doran. 


Wheeler & Doran. 


« 


" 


2 


Yavapai County. 












Alexandra. 


Peck. 


Peck M. Co. 


Silver. 


Steam. 


10 


Araatra Creek. 


Hoefler. 


Prescott M. Co. 


Gold. 


" 


5 


Big Bug. 


Big Bug. 


William Van Name. 




u 


10 


Bradshaw Basin. 


Bradshaw. 


Bradshaw Mill Co. 


Silver. 


11 


10 


Cherry Creek. 


Golden Era. 


Golden Era M. Co. 


Gold. 


" 


10 


Crook's Canon. 


Buffum's. 


W. M. Buffum. 


" 


" 


10 


Gillette. 


Tip Top. 


Tip Top S. M. Co. 


Silver. 


" 


10 


Groom Creek. 


Aztlan. 


Prescott M. Co. 


Gold. 


<< 


10 


Gus Springs. 


Tuscumbia. 




Silver. 


" 


8 


Hassayampa. 


Senator. 


Bowers & Richards. 


Gold. 


>( 


10 


Peeple's Valley. 


Bed Rock. 


Bed Rock M. Co. 


<( 


" 


5 


Model. 


R. C. Powers. 


" 


" 


2 


Tiger District. 


Tiger. 


Tiger M. & M. Co. 


Silver. 


" 


10 


Turkey Creek. 


HeneBzy. 




Gold. 


" 


5 


<< it 


Masterson. 




ii n 2 



in 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



WH. B. HOOPER & G0.{ T T e n~^^^^ Liquor Dealers. 



76 ARIZONA. 



COUNTIES AND COUNTY OFFICERS. 



APACHE COUNTY. 

Organized in 1879, bounded north by Utah, east by New Mex- 
ico, south by Graham and Gila counties, and west by Gila and 
Yavapai. Area, 20,800 square miles; population, 1880 — 5,283; 
county seat, St. John ; principal towns, Brigham City, Fort De- 
fiance, Holbrook, St. Joseph, Springerville, Snowflake, Sunset, 
and Woodruff. The principal rivers are the Colorado Chiquito, 
Puerco, Zuni, Silver Creek, and the south fork of the San Juan. 
Resources : mineral, pastoral and agricultural. This county 
comprises a vast area, greater than the State of Massachusetts, 
but slightly explored, with resources undefined and undeveloped. 
Occupying an elevated plateau near the dividing ridge of the 
continent, it possesses a climate similar to the Middle States of 
the Union, though perhaps not so severe in the winter. While 
not thoroughly explored, the greater part has been traversed by 
surveyors, prospectors, hunters, and tourists, who have reported 
upon its topography, climate, and apparent resources ; its strange 
Indian tribes, its ancient ruins, and its wonderful canons. In 
the southern part roamed the dread Apaches, who have given it 
the name it bears, written in trails of blood over its fair surface ; 
and in the north are the peaceful Zunis, the rock-dwelling Mo- 
quis, and the sheep-raising Navajoes. The Indians of the north- 
ern portion of the county are unlike any others found on the con- 
tinent. The " seven cities of Cibola," so vividly described by the 
Spanish explorers of the sixteenth century, were probably the 
seven villages of the Moquis, remaining with but few alterations 
to this day. The tribe now numbers about seventeen hundred, and 
live in seven villages on the tops of three cliffs, or headlands of 
rock, that rise more than six hundred feet above the plains. These 
almost inaccessible localities were selected, it is presumed, for the 
purposes of defense against the more warlike tribes. A recent 
visitor says : " On reaching the villages one finds oneself on a flat 
ledge of bare rocks, which extends out from the main table, nearly 
half a mile in length, and from ten to three hundred feet in width. 
The sides are almost perpendicular. The most populous of these 
villages, Wal-la-pi, is on the extreme end of the rock, where the 
width is not over a hundred feet. The water for all purposes is 
carried on the backs of men and women from a spring near the 
foot of the mountain, a distance of nearly a mile, while wood is 
brought eight miles. Here these people have lived longer than 
they can tell, even from their traditions, and hitherto they have 
been averse to a change of location, notwithstanding the diffi- 
culty of obtaining their necessary supplies, and the distance from 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. ^ 



MAJilFACTUBEKS, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



COUNTIES AND COUNTY OFFICERS. 



77 H 



their fields and herds. In the extreme north-east, occupying an 
extensive region, extending into Utah and New Mexico, dwell 
the large and powerful tribe of Navajoes, numbering some 8,000 
or 10,000 • a pastoral people, owning great flocks of sheep and 
bands of horses and cattle. These Indians possess some knowl- 
edge of manufacture, are expert, or at least ingenious, in making 
many ornaments for their bridles and saddles, and are distin- 
guished for the richness and beauty of their blankets. The fact 
that large numbers of savages dwell and subsist in the region 
they so tenaciously hold, is convincing proof of its capacity to 
support a much larger population upon the products of the soil, 
when aided by the teachings and appliances of civilization. But 
it is probable that neither agriculture nor grazing, promising as 
they may be, will constitute the great resources of the county, 
as in all the region of the central plateau of the continent, min- 
ing promises the greatest source of wealth and enterprise. Gold, 
silver, copper, iron, salt, coal, and precious stones have been found, 
and in such quantities do they appear to exist, that only the 
coming of the railroad is required to bring the county forward to 
wealth equal to any section of the Union. The great diamond 
excitement of 1873, sent the prospectors through northern Ari- 
zona, and in the wild region now comprised in Apache County, 
many precious stones were found, although the coveted placer of 
diamonds eluded all search. The prospector then told of great 
beds of anthracite coal, mammoth veins of copper ore, and min- 
eral indications of every character, which subsequent explorations 
confirm. Timber is abundant, and the forests of the White, Mo- 
gollon, Navajo, and other mountains, will furnish a century's sup- 
ply for the most enterprising and destructive of people. The 
White Mountains are in the southern part of the county, forming 
the sources of the many branches of the White, Black, and Salt 
rivers, flowing south-westerly to the Gila, and of the Colorado 
Chiquito flowing north-westerly to the great Colorado. This 
range is a broad plateau, rising to an altitude of 7,000 and 8,000 
feet above the sea, and is well covered with pine forests. This 
belt of timber has a general width of forty miles and extends 
north-westerly hundreds of miles. The pines reach a height of 
seventy feet, and the fir-trees are still higher. A close-grained 
white oak abounds of excellent quality for manufacturing pur- , 
poses ; and bunch and gramma grasses grow luxuriantly every- | Jj 
where. Dr. Rothrock, U. S. A., accompanying the Wheeler sur- 
vey, says : " The district would, in any portion of our dominion, 
be regarded as one of unusual promise. It is one of the most in- 
viting portions of our country yet remaining for civilization to 
occupy. Settlers will flock to occupy it." But a few years since 
the entire region was but the abode of savages, and the white man 
entered at his peril. Now the Indians are subdued, and are con- 
fined to their allotted reservations, and the surveyor, farmer, miner 



N 



CHIRARDELLl'S CHOCOLATE .The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & (».{^sa h 5S^ T a5Sr}Cioars of all Kinds. 



78 ARIZONA. 



and traveler are entering upon it and taking possession. The 
thirty-fifth parallel railroad route which crosses the county cen- 
trally from east to west, has been repeatedly surveyed and de- 
scribed since the country came into the possession of the Ameri- 
cans, and has been the thoroughfare for travel from Santa Fe to 
Prescott during the past twenty years. Now the railroad itself 
is pushing through, and before the year expires, the engines and 
cars of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company will enliven 
the wilderness with their busy presence and civilizing influences. 
The road enters the county from its junction with the Atchison, 
Topeka, and Santa Fe at Albuquerque, by the valley of the Rio 
Puerco, which it follows to its junction with the Colorado Chiquito 
at Holbrook ; thence along the valleyof the latter stream through 
the towns of St. Joseph, Sunset, an<J Brigham City, where it en- 
ters Yavapai. This is an agricultural and pastoral region of 
great worth and beauty, whose attractions have not been unob- 
served by- the thrifty Mormons of Utah, by whom it is chiefly 
settled and occupied. The Mormons having the contract to con- 
struct the railroad through the county, have an additional incen- 
tive to settle along its route, and with their usual great industry, 
exceeding prosperity will be expected. 

Officers. — Charles A. Franklin, Probate Judge ; E. S. Stover, 
Sheriff ; W. R. Rudd, District Attorney ; Dionicio Baca, Treas- 
urer ; R. J. Bailey. Recorder ; Antonio Gonzales, Luther Martin, 
and C. E. Cooley, Supervisors. 

CACH1SE COUNTY. 

Organized in 1881. Bounded on the north by Graham, east by 
the Territory of New Mexico, south by the Mexican State of So- 
nora, and west by Pima. Area, 5,928 square miles. Assessed 
valuation of property in 1880, in that portion of Pima County 
now included in Cachise, was $800,000, but in 1881 this had in- 
creased to $2,500,000, or an increase of 300 per cent. County 
seat, Tombstone. Principal towns, Benson, Bisbee, Charleston, 
Contention City, Dos Cabezas, Galeyville, Hereford, and Willcox, 
and the military posts of Fort Bowie and Camp Huachuca. There 
are also numerous stations on the Southern Pacific Railroad, and 
many mining camps throughout the county, which will probably 
soon develop into busy towns and thriving marts of trade. The 
mining districts are Cachise, California, Chiricahua, Dos Cabezas, 
Gold Camp, Huachuca or Hartford, Swisshelm, Tombstone, Tur- 
quoise, and Warren. Resources : mineral, pastoral, and agricul- 
tural. The chief river is the San Pedro, rising on the borders of 
Sonora, and running northwesterly it enters Pinal County and 
empties into the Gila after a course of nearly 200 miles. The San 
Bernardino is a limpid stream, rising in the Chiricahua mountains 
in the south-east, and runs southerly into the State of Sonora. 



Tho J, M. Brunswick & BslkB &)• 5!ffuFA&ujBSK£{^s?^» 1 ncK t 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



COUNTIES AND COUNTY OFFICERS. 79 

There are a number of small mountain streams, though seldom 
do they bear their waters to rivers that reach the sea, but are ab- 
sorbed by the soil of the valleys. The mountain ranges are the 
Chiricahua in the east, Pedrogoza in the south-east, Mule Pass in 
the south, Huachuca in the south-west, Whetstone in the west, 
Galiuro in the north, and the Dragoon Mountains in the interior. 
San Pedro Valley follows the river of that name through the 
western portion of the county ; the great Sulphur Spring Val- 
ley occupies a broad area between the Dragoon and Chiricahua 
mountains, and the San Simon Valley stretches across the north- 
east. Forests of pine and firs abound in the higher mountains, 
oak upon the lower hills, and mesquite and cottonwood in the 
lower valleys. Generally the soil is not adapted to agriculture, 
but there are quite extensive localities exceedingly favorable to 
cultivation. Almost everywhere the gramma and bunch-grass 
grow well, often luxuriantly, affording excellent grazing, but it is 
deficient in natural watering - places. Deer, antelope,, wild tur- 
keys, and other game peculiar to the Rocky Mountain region, are 
quite .plentiful. The entire region having an elevation of two to 
six thousand feet above the sea, is insured a healthy climate, warm 
in summer, but generally of the most pleasant character imagin- 
able. Great as is the county's capacity for the rearing of stock, 
its chief source of wealth is in the minerals which vein the hills 
and thread the valleys throughout its entire area. But few re- 
gions of the earth of equal extent have shown greater mineral 
wealth than is indicated by the present developments in this 
county. Gold, silver, copper, and lead appear in the greatest 
abundance. The Huachuca mountains are distinguished for their 
wealth in copper, lead, and silver. Tombstone has already pro- 
duced its millions of dollars of silver, and farther to the north 
and east are placers and veins of gold. Civilization and enter- 
prise have but recently entered this quarter of our Union, but the 
wealth that has been developed is a surprise to all, and a promise 
of a bright future. A thrifty, law-abiding, and intelligent people 
are filling the places recently held as the strongholds and hunting- 
grounds of the merciless Apache. Cities and villages are spring- 
ing up, with their churches, schools, and newspapers; their courts, 
stores, and pleasant homes ; their mail routes, telegraphs, and rail- 
roads ; and the hum and stir and triumphs of busy industry are 
everywhere apparent. The Southern Pacific Railroad crosses the 
county from west to east, having a length of 100 miles within its 
limits, thus affording cheap and easy connection with all parts of 
the Union. In this county are the Dragoon Mountains, Apache 
Pass, Mule Pass, and other localities made famous by the bloody 
acts of the Apaches, who held them as strongholds, defying the 
encroachments of traveler, prospector, or settler, until within the 
last few years. One of the fiercest, ablest, and most relentless of 
these dread Indian marauders was the chief, Cachise — who, if not 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm R Hnnner&CO i £ ™ \\8ole AgentajnA.J 



Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, $ C C. WHISKEY. 



80 ARIZONA. 



immortalized by the tales of his savage career, will have his name 
perpetuated by a forgiving people adopting it as the name of their 
county. 

Officers. — J. H. Lucas, Probate Judge; J. H. Behan, Sheriff; 
Lyttleton Price, District Attorney; John O. Dunbar, Treasurer; 
A. T. Jones, Recorder ; M. E. Joyce, Joseph Tasker, and Joseph 
Dyer, Supervisors ; R. J. Campbell, Clerk Board of Supervisors ; 
Rodman M. Price, jr., Surveyor; H. M. Matthews, Coroner; 
George Pridham, Public Administrator ; I. N. Mundell, Benson ; 
J. F. Duncan, Bisbee ; James C. Burnett and D. H. Holt, Charles- 
ton ; E. A. Rigg, Contention ; George Ellingwood, Galeyville ; 
Charles Ackley, Hereford ; A. O. Wallace, A. J. Felter, and Wells 
Spicer, Tombstone ; A. F. Burke, Willcox — Justices of the Peace, 

GILA COUNTY. 

Organized in 1881. Bounded on the north by Yavapai and 
Apache, east by Apache and Graham, south by Graham and Pi- 
nal, and west by Pinal and Maricopa. Area, 2,980 square miles. 
County seat, Globe. Principal towns, McMillen, Nugget or Rich- 
mond, and Stanton or Wheatfield. Mining districts, El Capitan, 
Globe, McMillen, and Tonto Basin. Resources chiefly mineral, 
but good pasturage obtains ; and where water is convenient, graz- 
ing becomes an important source of wealth. Along the small 
streams are many beautiful valleys, where a fertile soil, in con- 
junction with the most lovely climate that sun and air can make, 
invites the farmer to most prosperous and pleasant homes. The 
county takes its name from the river on its southern border. Salt 
River crosses the county from east to west, receiving numerous 
branches, of which the White Mountain River, Cibien Creek, 
Canon Creek, Cherry Creek, Tonto Creek, on the north, and Pinal 
Creek on the south are the principal. The mountains are the Pi- 
nal and Mazatzal, bordering it on the west, Apache mountains in 
the center, and San Carlos in the east, with numerous peaks and 
buttes, making the surface very irregular. This is the smallest of 
Arizona counties ; but, from present developments, appears to be 
a metalliferous nugget. The most prominent minerals are gold, 
silver, and copper ; lead and coal are also found. The mines of 
Globe and McMillen have produced many tons of ore in which 
the native silver in threads and nuggets bore a large proportion. 
Gold in placers and veins is found in the Richmond Basin and 
other districts, where it is mined with success and with bright 
prospects for the future. Copper in ledges a hundred feet in 
width and veins of smaller size yielding forty to sixty per cent, of 
copper, constitute a resource that alone would give it celebrity 
and wealth as a mining county. Coal also is found near Globe, 
promising wealth to the miner and cheap fuel for the mills and 
for domestic purposes. Emphatically it is a mining county, which 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. ffift*s^SKSr£ , WK8& 8t 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., WM - ,U » ,WU « 



OILS AX» I'AIVTS. 



COUNTIES AND COUNTY OFFICERS. 81 

will proceed rapidly in its development as the people of the world 
learn its worth and lines of transportation render it accessible. 
From the Southern Pacific Railroad it is reached by wagon-road 
from Casa Grande via Florence and Riverside, crossing the Pinal 
range, and from Willcox via Sulphur Spring Valley, Fort Grant, 
and the valley of the San Carlos ; also by saddle and pack-train 
via Pinal. With the completion of the Atlantic and Pacific Rail- 
road a shorter and more feasible route will be opened to the 
county, as that road will approach within one hundred miles of 
its northern border, to which valleys extend offering easy commu- 
nication. North of Salt River is the extensive Tonto Basin, a 
region once the favored home of that branch of the Apaches 
whose name it bears, and now regarded as of great value by its 
present occupants for its loveliness and wealth in soil, mines, and 
climate. Gold and copper are found in the hills throughout this 
region in such wealth of vein as to give assurance of a bright fu- 
ture. South of Salt River is the valley of Pinal Creek, which 
is highly extolled as most healthy and fertile, possessing the 
most delightful climate in the world, surrounded by scenery that 
charms the eye, and producing all the delicacies of a semi-tropical 
latitude. Of the Richmond Basin, a writer says : "It is situated 
fourteen miles north-east from Globe village, on a hollow plateau 
of the highest part of the Apache Mountains. The mountains 
immediately back, forming the eastern barrier, rise up boldly in 
alpine peaks hundreds of feet above the plateau and two thou- 
sand feet above the valley of Salt, River. At the foot of the bar- 
rier in the basin are found the ore bodies, all near the surface, 
and in these have been located the Mack Morris, the Richmond, 
East Richmond, Silver Nugget, and others. Porphyry and syenite 
constitute the country rock. Salt River is a rapid and beautiful 
stream, affording abundant power for machinery. A railroad is 
proposed, connecting it with the mines of Globe and of Rich- 
mond Basin." 

Officers. — G. A. Swasey, Probate Judge; W. W. Lowther, 
Sheriff; Oscar M. Brown, District Attorney ; D. B. Lacey, Treas- 
urer; P. B. Miller, Recorder; J. K. Smith, F. W. Westmeyer, 
and George Danforth, Supervisors ; John J. Harlow, Clerk Board 
of Supervisors; A. G. Pendleton, Surveyor; C. A. Macdonell and 
E. J. Pring, Coroners ; T. C. Stallo, Public Administrator ; George 
A. Allen, Globe ; J. Willett, Grapevine Springs ; T. T. Overton, 
McMillen ; C. Cline, Reno ; C. Fraser, Richmond Basin ; Reuben 
Wood, San Carlos ; George B. Walker, Stanton — Justices of the 
Peace. 

GRAHAM COUNTY. 

Organized in 1881. Bounded north by Gila and Apache, east 
by the Territory of New Mexico, south by Cachise, and west by 
Pinal and Gila. Area, 6,474 square miles. County seat, Safford. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm .B. Hooper i«oJ^S 1 S^^i^'}^.Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



82 ARIZONA. 



Principal towns, Clifton, Maxey,San Carlos, and Solomon ville, 
and the military posts of Camp Thomas and Fort Grant. Min- 
ing districts are Clifton, De Frees, and the Deer Creek Coal 
mines, which extend into the San Carlos Indian Reservation. 
Resources : agricultural, pastoral, and mineral. The topographi- 
cal features are mountain peaks, high and broad plateaus, and 
river valleys. The county embraces a tract about eighty miles 
square, with the Salt River on its northern border, and the Gila 
following a sinuous course from east to west, through the center, 
while the San Pedro forms its border for a short distance in the 
south-west. On the Gila is the great valley of Pueblo Viejo, 
containing some 70,000 acres of most excellent farming land. 
In the south-west is Grass. Valley, a large area of fine grazing 
land, and in the north-east are the Gila and Prieto plateaus. 
Centrally, in the southern half of the county, is the lofty Graham 
Peak, from which conspicuous landmark the county takes its 
name. This peak was so named in honor of Captain Graham, of 
the U. S. Army, who commanded one of the companies of the 
"Army of the West," under General Kearny, which marched 
through this region en route to California in 1846. North of the 
Gila are the Sierra de la Petahaya and Gila ranges of mountains, 
and south are the Peloncillo, Pinalino, Santa Teresa, and Galiuro 
ranges. The San Francisco River, Eagle Creek, Gila Bonita, 
and San Carlos are the principal tributaries of the Gila. Near 
the San Francisco are the rich and extensive copper mines of 
Clifton district, and in the valley of the same stream are found 
gold placers of great extent and value. In the west is the San 
Carlos Indian Reservation, a large tract of valuable land contain- 
ing veins of copper and coal of the finest quality. The geological 
formation comprises limestone, porphyry, syenite and granite. 
The surface of the county has a general elevation of from 3,000 
to 5,000 feet above the sea, possessing a remarkably healthy and 
salubrious climate, which with its great resources of soil and 
mines, and its proximity to the great transcontinental railroad, 
assure it a prosperity second to none in Arizona. 

Officers : — George Lake, Probate Judge ; C. B. Rose, Sheriff ; 
Neri Osburn, District Attorney ; I. E. Solomon, Treasurer ; W. 
F. Clarke, Recorder; Adolph Solomon, A. M. Franklin, and 
Jonathan Foster, Supervisors ; George H. Stevens, Clerk Board 
Supervisors ; James Haynes, Surveyor ; E. D. Tuttle, Coroner ; 
Thomas Neese, Public Administrator ; E. Mann, Camp Thomas ; 
S. W. Pomeroy, Clifton ; E. D. Tuttle, S afford ; D. W. Wicker- 
sham, Solomonville — Justices of the Peace. 

MARICOPA COUNTY. 

Organized in 1871. Bounded north by Yavapai, east by Gila, 
south by Pinal and Pima, and west by Yuma. Area, 9,200 square 



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San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



COUNTIES AND COUNTY OFFICERS. 



miles. Population, 1880 — 5,689. County seat, Phoenix. Princi- 
pal towns, Gila Bend, Mesaville, Seymour, Tempe, Vulture, and 
Wickenburg, and the military post, Fort McDowell. Mining Dis- 
tricts, Cave Creek, Magazine, Myers, Reno Mountains, Vulture, 
and Winifred. Resources, agricultural and mineral. The county 
receives its name from a tribe of Indians who dwell near its south- 
ern border. The chief streams are the Salt, the Gila, and Rio 
Verde Rivers, and Agua Fria and Hassayampa Creeks j the first 
enters the county from the east and flows southwesterly into the 
Gila. Along its borders and within reach of its waters, used in 
irrigating, is the richest agricultural region of Arizona. With its 
equable climate and fertile soil, it may well be regarded as a ver- 
itable paradise. The valley of Salt River, sixty miles in length 
by ten to thirty in breadth, spreading to the Gila in its lower 
part, contains evidences in ruins of villages and irrigating canals, 
of an ancient occupation by a numerous and thrifty agricultural peo- 
ple. As yet it is but sparsely settled, although there are several 
large and prosperous towns along its course. When developed 
to its full capacity by the reconstruction of its ancient canals, the 
valley of Salt River will support a population of many thousands. 

Hon. P. Hamilton, Territorial Statistician, speaking of this 
valley, says: 

"After a drive through its immense fields of golden grain, ripen- 
ing in the early summer sun, one is impressed with the almost un- 
limited capabilities of this valley, which has been well named the 
'Garden of the Territory.' No one who has not visited the Salt 
River country can have any conception of the area of land which 
has been reclaimed from the desert, brought under a high state of 
cultivation, and made fruitful and highly productive. For nearly 
thirty miles up and down the course of the river there is almost 
one continuous line of fine farms, bearing bountiful crops. A ride 
through this grand grain field is a sight the like of which is found 
nowhere else in the Territory. Wheat and barley are the princi- 
pal crops, but immense stretches of alfalfa, beautiful with its blu- 
ish purple blossoms, and waving gently in the summer breeze, like 
an emerald lake, greet the eye in every direction. Comfortable 
farm-houses, embowered in groves of cottonwood and poplar, and 
acequias, lined with shade trees, most admirably diversify the land- 
scape; while the rugged mountains, their outlines softened in a 
purple haze, complete the picture of this Arizona Arcadia, whose 
semi-tropical loveliness is the glory of our Territory. 

"It is estimated that there are over 15,000 acres of land under 
cultivation in the valley at the present time, more than half of 
which is in wheat. The average yield is about fifteen hundred 
pounds to the acre. The wheat crop for the present year pre- 
sents a splendid appearance, and will compare with that of any 
section of the Pacific Coast. The barley crop is now being har- 
vested, and as I passed through the valley large numbers of farm 



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WM. B. HOOPER & CO. TTe^o^ 



84 ARIZONA. 



hands, with threshers and headers, were scattered in every direc- 
tion, gathering the ripened grain. Modern ideas and modern ap- 
pliances have deprived the harvest-field of much of its poetical 
surroundings. The sickle and scythe have given place to the 
header and its labor-saving appurtenances. The farmers of Salt 
River, many of whom plant one thousand acres of grain, use the 
latest and most perfect agricultural machinery, and the work of 
gathering the crop is done cheaply and expeditiously. Leading 
farmers have informed your correspondent that they can raise 
grain in this valley as cheaply as in California. 

"About eighteen miles up the river from Phoenix a Mormon col- 
ony have established themselves. Their settlement has been made 
on a dry, barren mesa, elevated about forty feet above the level of 
the surrounding valley. Sage, gravel, and greasewood were the 
natural productions of this uninviting spot before these people 
settled there. By bringing water from a ditch high up the 
river they have literally made this desert to blossom as the 
rose, and are fast building up a prosperous community. Houses 
have been built, trees have been planted, gardens laid out, and 
this forbidding and sun-scorched plateau made to yield fine crops 
of grain and vegetables. Several vineyards* have been planted, 
many of which are already in full bearing. It is generally con- 
ceded that the soil of the Mormon settlement is the best adapted 
of any in the valley to the raising of the grape. The farms in 
the Mormon colony are small, averaging from ten to forty acres. 
They are being carefully cultivated, and the ' mesa ' settlement 
promises in a few years to be one of the most beautiful and pro- 
ductive spots in the Valley of the Salinas. Much attention has 
been paid to fruit culture during the last few years. Grapes, apri- 
cots, peaches, figs, strawberries, and many other varieties of fruit, 
do well here. Old settlers become enthusiastic in describing the 
glorious appearance of the orchards and vineyards in the early 
fall, when the luscious grapes hang in profusion in the vineyard 
and garden, looking tempting enough to induce old Bacchus to 
take up his abode here in the Valley of the Salt, where the pea- 
ches and plums and apples are as plentiful and as beautiful as the 
golden fruits that hung in the garden of Hesperides. For melons 
this place is already famous; no such juicy and magnificent speci- 
mens being grown on the Coast; and for pumpkins I will say 
nothing, for this valley has long borne the palm for its production 
of this palatable edible. Some farmers are turning their attention 
to wine making, and your correspondent can say from experience 
with a sample three years old, that it will compare favorably with 
the best California." 

Away from the streams the country presents a forbidding 
aspect; being generally dry and barren, with the ever present 
cactus as the sharpest feature of the landscape. The valley of 
the Gila, west of Salt River, is narrow and sandy, with but small 



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653 & 655 Market St 
Sail Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO.. Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



COUNTIES AND COUNTY OFFICERS. 85 

areas of arable land. Wherever cultivation is practicable, every 
plant of a semi-tropical clime can be produced in great abundance 
and perfection. While agriculture has been the main resource, 
mines of great value have been discovered in various sections. 
The Vulture mine in the northwest has produced a large amount 
of gold, and the region about Wickenburg and the Hassayampa 
has become noted for its placers and ore-bearing veins of the same 
precious metal. In the northeast are the Verde Mountains, where 
several mining districts have been organized, and veins of gold, 
silver, copper, and lead-bearing ores have been found, some of 
which are of great size and of undoubted richness. The western 
portion of the county presents an exceedingly barren and forbid- 
ding appearance ; but until it is proven void of valuable mines it 
cannot be condemned, as often have the rugged sun-burned rocks 
of Arizona been found to be only the rough casket of the richest 
treasure. How vividly is this proven by the developments in the 
Sierra de la Esperanza, in the extreme south-western part of the 
county. In this bleak and desolate region, where it appears na- 
ture has defied the approach of man by erecting barriers of des- 
ert, thorns, rocks, drouth, and heat, Myers district is formed, and 
great bonanzas of gold and silver ore exposed. Here are the 
"Gunsight," "Silver Girt," and other mines of high repute. 
This district is about 40 miles south of the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road, and is reached via Gila Bend. The residents of the fertile 
valley of Salt River have boasted of their county as pre-eminently 
agricultural in its resources, regarding the barren hills and rugged 
peaks with disdain ; but the great wealth of mines in such locali- 
ties, as proven by the Vulture in the north-west, and the mines of 
Myers district in the south-west, may yet give the latter industry 
the precedence. 

Officers. — Thomas G. Greenhaw, Probate Judge ; L. H. Orme, 
Sheriff ; A. D. Lemon, District Attorney ; John George, Treas- 
urer; R. F. Kirkland, Recorder; J. L. Gregg, Michael Wormser, 
and C. T. Hayden, Supervisors ; Frank Cox, Clerk Board of Su- 
pervisors ; Joseph D. Reed, Coroner and Public Administrator ; 
F. M. Pomeroy, Mesa City ; G. H. Rothrock, M. M. Jackson, and 
James Richards, Phoenix ; J. A. Barstow, Tempe ; J. H. Gifford, 
Vulture — Justices of the Peace. 

MOHAVE COUNTY. 

Organized in 1864. Bounded north by the State of Nevada 
and Territory of Utah, east by Yavapai, south by Yuma, and 
west by the States of California and Nevada. ' Area, 10,720 
square miles. Population, by the census of- 1880 — 1 ,190. County 
Seat, Mineral Park. Principal towns, Aubrey, Cerbat, Fort Mo- 
have, or Mohave City, Hardyville, and Signal. Mining Districts, 
Aubrey, Cedar Valley, Greenwood, Hope, Hualapai, Maynard, 



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86 ARIZONA. 



Owens, and San Francisco. This county has for its western bor- 
der the Colorado River, which separates it from Nevada and Cal- 
ifornia, and forming an artery of commerce, it being navigable 
for light-draft steamers, which ply on it in connection with the 
Southern Pacific Railroad at Yuma, and with ocean vessels at its 
entrance into the Gulf of California. This great river, in the wild- 
ness and grandeur of its scenery, is without a parallel on the 
continent. Formed by the junction of the Green and the Grand, 
and many other streams flowing from the Rocky Mountains, in 
distant Idaho, and the unexplored parks and peaks of Colorado, 
it has cut itself a channel a mile or more in depth, through the 
Territories of Utah and Arizona. One of those tremendous 
chasms is where the river crosses the County of Mohave, called 
The Grand Canon, and another is The Black Canon, where it 
separates Arizona from Nevada. After leaving these canons, it 
enters the great desert region of the west, the barren, rocky, sun- 
burned mountains holding it in a close embrace for hundreds of 
miles in its course, occasionally relieved by small valleys, made 
fruitful by its annual overflow. But these rugged rocks are not as 
valueless as they appear to the passing traveler. Mines of gold, 
silver, copper, and lead are found in their depths, some of which 
have been worked with success, and under more favorable auspi- 
ces, will undoubtedly become sources of great wealth. Near the 
Colorado, intense heat prevails in summer ; but the country rises 
rapidly to the east, where a milder climate is found, with grass- 
covered valleys and hills clothed with forests. The Black, Cer- 
bat, Music, Hualapai, Peacock, and Cottonwood mountains, are 
the principal ranges, with hills and valleys between. Across 
the southern part runs the thirty-fifth parallel, and the route 
of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, which has already entered 
the eastern border of Arizona, and is expected soon to be com- 
pleted, and aid in the development of the mineral resources of 
Mohave. 

Officers : — Charles Atchison, Probate Judge ; John C. Potts, 
Sheriff ; J. W. Stephenson, District Attorney ; W. A. Langley, 
Treasurer • John K. Mackenzie, Recorder ; L. C. Welbourn, Wil- 
liam H. Hardy, and W. F. Grounds, Supervisors ; H. Bucksbaum, 
Clerk Board of Supervisors; James J. Hyde, Public Administra- 
tor ; James J. Hyde, Mineral Park ; Samuel O. Prince, Sandy — 
Justices of the Peace. 

PIMA COUNTY. 

Organized in 1864. Bounded north by Maricopa and Pinal, 
east by Cachise, south and south-west by the Mexican State of 
Sonora, and west by Yuma. Area, 10,179. square miles. Popu- 
lation, census of 1880 — 17,007, which included what is now called 
Cachise County, and a portion of Graham County. County seat, 



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653 & 655 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., *■"*«" 



ROOTS AND SHOES. 



COUNTIES AND COUNTY OFFICERS. 87 

Tucson. Principal towns : Arivaca, Calabasas, Greaterville, Har- 
shaw, La Noria, or Lutrell, Oro Blanco, Pajarito, Pantano, Pel- 
ton, Tubac, Washington Camp, the military post Fort Lowell, 
and the Papago Indian village and church of San Xavier. Min- 
ing Districts: Arivaca, Aztec, Bloodsucker, Empire, Gold Moun- 
tain, or Horse Shoe Basin, Helvetia, or Santa Rita Placers, Old 
Hat, Oro Blanco, Pajarito, Palmetto, Patagonia, (including Har- 
shaw and Washington Camp) Pima, Silver Bell, and Tyndall. 
The county comprises a broad belt of the southern portion of the 
Territory, 175 miles from east to west, and eighty miles from 
north to south, extending from the grassy and pleasant region of 
the east to the hot and barren mesas of the west. The Santa 
Cruz River flows from south to north, through the eastern portion 
of the county, sinking into the earth on the northern border. The 
valley of this stream contains much arable land, and where irri- 
gation is practicable, fine crops are grown. The bordering hills 
and plains are covered with gramma grass, a beautiful and nutri- 
tious plant, rendering the region most favorable for the raising of 
cattle. This splendid grazing region embraces the eastern por- 
tion of the county and a large area of the southern border west 
of the Santa Cruz, and much other might in all probability be 
made available for grazing purposes and tillage, by a system of 
artesian wells. In their present state of nature, the plains and 
mountains are scorched, desolate and barren, relieved by the tierce 
and bristling cactus ; which sometimes rise in great columns thirty 
to fifty feet in height — a single trunk, lonely and singular, like 
some forgotten monumental pillar or neglected ruin : at other 
times,.sprawl in irregular brambles, as if to guard the place, saying 
plainly : " Touch not at your peril !" an admonition to the traveler 
never necessary to be repeated. The cactus — several varieties 
— hateful as they are, bear a delicious fruit, which constitutes an 
important part of the comestibles of the wild Indians of Arizona. 
Where such plants grow unaided, it appears that more valuable 
things could be made to grow with the aid of artesian water,- skillful 
cultivation, and the proper selection of plants. Mining is, and 
probably will continue to be, the great interest. Every mountain 
range, hill, and isolated peak appears to be veined with metal- 
bearing ore. Gold, silver, copper, and lead are the principal met- 
als found, and these appear in remarkable abundance. The 
region was occupied by the Spaniards in their earliest settlement 
of Mexico, and mines were worked centuries ago, as is proven by 
the growth of trees over abandoned shafts and other mining 
works. But here the Indians were more warlike than those of 
other parts of Mexico, and succeeded in limiting the area of civ- 
ilizing advancements ; until of recent date it has fallen into the 
hands of a more energetic people, who now, aided by the most 
improved methods of intercommunication, have invaded the coun- 
try, successfully occupied it, reduced its savage inhabitants to 



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ARIZONA. 



subjection, eliminated its dread jomadas del muerto, and will 
proceed to develop its resources and enjoy its wealth. This por- 
tion of Arizona, including all that south of the Gila River, was 
acquired by the United States in 1854 by purchase from Mexico, 
and known as the Gadsden Purchase, the sum of $10,000,000 
being paid j the professed object being the possession of a feasible 
route for a transcontinental railroad, all northern routes being 
declared impracticable. The war of the rebellion changed many 
plans, but at last the Southern Railroad is completed, and Pima 
County is in easy communicatfon with the rest of the world. The 
principal mountains are the Patagonia, Huachuca, Mustang, 
Sierra Colorado and Santa Catarina, along the eastern border ; the 
Santa Rita, a short range, running north and south, east of the 
Santa Cruz River. West are numerous low ranges of hills and a 
few isolated peaks, the more prominent being the Sierra Atascoso, 
Sierra Tucson, Sierra Verde, Baboquivari Peak, Cabibi Moun- 
tains, Quigotoa, Sierra de la Naril, and Sierra del Ojo. In the 
far west is the Ajo copper mine, and gold and silver are found in 
the same region. In most of the mining districts the precious 
metals are accompanied by lead and copper, and the ores are 
reduced by smelting. Fortunately, in many localities there is an 
abundance of fuel, the forest growth being mesquite, cottonwood, 
ash, oak, pine, and fir, the first a tree of the valleys and plains, 
the others upon the hills and in the mountain canons. The val- 
ley of the Santa Cruz has long been a thoroughfare of travel and 
trade with Mexico, adding the resource of commerce to those of 
mining and agriculture enjoyed by Pima. 

Officers :— John S. Wood, Probate Judge; R. H.Paul, Sheriff; 
Hugh F. Farley, District Attorney ; R. N. Leatherwood, Treas- 
urer ; Charles R. Drake, Recorder ; William C. Davis, B. M. 
Jacobs, Michael Fagan, Supervisors ; E. W. Risley, Clerk Board 
of Supervisors; L. D. Chillson, Surveyor ; W. B. Horton, Public 
Administrator ; Volney E. Rollins, Arivaca ; P. J. Coyne, Great- 
erville ; Trevor Lloyd, and J. W. Fuqua, Harshaw; R. S. Bar- 
clay, Luttrell ; Arthur Thatcher, Oro Blanco ; T. Lillie Mercer, 
Tubac ; C. H. Meyers, Joseph Neugass, and W. J. Osborn, Tuc- 
son ; A. J. Davidson, Tullyville ; R. Harrison, Washington Camp 
— Justices of the Peace. 

PINAL COUNTY. 

Organized in 1871. Bounded north by Maricopa and Gila, east 
by Gila and Graham, south by Pima, and west by Maricopa. Area, 
5,700 square miles. Population, 1880 — 3,044. County seat, Flor- 
ence. Principal towns : Casa Grande, Maricopa, Pinal, and Sil- 
ver King. Mining districts : Casa Grande, Mineral Creek, Min- 
eral Hill, Pioneer, Randolph, Saddle Mountain, and Summit. Re- 
sources : agricultural and mineral. The principal streams are the 



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LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



COUNTIES AND COUNTY OFFICERS. 89 

Gila and San Pedro Rivers, and Mineral and Queen Creeks. 
Mountains : the Santa Catarina Range, in the south-east, and the 
Tortilla and Tortillito Mountains, south of the Gila ; and the Pi- 
nal and Superstition Mountains north of the river. The San Pe- 
dro Valley forms an important farming section in the eastern part 
of the county ; and the valley of the Gila west of the junction of 
the San Pedro contains a narrow strip of fine arable land, but the 
greater surface of the county is of high and dry plains or mount- 
ain ridges. The elevation of the land at the mouth of the San 
Pedro is 2,115 feet above the sea, and at the Pima Reservation in 
the western part 1,308 feet, showing a fall in the Gila of 800 feet 
in about 100 miles of the river's course. From this point to its 
mouth, a distance by the river of 200 miles, the fall is 1054 feet. 
This rapid fall affords opportunity for turning the stream from 
its channel for the purpose of irrigating the land or propelling 
machinery. The Gila, from its position and the character of the 
country through which it flows, is, though not large in volume of 
water; the most important in Arizona ; and as it emerges from the 
canons of the eastern part of Pinal, becomes available for agricul- 
tural and mechanical purposes. By an enlightened and compre- 
hensive system of engineering it can be made to redeem a vast 
amount of desert, besides rendering its falling power in aid of 
the miner and the manufacturer. With such a system Pinal may 
be said to embrace the finest portion of the valley of the Gila. 
The elevation is such as to render the summer heats more tolera- 
ble than near the Colorado, while exempt from the winter frosts 
of the higher valleys in the east. Where irrigated, all the prod- 
ucts belonging to a semi-tropical clime can be grown, and or- 
anges, cotton, and sugar-cane have been successfully cultivated. 
In the western part, bordering both sides of the river, is the Pima 
Reservation, containing 4,500 Indians of the Pima tribe, and 500 
of the Maricopa. These are a peaceable and industrious people, 
living very rudely, but pleasantly, and cultivating a large area of 
their reservation. These Indians, though devoted to agriculture 
rather than to war and the chase, have stood as a barrier between 
the hostile Apaches and the white settler, protecting the traveler 
and furnishing supplies to the soldiers. North of their reserva- 
tion extends the open valley to Salt River, in which are the ruins 
of La Tempe \ and south are the ruins of Casa Grande, which indi- 
cate a once-numerous people and a system of irrigation that should 
incite to emulation the more pretentious skill and civilization of 
the present day. For the white element of the county, mining 
constitutes the great attraction. Gold, silver, and copper are the 
minerals most sought, but lead and salt are also found, and the 
existence of cement in the ruins of Casa Grande indicate that, that 
valuable mineral may be added to the others if an intelligent 
search be made for it. Foremost among the mining districts is 
the Pioneer, where is located the noted Silver King Mine, the 



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i 



WM. B. HOOPER & COA^^^'fi^\LubrlcMnq Oils. 



90 ARIZONA. 



details of which are given elsewhere in this volume ; and also the 
Gem, Last Chance, Surpriser, Pike, Emma, Copper Top, and 
many others rich in gold, silver, copper, and lead. In the Pinal 
and Superstition ranges of mountains, and also south of the Gila, 
the workings of ancient miners have been discovered. Hundreds 
of these old mines are said to exist, but it is not probable that 
very extensive or skillful mining was ever maintained in this 
country. A prospector says he has seen sahuaros (cactus gigan- 
tia) two feet in diameter and sixty feet in height, growing over 
the workings of these ancient mines. The mining regions are 
considerably elevated above the valley of the Gila, in a climate of 
greater difference of temperature, being warm in summer and re- 
ceiving slight falls of snow in winter. Everywhere it is healthy, 
and the comforts and refinements of high civilization are enjoyed. 
The great transcontinental railroad of the 32nd parallel crosses 
the county, and is connected by excellent wagon-roads with every 
section. The county derives its name from the Pinal range of 
mountains, which form its eastern border — these deriving their 
name from a branch of the Apache tribe of Indians. 

Officers. — George L. Wratten, Probate Judge; J. P. Gabriel, 
Sheriff ; H. B. Summers, District Attorney ; Peter R. Brady, 
Treasurer ; John J. Devine, Recorder ; Patrick Holland, John 
T. Bartleson, and G. F. Cook, Supervisors ; J. D. Walker, Clerk 
Board of Supervisors ; Henry Schoshusen, Public Administrator ; 
J. Miller, Florence; W. H. Benson, Pinal — Justices of the Peace. 

YAVAPAI COUNTY. 

Organized in 1864. Bounded north by the Territory of Utah, 
east by Apache, south by Gila and Maricopa, and west by Yuma 
and Mohave. Area, 30,700 square miles. Population, 1880 — 
5,013. County seat and capital of Arizona, Prescott. Principal 
towns : Alexandra, Bradshaw, Camp Verde P. O., or Fort 
Verde military post, Gillette, Tip Top, and Whipple Barracks, 
the headquarters of the Military Department of Arizona. Min- 
ing districts : Agua Fria, Big Bug, Black Canon, Black Hills, 
Black Rock, Cataract, Cherry Creek, Copper Basin, Hassayampa, 
Humbug, Martinez, Peck, Pine Grove, Silver Mountain, Tiger or 
Bradshaw, Tonto, Turkey Creek, Walker, Walnut Grove, and 
Weaver. The principal mountains are the Jerked Beef and Pi- 
nole peaks in the south-east, the Mogollon in the east, the Buck- 
skin Mountains in the north, the Juniper and Mt. Hope ranges in 
the west, the Bradshaw, Verde, and Mazatzal ranges in the south, 
'and the Black Hills, San Francisco, and other mountains and 
buttes in the interior. The rivers are the Great Colorado, enter- 
ing at the north and with a long sweep southerly, turning north- 
westerly and westerly, flowing into Mohave ; the Colorado Chi- 
quito, or Little Colorado, having its sources in New Mexico, 



Thfi J. HI. Brunswick & BbIkb Cfr MAwc#A.cTiJK*is^{ 6M ^LJF^nc£SS t 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



COUNTIES AND COUNTY OFFICERS. 91 

flowing northwesterly across Apache, joining the great river at its 
southern bend. Cataract Creek rises in the center of the county 
and flows north into the Colorado. The Santa Maria and other 
small streams in the west, join Bill Williams Fork ; and in the 
south are the Hassayampa, Agua Fria, Verde, Tonto, and their 
branches. The county comprises a vast area, sufficient to form a 
State larger than many of the older States of the Union. The 
surface is irregular and unique, with resources undeveloped, and 
known but to a limited extent. They are mineral, agricultural, 
and pastoral. The north is a high, and generally barren plateau 
of basaltic rock, through which the Colorado flows in a canon, 
the most remarkable in the world, being often near a mile in 
depth, with perpendicular walls, shutting out the light of day 
from the river's surface. South of this are the many mining dis- 
tricts, fertile and grassy valleys, and forest-covered mountains. 
The entire country is at an elevation of several thousand feet 
above the sea, and subject to snow in winter, though not to ex- 
cess, the general climate being mild and healthy. Game, such as 
deer, antelope, bear, and wild turkeys abound. Placer mines of 
great value were discovered and worked as early as 1862, and 
soon thereafter veins of gold, silver, copper, and lead-bearing ores 
were found, which have been mined with great success. For a 
number of years this was the principal mining county of Arizona, 
but the opening of new mines near the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road, has drawn the attention of capital and enterprise in that 
direction, leaving Yavapai in the background. The difficulty of 
access has greatly retarded development, but this will soon be 
remedied by the construction of the Atlantic and Pacific Rail- 
road, which will probably cross the county before the expiration 
of 1882. In the meantime a route for a railway from Prescott 
via Phoenix to the Southern Pacific at Maricopa has been sur- 
veyed, and work on it will probably soon commence. The Pres- 
cott and Thirty-Fifth Parallel Railroad Co. have also filed arti- 
cles of incorporation, and contemplate soon to commence the con- 
struction of a road from Prescott, to connect with the Atlantic 
and Pacific. With these improved lines of travel, the salubrious 
climate, grand scenery, and illimitable resources of mine, forest, 
and farm, will attract a thrifty population to Yavapai. 

Officers: — A. O. Noyes, Probate Judge; Joseph R. Walker, 
Sheriff; Joseph P. Hargrave, District Attorney; E. J. Cook, 
Treasurer ; William Wilkerson, Recorder ; J. N. Rodenburg, W. 
A. Cline, and J. M. Myers, Supervisors ; D. F. Mitchell, Clerk 
Board of Supervisors ; Thomas W. Simmons, Public Administra- 
tor ; John Mans, Agua Fria; John Anderson, Alexandra ; John 
Stemmer, Ash Creek ; S. E. Miner, Big Bug ; George C. Waddell, 
Bradshaw; George W. Hull, Central Verde; Richard De Kuhn, 
Cherry Creek; S. C. Rees, Chino Valley; W. H. Smith, Crook 
Canon ; J. Trotter, Gillette ; William Burch, Green Valley ; D. 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



WM. B. HOOPER & 80.{ T, ^ i a h ff^. T iiSiSr } Wbolosale Liquor Dealers. 



92 ARIZONA. 



Monroe, Lower Agua Fria ; Frank E. Jordan, and Murray Mcln- 
ernay, Lower Verde ; C. Y. Shelton, Lynx Creek ; P. Wilder, 
Mount Hope; Andrew Jackson, Oak Creek; J. H. Pierson, Pee- 
ples Valley ; John Hicks, Pine Creek ; Paul M. Fisher, Henry 
W. Fleury, and J. L. Hall, Prescott ; J. Douglass, Snyder's Holes ; 
H. Anderson, and A. J. McPhee, Tip Top ; W. W. Nichols, Up- 
per Verde; W. H. Williscraft, Walnut Creek; George Jackson, 
Walnut Grove ; C. P. Stanton, Weaver ; H. M. Clack and E. R. 
Nichols, Williamsons Valley — Justices of the Peace. 

YUMA COUNTY. 

Organized in 1864. Bounded north by Mohave, east by Yava- 
pai, Maricopa, and Pima, south by the Mexican State of Sonora, 
and west by the Mexican Territory of Lower California, and Cali- 
fornia, from which it is separated by the Colorado River. Area, 
8,360 square miles. Population, census of 1880 — 3,215. County 
seat, Yuma. Principal towns : Castle Dome Landing, Ehrenberg, 
Norton's Landing, Parker, (the name of the post-office on the 
Colorado Indian Reservation) Silent P. O., or Pacific City. Min- 
ing districts : Bill Williams Fork, Castle Dome, Eureka, Harcu- 
var, La Paz, Plomosa, Silver, and Weaver. Resources : commer- 
cial, mineral, and limited agricultural. Commencing these sketches 
of the counties of Arizona with Apache, far in the north-east among 
the high mountains and plateaus of the Sierra Madre, the back- 
bone of the continent, where the lofty pines and the winter snows 
tell of the northern temperate zone and its products, we close with 
the extreme south-west, near the level of the sea, where a burning 
sun heats with a torrid fierceness the dessicated mesas and the 
rugged rocks, and the thorny shrubs of the southern desert give 
the character to the vegetation. Nowhere in the United States 
does nature wear a more repulsive and desolate aspect than in 
the region bordering the Colorado. Here is the great American 
desert in all its terrible grandeur. From fifty to one hundred 
miles on either side of the river stretch sandy plains or barren 
ridges of rugged rocks, with - but an occasional oasis of fertile soil. 
The Colorado, flowing along the western border of the county 
180 miles, is one of the great rivers of the continent, and of the 
least value. Having a course of nearly 2,000 miles through yawn- 
ing chasms in its upper course, and over a changing, sandy bed in 
the desert region of the sbuth, it is of but slight avail for the pur- 
poses of commerce, of manufacture, or for irrigation. Light-draft 
steamers with some difficulty ascend it 500 miles from its mouth, 
and carry on a limited trade. In the northern part of the county 
the valley widens sufficiently to create a few thousand acres of 
arable land, which has been reserved for* the Mohave Indians, 
and is irrigated by water from the river. North and south of 
the junction of the Gila opens another valley, which, when irri- 



The J. Nl. Brunswick & Balks Go. wixii™vvsSiiSi{ 6SS £^^^ t ' 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



COUNTIES AND COUNTY OFFICERS. 



gated, is extremely productive. The Gila crosses the county in 
its southern part, and in its valley is a narrow strip of fertile soil. 
Bordering the county on the north is Bill Williams Fork, some- 
times a torrent swelling the great river with its flood, but gener- 
ally sinking in the sand before reaching its mouth. Along it is 
no valley of importance in an agricultural estimation. There are 
no other permanent streams, but there are numerous channels, or 
" washes," where torrents from sudden storms, or " cloud-bursts," 
to which the region is subject during the summer months, rush 
down with destructive energy to the river. Deficient as is Yuma 
in agricultural resources, the mineral resource is grand and inex- 
haustible. Rising from the river to its eastern border is a succes- 
sion of mountain ranges and table-lands, containing gold, silver, 
copper, and lead, in great veins and placers. These ranges are 
the Castle Dome, Flomosa or Lead Mountain, Eagle Tail, Gran- 
ite, and Harcuvar north of the Gila, and the Gila, Sierra de la Ca- 
beza Prieto, and Mohawk ranges south of that river. The argent- 
iferous galena and carbonate ores of the Castle Dome mountains 
have obtained a wide celebrity, the veins being gigantic in size 
and remarkable for the abundance and richness of the ore. In 
several localities, notably near Ehrenberg, in the north-western 
portion of the county, and south of the Gila, placers of gold have 
been found and mined with success. Adopting a system of " dry 
washing" by machinery, as recently put in practice, these placers 
will probably become sources of wealth. In the districts of La 
Paz and Bill Williams Fork are many copper-bearing lodes which 
have yielded large quantities of that metal, and promise a fine 
field for future enterprise. The Yuma, Cocopah, and Mohave 
Indians are in quite large numbers in the county. These were 
once hostile ; but by the force of arms and the sensual attrac- 
tions of civilization, have become subservient to the superior race. 
Physically they are fine specimens of the race, but void of noble 
or moral qualities, and are rapidly passing away. The county is 
now made accessible by the construction of the Southern Pacific 
Railroad, and the development of its great mineral resources in 
the near future is assured. 

Officers. — Isaac Levy, Probate Judge ; Andrew Tyner, Sheriff ; 
H. N. Alexander, District Attorney ; George Martin, Treasurer; 
Samuel Purdy, jr., Recorder ; Leopold Furrer, George M. Thur- 
low, and C. H. Brindley, Supervisors ; George M. Knight, Clerk 
Board of Supervisors ; Walter Millar, Surveyor ; J. H. Taggart, 
Coroner ; Henry R. Mallory, Ehrenberg ; A. D. Crawford, Si- 
leni; C. H. Brindley and W. H. Tonge, Yuma — Justices of the 



Peace. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & (».{^^^ h <S^^SSr^(»Bar8 of all Kinds. 



94 ARIZONA. 



INDIAN RESERVATIONS. 



COLORADO RIVER. 

This reservation was established by act of Congress, approved 
March 3rd, 1865, and was then occupied by only 840 Indians, 
belonging to the Mohave, Cocopah, Hualapai, and Yuma tribes, 
and the Chim-e-hue-vis band of Pah-Utes. 

The Reservation proper embraces about 75,000 acres of land, 
lying on either side of the Colorado River, beginning at a point 
opposite the old town of La Paz, and extending northward a dis- 
tance of 75 miles. The soil is alluvial, and very rich, but for want 
of irrigating facilities, is measurably non-productive. 

Since the establishment of the Reserve all the Indians aban- 
doned it voluntarily, except the Mohave tribe, whose numbers seem 
to have been augmented either by natural increase or other causes ; 
for, notwithstanding the withdrawal of other tribes, subsequent 
annual reports of superintendents and Indian agents show the 
population of the Mohaves to have been in excess of the number 
given as having been occupants of the land on which the Reserve 
was established. On the 15th day of May, 1880, by order of the 
Hon. Secretary of the Interior, the Chim-e-hue-vis band of the 
Pah-Utes, numbering 210, was again placed on the Reservation, 
where they now reside. The following statistics are taken from a 
report made by an enumerator appointed to make an enumera- 
tion of these Indians for the general census of 1880: 

Mohave Tribe. — Males over 20 years of age, 252 j females over 
20 years of age, 239 • males from 15 to 20 years of age, 48 ; fe- 
males from 15 to 20 years of age, 44; males from 5 to 15 years of 
age, 71 ; females from 5 to 15 years of age, 58 ; males under 5 
years of age, 38 ; females under 5 years of age, 41. Total 791. 

Chim-e-hue-vis. — Males over 20 years of age, 71 ; females over 
20 years of age, 65 ; males from 5 to 20 years of age, 25 ; females 
from 5 to 20 years of age, 23 ; males under 5 years of age, 12 ; 
females under 5 years of age, 14 — total, 210. Whole number of 
Indians on the Reservation, 1,001. 

Jonathan Biggs, Indian Agent; J. F. Woods, Agency Clerk and 
Postmaster ; Charles Biggs, farmer ; Charles Thon, blacksmith ; 
B. F. Snyder, carpenter ; Libbie M. Thresher, teacher ; Loretta 
Lang, matron. 

NAVAJO. 

This reservation is located partly in the north-eastern portion 
of Apache County, and partly in New Mexico, embracing an area 
of about 5,000 square miles. The Navajoes reside principally in 
the southern portion of the reservation, which is about the only 



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San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



INDIAN EESERVATIONS. 95 

part that can be used for agricultural purposes. The general sur- 
face is high table-lands, exceedingly broken up into ridges and 
small mesas by numerous rugged and deep canons, which carry 
running streams during the rains, but dry up entirely in the 
hot summer weather, affording only small pools and springs at 
long distances apart. The Navajoes are said to be a branch of 
the Apache tribe, although differing from them so materially in 
their industrial tendencies, being agricultural and pastoral in their 
habits. They raise a considerable quantity of corn, melons, pump- 
kins, and some good peaches. Their principal occupation is, how- 
ever, stock-raising. In this they do not confine themselves to the 
boundaries of their reservation, but when feed is scarce on their 
lands they drive their herds southward as far as the White Mount- 
ains, in the higher valleys of which they find an inexhaustible 
supply of grass. Besides horses, mules, and cattle, they have some 
500,000 sheep. They sell some wool, and manufacture excellent 
blankets. The number on the reservation is estimated at about 
12,000. 

PAPAGO. 

This reservation is situated a few miles south of Tucson, in the 
Santa Cruz Valley, covering about 70,000 acres, a portion of which 
is tillable land. The Papagoes have always been known as village 
Indians, and are of the same tribe as the Pimas. The Spanish found 
them occupying the country called Papagueria, from whence they 
moved to their present location. They are peaceful in character, 
although sufficiently brave and able to protect themselves from 
the attacks of the Apaches, while the Mexican population around 
them was exterminated. They readily accepted the friendship 
of the early Jesuit missionaries, becoming converts to Catholicism, 
in which church they still remain. The old mines were princi- 
pally worked through their agency. When first discovered by 
the Spanish three centuries ago, they lived as now, in villages, 
cultivated the soil, raised cotton, and wove both cotton and woolen 
fabrics. About the only change apparent in them is, that they 
have cut their hair, and adopted the Mexican dress. They have 
suffered less from bad habits, which are the general result of con- 
tact between the Indian and the civilized white man, than any 
other tribe in the Territory. Their number is estimated at 6,000. 
They own large herds of horses, mules, cattle, and sheep, and 
raise wheat, barley, sorghum, melons, pumpkins, and beans. On 
this reservation is the famous old church of San Xavier del Bac, 
which is religiously guarded and taken care of by the Papagoes. 

PIMA AND MARICOPA. 

This reservation borders on the Gila River, extending from 
about 17 miles below Florence to the mouth of the Salt River. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Ul»« D U ftftnoK Xt Pn i Tucson & Phoenix, A.T., Ei Paso, ) Sole Agents J". A. MILLER 
W ITI . D. nUUpcr W UU. \ Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, j c. C. WHISKEY. 



96 ARIZONA. 



The Indians number about 5,000, including 4,500 Pimas and 500 
Maricopas. Farming is carried on by them quite extensively so 
far as their mode of culture is concerned, they using the primi- 
tive wooden plow for the turning of the soil, and the two rocks 
for their milling and grinding. Water for irrigating purposes is 
brought in ditches from the Gila, and large crops, principally 
wheat, raised, the most of which is sold to traders in the vicinity. 
They also raise corn, barley, sorghum, melons, and vegetables of 
different kinds. Everything about the agency is conducted with 
strict conformity to law and order — police appointed from the 
Pimas preserving order. Punishment is inflicted on evil-doers by 
a sentence of hard labor with ball and chain attached. The dwell- 
ings resemble very much the pictures of the huts in the cold polar 
regions. They are low oval structures, covered with mud, with 
an opening at the bottom sufficiently large for a person to crawl 
in. These Indians have always been at peace with the whites, 
and the early settlers in Salt River Valley often received from 
them assistance in defending themselves from the attacks of the 
ruthless Apaches. Schools have been established for tne educa- 
tion of the young, and religious instruction is also given by clergy- 
men belonging to the Presbyterian Church. Mr. R. G. Wheeler 
is TJ. S. Indian Agent in charge, and Mr. E. B, Townsend is 
Special Agent. 

SAN CAELOS. 

This reservation lies principally in Graham and Gila Counties, 
including within its limits an area of over 4,000 square miles. On 
account of recent discoveries of coal in the southern portion of the 
reservation, a change of its boundaries has been recommended so 
as to exclude the coal lands and include lands on the north in 
compensation. It is also recommended to mark the boundary by 
posts at short distances apart, so that it may be perfectly distinct, 
and that there may exist no excuse for trespassing on the lands 
set apart for the Indians. There are about 5,000 Indians on the 
reservation, including the following tribes, all of whom are re- 
garded as Apaches, distinguished by the terms Yuma, Mohave, 
Tonto, Warm Springs, San Carlos, and a few others. Several of 
these tribes in past days have been hostile to each other, but at 
present their relations are peaceable. 

These are the remains of some of the most crafty, savage, and 
powerful tribes in Arizona. It is but a few years since they held 
almost undisputed sway south of the Gila, and had ravaged most 
of the towns in northern Sonora. Their bloody trails ran in every 
direction, and hardly a grazing rancho was left in northern Mex- 
ico. No doubt the difficulty which the Mexicans found in de- 
fending themselves against their attacks was the principal reason 
for consenting to the Gadsden Purchase. 

At last, however, after years of bloodshed, these savages have 



Th6 J. wl. Brunswick &. BbIkg Co. MAsupfCTrKEBf{ fa SM^indMo! t 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., "STZKVZgS? 



ANCIENT RUINS. 



97 



been subjugated and placed on this reservation, where they are 
quietly living, subjected to certain restrictions, and protected and 
supported by the Government. They are at present very peace- 
ably disposed, and many of the chiefs and prominent men mani- 
fest a strong* desire to profit by the civilizing influences that are 
placed within their reach, and express a wish to have the Gov- 
ernment parcel off: the land and give them a title to it. The 
number of farmers among them is increasing in proportion to the 
number of acres of land that are being irrigated, the area cul- 
tivated this year being greatly in excess of last year. A school 
has been established for the instruction of the young Indians, 
many of whom take a lively interest in school matters, and are 
advancing in a satisfactory manner. In addition to other supplies 
there is distributed among them, annually, 3,500,000 pounds of 
beef, 1,000,000 pounds of flour, 80,000 pounds of sugar, and 5,000 
pounds of tobacco. Col. J. C. Tiffany is the U. S. Indian Agent 
in charge of the reservation. 



ANCIENT RUINS. 



The triangular piece of territory lying between Salt River and 
Gila River, from their junction eastward to the Superstition 
Mountains, may be called historic ground, as the extensive plain 
which it embraces shows at every step some ruins of ancient hab- 
itation. These consist of broken pottery, which is found in great 
quantities ; and mounds of earth, which on being opened disclose 
the foundation walls of old buildings, and irrigating canals which 
have supplied the land with water for cultivation of the sdil. The 
main canals were from twenty to thirty feet in width, and often 
many miles in length, and cut to a true grade, which indicates 
considerable engineering skill. Some of these canals are now 
used for roads, and others have been opened again for irrigating 
purposes. No one can pass over this section without being con- 
vinced that it was some time — in a period long passed — thickly 
inhabited by an agricultural people. These ruins are also found 
on the south side of the Gila, and west of the Salt River for 
many miles. One of the best-preserved and most accessible of 
these ruins is Casa Grande, about three miles south of the Gila, 
and about fourteen miles from Casa Grande station, on the road to 
Florence. A well-known correspondent thus describes them : 

" Before reaching the ruins we drove over acres of pottery, and 
what seemed to us to be pieces of mechanical and culinary im- 
plements ; and many a mile was made through old aqueducts and 
canals, so deep and wide as to excite our surprise from the amount 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wn. B. Hooper & fkA^^S^?^} £& Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



98 AKIZONA. 



of labor required for their excavation. Arriving at the ruins we 
at once went up and into the Casa Grande. This ruin is on the 
most elevated portion of a vast plain covered with mesquite and 
artemisia. Portions of the walls are still standing, some of them 
reaching an altitude of forty or fifty feet ; but the outer ones are 
getting jagged and disjointed, and are giving way to the elements, 
while some of the inner walls are in a state of good preservation. 
The outer walls are, or were, about five feet six inches thick, and 
the inner ones about four feet. The composition is a sort of con- 
crete made from the native soil, with a mixture of some kind of 
natural or manufactured cement. The ruin measures fifty feet 
north and south, by forty east and west, and must have been at 
one time from sixty to eighty feet in height. There were # good 
many apartments on each floor between the outer and the inner 
walls, with an interior apartment four or five stories in height. 
There were many other buildings, all of which have crumbled into 
ruins. There were also, evidently, several large watch-towers. 
This was all inclosed by a wall four hundred and fifty feet in 
length from north to south, by two hundred and twenty-five feet 
in width from east to west, and probably ten or twelve feet in 
height. The main canal must have been eighteen or twenty miles 
in length ; and to-day, along its banks, for six or seven miles, may 
be seen pieces of plate, pottery, and other articles of earthenware. 
I have no doubt but what a large city once occupied this plain, 
containing thousands of inhabitants, all acting under one govern- 
ment. There are also other smaller ruins in this neighborhood, 
one of which is only a half-mile from White's old station. There 
are also ruins of more extensive casas and inclosures near Phoenix 
and Florence, but Casa Grande is the most accessible, and conse- 
quently the most famous. 

" A few miles from Phoenix, on the old Florence road, may be 
seen th« ruins of two or three towns, and several stupendous can- 
als from twenty to twenty-five feet in width, one of which received 
its water near the mountains twenty-odd miles away. Between 
two and three miles from Yail and Helwig's flouring mill, there 
was evidently once a large town. The ruins of one building at 
present remain, and measures two hundred and sixty by one hun- 
dred and thirty feet. Scattered all around in every direction are 
mounds which are supposed to be remains of habitations The 
walls of the above described ruins still measure ten or eleven feet 
in height. Between twelve and fourteen miles from Phoenix is 
another extinct system of canals-and reservoirs, and ruins of what 
must have been a populous city. For miles around you may see 
mounds and piles of ruins. In this city was a building three hun- 
dred and fifty feet in length by probably one hundred and seventy- 
five in width ; one of the largest, if not the very largest, on the 
Salinas. This building, and other lesser ones, were inclosed by a 
wall that must have been six hundred bv three hundred feet. As 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co, 



BILLIARD TABLE C 653 & 655 Market St. 
JMIAA U FACTUKEK8, { San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



ANCIENT RUINS. 99 



at the Casa Grande, pieces of plate, pottery, and other articles of 
earthenware may be found scattered among the ruins and along 
the beds and banks of the old canals. A few miles east of Flor- 
ence are some ruins discovered by Lieutenant Ward of the U. S. 
army some years ago. The principal ruin is a parallelogram forti- 
fication, sixteen hundred feet in length by six hundred in width, 
constructed of stone brought from the neighboring mountains. In 
many places this wall has been overgrown by vines and shrubs ; 
in other places it has fallen over or been thrown down by the ele- 
ments, while in some places it has either disappeared beneath the 
surface, or has been covered up by debris or moving sand. In 
many places the wall is twelve feet in height, and as erect and 
perfect as it was when erected, probably over a thousand years 
ago. Within this in closure is the ruin of a structure of roughly- 
hewn stones two hundred and seventy-five by two hundred feet, 
one of the interior walls of which still betrays perfectly distinct 
tracings of a drawing of the sun. 

" At the south.east corner of the wall is a tower which must have 
been of considerable altitude, as the ruin itself is at present twenty- 
five feet in height. On the south-west corner is also a companion 
ruin, at present thirty feet in height. The tops of these columns 
are crumbling, as great piles of debris at the base of each shaft 
unmistakably show. Plate, pottery, and carved stone are scattered 
in all directions, some of which still exhibit a process of indelible 
staining and glazing. These ruins are situated upon a piece of 
rising plain, which was watered by a system of canals running 
from the Gila, a few miles away. On the San Pedro, where it 
joins the Gila, is a large number of ruins, generally consisting of 
the foundations of buildings, which have formed villages. These 
foundations are of rough stones, selected with great care as to their 
shape, to make a good wall. The buildings on these foundations 
were of adobe. Similar ruins are found eastward and westward 
along the Gila in many places ; and most of these sites of ancient 
towns contain the ruins of a building of large size, like Casa 
Grande, as though it were made use of for some public purpose. 
Major Emery, of the United States Boundary Commission, says 
the ruins on the San Pedro indicate a population of one hundred 
thousand." 

From the Phoenix Gazette we clip the following description of 
one of the many ruins in its vicinity : 

"Four miles north-east of town, near Ross' Mills, there are sev- 
eral large and regularly -shaped mounds. The largest of these 
mounds is within twenty feet of the well-traveled road to Tempe. 
It is about forty feet high, and when once the curiosity-hunter has 
clambered over the fragments of adobe and earthen pottery which 
cover the sides to the summit, he is rewarded by discovering the 
well-defined divisions of what was once a large house. Although 
large trees of the slow-growing mesquite have sprung up, the adobe 



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100 ARIZONA. 



walls which divided the interior of the building into rooms still 
remain whole and intact a foot beneath the surface. In some of 
these walls there still remain the ends of the rafters used to sup- 
port the floors. All these pieces of rafters are charred, and ap- 
pear as though they had been at one time subject to intense heat. 
Looking to the north-west from the top of thi-> ruin the eye sweeps 
over a plain thickly dotted with mounds, which differ from the 
large one only in size, and the whole is enclosed with the remains 
of what was once a thick adobe wall, the south-east corner of 
which was formed by the large house. An examination of the 
ruins discloses a regular system of streets running north and south, 
intersecting one another, and forming regular and equal -sized 
squares. Immense quantities of broken pottery strew the ground, 
and from these fragments a relic-hunter can select, with little pa- 
tience, a score of pieces, with each piece bearing a different de- 
sign ; but this variety in design applies only to size and shape, as 
no colors save black, dark-blue, and dark-red appear to have been 
used by these ancient decorators. Here and there can be found 
fragments of shell ornaments, bracelets, ear-rings, etc., manufac- 
tured from a shell somewhat similar to abalone. Everything con- 
nected with this desert of ruins t^nds to give rise to the opinion 
that the destruction of the city was sudden, speedy, and com- 
plete, but when and in what manner it — in common with other cit- 
ies — was blotted out from the land we now occupy, must forever 
remain a matter of conjecture." 

In Yavapai and Apache counties — in fact, in all the country 
north of the Salt River Valley — these old ruins are found in 
many places and in great quantities ; but their character is very 
much changed, as here the walls are generally built of stone, 
more or less dressed. In some cases they occupy the tops of high 
mountains, or bluffs, or almost inaccessible shelves along the sides 
of abrupt |»iecipices. In some cases natural caves, which open in 
canons of limstone rock, have been taken advantage of, the open- 
ings walled up, except a small passage-way, and partition- walls 
run, dividing the cave-chambers into rooms. These cave-houses 
show excavations for cisterns and for storing grain. No house- 
hold implements have been found beyond a few stone axes and 
metates — a stone implement for crushing by hand any kind of 
grain. In some cases dwellings have been made by digging into 
the solid rock of the abrupt sides, of a cliff high above the base, 
and only reached by difficult climbing. The buildings appear to 
have been rectangular in shape, like those of Salt River Valley ; 
but they are generally smaller, and always indicate that defense 
was one of the chief objects to be attained. 

A correspondent in the St. Joe Gazette thus describes some of 
the cliff dwellings: 

"About four miles below Camp Verde there are about fifty cliff 
or cave dwellings — rooms hewn out in a solid cliff of rock. One 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. £&»»;&££££{' 



Sail Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T„ Wholesale Dry Goods, 



ANCIENT RUINS. * 101 



has to use ladders in order to penetrate some of them. The rooms 
are plastered inside, and have side-rooms leading from the main 
room. Many of these side-rooms seem to have been used for 
granaries, for in them have been small cells wherein have been 
placed ears of corn, cotton, and other seeds, and then cemented 
over and made air-tight. When these places are picked into, you 
find the ears of corn at first apparently natural ; but when the 
air strikes them, or the fingers touch them, the grain falls to ashes, 
leaving nothing but the cob, which seems to be little affected. In 
one of these cells I found a bunch of well-twisted cotton thread, 
and another kind of thread which was beyond my comprehension 
as to what it was made of. There are also, in the open valleys, 
extensive ruins of great cities. Judging from the debris, many of 
the buildings have been four or five stories high, built of stone 
neatly dressed, showing considerable mechanical skill in their 
construction. The parts of walls that are still standing bear 
traces of ancient writings and sculpture, with crosses and notches 
fc*ut deep into the solid rock at regular intervals. There are also 
traces of canals and reservoirs of vast dimensions, from which it 
is inferred that the country at one time was fertile and well- 
watered. With the exception of broken pottery but few relics 
are found. These pieces of pottery are remarkable, from the fact 
that they have been finely glazed, and bear paintings of flowers 
and ornamental figures; the coloring matter of a high mineral 
substance of some kind, which cannot or has not been defaced, 
and appears to be perfectly indelible. These relics have been 
exposed to the storms which have worn away the solid masonry 
of the walls, and show the colors as fresh and bright, to all ap- 
pearances, as when new. The pottery itself has been found to be 
perfectly fire-proof, upon a severe trial in crucibles, while the heat 
of furnaces will not affect it. 

" In the streets of Prescott, as the earth is worn and the winds 
blow it away, can be traced the walls of an ancient city, evidently 
as old as time itself. In the grading of our streets, excavating for 
cellars, and in digging wells, traces of the race that once lived in 
this — to Americans — new land, are found implements of war and 
domestic use many feet beneath the surface and under the hard- 
pan, which is next to the rock itself, .convincing in every particu- 
lar that this is a very old land. North-west of Prescott, along the 
banks of the grand caiion of the Colorado River, where it is thou- 
sands of feet from the top to the water — perpendicular as a wall — 
stone buildings are still standing. As the country back from the 
river has no water for miles, the inhabitants of these buildings 
must have obtained their water from the Colorado, which does 
not, at its present depth, appear possible." 

In the Big Chino Valley, north of Prescott, can be seen the 
walls of more than a hundred houses. The debris has collected 
around these walls to the depth, in some cases, of seven or eight 



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102 ARIZONA. 



feet. The walls are built of clay and stone, and plastered on the 
inside. The stone has been brought from a mesa at some distance. 
In one of these buildings were found three skeletons, and a large 
earthenware vessel containing the remains of grain. Stone axes 
were also found. South of Prescott, on the ridges on both sides 
of the Hassayampa, ruins of stone houses are found in many 
places. They generally show a small cluster of houses surrounded 
by a stone wall, and in all cases occupy a defensive position, while 
giving a wide outlook in the valley below. 



ARIZONA.— HOW IT DERIVED ITS NAME. 



" The Zufiia Indians believe that in the beginning a race of men 
sprang up out of the earth, as plants arise and come forth in the 
spring. The race increased until they spread over the whole 
earth, and, after existing through countless ages, passed away. 
The earth then remained without people a great length of time, 
until at length the sun had compassion on the earth, and sent a 
celestial maiden to repeople the earth. This young goddess was 
called Arizona — the name signifying Maiden Queen. This Ari- 
zona dwelt upon the earth a great length -of time in lonely soli- 
tude, until at a certain time, while basking in the sunbeams, a drop 
of dew fell from heaven and rested upon Arizona, who in due 
time blessed the world with twins — a son and daughter — and 
these became the father and mother of the Zufiia Indians, and 
from this tribe arose all other races of men. The Zunia is the 
only pure original stock of children of the sun now on the earth." 

" The name of Arizona, or El Arizona, was originally applied to 
a Real de Minas near the headwaters of the Rio del Aquimari — 
the larger branch of the Rio del Altar — at the entrance of the 
Canon del Inferno, some twelve miles to the southwest of the 
celebrated mines of the Planchas de Plata. It is now but a 
rancho, although remains of the former buildings are still to be 
met with. This place was for a long time the extreme north 
point attained by the conquest of the Spaniards, and the name 
Arizona is often given to the country thereabout. In the early 
part of the last century the country to the northward towards the 
Rio Gila and Rio Santa Cruz became better known, and at that 
time we find the name erroneously given to the newly discovered 
region. As for the name Arizona, it actually means at the foot of 
the mountain, or where the mountains end. The spelling in the 
Papago language would be Arizaka or Arizana — the name most 
certainly given by the Papagoes or Pimas, on account of the 
situation of El Arizona at the foot of the high range of 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co.^"Si^K£r.&ft22£ 8t 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., w-ou-am. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 



RAILROADS. 103 



mountains of the Planchas de Plata to the east, and the 
Sierra del Agua Caliente to the north, where towards the 
west and south extends a rolling, hilly country. Other persons 
say that there is a word in the Aztec language — Arizuma — 
signifying Land of Silver, and that these ancient inhabitants 
of Mexico, if they did not actually people the Territory, ex- 
tended their government and mining ventures to its southern 
borders, and gave it the name of Arizuma — the Land of Silver. 
The first bill introduced into the National Congress for the organi- 
zation of this Territory called it Arizuma. Again, it is said that 
the first explorers of this region were Spanish adventurers, who 
entered it from the Gulf of California by the way of the Color- 
ado, and then up the Gila, where the hot sandy plains, and dry, 
treeless plateaus or mesas gave them the impression that the coun- 
try was a dry barren region, and hence they gave it the name 
Arida Zona — barren zone — and that use has contracted it to Ari- 
zona, and extended the name to our whole Territory." 



RAILROADS. 



The Railway stands confessedly as one of the greatest of all 
human contrivances — one of the grandest achievements of human 
ingenuity — one of the proudest conquests of the power of mind 
over the domain of matter. The restless giant steam, under the 
curb and control of mind, far outstrips feeble and impotent mus- 
cle in the march of progress and improvement. The record of 
the superiority which the one has achieved over the other, is as 
interesting as any tale of the genii of Arabian story. It is the 
romance of civilization, and grows in interest as the index finger 
on the dial plate of time marshals the ages by in grand proces- 
sion. Railroads have been pioneers of great public improve- 
ments, especially in our own country. In their wake have fol- 
lowed individual wealth and national prosperity. Through the 
length and breadth of our fair possessions they have been mission- 
aries of good. They have built up cities, towns and villages, and 
diversified landscapes with grain-fields, orchards or gardens ; they 
have disturbed the silence of sixty centuries, and made the gloom 
of the forest and mountain give way to the glory of the vineyard 
and field. The Railroad is the acme of rapid transit, and has no 
rival in its method and means of transportation. It opens up 
waste plateaus and arid plains, and makes deserts blossom as the 
rose. It penetrates uninviting hillsides and mountains, and wakes 
np the raw material which lies slumbering therein. It is a great 
advertiser — it makes known to the world the natural wealth of 



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104 ARIZONA. 



the section through which it takes its way. It bears its precious 
burdens over and under and through mountains, and over and 
under rivers, by night and by day. It opens up vast treasures 
of mineral and agricultural wealth, and carries its fructifying in- 
fluences into every land. It traverses alike the summits of the 
snow-clad mountains of Switzerland and California, and the des- 
erts of Sahara and Arizona. It is the greatest civilizer of the 
age — it pushes the red man of America and the sepoy of India 
out of its way, and brings the prairies of the one and the jungles 
of the other into the pale of civilization and society. Wherever 
you find the railroad, you behold people who hew out for them- 
selves positions of usefulness in society ; people who wrestle with 
poverty or a sparse inheritance, and weave crowns from the flow- 
ers of industry. All along these marvellous thoroughfares you 
see churches and school-houses — those twin sisters of civilization, 
spring up and dispense light, liberty, education, and religion 
all around. Every year are developed more and more among the 
residents along the lines of these incomparable means <lf transit, 
the instincts of a higher and nobler manhood. Lands increase in 
value and homes are yearly improved, adorned and beautified. 

Southern Pacific Railroad. — Upon the completion of the 
Grand Trunk Line of the Central Pacific Railroad, surveyors were 
sent into that portion of California known as the upper San Joa- 
quin Valley. On the 13th of January, 1870, a party of surveying 
officers under Engineer Ives ran a line from Lathrop, and contin- 
ued its work on to what is now called Goshen, nearly 150 miles 
south and east of the point above designated on the main line. 
On the first day of April, 1872, trains were run from Lathrop to 
Merced. On the 25th of July of the same year, what is known 
as the Visalia Division of the Central Pacific Railroad was com- 
pleted to Goshen, 146 3-10 miles from Lathrop, and most of it 
through about as uninviting a country as at that time could be 
seen anywhere in California. Not only were the beautiful cities 
of Modesto, Merced and Fresno not in embryo even, but there were 
only here and there a habitation, and that of the ruder sort. 

Subsequently, the Southern Pacific Railroad Company was or- 
ganized ; and on the 18th of December, 1874, Mr. Charles Crocker, 
who had been not only one of the original incorporators of the 
Central Pacific, but the master mechanical spirit of the same, was 
elected President; Gen. David D. Colton, Vice-President; J. L. 
Wilcutt, Secretary, and E. H. Miller, jr., Treasurer. In the mean- 
time 21 miles of road, running from Los Angeles to Wilmington, 
had been purchased and consolidated with the system, and 31 
miles of what is known as the San Diego branch, from Los An- 
geles to Anaheim, were constructed. October 26th, 1874, the 
Southern Pacific reached Sumner, 94 miles from Goshen. The 
foot of the Tehachepi Mountains, 22 miles further, was reached 
April 26th, 1875. While this work was going on through the 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balks Co. ffiiKB^rffir 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



RAILROADS. 105 



valleys west of the Coast Range, a force of men was engaged in 
penetrating the Tehachepi Mountains, and also in tunneling under 
the San Fernando spur, and in building sections from Los Angeles 
to San Fernando, 20 miles, and south-east to Spadra, 29 miles. 
On JVIay 26th, 1876, the road was opt ned from Caliente to Keene's, 
13 miles; and from Keene's to Mohave, 32 niiles, on the 9th of 
August of the same year ; and displaying to the traveler an exhi- 
bition of engineering without a parallel. On the 6th of Septem- 
ber, less than one month after the arrival of the first regular train 
from San Francisco to Mohave, a gap of 73 miles had been closed, 
and the road was completed and in running order from Goshen to 
Spadra; that part of the road from Los Angeles to the latter point 
having been completed on the 15th of April, 1874, and still on to 
Colton, 28 miles further, July 16th, 1875; from Los Angeles to 
San Fernando on the 15th of April, 1874, and' to the tunfiel Janu- 
ary 1st, 1876. Los Angeles now became an important railroad 
center, the iron horse arriving and departing daily for San Fran- 
cisco and way places; Colton, 57 miles, and way places; Ana- 
heim, 31 miles, and intermediate stations; Wilmington, 21 miles, 
and Santa Monica, 16 miles. Population flocked from all quar- 
ters, and lands went up in value to an enormous price. On the 
23rd day of May, 1877, the Southern Pacific Railroad reached the 
Colorado River, 248 miles from Los Angeles, and 720 miles from 
San Francisco. Thus terminated the system of what is known as 
the Southern Pacific Railroad of California ; and in addition 40 
miles of road from Goshen to Huron were completed Februarv 
let, 1877. 

Southern Pacific Railroad of Arizona. — We now arrive 
at another important part of the system of railroads, which, 
without the successful operation of the Central Pacific, would 
not now be in existence ; and under the successful manage- 
ment of other men, less determined, and less energetic, and 
less public-spirited than Charles Crocker, Leland Stanford, 
and C. P. Huntington, we might have had no Southern Pacific 
Railroad to-day, and no intercourse with California, except that 
afforded through the old methods of ship and stage. While other 
operators, then, were and had been for years imploring Congress 
for financial aid for the spanning of the Colorado and Arizona by 
rail, contracts were being made for iron and ties for the further 
extension of the st^el highway, and on the 7th of October, 1878, 
the Southern Pacific Railroad of Arizona was incorporated, with 
Gen. D. D. Colton a* President, C. F. Crocker as Vice-President, 
H. M. Wright as Secretary, and F. S. Douty as Treasurer. Sub- 
sequently, on the death of Gen. Colton, Mr. C. F. Crocker was 
elected President, and A. P. K. Safford Vice-President, the other 
officers remaining as before. 

On November 19th, 1878, ground was broken at Yuma, and half 
a mile of track laid the same day. On January 8th 30] miles had 



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8 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO r { T ^a ! ^^iSSr}Lubricating Oils. 



106 ARIZONA. 



been laid and the road opened; on February 1st the road had 
been completed 64| miles, and on May 19th the Southern Pacific 
Railroad of Arizona had been built in a first-class manner of steel 
rails, and was opened to Casa Grande, a distance of 183 miles 
from Yuma, or 913 miles from San Francisco — nearly the length 
of the trunk line of its senior, the Central Pacific. Railroad 
building was resumed at Casa Grande on January 26th, 1880, and 
Tucson was reaehed on March 20th, 1880, and Deming on De- 
cember loth, 1880, where the Southern Pacific formed a conjunc- 
tion with the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe, and thus a second 
transcontinental thoroughfare was the result. The Southern Pacific 
kept right on from Deming, and reached El Paso on May 19th, 
1881. It is hardly necessary to add that the work goes right on, 
and that by July 1st, 1882, the Southern Pacific will have a direct 
line from San Francisco to the Gulf of Mexico. From El Paso, 
to San Antonio in Texas, the distance is about six hundred miles, 
and from San Antonio to New Orleans the distance is less than 
six hundred miles, and there is already in running order a road 
from New Orleans to San Antonio, with the exception of a short 
gap between Vermillionville and Lake Charles. This route is 
popularly known in New Orleans as the " Sunset Route." Upon 
the completion of the line, San Francisco and New Orleans will 
be within about two thousand four hundred miles of each other, 
or about five days' travel. This is six hundred miles nearer to 
tide- water than New York, and practically New Orleans is as near 
to Europe as New York. The largest ships and ocean steamers 
now ascend to New Orleans, and no doubt but abundant facilities 
Will be provided for European travel. Mr. R. S. Spofford, the 
attorney of the Sunset Route, thinks, that with the completion of 
the Southern Pacific Railroad, the staples of the Pacific Coast, 
destined for domestic and foreign markets, will find shipment at 
New Orleans. 

As an auxiliary to this business, freight and passenger lines will 
be established between New Orleans and European ports, which 
will be conducted with a view to attracting a large European im- 
migration into the South-western States and Territories. It is also 
contemplated to open railway communication between San Anto- 
nio and the City of Mexico. Between San Francisco and New 
Orleans there will be twenty-four hundred miles in length of ter- 
ritory, of which these two centers will be the shipping ports, and 
the Southern Pacific the intermediate connection. The way and 
through traffic which will spring up must be enormous. An im- 
mense and rich mineral belt lies between the two cities, extend- 
ing through Arizona, New Mexico, and the Northern States of 
Mexico. San Francisco will supply one portion of the Territory 
and New Orleans another. 

In illustrating the advantage which the Southern Pacific 
Railroad has been to Arizona, a Tucson correspondent says: 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. B^S^SSr^K^ 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



RAILROADS. 107 



"My last trip to this place, from San Francisco, thirteen years 
ago, cost me $25 from San Francisco to Los Angeles; time, 
four days and nights on top of a stage; no sleep, and meals 
75 cents each. I laid over in Los Angeles two days, partly 
to wait for a stage and partly because I was tired out. 
Then I t< ok a stage for Fort Yuma, for which trip I paid $60, 
and traveled four days and three nights; paying $1 per meal for 
pork and beans, villainous coffee, and corn-dodgers. After rest- 
ing in Arizona City for a day I took a vehicle for Tucson ; fare, 
875 ; time, four days and nights ; no sleep to speak of, and meals 
a d.llar each; taking in all fourteen days, and costing $193. It 
now takes but two days to make the trip, the expenses of which 
are as follows : Ticket from Tucson to San Francisco, $55; sleep- 
ing-car ticket, $6.50 ; meals, about $6 ; in all $67.50, and in the two 
days, as against fourteen days a few years ago." Upon the com- 
pletion of the Southern Pacific to Tucson, the Citizen of that date 
says : " There was rejoicing in Arizona la^t night. The iron 
horse panted into Tucson, and with its neigh gave notice that a 
new order of tilings was about to be established. The horrors of 
that Sahara, which stretches for many leagues beyond Yuma, are 
hereafter to be but themes for jest. The heart of Arizona has 
been moved up within two days' ride of the port of San Francisco. 
The days of mustangs, Indians, and barbarism in a hundred forms, 
are over for Arizona. The modern evangel — the locomotive — 
has come to bring comfort and joy to our Territory, and will now 
minister to every enterprise, and back every energy of the people 
here. With the advent of the Southern Pacific Railroad a new 
era has dawned on Arizona; our mental, moral, and material 
progress have commenced with a rapidity never witnessed in older 
communities ; and our great natural advantages, thus aided and 
stimulated, will render ihis progress on the road to wealth and 
prosperity permanent." 

Atlantic and Pacific Railroad. — This road, sometimes called 
the thirty-fifth parallel road, is now completed and in full opera- 
tion to Fort Wingate, one hundred and forty-five miles west of 
Albuquerque, New Mexico ; and it is confidently expected that 
by August, 1881, Brigham City. Apache County, a distance of 
two hundred and eighty-five miles from Albuquerque, will be 
reached. In an article describing the route of this road, the Al- 
buquerque Journal says : 

" The Atlantic and Pacific passes along the rich valley of the 
Rio Grande, crossing that stream at Isleta, then stretching over 
the divide between the Rio Grande and Rio Puerco, up the beau- 
tiful valley of San Jose to the continental divide. The valley is 
chiefly cultivated by Mexicans and Pueblos, a very peaceable 
tribe of Indians, who will become an important factor ; and will 
undoubtedly assert itself when the hand of industry, progress, 
and enterprise shall stretch forth across this charming valley. 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & e0.{ T Tett?& x ^ie E ^ o r} Wholesale Liquor Dialers. 



108 ARIZONA. 



Thence down the valley of the Rio Puerco of the West by Fort 
Wingate. This valley is used extensively by the Navajo Indians 
for sheep raising. These Indians are not an agricultural tribe 
like the Pueblos, but are largely engaged in stock-raising, com- 
prising horses, cattle, and sheep ; and great herds of these can be 
seen passing through this valley in view of their mountainous 
reservation. These Indians, like their brethren, the Pueblos, are 
peaceable ; and their large productions of wool, pelts, and hides 
will develop a large traffic, and increase the trade of our indus- 
trious business men. 

" Striking the Little Colorado at Holbrook, running down the 
valley of this river, and passing through the Mormon settlements 
of St. Joseph, Sunset, and Brigham City; crossing canons and 
ravines south of these points ; passing hard by the San Francisco 
Mountains, which are covered with valuable timber, and abound 
in wild game ; clear and beautiful springs, gushing forth from the 
mountains, enrich the valleys with their beneficent influence. 
Nowhere does the country afford lands better adapted for stock- 
raising and agricultural purposes than the valleys of the San 
Francisco Mountains. Enterprises are here met half-way. Nat- 
ure has crowned this region with everything calculated for the 
happiness of man. The huntsman, the agriculturist, the stock- 
raiser, and the lumberman, alike find here the opportunities to 
rise swiftly above want to prosperity and comfort. The tourist, 
too, can find here ample enjoyment, and refresh himself with the 
enchanting and wild beauties of nature. The weary wanderer, 
whose toils have shattered health upon life's arduous pathway, is 
hailed by the quickening influences of the climate ; and when 
these peaks become dotted with the modern inns of the nine- 
teenth century, and progress has wrought the changes incident to 
an advanced civilization, this locality will become a favorite spot 
for the sons and daughters of our country. Let the people of the 
East, the North, and South, sally forth and take early advantage 
of the great opportunities held out to the enterprising and indus- 
trious arm of man by this locality. 

*• Having passed the San Francisco Mountains, the line stretches 
across the Arizona divide at an altitude of 7,285 feet; and through 
the plains beyond, where it reaches the junction for Prescott, 
Arizona, sixty miles distant, passing through the famous mineral 
regions of that Territory, rich in resources as well as vast in area. 
The prospector in quest of the precious metals will find his reward 
in tnis locality. The entire region from the mountains to the Big 
Colorado River, 565 miles from Albuquerque, is covered with 
grass and cedars, and is well adapted for grazing purposes. 

" The line crosses the Big Colorado River, near the Needles, 
about two hundred miles from Yuma. An elegant and substantial 
bridge will be constructed across this stream, which is designed to 
rival in skill and mechanism structures of like character, and is to 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. SffiKtt&asKSf 



San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



RAILROADS. 109 



be in consonance with the superior construction and equipment of 
this great highway. This river is navigable as far up as Fort 
Mohave, about two hundred and fifty miles from Yuma, and boats 
ply between these points. The line stretches across the plain 
from the Big Colorado — about three hundred miles — to San 
Buenaventura, on the coast, and thence follows along the coast of 
California to San Francisco. A line is also built from San Diego 
northward through Cajon Pass — about one hundred and twenty- 
five miles — to a connection with this road.'' 

When completed, the Atlantic and Pacific will open up the 
northern portion of Arizona, as the Southern Pacific has the 
southern portion; and make accessible the rich mineral regions 
in Apache, Yavapai, and Mohave Counties. 

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. — This road, 
which has already made a conjunction with the Southern Pacific 
at Deming, New Mexico, is being energetically extended, and 
surveys are now being made through Southern Arizona, to ascer- 
tain the most practicable route for a road to connect with the sec- 
tion now being built by the same company from Guyamas, Mexico^ 
to Calabasas, Arizona. 

Utah and Arizona Railroad. — This is a projected road to run 
north from Tucson to a junction with Jay Gould's Southern Utah 
Railroad. Such a road, when built, would do wonders toward 
binding together north and south Arizona. From Tucson it is 
the intention to pass north through Florence, running east and 
near Fort Verde, crossing the great Colorado canon and river by 
a suspension bridge, higher than that over the Niagara river, and 
developing in its progress the great, and as yet untouched, tim- 
ber regions and coal beds of Apache County. The total length 
of this road will be 698 miles. 

Prescott and Thirty-Fifth Parallel Railroad. — This 
company contemplate the construction of a road from Prescott 
to connect with the Atlantic and Pacific. Articles of incorpora- 
tion have been filed, and in all probability operations will soon 
commence. The charter granted by the last Legislature exempts 
the road from county taxation for a period of six years. 

Maricopa, Phoenix and Prescott Railroad. — This company 
have recently filed articles of incorporation. It is proposed to 
commence operations immediately, and construct the road as rap- 
idly as circumstances will admit, thus connecting Prescott with 
the Southern Pacific at Maricopa. 

Pinal and Pichaco Railroad. — The preliminary surveys 
show the length of this contemplated road to be forty-six miles, 
with no important difficulties in the way. When completed, it 
will afford cheap and rapid transportation from the Southern Pa- 
cific to one of the richest mineral regions of Arizona. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER 4 C0.{^S^SSfei?ika2r}Cigaps of all Kinds. 



110 ARIZONA. 



Yuma and Port Ysabel Railroad. — The survey of the line 
of this road is now being made by the Southern Pacific R. R. Co. 
The terminus will be at deep water, at the head of the Gulf of Cali- 
fornia, where wharves and warehouses will be built, and other ship, 
ping facilities established. When the road is completed, a line of 
fast steamers will connect with Guaymas, Mazatlan and other 
Mexican ports. 

In additon to the above lines several others are projected, viz: 
from the Southern Pacific at Benson to Tombstone ; from Pres- 
cott via San Francisco Mountains and San Juan country to Duran- 
go in Colorado ; from Prescott to St. George, Utah ; from some 
pointfon the line of the Southern Pacific to Globe; and also a road 
from the newly discovered coal fields on Deer Creek, to intersect 
with the Southern Pacific. 



PAINTED ROCKS. 



About six miles from Oatman's Flat, on a hard gravel and rock 
mesa, surrounded by the peaks of the Arizona Mountains, rises 
abruptly a pile of boulders some fifty feet in height, and perhaps 
covering at the base an acre or more of ground. These boulders 
are from a size which a man might easily lift up, to a ton in 
weight. Their peculiar shape and position gives the appearance 
of having been collected and thrown up here in a loose pile. By 
going to the top, however, it will be seen that they have broken 
from a ledge, and that there their edges and corners are less 
rounded than those found at the base, or strewed over the plain. 
They are of hard granite, with a smooth surface. Many of these 
boulders have been painted over, and on most of them have been 
carved or painted rude hieroglyphics, of many shapes and figures. 
There are squares, diameters, long and short straight lines, 
sometimes tied together by other straight lines, and some'imes 
by regularly curved lines, circles, and circles quartered by bisect- 
ing diameters — figures which look like gridirons and kite frames; 
and then there are rude representations of men and women, 
children, dogs, horses, mules, snakes, turtles, lizards, insects and 
birds. They have the appearance of a rude picture-writing, which 
undoubtedly they are, and chronicle the important events of some 
prehistoric Indian race, who here relate, perhaps, their boundaries, 
wars, or victories, or perhaps only the name and individual pro- 
wess and adventures. The archaeologist and reader of prehistoric 
alphabets will find in these hieroglyphics, as well as in the old 
ruins found in all parts of the Territory, abundant sources to 
excite his curiosity, and exercise his study and skill. 



The J. Nl. Brunswick & Balke Co. SS23*2%22&S{ 



Bll.U.lltn TAB I.E f 653 <fc K55 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



TIME SCHEDULE. 



Ill 



TIME SCHEDULE. 



(SAN FRANCISCO TO DEMING.) 



CENTRAL PACIFIC RAILROAD. 



San Francisco to 

Eeming. 


TRAINS RUN DAILY. 
t Meals. * Telegraph Offices. 


Deming to San 
. Francisco. 


S. P. Atlantic 

Express 

19 


Mis 
from 
S.F. 


S. P. Pacific 

Express 

20 


9.30 A. M. 




leave SAN FRANCISCO arrive 


3.35 P. M. 


9 50 A. m. 


Oakland Wharf 


3.05 p. m. 








2.00 p. m. 
2.26 


94 
105 
108 
114 
127 
152 
162 
178 
185 
188 
207 
227 
235 
241 


Iv * Lathrop ar 

Ripon 


11.10 A. M. 

10.46 


2.31 


Salida 


10.39 


2.52 


* Modesto 


10.23 


3.24 


* Turlouk 


9.52 


4.30 


* Merced 


8.55f 
8.03 


4.55 


* Athlone 


5.35 




7.27 


6.20f 
6.27 


*Mndera 


7.10 




7.03 


7.07 


*Fresno 


6.20 


7.51 




5.35 


8.08 




5.18 


8.22 p. m. 


ar * Goshen Iv 


5.^4 A. M. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 



8.22 p. 


M. 


241 


8.50 




251 


9.51 




282 


11.00 




314 


11.59 p. 


M. 


336 


1.20 A. 


M. 


350 
352 


2.20 




362 


3.20 




382 


5.25 




431 


6.15 




452 


6.30 




456 


6.45 




461 


7.30fA. 


M. 


482 


8.00 a. 


If. 


482 


8.20 




491 


8.27 




494 


8.30 




495 


8.45 




501 


9.10 




511 


9.20 




515 


10.40f 




540 


10.50 




543 


11.50 a. 


M. 


563 



lv * Goshen 

*Tulare 

* Delano 

* Sumner 

* Caliente 

* Keene 

The Loop 

* Tehachapi Summit . . 

*Mojave 

*Ravena 

* Newhall 

San Fernando Tunnel. 

*San Fernando 

ar *Los Angeles 



lv Los Angeles . 

San Gabriel . 

* Savanna. . 

* Monte. .. 

Puente. . . . 

*Spadra . . . 

*Pomona . . . 

*Colton.... 

Mound City. 

1 v San Gorgonio , 



5.04 a. m. 
4.40 
3.31 
2.25 
1.20 
12.05 A. m. 

11.10 p. M. 
10.00 

7.35 

6.40 

6.25 

6.05 

5.15 P. M. 



4.45fp. M. 
4.23 
4.18 
4.15 
4.00 
3.36 
3.28 
2.25f 
1.50 
12.55 



» 
H 

H 

3 
H 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm.B.Hooper&Co. 



Tucson <fc 1'hoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



Sole Agents J\ A. MILLER 
C. C WHISKEY. 



112 



ARIZONA. 



TIME SCHEDULE —Continued. 



(SAN FRANCISCO TO DEMING.) 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 



San Francisco to 
Deming 


TWAINS RUN DAILY. 
t Meals. * Telegraph Offices. 


Deming to San 
Francisco. 


S P. Atlantic 

Express 

19 


Mis 
from 
S. F. 

569 
583 
612 
642 
653 
715 
721 
731 


S. P. Pacific 

Express 

20 


12.05 P. M. 
12 42 


lv Banning ar 

White Water 


12.37 p. m. 
12 00 m. 


1 55 


Indio 


10.50 A. M. 


3 05 


*Dos Palmas 


9.38 


3 30 




9 10 


6 15 


Ogilby 


6.10 


6 33 


Pilot Knob 


5 55 


7.00fP. m. 


ar * Yuma lv, 


5.30 a. m. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD OF ARIZONA. 



7 30 p. M. 


731 

793 

816 

850 

887 

913 

978 

1006 

1024 

1064 

1104 


lv Yuma ar 


5.C0f A.M 

2.33 


10 00 


Texas Hill 


10 52 t» m 


Stanwix 


1.39 


12 15 A M. 


Gila Bend 


12.15 a. m 


1 44 


*Maricbpa 


10.35 p. m 


2 47 


*Gasa Grande 


9.26 


6.00f 
7 30 


* Tucson 


6.30t 


.... * Pantano 


4.35 


8 25 


* Benson 


3.42 


10.55fA. M. 
12.53 p. m. 


*Willcox 


1.40fp. m 
11.26 a. m 


*San Simon 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD OF NEW MEXICO. 



25 p. m. 


1138 


10 


1178 


.00fp. m. 


1198 


.20 


1271 


.40 p. m. 


1286 



* Lordsburg 

.... Gag^e 

.*Deming lv 

. , . Strauss 

. .El Pa*o 



9.48 a. m. 
7.51 

7.00 A. M. 
1.20 
12.05 a. M. 



^T' C. P. R. R. Trains are run by San Francisco Time, being slower than Washington Time 
.2m.; Boston, 3 hrs. 26 m.; New York, 3 hrs. 14 m. ; Chicago, 2 hrs. 19 m. ; St. Louis, 2 hrs. 9m. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD XA RLE f 653 A 655 Market St 
MAHHJPACTUKEKS, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., «g-*-«»ww 



axw l-Aivroi. 



TIME SCHEDULE. 



113 



TIME SCHEDULE. 



(DEMING TO KANSAS CITY.) 



ATCHISON, TOPEKA AND SANTA FE RAILROAD. 



L£MIN3 TO ZAN3AS 


CITY. 






K 


Express. 




8.00 P. M. 


1149 


8.35 


1134 


9.34 


1110 


10.05 


1097 


11.02 P. m. 


1079 


12.08 A. m. 


1048 


1.15 


1021 


2.25 


994 


4.26 


949 


4.50 


939 


5.40 


918 


6.19 


902 


7.10 


881 


7.39 


870 


8.00 


863 


9.00+, 


851 


10.07 


841 


10.35 A. m. 


832 


l.OOfP. M. 


786 


1 25 p. m. 


786 


2.50 


758 


3.50 


741 


5.00 


716 


5.40 


702 


6.42 


681 


7.20+ 


676 


9.40 p. m. 


653 


1.50 A. M. 


571 


2.00 A. M. 


571 


2.26 


562 


2.55 


552 


3.05 


548 


5.30 A. m. 


497 

497 


5.35 a. m. 


6.30+ 


484 


7.43 


458 


9.10 


425 


9.25 


418 


9.57 


406 


10.43 


387 


11.40 A. M. 


369 



TRAINS HUN DAILY. 
t Meals. 



lv Deming. . . 

Porter .... 

Sellers . . . . 

Rincon . . . 

Upham. . . 

Crocker. . . . 

San Marcial. 

Socorro . ♦. 

Belen 

, .Los Lunas.. 

Albuquerque . 

Bernalillo. . 

, . . . . Wallace 

Cerillo. . . . 

Ortiz.... 

* Lamy . . . 

Glorieta . . . . 

Kingman . . 

ar Las Vegas . . 



lv Las Vegas ar 

Shoemaker 

Wagon Mound 

Springer 

Dorsey 

Otero 

Raton 

Trinidad 

ar **La Junta lv 



lv. 



La Junta ar 

Robinson , 

.West Las Animas 

, . . . Las Animas 

Granada J lv 



lv Granada ar 

Sargent 

Aubrey 

Sherlock 

Garden City 

Pierceville 

. . . .> Cimarron 

lv Dodge City ar 



Kansas Cit7 to 
Deming. 



Express. 



7.45+A. M. 

7.05 

5.38 

4.43 

3.47 

2.25 

L15 

12.10 A. M. 

10.16 p. m. 
9.52 
9.05 
8.26 
7.35 
7.03 
6.40 
6.05+ 
4.50 
4.13 
1.45 p. m. 

1.25fp. m. 
12.01 p. m. 
11.05 a. m. 
10.00 

9.25 

8.32 

8.20+ 

5.50 

1.00 A. M. 



12 45 A. m. 

12.15 A. M, 

11.45 p.m. 
11.30 
8.45 p. m. 



8.40 p. m. 

8.00+ 

6.35 

5.12 

4.55 

4.25 

3.37 

2.50 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm. B. Hooper & Go. 



' Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T.. El Paso, i 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, J 



Sole 
Agents 



Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



114 




ARIZONA. 






TIME 



SCHEDULE.— Continued 


• 


DEMING TO KANSAS CITY.) 




ATCIIISON, 


TOPEKA, AND SANTA FE RAILROAD. 


DEMING to KANSAS 
CITY. 


TRAINS RUN DAILY. 
t Meals. 


Kansas City to 

Doming. 

Express. 


Express. 


g 

a 
on 

333 
325 
319 
308 
299 
286 
276 
265 
253 
245 


1.15 P. M. 

1.35 
1.52 

2.40t 

3.04 

3.40 

4.08 

4.36 

5.10 

5.30 p. m. 


lv.... 


Kinsley - 

Nettleton 


.ar 


1.15 

1.00 
12.45 
12.22fp.M. 

11.40 A. M. 

11.08 
10.45 
10.23 

9.56 

9.40 A. m. 




Garfield 1 






Pawnee Rock 


Great Bend 


r Ellin wood 




. . . . Raymond 




f. Sterling 




ar . . . . 


Nickerson 


.lv 


5.35 P. M. 

6.00 

6.35 

6.58 

7.38 

7.55 

8.20 

9.10+ 

9.56 
10.12 
10.40 
11.10 

11.59 p. m. 
12.29 A. m. 
12.52 

1.05 

1.15 

2.00 A. M. 


245 

234 

220 

211 

201 

194 

184 

173 

154 

148 

137 

128 

113 

101 

93 

88 

84 

67 


lv 


Nickerson , . . . 


.ar 


9.35 A. M. 

9.07 

8.30 

8.07 

7.40 

7 15 

6.53 

6.30 f 

5.20 

5.05 

4.35 

4.10 

3.20 

2.53 

2.33 

2.20 

2.10 

1.15 A. M. 




"FTntohinson . 


. . r Burton 




. . Halstead .... 






Newton t * 


Walton 


.... Peabody 


Florence 


Elmdale 




. ". Plymouth 


Emporia 


Heading 


Oaaa-e Citv 


• 








Se.ranton 






ar. . . . 


Topeka 


.lv 


2.25 a. m. 

3.04 

3.15 

3.30 

3.55 

4.40 

5.30 a. m. 


67 
51 
46 
40 
33 
17 



lv... . 


Topeka 

Lecomnton _ 


.ar 


12 55 a. m. 
12.17 

12.05 a. M. 
11.50 p.m. 






Eudora 


11.27 
10.46 
10.00 p. if. 




ar 


Kansas City 


.lv 






2.20 a. m. 
3.17 
4.15 
5.10 a. m. 


51 
35 
17 


lv 


Topeka 

. Rock Crfiek 


.ar 


12.50 a. M. 
12.05 a. M. 

11.10 P. M. 
10.25 p. M. 




ar 


Atchison 


lv 


♦Junction 


for Santa Fe, 18 miles distant. ** Junction for Pueblo, Denver 


and Colorado. 


A. T. <fe S. 


F. R. R. Trains 


ire run by Jefferson time, being 2 hours faster than S. F. time. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE 
M V \ 17 I V < X l K I. K*. ' 



653 <fe 655 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson 


, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 




STAGE ROUTES. 




115 


The folio win 
stations on the 
throughout Ari; 
of fare: 


STAGE ROU 


TES. 

)ther points. 

te list of stage routes from 
*oad and prominent towns 
irture, distances, and rates 


* Connect with stages for < 

g table gives a coraple 

Southern Pacific Rail] 

sona, with time of depj 


From 


To 


Leave 


Miles 


Fare 




Contention City 

"Tombstone- 

"Florence 


::.! 


Daily. 

tt 

Tri-Weekly. 
Daiiy. 

Tri-Weekly. 

1 1 

it 

Daily. 
ii 
n 

Tri-Weekly. 
ii 

a 

Every other day . 
tt ii tt 

it a n 

a a it 

Daily. 
tt 

Tri-Weekly. 
ii 

a 
Daily. 

it 
a 
<< 
tt 
tt 
a 
a 
<< 
it 
n 

Tri-Weekly. 

Daily. 
<( 

it 

a 

a 

a 
n 


18 
28 

28 

27 
34 
33 
50 
90 
28 
27 
25 
40 
57 
90 
34 
69 

108 

128 
20 
50 
14 
25 
40 
55 
65 
28 
50 
64 
50 
61 
60 

125 
40 
49 
66 

100 
28 
34 
27 
27 
7 

65 
75 
86 

125 


$ 2 50 

4 00 

5 00 

4 00 

5 00 
5 00 
8 00 

12 00 
5 00 
5 00 

5 00 

4 00 

7 00 
12 00 

20 00 

3 00 

6 00 
1 50 

8 00 

5 00 

6 00 

7 50 

20 00 

20 00 
5 00 

5 00 

4 00 
1 00 

20 00 


<« 


Casa Grande 

Dos Cabezas 


Willcox 


Pinal City 

*S:lver King 

Riverside 

Mineral Creek 


■l 


ii 


({ 


it 


it 


Globe ) 


it 


Casa Grande 


H 




Globe 


*Silver King (saddle train) 






Riverside > 






San Carlos ^ 






Fort Grant ( 




Willcox J 

McMillen 


Harshaw 


Pantano 

Washington Camp.. . 
Camp Evans 


::} 


a 
<« 
a 
it 
Maricopa 


Charleston | 

"Tombstone , . J 


"Phoenix 




Harshaw 

Washington Camp 

"Seymour 

Vulture Mine 


::} 


ii 
Phoenix 




a 


Wickenburg f 

"Prescott J 

"Gillette S 

Tip Top 1 

Big Bug | 


a 


a 


a 


tt 


n 


"Prescott ) 

Maricopa 


it 


a 


Fort McDowell 


Pichaco 




Pinal City 

Prescott 




"Silver King 


Wickenburg "\ 

"Seymour 1 

Vulture Mine j 


tt 


a 


tt 


"Phoenix J 







< 

M 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. {'^tfffflS^^^HIIuminatingOils. 



116 



ARIZONA. 



STAGE ROUTES— Continued. 



From. 





































San. Simon 

Silver King 

U «( 

« «( 

Tombstone 

ii 

<« 

k 

«« 

(C 

II 

<( 

Tucson 


<< 


ii 


14 


«( 


«( 


< < 


11 


(< 


«< 


<( 


<« 


(C 

< c 


Willcox 




<« 
<< 


<c 


M 


Yuma 


<( 



To 



Big Bug 

*Gillette 

Tip Top 

Phoenix 

Crook Canon 

Turkey Creek , 

Alexandra 

Tiger Mine 

Minnehaha 

Walnut Grove 

Antelope Valley 

Brigham City ......... 

Fort Verde 

Hackberry 

Mineral Park 

Hardy ville 

Fort Mohave 

Galey ville 

Globe (saddle train) . . 

Pinal City 

^Florence 

Contention City 

Benson 

Charleston 

Hereford 

Bisbee 

Charleston 

Camp Huachuca 

Camp Evans 

Harshaw 

Silver Hill 

Silver Bell 

Old Hat District 

Arivaca 

Oro Blanco 

Fort Lowell 

San Xavier 

Riverside 

Tubac 

Calabasas 

Magdalena 

Hermosillo 

Guaymas 

Altar 

Fort Grant 

Camp Thomas 

San Carlos 

*Globe 

Dos Cabezas 

Fort Bowie 

Castle Dome Landing. 
*Silver District. 



Daily. 



Semi- Weekly. 



Leave 



Daily. 



Tri-Weekly. 



Semi- Weekly. 
<< 

Tri-Weekly. 
ii 

(« 
Daily. 

Weekly. 
Semi- Weekly. 



Every other day 



Tri-Weekly. 



Miles 



34 

60 

69 

100 

15 

19 

32 

41 

49 

64 

90 

200 

45 

120 

148 

182 

190 

25 

25 

7 

34 
10 
28 
10 
25 
40 
10 
25 
40 
65 
46 
55 
45 
65 
75 
9 
7 

95 

60 

67 

130 

275 

370 

150 

20 

59 

94 

128 



30 
50 



Fake 



20 00 

2 00 

3 00 
7 00 
9 00 



16 00 

25 00 

20 00 
20 00 
23 00 

26 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
75 
8 00 

6 00 

7 00 

4 00 

6 00 

7 00 

1 50 

5 00 



10 00 
18 00 
30 00 
10 00 



20 00 



3 00 
6 00 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. ESMS»£Kr£lS^ 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



BULLION SHIPMENTS. 117 



BULLION SHIPMENTS— 1881 



This table comprises the amount of Gold and Silver Bullion 
shipped from Arizona per Welle, Fargo & Co.'s Express, during 
the months specified. In addition to this, a large amount of Ore 
and Bullion was shipped by other conveyances. 

SILVER. 

Charleston. — January 8141,152, February $134,125, March 
$136,904, April $110,297, May $139,027. Total, $661,505. 

Contention. — January $135,465, February $113,665, March 
$168,329, April $210,934, May $259,089. Total, $887,482. 

Florence.— January $22,003, February $31,788. Total, $53,791. 

Globe. — January $20,940, February $18,460, March $43,144, 
April $41,413, May $44,241. Total, $168,198. 

Harshaw.— January $62,590, February $46,138, March $47,247, 
April $30,836, May $24,195. Total, $211,006. 

Maricopa.— January $28,347, February $33,861, March $35,913, 
April $13,871, May $84,189. Total, $196,181. 

Phoenix.— January $900, February $2,470, March $1,280, April 
$5,800. Total, $10,450. 

Pinal— April $71,684, May $95,208. Total, $166,892. 

Prescott. — January $1,200, February $2,400, March $6,550, 
April $12,400, May $7,790. Total, $30,340. 

* Tombstone.— March $2,380, May $11,550. Total, $13,930. 

Tucson.— January $4,200, February $2,665, March $1,871, April 
$3,032, May $2,870. Total, $14,638. 

Wiclcenburg.— January $1,319, February $349, March $1,434, 
May $5,060. Total, $8,162. 
Willcox.— February $3,212. 

Yuma.— April $3,326. 

GOLD. 

Contention. — January $291, February $335, March $503, April 
$612, May $1,041. Total, $2,782. 

Globe.— January $7,970, February $7,737, March $175, April 
$810, May $100. Total, $16 T 792. 

Pantano.— February $195, March $174. Total, $369. 

Phoenix.— March $175, April $405, May $300. Total, $880. 

Prescott.— January $865, February $3,341, March $955, April 
$5,041, May $2,375. Total, $12,577. 

Tucson.— January $4,980, February $3,495, March $1,867, April 
$4,105, May $4,235. Total, $18,682. 

*This amount, added to $887,482, from Contention, and $661,505 from 
Charleston, gives a total of $1,562,917 worth of silver bullion from the Tomb- 
stone mines. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. {^S?i5 h GlS^ T iiS^}Wiiie$of all Kinds. 



118 



ARIZONA. 



Vulture.— March $18,800, April $25,500, May $25,795. Total, 
$70,095. 

Wickenburg.— January $17,300, February $22,209, May $750. 
Total, $40,259. 

Yuma. — January $2,416, February $4,250, March $2,350, April 
$900, May $3,450. Total, $13,366. 



POPULATION OF ARIZONA. 



CENSUS OF 1880. 





Division of Population. 


gj 


Counties. 


8 

i 


J 

1 




a 

SO 
1 




u 

O 

-3- 
o 


Total 
Populati 
of Count 


Apache 


3,064 
3,813 
873 
12,600 
2,151 
3,724 
1.977 


2,219 
1,876 

317 
4,407 

893 
1,289 
1,238 


4,474 
3,442 

857 
8,298 
1,701 
3,757 
1,890 


809 
2,247 

333 
8,709 
1,343 
1,256 
1,325 


3,398 
5,030 
884 
15,616 
2,931 
4,790 
2,529 


1,885 
659 
306 

1,391 
113 
223 
686 


5,283 
5,689 
1,190 
17,007 
3,044 
5,013 
3,215 






Pima 


Pinal 




Yuma 


Totals 


28,202 


12,239 


24,419 


16,022 


35,178 


5,263 


40,441 







Since the census of 1880 was taken, three new counties have 
been created by legislative enactments. The County of Cachise, 
from Pima County; the County of Graham, from Pima and 
Apache ; and the County of Gila, from Maricopa and Pinal. 

* Including in the Territory, 1,630 Chinese, 2 Japanese, and 3,493 Indians 
and half-breeds, outside of reservations, distributed as follows : Apache 
County, 62 Chinese and 1,819 Indians and half-breeds. Maricopa County, 164 
Chinese and 486 Indians and half-breeds. Mohave County, 15 Chinese and 286 
Indians. Pima County, 1,153 Chinese, 2 Japanese, and 166 Indians and half- 
breeds. Pinal County, 64 Chinese and 28 Indians. Yavapai County, 140 
Chinese and 54 Indians. Yuma County, 32 Chinese and 654 Indians and 
half-breeds. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. Eintx&zzsi? 



C f 653 A 655 Market St. 
, ( San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., 


Tiir^nn A T wholesale 

1UWU ''' **■ ■•» ROOTS AKD SHOES. 


FEDERAL AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS. 119 


FEDERAL AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS. 


EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 




Name of Incumbent. 


Office. 


Eesidence. 


John C. Fremont 

John J. Gosper 


Governor 

Secretary 


Prescott. 
« 

u 
u 
<< 


E. P.Clark 

Thomas J. Butler 


Auditor 


Treasurer 


M. H. Sherman 


Sup't Public Instruction. 




DELEGATE TO CONGRESS. 


Name of Incumbent. 


Office. 


Residence. 


Granville H. Ourv 




Florence. 


j 




SUPREME COURT. 

Sessions held at Prescott — Second Monday in January. 


Name of Incumbent. 


Office. 


Residence. 


C. G. W. French 


Chief Justice 

Associate Justice 

Associate Justice 

Clerk Supreme Court. . 


Prescott. 
Tucson. 
Phoenix. 
Prescott. 


W.H. Stilwell 


De Forest Porter 

William Wilkerson 


DISTRICT COURT FIRST DISTRICT. 

W. H. Stilwell, Judge. — Comprises the Counties of Pima, Pinal, 
Cachise, and Graham. Sessions held at Tucson, second Monday 
in March and second Monday in September. At Florence, second 
Monday in April and second Monday in October. At Tomb- 
stone, second Monday in May and second Monday in November. 
At Safford, at will of the Judge. 



CHIRARDELLI S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm.B. Hooper & Go. { 



^e^ln^utmt^Me^oriTeas & Gandles at Wholesale. 



120 ARIZONA. 


DISTRICT COURT SECOND DISTRICT. 

De Forest Porter, Judge. — Comprises the Counties of 'Yuma, 
Maricopa, and Gila. Sessions held at Yuma, second Monday in 
March and fourth Monday in November. At Phoenix, first Mon- 
day in April and second Monday in October. At Globe, second 
Monday in May and second Monday in September. 

DISTRICT COURT THIRD DISTRICT. 

C. G. W. French, Judge. — Comprises the Counties of Mohave, 
Yavapai, and Apache. Sessions held at Mineral Park, first Mon- 
day in April and first Monday in September. At Prescott, first 
Monday in June and first Monday in November. At St. John, 
first Monday in July. 

FEDERAL OFFICERS. 


Name of Incumbent. 


Office. 


Residence. 


E. B. Pomroy 


U. S. District Attorney. 
U. S. Marshal 


Tucson. 

Prescott. 

Tucson. 

Tucson. 

Tucson. 

Tucson. 

Prescott. 

Prescott. 

Tucson. 

Prescott. 

Tucson. 

Tucson. 

Charleston. 

Tucson. 

Charleston. 

Tucson. 

S.C'los Res. 

Col'o Res. 

Pima Res. 


C. P. Dake. 


John Wasson 

C. H. Lord 


Surveyor-General 

Deposit'yP'blic Moneys 
Register Land Office . . . 
Receiver Land Office. . . 
Register Land Office . . . 
Receiver Land Office. . . 
Collector Internal Rev. . 
Dep'j Coll. Intern'l Rev. 
Dep'y Coll. Intern'l Rev. 
Dep'y Coll. Intern'l Rev. 
Dep'y Coll. Customs. . . . 
Dep'y Coll. Customs. . . . 

Inspector Customs 

Inspector Customs 

Indian Agent 


Henry Cousins 


C. E. Dailey 

W. N. Kelly 


George Lount 


Thomas Cordis 


J. A. Park 


G. W. Mauk 


R. J. Butler 


E 0. McClure 


W. F. Scott 


S. M. Ballesteros 

A. J. Keen 


J. C. Tiffany 


Jonathan Biggs 


Indian Agent 


R. G. Wheeler 


Indian Agent 




TERRITORIAL LEGISLATURE. 

Sessions held biennially. Terms of members expire December 
31st, 1882. 

Council. — Murat Masterson, (President) Prescott ; J. W. Ander- 
son, Pinal ; A. C. Baker, R. S. Thomas, Phoenix ; Solomon Barth, 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARH TABLE( 653 & 655 Market St. 
MJk.X UFACTVJBEKS, I San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



FEDERAL AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS. 121 

St. John ; A. Cornwall, Stockton ; B. A. Fickas, W. R. Meade, H. 
G. Rollins, Tombstone ; B. H. Hereford, George H. Stevens, Tuc- 
son ; J. W. Dorrington, Yuma. 

House of Representatives. — J. F. Knapp, (Speaker) G. W. Nor- 
ton, Yuma ; Jerome Barton, G. R. York, Clifton ; Donald Robb, 
Globe ; P. J. Bolan, J. R. McCormack, N. Sharp, Phoenix ; A. J. 
D.oran, Pinal ; George E. Brown, R. B. Steadman, Lewis Wollen- 
berg, Prescott ; J. R. Rogers, Safford ; David Southwick, Stock- 
ton; Thomas Dunbar, M. R. Lurty, John McCafferty, H. M. 
Woods, Tombstone ; E. B. Gifford, John Haynes, John Roman, 
W. G. Samaniego, E. H. Smith, M. S. Snyder, "Tucson. 

BOARD OF PRISON COMMISSIONERS. 

W. M. Buffum, Prescott ; John Haynes, Tucson ; J. F. Knapp, 
Yuma. 

BOARD OF FISH COMMISSIONERS. 

John J. Gosper, Prescott ; Richard Rule, Tombstone ; J. H. 
Taggart, Yuma. 

COMMISSIONER FOR THE COLLECTION OF MINERAL, AGRICULTURAL, 
AND PASTORAL STATISTICS. 

Patrick Hamilton, Prescott. 

TERRITORIAL GEOLOGIST. 

( Not yet appointed.) 

SILVER KING AND GLOBE 
Express and Saddle Train. 



ROBERT STEAD, - - Proprietor. 



Connecting at Silver King with the Coaches of the 
Arizona Stage Company. 

This ia the shortest and most comfortable route from the Southern Pacific 
Railroad to Globe. Particular attention given to the comfort of passengers. 

FARE, - - - $5.00. 

EXPRESS MATTER CARRIED AT REASONABLE RATES. 

CHIRARDELLI S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. {^tSS^ T *SSr \ Lubricating Oils 



122 ARIZONA. 



Arizona Stage Company 



WM. H. SUTHERLAND, JOHN C. LOSS, 

SUPEBINTENDENT. AGENT. 



Run a Line of Coaches from 

(^CASA aR^L^DE^S) 

S. P. R. R. 

Via Florence and Riverside, to 

(^GLOBE CITY^) 

Carrying U. S. Mail and Wells, Fargo & Co's Express. 



Also, run a Daily Line of Concord Coaches from 

FLORENCE, 

Via Pinal, to 

SILVER KING, 

Carrying U. S. Mail and Wells, Fargo & Co's Express. 

Wm, H. Sutherland, 

Superintendent. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. s 



MAJIUFACTUKER8, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



123 H 



ARIZONA 
Business Directory and Gazetteer. 



Agua Caliente, 

Maricopa Co, 80 miles s w of 
Phoenix, near the Yuma Co 
line. The hot springs in this 
locality are quite a resort for 
invalids, the water and cli- 
mate being very favorable for 
certain diseases. 

Neahr David, springs prop'r 

Agua Fria, 

Maricopa Co, 20 miles n w of 

Phoenix. 
Calderwood M H, station kep'r 

Agua Fria Valley P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 15 miles n e of 

Prescott 
Marrs John, justice of the peace 

Alamo Station, 

Maricopa Co, 15 miles s of Phoe- 
nix. 
Viall Ransom, M station keep'r 

Alexandra P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 30 miles s of Pres- 
cott, is located in the midst of 
an excellent mineral section, 
its support being mainly de- 



pendent upon trade with the 
miners in the vicinity. It is 
connected with Prescott by 
stage. 
Anders J H, gen'l merchandise 
Anderson John, justice of peace 
Barnum F C, groceries and liq- 
uor saloon 
Buffum W M, general mdse 
Campbell — , liquor saloon 
Curtis Cyrus, liquor saloon 
Donlan Peter, hotel 
Hines Frederick, butcher 
Minges Bros, brew'y and saloon 
Rice Charles, notary public 

American Ranch, 

Yavapai Co, 12 miles n of Pres- 
cott, on the road to Mineral 
Park 

Lee J H, stage station and liq- 
uor saloon 

Antelope Creek Station, 

Yavapai Co, 45 miles s of Pres- 
cott on the road to Phoenix 

Martin Rosa Mrs, groceries, liq- 
uors, dry goods, etc 

Antelope Station, 

Yavapai Co 

Bolin Otto, station keeper 



> 

o 

S 

o 



CO 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wl.B. HOOPER & GO. { 



Tucson & Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guaynias, Mexico, 



}Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



124 



ARIZONA. 



Antelope Valley P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 33 miles s of Pres- 
cott, on the road to Phoenix. 

Hamilton James H k postmaster 

Anvil Rock, 

Yavapai Co, 68 miles n w of 
Prescott, on tlie road to Min- 
eral Park. 

Wilder P C, stage station 

Apache Pass, 

Cachise Co (See Fort Bowie) 

Arivaca P 0/ 

Pima Co, 65 miles sw of Tucson, 
is a mining settlement in the 
Arivaca District. In this vi- 
cinity are a number of mines 
which were worked many 
years ago by the Spaniards 
and Mexicans, who erected 
smelters, and it is said ex- 
tracted a large amount of 
bullion. At present quite a 
number of mines are being 
worked, some of which are 
yielding good ore. With the 
exception of a few months 
the climate of this section is 
allthat could be desired, the 
days being warm and pleas- 
ant and the nights cool. Com- 
munication is maintained with 
Tucson and other points by a 
tri- weekly line of stages. 

Arivaca Mill Co, W F Witherill 

superintendent 
Bernard N W, postmaster 
Bernard N W & Co, gen'l mdse 
Rollins Volney E, justice of the 

peace 
Rouillier Camille, hotel 



Aubrey P 0, 

Mohave Co, 220 miles above 
Yuma, on the north side of 
Bill Williams Fork, near its 
junction with the Colorado, is 
the landing- point for freight 
for the towns and mining dis- 
tricts in the southern por- 
tion of Mohave County. The 
steamers of the Colorado 
Steam Navigation Company 
maintain communication with 
Yuma. 

Halleck Thomas, postmaster 
and general merchandise 



Yavapai Co 
PO.) 



Bed Rock, 

(See Big 



Bug 



Benson P 0, 



Cachise Co, 28 miles n of Tomb- 
stone, and on the line of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad, 
46 miles east of Tucson, is 
the supply depot for a large 
section of country, including 
the towns of Tombstone, Con- 
tention City, Charleston, Bis- 
bee, etc. In the San Pedro 
Valley, in which it is located, 
are good agricultural lands, 
that can be easily irrigated. 
Eight miles south is a settle- 
ment of Mormons, numbering 
about seventy-five, who have 
located lands in the valley, 
and are engaged in farming 
and freighting. From the 
town can be seen the peaks 
of the Santa Catarina, Whet- 
stone, and Dragoon Mount- 
ains. Population about three 
hundred. The stages of the 
Arizona Mail and Stage Line 
leave daily on the arrival of 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. ^5»&ffi^r&ES2£? t 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



125 



trains for Contention City and 
Tombstone, connecting at the 
latter place with stages for 
Charleston, Hereford, Bisbee, 
Camp Huachuca, Camp Ev- 
ans, and Harshaw. 

Arizona Mail and Stage Line, 

J D Kinnear & Co proprs 
Barnett & Block, general mer- 
chandise and forwarding and 
commission merchants 
Benson Hotel, D H Logan pro- 
prietor 
Blinn L W & Co, lumber, doors, 

windows, and blinds 
Brown Benjamin P, restaurant 
Bryan George W, liquors and 

cigars 
Clark & Mundell, general mer- 
chandise and forwarding and 
commission merchants 
De la Ossa David, butcher 
Forbes H B, shoemaker 
Gardiner John J, blacksmith 

and wagon-maker 
Germain & Montgomery, gen- 
eral merchandise, and for- 
warding and commission 
merchants 
Hammond N W. flour, grain, 
etc, and forwarding and com- 
mission merchant 
Hills & Carr, grain crushing mill 
Hutton Edward, barber 
Logan D H, proprietor Benson 

Hotel 
Long Yee, (Chinese) restaurant 
McCornas Hiram, butcher 
Montgomery James W, post- 
master and agent Wells, Far- 
go & Co 
Moore, Hunt & Co, liquor sal'n 
Mundell I N, notary public and 

justice of the peace 
Ohnesorgen & Co, livery and 

feed stable 
Patterson George W, liquor 
saloon 



Riley John, proprietor Railroad 
Saloon 

Robinson J A & Co, groceries 

Sisson, Wallace & Co, general 
merchandise 

Smith, Waddell & Gibbs, black- 
smiths and wagon-makers 

Vucovich, Lukini & Co, restau- 
rant and liquor saloon 

Webb S M, forwarding and 
commission agent 

Wells, Fargo & Co, James W 
Montgomery, agent 

Wilt A A, liv'y and feed stable 

Zeckendorf L & Co, general 
merchandise, and forwarding 
and commission merchants 

^ig Bug P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 25 miles s e of 

Prcscott, is a mining camp 

located in a good mineral 

region. 

Levy D & Co, general mdse 

Miner S E, general merchandise, 

hotel and justice of the peace 

Muncy William, station-keeper 

Schoonmaker George B, agent 

Stokes Mining Co 
Stedman A C, postmaster, deal- 
er in mines, and agent Valley 
Forge Mining Co 
Taft Marshall, mining engineer 
Van Name William, saw-mill 

proprietor 
Wakefield James A, millwright 

Bisbee P 0, 

Cachise Co, 35 mile s of Tomb- 
stone, occupies a picturesque 
site in a deep canon, known 
as Mule Pass, with steep, lofty 
mountains towering above it, 
the sides of which are cov- 
ered with a growth of live 
oak and other timber. Al. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & WA^i3%S^'iE&p}Q\im of all Kinds. 



126 



ARIZONA. 



though only a little over a 
year old, the place has al- 
ready assumed considerable 
importance, and the develop- 
ments recently made in the 
noted Copper Queen Mine, 
proving the existence of large 
and rich bodies of ore in the 
immediate vicinity, assures its 
future prosperity. The cli- 
mate of this section is delight- 
ful, there being no great ex- 
tremes of heat or cold, the 
thermometer ranging from 
about the freezing point in 
winter to about 90° in sum- 
mer. Communication is main- 
tained with Tombstone via 
Hereford and 'Charleston by 
a tri-weekly line of stages. 

Allen E H & Co, gen'l mdse 
Buford & Everett, liquor saloon 
Crosley Mrs, hotel 
Daniels & McReynolds, liquor 

saloon 
Duncan J F, justice of the peace 
Durham — , physician 
Furlow W H, cigars and tobacco 
Graff & Brentley, liquor saloon 
Hardy E T, general merchan- 
dise 
HoadleyMilo, U. S. deputy min- 
eral surveyor 
Jones J J & Co, news depot, 

stationery, etc 
Kelly J A, liquor saloon 
Krocher John, bakery 
Lazard & Jones, gen'l mdse 
Martin M & Co, liquor saloon 
Nichols, Lamb & Co, gen'l mdse 
Page & Weldt, butchers 
Savage W H, attorney at law 

and notary public 
Siebe & Tribolet, brewery and 

saloon 
Simas Manuel, hotel 
Stillman H C, postmaster and 
agent Wells, Fargo & Co 



Stilwell Frank, livery and feed 
stable 

Tolles George, blacksmith 

Walker Mrs, restaurant 

Watson J B, hotel 

Wells, Fargo & Co, H C Still- 
man agent 

Bradshaw P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 35 miles s of Pres- 
cott, is in Tiger District, a 
mining locality of some note, 
where are many promising 
mines, some of which have at 
different times yielded con- 
siderable bullion. Stage com- 
munication is maintained with 
Prescott 

Austin E J, livery and feed 
stable and postmaster 

Bennitt E J & Co, gen'l mdse 

Grove M E Mrs, hotel 

Hammond George A, liq'r saloon 

Raible John, brewery 

Shekels N C & Co, gen'l mdse 

Waddell George C, justice of 
the peace 

Brigham City P 0, 

Apache Co, 90 miles n w of St. 
John, is on the Little Colorado 
River near the line of Yava- 
pai Co. 

Adams J J, postmaster 
Ballard William, blacksmith 

and wagon-maker 
Sims S J, hotel 

Bumble Bee P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 45 miles s of 
Presc >tt. 

Snyder Warren W, groceries 
and liquors, and postmaster 



TIib J. M. Brunswick & B&ikb Co. ^^NiiS&vASlMA^A^nniffS^ t ' 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



127 



Calabasas P 0, 

Pima Co, 60 miles s of Tuc- 
son, at the junction of the 
Santa Cruz and Sonoita Riv- 
ers, and about 15 miles north 
of the Sonora line. In this 
section are excellent agricul- 
tural and grazing lands. On 
the mountain slopes is a good 
supply of timber, including 
oak, ash, black walnut, syca- 
more, cottonwood, and juni- 
per, and on the river bottoms 
a heavy growth of mesquite. 
The climate is pleasant, the 
thermometer ranging from 
about freezing point in the 
winter to about 100° above 
zero in the summer. 

Campbell John, general mdse 
Quiggle James M, groceries and 

liquors 
White & Rodgers, general mdse 

Oamp Huachuca P 0, 

Cachise Co, 25 miles s w of 
Tombstone, is a U. S. military 
post situated in the Huachuca 
Mountains, a section noted 
for the grandeur of its scene- 
ry. Lofty peaks covered with 
a luxuriant growth of differ- 
ent kinds of timber tower to 
a height of y,000 feet above 
sea level, while on every side 
may be seen romantic canons 
and deep chasms, through 
which run sparkling rivulets 
of clear mountain water. 
These attractions, together 
with the salubrity of climate, 
and the great abundance of 
game, will make this locality 
a favorite resort for tourists 
and pleasure-seekers. Veins 



of gold, silver, and copper 
have been found from the 
base of the mountains to the 
top of the highest peaks, 
many of which are being dev- 
eloped and yielding rich ore. 
Communication is maintained 
with Tombstone andHarshaw 
by a tri- weekly line of stages. 

Burton C E, hotel 

Camp Thomas P 0, 

Graham Co, 28 miles n w of 
Safford, is a U. S. military 
post situated on the north side 
of the Gila River. The cli- 
mate of this section is delight- 
ful, the land fertile, and wood 
and water abundant. In the 
vicinity are hot springs, noted 
for their medicinal qualities. 
Tri-weekly communication is 
maintained by a stage with 
Wilcox, on the Southern 
Pacific R R., Fort Grant, San 
Carlos, and Globe. 

Collins J B, hotel 

Franklin A M & Co, general 
merchandise 

Mann E, brewery, notary pub- 
lic and justice of the peace 

Neese Thomas, general mdse 

O'Neil J H & Co, liquors and 
cigars 

Patterson F Mrs, hotel 

Wood W V & Co, gen'l mdse 

Camp Verde P 0, 

Or Fort Verde, Yavapai Co, 41 
miles e of Prescott, is a U. 
S. military post garrisoned by 
four companies of troops. 

Head C P & Co, general mdse 
Head W S, postmaster 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm.B.Hooper&Co. 



Tucson <fc Fhcenix, A.T., E! Paso, ) Sole Agents J. A, MILLER 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, > £». c. WHISKET. 



128 



ARIZONA. 



Casa Grande P 0, 

Pinal Co, 28 miles s w of Flor- 
ence, is on the line of the S.P. 
R. R., 182 miles east of the 
Colorado River. It is the 
supply depot for Florence 
and several important mining 
localities including Pinal City, 
Silver King, and Globe. About 
14 miles distant on the road 
to Florence are the old Casa 
Grande ruins, from which the 
place derives its name. These 
ruins are of great antiquity, 
and will well repay the curi- 
osity-seeker for the trouble of 
a visit. Fifteen miles north, 
on the Gila River, is aa In- 
dian reservation, where are 
about 5,000 Pima and Mari- 
copa Indians. Stages leave 
daily for Florence, connecting 
with lines for Pinal City, Sil- 
ver King, Riverside, Mineral 
Creek, Globe, and McMillen. 

Arizona Stage Co, W H Suth- 
erland, proprietor 

Buckalew & Ochoa, gen'l mdse 

Fryer J ere, prop'r Fryer's Ho- 
tel, postmaster and notary 
public 

Marshall Charles, liquor saloon 

Nutling R, blacksmith and wag- 
on-maker 

Smith & Watzlavzick, general 
merchandise and forwarding 
merchants 

Wells, Fargo & Co, A J Wright, 
agent 

Western Union Telegraph Co, 
Arthur H Elliott agent 

Castle Creek, 

Yavapai Co, 50 miles s of Pres- 
cott, near Tip Top, is not- 
ed for a spring which dis- 



charges about twenty inches 
of w r ater, almost boiling hot. 

Fitzhugh Thomas, hotel 

Castle Dome Landing P 0, 

Yuma Co, 30 miles n of Yu- 
ma, on the east side of the 
Colorado River. About 16 
miles distant are the Castle 
Dome mines, from which con- 
siderable ore is extracted and 
shipped to San Francisco. 
Stages leave tri - weekly for 
Yuma, connecting with trains 
of the Southern Pacific R. R. 

Castle Dome Mining and Smelt- 
ing Co, general merchandise 

Sumner S, blacksmith and wag- 
on-maker 

Catalina P 0, 

Pima Co, 40 miles n e of Tuc- 
son, is a mining camp in the 
Santa Catarina Mountains. 

Young John T, general mdse 

Cave Creek Station, 

Maricopa Co. (See Overton 
P G.) 

Cerbat P 0, 

Mohave Co, six miles s e of 
Mineral Park, is on the west- 
ern slope of ' the Cerbat 
Mountains, a region abound- 
ing in gold, silver, and argent- 
iferous galena ledges, from 
some of which high assays are 
obtained. It was formerly 
the county seat. 

Blakely W G, attorney-at-law 
Canty D J, liquor saloon and 
postmaster 



The J. M. Brunswick & Baike Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE i 653 & 655 Market St 
MAS U FACTUKEKS, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T. 



i OH.S a.m» FAiarrs. 



BUSINESS DIEECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



129 



Charleston P 0, 

Cachise Co, 10 miles w of Tomb- 
stone, occupies a pleasant 
site on the west bank of 
the San Pedro River. Look- 
ing towards the north can be 
seen the Whetstone Mount- 
ains, to the south the Sierra 
de San Jose range in Sonora, 
and in a westerly direction 
the lofty peaks of the Hua- 
chucas. The town has a pop- 
ulation of about three hund- 
red, and contains several 
stores, some of. which have 
an extensive trade with the 
inhabitants of the surround- 
ing country. Here are located 
the works of the Tombstone 
and Charleston Ice Co, which 
have a capacity for manufac- 
turing eight tons of ice per 
day. The water used is ob- 
tained from a spring on the 
premises of the company. On 
the opposite side of the river 
are situated the Gird and 
Corbin mills belonging to the 
Tombstone Mill and Mining 
Co, one run by water with 
fifteen stamps, and the other 
by steam with twenty stamps, 
where is crushed the rich ore 
taken from their mines at 
Tombstone. In the vicinity 
of the town is the famous 
Bronkow Mine, at which its 
discoverer and two subsequent 
locators of the ground met 
bloody deaths. The old adobe 
built by Bronkow is still stand- 
ing, an object of curiosity to 
the passer-by. Considerable 
trade is carried on with So- 
nora by means of pack-trains, 
and it requires vigilance on 
the part of the Custom-House 



officer stationed here to pre- 
vent smuggling. Communi- 
cation is maintained with 
Tombstone, Bisbee, Camp 
Huachuca, Harshaw, and 
other points, by the stages 
of the Arizona Mail and Stage 
Line. 

Arizona Mail and Stage Line, 

J 1) Kinnear & Co prop'rs 
Barton Jeremiah, liquor saloon 
Blinn L W & Co, lumber, doors, 

windows, and blinds 
Brooks G H & Co, wines and 

liquors 
Burnell J C, notary public and 

justice of the peace 
Charles Kee, (Chinese) res'rant 
Clarke James, liquor saloon 
Cramer David R, butcher 
Field D C, agent Wells, Fargo 

& Co and notary public 
Fleres Antonio, proprietor Oc- 
cidental hotel 
Gattrell A T, postmaster 
Gird Richard, president Tomb- 
stone and Charleston Ice Co 
Herrera F & Co, gen'l mdse 
Holt D. H, justice of the peace 
Johnston Thomas B, Hq'r ta- 

loon 
Kraft Jacob, blacksmith and 

wagon maker 
Lenhart Jacob, barber, and to- 
bacco, cigars, etc 
Lindsay A E, agent Western 

Union Telegraph Co 
Low Ket, (Chinese) restaurant 

and bakery 
McAsh George, livery and feed 

stable 
McClure Ernest 0, U S col- 
lector customs 
McDowell & Gattrell, general 

merchandise 
McNair Walter, tannery 
McNair & Miller, carpenters and 
builders 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wru. B. Hooper & Eo. 



[ Tucson <fe Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
; Tex., and Quaymas, Mexico, 



ijffSL Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



130 



ARIZONA. 



Pearson Charles W, barber 
Rice George 8, superintendent 

Boston and Arizona Smelting 

and Reduction Works 
Springer Albert, notary public 
Springer & Hackes, genl mdse 
Stwart Jacob W, liq'r saloon 
Stwart & Murphy, livery and 

feed stable 
Tombstone & Charleston Ice 

Co, Richard Gird, president, 

D C Field, secretary 
Weber Charles, liquor saloon 
Wells, Fargo & Co, D C Field, 

agent 
Western Union Telegraph Co, 

A E Lindsay, agent 
Williams Henry F, drugs and 

medicines 
Zeckendorf L & Co, gen'l mdse 

Charming Dale, 

Yavapai Co, 30 miles n of Pres- 
cott, on the road to Mineral 
Park 

Rogers S C, stage station 

Chino P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 25 miles n of Pres- 
cott 

Delaney Frank, gen'l mdse 
Rees S C, justice of the peace 

Chiricahua City, 

Cachise Co 

Gray John W, civil engineer 
and assayer 

Clifton p o, 

Graham Co, 40 miles n e of Saf- 
ford, near the line of New 
Mexico, is in a section con- 
taining copper mines of ex- 
traordinary richness and ex- 



tent, and will no doubt soon 
be a thriving business locality 

Ashenfelter S M, att'y at law 
Crawford B H, notary public 
Grant William, postmaster 
Joseph L B, physician 
Pomeroy S W, hotel and jus- 
tice of the peace 
Smadbeck Lewis, notary public 

Contention P 0. 

Cachise Co, 10 miles n of Tomb- 
stone, is a thriving town on 
the San Pedro River. In the 
immediate vicinity are the 
mills of the Contention, Grand 
Central and Head Center Min- 
ing Co's of Tombstone. The 
stages of the Arizona Mail 
and Stage Line afford daily 
communication with Tomb- 
stone and Benson 

Ayler T W, butcher 

Barney J G, physician 

Cowan A C, postmaster, and 

agent Wells, Fargo & Co 
Cowan A C & Bro, gen'l mdse 
Dunn John & Co, liquor saloon 
Gibbons John, blacksmith and 

wagon-maker 
Goodman L & Co, gen'l mdse 
Guindania A, gen'l mdse 
Hibbard & Co, liquor saloon 
Jennison J E, restaurant 
Laurrier A, propr Contention 

House 
Marks S, general merchandise 
McDermott John, liquor saloon 
Montoya Rotnualdo, liq'r saloon 
Myers L W & Son, hotel and 

builders and contractors 
Rigg £ A, justice of the peace 

and notary public 
Smith J B, re taurant 
Wells, Fargo & Co, A C Cowan 

agent 



The J. IYI. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



It II. I.I Alt I» TABLE ( 653 <fc 655 Market St. 
91 AX17 FAVTUKEUS, 1 San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



131 



Cottonwood Spring, 

Mohave Co, 40 miles e of Min- 
eral Park. 
White Hugh & Co, stage stat'n 

Davidson's Spring, 

Pima Co, 30 miles s e of Tucson. 
Harshaw David, station 

Dos Cabezas P 0, 

Cachiee Co, 70 miles n e of 
Tombstone and 100 m les e of 
Tucson, is a thriving mining 
town of about 300 inhabit- 
ants. It is pleasantly situated 
on a high plateau about 5,000 
feet above the level of the sea, 
in the midst of a section 
abounding in rich gold and 
silver-bearing ledges, which 
are being energetically dev- 
eloped. The scenery in the 
vicinity is very romantic and 
picturesque. Communication 
is maintained with the South- 
ern Pacific Railroad by a tri- 
weekly line of stages to 
Willcox. 

Ashby A S, boarding-house 

Bassett & Scow, livery and feed 
stable 

Bayers J A, liquor saloon 

Boyer P A, blacksmith and 
wagon maker 

Cooper W T, barber 

Corey & Porter, general mdse 

Eaton C B, assayer 

Eld ridge George H, corral and 
feed-yard 

Hill Elmer, assayer and analyt- 
ical chemist 

Maley Bros, hotel 

Rasinger M, carp'tr and builder 

Resz Jacob, carp'tr and builder 

RiggS J M, general mdse 



Smith J A, freighter 
Smith P W, general mdse 
Washeim Charles, stationery, 
cigars, tobacco, etc, and agt 
Wells. Fargo & Co., and Dos 
Cabezas Stage Line 
White & Wood, butchers 
Wood & White, liquor saloon 

Drew's Station, 

Cachise Co, 1 5 miles n of Tomb- 
stone, on the r6ad to Benson 

Drew Harrison, liquor saloon 
and stage station 

Dripping Spring, 

Gila Co, 28 miles s of Globe. 
Sutherland W H, stage station 

Dudleyville P 0, 

Pinal Co 

Harrington William D, post- 
master 

Dunbar Station, 

Cachise Co. (See Tres Alamos) 

East Phoenix, 

Maricopa Co, 3 miles e of Phoe- 
nix. 
Ross Nathaniel, flour mill 

Ehrenberg P 0, 

Yuma Co, 125 miles n of Yuma, 
on the e side of the Colorado 
River, was named in honor of 
the noted mineralogist, Her- 
man Ehrenberg, who was one 
of the pioneer locators of 
mines in this vicinity. Some 
years since this was quite a 
thriving business locality, it 
being on the stage route from 
California to Prescott, Wick- 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & GO.{^^t^^^ T i£fcrHllumiitatfag Oils 



132 



ARIZONA. 



enburg. and Phoenix, and also 
the landing place for freight 
destined for that section. The 
Colorado River is here cross- 
ed by means of a ferry which 
was established as early as 
1862. Communication is main- 
tained with Yuma by the 
steamers of the Col. Steam 
Navigation Co., and also by a 
tri-weekly line of stages which 
connect with the trains of the 
Southern Pacific R. R. 

Frank Abraham, general mdse 
Goldwater Henry, postmaster 
Goodman Thomas J, groceries 

and liquors, and ferry propr 
Mallory Henry R, justice of the 

peace 

Emery City, 

Cachise Co, 10 miles w of 
Tombstone, and 3 miles above 
Charleston, on the San Pedro 
River. 

Boston and Arizona Smelting 
and Reduction Co, George S 
Rice, general manager ; C 
W Goodale, superintendent 

Empire, 

Pima Co, 40 miles s e of Tucson 
Knox Arthur A, general mdse 

Eureka Spring, 

Graham Co, 32 miles s w of 
Safford. 

Leach Charles, station keeper 

Flagstaff P 0, 

Yavapai Co 

Young Alfred D, postmaster 



Florence P 0, 

The county seat of Pinal County 
is pleasantly situated on the 
south bank of the Gila, about 
midway in its course from its 
source to its junction with the 
Colorado. The valley here is 
one and a half miles in width 
and near twenty in length, of 
arable land, made exceedingly 
productive by irrigation, for 
which the abundant waters of 
the river and the rapid fall of 
the channel afford very favor- 
able opportunities. This fer- 
tile valley in its season pre- 
sents a most charming pic- 
ture of rural peace and pros- 
perity, in its fields of waving 
grain and growing orchards, 
contrasting vividly with the 
desolate, sunburnt mesas be- 
yond the reach of the life-giv- 
ing water. In the midst of 
this verdant oasis is fair Flor- 
ence, the loveliest village of 
Arizona, and county seat of 
Pinal. The town is regularly 
laid out with broad streets, 
bordered by a most luxuriant 
growth of shade trees and 
freshened by rippling streams 
of water on either side of the 
roadway. The buildings are 
generally of adobe, or sun- 
dried brick, m stly of one- 
story, with very thick walls, 
making them very comforta- 
ble in the warm climate of 
this latitude. The popula- 
tion numbered 942 in the cen- 
sus of 1880, with several hun- 
dred additional in the valley 
surrounding the town, and is 
now estimated at 1,500. There 
are several stores carrying 
large stocks ; two hotels — the 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. K&ltz&zzszzni^Stto* 1 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



133 



Lewis House, Charles G. Lewis 
proprietor, and the Silver King 
Hotel, Thomas H McLellan 
proprietor, where can be ob- 
tained excellent accommoda- 
tions ; a brewery, saloons, two 
public schools, one for males 
and one for females, with 47 
pupils of the first and 42 of 
the latter, a Catholic church, 
a fine court house, a newspa- 
per, and numerous very pleas- 
ant private residences. Here 
is the center of trade for a 
very large area of country, 
including the valley and the 
neighboring mining districts, 
although the growing towns 
of Pinal, Silver King and 
Globe, with the construction 
of the railroad and the rush of 
mining enterprise have dis- 
turbed its dolcefar niente, and 
drawn its trade away to a great 
extent. But so very pleas- 
ant is Florence as a place of 
residence, and so stable its 
resources of ag iculture, com- 
merce and mines, that its per- 
manent prosperity is assured. 
The history dates back to 
1866, when Charles J. Mason 
and several others located 160 
acres each in the immediate 
vicinity of the present town 
site, constructed an irrigating 
ditch from the Gila and raised 
a crop of corn. The follow- 
ing year a lage crop of barley 
was grown, finding ready sale 
and remunerative prices at the 
military post of Fort McDow- 
ell. This success stimulated 
settlement, and soon a town 
was laid out, with streets 
100 feet wide, and crossing 
each other at right angles, 
north and south and east and 



west. In 1868 Joseph Col- 
lingwood opened a store, 
which in time grew into large 
proportions. This was then an 
agricultural section, and the 
trade depended greatly upon 
the military operations in the 
Territory. In 1 875 the Silver 
King mine was discovered, 
which stimulated business and 
advanced improvements. This 
new life continued until the 
mining districts built uptowns 
in their midst, transacting 
their business at home, and a 
period of depression followed 
in Florence, but with enter- 
prise coupled with the nat- 
ural advantages of the situa- 
tion this could not long con- 
tinue. Being very nearly in 
the center of the Territory, 
or at least in the center of 
population and business, it 
aspires to be the capital. As- 
tronomically, it is in latitude 
33 deg. 2 min. 32 sec. north, 
and 111 deg. 17 min. 14 sec. 
west longitude. Altitude 1,550 
feet above the sea. Rainfall 
for the year 1879, 13-42, and 
for the year 1 880, 5-35 inches, 
the greatest fall being usually 
in the months of July and 
August. The temperature in 
1880 ranged from 114 deg. 
maximum in June to 20 deg. 
the minimum in January. For 
a short period in summer the 
days are very warm, but the 
nights are cool, and gener- 
ally throughout the year the 
weather is delightful and the 
locality healthy. The tele- 
graph gives instant communi- 
cation with the busy world, 
and excellent roads connect it 
with the surrounding towns. 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



IAIM D tlfWIDCD JLP(\ I Tucson* Phoenix, A.T.,E1 Paso,} 
If Hit D. nUUrt n Of UU. \ Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico. J 



Wines of all Kinds. 



134 



ARIZONA. 



At Casa Grande, 28 miles 
southwest, connection is made 
with the Southern Pacific 
Railroad which is the great 
artery of travel and com- 
merce of Arizona. A line of 
stages also connect with the 
Southern Pacific Railroad at 
Picacho. Northerly run well- 
supplied lines of stages 27 
miles to Pinal and 34 to 
Silver King, whence transfer 
is made to the saddle, cross- 
ing the Pinal range to Globe, 
60 miles distant from Flor- 
ence. Globe is also reached 
by stage via Riverside, where 
the Gila is crossed, thence 
northerly to the point of des- 
tination. Surrounding Flor- 
ence are several mining dis- 
tricts which give promise of 
great wealth. The rapid fall 
of the river affords a fine wa- 
ter power which will undoubt- 
edly be utilized in manufac- 
tures and milling. Three flour- 
ing mills have been erected a 
short distance below the town, 
two of which are in operation. 
With these advantages this 
pretty town bids fair to be- 
come one of the most pros- 
perous of Arizona. 

Arizona Stage Co, W H Suth- 
erland proprietor, J C Loss 
agent 

Arizona Weekly Enterprise, 
The Enterprise Co publishers, 
G B Taylor editor and busi- 
ness manager 

Barraza Cristobal, barber 

Brady Peter R, prop'r Gila 
Flour Mill and treasurer of 
Pinal Co 

Brown George A, agent Wells, 
Fargo & Co 

Buckalew & Ochoa, gen'l mdse 



Collingwood Joseph & Co, gen'l 

mdse 
Corrales Jesus, groceries and 

liquors 
Cuen Francisco, butcher 
Devine John J, recorder Pinal 

Co, and clerk District Court 
Fitch Frank, attorney at law 
Florence Brewery, Peter Will 

prop'r 
Flores Agustin, liquor saloon 
Gabriel J P, sheriff Pinal Co 
Gila Mills, Peter R Brady propr 
Girard Eduardo Rev, pastor 

Church of the Assumption 
Gonzalez Gregorio N", harness 

and saddle maker 
Guild William E, postmaster 
Harvey William, physician 
Holland Patrick, member Board 

of Supervisors Pinal Co 
Lewis Charles G, prop'r Lewis 

House 
Loss John C, agent Arizona 

Stage Co 

McLellan Thomas H, proprie- 
tor Silver King Hotel 
Michea J B, groceries, liquors, 

and fruits 
Miller John, justice of the peace 
Oury Granville H, attorney-at- 
law and Delegate to Congress 
Owens & Weed, flour-mill 
Palmer E W, liquors and cigars 
Rapp Charles, liquor saloon 
Ridgway Frank, observer and 
operator Signal Service USA 
Romero Nicolas, groceries 
Schoshusen Henry, butcher and 
public administrator Pinal Co 
Signal Service USA, Frank 
Ridgway observer and oper- 
ator 
Silver King Hotel, Thomas H 

McLellan proprietor 
Smith Horace L, atty-at-law 
Smith & Watzlavzick, general 
merchandise and bakery 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



IIIKI.I \ICI» TABLECI 
MAMIAITIKEKS, \ 



San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T.. 



WHOLKHALE 
ROOTS AKD SIIOFH 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



135 



Summers H B, attorney-at-law 
and district attorney Pinal Co 

Sutherland W H, prop'r Ari- 
zona Stage Co 

Tantini G B, groceries 

Taylor G B, editor and business 
manager Arizona Weekly En- 
terprise 

United States Military Tele- 
graph, Frank Ridgway oper- 
ator 

Walker J D, clerk Board of Su- 
pervisors and District Court 
Commissioner 

Wells, Fargo & Co, George A 
Brown agent 

Will Peter, proprietor Florence 
Brewery 

Wilson John V, feed stable 

Wratten George L, probate 
judge Pinal Co, attorney-at- 
law and notary public 

Fort Apache P 0, 

Apache Co, 70 miles s w of St. 
John, is a U. S. military post 
situated on White Mountain 
River, 5,000 feet above sea 
level. The climate of this 
section is remarkably pleasant 
in summer, but cold and dis- 
agreeable during the winter 
months, severe snow storms 
being of common occurence. 
Wood, water, and game of 
different kinds are abundant. 

Barnes W C, observer Signal 
Service USA 

Lacy Henry E, post-trader and 
postmaster 

Fort Bowie P 0, 

Cachise Co, 60 miles n e of 
Tombstone/is a U.S. military 
post in Apache Pass, Chirica- 
hua Mountains ; altitude, 
4,871 feet. It was established 



in 1862, principally to protect 
the overland stages and sta- 
tions from the assaults of the 
Apaches. 
Tully, Ochoa & Co, gen'l mdse 

Fort Grant P 0, 

Graham Co, 25 miles s w of 
Safford, is a U S military post 
situated near Graham Peak, 
which rises to the height of 
10,000 feet above the level of 
the sea. The altitude of the 
post is 4,833 feet. A tri- 
weekly line of stages maintain 
communication with the S. P. 
R.R. at Willcox,and also with 
Camp Thomas, San Carlos, 
and Globe. 

Morgan H A, postmaster, no- 
tary public and agent Norton 
& Stewart Stage Line 

Norton & Stewart, gen'l mdse 

Fort Lowell, 

Pima Co, seven miles e of Tuc- 
son, is a U. S. military post 
named in honor of Brigadier- 
General Lowell; altitude 2,530 
feet. 
Austin F L, general mdse 
Hornblower W H, veterinary 
surgeon 

Fort McDowell, 

Maricopa Co, (see McDowell 
PO) 

Fort Mohave, 

Mohave Co, (see Mohave City 
PO) 

Fort Verde, 

Yavapai Co, (see Camp Verde 
PO) 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



. B. Hooper & Go. { 



Tucson & Phoenix, A.T.,ElPaso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



}Teas & Gaudies at Wholesale. 



136 



AKIZONA. 



Fort Whipple, 

Yavapai Co, (see Whipple 
Barracks) 

Galeyville P 0, 

Cachise Co, 60 miles n e of 
Tombstone, is a thriving min- 
ing town in the California 
district. It occupies a pic- 
turesque site in the midst of 
shady oaks, on a green sward 
mesa-land, in a cool corner of 
the Chiricahua Mountains, 
with the cold and clear waters 
of Turkey Creek coursing 
through its streets. In the 
vicinity are numerous mines, 
which are being energetically 

. developed, and yielding high- 
grade ore. Among the num- 
ber is the Texas, the owners 
of which have recently put 
up a smelter, and are now 
shipping bullion. The moun- 
tains on which the town is 
situated are noted for the 
grandeur of their scenery, and 
will no doubt soon become a 
favorite resort for tourists. A 
daily line of stages maintains 
communication with San Si- 
mon, a station on the S. P, 
R. R. 25 miles distant. 

Avery Frank & Co, lumber, 

doors, windows and blinds 
Babcock N J, liquor saloon 
Barnhart & Reeves, liq'r saloon 
Broughton W W, attorney-at- 

law and notary public 
Burdick J 

maker 

Carr David P, attorney-at-law 
Cummings D W, livery and feed 

stable 
Davidson D E, watchmaker and 

jeweler 



F, boot and shoe- 



Ellingwood George, justice of 
the peace 

Galey John H, president Gal- 
eyville Town-site Co. 

Galeyville Hotel, S M Wessels 
proprietor 

Galeyville Townsite Co, John 
H Galey, president; H B 
Maxson, secretary 

Garcia H A, butcher 

Greenwood A P, milk dairy 

Harrington W C, blacksmith 
and wagonmaker 

Herring & Spencer, house and 
sign painters 

Higbee A C & Co, general mer- 
chandise 

Holterman & Hollings, liquor 
saloon 

Johnson Rosa Mrs, restaurant 

Kattenhorn George, liq'r saloon 

Kelly Thomas, blacksmith and 
wagonmaker 

Kennett P, restaurant and liq'r 
saloon 

Kimbell Charles J, assayer 

Lewis J H, physician 

Maxson H B, secretary Galey- 
ville Town-site Co, and U S 
deputy mineral surveyor 

McAllister M & Co, butchers 

McCandless F & Co, general 
merchandise 

McCandless Frank, notary pub- 
lic 

McCarthy — , liquor saloon 

McClelland & Pearson, liquor 
saloon 

McConnachie J, liquor saloon 

New Mexico and Arizona 
Stage Co, A C Rynerson & 
Co, agents 

Pascholy & Ray, lumber, doors, 
windows and blinds 

Rynerson AC& Co, general 
merchandise 

Sessions C D, attorney-at-law 
and notary public 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



MASUFAOTURER8,l San Francisco, 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



137 



Shotwell C S & Co, groceries, 
liquors, mining supplies, etc 

Small B, proprietor Small's 
Hotel 

Smith A E, groceries and pro- 
visions 

Smith Seward, justice of the 
peace 

Thomas Martha Miss, laundry 

Tomlinson J H, liquor saloon 

Vaughn Thomas, bakery 

Waring & Co, baths 

Waring S W & Co, liq'r saloon 

Weidenhofer F, fruits and to- 
bacco 

Wessels S M, proprietor Galey- 
ville Hotel 

Gila Bend P 0, 

Maricopa Co, 60 miles s w of 
Phoenix, is a station on the 
line of the Southern Pacific 
R. R. 
Carscadin Frederick, groceries 
Noonan Daniel, general mer- 
chandise and postmaster 

Gillette P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 60 miles s e of 
Prescott, on the Agua Fria 
Creek. Here is located the 
mill of the Tip Top Silver 
Mining Co, which is con- 
stantly in operation, crush- 
ing the rich ore brought from 
the mine, nine miles distant. 
Stages from Phoenix and Pres- 
cott pass daily, and a branch 
line runs to Tip Top. 

Anderson John, general mer- 
chandise and postmaster 

Burfeind Martin, boarding- 
house and saloon 

Curtis G W, boarding-house 
and saloon 

Larsen James, blacksmith and 
wagon-maker 



Trotter J, justice of the peace 

Globe P 0, 

The county seat of Gila County, 
situated on the banks of Pi- 
nal Creek, near the eastern 
base of the Pinal Mountains, 
60 miles, as the road goes, or 
45 miles in an air-line, north- 
east of Florence, is an incorpo- 
rated village, well built with 
numerous stone and brick 
buildings, and possessing a 
population of about 1,400. 
Settlers and prospectors close- 
ly followed the expulsion or 
pacification of the Indians, 
and in their mountain fast- 
nesses, by their "tanks" and 
watering-places, and in their 
pleasant valleys they have 
discovered the vast deposits 
of ore or the fertile intervale, 
and there have made their 
homes and proceeded to de- 
velop the wealth so long con- 
cealed from the industries of 
the world. Thus were the 
rugged regions of Gila pene- 
trated, the mines of Globe 
discovered, a district organ- 
ized, and a village built. The 
first discoveries were made in 
1875 ; the building of a town 
commenced shortly ; then 
came that unvarying evi- 
dence of enterprise and en- 
lightenment, the newspaper; 
and on the 4th of January, 
1881, was held an election 
for mayor and all the officers 
necessary for the exercise of 
city government. Such ad- 
vancement is only witnessed 
in the rich mining regions of 
the West. The growth of 
Globe has been rapid, and its 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



10 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO.! 



Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T., El Taso, 
Tex., and Uuaymas, Mexico, 



(Lubricating Oils. 



138 



ARIZONA. 



basis is also substantial. The 
district claims to be second 
to none in the Territory in 
the extent and wealth of its 
mines, upon which the pros- 
perity of the town chiefly de- 
pends. Being the county seat, 
it possesses the resource of the 
county business, and a large 
trade with other mining and 
agricultural sections of Gila. 
Gold, silver, and copper are 
mined in the vicinity; and so 
rich, extensive, and varied are 
the mineral veins, that they 
constitute an inexhaustible re- 
source. The mines are well 
developed, and their wealth 
proven. Mills, hoisting- 
works, and smeltiug furnaces 
give evidence of prosperous 
work, and furnish the life- 
current of commerce. These 
are scattered for miles along 
the creek and among the 
neighboring hills. The town 
is chiefly built along one main 
street, which is lined with 
substantial brick and frame 
structures, thus differing from 
many other towns of Arizona, 
where the adobe style of arch- 
itecture prevails. The Amer- 
ican and progressive charac- 
ter of the place is shown by 
its general aspect of neatness, 
its peaceful and law - abiding 
citizens, the number and styl- 
ish appearance of its large 
mercantile establishments, its 
two well-conducted newspa- 
pers, its church, schools, and 
social orders. In May, 1878, 
the pioneer paper, The Silver 
Belt, was established, and in 
September, 1880, the Globe 
Chronicle. A graceful church 
adorns the town, where so re- 



cently was the unapproach- 
able wilderness. The St. 
Paul's Methodist Episcopal 
Society was organized in Feb- 
ruary, 1880, and a church edi- 
fice costing $3,500 was erect- 
ed in October of the same 
year, and dedicated the 7th of 
November following. Serv- 
ices are regularly held, and a 
Sunday School has an aver- 
age attendance of 52 scholars. 
An excellent public school is 
maintained, having been es- 
tablished in 1878, and has 58 
pupils enrolled, with Miss 
Clara Bailey as teacher. A 
Kindergarten school was es- 
tablished in February, 1881, 
by Miss Stella A. Morehouse, 
a graduate of the Kindergar- 
ten Normal School of Colum- 
bus, Ohio, and the same lady 
maintains a select school for 
more advanced pupils. The 
secret and benevolent orders 
are well represented. The 
White Mountain Lodge of F. 
& A. M. was organized in Au- 
gust, 1880, working under ju- 
risdiction of the Grand Lodge 
of New Mexico. The num- 
ber of members is 24, and- 
meetings are held monthly in 
the Masonic Hall. The An- 
cient Order of United Work- 
men have also organized a 
Lodge. A mining exchange 
is among the institutions 
maintained by the enterpris- 
ing citizens of this busy town. 
Thus it will be seen that all 
the associations of an enlight- 
ened and refined people are 
maintained here among the 
mines and mountains of Ari- 
zona, where so recently prowl- 
ed the untamable and merci- 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. ssasskS^s 



653 <fc 65.5 Market St 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



139 



less Apache. The Atlantic 
and Pacific Eailroad is now 
entering the Territory in 
Apache County, approaching 
within about 100 miles of 
Globe, and opening new 
routes of inter - communica- 
tion. The surrounding places 
contributory to Globe are 
McMillen, 18 miles north- 
east ; Eichmond Basin, 14 
miles, in the same direction ; 
the Tonto Basin, in the north- 
western part of the county; 
and the copper mines near 
"Bloody Tanks," six miles 
west : which, with innumer- 
able mines on every side, con- 
stitute a resource of trade that 
assures the future prosperity 
of Globe. 

Communication is main- 
tained with the Southern Pa- 
cific Railroad by a tri-weekly 
line of stages via Riverside 
and Florence, and by a daily 
saddle -train to Silver King; 
thence by stage via Pinal and 
Florence to Casa Grande and 
Picacho. Also by a line every 
other day via San Carlos, 
Camp Thomas, and Fort 
Grant to Willcox. 

Officers. — A. H. Morehead, 
Mayor ; D. B. Lacey, A. Bai- 
ley, George Scott, and Joseph 
Redman, Councilmen ; C. C. 
Meyers, Recorder and As- 
sessor; G. S. Van Wagenen, 
Treasurer ; George Ross, Mar- 
shal. 

Abraham Jacob, barber and 

baths 
Allen George A, justice of peace 
Anderson Hans A, carpenter 
Anderson James, liq'r saloon 
Arizona Silver Belt, A H 

Hackney, editor and prop'r 



Arizona Stage Co, W H Suth- 
erland, proprietor ; J J Vos- 
burgh, agent 

Bailey Alonzo, (Eaton & Bail- 
ey) agent Fireman's Fund 
Insurance Co 

Benbrook & Burchett, prop's 
Oriental Saloon 

Blake & Mendenhall, feed and 
sale stable 

Bohse Gustav, proprietor Pinal 
Brewery Depot 

Bostick Samuel, barber 

Brooks Emory H, pastor M E 
Church 

Brown Oscar M, district at- 
torney Gila Co, and notary 
public 

Buckalew & Ochoa, general 
merchandise 

Burns Cornelius, machinist, 
blacksmith and horshoer 

Cachot Emile, liquor saloon 

Cahill Joseph R, house and sign 
painter 

Calderon M, liquor saloon 

Carey H M & Co, blacksmiths, 
horseshoers, wagon-makers 

Central Hotel, Mrs M J Moore 
and Son proprietors 

Chapel G A, groceries, produce, 
fruit, tobacco, cigars 

Clark S C, editor Globe Chron- 
icle 

Cooke Belt, barber 

Cooyer C M & Co, wholesale 
wines, liquors, and cigars 

Dickinson & Adams, liq'r saloon 

Dillabough S J, prop'r Palace 
Saloon 

Duryea William H, groceries, 
clothing, tobacco, cigars, etc 

Eaton & Bailey, general mdse 
and lumber 

Ellis H & Co, general mdse 

Fish Charles A, banker, and 
local treasurer Globe City 
Mill and Mining Co 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WH. B. HOOPER & GO. {^e^n^G^^jM?^, 80 '} Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



140 



ARIZONA. 



Fiske Homer W, machinist and 
gunsmith 

Forman J H, assayer 

Frakes J W, butcher 

French W H, attorn ey-at-1 aw 

Gardiner Benjamin C, prop'r 
Sycamore Hotel and saloon 

Globe and San Carlos Tele- 
graph Co, A H Hackney, 
president ; A Bailey, sec'y 

Globe and Silver King Ex- 
press and Saddle Train, 
Robert Stead, proprietor 

Globe Chronicle, W H Glo- 
ver, publisher 

Globe Hotel, Nathan Meek, pro- 
prietor 

Globe Mining and Real Es- 
tate Agency, G A Swasey, 
proprietor 

Globe Mining Exchange, E 
F Kellner, president j A H 
Morehead, secretary ; F B 
Knox, treasurer 

Glover W H, publisher and 
proprietor Globe ''Chronicle" 

Graydon Alexander, black- 
smith and horseshoer 

Grime Cicero, photographer 

Guy ago Manuel, shoemaker 

Hackney A H, editor and pub- 
lisher "Arizona Silver Belt" 

Hamilton James, propr Globe 
Saloon 

Hammond & Taylor, station- 
ery, newspapers, cigars, to- 
bacco, toys, confectionery, etc 

Harlow John J, clerk Board of 
Supervisors, Gila Co 

Harrison, Fisher & Co, flour, 
grain, feed and produce 

Hayse, Bissig & Pieper, pro- 
prietors Pinal Brewery 

Hazard & Kennedy, butchers 

Heineman & Soyer, drugs and 
medicines 

Henderson David, general mer- 
chandise 



Hicks John C, attorney-at-law 
and notary public 

Hise John H, manager The 
Globe Mercantile Co, and 
agt California Powder Works 

Hitchcock & Co, drugs, medi- 
cines, cigars and tobacco 

Horse David, butcher 

Howe Rosa Mrs, proprietress 
Pascoe House 

Hyde H E, blacksmith 

Kellner E F, general merchan- 
dise and lumber, and prop'r 
Pinal Creek Saw Mills 

Kennedy E O, assayer 

Klein S & Co, general mer- 
chandise 

Lacey D B, treasurer Gila Co 

Love A E, liquor saloon 

Lowther W W, sheriff Gila Co 

Luedke J H, fruits, dairy pro- 
duce, candies, tobacco, cigars, 
etc 

Lundy J C, blacksmith and 
horseshoer 

Macdonell C A, physician and 
county coroner 

McKernan J B, feed and sale 
stable 

McNelly William T, proprietor 
Champion Billiard Hall 

Meek Nathan, proprietor Globe 
Hotel 

Meyers C C, city recorder and 
assessor 

Meyers & White, fruits and veg- 
etables 

Miller P B, recorder Gila Co. 
and notary public 

Moore M J Mrs & Son, pro- 
prietors Central Hotel 

Morehead A H, mayor Globe 
City 

Morehouse Stella A Miss, kin- 
dergarten school 

Myers J & Schein, dry goods, 
clothing, furnishing goods, 
hats, boots and shoes 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



«II,n.Yltl> TABLEj 653 <fc 655 Market St. 
MAKVFACTVBEKS, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



141 



Newell Milton, carriage and 

wagon-maker 
Newton George A, watchmaker 

and jeweler 
Norton & Stewart's Stage 

Line, J J Vosburgh agent 
Olguen Alejandro, tailor 
Orr J M Mrs, seamstress 
Palmer & Rice, contractors and 

builders 
Pascoe House, Mrs Rosa Howe 

proprietress 
Pascoe J H, proprietor Pascoe's 

Restaurant 
Pendleton A G, civil engineer, 

and county and U S deputy 

mineral surveyor 
Pinal Brewery, Hayse, Bissig 

& Pieper proprietors 
Pring E J, physician and county 

coroner 
Redman Joseph, butcher and 

sausage-maker 
Reynolds D A, livery and feed 

stable 
Robb Donald, examiner and 

negotiator of mining proper- 
ties 
Robertson P C, livery and feed 

stable 
Robinson Lewis, manufacturer 

tin, copper and sheet-iron 

ware, and dealer stoves, etc 
Rocha Alvino, blacksmith and 

wagon-maker 
ROSS G & Co, livery, feed and 

sale stable 
Ross George, city marshal 
Schell R H, liv'ry and sale 

stable 
Schulze Charles, shoemaker 
Scott George, boarding-house 
Shirpser David, auction and 

commission 
Smith Franklin W, wagon- 
maker 
Smith L K, attorney at law 
Southerland A F, banker 



Spence Willis E, postmaster 
Stallo T C, public administrator 

Gila Co 
Stead Robert, proprietor Globe 
and Silver King Express and 
Saddle Train 
Stout, Fisk & Co, bankers and 
financial agents for Mack 
Morris and Golden Eagle 
Mining Cos 
Sultan D & Bro, general mer- 
chandise 
Swasey Gustavus A, probate 
judge Gila Co, attorney at 
law, notary public and com- 
missioner of deeds 
Sycamore Hotel, Benjamin C 

Gardiner proprietor 
Thatcher C E, physician 
The Globe Mercantile Co, gen- 
eral merchandise, (principal 
office 43 Reaper Block, Chi- 
cago) 
Tweed W N, fast freight line 
Van Slyck Julius W,- attorney 

at law and notary public 
Van Wagenen G S, general 

mdse and city treasurer 
Vaughan & Coyle, feed stables 
Vosburgh J J, agent Wells, 
Fargo & Co, Arizona Stage 
Co, and Norton & Stewart's 
stage line 
Warren Abraham, shoemaker 
Weissig Clara Mrs, lodgings 
Wells, Fargo & Co, J J Vos- 
burgh agent 
Westmeyer Frederick W, 
general merchandise and Su- 
pervisor Gila Co 
Wilson Alice Miss, dressmaker 
Wisdom Thomas, wagon-maker 
Wright M A Mrs, bakery and 

provisions 
Yee Lee, Chinese goods 
Young Jesse, liquor saloon 
Zimmerman William, carpenter 
and cabinet-maker 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best 



WM. B. HOOPER & C0.{ T ^^SS5^ T kSSr }Cigars of all Kinds. 



142 



ARIZONA. 



Granite Peak, 

Cachise Co 

Barlow L L, gen'l merchandise 

Greaterville P 0, 

Pima Co, 55 miles s e of Tucson 
and 27 miles from Pantano, 
occupies a pleasant site in the 
Santa Eita Mountains, 5,000 
feet above the level of the 
sea. West of the town, at a 
distance of three miles, is a 
peak known as Old Baldy, 
which rises to the height of 
10,QOO feet, being one of the 
highest in Arizona. In the 
vicinity are rich gold placers, 
and also gold, silver and cop- 
per ledges of great richness 
and extent, which are being 
rapidly developed. The cli- 
mate of this section is unsur- 
passed, there being no very 
great extremes of heat or cold. 
The mountains and hills are 
covered with oak, pine, cedar 
and other kinds of timber, 
and abound in game, such as 
deer, antelope, turkey, duck, 
quail, rabbit, etc. The stages 
of the Pantano and Harshaw 
line pass within five miles of 
the town. 
Candeleria John, butcher 
Coyne P- J, justice of the peace 

and district recorder 
Cubberly E B, physician 
Elliott Ralph P, postmaster 
Elliott & Downer, gen'l mdse 
Thompson M. W. blacksmith 
Williamson H, assayer 
Young John, general merchan- 
dise and notary public. 

Hackberry P 0, 

Mohave Co, 28 miles e of 
Mineral Park, is on the east- 



ern slope of the Peacock 
Mountains, a region contain- 
ing gold and silver ledges and 
an abundance of wood, water 
and game. Stages for Pres- 
cott, Mineral Park, Hardy- 
ville, and Fort Mohave pass 
daily. 
Todd A, gen'l mdse, postmaster 
and agent Hugh White & 
Co's stage line 

Hardyville P 0, 

Mohave Co, 34 miles s w of 
Mineral Park, on t lie east bank 
of the Colorado River, 312 
miles above Yuma, is a land- 
ing point for the steamers of 
the Colorado Steam Naviga- 
tion Co. Communication is 
maintained with Fort Mo- 
have, Mineral Park, Hack- 
berry and Prescott by a daily 
line of stages. 

Hardy Wooster, general mer- 
chandise, postmaster and ferry 
proprietor 

Harshaw P 0, 

Pima Co, 70 miles s e of Tuc- 
son and 50 miles s of Pantano, 
is a thriving and important 
town, pleasantly situated 
among hills covered with 
grass and trees, in one 
of the richest mining dis- 
tricts of Arizona. It is about 
5,000 feet above the sea level 
and is supplied with good 
mountain water. A large 
trade is carried on with So- 
nora and adjacent camps. 
About three miles distant are 
the ruins of the smelting 
works of the old Mo wry Mine. 
A collection of adobe ruins 
and a lofty chimney are all 



The J. M. Brunswick 4 Balke Co. 5ffi»*s%5SSS< 



653 <fc R55 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. L, MINING SUPPLIES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 143 M 



that remain to denote the site 
of what was once the liveli- 
est mining camp in Arizona. 
From several mines in the 
vicinity high-grade ore is 
being extracted; and one, the 
Hermosa, which has a 20- 
stamp mill in constant opera- 
tion, is yielding from $60,000 
to $75,000 per month. In the 
valleys and hills throughout 
this section are some excellent 
agricultural and grazing lands. 
Timber, including oak, wal- 
nut, ash and juniper are abun- 
dant. The growth of the 
town has been rapid, and al- 
though but little over a year 
old contains about 1,000 in- 
habitants. Stages leave daily 
for Pantano, connecting with 
the trains of the Southern 
Pacific R R, and tri-weekly 
for Tombstone, via Camp 
Evans, Camp Huachuca, and 
Charleston. 

Aaron — , liquor dealer 

Alison Bros, butchers 

Bauman & Thomas, station- 
ery etc, and bakery 

Biswanger C, shoemaker 

Bonnand J, restaurant 

Bonnand & Mague, liquor sa- 
loon, 

Brickwood J T, liquor saloon, 

Brown T, bath house 

Butler Samuel, job wagon, 

Cassidy James, carpenter 

Darling James, butcher 

De Beaufford H, proprietor St 
Charles Hotel 

Denier — , drugs and medicines 

Drake W B, stationery and 
news depot 

Drenen George, corral and feed 
yard 

Ford Charles, butcher 

Fuqua John W, justice of peace 



Goldberg & Son, gen'l mdse 
Harlow C E & Co, gen'l mdse 
Hayes R. T, physician 
Johnson Covington, superin- 
tendent Hermosa S. M. Co 
Kaighin William, corral and 

feed yard 
Kane William & Co, oil and 

wine merchants 
Katz M D & Co, gen'l mdse 
Kessing S, assayer 
Lee Bin, restaurant 
Lintz H T, lodgings 
Lloyd Trevor, justice of peace 
Mattoon Mrs, milliner 
McDonald J, carpenter and 

builder 
McGregor A, superintendent 

Trench S M Co 
McNamee P J, liquor saloon 
Mills W F, agent Wells, Fargo 
& Co, stage agent and money 
broker 
Morrison P, liquor saloon 
Moss & McDonald, blacksmiths 
Murphy & Everts, liquor saloon 
Nelson S P, brewery 
Nicolas & Cazabon restaurant 
Northrop, — liquor saloon 
O'Donnell A, deputy sheriff 
O'Donnell P M, liquor saloon 
O'Halloran Mrs, hotel 
Pense & Biggs, hardware 
Pixley R F, superintendent 

Hardsheii S M Co 
Roger Bros, general merchan- 
dise 
Rogers A, lumber 
Rusher John, livery stable 
Seabury & Ryan, restaurant 
Sims T, liquor saloon 
Small Nathaniel, livery stable 
Smith Charles, liquor saloon 
Smith T H, physician 
Snyder D, general merchandise 
Tanner & Hayes, saw-mill 
Vanderlip & Fagan, butchers 
Volkert Julius, barber 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



\l/~» D U «Anfth JL On i Tucson <te Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, ) Sole Agents J. A. MILLER 
Wm . D. nOOper OC OU. * Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, § C. C WHISKEY. 



144 



ARIZONA. 



Washbourn S H, liquor saloon 
Wells, Fargo & Co, W F 

Mills agent 
Wilson — , liquor saloon 

Hassayampa P 0, 

Yavapai Co. 

Spence Matilda E, Mrs. post- 
mistress 

Hayden's Ferry, 

Maricopa Co. (See Tempe) 

Hereford, 

Cachise Co, 20 miles s w of 
Tombstone, on the San Pedro 
River, promises to be a place 
of some importance in the 
near future. The Neptune 
Mining Company, who are 
working valuable claims in 
Warren District and the 
Huachuca mountains, have 
commenced the erection of 
smelting works on an exten- 
sive scale, and propose to con- 
struct a narrow-gauge railroad 
for the transportation of their 
ores to this point. An east- 
ern company who have lately 
purchased claims in Warren 
District also contemplate the 
erection of chemical works. 
This, together with its advan- 
tageous location, being on the 
main road from Charleston to 
Sonora, assures its prosperity. 

Ackley Charles, justice of the 
peace 

Boyle Edward, hotel 

Ostermann J P, hotel and liquor 
saloon 

Iron Springs, 

Yavapai Co, 8 miles s of Pres- 
cott. 



Atkinson R J, stage station 

Junction, 

Pima Co, 55 miles s of Tucson. 
Clark & Woods, station keepers 

La Noria, 

Pima Co. (See Luttrell) 

Lees Ferry P0, 

Yavapai Co. 

Johnson Warren M, postmaster 

Little Giant P 0, 

Gila Co, 18 miles s of Globe. 
Anderson T, stage station 
Lowe Samuel A, postmaster 
Tripp R B, physician 

Luttrell P0, 

Pima Co, SO miles s e of Tucson 
near the line of Sonora, is in a 
rich mineral region, which is 
being rapidly developed. The 
climate of this section is in- 
viting, and in the surrounding 
hills and valleys wood, water, 
and nutritious grasses are 
abundant. The population of 
the town and immediate vicin- 
ity is about 500. The Holland 
Smelting works, which are 
constantly turning out a large 
amount of bullion, are located 
here. Communication is main- 
tained with the Southern Pa- 
cific R R by stage to Pantano. 

Barclay R S, postmaster and 
justice of the peace 

Besner J B, blacksmith and 
wagon maker 

Deckert John, brewery 

Goldberg H & Son, general 
merchandise 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE( 
MAXIFA<TIKIKS, X 



653 & 655 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., «"•—"»"* 



OILS AVI» I*AI\TS. 



! 



Q 
O 

■ 



p 



ID 

(0 

in 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



145 



Luttrell J K, superintendent 

Holland Mine 
Luttrell J M, hotel 
McBain & Seivers, general 

merchandise 
Wells, Fargo & Co, L C 

McBain, agent 

Maricopa P 0, 

Pinal Co, 45 miles e of Florence 
on the line of the Southern 
Pacific E E, 156 miles e of 
the Colorado Eiver. This is 
the distributing point for a 
large amount of freight des- 
tined for Phoenix, Vulture 
Mine, Tip Top, Prescott, and 
other localities in Maricopa 
and Yavapai counties. Stages 
leave daily on the arrival of 
trains for Phoenix, connecting 
with two lines for Prescott, 
one (Gilmer, Salisbury & 
Co's) via Seymour, Vulture 
Mine, and Wickenburg, and 
Kerens & Griffiths, via Gil- 
lette, Tip Top, Bumble Bee, 
and Big Bug. 

Batts & Bassett, proprietors 
Maricopa Hotel 

Brown & Wight, blacksmiths 
and wagonmakers 

Cottrell W F, groceries, dry 
goods, clothing, boots, etc 

Farrington R E, postmaster 

Farrington R E & Co, general 
merchandise and forwarding 
and commission merchants 

Freeman Frederick, feed yard 

Gilmer, Salisbury & Co's 
Stage Line, James Stewart, 
superintendent 

Lamb Patrick, feed yard 

Southern Pacific Mail and 
Stage Line, Kerens & Grif- 
fith proprietors 

United States Military Tele- 



graph, Theodore T Moore 
operator 

Vandever Bros, general mer- 
chandise, and forwarding and 
commission merchants 

Wells, Fargo & Co, Charles 
Vandever agent 

Western Union Telegraph Co, 
W E Hall agent 

Marysville, 

Yavapai Co. 

Chilson Bros, general mdse 

Maxey, 

Graham Co. 

Collins J B, general mdse 

McDowell P 0, 

Or Ft. McDowell, Maricopa Co, 
30 miles n e of Phoenix, is a 
"U S military post, garrisoned 
by two companies of troops. 
It is located on the west bank 
of the Eio Verde, about seven 
miles above its junction with 
Salt Eiver, and connected 
with Phoenix by stage. 

Smith John Y T, general mer- 
chandise 

Wilcox N, postmaster 

McMillen P 0, 

Gila Co, 18 miles n e of Globe, 
is a mining town of some 
note on the eastern slope of 
the Apache Mountains. In 
the vicinity are many rich 
mines, among them the fam- 
ous Stonewall Jackson, which 
since its discovery in 1875 
has yielded a large amount of 
bullion. The climate in this 
section cannot be surpassed, 
and wood and water are 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



Wn?. B. Hooper & Go. 



f Tucson & Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, ) Sole 
\ Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, > Agents 



Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



146 



ARIZONA. 



abundant. A stage line main- 
tains daily communication 
with Globe. 

Faucett E, sup't Washington 
Mining Co 

Flournoy Joseph, superintend- 
ent Hannibal Mining Co 

Hawkins Joseph, liquor saloon 

Hoffman H C, liquor saloon 

Jones John M, proprietor Mer- 
chants Hotel 

Kellner E F & Co, general mer- 
chandise and lumber 

Nichols J E, general mdse and 
and notary public 

Overton T T, justice of the 
peace 

Eose Patrick, general mdse 

Shanley Patrick, prop'r Miners 
Hotel 

Smith J K, superintendent Mc- 
Millen S M Co 

Strong George, general mdse 

Mesaville P 0, 

Maricopa Co, 25 miles east of 

Phoenix 
Dodson J N", postmaster 

Millville. 

Cachise Co, 10 miles west of 
Tombstone, on the San Pedro 
River, is the site of the Gird 
and Corbin mills belonging to 
the Tombstone M & M Co 

Mineral Park P 0, 

The county seat of Mohave Co, 
is situated on the western 
slope of the Cerbat Mount- 
ains, 34 miles n e of Hardy- 
ville, a landing on the Col- 
orado Eiver. The mountains 
in the vicinity abound in 
ledges of gold, silver and 
argentiferous galena, from 



many of which ore of a high 
grade has been obtained, and 
considerable bullion extract- 
ed. The completion of the 
Thirty-fifth Parallel Eailroad 
to the Colorado Eiver will, no 
doubt, give a great impetus 
to mining in this section, and 
Mineral Park may, in the near 
future, be a place of some 
note. The springs in the 
neighborhood are strongly 
impregnated with minerals, 
and the water so bitter as to 
be unfit for use ; but to coun- 
terbalance this, the climate is 
delightful, there being no 
great extremes of heat or 
cold. Communication is main- 
tained with Prescott, Hack- 
berry, Hardyville, and Fort 
Mohave by a daily line of 



Atchison Charles, probate judge 

Mohave Co 
Bartlett L, attorney at law 
Breon & Spear, general mdse 
Bucksbaum H, clerk Board of 

Supervisors t 

Burdeck E L, physician 
Curtis J S, mining engineer and 

U S deputy mineral surveyor 
Cuzino C, restaurant 
Davis & Stephenson, attorneys 

at law 
Fehr William, shoemaker 
Hamilton Samuel, attorney at 

law 
Hughes John, blacksmith 
Hyde James J, druggist and 

justice of the peace 
Krider Bros, general mdse, 

restaurant, and agent Hugh 

White & Co's Stage Line 
Krider W N, postmaster 
Langley W A, treasurer Mohave 

Co and assayer 
Lawspn Charles B, butcher 



The J. IYI. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARn TABLE < 653 & 655 Market St. 
MA* UF ACT 17 It Kits*, ( San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. TV, Wholesale Groceries. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



147 



Mackenzie John K, recorder 

Mohave Co 
Potts John C, sheriff Mohave Co 
Stephenson J W, district attor- 
ney Mohave Co and notary 
public 
White Henry, liquor saloon 
Wright Caldwell, clerk Dis- 
trict Court 
Wright & Bucksbaum, search- 
ers of records 

Mohave City P 0, 

Or Fort Mohave. Mohave Co, 40 
miles s w of Mineral Park, on 
the Colorado River, is a IT S 
military post, garrisoned by 
one company of troops. The 
summer season here is intense- 
ly hot, and the climate un- 
healthy, malarial diseases be- 
ing quite prevalent. Stages 
leave daily for Hardyville, 
Mineral Park, Hackberry and 
Prescott 
Breon Paul, postmaster 
Breon & Spear, general mdse 
Hoss J B, agent Hugh White & 
* Co's Stage Line 

Montezuma, 

Pinal Co, 12 miles w of Florence 
Austin & Dempsey, gen'l mdse 

Moore's Station, 

Maricopa Co, 40 miles n of 

Phoenix 
Brown Bros, liquor saloon 

Mountain Station, 

Yavapai Co, 60 miles n w of 
Prescott, on the road to Min- 
eral Park 
Sherman & Barrett, saw-mill 
White Hugh & Co, stage station 



New River Station, 

Maricopa Co, 35 miles n of 

Phcenix 
Hall George, stage station 

Norton's Landing, 

Yuma Co, 52 miles n of Yuma, 
on the w bank of the Colorado 
River, is the landing point 
for freight destined for the 
mining camps in Silver Dis- 
trict. Here are located the 
smelting works of the Red 
Cloud Mining Co 

Bamber John, hotel 

Stanley E A, general mdse and 
physician 

Stanley John, liquor saloon 

Thomas F F, superintendent 
Red Cloud Smelting Works 

Nugget P 0, 

Or Richmond, Gila Co, 14 miles 
n e of Globe, is a mining camp 
situated in a hollow plateau 
near the summit of the Apache 
Mountains. In this basin are 
located the Mack Morris, Sil- 
ver Nugget, Richmond, and 
other rich mines. The cli- 
mate is delightful, the scenery 
grand, and wood and water 
abundant. 
Drew B J, boarding house 
Frazer John, gen'l mdse 
Kellner E F & Co, general mer- 
chandise, lumber, and feed 
stable 

0ro Blanco P 0, 

Pima Co, 75 miles s of Tucson, 
near the line of Sonora, is in 
a mining district of the same 
name containing rich gold 
and silver ledges, which are 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. f^ifiSSS&J 



Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Mexico, 



f Illuminating Oils. 



148 



ARIZONA. 



now being developed. In 
this vicinity are several mines 
worked by the Spaniards 
many years since, which are 
supposed to have yielded a 
large amount of bullion. 
Stages leave tri-weekly for 
Arivaca and Tucson. 

Bartlett John, butcher 
Hoskins & Thatcher, genl mdse 
James William, livery stable 
Noon A H, physician 
Noon Owen, liquor saloon 
Ross W J, postmaster 
Ross W J & Co, genl mdse 
Thatcher Arthur, justice of the 
peace 

Overton P 0. 

Maricopa Co, 30 miles north of 

Phoenix. 
Hall C L, station keeper 
Wood Jeriah, postmaster 

Pacific City P 0, 

Yuma Co. ( See Silent P O.) 

Pajarito P 0, 

Pima Co, 75 miles s of Tuc- 
son, is situated on Agua Fria 
Creek, a tributary of the 
Santa Cruz River, about 7,000 
feet above sea level. In the 
vicinity are several mines 
yielding good ore. On the 
hills are good grazing lands, 
and timber of various kinds. 

Mc Arthur John M, general 
merchandise and postmaster 

Palace Station, 

Yavapai Co, 16 miles south of 

Prescoit. 
Spencer A B, station keeper 



Pantano P 0, 

Pima Co, 28 miles s e of Tucson, 
is a station on the Southern 
Pacific R R, and the distrib- 
uting point for freight des- 
tined for Harshaw, Washing- 
ton Camp, and other mining 
towns in the southern por- 
tion of Pima County. Stages 
leave daily for Empire, Har- 
shaw and Washington Camp. 
Tully, Ochoa & Co, gen'l mdse 
Wakefield Bros, gen'l mdse 
Wakefield L A, postmaster 
Wells, Fargo & Co, George S 

Safford agent 
Wolfolk George T, hotel 

Parker P 0, 

Yuma Co. 200 miles north of 
Yuma by the river route, is 
the headquarters of the U S 
Indian agent in charge of the 
Colorado River Reservation. 

Biggs Jonathan, U S Indian 
agent 

Woods J F, postmaster 

Pelton. 

Pima Co, 45 miles n e Tucson, 
Cohn W E, gen'l mdse 
Zeckendorf William & Co, gen- 
eral merchandise 

Phoenix P 0, 

Maricopa Co, county seat, and 
incorporated city, 124 miles 
s e of Prescott, and 28 miles 
n of Maricopa, on the South- 
ern Pacific Railroad, is pleas- 
antly situated in the midst of 
a fine agricultural section, and 
surrounded by numerous rich 
mining districts. The Salt 
River flows past the city, 



I llB J. HI. DflinSWlCK « D3|K8 COi MAWlJFACXlJKKKS.J^auFranSo. 4 * 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



149 



furnishing water for irrigat- 
ing the fertile valley, and 
supplying the life-giving ele- 
ment to the gardens and 
shade-trees of the streets. 
This is one of the most import- 
ant streams of the Territory, 
not from its size, but from the 
large extent of arable soil it 
flows past, and which may be 
irrigated by its waters. Hav- 
ing a considerable fall, the 
waters may, in its upper 
course, be utilized for pro- 
pelling mining and milling 
machinery, and in its lower 
course led long distances from 
its channel to the fields of the 
husbandman. The valley, in 
the midst of which is this 
lovely city, is 60 miles in 
length by from 10 to 20 miles 
in width, gently sloping to the 
river from each side, and slop- 
ing also toward the south-west 
with the fall of the stream, 
making it exceedingly favor- 
able for artificial irrigation. 
In such a naturally-favored 
region, a pleasant and pros- 
perous city was sure to spring. 
The settlement dates with the 
expulsion of the Apache ma- 
rauders who were driven from 
this region by the combined 
efforts of the military and the 
Pima and Maricopa Indians. 
The town was laid out in 
1870, on a liberal and com- 
prehensive plan, with streets 
crossing each other at right 
angles, in accordance with 
the cardinal points of the 
compass. Six of the princi- 
pal streets are 100 feet in 
width; the others 80 feet 
wide, with alleys of 20 to 25 
feet in width. Bordering the 



streets are sidewalks 16 feet 
wide, and on the others the 
walks are 12 feet wide. Those 
streets running north and 
south generally bear some 
Indian name, while those run- 
ning east and west are nam- 
ed after the Presidents of 
the United States. There 
are two public squares or 
plazas, each 300 feet square. 
It is in latitude 33 deg 18 min, 
and 112 deg min 15 sec west 
longitude. The altitude is 
1,800 feet above the sea. 
Rain-fall in 1879 was 6.25 
inches, and in 1880, 6.82 
inches, distributed through 
the year as follows: Jan, 
1.16; Feb. 0.38 ; March, 0.26 ; 
April, 0.15 ; May, 0.0 ; June, 
0.49; July, 1.18; Aug, 0.72 ; 
Sept, 0.67; Oct, 0.20; Nov, 
0.0; Dec, 1.61. The temper- 
ature was # at the highest June 
17th, 111 deg; and lowest, 
Nov 1 8th, 24 deg. The mean 
temperature was 68.9 deg. 
Slight frosts only are felt; 
the orange, grape, pome- 
granite, and all semi-tropical 
fruits and plants growing to 
perfection. The population, 
as given by the census in 
1880, was 1,800, but is now 
estimated at 2,400, and in- 
creasing with the rapid ad- 
vance of Arizona. The town 
is well built, though mostly 
of adobe, there being several 
handsome private residences 
and stores, and public build- 
ings of commodious and 
substantial appearance. The 
streets are lined by a luxur- 
iant growth of shade-trees, 
kept in a flourishing condi- 
tion by streams of water flow- 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



IA/M D UnnDCDi. Pfl /Tucson & Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, i 
W lYI. D. nUUl Lll <X UU. t Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, J 



Wines of all Kinds. 



150 



AKIZONA. 



ing along their roots from the 
irrigating ditches, which also 
water the plazas and gardens, 
giving a refreshing and invit- 
ing appearance to the town, 
and its pleasant homes. The 
stores contain large stocks 
of merchandise and fancy- 
wares, and carry on a profit- 
able trade, made secure by 
the substantial resources of 
the surrounding country. A 
first-class hotel, the Bank Ex- 
change, kept by Mr. E. Ganz, 
and also the Phoenix Hotel, 
provide excellent accommo- 
dations for the traveling pub- 
lic. A large flouring -mill, 
run by the waters of Salt 
River, capable of producing 
25,000 pounds of the best 
quality of flour per day, fur- 
nishes a market for grain, and 
supplies much of the flour 
used in Arizona. . This cre- 
ates considerable business for 
the town, and is an enterprise 
worthy of emulation. This 
mill has four sets of French 
burr millstones, driven by a 
thirty and a half inch Leffel 
turbine water-wheel, placed 
under a twenty-five foot fall. 
All the machinery necessary 
for a first-class mill is driven 
by this power. The condi- 
tion of society is well illustra- 
ted by the schools, churches, 
and numerous social orders. 
Phcenix justly takes pride in 
its fine school -house, this be- 
ing, as the cause deserves, the 
most conspicuous public build- 
ing in the city. It is a hand- 
some brick building, two sto- 
ries high, with belfry and flag- 
staff, 60 feet front by 40 in 
depth, with an entry 40 feet 



front by 12 in depth, with 
grounds 300 feet square. The 
ceilings are 14 feet high. In 
it are rooms for the primary, 
grammar, and high schools, 
which have 207 pupils en- 
rolled— 103 boys and 104 
girls. A library is maintained 
by the Maricopa Library As- 
sociation, organized in 1877, 
having a library of two hund- 
red and twenty-three volumes. 
In 1878 the Presbyterians held 
services, and on June 15th, 
1879, the Church was organ- 
ized. A chapel has been erect- 
ed, where services are held, 
and a Sunday School, having 
five teachers and 70 scholars. 
It is under the pastorate of 
Rev. William Meyer. The 
Methodist Church organized 
in 1880. The society has a 
brick edifice costing about 
$4,000, and with a seating 
capacity of 250. A Sunday 
School is connected with the 
church, having seven teachers 
and 85 scholars. Rev. G. F. 
Bovard is the pastor. The 
Methodist Episcopal Church 
South, with Rev. J. L. Hedge- 
path, pastor, also holds serv- 
ices. A Catholic Church has 
just been erected, under the 
charge of Right Rev. J. B. 
Salpointe, Bishop of Arizona. 
It was dedicated to public 
worship June 24th, 1881. The 
building is of imposing ap- 
pearance, of Gothic architect- 
ure, 125 feet in length and 75 
feet in width, with a massive 
tower, surmounted by a lofty 
spire. Of social orders the 
Independent Order of Good 
Templars have the preced- 
ence of date. The Garden 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



M1.VLIACTL«EJ{» 



;{' 



San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., 



WHOLESALE 
BOOTS AM> SHOES. 



BUSINESS DIKECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



151 



Valley Lodge No. 1,1.0, G. 

T. was organized May 21st, 
1877, and has 60 members. 
Arizona Chapter No. 1 Royal 
Arch Masons, was organized 
March 23rd, 1880, numbering 
23 members. Arizona Lodge 
No. 257, F. and A. M., organ- 
ized August 9th, 1879, and 
has 35 members. Phoenix 
Lodge No. 2, I. O. O. F., or- 
ganized July 27th, 1879, has 
43 members. Arizona Ee- 
beckah Degree Lodge No. 1, 
organized 1880, has 20 mem- 
bers. Maricopa Tribe No. 1, 
Improved Order of Red Men, 
organized January 1st, 1880, 
has 37 members. Phoenix 
Lodge No. 2, Knights of 
Pythias, organized Septem- 
ber 25th, 1880, has 23 mem- 
bers. Three newspapers are 
published, the Arizona Ga- 
zette and the Phoenix Her- 
ald, daily and weekly, and 
the La Guardia, a Spanish 
paper, weekly, all devoted to 
the advocacy of the resources 
of their section. Rapid com- 
munication is maintained with 
the outside world by means 
of the United States Military 
Telegraph, under the superin- 
tendence of Mr. S. E. Patton. 
A company has recently been 
organized to construct a rail- 
road from Maricopa, on the 
Southern Pacific, to Phoenix, 
with the intention of continu- 
ing it northerly via Prescott 
to the Atlantic and Pacific. 
Stages leave twice a day for 
Maricopa, and daily for Pres- 
cott, by two different routes; 
one via Seymour and Wick- 
enburg, connecting at the for- 
mer place with a stage to Vul- 



ture ; the other known as the 
Black Canon route, via Gil- 
lette, Bumble Bee, and Big 
Bug, connecting at Gillette 
with a stage to Tip Top. An- 
other line maintains commu- 
nication with Fort McDowell. 
Officers. — John T. Alsap, 
Mayor; T. W. Brown, John 
H. Burger, T. W. Smith, and 
J. M. Cotton, Councilmen ; M. 
W. Kales, Treasurer ; Henry 
Garfias, Marshal. 

Alsap John T, attorney-at-law 
and Mayor of Phoenix, Court 
House 

Arcade Brewery, Luke & Thal- 
heimer proprietors, Washing- 
ton 

Arizona Gazette, Charles H 
McNeil & Co., publishers, 
Washington 

Arizona Methodist, Rev G H 
Adams editor, Gosper & Mc- 
Clintock publishers, Centre 

Asher M & Bro, general mdse, 
Washington 

Baker Albert C, attorney-atrlaw, 
Washington 

Balsz & Kelly, butchers, Wash- 
ington 

Bank Exchange Hotel, Emil 
Ganz proprietor, Washington 

Bank Exchange Restaurant, 
P W Butler prop'r, Wash- 
ington 

Bank of Arizona Agency, M 
W Kales cashier, Washington 

Barruth Simon, tailoring and 
dressmaking, Washington 

Bicknell P C, carriage, house, 
and sign painter, Washington 

Blankenship J W, deputy sher- 
iff, Court House 

Bolan P J, attorney-at-law, 
Washington 

Bovard G F Rev, pastor Method- 
ist Episcopal Church 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm. B. Hooper & Go. { 



T ^ n& an p d h r^, T Me E ^or'}Tea8 & Gaudies at Wholesale. 



152 



ARIZONA. 



Brix Peter, soda water manu- 
factory, Montezuma 

Brown George E, groceries, 
provisions, stationery, notions 
tobacco, cigars, etc, Washing- 
ton 

Brown Thomas W, liquor sa- 
loon, Washington 

Brown & Cole, liquor and bil- 
liard saloon, Washington 

Bryan J M, blacksmith and 
wagonmaker, and feed yard 

Burge J C, photographer, Mon- 
tezuma 

Burger John H, blacksmith and 
wagonmaker, and feed and 
hay yard, Montezuma 

Butler Pierce W, prop'r Bank 
Exchange Bestaurant, Wash- 
ington 

Byers James S, proprietor Plaza 
Boarding House, Jefferson 

Campbell Joseph, attorney-at- 
law, Washington 

Carey William R, manufact'r 
furniture, bedding, upholstery 
etc, and undertaker, Wash- 
ington 

Coats George F, green and 
dried fruits, confectionery, 
cigars, tobacco, etc, Washing- 
ton 

Coeke Charles, liquor saloon, 
Washington 

Conyers B L, physician, Wash- 
ington 

Court House, Washington 

Cox Frank, attorney - at - law 
and notary public, Washing- 
ton 

Creamer & Abbott, agricultur- 
al implements, hardware and 
wagons, Montezuma and Jef- 
ferson 

Daneri Stefano, liquor saloon, 
Monroe 

Dupish Edward, barber and 
baths, Washington 



Ellis Gus & Co., general mer- 
chandise, Washington 

Everett William J, house and 
sign painter 

Farrington J B, physician 

Ganz Emil, proprietor Bank 
Exchange Hotel, Washington 

Garfias Henry, city marshal 

George John, treasurer Mari- 
copa Co, Court House 

Gilmer, Salisbury & Co Stage 
Line, James Stewart super- 
intendent, L Jilson agent, 
Washington 

Goldman & Co, general mer- 
chandise, Washington 

Gonzalez B, G, house and sign 
painter, Montezuma 

Gosper & McClintock, pub- 
lishers Phoenix Herald, Center 

Greenhaw Thomas G, probate 
judge Maricopa Co, Court 
House 

Gregory James M, lumber, 
doors, sashes, blinds, and 
builders' materials, Washing- 
ton 

Haeffner & Garcia, liquor and 
billiard saloon, Washington 

Hamlin George, livery, feed and 
sale stable, Washington 

Hancock W A, attorney at law, 
and notary public, Wash'ton 

Harrison Charles M, barber, 
Washington 

Harrison Henrietta Mrs, dress- 
maker. Washington 

Hedgepath J L, pastor Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church South 

Heinson Jacob, bakery, Wash- 
ington 

Henshaw Albert L, feed and 
sale stable 

Herrick & Lutgerding, black- 
smith and horseshoers, Jeffer- 
son 

Hooper Wm B & Co, oil and 
wine merchants, Jefferson 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE (653<fc655 Market St. 
MAXIT FACTVBER8, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



153 



Hughes J H, notary public 

Irvine E & Co, gen'l mdse, and 
agents California Powder Co, 
Washington 

Jackson M M, justice of the 
peace 

Jackson M M & Son, carpenters 
and builders 

Jackson & Reed, cabinet-mak- 
ers 

Jilson Lyman, agent Wells, 
Fargo & Co, and Gilmer, 
Salisbury & Co's Stage Line, 
Washington 

Jones Charles L, harness and 
saddle-maker, Washington 

Kales M W, cashier Bank of 
Arizona, insurance agent, and 
city treasurer, Washington 

Kaucher Gustav, jeweler, Mon- 
roe 

Kelly G H, leader Phoenix Brass 
Band, Washington 

Kirkland Richard F, recorder 
Maricopa Co, and agent 
Southern Pacific Mail and 
Stage Line, Washington 

Lemon A D, district attorney 
Maricopa Co, Court House 

Lemon & McCabe, attorneys at 
law, Washington 

Long R L, abstract office, Wash- 
ington 

Loosely J R, liquor saloon, 
Washington 

Loring George E, stationery, 
newspapers, cigars, tobacco, 
etc, Washington 

Lount Bros, ice manufacturers 

Lowell E T, carpenter and plas- 
terer 

Luhrs George H N, wagon- 
maker, Jefferson 

Luke John, liq'r saloon Wash- 
ington 

Luke & Thalheimer, prop'rs 
Arcade Brewery and liquor 
saloon, Washington 



McCabe J D, attorney at law' 
Washington 

McNeil A J, saddlery and har- 
ness, Montezuma 

McNeil Charles H & Co, 
publishers Arizona Gazette, 
Washington 

McNulty W F, insurance agent 
and notary public, Washing- 
ton 

Meyer William Rev, pastor 
Presbyterian Church, Monroe 

Monihon James D, livery, feed 
and sale stable, Washington 

Morgan Henry, general mdse, 
Washington 

Morgnett Bros, butchers, Wash- 
inton 

Mo wry George E, postmaster 
Washington 

O'Neill William O, reporter 
2nd Judicial District Court, 
Washington 

Olsson Tobias, boot and shoe- 
maker, Washington 

Orme L H, -sheriff Maricopa Co, 
Court House 

Patton S E, observer and oper- 
ator Signal Service USA, 
Center 

Pesqueira M, stoves and tin- 
ware, Maricopa 

Phoenix Brass Band, G H 
Kelly, leader, Washington 

Phcenix Flour Mill, John Y T 
Smith prop'r, Montezuma 

Phoenix Herald, Gosper & Mc- 
Clintock, publishers, Center 

Phoenix Hotel, Mrs Rosa Sal- 
ari, proprietress, Washington 

Pickens N A Mrs, homeopathic 
physician, Washington 

Porter De Forest, ;i>sociate 
justice Supreme Court, and 
judge Second Judicial Dist. 

Reed Joseph D, coroner and 
public administrator Mari- 
copa Co 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



11 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO.! 



Tucson & Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Uuaymas, Mexico, 



; Lubricating Oils. 



154 



ARIZONA. 



Richards James, justice of the 
peace, Center 

Righetti James P, groceries, 
liquors and dry goods, Mon- 
roe 

Roberts & Ryder, contractors, 
builders, and dealers lumber, 
doors, sash, blinds, builders' 
materials, etc., Jefferson 

Rosenthal Nathan, clothing, 
boots, shoes, dry goods, hats, 
cigars, tobacco, etc, Wash- 
ington 

Ross Nathaniel, proprietor Salt 
River Mills, East Phoenix 

Rosson R L, physician, Mari- 
copa 

Rothrock George H, justice of 
the peace, Washington 

Rothrock & Catton, landscape 
and portrait photographers, 
Montezuma 

Salari Rosa Mrs, proprietress 
Phoenix Hotel, Washington 

Salari & Righetti, restaurant, 
Washington 

Scherrer Carl, bakery, Wash- 
ington 

Shaw F A, clerk District Court, 
Court House 

Sheets Oliver H P, physician, 
Washington 

Sherman Thomas, liq'r saloon, 
Washington 

Signal Service U S A, S E 
Patton observer and operator 
in charge, O W White, assist- 
ant operator, Centre 

Slankard & Clarke, black- 
smiths and wagon-makers, and 
feed-yard 

Smith John Y T, prop'r Phoenix 
Flour Mill, Montezuma 

Smith William T, liq'r saloon, 
Washington 

Sou Yon & Co, Chinese goods 

Southern Pacific Mail and 
Stage Line, Kerens & Grif- 



fith proprs, R F Kirkland 
agent, Washington 

St Louis Brewery, Michael 
Wurch propr, Washington 

Stewart James, superintend- 
ent Gilmer, Salisbury & Go's 
Stage Line, Washington 

Streeter W C, contractor ma- 
son work 

Sturemburg William, barber and 
baths, Washington 

Thibodo Oliver J, drugs and 
medicines, Washington 

Thomson John W, druggist and 
apothecary, Maricopa 

Trumper V, watchmaker and 
jeweler, Washington 

Tweed & Hancock, attorneys- 
at-law, Washington 

United States Military Tele- 
graph, S E Patton operator, 
O W White, assistant opera- 
tor, Centre 

Wells, Fargo & Co, L Jilson 
agent, Washington 

Wharton H H, fruit and confec- 
tionery, Washington 

Wharton & McNulty, general 
merchandise, Washington 

Wharton & Rosson, physicians, 
Maricopa 

White O W, assistant operator 
Signal Service USA, Centre 

Wiley & Son, carpenters and 
builders, Montezuma 

Wilkes William, attorney-at- 
law, Washington 

Wing On Lung & Co, Chinese 
goods 

Woolsey Hall, Washington 

Wurch Michael, proprietor St 
Louis Brewery, Washington 

Picacho PO, 

Pinal Co, 25 miles s of Florence 
is a station on the line of the 
Southern Pacific R R, 201 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. tataus^asnsKsast' 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY .AND GAZETTEER. 155 E9 



miles e of Yuma. Stages 
leave on arrival of trains for 
Florence, connecting with 
lines for Pinal, Silver King 
and Globe. 

Picket Post, 

Pinal Co. (See Pinal P O) 

Pima Agency, 

Pinal Co, 30 miles w of Flor- 
ence, is the residence of the 
U S Indian agent in charge 
of the Pima and Maricopa 
Eeservation. It is situated 
near the Gila River, and sur- 
rounded by good agricultural 
lands, which are extensively- 
cultivated by the Indians, who 
number about 5,000. When 
the seasons are favorable large 
crops of wheat are raised, and 
disposed of to the traders on 
the reservation. Barley, corn, 
and different kinds of vege- 
tables are also raised to a 
•considerable extent. Water 
for irrigating purposes is 
brought in ditches from the 
Gila River. A number of 
improvements have recently 
been made at the agency, in- 
cluding the erection of a new 
two-story adobe buiiding for 
the use of the agent and his 
assistants. A school has been 
established for the education 
of the young Indians, and the 
spiritual welfare of all is at- 
tended to by a Presbyterian 
clergyman who preaches to 
them on the Sabbath. Every- 
thing about the agency is con- 
ducted in strict conformity to 
law, police being appointed 
from among the Pimas to 
preserve order. 



Hayden Charles T, trading post 
Townsend E B, U S Indian 

inspector and special Indian 

agent 
Wheeler Rowell G, U S Indian 

agent 

Pima Station, 

Maricopa Co, 15 miles s of 

Phoenix. 
Bennett & Jones, trading post 

Pinal P 0, 

Pinal Co., 27 miles n e of Flor- 
ence, the county seat, lies in 
the western foot-hills of the 
Pinal Mountains, on the 
banks of Queen Creek, where 
that pretty stream emerges 
from the rocky canons of that 
rugged range. This is the 
principal town of Pioneer Dis- 
trict, and is in the midst of a 
rich mineral -bearing region, 
there being some 2,000 min- 
ing locations in the district, 
including veins of gold, sil- 
ver, copper, and iron. The 
point has been occupied a 
number of years, first as a 
military station during the 
period of operations against 
the hostile Apaches, when it 
was a picket post. With the 
discovery of the mines in the 
vicinity the site was found 
most favorable for milling 
ores and as a business centre, 
and in 1878 the village of 
Picket Post was begun, and 
in 1880 the name was changed 
to Pinal. Its growth has been 
quite rapid, the population 
now numbering fully 1,000, 
with all the comforts, im- 
provements, and style that 
characterize a busy, enterpris- 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wfl.B. HOOPER & 60. { 



Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guay mas, Mexico, 



} Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



156 



ARIZONA. 



ing, and enlightened Ameri- 
can town, including schools, 
churches, newspaper, secret 
and benevolent societies, ho- 
tels, stores, express, post and 
telegraph offices, saloons, etc. 
The business portion occupies 
both sides of a long, wide 
street, running east and west, 
which is being rapidly im- 
proved by the erection of 
substantial buildings. From 
the Silver King and other 
mines in the vicinity run a 
constant stream of great 
quartz - hauling teams to the 
mill in Pinal, and stages and 
freight - wagons ply with un- 
ceasing industry and excite- 
ment between the growing, 
lively city, the county seat, 
and the railroad. On the 
bank of Queen Creek is the 
twenty-stamp mill of the Sil- 
ver King Mining Company, 
which, pounding away night 
and day, crushes sixty tons of 
ore daily, producing about 
$100,000 monthly. The of- 
fice of the company in Pinal 
is connected by telephone 
with the mine, and here can 
be seen one of the richest 
and most beautiful cabinets 
of mineral specimens in the 
world, collected from the ores 
of that remarkable mine. As 
in all progressive Ameri- 
can communities, schools are 
among the first to receive at- 
tention. In 1879 the public 
school of Pinal was organized, 
and a school-house built. Now 
one teacher is employed, a"nd 
50 pupils attend ; but another 
school - house is soon to be 
erected, with capacity to ac- 
commodate the increasing 



number of children. The 
Methodists have a fine wood- 
en church, costing about $4,- 
000, in which services are reg- 
ularly held, and well attended. 
Lodges of the Odd -Fellows 
and Masonic orders have been 
established, and the Knights 
of Pythias are about to or- 
ganize. The Pinal Drill, a 
weekly paper, is maintained, 
and furnishes the inhabitants 
the news from abroad. The 
business houses, hotels, etc., 
are generally substantial and 
handsome structures, some 
being of stone, an excellent 
quality of basalt being quar- 
ried in the vicinity, which is 
well adapted for the purpose. 
The Pinal Bank building is 
of this stone, and presents a 
fine appearance. Besides Pi- 
oneer are Summit and Mineral 
districts, contributory to this 
place ; also the neighboring 
villages of Silver King and 
Queen City. These, with the 
many rich mines, the favor- 
able location for residence 
and business, the salubrity of 
the climate, and other favor- 
able conditions, justify the 
bright expectations of its cit- 
izens that Pinal is destined in 
a short time to become one 
of the leading cities of Ari- 
zona. The elevation being 
about 3,500 feet above the sea, 
tempers the summer weather 
to a delightful degree, and in 
winter brings it in the region 
of occasional snow. 

Stages leave daily for Flor- 
ence, there connecting with 
lines for Casa Grande and 
Picacho, on the Southern Pa- 
cific Railroad. Daily commu- 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



BILLIARD TABLE f 653 <& 655 Market St 



MAXlFA(TIKi:«S 



;{' 



San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T.. IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



BUSINESS DIKECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



157 



nication is also maintained 
with Globe by stage to Sil- 
ver King, 8 miles ; thence by 
saddle -train over the Pinal 
Mountains, 25 miles. 

Adams Orson B, physician 

Allen Thomas F, freighting 

Bailey W L, butcher 

Baker J D, assayer 

Becher Gustav, proprietor II 
S Brewery and restaurant 

Benson W H, justice of peace 

Berthier Jules A, liq'r saloon 

Binkley Bros, gen'l mdse 

Bley William, carpenter and 
builder 

Bluett William H, drugs, med- 
icines, paints and oils 

Brinkman Delia Mrs, stationery, 
fruits and vegetables. 

Broadbeck — , stone mason and 
builder 

Brooks Jay, gt n'l mdse 

Brown John, carpenter and 
builder 

Brown P A, assayer 

Caveness Matthew, freighting 

Caveness & Co, blacksmiths, 
horse-shoers and wagonmak- 
ers. 

Champion Josiah, lumber, 
doors, sashes and blinds, and 
agent Commercial Insurance 
Co, of California 

Cox Gustavus, U S deputy min- 
eral surveyor 

Davis Hugh H, physician 

Davis James W, attorney at 
law and notary public 

Dodge M M, assayer 

Doran I A, millwright 

Ehlers E H, expressman 

Ellis, Aaron & Co, gen'l mdse 

Elmore R P, agent Windsor 
Silver Mining Co 

Gardner Hiram, barber 

Goforth M L Mrs, millinery 
and dress making 



Goldman & Co, gen'l mdse 
Gomez Francisco, groceries 

and liquors 
Graham P B, liquor saloon 
Grand Hotel, George Reynolds 

proprietor 
Hall, Hurley & Co, livery, feed 

and sale stables 
Hall William A, proprietor Pi- 
nal hotel 
Hilge & Co, bakery 
Hoffman Ottokar, metallurgist 

Silver King Mining Co 
Hunt Jotham B, liquor and 

billiard saloon 
Hunt's Hall, J B Hunt prop'r 
Hutchinson William T, black- 

smith and wagonmaker 
Jensen Frederick, bowling alley 

and baths 
Kennedy R R, deputy sheriff 
Kimball S F, livery and feed 

stable 
Lempker William H, barber 
Ling Chung, Chinese goods 
Loeffler & Fiehl, fruits and veg- 
etables 
Mason Aaron, superintendent 

Silver King Mining Co 
Mayhew Jesse, livery, feed and 

and sale stable 
McDowell J M, carpenter and 

builder 
Merritt W H, assayer and U S 

deputy mineral surveyor 
Miller George L, postmaster 
Miller George L & Co, general 

merchandise 
Murray H B, liquor saloon 
Myers William, teacher dancing 
Nicholas & Searle, butchers 
Paine Lewis L, barber and baths 
Palmer Charles, house and sign 

painter 

Pinal County Bank, E W Hop- 
kins president, Aaron Mason 
vice-president, C M Gilmore 
cashier 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



1A/M D UnnDCTD SL On / Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T.,ElPa80, 
WIYl.DinUUrLnOl uUi \ Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



} Cigars of all Kinds. 



158 



ARIZONA. 



Pinal Drill, J De Noon Rey- 

mert editor and publisher 
Pinal Hotel, William A Hall 

proprietor 
Reymert J De Noon, editor 

and publisher Pinal Drill, at- 
torney at law and notary pub. 
Reymert J D Jr, attorney at 

law and insurance agent 
Reynolds George, propr Grand 

Hotel 
Sarrick George H, liquor and 

billiard saloon 
Schmidt Henry, shoemaker 
Silver King Mining Co, Aaron 

Mason superintendent 
Souva & Ruddy, restaurant 
Stone W R, attorney at law and 

notary public 
Suter Jacob, stoves, tin-ware 

and hardware 
Thompson Anson N, physician 

and surgeon 
United States Brewery, Gus- 

tav Becher propr 
Venton Ascott, agent Wells, 

Fargo & Co 
Vie E E, stone-mason 
Warnke Ernest F, brewery 
Washburn & Co, liq'r saloon 
Wells, Fargo & Co, Ascott 

Venton agent 
Whitlow Allen, freighter 
Whitney C L, contractor 
Wright I) B, carpenter 
Zubrod Niklaus, shoemaker - 

Pinal Ranch, 

Pinal Co, 45 miles n e of Flor- 
ence, on the trail from Silver 
King to Globe. 

Irion Robert A, hotel and sta- 
tion 

Pine Springs P 0, 

Yavapai Co. 

Marshall Hugh, postmaster 



Polhamus, 

Mohave Co, 315 miles n of 
Yuma, on the e branch of the 
Colorado River. 

Welcome L S, general mdse 

Prescott P 0, 

Yavapai Co, capital of the Ter- 
ritory and county -seat, is 
pleasantly located in the val- 
ley of Granite Creek, sur- 
rounded by a grand amphi- 
theater of hills, giving it the 
most picturesque and roman- 
tic site of any town in Ari- 
zona. Attracted by the love- 
liness of, the locality, the fine 
climate, and the apparent re- 
sources, the officers of the 
Territory who had been sent 
hither by President Lincoln 
in 1863 to organize the terri- 
torial government, chose this 
as the seat of their future 
capital. A few weeks prior 
to the arrival of the party on 
Granite Creek, the Territorial 
organization had been effect- 
ed at Navajo Springs, the 
first camping place reached 
within the limits of Arizona, 
on the journey from Santa 
Fe. The party consisted of 
John N. Goodwin, Governor, 
(John A. Gurley was the first 
appointed governor, but died 
before entering upon his du- 
ties) R. C. McCormick, Secre- 
tary ; W. F. Turner, Chief 
Justice; W. T. Howell and 
J. A. Allyn, Associate Justic- 
es; Almon Gage, District 
Attorney ; Levi Bashford, 
Surveyor-General; M. P.Duf- 
field, Marshal; Charles D. 
Poston, Superintendent of 
Indian Affairs. In this love- 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TAB L.E ^653 & fi55 Market St. 
MA JTUFACTUKEKS, * San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



159 



ly spot the town was located, 
and named in honor of the 
great historian, dating its 
earliest settlement in 1864. 
At that date the southern por- 
tion of the Territory, where 
the principal population 
dwelt, was in a state of tur- 
moil, owing to the mixed 
character of the inhabitants, 
and the civil war then raging, 
and as a consequence, this 
secluded valley in the north 
was chosen for the seat of 
government. With the party 
came the printer, with his 
type and press, and soon the 
newspaper spread the fact to 
the world of the existence of 
the town, the beauty of the 
situation, and the grandeur 
of the resources of the sur- 
rounding country. Under the 
vigorous and able editorship 
of Marion, the Arizona Miner 
soon drew to the region a 
large population • and re- 
sources whose "existence had 
scarcely been suspected were 
brought into notice and to 
development. Shortly after 
its settlement came the sol- 
diers, and Camp Whipple — 
now called Whipple Barracks 
— was established one mile 
north, giving security to the 
people, stability to society, 
and adding much to the busi- 
ness and prosperity of the 
place. The city was laid out 
on a liberal scale, with broad 
streets crossing each other at 
right angles, and a large plaza 
of four acres in the center, 
with reservations for schools 
and public buildings. In 
August, 1872, a United States 
patent was obtained for the 



site, and in January, 1873, it 
was incorporated under the 
general laws of the Territory. 
By the census of 1880 the 
population was 2,074. The 
altitude is 5,700 feet above 
the sea, giving it the rare 
and healthy atmosphere of a 
mountain region; warm, with 
cool nights in summer, and 
occasional falls of snow in 
winter. The latitude is 34 
deg 29 min 6 sec ; longitude 
112 deg 30 min 30 sec. 
The rain-fall for year ending 
June 30th, 1879, was 11.31 
inches. The temperature, by 
the records of 1878, was: 
July, 103 deg highest, and 48 
deg lowest; Dec, 67 deg 
highest, and 4 deg lowest; 
Jan, 1879, 68 deg highest, and 
4 deg lowest; June, 97 deg 
highest, and 39 deg lowest. 
The preceding figures are 
from the records of the Signal 
Service. Mail routes radiate 
in various directions, the prin- 
cipal one being a well-equip- 
ped stage line to Phoenix, 124 
miles south-west; continuing 
thence to the Southern Pacific 
Railroad at Maricopa, a fur- 
ther distance of 28 miles. B ut 
this will all soon be changed 
by the construction of the 
Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, 
which will pass about 50 miles 
north. By the Legislature of 
1881 a charter was granted 
for a railroad from Prescott 
to intersect that road; and 
the Arizona Central Railroad 
is contemplated, running to 
Phoenix, and to the Southern 
Pacific. These will make it a 
central point of trade, very 
convenient to the many rich 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm. B. Hooper & Co. { T S^SSSiSn Sol < i?%%iii£2g** 



160 



ARIZONA. 



mining districts which now 
reach it by wagon and pack- 
mule. The city contains many 
substantial and elegant public 
buildings and business houses, 
and handsome private resi- 
dences. The Court House, 
erected in 1878 at a cost of 
S65,000, is a two-story brick, 
52 feet square, and 43 feet 
high, surmounted by cupola, 
in which is a large clock. 
On the first floor are several 
commodious offices, occupied 
by the different county offi- 
cials. On the second floor is 
an elegant court room, 45 feet 
square, well lighted and ven- 
tilated, for the use of the Su- 
preme and District Courts, 
also jury rooms. In the base- 
ment is the county jail, contain- 
ing a jailer's room and twelve 
cells, ten of which are built of 
iron. A fire-proof vault, with 
walls 18 inches thick, for the 
preservation of public records, 
is built on the first floor. The 
public school building is a fine 
two-story brick, pleasantly sit- 
uated on the crest of a hill. 
The first floor is occupied by 
class-rooms, and the second 
floor as offices for the Secre- 
tary of the Territory, and for 
the Territorial Library. There 
are 198 scholars enrolled, and 
an average attendance of 110. 
A school connected with the 
Church of the Sacred Heart, 
under the supervision of the 
Sisters of St. Joseph, has 
about forty pupils. They 
also contemplate the es- 
tablishment of an academy 
for the instruction of young 
ladies as soon as circumstan- 
ces will admit. The secret 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



and benevolent orders are well 
represented by Aztlan Lodge, 
No. 177, F. and A. M., organ- 
ized in 1865, number of mem- 
bers, 75 ; Arizona Lodge, No. 
1, I. O. O. F., organized July, 
1868, number of members 58 ; 
and the Knights of Pythias, 
organized in 1877, number of 
members 33. The churches 
established are the Methodist 
Episcopal, organized in 1874; 
the Roman Catholic Church 
of the Sacred Heart, organ- 
ized in 1878; the Congrega- 
tional, organized in 1880; the 
Methodist Episcopal South, 
and the Baptists, who have 
recently erected a commodi- 
ous house of worship. The 
St. Joseph's Hospital, estab- 
lished in 1878, is a wooden 
edifice, capable of accommo- 
dating about fifteen patients. 
It is under the supervision of 
the Sisters of St. Joseph, who 
kindly and carefully attend 
to the wants of the sick com- 
mitted to their charge. There 
are two newspapers pub- 
lished, the Arizona Miner, 
and the Arizona Democrat, 
both issuing a daily and a 
weekly, replete with reliable 
information in regard to the 
resources of the Territory. 
A hook and ladder company, 
organized in 1880, has 70 
members, and as a further 
protection against fire, cis- 
terns have been constructed 
at each corner of the Court 
House plaza, containing pow- 
erful force pump, capable of 
throwing water over the high- 
est buildings. The town also 
contains a U. S. Land Office, 
telegraph and express offices, a 



BILLIARD TABLE ( 653 A 655 Market St 
MAXlTFACTIIKEKei,! San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., ,, SSr!«SSS^ , 



BUSINESS DIKECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



161 



H 



bank, theatre, public hall, pub- 
lic library, law library, Territo- 
rial library, several extensive 
mercantile establishments, 
steam saw mills, a sash, door, 
and blind factory, two brew- 
eries, and other business places 
incident to a city. There is 
at present . no hotel in the 
place, but the Williams House 
provides excellent sleeping 
accommodations for the pub- 
lic, and good restaurants near 
by furnish all the delicacies 
that the market affords. Sur- 
rounding it are many min- 
ing districts of great impor- 
tance, and along Granite 
Creek are placers where gold 
is profitably obtained by wash- 
ing the soil in the rocker 
or in sluices. The mining 
districts contain rich veins of 
gold, silver and copper, some 
of which are already worked 
with profit; all regarding 
Prescott as the center of 
their business, and making 
it one of the chief mining 
towns of Arizona. Two lines 
of stages maintain communi- 
cation with Phoenix, one via 
Big Bug, Bumble Bee and 
Gillette, the other via Wick- 
enburg and Seymour; both 
connecting with stages for 
Maricopa on the Southern 
Pacific Railroad. Other lines 
maintain communication with 
Fort Mohave on the Colorado 
River via Hackberry, Mineral 
Park and Hardyville, with 
the Peck and Tiger mines, 
etc., with Brigham City and 
way stations, and with Fort 
Verde. 
Officers /—William N. Kelly, 
Mayor j F. G. Brecht, Alvin 



S. Haskell, John Raible, and 
Charles Spencer, Councilmen ; 
William Vernon, Treasurer; 
Charles B. Rush, Recorder; 
J. D. Park, Assessor, James 
M. Dodson, Marshal. 

Acker & Smith, butchers, Gur- 
ley 

Adams G H Rev, superintend- 
ent M E Church in Arizona 

Ah Gunn, restaurant, Monte- 
zuma , 

Antelope Copper Mining Co, 
Curtis C Bean agent, Arizona 
Bank Building 

Ainsworth F K, physician, 
Gurley 

Arizona Brewery, Urfer & Co 
proprietors, Montezuma 

Arizona Democrat, Gideon J 
Tucker editor and publisher, 
Cortez 

Arizona Miner, Charles W 
Beach editor and publisher, 
Montezuma 

Arnhold Frederick W, uphol- 
sterer and paper hanger, 
Cortez 

Bank of Arizona, Sol Lewis 
president, M W Kales cash- 
ier, Cortez 

Bashford L & Co, general mer- 
chandise, Gurley 

Beach Charles W, editor and 
publisher " Arizona Miner," 
Montezuma 

Bean Curtis C, mining, Arizona 
Bank Building 

Bennett W W, gunsmith, West 
Prescott 

Black Bros & Weston, feed 
yard, West Prescott 

Blake F W, banker, and agent 
Wells, Fargo & Co, and Gil- 
mer, Salisbury & Co's Stage 
Line, Montezuma 

Blake & Co, assayers, Monte- 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



I* B. Hooper & 8o.{ 1 ^a i SSfeiifaSEr}i!£t. Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



162 



ARIZONA. 



Bones & Spencer, fruits, con- 
fectionery, stationery, cigars, 
tobacco, etc, Montezuma 

Bowers & Richards, capitalists, 
Cortez 

Bradshaw Basin Mill, Curtis 
C Bean agent, Arizona Bank 
Building 

Brannen P B & Co, groceries, 
provisions, liquors, etc, Cortez 

Bray T C & Co, dry goods, 
clothing, boots, shoes, hats, 
trunks, stationery, etc, Cortez 

Brecht Frederick G, black- 
smith and wagonm'k'r, Gurley 

Brown C D, proprietor Prescott 
Foundry 

Buffum W M, general merchan- 
dise, Montezuma 

Butler Thomas J, Treasurer 
Territory of Arizona, and U 
S Court Commissioner, Mon- 
tezuma 

Campbell John G, general mer- 
, chandise, Montezuma 

Carpenter J H, notary public, 
Arizona Bank Building 

Cartter Harley H, attorney at- 
law and deputy recorder 
Yavapai Co, Court House 

Cate C F, proprietor Exchange 
Saloon, Montezuma 

Churchill & Masterson, attor- 
neys-at-law, Arizona Bank 
Building 

Clark E P, Auditor Territory 
of Arizona 

Clark & Adams, lumber manu- 
facturers, and doors, windows 
and blinds 

Cline W A, member Board of 
Supervisors Yavapai Co 

Coleman George M, boot and 
shoemaker, West Prescott 

Connell Robert, wholesale liq- 
uors and cigars, and liquor 
and billiard saloon, Monte- 
zuma 



Cook E J, treasurer Yavapai 
Co, Gurley 

Crane Joseph C, Diana Saloon, 
Montezuma 

Crocker Charles, boot and shoe 
maker, Cortez 

Curtis George W, saw-mill, 2£ 
miles s of Prescott 

Dake C P, U S Marshal Terri- 
tory of Arizona 

Daly Thomas B, liquor saloon, 
Montezuma 

Deraches J Rev, pastor Church 
of the Sacred Heart 

Dickinson Charles, shoemaker, 
Granite 

Dodson James M, city marshal 

Dougherty John W, groceries, 
provisions, liquors, grain, etc, 
and proprietor O K Feed 
Yard, West Prescott 

Eckhoff E A, civil engineer and 
notary public 

Ellis Nathan, general merchan- 
dise, insurance agent, and real 
estate, Cortez 

Fisher Frederick G, blacksmith, 
Cortez 

Fisher J L, general merchan- 
dise, Montezuma 

Fisher P M, justice of the peace 
and notary public, Montezuma 

Fleury Henry, justice of the 
peace and notary public 

Frederick & Hill, stoves, tin- 
ware, etc, Montezuma 

Fremont John C, Governor 
Territory of Arizona 

French C G W, Chief Just- 
ice Supreme Court of Arizona 
and Judge Third Judicial Dist 

Furbish A A Mrs, millinery, 
Gurley 

Garretsee Garret, carpenter and 
builder, Granite 

Gilmer, Salisbury & Co's 
Stage Line, F W Blake 
agent, Montezuma 



IMS J. M. BmnSWiGk & BfllKB CO. MAllIlIFACTUKEBS^IanFr™ 8 '" 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



163 



Gold water Henry, cigars, tobac- 
co, and cutlery, Montezuma 

Goldwater M & Son, general 
merchandise, Cortez 

Gosper John J, Secretary Ter- 
ritory of Arizona, Gurley 

Gosper & Smith, livery and feed 
stable, West Prescott 

Green C W Rev, pastor Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church 

Guild J A, restaurant, Gurley 

Haight M E Mrs, dressmaker, 
Cortez 

Hall J L, justice of the peace, 
Montezuma 

Hall & Poe, butchers, Monte- 
zuma 

Hargrave Joseph P, district 
attorney Yavapai Co, and 
notary public, Court House 

Hargrave & McGrew, attor- 
neys at law, Court House 

Hathaway Guilford, livery and 
feed stable, Granite 

Hatz Daniel, bakery, boarding- 
house, and saloon, Montezu- 
ma 

Hazel tine William E, assist- 
ant cashier Bank of Arizona, 
Cortez 

Head C P & Co, general mer- 
chandise, Gurley 

Herbert Henry M, under-sheriff 
Yavapai Co, Court House 

Herzog E, groceries, provisions, 
fruits, etc, Gurley 

Holden W F, agent Commer- 
cial Insurance Co of Cali- 
fornia 

Howard John, attorney at law, 
Montezuma 

Howey James, blacksmith and 
wagon-maker, Cortez 

Hunt T C, pastor Congregation- 
al Church 

Kelly W N, mayor City of 
Prescott and register TJ S 
Land Office, Montezuma 



Kelly & Stephens, stationery, 
cigars, clothing, boots, shoes, 
etc, Montezuma 

Kendall George D, druggist 
and physician, Gurley 

Kerr Joseph, wagon -maker, 
Montezuma 

Kirwagen & Sines, proprietors 
Sazerac Saloon, Gurley 

Levy D & Co, general merchan- 
dise, Montezuma 

Lewis Sol, president Bank of 
Arizona, Cortez 

Lincoln Oscar, druggist and 
apothecary, Gurley 

Lindenbaum Benjamin, carpen- 
ter, Montezuma 

Long Thomas, half-way house 
and feed-yard, Whipple Road 

Lount George, receiver TJ S 
Land Office, Montezuma 

Martindell C R, insurance ag't, 
Cortez 

Mason A J, manufacturer boots, 
shoes, harness, and saddlery, 
and dealer in saddlery, hard- 
ware, leather, gloves, etc, Cor- 
tez 

Masterson Murat, attorney at 
law, Arizona Bank Building 

McCandless J N, physician, 
Montezuma 

McGrew William H, attorney 
at law, Court House 

Meador J F, agent Hugh White 
& Co's Stage Line, notary 
public, insurance agent, and 
operator U S Military Tele- 
graph, Montezuma 

Miles James H, carpenter and 
builder, Marino 

Milligan Thomas, barber and 
baths, Montezuma 

Mitchell Daniel F, photograph- 
er and clerk Board Supervis- 
ors, Cortez 

Morgan Thomas J, watchmaker 
and jeweler, Gurley 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & C0.{ 



Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



(Illuminating Oils. 



164 



ARIZONA. 



Murphy & Scholey, liquor sa- 
loon, Montezuma 

Noyes A 0, probate judge Ya- 
vapai Co Court House 

K Feed Yard, John W, 
Dougherty proprietor, West 
Prescott 

Otis T W, postmaster, and deal- 
er in groceries, cigars, station- 
ery, etc, Gurley 

Pacific Brewery, John Raible 
proprietor, Montezuma 

Park Jesse A, deputy collector 
U S Internal Revenue, Gur- 
ley 

Porter George S & Co, furni- 
ture, wall paper, bedding, up- 
holstery, picture frame?, mold- 
ings, etc, Cortez 

Prescott and Thirty - Fifth 
Parallel R R Co, A L Moel- 
ler president, W C Bashford 
treasurer, W E Hazeltine sec- 
retary 

Prescott Foundry, C D Brown 
proprietor 

Prescott Mining Co, Curtis C 
Bean agent, Arizona Bank 
Building 

Radczewsky Jacob, blacksmith, 
Granite 

Raible John, proprietor Pacific 
Brewery and liquor saloon, 
Montezuma 

Randall Charles A, hardware, 
tinware, saddlery, harness, 
boots and shoes, Montezuma 

Roberts John W, gunsmith, 
Granite 

Robinson Benjamin, barber and 
baths, Cortez 

Rodenburg Julius N, chairman 
Board of Supervisors Yava- 
pai Co 

Rodgers E A, ice depot, North 
Granite 

Rush Charles B, attorney at law 
and citv recorder, Montezuma 



Rush & Wells, attorneys at 
law, Cortez 

Ryder Emmons P, dentist, Ari- 
zona Bank Building 

Sang Chong r & Co, Chinese 
goods, Montezuma 

Sherman M H, superintendent 
of Public Instruction Terri- 
tory of Arizona 

Shull John T, proprietor Plaza 
livery, feed, and sale stable, 
Goodwin 

Simmons Thomas W, public ad- 
ministrator Yavapai Co 

Sorg Jean, liquor saloon, Granite 

Southern Pacific Mail and 
Stage Line, Kerens & Grif- 
fith proprietors, F W Will- 
iams agent, Gurley 

St Joseph's Hospital, in charge 
Sisters of St Joseph, Marino 

Stahl Edward, assayer, Monte- 
zuma 

Thorne Daniel C, prop'r Cabi- 
net Saloon, Montezuma 

Thorne & Piercy, prop'rs Cabi- 
net Restaurant, Montezuma 

Throne W H, carpenter, Cortez 

Tompkins W J, barber, Monte- 
zuma 

Tompkins & Jackson, liquor and 
billiard saloon, Montezuma 

Trevaskis H Mrs, proprietress 
Waldo House, Montezuma 

Tucker Gideon J, editor and 
publisher Arizona Democrat, 
and attorney at law, Cortez 

Tucker Paul, attorney at law, 
Cortez 

United States Internal Rev- 
enue, J A Park deputy col- 
lector, Gurley 

United States Land Office, 
W N Kelly register, George 
Lount receiver, Montezuma 

United States Military Tele- 
graph, J F Meador opera- 
tor, Montezuma 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



RlUIARn TAB LE( 653 & 655 Market St 
MAWDFACTC BC i: Its, { San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



165 



Urfer Gotlieb, liquor saloon 
and lodgings, Cortez 

Urfer G & Co, proprietors Ari- 
zona Brewery and liquor sa- 
loon, Gurley 

Vernon William, proprietor 
Parlor Saloon, and city treas- 
urer, Montezuma 

Waldo House, Mrs H Trevas- 
kis proprietress, Montezuma 

Walker Joseph R, sheriff Ya- 
vapai Co, Court House 

Walker R H, notary public 

Weaver Benjamin H, grocer- 
ies, provisions, clothing and 
produce, Montezuma 

Wells Ed W, attorney at law 
and notary public, Cortez 

Wells, Fargo & Co, P W Blake 
agent, Montezuma 

Weyl Joseph, notary public, 
Gurley 

White Hugh & Co, proprietors 
Hardyville and Fort Mohave 
Stage Line, Montezuma 

Whitehair A J, feed yard, Cortez 

Wilkerson William, recorder 
Yavapai Co, and clerk Su- 
preme and District Courts, 
Court House 

Williams A P, proprietor Wil- 
liams House, Gurley 

Williams Frederick W, agent 
Southern Pacific Mail and 
Stage Line, Gurley 

Wilson & Haskell, manufac- 
turers doors, windows and 
blinds, and dealers in lumber, 
Cortez 

Windes E A Rev, pastor Bap- 
tist Church 

Queen City P 0, 

Pinal Co, 31 miles n e of Flor- 
ence, is pleasantly situated at 
the mouth of Queen Creek 
Canon, three miles east of Pi- 



nal City. In view of the 
town is a precipice over which 
three hundred and fifty hostile 
Indians were driven headlong 
to destruction by Gen. Crook's 
troops. It is said that human 
bones can still be found to 
mark the spot where they 
perished. Two quartz mills 
located here are in operation 
most of the time, crushing ore 
from the mines in the vicinity. 

Creveau — , boarding house 
Czarnowski A F, mining sup't 
Deutsch William, b'ding house 
Elmore D T, mining superin- 
tendent and assayer 
Faylor & Parker, liquor saloon 
Gen Shuy, restaurant 
Miller Charles, general mer- 
chandise, postmaster, and no- 
tary public 
Nettle Matthew, mining super- 
intendent 
Scott W M, mining sup't 
Taft D H, mining sup't 
Went worth F G, gen'l mdse 

Reno P 0, 

Gila Co, 55 miles n w of Globe. 

Cline C, justice of the peace 
Prater William, postmaster and 

station keeper 
Smith — , liquor saloon 

Richmond, 

Gila Co. (See Nugget P O.) 

Riverside P 0, 

Pinal Co, 30 miles e of Florence, 
on the San Pedro River. 
Smelting works have recently 
been erected here, to work 
copper ore obtained from a 
mine about six miles distant. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { T ^a h o fl Sfe^ T ik5£r} Wines of all Kinds. 



166 



ARIZONA. 



Stages for Florence and Globe 
pass tri-weekly. 

Pinal Copper Mining Co, smelt- 
ing works 

Putnam C D, postmaster and 
station keeper 

Sacoton. 

Pinal Co, 25 miles west of Flor- 
ence. 
Fish E N, general merchandise 

Safford P 0, 

The county seat of Graham Co, 
is situated about one quarter 
of a mile south of the Gila 
River, in the Pueblo Viejo 
Valley, a section containing 
some excellent agricultural 
and grazing lands. The 
mines in the vicinity are 
principally copper, but not 
yet developed to any extent. 
The erection of buildings for 
county use and other im- 
provements are in progress, 
and in the near future this 
will no doubt be a place of 
some note. 

Anderson P, hotel 
Ballard William, wagon maker 
Clarke W F, recorder Graham 
County and attorney at law 
Curtis Munroe M, carpenter 
Franklin A M & Co, general 

merchandise 
Glassman & Co, brewery 
Harrison John, liquor saloon 
Hayes James, attorney at law 
Haynes James, surveyor Gra- 
ham County 
Hill Joseph, cattle dealer 
Hyatt & Co, proprietors Star 

Flouring Mills 
Jacobs B M, postmaster 
Katz A, notary public 



Lake George, probate judge 

Graham County 
McCarty G B, gen'l mdse 
Morris James, attorney at law 
Munson William, freighter 
Osbwrn N, district attorney Gra- 
ham County 
Rose C B, sheriff Graham Co 
Sims John, carpenter 
Towndron W N, physician 
Tuttle Edward D, justice of 
the peace and coroner Gra- 
ham County 
Wade Anthony, blacksmith 
Wilson S F, school teacher 

Saint Joseph P 0, 

Apache Co, 80 miles n w of St 

John. 
Ladd G S, justice of the peace 
Richards J H, postmaster 

San Carlos P 0, 

Graham Co, 60 miles n w of 
Safford, is situated in the 
western portion of the coun- 
ty, on what is known as the 
San Carlos Reservation. It 
is the residence of the U. S. 
Indian Agent and his assist- 
ants, who have under their 
charge about 5,000 Indians 
belonging to several different 
tribes, but all of whom are 
generally designated as Apa- 
ches. Among these are what 
is left of the blood - thirsty 
savages who but a few years 
since roamed through the land 
seeking every opportunity to 
plunder and kill all who were 
so unfortunate as to fall in 
their way. They have at last, 
however, been subjugated, 
and are now quietly living 
on the reservation, protected 
and provided for by the Gov- 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



BILLIARD TABLE C 653 & 655 Market St. 
MAJTIJFACTIBLB8, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T.. 



wholesale; 

BOOTS Atf« SHOES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTOEY AND GAZETTEER. 



167 



ernment, but subjected to 
certain restrictions necessary 
to preserve law and order, 
and prevent those who might 
be so disposed from wander- 
ing away to commit depre- 
dations. Agricultural imple- 
ments and seeds are furnished 
to those who wish to cultivate 
the soil, and quite a number 
are now engaged in this pur- 
suit, while others are disposed 
to lead an indolent and rov- 
ing life. 

The Globe Mercantile Co, 

general merchandise 
Tiffany JC,US Indian Agent 
Wood Reuben, general mer- 
chandise and justice of the 
peace 

San Simon P 0, 

Cachise Co, 75 miles n e of 
Tombstone, on the Southern 
Pacific Railroad, 125 miles 
east of Tucson, is the distrib- 
uting point for freight des- 
tined for the mining camps 
in California and Chiricahua 
Districts. Stages leave daily 
for Galeyville, 22 miles dis- 
tant. 

Farrington R E & Co, general 
merchandise and forwarding 
and commission merchants 

Johnson J Mrs, restaurant 

Kelly R B, forwarding and com- 
mission merchant, and U S 
deputy mineral surveyor 

Rynerson A C & Co, stage pro- 
prietors 

Sells & Berry, groceries, liquors, 
etc, and restaurant 

Tompkins Peter, liquor saloon 

Wells, Fargo & Co, G F Moore 
agent 



San Xavier Del Bac. 

Pima Co, nine miles s of Tucson, 
in the valley of the Rio Santa 
Cruz, a village of Papago In- 
dians, is distinguished for its 
church, an ancient structure 
in the Moorish order of archi- 
tecture, built by the Jesuit 
missionaries in the early part 
of the eighteenth century. 
The history of this venerable 
edifice is in doubt ; but the 
most authentic accounts of 
the establishment of the Mis- 
sion, and subsequent erection 
of the present structure, say 
that the missionaries followed 
in the pathway of the explor- 
ing and conquering party of 
Coronado about the year 1560, 
planting several missions on 
the route to the Gila, one be- 
ing at the locality now known 
as San Xavier Del Bac, or 
San Xavier of the Spring. It 
cannot be presumed that the 
original Mission bore the 
name of San Xavier, as that 
great disciple of Ignatius Lo- 
yola was not canonized until 
1 622, although he died eighty 
years before, one of the most 
eminent and successful of 
missionaries. A church was 
erected and a mission main- 
tained for more than a hund- 



red 



year? 



when these ad- 



vanced outposts of civiliza- 
tion were beaten back by hos- 
tile savages, and their build- 
ings laid waste. About 1730 
the place was reoccupied and 
the present edifice erected, its 
construction probably occu- 
pying many years, as it real- 
ly never has been completed. 
Situated as it is — or until very 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm. B. Hooper i Go. { 



T Tet1n?^^; r Me E x 1 S 30 '}Teas & Bandies at Wholesale, 



168 



ARIZONA. 



recently it was — in the midst 
of a wilderness, surrounded 
by low adobe houses and In- 
dian huts, it makes a most 
imposing appearance, and im- 
presses the beholder with a 
feeling of reverence and ad- 
miration. The surprise, the 
contrast, and the age of the 
structure, combine to give an 
impress of grandeur greater 
than would obtain were the 
building in a different local- 
ity. Here the traveler may 
imagine himself in one of the 
Barbary States, or in the Holy 
Land, or take himself back 
to medieval times ; as the old 
church and its surroundings, 
its swarthy guardians, its sun- 
dried hills, its vegetation of 
the desert border, and the 
ever-blue sky above it, all re- 
mind him of an age,, a land 
and a people, not of the pres- 
ent — not American. Linking 
the present with the past — 
showing two ages in one — 
the venerable pile, so sacred 
to the poor Indians, who 
guard it so faithfully, should 
be held sacred as a monu- 
ment in the pathway of Time 
by the new element now 
surging around it in the mad 
excitement of progressive en- 
terprise. Now it is the " Blar- 
ney-stone " of Arizona, and he 
who writes of the Territory 
and neglects San Xavier, says 
nothing worthy of notice. The 
church covers an area of 8,050 
square feet, in the form of a 
Latin cross, the exterior di- 
mensions being 115 feet by 
70, and 57 £ feet to the upper 
floor of the tower, and about 
75 feet to the extreme top. 



The material is brick and 
stone, laid in a cement of su- 
perior quality, the source of 
which is unknown in the lo- 
cality at present. The main 
body is surmounted by a 
dome, and a tower rises from 
each of its front angles. The 
eastern tower, intended, evi- 
dently, as the principal, re- 
mains unfinished. The out- 
side was once stuccoed with 
white cement, but the marks 
of age are on its walls. Fres- 
coes, portraits, niches, and 
statuary once adorned the in- 
terior, and their remains be- 
speak for them a former ele- 
gance and worth worthy the 
place. It is related that there 
were formerly more than 
eighty pieces of statuary in the 
church, representing Christ, 
the Apostles, and Saints, but 
the images remaining are past 
recognition. The large fresco 
paintings of "TKe Last Sup- 
per," "The Pentecost," "The 
Nativity of Christ," " The An- 
nunciation," " The Visitation 
of the Virgin," and others, 
are past recognition. The In- 
dian, while venerating the 
structure, and dimly appre- 
ciating its purpose, has not 
learned to finish or to repair, 
much less to build; and noth- 
ing but original strength has 
saved this monument of the 
past from obliteration. 

Seymour P 0, 

Maricopa Co, 49 miles n e of 
Phoenix. Stages for Prescott 
and Phoenix pass daily, con- 
necting with a line for Vul- 
ture Mine, 11 miles distant. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balks Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE (653*655 Market St. 
MA\IFA(TIKEKS. \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



169 



Conger Daniel, stage station 
and liquor saloon 

Signal P 0, 

Mohave County, 75 miles s e of 
Mineral Park, on the Big 
Sandy River, about 18 miles 
above its confluence with Bill 
Williams Fork. In this sec- 
tion are numerous gold and 
silver ledges, some contain- 
ing ore of a high grade. 
Hall Charles, liquor saloon 
Kimble Bros, gen'l mdse, 
Koshland H, notary public 
Levy, Koshland & Co, general 
merchandise and hotel 

Silent P 0, 

Yuma Co, 40 miles n of Yu- 
ma, in Silver District. In 
this district are located sev- 
eral rich mines which are be- 
ing rapidly developed. A 
tri-weekly line of stages main- 
tain communication with Yu- 
ma, Castle Dome Landing, 
Norton's Landing, and Eh- 
renberg. 

Crawford A D, justice of peace 
Holjes J H & Co, general mer- 
chandise and liquor saloon 
Mendez Saturnino, boarding 
Millar Walter, blacksmith and 

wagonmaker 
Miller W G, attorney at law 
Norton Charles T, general mer- 
chandise, postmaster and no- 
tary public 
Rhodenback Harry, hotel 
Stein Joseph J & Co, liq saloon 

Silver King P 0, 

Pinal Co, 35 miles n e of Flor- 
ence and 7 miles from Pinal 
City, is pleasantly situated in 



a rich mining district called 
the Pioneer. Here is located 
the famous Silver King mine, 
which since its discovery in 
1875 has been continually 
yielding ore of extraordinary 
richness. The climate of this 
section is delightful and wood 
and water abundant. Daily 
communication is maintained 
with Pinal City, Florence, 
Casa Grande, and Picacho by 
stage, and with Globe by sad- 
dle train. 

Buckalew & Ochoa, gen'l mdse 

Ellis, Aron & Co, gen'l mdse 

O'Boyle W C, proprietor Silver 
King Hotel 

Thompson E F, postmaster and 
notary public 

Thompson & Bowen, liquor 
saloon 

Williams Robert, proprietor 
Williams Hotel 

Young R, news depot 

Skull Valley P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 18 miles s w of 

Prescott. 
Dickson John H, stage station 
Dickson Mary Mrs, postmis- 
tress 



Snowflake. 

2o, 45 miles v 
Smith J N, notary public 



Apache Co, 45 miles west of St. 
John. 



Solomonville P 0, 

Graham Co, 3 miles w of Saf- 
ford, and half a mile south 
of the Gila River, is in a sec- 
tion containing good agricul-. 
tural and grazing lands. 

Jesus Bros, hotel 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



12 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO.! 



Tucson <fe Phoenix, A.T., El Taso, 
Tex., and Uuaymas, Mexico, 



\ Lubricating Oils. 



170 



ARIZONA. 



Quiros R, blacksmith and wag- 
onmaker 

Solomon I E, general merchan- 
dise and postmaster 

Solomon Nathan, livery stable 

Wickersham D W, attorney at 
law, justice of the peace and 
notary public 

Springerville P 0, 

Apache Co. 

Franklin C A, postmaster 

St. John P 0, 

The county seat of Apache Co, 
is situated on the Little Col- 
orado River, about 25 miles 
west of the line of New Mex- 
ico. 

Baca Dionicio, treasurer Apache 
County 

Bailey R J, recorder Apache Co 

Franklin C A, probate judge 
Apache Co 

Rudd W R, district attorney 
Apache Co 

Stover E S, sheriff Apache Co 

Stanton P 0, 

Gila Co, 18 miles n w of Globe, 
occupies a beautiful site in a 
fertile valley, surrounded by 
scenery romantic and grand. 
The climate of this section is 
delightful, grain and differ- 
ent kinds of vegetables grow 
luxuriantly, and wood and 
water are abundant. A ten- 
stamp mill, owned by the 
Mack Morris Mining Co, is 
located here. 

Johnson Thomas L, postmaster 

Johnson & Baldwin, general 
merchandise 

"Walker George B, justice of 
the peace 



Summit Station, 

Cachise Co. 

Hooker C M, station keeper 

Sunset P 0, 

Apache Co, 90 miles n w of St 

John. 
Blanchard & Breed, gen'l mdse 
Savage L M, postmaster 

Sweet Water, 

Pinal Co, 30 miles w of Flor- 
ence. 
Rittenhouse J D, gen'l mdse 

Taylor P 0, 

Apache Co. 

Perkins Jesse N, postmaster 

Tempe P 0, 

Maricopa Co, 9 miles e of Phoe- 
nix, on the south side of Salt 
River, is in a section noted 
for its rich agricultural lands. 
Grain, and all kinds of vegeta- 
bles grow luxuriantly, and al- 
most every variety of fruit 
known in temperate or tropi- 
cal climates thrives well ; large 
quantities of alfalfa are grown, 
the land producing as many 
as six crops in a year ; cotton, 
sugar cane, coffee and rice can 
also be raised. An abundant 
supply of water for irrigating 
purposes is brought in ditches 
from Salt River. The weather 
is moderate during the greater 
part of the year, but in May, 
June, July and August, it is 
at times excessively hot. 

Barstow J A, justice of peace 

Crismon C, flour mill 

Edwards — , tannery 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BI LLIARD TAB r.E f 653 <fc 655 Market St 
MAMrA(TUU;iW,[ San Francisco. 




-^•HINGKLEY, SPIERS & HAYES, PROPRIETORS. •* 

^F^ OFFICE, ^-> 

220 Fremont Street, San Francisco, California. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Quartz Mills, 

Amalgamating Pans, 
Settlers, 

Steam Engines, 
Boilers, 

Hoisting Works, 
Ore Cars and Buckets, Cages, 

Pumping Machinery, 
Compressors, 
Retorts, 

Smelting Furnaces, 
Ore Feeders. 

Car W^heels and Axles, 

And all other kinds of Machinery used on the Coast. 



Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast for the Celebrated 

DEAME STEAM FUJXEP 



We have manufactured the Machinery for the following Mills in the 
Tombstone District, viz : 

TOMBSTONE MILL & MINING CO. 

GRAND CENTRAL MINING CO. 

SUNSET MINING CO., OR HEAD CENTER, 
WESTERN MINING CO., OR CONTENTION MILL, 
CORBIN MILL & MINING CO. 

As well as Machinery for many other Companies in Arizona and Mexico. 

I * $)* 

*170 



-^LOCOMOTIVE WORKS^ 

CORNER BEALE AND HOWARD STREETS, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

W. H. TAYLOR, President 

JOSEPH MOORE, - Superintendent 



^BUILDERS OF STEAM MACHINERY* 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 

Steamboat, Steamship and Land Engines and Boilers, 



HIGH PRESSURE OR COMPOUND. 




Ordinary Engines 

Compounded when advisable. 

Steam Boilers. 

Particular attention given to the quality of the material and workmanship, and none but 
first class work produced. 

Water Pipe, 

Of boiler or sheet iron, of any size, made in suitable lengths for connecting together, or 
sheets rolled, punched and packed for shipment, ready to be riveted on the ground. 

Hydraulic Riveting. 

Boiler work and water pipe made by this establishment riveted by hydraulic riveting machin- 
ery, that quality of" work being far superior to hand work. 

Pumps, 

For mining, of anv capacity and of any style. Our style of direct-acting, compound engines, 
with double line of pumps, are particularly recommended. We refer to those now 
in use, not one having ever been broken down. 

Direct- acting Engines, 

For underground work, irrigation «»r city waterworks' purposes, built with the celebrated 
Davey valve motion, superior to any other. 

Mining Machinery. 

Quartz Mills, Pans, Boilers, Hoisting Machinery, Sinking or Hoisting Engines, or other 
machinery required. 



171 




LORD & WILLIAMS CO.. Tucson, A. T.. General Merchandise. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



171 



Gallardo F, liquor saloon and 
restaurant 

Goldman & Co, gen'l mdse 

Harrison, Fisher & Co, flour 
and grain dealers 

Hayden Charles T, general 
merchandise, flour mill, black- 
smithing and wagon-making 

Hill C W, postmaster and agent 
Commercial Insurance Co of 
California 

Imperial Eulalia, liquor saloon 

Priest James T, general mer- 
chandise 

Shannon P K, liquor saloon 

Tip Top P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 55 miles s e of 
Prescott and 9 miles from 
Gillette, is a thriving min- 
ing camp in Humbug Dis- 
trict. Here is located the 
Tip Top mine, which is con- 
stantly yielding very rich ore. 
Daily communication with 
Phoenix and Prescott is main- 
tained by stage via Gillette. 

Anderson H, justice of peace 
Arnold Peter, liquor saloon 
Bernard & Smith, liquor saloon 
Blackford W C, livery and feed 

stable 
Bolien Augustus, liquor saloon 
Bostwick John, liquor saloon 
Dawes & St James, general mer- 
chandise 
Kepple & Murphy, liquor saloon 
Mahar Joseph, restaurant 
Marlow George, butcher 
McPhee A J, justice of peace 
Rowe W A & Co, general mer- 
chandise 
Urfer G, liquor saloon 
Wager Edward G, fruit, con- 
fectionery, etc, and postmas- 
ter 
Webber & Co, boarding house 



Tombstone P 0, 

Cachise Co, incorporated city 
and county-seat, 72 miles s e 
of Tucson, and 276 s e of 
Prescott, presents a conspi- 
cuous example of the sudden 
growth of a busy and pros- 
perous town, only witnessed 
in the mining regions of the 
west. Less than a decade has 
passed since the blood-thirsty 
Cachise from his stronghold 
in the neighboring mountains, 
defied and repelled all intrud- 
ing civilization, and decreed 
the land should ever be a 
waste and a wilderness, sub- 
ject to his will and caprice. 
With his merciless Apaches 
he had made south-eastern 
Arizona the "dark and bloody 
ground" of the far West, and 
the name of the county and 
county-seat will be forever 
commemorative and suggest- 
ive of the fierce chief and 
his victims. The Dragoon 
Mountains, the favorite ren- 
dezvous of Cachise; Mule 
Pass, Apache Pass, Dos Ca- 
bezas, the Chiricahua, and the 
Tombstone Mountains of this 
region, all bear sad remem- 
brances of the dire conflict so 
long maintained between the 
aborigines of the country and 
the white traveler and settler; 
and the very mention of their 
names will, at least until the 
generation of pioneers has 
passed away, bring a thrill 
and a tremor to the body as 
it recalls the scenes and events 
of former days. After great 
sacrifice and loss of life, the 
indomitable courage of the 
white man has prevailed, and 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



WM. B. HOOPER & gO.{ T T e x ?,t?^^ Liquor Dealers. 



172 



ARIZONA. 



the dread localities named are 
now sought without danger, 
and have become seats of 
pleasant and prosperous 
homes. The date of the first 
discovery of silver -bearing 
ores in this region is not 
definitely known ; but a 
German mineralogist named 
Bronkow was the first to lo- 
cate and attempt the working 
of a mine in these mountains 
— the mine being seven miles 
south-west of the present 
town. Bronkow was foully 
murdered by his Mexican 
operatives before he had de- 
veloped it to any great extent. 
Others followed in his foot- 
steps, to meet a similar fate at 
the hands of the Apaches. 
Sixteen persons, including lo- 
cators and operatives, are thus 
reported to have been slain in 
the attempt to develop the 
mine, until it was said he who 
would go there should first 
prepare his tombstone ; and 
prospectors thitherward bent, 
jocularly saying they were 
going to their tombstone, gave 
the name to the mountain 
now so noted for its wealth 
of minerals ; hence the name 
of the district and of the city. 
But the discovery of the 
mines which have drawn at- 
tention to the district was 
made by A. E. Scheiffelin in 
the fall of 1877; and in Feb- 
ruary, 1878, he and Richard 
Gird located the Tough Nut, 
Contention, and other mines. 
From that time must date the 
existence of the district, and 
the town soon followed. The 
first store in the vicinity of 
what is now the city of Tomb- 



stone was opened by A. 
W. Stowe, about September, 

1878, at a place called Water- 
vale, two miles from the pres- 
ent town-site ; and soon after- 
wards another was opened at 
the same place by Messrs. 
Cadwell & Stanford. The 
next store was opened by J. 
B. Allen, at a place called 
Hogem. In February, 1880, 
two other stores were estab- 
lished by Mark P. Shaffer- 
one at Hogem and another at 
Eichmond. The first restau- 
rant on the present town-site 
dates from June, 1879, under 
the proprietorship of C. H. 
Brown ; and the pioneer sa- 
loon soon followed, built by 
Calhoun Brothers: and the 
town may then be said to be 
established and endued with 
life and spirit. The stores of 
Messrs. Allen, Cadwell & 
Stanford, and Shaffer, were 
in 1880 removed to Tomb- 
stone, and with the store of 
P. W. Smith were the first 
establishments of the kind in 
the embryo city. The town- 
site was located in April, 

1879, by Judge Bidwell, J. S. 
Clark, and others. The vil- 
lage grew rapidly, keeping 
pace with the development 
of the mines, until now, July, 
1881, it is an incorporated 
city, with a population esti- 
mated at from 6,000 to 7,000 
— the liveliest and most 
promising mining town on 
the Pacific Coast. The loca- 
tion is f avQrable for the build- 
ing of a city, being on a 
slight elevation or ridge, the 
surface falling on every side, 
affording opportunity for 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



BILLIARD TABLE f 653 <fe 655 Market St 
MAWUFACTVREKH, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T.. IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



173 



drainage, while it is of easy 
access. The streets are broad, 
crossing each other at right 
angles; those running east 
and west being named after 
pioneer citizens, and the cross 
streets bearing numbers. The 
buildings are as yet rude and 
simple, being mostly of lum- 
ber, hastily constructed j but 
some are of adobe, and being 
covered with mastic in imita- 
tion of brick, present quite 
a fine appearance. Hotels, 
banks, stores, printing-offices, 
saloons, a theater, churches 
and schools are among the 
public buildings of promi- 
nence ; and all business per- 
taining to a busy American 
city is carried on. The Syc- 
amore Spring Water Com- 
pany supplies the city with 
water from a spring 8 miles 
north, which is brought in 
iron pipes of four inches 
diameter, having a capacity 
of 85,000 gallons per day; 
but this quantity is not usual- 
ly maintained. Water is also 
brought in carts from wells 
2? miles from town. A sur- 
vey has been made for a line 
of pipes to conduct water 
from the Huachuca Mount- 
ains ; and as water has been 
struck in some of the deep 
mines, an adequate supply 
will soon be had for all pur- 
poses. On the 22nd of June, 
1881, about four blocks in the 
business poriion of the city 
were swept away by fire — in- 
volving the destruction of one 
hundred and fifty buildings, 
and a loss of over $200,000. 
Such a disaster was, of course, 
severely felt; but in so young 



and vigorous a community, 
with most abundant resources 
in the first stage of develop- 
ment, it could da of but tem- 
porary effect. The work of 
rebuilding was at once com- 
menced, with great improve- 
ment on the old, and with 
precautions against a recur- 
rence of the calamity. Easy 
and rapid connection is had 
with the world by means of 
the Southern Pacific Eailroad 
at Benson, twenty-eight miles 
north, and this distance will 
soon be eliminated by the 
construction of a railroad, 
which is expected to be com- 
pleted before the end of the 
year. The telegraph gives 
instant communication, and 
many lines of stages lead to 
all the surrounding towns. 
Hotels of a high character, 
among which the Cosmopoli- 
tan — a first-class house con- 
ducted on the European plan, 
C. Bilicke, proprietor — also 
the Grand and Brown ? s, in- 
vite the traveler to comfort- 
able homes. The banking 
house of Safford, Hudson & 
Co., and many other large 
business houses, show the 
wealth and stability of the 
city. Four newspapers — the 
Epitaph, Nugget, Expositor, 
and Evening Gossip — advo- 
cate the interests of the sec- 
tion, publishing the local and 
telegraphic news, and serving 
the great purpose of the press 
in enlightening the people, 
exposing crimes, and main- 
taining order in the commun- 
ity. Although so new a town, 
composed of such heteregene- 
ous elements, and containing 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO.{ Tu T c eTJn?GT^t:MSrcr}Cigars of all Kinds. 



174 



ARIZONA. 



a large floating population, 
society is good, and law and 
order prevail. A public school 
is maintained, having a build- 
ing with accomodation for 
one hundred and fifty pupils. 
There are one hundred and 
ten enrolled, under the super- 
vision of two teachers. A 
private school — The Tomb- 
stone Academy — Prof. J. B. 
Patch, principal, is an excel- 
lent institution and well at- 
tended. The Methodists, 
Presbyterians, and Catholics 
have churches. The Tomb- 
stone Methodist Episcopal 
Church was organized May 
13th, 1880, being the pioneer 
society, services having been 
held as early as February, 
1880. The church edifice was 
completed and opened for 
divine service in October, 
1880. It is an adobe building, 
erected at a cost of about 
$4,000. The First Presby- 
terian Church was organized 
September 18th, 1880. The 
congregation has erected a 
substantial wooden edifice, 
costing about $1,400, which 
was opened for divine service 
December 19th, 1880. The 
Church of the Sacred Heart 
(Eoman Catholic) was organ- 
ized in August, 1880. The 
Eev. Antonio Jouvenceau, of 
Tucson, was the first Roman 
Catholic clergyman who held 
services in Tombstone. The 
church edifice — a wooden 
building, with a seating ca- 
pacity of about two hundred 
— was opened for divine ser- 
vice on January 22nd, 1881, 
Eev. E. P. Schnider, its pres- 
ent pastor, officiating. The 



benevolent and social orders 
are also well represented. 
The Solomon Lodge, F. and 
A. M., was organized in 
March, 1881, working under 
the jurisdiction of the Grand 
Lodge of California. The 
Tombstone Turn-Verein was 
organized November 20th, 
1880. They have a fine one- 
story wooden building on the 
corner of Fourth and S afford 
streets, erected at a cost of 
$2,000, and furnished at an 
additional cost of $500. The 
building contains a reading- 
room supplied with papers 
from various parts of the 
world. The Cachise Lodge 
No. 3, Independent Order of 
Good Templars, was organ- 
ized February, 1881, with 
thirty members. The Odd 
Fellows and Knights of Py- 
thias have also recently or- 
ganized. The Tombstone 
Mining Exchange was incor- 
ated March 12th, 1881, with 
the object of buying, selling, 
and improving real estate, 
dealing in mining stock, etc. 
The number of members is 
seventy. They propose to 
erect a two-story adobe build- 
ing, 30 feet front by 100 feet 
in depth, which will contain 
a library and reading - room 
for members, and a cabinet 
of minerals and native woods. 
A gas company and a street 
railroad company have been 
formed, completing the round 
of city institutions. Stages 
of the Arizona Mail and Stage 
Line leave daily for Benson, 
via Contention City, connect- 
ing with the trains of the 
Southern Pacific Eailroad ; 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. SS&2&&2K 



C653(fcfi55 Market St. 
( San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



175 



also tri- weekly for Bisbee, via 
Charleston and Hereford; and 
for Harshaw, via Charleston, 
Camp Huachuca and Camp 
Evans. 

Officers. — John P. Clum, 
Mayor; George Pridham, J. 
A. Kelly, Smith Grey and 
Godfrey Tribolet, Council- 
men ; Marcus P. Hayne, 
Attorney ; Josiah Brown, 
Treasurer; A. O. Wallace, 
Eecorder and Police Judge ; 
Frank Walker, Assessor ; 
Benjamin Sippy, Marshal; G. 
E. Goodfellow, M. D., Health 
Officer. 

Abbott B M, undertaker, 222 
Fifth 

Abbott Grafton St L, attorney 
at law, 433 Fremont 

Ackley Charles, civil engineer 
and deputy U S mineral sur- 
veyor, 218 Fifth 

Ahlers J D & Co, root beer 
brewery and coffee saloon, 
203 Fourth 

Anderson G W, physician, Cos- 
mopolitan Hotel 

Anderson N D, attorney at law 

Anderson & Schmidt, proprie- 
tors Russ House, Fifth 

Anderton P S, Palace Saloon, 
504 Allen 

Andrew & Co, groceries and 
fruits, 224 Fourth 

Aram Eugene W, attorney at 
law and notary public 

Archer & Co, Cosmopolitan Sa- 
loon, Allen 

Arizona Brewery, Bernhardt 
& Leptien prop'rs, 520 Allen 

Arizona Corral and Livery 
Stable, A G Garrison prop'r, 
corner Allen and Third 

Arizona Mail and Stage Line, 
J D Kinnear & Co proprie- 
tors, 427 Allen 



Arizona Transportation Co, C 
H Light sup't freighting, Fre- 
mont 

Armstrong & Young, wagons, 
Allen 

Arnold George, civil engineer 
and surveyor, 508 Allen 

Atchison Thomas A, tinsmith 
and plumber, 212 Fourth 

Bacigalupi & Martin, butch- 
ers and sausage-makers, 710 
Fremont 

Bald ridge William J, groceries, 
fruits, etc, cor Allen and Sixth 

Balurdo V R, barber and baths, 
419 Allen 

Baron William, barber and 
baths, 406 Allen 

Bayley George, prop'r Bayley's 
Bestaurant, 403 Allen 

Beauchamp Onesime, carpenter, 
306 Fremont 

Behan John H, sheriff Cachise 
Co, 306 Fifth 

Bell H J A & Co, liquor saloon, 
511 Allen 

Bennetts & Co, Magnolia Sa- 
loon, 522 Allen 

Bernhardt & Leptien, Arizona 
Brewery and liquor saloon, 
520 Allen 

Berry George G, attorney-at- 
law, cor Fifth and Fremont 

Berwin Simeon, tailor, 219 Fifth 

Bilicke C, proprietor Cosmo- 
politan Hotel, 407-411 Allen 

Bissell C E Mrs, dressmaker, 
723 Allen 

Blackburn L F, deputy sheriff 
and collector, 304 Fourth 

Blair Charles C, Way-Up Lodg- 
ing House and Saloon, 725 
Allen 

Blinn L W & Co, lumber, doors, 
windows and blinds, Tough 

• Nut 

Borland Mrs, dressmaker, 523 
Fremont 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



U/m R U nnnan JlPn i Tucson & Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, ) Sole Agents J. A. MILLER 
Will • Di nUUpcl OC UUi | Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, i c. C WHISKEY. 



176 



ARIZONA. 



Bourland W A, cigars and to- 
bacco, 431 Allen 

Brooks Ella Mrs, wines and liq- 
uors, 226 Fourth 

Brown Charles R, proprietor 
Brown's Hotel, corner Fourth 
and Allen 

Brown Fielding C, liquor sa- 
loon, 218 Fourth 

Brown Jessie E, Mrs, proprie- 
tress Grand Hotel, 424 and 
426 Allen 

Brown Josiah, city treasurer 

Brown R J Mrs, lodgings, 112 
Fifth 

Brown, Taylor & Co, corral and 
feed yard, Allen 

Brown & McGregor, carpenters 
and builders, 307 Fourth 

Bullock E & Co, livery and feed 
stable, Fremont 

Burke Francis G, attorney at 
law, Fremont 

Oadwell & Stanford, general 
merchandise, 512 Allen 

Caeser Julius, bakery and res- 
taurant, 415 Allen 

Cameron & Allender, wines 
and liquors, 429 Allen 

Campbell Alexander, attorney 
at law, Allen 

Campbell R J, clerk Board of 
Supervisors, Cachise Co 

Campbell Robert, restaurant and 
liquor saloon, 219 Fourth 

Campbell & Hatch, billiard 
parlors, 421 and 423 Allen 

Carleton Frank H, restaurant, 
cigars and confectionery, 523 
Allen 

Carpenter Sidney W, notary 
public and conveyancer, 209 
Fifth 

Carr John, blacksmith, 310 Allen 

Chapin S B, stationery, cigars, 
etc, 220 Fourth 

Charles Lee Kong, Chinese 
goods, 238 Allen 



Christie M R Mrs, lodgings, 107 
Fifth 

Clapp Milton B, cashier Saf- 
ford, Hudson & Co, notary 
public and insurance agent, 
206 Fifth 

Clark James S, capitalist, 532 
Fremont 

Clifford Robert, butcher, 614 
Fremont 

Clum John P, postmaster and 
mayor Tombstone, 220 Fourth 

Clum & Reppy, publishers 
Tombstone Epitaph, 325 Fre- 
mont 

Coghlan & Clements, Virginia 
Saloon, 522 Fremont 

Cohen R, groceries, mining and 
mill supplies, cor Allen and 
Sixth 

Cohn A & Bro, cigars, tobacco 
and notions, 509 Allen 

Colby Mattie Mrs, wines and 
liquors, Allen 

Colby P T, attorney at law and 
notary public, Gird's Building 

Commercial Job Printing Of- 
fice, H W Hasselgren, pro- 
prietor, 520 Fremont 

Corn well John W, notary pub- 
lic, 431 Fremont 

Cornwell & Davis, accountants 
and collectors, 431 Fremont 

Cosmopolitan Hotel, C Bilicke 
proprietor, 407-411 Allen 

Crowley B A Mrs, dressmaker 
and agent Butterick's pat- 
terns, 114 Fourth 

Culver Belden F, dealer in min- 
ing properties, Gird's Building 

Cusich J, restaurant, 216 Fourth 

Danner & Owens, Bank Ex- 
change, 438 Allen 

Davis L H, attorney at law and 
notary public, Gird's Building 

Dee William, blacksmith, Allen 

Dillon & Kenealy, dry goods, 
etc, 418 Allen 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE 
MAJTUPACTIIKEKs, 



653 & 655 Market St 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., ^^^1™' 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



177 



Diss F A J, agent Tombstone 
and Charleston Ice Co, Tough 
Nut 

Diss & Co, commission mer- 
chants, Tough Nut 

Doland & Brown, blacksmiths 
and wagon-makers, Third 

Doling John, proprietor Tomb- 
stone Race Course, one mile 
from city 

Drum Thomas J, attorney at 
law, 431 Fremont 

Duclos Mme, dressmaker,Tough 
Nut 

Dunbar Bros & Co, livery and 
feed stable, Fifth 

Dunbar John 0, treasurer Ca- 
chise Co, 306 Fifth 

Duval Charles J, metallurgi- 
cal engineer and assayer, 213 
Fifth 

Ear 11, Smith, Campbell & Rob- 
inson, attorneys at law, Allen 

Earll & Banning, confectionery, 
etc., Fourth 

Earp James C, sample rooms, 
434 Allen 

Egbert & Co, liquor saloon, 205 
Fifth 

Ekelund C P, liquor saloon, 618 
Allen 

Elmwood House, Allen S John- 
son proprietor, 417 Fremont 

Emmons G W & Co, hardware, 
217 Fourth 

Empire Lodging House, Wil- 
liam C Morison proprietor, 
433 Fremont 

Ernst Hyman, tailor, 103 Fourth 

Eschman & Alderson, liquor sa- 
loon, Fremont 

Eureka Soda Works, Herve & 
Carbon, proprietors, 212 Sixth 

Evening Gossip, Na^h & Em- 
mons, publishers, 215 Fourth 

Everhardy Jacob, butcher, 404 
Fremont 

Farrell J R, notary public 



Felter A J, justice of the peace 
and notary public, 332 Fre- 
mont 

Fesenfeld William, stoves and 
tinware, 205 Fourth 

Fickas B A, notary public and 
conveyancer, 227 Fifth 

Fitch Thomas, attorney at law, 
Sixth fc 

Fitzhenry John C, groceries 
and liquors, 216 Fifth 

Fitzhenry & Mansfield, grocer- 
ies and liquors, Fremont 

Fitzpatrick Jeremiah, wagon- 
maker, 310 Allen 

Flynn & Fitzpatrick, liquor sa- 
loon, Allen 

Fonck John L, furniture and 
bedding, Fourth 

Fortlouis Albert, stationery, ci- 
gars, and tobacco, 413 Allen 

Fowler Henry R, physician, 
518 Fremont 

Frary A P Mrs, millinery and 
fancy goods, 516 Fremont 

Frederick & Hill, stoves and tin- 
ware, 518 Allen 

Frerichs D G, merchant tailor, 
207 Fourth 

Frink George K, general mer- 
chandise, 411 Fremont 

Garrison A G, Arizona Corral 
and Livery Stable, cor Allen 
and Third 

Gehman Henry L, shoe maker, 
320 Allen 

Geisenhofer O W, bakery and 
restaurant, 529 Allen 

George AGP, attorney at law, 
434 Fremont 

Giberson N S, physician, 431 
Fremont 

Gildersleeve F Y B, physician, 
Epitaph Building 

Gillingham , physician, 

Epitaph Building 

Gird's Building, cor Fourth 
and Fremont 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



f ft B. Hooper & ZoA^Z^^^MfJoT^A^ Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



178 



ARIZONA. 



Glover Charles & Co, boots, 
shoes, clothing, hats, etc, 508 
Allen 

Godfrey & Burden, house and 
sign painters, 109 Fifth 

Golden Eaorle Brewery, Wehr- 
fritz & Tribolet proprietors, 
corner Allen and Fifth 

Goldschmidt Leo, furniture, 
carpets, and bedding 

Goodfellow George E, physi- 
cian and health officer, 431 
Fremont 

Graf & Schoenholzer, black- 
smiths and wagon makers, 
231 Fremont 

Grand Hotel, Mrs Jessie E 
Brown nroprietress, 424 and 
426 Allen 

Grant William M, American 
Lodging House, Tough Nut 

Gray D L, notary public and 
conveyancer, corner Fremont 
and Sixth 

Greer Joseph H, druggist and 
physician, 325 Allen 

Gregg V A, attorney at law, 
414 Allen 

Gundall John, shoe maker, 526 
Allen 

Hafford R F & Co, wholesale 
wines, liquors, and cigars, cor 
Allen and Fourth 

Hammond N W, flour, hay, 
grain, and feed, Fremont 

Harris T S, proprietor Tomb- 
stone Foundry and Machine 
Shop, corner First and Saf- 
ford 

Hart Samuel L, gunsmith and 
engraver, 421 Fremont 

Hartmann & Co, watch makers 
and jewelers, and sewing ma- 
chines, 513 Allen 

Harwood William A, agt Morse 
& Co, lumber dealers, and no- 
tary public, 308 Fourth 

Hasselgren H "W, prop'r Com- 



mercial Job Printing Office, 
520 Fremont 

Hatch Henry, physician, Frem't 

Hattich Bartholomy, merchant 
tailor, 528 Allen 

Hayne Arthur, mining engineer 
and assayer, 518 Fremont 

Hayne Marcus P, attorney at 
law, city attorney, and no- 
tary public, 327 Fremont 

Heitzelman Peter, watches and 
jewelry, 430 Allen 

Helyar Albert, barber, 533 Allen 

Henderson G T, physician, Fre- 
mont 

Herve & Carbon, prop'rs Eu- 
reka Soda Works, 212£ Sixth 

Heyes Wilfred A, watch maker 
and jeweler, 212 Fifth 

Hickson Henry, butcher, 218 
Fremont 

Hiller F, physician, Fifth 

Hills H E & Co, groceries, 217 
Fourth 

Hoefler Joseph, general mer- 
chandise, 41 7 Allen 

Hooker Edward R, butcher 
and sausage maker, 608 Allen 

Hopkins Mill Co, C J Pilsbury 
manager, W 7 atervale 

Howard James G, attorney at 
law, 327 Fremont 

Howe Henry G, civil engineer 
and U S deputy mineral sur- 
veyor, Gird's Building 

Hudson Taliaferro F, drugs and 
medicines, 510 Allen 

Hung Chung, Chinese goods, 
229 Allen 

Hutton J F, attornev at law, 
227 Fifth 

Ingersoll A E, dentist, 431 Fre- 
mont 

Ingoldsby Frank S, draughts- 
man, 307 Fourth 

Israel Salomon, Union News 
Depot, stationery, tobacco and 
cigars, 222 Fifth 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE ( 653 A 655 MarketSt. 
MA»UFA€TUKEK»a San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



179 



Jackson Edward H, restaurant, 
605 Allen 

Jenkins G W, dentist, 436 Fre- 
mont 

Johnson Allen S, proprietor Elm- 
wood House, 417 Fremont 

Johnson John P, groceries, 726 
Fremont 

Johnston A W, superintendent 
Sycamore Spring Water Co, 
Gird's Building 

Jones A T, recorder Cachise 
Co, 304 Fourth 

Jones Harry B, attorney at law, 
Allen 

Joyce M E & Co, wholesale 
liquor dealers and proprietors 
Oriental Saloon, Allen 

Kearney E T & Co, drugs, 
paints, oils, etc., 215 Fourth 

Kearsing Henry W, metallur- 
gist and assayer, 214 Fourth 

Kelleher & Peel, civil engineers 
and U S deputy mineral sur- 
veyors, 317 Allen 

Kellogg M E, Diana Lodging 
House and Saloon, 316 Allen 

Kelly Julius A, Kelly's Wine 
House, 428 Allen 

Kemp & Coleman, photograph- 
ers, Allen 

Kilillea Kate Miss, Golden 
Eagle Restaurant, 213 Sixth 

Kimball M H, mining opera- 
tor, notary public and insur- 
ance agent, 319 Allen 

Kingsbury Frank, manager 
Western Union Telegraph 
Co., 420 Allen 

Kinnear J D & Co., proprietors 
Arizona Mail and Stage Line, 
427 Allen 

Kinsman Catherine Mrs, lodg- 
ings, Tough Nut 

Kosha J A, restaurant, 507 Al- 
len 

Kramer & Emele, butchers and 

, sausage makers, Allen 



Lane Edward C, assistant post- 
master, 220 Fourth 

Lange & Storm, butchers, 408 
Allen 

Laventhal B, general merchan- 
dise, cor Allen and Fourth 

Leary J Miss, ice cream and re- 
freshments, 424 Fremont 

Leary John, boot and shoe- 
maker and dealer, 524 Allen 

Leavens William M, machin- 
ist, locksmith and saw filer, 
308 Fifth, (branch of 39 Elev- 
enth, S F) 

Leigh & Miramontez, liquor 

saloon, 323 Allen 
Lenoir Joseph, furniture, bed- 
ding* etc, 308 Allen . 
Levi I, liquor saloon, Allen 
Lewis J T, attorney at law, cor 

Fifth and Fremont 
Lion Brewery, A Uebel & Co, 

proprietors 517 Allen 
Lippert & Peyser, barbers, 436 

Allen 
Lloyd Hannah Mrs, restaurant 

319 Fremont 
Loveland A, shoemaker, 537 

Allen 
Lowery & Shearer, proprietors 

Contention House, near Sul- 

phuret Mine 
Lowrey Alva C, attorney at 

law, 434 Fremont 
Lucas J H, probate judge Ca- 
chise County, Gird's Building 
Lucas & Miller, attorneys at 

law, Gird's Building 
Lukini John & Co, Oriental 

Oyster House, corner Allen 

and Fifth 
Lynch P J, liquor saloon, Allen 
Mand V, proprietor Union Soda 

Works, and liquor saloon, 

406 Fremont 
Manning Joseph G, assayer, 

civil engineer, and TJ S deputy 

mineral surveyor, 212 Fifth 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. {^.iffffi^^W Illuminating Oils. 



180 



ARIZONA, 



Marchand G N, groceries and 
liquors, 408 Fremont 

Marcovich Peter, Queen Chop 
House, 516 Allen 

Mariluis & Co, liquor saloon, 
207 Fifth 

Matthews H M, physician and 
coroner Cachise Co 

Maxson H B, notary public 

Maynard & Milliken, liquor sa- 
loon, 432 Allen 

McCann & Walsh, liquor saloon, 
612 Allen 

McClelland J J, Kentucky 
distillers' agent, liquors and 
cigars, 506 Allen 

McConville J A, merchant tail- 
or, 535 Allen * 

Mclntyre J P, pastor Tombstone 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Safford 

McKean & Knight, groceries, 
hardware, etc, 539 Allen 

McKenna Mary, wines and liq- 
uors, 317 Fremont 

McLane & Gray, proprietors 
Dexter Stables, 318 Allen 

McMartin James, harness and 
saddlery, 318 Allen 

McSwegan Daniel, physician, 
210 Fourth 

Meyer John W, X L N Saloon, 
536 Allen 

Miley Jacob A, Sonoma Wine 
House, and importer lager 
beer, 519 Allen 

Milich F A & Co, fruits, pro- 
duce and provisions, 432 Fre- 
mont 

Millar W S. physician, 214 Fifth 

Millard Gustavus A, dentist, 
327 Fremont 

Miller John M, attorney at law, 
Gird's Building 

Minor B B, broker, and dealer 
mining properties, Allen 

Montgomery & Benson, livery 
and feed stable, 513 Allen 



Mooney D T, liquor saloon, 
Allen 

Moore John H, barber, 437 
Allen 

Morgan & Silent, attorneys at 
law, 601 Fremont 

Morison William C, Empire 
Lodging House, 433 Fremont 

Morse & Co, lumber dealers, 
308 Fourth 

Moses & Mehan, Capitol Sa- 
loon, 402 Fremont 

Murphy John M, attorney at 
law, 23 Brown's Hotel 

Myers H, merchant tailor, 211 
Fifth 

Myers J & Bro, clothing, dry 
goods, etc, 505 Allen 

Nash Brothers & Fritch, res- 
taurant, 209 Fourth 

Nash & Emmons, publishers 
"Evening Gossip," 215 Fourth 

Neff Andrew S, groceries, pro- 
visions and poultry, 324 Fre- 
mont 

Nichols & Melgrem, Alhambra 
Saloon, 433 Allen 

Noble James, U S Bestaurant, 
312 Allen 

Nowell & Curry Misses, restau- 
.rant, 521 Fremont 

O'Brien Mary Mrs, restaurant 
and lodgings, 617 Allen 

O'Melveny & Trantum, attor- 
neys at law, Gird's Building 

Otis A D & Co, lumber, doors, 
blinds, sashes, crockery, paints 
and oils, 414 Fremont 

Parke J G, civil engineer, and 
U S deputy mineral surveyor, 
526 Fremont 

Parker AH, US deputy min- 
eral surveyor, 430 Allen 

Parsons & Redfern, mining 
and general agents, 431 Fre- 
mont 

Patch J B Prof, principal Tomb- 
stone Academy, Fitch 



TIlB J. IB. BriinSWiCk 0C DBIKG CO. MA.TSVF^C^rVK^BiSli^iiln Fraiwtoo?*" 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



181 



Peacock Edwin R, house and 
sign painter, 518 Allen 

Peel B L, attorney at law, 317 
Allen 

Perkins Lanson W, Grand Ho- 
tel Bar, 426 Allen 

Peters Mary Mrs, lodgings, 105 
Fourth 

Petro A & Co, restaurant, 429 
Allen 

Pilsbury C J, manager Hopkins 
Mill Co, Watervale 

Pima County Bank, (agency) 
P W Smith manager, corner 
Allen and Fourth 

Pioneer Soda Works, Charles 
Riley proprietor, Tough Nut 

Post Office, John P Clum post- 
master, Edward C Lane assist- 
ant postmaster, 220 Fourth 

Power J D, dealer in mining 
properties, Fourth 

Price Lyttleton, attorney at law 
and district att'y Cachise Co 

Price Rodman M jr, civil engi- 
neer and U S deputy mineral 
surveyor, 508 Allen 

Pridham George, public admin- 
istrator Cachise Co 

Prouty Jackson, dealer in mines, 
Grand Hotel 

Pump William, liquor saloon, 
702 Allen 

Pyle B W, auctioneer and com- 
mission merchant 

Quigley B C, notary public and 
real estate and insurance ag't, 
305 Fourth 

Quigley & Shearer, electric rods, 
305 Fourth 

Quong on Chong, Chinese goods, 
225 Allen 

Rafferty & Co, wholesale and 
retail liquors, 521 Allen 

Rahn F, mining engineer and 
assayer, Allen 

Randle W C, vegetables, but- 
ter, and eggs, 413 Fremont 



Recum H C, shoe maker, 320 
Allen 

Reed Theron, attornev at law, 
414 Allen 

Rehbein Emil, private school, 
Sixth 

Reilly James, attorney at law 
and notary public, 434 Frem't 

Rickard William T, assayer, 
mining engineer, and metal- 
lurgist, Tough Nut 

RiggS T C & Co, publishers 
Territorial Expositor 

Riley Charles, prop'r Pioneer 
Soda Works, Tough Nut 

Ritter & Ream, undertakers, 
613 Allen 

Roberts Emma Mrs, florist, 919 
Fremont 

Roberts & Giles, carpenters and 
builders, 915 Fremont 

Robertson & Clarke, liquor and 
billiard saloon, 217 Fifth 

Robinson James S, attorney at 
law, Allen 

Rodecker & Kelly, restaurant 
and liquor saloon, 513 Allen 

Rogers Tempe S Mrs, restaur- 
ant, 517 Allen 

Rose John W, carpenter and 
builder, 308 Fifth 

Rosendorf Michael, dry goods 
and clothing, 405 Allen 

Russ House, Anderson & 
Schmidt proprietors, corner 
Fifth and Tough Nut 

Ryan N Mrs, San Francisco 
Lodging House, 233 Allen 

Safford, Hudson & Co, bank- 
ers, 206 Fifth 

Saul & Welmot, blacksmiths 
and carriage makers, Allen 

Schmieding Herman, watch- 
maker and jeweler, 420 Allen 

Schnider E P, pastor Church 
of the Sacred Heart, Safford 

Schoenfeld & Heyman, furni- 
ture and bedding, 211 Fourth 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER&CO. p^£S%g^ T a5iSr} Wines of all Kinds. 



182 



ARIZONA. 



Seawell Thomas, physician, 
431 Fremont 

Shaffer & Lord, general mer- 
chandise and commission mer- 
chants, cor Fremont and 5th 

Shewbridge Peter, boarding and 
lodging, Seventh 

Sichel Gustave W, dentist, 433 
Fremont 

Silent Charles, attorney at law, 
601 Fremont 

Sippy Benjamin, city marshal 

Smith Charles M, groceries, veg- 
etables and fruits, 411 Fre- 
mont 

Smith F M, attorney at law, 
Allen 

Smith P W, general merchan- 
dise, cor Allen and Fourth 

Solomon H, assistant manager 
Pima County Bank, and in- 
surance agent, cor Fourth and 
Allen 

Southard J B, attorney at law, 
and district court commis- 
sioner, 113 Fourth 

Spangenberg G F, gun and lock- 
smith, 212 Fourth 

Spicer Wells, attorney at law, 
notary public, U S commis- 
sioner, and commissioner of 
deeds for California, 218 Fifth 

Stephens C C, attorney at law 

Stewart G W Mrs, millinery 
and dressmaking, 425 Fre- 
mont 

Stigliano O, liquor saloon and 
chop house, 212 Sixth 

Stinchfield Ammi, Humboldt 
Lodgings, 616 Allen 

Street Webster, attorney at 
law and notary public, 113 
Fourth 

Stump Jonathan W, attorney 
at law and notary public, 327 
Fremont 

Stumpf Joseph, bakery, 215 
Fifth 



Sycamore Spring Water Co, 
A W Johnston superintend- 
ent, Gird's Building 

Tappeiner John, shoemaker, 207 
Fourth 

Tasker Mary, dress making and 
fancy goods, 506 Fremont 

Tasker & Pridham, general 
merchandise, corner Fifth and 
Allen 

Territorial Expositor, T C 
Biggs & Co, publishers 

Thabard Peter & Co, bakery, 
603 Allen 

The Nugget, H M Woods & 
Co, publishers, Fremont 

Thomas Charles N, corral and 
feed stable, corner Fremont 
and Second 

Thompson DEM, harness and 
saddlery, 321 Allen 

Thurmond Philip M, attorney 
at law and notary public, 213 
Fifth 

Tombstone Academy, Prof J 
B Patch, A M, principal, 
Fitch 

Tombstone and Charleston 
Ice Co, Richard Gird presi- 
dent, F A J Diss agent, Tough 
Nut 

Tombstone Epitaph, Clum & 
Reppy publishers, 327 Fre- 
mont 

Tombstone Foundry and Ma- 
chine Shop, T S Harris, pro- 
prietor, cor First and Safford 

Tombstone Mining Exchange, 
T E Sumner president, T R 
Sorin vice-president, Robert 
Eccleston treasurer, J P "Wel- 
les secretary, 329 Fremont 

Tomlinson William W, liquor 
saloon, 314 Allen 

Trantum 0, attorney at law 
and notary, Gird's Building 

Tritle & Murray, stock and min- 
ing brokers, 508 Allen 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go, 



BILLIARD TABLEf 653 A 655 Market St. 
MAHfUFACTU It Kite*, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T.. 



WHOLESALE 
BOOTS AND SHOES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



183 



Turn-Verein Hall, Fourth 

Tuttle H H, livery and feed 
stable, Fremont 

Uebel A & Co, Lion Brew- 
ery and liquor saloon, 517 
Allen 

Union News Depot, Salomon 
Israel proprietor, 222 Fifth 

Union Soda Works, V Mand 
proprietor, corner Second and 
Tough Nut 

Vallory Antoine, Palace Chop 
House, 531 Allen 

Vickers J V, real estate and in- 
surance agent, and notary 
public, 423 Fremont 

Vimont J N, general broker, 
209 Fifth 

Vogan James, liquor saloon, 634 
Allen 

Voisard E P, assayer, notary 
public and negotiator mines, 
508 Allen 

Voorhees Mary, shirt maker, 
737 Allen 

"Walker A M, attorney at law 
and commissioner of deeds 

Walker Frank, city assessor 

Walker George W, cigars and 
tobacco, 533 Allen 

Walker & Haymond, attorneys 
at law 

Wallace A 0, justice of the 
peace, city recorder, and no- 
tary public, 309 Fourth 

Wallace Thomas, mining broker 
and real estate agent, Allen 

Walsh & Co, restaurant, 614 
Allen 

Walsh & Shannon, restaurant, 
435 Allen 

Wang Woo Lung, Chinese 
goods, 111 Fourth 

Warren Emma Mrs, fruits, can- 
dies, cigars and tobacco, 425 
Allen 

Waterman & Goodrich, stoves 
and tinware, 207 Sixth 



Way Up Lodging House, 

Charles C Blair proprietor, 

725 Allen 
Wehrfritz & Tribolet, Golden 

Eagle Brewery and liquor 

saloon, corner Allen and 

Fifth 
Wells, Fargo & Co, Marshall 

Williams agent, 427 Allen 
Westerman & Euhlin, black- 
smiths and wagonmakers, 415 

Fremont 
Western Union Telegraph Co, 

Frank Kingsbury manager, 

420 Allen 
Williams Marshall, stationery, 

cigars, tobacco, etc, money 

broker and agent Wells, 

Fargo & Co, and Arizona 

Mail and Stage Line, 427 

Allen 
Williams & Davis, attorneys 

at law, Gird's Building 
Woods Henry M, under-sheriff 

Cachise Co, 306 Fifth 
Woods H M & Co, publishers 

" The Nugget," Fremont 
Woods M L Mrs, restaurant, 

426 Fremont 
Young John S, restaurant, 525 

Allen 
Young L Mrs, restaurant, 514 

Allen 
Zeckendorf William, dry goods, 

clothing, etc, Fremont 

Tonto Basin, 

Gila Co, 40 miles n of Globe. 
Adams John, station keeper 

Tres Alamos P 0, 

Cachise Co, 40 miles n e of 
Tombstone. 

Dunbar Thomas, postmaster 
and station keeper 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Win. B. Hooper & go. i^f&SSSitfi&Sr'Wm & Saddles at Wholesale. 



184 



ARIZONA. 



Tubac P 0, 

Pima Co, 55 miles s of Tucson, 
is the third oldest town in the 
United States ; following San 
Augustine, Florida, founded 
in 1513, and Santa Fe, New 
Mexico, 1540. The earliest 
published account known to 
exist (1549) gives Tubac as 
the only established town or 
city of any importance in El 
Desierto or La Papagueria, 
and states that it was then 
inhabited by a people much 
in advance of their neighbors. 
We again hear of it in 1600 
as being the largest city in 
Novum Mexicum, with the 
exception of Santa Fe, and 
the resting place for the trains 
to recruit on their journeys 
from Alamos in Sonora to that 
place. It was garrisoned by 
troops under Spanish, Mexi- 
can, and American rule, to 
protect the inhabitants from 
the raids of the savage Apa- 
ches who infested this region, 
and embraced every oppor- 
tunity to plunder and kill. In 
the vicinity are to be found 
the remains of arastras and 
smelters, together with large 
dumps of ore-slag, which pro- 
claim it to have been the 
center of extensive mining 
operations when occupied by 
the Spaniards and Mexicans. 
The land in the upper Santa 
Cruz valley, in which the 
town is situated, is very rich ; 
but owing to scarcity and un- 
certainty^ water, agriculture 
on a large scale has generally 
proved a failure. For raising 
stock of all kinds this section 
is unsurpassed, and the clim- 



ate is one of the most delight- 
ful in the world. 
Mercer T Lillie, general mer- 
chandise, postmaster, justice 
of the peace and notary 
public 

Tucson P 0, 

Pima Co, county seat, and in- 
corporated city of 9,000 in- 
habitants, is the chief com- 
mercial town of Arizona, be- 
ing eligibly situated for trade 
on an elevated plateau in the 
valley of the Rio Santa Cruz, 
in the midst of a productive 
country, and on the line of 
the Southern Pacific Eailroad, 
in latitude 32 deg. 14 min., 
longitude 110 deg. 56 min., 
and having an altitude of 
2,542 feet above the sea. The 
locality is about midway be- 
the Gila river and the Mexi- 
can border, being about 65 
miles from each in a direct 
line, and by the railroad is 
247 miles east of Yuma, and 
978 miles from San Francisco. 
The valley of the Santa Cruz 
leads into the Mexican State 
of Sonora, [with fine wagon- 
roads to Hermosillo, Altar, 
and other large towns of that 
country. From its favorable 
position it commands a large 
trade, with the prospect of 
becoming a railroad center of 
importance. The location was 
selected by the Spaniards 
fully 300 years ago, in ex- 
tending their frontier settle- 
ments and missions, making 
Tucson, then called Quequel- 
son, one of the oldest towns 
of the United States, ranking 
with St. Augustine, Florida, 



Tn6 J. Mi Brunswick & Bsikb Co. 55LSpACTrjBK»£{^sa^™nc£o? u 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTOKY AND GAZETTEER. 



185 



and Santa Fe, New Mexico. 
As a frontier town and mili- 
tary post it has experienced 
many vicissitudes : in constant 
war with the Apaches, at last 
standing alone, the only place 
occupied by the Mexicans in 
the region south of the Gila, 
since ceded to the United 
States. But it is not known 
that the occupation was con- 
tinuous previous to 1754, 
when the Presidio of Tucson 
was established as a protec- 
tion to the Mission of San 
Xavier del Bac, and the set- 
tlements of the valley of the 
Santa Cruz. In 1847 the 
place was occupied for a short 
time by the American forces 
known as the Mormon Batta- 
lion, under Colonel Philip St. 
George Cooke, and thencefor- 
ward was on the route of em- 
igrant travel from the * States ' 
to California. In 1849 it was 
a welcome resting-place to the 
weary pilgrim who found 
here his first and last signs of 
civilization in many hundred 
miles of travel. The protec- 
tion, kindness and hospitality 
of the people of Tucson is 
vividly remembered by the 
pioneers of '49, whose fortune 
led them by the, southern 
route in their journey to the 
El Dorado of the Pacific. In 
1854, by the treaty known as 
the * Gadsden Purchase," the 
region was ceded to the Uni- 
ted States, and Tucson became 
an American town, at least 
in name, if not in character. 
To every appearance it con- 
tinued a Mexican pueblo, with 
buildings of adobe, mere huts 
of one low story, with flat 



roofs, and the ground for the 
floor, placed with little regard 
to streets, or order of any 
kind, and without door-yards, 
out -houses, conveniences, or 
ornamentation ; and to a great 
extent the old accidents of lo- 
cation of streets, or passage- 
ways, continue to mar the city 
of the present. But the ad- 
vantages of position have 
drawn hither a large and 
profitable trade, which is rap- 
idly changing the ancient pu- 
eblo into a modern American 
city — having been organized 
as such in 1877. By the cen- 
sus of the place in 1872, the 
population was estimated at 
3,500; by the census of 1880, 
it was 6,993 ; and at present 
it is claimed to exceed 9,000. 
A great impetus was given it 
by the discovery of the mines 
of Tombstone, Bisbee, and 
other localities contributory 
to it, and this was acceler- 
ated by the completion of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad, 
which was finished to this 
point on the 20th of March, 

1880, and to the connection 
with the Atchison, Topeka 
and Santa Fe, making a trans- 
continental road in March, 

1881. With daily trains from 
both extremes of the conti- 
nent, with the telegraph con- 
necting instantaneous thought 
with all the world, and with 
well -equipped lines of stages 
running to surrounding points 
and extending into Sonora and 
the great cities of Mexico, its 
isolation is removed, and its 
means of intercommunication 
and trade perfected. Now it 
claims all the elements of a 



CHIRAR DEL LI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



13 



WM. B. HOOPER & WA^^^^^^^luMtamt Oils. 



186 



AKIZONA. 



first - class city, with its great 
mercantile houses, stock ex- 
change, banks, hotels, schools, 
churches, daily papers, parks, 
suburban resorts, hospitals, 
etc., with street railroads, gas 
and water -works soon to be 
added. While the general 
appearance of the city is Mex- 
ican, with many low, flat- 
roofed adobe structures, there 
are also many of a more pre- 
tentious order; and a number 
of quite elegant residences, 
costing fronf $5,000 to $10,- 
000, stores, and public build- 
ings of great value. So nu- 
merous are the business estab- 
lishments that it would be dif- 
ficult to name them. There 
are two prosperous banking- 
houses, that of Safford, Hud- 
son & Co., with a branch at 
Tombstone, being a substan- 
tial and well-conducted insti- 
tution, that would be a credit 
to any of the great cities of the 
Union. Five well-conducted 
hotels furnish excellent ac- 
commodation to travelers, 
and comfortable homes to res- 
ident boarders. Two brewer- 
ies supply the refreshing bev- 
erage which is said not to intox- 
icate, and a vast number of sa- 
loons dispense it to the thirsty. 
Three daily and weekly news- 
papers — the Citizen, Star, 
and Journal — furnish the 
American public with reading 
matter; and El Fronterizo 
informs the Spanish-speaking 
population, in their own lan- 



guage, 



of the events of the 
day. Besides these are the 
Arizona Mining Journal, 
published weekly, and the 
Arizona Quarterly Illus- 



trated. A steam flouring-mill 
in the limits of the city, and 
two propelled by water in the 
vicinity, afford a market for 
the grain grower. Here are 
the United States Custom 
House, Internal Eevenue Of- 
fice, U. S. Land Office, Sur- 
veyor-General's Oflice, U. S. 
Depository for the District of 
Arizona, U. S. Courts, and 
Signal Service offices. The 
Public School department 
was organized in 1872. A 
commodious school-house has 
been erected at an expense, 
including ground and furni- 
ture, of about $10,000. It 
contains a library valued at 
$1,000. The school is pre- 
sided over by two male and 
two female teachers, and has 
enrolled 260 pupils, of which 
149 are boys, and 111 girls. 
The St. Joseph's Academy, 
conducted by the Sisters of 
St. Joseph, is a seminary for 
young ladies, and has 135 
pupils. There is also a paro- 
chial school for girls under 
the charge of the Sisters of 
St. Joseph, and the Saint 
Augustine parochial school 
for boys. The number of 
school children in the district 
much exceeds the number 
enrolled, the great majority 
being Mexicans. A private 
school is kept by Mr. and 
Mrs. Silva, which is well at- 
tended. At all the schools 
instruction is given in both 
English and Spanish. The 
Tucson Library Associaion 
was organized January 1st, 
1880, and now has a library 
of 300 volumes, which is 
maintained by a fee of $5 per 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. UPMBrasantilss?' 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



187 



annum, or fifty cents a month 
from those partaking of its 
benefits. There is also a pub- 
lic library and a railroad 
library. The religious orders 
are also represented. The 
Presbyterian Church was or- 
ganized in 1877, and has an 
adobe church edifice with a 
seating capacity of 250. This 
was erected in 1879, at a cost 
of about $9,000. A Sabbath- 
school is maintained with 
seven teachers and fifty schol- 
ars. The Methodist Church 
was organized in 1879. The 
society has a brick edifice 
with a seating capacity of 
200, which was erected in 
1881, at a cost of $4,000. The 
St. Augustine Roman Catho- 
lic Church is an adobe struc- 
ture, finished in 1869. A 
flourishing Sabbath-school is 
connected with this church. 
The Mount St. Joseph Novi- 
tiate of the Sisters of St. 
Joseph is one mile from Tuc- 
son ; has two sisters and seven 
novices. The St. Mary's 
Hospital, under the charge 
of the Sisters of St. Joseph, 
is located one mile from the 
city, and has accomodations 
for forty patients. The hos- 
pital, as it now stands, was 
opened May 1st, 1880. It is 
a grayish stone building, lo- 
cated at the base of the Tuc- 
son Mountains. There are 
two stories : the lower of 
which is reserved for county 
patients, and the upper for 
those who are able to pay for 
the care they receive. Ano- 
ther story is to be added as 
soon as the funds can be se- 
cured. Of the social orders 



there are organized lodges 
of Masons, Odd Fellows, 
Knights of Pythias, Good 
Templars, and Turn-Verein. 
The Odd Fellows have erect- 
ed a fine brick hall, costing 
$8,000. There are some 
pleasant suburban resorts ; 
those which are most fre- 
quented being Silver Lake, 
three miles up the Santa 
Cruz, and the military post 
of Camp Lowell, about seven 
miles north. The lake is a 
favorite resort for bathers, 
and is exceedingly well pa- 
tronized. The climate is 
pleasant during the greater 
part of the year, although in 
summer the weather is at 
times extremely hot during 
the day, but generally cool 
and agreeable at night. The 
temperature during the year 
1880, as recorded by the U. 
S. Signal Service Observer, 
was maximum 110 deg. in 
June; minimum, 14 deg. in 
January. Range, 96 deg. 
Mean temperature in winter, 
55.5 deg.; mean temperature 
in summer, 79.6 deg. There 
are two rainy seasons — one 
in July and August, when at 
times considerable rain falls ; 
and again during the months 
of December, January, and 
February, when the rains are 
comparatively light. Stages 
leave for Arivaca and Oro 
Blanco tri-weekly; Tubac, 
Calabasas, Magdalena, Her- 
mosillo, Altar, and Guaymas, 
semi- weekly; Silver Hill and 
Silver Bell, semi-weekly ; Old 
Hat District, tri-weekly; Fort 
Lowell and San Xavier daily, 
and Riverside weekly. 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



WM.B. HOOPER & GO. { 



Tucson <fc Phoenix, A. T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



}WholesaIe Liquor Dealers. 



188 



ARIZONA. 



Officers. — John S. Carr, 
Mayor ; Alexander Levin, 
Mariano Samaniego, Charles 
T. Etchells, and Albert Stein- 
feldt, Councilmen ; P. R. 
Tully, Treasurer ; Charles H. 
Meyer, Eecorder and Police 
Judge ; Hylor Ott, Assessor ; 
A. G. Buttner, Marshal and 
Chief of Police. 

Adams George F Eev, pastor 
First Methodist Church, Pen- 
nington 

Aguirre Pedro, proprietor Ari- 
vaca and Oro Blanco Stage 
Line, Main 

Ainsa Santiago, Mexican attor- 
ney at law, Meyer 

Alcala Guadalupe, groceries, 
Meyer 

Allis Solon M, civil engineer 
and U S deputy mineral sur- 
veyor, Pennington 

Altar and Caborca Stage Line, 
Juan Bojorquez agent, Meyer 

American and Mexican Mining 
Exchange Co, Juan Gange 
secretary, Meyer 

Andrews J D, mining contractor 

Araiza Stage Line (Altar), D 
Velasco agent, Mesilla 

Arivaca, Oro Blanco and Al- 
tar Stage Line, C Orcillo 
agent, Main 

Arizona and California Lum- 
ber Co, J N Mason manager, 
opp railroad depot 

Arizona Citizen, R C Brown 
publisher, Church Plaza 

Arizona Daily Journal, F P 
Thompson publisher, Church 
Plaza 

Arizona Mining Journal, F P 
Thompson publisher, Church 
Plaza 

Arizona Quarterly Illustra- 
ted, Thomas Gardiner pub- 
lisher 



Arizona Star, L C Hughes pub- 
lisher, Maiden Lane 

Arizona Telephone Co, C H 
Lord president, G H Bowker 
superintendent, Congress 

Aros Romulo, carpenter, Cush- 
ing 

Bagnasco Policarpo, photog- 
rapher, Church Plaza 

Baker T J Mrs, dressmaker, 
Meyer 

Barragan R J, groceries and liq- 
uors, Convent 

Barthelemy C, groceries, Meyer 

Bayer & Schwarz, proprietors 
Levin's Park and Park Brew- 
ery, foot Pennington 

Beall George T, attorney at law, 
Pennington 

Berger James M, watchmaker 
and jeweler, and dealer in 
sewing machines, Congress 

Berton Thomas, notary public 

Betz Joseph, liquor saloon, 
Congress 

Bojorquez Juan, general mer- 
chandise, Meyer, cor Cushing 

Bowker George H, manager 
Arizona Telephone Co, Con- 
gress 

Bragg A M, blacksmith and 
wagon maker, Pennington 

Brewer Arthur K, assayer, 
Congress 

Brickwedel M H & Co, Pion- 
eer restaurant and liquor sa- 
loon, railroad depot 

Browder J A, agent eastern 
manufacturers, Meyer 

Brown G W, editor Arizona 
Citizen, Church Plaza 

Brown Henry J, crockery, 
glass ware, paints, oils, etc, 
Main 

Brown L M, proprietor Grand 
Hotel, Church 

Brown R C, publisher Arizona 
Citizen, Church Plaza 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



BILLIARD TABLE} 653 & 655 Market St 
M JL2* IV rF JL<:TX Jfcisits, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



189 



Brunier Josephine Mrs, liquors, 
etc, Meyer 

Buck H, confectionery and ice 
cream saloon, Congress 

Buehman H & Co, photograph- 
ers and dealers Arizona views, 
moldings, and picture frames, 
Congress 

Buell James, attorney at law, 
Meyer 

Burns Prank H, prop'r City 
Market, Congress 

Burroiel Manuel, butcher, Main 

Burton Ambrose, carpenter, 
McCormick 

Butler Eudolph J, deputy col- 
lector U S Internal Revenue, 
Convent 

Buttner A G, city marshal and 
chief of police, Meyer 

California Lodging House, Will- 
iam H Euel prop'r, Meyer 

Calles Jesus, butcher, Meyer 

Campbell Alexander, attorney 
at law, Camp 

Carr E M, attorney at law, Pen- 
nington 

Carr John S, Mayor of Tucson 

Carre & Sanders, Cabinet Sa- 
loon, Congress 

Carrillo Jesus, butcher, Meyer 

Carrillo L, groceries, Mesilla 

Carrillo Teodosia, groceries and 
liquors, Meyer 

Carroll James, livery and feed 
stable, Court 

Carter G C, plasterer, and brick 
and adobe layer, Congress 

Casamayou & Co, bakery, Camp 

Cason C, restaurant, Meyer 

Cassell Michael, livery and feed 
stable, Convent 

Caswell Alfred M, produce com- 
mission merchant, Meyer 

Chan Tin Wo, Chinese goods, 
Main 

Chane Charles S, liquor saloon, 
Meyer 



Chapman & Porter, Pima Ex- 
change, Congress 

Childs Samuel C, liquor saloon, 
Stone Av 

Chillson Lorenzo D, notary 
public, civil engineer, and U 
S deputy mineral surveyor, 
Meyer 

Choate & Shepherd, house paint- 
ers, Congress 

ChongGee (Chinese) restaurant, 
Mesilla 

Clarke C W, harness and sad- 
dlery, Main 

Clum George A, clerk District 
Court, Court House Plaza 

Cohn Jacob M, dry goods, 
clothing, etc, Meyer 

Cohn Max, rubber stamps, Me- 
silla 

Coleman James J, under-sheriff 
Pima Co, Court House 

Colton E F, livery, feed and 
sale stable, Meyer 

Consul for Mexico, Vincente 
Morales, Meyer 

Corbett W J, assistant post- 
master, Congress 

Cordis Thomas, collector U S 
Internal Eevenue, Convent 

Cory Frank B, liquor saloon 

Cosmopolitan Hotel, Paul 
Moroney proprietor, Main 

Cousins Henry, register U S 
Land Office 

Cropper W L, carpenter and 
builder, Church 

Crosley John S, butcher, Meyer 

Cuen Francisco, saddle and 
harness-maker, Meyer 

Cullum H B, notary public 

Culver John P, civil engineer, 
assayer, and TJ S deputy min- 
eral surveyor, Congress 

CzerwinskyT, dry goods, cloth- 
ing, etc, Main, cor Mesilla 

Dachena A, wholesale wines 
and liquors, Church Plaza 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & C0.{ Tu T c eTa« of all Kinds, 



190 



ARIZONA. 



Dailey C E, receiver U S Land 

Office 
Davis William 0, stoves, tin- 
ware and plumbing, Main 
Del Amo Juan, physician, Meyer 
Detoy Charles, groceries, 

Church Plaza 
Dixon J E, proprietor Russ 

House, Camp 
Dodge Edwin S, lodgings, Pearl 
Donsing Louis, liquor saloon, 

Mesilla 
Downey Patrick, lodging-house 

and restaurant, Church Plaza 
Downie William, carpenter and 

builder, Ochoa 
Drachman & Soto, groceries, 

liquors, and dry goods, Meyer 
Drake Charles R, recorder 

Pima Co, and notary public, 

Court House Plaza 
Drake F A, proprietor Tucson 

Limekiln, nr Railroad depot 
Durazo R, blacksmith, Stone av 
Durr Joseph, liq. saloon, Mesilla 
Dyer & Raynes, draymen 
Eagle Steam Flouring Mill, 

E N Fish, proprietor, Main 
Earll, Smith, Campbell & Rob- 
inson, attorneys at law, Camp 
Edwards & Brown, mining spec- 
ulators, Pennington 
El Fronterizo, Carlos I Velasco 

publisher, Stone av 
Elias Juan, butcher, Convent 
Erwin C F Mrs, dressmaker, 

Congress 
Etchells Charles T, blacksmith 

and wagon-maker, Congress 
Evans B L Mrs, baths, Main 
Evans J W, notary public 
Evans & Co, architects and 

builders, Congress 
Excelsior Brewery, Conrad 

Mundelius proprietor, li m'ls 

south Tucson 
Farley H F, district attorney 

Pima Co, Pennington 



Farley & Pomroy, attorneys at 
law, Pennington 

Felix Dennis, groceries, liquors, 
hay and grain, Congress 

Ferrin Joseph, merchant tailor, 
Meyer 

Field & Morgan, Iron Wood 
livery and boarding stable, 
Sixth Av 

Fish E N, proprietor Eagle 
Steam Flouring Mill, Main 

Fitzpatrick W F, carpenter and 
builder, Congress 

Fleishman Fred & Co, drugs 
and medicines, Congress 

Foster George F, liquor saloon, 
Meyer 

Fraser Robert, liquor saloon, 
Congress 

Fred Ignatz S, real estate bro- 

• ker, Congress 

Fulton & Duff, real estate ag'ts 
and collectors, Mesilla 

Gange Juan, secretaryAmerican 
and Mexican Mining Ex- 
change Co, Meyer 

Ganz William, bakery, con- 
fectionery and yeast powder 
manufacturer, Congress 

Garcia B & Co, general mer- 
chandise, Meyer 

Gardiner Thomas, publisher 
Arizona Quarterly Blustrated 

Gaynor William H, house and 
sign painter, Church Plaza 

Germain Eugene, groceries and 
produce, Mesilla 

Ghanetto C, groceries, Meyer 

Giffin William, cigar manufac- 
turer, Church Plaza 

Gin Foy & Co, restaurant, 
Camp 

Goldbaum & Wolf, stoves, tin- 
ware, hardware, etc, Main 

Goldschmidt Adolph & Co, 
gents' furnishing goods, hats 
and caps, and manufacturer 
shirts, Congress 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



B1UI1KD TAD LE J 653 & fi55 Market St. 
MASTUFA€TlKliK8, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



BUSINESS DIKECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



191 



Goldschmidt Leo, furniture, 
carpets and bedding, Meyer 

Goldtree Joseph, cigars and 
tobacco, Congress 

Gonzales Pedro, bakery, Meyer 

Goodman A, groceries, liquors, 
flour, grain, and importer 
Japan teas, Camp 

Goodrich Ben, attorney at law 
and notary public, Penning- 
ton 

Goodrich & Goodrich, attor- 
neys at law, Pennington 

Grand Hotel, L M Brown, pro- 
prietor, Church 

Gratto M, carpenter and build- 
er, Congress 

Gravel M P, carriage and wag- 
onmaker, Ochoa 

Graves Walter L, dentist, 
Church Plaza 

Gregg F W, attorney at law, 
Pennington 

Gregory U, pastor Baptist Ch 

Groff Charles F, plasterer, and 
brick and adobe layer, Con- 
gress 

Gruber Jacob, firearms, ammu- 
nition, etc, and gunsmith, 
Meyer 

Handy & Holbrook, physicians, 
Congress 

Harris Helena Mrs, manufact'r 
ladies' and children's under- 
wear, Meyer 

Harris & Sutton, groceries, 
fruits, etc, Congress 

Hart John, proprietor Tucson 
Transfer Co 

Hatch F W, notary public 

Haynes John, attorney at law, 
Meyer 

Hereford B H, attorney at law 
and notary public, Meyer 

Hereford & Zabriskie, attor- 
neys at law, Meyer 

Hermosillo Stage Line, C Or- 
cillo agent, Main 



Holbrook Charles E, physician, 
Congress 

Holler Sigrid Mrs, manufacturer 
ladies' and children's under- 
wear, Meyer 

Hooper Wm B & Co, oil and 
wine merchants, Mesilla 

Hop Kee, restaurant, Warner 

Horton Henry, wines, liquors, 
and cigars, Main 

Horton W B, public adminis- 
trator Pima Co 

Hucke John G, liquor saloon, 
Mesilla 

Hughes L C, publisher "Ari- 
zona Star," Maiden Lane 

Hunt J A Mrs, restaurant, 
Railroad Depot 

Hurd Isaac N, pastor First Pres- 
byterian Church, Stone Ave 

Hutchins Eobert A, quarter- 
master's agent, Pearl 

Innes J F & Co, proprietors Pio- 
neer Soda Works, Stone Ave 

Iron Wood Livery and Board- 
ing Stable, Field & Morgan 
proprietors, Sixth Av 

I X L Lodging House and Res- 
taur »nt, P Downey proprie- 
tor, Church Plaza 

Jacobs B M, cashier Pima Co 
Bank, Congress 

Jacobs Washington M, assayer, 
Pennington 

Johnson C H, proprietor Ven- 
tura Lodgings, Camp 

Johnson William L, lodgings, 
Congress 

Jouvenceau Antonio Rev, as- 
sistant pastor St Augustine's 
Church, Mesilla 

Jouvenceau Francisco Very 
Rev, pastor St Augustine's 
Church, Mesilla 

Kane S K, notary public 

Katz Marcus, groceries and 
hardware, and agent Califor- 
nia Powder Works, Congress 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



U/m R UnnnPr&C.n $ T "? son * phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 1 Sole Agents J. A. MILLER 
W IRi Di nOUpcrOC \j\j, \ Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, } C. C. WHISKEY. 



192 



ARIZONA. 



Kauffman Isidor, gents' furnish- 
ing goods, Meyer 

Kaufman Bros, general mer- 
chandise, Meyer 

Kearon E E, manager Western 
Union Telegraph Co 

J£een Andrew J,US inspector 
customs and internal revenue 
gauger, Main 

Knox & Whitney, commission 
merchants, Church Plaza 

Laurillard A, piano and organ 
agent 

Leatherwood R N, treasurer 
Pima Co 

Leboisne & Lester, plasterers, 
Camp 

Lee James, flour mill, 1$ miles 
south of Tucson, and liquor 
saloon, Mesilla 

Leventhal A, auctioneer, Mesilla 

Levin A, wines and liquors, 
Meyer 

Levin's Park, Bayer & Schwarz 
prop'rs, foot Pennington 

Levin's Park Theatre, Bayer 
& Schwarz prop'rs, foot Pen- 
nington 

Lewis Bros, boots and shoes, 
Congress, cor Main 

Lighthizer Harry B, attorney at 
law and notary public, Meyer 

Lopes Ramon, shoe maker, 
Cushing 

Lord C H, postmaster, and U 
S depository public moneys, 
Congress 

Lord & Williams Co, whole- 
sale dealers in general mer- 
chandise and country prod- 
uce, Congress, cor Main 

Lowenstein & Co, dry goods, 
clothing, etc, Meyer, cor Me- 
silla 

Lyford L Dexter, physician, 
Congress 

Maguire John, liquor saloon, 
railroad depot 



Manderfeld Wenzel, observer 
and operator Signal Service 
USA, Court House Plaza 

Mansfeld Jacob S, books, sta- 
tionery, cigars, etc, Congress 

Mason J N, manager Arizona 
and California Lumber Co, 
opp railroad depot 

Mauk George W, deputy col. 
lector U S Internal Revenue, 
Convent 

Maxwell Frederick, manufac- 
turers' agent, Pennington 

Mayr & Miltenberg, bakery, 
Mesilla 

McCoy James, house and sign 
painter, Main 

McFadden & Serrot, groceries, 
fruits and seeds, Meyer 

McWhorter L, liquor saloon, 
Mesilla 

Menager H, dry goods, cloth- 
ing, etc, Meyer 

Meyer Charles H, city recorder, 
justice of the peace and no- 
tary public, Meyer 

Meyer L & Co, general mer- 
chandise, Meyer, cor Mesilla 

Miller F K, attorney at law, 
Pennington 

Montaiio Cornelia, restaurant, 
Meyer 

Morales Vincente, consul for 
Mexico, Meyer 

Moreno Juan, proprietor Tubac, 
Magdalena and Hermosilla 
stage line, Main 

Morgan Benjamin, attorney at 
law and notary public, Pen- 
nington 

Moroney Paul, proprietor Cos- 
mopolitan Hotel, Main cor 
Pennington 

Moroney Paul & Co, baths, Lev- 
in's Park 

Mount St Joseph Novitiate of 
the Sisters of St Joseph, 1 
mile from city 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TA RLE f 653 & 655 Market St. 
MA.\ U FACTUREJiS, I San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., ™£sr%£ 3 *S5£? 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



193 



Mountain Ice Company, Hiram 
Sprague manager 

Mueller Wilhelm M, merchant 
tailor, Camp 

Mundelius Conrad, proprietor 
Excelsior brewery, 1? miles s 
Tucson 

Munoz Dario, groceries and liq- 
uors, Meyer 

Navarro Bernardo, groceries 
and liquors, Main 

Newlands & Calder, liquor sa- 
loon, Congress 

Nilson P F, watchmaker and 
jeweler, Congress 

Norton Isaac, money broker, 
Meyer 

ISToyes E W, auctioneer and 
real estate agent 

Noyes & Earll, mastic roofing, 
Camp 

Noyes & Prince, carpenters and 
builders, Camp 

O'Donnell P N, proprietor Tuc- 
son foundry and machine shop, 
opp railroad depot 

Oates James W, attorney at law 
and notary public, Maiden 
Lane 

Orcillo C, stage agent and con- 
sular papers for goods ship- 
ped to Mexico, Main 

Osborn William J, attorney at 
law, notary public and justice 
of the peace, Meyer, corner 
Maiden Lane 

Otis A D & Co, lumber, doors, 
windows, blinds, hardware, 
crockery, paints and oils, Mey- 
er, cor Pennington 

Ott Hylor, city assessor 

Palace Hotel, George Rayfield 
proprietor, Meyer 

Palmer Horatio B, wagonmaker, 
Pennington 

Pantlind John T, Elite Saloon, 
Congress 

Park Brewery, Bayer & 



Schwarz proprietors, foot 
Pennington 

Parkes & Wills, contractors and 
builders. Pearl 

Patterson John W, searcher of 
records and conveyancer, 
Congress 

Paul R H, sheriff Pima County, 
Court House 

Pearson A Mrs, ladies hair- 
dresser, Congress 

Pearson R C, wines and liquors, 
Congress 

Peguilhan Francois, restaurant, 
Congress 

Perry Joseph C, attorney at 
law, Pennington 

Petit Alexander P, architect, 
Jackson 

Phy Joseph, proprietor Tucson 
Water Works 

Pima County Bank, P P Tul- 
ly president, B M Jacobs 
cashier, Congress 

Pioneer Soda Works, J F Innes 
& Co, proprietors, Stone Av 

Plummer Paul, watchmaker and 
jeweler, Congress 

Pomroy Everett B, U S district 
attorney Territory of Ari- 
zona, Pennington 

Porter A A, proprietor Porter's 
Hotel, Railroad Depot 

Post Office, C H Lord postmas- 
ter, W J Corbett assistant 
postmaster, Congress 

Protopsaltis A & C, pro- 
prietors Union Restaurant, 
Meyer 

Protopsaltis John, restaurant, 
Levin's Park 

Pusch & Zellweger, butchers, 
Mesilla 

Quinlin James, blacksmith and 
wagon maker, Meyer 

Quinn & Wick, lodgings, Camp 

Quong You Chong, Chinese 
goods, Pearl 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm.B. Hooper & Go. 



: Tucson <ft Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, ) 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, J 



Sole 
Agents 



Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



194 



ARIZONA. 



Ramirez Eamon, groceries and 
liquors, Meyer 

Eavisioni Daniel, restaurant, 
Mesilla 

Rayfield George, prop'r Pal- 
ace Hotel, Meyer 

Read Will S, searcher of rec- 
ords, notary public, and con- 
veyancer, Congress 

Reardon James, prop'r Tucson 
City Stage Line 

Redding Matthew J, club 
rooms, Camp 

Rickey Joseph F, proprietor 
Silver Lake Race Course, bath 
houses, and restaurant, Sil- 
ver Lake, 1? miles s of Tuc- 
son 

Risley E A, official court re- 
porter and clerk Board of 
Supervisors Pima Co, Court 
House Plaza 

Robinson James S, attorney 
at law, Camp 

Robles B, general merchandise 
and livery stable, Meyer 

Roca M G, groceries, Main 

Roman John, attorney at law 

Romero Demetrio, groceries, 
Congress 

Rose William, mining and me- 
chanical engineer 

Rosenstock Albert, barber, Con- 
gress 

Roskruge George J, civil engin- 
eer, notary public, and TJ S 
deputy mineral surveyor, 
Maiden Lane 

Rothschild Otto, candy factory, 
Congress 

Rousseau Charles, restaurant, 
Ochoa 

Ruel William H, California 
lodging house, Meyer 

Ruelas Placido, groceries and 
liquors, Meyer 

Rusk W E, livery and feed sta- 
ble, Pennington 



Russ House, J E ])ixon, pro- 
prietor, Camp 

Russell Henry D, marble works, 
Congress 

Ryan Thomas F, commission 
merchant and distiller's agent, 
Congress 

Safford, Hudson & Co, bank- 
ers, Congress 

Salazar Baudelio, assayer, met- 
tallurgist and mining engin- 
eer, Meyer 

Salazar Jose, groceries and liq- 
uors, Meyer 

Salpointe John B, Rt Rev (R C) 
Bishop of Arizona, Church 

Sampson Amasa B, cigars and 
tobacco, and money broker, 
Meyer 

Schaaf Philip, butcher, Meyer 

Schayer Herman, wines and liq- 
uors, Camp 

Scott William A Jr, insurance 
agent, Congress 

Scott William F,.U S deputy 
collector of customs, Main 

Seligmann. C & Co, groceries, 
wines and liquors, Meyer 

Sheldon & Baston, liquor sa- 
loon, Meyer 

Signal Service USA, Wen- 
zel Manderfeld observer and 
operator, Court House Plaza 

Silent Charles, attorney at law, 
Pennington 

Silver Bell Stage Line, William 
Wheatley proprietor, Pening- 
ton 

Silver Hill and Silver Bell Stage 
and Fast Freight Co, U J 
Tuska manager, Meyer 

Silver Lake Race Course, Joseph 
F Rickey prop'r, 1} miles s 
Tucson 

Sinclair David A, liquor saloon, 
Mesilla 

Smith Edward J, undertaker 
and embalmer, Church 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



B1LLI ARD TABLE C 653 & 655 Market St 
M A.X V FAtTUKEKS, I San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



195 



Smith Ferdinand A, house and 
sign painter, Church 

Smith F M, attorney at law, 
Camp 

Snyder M S, agent Silver Bell 
Stage Line, and notary public 

Sorgatz B, restaurant 

Sparrow Frederick A, Napa 
Shaving Saloon, Congress 

Sprague Hiram, manager Moun- 
tain Ice Co 

Sresovich Joseph, wholesale 
groceries and produce, Mey- 
er, and restaurants, Church 
Plaza and Railroad De'pot 

St Joseph's Academy, Mesilla 

St Mark's Hospital, one mile 
from city 

Stanford Frederick, attorney at 
law, Pennington 

Stewart Wm H, barber, Meyer 

Stiles Theodore L, attorney at 
law and District Court Com- 
missioner, Pennington 

Stilwell W H, Associate Just- 
ice Supreme Court and Judge 
First Judicial District, Court 
House 

Stone George, shoe maker, 
Meyer 

Suastegui Rafael, watch maker 
and jeweler, Church 

Sullivan M J, architect and 
builder, Pearl 

Sweetland B R & Co, spring 
bed and mattress manufactur- 
ers, and dealers in pictures, 
frames, paints, oils, etc, Con- 
gress 

Talamonte P & Go, restaurant, 
Church Plaza 

Tapia Jose M, groceries and 
liquors, Convent, cor Cushing 

Tapie Bros, liq'r saloon, Meyer 

Tapie G, liquor and billiard sa- 
loon, Meyer 

Teeple Eobert E, liquor and 
billiard saloon, Meyer 



Terrazas I, blacksmith, Stone av 

The Singer Manufacturing 
Co, sewing machines, Con- 
gress 

Thompson F P, publisher Ari- 
zona Daily Journal and Min- 
ing Journal, Church Plaza 

Tiffany W H, mining and me- 
chanical engineer 

Topliff James F, notary public, 

' Congress 

Townsend Bros, produce and 
poultry, Congress 

Trabucco Joseph, restaurant, 
Mesilla 

Tucson Boot and Shoe Manu- 
facturing Co, Meyer 

Tucson City Stage Line, James 
Reardon proprietor 

Tucson Foundry and Machine 
Shop, P N O'Donnell prop'r, 
opposite Railroad Depot 

Tucson Ice Co, Paul Moroney 
& Co, proprietors, Levin's 
Park 

Tucson Library Association, 
Mrs P L Stiles librarian, Pen- 
nington 

Tucson Painting Co, carriage, 
house, sign, and ornamental 
painters, Congress 

Tucson Transfer Co, John Hart 
proprietor, Camp 

Tucson Water Works, Joseph 
Phy proprietor 

Tully, Ochoa & Co, general 
merchandise, Main 

Tully P R, president Pima 
County Bank, and city treas- 
urer, Congress 

Turner Jared, physician and 
surgeon, Meyer 

United States Custom House, 
W F Scott deputy collector, 
A J Keen inspector, Main 

United States Depository of 
Public Moneys, C H Lord, 
Congress 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { 



Tucson & Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



[Illuminating Oils. 



196 



ARIZONA. 



United States District Attor- 
ney, E B Pomroy, Penning- 
ton 

United States Internal Rev- 
enue, Thomas Cordis collec- 
or, Convent 

United States Land Office, 
Henry Cousins register, C E 
Dailey receiver 

United States Military Tele- 
graph, Wenzel Manderfeld 
operator, Court House Plaza 

United States Surveyor-Gen- 
eral, John Wasson, Main 

Uiibe Guillermo, butcher, Mey- 
er 

Yan Fleet M B, agent Wells, 
Fargo & Co, Camp 



Yan Pelt Samuel 
contractor 



K, 



mining 



Yan Yoorhies W, attorney at 
law 

Velasco Carlos I, publisher 
" El Fronterizo," Stone Av 

Yelasco D, commission mer- 
chant, and agent Araiza Stage 
Line, Mesilla 

Yentura Lodgings, C H John- 
son proprietor, Camp 

Yila A Mrs, sewing machines, 
and ladies' and children's 
underwear, Camp 

Yila & Douville, tailors, Camp 

Warner Solomon, flour-mill and 
ore-crusher, Pueblito 1 mile 
west Tucson 

Warren A L, groceries and 
fruits, Meyer 

Wasson John, U S Surveyor- 
General Territory of Arizona, 
Main 

Watkins M J, editor " Arizona 
Daily Journal," Church Plaza 

Watson C P V, physician, Pen- 
nington 

Weihs Albert, shoemak'r, Meyer 

Welisch Theo & Co, dry goods, 
ladies' and gent's furnishing 



goods, millinery goods, etc, 
Main 

Wells, Fargo & Co, M B Yan 
Fleet agent, Camp 

Western Union Telegraph Co, 
R E Kearon manager, Con- 
gress 

Wetmore Edward L, real estate 
agent, Meyer 

Wetmore & Dean, assayers, ore 
smelters and samplers, Mey- 
er 

Whaling Michael, attorney at 
law, Pennington 

Wheatley William, livery and 
feed stable and proprietor Sil- 
ver Bell Stage Line, Penning- 
ton 

Whitaker John C, shoemaker, 
Camp 

White W J, dentist, Congress 

Whitton & Co, liquor and bil- 
liard saloon, Congress 

Wicks Move, attorney at law 
and notary public, Meyer, 
cor Maiden Lane 

Wilkins Alexander, barber, 
Meyer 

Williams J W, contractor and 
builder 

Wing Lee, restaurant, Camp, 

Wing On Hong, drugs, Pearl 

Witfeld Gustavus, drugs and 
medicines, Camp 

Wood John S, probate judge 
Pima Co, Meyer 

Yarnell Joseph, liquor saloon, 
Meyer 

Yorba Javier F, drugs and 
medicines, Congress 

Yslas Genaro, groceries, Court 

Zabriskie J A, attorney at law, 
Meyer 

Zeckendorf L & Co, general 
merchandise, Main 

Zeckendorf William, general 
merchandise, Main 

Zuniga Maximo, barber, Meyer 



I j|6 J. Nit DflHISWiGk & DdlKB COi MAVLFACTIUKJSS,( San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



197 



Vulture P 0, 

Maricopa Co, 59 miles n w of 
Phoenix, is a mining town de- 
pending for its support upon 
the Vulture Mine, which has 
an eighty-stamp mill in con- 
stant operation, and is regu- 
larly shipping a large amount 
of bullion. Daily communi- 
cation with Phoenix and Pres- 
cott is maintained by stage 
via Seymour 

Barnes John, hotel 

Best & Dennis, liquor saloon 

and feed yard 
Garress Gus, carpenter and 

builder 
Genung Charles E, butcher 
Gifford J H, justice of the peace 
Gonzales Philippi, liquor saloon 
Grant E & Co, general mer- 
chandise 
Johnson Thomas E, liq'r saloon 
Kirkland E E, general mer- 
chandise, and agent Wells, 
Fargo & Co 

Lawrence , physician 

Levy I H, general merchandise 

and postmaster 
Noriego Jesus, liquor saloon 
Orosco & Hoeffner, liq'r saloon 
Eowe W A & Co, general mer- 
chandise, and boarding-house 
Saville E N, manager Central 

Arizona Mining Co 
Stroud & Peeples, liq'r saloon 
Wells, Fargo & Co, E E Kirk- 
land agent 
Yarnell William, fruits and 
vegetables 

Walker P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 18 miles s of Pres- 
.cott, is a mining camp in 
Walker District, a section 
containing many promising 



locations, some of which are 
yielding high-grade ore. 

Brannen P B & Co, general 
merchandise 

Davidson S A, blacksmith 

Hughes H H, postmaster 

Milliken J J, hotel 

Shelton C Y, mining 

Walnut Grove, 

Yavapai Co, 20 miles s of Pres- 

cott. 
Jackson George, justice of the 

peace 

Washington P 0, 

Pima Co, 78 miles s e of Tucson 
and 64 miles from Pantano, 
occupies a beautiful site 
among rolling hills, in a sec- 
tion noted for immense ledg- 
es of good ore, which are 
being rapidly developed. The 
view from the town is mag- 
nificent, embracing the lofty 
peaks of the Patagonia Moun- 
tains, the lovely Santa Cruz 
Valley, and the mountain 
ranges of Sonora. The clim- 
ate is equable and balmy : the 
summers not oppressive; while 
the winters are relieved of 
the severity of more northern 
latitudes. It undoubtedly will 
ere long be a resort for tour- 
ists and invalids. The hills 
are covered with timber, 
principally oak; and a lux- 
urious growth of nutritious 
grasses. In the valleys are 
some excellent agricultural 
lands. Communication is 
maintained with the Southern 
Pacific Eailroad by a daily 
line of stages to Pantano, via 
Harshaw, connecting at the 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { T ^^!g^ T aS£r} Winesof all Kinds. 



198 



ARIZONA. 



latter place with a tri-weekly 

line for Tombstone. 
Bisner J B, bakery 
Bragg H N, notary public 
Clark J W,' butcher 
Glander Louis, brewery 
Harrison E, justice of the peace 
Joyner F 0, hotel, and notary 

public 
Joyner J T, postmaster 
Melstedt Sarah Mrs, hotel 
Patrick Isaac, general mdse 
Rogers E S, general mdse 
Salamon Rosala, blacksmith and 

wagonmaker 
Smith Samuel, laundry 
Wells, Fargo & Co, J R Allen 

agent 

Watervale, 

Cachise Co, 2 miles n of Tomb- 
stone, was the site of the 
pioneer store of Tombstone 
District. Water is abundant, 
and a considerable quantity 
is daily taken to Tombstone 
and sold to the inhabitants. 
The Hopkins Mill Company 
have erected at this place a 
five-stamp mill for crushing 
ore from the surrounding 
mines. 

Wheatfield. 

Gila Co. (See Stanton P. O.) 

Whipple Barracks, 

Yavapai Co, 2 miles e of Pres- 
cott, is a U. S. military post 
and head-quarters of the De- 
partment of Arizona. It was 
established for the protection 
of the frontier settlements 
several years since, when this 
region was infested by hostile 
Apaches. It is pleasantly 



situated, and is at present 
garrisoned by*one company 
of troops. 
Oliver W G, post trader 

Wickenburg P 0, 

Maricopa Co, 60 miles n w of 
Phoenix, is named after Henry 
Wickenburg, the discoverer 
of the Vulture Mine. For 
some time the ore extracted 
from that mine was worked 
in mills located at this place. 
Communication is maintained 
with Prescott, Vulture, Phoe- 
nix and Maricopa by a daily 
line of stages. 

Eglof John, blacksmith and 
wagonmaker 

Grant E 0, general merchan- 
dise 

Hodge Thomas, hotel 

Klein H W, hotel 

Peeples A A, liquor saloon, and 
feed yard, postmaster, and no- 
tary public 

Wells Fargo & Co, D C Smith 
agent 

Willcox P 0, 

Cachise Co, 55 miles n e of 
Tombstone, on the line of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad, 86 
miles e of Tucson, is a thriv- 
ing town which has sprung 
into existence since the com- 
pletion of the railroad to this 
point. From here is shipped 
a large amount of freight des- 
tined for Dos Cabezas, Fort 
Bowie, Fort Grant, Camp 
Thomas, San Carlos, Globe, 
and other points. The Sul- 
phur Spring Valley in which 
the town is situated, is noted 
for its abundant growth of 
nutritious grasses, and con- 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



•» JL A L*A€TlUtit» 



San Jb'raucisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T.. 



WHOLESALE 
ROOTS AM> SHOES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



199 



tains some of the best stock 
ranches in 'this part of the 
country. This, in connec- 
tion with its proximity to sev- 
eral rich mining districts, in- 
sures its future prosperity. 
In the vicinity is a scope of 
good agricultural land, and an 
abundance of water for irri- 
gating purposes can be ob- 
tained within a few feet of 
the surface. Stages leave ev- 
ery other day for Fort Grant, 
Camp Thomas, San Carlos, 
and Globe, and tri-weekly 
for Dos Cabezas and Fort 
Bowie. 

Blaisdell & Johnson, general 

merchandise 
Blinn L W & Co, lumber, doors, 

windows and blinds 
Burke A F, justice of the peace 
Campbell J, hotel 
Claire Charles, liquor saloon 
Clarke & Co, blacksmiths and 

wagon makers 
Cook H B, liquor saloon 
Dalton A F, blacksmith and 

wagon maker 
Ellis C D, agent Southern Pa- 
cific Railroad 
Hanna J B & Co, general mer- 
chandise 
Hudson & Weaver, butchers 
Jones E A, superintendent Nor- 
ton & Stewart's stage line 
Kelly RB,US deputy mineral 

surveyor 
Kirkland W H, deputy sheriff 
Liberman J & Co, general mer- 
chandise, and forwarding and 
commission merchants 
Macy & Dalton, carpenters 
Maley James, liquor saloon 
Norton, Stewart & Co, gener- 
al merchandise, and forward- 
ing and commission mer- 
chants 



Norton & Stewart's stage line, 
E A Jones superintendent 

Powers A, hotel 

Rohn Hugo, liquor saloon 

Rolls J F, news depot, station- 
ery, confectionery, etc 

Smith Charles, fruits 

Smith Delos H, notary public 
and USA quartermaster's 
agent 

Smith F, shoemaker 

Steele & McKenzie, corral and 
feed yard 

Thomson H N & Co, forward- 
ing and commission mer- 
chants 

Tully, Ochoa & Co, general mer- 
chandise 

Waters James, liquor saloon 

Wells, Fargo & Co, E Bonsall 
agent 

Western Union Telegraph Co, 
E Bonsall manager 

Williams T L, postmaster 

Williamson's Valley P 0, 

Yavapai Co, 25 miles n of Pres- 
cott on the road to Mineral 
Park 

Breon Stephen, stage station 

Home Louis, liquor saloon, and 
postmaster 

Puntenney Eli, blacksmith 

Yuma P 0, 

The county seat of Yuma Co, 
250 miles s w of Prescott, 247 
miles w of Tucson, and 731 
miles s e of San Francisco, 
lies on the east bank of the 
Colorado Biver, immediately 
below the junction of the 
Gila, and opposite the old 
military post of Fort Yuma. 
The place was first called 
Arizona City, building having 
been commenced soon after 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm. B. Hooper&Go.{ 



Tucson & Phoenix, A. T., El Pas 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



} Teas & Eandles at Wholesale. 



200 



ARIZONA. 



the country came into posses- 
sion of the United States, in 
1854. Here was the extreme 
outpost of civilization — if 
civilization it could be called 
— and the extreme angle of 
our country. Indians, savage, 
merciless, and degraded ; des- 
peradoes, bold, unscrupulous, 
and adventurous; and pio- 
neers brave, enlightened, and 
enterprising, have occupied 
the land, ruling, each as it 
could — the last class triumph- 
ing in the end — and all mak- 
ing a history dark and roman- 
tic, with many scenes of blood; 
many large fortunes made 
and lost ; while the years of 
its existence do not cover a 
generation. Here was the 
natural crossing of the Color- 
ado by travelers from Mexico 
and the States ; and here Col. 
Cave J. Coutts, then a lieu- 
tenant in the U. S. Army, 
and in command at Fort 
Yuma, in the fall of 1849 es- 
tablished a ferry, using for 
the purpose a boat which had 
been used as a wagon-bed by 
a Mr. Howard in his journey 
from Wisconsin to California. 
The ferry was subsequently 
owned by a Dr. Lincoln and 
Col. Glanton, who, with four- 
teen others, were massacred 
by the Yuma Indians in 
March, 1850. For many 
years this important ferry 
was conducted by Don Diego 
Jaeger, who exercised a great 
influence in the region, and 
accumulated a large fortune. 
The population in 1875 was 
estimated at 1,300, and by 
the census of 1880 at 1,232. 
The locality is very favorable 



for trade, being at the cross- 
ing of the Colorado by the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. 
The river is navigable for 
light-draft steamers, which 
here receive the goods brought 
by the railroad, or shipped 
by sea to the mouth of the 
river, 165 miles below. The 
steamers ascend the river a 
distance of 500 miles; and 
when the country is more 
fully developed, such an ar- 
tery will bring a large trade 
to Yuma. The site and sur- 
roundings are unattractive, 
having a barren appearance 
and subject to great heat and 
aridity, but there is much good 
soil, only needing the fructi- 
fying effects of irrigation to 
render it exceedingly fruit- 
ful, while in the neighboring 
mountains are mines of great 
extent and of the richest char- 
acter. The great heat of sum- 
mer has been a bar to its rapid 
growth ; but the advantages 
of its position and the abund- 
ant resources of its surround- 
ings will incite to enterprise 
which will surmount all cli- 
matic defects, and make the 
sandy city the pleasant abode 
and prosperous mart that 
nature designed. The town 
makes little pretense in archi- 
tectural style, the buildings 
being mostly of adobe ; but it 
contains some large mercan- 
tile establishments, three ho- 
tels, a Catholic church, school- 
house, two newspapers, rail- 
road depot, and the Territo- 
rial prison. The latter is situ- 
ated on a bluff at the junction 
of the Gila and Colorado riv- 
ers, is one hundred and fifty 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLrARD TABLE 
MA.MFAtXlKKKS 



';{ 



653 <fe 655 Market St. 
Saa Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND GAZETTEER. 



201 



feet square, and surrounded 
by a high stockade on three 
sides, and a cliff on the other. 
It is built of granite, at pres- 
ent but one story in hight, 
but it is intended to add an- 
other when necessity and 
appropriations warrant. The 
walls are five feet in thickness 
at the base and three feet at 
the top, an iron grating ex- 
tending through the entire 
hight of wall sixteen feet. 
It contains twelve cells, con- 
structed of masonry and iron 
work. The number of prison- 
ers is thirty-four, of which two 
are confined for life, and the 
others for terms varying from 
one to eighteen years. The 
prison will accommodate 
about one hundred prisoners. 
It is very neatly kept and 
well ventilated. The Colo- 
rado Steam Navigation Com- 
pany maintain a line of steam- 
ers on the river, which make 
trips to the far north as occa- 
sion offers and business de- 
mands. The Colorado Eiver 
at Yuma is 550 feet wide, 
and 13 feet in depth at low 
water, which rises in flood to 
the depth of 24 feet in sum- 
mer from the melting of the 
snow in the Rocky Mount- 
ains. The river is crossed by 
a railroad bridge 600 feet in 
length and 20 in width. As 
everywhere in Arizona, the 
schools are of the first con- 
sideration. A public school 
is maintained, with 45 pupils, 
and a private school by Mr. 
T. Roy, where all the branches 
of an ordinary education and 
the English, Spanish, and 
French languages are success- 



fully taught. Besides these 
is a parochial school for boys, 
conducted by the Sisters of 
St. Joseph, which has an at- 
tendance of 35 pupils. The 
Convent of the Sacred Heart 
was established in 1875. It 
is an academy.for young la- 
dies, and is conducted by the 
Sisters of St. Joseph. In it 
are taught all the higher 
branches and the Spanish and 
French languages. The aver- 
age daily attendance is 55. 
The Church of the Immacu- 
late Conception is an adobe 
edifice, in cruciform shape, 
built in 1865, under the direc- 
tion of the Very Rev. Bishop 
Salpointe. It is largely at- 
tended by the Mexican popu- 
lation, who constitute about 
two-thirds of the population 
of the city. The climate of 
Yuma is remarkably health- 
ful, but the intense heat at 
times during the summer is a 
serious inconvenience. The 
records at the U. S. Signal 
Service Station give the tem- 
perature during 1880 as fol- 
lows : Maximum, August 
16th, 111 deg. ; minimum, 
February 1st, 25 deg. ; aver- 
age for the year, 70.2 deg. 
During the same year there 
was no rain until December, 
when 0.74 fell. Stages leave 
tri- weekly for Castle Dome 
Landing, Silver District, and 
Ehrenberg. 

Alcayaga & Ruiz, gen'l mdse, 

First 
Alexander Henry N, attorney 

at law, Main 
Amabisca Felipe, butcher, Main 
Arizona Sentinel, J F Knapp 

publisher, Main 



m 

30 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



14 



UfM D UHODCD JP. OH /Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T., El Taso, 
WIYl. D. nUUrLri <X UU. \ Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



Lubricating Oils. 



202 



ARIZONA. 



Baine Christopher, wagon mak- 
er, Main 

Barney William C, gunsmith, 
Main 

Bonine E A, photographer 

Brindley C H, justice of peace 

Burke William H, proprietor 
American Hotel, Gila 

Chaucot J M Rev, pastor Church 
of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion, Main 

Colorado Steam Navigation 
Co, Railroad Depot 

Convent of the Sacred Heart, 
Main 

Douglas H H, proprietor Silver 
District Stage Line 

Forrest M E Mrs, fruits, confec- 
tionery, etc, Main 

Furrer Leopold, liq'r and bill- 
iard saloon, Main 

Gawley R C, blacksmith 

Ginocchio G & Co, gen'l mdse 
and fruits, Main 

Hanes William, liq'r and bill- 
iard saloon, Main 

Horner Christopher, machin- 
ist, blacksmith, and wagon 
maker, Gila 

Hughes Thomas, liquor and bill- 
iard saloon, Main 

Knapp J F, publisher Ariz >na 
Sentinel, Main 

Knight George TM, stationery, 
cigars, tobacco, etc, and attor- 
ney at law, Main 

Levy Isaac, prob. judge Yuma Co 

Lorette Althee, gen'l merchan- 
dise, Maiden Lane and Third 

Lyons Isaac, gen'l mdse, Main 

Martin George, drugs, medi- 
cines, stationery, etc., Main 

Miller Walter, surveyorYumaCo 

Mullan L A, attorney at law 

Napoleon Nicanor, shoe maker, 
Main 

Olaeta Concepcion, manufactur- 
ing jeweler, Main 



Olaeta J P, liquor saloon. Main 
Onofre Daniel, blacksmith and 

wagon maker, Main 
Purdy Samuel Jr, publisher 

Yuma Free Presg, attorney 

at law, and recorder Yuma 

Co 
Ringwald G A, harness and 

saddle maker, Gila 
Roy Theophilus, private eclec- 
tic school, Gila 
Rubottom C E, watch maker 

and jeweler, Main 
Salcido Pedro, liq'r saloon, Main 
Schnmaker Henry, barber, Main 
Scott Charles W, liquor and 

billiard saloon, Main 
Signal Service U S A, C A 

Smith observer 
Silver District Stage Line, 

H H Douglass proprietor 
Sisson, Wallace & Co, general 

merchandise, Main 

Soeur Andrew, butcher, grocer- 
ies, and restaurant, Main 

Sun Ho Chung, bakery, First 

Taggart J H, physician, and 
coroner Yuma Co 

Territorial Prison, C V Mee- 
den superintendent, 

Tonge W H, justice of peace 

Townsend O F, notary public 
and U S deputy mineral sur- 
veyor 

Tyner Andrew, sheriff Yuma 
Co, and proprietor Palace 
Hotel, Main 

Weaver Henry, prop'r South- 
ern Pacific Railroad Hotel 

Wells, Fargo & Co, F B 
Wightman agent 

Western Union Telegraph Co, 
W H Mahuiiey manager 

Wightman F B, postmaster, 
and agent Wells, Fargo & Co 

Yet Hing, bakery 

Yuma Free Press, Samuel 
Purdy Jr publisher, Main 



Thfi J. M. Brunswick & B&Ikb C& m^i^^vK^nJi^t^F^nifsfo^ 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



203 



ARIZONA 

Classified Business Directory, 

Arranged Alphabetically by Business and Towns. 



Academies. 

(See Schools.) 

Agents. 

(See Respective Heads.) 

Agricultural Implements. 

Sipson, Wallace & Co . . Benson 
Herrera F & Co . . . Charleston 
Springer & Hackes . . " 
Zeckendorf L & Co . " 
Buckalew & Ochoa . . . Florence 
Collingwood Joseph & 

Co « 

Smith & Watzlavzick.. " 
Buckalew & Ochoa. .... .Globe 

Eaton & Bailey " 

Kellner E F « 

The Globe Mercantile Co. " 

Van Wagenen G S " 

Harlow C E & Co . . . Harshaw 
Farrington R E & Co.Maricopa 

Vandever Bros " 

Kellner E F & Co. . .McMillen 

Kellner E F & Co Nugget 

Creamer & Abbott ... Phoenix 

Ellis Gus& Co " 

Goldman & Co * . " 

Irvine E & Co " 



Bashford L & Co Prescott 

BuffumWM " 

Gold water M& Son... " 

Head CP&Co « 

Goldman & Co Tempe 

Hayden Charles T « 

Shaffer & Lord Tombstone 

Smith PW " 

Lord & Williams Co, Tucson 

Meyer L & Co « 

Tully, Ochoa & Co.... " 
Zeckendorf L& Co... « 
Zeckendorf William. . . " 

Liberman J & Co Willcox 

Sisson, Wallace & Co Yuma 

Apothecaries. 

(See Druggists.) 

Architects. 

Evans & Co Tucson 

Petit Alexander P " 

Sullivan M J « 

Assayers. 

Gray John W, Chiricahua City 

Eaton C B Dos Cabezas 

Hill Elmer " 

Kimbell Charles J. . . Galeyville 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WH.B. HOOPER & GO. { 



Tucson & Phoenix, A. T., El Faso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



} Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



204 ARIZONA. 


Forman J H Globe 

Kennedy E " 

Lanzweert G Greaterville 

Williamson H " 

Keesing S Harshaw 

Langley W A . . . . Mineral Park 

Baker J D Pinal 

Brown P A « 

Dodge MM " 


Baker Albert C 

BolanP J 

Campbell Joseph 

Cox Frank 

Hancock W A 

Lemon & McCabe . . . 

Porter DeForest 

Tweed & Hancock . . 

Wilkes William 

Davis James W 

Reymert J De Noon. 

Reymert J D Jr 

Stone W R 


. Phoenix 

a 
u 

a 
a 
« 
u 

a 
a 

....Pinal 

iC 

u 

it 


Merritt W H " 


Blake & Co Prescott 

Stahl Edward " 

Duval Charles J . , Tombstone 

Hayne Arthur " 

Kearsing Henry W . " 
Manning Joseph G. " 
Rahn F " 


Cartter Harley H . . . . 
Churchill & Masterso 

French C G W 

Hargrave J P 

Marcou S G 


.Prescott 
n " 
« 

a 
a 

u 
u 

(I 
u 
a 
a 

".Safford 

M 
U 
(1 


Rickard William T 

Voisard E P « 

Brewer Arthur K Tucson 

Culver John Pi " 

Jacobs Washington M. . " 
Salazar B " 


Masterson Murat 

McGrew William H . 

Howard John 

Rush Charles B 

Rush & Wells 

Tucker Gideon J 

Tucker Paul 


Wetmore & Dean " 

Attorneys at Law, 

Savage W H Bisbee 

Blakeley W G Cerbat 

Ashenfelter S M Clifton 

Fitch Frank Florence 

Oury Granville H. . . . " 

Smith Horace L u 

Summers H B " 

Wratten George L . . . " 

Broughton WW Galey ville 

Carr David P « 

Sessions C B " 

Brown Oscar M Globe 

French W H " 


Wells Edward W... 
Clarke William F.... 

Hayes James 

Morris James 

Osborn N 


Miller W G 

WickershamD W.Sol 
Rudd WR 


...Silent 

omonville 

..St John 

ombstone 
a 

u 

a 
a 
u 
tc 
u 
tl 

It 
(( 
u 
(( 

it 


Abbott Grafton St LT 

Anderson N D 

Aram Eugene W . . . 
Berry George G . . . 
Burke Francis G. . . 
Campbell Alexander 

Colby P T 

Davis L H 

Drumm Thomas J . . 
Earll, Smith, Camp- 
bell & Robinson. . 

Fitch Thomas 

George AGP 

Gregg V A 

Hayne Marcus P. . . 


Hicks John C " 


Smith L K " 


Swasey GustavusA — " 

Van Slyck Julius W " 

Bartlett L Mineral Park 

Davis & Stephenson " 
Hamilton Samuel. " 
Alsap John T Phoenix 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



BILUARn TABLE) 653 & 655 Market St 
MAAIFAOTIBEKS, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



classified^businessTdikectory. 



205 



Howard James G. . . Tombstone 

Hutton J F " 

Jones Harry B " 

Lewis J T « 

Lowrey AC M 

Lucas J H " 

Miller John M " 

Morgan & Silent. .. li 

Murphy John M " 

O'Melveny & Tran- 

tum « 

PeelBL " 

Price Lyttleton " 

Eeed Theron u 

Eeilly James " 

Robinson James S . . " 

Silent Charles " 

Smith F M " 

Southard J B " 

Spicer Wells " 

Stephens C C " 

Street Webster " 

Stump J W " 

Thurmond Philip M " 

TrantumOO 

Walker AM 

Walker & Haymond " 

Williams & Davis . . " 

Ainsa Santiago Tucson 

Beall George T " 

Buell James " 

Campbell Alexander. . . " 

CarrE M " 

Earll, Smith, Campbell 

& Robinson " 

Farley H F " 

Goodrich Ben " 

Goodrich & Goodrich . . " 

Gregg F W " 

Haynes John " 

Hereford & Zabriskie . H 

Hughes L C « 

Lighthizer Harry B . . . . " 

Miller FK " 

Morgan Benjamin " 

Oates James W " 

Osborn William J ..... . " 

Perry Joseph C. . " 



Pomroy Everett B Tucson 

Robinson James S " 

Roman John " 

Silent Charles " 

Smith FM « 

Stanford Frederick M 

Stiles Theodore L " 

Stillwell WH « 

Van Voorhies W tc 

Whaling Michael " 

Wicks Moye " 

Zabriskie J A " 

Alexander Henry N Yuma 

Knight George M " 

Mullan LA « 

Purdy Samuel Jr " 

J. A. ZABBISKIK. B. H. HEREFOKD. 

HEREFORD & ZABRISKIE, 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law, 

AND 

NOTAR I E© PUBLIC, 

Mining and Land Lavt a Specialty, 
Office on MEYER ST., opposite Palace Hotel, 

Tucson, Arizona. 

Auctioneers. 

Fisher J L Prescott 

Pyle B W Tombstone 

QuigleyB C. " 

Vickers J V " 

Leventhal A Tucson 

Noyes E W " 

Bakers. 

Krocher John Bisbee 

Low Ket Charleston 

Vaughn Thomas .... Galey ville 

Wright M A Mrs Globe 

Bauman & Thomas. , . Harshaw 

Heinson Jacob Phoenix 

Scherrer Carl " 

Hilge&Co Pinal 

Hatz Daniel Prescott 

Caeser Julius Tombstone 

Geisenhof er O W. . . " 

Stumpf Joseph " 

Thabard Peter & Co " 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best 



WM. B. HOOPER & C0.{^a h S^ T a^ ICigars of all Kinds. 



206 



ARIZONA. 



Casamayou & Co Tucson 

Ganz William « 

Gonzales Pedro " 

Mayr & Miltenberff. . . " 

Bisner J B Washington 

Sun Ho Chung Yuma 

Yet Hing Yuma 

Banks and Bankers. 

Stout, Fisk & Co Globe 

Bank of Arizona (bra'h)Phoenix 

Pinal County Bank Pinal 

Bank of Arizona Prescott 

Blake PW " 

Pima County Bank 

(branch) Tombstone 

Safford, Hudson & 

Co (branch) " 

Safford, Hudson & Co . Tucson 
Pima County Bank " 

Barbers. 

Hutton Edward Benson 

Lenhart Jacob . Charleston 

Pearson Charles W. " 

Cooper WT Dos Cabezas 

Barraza Cristobal . . . .Florence 

Abraham Jacob Globe 

Bostick Samuel " 

Cooke Belt " 

Yolkert Julius Harshaw 

Dupish Edward Phoenix 

Harrison Charles M " 

Sturemburg William ... " 

Gardiner Hiram Pinal 

Lempker William H " 

Paine Lewis L " 

Milligan Thomas Prescott 

Robinson Benjamin. . . " 

Tompkins W J 

Balurdo V R Tombstone 

Baron William " 

Helyar Albert " 

Lippert & Peyser. .. " 

Moore John H " 

Bosenstock Albert Tucson 

Sparrow Frederick A . " 



Stewart William H Tucson 

Wilkins Alexander " 

Zuniga Masimo " 

Schumaker Henry Yuma 

Baths. 

Waring & Co Galey ville 

Abraham Jacob Globe 

Brown T Harshaw 

Dupish Edward Phcenix 

Sturemburg William. . . " 

Jensen Frederick Pinal 

Paine Lewis L " 

Milligan Thomas — Prescott 
Robinson Benjamin. . . " 

Balurdo V R Tombstone 

Baron William " 

Evans B L Mrs Tucson 

Moroney Paul & Co " 

Rickey Joseph F " 

Bedding. 

Kellner EF .....Globe 

Carey William R Phcenix 

Porter Geo S & Co . . .Prescott 

Fonck J L Tombstone 

Goldschmidt Leo ... " 

Lenoir Joseph " 

Schoenfeld & Hey- 

man " 

Goldschmidt Leo Tucson 

SweetlandBR& Co.. " 

Beer Importers. 

(See also Liquors Wholesale.) 

Hooper Wm B & Co (agents 
Blatz, Milwaukee) . . . Phoenix 

Hooper Wm B & Co (agents 
Blatz, Milwaukee) . . . Tucson 

Lord & Williams Co (agent 
Conrad & Co's Bud- 
weiser) Tucson 

Billiard Saloons. 

Lewis C G Florence 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



1*1 1,1,1 A 16 *> TABLEf 

MA\lFVtTlKEKS, \ 



653 <fe fi55 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIKECTORY. 



207 W 



McLellan T H Florence 

Hammon & Taylor Globe 

Hoffman HC « 

McNelly William T. 

Brown & Cole Phoenix 

Haeffner & Garcia " 

Hunt J B Pinal 

Sarrick George H " 

Connell Eobert Prescott 

Tompkins & Jackson . . " 
Kirwagen & Sines . . " 

Anderton F S Tombstone 

Campbell & Hatch . . " 

Robertston & Clarke " 

Bayer & Schwarz Tucson 

Tapie G " 

Teeple Eobert E " 

Whitton & Co " 

Furrer Leopold Yuma 

Hanes William " 

Hughes Thomas , . " 

Scott Charles W « 



Blacksmiths and Wagon 
Makers. 

Gardiner John J Benson 

Smith, Waddell&Gibbs « 

Tolles George Bisbee 

Ballard William . Brigham City 

Nutling R Casa Grande 

Sumner S . Castle Dome Landing 

Kraft Jacob Charleston 

Gibbons John Contention 

Boyer PA Dos Cabezas 

Harrington W C . . . . Galey ville 

Kelly Thomas " 

Larsen James . Gillette 

Burns Cornelius Globe 

Carey H M & Co " 

Graydon Alexander u , 

Hyde H R « 

Lundy J C " 

Newell Milton " 

Rocha Alvino " 

Smith Franklin W " 

Wisdom Thomas " 



Thompson M W . . Greaterville 
Moss & McDonald . . . Harshaw 

Besner J B Luttrell 

Brown & Wright .... Maricopa 

Hughes John Mineral Park 

Bryan J M Phoenix 

Burger John H " , 

Herrick & Lutgerding " 
Luhrs George HN.,.. " 
Slankard & Clarke .... " 

Caveness & Co • • • • Pinal 

Hutchinson William T. " 
Brecht Frederick G . . . Prescott 

Fisher F G " 

Howey James " 

Kerr Joseph . " 

Radczewsky Jacob " 

Ballard William Safford 

Wade Anthony " 

Miller Walter Silent 

Quiros R Solomonville 

Hayden Charles T Tempe 

Carr John Tombstone 

Doland & Brown. . . " 

Dee William " 

Fitzpatrick Jeremiah " 

Graf & Schoeholzer . u 

Saul & Welmot.. .. <c 

Westerman & Ruh- 

lin " 

Bragg AM Tucson 

Durazo R " 

EtchellsCharles^T..... " 

GravelM P " 

Palmer Horatio B " 

Quinlin James " 

Terrazas I u 

Davidson S A Walker 

Salomon Rosala . . . Washington 

Egloff John Wickenberg 

Clarke & Co Wilcox 

Dalton A F " 

Puntenney Eli 

Williamson's Valley 

Baine Christopher Yuma 

Gawley R C « 

Horner Christopher " 

Onof re Daniel " 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm.B. Hooper & Co. 



Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T., EI Paso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



Sole Agents ,T. A. MILLER 
C. C. WHISKEY. 



208 



ARIZONA. 



Booksellers. 

Jones J J & Co Bisbee 

Hammond & Taylor Globe 

Baunian & Thomas. . .Harshaw 

Drake W B « 

Loring George E Phoenix 

Israel Salomon Tombstone 

Mansf eld J S Tucson 

Rolls J F Willcox 

Martin George Yuma 

Boots and Shoes. 

(See also General Merchandise) 

Meyers J & Schein Globe 

Cottrell WP Maricopa 

Rosenthal Nathan Phoenix 

Bray T C & Co Prescott 

Kelly & Stephens " 

MaFon A J " 

Randall Charles A . . . . " 
Glover, Charles & 

Co Tombstone 

Leary John " 

Myers J & Bro M 

Zeckendorf William " 

Cohn Jacob M, Tucson 

Czerwinsky T " 

Lewis Bros " 

Lowenstein & Co " 

Menager H " 

WelischTheo& Co « 

Boot and Shoe Makers. 

Forbes H B Benson 

Burdick J F Galeyville 

Guyago Manuel Globe 

Schulze Charles " 

Warren Abraham " 

Biswanger C Harshaw 

Fehr William Mineral Park 

Olsson Tobias Phoenix 

Schmidt Henry Pinal 

Zubrod Niklaus " 

Coleman George M . . . Prescott 

Crocker Charles " 

Dickinson Charles " 



Mason A J Prescott 

Gehman Henry L . . Tombstone 

Gundall John " 

Leary John " 

Loveland A " 

Recum H C " 

Tappeiner John .... " 

Lewis Bros Tucson 

Lopes Ramon " 

Stone George " 

Tucson Boot and Shoe 
Manufacturing Co . . . " 

Weihs Albert " 

Whitaker John C " 

Smith F Willcox 

Napoleon N Yuma 

Bowling Alleys. 

Jensen Frederick Pinal 

Bayer & Schwarz — Tucson 

Breweries. 

Minges Bros Alexander 

Siebe & Tribolet Bisbee 

Raible John Bradshaw 

Mann E Camp Thomas 

Will Peter Florence 

Pinal Brewery Globe 

Nelson S P Harshaw 

Deckert John Luttrell 

Luke & Thalheimer . . Phoenix 

Wurch Michael " 

Becher Gustav Pinal 

Warnke Ernest F " 

Raible John Prescott 

Urfer & Co " 

Glasman & Co Safford 

Bernhard & Leptien.Tombstone 
Uebel A& Co. ... " 

Wehrfritz& Tribolet " 

Bayer & Schwarz Tucson 

Mundelius C " 

Glander Lewis .... Washington 

Bricks and Adobe Layers. 

Streeter W C Phoenix 



The J. M. Brunswick & Baike Co. 



BILLIARD T A BLE ( 653 & 655 Market St 
MAJiUPACTUKEKS,! San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., ^SS^S^SSS!^ 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



209 



Carter G C Tucson 



Groff Charles F . . 


M 


Brokers 




General. 




Parsons & Eedfern . Tombstone 
Vimont J N « 


Mining. 




Swasey G A 

Culver BF 

Kimball MH 

Minor B B 

Parsons & Redfern . 

Power J D 

Prouty Jackson 

Tritle & Murray 

Vimont J N 

Voisard E P 

"Wallace Thomas . . . 


. . . . . Globe 
Tombstone 

M 

a 
u 

H 

« 

u 

(C 

cc 
« 


Money. 




Mills WF 

Williams Marshall . . 

Norton Isaac 

Sampson A B 


. . Harshaw 

Tombstone 

Tucson 

u 


Pawn. 




EoblesB 


. . . Tucson 


Heal HJstate. 


(See Real Estate 


Agents.) 


Stock. 




Tritle & Murry 


Tombstone 



Builders' Materials. 

( See Lumber Dealers.) 

Butchers, 

Hines Frederick . . . Alexandra 

De la Ossa David Benson 

McComas Hiram " 

Page & Weldt Bisbee 

Cramer David E . . . Charleston 



Ayler T W 


Contention 


White & Wood. . .Dos Cabezas 


Cuen Francisco . . . 


. . . Florence 


Schoshusen Henry. 


M 


Garcia HA 


. Galey ville 


McAllister M & Cc 


>. . " 


Frakes J W 


Globe 


Hazard & Kennedy 


u 


Horse David 


(i 


Redman Joseph . . . 


u 


Candeleria John. . . 


Greaterville 


Alison Bros 


. . Harshaw 


Darling James 


« 


Ford Charles . 


ii 


Vanderlip & Fagan 
Law son Charles B . A 


u 


tineral Park 


Bartlett John 


Oro Blanco 


Balsz & Kelly.... 


Phoenix 


Morgnett Bros .... 


u 


Bailey W L 


Pinal 


Nichols & Searle . . 


<t 


Acker & Smith .... 


. . . Prescott 


Hall & Poe 


u 


Marlow George .... 


...Tip Top 


Bacigalupi& Martin.Tombstone 


Clifford Robert . . . 


it 


Everhardy Jacob. . 


u 


Hickson Henry . . . 


a 


Hooker Edward R . 


u 


Kramer & Emele.. . 


cc 


Lange & Storm . . . 


(t 


Burns Frank H. . . 


. . . .Tucson 


Burroiel Manuel. . . 




Calles Jesus 


u 


Carillo Jesus 


i. 


Crossley John S . . . 


a 


Elias Juan 


M 


Pusch & Zellweger. 


a 


Schaaf Philip 


a 


Uribe Guillermo. . . 


a 


Genung Charles E. 


. . . Vulture 


Clark J W 


Washington 


Hudson & Weaver. 


. . . Willcox 


Amabisca Felipe . . . 


Yuma 


Soeur Andrew 


(C 



Cabinet Makers. 

Zimmerman William . . Globe 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wnj. B. Hooper & 6o.{ T ¥S£S , SSfet;TaS£r}^S to Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



210 



ARIZONA. 



Carey William R Phcenix 

Jackson & Reed " 

Sweetland B R & Co- .Tucson 

Candles. 

(See also General Merchandise) 

Kane, William & Co . Harshaw 
Hooper Wm B & Co . Phcenix 
Hooper Wm B & Co. . . Tucson 

Candy Manufacturers. 

Rothschild Otto Tucson 

Carpenters and Builders. 

McNair & Miller. . .Charleston 
Myers LW& Son. . Contention 

Rasinger M Dos Cabezas 

Resz Jacob. ..... " 

Anderson Hans A Globe 

Palmer & Rice " 

Zimmerman William " 

Cassidy James Harshaw 

McDonald J " 

Jackson M M & Son . . . Phcenix 

Lowell E T " 

Roberts & Ryder " 

Wiley & Son « 

Bley William Pinal 

Brown John " 

McDowell J M " 

Wright DB « 

Garretsee Garret Prcscott 

Lindenbaum Benjamin " 

Miles James H " 

Throne WH « 

Curtis Monroe M Safford 

Sims John " 

Beauchamp Onesime Tombstone 
Brown & McGregor " 

Roberts & Giles .... " 

Rose John W " 

Aros Romulo. . Tucson 

Burton Ambrose " 

Cropper W L " 

Downie William " 

Evans & Co " 



Fitzpatrick W F Tucson 

Gratto M " 

Noyes & Prince " 

Parkes & Wills " 

Sullivan M J * 

Williams J W " 

Garress Gus Vulture 

Macy & Dalton Willcox 

Carpets and Oil Cloths. 

KellnerE F Globe 

Irvine E & Co Phoenix 

Goldman & Co " 

Gold water M & Son . . Prescott 
Goldschmidt Leo . . . Tombstone 
Lenoir Joseph ...... " 

Schoenfeld & Her- 
man " 

Goldschmidt Leo Tucson 

Carriage Makers. 

(See Blacksmiths and Wagon 
Makers.) 

Chinese Goods. 

Tee Lee Globe 

Son Yon & Co Phoenix 

Wing On Lung & Co . . " 

Ling Chung Pinal 

Sang Chong & Co Prescott 

Charles Lee Kong. .Tombstone 

Hung Chung " 

Quong On Chong. . . li 

Wang Woo Lung . . " 

Chan Tin Wo Tucson 

Quong You Chong " 

Cigar Manufacturers. 

Giffin William Tucson 

Cigars. 

(See also General Merchandise; 
also Liquors.) 

* Wholesale. 

Furlow W H Bisbee 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE 
M AS U FA€TIJK£B8, 



653*655 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



211 



Lenhart Jacob .... Charleston 
Washeim Charles . .Dos Cabezas 

Weidenhof er F Galey ville 

Chapel G A Globe 

*Coover C M & Co " 

Duryea W H " 

Haramon & Taylor li 

Hitchcock & Co " 

Luedke JH « 

Brown George E Phoenix 

Coats George F " 

* Hooper Wm B& Co " 

Loring George E " 

Rosenthal Nathan * 

Bones & Spencer Prescott 

BrannenPB&Co.... " 

Goldwater Henry " 

Kelly & Stephens " 

OtisT W " 

Baldridge W J Tombstone 

Bourland WA " 

Carleton Frank H.. " 

Chapin SB " 

Cohn A & Bro " 

Fortlouis Albert " 

* Harford RF& Co 
Israel Salomon — " 
Walker George W . . " 
Warren Emma Mrs . " 
Williams Marshall . . " 

Goldtree Joseph Tucson 

Harris & Sutton " 

* Hooper Wm B & Co. " 

Horton Henry " 

Mansf eld Jacob S .. " 

Sampson Amasa B " 

Forrest M E Mrs Yuma 

Knight George M * 

Civil Engineers. 

(See Mineral Surveyors.) 

Clergymen. 

Girard Eduardo Florence 

Brooks EH Globe 

Bovard G F Phoenix 

Hedgepath J L " 



Meyer William Phcenix 

Adams G H Prescott 

Deraches J " 

Green C W « 

Hunt T C " 

Windes R A •" 

Mclntyre J P Tombstone 

Schnider E P 

Adams George F Tucson 

Gregory U " 

Hurd Isaac NV " 

Jouvenceau Antonio ... " 
Jouvenceau Francisco. . " 

Salpointe John B " 

Chaucot J M Yuma 

Clothing. 

(See also General Merchandise.) 

Duryea W H Globe 

Myers J & Schein " 

Cottrell W F Maricopa 

Rosenthal Nathan Phcenix 

Bray T C & Co Prescott 

Kelly & Stephens " 

Glover Charles & Co Tombstone 

Myers J & Bro " 

Rosendorf Michael . " 

Zeckendorf William. " 

Cohn J M Tucson 

Czerwinsky T " 

Ferrin J . . . " 

Lowenstein & Co *' 

Menager H " 

Welisch Theo&Co.... " 

Collectors. 

Blackburn L F . . . . . Tombstone 
Conwell & Davis ... " 

Quigley B C 

Fulton & Duff Tucson 

Commission Merchants. 

Barnett & Block Benson 

Clark &Mundell " 

Germain & Montgomery " 
Hammond N W " 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { 



Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



\ Illuminating Oils. 



212 



AKIZONA. 



Webb SM « 

Zeckendorf L & Co ... " 
Buckalew&Ochoa. Casa Grande 
Smith & Watzlavzick " 
Farrington R E & Co . Maricopa 

Vandever Bros " 

Wakefield Bros Pantano 

Farrington RE & Co. San Simon 

Kelly R B 

Diss & Co Tombstone 

Neff AndrewS.... " 

Pyle B W " 

Shaffer & Lord ... " 
Smith Charles M... " 

Browder J A Tucson 

Caswell AM '« 

Detoy Charles " 

Harris & Sutton " 

Knox & Whitney " 

Byan Thomas F " 

Velasco D " 

Liberman J & Co Willcox 

Norton, Stewart & Co . . " 
Thomson HN& Co.... « 
Tully, Ochoa & Co " 

Commissioners of Deeds. 

Swasey Gustavus A — Globe 

Spicer Wells Tombstone 

Walker AM. " 

Topliff James F Tucson 

Alexander H 1ST Yuma 

Confectionery. 

(See also General Merchandise-) 

Luedke JH Globe 

Hammon & Taylor " 

Coats George F Phoenix 

Wharton HH « 

Bones & Spencer Prescott 

Herzog E " 

OtisT W " 

Wager Edward G Tip Top 

Carleton Frank H . . Tombstone 
Earl & Banning. ... " 

Leary J Miss . . . . M 

Warren Emma Mrs . " 



Buck H Tucson 

Eothschild Otto " 

Ganz William « 

Rolls J F Willcox 

Forrest M E Mrs Yuma 

Contractors. 

(See also Carpenters and 
Builders.) 

Mc Nair & Miller . . Charleston 
Myers L W & Son . Contention 

Rasinger M Dos Cabezas 

Resz Jacob " 

Kellner EF Globe 

Palmer & Rice " 

McDonald J Harshaw 

Streeter W C Phoenix 

Jackson M M & Son ... " 

LowellET " 

Roberts & Ryder " 

Wiley&Son " 

Bley * William Pinal 

Broadbeck — " 

Brown John " 

McDowell J M " 

Whitney CL " 

Wright D B « 

Miles James H Prescott 

Roberts & Giles Tombstone 

Rose John W " 

Andrews J D (mining) . Tucson 

Downie William " 

Evans & Co " 

Fitzpatrick W F " 

Gratto M " 

Parkes & Wills " 

Sullivan M J ; « 

Van Pelt S amuel K (mining) ' * 

Williams J W « 

Macy & Dalton Willcox 

Conveyancers. 

Marcou S G Prescott 

Carpenter Sidney W.Tombstone 

FickasB A " 

Gray D L 

Vickers J V " 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 3££*S£r£S£3! 



653* 655 Market St 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



213 



Wallace Thomas. . .Tombstone 

Fulton & Duff Tucson 

Osborn W J " 

Patterson John W " 

Read Will S « 

Topliff James F « 

Crockery and Glassware. 

(See also General Merchandise.) 

Eandall Charles A . . . . Prescott 

Otis AD&Co Tombstone 

Brown Henry J Tucson 

Otis AD & Co " 



Cutlery. 

( See General Merchandise, also 
Hardware.) 

Dentists. 

Ryder Emmons P Prescott 

Ingersoll A E Tombstone 

Jenkins G W " 

Millard Gustavus A . " 
Sichel Gustave W.. " 

Graves Walter L Tucson 

White W J « 

Doors, Windows, and 
Blinds. 

* Manufacturers. 

Blinn L W & Co Benson 

Blilin L W & Co. . .Charleston 
Avery Frank & Co . . Galey ville 

Pascholy & Ray " 

Rogers A Harshaw 

Gregory James M Phoenix 

Roberts & Ryder « 

Champion Josiah Pinal 

Clark & Adams Prescott 

* Wilson & Haskell... " 
Blinn L W & Co. . .Tombstone 

Otis A D&Co " 

Shaffer & Lord.... " 
Arizona and California 

Lumber Co Tucson 



Otis A D & Co Tucson 

Blinn L W & Co Willcox 

Dress Makers. 

Orr J M Mrs Globe 

Wilson Alice Miss " 

Barruth Simon Phoenix 

Harrison Henrietta Mrs " 

Goforth M L Mrs Pinal 

Haight M E Mrs Prescott 

Bissell C E Mrs Tombstone 

Borland Mrs " 

Crowley B A Mrs . . " 

Duclos Madam " 

Stewart GW Mrs.. '< 

Tasker Mary " 

Baker T J Mrs Tucson 

Erwin C F Mrs " 

Drugs and Medicines. 

(See also General Merchandise.) 

Williams Henry F . . Charleston 

Heineman & Soyer Globe 

Hitchcock & Co " 

Denier Harshaw 

Hyde James J . . . . Mineral Park 

Thibodo Oliver J Phoenix 

Thomson John W " 

Bluett William H Pinal 

Kendall George D . . . . Prescott 

Lincoln Oscar " 

Greer Joseph H Tombstone 

Hudson Taliafero ... " 
Kearney ET&Co. " 
Fleishman Fred & Co . . Tucson 
Witfeld Gustavus T.... " 

Torba Javier F " 

Martin George Yuma 

Dry Goods. 

(See also General Merchandise.) 

Myers J & Schein Globe 

Cottrell W F Maricopa 

Righetti James P Phoenix 

Rosenthal Nathan .... " 
Bray T C & Co Prescott 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM.B. HOOPER & CO. { 



Tucson & Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico. 



Wines of all Kinds. 



214 



ARIZONA. 



Dillon & Kenealy . .Tombstone 

Myers J & Bro 4< 

Eosendorf Michael . . " 
Zeckendorf William " 

Cohn Jacob M Tucson 

Czerwinsky T " 

Drachman & Soto " 

Lowenstein & Co " 

Menager H " 

WelischTheo& Co.... M 

Electric Rods. 

Quigley & Shearer . . Tombstone 

Express Agents. 

(Wells, Fargo & Co.) 
Montgomery James W . Benson 

Stillman H C Bisbee 

Wright J A Casa Grande 

Field DC Charleston 

Cowan AC Contention 

Washeim Charles. Dos Cabezas 
Brown George A . . . . Florence 

Vosburgh J J Globe 

Mills W F Harshaw 

McBain L C Luttrell 

Yandever Charles ... Maricopa 

Jilson L Phoenix 

Venton Ascott Pinal 

Blake F W Prescott 

Bonsall E San Simon 

Williams Marshall . Tombstone 

Van Fleet MB . .Tucson 

Kirkland E E Vulture 

Allen J K Washington 

Smith DC Wickenburg 

Bonsall E Willcox 

Wightman F B Yuma 

Firearms. 

(See General Merchandise, also 
Gunsmiths.) 



Florists. 

Boberts Emma Mrs 
TuttleHH 



Tombstone 



Flour Dealers. 

( See also Flour Mills, also Gen- 
eral Merchandise, also grocer- 
ies.) 

Hammond N W Benson 

Harrison, Fisher & Co . . . Globe 
Hammond N W . . . Tombstone 

Flour Mills. 

Brady P E (Gila) ..Florence 
Owens&Weed (Owens) " 
Eoss Nathaniel (Salt Eiver), 

Phoenix 
Smith J Y T (Phoenix) . 
Hyatt & Co (Star) . . . .Safford 

Crismon C Tempe 

Hayden C T « 

Fish E N (Eagle) Tucson 

Lee James " 

Warner Solomon .... " 
Jordan Bros Verde 

Forwarding Merchants. 

Barnett & Block Benson 

Clark & Mundell " 

Germain & Montgomery " 

Hammond N W " 

Webb S M « 

Zeckendorf L & Co " 

Buckalew& Ochoa.Casa Grande 
Smith & Watzlavzick " 
Farrington R E &Co..Maricopa 

Vandever Bros " 

Wakefield Bros Pantano 

Farrington R E & 

Co San Simon 

Kelly RB 

Liberman J & Co Willcox 

Norton Stewart & Co . . " 
Thomson H N & Co . . " 
Tully, Ochoa&Co.. .. " 

Foundries. 

Brown CD Prescott 

Harris T S Tombstone 

O'Donnell P N Tucson 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. Z^*Z^£2^ m £?8!^P 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T.. 



WHOLESALE 
BOOTS AXO SHOES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



215 



Fruits. 

Michea J B Florence 

Weidenhof er F Galey ville 

Chapel G A Globe 

Luedke JH " 

Myers & White " 

Coats George F Phoenix 

Wharton H H « 

Brinkraan Delia Mrs. . . . Pinal 

Loeffler & Fiehl « 

Bones & Spencer Prescott 

Herzog E " 

Wager Edward G Tip Top 

Andrews & Co Tombstone 

Baldridge W J . . . . 

Diss & Co 

MilichF A&Co... 
Smith Charles M . . . 
Warren Emma Mrs. 

Harris & Sutton Tucson 

McFadden & Serrot ... " 

Sresovich Joseph " 

Townsend Bros " 

Warren A L " 

Yarnell William Vulture 

Smith Charles Willcox 

Forrest M E Mrs Yuma 

Ginocchio G & Co " 

Furnishing Goods. 

(See also General Merchandise.) 

Myers J & Schein Globe 

Brannen P B & Co. ...Prescott 

Bray T C & Co " 

Dillon & Kenealy. .Tombstone 
Glover Charles & Co " 

Myers J & Bro " 

Zeckendorf William u 

Ferrin J Tucson 

Goldschmidt Adolf & Co " 

Harris Helena Mrs •' 

Holler Sigrid Mrs " 

Kauffmau Isidor ....... " 

Vila A Mrs " 

WelischTheo& Co.... " 



Furniture. 

KellnerEF Globe 

Carey William R Phoenix 

Goldman & Co " 

Irvine E & Co " 

Porter George S & Co . Prescott 

Fonck John L Tombstone 

Goldschmidt Leo ... " 

Lenoir Joseph " 

Schoenfeld & Hey- 

man " 

Goldschmidt Le6 Tucson 

SweetlandBR&Co.. " 

General Merchandise. 

(Includes a general assortment 
of Groceries, Liquors, Dry. 
Goods, Clothing, Boots, Shoes, 
Hats, Caps, Hardware, Crock- 
ery, Drugs and Medicines, Ci- 
gars, Tobacco, etc.) 

Anders J H Alexandra 

Buffum W M 

Bernard NW&Co... Arivaca 

Halleck Thomas Aubrey 

Barnett & Block Benson 

Clark & Mundell " 

Germain & Montgomery " 
Sisson, Wallace <bCo.. m 

Zeckendorf L & Co " 

Levy D & Co Big Bug 

Miner SE " " 

AllenEH&Co Bisbee 

Hardy ET « 

Lazard & Jones " 

Nichols, Lamb & Co li 

Bennett E J & Co . . . Bradshaw 
ShekelsNC&Co.. 

Campbell John Calabasas 

White & Eodgers... " 
Franklin A M & 

Co Camp Thomas 

Neese Thomas... " " 

WoodWV&Co " " 

Head C P & Co. .Camp Verd e 
Buckalew & Ochoa.Casa Grand e 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wn?. B. Hooper 4 Go. { 



'^flRgiS&tiESr'Wm & fondles at Wholesale. 



216 



ARIZONA. 



Smith & Watzlav- 

zick Casa Grande 

Castle Dome Min- 
ing and Smelt- 
ing Co . Castle Dome Landing 

Young John T Catalina 

Herrera F & Co ... . Charleston 
McDowell & Gattrell " 
Springer & Hackes . . M 
Zeckendorf L & Co. " 
Cowan A C & Bro . . Contention 
Goodman L & Co. . " 

Guindania A " 

Marks S " 

Corey & Porter . . . Dos Cabezas 

Eiggs J M " 

Smith P W " 

Frank Abraham Ehrenberg 

Knox Arthur A Empire 

Buckalew & Ochoa. . .Florence 
Collingwood, Joseph & Co " 
Smith & Watzlavzick . " 
Lacy Henry E . . . . Fori Apache 
Tully, Ochoa & Co. Fort Bowie 
Norton & Stewart. .Fort Grant 

Austin F L Fort Lowell 

Higbee A C & Co . . . Galey ville 
McCandless F & Co. " 
Eynerson A C & Co. " 

Noonan Daniel Gila Bend 

Anderson John Gillette 

Buckalew & Ochoa Globe 

Eaton & Bailey " 

Ellis H& Co " 

Henderson David " 

Kellner E F " 

Klein S & Co « 

Sultan D & Bro " 

The Globe Mercantile Co " 

Van Wagenen G S " 

Westmeyer Frederick W " 

Barlow L L Granite Peak 

Elliott & Downer . . Greaterville 

Young John t( 

Todd A Hackberry 

Hardy Wooster . Hardyville 

Goldberg & Son Harshaw 

Harlow CE& Co. " 



Katz M D & Co Harshaw 

Roger Bros " 

Snyder D " 

Goldberg H & Son Luttrell 

Mc Bain & Seivers " 

Farrington R E & Co.Maricopa 

Vandever Bros " 

Chilson Bros Marys ville 

Collins J B Maxey 

Smith John Y T . . . . McDowell 
Kellner E F & Co • . McMillen 

Nichols J B " 

Rose Patrick " 

Strong George " 

Breon & Spear . . Mineral Park 

Krider Bros " 

Breon & Spear . . . Mohave City 
Austin & Dempsey. Montezuma 
Stanley E A . Norton's Landing 

Frazer John Nugget 

Kellner E F & Co " 

Hoskins & Thatcher.Oro Blanco 
Ross WJ&Co... " " 

Mc Arthur John M Pajarito 

Tully, Ochoa & Co ... . Pantano 

Wakefield Bros " 

Cohn W E Pelton 

Zeckendorf Wm & Co . . " 

Asher M & Bro Phoenix 

Ellis Gus& Co « 

Goldman & Co " 

Irvine E & Co " 

Morgan Henry " 

Wharton & McNulty ... " 
Bennett & Jones. Pima Station 
Hayden Chas T . . Pima Agency 

Brinkley Bros Pinal 

Brooks Jay " 

Ellis, Aran A Co " 

Goldman & Co " 

Miller George L & Co ... . " 

Welcome L S Polhamus 

Bashford L & Co — Prescott 

BuffumWM 

CampbellJohnG.... " 

Ellis Nathan " 

Fisher J L " 

GoldwaterM& Son.. " 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



BILLTARA TABLE C 653 «fe 655 Market St. 
MAAVFACTUBEK8, 1 San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



217 



Head C P & Co Prescott 

LevyD& Co " 

Weaver B II " 

Miller Charles Queen City 

Wentworth F G. . . " * 

Fish EN Sacoton 

Franklin A M & Co ... . Safford 

McCarty G B " 

The Globe Mercan- 
tile Co San Carlos 

Wood Reuben " " 

Farrington R £ & 

Co San Simon 

Kimble Bros Signal 

Levy, Koshland & Co . . . " 

Holjes J H & Co Silent 

Norton Charles T « 

Buckalew & Ochoa . Silver King 
Ellis, Aron & Co... " " 

Solomon IE Solomonville 

Johnson & Baldwin . . . Stanton 
Rittenhouse J D . . Sweet Water 

Goldman & Co Tempe 

Hayden Charles T " 

Priest James T " 

Dawes & St James Tip Top 

Rowe W A & Co " 

Cadwell & Stanford . Tombstone 

Cohen R 

Frink George K . . . . 

Hoefler Joseph 

Laventhal B 

Shaffer & Lord... 

Smith PW • 

Tasker & Pridham . 

Mercer T Lillie Tubac 

Bojorquez, h Juan Tucson 

Garcia B & Co " 

Kaufman Bros "* 

Lord & Williams Co.. " 

Meyer L & Co " 

Robles B " 

Tully, Ochoa & Co ... . " 
Zeckendorf L & Co ... . " 
Zeckendorf William ... " 

Grant E O & Co Vulture 

Kirkland E E " 

Levy I H " 



Rowe W A & Co Vulture 

Brannen P B & Co . . . .Walker 

Patrick Isaac Washington 

Rogers E S " 

Oliver W G.Whipple Barracks 

Grant E O Wickenburg 

Blaisdell & Johnson . . . Willcox 

Hanna J B& Co " 

Liberman J & Co " 

Norton, Stewart & Co . " 
Tully, Ochoa & Co ... . '< 

Alcayaga & Ruiz Yuma 

Ginocchio G & Co ..... . " 

Lorette Althee " 

Lyons Isaac u 

Sisson, Wallace & Co . . " 

Grain. 

Hammond N W ... Benson 
Sisson, Wallace & Co . . " 
Buckalew & Ochoa . . . Florence 
Collingwood Joseph & 

Co « 

Buckalew & Ochoa Globe 

Eaton & Bailey " 

Harrison, Fisher & Co. .. " 

Kellner E F " 

The Globe Mercantile Co " 

Van Wagenen G S " 

Farrington RE & Co.Maricopa 

Vandever Bros " 

Ellis Gus & Co Phoenix 

Goldman & Co « 

Irvine E & Co " 

Bashford L & Co Prescott 

BuffumWM " 

Campbell J G " 

Dougherty J W " 

Ellis Nathan " 

Goldwater M & Son ... " 

Head C P & Co « 

Cadwell & Stanford. Tombstone 
Hammond N W.... " 

Shaffer & Lord.... " 

Smith PW " 

Tasker & Pridham . . " 
Goodman A Tucsoft 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



15 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { 



Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T., El Faso, 
Tex., and Uuaymas, Mexico, 



(Lubricating Oils. 



218 



ARIZONA. 



Lord & Williams Co • . Tucson 

Mever L & Co " 

Tully, Ochoa& Co " 

Zeckendorf L&Co " 

Zeckendorf William . " 
Sisson, Wallace & Co. . .Yuma 

Grain Crushing. 

Hills & Carr Benson 

Grist Mills. 

(See Flour Mills.) 

Groceries. 

(See also General Merchandise.) 

Barnum F C Alexandra 

Martin Eosa Mrs 

Antelope Creek Station 
Rol>inson J A & Co ... . Benson 
Snyder Warren W.Bumble Bee 
Goodman Thomas J.Ehrenberg 

Corrales Jesus Florence 

Michea J B « 

Eotnero Nicolas " 

TantiniGB " 

Shotwell C S & Co. .Galeyville 

Smith A E " 

Carscadin F Gila Bend 

Chapel G A Globe 

Duryea W H " 

Cottrell W F Maricopa 

Brown George E Phoenix 

Righetti James P " 

Gomez Francisco Pinal 

Brannen P B & Co . . . Prescott 
Dougherty John W. . u 

Herzog E " 

Otis T W 

Sells & Berry San Simon 

Andrew & Co .... Tombstone 
Baldridge W J...\. " 

Fitzhenry J C " 

Fitzhenry & Mansfield "] 
HillsHE&Co.... 

Johnson John P *' 

'Marchand 6N . . " 



McKean & Knight . Tombstone 
Milich F A&Co... " 
NefiE Andrew S . . . . « 
Smith Charles M . . . " 

Alcala Guadalupe Tucson 

Barragan E J 

Barthelemy C 

Carrillo L 

Carrillo Teodosia 

Detoy Charles 

Drachman & Soto 

Felix Dennis 

Germain Eugene 

Ghanetto C 

Goodman A 

Harris & Sutton 

Katz Marcus 

McFadden & Serrot . . . 

Munos Dario 

Navarro Bernardo 

Ramirez Eamon 

Eoca M G 

Eomero Demetrio 

Ruelas Placido 

Salazar Jo?e 

Seligmann C & Co 

Sresovich Joseph 

Tapia Jose M 

Warren A L 

Yslas Genaro 

Soeur Andrew Yuma 

Gunsmiths. 

Fisk Homer W Globe 

Bennett WW Prescott 

Roberts John W " 

Hart Samuel L Tombstone 

Spangenberg G F . . . f* 

Gruber Jacob Tucson 

Barney William C Yuma 

Hardware. 

(See also General Merchandise.) 

Pense & Biggs Harshaw 

Creamer & Abbott . . Phoenix 
Roberts & Ryder(builders) " 



Thfi J. Hi. BrilllSWiGk a BSlkfi COi MAWur"A'^K?iS{ 6M st^Franc r Uc t o? , 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



219 



Suter Jacob Pinal 

Frederick & Hill ..... Prescott 
Mason A J (saddlery) . " 

Eandall Charles A " 

Emmons GW&Co. Tombstone 
McKean & Knight. " 
Otis A D & Co (builders) " 

Brown Henry J Tucson 

Goldbaum & Wolf " 

Katz Marcus " 

Otis A D & Co (builders) " 

Harness and Saddlery. 

( * Manufacturers.) 

Buckalew & Ochoa . . . Florence 
Collingwood, Joseph & Co " 

*GonzalezGN " 

Buckalew & Ochoa Globe 

Eaton & Bailey " 

Kellner E F " 

The Globe Mercantile Co " 

Van Wagenen G S " 

Harlow E & Co . . Harshaw 

Goldman & Co Phoenix 

Irvine E& Co 

* Jones Charles L " 

* McNeil A J 

Brooks Jay Pinal 

Ellis, Aron & Co " 

Goldman & Co " 

Miller George L & Co .. . " 

Bashford L & Co Prescott 

BuffumWM, « 

Campbell J G M 

Goldwater M & Son. . " 
HeadCP&Co 

* Mason A J " 

Eandall Charles A . . . " 

* McMartin James . Tombstone 
Shaffer & Lord.... " 
Smith P W 

* Thorn vsonDRM. 

* Clarke CW Tucson 

* Cuen Francisco " 

Lord & Williams Co.. " 

Meyer L & Co " 

Tully, Ochoa & Co " 



Zeckendorf L & Co ... . Tucson 
Zeckendorf William ... " 

*Ringwald G A Yuma 

Sisson, Wallace & Co . . . " 

Hats and Caps. 

( See also General Merchandise.) 

Myers J & Schein Globe 

Rosenthal Nathan .... Phoenix 

BrayT C & Co Prescott 

Kelly & Stephens ■* 

Glover, Charles &Co.Tombstone 
Myers J & Bro . . . . « 
Rosendorf Michael. " 
Zeckendorf William " 

Czerwinskv T Tucson 

Goldschmidt, Adolf & Co " 

Horseshoers. 

( See Blacksmiths and Wagon- 
makers.) 

Hotels. 

Donlan Peter Alexandra 

Rouillier Camille Arivaca 

Benson Hotel, D H Lo- 
gan Benson 

Miner S E Big Bug 

Crosley Mrs Bisbee 

Simas Manuel " 

Watson J B " 

Grove M E Mrs Bradshaw 

Sims S J Brigham City 

Burton C E . . . Camp Huachuca 

Collins J B Camp Thomas 

Patterson F Mrs. " " 

Fryer Jere Casa Grande 

Fitzhugh Thomas Castle Creek 
American Hotel, J F 

Brown Charleston 

Occidental Hotel, A 

Fleres " 

Pomeroy S W Clifton 

Laurrier A Contention 

Myers L W& Son.. " 

Ashby AS Dos Cabezas 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



WH. B. HOOPER 4 80. i^lffSS^fiS^} Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



220 



ARIZONA. 



Maley Bros Dos Cabezas 

Lewis House, C G 

Lewis Florence 

Silver King Hotel, T 

HMcLellan u 

Galeyville Hotel, S 

M Wessels Galeyville 

Small B « 

Burf eind Martin Gillette 

CurtisG W " 

Central Hotel, Mrs M J 

Moore & Son Globe 

Gardiner B C " 

Globe Hotel, Nathan 

Meek « 

Pascoe House, Mrs Rosa 

Howe " 

St Charles Hotel, H De 

Beaufford Harshaw 

O'HalloranMrs " 

Boyle Edward Hereford 

Ostermann J P " 

Luttrell J M Luttrell 

Batts & Bassett Maricopa 

Jones John M McMillen 

Shanley Patrick " 

Bamber John, Norton's Landing 

Drew B J Nugget 

Wolf oik George T Pantano 

Bank Exchange Ho- 
tel, E Ganz Phoanix 

Byers James S " 

Phoenix Hotel, Miss 

Eosa Salari " 

Grand Hotel, Geo Rey- 
nolds Pinal 

Pinal Hotel, W A Hall.. " 
Irion Robert A . . . Pinal Ranch 
Deutsch William .. Queen City 

Anderson P ... Safford 

Levy, Koshland & Co . . . Signal 

Rhodenback Harry .' Silent 

O'Boyle W C Silver King 

Williams Robert... " " 

Jesus Bros Solomonville 

Webber & Co Tip Top 

Brown's Hotel,Chas. 

R Brown Tombstone 



Contention House, 

Lowery & Shearer Tombstone 
Cosmopolitan Ho- 
tel, C Bilicke " 

Grand Hotel, Mrs 

Jessie E Brown " 
Russ House, Ander- 
son & Schmidt . . " 
Cosmopolitan Hotel, Paul 

Morony Tucson 

Grand Hotel, L M Brown " 
Palace Hotel, Geo Rav- 

field ., « 

Porter's Hotel, A A Por- 
ter " 

Russ House, J P Dixon " 

Barnes John Vulture 

Milliken J J Walker 

Joyner F O Washington 

Melstedt Sarah Mrs " 

Hodge Thomas . . . Wickenburg 

Klein H W 

Campbell J Willcox 

Powers A " 

American Hotel, W H Burke 

Yuma 
Palace Hotel, Andrew Tyner " 
Southern Pacific Railroad 
Hotel, Henry Weaver ..." 

Ice Manufacturers. 

Lount Bros Phoenix 

Rodgers E A Prescott 

Tombstone and Charleston 

Ice Co Tombstone 

Mountain Ice Co Tucson 

Tucson Ice Co " 

Insurance Agents. 

Bailey Alonzo Globe 

Kales M W Phoenix 

McNulty WF « 

Champion Josiah Pinal 

Reymert J D Jr " 

Ellis Nathan Prescott 

Holden WF 

Martindell CB " 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



BILUAKD TABLEt 653 & 655 Market St 
MAJitFACTl'BEJls, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



221 



Meador J F Prescott 

HillC W Teniae 

Clapp Milton B . . . . Tombstone 

Kimball MH 

Manning J G " 

QuigleyB C « 

Solomon H " 

Vickers J V M 

Scott Wm A Jr Tucson 

Iron and Steel. 

( See General Merchandise, also 
Hardware.) 

Iron Foundries. 

( See Foundries.) 

Jewelers. 

Davidson DE Galeyville 

Newton George A Globe 

Kaucher Gustav Phoenix 

Trumper V " 

Morgan Thomas J Prescott 

Hartman & Co Tombstone 

Heitzelman Peter. " 

Heyes W A " 

Schmieding Herman " 

Berger James M Tucson 

Nilson PF " 

Plummer Paul " 

Suastegui Rafael " 

Olaeta Concepcion Yuma 

EubottomC E « 

Lawyers. 

(See Attorneys at Law.) 

Lime, Cement, and Plaster. 

(See Lumber Dealers.) 

Lime Kilns. 

Drake FA Tucson 



Liquors. 

(See also General Merchandise ; 
also Hotels.) 

* Wholesale. 

Viall Ransom M . Alamo Station 

Barnum F C Alexandra 

Campbell " 

Curtis Cyrus " 

Minges Bros " 

Lee J H American Ranch 

Martin Rosa Mrs 

Antelope Creek Station 

Bryan George W Benson 

Moore, Hunt & Co " 

Patterson George W . . . " 

Riley John » 

Vucovich, Lukini & Co. " 

Buford & Everett Bisbee 

Daniels & McReynolds . . " 

Graff & Brentley M 

Kelly J A « 

Martin M & Co " 

Siebe & Tribolet « 

Hammond George A, Bradshaw 
Snyder Warren W, Bumble Bee 
O'Neil J H & Co, Camp Thomas 
Marshall Charles . .Casa Grande 

Canty D J Cerbat 

Brooks G H & Co. . . Charleston 
Barton Jeremiah .... " 

Clarke James " 

Johnston Thomas B " 

Stwart J W 

Weber Charles. " 

Dunn John & Co . . . Contention 

Hibbard&Co " 

McDermott John ... " 
Montaya Romualdo . " 

Bayers J A Dos Cabezas 

Wood & White... " " 

Drew Harrison, Drew's Station 
Goodman Thos J . . . Ehrenberg 

Corrales Jesus Florence 

Flores Augustin " 

MicheaJB " 

Palmer E W " 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & W.l^ t i3%S^&^}1}wn of all Kinds 



222 



ARIZONA. 



Rapp Charles Florence 

Will Peter 

Babcock NJ Galeyville 

Barnhart & Reeves . . " 
Holterman & Hollings " 
Kattenhorn George . . " 

Kennett P " 

McClelland & Pearson " 

McConnachie J " 

Shotweli C S & Co . . " 

Tomlinson JH " 

Waring S W & Co.. " 

Burfeind Martin Gillette 

Curtis GW " 

Anderson James Globe 

Benbrook & Burchett .... " 

Bohse Gustav " 

Cachot Emile " 

Calderon M * 

*Coover CM&Co " 

Dickinson & Adams .... " 

Dillabough S J " 

Gardiner Benjamin C " 

Hamilton James " 

Hammon & Taylor " 

HoffmanHC " 

Love A E « 

McNelly WT " 

Rinehart JH " 

Steiner Rosie " 

Young Jesse " 

Bonnand & Mague . . .Harshaw 

Brickwood JT " 

*Kane William & Co " 

McNameeP J " 

Morrison P " 

Murphy & Everts " 

Northrop " 

O'Donnell PM 

Sims T " 

Smith Charles " 

Washbourn S H " 

Osterman P Hereford 

Hawkins Joseph McMillen 

HoffmanHC 

White Henry Mineral Park 

Brown Bros . . . Moore's Station 
Stanley John, Norton's Landing 



Noon Owen Oro Blanco 

Bfcwn Thomas W . . . .Phoenix 

Brown & Cole " 

Coeke Charles " 

Daneri Stefano " 

Haeff ner & Garcia " 

* Hooper WmB& Co. " 

Luke John " 

Luke & Thalheimer . . " 

Righetti James P " 

Sherman Thomas u 

Smith William T « 

Berthier Jules A Pinal 

Gomez Francisco " 

Graham PB " 

Hunt J B " 

Murray H B " 

Sarrick George H " 

Washburn & Co " 

Brannen P B & Co . . .Prescott 

CateC F 

*Connell Robert " 

Crane Joseph C " 

Daly Thomas B « 

Dougherty John W . . * 

Hatz Daniel " 

Kirwagen & Sines . . " 
Murphy & Scholey ... " 

Raible John " 

Sorg Jean « 

Thorne Daniel u 

Tompkins & Jackson . . " 

Urfer G « 

Urfer & Co " 

Vernon William " 

Faylor & Parker . . Queen City 

Smith — Reno 

Harrison John Safford 

Sells & Berry San Simon 

Tompkins Peter " 

Conger Daniel Seymour 

Hall Charles Signal 

Stein Joseph J & Co Silent 

Thompson & Bowen.Silver King 

Gallardo F Tempe 

Imperial Eulalia " 

Shannon PK " 

Arnold Peter Tip Top 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



MA\lFVtTlKEKS 



';{' 



San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 


223 


Bernard & Smith .... 


.Tip Top 


Stigliano O Tombstone 


Bolien Augustus 


u 


Toralinson Wm W . " 




Bostwick John 


<( 


UebelA&Co 




Kepple & Murphy . . 


u 


Vogan James " 




Urfer G 


a 


Wehrfritz & Tribolet " 




Anderton F S Tombstone 


Barragan R J Tucson 


Archer & Co 


i< 


Bayer & Schwarz * 




BellH J A&Co... 


i< 


Betz Joseph * 




Bennetts & Co 


a 


Brickwedel M H & Co. * 




Bernhardt & Leptien 
Blair Charles C 


fl 


Brunier Josephine Mrs . ' 




« 


Carre & Sanders « 




Brooks Ella Mrs . . . 


a 


Carrillo Teodosia ' 




Brown Fielding C . . 


a 


Chane Charles S * 




Cameron & Allender 


It 


Chapman & Porter . . ^ . * 




Campbell Eobert . . . 


a 


Childs Samuel C * 




Campbell & Hatch . 


a 


Cory Frank B * 




Coghlan & Clements 


M 


* Dachena A * 




Colby Mattie Mrs . . 


II 


Donsing Louis ' 




Danner & Owens. . . 


(1 


] )rachman & Soto * 




Earp James C .... 


H 


Durr Joseph < 




Egbert & Co 

Ekelund C P 


U 


Felix Dennis ' 




a 


Foster George F f 




Eschman & Alderson 


M 


Fraser Robert ' 




Fitzhenry John C . . 


a 


* Goodman A ' 




Flynn & Fitzpatrick 


a 


* Hooper WmB&Co. ■ 




*Hafford R F & Co 


a 


Horton Henry ; . . . < 




♦Joyce ME& Co.. 


« 


Hucke John G * 




Kellocyo- ME 




Levin A ( 




Kell /Julius A 


Maguire John < 


Leigh & Miramontez 


u 


McWhorter L 1 




Levi I 


a 


Munoz Dario ' 




Lynch P J 

Mand V 


« 


Navarro Bern ado ' 




M 


Newlands & Calder. ... ' 




Marchand GN 


a 


Pantlind John T * 




Mariluis & Co 


u 


Pearson R C * 




McCann & Walsh . . 


a 


Ramirez Ramon ' 




♦MClelland J J.... 


(I 


Ruelas Placido ' 




McKenna Mary 


M 


Salazar Jose l 




Meyer John W 


U 


Schayer Herman ' 




Miley J A 


u 


Seligmann C & Co f 

Sheldon & Baston ' 




Mooney D T 


li 




Moses & Mehan .... 


ti 


Sinclair David A i 




Nichols & Melgrem . 


M 


Tapia Jose M ' 




Perkins Lanson W. 


II 


Tapia Brothers ' 




Pump William 


u 


Tapie G ■ 




Rafferty & Co 


II 


Tee pie Robert E * 




Robertson & Clarke 


II 


Whitton & Co ' 




Rodecker & Kelly . . 


II 


Yarnell Joseph ' 





H 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm.B. Hooper&Co. {^KSSK& T i^^ 


224 ARIZONA. 


Best & Dennis Vulture 

Gonzales Philippi " 

Johnson Thomas E . . . . " 

Noriego Jesus " 

Orosco & Hoeffner " 

Stroud & Peeples u 

Peeples A A Wickenburg 

Claire Charles Willcox 

Cook H B " 


Bryan J M Phoenix 

Hamlin George " 

Henshaw Albert L " 

Monihon James D " 

Hall, Hurley & Co Pinal 

Kimball S F » 


Mayhew Jesse " 

Black Bros & Weston . Prescott 
Dougherty John W. . " 

Gosper & Smith " 

Hathaway Guilford ... M 

ShullJohnT " 

Whitehair A J " 

Solomon Nathan . Solomonville 

Blackford W C" Tip Top 

Brown Taylor & Co . Tombstone 
Bullock E & Co ... . " 
Dunbar Bros & Co. " 

Garrison AG " 

McLane & Gray .... " 
Montgomery & Ben- 
son " 


Maley James " 

Bohn Hugo " 

Waters James a 

Home Louis 

Williamson's Valley 

Furrer Leopold Yuma 

Hanes William " 


Hughes Thomas " 

Olaeta J P " 


Salcido Pedro " 


Scott Charles W " 

Livery and Feed Stables. 

Ohnesorgen & Co Benson 

Wilt A A . . . " 

Stilwell Frank *. - , . Bisbee 


Thomas Charles N. " 

Tuttle H H 

Carroll James Tucson 

Cassell Michael " 

Colton E P " 


Austin E J Bradshaw 

McAsh George Charleston 

StwartJW 

Basset & Scow . . . Dos Cabezas 
Eldridge George H " 

Wilson John V Florence 

Cummings D W . . . . Galey ville 

Adams & Reynolds Globe 

Blake & Mendenhall • 

McKernan J B " 

Robertson PC " 


Field & Morgan " 

Robles B " 

Rusk WE " 

Wheatley William " 

Best & Dennis Vulture 

Peeples A A . ... Wickenburg 
Steele & McKenzie .... Willcox 
Furrer Leopold Yuriia 

Locksmiths. 

Fisk Homer W Globe 

Hart Samuel L Tombstone 

Leavens W M " 

Spangenberg G F. . " 
Gruber Jacob Tucson 

Lodging Houses. 

Weissig Clara Mrs Globe 

Lintz H T Harshaw 

Trevaskis H Mrs Prescott 


Ross G & Co " 


Schell EH " 


Vaughan & Coyle " 

Drenen George Harshaw 

Kaighin William u 

Rusher John M 

Small Nathaniel " 

Freeman Frederick . . Maricopa 

Lamb Patrick M 

Kellner E F & Co Nugget 

James William Oro Blanco 



The J. M. Brunswick & Baike Co. 



BILLIAKD TABLE f 653 & 655 Market St. 
MAS I F ACTUKEUS, 1 San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., ^ SST jSStV Sm^ 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



225 



Williams A P Prescott 

Blair Charles C Tombstone 

Brown R J Mrs. ... u 

Christie M E Mrs . . « 

Grant WM « 

Johnson Allen S ... . a 

Kellogg ME 

Kinsman Catherine " 
Morison W C ...*.. . " 

O'Brien Mary Mrs. . « 

Peters Mary Mrs. . . " 

Ryan N Mrs " 

Shewbridge Peter. . « 

Stinchfield Annie . . " 

Dodge Edwin S Tucson 

Downey Patrick M 

Johnson CH « 

Johnson WL " 

Quinn & Wick " 

Euel WH « 

Furrer Leopold Yuma 

Lumber. 

(See also Saw Mills.) 

Blinn L W & Co Benson 

Sisson, Wallace & Co . . " 
Blinn L W & Co. . .Charleston 
Avery Frank & Co . . Galeyville 

Pascholy & Ray " 

Eaton & Bailey .... Globe 

Kellner E F " 

Harlow C E & Co . .Harshaw 

Eogers A " 

Kellner E F & Co . ..McMillen 

Kellner E F & Co Nugget 

Goldman & Co Phoenix 

Gregory James M " 

Irvine E &Co " 

Roberts & Ryder " 

Champion Josiah Pinal 

Bashford L & Co ... • Prescott 

Clark & Adams " 

Curtis George W " 

HeadCP&Co " 

Wilson & Haskell .... " 
Blinn L W & Co. • • Tombstone 
HarwoodWA " 



Otis A D & Co Tombstone 

Shaffer & Lord... " 
Arizona and California 

Lumber Co Tucson 

Lord & Williams Co . . M 

Otis AD & Co .. M 

Blinn L W & Co Willcox 

Machinists. 

Burns Cornelius Globe 

Fisk Homer W " 

Hutchinson W T Pinal 

Leavens William M . Tombstone 
Tombstone Foun- 
dry and Machine 
Shop, T S Harris " 
Horner Christopher Yuma 

Marble Works. 

Eussell Henry Tucson 

Mattress Manufacturers. 

Sweetland BR&Co... Tucson 

Medicines. 

( See Drugs and Medicines, also 
General Merchandise) 

Merchants— Commission. 

(See Commission Merchants.) 

Merchants— Forwarding. 

(See Forwarding Merchants.) 

Merchants General. 

( See General Merchandise.) 

Metallurgists. 

( See also Assayers.) 

Hoffman Ottoker Pinal 

Duval Charles J . . . Tombstone 
Kearsing Henry W . " 
Rickard William T 
Salazar B Tucson 



CHIRARDELLI S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wnj.B. Hooper & Go. 



Tucson <fe Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, ) Sole 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, J Agents 



Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



226 



ARIZONA. 



Mill and Mining Supplies. 

( See General Merchandise.) 

Milliners. 

Mattoon Mrs Harsh aw 

Goforth M L Mrs Pinal 

Furbish A A Mrs . . . . Prescott 

Frary A P Mrs Tombstone 

Stewart GW Mrs.. « 

Mineral Surveyors. 

Gray John W . Chiricahua City 

Hoadley Milo Bisbee 

Maxson HB Galeyville 

Pendleton AG Globe 

Curtis J S ... Mineral Park 

Cox Gustavus Pinal 

Merritt W H 4i 

Eckhoff E A Prescott 

Haynes James Safford 

Kelly R B San Simon 

Ackley Charles Tombstone 

Arnold George 

Howe Henry G. . . 

Kelleher & Peel 

Manning J G 

Parke J G 

Parker AH 

Price Eodman M Jr 

Allis Solon M • Tucson 

Chillson Lorenzo D . . . " 

Culver John P " 

Eoskruge George J ... . '" 

Kelly EB Willcox 

Miller Walter Yuma 

Townsend OF " 

Mining Engineers. 

Taft Marshall Big Bug 

Curtis J S Mineral Park 

Hayne Arthur Tombstone 

Eahn F 

RickardWmT... " 

Eose William Tucson 

Salazar B " 

Tiffany W H " 



Mining Exchanges. 

Globe Mining Exchange, Globe 
Tombstone Mining 

Exchange Tombstone 

American and Mexican 

Mining Exchange .... Tucson 

Mining Superintendents. 

(See page 71.) 

Newspapers. 

Arizona Weekly En- 
terprise Florence 

Arizona Silver Belt (weekly) 

Globe 

Globe Chronicle (weekly) " 

Arizona Gazette (daily and 
weekly) Phoenix 

Arizona Methodist (mo nth- 

ly) " 

La Guardia (weekly) . . li 
Phcenix Herald (daily 

and weekly) " 

Pinal Drill (weekly) Pinal 

Arizona Democrat (daily and 

weekly) Prescott 

Arizona Miner (daily 

and weekly) " 

Evening Grbssip (daily) 

Tombstone 
Territorial Expositor 

(weekly) " 

The Nugget (daily 

and (weekly) " 

Tombstone Epitaph 

(daily and weekly) " 
Arizona Citizen (daily and 

weekly) Tucson 

Arizona Journal (daily 

and weekly) " 

Arizona Mining Journal 

(weekly) " 

Arizona Quarterly Illus- 
trated " 

Arizona Star (daily and 

(weekly) " 



The J. Wl. Brunswick & Baike Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE 
tl A \ U FArniJlKN, 



653 <fe 655 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



227 



El Fronterizo (weekly) . Tucson 
Arizona Sentinel (weekly) Yuma 
Yuma Free Press(weekly) " 

Notaries Public. 

Rice Charles Alexandra 

Mundell IN Benson 

Savage W H. . Bisbee 

Aldred B A Bush Valley 

Mann E Camp Thomas 

Fryer Jere, Casa Grande 

Burnell J C Charleston 

Field DC 

Springer Albert " 

De Kuhn E Cherry Creek 

Hance George W Cienega 

Crawford Benjamin H. .Clifton 

Smadbeck Louis " 

Rigg E A Contention 

Wratten Geo L Florence 

Morgan HA Fort Grant 

Broughton WW Galey ville 

McCandless Frank . . M 

Sessions C B " 

Brown Oscar M Globe 

Hicks J C " 

Miller P B " 

Swasey Gustavus A — " 

VanSlyck J W 

Young John Greaterville 

Jordan F E Lower Verde 

Nichols J R McMillen 

Stephenson J W.. Mineral Park 

Crawford B M Oro 

Stokes W R Parker 

Cox Frank Phoenix 

Hancock W A " 

Hughes JH " 

McNulty W F " 

Rogers J K Pima 

Davis James W Pinal 

Goodwin FLB " 

Reymert J De Noon .... " 

Stone WR " 

Carpenter J H Prescott 

Eckhoff E A " 

Fisher PM 



Fleury Henry W Prescott 

Hargrave Joseph P . . . " 

MarcouSG " 

Masterson Murat " 

Meador JF " 

Walker RH " 

Wells Ed W " 

Weyl Joseph . " 

Miller Charles Queen City 

KatzA Safford 

Koshland H Signal 

Norton Charles T Silent 

Thompson % E F Silver King 

Rogers J R Smithville 

Smith J N Snow Flake 

Wickersham D W, Solomonville 

O'Brien E T Springerville 

Aram Eugene W. . .Tombstone 
Carpenter S W . . . . " 

Clapp MB 

Colby P T 

Conwell John W. . . " 

DavisLH 

Farrell JR 

Felter A J " 

FickasBA " 

Gray D L " 

Harwood W A 

Hayne Marcus P . . . " 

Kimball MH 

Maxson HB " 

Neff AS.... 

Quigley BC " 

Reilly James " 

Spicer Wells " 

Street Webster " 

Stump J W " 

Thurmond PM.... « 

TrantumOO " 

Vickers J V 

VoisardEP 

Wallace A O 

Mercer T Lillie Tubac 

Berton Thomas Tucson 

Chillson Lorenzo D . . . " 

Cullum H B " 

Drake C R " 

Evans J W " 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { 



Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



Mlluminating Oils. 



228 



ARIZONA. 



Goodrich Ben Tucson 

Hatch FW " 

Hereford B H « 

KaneSK « 

Lighthizer H B " 

Meyer Charles H " 

Morgan Benjamin " 

Oates JW " 

Osborn William J " 

Read WillS « 

Roskruge George J " 

Snyder MS « 

Topliff James F " 

Wicks Moye " 

Bragg H N Washington 

Joyner FO " 

Peeples AH Wickenburg 

Smith Delos H Willcox 

Alexander HN Yuma 

TownsendO F «' 

Oil Cloths. 

(See Carpets and Oil Cloths.) 

Oils. 

(See also General Merchandise • 
also Paints and Oils.) 

Kane, William & Co, Harshaw 
Hooper Wm B & Co . . Phoenix 
Hafford R F & Co. . Tombstone 
Hooper Wm B & Co.. .Tucson 

Painters. 

Herring & Spencer. .Galeyville 

Cahill Joseph R Globe 

Bicknell PC Phoenix 

Everett W J " 

Gonzales R G " 

Palmer Charles. . .... Pinal 

Godfrey & Burden. . Tombstone 
Peacock Edwin K . . " 

Choate & Shepherd Tucson 

Gaynor William H u 

McCoy James " 

Smith Ferdinand A " 

Tucson Painting Co. ■ . " 



Paints and Oils. 

(See also General Merchandise.) 

Bluett William H Pinal 

Kearney E T & Co. Tombstone 
Otis A D & Co. ... 

Brown Henry J Tucson 

Otis AD & Co " 

SweetlandB R&Co.. " 

Paper Hangers. 

Arnhold F W Prescott 

Sweetland B R & Co Tucson 

Photographers. 

Grime Cicero Globe 

Burge J C Phoenix 

Rothrock & Catton ... " 

Mitchell Daniel F Prescott 

Kemp & Coleman . . Tombstone 
Bagnasco Policarpo .... Tucson 

BuehmanH&Co " 

Bonine E A Yuma 

Physicians. 

Durham — Bisbee 

Joseph LB Clifton 

Barney J G Contention 

Harvey William Florence 

Lewis J H Galeyville 

Pring E J Globe 

Macdonell C A " 

Thatcher CE " 

Cubberly E B . ... Greaterville 

Hayes R T Harshaw 

Smith TH 

Tripp R B Little Giant 

Burdeck EL.... Mineral Park 
Stanley E A . Norton's Landing 

Noon AH Oro Blanco 

Conyers B L Phoenix 

Farrington J B " 

Pickens N A Mrs " 

Rosson R L " 

Sheets Oliver HP.... '< 
Wharton & Rosson ... " 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



Itll.l I AlCIt TABLE 
MAXl' FACTl ICI : 1 1 W 



653 & 665 Market St 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T.. Wholesale Dry Goods. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIKECTORY. 229 


Adams Orson B 

Davis Hugh H 

Thompson Anson N . . 

Ainsworth F K 

Kendall George D . . . 

McCandless J N 

Towndron W N . . . . 
Anderson GW....T 
Fowler Henry E. . . 

Giberson NS 

GildersleveFVB.. 

Gillingham — 

Goodfellow Geo E . 

Greer Joseph H 

Hatch Henry 

Henderson G T 

Hiller F 


...Pinal 
u 

u 

. Prescott 
u 
u 

.Safford 
ombstone 

« 
u 
u 
u 

li 
K 
ft 
M 

U 

u 
u 

a 

.Tucson 
u 

U 

u 

a 
<( 

. Vulture 
. .Yuma 

IS. 

Prescott 
. . Tucson 

a 

. . Tucson 

« 

...Globe 

. Prescott 

)mbstone 
u 

. . Tucson 


Powder. 

(See General Merchandise.) 

Printers. 

(See also Newspapers.) 
Hasselgren H W . . . Tombstone 

Produce. 

(See also General Merchandise.) 

Ellis Gus & Co Phoenix 

Irvine E & Co " 

Goldman & Co " 

Baldridge W J Tombstone 

Milich F A&Co... 
Neff Andrew S . . . . " 

Eandle W C " 

Shaffer & Lord... 

Smith CM 

Smith PW 

Caswell AM Tucson 


Matthews H M 

McSwegan Daniel. . 

Millar WS 

Seawell Thomas . . . 

Del Amo Juan 

Handy J G 


Holbrook Charles E . . 
Lyf ord L Dexter .... 


Goodman A 




Lord & Williams Co • ■ 




Turner Jared ....... 


Sresovich Joseph " 

Townsend Bros " 

Zeckendorf L & Co ... . " 
Sisson, Wallace & Co . . . Yuma 

Provisions. 

(See General Merchandise ; also 
Groceries.) 

Public Gardens. 

Levin's Park Tucson 

Publishers. 


Watson C P V 


Lawrence 

Taggart J H 

Picture Frame 

Porter George S & Co 
Buehman H & Co . . . 
SweetlandB R & Co 

Plasterers. 

Carter G C 

Groff Charles F . . . . 


Leboisne & Lester . . . 

Plumbers. 

Eobinson Lewis 

Frederick & Hill 

Atchison ThosA...T< 
Frederick & Hill . . . 
Davis William C . . . . 


(See Newspapers.) 

Quartz Mills. 

(See page 75.) 

Real Estate. 

Galeyville Townsite 

Co Galeyville 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. {^^S&gsES? } Wines of all Kinds. 



230 



ARIZONA. 



Swasey G A Globe 

Quigley BC Tombstone 

Vickers J V " 

Vimont JN. " 

Wallace Thomas. . . " 

Fried IS Tucson 

Fulton & Duff " 

Noyes E W " 

Wetmore Edward L. . . u 

Restaurants. 

Brown Benjamin P. . . .Benson 

Long Yee " 

Vucovich Lukini & Co " 

Walker Mrs Bisbee 

Charles Kee Charleston 

Low Ket " 

Jennison J E. Contention 

Smith J B 

Johnson Eosa Mrs. . . Galey ville 

Kennett P " 

Pascoe J H Globe 

Bonnand J Harshaw 

Lee Bin " 

Nicolas & Cazabon. . . " 
Seabury & Ryan. .... " 

Cuzeno C Mineral Park 

Krider Bros " 

Butler P W Phcenix 

Joe Ching " 

Salari & Righetti " 

Becher Grustav Pinal 

Souva & Ruddy " 

Ah Gunn Prescott 

Guild J A " 

Katz Daniel " 

Thorne & Piercy li 

Gen Shuy Queen City 

Johnson J Mrs San Simon 

Sells & Berry " 

Gallardo F Tempe 

Maher Joseph Tip Top 

Ahlers J D & Co. . .Tombstone 

Bayley George " 

Caeser Julius " 

Campbell Robert ... " 
Carleton Frank H . . " 



Cusich J Tombstone 

Geisenhofer O W. . M 
Jackson Edward H . " 
Kilillea Kate Miss . . " 

Kosha J A m 

Lloyd Hannah Mrs. " 
Lukini John & Co . . " 
Marcovich Peter . . * 
Nash Brothers & 

Fritch " 

Noble James " 

No well & Curry 

Misses " 

O'Brien Mary Mrs . . " 

Petro A& Co 

Rodecker & Kelly. . " 
Rogers Tempe S Mrs " 

Stigliano O " 

Vallory Antoine ... " 

Walsh & Co " 

Walsh & Shannon . . " 
Woods ML Mrs.. . " 

Young John S " 

Young L Mrs " 

Brickwedel M H & Co . Tucson 

Cason C 

Chong Ghee 

Downey Patrick 

Gin Foy&Co 

Hop Kee 

Hunt J A Mrs 

Montano Cornelia ... 

Peguilhan Francois 

Protopsaltis A & 0. • . 
Protopsaltis John . . ... 

Ravisioni Daniel 

Rickey Joseph F 

Rousseau Charles 

Sorgatz B 

Sresovich Joseph 

Talamonte P & Co 

Trabucco Joseph 

Wing Lee 

Soeur Andrew Yuma 

Roofing Materials. 

Noyes & Earl Tucson 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



BILUAKD TABLECI 



Han Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., 



WIIOLESAI-E 
BOOTS AND SHOES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



231 



Rubber Stamps. 

Cohn Max Tucson 

Saddles and Harness. 

(See Harness and Saddlery.) 

Saw Mills. 

Van Name William. . .Big Bug 
Downing W M, Chiricahua Mts 
Morse & Co ... . " " 

Tanner & Hayes Harshaw 

Carnell John Huachuca Mts 

Carr James " " 

Tanner & Hayes. " " 

Patterson James . . .Minnehaha 
Sherman & Barrett, 

Mountain Station 

Bremen M W Pinal Mts 

KelinerE F 

Clark & Adams Prescott 

Curtis GW 

Parker & Parker, Willow Creek 

Schools. 

Moorehouse Stella A Miss, Globe 
Sisters of St Joseph .- . . Prescott 

Behbein Emil Tombstone 

Tombstone Academy 

Prof J B Patch... " 
R C Parochial (boys).. .Tucson 
EC Parochial (girls)... " 

Silva Mr and Mrs " 

S* Joseph's Academy . . " 
Convent of the Sacred Heart 

Yuma 

EC Parochial " 

KoyTheophilus " 

Searchers of Records. 

Wright & Bucksbaum 

Mineral Park 

Long RL Phoenix 

Patterson John W Tucson 

Read WillS " 



Sewing Machines. 

Creamer & Abbott Phcenix 

Hartman & Co . ... Tombstone 

Berger James M Tucson 

Singer Manufacturing Co " 

Vila A Mrs " 

Martin George Yuma 

Shirt Manufacturers. 

Voorhees Mary. . . Tombstone 
Goldschmidt Adolf & Co,Tucson 

Soda Water Manufacturers. 

Brix Peter Phcenix 

Eureka Soda Works, Tombstone 
Union Soda Works . u 

Pioneer Soda Works " 
Pioneer Soda Works . . .Tucson 

Spring Bed Manufacturers. 

Sweetland B R & Co- .Tucson 

Stage Lines. 

(See page 115.) 

Stationery. 

(See also General Merchandise.) 

Jones J J & Co Bisbee 

Washeim Charles, Dos Cabezas 

Hammon & Taylor Globe 

Shirpser David " 

Bauman & Thomas . . . Harshaw 

Drake W B « 

Brown George E Phcenix 

Loring George E *' 

Brinkman Delia Mrs Pinal 

Bones & Spencer Prescott 

Bray TC& Co " 

Kelly & Stephens " 

OtisTW « 

Chapin SB Tombstone 

Fortlouis Albert. ... " 

Israel Salomon " 

Williams Marshall. . M 

Mansf eld Jacob S Tucson 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Win. B. Hooper & Go. {^*J?S!S&?ik 1 £ZS*}1m & Gaudies at Wholesale. 



232 



ARIZONA. 



Eolls J F Willcox 

Knight George M . . . Yuma 

Martin George " 

Stoves and Tinware. 

Eaton & Bailey Globe 

Kellner E F « 

Robinson Louis " 

The Globe Mercantile Co " 
Van Wagenen G S . . . . " 

Goldman & Co Phoenix 

IrvineE& Co " 

Pesqueira M " 

Suter Jacob Pinal 

Bashford L & Co — Prescott 

Buffum W M " 

CampbellJG .... " 

Frederick & Hill " 

Goldwater M & Son . . " 

HeadCP&Co « 

Randall Charles A.... " 
Atchison Thomas A, Tombstone 
Fesenfeld William.. " 
Frederick & Hill... " 
Shaffer & Lord.... " 

SmithPW 

Waterman & Good- 
rich " 

Davis W C Tucson 

Goldbaum & Wolf " 

Lord & Williams Co.. " 

Meyer L& Co " 

Tully, Ochoa & Co ... . " 
Zeckendorf L&Cp.... " 
Zeckendorf William .... " 

Surveyors. 

(See Mineral Surveyors.) 

Tailors. 

Olguen Alejandro Globe 

Barruth Simon Phoenix 

Berwin Simeon .... Tombstone 

Ernst Hyman " 

Frerichs D G " 

Hattich Bartholomy " 



Hayes Wilfred A . . Tombstone 

McConville J A " 

Myers H " 

Ferrin Joseph Tucson 

Mueller Wilhelm M " 

Vila & Douville " 

Tanneries. 

McNair Walter Charleston 

Edwards — Tempe 

Tea Dealers. 

( See also General Merchandise, 
also Groceries.) 

Hooper Wm B & Co . . Phoenix 
Hooper Wm B & Co • • Tucson 

Telegraph Lines. 

Western Union Benson 

United States Military, 

Camp Thomas 
Western Union . . Casa Grande 

Western Union Charleston 

United States Military, 

Dos Cabezas 
United States Military, 

Florence 
United States Military, 

Fort Apache 
United States Military, 

Fort Bowie 
United States Military, 

Fort Gr^int 
United States Military, 

Fort Lowell 
United States Military, 

Fort McDowell 
United States Military, 

Fort Verde 
Globe and San Carlos, Globe 
United States Military, 

Maricopa 

Western Union " 

United States Military . Phoenix 
United States Military . Prescott 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



IIILIJAKI) TABLE (653 £655 Market St. 
MAJM U F ACTUBER8, 1 San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T„ MILL SUPPLIES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



233 



Globe and San Carlos, 

San Carlos 
United States Military " 
Western Union .... San Simon 

Western Union Tombstone 

United States Military, 

Tres Alamos 
United States Military . Tucson 

Western Union " 

United States Military, 

Whipple Barracks 
United States Military, 

Wickenburg 
United States Military. Willcox 

Western Union " 

United States Military . .Yuma 
Western Union " 

Telephone Companies. 

Arizona Telephone Co . . Tucson 

Theaters. 

Prescott Theater Prescott 

Tombstone Theater, Tombstone 
Levin's Park Theater, Tucson 

Tinsmiths. 

Robinson Lewis Globe 

Pesqueira M Phoenix 

Suter Jacob Pinal 

Frederick & Hill Prescott 

Atchison Thomas A, Tombstone 
Fesenfeld William.. " 
Frederick & Hill... " 
Waterman & Good- 
rich " 

Davis William C Tucson 

Goldbaum & Wolf " 

Tinware. 

(See General Merchandise; also 
Stoves and Tinware.) 

Tobacco. 

(See Cigars ; also General Mer- 
chandise.) 



Undertakers. 

Carey William E Phoenix 

Abbott B M Tombstone 

Eitter & Eeam " 

Smith Edward J Tucson 

Upholsterers. 

Carey William R Phoenix 

Arnhold F W Prescott 

Porter George S & Co " 

Fonck John L Tombstone 

Goldschmidt Leo ... " 

Lenoir Joseph " 

Schoenfeld & Hey- 

man " 

Goldschmidt Leo . . ... Tucson 
Sweetland B R & Co.. " 

Wagon Makers. 

(See Blacksmiths and Wagon 
Makers.) 

Wagons. 

Sisson, Wallace & Co. . Benson 
Zeckendorf L & Co. . Charleston 
Buckalew & OchOa . . . Florence 
Collingwood Joseph & 

Co 

KellnerE F Globe 

Harlow C E & Co- . . . Harshaw 
Farrington R E & Oo..Maricopa 
Kellner E F & Co . • McMillen 
Kellner E F & Co . . . .Nugget 

Creamer & Abbott Phoenix 

Ellis Gus& Co " 

Goldman & Co " 

Irvine E & Co u 

Bashford L & Co Prescott 

HeadCP&Co " 

Goldman & Co Tempe 

Hayden Charles T " 

Armstrong & Young, Tombstone 
Shaffer & Lord.... " 

Smith P W 

Lord & Williams Co, Tucson 
Tully, Ochoa & Co " 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



16 



Ufa B. Hooper & Go. { T ^.!i£ i g£S&?ik££xr'} j rm & Gaudies at Wholesale. 



234 



ARIZONA. 



Zeckendorf L & Co Tucson 

Zeckendorf William. . . . *'• 

Watches and Jewelry. 

Davidson D E 'Galeyville 

Newton George A Globe 

Trumper V Phoenix 

Morgan Thomas J . . . . Prescott 

Hartman & Co Tombstone 

Heitzelman Peter. " 

Heyes W A " 

Schmieding Herman " 

Berger James M Tucson 

Nilson P F " 

Plummer Paul " 

Suastegui Eaf ael " 

Rubottom C E Yuma 

Water Works. 

Sycamore Spring Water Co, 

Tombstone 



Tucson Water Works. .Tucson 

Wheelwrights. 

(See Blacksmiths and Wagon 
Makers.) 

Wines and Liquors. 

(See Liquors.) 

Wood and Willow Ware. 

(See General Merchandise.) 

Wood Turners. 

Harris T S Tombstone 

Yeast Powder Manufactur- 
ers. 

Ganz William Tucson 



HUGH WHITE & CO'S STAGE LINE 

BETWEEN 



ffM 



Hackberry, 



iiPJ 



■via. 



Mineral Park and 

Hardyville, 



J. F. MEADOK, Agent, 

PEESCOTT 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARU TABLE i 653 & 655 Market St. 
MAVlFAdlUKKS, \ San Francifco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



235 



A. GOODMAN, 

WHOL 

hnnfe ^ 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 



ftp 



AND IMPORTER OF 



Jqoi anfl Eilisl Breakfast Teas and Coffees, 

SPICES, WINES, LIQUORS, CIGARS, ETC. 



FLOUE MB m&m A SFE€IALTT. 



M 



r 



Corner Camp and Convent Streets, 

TUCSON, A. T. 



Q 
O 

■ 

1 

8 
N 

■ 



Eighteen Years in Existence. 

shSrogs, QbMBkaU, I M l cinw , Perfumery, Bte. 

Physicians' Prescriptions Carefully Compounded, Day or Night. 

J. F. YORBA, Proprietor, 

(Successor to Charles H. Meter,) 
CORNER OF CONGRESS AND MEYER STREETS, 

TTJOSOIST, -A.. T- 



X.. 23. CI3ZZ.Z.SOXT, 

NOTARY PUBLIC, 

Civil Kngineer 

AND 

U. S. DEPUTY 



TUCSON, A. T. 



SANTIAGO AINSA, 

Practices in ail the Courts 

OF 

gMffem, and of gmwxix, gtacfto. 



m 
o 

3D 

m 

CO 

> 



OFFICE , 

TUCSON, PIMA CO., A. T. 



m 



CHIRARDELLIS CHOCOLATE The Best. 



17 



WM. B. HOOPER & C0.{ T, ^.tn? o % x itf3&Sr«rJLubricating Oils. 



236 



ARIZONA. 



CIVIL ENGINEER, 

IT. S. Deputy Surveyor and Notary Public, 

Pennington Street, Opposite the Cosmopolitan Hotel, 

Is prepared to do any work in his line with Promptness 

and Dispatch. 

^^■Topographical and Sectional Drawings of Mines a Specialty. °^2 

MINES EXAMINED AND KEPOKTS FURNISHED. 

TUCSON, A. T. 

EVANS & CO. 

Ar cMtecfs BttlMers*- 

— _*-. — 

CONTRACTS TAKEN FOR ALL KINDS OF 

CARPENTER AND ADOBE WORK. 

Jobbing "Work done Neatly and with Dispatch. 

H. BUEHMAN & CO. 

Congress Street, above Meyer, 



TUCSON, ARIZONA. 



OLD PICTURES COPIED ANT> ENLARGED. 

Photographs Painted in Oil, Water Colors, India Ink and Pastel. 

t^"Viewing a specialty. Views from all parts of the Territory on nand. 

PICTURE FRAMES MADE TO ORDER. 



B. R. SWEETLAND & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Diagonal Spring Beds 



And Dealers in 

Wall Paper, Pictures & Frames 

Paints, Oils, Bkushks, Glasr, &c. 
Congress St., near Stone Avenue 

TUCSON, A. T. 



C. F. GROFF, 

PLABTEBBR 

— AND — 

Brick | Adobe Layer 

TUCSON, ARIZONA. 



All Orders Attended to Promptly. 



The J. Nl. Brunswick & BsIKb Co. ™iiiwfS^tSiS t s ^&^^Sij" 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



237 




— AND — 



CARRIAGE PAINTERS, 

Graining, Glazing, Kalsomining, Paper Hanging, Etc. 

West end of Congress Street, opposite C. Etchell's Blacksmith Shop. 




GILDING ON GLASS AND SILK BANNERS A SPECIALTY. 

J, GETJBEE, 

In M aker I Locksmith, 

TUCSON, AEZZONA. 

Easier in Guns, Biles, PittolM, Cartridges, Me. 

S^,Repairing of Every Description Neatly and Promptly Executed, 
and Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



FEED, SALE AND 

LIVERY STABLE, 

MEYER STREET, SOUTH OP PALACE HOTEL, 

TXTCSaBT, ARXZOXfA. 

FIRST-CLASS TURNOUTs'TnD MODERATE CHARGES. 

{J^,Transient Teams carefully provided for. 



TOWNSEND BROS. 

DEALERS IN 



— AND — 



POULTRY, 

Congress Street, TUCSON. 



R. 0. PEARSON, 

Jw|bm Satan, 

CONGRESS STREET, 

Opp. Pima Co. Bank, 

TUCSON, ARIZONA. 

Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



WH. B. HOOPER & SO. {^.a h a n ^Si2£r} Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



238 



ARIZONA. 



DAILY ARIZONA JOURNAL 

PUBLISHED EVERY DAY AT TUCSON, A. T. 

Its columns contain the Latest Telegrams from the East. 
Official Correspondents in every County in the Territory. 
The Latest Reliable Intelligence in regard to the Markets, 
Mining, Stock Raising and Local Events. 

TERMS, INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE : 

Daily, One Year $10.00 

" Six Months 6.00 

" Three Months 3.00 



ARIZONA MINING JOURNAL 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. 

Full Details of Mining Developments in every Camp. 
Special Correspondents in the Mexican Border States. 

Price, One Year $5.00 

" Six Months 3.00 

" Three Months 1.50 



En 
4|, i 



MESILLA STREET, TUCSON, A. T. 









A. MAYR » F. MILTENBERG, 



PROPRIETORS. 

♦-♦-♦ 



We deliver Hot Rolls, Bread, Pies and Cakes to any part of the City. 



DEALEK IN 



Beef, Pork, Mutton, 

POULTRY AND GAME. 



Hotels and Families Supplied on Reasonable Terms. 

Goods Delivered Free of Charge. 
CONGRESS STREET, TVCSON,A.T. 



UNION 

IMA 

No. 77 Meyer Street, 

TUCSON, A. T. 



The Best of French Dinners Furnished, 

And Guests are requested to call for all 
they want to eat. 

A. & C. PB0T0PSALTIS, Props. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



BIl.JLIA.1t1> TABLE( 653 & 655 Market St 
JHAJtfUFACTURJHlte*,* San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



239 



PIONEER PAPER OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA. 







BAYER & SCHWARZ, Proprietors. 

Beer in Kegs or Bottles Shipped to any part of the Terri f ory. 

Our Park is the most delightful place of resort in Tucson. On the grounds 
are two theaters, adapted for amusements summer or winter. Also a first-class 
restaurant, billiard halls, bowling alleys, bath houses, etc. 

ICE IS MANUFACTURED AND SOLD ON THE PREMISES. 



TTJOSOISr, A_ T. 


C. WEIGHT. H. BUCKSBAUM. 


FREDERICK A. SPARROW, 


WRIGHT & BUCKSBAUM, 


XTA-FA. 


fjjein&erfl §1 f|@wlp ? 


SEAVIM SALONT 


MINERAL PARK, 


Congress St., neap Meyer, 


Mohave Co. Arizona. 


TUCSON, ARIZONA. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



WM. B. HOOPER 4 CO.{ Tu T c e^fn?G^ y x ^£i p cr}Cigars of all Kinds. 



240 



ARIZONA. 



L. W. BLINN & CO. 

DEALERS' II LUMBER 

DOORS, WINDOWS AND BLINDS, ETC. 

MINING AND MILL TIMBERS A SPECIALTY. 

^ ..^ 

TOMBSTONE, A. T. 
Yards : Benson, Willcox and Charleston, A. T., and Demino, N. M. 

O. J. DUYAL, 

-AND 



213 Fifth Street, 



Tombstone, Arizona* 

P. O. Box 247. 



H. G. HOWE, 

rwm mm ©inr m 



AND 



U. S. DEPUTY MINERAL SURVEYOR, 



GIRD'S BUILDING, 



TOMBSTONE, A. T. 



Topographical Maps of Mining Properties Neatly Executed at Short Notice. 

Careful Reports made upon Mining Propeities. 
Sonora Properties a Specialty. • fli^The best of references given. 



iiiP 



>9 

PETER MARCO VTCH, Proprietor, 
516 ALLEN STREET, TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA. 

v-v^> * 

ONE OF THE BE8T RE8TAVRANT8 IK THE TERRITORY, 

Open at all hours, where can be found all the Dcdicacies in the market, and 

Choice Eastern Oysters cooked in every style. The finest brands 

of Cigars and Liquors constantly on hand. 

PRIVATE ROOMS FOR LADIES. GIVE US A TRIAL. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



Bl LLIARD TAB LE C 653 & r,55 Market St. 
MAJfUFACTUKKUS, I San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. , 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 241 



(Fellow of the Chemical Society, London, England,) 

SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY, LABORATORY, 

— AND — 

TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA. 

■ » «■■♦ 

fl^Mining Engineer and. Metallurgist. .JP 

P. HEITZELMAK, 

a Francisco Jcwilrj Stm, 

No. 430 ALLEN STREET, TOMBSTONE, 

Has the Largest Stock of Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry in Arizona. 

. ♦ . 

Special Attention Paid to the Repairing of Fine Watches, 

ALL WORK AND GOODS WARRANTED AS REPRESENTED. 

WELLS SPICER, 

Attorney! Counsellor-at-Law 

218 FIFTH STREET} 
TOMBSTONE, OAOH1SE CO., A. T. 




Also, Notary^ Public, 17. S. Commissioner, and Commissioner of 
Deeds for California. 

UNION NEWS DEPOT, 

SALOMON ISRAEL, PROPRIETOR, 

222 FIFTH STREET, Next to the Post Office, 

TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA. 



Alx Kinds of Fancy and Staple -Stationery. 

Newspapers from all parts of the world. Maps of Arizona, Mexico, etc. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm. B. Hooper & Co. {"SSKiS^SSfctfagfir-f**' #£%£«¥*■ 



242 ARIZONA. 



Tombstone Foundry and Machine Shop, 

T. S. HARRIS, Proprietor, 

Corner of First and SaiFord Streets, 
TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA. 

■*♦► 

IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS OF ALL KINDS MADE TO ORDER. 

Machine Work, Wood Turning and Blacksmithing. 
IMZIILX, WORK A. SPECIALTY. 

P. O. Box 24 




This institution opened its first session in Tombstone January, 1881. Its course 
embraces a thorough preparation in the department of 

Mathematics, Literature, Science, ant Laipaps. 

Parents and guardians desiring to place their children under strict regulations 
of Mental and Moral Discipline will find superior advantages in this School. 

With an experience of twenty-five years, the Principal feels confident of being 
able to render full satisfaction to his Patrons. 

Primary, per month, -- - -$3 00 

Intermediate, per month, 4 00 

Advanced, in English, per month, 5 00 

Languages, Latin, Greek, German, or Spanish, extra, each, - 5 00 

Music, with use of Organ or Piano, ------- 6 00 

Prof. J. B. PATCH, A. M., Principal. 

An Evening School for Ladies and Gentlemen has been opened in connnection 
with the Academy, where the following branches are taught : Mathematics, Elo- 
cution, English Literature, Penmanship, Drawing, Bookkeeping, and the Spanish, 
French, and German Languages. Monthly Terms, $6.00. 

John Wasson. F. Herrera. 

F. HERRERA <& CO, 

CHARLESTON, ARIZONA, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

UcMi.oi-iil. >IeiM*lian.(liKc, 

MINERS' SUPPLIES, HARDWARE, ETC. 



The J. Hi. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TA WLEf 653 & 655 Market St. 
MAXIJFACTIJKEKM, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., "£,£"25^55^ 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 243 

T. LILLIE MERCER, 

TUBAO, JlRIZONJl, 

DEALER IN 

Www ®@®il®» VtMiMob 

Hardware, Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes, and Rubbers, 
Ready-Made Clothing, Etc. 

Customers will find our stock complete, comprising many articles it is impossible 
here to enumerate, and all sold at moderate prices. 

J. M. McARTHUR, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 



PBT-tMBSi'iftOOIMM, 

Boots, Shoes, Clothing, 

Miners 9 and Ranchers 9 Supplies of all hinds* 

PAJARITO, PIMA COUNTY. 

WASHINGTON HOTEL, 

Washington Camp, A, T, 

m • » 

FIRST-CLASS I1ST EVERY RESPECT. 

FINEST HOTEL SOUTH OF TUCSON. 

The table supplied with the best the market affords. First-class sleeping rooms. 

Post Office in the Building. F. O. JOYNER, Proprietor. 



J. W. STWAUT, 

Charleston, Arizona, 

Keeps constantly on hand the best 

Wines, Liquors, and Gigars. 

This is the Pioneer Saloon of the Town. 
GIVE TJS A. CALL. 



PIONEER 

Livery, Feefl, and Sale Stable, 

J. W. STWART, Proprietor, 
Charleston. Arizona. 



Saddle Horses and Buggies for Hire 
on the most Reasonable ^Terms. 

Accommodations First-Class. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



Int. B. Hooper & Go. {^SffSSKs^aSSr \/£t,. Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



244 ARIZONA. 



Prescott Mining Company. 

OFFICE : 

50 Exchange Place, 

NEW YORK CITY. 

TOWNSEND COX, - - - - - - President 

JAMES F. COX, ------ Vice President 

SAMUEL M. CHAPMAN, - - . - - Secretary 
CURTIS C. BEAN, Agent, Prescott, Arizona. 



A.1STTELOPE 

Copper Mining Company. 

OFFICE : 

50 Exchange Place, 
NEW YORK CITY. 

TOWNSEND COX, President 

JAMES F. COX, ------ Vice President 

SAMUEL M. CHAPMAN, Secretary 

CURTIS C. BEAN, Agent, Prescott, Arizona. 



Both above companies incorporated under the laws of the 
State of New York, 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. sv*v- 



AKI» TABLEf 653 <fc 655 Market St. 
PACTUKEK8,t San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 

M 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 245 

~~JOHN C. CAMPBELL, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Dealer in General Merchandise, Etc. 

PRESCOTT, ARIZONA. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 



Groceries, Liquors, 



Furnishing Goods, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps, 
Hardware, Mill and Mining Supplies, 

CROCKERY, DRUCS, PAINTS, OILS, 

Tin Ware, Agricultural Implements, Harness and Saddlery, Cigars 
and Tobacco, Stationery, Grain, Etc., constantly on hand. 



9 
KIRWAGEN & SINES, Proprietors, 

PEE8COTT, - .AJRIZOJSTA., 



Wines, Liquors and Cigars of the Best Quality 

CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
A. P. WILLIAMS, Proprietor, 

PRESOOTT, .AJRIZOISTA.. 



THIS HOUSE IS CENTRALLY LOCATED. 

Rooms, en Suite or Single, Large and Well Ventilated, 
and Furnished in Good Style. 

The Beds Escel those of any other House in the Territory. 



H 



Q 
O 

■ 

v 
8 

N 






C/5 



c/> 



I— 

ay 

a> 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { T, ^.a h fflfe^^r , Hlluminating0il8. 



246 



ARIZONA. 



SOL. LEWIS, President. 



M. W. KALES, Cashier. 




®k of Arizona, 



PEESCOTT, A.. T. 



CORRESPONDENTS i 

The Bank of California San Francisco. 

Laidlaw & Co New York. 

Union National Bank , Chicago. 

Boatmen's Savings Bank St. Louis. 

Agency at Phcenix, A. T. 

»■ • ■« 

A General Exchange anil Banking Bnsiness Transacted. 

COLLECTIONS A SPECIALTY. 

» • •* 

31. W. KALES, -------- Cashier. 



DEALER IN 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE, 

Pkescott $? Alexandra, 

YAVAPAI COUNTY, ARIZONA. 



O. K. STORE 

JOHN W. DOUGHERTY, Proprietor. 

West Prescott, Arizona. 



A Large Assortment of 

GROCERIES, PROVISIONS 

GRAIN, 

WINES AND LIQUORS, 
Constantly on Hand. Prices Seasonable. 



0. K. FEED YARD 

JOHN W. DOUGHERTY, Proprietor, 

West Prescott, Arizona. 



BALED AND LOOSE HAY 

And a Large 8tock of 
Grain Constantly on Hand. 

Horses Boarded by the Day, Week or Month, 

at the Most Reasonable Rates. 
AGood Camp House on the Premises. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co 



niLLLlltll TAB LE( 653 &b55 Market St 
■ MASUFUT1JUEK8, ( San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO.. Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



247 ! H 



ARIZONA 



DEMOCRAT 



DAILY AND WEEKLY, 



PUBLISHED AT PEESCOTT, 



Capitol of Arizona Territory, 



BY 



Gideon J. Tucker. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. P^SSBS^SsBSP } Wines of all Kinds. 



248 



ARIZONA. 



CHAS. W. BEACH, Editor and Proprietor, 

PEESOOTT, A. T. 

PIONEER PAPER OF TBI TERRITORY 



^i^The Aeizona Miner was established in 1864, hence is the 
Oldest Paper in the Territory. The circulation of The Miner 
extends into every State and Territory in the United States and 
also to foreign countries, at once making it the most desirable as 
an advertising medium. It is the official paper of the U. S. Gov- 
ernment, also the official paper of the county of Yavapai and city 
of Prescott. 

teh,:m:s feu, -5t:ela.:r = 
DAILY, $12. - - - WEEKLY, $5. 



Prescott and Big Bug, Arizona, 



DEALERS IN 



Groceries, Liquors, Dry Goods, 

CLOTHING, BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, 
Crockery, Mill and Mining Supplies, Farm Produce, Etc. 

We also Purchase Gold and Silver Bullion. 

PLAZA LIVEEY, FEED, MB SALS STABLE, 



PRESCOTT, 




ARIZONA, 



SOUTH SIDE OF PLAZA, GOODWIN STREET. 

J1STO. T. SHULL, - - Proprietor. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



BILLIARD TABLE (653 <fe 655 Market St. 
MAKVFACTIJ It Kits, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., WHOlE9AlE 



BOOTS A\I» SHOES. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



249 



GLOBE, A. T. 



E, F. KELLNER & CO. 

McMillen, A. T, 
General Merchants 



MINERS' OUTFITS. 



E. F. KELLNER, 

PROPRIETOR 

PINAL CREEK SAW MILLS, 

Pinal Mountains, A, T. 



E. F. KELLNER & CO. 

Richmond, A. T. 

G-eneral Merchants 



MINERS' OUTFITS, 



E. F. KELLNER, 

Globe, A. T. 

LUMBER YARD 

Mining Timber, Lumber, Shingles, Etc. 



CORRESPONDENTS : 

H. K. & F. B. Thurbkr & Co., Weli,s, Fargo & Co's Bank, 



New York. 



San Francisco. 



C li 21 in pioil B 11 1 iai*«a Hull, 

W. T. MoNELLY, Ppoprietop, 
GLOBE, ARIZONA, 

Has recently been Fitted Up with the Latest Improved Tables, Luxurious Club 
and Private Card Rooms. 

The Bar, one of the best in Arizona, is supplied with the choicest brands of Wines, 
Liquors, and Cigars, St. Louis and Cincinnati Beer, etc. 

PASCOE'S RESTAURANT, 

(Next Door to Globe Mercantile Co.) 



Globe, 



Arizona. 



THE LONG-FELT WANT OF A FIRST CLASS RESTAURANT 
HAS AT LAST BEEN SUPPLIED. 

Meals First Class at all Hours, and Served by-Attentive Waiters. 
J. H. rASCOE, Proprietor. 



CHIRARDEL LI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Win. B. Hooper & Go. { T TeZin^u n i^jMe E x 1 i ro a f°'}Tea8 & Gandles at Wholesale. 



250 ARIZONA. 



J. H. Eaton. Alonzo Bailey. 

EATON & BAILEY, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

Isner&l Miiciiaiiis^ 



GLOBE, ARIZONA. 



A GENERAL ASSORTMENT OF 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Hardware, Crockery, 

Hats, Boots and Shoes, Steel and Iron, 

Clothing, Mill and Mining Supplies, 

Liquors, Cigars, Tobacco, Etc. 

OOlSTSTAXATTLir ON HAND. 

Exchange Bought and Sold. Highest Rates Paid for Gold and Silver Bullion. 

AGENTS FOR M. W. BREMEN'S SAWMILL. 

Globe Btaiig ami Real Estate Agency. 

a. ^. sw^lsey, 

Commissioner of Deeds for all Pacific States and Territories, 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW, NOTARY PUBLIC, AND CONVEYANCER. 

All kinds of Instruments drawn and Acknowledgments taken. Mines, Town and other 
Property bought and sold on commission. Loans negotiated, and a geueral Agency busi- 
ness solicited. Patenting Mines and other U. S. Lands a specialty. Correspondence from 
abroad promptly attended to. 

GLOBE, GILA COUNTY, ARIZONA. 

Beferences.— J. P. Clum, Esq., Mayor of Tombstone ; H. B. Summers, Esq., Attorney 
at-Law, Florence; Eaton & Bailey, Merchants, Globe ; J. J. Gosper, Esq., Secretary of Ter 
ritory, Prescott ; San Francisco News Co., 413 Washington street, San Francisco; Mark L. 
McDonald, New York. 

LEWIS ROBINSON, 

GLOBE, ARIZONA, 

MANUFACTURER of 

Tin, Copper, and Sheet Iron Ware, 

AIR PIPE FOR MINES, AND METALLIC ROOFING, 

-A.3NT3D DEALER IUNT STOVES OF ALL ZKITsTIDS- 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. sssittg^a&ii 



BILLIARD TABLE (653* 655 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T.. MILL SUPPLIES. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 251 



G. S. VAN WAGENEN, 



DEALER IN 



WWW fiOOiB f ©P®©®Pi®® f 

CLOTHING, BOOTS, SHOES, 

Hardware, Crockery, Glassware, Mill and Mining Supplies, 
Wines, Liquors, Cigars, Tobaccos, Etc. 

GLOBE, ARIZONA. 

F. W. WESTMEYER, 



DEALER IN 



ft 

HATS, CAPS, BOOTS, SHOES, 
Miners' Groods, &c, &c. 

LOWEST CASH PMICES. 
G-LOBE, - - - ARIZONA. 



GLOBE, ABIZONA. 
MRS. ROSA HOWE, Proprietress. 



The Table is Supplied with the best the Mabket Appobds. The 
Lodging Depabtment Excels any in this Section. 

THE RESTAURANT WILL BE OPEN PROM 6 A. M. TO 9 P. M. 

Stages for Different Points Leave the House Daily. 

PINAL BREWERY, 

GLOBE, ARIZONA, 

Keeps Constantly on Hand and fob Sale at Wholesale and Retail 
the best kind op 



AT THE FOLLOWING BATES: 

By the Keg, per Gallon, - - - $75 

Dozen Bottles, 3 00 

Per Bottle, - 35 

Address all Orders to FINAL BEEWEHY, Globe, A. T. 



CHIRARDELLI S CHOCOLATE The Best. 

18 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. {^SitSfSSSAJaSSr \ Lubricating Oils. 



252 ARIZONA. 



GEORGE E. BROWN, 



DEALER IN 



CHOICE GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS, 

CALIFORNIA FRESH AND CANNED FRUITS, 

Stationery, Notions, Tobacco, Cigars, Etc., Etc. 

ARCADE BREWERY AHD SALOON, 

LUKE & THALHEIMER, Proprietors, 
FKCGBlSriS:, ARIZONA- 

We Manufacture the Finest Beer in the Territory. 

For Sale in Any Quantity. Bottled Beer a Specialty. 
WE A.LSO MANUFACTURE MALT. 

In our Saloon we keep a choice assortment of 

ROBERTS <& R7DXXI, 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS, 

DEALERS IN 

Lumber, Mouldings, Pickets, Posts, Shingles, Shakes, Laths, Doors, 
Sash, Blinds, Transoms, Lime, Cement, Hair, Plaster, and 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Plans, Specifications, and Estim atbs Made When Desired. 
TERMS 0-A.SH- ILO'OT" PRICES. 

Office and Yard, South Side of Plaza, Phoenix, A. T. 

HERRICK & LUTGERDING, 

FHCENIX, A. T. 

MORAL BLACKSMITHS. 

Buggies, Ambulances, and Wagons Made and Repaired. 

Wagon and Carriage Ironing. Also, Repairing at Low Rates. 

HORSE SHOEING A SPECIALTY. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 5^»smsssj 



653 <fe 655 Market St 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 253 



GEORGE REYNOLDS, - PROPRIETOR, 
PINAL CITY, ARIZONA.. 



The Table is always supplied with the Best Viands the 

Market affords, and the Lodging Department 

is not Eoccelled by any Hotel in 

the Territory, 

The House has recently been remodelled and fitted np with all modern 

Conveniences, A Bath Room is attached to the Hotel 

for the Accommodation of Travelers. 



ARIZONA GAZETTE, 

CHA8. H. McNEIL & CO., Publishers, 
PHOENIX, A. T. 

OFFICIAL PAPER OF MARICOPA COUNTY. 

The GAZETTE has as Large a Circulation as any Paper Published in 
the Territory, and is the Best Advertising Medium in Arizona. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

Daily, One Year, 10 00 

" Six Months, 5 00 

" Three Months, - - 3 00 

Weekly, One Year, if paid in advance - - - 4 00 

" Six Months, 2 25 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wl. B. HOOPER & 60. {^SSfi^S^i^aSSr} Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



254 . ARIZONA. 



FLORENCE, A.. T. 

CHARLES G. LEWIS, - - - Proprietor. 



A FIRST CLASS HOTEL, 



The Table is Always Supplied with, the Best and 
Choicest Yiands the County Affords. 

NICE CLEAN ROOMS, 

Furnished with the latest improvements, are kept for the convenience of guests. 
In connection with the Hotel, the proprietor has furnished 

An Elegant Bar and Billiard Room. 
The Very Best Liquors and Choice Brands of Cigars 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

An attractive feature of the grounds connected with the Hotel is a mammoth 
wire Cage containing one hundred and eighty live Arizona Quail. In another large 
cage are a variety of native birds. 

TERMS REASOISTABLE. 

From my success in the past, I am confident of giving satisfaction to all who 
may favor me with their patronage. 

Stages Leave the House Daily for Different Points. 

W. T. HUTCHINSON, 

Pinal City, Arizona. 

HORSE SHOEHNTO A SPECIALTY. 

Boilers and Machinery Repaired. Work Done at Bed Rock Prices 





and Guaranteed. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 32K*2SrffiffiK{ 



BILLIARD TABLE f 653 A 6W Market St 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 255 



FLORENCE, ARIZONA. 



I desire to announce to the citizens of Florence and Pinal County, and the 
traveling public generally, that I am prepared to give satisfaction to all who may 
favor me with their patronage. The tables are set with the best the market 
affords, and cannot be surpassed in San Francisco for the same price — 

50 Cents a Meal, 
BOARD AND LODGING, - $10.00 A WEEK, 

GOOD CLEAN BEDS. 

Connected with the Hotel is a Bar, well supplied with the best 

Whiskies, Wines, Brandies, and Cigars 

That the market affords. 

I have also a fine BILLIARD TABLE, in a comfortable room, with open 
fire-place and easy chairs. 

The house is centrally located on the ma.n .-treet, immediately in front of the 
Express and Post Office, where all stages stop. It is completed with board flooring 
throughout. 

Give me a call. My terms are reasonable, and I will try to please you. 

THOMAS H. McLELLAN. 

ARIZONA WEEKLY ENTERPRISE, 

Published Every Saturday Morning in 

FLORENCE, COUNTY SEAT OF PINAL CO., ARIZONA. 

Enterprise Company, Publishers. 
GEO. B. TAYLOR, - - Editor and Business Manager. 

The Enterprise is one of the largest sheets published in Arizona. Has a large 
and daily increasing list of subscribers, offering inducements to all who mav desire 
to advertise with us. Terms reasonable, and given on application to this office. 



In connection with our paper, we have a 

No. 1 JOB OFFICE, 

Where we are prepared to do work of all kinds reasonablv and expeditiously. We 
do business on the theory that " a nimble penny is better than a slow shilling." 

Give Us a Call. Take Our Paper. Advertise With Us, 
Give Us a Job. It Will Do You Good. 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm.B. Hooper&Co. r'^a^l^^aSK '}* 01 



C. C WHISKEY. 



256 ARIZONA. 



R. E. FARBINGTON & CO. 

Dealers in General Merchandise 

AND 

Forwarding and Commission Merchants, 

MARICOPA, PINAL CO*. -and- SAN SIMON, CACHISE CO. 

ARIZONA. 

Purchase, Sell, and Ship Gold, Silver, and Copper Ores. 

We have facilities for moving fast freight or heavy machinery at short notice. 
Parties desiring to invest in undeveloped mines, prospecting well, will find it to 
their interest to call on us. 

CASA GRANDE, ARIZONA. 



I am prepared to accommodate the traveling public with 

Excellent Meals, anfl Glean, Mortal Beds. 

My New Rooms are Large, Well Furnished, and Quiet, insuring to 
the Weary a Comfortable Night's Sleep. 

Connected with the House is a 

BAR, WELL SUPPLIED WITH GOOD LIQUORS AND CIGARS. 

I ALSO HAVE A CORRAL AND FEED YaRD, WHERE MAT BE FOUND THE BEST OF 

Hat and Grain. 

JERE FRYER, Proprietor. 

E« Jk. BONINE, 

PHOTOGRAPHER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF YUMA IMS ID ADA MS. 

$5.00 per Dozen and $2.50 for Six. 

"5rTJ^CA. J ARIZONA. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. Wiii^&RrJ&xsss? 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T.. MINING SUPPLIES. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 257 



R. C. KERENS, St. Louis, Mo. W. M. GRIFFITH, Tucson, A. T. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



MAIL AND STAGE LINE 

KERENS & GRIFFITH, Proprietors. 

Doing a general Stage and Express business and carrying U. S. Mail, 



PHCENIX AND PRESCOTT, 

Via Gillette and Big Bug, 



• Connection made at Gillette with line for 

"X- 1 3F» a? 1 o 

And at Prescott with Stages for 

PECK AND TIGER MINES, 

Fort Verde and Mineral Park, 
Fort Mohave and Saokberry, A. T. 

AND SANTA FE, N. M 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER 4 C0.{^£?£&£?i££r ICigars of all Kinds. 



258 ARIZONA ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 

gilmer, salisbury & cos 
ST^lGE line 

BETWEEN 

MARICOPA AND PRESCOTT, 

Via Phoenix, Seymour, and Wickenburg, 
CARRYING U. S. MAILS AND W. F. & COS EXPRESS. 

TIME TO PHCENIX, - 6 HOURS. 

TIME TO PRE3COTT, ... 30 HOURS. 

Connection made at Seymour with stage for 

VULTURE, 

And at Prescott with line of Buckboards for 

MINERAL PARK, FORT MOHAVE, AND HACKBERRY. 

Also, with Buckboard line to 

Camp Verde and Points East. 

OFFICES t 

MARICOPA, PHCENIX, AND PRESCOTT. 

JAMES STEWART. Superintendent. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. ss£#£%3SSS{ 



BILLIARD TAB L>E( 653 <fc 655 Market St. 
MASfUFACTUKERS,! San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Classified Business Directory, 

CONTAINING »HE NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF 

WHOLESALE MERCHANTS AND MANUFACTURERS. 



also 



Acids. 

(See Chemical Works 
Druggists.) 

Agricultural Implements. 

(* Manufacturers. J 

Baker & Hamilton, 13 and 19 

Front 
*Bonney O Jr (estate of) 221 

Mission 
Davis George A, 327 Market 
Frank Bros, 349 Market 
*Gracier F J, 211 Mission 
Hawley David N, S W cor Mar- 
ket and Main 
Hawley Marcus C & Co, 301 
Market 

* Jackson & Truman, S E cor 

Sixth and Bluxome 
Linforth, Rice & Co, 323 Mark't 

* Osborne D M & Co, 33 Market 

* Soule E,cor Fourth and Bryant 

* The Lighthall Harvester Com- 

pany, 429 Fourth 
Woodin & Little, 109 Pine 

D. M. OSBORNE & CO. 

33 Market St., San Francisco, 
MOWERS, REAPERS, HEADERS, 
SELF-BINDING HARVESTERS, 

XJsing Twine or Wire, 

All Manufactured by Ourser 



Air Compressors. 

Reynolds *& Rix, 49 Fremont 

Ale and Porter Manufact- 
urers. 

Albion Brewery, J H Burnell 
& Bro prop'rs, South S F, 
Burnell & Turner agents, 519 
Sacramento 

Empire Brewery. John Har- 
rold, 418 Chestnut 

Mason John, 523 Chestnut 

Swan Brewery Co, cor Fif- 
teenth and Dolores 

Amalgamating Plates. 

California Electrical Works, 

134 Sutter 
Denniston E G, 653 Mission 
Shepman W E, 41 Geary 

Amalgamators. 

Dodge M B, 143 Fremont 
Russell E F, 6385- Mission 

Ammonia Manufacturers. 

San Francisco Gas Light Co, 
cor First and Natoma 

Aquarium Manufacturers. 

Dixon & Bernstein, 250 Market 
Teubner & Hoffmann, 532 Cala 



CHIRARDELLI S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



19 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { T, ^{B?fi£^a5Sr i fLubpicatino Oils. 



260 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Arms and Ammunition. 

(See Guns and Sporting Ma- 
terials.) 

Artesian Well Pipe Manu- 
facturers. 

Prag Martin, 125 Clay 

Smith Francis & Co, 130 Beale 

Artificial Flowers. 

(See Millinery Goods.) 

Artificial Limbs. 

* Manufacturers. 

Jewett Jarvis, 20 Merchants 

Exchange 
* Spring Menzo, 9 Geary 

Artificial Stone Manufactur- 
ers. 

California Artificial Stone Pav- 
ing Co, 400 Montgomery 
Eansome E L, 402 Montgomery 

Assayers. 

Berton F & Co, 527 Clay 
Falkenau & Reese, 328 Mont- 
gomery 
Griswold John C, 214 San some 
Irelan William Jr, 49 Mer- 
chants' Exchange 
Johnston William D, 118 Hal- 

leck 
Kuh Leopold, 611 Commercial 
Kustel & Eiotte, 318 Pine 
Luckhardt C A & Co, 23 Ste- 
venson 
Mosheimer J, 507 Montgomery 
Price Thomas, 524 Sacramento 
Reichling F & Co, 400 Mont- 
gomery 
Selby Smelting and Lead Co, 

416 Montgomery 
Strong & Co, 10 Stevenson 



WM. D. JOHNSTON, 

[Formerly Chief Assayer withThos. Price.] 

Assayer and Analytical Bhenjist, 

118 AND 120 HALLECK STREET, 

Near Leidesdorff, San Francisco. 

ASSAYING TAUGHT. 

Personal Attention Insures Correct Returns. 

Nevada Metallurgical Works, 

23 Stevenson St, San Francisco, 

ASSAYERS OF ORES AND PRODUCTS. 

Ores sampled and worked. Reliable practical 
working tests of Ores made by any process. 
Special attention paid to examination of mines. 
Plans, reports, and specifications furnished. 
C. A. LUCKHARDT & CO. 
Formerly Huhn <fc Luckhardt, 
Consulting Mining Engineers & Metallurgists. 

THOMAS PRICE'S 

Bullion and Melting Rooms, 

Chemical Laboratory and Assay Office, 

524 SACRAMENTO STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Assayers' Materials. 

Caire Justinian, 521 Market 
Goodyear Eubber Co, 577 

Market 
Taylor John & Co, 118 Market 

Assaying Schools. 

Van der Naillen A, 24 Post 
Awning and Tent Makers. 

Anderson C L, 856 Howard 
Burton W H, 159 New Mont- 
gomery 
Detrick E & Co, 108 Market 
Neville & Co, 33 California 
Rossiter James, 104 Francisco 
Simonton T B, 771 Mission 
White James F, 111 Clay 

C. L. ANDERSON, 

Manufacturer of 

AWNINGS AND TENTS, 

856 EOWABD STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Awnings, Tents, Wagon. Covers, and Canvas 
Signs Made to Order. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. SffiKif^^^r&f&g* 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



261 



Axle Grease Manufacturers 

Lambert & Greene, 1 44 Natoma 
Worden W H, 223 Sacramento 

Bag Manufacturers. 

(See also Paper Bags.) 
Cook A 0, (mail) 415 Market 
Cook H N, (mail) 405 Market 
Detrick E & Co, 108 Market 
Hanna J & P N, 308 Davis 
Neville & Co, 33 California 

Bag Twines. 

Barbour's, 511 Market 

Baking Powders. 

(See Yeast Powders.) 

Banks and Bankers. 

Anglo-Californian Bank, N E 

cor California and Leidesdorff 

Bank of British Columbia, S K 
cor California and Sansome 

Bank of British North Amer- 
ica, 221 Sansome 

Bank of California, N W cor 
California and Sansome 

Belloc & Cie, 524 Montgomery 

Berton F & Co, 529 Clay 

Borel Alfred & Co, 601 Mont 

California Savings and Loan 
Society, N W cor Eddy and 
Powell 

Donohoe, Kelly & Co, S E cor 
Montgomery and Sacramento 

First National Gold Bank of 
San Francisco, 315 Montgom- 
ery 

French Savings and Loan So- 
ciety, 534 California 

German Savings and Loan So- 
ciety, 526 California 

Grangers' Bank, N E cor Cali- 
fornia and Davis 

Hibernia Savings and Loan 
Society, NE cor Market and 
Montgomery 



Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank- 
ing Corporation, 423 Cal'a 

Humboldt Savings and Loan 
Society, 18 Geary 

Lazard Freres, 205 Sansome 

London and San Francisco Bank, 
N W cor California and Lei- 
desdorff 

Nevada Bank of San Fran- 
cisco, 301 Montgomery 

Pacific Bank, N W cor Pine 
and Sansome 

San Francisco Savings Union, 
532 California 

Sather & Co, N E cor Mont- 
gomery and Commercial 

Savings and Loan Society, 619 
Clay 

Security Savings Bank, 215 
Sansome 

Tallant & Co, 234 California 

Union Trust Co, 421 California 

Wells, Fargo & Co's Bank, 
N E cor Sansome and Cal'a 

Banner Manufacturers. 

Norcross & Co, 6 Post 
Pasquale B, 650 Washington 
Plate A J, 418 Market 

Barbers' Tools Manufactur- 
ers. 

Will & Finck, 769 Market 

Baskets. 

(See Wood and Willow Ware.) 

Bed Comforter Manufactur- 
ers. 

Du Rose F F, 29 Second 



E\ F. 33XJ ROSE, 

CALIFORNIA 

BED COMFORTER FACTORY, 

29 SECOND STEEET, 
A few doors from Market, SAN FRANCISCO' 
A Superior Quality of all Sizes filled with 
Cotton Batting constantly on hand. 

2TO BHODDT USED. 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



Wfl. B. HOOPER & 80. i^i3?gES^itS£r} Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Bed Lounge Manufacturers. 

Klemm Charles, 148 Bluxome 

CHARLES KLEMM, 

Manufacturer of 

IMPROVED PATENT BED LOUNGES, 

Patent Sofa Beds, Parlor Suites, 

Patent Rockers, and "Walnut Lounge Frames, 

148 Bluxomb, and 617 and 619 Brannan St. 

Between Fifth and Sixth Streets, 

Sax Francisco. 

Bed Spring Manufacturers. 

Blan chard Jules, 44 Fourth 

California Spring Manufactur- 
ing Co, 147 New Montgomery 

Keogh John, 73 New Mont- 
gomery 

Nachman A, 151 New Mont- 
gomery 

Pacific Spring and Mattress Co, 
25 New Montgomery 

Bedding Manufacturers. 

(See also Furniture ; also Mat- 
tress Makers ; also Spring 
Beds.) 
California Furniture Manufact- 
uring Co, 224 Bush 
Chadbourne F S & Co, 735 

Market 
Clark, Truman S & Son, 21 

New Montgomery 
Emanuel L & E, 319 Pine 
Frank Henrv, 212 Commercial 
Heney WJ& Co, 14 Ellis 
Hufschmidt F, 323 Pine 
Jansen Alexander, 48 Second 
Shaber John A & Co, 707 
Market 

Bedding Materials. 

Glover & Willcomb, 67 New 
Montgomery 

Keogh John," 73 New Mont- 
gomery 



JOHN KEOGH, 

importer of Bedding Materials, 

Wholesale Dealer in 

Curled Hair, Live Geese Feathers, Furniture 

Springs, Moss.Towr, Pulu, Excelsior, Bed 

Lace,Webbing,Ticking, Spring, and 

Stitching Twines, Burlaps, 

Tacks, Tufts, «fcc. 

73 and 75 Naw Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Bedsteads, 

(See Furniture Manufacturers ; 
also Iron Bedsteads.) 

Bell Founders. 

Bell John P & Co, 18 Fremont 
Garratt WT, NAY cor Fre- 
mont and Natoma 
Greenberg & Co, 205 Fremont 
Weed & Kingwell, 125 First 

Bellows Manufacturers. 

California Bellows Manufact- 
uring Co, 32 Fremont 
Fenn F C 1628 Mission 
Mc Keune Henry, 566 Mission 

James Campbell, Superintendent. 

CALIFORNIA BELLOWS MANUFACTURING CO, 

Blacksmiths', Miners', Moulders', and Coopers' 

BELLOWS 

Constantly on hand and made to order. 

No. 32 FREMONT STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 

Belting. 

(* Manufacturers. ) 

Baker & Hamilton, 13 and 19 

Front 
Berry & Place, Machinery Co, 

323 Market 
*Cook AO, 415 Market 

* Cook HN, 405 Market 

* Degen L P, 13 Fremont 
*Detrick E & Co, (cotton) 108 

Market 
Gregory H P & Co, 2 Cal'a 

* Gutta Ferchaand Rubber Man- 

ufacturing Co, 501 Market 
*Boyer Herman, 855 Bryant 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. sxftis^ff^r&ftiss? 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



263 



Wagner, Joseph & Co, (flour 
mill) 105 Mission 

H- 1ST. COOK, 

Manufacturer of 



405 MARKET STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Billiard Table Cushions. 

Liesenfeld P, (Calender's) 585 

Market 
Strahle Jacob & Co, (Dela- 

ney's) 533 Market 
The J M Brunswick and 

Balke Co, (Monarch) 653 

Market 

Billiard Table Manufac- 
turers. 

Jungblut Aug & Co, 14 Golden 

Gate Av 
Liesenfeld P, 585 Market 
Meyer J G H, 320 Kearny 
Strahle, Jacob & Co, 533 Mar- 
ket 
The J M Brunswick & Balke 
Co, 653 Market 

JACOB STRAHLE & CO. 

Billiard Table Manufacturers, 

Importers and Dealers in 

Billiard and Pool Tables, Billiard Goods, 

Ten Pin Goods and Alleys. 

Sole Owners and Patentees for 

Delaney's Steel Spring Cushions. 

Largest Billiard House on the Coast. 

533 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Bird Cage Manufacturers. 

Fuhrmann A M, 751 Mission 
Gruenhagen C H, 669 Mission 
Hallidie AS, 6 California 

Bitters. 

(* Manufacturers. ) 
* Cahen Louis & Son, 416 Sac- 
ramento 



* Cassin P J,SW cor Washing- 

ington and Battery 

* Haraszthy, Arpad & Co, 530 

Washington 

* Hess Louis, 1 2 Montgomery Av 

* Jaujou E A & Co, 430 Jack- 

son 
Lang & Co, 212 Dupont 

* Lyons E G &Co, 506 Jackson 

* McMillan Donald, 714 Front 
*Naber, Alfs & Brune, 413 

Front 
Redington & Co, 529 Market 
*Renz John, 219 Commercial 
Sroufe & McCrum, 208 Market 
Van Alstine & Co, 8 Brenham 

Place 
Van Bergen N & Co, 413 Clay 
Walter M & Co, 625 Sansome 
Wichman & Lutgen, 321 Clay 

* Wilmerding & Co, 214 Front 

* Wolters, Bros & Co, 221 Cal'a 

Blacksmiths' Tools. 

(See also Hardware.) 

Baker & Hamilton, 13 Front 

Carolan, Cory & Co, 119 Cal'a 

Dunham, Carrigan & Co, 107 
Front 

Gibbs George W & Co, 33 Fre- 
mont 

Huntington, Hopkins & Co, cor 
Bush and Market 

Selby Thomas H & Co, 116 
California 

Van Winkle I S & Co, 413 
Market 

Blank Book Manufacturers. 

Althof & Bahls, 329 Sansome 
Bartling & Kimball, 505 Clay 
Bosqui Edward & Co, 523 Clav 
Buswell & Co, 525 Clay 
Cooke Wm B & Co, 723 Market 
Crocker H S & Co, 215 Bush 
Hicks D & Co, 508 Montg'y 
Leary A J, 404 Sansome 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO.{ I ^a h fflS^ T aaar'}Cigaps of all Kinds. 



264 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Mclntyre John B, 423 Clay 
Rankin Charles E, 540 Clay 

Blinds. 

(See Doors, Sashes and Blinds.) 

Boiler Covering. 

Burton W H, 159 New Mont- 
gomery 
Fowler G C, 413 Pacific 
Hanna J&PN, 310 Davis 
Merrell I, L, 314 Townsend 

Boiler Makers. 

Golden State and Miners' Iron 

Works, 237 First 
Hall J V, 214 Beale 
Hawkins William, 210 Beale 
Hinckley, Spiers & Hayes, 

220 Fremont 
Jardine J B, 135 Beale 
McAfee, Wheeler & Co, 210 

Spear 
Moynihan & Aitken, 311 Miss'n 
Ohmen W H, 109 Beale 
Prescott, Scott & Co, N E cor 

First and Mission 
Pretorious, Trowbridge & Co., 

141 First 
Rankin, Brayton & Co, 127 

First 
Risdon Iron and Locomotive 

Works, S E cor Beale and 

Howard 
Roebuck Thomas G, 137 Beale 
Sefrin & Schober, 203 Fremont 

Bolt Makers. 

Pacific Rolling Mill Co, 202 

Market 
Payne William, 133 Beale 
Phelps Manufacturing Co, 13 

Drumm 

Bolting Cloths. 

Wagner Joseph & Co, 105 

Mission 



Booksellers. 

Bancroft A L & Co, 721 Market 
Payot, Upham & Co, 204 San- 
some 

Boot and Shoe Findings. 

(See Shoe Findings.) 

Boot and Shoe Manufact- 
urers. 

Armstrong T H, 67 Stevenson 
Buckingham & Hecht, 25 San- 
some 
Cahn, Nickelsburg & Co, 31 

Battery 
Chase R P, 869 Market 
Hecht, Bros & Co, 25 Sansome 
Hobart<fc Wood, 15 Sansome 
Jory Bros, 23 Van Ness Av 
Kullman, Salz& Co, 106 Battery 
Levinsky Bros, 515 Market 
Levy, Diamant & Co, 107 Bat- 
Marks S, 87 Stevenson 
Nolan E D & Co, 71 Stevenson 
Nolan P F & Co, 414 Market 
Porter, Oppenheimer, Slessinger 

& Co, 117 Battery 
Rosenthal, Feder & Co, 33 Bat- 
tery 
Rosenstock S W & Co, S E cor 

Sansome and Bush 
Tirrell C & P H & Co, 419 Clay 
United Workingmen's Co-oper- 
erative Boot & Shoe Co, 416 
Market 
Wentworth I M & Co, 400 Bat- 
tery 

Bottle Manufacturers. 

(See Glass Works) 

Bottling Machines. 

Watson & Co, 122 Market 

Box Brands. 

Schmidt M & Co, 411 Clay 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



B1 LLIARn TAB r.E f 653 & 655 Market St. 
MAMFACTlKEKS.l San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



265 



ARTISTIC DESIGNS 

IN 

BOX! BDR^lKJ-JDS 

BT 

M. SCHMIDT & CO. 

411 Clay Street, San Francisco. 

Box Manufacturers. 

. Cigar. 

California Cigar Box Factory, 
Berry, bet Third and Fourth 

Korbel F & Bros, 308 Battery 

Waldstein Abraham, 320 San- 
some 

Packing. 

Hobbs, Pomeroy&Co, 13 Beale 

Myers, Gilman & Co, S W cor 
Harrison & Ninth 

San Francisco Box Factory, 
Berry, bet Third and Fourth 

Union Box Factory, 114 Spear 

Paper. 

(See Paper Boxes.) 

Tin. 

(See Tin Cans and Boxes.) 

Brass Founders. 

Baud Frank, 522 Fulton 

Bell John P & Co, 18 Fremont 

Engels William, S TV corner 

Twenty-Fourth and Utah 
Garratt W T, N TV corner Fre- 
mont and Natoma 
Giovannini & Co, 417 Mission 
Green berg & Co, 205 Fremont 
Roylance Joseph, 45 Fremont 
Weed& Kingwell, 125 First 

Breweries. 

Albany, 71 Everett 

Albion (Ale and Porter), Bur- 

nell & Turner agents, 519 

Sacramento 
Bavarian, N E cor Montgomery 

Av and Vallejo 



Boca Brewing Co, 415 Sacra- 
mento 

Broadway, 637 Broadway 

California, Serpentine Av, near 
Brvant 

Chicago, 1420 Pine 

Eagle, S TV cor Fourteenth and 
Folsom 

Empire, 418 Chestnut • 

Enterprise, 2017 Folsom 

Eureka, 235 First 

Europa, Nebraska nr Serpentine 
Avenue 

Golden City, 1431 Pacific 

Golden Gate, S E cor Montgom- 
ery Av and Greenwich 

Hayes Valley, 514 Grove 

Hibernia, 1225 Howard 

Humboldt, Mission, near Fif- 
teenth 

Jackson, 1428 Mission 

Lafayette, 725 Green 

Mason's, 523 Chestnut 

Milwaukee, 612 Seventh 

National, S E cor Fulton and 
Webster 

North Beach, N E cor Powell 
and Chestnut 

Pacific, 267 Tehama 

Philadelphia, 240 Second 

Pioneer, 209 Treat Avenue 

Railroad, Valencia nr Sixteen'h 

San Francisco Stock, S E cor 
Powell and Francisco 

South San Francisco, cor Rail- 
road and Fourteenth Aves 

Swan, S E cor Fifteenth and 
Dolores 

Swiss, 414 Dupont 

Tivoli, E s Fillmore, bet Waller 
and Germania 

Union, 326 Clementina 

United States, SE cor Franklin 
and McAllister 

Washington, S E cor Lombard 
and Taylor 

Willows, S E cor Mission and 
Nineteenth 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm.B. Hooper & Co. 



I'ucson <fc l'hcenix, A.T., KI Paso, ) Sole Agents jr. A. MILLER 
Tex., and Guayraas, Mexico. § CC. WHISKEY. 



266 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Brewers' Materials. 

Bauer J C & Co, 632 Sac'to 
Herrman & Co, 313 Sacramento 
Neis Philip, 409 Front 
Scherr, Bach & Lux, 535 Sac- 
ramento 

Brick Manufacturers. 

Hunter & Shackleford, 310 Pine 
Lynch Peter, Pacific St. Wharf 
Patent Brick Co, 401 Montg'y 
Bemillard Brick Co, Pacific St. 
Wharf 

Bridge Builders. 

Boobar E C, 14 Howard 
Hallidie A S, (wire) 6 Cal'a 
Martin W H & Co, 7 Spear 
Pacific Bridge Co, 4 California 
San Francisco Bridge Co, 10 
California 

Broom Manufacturers. 

Armes & Dallam, 115 Front 
Cole & Kenny, 114 Sacramento 
Copson Benjamin, 322 Davis 
Feldman L & Co, 315 Sac'to 
Golden Thomas, 109 Clay 
Harrison & Dickson, 210 Sac'to 
Kunze Otto E, 646 Mission 
Simpson E W, 325 Sacramento 
Titcomb & Co, 203 Sacramento 
Unna Jacob, 157 New Mont- 
gomery 
Van Laak Lambert, cor Seven- 
teenth and Howard 
Ward Thomas, 27 Drumm 

Brush Manufacturers. 

Bleibtrey Charles, 609 Howard 
Cole & Kenny, 114 Sacramento 
Conklin T C, 418 Fourth 
Feldman L & Co, 315 Sac'to 
Figer Bros, 615 Sacramento 
Golden Thomas, 109 Clay 
Harrison & Dickson, 210 Sac- 
ramento 



Kunze Otto E, (O K Factory) 

646 Mission 
Simpson R W, 325 Sacramento 
Unna Jacob, 157 New Mont'y 

Bung Manufacturers. 

Gracier F J, 211 Mission 
Mixer George H, 51 Beale 
Swift James, 221 Mission 
Waas Henry, 718 Minna 

Button Manufacturers. 

Colombat A, 108 O'Farrell 
Ettinger S, 105 Post 
Norcross <&r Co, 6 Post 

Cabinet Makers. 

(See Furniture Manufacturers.) 

Cabinet Makers' Supplies. 

Wigmore John, 129 Spear 

California Wines and Bran- 
dies. 

(See Wines — Native.) 

Candle Manufacturers. 

Bay Soap and Candle Co, 

(Limited) 116 Front 
Castle Bros & Loupe, (agents 

Comstock candles) 213 Front 
Coleman William T & Co, 

(agents) 203 California 
Mission Soap & Candle Works, 

108 Bush 
San Francisco Candle Co, 402 

Front 

Candy Manufacturers. 

Demartini L & Co, 211 Post 
Dexter Frank, 526 Washington 
Fahrbach & Seidl, 405 Davis 
Foster & Co, 1025 Market 
Gruenhagen W, 20 Kearny 
Guillet Charles, 206 Second 
Hirschfeld & Saroni, 118 Davis 
Masson Freres, 413 Commercial 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



KILLIAKD TABLE f 653 & 655 Market St 
MAAl'FA€TUKEK8,l San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., «*«.iu»w4i«, 



Oil,* AND PAINTS. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



267 



Mercer M A, 518 Kearny 
Pitt WGG& Co, 465 Stevenson 
Roberts George F, 1301 Polk 
Rotger & Bischoff, 307 East 
Rothschild & Ehrenhfort, 118 

Front 
Schlesinger & Co, 102 Market 
Schroder, Albrecht & Co, 224 

Battery 
Seidl J & Co, 405 Davis 
Thain Bros, 781 Market 
Townsend W S, 627 Market 

Canned Goods. 

(See Hermetically Sealed 
Goods.) 

Cap Manufacturers. 

Garn William, 423 Pine 
Bosenberg George, 20 Sansome 
Zobel J, 104 Dupont 

Car and Iron Bridge Work. 

The Phelps Manufacturing 
Co, 13 Drumm 

Car Springs. 

Betts Spring Co, 218 Fremont 

Carpets. 

Heynemann H & Co, 5 Sansome 
Bichter P E, (Turkish) 209 

Sansome 
Sloane W & J, 525 Market 
Walter D N, and E & Co, NW 

cor Battery and Market 

Carriage Goods. 

Stein C W, 265 Stevenson 

Carriage Importers. 

Albaugh M S, 41 H California 
Eastman T S, 46 New Mont- 
gomery 
Willey O F & Co, 427 Mont'ry 

Carriage Manufacturers. 

Black H M & Co, 851 Market 



Briggs R F & Co, 220 Mission 
Carvill Manufacturing Co, 9 

Powell 
Folsom Albert, 217 Ellis 
Grave B & Co, 421 Pacific 
Holmes M P, 327 Sutter 
Larkins & Co, 631 Howard 
Locke J P & Co, 817 Market 
Shute Daniel S, 111 O'Farrell 

Carriage Springs. 

Betts Spring Co, 218 Fremont 
Morris H D, 4 Fremont 

Carriage and Wagon Ma- 
terials. 

Holt Bros, 27 Beale 

Straut W E, N W cor Drumm 
and Sacramento 

Waterhouse & Lester, 29 Fre- 
mont 

White Bros, 13 Main 

Carriage and Wagon Tops. 

Plumbe J F, 25 Second 

Chain Manufacturers. 

Pacific Chain Works, office 250 

Market 
Payne William, 133 Beale 
Phelps Manufacturing Co, 13 

Drumm 

Chair Manufacturers. 

(See also Furniture Manufac'rs.) 

Carmouche M, 124 Main 

Hey wood Bros & Co, 589 

Mission 
Indianapolis Chair Manufactur- 
ing Co, 1 60 Naw Montgomery 
Postel I, 413 Mission 
San Francisco Chair Factory, 
135 Beale 

Champagne Manufacturers. 

Finke A, 809 Montgomery 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



I*. B. Hooper & to.{ 1 ^a h ffl^ T ka£r}^ rt Blitz Milwaukee Beer. 



268 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Haraszthy Arpad & Co, 530 

Washington 
Lachman S & Co, 409 Market 

Chemical Works. 

California, San Bruno Eoad bet 
Twenty-seventh and Twenty- 
eighth 

Golden City, N W cor Seventh 
and Townsend 

San Francisco, office 402 Front 

Chimney Tops. 

Gladding, McBean & Co, 1310 

Market 
Owens John B, 22 California 
Williams J B, 400 Thirteenth, 

Oakland 

Chimneys — Patent. 

Williams J B, 400 Thirteenth, 
Oakland 

Chlorinating Tubs, 

Jewell A M & Co, Berry, bet 
Third and Fourth 

Chocolate Manufacturers. 

Ghirardelli & Danzel,415 Jack- 
son 
Guittard E & Co, 405 Sansome 

Chrome Works. 

Kruse & Euler, (agents Balti- 
more Chrome Works) 209 
Front 

Cider Manufacturers. 

Code, Elfelt & Co, 314 Wash- 
Cutting Packing Co, 17 Main 
Eastern Cider Co, 719 Bryant 
King, Morse & Co, N W cor 

Broadway and Sansome 
Pennie J C Jr, 504 Jackson 
Preble & Jones, 218 Davis 
Wangenheim Sol & Co, 118 

Davis 



Cigar Importers. 

Castle Bros & Loupe, (agents 
Owl cigars) 215 Front 

Drinkhouse J A, S W cor Bat- 
tery and Sacramento 

Dwyer & Cartan, 513 Sacra- 
mento 

Kohlberg M P & Co, 218 Bat- 
tery 

Michalitschke Bros, 239 Kearny 

Eosenbaum A S & Co, S E cor 
California and Battery 

Eosenshine M & Bro, 604 Front 

Schoenfeld Jonas, 423 Jackson 

Wellman, Peck & Co, 126 
Market 

Wertheimer L & E, 300 Front 

Cigar Manufacturers. 

Armer & Co, 306 Sacramento 
Boukofsky & Sternberg, 316 

Washington 
Bowman John S & Co, 215 Bat- 
tery 
Brand Herman, 304 Battery 
Bremer Joseph & Co, 310 Sacra- 
mento 
Brune August, 227 Clay 
Bura Adolph, 104 Dupont 
CohnG&Co, 117 Pine 
Culp JD&Co, 16 Front 
Diez & Eamon, 416 Battery 
Eisenberg E & Bro, 329 Market 
Engelbrecht, Fox & Co, 312 

Front 
Esberg, Bachman & Co. 126 

Battery 
Evers A, 522 Kearny 
Falkenstein & Co, N E cor Bat- 
tery and Sacramento 
Freund & Morgan, 763£ Bryant 
Gaffke Ernst, 443 Bush 
Galleano A, 802 Montgomery 
Gelien E G, 315 Davis 
Goldberg & Poppe, 410 Sacra- 
mento 
Goslinsky E & Co, 219 Battery 
Harris Bros, 514 Washington 



I l18 J. M. BrUnSWiCK & HfllKB uO. MAXUFUTrKEKVi San Francisco. ' 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



269 



Helrauth William, 506 Jackson 
Klopstock C & Co, 212 Front 
Kutner & Goldstein, 427 Battery 
Lewis Samuel & Co, 24 Cala 
Lewis William & Co, 30 Cala 
Liebes, Bros & Co, 203 Sacra- 
mento 
Mann Alexander, 324 Clay 
Mayrisch Bros & Co, 405 Bat- 
tery 
Oppenheimer & Co, N E cor 

Front and California 
Ordenstein & Co, 306 Battery 
Plagemann H & Co, 305 Sacra- 
mento 
Pollak, Arnold & Co, 206 Sacra- 
mento 
Poppe Charles, 305 Battery 
Riese Bros, 625 Clay 
Rosenbaum I S & Co, S E cor 

Battery and Clay 
Sabin Ferdinand, 802 Montg'y 
Sanderson & Horn, 327 Front 
Shaeffer J W & Co, 321 Sacra- 
mento 
Sideman, Lachman & Co, 209 

Battery 
Siebenhauer L & Co, 222 Bat- 
tery 
SikesE& Co, 115 Front 
Timke J H & Bro, 611 Sansome 
Wertheimer M & Bros, 518 

Front 
White Isaac K, 221 Sacramento 

Cigarette Manufacturers. 

Bollman John & Co, 409 Wash- 
ington 
Diez & Ramon, 416 Battery 
Franetta John & Co, 419 Battery 
Frohman S & Co, 629 Montg'y 
Perazzo J, 1421 Dupont 
Rosenthal B, 515 Montgomery 

Cloaks and Suits. 

Davidson J W & Co, 101 

Kearny 
Fratinger & Noll, 105 Kearny 



Hodge Robert, 10 Fifth 
Kramer & Co, 28 Sansome 
Mayer Charles, 569 Market 
Pacific Cloak and Suit Manu- 
facturing Co, 212 Sutter 
Sullivan Thomas, 120 Kearny 
Verdier Moreau & Co, 100 

Montgomery 
Wurkheim & Co, 125 Kearny 

HODGE'S 

CLOAK AND SUIT ROOMS, 

10 Fifth Street, San Francisco. 

Ladies' Suits, from $4.00 upwards. 

Ladies' Calico and Linen Suits embroidered 
from $2.50 upwards. 

Special Prices to the Country Trade. 

dock Importers. 

(See also Watch Importers.) 
Andrews A, 221 Montgomery 
Day Thomas, 122 Sutter 
Braverman, Louis & Co, 119 

Montgomery 
Lawton O & Co, 609 Market 
Levy, John & Co, 118 Sutter, 
Pacific Jewelry Co, 6 Battery 
Randolph & Co, 101 Montgom- 
ery 
Seth Thomas Clock Co, (H. Moli- 

neux agent,) 132 Sutter 
Shreve George C & Co, 110 

Montgomery 
Waterbury Clock Co, (A I 
Hall & Son agents), 585 Mar- 
ket 

Clock Manufacturers. 

Wenzel Herman (PneumaticJ, 
328 Kearny 

Clothing Importers and Man- 
ufacturers. 

Alexander S O & Co, 4 Battery 
Badger W G, 13 Sansome 
Banner Bros, N E cor Sansome 
and Market 



CHIRARDELLPS CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. {'%£i^ 



270 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Baum J & Co, 9 Sansome 
Brown Bros, 24 Sansome 
Brown, Nathan & Co, 108 Bat- 
tery 
Colman Bros, N W cor Sutter 

and Sansome 
Elfelt A B & Co, 108 Sansome 
Fechheimer, Goodkind & Co, 

16 Sansome 
Hastings C C & Co, S W corner 

Sutter and Montgomery 
Hyams Bros, 123 Sansome 
Meyerstein & Lowenberg, 109 

Sansome 
Nathan, Pulverman & Co, 29 

Battery 
Steinhart W & I & Co, 3 Bat- 
tery 
Straus & Levy, 22 Sansome 
Strauss, Levi & Co, 14 Battery 

Cloths. 

Baumgarten A, 7 Montgomery 
, Mason John R, 535 Market 
Reiss, Bros & Co, 115 Sutter 
Stein, Simon & Co, S E cor Mar- 
ket and Second 

Coal. 

Barnard, F & Co, 213 Jackson 
Belling}] am Bay Coal Co, S E 

cor Folsom and Spear 
Bichard N, 16 Howard 
Black Diamond C & M Co, S E 

cor Folsom and Spear 
'Chandler R D, 120 Pacific 
Dunsmuir,Diggle & Co, 620 East 
Eastport Coos Bay Coal Co, 30 

Merchant's Exchange 
Ebbets A M, 109 Sacramento 
Gawthorne & Maguire, corner 

Main & Folsom 
Haste & Kirk, 21 Beale 
Kershaw M, 19 Spear 
Macdonough J, 41 Market 
Newbauer Joseph, 206 Bush 
Ramsdell B H, 110 Jackson 
Renton Coal Co, 22 Sac'to 



Rosenfeld John, 302 California 

Seattle Coal and Transportation 
Co, 32 Market 

Selby, Thomas H & Co, 116 
California 

Shaw & Sharp, 10 Fremont 

Summerfield A Jr, N E cor Fol- 
som and Spear 

Summerfield L, N E cor Folsom 
and Spear 

Whitney & Marshall, 22 Fre- 
mont 

Coal Oil. 

(See also Groceries.) 
Allyne & White, 112 Front 
Castle Bros & Loupe, (agents 

XLNT) 213 Front 
Coleman William T & Co, 203 

California 
Continental Oil and Trans- 
portation Co, 123 California 
Dietz A C & Co, 9 Front 
Hooper Wm B & Co, 122 Front 
Koster Henry, 412 Sansome 
Levi H & Co, (agents Sunlight) 

221 Front 
Low C Adolphe & Co, 208 Cali- 
fornia 
Standard Oil Co, 123 California 
Scofield & Tevis, 120 Front 
Yates & Co, 113 Front 

Coffee and Spice Mills, 

Adelsdorfer & Co, 406 Clay 

Bernard Charles, 707 Sansome 

Berton & Lepori, 517 Com- 
mercial 

Bothin, Dallemand & Co, 305 
Front 

Devers, Koehneke & Allen, 30 
Fremont 

Folger, Schilling & Co, 104 
California 

Gates, Horace & Co, 10 Ste- 
venson 

Ghirardelli & Danzel, 415 
Jackson 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE 

MAXl'FACTl'KKIM, 



653* 655 Market St 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO.. Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



271 



Guittard E & Co, 405 Sansome 
Hanly George T & Co, 214 Sac- 
ramento 
Hofen & Co, 412 Clay 
McCarthy Bros, 119 Front 
Montealegre J G, 218 Sacram'to 
Seriat Sim & Co, 418 Com- 

mercial 
Tyler S H & Son, 221 Com- 
mercial 
Venard G, 625 Front 

Coffin Manufacturers. 

Gray N & Co, 641 Sacramento 
Lockhart & Porter, 29 Bluxome 
Massey Atkins, 651 Sacramento 
McAuliffe & Gard, 516 Eighth 
Pacific Manufacturing Co, 629 
Mission 

Collar Manufacturers. 

(See Paper Collars ; also Shirt 
Manufacturers.) 

Colleges— Business. 

Barnard's Business College, 

120 Sutter 
Heald's Business College. 24 

Post 
Pacific Business College, 320 

Post 

Commission Merchants. 

Arnold N S & Co, 310 Cal'a 
Balfour, Guthrie & Co, 316 Cal'a 
Balzer, Henry & Co, 209 San- 
some 
Bandmann, Nielsen & Co, 210 

Front 
Beadle & Co, 3 Spear 
Bell, Thomas & Co, 305 San- 
some * 
Brigham, Whitney & Co, 320 

Front 
Bryant & Cook, 8 Davis 
Cabrera, Roma & Co, 123 Cal'a 
Campbell W H, 402 Front 



Christy & Wise, 607 Front 
Clayton Charles, 400 Front 
Clements G, 318 Front 
Coleman Wm T & Co, 203 Cal'a 
Cutting John T& Co, 206 Front 
De Castro. D & Co, 213 San- 
some 
De Fremery James & Co, 410 

Battery 
De Sabla Eugene, 425 Battery 
Degener & Co, 308 California 
Dellepiane & Co, 425 Battery 
Dempster & Keys, 202 Market 
Dibblee Albert, 10 California 
Dickson, De Wolf & Co, 412 

Battery 
Donaldson & Co, 124 California 
Doyle, Henry & Co, 511 Market 
Dresbach & Co, 316 California 
Everding J & Co, 48 Clay 
Falkner, Bell & Co, 430 Cal'a 
Feiling & Henry, 319 Sacra- 
mento 
Feinberg & Co, 324 Clay 
Flint, Peabody & Co, 408 Cal'a 
Forbes Bros, 308 California 
Freeman, Smith & Co, 122 Cal'a 
Getz Bros & Co, 301 Front 
Grace J W & Co, 40 California 
Grinbaum M S & Co, 214 Cal'a 
Gutte I, 307 California 
Haight Eobert & Co, 226 Front 
Hall A I & Son, 585 Market 
Helimann Bros & Co, 525 Front 
Hume George W, 309 Sacra- 
mento 
Hume R D & Co, 309 Sacra- 
mento 
Hussey H P & Co, 205 Front 
Hutchinson, Kohl, Philippeus 

& Co, 310 Sansome 
Iken Frederick, 506 Battery 
Jackson T W, 304 California 
Jones S L & Co, 207 Cal'a 
Kittle & Co, 202 California 
Kruse & Euler, 209 Front 
Lewis Henry L, 215 Sacramento 
Loaiza W, 323 California 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. {^.tSfig^tiSS?} Wines of all Kinds. 



272 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Lohman & Coghill, 313 Front 
Low C Adolphe &Co, 208 Cal'a 
Lund Henry, 214 California 
Macondray & Co, 206 Sansome 
Martens F & Co, 427 Front 
Martin, Feusier & Steffani, 309 

Clay 
Mason John R, 541 Market 
McHenry S & Co, 425 Front 
Meade George W & Co, 316 

Washington 
Melczer William, 123 California 
Merrill J C & Co, 204 Cal'a 
Montealegre & Co 230 Cal'a 
Moody & Farish, 210 Davis 
Moore A D, 109 California 
Muecke, Vietor & Co, 109 Cal'a 
Newhall's Sons & Co, 309 San- 
some 
Oppenheimer Ivan, 45 Clay 
Page, Moore & Co, 21 1 Clay 
Parrott & Co, 306 California 
Pinet J, 508 Jackson 
Rodgers, Meyer & Co, 212 

Battery 
Rosenfeld John, 302 California 
Scotchler & Gibbs, 318 Front 
Searles & Stone, 22 California 
Severance H W, 316 California 
Simon & Breslauer, 13 First 
Sloss, Louis & Co, 310 San- 
some 
Spafford J M & Co, 310 Clay 
Sperry & Co, 22 California 
Stearns & Smith, 423 Front 
Stevens, Baker & Co, N W cor 

Sacramento and Davis 
Taylor C L & Co, 34 California 
Trejos J & Co, 123 California 
Underhill Jacob, 308 Cal'a 
Urruela & Urioste, 202 Market 
Von Ronn & Hencke Bros, 406 

Front 
Wadhams & Elliott, 206 Front 
Waterman & Co, 113 Clay 
Welch & Co, 109 California 
Wheaton & Luhrs, 219 Front 
Wieland Bros, 326 Front 



Wightman Bros, 117 Clay 
Williams, Dimond & Co, 202 

M^arket 
Wolf Philip & Co, 304 Battery 
Wooster, Hubbell & Co, 317 

Front 
Zeigenbein John & Co, 201 Da- 
vis 

Confectioners. 

(See Candy Manufacturers.) 

Copper Works. 

Perey Pierre, 308 Market 
Sanders & Co, 421 Mission 
Smith Charles W, 520 Davis 
Tripp George A, 226 Fremont 
Wagner & Todt, 565 Mission 

Cordage Manufacturers. 

Hallidie A S, (wire) 6 Cal'a 
San Francisco Cordage Fac- 
tory, Tubbs & Co, 611 Front 

Cordials. 

Cahen, Louis & Son, 416 Sac- 
ramento 
Jaujou E A & Co, 430 Jackson 
Lyons E G & Co, 506 Jackson 
McMillan Donald, 714 Front 

Corks. 

Bauer J C & Co, 632 Sac'to 
Herrmann & Co, 313 Sac'to 
Scherr, Bach & Lux, 535 Sac- 
ramento 
Watson & Co, 124 Market 

Corkscrew Manufacturers. 

Price M, 415 Kearny 
Schintze J H, 10 Stevenson 
Will & Finck, 769 Market 

Corset Manufacturers. 

California Corset Co, 539 Mar- 
ket 
Freud M & Sons, 742 Market 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



MAXUFACTIKEK*, 



San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T.. 



WHOLESALE 
BOOTS A\D BHOEI. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



273 



Cotton and Flax Sail Twines 

Doyle Henry & Co, 511 Mar- 
ket 

Cotton Gill Net Lines. 

Doyle Henry & Co, 511 Mar- 
ket • 

Cracker Manufacturers. 

California Cracker Co, 801-817 
Battery 

Eclipse Cracker Co, 214 Sac- 
ramento 

Crockery and Glassware. 

Ackerman Bros, 123 Kearny 
Altschul, Seller & Co, 119 Bat- 
tery 
Cerf J & Co, 517 Market 
Daneri Antonio, 420 Battery 
Lawton O & Co, 609 Market 
Nathan B & Co, 130 Sutter 
Reid & Brooks, 524 Sansome 
Sanderson & Brother, 310 Bat- 
tery 
Strauss, Kohnstamm & Co, 102 

Battery 
Swain R A& Co, 112 Cal'a 
Wangenheim, Sternheim & Co, 
17 Sutter 

J. CERF <Sc CO. 

Importers and Dealers in 

CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE, 

Pocket and Table Cutlery, 

PLATED WARE, LAMPS, CHINA WARE, 

AND FANCY PORCELAIN. 

517 and 519 Market Street, opp. Battery, 

P. 0. Box 1439. San Fbakcisco. 

Curled Hair. 

Eureka Hair Factory, 416 Sac- 
ramento 

Glover & Willcomb, 67 New 
Montgomery 

Keogh John, 73 New Mont- 
gomery 



Cutlery. 

(See also Hardware.) 

* Manufacturers 

Allen ET, 416 Market 
Altschul, Seller & Co, 119 Bat- 
tery 

* Bauer Bros, 637 Kearny 
Cerf J & Co, 517 Market 
Daneri Antonio, 420 Battery 

* Denniston E G, 653 Mission 
Frankenthal, Bach man & Co, 

S W cor Cal'a and Battery. 
Folkers J H A & Bro, 118 

Montgomery 
Hoppe Reinhoid, 318 Pine 
*Kohnke John, 405^ California 
Landers P, 406 Market 
Lawton O & Co, 609 Market 
Nathan B & Co, 130 Sutter 
Price M, 415 Kearny 
Sanderson & Bro, 310 Battery 
Son Brothers, 300 California 
Straus, Kohnstamm & Co, 102 

Battery 
Swam R A & Co, 112 California 
Wangenheim, Sternheim & Co, 

27 Sutter 
Weil & Woodleaf, 113 Battery 

* Will & Finck, 769 Market " 

Dental Instruments. 

(See Surgical and Dental In- 
struments.) 

Dental Laboratory. 

Odermath F A, 37 Post 

Die Sinkers. 

Giller C L, 420 Montgomery 
Hoffman & Schenck, 414 Sacra- 
mento 
Klumpp William, 235 Kearny 
Kuner A, 611 Washington 
Pages J F, 648 Sacramento 
Robbins F A, 7 First 
Wood George M & Co, 120 
Post 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wto.B. Hooper & Go. { 



'^tRSS^ikSSrWm & Gaudies at Wholesale. 



274 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Distilleries. 

Distilling 



Co, 321 



California 
Battery 

Oberfelder Bros & Co, (agents) 
123 California 

Pacific Distilling and Refining 
Co, 416 Battery 

Potrero Distilling Co, cor Ne- 
vada and Minnesota 

Doors, Sashes and Blinds. 

Bradbury W B, 556 Brannan 
Doe B & J S, 44 Market 
Glade F W, 30 Spear 
Haskell Phineas, cor Bryant 

and Fifth 
Jewell A M & Co, Berry, bet 

Third and Fourth 
Kittredge E H & Co, 1 13 Mark't 
Knowles G B, S E cor Mission 

and Main 
Macdonald D A & Co, 217 

Spear 
McKay & Small, 415 Mission 
Meeker W A, S W cor Bryant 

and Fifth 
Prescott & Sanborn, N W cor 

Howard and Spear 
Segars Uriah, 160 Main 
Springer Jason & Co, S E cor 

Spear and Mission 
Turner, Kennedy & Shaw, 840 

Fourth 
Washburn Albert, Berry, bet 

Fourth and Fifth 
Wells, Russell & Co, S W cor 

Mission and Fremont 
Wilkie Andrew, S W cor Mis- 
sion and Fremont 
Wilson & Bros, 18 Drumm 

Drain and Sewer Pipe. 

(See Sewer Pipe.) 

Drilling Machines. 

Woodin L H, 109 Pine 



Drills— Rock. 

Ingersoll Rock Drill Co, 18 First 
Parke & Lacy, 21 Fremont 
Rankin, Bray ton & Co, 127 

First 
Reynolds L & Co, 16 First 
Richmann Drill and Compressor 

Co, 25 Stevenson 
Severance H W, 320 Sansome 

Drug Mills. 

Clapp & Jessup, 51 Fremont 
Gates Horace & Co, 10 Ste- 
venson 

Druggists. 

Beardsley Geo F & Co, (homeo- 
pathic) 44 Geary 
Boericke & Tafel, (homeo- 
pathic) 234 Sutter 
Crane & Brigham, 520 Market 
Downing AF& Son, 14 Second 
Gates J R & Co, 417 Sansome 
Langley & Michaels, 101 Front 
Mack J J & Co, 11 Front 
Merten, Moffit & Co, 322 Clay 
Redington & Co, 529 Market 
Richards C F & Co, 427 San- 
some 
Wakelee H P & Co, 140 Mont- 
gomery 

Druggists' Glassware. 

(See also Druggists.) 
Taylor John & Co, 118 Market 

Dry Goods. 

Bachman Bros, 10 Battery 
Dannenbaum J & S, 124 San- 
some 
Dinkelspiel L & Co, 37 Battery 
Feder M M & Co, 33 Battery 
Fisher & Baum, 103 Sansome 
Franklin M & Bro, 18 Battery 
Goldstone M & Co, 4 Battery 
Heller M & Bros, 112 Sansome 
Heynemann, H & Co, 5 Sansome 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



iciii.i vun 

HAXrF.K'ii'Itr.HI 



TABLE ( 653 & 655 Market SU 
\ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



275 



Hoffman & Co, 17 Battery 
Kahn, Bros & Co, 25 Battery 
Levinsohn & Meyerstein, 117 

San some 
Murphy, Grant & Co, 100 San- 
some 
Sachs, Heller & Co, S W corner 

Battery and Bush 
Sheyer M& Bro, 121 Sansome 
Strauss Levi & Co, 14 Battery 
Weil Bros & Co, 21 Battery 

Electric Light Companies. 

California Electric Light Co, 
119 O'Farrell 

Electrical Apparatus Man- 
ufacturers. 

California Electrical Works, 

134 Sutter 

CALIFORNIA ELECTRICAL WORKS, 

Telegraph and Electrical Engineers 

AND MANUFACTURERS, 

Electro Platers in Nickel, Gold, and Silver, 

Blasting Machines and Supplies, and 

Amalgamating Plates for Mines 

a specialty. 

Office and Works, 134 Suttee St. 

Paul Seileb, Supt. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Elevators. 

Birch William H, 119 Beale 
Garratt W T, 138 Fremont 
Hinkle Philip, 116 Main 

Embroideries. 

(See also Dry Goods.) 
Bauer Bros & Co, 547 Market 
Cobliner Bros, 543 Market 
Kramer & Co, 28 Sansome 
Lash H, 537 Market 
Muser Bros, 541 Market 
Rosenbaum & Co, 22 Battery 

Emery Wheels. 

Gregory H P & Co, 2 Cal'a 



Engines. 

(See Iron Works, also Machine 
Works.) 

Engravers. 

Bosqui E & Co, 523 Clay 
Britton & Rev, 525 Commercial 
Francis, Valentine & Co, 517 

Clay 
Giller C L, (seal) 420 Mont- 
gomery 
Goldsmith W E & Son, 26 

Montgomery 
Hoffmann & Schenck, 414 Sac- 
ramento 
Kuner A, (seal) 611 Washing- 
ton 
Oliver Henry, 535 Clay 
Pettit & Buss, 320 Sansome 
Schmidt M& Co, 411 Clay 
Van Vleck D, 432 Montgomery 
Waldstein A, 320 Sansome 
Wood Geo M & Co, 120 Post 

C. L. GILLER, 

Seal Engraver and Die Sinker 

No. 420 Montgomery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

N. B.— Mr. Giller is known to do the most 
superior work, at the lowest prices on the 
Pacific Coast. 

A. KUNER, 

Seal Engraver 1 Die Sinter, 

Ho. 611 Washington Street, 
Third Floor. SAN FRANCISCO. 



Engravers' Materials. 

Wood Geo M & Co, 120 Post 

Essence Manufacturers. 

Lyons E G & Co, 506 Jackson 
McMillan Donald, 714 Front 
Rieger P & Co, 511 Front 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



20 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { 



Tucson «fc Phoenix, A.T., El Taso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



\ Lubricating Oils. 



276 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Eyelets. 

Field A & Sons, 511 Market 

Fancy Goods. 

Bauer Bros & Co, 547 Market 
Cobliner Bros, 543 Market 
Feigenbaum&Co,120 Sansome 
Frankenthal, Bachman & Co, S 
W cor Battery and California 
Jones E H & Co, 535 Market 
Kahn Bros & Co, 25 Battery 
Levinsohn & Meyerstein, 117 

Sansome 
Levy M & Co, 109 Battery 
Michels, Friedlander & Co, 7 

Battery 
Nathan B & Co, 130 Sutter 
Kosendale A C, 549 Market 
Sachs, Strassburger & Co, S E 

cor Sansome and Pine 
Sadler & Co, 605 Market 
Schweitzer, Sachs & Co, 29 San- 
some 
Son Brothers, 300 California 
Stevenson & Longwill, 603 

Market 
Tobin, Davisson & Co, 6 Sutter 
Weil & Woodleaf, 113 Battery 

Feather Duster Manufact- 
urers. 

Figer Bros, 615 Sacramento 
Kunze Otto E, 646 Mission 
Simpson B W, 325 Sacramento 
Unna Jacob, 157 New Montg'y 

Feathers. 

Glover & Willcomb, 67 New 

Montgomery 
Haker W & Hinz, (fancy) 545 

Market 
Held Bros & Co, (fancy) 512 

Market 
Jansen Alexander, 48 Second 
Keogh John, 73 New Montg'y 
McCabe Owen, 921 Market 



Feed Mills. 

California, 415 Battery 
Capitol, 202 Davis 
Laumeister C S, 118 Mission 
Pioneer and Alta, 16 Stevenson 
Washington, N W cor Drumm 

and Washington 
Yolo, N E cor Mission and Main 

File Makers. 

Doble A, 13 Fremont 
Kelly Martin, 305 Howard 
Pacific Saw Manuf Co, 17 Fre- 
mont 

Fire Arms. 

(See Guns and Sporting Ma- 
terials.) 

Fire Bricks and Clay. 

Blochman & Cerf, 10 Drumm 
Davis & Co well, 211 Drumm 
Gladding, McBean & Co, 1310 

Market 
Holmes H T & Co, 14 Market 
Owens John B, 22 California 

Fire Works. 

Eckstein Alfred B, 10 Front 
Steele, Elder & Co, 204 Front 

Fish Hooks. 

Doyle Henry & Co, 51 1 Market 
Mil ward Henry & Sons, 511 
Market 

Fish Nets, Seines & Twines. 

Doyle Henry & Co, 511 Market 
Fishing Tackle. 

Armes & Dallam, 230 Front 
Clabrough & Golcher, 630 

Montgomery 
Doyle Henry & Co, 511 Market 
Dunn Horace D, 547 Wash- 
ington 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. &%^?&ffissssr£¥£s& tt - 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



277 H 



Liddle & Kaeding, 538 Wash- 
ington 
Plate A J & Co, 418 Market 
Shreve & Wolf, 214 Bush 
Wilson H H & Son, 513 Clay 

Flags. 

Hanna J & P N, 308 Davis 

Norcross & Co, 6 Post 
Pasquale B, 650 Washington 
Plate A J & Co, 418 Market 

Flavoring Extracts. 

Cutting Packing Co, 17 Main 
Langley & Michaels, 101 Front 
Mack J J & Co, 11 Front 
Merten, Moffit & Co, 318 Clay 
Redington & Co, 529 Market 
Eieger P & Co, 511 Front 
Souther Joseph N & Co, 124 

Market 
Thompson Ira D & Son, 414 

Front 

Flour Dealers. 

Bassett Joseph, 221 Clay 
Bray Bros, 226 Clay 
Bryant & Cook, 8 Davis 
Clayton Charles, 400 Front 
Ellis M C & Son, 232 Cal'a 
Everding J & Co, 48 Clay 
Page, Moore & Co, 211 Clay 
Pallies A, 318 Davis 
Sperry & Co, 22 California 
Starr & Co, 16 California 
Tenney R P, N E cor Davis 

and Market 
Waterman M & Co, 113 Clay 
Zeigenbein John & Co, 201 

Davis 

Flour Mills. 

Caledonia, (oat meal) 713 San- 
some 
California, 415 Battery 
Capitol, 204 Davis 
Genesee, Gold near Sansome 



Golden Age, 717 Battery 
Golden Gate, 41 First 
National, S W cor Battery and 

Pacific 
Pioneer and Alta, 1 6 Stevenson 
Washington, N W cor Drumm 

and Washington 

Foundries. 

(See Brass Foundries ; also Iron 
Works.) 

Fringe and Tassel Manu- 
facturers. 

Colombat A, 108 O'Farrell 
Ettinger S, 105 Post 
Fromm & Schafer, 545 Market 
Gaeth & Roehrigs, 727 Market 
Pacific Fringe Factory, 751 
Market 

Furnishing Goods. 

Alexander S O & Co, 4 Battery 
Badger W G, 7 Sansome 
Banner Bros, N E cor Sansome 

and Market 
Baum J & Co, 9 Sansome 
Brown Nathan & Co, 108 Bat- 
tery 
Cohen W & Co, 13 Battery 
Colman Bros, N W cor Sutter 

and Sansome 
Elfelt A B & Co, 108 Sansome 
Fisher & Baum, 103 Sansome 
Goldstone M & Co, 4 Battery 
Greenebaum, Sachs & Free- 
man, 17 Sansome 
Hevnemann H & Co, 5 Sansome 
Hoffman & Co, 17 Battery 
Honig & Baruch, 111 Sansome 
Hyams Bros, 218 Sansome 
Levy M & Co, 109 Battery 
Meyerstein & Lowenberg, 109 

Sansome 
Michels, Friedlandcr & Co, 7 

Battery 
Morison, Hutchinson & Co, 112 
Bush 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM.B. HOOPER & GO. { 



Tucson & Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



} Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



278 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Neustadter Bros, NW cor Pine 

and Battery- 
Sachs, Heller & Co, S W cor 

Battery and Bush 
Schweitzer, Sachs & Co, 29 

Sansome 
Sheyer M & Bro, 324 Sansome 
Steinhart W I & Co, 3 Battery 
Strauss Levi & Co, 14 Battery 
Weil & Michels, 8 Battery 

Furniture Manufacturers. 

(See also Chair Manufacturers.) 

California Furniture Manuf Co, 

224 Bush 
Chadbourne F S & Co, 735 

Market 
Easton John, 261 First 
Emanuel L & E, 319 Pine 
Fifth Street Furniture Manuf 

Co, 545 Fifth 
Frank -Henry, 212 Commercial 
Frei Andrew, 231 King 
Geishaker Andrew, S W cor 

Mission and Main 
Gilbert & Moore, 20 Sutter 
Granz Herman, 617 Brannan 
Heney W J & Co, 14 Ellis 
Hufschmidt F, 323 Pine 
Jansen Alexander, 48 Second 
Johnson A, (Pine) 572 Brannan 
Klemm Charles, 148 Bluxome 
Knorp A, 411 Mission 
Kragen & Geist, 736 Brannan 
Linforth & Bawling, 413 Miss'n 
Luchsinger John B & Son, 710 

Minna 
Plum Charles M & Co, 641 

Market 
San Francisco Furniture Fac- 
tory, Berry, bet Third and 
Fourth 
Shaber J A & Co, 707 Market 
Snyder & Beichling, 574 Bran- 
nan 
Union Furniture Factory, 560 
Brannan 



Wakefield Eattan Co, 644 Mar- 
ket 
Weir & Cates, 221 Mission 

H. GBANZ, 

Furniture Manufacturer, 

617 and 619 Brannan Street, 
Near Sixth, SAN FRANCISCO. 

A large assortment of Furniture constantly 
on hand and manufactured to order. 

Furniture Springs. 

Blanchard Jules, 44 Fourth 
California Spring Manuf Co, 

147 New Montgomery 
Keogh John, 73 New Montg'y 
Pacific Spring and Mattress 

Manuf Co, 25 New Mont 

Furs. 

Alaska Commercial Co, 310 

Sansome 
Bissinger & Co, 310 Sansome 
Cahen Bros, 41 Clay 
Koshland Bros, 301 Battery 
Newmark J P & Co, 214 Cali- 
fornia 
Oppenheimer Ivan, 45 Clay 
Platshek & Harris, 314 Bat- 
tery 
Sloss Louis & Co, 310 Sansome 
Western Fur and Trading Co, 
430 California 

Fuse Manufacturers. 

California Fuse Association, 16 

Front 
Eagle Safety Fuse Co, John 

Skinker agent, 115 Pine 

Galvanized Iron Cornices. 

Forderer Joseph F, 53 Beale 
Hayes George & Co, 539 Fifth 
Pacific Zinc Ornament Factory, 
569 Mission 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. ssmwirssssrisssss! 1 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



279 



Gas Companies. 

San Francisco Gas Light Co, cor 
First and Natoma 

Gas Fixtures. 

Bush David, 22 Post 
Day Thomas, 122 Sutter 
McNally & Hawkins, 607 Mar- 

ket 
Nye A F & Co, 315 Pine 
Prior James K, 1128 Market 

Glass— Plate. 

(See also Paints, Oils, and 
Glass.) 

Gump S & G, 581 Market 
Hausmann Bros, 217 Pine 
Kelly James E & Co, 221 

Market 
Rosenbaum Fr H & Co, 567 

Market 
Whittier, Fuller & Co, 21 Front 

Glass Cutters. 

Hopper S E, 39 £ Fremont 
Mallon John, 19 Fremont 

Glass Stainers. 

Hoist W, 118 Main 
Hopper S E, 39J Fremont 
Mallon John, 19 Fremont 

Glass Works. 

San Francisco and Pacific, King 
near Fourth 

Glassware. 

(See Crockery and Glassware.) 

Gloss Labels. 

Schmidt M & Co, 411 Clay 

Glove Manufacturers. 

Blumenthal, Quinlan & Co, 10 
Bush 



Busby Frederick H, 412 

IVtaTkcl" 
Conklin P & F G, (buckskin) 

535 Market 
Danicheff Glove Factory, Rob- 
ert C Clark, (kid) 114 Post 
Mills, Leak & Co, 22 Sutter 
Philipp, Hesthal & Co, 109 

Battery 
Shires William, 506 Market 
Shoenberg & Co, 106 Battery 
Winehill G, 125 Sansome 

Glue Manufacturers, 

Francis William H, 328 Market 

Glycerine. 

Bay Soap and Candle Co, 

(limited) 116 Front 

Gold Dry Washing Machines 

Barber C J <fc E T, (Wauga- 
man's Dry Gold Washer) 2 
Summer 

Eureka Concentrator, J C Mc- 
Curdy, 10 Stevenson 

Harris James & Co, 308 Mis- 
sion 

Gold Leaf Manufacturers. 

Newman James, 124 Post 

Gold Pen Manufacturers. 

Baptis John H, 328 Bush 
Pearce H D, 137 Montgomery 

Gold, and Silver Platers. 

California Electrical Works, 

134 Sutter 
Denniston E G, 653 Mission 
Shepman W E, 41 Geary 

Gold and Silver Refiners. 

Johnston William D, 118 Hal- 

leck 
Price Thomas, 524 Sacramento 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & C0.{ T ^»fflS^i5Sr}CigaP8 of all Kinds. 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



Selby Smelting and Lead Co, 
416 Montgomery 

Gong Manufacturers. 

Bell John P & Co, 18 Fremont 
Garratt W T, 138 Fremont 
Weed & Kingwell, 125 First 

Grates. 

Montague W W & Co, 110 

Battery 

Groceries. 

Bigley Bros, N E cor Clay and 

Davis 
Castle Bros & Loupe, 213 Front 
Chichizola A, 725 Sansome 
Daneri F & Co, 27 California 
Dellepiane & Co, 425 Battery 
Dodge W W & Co, 401 Front 
Ehrman M & Co, 104 Front 
Foster S & Co, 26 California 
Gibson C W, 205 Sacramento 
Haas Brothers, 100 California 
Hanley & Snow, 126 California 
Hawley C J & Co, 215 Sutter 
Hyman Brothers, 216 California 
Jennings Thomas, 416 San- 
some 
Jones & Co, 218 Front 
Kruse & Euler, 209 Front 
Lennon J A, 313 Clay, 
Levi H & Co, 113 California 
Lewis Henry L, 215 Sacramento 
Lohman & Coghill, 313 Front 
Mangels M& C,319 Clay 
Mau Albert & Co, 212 Market 
McKay & Brown, 427 Davis 
Meade George W & Co,' 316 

Washington 
Middleton & Co, 521 Front 
Newton Brothers & Co, 204 

California 
Pascal, Dubedat & Co, 426 Jack- 
son 
Eichards & Harrison, 401 Sac- 
ramento 



Root & Sanderson, 122 Market 
Rountree & McClure, 405 Front 
Saulnier John & Co, 607 Front 
Taber, Harker & Co, 108 CaPa 
Tillmann & Bendel, 407 Clay 
Wellman, Peck & Co, 126 Mar- 
ket 

Taber, Harker & Co. 

IMPORTERS 

AND 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

/OS and //O California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Grocers' Sundries. 

Mack J J &Co, 11 Front 

Guns and Sporting Mate- 
rials. 

Allen E T, 416 Market 
Clabrough & Golcher, 630 

Montgomery 
Curry Nathaniel & Bro, 113 

Sansome 
Liddle & Kaeding, 538 Wash- 
ington 
Plate A J & Co, 418 Market 
Shreve & Wolf, 214 Bush 
Skinker John, 115 Pine 
Wilson H H & Son, 513 Clay 

CLABROUQH & GOLCHER, 
Guns, Rifles, and Pistols, 

630 and 632 Montgomery St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Factory, 15 St. Mary's Square, Birmingham, 

England. 

A Full Assobtment of Fishing Tackle. 

Hand-Cuff Manufacturers, 

Daley & Zollner, 134 Sutter 

Hardware. 

Allen E T, 416 Market 

Arnold N S & Co, 310 Califor- 
nia 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE! < 653 <fe 655 Market St. 
* \ San Francisco. 



MAMFAITIKKKS, 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T.. MINING SUPPLIES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



281 



Baker & Hamilton, 13 Front 
Caire Justinian, 521 Market 
Carolan, Cory & Co, 117 Cali- 
fornia 
Daneri Antonio, 420 Battery 
Dunham, Carrigan & Co, 107 

Front 
Gordon Hardware Company, 

250 Market 
Hawley Charles A & Co, 412 

Market 
Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson, 

225 Market 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co, 

cor Bush and Market 
Landers P, 406 Market 
Linforth, Rice & Co, 323 Mar- 

ket 
Montague W W & Co, HO 

Battery 
Richards & Snow, 406 Market 
Selby Thomas H & Co, 116 

California 
Simmons, Eowe & Co, 52 Clay 
Tay George H & Co, 101 Cal'a 
Underhill Jacob, 308 California 
Van Winkle I S & Co, 413 

Market 
Whitney & Marshall, 22 Fre- 
mont 

Hardwood Lumber and Ven- 
eers. 

Wigmore John, 129 Spear 

Harness and Saddlery. 

Davis William, 410 Market 
Johnson J C & Co, 12 Pine 
Main & Winchester, 214 Bat- 
tery 
Stone E, 422 Battery 

Hats and Caps. 

( * Manufacturers. ) 
Berwin P & Bro, 111 Battery 
Fleisher Wolf, 108 Battery 
Friedlander Bros, 21 Sansome 



* Herrmann C, 336 Kearny 
Kline Louis & Co. 110 Bush 
Kline & Co, 26 Battery 

* Meussdorffer J C & Son, 653 

Market 

* Meussdorffer M, 200 Mont- 

gomery 
Meyer CH& Bros, 28 Sansome 
Simon U. Sons & Cook, 3 San- 
some 
Triest & Co, 116 Sansome 

Hatters' Stock. 

Kline & Co, 26 Battery 
Meussdorffer J C & Son, 653 

Market 
Meussdorffer M, 200 Mont- 
gomery 

Hermetically Sealed Goods. 

Artigues Canning Co, (meats) 
14 S F Market 

Banner Packing Co, N W cor 
Folsom & Spear 

Code, Elfelt & Co, 314 Wash- 
ington 

Cutting Packing Co, 17 Main 

Dodge, Sweeney & Co, (agents 
Libby,McNeill & Libby's,Chi- 
cago) 114 Market 

Hume George W, (agents San 
Jose Packing Co) 309 Sacra- 
mento 

King, Morse & Co, N W corner 
Broadway and Sansome 

Lusk A & Co, 536 Clay 

Merry, Faull & Co, (meats) 125 
California 

Spafford JM & Co, (agents) 310 
Clay 

Wangenheim Sol. & Co, 118 
Davis 

Hides. 

Bissinger & Co, 310 Sansome 
Cahen Bros, 41 Clay 
Christy & Wise, 607 Front 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



M/rv. D Unnnflh SL Ft\ $ Tucson & Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, \ Sole Agents J. A. MILLER 
Wm . D. nOOper <X 00. \ Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, f c.C WHISKEY. 



282 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Clayburgh & Nathan, 320 Bat- 
tery 
Cox J W & Co, 1001 Front 
Foley F & Co, 219 Drumm 
Frank J & Sons, 406 Battery 
Koshland Bros, 301 Battery 
Kullraan, Salz & Co, 106 Battery 
Newmark J P & Co, 214 Cal'a 
Nichols A C & Co, 400 Battery 
Oppenheimer Ivan, 45 Clay 
Platshek & Harris, 314 Battery 
Eogers N, 818 Battery 
Simon & Breslauer, 13 First 
Sloss Louis & Co, 310 Sansome 
Sumner W B& Co, 415 Front 

Hoisting Works— Builders. 

-Etna Iron Works, 217 Fre- 
mont 
Fulton Iron Works, 220 Fre- 
mont 
Golden State and Miners' 

Iron Works, 237 First 
Hawkins William, 210 Beale 
Pacific Iron Works, 127 First 
Reynolds & Rix, 49 Fremont 
Risdon Iron and Locomotive 
Works, S E cor Beale and 
Howard 
Union Iron Works, N E corner 
First and Mission 

Hops. 

Bauer J C & Co, 632 Sacra- 
mento 

Herrmann & Co, 313 Sac'to 

Neis Philip, 409 Front 

Scherr, Bach & Lux, 535 Sac- 
ramento 

Horse Power. Manufactu- 
rers. 

Bodwell H H, 211 Mission 
Jackson & Truman, S E cor 

Sixth & Bluxome 
Krogh F W & Co, 51 Beale 
Tustin W I, 308 Mission 



Horseshoe Nails. 

(See also Hardware.) 

Carolan, Cory & Co, (agents 
Northwestern Horsehoe Nail 
Co) 117 California 

Hose. 

(* Manufacturers. ) 

Berry & Place Machinery Co, 
323 Market 

* Cook A O, 415 Market 

* Cook HN, 405 Market 

* Detrick E & Co, (cotton) 108 

JMarket 

* Goodyear Bubber Co, 577 

Market 
Gregory H P & Co, 2 Cal'a 

* Gutta Percha and Bubber Man- 

ufacturing Co, 501 Market 

* Neville & Co, (cotton) 31 Cal- 

ifornia 

.a., ex oook:, 

415 Market Street, San Francisco, 
LEATHER BELTING, 

Leading and Suction 



Hose Couplings and Nozzles 

Bell John P & Co, 18 Fremont 
Garratt W T, 138 Fremont 
Weed & Kingwell, 125 Fir*t 

Hotels. 

Ahlborn House, 321 Dupont 

American Exchange, 319 San- 
some 

Baldwin, N E cor Market and 
Powell 

Bootz's, 435 Pine 

Brooklyn, 210 Bush 

California, 210 Montg'y Av 

Chicago, 220 Pacific 

Commercial, 130 Montg'y Av 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILIJARD TABLE i 653 & 655 Market St 
MA\ITA<TIREU», \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T. 



Wholesale HARDWARE, 
OILS ANI> PAINTS. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



283 



Franklin, S E cor Sansome and 

Pacific 
Gailhard, 507 Pine 
Golden Eagle, 420 Broadway- 
Grand, S E cor Market and 

New Montgomery 
Hansa, 429 Bush 
Helvetia, 431 Pine 
Hotel Rhein, 909 Kearny 
International, 824 Kearny 
Lick House, S W cor Montgom- 
ery and Sutter 
New Wisconsin, N E cor Pa- 
cific and Montgomery 
Nucleus House, S E cor Market 

and Third 
Occidental, E s Montgomery, 

bet Bush and Sutter 
Overland. House, 531 Sacra- 
mento 
Palace, S W cor Market and 

New Montgomery 
Philadelphia House, 421 Bush 
Prescott House, S W cor Mont- 
gomery Av and Kearny 
RUSS House, W s Montgomery, 

bet Bush and Pine 
What Cheer House, 529 Sacra- 
mento 

House-Smiths. 

Bigelow & Morris, 316 Mis- 
sion 

Jung J C, 110 Main 

Kittredge Jonathan, 18 Fre- 
mont 

Leavitt C H, 225 Beale 

Nutting Calvin & Son, 121 
Fremont 

Sims John R & Son, 123 Beale 

Upstone John, 122 Spear 

Hydraulic Pipe. 

Garratt W T, 138 Fremont 
Hall J V, 214 Beale 
Smith Francis & Co, 130 Beale 
Weed & King well, 125 First 



Ink Manufacturers. 

Pacific Ink Factory, 617 Bran'n 
Patek A, 413 Sixth 
Shattuck & Fletcher, printers', 
520 Commercial 

Insurance Companies. 

California Insurance Co, 318 

California 
Commercial Insurance Co of 

California, 405 California 
Fireman's Fund Insurance Co, 

401 California 
Home Mutual Fire Insurance 

Co, 406 California 
Pacific Mutual Life Insurance 

Co of California, 512 Cal'a 
State Investment and Insurance 

Co, 218 Sansome 
Union Insurance Co, 416 Cal'a 
Western Fire and Marine In- 
surance Co of California, 

409 California 

Irish Flax Threads. 

Barbour's, 511 Market 

Iron and Steel. 

Arnold N S & Co, 319 Califor- 
nia 

Arnold & Flint, 26 Beale 

Baker & Hamilton, 13 Front 

Carolan, Cory & Co, (agents 
Pittsburg Steel Works) 117 
California 

Doble A, 13 Fremont 

Dunham, Carrigan & Co, 107 
Front 

Gibbs George W& Co, 33 Fre- 
mont 

Huntington, Hopkins & Co, 
cor Bush and Market 

Linforth, Rice & Co, (English 
Steel, 323 Market) 

Montague W W & Co, HO 
Battery 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best, 



21 



Wm. B. Hooper i to.{ , ^aW^ T iiSSr , }4a.Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



284 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Morris H D, (agent Sanderson 
Bros Steel Co, and Chester 
Steel Castings Co) 4 Fremont 

.Reynolds L <fc Co, 16 First 

Selby Thomas H & Co, 116 
California 

Van Winkle I S & Co, 413 
Market 

Whitney & Marshall, 22 and 
24 Fremont 

Iron Barrows. 

Upstone John, 122 Spear 

Iron Bedsteads. 

Clark Truman S & Son, 21 New 

Montgomery 
Kuhling A, 549 Fifth 

Iron Doors, Shutters. Etc. 

(See House Smiths.) 

Iron Railing Manufacturers. 

Bigelow & Morris, 316 Mission 

Jung J C, 110 Main 

Sims John R & Son, 123 and 

125 Beale 
Upstone John, 1 22 Spear 

Iron Works. 

.ffitna, Pendergast, Smith & Co, 
217 Fremont 

Architectural Iron Works, 420 
Beale 

Atlas, J B Jardine, 135 Beale 

City, Low & Chartrey, 26 Fre- 
mont 

Columbia, Reese Llewellyn, 133 
Beale 

Empire, Savage & Son, 143 Fre- 
mont 

Eureka, Thompson Bros, 129 
Beale 

Fulton, Hinckley, Spiers & 
Hayes, 220 Fremont 



Golden State and Miners' 
Iron Works, 237 First 

Hawkins William, 210 Beale 

Industrial, McCormick, Lewis 
& Co, 233 Beale 

Jackson, J G lis, 814 Kearny 

Main Street, William Deacon, 
133 Main 

Mechanics,' 217 First 

Metropolitan, Curtis Tobey, 
228 Fremont 

National, Marshutz & Cantrell, 
N W corner Main |and How- 
ard 

Novelty, W E Crist & Co, 215 
First 

Occidental, Steiger & Kerr, 137 
First 

Pacific, Eankin, Brayton & Co, 
127 First 

Pacific Stove and Iron Works 
Co, 228 Main 

Pfeiffer & Petterson, 3 ^.How- 
ard 

Phoenix, Jonathan Kittredge, 
18 Fremont 

Pioneer, C H Leavitt, 225 Beale 

Pioneer, Calving Nutting & 
Son, 121 Fremont 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive 
Works, S E cor Beale and 
Howard, 

San Francisco, Sefrin & Shober, 
203 Fremont 

Tay George H & Co, 616 Bat- 
tery 

Union, Prescott, Scott & Co, 
N E cor First and Mission 

Western, Bigelow & Morris, 316 
Mission 



GOLDEN STATE AND/MINERS' 

MANUFACTURE 

CASTINGS AND MACHINERY 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS. 

237 TO 251 FIBST STBEET, SAN FBANCISOO. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. ^ 



■AjrVfACTV KKKH, ( San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



285 



Jewelry Importers. 

Andrews A, 221 Montgomery 
Braverman Louis & Co, 119 

Montgomery 
Dinkelspiel S. B. & Co, 313 

Bush 
Eisenberg A, 206 Kearny 
Haskell & Muegge, 206 Kearny 
Kahn L & M & Co, 1 26 Kearny 
Levison Bros, 134 Sutter 
Levy John & Co, 118 Sutter 
Lichtenstein M B & Co, 126 

Kearny 
Nast, Greenzweig & Co, 533 

Market 
Pacific Jewelry Co, 6 Battery 
Randolph & Co, 101 Montgom- 
ery 
Sherwood William J, 517 Mont- 
gomery 
Shreve George C. & Co, 110 

Montgomery 
Thompson L, 342 Bush 
Titcomb A C & Co, 24 Post 
Vanderslice & Co, 136 Sutter 
Wolf Joseph, 120 Sutter 
Wolff & Loze, 120 Sutter 
Zacharias L,&Bro, 210 Kearny 

Jewelry Manufacturers. 

Andrews A, 221 Montgomery 
Baehr William, 649 Sacra- 
mento 
Bellemere A, 331 Kearny 
Braverman Louis & Co, 119 

Montgomery 
Bretonnel J V, 328 Bush 
Bujannoff E, 13 Trinity 
Chapman H, 608 Merchant 
Edwards & Son, 618 Merchant 
Elleau H, 208 Sutter 
Hirschman A, 328 Bush 
Koehler & Eitter, 120 Sutter 
Laird D. W., 27 Post 
Levison Bros, 134 Sutter 
Levy John & Co, 1 18 Sutter 
Mathieu & Maison, 15 Trinity 



Miller Louis Jr, 335 Bush 
Morris B & Co, 643 Sacra- 
mento 
Randolph & Co, 101 Mont 
Richter A, 622 Merchant 
Simons Bros & Co, 120 Sutter 
Tuckey Alfred, 13 Trinity 
Vanderslice & Co, 136 Sutter 
Wagner F, 223 Kearny 
Wenzel, Rothschild & Haden- 

feldt, 37 Post 
Weyl J, 110 Sutter 
Wunsch M. & Co, 111 Sutter 

LOUIS BRAVERMAN & CO. 

119 Montgomery St., San Francisco, 
Successors to Braverman & Levy. 
Manufacturing Jewelers and Im- 
porters of Watches, Dia- 
monds, Silverware, 
Clocks, Etc. 

Jewelry Case Makers. 

Lochbaum A H, 134 Sutter 
Muhs A, 208 Sutter 

Lace Manufacturers. 

Lash H, 537 Market 
Muser Bros, 541 Market 

Laces. 

(See also Dry Goods.) , 

Bauer Bros & Co, 547 Market 
Cobliner Bros, 543 Market 
Hoffmann & Co, 17 Battery 
Jones E H & Co, 535 Market 
Muser Bros, 541 Market 
Rosenbaum & Co, 22 Battery 
Sachs, Strassburger & Co, S E 

cor Sansome and Pine 
Schweitzer, Sachs & Co, 29 San- 
some 
Western White Goods Manuf 
Co, 547 Market 

Lamp Manufacturers. 

Boesch Emile, 583 Mission 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO.; 



Tucson <fc Phoenix, A.T., El Paso, 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico, 



f Illuminating Oils. 



286 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Lamps. 

(See also Crockery and Glass 
Ware.) 

Allyne & White, 112 Front 
Dietz A C & Co, 9 Front 
Koster Henry. 410 v Sansome 
Yates & Co, 113 Front 

Lap Boards. 

Hawley C J & Co, (ag'ts Plym- 
outh Lap Board) 215 Sutter 

Last Manufacturers, 

San Francisco Last Factory, 10 
Stevenson 

Wing WH&Co,NE cor Mis- 
sion and Fremont 

Lead Works. 

Selby Smelting and Lead Co, 

416 Montgomery 

Leather. 

Bloch & Davidson, 223 Battery 
Cahen Bros, 41 Clav 
Clayburgh & Nathan, 320 Ba- 

tery 
Cox J W & Co, 1001 Battery 
Danforth & Moore, 8 New 

Montgomery 
Dolliver & Bro, 573 Market 
Frank J & Sons, 406 Battery 
Getleson & Landis, 543 Market 
Hecht Bros & Co, 25 Sansome 
Heinberg B, 303 Battery 
Johnson JC& Co, 12 Pine 
Kullmann, Salz & Co, 106 Bat- 
tery 
Magee & Moore, 513 Market 
Main & Winchester, 214 Bat- 
tery 
Mattern & Moore, (French) 

42 Geary 
Nichols A C & Co, 400 Battery 
Eosseter & Smith, 545 Market 
Rued J C, 119 Clay 
Sloss Louis & Co, 310 Sansome 



Sternfeld Bros & Co, 539 Mar- 
ket 
Stone R, 422 Battery 
Sumner W B & Co, 415 Front 
Williams Bros, 569 Market 

Lime. 

Blochman & Cerf, 10 Drumm 
Davis & Cowell, 211 Drumm 
Holmes H T & Co, 14 Market 

Liquors. 

(See also Wines — Native.) 
Allen D H & Co, 322 Front 
Anduran C & Co, 515 Sacra- 
mento 
Bach, Meese & Co, 321 Mont- 
gomery 
Benhayon &' McGlennon, 623 

Sansome 
Brickwedel Henry & Co, 208 

Front 
Brooks, York & Co, 315 Cal'a 
Buneman H & Co, 321 Battery 
Carroll, Abrams & Carroll, 3 

Front 
Cartan, McCarthy & Co, 511 

Sacramento 
Cassin P J, S W cor Battery 

and Washington 
Chauche A G, 615 Front 
Chevalier F & Co, 520 Wash- 
ington 
Chielovich E & Co, 601 Front 
Commins & O'Connor, 204 Mar- 
ket 
Crane, Hastings & Co, 121 Cali- 
fornia 
Daneri F & Co, 27 California 
Denaveaux & Maisonj N W c r 

Jackson and Sansome 
Dickson, De Wolf & Co, 412 

Battery 
Dodge W W & Co, 401 Front 
Fargo E A & Co, 316 Front 
Fenkhausen & Braunschwei- 

ger, 414 Front 
Fisher W J & Co, 407 Front 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. KSSffS^SK 



653 A 655 Market St. 
San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



CLASSIFIED BtTSINESS DIRECTORY. 



287 



Frapolli & Co, 710 Sansome 
Gilman, Walker & Co, S W cor 

California and Front 
Goodwin M & Co, 407 Battery 
Grange N, 711 Sansome 
Gundlach J & Co, S E cor Mar- 
ket and Second 
Haraszthy Arpad & Co, 530 

Washington 
Hoelscher William & Co, 504 

Market 
Hooper Wm B & Co, 122 Front 
Hotaling A P, 429 Jackson 
Jaujon E A & Co, 430 Jack- 
son 
Kane, O'Leary & Co, 221 Bush 
Kelly & Egan, 604 Battery 
Kelly & Gilchrist, 309 Front 
Kenny John, 605 Front 
Kowalski & Co, 526 California 
Lang & Co, 212 Dupont 
Lilienthal & Co, 100 Front 
Livingston & Co, 220 California 
Loewe Brothers, 217 Battery 
Lyons E G & Co, 506 Jack- 
son 
Mandlebaum F, 312 Sacramento 
Martin E & Co, 408 Front 
Meinecke Charles & Co, 314 

Sacramento 
Moon, Scully & Co, 316 Sacra- 
mento 
Moore, Hunt & Co, 417 Mar- 
ket 
More, Eeynolds & Co, 212 Cali- 
fornia 
Naber, Alfs & Brune, 413 

Front 
Oberfelder Bros & Co, 123 Cali- 
fornia 
Pascal, Dubedat & Co, 426 

Jackson 
Pestner & Hildebrandt, 411 

Battery 
Porter David, 405 Montgomery 
Rebstock, Endres & Co, 322 

Sansome 
Renz J, 219 Commercial 



Richards & Harrison, N W cor 

Sansome and Sacramento 
Roth & Co, 214 Pine 
Ruhl Bros, 522 Montgomery 
Sabatie P G & Co, 330 Bush 
Saulnier John & Co, 607 Front 
Schroder Henry & Co, 619 San- 
some 
Schultz William A, 523 Front 
Schultz & Von Bargen, S E cor 

Front and California 
Shea, Bocqueraz & McKee, S 

W cor Front and Jackson 
Siebe Bros & Plagemann, 328 

Sansome 
Silliman F W & Co, 516 Wash- 
ington 
Spruance, Stanley & Co, 410 

Front 
Sroufe & McCrum, 208 Market 
Taussig Louis & . Co, 205 Bat- 
tery 
Thacher George & Co, 322 

Clay 
Van Bergen N & Co, 413 Clay 
Vignier A, 429 Battery 
Walter M & Co, 625 Sansome 
Ward William & Co, 509 Sacra- 
mento 
Warde M & Co, 313 Battery 
Weil Bros, 213 Jackson 
Wichman & Lutgen, 321 Clay 
Wicker Bros, 702 Front 
Wilhelmi H & Co, 109 Cal'a 
Wilmerding & Co, 214 Front 
Wolters Bros & Co,' 221 Cali. 
fornia 

Lithographers. 

Bancroft A L & Co, 721 Market 
Bosqui E & Co, 523 Clay 
Britton & Rey, 525 Commercial 
Crocker H S & Co, 215 Bush 
Galloway W T, 540 Clay 
Korbel F & Bros, 308 Battery 
Schmidt M & Co, 41 1 Clay and 

412 Commercial 
Waldstein A, 320 Sansome 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO.; 



Tucson & Phrenix, A.T., El Paso 
Tex., and Guaymas, Mexico. 



} Wines of all Kinds. 



SAN FKANCISCO. 



M. SCHMIDT & CO. 

Lithograpliers, Zincoeraphers 

DESIGNERS AND PRINTERS, 

411 Clay and 412 Commercial, 

SAN FRAKCISCO. 

Locks. 

Hall Safe and Lock Co, 211 
California 

Kittredge Jonathan, 18 Fre- 
mont 

Leavitt C H, 225 Beale 

Paige S B & Co, 8 New Mont- 
gomery 

Sims John R & Son, 123 Beale 

Lumber. 

Adams W J, pier, 17 Steuart 
Dean E B & Co, 22 California 
Derby E M, 226 Clay 
Dingley C L, pier 10 Steuart 
Doe Charles F,SW cor Spear 

and Howard 
Dolbeer & Carson, 22 Califor- 
nia 
Falk, Chandler & Co, 128 Steu- 
art , 
Hanson, Ackerson & Co, pier 

11 Steuart 
Harmon SH, pier 13 Steuart 
Hinsdale & Co, 22 California 
Holt Bros, (carriage) 27 Beale 
Hooper C A & Co, cor Fourth 

and Channel 
Hooper F P & J A, pier 2£ 

Steuart 
Jackson J G, pier 4 Steuart 
Kentfield John & Co, pier 9 

Steuart 
Knowles G B, S E cor Mission 

and Main 
Mastick S L & Co, pier 10 Steu- 
art 
Mendocino Lumber Co, 40 Cali- 
fornia 



Morrison JJ, NE cor Mission 
and Spear 

Neylan James, 18 Spear 

Pope & Talbot, 204 California 

Preston & McKinnon, pier 5 
Steuart 

Redwood Lumber Co, 10 Mar- 
ket 

Renton, Holmes & Co, pier 3 
Steuart 

Sierra Lumber Co, N E corner 
Fourth and Channel 

Simpson A M & Bro, 44 Mar- 
ket 

Springer Jason & Co, S E cor 
Spear and Mission 

Starbird & Goldstone, 107 
Market 

Straut W E, (carriage) N W 
cor Sacramento and Drumm 

Tichenor H B & Co, 42 Mar- 
ket 

Turner, Kennedy & Shaw, 
840 Fourth 

Waterhouse & Lester, (car- 
riage) 29 Fremont 

White Bros, (carriage) 1 3 Main 

Wigmore John, (hard wood 
and veneers) 129 Spear 

Winslow William, pier 2 2 Steu- 
art 

S. H. HARMON, 

Lumber Dealer, 
Office, Pier 13, Stewart Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Mills, Gualala, Mendocino County. 

A. M. SIMPSON & BRO. 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

LUMBER, 

44 Market Street, (Junction California) 
Yard, Howard and Beale Street Wharves, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Sam'l Perkins, Agent. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TABLE < 653 & 655 Market St. 
M JLSi UFAOTITRER8, I San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T. 



WHOLESALE 
BOOTS V\l» SHOES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



289 



Macaroni and Vermicelli 
Manufacturers. 

California Italian Paste Co, 415 
Battery 

Ravenna, Ghirardelli & Co, 
421 Battery 

Tenthorey J P & Co, 558 Mis- 
sion 

Machine Works. 

(See also Iron Works.) 

Birch William H, (California) 

H9Beale 
Clot & Meese, 303 Mission 
Goss & Adams 114 Beale 
Hawkins William, 210 Beale 
Heald I A, 514 Commercial 
Hedges & Dillenburg, 32 Fre- 
mont 
Kallenberg Theodore, 32 Fre- 
mont 
Ohmen W H, 109 Beale 
Periam C J, 318 Mission 
Rice H W, 56 Bluxome 
Robbins F A, 7 First 
Small I H, 574 Brannan 
Tait & Hainque, 115 Beale 
Thomson & Evan*, 110 Beale 
Walkington S B, 109 Mission 

Machinery. 

(See also Iron Works, also Ma- 
chine Works, also Mining 
Machinery.) 
Arnold NS& Co, 310 Cal'a 
Baker & Hamilton, 13 Front 
Berry & Place Machinery Co, 

323 Market 
Fish A L, 9 First 
Gregory H P & Co, 2 Cal'a 
Hedges & Dillenburg 32 Fre- 
mont 
Huntington, Hopkins & Co, 

cor Market and Hush 
Marwedel C F, 56 First 
Mc Cone Robert, 403 Beale 



Parke & Lacy, 21 Fremont 
Reynolds & Rix, 49 Fremont 
Steen E T, 107 Beale 
Tatum & Bowen, 12 California 

Machinist's Supplies. 

Berry & Place Manufacturing 

Co, 323 Market 
Dunham, Carrigan & Co, 107 

Front 
Fish A L & Co, 9 First 
Gregory H P & Co, 2 Cal'a 
Marwedel C F, 56 First 
Parke & Lacy, 21 Fremont 
Reynolds & Rix, 49 Fremont 
Savage & Son, 143 Fremont 

Malt Manufacturers. 

Scherr, Bach & Lux, 535 Sac- 
ramento 
Zwieg Hermann, 608 Brannan 

Mantels— Marbleized Iron. 

Montague W W & Co, 112 

Battery 

Map Mounters and Picture 
Framers. 

Walkup W B & Co, 543 Clay 
Ward V & Co, 508 Montg'y 

Match Manufacturers. 

Harrison & Dickson, 210 Sac- 
ramento 

Hofen & Co, 412 Clay 

Newbauer & Co, 206 Sacra- 
mento 

Mathematical Instrument 
Manufacturers. 

Kahn Brod & Co, 335 Bush 
Rahsskopff Carl, 412 Commer- 
cial 
Roach John, 429 Montgomery 
Schmolz William, 420 Montg'y 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm. B. Hooper & Go. 



'^flStSSS&tikSZr-Wm I Bandies at Wholesale. 



290 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Mattress Makers. 

Beal Samuel, 49 Second 
California Furniture Manuf Co, 

226 Bush 
Clark Truman S & Son, 21 New 

Montgomery 
Frank Henry, 212 Commercial 
Jansen Alexander, 48 Second 
Pacific Spring and Mattress 
Manuf Co, 25 New Mont- 
gomery 

Mercantile Agencies. 

Bradstreet (The) Company, 

230 California 
Edwards, Pickens & Fulton, 

401 California 
The Mercantile Agency, 

(Dun's) 320 California 

Metallurgists. 

Bisbee, Williams & Co, 32 

Merchants' Exchange 
California Metallurgical Works, 

"43 Fremont 
Falkenau & Reese, 328 Mont- 
gomery 
Hofmann Bros, 415 Mission 
Johnston William D, 118 Hal- 

leck 
Kuh Leopold, 611 Commercial 
Kustel & Ribtte, 318 Pine 
Luckhardt C A & Co, 23 Ste- 
venson 
Morrow & Strong, 1 1 5 First 
Mosheimer J, 507 Montgomery 
Price Thomas, 524 Sacramento 
Selby Smelting and Lead Co, 

416 Montgomery 
Strong & Co, 10 Stevenson 

Metals. 

(See also Hardware ; also, Iron 
and Steel) 

Pacific Metal Works, Morrow 
& Strong, 115 First 



Military Goods. 

Ettinger S, (trimmings) 105 

Post 
Norcross & Co, 6 Post 
Pasquale B, 650 Washington 
Plate A J & Co, 418 Market 

Mill Supplies. 

(See also Hardware.) 

Berry & Place Machinery Co, 
323 Market 

Egerton Henry C, 109 Cali- 
fornia 

Huntington, Hopkins & Co. 
cor Bush and Market 

Marwedel C F, 56 Kirst 

Wagner Joseph & Co, 105 
Mission 

Millinery Goods. 

Cobliner Bros, 543 Market 
Haker W & Hinz, 545 Market 
Held Bros & Co, 512 Market 
Held & Co, 526 Market 
Toplitz F & Co, 571 Market 

Millwrights. 

Malter, Lind. & Co, 419 Cali- 
fornia 

Wagner Joseph & Co, 105 
Mission 

White, Mee & Patton, 318 
Pine 

Mining and Engineering 
School. 

Van der Naillen A, 24 Post 

Mining Machinery. 

(* Manufacturers. J 

*.ffitna Iron Works, 217 Fre- 
mont 

Berry & Place Machinery Co, 
323 Market 

^California Machine Works, 
119 Beale 



The J. M. Brunswick & Baike Co. &&»»%££S3 



BILLIAKD^ TABLE J 653 «fc 655 Markf t St. 
San Kraucisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., MILL SUPPLIES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIKECTOKY. 



291 



*Fulton Iron Works, 220 

Fremont 
*Golden State and Miners' 

Iron Works, 237 First 
Gregory H P & Co, 2 Cal'a 
*Hawkins William, 210 Beale 
*Hendy Joshua, 49 Fremont 
^Huntington F A, 220 Fre- 
mont 
*Novelty Iron Works, 215 

First 
^Pacific Ironworks, 127 First 
Parke & Lacy, 21 Fremont 
^Reynolds & Rix, 49 Fremont 
*Risdon Iron and Locomotive 

Works, S E cor Beale and 

Howard 
*Savage & Son, 143 Fremont 
*Union Iron Works, N E cor. 

First and Mission 

• 

Mining Supplies. 

Dunham, Carrigan & Co, 107 
Front 

Egerton Henry C, 109 Cal'a 

Huntington, Hopkins & Co, 
cor Bush and Market 

Linforth, Rice & Co, 323 Mar- 
ket 

Reynolds & Rix, 49 Fremont 

Mirrors. 

Gump S & G, 581 Market 
Hausmann Bros, 217 Pine 
Rosenbaum Fr H & Co, 567 

Market 
Sanborn Vail & Co, 857 Mar- 

ket 
Whittier, Fuller & Co,21 Front 

Model Makers. 

Heald 1 A, 514 Commercial 
Howland R, 259 First 
Peterson, L, 328 Bush 

Musical Boxes. 

Juillerat A E, 23 Dupont 



MUSICAL_ BOXES. 
A. E. JUTLLERAT, 

Sole Agent for 
Sf. «T. I»AI I,I,A ICI» «fe CO. 

(Factory, St. Croix, Switzerland:) 
Musical Boxes Carefully Repaired. 

23 DUPONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

« 

Mustard. 

Burr C C & Co, 13 Pine 
Fisher J H, (French and Ger- 
man) 109 Commercial 
Ghirardelli & Danzel, 415 
Jackson 

Needles. 

Doyle Henry & Co, 511 Market 
Mil ward Henry & Sons, 511 
Market 

Notarial and Lodge Seals 
and Steel Stamps. 

Truworthy F M, 318 Front 

Oil. 

(See also Coal Oil, also Paints, 
Oil and Glass.) 

Bay Soap and Candle Co, 

(red oil) 116 Front 

Orrick O S, (lubricating) 403 
Market 

Pacific Oil and Lead Works, 
(linseed and castor) 202 Cal- 
ifornia 

Oil Cloth. 

(* Manufacturers. ) 

*Hartshorn & McPhun, 861 

JVEarket 
Sloane W & J, 525 Market 
Walter D N & E & Co, N W 

cor Battery and Market 

Oil Clothing 

Asher S, 325 Davis 
Marks M, 52 Clay 



GHIRARDELLI S CHOCOLATE The Best 



22 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { 



Tucson & Phoenix, A.T., El Taso, 
Tex., and Uuaymas, Mexico, 



: Lubricating Oils. 



292 



SAN FKANCISCO. 



Sutton Charles Jr & Co, 32 

California 
White James F, 111 Clay 

Optical Instrument Manu- 
facturers. 

Berteling & Watry, 427 Kear- 
ny 
Kahn Brod & Co, 325 Bush 

Roach John, 429 Montgomery 

Ore Concentrating Machin- 
ery. 

Adams & Carter, 109 Cali- 
fornia , 
Hendy Joshua, 49 Fremont 
Steiger & Kerr, 137 First 

Ore Feeders. 

iEtna Iron Works, 217 Fre- 
mont 
Fulton Iron Works, 220 Fre- 
mont 
Golden State and Miners' 

Iron Works, 237 First 
Hendy Joshua, 49 Fremont 
Pacific Iron Works, 127 First 
Risdon Iron and Locomotive 
Works, S E cor Beale and 
Howard 

Ore Furnaces. 

JEtna Iron Works, 217 Fre- 
mont 
Dodge M B, 143 Fremont 
Fulton Iron Works, 220 Fre- 
mont 
Golden State and Miners' 

Iron Works, 237 First 
Pacific Iron Works, 127 First 
Risdon Iron and Locomotive 
Works, S E cor Beale and 
Howard 

Ore Sacks. 

Detrick E & Co, 108 Market 
Hanna J & P N, 308 Davis 



White James F, 111 Clay 
Ore Samplers and Crushers 

Hofmann Bros, 415 Mission 
Luckhardt C A & Co, 23 Ste- 
venson 

Organs. 

(* Manufacturers. ) 

Antisell T M & Co, N W cor 

Powell and Eddy 
Badger WG, 13 Sansome 
Bancroft A L & Co, 721 Mark't 
*Bergstrom John, (church) 

cor Mission and 29th 
Gray Matthias, 117 Post 
Kotiler & Chase, 137 Post 
* Mayer Joseph, 127 Page 
Sherman, Clay & Co, 139 
* Kearny 
Woodworth, Schell & Co, 105 

Stockton 



JOHN BERGSTR0M, 

MANUFACTURES OF 

CHURCH PIPE ORGANS, 

FACTORY, 

Corner of Mission and Twenty-ninth Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Paint Manufacturers. 

California Paint Co, 419 Jack- 
son « 

Orrick O S, 403 Market 

Pacific Oil & Lead Works, 202 
California 

Pacific Rubber Paint Co, 21 
Front 

Whittier, Fuller & Co, 21 
Front 

^•ATEKILL MIXED PA1IT8 

Beady for the Brush and of any Shade or Col- 
or desired. Sample cards and price lists mailed 
free on application to 

O. S. OKRICK, General Agent, 
4<>:J Market Street, San Francisco 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



KILLIAKD TAB LE| 653 & 655 Market St 
MANUFACTl'KUBS, ( San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., General Merchandise. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTOKY. 



293 



Painters' Materials. 

Orrick S, 403 Market 



Er*ATEBILL MIXED RAISTTS 

Ready for the Brush and of any shade or col- 
or desired. Sample cards and price lists mailed 
free on application to 

O. S. ORRICK, General Agent, 
1 «»:* Market Street, San Francisco. 



Paints, Oils and Glass. 

Allyne & White, 112 Front 

Dietz A C & Co, 9 Front 

Hueter Bros & Co, S W cor 
Market and Second 

Kelly James R & Co, 221 Mar- 
ket 

Orrick S, (ag't Averill mixed 
paints) 403 Market 

Whittier, Fuller & Co, 21 
Front 

Yates & Co, 113 Front 

^AVEBILL MIXER PAINTS 

Ready for the Brush and of any shade or col- 
or desired. Sample cards and price lists maiied 
free on application to 

O. 8. ORRICK, General A gent, 
403 Market Street, San Francisco. 



(* Manufacturers.) 
Blake, Robbins & Co, 516 Sac- 
ramento 
Bonestell, Allen & Co, 413 San- 
some 
* California Paper Co, 10 Cal'a 
Frank & Co, 400 Sansome 
Leavitt S B & Co, 526 Sac'to 
Taylor S P & Co, 414 Clay 

Paper Bags. 

(* Manufacturers.) 
Armes & Dallam, 230 Front 
*Blake, Robbins & Co, 516 Sac- 
ramento 
Bonestell, Allen & Co, 413 San- 
some 
*Taylor S P & Co, 414 Clay 

Paper Box Manufacturers. 

Thiebault Carl, 744 Mission 



Waizman M, 539 Market 
Wempe Bros, 569 Market 

Paper Collar Manufacturers 

Atkinson L & Co, 22 Sansome 
New York and S F Collar Co, 

6 Battery 
Wempe Bros, 569 Market 

Paper Hangings. 

Clark George W, 645 Market 
Hartshorn & McPhun, 861 

M^arket 
Walter D N & E & Co, N W 

cor Battery and Market 

Passe Partout Manufactur- 
ers. 

Burkardt Max, 545 Washing- 
ton 
Currier A, 103 Dupont 
Dampf L & Co, 638 Market 

Patent Agents. 

Boone & Osborn, 320 Cali- 
fornia 
Dewey & Co, 202 Sansome 

MINING I SCIENTIFIC PRESS 

American and Foreign 

Patent Agency for the Pacific Coast. 

DEWEY & CO. 

202 Sansome St. San Francisco, Cal. 

Send for Illustrated Guide. 

Perfumery Manufacturers. 

Franco - American Perfumery 
Co, 109 Battery 

Pianos. 

(* Manufacturers.) 

Antisell T M & Co, N W cor 

Powell and Eddy 
Badger W Gr, 13 Sansome 
Bancroft A L & Co, 721 Market 
Benham A M, 647 Market 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best 



WM. B. HOOPER & 



{ u tIx" and GiTa'ymasjMeiiro, 80 '} Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 



294 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Curtaz B, 20 O'Farrell 
Gray M, 117 Post 
*HallCR, 16 Tyler 
Kohler & Chase, 137 Post 
*Long S H, 1815 Washington 
* Eudolf G & Co, 107 Stockton 
Sherman, Clay & Co, 139 

Kearny 
Woodworth, Schell & Co, 105 

Stockton 
*Zech Jacob, 211 Ninth 

o_ :r. hall, 

Manufacturer ot 
ZEPIAINTO FORTSS 

No. 16 Tyler Street, San Francisco. 

Pianos Tuned and Repaired in the Best Manner. 

S. H. LONG, 

Manufacturer of the Celebrated 
HEMME & LONG PIANOS, 

1815 Washington Street, San Francisco. 

Picture Frame Manufact- 
urers. 

Burkardt Max, 545 Wash- 
ington 
Dampf L & Co, 638 Market 
Davis Bros, 718 Market 
Gump S & G, 581 Market 
Hausmann Bros, 217 Pine 
Lippi Bros, 749 Market 
McEachran & Rowe, 132 Main 
McKay & Small, 415 Mission 
Nile M D, S E cor Montgomery 

Av and Chestnut 
Sanborn, Vail & Co, 857 Mar- 
ket 

Pictures. 

Burkardt Max, 545 Wash- 
ington 
Gump S & G, 581 Market 
Sanborn, Vail & Co, 857 Mar- 
ket 

MAX BURKARDT, 

Importer and Manufacturer of 

PICTUSES & FEAMES, PASSE PAETOUTS, ETC. 

545 Washington Street, San Francisco. 



S. & C. GUMP, 

Manufacturers and Importers of 

MIRRORS, WINDOW CORNICES, 

Pictures and Frames, 

Mouldings, Looking-Glass Plates, Etc., Etc. 

581 & 583 Market St., near Second. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Planing Mills. 

Bradbury W B, 556 Brannan 
California Mills, NW cor How- 
ard and Spear 
Fulda Bros & Co, 34 Spear 
Glade F W, 30 Spear 
Hansen M & A, 130 Main 
Hardenburgh Isaac, 134 Main 
Jewell A M & Co, Berry bet 

Third and Fourth 
Macdonald D A & Co, 217 

Spear 
Meeker W A. cor Bryant and 

Fifth 
Washburn Albert, Berry bet 

Fourth and Fifth 
Wells, Eussell & Co, S W cor 

Mission and Fremont 
Wetherbee G M, NW cor Fifth 

and Bryant 

Plumbers' Materials. 

Day Thomas, 122 Sutter 
Dunham, Carrigan & Co, 107 

Front 
Garratt W T, 138 Fremont 
Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson, 

225 Market 
Richards & Snow, 406 Market 
Weed & Kingwell, 125 First 

Pool Tables. 

Liesenfeld P, 945 Folsom 
Strahle Jacob & Co, 533 Mar- 
ket 
The J M Brunswick & Balke 
Co, 653 Market 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Go. 



BILLIARD TABLEf 653 & 655 Market St 
MA»IJFA<n T KKK8, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., IMPORTERS OF TEAS. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



295 



Potteries. 

Gladding, McBean & Co, 1310 

Market 
Owens John B, 24 California 
Stevens WE, N E cor Market 

and Larkin 
Williams J B, 400 Thirteenth, 

Oakland 

Powder Manufacturers. 

California Powder Works, 230 

California 
California Vigorit Powder 
Co, English & Wright ag'ts, 
327 Pine 
Dupont Powder Co, John 

Skinker agent, 115 Pine 
Eureka Powder Co of Califor- 
nia, 310 Pine 
Excelsior Powder Co, 40 Mer- 
chants' Exchange 
Giant Powder Co, (Bandmann, 
Nielsen & Co ag'ts, 210 Front 
Granite Powder Co, 309 Sac'to 
Hazard Powder Co, Thos H 
Selby & Co agents, 116 Cal'a 
Safety Powder Co, 202 Sansome 
Thunder Powder Co, 606 Mont- 
gomery 
Tonite Powder Co, 218 Cal'a 
Union Powder Co, 40 Cal'a 
Vulcan Powder Co, 218 Cal'a 
Warren Powder Co, E H Yates 
agent, 24 Merchants' Exch'ge 

GIANT POWDER COMPANY. 

The Giant Powder is manufactured under 
A. Nobel's Patents covering all Nitro- 
Glycerine Compounds. It is the only Safe, 
and at the same time the Strongest High 
Explosive. Judson Powder is rapidly su- 
perceding ordinary Blasting Powder. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO. 

General Agents. 

Provisions. 

(See also Groceries.) 
Brigham, Whitney & Co, 320 
Front 



Dodge, Sweeney & Co, 114 

Market 
Feiling & Henry, 319 Sac'to 
Getz Bros & Co, 301 Front 
Haight Robert & Co. 226 Front 
Hentrich L, (packers) 513 

Front 
Martin, Feusier & Steffarii, 309 

Clay 
Merry, Faull & Co, (packers) 

125 California 
Michelssen, Brown & Co, 

(packers) 308 Front 
San Francisco Packing . and 

Provision Co, 519 Wash'ton 
Stearns & Smith, 423 Front 
Steele, Elder & Co, 204 Front 
Wieland Bros, 326 Front 
Wilson J Y & Co, (packers) 

508 Market 
Wooster, Hubbell & Co, 317 

Front 

Pumps. 

Bachelder Manf. Co, 13 Fre- 
mont 
Berry & Place Machinery Co, 

323 Market 
Bodwell H H, 211 Mission 
Fulton Iron Works, 220 Fre- 
mont 
Garratt W T, 138 Fremont 
Greenberg & Co, 205 Fremont 
Gregory H P & Co, 2 Cal'a 
Hedges & Dillenburg, 32 Fre- 
mont 
International Water Eleva- 
ting Co, 202 Bush 
Jewell A M & Co, (wooden) 

Berry, bet 3d and 4th 
Krogh F W & Co, 51 Beale 
Linforth, Rice & Co, 323 Mar- 

ket 
Montague W W & Co, HO 

Battery 
Parke & Lacy, 21 Fremont 
Tustin W I, 308 Mission 
Woodin & Little, 109 Pine 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO.{ 1 ^ffiS!S^ T k52sr , '}CioaP8 of all Kinds. 



296 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Quartz Mill Builders. 

*-ffitna Iron Works, 217 Fre- 
mont 
Fulton Iron Works, 220 Fre- 
mont 
Golden State and Miners' 

Iron Works, 237 First 

Huntington F A, 220 Fremont 

Pacific Iron Works, 127 First 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive 

Works, S E cor Beale and 

Howard 

Ranges. 

(See Stoves and Eanges.) 

Reflector Manufacturers. 

Boesch Emile, 583 Mission 

Regalia and Lodge Supplies. 

Norcross & Co, 6 Post 
Pasquale B, 650 Washington 
Plate A J & Co, 418 Market 

A. J. PLATE & CO. 

Manufacturers and Importers of 

Military, Masonic, and Society Goods, 

LODGE SUPPLIES AND REGALIAS. 

Guns, Pistols, and Sporting Goods, 

418 and 420 Market Street, San Francisco. 

Rolling Mills. 

Pacific Rolling Mill Co, 202 
Market 

Rubber Goods. 

Goodyear Rubber Co, 577 Mar- 
ket 
Gregory H P & Co, 2 CaPa 
Gutta Percha and Rubber 
Manuf'g Co, 501 Market 

Rubber Stamp Manufact- 
urers. 

Hanks M W & Co, 34 Mer- 
chant's Exchange 

Klinkner C A & Co, 320 San- 
some 



Oakley A D, 712 Montgomery 
Sheplar S H & Co, 702 Market 
Truworthy F M, 318 Front 

Ruching Manufacturers. 
Muser Bros, 541 Market 
Western White Goods Manu- 
facturing Co, 547 Market 

Safes. 

(* Manufacturers.) 
Bryant & Taylor, 312 California 
'Hall's Safe and Lock Co, 

211 California 
*Kittredge Jonathan, 18 Fre- 
mont 
* Leavitt C H, 225 Beale 
Paige S B & Co, 8 New Mont 
Raymond & Wilshire, 115 

Front 
*Sims John R & Son, 123 
Beale 

Salmon Net Twines. 

Barbour's, 511 Market 

Salt. 

Alvarado Salt Works, Getz 
Bros & Co, agents, 301 Front 

American Salt Co, 217 Sac'to 

Carmen Island Salt Works, 207 
Front 

Pioneer Salt Works, 211 Sac- 
ramento 

Union Pacific Salt Co, 216 
Sacramento 

Saw Manufacturers. 

American Saw Co, 24J Spear 
Pacific Saw Manuf Co, 17 

Fremont 
Spaulding N W, (circular) 17 

Fremont 
Webster W W, 39 J Fremont 

Saw Mill Builders. 

Huntington F A, 220 Fremont 
Small I H, 574 Brannan 



The J. Wl. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TAB L.E( 653 <fefi55 Market St. 
MAlVUFACTVBfiBS, \ San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A.T., MINING SUPPLIES. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



297 



Saw Mill Machinery. 

Berry & Place Machinery Co, 

323 Market 
Gregory H P & Co, 2 Cal'a 
Hendy Joshua, 49 Fremont 

Scales. 

Fairbanks & Hutchinson, 401 

lYT*lT*KPt" 

Parkhurst, VSW, 416 Market 

Screen Manufacturers. 

Quick John W, 32 Fremont 

Scroll Sawyers! 

Kemp J & Co, 109 Mission 

Seeds. 

Vincent Sevin & Co, 607 San- 
some 

Sewer Pipe Manufacturers. 

Gladding, McBean &Co, 1310 
Market 

Owens John B, 24 California 

Stevens W E, N E corner Mar- 
ket and Larkin 

Williams J B, 400 Thirteenth, 
Oakland 

J. 15. WILLIAMS, 

400 to 406 Thirteenth St., Oakland, 

Manufactory, Michigan Bar, Sac'o Co. 

OWNER OF 

Mvel ant Browell Patent Chimneys, 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

Vitrified Iron-Stone Sewer Pipe. 

State and County Rights For Sale. 

Sewing Machines. 

Automatic S M Co, 124 Post 
Davis S M Co, 130 Post 
Domestic S M Co, 29 Post 
Hill Samuel, General Agency 
for the White, New Home, 
Crown, Wilson, Florence, Vic- 
tor, Weed, and other leading 
kinds, 634 Market 



New Eldridge S M Co, 26 New 
Montgomery 

Eemington S M Co, 30 Second 

The Singer Manufacturing 
Co, 116 Sutter 

Wheeler & Wilson Manufactur- 
ing Co, 20 Geary 

Willcox & Gibbs S M Co, 124 

Post 

The "AUTOMATIC" 

Send for Descriptive Circular and 
Price List. 

3 |^k)x & Gibbs, Sewing Mach'e Go. 

124 POST STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Sewing Silk. 

Brown & Metzner, (Corticelli) 

549 Market 
California Silk Manufacturing 

Co, 585 Market 
Carlson & Currier, (Belding 

Bros) 565 Market 

Sheet Iron Pipe. 

Smith, Francis & Co, 130 Beale 

FRANCIS SMITH & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

SHEET IRON PIPE, 

All Sizes. 
No. 180 Beale Street, San Francisco. 
Iron cut, punched and formed, for making 
Pipe on ground where required. All kinds of 
Tools supplied for making Pipe. Estimates 
given when required. Are prepared for coating 
all sizes of Pipes with a composition of Coal 
Tar and Asphaltum. 

Shirt Manufacturers. 

Atkinson L & Co, 22 Sansome 
Jacobs M & Son, 20 Sansome 
Morison, Hutchinson &.Co, 112 

Bush 
Neustadter Bros, N W cor Bat- 
tery and Pine 
Shirek & T^onner, 124 Sansome 
Stolz & Weidenreich, 202 Bush 
Weil, Leiter& Co, 521 Market 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



Wm.B. Hooper&Co. p^MSS^aS^ 



:98 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Shoe Findings. 

Cahn, Nickelsburg & Co, 31 

Battery 
Dolliver & Bro, 573 Market 
Getleson & Landis, 543 Market 
Hecht, Bros & Co, 25 Sansome 
Magee & Moore, 513 Market 
Mattern & Moore, 42 Geary 
Nichols A C & Co, 400 Battery 
Eosseter & Smith, 545 Market 
Williams Bros, 569 Market 

Shoe Nails and Tacks. 

Field A & Sons, 51 1 Market 

Shot Manufacturers. 

Selby Smelting and Lead Co, 
416 Montgomery 

Show Case Manufacturers. 

Ankers C, 937 Market 
Dixon & Bernstein, 250 Market 
Faust J L & Co, 538 California 
Furlong & Manseau, 819 Mar- 
ket 
Miller J M & Son, 545 Cal'a 
Proll William, 537 California 
Teubner& Hoffman, 532 Cal'a 

DIXON Si BERNSTEIN, 

Show Case Manufacturers, 

250 and 252 Market Street, 

12 and 14 Front Street, 

SAN FBANCISCO. 

Silk Manufacturers. 

California Silk Manufacturing 
Co, 585 Market 

Silver Ware. 

(See also Jewelry Importers.) 

Braverman, Louis '& Co, 119 

Montgomery 



Levy John & Co, 118 Sutter 
Randolph & Co, 1 01 Montgom- 
ery 

Silversmiths. 

Koehler & Bitter, 120 Sutter 
Kroger F & Co, 13 Trinity 
Levison Bros, 134 Sutter 
Shulz & Fischer, 513 Market 
Vanderslice & Co, 136 Sutter 

Smelting and Lead Works. 

Selby Smelting and Lead Co, 
416 Montgomery 

Soap Manufacturers. 

Alta Soap Co, 109 Oregon 
Bay Soap and Candle Co, 

(limited) 116 Front 
Bettman M, 311 Commercial 
Commercial Soap Co, 223 Sac- 
ramento 
Houston W J & Co, (agents 

Eoyal Soap Co) 215 Cal'a 
Lucy GR&Co, 123 Cal'a 
Mission Soap & Candle Works, 

108 Bush 
New England Soap Factory, 
cor Sixteenth and Nebraska 
Newell & Bro, 221 Davis 
Petersen William J, 421 Clay 
Pioneer Soap Co, 708 Brannan 
Smith, Lucy & Co, 405 Front 
Standard Soap Co, 204 Sac'to 
Welsh Michael, S W cor Utah 
and El Dorado 

"THE EIGHTH WO.VDEU. ' 

"Thomas' Cool Water Bleaching Soap," 

Also the Largest assortment of 

LAUNDRY AND TOILET SOAPS 

Made in the World by 

THE STANDARD SOAP CO. 

304 Sacramento Street, San Francisco. 

Soda and Saleratus. 

Pacific Soda Co, 767 Bryant 
Tyler SH& Son, 221 Commer- 
cial 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



HADHIFACTUKEUA,! .San Francisco 



!{' 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., ^mdpa^ 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



299 



Spool Cotton. 

Clark George A & Brother, 

oil Market 
Mason John R, (agent John 
Clark Jr & Co, 541 Market 

Spring Beds. 

Clark Truman S & Son, 21 New 
Montgomery 

Nachman A, 77 New Montgom- 
ery 

Pacific Spring and Mattress Co, 
25 New Montgomery 

Stair Builders. 

Hurley D J, 134 Main 

Jesse & Drew, Berry, bet 3d 

and 4th 
Langland N P, 407 Mission 
McGuire, Arthur, 415 Mission 

JESSE & DREW, 

STAIR BUILDERS 

South Point MiU, Berry St., bet. 3rd and 4th. 

Constantly on hand and made to order, 
Stair Rails, Posts, Balusters, etc. Estimates 
made on all kinds of Mill Work. Orders 
from the Country promptly attended to. 

Stair Builders' Stock. 

Wigmore John, 129 Spear 
Starch . 

Buffalo Grape Sugar Starch Co, 

205 Front 
Egerton Henry C, (Duryea's) 

109 California 
Everding J & Co, 48 Clay 
Illinois Starch Co, 215 Cal'a 
Oswego Starch Co, 116 Front 
Titcomb & Co, (Peoria) 203 

Sacramento 

Stationers. 

Bancroft A L & Co, 721 Market 
Carlisle A & Co, 221 Sansome 
Crocker H S & Co, 215 Bush 



Cunningham, Curtiss & Welch, 

327 Sansome 
Denny Edward & Co, 512 Sac- 
ramento 
Dutton & Withington, 306 Cali- 
fornia 
Frank & Co, 400 Sansome 
Hodge John G & Co, 314 Cal'a 
Le Count Bros, 417 Montg'y 
Leary A J, 402 Sansome 
Payot, Upham & Co, 204 San- 
some 
Sadler & Co, 605 Market 
San Francisco News Co, 413 

Washington 
Son Brothers, 300 California 
Stevenson & Longwill, 603 
Market 

Stencil Cutters. 

Hoffmann & Schenk, 414 Sacra- 
mento 
Klinkner C A & Co, 320 San- 
some 
Ridley A E & Co, 323 Front 
Truworthy F M, 318 Front 
Wood George M & Co, 120 
Post 

Stencil and Key Check 
Stock. 



Wood George M & Co, 
Post 



120 



Stoves and Ranges. 

(* Manufacturers. ) 
De La Montanya J, 214 Jackson 
Goodrich Taylor, 254 Market 
Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson, 

225 Market 
*Jewett Sherman S & Co, 120 

Battery 
Montague W W & Co, HO 

Battery 
^Pacific Stove and Iron Works 

Co, 228 Main 
Prag Marten, 125 Clay 



CHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best 



23 



Yiq. B. Hooper & 60. ! T S SS 1 SSfet;TijS£r}4£. Blatz Milwaukee Beer. 



300 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Eay W S & Co, 12 Market 
Savage & Son, 137 Fremont 
*Tay George H & Co, 101 Cal- 
ifornia 

Sugar Refineries. 

American Sugar Eefinery, 208 

California 
California Sugar Refinery, 327 

Market 
Standard Sugar Refinery, 16 

Front 

Surgical and Dental Instru- 
ments. 

Folkers J H A & Bro, 118 

Montgomery 
Will & Finck, 769 Market 

Surveying Instruments. 

Rahsskopff Carl, 412 Commer- 
cial 
Roach John, 429 Montgomery 
Schmolz W, 420 Montgomery 

WILLIAM SCHMOLZ, 

Surveying Instrument Maker, 

No. 420 Montgomery Street, 

San Francisco. 

Personal and Prompt Attention paid to the Re- 
pairing and Adjusting of Instruments. 

Syrups. 

Cahen, Louis & Son 416 Sacra- 
mento 
Jaujou E A & Co, 430 -Jackson 
Lyons E G & Co, 506 Jackson 
McMillan Donald, 714 Front 

Teas. 

(See also Groceries.) 
Bothin, Dallemand & Co, 305 

Front 
Castle Bros & Loupe, (agents 

[cb] Tea) 213 Front 



Folger, Schilling & Co, 104 
California 

Low C Adolphe & Co, 208 
California 

Macondray & Co, 206 Sansome 

Moore L P, (Japan) 412 Sacra- 
mento 

Newton Bros, 204 California 

Siegfried & Brandenstein, 210 
California 

Taber, Harker & Co, 108 Cal'a 

Tents. 

(See Awnings and Tents.) 

Thread. 

Carlson & Currier, 565 Market 
Tin Can and Box Makers. 

Austin B C, 406 Front 
Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson, 

225 Market 
Montague W W & Co, 110 

Battery 
Seller Bros, 422 Sacramento 
Tay George H & Co, 101 Cal'a 

Tobacco. 

Adams Cyrus & Co, (leaf) 417 
Battery 

Armer M & Co, 306 Sacramento 

Bowman John S & Co, 215 Bat- 
tery 

Bremer Joseph & Co, (leaf) 310 
Sacramento 

Buchanan & Lyall, (manufact- 
urers) 315 Battery 

Culp J D & Co, 16 Front 

Dwyer & Cartan, 513 Sacra- 
mento 

Engelbrecht, Fox & Co, 312 
Front 

Esberg, Bachman & Co, 126 
Battery 

Falkenstein & Co, 300 Battery 

Goldberg & Poppe, 410 Sacra- 
mento 



ThB J. HI. Brunswick « BbIKb Co. MAiuFrCTrBSSi^saiFrSS!*' 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Groceries. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



301 



Goslinsky E & Co, 219 Battery 
Harris Bros, 514 Washington 
Klopstock C & Co, 212 Front 
Kohlberg M P & Co, (seed 

leaf) 225 Battery 
Levi H & Co, 113 California 
Lewis, Samuel & Co, 24 Cal'a 
Lewis William & Co, 30 Cal'a 
Liebes Bros & Co, 207 Sacra- 
mento 
Mayrisch, Bros & Co, 405 Bat- 
tery 
Oppenheimer & Bro, 200 Front 
Ordenstein & Co, 306 Battery 
Root & Sanderson, 123 Market 
Bosenbaum A S & Co, (leaf) S 
E cor California and Battery 
Bosenbaum I S & Co, S E cor 

Battery and Clay 
Bosenshine M & Bro, (leaf) 604 

Front 
Sanderson & Horn, 327 Front 
Schoenfeld Jonas, (leaf) 423 

Jackson 
Sideman, Lachman & Mayer, 

(leaf) 209 Battery 
Wellman, Peck A Co, 126 Mar- 
ket 
Wertheimer L & E, 302 Front 
Wertheimer M & Bro, 518 Front 

Tool Makers. 

Doble A, (steel) 13 Fremont 
Kuhling A, 549 Fifth 
San Francisco Tool Co, (ma- 
chine) 21 Stevenson 
Weichhart J, (steel) 143 Beale 

MANUFACTURER OF 

IRON BEDSTEADS 

AND TOOL MAKER, 

549 Fifth Street, San Francisco. 

Moulding, Carving and Turning Tools 
made and repaired. 

Trunk Makers. 

Behrendt H & Co, 107 Sansome 



Fechheimer & Steele, 109 Bat- 
tery 

Truss Manufacturers. 

Beeman William, 424 O'Farrell 
California Elastic Truss Co, 

702 Market 
Folkers J H A & Bro, 118 

Montgomery 
Koehler August, 507 Kearny 
Magnetic Elastic Truss and 

Belt Co, 704 Sacramento 

Twines. 

Doyle Henry & Co, 511 Mark't 

Type Foundries. 

Miller & Eichard, 529 Com- 
mercial 

Pacific Type Foundry, 528 Sac- 
ramento . 

Painter & Co, 510 Clay 

Upholstery Goods. 

(* Manufacturers. ) 
^California Furniture Manuf 

Co, 224 Bush r 

*Ettinger S, 105 Post 
*Fromm & Schaefer, (trim- 
mings) 543 Market 
Heynemann H & Co, 5 San- 
some 
Jansen Alexander, 48 Second 
Marwedel E H, 541 Market 
*Plum Charles M & Co, 641 

jyTo VtCPf 

Sloane W & J, 525 Market 
*Walcom George, 109 Stockton 

ALEX. J^lNSEN, 

Manufacturer and Wholesale Dealer in 

Upholstery, Bedding 

AND 

FEATHERS, 

Nos. 48—54 SECOND STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



GHIRARDELLI'S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HO0reB&C0.i x ^^^^i&^HHuminating0fe 



302 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Upholsterer's Tacks. 

Field A & Sons, 511 Market 
Varnish Manufacturers. 

Hueter Bros & Co, S W cor 
Second and Market 

Veneers and Cabinet Woods. 

Wigmore John, 129 Spear 

Vinegar Manufacturers. 

Cutting Packing Co, 17 Main 
Fisher J H, 109 Commercial 
King, Morse & Co, N W cor 

Broadway and Sansome 
Pacific Vinegar Works, 323 

Front 
Robinson C A, 15 Van Ness Av 
Wangenheim Sol & Co, 118 

Davis 

Wagon Importers. 

Baker & Hamilton, 13 Front 
Davis George A, 327 Market 
Fairbanks & Hutchinson, 401 

Market 
Frank Bros 319 Market 
Hawley David N,SW corner 

Market and Main 
Hawley Marcus C & Co, 301 

Market 
Sanborn A W, 24 Beale 

Wagon Manufacturers. 

(See also Carriage Manufact- 
urers.) 

Farren J W, 121 Beale 
Kerr David, 47 Beale 
Sanborn A W, 24 Beale 

Watch Importers. 

Andrews A, 221 Montgomery 
Braverman Louis & Co, 119 

Montgomery 
Dinkelspiel S B & Co, 313 Bush 
Hall A I & Son, (agents Water- 
bury Watch Co) 585 Market 



Levison Bros, 134 Sutter 
Levy John & Co, 118 Sutter 
Randolph & Co, 101 Montg'y 
Shreve George C & Co, 110 

Montgomery 
Titcomb A C & Co, 24 Post 
Vanderslice & Co, 136 Sutter 

Water Closet Manufactur- 
ers. 

Smith William, (patent) 21 
Montgomery Av 

Water Pipe Manufacturers. 

American Pipe Co, 324 Pine 

Garratt W T, (agent) 138 Fre- 
mont 

Jewell A M & Co, (wooden) 
Berry, bet Third and Fourth 

Smith Francis & Co, (hydrau- 
lic) 130 Beale 

Water Tank Manufacturers 

Bachelder Manufacturing Co, 

13 Fremont 
Bodwell H H, 211 Mission 
Jewell A M & Co, Berry, bet 

Third and Fourth 
Krogh F W & Co, 51 Beale 
Tustin W I, 308 Mission 

Wax Manufacturers. 

Bay Soap and Candle Co, 

(limited) 116 Front 

Wheelbarrow Manufactur- 
ers. 

Upstone John, 122 Spear 

White Lead Works. 

Pacific Oil and Lead Works, 

202 California 
Whittier, Fuller & Co, 21 

Front 

White Oak Timber & Plank. 

Wigmore John, 129 Spear 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. 



BILLIARD TAWLE J 653*655 Market St. 
MLAJ¥UFJLC!TUltEJt»,t San Francisco. 



LORD & WILLIAMS CO., Tucson, A. T., Wholesale Dry Goods. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



303 



Wind-Mill Manufacturers. 

Bachelder Manuf Co, 13 Fre- 
mont 
Bodwell, H H, 211 Mission 
Jackson & Truman, S E cor 

Sixth and Bluxome 
Krogh F W & Co, 51 Beale 
Linforth, Rice & Co, (agents) 

323 Market 
Tustin W I, 308 Mission, 
Woodin & Little, 109 Pine 

Window Shade Manufactur- 
ers. 

Clark George W, 645 Market 
Hartshorn & McPhun, 861 

IVlarket 
Mardwedel E H. 541 Market 
Wohlke F W, (rustic) 413 Mis- 
sion 

Wines— Native. 

(See also Champagne ; also, Liq- 
uors.) 

Bach, Meese&Co, 321 Montg'y 
Dreyfus B & Co, 116 Front 
Gundlach J & Co, S E cor Mar- 
ket and Second 
Kohler& Frohling, 626 Montg'y 
Lachman & Jacobi, S E corner 

First and Market 
Lachman S & Co ? 409 Market 
Lyons E G & Co, 506 Jackson 
Neuman & Putzman, 340 Pine 
Walter, Schilling & Co, N W 
cor Pine and Battery 

CALIFORNIA 

WINES AND BRANDIES. 

J. GUNDLACH & CO. 
WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

WINE VAULTS. 

Corner Market and Second Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Wire Goods. 

California Wire Works Co, 6 

California 
Fuhrman A M, 751 Mission 
Gruenhagen C H, 669 Mission 
Hallidie A S, 6 California 

Wire Manufacturers. 

California Wire Works Co, 6 

California 

Wire Rope. 

California Wire Works Co, 6 

California 
Hallidie A S, 6 California 
Kruse & Euler, (agents English 

wire rope) 209 Front 

Wood Turners. 

Jessie & Drew, Berry, between 

Third and Fourth 
Jewell A M & Co, Berry, bet 

Third and Fourth 
Kemp J & Co, 109 Mission 
Langland N P, 407 Mission 

Wood Working Machinery. 

Parke & Lacy, 21 Fremont 
Small I H, 574 Brannan 

Wooden and Willow Ware. 

Armes & Dallam, 230 Front 
Feigenbaum & Co, 120 San- 
some 
Feldmann L & Co, 315 Sacra- 
mento 
Harrison & Dixon, 210 Sacra- 
mento 
Thibault Frank, 33 Main 
Titcomb & Co, 203 Sacramento 

Woolen Mills. 

Golden Gate, 401 California 
S F Pioneer, 115 Battery 



CHIRARDELLI S CHOCOLATE The Best. 



WM. B. HOOPER & CO. { T ^f„?o-J^ T 3i2ySr-} Wines of all Kinds. 



304 SAN FKANCISCO. 



Yeast Powders. 

Adelsdorfer & Co, 406 Clay 
Barton B F & Co, (Peerless) 

211 Sacramento 
Burr C & Co, 13 Pine 
Callaghan D & Co, 119 Front 
Hanly G T & Co, 214 Sac'to 
Levi H & Co, (Good as Gold.) 

113 California 
Tyler S H & Son, 221 Commer- 
cial 



Zincographers. 

Schmidt M & Co, 411 Clay 
M. SCHMIDT & CO. 

Lithographers, Zincocraphers 

DESIGNERS 

AND 

PRINTERS, 

412 Commercial St. and 411 Clay St. 



SEWI1TC MACHINES! 



GENERAL AGENCY FOR THE 

"White, ISTew Home, Crown, "Wilson, 
Florence, "Victor, "Weed, 

-AJNTID OTHER. IiBA.3DI3SrO- TZXTST1DS. 

C. Howard & Co's Needles for all Machines. Genuine Attachments, 
Parts, Oil, Etc. 

Send for circulars and bed-rock prices. Liberal terms. Exclusive territory 

to dealers. 

SAMUEL HILL, General Dealer, 

Opposite Palace Hotel, 634 Market Street, San Francisco. 



The J. M. Brunswick & Balke Co. *K£$ns*323£i 



BILLIAltn TABLE (653 & 655 Market St 
MASUFACTIIRER8, \ San Francisco. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



305 



Huntington's 

OSCILLATING STAMP MILL. 




It has no Stems, Cams or Tappets, and Adjusts Itself to the "Wear of 
the Shoes and Dies. 



For Simplicity, Economy, Durability and Effective Working, it exceeds anything ever 
presented to the public, and will do the work of five stamps with one-fourth the power. 

The Mill can be seen in operation at the New York Metallurgical Works, 104 and 106 
Washington Street, New l'ork. Manufactured by 

FRASER V CHALMERS, 

145 Fulton Street, Chicago, Ills. 



Price, 900-Pound Hammer, 
- Double Mills, - 

Price, 1200-Pound Hammer, 
' ' Double Mills, - 



$ 500 

950 

- n00 

1150 



Weight, 



3600 lbs 
6700 " 
5000 " 
9500 " 



Send for Circulars and Testimonials. 

8HINGLE MACHINES AND SAW MILL MACHINERY, STEAM ENGINES, ETC., TO 

ORDER. MINING MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS. 

ft I, HUHTIHBTOH, 



220 Fremont Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



® 



SANDERSON BROS.' STEEL CO. 

SWEET'S MANUFACTURING CO. 

FORT PLAIN SPRING AND AXLE WORKS. 

CHESTER STEEL CASTINGS CO. 

4 and 6 Fremont Street, corner Market, San Francisco. 



24 



306 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



THE WAUGAMAN 




C.J.&E.T. BARBER 

PROPRIETORS 

No. 2 Summer Street, 

Off Montgomery, bet. California & Pine, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



This machine weighs 150 lbs., has a capacity of two tons an hour, and is 
guaranteed to save 95 per cent, of the gold. One man is required to turn the 
crank, and three others to feed and prepare ground. It is a perfect Dry Metal 
Concentrator. 

PRICE, $200. 

SKND FOR CUfcCULAHS. 

CAROLAN, CORY & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF 

HARDWARE, IRON, AND STEEL, 

AGENTS FOR 

Pittsburg Steel Works, North Western Horse Shoe Nails, 
and Glidden's Barb Fence Wire, 

117 AND 119 CALIFORNIA STREET AND 120 AND 122 FRONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

JOHN S. OWENS, 

AGENT FOR THE 

San Francisco Sewer Pipe Association, 

DEALERS IN 

VITRIFIED IRON STONE SEWER PIPE, 

TERRA-COTTA CHIMNEY TOPS AND PIPE, 

Stone and Earthen Ware, Vases, Flower Pots, Fire Brick and 

Tile, Fire Clay, Etc. 

22 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 307 

GOLDEN STATE AND MINERS' 

IRON "WORKS 

MANUFACTURE 

CABVIHM AITO HAtHDnHKY 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Mining and Milling Machinery a Specialty- 

237 TO 251 FIRST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

JOS. WAGNER % CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

French Burr Mill-Stones & Portable Hills 

105 AND 107 MISSION STREET, S. F. 



Dufour & Cos Celebrated Dutch Anchor Bolting Cloths. 

BOLTING CLOTHS MADE UP. 
Mills Built by Contract or Day Work. 

Eureka Smut Machines, Bran Dusters, Middlings Purifiers, Porcelain and Iron 
Rolls, Bran and Flour Packers, Mill Irons, Spindles, Bails, Regulating Screws, 
Drivers, Steps, Pulleys, Silent Feeders, Proof Staffs, Hoisting Screws, Bails and 
Pins, Conveyor Flights, Plaster, Rubber and Leather Belting, etc. 

Mill Picks, Mill Picks Dressed, Mill Stones Repaired, Rebuilt or Balanced. 

Plans i rawn and Specifications Made for Parties Wishing to Build Mills. 

CHARLES F. DOE, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

LUMBER DEALER, 

Cor. Spear and Howard Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

(FREE DELIVERY ON CARS.) 



308 SAN FRANCISCO. 



RANDOLPH & CO. 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

AND IMPORTERS, 

101 and 103 Montgomery Street (Corner oi Sutter). 
GOODS SENT TO ALL PARTS OF THE COAST. 

B. NATHAN. F. DOHRMANN. 

B. 1TATHAXT <& CO. 

IMPORTERS OF 

FB^W©li ©Hllfik, 

CROCKERY, GLASS AND PLATED WARE, 

Clocks, Bronzes, Glass Shades, Lamps, Etc. 

130 SUTTER STREET, 

Between Kearny and Montgomery, SAN FRANCISCO. 

for wmmm hats 

GO TO 

M. MET7SSDORFFER, 

MANUFACTURER AND IMPORTER OF 

♦•HATS AND HAT MATERIALS* 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 

N. E. Corner Montgomery and Bush Streets, 

BRANCH, 402 KEARNY STREET, 
Factory, 416 Market Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



309 



JOHN WIGMORE, 



IMPORTER AND DEALER IN 



Hardwood Lumber and Veneers 



Black Walnut, 

Maple.Cherry.Whitkwood, 

White Holly, 

Ash, Hickory and Oak. 



Counter Tops, 

Mahogany Curriers' Tables, 

Balusters and Newels, 

French and American Veneers, 

Scroll Stock and Dowels. 



Mahogany, 

Spanish Cedar, Primavera, 

Toa and Tamano 

In Logs and Lumber. 



White Oak Timber and Plank for Ship, Railroad, 
and Mill Work. 

Rosewood, Satinwood, Boxwood, Ebony, Tulip, 
Lignum Vit^e, Mesquit and Linaloa. 

Nos. 129, 131, 133, and 135 Spear Street, near Howard, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



JOHN WIGMORE, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



ALPHONSO A. WIGMORE, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



^Established, ---------- 1853. 

E. G. I/STOITS <& CO. 

wnfM ira UQtroM 

DISTILLERS AND MANUFACTURERS OP 

SYRUPS, CORDIALS, ESSENCES, ETC., ETC. 

Constantly on Hand, Imported and Native Wines. 
506 JACKSON STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 




MANUFACTURER OF THE BEST 



IMPROVED 



rniA 



OFFICE AND ADDRESS : 

9 Geary Street, Junction of Market and Kearny, San Francisco. 



310 SAN FRANCISCO. 



JNO. LEVY & CO. 

(Of the late firm of Braverman <fe Levy.) 

118 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Importers and Dealers in 

FINE JEWELRY, DIAMONDS 

AND OTHER PRECIOUS STONES, 

STERLING SILVERWARE, WATCHES, FRENCH CLOCKS, ETC. 

Jewelry manufactured from original designs, furnished on application. 
Diamond Setting and Watch repairing a specialty. 

All Goods marked in Plain Figures from which there will be no deviation. 
SAN FRANCISCO CORDAGE FACTORY. 

Constantly on hand a Large and Complete Assortment of 

Manila and Sisal Cordage, 

(Bkle f(ope, ¥ki¥e<l ^Ikqilk IJope, ^Iir|in^ f{ope$. 



611 and 613 FRONT STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 

JOBI UPST0I1. 



Manufacturer of Fire-Proof 



DOORS AND SHUTTERS 

Bank Vaults, Balconies, Gratings, Iron Fence, Prison 

Cells, Awnings, Stairs, Safes, Girders, Etc. 

And Champion T Metallic Wheelbarrow, Patented August 20, 1878 



Constantly on hand a Large Assortment of 

Second-Bud Fite-Pnof Sons u£ Shutters 



122 Spear Street, bet. Mission and Howard, San Francisco 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 311 

W. T. GARRATT, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Hooker's Gelebrated Steam Pump 

AND 

Double Acting Suction and Force Pump, 

Garratt's Jackhead Miners' Pump, 
BRASS AND BELL FOUNDRY 

AND MACHINE WORKS. 

A Large Supply of Engineers' Fittings of All Kinds. 

IMPORTER OF IRON PIPE AND MALLEABLE IRON FITTINGS, 

ROOT'S BLOWERS AND FORGES, 

Hydraulic Pipes and Nozzles for Mining Purposes. 

Cor. Fremont and Natoma Sts. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

F. B. MORROW. N. R. STRONG. 

PACIFIC METAL WORKS, 

Importers and Manufacturers of Metals, 

BAR AND WIPING SOLDER, 

BAR LEAD, BAR TIN, AND BABBITT METALS OF ALL 

GRADES, PIG LEAD, TIN, ANTIMONY, AND ZINC. 

Nos. 115 AND 117 FIRST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

PRESTON & McKINNON, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

DEALERS IN LUMBER. 

Cargoes of Pine or Red Wood Furnished to Order. 
Pier No. 5, Steuart Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 

O. J. Prestom. J. J. MoKinnon. 



312 SAN FRANCISCO. 



ATTENTION, COLD MZXTSB.S 

Working Placer Gravel, and Quartz Mines. 

GOLD SAVED 

BY USING 

Silver Plated Amalgamating Plates. 

I will warrant my Plates to save a much larger percentage of Gold than by any other 

method. Swing and Riffle Plates for saving Float Gold made to order. Old mining plates 

bought, taken in exchange for new, or replated. These plates will save in a few days a per 

centage of Gold over any other process, more than sufficient to pay for the cost of the plates. 

Send for Circular. 

Pacific Bi, Silver aM Nickel Plating; Worts, 

41 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cat. 

W. E. SHEPMAN, PROPRIETOR. 
RENTON, HOLMES & CO. 

&IMB1B llAUISi 

SPARS AND PILES CONSTANTLY ON HARD. 

Office, 3?ier 3, Stexiart Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Office of the Port Blakely Steam Saw Mill, Puget Sound. 

CARGOES FURNISHED TO ORDER. 

iilEI F. WBIVH, 

Ill CLAY AND 112 COMMERCIAL STREETS, 

DEALER IN 

TENTS AND AWNINGS, 

Grain Bags, ORE and Flour Sacks. 

Second-hand Grrain Bags a Specialty. 

Burlaps, Duck, Canvas, Bag and Seine Twine, Rubber and Oil Clothing. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



313 



2ETNA IRON WORKS 

PEKDERGAST, SMITH & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

IRON CASTINGS AND MACHINERY 

OF ALL KINDS. 

217, 219 and 221 Fremont Street, 

Between Howard and Folsom, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Geo. T. Shaw. 



John F. Kennedy. 



A. J . Turneb. 



TURNER, KENNEDY & SHAW, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



Laths, Shingles, Etc Also Doors, Sash, and Blinds. 

FOURTH, CHANNEL, AND BERRY STREETS. 

(At the Drawbridge.) 

Yards connect direct with the C. P. and S. P. R. R. Also with the Shipping, 

P. O. ADDRESS, 840 FOURTH STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 




J. B. WILLIAMS, 

400-406 Thirteenth Street, Oakland. 

MANUFACTORY, 

Michigan Bar, Sacramento County, Oal. 

Browell & Nativel Patent GMmneys 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

Vitrified Iron Stone Sewer Pipe, Stone Ware, 
Flower Pot:, and Terra-Cotta Chimney Tops. 

BROWELL'S PATENT CHIMNEYS 

Are the only Chimneys where Bands and Fill- 
ing can be used to make a Smoke and Air-Tight 
Joint, and with iron rods or strapped to the 
building, 

The U. S. Circuit Court has granted a per- 
petual injunction against L. E. Clawson and 
Jos. S. Brown. All persons are cautioned 
against using any improvement in Sectional 
Chimneys patented by J. Browell. 

Browell's Patent Chimneys can be placed 
in any part of the house, or attached to the out- 
side of any building, with perfect safety. 

They are now in use in the best buildings of 
San Francisco and Oakland, and have been 
highly approved and recommended by the 
Board of Supervisors, and by the leading 
architects of the State. 

They are made of Fire Clay, without brick or 
mortar. No decay to them, no danger, no re- 
pairing, no dirt, no trouble, perfect ventilation, 
and are cheap, light, and portable; are Fire and 
Earthquake proof. 

State and County Rights for Sale. 



314 SAN FRANCISCO. 




RUSSELL'S AMALGAMATOR, 

FOR 

QUARTZ MILLS, BLACK SANDS, TAILINGS, GRAVEL, ETC. 

SAVES YOUR GOLD, AMALGAM, AND QUICKSILVER. 

First Premium and Medal awarded for best Amalgamators (Russell's Patent) 
at Mechanics Fair, San Francisco, 1880. 

Demand Increasing, with General Satisfaction. Send for Circular and Price List. 

E. F. RUSSELL & CO. 

638% Mission Street, San Francisco. 

WEED & KINGWELL, 

California Brass Works, 

No. 125 First Street, (opp. Minna) San Francisco, 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

Brass, Composition, Zinc, and Babbitt 

Metal Castings, 
CHURCH AND STEAMBOAT BELLS. 

ALSO A FULL ASSORTMENT OF 

Steam and Water Cocks and Valves, Hydraulic Pipes, 
Nozzles and Hose Couplings, Etc., Etc. 

BRASS SHIP WORK, SPIKES, SHEATHING NAILS, RUDDER BRACES, ETC. 
Agents for Siebert's Eureka Lubricator. 

TET7SXTEB. <& HOFFMAN, 

ENTIRE NE^VV «TYLE OE 

■1141 BIOW €ASM t 

532 California Sireei, San Francisco. 

MAGIC SHOW CASE DOOR SPRINGS. 

A large assortment of Silver, White Metal, and Wood Show Cases of the 
latest improved patterns, constantly oil hand. Old Show Cases taken in ex- 
change. Orders by mail promptly attended to. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



315 




SAVE MONEY 

By purchasing the California 
Wind Engine. This mill has no 
equal in the market. Do not fail 
to see it, and be convinced. 
Cheap, simple, compact, durable, 
strong, powerful, adjustable, au- 
tomatic, anti-friction, self-regulat- 
ing, noiseless, ornamental, giving 
a perpendicular stroke to the pis- 
ton, which is a very essential point 
in a mill. 

The proprietor challenges com- 
petition on any or all of the above 
enumerated qualities of a Wind 
Engine. Price, 10-ft. wheel, $75 ; 
12 ft., $85 ; U ft., $100. 

Steel pin for connecting rods, 
with oil founts. The stroke is 
adjustable. Axle, wrought iron, 
running in Babbited Box and 
Bedded in Oil. Will not blow down. 



Address, 

JACKSON & TRUMAN, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Manufacturers of WINDMILLS, JACKSON'S SELF 
FEEDERS, Derrick Forks, Threshing Machines, Steam 
Engines, Etc. 




PARKE & LACY, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

Mining and Wood Working Machinery. 

21 and 23 FREMONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 







SAW MANUFACTURING 





C. P. Sheffield, N. W. Spaulding, J. Patterson. 

PACIFIC SAW MANUFACTURINa CO. 

17 and 19 Fremont Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Saws of Every Description on hand and 
Made to Order. 

AGENTS FOR C. B, PAUL'S FILES. 

Repairing of all kinds done at short notice. 



316 SAN FRANCISCO. 



SILVER-PLATED 

AMALGAMATING PLATES, 

FOR SAVING GOLD, 
USED IN QUARTZ, GRAVEL, AND PLACER MINING, 

In any Size or Quantity, Furnished to Order. 

The Best Process Yet Discovered for Saving Fine Gold. 

GOLD, SILVER, NICKEL, AND COPPER PLATING ON ALL METALS. 

New Plated Goods and Cutlery at Factory Prices. Old Table Ware 
Repaired and Re-plated. 

San Francisco Plating Works, 

653 AND 655 MISSION STREET. 

E. G. DENNISTON, Proprietor. 

GLADDIHG, McBEA.1T A CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 



Terra-Cotta Chimney Tops and Pipe, Fire Brick, Fire Clay, Etc. 

1310 to 1316 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Manufactory at Lincoln, Placer Co., Cal. 

Engine and Machine Works, 

W. H. OHMEN, Proprietor, 
109 and 111 BEALE STREET, 

^ear Mission Street, - SAN FRANCISCO. 

Upright and Horizontal Engines and Boilers a Specialty. 

REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



31T 



$1,000 CHALLENGE 




THE FRUE ORE CONCENTRATOR. 

Over 250 are now in use, giving entire satisfaction. Awarded First Premium and Silver 
Medal at the Industrial Fair for 1880 of the Mechanics' Institute of San Francisco, Oal. 

Saves from 50 to 100 per cent, more than any other Concentrator in use, and the concen- 
trations are clean from the first working. The wear and tear are merely nominal ; the water 
required is less than in any other wet Concentrator ; the power required per machine is less 
than one-half horse power ; the labor required is light, one man on a watch can attend to 
sixteen machines. 

We challenge any other Concentrator in use for a fair and impartial competitive trial, 
side by side, for stakes of $1000 each, and we mean business. 



I 4k CAMfHBi Aeenta* 

Room 7, No. 109 California Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 



(LIMITED) 

Manufacturers of Bay Diamond "Wax, Bay Mining Wax, Bay Solar, 

Stearic Acid, Navy, Coach and Hotel 

CANDLES OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

ALSO, ALL KINDS OF 

FAMILY AND TOILET SOAPS, GLYCERINE, SAPONIFIED RED OIL 

Office, 116 Front Street, between Pine and California, San Francisco. 

Factory, M Street, from 6th to 7th Avenues, South San Francisco. 




1: 



MANUFACTURER OF 
AND ALL KINDS OF 

LADIES' DRESS TRIMMINGS, 

Upholstery and Military Trimmings, Etc. 

105 POST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



318 SAN FRANCISCO. 



"HOTEL DEL MONTE," 

MONTEREY, CAL. 

THE MOST CHARMING 

Summer and Winter Resort 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST, 

IS OPEN ALL THE YEAR ROUUD, 

For the reception of permanent guests and transient seekers 
after recreation and health. 

The Magnificent "Hotel del Monte" 

Is about four hours by rail from San Francisco, and 
is reached by the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD, 

(northern division) 

Via SAN FRANCISCO AND SAN JOSE. 

The " Hotel del Monte " is one of the most elegant seaside establish- 
ments in the world, and is handsomely furnished throughout, and provided 
with all modern improvements, such as hot and cold water, gas, etc., etc. It 
is picturesquely situated in a grove of 126 acres of oak, pine, spruce, and 
cypress trees, and is within a quarter of a mile of the beach, which is un- 
rivalled for bathing purposes. 

There are many beautiful drives to places of great interest, such as 
Cypress Point, Carmel Mission, Point Lobos, etc. 

THE BATHING ESTABLISHMENT IS UNSURPASSED. 

SPACIOUS SWIMMING TANK, 

(150x50 feet) for Warm Salt "Water Plunge and Swimming Baths. 

ELEGANT ROOMS FOR INDIVIDUAL BATHS, WITH DOUCHE 
AND SHOWER FACILITIES. 

Magnificent Beach of Pure White Sand for Surf Bathing, Etc., Etc. 
GEO. SCHONEWALD, MANAGER, ■ 

[B^~ See Other Paoe.] MONTEREY, CAL. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT, 



319 



THE 



CLIMATE AHD HEALTHFULHESS 



•OF- 



MONTEREY 

THE 

Most Delightful Summer Pleasure Resort 

♦ AND 

WINTER SANITAEIUM 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 

The weather at Monterey is not so warm either in summer or winter as in 
other parts of California further south, but there is an even temperature that 
can be found nowhere else. From January to December, year in and year out, 
there is neither summer nor winter weather. Indeed, the weather at Mon- 
terey, from one year's end to another, partakes of that delightful interlude 
known in the East and South as "Indian Summer." The same balmy 
zephyrs breathe a delicious atmosphere all the year round, and summer and. 
winter, so-called, serenely face each other and exchange compliments. 

It will be seen by the annexed table that Monterey has only one rival 
(Honolulu) in equability of temperature. It must be understood, however, 
that there is a good deal of hot, disagreeable weather on the islands, and a 
multiplicity of drawbacks which Monterey does not possess. There are seldom 
any high, cold winds at and around Monterey, and never any hot ones. 

The following carefully prepared table presents the 

Average Temperature of Monterey 

AND 

Many other Health Resorts Throughout the World.' 



PLACE. 



MONTEREY. 

San Francisco. 
Ix)s Angeles . . 
Santa Barbara. 
San Diego .... 
Santa Monica. 
Sacramento. . . 

Stockton 

Vallejo 

Fort Yuma . . . 
Cincinnati. . . . 



Jan. 



Degs. 
52 
49 
55 
56 
57 
58 
45 
49 
48 
56 
30 



July. 



Degs. 
58 
37 
67 
66 

.65 
65 
73 
72 
67 
92 
74 



Diff. 



Degs 

6 

8 

12 

10 

8 

7 

28 

23 

19 

36 

44 



Latitude. 



Deg. 
36 
37 
34 
34 
32 
34 
38 
37 
38 
32 
39 



Min. 

36 

48 

04 

24 

41 

00 

34 

56 

05 

43 

06 



PLACE. 



New York . . . 
New Orleans. 

Naples 

Honolulu 

Funchal 

Men tone 

Genoa 

City of Mexico 
Jacksonville . . 
St. Augustine. 
Santa Cruz . . . 



Jan. 



Degs. 
31 
55 
46 
71 
60 
40 
46 
52 
58 
59 
50 



July. 



Degs. 
77 
82 
76 
77 
70 
73 
77 
63 
80 
77 
60 



Diff. 



Degs. 
46 
27 
30 
6 
10 
33 
31 
11 
22 
18 
10 



Latitude. 



Deg. Min. 

40 37 

29 57 

4 52 



16 



21 

32 38 

43 71 

44 24 
19 26 
30 50 
30 05 
37 00 



320 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



TUSTIN'S PATENT FIRST PREMIUM 

(ILLS MB BOBSB-FOWI 



RS. 




THE DAIRY QUEEN 




THE ECONOMY, fop I Horse. 




THE ECLIPSE, for I Horse. 

«^9 




THE ECONOMY, for I or 2 Horses 



P 

o 

•H 

O 

u 

0) 




W. I. TUSTIN, Patentee and Sole Proprietor. 

FACTORY AND OFFICE, 308 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



321 



L. P. DECEIT, 



MANUFACTURER OF 




FINEST LACING. 

CUT STRINGS OR SIDES 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

No. 13 Fremont Street, 

Neap Market, SAN FRANCISCO. 



NO Main Street, bet. Mission and Howard, 

Blacksmith and Shutter Maker, 

Hoiase Smith. ^Work. 
ALSO, SHEET IRON WORK OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS. 

Railings, Safes, Awnings, Vaults ; Tanks for Sugar, Water, Soap, Etc. 

Chely's Machine for Putting Corks in Bottles a Specialty. 



OTTO E. KUNZE, 

PROPRIETOR O 17 BRUSH 
OF THE U. JL FACTORY, 

Manufacturer and Importer of 

Brushes, Brooms, and Feather Dusters 

OP EVERT DESCRIPTION, 

646 MISSION STREET, 

Bet. Third and Hex Montg'y, San Francisco, 

Formerly 260 Third Street. 



L. PETERSON, 
MODEL MAKER, 

Models for tlie Patent Office 

in Wood or Metal, a Specialty* 
338 BUSH STREET, 

SAN FEANCISCO. 

Emblematic Signs, and all kinds of Tin, 
Copper, and Brass Work Made to Order. 



25 



322 SAN FRANCISCO. 



JOHN D. YOST. H. S. CROCKER. 

H. S. CROCKER & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

iTATIONEH 1 

LITHOGRAPHERS, 

AND 

^PRINTERS^ 



7T7Z.Z. LINE OF STATIONERY. 

NEWS, POSTER, AND BOOK PAPERS. 

Straw and Manila Wrapping Papers. 



A. PULL LINE OF 



PRINTERS' CARDS AND PAPERS 

Always in Stock. 



EL S. CROCKER & CO. 
215, 217, 219 BUSH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 323 

IMPORTANT TO MINERS! 

A NEW KIND OF 

DR7 GOLD SEPARATOR 

HAS BEEN INVENTED, AND PATENT APPLIED FOR. 

After experimenting with and improving this machine for nearly twelve 
months, it has now been thoroughly tested by some of the best experts from 
the dry gold fields of Arizona, and pronounced by all at every test to be the 
best machine yet known, inasmuch as it has a large capacity and two different 
currents of air— one to agitate the material and the other to carry off the dross 
while the gold is being separated ; by this means it cleans out and separates 
one-half more material than any other machine of the same size, at the same 
time saving every speck of gold that may exist in sand or gravel, such as that 
found at Mammoth Station, Mesquite, Casa Grande, and elsewhere. A sample 
of gold has been sent here to parties in San Francisco, who bought one of 
these machines ; they thoroughly examined it before buying, and have as 
thoroughly tested it by subsequent use. The result of one test sent on by ex- 
press was $5.56, from 600 pounds of material, which came from these mines or 
claims and separated by this machine. These machines are now a perfect 
success, and a number ordered to be made at once. 

The Construction of the Machine is as follows : 

It has a good solid frame, bolted together with rods, and can be readily 
taken apart and put together. The combination is a fan, with a bottom and 
top-bellows of leather, the latter forming an adjustable riffle box combined 
with an apron, so as to regulate the two currents of air while working the 
different kinds of dirt. 

CAPACITY, 30 TO 40 TONS PER DAY OF 10 HOURS, 

according to the kind and nature of the soil. ' Dry sulphuret concentration is 
also combined in this machine. An adjustable round belt runs the whole ma- 
chine. No cogs or cast iron work to break or wear out. 

Parties wishing to send us some dirt, we will run it through the machine 
and let them know the result. 

fhicss heduced. 

All machines complete with fan, top and bottom-bellows. 

No. I, Weight 60 pounds, - - - Price $ 50.00 
No. 2, " 150 ... . " 100.00 

No. 3, " 280 " ..." 175.00 

Larger Machines, to run with Steam or Horse Power. Prices in Proportion. 

JAS. HARHIS <fi CO. 

308 MISSION STREET, CORNER OF BEALE, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



324 SAN FRANCISCO. 



HENRY C. EGERTON, 



IMPORTER AND BUYER 



MILLAND MINE SUPPLIES 



AND RECEIVER OF 



Ores, Bullion and Gold Dust. 

AL80 AGENT 

Duryea's Celebrated Starch and Maizena 

109 CALIFORNIA STREET, 
San francisco. 

ADOLF HOFMANU. OTTOKAR HOFMANN. 

HOFMANN BROTHERS, 



Crushing and Pulverizing "Works, 

ESTABLI§HED I IV 1862. 

415 Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal, 

BT" SAMPLES FURNISHED IN SEALED BOTTLES ONLY !. 



Importer and Dealer in 



SA1MAJ1 Q««"» 




i"3 




JJ 



265 STEVENSON STREET, 
Between Third and Fourth Streets, San Francisco. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 325 



IN 



i@mt&©^m ©alii @>&>m£&< 



The attention of all heads of families or others contemplating going West is called to the 
extraordinary offers now being made by the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD CO. 

IN THEIR 8ALES OF CHOICE FARMING AND FRUIT AND VINEYARD LANDS, 
LYING ADJACENT TO THE RAILROAD in Stanislaus, Merced, Fresno, Tulare, Kern, 
Los Angeles, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Benito, Monterey, and Santa Clara Counties, 
which are unexcelled in Climate, Healthfulness, Productiveness of Soil, and Ac- 
cessibility to Market, and include the 

BEST WHEAT, FRUIT, GRAZING, VINEYARD, AND TIMBER 
LANDS IN AMERICA, 

And are adapted to all purposes of profitable agriculture, and may be had in tracts of 40 
acres or upward at prices ranging from $2.50 to $20 per acre, according to quality, location, 
and accessibility to the main line of road. 

Thesa lands will increase in value annually. Already thousands of heads of families 
have purchased lands along the Southern Pacific Railroad, and have erected thereon splendid 
farms and homesteads, while many hold lands that they purchased a few years ago for from 
$2.50 to $20 per acre at from $25 to $150 per acre, for speculative purposes. 

Almost everywhere throughout the counties above named, no snow, and only an occa- 
sional frost, that does no harm, is ever seen. There is really NO WINTER WEATHER in 
Southern California, and not one home in one hundred ever has a fire except for culinary 
purposes. The summer weather is never oppresssive, as in the Eastern and Southern States, 
while the nights are cool the year round. 

In Santa Clara, San Benito, Monterey, Stanislaus, Merced, Fresno, Tulare, and Kern, the 
staples are wheat, rye, barley, and wool, which are produced witnout irrigation. All kinds 
of fruits and vegetables are raised with irrigation, also cotton, tobacco, and hemp. Wine- 
making and orcharding are extensively carried on in Santa Clara County. In Los Angeles, 
San Bernardino, and San Diego Counties, are produced all the semi-tropical fruits, such as 
oranges, lemons, bananas, figs, nuts, and all the cereals. One-fonrth of all the wine and 
brandy made in California is produced in Los Angeles County ; the finest oranges and lemons 
to be f ouud in the world are raised in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and San Diego Counties ; 
also the best honey. In 1878, Los Angeles had, according to the assessors' report, 180,000 
bearing orange, 30,000 lemon, and 3,000 olive trees ; also about 6,000,000 bearing grape-vines. 
The lands along the Colorado River are as rich as those at the mouth of the Danube or the 
Nile, and will produce either corn, rye, wheat, tobacco, hemp, or cotton. There are several 
parties experimenting with rice and sugar. 

Over 65,000 people have already taken up home in Southern California since the com- 
pletion of the Southern Pacific Railroad, and great inducements will be offered to, the 
hundreds of thousands who will follow in the conrse of the next few years. 

Every person contemplating permanent settlement at any point west of the Allegheny 
Mountains should, before applying elsewhere, get a circular or pamphlet setting fourth 
what has been briefly stated above, which will be sent gratis by applying in person or 
addressing 

JEROME MADDEN, Land Agent, S. P. R. R. 

Corner Fourth and Townsend Streets, San Francisco, Cal. 



326 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



RANKIN, BRAYTON & 60. 

127 FIBST ST2ZET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Minii MacMnery. 

Plants for Gold and Silver Mills, embracing the latest and most improred machinery and 
processes for base and free ores. Hoisting Works, Pumping Machinery, Cbloridizing Furnaces, etc. 
We offer our customers the best results of 30 years' experience in t" * 

Srepared to furnish the most approved character of Mining and Re 
•sign and construction to that of any other make, at the lowest 




We offer our customers the best results of 30 years' experience in this special line of work, and are 

" Mining and R 
the lowest p 
tract to deliver, in complete running order, Mills, Furnaces, Hoisting Work's, etc., in any of the 
Mining States and Territories. 



ning and Reduction Machinery, superior in 
ossible prices. We also con- 



Estimates Given on Application. Send for Illustrated Circular. 



wmmmmm. 




For Silver, Lead, and Copper Ore, 



NEW AND IMPORTANT IMPROVEMENTS 



OF GREAT PRACTICAL UTILITY. 



No other furnaces can compare with 
ours for durability, and in capacity 
for continuous and uninterrupted 
work. 



Ml O R, E THAN FIFTY 

of them are now running on the Pacific Coast, giving results never before obtained as regards 
continuous running, economy of fuel, grade and quantity of bullion produced. 

These Smelters are shipped in a complete state, requiring no brick or stone work, thus saving 
great expense and loss of time in construction. 




EMILE BOESCH, 

Patentee and Manufacturer 
IRATEHVT 

Locomotive & Mining Head Lights, 

CENTRAL REFLECTOR LAMPS, 
STREET LAMPS, 

For Gas, Oil, Naptha, 

Silvered Corrugated Glass Reflectors, 

AND 

Railroad, Ship, Car, and Stage 
Lamps. 

PACIFIC LAMP k REFLECTOR FACTORY 

58J and 585 Mission Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 327 

LINFORTH, RICE & CO. 



Wholesale Dealers in 




HARDWARE8AGRI6ULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 



AGENTS FOR 

Black Diamond Files, Diamond Axes, Blymyer Church, 

School and Fire-Alarm Bells, Sugar Cane and 

Sorghum Machinery, Portable Engines, the 

Giant Riding Saw Machine, Enterprise 

^Wind Mills, Pumps, Etc. 



ENGLISH STEEL IN BOND OR DUTY PAID 



Please send for Illustrated Catalogue. Solicitamos Correspondencia en 
Espanol. 

323 & 325 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Assayer and Mining Geologist 



EAID. I 



C. GILBERT WHEELER, 

Professor of Chemistry in the University 
of Chicago and of Geology and 
Metallurgy in the Univer- 
sity of Denver. 



The Examination of Mines a Specialty. 

Large experience in the United States, in Mexico and South 
America. 

In Denver during April and May, at Tombstone in June, (Grand 
Hotel) at other times to be addressed at Chicago. 



SO