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Full text of "The arrow-maker's daughter;"

lernational Copyrighted (in England, her Colonies, aiK! 
I States) Edition of the Works of the Best Authors 



No. 274 



ARROW-MAKERS' 



M Camp 3Fire ipla^ 
Adapted from Longfellow's Poem of Hiawatha 



BY 

GRACE E. SMITH 

AND. 

GERTRUDE KNEVELS 

Copyright, 1913, by Samuel French 
PRICE 25 CENTS 



HE ARROW-MAKER'S 
DAUGHTER 



m&: 



a Camp jflrc pla^ 
Adapted from Longfellow's Poem of Hiawatha 



BY 

GRACE E. SMITH 

AND 

GERTRUDE KNEVELS 



Copyright, 1913, by Samuel French 



New Ynnir I t^^. 



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THE ARROW-MAKER'S 
DAUGHTER. 

A CAMP-FIRE PLAY. 



CHARACTERS. 

Hiawatha .the 

Hiawatha iht^ 

Iagoo 

N'OKOMIS 

'Minnehaha 

The Arrow -Maker 

Famine 

Fever 

The Priest 

The Robin 

The Squirrel 

The Blup:jay 

The Rabbit 

Indian maidens' and braves 

Scene 1. — Hiawatha's Boyhood. 
Scene 2. — Hiawatha's Wooing. 
\' Scene 3. — The Arrow-Maker's Lodgp. 
Scene 4. — The Famine. 



THE ARROW-MAKER'S DAUGHTER. 3 

COSTUMES. 

hen this play is given, as is intended, by a band 
amp-fire girls, the Indian maidens may wear the 
lar Camp-fire dress. A bright feather should be 
1 in the hair in addition to the bead fillet. iSTo- 
is should wear a plainer dress than the others 
a dark colored blanket wrapped about head and 
Iders. The braves should wear loose shirts of 

brown stuff ornamented around bottom, sleeves, 

neck with fringe. Also fringed trousers and 
ler head dresses. Imitation feathers cut from 
it colored crepe paper can be used instead of real 
lers in the head-dresses. They should carry bows 

arrows and some of them should wear bright 
'ed Indian blankets. 
lie child Hiawatha should wear a suit like that 

brave but ornamentefl with bright beads and 

^minp: may be dressed in a domino or long clo'ak 
lack, and wear a white mask, or have face painted 
e to give ghastly appearance. Fever should 
' much the same sort of costume but her domino 
I oak should be gray. 

he Squirrel and Rabbit should wear tight fit- 
suits, the first of white cotton flannel, the second 
eddish brown. Suits sliould be cut like child's 
it drawers with i'eet and legs all in one. He'ads 
[Id be covered witli tiglit lielmet shaped caps of 
3 material as suits and attacli'ed to them. The 
e ears of tlic Rabbit can be cut out of white 
^r-muslin or crinoline, lined with pink, and wired, 
tail of the Squirrel could be made from brown 
I or from an old fur boa. It should be wired to 
d up stiffly. The birds wear suits on the same 
as animals' hut slicrhtlv fnllpr. Hplmpt hnnds of 



4 THE ARROW-MAKER^S DAUGHTER. 



COSTUMES 




Rabbit 




Squirrel 




THE AEROW-MAKEirS DAFUHTER. 



SCENERY. 

le play of the Arrow-Maker's Daagliter is most 
Dpriate for outdoor production, but can easily be 
1 on tlie average school stage. In the latter ease, 
t practical to have regular scenery, ia forest back- 
iid may be indicted by screen^s covered with green 
•lies. A fish net or tennis net hung like a curtain 
stuc-k full of oTcen twigs and boughs ogives an 
lent effect. The floor should be covered with a 
1 cloth and thickly strewn with leaves, 
wigwam can be constructed of poles hung witli 
n paper-muslin or burlap. 

le effect of a fire can be produced by hea])ing 
rood in a circle and partly concealing in its midst 
al lighted candles. The flames should be 
ned with isinglass to prevent danger. A little 
•oal or smoke powder burncl in an iron vessel 
help to give natural effect of rising smoke, 
re it is convenient, electric light bulbs covered 
red land yellow pa]ier can take the place of candle 
es. 



DESCRlPriOX OF DANCES. 

NCE OF BIRDS AND ANIMALS. ACT 1. SCENE I. 

oin hands, side by side. Dance to right. Dance 
to left. Dance forward. Dance backward, 
orm circle, hands joined. Blue jay opposite 
Rabbit, Robin opposite Squirrel. Bluejay 



6 THE AEROW-MAKER^S DAUGHTER. 

'' fly ^' around^ stopping in pliace. Birds reii 

in place while animals liop and frisk in s 

figure. Return to place. 

5. All circle twice, break circle and frisk off sta 

For this dance use music of " Stephanie Gavot 

(obtainable at any music store) or any musi( 

schottische time, played with light staccato touch 

DANCE OF MAIDENS. ACT I. SCENE III. 

Maidens should be hopping and skipping lightl 
circle as curtain rises. 

Dance — Advance in circle, single file, with ( 
monial step as described in Camp-Fire Girls' Mai 
x4dvance left foot, touching toe lightly, without b 
ing knee. Touch whole of left foot to floor, sw 
ing entire weight of body to that foot. Heel of i 
foot has been gradually raised and right knee 
so that girl stands weight of body on left foot, i 
lieel raised, toe on floor. Advance right foot aii^ 
tern ate. 32 counts. 
TT. (a) Face in toward center — Step on left 
knee bent. Bend body, and raise 
h^^nd as over imaginary fire, right ] 
slightly raised backward at shoi 
height. 8 counts. 

(b) Raise body, weight on left foot, riglr 

touching floor in back, arms raised 
in supplication. 8 counts. 

(c) Bend over fire again as in (a). 8 co 

(d) R.aise body as in (b), left arm pointim 

ward, right arm slightly raised 
ward. 8 counts. 
TTT Vv\cp Tio-hf ill siTiorlp filp to form circle. I 



THE ARROW-MAKEK'S DAUGHTER. 7 

Squat on floor, legs crossed, facing toward cen- 
ter, raise arm bend bodj^ backward. 16 counts. 
Bend body forward, arms extended, head bent 
toward floor. 16 counts. 

Rise, separate into two groups and dance toward 
back of stage. x\s Minnehaha comes through 
to center, all make hand sign of fire. 

fsic : — First two purges of " Hiawatha " by Xeil 
t. To be obtained by mail order from any music 
sher or can certainly be had from Whitney 
er, Warner Publishing Co., Detroit, Mich. 

DANCE OF BRAVES. ACT II. SCENE II. 

Circle formation. Enter with hopping step; 
hop twice on right foot, left foot raised, right 
hand holding bow and arrow raised, left arm 
bent at elbow. Change to left foot and repeat 
fig. Form circle and advance single file with 
liopping step. 32 counts. 

Turn around in place, same hopping step, bow 
and arrow raised above head. 32 counts. 
3 steps on right foot, 3 steps on left foot, first 
right hand then left hand to forehead, as if 
sighting game. 16 counts. Kneel on right 
knee, aim witli bow and arrow. 16 counts. 
Kneel. Rise and kneel on left knee and aim. 
16 counts. 

Jump up, hopping step. Round and round in 
circle, uttering short cries or grunts (Ugh! 
Ugh!). Then war cry or whoop made by clap- 
ping palm to mouth. 16 counts. Repeat whole 
dance from II— IV. 



THE ARROW MAKERS DAUGHTER 



Songs used in Scene I— Act I 



Hiawatha. 



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#— ^ 



A- 



rifc-^ 



Wall- wah-tay -see lit - tie fire-fly, Lit -tie flit-tir 



A— K- 



l&Blzt: 



yt. 



-H— 



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white five in-sect, Lit-tle dancing, white fire creatu: 





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Tl'Jl ~^" 


S 




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4 


&-&-•- 




-• — 


1 


-h'*^ -a- 


h"^ ^- 


~fj~ 


[7- 


1 ' 








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_* — i_ 


^^-^— u^— y 



Light me with your lit - tie can-die. Ere up - on m;' 





n • k 




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r. 17 








s 












-• - 




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-•-— 


P 


-•- 



hi'd I lay me. Ere in sleep I close my eye-Iidf 



NoKOMIO 




E - wa yea! my lit - tie owl-et! Who is thi 



HE ARROW-MAKER'S 
DAUGHTER. 



xA^CT I. Scene T. 

dge of forest near Hiawatha's lodge. Wigwam 
ackground. ISTokomis seated near door, singing. 
WATTTA, a boy of ten, listens. 

Ewa-yea ! My little owlet ! 
Who is this that lights the wigwam? 
With his great eyes lights the wigwam? 
E\va-3'ea ! ' My little owlet ! 
. (speaks) — 

Sing to me now, Hiawatha, 
Sing the song Xokomis taught thee ! 
lA. (sings) — 

Wali-wah-taysee, little fire-fly, 
Little flitting, white-fire insect. 
Little dancing, white-fire creature, 
Light me with your little candle. 
Ere upon my bed I lay me, 
Ere in sleep I close my eyelids ! 

(pointing off in distance) 



10 THE AEROW-MAKEirS DAUGHTER. 

NOK., — 

Once a warrior, very angry, 

Seized his grandmother and threw her 

Up into the sky at midnight, 

Right against the moon he tlirew lier; 

'Tis her body that you see there. 

(Owl is heard ] booting.) 

HiA. {railiei' frightened) Listen ! Whint is 1 
Nokomis ? 

NoK.,— 

That is but the owl and owlet 

Talking in their native language, 

Talking, scolding at each other. 

You must learn, oh Hiawatha, 

Learn of every bird its language, 

Learn their names (and all ther secrets. 

How they build their nests in summer, 

Where they hide themselves in winter. 

Talk with them whene'er you meet them. 

Call them Hiawatha's chickens. 

You must seek the beaver's lodges, 

Know" where squirrels hide their acorns. 

How the reindeer runs so swiftly, 

Why the rabbit is so timid. ^ 

Talk with them whene'er you meet tlioin 

Call them Hiawatha's brothers. 

When you see a bow in Hejaven, 

In the esatern sky the rainbow, 

'Tis the heaven of flowers you see there. 

All the wild flowers of the forest, 



THE ARROW-MAKER'S DAUGHTER. 11 

in haclcrgound, grunting approval from time to 
time.) 

AGOO, — 
Here's a bow for Hiawatha ! 
From a branch of ash I've made it, 
From an oak bough are these arrows, 
Tipped with flint and winged with feathers. 
And the cord is made of deer skin. 
Go, my son, into the forest 
Where the red deer herd together. 
Kill for us a famous roebuck, 
Kill for us a deer with antlers ! 

lAWATHA starts ojf in one direction, Nokomis 
and Iagoo and braves turn away in anotlier. In 
hacTcground animals and birds can be seen peep- 
ing throng Ji screen of boughs. As soon as Hia- 
watha is alone they come out and dance about 
liim, niocHng and teasing him.) 

vOBix. Do, not shoot me, Hiawatha ! 
U.UEJAY. Do not shoot me, Hiawatha ! 
>QUiEREL. Do not shoot me, Hiawatha! 
^\BBiT. Oh, do not — do not shoot me, Hiawatha ! 
lAWATiiA breaks airay from tliem and goes out. 
lice of animals and birds. As Nokomis and 
00 return, thri/ frolic off. Enter Hiawatha, 
impliant) 

IlA., 

Hear, Nokomis, hear, Iagoo! 

I have shot the red deer, killed him ! 

Dead he lies there in the forest. 



12 THE AEROW-MAKER'S DAUGHTER. 

(Indian beaves wnd giels run in from both side 
trances, much excited to hear news.) 

XoK. and Iagoo, — 

He has killed the famous roebuck. 
He has killed a deer with antlers ! 

All, — 

Strong heart, Strong heart, Soan-ge-taha ! 
Iagoo. Loon heart, Loon-heart, Mahn-go-tay 

CURTAIN. 



Act I. Scene TI. Hiawatha's Woo inc. 

{Same setting as before. Hiawatha is now a y^ 
of 18. He sits, looking off into distance 
dreamy mood. Nokomis busy serving mc 
sin.'< or grinding corn.) 

HiA.,— 

As unto the bow the cord is, 
So unto the man is woman, 
Though she bends him she obeys him. 
Though she draws him, yet she follows. 
Useless each without the other ! 

[Enter two maidens carrying bundles of fii\n 
which they place on ground near No kg 
XoKOMis beckons to one of them wlio a 
.^hvlii forward and durinq fol' owing speech 



THE AREOW-MAKEE^S DAUGHTEE. 1?> 

Go not eastward, go not westward 
For a stranger whom we know not ! 
Like a fire upon the hearth stone 
Is a neighbor's homely daughter, 
Like the starlight or the moonlight 
Is the hlandsomest of strano-ers ! 

O 

Ii.A. {smiling) — 

You speak well, dear old Xokomis, 
Very pleasant is the firelight. 
But I like the starlight better. 
Better do / like the moonlight ! 

p};' flic inaiden who lias heen Videning, drops Xo- 
komis' hand, wraps hlanket ahout face, and re- 
tires sadly to hack of stage ivith companion. 
Two braves enter and stand opposite girls, not 
heeding them but listening to Xokomis and 
HiAWATPiA. They signify approval or disap- 
proval by grunts and shaking heads.) 

fOKOMis. (angry) — 

Bring not here an idle maiden. 

Bring not here a useless woman, 

Hands unskilful, feet unwilling. 

Bring a wife with nimble fingers. 

Heart a.nd hand that move together, 

Feet that run on willing errands ! (she looks 

ard gij'ls in backgroiurl) 

IlA,- 

Li the Land of the Dacotahs 
Lives the Arrow-M'^ker's daughter, 
Minnehaha, Lauffhinsr Water, 



14 THE ARROW-MAKER^S DAUGHTER. 

{Braves in hackgj'ound grunt approval, hut < 
shake their heads.) 

NoK. (still unwilling) — 

Bring not to \\\y lodge a stranger 
From the Land of the Dacotahs, 
Very fierce are the Dacotahs, 

(Braves nod.) 

Often is there war between us, 
There are feuds yet unforgotten. 
Fends that ache and still mav open ! 

HiA.,— 

For that reason, if no other. 
Would I wed the fair Dacotah, 
That our tribes might be united, 
That old feuds might be forgotten, 
And old wounds be healed forever ! 

(Exit Hiawatha. Braves follow to back of s( 
looking after him in great excitemetit. Mali 
come forward,, one on either side Nokomii^ 
console her. Xokomis gazes niournfully c 
Hiawatha, then hides head in blanket.) 

CURTAIN. 



Act I. Scene II. The Arrow-Maker's Lo 

(Curtain rises on Dance of the Maidens. For 
dance see Descrivtion of Dances and Music. 



THE ARROW-Mx\KER^S DAUGHTER. 15 

[atdens, 

See, the Arrow-Maker^s daughter ! . 
Welcome, welcome, Minnehaha! 
Welcome to you, Laughing Water ! 

[iNXEIIAHA, — 

Greeting, oh Daiotah daughters ! 
ST Maiden, — 

Dance with us now, Minnehaha ! 

LL, — 

Dance with us, oh Laughing Water! 

[NXEiTATiA joins iiiaiclefis and one or two figures 
of dance are repeated until entrance of Aerow- 
Makee. At sight of liim, dance is hrolcen off 
and maidens, as if frightened, hurry off stage. 
MixxEHAHA^s mood has changed from gay to 
grave and sJie walks slowly to front of stage, sits, 
and begins wori- on basket. Arrow-Maker re- 
gards her gravely.) 



Wayward art thou, Minnehaha ! 

With thy moods of shade and sunshine, 

Eyes that smile land frown alternate, 

Feet as rapid as the river. 

Tresses flowing like the water, 

Well I named thee, Minnehaha, 

Well I named thee, Laughing Water! 

e sits and begins work on arrow heads. Minne- 
haha stops icork, and resting cheek on hand, 
gazes into distance.) 

lrrow-Maker, — 

Ac T sif liorp T fjm fhinkincr 



16 THE AliEOW-MAKER^S DAUGHTEIi. 

On the wing, the clamorous Wawa; 
I remember great war parties, 
How the}^ came to buy my arrows. 
Could not tight without my ,>arrows. 
Ah, no more such noble warriors 
Can be found on earth as they were. 
Xow the men are all like women, 
And they use their tongues for weapons ! 

Mm., — 

I am dreaming too, my father. 
But my thoughts are of the future. 
T am thinking of a hunter 
From ^another tribe and country. 
Tall, and strong, and very handsome. 
Who one morning in the springtime 
Came to buy your arrows, father ! 
I remember how you praised him, 
Praised his courage and his wisdom. 
Will he come again for arrows 
To the Falls of Minnehaha ? 

[Enter Hiawatha.) 

Arrow-Maker, — 

You are welcome, Hiawatha ! 
MiN. {very shyly) — 

You are welcome, Hiawatha ! 

{She sets food and drink before men.) 

HiA.,— 

After many years of warfare. 
Many years of strife 'and bloodshed. 



HE ARROW-MAKER'S DAUGHTER. IT 

Give me as my wife this maiden, 
Minnehaha, Langhing Water, 
Loveliest of Dacotah women ! 
%fter grave pause) — 

Yes, if Minnehaha wishes. 

Let yonr lieart speak, Minnehaha. 

EHAHA crosses to Hiawatha and piching up 
rden lie has flung down — hlanhet, how and 
roio, etc. — puts it on her own hack and stands 
mhlij l)eside hiiii.) 

Ni':irAiiA. I will follow you. my linsband! 

// IIiawattta's speech, hraves and maidens 
ve entered and stand listening for Minne- 
iha's answer. Hearing it tliey surround 
upte, shouting and leaping. Hiawatha tries 
lead Minxkhaiia away, and young people go 
hack of stage with them, separating into two 
les, men one one side, maidens on other, HiA- 
iTHA and MixxEirAiTA in center. Arrow- 
AKER stops them hij motion of hand.) 

)w-Makee, — 

Happy are you, Hiawatha, 

Having such a wife to love you ! 

Happy are you, Minnehaha, 

Having such a nol)le husband 1 

But remember, oh my children. 

Life is checkered shade and sunsliine. 

Rule by love, Hiawatha! 

Day is restless, night is quiet, 

Man imperious, woman feeble; 



18 THE AEROW-MAKER^S DAUGHTER. 

Aeeow-Maivee (sadly ) — 

Farewell, farewell, Minnehaha! 

(Exit Minnehaha and Hiawatha.) 

Thus it is onr daughters leave us, 
Just when they have learned to help us, 
When we are old and lean upon them ! 
Comes a youth with flaunting feathers. 
With his flute of reeds a stranger 
Wanders piping through the village, 
Beckons to the fairest maideu 
And she follows where he leads her 
Leaving all things for a stranger ! 

CURTAIN. 



Act II. Scene I. The Famine. 

(Minnehaha, ver-y ill, lies on blanket near ivigw 
8ame setting as Scene I of first act. XoKO 
seated beside Minnehaha, is watching 
sadly. Enter Hiawatha, walking as if i 
weary. He looks sadly at Minnehaha then 
burying head in hands. ) 

HiA.,— 

Oh, the long and dreary winter, 

the cold and cruel winter ! 

All in vain I've roamed the forest, 

Sought for bird or beast and found none. 

Shav^ no Irnnlr of rlppr or ra.hhit. 



THE ARROW-MAKER\S DAUGHTER. 19 

iter Famine, ivho passes slowly across hacJc of 
siage, stopping to point at Minnehaha.) 

'amine, — 

I am Famine, Bukadawin ! 

■it Famine and enter Fever. She crosses stage, 
same business.) 

'ever, — 

(Exit Fever.) 

I am Fever, Ahkosewin ! 

[lA. {rising ir'eal'hj to feet and grasping how and 

nc) — 

Gitche Manitou the Mighty, 
In this bitter hour of anguish. 
Give your chiklren food, oh Father, 
Give us food or we must perish ! 
Give me food for Minnehaha, 
For my dying Minnehaha ! 

(He goes out.) 

hs. (raising herself on elhow) — 

Hark, I think I hear a rushing. 
Hear a roaring and a rushing, 
Hear the Falls of Minnehaha 
Calling to me from a distance I 

I OK., — 

Xo, my child, you do not hear them, 
^Tis the night wind in the pine trees. 



20 TJIE AKKOW-MAKER^S DAUGHTER. 

No, my child, you do not see him, 
^Tis the smoke that waves and beckons. 

MiN., — 

See, ah see — the eyes of Pauguk 
Glare upon me in the darkness, 
I can feel his ic}^ fingers 
Clasping mine amid the darknrs^^ — 
Hiawatha ! Hiawatha ! 

(She dies. During her d&liriiwi several srfuairs 
hrapes have entered from each side si age. 7 
stand, heads bowed and covered with ii 
hlanlcets, ready to begin funeral lainenf.) 

XoK., — 

Wahonowin ! Wahonowin ! 
Would that I had perished for yon. 
Would that I were dead as yon are, 
Wahonowin, A¥ahonowin ! 

Squaws and Beaves, — 

Wahonowin ! Wahonowin ! 

(Enter Hiawatha. He pushes them aside as he i 
to Minnehaha.) 

HiA. (looldng cloivn at Minnehaha) 
Farewell, farewell, Minnehaha, 
As you die my heart dies witli you, 
All my thoughts go onward with yon ! 
Come not back again to labor. 
Come not back again to suffer. 



HE ARROW-MAKER'S DAUGHTER. 31 

To the Kingdom of Ponemah, 
Fo the Land of the Hereafter ! 

CURTAIN. 

. Scene II. The Coming of the White 

Man. 

of Hiawatha. Braves sitting in circle about 
'■, maidens in haclcground. Nokomis making 
Tcet. Iagoo, the Boaster, is relating adven- 
es.) 

). — 

I have wandered far to eastward, 
I, Iagoo, the great traveller, 
I have seen the Big- Sea- Water, 
Broader than the Gitchee Gumee, 
Bitter, so that none could drink it ! 

ws nudge one another and smile. Women 
same btmness. ) 

O'er this water — Big- Sea-Water, 
Came a great canoe with pinions, 
A canoe with wings came flying. 
Bigger than a grove of pine trees. 
Taller than the tallest tree tops ! , 

5N. (tittering) — 

^aw ! Oh kaw ! We don't believe it ! 
[sliaking heads) — 
^aw ! What tales are these you tell us ! 

I. [earnestly) — 

n the great canoe with pinions, 



22 THE AREOW-MAKER'S DAUGHTER. 

(Exit one of braves.) 

XoKOMis. {angrily) — 

Boaster! These are lies you tell us, 
Do not think that we believe you ! 

(Brave re-enters hurriedly.) 

True is all lagoo tells us, 
. Hiawatha is returning, 

And a pale-face walks beside liiin I 

(Enter Hiawatha with Priest. Bravks rise 
greet Hiawatha witli shout.) 

BllAVJiS. — 

Hiawatha ! Hiawatha ! 

Strong heart, Strong heart, Soan-ge-taha ! 

Loon-heart, Loon-heart, Mahn-go-taysee ! 

(They circle slowly about fire. For this dance 
Dance of Braves. Description of Dances, j 
7. Aftertvards, Hiaw\a.ttta leads Priest 
wurd. ) 

HiA. (ta Priest) — 

Beautiful is the sun, oh stranger. 
When ^'^ou come so far to see iis ! 
All our town in peace awaits yon, 
All our doors stand open for you ; 
You shall enter all our wigwams. 
For the heart's right hand we give you. 
Never bloomed the earth so gayly, 
Never shone the sun so brightly, 



THE ARROW-MAKER'S DAUGHTER. 23 

A. (to XOKOMIS) 

Lead the stranger to the wigwam, 
Seat him on the skin of bison, 
Bring him food in bowls of bass wood, 
Water bring in birchen dippers, 
And the Peace Pipe for our smoking! 

'(/ is r/iren by Xokomis and Peace Pipe is 
passed.) 

JEST, (rising) — 

I will tell you now my message, 
Tell the purpose of my mission, 
I have come to teach you, brothers, 
Of our blessed Lord and Saviour, 
How in distant lands and ages. 
He has lived on earth as we do. 
How he fasted, prayed, and labored, 
And ascended into Heaven. 

GOO, — 

We have listened to your message. 
We have heard your words of wisdom, 
We will think on what you tell us. 
It is well for us, oh brother. 
That you come so far to see us ! 

[A. (who has been mali-ing preparations as if for 

'ley)— 

I am going, oh Xokomis, 

On a long and distant journey. 

To tlie portals of the Sunset, 

To the regions of the home wind. 

Of the north-west wind, Kee-waydin. 



24 THE AEROW-MAKER^S DAUGHTER. 

Never danger or suspicion, 
Never want of food or shelter 
In the Lodge of Hiawatha! 

{He turns to go. All stand, raising arms in sal 

All, — 

Farewell, farewell, Hiawatha! 

Oh, beloved Hiawatha ! 

Strong heart, strong heart, So-an-getaha ! 

Loon-heart, Loon-heart, Mahn-go-taysee ! 

Farewell, farewell, Hiawatha ! 

CURTAIN. 



/ 




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