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Full text of "Armstrong State College Catalog"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



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Armstrong 



STATE COLLEGE 




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1995-96 Catalog ^ 



51 



Accreditation: Armstrong State College is accredited by the Commission on College* 
of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaure- 
ate, masters, and educational specialists degrees. 

Academic Calendar I 

Fall. 1995 Winter, 1996 Spring. 1996 Summer. 1996 

Session A Session B Session C Session 
(11 weeks) (11 weeks) (11 weeks) (4 weeks) (4 weeks) (8 weeks) (6 weeks 



Freshman Applications Due 




Aug. 14 


Dec. 5 


Feb. 26 


June 3 


July 17 


June 3 


June 3 


New Student Document Deadline 




Sept 6 


Dec. 18 


March 11 


June 10 


Julyl 


June 10 


June 10 


Registration 




Sept. 19-20 


Jan. 3 


March 27 


June 18 


July 16 


June 18 


June 18 


First Day of Class 




Sept. 21 


Jan. 4 


March 28 


June 19 


July 17 


June 19 


June 19 


Mid-Term 




Oct. 25 


Feb. 8 


Mayl 


July 3 


July 29 


July 17 


July 11 


Last Day to Withdraw Without Automatic Penalty 


Oct. 25 


Feb. 8 


Mayl 


July 3 


July 29 


July 17 


July 11 


Advisement & Advance Registration 




Nov 6-10 


Feb. 19-23 


May 13-17 


July 29- 
Aug2 




July 29- 
Aug2 


July 29- 
Aug2 


Last Day of Class 




Dec 4 


March 14 


June 5 


July 15 


Aug. 9 


Aug. 13 


Aug. 2 


Reading Day 




Dec. 5 


March 15 


June 6 










Final Examinations Begin 




Dec. 5 


March 18 


June 7 


July 16 


Aug. 12 


Aug. 14 


Aug. 5 


Final Examinations End 




Dec. 8 


March 20 


June 11 


July 16 


Aug. 12 


Aug. 15 


Aug. 6 


Graduation 




Dec. 10 




June 14 










Holiday 




Nov. 22* '-24 


Jan. 15 


May 30 


July 4 




July 4 


July 4 


ISAT Application Deadline 

Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test (ISAT) 


July? 
Aug. 12 


Oct. 27 
Dec. 2 


Jan. 19 
Feb. 24 


April 26 
Junel 








Collegiate Placement Exam (CPE) 




Contact Admissions Office, 927-5277 










College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 


Sept. 20 


Jan. 2 


March 27 


May 17 








Regents' Test Application Deadline 
Regents' Test Administration 




Oct. 3 
Oct. 23-24 


Jan. 23 
Feb. 12-13 


April 16 
May 6-7 


July 2 

July 29-30 








CHAOS Orientation Sessions (Summer 


1995) 


Contact Division of Student Affairs. 927-5271 









* All dates subject to change 

* ' Nov. 22 holiday for students only 



1995 1 


JANUARY 






FEBRUARY 






MARCH 


APRIL 




MAY 






JUNE 1 


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30 


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JULY 






AUGUST 






SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 




NOVEMBER 






DECEMBER 1 


S M T W T 


F S 

1 


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M T W T F 

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1 


■ 


1996 1 


JANUARY 






FEBRUARY 






MARCH 


APRIL 




MAY 






JUNE 


S M T W T 


F S 


S 


M T W T F 


s 


s 


M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S 


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1? 


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24 

31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


28 29 30 


26 


27 28 29 30 31 




23 
30 


24 25 26 27 28 2< 


JULY 






AUGUST 






SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 




NOVEMBER 






DECEMBER 


S M T W T 


F S 


s 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


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1 


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1 


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7 8 9 10 11 


12 13 


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10 


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6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 


9 


8 


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14 15 16 17 18 


19 20 


11 


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17 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 


16 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 2 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 


23 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 2i 


28 29 30 31 




25 


26 27 28 29 30 


31 


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Introduction 4 

The College/City 9 

Student Life 19 

Admissions 25 

Financial Information 45 

Academic Policies and Information 57 

School of Graduate Studies 77 

School of Arts and Sciences 81 

School of Education 187 

School of Health Professions 217 

Special Programs 265 

Faculty/Administration 277 

Index 294 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



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As president of Armstrong State College, I am asked that questior 
often — and my answer invariably depends on what prompted the 
query. 

Yes, our academic programs are excellent. This fact shows best b}' 
how well our graduates do once they leave us. Today's world stresses 
job readiness and career preparation and we place significant emphasis 
on assuring our graduates that they can compete with the best in the 
current job market. Our 
graduates in fields such as health 
care and computer science 
generally have multiple job offers 
to consider. Health students 
consistently post passrates that 
exceed 95 percent on national 
licensing exams and elementary 
education graduates have earned 
100 percent passrates on the 
Georgia Teacher Certification 
Test for the past seven years. 
Strong science and liberal arts 
programs produce excellent 
candidates for graduate study, 
pre-professional programs and 
today's job market. 




ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Outstanding academic programs? 
Dedicated teaching faculty? 
Extensive student self-governance? 
Low student-faculty ratios? 
Close-knit, friendly atmosphere? 
A beautiful campus? 

Career-oriented educational preparation? 
Effective job placement programs? 



Is it our faculty? Many proudly say that they came to Armstrong 
because they love the stimulation of classroom teaching. We keep our 
class sizes small so students and faculty really get to know one another. 
I like seeing students and professors discussing today's lecture over a 
cup of coffee or spending time on a research project that has gone far 
beyond the classroom assignment. 

Then, too, I know that many students are very special. And we try 
to treat them in a special way. Armstrong has a commitment to 
encouraging student involvement in campus-wide decisions. There 
are not very many other schools that allow students to determine how 
to spend student activities fees and promote student representation on 
all campus-wide standing committees. Leadership opportunities are 
available to everyone who wants to develop these skills. 

In short, I do not think that any one aspect distinguishes Armstrong 
State College from any other campus. The way all of these distinguish- 
ing factors blend together is what makes Armstrong State College 
what it is — a college that cherishes its tradition of excellence while 
looking forward to meeting the challenges of the future. 

Robert A. Burnett 
President 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 




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Degree Programs 5 

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Bachelor's 
Master's 




ARTS: Art 


. 




. 






Arts 




• 








Drama/Speech 


• 










English 


• 










English 
(Communications) 












English 
(with Teacher Certification) 










(0 


General Studies 




• 








History 


• 






• 


< 


History 
(with Teacher Certification) 

Music 

Music Education 

Political Science 

Political Science 
(Public Administration) 

Political Science 
(with Teacher Certification) 

Psychology 


• 








SCIENCE: Biology 


• 










Biology 
(with Teacher Certification) 












Chemistry 


• 










Chemistry 
(with Teacher Certification) 










LJJ 



Computer Science 










Z 


Criminal Justice 


• 


• 




• 


LU 


Criminal Justice (Corrections) 




• 









Criminal Justice (Law Enforcement) 




• 






C/} 


Criminal Justice (Law Enforcement 
with POST Certification) 




• 








Mathematical Sciences 


• 










Mathematical Sciences 












(with Teacher Certification) 













Physical Sciences 










EDUCATION: Art Education 












Elementary Education 








• 


•-» 


Early Elementary Education 












Health & Physical Education 
Middle School Education 










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3 


Middle Grades Education 
Secondary Education 











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Business Education* 
English Education 

Mathematics Education 

* In conjunction with Savannah State College 











ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Degree Programs j 


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Social Science Education 

Special Education 

Behavior Disorders 

Learning Disabilities 

Speech/Language Pathology 

Speech Correction 
Noit TMcr>«f c«mtic«llon options at th« baccalauraatt (avtl ar* 
avallabt« in Bioloay. Ch«mlatry, English, History, Math«matlcs. and 
Political Sc»«nc« {%— listing und^f Arts and Scl«nct) 






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HEALTH PROFESSIONS: 

Dental Hygiene 
Dental Hygiene Education 
Health Science 
Medical Technology 
Nursing 

Physical Therapy 
Radiologic Technology 
Respiratory Therapy 




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MINOR CONCENTRATIONS: 

(not listed elsewhere): 

Anthropology 

Botany 

Communications 

Economics 

Engineering Science 

Film 

Foreign Language 

Historical Archaeology 

Human Biology 

International Studies 

Legal Studies 

Library Media 

Linguistics 

Mental Health 

Military Science 

Organizational Psychology 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 

Physics 

Preservation Studies 

Public Administration 

Russian Studies 

Sociology 

Teacher Education 

Zoology 














ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Get started in college on the right foot 

Students often use their college catalog solely as a reference book — to look up rules, 
regulations, and requirements. Yet merely browsing through its pages can yield a 
tremendous amount of information about Armstrong State College as your academic 
home. This catalog can help you plot the best course for your years at ASC. Take time to 
take a look. 

You'll learn such facts as: 

— Armstrong supports a broad-based, pre-professional program in a variety of areas 
like business, dentistry, forestry, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy and veteri- 
nary medicine. 

— Engineering studies students have several options for completing much of their 
coursework at Armstrong before transferring to a regional school of engineering 

— A cooperative education program flourishes on campus 

— Evening and w^eekend classes offer flexible scheduling 

— Off-campus classes at corporate sites and in Southeast Georgia are available 

— A versatile schedule of non-credit, continuing education classes are offered each 
quarter. 

The many student services are also outlined. They range from career planning and job 
placement to personal counseling and academic assistance programs. 

More than 30 student organizations meet religious, Greek, professional, academic, 
and special interest needs. An active student governance program plans extensive 
student activities throughout the year. Intercollegiate and intramural sports offer enjoy- 
ment for spectators and participants alike. 

The current academic calendar is located on the inside front cover for your conve- 
nience in planning your year. A brief "Where to Write or Call" listing on the inside back 
cover may help you find the right place to get your questions answered quickly and 
accurately. The catalog is your guide to success on campus. Keep it handy and use it 
often. 



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10 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Statement of Purpose 

Armstrong State College, a senior college in the University System of Georgia, 
provides a range of strong academic programs and an environment for intellectual and 
cultural growth in the arts and sciences, education, and health disciplines. The College 
pursues its purpose by promohng the free exchange of ideas in a variety of undergradu- 
ate programs leading to degrees at the Associate and Baccalaureate levels. Graduate 
programs of regional significance are offered. Recognizing its regional educational 
responsibilities, the College offers baccalaureate programs at the Brunswick Center and 
courses on an as-needed basis throughout its service area. The College provides non-degree 
programs and activities through the Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education. 

Instruction 

Through instruction, the College ensures that students read and write effectively, 
and, through a strong liberal arts core curriculum, promotes the acquisition of knowl- 
edge in humanities, mathematics, the natural sciences, and the social sciences. The 
College prepares students in the methods of scholarly inquiry, research, and problem 
solving, and, in the process, encourages student commitment to learning and to physical, 
emotional, and social development. Furthermore, the College helps students to identify 
goals and the means of achieving them, as well as to understand and to respect people 
from diverse backgrounds and cultures. Additionally, it broadens the base of educa- 
tional opportunities for students through formal and informal arrangements with other 
colleges and universities. 

Faculty, Students, and Staff 

The College recruits and retains faculty who are able teachers, supportive of its 
academic purpose, and who are professional sources of knowledge and expertise. It 
seeks, recruits, and retains students whose interests, needs, and backgrounds are diverse 
and whose records indicate a likelihood of success. It strives to create a community of 
learners in which a sense of mutual trust and respect is evident. It encourages and 
supports an active intellectual, cultural, and social life on campus. In addition, the 
College recruits and retains a well-trained staff, sensitive to the needs of those it serves 
and committed to supporting its academic purpose. 

Administration 

The administration ensures equal opportunity and access to employment, admis- 
sions, and programs and services of the College without regard to age, sex, race, national 
origin, color, religion, or disability. It encourages faculty research and development, and 
provides an environment which enables faculty members to participate in the search for 
knowledge. It secures and manages funds necessary to maintain the College's academic 
programs, library, and support services. Furthermore, the administration provides 
systems of campus governance which are responsive to the concerns of students, faculty, 
staff, and the Board of Regents. And finally, it acquires and maintains facilities and 
equipment necessary to support the College. 

Community Service 

A regional resource for information and expertise, the college is responsive to the 
unique educational and community service needs of its constituency. By combining 
efforts with the community, the college designs and conducts continuing education 
programs and offers a variety of cultural and athletic events. Moreover, it liberally shares 
its physical facilities and grounds for the betterment of the academic and cultural life of 
the community. 



PROGRAMS 1 1 



I History of the College 



Armstrong; State College, a siMm>r uiul dI the University System of Georgia, was 
toutuii'J in U)35, as Arinslroii^ |iimor Ci)llem', to help meet the need for college level 
educational opportunities m the community. The college, as established by the City's 
Mayor m\k.\ Aldermen, was housed in tin* beautiful Armstrong home, a gift to the city 
froni the tamilv ot Cieorge F". Armstrong Over the years the college occupied five 
additional buildings in the l-orsyth Park and Monterey Square areas. In 1959, as 
Armstrong College of Savannah, it became a two-year unit of the University System. The 
Board of Regents conferred four-year status on Armstrong in 1964 and the college moved 
to its present 250 acre site, a gift from the Mills B. Lane Foundation, in December of 1965. 
.Additional buildings joined the eight original structures as Armstrong added profes- 
sional and graduate programs and tripled in size. 

rhe Fine .Arts Center, including a 1,000 seat theatre/auditorium, the Health Profes- 
sions Building, a new apartment style residence complex, a library wing, and an 
academic computing center are among more recent additions. 

Armstrong State College, offers over 75 academic programs and majors in the School 
of Arts and Sciences, the School of Health Professions, and the School of Education. 

The academic community includes approximately 5000 students and more than 200 
full-time faculty members. Armstrong State College was fully accredited as a senior 
institution bv the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools in December, 1968, with 
accreditation retroactive to January 1, 1968, and was last reaccredited in December 1992. 

Location 

Armstrong students find much to enjoy about living in the cosmopolitan city of 
Savannah, the major urban area (pop. 200,000) in coastal Georgia. The college's 250 acre 
campus is located in a residential area of the city which promotes a feeling of freedom and 
security on campus. 

Savannah, Georgia's founding city, has all the historic and cultural variety of a 
metropolitan city with the added advantage of the ocean at its back door. A temperate 
climate encourages outdoor activities and recreation year round. Beach and river outings 
include sailing, boating, water skiing, sunning and beachcombing. Golf, tennis, fishing 
and hunting are also popular. 

A resident symphony orchestra, dance and theatre groups, and visiting entertain- 
ment groups regularly perform at the Civic Center. Special celebrations and other 
festivals are scheduled throughout the year. 

The historic past lives in harmony with today's progress in Savannah. As a living 
laboratory for history, Savannah is unsurpassed yet the Savannah port is one of the 
busiest on the Atlantic coast. 

Community oriented leisure activities complement on-campus happenings. A grow- 
ing NCAA intercollegiate athletic program, active intramurals, concerts, plays and 
special entertainment mean lots to do without leaving campus. 

Accreditation 

Armstrong State College has earned the following regional and special purpose 
accreditations: 
Armstrong State College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 

Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate and baccalaureate degrees. 
Associate Degree Nursing - bv the National League for Nursing for the period 

1977-2001. 
Baccalaureate Degree Nursing - bv the National League for Nursing for the period 

1985-1999. 
Computer Science - by the Computer Science Accreditation Commission. 



12 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Dental Hygiene - by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental 
Association for the period 1985-1994. 

Medical Technology - by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation 
for the period 1985-1997. 

Music - by the National Association of Schools of Music for the period 1985-1994. 

Radiologic Technologies - by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accredi- 
tation for the period 1984-1997. 

Respiratory Therapy Department - by the Committee on Allied Health Education and 
Accreditation for the period 1983-1997. 

Teacher Education Programs - by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education for the period 1982-1997. 

Office of College Advancement 

The Office of College Advancement consists of three components: Alumni Affairs, 
Public Relations, and Development, which includes the Armstrong State College Foun- 
dation, Inc. The office works with graduates, friends, area businesses, corporations, 
foundations, and other supporters of Armstrong State College by providing a vehicle of 
communication and fundraising support. 

Alumni Affairs 

The Office of Alumni Affairs serves as a liaison between the Alumni Association, 
Armstrong State College, graduates, former students, and friends. The office maintains 
current alumni records, processes alumni membership dues, and circulates college and 
alumni information. Membership in the association is open to all graduates and former 
students. 

Organized in 1937, the Armstrong State College Alumni Association is comprised of 
graduates and former students of Armstrong Junior College and Armstrong State 
College. The association promotes interaction among alumni, students, faculty, staff, 
and friends of the college in order to strengthen the ties between the college and its 
supporters. 

Each year the Alumni Association recognizes individuals who have made outstand- 
ing contributions to the college and the Alumni Association by presenting the 
Distinguished Alumni Award, the Outstanding Alumni Service Award, the Distin- 
guished Citizen's Award, and the Outstanding Faculty Award. 

Public Relations 

The Office of Public Relations promotes Armstrong, its activities, students, and 
faculty through interaction with media representatives. The office is responsible for 
external publications and promotions related to the college, including Armstrong Maga- 
zine and the alumni newsletter. The Office of Public Relations serves as the liaison 
between the college and media representatives and reports media activities to the 
University System of Georgia public relations representatives. 

Development 

In support of Armstrong, alumni and friends can make donations of cash, securities, 
or other qualifying assets through the Armstrong State College Foundation, Inc. 

Donations are used to respond to challenges and opportunities for growth. The funds 
provide the college with support unavailable through state appropriations. Gifts are also 
used to assist students through scholarships and other financial assistance, support 
outstanding teachers through faculty development awards and professorships, sponsor 
symposia and guest lecturers, enhance library holdings and facilities, and assist in other 
special projects and programs. Private support helps sustain Armstrong State College's 
tradition of academic excellence. 



PROGRAMS 1* 



The Armstrong State College Foundation, Inc. is a direct support organization and the 

le^ali'iititv tn riMMVf^ittsfor the college. Contributions to thi'found.ition, a '>()l(c)(-l)tax 
I'vi'inpt ». hant.ihli' orv;.uu/.ition, .in* entitled to all tax benefits authorized by law. 

Two-Year Degree Programs 

The folK>vving two-year degrees are offered as preparation for higher degrees in the 
liberal arts i\r[d professii>ns or as terminal professional degrees: 
Associate oi Arts 

Associate of Applied Science in Criminal justice 
Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene 
Associate of Science in Nursing 
Associate of Science in Radiologic Technologies 
Associate oi Science in Respiratory Therapy 

Four-Year Degree Programs 

Bachelor of Arts in the fields of art, drama-speech, English, history, music, political 
science, and psychology. 

Bachelor of General Studies. 

Bachelor oi Health Science. 

Bachelor of Music Education. 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, chemistry, computer science, criminal 
justice, mathematical sciences, and physical sciences. 

Bachelor of Science in Education with majors in Early Elementary Education; Middle 
School Education; Secondary Education in the teaching fields of Biology, Business 
(cooperative arrangement with Savannah State College), Chemistry, English, Mathemat- 
ics, History, Political Science, Social Science and K-12 programs in Art, Health and 
Physical Education, and Speech Correction. 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy 

The College is authorized to offer Teacher Education programs, preparing students 
for certification by the Georgia State Department of Education in the following areas: art, 
biology, business education, chemistry, early elementary education, English, history, 
library media, mathematics, middle school education, political science and social 
science. 

Pre-Professional Programs 

(One of the Four-Year Degree Programs Must Be Pursued) 

Armstrong State College offers courses appropriate for the first two years of baccalaureate 
programs such as business, engineering, forestry, industrial management, pharmacy, phys- 
ics, etc., not offered among its degree programs, and it offers the pre-professional study 
appropriate for dentistry, medicine, veterinary medicine, and other professional fields. 

Graduate Degree Programs 

Master oi Arts - Histor\- 

Master of Health Science 

Master of Science - Criminal Justice 

Master of Education -Elementary Education 

Middle Grades Education 
Secondary Education 
Business Education 
English Education 



14 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Mathematics Education 
Science Education 
Social Science Education 
Special Education 
Behavior Disorders 
Learning Disabilities 
Speech /Language Pathology 

Regents Engineering Transfer Program 

The Regents Engineering Transfer Program (RETP) is a cooperative program between 
Armstrong State College and Georgia Tech. This program allows qualified students to 
attend Armstrong State for the first two years of engineering studies then transfer to 
Georgia Tech to complete their bachelor of engineering degree. RETP students transfer- 
ring to Georgia Tech compete on a equal basis with Georgia Tech students at the junior 
academic level. To be admitted as an RETP student, the applicant must meet the 
academic requirements set for the program (contact Armstrong State Engineering 
Studies) and be a U.S. citizen with Georgia residency. 

Dual-Degree Programs 

Armstrong State College has dual-degree programs in engineering with the Georgia 
Institute of Technology, Auburn University, Clemson University, Mississippi State 
University, and the University of Florida. Upon completion of the first three years of 
academic work at Armstrong, the student may enroll for two subsequent years at one of 
the participating schools. Upon completing the requirements of the two cooperating 
schools, the student will receive a baccalaureate degree from Armstrong State College 
and a baccalaureate degree in the chosen field of engineering from the second school. 

The Assistant Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences is the Armstrong coordinator 
of these dual-degree programs and should be contacted for additional information. 

A dual-degree program in forestry and environmental management with Duke 
University is available. Students complete three years of academic work at Armstrong 
State College, then enroll for two subsequent years at Duke University. Students who 
successfully complete the program receive a B.S. in biology from Armstrong State 
College and a M.S. in either forestry or environmental management from Duke Univer- 
sity. The Head of the Department of Biology should be contacted for additional 
information. 

Cooperative Education Program 

In the cooperative education program students typically alternate quarters between 
college and work. This program offers students valuable practical experience as well as 
financial assistance in the form of compensation from the firms that employ them. 

Cooperative opportunities are available to students in computer science, chemistry 
and engineering, but are not limited to these majors. 

Cooperative students must register for Cooperative Education Program (CEP 100) for quarters 
in which they work. This course carries no credit and there is no charge for registration. 

Students interested in applying for admission to the Cooperative Education program 
should contact the head of their major department and the Director of Career Services, 
who is the director of this program. 

Evening and Weekend Courses 

To accommodate students who are employed during the day, all core curriculum 
courses and many upper-division courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening. 
At present, the following degree programs are available to students who attend classes 



PROGRAMS 18 



exclusively in the evening: Associate in Arts, Associate in Criminal Justice, and baccalau- 
reate decree pri>^rains in Communications, Computer Science, Criminal justice, Hnglish, 
Cieneral Studies, History, Mathematics, Political Science, Psychology, and Public Ad- 
ministration. Although evening offerings are expanded each year, prospective students 
should be advised that it often takes a longer time to complete degree requirements by 
attending evening classes exclusively than it does by attending day classes or a combi- 
nation of L\^y and evening classes. 

The college also sponsors a weekend program of selected core curriculum courses in 
such fields as ci^mpc^sition, history, speech communications, economics, political sci- 
ence, and psychology. The Office of Nontraditional [.earning oversees the coordination 
and development of the evening and weekend programs. 

Off-Campus and Distance Learning Courses 

To mtvt particular local and regional needs, the college offers selected courses at various 
off-campus sites, including The Coastal Georgia Center, Culfstream Aerospace, Hinesville 
public schools. Memorial Medical Center, and Union Camp Corporation. Although most of 
these courses are taught by college faculty at the off-campus site, some may be delivered by 
means of interactive teleconferencing originating from the main campus. Armstrong is an 
active member of the Georgia Statewide Academic and Media System. 

The Brunswick Center 

The Brunswick Center is a consortium composed of Brunswick College, Armstrong 
State College in Savannah, and Georgia Southern University in Statesboro. It was 
authorized by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia in September 
1986 and was organized for the purpose of establishing a residence center for baccalau- 
reate degrees. However, all three participating institutions teach courses which apply 
toward the degrees, and credit earned from any of these colleges through the Brunswick 
Center is accepted as residence credit by Armstrong State College. 

Degree Programs: 

The Brunswick Center offers programs of study leading to four degrees from 
Armstrong State College: 
Bachelor of General Studies 

a broad-based general education degree with minor concentrations in business, 

history, political science, and psychology 
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice 
Bachelor of Science in Education 

with certification in early childhood education (P-5) or middle school education (4-8) 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Criteria for Admission: 

Anyone who has completed an associate degree or its equivalent is eligible for 
admission to Brunswick Center programs and courses. Moreover, Brunswick College 
students who have sophomore standing and meet certain requirements, including 
completion of all Core Curriculum English requirements and passing the Regents Test, 
may be admitted to Brunswick Center classes taught by the senior colleges. 

Anyone who already has a baccalaureate degree also may be admitted as a nondegree 
student to take courses, particularly for teacher certification. 

Admission Procedures: 

Prospective students apply for admission to Armstrong State College and must meet 
all admission requirements for that college. The admission application process is 
handled through the Brunswick Center Office; the completed application and all 
transcripts of previous college work must be sent for preliminary processing to the 
Brunswick Center, which will then send the documents to the ASC Admissions Office. 



16 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



After Admission: 

Once admitted to Armstrong State College or either of the other consortium institu- 
tions, students are allowed to take courses offered through the Brunswick Center by all 
three institutions. The senior colleges accept all course work done through the Brunswick 
Center as residence credit. Upper level courses taken by Brunswick College students will 
be applied toward their baccalaureate degrees. 

The Director of the Brunswick Center serves as the initial advisor for all students in 
the Center. He meets with each student to outline an overall program as well as to plan 
a schedule each quarter. 

Registration for the Brunswick Center is done through the Center office at the time of 
Brunswick College registration. Students are encouraged to preregister for the next 
quarter during the specified preregistration time each quarter. 

Graduation requirements in each degree are set by Armstrong State College. The 
respective department heads and the Registrar at ASC certify each candidate for 
graduation. 

All Brunswick Center students have full use of the Brunswick College Library and 
other support services of Brunswick College. 

Fees: 

There is a $10 processing fee which must accompany each application for admission 
to Armstrong State College. 

Tuition fees for both senior college courses and junior college courses are collected at 
the current rates set by the University System Board of Regents. Senior college students 
taking six or more quarter hours at Brunswick College also must pay student activity and 
athletic fees at this institution. Tuition fees are paid to Brunswick College. 

Financial Aid: 

Prospective students interested in seeking financial aid should make application for 
their aid through the Financial Aid Office of their home school. Financial aid application 
forms for Armstrong State College may be obtained from the Brunswick Center Office. 

Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education 

The Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education was established in 1979 to 
combine the resources of Armstrong State College's Community Services Division and 
Savannah State College's Extended Services Division. The Center operates a unified 
continuing education program dedicated to serving the people of Savannah, Chatham 
County, the State of Georgia and, for some programs, persons beyond those boundaries. 

A wide variety of programs is offered at Armstrong State College, Savannah State 
College, the Downtown Center and, when it is appropriate, at job sites, schools, 
community centers, and other locations in Savannah. Instructors are drawn from the 
faculties of both institutions, from qualified experts in the Savannah community, and 
from consultants throughout the region. 

On the Armstrong campus, the major community services / continuing education 
component of the college is the short-course / conference program. This unit administers 
non-degree courses, conferences, and seminars designed for area residents who do not 
wdsh to participate in the regular credit classes offered by the college. These activities 
vary widely - some are related to professional development, others reflect personal 
interests, while others are recreational in nature. The Registrar maintains permanent 
records of persons participating in activities that meet certain criteria. 

Elderhostel Program 

Elderhostel is an educational adventure for older adults looking for new beginnings, 
opportunities, and challenges. Participants from all over the world travel to college 
campuses, recreational sites, and conference centers in over 47 countries to experience 



PROGRAMS 17 



atiUli'inu, cultural, aiul social cnh^htiMiiiuMU I'.irtK ip.ints arc i»n site tor a wi't'k, usually 
participating in thret* coupics set up by the pri)>;ram cDDrdinator. Ihcs*.* courses are 
strictly informational, requiring no testing and no grading, and are often supplemented 
with tours and extracurricular activities. 

Armstrong State College lias been providing I"lderhostel since 14K6 and now offers 
more than 45 weeks i)t programming per year at two sites: ASC campus and I ybee Island. 
Armstrong's program is i>pen to applicants within the commumtv, nationwide, or 
abroad Individuals M) years ot age And older are eligible. I he program brings in more 
than 1400 participants in a year, contributing to Georgia's status as the second most 
pop'>iiIar state within the national program 

Public Service Center 

Ihe .Armstrong State College Public Service Center is dedicated to helping Savannah 
and Southeast Georgia identify and resolve complex urban and regional issues. City and 
county governments, state, regional, and local agencies, and non-profit groups comprise 
the broad spectrum of organizations that stand to benefit from the Center's applied 
research, service, training, and public information programs. 

The Public Service Center's mission is to inform local government and agency 
decision makers of options as they face complex urban and regional issues. An important 
aspect oi this mission is to provide relevant and timely information to these leaders to 
facilitate the work of their organizations, thus enabling them to provide better service to 
their constituencies, clients, and customers. 

The Public Service Center achieves its objectives through research, service, and 
information dissemination. In particular, the Center's activities include: 

- conducting applied research and analysis of local public and private sector issues 
and problems; 

- providing informed analysis and consultation on policy, procedure, and opera- 
tions to local governments, private non-profit, and public-sector agencies; 

- supporting in-service training to public and private non-profit organizations; 

- engaging in program development and planning to improve the delivery of local 
and regional government services; 

- collecting and disseminating a variety of relevant information to local and regional 
service delivery groups. 

Regional Criminal Justice Training Center 

The Armstrong State College Regional Criminal Justice Training Center is a regional 
training site for criminal justice employees, especially those in law enforcement. The 
region consists of nineteen counties; however, training is made available to all criminal 
justice employees throughout the State of Georgia. The basic mission of the Center is to 
provide certification classes for law enforcement and jail officers. In addition, there are 
numerous advanced and specialized courses for higher certification credits. The training 
center has seven full-time staff members and a large part-time instructor cadre. 

Armstrong State/Savannah State Cross Enrollment Program 

A student enrolled at Savannah State College or at Armstrong State College taking AT 
LEAST 10 QUARTER HOURS at one institution has the privilege of taking ONE 
COURSE at the other college without paying an additional fee. A student usually would 
take two courses at the home college paying full fees and one course at the other college 
which would be transferred back to the home college; or a student with at least a "B" 
AVERAGE (3.0) the preceding quarter may take three courses at the home college, 
paying full fees there, and register at the other college for one additional course without 
additional cost. Students majoring in Business Education may take more than one course 
in these subject areas. 



r 



18 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CO 





20 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



r^ 



!5 



Student Life 

One of the primary aims of the educational mission at Armstrong State College is the total 
development of students. This growth process is enhanced by integrating opportunities for 
social, emotional, cultural, physical and spiritual development in addition to intellectual 
grou^th. The Division of Student Affairs is committed to providing programs and services 
v^hich foster an educational environment which will assist students in achieving their full 
potential. The college encourages learning through involvement in the residence center, 
student government, campus organizations, intramurals, and more. 

Residence Life and Food Service 

The residence center, completed in September of 1985, consists of three buildings which 
house 64 students each. The apartment-style design encourages student interaction without 
a loss of privacy. Each two-bedroom suite, accommodating four students, has a bath and 
living room. All units are fully furnished, carpeted, and have unit-controlled heat and air 
conditioning. Phone jacks and an on-site coin laundry are added conveniences. Several units 
are equipped to accommodate students with disabilities. The residence complex is staffed by 
a head resident and resident assistants. These students are chosen on the basis of leadership 
and willingness to serve their fellow students. 

Students who live in college housing are required to participate in the 19-meal plan 
provided in the Memorial College Center. The plan includes three meals per day, 
Monday through Friday, and morning and evening meals on the weekend. The meal 
plan is also available for students who do not choose to live in college housing. 

Housing applications and /or specific information should be requested from the 
Office of Admissions or the Division of Student Affairs. 

Student Involvement 

The Orientation Program is designed to promote social and academic adjustment of 
new students and transfer students. CHAOS (Communication, Help, Advisement, 
Orientation and Service) provides new students with the information, services and 
support essential to a successful transition into the Armstrong community. Participants 
in these one day summer CHAOS sessions receive individual attention from student 
leaders and staff as they acquire first hand experience with academic advising, registra- 
tion, campus facilities, student activities, and college policies /procedures. The CHAOS 
program is a cooperative effort of student leaders and college staff. Competitive selection 
of student leaders occurs annually during Spring Quarter. Inquiries concerning CHAOS 
should be addressed to the Office of Student Affairs. An abbreviated orientation 
program is scheduled for students new to the college prior to registration Winter, Spring, 
and Summer Quarters. 

The Student Government Association is the official governing body of the students 
at Armstrong State College. It assists in formulating a program of student services and 
activities, and it strives to express the will of the majority of students and to provide 
experience in democratic living. All students are automatically members of the SG A and 
are entitled to vote in SGA elections. Qualified students may seek positions of leadership 
in the Student Government Association by running for office during the Winter elections. 

Student Clubs and Organizations provide Armstrong State College students with 
opportunities to develop leadership skills, broaden their social and professional back- 
grounds, and make a significant contribution to the college and the community. They 
reflect the natural variety of interests found in a diverse student body. Inquiries 
concerning any campus club or organization should be addressed to the Office of Student 
Activities. 

Religious: Baptist Student Union. 

Greek: Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority and Phi Mu Sorority. 



STUDENT LIFE 21 



Professional: Armstron); Bio1oj;k»iI SikuIs, Aiiuik.im Chemical Society, ASC An- 
throp^logv C lub. ASC lii>;iruvring Society. Cieor^ia Association of Nursing Students, 
James Moore Wavne I. aw Club, Jr American Dental Hygienists Asst>ciation, Medical 
Techni>U>gv Club, Student Cteorj;ia Association ot lulucators, Ihe F. B. Iwitmeyer 
Society (Psvchi>U>^v), An\A the Armstrong Economic Club, Association for Computing 
MachiiuTV & Data Trocessin^ Management Association, Music Hducat(^rs National 
Conference, Radiologic Technologies Association, National Art Evducation Association. 

Special Interest: Band, Cheerleaders, Chorus, College Republicans, Ebony Coalition, 
The Armstrong Environmental Coalition, ASC Gospel Choir, ASC Hispanic Society, 
Masquers, I'irateers, Vocal Ensemble, and Women of Worth (WOW), ASC Cjamers. 

Academic Honor Societies recogni/e and encourage superior scholarship in many 
fields ot studv. Campus chapters include: Alpha Eta (Allied Health, Associate Degree 
Nursing), Alpha Sigma Chi (Physical Education), Beta Beta Beta (Biology), Alpha Sigma 
Chi (Ph\ sical I'ducation) and Sigma Delta Tau (English). 

Student Publications provide opportunities for students to develop skills in creative 
writing, reporting, photography and design. The Gecchec (yearbook), hikzvell (newspa- 
per) and Calliope (literary magazine) are all produced by students under the supervision 
of approved college advisors. Student Photographic Services provides employment and 
recognition for Student photographers. All are financed primarily by the Student 
Activity Fund. 

Intramural and Recreation Offerings. The college places a high priority on its 
intramural and recreational offerings and provides a wide variety of activities including 
organized competitive sports. The physical education complex includes an indoor 
olympic-size pool, gymnasium and weight room. Outdoor facilities for tennis and field 
sports are adjacent. 

The Intercollegiate Athletics Program at Armstrong is affiliated with the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II. Athletic scholarships are available 
to support student-athletes who participate in the intercollegiate program. The men's 
athletic teams consist of basketball, baseball, tennis, and cross country. Women's teams 
include tennis, cross country, volleyball, and basketball. Cheerleaders are also spon- 
sored. Armstrong State College is affiliated with the Peach Belt Athletic Conference. 
(Armstrong State College, Augusta College, Columbus College, Francis Marion College, 
Georgia College, Kennesaw State College, Lander College, Pembroke State University, 
use Aiken, and USC Spartanburg). 

Cultural Opportunities on campus and off are an important aspect in the total 
educational process. Nationally known speakers, contemporary concerts, dances, popu- 
lar films, exhibits, and performances by outstanding classical and modern artists from 
around the world complement the student's general education. These programs are 
selected and coordinated by the College Union Board. Student dramatic, choral, and 
instrumental groups, under professional direction, have established distinguished tra- 
ditions. On-campus offerings, such as the Faculty Lecture Series, broaden knowledge 
and interest in a non-classroom setting. The 1,000 seat Fine Arts Auditorium often hosts 
performances by the Savannah Symphony, area arts groups, and out-of-town troupes, 
such as the National Shakespeare Company and the Vienna Choir Boys. 

Student Services 

Counseling Services are offered to currently enrolled and former students at no cost 
to the counselee. Whether setting goals or resolving personal issues, a student can be 
assured that discussions held with a professional counselor are strictly confidential. 
Students may schedule individual appointments or sign up for group workshops in the 
Division of Student Affairs on the second floor of the Memorial College Center. 

The Office of Career Services provides assistance with all aspects of career develop- 
ment and the job search process. Students can receive assistance with the early stages of 
career development such as selecting a major, gathering occupational information. 



22 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



investigating career paths through individualized career counseling and computerized 
career guidance techniques. Part-time and full-time employment opportunities are 
listed in the Career Library along with cooperative education opportunities. Students 
closer to graduation may take advantage of one-on-one assistance or workshops on 
topics such as, resume writing, interviewing skills, business and social etiquette, dress- 
ing for success and applying to graduate school. Mock interviews are also available to 
help prepare students and alumni for the job search process. Also available, free of 
charge, is a resume and cover letter software package called ResumExpert. Users only 
need to furnish an appropriate disk and provide resume paper to utilize this exciting 
system. Local, regional and national job listings, referrals and on-campus interviewing 
services are available to students and alumni registered with the Office of Career 
Services. Two job fairs are held annually. The job fair for Liberal Arts and Health 
Professions graduates is held ever)^ fall and the Education Career Day is held in late 
winter quarter for Education students and graduates. All juniors and seniors are urged 
to register with the Office of Career Services three quarters prior to graduation to 
establish a placement file and become eligible for placement services. 

The Alcohol and Drug Education Office provides campus alcohol and drug preven- 
tion programming; and services to students with concerns about alcohol /drug related 
issues which include: personal assessments, counseling, and /or referral to community 
treatment programs. Assistance is also offered for other personal issues. The Director of 
Alcohol /Drug Education coordinates support group meetings on campus and collabo- 
rates with local prevention and treatment facilities. Training is provided for residence 
hall advisors and CHAOS Leaders. Classroom instruction is provided upon request of 
instructors. Resource materials are available. 

Students with Disabilities are provided with needed services on an individual basis. 
After students are accepted to the college, if they have special needs as a result of a 
disability, they should set up an appointment in the Office of Student Affairs with the 
Director of Disability Services, to discuss their disability as it relates to their educational 
program. 

Testing for career interests, study habits, learning style, personal preferences, and 
ability is provided free of charge with counseling services. In addition, the following 
state- and nation-wide testing programs are administered by the director of counseling 
services: Academic Profile, ACT PEP Regents College Degrees, College-Level Examina- 
tion Program, DANTES Subject Standardized Tests, Graduate Record Examinations, 
Major Field Achievement Tests, Medical College Admission Test, Miller Analogies Test, 
Pharmacy College Admission Test, The Praxis Series, and the Regents' Testing Program. 
For information about these and other testing programs, please contact the Division of 
Student Affairs. 

The Minority Advisement Program helps minority students develop interest in all 
facets of college life. A peer advisor offers one-on-one assistance to students in adjusting 
to personal and academic life on campus. In addition, social, cultural and educational 
activities designed to broaden all students' knowledge of African- American people and 
their contributions to society are presented. 

The Adults Back to College Program meets the special needs and concerns of the 
non-traditional student. Mature students who are beginning college or are returning 
after several years away will find that the A. B.C. program will ease their transition to 
student life and address their career and academic questions. 

The Office of Nontraditional Learning, located in Gamble 104, responds to the needs 
and concerns of evening, weekend, and reentr}' students. Open till 9:00 on most weekday 
evenings and on Saturday and Sunday afternoons, the Office houses information on 
degree programs and college services, hosts focus group sessions and workshops, 
develops and coordinates distance learning programs (courses delivered by means of 
cable television, satellite, and teleconferencing), and provides individual guidance to the 
new majority of reentry students on and off campus — students whose academic goals 
were deferred or interrupted for reasons of work, family, or other commitments. 



STUDENT LIFE 29 



Velerans will tiiul tlu-Ottut'ot ! uiaiKi.il AkI .ukI \ iti-rans Atidirsiiclpful in advising 
abi)ut aJniissu>i>s prmi'duri's and scrviii's availabli' to them. 

The Academic C omputin^ Center houses separate miniiomputer and microcom- 
puter tacihties ti>r student use All machines in the Academic Computing Center are 
connected to the campus wide network and allow access to file servers and other network 
services. There is also a separate Hngineerinj; micro computer lab with high performance 
Zenith color workstations and a Hewlitt-Packard high speed pen plotter. 

The Advisement Center, located on the second floor of Lane Library, provides 
academic advisement tor undeclared majors and students who have CPC deficiencies in 
foreign languages, social science, or sciences. The Center is staffed by faculty volunteers 
from the academic departments. Each quarter during Advance Registration (a one-week 
period atter mid-term), students are expected to meet with an advisor to select courses 
for the following quarter. Advisors are also available during the rest of the quarter for 
questions about core curriculum, transfer credit, majors, and career choices. 

The Writing Center is a place where students in all disciplines may come for help with 
their writing. Tutors in the Writing Center offer individual instruction in basic writing 
skills and provide guidance in the preparation of essays, reports, and research papers. 
The aim of the Writing Center is not only to assist students in core composition courses, 
but also to work with faculty to improve writing across the curriculum. The center is 
administered by the Department of Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. 

The Reading Lab is used by students who feel the need for assistance in college level 
reading. Staffed by student tutors and by faculty volunteers from the Department of 
Learning Support, the lab is open 6-8 hours a day and, in addition to one-on-one 
assistance, offers audiotapes and computer programs that foster the development of 
reading skills. The lab is administered by the Department of Learning Support and is 
located on the second floor of the Lane Library. 

The Math Tutorial Center provides services on a first-come, first-served basis to a 
large number of students enrolled primarily in Developmental Math or in College 
Algebra. The Center is staffed 6-8 hours a day by student tutors and by faculty volunteers 
from Learning Support. The lab is administered jointly by the Department of Learning 
Support and the Department of Mathematics anci Computer Science, and is located on 
the second floor of the Lane Library. 

Lane Library, built in 1966 and substantially enlarged in 1975, supports the academic 
programs oi Armstrong State College. To that end, library faculty provide assistance to 
users in identifying, locating, obtaining, and using information resources. 

The library collections consist of 750,000 items, including 172,000 book volumes; 
553,000 microforms; and 15,000 compact discs, records, laser discs, slides, and video 
recordings. In addition, the library subscribes to approximately 1,200 journals and 
newspapers. A special collection, the Florence Powell Minis Collection, contains publi- 
cations of the college, published works by Savannah authors, and published material 
about Savannah and the surrounding area. The collection also includes first editions by 
Conrad Aiken, Flannery O'Connor, and other Savannah authors. Through participation 
in state, regional, and national resource sharing agreements with other libraries, Lane 
Library is able to borrow and to obtain for its clientele materials not available at 
Armstrong. 

Lane Library employs an array of modem technologies in the provision of library 
services. Examples include an online catalog and circulation system, computerized 
searching of both online and CD-ROM databases, and internet access to other library 
catalogs and to information sources via gopher and World Wide Web. With its commit- 
ment to a high level of automation, the library also maintains a high level of personalized 
reference service to aid users. 

Library programs at Armstrong seek to meet the needs of each student in the course 
of study and to prepare graduates for life-long learning. 



24 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Parking Regulations 

All vehicles driven on campus must display a college parking decal on the left rear 
bumper. Free decals are available at the Public Safety Office on Science Drive. 

All students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to become aware of the parking 
regulations. A set of regulations may be picked up in the Public Safety Office or Office 
of Student Affairs, and a copy is published in Students Illustrated. 



26 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



General Admission Policies 

Armstrong State College welcomes students who wish to pursue a college-level 
program of study. Applicants must provide evidence of a reasonable possibility of 
academic success in college in order to be admitted as a regular student. Applicants who 
do not meet the minimum requirements for admission may be admitted under condi- 
tional or provisional status or under other Special Admission Categories. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to employ appropriate assessment mecha- 
nisms to ascertain the suitability of applicants to enroll in the College and to deny 
enrollment or admission to individuals based upon the results of the assessment. 

Final acceptance or rejection of each applicant is determined by the Director of 
Admissions and is subject to the applicant's right of appeal to the Academic Standing 
Committee prior to the beginning of the desired quarter of entry. The committee will 
review the appeal and make a recommendation to the President of the College, who will 
render a decision. The College reserves the right to withdraw admission prior to or 
following enrollment if the student becomes ineligible as determined by the standards 
of the College or Board of Regents. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to refuse to accept any or all of the credits 
from any high school or other institution, notwithstanding its accredited status, when the 
College determines through investigation or otherwise that the quality of instruction at 
such high school or institution is, for any reason, deficient or unsatisfactory. The 
judgement of the College on this question shall be final. 

The College reserves the right to reject an applicant who is not a resident of the State 
of Georgia. All students enrolled at Armstrong State College are required to affirm that 
they will abide by the provisions of the Honor Code. 

Admission Requirements 

It is the responsibility of the applicant to request that official documents required for 
admission be sent directly from the previous institutions to the Office of Admissions. 
Documents that have been in the hands of the applicant, such as student copy transcripts 
or letters, grade reports, diplomas, or graduation lists are not official. The documents 
must be issued and mailed directly by the registrar of the previous institution(s) in a 
sealed envelope. These documents become part of the applicant's permanent record and 
will not be returned. 

The following items are required for admission: 

1 . OFFICIAL APPLICATION FORM. An applicant seeking admission must file an 
application for admission prior to the specified deadline as indicated in the 
academic calendar. An application may be obtained from the Office of Admis- 
sions. Care should be taken to read the directions accompanying the application 
and provide all information requested. An incomplete application will cause delay 
and may be returned to the applicant. 

2. CERTIFICATE OF IMMUNIZATION. All applicants must submit a University of 
Georgia Certificate of Immunization verifying immunity against measles, mumps, 
and rubella. This form must accompany the application. 

3. A $10 NONREFUNDABLE APPLICATION FEE. This processing fee is required 
with applications. 

4. OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT(S) OF COURSES COMPLETED. All documents must 
be on file in the Office of Admissions prior to the specified document deadline 
indicated in the academic calendar. A freshman applicant should ask his or her 
guidance department to send an official copy of the high school transcript. A 
delayed decision candidate must submit an official high school transcript and 
official college transcripts, if applicable. A transfer candidate should ask the 
registrar from each college attended to send a transcript of grades (a separate 
transcript from each college) and submit a high school transcript if he or she has 



ADMISSIONS 27 



.itti'mptfd loss than ^t^ i|ii.uli'r hours or 24 si'mt'strr hours Thi* holdrr of .1 (iFD 
cortiluati* must ri\|ui'st that .ui ottici.il scon* ri'port hi* sont to thi' Offut* of 
Admissions. rU'aso soo Spoiial Admissions lato^orii's. 

S CMMCIAI SCl^Kl-S ON IMF SCHOLASIIC AITH UOl: TEST (SAT) of the Lol- 
logo Fntranco Examination Board or THE AMIIKICAN COLLEGE TESTING 
TKCXiKAM (ACT). AppUcations and information may hv obtained from ihe 
College Entrance Examination Hoard (\\o\ S"^)2, I'rinceton, New Jersey ()HS4()), or 
the American Ci>lle>;e Testing Trogram (^^S^ [.vno\ Koad, N.\-.., Suite ^20, Atlanta, 
Georgia ."^3026-1332). Ihe CEIU^ code assigned to Armstrong State College is 
005012. An histitutional Scholastic Aptitude lest (ISA 1) is offered tjuarteriy by the 
Office of Counseling Services. ISA I scores can be used only tor admission to 
Armstrong State College. A freshman candidate is required to submit SAT or ACT 
scores. A holder of the CiED certificate is also required to submit SAT or ACT 
scores. A transfer candidate who has attempted less than 36 quarter hours or 24 
semester hours must also submit SAT or ACT scores. Exceptions to the SAT and 
AC r requirements are discussed in the Special Admissions section. 

t>. OTHER RFQL'IKHMENTS. The College may require any applicant to appear for a 
personal inter\iew and to take any achievement, aptitude and psychological tests 
it deems appropriate in order to make a decision regarding the applicant's 
qualification for admission to the College. 

Admission of Recent High School Graduates 

An applicant must be a graduate of an accredited high school. Students graduating 
from high school in the Spring of 1988, or later, must meet the requirements of the College 
i'reparatory Curriculum (CPC) of the Board of Regents. Students who lack required 
courses in any of the five areas must make up the deficiencies according to established 
j,uidelines. The following high school courses are minimum requirements for regular 
admission: 

Units Instructional Emphasis/Courses 

English (4) * Grammar and usage 

* Literature (American and World) 

* Advanced composition skills 
Science (3) * Physical Science 

* At least two laboratory courses from Biology, 
Chemistry or Physics 

Mathematics (3) * Two courses in Algebra and one in Geometry 

Social Science (3) * American History 

* World History 

* Economics and Government 

Foreign Language (2) * Two courses in one language emphasizing speaking 
(must be listening, reading and writing) 

The minimum regular admission requirements to Armstrong State College are an 
SAT score of not less than 380 on the verbal section and 380 on the math section 
individually, or an ACT score of not less than 20 on the English section and 18 on the math 
section individually. Also a minimum 2.0 grade point average on all academic courses 
is required. All of the academic courses computed in the high school grade point average 
will have been taken in grades 9-12. 

Provisional Admission 

Applicants to the College who do not meet the College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) 
will be considered for provisional admission to the College. The following represents the 
College's criteria for provisional admission. 



28 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



English - Students graduating with less than the four required units of EngUsh will 
be required to take the Collegiate Placement Examination (CPE) in English and the CPE 
in Reading. Based on the student's score, the student would (1) exempt Developmental 
English and /or Reading, or (2) be placed in Developmental English and /or Reading. 

Mathematics - Students graduating with less than the three required units of 
mathematics will be required to take the Collegiate Placement Examination (CPE) in 
mathematics. Based on the student's score, the student would (1 ) exempt Developmental 
Mathematics, or (2) be placed in Developmental Mathematics at the appropriate level. 

Science - Students graduating with less than the three required units of science will 
be required to take an additional five quarter hour (for credit) course in a laboratory 
science. 

Social Science - Students graduating with less than the three required units of social 
science will be required to complete one additional five quarter hour (for credit) course 
chosen from approved social science courses. 

Foreign Language - Students graduating with less than the two units of the same 
foreign language will be required to complete one additional five quarter hour (for 
credit) introductory foreign language course. 

All course work required as a result of a deficiency must be completed prior to the 
accumulation of 30 hours. In the areas of social science, science, and foreign language, the 
student is required to complete the appropriate course with a "C" grade or better. 
Students receive credit for courses used to satisfy College Preparatory Curriculum 
deficiencies, but such credit may not be used to satisfy core curriculum or degree 
requirements. 

Exceptions to the CPC Requirement 

1 . Any applicant who graduated from high school prior to Spring of 1988 is exempt from 
CPC requirements. 

2. An applicant applying for any associate of applied science or associate of science 
degree program offered by Armstrong State College is exempt from the CPC require- 
ments. 

Conditional Admission 

An applicant who qualifies for admission to the College but who does not qualify for 
regular admission will be granted conditional admission. A student is conditionally 
admitted to the College if any part of the SAT score (verbal or math) is less than 380. A 
student is conditionally admitted to the College if the ACT English is less than 20, or ACT 
Math is less than 18. An applicant who scores less than 250 verbal or 280 mathematics on 
the SAT (less than 13 on the ACT English or less than 14 on the ACT math) or has less than 
a 1.8 high school grade point average on all academic courses will be denied admission 
to the College. 

All conditionally admitted students must take the Collegiate Placement Examination 
(CPE) in order to qualify for regular admission. This examination must be taken before 
a student can register for classes. 

Any student placed in a course numbered below 100, as a result of placement testing, 
will be considered a conditionally admitted Learning Support student. 

Any other courses taken prior to completing and passing appropriate parts of the CPE 
must be approved by the Learning Support Counselor or by an advisor within that 
department. 

Any student who is in required Learning Support (Developmental English, Reading 
or Mathematics) must have a schedule of classes approved by the Learning Support 
Counselor or by an advisor within that department each time the student registers. 



ADMISSIONS 29 



StuJonts \vhi> ATv ri\]uirt*ii to taki* I V\ rlopmiTital ioup»4.*s Kf.iUM* thfv an* K*lnw iMther 
the UniviTsitv Svstoin i>l CiiH»r>;ia ruiiunuiin or tin* itistitution.il inininujin on the Collr^f 
riacementI-xaniinatJon(Ll*l-)\vilk'\iltlH"l.oarnin^Siip|>ort I'ro^ram in the following ways 

1. Passing all rccjuirt'd parts of the Lollfgiate riaccnicnt Hxamination. 

2. It any re».|uirt' d part ot the CPE is not passed, the student will be required to enroll 
in the appri)priate developmental course Upon successful completion of all 
reijuired de\ eU>pmental courses and passing the CPE, the student will exit 
I earning Support. 

Students are limited to a total of four attemps in each Learning Support area, including 
K)th re«.juired and voluntar\ participation. Students who do not complete the requirements 
for each area after a maximum oi four attempts per area are subject to Developmental 
Suspension. Contact the Learning Support Office for copies of the department's policy. 

Transfer of Non-Traditional Credit 

Credit by Examination 

Armstrong State College will grant up to one-fourth of the credit required in a college 
degree for satisfactory scores on the following examinations: 

ACT: Proficiency Examination Program Analysis and Interpretation of 

(PEP) Literature with Essay - 55 

Statistics - 45 Freshman College Composition 

Advanced Placement with Essay - 49 

Biology - 4 College French - 45C 

English: Language and Composition or College German - 44C 

Literature and Composition - 3 College Spanish - 45C 

Calculus AB - 3 American Government - 47C 

Calculus BC - 3 American History I - 45 

Computer Science AB - 3 American History II - 45 

Chemistrv - 3 Introductory Sociology - 47 

American History - 3 Western Civilization I - 46 

European History - 3 Western Civilization II - 47 

Government and Politics: U.S. - 3C Calculus with Elementary 

SAT II: Subject Tests Functions - 53 

American History - national average College Algebra - 52 

European History - national average College Algebra-Trigonometry - 54 

College-Level Examination Program DANTES Subject Tests 

(CLEP) Astronomy - 61 

Humanities - 450 Criminal Justice - 49 

Natural Sciences - 450C General Anthropology - 47 

These guidelines are subject to change without notice. 

Academic departments select the examinations and determine passing scores which 
follow the test titles. The letter C following a score denotes conditional credit and means 
that an additional requirement must be satisfied before credit hours will be awarded. For 
example, the award of credit in American Government is contingent upon passing a local 
test on Georgia government, as well as an AP or CLEP test. The credit hours awarded are 
the same as those earned by students who complete the equivalent course(s). The letter- 
grade K is used to identify credit by examination and has no effect on the academic grade 
point average. The Office of the Registrar adds courses and credit hours to the academic 
records of enrolled students. A brochure published by the Division of Student Affairs 
lists equivalent courses, any conditions for award of credit, and test dates. 

For additional information, please make inquiry to the Office of the Registrar/ 
Director of Admissions, the Office of Student Affairs, or the head of the appropriate 
academic department. 



30 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



College Credit for Military Experience and Training 

Students who wish to have their mihtary experience and training evaluated for 
college credit should submit a copy of appropriate forms to the Registrar's office. 
Veterans should submit DD Form 214 and active duty military personnel should submit 
DD Form 295. Active duty Army personnel and soldiers discharged since October 1, 
1986, should also provide the Registrar with a copy of their Army /American Council on 
Education Registry Transcript. 

Regents Engineering Transfer Program 

The Regents Engineering Program (RETP) at Armstrong State College provides two 
access points for admission. 

I. At the time of admission to Armstrong State College the student must have 
achieved at least: a 550 on the mathematics portion of the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
(SAT); a 450 on the verbal portion of the SAT; and a 3.0 high school grade point 
average. However, any student who has been admitted to an engineering program 
at Georgia Tech on the basis of his / her academic record can enter Armstrong State 
College as a RETP student even if the above requirements are not met. 

II. Students at Armstrong State College who did not qualify for admission to the RETP 
under Access Point I but want to join at the end of the freshman year must fulfill 
the following acceptance criteria: completion of Mathematics 206 and 207 with 
grades of "B" or higher; completion of Chemistry 128 and 129 with grades of "B" 
or better; a college grade point average of 3.0. 

Regents Engineering Transfer Program students who satisfactorily complete the 
pre-engineering curriculum and apply for transfer will be accepted to Georgia Tech. 

Requirements of Transfers 

1. Transfer students completing high school in the Spring of 1988, or later, from 
non-University System institutions will be required to submit their high school 
transcripts as part of their application process unless they have completed their 
freshman and sophomore years, completed an associate degree, or have more than 45 
hours of transfer credit approved. This requirement also applies to students enrolled 
in University System programs that do not require the College Preparatory Curricu- 
lum for admission. 

2. Transfer students completing high school in the Spring of 1988, or later, transferring 
from University System institutions will maintain their CPC status as determined by 
the first University System institution making the original CPC evaluation. 

3. Transfer applicants completing high school prior to Spring of 1988 will follow the 
same procedure as freshman applicants except these applicants will not be required 
to meet the College Preparatory Curriculum requirements. In addition, these appli- 
cants who have achieved sophomore standing at the time of entrance, will not be 
required to submit their high school records. Such records may be required by the 
Office of Admissions, but normally the transcripts of previous college records will 
suffice in place of the high school record. Transfer applicants must ask the Registrar, 
of each college they have previously attended, to mail an official transcript of their 
records to the Office of Admissions at Armstrong State College, regardless of the 
transferability of the credits. 

4. Transfer applicants will not be considered for admission unless they are academi- 
cally eligible to return to the college or university last attended, or unless the officials 
of the institution last attended recommend the applicant's admission. 

5. Transfer applicants will be considered for admission to Armstrong State College, if, 
on all work attempted at other institutions, their academic performance as shown by 
their grade-point-average is equivalent to the minimum standard required by Arm- 
strong State College students by comparable standing. Students not meeting the 



ADMISSIONS 91 



required C.I'A may be iUliniltoti on t.oDtl St.iiulm^ witli Warning (Stv chart under 
Acadi'init l'ri)batioii and Dismissal ri)licy m tlu* "Acidi'mic Kf>;ulatu)ns" si-ition of 
thisCatak)>;.) 

6. TranstiT students from outside the University System of Georgia who have not yet 
completed the required English courses prescribed by Armstrong degree programs 
should visit the [director ot Composition for a placement interview. At this interview, 
the Director of Composition will evaluate student transcripts for English credits, 
administer the English Placement Test (if necessary), provide information on the 
composition sequence mu\ the Cie(.)rgia Regents' Test, and determine placement in 
the approp^riate composition course. Interview schedules are available in the Office 
of the Registrar and in the Department of Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. 
In addition, transfer oi an American Ck)vernment course in substitution for POS 1 13 
IS contingent upon passing a local test on the Georgia constitution. 

7. Transfer credit may be accepted from degree granting institutions that are accredited 
at the collegiate level by their appropriate regional accrediting agency. Provisions 
may be considered when an institution appeals the policy. Students transferring 
from an institution which is not a member of a regional accrediting agency must 
achieve a "C" average on their first fifteen quarter hours of work at Armstrong in 
order to be eligible to continue. In certain areas they may be required to validate 
credits by examination. In computing cumulative grade averages, only the work 
attempted at Armstrong will be considered. 

8. The amount of credit that Armstrong will allow for work done in another institution 
within a given period of time may not exceed the normal amount of credit that could 
have been earned at Armstrong during that time. A maximum of 100 quarter hours 
may be transferred from a junior college. At least half of the courses in the major must 
be taken at Armstrong. 

9. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a degree may consist of 
courses taken by correspondence, extension, or examination. No correspondence 
courses may be used to meet the requirements in the major field or the related fields 
for the Bachelor's degree or in English composition or foreign language. No correspon- 
dence courses may be taken while a student is enrolled, without prior approval of the 
appropriate Dean and the head of the department in which the student is majoring. 

10. If the Core Curriculum requirements in Area I (Humanities), Area II (Sciences), and / 
or Area III (Social Sciences) have been completed in a University System of Georgia 
institution, each completed area will be accepted as having met the respective area 
requirement at Armstrong State College. 

11. An official evaluation of all previous college credit earned will be done during the 
first quarter of the applicant's attendance provided that all transcripts are on file. 
Transfer credit will be awarded from institutions listed in the American Association 
of College Admission Officers and Registrars as being accredited. 

Learning Support Transfer Student Policy 

Conditionally admitted transfer students must meet the same admission require- 
ments as individuals admitted to the College for the first time. A complete record of the 
student's past remedial coursework and CPE scores must be on file in the Armstrong 
State College Registrar's Office before the student can be admitted. Further, con- 
ditionally admitted transfer students must be eligible to return to their previous 
institutions before they will be considered for admission to Armstrong State College. 
Students who have not exited Developmental Studies at another University System 
school need to be advised by the Learning Support Department, but do not have to sign 
up for another CPE. 



32 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Readmission 

Students who have not been enrolled at Armstrong for two or more consecutive 
quarters must apply for readmission on a form provided by the Office of The Registrar. 
Former students who have not attended another college since leaving Armstrong may 
be readmitted, provided they are not on suspension at the time they wish to reenter. 
Former students who have attended another college since leaving Armstrong must meet 
requirements as listed in the catalog in effect at the time of return. A student who is 
readmitted after an absence from the college for more than two years must meet degree 
requirements as listed in the catalog in effect at the time of his or her return. 

Transient Students 

Students enrolled in another college or university may apply for temporary admis- 
sion to Armstrong State College. They must have written approval from their Dean or 
Registrar that they are in good standing and have permission to take specific courses at 
Armstrong State College to be transferred to their own institution when satisfactorily 
completed. Transient students are admitted for a specific period of time, normally one 
quarter. If they wish to remain at Armstrong State College longer than one quarter they 
must submit additional statements from their Dean or Registrar, or must meet all 
requirements for regular transfer admission. 

Armstrong Students Transient Elsewhere 

Armstrong students who wish to take course work at another college with the intent 
of applying the courses to their academic record at Armstrong may do so in accordance 
with regulations for transient status to another college. Students must meet the require- 
ments stipulated by the other college, and, in order to apply the credits toward their 
academic records at Armstrong, must meet the academic regulations of Armstrong. 
Consult with the Registrar's Office for details. 

Accelerated Program for High School Students 

Through this program for superior high school juniors and seniors, students may 
complete more than two-thirds of the freshman year of college before beginning a regular 
college career. Students accepted into the program may choose any freshman course 
provided they meet course prerequisites and receive permission from their high school 
principal or counselor and their college advisor. 

Students in this program may enroll for college credit in a maximum of two courses 
each quarter while completing their senior year of high school. Upon graduation from 
high school, the student will be admitted as a regular college enrollee. 

Students forfeit the privilege of this program if they receive a college course grade 
below C or their high school average in academic courses falls below B in any quarter. 

The College will consider students for this program only upon written recommenda- 
tion of their high school principals or counselors. 

To be admitted to the program, students must satisfy all of the following criteria: 

1 . Minimum Scholastic Aptitude Test score of 850, combined verbal and mathematics 
sections, or the ACT composite no less than 21; 

2. Minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 3.0 or a numerical 
average of 80 or higher in academic subjects; 

3. Exemption of all Developmental Studies requirements for early admission; 

4. Written recommendation from the high school principal or counselor; 

5. Written consent of parent or guardian (if the student is a minor); 

6. Completion of the University System of Georgia College Preparatory Curriculum 
requirements with the following exceptions: 



ADMISSIONS 33 



t 



a. Students with SAT verbal scores of at least 450 (or ACT tnj;lish of at least 23) who 

have nt>t a>mpleted the final unit i)f hi^h schiH)! llnglish and /or vKial studies may 
K' pennilted io tultill theso hi^h schiH»l reijuirenu'nls with the appropriate ti)lley»e 
cDurst's taken throu>;li the )i)inl enroUinent or early admissions program, 
b Students who have not completed thi'Colie^e Preparatory Curriculum require- 
ments mav be admitted throu^li the joint enrollment pro>;ram if they are 
enrolled in the necessary hi^h school courses and scheduled to completi* the 
rec]uirements by the end oi their senior year. 
With the exception of English and social studies courses taken by students with SAT 
verbal scores c^f at least 450 (or ACT English of at least 23), a college course may not be 
used to fulfill both high school College Preparatorv Curriculum recjuirements and 
college degree retjuirements. 

Early Admission and Joint Enrollment Programs 

Armstrong State College offers an early admission program for those students who 
have completed the tenth grade in high school and who have demonstrated outstanding 
academic potential. Ihe criteria foradmissic^n to this program are the same as those listed 
tor the .Accelerated Program. 

Additionallv, the college offers a joint enrollment program which is an early admissions 
program allowing students to enroll full time at the College while remaining on the rolls of 
a kx'al high schcxil. After successfully meeting all established criteria for the Accelerated 
Program, students will be awarded high school diplomas at the end of their freshman year 
in college. For further information on this program, prospective applicants should consult 
with their high schtx)! counselors and rec]uest information from the Office of Admissic:)ns. 

Units oi the University System of Georgia are prohibited from accepting transfer credit 
awarded by any college or university to students enrolled in joint high school and college 
enrollment programs unless those students have a minimum SAT score of 850 and a high 
school Grade Point Average of 3.00 (B) on a 4.00 scale, effective fall quarter, 1985. 

International Students 

(All students who are citizens of countries other than the U.S.) 

It is recommended that international students begin their attendance at the college in 

the Fall Quarter. The college also recommends that international students attend an ELS 

language center prior to enrollment. 

Students from a countrv other than the United States who are interested in attending 

Armstrong must meet the following requirements before application is made: 

1. Meet the requirements of freshman applicants. International students must have 
completed the equivalent of a U.S. high school. However, College Preparatory 
Curriculum (CPC) requirements do not apply to these students. 

2. Have an official transcript of academic records mailed to the Office of Admissions 
at Armstrong with an official translation. 

3. If SAT or ACT scores are available, ask that the results be sent to Armstrong. If these 
scores are not available, the student will be required to take the Collegiate 
Placement Examination and take any such required coursework in accordance 
with the Learning Support Guidelines. 

4. A student whose native language is not English must take the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) and score a minimum of 500 for consideration for 
admission to the College. 

5. Submit a statement of financial resources prior to attendance. 

6. Show proof of adequate health and life insurance. 

After completion of application form and submission of all required records, the College 
will make a decision on the application. If an application is approved, the College will send 
an 1-20 form (which the international student will use to obtain a student visa). Upon arrival 
these students may be tested in English composition for class placement purposes. 



34 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Special Admission Categories 

GED 

An applicant who is not a high school graduate may be considered for admission 
based upon completion of the General Educational Development Examination (GED) 
with a score that satisfies the minimum requirement of the State of Georgia (standard 
score average-45). A score report must be submitted directly to the College from the GED 
testing center where the student took the test, or by D ANTES (2318 South Park Street, 
Madison, Wisconsin, 53713) if the student took the test through the United States Armed 
Forces Institute while in military service. If the applicant's high school class graduated 
in the Spring of 1988, or later, then all College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) require- 
ments must be met. The only exception to this requirement will be those applicants 
pursuing associate of science or associate of applied science degrees. These individuals 
are exempt from the CPC requirements. 

Delayed Admission 

Applicants who have not attended high school or college within the previous five 
years, and have earned fewer than 20 transferable quarter hours of college credit, are not 
required to take the SAT or ACT admissions test. However, these applicants will be 
required to take the Collegiate Placement Examination and complete any Learning 
Support requirements. Students admitted under this category must complete 30 hours 
of college credit with a minimum 2.0 grade point average in order to be granted regular 
admission status. 

Non-Degree Student 

Applicants who have never attended college and who wish to pursue courses for 
personal enrichment for advancement may be admitted as non-degree students by 
permission of the Director of Admissions. To be considered an applicant must possess 
a high school diploma or GED certificate and have been out of high school for a period 
of seven or more years. 

The SAT /ACT is not required, but students must take the Collegiate Placement 
Examination. Applicants admitted as non-degree students may earn a maximum of 
twenty quarter credit hours before being required to fulfill any Learning Support 
requirements. To enter a degree program, fulfillment of all begiiming freshman require- 
ments is necessary. A non-degree student must satisfy all prerequisites before enrolling 
in a course. 

Persons 62 Years of Age or Older 

Persons who are 62 years of age, or older, may enroll as regular students in credit 
courses on a "space available" basis without payment of fees, except for supplies, 
laboratory or special course fees. They must be residents of the State of Georgia and must 
present a birth certificate or comparable written documentation of age to enable the 
Admissions Office to determine eligibility. They must meet all admission and degree 
requirements. 

Admission of Veterans 

After having been accepted at Armstrong State College and upon receipt of Certifica- 
tion of eligibility and entitlement from the Veterans Administration, veterans may 
attend under Public Law 358 (Veterans Readjustment Benefit Act of 1966), Public Law 
815 (disabled). Public Law 894 (disabled). Public Law 634 (war orphans), or Public Law 
631 (children of permanently disabled veterans). Students under Public Laws 358, 631, 
634 should be prepared to pay tuition and fees at the time of registration. 



ADMISSIONS 



Vocational Rehabilitation Applicants 

Thoso applicants sponsored by Vocational Ki'habilitation or other community agen- 
cies must apply at least six weeks betore the be>;innin>» of any quarter to msure propiT 
processing ot applications. 

Requirements for Admission to Art and Music Programs 

The college-level study of art and music requires considerable background as well as 
a basic proficiency level. Those students who wish to major in art are expected to show 
the faculty a ptirtfolio of previous work in at least one medium. In music, placement 
examinations are required o\ all entering students in music theory and applied music. 

Requirements and Procedures for Admission to Health 
Programs 

School of Health Professions Statement of Professional Standards 
Related to Applicants and Students 

All applicants to and students enrolled in the School of Health Professions must meet 
and continue to meet the approved professional standards of the School and respective 
programs. 

1. In order to meet the intellectual, physical and social competencies necessary to 
meet professional requirements, all applicants and students must possess the 
needed physical attributes, and exhibit qualities of good judgment, mental strength 
and emotional stability. 

2. No applicant who may jeopardize the health and /or the well being of a patient, 
client, coworker, or self, may be accepted into the School of Health Professions 
program or continue as a student within a program. 

3. The individual programs will inform each applicant in writing of the technical 
standards which are related to the professional duties of the discipline. 

4. The faculty of each program or department shall be responsible for applying the 
standards for their students and prospective students. 

5. In all cases, final appeal may be brought to the attention of the Dean of Health 
Professions who would appoint an Appeals committee. 

Insurance 

Because of contractual requirements. Health Insurance is required of students in 
Associate Degree Nursing, Baccalaureate Degree Nursing, Dental Hygiene, Medical 
Technology, Physical Therapy, Radiologic Technologies and Respirator)' Therapy. Mal- 
practice/Liability Insurance is required of students in Associate Degree Nursing, 
Baccalaureate Degree Nursing, Dental Hygiene, Medical Technology, Physical Therapy, 
Radiologic Technologies and Respiratory Therapy. 

Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs 

There are many more students applying for admission to these programs than we 
have spaces available. Therefore, 

1 . IT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU CONTACT THE PROGRAM OF YOUR CHOICE 
FOR ADVISEMENT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. 

2. Admission to Armstrong State College and / or completion of prerequisite courses 
do /does not guarantee you admission to a Health Professions program. Because 
each program has its own admission criteria and procedure for admission, stu- 
dents must applv to the particular programs thev wish to enter. 

3. NO MORE THAN TWO (2) SCIENCE COURSES MAY BE REPEATED, and that 
NO ONE COURSE MAY BE REPEATED MORE THAN ONCE. If a student fails a 



36 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



course a second time, he/she will not be eligible for admission to the health 
programs for which this course is a requirement. 
4. ONLY STUDENTS MAKING SATISFACTORY PROGRESS toward admission to 
or in an Armstrong State College health program will be assigned a science seat. 

Associate Degree Nursing 

See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs" above. 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any way guarantee formal 
admission to the Associate Degree Nursing Program. Application for admission will be 
accepted between January 1st and April 15th for the coming academic year. Admission 
decisions will normally be made in April /May each year. 

The Admissions Committee of the Department of Associate Degree Nursing will act 
only on completed applications. A student seeking admission to the program who has 
taken courses at another college must supply the ADN office with a current transcript. 
After admission to the program, the student must pay a $50.00 non-refundable Health 
Professions Deposit to reserve a seat in the program. This deposit is applied to the 
student's first quarter matriculation fee. Students who qualify for admission but who are 
not admitted because of lack of space may reapply. Students admitted for a given quarter 
must enter the program during that quarter or reapply for admission for any subsequent 
quarter. Determination of admission to the program is a function of the faculty. 

Transfer students must meet the criteria for admission to the Department of Associate 
Degree Nursing as stated. Credit for nursing and science courses taken prior to applica- 
tion to the program must be approved by the Department of Associate Degree Nursing. 
It is recommended that nursing courses not be over one year old and science courses not 
be over five years old. Students wishing to be given credit for nursing courses which are 
over one year old and science courses which are over five years old may be required to 
validate current knowledge by examination or be required to repeat these courses. 

The Associate Degree Nursing Program is approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing 
and is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing (NLN). 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission to the Associate Degree Nursing Program is made on a space available 
basis and is limited to the best qualified students as determined by the Associate Degree 
Nursing faculty using an admission point index system. Admission criteria include: 

1. Completion of ZOO 208 with a grade of "C" or better. 

2. Completion of CHE 201. 

3. Completion of MAT 101. 

4. Eligibility for ENG 101. 

5. A minimum adjusted college GPA of 2.0. 

Time Limit for Program Completion 

Students must complete the Associate Degree Nursing Program within three con- 
secutive academic years from the date of their initial entry into the program. Students 
who do not complete the program within this time limit must reapply for admission, 
meet current criteria for admission, and have their previous credits evaluated at the time 
of their subsequent admission. Students who are readmitted must meet course require- 
ments in effect at the time of their readmission. 

Transfer Applicants 

Transfer applicants and those with degrees in other fields must meet the criteria 
established for admission to the nursing major. Transfer credit will be awarded depend- 
ing upon equivalency of courses. These decisions will be determined by the Department 
of Associate Degree Nursing faculty who will use actual course outlines, descriptions, 
etc., supplied by the student. 



ADMISSIONS 37 



Readmission Procedures 

1 llu" stuJi'iU must iumpk'to thi* riMtlmission »ipplicnti(>n for Armstrong State 
Collo^f and tlu' IVp.irtnu'nt ot AssDciato IX'^rt'f Nursing 

2. The student will be required to meet admission and curriculum requirements in 
effect at the time of readmission. 

3. If eligible, the student's readmission will be based upon space availability and 
recommendation bv the Department of Associate Degree Nursing. 

Baccalaureate Nursing Department 

Sc"e Limits on Admissu)n to llotjlth rrotfssioiis Programs" m the "Admission^, 
section of this catalog. 

Applicants to the program must be regularly admitted to Arinstrong State College 
prior to making application to the nursing major. Students must meet the admission 
requirements oi the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing to be eligible for admission to 
the nursing major. Admission to the nursing major is the function of the Faculty. Only 
completed applications will be considered. 

Students will be admitted to the nursing major during Winter Quarter, sophomore 
year. After admission to the nursing major, the student must submit a $50.00 non- 
refundable deposit to reserve a seat in the program. This deposit is applied to the tuition. 
Students who are not admitted may reapply for the next year. 

Applicants may address the Head of the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing if they 
require additional information concerning admission procedures. 

The Bachelor oi Science degree program is approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing 
and is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing (NLN). 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission criteria include: 

T Regular admission to Armstrong State College. 

2. A minimum SAT verbal score of 380. 

3. A minimum SAT mathematics score of 380. (SAT scores will not be required for 
those applicants with Associate, Bachelor's or Master's Degrees). 

4. A grade of "C" or better in each science course. 

5. A minimum adjusted GPA of 2.5 in all prerequisite course work attempted. 
However, meeting minimal requirements does not guarantee admission to the 
nursing major. Those applicants who, in the judgment of the Recruitment and 
Retention Committee present the strongest academic record and show the most 
promise of success in the nursing major will be accepted. In making comparisons 
between applicants, the Recruitment and Retention Committee evaluates the 
academic record of each applicant thoroughly, including an evaluation of grades 
received in particular courses, number of hours completed at ASC, and Regents' 
Test status. 

6. Application to the nursing major must be submitted no later than the end of Fall 
quarter of the Sophomore year. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance 
status by the end of Winter quarter. 

7. Students must meet all legal requirements for licensure. See "Baccalaureate Degree 
Nursing" section of this catalog "Georgia Board of Nursing Legal Requirements." 

8. Admitted students must submit all required health data, CPR certification, proof 
of health insurance and liability insurance by August 1, prior to Fall quarter entry. 

9. Students are expected to comply with the Core Performance Standards for nurs- 
ing. See list of standards included on application. 

It should be noted that the pool of applicants has increased in quality and quantity in 
recent quarters, and that admission to the nursing major is of a competitive nature. 



38 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Transfer Applicants and those with degrees in other fields must meet the criteria 
established for admission to the nursing major. Transfer credit will be awarded depend- 
ing upon equivalency of courses. These decisions will be determined by the Nursing 
Faculty who will use actual course outlines, descriptions, etc., supplied by the student. 

Registered Nurse applicants must meet the criteria established for admission to the 
nursing major and must also submit proof of licensure. The program follows the RN to 
BSN admission procedures defined by the Georgia State Articulation Committee (For 
further information see the BSN Department.) 

Program Completion Requirements 

Students must complete the Baccalaureate Nursing Program within four consecutive 
years from the date of their initial admission to the nursing major. Students who do not 
complete the program within this time limit must apply for readmission, meet current 
criteria for admission, and have their previous credits evaluated. Students who are 
granted readmission must meet course requirements in effect at the time of readmission. 

Senior nursing students are required to take a written comprehensive exam prior to 
graduation. 

Readmission Procedures 

1. The student must complete the readmission application for Armstrong State 
College and the nursing major. 

2. The student will be required to meet admission and curriculum requirements in 
effect at the time of readmission. 

3. The student's admission will be based upon space available and recommendation 
by the Recruitment and Retention Committee of the Department of Baccalaureate 
Nursing. 

4. Readmission to the nursing major is the function of the faculty. 

Associate Degree Dental Hygiene 

See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs" in the "Admissions" 
section of this catalog. 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any way guarantee admission to 
the Associate Degree Program in Dental Hygiene. Applicants must first be accepted for 
admission to the College with regular admission status before the Dental Hygiene 
Admissions Committee evaluates the application to the Associate Degree Program in 
Dental Hygiene. 

Admission to the program is limited in each class. Students matriculate in the Fall 
Quarter of each year. Applications for admission should be completed as soon as 
possible for the Fall quarter and must include a transcript of all academic work. 

The Department has a separate formal admission process in addition to the admission 
process to Armstrong State College. The Admissions Committee will act only on 
completed applications. 

The program requires students to submit a complete health history form, evidence of 
health insurance, and evidence of liability (malpractice) insurance prior to participation 
in clinical experiences. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission to the Associate Degree Dental Hygiene major is on a space available basis 
and is limited to the best qualified students as determined by the Dental Hygiene 
Admissions Committee using an Admission Point Index system. Admission criteria 
include: 

1. Admission to Armstrong State College. 

2. Eligibility for ENG 101 and MAT 101. 



ADMISSIONS 3t 



^ A niiimiunn adjusted collogeGPA of 2.0; however, meeting minimal requirement* 
diH's iu>t ^uar.uiti't' admission to tlu' dental hygiene major. 

4 Students must meet all legal recjuirements tor licensure See "Dental Hygeme" 
section ot this catalog, "legal Kecjuirements " 

Because ot the heavy emphasis on science m the dental hygiene curriculum, it is 
Muportant that the applicant have a strong foundation in biology and chemistry. 

The Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee will give special consideration to appii- 
i ants who have comp-»leted one year of college work and who have completed LWli 201 
or ZOO 208 (or their equivalents) with a grade of "C" or better. 

After admission to the [)ental Hygiene Department, the student must pay a $50.00 
non-retundable Health Programs Deposit to reserve a seat in the program. This deposit 
is applied to the student's first quarter matriculation fee. 

The applicant may request a personal interview with the Dental Hygiene Admissions 
Committee to discuss the application after all credentials have been received. 

Students must complete the Associate in Science degree dental hygiene program 
within four consecutive academic years from the date of their initial entry into the 
program. 

Challenge Examinations 

Challenge examinations for specific dental hygiene subject areas are available in the 
department. Contact the department for information. 

Transfer Applicants 

Transfer applicants and those with degrees in other fields must meet the criteria 
established for admission to the dental hygiene major. Transfer credit will be awarded 
depending upon equivalency of courses. These decisions will be determined by the 
Department of Dental Hygiene faculty who will use actual course outlines, descriptions, 
etc., supplied by the student. 

Readmission Procedures 

1 . The student must complete the readmission application for Armstrong State College 
and the Department of Dental Hygiene. 

2. The student will be required to meet admission and curriculum requirements in effect 
at the time of readmission. 

3. The student's readmission will be based upon space availability and recommendation 
by the Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee. 

4. The student must have his/her previous credits evaluated at the time of readmission. 

Baccalaureate Degree Dental Hygiene Education 

Candidates for the program must be graduates of accredited associate degree dental 
hygiene programs and licensed as registered dental hygienists. 

Students begin their course of sequenced dental hygiene courses in the Fall Quarter. 
Application for admission should be completed as soon as possible. 

Transfer credits are accepted for courses other than the professional sequence. A 
minimum of 45 quarter hours must be earned at Armstrong State College for the Bachelor 
of Science Degree in Dental Hygiene Education to be awarded from this institution. The 
Office of the Registrar will evaluate all transfer credits. The Department has a separate 
formal admissions process in addition to the admission process to Armstrong State 
College. 

The program requires students to submit a complete health history form, evidence of 
health insurance, and evidence of liability (malpractice) insurance prior to participation 
in clinical experiences. 



40 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Criteria for Admission 

Admission requirements include: 

1. Dental Hygiene Licensure. 

2. One year of professional experience preferred. This may include any dental-related 
work experience. 

3. A minimum 2.0 GPA on all previous college work. Students transferring from 
another college must have this average to be considered for admission. The 2.0 
average must be maintained to date of actual matriculation in the program. 

How to Apply 

1 . Complete all application forms required for admission to Armstrong State College. 

2. Complete the separate Dental Hygiene Bachelor of Science Application Form and 
return to the Department. 

3. Submit National Board Scores to the Department of Dental Hygiene. 

Baccalaureate Degree Physical Therapy 

See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs" in the "Admissions" 
section of this catalog. 

Students in the program must be admitted to Armstrong State College prior to 
enrolling in the Physical Therapy Program. Students must meet the admission require- 
ments of the Department of Physical Therapy to be eligible for admission to the physical 
therapy major. Admission to the Physical Therapy Program is a function of the physical 
therapy faculty. 

The Department of Physical Therapy offers both the Bachelor of Science Degree in 
physical therapy and a Post-baccalaureate Certificate of Completion in physical therapy. 

Postbaccalaureate Certificate of Completion. All students graduating from the 
Physical Therapy Program at Armstrong State College will earn a Postbaccalaureate 
Certificate of Completion, which will qualify them to take the National Physical Therapy 
Examination (NPTE). 

Students applying to the program who have already earned a baccalaureate (or 
higher) degree may elect to: 

1. earn a baccalaureate degree in PT from Armstrong State College. Students choos- 
ing this option must meet all the Armstrong core requirements. These criteria must 
be completed prior to matriculation (in the Summer quarter). No more than 1 
prerequisite science course may be outstanding at the time of application. 

OR 

2. earn only the Postbaccalaureate Certificate of Completion. Students choosing this 
option do not need to complete the Armstrong core requirements, but must meet 
the criteria for application to the PT program (listed below). These criteria must be 
completed prior to matriculation (in the Summer quarter). No more than 1 
prerequisite science course may be outstanding at the time of application. 

After admission to the Physical Therapy Program, students must formally accept the 
position in the professional phase of the physical therapy curriculum and submit a non- 
refundable $50.00 deposit to retain their position in the physical therapy program. This 
deposit is applied to the student's first quarter matriculation fee. 

Applicants must obtain the most recent application packet from the Department of 
Physical Therapy. This application packet outlines the steps in the application process 
and contains the Physical Therapy Program application form. Deadlines for submission 
of application is January 15. 



ADMISSIONS 41 



Criteria for Application for Admission 

Applicalu>i\ lur »n.lini>sK)i\ crittTui iiuliiJi* 

1. ['ttoclivi' Dral aiul written coiniiuiiiuatiDii skills 

2. An understanding; ot the physical sciences so that students can comprehend 
physiological, pharmacological and biomechanical principles and integrate those 
principles inti> physical therapy practice. Mininuil satisfaction of this criterion will 
include the ci>mpletion oi 2 terms of basic chemistry with labs and 2 terms of basic 
physics with labs (must include mechanics, electricity, magnetism and light). 

3. An understanding of the functional and structural characteristics of all human 
body s\ stems so that students i.\\n comprehend pathology and dysfunction as they 
relate ti> physical therapy practice. Minimal satisfaction of this criterion will 
include the completion ot 2 terms of anatomy and physiology with labs. Tlu'sf 
courses must be completed in a basic science department. 

4. An understanding of individual and group human behavior. 

5. A knowledge of the political process at different levels. 

6. A knowledge of the scope of physical therapy practice. 

7. A knowledge of computers and computer software applications. 

8. Certification in adult CPR and first aid. 

9. Involvement in extracurricular activities and community service. 

10. Immunizations and physical exams required of all Health Professions' students. 

11. A minimum science grade point average of 2.75. No science grade of a D or F will 
be acceptable. 

Enrollment as a pre-physical therapy major at Armstrong State College does not 
guarantee admission to the physical therapy major. Meeting the minimum criteria for 
application does not guarantee admission to the physical therapy major. It should be 
noted that the pool of applicants for the physical therapy program includes many highly 
qualified applicants, and the number of available positions is limited. Therefore, admis- 
sion to the physical therapy program is highly competitive. 

Transfer applicants who wish to complete a bachelor's degree and pre-physical 
therapy majors at Armstrong State College must complete the general education require- 
ments (see Bachelor's Degree Program) prior to beginning physical therapy courses. 
Transfer credit for prerequisite courses may be accepted for required core courses upon 
receiving approval from physical therapy faculty, the Department in which the course 
is taught at Armstrong State College and the Office of the Registrar. 

Transfer applicants who already have a bachelor's degree and who wish not to 
complete a second bachelor's degree must meet only the 11 admissions criteria listed 
previously. 

All physical therapy students shall comply with the standards of the Georgia Physical 
Therapy Practice Act. Failure to adhere to these standards may be cause for denial of a 
license to practice as a physical therapist in accordance with Georgia law and will be a 
cause for expulsion from the Physical Therapy Program at Armstrong State College. 

Program Completion Requirements 

Students must complete the physical therapy program within four consecutive years 
from the date of their initial admissions to the physical therapy major. Students who do 
not complete the program in the required period of time may apply for readmission. To 
qualify for readmission, there must be space in the class into which the former student 
is seeking admission. The former student must meet the current criteria for admission 
and be evaluated along with the other applicants to the program. 



42 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Readmission Procedures 

1. The student must complete the readmission application for Armstrong State 
College and the physical therapy major. 

2. The student will be required to meet admission and curriculum requirements in 
effect at the time of application for readmission. 

3. The student's admission will be based upon space available in the class into which 
the former student is seeking admission and recommendation of the Department 
faculty. 

4. The former student, who has failed out of the program because of an inability to 
meet the grade requirements (C in all 300 and 400 level PT courses and a B in all 500 
level PT courses) or has been dismissed from the physical therapy program for any 
reason, is not eligible to apply for readmission. 

Associate Degree Respiratory Therapy 

See Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs in the Admissions section 
of this catalog. 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not guarantee admission to the Respira- 
tory Therapy program. The department has a separate formal admissions process. 

Students are normally admitted to the professional component of the program in the 
fall. The application deadline is April 1. Applications received after that date will be 
considered on a space available basis. Our maximum enrollment ceiling is 20 students. 

To meet contractual obligations with our clinical affiliates, students are required to 
submit a complete health history form and evidence of health insurance, immunizations, 
and liability (malpractice) insurance prior to participation in clinical practicums. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission requirements include: 

1. Regular admission to Armstrong State College. 

2. Good academic standing at the time of admission to the major. 

3. The primary criteria used to evaluate applicants are the adjusted GPA and the 
student's performance in MAT 101 and the sciences. The "cut score" for 1994 was 
on adjusted GPA of 2.40. 

Readmission to the Program 

Students who have withdrawn or been suspended from the program must apply for 
readmission. Applications must be received at least 1 quarter prior to the actual time of 
readmission. A student must be in good academic standing at the time of readmission. 
Students will be readmitted on a space available basis. 

A student who has been dismissed from the program for any reason will not be 
eligible for readmission. 

Disclosure 

The curriculum is demanding and requires total commitment. During most quarters 
students are in direct contact with their instructors 25-30 hours per week. We discourage 
students from working more than 16-24 hours per week. 

Our graduate profile indicates a successful student will have an SAT score greater 
than 800 (400M, 400V) and at least 30 hours of previous college credit with a GPA of 2.4 
or higher. Students requiring more than 1 area of developmental studies are usually not 
successful. The attrition rate for a given class ranges from 30-50%. 



ADMISSIONS 49 



Associate Degree Radiologic Technologies 

See "Limits on Admission lo HiMlth I'rofessions Programs" m thi* "Adminsiorw" 
section ot this citalog. 

AdinissiDH to Armstrong State College does not guarantee admission to the Radio- 
logic lechnologies DoPiirtinent Iho Dep.irtnient has a st'p.irate formal admissions 
process in addition to tne admission process to Armstrong State College. 

Students are n(.>rmallv only admitted to the protessional component of the program 
at the start ot the Fall Quarter each year except for transfer students. Students may begin 
taking core courses at any time but turd tiot have cortipletcd all the core courses prior to entry 
into the professional component. The application process begins in the Fall quarter of the 
year for the next year. 

To meet contractual obligations with the clinical affiliates, the program requires 
students to submit evidence of health insurance, evidence of liability (malpractice) 
insurance, CPR certification, and a physical examination prior to participation in clinical 
education courses. 

Criteria for Admission 

The actual determination of admission of applicants to the department is a function 

of the Radiologic Technologies Program Admissions Committee. Admissions are com- 
petitive in nature and are based on scholastic history. 
The following are specific criteria for admission: 

1. A minimum GPA of 2.5 in a high school curriculum. 

2. A minimum GPA of 2.5 in all science and mathematics courses in the high school 
curriculum. 

3. A minimum overall adjusted college GPA of 2.0, if applicable. 

4. A minimum GPA of 2.0 in all mathematics and science courses at the college levels. 

5. Must be eligible for college English and Algebra. 

The above listed criteria is required, however, we give preference to students that 
have completed 20 or more quarter hours of degree required core courses and have a 2.2 
or better cumulative GPA. 

Applicants who do not meet the criteria for admissions outlined above may stijl apply 
for admission. Please contact the Department for information. 

After admission to the Radiologic Technology Department, the student must pay a 
$50.00 nonrefundable Health Programs Deposit to reserve a seat in the program. This 
deposit is applied to the student's first quarter matriculation fee. 

Readmission to the Program 

Students who have been admitted to and have enrolled in the Associate Degree 
Program in Radiologic Technologies, but who have either withdrawn or been dismissed 
without prejudice from the program, may apply for readmission to the program only if 
they have a cumulative college GPA of 2.0 at the time they wish to reenter. The student's 
readmission will be based upon space availability and recommendation by the Radio- 
logic Technologies Admissions Committee. 

Baccalaureate Degree Health Science 
Criteria for Admission to Program 

1. Regular admission to Armstrong State College. 

2. Eligible for MAT 101 and ENG 101. 

3. Adjusted college GPA of 2.0. 

4. Formal interview conducted by health science faculty members. 

5. Completed health science program application. 



44 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Baccalaureate Degree Medical Technology Program 

The professional phase of the Medical Technology curriculum begins in the Fall 
quarter of each year with the MT courses. Students desiring acceptance to the Medical 
Technology Program should make application to the program during the early spring of 
the preceding academic year. 

Minimum Admission Requirements 

1. SAT of at least 800 with 350 or more in Math and 350 or more in Verbal. 

2. Cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.2 or more. 

3. Completion of required chemistry and biology courses prior to the senior year. 

4. Science course (Chemistry and Biology) average of 2.25 or better with no more than 
one required science course with a grade of "D" 

5. Satisfactory completion of Regents' Testing Program. 

Other Requirements 

Per N AACLS requirement, all applicants must have taken the organic or biochemistry 
course and the microbiology course within the past seven years. Updating coursework 
can be done by completion (a grade of "C" or better) of the appropriate course or by a 
challenge examination. 

Currently enrolled Armstrong State College students must also meet the require- 
ments for admission to the MT program and apply to the program. 

Transfer students must be accepted to the college with "Regular Status" admission. 

Certified associate degree medical laboratory technicians may receive transfer credit 
for junior level MT courses upon presentation of acceptable certification scores and /or 
transfer credit and satisfactory completion of written and /or practical examinations in 
the professional content areas. 

An applicant with B.S. degree not desiring the B.S. in Medical Technology degree 
must meet the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences academic 
prerequisites for Medical Technology. These students will be awarded a certificate upon 
completion of the professional coursework. 

Foreign applicants must meet the requirements for admission to Armstrong State 
College as outlined in the college catalog. 

Application Process 

1 . Complete all requirements for Application for Admission to Armstrong State College 
if not currently enrolled at ASC. 

2. Complete an Application to Medical Technology Program form. 

3. Have official transcripts sent to Program Director. 

4. If certified, have scores sent to Program Director. (Ask Program Director for form 
letter.) 

5. Applicants meeting the minimum admission requirements will be invited for an 
interview with at least two of the Admission Committee members, one of whom is the 
Program Director. 

6. Request two references to complete Confidential Appraisal Form to be forwarded to 
Program Director. 

7. All applicants will be informed by letter of their application status. 

Graduate Degree Programs 

The program-specific admissions requirements are listed in the Armstrong State 
College Graduate Catalog. 



46 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Expenses 

The following schedules list the principal expenses and regulations concerning the 
payment of fees. Fees and charges are subject to change at the end of any quarter. 

When such changes are made, notice will be given as far in advance as possible. 

Tuition 

Georgia Residents 

The matriculation fee for students registering for at least 12 quarter hours is $498.00. 
Students carrying fewer than 12 credit hours on campus in a quarter will pay $42.00 per 
quarter hour. This fee is waived for residents of Georgia upon presentation of written 
documentation that they are 62 years of age or older. 

Out-of-state Residents 

Full time students who are non-residents of Georgia pay a fee of $1,568.00. Those 
carrying fewer than 12 credit hours in a quarter pay $132.00 per quarter hour tuition. 
Out-of state tuition fees are waived for active duty military personnel and their depen- 
dents stationed in Georgia (except military personnel assigned to this institution for 
educational purposes). 

Regents' Policies Governing Residency Requirements 

To be considered a legal resident of Georgia, the applicant must establish the following 
facts to the satisfaction of the Registrar. 

1 . (a) If a person is 18 years of age or older, he or she may register as an in-state student 
only upon a showing that he or she has been a legal resident of Georgia for a period 
of at least twelve months immediately preceding the date of registration. 

(b) No emancipated minor or other person 18 years of age or older shall be deemed 
to have gained or acquired in-state status for tuition purposes while attending any 
educational institution in this State, in the absence of a clear demonstration that he 
or she has in fact established legal residence in this State. 

2. If a person is under 18 years of age, he or she may register as an in-state student only 
upon a showing that his or her supporting parent or guardian has been a legal 
resident of Georgia for a period of at least twelve months immediately preceding 
the date of registration. 

3. If a parent or legal guardian of a minor changes his or her legal residence to another 
state following a period of legal residence in Georgia, the minor may continue to 
take courses for a period of twelve consecutive months on the payment of in-state 
tuition. After the expiration of the twelvemonth period, the student may continue 
his or her registration only upon the payment of fees at the out-of-state rate. 

4. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as guardian of a 
nonresident minor, such minor will not be permitted to register as an in-state 
student until the expiration of one year from the date of court appointment, and 
then only upon a proper showing that such appointment was not made to avoid 
payment of the out-of-state fees. 

5. Aliens shall be classified as nonresident students provided, however, that an alien 
who is living in this country under an immigration document permitting indefinite 
or permanent residence shall have the same privilege of qualifying for in-state 
tuition as a citizen of the United States. 

6. Waivers: An institution may waive out-ofstate tuition for: 

(a) nonresident students who are financially dependent upon a parent, parents or 
spouse who has been a legal resident of Georgia for at least twelve consecutive 
months immediately preceding the date of registration; provided, however. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 47 



that such financial dependence shall have existed for at least twelve connecu- 

tive nu>nths imnu'diately pri'ct'din^ the date of registration. 

(b) international students, selectedbv the institutional president or his authorized 
representative, provided that the number of such waivers in effect does not 
exceed one percent o! the equivalent full-time students enrolled at the insti- 
tution in the fall quarter immediately preceding the quarter for which the 
out-of-state tuition is to be waived. 

(c) full-time employees of the University System, their spouses, and their de- 
pendent children. 

(d) full-time teachers in the public schools of Georgia or in the programs of the 
State Board of Technical and Adult Education and their dependent children 
Teachers employed full-time on military bases in Georgia shall also qualify for 
this waiver; 

(e) career consular officers and their dependents who are citizens of the foreign 
nation which their consular office represents, and who are stationed and living 
in Georgia under orders of their respective governments. This waiver shall 
apply only to those consular officers whose nations operate on the principle of 
educational reciprocity with the United States. 

(f) military personnel and their dependents stationed in Georgia and on active 
duty unless such military personnel are assigned as students to System 
institutions for educational purposes. 

(g) students who are legal residents of out-of-state counties bordering on Georgia 
counties in which an institution of the University System is located and who are 
enrolled in said institution. 

Residency Reclassification 

A student is responsible for registering under the proper residency classification. A 
student classified as a nonresident who believes that he/ she is entitled to be reclassified 
as a legal resident may petition the Registrar for a change in status. The petition must be 
filed no later than sixty (60) days after the quarter begins in order for the student to be 
considered for reclassification for the quarter. If the petition is granted, reclassification 
will not be retroactive to prior quarters. The necessary forms for this purpose are 
available in the Registrar's office. 

Student Housing 

To secure housing, students must send a $100.00 deposit with their housing applica- 
tion. Refer to the housing contract for specific terms and conditions. 

The fee for double occupancy is $664.00 and $848.00 for single occupancy per quarter. 

Food Service 

All students who reside in the dormitory must purchase a 5-day, 15-meal plan at the 
current fee of $578.00 per quarter. 

Other Special Costs 

Application Fee $10.00 

Must accompany initial application. Acceptance of application fee does not constitute 
acceptance of the student. Non-refundable. 

Athletic Fee $52.50/qtr. 

All students pay each quarter. 



48 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Exit Exam Fee 

Fees are announced in test bulletins. 

Graduation Fee $34.00 

Payable by each candidate for graduation when graduation application is submitted 
two quarters prior to graduation. If candidate is receiving a second degree at the same 
graduation ceremonies, an additional $5.00 is due. The full $30.00 is charged for a second 
degree awarded at a subsequent graduation ceremony. A fee of $15.00 is charged for each 
replacement diploma. 

Health Professions Deposit $50.00 

Reserves a seat in appropriate health program, payable upon application to program. 

Late Registration Fee $35.00 

Non-refundable fee charged to students who register after the registration period. 

Student Activity Fee $22.50/qtr. 

All students pay each quarter. 

Transcript Fee, Official 1 free, $3.00 each additional 

Unofficial transcripts for academic advisement and schedule planriing will be issued 
at no charge. 

Music Fees 

Applied music courses consist of one twenty-five minute private lesson per week 
(Music 130) or a fifty minute private lesson per week (Music 140, 240, 340, 440). A special 
fee of $52.00 is charged for students enrolled in Music 130. A special fee of $104.00 is 
assessed for Music 140440 to music majors enrolled for less than 12 hours and to students 
who are not music majors. Music majors may enroll, at no charge, for one applied music 
course from Music 140-440. Additional applied music courses will be assessed a special 
fee at the non-music major rate. 

The applied music fee is refundable only if the student does not meet the first 
scheduled lesson. 

Summary of Fees* 

Matriculation, per quarter $ 498.00 

Student Activity, per quarter $ 22.50 

Athletic, per quarter $ 52.50 

Total for Georgia Resident $ 573.00 

Out-of-state Tuition, per quarter $ 1,070.00 

Total for Non-Resident $ 1,163.00 

Matriculation Part-Time Students, per quarter hours $ 42.00 

Non-Resident Tuition, Part-Time Students, per quarter hour 

(in addition to Matriculation Fee) $ 90.00 

*The fees shown are for the 1995-96 academic year as approved by the Board of Regents. 
Graduate fees are listed in the Graduate Catalog. 

Short Courses 

Fees are announced for each quarter when the course is scheduled by the college. 
Students w^ho formally withdraw from a short course or conference up to twenty-four 
hours prior to the first class meeting will receive a full refund of fees paid. No refunds 
will be made for withdrawals after the first class meeting. Fees paid for courses or 
conferences cancelled by the Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education will be 






FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



rctunJtd 100%. Refund checks will bo iiuukJ approximately four weeks after the 
approved withdrawal iorm is received by tlie Business Office. 

Refunds 

!~>tudiMits w luUi>riiK»ll\' witluirtiw troiii tlu* institiitu>n mior hi* ton* flu* lirst il.i\ t)U Uiss 
are entitled to a retund ot 100' I ot the tuition ,\nd tees paid tor that period of enrollment. 

Students who torinallv withdraw troin the institution alter the first day of class, but 
betoretheendot thetirst 10' . (iii tinu')i>t the period of enrollment, areentilled toa refund 
of W' .' ot the tuition mu\ tees paid tor that period ot enrollment. 

Students who formally withdraw trom the institution after the first 10' r. (in time) of 
the period of enrollment, but before the end of the first 25'/n (in time) of the period of 
enrollment, are entitled to a refund of 30'/) of the tuition and fees paid for that period of 
enrollment. 

Students who formally withdraw from the institution after the first 25' /'- (in time) of 
the period of enrollment, but before the end o\ the first 50' o (in time) of the period of 
enrollment, are entitled to a refund of 25' ^ of the tuition and fees paid for that period of 
enrollment. 

Students who formally withdraw from the institution after the first 50' ^ (in time) of 
the period of enrollment are not entitled to a refund of any portion of tuition and fees. 

Refund of elective charges for withdrawing from the institution during a quarter will 
be made on a prorated basis determined by the date of withdrawal. 

Students attending an institution for the first time who receive assistance under Title 
l\'of the Higher Education Act of 1965 as amended are entitled to a prorata refund of that 
portion of the tuition, fees, room and board, and other charges assessed the student by 
the institution equal to that portion of the period of enrollment for which the student has 
been charged that remains on the last day of attendance by the student up to the sixty 
percent (60' n) point (in time) in the period of enrollment. 

A refund of all quarterly non-resident fees, matriculation fees, and other mandatory 
fees shall be made in the event of the death of a student at any time during an academic 
quarter. 

Financial Obligations 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any financial obligation to the college will 
have grade reports and transcripts of records encumbered. Grade reports and transcripts 
will not be released, nor will the student be allowed to register at the college until all 
financial obligations are met. 

Fees for each quarter are to be paid in full at the time of registration. 

Returned Check Policy 

Students whose checks are returned to the college unpaid by their banks will be 
notified by the Business Office to pay the amount due. Student checks used for 
bookstore and other purchases will be assessed a service charge of 520.00 or 5' 7 of the 
check, whichever is greater. Student checks used for tuition and fees will be assessed 
the service charge plus the late registration fee. A stop payment of a check does not 
constitute a formal withdrawal and is considered a returned check. Legal means will be 
used to collect returned checks. Writing a non-sufficient funds check or stopping 
payment on a check does not cancel registration. Students whose check is returned for 
non-sufficient funds or who stop payment on a check must honor the check and pay the 
service charges before withdrawing from college. After honoring a returned or stop 
payment check and formally withdrawing in the Office of Student Affairs the student 
will receive a refund. Checks returned because of bank errors will be redeposited after 
written notification is received by the bank and a $20.00 service charge is paid by the 
student. No late registration fee is assessed for checks returned because of a bank error. 
Students should request reimbursement of the $20.00 service charge from their bank. 



50 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Financial Aid 
Governing Principles 

Armstrong State College subscribes to the principle that the primary purpose of a 
student financial aid program is to provide financial assistance to students who without 
such assistance would be unable to attend college. The primary responsibility for 
financing a college education is the inherent obligation of the student and /or family. 
Financial assistance from Armstrong State College should be viewed as supplementary 
to the efforts of the student and / or family. An assessment of parental ability to contribute 
toward the student's educational expenses is made according to federal guidelines so 
that neither the parent, the student, nor Armstrong State College will be required to bear 
an undue share of the financial responsibility. 

General Information 

Student financial aid is awarded to eligible students on the basis of need in nearly all 
cases except scholarships which have been provided by donors for the purpose of 
recognizing academic promise or achievement. The determination of need is provided 
for Armstrong State College students through the use of the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid. The process involves a government analysis of the data provided by the 
student's family or, if independent, by the student. This analysis is sent to the Office of 
Student Financial Aid where it is compared with the cost of education for the appropriate 
classification of student. If the analysis shows that the family contribution or student 
contribution is less than the cost of education, financial need has been established. 

In general, students who enter the College at the beginning of the Fall Quarter have 
a greater opportunity to receive financial assistance than those who enter later in the 
academic year. The awards processing time usually runs from May 1 to August 31. It is 
during this period that the Office of Student Financial Aid distributes its yearly allocation 
of funds to students who have completed the process cycle. Many types of assistance are 
awarded to the neediest students who apply first. In the event that there is a shortage of 
funds, students who are eligible for financial aid but whose applications were late will 
be placed on a waiting list until such time as funds become available. For this reason, 
students are encouraged to apply as early in the year as possible. 

The Financial Aid Office is very interested in helping you find ways to finance your 
education. The application and awards process, however, is heavily regulated by federal 
and state law and as a result does not always proceed at a quick pace. Please keep in mind 
that although we are here to help you, we are not responsible for delays caused by 
inaccurate or incomplete applications and files. Unless your file is complete, correct, and 
unencumbered at least 45 days prior to registration day each quarter, you should be 
prepared to pay your own fees. 

Students are eligible to apply for financial assistance provided that: (1) the student 
meets the requirements pertinent to the program(s) from which assistance is sought; and 
(2) the student has been admitted to the college or is enrolled in good standing and is 
making satisfactory academic progress. Students who are classified as Transient, Con- 
tinuing Education, or Exchange are not eligible for financial aid. Students are required 
to adhere to all regulations and requirements of the program from which they receive 
assistance and to notify the Office of Financial Aid of any change in status which may 
affect their eligibility for aid. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 51 



Application Information 

An iippluant lor stuJi'iU tintiiui.il aid must: 

1. Bo tMUDllfd or tKcoptt'd lur onrullnuMU M Armstrong State College. 

2. Complete an Armstrong Application ti>r Fmancial Aid 

3. Obtain, complete, and submit a FAFSA by May 1 precednig the next academic year. 

4. Submit a Student Aid Report to the Office of Student Financial Aid as soon as 
received. 

5. Submit a complete Financial Aid Transcript trom each institution of higher 
learning attended, regardless ot whether the student received, applied for, or 
benefitted trom aid at that institution. 

It mav be necessarv to submit additional forms, such as tax returns, depending on a 
student's year in school, major course oi study, and /or eligibility for a particular 
program. Applications for financial assistance must be repeated annually. Most financial 
aid awards are made on an annual basis. 

The minimum number of quarter hours for which a student financial aid recipient 
mav enroll per quarter varies from program to program. Some require at least 12 hours 
per quarter (full-time status). Many programsrequire that the student be enrolled at least 
halt-time, taking b or more quarter hours (5 hours for graduate students). 

Students applying for financial aid, whether eligible or not, who do not meet or adhere 
to the above requirements will not be considered for financial aid. It is the responsibility 
of the parents and / or student to determine that all pertinent information and data have 
been obtained and are located in the Office of Student Financial Aid to assure a complete 
and accurate awarding of financial assistance. 

When the student has delivered the Student Aid Report (SAR), the Armstrong 
Application for Financial Aid, and all other required documents, the Office of Student 
Financial Aid will send the student a tentative award notice. 

Types of Aid 

Grants — .Awards that students are not required to repay. 

Federal Pell Grants are based on need. Pell Grants are awarded to eligible under- 
graduate students. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) are awarded to 
undergraduates who exhibit exceptional financial need. 

Georgia Student Incentive Grants are state grants awarded to full-time undergradu- 
ate students who are legal residents of Georgia and who demonstrate exceptional 
financial need. 

HOPE (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally) is Georgia's new program that 
rewards exemplary performance in high school with tuition scholarships at Georgia 
public colleges. To be eligible a student must have the following qualifications: 

• Be a graduate of a Georgia high school in 1993 or later. 

• Earn at least a "B" average (at least a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average on a 4.0 
scale in a college preparatory track, 3.2 for all other curriculum tracks). 

HOPE scholarships are also available for other graduates and undergraduates who 
meet certain criteria. Contact the Financial Aid Office for additional information. 

Loans — Financial aid that must be repaid. Borrowing limits increase as a student pro- 
gresses toward a degree. 

Federal Stafford Loans are available through local lending institutions and state 
agencies. The student may defer repayment until six months after the student graduates 
or falls below half-time (minimum 6 hours) attendance. 

• Subsidized loans - interest is paid by the federal government. 

• Unsubsidized loans - the student is responsible for the interest which accrues on 
this loan. 



52 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Georgia Service-Cancellable Guaranteed Student Loans are offered for certain 
"critical" health and teaching fields. These loans are repaid by service in Georgia after 
graduation. Because of limited funding, students should complete the FAFSA as early as 
possible each year to receive full consideration for this award. 

Additional Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are available to independent students 
regardless of need. 

Federal PLUS Loans are available to parents of dependent students. 

Institutional Short-term Loans are available to students for a maximum of 60 days. 
These loans are av^^arded solely to assist students with the payment of tuition and fees. 
These loans are available to eligible students for a maximum of $400. Other requirements 
concerning short-term loans are available in the Office of Student Financial Aid. Funds 
are limited. 

Employment 

The Federal College Work Study Program provides on-campus employment for 
eligible undergraduate students. These awards are based on need and are given on a 
first-come, first-serve basis. Applications are available in the Financial Aid Office. 

Institutional Work Study positions are offered on a limited basis to students with 
specific skills. These awards are not based on need. Students may contact various 
departments for information on job openings. 

Scholarships 

The following list includes many of the scholarships available to Armstrong students. 
The list is intended for reference only and should not be considered an exhaustive source 
of all funds available. The Office of Student Financial Aid will post notices as other 
scholarship opportunities arise. 

Alumni Association Scholarship: Open to all full-time students. Scholarships in- 
clude full and partial awards. Participation in civic and campus organizations, financial 
need, and academic standing are considered. 

Scholarships include The Arthur M. Gignilliat Entering Freshman Scholarship, The 
Judge Grady L. & Sara M. Dickey Scholarship, The Class of '37 Scholarship and others. 
For more information on specific criteria, contact the Office of Alumni Affairs (927-5236). 
Applications are available each winter quarter for awards made in the spring. 

American Association of University Women: Open to older women in non-tradi- 
tional fields who have a 3.0 GPA and are Chatham County residents. For additional 
information, contact the Office of Student Financial Aid (927-5272). 

Savannah Jaycees Scholarship: A full scholarship for full-time Chatham County 
residents. Civic and community involvement are considered. For additional information 
or a scholarship application, contact the Office of Student Financial Aid (927-5272). 
Applications will be accepted prior to May 1. 

Billy Bond Memorial Scholarship: Open to all students with a 3.0 GPA. Civic and 
community involvement are considered. For additional information or scholarship 
application, contact the Office of Student Financial Aid (927-5272). Applications will be 
accepted prior to May 1. 

Elizabeth Wilmot Bull Scholarship: Offered by the Council on Auxiliaries of the 
Georgia Hospital Association. Students in the two- and four-year nursing programs who 
are Georgia residents are eligible to apply. For additional information, contact the Office 
of Student Financial Aid (927-5272). 

Chemistry and Physics Faculty Scholarship: Open to all students. Academic stand- 
ing is considered. For additional information, contact the Chemistry and Physics 
Department (927-5304). 

Ross E. Clark Scholarship: Open to full-time students majoring in Political Science 
with an overall 3.0 GPA, or entering freshmen with a 1200 SAT score. For more 
information, contact Professor Gross, History Department (927-5283). 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION »3 



Coastal l.mpire Pathology Services Scholarship: fiiil-linu' Medical Technology 
cMUor I or .KlJitu>>ial iiUDriiiatioii, loiit.K t the IVp.irtinent ol Medical Technology (927- 
>U)2). 

Ty Cobb Scholarship: Sliuieiits iiuist have completed 4S hours with a H average and 
beCieor>;iii residents I or additional intoriiiation, contact the Ottice of Student Iinancial 

Aidc^:?^:?:), 

Cooper Scholarship: Open to all under^r.idii.ite majors except law, theology, and 
medicine. Ihis scholarship reijuires a H average and good academic standing and is 
based on need, l-or additional intormation, contact First Union Bank (944-2134). Appli- 
cations are accepted until April 15. 

Engineering Society Scholarship: Full-time sophomore and junior engineering 
students with a 2.75 CiPA who are active members of the Engineering Society. For 
additional intormatii>n, contact the Department of Chemistry and Physics (927-5304). 

Freshmen Engineering Scholarship: Open to entering freshmen who major in 
engineering. For additional intormation, contact the Chemistry and Physics Department 
(927-5304). 

Gibson/Hamilton Memorial Scholarship: Sponsored by the Candler Hospital Aux- 
iliary. Students in the allied medical field who have at least a 3.0 GPA are eligible to apply. 
For additional information, contact the Office of Student Financial Aid (927-5272). 

Curtis G. Hanes Nursing Scholarship: BSN nursing scholarship for full-time junior, 
senior, c^nd graduate students with a C or higher average. Residents of Southeast Georgia 
with financial need may apply. For more information, contact Georgia Southern College 
Foundation, Inc. 

Sarah Mills Hodge Memorial Scholarship: Awarded to full-time Chatham County 
residents on the basis of scholastic merit. Requires a 3.0 GPA. For additional information 
or a scholarship application, contact the Office of Student Financial Aid (927-5272). 

Memorial Medical Center Auxiliary Nursing Scholarship: For ADN or BSN stu- 
dents. Must be a Georgia resident with a 2.5 high school GPA and a 750+ SAT score. 
Current nursing students must have a 2.5 GPA. For more information, contact Memorial 
Medical Center. 

Metzel-Magnus Award for Scholarship in Criminal Justice: Awarded to Criminal 
Justice senior with the highest academic average. For additional information, contact the 
Department of Government. 

Padrewski Scholarship/Loan Program: Dental Hygiene. Must be a Georgia resident 
with financial need. For additional information, contact the Dental Hygiene Department 
(927-5308). 

Anthony Porter Scholarship: Academic standing and civic and community involve- 
ment are considered. For additional information and a scholarship application, contact 
the Office of Student Financial Aid (927-5272). Applications will be accepted through 
May 1. 

Savannah Foods and Industries Engineering Scholarship: Awarded to engineering 
students with demonstrated academic potential. Contact the Director of Engineering 
Studies (927-5304). 

Savannah Pathology Laboratory Scholarship: Open to a full-time Medical Technol- 
ogy seniors. For additional information, contact the Medical Technology Department 
(927-5402). 

Savannah Scholarship for Radiologic Technologies: Full-time freshmen or sopho- 
more Radiologic Technology major with a 2.0 GPA. For additional information, contact 
the Radiologic Technology Department (927-5360). 

Solomon's Lodge: Full-time students in the top 30% of their class and 900 SAT. Civic 
and community involvement and financial need are considered. For additional informa- 
tion, contact Solomon's Lodge No. 1. 

Regent's Scholarship: Georgia residents in the top 25% of their class may apply. A 
specific Regent's Scholarship application is required. For additional information, contact 



54 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



the Office of Student Financial Aid (927-5272). Applications will be accepted through 
May 1. 

Rotary Club of Savannah: Must be a full-time student and have a 3.0 GPA. For 
additional information, contact the Office of Student Financial Aid (927-5272). Applica- 
tions will be accepted through May 1. 

Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of Georgia Scholarship Foundation: For full-time 
students. Academic standing (3.0 GPA), civic and community involvement, and finan- 
cial need are considered. For additional information, contact the Office of Student 
Financial Aid (927-5272). 

WOW (Women of Worth): Full-time student who is an active WOW member. For 
additional information, contact the Psychology Department (927-5286). 

Government Benefits 

The Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Program provides financial assistance for 
the applicant who possesses an impairment which would prove to be a vocational 
handicap. Students who think that they may qualify under this program should contact 
the Vocational Rehabilitation Center. Applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabil- 
itation or other community agencies must apply at least six weeks before the beginning 
of any quarter to insure proper processing of applications. 

Veterans Benefits 

V. A. Educational Benefits may be used for study at Armstrong. Contact the Veterans 
Affairs Representative in the Registrar /Admissions Office for specific instructions on 
application procedures. 

Standards of Academic Progress 

The Higher Education Act mandates that institutions of higher education establish 
minimum standards of "satisfactory academic progress" for students receiving financial 
aid. To receive financial aid at Armstrong State College, a student must both maintain a 
satisfactory grade point average and be making satisfactory progress as outlined below. 
These requirements apply to any grants, loans, or scholarships that contain any federal 
or state funds. 

It is the responsibility of the student to read and adhere to Armstrong's policy 
regarding Standards of Academic Progress. Failure to meet the minimum requirements 
defined by this policy will result in the student's ineligibility for assistance. Before a 
student can receive aid from any of these programs for a particular year, he or she must 
meet the following requirements: 

(1) Academic Standing: The grade point average requirement is the same standard 
used by the registrar /admissions office to determine academic standing. Students who 
are placed on academic suspension lose their eligibility for aid until the grade point 
average is raised to a satisfactory level. This standard is based on the student's number 
of attempted quarter hours and grade point average. This policy can be found in the ASC 
catalog. Suspension from the Learning Support program will also result in the loss of aid. 

(2) Progress Toward Degree Completion: Students must make significant progress 
toward completion of degree requirements in order to receive aid. Armstrong State 
College requires students to successfully complete at least 67% of attempted coursework. 
For instance, a student who enrolls in 15 hours in Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters will 
be required to complete 30 hours (67% of 45 = 30). Grades of W, WF, V, U, and I are not 
considered successful course completion. 

(3) Credit Hour Limit: Students at Armstrong are given a maximum number of credit 
hours in which to complete their degrees. Students who exceed this limit are not eligible 
for aid. The credit hour limit allowed for financial aid purposes is 150% of the total 
number of hours necessary to be awarded a degree in the student's declared major field 
of study. Credit hours attempted both at Armstrong and elsewhere are counted toward 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 55 



this limit A stiiciont scokiii^ a BacholDr of Arts with a major in History, for example, is 
required to complete 1^1 credit hours. If the student has attempted 2H6 hours without 
earning a degree, therefore, he or she will no longer be eligible to receive aid (150% of 
191 = 286). This policy has the greatest effect on students who change their majors; 
therefore, students planning such a change should give careful consideration to the 
potential impact on their financial aid. Learning Support and CI'C credits will not be 
counted ti>ward the credit hour limit. Students who complete 20 hours of Learning 
Support coursework, for instance, will have 20 hours added to their credit hour limit. 

Reinstatement of Aid 

Students whose aid is terminated because they failed to meet the above requirements 
may request their aid be reinstated once they have corrected the deficiencies in hours 
earned or GPA. Students are not eligible for aid during these "catch up" quarters. 
Reinstatement of aid is dependent on the availability of funds. 

Appeal of Aid Suspension 

Students who feel they can demonstrate mitigating circumstances which affected 
their academic progress may make a written appeal to the Standards of Progress Appeals 
Committee. Students will be notified in writing of the committee's decision approxi- 
mately two weeks from the date the appeal is submitted. To mail in an appeal, use the 
following address: 

SOP Appeals Committee 

Office of Student Financial Aid 

Armstrong State College 

11935 Abercorn Extension 

Savannah, GA 31419 



56 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 





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58 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Academic Advisement 

Advisement is a required segment of the registration process. All students must be 
advised prior to registering for courses and may register only for courses that have been 
approved on a signed advisement form. Students and their advisors are encouraged to 
determine alternate approved courses and to include them on the advisement form. In 
the event that one or more of the preferred courses are filled, the student may immedi- 
ately select an alternate approved course to replace the filled course. The Vice President 
and Dean of Faculty gives overall direction to the advisement program, with the 
appropriate department heads coordinating advisement activities v^ith the various 
departments. Academic advisement is available as follows: 

1) The Advisement Center - Second floor. Lane Library 

* All undecided majors 

* All students with CPC deficiencies in science, social science, or foreign language. 

* Please come to the Advisement Center for an appointment. 

2) The Learning Support Office — Memorial Center Annex 

* All students with CPC deficiencies in math and English. 

* All students currently enrolled in a required Developmental course. 

* Please come to the Learning Support Department to make an appointment 
for advisement. 

3) Departmental Offices 

* All students who have declared a major or who have selected a pre-professional 
program. 

* Appointments are to be made with departmental advisors. 

English Composition and IVIathematics Requirements 

See English Composition and Mathematics Requirements in the Degree Requirements 
Section of this catalog, where important requirements are outlined for entering students. 

State Requirement in History and Government 

See State Requirement in History and Government in the Degree Requirements 
Section of this catalog. 

Course and Study Load 

The normal course load for full-time students is 15-18 quarter hours including a 
course in physical education during the freshman and sophomore years. 

A full-time student is defined as one who is registered for 12 or more hours. A 
part-time student is one registered for fewer than 12 quarter hours. A student should 
plan about ten hours preparation per week for each 5 quarter hour course. 

Classification of Students 

A student who has earned fewer than 45 quarter hours will be classified as a freshman; 
between 45 and 89 a sophomore; between 90 and 134 as a junior; and 135 or more as a senior. 

Overloads and Courses at Other Colleges 

Permission to enroll for more than 18 quarter hours will be granted by the Registrar 
to a student: 

1. with an average grade of "B" for full-time enrollment in the preceding quarter, or 

2. with an overall grade-point average of 3.0 or 

3. requiring an extra course in one of the two quarters prior to graduation. 

No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 quarter hours. A student who 
is on academic probation will not be permitted to register for more than 18 quarter hours. 
Exceptions to these limitations may be made only by the appropriate Dean. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



A student onrDllfJ .it Armstrong who at the same time takes courses for credit at 

anotluT ci)llt'>;c iiuu tu>t tFiirisfor such crodit to Armstrong, unless written permission 
trom the .ippri^pn.ite Hean has been obtained. 

Grade Reports 

Grade repi>rts are is>ued directly to students at the end of each quarter. The following 
grades are used in the deterininatu>n oi grade-point-averages: 
Griuic Hotior Points 

A (excellent) 4.0 

B (good) 3.0 

C (satisfactory) 2.0 

D (passing) 1.0 

F (failure) 0.0 

VVF (withdrew, failing) 0.0 

The cumulative CPA is determined by dividing the total honor points earned by the 
total hours attempted at Armstrong State College. The adjusted GPA is determined by 
di\ iding the total honor points earned by the total hours attempted, with hours and 
honor points for repeated courses not duplicated in the calculation. 

Armstrong State College also uses the following symbols for grade reports. These 
symbols carry no honor points and are not included in the determination of either the 
cumulative GPA or the adjusted GPA. 

Symbol Explanation 

W withdrew, no penalty 

I in progress or incomplete 

S satisfactory 

U unsatisfactory 

V audit 

K credit by examination 

NR not reported 

An "I" which has not been removed by the middle of the succeeding quarter is 
changed to an "F" unless the instructor recommends an extension in writing addressed 
to the appropriate Dean. The "S" and "U" symbols may be utilized for completion of 
degree requirements other than academic course work (such as student teaching, clinical 
practice, etc.). A "VVF" (Withdrew, Failing) is recorded for any student withdrawing after 
the mid-term date. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the Dean of the School 
in which the course is taught and will be approved only on the basis of hardship. 

Grade Appeals 

Appeals for a change of grade may be initiated through the head of the appropriate 
academic department prior to midterm of the quarter after the grade was received, in 
accordance with the Regulations of Armstrong State College. Without the approval of the 
Academic Standing Committee, no change of grade, other than incomplete, may be made 
later than two calendar quarters following the quarter in which the grade was received. 

A student who contests a grade will have the following line of appeal: 

1. The student will discuss the contested grade with the instructor involved. 

2. If the grade dispute remains unresolved, the student will meet with the depart- 
ment head and the instructor. If the grade dispute is with the department head, the 
student will meet with the dean of the school and the department head. A 
"memorandum for the record" will be prepared which will include the substance 
of the conversations during the meeting. 

3. If the grade dispute remains unresolved, the student will present his or her appeal 
in writing to the department head or the dean of the school, as applicable, who will 
then appoint a review board to hear the appeal. The student will initiate this step 
prior to midterm of the quarter after the grade was received (except if the student 



60 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



plans enrollment in a course for which the course grade being appealed is a 
prerequisite — see "4" below). 

a. The review board will consist of the department head or the dean of the school, 
as applicable, and two members of the department, not including the instructor 
involved. In small departments, membership may come from outside the 
department. 

b. The review board shall hear statements from both the student and the instructor 
involved and will examine documents that are pertinent to the matter under 
review. 

c. The review board will hear the grade appeal and present its findings to the vice 
president and dean of faculty prior to the last week of the quarter. 

4. If the student plans enrollment in a course for which the course grade being 
appealed is a prerequisite, then the following timetable will be met at the first of 
that quarter: 

a. If a grade appeal is not resolved with the instructor concerned, then the student 
will file an appeal in writing with the department head (or the dean of the school 
if the grade dispute is with the department head). This step will be taken by the 
second day of the quarter. 

b. The review board to hear the appeal will be appointed by the third day of the 
quarter. If department members are not available to form a review board, the 
dean of the school, in consultation with the department head, will appoint a 
review board. 

c. The review board will hear and complete the grade appeal by the fifth day of the 
quarter, and present its findings to the vice president and dean of faculty. 

d. If the appeal to the vice president and dean of faculty is denied, the student will 
be disenrolled from the course in question. 

5. If the vice president and dean of faculty denies the appeal, the student may 
continue the appeal to the president. 

6. The Board of Regents will not accept or consider appeals based on academic grades. 

Honors 

Dean's List: Students enrolled for at least ten quarter hours of course work who earn 
an honor point average of at least 3.6 will be placed on the Dean's List. Only course work 
taken at Armstrong will be used in the computation of Dean's List honors. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point average of 3.2 through 
3.499 will be graduated cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point average of 3.5 
through 3.799 will be graduated magna cum laude. 

Summa Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point average of 3.8 
through 4.0 will be graduated summa cum laude. 

All work attempted at Armstrong and other accredited institutions will be considered 
in computing honors for graduation. 

Attendance 

The control of student attendance at class meetings and the effect of attendance on the 
grades in a course are left to the discretion of the instructor. 

A student is responsible for knowing everything that is announced, discussed, or lectured 
upon in class as well as for mastering all assigned reading. A student is also responsible for 
submitting on time all assignments and tests, recitations and unannounced quizzes. 

The instructor will be responsible for informing each class at its first meeting what 
constitutes excessive absence in that particular class. Each student is responsible for 
knowing the attendance regulation and for complying with it. An instructor may drop 
a student from any class with a grade of " W" or " WF," as appropriate, if in the instructor's 
judgment the student's absences have been excessive. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION tl 



Academic Standing 



The coIle>*e recogni/es ti)ur academic categories: Ciood Standing, Good Standing with 
Warning, Acadenuc Probation, and Academic Suspension. Students are expected to 
maintain or exceed the grade point average (Cil'A) as indicated in the chart below. 



Quarter Hours Attempted 


Required Adjusted 


at Armstrong and Elsewhere 


GPA 


- 30 


1.5 


31 - 60 


1.7 


61-90 


1.9 


over 90 


2.0 



A student who tails below the required CiPA tor the first time is placed on Good 
Standing with Warning. Failure to raise the adjusted GI'A to the required level during 
the next quarter will result in Academic Probation. Students on Academic Probation are 
not in Good Standing. If the student's adjusted GPA is raised to the required level, the 
student is returned to Good Standing. The second or any subsequent failure to meet the 
required GPA will result in Academic Probation. In order to participate in extracurricu- 
lar activities endorsed by the college, students must be in Good Standing or Good 
Standing with Warning. Students under warning should plan both curricular and 
extracurricular activities under the guidance of their advisors. 

Students on Academic Probation who fail to achieve the required adjusted GPA, but 
who do earn an average of at least 2.0 during the probationary quarter, will be continued 
on Academic Probation for the next quarter of attendance. Students on Academic 
Probation who neither achieve the required adjusted GPA nor earn at least a 2.0 average 
during the probationary quarter will be placed on Academic Suspension from the college 
for one quarter. A student on Academic Suspension for the first time has the option of 
attending summer school without having to appeal the suspension. However, a student 
who fails to make satisfactory progress as a result of summer school will have to appeal 
for readmission in the fall quarter. Other than this one exception (attending summer 
school without having to appeal the suspension), students must submit a written appeal 
in order to be considered for readmission. 

A student suspended for academic reasons for the first or second time may appeal by 
letter to the Committee on Academic Standing to be considered for readmission. This 
letter should state the nature of any extenuating circumstances relating to the academic 
deficiency, and must be delivered to the office of the Dean of Academic and Enrollment 
Services no later than 9 AM of registration day. The Committee on Academic Standing 
will make a recommendation to the President and the decision of the President is final. 

A student re-entering the college after an Academic Suspension is placed on Aca- 
demic Probation and must meet the requirements listed above. A third Academic 
Suspension is final. 

Repeating Courses 

Any course may be repeated with the last grade to be counted in the adjusted GPA. 

Dropping Courses 

A student desiring to drop a course after the quarter has begun must obtain a 
Drop-Add Notice in the Office of the Registrar. The notice must be signed by the 
instructor of the course being dropped and returned by the student to the Office of the 
Registrar. 

A student who drops a course within the first seven days will receive a grade of "W" 
for the course. A student who drops a course after the first seven class days and on or 
before the quarterly dates listed for mid-terms will receive a " W" or a "WF" depending 



62 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



on the status in the course. A student who drops a required Developmental course after 
the first seven class days will receive a "U"; a drop after the first seven days in a voluntary 
Learning Support class will result in the grade of "WF". A student may not drop a course 
without penalty following the quarterly dates listed for mid-term. A student is not 
allowed to drop ENG 025, 101, 102, or 201 at any time unless extenuating circumstances 
prevail. In order to drop one of these courses, the drop form must be authorized by the 
Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences or a designated representative. 

A Learning Support student who withdraws or is withdrawn from a required 
Developmental course will also be dropped from all five or more credit hour courses he/ 
she is taking that are numbered 101 or above. The student may, however, remain enrolled 
in other Learning Support courses and in courses carrying fewer than five credit hours. 

Withdrawing from College 

Any student who finds it necessary to withdraw from college must begin the process 
in the Office of Student Affairs. A formal withdrawal is required to ensure that the 
student is eligible to return to Armstrong State College at a future date. Any refund to 
which a student is entitled will be considered on the basis of the date which appears on 
the withdrawal form. Dropping all courses is considered withdrawing from college. 
Grading policies for withdrawing from college are the same as listed for dropping a 
course. 

Involuntary Withdrawal 

A student may be administratively withdrawn from the college when in the judgment 
of Vice President of Student Affairs and the college physician, if any, and after consul- 
tation with the student's parents and personal physician, if any, it is determined that the 
student suffers from a physical, mental, emotional or psychological health condition 
which: (a) poses a significant danger or threat of physical harm to the student or to the 
person or property of others or (b) causes the student to interfere with the rights of other 
members of the college community or with the exercise of any proper activities or 
functions of the college or its personnel or (c) causes the student to be unable to meet 
institutional requirements for admission and continued enrollment, as defined in the 
student conduct code and other publications of the college. 

Except in emergency situations, a student shall, upon request, be accorded an 
appropriate hearing prior to final decision concerning his or her continued enrollment 
at the college. 

Auditing Courses 

A regular student wishing to audit a course without receiving credit must obtain 
permission of the instructor before registering for the course. During the registration 
process the student should request to audit. A student may not change from audit to 
credit status or from credit to audit status after completing the process of registration for 
a course. A student who audits a course will have a "V" recorded for that course. The 
regular schedule of fees applies to auditors. Unauthorized auditing is prohibited. No 
student may audit a course in the Department of Learning Support. 

Honor Code 

The Honor Code at Armstrong State College is dedicated to the proposition that the 
protection of the grading system is in the interest of the student community. The Student 
Court is an institutional means to assure that the student community shall have primary 
disposition of infractions of the Honor Code and that students accused of such infrac- 
tions shall enjoy those procedural guarantees traditionally considered essential to fair 
and impartial hearing, the foremost of which is the presumption of innocence until guilt 
be established beyond a reasonable doubt. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION M 



I. Responsibilities of students: 

All studoiUs nuist a^rt't' ti) abiJf hv tlu' riiU's i)t tlu' 1 Ioiidf C oJiv A stmiiMit sh.iil not 
be accvptt'd at ArinstrDn^ State L i>llo^f unless ho or she si^ns a statement aHirming 
his unJerslanJin^ ot this a^reenu'nt. I he I lonor Code shall be printed in the official 
bulletin and Stiuit-tits lllustratcii 

It will be the responsibility ot the Student C ourt or its designated representative 
to conduct an orientation pro>;rani at the be^innin>; of each quarter for all newly 
entering students to explain fully the Honor Code and to allow full discussion of its 
requirements. 

Any student desiring assistance with any matter related to the Honor Code is 
invited to seek assistance in the Office of Student Affairs. 

II. Violations of the Honor Code: 

Violations oi the Honor Code may be of two kinds: (a) general and (b) those related 
to the peculiarities of specific course-related problems and to the understanding of 
individual instructors. Any instructor whose conception of cheating would tend to 
enlarge or contract the general regulations defining cheating must explicitly notify 
the affected students of the qualifications to the general regulations which he or she 
wishes to stipulate. The following will be considered general violations of the Honor 
Code. 

1. Giving or receiving any unauthorized help on any assignment, test or paper. The 
meaning of unauthorized help shall be made clear by the instructor of each class. 

2. Stealing when related to cheating. 

3. Plagiarizing. Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of another's words or ideas. 
Students must be familiar with the explanation of plagiarism given in the writing 
handbook used in freshman composition classes (pp. 522 in the current text, 
Writing: A College Handbook, Heffernan and Lincoln, 1986). Ignorance of what 
constitutes plagiarism will not be accepted as an excuse for plagiarism. 

4. Giving perjured testimony before the Student Court. 

5. Suborning, attemption to suborn, or in intimidating witnesses. 

6. Failing to report a suspected violation of the Honor Code. 

III. Reporting Violations of the Honor Code: 

Anyone wishing to report a violation may come to the Office of Student Affairs for 
assistance in contacting members of the Student Court. 

A. Self-reporting: Students who have broken the Honor Code should report them- 
selves to a member of the Student Court. 

B. Anyone (faculty member or student) who is aware of a violation of the Honor Code 
must report the matter. 

1. Tell persons thought to be guilty to report themselves to a member of the 
Student Court no later than the end of the next school day. After this designated 
time the person who is aware of the violation must inform a member of the 
Student Court so that the Student Court may contact the accused persons if they 
have not already reported themselves. 

2. Report the suspected violation directly to a member of the Student Court 
without informing the accused. 

IV. The procedural rights of the students accused of violations of the Honor Code: 

The essence of the procedural rights of the accused is the right to be presumed 
innocent until proven guilty. Specific rights are as follows: 

1. The accused will be notified in writing by the Student Court or its designated 
representative of the nature and details of the offense with which they are charged 
along with the names of their accusers and the principal witnesses to be brought 
against them. This notification shall occur no less than three days prior to the date 
of the hearing. 

2. The accused has the right to counsel of their own choosing. Such counsel will not 
participate directly in the proceedings except to advise the client. It is expected that 
such counsel will be drawn from the college community. 



64 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



3. The accused and the person bringing the charges shall be afforded an opportunity 
to present witnesses and documentary or other evidence. The accused and any 
individual bringing the charges shall have the right to cross examine all witnesses 
and may, where the witnesses cannot appear because of illness or other cause 
acceptable to the Court, present the sworn statement of the witnesses. The Court 
shall not be bound by formal rules governing the presentation of evidence, and it 
may consider any evidence presented which is of probative value in the case. 

4. The accused may not be made to bear witness against themselves. The Court may 
not take the refusal of the accused to testify as evidence of guilt, but this proviso 
does not give the accused immunity from a hearing or from recommendations 
reached in a hearing simply because the accused does not testify. 

5. The accused shall have access to a complete audiotape of the hearing and to the 
record prepared by the secretary. 

6. The substantive facts of a case may be re-opened for consideration upon initiation 
of the accused acting through normal appeal channels. The accused shall not be put 
in double jeopardy. 

7. All witnesses will be sequestered from the hearing room during the course of a 
hearing. Witnesses may not discuss a pending case. 

8. By prior agreement, the accused will be allowed such observers of the hearing as 
may be commensurate with the space available. Otherwise, in the interests of the 
right of privacy of the accused, hearings will be private, except that the College 
may also have observers additional to the advisors to the Student Court. 

V. The Student Conduct Committee, the Student Court and Advisors to the Student 
Court: 

A. Student Conduct Committee 

1. The Student Conduct Committee shall be responsible to the faculty for recom- 
mending policies relating to the Academic Honor Code and the Code of 
Conduct, for formulating or approving rules, enforcement procedures, and 
sanctions within the framework of existing policies, and for recommending 
changes in the administration of any aspects of the Honor Code and the Student 
Code of Conduct. The Conduct Committee will also interview and select 
members for the Student Court. 

2. The Committee shall consist of five teaching faculty members, the Vice Presi- 
dent of Student Affairs and four students. The four students will be the 
President and Vice President of the Student Court, the President of the Student 
Government Association, and one student-at-large. The faculty members shall 
be appointed by the faculty in accordance with the faculty statutes. 

3. The Vice President of Student Affairs shall assist the Conduct Committee in the 
development of policy and in the discharge of its responsibilities. He or she shall 
coordinate the activities of all officials, committees, student groups, and tribu- 
nals for student conduct. 

4. All regulations or rules relating to student conduct that are proposed by any 
College official, committee or student group, and for which sanctions may be 
imposed in the name of the College, must be submitted to the Committee for 
consideration and review prior to submission to the faculty and the student 
body. The Committee shall have 10 days in which to review the same. 

B. Student Court 

1 . The Student Court will be selected by the Student Conduct Committee and wull 
be composed of twelve students. Due consideration will be given to equitable 
apportionment of court members on the basis of academic class, race, and sex. 
Students on academic probation may not serve. All appointments will be issued 
and accepted in writing. Appointments will be made during Spring Quarter in 
time for newly elected members of the Court to assume their duties by May 1. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 65 



Appointments will be made as needed to keep the Student Court staffed to do 
business on a reasonably prompt basis. These appointments may constitute 
pern\anent or temporary replacements as the Student Conduct Committee 
deems necessary 

2. The Student Court will elect a I'resident, Vice President, and a Secretary from 
its meinbership The Tresident will preside at all meetin>;s The Vice President 
will assume the duties ol the I'resident it the I'resident is absent The Secretary 
will maintain written notes ot all proceedings and audiotape records oi all 
testimony, and will maintain exhibits of evidence which by their nature may 
reasonably be maintained in the Court files. A quorum of the Court shall consist 
of seven members. A two-thirds majority secret ballot vote is required to reach 
a finding ot guilty. All other questions may be decided by a simple majority 
vote. 

3. Constituencvof the Student Court during the Summer Quarter shall include all 
appointed members in attendance, and others shall be appointed to member- 
ship by the Student Conduct Committee. 

4. Student Court members shall examine their consciences carefully to determine 
whether they can in good conscience serve on a panel hearing a particular case, 
and in the event that there is any doubt whatsoever, such members shall excuse 
themselves from duty on the specific panel in question. 

C. Advisors to the Court 

1. An advisor and an associateadvisor to the Student Court shall be appointed by 
the President of the College. 

2. Ordinarily the advisor will serve in that office for one year only and usually will 
be succeeded in that position by the associate advisor. Therefore, after the initial 
appointments, only an associate advisor will ordinarily be appointed each year. 
The succession of an associate to the advisor position is deemed to occur on the 
last day of Spring Quarter. If, for any reason, the advisor is unable to complete 
his or her term, the associate advisor shall succeed to the office of advisor and 
another associate advisor shall be appointed by the above procedures. If, during 
the Summer Quarter, neither advisor is on campus, a temporary advisor will be 
appointed. 

3. Duties of the advisor and the associate advisor: It shall- be the duty of the 
advisor to consult with the Court and to offer advice to the President and 
members of the Court on substantive and procedural questions. The advisor, or 
the associate advisor in the event the advisor is unable to attend, shall be present 
at all meetings and hearings of the Court. The advisor may not vote or 
participate directly in the conduct at hearings before the Court except through 
the chair, or acting chair, of the Court. The advisor should be governed at all 
times by the principle that a hearing before the Student Court is primarily a 
matter of student responsibility. 

VI. Procedures and Penalties adopted by the Student Court. 

The Student Court shall formulate its own bylaws governing internal organization 
and procedure. Such bylaws must be consistent with the Honor Code. 

A. Hearings shall be called by the Court President to be held on a date not less than 
three nor more than ten class days after notice to the accused as provided in Section 
IV-2. Exceptions to these time requirements may be granted. 

B. Upon reaching a finding of guilty, the Court shall make a recommendation to the 
Vice-President of the College as to the administrative action it deems appropriate 
within the following limitations: 

1. A minimum penalty shall be loss of assignment or test credit for the assignment 
or test for violations involving cheating as specified in Section II, subsections 1, 
2, and 3. 



66 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Additional penalties such as reprimands, suspension, or others may be recom- 
mended for any aspects of Section II. 

2. Maximum penalty for a first offense of any type shall be suspension for a full 
calendar year. 

3. Maximum penalty for a second offense may be suspension for three years. 

C. Immediately following a hearing, the accused will be informed of the Court's 
finding, and its recommendation to the Vice President /Dean of Faculty. If the 
finding is guilty, the accused will be informed that the Court may reopen the case 
with the consent of the accused for good cause, within a three week period. 

D. The Vice President /Dean of Faculty will inform all involved persons in writing 
of the action taken in view of Court recommendation. The Court Secretary will 
post public notice of the Vice President's action by case number without identify- 
ing the accused. 

VII.Appeals of Findings and Penalties: 

Should students have cause to question the findings of the Court or the action of 
the Vice President of the College or both, they have the right to appeal. The channels 
of appeal are as follows: 

A. Court findings and /or the administrative action of the Vice President of the 
College may be appealed within five days by writing the President of the College. 
Further appeal procedures will conform to the appeal procedures of the College 
and of the Policies of the Board of Regents, University System of Georgia. 

VIII. Supervision of the Student Court: 

As an institutional means of responding to reported infractions of the Honor Code, 
the Student Court is ultimately responsible to the President of the College. 

Supervision of the Student Court will be accomplished ordinarily through the Vice 
President for Student Affairs and the Advisors. 

In accordance with Article VI, Section F, of the College Statutes, the Vice President 
for Student Affairs will provide general supervision of the Student Court and will 
provide other guidance or services as directed by the President of the College. 

IX. Revision of the Honor Code will require confirmation by the majority vote of those 
faculty and student body members voting. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 
General Degree Requirements 

1. Each student is responsible for fulfilling the requirements of the degree program 
chosen in accordance with the regulations of the college catalog. 

2. Exceptions to course requirements for a degree are permitted only with the written 
approval of the appropriate Dean, upon the recommendation of the department or 
division head. However, all exceptions to the core curriculum requirements must 
have the approval of the Vice President and Dean of Faculty. 

3. A student will normally graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of admission 
to the College. In the School of Health Professions, a student will graduate under the 
catalog in effect at the time of admission or readmission (whichever is more current) 
to a particular Health Professions program. In the School of Education, a student will 
graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of admission to the teacher education 
program. Armstrong State College, however, reserves the right to change any provi- 
sion listed in this catalog, including but not limited to academic requirements for 
graduation, without actual notice to individual students. If students have been absent 
from the College for two or more consecutive years, they should expect to meet all 
requirements in effect at the time of return. 

4. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a degree may consist of courses 
taken by correspondence, extension, or examination. No correspondence courses 
may be used to meet the requirements in the major field or related fields for the 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 67 



Bachelor's degree or in Knglish composition or foreign language. No correspimdence 
courses niav bo t.ikon whilo a stuJont is fnrt)llrJ, without prior approval of the 
appropriate Hoan anJ the lu\ul ot thi* Jepartnu'iit in which the student is majoring 

5. Bv State law, each student who receives a diploma or certificate from a school 
supported by the State ot deorgia must demonstrate proficiency in United States 
History and Ciovernment and in Cieorgia History and Government. A student at 
Armstrong State College may demonstrate such proficiency by: 

A. Examinations. For U.S. and Cieorgia Government — CLEP: American Government 
and local test on Cieorgia constitution; for U.S. and Georgia History — the relevant 
CLEP, Advanced Placement lest, or College Board SAT II: Subject Test. 

B. Credit in certain courses For U.S. and Georgia government - Political Science 1 1.3; 
for U.S. and Georgia Historv - Historv 251 or 252 or anv upper division course in 
U.S. History. 

6. To qualify for the baccalaureate degree, a student must earn at Armstrt)ng at least 45 
quarter hours of credit applicable toward the degree. Additionally, the student must 
completesuccessfully at Armstrong at least halfof the upper division credits required 
in the major field of study. For students in teacher education programs, the major field 
of study is the teaching field. For the Associate Degree, the student must complete at 
least 45 quarter hours of course work at Armstrong State College. Armstrong students 
enrolled in the cooperative degree programs with Savannah State College in Business 
Education may be exempted from these requirements by a recommendation of the 
Dean of the School of Education, concurrence by the Education Curriculum Commit- 
tee and approval of the Committee on Academic Standing. 

7. For graduation the student must earn an overall average of 2.0 or better considering 
work taken at all colleges, computed in such manner that a course will be counted only 
once, regardless of the number of times that it has been repeated. The grade earned 
in the last attempt will determine the number of honor points assigned for graduation. 
Additionally, the student must earn a GPA of 2.0 or better in each of the following: 

A. All work at Armstrong 

B. All courses in the major field. 

8. Student's wishing to receive a double major must satisfy major requirements of both 
disciplines including all residency and institutional requirements for each major. 
Only one major will appear on the diploma. Both majors will be designated on the 
transcript. 

9. To qualify for a second Armstrong baccalaureate degree, a candidate must earn at 
Armstrong at least 45 additional hours of credit and meet all qualitative requirements 
for the degree. 

10. Before a degree will be conferred students must pay all fees and must submit to the 
Registrar a completed Application for Graduation tico quarters before graduation. A 
candidate for a degree, unless excused in writing by the President, Vice President and 
Dean of Faculty, Vice President of Student Affairs, or Dean of Academic and 
Enrollment Services, must attend the graduation exercises at which a degree is to be 
conferred. 

11. All students must successfully complete the Regents' Test and must take an Exit 
Examination in their major field as may be stipulated as requirements for graduation. 
Candidates for a second baccalaureate degree are exempted from the Regents' Test 
requirement. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

Each unit in the University System of Georgia requires as a Core Curriculum for all 
baccalaureate degree programs the following minimum number of quarter hours in the 
major areas of study. 



68 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Hours 
Area I 

Humanities, including, but not linnited to, grammar & composition & literature 20 

Area II 

Mathematics & the natural sciences, including, but not limited to, 

mathematics and a 10-hour sequence of laboratory courses in the 

biological or physical sciences 20 

Area III 

Social Sciences, including, but not limited to, history & American government 20 

Area IV 

Courses appropriate to the major field of the individual student 30 

TOTAL 90 

In addition to the University System Core Curriculum requirements as outlined 
above, Armstrong State College requires six quarter hours in physical education as part 
of all baccalaureate degree programs. 

The student in any baccalaureate degree program at Armstrong State College must 
complete the following specific Core Curriculum requirements. Consult the relevant 
departmental section for a complete statement of degree requirements for a specific 
program. Certain courses in the Core Curriculum may be exempted with credit awarded. 

Hours 
Area I 

Humanities 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

One of the following courses: 

ART 200, 271, 272, 273, DRS 201, MUS 200, PHI 201 5 

Area II 

Mathematics & the Natural Sciences 20 

One course from MAT 101, 103, or 206, and an additional 

course from MAT 103, 195, 206, 207, 220, or 290 10 

One of the following course sequences: 

BIO 101, 102 

CHE 121, 122 

CHE 128, 129 

PHY 211, 212 

PHY 217, 218 

PHS121, 122 10 

Area III 

Social Sciences 20 

HIS 114 and 115 or 192 10 

POS113 5 

One course selected from: 

PSY 101, SOC 201, ANT 201, ECO 201 or 202, GEO 212 5 

Area IV 

Courses Appropriate to the Major Field 30 

Goals for the Core Curriculum 

The core curriculum is the heart of undergraduate education at Armstrong. The 
following is a statement of the goals that all students should achieve once they have 
completed their core courses. It defines what the college expects of its students and what 
it tries to accomplish in its general education courses. 

What does it mean to be an educated human being? The fundamental goals of all education are 
two-fold: the inculcation of a body of knowledge and values, and development of the skills 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



nectssary to acquire and jud^^e them. The areaa of the core curriculum address these }(oals hy asking 
and explorin\^ the foUowin)^ questions. 

Area I: How do human bein^s define their humanity? 

In what works aiul bv wluit iiumms lia\ c w r most lully expressed our humanity? How 
do we |ud^o these^ 

The aiurscs in tins area seek to give students an appreciation M\d understandmg of 
human culture and expression, developing their aesthetic, imaginative, empathetic, and 
intellectual powers. In addition, these courses propose to instruct students in the 
methods and language o\ scholarly and critical discourse. 

The objectives ot these courses are to help students 

— Read M\d write ettectively 

— Conduct librarv research with etticiency and integrity 

— Support and detend ^n interpretation by gathering information, reasoning from 
it, generalizing and reaching conclusions 

— Develop a vocabulary to discuss the elements of one of the arts 

— Express an understanding of one of the arts in critical essays 

— Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between art and culture 

Area II: What is the relationship between human beings and the universe? 

How do we use its resources wisely? What is the appropriate language to use in 
discussing and modeling the natural phenomena that we observe? How do we build 
conceptual models oi our own? 

The courses in this area have the common objective of increasing the students' ability 
to understand and participate in scientific and technical discourse by providing the 
student with some of the specific knowledge of mathematics and natural sciences that is 
presumed in that discourse. 

In addition to knowledge-based objectives, the courses have the additional objectives 
of helping students to 

— Acquire skills in observing natural phenomena, thereby increasing understand- 
ing of the universe 

— Develop an understanding of the scientific method and its impact on modern 
thought 

— Develop skills in reading and understanding quantitative, scientific, and techni- 
cal information 

— Acquire skills in extracting the essence of a problem from its verbal statement and 
applying the appropriate scientific and mathematical tools to solve the problem 

Area III: What are the relationships between human beings and their Institutions? 

The courses of this area seek to give students a comprehension of human behavior and 
institutions as these merge from social and historical relationships. In addition, they 
propose to instruct students in the basic language and methods of social, political, and 
historical discourse and to inculcate a sense of openness and tolerance that comes from 
the examination of diverse values and perspectives. 

The objectives of these courses are to help students 

— Demonstrate a comprehension of social relationships and institutions and their 
development 

— Communicate with clarity about social relationships and institutions and their 
development 

— Identify basic features of human social relationships and problems 

— Develop competence in regard to making positive contributions toward solving 
social problems 

— Demonstrate an understanding of both the uniqueness of individuals and the 
complexity of collective human experience as perceived through history and the 
social sciences 



70 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Regents' Testing Program 

Each institution of the University System of Georgia shall assure the other institu- 
tions, and the System as a whole, that students obtaining a degree from that institution 
possess certain minimum skills of reading and writing. The Regents' Testing Program 
has been developed to help in the attainment of this goal. The objectives of the Testing 
Program are: (1 ) to provide Systemwide information on the status of student competence 
in the areas of reading and writing; and (2) to provide a uniform means of identifying 
those students who fail to attain the minimum levels of competence in the areas of 
reading and writing. 

Students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs leading to the baccalaureate degree 
shall pass the Regents' Test as a requirement for graduation. Students must take the Test in 
the quarter after they have completed 60 quarter credit hours if they have not taken it 
previously. Each institution shall provide an appropriate program of remediation and shall 
require students who have earned 75 quarter credit hours and have not passed the Test to 
enroll in the appropriate remedial course or courses until they pass the Test. Students with 
60 or more college-level credit hours transferring from System programs that do not require 
the Regents' Test or from institutions outside the System shall take the Test no later than the 
second quarter of enrollment in a program leading to the baccalaureate degree and in 
subsequent quarters shall be subject to all provisions of this policy. 

The Regents' Test is not a requirement for an Associate of Applied Science Degree or 
an Associate of Science degree in an allied health field, although institutions may choose 
to require the Test for these degrees. (Armstrong State College has chosen to require the 
Test of all undergraduates who have not earned a baccalaureate or higher degree 
regardless of degree objective.) 

A student holding a baccalaureate or higher degree from a regionally accredited 
institution of higher education will not be required to complete the Regents' Test in order 
to receive a degree from a University System institution. 

The Chancellor will issue administrative procedures for the operation of the Regents' 
Testing Program. (A copy of Regents' Testing Program Administrative Procedures is 
available from the Division of Student Affairs, Room 211, Memorial College Center.) 

According to "Regents' Testing Program Administration Procedures" institutions 
may increase requirements related to the Regents' Testing Program "provided that such 
increased requirements are authorized by the Chancellor and ... published in the official 
catalog of the institution prior to implementation." 

Regents' Test: Administration and Remediation Requirements 

Students attending Armstrong State College are urged to take the Regents' Test 
during their first quarter of enrollment after the quarter in which the 45th credit hour is 
earned. For the purpose of enforcing Regents' Testing Program Policy, enrolled students 
are identified by computer printed notices on end-of-quarter grade reports and transfers 
through the processes of admission and transcript evaluation. Students register for the 
Test at the Division of Student Affairs prior to the publicized application deadline. 

Students who neglect to take the Regents' Test until their first quarter of enrollment 
after the quarter in which the 60th credit hour is earned may be barred from all phases 
of registration until after Test scores are posted. 

Regardless of credit hours earned, students who do not pass the Regents' Test may be 
required by Armstrong State College to take remedial courses before they retake the 
Regents' Test. In accordance with Regents' Testing Program Policy, students who have 
not passed the Test and who have earned 75 quarter hours must take remedial courses, 
whether or not they have attempted the test. 

Students who fail the reading portion of the Regents' Test and who have less than 75 
hours earned with an adjusted GPA of 2.5 or better may appeal the requirement for 
Reading 025 (Developing Reading Maturity) to the Head of the Department of Learning 
Support. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 71 



Students whi> tail tlu'tssav }n>rtionof the Test and have lt»ss than 75 houpi earned with 
anaJ|usti'dCirAi)t.VOi)rbotteri»nd»\.l()orbetter in ri'tjuirrd core courses in hn^lishmay 
appeal the requirement tor Lnglish l)2S (Composition Keview) to the Wvtxd of the 
Department of Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. 

Regents' Test: Special Categories of Students 

students whose native language is not English nuist take the reading component of 
the Regents' Test, but may take a college examination to certify competence in writing. 
The college equivalent ot theessav compt)nenl of the Regents' lest is administered on the 
same date as the reading component of the lest. International students are allowed two 
hours for each test. 

Students with documented disabilities may request additional time and other appro- 
priate accommodations for the Regents' Test. 

Regents' Test: Essay Review 

Students may request a formal review of failure on the essay component of the 
Regents' Test if the essay received at least one passing score and the review is initiated 
by mid-term oi the first quarter of enrollment following testing and no more than one 
year from the quarter in which the failure occurred. Only reviews processed in the first 
two weeks of a quarter will be answered before the next Regents' Test. Students may 
initiate an essay review at the Division of Student Affairs. 

Regents' Test: Health Professions Program Requirement 

Before a student in a Health Professions program may enter his/her last quarter, he/ 
she must have passed the Regents' test. 

Physical Education Requirements 

All students who are enrolled in baccalaureate degree programs for ten or more 
quarter hours on the daytime schedule must adhere to Armstrong Core Curriculum Area 
V requirements. Any student who holds a valid life guarding certificate or a valid water 
safety instructor certificate or passes the Armstrong swimming test may be exempted 
from PE 103 or PE 108. Physical education is not required of anyone who is beyond the 
age of 25 at the time of initial matriculation at Armstrong or of anyone enrolled primarily 
in evening classes. 

Students should check their program of study for P.E. 117 and /or 166 requirements. 

English and Mathematics Placement 

During the initial quarters of enrollment at Armstrong State College, students must 
enroll in the appropriate sequence of English composition courses until the sequence has 
been completed and / or the Regents' Test has been passed. Students must not delay this 
sequence beyond their second quarter of attendance. For assistance in identifying the 
appropriate English composition courses, students should consult advisors in the 
departments of their declared majors or the Office of Admissions, or the Department of 
Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. See Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 
Department for further information. 

The College reserves the right to place students in appropriate English and mathemat- 
ics courses in the core curriculum. Diagnostic tests are administered for this purpose. 

State Requirement In History and Government 

By State law, each student who receives a diploma or certificate from a school 
supported by the State of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in United States History 
and Government and in Georgia History and Government. A student at Armstrong State 
College may demonstrate such proficiency as follows: 



72 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



American Government/GA Government - 

1. Successfully complete POS 113 at Armstrong 

2. Successfully complete a course that equates to POS 113 at another University System 
of Georgia institution 

3. Successfully complete a course in American Government at another institution (non- 
system) and pass a local test on the Georgia Constitution 

4. Earn an acceptable score on the CLEP: American Government exam and pass a local 
test on the Georgia Constitution 

U.S. and Georgia History - 

1. Successfully complete HIS 251 or 252 or any upper division course in U.S. History at 
Armstrong 

2. Successfully complete a course at another institution that equates to HIS 251 or 252 at 
Armstrong 

3. Earn an acceptable score on the relevant CLEP, AP, or College Board SAT II: Subject 
Test 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of 
Science Degrees 

Requirements for each major program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts with 
a major in Art, English, History, Music, Political Science, Psychology, or to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, or Math- 
ematical Sciences are described in the appropriate departmental listing. For the BA and 
the BS degrees, a minimum of 185 quarter hours, exclusive of the required physical 
education courses, is required for graduation. An exit exam is also required. 

Each student in one of these major programs must complete the 90-hour core 
curriculum requirement as listed above, along with the 6-hour Physical Education 
requirement. 

Students will not be allowed to take senior division courses in the major field unless 
they have a minimum grade of "C" in all prerequisite courses in that field. No major 
program in a department will require more than 60 quarter hours at all levels in the major 
field; however, the department may recommend up to 70 quarter hours. 

For its major program, a department will require from 15 to 30 quarter hours of 
specific courses or approved elective courses in related fields and may require language 
courses reaching the degree of proficiency specified by the department. Total require- 
ments in the major and related fields, may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 

Each BA or BS degree program, except those designed for Dental Hygiene, Medical 
Technology, Nursing and teacher certification, will include a minimum of 15 hours of 
electives approved for credit within the Armstrong State College curriculum. 

Associate Degree Requirements 

Each associate degree program includes as part of its curriculum the following: 

ENGlOl, 102 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

MAT 101 5 

POS 113 5 

One five hour course selected from 
Areas I, II, or III of the Baccalaureate 

Core 5 

Three PE credit hours 3 

TOTAL 33 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



73 



Students in associatf Ji'^rtv pri)>;ranis t\Tv rccjuired to complete successfully the 
Regents' lest and may be required to take an Exit Examination in the appropriate area 

oi concoMlralinn 

Double Major 

Students wishing to receive a double major must satisfy major requirements of both 
disciplines, including all residency and institutional requirements for each major. Only 
one major will appear on the diploma. Both majors will be designated on the transcript. 

Numbering System for Courses 

In the course listing to follow, there appear three numbers in parentheses after each 
course title. The first number listed indicates the number of hours of lecture; the second 
number listed indicates the number of hours of laboratory; the third number listed 
indicates the number of quarter hours of credit carried by the course. The letter "V" 
represents variable hours. 

Courses numbered 0-99 carry institutional credit only and may not be applied to a 
degree program. Courses numbered 100-199 are generally planned for the freshman 
year; courses numbered 200-299 for the sophomore year; courses numbered 300-399 for 
the junior year and courses numbered 400-599 for the senior year. 

Courses taken to fulfill core curriculum requirements may not be used to meet other 
requirements of a degree program. 

Lettering System for Course 

In the course listings given in the Armstrong Core Curriculum requirements and in 
the departmental curricula which follow, there appear two or three letters preceding a 
three digit number. Following is an exhaustive list of all abbreviations used for course 
designation purposes. 



ACC = Accounting (SSC) GEL 

ANT = Anthropology GEO 

ART = Art GER 

ASC = ASC Strategies for Success GRN 

AST = Astronomy HE 

BAD = Business Administration (SSC) HIS 

BIO = Biology HS 

BOT = Botany HSC 

BSN = Baccalaureate Nursing JRN 

CEP = Cooperative Education Pro- LAT 

gram LIN 

CHE = Chemistry LM 

CJ = Criminal Justice LS 

CS = Computer Science LSE 

DH = Dental Hvgiene LSM 

DRS = Drama and Speech LSR 

ECO = Economics MAT 

EDN = Education MED 

EGR = Engineering MET 

ENG = English MIL 

ENT = Entomology MT 

EXC = Exceptional Children MUS 

FED = Foundations of Education NSC 

FLM = Film NUR 

FRE = French OCE 



Geology 

Geography 

German 

Gerontology 

Health Education 

History 

Health Science 

Health Science 

Journalism 

Latin 

Linguistics 

Library Media 

Library Science 

Learning Support English 

Learning Support Math 

Learning Support Reading 

Mathematics 

Mathematics Education 

Meteorology 

Military Science 

Medical Technology 

Music 

Naval Science 

Nursing (Associate) 

Oceanography 



74 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PA = Public Administration PT = Physical Therapy 

PBH = Public History RAD = Radiologic Technologies 

PE = Physical Education RED = Reading (Regent's 

PEM = Physical Education Major Remediation) 

PHI = Philosophy RT = Respiratory Therapy 

PHS = Physical Science SOC = Sociology 

PHY = Physics SPA = Spanish 

POS = Political Science SSC = Savannah State Exchange 

PSY = Psychology ZOO = Zoology 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The degree programs of Armstrong State College are presented in this catalog by 
school, by division, and by department. The College is organized into three schools, each 
administered by a dean, and tw^o non-school affiliated departments. The degrees offered 
by each school and division are listed below: 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Degree Department 

Associate of Arts Interdepartmental 

Associate of Applied Science 

Criminal Justice Government 

Bachelor of Arts 

Art Art and Music 

Drama/Speech Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 

English Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 

History History 

Music Art and Music 

Political Science Government 

Psychology Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Bachelor of General Studies Interdepartmental 

Bachelor of Music Education Art and Music 

Bachelor of Science 

Biology Biology 

Chemistry Chemistry and Physics 

Computer Science Mathematics and Computer Science 

Criminal Justice Government 

Mathematical Sciences Mathematics and Computer Science 

Physical Sciences Chemistry and Physics 

Master of Arts 

History History 

Master of Science 

Criminal Justice Government 

School of Education 

Division of Curriculum and Instruction 

Degree 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
Early Elementary Education 
Middle School Education 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 7S 



Secondary SchiK)l Education 
'Business Education 
Social Science liducalion (History) 
Social Science Education (Political Science) 

All Levels (K-12) De>»ree Programs 
Art Education 
Speech Correction 

Other Degree Programs 
The Division ot Curriculum And Instruction works cooperatively with the Division 
ot Physical Education and Athletics in providing the Bacnelor of Science in Education 
in Physical Education as an all levels (P-12) program. Also, working with depart- 
ments in the School ot Arts and Sciences, the Division helps provide B.A. or B.S. 
degrees with teacher certification in the secondary fields of Biology, Chemistry, 
English, History, Mathematical Sciences, and Political Science (see the departmental 
sections in the Arts and Sciences listings for degree particulars). 

Master of Education 

Early Elementary Education 

Middle School Education 

Secondary Education 

'Business Education 
English 
Mathematics 
Science Education 
Social Studies 

Special Education 
Behavior Disorders 
Learning Disabilities 
Speech /Language Pathology 

'Offered in conjunction with Savannah State College. 

Division of Health and Physical Education 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
Physical Education 

School of Health Professions 

Degree Department 

Associate of Science 

Dental Hygiene Dental Hygiene 

Nursing Associate Degree Nursing 

Radiologic Technologies Radiologic Technologies 

Respiratory Therapy Respiratory Therapy 

Bachelor of Health Science Health Science 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education Dental Hygiene 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology Medical Technology 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Baccalaureate Nursing 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy Physical Therapy 

Master of Health Science Health Science 

Master of Science in Nursing Baccalaureate Nursing 



76 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 




78 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The School of Graduate Studies 

Graduate programs at Armstrong State College are designed to provide students with 
the opportunity and resources to enhance their educational, professional, and cultural 
backgrounds while improving their professional skills and competence. Graduate 
programs encourage scholarly inquiry through the appropriate application of valid 
research methods. 

Armstrong State College is authorized to grant degrees in the following graduate 
programs: 

Master of Arts 

History 
Master of Science 
Criminal Justice 
Master of Health Science 
Master of Science in Nursing 
Master of Education 
Elementary Education 
Middle Grades Education 
Special Education 

• Behavior Disorders 

• Learning Disorders 

• Speech /Language Pathology 
Secondary Education 

• Business Education 

• English Education 

• Mathematics Education 

• Science Education 

• Social Science Education 

Additional graduate courses are taught by Georgia Southern University and Savan- 
nah State College on the ASC campus. 

Admission to Graduate Study 

Graduates of colleges or universities accredited by the proper regional accrediting 
association may apply for admission to the School of Graduate Studies. Admission is 
restricted to include only those students whose academic records indicate that they can 
successfully undertake graduate work. 

Armstrong State College Graduate Catalog 

Please refer to the Armstrong State College Graduate Catalog for additional informa- 
tion related to admission procedures and requirements. The Graduate Catalog also 
contains information on graduate programs, graduate courses, the graduate faculty, 
financial aid opportunities, and academic standards and regulations. 

Copies of the graduate catalog are available from: 

School of Graduate Studies 
Armstrong State College 
Savannah, GA 31419 
(912) 927-5377 

Office of Admissions 
Armstrong State College 
Savannah, GA 31419 
(912) 927-5277 
800-633-2349 



SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES 79 

Immunization Requirements 

hi ordiT ti) toiiiplv with the UmviTsitv Svsti'ni of Cicorgi.i policies, all new students 
attending Armstrong State College will be required to submit a Certificate of hiununi 
zation for measles, mumps, and rubella prior to registering for classes. 



80 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 




82 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Adams, Joseph V., Dean 
Harris, Henry E., Assistant Dean 

Philosophy and Goals 

Through its faculty, laboratory facilities, and other instructional resources, the School 
of Arts and Sciences offers students a broad range of educational opportunity in curricula 
ranging from Anthropology to Zoology. 

As a foundation for baccalaureate programs, the School provides the core curriculum 
of the College - courses in the arts, humanities, and mathematics, as well as the sciences 
and social sciences, which are required of all students regardless of major. (For details, 
please see the section on "Degree Requirements" in this Catalog.) Beyond these basics. 
School curricula enable students to pursue specialized studies in a discipline, which 
provides a solid grounding in the field by probing its theory, methodology, and broader 
implications. Finally, major programs generally culminate in a "senior experience" - e.g., 
an internship, a capstone course, or a senior thesis - which is designed to help students 
comprehend their field as a whole. 

In summary. Arts and Sciences curricula are designed to sharpen critical thinking and 
problem-solving skills and to cultivate such ethical sensitivity as will (1) equip students 
for careers, (2) provide a firm foundation for graduate study, and (3) educate for living. 
To this end many departments have active student professional or honorary societies. 
Moreover, the School of Arts and Sciences seeks to complement classroom instruction by 
offering an annual schedule of cultural events in liberal arts and sciences, such as 
lectures, field trips, faculty and student recitals or concerts, plays and exhibits - most of 
which are opened to the general public. More than one hundred such events are 
presented each year. In addition to supporting the overall mission of the College to serve 
the community beyond the campus, such events persuasively demonstrate for students 
how greatly all are enriched when curriculum comes to life. 

Organization and Degrees 

The School of Arts and Sciences includes the departments of Art and Music; Biology; 
Chemistry and Physics; Government; History; Languages, Literature, and Dramatic 
Arts; Mathematics and Computer Science; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Learning 
Support; and Military Science. 

Undergraduate degree programs: 
Associate in Arts 

Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice 
Bachelor of Arts with majors in: 
Art 

Drama /Speech 
English 
History 
Music 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Bachelor of General Studies 
Bachelor of Music Education 
Bachelor of Science with majors in: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 
Mathematical Sciences 
Applied Physics 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



•3 



Further particul.irs ou tin* undergraduate liberal arts programs are found in the 
soctiDH devoted toe.uh dep.utnu'nl; Learning Support and Military Science are detailed 
11^ the chapter on "special programs". 

Si'veral lilvral arts Jf^nvs are otteri'd in an^poration with the Schix)l ot Education and 
provide teacher cvrtiticatuMV Ihesi' are shown below; howi-ver, please- note the more 
comprehensive list t>t certitication programs in iheSthiH)! ot Education section of thiscatalog. 
Bachelor ot Arts (with teacher certitic.itKMi) with majors in: 
English 
History 

Political Science 
Bachelor ot Science (with teacher certification) with majors in: 
Biologv 
Chemistry 

Mathematical Sciences 
All teacher education programs are approved by the Georgia State Professional 
Standards Commission and are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Education. 

Graduate degrees are offered by Armstrong State College. For particulars, see the 
Armstrong State College Graduate Catalog. 

Minor Concentrations of Study 

The following minors are offered by departments within the School of Arts and 
Sciences. Students may include one or more of these in their programs of study as 
circumstances may permit. 



Anthropology 

Art 

Biology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Communications 

Computer Science 

Criminal Justice 

Drama /Speech 

Economics 

Engineering Science 

English 

Film 

Foreign Language 

History 

Historical Archaeology 

Human Biology 

International Studies 



Legal Studies 

Linguistics 

Matnematics 

Mental Health 

Military Science 

Music 

Organizational Psychology 

Philosophy 

Physical Sciences 

Physics 

Political Science 

Preservation Studies 

Psychology 

Public Administration 

Public History 

Russian Studies 

Sociology 

Zoology 



General Studies 



Director: Dr. Grace Martin 

Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Coordinator: Dr. Donald Anderson 

Associate and baccalaureate degree programs in General Studies, emphasizing a 
liberal arts education, are operated under the general supervision of the Dean of the 
School of Arts and Sciences and under the immediate direction of the head of Social and 
Behavioral Sciences. Curriculum guidance for these programs is provided by the 
General Studies Degree Program Committee. Interested students should contact the 
General Studies Coordinator. 



84 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Bachelor of General Studies degree is also available at the Brunswick Center 
on the Brunswick College campus in Brunswick, Ga. Interested persons should contact 
the coordinator of the Brunswick Center or the General Studies Coordinator on the 
Armstrong campus. 

For the two-year degree of Associate in Arts, a student must complete at least 30 hours 
of the required course work and 45 quarter hours of all coursework in this program at 
Armstrong State College. The program is designed to provide a substantial liberal 
education as a base for upper division specialization. 

Certain courses may be exempted by examination. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 63 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

2. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 or 220 or 290 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; HIS 251 or 252 10 

2. POS 113 and one course selected from: ANT 201; 

ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 10 

AreaV 3 

1. PE 103 or 108 1 

2. Two activity courses 2 

B. Courses in the Concentration and/or Electives 30 

These courses may be specified by a department or may be electives. 
Students planning work toward a baccalaureate degree should select 

courses that meet listed requirements of that degree program. 

C. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 93 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES 

At least four quarters prior to anticipated graduation, students must submit a degree 
proposal to the General Studies Coordinator for approval. 

Hours 
A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 or 220 or 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. Two courses selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

PHI 201; two courses in any foreign language through the 200 level.. 10 



ART AND MUSIC M 



3. One or two courses selected from; ANT 201; CS 115, 120, 142; 

ECO 201, 202; I*SY 101; SOC" 201 5-10 

4. One or two courses selected from: BIO 101, 102; BOT 203; CHE 
121, 122; CHE 12S, 129; CHE 201, 202; CHE 211, THY 211, 212, 213; 
PHY 217, 218, 219; PHS 121, 122; ZOO 204, 208, 209 5-10 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

NOTE: Certain preceding courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. 
Also, if a physical science sequence is used to satisfy Area II, then a bulogical science 
must be chosen in Area IV. The converse is also true. 

Other Requirements 95 

1. A minimum of 35 hours at the 300 level. 

2. A maximum of 40 hours in any one discipline excluding courses taken 
under section A. 

3. No more than two "D's" are allowed in the General Studies section. 

4. Fifteen of the 30 General Studies hours must be completed at 
Armstrong. 

General Studies 30 

Courses at the 200 or above level 

1. Humanities 5-10 

American civilization, art, comparative literature, 

English or American literature, history, music, philosophy. 

2. Social Sciences 5-10 

Anthropology, criminal justice, economics, geography, 

political science, psychology, public history, sociology. 

3. Mathematics and Natural Sciences 5-10 

Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, entomology, 

geology, mathematics, meteorology, oceanography, 
physics, zoology. 

4. Communication Arts 5-10 

Computer science, drama /speech, 

film, foreign languages, journalism, linguistics. 

Area of Concentration (Any University System approved minor) 20-29 

Electives 36-45 

5. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Art and Music 

Faculty 

* Anderson, James, Department Head 

Cato, Tom Keith, William 

Harris, Robert Schmidt, John 

Green, Rachel * Schultz, Lucinda 

* Jensen, John Vogelsang, Kevin 

* Jensen, Linda Wacker, Johnathan 

White, Christopher 

* Graduate Faculty 

The Department of Art and Music offers concentrations in art and in music in support 
of the Associate in Arts degree and offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in art 
and music, the Bachelor of Music Education degree, and in cooperation with the 
Department of Secondary Education, the Bachelor of Science in Art Education. 



86 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Placement Examinations 

Transfer and new students in music must take placement examinations as appropri- 
ate in applied music, music theory, and music history. Acceptance of transfer credit 
towards graduation requirements in each area is contingent upon the results of the 
examination. 

Transfer students in art will be required to take a placement examination in art 
history. Additionally, coursework at other institutions in studio art may not be counted 
towards graduation until a portfolio of artwork is submitted demonstrating competency 
in those areas in which classes have been completed. 

Additional Requirements for Music Majors 

There are a variety of departmental policies and regulations which affect music 
majors. Included are requirements for recital attendance, ensemble participation, piano 
proficiency, recital participation, applied music levels, and the Rising Junior Applied 
Music Examination. A copy of A Handbook of Policies and Regulations for Music Majors will 
be given to each music student. 

Please see the "Fees" section of this catalog for information on applied music fees. 

Directed Individual Studies (DIS) 

Directed Individual Studies (DIS) have a distinctly useful place in the Arts and Music 
curriculum. The intent of the DIS is for an enrichment experience that otherwise is 
unavailable in the classroom. Normally, regular curriculum coursework should not be 
completed by individual study. 

However, if a regular course is to be taught by individual study, the following criteria 
must be met before approval may be granted by the department head: 1 ) the course must 
not have been offered during the preceding three quarters nor be scheduled during the 
succeeding three quarters; 2) the student must gain the approval of the anticipated 
instructor; 3) transient students must gain the permission of not only the department 
head, but the dean of faculty, and of the college from which the student comes; and 4) the 
student must demonstrate, in writing, that a hardship will exist if permission is denied, 
for the student to take an individual study. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN ART 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; PHI 201; MUS 200 5* 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 or 290 10 

2. Lab Science Sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, PSY 101, SOC 201 5 

Area TV 30 

1. ART 111, 112, 201, 202, 213 25 

2. MUS 200 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 



ART AND MUSIC 97 



H C ourses in the Major Field 40 

1. AKr 21)4, 313, 33(), 340, 370, 413, 470 35 

2. One trom: ART 271, 272, 273 5* 

C Special Course Requirements 20 

1. 1 orei^n lan>;ua>;e sequence through 103 15 

2. PHI 400 5 

D. Electives 35 

ReconuiienJ ART 271, 272, 273* 
H. Rey;ents' arid l\it I-xaminations 

TOTAL 1% 

*(May not be duplicated with major field, Area I, and elective requirements.) 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN MUSIC 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area! 20 

1. ENG 101,102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Lab Science Sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; PCS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. MUS 111, 112, 113, 211, 212, 213 18 

2. MUS 140 6 

3. MUS 256 or 254 6 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 33 

1. MUS 240, 281, 340, 371, 372, 373 24 

2. Two Courses from MUS 312, 361, 412 6 

3. One Course from MUS 416, 425, 427 3 

C. Track Options 38 

A minimum of 5 hours must be non-music electives in the School 
of Arts and Sciences. 

1. General Track: Electives 38 

One of the following performance /composition tracks. 
Prerequisite: Departmental Permission Only. 

2. Keyboard Performance 

MUS 258, 440, 420, 421 14 

Electives 24 

3. Vocal Performance 

MUS 217, 218, 219, 414, 415 16 

Electives 22 

4. Wind Instrument Performance 

MUS 440, 481 9 

One course from MUS 312, 361, 412 3* 

One course from MUS 432 or 433 3 



88 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Electives 23 

5. Composition 

MUS422 12 

One course from MUS 312, 361, 412 3* 

Electives 23 

D. Special Course Requirements 25 

1. ART 271, 272, 273 (may not be duplicated with Area I requirement) .. 10 

2. Foreign language sequence through 103 15 

3. RECITAL PERFORMANCES (determined by option 3 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 197 

*(May not be duplicated with Major Field Requirements) 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200 5 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

3. MUS 111, 112, 113, 140 15 

4. MUS 254 or 256 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 76-79 

1. MUS 211, 212, 213, 236, 237, 238, 239, 281 20 

2. MUS 240, 340 12 

3. MUS 312, 330, 331, 361 14 

4. MUS 371, 372, 373 9 

5. MUS 254 or 256 6 

6. One of the following emphases: 

A. Choral Emphasis 17 

MUS 217, 218, 353, 423, 427, 480 

Choice of 3 credits of secondary piano or voice 

B. Instrumental Emphasis 15 

MUS 227, 352, 416, 424, 481 

MUS 130 (3 qtrs. of a second applied wind or 
percussion instrument) 

C. Elementary Music Emphasis 16 

Choose 2 of the following secondary applied areas: 

MUS 130 (2 hrs.), 130 (2 hrs.), 224 (2 hrs.), 217, 332 
Choice of: MUS 353, 423, 427, or 352, 424, 416 



ART AND MUSIC •• 



> 



C. Professional Soquence .25 

1. FXC 310; FDN ^^^ 471, 472, 473 25 

IX Special Course Koquiretnonts 

One halt ot senior recital ..0 

1 l\e^ent>' and h\it Hxaininalions 

TOTAL 202-205 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 
(With Concentrations in Art or Music) 

Hour« 

A. Cjcneral Kequireiiients 63 

Area! 20 

1. ENC 101, 102 or 192,201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

2. MAT 101 and 103 or' 195 or 220 or 290 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 115 or 192; HIS 251 or 252 10 

2. PCS 113 and one course selected from: ANT 201; 

ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 10 

Area V 3 

1. PE 103 or 108 1 

2. Two activity courses 2 

B. Courses in the Concentration 

Art 25 

1. ART 111, 112 10 

2. One course selected from: ART 271, 272, 273 5 

3. Two courses selected from: ART 201, 202, 204, 211, 213, 

314, 316, 330, 331, 340, 362, 363, 364, 370, 413 10 

Music 29 

1. MUS 111, 112, 113 9 

2. Applied Music (six hours in one area) 6 

3. Music Ensemble 256, 254 6 

4. Music History and Literature 8 

5. Piano Proficiency 

6. MUS 000 (Recital Attendance) 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN ART EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; PCS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 



90 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

3. ART 111, 112, 213 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 63-68 

1. ART 201, 202, 204 15 

2. ART 271, 272, 273** 10-15 

3. ART 313, 314, 330, 340, 350, 351, 370, 400 38 

4. Elective 5 

C. Professional Sequence 25 

1. EXC 310, EDN 335, 471, 472, 473 25 

D. Electives 0-5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 194- 199 
**May not be duplicated in Area I. 

Minor Concentrations 

Minor concentrations in art and music are available through the Department of Art 
and Music. The requirements for each are: 

Hours 
Concentration in Art 25 

1. ART 111, 112 10 

2. One course selected from: ART 271, 272, 273 5 

3. Two courses selected from: ART 201, 202, 204, 211, 213, 

314, 330, 331, 340, 362, 363, 364, 370, 413 10 

Concentration in Music 29 

1. MUS 111, 112, 113 9 

2. Applied Music (six hours in one area) 6 

3. Music Ensemble 251 or 254 6 

4. Music History and Literature 8 

5. MUS 000 (recital attendance) 

Art Offerings 

Unless stated otherwise, courses are open to non-art majors. 

ART 111 Basic Design I (4-2-5) 

An introduction to two-dimensional design and graphic communication. 

ART 112 Basic Design II (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in ART 111 or permission of instructor. 
The fundamentals of three-dimensional design introduced through sculptural 
projects in various media. 

ART 200 Introduction to the Visual Arts (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

A study of artistic theories, styles, media and techniques and their application in 

masterworks of art from all ages. Not recommended for art majors. 

ART 201 Painting I (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ART 111 or ART 213 or permission of the 

instructor. 

A basic course in acrylic painting from observed and secondary sources. 



ART AND MUSIC t1 



i ART 21 



ART 202 Painting IM4-2-5) 

PriTt'tjuisito A ^rado ot "C nr higher m\ AK I Jni nr ptTnMssion of thr iiistruitor 
A continuation ot Painting I with an imrrasin^ emphasis on student selected 
p.uiitin^ probliMUs 

ART 204 Introduction to Photography (4-2-5) 

L^tfored on denuuul 

lntri>ductu>n to black aiul white photographic aesthetic*! and proceMCS- Including 
study ot the mechanual-tiptical functions of cameras and enlargcrs as well as 
prinlin); and pri>cessm>; of film in a controlled environment 

Graphic Design (4-2-5) 

L^fferod on demand Prerequisite: AK T 111 or permission of the instructor 

The fundamentals of visual communication including design, layout, typography 

and reproduction as related to modern advertising techniques 

ART 213 Drawing I (4-2-5) 

A fundamental course emphasizing representational drawing from still-life, land- 
scape, and figural form. 

ART 215 Computer Art (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ART 111. 

An introduction to the computer technology and software used in image making 

and manipulation, and in graphic design. The computer, as another tool for making 

images, will be considered in relation to its own unique output characteristics and 

to the means in which computer images might be executed in more traditional 

media. 

ART 240 Arts and Crafts (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: none. 

An introduction to the terminology and techniques used in a variety of craft media 
including batik, weaving, and jewelry. Includes a historical review of Decorative 
Arts in the twentieth century. 

ART 271 History of Art (5-0-5) 

A survey of the visual arts, painting, sculpture, and architecture, in Western 
Civilization from prehistory to the Late Middle Ages. 

ART 272 History of Art II (5-0-5) 

Italian Renaissance through Rococo art. 

ART 273 History of Art III (5-0-5) 

Modern Art, the late eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. 

ART 303 Oil Painting (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ART 201 or permission of the instructor. 

Introduction to the techniques and special qualities of oil paint and associated 

variations of the mediums. 

ART 304 Watercolor Painting (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ART 201 or permission of the instructor. An exploration of traditional 
and experimental approaches to transparent watercolor medium. 

ART 305 Art Criticism (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ART 273 or permission of the instructor. The study and practice of 
visual art criticism in the context of modern critical approaches. 

ART 313 Drawing II (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ART 213 or permission of the instructor. 
A continuation of Drawing I with emphasis on figuration, composition, and color. 

ART 314 Intermediate Photography (3-3-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ART 204 or permission of the instructor. 

A continuation of the study of the aesthetics and processes in black and white 

photography. 

ART 315 Color Photography (3-3-5) 

No Prerequisite. 

An introduction of the principles, aesthetics, and print processes of color photography. 



92 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ART 316 Hand Colored and Manipulated Silver Print (3-3-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ART 204, or permission of the instructor. 
Exploration of a variety of media and techniques to enhance and alter a silver print. 

ART 317 Experimentation in Photography (3-3-5) 

Prerequisite: ART 204 or permission of instructor. 

A course designed for students who have basic knoweledge of 35 mm camera 
operations and black and white darkroom procedures and an interest in the use of 
photographic images as a part of a broad vocabulary of imagery preoceses. Students 
will explore experimental processes including solarization, negative prints, photo- 
grams, double exposures, reticulation of negatives, cliche verre, as well as non-silver 
processes such as gum bichromate, cyanotype, and van dyke brown. 

ART 320 Art for the Elementary Teacher (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A study, with studio experience, of materials and methods for teaching art at the 

elementary school level. 

ART 330 Ceramics I (4-2-5) 

Introduction to fundamentals of wheel thrown pottery, handbuilding techniques 
and ceramic sculpture. Emphasis is on decoration, form, craftsmanship and creativ- 
ity. Traditional glazing and firing techniques as well as an exploration into 
non-traditional methods of coloring and construction. 

ART 331 Pottery Techniques (4-2-5) 

Emphasis in on techniques of pottery utilizing the potter's wheel. 

ART 333 Ceramic Sculpture (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Ceramics I or permission of instructor. 

Emphasis is on developing ideas into large scale ceramic sculpture. Individual 
attention and direction is facilitated. Projects may include pottery, the figure, 
abstractions, wall relief and mixed media construction. 

ART 335 Glaze Experimentation (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ART 330 or permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to teach students about raw materials and chemicals used 

in glazes, glaze formulation, and firing glazes in oxidation, reduction, and raku 

kilns. 

ART 340 Printmaking I (4-2-5) 

An introduction to basic printmaking ideas and terminology. Projects will include 
one or more of the following: linoleum, woodblock, intaglio, silkscreen and non- 
traditional methods of making prints. 

ART 350 Art In the Lower School (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Art education majors only. 

The analysis and evaluation of techniques and materials for teaching art in the 

elementary school. 

ART 351 Art In the Middle and Upper School (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Art education majors only. 

The analysis and evaluation of techniques and materials for teaching art in junior 

and senior high school. 

ART 362 Enameling/Jewelry Making (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Introduction of process in the production of a variety of enameled art works, and of 

processes in the making of jewelry, both handmade and cast. 

ART 363 Batik/Textile Design (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Exploration of a variety of processes used in applying original designs to fabric. 

ART 364 Fibers Construction (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Development of processes used in on and off techniques in weaving and in 

contemporary fiber wall hangings. 



ART AND MUSIC W 



ART 366 Papermaking (4-2-5) 

rrori'ijuisitf Art i 12 dt pernussiDii ot thi- instriutor 

An mtiTJUfdiatt'crahs course which fxplnrcs the priKi'sscs, techniques, and histort- 
c.il si^niticancf ot papormakin>; I- rnphsis will bt* placed on the production of both 
two-dimonsional and thref-dirnensional pieces 

ART 370 Figure Sculpture 1 (4-2-5) 

An inirodiK liDH ti) basic sculpture ideas, terminology, and processes. Emphasis will 
bo placed on \vi>rkin>; with the human figure utilizing clay and other media. 

ART 371 Sculpture Materials (4-2-5) 

This course is an introduction to additive and subtractive sculpture techniques. 
Fmphasis will be placed on a variety of sculptural imagery and media including 
wood construction, carving, and mixed media. 

ART 400 Seminar In Art Education (3-0-3) 

rrerequisito Permission ot the instructor Art education majors only. 
.-\ survey ot current trends in instructional and research techniques. 

ART 413 Drawing III (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites; A grade of "C" or higher in ART 313 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of Drawing II with increasingly complex problems in concept, 
design, and technique. 

ART 414 Figure Drawing (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Art 313 or permission of the instructor. 

A continuation of Art 313 with special emphasis on the human figure as structure 

and expressive form in dry and aqueous media. 

ART 462 Museum Studies (4-2-5) 

Spring, 1^94. 

A survey of the development of museums in the United States and of the ethics and 
practices of the museum profession, to include collections management, planning, 
outreach, and public education. 

ART 470 Senior Portfolio (1-6-5) 

Each student will develop a body of work in the medium of choice that demonstrates 
a consistent theme or approach. This course is taken in preparation for the Senior 
Portfolio Review and Exhibition. 

ART 489 Selected Studies In Art (V-V(l-5)) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Varied course offerings designed to meet special institutional and community 

needs. May be repeated for credit. 

ART 490 Directed Individual Study (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisite: See departmental statement. 

ART 491 Internship (V-V-(l-4-5)) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and depart- 
ment head and an overall grade point average of 2.5. 

The student will pursue an individually designed course project involving off- 
campus study, work, and /or research. Projects usually encompass the entire 
academic quarter and are under the joint supervision of the sponsoring institution 
and his/her faculty supervisor. 

ART 495 Special Problems (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: 15 hours of coursework in a selected studio area. 

The special problems courses consisting of visual arts studies to be mutually agreed 

upon by consultation between the instructor and student. 



94 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Applied Music Offerings 

Unless stated otherwise, courses are open to non-music majors. 

MUS 130 Applied Music (one credit) 

Prerequisite: Sufficient music background, determined by audition of MUS 110. 
One twenty-five minute lesson per week in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, 
voice, or woodwinds. Applicable to a music degree only for a secondary applied 
credit. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 140 Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Open to music majors and a limited number of non-majors by audition 

only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice or 

woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 240 Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the MUS 140 level as determined by jury examination. 
Music majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice or 
woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 340 Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Rising Junior Applied Music Examina- 
tion. Music majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice or 
woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 440 Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the MUS 340 level as determined by jury examination. 
Music majors only 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice or 
woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 



Music Offerings 

MUS 000 Recital Attendance (0-V-O) 

A requirement for music majors and minors which consists of attendance at a 
designated number of concerts /recitals each quarter. 

MUS 110 Basic Music Theory (3-0-3) 

An introduction to music theory for students needing skills for MUS 111. May not 
be used for credit toward a degree in music. 

MUS 111 Elementary Theory I (3-2-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: MUS 110 or equivalent by examination. 

An introduction to the basic theoretical principles of music including sightsinging, 

ear-training and keyboard harmony. 

MUS 112 Elementary Theory II (3-2-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 111 or permission of 

instructor. 

A continuation of MUS 111 with emphasis on part-writing and diatonic material. 

MUS 113 Elementary Theory III (3-2-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 112 or permission of 

instructor. 

A continuation of MUS 112 introducing seventh chords and diatonic modulation. 

MUS 114 Jazz Improvisation I (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 113 or permission of instructor. 
Emphasis on basic jazz literature, chord symbol, melodic patterns, ear training, 
melodic concepts and analysis of improvised solos. 

MUS 200 Introduction to Music Literature (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand music by means of analysis of 

style, forms, and media of musical expression. 



ART AND MUSIC 



MUS 201 Understanding Jazz (.VO-3) 

A non-tochnual survey of jdz/ porformcrs and "ityle** wilh emphasis on recorded 
literature The course will examine elements of jazz such as improvisation, instru- 
iitentiition and rhythm and trace their development from New Orleans to 
contemporary tusion music 

NIUS 202 Survey of Rock Music (3-0-3) 

tittered on demand. 

A ni>n-tochn«cal survey of rock music and its styles with emphasis on recorded 

liti'rature 

MUS 203 Popular Music In 20lh Century America (3-0-3) 
Offered on demand. 

A survey of popular music from ragtime to present. Examination of popular music 
and its relationship to American culture. 

MUS 211 Intermediate Theory I (3-2-3) 

Fall Troroquisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 113 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of MUS 1 13 with emphasis on chromatic harmony. 

MUS 212 Intermediate Theory II (3-2-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 211 or permission of 
instructor. 

A continuation of MUS 21 1. 

MUS 213 Intermediate Theory III (3-2-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 212 or permission of 

instructor. 

A continuation of MUS 212 with emphasis on twentieth century techniques. 

MUS 214 Jazz Improvisation II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 114 or permission of the instructor. 

Emphasis on the analysis and performance of intermediate jazz literature and 

composition in contemporary styles. 

MUS 217 English and Italian Lyric Diction (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

A study of the Internatioknal Phonetic Alphabet and the phonetics of Standard 

American English and Italian for singing. 

MUS 218 Latin and German Lyric Diction (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in MUS 217. 

Orientation of the phonetics of liturgical Latin and German for singing by means of 

the International Phonetic Alphabet. 

MUS 219 French Lyric Diction (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in MUS 217. 

Orientation of the phonetics of French for singing by means of the International 

Phonetic Alphabet. 

MUS 224 Class Guitar (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Designed for the development of basic skills in playing the guitar for accompanying. 
Focuses on chorded styles and their application to music such as folk songs and 
popular music. 

MUS 226 Class Piano I, II, III (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Students enrolling in 
II or III must have received a grade of "C" or higher in the preceding class. 
A study of keyboard techniques with emphasis on the skills needed to fulfill the 
piano proficiency requirement. 

MUS 227 Class Voice (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music major status or permission of the instruc- 
tor. 

A study of voice production techniques with practical application to standard song 
literature. Not open to students whose principal instrument is voice. 



96 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MUS 228 Class Piano for Non-Music Majors (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 
An applied study of keyboard literature and techniques at the beginning and 
elementary levels. An elective course, open only to non-music majors, which meets 
in the electronic piano laboratory. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 236 Brass Methods (0-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the principles of brass instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 237 Woodwind Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the principles of woodwind instrument performance and peda- 
gogy- 

MUS 238 Percussion Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the principles of percussion instrument performance and peda- 
gogy- 

MUS 239 String & Guitar Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the principles of string and guitar performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 250 Pep Band (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter. Open to qualified students. 

A group to provide spirit music at school athletic functions. May be taken for 

academic credit, at most, four times. 

MUS 251 Concert Band (0-2-1) 

Open to qualified students. 

Repertoire to be selected from the standard literature for symphonic band. Public 

performances are a part of the course requirement. 

MUS 252 Jazz Ensemble (0-2-1) 

Open to qualified students. 

Repertoire to be selected from a variety of jazz styles and periods. Public perfor- 
mances are a part of the course requirement. 

MUS 253 Armstrong Singers (0-2-1) 

Membership open to all students by audition. Jazz Choir. Public performances are 
a part of the course requirement. 

MUS 254 Concert Choir (0-3-1) 

Membership open to all students. Ability to read music desired but not required. 
Repertoire to be selected each quarter from the standard choral concert literature. 
There will be public performances each quarter. 

MUS 255 Chamber Ensemble (0-2-1) . 

Offered on demand. 

Open to all qualified students in the performance media of brass, woodwind, string, 

keyboard, voice, and percussion instruments. 

MUS 256 Wind Ensemble (0-3-1) 

Offered on demand. Permission of instructor only 

Repertoire to be selected from the standard wind ensemble literature. Public 

performances are part of the course requirement. 

MUS 257 Opera Workshop (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Preparation and performance of work or excerpts of works 
from the operatic repertoire. 

MUS 258 Keyboard Accompanying (1-2-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

A study of the basic principles of accompaniment. 

MUS 259 Oratorio Chorus (0-2-1) 

Membership open to all. 

Evening rehearsals. Literature to be selected from the larger choral works. Ability 

to read music not required. Public performances are part of the course requirement. 



ART AND MUSIC 



97 



MUS 281 Conducting (3-0-3) 

\-t\\\ rri*ri'i|uisiii' Ml s 1 M Musurn.iiors only 

An inlriKiiu tu>n In ihc tfchnujUfs o\ conducting and interpretation 

MUS 312 Form and Analysis (3-0-3) 

C^tfiri'd on (.K-m.ind I'riTi'quiMtc: MUS 213. Mumic majors only 

riu* studv ot tlu- pniu lull's of torm in musu and techniques of harmonic analysis. 

MUS 320 Music for the Elementary Teacher (5-0-5) 

l*ri'ri'».)uisito Admission to ItMcluT Iducatmn 

A study ot the materials and methods tor teaching general music in the elementary 

classrtx>m. Not for music majors. 

MUS 330 Music In the Lower School (4-0-4) 

Musk niaii>rs onK' 

A course tor music ma|ors emphasi/uig analysis and evaluation of techniques and 

materials tor teaching music in the U>wer school. 

MUS 331 Music In the Middle and Upper School (4-0-4) 

Music ina|ors onl\- 

A course tor music majors emphasizing analysis and evaluation of techniques and 

materials tor teaching music in the middle and senior high schools. 

MUS 332 Music in the Lower School II (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MUS 330. 

A continuation of MUS 330 with special emphasis on specific pedagogical strategies 

in teaching olementarv music. 

MUS 352 Band Methods (2-1-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 281 and one course selected from MUS 236, 237, or 238. 
A course dealing with the organization and development of school band ensembles 
and problems of teaching all levels of instrumental music. Includes a laboratory 
experience designed to allow students to apply techniques and strategies to en- 
semble rehearsals. 

MUS 353 Choral Methods (2-1-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 281 and one course selected from MUS 236, 237, or 238. 
A course dealing with the organization and development of school choral en- 
sembles and problems of choral singing. Includes a laboratorv experience designed 
to allow students to apply techniques and strategies to ensemble rehearsals. 

MUS 361 Orchestration and Arranging (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213. Music majors only. 
An introduction to the techniques of arranging and scoring for vocal and instrumen- 
tal ensembles. 

MUS 371 Music History I (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 113 and MUS 200. 

The history of music in Western Civilization from its origins through the Renais- 
sance. 

MUS 372 Music History II (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 113 and MUS 200. 

The history of music in Western Civilization in the Baroque and Classic Periods. 

MUS 373 Music History III (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 113 and MUS 200. 

The history of music in Western Civilization in the Romantic Period and in the 20th 

centurv. 

MUS 411 Composition (V-V-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213. Music majors only. May be repeated for 

credit. 

MUS 412 Counterpoint (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213. Music majors only. 
A study of contrapuntal practices of 18th century music. 



98 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MUS 414 Song Literature I (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

A survey of German and Italian song literature. 

MUS 415 Song Literature II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

A survey of French and English song literature. 

MUS 416 Topics In Instrumental Repertoire and 
Pedagogical Techniques (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Junior status or permission of the instructor. May be repeated 
for credit as topics vary. 

A survey of instrumental literature and teaching techniques for brass, guitar, 
percussion, or woodwind instruments. 

MUS 420 Piano Literature I (3-0-3) 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of piano literature 
of the Baroque and Classic periods. 

MUS 421 Piano Literature II (3-0-3) 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of piano literature 
of the Romantic and Contemporary periods. 

MUS 422 Opera Literature (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 200. 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of the lyric theatre 

from Baroque to the present. 

MUS 423 Choral Repertoire (2-1-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 281 and one course selected from MUS 236, 237, or 238. 
A survey of literature and related performance practice for school choral ensembles. 
Includes a labboratory situation designed to allow students to experience teaching 
the literature and applying performance practice concepts in an ensemble setting. 

MUS 424 Band Repertoire (2-1-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 281 and one course selected from MUS 236, 237, or 238. 
A survey of literature and related performance practice for school instrumental 
ensembles. Includes a labboratory situation designed to allow students to experi- 
ence teaching the literature and to apply performance practice concepts in an 
ensemble setting. 

MUS 425 Piano Pedagogy (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

A study of pedagogical techniques of the piano and a survey of literature suited for 

teaching purposes. 

MUS 427 Vocal Pedagogy (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. 

A study of pedagogical techniques of the voice and a survey of literature suited for 

teaching purposes. 

MUS 428 Marching Band Techniques (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music majors only or permission of the instructor. 
A study of techniques used in show design and instruction of the high school 
marching band. 

MUS 429 Art Song (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 200. 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of the art song from 

its origins to the present day. 

MUS 432 Symphonic Music Literature (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 200. 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of symphonic 

music from its origins to the present day. 

MUS 433 Instrumental Chamber Music Literature (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 200. 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of instrumental 

chamber music from its origins to the present day. 



BIOLOGY 



MUS 480 Advanced Choral ConduclinK (3-0-3) 

(.>t!i'ri'd DO di'inand I'riTcqiiisiti's MUS2M1, >i. >f>i \1umi ri\.i)»>rs «»niy 
AdvaiKi'ti tt'chnujucs Ji)r thr choral CDnduitDr 

MUS 481 Advanced ln«»trumental C onducting (3-0-3) 

Oftrri'vl on diMi\.»nd I'rrri-ijuiMti-s MI'S2KI, ^12, 261. Mukic m4)ors uniy. 
Ad\aiui'd ti'chiiii|iK's tor thi* instruiiu'ntal Limductor 

MUS 489 Selected Studies In Music (V-V-(l-5)) 

(.^tJtTod on demand Prorfquisitc I't-rmission of the instructor 

\'anod course ottenn^s designed to meet sp«'i ul mstifntiDfi.il .uul . .itntiuinitv 

ncvds. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 490 Directed Individual Study (V-V-(l-5)) 

rriTi'cjuisito See departmental statement. Music majors only. 

MUS 491 Internship (V-V-(l-5)) 

Ottered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and depart- 
ment head and an overall grade p«.)int average of 2.5. 

The student will pursue an individually designed course project involving off- 
campus study, work, and /or research. Projects usually encompass the entire 
academic quarter and are under the joint supervision of the sponsoring institution 
and his/her faculty supervisor. 

Biology 

Faculty 

Relyea, Kenneth, Department Head 

Awong-Taylor, Judy Khan, Ritin 

* Beumer, Ronald Larson, Brett 
Brower, Moonyean Thome, Francis 
Guillou, Laurent Wynn, Gail 
Hyde, Linda 

Kempke, Suzanne 

* Graduate Faculty 

The major in biology consists of BIO 101, BIO 102, BOT 203 and ZOO 204, and at least 
40 quarter hours credit in biology courses (BIO, BOT, ZOO) numbered 300 or above. The 
majority of the courses in the major numbered 300 or above must be taken in the Biology 
Department at Armstrong State College. 

Each student acquiring a major in biology must include in his/her program the 
following courses: BIO 360, 370, 480; BOT 410 or ZOO 510; one course in botany 
numbered 300 or above, other than BOT 410; and one course in zoology numbered 300 
or above, other than ZOO 510. If credit for any of the first three required units is 
transferred to Armstrong from another college, the department may require that it be 
validated by examination. 

In addition, biology majors must complete elementary statistics and the course 
sequence in organic chemistry (15 quarter hours). The course in general college physics 
(15 quarter hours) is strongly recommended and should be considered essential for those 
w^ho expect to continue the study of biology beyond the B.S. degree. 

To be eligible for a B.S. degree in biology the student must have a grade of at least "C" 
for all biology courses. 

Beginning students who have successfully completed strong courses in biology in high 
school may take examinations for advanced placement or for credit for BIO 101 and /or 102. 
Arrangements to take these examinations may be made with the head of the department. 

In order to receive Core Curriculum credits for the biology laboratory science 
sequence by taking biology in the Savannah State-Armstrong exchange program, a 
student must take the ENTIRE sequence of ten quarter hours either at Armstrong State 
College or at Savannah State College. 



1 00 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



By careful use of electives a student majoring in biology may concurrently acquire a 
second major in chemistry (i.e., he or she may take a "double major"). This program is 
recommended for preprofessional students. It does require 10 to 20 quarter hours credit 
above the minimum required for graduation. Ask the department head for additional 
information. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN BIOLOGY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. BIO 101; 102 10 

2. MAT 101 (or 103 or 206 if examination allows) and MAT 220 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CHE 128, 129; BOT 203 and ZOO 204 20 

2. Two courses from: natural sciences. Mathematics, foreign language ..10 
AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement: HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

1. BIO 360, 370, 480; BOT 410 or ZOO 510 20 

2. Electives at the 300-400 level selected from biology, botany, 
and zoology. Electives must include one BOT course other 

than BOT 410 and one ZOO course other than ZOO 410 20 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

CHE 341, 342, 343 15 

D. Electives 35 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 
SPECIAL NOTES: 

(1) Biology majors should take BIO 101 and BIO 102 during the freshman year, and BOT 
203 and ZOO 204 during the sophomore year. CHE 128 and 129 should be completed 
by the end of spring quarter of the sophomore year. 

(2) The biology major should complete organic chemistry (CHE 341, 342, 343) no later 
than the end of the junior year as it is prerequisite or corequisite to some physiology 
courses. 

(3) Students who may wish to enter graduate school are advised that PHY 211, 212, 213, 
and foreign language to third quarter proficiency should be considered essential. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN BIOLOGY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 



BIOLOGY 101 



ArtM II ............M... M.....M......M.....MM 20 

1. MAT 101. 103, or 206 „ 5 

2 MAI 220 ^ 5 

r BIO 101; 102 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; 

POS113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CHE 128, 129; ZOO 204; MAT 103 20 

2. Ono course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

3. One course from: ART 2tK), 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement: HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1. BIO 360, 370, 480; BOT 203 20 

2. BOT 410 or ZOO 510 5 

3. Electi\ es at the 300-400 level selected from botany and zoology 20 

C. Courses in Related Fields 30 

1. CHE 341, 342, 343 15 

2. Three of AST 301, MET 301, GEO 301, OCE 301, or PHY 211, 212, 213 15 

D. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EDN 200; EXC 310, EDN 335, 447, 471, 472, 473 35 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201 5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 216 

MINOR CONCENTRATIONS 

The following minor concentrations are available from the Department of Biology. 
For minors, the student must earn a grade of "C" or better in all courses offered for the 
minor. Students should be aware that BIO 101, 102 are pre-requisites to all courses listed 
below except BIO 210 and ZOO 215. 

The minors and their requirements are: 

Hours 

Biology 20 

1 . 20 hours of upper division BIO courses chosen from BIO 310, 351 . 
352, 353, 358, 360, 370, 380, 410, 450, 460, 480 
Botanv 20 

1. BOT 203 5 

2. 3 courses from BOT 305, 323, 510, 425 15 

Zoology 20 

1. ZbO 204 5 

2. 3 courses from ZOO 301, 326, 355, 356, 372, 410, 429, 435 15 

Human Biology 20 

1. BIO 210 or ZOO 215 5 

2. 3 courses from BIO 310, 351, 353, 370, 380, ZOO 330 15 

Pre-Professional Programs 

Pre Medical/Pre Dental/Pre Veterinary. Students majoring in biology may concur- 
rently complete all premedical, predental, and preveterinary requirements. 

Secondary Teaching Certificate in Biology. Students may major in Biology and 
obtain teaching certification. 



102 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Internships. The Department offers a number of internship options in the areas of 
research, applied biology, and environmental education. It also offers programs in which 
students can work with physicians, veterinarians, and dentists. 

Pre-forestry program with the University of Georgia. A student may complete two 
years of a pre-forestry curriculum at Armstrong, then transfer to the University of 
Georgia. After two additional years of coursework, the student may receive a B.S. in 
Forest Resources. 

Pre-forestry/Environmental Management Affiliation with Duke University. In this 
program, a student may complete three years of study at Armstrong and then may apply 
for admission to the Duke program. If accepted, the student may complete two addi- 
tional years at Duke. Upon successfully completing the first year at Duke, the student 
will receive a B.S. in Biology from Armstrong; after successful completion of the second 
year, the student will receive a Master of Science degree in either forestry or environmen- 
tal management from Duke University. 

Biotechnology. Students seeking to attain biotechnology credentials appealing to 
employers in genetic technology industries, forensic science, pharmaceuticals, agricul- 
ture, aquaculture, and graduate programs may consider this track within the Biology 
Major. Pre-medical students, especially those considering biomedical research, will find 
this track attractive. The student completes the same required courses (BIO 101, 102, BOT 
203, ZOO 204, BIO 360, 370, 480 AND EITHER BOT 410 OR ZOO 510) as all other Biology 
majors, but then chooses BIO 351, 353, and 460 and one elective chosen from BIO 352, 410, 
BOT 410, ZOO 372, 510, 429, or 435. 

Scholarships In Biology 

The department offers a limited number of scholarships to Biology majors. Interested 
students are invited to inquire in the department office for details. 

Biology Honors 

Students who perform independent biological research and submit acceptable oral 
and written reports to a departmental committee may be eligible to have "graduated 
with departmental honors" noted on their official academic records. 

To qualify for this honor, students must have at the time of application: 120-150 
quarter hours of course work; a minimum college GPA of 3.3; a minimum biology GPA 
of 3.5 with no grade lower than "C"; and three or more 300-400 level course completed. 

The committee will consist of three biology faculty, adding where applicable a 
biologist from outside the college. The committee will examine students' proposals 
before projects are undertaken and evaluate the projects at their completion. 

Biology Offerings 

BIO 101 Principles of Biology I (4-3-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

Origin and characteristics of living systems, structure and function of cells, biologi- 
cal chemistry, the five kingdom concept (with emphasis on plants), basic principles 
and global aspects of ecology. 

BIO 102 Principles of Biology II (4-3-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: BIO 101. 

Mendelian and modern genetics; evolutionary mechanisms; survey of the animal 
kingdom; structure, function and development of animal organ systems, with 
emphasis on vertebrates. 



BIOLOGY 103 



BIO 21U MicroorganiHins aiul DiM'aM' (4-;^-S) 

C^tftTfvl tMch qu.irtiT rriTi'v|uisili'N C \H. 201 i>r 122 and /CX) 2(N 
\n iiitriKliK tu)r\ ti) the study ot niicriHir^anismH with primary ernphamson bactrria 
Iho nu>rphoU)^y, lift' history, aiid impurtancr ti> public hralth of rrpri*M*ntativc 
bactiTia, fur\>;i, viruses, and proti>/i>a art* considered Credit fi>r thihcourMr may r^ol 
l>f applu'*.! toward a major \i\ biolo>;y. 

BIO 310 Man and the Environment (5-0-5) 

Spring or Winter Prerequisite: Completion of 75 quarter hours credit in college 

course's. 

Consideration of the interactions between humans and the support systems of the 
earth which are essential to their existence. Credit for this course may not be applied 
toward a major in biology. 

BIO 351 Bacteriology (3-4-5) 

Fall rriToquisites 10 hours of biological science, CHE 128-129. 

A study of the morphology, ecology, classification, and genetics of the bacteria and 

related micro-organisms, including the viruses. 

BIO 352 Medical Microbiology (3-4-5) 

Winter Prerequisite. BIO 351 and permission of the instructor. 

A comprehensive study of the disease-causing microbes in terms of their diagnosis, 

pathology, and epidemiology. 

BIO 353 Immunology and Serology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: CHE 128 and 129 or permission of instructor and department 
head. 

A fundamental study of humoral and cellular immunity, the structure and biosyn- 
thesis of antibodies, and the interactions between antigens and antibodies. 
Consideration will be given to allergic states and other immunological diseases. 

BIO 358 Histological Technique (0-10-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 101, and 102. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, staining, and 

mounting plant and animal materials for study. 

BIO 360 Cell Structure and Function (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 102, CHE 128, 129 

An introduction to cell biology including the study of cell ultrastructure, the major 

physiological processes, cell reproduction and cell differentiation. 

BIO 370 Genetics (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 101, BIO 102 or 112, CHE 128, 129; BIO 351 and junior 

status recommended. 

An introduction to the principles of biological inheritance. 

BIO 380 Human Genetic (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: BIO 101-102 or ZOO 208-209 and CHE 128-129 or CHE 201-202, or 
CHE 121-122. 

An introduction to human inheritance including gene transmission, gene effects 
upon metabolism, population and quantitative genetics, genetics of sex-determina- 
tion, pedigree analysis, eugenics, and genetic screening and counseling. 

BIO 410 Cellular Physiology (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: At least third quarter junior status; two courses 
in biology numbered 300 or above; and organic chemistry. 

A consideration of the functional relationships between microscopic anatomy and 
cell chemistry, emphasizing permeability, metabolism, and growth. 

BIO 450 Evolution (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Major in biology (at least 15 qtr. hrs. credit in biology courses 

numbered 300 or above). 

Modem concepts in organic evolution. 



104 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



BIO 460 Molecular Genetics (4-4-5) 

Prerequisite: BOT 203, ZOO 204, BIO 360, and CHE 341. 

Detailed study of gene structure and the control of gene expression in prokaryotic, 
eukaryotic and viral systems, including topics such as replication, recombination, 
repair, mutagenesis of DN A and RN A synthesis. Recombinant DN A techniques and 
genetic engineering will be introduced. 

BIO 470/ 

471/472 Seminar (1-0-1) 

Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior Biology majors. 

Library research, class presentations, and discussions in selected areas of Biology. 

BIO 480 General Ecology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: Senior standing and three courses in biology numbered 300 or 

above. 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the welfare of humans, 

coordinated with a study of populations and communities in the field. Research 

project and oral and written presentations are required. Ecology is a discipline 

which draws on information and methods from other areas of biology and science, 

and constitutes a "capstone" experience for biology students. 

BIO 481 Biology of Marine Organisms (4-3-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: BOT 203, ZOO 204. 

Study of the relationship between organisms and abiotic and biotic features of the 

marine environment. Emphasis on local marine ecosystems. Field trips. 

BIO 490 Research (V-V-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: At least 20 hours credit in biology courses 
numbered 300 or above; a B average in biology courses and in overall work; consent 
of department head; agreement of a staff member to supervise work. 
Problems to be assigned and work directed by a member of the department. 
Supervised research including literature search, field and /or laboratory investiga- 
tion and presentation of an acceptable w^ritten report of results. Credit will depend 
upon the work to be done. Both credit and proposed work must be approved in 
advance, in writing, by the faculty member to supervise the work and by the 
department head. 

BIO 495/496 Internship (V-V-(l-5)) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the Depart- 
ment Head. 

The student will be engaged in a biological project sponsored by an outside agency. 
The project will be selected, supervised, evaluated, and credit hours determined by 
the student's faculty advisor in consultation with the outside agency. The student 
must make application during the quarter preceding the internship. No more than 
5 (five) hours may be counted toward the major. 

Botany Offerings 

BOT 201 Principles of Horticulture (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: None. 

Introduction to basic gardening principles with emphasis on plant growth and 
development as responses to varying environmental conditions. Topics to be 
covered include plant classification, growth and development, environment, propa- 
gation, disease and pest control. This course may be applied as elective credit 
towards the B.S. degree in biology. 

BOT 203 Survey of the Plant Kingdom (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: BIO 101 and 102. 

Morphology and phylogeny of the divisions of the plant kingdom, with emphasis 

upon the evolution of the land flora. 

BOT 305 Identification of Flowering Plants (0-10-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: 15 quarter hours of biology. 

Studies in the identification of plants with emphasis on local flora. 



ZOOLOGY 105 



BOT 323 riant Anatomy (3-4-5) 

liill rriTOtjuisitc IS c|u.trti>r hi>urs of bu)li>Ry 

I hf i>n);in aiui dovrUtpnirnt o( tlu' organs and tiMUC Hyutems of V4»cular planti. and 

.1 «.i)M\[\u.>tivi' study o\ tho strut turo oi riH)ts, »temr leaven, flower*, and fruit%. 

BO r 411) Plant Physiology (3-4-5) 

spnii^ rrori'ijuisiti's: IS ijuartor hours ot biology 

A survey oi physiok>gK" procosst's Duurniu' m pl.uifs .uul tin- lotulitions whuh 

attect those priKCHses. 

BOT 42S Plant Morphology (3-4-5) 

elttored on demand Prerequisite: BOT 323. 

Comparative studiesot vascular plants with emph.isis on torm, structure, reproduc- 
tion, and evolutionary relationships. 

Zoology Offerings 

ZOO 204 Survey of the Animal Kingdom (3-4-5) 
Fall. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102. 
An evolutionary survey of the major animal phyla. 

ZOO 208 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4-2-5) 

Ottered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility tor ENG 101 and a passing grade in 
High School chemistry or CHE 201 (if the student has passed High School chemistry 
then CHE 201 is a co-requisite for ZOO 208), or CHE 121-122, or 128-129. 
A basic course considering the gross anatomy, histology, and physiology of the 
human organ systems. Intended primarily for majors in health sciences, credit for 
this course may not be applied toward a major in biology. 

ZOO 209 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4-2-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: ZOO 208 and completion of the chemistry 
prerequisite or co-requisite for ZOO 208. 

A continuation of the basic course considering the anatomy and physiology of the 
human. Credit may not be applied toward a major in biology. 

ZOO 211 Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology (2-2-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: ZOO 209. 

The cardiopulmonary system is studied with special emphasis on functional anatomy. 
The physiology of the heart, the control of circulation, respiration, and blood 
pressure, and particle movement across membranes arc also studied. Intended 
primarily for majors in health sciences; credit for this course may not be applied 
toward a major in biology. 

ZOO 215 Human Physiology and Disease (4-2-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: ZOO 208 and 209 or other acceptable courses in human, 
general, or vertebrate physiology. 

An introductory' consideration of disease as disruption of physiological homeostasis. 
Initial emphasis is placed on normal function, control, and environment of cells as a 
basis for understanding cellular and systemic responses to agents of injury and 
organismic effects of those responses. Intended primarily for majors in health sciences. 

ZOO 301 Introductory Entomology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: BIO 101 and 102. 

An introduction to the study of insects — their structure, identification and biology. 

ZOO 310 Human Physiology. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: BIO 101-102 or ZOO 208-209; college chemistry. 

Functioning of human organ systems, with special attention to neuromuscular and 

cardiopulmonary function. 

ZOO 311 Physiology Laboratory. (0-3-1) 

Prerequisites or co-requisite: course in human or animal physiology. 

Empirical demoastration and reinforcement of concepts presented in physiolog\- lecture. 

ZOO 326 Invertebrate Zoology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and natural histor)' of the 

major invertebrate groups. 



1 06 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ZOO 330 Fundamentals of Nutrition (5-0-5) 

Winter, alternate years. Prerequisites: BIO 101 102 or ZOO 208-209, and CHE 121-122 
or CHE 201. 

Biological bases of animal, including human, nutrition; sources and biological 
utilization and functions of nutrients. 

ZOO 354 Natural History of Vertebrate Animals (4-3-5) 

Fall, alternate years. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

Study of life histories, taxonomy, evolution, and adaptations of vertebrate animals 
v^ith emphasis on identification and examination of local vertebrates through field 
oriented labs. 

ZOO 355 Embryology (4-3-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

An elementary course in embryology in w^hich the chick is used to illustrate the basic 

principles of developmental anatomy. 

ZOO 356 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates (3-6-6) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the vertebrates. 

ZOO 357 Animal Histology (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A study of the tissues and their organization into organs and organ systems in 

animals. 

ZOO 372 Parasitology (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A comparative study of the internal and external parasites of man and other 

animals. 

ZOO 429 Endocrinology (4-3-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: ZOO 410 or other acceptable physiology course. 
Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism and reproductive cycles. 

ZOO 435 Comparative Physiology (3-4-5) 

Winter, alternate years. Prerequisites: Junior status, including 15 hours of biology; 
Organic Chemistry (may be taken concurrently). 

Studies in various groups of animals of the functions of organ systems involved in 
the maintenance of homeostasis under varying conditions v^ithin normal habitats 
and of in vitro reactions of tissues and systems under laboratory conditions. 

ZOO 510 General Vertebrate Physiology (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 204 and Organic Chemistry, CHE 341. 
An introduction to the general physiologic processes of the vertebrates. 

Chemistry and Physics 

Faculty 

Brewer, John, Acting Department Head 
Carpenter, Suzanne, Coordinator of Chemistry 
Martin, Keith, Coordinator of Engineering Studies 

Brush, Sabitra Lynch, Will 

Butler, Frank MacGow^an, Catherine 

* Byrd, James Murray, Eric 
Harris, Henry Wallace, Richard 

* Hizer, Todd Weiner, Steven 
Jaynes, Leon * Whiten, Morris 
Kolodny, Robert Zipperer, W.C. 



* Graduate Faculty 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 107 



Iho department offers majors in chemistry and in physical sciences. Minor concentra- 

tii»i\s are ottered in chemistry, en^l^eenng studies, physical science, and physics. The 
departn\ent sponsors the ^■^^l^eerln^ Studies Program to facilitate the transfer of 
students inti> engineering pri>grams 

The major in chemistry is designed to giye depth in the fields of chemistry, yet is 
flexible enough to accon^iiodate a range of career goals. Students ma)oring in chemistry 
may concurrently complete all pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-veterinary require- 
ments and all recjuirements tor secondary teaching certification in chemistry. A grade of 
"C" or better in all chemistry courses applied towani tin* major, and the successful 
completion ot the chemistry exit exam are graduatu^n reijuirements 

physical sciences is designed to give a brivid toundatu>n in the fields of physics and 
engineering with enough flexibility to support a range of career goals from industrial 
employment to graduate work. A grade o\ "(J" or better in all physics courses applied 
toward the major and the successful completion oi the physical sciences exit exam are 
graduation requirements. 

The department participates in the Dual Degree Program of Armstrong State College 
under which students may earn simultaneously the B.S. degree with a major in chemistry 
physical sciences from Armstrong and the baccalaureate in a field of engineering from 
the Georgia Institute of Technology or one of several other participating schools. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY (Applied Chemistry Option) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

MAT 101, 103 10 

PHY 211, 212 or 217*, 218* 10 

Area III 20 

HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

PCS 113 5 

One course selected from: ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

CHE 128, 129, 130 15 

MAT 206 5 

PHY 213 or 219* 5 

Computer Science or Mathematics or Natural Science 5 

Area V 6 

PE 166 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major Field Requirements 45 

CHE 321, 341, 342, 343, 350, 381, 491 32 

CHE 410 and two courses selected from: 

CHE 421, 441, 461, 480, 492, 493, 496* (5 hours) 13 

C. Related Field Requirements 15 

PHY 312 5 

CS 115, 116, 120, or 142 5 

Additional course in Computer 

Science, Mathematics, or Natural Sciences 5 

D. Electives 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 
*Preferred sequence. 



■Bi 



108 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

(Pre-professional/Biochemistry Option) 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

One course selected from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; 

MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

MAT 101, 103 10 

PHY 211, 212 or 217*, 218* 10 

Area III 20 

HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

POS113 5 

One course selected from ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

CHE 128, 129, 130 15 

MAT 206 5 

PHY 213 or 219* 5 

BIO 101 5 

AreaV 11 

PE 166 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major field requirements 45 

CHE 321, 341, 342, 343, 350, 381, 461, 462, 463, 491 45 

C. Related field requirements 15 

PHY 312 5 

CS 115, 116, 120 or 142 5 

BIO 102 5 

D. Electives 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 
* Preferred 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY (Pre-graduate Study Option) 

A. General Requirements 104 

Area 1 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

One course selected from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; 

MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 22 

MAT 101, 103 10 

PHY 217, 218 12 

Area III 20 

HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

POS113 5 

One course selected from ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; 

PSY 101; SOC 201 5 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 109 



Area IV 31 

CHI-: 128. 12^. 130 15 

MAT 206, MAT 207 10 

PHY 219 6 

AreaV 11 

PK 166 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major field requirements 45 

CHH 321, 341, 342, 343, 350, 381, 491, 492, 493 42 

Approved 3tK)-400 level chemistry courses 3 

C. Related field requirements 15 

PHY 312 5 

CS 115, 116, 120 or 142 5 

MAT 208 5 

D. Electives* 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 194 

• Additional chemistry and math courses are recommended for students desiring to 

enter graduate school. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY (Teacher Certification in Secondary Schools Option) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

MAT 101, 103 10 

CHE 128, 129 10 

Area III 20 

HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

PCS 113 5 

PSYlOl 5 

Area IV 30 

CHE 130 5 

MAT 206 5 

PHY 211, 212, 213, or 217, 218, 219 15 

CS 115 or 116 5 

AreaV 11 

PE 166 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major Field Requirements 45 

CHE 321, 341, 342, 343, 350, 381, 461, 491 37 

Approved 300-400 level chemistry courses 8 

C. Related Field Requirements 20 

PHY 312 5 

BIO 101, 102 10 

One course selected from: AST 301; GEL 301, 310; MET 301; 

OCE301 5 



110 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



D. Professional sequence 40 

EDN 200, EXC 310, EDN 335, 447, 471, 472, 473 35 

PSY 201 or EDN 201 5 

E. Regents' Examination and Exit Examinations ; 

TOTAL 206 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
WITH A MAJOR IN PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 104 

Area! 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 103, 206 10 

2. CHE 128, 129 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 5 

3. One course selected from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; GEO 212; 

PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

AreaFV 33 

1. PHY 217, 218, 219 18 

2. MAT 207, 208, 216 15 

AreaV 11 

1. PE 166 and PE 103 or 108 3 

Three (3) activity courses 3 

2. HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major Field Requirements 35 

PHY 417 or EGR 221 (Mechanics) 5 

PHY 330 or CHE 491 (Thermodynamics) 5 

PHY 380 (Intermediate Modern) 5 

PHY 310 (Circuit Analysis) 5 

PHY 312 (Digital Electronics) 5 

PHY 412 (Scientific Measurements with Digital Interfacing) 5 

Five hours selected from: PHY 322 (Deformable Bodies), 

PHY 323 (Fluids), PHY 490 (Special Topics) or PHY 496 

(Internship) 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 28 

MAT 309, 341 10 

CS142 5 

EGR 171, 220 8 

ENG 372 5 

D. Electives 25 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 192 



i 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 111 



Minor Concentrations 

I hf nuiH)r ii\ C hi'iiustry roquiros twenty credit hours with grades of "C" or better in 
iippor division chemistry courses. 

Ihe minor m l-n^meorin^ Studies requires HCiK llH), 171, 220, 221, plus 10 hours 
chosen from upper division engineering electives for a total of 26 quarter credit hours. 
A grade oi at least "C" in each course is required. 

The minor in Physics requires twenty-three credit hours from courses designated as 
physics numbered 211 or higher. A grade of "C" or better in each course is required. 

The minor m Phvsical Sciences requires ten credit hours of a laboratory sequence in 
chemistrv, phvsical science, or phvsics phis fifteen hours chosen from: AST 101, CHH 301, 
C^Fl 301 . c;F1 3 10, MFT 301 , CKT- 301 A grade o\ "C" or better is required in each course. 

The ASC Engineering Transfer Program 

The ASC Engineering Transfer Program offers course work contained in the first two 
years of the standard engineering curriculum at most accredited engineering schools. 
After following the suggested course sequence at Armstrong State, a student should be 
able to transfer to any ABET accredited engineering school and complete the require- 
ments for a baccalaureate in a chosen field of engineering in a total of four to five years, 
which is the time typical of all engineering students. The program of courses has been 
constructed with advice from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Students are advised 
to contact the engineering school of choice on questions of transfer. 

Chemistry Offerings 

CHE 121/122 Introduction to Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 101, CHE 121 or CHE 128 is a prerequisite for CHE 
122. (Credit in these courses may not be applied to a major in chemistry.) 
These courses include a study of the fundamental laws and theories of inorganic 
chemistry, a survey of organic chemistry, and an introduction to biochemistry. The 
laboratory work includes an understanding of fundamental techniques. 

CHE 128/129 General Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 or concurrently. CHE 128 is a prerequisite for CHE 129. 
These courses are a study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry 
including stoichiometry, chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, and equilibria with a 
quantitative approach to the subject. These courses are designed for the science, 
premedical and engineering student. The laboratory work includes an understand- 
ing of fundamental techniques. 

CHE 130 Principles of Chemical Analysis (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 129. 

This course is the third in the series 128, 129, 130 -required to complete an academic 
year of general chemistry. Classical methods of chemical analysis, including gravi- 
metric and volumetric methods, equilibria and statistical treatment of data are 
studied. The laboratory will reinforce the theoretical aspects of these methods. 

CHE 201 Essentials of Chemistry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 Eligibility. Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to inorganic, organic, and biochemistry with emphasis on applica- 
tions in human physiology and clinical chemistry. Experimental principles will be 
illustrated with classroom demonstrations. 

CHE 202 Physical Principles (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 201. 

This course provides a study of the physical principles of gas behavior, acid-base 

calculations, weak acid ionization, buffer solutions, pH measurements, blood gas 

measurements, and other subjects of special interest to persons in the allied health 

sciences. 



112 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CHE 301 The Chemistry of Life (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laboratory science completed. Offered on de- 
mand. 

An introductory course covering selected areas of applied biochemistry. This course 
is not recommended for chemistry, biology, or premedical students. 

CHE 307 Principles of Chemical Processes (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: CHE 129 and MAT 206. 

Methods of material balance in chemical process are studied. Topic subjects include 
processes and process variables, systems of units, gas behavior, single-phase and 
multi-phase systems. TEXT: Level of Felder and Rousseau Elementary Principles of 
Chemical Processes. 

CHE 308 Principles of Chemical Processes II (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 307. 

Methods of energy balance in chemical processes are studied. Various forms of 
energy changes involved in both reactive and non-reactive processes are intro- 
duced. Emphasis is placed on the application of combined material and energy 
balances in processes. TEXT: Level of Felder and Rousseau Elementary Principles of 
Chemical Processes. 

CHE 321 Inorganic Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 130; Co-requisite: CHE 341 or permission of the instructor. 
This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry. 
Topics covered v^ill include the descriptive chemistry of representative and transi- 
tion elements, coordination chemistry, and inorganic bonding theories. The 
laboratory will reinforce the theoretical aspects of inorganic chemistry, emphasiz- 
ing the synthesis of inorganic complexes and their characterization by a variety of 
analytical techniques. 

CHE 341/342 Organic Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 129. Fall, Winter; Winter, Spring. 

These courses include the study of aliphatics, aromatic hydrocarbons and their 
derivatives, polyfunctional compounds, and polynuclear hydrocarbons. Organic 
reactions are emphasized in terms of modern theory. 

CHE 343 Organic Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. Fall, Spring. 

A continuation of the organic chemistry sequence 341,342. This course completes 
the fundamental study of organic chemistry w^ith a consideration of carbohydrates, 
amino acids, and heterocyclics with their related compounds. 

CHE 350 Chemical Literature (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. Offered on demand. 

An introduction to the use of the chemical library, the important journals, references 
and other information sources. Information will be collected, organized, and orally 
presented as a seminar. 

CHE 381 Instrumental Analysis (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 130; Co-requisite: CHE 341 or permission of the instructor. 
This course is a study of modern methods of instrumental analysis, stressing 
electroanalytical, spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods. The labora- 
tory will reinforce the theoretical aspects of these methods. 

CHE 397 Scientific Glass-Blowing (0-4-2) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. Offered on demand. 
Properties of glass for scientific apparatus; introduction of glass working equip- 
ment; planning of sequential joining operations; demonstration of major techniques 
for joining and working glass; supervision of individual students in preparing test 
pieces. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 113 



CHL 410 Chemical Safely (3-0-3) 

Prori'quisiti' C HI- 341 C)tti'ri*d nn di-niand 

1 opic sub|ivts will include standard laboratory safety practice?., ha/ardous proper- 
ties of chi'inicals, safety practices in the storage, use and disposal of chemicals, aruJ 

m.>vortinu'nt ri'^ulations 

CHE 421 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3-6-5) 

rreroquisite: CHh 381, CHh 4^1 Ottered on demand. 

Seltvted topics in inorganic chemistry tending to increase students' understanding 
of mtvhanisms of chemical reactions. Emphasizes the periodicity of elements. 
Students will carry out extensive literature searches and participate in inorganic 

labvirator\ research. 

CHE 441 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. 

This course is a further study of important organic reactions emphasizing theories 

of reaction mechanisms. The laboratory will reinforce the theoretical aspects of the 

course. 

CHE 448 Organic Qualitative Analysis (2-9-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Offered on demand. 

Systematic approach to the identification of organic compounds. 

CHE 451 History of Chemistry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Junior standing and CHE 129. 

The development of science surveyed from antiquity to the present. Emphasis is 
placed on the development of ideas, significant contributions, evolution of chemical 
theories, and the modern social implications of science. 

CHE 461 Biochemistry I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343 or permission of the instructor. 

This course is a study of the chemical nature of cellular constituents and cellular 
metabolism. Subject topics include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, enzymes, vita- 
mins and coenzymes, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, and the 
metabolism of ammonia and other nitrogen containing compounds. 

CHE 462 Biochemistry II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 461 or permission of the ir\structor. 

This course is a study of the chemistry of DNA, including the biosynthesis and 

function of nucleic acids, modern techniques in nucleic acid research and selected 

topics. 

CHE 463 Biochemistry Laboratory (1-6-3) 

Prerequisites: CHE 461 and CHE 462 or permission of the instructor. 

This course is a study of modern biochemical research techniques. Purification and 

characterization of nucleic acids and proteins will be emphasized. 

CHE 480 Advanced Instrumental Analysis (3-6-5) 

Prerequisites: CHE 381 and PHY 312. 

This course is a study of spectrographic and chromatographic methods of analysis. 
Laboratory topics will include visible, ultraviolet, atomic emission, atomic absorp- 
tion, infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry, and gas and high 
performance liquid chromatography. 

CHE 491 Physical Chemistry I - Thermodynamics (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CHE 130, 381, PHY 211 or 217, MAT 206. Fall. 

An introduction to physical chemistry, including study of the gas laws, heat and 
work, and the first, second and third laws of thermodynamics. These concepts will 
be applied to the study of material and reaction equilibrium as well as standard 
thermodynamic functions. Real gases and one-component phase equilibrium will 
also be studied. Students will carry out laboratory assignments designed to rein- 
force and supplement lecture material. 



114 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CHE 492 Physical Chemistry II - Multicomponent Systems and Kinetics (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 491. Winter. 

A continuation of CHE 491, this course begins with a study of ideal and non-ideal 
solutions, surface chemistry and electrochemical systems. Course concludes with 
the study of the kinetic-molecular theory of gases, transport processes and reaction 
kinetics. Students will carry out laboratory assignments designed to reinforce and 
supplement lecture material. 

CHE 493 Physical Chemistry III - Quantum Mechanics (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CHE 130, 381, PHY 211 or 217, MAT 206. 

An investigation of the development of quantum mechanics and the corresponding 
evolution of modern theories of atomic and molecular structure. The application of 
these theories to spectroscopy and photochemistry are also studied. Emphasis is 
placed on the use of the scientific method and the importance of observation-based 
development of theory. Students will carry out laboratory assignments designed to 
reinforce and supplement lecture material. 

CHE 496 Internship (V-V(l-12)) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisites: CHE 343, 381, 491 and permission of 
the Chemistry Intern Program Director. 

The student will pursue a meaningful project in industry, government or other 
institutional setting. The project will be determined, supervised, and evaluated by the 
sponsor of the activity and the student's faculty adviser. Application and arrangement 
must be made through the department by mid-quarter preceding the quarter of 
internship. Open to transient students only with permission of the Dean of the Faculty 
at Armstrong and the appropriate official of the school from which the student comes. 

CHE 497/ 

498/499 Independent Study (V-V-(l -5)) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Head of the Department. Offered each quarter. 
Designed to permit qualified students to pursue supervised individual research or 
study. Emphasis will be placed on the literature search, laboratory experimentation, 
and presentation of an acceptable written report. Both the credit and proposed work 
must be approved in writing by the faculty member who will supervise the work and 
by the department head. Open to transient students only with the permission of the 
Dean of the Faculty at Armstrong and of the college from which the student comes. 

CHE 550 Chemical Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. 

An introduction to the use of the chemical library, the important journals, references 
and other information sources. Information will be collected, orgaruzed, and orally 
presented as a seminar. 

Engineering Offerings 

EGR 100 Introduction to Engineering (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: Eligibility to enter MAT 101 and ENG 101. 

A comprehensive orientation to the engineering process from problem formulation 

to the evolution of creative design; fundamental concepts from various fields of 

engineering. 

EGR 171 Engineering Graphics (2-3-3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 103, CS 116. 

Computer-aided graphics and engineering design fundamentals. Spatial analysis 

axioms, projection theory, sketching, creating design, geometric dimensioning, and 

tolerancing. 

EGR 220 Statics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 and MAT 207. 

Concepts of forces, moments, and other vector quantities; analysis of two-and- 
three-dimensional force systems; conditions of equilibrium; friction; centroids and 
moments of inertia. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS H* 



ECR221 Dynamus (5-0-5) 

rnriviuisiios; ECR 220 and MAT 20« 

kitAi'inalus oi particlfs and ri^id biKlirs, kiruiu s (if p.irtu ll•^ ami ri^ul h«Klu*s usinj; 
h>rct'-niass-aci.i*lt'ratu>n, wi>rk-t'niT^v, and nuimi-ntiim mt'th»Kls in two-and-lhrif- 
diinfnMi>nal ini>lii»iv 

EGR 322 Mechanics of Deformable Bodies (5-0-5) 

Prort'quisiti'; KCiK 221). 

Internal chet ts and dimonsiDn changes of solids resulting from externally applied 
Uuds; shear and bonding mi)mont diagrams; analysis of stress and strain; beam 
deflection; column stability. 

EGR 310 Electrical Circuit Analysis (5-0-5) 

rrereqiusite: PH"^ 21S. Prerequisite dp Corequisite: MAI 341. 

Basic laws of elinrtrical circuits: RCL circuits, nodal and mesh analysis. Thevenin's 

and Norton's theorems; phasors, magnetically coupled circuits, and twtvport 

parameters. 

EGR 311 Electronics I (5-3-6) 

Prerequisite: FC;R 310. 

Introduction to P-N junction theory and the concepts of solid-state devices; devel- 
opment of the electrical characteristics of diodes and transistors; bipolar and 
field-ettect amplifying circuits; operational amplifiers and analog systems. 

EGR 312 Electronics II (2-6-4) 

Prerequisite: EGR 311. 

Operation and application of integrated circuits used in digital systems; gates, flip- 

tlops, counters, registers and memory devices. 

EGR 323 Fluid Mechanics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: EGR 221, EGR 330, and MAT 341 

Fluid Statics; analysis of fluid motion using the continuity, momentum, and energy 

conservation relationships; introduction to viscous flows. 

EGR 330 Thermodynamics I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 and MAT 208. 

Basic concepts of thermodynamics; properties of substances; conser\'ation prin- 
ciples; the first and second laws of thermodynamics; entropy; analysis of 
thermodynamic systems. 

EGR 331 Thermodynamics II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 330. 

Gas cycles; vapor cycles; thermodynamic relationships; thermodynamic behavior 

of real gases; non-reacting gas mixtures; thermodynamics of chemical reactions. 

EGR 332 Heat Transfer (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 323. 

The fundamental principle of heat transfer; steady and transient conduction in 

solids; introduction to convective heat transfer; thermal radiation. 

EGR 350 Computer Applications In Engineering (2-3-3) 

Prerequisites: CS 246, EGR 221, EGR 310, EGR 323. 

The application of digital computers to the solution of selected engineering prob- 
lems; emphasis on problem analysis and solution techniques. 

EGR 370 Engineering Economic Analysis (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: MAT 206 and ECO 202. 

Fundamental principles and basic techniques of economic analysis of engineering 
projects including economic measure of effectiveness; time value of money, cost 
estimation, breakeven and replacement analysis. 

EGR 396 Engineering Internship (V-V-(l-12)) 

Prerequisites: EGR 171 , EGR 322, and permission of the Engineering Intern Program 

Director. 

The student will pursue a meaningful project in industry or government. The project 

will be determined, supervised, and evaluated by the sponsor of the activity and the 

Engineering Intern Program Director. Application and arrangement must be made 

through the department by mid-quarter preceding the quarter of internship. 



116 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Physical Science Offerings 



PHS 121 



PHS 122 



AST 301 
AST 501 
GEL 301 

GEL 310 

GEL 501 
GEL 510 

MET 301 

MET 501 
OCE 301 



OCE 501 



Physical Environment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 Eligibility. Offered each quarter. 

An elementary study of the fundamental laws and concepts of physics and as- 
tronomy. This course is designed for non-science majors interested in a descriptive 
survey. The laboratory study is designed to supplement the study of theory. 

Physical Environment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 Eligibility. Offered each quarter. 

An elementary study of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, geology, 
meteorology and physical oceanography. This is a descriptive course which in- 
cludes the classification of elements, basic chemical reactions, and atomic structure 
designed for the non-science major. The laboratory study includes experiences 
which augment class discussion. 

Introduction to Astronomy (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laboratory science completed. 

A study of the planetary system, stars, stellar structure, and cosmology. 

Astronomy (5-0-5) 

Topic subjects will include the solar system, stellar evolution, star and star systems 
and methods in astronomy. 

Introduction to Physical Geology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory science completed. 
An introduction to physical geology. A study of common earth materials, dynamic 
processes of change, volcanology, seismology, plate tectonics, and the structure and 
evolution of the earth's crust and inner regions. 

Introduction to Historical Geology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory science. 

An introduction to historical geology. A study of the earth's origin and the changes 

through time. 

Physical Geology (5-0-5) 

A survey of physical and historical geology. Topic subjects will include a geologic 
history, plate tectonics and identification of minerals and rocks. 

Historic Geology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of undergraduate or graduate laboratory science. 
An introduction to historical geology. A study of the earth's origin and the changes 
through time. 

Introduction to Meteorology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laboratory science completed. 

An introduction to the description of the state of the atmosphere and to the physical 

laws that describe atmospheric phenomena. 

Meteorology (5-0-5) 

A study of the atmosphere, weather and climate. 

Introduction to Oceanography (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory science completed. 
A study of the basic principles of oceanography. Topic subjects to include the 
distribution of water over the earth, nature and relief of the ocean floors, tides and 
currents, chemical properties of sea water and constituents, and applications of 
oceanographic research. 

Oceanography (5-0-5) 

Topic subjects will include origin and structure of ocean floors, tides and currents, 
chemical and physical properties of sea water, and application of oceanographic 
research. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 117 



Physics Offerings 

V\\\ 211 Mechanics (4-2-5) 

I'ri'n.iiusitt' MAI 103. Fall, WmttT. 

Iho hrst p»irt oi \\\v st'cjuence I*HY 211-212-21.1 in general phynics Basic classical 

physics, including mechanics, sDund, and heat Designed for sludi-nts with aptitude 

in mathematics helow the level of calculus Selected experiments to denrion^trate 

applications. 

PHY 212 Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light (4-2-5) 

rriTi'quiMtfs MAI lO.'^andrii'i 211 VVinter, Spring, 

The stvond part of the sequence I'M Y 21 1212-213. Basic electricity, magnetism, and 

geometrical optics. 

PHY 213 Light Phenomena, Modern Physics (4-2-5) 

rrcroquisitos; MAI 103 and PHY 212. Spring. 

The last part of the sequence PHY 21 1-21 2-21 3. Continues the study of light from the 
viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes with the study of atomic and nuclear 
physics. Laboratory work includes two selected experiments of advanced scope. 

PHY 217 Mechanics (5-3-6) 

rrcrequisito: MAT 20b. Fall and Spring. 

The first part of the sequence PHY 217-218-219 in general physics. Basic classical 
physics, including mechanics, sound and heat. Designed especially for engineering 
students and recommended for science majors. Selected experiments to demon- 
strate applications. 

PHY 218 Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light (5-3-6) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207 or concurrently and PHY 217. Fall, Winter. 

The second part of the sequence PHY 217218-219. Basic electricity, magnetism, and 

geometrical optics. 

PHY 219 Light Phenomena, Modem Physics (5-3-6) 

Prerequisite: PHY 218. Spring. 

The last part of the sequence PHY 217-218-219. Continues the study of light from the 
viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes with the study of atomic and nuclear 
physics. Laboratory work includes two selected experiments of advanced scope. 

PHY 310 Electrical Circuit Analysis (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PHY 218. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MAT 341. 

Basic laws of electrical circuits: RCL circuits, nodal and mesh analysis. Thevenin's 

and Norton's theorems; phasors, magnetically coupled circuits, and two-port 

parameters. 

PHY 312 Digital Electronics (3-6-5) 

Prerequisites: Math 103 and ten quarter hours of laboratory science completed. 
An introduction to discrete component and integrated circuits used in modem 
digital electronics. The primary objective of this course is to give students hands-on 
experience in constructing and investigating an array of digital circuits that are 
directly applicable in instrumentation. 

PHY 322 Mechanics of Deformable Bodies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 220. 

Internal effects and dimension changes of solids resulting from externally applied 
loads; shear and bending moment diagrams; analysis of stress and strain; beam 
deflection; column stability. 

PHY 323 Fluid Mechanics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: EGR 221, EGR/PHY 330, and MAT 341. 

Fluid Statics; analysis of fluid motion using the continuity, momentum, and energy 

conservation relationships; introduction to viscous flows. 

PHY 330 Thermodynamics I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 and MAT 208 

Basic concepts of thermodynamics: properties of substances; conser\'ation prin- 
ciples; the first and second laws of thermodynamics; entropy; analysis of 
thermodynamic systems. 



118 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PHY 380 Introductory Quantum Mechanics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 213 or PHY 219 and MAT 207. Offered on demand. 

An introduction to quantum mechanical principles with applications in atomic and 

molecular structure. 

PHY 412 Scientific Measurements with Digital Interfacing (2-6-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 312 and CS 142. 

Principles and techniques used in measuring physical quantities. The major topics 
include transducers, data acquisition interface (A/D, D/A, DIO), GPIB, and data 
analysis. The computer is introduced as a general purpose laboratory instrument 
with data acquisition and process control capabilities. The students will gain hands- 
on experience through applications in experimental physics. 

PHY 417 Mechanics II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 or 211 and MAT 207. PHY 218 or 212 and MAT 341 are 
recommended. Offered on demand. 

Statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles and of systems of particles are 
developed using Newtonian principles. 

PHY 490 Independent Study in Physics (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and permission of the department head and 
at least a junior standing. 

Permits qualified students to pursue research or study in physics under the 
supervision of a member of the physics faculty. Research activities will require the 
presentation of a written report. Studies of special topics will require the completion 
of written exams. Both the credit and proposed work must be approved in writing 
by the faculty member who will supervise the work and by the department head. 
Open to transient students only with the permission of the Dean of Arts and Sciences 
at Armstrong and of the college from which the student comes. 

PHY 496 Physics Internship (V-V-(l-12)) 

Prerequisites: PHY 417 or EGR 220, PHY 330 or CHE 491, PHY 310, and permission 
of the Physics Intern Program Director. 

The student will pursue a meaningful project in industry or government. The project 
will be determined, supervised, and evaluated by the sponsor of the activity and the 
Physics Intern Program Director. Application and arrangements must be made 
through the department by mid-quarter preceding the quarter of internship. Open 
to transient students only with permission of the Dean of Arts and Sciences at 
Armstrong and of the college from which the student comes. 



Government 

Faculty 

* Donahue, Michael, Department Head 

* Murphy, Dennis, Graduate Coordinator 

Brown, George 
Kearnes, John 

* Megathlin, William 

* Graduate Faculty 



* Rhee, Steve 

* Skidmore-Hess, Daniel 



The Department of Government embraces the ideal of liberal education and view^s 
education in related professional areas as an extension, rather than the antithesis, of 
liberal education. Consequently, all departmental programs and courses are conceptu- 
ally-based, thereby enabling students to develop a theoretical sophistication applicable 
to practical realities. So conceived, courses and programs achieve curricular integrity. 

The Department firmly believes that even curricular integrity is not enough, how^ever. 
Instructional effectiveness is its inseparable complement, and attainment of these twin 
goals serves as the primary purpose of the Department of Government. The ongoing 



GOVERNMENT Hi 



program ot tiKult\ di'\ t'lDpinriit t'nMiri'> that thi- statt ot highly ijuahtirii rtlmators — 
each sekvtt'd tor svr\wv oi\ tho basis ot solid proft'ssional credentials- continually 
achit'M's that pnniarv purpose. 

In addition, the Department of Government highly values both research and service. 
\o the evtent ot resi>urtes available, the I )epartment encourages research by both faculty 
An*A students and service to the Schoi^l, the C ollege and the community. 

It is within the foregoing context that the Department of Ciovemment offers criminal 
justice and political science programs through the Brunswick Center, requires theCR.E. 
or Political Science Major Field Achievement Test as an exit examination for its majors 
and offers the Master of Science in Criminal justice and the following on-campus 
undergraduate pri>grams, concentrations and courses. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN CORRECTIONS 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272 or 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; or PHI 201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratorv science sequence 10 

5. HIS 251 or 252, POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101, see 201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

B. Area of Concentration 40 

CJ 100, 103, 210, 280, 290, 301, 303, 360, and one CJ elective 

C. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 93 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272 or 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; or PHI 201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratorv science sequence 10 

5. HIS 251 or 252; POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101; see 201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

B. Areas of Concentration 40 

CJ 100, 103, 210, 280, 290, 301, 305, and two CJ elecrives 

C. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 93 
At least 45 hours of each of these two programs must be completed at Armstrong. 



120 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN LAW ENFORCEMENT 
(With P.O.S.T. Certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272 or 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; or PHI 201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratory science sequence 10 

5. HIS 251 or 252; POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101; SOC 201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 166 or 167 3 

B. Areas of Concentration 40 

CJ 100, 103, 104, 204, 210, 280, 290, 301, 305 

C. P.O.S.T. Certification 

CJ 426, 460, PSY 208, PE 167 18 

D. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 111 

NOTE: Students desiring P.O.S.T. Certification must see the Criminal Justice Training 
Center Director for advisement on P.O.S.T. requirements. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 

Students who intend to major in Criminal Justice should complete Criminal Justice 
100 before the end of the freshman year and should complete all general education 
requirements as soon as possible. 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103, 195, 220, or 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III \ 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. SOC 201; PSY 101; ECO 201 or 202; ANT 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CJ 100, 103, 210, 280, 290 20 

2. One course selected from: 

ANT 201, ECO 201, 202, DRS 228, SOC 201, PSY 101 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Area of Concentration 45 

1. CJ 301, 303, 305, 360, 390, 452, 453, 454 and one capstone course, 

either CJ 490 or 495 45 

C. Electives from Related Areas 50 

1. Fifty hours chosen with advisor approval, thirty hours of which 
must be at the 300-400 level. Except for students pursuing a minor 
in another department, no more than fifteen hours may be taken 
from any one department except Government 50 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



GOVERNMENT 121 



Majors In Political Science 

1 hf mi>)i>t in I'olitKiil VuMUi* lUiW tiiki- tluri- clistiiut tonus I'olitu.ii ^u-iuf, 
f't'r St'. !\>lilital Science with ItMchor CtTtihc.ition, or I\>litKal S. ifncf with .1 concentra- 
tion in Public Adnunistration 

\o ci>niplctc a I'olitical Sv iciuc nia)or n^juires forty quarter hours of upper division 
«. Durscs in the tield with grades ot "C " or better in each course Further, the program must 
include at least onv course tri>m each oi the tollowmg: An>erican Political Institutions, 
lnternatii>nal Relations, l\>litical Theory, and Comparative Ciovernment. I he major 
allows the option ot a foreign language (French or Cierman preferred) through the 103 
level or a sequence of computer science courses. Students who contemplate graduate 
wi>rk in Political Science are strongly advised to take the foreign language option and to 
continue their linguistic study beyond the 103 level. 

Programs in Public Administration and Political Science with Teacher Certification 
are more structured in order to prepare students adequately to meet the demands of their 
professions and appropriate licensing agencies. 

Scholarships In Political Science 

Lnnited scholarship aid is a\ailable annually. Interested students are invited to 
inquire in the Department of Government office for details. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 86 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 . 5 
Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; BIO 111, 112; 

CHE 121, 122, PHS 121, 122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, PSY 101, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 20 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. One of the sequences: 

A. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 or 

B. CS 115, 142, and 247 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

At least one course from each of the following areas: 

1. American Political Institutions — 

POS 303, 305, 317, 318, 360, 401, 403, 411, 412, 415, 4Ks, 4 W, C] 390 .5-25 

2. International Affairs — 

POS 320, 321, 325, 326, 329, 426, 429 5-25 

3. Political Theory — 

POS 333, 334 ..: 5-10 

4. Comparative Government — 

POS 344, 345, 346, 348, 349, 445, 447 5-25 

5. Capstone Course — 

POS 495 5 



122 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



C. Courses in Related Fields 35 

To be chosen in fields such as Computer Science, Economics, 
Geography, Mathematics. See Department for exhaustive list 

D. Electives '. 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 

WITH A MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 . 5 
Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 or CS 115, 142, 247 15 

2. HIS 251 or 252 5 

3. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 60 

At least one course from each of the following areas: 

1. American Political Institutions — 

POS 303, 305, 317, 318, 360, 401, 403, 411, 412, 415, 418, 419; CJ 390 .5-25 

2. International Relations — 

POS 320, 321, 325, 326, 329, 426, 429 5-25 

3. Political Theory — 

POS 333, 334 5-10 

4. Comparative Government — 

POS 344, 345, 346, 348, 349, 445, 447 5-25 

5. Capstone Course POS 495 5 

6. Supporting Work 20 

Ten hours each from two of the following areas: 

A. HIS 251 or 252 and approved 300+ elective 

B. ECO 201 and approved 300+ elective 

C. Approved electives in behavioral sciences (ANT, PSY, SOC) 

D. GEO 211, 212 

C. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EDN 200; EXC 310, EDN 335, 449, 471, 472, 473 35 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201 5 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



GOVERNMENT 123 



PROGRAM FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
POLITICAL SCIENCE (PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION) 

lluur^ 

A. Ciciu'ral Kcquiremcntb 96 

Area I . . 20 

1 ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2 One course from; ART 2(H), 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 . 5 
Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHE 121, 122; PHS 121, 122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 142 10 

2. POS 113; ECO 201 10 

Area IV 30 

1. CS 142, 231, 242 15 

2. HIS 251 or 252; ECO 202; SOC 201 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 50 

1. One course from each of the following 20 

A. American Political Institutions — 

POS 305, 317, 318, 360, 411, 412, 415, 419 5 

B. International Affairs — 

POS 320, 321, 325, 326, 329, 424, 426, 429 5 

C. Political Theory — 

POS 333, 334 5 

D. Comparative Government — 

POS 344, 345, 346, 348, 349, 445, 447 5 

E. Capstone Course POS 495 5 

2. Public Administration 

PA/POS 303, 401, 403, 418; CJ 390 25 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

1. CS 301, 308 10 

2. SOC 350 or MAT 220 5 

D. Electives 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 191 

Minor Concentrations 

The Department of Government offers a number of minor concentrations. 

A minor in Criminal Justice or in Political Science has great practical value. Its notation 
on the transcript indicates to an employer that the applicant has some solid liberal arts 
background with its accompanying insight into the development and functioning of 
modern society, and that the applicant has made an extra effort to refine research and 
writing skills so essential to dealing with that society. Whatever the major one chooses, 
such a minor will strengthen the student's academic record. 

Minors, in addition to grades of "C" or better in each course, require: 



124 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Hours 

Criminal Justice 25 

CJ 301, 303, 305, 360, and any one course from 

CJ 390, 410, 425, 426, or 447 25 ' 

International Studies 25 

(assumes competency in one modern foreign language through the 
103 level). 

1. POS 329 and 325 or 326 10 

2. One course from: POS 320, 321, 345, 346, 348, 349 5 

3. Two courses from: POS 426, 429; HIS 323, 330, 455, 564, 569, 591 10 

Legal Studies 25 

1. CJ/POS 360, CJ 460, and POS 317 or 318 15 

2. Two courses from: CJ 380, CJ 391, CJ/POS 447, POS 326, 

POS 415, POS 418 10 

Political Science 20 

Twenty hours of 300+ level POS courses, with at least one 

course from each of the four concentration areas of POS 20 

Public Administration 25 

CJ 390; PA 303, 401, 403, 418 25 

Russian Studies 20 

1. RUS 201 (assumes completion of RUS 101-103) 5 

2. POS 349 5 

3. Two courses from: HIS 329, 330, 481, 567, 568, 569; POS 440 10 

(a multi-departmental minor) 

Criminal Justice Offerings 

CJ 100 Administration of Justice (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

This survey course examines the emergence and current state of formal institutions 
established within the American experience to deal with criminal behavior. Philo- 
sophical, cultural, social and political aspects of the justice system and processes will 
be examined. Emphasis will be given to the current political and bureaucratic 
realities of the system's administration and to related public policy issues stemming 
from the profound transformation of American society as the next century ap- 
proaches. 

CJ 103 Developing Interpersonal Communication Skills (5-0-5) 

The emphasis of this course will be placed upon the development of interpersonal 
communication skills, i.e. skills that can be effectively utilized on the job to improve 
interaction among employees and between employees and the public. 

CJ 104 Introduction to Law Enforcement (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or permission of the instructor. 

This course provides an introduction to the history, philosophy, and basic objectives 
of the police system in the United States and Georgia. This course will treat 
applications of the law which a Taw enforcement officer must know when conduct- 
ing law enforcement activities. 

CJ 204 Criminal Investigation (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

Introduction to investigative methodology. Special techniques employed in crimi- 
nal investigation, such as crime scene searches, the use of informants, and the 
techniques of surveillance will be emphasized as well as the presentation of police 
cases in court. 

CJ 210 Criminology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

The nature and extent of crime in the United States; assessment and evaluation of 
various factors and influences that lead to criminal behavior; various measures 
proposed for the control of criminal behavior. 



QOVERNMtNT 125 



Cj 250 Direcled Keadin^^ In Criminal lustice (5-0-5) 

l*ri'rt\|u»siti' C I 1(H) 

A ct>iirM' Ji'M^nfJ to jH-rmil I'.uh stiul»M\t to pursut* an approvftl topu through 

indi'pt'ndi'nt studv atul ri'svarch iindiT thc^uuiaiucand dint tu»ii of thr ifistm. tor 

C j 280 Ethics In Criminal Ju!>tice Practice and Research (2-0-2) 

l*rt'ri\]uisiti'; CI UK) i>r l\>S 1 \^ or cons4*nt of Ihi* instriKtt>r 

Analysis of ethical concepts, principles, and preM.riptive moral judgments in the 

practki' aiul ri-srar*. h of criminal lu^tue 

Cj 290 Criminal Procedure (3-0-3) 

Prerecjuisite: CJ ^t>0 or consent of instructor 

A survey of the distinctive features of, and the basis for, American criminal law 
buttressed by an analysis of leading court decisions relative to procedural rights 
emanating from the Bill of Rights 

CJ 301 Juvenile Delinquency (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Cj UK) or consent o\ instructor. 

A survey of theories oi juvenile delinquency; the stnriological, biological, and 
psychological factors involved in juvenile delinquency and the modern trends in 
prevention and treatment. 

CJ 302 Criminalistics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: .A natural science laboratory sequence or consent of instructor. 
An introduction to the problems and techniques of scientific criminal investigation. 
Emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the student with the role of science and 
technology in modern law enforcement. 

CJ 303 Penology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100, or consent of instructor. 

This course deals with the analysis and evaluation of both historical and contempo- 
rary correctional systems. This course will also deal with the development, 
organization, operation and results of the different systems of corrections found in 
America. 

CJ 304 Probation and Parole (5-0-5) 

Prerecjuisite: CJ 303 or consent of instructor. 

This course will deal with the development, organization, operation and results of 

systems of probation and parole as substitutes for incarceration. CJ 305 Law 

Enforcement Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or consent of instructor. 

An introduction to the philosophical, cultural and historical background of the 

police idea. The course is conceptually oriented and will deal with concepts such as 

the role of the police in contemporary society, the quasi-military organization of the 

police, and community relations. 

CJ 307 Community Based Treatment (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 303 or consent of instructor. 

This course will investigate the different community based treatment programs. An 
emphasis will be placed on investigating the function of halfway houses and the use 
of \olunteers in corrections. 

CJ 360 Law and Legal Process (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or POS 113 or consent of the instructor. 

Examination of law as a dynamic societal institution. Sources and functions of both 

civil and criminal law, as well as operation of the legal process, are studied from the 

perspectives of jurisprudence, political science, and sociology. (Identical with POS 

360.) 

CJ 380 Law of Evidence (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 360 or consent of instructor. 

An intensive analysis of the rules of evidence in criminal cases. Particular subjects 

will include burden of proof, hearsay evidence, and the principles of exclusion and 

selection. 



126 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CJ 390 Research Methods (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 and permission of instructor. 

This course deals with the methods and techniques of research in the behavioral 

sciences. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to evaluate research. 

CJ 391 Legal Research/Law Mini-Thesis (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: CJ 360, ENG 102. 

Open to students of any major, this course comprises the major areas of legal 

research and writing; finding and using appropriate legal research tools and 

resources and applying these to develop and complete a scholarly legal research 

paper. 

CJ 399 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Coverage of substantive topics, problems and issues, not covered in other courses, 
which are of contemporary importance to students in criminal justice. Topics to be 
announced before each offering of the course. 

CJ 410 Criminality and Abnormal Behavior (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 and either CJ 100 or permission of instructor. 
The course examines the interface between abnormal behavior, including mental 
illness, and criminality by presenting recent developments in the identification, 
classification, and treatment of criminals. Special emphasis is given to understand- 
ing the sometimes bizarre behavioral patterns and motivations of repeat offenders, 
such as child molesters, sex criminals, perpetrators of domestic violence, addicts, 
serial murderers and rapists. 

CJ 425 Drug Enforcement: Issues and Problems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100. Open to seniors only or by consent of instructor. 
A survey of historical and contemporary drug law enforcement in American society. 
Such topics as drug distribution, gangs, and government drug-enforcement agen- 
cies, policies, and techniques will be examined. 

CJ 426 International Terrorism (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: POS 113 or CJ 100, or consent of instructor. 

Investigation of the political, legal, and sociological aspects of international terror- 
ism. Topics to be examined include the relationships of international terrorism, 
international relations, and principles of international law, the nature of the anti- 
terrorist response, and the implications of international terrorism for the future. 
(Identical with POS 426.) 

CJ 447 Comparative Judicial Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 305 or CJ/POS 360, or POS 415, or consent of instructor. 
Designed to focus on the law enforcement and judicial procedure aspects of the 
Japanese, French, German, and the former Soviet political systems. (Identical with 
POS 447). 

CJ452/ 

453/454 Internship (V-V-5) 

Offerred each quarter. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and permission of the 
instructor. 

This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply 
academic training in the practical governmental setting. Setting will include law 
enforcement agencies (local, state, or federal), community treatment facilities, 
courts, congressional offices, and various governmental agencies. This course will 
be jointly supervised by departmental instructors and agency officials. Open to 
transient students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong and of the 
college from which the student comes. (Identical with PA /POS 452-453-454.) 

CJ 460 Criminal Law (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ/POS 360 or permission of instructor. 

Examination of criminal deviant behavior from society's perspective in both the 
defining of crimes and the prosecution/conviction/punishment of those engaging 
in such behavior. Georgia criminal law will be highlighted. 



GOVERNMENT 1J7 



CJ 490 Directed Re!iearch In Criminal Justice (S-0-5) 

1'ri'rt't.jiiisittv C J 3*>0 Opon lo soiAK)r> oiilv 

Ouv ot IwocapstimecDurM'*., i-ithiT i>f whu h s»itishi*s thccapntom* retjuiremeni, lhi» 
CDurst' pri)\ idoN qualititii sUidi*nls thr opptirtur^itv It) undrrtaki* and mmpU'tf a 
nia|or ri'M'arch pri>)tit in crm\nud luslKf Studrnts will conduct rfst-arch and 
pri'M'nt their results orally and in.i paper conforming to departmental guidelineft for 
written work. 

CJ 495 Seminar in Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 

Prerevjuisite: CJ 3^0 Open to seniors only. 

C>ne ot two capstone courses, either of which satisfies the capstone requirement, this 
course is an intensive study of selected criminal justice topics. Students will conduct 
research and present their results orally and in a paper conforming to departmental 
guidelines for written work. 

Political Science and Public Administration Offerings 

POS 113 American Government (5-0-5) 

(.Offered each quarter Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

A study ot the structure, theory, and functions of the national government in the 

United States, and some of the major problems of the state and local government. 

PA/POS 303 Foundations of Public Administration (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or permissii>n oi instructor. 

An introduction to the framework ot public administration including such concepts 
and issues as bureaucracy, administrative power, informal groups, third party 
government, issue networks, budgeting, implementation, incremental decision 
making, personnel motivation, and the relationship of ethics and public service. 

POS 305 State and Local Government (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

A comparative study of states, communities, and local governments, and their 
management of political conflict. Included is a study of federalism, differences in 
governmental structures and functions, political culture, community power, tax 
and budget systems, and public policy issues facing states and communities. 

POS 317 Constitutional Law and the Federal System (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

A case-study approach to the judicial interpretation of the Constitution, and the 
powers of the federal government. Including: the nature and scope of judicial 
review, commerce power, separation of powers, power to tax and spend, state 
power to regulate, and economic due process. 

POS 318 Constitutional Civil Liberties (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

A case study approach to the judicial interpretation of individual rights and the 
Constitution. Including: nationalization of the Bill or Rights, criminal due process, 
freedom of expression, association, religion and privacv, and equal protection and 
due process. 

POS 320 International Trade (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 202 or permission of instructor. 

Examines the economic importance and problems of international trade, exchange 
rates and monetary standards, tariffs and other trade barriers. Attention will be 
focused on fixed and floating exchange rates and their effects on trade balances of 
states. Current debt problems of developing nations will be examined. 

POS 321 International Relations: East Asia (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or consent of instructor. 

Contemporarv international politics in East Asia are examined in terms of such 
broad historical trends as the decline of imperialism, development of nationalism, 
and superpower interaction in East Asia during the Cold War and post-Cold War 
eras. Further attention will be placed on the significance of the political economy of 
the Asian Pacific Rim states toward the 21st Century. 



1 28 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



POS 325 International Organization. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

A survey of the development, principles, structures and functions of international 
organizations, with emphasis upon the role of these institutions in the maintenance 
of peace. 

POS 326 International Law (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to selected public international law topics including: recognition, 
state succession, jurisdiction, extradition, nationality, the law of treaties, the law of 
diplomacy, and the law of war. 

POS 329 International Relations (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the theories, forces, and practices dominating contemporary 

international relations. 

POS 333 Contemporary Political Thought (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

Analysis of the important ideological currents of our time with selected in-depth 

readings from original sources. 

POS 334 Political Philosophy (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

Examination of the political ideas of leading political theorists, beginning with 
Socrates and extending to the end of the 19th Century. Selected primary source 
material will be read and analyzed. 

POS 343 Politics of Africa (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

A comparative examination of the governmental institutions of Africa. Critical 
issues and topics of study will include cultural pluralism, state formation, political 
economic development and the legacy of colonialism. The course includes a survey 
of the political geography of Africa. 

POS 344 Politics of the Indian Subcontinent (5-0-5) 

The course will assess the political, economic, social and cultural problems related 
to the functionmg of governmental regimes within the Indian Subcontinent. A 
micro-based analysis of Indian social and political structures will also be under- 
taken. The move toward greater regional cooperation through the South Asian 
Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) will also be evaluated. 

POS 345 Latin American Politics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

Examination of governments and political processes of selected nations in South 
America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Roles of state terrorism, revolution- 
ary movements, and narco-terrorism are examined. 

POS 346 Governments of East Asia (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

A comparative examination of the contemporary political institutions, processes, 
and ideas of the People's Republic of China, Japan, and Korea. Examines the 
development of these political systems with particular emphasis on historical, 
social, cultural, and contemporary-issue dimensions. 

POS 348 Governments of Western Europe (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

An analytical and comparative study of the major Western European governments, 
with principal emphasis upon the analysis of the conditions which led to effective 
and stable parliamentary government and those which lead to the inefficiency, 
instabihty and breakdown of such systems. 



GOVERNMENT 129 



POS 34^ The Political Transformatiun: the Former Soviet Union (S-O-^^) 
PrtTi'ijuiMtt' I\>S 1 13 i)r ions4'nl i>t ii>stru«.lor 

An ^^n4^lvsl^ Mui contt'mpor.irv study dI \hv politu.il ih.iiim* m thi* forrnrr ^»\n't 
Unii>n; primarily fxamino tho now dirix tioii o\ Ihi* politK.il, itunDmu and stxial 
transfurniatu*!^ oi tho K>rnu'r Soviot Unmn. l-vi-n thuu^h somt* emphasis will be 
plactH-l on tho comparison nt tho Isarist aiitiKracvand theSoviot totalitarian system, 
the course will pnn^arilv examine the political transformation oi the former Soviet 
Unu>n in the pt)st-C i>ld War setting 

POS 360 Law and Legal Process (5-0-5) 

PrerevjuiMte C I 100 or I'OS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

Examination of law as a dynamic societal institution. St>urces and functions of both 

civil ancl criminal law, as well as operation of the legal priKess, are studied from the 

perspectives of jurisprudence, political science, and sociology. (Identical with CJ 

360). 

PA/POS 399 Special Topics in Public Administration/Political Science (5-0-5) 

rrerec]uisite; POS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

Coverage of substantive topics, problems, and issues not available in other course 

offerings. Topics to be announced before each offering of the course. 

PA/POS 401 Politics of the Budgetary Process (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

This course examines the procedures, strategies and rationales involved in making 
public budgets at the local, state, and national levels. It is also concerned with 
critiques of the several types of budgets now in use together with an explanation of 
fiscal and monetary policies as they affect budgeting. Finally, it is concerned with 
the revenue systems in effect together with auditing and other controls exercised in 
the budgeting process. 

PA/POS 403 Public Policy Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 303 or permission of the instructor. 

This course is primarily concerned with a study of the theoretical aspects of 
decision-making theories (i.e., rational/comprehensive model vs. incremental 
model), political aspects of policy-making process, mc^bilization of political sup- 
port, anci the cost/benefit aspects of the public policy-making. 
Some attempt will be made to apply the general theory of public policy-making to 
specific settings of welfare policy, urban problems, and national defense /foreign 
policy. 

PA/POS 405 Principles of Public Management (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PA/POS 303 or permission of instructor. 

This course will critically assess the operational philosophies underlying public 
management and contrast them with contemporary theories in private sector 
management. An emphasis on case-oriented analysis will be built into the curricu- 
lum and the aim will be to develop a composite and holistic model of public 
management, based on measurable indicators of accountability. A transnational 
comparison covering selected European and Asian models will be integrated into 
the course. 

POS 410 Independent Study In American Government (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisite: A minimum of 120 credit hours, including at least 20 hours in Political 

Science at the 300-level or above. Admission is by approval of a departmental 

committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in 

some field of political science under the supervision of a member of the staff. 

Emphasis will be on wide reading, conferences with the advisor and written reports 

and essays. Normally open only to students with a B average (3.0) in Political Science 

and at least a 2.5 GPA overall. Applications must be filed with the Department by 

mid-quarter preceding the quarter independent study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong 

and the college from which the student comes. 



1 30 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



POS 411 American Presidency (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

Offers an in-depth look at the office of the presidency, with the principal emphasis 
on the relations of the executive branch with the Congress and the court system. 
Some attention will be given to the evolution of the presidency to its present 
dominant position in the American political process. (Completion of a survey 
course in American History is desirable). 

POS 412 American Political Parties (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

Operation of political parties in the political system. Relationship between party 

organization, electoral system, and the recruitment and advancement of political 

leaders. 

POS 415 American Supreme Court (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

An analysis of the structure and functions of the Court, including examination of the 

role of the Court as policy maker. 

PA/POS 418 Administrative Law (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

This course explores the framework of law governing administrative agencies 

including: administrative power and its control by the courts, the determination and 

enforcement of administrative programs, discretion of administrative officials and 

their powers of summary actions, hearings before administrative boards, and the 

respective spheres of administrative and judicial responsibility. 

Some attention will be given to the problem of the maintenance of traditional 

procedural safeguards in administrative law and the problem of civil rights and 

relation to administrative boards. Leading cases will be examined. 

POS 419 American Congress (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

An analysis of the structure and functions of Congress, including a discussion of the 
theoretical framework for representative government, and Congress' role as policy- 
maker. 

POS 420 Independent Study In International Relations (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisite: A minimum of 120 credit hours, including at least 20 hours in Political 

Science at the 300-level or above. Admission is by approval of a departmental 

committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in 

some field of international relations under the supervision of a member of the staff. 

Emphasis will be on wide reading, conferences with the advisor and written reports 

and essays. Normally open only to students with a B average (3.0) in Political Science 

and at least a 2.5 GPA overall. Applications must be filed with the Department by 

mid-quarter preceding the quarter independent study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong 

and the college from which the student comes. 

POS 426 International Terrorism (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: POS 113 or CJ 100, or consent of instructor. 

Investigation of the political, legal and sociological aspects of international terror- 
ism. Topics to be examined include the relationships of international terrorism, 
international relations, and principles of international law, the nature of the anti- 
terrorist response, and the implications of international terrorism for the future. 
(Identical with CJ 426.) 

POS 429 American Foreign Policy (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

An analysis of U.S. foreign policy and factors, both domestic and foreign, contrib- 
uting to its formulation. 



GOVERNMENT 191 



POS 430 Independent Study In Political Theory (V-V-(l-'»); 

l'rirf».|iusitr A iniminuin nf 120irc'dil h«)ur«.. iiuludin>;al UM»t 20 houre in Political 

Scu'iuf at thi- 3(K)-level or above. Admi«>M(>n i> by approval of a drpartmmtal 

committee 

IX^si^ncxI to permit superu>r students to pursue mdividual reM*arch and readm^ in 

some field ot pi>liludl theory under the supervision of «i member of the staff 

Fmphasis will be on wide reading, ct»nffrences with the advisor and written reports 

and essays Normally open only to students with a B avt-rage ( 10) in Political Scirnce 

and at least a 2 5 C.PA overall Applicatums must be filevl with the IX-partment by 

mid-quarter preceding the quarter independent study is contemplated 

C^en to transient students only with permissiim of the school dean at Armstrong 

and the college from which the student comes 

POS 440 Independent Study In Comparative Government (V-V-(l-5)) 

Trerevjuisitt' A minimum of 120 credit hours, including at It-ast 20 hours in Political 
Science at the 300-level or above. Admission is by approval of a departmental 
committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading m 
some field of comparative government under the supervision of a member of the 
staff. Emphasis will be on wide reading, conferences with the advistir and written 
reports and essays. Normally open only to students with a B average (3.0) in F'olitical 
Science and at least a 2.5 GPA overall. Applications must be filed with the Depart- 
ment by mid-quarter preceding the quarter independent study is contemplated. 
Open to transient students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong 
and the college from which the student comes. 

POS 445 Comparative Economic Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The course will constitute a survey of the basic tenets of the major economic systems 
developed in the 19th and 20th centuries. The role of government and politics will 
be examined, along with the contributions to economic and political thought of such 
men as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, John Mavnard Kevnes, and Milton Friedman. 
(Identical with ECO 445.) 

POS 447 Comparative Judicial Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 305 or CJ/POS 360, or POS 415, or consent of instructor. 
Designed to focus on the law enforcement and judicial procedure asp>ects of the 
Japanese, French, German, and the former Soviet political systems. (Identical with 
CJ 447.) 

PA/POS 

452/453/454 Internship (V-V-5) 

Offered each quarter under each heading. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 
and permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply 
academic training in the practical governmental setting. Settings will include law 
enforcement agencies (local, state, or federal), community treatment facilities, 
courts, congressional offices, and various governmental agencies. This course will 
be jointly supervised by departmental instructors and agency officials. Open to 
transient students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong and of the 
college from which the student comes. (Identical with CJ 452-453-454.) 

POS 495 Seminar in Political Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Open to seniors only. 

This capstone course is an intensive study of selected political science topics. 
Students will conduct research and present their results orally and in a paper 
conforming to departmental guidelines for written work. 

POS 520 International Trade (5-0-5) 

Examines the economic importance and problems of international trade, exchange 
rates and monetary standards, tariffs, and other trade barriers. Attention will be 
focused on fixed and floating exchange rates and their effects on trade balances of 
states. Current debt problems of developing nations will be examined. 



1 32 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



POS 545 Comparative Economic Systems (5-0-5) 

This course will constitute a survey of the basic tenets of the major economic systems 
developed in the 19th and 20th centuries. The role of government and politics will 
be examined, along with the contributions to economic and political thought of such 
men as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and Milton Friedman. 

POS 599 Latin American Politics (5-0-5) 

Examination of governments and political processes of selected nations in South 
America, Central America, and the Caribbean. Roles of state terrorism, revolution- 
ary movements, and narco-terrorism are examined. 



History 

Faculty 

* White, Nancy A., Department Head 
Patterson, Robert, Graduate Coordinator 

* Arens, Olavi Lanier, Osmos 

* Burnett, Robert * Patterson, Robert 

* Comaskey, Bernard Price, Michael 

* Duncan, John * Pruden, George 
Fertig, Barbara * Stone, Janet 

* Finlay, Mark Waters, Thomas 

* Gross, Jimmie F. * Yentsch, Anne 
Hendricks, Christopher F. 

Howard, Thomas F. 

* Graduate Faculty 

The History Major 

The major in history may take either of tw^o forms: History per se or History w^ith 
T-4 Certification. 

Students who major in history are required to complete a fifteen quarter hour foreign 
language sequence, or proficiency in a foreign language offered by the College through the 
103 level. Students should begin their language sequence during their Sophomore year, 
certainly not later than their Junior year. Therefore, students should plan their programs of 
study with careful consultation with a Faculty Advisor. Students who change majors, or who 
transfer, may find it necessary to enroll beyond the traditional 12 quarters, if the degree 
requirements including the foreign language cannot be fulfilled within that time. 

Students enrolled in the evening program should not expect to be exempted from the 
foreign language requirement, unless for a three year period prior to graduation no 
available foreign language sequence is offered in the evening. 

In addition to meeting minimum requirements for either program, students contem- 
plating graduate work in history are strongly advised to continue their linguistic study 
beyond the language sequence 103 level. Students with a double major, where Computer 
Science is a language choice, may substitute Computer Science for the foreign language 
requirement in history. 

Advanced coursework in History for either form of the major requires HIS 450 and 
HIS 496 or 497. In selecting the remainder of their advanced courses students may choose 
to concentrate in one particular area of History (e.g. European or American), providing 
they diversify to the extent of completing at least ten hours outside that area. 

The B. A. History major is offered both day and evening hours on the ASC campus, and 
in the evening at the Brunswick Center — except for HIS 450 and 496 or 497. These two 
requirements must be completed on campus. The B.G.S. with a History concentration is 
fully available at both locations. 



HISTORY 133 

Honors In History 

^Kv His b>J — I U>iu>c> Civilization II — K»r dt'tinli'il iiiH.un.iii.Mi 
St*f HIS 499 — Senior Thesis in History — for dft.nlfd information 

Scholarships In History 

Lmutt'd scholarship aid is availablr annually. Interested students are invited to 

inquire \n the department lattice for details 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN HISTORY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements* 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192,201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103, 195, 220 or 290 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHE 121, 122; PHY 121, 122; 

PHS 121, 122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192, POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201; SOC 201; PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 15 

2. History 251, 252 10 

3. Related course 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

1. HIS 450 and 496 or 497 10 

2. History courses 300 level or above with at least 10 hours 

outside the area of concentration 30 

The concentration areas are: 

A. U.S. Historv— HIS 351, 352, 354, 355, 357, 361, 363, 371, 374, 375, 376, 
377, 379, 400, 421, 425, 451, 455, 456, 459, 462, 463, 465, 485, 486, 496 

B. European History— HIS 333, 336, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 
348, 350, 410, 4lf, 445, 447, 464, 483, 484, 497 

C. Russian-Asian-African-Latin American Historv — HIS 310, 311, 312, 
320, 321, 322, 323, 329, 330, 428, 431, 435, 481, 482 

C. Courses in Related Fields 20 

To be chosen from such fields as anthropology, economics, geography, 
literature, political science, public history, sociology, statistics at least 
10 hours of which must be at 300-level or above. See Department for 
exhaustive list 20 

D. Electives 35 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 191 



1 34 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN HISTORY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192, POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 15 

3. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major and Supporting Fields 60 

1. HIS 450 and 496 or 497 10 

2. U.S. History 

A. HIS 371 or 377 (dependent on HIS 251, 252 selection) 5 

B. One or two courses from: 

HIS 351, 352, 354, 355, 357, 361, 363, 374, 375, 376, 379, 400, 

421, 425, 451, 455, 456, 459, 462, 463, 465, 485, 486, 496 5-10 

3. European History 

Two or three courses from: 

HIS 333, 336, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 

348, 350, 410, 411, 445, 447, 464, 483, 484, 497 10-15 

4. Russian-Asian- African-Latin American History 
Two courses from: 

HIS 310, 311, 312, 320, 321, 322, 323, 329, 330, 428, 431, 435, 481, 482 .. 10 

5. Supporting Work 20 

Ten hours each from two of the following areas: 

A. Approved 300-400 level POS electives 

B. ECO 201 and approved 300+ elective 

C. Approved electives in behavioral sciences (SOC, ANT, PSY) 

D. GEO 211, 212 and approved GEO elective 

C. Professional sequence 40 

1. EDN 200, EXC 310, EDN 335, 449, 471, 472, 473 35 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201 5 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 196 

Minor Concentrations 

The Department of History offers a number of minor concentrations. 

A minor in History has great practical value. Its notation on the transcript indicates 
to an employer that the applicant has some solid liberal arts background with its 
accompanying insight into the development and functioning of modern society, and that 
the applicant has made an extra effort to refine research and writing skills so essential to 



GEOGRAPHY 135 



dt'aliii^ with that siKifty VVhatfvt*r thi- inajoronechooses, such a minor will !itren^th«*n 
thf studt'iit's acadiMiiK rtM>rd 

StiKli'i\tN\s holu>pi' ti) vvi>rk iiihistorv rt'latfJ fifUlsupon^r.KluationshDuldconsuliT 
adding a nuiu^r in TublR History, i>r in \ Iistoric al An hacolD^y I hrough thfM* programs 
unique opportunities are provided tor qualified students to gain practical experience 
while making a realistic assessment of the possibilities offered by their field of interest. 
Cooperative arrangements with Historic Savannah loundation, Georgia Historical 
SiKiety, Savannah I andmark Project, Oatland Island Center, and with a number of 
museums and historical sites, such as Telfair Academy, l-t. Pulaski, Juliette Low Center, 
Wormsloe Plantation, and Ft. King George, permit placement of students in positions 
relating to: 

(a) archi\ al and manuscript curation, (b) historic site administration and interpreta- 
tion, (c) museum studies, (d) historic preservation, and (e) historical archaeology. 

Additional minor concentrations are offered jointly with the Department of Govern- 
ment in International Studies and Russian Studies. 

Minors, in addition to grades of "C" or better in each course, require the following: 

Hours 

History 20 

1. Twenty hours of 300-»- level HIS courses 20 

Historical Archaeology 25 

1. PBH/ANT 401, 402 and 455 15 

2. Ten hours from the following: HIS 341, 359, 361, 371 and 450 10 

International Studies 25 

(assumes competency in one modern foreign language through the 
103 level*) 

1. POS 329 and 325 or 326 10 

2. One course from: POS 320, 346, 348, 349 5 

3. Two courses from: POS 429; HIS 321, 330, 350, 355, 435 10 

Public History 25 

1. HIS 450 5 

2. Fifteen hours from the foUowing: PBH 420, 425, 421, 455, 460, 462, or 463 15 

3. PBH 495 or 498 5 

Russian Studies 20 

1. RUS 201 (assumes completion of RUS 101-103*) 5 

2. POS 349 5 

3. Two courses from: HIS 329, 330, 428, 431, 435, 481; POS 440 10 

Geography Courses 

GEO 211 Physical Geography (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Course will include such topics as earth-sun relationships, weather, climate and 
climate classification, soils, bio-geography, vegetation and landforms. Emphasis 
will be on global patterns of distribution. 

GEO 212 Cultural Geography (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

Course will include such topics as the concept of culture, population settlement 
patterns, technological origins and diffusions, types of economics and the relation- 
ship of man to his environment. Emphasis will be given to the process of cultural 
change through time in place. 

GEO 302/ 

GEL 301 Introduction to Geology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 21 1 plus 1 hours of a lab science. 

An introduction to physical geology. A study of common earth materials, dynamic 
processes of change, volcanology , seismology, plate tectonics, and the structure and 
evolution of the earth's crust and inner regions. 



136 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



GEO 303/ 

MET 301 Introduction to Meteorology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 211 plus 10 hours of a lab science. 

An introduction to the description of the state of the atmosphere and to the physical 

laws that describe atmospheric phenomena. 

GEO/ 

BIO 310 Man and the Environment (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 211 or 212 plus 75 quarter hours credit in college courses. 
Considerations of the interactions between humans and the support systems of the 
earth which are essential to their existence. 

GEO 353 Historical Biogeography 

Spring, 1994. 

A survey of interrelationships between the growth and dispersal of human popu- 
lations, and of other living organisms, such as crop plants, domesticated animals, 
weeds, and microbes. 

GEO 487 Historical Geography of North America (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

Geographic relationships in the exploration, settlement, and changing patterns of 

human occupancy of North America from the 17th century to the present. 

GEO 553 Historical Biogeography (5-0-5) 

A study of the interrelationships between the growth and spread of human popu- 
lations and other living organisms, such as crop plants, domesticated animals, 
weeds, and microbes. 

GEO 587 Historical Geography of North America (5-0-5) 

Geographic relationships in the exploration, settlement, and changing patterns of 
human occupancy of North America from the 17th century to the present. 

History Offerings 

Advanced courses in History are generally open to all students who have completed the 
appropriate surv^ey. Specifically, the Department considers background equivalent to HIS 
114 and HIS 115, or permission of the instructor, to be the prerequisite for all advanced 
courses on European, Russian, Asian, African, and Latin American topics. For advanced 
courses in American history, the equivalent of HIS 251 or HIS 252, or permission of the 
instructor, is considered prerequisite. Exceptions are noted on specific courses. The depart- 
ment cannot guarantee the schedule of courses as specifically indicated. 

General 

HIS 114 Civilization I (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for college credit English, i.e. English 
101 or above. 

A survey of the main currents of political, social, religious, and intellectual activit}^ 
from the time of the ancient Middle-Eastern civilizations to 1648. Throughout the 
course the major civilized traditions are considered and comparative methods used 
to facilitate interpretations of them. 

HIS 115 Civilization II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for college credit English, i.e. English 
101 or above. 

A survey of the main currents of political, social, religious, and intellectual activity 
from 1648 to the present. Throughout the course the major civilized traditions are 
considered and comparative methods used to facilitate interpretations of them. A 
continuation of HIS 114. 



HISTORY 137 



HIS 142 Honors Civilization 11 (5-0-5) 

WmtiT or Sprii^^ l'rirr«.|uis»lf HIS 191 or a grade of "A" in HIS 1 
I his ti>urM' rt'pliUi's HIS 1 1'^ ti»r si-livlt'd studi'nls While the Hubjet t n\.iit«r will tx* 
the •.anu' as ti)r HIS 1 15, the treatment nt it will vary greatly l.iKfwiM', instruction 
will gn beyonii the usual lecture methiKl, alli>wing stuilrnts to ri-ad widely and carry 
iHit their i>wn research under the direction of the protesst)r 

HIS 295 Internship (V-V-(l-5)) Offered on application. 

i'rcri\|ui.sites At least 15 hours of History ».«)ursfs with a History GPA of 2.5 and 
sophi>tm>re status. Application and credit arrangt'inents must be made through the 
Department in advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding the internship Iran- 
sient students must also have permission from the Dean of Faculty and college from 
which the student comes. 

An indi\ iduallv designed course involving i>tf-campus study and research or work 
in an appropriate public agency or private business. Assignments are normally 
designed to required the full quarter for completion, during which time the student 
will be under the joint supervision of the sponsoring organization and his/her 
academic instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

Internships at this level are graded on an 8/ U basis and will be credited only among 
olocti\es. 

HIS 399 Fieldwork In History (V-V-(l-5)) 

Summer, W44. 

Offered only by special arrangement with the Department, made in advance, this 
course is designed to provide credit for field-trip based courses or extended site 
visits, whether abroad or in the U.S. Research, reading, and written assignments will 
be tailored to the specific nature of each study tour or site visitation. (Specific area 
of study will be indicated on the transcript.) The course may be repeated for credit 
as topics vary, but no more than five hours may be counted among the 40 hours 
required for a major in History. 

HIS 450 Historical Method (3-4-5) 

Fall and Spring (evening). Required of all History majors and of Preservation 
Studies minors. 

An introduction to the nature and method of historical research, treating problems 
of investigation, organization, and writing through discussion and actual research 
experience in local history. 

HIS 495 Professional Internship (V-V-(l-5)) 

(Dpen to transient students only with permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong 
and the college from which the student comes. Prerequisites: 3.0 in all history 
courses; 20 hours of upper level history including HIS 450. 

Application and credit arrangements must be made through the department in 
advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding the quarter of internship. 
The student will pursue an individually designed course project involving off- 
campus study and research in a government or private agency. Projects are normally 
designed to require the full eleven week quarter for completion, during which time 
the student will be under the joint supervision of the sponsoring agency and his 
faculty advisor. May be repeated for credit. 

This internship, graded on an S or U basis, will be credited among related studies, 
not as a part of the minimum 40 hours of traditional work required for the major. 

HIS 499 Senior Thesis In History (0-6-3) 

Offered on application. Prerequisites: Senior status; 25 hours of upper division 
History courses, including HIS 450; a 3.5 GPA on all History courses. 
A directed research course under the supervision of a permanent member of the 
Department of History. The student must file an application with the Academic 
Affairs Committee of the History Department by mid-term of the quarter (excluding 
summer) before the student wishes to enroll for the course. The completed thesis 
must be submitted three weeks prior to the end of the quarter. If the faculty of the 
department approve the completed thesis for honors, the degree designation on the 
student's transcript will be noted "Honors in History." Consult the Department 
Office for important details. 



138 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HIS 564 Topics in the History of Technology and Culture (5-0-5) 

An examination of developments in the history of technology. The course defines 
technology broadly, rather than stressing specific machines, and emphasizes rela- 
tionships among European and American technology, societies and cultures. 

HIS 594 Fieldwork in History (V-V-(l-5)) 

Offered only by special arrangement with the Department, made in advance, this 
course is designed to provide credit for field-trip based courses or extended site 
visits, whether abroad or in the U.S. Research, reading, and written assignments will 
be tailored to the specific nature of each study tour or site visitation. (Specific area 
of study will be indicated on the transcript.) The course may be repeated for credit 
as topics vary, but no more than five hours may be counted among the 40 hours 
required for a major in history. 

United States History Offerings 

HIS 251 American History to 1865 (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the United States to end of 

the Civil War. 

HIS 252 American Since 1865 (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the United States from 1865 

to the present. 

HIS 351 Popular Culture In the United States to 1914 (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1996. 

An examination of the major trends in the news media, popular literature, entertain- 
ment, and recreational activities to 1914. 

HIS 352 Popular Culture In the United States Since 1914 (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

An examination of the major trends in news media, popular literature, entertain- 
ment, and recreational activities since 1914. 

HIS/PBH/ 

ANT 353 Historical Archaeology I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

The historical archaeology of the New World from the first arrival of Europeans and 
Africans to 1 800. Attention will be focused on the colonialization of coastal Georgia, 
Florida, and South Carolina; the development of plantation society in the Caribbean 
and the South; and the growth of African- American culture. 

HIS 354 Studies In American Diplomacy to WW I (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from colonial times to 

World War I. 

HIS 355 Studies In American Diplomacy since WW I (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from World War I to 

the present. 

HIS 357 American Military History (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

A study of the history of warfare and military technique in their social, economic, 

and political contexts, with special emphasis on the American military tradition. 

HIS 358 The New South (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HIS 251 or 252 or permission of the instructor. 

A study of the social history of the South since 1877. Political, economic, and cultural 
developments will be explored in relation to the social transformation of the region 
since Reconstruction. 



HISTORY 139 



MIS 361 Ihe Old South (5-0-3) 

Spring, l^^. 

l-ci>niimic, cultural, tind politu.il histurv ot thi* antchfllurn South with iTi\pli.f.i-. on 

thi>so tactt^rs that niado tho South a unujui* s*t tion ot thi* nation 

HIS 363 Fconomic History of the United Slates (5-0-5) 

I all. l^A'S j'riTi^iwiMti' I CO 201 

Ihis coursf surveys tht" growth and dt'\ t'lopmcnt ot ivonomic «nstitutl<ir«s in the 
United States from the ii>lonial period to the prej»ent, with emphasis on the period 
since I860. Developments in agriculture, mdustry, labor, transportation, and fi- 
nance will be studied and analyzed 

HIS 371 Colonial and Revolutionary America (5-0-5) 

Winter, IWd. 

A study of the discoveries of the New World and the settlement and growth of the 

English colonies of North America; triumph over France in the New World, the 

drastic change in British colonial policv and the rise of American opposition to it, the 

achievement of independence, and the establishment of the United States under the 

Constitution. 

HIS 374 Women In American History (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1^%. 

Women in American History: An examination of the changing political, siKial, and 
economic roles of the American woman from colonial times to the present. Empha- 
sis will be given to the pre-Civil War feminist reform movements, woman's broader 
scxial and economic role after the war, her awakening awareness of the need for 
political power, and the mid-20th century revolution. 

HIS 375 Civil War and Reconstruction (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1996. 

The causes and significance of the American Civil War, with minor consideration of 

the military campaign; political, economic and social aspects of reconstruction. 

HIS 376 Victorian America (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Presentation of the major subjects of the late 19th century, including the emergence 
of a national economy, its theory and policies; partisan and reform politics; the 
moral and Constitutional dimensions of Reconstruction; American sc^iety and 
social thought; and territorial aggrandisement. 

HIS 377 Recent America (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

An analysis of the institutions and forces which molded American life from the late 
19th century (1890) through World War II, including political, economic, social and 
intellectual issues. 

HIS 379 Contemporary America (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1996 (evening). 

An examination of the society of the United States since World War II, with special 

emphasis given to the major social and cultural trends. 

HIS 400 Seminar In American History (5-0-5) 

Permission of instructor required for admission. 

Designed to permit a group of advanced students to pursue intensive research on 

a special topic in the field to be defined by the instructor. 

HIS/ 

PBH 421 American Architectural History (4-2-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

A study of various styles of American architecture, Georgian, Federal, Neoclassical, 
Eclecticism and modem; slides from Historic American Building Sur\ey; landscape 
architecture. Visiting speakers and field trips will be used. 

HIS/ 

PBH 425 American Vernacular Architecture (4-2-5) 

Spring, 1996. Prerequisite: PBH 421 or permission of instructor. 



140 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HIS 451 



HIS/PBH/ 

ANT 455 



HIS 456 



HIS/PBH/ 

ANT 459 



HIS 462 



HIS/ 
PBH 463 



HIS 465 



HIS/ 
PBH 474 



An interdisciplinary study of the historic built environment with emphasis on 
traditional and popular architecture. Recording techniques, research strategies, and 
theoretical approaches, past and present, will be examined. 

Reform Movements In American History (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

A study of the reform movements in America since the Revolution. 

Historical Archaeology II (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PBH 207, or permission of the instructor. 

An introduction to the archaeology of North America since the arrival of Europeans 

in the New World. Some attention will be paid to British and Continental Post 

medieval Archaeology as well as to the special areas of Industrial and Nautical 

Archaeology. Emphasis will be given to anthropological archeology's method and 

theory both as perspective for the writing of history and as a component of Historic 

Preservation. 

History of Savannah and Georgia (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1996. 

Begins with a history of Indians, emphasis on the founding of the colony at 

Savannah and on the colonial. Revolutionary, antebellum and Post-Civil War 

periods. Political, economic, social, religious and artistic trends are discussed and 

placed in context of Georgia and U.S. history. 

The course will involve considerable research in primary sources available locally. 

American Material Culture (4-2-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

An introduction to the study of the non-literary remains of our society, past and 

present. Vernacular and polite architecture, ceramics, mortuary art, community and 

settlement patterns, dress, diet, and diseases are among the topics that will be 

discussed. 

Americans Called Indians (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201. 

An investigation of the aboriginal cultures of North American from the Arctic to the 
Rio Grande. Study will include origins, distribution, ecology and interrelationships, 
past through present. 

Folklif e (3-4-5) 

Spring, 1996. 

A survey of the creation and persistance of tradition in societies and of the process 
of change, as demonstrated in such aspects as narrative, music, song, celebration, 
festival belief, and material culture. Emphasis will be given to understanding the 
multi-ethnic nature of the traditions in American life. 

Technology and Culture II: 1900 to the Present (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1996 (evening). 

An examination of developments in the history of technology in the twentieth 
century. The course defines technology broadly, rather than stressing specific 
machines; and emphasizes the relationships among American technology, society, 
and culture. 



Oral History (2-6-5) 

Prerequisites: HIS 450, or permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to teach history students how to prepare for and conduct 
oral history interviews, how to transcribe, log and index oral history recordings, and 
how to use oral history collections in writing research papers. 



HISTORY 



141 



HIS 485/486 Independent Study In United State*, llifttory (V-V-(l-5» 

AvailabU" f.uh quarter I*rerfijuiMti«s MIS 4S() and a\ least IS 4ddilior\4l houre in 
upper diMMnn \ Jistory t Durs^s ( with .1 mmimum Cil'A t»l 1 0). an overall CiPA of 2.5 
(after completion ot 120 hours), and an approved application Open to transiml 
students only with the permission of ihi* l^an of Faculty of Arm»tronK and the 
college from which the student ci>mes 

IX'M>;neci ti> permit superior students to pursue individual reM*arch and reading in 
the chosen field under the supervision of a member of the History faculty An 
application must be filed with tht* department, in advance, m>rmally by mid-quarter 
preceding the independent study A full description of the requirements and an 
application mav be c^btained in the departmental office. 

HIS 496 American Historiography (5-0-5) 

Winter, \^b. 

See major program outlines, part B.l, for the historiography requirement 

A study oi the writing of American history from colonial times to the present with 

emphasis on the historical philosophies and interpretations of the ma)or schools of 

thoughts as well as individual historians. Recommended especially to students 

contemplating graduate work in Historv 



HIS/PBH/ 
ANT 501 



HIS/PBH/ 

ANT 553 



HIS 554 
HIS 556 



HIS 557 



Fieldwork in Historical Archaeology (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Introductory Anthropology or permission of the instructor. 
The course is designed to familiarize students with basic archaeological field 
techniques. Students will participate in mapping, excavation, processing and cata- 
loging artifactual materials from a multicomponent site. The fieldwork will be an 
intensive introduction to practical archaeology. 

Historical Archaeology II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PBH 207 or the permission of the instructor. 

An introduction to the archaeology of North America. Attention will be given to 
British and Continental Post-Medieval Archaeology as well as the special areas of 
industrial and nautical archaeology, anthropological archaeology's methods, and 
theory both as a perspective for the writing of history and as a component of 
historical preservation. 

Topics in American Diplomacy (5-0-5) 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs. 

History of Savannah and Georgia (5-0-5) 

Begins with a history of Indians, emphasis on the founding of the colony at 
Savannah and on the colonial. Revolutionary, antebellum and Post-Civil War 
periods. Political, economic, social, religious and artistic trends are discussed and 
placed in context of Georgia and U.S. History. The course will involve considerable 
research in primarv sources available locallv. 

Topics in the History of the American South (5-0-5) 

Topics will be chosen from the economic, cultural, and political history of the South 
with emphasis on those factors that made the South a unique section of the nation. 



European History Offerings 

HIS 333 Modem Germany, 1789-1933 (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

A study of Germany from the pluralism of the Holy Roman Empire through the 
German confederation to the unified Reich. Attention will be given to the political, 
social, and cultural developments in Austria, Prussia, and the "Third Germany." 



142 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HIS 336 Modem East Central Europe (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1996. 

A survey of the history of the nations between Germany and Russia in the 19th and 
20th centuries. Topics to be covered include the rise of nationalism, the gaining of 
independence, problems in establishing democracy, experience during World War 
II, and the establishment of communist control 

HIS 340 English History, 1485-1660 (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

An analysis of political, constitutional, economic, and religious issues under the 

Tudors and early Stuarts, including the English Civil War. 

HIS 341 English History, 1660-1815 (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1996. 

An investigation of the Restoration monarchies, the constitutional revolution of 
1688, the rise of ministerial responsibility in the early 18th century, the American 
colonial revolt, and England's relationship to the French Revolution. 

HIS 342 Ancient History (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

A study of the early civilizations of the Middle East, the Greek city states, the Roman 
republic and empire, with special emphasis on the social, political and cultural 
contributions of these ancient peoples. 

HIS 343 Early Middle Ages, A.D. 333 - c. 1000 (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1996. 

The history of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire through the Carolingian 
period with special emphasis on the institutional developments which led to the 
emergence of stable kingdoms out of the chaos of the barbarian invasions. 

HIS 344 The High Middle Ages, c. 1000 to c. 1300 (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1996. 

The history of Europe from c. 1000 to 1300 with emphasis on the struggle between 
church and state, the Crusade movement, and the 12th century intellectual renais- 
sance, all of which profoundly influenced the development of the various mediev^al 
kingdoms. 

HIS 345 The Late Middle Ages and Renaissance (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1996. 

The history of Europe from c. 1300 to 1517 with emphasis on the political, cultural, and 

intellectual developments which transformed medieval and Renaissance society. 

HIS 346 Reformation Era (5-0-5) 

A study of the controversial era emphasizing its major issues and movements, and 
their development through the Thirty Years War. Political, social, and economic, as 
well as religious facets of the upheaval will be considered. 

HIS 347 Europe In the Eighteenth Century (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

This course covers the period from the reign of Louis XIV to the French Revolution, 
considering the major political, social, and intellectual trends on the Continent. 
Particular emphasis is placed on France. 

HIS 348 Europe In the Nineteenth Century (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

A study of the most important social, political, and intellectual directions of 

European history from the Congress of Vienna to the end of the nineteenth century. 

HIS 350 Europe In the Twentieth Century (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1996 (evening). 

A study of the major developments in Europe since 1900. 

HIS 410 Seminar In European History (5-0-5) 

Permission of instructor required for admission. 

A detailed analysis of a specific problem in European history by examination of 

primary materials. 



HISTORY 14J 



HIS 411 Seminar on the CniMdes (5-0-5) 

AnexaminatiDHDJ thr I2thand l.^thicnUirv i rus.ulr nuivi-nu-nt through thf study 
of the available primary sourn* niatrrial 

HIS 445 Seminar In Medieval History (S-0-5) 

A tri'atini'nt of siln tiil topus in nuiiicval history working from primary source 
niatiTials Mav bv Tv\H\\[i\i for i n-dit .is topics vary 

HIS 447 The French Revolution and Napoleon (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

This course examines the background and events of the Trench Revolution and the 

career of Napoleon. Different interpretations are considered. 

HIS 464 Technology and Culture I: The Industrial Revolution to 1900 (5-0-5) 

Winter, N^>h 

An e\aminatu>not developments in the history ot lechnolo>;v trom 17tX)to 1900 The 
course defines technology broacily, rather than stressing specific machines, and 
emphasizes relationships among European and American technology, societies, 

and cultures. 

HIS 483/484 Independent Study In European History (V-V-(l-5)) 

Available each quarter Prerequisites: HIS 450 and at least 15 additional hours in 
upper division History courses (with a minimum GPA of 3.0), an overall GPA of 2.5 
(after completion of 120 hours), and an approved application. Open to transient 
students only with the permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the 
college from which the student comes. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in 
the chosen field under the supervision of a member of the History faculty. An 
application must be filed with the department, in advance, normally by mid-quarter 
preceding the independent study. A full description of the requirements and an 
application may be obtained in the departmental office. 

HIS 497 European Historiography (5-0-5) 

Winter (evening). See major program outlines, part B.l, for the historiography 

requirement. 

A study of the writers of history in the Western cultural tradition, with an emphasis 

on the historical philosophies, interpretations, and problems raised by the major 

modern European historians. Recommended especially to students contemplating 

graduate work in History. 

HIS 511 Seminar on the Crusades (5-0-5) 

An examination of the twelfth and thirteenth century Crusade movement through 
the study of the available primary source material. 

HIS 545 Seminar in Medieval History (5-0-5) 

A treatment of selected topics in medieval history working from primarv source 
materials. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

HIS 546 Topics in European History (5-0-5) 

A study of the most important social, political, and intellectual directions of 
European history from the Congress of Vienna through the twentieth century. 

Russian, Asian, African and Latin American History Courses 

HIS 310 Latin America (5-0-5) 

An introductory course in Latin-American history with consideration given to 
institutions of the areas as well as events and personalities. 

HIS 311 The Caribbean (5-0-5) 

A study of the historical development of the Caribbean from European conquest 
and colonization to twentieth-century nationalism. Emphasis will be given to 
understand present-day Caribbean Cultures. 



144 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HIS 313 History of Africa to A.D. 1800 (5-0-5) 

A survey of African history and culture from human origins through the 17th 
century. Focuses on ancient civilizations of the Nile Valley including eastern, 
southern, and western Africa. 

HIS 314 History of Africa since 1800 (5-0-5) 

A survey ot African history with emphasis on the political, economic, social and cultural 
processes of the last two centuries with some particular attention to the emergence of 
new states and nations, and their challenges as they enter the 21st century. 

HIS 320 Traditional China (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

The history of Chinese civilization from ancient times to the early nineteenth 

century, with emphasis on its characteristic political, social, economic, and cultural 

developments. 

HIS 321 Modem China (5-5) 

Spring, 1996 (evening). 

The history of China from the nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on 

political, social, economic, and intellectual developments. 

HIS 322 History of Japan (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

A survey of the history of Japan from the earliest times to the present, with primary 

emphasis on its emergence as a world power since the late nineteenth century. 

HIS 323 History of the Middle East (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1996. 

A survey of Middle Eastern history from Muhammad to the present, and of Islamic 
culture and civilization. Emphasis will be placed on the background of current 
issues and conflicts in the region. 

HIS 329 Medieval Russia (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1996. 

A survey of the economic, social, and political development of the Russian state 
from its foundation in the 9th century through its modernization by Peter the Great 
in the early 18th century. 

HIS 330 Modem Russia (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1996 (evening). 

A survey of Russian history from Peter the Great to the present. The major political, 
cultural, economic, and social developments of Russia in both the Imperial and 
Soviet periods will be covered. 

HIS 428 Russia and the West (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1996. 

A detailed study of the impact of Western influence on the Muscovite state in the 

sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

HIS 431 The Russian Revolution (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1997. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

An examination of the Russian revolutionary tradition, the causes for the collapse 

of Tsarism, the Boishevik Revolution, and victory in the Russian Civil War. 

HIS 435 History of Soviet Foreign Policy (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

This course reviews historically the development of soviet foreign policy toward 
Western European states, notably Germany, and also with the non-European world 
through 1917-1940, World War II, and cold War phases. Special attention will be 
given in this last phase to U.S. -Soviet rivalry. Soviet relations with other communist 
states in Eastern Europe, China, and the Third World, and to the recent moves 
toward detente. 



HISTORY 



149 



HIS 481/482 Independent Study In Russian/A»ianyAtrK.iii/l .itin Anurn .m 
History (V-V(I-S)) 

Awiil.iblf I'tuh qUiUtiT I'riTi-quisitfs MIS 4'>() and .it U'.isl l^ .iilclitmn.jl h«)urs in 
upper division Hislory cnurst's (with a minimum C.I'Ai>( 3()). anovfralU.PAof 2 S 
(attor cumpli'tiDn i>t 121) hi)urs), and an approvfd applicalit)n Open Id tran-sifnt 
students onlv with the pi'rnussu>n i>f the IX-an t>f faculty at Armstrong and the 
ci»lli'^i* trt>m which the student comes. 

IX'M^ned lo permit superior students to pursue individual re»earch and reading in 
the chi>sen field under the supervision of a member of the History faculty An 
applicatu>n must be filed with the department, in advance, normally by mid-quarter 
prececiin^ the independent study A full description of the requirements and an 
application may be obtained in the departmental i>ffice 

HIS 530 Topics in the History of Russia and Eastern Europe (5-0-5) 

A stud\ oi selected ti>pics in Russian and Lastern liuri>pean history. 



Public History Offerings 



TBH/ 
ANT 207 



PBH 295 



HIS/PBH/ 
ANT 353 



PBH/ 

ANT 401 



Introduction to Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Fall, \^^5. 

The introductory archaeology course consists of a history of the field, basic tech- 
niques, theoretical underpinnings, and examples of field work from all types of 
excavation. It covers the range from early man to industrial and urban archeology 
in a general fashion. Analysis is introduced along with survey techniques, preser- 
vation reporting and other skills. 

Internship (V-V-(l-5)) 

Ottered on application. Prerequisites: At least 15 hours of History courses with a 
History GPA of 2.5 and sophomore status. Application and credit arrangements 
must be made through the Department in advance, normally by mid-quarter 
preceding the internship. Transient students must also have permission from the 
Dean of Faculty and college from which the student comes. 

An individually designed course involving off-campus study and research or work 
in an appropriate public agency or private business. Assignments are normally 
designed to required the full quarter for completion, during which time the student 
will be under the joint supervision of the sponsoring organization and his/her 
academic instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

Internships at this level are graded on an 5/ U basis and will be credited only among 
electives. 

Historical Archaeology I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

The historical archaeology of the New World from the first arrixal of Europeans and 
Africans to 1 800. Attention will be focused on the colonialization of coastal Georgia, 
Florida, and South Carolina; the development of plantation society in the Caribbean 
and the South; and the growth of African-American culture. 

Fieldwork In Historical Archaeology (0-20-10) 

Spring. 

Prerequisite: PBH 207 or permission of instructor or director. 
An introduction to and first application of archaeological methods to a specific field 
project. Excavation techniques, surveying and map making, data collecting and 
recording, archaeological photography, the identification and analysis of art facts, 
and the interpretation or archaeological data will be presented in field and labora- 
tory work as well as in lectures and readings. (Under certain circumstances this 
course may be substituted in the Preservation Studies minor for PBH 498). Course 
may be repeated for credit. 



146 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PBH/ 

ANT 402 



PBH 420 



Practicum In Archaeological Analysis (2-6-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

The application of archaeological interpretative techniques to a specific site or 
analytical problem. Individual research projects in the interpretation of archaeo- 
logical data and the conservation of artifactual finds with special attention to the 
care and storage of collections, display in the museum setting, and the presentation 
of archaeologically-derived information. (Under certain circumstances this course 
may be substituted in the Museum Studies minor for PBH 495). 

Historic Preservation (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1996 (evening). 

Students may find HIS 450 to be useful preparation for this course. 

An examination of the field including values, principles, practices, development of 

planning and organization for preservation; preservation law, economics and 

politics. 



PBH/HIS421 American Architectural History (4-2-5) 

Fall, 1995 (evening). 

A study of various styles of American architecture, Georgian, Federal, Neoclassical, 

Eclecticism and modern; slides from Historic American 

Building Survey; landscape architecture. Visiting speakers and field trips will be 

used. 



PBH/ 
HIS 425 



PBH/HIS/ 

ANT 455 



PBH/HIS/ 

ANT 459 



PBH 460 



PBH 462 



American Vernacular Architecture (4-2-5) 

Spring 1996. Prerequisite: HIS/PBH 421 or permission of instructor. 
An interdisciplinary study of the historic built environment with emphasis on 
traditional and popular architecture. Recording techniques, research strategies, and 
theoretical approaches, past and present, will be examined. (Also listed as 
HIS 425.) 

Historical Archaeology II (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PBH 207 or permission of the instructor. 
The archaeology of North America since the arrival of Europeans in the New World. 
Some attention will be paid to British and Continental Post Medieval Archaeology 
as well as to the special areas of Industrial and Nautical Archaeology. Emphasis will 
be given to archaeological archaeology's method and theory both as a perspective 
for the writing of history and as a component of Historic Preservation. 

American Material Culture (4-2-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

An introduction to the study of the non-literary remains of our society, past and 

present. Vernacular and polite architecture, ceramics, mortuary art, community and 

settlement patterns, dress, diet, and disease are among the topics that will be 

discussed. 

Archival Studies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HIS 450 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the archivist as a professional and to the role of archives in 
society. A survey of documentary materials and of principals and practices involved 
in their acquisition, cataloging, care, and retrieval in pUblic and private facilities will 
also be included. 

Museum Studies (3-4-5) 

Spring. 

A survey of the development of museums in the United States and of the ethics and 
practices of the museum profession, to include collections management, planning, 
outreach, and public education. 



HISTORY 147 



PBH/ 

HIS 463 Folklife (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1^6. 

A suney of the creation and persistence of tradition in societies and of the proceM 
of change, as demimstratod in such aspects as narrative, music, song, celebration, 
festival belief, and nnUrnal culturt* l-inphasis will bf given to understanding the 
multi-othnk- naturo o\ \\w traditinns in AmtTuan lifi- 

PBH/HIS474 Oral History (2-6-5) 

Prerequisites: HIS 4W, or permissii>n oi instructor 

This ci>urse is designed to teach history students how to prepare for and conduct 
oral history interviews, how to transcribe, log and index oral history recordings, and 
how to use oral historv collections in writing research papers. 

PBH 480 Special Topics In Archaeology (V-V-(l -5)) 

Prerequisites: A.\T/PBH 207, ANT/PBH 401. 

The course is designed to offer a wide variety of experience to advanced, upper level 
students in archaeological techniques. Subject matter will center on such topics as 
archaeological graphics, faunal analysis (zooarchaeology), conservation, or involve 
some off-campus archaeological experience. 

PBH 481 Special Topics In Historic Preservation (V-V-(l-5)) 
Prerequisites: PBH 420. 

The course is designed to offer a wide variety of experience to advanced, upper level 
students in historic preservation. Subject matter will center on such topics as 
preservation philosophy, rural preservation, urban planning or involve some off- 
campus acti\ it\'. 

PBH 492 Heritage Tourism (5-0-5) 

A survey of the history of tourism, with emphasis on heritage and tourism, and of 
the function and impact of tourism on guest and host societies. Aspects of the 
modem tourist industry and its products, such as promotional and travel literature, 
accommodations and transport, and tourist arts, will also be investigated. 

PBH 495 Internship In Museum Studies (V-V-5) 

Prerequisites: PBH 460 and 462 with a "C" or better in each course. 
The student will pursue an individually designed course project involving off- 
campus study and research in a government or private agency involved in museum 
work. Projects are normally designed to require the full eleven week quarter to 
completion, during which time the student will be under the joint supervision of the 
sponsoring agency and his faculty sponsor. 

PBH 498 Internship In Preservation Studies (V-V-5) 

Prerequisites: PBH 420 and 421 or 425 with a "C" or better in each course. 
The student will pursue an individually designed course project involving off- 
campus study and research in an appropriate preservation agency. Projects are 
normally designed to require the full eleven week quarter for completion, during 
which time the student will be under the joint supervision of the sponsoring agency 
and his faculty sponsor. 

PBH 520 Historic Preservation (5-0-5) 

An examination of the field including values, principles, practices, development of 
planning and organization for preservation: preservation law, economics, and 
politics. 

HIS/PBH 521 Topics in American Architectural History (5-0-5) 

A study of the various styles of American architecture, Georgian, Federal, Neo- 
classical, Eclecticism and Modern; slides from American Historic Building Survey; 
landscape architecture. Visiting field trips and lectures will be used. 

PBH 525 American Vernacular Architecture (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HIS 521 or permission of instructor. 

An interdisciplinary study of the historic built environment with emphasis on 
traditional and popular architecture. Recording techniques, research strategies, and 
theoretical approaches, past and present, will be examined. 



148 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



fflS/PBH 559 American Material Culture (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Introductory Anthropology or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the study of the non-literary remains of our society, past and 

present. Vernacular and polite architecture, ceramics, mortuary art, community and 

settlement patterns, dress, diet, and disease are among the topics that will be 

discussed. 

PBH 562 Museum Studies (3-4-5) 

A survey of the development of museums in the United States and of the ethics and 
practices of the museum profession, to include collections management, plarming, 
outreach, and public education. 

HIS/PBH 563 Folklif e (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Introductory Anthropology or permission of instructor. 
A survey of the creation and persistence of tradition in societies and of the process 
of change as demonstrated in such aspects as narrative, music, song, celebration, 
festival, belief, and material culture. Emphasis will be given to understanding the 
multi-ethnic nature of the traditions in American life. 

PBH 569 Heritage Tourism (5-0-5) 

A survey of the history of tourism, with emphasis on heritage tourism, and of the 
have on and impact of tourism on guest and host societies. Aspects of the modern 
tourist industry and its products, such as promotional and travel literature, accom- 
modations and transport, and tourist arts, will also be investigated. 

Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 

Faculty 

* Baker, Christopher, Department Head 

* Andrew^s, Carol Martin, William 
Blessman, M. Ellen Mellen, Peter 
Clancy Frank Noble, David 

* Cooksey, Thomas * Nordquist, Richard 
Cottrell, Isabel * Raymond, Richard 

* Hollinger, Karen Sconduto, Leslie 

* Jamison, Carol Smith, James 
Jenkins, Marvin Welsh, John 
Manderson, Sandra * Winterhalter, Teresa 

* Marinara, Martha 

* Graduate Faculty 

English Composition 

Entering students should begin the required English core sequence in their initial 
quarter of attendance. Students must not delay beginning this sequence beyond their 
second quarter of attendance. Students must enroll in the appropriate course in the core 
sequence and do so each quarter until they complete the sequence and /or pass the 
Regents' Test. ENG 101, 102, and 201 courses may not be dropped w^ithout permission 
of the Department Head. Students who do drop these courses w^ithout Department Head 
approval will receive a failing grade in the class. 

Exemptions from Core English 

Students who wish credit exemption for English 101 must take the CLEP Freshman 
College Composition (with Essay) examination and make a score of 49 (grade equivalent 
of a "B") and pass the essay portion of the test. Students who wish a credit exemption for 
English 102 must take the CLEP Analysis and Interpretation of Literature and Essay 
examination and make a score of 55 (Grade equivalent of "B") and pass the essay portion 
of the test. 



I 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS 149 



Stuclontswhosvi-u ' 1. 1 at'UM on an A PeXfim (English I .in^;ii.i^i' and Composition 
or I itoraturt* m\k.\ Composition) also will receive crtniit exemption ifor I n^lish 101 

English Composition Transfer Credit 

iranstiT stucicnts troin oulMdc the I !\i\ersity System of Georgia who have not yet 
completed the required I ii^lish cinirses prescribed hv Armstrong decree programs 
should visit the Directi^rotC t^mpoMtion tor a placement interview. At this interview, the 
Director ot Ci>mpi>sitii>n will e\ aluate student transcripts tor l-n^lish credits, administer 
the E-n^lish Placement lest (it necessary), provide information on the composition 
sequence and the Cieorgia Regents' Test, and determine placement in the appropriate 
composition course. Interview schedules are available in the Office of the Registrar and 
in the IVpartment of I an^uages, literature, and Dramatic Arts. 

Foreign Languages 

Students who, while enrolled at Armstrong State College, take their foreign language 
>. ourses on another campus must pass an appropriate national standardized test with a 
score not lower than the 60 percentile on each part to receive credit for 10.3 and/or 201. 
Students transferring to Armstrong State College, after having completed the required 
foreign language secjuence at another college, with "C's" or above, are not required to 
complete the proficiency examinations at Armstrong. 

Exemptions from Foreign Languages 

Students who wish a credit exemption for the French or Spanish requirement must 
make a score of 45 (Grade equivalent of a "B") on the CLEP exam, and make a "C" or 
better in the appropriate 201 class. Students who wish a credit exemption for German 
must make a score of 44 (Grade equivalent of a "B")and make a "C"or higher in German 
201. For further information students should contact the Head of the Department of 
Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts, or Ms. Benson in Counseling and Placement. 

Satisfying Core Requirements 

Students majoring in English or in Drama-Speech should satisfy the college core 
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree during the freshman and sophomore years. 

The "C" Average for Courses in Major and Minor 

Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in each 300 or 400 level course included 
in any major or minor area. 

CPC Requirement 

The CPC deficiency in foreign languages may be fulfilled by successfully completing 
any of the 100-level courses in Spanish, French, Latin, or German with a final course 
grade of C or better. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN ENGLISH 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area! 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. Two from MAT 101, 103, 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One from ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 



150 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area IV : 30 

1. Foreign language sequence through 201 20 

2. Two from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 227, 228; 

MUS 200; PHI 201; CS 115 10 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 50 

1. ENG 301 5 

2. ENG 311 and 312 10 

3. ENG 315 and 316 10 

4. ENG 545 or 546 5 

5. One from: ENG 541, 547, 550, 556, or 557 5 

6. One from: ENG 552, 553, 563 5 

7. One from: ENG 536, 537, 538, 564 5 

8. One from: English 372, 470, 474, 475, 580 or 582 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 25 

Five courses numbered 300 or above in the School of Arts «& Sciences or 

the Division of Education 25 

D. Electives 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR 
IN ENGLISH (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 or 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence through 201 -. 20 

2. DRS 228 or 341 5 

3. One from ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

1. ENG 301 5 

2. ENG 311 and 312 10 

3. ENG 313 or 314 5 

4. ENG 315 or 316 5 

5. ENG 545 or 546 5 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS 1»1 



l.\c.4/l) ...5 

7. FNG 580 or 582 5 

C Rt'lati'd Tit'ld Rt*t|uiron\onts 

1. DKS/l'lM .\S(), .^Sl, 340 or 349 5 

2. Appri>vfd I'loctives .10 

D. Protessional St^quonce 45 

1 I-DN 21X); HXC 310, EDN 335, 428 or 445, 439, 471, 472, 473 40 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201 S 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 201 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN DRAMA-SPEECH 



Hour* 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III ' 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; PCS 113 15 

2. One from: ANT 201; ECO 201; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence through 201 20 

2. DRS 228 5 

3. DRS 227 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1. DRS 300 5 

2. DRS 341 5 

3. DRS 344 5 

4. DRS 346 ... 5 

5. DRS 450 5 

6. Choice of DRS 340, 349, 350, 351, 401 10 

7. Choice of DRS 303, 342, 345, 347, 400, 447, 451, 452; ENG 500, 501, 

or 502 5 

8. ENG 301 5 

C. Courses in Related Field 30 

1. ENG 545, 546, 556, 557, 560, 565 20 

2. One from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

3. One from LIN 480, 482 5 

D. Elecrives 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _ 



TOTAL 191 



152 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN ENGLISH (Communications) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. Two from: 

MAT 101, 103, 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence through 201 20 

2. CS 115, and one from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1. ENG 311 or 312 5 

2. ENG 313 or 314 5 

3. ENG 315 or 316 5 

4. Three from ENG 372, 470, 474, 475, JRN 343 15 

5. Three from ENG 573, 580, 582, JRN 400, ELM 401 15 

C. Related Field Requirements 25 

1. Two from DRS 228, 341, 349 10 

2. Two from ART 204, ENG 500, 501, 502, ENG 499, DRS 400 10 

3. One from FLM 340, 349, 350, 351 5 

D. Electives 20 

1. Electives 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Minor Concentrations 

The following minor concentrations are available from the Department of Languages, 
Literature, and Dramatic Arts. For completion of each of the minors, the student must 
earn a "C" or better in each course offered for the minor. 
The minors and their requirements are: 

Hours 
Communications 20 

1. Two from ENG 470, 372, 474, 475, DRS/FLM 349, JRN 343 10 

2. Two from ENG 573, 580, 582, JRN 400, FLM 401 10 

English 20 

English electives numbered 300 or above (only 5 hours of 499) 20 

Film 20 

1. DRS/FLM 340, 351 10 

2. DRS/FLM 350, DRS/FLM 401 10 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS 153 



Foreign I an^iia^c 20 

language electives numbered above 2Ul 20 

Linguistics 20 

Courses selected from ENG 580, 582; UN 500 .. 20 

Philosophy 20 

Philosi>phv oltvtivi's numberfd "^OO or abo\ i* ?n 

Drama-Speech Offerings 

Succt'sstul (.iMnpU'tion ot 1-Nci 11)1 is prorcquisite to all DRS courses with the exception 
ot DRS 201, 227, 31)0, 303, 304 and 447. 

DRS 201 Theatre Appreciation (5-0-5) 

An intriKliK tion to the thoatrt' as an art form and a profession. Students will study 
the varu>us roles ot playwright, actor, designer, director, stage manager, and theatre 
manager; the collaborative nature of theatre; the relationship of theatre to other art 
forms; and the organizational structure of educational, community, and profes- 
sional theatre. 

DRS 227 Theatre laboratory (0-3-1) 

Ottered every quarter. 

Practical experience in theatre. The student will work on the Masquers' production 

of the quarter. Only one hour of credit may be earned per quarter. The maximum 

total credit allowed in Theatre Laboratory is five quarter hours. 

In the summer students may take up to five hours credit in DRS 227 by working part 

time in summer theatre workshop (DRS 450). 

DRS 228 Speech Communication (5-0-5) 

Offered every quarter. 

Practice and theory of interpersonal communication and public speaking. Students 
develop skills through practice of the individual parts of speech, working in small 
groups, and through the performance of vocal exercises and oral readings. Each 
student prepares and delivers several major speeches, including extemporaneous 
and impromptu ones. 

DRS 300 Introduction to Acting (5-0-5) 

A beginning course in acting which focuses on basic stage movement, fundamentals 
of voice and diction, improvisation, dramatic imagination, memory, scene analysis, 
and performance of scenes and monologues from contemporary drama. 

DRS 301 Interpersonal Communication (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG lOL 

The study of human communication as a complex set of on-going transactions. The 
student will explore and apply behavioral theories concerning how to create and 
maintain successful relationships, in and out of the work place. 

DRS 302 Small Group Communication (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

The study of various communication theories concerning how and why work 
groups succeed or fail in respect to achieving the twin goals of task completion and 
group harmony. Course assignments allow the students to implement the above 
mentioned theories in task-oriented group projects. 

DRS 303 Creative Dramatics and Children's Theatre (5-0-5) 

An introduction to 1 ) the elements of dramatic performance for all ages and group>s, 
2) the teaching of dramatic arts to children, and 3) the production of plays for an 
audience of children or other special groups. Students explore how various ele- 
ments which make up a dramatic event, including improvisational-based acting 
and storytelling, can be used as teaching devices. All aspects of production will be 
studied, such as play selection, performance techniques, elementary design and 
stagecraft, and industrial and technical resources. Designed for education majors 
and drama-speech majors. 



1 54 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



DRS 304 Stagecraft (5-0-5) 

A systematic introduction to the fundamentals of scenic design, construction and 
rigging. The course will rely heavily on hands-on experience with the tools, 
techniques and materials used in mounting a stage production. 

DRS/FLM 340 Development of the Cinema (5-0-5) 

Same as FLM 340. 

A study of the history and development of the cinema with special emphasis on the 

American dominance of the medium. 

DRS 341 Oral Interpretation (5-0-5) 

The oral interpretation of poetry and prose. The techniques of literary analysis and 
the vocal techniques needed to communicate an author's mood and meaning are 
stressed. 

DRS 342 Acting II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: DRS 200, at least two credit hours in DRS 227, or permission of 
instructor. 

Intensive study of characterization and styles of acting from several points; histori- 
cal, critical, practical, theoretical, and experimental. Emphasis on development of 
performance skills. 

DRS 344 History of the Theatre (5-0-5) 

A survey of theatrical art from its beginnings through the Elizabethan period, 
emphasizing theatrical conventions of Greek, Roman, medieval, and Elizabethan 
theatre. 

DRS 345 History of the Theatre (5-0-5) 

A survey of theatrical art of the world, emphasizing theatrical conventions from the 
Restoration to the present. 

DRS 346 Play Directing I (5-0-5) 

The theory and practice of acting and directing with special attention to image- 
making on stage. Individuals under supervision prepare and execute the production 
of scenes and short plays. 

DRS 347 Theatre Management (5-0-5) 

Combines theory and practice in theatre management. Students will learn about 
budget planning, revenue, box office, publicity, royalties, literary management, 
public relations, selection of theatrical seasons, guilds, unions, and other manage- 
ment aspects of the theatre. 

DRS/FLM 349 Television Theory and Criticism (5-0-5) 

A study of television theory and criticism with special emphasis on television as a 
media form. Topics include: television spectatorship, genres, production, and 
scholarship. 

DRS/FLM/ 

JRN 350 Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as FLM 350 and JRN 350. 

Study of film with emphasis on critical appreciation of film as an art form. 

DRS/FLM 351 Film and Literature (5-0-5) 

Same as FLM 351. 

Studies in the translation of literature to film with emphasis on the differences of the 

media in form, content and perception. 

DRS/FLM 373 Rhetoric (5-0-5) 

See ENG/DRS 373 for course description. 

DRS 400 Special Topics In Communications (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 201. 

The special subject matter in this course is announced when the course is offered. 

DRS/FLM 401 Topics In Film (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Film 350 or 351. 

The special subject matter of this course will be announced when the course is 

offered. Topics include: Film Genres, Auteurs, and Critical Theory. 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS ^ 

DRS 447 Stage Managers and Pesigneni laboratory (0-2-2) 

C>ffi'ri*vl i*\cr\ ijinrtiT I'riTi-vjiiiMtr pfrinissu>ii i»( inslriiittir 

IViKtual I'xptTiorHi' in IhtMtrr ti»r sl»>>;f man»»>;iT> .md dt-M^niTH m lighting, ci>»- 
turno, m»»kr-up, and set I he student will wt»rk on thr Mdsi|Ufrs pnKluitum ot the 
wjuarler C>nlv twt) lH>urs oi credit nyA\ bt* earned jht quarter I he maximum credit 
allowed in this laboratory is h quarter hours In the summer students may take up 
to tive hours credit in DKS 447 by working part time in the summer theatre 
workshop (DRS 450). (See URS 227 Jor . r...iit f.„ .t,,. <.-,.. „..f .„v..iv...) .m sf.iv,.- 
management or design work.) 

DRS 450/ 

431/452 Drama Workshop (0-15-5) 

Summer only. 

Summer stiKk theatre for credit. Students are directed and instructed by a member 
ot the faculty who is a professional in the theatre All aspects of production will be 
studied. Students may earn credit for DRS 450 by participating in an off-campus 
summer stock company with prior written approyal of a faculty theatre director. 

DRS 490 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand. Preree]uisites: Senior status plus ENG 101 plus at least one 300 
level DRS course. Open to transient students only with the permission of Dean of 
Faculty at Armstrong and the college from which the student comes. 

English Offerings 

Please Note: ENG 201 is prerequisite to all ENG 300-400 courses. ENG 311 and 312 are 
prerequisite for all English courses 330 through 499, except ENG 370 through 382. 

ENG 025 Composition Review (5-0-5) 

Institutional Credit. 

Designed to correct deficiencies in writing revealed by the Regents' Test. Prerequi- 
site: Completion of the English core requirements of the student's program. 

ENG 101 Composition I (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

Each student must attain at least one of the following prior to enrolling: (a) a score 

of at least 380 SAT Verbal and 40 or above on the TSWE (Test of Standard Written 

English), or 20 on the verbal section of the ACT, or (b) a passing score on the 

placement CPE in English and in Reading, or (c) exit Developmental English and 

Developmental Reading successfully. 

For the student having demonstrable ability in reading, writing, and organizing. 

The student will sharpen composition skills by writing themes of varying length 

and complexity utilizing techniques learned from intensive study of essays. The 

course also aims to increase the student's awareness of language itself. Readings in 

addition to the essay may be used. 

ENG 102 Composition II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ENG 101 or ENG 191. 
Gives the student guided practice in reading and composition skills. The course 
introduces literary forms and language — fiction, poetry, drama — using readings in 
and study of those forms to stimulate the writing ot interpretive and critical papers. 

ENG 192 Honors Composition and Introduction to Literature (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "B" in English 101 and the recommenda- 
tion of the English 101 instructor and approval of the Department Head. 
The student will read and write in greater depth than in English 102. 

ENG 201 Selections In World Literature (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 192. 

Completes the Core I sequence. Organized around literary and extra-literary 
materials, the course facilitates student investigation of enduring issues and ideas 
found in world literature. Research techniques are introduced. The specific content 
in each section of this course is announced quarterly. 



156 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ENG 292 Honors Composition and Literature (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "C" in English 192 or minimum grade of 
"B" in English 102 and the recommendation of the English 102 instructor. 
The student will read and write in greater depth than in English 201. 

ENG 301 Introduction to Literary Studies (5-0-5) 

Fall or Spring. 

Familiarizes the English major with the vocabulary and approaches of modem 
literary criticism, advances abilities in the reading and interpretation of literary 
texts, and promotes understanding of the tools of literary research and writing. 

ENG 302 Introduction to Composition Studies (5-0-5) 

Students apply theories on the teaching of composition by devising assignments, 
conducting class sessions, writing essays, and responding to academic writing. 

ENG 311 Survey of English Literature I (5-0-5) 

Alternate quarters. 

A study of the major works of English literature from its beginnings to the end of the 

18th century. Includes the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Spenser and Milton. 

ENG 312 Survey of English Literature II (5-0-5) 

Alternate quarters. 

A study of major works from the beginning of the 19th century to the contemporary 

period. Includes the Romantics, the Victorians and the Modems. 

ENG 313 World Literature I (5-0-5) 

A study of major works and movements in world literature through the Renais- 
sance. 

ENG 314 World Literature II (5-0-5) 

A study of major works and movements in modem world literature. 

ENG 315 Survey of American Literature I (5-0-5) 

A study of American literature from its beginnings to 1865, with emphasis on 
historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts. 

ENG 316 Survey of American Literature II (5-0-5) 

A study of American literature from 1865 to the present, with emphasis on historical, 
philosophical, and cultural contexts. 

ENG 372 Technical and Business Communication (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

Students learn to report technical information clearly and persuasively. Assign- 
ments include technical descriptions and instructions, memoranda, business letters, 
reports, and research articles. Emphasizes writing and includes oral presentations 
using visual aids. 

ENG 470 Advanced Composition (5-0-5) 

The study of expository and argumentative techniques. 

ENG 474 Creative Writing (Poetry) (5-0-5) 

Students submit poems which they then critique by written statement and by class 
discussion under the guidance of the professor. The professor supplements this 
workshop method with a relevant textbook. Students wishing to take the course 
should submit a wTiting sample to the professor for an initial screening. 

ENG 475 Creative Writing (Fiction) (5-0-5) 

Students submit stories which they then critique by written statement and by class 
discussion under the guidance of the professor. The professor supplements this 
workshop method with a relevant textbook. Students wishing to take the course 
should submit a writing sample to the professor for an initial screening. 

ENG 490 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisites: Senior status or department head's approval. Available to transient 
students under the following conditions: approval of the Dean of the faculty and 
Dean of the college from which the student comes. 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ART8 W 

1 \(. 4^)1 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

I'rirtvjiiisitrs S'nu>r st.>tvj>. i>r Ji'p.irtmt'nt head's Approval. Available to transient 
stiKli'nt> iiiuliT thf fnIK>v\ in^ tunJilmns, approval of the Dean of the Faculty and 
\\\\i\ o\ thi* iDlli'm* \Ton\ whuh thr sfiuliiit i tnurs 

ENG 499 Internship (up to 15 hrs) 

(.^MiTi'd hv Spivial arranm'nu'iit in n v|uisiti- lunmr st.iuis .i ^ 1 1 .i A, .i mijmtv i- 
sory statt mi'mber, rivi>nin^i'tulatu»n of tho di'partmfnta! internship Committee, 
and approval i>t tho Dopartnu'nt head May bo rrpeati'd to a maximum of lf> credit 
hi>iirs. The sludont pursues an individually desi^nrd project involving off-campus 
work, study, and/i>r research Projects are under the joint supervision of the 
sponsoring institution and the staff member. Fifteen hours credit requires forty 
hours a week at the sponsoring institution Ten hours credit requires twi-nty-five 
hours a week; five hours credit requires fifteen hours a week 

ENG 500 Special Topic (5-0-5) 

Sub|ivl IS aniHHincod when the course is offered. Subjects include: Modernism: 
1880-1^40, Apartheid in Perspective; World-wide English Literature, Decadence, 
Women in Literature. 

ENG 501 Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Subject is announced when the course is offered. Genres include: New England 
Poets, Victorian Novel, Eighteenth Century Novel, Russian Novel, Southern Fic- 
tion, British Drama, Short Story- 

ENG 502 Special Author (5-0-5) 

Subject is announced when the course is offered. Authors include: Faulkner, Joyce, 
Dickens, Twain, Hardy, Fielding, Chaucer, Milton, Dante, Frost, Dickinson, Austen, 
and Flannerv O'Connor. 

ENG 536 The American Novel (5-0-5) 

A study oi the American novel as a distinctive literary form. 
ENG 537 American Poetry (5-0-5) 

A study of American poetry in the context of technological developments, philo- 
sophical movements, and literary currents. 

ENG 538 Southern Literature (5-0-5) 

A stud\' of Southern literature in its distinctixe social and aesthetic contexts. 

ENG 541 Eariy English Literature, Beginnings through 1603 (5-0-5) 

Surveys major English literature from its beginning to the 15th century. Emphasis 
is on the development of a literature that reflects the diversified England of this 800- 
year period. Writers include: the Beowulf poet and other Old English authors, early 
Middle English lyrics and the major flgures of the 14th century (the Pearl Poet, 
Chaucer, Langland, Gower). 

ENG 545 Shakespeare I (5-0-5) 

Fall or Spring. 

A comprehensive study of the tragedies, comedies, and history plays drawn from 

Taming of the Shrezu, Merchant of Venice, Merry Wives of Windsor. Much Ado Abowt 
Nothing, As You Like It, Troilus and Cressida, Measure for Measure, Richard II, Henry IV 
Parts 1 and 2, Henry V, Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and 
Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. 

ENG 546 Shakespeare II (5-0-5) 

Spring or Fall. 

A second comprehensive study of the tragedies, comedies and history plays drawn 
from A Comedy of Errors, Love's Libor's Lost, Romeo and Juliet. Midsummer Night's 
Dream, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Othello, A Winter's Tale, The Tempest. Pericles, Cymbeline, 
All's Well That Ends Well, Two Gentlemen of Verona, King John, Timon of Athens, Richard 
III, Henry VI, and Henry VIII. 



158 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ENG 547 17th Century British Poetry and Prose: 1603-1689 (5-0-5) 

Alternate years. 

A survey of the major non-dramatic literature from the death of Elizabeth I to the 
reign of William and Mary, this course places its major emphasis upon the meta- 
physical and classical traditions in EngUsh poetry. Authors include Donne, Jonson, 
Herbert, Herrick, Crashaw, Vaughan, Marvell, Milton, Bacon, Brown, Bunyan, 
Dryden, and Rochester. 

ENG 550 18th Century British Poetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

A survey of British poetry and prose from 1690 to 1784, this course acquaints 
students with the philosophic and aesthetic concerns of the age as reflected chiefly 
but not exclusively in the works of Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Fielding. 

ENG 551 The British Novel (5-0-5) 

A study of the British novel as a distinctive literary form. The course examines the 
aesthetic, philosophical and social concerns that inform selected works from the 18th, 
19th, and 20th centuries. 

ENG 552 19th Century I: British Romantic Poetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 353. 

An examination of the works of the major Romantic writers including Blake, 

Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

ENG 553 19th Century II: British Victorian Poetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 352. 

An examination of the responses of novelists, poets, and prose writers to the issues 
troubling Victorian England: the conflict between science and religion, the faith in 
"progress," the growth of industrialism, the rights of the individual and of the 
society, and the role of the artist. 

ENG 556 British Drama I: Beginnings to 1630 (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 357 and 365. 

Medieval and Renaissance Non-Shakespearean drama; stresses the plays of Marlowe, 
Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Middleton and Webster; and grounds the student 
in the conventions and traditions of Medieval and early Tudor drama. 

ENG 557 British Drama II: 1630-1800 (5-0-5) 

Alternates with English 356 and 365. 

Restoration and Eighteenth Century Drama; begins with Pre-Restoration, late 
Caroline drama; and stresses the plays of Ford, Shirley, Dryden, Lee, Otway, 
Etherege, Wycherley, Congreve, Goldsmith, and Sheridan. 

ENG 560 Ancient Epic and Drama (5-0-5) 

Spring. Alternate years. 

A study of major works of antiquity. Authors include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, 

Euripides, and other significant figures. 

ENG 563 Modernism (5-0-5) 

A study of major British and American fiction and poetry of the early twentieth 
century in the context of continental developments. Writers may include Conrad, 
Proust, Joyce, Woolf, Yeats, Eliot, and Faulkner. 

ENG 564 Contemporary Literature (5-0-5) 

A study of fiction or poetry (or both) since World War II as it relates to literary 
traditions and cultural movements. Topics may include the following: postmodernist 
fiction, ethnic writers, and confessional poetry. 

ENG 565 British, American, and Continental Drama: Ibsen to the Present (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 356 and 357. 

A survey of 19th and 20th century British, American and European plays. Move- 
ments include ReaUsm, the Irish Renaissance. Expressionism, Impressionism, and 
Theater of the Absurd. Ibsen, Shaw, Yeats, O'Casey, Wilde, Strindberg, O'Neill, and 
Williams are among the dramatists studied. 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS 1W 



ENGAGES 573 Khoturu (S-U-S) 

An ii\tr»KliK tu'n tt> thi- stiulv ot rhetoric, from Aristotle to the preftent, with 
i-mphasis oi\ rlu'tork .»1 .inaK st-> i)f litrratun* .uul Dthcr form* of diftcourve 

ENG/UN 580 Advanced Cirammar (5-0-5) 

A sliulv i»Kurri'Mt apprinuhes tn^r»»rnnuu (iniludinj; generative tran»formational); 
phi)iu)U>);v, nu»rphi>K)^v »iiu1 sviita\ .irc stiKliitl. 

ENGA.IN 582 History of English Language (5-0-5) 

A >tudv ot tht' In^lish laii^vK»y,i' from its ^H•gln^in^s in thr fifth and sixth centuries 
to Its wiirldwido t'\pansu>n in tho 2l)th. Traces thr lan^ua^t* chronologically from 
Old to Middlf to Modern E-nglish. h mphasis is on the pht>netic, syntactic, and lexical 
changes with weight given both to internal and external influences 

Film Offerings 

FLM/DRS 340 Development of the Cinema (5-0-5) 

Winter 

A study ot the history and development of the cinema with special emphasis on the 

American dominance of the medium. 

FLM/DRS 349 Television Theory and Criticism (5-0-5) 

See DRS/FLM M^) for course description. 

FLM/DRS 350 Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Same as J RN 350. 

Study of film with emphasis on critical appreciation of film as an art form. 

FLM/DRS 351 Film and Literature (5-0-5) 

Studies m the translation of literature to film withemphasison the differences of the 
media in form, content, and perception. 

FLM/DRS 401 Topics In Film (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FLM 350 or 351. 

Special subject matter is announced when the course is offered. Topics: film genres, 

auteurs, and critical theory. 

Foreign Language Offerings 

Prerequisite for all foreign languages 101 and Spanish 105 is eligibility for English 101. 
Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in Foreign Language (French, German, Latin, 
Spanish) 103 in order to enter Foreign Language 201. Any exception to this rule may be 
granted at the discretion of the individual instructor of the FL 201. 

FRE 101/ 

102/103 Elementary French One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. 

Provides the student with the elements of French grammar, pronunciation, and oral 
comprehension, together with an introduction to the culture and civilization of the 
French-speaking world. Regular practice with tape recordings is required. No 
foreign language background is necessary to begin 101. 

FRE 201 Intermediate French (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. Prerequisite: Three quarters of college French or permission of 

instructor. 

Continues to develop reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. 

FRE 210 French Conversation and Compositon I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 201 or equivalent. 

Emphasis is on conversahonal French in simulated situations to de\elop greater oral 
proficiency and to promote continued awareness of the French speaking culture. 
Students will review grammar and syntax through guided essavs to develop writing 
skills in the contact language. Classes will be conducted entirely in French. 



160 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



FRE 211 French Conversation and Composition II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 210. 

The continuation of French 210. 

FRE 300 Advanced Grammar and Syntax (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 211 or equivalent. 

Advanced analysis and examination of the grammar and syntax of the French, stressing 

oral usage through written grammar exercises. Classes conducted in French. 

FRE 310 French Civilization I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: French 211 or equivalent. 

Survey of the culture and civilization of France. Areas of study include history, 
geography, politics, the arts, and daily life from the middle ages to the Revolution. 
Classes will be conducted entirely in French. 

FRE 311 French Civilization II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: French 211 or equivalent. 

Continuation of French 310. The analysis of contemporary French society: geogra- 
phy, sociology, art, and science since 1799 (the French Revolution). This course will 
also survey the cultures of other French-speaking countries. Classes will be con- 
ducted entirely in French. 

FRE 320 Special Topics In French Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 300. 

Subject matter is announced when the course is offered. Includes: surveys of 

Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century literature. Classes conducted in French. 

FRE 351/ 

352/353 Study Abroad in France (V-V-15) 

Prerequisite: FRE 103. 

A summer quarter's residence and study in France in conjunction with the Studies 
Abroad Program of the University System of Georgia. The program lasts for a period 
of 8-9 weeks. The student receives intensive instruction in language and culture and 
participates in University-sponsored activities. 

FRE 401 Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 320 or permission of instructor. 

Subject matter is announced when the course is offered. Subjects include: Seven- 
teenth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Fiction and Theatre. Classes 
conducted in French. 

FRE 402 Special Author (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 320 or permission of instructor. 

Subject matter is announced when the course is offered. Authors include: Flaubert, 

Hugo, Zola, Malraux, Camus. 

FRE 490 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisites: FRE 320 or approval of instructor. 

Transient students may take this course only with permission of the Dean of Faculty 

at Armstrong and the college from which the student comes. 

FRE 499 Language Internship (0-6-3) 

Offered by special arrangement. 

Prerequisites: Junior status, a minimum 2.75 overall G.P.A., a 3.0 G.P.A. in French, 
recommendation of the department head and an instructor of French. 
The student pursues an individually designed project involving off-campus in- 
struction at the elementary school level (grades 1-6). Each week the student will 
prepare for five hours to teach a one hour class. A supervisor from the sponsoring 
institution and an instructor of French will coordinate instruction with the class- 
room teacher and the intern. The ASC instructor will observe the student's class 
twice quarterly and evaluate the teaching. 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



161 



CFR 101/ 

102/103 



GER201 



GER210 



GER211 



GER351/ 

352/353 



GER401 



GER402 



GER490 



LAT 101/ 
102/103 



LAT 201 



LAT 300 



LAT 301 



Elementary Genu.iii ()iu\ I wo, I hree (5-0-5) 

C)tUTfvl I'.uh VlMf 

Provuli* ihi' stiulfnt with the elements of German grammdr, pronunciation, and oral 
comprehfivsiuM, together with .in intrinliK tu>n tt> thi- culturf and c ivili/ation of the 
Cernuin-speakin^ world Ko^ular practice with tapt* rtvording;* is rei^uired. No 
fi>rtM^ti l.u>^uam' b.K kv;ri>iuul is mvrssarv to bej;in 101. 

Intermediate German (5-0-5) 

Otten\li\Kh vi'ar l*n'r\\|uisiiiv I"havt|iurttTsola)lltyeC .I'mun or permLvtKin of instructor. 

ContitMit's to dt'M'lop ri'adin^;, writing, listi'iuii^, Mui sprakin^ skills. 

German Conversation and Composition I (5-0-5) 

rrerequisiltv CitK 201 or oqiiivalont 

Emphasis is on conversational German in simulated situations to develop greater 
oral proficiency and to promote continued awareness of German culture. Review of 
grammar and syntax through guided essays to develop writing skills in the contact 
lan^uay;i' Classes conductod in Cierman. 

Conversation and Composition II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite; GER210. 

The continuation of GER 210. 

Study Abroad In Germany (V-V15) 

Prerequisite: GER 103. 

An 8-9 week summer quarter's residence and study at the Friedrich Alexandar 

University at Erlangen, Germany. An lISP program operating in conjunction with 

the University of Georgia; offers intensive instruction in the C.frm.m language and 

culture, complemented by a number of excursions. 

Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 305 or permission of instructor. 

Subject is announced when the course is offered. Subjects include: Medieval Poetry; 
Prose, Poetry, and Drama in the 17th and 18th Century; the Novella in the 19th 
Century; 20th Century Prose. 

Special Author (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 305 or permission of instructor. 

Subject is announced when the course is offered . Authors include: Grimmeishausen, 

Goethe, Schiller, Thomas Mann, Kafka, Grass. 

Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor or GER 201. Transient students may take this 
course only with permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 

Elementary Latin One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Three courses offered each year. 

Essentials of grammar; readings from selected Latin authors. 

Intermediate Latin (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Three quarters of college Latin or three years of high school Latin. 

Further readings in Latin literature with special emphasis on Vergil and Ch'id. 

Readings In Latin (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: LAT 201. 

Readings from the 2,000 vears of Latinity from Plautus to the recent encycilcals. 

Readings In Latin II (5-0-5) 

Readings of Latin poetrv; may include Horace, Catullus, CKid, Propertius, and 
Tibullus. 



162 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



LAT 302 



LAT/CIA 

351/352/353 



LAT 396 



LAT 401 



SPA 101/ 
102/103 



SPA 105 



SPA 201 



SPA 210 



SPA 211 
SPA 301 



Ovid (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: LAT 201. 

Readings from the Metamorphoses, with emphasis on familiar mythology, and 

from other selected works. 

Study Abroad In Rome and Athens (V-V-15) 

Prerequisite: LAT 103. 

An 8-9 week summer quarter's residence and study in Rome and Athens in 
conjunction with the Studies Abroad Program of the University System of Georgia. 
Taught in English. Through visits to monuments, museums, and classical ruins, and 
on excursions to Crete, Delphi, Ostia, Tivoli, Tarquinia, and Frascati, the student 
experiences first hand the reality of life in the ancient world. 

Latin Language and Culture In Rome (15-0-15) 

Summer. Prerequisite: LAT 201 or the equivalent. 

Classes meet in Rome for 3 hours a day, 6 days a week, for 7 weeks, to speak, read, 
and hear Latin. Students practice composition outside of class and travel to places 
of cultural significance. 

Vergil (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: LAT 201, permission of professor. 

Readings from the Aeneid, with emphasis on books II, IV, VI, and VIII, and from 

other selected works. 

Elementary Spanish One-Two-Three (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. 

Provide the student with the elements of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, and oral 
comprehension, together with an introduction to the culture and civilization of the 
spanish-speaking world. Regular practice with tape recordings is required. No 
foreign language background is necessary to begin 101. 

Spanish for Survival in Health Care Delivery Systems (5-0-5) 

A one-quarter designed for the student who has had little or no formal study of 
Spanish. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with the most basic 
communications skills in the language so that he / she might be able to deal with non- 
English speaking patients in a wide variety of clinical situations. This course will 
fulfill the CPC requirement in foreign languages. 

Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. Prerequisite: Three quarters of college Spanish or permission of 

instructor. 

Continues to develop reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. 

Spanish Conversation and Composition I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 201 or equivalent. 

Emphasis is on conversational Spanish in simulated situations to develop greater 
oral proficiency and to promote continued awareness of Hispanic culture. Review 
of grammar and syntax through guided essays to develop writing skills in the 
contact language. Classes will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

Spanish Conversation and Composition II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 210. 

The continuation of Spanish 210. 

Advanced Grammar and Syntax (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 211 or equivalent. 

Advanced analysis and examination of the grammar and syntax of Spanish, stress- 
ing written usage through written grammar exercises, essays and translations of 
English texts into Spanish. Class will be conducted entirely in Sparush. 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS 1W 

SPA 302 Ad\ amod (.rammar and Syntax for Native Speakers 

ot Spanish (S-O-S) 
rriTOvjiiiMtt' IVrnu.ssiDn ot instriu tur 

Ad\ aiKiil aiialvMs and f\aminatu>n i)f thi- grammar and syntax of Spanihh for the 
nativf sp^'akt•r^ o\ Spanish, strrssm^ vvntti-n usa^i* thri)u>;h written grammar 
I'xtTcisfs and I'ssays Class will bf londm titl iT^tirolv in Spanish 

SPA 310 Civilization and Culture of Spain I (5-0-5) 

iViTcqiiisiti": Spanish 211 i)r eijiiivaifnt 

An historical siirvfvot thfculliirft>f Spain from the Pre- Roman era to the end of the 

Hapsbur^; Dvnastv (170()) C lassos will bf conducttil entirely in Spanish 

SPA 311 Civilization and Culture of Spain II (5-0-5) 

rrerev]uisitt*: Spanish 211 or fcjui\ alent 

The continuation of Spanish 310. An historical survey of Modem Spain, from the 
establishment oi the Iknirbon [dynasty (1700) to the present. Classes will t>e con- 
ducted entirely in Spanish 

SPA 312 Civilization and Culture of Latin America (5-0-5) 

rreroquisite: Spariish 211 or equivalent. 

An historical survey of the culture of Latin America friim the pre-Columbian era to 

the present dav. Classes will be conducted mtiroK ir-i Spanish 

SPA 320 Introduction to Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 301 or equivalent. 

This course will provide the student with methods of analysis for approaching a 
literary text in Spanish. Selected pieces of poetry, prose and drama from the 
Hispanic tradition will be selected for analysis. Classes will be conducted entirely 
in Spanish. 

SPA 351/ 

352/353 Study Abroad In Spain (V-V-1-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 103 and a 3.0 minimum G.P.A. in all Spanish course work. 
A 8-9 week summer quarter's residence and study at the Universidad de Salamanca 
in Salamanca, Spain. An LIS. P. program operating in conjunction with the Univer- 
sity System of Georgia, offers intensive instruction in languages and culture 
complemented by a number of excursions. 

SPA 401 Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 320 or permission of the instructor. 

Hispanic Literature: Subject is announced when course is offered. Classes will be 

conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 402 Special Author (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 320 or permission of instructor. 

Hispanic Literature: Subject is announced when course is offered. Classes will be 

conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 403 Special Topics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 320 or permission of instructor. 

Hispanic Literature: Subject is announced when course is offered. Thematic studies 
of Hispanic literary topics, such as "The Anti-hero in Spanish Literature" or "The 
Theme of the Dictator in Latin American Literature." Classes will be conducted 
entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 404 Spanish Phonetics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 301 or permission of instructor. 

This course will examine the phonological system of the Spanish language. Classes 

will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 490 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisites: Approval oi instructor and SPA 201 . Transient students may take this 
course only with the permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 



1 64 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



SPA 499 Language Internship (0-6-3) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisites: Junior status, a minimum 2.75 
overall G.P.A., a 3.0 G.P.A. in Spanish, recommendation of the departmental 
internship committee, and approval of the department head and a Spanish faculty 
member. The student pursues an individually designed project involving off- 
campus instruction at the elementary school level (grades 1-6). Weekly preparation 
of five hours towards a class instruction period of one hour is expected. The project 
is under supervision of the sponsoring institution and a Spanish faculty member 
who will coordinate it with the classroom teacher and the intern. The supervisor in 
charge will evaluate by observation (twice quarterly) the quality of the intern's 
performance. 

Journalism Offerings 

JRN 343 Journalistic Writing and Editing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 201. 

Investigation of and intensive practice in the techniques of modem journalism with 

emphasis on writing and editing for newspapers and magazines. 

JRN 347 Basic TV Production (2-9-5) 

Same as DRS 347. 

A study of the theory and practice of television production styles, forms, and 
concepts, with special emphasis on the critical appreciation of electronic communi- 
cation techniques. 

JRN 350 Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Same as FLM/DRS 350. 

Study of film with emphasis on critical appreciation of film as an art form. 

JRN 400 Topics In Journalism (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: JRN 340 or 343 or permission of instructor. 

A seminar on the impact of the media on the world today. Topics include rights and 
responsibilities of journalists, censorship, media control, propaganda, and other 
current issues. 

Linguistics Offerings 

LIN 470 Advanced Composition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 201 or consent of instructor. Same as ENG 370. 
A study of expository and report techniques. 

LIN 500 Topics In Linguistics (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

A seminar in subjects of interest in both theoretical and applied linguistics. Topics 

are announced. Tlie course may be taken more than once for credit as topics change. 

LIN 580 Advanced Grammar (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as ENG /LIN 580. 

LIN 582 History of the English Language (5-0-5) 

Same as ENG /LIN 382. 

Philosophy Offerings 

Please Note: ENG 101 is prerequisite: to all following PHI courses. 

PHI 201 Introduction to Philosophy (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the basic themes, problems, vocabulary, and representative 
figures of philosophy. 

PHI 301 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (5-0-5) 

An historical introduction to philosophy, tracing the development of European 
philosophy from the early Greeks through the Middle Ages, with emphasis on 
selected works of major philosophers. 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 1M 



PHI 302 Ibth, 17th, 18th Century rhilosophy (5-0-5) 

I urv>pfat\ philnM»phv tri)m tht* Kfn.iissance through Kant, rmphatizing Bclcctcd 

works ot n\A]OT phiU>M»phi'rs 

PHI 303 19th and 20th Century Philosophy (5-0-5) 

A study oJ the nAajiir philosophfrs and philoMiphicdl movements of tMv l^th and 
20th centuries 

PHI 400 Special Topics (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

l^tftTfd on di'nuind Pri-requisite: PHI 201 or a 300 philosophy course. 

Subject is announced when the course is offered. Current courses: Aesthetics, 

Philosophy of Religion, Ethics, Nietzsche. 

PHI 490 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Ottered on demand I rerequisite: Senior status and one 300-philosophy course. 
The student, with the advice and consent of this supervising professor and of the 
department head, selects the topic for supervised independent study and submits 
a prospectus for department approval before the quarter in which the course is to be 
taken. Transient students may take this course only with p>ermission of the Dean of 
Faculty at Armstrong and the college from which the student comes. 

Mathematics and Computer Science 

Faculty 

* Wheeler, Ed, Department Head 

* Barnard Jane * Jodis, Stephen 

* Bykat, Alex ♦ Kilhefner, Dale 

* Hansen, John * McMillan, Tim 

* Hollis, Selwyn Munson, Richard 
Horta, Arnaldo Ouzts, Susan 

* Hudson, Anne Shipley, Charles 

* Hudson, Sigmund * White, Laurie 

* Graduate Faculty 

The Mathematics and Computer Science Department offers a wide range of services 
to the ASC student. Several introductory courses are available both to satisfy the general 
education needs of the student and to satisfy prerequisites in the major program. A minor 
in either mathematics or computer science can be designed to complement the rest of a 
student's program. A major in the mathematical sciences allows the student to choose 
from among four options; a flexible computer science major meets the needs of students 
with a number of different interests. 

The Mathematical Sciences Major: Option 1 of this major is entitled "Mathematics" 
and prepares students intending to pursue graduate studies in mathematics. Option 3 is 
entitled "Mathematics Education" and prepares students to teach in public and private 
secondary schools. This option is an approved program for the Georgia Teacher's 
Professional Four Year Certificate (T-4). Option 4 is entitled "Computer Science" and is 
available for students who desire a dual concentration in mathematics and computer 
science. 

The most flexible of the four options is Option 2 entitled "Applied Mathematics." This 
option is a good choice for students preparing for a variety of careers in business and 
industry, intending to attend graduate school in a quantitative area such as biostatistics, 
economics, or operations research, or wishing to participate in a Dual-Degree Program 
in engineering. 

The Computer Science Major: In recent years this major has equipped many students 
to step into a broad spectrum of jobs in the computer industry. The degree features a core 
of courses designed to provide a solid foundation in theoretical computer science as well 
as practical programming experience. After finishing the core, students choose from 



1 66 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



several optional senior level tracks that give an individual focus to the major. At present 
students may choose from tracks in large software system development, computer 
systems, knowledge-based systems, and scientific computation. A variety of internships 
and cooperative education placements provide students with opportunities for practical 
experience in the discipline. 

Important Note: In August of 1991 the computer science major was accredited by the 
Computer Science Accreditation Commission (CSAC) making the Armstrong program 
the second accredited program in the state. (The first accredited program in the state is 
housed at Georgia Institute of Technology.) The Computer Science Accreditation Com- 
mission is an agent of the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board (CSAB), a specialized 
accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA) 
and the U.S. Department of Education. 

Co-ops and Internships: Students are able to compete for cooperative education 
positions and internships at major Savannah employers such as Gulfstream and Savan- 
nah Foods. Such positions provide students invaluable opportunities to acquire practical 
experience that complements their classroom experience. 

The Dual Degree Program: Under arrangements with Georgia Tech, students may in 
five years of study earn simultaneously the BS degree in the mathematical sciences from 
Armstrong and the Bachelor's degree in any one of a number of fields of engineering 
from Georgia Tech. Armstrong participates in similar programs with other major 
universities. Students considering this option should contact an advisor in the Math- 
ematics and Computer Science Department as soon as possible. 

Minors: Students in any major program whatever (either two year or four year) can 
augment their major with a minor in mathematics or a minor in computer science. 

Minor in Mathematics: 

1. MAT 207, 208, 216 

2. Ten additional quarter hours chosen from MAT 260, MAT 265, 300-400 level 
mathematics courses (excluding MAT 391 and MAT 393). MAT 260 and MAT 
265 may not both be included in the minor. 

Minor in Computer Science: 

1. CS242 

2. Four of CS 262 or 300-400 level courses (excluding CS 400, 496, 497) 

Special Academic Regulations: 

1. To earn the BS degree in the mathematical sciences or computer science, a 
student must successfully complete with a grade of C or better all mathematics 
and computer science courses required in the program of study. 

2. To fulfill the prerequisites for any mathematics or computer science course one 
must obtain a grade of "C" (or above) in each prerequisite course except 
Mathematics 101. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 .. 5 
Area II 20 

1. MAT 103, 206 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHE 128, 129 (required for 

dual degree students); PHY 217, 218 10 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 167 



Area III 20 

1 HIS 114, lis or W2 10 

2. rc)S 113 and one course selected from: PSY 101 (required for 

math education option); SCX 201; ECO 201, 202; ANT 201 10 

Area IV 30 

1 CS 142 5 

2. MAT 207, 208, 216, 260 ^ 20 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 „ 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Major lield Requirements 30 

Option One — Mathematics: 

1. MAT 309, 311, 401 

2. Oneof MAT317, 402, or4l6 

3. Additional approved electives in mathematics 
Option Two — Applied Mathematics 

1. MAT 321, 341 

2. One of CS 242, 246, 247 

3. Oneof MAT 311, 317, 401,416 

4. Additional courses from: MAT 309, 317, 322, 342, 346, 353, 401, 406, 490 
Option Three — Mathematics Education 

1. MAT 311, 321, 336 

2. MAT 416 or 470 

3. Additional approved mathematics electives 
Option Four — Computer Science 

1. MAT 321, 353 

2. Oneof MAT 322, 341,346 

3. CS 242, 303, 304 

C. Courses Related to Major 25 

Option One — Mathematics 

1. Language or approved computer science 10 

2. Approved electives from mathematics or related field 15 

Option Two — Applied Mathematics 

One of the following sequences: 

1. PHY 217, 218, 219 with additional approved electives in chemistry, 
physics, or engineering 

2. ACC 211, 212 and ECO 201, 202, 330 

3. Approved computer science courses 

4. Approved biology courses including BIO 370 or 480 

5. Approved chemistry courses 
Option Three — Mathematics Education 

1. PSY 201 or EDN 201 

2. EDN 200, 335, 441, EXC 310 
Option Four — Computer Science 

1. CS 312 and approved electives in computer science 

D. Electives 40 

Students in Options 1, 2, and 4 may choose any electives. Students in option 3 must 
use these hours to complete student teaching. 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



168 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 .... 5 
Area II 20 

1. MAT 103, 206 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHE 128, 129; PHY 217, 218 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 292 10 

2. POS 113 and one of the courses: PSY 101; SOC 201; ECO 201, 202; 
ANT 201 10 

Area IV 30 

1. MAT 207, 265 10 

2. CS 142, 242, 262 15 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Major Field Requirements 45 

1. CS 303, 304, 312, 326, 334, 342 30 

2. Three courses chosen from one of the following groups: 15 

a. Large Software System Development: CS 346, 434, 445, 461 

b. Computer Systems: CS 346, 421, 426, 445 

c. Knowledge-based Systems: CS 414, 461, 481 

d. Scientific Computation: CS 353, 414, 445, 481 

C. Related Field Requirements 30 

1. ENG 372 5 

2. MAT 321 5 

3. One course from MAT 208, 216, 322, 346, 353 5 

4. A third quarter of laboratory science completing the sequence begun 
in Area 2: 5 

a) BOT 203 or ZOO 204 

b) CHE 211 or CHE 341 

c) PHY 219 

5. Two additional approved electives from scientific disciplines 10 

D. Electives 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 
OFFERINGS 

Mathematics Offerings 

MAT 101 College Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Student must satisf}' one of the follow- 
ing: (a) fulfillment of the College Preparatory Curriculum mathematics requirement 
and a score of at least 380 on the SAT Math, (b) a passing grade on the math 
component of the College Placement Exam, or (c) successful exit from Developmen- 
tal Studies Math. Real and complex number arithmetic, polynomial and rational 
expressions, equations and inequalities, absolute value, functions and graphs, 
exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and matrices. 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



169 



Piacrment K. . < J.tiion S^mu .wv., .... who %4ti%(y the prrrr<' — • - • tMATIOI 

rn>ni'lhfU*NN nttii to riMi\Ji)r».f Ihfir iTUithfrndtKal HkilK in a ili mI •itudu*% 

mathenuitics courst* bffiuf talking MA I IDl In particular »< an^ .-. ;.., ;.>llowingi* 
trill*, the >tuiii*nl should ci>nMdi*r i*nri>lling in l^M l)W 

a) I hi* student did not compli'ti* two yearn oi algebra and oxuf yr«r of gromrtry in 
hi^h NchiH^I 

b) I he student has not completed a mathematics course m five or more years. 

c) The student made below 420 on the mathematics pi>rtion of the SAT examination. 

MAT 10.1 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (5-0-5) 

I .ill, Wiiitir, Spring, SuinnuT Preri'quisite: MAT 101, a score of at least 550 on the 
mathematics portu>n ot the SA I, or permission of the department head 
functu>ns; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and in- 
verse trigonometric; trigonometric identities, law of sines and cosines, complex 
numbers. 

MAT 195 Applied Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAI 101 

An applied mathematics course featuring applications in economics and the social 
sciences. Linear functions and models; matrix operations and applications; in- 
equalities and linear programming; exponential functions and log functions; single 
and multivariant differentiation. 

MAT 206 Calculus I (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 103, a score of at least 600 on the 
mathematics portion of the SAT, or permission of the department head. 
Functions; the derivative and its applications, antidifferentiation; the definite 
integral. 

MAT 207 Calculus II (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 206. 

Techniques and applications of integration; conic sections and polar coordinates. 

MAT 208 Calculus of Several Variables I (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 207. 

Parametric curves and vectors in the plane; indeterminate forms. Taylor's formula, 

and improper integrals; infinite series; vectors, curves, and surfaces in space; partial 

differentiation. 

Linear Algebra (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 207. 

Linear systems and matrices; vector spaces; linear independence, rank of a matrix; 
linear transformations; determinants; introduction to eigenvalues and eigenvec- 
tors; diagonalization; applications. 

Elementary Statistics (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

Measures of central tendency and dispersion; probability distributions; inferences 

concerning means; analysis of variance; correlation; linear regression. 

MAT 2^ Introduction to Mathematical Proof (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: MAT 207. 

Elementary logic, sets, functions and relations, methods of proof including induc- 
tion, and selected topics from abstract algebra. 

MAT 265 Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 103 and CS 142. 

Elementary logic; naive set theory; relations and functions; graphs; finite automata; 

Turing machines; formal languages and grammars. 

MAT 290 The Spirit and Structure of Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: .MAT 101. 

A terminal course of selected topics designed to portray the history, philosophy, and 
aesthetics of mathematics, and to develop an appreciation of the role of mathematics 
in western thought and contemporary culture. 



,>v 



MAT 216 



MAT 220 



170 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MAT 309 Calculus of Several Variables II (5-0-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 208. 

Multiple integrals and their applications; vector fields; line and surface integrals; 

Green's theorem; the Divergence theorem; Stokes theorem; differential equations. 

MAT 311 Abstract Algebra (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

Elementary properties of integers; groups, rings, and fields; mappings, homomor- 

phisms, kernels, and quotient structures. 

MAT 317 Advanced Linear Algebra (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 216, MAT 260. 

Abstract vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, di- 

agonalization, inner product spaces, real quadratic forms. 

MAT 321 Probability & Mathematical Statistics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207. MAT 260 or MAT 265. 

Data collection, organization, and description; probability; random variables; dis- 
crete and continuous probability distributions; Central Limit Theorem; point and 
interval estimation; tests of hypotheses; simple linear regression and correlation. 

MAT 322 Probability & Mathematical Statistics II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 321. 

Analysis of variance; nonlinear and multiple regression; chi-square tests for cat- 
egorical data; nonparametric methods; Bayesian inference. This course uses statistical 
packages to analyze data sets. 

MAT 336 Modem Geometry (5-0-5) 

Fall (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 
A survey of topics from Euclidean geometry. 

MAT 341/342 Differential Equations I, II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 208. 

Ordinary differential equations; series solutions; systems of first order differential 
equations, the Laplace transform; introduction to Fourier series; partial differential 
equations; Sturm-Liouville theory; applied problems; numerical solutions with 
emphasis on computer aided solution. 

MAT 346 Mathematical Modeling and Optimization (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 321. 

Design, solution, and interpretation of mathematical models of problems in the 
social, life, and management sciences. Topics chosen from linear programming, 
dynamic programming, scheduling theory, Markov chains, game theory, queuing 
theory, inventory theory, and computer based simulation. Various projects are 
assigned which require computer software packages for solution. 

MAT 353 Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207 and CS 120 or 142. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; systems of linear equations; numerical 
integration and numerical solution of differential equations; matrix inversion; 
evaluation of determinants; calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors; boundary 
value problems. 

MAT 360 Mathematical Logic (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207, 260. 

The elementary statement and predicate calculus; formal systems; applications of 

logic in mathematics. 

MAT 391 Mathematics for the Elementary School Teacher (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101, 103 or 290 with a grade of "C" or better, and admission to 
Teacher Education. 

A study of the mathematics in the K-6 curriculum, with emphasis on appropriate 
methods of teaching for understanding through activity based and problem solving 
experiences. Communication and connections will be emphasized. Frequent use of 
wide range of concrete manipulatives to embody concepts in arithmetic and whole 
numbers, fractions and decimals, and in geometry and measurement. Directed field 
experience and required laboratory. (Credit will not apply toward a degree in the 
mathematical sciences.) 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



171 



MAT 393 Teaching of Middle School/ General Mathemattci (4-3-5) 

Pri'ri'quisitf MAI >M. 

iVobli'nvs i»t teaching tfiulitional topii> siuh .is fractl(nl^ timm.il^ p<Tt i-nt.ij'r, mra- 
surfment (fsptviallv tho mHru syNtcm), inlormal . 
probability, m\k\ NtatistKs CimjHTativr learning; in an ■ 
environment will bi* emphaM/i\l lrHi>rpt>ration of drill .»iu: 
with appropriate >;anu> and laK>rator\' exeroM-s I>!rivti 

ijiiiri-vl lal^oratorv (Oixlit will not apply toward a di7;rw in tlu- inalluinutaal :^aiu.i3».) 
MAT 400 Putnam Seminar (0-2-1) 

Fall TrerequiMtes MAI 208, 26() 

A variety of mathematical problems, cor>»idered with the aim of developing 

problem sol\ m^ techniques 

MAT 401/402 Advanced Calculus 1, II (5-0-5) 
Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

The real number system; sequences; limits of functions; the Bol/ano-WeierstrsM 
theorem; ci>mpactness; uniform continuilv. the derivative; the Kiemann integral; 
Euclidean n-space; sequences of functit>ns, the Weierstrass approximation theorem; 
series; elementar\ tunctu>ns 

MAT 406 Functions of a Complex Variable (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 208, 2bO. 

Complex numbers; elementary functions and transfcirm.uions th*- ( .m. h\ rheory; 

conformal mapping; Riemann's mapping theorem. 

MAT 436 Topology (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 401. 

Topological spaces and homeomorphisms; separability; compactness; connected- 
ness; completeness; metrizability; introduction to homotopy theory. 

MAT 490 Special Topics (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and per- 
mission of the department head. 

Individual readings and research under the direction of a member of the mathemat- 
ics facultv. 



MAT 496/ 

497/498 



MAT 516 

MAT 560 
MAT 570 

MAT 590 
MED 550 



Internship In Mathematics ((0-l)-(12-15)-5) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head. 
Experience, in a variety of mathematical applications suited to the educational and 
professional aspirations of the student, under the direction of the faculty and 
appropriate off-campus supervisory personnel. (Open to transient students only 
with permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and that of the appropriate 
official of the college from which the student comes.) 

Theory of Numbers (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: At least 23 hours of college mathematics at the calculus level or 
beyond, including calculus and at least one proof-oriented course. 
A survey of topics from number theory to include: divisibility and congruence; 
diophantine equations; distribution of prime numbers, famous unsolved problems, 
number-theoretic functions and their applications; Theorems of Fermat and Euler. 

Foundations of Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 207. 

Fundamental ideas of axiomatic mathematics, including sets, relations, furnrtior^, 

algebraic structures, with emphasis on techniques of writing proofs. 

History of Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: At least 25 hours of college mathematics at the calculus le\ el or beyond, 
including calculus and at least one proof-oriented course and a college geometr)' course. 
The historical development of mathematics from its empirical beginnings to its 

present state. 

Topics in Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Individual readings and research under the direction of the mathematics faculty. 

Teaching Mathematics with Technology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 103. 

Use of^graphing calculators and special computer softv\'are to teach algebra, geom- 
etry, advanced algebra, and precalculus. 



172 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MED 590 Special Topics in Mathematics Education (5-0-5) 

MED 592 Modem Mathematics for Elementary Teachers (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 and at least 5 more hours of college mathematics or math- 
ematics education. 

A study of the mathematics content to be taught in the elementary school, using 
concrete materials for teaching concepts, skills, and problem solving. (This course 
may not be counted towards the M. Ed. in mathematics.) 

MED 594 Teaching of Middle School/General Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 103. 

Problems of teaching traditional topics, such as fractions, decimals, percentage, 
measurement, informal geometry, algebraic structures, probability, and statistics. 
Cooperative learning in an activity-based problem solving environment will be 
emphasized. Incorporation of drill and practice in necessary skills with appropriate 
games and exercises. 

Computer Science Offerings 

CS 115 Introduction to Computer Concepts and Applications (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

The study of hardware and software components of computers, elementary pro- 
gramming, and the impact of the computer on society. Discussion of the capabilities 
and the limitations of computers, and the kinds of problems that are best solved by 
computers. Experience with developing and modifying algorithms to solve such 
problems. Emphasis on the major uses of computers. This course is designed for the 
non-computer science major. It may not be applied as part of a language sequence. 
Credit will be granted for only one of CS 115, CS 116, and CS 296. 

CS 116 Honors Computer Concepts and Applications (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite or Corequisite: MAT 103. 

This course replaces CS 115 for selected students. While the subject matter will be 
similar to the subject matter in CS 115, the treatment will have greater depth due to 
the higher mathematical experience of the students. Mathematical software pack- 
ages will be included in the laboratory component. Credit will be granted for only 
one of CS 115, CS 116, and CS 296. 

CS 120 Introduction to BASIC Programming (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

BASIC programming and program structure; elementary logic and Boolean algebra; 
algorithms; flow charts; debugging; computer solutions of numeric and non- 
numeric problems; characteristics and applications of computers in modem society. 
(Credit will not apply toward a degree in computer science.) 

CS 136 RPG Programming (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 120 or 142. 

Introduction to the language and programming applications for small computer 

systems using RPG. 

CS 142 Introduction to Programming Principles (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

Structured programming; control structures, input /output, functions and proce- 
dures, fundamental data types, arrays and records; elementary searching and 
sorting; debugging techniques. 

CS 225 Statistical Programming for the Social Sciences (3-4-5) 

Winter (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 220 or 321 and CS 120 or 142. 

Uses of computers in statistical analysis, including the study of statistical methods, 

the programming of statistical analyses, and data analysis using packaged systems. 

CS 242 Advanced Programming Principles (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: MAT 103 and CS 142. 

Advanced programming concepts; abstract data types; recursion, binary files, 

pointers, lists, queues, stacks and trees; sorting methods of order n log n. 



I 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 17J 



C S 24b 1 ortran rrogramming (2-3-3) 

^rl•r^^lm^^^l•^ MA I llU and C S 12l) or CS 142 

Alm.>nthniK priKi'sM's oi mmputrr problem •iolvinj^ in a sKirntific context; FOR- 

I K A\ pri»^ranui\ir\>;lan^uam' sviUax, arrays, input-output.subroutinr*. function*. 

CS 247 Programming Principles with COBOL (4-3-5) 

Prorrquisittv CS 142 

1 hf COIKM. programming lanf;ua^e basic syntax, inpul-outpul, clfbu^^ing, table- 
handling, sorting, searching, sequential and random file manipulation, "itructured 
progranimmg tor COIKH.. 

CS 2b2 Introduction to File Structures (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 242. 

An mtrixluction to the concepts and techniques of accessing data in files on 
stvondarv devices. Includes sequential, relative, and indexed access methods, and 
trtv-structured organizations. Also includes security and ethics, introductory and 
relational database system concepts, and external sorting. 

CS 29b Computer Literacy for Educators (2-3-3) 

Winter. Prerequisites: MAT 101. 

The study of hardware and software components of computers, elementary pro- 
gramming, and the impact ofcomputers on curriculum. Discussion of the capabilities 
and limitations of computers, and the kinds of problems that are best solved by 
computers. Experience with developing and modifying algorithms to solve such 
problems. Emphasis on instructional uses of microcomputers. This course is 
designed for the non-computer science major. It may not be applied as part of a 
language sequence. Credit will be granted for only one of CS 115, CS 116, and 
CS 296. 

CS 303 Computer Organization and Architecture I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 242. 

Hardware and software concepts of digital computing systems, with emphasis on 
fundamental system software and details of hardware operation. Topics include 
virtual machines, systems organization, digital logic, and microprogramming. 

CS 304 Computer Organization and Architecture II (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 303. 

Continuation of CS 303. Topics include instruction and data formats, addressing 
modes, instruction types, flow of control, assembly language programming, 
and advanced computer architectures, including RISC machines and parallel archi- 
tectures. 

CS 312 Algorithms and Data Structures (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 262 and MAT 265. 

Abstract data types; algorithms for the manipulation of data structures; analysis of 
algorithms; concepts related to the interaction between data structures and storage 
structures for the generating, developing, and processing of data; algorithms for 
memory management. 

CS 326 Operating Systems I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 304. 

Concepts, structure, and mechanisms of operating systems. Topics include: pro- 
cesses, concurrency, memory management, scheduling, I/O management, disk 
scheduling, and file management. 

CS 334 Software Engineering Concepts I (4-3-5) 

requisites: CS 262 and ENG 372. 

Principles and techniques of designing and implementing software systems, includ- 
ing system life-cycle models, planning techniques, requirements analysis and 
systems specification, hman interfaces, design, implementation, testing, mainte- 
nance, team structure and project management. The role and responsibilities of 
computing professionals. A student project encompassing some or all of these 
techniques will be required. 



174 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CS 342 Comparative Languages (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 262, CS 304 and MAT 265. 

Comparative study of programming languages including facilities for procedures, 
parameter passing and recursion, control structures, and storage allocation tech- 
niques. Methods of specifying syntax and semantics. Introduction to program 
translation. 

CS 346 'C Programming under UNIX (tm) (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 342. 

The 'C' programming language: basic syntax, types, operators and expressions, 
statements, modular programming, arrays, structures, unions and pointers. UNIX 
(tm) system programming techniques: I/O forking, pipes, signals, interrupts. 
Software tools: macros, conditional compilation, passing values to the compiler, 
lint, symbolic debugging, source code control, libraries. 

CS 353 Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207 and CS 142. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; systems of linear equations; numerical 
integration and numerical solution of differential equations; matrix inversion; 
evaluation of determinants; calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors; boundary 
value problems. 

CS 400 Programming Seminar (0-2-1) 

Fall. Prerequisite: CS 242. 

A variety of programming problems, considered with the aim of developing 

problem solving techniques. 

CS 414 Computer Graphics (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 312. 

Introduction to computer graphics: hardware and software. Algorithms for com- 
puter graphics programming. Windows, clipping, two and three dimensional 
transformations, hidden line and hidden surface removal. Graphics standards for 
hardware and software systems. 

CS 421 Data Communications and Computer Networks (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 304. 

Communications media; codes; data transmission; multiplexing; protocols; layered 

networks. 

CS 426 Operating System Concepts II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 326 and an elementary knowledge of 'C. 
Case studies of UNIX and/or similar operating systems. 

CS 434 Software Engineering Concepts II (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 334. 

Advanced software engineering principles, including software processes and meth- 
odologies, CASE tools, software metrics, software quality assurance, reusability 
and reengineering, and future trends. A student project encompassing some or all 
of these techniques will be required. 

CS 445 Compiler Theory (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 312, 342. 

Study of programming language translation and basic compiler implementation 
techniques. Formal grammars and languages; specification of syntax and semantics; 
lexical analysis; parsing; semantic processing. 

CS 461 Database Systems (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 334. 

Database management system concepts and architecture; the relational, hierarchi- 
cal, network, entity-relationship, and other models; design concepts; internal 
implementation techniques. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCICNCES 17S 



CS 481 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (4-3-5) 

rrfrevjuisiti's: CS 342 

Iho baMC cinui'pts i>f artificial int»'llim*ncf including: itihIih lion tyAtems. kni>wl- 

e\.\f,v rt'prcM'iitatiDn, pattrrn lualihin^, hcuri>lu •»« > il and pr 

roasi>nit>g,andt'xpt'rt >vsti'ms Ihi'stKial, cultural. an Mimpait«' 

mti'lli^iTUiv 

CS 490 Special Topics In Computer Science ((0-5)-(0-15Hl-5)) 

PriTevjuiMtt's: CDnsonl oi thi' instrin. ti)r and ptTmisMon of the department head. 
St'Iivtot-i topics m some area of current interi*st m computer science, possible areas 
include system simulatu>n, graphics, and micrtKomputers 

CS 49b/ 

497/498 Internship In Computer Science ((0-l)-(12-15)-(l-5) 

Ottered by special arrangement FVerecjuisite: Permission of the department head. 
Mav not be taken ct>ncurrentlv 

Experience, in a variety of computing envirimments suited to the educational and 
professional aspirations of the student, under the direction of a member of the 
facult\ and appropriate off-campus super\ isory personnel. 

CS 551 Computer Literacy for Educators (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

A study of the use of computers with emphasis on instructional use Hardware 
components of computers, programming, instructional software evaluation and the 
impact of computers on the curriculum. Hands-on experience with the use of 
commercial packages, including word processing and spreadsheets. (This course 
may not be counted toward the M. Ed. in mathematics.) 

CS 590 Topics in Computer Science (5-0-5) 

Selected topics in some area of current interest in computer science 

Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Faculty 

* Martin, Grace, Head 

McCormick, Cynthia, Coordinator of Psychology 

* Adams, Joseph * Palefsky, Elliot 
Cornell, David Saadatmand, Yassaman 
Douglass, Keith Taylor, Stephen 
Khondker, Karinn Walker, Deborah 
Kingery, Dorothy 

* Lane, Joseph 

* Graduate Faculty 

Students are advised to complete as many of the general degree requirements as 
possible before entering their junior year. Psychology majors should take PSY 101 and 
220 before the end of their sophomore years. Approved course distributions and annual 
schedules are available in the department office. All students are urged to seek advise- 
ment with regard to degree requirements and scheduling. 



176 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 220 10 

2. One of the sequences: CHE 121, 122, CHE 128, 129, or PHS 121, 122 .. 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192, POS 113 15 

2. ECO 201 or SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. BIO 101, 102 10 

2. CS 115 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

4. PSY 101, ANT 201 10 

Area V 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Degree Requirements 65 

1. PSY 220, 312, 408, 410 and 411 or 412 25 

2. Approved selection of psychology courses 25 

3. Foreign language sequence 15 

C. Elective Courses 10-25 

1. An appropriate minor or selected upper division courses 10-25 

D. Unspecified 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 191-206 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 

WITH A MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY (Leading to Teacher Licensure in 

Special Education: Behavior Disorders) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area! 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 220 10 

2. One of the sequences: CHE 121, 122, CHE 128, 129, or PHS 121, 122 .. 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192, POS 113 15 

2. ECO 201 or SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. BIO 101, 102 10 

2. CS 115 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

4. PSY 101, ANT 201 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 or 166 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 



I 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 177 



I 



B. IX'griv Kfiimri'iiuMits IIU 

1. INY220, 312, 4l)H, 4U).uul411 or 412 „ 25 

2. I^Y 2()U 316, 328, 350, 40b 25 

3. Foreign Ic^^gua^e sequencc-SPA 101, 102, 103 15 

C. Professional S<.*quenco r 

1 i: ON 21H), !• DN 320, EDN 422, EXC 310, plus 10 hours in courses 

now boing developed 30 

2. HDN 471, 472, 473 Student TeachinR 15 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 206 

Minor Concentrations 

The SiK'ial and Behaxioral Sciences offers minors in the following five areas: 

A. Psychology — which requires 20 credit hours of upper division work. 

B. Mental Health— which requires PSY 302, 316, 328, 406, 515. 

C. Organizational Psychology — which requires five of the following: PSY 302, 406, 
515,520,521,522.' 

D. Anthropology — which requires 20 hours oi upper division anthropology credits. 

E. Sociology — which requires 20 credit hours of upper division work. 

F. Economics — which requires 20 hours of upper division work selected from ECO 
310, 330, 350, 421, 431, 440, 441, 450, 520, 540, 545, 563 and 401-403. 

All minor concentrations require a grade of "C" or better in each course. 

Anthropology Offerings 

ANT 201 Introduction to Anthropology (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to the biocultural nature of humans through a survey of the 
subdisciplines of anthropology. 1 he course is organized around an ecological and 
evolutionary framework. 

ANT/PBH 207 Introduction to Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

The introductory archaeology course consists of a history of the field, basic tech- 
niques, theoretical underpinnings, and examples of field work from all types of 
excavation. It covers the range from early man to industrial and urban archaeology 
in a general fashion. Analysis is introduced along with survey techniques, preser- 
\ation, reporting and other skills. (Identical with PBH 207.) 

ANT 302 Human Evolution (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201 or permission of instructor; BIO 101 and 102 strongly 

recommended. 

Biological anthropology is introduced through the principles of evolution and 

genetics, evolutionary forces, human variation and adaptation, primate evolution 

and behavior, the fossil record of human ancestors and early modem humans, and 

the relationship between human biology and culture. 

ANT 305 North American Indians (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201 or permission of instructor. 

A study of the prehistoric, historic and contemporary Native American populations 
north of Mexico, emphasizing the role of the environment in the diversity and 
complexity of Native American cultures. 



178 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ANT 308 Primate Social Behavioi' and Ecology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201 or permission of instructor. 

The social behavior and ecology of prosimians, monkeys, and apes and implications 
for the evolution of human social behavior are examined. Topics include primate 
origins and evolutionary trends, survey of living primates, social organization, 
ecology and social behavior, and models for the evolution of human behavior. 

ANT 310 Anthropology of Sex and Gender (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201 or permission of instructor. 

A study of the biological and cultural determinants of sex differences and sex roles. The 

relationship between sex roles and control of resources will be examined cross-culturally. 

ANT 395 Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences {V-V (1-5)} 

Prerequisites: Junior standing, permission of department head, and agreement by 
a faculty member to supervise the research. 

Uncompensated research to be assigned and directed by a faculty member of the 
appropriate discipline. Students will conduct research using methods appropriate 
for that discipline. Student research may include a literature search, field or 
laboratory observation and experimentation, data reduction and analysis, and 
written and /or oral presentation of results. The research experience will be evalu- 
ated by a rotating committee of the departmental faculty before the initiation of the 
project, and again upon completion of the work. Credit will vary depending on the 
work to be completed. Up to five (5) credit hours may be earned in any one 
discipline, for a maximum of ten (10) credit hours. 

ANT 400 Sorcery, Demons and Gods (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Anthropological analysis of religion as a universal category of culture. The super- 
natural will be considered: Mother goddesses myth, sorcery, shamanism, sacrifice 
and totemism. Belief systems in their sociocultural contexts will be emphasized. 

ANT/PBH 401 Fieldwork In Historical Archaeology (0-20-10) 

Spring. 

Prerequisite: PBH 207 or permission of instructor or director. 
An introduction to and first application of archaeological methods to a specific field 
project. Excavation techniques, surveying and map making, data collecting and 
recording, archaeological photography, the identification and analysis of artifacts, 
and the interpretation of archaeological data will be presented in field and labora- 
tory work as well as in lectures and readings. (Identical with PBH 551.) (Under 
certain circumstances this course may be substituted in the Preservation Studies 
minor for PBH 598.) Course may be repeated for credit. 

ANT/PBH 402 Practicum In Archaeological Analysis (2-6-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: permission of instructor or director. 
The application of archaeological interpretative techniques to a specific site or 
analytical problem. Individual research projects in the interpretation of archaeo- 
logical data and the conservation of artifactual finds with special attention to the 
care and storage of collections, display in the museum setting, and the presentation 
of archaeologically-derived information. 

ANT 405 Sociobiology of Human Behavior (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201 or permission of instructor. 

The evolution of human social behavior is examined from a biological anthropologi- 
cal perspective. Topics include altruism and kinship, human mating systems, 
reproduction and parenting, ecology of social systems, and life history strategies. 






ANT/HIS/ 

PBH 455 



Historical Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995. 

Prerequisite: PBH 207 or permission of the instructor. 

An introduction to the archaeology of North America since the arrival of Europeans in 

the New World. Some attention will be paid to British and Continental Post Medieval 

Archaeology as well as to the special areas of Industrial and Nautical Archaeology. 

Emphasis will be given to anthropological archaeology's method and theory both as a 

perspective for the writing of history and as a component of Historic Preservation. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 179 



ANT/HIS/ 

PBH 45«J American Material ( ulture (4-2-S) 

An inlriHiiictu>n to the sliidv ot the m>n-literary remdinn of our MKiety. pajit and 
present Vernacular and polite architecture, ceramioi. mtirtuary art. community and 
si'ttlenu'nt patterns, diet, dre»s and di»ea»c are among the topics that will be 
discussed. 

ANT/PBH 480 Special Topics In Archaeology (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisites: A.M/I'HH 207, ANI/PBH 5S1 

The a>urse is designtni to offer a wide variety of experience to advanced, upper level 
students in .uchaei>logical techniques Sub|tvt matter will center on such topics as 
archaeological graphics, faunal analvsis (/iH>archaeoIogy), conservatu>n. or involve 
some oft-campus archaeological experience. 

ANT/HIS/ 

PBH 501 Fieldwork in Historical Archaeology (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite hitroductorv Anthropology ot permission of the instructor. 
Ihe course is designed to tamiliari/e students with basic archaeological field 
techniques. Students will participate in mapping, excavation, pr(Kessing and cata- 
loging artifactual materials from a multicomponent site. The fieldwork will be an 
intensive introduction to practical archaeology. 

ANT/HIS/ 

PBH 553 Historical Archaeology II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PBH 207 or the permission of the instructor. 

An introduction to the archaeology of North America. Attention will be given to 
British and Continental Post-Medieval Archaeology as well as the special areas of 
industrial and nautical archaeology, anthropological archaeology's methods, and 
theory both as a perspective for the writing of history and as a component of 
historical preservation. 

Economics Offerings 

ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics (5-0-5) 

Ottered on demand. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 and MAT 101. 

A survey of macro-economics, including basic economic concepts, national income, 

the monetary system, and the international economy. 

ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 and MAT 101; ECO201 not 
a prerequisite. 

A survey of micro-economics, including the composition and pricing of national 
output, government and the market economy, factor pricing and income distribu- 
tion, and a comparison of market systems. 

ECO 203 Principles of Accounting I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for MAT 101. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and practices of accounting; the 
construction and interpretation of balance sheet and profit and loss statements; the 
theory of debits and credits and their application to the accounting priKess. 

ECO 204 Principles of Accounting II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 203. 

The application of accounting principles to specialized problems found in 
proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations, with emphasis on cost accounting 
theory, modern methods of data processing, and the sources and applications of 

funds. 

ECO 205 Intermediate Macro Economics ( 5-0- 5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

Analysis of theories of national income determination, the factors affecting employ- 
ment and price level as presented by neo-Keynesians and the monetarists. Also 
included are some of the recent developments in the field of macroeconomics. 



180 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ECO 310 Multinational Economic Enterprises (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

Topics include how multinational economic enterprises have evolved over time, 
how they affect jobs and exports /imports in the U.S., and how they affect the 
economics of less developed countries. 

ECO 350 Managerial Economics 

Prerequisite: ECO 202, or permission of instructor. 

An examination of how economic theories may be used to aid in decision making in 
the private sector. Topics include demand and elasticity, production and cost 
theory, pricing policies, linear programming and capital budgeting. 

ECO 360 Mathematical Economics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ECO 201, ECO 202, MAT 195 or MAT 206, or permission of instructor. 
An examination of selected topics in economic theory using mathematics. Topics 
include the development of portions of consumer and producer theory, the study of 
static and dynamic models from macro theory and international finance. 

ECO 370 Econometrics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ECO 201, ECO 202, MAT 220. 

Introduction of applied econometrics. Included are parameter estimation, infer- 
ence, hypothesis testing and problems of designing econometric models. 

ECO 395 Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (V-V (1-5)} 

Prerequisites: Junior standing, permission of department head, and agreement by 
a faculty member to supervise the research. 

Uncompensated research to be assigned and directed by a faculty member of the appropriate 
discipline. Students will conduct research using methods appropriate for that discipline. 
Student research may include a literature search, field or laboratory observation and 
experimentation, data reduction and analysis, and written and/or oral presentation of 
results. The research experience will be evaluated by a rotating committee of the departmen- 
tal faculty before the initiation of the project, and again upon completion of the work. Credit 
will vary depending on the work to be completed. Up to five (5) credit hours may be earned 
in any one discipline, for a maximum of ten (10) credit hours. 

ECO 401/ 

402/403 Special Topics in Economics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201 or ECO 202 or permission of instructor. 
Upper-level courses not otherwise offered in the economics curriculum. Coverage 
of substantive topics, problems and issues, not covered in other courses, which are 
of contemporary importance to students. Topics to be announced prior to each 
offering of the course. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Normally, 
no more than two such courses may be counted toward the minor in economics. 

ECO 421 International Law of Expropriation and Compensation (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113. Corequisite: POS 326, "International Law," or permission of 
instructor. 

The course will examine the traditional Western view of the right of governments 
to expropriate foreign-owned property, and compare it to the views of many third- 
world and Marxist governments. Major takings of property owned by U.S. citizens 
and corporations will be highlighted. Arbitration and adjudication processes, as 
well as the role of the executive and legislative branches, will be examined. 

ECO 431 International Financial Institutions (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201 or permission of instructor. 

This course analyzes international monetary relations. Topics include different 
exchange rate systems, the balance of payments, adjustment to balance of payments 
disequilibrium, and a survey of major international financial institutions, including 
IMF and the World Bank. Additional focus is on the role of central banks of the major 
countries in attempting to help stabilize the foreign exchange market. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 181 



ECO 440 Seminar In Third World Economic DevelopmenI (S-O-S) 

I'rt'rr*.juiMtt' ECO 201 i)r pfrnu>Mi>n i>( instrm tor 

Ihfdt'voliipin^iUfasanJ thoir pri>sptvt for tiDMDnm bfttermrnt arrslmlird \t\ this 
ci>ursi" Ti>pu> includf dittori'iil thforifs oi umlfrdi'vi'lopmfnt, analyzing difffrrnt 
ttvhniqufs t'n^pli>yt'd bv various Ifss ilt'Vfh)p«'«.l countru'^ for lU'vrlopmfnt, includ- 
in^ import siibstitiition.sand t'xport-U'd growth F-(h us isalsoon prohU'ms fai ing thr 
thirJ world at tht* prrsont timt', siuh as Ihinl Worlil dfbt 

ECO 441 Regional Economics (5-0-5) 

Prort'quisito IXO 320 or permission ot instructor. 

Study ot transnatii>nal labor and transportation economics and of international 
trade, posited m the regional context I- mphasis will be placed on such topics as the 
European Economic Community and the Caribbean Basin Initiative The social and 
political, as well as economic consequences of migratory labor and permanent 
immigrant labor will be addressed. 

ECO 450 Public Finance (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: 201 or equi\alent. 

An Application of economic principles to the study of the role of government. 
Emphasis is on the reasons for and the effects of government intervention in the 
economy. Topics covered include market failure, public gcK>ds and externalities, 
public choice and political equilibrium, taxation, public debt and cost benefit 
analysis, and some selected areas of public policy such as welfare, defense, and 
health care. 

ECO 452/ 

453/454 Internship (V-V-5) 

Prerequisite; junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. 
This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to relate 
academic understanding to an applied economic setting. Settings will include 
nonprofit agencies such as the Chamber of Commerce, as well as financial institu- 
tions and international businesses. This course will be jointly supervised by 
departmental instructors and agency officials. Transient students must have per- 
mission of the school dean at Armstrong and of the college which the student comes. 

ECO 520 International Trade (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 202 or permission of instructor. 

This course examines the economic importance and problems of international trade. 
Topics include theories of international trade, the gains from trade, tariffs and non- 
tariff barrier to trade, U.S. commercial policy, economic integration and trade 
policies of developing countries. 

ECO 530 Money and Banking (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The study of governmental and corporate finance, with emphasis on fiscal and 
monetary policy. Open-market operations, discount policy, and the functions and 
problems associated with central banking will be examined and analyzed. 

ECO 540 Economics of Labor (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 202. 

An introductory general survey of labor economics and labor relations. Organiza- 
tion and operation of American trade unionism, collective bargaining, economics of 
the labor market, wage theory and income distribution also among topics studied. 

ECO 545 Comparative Economic Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The course will constitute a survey of the basic tenets of the major economic systems 
developed in the 19th and 20th centuries. The role of government and politics will 
be examined, along with the contributions to economic and political thought of such 
men as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and Milton Friedman. 
(Identical with POS 545.) 



182 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ECO 563 Economic History of the United States (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

This course surveys the growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the period 
since 1860. Developments in agriculture, industry, labor, transportation, and fi- 
nance will be studied and analyzed. (Identical with HIS 363). 

Psychology Offerings 

PSY 101 General Psychology (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to the vocabulary, concepts, and methods of the science of behav- 
ior. Discussion and demonstrations assist in surveying all the areas of psychology. 
Psychology 101 is prerequisite to all other courses in the department. Eligibility for 
ENG 101 is strongly recommended. 

PSY 191 Honors General Psychology (2-3-5) 

Prerequisites: SAT verbal of at least 550. 

This course may be substituted for PSY 101 by qualified students. Course content is 
similar to PSY 101, but emphasis is on psychology as a laboratory science. Students 
will conduct a variety of experiments and demonstrations and will write research 
reports on these topics. 

PSY 201 Human Growth and Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A survey of lifespan development that focuses on physical, emotional, cognitive and 
social development. Understandings of growth and development are applied to 
classroom teaching and learning. Not recommended for Psychology majors. 

PSY 208 Psychology of Parenting (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the psychological research and issues related to the family with an 
emphasis on child development, parenting styles, child abuse, dysfunctional fami- 
lies and community resources. This course can be used by the Criminal Justice 
Training Center program. 

PSY 220 Introduction to Psychological Research (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

An introduction to scientific methodology and its application to behavior analysis. 

Various techniques of data collection and the statistical analysis of such data are 

emphasized. 

PSY 295 Developmental Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the origin and development of psychological processes from the life span 
perspective. The effects of genetic /maturational and socio-cultural/environmental 
factors on the development of behavior throughout the life span are included. 

PSY 301 Educational Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Offered each quarter. 

The application of behavioral science to the problem of learning in the classroom. 

Primarily for teacher preparation. 

PSY 302 Psychological Testing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

Survey of individual and group tests in psychological, educational, and clinical 
settings. Course focuses on the theoretical and statistical principles that underlie 
psychological and educational measurement. Standardized psychological instru- 
ments are critically analyzed. Ethical issues in psychological testing are considered. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 183 



I'SY M)^ Social Psychology (5-0-S) 

I'rfti-ijiiisili' {"s^ 101 

Ihi'stiulvof Ihrbfh.iviornf I ithtTSiiH lU'trrminnntn of thrK'hflv u>r of the individual 
rhi" i'ultvir>tl nulirii and ^'/oiip prt'ssurfs will b«* fx.imimtl in tiTms of their effect on 
hrh.u lor 

rS'^ 304 Fundamentals o! Cou^selin^ and rsychotherapy (5-0-5) 

IViTt'iiuisite I'SY 101 

A survey of personality theories and the behavior changing techniques arising from 
them. The emphasis will be on learning theory and environmental influences. 

PSY 305 Topics in Development (5-0-5) 

IViTi-quisite |N^ U)l 

A survfv ot the tundanu'nlal issues, priKessi*s and thet)ru's of llu- fu-ld ot develop- 
mental psychoU>gy. This approach to developmental concepts will fcKus on relevant 
research and practical applications through adolescence. This course may not be 
substituted tor 1^^ 2^5 or PSY 201. 

PSY 307 Perception (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: I'SY 101,220. 

The nature of perceptual processes will be explored through experiment and 

theoretical analysis. 

PSY 309 Physiological Psychology (4-2-5) 

rrerequisites: PSY 101, BIO 101 and 102. 

The structure and function of the nervous system will be analyzed and related to 

beha\'ior using lecture, slide presentations, and tissue. 

PSY 310 Psychology of Human Sexuality (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

An examination of the developmental, physiological, clinical and social aspects of 
human sexuality. The emphasis of the course will be on the various components of 
human sexuality from a developmental perspective. 

PSY 311 Theories of Personality (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: I'SY 101. 

A study of selected personality theories with emphasis on normal behavior. Atten- 
tion will be given to both experimental and clinical data. The determinants of 
personality structure and the development of personality will be examined from 
divergent points of view. 

PSY 312 Measurement (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101,220. 

An examination of the theory of measurement. Reliability and validity techniques 

are discussed, using current psychological tests as examples. 

PSY 316 Clinical Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY lOL 

A survey of behavioral problems, treatment modes, and theories. 

PSY 319 Animal Behavior (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

The adaptations and behaviors with which living organisms cope with their 
environments will be studied through lecture and field work. Naturalistic observa- 
tion and experimental methods will be considered. 

PSY 328 Abnormal Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the scientific and cultural bases of various conceptions of undesirable 

behavior. Application of principles derived from basic research will be emphasized. 

PSY 350 Cognitive Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the issues related to the various models of human information processing 
with an emphasis on perceptual and linguistic development. Principles and appli- 
cations derived from basic research will be included. 



184 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PSY 395 Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences {V-V (1-5)} 

Prerequisites: Junior standing, permission of department head, and agreement by 
a faculty member to supervise the research. 

Uncompensated research to be assigned and directed by a faculty member of the 
appropriate discipline. Students will conduct research using methods appropriate 
for that discipline. Student research may include a literature search, field or 
laboratory observation and experimentation, data reduction and analysis, and 
written and /or oral presentation of results. The research experience will be evalu- 
ated by a rotating committee of the departmental faculty before the initiation of the 
project, and again upon completion of the work. Credit will vary depending on the 
work to be completed. Up to five (5) credit hours may be eartnerd in any one 
discipline, for a maximum of ten ( 10) credit hours. 

PSY 401/ 

402/403 Special Topics in Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

Upper-le\'el courses not otherwise offered in the psychology curriculum. Coverage of 
substanti\'e topics, theoretical issues and problems not covered in other courses, which 
are of contemporary' importance to students. Topics to be announced prior to each 
offering of the course. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Normally, no 
more than two such courses may be counted toward the minor in psychology. 

PSY 406 Behavior Modification (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of proven methods of generating behavioral change, their empirical 

foundations and their applications in clinical, educational and social settings. 

PSY 408 Learning and Motivation (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 220. 

A study of the methodology and theory associated with the various forms of 
learning and their motivational concomitant. The laboratory will provide an intro- 
duction to animal care, training, and experimentation. 

PSY 410 History and Systems of Psychology (5-0-5) 

Open onlv to Psvchologv majors or bv invitation of the instructor. 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the basic ideas in psychology from early animism to modem beha vioristics. 

Special attention is given to the philosophical basis at various times in the history of 

psychology. 

PSY 411 Senior Seminar (5-0-5) 

Open only to senior psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. 

A reading and discussion group which will concentrate on selected contemporary 

issues in psychology. Specific content will vary from year to year. 

PSY 412 Senior Project (V-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Senior status. 

Each student will work with a faculty member qualified in the student's area of 
interest. Work is to begin in the first quarter of the senior year (register for the 
quarter of expected completion). The student will produce a scholarly paper which 
must be acceptable to the departmental faculty. 

PSY 413 Senior Internship (V-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Senior status. 

Students may petition the faculty to receive academic credit for an individually 
designed work experience in an applied setting. The sponsoring organization must 
provide a qualified super\'isor. A faculty advisor will establish performance criteria 
and evaluate accordingly. The student will produce a scholarly paper which must 
be acceptable to the departmental faculty. 

PSY 515 Psychology of Conflict and Stress (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the interactions between physiological and psychological processes in 
the development and maintenance of stress related disorders. Emphasis is on 
environmental factors and stress management techniques. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES ItS 



rSY S2l) Industrial/Organiziitionj! INychology (5-0-5) 

rtt'riv|uisiti- l's^ 101 

A Mirvi's ot applu.Uunvs i>l psN\hi»U)^u.»l pnruipU-s to buiiPi una! 

M'ttin^N liuliidt^l art' work motiN.ilJt'tv m>.il M'ttm^. powrr pol i'.ind 

».i»rnnuinKatioti 

PS^ =^21 Psychology ol Work behavior 15-0-5) 

rri-rt\)in>iti'; F*SV IDl. 

A psw hi>lo^ical analysis of issues related to the individual wt)rker in industry and 
organizations. In«. luded are employee selection, training strategies, performance 
evaluatiiMi and )ob satistaction 

I'S^ 522 Psychology of Organizational Development (5-0-5) 

I'reroquiMto: I'S^ 101. 

Psychological principles applied to interpersonal and intergroup relations, organi- 
zational leadership, management of organizational change relating to the social 
en\ ironment and cimimunication systems. 

PSY 575 The Psychology of Aging (5-0-5) 

Preroquisitf: PSY 101. 

An analysis of the aging process as physical and bios<Kial change. Important 
adaptive aspects from health to economics v^ill be considered with an emphasis on 
maintaining an optimal quality of life. 

Sociology Offerings 

SOC 201 Introductory Sociology (5-0-5) 

Ottered each quarter. 

An introduction to the concepts and methods of the science of human group 
behavior. Includes the study of socialization, culture, race, ethnicity, gender, age, 
and social institutions. It is designed to provide a better understanding of American 
society and social phenomena. Eligibility for E\C. 101 is strongly recommended. 

SOC 315 The Family and Alternative Lifestyles (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

A study of the institution which has major responsibility for socializing members of 

society. Consideration will be given to various forms and types of families. 

SOC 320 Ethnic minorities (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

This course focuses on the historical and /or contemporary realities of sub-cultural 
life in these United States, especially where skin color and language pose scKial and 
economic barriers. Examined are the cultural and structural factors which shape 
and inform the particular experiences of groups. It looks at dominant public 
institutions and patterns of response by minorities such as Black Americans, 
Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Native Americans, and other sizeable ethnic groups. 

SOC 333 Exploring Popular Culture (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

An examination of popular culture using music, radio, telt- \ isum, texts, iiuii;.i/infs, 

movies, technology and language to explore a given era. Comparisons will be made 

of lifestyles, sex roles, racial attitudes and the national regional mood oi times 

examined. 

SOC 340 Methods of Social Research (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

This course will explore several methods of applied social research including case 
studies, record research, experimental designs, surveys, observation and systems 
interaction as they apply to social data. The student must demonstrate a working 
knowledge of each method in the context of social work practice. 

SOC 350 Social Problems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

This course is an examination of deviant behavior, normalcy, and the differences 

between social ideals and social realities in the context of sociological theory. 



186 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



SOC 395 Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences {V-V (1-5)} 

Prerequisites: Junior standing, permission of department head, and agreement by 
a faculty member to supervise the research. 

Uncompensated research to be assigned and directed by a faculty member of the 
appropriate discipline. Students will conduct research using methods appropriate 
for that discipline. Student research may include a literature search, field or 
laboratory observation and experimentation, data reduction and analysis, and 
written and /or oral presentation of results. The research experience will be evalu- 
ated by a rotating committee of the departmental faculty before the initiation of the 
project, and again upon completion of the work. Credit will vary depending on the 
work to be completed. Up to five (5) credit hours may be earned in any one 
discipline, for a maximum of ten (10) credit hours. 

SOC 401/ 

402/403 Special Topics in Sociology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

Upper-level courses not otherwise offered in the sociology curriculum. Coverage of 
substantive topics, theoretical issues, and problems will vary. May be repeated for 
credit with different topics. No more than two such courses may be counted toward 
the minor in sociology. 

SOC 430 Alcohol and Drug Studies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

A course focusing on the various forms of alcohol and drug abuse with emphasis on 

the stages of harmful dependence and addiction. There will be an examination of the 

legal and social implications of addiction as well as approaches to treatment and 

rehabilitation. 

SOC 450 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

By invitation of the professor. Offered on demand. Open to transient students only 
with permission of the Dean of Arts, Sciences and Education at Armstrong. 



aar 








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188 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Newberry, S. Lloyd, Dean 
Brandt, Patricia, Assistant Dean 

Philosophy, Goals, and Objectives 

The School of Education offers a variety of degree programs designed for the 
preparation of competent teachers who are committed to excellence in the profession and 
who are ultimately prepared to become decision makers in the classroom. Appropriate 
to this philosophy the faculty have established three program outcomes which develop 
and exemplify the teacher as: (1) deliverer of content, (2) manager of classroom dynam- 
ics, and (3) developer of professional self. 

Pursuant and preamble to these outcomes the School of Education has developed the 
following goals: 

To provide prospective teachers with proficiency in the content of their selected 
teaching field. 

To provide the prospective teacher with the appropriate learning theory and method- 
ology necessary to successful implementation of classroom plans and procedures. 

To provide prospective teachers with the abilities and skills which will enable them 
to offer appropriate educational opportunities to students representing a variety of 
cultural and economic backgrounds. 

To provide prospective teachers with the abilities and skills that will enable them to 
meet the special needs of exceptional children. 

To provide a teacher education program that will offer the professional and educa- 
tional atmosphere conducive to the development of teachers who possess the highest 
qualities of character, commitment, and professional competence. 

Each degree program in the School of Education is guided by an individual set of 
objectives which is specific to that degree program, but also reflects the School goals. 

Organization and Degrees 

The School of Education consists of two divisions: the Division of Curriculum and 
Instruction and the Division of Physical Education and Athletics. 
The Division of Curriculum and Instruction offers the following degrees: 

Bachelor of Science in Education in: 

Art Education 

Business Education (with Savannah State College) 

Early Elementary Education 

Middle School Education 

Social Sciences Education (History) 

Social Sciences Education (Political Science) 

Speech Correction 
The Division of Physical Education and Athletics offers the following degrees: 

B.S. in Health and Physical Education. 
With the School of Arts and Sciences: 

Biology with Teacher Certification 

Chemistry with Teacher Certification 

English with Teacher Certification 

History with Teacher Certification 

Mathematics with Teacher Certification 

Music Education 

Political Science with Teacher Certification 

Graduate degrees (M.Ed.) are offered by Armstrong State College. For particulars, see 
the Armstrong State College Graduate Catalog. 

Accreditation 

All teacher education programs at Armstrong State College are accredited by the 
Georgia Professional Standards Commission and the National Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 1S« 



Academic Advisement 

Stuv-lt'iUrs Jt'Miin^ to pursue a tiwchiT odutatidn pro^riim should S4.'ek academic 
ad\ isenu'nt in the appropriate division (C urricuUim and Ir^struction or Health and 
Physical Education) An adviM.)r will be assigned to each student and will assist the 
student in establishing a program ot study torm which should be followed without 
deviation. These forms will be filed in tfie appropriate division office and a copy 
provided to each student. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate and maintain 
the advisement process 

All completed courses to be used to satisfy the recjuirements oi a student's course of 
study must be included on the official Program Studies Planning form at the time of its 
acceptance by the division head. 

Admission to Teacher Education 

A student wishing to pursue a teacher education program leading to teacher certifi- 
cation must apply for admission to the teacher education program. This application will 
be filed normally during the second quarter of the sophomore year or, for transfer 
students, in the first quarter of the junior year. Application forms may be secured from 
the appropriate division. 

The following criteria apply for admission to the teacher education program: 

1. Completion oi at least 60 quarter hours of college credit with a minimum 2.5 
(unrounded) GPA. 

2. Completion of EDN 200, and ENG 101, 102, and 201 or their equivalents, with a "C" 
or better in each course. 

3. Completion of MAT 101. 

4. Competence in oral and written expression. 

5. Indication of desirable attitude, character, and teaching potential. 

6. Satisfactory completion of the Regents' Test. Students already holding baccalau- 
reate degrees from an accredited institution are exempted from the Regents' Test. 

7. Submission of four letters of recommendation; such letters may be secured from 
college or universities where applicants may have been previously enrolled. 

8. Submission of an up-to-date copy of the program of study planning sheet. 

Recommendation for Certificate 

To be recommended for a teaching certificate, a student must complete the degree 
requirements for an approved teacher certification program of Armstrong State College 
and must complete at Armstrong State College a majority of the courses in each of the 
following areas: the professional sequence, the teaching field, and the related field. 

Liability Insurance Requirement 

All students who participate in courses for which field experiences (i.e., laboratory 
practicum) are required must provide evidence of liability insurance (i.e., SGAE mem- 
bership or must sign a waiver of insurance coverage). Students should consult their 
advisors regarding this requirement. 

September Practicum 

The purpose of the September Practicum is to provide an opportunity for future 
teachers (1) to learn what teachers do at the beginning of a new school term, (2) to 
participate in experiences that will assist the prospective teacher with future decisions 
concerning teaching as a career, and (3) to become acquainted with the organization and 
curriculum of a particular school. 

The September Practicum occurs during the first two weeks of the public school term 
(usually in late August and early September) and should be scheduled during the 
student's junior or senior year. No credit is given for the September Practicum, but it is 
a requirement in all of the teaching fields in the Armstrong State College Teacher 
Education Program. 



190 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Application for the September Practicum should be made during the first week of the 
Spring Quarter for a September Practicum in the forthcoming September. The student 
should contact the Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences. 

Student Teaching 

Student teaching, the culminating activity of the professional sequence, is provided 
in selected off-campus school centers. The full quarter of student teaching is arranged 
cooperatively by the college, the participating schools, and supervising teachers. Com- 
pleted applications for admission to student teaching must be submitted to the 
Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences during the first week of the quarter 
preceding student teaching. While student teaching, the student is required to adhere 
to established policies and procedures of the cooperating school system in addition to 
those policies and procedures established by the college. 

A student is admitted to student teaching at the time assignment is made. School 
placement is jointly arranged by the college and the participating school system. The 
student will receive a letter of assignment. Orientation to student teaching will be held 
during the first several days of the quarter in which student teaching is scheduled. The 
following requirements must be met before a student can enroll in student teaching: 

1. Completion of the core curriculum. 

2. Admission to Teacher Education. 

3. Completion of all teaching field courses. 

4. Satisfactory completion of the September Practicum and the Regents' Exam. 

5. Satisfactory completion of the Media Competency Exam or EDN 240. 

6. Have at least senior status. 

7. Completion of 15 hours of approved coursework at Armstrong. 

8. Have a 2.5 average on all courses attempted, and "C" or better in all courses 
acceptable toward the teaching field, professional sequence, concentration, and 
related electives. 

9. Be endorsed by four approved full time members of the faculty, one of whom must 
be the student's advisor. 

10. Be endorsed by the Division of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Students who are completing requirements for certification as outlined in a 
State Department of Education Letter and are requesting a student teaching 
assignment must have a minimum 2.5 GPA and be in good academic standing. 
They must also meet the requirements found in items 7, 9, and 10 above. 
A student will not be permitted to take additional courses during student teaching. 
Student teachers are not permitted to teach in a school in which their children are enrolled. 

Program Completion 

A student must complete the college's approved program for certification within the 
four years following admission to the Teacher Education program. In the event that the 
student does not complete the program in four years, the individual must meet the 
requirements of the program in effect at that time. 

For acceptable completion, each course in the teaching field, professional education 
sequence concentration, and related fields must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

Alternative Teacher Preparation Program 

Students who have taken staff development courses covering content of EDN 422, The 
Teaching of Reading, and EXC 310, Introduction to Exceptional Children, must pass a 
challenge examination in order to receive credit. Please see the Coordinator for the 
Alternative Preparation Program. 

Exit Examination 

Students are required to take the Georgia Teacher Certification Test during student 
teaching or immediately upon completion of their deeree program. 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 1^ 

Application for Graduation 

StiKlt'Mts art' ri\|uiri'd ti> lOinpU'ti* tlu* AppluatiDn tor C iratlu.ilu)i> at least two (2) 
quarters prior ti> grailuatin^ StiultMits luvd to submit an application for graduation, 
updated cop\ ot their iransenpts and Tro^rain ot Study to their advisors. The application 

will be checked b\ the tipfMopn.Ue di\ ision head. 

Brunswick Center Programs 

The Bachelor of Science in Education with concentrations in Early Childhood and 

Middle S<.-hi>ol Education is offered by Armstrong State College at Brunswick College 
through the Brunswick Center. The program, which is primarily an evening program, 
alli>ws students who have ^n associate degree to complete their baccalaureate degree in 
Brunswick. Interested students should contact Dr. Ciene Barber, Director of the Brunswick 
Center or Dr. Warren SchoUaert, Director oi Teacher Education. 

Cooperative Program 

Sa\ annah State College cooperates with Armstrong State College in offering a major 
in Business Education. Coursework in the major field of study for this program is offered 
bv Savannah State. Students interested in this program should contact the head of the 
Division of Curriculimi and Instruction at Armstrong State College. 

Minor Concentration 

A minor in teacher education is available for students who do not wish to earn teacher 
certification. The minor incorporates courses which address leading concepts and 
problems in the field of education. Students majoring in general studies, psychology, 
health science, and other fields may find this minor a valuable adjunct to their programs 
of study. For the minor to be officially recognized, all courses in the minor must be passed 
with a grade of "C" or better. 

EDN 200 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

EXC 310 - Introduction to Exceptional Children 5 

EDN 201 - or PSY 201 - Human Growth and Development 5 

EDN 240 - Educational Media 2 

CS 296 - Computer Literacy for Educators 3 

One additional upper divisional education course 5 

(Illustrative courses include library media courses, EDN courses and 

EXC courses.) 

Total 25 

Academic Divisions 
Division of Curriculum and Instruction 

Faculty 

* Battiste, Bettye Anne, Division Head 

* Harwood, Pamela, Graduate Coordinator 

* Agyekum, Stephen * Dandy, Evelyn 
Anderson, Donald * Hobe, John 

* Ball, A. Patricia * SchoUaert, Warren 

* Bergin, Joyce Sisson, Michelle 
Bjorn, Edith * Strauser, Edward 

* Burgess, Clifford * Walworth, Margaret 

* Chenault, George Wambold, Constance 

* Cosgrove, Maryellen White, Susan 

* Graduate Faculty 

R;irra1;iiirp;^!-p Arlvi<;nr Rr^rilpv VirWi A 



192 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Bachelor Programs 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN EARLY ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II ^ 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 290 (with a grade of C or better) 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

AreaFV^ 30 

1. EDN 200, 201 or PSY 201 10 

2. DRS 228, PSY 101 10 

3. HIS 251 or 252 and GEO 2li or 212 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

2. Activity courses 3 

B. Specialized Content Courses 45 

1. ART 320 or MUS 320 5 

2. MAT 391 5 

3. EDN 324, 336, 342, 422, 434, 435' 30 

4. CS 296 and PE 117 5 

C. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EXC 310, EDN 304, 432, 436, 471, 472, 473 35 

D. Electives (upper division content) 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 290 (with a grade of C or better) 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

AreaP/ 30 

1. GEO 211 or 212 and HIS 251 or 252 10 

2. DRS 228, PSY 101, EDN 200 15 

3. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108; 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 193 



B. Content Coiirsi»s Requiretl and /or Appropriate for Concentration Choices: 

(15 hrs. required) 15 

EDN 336. 342, 418, 428, 434, 435, MAT 391, 393. (EDN 428 and MAT 391 
must be included here or in C.) 

C. Concentrations 4S 

MAT Concentration must incl. MAT 391, 393 

SCI Concentration must incl. EDN 434, 435 
LA Concentration must incl. EDN 336, 418, 428 
SOC ST Concentration must incl. EDN 342 

1. Concentration 1 25 

language Arts, Mathematics, Science or Social Studies 

2. Concentration II 20 

Must be trom remainder in Concentration I 

D. Protessional Sequence 38 

1. CS296 3 

2. EXC 310, EDN 304, 438, 450, 471, 472, 473 35 

F. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 194 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN SOCIAL SCIENCES EDUCATION (HISTORY) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Apprc^ved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 104, 115 or 192; PCS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200 and EDN 201 or PSY 201 10 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

3. Approved language sequence through 103 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

3. Required Elective: 

One course from ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 35 

1. HIS 251 or 252; HIS 371 or 377 10 

2. HIS 450 5 

3. Approved Non-Westem HIS 

course(s) 5-10 

4. Approved 300+ US HIS course 5 

5. Approved European HIS course(s) 5-10 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 30 

1. ECO 201, 202, 363 10-15 

2. GEO 211, 212, elecrive 10-15 

3. POS 305 5 

4. POS 317, 318 5-10 



1 94 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



D. Professional Sequence 30 

1. EXC 310, EDN 335, 449 15 

2. EDN 471, 472, 473 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 
EDUCATION (POLITICAL SCIENCE) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200 and EDN 201 or PSY 201 10 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; any GEO course; SOC 201 .. 5 

3. Approved language sequence through 103 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

3. Required elective; 

One course from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 30 

1. POS 305 and 317 or 318 10 

2. POS 333 or 334 5 

3. POS 320, 321, 325, 326, 329, 424, 426, or 429 5 

4. POS 345, 346, 348, 349, 445 or 447 5 

5. POS Upper Level Elective 5 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 35 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. Courses from three of the following: 

a. GEO 211, 212, elective 10-15 

b. ECO 201, 202, 363 10-15 

c. 300+ HISelectives 10-15 

d. ANT, PSY, SOC electives 10-15 

D. Professional sequence 30 

1. EXC 310 5 

2. EDN 335, 449, 471, 472, 473 25 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 1M 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN ART EDUCATION 

Houni 

A. GentTiil l\i\iuirtMi\«.'nts 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 S 
Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III ' 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 1^2; PC^ 113 15 

2. One course trom: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

2. EDN 201 or I^Y 201 5 

3. ART 111, 112, 213 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 63-68 

1. ART 201, 202, 204 15 

2. ART 271, 272, 273** 10-15 

3. ART 313, 314, 330, 340, 350, 351, 370, 400 38 

4. Elective 5 

C. Professional Sequence 25 

1. EXC 310, EDN 335, 471, 472, 473 25 

D. Electives 0-5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 194-199 
**May not be duplicated in Area I. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 106 

Area! 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, 201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 195 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192, POS 113, ECO 201 20 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101, DRS 228 15 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201, MAT 220, HIS 251 or 252 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activitv courses 3 



1 96 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



B. Additional Requirements 

May Be Exempted 5 

OSM121 2 

OSM122 3 

C. Teaching Concentration 75 

1. BAD 201, ACC 211, ACC 212 15 

2. BAD 225, ECO 202 10 

3. ACC 300, OSM 320, OSM 340, BAD 317, BAD 320, BAD 340 BAD 362, 

OSM 405, OSM 420 BAD 440 50 

D. Professional Sequence 32 

1. EDN 240 2 

2. EXC 310, EDN 335, BED 350 15 

3. EDN 471, 472, 473 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Exams 

Total 203 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN SPEECH CORRECTION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area! 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 290, or 103, or 195, or 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III..: 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. ANT 201 or ECO 201 or SOC 201 or ECO 202 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200; PSY 101, 295 15 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; DRS 228 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Teaching Concentration 60 

1. EXC 220, 225, 230, 315, 335 25 

2. EXC 410, 411, 412, 413, 415, 420, 421 35 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 15 

PSY 328 5 

PSY 302 5 

Approved elective 5 

D. Professional Sequence 25 

1. EXC 310 5 

2. EDN 422, 471, 472, 473 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 1*7 



Library Science Media 

Ilu- 1 \b\M\ Svuiui- Mfdui program has three emphases: (1) basic information skills 

ourso aiul >ptviali/c'd skill courses desigiu'd to help students in specific subject areas 

^levelop resiMFch skills; (2) career courses for prospective media specialists and persons 

interested in public and special libraries; and (3) basic research courses which may be 

elected bv majors in other areas. 

Certification Program 

1 he NS-4 in media is a non-renewable certificate that must be upgraded to an S-5 
(master's level) within five (5) years. 

Certification in Library Media may be obtained by completing 40 quarter hours in 
media and related courses with grades of "C" or better. This program must be incorpo- 
rated into an existing teaching major. The following courses are required for certification 
as a schcx-^l library media specialist: 

Hours 

A. LM 300, 310, 320, 410, 420, 425 25 

B. EDN 240, 451; CS 2% 10 

C. One course from: EDN 324, 418; EDN 423 5 

TOTAL 40 

Non-Certification Program 

A student may choose any field of concentration which allows a double major. The 
major in Library Media is comprised of the following: 

Hours 

A. LM 300, 310, 320, 410, 420, 425 25 

B. EDN 240, 451; CS 296 or 115 10-12 

C. One course from: EDN 324, 418; EDN 423 5 

TOTAL 40-42 

Library Media Minor 

A student choosing to minor in Library Media is required to complete the following 
courses with grades of "C" or better in each: 

Hours 

A. LM 300, 310, 320 12 

B. LM 410, 420, 425 13 

TOTAL 25 

Learning Disabilities Add-On 

Learning Disabilities (grades P-12) may be added to certification in elementary or 
middle school education by successful completion of the following courses: 
EXC 312 - Introduction to Learning Disabilities 
EXC 430 - Teaching Children with Disabilities 
EXC 340 - Behavior Management 
EXC 315 - Language Development 
FED 501 - Education Test and Measurements 



1 98 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Education students interested in an endorsement in Learning Disabilities need to see 
a Special Education advisor in the Division of Curriculum and Instruction in order to 
identify the appropriate courses. 

The above "add-on" in LD would consist of a non-renewable provisional certificate 
at the T-4 level in Learning Disabilities. In order for the student to obtain a non- 
provisional certificate, other requirements, outlined by the State Department of Education 
would have to be satisfied. 

Hearing Impaired Add-On 

Hearing Impaired (P-12) may be added to an established Professional certificate in 
any teaching field by successful completion of the following courses: 
EXC 230 Anatomy & Physiology of the Speech & Hearing Mechanism 
EXC 310 Introduction to Exceptional Children 
EXC 410 Audiology 

EXC 423 Psychoeducational Aspects of Hearing Impairment 
EXC 424 Teaching Communication Skills to the Hearing Impaired 
EXC 425 Methods of Teaching Speech Reading to the Hearing Impaired 
EXC 426 Methods & Materials for Teaching Academic Subjects to the Hearing Impaired 
EXC 427 Practicum in Special Education-Hearing Impaired 

Education Offerings 

EON 200 Orientation to Teaching (5-0-5) 

The study of the status of education and of teaching as a profession. The student 
engages in directed self-study and plans for the achievement of professional goals. 
Directed observation. 

EDN 201 Human Growth and Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200. 

A survey of lifespan development that focuses on physical, emotional, cognitive, 
and social development. Understandings of growth and development are applied 
to classroom teaching and learning. 

EDN 202 Health and the Young Child (3-0-3) 

Study of factors impacting upon the physical social and emotional health of young 
children, including food and nutrition, safety, disease and trauma. 

EDN 240 Education Media (1-2-2) 

Workshop experience in the selection, utilization, evaluation, and preparation of 
various kinds of media. Emphasis is placed on utilization of media in teaching. 

EDN 304 Childhood and Adolescence (4-6-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200. 

An overview of the developmental process of children from birth through adoles- 
cence. Students will explore various factors which affect development and will 
examine the inter-relationship of school achievement and societal factors. The six 
hours per week laboratory component will include use of school and community 
resources. 

EDN 324 Literature for Children (5-1-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A study of children's books and selections from books. Designed to assist future 
teachers in the selection of the best that has been written in the realm of children's 
literature for each period of the child's life. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 335 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, General (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education; PSY 201 or EDN 201. 
The study of secondary school curriculum and methods. Detailed study is given to 
techniques of systematic observation, preparation of behavioral objectives, analysis 
of critical incidents, production of media materials, practices of classroom control, 
and examination of instruction models. Directed field experiences include two 
hours per day, M-F, for five weeks. 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 



1M 



EON 116 LlenuMitary School 1 .111^11.1^0 Arts (5-4-5) 
l'riTf».|niMtf Ailn\ission to If.uluT l:duc4)lion 

IX'si^iu'd to ottor the student the opportunity to explore methods, content, and 
mattTuils usttl in teaching the skills of communicative «rt» to children. Directed 
tu'ld e\penenit's 

EDN 342 Elementary School Social Studies (5-0-5) 

rrerevjuisite Admission to leiiiher llducition 

FiKTus upon fundamental stKial studies skills and proceMM needed by children. 

Pirev ted i)bser\ atiorv 

EDN 410 Independent Study (1-8-5) 

Prerequisite; Admission to leacher Fducation 

Students conduct an in-depth, closely supervised instructor-approved study of a 
topic in education. The student is required to evidence skills in independent 
research and study. 

EDN 415 Adolescent Psychology (5-0-5) 

Focus on the phenomenon of modern adolescence. Emphasis upon the intellectual, 
cultural and personal transitions of the adolescent period. 

EDN 418 Literature for the Middle School Learner (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission [o Teacher Pducatiim. 

Provides opportunity for prospective and inservice teachers to explore multimedia 
offerings of literary value and of significance to age level of learners found in the 
middle schiHil. Relates literature to all areas o( the middle school curriculum. 

EDN 422 The Teaching of Reading P-5 (5-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Study of the developmental reading program. Emphasis will be placed on reading 
skills, approaches, techniques, materials and evaluation for classroom use. 
Directed field experiences. 

EDN 423 Adolescent Literature (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A studv of significant literature appropriate for adolescents. 

EDN 424 Practicum In Individual Reading Instruction (2-8-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 422 or EDN 428. 

Designed to provide prospective teachers with directed practice in the teaching of 
reading. Special emphasis will be placed upon diagnosis and teaching of needed 
reading skills. Students will be required to tutor at least one remedial reader. 
Directed field experiences. 

EDN 428 Methods for Teaching Reading In the Middle School (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Primary focus upon reading as a tool for extending learning in the C(inti>nt areas of 

the middle school. 

EDN 430 Diagnosing and Prescribing for Learning Problems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 422 or 428. 

Diagnostic and prescriptive process principles underlying assessment and correc- 
tion of learning problems. Designed to help the classroom teacher (1) determine 
performance levels and needs of pupils and (2) provide effective learning assistance. 

EDN 432 Methods and Materials for P-5 (5-2-5) 

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and EDN 304. 
Examination of teaching resources, teaching strategies and the range of interper- 
sonal relationships involved in teaching young children. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 434 Methods and Curriculum of Elementary Life Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Interpretation of life science for elementary school teaching: exploration of pro- 
cesses for translating meaning into classroom practice, emphasis upon inquiry, the 
discovery process and other science teaching strategies. 



200 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EDN 435 Methods and Curriculum of Elementary Physical Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Interpretation of physical science for elementary school teaching including explo- 
ration of processes for translating meaning into classroom practice, with emphasis 
upon the discovery process and other science teaching strategies. 

EDN 436 Curriculum and Teaching P-5 (5-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and EDN 304. 

This course is the study of early elementary curricula, existing administrative and 
instructional organizations, evaluation procedures, and experiences in curriculum 
at the primary level (P-5). It includes study and development of teaching materials. 
Directed field experiences. 

EDN 438 Curriculum and Teaching (4-8) (5-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and EDN 304. 

This course is the study of Middle School curricula, existing administrative and 
instructional organizations, evaluation procedures, and experiences in curriculum 
at the middle school level (4-8). It includes study and development of teaching 
materials. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 439 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, English (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or EDN 201 and admission to Teacher Education. 

The study of secondary school English curriculum w^ith emphasis upon materials 

and methods of teaching English. Directed observation. 

EDN 441 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: MAT 260. 

The study of secondary school mathematics curriculum with emphasis upon 

materials and methods of teaching mathematics. Directed observations. 

EDN 445 Reading In the Secondary School (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course is designed to provide students with the rationale for teaching reading 

as they teach their content areas in the secondary school. 

EDN 447 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Science (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, PSY 201 or EDN 201, and EDN 335. 
The study of secondary school science curriculum with emphasis upon materials 
and methods of teaching science. Directed observations. 

EDN 449 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Social Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; PSY 201 or EDN 201 and EDN 335. 
The study of secondary school social science curriculum with emphasis upon 
materials and methods of teaching social science. Directed observ^ations. 

EDN 450 The Middle School (5-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and EDN 304. 

An overview of the history and purpose of the middle school; characteristics of the 
middle school learner, emphasis upon the nature and role of the middle school 
teacher and upon appropriate programs and methods for the needs of middle school 
learners. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 451 Teaching Media (2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 240 or permission of instructor. 

Laboratory course in designing and producing instructional media: transparencies, 

slides, tapes and other media for teaching. 

EDN 460 Multi-Cultural Education (5-0-5) 

Designed to study the educational implications of cultural diversity. Examination 
of the school programs designed to meet the needs and interests of children from 
different ethnic backgrounds. 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 201 



EDN 471 Student Teaching— Knowledge of C ootent (0-V-S) 

EDN 472 Student Teaching — Instructional Methods and Material (O-V-5) 

EDN 473 Student Teaching— Professional/ Interpersonal Skills (O-V-5) 

I'liTi'iimsiti' Srr (.ifniT.il Kiijuiri-infi\ts Ir.uhiT I «.lui.itu»n Programs " Students 
iUv pLui'd in sflivtt'd schools tor otu- ijinrti-r .is tull-linu- siutli*nl staff members. No 
additional crodit hours mav bo cariu'd whili* studfnt tt-achinj; Classr(M)m experi- 
ences and i>ther staff responsibilitii's are jointly' supervised bv thi* collf>;e staff, 
supervising teachers and principals in the selecteti schools Open to transient 
students onlv with permission of the Director of I'rofessional l.abt)ratory Experi- 
ences at Armstri>ng and oi the college from which the student comes. 

EDN 481 Internship (0-V-l to 5) 

Trerequisites Permission oi the Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences; 
criteria for meeting prerequisites are on file in the Director's office. 
Students who hold teaching pt>sitions in school and /or clinic settings will be 
supervised bv College staff member for one academic quarter. Supervisors will 
observe and hold conferences with each candidate. Completion of the fifteen hour 
sequence will depend on program requirements. 

EDN 482 Internship (0-V-l to 5) 

Prerequisites: Permission of the Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences; 
criteria for meeting prerequisites are on file in the Director's office. 
Students who hold teaching positions in school and /or clinic settings will be 
supervised by College staff member for one academic quarter. Supervisors will 
observe and hold conferences with each candidate. Completion of the fifteen hour 
sequence will depend on program requirements. 

EDN 483 Internship (0-V-l to 5) 

Prerequisites: Permission of the Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences; 
criteria for meeting prerequisites are on file in the Director's office. 
Students who hold teaching positions in school and/or clinic settings will be 
supervised by College staff member for one academic quarter. Supervisors will 
observe and hold conferences with each candidate. Completion of the fifteen hour 
sequence will depend on program requirements. 

FED 501 Education Test and Measurements (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200. 

A beginning course in measurement which covers statistical methods, research 
designs and research problems. Students are provided experiences in the adminis- 
tration and evaluation of psychological tests. 

Exceptional Children Offerings 

EXC courses must be taken in the approved sequence. These courses must be completed 
with a grade of "C" or better to continue in the sequence. You should see the Education 
Program Advisor before you begin taking any EXC courses. 

EXC 220 Introduction to Communicative Disorders (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the types, etiologies, and remediation sources and techniques of 
various communicative dysfunctions in children and adults in the areas of lan- 
guage, articulation, voice and stuttering. Emphasis is on the recognition and 
awareness of these disorders, appropriate classroom strategies, and treatment 
referral. Observations. 

EXC 225 Phonetics for Speech Correctionists (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Deals with the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) in speech correction, 
IPA transcription of normal and defective articulation and the important character- 
istics of regional dialects are stressed. 



202 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EXC 230 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing 
Mechanism (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Anatomy and physiology of the head, neck, and thorax from a speech and hearing 
standpoint. Special emphasis is placed on functional considerations of the respira- 
tory system, larynx, oral and nasal structures, and ear. Observations. 

EXC 310 Introduction to Exceptional Children (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200 and PSY 201 or EDN 201. 

An orientation to exceptional children with emphasis on educational implications 
and rehabilitation requirements. Includes classroom discussion of and visitations to 
facilities for training. 

EXC 312 Introduction to Learning Disabilities (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 310 and permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the area of specific learning disabilities, with an emphasis on 

identification, terminology, and prevalence. 

EXC 315 Normal Speech and Language Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

The study of normal language development with emphasis on oral language. This 
course traces developmental scales of speech and language growth across various age 
levels and includes the relationship between speech and language. Observations. 

EXC 335 Speech Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Speech communication from a psychophysical standpoint. Study focuses on acous- 
tics, physics of speech, transmission media, and physical analysis of speech. 

EXC 340 Behavior Management for the Exceptional Child (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

A study of the application of behavioral principles for the management and growth 
of exceptional learners. Consultation in using the principles with other teachers and 
with parents will also be emphasized. 

EXC 410 Introduction to Audiology (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and permission of instructor. 
An introduction to the methods of hearing assessment through pure tone and 
speech audiometry, with a focus on rehabilitation of the hearing impaired. Super- 
vised clinical practicum. 

EXC 411 Stuttering (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and permission of instructor. 
An introduction to the problem of stuttering, its possible causes and the manage- 
ment training of cases. Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 412 Language Disorders (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and permission of instructor. 
An introduction to language disorders of children. Etiologies, evaluation proce- 
dures, and therapeutic approaches are studied. Major emphasis will be given to 
delayed language development. Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 413 Organically Based Communication Problems (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and permission of instructor. 

The course includes a study of the communication problems related to disorders of 

voice, cleft palate, and cerebral palsy. Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 415 Articulation Disorders (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 225, admission to Teacher Education and permission of 

ir\structor. 

A study of the etiology, rationale, evaluation, and methods of therapy for disorders 

of articulation. The course includes the development of a therapeutic program, and 

lesson plans. Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 420 Public School Program Administration (4-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and permission of instructor. 
Administration and implementation of public school speech therapy programs 
including identification, case load selection, scheduling, due process, and relation- 
ship of speech therapy to the total school program. Supervised clinical practicum. 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 203 



EXC 421 Senior heininar Speech Correction (3-6-5) 

Prerevjuisite; AcltnisMi>ii li> loiuher l-iciucation .ind pernusMon of in.Htrucior. 
An overview ot conleiiiporarv issues, pnmiples, ami practices sptvific to »p««ch 
corrivtion in the piihlu schiH)ls Detailed study will be ^lven to the areas of 
diagnostic assessment, alternative/augmentative communication, »"•< '-••rv i. .• .jr- 
livery mixiels. Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 422 Manual Language for the Deaf (4-2-5) 

I'litiquisitf Adimssion ti> li'.uher I'ciiicatu>n and permission of instructor. 
t)tfered on demand. 

A study of the practices, procedures and methods in teaching manual language to 
the K.ic>.\t. with a review of the historical phiIost>phies and current trends and 
literature. At the conclusion ot the course the student will have a working ability to 
communicate with a manual deat individual as well as the ability to teach deaf 
children the priKess of manual language. 

EXC 423 Psycho-Educational Aspect of Hearing Impairment (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the i'rogram Ad\ isi>r. 

A study of the development, adjustment and educational needs of the hearing 
impaired. Including mental development, personality development, emotional 
adjustment and social maturity: the aptitudes, special abilities and associated 

handicaps of the hearing impaired. 

EXC 424 Teaching Communication Skills to the Hearing Impaired (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Prt>gram Advisor. 

Course examines techniques of teaching communication skills to hearing impaired 
children. Includes various systems of teaching oral speech and language, and 
introduces non-oral methods of instruction including American Sign Language, 
Signing Exact English, Cued Speech anti Finger Spelling. 

EXC 425 Methods of Teaching Speech Reading to the Hearing Impaired (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Advisor. 

Intrcxluces the methods of teaching speech reading to the hearing impaired child - pre- 
schtxil through secondary'. Included principles, techniques and equipment used in 
auditor)- training and speech reading for the hearing impaired and deaf population. 

EXC 426 Methods & Materials for Teaching Academic School Subjects to the 
Hearing Impaired (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Advisor. 

Adapting the academic school curriculum for the hearing impaired: principles and 
methods of teaching reading, math, scKial studies and science in primary through 
upper grades. Emphasizes writing individual educational programs and interac- 
tion with regular classroom educators. 

EXC 427 Practicum in Special Education - Hearing Impaired (0-10-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Ad\isor. 

Students are required to serve a minimum of ten clock hours per week in classes 
designed to teach the hearing impaired. Students will be expected to have direct 
involvement in planning for and teaching hearing impaired children individually 
and in small groups. 

EXC 430 Teaching Children with Learning Disabilities (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: EXC 213, Introduction to Learning Disabilities and ED\ 422, The 
Teaching of Reading; admission to Teacher Education and permission of instructor. 
Teaching strategies for children with specific learning disabilities. A focus on 
approaches, techniques, and materials with directed application. 

Library Media Offerings 

LM 300 Introduction to Media Profession (2-0-2) 

An introductory course in which students examine the role, functions and services 
of different types of libraries and information centers. Emphasizes the role and 
responsibilities of librarians/ media specialists. Includes also the social role of 
libraries and library networks. The student is given an opportunity to be involved 
in public, school, and special libraries during field experience. 



204 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



LM 310 Reference Sources (5-0-5) 

Study of basic reference sources, electronic resources, and searching strategies. The 
course has two phases: (1) study and evaluation of major types of references and 
information sources; (2) study of specific sources of information in elementary and 
secondary schools as well as specific sources for a subject field. Directed field 
experiences. 

LM 320 Cataloging and Classification (5-0-5) 

Introduction to the basic principles of cataloging and classification of multimedia 
materials combined with practical experience. Dewey Decimal and Library of 
Congress Classification; Sears and Library of Congress Subject headings; MARC 
formats, OCLC and AACR2. Both manual and automated methods are stressed. 
Problems peculiar to the media specialist are considered. Practical experience is also 
offered. 

LM 410 Media Selection (3-0-3) 

Winter. 

Selection of various types of media, based on fundamental principles and objectives. 
The course has three phases: (1) selection criteria, source lists and their use in media 
selection, publishing, and order processing;' (2) selection and evaluation of media 
for children considering curricular considerations and understanding of the media 
specialist's responsibilities toward guidance in media; and (3) selection and evalu- 
ation of media for young adults considering curricular correlations and enrichment; 
recreational and developmental needs; young adult services and programs. In- 
cludes field experiences. 

LM 420 Administration of Information Centers (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

Prerequisites: LM 300, 310, 320, 410. 

Study of organization and administration of all types of information centers includ- 
ing administering the budget, purchase of materials, personnel, circulation, 
equipment, routines and schedules, maintenance of the collection, preventive 
maintenance and minor repairs of equipment, library automation, and relations 
with administration and users will be considered. Students will examine the role of 
the media specialist in the curriculum process and media center instruction and 
orientation. 

School library media philosophies and educational objechves will also be examined. 
Concurrent enrollment in Media Internship is recommended. 

LM 425 Media Internship (0-12-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: LM 300, 310, 320, 410, with a grade of "C" or 
higher and concurrent enrollment in LM 420. 

Supervised experience in library media center, or other appropriate setting. Stu- 
dents must complete 1 20 clock hours of work. Offered on a pass / fail basis. Application 
for the Internship must be made at least one quarter in advance. 

NOTE: (The follov^^ing library science courses are administered by the Director of 
Library Services and are taught by professional library faculty.) 

Library Science Offerings 

LS 110 Introduction to Library Research and Materials (1-0-1) 

An orientation to the library, library terminology, search strategy formation, and 
major library aids such as the online catalog, classification and subject heading 
guides, periodical indexes and abstracts, CD-ROM network, encyclopedias, dictio- 
naries, almanacs, handbooks and yearbooks, reviews, and criticisms, and biographical 
sources. This course will provide students with opportunities to learn how to access 
information in a variety of formats so that they can continue life-long learning. 
Directed to the individual student's subject interest. 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 



205 



LS 31 1 rriiutples oi Library Kcsijuh and MateriaU (1-0-1) 

Stiulv ot two soparatr but cDmpU'riu'nt.uv asptvts of library rr»«rarch, rr«rarch 
im'thiKiolo^v and research tiH)l.s Iht- mt'thiHit>lo^y mi lion addrc«kM^ the way in 
which a research paper is written, trom the selection of a topic tt) the paper'* final 
bibliography. The study of tiH>Is fiKusi's i>n various print, non-pnnt and electronic 
rt^Si^urces and services available to the student preparing a scholarly paper 

LS 312 Information Resources In the Humanities (1-0-1) 

I \tiM\si\ i-siiidv o\ baMcand ad\ .inn-d ri'terence materials and !»earch techniques in 

the huniaiiitu's 

LS 313 Information Resources In the Social Sciences (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced reference materials and search techniques in 

the social sciences. 

LS 314 Information Resources In the Sciences (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced reference materials and search techniques in 
the sciences. 

SSC Business Education Offerings 

NOTE: The following courses are requirements of the Bachelor of Science in Education 
in Business Education offered cooperatively with Savannah State College. 



ACC 211 



ACC 212 



ACC 300 



BAD 201 



BAD 225 



BAD 317 



BAD 320 



Principles of Accounting I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Math 110, BAD 201. 

The fundamental concepts and procedures of accounting are studied with emphasis 
both on rationale and technique. The elements of accounting, the accounhng cycle, and 
financial statement presentation are covered in depth for the transactions of a merchan- 
dising firm. Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) will be utilized wherever applicable. 

Principles of Accounting II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ACC 211. 

Continuation of ACC 211 with emphasis on partnership and corporate financial 
reporting. Coverage also includes basic accounting concepts in job order and process 
costing, the statement of changes in financial position and interpretahon of financial 
statements. Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) will be used wherever appropriate. 

Managerial Accounting (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ACC 211, ACC 212. 

Study, interpretation, and analysis of accounting data as used in the decision 

making process of business and not-for-profit organizations. 

Introduction to Information Systems (3-5) 

Prerequisite: OSM 121 or keyboarding proficiency. 

A concepts and tools course; includes study of information processing concepts and 
historv-; familiarization with terminals and microcomputers; developing introductory 
level proficiency with a micro based spreadsheet, word processor and filer package. 

Business Communications and Report Writing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 109. 

The application of basic principles of English grammar, basic report writing, and 
research techniques to presentations and written communications as demanded in 
business. The role of written communications in relation to news media enters into 
the consideration given to communication theory. 

Legal Environment of Business (5-0-5) 

A study of legal rights, social forces and government regulations affecting business; 
an in depth study of the law of contracts; the law of personal property and bailments. 

Principles of Business Finance (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: BAD 331. 

Principles, problems, and practices associated with the financial management of 
business institufions; nature and types of equity financing; major types of short- 
term and long-term debt; capitalization; financial statements, working capital 
requirements, reorganization; bankruptcy; methods of intercorporate financing. 



206 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



BAD 340 Principles of Marketing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The distribution of goods, and services from producers to consumers, market 
methods employed in assembling, transporting, storage, sales, and risk taking; 
analysis of the commodity, brands, sales methods and management; advertising 
plans and media. 

BAD 362 Organizational Theory and Behavior (5-0-5) 

Basic principles and functions of management, with emphasis on the process of 
integrating people into the work situation so that they work together productively 
and with economic, psychological, and social satisfaction. 

BAD 440 Management Information Systems (5-0-5) 

Total information system for managerial strategy, planning, and control. Informa- 
tion management, the systems approach, storage and data bases, functional 
information systems, information systems development. 

BED 350 Methods of Teaching Business (5-0-5) 

Offered Winter Quarter, Odd years. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 
An analysis of specialized methods used to teach business subjects on the secondary 
level. Includes basic principles and curriculum structure of general and vocational 
business education. 

ECO 201 Principles of Macro-Economics (5-0-5) 

Basic economic concept, with emphasis on the role of government; national income 
and products; business cycles; money and banking; fiscal and monetary policy, and 
international trade. 

ECO 202 Principles of Micro-Economics (5-0-5) 

Basic economic concepts continued from 201. Factors of production; supply and 
demand; determination of prices and of income; monopolies; the problem of 
economic growth; and comparative economic systems. 

OSM 121 Keyboarding for Information Processing (1-2-2) 

Introductory course covering alphanumeric keyboarding skills for students who 
intend to use typewriters, microcomputers, word processors, computer terminals, 
and other types of information processing equipment. Student may take a profi- 
ciency test to exempt. 

OSM 122 Keyboarding Applications for Business (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: keyboarding proficiency. 

For students who have had one or two semesters of high school typewriting (or OSM 
121) and are able to touch type. Course covers formatting of documents, including 
letters, manuscripts, and tables. Introduction to production keyboarding. Mini- 
mum passing speed: 35 words a minute on five-minute timed writings. 

OSM 320 Advanced Keyboarding Applications (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: OSM 122. 

Further skill development in production of office documents. Includes machine 

transcription. Minimum passing speed: 50 words per minute. 

OSM 340 Word Processing Concepts and Technique (3-4-5) 

The development of basic concepts and operational techniques on selected word 
processing units. Typewriting proficiency required. 

OSM 405 Information and Records Management (5-05) 

Creation, maintenance, and disposition of records including hard copy and elec- 
tronic media. Indexing rules and procedures; records management programs 
including inventory, retention and disposition schedules; vital records protection, 
the management of electronic files, micrographics, active and inactive records 
control are major components of the course. 

OSM 420 Office Information Systems (5-0-5) 

Trends and issues in office automation. A study of information processing functions 
focusing on the integration and management of automated office systems. The organi- 
zational concept; the traditional and emerging office; characteristics of major support 
systems; information/ data /user interface; analysis and design; future office systems. 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 207 



Division of Physical Education and Athletics 

F acuity 

Counsil, Roger, Division \ lead 

l-tiriscv, Michael, Coordinator of Kni>rr, \ irginia 

Physical I ducation Programs Koth, Andreas 

Aonchbacher, Hddie Roberts, Lynn 

1 ord, Betty 
I ones, Lynda 

Goals and Objectives 

The mission o\ the Division of HeaUh and Physical lidiicatiDn is to prt)\ ide a range of 
academic, service and athletic programs in an intellectually, physically, and socially 
stimulating environment. To accomplish these goals, the objectives of the various units 
oi the Division are: 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM: 

To provide depth and breadth of content, pedagogy and practical application in the 
preparation of subject matter for both health and physical education. 

To provide knowledge of health and educational concepts and principles, and their 
applications in an educational environment and society. 

To develop competency in using the processes of health and physical education in a 
broad range of activities to include research, laboratory skills, and field experiences. 

To develop a positive attitude toward health and physical education, and the 
motivation to participate in a wholesome program of health-enhancing activities. 

To demonstrate the ability to teach health and physical education processes, attitudes, 
and content to learners representing a wide range of abilities from various socioeco- 
nomic and ethnic backgrounds. 

To gain the necessary knowledge of the learning process and broad range of instruc- 
tional strategies and materials, with proper selection best suited for a given teaching and 
learning situation. 

To demonstrate an understanding of the goals and objectives of the overall educa- 
tional system, and how health and physical education relates to these broader purposes. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION SERVICE PROGRAM: 

To provide a wide variety of offerings that focus upon life-long physical activities. 

To develop knowledge, basic skills and appreciation of recreational sports and 
activities. 

To provide instruction which will certify and qualify students in the areas of aquatics 
and safety, first aid and CPR. 

To provide basic instruction in personal health practices and behaviors. 

THE INTRAMURAL PROGRAM: 

To provide opportunities for participation, regardless of ability, in a wide variety of 
sports and recreational activities to the entire college community. 

To provide an opportunity to develop friendships, to increase physical fitness, and to 
use leisure time wisely. 

To foster a spirit of sportsmanship and fair play among all participants and spectators. 

THE INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETIC PROGRAM: 

To provide the opportunity for student-alumni to participate in an intercollegiate 
athletic program. 

To furnish a spectator sports program for the students and general public which in 
turn will provide a public relations opportunity for the college. 

To provide an environment for learning and enjoyment regardless of whether a 
student is a participant or a spectator. 



208 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



THE COMMUNITY EDUCATION SERVICE PROGRAM: 

To offer a range of activities designed to appeal to the community. 

To utilize the campus gymnasium and field facilities to enhance the community image 

of the college. 

To provide an environment of learning and enjoyment for the participants. 

Required Activity Courses 

During the freshman year, all students should take PE 1 17 (Basic Health) or 166 (Safety 
and First Aid) and 103, 108, 199, 203, 311, or 316 (Swimming). During the sophomore 
year, students may elect any three Physical Education activity courses. Students unable 
to participate in the regular program should plan an alternate program with the 
Coordinator of the Physical Education Programs. Students should note the Physical 
Education Requirements section located in the Academic Policies and Information 
section of the catalog. 

Swimming Exemption 

A student who can show cause (a physical handicap for example) to be exempted from 
the swimming requirement should make an appointment with the Coordinator of the 
Physical Education Programs. A student may request a swimming test to exempt 
swimming and to substitute another activity course through the Coordinator of the 
Physical Education Program. Exemption tests are administered the first two days each 
quarter. 

Advisement 

Any student who declares physical education as his/her major is assigned an advisor 
who is a faculty member. A conference should be scheduled to determine any /all 
conditions and requirements the student must meet in order to complete the degree and 
certification objectives. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate and maintain the 
advisement process. 

Transfer of Courses 

Provisions for transfer of credits are delineated in the Academic Regulations section 
of the catalog. The procedure for transferring CATES courses is published in the 
Graduate section of the catalog. 

Bachelor of Science in Education in 
Health and Physical Education 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Education with a Major in Health and Physical 
Education provides the student with a degree leading to teacher certification P-12 in the 
areas of Health and Physical Education. The program is approved by the National 
Council for Accreditahon of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Georgia State Depart- 
ment of Education. Students selecting this major should seek advisement in the Division 
of Physical Education and Athletics. Students pursuing this degree should refer to the 
Teacher Certification section of the catalog to find those stipulations affecting all 
undergraduate education programs at Armstrong State College. 

Progression Requirements: 

1. Successful completion of basic core requirements 

a. General Requirements 

b. Regents Exam 

2. Application for Admission to Major Program 

a. Departmental Advisor Assigned 

b. Program of Study Established 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 209 



3. ApplKatu>n tor .•\tlnu>MiMi to ii'.uluT I ilui .Uioii (J.SCi i'.A mjiiiriHl) 

a. Mt'dia C i>inpotfncv COmpk'tioii 

b. Sfplt'inbor prat ticum 

c. ApplKalioii k>r Student Teaching Assignment 

4. Successtui C onipletion i>t Departnu'iUal Requirements 

a. All additional maji>r courses 

b. Proficiency tests 

c. TCT 

5. Application for Graduation 

Physical Education Minor 

The iniiH)r in physical education requires 25 credit hours with grades of "C" or better. 
The student will select 25 hours from the following courses: 

1. PE 210, 216, 217, 219, 31 1, 413, 421, PHM 250, 251, 252, 351, 352. 

2. No more than two courses from: PE 212, 213, 214 or 21 5. 
See course offerings for the description of courses. 

Athletic Training Internship 

1 he Athletic Training Internship requires 39 credit hours from the following classes: 
PE 117, PE 345, PE 346, PE 347, PE 348, PEM 228, PEM 229, PEM 410, PEM 352. 
In addition to the above courses, students are required to complete 1500 hours in an 
athletic training setting in order to be eligible to sit for NATA Boards. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
IN EDUCATION IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 103 

Area! 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III \ 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

2. PCS 113 5 

3. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, DRS 228, PSY 101 15 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

3. HIS 251 or HIS 252 5 

4. CS 115 or CS 120 5 

AreaV 5 

Five hours of activity courses 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 72 

1. PE 103, 108, 203, 311, or 316 1 

2. PE 166 2 

3. PEM 228, 229, 250, 251, 253, 254, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355 48 

4. HE 260, 360, 361, 362 and HSC 530 21 

C. Professional Sequence 32 

1. EXC 310; EDN 335, 471, 472, 473 25 

2. HE 460 5 

D. Electives 7 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 199 



21 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Physical Education Offerings 

SPECIAL NOTE: 

Swimming is required of all students as part of their 6 hours of physical education. 
Students with a valid LifeGuarding, WSI, or Open Water Diver certificate or who have 
passed the Armstrong swimming test may be exempted from the swimming require- 
ment. Students able to swim in deep water should register for P.E. 108. If in doubt as to 
proper course, consult one of the Division's swimming instructors BEFORE REGISTER- 
ING. All courses designated PEM are required of majors. 

PE 100 Beginning Weight Training (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Emphasis on developing physical fitness through a variety of fundamental weight 
training exercises. Introduction of mechanical principles and techniques necessary 
for the understanding of weight training programs. Only one of PE 100 or PE 204 
may count as an activity course toward the six hours of required physical education. 

PE 101 Lifetime Fitness (0-3-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Basic fitness concepts and their application to our everyday life. Students will participate 

in an indi\idualized program of aerobic activity and lectures on fitness and nutrition, 

PE 102 Team Sports (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Consists of two of the following sports: basketball, volleyball and softball. 

PE 103 Basic Swimming Skills (0-3-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. (PE 311 or 316 may be substituted for PE 103 or 108). 
Skills and strokes for the student unfamiliar with or afraid of the water and who 
cannot swim. Satisfies Armstrong swimming requirement. 

PE 104 Bowling (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in bowling. Minimum of two games required per class period at 

student's expense. Must provide own transportation. 

PE 105 Badminton (0-2-1 ) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in badminton. Student must provide own racquet. 

PE 106 Beginning Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Winter. 

Fundamentals and practice in beginning tumbling and gymnastic apparatus. 

PE 107 Trampoline (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

The teaching of the proper care and use of the trampoline. Under strict supervision, 

the student learns to perform basic skills. 

PE 108 Intermediate Swimming (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. (PE 311 or the American Red Cross WSI course may 
be subshtuted for PE 103 or 108). 

Six basic strokes, skills, endurance and knowledge pertaining to safety in, on, or 
about water. Satisfies swimming requirement. 

PE 109 Intermediate Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 106 or permission of instructor. 

Continuation of PE 106 with additional practice of tumbling and gymnastic apparatus. 

PE 110 Aerobic Dance (0-3-1) 

A fitness course in which the cardiovascular, muscular endurance and strength, 
flexibility, and body composition components of physical fitness can all be improved; 
a combination of exercise and dance steps (exertion and rhythmical movement). 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 21 1 



PE 115 Officiating of Football (2-2-2) 

CiuiMslsnt a sludv nt ruli's, riili*> intiTprrtntion, .mci .ictual fxptTifnii* in offuuiting 
intrainuriil ^.uiu's, appri>vtt.l a>mniiinitv rtvrr.ition ^»^mt•^, ami public schcKiI 
ganios StiKli'i\t> imi>t provide own t't|iiipnu'nt ami transpt>rtatu»n Studfnt* must 
providi' i>\vn whistles, hats mu\ transpurtatiim to any t>ff-campu'» aHsignment. 

PE lib Officiating of Basketball (2-2-2) 

WinttT. 

Consists ol a study ot rules, rules interpretation, and actual experience in officiating 
in class games, intramural games, approved community recreation games and 
public sch«.H>I games. Elective credit Student must provide own whistle and 
transpi'irtation ti> anv ott-campus assignment 

PE117 Basic Health (2-0-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

A basic course in health education with emphasis on personal health. 

PE 118 Officiating Team Sports (2-2-2) 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the rules, mechanics and ethics 
involved in officiating a variety of team sports activities. The student will develop 
a fundamental understanding of the rules and proper application of mechanics 
associated with the following: Basketball, Baseball, Football, S<x:cer, Softball and 
VoUevball. Student must provide own equipment appropriate to the sports and 
transportation for off-campus assignment. 

PE 120 Jazz Dancing (0-2-1) 

.An intri>duction to modem, lyrical and hip hop forms of jazz, including fundamen- 
tal techniques and choreographv. 

PE 166 Community First Aid and CPR (3-0-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

The American Red Cross advanced course in safety and first aid and adult, child 
and infant CPR. Required of majors. To receive a certification card, students must 
pay an administrative fee to the American Red Cross. 

PE 167 Community First Aid and Stress Management For The Law 

Enforcement Officer (3-1-3) 

Summer. 

This course is designed to provide the student with American Red Cross First Aid 
and CPR Certification. Stress management skills of particular significance to the law 
enforcement officer will be an integral part of the course. Students will be required 
to pay an administrative fee to the American Red Cross. 

PE 199 Basic Water Safety (0-2-1) 

This course is designtxi to create an awareness of causes and pre\'ention of water accidents, 
to de\elop a desire to be safe, and to encourage health and safe water recreation. The 
focus is on personal and community water safet}'. No swimming skills required. 

PE 200 Archery (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in archery for recreational use. Students must provide own arm and 

fingerguards. 

PE 201 Elementary Tennis (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in tennis. Student must provide own racquet and one can of new tennis balls. 

PE 202 Racquetball (0-2-1) 

Designed to de\ elop enthusiasm and appreciation for the game of racquetball. 
Course content will include strokes, strategy, forms of play, rules, equipment, safety 
and etiquette. Classes held off campus. Students must provide transportation. 
Additional fee is required. 



21 2 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PE 203 Beginning Scuba (0-3-1) 

Prerequisite: Tread 10 minutes, swim 200 yards any style. 

Equips student to engage in beginning recreational scuba diving activities in local 
aquatic environments. Topics covered include: adapting to the underwater world, 
underwater communications, dive planning, diving equipment, boat diving, health 
for diving, dive tables, marine life identification, and the underwater environment. 
Additional fee is required. 

PE 204 Advanced Weight Training (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: PE 100 or permission of instructor. 
Emphasis on continued development of physical fitness through a variety of 
advanced weight training exercises. Improvement of maximal muscular strength 
and endurance in the main muscle groups of the body through progressive resis- 
tance exercises. Only one of PE 100 or PE 204 may count as an activity course toward 
the six hours of required physical education. 

PE 205 Folk Square, Social Dancing (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Instruction and practice in many forms of folk, square, and social dancing. 

PE 206 Beginning Modern Dance (0-2-1) 

Fall. 

Introduction to the art of modem dance. Includes technique, exercise, basic impro- 
visation, dance positions, and locomotor movement. 

PE 207 Basic Ballet (0-2-1) 

A review of basic ballet steps, exercises and stretches. Emphasis on body placement 
and practice in using steps in combinations. 

PE 208 Golf (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic techniques and instruction for the beginning golfer. Minimum of 9 holes of golf 

must be played outside of class at student's expense. Must provide 1 2 shag balls for class. 

PE 209 Intermediate Modern Dance (0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 206 or permission of the instructor. 

A continuation of PE 206 with emphasis on dynamics, composition, and choreography. 

PE 210 Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (2-1-2) 

Winter. 

Theory and practice of caring for and preventing injuries relating to a variety of 
sports. Students required to assist in laboratory experiences with treating and 
preventive training through the athletic, intramural or physical education pro- 
grams. Student must provide own athletic tape. 

PE 212 Coaching Football (3-0-2) 

Fall. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play, coaching courses is 

required of majors. Minimum of two games must be scouted at student's expense. 

PE 213 --Coaching Basketball (3-0-2) 

Winter. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play, emphasizing methods 
and drills used by leading coaches. One of the coaching courses is required of 
majors. Minimum of two games must be scouted at student's expense. 

PE 214 Coaching Baseball and Softball (3-0-2) 

Spring. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play emphasizing methods 
and drills used by leading coaches. One of the coaching courses is required of 
majors. Minimum of two games must be scouted at student's expense. 

PE 215 Coaching Volleyball and Soccer (3-0-2) 

Spring. 

Introduction to the rules and fundamental skills of volleyball and soccer. Individual 
development and application of successful coaching methods. Coaching methods 
will include acquisition of sound organizational practices and understanding of 
various coaching types. 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 213 



PE216 Basic Games (2-0-1) 

Spring; 

I Vsi^nod to acquaint stiuiiTit with thi- various cati*^(>ru»s of gamf«i, thr appropnate- 
iu'» tor rach tvpo ot various a^i* levels, proper progrfsMons, and the bc?it way* to 
use ^anu's teach phvsu al skills, emotional and MHriai hkills, and actual spnjrts skills. 

PE 217 Techniques of Dance (2-0-1) 

Winter. 

Overview of the art of dance and its various categories Stresses similarities and 
differences in form, technique and history of the ballet mixJern dance, )a/z dance, 
ballriH>m dance, square dance, aerobic clance and folk dance with emphasis on 
teaching and techniques. 

PE 219 Techniques of Safety In Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Winter Prerequisite: PF lOh. 

Course designed to give majors thorough understanding of the basic principles of 
spotting in gymnastics to assure maximum safety for learners as well as proper 
teaching progressions and lead-up skills necessary at each level of learning. 

PE 220 Principles of Sports Training (2-1-2) 

Study oi the basic principles, methods and characteristics associated with a variety 
of sports. Students will develop and participate in a variety of training and 

nutritional programs used in sport settings. 

PE 300 Psycho-Social Aspects of Sports (5-0-5) 

Study of the research relevant to sports behavior and performance. The student will 
be provided with knowledge about various psycho-social factors and influences in 
sports settings. 

PE 311 Lifeguard Training (1-2-2) 

Prerequisite; American Red Cross Standard First Aid and CPR certification, 500 
yard continuous swim, and proficiency in basic water skills. 

This course parallels the certification qualifications for the American Red Cross 
Lifeguard Training course, covering such topics as: recognizing and responding to 
aquatic mishaps: pool health, sanitation, and management; spinal injury manage- 
ment. Timed swims required to pass. 

PE 316 Swimming Methods and Techniques (2-2-2) 

Prerequisite: Minimum 17 years old, current Safety, First Aid, and CPR. 
This course parallels the certification qualifications for American Red Cross Water 
Safety Instructor, covering the methods of teaching Infant and Pre-School Aquatics, 
Whales Tales, the seven levels of "learn to swim program," as well as Basic Water 
Safety, Emergency Water Safety, IHSE and Safety Training for Swim Coaches. 

PE 320 Health and Physical Education for the Elementary School Teacher (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Theory and current practice in the teaching of health and physical education at the 
elementary school level. Designed to meet the requirement for elementary certifica- 
tion. Directed field experience included. 

PE 345 Athletic Injuries I (3-4-5) 

Introduction to the assessment, care and prevention of lower extremity' injuries. 
Specifically, sports related injuries to feet, toes, knee, lower leg, thigh, hip and pelvis 
will be studied. 

PE 346 Athletic Injuries II (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: PE 345 or permission of instructor. 

Introduction to the assessment, care and prevention of upper extremity injuries. 
Specifically, sports related injuries to the axial skeleton, shoulder girdle, elbow, 
wrist, hand and fingers, and injuries to the solid and hollow organs will be studied. 

PE 347 Therapeutic Modalities (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PE 345 or permission of the instructor. 

An investigation of the theoretical and technological basis of sports injurv' rehabili- 
tation, therapeutic modalities and taping techniques associated with athletic injuries. 
Each student is responsible for his/her own transportation to off-campus sites and 
the procurement of taping supplies. 



214 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PE 348 Seminar in Athletic Training (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Presentation and discussion by faculty and students of research and topics of 

current interest in the field of athletic training. 

PE 364 Physical Education for the Exceptional Child (3-2-5) 

Student is introduced to methods of identifying and programming for the exceptional child. 

PE 421 Management of Sports Programs (5-0-5) 

Designed to apply principles of management to a variety of sports settings. Manage- 
ment applications for school, municipal, and proprietary sports organizations will 
be examined. 

PE 431 Practicum in Athletic Training I (V-V-(l-3)) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or PEM 252. To become familiar with the 
daily procedures of the treatment center and to learn the basic skills associated with 
athletic training. Orientation to athletic training through 150 hours of supervised 
observation in various activities associated with athletic training. 

PE 432 Practicum in Athletic Training II (V-V-(l-3)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 431. 

Emphasis in the areas of evaluation and rehabilitation of athletic and sport injuries. 

Supervised clinical experience through 150 hours of practical field work. 

PE 433 Practicum in Athletic Training III (V-V-(l-3)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 432. 

Emphasis on lower extremity modalities. Supervised clinical experience through 

150 hours of practical field work. 

PE 434 Practicum in Athletic Training IV (V-V-(l-3)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 433. 

Emphasis on upper body modalities. Supervised clinical experience through 150 

hours of practical field work. 

PE 435 Practicum in Athletic Training V (V-V-(l-3)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 434. 

Supervision of conditioning and rehabilitation programs. Supervised clinical expe- 
rience through 150 hours of practical field work. 

PE 436 Practicum in Athletic Training VI (V-V-(l-3)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 435. 

Assuming a leadership role in a practical phase of athletic training. Supervised 

clinical experience through 150 hours of practical field work. 

PE 437 Athletic Training Internship I (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisite: PEM 352 and PEA 436. 

Assist in assessment, prevention, and treatment of injuries. The internship in athletic 
training allows students to broaden their experience and to complete 200 hours required 
by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) for certification. 

PE 438 Athletic Training Internship II (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 437. 

To assume a role as a lead trainer for emergency procedures and assessment. Continu- 
ation of Athletic Internship I. Students are required to complete 200 hours of service. 

PE 439 Athletic Training Internship III (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 438. 

To perfect advanced skills and techniques of athletic training while assuming 
responsibility for the management and operation of a clinical setting. Continuation 
of Athletic Internship II. Students are required to complete 200 hours of service. 

PEM 228 Structure and Function of the Human Body I (3-0-3) 

A study of the skeletal and muscle systems of the human body. Required of majors. 

PEM 229 Structure and Function of the Human Body II (2-0-2) 

A continuation of PEM 228 with emphasis on certain organ systems including the 
circulatory, respiratory and digestive. Required of majors. 

PEM 250 Introduction to Physical Education (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the subdisciplines of physical education. Study will include a 
survey of historical foundations, relationships between health and physical educa- 
tion, professional skills, and career opportunities. 



DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 218 



PEM 251 Intramurals and Recreation (3-0-3) 

I his ^.oiUM' IN i.li'M^ni'J to pri'p.ur ihi* Ntudont ti) itrKani/t* and adminiHliT intramu- 
ral »ind nvriMtional sports activities for rlementary and Jkecondary sihcKiK. for the 
collt'm' It'vol and tor the community Activities ran^e from cantHMng to horM^hoes. 
Students are reijuired to participate in tield experiences and obser\'ations. Tran»- 

portatu>n must K' supplied bv the student 

PEM 253 Individual and Dual Sports (3-4-5) 

IVsigniti to acquaint student with the varu>us indi\idual and dual sports The 
student will analyze and gam practice in teaching activities such as: archery, 
badminti>n, bicycling, bowling, fencing, fitness, golf, hiking, backpacking, racketball, 
tennis <\n\A weight training. 

PEM 254 Team Sports Techniques (3-4-5) 

Designed tor the enhancement ot sports skills and for the analysis and practice in 
teaching these skills. Team sports include: basketball, field hockey, flag/tag foot- 
ball, siKcer, Softball, speedball and vollevball. 

PEM 351 Measurement and Evaluation In Health, Physical Education (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Math 220. 

Lectures, laboratory and field experience in the development, evaluation and 
application of tests in health and physical education. Students will learn to utilize 
computer software for instructional and administrative purposes. 

PEM 352 Physiology of Exercise (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 232. 

A study of body systems and their reactions to various types and levels of exercise. 
Study will include parts and functions of systems most involved in the exercise 
process. Students will investigate various components of physical fitness, weight 
control, and exercise prescription. 

PEM 353 Elementary School Physical Education (4-2-5) 

Theory and current practice in the teaching of elementary physical education 
including developmental tumbling and gymnastics, basic movement patterns, 
fundamental and creative rhythmic activities, activities related to health- fitness and 
basic skill pattern development. Multicultural considerations in planning and 
implementing adequate elementary physical education programs to meet the needs 
and interests of all students will be explored. Directed field experience included. 

PEM 354 Middle School Physical Education (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 353 and Admission to Teacher Education. 

Theory and current practice in the teaching of middle school physical education 
including physical fitness concepts and activities, rhythmic and dance activities, 
individual/partner/group games, lead-up and modified individual/dual/team 
sports. Multicultural considerations in planning and implementing adequate middle 
school physical education programs to meet the needs and interests of all students 
will be explored. Directed field experience included. 

PEM 355 Secondary School Physical Education (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 334 and Admission to Teacher Education. 

The study of curricular methods, media and assessment of secondary' physical 
education programs as they apply to the developmental levels of the secondary age 
student. Multicultural considerations in planning and implementing adequate 
secondary physical education programs to meet the needs and interests of all 
students will be explored. Directed field experience included. 

PEM 410 Kinesiology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 232. 

Analysis of human sports performances using physiological principles and the 

physical laws of motion. 

PEM 413 Special Topics In Physical Education (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: PEM 351. 

Research methods in health and physical education. Allows students an opportu- 
nity for in depth pursuit into areas of their interests. Open to majors only. 



216 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PEM 425 Law in Sports and Physical Activity (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the major issues and legal principles 

involved in the realm of physical education, athletics and recreational sports. 

PEM 430 Facility Management and Operation (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Analysis of management competencies necessary to operate physical education, 
sports, recreational and athletic facilities. Conceptual and technical aspects of 
planning and design are introduced. 

PE 558 Physical Activity and the Older Adult (3-4-5) 

This course is concerned with the impact of fitness activities in the lives of older 
adults. The focus is upon the physiological and psychological benefits associated 
with leading an active life and their effects upon the quality and quantity of life. 



4".^ 




218 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

SCHOOL OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

Repella, James, Dean 
Buck, Marilyn, Assistant Dean 

Goals and Objectives 

The faculty of the School of Health Professions believes that the development of the 
student as an individual is a primary objective of a college education. The central role and 
function of the School of Health Professions is to provide an appropriate academic, 
intellectual, and professional milieu to develop the skills required for a high level of 
professional competence. This includes the development of intellectual and physical 
competencies; personal values and beliefs; leadership abilities; a sense of integrity, self- 
worth, and self- reliance; and a sense of responsibility toward the community and 
society. To achieve these objectives, the goals of the School are: 

To prepare graduates who possess, at the appropriate level, the competencies re- 
quired in their professional endeavors, and whose practice is compatible with the ethics 
of democratic humanistic philosophy; 

To prepare an educational environment which will motivate the student to develop 
a life-long commitment to learning and services; stimulate creativity, flexibility, and 
independence of thought and judgement within acceptable professional and humanistic 
constraints; and foster appreciation for scholarship and critical reasoning; 

To develop the leadership abilities of students so they may function effectively as 
leaders both in their professions and in their communities; To anticipate and to identify 
problems and needs and to encourage change and open-mindedness in finding solutions 
through appropriate research. 

To develop the School as a planning and resource center for professional growth and 
community service; 

To complement other Schools of the College by providing programs of a uniquely 
professional character which enhance the educational opportunities of Armstrong State 
College. 

Organization and Degrees 

The School of Health Professions includes the departments of Associate Degree 
Nursing; Baccalaureate Degree Nursing; Dental Hygiene; Health Science; Physical 
Therapy; Radiologic Technologies; Respiratory Therapy; and the degree program in 
Medical Technology. 

The following degree programs are offered within the School: 
Associate in Science in: 
Dental Hygiene 
Nursing 

Radiologic Technologies 
Respiratory Therapy 
Bachelor of Health Science 
Bachelor of Science in: 

Dental Hygiene Education 
Medical Technology 
Nursing 

Physical Therapy 
Graduate degrees are offered by Armstrong State College. For particulars, see the 
Armstrong State College Graduate Catalog. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING 2^9 



Division of Nursing 

Cruss, iVaniia, Dinisioii Hi\Kl 

• Masscv, Carole, I'ro^ram Cimrdiiiator Baccalaureate IV^ree Nursing 

• Stem, Camille, Graduate Coordinator 

Titus, Fli/abeth, Program Coordinator Associate IX'^ree Nursing 

Associate Degree Nursing 

Faculty 

Titus, Elizabeth, Program Coordinator 

Connor, Sara Reilly, Nancy 

Cornell, Marsha Williamson, jane 

Cross, LXMnna Wright, Janet 
Pruden, Fthel 

The Associate Degree Nursing Program provides the student with the opportunity to 
obtain a general education and to study nursing at the college level. The program is 
approvecl by the Georgia Board of Nursing and accredited by the National League for 
Nursing (NLN). Graduates are eligible to take the National Council of State Boards of 
Nursing Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN) for licensure to practice as Registered 
Nurses. Graduates must meet all legal requirements for licensure as established by the 
State Board of Nursing. Student nurses participate in nursing clinical experiences at local 
hospitals and other community agencies and are responsible for providing their own 
transportation. 

The Georgia Board of Nursing Legal Requirements 

The Georgia Board of Nursing has the authority to refuse to grant a license to an 
applicant upon a finding by the board that the applicant has been convicted of any felony, 
crime involving moral turpitude, or crime \iolating a federal or state law relating to 
controlled substances or dangerous drugs in the courts of this state, anv other state, 
territory, or countr\', or in the courts of the United States, including but not limited to a 
plea of nolo contendere entered to the charge. 

Unlicensed students may be employed only as unlicensed, nursing personnel. They 
may not represent themselves or practice as nursing students except as part of a 
scheduled clinical learning activity in the curriculum. 

Progression Requirements 

For progression through the Associate Degree Nursing Program, the following must 
be maintained: 

1. Natural science courses (CHE 201; ZOO 208, ZOO 209, BIO 210) (See "Limits on 
Admission to Health Professions Programs, #3" in the "Admissions" section of 
this catalog for the policy regarding the repeat of science courses.) 

a. A grade of C or above is required for ZOO 208 and 209. 

b. A grade of D or above is required for CHE 201 and BIO 210. Only one D will 
be allowed. 

2. Nursing courses: 

a. A grade of C or above is required in each nursing course. 

b. A student who must repeat a course will be subject to availability of space in 
the subsequent course. 

c. Only one repeat in a nursing course will be allowed. A student who fails a 
nursing course may repeat this course. An additional failure in this nursing 
course or any other nursing course will result in dismissal and the student 



220 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



will be ineligible for readmission to the program as a generic Associate 
Degree Nursing student. 

3. Grade Point Average: 

An overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required to remain in the 
program. 

4. Regents' Test. 

All students must have passed the Regents' Test before entering their last 
nursing course. 

5. CPR Certification 

All students are required to be certified in Basic Life Support (adult and child) 
prior to entering NUR 110 and must remain certified throughout the program. 

Insurance 

To meet contractual obligations with the cooperating clinical agencies, the Department 
requires students to submit a completed health history and evidence of hospitalization 
insurance prior to the first day of class. Once admitted, all students must obtain nursing 
liability insurance. Nursing habiUty and hospitalization insurance must remain current 
throughout the program. 

Advanced Placement 

The first two nursing courses, NUR 110 and 111, may be exempted by taking the NLN 
Mobility Profile examination. The examination may be taken only once and is good for 
three (3) years. If over three (3) years, the candidate is recommended to take the ACT PEP 
examination. Medical corpsmen and licensed practical nurses who have graduated and/ 
or practiced in a clinical setting within the past two years are eligible to sit for this 
examination. Proof of practice is required. Successful completion of the examination 
does not guarantee admission into the program. Candidates who successfully challenge 
NUR 110 and 111, will be required to take NUR 113 and complete all prerequisite courses 
prior to entering NUR 134. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE 
IN SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

Area I 10 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

Area II 5 

1. MAT 101 5 

Area III 15 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. POS 113 5 

3. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 20 

1. ZOO 208, 209 10 

2. BIO 210, CHE 201 10 

AreaV : 3 

1. PE 117 or 166 and one activity course or three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 55 

1. NUR 110, 111, 113, 134, (for advanced placement students only) 

230, 231, 232, 233 55 

C. Regents' and National Standardized Nursing Examinations 

TOTAL 108 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING 221 



Curriculum Design 

Prerequisites 

ZOO 208 « 5 

CHE 201 5 

MAT 101 5 

15 

1st Quarter 

NUR 1 10 6 

ZOO 209 5 

ENGlOl 5 

16 
2nd Quarter 

NUR 111 7 

BIO 210 5 

ENG 102 5 

*NUR113 (3) 

17(20) 
3rd Quarter 

NUR 134 9 

PSYlOl 5 

PE 117 or 166 2 



16 
4th Quarter 

NUR 230 9 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

PE ACTIVITY 1 

15 
5th Quarter 

NUR 231 10 

POS113 5 

15 
6th Quarter 

NUR 232 8 

NUR 213 6 



14 

*For Advanced Placement Students Only 

Offerings 

NUR 110* Nursing to Meet Basic Needs I (3-9-6) 

Fall, Winter. Prerequisites: Admission to the nursing program, ZOO 208, CHE 201, 
MAT lOL eligibility for ENG 101. Corequisite: ZOO 209. 

This course introduces the conceptual framework of the nursing program with 
emphasis on basic human needs, growth and development, biopsychosocial man, 
teaching/ learning and roles of the nurse. The nursing process is used to promote 
adaptation with problems related to hygiene, activity /exercise, safety, elimination, 
oxygenation, nutrition and sexuality. Principles of pharmacology and administra- 
tion of non-parenteral medications are presented. Concurrent clinical learning 
experiences are provided in extended care facilities and acute care hospitals. 



222 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



NUR 111* Nursing to Meet Basic Needs II (3-12-7) 

Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: NUR 110, ZOO 209. Corequisite: BIO 210. 
A continuation of NUR 110. This course introduces fluid /electrolytes, rest/comfort, 
emotional safety, love/belonging and self-esteem. The nursing process is used for 
patients undergoing surgery with emphasis upon nursing skills, patient teaching 
and interpersonal relationships. Concurrent[ clinical learning experiences are pro- 
vided in acute care hospitals. 

NUR 113* Transition to Associate Degree Nursing (3-0-3) 

Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: Successful Exemption of NUR 110 and 111. 
Corequisite: BIO 210. 

This course is designed for the advanced placement student. Content includes 
review^ of dosage calculation and introduction to the conceptual framework with 
emphasis on nursing process, roles of the AD nurse, growth and development, 
physical assessment, communication and teaching/learning. 

NUR 134 Adult Nursing I (6-9-9) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: NUR 111, or NUR 133. Corequisite: PSY 101. 
This course is the first in a three-quarter study of the physically ill adult. Basic 
human needs are evolved into the concepts of oxygenation, fluid and electrolytes/ 
metabolism, inflammation/immunity, and perception/coordination/mobility. 
These concepts focus on common health problems in which there is a maladaptive 
response of the body's ability to meet its needs. Concurrent clinical learning 
experiences are provided in acute care hospitals. 

NUR 212* Nursing in the Maternal-Child Continuum (6-9-9) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 210. Corequisite: NUR 213. 
This course concentrates on the experience of the childbearing family / developing child 
as they impact upon the health care system. Emphasized is the use of the nursing process 
to promote adaptation during the stages of childbearing and into the life cycle from birth 
through adolescence. The teachingleaming interaction and developmental appropri- 
ateness of care are additional foci. Concurrent clinical learning experiences are provided 
on maternity and pediatric units in acute care hospitals. 

NUR 230 Adult Nursing II (6-9-9) 

Fall, Winter. Prerequisite: NUR 134. Corequisite: HIS 251/252. 
This course is the second quarter of study of the physically ill adult. Basic human 
needs are further evolved into the concepts of oxygenation, inflammation /immu- 
nity, fluid and electrolytes /metabolism, and perception/coordination/mobility. 
These concepts focus on more complex common health problems in which there is 
a maladaptive response of the body's ability to meet its needs. Concurrent clinical 
learning experiences are provided in acute care hospitals. 

NUR 231 Advanced Nursing (4-18-10) 

Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 230. Corequisite: POS 113. 
This course is the third quarter of study of the physically ill adult. The concepts 
previously taught are applied to the adult with multiple system failure and /or 
trauma. The focus of study is on caring for clients in emergency, home and 
rehabilitation settings as well as developing beginning skills as coordinator of care 
for patients with multiple needs. Transition from the role of student to practitioner, 
leadership skills and trends/issues are emphasized. Concurrent learning experi- 
ences are provided. 

NUR 232 Maternal Child Nursing (5-9-8) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 231. Corequisite: NUR 213. 

This course concentrates on the experience of the childbearing family /developing 
child as they relate to the health care system. The nursing process is used during the 
stages of childbearing and into the life cycle from birth through adolescence. The 
teaching /learning interaction and developmental appropriateness of care are addi- 
tional foci. Concurrent clinical learning experiences are provided on maternity and 
pediatric units in acute care hospitals, clinics and community based settings. 



Course cycle is under review^ and is subject to change. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING 223 



NUR 233 Mental Health-Psychiatric Nuniing (3-9-6) 

1 all, VVinttT, Spring PrtTt-quisilf \LK2U) CDrcquiMfr \'L'R212 
Ihis anwx' Kxiisfs ix\ tht* df\ek»pnHiit t>t M-U-awamu-v. ami tm thr thiTapcutic Uieoltdf 
in aoBistin g man to achieve mental ht-alth Fhe nursing pn^x-sh ls um\1 Un thi' patniit with 
problems of psychosocial adaptatiix^ MxamuK-d atv thtTaptoitK aimmunKabtn skill*, 
tvcwhing/loanrving, df\ eU>j"»n^fnt.»l lf\ t-l and tht* null's of tht* psvchiatru. nurstv Ctint-urrvnt 
clinKal loaniing fxpfninxx-s atv proNidtil in a vanffv t >f a )mnuinit\ / nuTital ht-alth facilities. 

NUR 299 Special Topics in Associate Degree Nursing (V-V-(l-5)) 

Offorttl on demand FVorequisite: IVrmission of thi* AI^N IX'partment 

Selected topics and sptHrial clinical activities. The course, topics and /or activity will 

bo designed to meet individu.il liMrning needs 

ACCELERATED LPN TO ADN PROGRAM 

I his program has been designed to offer graduates of an NLN accredited Practical 
Nurse Program an opportunity to obtain an Associate of Science Degree in Nursing. The 
program will be offered during evenings and weekends using non-traditional teaching 
methodologies for the nursing sequence. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Hours 

*A. General Requirements 53 

Area 1 10 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

Area II 5 

1. MAT 101 5 

Area III 15 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. PCS 113 5 

3. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 20 

1. ZOO 208, 209 10 

2. BIO 210, CHE 201 10 

Area V 3 

1. PE 117 or 166 and one activity course or three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 55 

1. NUR 122, 220, 223, 224, 226 55 

C. Regents' and National Standardized Nursing Examinations 

TOTAL 108 
* Candidates must complete general core requirements prior to admission to the 
accelerated program. 

Curriculum Design 

Summer 

Nursing Bridge (NUR 122) 8 crs. 

Fall 

Nursing I (NUR 220) 8 crs. 

Winter 

Nursing II (NUR 223) 8 crs. 

Nursing III (NUR 224) 3 crs. 

Spring 

Nursing IV (NUR 226) 10 crs. 

A total of 18 credits will be awarded for previous nursing education /experience upon 
completion of NUR 122. 



224 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Offerings 

NUR 122 



NUR 220 



NUR 223 



NUR 224 



NUR 226 



Nursing Bridge (6-6-8) 

Summer quarter. Prerequisite: Admission to accelerated program. 
This course is designed to meet the transitional needs of students from the practice 
of an LPN to that of an RN. Preparation for self paced learning and development of 
critical thinking skills will be emphasized. Content will include physical assess- 
ment, caring, accountability and the role of the nurse in meeting the needs of clients 
in a variety of health care settings. The college lab will be utilized to build on 
previously learned skills. 

Nursing I (4-12-8) 

Fall. Prerequisite: NUR 122. 

This course is designed to provide students with critical thinking and problem 
solving skills to meet the basic needs of ill patients (infant to adult including 
newborn, mother and geriatric clients). Concurrent clinical laboratory experiences 
will be provided on a variety of patient care units in acute care hospitals. 

Nursing II (4-12-8) 

Winter quarter. Prerequisite: NUR 220. 

This course is designed to expand upon the concepts introduced in Nursing I. 
Emphasis will be focused on more complex nursing care problems of infants and 
adults including rehabilitation, long term care, death/dying and self esteem. 
Concurrent clinical laboratory experiences will be provided in acute care hospitals, 
nursing homes and some community agencies. 

Nursing III (3-0-3) 

Winter quarter. Prerequisite: NUR 220. Corequisite: NUR 223. 
This course is designed to expand upon students' knowledge of problems of 
psychosocial adaptation. Content by case study analysis will include maladaptive 
problems and the role of the psychiatric nurse. Clinical experiences will be provided 
in a variety of community and mental health facilities in cooperation with N U R 223 . 

Nursing IV (4-18-10) 

Spring quarter. 

This course is designed to expand upon the concepts in Nursing I and II. Nursing 
IV focuses on the transitional role of the student to beginning practitioner and 
leader. The student will coordinate care for patients with more complex medical/ 
surgical problems. The student will be introduced to additional nursing care 
settings such as hospice, home health and emergency care units. 



Baccalaureate Degree Nursing 

Faculty 

* Massey, Carole, Program Coordinator 

* Buck, Marilyn 
Caldw^ell, Eva 
Clark, Sandra 
Conway, Marian 
Dunn, Barbara 
Dutko, Kathy 

* Hart, Marcella 
Keller, Carola 

* Graduate Faculty 

The Armstrong State College Department of Baccalaureate Nursing offers entering 
freshmen, transfer students, and Registered Nurses the opportunity to earn a Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing Degree. The American Nurses Association (ANA) and the National 
League for Nursing (NLN) have adopted a position statement calling for the baccalau- 
reate degree in nursing as the academic preparation for professional nursing practice. 



Levett, Nettie 
Miller, Mary 
Neuman, Bonnie 
Powell, Catharine 

* Repella, James 

* Roesel, Rosalyn 
Silcox, Elaine 
Taggart, Helen 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 229 



Cirtuiutito^ arc proparcd to pri>\ iJo ci>ii\prt'l\i'nsi\ i- nursing lari* for pt'oplt* in a variety 
ot settings 1 ho HSN di'^nv a\so providrs thr tounJation tor ^r»uiuati' t'ducation in 
mirsin^. 

I he pri^^rani i> approved by the CjtH>r^ia Hoard ot NurMn^ t\nd is tully accredited by 
the National Iam>;iu' tor Nursing (NLN). Graduates who are not already RNs must meet 
all le^al requirements tor licensure as established by the State Eioard of Nursing in order 
to be eli>;ible to take the National Council Licensure Kxamination (NCLHX-RN) for 
luensiiti' as .1 Ke^istiTeLl \urse (!\\) 

The Georgia Board of Nursing Legal Requirements 

1 he Georgia Boardof Nursing has the authority to refuse to grant a license to an applicant 
upon a finding b\ the board that the applicant has bcvn convicted of any felony, crime 
in\ oKing nu^rai turpitude, or crime \ iolating a federal or state law relating to controlled 
substances or dangerous d rugs in the courts of this state, anv other state, territory, or country, 
or in the courts oi the United States, including but not limited to a plea of nolo contendere 
entered to the charge. Unlicensed students may be employed only as unlicensed, nursing 
personnel. They may not represent themselves or practice as nursing students except as 
part of a scheduled clinical learning activity in the curriculum. 

Progression Requirements 

For the generic Bachelor oi Science program: 

1. A "C" or better must be earned in each science course (see School of Health 
Professions policy regarding repeat of science courses, p. 33). 

2. A "C" or better must be earned in each nursing course. 

3. Students who earn less than a "C" in a nursing course must apply for readmission 
to the nursing major. If readmitted, the course may be repeated at its next offering 
on a space available basis. This course may be taken concurrently with a non- 
sequential course. No more than one nursing course may be repeated. 

4. An ON'erall gradt^point a\'erage (GPA) of 2.0 Ls required to remain in the nursing program. 

5. Students must maintain a current health history, annual tuberculin test or proof 
of negative chest x-ray, and immunization record throughout the program. 

6. CPR certification, liability insurance, and health insurance must be maintained 
while in the program. 

7. All students must have passed the Regents' Test before entering their last quarter. 

8. If a student does not matriculate each quarter, excluding Summer Quarter, the 
student must apply for readmission to the College and to the Department, (see 
Readmission page 35) 

9. Failure to comply with any of the above requirements while in the nursing 
program constitutes grounds for dismissal from the program. 

10. The student is responsible for reading and understanding the BSN Department's 

Student Handbook, 
n. Students are expected to meet the Core Performance Standards of the BSN 

program. (Please refer to BSN Department's Student Handbook.) 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 .. 5 



226 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area II 20 

1. CHE 121, 122* 10 

2. MAT 101, 220 10 

Area III 25 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 and HIS 251 or 252 10 

3. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. BIO 210; PSY 295; SOC 201; ZOO 208, 209, 215 30 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 or 166 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 82 

1. BSN 231, 310, 320, 334, 335, 336 or 339, 340, 350, 422, 423, 432, 

433,436 82 

C. Courses in Allied Fields 10 

1. Electives 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examination 

Total 193 
*Students who have already completed an approved Area II lab science sequence may 
take CHE 201 to meet the prerequisite for ZOO 208. Associate degree RNs and others 
with Associate Degrees in the health professions who were required to take CHE 201 may 
use CHE 201-CHE 122 in Core Area II. 

RN to BSN Articulation 

Armstrong State College, Department of Baccalaureate Nursing has adopted the Georgia 
RN-BSN Articulation Model as its basis for accepting RNs into the BSN program. The 
purpose of the model is to "enable registered nurses to advance their education" minimizing 
duplication of knowledge and skills and /or loss of credit "while maintaining the integrity of 
the educational process and the autonomy of participating programs. " The Registered Nurse 
may receive advanced placement in the BSN program by applying previous credits from 
basic nursing courses toward the BSN degree. All required science courses must be com- 
pleted before enrollment in BSN 433 and /or BSN 436. Registered Nurse applicants who 
graduated more than four years before admission to the BSN program will need to validate 
current nursing practice. Due to the complexities of the evaluation of previous work, RNs are 
strongly encouraged to seek faculty advisement before making coursework decisions. 

Curriculum Design 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall 

ENGlOl 5 

CHE 121 5 

MAT 101 5 

PE 1 

16 
Winter 

ENG102orl92 5 

CHE 122 5 

HIS 114 or 191 5 

PE 103 or 108 .^^ 

16 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 227 



Spring 

l-NG 201 or 292 5 

HIS 1 15 or 192 ^ 5 

ZCX^208 5 

PE 117 or 166 2 

17 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

fall 
VPS^ 101 5 

\ZOO209 5 

Area 1 Elective 5 

PE 1 

16 
Winter 

\ BIO 210 5 

\. MAT 220 5 

SOC201 5 

PE 1 

16 
Spring 

VPSY295 5 

\/BSN231 5 

^ ZOO 215 5 

15 
JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall 

BSN310 7 

BSN320 5 

♦Pol. Sci./Am. His 5 

17 
Winter 

♦*BSN334 6 

BSN340 5 

Elective, or 5 

♦*BSN335 6 

16 or 17 
Spring 

BSN336 3 

**BSN 350 or BSN 423 6 

**BSN335,or 6 

Elective 5 

14 or 15 



228 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall 

**BSN 350 or BSN 423 6 

**BSN422 6 

BSN 432 or 

Elective 5 

17 
Winter 

BSN 433 or BSN 436 10 or 12 

Elective or BSN 432 5 

15 or 17 
Spring 

BSN 433 or BSN 436 10 or 12 

10 or 12 

*By State law, each student who receives a diploma or certificate from a school 
supported by the State of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in United States History 
and Government and Georgia History and Government. Students at Armstrong State 
College may demonstrate such proficiency by successfully completing examinations for 
which credit will be awarded for Political Science 113 and History 251 or 252. If students 
elect to take courses instead of challenging them, students will be responsible for 
arranging their schedules to complete both of the courses before graduation. 

**Although clinical laboratory hours are computed on the basis of 6 hours per week; 
actual clinical laboratory hours are 12 hours every other week. 

Offerings 

BSN 231 A Conceptual Framework for Professional Nursing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101, SOC 201. 

This course is designed for beginning students of professional nursing. The concep- 
tual framework of the baccalaureate curriculum is examined. Major emphasis is 
placed on an introduction to the concepts of Person, Environment, Health, and 
Nursing. 

BSN 310 Concepts of Nursing Practice (4-9-7) 

Prerequisites: BSN 231, PSY 295, all required science courses. 
This introductory course provides the foundational knowledge for clinical nursing. 
Emphasis is placed on concepts for professional nursing practice that will assist 
individuals to meet health needs. The student assumes the role of professional nurse 
by implementing various cognitive, psychomotor, and interpersonal skills to pro- 
mote positive adaptation. 

BSN 320 Health Appraisal of the Individual (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 215, BSN 231 or permission of department head. 
This is a beginning course in physical assessment which provides knowledge and 
experience for the nursing student and interested health professional, with a focus 
on appraisal of the individual throughout the lifecycle. Emphasis is placed upon 
understanding of physical assessment skills appropriate for nursing. Course didac- 
tic and laboratory components focus on normal findings of the physical appraisal 
and common deviations from normal are addressed as necessary. 

BSN 334 Health Restoration of Adults T* (4-6-6) 

Prerequisite: BSN 310, 320. 

This course provides students with the opportunity to assist adult individuals cope 
with alterations in the ability to meet human needs related to the concepts of 
oxygenation, fluid and electrolytes, perception and coordination, and metabolism. 
Clinical experiences are provided in secondary health care settings. 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 22t 



BSN 335 Promotion of Psychosocial Adaptation** (4-6-6) 

rriTi'viuiMti'> HSN 310, .120 

I hiN cour^f l^ Ji'signixi lo ajinist Htudrnt» to promote positive adaptive behavior of 
indi\ idiuils .md tamilu'N with psvchohocial problfms through the um* of the nur»ing 
priKfss Irt-nds »n nu-nlal hralth, Irgal isMiffi and tht* roIi* ot the nuriK* in the 
psvchialru Nfttmg <\rv examinrd C hnual I'xptTU'nce*. are provided in secondary 
health ».art' settings and ti>mnuinity mental health facilities. 
BSN 336 Leadership In Nursing Care Management (3-0-3) 
l'rere*.juiMte HSN ."^10 

Management and leadership principles are intri>duced and applied to nursing The 
tiviis of this course is «.)n the leadership role of thr proffssimul rnirs*- m th^ 
management of health care 

BSN 339 Topics In Professional Nursing (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: BSN 231 and K\ licensure. 

This course builds upon BSN 231. Major emphasis is placed on the discussion and 
application of selected concepts and theories that underlie the practice of profes- 
sional nursing. 

BSN 340 Nursing and Family Health (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: BSN 310 or permission of department head. 

This course is designed to explore the family as a biopsychosocial unit of a multi- 
cultural society Internal and external variables affecting the health and adaptation 
of the family system are considered. The nursing process is utilized as a framework 
to assess structural and functional needs, plan nursing interventions, and develop 
outcome criteria. 

BSN 350 Nursing and the Childbearing Family** (4-6-6) 

Prerequisites: BSN 334, 340. 

Using the developmental approach, this course focuses on health promotion and 
restoration of the childbearing family. The nursing process is utilized to assess 
health needs and promote positive adaptation. Clinical learning experiences are 
pro\ided in a varietv of settings. 

BSN 361 Professional Nursing Extemship (2-9-5) 

An experiential nursing course which provides role expansion opportunities for the 
students. Therapeutic nursing interventions will be implemented within current 
scope of practice. The student will assume the role of professional nurse under the 
guidance of a preceptor in the clinical setting. 

BSN 422 Health Restoration of Adults 11** (4-6-6) 

Prerequisites: BSN 334, 335, 336, 340, senior status. 

This course provides students with the opportunity to assume a beginning leader- 
ship role in the management of nursing care of adult individuals and their families 
who are experiencing maladaptive responses related to complex alterations in the 
ability to meet basic human needs. Clinical experiences are provided in secondary 
health care settings. 

BSN 423 Health Restoration of the Child** (4-6-6) 

Prerequisites: BSN 340, 334. 

The student uses the nursing process as a problem solving approach in the care of 

children experiencing alterations in their ability to meet human needs from infancy 

to adolescence. Clinical experiences are provided in secondary care and community 

settings. 

BSN 432 Nursing Research (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Three clinical Nursing courses and MAT 220. 

This course focuses on the research process from problem identification to commu- 
nication of results. The evolution of nursing research is examined. The role that 
clinical nursing research plays in the improvement of the quality of care is empha- 
sized. 



230 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

BSN 433 Nursing and Community Health (5-15-10) 

Prerequisites: BSN 320, 340, 350, 422, 423. 

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and opportunity to 
utilize the nursing process to assist clients to attain their maximum level of wellness 
through the promotion and maintenance of health and the prevention of disease. The 
student functions as a beginning member of the interdisciplinary health care team to 
plan and provide comprehensive nursing care in selected community settings. 

BSN 436 Professional Nursing Practicum (4-24-12) 

Prerequisites: BSN 320, 340, 350, 422, 423. 

This course provides the opportunity for students to synthesize knowledge from the 
liberal arts, sciences, and nursing as a basis for professional nursing practice. 
Students practice the leadership role of the professional nurse in assessing, plan- 
ning, implementing and evaluating nursing care in a selected clinical setting. 
Seminar sessions are provided for students to share experiences and to discuss 
trends and issues which influence change in professional nursing practice. 

BSN 360 Issues In Gerontological Nursing (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, SOC 201, BSN 310, or permission of department. 
Application of the nursing process to the older adult population is the focus of this 
course. The emphasis is on promotion of health among the population in order to 
foster successful aging through positive adaptation. The student will explore 
nursing strategies which promote the health of older adults. 

BSN 450 Health Restoration of Individuals and Families Experiencing Critical 
Illness (2-3-3) 

Prerequisite: BSN 422 or permission of department head. 

This course provides the opportunit)' for students to synthesize knowledge from the liberal 
arts, sciences, and nursing to assist in the promotion of positi\'e adaptation of individuals and 
families experiencing multisystem failure. Critical thinking and problem sohing opportuni- 
ties from a nursing perspecti\'e are provided in selected critical care settings. 

BSN 460 Independent Study (V-V-(l-3)) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: Senior status or permission of BSN department. 

The student, in consultation with the professor, will select the topic for supervised 

independent study. The student will submit an independent study proposal prior 

to the quarter in which the course is to be taken. 

Dental Hygiene 

Faculty 

* Tanenbaum, Barbara, Department Head 

Coursey, Teresa 
Edenfield, Suzanne 
Mengle, Janice 
Weir, Joanne 

* Graduate Faculty 

The mission of the dental hygiene programs is to educate dental hygiene graduates 
w^ho demonstrate competent clinical skills, effective communication skills, respect for 
the dental team, and professional and ethical standards in providing complete dental 
hygiene patient care. During the educational process, the program fosters the develop- 
ment of life long learning w^ith faculty that are current in academic and clinical knowledge. 

Student Outcomes 

1. The dental hygiene student and graduate will exhibit the ability to demonstrate 
competent clinical skills. 

2. The dental hygiene student and graduate will demonstrate respect for the dental team 
and possess ethical and professional standards. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 231 



3. Tht' di'iital hy^KMU* studerAt and ^raJiuUi' will intc^ratr iK.ulunuc kni)wK ' 
general education, biomedical sciences, dental sciences, and dental hygieiu 
into practical application. 

4. The dental hygiene student and gradtaate will develop effective communication skills 
to disseminate preventive dental health education in the clinical setting and in the 
community. 

5. The dental hygiene student and graduate will develop an interest in life long learning 
through development of critical thinking and research skills to become an effective 
change agent. 

The student must complete a curriculum of 120 quarter hours for the two-year 
program leading to the Associate in Science Degree in Dental Hygiene. Dental hygienists 
provide dental health ser\ ices in private dental offices, civil service positions, industry, 
and in various public health fields. They practice under the supervision of a dentist and 
must pass a national and a regional or state board examination for licensure. The 
curriculum is fully approved by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the Ameri- 
can Dental Association. 

Legal Requirements 

The Georgia Board of Dentistry shall have the authority to refuse to grant a license to 
an applicant who has been convicted of any felony or any crime involving moral 
turpitude. This law is further defined in 43-11-47 of the Geors^in Board of Dentistry Laws. 
Because oi the inability of these persons to become or remain Registered Dental 
Hygienists, persons to whom this law applies may not be admitted into the Program or 
mav be dismissed from the Program. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE 

Progression Requirements 

1 . The student must earn a "C" or better in each Dental Hygiene course before register- 
ing for subsequent dental hygiene courses; therefore, a grade of "C" or better in the 
previous course{s) is a prerequisite for each dental hygiene course for which the 
student registers after the first quarter of the first year. 

2. A passing grade in all related natural science courses is a prerequisite to the 200 level 
Dental hygiene courses; therefore, CHE 201, ZOO 208-209, and BIO 210 must be 
satisfactorily completed before the student will be admitted into second-year status 
in the Dental Hygiene Program. A grade of "C" or better must be achieved in 3 of these 
4 courses. See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs," in the "Admis- 
sions" section of this catalog for the policy regarding the repeat of science courses. 

3. Challenge examinations for specific dental hygiene subject areas are available in the 
department. Contact the department for information. 

4. Audited and /or repeated coursework may affect a student's academic progress in 
relation to the requirements for financial aid. In addition, federal assistance and VA 
educational benefits will not be paid for audited and /or repeated coursework. 

5. All students must submit a complete medical report form, evidence of health insur- 
ance, and evidence of liability (malpractice) insurance prior to participation in clinical 
experiences. 

6. Students must obtain CPR certification prior to entering DH 113. 

7. All students must have passed the Regents' Exam before entering their last quarter. 

8. An overall GPA of 2.0 is required for graduation. 



232 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Hours 

A. General Requirements 48 

Area 1 15 

1. ENG 101, 102; or 192 10 

2. DRS 228 5 

Area II 5 

1. MAT 101 5 

Area III 20 

1. PSY 101 5 

2. SOC 201 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

4. POS 113 5 

Area IV 5 

1. CHE 201 5 

AreaV 3 

1. PE 117 or 166 2 

2. One activity course 1 

B. Courses in the Major Field 57 

1. DH 111 , 112, 113, 118, 120, 122, 123, 125, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 221, 
222, 223, 225, 228 57 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

1. BIO 210 5 

2. ZOO 208, 209 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 120 

Offerings 

DH 111 Clinical Dental Hygiene I (2-6-4) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Formal admission to the program. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the dental hygiene profession. 
The subject matter includes fundamental knowledge of clinical procedures and 
techniques of removing deposits from the teeth. Clinical procedures are introduced 
on the manikins and the student is required to practice these techniques until 
proficiency is achieved. 

DH 112 Clinical Dental Hygiene II (2-6-4) 

Prerequisite: DH 111 and DH 122. 

The student further develops clinical skills by performing instrumentation proce- 
dures on classmates. Additionally, the student performs oral prophylactic techniques 
on patients in the clinic under supervision. The subject matter includes procedures 
which the hygienist will use in the performance of clinical duties. The student 
applies acquired knowledge in clinical situations. 

DH 113 Clinical Dental Hygiene III (1-9-4) 

Spring. Prerequisite: DH 112. 

Students continue with oral prophylactic techniques on patients in the clinic under 
supervision. The subject matter includes material which the student will integrate 
into the performance of clinical procedures. 

DH 118 Periodontics (2-0-2) 

Spring. Prerequisite: DH 112. 

The basic principles of periodontal health and disease in relation to the total health of 
the patient are presented in this course. Concepts of etiology and periodontal pathology 
are considered. Periodontal knowledge is applied in the clinical experience. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 233 



n\{ 120 Dental Koi-nl^i-noloKV (2-3-3) 

Wintrr I'rtTi-viuiMti' DU'llI ^x^d DM 122 

I hi> ». iHjrM' will iru liulr .» st-ru's of Uvturi's, di'mi)n>lr.itU)nH, and dirw ti-d labtirdtor)' 
fxptTU'iUf in the futul.unt'nt.ils ot dental radiology Intraoral mm.\ extraoral ti*ch- 
njques ti>r the taking and priKossm^ ot radiograph* are taught Clini«.«I »'">•• "" 
subsequent quarters will afford the application of these principle*. 

DM 122 Head and Neck Anatomy (2-0-2) 

fail I'rtTi'(.|uisite I i>rni.il adimsMon to the program 

This (.i>urse is designed to tamilian/e the dental hygienr student with gross 
anatomical relatu>nships in the head and neck Special emphasis is given to the 
ai-iatonn oi the i>ral CtU it\ and its clinical application. 

DH 123 Dental Anatomy and Oral Histology (3-2-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Formal admission to the program. 

This course is designed to familiarize the dental hygiene student with the nomen- 
clature, morphology, eruption sequence of the primary and secondary dentition 
and oral histology and embryology of the oral cavity. 

DH 125 General and Oral Pathology (2-0-2) 

Spring, rrerequisito: DH 112. 

This course is designed to familiarize dental hygiene students with the principles of 
general pathology in relation to the common oral diseases. Emphasis is placed on 
clinical manifestahons and the importance of early recognition of abnormal condihons. 

DH 211/ 

212/213 Clinical Dental Hygiene IV, V, VI (2-12-6) (2-12-6) (1-15-6) 

Fall, Winter and Spring respectively. Prerequisites: DH 1 1 1, 112, 1 13; BIO 210. 
These courses are a continuation of the preceding clinical courses. Emphasis centers 
on the students' advancement and improved proficiency in all areas of a working 
clinic. Students are supervised and evaluated on all clinical procedures using a 
sequenced level of difficulty to determine competency of clinical skills as well as 
assimilation of didactic knowledge into clinical arenas. Lecture time is devoted to 
pertinent material related to the dental hygiene profession and discussion of 
experiences encountered in clinical situations. 

DH 214 Anesthesiology and Pharmacology (2-0-2) 

Winter. Prerequisite: DH 211. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with drugs and anesthetics with 
particular emphasis on those used in denhstry. The subject matter will include origin, 
physical and chemical properties, preparahon, modes of administration, and effects 
upon the Ixxiy systems. The fundamentals of prescription writing will be intrcxluced. 

DH 216 Dental Public Health (3-0-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: DH 211. 

This course introduces the student to the various aspects of public health with 
reference to the dental needs of the community. The distribution of dental disease 
and current public health trends are considered. Epidemiology and interpretation 
of data related to community dental health programs are emphasized. Directed field 
experience is included. 

DH 221 Scopes of Dental Hygiene Practice (1-0-1) 

Spring. Prerequisite: DH 212. 

This course is designed to acquaint students with various scopes of dental hygiene 
practice, the jurisprudence governing the practice of dental hygiene, and the 
structure and function of professional associations. 

DH 222 Dental Materials (2-3-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: DH 113. 

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the 
chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of dental materials. The indications 
and limitations of materials are stressed as well as proper manipulation of those 
materials used by dental hygienists. The principles of dental materials utilization 
are presented and applied during the clinical experience. 



234 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



DH 223 Applied Nutrition (2-0-2) 

Fall. Prerequisite: DH 113. 

This course presents the aspects of nutrition as applied to the practice of dentistry. 
The course acquaints the student with nutrition education as an integral component 
of the duties and functions of a dental hygienist. 

DH 225 Preventive Periodontics (2-0-2) 

Fall. Prerequisite: DH 113. 

The emphasis of this course is the prevention of periodontal diseases. Many facets 
of preventive periodontics are included with emphasis on mechanical and chemical 
plaque control measures and patient motivation. Various aspects of periodontal 
diseases are presented. Treatment planning and case presentations allow the 
synthesis of knowledge which is applied in the clinical experience. 

DH 228 Dental Health Education (1-3-2) 

Winter. Prerequisite: DH 211. 

The student is familiarized with the practical application of modern methods of 
dental health education. Course content includes development of teaching materi- 
als for dental health education demonstrations, presentation of materials, and field 
experiences. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE EDUCATION 

The Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education Program is designed for the post 
associate degree registered dental hygienist. The goal of the program is to provide 
additional education in preparation to assume key roles in educational and other 
settings. Students may choose to enter the program as a full or part-time student allou^ing 
for flexibility of class and w^ork schedules. The program is comprised of preparatory 
courses that will enable the student to be employed in areas such as dental hygiene and 
dental assisting instruction, dental health education, and public health. The student will 
work with the dental hygiene faculty and participate in the student teaching practicums 
in various associate degree classes, clinics, laboratories, and extra-mural facilities. 

Progression Requirements 

The student must earn a "C" or better in each dental hygiene course before registering 
for subsequent dental hygiene courses. 

Hours 
A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. BIO 101, 102 10 

Area III 25 

1. SOC 201 5 

2. HIS 251 or 252 and 114, 115 or 192 15 

3. POS 113 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CHE 121, 122 10 

2. DRS 228 5 

3. PSY 101 5 

4. ZOO 208, 209 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 



HEALTH SCIENCE 238 



B. Course's in itu* Ma|or licld 77 

1. DH 111, 112, \\^. 118, 120,122,123,125,211,212,213,214,216,221, 

222, 223, 225, 228 ^ 57 

2 DH 401. 402. 403, 404 !...!.1!Z"."!.!Z" !Z"""!".... 20 

C. Coursi's in Related Fields .25 

1. BIO 210 5 

2. rS\ 201 or EDN 201, PSY 295 10 

3. EDN 200 5 

4. HE 301 or CRN 500 5 

D Regents' and \W\\ l-xaminations 

TOTAL 203 
Offerings 

DH 401 Practicum In Dental Hygiene Education I (3-6-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Education Program. 
This course is an introductory field experience in the college dental hygiene clinic, 
community agencies, and patient care facilities with emphasis on observation, 
individual and small group teaching, and teacher aide work. The first professional 
course for majors in Dental Hygiene Education 

DH 402 Practicum In Dental Hygiene Education II (3-6-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: DH 401. 

This course is a continuation of Dental Hygiene 401 . Problems common to beginning 
dental hygiene teachers, practices and procedures designed to accomplish program 
objectives, establishment and organization of content, methods of evaluation and 
supervision in the dental hygiene clinic are included. 

DH 403 Practicum In Dental Hygiene Education III (3-6-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: DH 402. 

This course is an advanced field experience designed to assist the student in the 
development of learning activities, teaching prcKedures, and the presentation of 
materials pertinent to dental hvgiene education. The student will develop and teach 
selected units in the basic dental hygiene sequence at community agencies, and 
patient care facilities. 

DH 404 Directed and Individual Study (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite or Corequisite: DH 403. 

This course is a directed individual study in an area of major interest with emphasis 
relevant to dental hygiene and future career objectives. Scientific research and 
e\aluation methods will be re\iewed and used in the student's individual project. 

Health Science 

Faculty 

* Streater, James, Acting Department Head & Graduate Coordinator 

* Lefavi, Robert 

* Simon, Emma T. 
Wright, Linda L. 

* Graduate Faculty 

The overall mission of the Bachelor of Health Science program is to make available an 
educational opportunity for persons interested in entering a health field and an academic 
program for experienced health professionals who wish to further their career opportu- 
nities. More specifically, the objectives of the program are: 

1 . To prepare students with the knowledge that behavioral change can occur through 
education; 



236 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



2. To prepare students to foster health, health promotion, and disease prevention; 

3. To provide the opportunity for students to gain expertise in the health related areas 
of health promotion/education, administration, nursing and allied health profes- 
sions, or health and fitness management. 

The emphasis of the curriculum is to view "health" as different from "illness" and to 
teach new students and practicing health professionals of this difference. The curriculum 
will permit the student to earn a baccalaureate degree that reflects expertise in health 
science while focusing on an applied health related area. Upon graduation, these health 
professionals will implement the concepts they have learned and direct the efforts of the 
public in the promotion, enhancement, and maintenance of health and in the prevention 
of health problems. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
HEALTH SCIENCE 

General Requirements (96 hours) 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; DRS 201; 
PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. One of the following laboratory science sequences: 10 

BIO 101, 102 or 111, 112 

CHE 121, 122 
CHE 128, 129 
PHS 121, 122 
PHY 211, 212 

2. MAT 101 and 220 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 5 

3. One course selected from: ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. HS 100 5 

2. HIS 251 or 252 5 

3. PSY 101 5 

4. PEM 228(3), 229(2) 5 

5. CS 115 5 

6. DRS 228 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 166 2 

2. PE 101 1 

3. PE 103 or 108 1 

4. Two activity courses 2 

Health Science Core (45 hours) 

HS 350 Health in the Community 5 

HS 440 Health Planning and Evaluation 5 

HS 445 Seminar in Health Science 5 

HS 450 Health Science Practicum 5 

HS 480 Epidemiology 5 

HE 301 Marketing Health 5 

ENG 372 Technical and Business Conrmi 5 

PSY 220 Intro to Psychological Research 5 

PSY 295 Developmental Psychology 5 



HEALTH SCIENCE 237 



Specialty Tracks (SS hours) (Student will choone one specialty track) 

I rack I - Health Proinotion/l ducation (SS hours) 

HS 3()0 \ iiMJth Pri)biems in a Changing Societv . 5 

HSC 530 Nutrition 5 

GRN 50() Sur\ fv of Gerontology 5 

HS 432 Health Law and Fthics 5 

HE 361 Health and Human Sexuality Education 5 

HE 370 Health Promotion 5 

HE 420 Health Education in Rehabilitation 5 

PSY 515 Psychology of Conflict and Stress 5 

PSY 406 Behavior Modification 5 

(2) Electives 10 

Track II - Health Administration (55 hours) 

ACC 211 Principles of Accounting I 5 

HE 370 Health Promotion 5 

HS 430 Health Care Economics 5 

HS 431 Health Finance 5 

HS 432 Health Law and Ethics 5 

HS 433 Health Administration 5 

PSY 520 Industrial/Organizational Psychology 5 

PSY 521 Psychology of Work Behavior 5 

PSY 522 Psychology of Organizational Oevelopment 5 

Electives 10 

Track III - Health and Fitness Management (55 hours) 

ACC 211 Principles of Accounting I 5 

HS 431 Health Finance 5 

HS 432 Health Law and Ethics 5 

HS 434 Wellness Management 5 

HS 452 Health/Fitness Practicum 5 

HE 420 Health Education in Rehabilitation 5 

PSY 521 Psychology of Work Behavior 5 

PSY 522 Psy of Organizational Development 5 

PSY 406 Behavior Modification 5 

Electives 10 

Track IV- Nursing, Allied Health and Athletic Training (55 hours) 

Forty-five (45) quarter hours from nursing, allied health or athletic training major 
course work and ten (10) hours of electives may be utilized. The fifty-five (55) hours 
utilized will be determined by the Health Science Department Head. 

Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL HOURS FOR THE BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE 196 

NOTE: All BHS students must be currently CPR cerhfied at the time of graduation. 

Minor Concentration: 

The minor in Health Science requires 20 quarter hours with grades of "C" or better. The 
student will complete the following: 

4 courses from: 20 

HE 301 - Marketing Health 

HE 480- Epidemiology 

HS 350 - Health in the Community 

HS 440 - Health Planning and Evaluation 

HS 445 - Seminar in Health Science 

TOTAL HOURS FOR THE BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE MINOR 20 



238 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Health Science Gerontology Certificate Program 

Goal: To provide students with a multi-disciplinary background in aging and present 
them the opportunity to explore aspects of aging and relevant to interests and career goals. 
Securing Admission to the Certificate Program: As soon as a student determines that he 
or she would like to complete the Gerontology Certificate Program, the student must 
complete the application for admission and return it to the Health Science Department. Upon 
receipt of the application, the student will be invited to meet with an assigned faculty member 
to discuss the proposed program of study. A minimum grade of "C" or better must be earned 
in each course for the certificate to be awarded on the undergraduate level. 

Curriculum Requirements: The Gerontology Certificate Program consists of six 
courses (30 qtr. hours). 

GRN 500 - Survey of Gerontology 5 

GRN 520 - Gerontological Practicum 5 

(Prerequisite/Corequisites: GRN 500 and four (4) courses) 20 

chosen from: HSC 530 - Nutrition, PSY 575 - Psychology of Aging, 

PE 558 - Physical Activity and the Older Child, GRN 510 - Healthy Aging 

or Elective - (from approved list). 

Health Science Offerings 

HS 100 Introduction to Health Science (5-0-5) 

Exploration of the science of health. Based on the health (versus illness) model, this 
course will emphasize the enhancement of health as part of natural human devel- 
opment. The multifaceted health care delivery system will be introduced, and some 
ethical, philosophical, and socio-cultural issues of health care will be discussed. 

HS 200 Health and Human Development I (5-0-5) 

A presentation of human growth and development theory. Emphasis will be placed 
on the physical, cognitive and psychosocial development of man from pre-natal 
development to the adolescent stage of the human lifespan. This will be examined 
from the perspective of enhancing health and concomitantly avoiding illness. 

HS 201 Health and Human Development II (5-05) 

The continuation of the study of human development from young adulthood to the 
completion of the life cycle. Special emphasis is placed on health concerns and 
lifestyle consequences of the adult years of the life span. 

HS 300 Health Problems In A Changing Society (5-0-5) 

A review of health as a function of changing societal health status indicators. Topics 
may include, but are not limited to, substance abuse, violence, environmental 
issues, and technology. 

HS 320 Introduction to Managed Health Care (5-0-5) 

Global view of the dynamics driving health reform in America, and the effects of a 
contemporary model ("managed care") of an integrated health care delivery system 
on the community and health care providers therein. Topics will include but are not 
limited to: understanding the basic terminology of managed care in selected 
communities; the economics of managed care; the financial models which support 
managed care, and how information systems drive this process. 

HS 350 Health In the Community (5-0-5) 

Analysis of major community health problems, their causes, the role of individuals, 
community institutions, and government. 

HS 430 Health Care Economics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201 or equivalent. 

Economics of the health care sector. An economic analysis of public policy alterna- 
tives in the health care industry. Roles of the physician, hospital, insurance companies, 
government and other forces that influence health care economics are examined. 



HEALTH SCIENCE 239 



MS 4M Health I inaiuf (5-0-5) 

l'rori'v|iiiMttv ACC 211 

lntriHliuti>rv survey of thtH)rftical and practical appri>4chiii ti> the finarw ..». ....ti. 
a^ement ot health care institution!* Financing isjkuen specific to the health care 

mdiistPN will be disviissed 

US 432 Health Law and Ethics (5-0-5) 

lntroduclu>n of the le>;al bases atul i-thual dimensions of hcalthcan* dt-cision 
makin>; Designed ti> give the student a philosophical foundation in the dibcu&sion 
o\ sptvihc K'g.il ^nd ethical topics in health care. 

HS 433 Health Administration (5-0-5) 

Application of theory and concepts of administration in health ser\'ice«i systems and 
organizations. Course covers the broad spectrum of health policy, planning, and 
management of the health services system. 

HS 434 Wellness Management (5-0-5) 

This course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to design, 
implement, manage and evaluate profit-oriented health promotion and fitness 
programs in various settings. Emphasis will be on financing/budgeting, human 
resources, marketing, program effectiveness, solvency and legal issues specific to 
wellness centers. 

HS 440 Health Planning and Evaluation (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite; HS 100. 

Planning and e\aliiation of health programs in a variety of settings. 

HS 445 Seminar In Health Science (5-0-5) 

Corequisite/ Prerequisite; HS 440. 

Health Science concepts are analyzed and synthesi/t'd FmtTv^ing and fmergent 

issues and trends are investigated. 

HS 450 Health Science Practicum (1-8-5) 

Corequisite/Prerequisite: PSY 220, HS 445, 440. 

This course provides the health science student the opportunity to be an active 

participant in an area of the health care industry. 

HS 452 Health/Fitness Practicum (1-8-5) 

Practicum in health and fitness management. 

HS 480 Epidemiology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HS 100. 

The application of ecology to health and illness. An investigation into the various 
factors and conditions that determine the occurrence and distribution of health, 
disease, and death among groups of individuals. 

HS 486 Healthy Aging (5-0-5) 

This course will address the physical, social, emohonal, intellectual, occupational, 
and spiritual needs of older adults with emphasis on the new image of holistic aging 
and health. 

HSC 530 Nutrition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Area II Lab Science sequence. 

Nutrition, as a major component of lifestyle, is related to enhancement of health and 

contribution to illness. Basic concepts of nutrition and various "diets" are studied. 

HSC 540 Women and Minorities' Health Issues (5-0-5) 

This course is designed to present the opportunity to explore contemporary health 
issues of concern to women and selected minority populations. This course should 
be of interest not only for those who may be preparing to work in health settings, but 
also for an emerging student population who desires to participate actively in 
decisions affecting their own health. 



240 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



GRN 500 Survey of Gerontology (5-0-5) 

This course is designed to introduce students to the elements necessary for under- 
standing the aging situation. Emphasis will be placed on the physiological and 
functional changes associated with the aging process: chronic diseases, illness and 
morbidity, death and dying, and effects of aging on health, attitudes, and activities. 
Research methods in gerontology, major public policy issues, and financial issues 
will be included. 

GRN 510 Healthy Aging (5-0-5) 

This course will address the physical, social emotional, intellectual, occupational, 
and spiritual needs of older adults with emphasis on the new image of holistic aging 
and health. The focus of this course is on the development of community based 
programs to serve an aging population. 

GRN 520 Gerontological Practicum (1-8-5) 

Prerequisite/co-requisites: GRN 500, PSY 575, PE 558, HSC 530, and gerontology 

elective. 

This course is designed to assist the student in applying the knowledge obtained 

from previous courses in order to implement a chosen role in gerontology. Each 

sponsoring organization will provide a qualified supervisor. A member of the ASC 

Faculty will be assigned to the practicum; he/she will establish performance criteria 

and evaluate accordingly. 

Health Education Offerings 

HE 260 Contemporary Health Issues (5-0-5) 

Study of major health topics along with their effects on modern society. Such topics 
as environmental pollution, medical ethics, health care costs, personal health, and 
health consumerism will be investigated. 

HE 301 Marketing Health (5-0-5) 

A survey of marketing strategies utilized in health settings. Basic principles of 
communication integrated with various media modalities are explored. The meth- 
ods and media will be designed for the biopsychosocial requirements of the client. 

HE 360 School Health Education (3-0-3) 

An investigation of the total school health environment and health instruction. 

HE 361 Health and Human Sexuality Education (5-0-5) 

A study of the relationship between health and sexuality education. Health promo- 
tion strategies dealing with sexual behavior, sexually transmitted diseases, 
pregnancy, pregnancy prevention, and parenthood are involved. Emphasis is on 
interventions and curriculum material available for teachers and health educators. 

HE 362 Health and Drug Education (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: HE 260. 

This course emphasizes effective educational strategies and techniques for teaching 
material related to chemical dependency and abuse. It includes precursors to abuse, 
physiological and psychological effects, rehabilitation methods and costs to society. 

HE 370 Health Promotion (5-0-5) 

Students will learn the multiple skills needed to design, implement and evaluate 
health promotion and wellness programs in various settings, such as hospitals, 
corporations, and school systems. All aspects of program administration and 
evaluation will be discussed from program justification to participant motivation. 
In addition, specific modalities of health promotion at the worksite will be 
addressed. 

HE 420 Health Education In Rehabilitation (5-0-5) 

The role of health promotion/education in the rehabilitative process will be dis- 
cussed and evaluated. Various strategies and their effectiveness will help students 
identify the best methods for ensuring compliance and improved health status of 
clients. The specific needs of various populations will also be discussed. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 241 



HF 4bO Health In the Curriculum (S-O-S) 

I'riTi-vjiMsitos HI 2h(), ;tM, v>: 

Iho study ot health I'diK.itioii ciirrKulun^ with fniph.jsis upon matiTtals and 
methiHis oi teaching hi'alth rducatjon K- 12 This cdufm" placfs sptHfial fixu* on the 
dfvi'lopmont i>f health i'duiatu>n lurnculum, instructional units, writing obii-c- 
ti\ fs, lesson and unit planning, and the relationship ot health education to the total 
evUicatii^n program. 



Medical Technology 

Faculty 

Hardcgrtv, Lcstor Jr., Program Director 
Edgar, John Ralph, Medical Director 
Rodgers, Anne 

Medical technology is a career in clinical laboratory science. Medical technologists 
perform and /or super\ise the testing of blood, urine, spinal fluid and other body 
specimens. Applying the knowledge of chemistry, mathematics and biology, the medical 
technologist uses both manual and automated techniques to provide diagnostic data to 
physicians. 

The Medical Technology Program offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical 
Technology and a Post-Bachelor's Certificate of the Medical Technology Program. The 
B.S. in Medical Technology is awarded to students who complete all degree require- 
ments for Armstrong State College. Entering Freshman, transfer students, and associate 
degree medical laboratory technicians are eligible for the degree. The Post-Bachelor's 
Certificate is awarded to those who ha\'e completed a degree in biology, chemistry, 
microbiology or related science fields and to transient students from other institutions 
affiliated with the program which award the Bachelor of Science degree (Georgia 
College, Georgia Southern University and Savannah State College). 

The B.S. in Medical Technology curriculum is a 4 year program. During the first two 
or three years students complete core curriculum courses in chemistry, biology, math- 
ematics, humanities and social science. The fi\e quarter professional phase starts each 
fall quarter. Courses cover the major laboratory areas (urinalysis, hematology, clinical 
chemistry, blood banking, microbiology, serology), and are taught on campus. The 
clinical practicum is provided in the clinical laboratories of Candler Hospital, the South 
Atlantic Red Cross Blood Center, Memorial Medical Center and St. Joseph's Hospital, all 
located in Savannah. Upon completion of the program, graduates are eligible to take the 
certification examination of the Board of Registry for Medical Technologists of the 
American Society of Clinical Pathologists and the Clinical Laboratory Scientist examina- 
tion of the National Certification Agency for Medical Laboratory Personnel. 

Post Acceptance Requirements 

Students accepted into the program will be required to submit a complete Armstrong 
State College Health Professions Student Health Appraisal form. Prior to enrollment in 
the clinical practicum the student will be required to provide evidence of liability 
insurance and medical coverage. Students are responsible for their own transportation 
to and from the clinical sites and are required to adhere to arranged hospital time 
schedule. 

Progression Requirements 

1. The student must earn a "C" or better in each Medical Technology course. 

2. A student may repeat a single MT course only one time and at the next offering 
provided space is available. 



242 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



3. A student who must repeat a single MT course more than once or more than one MT 
course will be dismissed from the program with no option for readmission. 

4. The student must maintain an overall adjusted Grade Point Average of 2.0 or better. 
A student who falls below the 2.0 GPA will be placed on "Suspension" for one quarter. 
If the student's GPA is not raised by the end of the next quarter, then the student will 
be dismissed from the program. 

5. The student must complete the Professional coursework within three (3) consecutive 
years from the date of their initial admission to the Medical Technology Program. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200 5 

Area II 20 

1. CHE 128, 129 10 

2. MAT 101, 220 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 5 

3. One course selected from: ANT 201, ECO 201, PSY 101, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. BIO 101 5 

2. ZOO 208 5 

3. Electives in BIO, CHE and/or CS 20 

(Must contain at least 1 Biology or Zoology course which completes 

a 10 hour sequence, and 1 Chemistry course.) 
AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 98 

1. Upper Division Sequences 20 

BIO 351, 353 10 

CHE 341, 342, 10 

2. Professional Courses 78 

MT 200, 310, 320, 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, 390, 450, 

411, 421, 431, 441, 451, 460, 461, 490 78 

C. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 198 

Offerings 

MT 200 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Science (2-2-3) 

An introductory course to acquaint the student with the role of the Medical 
Technologist as a member of the health care team and basic skills needed for the 
practice of clinical laboratory science. Topics will include content common to 
several discipline areas and basic laboratory mathematics. The laboratory will 
emphasize basic skills common to many diagnostic procedures /tests. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 243 



MI 310 Urinalysis and Body Fluids (3-4-5) 

rriri'viiMsitf AdmisMiin to th»- M I pri)>;ram or ptTmiasion of program director. 
A qualil.Uu o and quantilati\ i* stmly ot the chemical and micro«:opic constituents 
of iinnt' And i>thfr NkIv fluids and the clinical si^nificanci* of thi* te«»t rtrsults 

MT 311 Urinalysis and Body Fluids (3-0-3) 

l'rori'v]uiMti' Admission to tlu* M 1 program or permission of program director. 
A qualitative and quantitative studv ot the chemical and microscopic constituents 
of urine and other body fluids and the clinical significance of test results Open to 
students with an asstK'iate degree with acceptable national certification as a medical 
laboratory ttvhnician (Ml.T) and clinical laboratory experience. Offered concur- 
rentlv with MI MO or on di-mand as directed study. 

MT 320 Clinical Microbiology I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: BIO 351 or permission of program director. 

A study of the relationship of bacteria to disease. Major emphasis is placed on the 
isolation and identification of bacteria responsible for human diseases. Also in- 
cluded is sensitivity testing and mycobacteriology. 

MT 321 Clinical Microbiology I (4-0-4) 

Prerequisite: Completion of BIO 351 or permission of program director. 
A study of the relationship o\ bacteria to disease. Major emphasis is placed on the 
isolation and identification of bacteria responsible for human diseases. Also in- 
cluded is sensitivity testing and mycobacteriology. (Dpen to students with an 
asscxriate degree with acceptable national certification as a medical laboratory 
technician (MLT) and clinical laboratory experience. Offered concurrently with MT 
320 or on demand as directed study. 

MT 330 Clinical Hematology I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A qualitative and quantitative study of the formed elements of the blood. To include 
the complete blood count and specialized test procedures. This course will also 
include the basic principles of hemostasis and blood coagulation. 

MT 331 Clinical Hematology I (4-0-4) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A qualitative and quantitative study of the formed elements of blood. To include the 
complete blood count and specialized test procedures. This course will also include 
the basic principles of hemostasis and blood coagulation. Open to students with an 
associate degree with acceptable national certification as a medical laboratory 
technician (MLT) and clinical laboratory experience. Offered concurrently with MT 
330 or on demand as directed studv. 

MT 340 Clinical Immunohematology I (3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of basic immunohematologic principles and their application to the prepara- 
tion and administration of whole blood and blood components. To include the selection 
and processing of donors, cross matching procedures, and antibody idenhficahon. 

MT 341 Clinical Immunohematology I (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of basic immunohematologic principles and their application to the 
preparation and administration of whole blood and blood components. To include 
the selection and processing of donors, cross matching procedures, and antibody 
identification. Open to students with an associate degree with acceptable national 
certification as a medical laboratory technician (MLT) and clinical laboratory 
experience. Offered concurrently with MT 340 or on demand as directed study. 

MT 350 Clinical Chemistry I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: CHE 342, and MT 360 or permission of program director. 

A comprehensive study of the physiological principles, methodology and cliniced 

significance of the biochemicals and elements found in the body fluids. 



244 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MT 351 Clinical Chemistry I (4-0-4) 

Prerequisite; Completion of CHE 342 or MT 360 or permission of program director. 
A comprehensive study of the physiological principles, methodology and clinical 
significance of biochemicals and elements found in body fluids. Open to students 
with an associate degree with acceptable national certification as a medical labora- 
tory technician (MLT) and clinical laboratory experience. Offered concurrently with 
MT 350 or on demand as directed study. 

MT 360 Clinical Instrumentation (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A basic study of the principles and operation of laboratory instrumentation. 
Emphasis will be placed on the individual components and the inter-relationship of 
the components. Electronics will be included. 

MT 361 Clinical Instrumentation (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A basic study of the principles and operation of laboratory instrumentation. 
Emphasis will be placed on the individual components and the interrelationship of 
the components. Electronics will be included. Open to students with an associate 
degree with acceptable national certification as a medical laboratory technician 
(MLT) and clinical laboratory experience. Offered concurrently with MT 360 or on 
demand as directed study. 

MT 370 Clinical Serology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of the principles and procedures used in the isolation, identification and 
quantitation of diagnostically significant antigens and antibodies. 

MT 371 Clinical Serology (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of the principles and procedures used in the isolation, identification and 
quantitation of diagnostically significant antigens and antibodies. Open to students 
with an associate degree with acceptable national certification as a medical labora- 
tory technician (MLT) and clinical laboratory experience. Offered concurrently with 
MT 370 or on demand as directed study. 

MT 380 Clinical Parasitology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 

A study of the pathogenesis, life cycle, and laboratory identification of human parasites. 

MT 381 Clinical Parasitology (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of the pathogenesis, life cycle, and laboratory identification of human 
parasites. Open to students with an associate degree with acceptable national 
certification as a medical laboratory technician (MLT) and clinical laboratory 
experience. Offered concurrently with MT 380 or on demand as directed study. 

MT 390 Clinical Mycology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of the pathogenesis and laboratory isolation and identification of fungi that 
can invade humans. 

MT 391 Clinical Mycology (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of the pathogenesis and laboratory isolation and identification of fungi that 
can invade humans. Open to students with an associate degree with acceptable 
national certification as a medical laboratory technician (MLT) and clinical labora- 
tory experience. Offered concurrently with MT 390 or on demand as directed study. 

MT 400 Directed Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand with approval of program director. 

A study of selected Medical Technology topics designed to meet the needs of the 
student. Credit will depend upon the work to be done. May be repeated up to 10 
quarter hours. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 245 

MI 411 Phlebotomv Practicum (0-4-1) 

MI 421 Clinical Microbiology I'ractitum (0-16-4) 

MT 431 Clinical Hematology Practicum (0-16-4) 

MT 441 Clinical Immunohematologv Practicum (0-8-2) 

MI 431 Clinical Chemistry Practicum (0-20-5) 

MT460 Seminar (5-0-5) 

Prereviuisite Completion of MT 320. 330, 340. and 350. 

Corerquisitf Hnrollment in Clinical practicum course(5). 

A study of advanced level topics in clinical laboratory science. Emphasis will be on 

analysis and presentation of multi-disciplinary case studies A research paper will 

be required 

MT 461 Clinical Urinalysis Practicum (0-8-2) 

Total (0-72-18) 

Prerequisites: Completion of respective didactive MT courses. 

A structured clinical laboratory experience where the students integrate theory and 

application under supervision in the identified content area. This will provide time 

and facilities to allow the students to develop speed, confidence, and organization 

and to anaKve and solve technical problems 

MT 490 Management and Education (4-0-4) 

A introduction to fundamental concepts of laboratory management, laboratory 
operation and finance, managerial leadership, and personnel administration. 

Physical Therapy 

Faculty 

* Lake, David A., Department Head 

Thompson, Anne, Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education 
Lander, Jennifer 

* Graduate Faculty 

Physical therapy is a health care profession based upon scientific knowledge and 
principles whose practitioners evaluate, diagnose, treat, and instruct persons of all ages 
with movement disorders. Evaluation, diagnosis and treatment planning requires the 
ability to critically analyze a large number of factors, determine the most important of 
those factors and develop a treatment plan based on that analysis. Physical therapists 
must effectively communicate their findings to the clients, the clients' families, other 
health care providers and the agencies that reimburse the clients and /or the physical 
therapists for the phvsical therapy ser\'ice. Physical therapists must provide care in a 
compassionate, competent, legal and ethical manner. A major aspect of physical therapy care 
is the prevention of injuries and disabilities and communicating these plans to the client. 

To meet the needs of the physical therapy profession, all course work in this program 
is clinical case centered with the emphasis on problem identification and problem 
solving. This allows students to integrate the pathophysiology, evaluation methods, 
treatment approaches and psychosocial principles into each case. Students are encour- 
aged to seek new solutions to the clinical problems and propose new treatment approaches. 
Active learning promotes independent thinkmg. Students learn to seek and confirm 
answers on their own rather than relying on faculty to give them answers. This pattern 
of independent learning develops in the student a goal of life-long learning. Active 
learning methods develop self-reliance and an increase in self assessment skills. 

By working in small groups, students develop a respect and understanding for the 
problem solving skills and clinical solutions developed by their classmates. Small group 
activities promote the development of teamwork and leadership skills. Clinical labora- 
tories and clinical practice experiences in the curriculum are designed to foster the 
development of intellectual and physical competencies and strong professional values. 



246 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The central principle in the Department's educational philosophy is that the primary 
role of the instructor is as a facilitator of learning, not as the source of knowledge. The 
Department will provide a supportive environment in which students take responsibil- 
ity for their own learning. The Department fosters mutual respect between faculty and 
students, between students and their classmates and between students and other health 
care professionals. The Department promotes a respect and understanding for all 
individuals regardless of their cultural background. 

Accreditation Status and Degrees Offered 

The Department of Physical Therapy is seeking accreditation by the Commission on 
Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). The first step in accreditation 
was completed in September, 1994. The Program will be reviewed for Candidacy status 
in Fall, 1995 and full accreditation in the Spring, 1997. The final accreditation decision in 
the Summer of 1997 will apply to all students in the Program. 

The Physical Therapy Department at Armstrong State College offers a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in physical therapy. Because course work beyond the Bachelor's Degree 
is required to complete Program, all graduates will also receive a post-baccalaureate 
Certificate of Completion. 

The Georgia Board of Pliysical Therapy Legal Requirements 

Graduation from an accredited professional physical therapy education program 
allows students to take the National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE). Passing this 
exam is required for licensure in any jurisdiction within the United States and its 
territories. The Georgia Board of Physical Therapy has the authority to refuse or revoke 
licensure to an applicant upon a finding by the board that the applicant has been 
convicted of any felony, crime involving moral turpitude, or crime violating any federal 
or state law relating to controlled substances or dangerous drugs in the courts of this 
state, any other state, territory, or country or in the federal courts of the United States 
including but not limited to plea of nolo contendere entered to the charge. 

Progression Requirements 

To progress within the Physical Therapy Program, students must: 

1. earn a "C" or better in all 300 and 400 level PT courses and a "B" or better in all 500 
level PT courses. If less than the required grade is earned in a PT course, that course 
must be repeated. Only 1 course can be repeated and that course can be repeated only 
once. A course can be repeated only when it is normally offered again in the curricular 
sequence. No additional courses can be taken in the Physical Therapy Curriculum 
until the course deficiency is satisfied. Thus, failure to pass a course will require the 
student to "drop back" to the next graduating class. 

2. be continuously enrolled in the Program through the entire 10 quarter sequence of 
courses. Medical or personal leave may be granted but will also require the student 
to "drop back" to the next graduating class. 

3. maintain malpractice /liability and health/medical insurance and CPR/ First Aid 
certification. 

4. pass the Regents' Exam prior to enrollment in PT courses, if seeking the Bachelor's 
Degree. 

5. complete all courses in the physical therapy curriculum within four consecutive years 
from the date of their initial admissions to the physical therapy major. Students who 
do not complete the program in the required period of time may apply for readmis- 
sion. 

6. obtain faculty permission to "drop back" for academic, medical or personal reasons. 
A student may re-enroll in PT courses only if the faculty have determined that space 
is available for that student. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 247 



Failure to p«iss ("C or better in all 3(K) and 4(K) level IT coursers and a "H" or better in 
all 5(K) level IT courses) two or more IT courses will result in dismissal from theProj;ram. 
Failure ti> pass a tailed PF course on the seconil attempt will alst) result in dismissal from 
the rri>^ranv It the ti>riner student has tailed out ot the program because of an inability 
to meet the grade requirements, she/he is not eligible to apply for readmission. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
PHYSICAL THERAPY* 

' post baccalaureate certificate also aw ardi-d at the i-iui of flu- prot'r.im 

tloure 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 (or 192), 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; 

MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. CHE 121, 122** (or 128, 129) 10 

2. MAT 101, 103 10 

** note CHE 121, 122 may not meet the chemistry requirements of other 

physical therapy programs 

Area III.' 25 

HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

PCS 113 and HIS 251 or 252 10 

PSYlOl 5 

Area IV 30 

PHY 211, 212 10 

ZOO 208, 209 10 

Two courses selected from: ANT 201, 310, 405, BIO 101, 102; CS 115; 

PSY 201, 295, 328, 375; SOC 201, 315, 320 10 

Area V 6 

PE 103 or 108 and 166 First Aid and CPR 3 

Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 156 

1. PT 310, 312, 314, 316, 420, 422, 424, 426, 430, 432, 434, 438, 446, 448, 
510, 512, 514, 516, 520, 522, 524, 526, 530, 532, 534, 536, 546, 556, 560, 
562, 568 



TOTAL 257 



PROGRAM FOR THE POST-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN 
PHYSICAL THERAPY 

A. Bachelor's Degree (which includes all prerequisite coursework - 
see Admissions section) 

B. Courses in the Major Field 156 

1. PT 310, 312, 314, 316, 420, 422, 424, 426, 430, 432, 434, 438, 446, 448, 
510, 512, 514, 516, 520, 522, 524, 526, 530, 532, 534, 536, 546, 556, 560, 
562, 568 

TOTAL 156 



248 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Curriculum Design of Bachelor's Degree Program 

PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY COURSES - FRESHMAN YEAR 
Fall 

ENGlOl 5 

CHE 121 (or 128) 5 

MAT 101 5 

PE 103 or 108 1 

16 
Winter 

ENG 102 (or 192) 5 

CHE 122 (or 129) 5 

MAT 103 5 

PE166 2 

17 
Spring 

ENG 201 5 

PSYlOl 5 

ZOO 208 5 

HIS 114 5 

20 
PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY COURSES- SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall 

PHY 211 5 

HIS 115 5 

ZOO 209 5 

PE 1 

16 
Winter 

PHY 212 5 

POS113 5 

Area FV Elective 5 

PE 1 



16 
Spring 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

Area IV Elective 5 

Area I Elective 5 

PE 1 



16 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 240 



PHYSICAL THERAPY COURSES - JUNIOR YEAR 
Summer 

PT310 5 

PT312 8 

PT314 2 

PT316 3 

18 

Fall 

PT420 5 

PT422 8 

PT424 2 

PT426 3 

18 
Winter 

rT430 5 

FT 432 8 

rT434 2 

rT438 3 



18 
PHYSICAL THERAPY COURSES - SENIOR YEAR 
Spring 

PT446 10 

PT448 2 

12 
Summer 

PT510 3 

PT512 8 

PT514 3 

PT516 4 

18 
Fall 

PT520 3 

PT522 : 8 

PT524 3 

PT526 4 



18 
PHYSICAL THERAPY COURSES - POST-BACCALAUREATE YEAR 

Winter 

PT530 3 

PT532 8 

PT534 3 

PT536 4 

18 

Spring 

PI 546 12 

Summer 

PI 556 12 



250 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Fall 

PT560 4 

PT562 4 

PT568 4 



12 

Offerings 

FT 310 Functional and Structural Aspects of Movement 1 (2-6-5) 

Prerequisites: admission to the professional phase of the Physical Therapy Program. 
Corequisites: PT 312, PT 314, PT 316. 

This course will cover the gross anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology of the back and 
upper limb. Laboratory sessions will involve human cadaver dissection, surface anatomy 
and introduction to manual muscle testing. Problem-solving, case-centered discussions 
will be used to guide the integration of the basic science of movement with the 
introduction to physical therapy assessment and treatment techniques. 

PT 312 Foundation of Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment 1 (2-12-8) 

Prerequisites: admission to the professional phase of the Physical Therapy Program. 
Corequisites: PT 310, PT 314, PT 316. 

This course will cover fundamental patient care skills including basic evaluation, 
treatment, patient draping and positioning, patient transfers, therapeutic modalities 
and documentation. Laboratory sessions will emphasize the application of evaluation 
and treatment techniques to the back, neck and upper limb. Case-centered discussions 
will be used to guide the integration of the basic physical therapy assessment and 
treatment techniques with the scientific principles of movement. 

PT 314 Physical Therapy Practice Issues 1 (2-0-2) 

Prerequisites: admission to the professional phase of the Physical Therapy Program. 
Corequisites: PT 310, PT 312, PT 316. 

This course will focus on discussions of professional socialization, clinical docu- 
mentation, legal and ethical aspects of health care and psychosocial aspects of 
illness, disability and health care. Case studies will link the material presented in 
this course with other courses taught in this quarter. 

PT 316 Clinical Practicum 1 (2-2-3) 

Prerequisites: admission to the professional phase of the Physical Therapy Program. 
Corequisites: PT 310, PT 312, PT 314. 

This course will provide an initial exposure to the health care setting and health care 
professionals through laboratory and half-day, on-site observational experiences. 

PT 420 Functional and Structural Aspects of Movement 2 (2-6-5) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: PT 422, PT 424, PT 426. 

This course will cover the gross anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology of the lower limb 
and trunk. Laboratory sessions will involve complete dissection of human cadaver 
lower limb and trunk, study of surface anatomy, and palpation. Case-centered discus- 
sions will be used to guide the integration of the basic science of movement with the 
introduction to physical therapy assessment and treatment techniques. 

PT 422 Foundations of Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment 2 (2-12-8) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: PT 420, PT 424, PT 426. 

This course will cover fundamental patient care skills including gait and posture 
evaluation, wound management, strengthening protocols, fitness evaluation and 
cardiopulmonary conditioning, and documentation. Laboratory sessions will em- 
phasize the application of evaluation and treatment techniques to the lower extremity 
and cardiopulmonary function. Case-centered discussions will be used to guide the 
integration of the basic physical therapy assessment and treatment techniques with 
the scientific principles of movement. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 251 



r I 421 Physical Therapy Practice Usues 2 (2-0-2) 

rriTi'qiiisiti's Muii's^tul i«)n\pli'tu)n nt all prl•vl1^in^ ct)ur^Mr<» in the profeMional 

physical thorapv curriculum. 

CortHjuisiti-s PT 420, PI 422, IT 426 

This ci>ursc will tiKu> on di>cussit)ns of thr practical ami It'^al asptt t* i>f lupcrN'!- 

sion, clinical Jixunu'titation, health pnmiotion and in)urv prrvcntiDn education 

and adult ItMniin^ skills usiii in patient and family education Ca*^- studies will link 

the material presented in this course u ith ctiur i mirses taiik-lit in this uuartrr 

PT 426 Clinical Practicum 2 (0-6-3) 

Prereijuisites: successful completion m .m {m<v«mih^; loursrs it\ tn«- pri)»«ssit>tuii 

physical therapy curriculum 

Corequisites: F't 420, PI 422, PI 424. 

This course will provide an obseryational and intrixluctory hands-on exposure in 

health care settings where physical therapy plays an integral role in patient care. 

Care settings will include specialty clinics, long term care facilities, hi>spitals, and 

school systems. 

PT 430 Functional and Structural Aspects of Movement 3 (2-6-5) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 

physical therapy curriculum. 

Corequisites: PT 432, PT 434, PT 438. 

This course will coyer the gross anatomy, surface anatomy, physiology, and 

kinesiology of the head and face, including neuroanatomy. Discussions and cases 

will focus on the neurophysiological and anatomical basis of normal function of the 

brain and head as well as common disorders. 

FT 432 Foundations of Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment 3 (2-12-8) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: Pt 430, PT 434, PT 438. 

This course is a continuation of Foundations 1 & 2. The content oi this course will 
focus on basic evaluation and treatment of balance, gait, and somatosensory 
dysfunctions. Included will be basic principles of motor control, motor learning, 
and biofeedback as applied to physical therapy intervention. Case studies will be 
presented that will link this course with corequisite courses 

PT 434 Physical Therapy Practice Issues 3 (2-0-2) 

Prerequisites: successful completion oi all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: Pf 430, PT 432, PT 438. 

This course addresses practice issues of scope of practice vs. scope of abilities, the 
disabled /impaired practitioner, and "bum-out" syndrome. Additional profes- 
sional issues covered in this course include supervision of PTAs and aides, 
documentation of quantitative terminology, and home-health/home environmen- 
tal assessment. 

PT 438 Physical Therapy Case Management (2-2-3) 

Prerequisites: successful completimi oi all preceding courses in the professional 

physical therapy curriculum. 

Corequisites: Pt 430, PT 432, PT 434. 

Presentation of specific cases for students to manage from referral to discharge 

utilizing given information with increasingly complicated scenarios. Students work 

in small groups to develop total management of each case. The cases presented will 

link this course to the corequisite courses. 

PT 446 Supervised Clinical Education 1 (0-32-10) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 

physical therapy curriculum. 

Corequisites: PT 448. 

This course provides 8 weeks of full time clinical affiliation in general care settings. 

This course provides an opportunity for students to practice the skills learned in all 

preceding courses in the clinical setting. 



252 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PT 448 Clinical Education Synthesis 1 (0-4-2) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 

physical therapy curriculum. 

Corequisites: PT 446. 

This course presents an opportunity to incorporate clinical learning experiences 

with academic principles from the classroom. Students will work in small groups, 

with emphasis on case studies based on clinical experiences in Supervised Clinical 

Education 1. 

PT 510 Clinical Medicine 1 (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: PT 512, PT 514, PT 516. 

This course will focus primarily on the study of the pathophysiology, medical 
diagnosis and pharmacological and surgical treatment of metabolic disorders, 
autoimmune diseases, neoplastic diseases, orthopedic disorders and injuries, am- 
putation and bums. 

PT 512 Advanced Assessment and Treatment 1 (2-12-8) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: PT 510, PT 514, PT 516. 

This course is a problem-solving approach to the physical therapy evaluation and 
treatment of young and middle aged adults with neurological, musculoskeletal, 
cardiopulmonary and medical conditions. Advanced assessment and treatment 
techniques, testing, and equipment will be emphasized. Case studies will be 
presented which will link this course with corequisite courses. 

PT 514 Implementation of Lifespan Concepts in Physical Therapy 1 (1-4-3) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites; PT 510, PT 512, PT 516. 

The content of this component of the three course sequence focuses on the young 
and middle age adult. Issues addressed are developmental theories and clinical 
perspectives of the adult, motivation for treatment compliance, lifestyle and envi- 
ronmental adaptation needed for chronic disorders, and other community issues 
(recreation, etc.) 

PT 516 Clinical Practicum 3 (0-8-4) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: PT 510, PT 512, PT 514. 

This course will provide observational and laboratory learning experiences that 
correlate with objectives of concurrent courses. Students will work with patients in 
small groups with academic and clinical faculty on-site in clinical facilities. Care 
settings will include specialty clinics, long term care facilities, hospitals, and school 
systems. 

PT 520 Clinical Medicine 2 (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: PT 522, PT 524, PT 526. 

This course is a continuation of Clinical Medicine 1. The content of this component 
of the sequence focuses on the clinical perspective of the aging individual with an 
emphasis on geriatric disorders, including, but not limited to, orthopedic, neuro- 
logic, and cardiopulmonary disorders. 

PT 522 Advanced Assessment and Treatment 2 (3-10-8) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: PT 520, PT 524, PT 526. 

This course will explore advanced techniques in evaluating, assessing, designing 
and implementing appropriate treatment strategies for the elderly adult. Neuro- 
logic, orthopedic, and cardiopulmonary disorders are addressed. Case studies will 
be presented which will link this course with corequsite courses. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 253 



PI S24 Implementation of Lifespan Concepts in Physical Therapy 2 (1-4-3) 

I'riTi'vjiusili'N MK\■t'^^^lll ci)in[>lrtu)t) i)f all prtM'djMg mursfs in ihf proirn^tiunal 

phvMc.ll therapy curnculum. 

Corti^uisites: PT 520, PT S22, PT 526. 

This course is a contmualion i>f lmplomentatu>n of lifespan Concepts in Physical 

Therapy 1 The content of this component of the sequence focuses on the physical 

and motor development of the aging adult, death and dying, general issues of aging, 

and other community issues. 

PT 526 Clinical Practicum 4 (0-8-4) 

rrerequiMle>: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum 
Corequisites: PT 520, PT 522, PT 524 

This course will provide observational and laboratory learning experiences that 
correlate with objectives of concurrent courses. Students will work with patients in 
small groups with academic and clinical faculty on-site m clinical facilities. Care 
settings will include specialty clinics, long term care facilities, hospitals, and school 
systems. 

PT 530 Clinical Medicine 3 (3-0-3) 

rrcroquisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 

physical therapy curriculum. 

Corequisites: PT 532, PT 534, PT 536. 

This course is a continuation of Clinical Medicine 1 and 2. The content of this 

component of the sequence focuses on the clinical perspective of the pregnant 

female, genetic screening, and various pediatric disorders, including, but not 

limited to, orthopedic, neurologic, and respiratory disorders. 

PT 532 Advanced Assessment and Treatment 3 (3-10-8) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: PT 530, PT 534, PT 536. 

This course will explore advanced techniques in evaluating, assessing, designing 
and implementing appropriate treatment strategies for the pregnant female, neona- 
tal, and pediatric clients. Case studies will be presented which will link this course 
with corequisite. 

PT 534 Implementation of Lifespan Concepts in Physical Therapy 3 (1-4-3) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: PT 530, PT 532, PT 536. 

This course is a continuation of Implementation of Lifespan Concepts in Physical 
Therapy 1 and 2. The content of this component of the sequence focuses on the 
pregnant female, prenatal and postnatal events, neonatal issues, and the physical 
and motoric development of the child. Other issues addressed are; psychosocial 
issues of families with a disabled child, death/dying, loss of the "normal" child; 
public laws that affect the delivery of services to children; child abuse; ethical 
practice in the pediatric arena; and other community issues (recreation. Special 
Olympics, etc.) 

PT 536 Clinical Practicum 5 (0-8-4) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 
Corequisites: Pt 530, PT 532, PT 534. 

This course will provide obser\'ational and laboratory learning experiences that 
correlate with objectives of concurrent courses. Students will work with patients in 
small groups with academic and clinical faculty on-site m clinical facilities. Care 
settings will include specialty clinics, long term care facilihes, hospitals, and school 
systems. 



254 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PT 546 Supervised Clinical Education 2 (0-40-12) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of all preceding courses in the professional 
physical therapy curriculum. 

This course provides 10 weeks of full-time clinical field experience. Students are 
able to choose affiliation sites in general, acute care, rehabilitation, and other 
specialty settings. The student is expected to be able to work with patients with all 
physical therapy diagnoses, including multiple diagnoses. The student should 
begin to demonstrate the ability to integrate information from all didactic and 
clinical components of the curriculum. 

PT 556 Supervised Clinical Education 3 (0-40-12) 

Prerequisites: PT 546. 

This course provides 10 weeks of full-time clinical field experience. By the end of this 
affiliation, the student should be able to treat complex patients independently, or 
with the assistance of more experienced staff as would be appropriate for a new 
graduate working at the facility. The student should clearly and consistently 
demonstrate the ability to integrate information from all didactic and clinical 
components of the curriculum. 

PT 560 Practical Management and Supervision in Physical Therapy (4-0-4) 

Prerequisites: PT 556. 
Corequisites: PT 562, PT 568. 

This course will provide an introduction to the practical application of management 
strategies specific to physical therapy settings, including finance, personnel man- 
agement, quality assurance, and accreditation/ licensure processes. Emphasis will 
be placed on hospital, private practice, rehabilitation and home care settings. 

PT 562 Current Topics in Physical Therapy (4-0-4) 

Prerequisites: PT 556. 

Corequisites: PT 560, PT 568. 

This course will allow students to pursue areas of special interest that are within the 

academic or selected clinical faculty's areas of expertise. A course project will 

require evidence of ability to utilize acceptable principles and methods in the 

investigation of a specific physical therapy problem. 

PT 568 Clinical Education Synthesis 2 (4-0-4) 

Prerequisites: PT 556. 
Corequisites: PT 560, PT 562. 

This course presents an opportunity to incorporate clinical learning experiences 
with academic principles of clinical problem solving from the classroom. Students 
will work in small groups, with emphasis on case studies based on clinical experi- 
ences in Supervised Clinical Education 2 and 3. This is the culminating academic/ 
clinical experience. 

Radiologic Technologies 

Faculty 

Gibson, Sharyn, Department Head 

* Tilson, Elwin, Clinical Coordinator 

Adams, Laurie, Program Director, Radiation Therapy 

* Graduate Faculty 

Radiologic Technology is a comprehensive term that is applied to the science of 
administering ionizing radiation, radionuclides, and other forms of energy to provide 
technical information and assistance to the physician in the diagnosis and treatment of 
diseases and injuries. This field offers four specific career specialities; radiography, 
nuclear medicine technology, radiation therapy technology and diagnostic medical 
sonography. At present, the Radiologic Technologies Program offers an Associate 
Degree in the specialty area of radiography and a post certificate program in Radiation 
Therapy. 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 2Sft 



Radiography Program Goals 

The goals ot the Radiography Program arc as follows: 

1. The students will be enculturated into the art and science of Radiograph) .1^ t »,- 
denced by graduates who exhibit accurate, responsible, and compassionate behavior 
as members of the healthcare team responsible for p)erforming radiography examina- 
tions. 

2. The students will receive not only an indepth education to radiography but also a well 
rounded liberal arts education. 

' To mtvt the needs of the community by supplying radiographers to Savannah and the 

surroundmg communities. 
4. To promote professional awareness among the students and the community. 

Professional Insurance, Transportation 

Local hospitals arc attiliated with the college for the Clinical Education courses. 
Students are responsible for providing their own transportation to the hospitals. 

Prior to matriculation through Clinical Education Courses, students are required to 
submit evidence ot professional liability insurance, health insurance, CPR certification, 
and a physical examination. Specific information regarding these requirements will be 
distributed to students admitted to the Program. 

Radiography Progression Requirements 

For progression through the Radiography Program, the following is required: 

1. Science courses (ZOO 208, 209, CHE 201, CS 115) 

a. A passing grade in each course. 

b. A "C" or better in at least three of these courses. 

c. No more than two (2) science courses may be repeated, and that no one 
course may be repeated more than once. 

2. Radiography courses 

a. A "C" or better in each radiography course. 

b. A student who fails any radiography course or earns a grade less than "C" in 
RAD 115 will be dismissed from the Program. 

c. If a student earns a grade of "D" in one radiography course, the student will 
be placed on probation and must repeat the course. If a second grade of "D" 
is earned in a radiography course, the student will be suspended from the 
Program. 

d. In the event a student makes less than a grade of "C" in any prerequisites for 
a Radiography course, the student may not be allowed to progress in the 
curriculum sequence. 

Technical Standards 

Minimum physical and communicahon technical standards are part of the admission 
process. Complete technical standards are included in the admissions information packet. 

Attendance and Advanced Standing 

A student must matriculate each quarter, including the summer quarter, to remain in 
the Radiography Program. If, because of illness or other extenuating circumstances, a 
student must be away from the program for more than a month, the student must seek 
formal approval from the Department Head for such an absence. Students who have 
received a leave of abscence must apply for readmission. Readmission is competitive in 
nature and is based on space availability and the readmission criteria at the time of 
application for readmission. Readmission is based on the readmission criteria and space 
availability, and are competitive in nature. 



256 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Radiologic Technologies Program is committed to a philosophy of education 
flexibility to meet the needs of the profession. Individuals who are graduates of 
Certificate (hospital) Programs, working in the profession, and who are certified by the 
American Registry of Radiologic Technologists may receive advanced standing by a 
process of exemption examinations and CLEP examinations. These individuals may be 
awarded Credit-By-Examination up to 45 quarter hours for previous professional 
education. Please contact the department for details. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE 
IN RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 33 

Area 1 10 

ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

Area II 5 

MAT 101 5 

Area III 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

POS113 5 

AreaR^ 5 

CHE 201 5 

AreaV 3 

Any three physical education credits 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 63 

RAD 101, 104, 110, 115, 116, 117, 118, 121, 122 35 

RAD 201, 202, 203, 205, 221, 222, 223, 224 30 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

CS115 5 

ZOO 208, 209 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 113 

Radiologic Technologies Offerings 

RAD 101 Introduction to Radiologic Technology (2-0-2) 

The role of the Radiologic Technologist is presented in the historical context of 
medicine and radiology within the health care deliver)' system. The organizational 
structure of the Radiology Department, specialties within the profession, profes- 
sional organization, accreditation, certification, licensure, and professional 
development are discussed. Elementary radiation protection and elementary image 
control are emphasized. 

RAD 104 Principles of Radiographic Exposure (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Program. 

Factors influencing radiographic quality and conditions influencing exposures are 
presented. Attenuating devices, beam restricting devices, and accessory equipment 
are demonstrated. Technic charts and formation are vehicles for the application of 
the radiographic process. 

RAD 110 Patient Care and Interaction (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Formal admission to the Program. 

Concepts of patient care including physical and psychological needs of the family 
and patient will be addressed. Principles of body mechanics and patient transfer 
techniques, interaction with the terminally ill, obtaining vital signs, administration 
of injections, I.V. maintenance, urinary catherization, and dealing with emergency 
medical situations will be studied. Infectious disease processes and universal 
precautions will be included. 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 297 



KM) lis Radiographic Procedures I (4-3-5) 

rri'ri'vjiMsitfN Jurn^.tl adiuissuM^ Id iht* prD^ram 

I hi" tht'orv »HKi pnnciplfs ot radio^raphu fx arm nations oi the chest and abdomen 
ATv sUulu'd hrnphasis is pKufd ou radio^raphu I'xammation ot the visceral organs 
riHiinnn^ tht* iiso of contrast modia, spatial rt'lationships, patient positioning, 
t'qmpnu'nl nianipulation, and qualit\ I'vakiation ot the study Basic mfdical termi- 
noU>);\ will bo includt'd 

RAD 1 lb Radiographic Procedures II (4-3-5) 

rrtTOt-juisitos I onnal aJniissuMi tn tho program and a C or better in RAD 115. 
The basic theory and principles o\ radiographic prtKedures of the extremities and 
shoulder girdle are studied. Emphasis is placed on i>steo anatiimy, spatial relation- 
ships, patient positioning, ec]uipment manipulation, and quality evaluation of the 
radiographic examinations. Basic medical terminology will be included. 

RAD 117 Radiographic Procedures III (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Fornial admission to the program and RAD 1 16. 
The theory and principles of radiographic examinations of the spines, bony thorax, 
and peK ic girclle are studied. Emphasis is placed on the osteo anatomy, spatial 
relationships, patient positioning, equipment manipulation, and quality evaluation 

oi the radiographic examinations. 

RAD 118 Radiographic Procedures IV (3.5-1.5-4) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the program and RAD 117. 
The theory and principles of facial bones, cranium, heart, breast, reproduction 
organs, and additional non-routine examinations are studied. Emphasis is placed 
on the osteo and soft-tissue anatomy, spatial relationships, patient positioning, 
equipment manipulation, and quality evaluation of the radiographic examinations. 

RAD 121 Clinical Education I (0-8-1) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Prt^gram, permission of the instructor, and 
CPR certified. RAD 104, RAD 110, and RAD 115 must be taken as corequisite or 
prerequisite. 

Orientation to patient care, introduction to areas involving the field of radiology, 
and orientation to the clinical setting are presented. This is a supervised clinical 
practice in performing radiographic procedures, radiation protection, patient care, 
equipment orientation, radiographic technique, darkroom procedures, and film 
quality evaluation, observing and participating in routine radiographic examina- 
tions is included. 

RAD 122 Clinical Education II (0-16-2) 

Prerequisites: RAD 104 and RAD 121 and permission of the instructor. RAD 116 
must be taken as corequisite or prerequisite. 

This is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures with an 
emphasis on the competency evaluation of routine radiographic examinations. 

RAD 123 Clinical Education III (0-16-2) 

Prerequisites: RAD 122 and permission of the instructor. RAD 1 17 must be taken as 
a corequisite or prerequisite. 

This course is a super\ised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures with 
an emphasis on the competency evaluation of routine radiographic examinations. 

RAD 201/202Radiation Science I & II (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 or Permission of the instructor. 

This course deals with the application of radiation physics as it relates to the 
production, propagation and detection of electromagnetic and particulate radia- 
tion. Emphasis will be given to mechanisms describing the interaction of X- rays 
with matter, photographic and electronic image detection, electronic circuitry, and 
the physical function of associated radiographic equipment. 

RAD 203 Radiobiology (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: RAD 202 and ZCHD 209 or permission of instructor. 
This course is designed to give the radiography student an understanding of the 
effects of radiation exposure, dose limits, and structural protection requirements. 
Topics included will be somatic and genetic effects of radiation exposure, measure- 
ment and protection methods, plus NCRP and BRH standards. 



258 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



RAD 205 Quality Assurance (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

This course is a study of equipment testing and instrumentation, record keeping systems, and 
statistical analysis of equipment and supply usage. Emphasis will be given to testing 
procedures, QA program implementation, and federal government guidelines. 

RAD 221 Clinical Education IV (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 123 and permission of the instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 

with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. 

RAD 222 Clinical Education V (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 221 and permission of instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 

with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. 

RAD 223 Clinical Education VI (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 222 and permission of the instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 

with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. 

RAD 224 Clinical Education VII (0-24-4) 

Prerequisites: RAD 223, successful completion of Regents' Examination, and per- 
mission of instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 
with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. The 
program Exit Examination is included in this course. 

RAD 290 Selected Topics In Advanced Medical Imaging (4-4-5) 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. 

This is an elective course that is offered upon demand. Topics such as neurovascular 
system examinations, central nervous system examination, abdominal and periph- 
eral vascular studies, heart studies, computerized imaging systems, and magnetic 
resonance imaging may be included. 



Radiation Therapy Technology Certificate Program 

Radiation Therapy is the use of ionizing radiation to treat disease (primarily cancer) 
and is an important modality in cancer treatment. 

Program Goals 

1. The student w^ill be enculturated into the art and science of Radiation Therapy as 
evidenced by graduates who exhibit accurate, responsible, and compassionate behav- 
iors as members of the healthcare team responsible for providing radiation treatments. 

2. To graduate students who consistently score 5% higher than the national mean on the 
certifying examination for Radiation Therapy Technology. 

3. To meet the needs of the community by supplying Radiation Therapists to Savannah 
and the Surrounding communities. 

4. To promote professional awareness among the students and the radiation therapy 
community. 

Admission 

A.R.R.T. registered or registry eligible radiographers may apply to this 12 month 
certificate program. The program begins in the Fall of each year, thus students are 
admitted only once per year. The program makes the determination of admission based 
on scholastic history and personal references. See the Radiologic Technologies Depart- 
ment for further information and a program application. 

Program for the Certificate in Radiation Therapy Technology 

RAD 301, 302, 303, 304, 310, 313, 311, 314, 312, 318, 320, 321, 322, 323. 

Total 59 hours 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 



258 



Radiation Therapy Course Offerings 

RAH 301 Principles of Radiation Therapy (5-0-5) 

I'ri'-rtijujMtf I i>rnial 4Klinissii»n to ihf pri)>;ram. 

An intri>(.iuctu)n to radiatiDn tluTapv including tiTminology, as well as clinical and 

ttvhnuwl ». ritiTia utili/i\i m the trfatmont o\ canctT patients. 

RAD 302 Methods of Patient Care (5-0-5) 

rre-roquiMte or co-requisitc KAD 301. 

Insight into the physical and emotional care of the cancer patient. Emphasis will be 
placed on radiation side effects as well as special care required by individuals 
receiving Radiation Therapy 

RAD 303 Radiation Protection/Radiobiology in Radiation Therapy (5-0-5) 

rre-rocjuiMte or co-requisite: KAD 301. 

The measurement and reduction of radiation exposure to the patient, healthcare 
worker, and general public will be studies. The principles of cellular response to low 
and high dose radiation will be thoroughly explored. 

RAD 304 Oncologic Pathology (4-0-4) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 301, RAD 303 and permission of the instructor 
The underlying pathologic mechanisms of tumor development and the theories 
describing causation of cellular changes will be explored. Tumor classification will 
also be introduced. 

RAD 310 Radiation Oncology I (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite or co-requisite: RAD 304 and permission of the instructor. 

Aspects of cancer as a disease including tumor classification, stagmg, and the 

rationale of treatment choice will be discussed. 

RAD 311 Radiation Oncology II (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 310. 

A study of malignant neoplasms with an emphasis on etiology, epidemiology, 

treatment methods, and prognosis for cancers affecting each major system of the 

body. 

RAD 312 Radiation Oncology III (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 311. 

Special topics in cancer treatment will be explored including the latest innovations 
in the modalities of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immuno- 
therapy. 

RAD 313 Radiation Therapy Physics (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 303. 

This course will cover basic and applied concepts of physics as related to Radiation 
Therapy. Emphasis will be placed on production of radiation, operating principles 
of therapeutic equipment, dosimetric principles and the use of radioactive sources 
in cancer treatment. 

RAD 318 Quality Assurance in Radiation Therapy (3-0-3) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 313 and permission of the instructor. 

Facets of quality assurance in a radiation oncology department including principles 
of record-keeping as well as methods of baseline testing and periodic calibration of 
commonly used equipment. 

RAD 314 Treatment Planning (5-0-5) 

Co-requisite: RAD 313 and permission of the instructor. 

Provides the student with the introductory skills necessary to plan and calculate 
dosage for a range of treatment techniques. Treatment planning methods with and 
without computer assistance will be included. 

RAD 320 Clinical Education I (0-16-2) 

Pre-requisite: Formal admission to the program. 

Clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy. Orientation 
to simulation, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and patient care activities 
within a radiation oncology department will be provided. 



260 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



RAD 321 Clinical Education II (0-24-3) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 320 and permission of the instructor. 

Clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy: simulation, 
planning, patient care, and delivery phases. Basic skills will be evaluated with 
clinical examinations designed to demonstrate competence. 

RAD 322 Clinical Education III (0-24-3) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 321 and permission of the instructor. 

Clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy: simulation, 
planning, patient care, and delivery phases. Basic and advanced skills will be 
evaluated with clinical examinations designed to demonstrate competence. 

RAD 323 Clinical Education IV (0-32-4) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 322 and permission of the instructor. 

Clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy. Simulation, 
treatment planning, treatment delivery, and patient care skills will be refined. 
Advanced skills will be evaluated with clinical examinations designed to demon- 
strate competence. 



Respiratory Therapy 

Faculty 

Bowers, Ross, Department Head 

Di Benedetto, Robert, Co-Medical Director 

Morris, Stephen, Co-Medical Director 

Smith, William, Director of Clinical Education 

Hopper, Keith 

For the two-year (seven consecutive quarters) program leading to the Associate in 
Science degree in Respirator\' Therapy, the student must complete a curriculum of 59 
quarter hours in academic courses and 65 quarter hours within the major. The A.S. 
degree from an accredited Respiratory Therapy program qualifies the graduate for entry 
into the Registry credentialing system. The Registry is the highest professional credenhal 
available in the field of respiratory therapy. The credentialing process is a two-step 
nationally administered examination. Step 1 is a comprehensive written exam to be taken 
shortly after graduation. The graduate who passes this exam will earn the entry level 
credential C.R.T.T. and will be ehgible to enter the registry credentialing system. The 
registry exam consists of a written and a clinical simulation component. The candidate 
who passes both parts of the registry exam will earn the credential Registered Respira- 
tory Therapist. The C.R.T.T. credential is the criteria required for licensure by the State 
Board of Medical Examiners. 

PROGRESSION REQUIREMENTS 

For progression through the Associate Degree Program in Respirator}- Therapy, the 
following must be maintained: 

1. Courses Related to the Major (CHE 201, 202, ZOO 208, 209, 211, BIO 210) 

a. A student may carry no more than one grade of less than "C" 

b. A grade of "F" must be repeated the next quarter that the course is offered 

c. A student must have successfully completed the requirements for CHE 202 
and ZOO 211 by the end of the spring quarter of the freshman year. Failure 
to comply with this requirement will result in suspension from the program. 
A student suspended from the program will be eligible for readmission 

d. A student who must repeat more than one course because of a grade of "F" 
will be dismissed from the program with no option for readmission 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 261 



2. Courses in the Respiratory Therapy Ma)or 

a. A ^rado of "C" or better is required tor each course that is a prerequisite for 
a subsequent ci>urse. laikire to comply with this reijuirement will result in 
suspensit>n trom the program 

b. A student who earns a grade ot less than "C" must repeat that course the 
next quarter it is offea»d. 

c. A student may repeat a respiratory therapy course only once. 

d. Students who must repeat a respiratory therapy course more than one time 
will be dismissed from the program with no option for readmission. 

e. Students who must repeat more than one respiratory therapy course will be 
dismissed from the pri^gram with no option for readmission. 

3. Grade Point Average 

The maintenance of a 2.0 GPA is desirable throughout the respiratory therapy 
program. Students who fall below 2.0 are subject to the academic status 
classification identified in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog. 
Students placed on academic Warning who do not raise their GPA to the 
minimum criteria for academic Good Standing the subsequent quarter will be 
suspended from the program until such time they return to Good Standing. 
Courses used to raise the GPA must be approved by their academic advisor. 

4. Regents' Test 

Successful completion of the Regents' Test is a requirement for all students 
receiving a degree from the University System of Georgia. The School of Health 
Professions requires that a student must have passed both parts of the Regents' 
Test prior to their last quarter in their major. Failure to comply with this 
requirement will result in suspension from the program until such time that the 
exam is successfully completed. 

5. Exit Exam 

The University System of Georgia requires that all students take a comprehen- 
sive Exit Exam in their major field. The department of respirator)' therapy uses 
a nationally validated exam for this purpose. The exit exam is administered 
during the spring quarter of the sophomore year. All students are required to 
pass this exam prior to the end of the spring quarter. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN 
RESPIRATORY THERAPY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 59 

Area 1 10 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

Area II 5 

1. MATH 101 5 

Area III 15 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. POS 113 5 

3. PSY 101 or see 201 or ANT 201 5 

Area IV 26 

1. CHE 201, 202 8 

2. ZOO 208, 209, 211 13 

3. BIO 210 5 

AreaV 3 

1. PE 117 or 166 2 

2. PE Activity Course 1 



262 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



B. Courses in the Major Field 65 

1. RT 120, 121, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155 32 

2. RT 221, 222, 223, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256 33 

C. Regent's and National Standardized 

Self Assess Exams 



TOTAL 124 

Course Offerings 

RT 150 Medical Terminology (3-0-3) 

Offered: Fall quarter. 

A study of the language of medicine: word construction; definition; abbreviations 
and symbols; and use of terms related to all areas of medical science, hospital service 
and the medical specialties. Open to non-majors. 

RT 151 Patient Assessment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 208, CHE 201, RT 150. 
Offered: Winter Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 151 is to teach the student the assessment skills required to 
evaluate and develop a respiratory care plan. By the completion of RT 151 the 
student will be able to: review the medical record, conduct a patient interview, 
perform a physical examination of the chest, monitor and interpret vital signs, 
perform ventilatory monitoring procedures, interpret arterial blood gases and 
interpret the chest x-ray. The content of RT 151 is essential to the student's 
progression to the clinical phase of the curriculum. 

RT 152 Respiratory Therapy Equipment (3-2-4) 

Prerequisite: CHE 202, RT 151. 

Offered: Spring Quarter. 

A course designed to focus on the technology and equipment used in providing 

respiratory care. The student will be able to select and obtain equipment appropriate 

to the care plan, assemble and check for proper function and identify and correct 

equipment malfunctions. Quality control and asepsis procedures will also be 

emphasized. 

RT 153 General Patient Care (3-2-4) 

Prerequisite: RT 151. 

Corequisite: RT 120, 152, ZOO 211. 

Offered: Spring Quarter. 

A course designed to focus on implementation and evaluation of the respiratory 

care plan. The student will develop the cognitive and technical skills necessary to 

initiate and evaluate the patient's response to: 02 therapy, CPR, aerosol and 

humidity therapy, bronchial hygiene, IPPB therapy and airway care. A protocol for 

initiating a change in the care plan will also be emphasized. 

RT 120 Applied Patient Care (0-8-2) 

Prerequisite: RT 151. 

Corequisite: RT 152, 153. 

Offered: Spring Quarter. 

A clinical practicum designed to orient the student to the hospital environment. Basic 

assessment skills and 02 rounds will be emphasized. Students wiH also participate in the 

cleaning, sterilization, assembly, and routine maintenance of equipment. 

RT 154 Pulmonary Pharmacology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: RT 152, 153, ZOO 211. 
Offered: Summer Quarter. 

This course is designed to give the student an in-depth look at drugs that directly 
affect the pulmonary system. During this course the student will study: route of 
drug administration, pharmacodynamics, drug interactions, mucokinesis and 
mocokinetic drugs, bronchospasm and bronchodilators, cholinergic drugs cromol\Ti 
sodium, corticosteroids, antibiotics, antitiberculan drugs, respiratory stimulants 
and depressants, anesthetics and neuromuscular blockers. 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 263 



RI 121 Applied Respiratory Care I (0-16-4) 

rrtTt'vjuiMti'N KI \20 
OHertil Summer Quarter 

The primary goal oi RT 121 in to provide the student sufficient opportunities to 
applv the cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills deveU>ped in RT 152 and RT 
153 in the clinical setting. By the completion of this course the student will be able 
to: collect data necessary for developing the care plan, implement the prescribed 
care plan, evaluate the patient's response to therapy and modify or recommend 
miHiification of the care plan based i>n patient response By the completion of RT 121 
the student will be able to demonstrate problem striving skills in the clinical setting. 
The clinical competencies developed in RT 121 are a prerequisite for progression to 
the critical care component of the curriculum. 

RT 155 Diagnostic Procedures (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: RT 152, 153, ZOO 211. 
Offered: Summer Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 155 is to teach the student the cognitive and psychomotor 
skills necessary to perform or assist the physician in performing diagnostic proce- 
dures in the blood gas, pulmonary function and cardiovascular labs. 
The student will also develop competencies in cardiovascular assessment. By the 
completion of this course the student will be able to interpret diagnostic data and 
apply it to patient care. 

RT 221 Applied Respiratory Care II (0-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 121, 154, 155. 
Offered: Fall Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 221 is to provide the student sufficient opportunities to 
apply the cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills developed in RT 251 and RT 
252 in the clinical setting. Emphasis will be placed on developing clinical competen- 
cies in the ICU, diagnostic lab and operating room setting. 

RT 251 Care of the Ventilator Dependent Patient (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: RT 116, RT 121; Corequisite: RT 252, RT 221. 
Offered: Fall Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 251 is to teach the principles and management of the 
ventilator-dependent patient. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing indications 
for and initiating ventilatory support, monitoring and modifying ventilatory sup- 
port based on the patient's response and weaning from ventilatory support. Emphasis 
will be placed on developing the students' analysis and decision making skills. 

RT 252 Ventilator Technology (3-3-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 116, RT 121; Corequisite: RT 251, RT 221. 

Offered: Fall Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 252 is to teach the technical and psychomotor skills 

associated with life support technology. Emphasis will be placed on ventilator 

classification, modes and monitoring systems. Students will work with ventilators 

used in the community as part of their laboratory experience. Emphasis will be 

placed on developing the students' problem solving and decision making skills. 

RT 253 Advanced Critical Care II (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: RT 221, 251, 252. 
Offered: Winter Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 253 is to teach the student how to evaluate the effect of 
mechanical ventilation on other organs or body systems and to apply that knowl- 
edge to the total care of the patient. The student will develop a broader base for 
understanding the total patient care plan. Emphasis will be placed on hemodynamic 
monitoring, critical care pharmacology, fluid balance, shock and trauma. 



264 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



RT 222 Applied Respiratory Care III (0-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 221, 251, 252. 

Offered: Winter Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 222 is to provide the student with sufficient opportunities 

to apply cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills to the care of the critically ill 

patient. The emphasis will be placed on patient monitoring and evaluating the effect 

of therapeutic procedures on other organs or body systems. 

RT 254 Perinatal Care (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: RT 221, 251, 252. 
Offered: Winter Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 254 is to teach the student the cognitive, affective and 
psychomotor skills necessary to care for the critically ill pediatric patient and 
neonate. Emphasis will be placed on knowledge of ventilatory support equipment 
as well as techniques for initiation assessment, modification and discontinuation of 
ventilatory support systems. The student will also study embryology, assessment of 
the fetus in utero, complicated pregnancies and deliveries, resuscitation of the 
newborn and abnormal pathophysiologic states. 

RT 255 Cardiopulmonary Medicine (4-0-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 221, 251, 252. 
Offered: Winter Quarter. 

The primary goal is to focus on the pathophysiology associated with cardiopulmo- 
nary diseases or conditions commonly seen in the hospital setting. Emphasis will be 
placed on assessment, rapid recognition, intervention and management of potential 
life-threatening conditions. Emphasis will be placed on developing decision mak- 
ing and problem solving skills. 

RT 223 Applied Respiratory Care IV (0-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 222, 253, 254, 255. 
Offered: Spring Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 223 is to provide the student with sufficient opportunities 
to apply cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills in the care of the critically ill 
neonate and pediatric patient. Emphasis will be placed on care of patients requiring 
ventilatory support. Students will continue to develop their skills in the adult 
critical care unit. The student will also be oriented to the care of the chronically ill 
patient in the home or secondary care facility. 

RT 256 Seminar In Respiratory Care (2-0-2) 

Prerequisites: RT 222, 253, 254, 255. 
Offered: Spring Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 256 is to provide an open forum for discussion of contem- 
porary issues facing the profession and the health care delivery system. Topics to be 
discussed include credentialing, gerontology and the health care needs of the 
elderly, the shift in focus from primary to secondary care facilities, care of ventilator 
dependent patients in the home and the impact of DRG's and the prospective 
payment system on the traditional respiratory care service. 



266 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



International Intercultural Studies Program 

The International Intercultural Studies Program (IISP) of the University System of 
Georgia provides students with a multitude of opportunities to study abroad while 
earning academic credit toward completion of degree requirements at their home 
campus. The IISP currently offers summer study abroad programs in Western Europe, 
the Soviet Union, Israel, Canada, and Mexico, and quarter, semester, and academic year 
opportunities in several countries in Western Europe. In 1989 approximately 350 
participants enrolled in one of these programs. 

Studying abroad enables students to increase knowledge of a foreign language, 
provides the opportunity to gain insights into and appreciation for the cultures and 
institutions of other peoples, facilitates the development of relevant career skills, and 
contributes to personal maturity, a sense of independence, self-knowledge, and confi- 
dence. 

IISP programs are open to all undergraduate students with a minimum cumulative 
GPA of 2.5; ho"^vever, certain programs may require a higher GPA and completion of 
prerequisites. Graduate students are required to have a 3.0 GPA. Students in the 
University System of Georgia who are eligible for financial aid may use that aid toward 
IISP programs. A Umited number of scholarships are available from some System 
institutions. For further information, see the Vice President and Dean of Faculty, or 
contact the IISP directly at 1 Park Place South Building, Suite 817, Atlanta, GA 30303. 
Telephone: 404-651-2450. 

The Freshman Experience 

Freshman Orientation Program 

In order to assist freshman students in making the transition to college, the college 
encourages new students to enroll in ASC 101. In addition to the course content, enrolled 
students will receive special advising and other services. The course is described as 
follows: 

ASC 101 College: Strategies for Success (3-0-3) 

This course aims to provide the student with the skills, information, and guidance 
useful for success in college. It will focus on the purposes of higher education, the 
roles of the student, and the resources available within the college for academic 
success and career choices. 



Learning Support 

Faculty 

Geoffroy, Cynthia, Department Head 

Childress, Beth Oglesby, Edward 

Diaz, Donna McMillan, Charlotte 

Harris, Karl Remler, Nancy 

Jones, Dianne Richardson, Edwin 

Josten, Denice Smith, Carolyn 

The Learning Support Program is intended to serve students who are not prepared for 
Core Curriculum courses and need additional learning support in reading, mathematics, 
and English. Two categories of students may be served within the overall Learning 
Support Program, of which Developmental Courses make up a significant component. 
First, students are required to take Developmental Courses when they fall below either 
the University System minimum requirements or Armstrong's minimum requirements 
on the CPE. Second, students may elect to take Learning Support Courses without 



DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES 267 



penalty in order to prepare tor the core The department als<i administers the Regents' 
RemediatiiMi ti>urse. 

L\>nilitionallv admitted students nuist I'nroll in accordance with the stipulations of 
their admissiiMi (see the Conditional Admission section of this catalog). Those entitled to 
\'eterans Administration educational benefits may be certified for no more than 4S credit 
hours in departmental courses, if these courses are required for regular admission. At 
most, 13 hours may be certified in each of the linglish, mathematics, and reading areas. 

Students who enroll in Learning Support are limited to four attempts per area in a 
combination o\ Dt^velopmental and Learning Support Courses. An "attempt" is defined as 
a course i\]ui\alent to five quarter institutional-credit hour course.*) in which a student 
receives anv grade or s\ mbol except " W". Students who do not exit a required LX'velopmen- 
tal area after four attempts will be suspended from the College. Students who elect to enroll 
in Learning Support are limited to four attempts per area, but are not subject to suspension. 

Students who are enrolled in or wish to register for required Developmental Courses must 
come to the Learning Support Department for advisement. A complete list of Developmen- 
tal /Learning Support Policies is available in the Department of Learning Support. 

Offerings 

LSE 098 Grammar Review (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course is for the student who needs to review grammar fundamentals, to 
improve sentence writing skills, and to develop paragraphs. The student works 
toward competence in sentence construction, verb use, determination of subject- 
verb agreement, formation of possessives, punctuation, and other basics. Along 
with reviewing grammar, the student engages in extensive writing practice, includ- 
ing sentence building, sentence combining, and paragraph writing. 

LSE 099 Basic Composition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: See Developmental Studies Policies above. 
Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course is for the student who has already mastered the basic skills of compo- 
sition but who needs additional practice in developing the essay. It will help the 
student construct more mature and sophisticated sentence patterns, create coherent 
and well developed paragraphs, and organize paragraphs into essays. 

LSM 098 Introductory Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course offers a review of arithmetic integrated into an intrcxluctory algebra 
course. Topics include operations on signed numbers and simple polynomials, 
integer exponents, equations, word problems, factoring, some graphing, and simple 
radicals. This course is for Developmental students only. 

LSM 099 Intermediate Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Prerequisite: See Developmental Studies Policies above. 

Topics include rational expressions, factoring, linear equations and inequalities, 

quadratic equations, word problems, graphs of linear functions, rational exponents, 

and radicals. 

LSR 099 Reading Skills (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course offers reinforcement of basic reading strategies required for both literal 
comprehension and critical thinking. These strategies will build on what each 
student already knows to facilitate increased vocabulary, recognition of main ideas, 
supporting details, organizational and rhetorical patterns, transitions, tone, pur- 
pose, fact and opinion, and inferences. 

RED 025 Developing Reading Maturity (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course is for any student who must remediate following an unsuccessful 
attemp to pass the Regents' Test in Reading. The course covers comprehension 
strategies, vocabulary enrichment, test-taking techniques, and reading fluency. 



268 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Military Science 

Faculty 

Police, Donald, Major, Department Head 

Smith, Scott, Captain Bryant, George, Master Sergeant 

Vacant, Sergeant First Class 

The Army Department of Military Science is a Senior Division Reserve Officer 
Training Corps (ROTC), Instructor Group, staffed by active Army personnel. The 
department provides a curriculum available to Armstrong State and Savannah State 
students that qualifies the college graduate for a commission as an officer in the United 
States Army, United States Army Reserve, or the United States National Guard. Quali- 
fying for a commission adds an extra dimension to the student's employment capability 
in that, upon graduation from the college, the student has either military or civilian 
employment options. Enrollment in Military Science classes is open to all students. 

The course of study offered in military science is designed not only to prepare both 
the student for service as a commissioned officer in the United States Army but also to 
provide knowledge and practical experience in leadership and management that will be 
useful in any facet of society. Male and female students are eligible for enrollment. Each 
student is provided with a working knowledge of the organization and functioning of 
the Department of Defense and the role of the U.S. Army in national security and world 
affairs. 

The course of study pursued by students during their freshman and sophomore years 
is the basic military science course and /or related skill activities. The course of study 
normally pursued by students during their junior and senior years is the advanced 
military science course. 

For selection and retention in the advanced course, a student must be physically 
qualified, should have maintained above average military and academic standing, and 
must demonstrate a potential for further leadership development. 

Graduates of the advanced course are commissioned second lieutenants in the United 
States Army, United States Army Reserve, or the United States National Guard in the 
branch of service most appropriate to their interests and academic achievements, 
consistent with the needs of the Army. Regardless of the Branch selected, all officers will 
receive valuable experience in management, logistics and administration. Graduates 
may be granted a delay in reporting for duty for graduate study, if requested. A small 
number of outstanding students are designated Distinguished Military Graduates and 
are offered commissions in the Regular Army each year. 

Basic Military Science 

Basic military science courses involve six quarters during the freshman and sopho- 
more years. The student learns leadership and management and acquires essential 
background knowledge of customs and traditions, weapons, map reading, tactics and 
survival. Equally important, these courses have the objective of developing the student's 
self-discipline, integrity and sense of responsibility. 

Advanced Military Science 

The general objective of this course of instruction is to produce junior officers who by 
education, training, attitude and inherent qualities are suitable for continued develop- 
ment as officers in the Army. There are two avenues available for the student to be eligible 
for entry into the advanced program and obtain a commission as a second lieutenant, 
(a) satisfactory completion of, or placement credit for, the basic program at Armstrong 
State or at any other school, college or university offering basic ROTC and meeting the 
entrance and retention requirements established by the Army. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 269 



(b)to bo An actiM' dutv \otcraii or junior KOIC cadet graduate eligible for placement 

cri'dit 

Placement 

\ ctcrans entering the military science programs will receive appropriate placement 
credit for their active military service. Students who have completed military science 
courses in militarv preparatory schools or junior ct>lleges mav be given appropriate 
credit. Students with at least three years of high school ROIC may also be granted 
placement credit. Placement credit or six quarters oi basic military science, or the 
cqui\ client thereof, is a prerequisite to admission into the advanced program. 

Alternate Programs for Admittance 

Students with two vears of courscwork remaining, but who have not completed basic 
military science, are eligible to be considered for selection into the advanced military 
science program. Those selected under the provisions of the two-year ad vanced program 
must satisfactorilv complete a basic summer camp of six weeks duration prior to entering 
the advanced program. Students attending the basic camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky, are 
paid at acti\e army rates and given a travel allowance from their home to camp and 
return. Attendance at Basic Camp is voluntary and incurs no military obligation until the 
student returns and decides to sign a contract to pursue a commission. 

Participating Students and Aliens 

Participatmg students are students who participate in Military Science courses but are 
not fully enrolled or are ineligible for enrollment in the ROTC programs. Participating 
and alien students mav enroll in the Military Science classes provided they meet the 
requirements outlined in Army Regulations and are approved by the Department Head 
and /or school authorities. Although these students may enroll in military science 
classes, they may only participate in classroom instructions. They will not participate in 
any high risk training, drill, marching, leadership laboratories, field training exercises, 
voluntary programs, or attend basic or advanced camp. These students will also not be 
issued or wear the uniform, nor receive credit toward commissioning or enlisted grade 
status through completion of ROTC courses. 

Advanced Summer Camp 

Students contracting to pursue the advanced courses are required to attend advanced 
summer camp, normally between their junior and senior academic years at Fort Bragg, 
North Carolina. 

Financial Assistance 

All contracted advanced course cadets are paid a subsistence allowance of $100 per 
month while enrolled in the advanced course. 

Scholarship Program 

Each year the U.S. Army awards two- and three-year scholarships to outstanding 
young men and women participating in the Army ROTC program who desire careers as 
Army officers. The Army pays tuition, fees, books and laboratory expenses incurred by 
the scholarship student. In addition, each student receives $100 per month for the 
academic year. The Savannah Volunteer Guards have established a full-tuition scholar- 
ship for qualified incoming freshmen enrolled in ROTC classes. No military obligation 
is incurred. The scholarship is for one year, with a possibility' of renewal for the next 
school year. Individuals desiring to compete for these scholarships should apply to the 
Military Science Department. 



270 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Army ROTC Uniforms, Books and Supplies 

Students enrolling in the Army ROTC program will be issued U.S. Army uniforms, 
books and supplies by the Military Science Department. No fees or deposits of any kind 
will be required . Uniforms must be returned before commissioning or upon disenrollment 
from the ROTC program. 

MIL Courses 

The basic course of six quarters duration consists of two hours of instruction work per 
week. Students acquire knowledge of military leadership, weapons, tactics, basic mili- 
tary skills, and physical fitness. In field training exercises, potential for leadership is 
progressively developed. Basic course students are invited and encouraged to attend 
military science leadership laboratories and physical training sessions. 

The advanced course consists of three hours of classroom work and one hour of 
leadership laboratory per week. During the spring quarter prior to advanced camp the 
student will enroll in MIL 323 to prepare for attendance at Advanced Camp. HIS 357 
(American Military History) is normally taken spring quarter of the senior year. The 
coursework during the advanced course emphasizes techniques and management and 
leadership and the fundamentals and dynamics of the military team. Field training 
exercises provide the student with applied leadership experiences. Participation in 
leadership laboratories and physical training sessions are mandatory. 

Professional Military Education (PME) Requirements 

The Army's Professional Military Education requirements are established to provide 
cadets with the training and enrichment necessary to successfully compete in the Army. 
In addition to completing a baccalaureate degree, the cadet must complete one under- 
graduate course from each of the five designed fields of study (Some of these requirements 
may be waived for nursing majors). The five PME designated fields of study are listed 
below and the courses that meet the Cadet Command PME requirement: 

A. Written Communications Skills: ENG 101, ENG 102, and ENG 192. 

B. Human Behavior: PSY 101, SOC 201, HIS 114, HIS 115, and ANT 201. 

C. Math Reasoning: MAT 101 and MAT 103. 

D. Military History: HIS 357. 

E. Computer Literacy: CS 115, CS 120, CS 142, and CS 296. 

Minor Concentration 

The department offers a minor in Military Science. The program is designed to 
prepare the student for a commission in the United States Army and is offered to, but not 
required of, those students participating in the advanced course of Army ROTC instruc- 
tion. Whatever the major, a Military Science minor will strengthen the student's 
management, leadership, and interpersonal communication skills. The minor requires: 

Twenty credit hours with grades of "C" or better in any of the following upper 
division military science courses: 321, 322, 323, 421, 422, 423, and HIS 357. 

Offerings 

MIL 121 Introduction to Mountaineering (1-2-2) 

Prerequisite: Enrollment is restricted to ROTC-eligible freshmen (and sophomores 
who are compressing MSI and MSII level courses) who desire to pursue to commis- 
sion in the U.S. Army. 

Instruction and practical exercises introducing the fundamentals of mountaineer- 
ing (climbing, rappelling, belaying, and rope-bridging techniques). Emphasis is 
placed on knot-tying, safety procedures, and the use of group dynamics to expand 
the learning experience in a wilderness environment. One weekend field trip is 
required. Acceptable as a I^.E. requirement. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 271 



MIL 122 Intriidiutioii ti) thi- Army (2-1-2) 

li\slrvKtion provides a basn. uiuU'r>t.uulM\>; to Ihf US Army and its roii- in rnitional 
dt'tri\stv Ihf course iiKJudi's a study ot the Army RC) IC organization and brancht**. 
ot the US. Army, map reading, customs and traditions of the service, military 
writing, physical fitness, leadership drill and ceremonies, conduct and inspection, 
role of the Army National C.uard and Army Reserves, and the role t)f the non- 
commissionini officer. This course includes a mandatory leadership laboratory for 
stu*.lents pursuing a comniissum 

MIL 123 Basic Military Leadership (2-1-2) 

Instruction covers the fundamentals oi Army leadership and management tech- 
niques. This is accomplished through lectures and discussions on leadership and 
management theories, special readings, and student presentations. One weekend 
field training exercise (FTX) and attendance at leadership laboratory are mandatory 
for students pursuing a commission. 

MIL 221 Land Navigation/Map Reading (2-1-2) 

This course consists oi a study oi Land Navigation to include map reading and 
orientation, including practical land navigation exercises. Attendance at leadership 
laboratory is encouraged for students pursuing a commission. 

MIL 222 Individual Military Skills (2-1-2) 

This course consists of the study of and practical application of basic military skills 
to include basic first aid, survival, and individual tactical skills. Attendance at 
leadership laboratory is encouraged for students pursuing a commission. 

MIL 223 Basic Tactics (2-1-2) 

This course consists of a study of basic organization, tactics, and operational 
procedures executed at the (Light Infantry) platoon level. This course includes a 
mandatorv leadership laboratory for students pursuing a commission. 

MIL 225 Basic Military Skills Practicum (V-V-5) 

Summer. Prerequisite: Must be an academic sophomore or junior. 
A six-week training and leadership development program which will qualify 
students for entry into the ROTC advanced course of study. Encampment and 
training is conducted at Ft. Knox, KY. Grading for this course will be done on a 
satisfactory /unsatisfactory basis. Instruction and evaluation is accomplished by 
U.S. Army personnel assigned to the U.S. Army ROTC Cadet Command. 

MIL 321 Advanced Tactics I (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of the Basic Course or equivalent and approval of the 
Department Head. 

Instruction and practical exercises on the fundamentals of leadership and leaders 
role in directing individuals and small units in offensive and defensive tactics. 
Emphasis is placed on developing and executing orders under a given scenario, and 
troop leading procedures. Land navigation and communication subjects are in- 
cluded in the course. This course includes a mandatory leadership laboratory and 
attendance at physical training sessions. 

MIL 322 Advanced Tactics II (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of the Basic Course or equivalent and approval of the 
Department Head. 

Instruction and practical exercises on the fundamentals of leadership and the 
leader's role in directing small and large units in offensive and defensive tactics. 
Emphasis is placed on squad tactical reaction, patrolling techniques, and conduct- 
ing after-action reviews. This course includes a mandatory leadership laboratory 
and attendance at physical training sessions. 

MIL 323 Advanced Military Leadership (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of the Basic Course or equivalent and approval of the 
Department Head. 

Instruction and practical exercises on management, leadership, and motivation tech- 
niques which relate to both civilian and military environments. Emphasis is placed on 
Green lab leadership and leadership assessment. Course includes subjects deemed 
necessary as final preparation for ad\anced summer training. This course includes a 
mandatory leadership laboratory and attendance at physical training sessions. 



272 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MIL 325 Military Skills Practicum (V-V-5) 

Summer. 

Prerequisites: MIL 323 and approval of the Department Head. 

The study and practical application of military skills and leadership ability during 

a six-week encampment experience. Grading for this course will be done on a 

satisfactory/unsatisfactorybasis. Instruction and evaluation is jointly accomplished 

by Department staff and selected ROTC personnel assigned to 1st Region. 

MIL 421 Command and Staff Operations (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: MIL 321 and 322 or approval of the Department head. 

This course provides the MS IV cadet with instruction in the Army Command and 

staff functions. Military and professional knowledge topics include: write in the 

Army style, write an After Action Report, oral communications, conduct briefings, 

prepare to and conduct training, evaluate training, and the Leadership Assessment 

Program. Attendance at leadership laboratory and physical training sessions is 

mandatory. 

MIL 422 Leadership and Management (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: MIL 321 and 322 or approval of the Department Head. 
This course consists of study of military law, the law of war and basic professional 
knowledge an individual needs in order to be a professional officer. Attendance at 
Leadership Laboratory and physical training sessions is mandatory. 

MIL 423 Transition to an Army Lieutenant (1-3-2) 

Prerequisites: MIL 321 and 322 or approval of the Department Head. 
This course prepares and assists MS IV cadets in their transition from cadet/student 
to commissioned officer /professional. Attendance at leadership laboratory and 
physical training sessions is mandatory. 

Naval ROTC Program 

Faculty 

CDR Xzara M. Tellis, USN, Department Head 

CDR Edward J. Kriewaldt, USN LT Grant Sbrocco, USN 

MAJ Edwin Fielder, USMC LT Bernard Doctor, USN 

General 

Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) prepares students for commissioned 
service as regular or reserve officers in the Navy or Marine Corps. 

Students enrolled in NROTC are referred to as Midshipmen (MIDN) or as Naval 
Science Students (NSS) and are classified based on Naval Science academic status as 
follows: 

ASC Student NROTC Midshipmen 

Senior 1 /C (First Class) 

Junior 2/C (Second Class) 

Sophomore 3/C (Third Class) 

Freshman 4/C (Fourth Class) 



NAVAL ROTC PROGRAM 273 



Naval Science Curriculum 
Basic Program 

Al I MlDsllll'MI \ 

Hours 

A. Na\ al Scionct* 24 

NSC 101, 102, 103 9 

NSC 210, 202, 203 15 

B. Advanced Program-Navy Option 20 

NSC 301, 302, 303 12 

NSC 401, 402, 403 8 

C. Advanced Program-Marine Corps Option 14 

NSC 303, 304, 305 8 

NSC 404, 405 6 

D. Additional and Substitute Requirements 

NSC 450 Na\ al Drill (0-2-0), required each academic term by all midshipmen. 
NSC 103, 303, and 450 satisfies 6 hours of physical education requirements. 

E. Navy Scholarship Midshipmen 

(1) Requirements 53 

Math 206-207-208 (to be completed by end of Sophomore Year) 15 

Physics 217-218-219 (to be completed by the end of Junior Year) 18 

Computer Science 136 or 142 or 246 or 120 5 

Must complete HIS 357 and PSC 201 (SSC) 10 

Must complete one academic term in a major Indo-European or 

Asian Language prior to commissioning 5 

(2) Navy Optic^n in a non-technical curricula shall complete a sufficient 
number of technical electives from the below list to comprise 50 per- 
cent of all electives not required by the academic major or NROTC 
Program. Calculus and Physics courses count towards satisfying this 
requirement: 

Business (SSC): BAD 331, 332, 416 

Chemistry: any listed course 

Math, Phvsics, Physical Science: any listed courses except Math 290, 391, 

and 393. ' 

Computer Science: CS 120, 136, 142, 246 

Engineering Courses: Anv listed course except EGR 100, 170, 171 

Navy College Program Midshipmen (nonscholarship) 

Must complete 1 vear of Math, college algebra or higher, by the end of the Junior Year 
and 1 year Physical Science by the end of the Senior Year as a requisite for commissioning. 
The Physical Science requirement can be met by completing a one-year sequence, or two 
courses, in any area of physical science. One Mathematics course mav be selected from 
the fields of computer science or statistics. 

Marine Corps Option 

All students shall take, during the Junior or Senior year, HIS 201 and PSC 201 (SSC). 
(Courses must be approved by the Marine Corps Officer Instructor and should not create 
an academic overload (increase time required for degree completion /commissioning 
and/or require student to carry more than 18 hours). 

NROTC Uniforms, Books, and Instructional Materials 

Will be issued at no cost to Naval Science students. Uniforms must be returned before 
commissioning or upon disenroUment from the NROTC Program; books and other 
instructional materials must be returned at the end of each academic term. 



274 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Scholarship Program 

Two and three-and-a-half year scholarships that pay tuition, fees, books and labora- 
tory expenses, in addition, scholarship midshipmen also receive a $100 per month tax 
free stipend during the academic year. 

Financial Assistance 

All midshipmen in the advanced NROTC Program (Junior and Senior Years) are paid 
a $100 per month tax free subsistence allowance (same as $100 per month stipend for 
scholarship midshipmen). 

Summer Training Cruises 

All scholarship midshipmen will go on Summer Training Cruises each year. While on 
summer training, midshipmen will be paid active duty Navy rates and will be provided 
travel, room and board at government expense. 

4 and 2- Year NROTC Programs 

4-year program students enroll in the program as Freshmen and participate until 
graduation. 

2-year program students enter the program after they complete approximately 90 
hours (end of Sophomore year) and complete a six-week professional, academic, and 
physical training program conducted each summer by the Navy, normally in Newport, 
RI and referred to as Naval Science Institute (NSI). Academic work at the Naval Science 
Institute is the equivalent of the NROTC basic course and 18 hours of credit will be given 
to students w^ho successfully complete NSI. 

Naval Science Offerings 

NSC 101 Introduction to Naval Science (2-1-3) 

Introduce midshipmen to NROTC Program mission, organization, regulations, and 
broad warfare components of the naval sers'ice. Included is an overview of officer 
and enlisted rank and rating structure, training and education, promotion and 
advancement, and retirement policies. The course also covers naval courtesy and 
customs, a study of the organization of the naval service, career opportunities, and 
the duties of a Junior Officer in the naval service. Students are familiarized with the 
major challenges facing today's naval officer, especially in the areas of leadership 
and human resources management. Fall, Winter. 

NSC 102 Seapower and Maritime Affairs (5-0-5) 

A sun^ey of American Naval and Maritime histor\^ from the American Re\'olution to the 
present with emphasis on major developments. Attention will be focused on Mahan's 
geopolitical theory; economic and maritime forces; U.S. military and maritime strategy; and 
a comparati\'e analysis of American and Soviet maritime strategies. Winter. 

NSC 103 Basic Sailing I (Classroom) (1-1-1) 

A basic foundation course that provides students with the fundamental knowledge and 
skills to be a competent crew member. The course covers the basic theory of sailing, 
nomenclature, seamanship, boat equipment and safety, and inland waters navigation 
rules for sailing craft. An "A" crew qualification will be issued upon completion. 
Prerequisite: Student must be a certified third class swimmers. Fall, Spring. (PE Credit) 

NSC 201/202 Navigation I & II (3-2-5) 

An in-depth study of piloting and celestial navigation theory, principles, and 
procedures. Students learn piloting navigation: the use of charts, visual and elec- 
tronic aids, and the theory and operation of magnetic gyro compasses. Celestial 
navigation is covered in-depth including the celestial coordinate system, an intro- 
duction to spherical trigonometry, the theory and operation of the sextant, and a 
step-by-step treatment of the sight reduction process. Students develop practical 
skills in both piloting and celestial navigation. Other topics discussed include tides, 
currents, effects of wind and weather, plotting, use of navigation instruments, types 
and characteristics of electronic navigation systems. Fall, Winter sequences. 



NAVAL ROTC PROGRAM 275 



NSC 203 Leadership and ManaKeinent 1 (5-0-5) 

Acninpri'l\er^M\estud\ t>f the pniu ipk's.ind concepts of institutiontil management, 
iirgam/.Uional ai^d human bi'h»»vior, and effective leadership Students will de- 
\eK>p a(.iditii>nal kni>wleti^e and practical skills in the areas of communication 
theory and practices; Human Kesourci's Mana^fment; Stress Management; Coun- 
seling; Ciroup Dynamics; and the nature and dynamics of individual and institutional 
change, human resistance to change and tht- strategy for implementing change. 
Spring (BAD 3h2 Organizational lh».H)ry and [Jehavior offered at the Sch(X)l of 
Husini'ss (SSC ) will substituti' ti>r this coursiv 

NSC 301 Naval Ships Systems I (Engineering) (5-0-5) 

A detailed study of ship characteristics and types including ship design, hydrody- 
namic forces, stability, compartmentation, propulsion, electrical and auxiliary 
systems, interior communications, ship control, and damage control. Basic concepts 
of the theory and design of steam, gas turbine, and nuclear propulsion, shipboard 
safety and firefighting are also covered. Spring. 

NSC 302 Naval Operations (5-0-5) 

A study o\ the international and inland rules of the nautical road, relative-motion 
vector-analysis theory, relative motion problems, formation tactics, and ship em- 
ployment. Also included is an introduction to Naval Operations and aspects of ship 
handling and afloat naval communication. Prerequisites: NSC 201-202. Winter. 

NSC 303 Intermediate Sailing (On-water) (1-3-2) 

Basic hands-on sail training leading to qualification as "B" skipper qualification. 
Practical skills to be mastered consist of rigging and sailing from a pier: sail to 
weather; sail two figure eight courses with two tacks and two jibes; man overboard 
maneuver; a capsize; and return to dock and secure. Prerequisites: NSC 103. Spring. 
(PE credit) 

NSC 304/305 Evolution of Warfare I & II (3-0-3) 

This course historically traces the development of warfare from the dawn of 
recorded history to the present, focusing on the impact of major military theorists, 
strategists, tacticians, and technological developments. Students acquire a basic 
sense of strategy, develop an understanding of military alternatives, and become 
aware of the impact of historical precedent on military thought and actions. Fall, 
Winter. 

NSC 306 Marine Corps Laboratory (0-3-0) 

A course for Marine Corps Option students which stresses the development of 
leadership, moral, and physical qualifications necessary for service as Marine Corps 
officers. Practical laboratory exercises in mission and organization of the Marine 
Corps, duties of interior guards, introduction to military tactics, troop leadership 
procedures, rifle squad weapons and theory of physical conditioning program. This 
course serves to prepare students for the Marine Corps Summer Training at Officer 
Candidate School (BULLDOG). Spring. 

NSC 401 Naval Ships Systems II (Weapons) (5-0-5) 

This course outlines the theory and employment of weapons systems. Students 
explore the processes of detection, evaluation, threat analysis, weapon selection, 
delivery, guidance, and naval ordinance. Fire control systems and major weapons 
types are discussed. The concepts of command-control-and- communications are 
explored as a means oi weapons systems integration. Winter. 

NSC 402 Naval Operations Laboratory (0-1-0) 

Practical laboratory exercises conducted in a dynamic, composite and time oriented 
fleet environment to further develop and improve surface warfare skills for Navy 
Option midshipmen. Winter. 



276 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



NSC 403 Leadership and Management II (3-0-3) 

A study of the Management responsibilities of a junior Naval Officer. The course 
covers counseling methods, military justice administration, Naval human resources 
management, directives and correspondence, naval personnel, administration, 
material management and maintenance, and supply systems. This course builds on 
and integrates the professional competencies developed in prior course work and 
professional training. This course prepares final quarter midshipmen for the per- 
sonal and professional responsibilities of a Junior Officer reporting aboard and 
relieving. Prerequisite: NSC 203. Spring. 

NSC 404/405 Amphibious Warfare I & II (3-0-3) 

A historical survey of the development of amphibious doctrine and the conduct of 
amphibious operations. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of amphibious warfare 
in the 20th century, especially during World War II. Present day potential and 
limitations on amphibious operations, including the rapid deployment force con- 
cept. Fall, Winter. 

NSC 450 Naval Drill (0-2-0) 

Introduces students to basic military formations, movements, commands, courte- 
sies and honors, and provides practice in Unit leadership and management. Physical 
conditioning and training are provided to ensure students meet Navy /Marine 
Corps physical fitness standards. Successful completion of three quarters of this 
course by NROTC students satisfies the College's six hour Physical Education 
requirement. NSC 450 is required each quarter for all NROTC students (450.1 for 
Freshman and Sophomores; 450.2 for Junior and Seniors). 



278 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY ROSTERS 



Permanent, Full-Time Members of the Teaching Corps or 
Administrative Staff 

(This list includes only individuals who have faculty voting privileges. The number 
in parentheses after the names represents the initial year of employment at Armstrong 
State College. Asterisk indicates full graduate faculty status.) 



*Adams, Joseph V. (1970) 

Dean of Arts and Sciences 

Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., University ofAlabama 

M.A., Baylor University 

B.A., Tennessee Temple College 

Adams, Laurie McRae (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Radiation Therapy 
M.S., The University of North Florida 
B.S., University of Central Florida 

Aenchbacher, Louis E., Ill (1980) 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

*Agyekum, Stephen K. (1979) 

Professor of Education 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of Georgia 
A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 

♦Anderson, James N. (1985) 
Head of Art & Music Department 
Professor of Music 

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 
M.M., University of Fiouston 
B.M.E., Wichita State University 

♦Andrews, Carol M. (1988) 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Furman University 

*Arens, Olavi (1974) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Columbia University 
M.A., Columbia University 
A.B., Harvard University 

Awong-Taylor, Judy (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.S., University of Florida 
B.S., University of the West Indies 

* Baker, Christopher P. (1994) 

Head of Languages, Literature and Dramatic Arts 

Professor of English 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
B.A., St. Lawrence University 

Ball, Ardella P. (1968) 

Associate Professor of Library Science 
Sc.D., Nova University 
M.S., Atlanta University 
A.B., Fisk University 



♦Barnard, Jane T. (1980) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics and 

Computer Science 

Ed.S. Georgia Southern College 
M.S., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Georgia Southern College 

*Battiste, Bettye A. (1980) 

Head of Curriculum and Instruction 
Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Florida 
M.Ed., State University of New York 
B.S., Savannah State College 

Bergin, Joyce (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ed.D., East Texas State University 
M.Ed., William and Mary College 
MLS Texas Woman's University 
B.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

*Beumer, Ronald J. (1975) 

Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., University of Arkansas 
B.S., University of Dayton 

Bjom, Edith (1990) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ph.D., State University of New York 
M.S., State University of New York 
M.Ed., East Stroudsburg State College 
B.S., East Stroudsburg State College 

Blossman, M. Ellen (1995) 

Associate Professor of Spanish 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.A., Louisiana State University 
B.A., Louisiana State University 

Bowers, Ross L., Ill (1979) 

Head of Respiratory Therapy Department 
Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 

MHS, Armstrong State College 

B.S., (Georgia State University 

Brandt, Patricia (1995) 

Assistant Dean of Education 
Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University 
M.S., California State University 
B.A., Houghton College 

Brewer, John G. (1968) 

Coordinator of Chemistry 
Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 

M.S., University of Georgia 

B.S., University of Georgia 



FACULTY 



279 



Browrr, Muunycan S. (1«W»7) 

A>stK Mti' Pri>U'>si>r i»t Hiolu^v 
M.A., UnivtTMtv ot MassticViust'ttN 
H.S., Univorsity oi Massachusottji 

Brown, George E. (1972) 

ANMst.uil Pri>ti'SM»r ot L riminal justice 
M.S.S.W , Atlanta L nivorsitv 
B.S.W., Armstrong Stati- C nllc>;f 
A B , Arn'»stroi\y; State College 

Brush, Sabitra S. (1993) 

Assistant Protessi>r ot Chemistry 
I'h n., Florida State University 
M.S., Florida State University 
B.F.A., University of the West Indies 

Buck, Joseph A., Ill (1968) 

\'ice President for Student Affairs 
Ed.D., University oi Georgia 
M.S., Florida State University 
B.A., Auburn University 

•Buck, Marilyn M. (1974) 

Assistant Dean of Health Professions 

Professor of Nursing 

Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N. , Boston University 

•Burgess, Clifford V. (1979) 
Professor of Education 
Ed.D., Auburn University 
M.A., George Peabody 
A.B., Mercer University 

•Burnett, Robert A. (1978) 

President 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
B.A., Wofford College 

•Butler, Frank A. (1985) 

Vice President and Dean of Faculty 

Professor of Physics 
Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic 
B.S.E.S., University of Miami 

•Bykat, Alexander (1992) 

Callaway Professor of Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of London 
M.Sc., University of London 
B.Sc., City of Leicester Polytechnic 

•Byrd, James T. (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.S.P.H., University of North Carolina 
A.B., University of NJorth Carolina 

Caldwell, Eva (1987) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N. , Armstrong State College 

Carpenter, Suzanne (1988) 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
B.S., Auburn University 
A. A., Lake-Sumter Junior College 



C ato, I hoiujs I lv»« \) 

Assistant Proti'ssor »)f Art 
M Ld , Valdosta State College 
B.F. A., Valdoftta State College 

Chenault, George S. (1992) 

Assistant Professor ot Fducation 
Ph.D., University of Iowa 
M.Ed., South Carolina State College 
B.S , South C arolina State College 

Childress, Beth (1990) 
Assistant Professor of Reading 

M.A., New York University 

B.A., Temple University 

Clancy, Frank M. (1989) 
Assistant Professor of English 

M.A., Villanova University 

B.S., Villanova University 

Clark, Sandra H. (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S N., Armstrong State College 

Comaskey, Bernard J. (1966) 
Assistant Professor of History 

M.A., New York University 

B.A., Fordham College 

Connor, Sara E. (1980) 
Assistant to the Vice President 
Professor of Nursing 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

Conway, Marian (1987) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

B.S.N., Georgia College 

•Cooksey, Thomas L. (1987) 
Associate Professor of English and 
Philosophy 

Ph.D., University of Oregon 
M.A., California Polytechnic State 

University 
B.A., University of California 

Cornell, David (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., University of Georgia 
B.S., Eastern Kentucky University 

Cornell, Marsha (1989) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., University of Evansville 
B.S.N., University of Evansville 

•Cosgrove, Maryellen S. (1989) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
M.A., University of Connecticut 
B.S., University of Connecticut 

Cottrell, Isabel D. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.A., University of Texas at Arlington 
B.A., University of Texas at Austin 



280 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Counsil, Roger L. (1991) 

Head of the Division of Physical Education 
and Athletics and Athletic Director 
Professor of Physical Education 
Ed.D., Indiana University 
M.S., Southern Illinois University 
B.S., Southern Illinois University 

Coursey, Teresa (1971) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., West Liberty State College 

Cross, Deanna S. (1989) 

Head of Associate Degree Nursing 
Associate Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., Boston College 

M.S.N., Boston College 

B.S.N., University of Akron 

*Dandy, Evelyn B. (1974) 

Professor of Education 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
M.Ed., Temple University 
B.S., Millersville State College 

Deaux, Patricia M. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.L.I.S., University of South Carolina 
B.F.A., University of Georgia 

Deaver, William (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.A., University of Virginia 
B.A., University of Virginia 

Diaz, Donna P. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., University of Southern Mississippi 
B.S., Mississippi College 

*Donahue, Michael E. (1993) 

Head, Government Department 
Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 
M.S., University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of North Carolina- 
Charlotte 

Douglass, W. Keith (1970) 

Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 
M.A., Syracuse University 
B.A., Franklin & Marshall College 

Dubus, Judy (1990) 

Reference / Bibliographic Instruction 

Librarian 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 

M.S., Florida State University 

A.B., University of Georgia 

*Duncan, John D. (1965) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Emory University 

M.A., University of South Carolina 

B.S., College of Charleston 



Dunn, Barbara (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S., St. Louis University 
B.S., Maryville College 
A. A., Maryville College 

Dutko, Kathleen (1978) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.A., Neu^ York University 
B.S.N. , Niagara University 

Edenfleld, Suzanne (1983) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Fertig, Barbara (1992) 

Assistant Professor of History 

Ph.D., George Washington University 1993 
B.S., Skidmore College 1956 

Finlay, Mark (1992) 

Assistant Professor of History 
Ph.D., Iowa State University 
M.A., Iowa State University 
B.A., Grinnell College 

Ford, Elizabeth J. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Winthrop College 

Frazier, Douglas R. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.L.S., University of Washington 
B.A., Western Washington State College 

Gehrm II, John A. (1992) 

Vice President for College Advancement 
M.Ed. Salisbury State University 
B.S. Salisbury State University 

Geoffroy, Cynthia D. (1978) 

Head of Department of Learning Support 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., University of South Carolina 

B.A., Westfield State College 

Gibson, Sharyn (1983) 

Head of Radiologic Technologies 

Department 

Assistant Professor of Radiologic 

Technologies 

M.H.S., Armstrong State College 

B.S., St. Joseph's College 

A.A., Armstrong State College 

Green, Rachel (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Art 
M.F.A., University of Georgia 
B.F.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

♦Gross, Jimmie (1967) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Auburn University 
B.D., Southern Theological 
B.A., Baylor University 



FACULTY 



281 



Guillou. I jurent )., |r. (1970) 

l'rott»ssi>r ot HioU>^\ 

Ph.D., LouisiaMiJ Statf Univorsity 
M.S., l.omsiana Stato University 
B S , I oiusiana State University 

•Hansen, John R. {\9b7) 
Protevsor i>t Mathematics 
Ed.D., University ot Georgia 
M.Ed., University oi Geiugia 
B.S.. Troy State College 

Hardegree, Lester E., jr. (1982) 
Director of Medical TechnoU>^y Program 
Assistant Professor oi Medical Technology 
M.Ed., Georgia State University 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Harris, Henry E. (1966) 

Assistant Dean of Arts and Sciences 

Professor oi Chemistry 

Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 
B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Harris, Karl D. (1971) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., University of Tennessee 
B.A., Carson-Newman College 

Harris, Robert L. (1981) 

Professor of Music 

D.M.A., University of Washington 
M.M., University of the Pacific 
B.M., University of the Pacific 

Hart, Marcella (1986) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
M.N., University of Washington 
B.S.N., St. John College 

•Harwood, Pamela L. (1985) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., Auburn University 
M.A., Appalachian State University 
B.S., Appalachian State University 

Hendricks, Christopher E. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of History /Historic 

Preservation 

Ph.D., The College of William and Mary 
M.A., The College of William and Mary 
B.A., Wake Forest University 

*Hizer, Todd J. (1989) 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
B.S., Old Dominion University 

Hobe,JohnJ. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of San Francisco 
M.A., California state University 
B.S.Ed., Bowling Green State Uriiversity 

*Hollinger, Karen (1990) 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 
M.A., Loyola University 
B.A., Loyola University 



Holliv Srlwyn L. (1991) 

Assistant Protess4)r oi Mathematics 
PhD , North Carolina State University 
B.S.. University of (.etirgia 

Hopkinson, Caroline (1989) 
Assistant Protesst)r ot Library Science 

M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin- 
Milwaukee 

B.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Hopper, Keith (1993) 

.AsMstant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 
M.A., Boi.se State University 
B.S., Boise State University 

Horta, Amaldo (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of Miami 
M.S., University of Miami 
B.S., University of Miami 

Howard, Thomas (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Historical Geography 
Ph.D., University of California 
M.A., University of California 
M.A., University of Chicago 
B.A., University of Chicago 

^Hudson, Anne L. (1971) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph.D., Tulane University 

M.S., Tulane University 

B.A., Hollins College 

Hudson, Sigmund (1985) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 

Science 

Ph.D., Tulane University 

M.S., Clarkson University 

A.B., Dartmouth College 

Hyde, Linda (1995) 

Assistant Professor in Biology 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
B.A., University of Delaware 

Jamison, Carol P. (1993) 

Assistant Professor oi English 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of South Alabama 
B.A., University of Montevallo 

Jaynes, Michael L. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

M.S., University of North Carolina 
B.A., Appalachian State University 

Jenkins, Marvin V. (1968) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M. A., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Jensen, John C. (1985) 

Associate Professor of Art 
M.F.A., University of Arizona 
B.S., University of Wisconsin 



282 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



*Jensen, Linda G. (1985) 

Associate Professor of Art 

M.F.A., Memphis State University 
M.A.T., Memphis State University 
B.A.E., University of Mississippi 

Jodis, Stephen (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
M.S., Auburn University 
B.C.P.E., Auburn University 

Jones, Dianne (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.Ed., WilHam Carey College 
B.S., Mississippi State University 

Jones, Lynda B. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.Ed., Armstrong State College 

Josten, Denice (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Reading 
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 
M.M., Southern Illinois University 
B.M., Southern Illinois University 

Keames, John (1988) 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

Ph.D., University of Utah 

M.A., Andrews University 

B.A., Union College 

Keith, William C, Jr. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Music 

M.M., University of North Carolina 
B.M., East Carolina University 

Keller, Carola (1970) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., University of Virginia 

Kempke, Suzanne (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
M.S., University of Illinois 
M.A., Northvv^estern University 
A.B., University of Illinois 
B.S., University of Illinois 

Khan, Ritin (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., George Washington University 
M.A., The American University 
B.S., University of Patna, India 

Khondker, R. Karim (1993) 
Associate Professor of Economics 

Ph.D., West Virginia University 
M.A., Bowling Green State University 
M.A., University of Dhaka 
B.A., University of Dhaka 

*Kilhefner, Dale Z. (1973) 
Professor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

M.S., Purdue University 

M.Ed., Washington State University 

B.S., Elizabethtown College 



Kingery, Dorothy (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Georgia College 
B.S., University of Alabama 

Knorr, Virginia W. (1973) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.S., University of Tennessee (Knoxville) 
B.S., University of Tennessee (Chattanooga) 

Kolodny, Robert A. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., Queens College of New York 

Koth, Andreas W. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Georgia Southern College 

Lake, David (1994) 

Head of Physical Therapy Department 
Professor of Physical Therapy 

Ph.D., Texas Tech University 

M.S., Indiana State University 

B.S., University of California 

Lander, Jennifer (1994) 

Associate Professor of Physical Therapy 
Ed.D., Nova University 
M.S., Long Island University 
B.S., Indiana University 

*Lane, Joseph M., Jr. (1970) 

Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Lanier, Osmos, Jr. (1965) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Auburn University 
B.A., LaGrange College 

Lariscy, Michael L. (1976) 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
Coordinator of Physical Education Programs 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Larson, Brett A. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., University of Oregon 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Lee, Byung Moo (1981) 

Director of Library Services 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

M.L.S., University of Wisconsin 

B.A., University of Wisconsin 

B.A., Yon Sei University 

*Lefavi, Robert (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Health Science 
Ph.D., Auburn University 
M.S., Nova University 
B.S., Univerity of Florida 



FACULTY 



283 



Level!, Nettle M. (1975) 

AsMstant rroU'NM)r i>t Nursing 

M.S.N., Mtilual Culli'^f of CtH»rgia 
B.S.N.. Florida A St. M Uni\ t-rsity 

Lynch, Will E. (1993) 

AsMstant l'ri>ti*ssor of Chemistry 
Ph I) , Wavno Stato L nivorsity 
B.A., Kalania/iH) College 

MacGowan, Catherine E. (1993) 

Assistant rroti'>M>r of L hemistry 
M.S., University of Colorado 
B.S., University of Michigan-Dearborn 

Manderson, Sandra (1991) 

Assistant IViUesMir o\ Drama /Speech 
Ph.D., University ot Iowa 
M.A., University of Tennessee 
B.A„ Bronau Ci^Uego 

Marinara, Martha (1993) 
Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., Lehigh University 
M.A., Si^uthern Connecticut State 

University 
B.A., Southern Connecticut State 
University 

^Martin, Grace B. (1980) 

Head of Division oi Social and Behavioral 

Sciences 

Director of General Studies Program 

Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.S., Florida State University 
B.A., Armstrong State College 

Martin, Keith W. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Engineering Studies 
Ph.D., Clemson University 
MS., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Martin, William B. (1980) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., Duke University 
B.A., Armstrong State College 

Massey, Carole M. (1976) 

Head of Baccalaureate Degree Nursing 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S.N., Medical'College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

McCormick, Cynthia (1989) 

Coordinator of Psychology 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 
M.A., Georgia Southern University 
B.A., Armstrong State College 

McMillan, Charlotte (1992) 

Assistant Professor of English 

M.A., State University of New York 
B.A., University of California 

McMillan, Tim (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.S., University of Florida 
B.S., University of South Carolina 



'Megathlin, William L. (1971) 

I )f.in of .Niailrmu mu\ I t>rollmenl Services 
Protessor ot Criminal ju ' 

l:d D, University of ( 

M.Ed., University of t ... -i ^,i.i 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

Mellen, Peter J. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Drama/Speech 
Ph.D., Bowling Cireen State University 
M.A., Bowling Clreen Stati* University 
B.A., Bowling Green State University 

Menele, Janice (1984) 

M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Miller, Mary (1970) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Virginia 

Munson, Richard E. (1972) 

Professor of Mathematics and 
Computer Science 

Ph.D., Rutgers University 

M.S., Rutgers University 

B.A., Houghton College 

*Murphy, Dennis D. (1981) 

Professor of Criminal justice 
J.D., University of Florida 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.Ed., University of Florida 
B.A., University of Florida 

Murray, Eric (1993) 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

Ph.D., Cornell University 

M.S., Cornell University 

B.S., Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology 

Neuman, Bonnie (1990) 

Assistant Professor of .Nursing 
M.S.N., Wayne State University 
B.S.N. , University of Michigan 

♦Newberry, S. Lloyd (1968) 
Dean of Education 
Professor of Education 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 

M.Ed., University of Georgia 

B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 

Noble, David (1969) 

Professor of German and Latin 
Ph.D., McGill University 
A.M., Boston University 
A.B., Boston University 
Diploma Litterarum Latinarum, 
Pontificia Universitas Gregoriana 

*Nordquist, Richard F. (1980) 

Director, Office of Nontraditional Learning 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University oi Leicester 
B.A., State Uniyersit\' of New York 



284 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Norsworthy, Gary (1980) 

Dean, Coastal Georgia Center 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.A., Florida State University 
B.A., Florida State University 

Oglesby, Edward (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.Ed., Savannah State College 
B.S., Savannah State College 
B.A., Savannah State College 

Ouzts, Susan (1992) 

Instructor of Mathematics 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

*Palefsky, Elliot H. (1971) 

Professor of Psychology 

Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
Ed.S., Georgia Southern College 
Ed.M., Temple University 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Eaton, Jennie C. (1989) 

Instructor of Library Science 
M.L.S., University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of South Carolina 

Patterson, Robert L. (1966) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., University of Kentucky 
B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan 

Police, Donald P., Major (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Military Science 
M.S., Jacksonville State University 
B.S., University of Nebraska 

Popieniek, Paul H. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Wesleyan University 
M.S., University of Bridgeport 
Sc.B., Brov^n University 

Powell, Catharine L. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., Indiana University 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
B.S.N., DePauw University 

Price, Michael E. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of History 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of Georgia 
B.A., Kansas State University 

Pruden, Rhel B. (1985) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.N., University of South Carolina 
B.S.N., SUNY- Buffalo 

*Pruden, George B., Jr., (1982) 

Associate Professor of History 
Ph.D., American University 
M.A., American University 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.A., Wake Forest 



Raines, Helon (1994) 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Denver 
M.A., University of Southern Mississippi 
B.S., Mississippi Southern College 

♦Raymond, Richard (1983) 

Professor of English 

Ph.D., Miami University 
M.A., University of Wyoming 
B.A., University of Wyoming 

Reilly, Nancy E. (1990) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 
M.S., University of Michigan 
B.S.N., Georgetown University 

Relyea, Kenneth (1990) 

Head of Biology Department 
Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., Tulane University 

M.S., Florida State University 

B.A., Florida State University 

Remler, Nancy (1992) 

Assistant Professor of English 

M.A., Georgia Southern University 
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 

*Repella, James F. (1976) 

Dean of Health Professions 

Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania 
B.S.Ed., Temple University 

*Rhee, Steve Y. (1974) 

Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Missouri 
M.A., University of Oregon 
B.A., University of Oregon 

Richardson, Edwin G. (1989) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., University of Maine 
B.A., University of South Florida 

Roberts, Lynn T. (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Rodgers, Anne T. (1985) 

Associate Professor of Medical Technology 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.A.T., University of Massachusetts 
B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University 

*Roesel, Rosalyn L. (1984) 

Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., North Texas State University 
M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 

Saadatmand, Yassaman (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 
M.B.A., James Madison University 
B.S., National Iranian Oil Company 
College of Finance 



FACULTY 



288 



Sajwan, Maria (1<^2) 

Intorlibrary Loan/ Bibliographic In-struction 

I ibranan 
MIS. University of Kentucky 
B A., Colorado State University 

Schmidt, John C. (1979) 

AssiKMlt' Pri>tossor o\ Art 
Ml .A., Ohio University 
B.F.A., Came>»ie-Mellon University 

SchoIIaert, Warren L. (1989) 

As>ocKitt' I'ri>to>si>r oi E-ducation 
Ed.D , Lniversity ot Gec>rgia 
M.A., Roosevelt University 
B.A., Arizona State University 

'Schultz, Lucinda D. (1986) 

AsstKiate Professor of Music 
DMA., University of Coloradoo 
M.M., Colorado State University 
B.S., Dickinson State College 

Sconduto, Leslie (1995) 

Assistant Professor of French 

Ph.D., Rutgers, State University of New Jersey 
M.A., Rutgers, State University of New Jersey 
B.A., Augsburg College 

Shipley, Charles (1972) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 

Science 

Ph.D., University of Nebraska 
M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.A., University of Nebraska 
B.A., University of North Dakota 

Silcox, Elaine (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Florida 
B.S.N. , University of Florida 

'Simon, Emma T. (1974) 

Acting Associate Graduate Dean 

Professor of Health Science 

Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
M.H.E., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Sisson, Michelle W. (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 

Skidmore-Hess, Daniel (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
M.A., University of Wisconsin 
B.A., Oberlin College 

Smith, Carolyn G. (1977) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Smith, James (1990) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Berry College 



Smith, William J., |r. (1982) 

Assistant I'rofesst)r of Kespiratorv Therapy 
M MS, Armstrong State College 
H S., Medical L'ni\ »Tsit\ of South 
Carolina 

Stegall, John L. (1981) 

Vice I'ri'sident for Business and Finance 

M.B.A, University of Georgia 

B.S., Indiana State University 

•Stem, Camille P. (1991) 

Associate I'ri>fessor of Nursing 
Ph.D., Universitv of Texas 
M.S.N., University of Alabama 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 

•Stone, Janet D. (1975) 

AsscKiate Professor of History 
Ph.D., Emory University 
M.A., Purdue Universitv 
A.B., Randolph-Macon Women's College 

Strauser, Edward B. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ed.D., State University of New York 
M.S., Canisius College 
B.S., State University of New York 

•Streater, James, Jr. (1988) 
Associate Professor of Health Science 
Ed.D., University of Sc^uth Carolina 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of South Carolina 

Taggart, Helen M. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Georgia Southern University 
B.S.N. , Armstrong State College 

•Tanenbaum, Barbara G. (1972) 

Head of Dental Hygiene Department 
Associate Professor of Dental Hygiene 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 

Taylor, Stephen A. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
B.A., Oswega State College 

Thompson, Anne W. (1994) 

Assistant Professor oi Physical Therapy 
M.S., Duke University 
B.S., College of William and Mary 

Thome, Francis M. (1965) 

Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., Stetson University 

Tilley, Roger (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine 
M.S., East Tennessee State University 
B.S., East Tennessee State University 

*Tilson, Elwin R. (1982) 

Professor of Radiologic Technologies 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., San Francisco State University 
B.S., Arizona State University 



286 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Titus, Elizabeth (1988) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Meidcal College of Georgia 
B.S.N., St. Louis University 

Vogelsang, Kevin (1988) 

Associate Professor of Music 
D.M.A., University of Cincinnati 
M.M., University of Cincinnati 
B.M., University of Cincinnati 

Wacker, Jonathan (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
Ph.D., Indiana University 
M.M., University of Nevada 
B.M., North Texas State University 

Walker, Deborah J. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Anthropology 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
M.A., Pennsylvania State University 
B.S., University of Michigan 

Wallace, Richard (1995) 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Clemson University 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Walworth, Margaret E. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Clemson University 
B.S., Clemson University 

Wambold, Constance A. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Speech Correction 
M.S., Towson State University 
B.A., Molloy College 

Waters, Thomas M. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of History 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Emory University 

Weiner, Steven (1995) 

Assistant Professor of Organic /Biochemistry 
Ph.D., Brown University 
B.A., Brandeis University 

Weir, Joanne (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.P.S., State University of New York 
B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University 
A.A.S., Orange County Community College 

Welsh, John A., Ill (1967) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Davidson College 

♦Wheeler, Ed R. (1987) 
Head of Mathematics and Computer Science 
Department 
Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 

B.A., Samford University 

White, Christopher (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
DMA, University of Colorado 
M.M., University of Northern Colorado 
B.M., University of Northern Colorado 



White, Laurie (1989) 

Associate Professor of Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.S., University of Florida 
B.A., University of Virginia 

White, Nancy A. (1994) 

Head of History Department 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., The American University 
M.A., The American University 
B.A., Mount Holyoke College 

White, Susan S. (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.S., Winthrop College 

*Whiten, Morris L. (1970) 

Professor of Physics 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georia 

Williamson, Jane B. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S.N. , University of Georgia 

Winterhalter, Teresa (1994) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Rochester 
M.A., University of Rochester 
M.A., SUNY Cortland 
B.A., SUNY Brockport 

Wright, Janet (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S., Syracuse University 
B.S.N. , Syracuse University 

Wright, Linda (1994) 

Professor of Health Science 
Ph.D., Texas Tech University 
B.S., Eastern New Mexico University 

Wynn, Gail G. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.S., Louisiana State University 
B.S., Oglethorpe University 

*Yentsch, Anne (1992) 

Associate Professor of Historical 
Archaeology 

Ph.D., Brown University 

M.A., Brown University 

M.A., University of Miami (Florida) 

Zipperer, William C. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 



THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 



287 



Emeriti Faculty 



Aiuhon», lorrairu- (l^>4-l*<h3) 
l'rolovs<>r ot I Mulish l-monla 

Anderson, Donald P. (1966-1992) 

Ashmore, Henr> L. (1965-1982) 

Pro«»idi'nt Imfritiis 

Beecher, Orson (1942-19H2) 
ProK*SM>r of Histiuv InuTitus 

Bell, Dorothy G. (1969-1991) 

Assistant Professor oi Nursing Ementa 

Boney, Madeline (1967-1982) 

Professor of Hislorv Fmerita 

Brooks, Sammy Kent (1966-1990) 

Professor o\ Fnglish Emeritus 

Brown, Hugh R. (1968-1994) 

Professor ot English Emeritus 

Coyle, William (1957-1987) 

Professor oi FVlitical Science Emeritus 

Davenport, Leslie B., jr. (1958-1983) 

Professor of Biologv Emeritus 

Davis, Lamar W. 

Professor of Business Administration 
Emeritus 

Gadsden, Ida (1956-1981) 

Professor of Education Emerita 

Harmond, Thelma (1963-1981) 

Professor of Education Emerita 

Killorin, Joseph I. (1947-1988) 

Professor of Philosophy & Literature Emeritus 

Lawson, Cornelia (1972-1987) 

Professor of Education Emerita 



Magnuv Robert E. (1973-1991) 

Professor i>t C rmim.il lustue l\mentu.s 

McCarthy, John C. (1962-1990) 

Protess4»r of Pohtual St lernr 1 mentus 

McClanahan, Billie F. (198M989) 

Assistant Professor oi English Ementa 

Newman, John (1968-1987) 

Professor of I'ohtual Science Emeritus 

Pendexter, Hugh III (1965-1983) 

IVofessor of I'nghsh llmentus 

Pingel, Allen L. (1969-1992) 

Professor oi Biologv Emeritus 

Propst, H. Dean (1969-1979) 

Professor of English, Vice President and 
Dean of Faculty Emeritus 

Robbins, Paul (1966-1986) 

Professor of Chemistrv Emeritus 

Robinson, Aurella (1972-1986) 

AssiKiate Professor of Education Emerita 

Sartor, Herman (1964-1981) 

Professor oi Education Emeritus 

Sims, Roy Jesse (1955-1990) 

Professor of Physical Education Emeritus 

Stephens, Jacquelyn (1979-1990) 

Professor of Education Emerita 

Stratton, Cedric (1965-1993) 

Profess(u oi Chemistrv Emeritus 

Tapp, Lawrence (1959-1994) 

Professor of Physical Education Emeritus 

Warlick, Roger (1970-1994) 

Professor of History Emeritus 

Winn, William (1957-1971) 
Professor of Mathematics Emeritus 



Boarci of Regents Staff of the University System of Georgia 

Dr. Stephen R. Portch Chancellor 

Dr. Arthur N. Dunning Senior Vice Chancellor for Human and External Resources/ Acting Deputy 

Vacant Secretary & Special Assistant to the Board of Regents 

Mr. Thomas E. Daniel Vice Chancellor of External Affairs 

Vacant Vice Chancellor of Human Resources and Legal Affairs 

Vacant Senior Vice Chancellor for Capital Resources 

Mr. Douglas H. Rewerts Vice Chancellor - Facilities 

Dr. Joan M. Elifson (Interim) Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

Dr. Barr\' A. Fullerton Vice Chancellor - Student Ser\ices 

Dr. J. B. Mathews Vice Chancellor - Information/ Instructional Technology /CIO 

Vacant Vice Chancellor - Planning and Policy Analysis 



University System of Georgia 

244 Washington St., S.W. 

Atlanta, Georgia 30334 



288 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Officers of Administration 

Robert A. Burnett President 

Frank A. Butler Vice President and Dean of Faculty 

John L. Stegall Vice President for Business and Finance 

Joseph A. Buck Vice President for Student Affairs 

John A. Gehrm II Vice President for College Advancement 

William L. Megathlin Dean, Academic and Enrollment Services 

Joseph V. Adams Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

S. Lloyd Newberry Dean, School of Education 

James F. Repella Dean, School of Health Professions 

Emma T. Simon Dean, School of Graduate Studies 

Sara Connor Assistant to the Vice President 

William P. Kelso Assistant to Vice President for Student Affairs 

Patricia A. Brandt Assistant Dean, School of Education 

Henry Harris Assistant Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

Marilyn Buck Assistant Dean, School of Health Professions 

Gary F. Norsv/orthy Dean, Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education 

Kim West Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Dan Scott Director, Academic Support 

Lynn Benson Director, Counseling Services 

Roger Counsil Director, Athletics 

Lorie Durant Director, Career Services 

Mark EversoU Director, Computer and Information Services 

Daniel Harrell Director, Financial Services 

Al Harris Director, Student Activities 

Jan Jones Director, Disability Services 

Byung Moo Lee Director, Library Services 

Richard Nordquist Director, Nontraditional Learning 

Carol Schmidt Director, Alcohol and Drug Education 

Vacant Director, Public Relations 

William Cebie Smith Director, Alumni Affairs and Annual Fund 

Alfred Owens Director, Minority Affairs and Minority Recruitment 

David Faircloth Director, Plant Operations 

Vacant Director, Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs 

Ellen Struck Director, Human Resources 

Joann Windeler Director, Business and Auxiliary Services 

Ed Lyons Director, Public Safety 

Stephen Whalen Director, Public Service 

Institutions of the University System of Georgia 
Universities 

Athens 30602 Augusta 30912 

University of Georgia — h; BJ,M,S,D Medical College of Georgia — h; A,B,M,D 

Atlanta 30332 Statesboro 30460 

Georgia Institute of Technology — h; Georgia Southern University — h; 

B,M,D A,B,M,S,cD 

Atlanta 30303 Valdosta 31698 

Georgia State University— A,BJ,M,S,D Valdosta State University— h; A,B,M,S,cD 



THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 



289 



Senior Colleges 



Albany 31705 

Albany State College— h; B.M 
Americus 31709 

Ge<.>rgia S<.>uthwestem College — h; A,B,M,S 
Augusta 30<J 10 

Augusta College— A,B,M,S 
Carrollton 30118 

West Geiirgia College — h; A,B,M,S 
Columbus 31^3 

Columbus College — A,B,M,S 
Dahlonega 30597 

North Georgia College — h; A,B,M 
Fort Vallev 31030 

Fort Valley State College— h; A,B,M 



-A,B 



Marietta 30061 

Kennesaw College 
Marietta 3(K)6() 

Southern Technical Institute — h, A.B,M 
Milledgeville 31061 

Cieorgia College — h; A,B,M,S 
Morrow 30260 

Clavton State College— A, B 
Savannah 31419 

Armstrong State College — h; A,B,M 
Savannah 31404 

Savannah State College — h; A,B,M 



Two-Year Colleges 



Albany 31707 

Darton State College — A 
Atlanta 30310 

Atlanta Metropolitan College— 
Bainbridge 31717 

Bainbridge College — A 
Bamesville 30204 

Gordon College — h; A 
Brunswick 31523 

Brunswick College — A 
Cochran 31014 

Middle Georgia College — h; A 
Dalton 30720 

Dalton College — A 
Decatur 30034 

Dekalb College— A 



Douglas 31533 

South Georgia College — h; A 
Gainesville 30503 

Gainesville College — A 
Macon 31297 

Macon College — A 
Rome 30163 

Floyd College — A 
Swainsboro 30401 

East Georgia College — A 
Tif ton 31793 

Abraham Baldwin Agri. College — h; A 
Waycross 31501 

Waycross College — A 



h - On-Campus Student Housing Facilities Degrees Awarded: A - Associate: B - Baccalaureate; 

) - Juris Doctor; M - Masters; S - Specialist in Education; D - Doctorate 

cD - Doctorate offered in cooperation with a Universit)' System university, 

with degree awarded by the university 



Board of Regents 

AUgood, Thomas F., Sr Tenth 

Anderson, John H., Jr State at Large 

Baranco, Juanita Powell, Vice Chair Eleventh 

Cannestra, Kenneth W Sixth 

Clark, John Fioward Eighth 

Clark, S. William, Jr. M.D First 

Coleman, J. Tom, Jr State at Large 

Elson, Suzanne G State at Large 

Evans, Dwight H Fourth 

Hand, Elsie P Second 

Jenkins, Edgar L Ninth 

Jones, Charles H State at Large 

Leebern, Donald M., Jr., Chair State at Large 

McMillan, Elridge W Fifth 

Rhodes, Edgar L Seventh 

Turner, William B Third 



290 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

GLOSSARY OF TERMS 

academic advisement: students meet with an advisor each quarter before registering for 
courses (departmental advising for students who have declared a major. Advisement 
Center for students who have not, Learning Support for students required to take 
Learning Support courses) to discuss the classes planned for the next quarter. Advising 
ensures students are fulfilling requirements for their degree. 

academic probation: a status that indicates students are not maintaining the required 
minimum GPA. The first time a student falls below the required GPA he or she is placed 
on Good Standing with Warning. Failure to raise the adjusted GPA to the required level 
during the next quarter will result in Academic Probation. Students on Academic 
Probation are not in Good Standing. 

academic suspension: status given to students on academic Probation who neither 
achieve the required adjusted GPA nor earn at least a 2.0 grade point average during the 
probationary period. Such students will need to appeal to continue attending college. 

accredited: a designation that an institution has been evaluated and met criteria set by 
an independent oversight agency. The Commission on Colleges of the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Schools rules on accreditation for Armstrong State College. 

ACT- American College Testing: a standardized exam that tests verbal and math skills. 

add (a class): students may sign up for another class after their initial registration. 

adjusted GPA: the total honor points earned divided by the total hours attempted, with 
hours and honors points for repeated courses not duplicated in the calculation (see GPA) 
Includes transfer hours credited to the student's course of study at Armstrong. 

advance registration: an early registration period, usually about six weeks prior to the 
start of the quarter, available to currently enrolled students. Also known as pre- 
registration. 

area of concentration: a part of the course of study required for the Bachelor of General 
Studies degree; any minor approved by the Board of Regents can be chosen. 

Associate of Arts Degree (AA): a program of study lasting two years (full-time that 
completes a student's core curriculum requirements. 

Associate Degree (AD): a program of study lasting two years (full-time) in a specific 
discipline also known as a career degree, the program of study is designed to prepare 
students for immediate employment (see Associate of Applied Science and Associate of 
Science Degrees. 

Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS): a program of study lasting two years (full- 
time) in a specific discipline (see Associate Degree). 

Associate of Science Degree (AS): a program of study lasting two years (full-time) in a 
specific discipline (see Associate Degree). 

auditing: attending a class without receiving credit. Students must be enrolled, receive 
permission from the instructor, declare audit status at the time of registration, and pay 
the tuition and fees for the class. 

baccalaureate: a program of study lasting four years (full-time) consisting of two years 
of core curriculum and two years of courses in an area of specialization or major (see 
Bachelor of Arts/Science Degrees). 

Bachelor of Arts Degree (BA)/Bachelor of Science Degree (BS): a program of study 
lasting four years (full-time) consisting of two years of core curriculum and two years of 
courses in an area of specialization or major also referred to as a "Bachelor's Degree" or 
baccalaureate degree. 
Board of Regents: the governing board of the University System of Georgia. 



GLOSSARY 291 



certitication pru^raiiih: »» course ot sIlkIv, shDrttT tluin a decree, leading tuhpct idli/ation 
in a held Certification programs at the College include teacher certification and radio- 
logical technician certification. 

CHAOS(Communication, Help, Advisement, Orientation and Service): an orientation 

program held during the summer for new students. CHAOS leaders are students who 
h.u e been Irameci ti> run these orientation sessions. 

challenge exams: available only for specific courses, usually for students who have 
experience in a certain field. Students passing this type of exam would be exempt from 
certain basic classes. 

CLEP — College Level Examination Program: a standardized test used to determine 
proficiency in a specific area ot study. If students score at a certain level on a CLEP test, 
they will receive credit for a class in that subject area In some areas, students will be 
required to pass a higher lexei course with a minium grade before CLEP credit is given. 

CPC — College Preparatory Curriculum: a high school course of study required of all 
students graduating from high school in the spring of 1988 or later. Course requirements 
include English, math, science, social sciences and foreign languages. CPC requirements 
apply to students with a GED who would have graduated in 1988 or later. 

CPE — College Placement Exam: establishes students' proficiency levels in reading, 
English and math. Based on the scores received, students may be required to take 
Learning Support courses. This exam is given to students before their first quarter. 

conditional admission: admission status of students who do not qualify for regular 
admission because of low SAT or ACT scores and /or grade point average (GPA). 

core curriculum: a broad-based course of study required of all students pursuing a 
Bachelor's degree. Courses come from the areas of the humanities, social sciences, and 
math and natural sciences for a total of 90 quarter hours. 

delayed admission: admission status of students who ha\'e not attended high school or 
college within the last five years and have earned fewer than 20 transferable credits. 
These applicants are not required to take the SAT or ACT, but will take the College 
Placement exam (CPE). 

Doctorate of Philosophy: a program of study lasting three or more years (full-time in a 
specific area of specialization. This degree is attempted after a Master's degree and 
usually requires a dissertation for completion of the degree. 

drop (a class): students may decide not to take a class they signed up for. 

early admission: a program for high school students who have not completed the 
eleventh grade and who have demonstrated outstanding academic potential. High 
school students are allowed to take a maximum of two college courses each quarter. 

exit exams: exams given by a department to graduating seniors to determine minimum 
levels of competency in the major subject area. 

freshman: student who has earned fewer than 45 quarter hours. 

full-time: students taking 12 or more quarter hours of classes. 

GED — General Education Development: an equivalent to the high school diploma; 
students must produce GED scores for admission. 

good standing: a status that indicates students are maintaining the required minimum 
GPA. 

good standing with warning: status given to students whose GPA falls below the 
required GPA for the first tie. 

GPA (Grade Point Average): a point system used to determine the average of all grades 
a student has received for one quarter or for an entire college career. To determine GPA, 
honor points are awarded based on each grade received, which are totaled then divided 
by the number of hours attempted. 



292 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

graduate work: refers to any studies done toward a master's degree or PhD. 

GRE — Graduate Record Exam: a standardized exam that tests verbal and math skills, 
usually used as part of the admissions process for graduate school. 

honor points: the points earned based on the letter grade and quarter hours credited for 
a course. Used to determine GPA. 

independent study: classes that permit students to pursue individual research and 
reading in their major field. Permission from the department head or the professor is 
required. 

in-state tuition: rate of tuition paid by Georgia residents. Non-residents, in special cases, 
may receive an out-of-state tuition waiver which would allow them to pay the in-state 
tuition rate. 

intramurals: organized competitive sports activities coordinated though the Depart- 
ment of Athletics. Open to all interested students. 

joint enrollment: a program for high school students who have completed the tenth 
grade and have demonstrated outstanding academic potential. This program allows 
students to enroll full-time at the College while remaining on the rolls of a local high 
school. At the end of their freshman year students receive their high school diploma. 

junior: student who has earned between 90 and 134 quarter hours. 

major: an area of concentrated study in a degree program approved by the Board of 
Regents. For a major program, a department will require from 15 to 30 quarter hours of 
specific courses or approved elective courses in related fields and may require language 
courses reaching the degree of proficiency specified by the department. Total require- 
ments in the major and related fields may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 

Master's degree (MA, MS, MEd): a program of study lasting two years (full-time) in a 
specific area of specialization. This degree is attempted after a Bachelor's degree and may 
require an in-depth research paper or thesis for completion of the degree. 

minor: an optional course of study chosen in addition to a major consisting of 20 specified 
quarter hours in an area of study different from the students' major. Minors are approved 
by the Board of Regents. 

out-of-state tuition: rate of tuition paid by students who are not legal residents of 
Georgia. 

part-time: students taking fewer than 12 quarter hours of classes. 

pre-prof essional programs: courses appropriate for the first two years of baccalaureate 
programs not offered among degree programs here at the College, such as business, 
engineering, forestry, pharmacy and physical therapy Also includes study appropriate 
for dentistry, law, medicine, veterinary medicine and other professional fields. 

pre-registration: an early registration period available to currently enrolled students. 
Also known as advance registration. 

prerequisite: a course required before a more advanced course may be taken. Prerequi- 
sites are listed in the catalog under course descriptions. 

programs of study: refers to specific majors or areas of study, usually leading to a degree, 
that are offered by the College. 

provisional admission: admission status of students who have not completed the 
college prep curriculum (CPC) upon entering the College. College level courses to fill 
these deficiencies must be taken immediately (See CPC). 

quarter hours: the approximate number of hours spent each week in a particular class. 
Also used to determine the total number of hours students register for. 



GLOSSARY 293 



quarter system: a school torm based on approximately ten weeks, with four sessions per 
year 

readmission: students who have attended Armstrong in the past, but have not taken 
dassos at tho Ci^llogo for twi> or more quarters, ni>t including summer quarter. 

Regents' Test: an exam measuring mii^imum writing and reading skills given to all 
students in the university System of Georgia. At ASC, this exam is required after a 
student has completed 45 quarter hours. 

registration: a time to enroll for specific classes for the next quarter Regular registration 
is held each quarter the day before classes begin. 

regular admission: admission status for students who, upon entrance to the College, 
have the required standardized test scores (SAT Verbal 380/SAT Math 380 or ACT 
English 20/ACT Math 18), required grade point average (2.0), have completed the 
required college prep curriculum (see CPC), and have not been out of high school more 
than four Years. This status will be awarded to other students upon completing 30 hours 
oi college credit with a 2.0 grade point a\ erage. 

residency: students are considered residents of Georgia if they have lived in Georgia at 
least one year and consider Georgia their home. Students who have not lived in Georgia 
for one year or who are just coming to Georgia for their education and plan to move back 
to another state after graduation are not considered residents. 

ROTC — Reserve Officer Training Corps: a curriculum available to students at 
Armstrong and Savannah State that qualifies students for a commission as an officer in 
the US Army, Army Reserves, US Navy, Naval Reser\'es or US National Guard after 
graduation. 

SAT — Scholastic Aptitude Test: a standardized exam that tests verbal and math skills. 
Scores are used to determine admission status for freshmen. 

semester system: a school term based on approximately 15 weeks, including two regular 
sessions each vear plus a short summer session. 

senior: student who has earned 135 or more quarter hours. 

short course: a continuing education course that does not award college credit though 
it mav award continuing education units. 

sophomore: student who has earned between 45 and 89 quarter hours. 

transcript: an official record of all courses a student has taken at a particular institution. 
An official transcript is a transcript sent directly from one institution to another; a student 
copy is a transcript issued to students. 

transfer: students seeking admission who have previously been enrolled at another 

institution of higher education. 

transfer credit: credit for courses taken at another institution. Granting credit will be 
considered only for course work from an accredited institution. 

transient: admission status of students currently enrolled at another institution applying 
for temporary admission to Armstrong for one quarter. Students must be in good 
standing at their home college, and have written permission from their dean or registrar 
to take specific courses at Armstrong which will be transferred to their home institution. 

University System of Georgia: the overall system of public higher education in Georgia, 

comprised of 5 universities, 14 senior colleges and 15 junior colleges. 

withdrawal: the act of dropping out of school completely, the date of the withdrawal 
determining anv fee refund or grade penalty. 



294 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



INDEX 

Academic Progress 54 

Academic Standing 61 

Accelerated Admission Program 32 

Accreditations 11 

Administrative Officers 288 

Admissions 26 

Conditional 28 

Delayed 34 

Early 33 

GED 34 

General Information 26 

Graduate 78 

International Students 33 

Joint Enrollment 33 

Non-Degree 34 

Over 62 34 

Policies 26 

Postsecondary Options 32 

Provisional 27 

Readmission 32 

Regular 26 

Sixty Two Plus 34 

Special Categories 34 

Transfer Students 30 

Transient Students 32 

Veterans 34 

Vocational Rehabilitation 35 

Admission Requirements to Specific 

Programs 35 

Art & Music 35 

Dental Hygiene 38 

Dental Hygiene Education 39 

Health Science 43 

Medical Technology 44 

Nursing (Associate) 36 

Nursing (Baccalaureate) 37 

Physical Therapy 40 

Radiologic Technologies 43 

Respiratory Therapy 42 

Teacher Education 189 

Adults Back to College Program 22 

Advancement 12 

Alumni Affairs 12 

Development 12 

ASC Foundation 12 

Public Relations 12 

Advisement 56 

Advisement Center 23 

Alcohol & Drug Education 22 

Alumni Association 12 

Application Fee 47 

Art & Music Department 85 

Arts and Sciences, School of 82 

ASC 101 266 

Associate Degree 

General Requirements 84 



Athletics 21 

Athletic Training Internship 209 

Attendance 60 

Auditing 62 

Baccalaureate Degree 

General Requirements 72 

Biology Department 99 

Brunswick Center 15 

Calendar (Academic) inside front cover 

Career Planning & Placement 21 

Chemistry, Physics & Engineering 

Department 106 

Classification of Students 58 

Clubs/Organizations, Students 20 

Coastal Georgia Center for 

Continuing Education 16 

College Preparatory Curriculum 27 

Collegiate Placement Examination 28 

Computer Center 23 

Continuing Education 16 

Cooperative Education Program 14 

Core Curriculum Requirements 67 

Corporate Program 15 

Counseling 21 

Course Offerings 

Accounting (SSC) 205 

Anthropology 177 

Art 90 

Astronomy 116 

Biology 102 

Botany 104 

Business Administration (SSC) 205 

Chemistry Ill 

Computer Science 172 

Criminal Justice 124 

Dental Hygiene 232 

Drama/Speech 153 

Economics 179 

Education 

Business 205 

EDN 198 

Exceptional Children 201 

Library Media/Science 203 

Engineering 114 

English 155 

Film 159 

French 159 

Geography 135 

Geology 116 

German 161 

Health Education 240 

Health Science 238 

History 136 

Journalism 164 

Latin 161 

Learning Support /Developmental 267 

Library Media 203 

Library Science 204 



INDEX 



295 



1 inj^uistics IM 

Mathematio \bH 

Medual Iivhnology 242 

MettH>rolo>;y 116 

Military Science 271 

Music. 94 

Naval ROTC 274 

Nursing 

AssiK'iate Degree (NUR) 222 

Baccalaureate Degree (BSN) 228 

CVeanography 116 

Ottice Administration (SSC) 206 

Philosophy 164 

Physical Education 210 

Physical Science 116 

Physical Therapy 250 

Physics 117 

Political Science 127 

Psychology 182 

Public Administration 129 

Public History 145 

Radiation Therapy 259 

Radiologic Technologies 256 

Respiratory Therapy 262 

Sociology 185 

Spanish 162 

Zoology 105 

Courses 

Auditing 62 

Course Load 58 

Dropping 61 

Lettering System for 73 

Numbering System for 73 

Overload 58 

Repeating 61 

Withdrawing from College 62 

Credit by Examination 29 

Criminal Justice Training Center 17 

Cross Enrollment (ASC-SSC) 17 

Curriculum & Instruction Division 191 

Dean's List 60 

Degree Programs Offered 6, 74 

Degree Programs (Categories) 

Cooperative 14 

Dual-Degree 14 

Four- Year 13 

Graduate 13 

Pre-Professional 13 

School of Arts and Sciences 74 

School of Education 74 

School of Health Professions 75 

Two-Year 13 

Degree Requirements 66 

Dental Hygiene Department 230 

Development 12 

Disabilities, Students with 22 

Dismissal (Academic) 61 

Distance Learning 15 

Division of Curriculum and Instruction 191 



Division of Physical Education 

and Athletics* 207 

Drop/ Add : 61 

Dual IX'gree Programs 14 

Education, SchiH>l of 188 

Elderhostel 16 

Engineering Transfer Program 14 

English Placement 71 

Evening Courses 14 

Expenses (Student) 48 

Faculty Roster 278 

Fees 48 

Financial Aid 50 

Application Procedure 51 

Employment 52 

Government Benefits 51 

Grants 51 

Loans 51 

Scholarships 52 

Veterans Benefits 54 

Food Service 20, 47 

Freshman Experience (ASC 101) 266 

General Studies 83 

Glossary 290 

Government Benefits 54 

Government Department 118 

Grade Appeals 59 

Grade Reports 59 

Graduate Studies, School of 78 

Admission 78 

Programs 78 

Graduation, State Requirements 71 

Health Professions, School of 218 

Health Science Department 235 

History Department 132 

History/Government State Requirements ... 71 

History of the College 11 

Honor Code 62 

Honor Societies 21 

Honors 60 

Housing 47 

Intercollegiate Athletic Program 21 

International Students 33 

Intramurals 21 

Inventories of Interest 21 

Lane Library 23 

Languages, Literature, and Dramatic 

Arts Department 148 

Learning Support Department 266 

Lettering System for Courses 73 

Library Media Program 197 

Library Services 23 

Location of the College 11 

Mathematics and Computer Science 

Department 165 

Mathematics Placement 71 

Math Tutorial Center 23 

Medical Technology Program 241 

Military Experience, Credit for 30 



296 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Military Science Program 268 

Minority Advisement Program 22 

Minors 6, 7 

Arts & Sciences 83 

Education 191 

Naval Science Program 272 

Nontraditional Learning, Office of 22 

Numbering System for Courses 73 

Nursing Department (Associate) 219 

Nursing Department (Baccalaureate) 224 

Off-Campus Courses 15 

Orientation 20 

Overloads 58 

Parking Regulations 24 

Physical Education Division 207 

Physical Education Requirements 71 

Physical Therapy Department 245 

Pre-Professional Programs 13 

Probation (Academic) 61 

Provisional Admission 27 

Public Relations 12 

Public Service Center 17 

Purpose of the College 10 

Radiation Therapy Technology 258 

Radiologic Technologies Department ......... 254 

Reading Lab 23 

Readmission 32 

Refunds 49 

Regents' Engineering Transfer 

Program 14, 30 

Regents' Testing Program 70 

Regional Criminal Justice 

Training Center 17 

Registration 

Late Fee 48 

Repeating Courses 61 



Residence Life 20 

Residency Reclassification 47 

Residency Requirements 46 

Respiratory Therapy Department 260 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 54 

Scholarships 52 

Short Courses 48 

Social and Behavioral Sciences 175 

Statement of Purpose 10 

Student 

Government Association 20 

Housing 47 

Organizations 20 

Publications 21 

Student Teaching 190 

Suspension (Academic) 61 

Testing 

Collegiate Placement Examination 28 

Counseling & Testing 22 

Credit by Examination 29 

English and Mathematics 

Placement Tests 71 

Regents' Test 70 

Transfer Students 

Requirements of Applicants 30 

Transient Students 32 

Tuition 46 

Veteran 

Admissions 34 

Financial Aid 54 

Vocational Rehabilitation 35 

Weekend Classes 14 

Withdrawals (Involuntary) 62 

Withdrawing from College 62 

Writing Center 23 



Where to Write or Call 



her»' IS .1 ; mtM "I I'urii un LdfTipuS Spu( 
tfices listed [)»■!. 'w ,1' ti .idding: 
rmsUong State College 
1935 Abercorn Street 
lavannah, GA 31419-1997 



rn.iy [)!• oi^tained by writing to the 



DMISSION 

rector of Admissions 

>7-5277 

^00-633-2349 

OVISEMENT 
dvisemenl Center 
M-5465 

.UMNI 

Pumni Affairs. Office of College 
'^'^vancement 
264 

f'LETICS 
■ -tor of Athletics 
-336 

NESS MATTERS 

^resident for Business & Finance 

-255 

: ER PLANNING & PLACEMENT 
:or of Career Planning 
; Placement 
5269 

.TALOG 

rector of Admissions 

^7-5277 

ONTINUING EDUCATION 
oastal Georgia Center for 
Continuing Education 
?7-5322 

■•OUNSELING 
irector of Counseling 
27-5269 

NANCIAL AID, GRANTS. LOANS. 

WORK-STUDY ELIGIBILITY 
irector of Student Financial Aid 
^7-5272 
•800-633-2349 

VENING. WEEKEND. & OFF- 
CAMPUS PROGRAMS 
rector of Nontraditional Learning 

21-5626 

^.ENERAL ACADEMIC AND 

FACULTY MATTERS 
'ice President and Dean of Faculty 
27-5261 

JIFTS, GRANTS & BEOUESTS 
)ffice of College Advancement 
27-5263 

GRADUATE STUDY 
.ssociate Graduate Dean 
27-5377 



HOUSING 
Director of Housing 
927-5269 

OFFICE OF MINORITY AFFAIRS 
Director of Minority Recruitment 
927-5252 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Office of College Advancement 

927-5263 

SECURITY 
Campus Police 
921-5555 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 
Certification Officer 
927-5294 

TESTING 

Division of Student Affairs 

927-5269 

TRANSCRIPTS 
Office of the Registrar 
927-5275 

TUITION, PAYMENT OF BILLS. REFUNDS 
Vice President for Business & Finance 
927-5255 



Special Notice 

The statements set forth in this Catalog are for 
information purposes only and should not be 
construed as the basis of a contract between a 
student and this institution. 

While the provisions of the Catalog will generally 
be applied as stated. Armstrong State College 
reserves the right to change any provision listed 
in this Catalog, including but not limited to aca- 
demic requirements forgraduation, without actual 
notice to individual students. Every effort will be 
made to keep students advised of any such 
changes. Information on changes will be avail- 
able in the Offices of the Registrar, the Vice 
President of Student Aflairs. and the academic 
deans. It is especially important that students 
note that it is their responsibility to keep them- 
selves apprised of current graduation 
requirements for their particular degree pro- 
gram. 

Armstrong State College is an affirmative action 
equal opportunity education institution and does 
not discriminate on the basis of sex. race. age. 
religion, disability, or national ongm in employ- 
ment, admissions, or activities.