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ARIZONA 

A Drama in Four Acts 




BY 



Augustus Thomas 



Author of "ALABAMA,'* etc. 




CHICAQO 
The Dramatic Publishing Company 



21 



:^^ 






i 



^ x^S PS 

302Z 

HIS p/ay ts fully protected by thf^ 
copyright law., all requirefnents of 
which have been complied wi^h. In 
its present printed form it is dedicated to the 
readifig public only^ and no perfor7nance of it 
may be given, except by special arrangement 
with the owner of the acting rights^ who may be 
addressed in care of the publisher. 




By 



Copyright, 1899 
ROBERT HOWARD RUSSELL 






r>^^ PERSONS of the PLAY 

ri^^ ORIGINAL CAST at 
Hamlin' s Grand Opera House, Chicago 



HENRY CANBY, owner of Aravaipa ranch, 

Mr. Theodore Roberts 
Colonel BON HAM, Eleventh United States 

Cavalry, . . . . . .Mr. Edwin Holt 

SAM WONG, a cook, . . Mr. Stephen French 

Mrs. CANBY, wife of the rancher, . Miss Mattie Earle 

ESTRELLA BONHAM, wife of the Colonel, Miss Mabel Bert 
LENA KELLAR, a waitress, . . Miss Adora Andrews 

Lieutenant DENTON, Eleventh United 

States Cavalry, .... Mr. Robert Edeson 

BONITA CANBY, Estrella's sister, . . Miss Olive May 

Miss MacCULLAGH, a school teacher. Miss Edith Athelstone 
Dr. FENLON, surgeon. Eleventh United States 

Cavalry, , . . . .Mr. Samuel Edwards 

Captain HODGMAN, Eleventh United 

States Cavalry, . . . . Mr. Arthur Byron 

TONY MOSTANO, a vaquero, . . Mr. Vincent Serrano 

Lieutenant HALLOCK, Eleventh United 

States Cavalry, . . . Mr. Franklin Garland 

Sergeant KELLAR, Eleventh United States 

Cavalry, Mr. Walter Hale 

Lieutenant YOUNG, Eleventh United 

States Cavalry. . . . Mr. Lionel Barrymore 

Major COCHRAN, Eleventh United States 

Cavalry, . . , . Mr. Menifee Johnstone 



*)H ^ ^n\ ^n\ A)H^ A>K^ A>a< 
■'5^ &r'5^ Gir'^^ G^S^ Ci/^ 






8 ARIZONA 

Aravaipa Valley show in bold relief against the hot 
summer sky of Arizona, Henry Canby, the ranch 
owner ^ aged sixty ^ and Colonel Bonham, aged 
fifty-two, are seated at a rough deal table. Julep 
glasses are beside them. Both men are in their shirt- 
sleeves, 

Canby. 

[^As Colonel draws last of julep through strata,'^ Have 

another? 

Colonel. 
No, I think not. 

Canby. 

Well, if you only think not — [Calls,'] Sam — 

Colonel. 
They 're just a trifle strong for me. 

[Sam, a Chinaman, enters from the house, 

Canby. 

Sam, fix two more of these, and don*t put quite so much whisv 
key in the Colonel's. 

Sam. 

Yes sa. \He goes into the house carrying the julep glasses. 

Colonel. 
I really oughtn't to take another one^ but it's been a year since 
I had a smell of mint. 

Canby, 
1*11 do up a bundle of it for you. 

Colonel. 

No, no, I couldn't use it at the Post. 



ARIZONA 9 

C A N B y. 

Well, if you can't find a market for a bundle of mint in a regi- 
ment of cavalry, I 'd like to kpow where on God's green earth — 

Colonel. 
Oh, they *d like it all right, but it 's a bad example in a Colonel. 
Besides Estrella kicks if I get off the water-wagon too often. Once 
she said this nose of mine commenced to get little blue railroad 
maps ; had to paint it with bismuth. And if Estrella scents liquor, 
anywhere, she pretends they're coming back again. 

C A N B Y. 

I know Estrella. Used to try to put a crimp in my medicine 
with the same scare; but I pretended to like it, and used to shine 
up my horn this way \He catches his nose with one hand and 
pretends to polish it vigorously with the other ^ whenever she began 
her lecture. 

Colonel. 

I reckon you M toe out a little more, if you were her husband. 

C A N B Y . 
Yes, I guess I would. A woman that 's married to a fellow has 
a pretty tight cinch on him — that is, if he likes her. 

Colonel. 

And I confess I do like Estrella. She 's really great. Governor. 
You 're her father, of course, and ought to know her, but she 's a 
bnck. 

C A N B Y. 

Colonel, at her age they 're all pretty good — and when one of 
*em happens to marry a man that 's sort o' settled — 

Colonel. 

Oi even gray -headed — 



lo ARIZONA 

C A N B Y. 

Yes — why he 's pretty sure to be a little dotty about her. 

Colonel. 
You think Pm ** dotty *' about Estrella ? 

C A N B y. 

[/» an explosive high laugh. '\ He, he — Oh, no— 

Colonel. 

Well, how do I show it ? 

C A N B Y. 

Why, ridin* down here. Why didn't you stay with the troop, 

and come to-day ? 

Colonel. 

I avoided the heat. 

C A N B Y. 

^ResignedlyT^ All right. [Sam re-enters with the juleps. "^ 
Come on. There *s yours. 

[Sam places the glasses on the table and goes into the 
bouse. "^^ 

Colonel. 

[Talking hi' glass.'] Well, that 's a fact. 

C A N B Y. 

? s'pose if Estrella hadn't been here, you'd 'a* rode down jest 

the same. 

Colonel. 
No, I don't say that, 

C A N B Y. 

You' d been a week at Carlos, and you was simply honin' like a 
sailor to get back, — and. Colonel, you are jes* naturally dotty 
about her. 



ARIZONA 11 

Colonel. 

iMtoJi/y.] You don't understand, Gov»«*r<r, 

C A N B Y. 

[Laughing again. '\ He, he! Well, you 're s*<*Hi» n Utile late to 
learn me. He, he! 

Colonel. 

I 'm rather careful about Estrclla — [//if rises ani ir^> f^*H^^ 
about. "] — ^because — there's something wrong. 



Wrong ? 
She ain't happy. 
Git out. 
I mean it. 



C A N B y. 

Colonel. 

C A N B Y. 

Colonel. 



Ca n b y. 
She *8 been here t whole week, and I never saw her chippcrer 
in her life. ^ 

Colonel. 

But — I was away. 

C A N B Y. 
Well ? \The Colonel shrugs shouldersS\ You mean that 
made her chipper ? 

Co lonbl. 

\Sitting,'\ Yes. 

C A N B y. 

Why? 

Colonel. 

Because she isn*t happy at the Post. 



12 ARIZONA 

C A N B Y. 

Well, you ain't the Post. 

Colonel. 

But I *m her husband. 

C A N B y. 
[^jf/Ur a pause."] Ain't the julep brewed proper ? 

Colonel. 

^Taking the julep mechanically.'] I *d think, maybe, she was 
lonesome for her own people, but most of her life was spent away 
from you, at school and at the Seminary in 'Frisco. 

C A N B Y. 

\_Rising and walking.] Colonel, Pve broke a good many colts, 
broke lots of 'em to go double. When you first yoke 'em up, 
they jes' whip-saw that way. \He pantomimes a sudden and dis- 
concerted pulling with his hands.] They ain't never both agin 
the tugs at the same time. Then I give 'em the gaff, an' after 
they *ve run 'emselves nearly to a standstill, I point 'em home. 
They come back together like the wheelers in a band wagon. 

Colonel. 

But I'm no colt. Governor. 

C A N B Y. 

You are at gittin' married; and all new married folks are jes' the 
same. For a while whip-saw — then bolt. Some bolt harder and 
more of it than others, but they bolt — all of *em. 

Colonel. 

Well, are Estrella and I whip-sawing or bolting ? 



ARIZONA 

C A N B Y. 

[Resuming bis place at the table.'\ I take it you *re boltin*. 
Each of you thinks, if he could only run a little faster, he'd get 
away from the other ; but you can't. You *re yoked. Now, that 
don't mean trouble ; it simply means you ain't used to your 
harness. 

[Mrs. Canby enters excitedly from the bouse, carrying a pair of 
field glasses, "] 

M RS. C AN BY. 

Henry. 

Canby. 

Hello, mother. 

Mrs. Canby. 

I been lookin' at that cavalry troop through the Colonel's spy- 
glasses. 

Canby. 

Ma loves the soldiers. 

M RS. C AN BY, 

Git out ! I been watchin' fur Bonita. 

Canby. 

Oh, Bonita 's all right. 

Mrs. Canby. 

She went out at three, and it 's after six now. 

Canby. 

WeU? 

Mrs. Canby. 

And jest as I thought, she 's gallivanted up the Valley to meet 

the troop. 

Canby. 

Well, we ain't never hung anybody for that. 



14 ARIZONA 

Mrs. C a n b v. 

But one girl herdm* with forty soldiers all afternoon — 

Colonel. 

Why, bless your soul, mother, she *s Estrella's sister, and any 
one of them would let Bonita walk on him. 

Mrs. Canby. 

I don't see that helps any. Imagine her walkin* on one of 
*em. [^Goes anxiously to the gate."] 

Canby. 

Colonel, Mt won't stand for any poetry. 

Mrs. Canby. 

I was a girl in this territory myself. [^She returnsj^ 

Canby. 

Well, nothing happened to you, that you couldn't get over, 
did they ? 

Mrs. Canby. 

\^After a glare at Jbim.'j Well, I '11 leave it to anybody that 
knows you. [Canby hegins to polish his nosej^ Stop that ! 
[Canby stopsJ^ Whenever he begins that tom-fool dido, you kin 
know Henry 's had his full gauge. 

Canby. 

Colonel, she always jackets me when either of the girls steps 
over a trace. 

M R S. C A N B Y. 

Well, somebody *s responsible. 

Canby. 
See ? Ma 's made out somehow that it 's my fault they was n't 
boys. 



ARIZONA 15 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Where 's Estrclla ? 

C A N B Y. 

Lay in* down. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Well, I think she might be doin* better when the Colonel *s rode 
nearly all night to spend the day with her. 

Colonel. 

Oh no, no, Estrella usually takes a nap in the afternoon at 
the Post. 

[Estrella enters from the house dressed in an easy 
wrapper, 

Estrella. 
[Half sleepily.'] Hello, everybody. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Arc you up for all day, Estrella ? 

Estrella. 

Yes, and all night, if it *s as pretty as last night was. [Shi puts 
her arms over the Colonel's shoulders and kisses him. 

Colonel. 

Get a nap, sweetheart ? 

Estrella. 

Not much. I was reading most of the time. Haa C Troop 

come ? 

Colonel. 

Not yet, 

, Mrs. C a n b y. 

[From the gateway, ] They *re in sight, and Bonita *s Joan-o^ 
Arc-in* *em. 



i6 ARIZONA 

ESTRELLA. 
Oh, that's fun. I'd have gone with her if I 'd known it. [^Sbe 
pauses as she catches sight of the glasses."] What are you drinking, 
Frank ? 

Colonel. 

Julep. [^G/ances warningly at Canby. 

EsTRELLA. 
You mustn't let Pa get you into bad habits. 
[Canby begins polishing nose. 

Mrs. Canby. 

Stop it. 

Canby. 

We been drowndin* our sorrows, the Colonel and me. He '» 
got an idear, Estrella, that you ain't easy down at the Post. 

EsTRELLA. 
Why, I don't see how. 

Colonel. 

[Putting his arm about her waist,"] Thought you were a 
trifle moody, that 's all. Thought maybe you were getting a little 
homesick for the city. 

Estrella. 

[In lulling manner."] Why, no. 

Mrs. Canby. 

Well, any woman that could get lonesome at the Post, deserves 
it. Huh! You ought to have a dose of this place — cactus and 
sand, and slab-sided cattle, and havin' to let the clock run down 
to tell when it 's Sunday. I don't know what women want now* 
a-days. ^She goes up to the gate. 



ARIZONA 17 

Colonel. 

Maybe they want their husbands like C Troop's first Lieuten- 
ant, young and handsome 

ESTRELLA. 
\Her fingers over his Zips.'] Stop — stop, I won't hear you! 

Colonel. 

And then, as soon as I 'd got her, I log-rolled a transfer down 
here in the desert, where she can't possibly escape, 

C A N B Y. 
Don't call the Aravaipa Valley a desert. Colonel. 

Colonel. 

Estrella called it that. 

EsTRELLA. 
But I didn't know how pretty Fort Grant could be. I thought 
it was all like this. 

Colonel. 
Oh, the Post is better than this, but it isn't San Francisco, is it, 
dear ? 

Estrella. 

I don't think of San Francisco, Frank. 

Mrs. Canby. 

I hope not. San Francisco 's got all it can answer for. You 
ain't been anything but faint-and-fall-in-it, and Bonita wouldn't 
touch a darnin' bag with a ten foot pole since they San Francis- 
coed her. 

Canby. 

Well, what 's the money for. Ma, if it ain't white bread to the 
girls ? 



i8 ARIZONA 

Mrs.Canby. 

Well, it might be a little white bread to me. 

C A N B Y. 
[TV Colonel.] Woundn't you think it was nothin* but crackers 
and water ? An* she *s got finery enough in those rooms to sink a 
ship. They 's a dymond breast-pin, big as a paddle-lock — a gold 
bracelet so thick that the greasers don't steal it, 'cause they think 
it *s brass. There 's silk dresses 

Mrs. Canby. 

Yes, and greasers are all they are to show *em to. I never 
been out. Colonel, in my breast-pin but once in five years, and 
that was to the opera at El Paso. 

Canby. 

Oh, Ma, you wore it on the sleepin'-car to Phcenix! 

Mrs. Canby. 

But toe wa» the only folks in the car, besides the nigger. 

Canby. 

Well, I saw him looking at k. 

[Lena enters from the house. 

Lena. 



Mrs. Ctnby. 
Yes? 



Mrs. Canby. 

\T'he CoLONBL rises from bis chair » 

Lena. 

The troop is up to the fence now — they 're just coming through 
the gate, double column. 



ARIZONA 19 

Colonel. 

\B right /yS\ How are you, Lena ? 

Lena. 

[Mooiitly.l Well, thank you. Colonel. 

Colonel. 
Shake hands. [He takes her band, 

Lena. 

[Embarrassed little laugh. '\ Huh — [She goes quickly into 
the house. 

Colonel. 

[Looking after Lena."] AW right, now ? 

Mr s. Canby. 
[Sullenly."] Not strong enough to do much work. She's kind 
of a lady's maid for Bonita. 

C O L ONEL . 

Too bad, isn't it ? She'd 'a* made some chap a good wife. 

Canby. 

[Optimistically."] In Arizona, my boy, she 's worth a whole 
hatful of dead ones yet. 

Colonel. 

Well, there 's C Troop. I '11 put on my blouse. 

[He goes into the house, 

Mrs. Canby. 
Henry ! 

Canby. 
Well? 

Mrs. Canby. 
You put on your coat, too. 



20 ARIZONA 

C A N B Y. 

Why ? They don't have to salute me. 

Mrs. Canby. 

It don't look decent, with Bonita arcnd, ard those young 

fellows. 

Canby. 

[Going.l You bet. Ma. Every day is Sunday when the 
soldiers come. [//«" goes into the bouse. 

Mrs. Canby. 

And now, Estrella, stop your mopin'. You 've made your bed, 
and you Ve got to sleep in it. 

Estrella. 

Did I make it ? 

Mrs. Canby. 

Yy^ggressively.'] Yes, you did. You could *a' had most anv 
man in California — in the army, or out of it. 

Estrella. 

What about Thompson ? 

Mrs. Canby. 

He was fast ! That 's what — fast. 

Estrella. 

[Shrugs shoulder s.'\ And a row, wasn't there, when young 
Burgess began calling. 

Mrs. Canby. 

He was all upper lip, and no chin, like a prairie dog. 

Estrella. 
[Wearily."] Oh, yes, all wrong some way, but the Colonel. 



ARIZONA 21 

Mrs. Can by. 

Well, I leave it to you, wasn't he the best of 'em — the whole 
kit and boodle ? 

ESTRELLA. 
Do I say he wasn't. 

[^TJbe sound of many hones on a dirt road and a jingle 
of sahres begins faintly and grows in volume, 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

You act like it, I mus. say. And he notices it, too. He rode 
nearly all night to get here, and the way you appreciate it, is to 
sleep all day. 

EsTRELLA. 
Well, the troop will be here to-night, and we *1] be up late. 

\The light begins to change to the golden yellow of an 
Arizona sunset, 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Why ? Your Pa an' nie will do the entertainin*. You can go 
to bed. Jes' you don't fret so much about the troop ; and while 
we 're about it, Estrella, let 's understand each other. There must 
be no goin' s-on, this time, with this Captain Hodgman — here. 

Estrella. 
That talk bores me. Mother, excessively. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Well, I make it jest the same. 

Estrella. 
You *re Eighty about Captain Hodgman, and the Colonel *8 
alw«/s harping on Mr. Denton. [She goes up to gate. 



22 ARIZONA 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

You *vc got the best man in the regiment, the boss of all of 'em, 
and so don't get frisky with the others. [Hodcman's voice is 
heard outside, 

H O DG M AN, 
\Outside the court. '\ Right into line — , 

[Colonel re-enten from the house in uniform. 

Colonel. 

\To EsTRELLA, who ts at the gate. "^ How do the fellows look, 
Jearie ? 

H O D G M A N. 
{Outside. '\ Halt. 

ESTRELLA. 

Very well. 

\The general noise quickly quiets and out of it grows tbt 
crescendo approach of two horses racing, 

Mrs. C a n b y. 
{Angrily."^ Now, look at that ! Bonita *s a perfect harum- 
scarum whenever that fellow *s around. {Calls.'] Bonita ! 
Bonita ! Stop it. {Horses slow down. Laughter by Bonita and 
Denton. 

[Denton enter i in service uniform , and covered with 
dust, 

Denton. 

Mr. Canby here ? Colonel! {Salutes, The Colonel returns 
Denton's salute.'] Captain Hodgman's compliments, wanti to 
know where to make camp. 

Mrs. Canby. 
Why, the same old field. 



ARIZONA 23 

Denton. 

But the home cattle — 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Our boys *11 turn them out. 

Denton. 

Thank you. [^He again salutes the Colonel, who salutes in 
answer. Denton, turning to go, meets Bonita laughing and lead' 
ing her horse , from which she has just dismounted. He smilingly 
whispers to her and disappears. 

M R S. C A N B y. 

Well, Miss, it *s about time. 

\A cowboy takes Bonita* s horse and leads it away to left 
back of the gate, 

Bonita. 

Why, Mother, it isn't «un-down. 

[Canby comes from the house with coat on, and hair 
combed sleek. 

Canby. 

[^Smoothing his front. J Well, we're ready for *em. Mother, 

[Bonita comes down, 

H O D G M A N. 

[Outside.'\ Dismount. 

[Canby goes to the welly puts one foot on the curb and 
arranges his trousers over his boot. 

Bonita. 
Colonel, I scouted C Troop in from Curry's wind mills. 



24 ARIZONA 

Colo N EL. 

All right, ril put you on the pay rolls. 

B O N I T A. 

Miss MacCullagh 's with the troop, and Ma — we *ve planne<J 
for me to go to the Post with Miss MacCullagh and Estrella. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 
Not with this C Troop there. 

Colonel. 

Why? 

Mrs. C a nby. 

Bonita 's a little too frisky with this First Lieutenant 

B O N I T A. 

Why, ma ! 

Colonel. 
Denton ? 

Mrs. C a n b y. 
Yes, Denton 

Colonel. 

[^Smi/iftg."] Well, Denton *s a splendid fellow. Isn't he, 
Estrella ? 

[Estrella furns azvay, a?inoyed. Can by who has come 
down right meets her back of the table. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

I know about him. They ain't a piece of deviltry in ':he 
Valley, he ain't in it. An* when he *s around, Bonita, she 's like 
a calf in a prairie fire. 

[Bonita prances comically up to the carette. 



ARIZONA 25 

Colonel. 

Oh, boy's fun. Denton ? Why, Bonita, Denton 's the best 
cavalryman that ever stood in the saddle. 

^Enier Hodgman, throngh the gate from right. He is 
in service uniform and very dusty, 

Hodgman. 
\Salutes Colonel. The Colonel salutes in answer. Bows to 
others who return his how. 

Canby and Mrs. Canby. 
Evening, Captain. 

Hodgman. 

Came through all right, sir; men and horses in good condition. 
Doctor Fenlon and school teacher just behind in the ambulance. 

Colonel. 

Very well. Captain. Let the men make camp and get supper, 

have everything ready in the morning, to start sharply at eight. 

[Hodgman and Colonel exchange salutes, 

Canby. 
Colonel, officers in here. 

Hodgman. 

\_lVho has started off."] No need to trouble, Mr. Canby, we 
have our tents. 

Colonel. 
Oh, come in. It pleases Mr. Canby and his wife. 

Mrs. Canby. 
Yes, indeed. 

Hodgman. 

Thank you. 



a6 ARIZONA 

C A N B y. 
Sopper! 

H O D O M A N. 

[From the gateway.'] I *!! seethe troops disposed first. [SMiutts 
tie Colonel.] Ambulance, nr. 

Voice. 

[0«/i/^^.] Whoa. 

Colonel. 

All right. [HoDGMAN disappears, . Noise of ambulance brake 
and stop is heard outside with jingle of chains. 
[EsTRELLA goes to gate. 

B O N I T A. 

Colonel — you make Ma let me visit the Post. 
[Lena re-enters. 

Colonel. 

Of course. 

[Miss MacCullagh and Doctor Fenlon come mt§ 
gateway. They are very travei-stained, 

EsTREi^LA. 
Miss MacCullagh, my mother and father. 
[Canby bows. 

Mrs. Canby. 

How are you ? [Shakes hands and kisses her."] Doctor, glad 
to see you. [Takes bag from Miss MacCullagh, ifr^W/ // to 
Lena.] Now, you poor thing, come right to your room. I '11 
lock the bath-room door on my side, and you can git right in it. 
[Bustles effusively into the house followed by Miss Mac- 
Cullagh and Lena with the bag. 



ARIZONA 27 

C A N B y. 

Sit down. Doctor, and rest yourself. 

Doctor. 

[^fTh has been limbering bis knees, "] Mr. Canby, I shall never 
tit down again. 

Colonel. 

l^Laugbing,'] Been in the ambulance since dayfight. 

Doctor. 

You know, that school teacher 's one of the nicest girls I ever 
saw. Colonel — ^not a bit /ike a school teacher ; blushes, you know, 
and all that. [^Re-enter Lena with bag. 

Colonel. 

I hope you didn't make her blush. Doctor, 

Lena. 

[To EsTRELLA.] Mrs. Bonham, that lady says this ain*t her 

bag. 

ESTRELLA. 

Where did you get it ? 

Doctor. 

[Looking at similar hag in his hand.'\ Nobody said it was her 
bag, Lena, that 's mine. \Takes bag from Lena ; holds both. 2 
You 're lookmg better. [Regards her professionally. Lena // em- 
barrassed and goes into the house carrying the second bag.'j The 
idea of mistaking my New York Russia leather bag for this miser- 
able Kansas City a^ir. 

B O N I T A. 

[Laughs and goes toward house. '\ Doctor, your room is jtift 
through this hall. 



28 ARIZONA 

Doctor. 

[^Go/ng.'j Thank you. 

B O N I T A. 
You and Mr. Denton will be together. 

Doctor. 
[^Pausmg."] Pardon me, but I can't sleep with another man, 

C A N B Y. 
Two htds. 

Doctor. 

Oh, easy enough, [^Goes into home, 

C A N B Y. 
[Calling after him."] Supper soon as you 're ready. Don't 
keep it waiting, girls. 

E S T R E L L A. 
[Going.'\ You ready. Colonel ? 

Colonel. 
\Looking himself over and smiling. ] Well, what else ? Epaul- 
ettes ? 

ESTRELLA. 
All right. \Sbe goes into bouse. 

C A N B Y. 
Come, Colonel. [^Disappears with Colonel through door to 
dining-room. 

[BoNiTA goes to the gate, meets Hodgman and Hal- 
lock, with strikers carrying packs. They give way, 
smiling. Bonita goes through gate, but remains 
in view, looking off. Hodgman, Hallock and two 
strikers enter the court. 



ARIZONA 29 

H O D G M A N. 
Same room, Mr. Hallock. [Lena re-enters from bouse. 

H A L L O C K. 

This way. \Exity followed by two strikers. 

Lena. 

Miss Bonita. 

H O D G M A N. 

Lena. [^Looks furtively back toward Bonita, who is not regard- 
ing him. 

Lena. 

[Shrinking from him with disgust. '\ No. 

H O D G M A N. 

Don't be foolish, Lena. You see, the trouble *s all over, and 
you 've got a nice place here. I told you I 'd do something hand- 
some for you, if you kept still, and I will. 

Lena. 

I kept still because I didn't want my father to kill you. 
[Denton appears in gateway with Bonita. 

H O D G M A N. 

Ha! ha! ha! You wait till Christmas. \Cbu(ks Lena under 

the chin and goes into house laughing. 

[Bonita comes down with Denton. 
\The yellow sunlight deepens. 

Denton. 

I understand your father 's going to put us up again. 



30 ARIZONA 

Bo NIT A. 
Yes, you *rc with the Doctor — in there. [7^<? Lena.] In a 
minute. [Lena goes into bouse. 

[OuiGLEY enters gate with Denton's pack. 

Denton. 

[Seeing iroom."] I Ml leave some of this real estate outside. [He 
hands broom to Quigley, who brushes him. Bonita retreats down 
right centre,"]^ Careful, Quigley \as broom strikes back of nec1t\. 
Little sunburnt there. Thanks ! 

[Quigley takes Dentoh* s pack into house, 

Denton. 

[Alone with Bonita.] Well, what about the visit to the 
Post? 

Bonita. 

Ma hasn't decided yet. 

D E N T O N. 

I '11 speak to her about it. 

Bonita, 

[Alarmed.l^ Oh, no! 

[Tony, a Mexican vaquero, inters from stMbie, tarrying 
a horse bucket, 

Denton. 

[T'^? Bonita.] No? [T^^? Tony.] Hello, Tony. [Tony 

Jtodi with a pleased grin. 

Bonita. 
YtUt 'Tenant, must pretend not to care about it. 



ARIZONA 31 

Denton. 

/ must f 

[HoDGMAN*8 affJ Hallock's Striker s return from botui 

and pass out through the gate. 

B O N I T A. 
Well, all the gentlemen. 

Denton. 

Oh ! [Tony has filled his bucket from the well and started to 
go.'\ That a horse bucket ? 

Tony. 
Yc8, sir. 

Denton. 

That *1I do me. [Tony sets the bucket down, 

B O N I T A. 
^As Denton kneels over bucket washing bis bands.^ Why, 
things are so much nicer in your room. 

Denton. 

^Pausing,"] Er — a — I like the scenery. [Smiles — buries face 

in bucket. 

Bo NIT A. 

[Also smiling, calls ^ Oh! Lena. ^As if seeing ber,^ A 

towel^ please, for Mr. Denton. 

Denton. 

Oh, I don't need a towel. Miss Bonita. What do you tWnk I 
carry a handkerchief for ? [Stands up, 

[QuiGLEY returns from bouse, 

Q.UIOLEY. 
[Saluting.'l That all, sir ? [Re-enter Lena carrying a towei. 



32 ARIZONA 

D E NTO N . 

That's all, Quigley. Thanks. [Qvigley goes 9Ut at gMte, 

Denton. 

[Taking towei.^ Hello, Lena, glad to see you. Got your 
Dad with us, too. 

B O N I T A. 
But your hair. 

D E NTO N. 
Look bad ? 

B O NI T A. 

\^NoddingS\ *m *m — that is — not very. 

Denton. 

Oh — lend me a side-comb. [Bonita nods — Denton hands towel 
to Lena.] Thank you. [Goes to Bonita. 
[Tony starts left with bucket. 
[Sergeant Kellar enters at gate. 

Ke L LAR. 
Why, Lena ! [Tony turns at sound of IjEnh's name. Leka goes 
to Kellar and kisses htm. 

Tony. 
[Fiercely.'] Who is this man ? [All but Kellar look at Tony.] 
You ! You ! [Kellar looks at Tony.] Who atq you ? 

Le n a . 
This is my father. 

[Tony quickly disappears into stable carrying bucket, while 

Denton, Bonita and Lena laugh at him, 

K E LL a R. 
[Saluting.'\ 'Tenant. Stables — 



ARIZONA 33 

Denton. 

[Returning salute.~\ Very well. I '11 be right out. [Kellar 
goes to gate. 

Kellar. 
'Tenant. {Salutes. 

Denton. 

[Saluting.'\ Sergeant? 

Kellar. 

Who is dat man ? 

B O NITA.. 
That 's one of the vaqueros. 

Kellar. 
[Looking after Tony. ] Ferricht ! 

[He goes out through gateway. Lena, suppressing a 
laugh, disappears into stable. 

Denton. 

[Returning comb to Bonita.] I have to go now. 
[He starts up toward gate. 

Bonita. 

Where ? 

Denton. 

Stables inspection. 

Bonita. 

But supper 's ready. 

Denton. 

[Pausing in gateway. '\ I *m afraid I '11 be a little late to it, then. 

Bonita. 

[Also goingy but toward house. ] I, too. 



34 ARIZONA 

Denton. 

[Turning with complimentary eagerness. "] Eh ! 

B O N I T A. 

Must change my dress. 

Denton. 

Oh ! [^ pause and a negotiating approach. ] Take me about 
fifteen minutes with the horses. 

B O N I T A . 
Take me about fifteen minutes to dress. [She in turn takes a 
step toward Denton with challe7iging diffidence. 

Denton. 
Make us both late, won't it t 

[Lena re-enters from the stable and gets mandolin from 
lattice. 

B O N I T A . 
Yes. What 's that, Lena? 

Lena. 

Tony*s. [She holds mandolin up to view. 

B O N IT A. 
Very well. 

[Lena carries mandolin into the stable, 

D ento n . 

Miss Bonita, do you know the most exciting thing that *s hap- 
pened to me since 1 've been in Arizona } 

[ Yellow sunlight begins changing to red. 

B O N IT A . 
What? 

Denton. 

That side comb. 

B O N I T A . 

This side comb ? 



ARIZONA 35 

Denton. 
Kes. 

[BoNiTA //// on the end of the table. \>^stoh follows 

with portentous intensity. 

B O N I T A. 
[IVith feminine dissembling.'] Why! It *8 like any other side 
comb. May be a little more curved. 

Denton. 

[Lightly, but not misled.] Well, perhaps that 's it. Funny, 
though, to run up against a new curve, *way out here. 

B O N I T A. 

I don't know what you 're talking about. [She smiles in com- 
plete confusion. 

Denton. 

Well — I don't know that / do. \_He walks away satisfied with 
his skirmish y then resumes deliberately.] That comb — [Pause.] 
J *ve combed my own hair ever since my mother quit brushing it 
round a broom handle. [Pantomime of curling hair and pause.] 
I *ve used all kinds of combs — combs just fresh from the drug store, 
and smelling like cologne — I 've used combs that were chained 
alongside of roller-towels — used every kind, I guess. [Parenth- 
etically.] And I asked you for that one more in fun than anything 
else — [He approaches her with voice lowered to an ardent tremolo 
and speaks with his face close over her shoulder.] but I never can 
tell you just exactly the way I felt when I used it. 

[Tony's mandolin is heard playing ** The Crescent 
Moon:* 

B O N I T A. 

[After pause, during which she turns to him with some amuse- 
ment not unmixed with alarm.] You 're a funny fellow. 



36 ARIZONA 

Denton. 

[^Looking into her eyes."] Am I ? 

B O N I T A. 

[^S/ow/y retreating half a step.~\ Yes. 

\T>E^TO^ follows her almost imperceptibly. There is a 
moment* s pause ^ during which there is no adequate ex- 
planation for his not kissing her. Both sigh, and 
Denton recovers with a step or two to the rear, 

Denton. 

You know, at the Post, most of us bachelors have quarters in 
the same building. 

B O N I T A. 
Yes, I know that. \yery matter-of-fact. 

D E N T O N. 

After being together a while, we become rather free with onf 
another's possessions. It 's a way we get into in the Academy. 
But, if we don't like a chap pretty well, \_In a tone of judicial 
punishment. '\ we don't use his things. \Pause.^ Now, how do girls 
feel about that ? 

B O N I T A. 

\With Alice-in- Wonderland manner. ~\ I don't think they knovt 
about it. Has it been printed ? 

Denton. 

^Menacingly. '\ I mean, among themselves. Is the rnine and 
thine rather sharply drawn ? \He comes to her, his wooing 
resumed. 

B O N I T A. 

Yes, [She turns, meeting his gaze with insinuating frankness. 
Pause. '\ unless they like a fellow. 



ARIZONA 37 

Denton. 

[^Laughing nervously. "] Oh! Kind o* human, after all. 

B O N I T A. 
[Also iaugbing.'\ At times, yes. 

Denton. 

[7/7 playful earnestness. ~\ Any other fellow ever used that 

comb ? 

[BoNiTA shakes her heady and Denton smiles and turns 

away much pleased. 

B O N IT A. 

\Taking comb from hair and regarding //.] I haven't had it 

very long. 

Denton. 

Oh ! \Pause.'\ And I suppose there aren't very many fellow^s 

passing this way ? 

B O N I T A. 

\With affected innocence. '\ No, not many. 

Denton. 

\Refiecting.'\ Well, that rather cuts down my average — 

still — \Pause. 

B O N I T A. 
What ? 

Denton. 
Do me a favor ? 

B O N I T A. 
Yes. 

Denton. 

[Really serious and very near her."^ Don* t lend it to any 
other. [Pause"] Will you ? [Bonita purses lips in restt gint 
of smile y and slowly shakes her head,] Thank you. 

[Denton smiles and turns with sigh of relief 



38 ARIZONA 

B O N 1 T A. 

[Taking second comb from her hair ] It 's pretty hard, though 
to tell them apart. 

Denton. 

[Quickly.']^ I mean both, 

B O N 1 T A. 
Both ! ! 

D E N T O N. 
Both. \^Pofitively. Bonita sighs with resignation, sits slowly 
and replaces combs."^ Thank you. \Starts up.'\ Fifteen minutes. 
[Tony's mandolin ceases playing. 

B O N I T A. 

[g///V/f/y.] Mr. Denton. 

Denton. 

\Turning.'\ Yes. 

\The red sunset shows a glow of purple. 

Bonita. 
\Pause,^ You — you 've been around the country a good deal, 
haven't you ? 

Denton. 
Quite a bit, yes. 

Bonita. 

\^Archly.'\ Have you tied up very many side combs ? 

Denton. 

\Meaningly.~\ My first pair. [Bonita moves one step down,'\ 
'Tisn't going to be too hard, is it \ [Bonita looks at him and, 
without answerifig, goes to the table. "Dl^to^ follows. Her face 
is averted; and he leans on the table speaking over her right shoulder, '\ 
You see, in this cattle-law country, some fellows rope the first 



ARIZONA 39 

pretty creature they see, and call her all theirs ; I *m asking only a 
little loyalty in the matter of side combs. Then, if that doesn't 
fret her — why — [He restrains a manifested impulse to embrace her, 
reverently kisses a lock of her hair and with a sigh rum quickly off. 
A bell rings. Bonita follows to gate looking after him. The 
Doctor, Miss MacCullagh and Mrs. Canby enter from bouse 
and come down. 

Doctor. 
[To Miss MacCullagh.] Feel refreshed ? 

Miss MacCullagh. 
Yes, indeed. [Doctor indicates door to dining-room for Miss 
MacCullagh. 

Mrs. Canby. 

Why, Bonita, you ain't ready. 

[Miss MacCullagh goes into dining-room, 

Bonita. 
I *m not hungry. Ma. 

M R S. C A N B Y. 
\Going with the Doctor.] I wish you *d give her something 
for that. Doctor ; the soldiers excite her so. 

Doctor. 

I Ml give her a soldier, 

Mrs. Canby. 
Git out ! 

Doctor. 
Best / can do. [Goes into dining-room followed by Mrs. Canby. 
[Hallock enters and goes into dining-room, 

H O D G M A N. 

[Entering and looking about. '\ Oh — Miss Canby, that was 
supper bell, wasn't it ? 



4° 



D 


ARIZONA 




B O N I T A. 


Yes. 






H O DG M A N. 


Going in ? 





B O N I T A. 

Not just yet, I must change my dress. \^She comes down from 
the gateway. 

H O D G M A N. 

Can't improve on that. [Bonita j;w/7^j, and bows a '* thank 
vc/y."] Who taught you to ride. Miss Bonita ? 

B O N IT A. 

Pa says I was able to ride before I could walk. Anybody in 
Arizona who can* t ride a horse, had better be dead. [^Laughs. 

H O D G M A N. 

Well, if riding is the test, you 've a good long life ahead of you, 

Bonita. 

Not in Arizona, I hope. 

H O D G M A N. 

You don't like it > 

Bonita. 
Do you ? 

H O D G M A N. 

[Smi/ing,'^ I have to. 

Bonita. 

Oh ! well, / have to — for a while, anyway. 

H O D G M A N. 

YfVith apprehensive look back,'\ Made any plans for escape? 
[Lightly. 



ARIZONA 41 

B O N I T A. 

No — none — [^Sbe takes the side comb from her hair and regards 
//.] none — definite. 

H O D G M A N. 

[^ffith some earnestness.'^ Do you know — you — you 've never 
seemed like an Arizona girl to me — Miss — Bonita ? 

^The glow of the sunset fades into the pale blue of moon' 
light. 

Bonita. 
Oh ! well, I went to school in 'Frisco. 

H O D G M A N. 

Nor like a California one, either. 

Bonita. 
Haven't I ? 

[EsTRELLA comes from the house and pauses, overhearing. 

H O D G M A N. 

[Quite earnestly,'] God*s country is down East, just between 
the Mohawk River and Long Island. 

Bonita. 

You call that — God*s country, do you ? 

H O D G M A N. 
Yes, and it *s where God*s loveliest creatures seem to belong. 
If you were to spend one Autumn there, you 'd be heart-broken 
over every one you *ve wasted on these ashes. T'ou seem to belong 
there, litde girl. 

Estrella. 
[/« fateful monotone."] Oh — Bonita. 



f2 ARIZONA 

B O N I T A. 
Yes? [HoDGMAN crosses with slight show of annoyance. 

ESTRELLA. 
[//; lighter manner.'] Why aren't you dressing? 

B O N I T A. 
I am late. Excuse me. Captain. 

[HoDGMAN hows. BoNiTA goes tnto the house. 

E S T R E L L A. 
Captain 

H O D G M A N. 
Yes ? 

EsTRELLA. 

Of course, Bonita is one of God's loveliest creatures, but 
[Pause] if I were you, I 'd let some one else tell her so. 

H O D G M A N. 
There was nothing in that, was there ? 

EsTRELLA. 
Something that, for the moment, made me wonder if you were 
not the most insincere man I ever met. 

H O DGM AN. 

Why! — why the young lady is your sister. 

EsTRELLA. 
That is what / urge. You can't use it in your defense, 

H O D G M A N. 

Is defense needed ? 

EsTRELLA. 
You were trying to impress Bonita. 



ARIZONA 41 

H O D G M A N. 
Yes ? ^Pause."] And your look is saying that I had also tried 
to impress you. 

ESTRELLA. 

[^Rei'uiing/y.'] I am the wife of — your Colonel, Captain 
Hodgman. You are unpleasantly personal. 

H O D G M A N. 

Certainly not wlien I spoke to your sister 

E S T R E L L A. 
You were trying to make Bonita unhappy with her •!»- 
roundings. 

Hodgman. 

The law of progress 

EsTRELLA. 

You have taken the content from my life for your amusement. 

Let her* s alone. 

Hodgman. 

Amusement, Estrella ! [Pause.'] Look at me \F$treUa 

looks at him and then looks away.] I didn't say glance at inc. 

Look! 

Estrella. 

[Looking at him.] Why ! I hope you don't think I fear you. 

Captain. 

Hodgman. 

[Smiling.] Fear me — of course not. [Pause.] Now, don*t 
say I stole your peace of mind. Lethargy isn't content. Vou 
were dreaming here in the hot sands like a torpid nestling. I 
talked of the ocean and the smell of the low tide, and you began 
to wake up — you breathed deeper — [Pause and a slight movement 



44 ARIZONA 

of his hand before her face. '\ — as you are breathing now. [Smi/es 
and watches her.l^ The languor went out of your eyes, [^Pause^ as 
it is going now, and your soul came into them 

E S T R E L L A. 
I have the love of the best man in the world. 

H O D G M A N. 
Which should /// every empty hour, and yet 

ESTRELLA. 
And I love him, 

H O U G M A N. 

Almost like a father. [Laughs and turns from her, 

EsTRELLA. 
\Pau5e,^ You 're not a man. You 're a devil. 

H O D G M A N. 

[Again catchin% her gaxe,'\ No! This is the wilderness, and 
all these things I show you, but I don't ask you to bow down and 
worsnip me. 1 ' m the idolater. 

E STRE LLA. 
I don't want vour interest. 

H O D G M A N. 

I love you — ^love you — as I 'd love a rose — to look at — to in- 
hale — to hold. 

E S T R E L L A. 

Or — ^perhaps — to crush. 



ARIZONA 45 

H O D G M A N. 

If it were sweeter so — to crush ! [Pause ; be looks at her 
with fierce ardor y as awaiting some reply ; she returns his looky and 
after a moment gives him her hand.'\ Estrella ! 

ESTRELLA. 
\After a look to right. 1 Leonard ! [Hodgman starts to em- 
brace her ; she shrinks back ; he retains her handy stoops and kisses 
it; Denton enters through gate; Estrella quickly withdraws 
hand; Hodgman glances at her in surprise, and from the direction 
of her ga%e apprehends Denton. He turns, 

Denton. 

\SalutingS\ Captain. 

Hodgman. 

Mr. Denton. 

Denton. 

That horse of Shannon's — unfit for saddle to-morrow. 

Hodgman. 

Will he do with a blanket ? 

Denton. 

Yes, sir, 

Hodgman. 

Very well. 

[HoDGMANyj?//<?«c// Estrella, who has gone toward dining- 
room. He again notes her steady regard of Denton, 
who has not moved, and turns sharply upon him.'] 
Anything further, Mr. Denton ? 

Denton. 

[/« defiant under tone. '\ Only supper, I believe, sir. 



46 



ARIZONA 



ESTRELLA. 

Come, Captain. ^SJhe touches his arm and goes, Hodgman 

follow i her to door ; Denton comes to the table ; Hodgman turns am 

meets Denton's gaze ; is about to exclaim upon him when Estrella 

again touches his arm, A burst of laughter is heard in the dining' 

room in response to some joke of Canby's.] Captain ; Come ! 

[Hodgman follows Estrella into the dining-room, 

Denton stands looking after them. 

CURTAIN 




The Second Act 




\HE scene represents the interior of the 
drawing-room of Colonel Bon- 
hom's quarters at Fort Grants 
Arizona. The wall to the left of 
the stage is occupied by a large open 
fireplace^ with inglenook seats on 
either side of ity and facing each other, A ynoose 
head is over the mantel sheif Below the fireplace^ 
that is, nearer the audience^ is a big wooden settle, 
with its back to the wall, 'The settle is furnished 
with sofa pillows and fitted with a shelf overhead. 
The wall space above the fireplace is filled by a piano. 
The wall facing the audience obliques slightly to the 
right, so that the right wall is a third shorter than 
the left^. The back wall is occupied by a single door 
to the left of the center and by a large window filling 
its remaining space. The door opens into a hall. The 
window lets upon the parade ground, A smaller 
window adjoins this in the left wall. All of the 
openings in the wall show the regular adobe thickness 
of three feet, making in the windows recesses deep 
enough for chairs. The walls are stained a deep terra 
cotta. The ceiling is of sage green, ribbed by the 
natural wood of the beams. The settle and mantel 
are sage green. Some framed engravings are hung 
upon the walls. The furniture of the room is simple 



48 ARIZONA 

and old-fashioned. The windows are fitted with green 
blinds against the sash and with sage green portieres 
flush with the walls. In a jog of the left wall, near 
the auditor, is a Mexican loom, 

'The time is midnight. Outside is the light of the 
moon. Indoors are a couple of hanging-lamps and the 
light from the fireplace. A few empty dishes, rumpled 
napkins and some spoons indicate the recent serving of 
refreshments. The music of a military hand playing a 
valse is heard outside. 

Doctor Fenlon is seated at the fireplace smok- 
ing a cigarette. Miss MacCullagh, the school 
teacher, stands beside him in an evening gown. Her 
eyes snap and she taps impatiently with her toe. 

Miss MacCullagh. 

Why don't you smoke out-of-doors ? 

Doctor. 

I do. 

Miss MacCullagh 

Are you ever serious. Doctor Fenlon ? 

DOCTO R. 

Do you mean in my intentions ? 

Miss MacCullagh. 
I mean in your life. I don't believe you ever had a genuine 
sorrow. 

Doctor. 

\Taking the cigarette from his mouth. ^ Huh ! Laid down 
three queens last night with nothing against *cm hut a pair of ten 
spots. 



ARIZONA 49 

Miss MacCullagh. 

[Shotving anger, as school teachers sometimes do.'\ God gave you 
brains. Doctor Fenlon. He put your ears far enough back to leave 
room for some perception. 

DoCTO R . 

[Jpologetically.'] Can't see through a pasteboard. 

Miss MacCullagh. 

And yet you dawdle your life away over a pack of cards. 

DoCTO R. 

Can*t make *em take medicine when they ain*t sick — that is, not 
always. 

Miss MacCullagh. 

Why not write ? Why not read ? Why not walk ? Why, you 
aren't even in good physical condition. 

Do CTO R. 

[Placidly.'] Oh — you 're jealous. [Miss MacCullagh goe^ 
sut angrily. '\ 

[Sergeant Kellar enters briskly from the left of the 
door, followed by his daughter Lena. Lena carries a tray, 

Kellar. 

Clean everything here, first, den de porch. \Pich up a spoon. '\ 
Here is a spoon on de floor, somebody step on him. [Straightens 
spoon, throws it in dish, and goes out. Lena goes about collecting 
plates. 

Lena. 

Can I have your plate. Doctor ? 

Doctor. 
Yes. ^?.K\ takes "Doctor* z plate, and starts out.^ Lena! 



so ARIZONA 

Lena. 

^Pausing in the doorway. "^ Doctor ? 

Doctor. 

That man doing anything for you ? 

Lena. 

^Wtth furtive look to the outside. '\ I won't let him do any- 
thing for me. 

Doctor. 

\Rising and speaking in reassuring tone. '\ But you must. It 
is n't only of yourself you have to think. Now let me speak to 
him, and make some arrangement for the support of that little one. 

Lena. 
My father — I am afraid he will find out. My father would 
kill him. 

Doctor. 

But your father won't find out. 

Lena. 

You would n't tell my father who it was? 

Doctor. 
No. 

Lena. 

You have n*t told anybody ? 

Doctor. 

No. 

Lena. 

Because you are the only one I have told his name. 

K E L L A R. 
\Re- appearing busily. '\ Come, Lena, make quick. 



ARIZONA 51 



Lena. 

Yes, Father. [SJbe goes out looking back appeaiingly to fjbe 
Doctor. 

Doctor. 

Must compliment you. Sergeant, on your part of the entertain- 
ment. 

K E L L A R. 
[^Tentatwe/y."] Yes, [The music outside ceases. 

Doctor. 

Could n't have been smoother at Delmonico's. 

K E L L A R. 
[With ill-concealea pride. '\ I have worked at a restaurant in 

Berlin. 

Doctor. 

V 

Lena is very handy, too. 

K E L L A R. 
\His brow cloudingJ\ Lena would be a good waitress, but 
it is better she is a striker for Miss Canby. 

Doctor. 

Much better. 

K EL L A R. 

Dat Canby* s ranch is a nice place for a girl, better dan a dam*t 
Cavalry Post. 

[BoNiTA appears at the window with Miss MacCullagh. 

B O N I T A. 
Sergeant ! Have you seen Mr, Denton I 



52 ARIZONA 

Sergeant. 

Not now. Lieutenant is officer of the day. 

[Miss MacCullagh re-enters and joins the Doctor bj 
the fireside. 

B O N I T A. 

I know. ^Then complainingly to the Doctor.] But he had that 
last dance with me. 

Miss MacCullagh, 

Why don't you dance. Doctor.? [Bonita leaves the window 
and appears in the doorway !\ You could, I believe, if you wore 
suspenders. [Doctor hitches up his trousers. Bonita enters. 

Sergeant. 

\To Bonita.] Vcn are you going to de ranch back agm. 
Miss Canby ? 

[Miss MacCullagh // talking animatedly to the Doctor, 
who listens tolerantly. 

Bonita. 

As soon as Colonel gets home from this trip of to-night. 

K E L L A R. 
You must oxgooze, but you take Lena ? Ycz ? , 

Bonita. 
Take Lena ? Yes, indeed, I couldn't do without Lena. 

K E L L a R. 
Good! Much oblige. 

[Denton appears in doorway. He wears his side armsy 
indicating that he /j on duty. 



ARIZONA 53 

Denton. 

Forgive me. Miss Canby, but I couldn't make it. Sergeant. 

K E L L A R, 
'Tenant. 

Denton. 

Report to Col. Bonham that the ambulance is ready. [Comes 
to chair down to the right where Bonita sits. 

K E L L A R. 
Yes, sir. [He goes out the door and to the right. 

Miss MacCullagh. 

You know. Dr. Fenlon, your — your indifference to dress is a 
thing of comment in the Post ? 

Doctor. 
Well, that *s a God's blessing these dull times, isn't it ? 

\He chuckles to himself. Miss McCullagh leaves bim 
and goes to the doorway. 

Miss MacCullagh. 
How does he expect any woman to take an interest in him ? 
\She goes out, passes the big window and disappears. 

Doctor. 

\Following.'\ Don't go 'way mad. [He pauses at door.l 
Pardon, Miss Canby, but understood smoking was permitted in 
this room. 

Bonita. 

Everywhere. [Doctor follows Miss MacCullagh.] I be 
lievc you didn't care to dance with me. [She crosses in mock 
dignity to the fireplace. 



54 ARIZONA 

Denton. 

[Following her.~\ You know better. You know 'way down 
in your wild Arizona heart that I *d almost mutiny to be with you, 
don't you ? 

B O N I T A . 
Why, you don't even keep your appointments. 

[Music is resumed outside. 

D E N T O N. 

The Colonel 's going to Los Angeles, and I *ve had to make 
ready for him. But I '11 stand under your window to-night, and 
I '11 spend every hour at your side to-morrow. 

B O N I T A. 
I 'm going to sleep to-morrow. 

D E N T O N. 

Lucky girl to be able. I 've almost forgotten how. 

B O N I T A. 

Forgotten how to sleep ? 

Denton. 

Yes — I 'm worse than no soldier at all. There 's a girl's name 
sings in my ears, and I don't hear the bugle. Captain 's sent me 
to headquarters twice in a week, and I have to take it ; because 
what would be a Colonel's answer if a man with one bar on his 
shoulder said, ** I forgot parade, sir, because I was dreaming of 
your wife's sister !" 

B O N I T A. 

[Laughing.^ He 'd probably answer that you hadn't forgot- 
ten to sleep. 



ARIZONA 55 

Denton. 

Day dreams — Bonita — day dreams — night, and day. Believe 

me ? 

Bonita. 

I think that *s something you learn at West Point. Every 

Lieutenant talks that way, Mr. Denton. \^She recrosses to the chair 

at right, 

Denton. 

To you ? 

Bonita. 

To all ^rls. 

Denton. 

Miss Canby, 

Bonita. 

Of course. Did you ever see a girl near an army Post that 
did n't have a gown trimmed with soldiers' buttons ? \She sits. 

Denton. 

[^Bending over her.'j But what of that ? 

Bonita. 

Every button a vow. 

Denton. 
^Ardent/y.'^ If each vow of mine {or you took a button, I M 
have to report in pajamas. 

[HoDGMAN and EsTRELLA pass the window and come in 

through the door, 

•■ 

H O D G M A N. 
Oh! Mr. Denton, anything wanted ? 

D E N T O N. 
Reporting to Colonel Bonham, sir. 



56 ARIZONA 

H O 1) G M A N. 

Oh! [He joins Estrella at the settle. 

Bo N I T A. 

[iV^//V/>?g- HoDGMAN*s manner and rising sympathetically.'^ Have 
r made trouble for you ? 

Denton. 

[As she looks at Hodgman,] Not there. Here. [Hand on 
heart. Bonita puts fan on his lips. Denton takes hold of it.'\ 
Where are those side combs ? \They go to the window. 

Estrella. 
[With Hodgman.] Don't talk about it, Leonard, until the 
Colonel has gone, or I shall scream. 

Hodgman. 

But Estrella, dear, only to ask if you followed instructions. Is 
everything ready ? 

Estrella. 
Yes, everything. 

Hodgman. 

Good ! Now, keep your nerve. In fifty-six hours we '11 be 
in New Orleans, and then — [Music outside ceases. 

Estrella. 
Careful — careful — 

[Colonel enters with Miss MacCullagh on his srm. 

Colonel. 

[Laughing. "l Estrella — 

Estrella. 

Yes, dear 



ARIZONA 57' 

Colonel. 

Miss MacCullagh hasn't decided — 

Miss MacCullagh. 
[^Trying to stop him,'\ Now, Colonel. 

EsTRELLA. 
What is it. Miss MacCullagh ? 

Colonel. 

[Laughing and holding her hands.~\ Has n't picked out an 
officer. Now, I say, a girl that can't find a fellow in the 
Eleventh, doesn't deserve one. Even offered a Captain. 
[EsTRELLA and Captain exchange glances. 

Miss MacCullagh. 
'Tisn't fair, is it ? 

[She goes to Bonita — Lieutenant Hallock and Youno 
enter and join the young people at the windoto, 

Denton. 

[Saluting, ] Colonel . 

Colonel. 
Mr. Denton. 

Denton. 

Ambulance is ready. 

Colonel. 
I know. Thank you. See here, Mr. Denton, why haven't 
you been dancing ? 

Denton 

Duty, sir ; officer of the day. 



58 ARIZONA 

Colonel. 

Oh. [Pause. Denton Joins Boi^ita a moment, tben goes into 
the doorway.'^ Well, dear. [71? Estrella.] Ambulance is here. 
I 'm going to be excused. You young folks '11 have to get along 
without me. 

D E N T O N. 

Ambulance here. Colonel, or at headquarters ? 

Colonel. 
Here. 

Denton. 

Yes sir. [Sa/.utes.~\ Ladies. \_He bows and goes out. 

Colonel. 

[At door and looking after Denton.] Mr. Hallock. 

H A L L O C K. 

Colonel. 

Colonel. 

What 's the matter with Harry? 

Hallock. 

Oh, nothing serious, I think, sir. 
» 

Colonel. 

[Coming back.'\ I want you juniors to understand that I have- 
n't any favorite officer. Even my adjutant 's a matter of business. 
But, Bonita, I have a favorite protege. That boy's father and I 
in the Washita Campaign made a ride with papers from Custer to 
Miles, that you '11 find in the printed records of the War depart- 
ment. Finished by trotting— bang — into Miles's dining-room, on 
the same horse. Denton insensible — me, crazy. Papers in 
Denton's water-soaked boot — cut it off — [Pause. Doctor 



ARIZONA 59 

re-aiters.'] And right now, I M be willing to — Well, just un- 
derstand, I like Ms boy. [Pause. "] Now, what *s the matter 
with him ? Com^, I see you know something. Doctor. 

Doctor. 

Don't believe it 's in my department. Colonel. 

Colonel. 
But, what is it ? 

Miss MacCullagh. 

Poker ! It 's that dreadful game you permit at the Officert* 
Club. 

Colonel. 

Poker? — *m — I had n*t noticed Harry losing much. 

Doctor. 

Only a few hundred, I believe, but — 

Colonel. 

[^Jstonished,"^ A few hundred? Gad! [Pause. 

Doctor. 

I don't think it 's :he money. Colonel. Denton isn't like 

the rest of us. 

Colonel. 

I should say not, if he doesn't mind the money. 

Doctor. 

He doesn't like merely vegetating. I really think Denton 'd 
be happier in some large business, where his activity could be en- 
gaged. He says a man rusts out in the army. 



6o ARIZONA 

Colonel. 

Gad ! If somebody in Washington had a little backbone, we 
wouldn't be rusting. [//^ goes to the door and turmJ\ Well, 
come, little gal, I '11 change my duds. 

E S T R E L L A. 
Excuse me. \Ske a?id Colonel disappear left. 

H O D G M A N. 
Guess it 's about time for us all to go. 

Doctor. 
Yes, nearly. [Miss MacCullagh goes out with Mr. Young. 

H A L L O C K. 
[Offering arm to Bonita.] I might have a minute's promenade. 

B O N I T A. 
Yes, and tell me something about Mr. Denton's losses. \She 
goes out with Hallock. 

Doctor. 
A few hundred covers it. Captain, does n't it ? 

H O 1) G M A N. 
Covers what ? [Walking slowly toward door. 

Doctor. 

Denton's losings. 

H O D G M A N. 

\Easily.'\ How should I know. 

Doctor. 

Oh ! then he *s paid, has he? Thought you had a record. 
Don't go. 



ARIZONA 61 

H O D G M A N. 

{_Ltghf/y.'] Think I will. Getting late. 

Doctor. 

But I want a word with you. 

H O D G M A N. 
[y// Joor."] Poker sermon ? 

Doctor. 

[^J/ter lighting cigar ette.'\ Woman. 

H O D G M A N. 
[^ickly alert. "l Woman ? [The Doctor nods.'] What 
woman ? 

Doctor. 

Lena. 

H O D G M A N. 

Lena } Lena who ? 

Doctor. 

Sergeant Kellar's daughter. 

H O D G M A N. 

What about her ? 

Doctor. 

Professional secret, but I have her permission to speak. [Pause.] 

She says your secret, too. 

H O D G M A N. 

I clon*t know what you mean. 

Doctor. 

\_Smi!ingS\ And you *re a cavalryman. [Pause.] Well, 
Captain, there 's a little guest at the Catholic Nursery in EI Paso. 
I told theni his board would be paid. 



62 ARIZONA 

H O D G M A N. 

Oh — I suppose we all contribute ? 

Doctor. 

[^Rising angrily.'] That 's very nasty, Hodgman, but you *11 
have to put up just the same. \_He crosses to the f replace, 

Hodgman. 
Rot ! 

Doctor. 

Kellar holds the sharp-shooter's medal for the regiment. 
[Kellar enters and goes to window , closing ;/.] Just speaking of 
you, Sergeant. Closing up ? 

Kellar. 
Only this side, sir. Dance is over. Colonel goes away 

besides. 

Do 2TOR . 
\_JVatcbing Hodgman.] Yes ? Er — a — Sergeant, are you as 
^ood with a six-shooter as you are with the carbine. 

Kellar. 
No, sir. Two men better dan me wid six-shooters. 

Doctor. 

[SmilingJ] Oh! Only two, eh ? 

Kellar. 

y^ZTJA, 'Tenant Denton and Private Kane, B Troop. 
[Lena appears in the door. 

H O O G M A N. 
You can go to bell, Fcnlon. \He turns on bis bet I and goes 
quickly out. 



ARIZONA 63 

1-E N A- 

[Apprebensively,"] Doctor. 

Doctor. 

[^Following HoDGMAN.] Will you put that permission in 
writing. Captain. [He disappears. 

K E L L A R. 

[Starting after them.'] Ha! They can*t fight at the Colonel's 

dance. 

Lena. 

Father! 

Ke L L A R. 
[Turning in the doorway.] What's the matter, Lena ? [He 
again turns away. 

Lena. 

Father — 

K E L L A R. 
[Impatiently.] Yes — yes — yes. 

Lena. 

I have found a letter. 

K E L L A A. 
Found a letter ? [Comes back into the room, 

Lena. 

From the Captain. 

K E L L A R. 
His letter ? 

Lena. 

To Missus. I saw him hand it to her. After a while / got it. 

Ke L L A R. 
Well, Lena, that is not your business. What everybody talks 



64 ARIZONA 

in the Post — you do not hear. I f an old man like the Colonel 
marries his granddaughter — let 'em talk — let 'em talk. I Ixavc 
this told you before. 

Lena. 
But they are going. 

K E L L A R. 
Who? 

Lena. 

The ColonePs wife. 

K E L L A R. 
[Shaking his headS\ Only the Colonel. 

Lena. 

But afterwards — with the Captain. 1 know. 

K E L L A R. 
Sh! [Pause. In lowered Jone.'\ Well, we must pretend noi 
CO know. And, when they come back, still not to know — 
nothing. 

Lena. 

But not to come back. 

K E L L AR. 
Not come back ? 

Lena. 

He is going — that is it — forever. 

K E L L A R. 
You talk foolishness. Forever } Leave a Captain's pay * 

Lena. 

She is rich. Every jewel is packed up. Believe me, father. 

I know. [Produces fetter.] And his letter [y// she gives 

the letter to Kellar, voices are heard in the hall. 



ARIZONA 



K E L L A R. 



6S 



ShJ 



[TJbe Colonel an^ Estrella enfer. The Colonei 
has bis cap and cape. 



C O L O N E ^. . 

Sergeant, have my bag put in the ambulance. 

Sergeant. 
It is in the hall. 

Estrella. 

In my room, the big bag. Lena knows. [Kellar and Lena 

goP^ Frank, dear, be careful, won't you ? 

Colonel. 

\Laughing and chucking her chin.~\ Why, little gal, what *s 
the matter to-night ? Careful ? Pulman car, fine hotel, and I, 
an old campaigner, who needs only a blanket. 

\_Again the music begins outside, 

Es TRELLA. 
Yes, and that makes you careless. I don't want anything to 
happen to you. I want you to live for years and years, and forget 
what a foolish girl you married. 

Colonel. 

Foolish girl, indeed! Here, none o' that. Why, litde one, 
you mustn't get the idea, because I don't dance, that I think 
dancing 's foolish. Gad! I 've danced all night and ridden both 
days to do it. Why, Strella, you never take a step or laugh a 
note, that your silly old martinet of a husband doesn't skip and 
laugh with you — in his heart — but, jingo! after sixty, you can't 



66 ARIZONA 

two-Step this outline of mine around, except by platoon. 
Ha, ha! 

E S T R E L L A. 
'T isn't that, but when you 're away and you thinlc about 
me, I want you to know that I respected you more than anybody 
in the world, and that I think you 're noble and good — 

Colonel. 

[Hurlesquely."^ Help — help! Officer of the guard! 

E S T R E L L A. 
And — and— --any mistakes I make, are because I 've been 
spoiled, and always had my own way — and — 

Colonel. 

Ha, Ha! \_Stops her with loud laughter and kisses her ; Denton 
appears in doorway, 

Denton. 

Pardon, Colonel, but had to put mules to the ambulance. That 
West bound train goes through at three thirty, and two hours and 
a half isn't any too much time for twenty miles. 

Colonel. 

Right. \K.isses Estrella again.'\ Good-bye. \He goes out, 

followed by Estrella. 

Colonel. 

[Outside.'] Good-bye, Bonita. Make it a wing shot, if you 
want to kiss me. 

[Denton y^//?a/j to door; Kellar enters. 

K E L L A R. 
Lieutenant — 'Tenant Denton. One minute, please. [They 
come down together. 



ARIZONA 67 

Denton. 

. Well, Sergeant ? 

KeL L AR. 
\_Handing letter.'] My Lena — found this letter. She thinks 
they mean to go to-night, [Denton reads, with an increasing 
frown ^ Missus Bonham*s horse is saddled. Lena says, things 
packed to travel. 

Denton. 

There is no address or name. 

K E L L AR. 
Lena saw Captain Hodgman give it to Mrs. Bonham. 

Denton. 

\StiH reading.] God Almighty ! 

Ke L L A R. 
'Tenant. [Denton looks up] Lena says, a roll of diamonds 
in a buckskin, big as ray wrist. 

D ENTON. 
[In disgust.] Ha! [Pause.] Don't speak of this. Sergeant. 
[BoniTA enters. 

BONTTA. 

Well, the Colonel 's gone, and it seems like the fun had all 
gone with him. 

Denton. 

A good deal of it has. [^Puts the letter in his breast and 
crosses moodily to the settle. 

K E L L A R. 
Orders, sir ? \^A Sergeant-Major appears in the doorway. 



68 ARIZONA 

Denton. 

That »s all. 

Sergeant-Major. 

Sergeant Kellar. Sergeant of the Guard sick. You Ml have to 
take his place. 

Kellar. 

All right, [The Sergeant-Major disappears. "[ Oh! it *s a 
dog's life, in the army. [Kellar ^^^z out, 

B O N IT A. 

[Regarding Denton.] Is this OfHcer-of-the-day business such 
a depressing thing .? 

Denton. 

Pardon me. A trifle pre-occupied. Oh no, rather a matter 
of form in peace times, this " Officer-of-the-day business.'* The 
Colonel goes in heavily for discipline, however, and I think he 
likes us to closely observe the regulations. 

BONITA. 
He likes you. 

Denton. 

I 'm sure of that. Perhaps you know that he got me my 
appointment to the Academy } [He crosses to where she stands at 
right, 

Bon IT A. 

Did he? 

Denton. 

[With emotion. "^ Been kind of a father to me, always. 1 
couldn't begin to tell you all that Colonel Bonham has done for 
me, and mine. 

[HoDGMAN in civilian dress comes quickly into the room. 



ARIZONA 69 

Bo N ITA. 

Why, Captain, in citizen's dress ? 

H O D G M A N. 

Yes. I thought I Mride as far as the village with the Colonel, 
but changed my mind. 

Denton. 

[Sullenly, "l Couldn't one do that in uniform? 

H O D G M A N. 
Mr. Denton! 

Denton. 

[Saluting.'\ Captain. 

H O D G M A N. 

Send word to that band-master to turn in. Get the Post quiet. 

Denton. 

Yes, sir, [He suiutes and goes, 

B O N I T A. 

Take me with you, Mr. Denton. [She runs after Denton in 
comic affectation of terror,. 

H O D G M A N. 

[At the mantel^ By God, what a finish ! But, after twenty 
/ears in the beastly service, with its favoritism and political pro- 
motions, the lick-spittal 's sent to the sea shore, and I in this sage- 
brush and alkali. [Looks about.'\ And now, this Dutch girl with 
more trouble for me. 

I^EsTRELLA appears in the doorway, 

Estrella. 

Leonard. 



70 ARIZONA 

H O D G M A N. 



Estrclla. 
Alone ? 



ESTRELLA, 



H O D G M A N. 
Alone. [/^he band outside stops playing, 

ESTRELLA. 
It *s awful, isn't it ? \She comes down right and sits, 

H O D G M A N. 

What? 

EsTRELLA. 
To go. 

H O D G M A N. 

Awfiil, if you think it awful. To me it 's life, 

E S T R E L L A. 
He doesn't dream of it — and he 's been so good to me. Oh! 
if I 'd never known you, Leonard. 

H O D G M A N. 

But you do know me, and you knew me as soon as you knew 
him, but he had an eagle on his shoulder ; and youth and love 
and devotion couldn't count against an epaulette. 

EsTRELLA. 
Haven't they counted, Leonard — haven't they. Am f not 
giving my immortal soul for them ? 

H O D G M A N. 
\Bendinz over her.l Forgive me. 
[BoNiTA returns. 



ARIZONA 71 

B O N I T A. 

They *re all gone, Estrella. 

[HoDGMAN goes to the settle, 

Estrella. 

\Rising.'\ Yes, dear — it 's been a long, gay evening for you. 

Bo NIT A. 

What 's the matter, Estrella ? 

Estrella. 

Tired a little, dear. Come, say good night to the Captain 
and go to your room. 

B O N I T A. 

\Laughing,'\ Like a good little girl! [7<7 Hodgman.] I 
suppose, if I get to be a hundred, I shall always be '* little sister ** 
to Estrella. Well, good night. Captain. [Offering her hand, 

H O D G M A N. 

[Shaking her hand."] Good night. I congratulate you on 
your evening. 

B O N I T A. 

Wasn't it gorgeous? 

Estrella. 
Good night, dear. [Kisses Bonita. 

B O NI T a. 

Good night. [She holds Estrella' s hand.'\ I say, Estrella, 
of course, you 're the chaperone, but if it 's so late that I 've got 
to go to bed, isn't it a shade late lor married chape/ones, «ind 
captains with black mustaches ? 



72 ARIZONA 

ESTRELLA. 
Sh! Bonita, you don't know what you are saying. Captain 's 
in command of the Post now, and there are important subjects to 
discuss. 

Bonita. 
Ow! Excuse me. 

[^She walks quickly and stiffly to the door, turns and 

salutes, and runs out laughing heartily. Estrella 

looks at the Captain and falls into the chair weeping. 

H O D G M A N. 
\_After closijig the door. '\ We won't get very far, Estrella, or 
that kind of mettle. 

Estrella. 
Is it best to go now ? Is this the time ? 

H O D GM A N. 

The only time. This trip of the Colonel's to Los Angeles ; a 
conference of this department. 

Estrella. 
Well ? 

H O D G M > N. 
Getting ready ! The talk is about over. We may be ordered 
to the front any day, and then — 

Estrella. 

There might be glory for you. 

H O D G M A N 

\Moodily.'\ I have a feeling that I should never come back. 
Officers are shining marks, Yr>u and I would meet no more. 
\Pause.'\ But if you haven't the courage — 



ARIZONA 73 

E ST RE 1. L A, 
[Stout/y.'\ There! [Rises. "l I 'm as brave as you arc now. 

H O D G M A N. 

Good ! Then get ready to ride, 

ESTRELLA. 
I have only my gown to change, 

H O D G M A N. 

[iVitb averted gaze."] And your — ^personal effects — the — the 
jewels — 

EsTRELLA, 
[Smiiing hitterly.'^ Here. [She takes a package from her 
breast, 

H O D G M A N. 
Don't resent my remembering them, because they 're all we 
shall have with which to travel. Besides, you ordered them, 
remember. 

E STR e'l L a. 
Of course, Leonard. Forgive my smile. But I resent anything 
that seems to take your first thought from me. [She extends the 
package toward him.'^ Take them, 

H O D G M A N. 

[Walking azaay."] No, let 's call it off, Estrella, if wc are to 
be reminded that yours is the money. 

EsTRELLA. 

Nonsense, Leonard. [She follows, 

H O D G M A N. 

And yet, at the first necessity, vou smue. 



74 ARIZONA 

ESTRELLA. 

I explain that, and say forgive me. [^Sbe /igain offers the 

jewels. 

H O 1) G M A N. 

Oh, well — [//> takes them with a show of reluctance. 

EsTRELLA. 
Now, don't pout, Leonard, or I shall break down. 

H O D G M A N. 

I won't then. Come. \He takes her hand.'\ I '11 make 
haste with my own horse, and look after yours. There — hurry 
now, yourself. [They go to the door, Hodgman opens it disclosing 
Denton in doorway; Hodgman slightly starts hack; Estrella 
gives a little cry of alarm. 

Hodgman. 

Well, Mr. Denton. 

Denton. 

An order came to C troop stables to saddle your horse. 

Hodgman. 

Well ? 

Denton. 

I countermanded the order. 

Hodgman. 

The order was mine. 

Denton. 

I countermanded it. 

Hodgman. 
Ycf? 

Den ton. 
Yes. 



ARIZONA 75 

H O D G M A N. 

By what authority. 

Denton. 

Officer of the day. 

H O D G M A N. 

I am your Captain. 

Denton. 

Still, the horse won't be taken from the stables. 

H O D G M A N. 
This is insubordination. 

Denton. 

It is more, sir, if you persist. 

H O D G M A N. 

What do you mean ? 

Denton. 

I mean death. [//// hand goes to his holster, 

ESTRELLA. 
Death ! Leonard ! 

H O D G M A N. 

Mr. Denton, you are using threatening language to your com- 
manding officer, and you have your hand upon your holster. 

Denton. 

Holster, yes — drawn, if you will. \He draws his revolver. 

EsTRELLA. 
Lieutenant Denton! You are in your Colonel's house. 

Denton. 

\Speaking to Estrella but watching Hodgman.] I 'm glai 



76 ARIZONA 

you remember it. Madam. I am in my Colonel's house, so is 
this man. I have here his letter, arranging this departure, and if 
he tries it, I am here to kill him. 

EsTRELLA. 
No — no! Oh, Denton, don't — don't make a row. Think ot* 
the scandal. Think — think of Bonita! 

Denton. 

\In a fateful undertone. "^ I am thinking of Bonita, but most, 
I think of that brave old soldier to whom I owe almost my exist- 
ence — to whom, as Colonel of my regiment, I owe allegiance; 
and I swear to God, Hodgman, if you attempt this wrong upon 
him, I *11 just kill you. 

Hodgman. 

\Pause.'\ You *ve got the drop on me, Denton, and I think 
you 're fool enough to shoot. \Pause,'\ As this lady's name is 
involved, I 've got to do what you say. 

De nto n. 
Then, go. \He steps aside, leaving ihe doorway free, 

Hodgman. 

Where ? To my quarters ? » 

Denton. 

To hell, if you care to, as you told the Doctor. [Hodgman 
starts at mention of the Doctor's name. The men exchange 
glances. Hodgman takes a step toward the door^ and Denton 
again interposes^ But, wait! \_Pause. T^ehtoh looks from one 
tn the other. "^ There are some jewels, wrapped in a piece of 
chamois skin ; I '11 take those. [^Pause. Denton extends bis 



ARIZONA -jj 

hand tozaard HoDGM AN. Hodgman hands him the packet,"^ I was 
as sure he had them as I was that he M ordered the horses. Your 
money, that *s all. 

ESTRELLA. 
The world ought to pity a woman who has money, 

Hodgman. 

You 're devilish careful to have your gun when you make this 
play, ain't you, Denton ? 

Denton. 

[Replacing revolver in its holster. ~\ A blackguard always ; 
nearly expelled from the Corps Cadets ; mixed up nastily, after 
that, in the Leavenworth papers ; and even now there *s a woman 
in this very Post with a greater claim on him than yours. 

Hodgman. 

You pup ! 

E S T R E L L A. 
Whom do you mean ? 

Denton. 

I mean that poor little girl of Kellar's. 

ESTREL LA. 
\Turning away sick at heart. 2 Oh! 

Hodgman. 

Mrs. Bonham, I swear to you — 

EsTRELLA. 
No — no! I feel that it is true. Oh! [She hreahs tnto soos 
anJ leans on the mantel. 



yS ARIZONA 

H O D GM A N. 
Look at me. 

D E NT O N. 

[Interposing.'^ She won't look at you, but I will, [/'/yz^i/'.] 
Now go ! 

H O D G M A N. 
[Stopping in the doorway.'^ \{ Kellar's daughter told all she 
knows, Mrs. Bonham, this gentleman might not stand so highlv 
with Bonlta. 

[Denton /i;^/j- his hand over Hodgman's mouth. 

Denton. 
That lady's name is not for your lips. 

H O D G M A N. 

[Pausing and with defiance. '\ It *s to a finish, you — beauty. 
\^Goes out and Denton closes the door. 

Denton. 

[Pause."^ And now, Mrs. Bonham, I want your parole. [He 

goes to mantel. 

ESTRELLA. 

Oh, Mr. Denton, you don't understand. You don't know 
how desperate a woman may become ; and — it sounds empty 
and foolish as an excuse to say that — a thing like this has grown 
— grown so gradually that the woman, herself, can't quite under- 
stana it — and yet — [Pause, followed by impulsive outburst.']^ 
Yet, it *s as irresistible as any dreadful fate that comes to you 
in a dream. The will is paralyzed ; you»- feet don't step where 
you mean they should go. Oh, I can't explain it, and I know I 
seem like a willfully wicked woman. [She sits in the inglenook seat 
and covers her face ^ 



ARIZONA 79 

Denton. 

[^Teffiier/y,"^ I think I understand it, Mrs. Bonham. I tried 
to knock off whisky once, and it was a deuce of a pull. Used to 
say to myself, ** I *11 bet I won't drink this," even while 1 was 
pouring it out. Finally got so I 'd bet I hadn't drunk it, after I 
had. Then one day the Colonel slapped me on the back, and 
told me to pull up. Stumbled occasionally after that, but he put 
his arm around me, and now I go in for golf — and tea. [Pause. "^ 
Most anybody can pull up if the Colonel *s with *em. 

ESTRELLA. 
\_Sobbing.'\ You 're talking about him just to break my heart. 

[She crosses to the tvindow. 

Denton. 

Yes. [Pause."] It ought *o break your heart, Mrs. Bonham. 
He 's fifty-two, but he is as young as any of us, and his love for 
you is the talk of Arizona. He 's as jealous as a Mexican. 

EsTRELLA. 
I know it. 

Denton. 

He 'dtake the life of a man, if he thought the man had kissed 
your hand. 

EsTRELLA. 
Yes. 

Denton. 

You can't beat that for a lover. And now, your parole. 
Promise me, you *1I never speak to this man again. 

EsTRELLA. 
Do you think I need to promise ? 



8o ARIZONA 

Denton. 

Still, your word. 

ESTRELLA. 
I give it. 

Denton. 

Your hand. 

Estrella. 

You care to take it, Denton ? 

Denton. 

Of course, [^j he takes her hand the Colonel's voice is heard. 

Colonel. 

\Outside.'\ Orderly, fetch in my bag. 
Estrella. 

The Colonel ! \_She runs to the door and locks it. 

Denton. 

Don't do that ! 

Estrella. 
Hide, Denton, please ! ^She turns to him, appealing, 

Denton. 

Impossible! There is nothing wrong. 

Estrella. 

But we can't explain. As you said, he 's as jealous as a 
Spaniard. Go — in the window a moment, and I '11 take him 
away. Then you can go out. It is you, of whom he has been 
jealous always. Never Captain Hodgman. 

Denton. 

Madness ! 



ARIZONA 8i 

Colonel. 

\Outside:\ Estrella. 

ESTRELLA. 
Here — here. Colonel. \Then in a whisper, '\ Please, Denton. 
Give me a chance to retrieve. [Denton dumbly expostulates. 

Colonel. 

\Trying the door,'\ Estrella. 

Estrella. 

Yes, dear, I *m coming. \She goes to the door with a last 
appeal to Denton. Denton goes into the window, Estrella 
opens the door. 

Colonel. 

\_As he enter s,'\ What 's the matter dear? You *ve been 
crying ? 

Estrella. 

Yes, a little. I came in here and locked the door, because 

I — I didn'uwant Bonita to see me. She *s been so happv 
to-night. She wasn't in our room, was she ? 

Colonel. 

No. 

Estrella. 

Let 's go there, then. 

Colonel. 

You — alone in here ? 

Estrella. 

\_Faint-heartedly. ] Yes — alone. 

Colonel. 

Where 's Denton. 



82 ARIZONA 

ESTRELLA. 
Denton ? 

Colonel. 

Yes. Captain Hodgman *s at the gate. He says he saw 
Denton come in the house. [Estrella shakes her head.\ Funny. 
\Pause — looks at Estrella with growing suspicion, 

Estrella. 
Well, let us look. 

Colonel. 

I 've been over this floor. , \Pause.'\ I wouldn't like Harry 
to know that we stood doubting him this way, for even a moment. 
And I won't. \He goes to the door but again pauses in suspicio.\'\ 
But Hodgman certainly saw somebody. That last batch of 
recruits had one or two gay birds in it. \He crosses to the window 
in the right wall and looks out.~\ Hodgman still there. 

Estrella. 
[^Under her breath. "^ My God! \_The Colonel turns and seet 
Denton behind the curtain of the larger window. 

Colonel. 

What ! \_Pause.'\ Mr. Denton ! [Denton comes from behind 
the curtain. Estrella appeals to htm from behind the Colonel. 
The men look steadily into each other* s eyes. 

Colonel. 

\^After a moment's pause. ^ Well, sir ? 

Denton. 

I 'd like until to-morrow to explain this — matter — to you. 



ARIZONA 83 

Colonel. 

Now ! And for God's sake be quick about it. Tell me at 
once, that I *m a trusting, old fool, betrayed, as they always are, 
by the dearest friend. [//^ crosses to position between Denton and 

ESTRELLA. 

Denton. 
No sir — no ? 

Colonel. 

But the door was locked. \Pause.'\ And she told mc she was 
alone. What other meaning is there to that } 



No other. 




Denton. 


What! 




Colonel. 

EsTRELLA. 


[ Under her breath 


. ] Denton. 






Denton. 


Only that. 


Mrs. 


Bonham thought she was alone. 


And you .? 




Colonel. 


Was there. 




Denton. 


Why? 




Colonel. 



Denton. 

Hiding. I heard Mrs. Bonham coming — and — and I hid there. 

Colonel. 
Why hide ? Why were you in the house ? \Pause. ] Not — 
\He looks at EsTRELLA, then at Denton.] There is one other 
lady here, under my care — a guest of the Eleventh. 



84 ARIZONA 

Denton. 

[^Quick/y and somewhat fiercely. '\ Colonel Bonham: 

Colonel. 

Well ? 

Denton. 

\Pause^ You — you are also mistaken in that. 

Colonel. 

Then why here ? 

Denton. 

1 '11 answer you to-morrow. 

Colonel. 
You *11 answer me now, or I shall place you under guard, 

Denton. 

To-morrow. 

Colonel. 

Now. \_Pau5e. He goes to the door.'\ Sergeant of the guard — 
Sergeant. \He returnsS\ Will you answer ? In the name of 
the regiment, Denton, don't force me to do this. 

[Pause, Enter Kellar and the Guard, who come in and 
halt at command from Kellar.] Sergeant, take Lieutenant Den- 
ton, and confine him under guard in his quarters. 

[Kellar salutes. Denton gives up his sword and pistol. 
He takes Hodgman's letter from his breast in an 
attempt at concealment. 

Colonel. 

What is there ? 

iJ E N TO N. 

Nothing, sir. 



ARIZONA 85 

Colonel. 

Search Kim. 

K E L L A R. 
[y/j Denton {iemurs.'\ I 've got to search you. Lieutenant. 

Denton. 

[In an undertone to Kellar.] The letter — for God*8 sake — 
that letter. 

Kellar. 

Sh ! \He passes and palms letter. 

Colonel. 

Well ? 

Kellar. 
\_With his attention on secreting letter.^ His pipe, I think, 
^o—\He inadvertently produces the jewels from Denton's breast. 

Colonel. 
What is it ? 

Kellar. 

I don't know. 

Colonel. 

Open it. 

[Kellar opens the jewel roll. Colonel sees contents^ 
takes ity looks at his wife. Denton quickly signals 
silence. Estrella affects astonishment. 

Colonel. 
Sergeant, wait outside. 

[Kellar goes out with guard.'\ Yours, ain't they ? 

Estrell/*. 

I think thev are — hut — 



86 ARIZONA 

Denton. 

[Interrupting.!^ Mrs. Bonham — 

Colonel. 

[Turning fercely upon him.'j Well, Mr. Denton. 
Denton. 

Well, sir. 

Colonel. 

How do you come by the possession of these ? 







Denton. 


[P^use.] 


I decline 


to answer. 

Colonel. 


You do ? 




Denton. 


I do. 







Colonel. 

Your refusal will leave but one inference. [Pause.'j And, 
damme, that *s impossible! Why should an officer of this regi- 
ment steal? [Pause. "^ Can*t you speak? [Pause.'j Mr. 

Denton. 

Denton. 

I *vc nothing to say, sir. 

Colonel. 

An officer of the Eleventh — [He breathes heavily.'^ And every 
one of *em 's been like a member of my family. [Pause."] I start 
out for a journey. The orderly rushes after me with a telegram, 
calling it off. I turn right back, and find — this! [Pause and per- 
plexed glance wavering between his wife and the jewels which he 
holds.] I 've been told to-night that you needed money — poker 



ARIZONA 87 

losses — but why not come to me ? \_Looks suspiciously at his zvi/e.'\ 
You have either committed a theft, Mr. Denton, or your presence 
here implies dishonor in this family. \_RegarJs Estrella distrust- 
fully, 

Denton. 

[Quickly."] Not that, sir — no. 

Colonel. 

[Turning upon Denton in almost rending anger.] The thief, 
then. 

Estrella. 

He *s not a thief. Those trinkets! [Denton starts to expostu- 
late.] I don't care — 

Colonel. 

I don't care for them, either. If I owned them, I 'd give 
them all to know that he was completely innocent. [Pause and 
a return to Denton.] Denton, I knew your father. [Pause.] 
I can't try his boy on so detestable a charge. Don't— don't make 
me do it. [The men look at each other for a moment^ and the 
Colonel's tone softens,! You 've been sullen and indifferent 
lately. You don't like your duty. I *m afraid, my boy, the 
army isn't the place for you. 

Denton. 

[Slowly apprehending.] What do you mean, sir? 

Colonel. 

I mean you ought to try something else. The only way out 
of — [Another waver between the wife and the jewels,] this tlung 
is for you to resign. 

Estrella. 

[Half hysterically.] No, Colonel, no! [She throws herself 
•n his breast, sobbing helplessly. 



88 



ARIZONA 



Colonel. 

[Looking frst at Denton, then down at her with half-closed 

eyesy that indicate suspicion ^ then searchingly at Denton again."^ 

Your resignation — write it! [He points to the writing table, 

[Denton pauses ^ walks to writing tabky turns in dumb 

appeal to the Colonel, and sits. The Colonel 

glances a moment at the woman who is sobbing on his 

shoulder, then, with a look of disgust at the jewels, 

pushes her roughly from him and dashes the jewels on 

the floor. 

E S T R E L LA. 

\lVith a step toward Denton and a broken-hearted cry.'X Oh, 

Denton ! 

[Denton rises and turns toward her, 

t Colonel. 

\Turning fiercely upon them.'\ What is it \ [Estrella sinh 
into a chair. Denton siti at table and quickly writes his 
resignation. 

CURTAIN 




The Third Act 




HE scene represents the interior of the 
dining-room at Canby's. There are 
doors in the walls right and left^ 
and a door and window in the back 
wall. All these openings show the 
three-foot thickness common to walls of adobe con- 
struction. Through the back door and window 
appear the court in which the first act took place 
and the stable beyond it. The walls of this dining- 
room have been white-washed^ but are now a smoky 
and uneven grey. Two or three prints of game and a 
powder company's advertising calendar hang about^ 
and there is a profusion of Apache pottery^ woven 
baskets and Indian trophies on shelves over the doors 
and window. Some Avajo blankets are on the floor 
for rugs. An olla of drinking water hangs outside the 
door. T'o the right is a home-made dresser. In the 
center is a heavy dowelled table. I'here are also four 
or five heavy square dowelled chairs, with seats and 
backs of cowhide, from which the hair has not been 
removed. Lena is setting the table for luncheon, while 
Tony, the vaquero, sits in the deep adobe window, 
singing to the accompaniment of his mandolin. 



90 ARIZONA 

Tony. 

[Singing. 

Del cielo la estrella Brillante, 
El viento que viene del mar, 
Sabiendo tu perfidia te adora, 
Porque lo llama locura ? 

Lena. 

That *s a, pretty song. 

Tony. 

I make this song. 

Lena. 

What does it mean ? 

Tony 

Major-Domo tell me 'Merican words. 

Lena. 

Did he ? Well, sing them. 
[Tony sings. 

The heavenly star far above her. 
The wind of the infinite sea. 
Who know all her perfidy, love her. 
Then why call it madness in me ? 

Lena. 

[Excitedly. '\ Stop. 

Tony. 

What is the matter ? 

Lena. 

You sang, *' who know all her perfidy. Are you ringing about 
me? 

Tony. 

What is perfidy ? In Spanish means, ''she break my hear*.** 



ARIZONA 91 

Lena. 

Perfidy is terrible. 

Tony. 

Is cuss word, like go-damn ? 

Lena. 

[Regaining seif-controL'\ No, Tony, I am foolish — it u 
nothing. \She sits to the left of the table. 

Tony. 

[Bravely.'] Because, when it is cuss word, I m«kc it. \_Fiereeif,'\ 

Go-dam ! I love you ! 

Lena. 

Oh! Tony ; no — no. 

Tony. 

\_^ite calm again.] Yes — ^yes. 

Lena. 

[Tearfully.] What right have I to be loved by anybody ? 

Tony. 

I go vdth soldiers. Speaky Spanish. When I come back, you 
be my wife — Tony Mostano, best vaquero in all the world. 

Lena. 

When do the soldiers go, Tony ? 

Tony. 

Damn 'f I know. 

Lena. 

Tony, you mustn't swear so. 

Tony. 

Oh, well, when I learn 'Merican, I learn good, bad together— 



92 ARIZONA 

no difference to mc. [Tot^y p/ays ** Lieber Augustin'''' wooingly, 
with Spanish time, grinning at Lena.] Lena, your father is a 
Dutchman. 

Lena. 

[^Smiling as she resumes her tvork.~\ Oh, yes! and that *s a 
German tune. 

Tony. 

[Growing graver and shifting his tune back to the melody of his 

ballad."^ When I come back, I build for you a shack. Not one 

room, like vaquero shack ; two rooms, with bench on East, where 

shadow comes. My mandolin — and damn-to-hell-my-soul, I love 

you. 

Lena. 

Tony! 

Tony. 

You live with me in 'dobe shack ? You be my wife ? 

Lena. 

I couldn't, Tony, I couldn't. 

Tony. 

[Fiercely. '\ What you want ? A Dutch fall-off-his-horse 
Corporal } I shall stay awake night, forever ? No! No! 

[BoNiTA and Mrs. Canby come in by the door, left. 
Tony disappears. 

Mrs. Canby. 
[Catching sight of the feeing lover.'] Lena. 

Lena. 
Yes, ma'am. 

Mrs. Canb\. 

Z^Severely."] What man was that ? 



ARIZONA 93 

Lena. 

Tony. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Well, the men don't belong in the court, Lena. You must tell 
them not to come beyond the stables. I wish they M get their 
blamed regiment done, and go. 

B O N I T A. 

Ma doesn't mean by that, Lena, that if there *s any one of 
them j.o\i care to see, he can't come, when your work is done. 

Lena. 

TWe is none I care to have come. 

[Denton appears in the door at back. He is in cowboy 
attire, with leather * * chaps. * * 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Is ic a round-up ? 

Denton. 

No, not a herd of any kind. It 's the regulars. 

B O N I T A. 
lBright/y.'\ The Eleventh .? 

Denton. 

I think so. What 's the matter with Tony ? [Bonita turm 
ana' looks at hEfiA."^ Oh! [^Pause anJ smi/e."] What is it, Lena ? 

Lena. 

He was playing his mandolin [^She stops in embarrassment 

and runs out of the door, right. 

Denton. 

She 'might do worse than Tony. He wants to quit again, and 
I 'd rather lose most any man from the company than Tony. 



94 ARIZONA 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

I 'II see him myself. I promised Estrella I 'd look after Lena ; 
and if Tony 's in earnest she '11 have to marry him. [^She disap- 
pears into the court after Tony. 

B O N I T A. 

You say the Eleventh is coming, Major-Domo ? 

Denton. 
Yes, ordered to the Gulf, I believe. \_He lays his hat and 
gauntlets on the window-sill, 

B O N I T A. 

Then they won't need the volunteers, will they ? \She sits at 
right of table. 

Denton. 
Yes, miss. \He comes down beside her. 

i B O N I T A. 

But why do you go ? Pa needs you here. He says you 're 
the best Major-Domo the ranch ever had. 

D E NTO N. 
\Sadly.'\ But I *m not a cattle-man at heart. Miss Canby. 
When I quit the service, I wasn't needed. But, with war in 
sight, and the President calling for men, a chap that 's had his 
bread and butter, and everything he knows in the world, ^ven him 
by his country, can't hang back. [//> goes behind the table and 
to the left. 

BoN ITA. 
You *re only one. 

D ENTO N. 

Yes, but the only one among these cowboys with the knowledge 



ARIZONA 95 

that can help them. It 's no use. Miss. The boys like me. 
They 've *lected me Captain of a company, and I *ve got to go. 

Bo N I T A. 

You may be killed if you go. [She rises and comes in front of 
table. 

Denton. 

And if I didn't go, I could never look you in the eyes again. 
Don't turn away. We may march to-morrow. If I stayed behind, 
wouldn't you — even you — despise me : [_He comes near her. 

B O N I T A. 

Go. ^She gives him her handy but as he takes it she sways with 
faintness. 

Denton. 

[Sustaining her.^ Bonita. [She regains herself^ Does it make 
such difference to you ? 

Bonita. 

Will you answer me one question truly ? [She gently pushes 
him from her. 

Denton. 
Yes. 

Bonita. 

When you left the service, why did you come here ? 

Denton. 

[Patise."^ It was out of doors. It was in the saddle. 

Bonita. 
Why didn't you go to Dunlap's, or to Fraser's ranches i 

Denton. 

[Avoiding her gaze,"^ Oh — 



96 ARIZONA 

Bon IT A. 

Truthfully. 

Denton. 

l^fTifb reserve,"^ Because I wished to be near you. 

B O N I T A. 

Why ? [Denton turns from her and does not reply, '\ You had 
more courage in your uniform, didn't you ? 

Denton. 

I had more right. 

B O N ITA. 
Do you mean that that was because you were not on my 
father's pay-roll ? 

Denton. 

I mean. Miss Canby, that — \PauseJ\ — that I am here. That 
I should have been stronger than to have come. That I should 
have ridden, as you suggest, to Eraser's or toDunlap's. \He again 
turns away, unable to express himself, 

B O N I T A. 

At the Post, on the night of my dance, you told me that you 
would almost mutiny to be with me. 

Denton. 

Yes. 

B O N I T A. 

When you first came, I thought you had left the army — because 
of me. [Pause."] Pa thought so, too. And then — [Pause."] You 
never said anything, and when the old Major-Domo was killed at 
Wilcox, and Pa gave you his place, I thought maybe you 'd be 
more like your old self; because, on a ranch, a Major-Domo is 
really a Captain. But you still seemed to avoid me — 



ARIZONA 97 

Denton. 

[Expostulating. 1 Miss Canby — 

B O N I T A. 

And that kind o* hurts a girl's pride. I wrote to Estrella 

about it. 

Denton. 

About what ? 

B O N I T A. 

All of it — your silence, your avoidance of your old comrades. 

Denton. 

To Mrs. Bonham ? 

B O N I T A. 
Yes, and Estrella answered — \_Pause,'\ — that you were the 
bravest and most honorable man she ever knew. 

[Denton passes her with a gesture of expostulation and 
goes right. 

B O N I T A. 

[Following slightly. "l I know I'm insistent and unwomanly 
now, but I didn't hunt you, Mr. Denton. You went out of 
your way to make me care for you ; and now, you can't ride to 
war, and be silent. Even a girl has some rights. 

Denton. 

Why, God help me, I love you. [He turns impulsively , 
abandoning all self-retraint and embraces her, 

Canby. 

[Outside. '\ All right, Tony, tell us as soon as you can make 
*em out. [Denton goes to the dresser. Bonita sits right of table. 
Canby appears in door at back.'\ You see those soldiers ? 



98 ARIZONA 

Denton. 

Yes, sir. [^Canby enterSy followed by Mrs, Canby. 

C A N B y. 

On the move, at last. Means business. [^He rings a small 

tap-bell on the table. "^ Like as not. Ma, the Colonel '11 come 

back a General. [Sam, the Chinaman y enters right. ~\ Sam, we 

want you to hurry up lunch. We '11 ask the officers to eat with 

us. Ma. 

Mrs. Canby. 

*Bout all we can do for *em in this God-forsaken country. 

Canby. 

Get up stuff for about — \l^o Denton] — How many officers do 
you suppose there are in that column ? 

Dent on. 

Those are only the four troops from Fort Grant. Say fifteen 
officers. 

Sam. 

Fifteen ? Lunch ? 

Canby. 

Yes, and put a case of champagne in a tub, and chink it full of 
cracked ice and salt. 

Sam. 

Yes, sa. \^He disappears by doory right. 

Mrs. Canby. 

I '11 change my dress. [She disappears left. 

Canby. 

[Smiling broadly."] Mother *s been itching for a chance tt one 
o* them new dresses. 



ARIZONA 99 

Denton. 

Mr. Canby. 

C A N BY. 

Major-Domo. [//If comes down left of table. 

Denton. 

Have you ever thought that — anybody around the ranch might 
get interested in — in your daughter ? 

C A N B Y. 
\After long pause."] Yes — at times. 

Denton. 

Ever thought that — I might ? [Canby reaches to his hip pocket; 
Denton's hand quickly drops to his revolver. Canby draws a 
tobacco pouch, and Denton sighs with relief 

Canby. 

Yes. \Takes a chew of tobacco, 

Denton. 

Well, sir, I have. [Canby nods, walks slowly back of table, 
keeping his eye searchingly on Denton.] Have you any objection, 
sir ? \_Pause ; Canby shakes his head.] I — I 've been talking to 
her. I Ve told her I love her — and — and she *s been good 
enough to admit that she loves me, sir. 

£Canby pauses a moment , leans over and rings bell. He 
then walks deliberately to the door. Denton crosses 
to left of table y observing him. At the door Canby 
takes a cup of water from the olla and rinses his 
mouth, 
[Sam enters, right. 



loo ARIZONA 

C A N B Y. 

Sam ! Bring a bottle of champagne — right now. [Sam dis- 
appears, 

B O N I T A. 

\_Running to him as he comes to the table.'\ Oh! Pa. [Canby 
embraces her, with a swing tozvard the chair left, and comes tn front 
of table, 

Canby. 
Sit down, kitten. Major-Domo — [Bonita sits. 



Denton. 



Yes, sir. 



Canby. 
I *ve lived here and sold beef to Government and Apaches for 
thirty years. [Denton nods.'\ Lots of *em have tried to drive 
herds in here, and steal a march on me, but whenever they reached 
the Posts or the Agencies, Canby 's cattle was usually there ahead of 
them. \He strikes the table, emphatically, 

Denton. 
Yes, sir. 

Canby. 

Nobody 's made a move in this valley — twenty miles from peak 
fo peak, and two days in the saddle up and down — that I 
wasn't on. 

Denton. 

Yes, sir. 

Canby. 

So it *s a pretty safe bet that I *d tumble to whatever was Join* 
in this 'dobe corral, ain't it. [Denton nods, 

[Sam brings in a quart of champagne and three glasses^ 



ARIZONA loi 

C A N B Y. 
^To Sam.] Open it. [^Tbe;i to Denton.] And you *ve 
suited me from start to finish. 

Denton. 

Thank you, Mr. Canby. 

Can by. 

One year, I may make a hundred thousand dollars. The next, 
I may be broke. \He takes the bottle from Sam and motions him 
to go. Sam disappears into the pantry y right. '\ It all depends on 
the weather, and Congress. Give us plenty of rain, and a tariff 
that a Mexican heifer can climb over, and we 're all right. 
[Hands a glass of wine to Denton.] God has charge of the rain, 
[Hands a glass to Bonita.] Blast me, if I know whose depart- 
ment the tariff" 's in. Well, here 's luck. [They drink."] My 
boy, up to this time you Ve been on a salary. Now, you *re a 
half owner. 

Denton. 

Mr. Canby. 

Canby. 

I 've just been waitin* for you and Bonita to get together. [He 
places his glass on the table and walks right. 

Denton. 

[Sadly.] I can't stay, sir. 

Canby. 

[Slowly returning to the table and putting an arm around 
Bonita.] She 's told you she loves you, and you 're goin' just 
^he same ? 

Denton. 

I must. 



I02 ARIZONA 

C A N B y. 

[^Pfrjua^hig.J The other girl, Estrella, had half a million 
when she married, and this one hasn't got any the worst of it. 

Denton. 

'Tain't money, sir. My old messmates at the 'Cademy are 
going with their lives. It may be kind o' silly to you, but the 
flag to which I was taught to take off my hat, that 's going, too. 

C A N B Y. 
And damme, if I had twenty years off my shoulders, I *d 
go myself. [^To Bonita.] How is it, kitten, we send him, 
do we ? 

Bonita. 

lFawt/y.'\ Yes. 

C A N B Y. 

Bully ! Go get that finery. 

D E NTON. 
Finery ? 

C A N B Y. 

Your old first Lieutenant shoulder straps. / cut *cm from your 

jacket, and she ^s sewed on an extra bar of braid. [Bonita g^fs a 

cavass coat from the wall.'\ Now, brand him a Captain of Arizona 

Volunteers. 

Denton. 

Not this coat. [Bonita helps him put it on, 

C A N B Y. 

Yes, let 's see how it looks. \Passes tvine,"] You might 

'a* been with these Regulars, but your 're doin* the next best 

thing — and you go heeled. Yes, sir, you go half owner of the 

fattest ranch in Arizona. [Canby brinks. Bonita gets close to 



ARIZONA 103 

Denton, and both drink from the same glass simultaneously,^ 
Now, lad, come back a colonel if you kin. I say that for 
Bonita, because, as far as she *s concerned, there 's only one sand- 
storm ahead of you. [He crosses to the door left, 

Denton. 

What 's that, sir ? 

C A N B Y. 

Mrs. Canby. 

Denton. 

Mrs. Canby ? 

Canby. 
Yes. Ma don't care a heap about leather, but she loves gold 
braid. There 's hardly anything in the world she won't trade 
even for a string of soldier buttons. 

Denton. 
'M. 

Canby. 

\^Moodily,'\ She fixed up Estrella's match with the Colonel. 
That wasn't my kind, and now, well — they ain*t much more 'n 
speakin' to each other. 

Denton, 

Too bad ! I thought them most devoted. 

Canby. 

They were. The trouble, whatever it is, is since you 've been 
here. [Tony appears at the window. 

Tony. 

Governor ! Governor ! 

Canby. 

Well, Tony ? 



I04 ARIZONA 

T O N Y. 

The soldiers comin' in sight plain enough now. Colonel *s 

with 'em. 

C A N B Y. 
The Colonel ? 

Tony. 

And Mrs. Colonel, too. [f/> disappears. 

B O N I T A . 

Estrella ? 

C A N B Y. 

Well, let 's meet 'em, kitten. \_He goes out the door. 

B O N I T A . 

[Running to door and stopping.'^ Will you go, too ? [Denton 
shakes head ; she returns and gives him both her hands, '\ Harry, 
Pa has given you half the business. 

D E N T O NT. 

He has given me all the world. \He kisses her. Bonita runs out. 

Den to n. 

\Refiectively.'\ Colonel and wife estranged. Hardly worth 
my silence. No matter, this is worth it. \Looks about.'] Freedom, 
acdon, the wide horizon. 

[Sam enters from pantry. 

Sam. 

May' Domy. Boss says fifteen — fifty ? 

Denton. 

Fifteen — lunch for fifteen. \Sam removes bottle and glasses. 



ARIZONA 105 

Sam. 

Vclly good. [y^ bugle sounds in the distance, 

D E NTO N. 

\lVith suppressed enthusiasm. '\ Left into line. Conley's 
bugle. Not another trumpeter like him in the service. \The bugle 
sounds again. "^ By jove ! 

Sam. 

\SmilingJ\ You like sodga trumpet. May' Domy ? 

Denton. 

Like it, Sam ? That 's a soldier's cocktail. \^Again the bugle. "^ 
Dismount. 

Sam. 
You sabe what he say, eh ? [Another call. 

D ENTON . 
Yes, that 's the water call. 

[EsTRELLA and BoNiTA enter ; Bonita has a rose in her 
hand. EsTRELLA comes silently to Denton and takes 
his hand. Bonita crosses to where Sam /V, near the 
dresser. 

Bonita. 

Sam, what about luncheon ? \They talk apart, 

EsTRELLA. 
\To Denton.] I '11 never forget your awful sacrifice for mc. 
Night and morning I prayed for you. 

D E NTON. 

Mrs. Bonham. 

EsTRELLA. 
Yes, and I 've kept my parole. \She gives him her hand, 
Sam goes out. Bonita rejoins them. 



io6 ARIZONA 

Bon IT A. 

[^Fastening the rose at Estrella's throat. "^ How do you think 
he looks, Estrella ? 

E S T R E L L A. 
Looks well — and happy. I hope you are happy, Mr. Denton ? 

Denton. 

I *m the happiest man in the world. \_He crosses playfully y 
catching at Bonita, who retreats. 

\_The Colonel and Canby pass the window^ talking. 
They appear in the doorway. The Colonel // travel- 
stained and dusty. 

Colonel. 

[y/r they enter. "^ I really haven't time. \He pauses as he 
sees Denton. 

Canby. 

[Noting this.'\ Got a little of the military ourselves — Mr. 
Denton, my Major-Domo, Captain ist Arizona Volunteers. 

Colonel. 

[With reserved] Oh — Captain Denton. \_Bows. 

Denton. 
Colonel. 

Canby. 

Why, what *s the matter } 

Denton. 

You gentlemen must care to talk together. I Ml be excused. 

[He goes out, 

Canby. 

Why ! Thought you were the best of friends. [Lena comes 

from the pantry with some dishes. 



ARIZONA 107 

E S T R E L L A. 
Why, Lena, how do you do ? 

Lena*. 

Oh, Mrs. Bonham. [She takes E^TKEhh^'i hand and kisses H' 

effusively. 

EsTRELLA. 
Nonsense ! 

Colonel. 

\^Ohserving the dishes.'] Here, what *s this for? We can't 
stop. [Lena returns to the pantry, 

C A N B Y. 
Now, why not ? 

Colonel. 

Because this is simply a halt to water, and tighten cinches. Our 

cars are on the side track now. Wouldn't mind a bottle of beer. 

C A N B Y. 
Got some champagne on ice, and — 

Colonel. 
Beer! 

C A N B Y. 
[To BoNiTA.] Beer. [Bonita leaves to fetch it. 

EsTRELLA. 
And I 'm to stay here. Pa, with you — and Mother — and 
Bonita. 

C A N B Y. 
Of course — I 'U send some champagne to the officers. [Bonita 
hrings the beer. 



io8 ARIZONA 

Colonel. 

Coffee's better for 'em. \_Takes beer.'\ Good ! 

[Mrs. Canby re-enters in gaudy costume. She and 
EsTRELLA embrace, 

E S T R E L L A. 
/ V/send them the coffee. 

M R S. C A N B Y. 

Estrella^ 

EsTRELLA. 

I 'd rather. Mother. I 'm at home, now, for a while. \She 
goes into the pantry. 

\T'he Doctor and Miss MacCullagh enter. 

Canby. 

\ln exaggerated welcome J\ How are you ! [Mrs. Canby 

also greets them. 

B O N I T A. 

\To Miss MacCullagh.] You goin' to stay with us, too ? 
Miss MacCullagh. 

No, dear. [Displays Red Cross insignia. 

Canby. 
Quit school tcachin', eh ? 

Miss MacCullagh. 

Yes, for good. 

Doctor. 

Colonel — 

Miss MacCullagh. 
Doctor Fenlon, if you don't like suspenders, wear a belt, 
please. 



ARIZONA 109 

Doctor. 

[7(7 Colonel.] That two-story, next to Major Cochran's, at 
the Post — 

Colonel. 

Yes. [^Pause, during which Doctor looks at Miss MacCul- 
LAGH.] What of it ? 

Doctor. 

The custom 's been to assign those 'dobe quarters to the mar- 
ried men. Three bachelors in that. 

Colonel. 

No married men unprovided for ? 

Doctor. 

[Shaking headJ^ Was wondering what your policy would be 
if other married men should — turn up when we come bs^ck. 
[Glances meaningly at Miss MacCullagh. 

Colonel. 

Why, oust the boys, of course. 

Doctor. 

[Smiling reflectively,'] Er — Colonel — 

Colonel. 

Well ? 

Doctor. 

You 're a member of the Officers' Cab? 

C O 1 O N ^. 1. 

Rather. 

Doctor, 

[To Miss MacCullagh.] He 's the President. 



no ARIZONA 

Miss MacCullagh. 
Why, I know that. 

Doctor. 

[To Colonel.] Whenever there *s a little game of draw, y^ou 
usually take chips ? 

Colonel. 
Yes. 

Doctor. 

We play pretty much same kind of game ? Don*t hold *em 
too close, and, on the other hand, don* t bet every dinky ten-spot. 
[Colonel nods.'\ And in the long run, what *s been j^i;^r losses? 

Colonel. 

Think I *m a little ahead. 

Doctor. 
[7(? Miss MacCullagh.] There ! Me, too, 

C A N B y. 
What 's he talkin* about ? 

Doctor. 

[TV Colonel.] Hates it. 

Miss MacCullagh. 

Poker ? 

Doctor. 
Yes. 

Miss MacCullagh. 

I do. 

Doctor. 
[To Colonel.] Sec ? 

Colonel. 

Not quite. 



ARIZONA III 

Doctor. 

It *s really the only game f care for. [^Turns to Miss Mac- 
CuLLAGH.] So there *s your explanation. 

Miss MacCullagh. 

What explanation ? 

Doctor. 

This is the third time she 's declared her intention of quitting 

school, always in my hearing, and she 's displayed a personal 

interest in my wearing apparel, that nothing short of matrimony 
can make legitimate. 

Miss MacCullagh. 

Why, you horrible creature ! 

Doctor. 

[^To Colonel.] But if I can't draw and fill occasionally, 
.what's a two-story *dobe to me? [Colonel j/^/A"/.] So that 
explains my silence. [He turns to Miss MacCullagh. 

Miss MacCullagh. 

Which is infinitely easier to explain than your speech. \Sbe 
goes haughtily out. 

D OCTOR . 

My method — ^healthy irritation. Next time, I 'II ask her 
tUrecdy. She was bom for a hospital. 

[HoDGMAN enters. Like all the other soldiers of this act, 
he is Just-covered, 

H O D G M A N. 

[Saluttng.l Colonel. Ready in fifteen minutes. 



112 ARIZONA 

Colonel. 

Good. [^Returns sa/ufe,"] Governor. [Goes to door with 
Canby. 

Mrs. Canby. 

I *m sorry there *s got to be war, but it *s good to see you 
again. Captain. [Hodgman shakes hands with Bonita. 

H O D G M A N. 
Thank you. 

Bonita. 

Does the army miss Mr. Denton very much. Captain ? [Th 
Colonel goes. Canby comes down, 

Hodgman. 

Does the army miss Denton ? [Laughs."] Oh, not particularly. 
The army 's conscious that he *s gone, and it *s rather glad. 

Bonita. 

Glad ? 

Hodgman. 

Pardon ! I forgot that Denton was something of a favorite 
with you. Miss Bonita. 

M R S. C A N B Y. 

Not at all. Captain. But, why glad he *s gone ? 

Hodgman. 

Rather a dangerous man to have around. 

Canby. 

Quick on the trigger ? 

Hodgman. 
No. Denton *s specialty was the ladies. [Laughs,"^ 



ARIZONA ii; 

C A N B Y. 

Get out ! 

B O N I T A. 

I don't believe you. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 
Bonita ! 

H O D G M A N. 

[/^/V>& dignity. "^ Sorry to brush Miss Canby the wrong viay, 

but — 

Canby. 

But about Denton ? 

H O D G M AN. 

[After a look toward the door for the Colonel.] That was 
why he had to resign. 

M R S. C A N B Y. 

\Looking at Canby.] Had to resign ? 

Canby. 

Why, had to ? How ? 

H O D G M A N. 
Excuse gossip. \Laughs,'\ But since my veracity is ques- 
tioned — \Looks at Bonita, the?i to Mrs. Canby.] — an officer 
coming home unexpectedly, found his young wife with another — 
man. That man was Denton. 

Bonita. 

That *£ a falsehood, a cowardly falsehood' \Tbe women look 
at Doctor, who is by the door. Hodgman laughs and crosses to 
the dresser, right. 

Doctor. 

First I 've heard of it. 



114 ARIZONA 

C A N B Y. 

You understand. Captain — er — Denton 's my manager here <A 
the ranch. ' 

H O I) G M A N. 

[/v some alarm,'\ Here ! 

B O N I T A. 
\Noticing Hodgman*s discomfort.^ I told you it wasn't »o. 

Doctor. 
On the place now ? 

C A N B y. 

Yes. \l'he Doctor goes out in search for Denton. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Who was the woman ? Mrs. Cochran ? \She crosses eager t-j 

to HODGMAN. 

H O D G M A N. 

\Leaving her."] I can't mention names, Mrs. Canby. 

C A N B Y. 
[>/f HoDGMAN passes him."] But the fact? 

H O D GM A N. 

The fact I know. 

[EsTRELLA and Sam enter from pantry with big coffee-pot, 

ESTRELLA, 

Now, take that to the officers, Sam. 

H O D G M A N. 

[Overhearing,"] Coffee } I '11 show Sam where to go. 

Come. 

[He goes out, Sam follows, Bonita burst* into tears 

and falls on tahle. 



ARIZONA 115 

E S T^l E L LA. 

Why, little sister, what is it ? [^Sbe puts her arms around 

BONITA. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 
It idl comes o* Canby*s havin* a punch eat with us. 

C A N B y. 
A Major-Domo ain't a puncher. 

ESTRELLA, 
Mr. Denton ? 

M R S. C A N B y. 

Yes. She thinks she *s in love with him, and you know who 
stubborn a puppy love can be. 

C A N B y. 

Well, Mother, I don't call it puppy love. 

B O N I T A. 

[Looking up.'\ If to love once and for always is puppy love, 
then my love is that. He is the first man I have ever cared for — 
I am the first woman he has loved. [She buries her face in 
Estrella's goton, 

ESTREL LA. 

\Comforting.'\ A soldier's sweetheart mustn't cry, Bonita. 

M R S. C AN B Y. 

[Resenting Estrella's attitude, "^ We understand there were 
some didos down at the Post, that Denton had to resign on ac- 
count of. 

EsTRELLA. 

His resignadon was a mistake. Denton committed no wrong. 
He is an absolutely upright, innocent man. [She comes dotun^ in- 
dignantly. 



ii6 ARIZONA 

B O N I T A. 

^Rising and embracing her."^ Estrella! 

E S T R E L L A. 
And you love him, darling, all you know how ? 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

[DominantlyJ^ You may think he 's innocent, Estrella, but 
you can't know anything about it. 

Estrella. 

I can know, and I do know. 

C A N B y. 

[Apprehensiveiy,~\ How, daughter ? 

Estrella. 

Because at the time of which he was accused — [Pause. '\ 
Denton was with me. [Canby and wife exchange looks. Bonita 
recoils from Estrella. 

Bonita. 

With you ? 

Estrella. 
With me. 

M R S. C A N By. 
Where ? 

E S T R E L L A. 

\ Puzzled.'] Why, in my drawing-room. [Pause.'\ What 

is the matter ? 

C A N B y. 

Did — did the Colonel find you there ? 

Estrella. 
\Hunted and at bayj\ The Colonel ? 



ARIZONA 117 

C A N B Y. 

Yes. When you and Denton were together, did the Colonel 
come in of a sudden and make trouble about it ? 

ESTRELLA. 
Wth whom have you been talking ? 

Bo N IT A. 

Captain Hodgman. 

EsTRELLA. 
\_HystericaIIy.'\ My God I To my own people ! What a 
poltroon ! \^She weeps, 

{The Colonel re-enters followed hy the Doctor. 

Colonel. 
Goodbye. Don't cry about it. \_He avoids Estrella's extended 
band. 

EsTRELLA. 
Frank — Don't humiliate me here, however you distrust me. 

Colonel. 

Where did you get that rose ? [//i? looks at the rose on her breast, 

EsTRELLA. 
Bonita put it there. Will you have it ? 

[Canby goes into doorway at back. 7'he Doctor talks 
apart with Bonita and Mrs. Canby. 

Colonel. 

"Ho— [Pause. "^ Denton is here. 

EsTRELLA. 
Yes- 



ii8 ARIZONA 

Col ONEL. 

Did you know ic ? 

ESTRELLA, 
Yes. 

Colonel. 

That is why you asked me to bring you. 

Estrella. 

No, I didn't want to be at the Post while you were gone. 
Frank ! Don't smile in that bitter way; don't let these people 
know that you hate me. 

Colonel. 

[//? undertone."^ My God ! I love you with a perversenesi 
that makes me despise myself. 

Estrella. 

And I love you. There was never a thought between me and 
Denton, I swear it. 

Colonel. 

We can't talk of it now. 

Estrella. 

It 's been two months — ^and — 

Colonel. 

Yes — two months in hell. Don't talk of — it — now. 
Estrella. 

Come a minute with me, Frank. ^Pause. She goes out left ; 

the Colonel follows, 

C A n B y. 

Poor girl, I don't blame her ; Colonel 'd be a pretty easy mark 
for the fever. \He comes inside. 



ARIZONA 119 

Doctor. 

Oh, I *II get some suspenders, and then Miss MacCullagh 
can look after the Colonel. 

[Sergeant Kellar enters. 

K E L L A R. 
The Colonel here ? 

C A N B Y. 

Be right out. How are you. Sergeant ? 

Kellar. 

Mr. Canby, I haven't seen you since my Lena — is — here. 

C A N B Y. 

Oh, that 's all right. Sergeant. 

Kellar. 
I never forget it. But you have been fader for two girls, you 
know how a man's heart is for one. And I think about your 
care for Lena. \To Doctor.] Dat is so. Doctor, you know. 
[TV Canby.] She is here, yet t 

Canby. 

Oh, yes. 

Kellar. 

Good girl, now ? 

Canby, 

Splendid girl. 

Kellar. 

Mit de men — is behave all right ? 

Canby. 

You bet. The best vaquero on my place is dead in love with 
her. 



1 20 ARIZONA 

K E L L A R. 
Yes? 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Wants to marry her. I *11 find him. [^Sh goes in search of 
Tony. 

K E L L A R. 
Lena likes him ? 

C A N B Y. 
Yes, I think so. 

K E L L A R, 
German ? 

C A N B Y. 
No, he 's a Mexicai., out a pretty good one. Going to Cuba 
with our volunteers. 

K E L L A R. 
Well — \He looks around at Bonita. 

C A N B Y. 
Coming now. 

K E L L A R. 

I talk mit him. \jigain looks at Bonita, who^ seeing his anxiety ^ 
goes out hy pantry door. 

C A N B Y. 

[To the Doctor.] You don't have to build a fire under her, 
do you ? [Tony appears at window 

Tony. 

Yes, sa. \^Sees Kellar,] Sergeant. 

C A N B Y. 
Come in. [Tony leaves the window, 

Kellar. 

Is dis man? \yo^Y appears in doorway and comes iv^ followed 
by Mrs. Canby, 



ARIZONA 121 

C A N B Y. 
That 's Tony. [^Pause, Men regard each other in panic 
silence, 

T O N V, 
What is the matter ? 

C A N B Y. 
The Sergeant — 

KeL L A R. 

Mr. Canby tell me — that Lena is — that maybe you like Lena. 

Tony. 

[^Firing up.'\ Lena r Is my own beezness. For him, I rope 
the cow. What I think, what I lofe, is no beezness, but there — 
\To heaven'] — and me. [//> s/aps his breast and breathes hard, 

Canby. 

^Soothingly.] Well, keep your shirt on, Tony. Ain't any- 
body kickin*. 

[Lena enters and shrinks back into doorway of pantry. 

Ke L L A R. 
Der — ah — Mr. Canby speaks fine for you. If Lena shall like 
you, I am glad. But I don't want some man to like Lena, und 
den some day find out. It is right de man must know before I 
go vay — now ! 

Canby. 

Well, I think he does. 

K E L L A R. 
Yes ! IJhey look at Tony. 

Canby. 
You know — er — Lena — about the trouble Lena had ? 



\22 ARIZONA 

Tony. 

[Angrily. '\ Yes — yes. I know. 

C A N B Y. 
Yes, he knows. 

K E L L A R. 

[LeaMng him,"] And still — yet ? 

Tony. 

^PFith spirit.'^ What the difference ? Some say I marry her. 
First she tell me his name — and then — \_Pausey and successful 
effort at self-controL"] — Never mind. Now — -now she — lofesme. 
[Lena covers her face. 

C A N B Y. 

\_A?istoering Doctor's look.'^ That 's Arizona. We 're a little 
shy on water, but there 's as much charity for a woman as you can 
round up in the Gospel of St. John. [//> signals Tony to go. 
Tony, goifig reluctantly, bows. Kellar salutes bim, 

K E L L A R. 
Vtrc is Lena ? [Tony pauses,. 

C A N B Y. 

In the pantry, likely. [He starts down and sees her, 

Kellar. 

[Turning.'^ Lena. [He embraces her and turns helplessly to 
Canby. Canby points off. Kellar goes with Lena into the 
pantry. Tony tries to follow , and is stopped by Canby, 

Tony. 

Is my bcezness — I go dere ! [Pause, Canby slaps him on the 
baek, ^OfiY follows Lena into pantry. 



ARIZONA 123 

C A N B Y. 

[Turning to Doctor] Eh ? [Doctor nods, *« You bet." - 

Denton. 

[Meeting Doctor at the door,'\ Why, hello Doctor. Good 

of you to ask for me. 

Doctor. 

[Effusively,'] Denton ! And those ? [Points to shoulder* 

straps, 

[BoNiTA re-enters hurriedly by door at back, 

Denton. 

Volunteers. 

B O N I T A. 
\To Canby.] Ask him now. Before Captain Hodgman goes. 

Can B Y. 

Oh — er — Mr. Denton — [Denton attends; pause.] Captain 
Hodgman said something here, that you ought to know *bout 
*fore you go. It 's about your leavin* the Cavalry. 

Denton. 

WeU? 

Canby. 

What was the reason ? 

Denton. 

What did Hodgman say ? 

Canby. 
[Paused] An officer's wife. Was that it? 

Denton. 
{Pause.] I can't explain just now. 



124 ARIZONA 

Doctor. 
Excuse mc. [//^ goes out. 



Now. 

Not now, Mr. 



C A N B Y. 

Denton. 



C A N B y. 
You mean * cause the women are here ? 

Denton. 

No sir. The truth concerns another more than it does myself. 

C A N B Y. 
\_Pause.~\ Er — a — Captain Denton. [^Paase.J You know I 
— er — [^Pause. Bonita goes to Canby, who puts an arm about her.'\ 
We take a man on here, and ask no questions. We know when 
he throws his saddle on his horse, whether he understands his 
business or not. He may be a minister backsHdin', or a banker 
savin' his last lung, or a train-robber on his vacation — we don't 
care. A good many of our most useful men have made their 
nustakes. All we care about now is, will they stand the gaff,? 
Will they set sixty hours in the saddle, holdin' a herd that 's 
tryin' to stampede all the time ? Now, without makin' you any 
fine talk, you can give anyone of 'em the fifteen ball. I don't 
know whether it 's somethin' you learned in the school, or 
whether you just happened to pick the right kind of a grandfather, 
or what. But your equal has never been in this territory in my 
time. [BoNiTA kisses her father, 

Denton. 

You *rc very good, sir. 



ARIZONA 125 

C A N B Y. 

All of which is merely to say that my proposition about half 
owner will still go — after you do explain your leaving the Cavalry 
— if the explanation doesn't hit too near home to me. 

Denton. 

Very well, sir. 

C A N B y. 
And if it does pinch any woman that I 'm due to protect, 
why — I MI protect 'em all right. 

Denton. 

I hope so. 

C A N B Y. 

You know whether you want to talk or not, but until you do, 
we copper the daughter proposition. 

Denton. 

You mean you withdraw your consent — concerning Miss Bonita. 

C A N B Y. 

That 's it. 

Mrs. Ca n b y. 

\With antagonism for Denton.] Why ? Had you given it ? 

C A N B Y. 

I had — and if the boy squares himself. Mother, you kin buck all 
you want to. It goes as it lays. 

Denton. 

I '11 square myself. I — blundered into a false position trying 
to help a friend, but before I '11 give up the woman I love, or 
even hurt her by any doubt, I 'II tell — I resigned because I — \Stops 
and breathes hardy with effort at control. 



126 ARIZONA 

B O N IT A. 

[Crossing to Jhim."] Captain Denton — I don't doubt you. [Sbf 
gives him her hand ; Canby restrains Mrs. CANBY/rom interfering. 
[Kellar comes quickly from pantry door. 

K E L L A R. 
\ln suppressed excitement. '\ Lieutenant ! 

Denton. 

\With melancholy.'] Oh Kellar, how are you ? [l^akes bis hand. 

K E L L A R. 
I have seen my Lena. 

Denton. 

What 's the matter ? 

Kellar. 

She will marry Tony. She tells me and Tony de man's name. 
A tamnt loafer 1 I got even if dey hang me for it. 

Denton. 

Steady — steady, old man. [Hodgman re-enters, 

Kellar. 
[Seeing Hodgman.] Oh, I can't stand it ! 

Canby. 

[Coming between Denton and Hodgman.] Here 's your 
authority. Captain Hodgman, Captain Denton, Arizona Volunteers 
and incidentally my partner in the cattle business. [To Denton.] 
Need me ? 

Denton. 

[ffith gesture to Canby, but eye on Hodgman.] Please go, sir. 



ARIZONA 127 

C AN B Y. 

Goon, Mother, kitten. ^He puts women out and follows them, 
[HoDGMAN goes left, 

H O D G M A N. 

\pefiantlyJ\ Well ? [Denton regards Hodgman a moment^ 
then steps near to him. After a moment' s pause he strikes 
Hodgman in the face with his somhreroy at the same time drawing 
hi. revolver. 

Hodgman. 

[Recoiling.'\ Sergeant Kellar. 

K E L L A R. 
[Saluting. ] Captain . ^ 

Hodgman. 

Arrest this man . [Tony appears in the pantry door struggling 
with Lena, who is trying to restrain him. 

K E L L AR, 

\Saluting.'\ I Ml see you damned first! 

[Tony fres; Denton, startled by the noise^ acci- 
dentally fires his gun into the floor ; Hodgman falls ; 
Tony disappears. 

Dent on. 

\Turning to Kellar.] Kellar ! 

Kellar. 

/ didn*t shoot him. 

Colonel. 

[^Entering."] What 's that firing? Why, Captain — 
[Canby enters. 



128 ARIZONA 

H O D G M A N. 

[^Pointing accusingly.'\ Denton. 

C A N B Y. 
[To Denton.] You shoot him r 

Denton. 

No. 

Colonel. 

\^Grabhing Denton's revolver and quickly examining //.] Ar 
empty shell, and it 's hot. 

Denton. 
Discharged by accident. 

■ \Enter Hallock,, Doctor, some troopers and cowboys. 
Enter Mrs. Canby. 

H O D G M A N. 

[Apparently dyingS\ Denton struck me in the face. I told 
Sergeant Kellar to arrest him. KelJar refused. Denton shot me. 
[Doctor kneels by Hodgman. 

Colonel. 

Mr. Hallock, put these two men under guard. 

[There is a murmur of opposition, and threatened rescue 
by the cowboys. 

Denton. 

[Restraining them.'\ Hold on, boys ! [The cowboys obey him. 

Hallock. 

[To Kellar and Denton.] Fall in. [Kellar and Denton 
march out under arrest ^ amid a chorus of exclamations and ques- 
tions from, the cowboys. 

CURTAIN 



The Fourth Act 



^M^% 






]HE scene is the same as that of the 
first act. twenty minutes are sup- 
posed to have elapsed since the end of 
'the third act. Colonel, Lieu- 
tenants Hallock and Young, 
Canby, Bonita and Mrs. Canby are in the court- 
yard. An orderly is at the gate. 

Colonel. 
Tell Major Cochran to keep those volunteers outside the fences. 

Hallock. 

\Saluting.'\ B troop deployed in that duty now, sir. 

Colonel. 

\Briskly.'\ Very well. My compliments to the Major, and 
tell him to keep 'em there. Get the rest of the regiment ready to 

move. 

Hallock. 

Yes, sir. \He salutes. The Colonel returns the salute^ 

Hallock goes briskly out. 

Canby. 
\Angrily,^ The men from this ranch want their horses. 

Colonel. 
They can't have 'em. They 've shown a disposition to make 



130 ARIZONA 

trouble and I '11 keep 'em away from the stables till we go. Mr. 
Young — 

Young. 

Colonel. [Salutes. • 

Colonel. 

[Saluting."^ Ask Doctor Fenlon how Captain Hodgman 's 
doing. 

Young. 

Yes sir. \_SaIutei and goes briskly into the dining room. 







Bonita. 


Colonel Bonham. 




Colonel. 


Bonita — 




Bonita. 


That guard won't 


let 


me speak to Mr. Denton, 
Colonel. 


My orders. 




C A N B Y. 


Why? 







Colonel. 

I don't want anybody to see either of the prisoners. 

C A N B Y. 
Well, ain't that a little high-handed with one of my men ? 

Colonel. 
Call it anything you want to, Canby, but you know better than 
to buck against the cavalry, don't you ? 

Canby. 

I ain*t looking for any trouble, but when anybody puts my 
ranch under martial law, I *m goin' to holler some. 



ARIZONA 131 

Colonel. 

Well, holler. [Young re-enters from the dining-room^ How 

is he ? 

Young. 

\Saluting,'\ Doctor Fenlon is probing for the ball. See you 

himself in a minute. 

C A N B Y. 

\Apart to Mrs. Canby.] If he wasn't Estrella's husband — 

B O N I T A. 
Mr. Young, 

Young. 

Miss Canby, 

B O N I T A, 
They 've got Mr. Denton in the blacksmith shop, under guard. 
Will you take him a letter for me ? 

Mrs. Canby. 

You won*t send any letter to that man, Bonita. 

Canby. 

Well, hold on. I reckon one commanding officer 's enough. 
Mother. \T'o Bonita.] You write your letter. 

Bonita. 

It *s written. 

Canby. 

Then give it to Mr. Young. 

Mrs. Canby. 
^Warningly as the letter is passed. "^ Bonita ! 

Canby, 

[Interposing. ] Mother. 



132 ARIZONA 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

[^Sharply. ~\ Am I under martial law, f^enry Canby ? 

C A N B Y. 

[In same tone.~\ No, but you ain't sellin' any too high in the 
pools. 

Young. 

[Extending letter.'] Colonel } 

Colonel. 

No. 

Young. 

Sorry, Miss Canby. [Returns letter. 

Canby. 
[Getting out his pocket-book.'] Give me the letter, Bonita. 

B O N I T A. 
Here. 

Canby. 
[Licking a postage stamp and fixing it to the letter.] There ! 
There *s a two-cent stamp on it. Now I reckon the United 
States mail is about as big as the Eleventh Cavalry. [Starts 
toward the gate. 

B O N I T a. 
Splendid, Paw. 

Canby. 

I Ml deliver the letter myself. 

Mrs. Canby. 

Henry Canby. 

Canby. 

Well, Madam ? [He turns in the gateway. 



ARIZONA 133 

iVi R S . C A N B Y. 

If you carry that letter to him, I put my bonnet on, 

C AN BY. 
You do ? 

Mrs. Canby. 

I do. We *ve had our understanding. It 's no fault of mine 
that these two offspring was girls, but they are girls, and they 're 
in my department. 

Canby. 

But here 's a letter with a United States brand upon it. The 
government buys my beef, and bonnet or no bonnet. Mother, I Ml 
put this in the right corral. [^Starts, 

Colonel, 

[//f tone of command r^ Canby. 

Canby. 

Well? 

Colonel. 

Don*t be a fool. I 've got twenty minutes in which to make 

an investigation, and turn Denton, or some other guilty man, over 
to the civil authorities with the facts. Every attempt of his friends 
to hamper that, will react against him. 

Canby. 

Well, make your investigation. 

Colonel. 

I 've had no chance. Your punchers are menacing, and taking 
my attention. I don't want to destroy them, but we 're getdng 
where a half hour is worth more to us than their bVes, and, I 'm 
sorry to say, more than yours. 



134 ARIZONA 

C A N » Y. 
But fair play — fair play. 

Colonel. 

In what ? 

C A N B Y. 

Your trial. 

Colonel. 
Bring in two of Denton's company to hear it. 

C A N B Y. 

Now you 're talking. 

Colonel. 

[TV YoungJ Go with him. [Younc; and Canby go out of 
gate and go left,~\ Orderly, ask Major Cochran and the commis- 
sioned officers of A troop to come here. \_The orderly salutes and 
goes out of the gate and to the right. 

Doctor. 

\_Coming from dining-room, '\ Haven't finished. Colonel. Have 
given him stimulant, and we 're only waiting. 

Colonel. 
Found the ball ? [His tone is business-like and brisk* 

Doctor. 

Located, but no use to extract it. Too painful, unless we use 
chloroform, and he wouldn't rally from that. 

Colonel. 

What arc his chances ! 

Doctor. 

None. 



ARIZONA 135 

Colonel. 

Positively none ? 

Doctor. 

Positively none. [Estrella comes from the bouse. 

Colonel. 

Then get the ball. 

[ The Doctor salutes and goes ^ followed by the Colonel. 

B O NITA . 

Will he die. Colonel ? 

Colonel. 

Surgeon says so. [^Disappears with Doctor, 

Estrella. 
Bonita. 

Bo NITA. 

Do you think he shot him ? 

Estrella. 

I don't know. 

Mrs. Canby. 

[Severe ly,'\ Was there any reason why he should have shot 



him ? 






Estrella. 


Yes. 






Bonita. 


Ah! 






Estrella. 


But not 


between Denton and me. 



Bonita. 

Why, then ? 



136 ARIZONA 

E S T R E L L A. 
For the lie that Denton cared for me. Of all the men in the 
world, Hodgman knew that was a lie. 

B O N I T A. 

Estrella — Estrella ! [SJhe looks a?ixiously into her sister's face, 
insisting on the truth. 

K S T R E L L A. 

[Convincingly. "^ Little sister, yes. [Bonita goes to her, 
Estrella embraces Bonita. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

\lJnrelenting.'\ But Hodgman says he shot him, and the 
Doctor says Hodgman '11 die. 

Estrella. 
Die? 

Mrs. C a n by. 
Yes. 

Bonita. 

\_Anxiously.'\ What can they do to Denton? 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Well, what do you think they '11 do ? You was born here. 

Bonita. 

Oh, if I were only a man. [Tony comes from the stable, 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

That wouldn't count much with a jury. 

Bonita. 

\^ickly.'\ Tony — 

1 O N Y. 

Sefiorita. 



ARIZONA 137 

B O N I T A. ' 

They 're going to give M"jor-Domo up to the ShcriiF at 
Tucson. 

Tony. 

Not by damn sight. 

B O N I T A. 

They will try. 

Tony. 

\Melodramatically,'\ Before they get by Tucson, one hundred 
vaquero stops him. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 

Now, see here, Tony, no devilment. 

B O N I T A. 

Maybe you won't have to wait for that. Maybe some chance 
will happen for him to get away from here. 

Tony. 

\Eag€rly:\ Yes! 

B O N IT A. 

\Suggesting.'\ If he had my horse — 

Tony. 
Cochise ! 

B O N I T A. 
Yes, Cochise. 

Tony. 

Ah! [Tony kisses his finger tips in an imaginary farewell, 

B O N I T A. 
Piit Major-Domo's saddle on him. 

Tony 

\Turring to ^<7.] Yes — yes, Sefiorita. To hell with Fort 



138 ARIZONA 

Grancsoldiers. You tal me, I rope the Colonel he self. ^Gofs 
info stable high in hope, 

Mrs. C a n by. 

Now, Bonita, whenever you *ve done with your highfalutins, 
we '11 get back to earth. Mr. Denton '11 take his chances with 
the law, same as any other man that gets too gay with his gun. 

Bonita. 

XFatefully and with folded arms S\ Let's don't talk about it. 

Mother. 

[Major Cochran, a Captain and two Lieutenants enter the 

court. 

Major Cochran. 

\T'o EsTRELLA.] The Colonel sent for us. 

\The Colonel enters. The officers salute him. The 

Colonel returns their salute. 

Colonel. 

Orderly! Tell the Sergeant of the Guard to bring Sergeant 
Kellar and Captain Denton in here. 

\Orderly salutes and goes out left. 

Mrs. C a n b y. 
Colonel. 

Colonel. 

Mrs. Canby. 

Mrs. Canby. 

You might as well know there 's a petticoat plot io rescue Mr. 

Denton. 

[Colonel looks at Estrella. 

Bonita. 
It 's mine. 



ARIZONA 139 

Colonel. 
Oh! 

[Lena enters from house, 

B O N I T A . 

\Going to Colonel.] Colonel. \Pause,'\ I *vc always tried 
to be friends with you. 

Colonel. 
J 'm sure of that, Bonita. 

B O N IT A. 

And this isn't a time to mince matters, or for a girl to play at 
being shy. I love that man you *ve got under guard, and any 
advantage you take over him, is one you take over me, too. I 
feel just that way about it, and any chance you give him, or fair 
play, goes double. Understand ? 

Colonel. 
Perfectly. 

Bonita. 

If war 's on, I guess your regiment '11 get enough trouble, and 
this one man needn't keep you sitting up nights. 

Colonel. 
Bonita — I held Denton on my knee when he wasn't larger 
than that. If he 's got a show on God's earth, it 's with me. 
\Pauses impressively y then offers Bonita his hand which she takes 
in evident gratitude. 

[Canby and two cowboys enter, 

C A N B Y. 

Who saddled Cochise ? 



I40 ARIZONA 

B O N I T A. 

Done for me. 

\The Guard with Denton and Kellar enters and halts 
at command. 

Lena. 

Father ! [She impulsively starts to Kellar who is about to em- 
brace her. 

Colonel. 

Stand back. [Kellar comes to attention. Lena shrinks back 
rebuked."] Major Cochran and gentlemen, as you know. Captain 
Hodgman was shot in that room, about half an hour ago. He 
says Captain Denton shot him. I 've asked you to meet me in an 
inquiry into the facts, which, of course, must be brief. These 
men of the volunteers and Mr. Canby are here, as friends of the 
prisoner. I '11 ask Mr. Hallock to take notes of our work, and 
you men will attest them. 

[Hallock goes to table. Tony appears with Bonita's 
horse at the gate. 

Colonel. 
Ready ? 

Hallock. 

Yes sir. \Prepares to write. 

Colonel. 
\With a paper.] This is Captain Hodgman' s statement, 
which he hasn't the strength at present to sign. [Hands it to 
Canby.] It affirms that Captain Denton, ist Arizona Volunteers, 
struck Captain Hodgman, i ith United States Cavalry, in the face 
with his hat, and without any retaliating blow from Hodgman, 
shot Hodgman. / entered the room, myself, at the sound of a 
revo/ver. [To Hallock.] Write this — And placed Captain 



ARIZONA 141 

Denton and Sergeant Kellar — Kellar of nth United States 
Cavalry — under guard. Kellar' s daughter, Lena, was also 
there. I took Denton's weapon, which is here — [//> takes a 
revolver from the table. '\ Colt's Army 44, chamber under ham- 
mer empty, barrel warm from recent discharge. Tag it, Mr. 
Hallock, and mark it Exhibit A on tag and also in your minutes. 

H A L L O C K. 
\Looking about. '\ Have no tag. 

Colonel. 

[Impatiently.'] Take the back of that writing tab. [Tears 
pasteboard back into two pieces and throws them on the table. 

C AN B Y. 

I 'm through with this. [Returns Hodgman's statement to 

Colonel. 

Colonel. 

Captain Denton ! [Tony leaving the horse in care of a cowboy^ 

quickly approaches Denton and whispers to him. 

Denton. 

[Stepping down two paces.'] Denial. [Pause; then speaks slowly 
that Hallock may report him."] Did strike him with my hat. 
The shot came from some one else to my right, to Captsun Hodg- 
man's left. I had my revolver in my hand. The start of the 
report to my right gave an involuntary pressure to my trigger, and 
I fired. As Hodgman fell, I turned to Sergeant Kellar, thinking 
he had fired, but his hands were empty. 

[Tony comes unobtrusively down left. 

Colonel. 
You admit striking Captain Hodgmm ? 



142 ARIZONA 

Denton. 
I do. 

Colonel. 
Why? 

Denton. 

[^Pause."] A personal matter. He had lied about me to my 
employer, I might say, my partner in business. 

C A N B Y 
Partner in business — is right. 

Colonel. 
What had he said ? [Pause; to Hallock.] Declines to answer. 

C A N B Y. 
[To Denton.] Answer ! 

Colonel. 

The man has that right. 

B O N IT A. 

[Advancing. '\ Answer, Captain Denton. [Pause; then im- 
pulsively. "^ He told my father, and me, ihat Captain Denton 
was forced to resign from the regular army — 

Denton. 
Bonita ! 

Colonel. 

[To Hallock.l Don't write. 

Bonita. 
Because of another man's wife. [Pause, 

Mrs. Canby. 
He said your wife. 

[EsTRELLA sinks to her knees and covers her face. 



ARIZONA 141 

Colonel. 

[Ca/m/y.] Then he did lie. 

B O N I T A. 

I knew it ! Estrella ! [Goes quickly to Estrella and puts her 
arms about her. 

Colonel. 

Sergeant Kellar. [Kellar advances two paces, Denton retires 
the same."] Did you see Captain Denton shoot Captain Hodgraan ? 

Kellar. 

No, za. 

Colonel. 

You were present ? 

Kellar. 

Yes, za. ^ 

Colonel. 
Watching the man ? 

Kellar. 
Yes, za. 

Colonel. 

And you didn't see him shoot ? 





Ke L L AR. 


No, za. 






Colonel. 


Why not? 





Kellar. 

[Pause, ~\ I looked 'round. 

Colonel. 

Why? 

Kellar. 
[Longer pause."] Dere was a noise behind. I looked 'round, 
lieutenant Denton — 



144. ARIZONA 

Colonel. 

[TV Hallock.] Captain Denton. 

K E L L A R. 

[^Correcting himself.'] Captain Denton say ** Kcllar! " I say 
** /didn't shoot him." 

Colonel. 
What was the noise behind you ? [Pause. Then more sharply,] 
The noise behind you, what was it ? [Pause, Now angrily.] 
Answer } 

Lena. 
It was me. 

Colonel. 
[Regretting the development,] Your daughter, Lena ? 

K E L L A R. 
[Slowly,] Yez, za. 

Colonel. 

[Annoyed. Consulting Hodgman's statement , and resuming inquiry 
with increased severity.] Captain Hodgman says he had previously 
ordered you to arrest Captain Denton. 

K E L L A R. 
[Quickly,] Yez, za. 

Colonel. 

That you refused ? 

K E L L A R. 
Yez, za. 

Colonel. 

Why ? [Kellar hesitates.] Why .? 

K E L L A R. 

[In a burst.] He was a damned loafer. My Lena — he 
ruined her — ruined her — my Lena ! 



ARIZONA 145 

Colonel. 
What ! [There is a general movement among the spectators, 

K E L L A R. 
Yez, za — by Gott in Himmel — if de whole army kills me, 
\Jie struggles a moment for self-controh then stoically folds his arms. 

Colonel. 
Did you shoot him ? 

K E L L A R. 

No. 

Colonel. 

The noise that distracted you — was it a gun shot ? 

K E L L A R. 
[Pause."] Yez, za. 

[All eyes are now upon Lena. 

Colonel. 

From — behind — you ? [Pause. 

H A L L O CK. 

I 've written — **from behind him.'* 

Colonel. 

And when you turned, your daughter, Lena, was there .' 

K E L L A R. 
[Slowly.] Yez, za. 

[Doctor Fenlon comes from the dining-room, his coat 

off and sleeves rolled up. 

Colonel. 

\After pause.] Well ? 



140 ARIZONA 

Doctor. 

The ball. \^Haniis a bullet to Colonel a?id returns to dining- 
room. 

Colonel. 

[To Hallock.] Mark exhibit B, ball extracted from Captain 
Hodgman's breast, by Dr. Fenlon; calibre of ball, 38. [P^/;^/^.] 
Mr. Denton your revolver is 44. [Picks up revolver. \ 1 release 
you. [Cowboys in gateway yell and wave their hats. There is an 
answering yell from outside, accompanied by shots. 

Denton. 
[Advancing."^ Thank you. My revolver. [Extends hand. 

Colonel. 

Is part of this record. Take mine. [He hands his own revolver 
to Denton who takes it, with some show of emotion. 

Colonel. 
[Pause,'] Lena Kellar. 

Ke L L A R. 
Lena. [Starts impulsively toward her. 

Colonel. 

^^Fiercely.] Attention. [Kellar comes to attention.] Lena, 
do you know who fired this shot ? 

C A N B Y. 

One minute. Colonel. 

Colonel. 

The girl must answer or decline to answer. 

C A N B Y. 
That 's just what I want her to know. If her answer would 



ARIZONA 147 

any way go against her, she can keep still. [Tony, standing to the 
left of the others y calmly strikes a match and lights a cigarette. 

Colonel. 

Do you know who fired this shot, that struck Captain Hodgman? 
\Pause.'\ Declines to answer. \Pause,'\ Did you shoot him ? 
\Pause.'\ Declines to answer. Did you know Captain Hodgman ? 
Had you any motive for injuring him, or wishing him injury ? 
\Pause.'\ Declines to answer. \Pause.'\ Lena — as you were 
the only person present at the time of this shooting, as your father 
testifies that you had cause of complaint against Captain Hodgman, 
as your silence indicates you are in possession of facts concerning 
the shooting, if you did not actually commit it, I must place you 
under arrest, and turn you over to the civil authority. 

K E L L A R. 

\Aspirantly.'\ Gott ! 

Tony. 

No ! [Sullenly and coming to the centre of the group* 

Colonel. 
Do you know anything of this ? 

Tony. 

\Pause,'\ I shoot him. [General movement of surprise by the 
listeners.^ My gun thirty-eight. She will be my wife — Tony 
Mostano. [He tenderly embraces Lena. 

Colonel. 
[With relief. '\ That simplifies everything. 

C A N B Y. 

And with an Arizona jury, it 's a cinch. 



148 ARIZONA 

Colonel. 

Major Cochran, detail four men to take this vaquero to Tucson. 

Major. 

Yes, sir. [/j about to go. 

Tony. 

One minute. \0n signal from Colonel all wait.'\ While he 
[Pointing to Hallock.] — is here, I tell you. I was in the kitchen; 
these men are thare. \_Diagraming it on stage. '\ Hodgman, 
damn him! is there. Lena tells me this is the man. I look in 
the door so. I pop him — bang ! I jomp back. [^Suiting his 
action to the word, Tony jumps back and vaults on to the horse, 
starting off at a gallop. 

Colonel. 

Stop him. \The cowboys close the gates, while affecting to rush 
out of them. Tony's horse is heard galloping away, cheered by 

cowboy yells outside. 

Colonel. 

Open those gates. 

C A N B y. 
Why, certainly.. [Slowly drags his men away and opens the 
gates. Major Cochran and the Guard rush into gateway. 

Major. 

He 's through the line. Shall they fire? [The guard is at 
"aim.'' 

Lena. 

[Frantically.'] No. 

Colonel. 

No. Pursue and arrest him. 

[Major salutes ond exit. Orders heard rapidly outside ; 
then sound of several pursuing horses. 



ARIZONA 149 

Mrs. Canby. 
WcH, I never! 

B O N I T A. 

[Exultantly.^ He was on Cochise. 

Canby. 

Yes, and they — they won't any troopers catch him. 

Colonel. 

That 's all, gentlemen. Get ready for march. Sergeant 
Kellar, pending inquiry, reduced to ranks. [Kellar goes out 
much depressed.'\ Send those minutes to Sheriff — copy to Depart- 
ment. [To Hallock. 

H AL L O CK. 

Yes, sir. [ Takes his notes and goes out of gate, and to the right. 

Colonel. 

Denton, I 'm glad this officer's death will not be at your door. 
[Denton bows^ Orderly, my horse. [He goes into the dining- 
room. 

E S T R E L L A. 

Mr. Denton. 

Denton. 

Mrs. Bonham. 

ESTRELLA. 
I want to speak with you and the Colonel before he goes. 

B O N I T A. 

What is it, Estrella. 

Colonel. 

[Coming quickly from the house."] Mr. Canby, Captain 
Hodgman cannot live. I Ml leave a detail to wire his people, and 
consult their wishes. 



I50 ARIZONA 

C A N B y. 

Yes, sir. 

Mrs. Canby. 

And, Colonel — 

Colonel. 
Yes. 

Mrs. Canby. 

You said he lied. [^Pause.'j Pld he ? [Searchingly. 

Colonel. 

The cause of Mr. Denton's resignation was not that given by 
this dying officer. Captain Denton, I want you to believe I 've 
never spoken to any one on earth concerning the facts connected 
with your resignation. 

Denton. 

I do believe that. 

Canby. 

What was the real cause for Denton's leaving ? I ask it in his 
presence, because he has asked to marry my daughter, Bonita. 

Colonel. 

It was a matter personal to him, and of which I will not 
speak. 

Canby. 

If it was any nonsense with Estrella, / want you to say so. 

Colonel. 

It — was — not — that. 

Canby. 

Tell me, too, that it was nothing against his honor — nothing 
that should make the little one ashamed for loving him. [PauseJ] 
She 's the sister of your wife. Colonel Bonham. / ask you to 
answer. 



ARIZONA ^ 151 

Colonel. 

Her sister knows all of the circumstances that I know. Bonita*s 
happiness more nearly concerns her than it does me. She will 
have to tell you. Goodbye. [//> starts away. 

ESTRELLA. 
Wait, I w/7/tell them and you shall hear me. \_The Colonel 
pauses and returns.'] My husband did find Mr. Denton in our 
drawing-room — and — I was there, too. I was going away — 
Denton came to prevent us. He took from Captain Hodgman 
my jewels, which I had given him, and which were all of me he 
loved, and told him to go. Then I heard my husband returning. 
In that terrible moment, I knew that I loved my husband, and I 
hoped to keep him from learning the truth, I made Mr. Denton 
go back of the curtain, but Captain Hodgman met my husband on 
his way and told him that Denton was in the house. My husband 
discovered Mr. Denton, guiltily hiding, as he thought. He had 
him searched — and found — my jewels — and a letter from Captain 
Hodgman to me, planning our flight. Sergeant Kellar hid the 
letter. The jewels seemedthe explanation- of Denton's presence, 
and, without believing his own words, my husband called Mr. 
Denton a thief, and demanded his resignation. Oh, Denton, I 
thank you with all my broken heart ! But it was all in vain. 
From that day my husband has distrusted me — not you. He knew 
you couldn't steal, and he doesn't know that I love him. And 
I am punished as only women can understand. 

\_Kneels at table weeping. The rose which Bonita gave 
her drops from her throat to the stage, Bonita in- 
stinctively starts toward Estrella, but Canby re- 
strains her. 



152 ARIZONA 

C A N B Y. 

[^Going to Estrella's side,'\ Gentlemen, from the minute 

they put on long dresses, I reckon every father fears that a moment 

like this may come to him. We 've been uncommon proud of 

Strella, and Ma and me have throwed out our chests and stepped 

high. It seems she 's mixed it up a little now, but they ain't any 

trouble comin' to her that her Gov' nor ain't goin' to divide. [//> 

lifts her up and folds her close to his breast. Pause. "^ I know that 

it *s your say. Colonel, and I can see you 're turnin' it over in 

your mind. I want you to do that, and do all of it, before you 

talk any. 

l^Pause. Hallock re-enters. 

* Hallock. 

\Saluting.'\ Colonel, ready. [Colonel answers salute and 
starts to go, Bonita interposes y with tearful vehemence. 

B O N I T A. 

Colonel Bonham. You must speak to my sister! 

Colonel. 

\Pause.'\ Tell Major Cochran to start. I 'I' jvertake you, 
[Hallock salutes and goes. 

Bonita. 
\Continuingy almost hysterically. "^ You never danced with 
her. You never took her to the towns. You were always at 
headquarters. Don't put all the blame on her. 
\There is the distant sound of a bugle. 

Colonel. 

\To Denton, with an effort at judicial calrn.^ The letter that 
was on you when Kcllar arrested you — 



ARIZONA 153 

Denton. 

[Taking his tune from the Colonel.] Kellar returned it to 
me, and I sent it back to Mrs. Bonham. 

E ST R E LL A. 
[Lifting her face from her father"* s shoulder. "^ I have it. 

Colonel. 
You first got it, how ? [To Denton. 

Denton. 

From Kellar. Lena had given it to him. [Colonel looks at 

Lena. 

Lena. 

I saw Captain Hodgman give it to Mrs. Bonham, and I 

took it. 

Denton. 

[Pause. "^ I have reason to believe that, after that night, Mrs. 
Bonham never spoke to Captain Hodgman again. 

Colonel. 

[Pause.l^ Mr, Canby — [Pause."^ — I do not care to say any' 
thing that I may wish unsaid. I must join my regiment. I — I 
will leave — Mrs, Bonham in your care — till I return. 

Estrella. 

Frank — [Pause ; she slowly approaches him.'\ — you 're not a 
young man any longer. There will be fever as well as war. 
You may not return. 

Colonel. 

Worse fates than that may come to a soldier. [He turns to 
Denton. 



154 ARIZONA 

E S T R E L I A. 
I must say more to you. [^She shrinks, hurt by the rebuff, and 
Canby quickly takes her in his arms again, Mrs. Canby, moved 
by Estrella's suffering, crosses to her. 

Colonel. 

\TakingY>^nTO\C% hand,'\ My boy. \Pause,'\ Your father 
and I — on the same horse — bang into Miles' s dining-room — 
\There is something in his voice very like weakness, 

Denton. 
I know. 

Colonel. 

We 're both going to the front. I '11 wire the department, 
and you 've got to rejoin the i ith. 

Denton. 

Why, Colonel— 

Colonel. 

\lnsisting.'\ If it 's only for one week. You will give an old 
man that chance of reparadon. 

Denton. 

Yes — \Pause,'\ — and you — give the wife a chance? \Tbt 
Colonel makes a momentary effort at composure, and approaches 
EsTRELLA, whom Canby pushes gently toward her husband. 

ESTRELLA. 
Frank — I love you. 

Colonel, 
And — this man, who is dying ? 

EsTRELLA. 
No — ^ncver. It was a madness, a recoil from the dreariness of 



ARIZONA 



^55 



the desert — a woman too much alone. [^Pause."] Can*t you say 
one kind thing— one word of — forgiveness ? , 

[^Thf Colonel /t/ts bis head; the look on his face softens 
to tenderness. He is about to speak, when there comes 
a second and more distant sound of the bugU, 

Colonel. 

When— I— come — back. \He starts away, 

ESTRELLA. 
[ Taking one step after him.'j Frank — [She turns back to Canby' s 
ready embrace. The Colonel, hearing her sob, stops and looks 
back. The others move in an involuntary gesture of appeal. 
He signals silence ; comes to where the rose which Estrella wore is 
lying and stoops to get it, Canby quickly turns I^stkella* s face so 
that she sees her husband pick up the rose and thrust it into the 
breast of bis blouse. He goes. 

curtain 




(^ 



fDINGSECT. SEPlTwa 



/ 



3022 

A68 

1899 



Thomas, Augustus 
Arizona 



/ 



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