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Full text of "Arsenal Cannon (1956)"



theHrsenaluannon 



This Book Belongs To 




OF ARSENAL TECH 



PROUD OF OUR COMPREHENSIVE HIGH SCHOOL AND OUR 
BEAUTIFUL 76-ACRE CAMPUS WITH ITS THIRTEEN IMPRESSIVE 
BUILDINGS ... IN THIS, THE 1 956 EDITION OF OUR YEARBOOK, 
RECORD THE UNFORGETTABLE EVENTS OF A HAPPY SCHOOL 



YEAR 



A TYPICAL YEAR AT A TYPICAL AMERICAN HIGH 



SCHOOL ... A YEAR DURING WHICH, IN OUR CLASSES AND 
OUR ACTIVITIES, WE HAVE LEARNED THE AMERICAN WAY 
OF LIFE THROUGH THE AMERICAN WAY OF EDUCATION. 



the Arsenal Cannon 

ARSENAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

INDIANAPOLIS, U. S. A. 




Our four flags symbolize our way of living, 
our efforts for world unity. Our school 
flag represents our preparation for life in 
the community. Our R.O.T.C. flag is indica- 
tive of the home guard, training for peace 
instead of war. Our state flag points 
out the individuality of each state, an 
individuality which we students are encour- 
aged to develop for ourselves. Our nation's 
flag reminds us of our strong bonds with 
the rest of our country, and our allegi- 
ance to freedom. At Tech, we not only 
study the American way of life— we live it! 




The 1956 



ARSENAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL, IND 



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Arsenal Cannon 



^NAPOLIS, U.S. A 



Our Privileges 6-21 

Our Guidance Program 22-25 

Preparation for Life 26-35 

Co-Curricular Activities 36-57 



Our R. O. T. C. Unit 58-61 

Music Groups 62-67 

Athletics 68-81 

We the People 82-115 




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We are proud of our beautiful campus with 
its college atmosphere. We are also proud 
of its history and traditions. Our school 
history is shadowed by four wars, fought 



to pave the way for 



Eight of ourJouildin 

the Civil W_ar. 

slavery. 

structu 

so tha 

would ;'eek 





any freedoms, 
re erected during 

against 
uiiaings, v \er 

now used to edufcateTsludents 
remain free ot^ti ^%<ip 
to' enslave our mines. We lore 
ish our freedoms "anc -Xa ^ 
vho would deprivs us of^fiqm)^ 
we, by our actiotyrr eternfiiieJJ 
e*fhe "we rr ay keep the f reec oms N^a^J^^J/hich 
►*^TT€f<5Tved. This is "bur cc^ £D_i|s— «-this is 
oul_ 
We are happy peoprej mi^-Of^ tree people. 







THE ARSENAL, oldest building on our historic campus, 
with 1865 on its keystone arch, is a symbol of strength. 

WE ARE PROUD OF OUR HISTORY AND OUR TRADITIONS 

SECOND of our "twin towers" is the Milo H. Stuart Memorial Hall, named for the founder and first principal of Tech. 



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SOME OF OUR HAPPIEST HOURS ARE SPENT WITH 



HAPPILY sing the Elizobeth Kaltz Singers at the "I Am Glad" assembly when teachers and pupils told why they are glad. 




FRIENDS IN INFORMAL GROUPS 



We are free — free to meet with our friends, 
free to gather in cheering crowds at our 
games, free to meet in informal 
groups, and free to gather 
for formal assemblies. Throughout 
the school year we enjoy entertaining 
programs, whether they be all- 
pupil affairs, a symphony orchestra concert, 
or an address by a speaker of note. 
All are designed to educate and to inform 
us. We are proud that we are 
trusted to conduct ourselves properly 
without regimentation. Yes, we vririe Ui 
States glory in this freedom. 





EACH NOON hour the R.O.T.C. 
with laughter of exuberant junior 



drill field rings 
high students. 



INTEREST centers around the tables of literature, arranged by Miss 
Edith Silver at the reception for the parents of college-bound seniors. 



HISTORY pupils are tested on current 
world affairs on Quiz 'Em on the Air. 






'ON THE AIR in one minute" signals the control room to the waiting Radio-Expression cast during Brotherhood Week. 



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DED BY OUR FREEDOMS OF EXPRESSION 




JEROME Perkins and David Baker manage the flatbed press, 
proud of their work for they know the "power of the press." 



Our life is a world of words — printed and 
spoken. Through radios, televisions, news- 
papers, and magazines, all free of govern- 
ment censorship, we direct our thinking, 
interpret current events, and transmit our 
opinions on government and world affairs, 
that we, a part of young America, will fit 
into the established pattern of our country. 

BETTY Converse reads the Arsenal Cannon 
which always reflects freedom of the press. 



MARGIE Gobbert, U.N. delegate, 
catches up on our world affairs. 




IN THE U. S. we enjoy as our heritage, freedom of religion. 



THE RIGHT TO WORSHIP GOD IN 

ONE'S OWN WAY 




we have 
understanding 
and friendship 




Our nation is based on the fundamental 
belief in God. In the beauty of our campus 
and our Nature Preserve, we are reminded 
of His works. We are inspired to practice 
brotherhood all year, not just for one 
week. In our sports, our extra-curricular 




MARCELLUS— Clifton Bush, hands Christ's robe 
to Simon Peter — Robert Richards, in "The Robe." 




activities, our classes, and our churches, 
we gain an understanding of all the races, 
colors, and creeds. We acguire respect — 
respect for our flag, our school, our friends, 
and our God. We are proud that we live 
in a country with its freedom of religion. 



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YOUNG voices of representative teen-agers fill the air as the 
choir sings one of its favorite songs, "America, Our Heritage." 



THE FOOTBALL eleven joins arms in a moment 
of silent prayer before the opening kick-off. 




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"BE SURE before you pull the lever," says Mr. Minnick, explaining our right to free elections and the secret ballot. 



WE LEARN THE INTRICATE PROCESSES OF GOVERNMENT AND 





LITTERBUGS ore not welcome on the campus at any time, 
most certainly not during Service Club Clean-Up-Week. 



We like to be well informed about the 
world around us and to know how its affairs 
influence our daily lives. We are being 
trained, as good citizens, to be 
intelligent voters, to recognize the 
rights of others, and to have a respect 
for property. We are proud that 
through our campus clean-up campaigns 
Tech has played a part in bringing 
the Cleanest City Award to Indianapolis. 



TAKE PRIDE IN OUR CIVIC DUTIES 

In our Social Studies classes we learn 
the processes of self-government so that 
we may step into the role of "public 
citizen" with confidence and knowledge. 

"Let's make brotherhood a year-round practice," says Paul 
Downer, one of the speakers in the enlightening program pre- 
sented in the Forum in recognition of Brotherhood Week. 




Posed for YearDc 



"PUT THAT knife away," Jerry Griffith tells Earl 
Frasier for Tech pupils are respectful of property. 








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LIKE high school students Evening School men 
assemble on the Stuart Hall steps before class. 



WE ARE THANKFUL THAT OURS IS A LIFE UNFETTERED 




IN HIS German class Mr. Veltrup points to his home, Min- 
den, as Keith Tressler shows a picture of Bremen where Mrs. 
Underwood, Tech's exchange teacher, met Mr. Veltrup. 



When we welcome an exchange teacher from 
another country, when we have the oppor- 
tunity to visit industries and see free 
enterprise in practice, when we meet 
in the cafeteria for our breakfast, or 
even as we walk around our campus during 
the four lunch periods, we know that 
we are experiencing one of the finest 
freedoms our country has to offer. A buzz 
of activity is always prevalent around 
the school for day and night, summer and 
winter, classes are in session; and after 
school teen-agers are busy taking part 
in various extra-curricular activities. 




A GOVERNMENT class boards the bus to go to the State House where it will visit the General Assembly. 



14 






BY UNREASONABLE BOUNDARIES 



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A FAVORITE SPOT during the four lunch periods, on clear, sunny days, is the plaza in the center of the quadrangle 



15 




"IT FITS perfectly," says Norma Worth, showing Marilyn Houghland a coat in Mr. Paul Lahr's salesmanship class. 

BECAUSE OF OUR EXTENSIVE CURRICULUM WE CAN BE 




MR. HERMAN DENZLER interviews Robert Rowls in the Employ- 
ment Office while a long line of other job seekers await their turns. 



16 





FIVE BOYS applying finishing tape to new airplane control 
surfaces in Airplane Mechanics are Charles Senteny, Charles 
Becker, Paul Huser, David A. Pope, and Robert Sheldon. 



We choose our four-year programs from a 
varied and extensive curriculum, for our 
school offers vocational and technical as 
well as academic subjects. Our Employment 
Office places many of our youthful sales- 
men, typists, carpenters, printers in 
industry and in business. We even earn 
pocket money at school by helping in the 
lunchroom or assisting teachers. Since we 
will be paid according to our abilities, 
we are encouraged to work for a high 
standard of accomplishment. 




AT A DRAFTING table, Robert Souders makes a drawing 
of a machine part, as David Woempner, at the Ozalid 
White-Print machine, makes a blueprint of a pencil tracing. 



TRAINED TO WORK IN CALLINGS OF OUR CHOICE 




STUDENT LUNCHROOM workers Patricia Mc- 
Cormick, Robert Richards, Marilyn Dunn, James 
Allen, and Thomas Redick punch the time clock 
as they report for one or two periods of work. 



17 




WE LEARN THAT OUR CULTURE STEMS FROM MANY 



RALPH Morris and Helen Henderson read the constitu- 
tion to prove a point in American Government class. 




We call America the melting pot of the world 
for we have welcomed to our shores peoples 
from all nations and have taught them the 
principles of Americanism. In turn, these 
freedom-loving peoples have brought with them 
not only their ideas and ideals, but also 
the culture and background of the old world. 
Today, we study this old-world culture and 
adapt it to our modern use. Although our 
government was revolutionary in giving its 
people control, we still study the laws of 
ancient civilizations; we study Latin as the 
basis of our modern English language; and 
in our mathematics we learn that it origi- 
nated in Egypt in the time of the Pharaohs. 
Through the process of elimination, we 
have taken the best of the culture 
of the world and have made it our own. 




MARILYN Bochleman is proving a theorem in geometry as 
Larry Gaston, Sandra Eavey, and Mr. J. H. Stoekinger listen. 



18 



CULTURES OF THE WORLD 




DIANE Bowman reads a facsimile of an old Latin scroll 
to members of the Vergil class of Miss Mabelle Sprague. 



TWO classes in English III of Miss Bozell and Miss Garner enjoy a travelogue illustrating our American heritage. 




19 



WE ARE ENCOURAGED TO REACH FOR A STAR, TO DEVELOP 




EARL Snellenberger and Janet Waggoner, yearbook and weekly editors, are 
proud that the 1955 yearbook received N.S.P.A. Ail-American rating (tenth 
time) and C.S.P.A. Medalist rating (sixth time) besides first place in the 
Wabash Valley contest; and that last year's weeklies received Quill and 
Scroll International Honor Rating and the George Gallup Award (tenth time). 



JAMES Swain, a member of Mr. Per- 
syzk's Metal Craft class, works on a 
huge brass bowl which won for him 
an award at the 1955 State Fair. 



DON HILL and Ronald Ward, champions, admire 
the Marion County Wrestling championship trophy. 




FIVE English Via pupils who had their poems accepted for the Na- 
tional High School Poetry Anthology are Thomas Dunaway, Sandra 
Huebner, Vija Celmins, Janet Ramsey. Not shown, Forrest McGinnis. 






PRINCIPAL Anderson holds one of Tech's nine Free- 
doms Foundation George Washington hlonor Med- 
als as he tells Karen Nichols and Kenneth Brooks 
that the school has received five of the medals, 
and the Cannon has received four for editorials. 



MISS Book, committee chairman, Mr. Glore, and Mr. 
Peeler look at the entry in Freedoms Foundation 
Awards for 1954-55, which they, together with Miss 
Alice Brown, prepared and which received one of 
the Top Ten Principal School Awards; the third 
time Tech has received a Principal School Award. 



OUR TALENTS WHILE REACHING 



We are encouraged to develop our talents, to strive toward higher goals. 
Many of us win awards each year in art, languages, mathematics, music, and 
sports, but just to win is not a fetish with us. Each is given the opportu- 
nity to achieve our goals, but we do not have to train or to develop our 
talents just to glorify our school. If we succeed, we are given recognition 
in assemblies, on Honor Day, and at Commencement. If we fail, our 
teachers applaud us for initiative, for our courage to try. At the end of 
our four years at Arsenal Tech, if we have done our best, we will 
have learned to accept victory with modesty and defeat with a smile. 



21 




WE MUST BE developed 
physically as well as men- 
tally so, as a requirement 
we must take two se- 
mesters each of Physical 
Education and Physical 
Fitness, with Posture as 
a substitute for either. 



WE RECEIVE GUIDANCE IN COURSE SELECTION AND HEALTH 



AS PART of the guidance program of our school Miss Jennie Moton, sponsor of 
Room 156, explains why the school insists that each pupil plan his four-year program. 





IN ANOTHER course for teen-agers, Child Care, taught 
by Mrs. Jeanne Bose, girls enjoy each other's scrapbooks. 

MISS Anna Parker has a timing lesson in Sight-saving, 
a non-credit class for pupils with defective eye-sight. 

DEVELOPMENTAL Reading, which trains our classmates to 
be more rapid readers, meets in a well-equipped laboratory. 




23 




MR. JAMES Stewart points out the dangers in the use of habit-forming drugs to 
Mary Butler, Richard Taylor, Delilah Hollis, and Larry Weims in his Narcotics class. 




ONE of the representatives from 
colleges and universities who in- 
terview students planning to at- 
tend their institutions concerning 
college opportunities today is 
Charles Henry, Hanover College. 




MRS. MARTHA Turpin, our dean of 
girls, gives some pre-college guid- 
ance pointers to L. David Smith 
and Kathleen Kelley, June seniors. 



MERETHA Bruner takes a Kuder test, given 
by Miss Louisa Steeg, Guidance clerk, to Eng- 
lish V classes to determine pupil aptitudes 
and to guide students as to courses to take. 



DORIS Bronson is interested in 
Mr. Ernest Thiel's explanation of 
reguirements necessary to earn 
a coveted vocational certificate. 



YES, WE HAVE SUPERIOR GUIDANCE ALONG MANY LINES 



TO BE A GOOD driver, a person must be familiar with the parts of the motor, Mr. 
George Mihal, Driver Education teacher, tells William Andrews and Thomas Abraham. 




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WITH its 100 magazine subscriptions, newspapers, 70,000 books, and clipping files, our library is in constant use. 

COMPREHENSIVE IN ITS VARIETY OF COURSES IS TECH 



In this our nationally known comprehensive 
high school we are offered I 12 semester 
courses in the academic field and 287 in 
vocational and technical fields. Because 
of this wide variety of offerings, we are 
given an opportunity to work toward our 
personal goal, whether it is to be prepared 



JOANNE WALSH explains the parts of the brain 
to her psychology class, taught by Mr. O. S. Flick. 




26 




IN MISS Edith Baker's Spanish class James Alfred and Mary Lou Hobbs display native costumes. 



for higher education leading toward a 
profession, to be successful in an occupa- 
tion, or to be useful as a member of society. 
Our school strives to afford all of 
us of high school age the particular kind 
of training that best suits our needs. 



EXPLAINING a problem on the blackboard in a Sen- 
ior Arithmetic class of Mr. Herbst is Janice Egelhof. 

THE BOTANY I class listens with interest as Mrs. 
Persell describes the biossom of the Devil's Tongue. 





27 




BARBARA Coleman makes a stencil on the mimeoscope machine while the rest 
of Miss Elma Sullivan's Office Practice class types mailing slips for the Cannon. 



MISS Frances Potter's students are encouraged 
to develop speed and accuracy in timing tests. 





THE family budget is the topic of discussion for Nancy 
Taylor, James Little, James Barber, and Sandra Coyne in 
Mr. Wilmer Lawrence's first-hour Junior Business class. 




GAIL Etherington, Albert Moore, and Stephen Duncan 
are working on an Intriguing experiment, conductivity 
of solutions, in Mr. Ralph Wolvertons' chemistry class. 



NATALIE Krueclceberg and Richard Hibett examine 
models of embryos in Mr. Paul Meyers' Zoology class. 



KARL KAPP, FRED Masuccio, Janis Liepnieks, Doris Bronson, and Bernard Van Buskirk look over a 
static machine in the study of static electricity, taken up in Mr. William Hawley's physics class. 





CHILDREN LOOK FORWARD 
TO SEEING TOYLAND SCENE 

Indianapolis children have grown to expect a toyland 
scene in the east basin of Monument Circle for the 
holidays. Last Christmas for the third time the 
Division of Program Production, directed by Mr. C. S. 
Stewart, built such a scene. And it was the tenth 
time that the Stagecraft class had arranged a Circle 
display, the first seven years having made the 
Nativity scene for the west basin. For this year's 
project Jack Fischer was in charge of building 
the Victorian house, and Forrest McGinnis made 
the papier mache figures of the children in the house. 



WHILE Billy Leavell works on the model for the house, Jack Stiere- 
walt puts the finishing touches on the scale model of the display. 

LARRY Aiken assembles an aluminum deer which has pivoted joints 
and hidden springs to give it a galloping motion when finally mounted. 

THREE of the youthful stagecraftsmen in the class are building the 
house on the gymnasium stage, prior to taking it to Monument Circle. 

ON A BITTER cold day a few weeks before Christmas the class moves 
the setting to the east basin of the Monument where they assemble it. 

AT LAST the tremendous project is completed ready to be enjoyed by 
old and young as they pause to admire the mechanical toyland scene. 








IT IS ART FOR ART'S SAKE 
PLUS ART FOR A VOCATION 

Whenever awards for art contests are announced 
names of Tech teachers and students are sure 
to be included. Our art faculty wins prizes at 
the State Fair Art Exhibit, the Hoosier Art 
Salon, and Indiana Artists' exhibit. This spring 
art pupils won 63 places in the Scholastic Art 
Awards for paintings, ceramics, jewelry, and 
sculptures; fifteen art students won sixteen 
prizes and places in the Ford Motor Company 
Industrial Art Awards, while Drafting 
pupils came in for their share 
of the honors in the same contest. 



ROBERT Dickey, at the drafting table, uses a draft- 
ing machine to make a drawing of a Fink Truss, with 
an engineer-drawing by Thomas French as reference. 

THREE YOUNG artists painting landscapes with 
water colors in Mr. E. G. Schildknecht's class are 
Jack Moore, Patricia Ann Wagner, Andrejs Strikis. 

ENJOYING a trip to the American Art Clay Com- 
pany to follow through steps in creating objects 
are members of Mr. Richard Peeler's Art VI class. 




I 




LOOKING through the doors of the home economics practice dining room we see 
how girls in Mrs. Betty Hungerford's class are taught to set a table and serve a meal. 



BETTY WHITNEY, Faith Sudbrack, 
Winifred Fuller, and Judith Hurley 
enjoy making their own clothes in 
Miss Pearl Apland's clothing class. 



32 




WHATEVER ONE'S TASTE, 
ONE FINDS A CLASS 





TWO OF THE 2,880 adults attending Evening School 
are developing a pleasant hobby in a ceramics class. 



EARLY American explorations are the topic for discussion 
in Miss Mary Marshall's seventh grade Social Studies class. 

Tech offers a variety of courses for a 
variety of age-level groups: courses 
for students from seventh grade to 
Senior High to Evening School. Tech 
teaches everything from home-making to 
history, from child care to carpentry; 
from crt to Driver Training. 



EIGHTH GRADERS making posters are Marina Howell, Douglas 
McPherson, Victoria Vos, Russell Hirschy, Dorothy Vandegriff. 



GREEN thumb members of the Landscaping class 
beautify a spot in front of the West Residence. 




NOWHERE CAN ONE FIND 



WORKING with great precision on a variety of projects are boys 
n a Cabinet Making class with Mr. Ithel Shoemaker instructing. 




AT THE Ludlow machine in the Print Shop, 
setting heads for the Arsenal Cannon weekly, 
is Terry Kinley with Charles Stroud nearby. 



SKILLED young workers in Mr. Clifford Allen's Auto 
Shop are Benny De Luca, Richard Cullison, and Gerald 
Brown, masking and spraying a customer's automobile. 



With 140 different courses in five Shop departments 
Tech is noted for offering the finest vocational 
curriculum in the city. No boy who has the desire 
to enter a trade can escape being trained for 
the job if he maps his course with care, if he 
chooses the classes that will give him the best 
opportunity to develop, and if he keeps 
in mind that a vocational certificate will 
open the door for him to his chosen field of work. 




34 



BETTER SHOP COURSES 



DONALD Ballard, Donald McAuley, George Shulse, and George 
Freeberg are learning to service television sets in Mr. Fye's class. 





GERALD SCOTT WORKS at the very latest model 
Universal Milling Machine which is accurate within 
.0015, m Mr. W. D. Whetstine's Machine Shop class. 




35 



YOUTHFUL TALENT DELIGHTS THE AUDIENCES IN OUR 
ANNUAL "SKETCHBOOK" AND "SCRATCHPAD" REVUES 




Two student talent revues are the "Sketchbook," 
now with 24 performances to its credit, and 
the "Scratchpad," a Junior High production, 
with two performances to its credit. Last 
year the theme of the "Sketchbook" was 
"Show Boat," with three of the original acts 
shown here. This year the theme was 
"Green and Bear It." It was an almost com- 
pletely student-produced performance featur- 
ing forty acts, for the judges, the three 
masters-of-ceremonies, and the 
directors of the acts were teen-agers. 



A BEVY of "squaws" watch Richard Hedge 
do his genuine Pueblo Indian Eagle dance. 





WHIRLING lightly to lilting music 
Sharon Rice dances a fast tap routine. 



STRIKING ACT in the "Scratchpad" was 
the eighth grade choir which sang 
"Surrey with the Fringe on Top," under 
the direction of Miss Rosemary McGuire. 



DRESSED as barbers and chaps of Yes- 
teryear the Girls' Ensemble blend their 
voices in typical barber shop harmony. 




37 




WITH a broad smile Mr. Anderson poses with Bar- 
bara Duke and Larry Engle at the Military Ball. 



PROUDLY wearing their crowns Barbara Rodocker and Rob- 
ert Pritchett dance to the music of the Tech Dance Band. 



IT'S ALWAYS LAUGHTER AND FUN AT OUR DANCES 

With the choosing of a queen for the Senior Prom seven royal 
members will have reigned at formal and semi-formal dances. 
For weeks before a dance a great advertising campaign for candi- 
dates' votes is launched, original decorations are planned, publicity 
is written, and tickets are sold. Each dance must be "the best." 




IT'S ON WITH the dance after Barbara 
Coleman and Phillip Jones have just been 
crowned at the White Christmas dance. 



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MONEY WAS KING 
AT THE MARDI GRAS 

A time of fun, of laughter, of music, 
and of excitement — that's the Mardi 
Gras. The smell of hot buttered 
popcorn, the clicking of ping-pong 
balls against glass fish bowls, the 
hawking of costumed vendors, the 
odor of home-made cookies and candy, 
that, too, is the Mardi Gras. It's 
a time for clubs and music groups 
to make money for their activities. 



"RING A COMIC," the eighth grade choir 
booth, drew a crowd with Rita Parker, Janice 
Pedigo, Judith Heitzmann, and James Hart as 
comic book characters passing out the rings. 

SIX TIMES an ambitious cast presented 
an old-fashioned melodrama, "The Triumph of 
Goodness," or "Saved, in the Nick of Time." 

LAUGHING as they had their pictures taken, 
Marilyn Farmer, Jeanne Sutton, Sally Hanks, 
Patty Moye kindly pose for another picture. 

IT didn't take long for Principal Anderson to 
prove that he's surely a straight shooter. 

SHINING shoes was a profitable business 
for Misses Marilyn Thomas and Virginia Hoke. 




39 




MISS Sara Ewing's class reads the credo of Freedoms Foundation. 

THE AMERICAN WAY OF LIFE 

Approximately nine thousand young people and adults 
received a clearer concept of our American heritage 
when they visited the breathtaking Freedoms 
Foundation panoramic exhibit during the week 
of October tenth, on display in Stuart Hall tower. 



IT WAS QUITE A CEREMONY when members 
of Mr. Harold Stewart's class and Mr. Anderson 
hung the Freedoms mobile in the principal's office. 



MR. FUNK (left) and Mr. Fugett (right) explain the panoramic exhibit to Mr. and Mrs. Leverenz, parents of senior Leroy. 




OPEN HOUSE AND SUPREME DAY 
ARE TWO BIG EVENTS 

THE photography laboratory proves to be a popular place. 



Visitors are always welcome for 
Open House, American Educa- 
tion Week and Supreme Day. 
Buildings are open during the 
evening with displays of pupil 
work and students demonstrating 
projects for the visitors. 
For the thirty-ninth observance of 
Supreme Day when the Supreme 
Court gave these grounds to the 
school city, besides Honor Day, 
the P-T.A. had its first Fish Fry. 




JOE Duddmg, Electricity Ml 
pupil, operates a motor gen- 
erator set during Open House. 




MR. Robert Offutt demonstrates the 
Ranger Aircraft engine which his boys 
tuned up and operated, Supreme Day. 



AN innovation for Open House was the 
Fish Fry the P.-T.A. had east of the Gym. 



41 




"NIGHT OF 
JANUARY I6TH" 

April 12-13 

CAST OF 
CHARACTERS 

Carol Frisbie, Ronald Mar- 
shall, Henry Townes, Larry 
Richards, Louise Burgess, 
Paul Mathewson, Beverly 
Snodgrass, Schorling Schnei- 
der, Conchita Howell, Nor- 
ma Watkins, Paul Downer, 
John Strelnicks, Jo Dol- 
ling er, Robert Richards, 
Larry Coleman, Nickie Es- 
cue, Judith Hanson, Jerry 
Steinker, William Breedlove, 
Rebecca Shrigley, Janet Al- 
len, Jean Hornberger, and 
Patricia Copas. Director, 
Mr. Paul Wadleigh. 



A JURY, chosen from the audience, made the trial in "Night of January 16th" interesting. 



"THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS" 



CAST OF "THE ROBE," presented October 18 and 19, under the direction of Mr. Gaylord Allen— (left to right): Patricia 
Myers, Martha Hughes, Richard Allen, Paul Owen, Robert Richards, Marilyn Reynolds, Rebecca Shrigley, Beverly Snodgrass, 
Schorling Schneider, Jo Dollinger, Fred Albert, Raymond Kriese, Theodore Wiese, Cevia Greenberg. At center table: Paul 
Mathewson, Shirley Ball, Philip Shrigley. 




42 




CAST OF "LADY WINDERMERE'S FAN," presented January 19 and 20, under the direction of Mr. Robert Maloy, (left 
to right): Paul Downer, Shirley Ball,. Martha Hughes, Janet Tileston, Herbert Goshen, Raymond Kriese, Carol Frisbie, Col- 
leen Murray, John Wampner, Paul Mathewson, Henry Townes, Richard Allen, Beverly Snodgrass, Henry Werking, Marina 
Howell, Claire Arment, Joyce Cooper, Jeannine Powell, Schorling Schneider. 



"There's no business like show business/' 

Thespians agree. In spite of difficulties 

in memorizing lines, off-day rehearsals, and 

costume fittings, "the show must go on," 

and it always does! Our three directors 

have produced three-act and one-act plays 

during the school year. The applause and 

prestige were rewarding to those in the casts 

but the lessons in good sportsmanship, 

patience, and perseverance meant more to them. 




MAKING signs to advertise "The Robe" are John 
Lane, William Brown, Charles Walter in Sign class. 



FOUR TALENTED young actors performing in "The 
Importance of Being Ernest" are Raymond Kriese, 
Jo Dollinger, Paul Mathewson, and James Kriese. 



43 




ACTIVITIES 



WHETHER it's for a Home Economics 
project or a College Tea for senior 
girls, Style Shows are always popular. 

EARL Snellenberger and Danny Luns- 
ford arrange a display when the Arse- 
nal Cannon observes Newspaper Week. 



MISS Margarette Miller stops at Arsenal Tech on her way to Seattle, Washington, to 
present a Frances Bellamy Award, which Tech received in 1948, to Franklin High School. 




TECH 

A *SE!Ul TtCniCAl 
"'<•■ SCHOOL 

Mr* 

FR WIS BELLAMY 

Fl AG AWARD 

******* 

fO« T ||t 

S^ 1 *** INDUMA 



44 



ARE MANY AND VARIED 

There's never a dull moment for many 
activities are either being planned 
or in the process of being carried out. 
There are the senior and Home Economics 
style shows, assemblies, broadcasts, the 
packing of Junior Red Cross overseas 
gift boxes, the sale of tuberculosis Christ- 
mas Seals by the journalism class, the 
sale of Easter seals by the Future Nurse 
club, the collecting of toys by the 
Cannon staff for underprivileged children, 
and the packing of baskets of food 
by the Service club for needy families. 




CHECKING THE 530 Junior Red Cross overseas 
boxes which sponsor rooms hove filled are Sharon 
Rice, Marvis Johnson, Connie Moore, Linda Pentecost, 
Jerry Steinker, and John Drake of the SAO Board. 




AUTO CLUB— First Row (left to right) : Patrick Cole, Paul Owen, Rob- 
ert Eubank, Larry Wiley, Stephen Guyer, Danny Adams, James Foy. 
Second Row: Max Phillips, Joel Jones, Herbert Maples, Ronnie Rickey, 
Lowell Kirkbride, Kenneth Jolly, Jack Hervey, Jerry Fickland, Mr. Sam 
Dudkowski, sponsor. Not shown: Tom Armstrong, Jerry Ingle, Gary 
Ruddell, Warren Byerly, Maurice Paul, Lerrell White, Florence Ridg- 
ley, Sharon Marsh. 





KEY CLUB— First Row (left to right): 
Allen Maxwell, Thomas Bolinger, Philip 
Jones, Fred McCoy, Gerald Stein- 
ker, Stephen Behlmer, Lorry Gaston, 
Charles Rippy, Richard Davis. Second 
Row: Gerald Hinchman, Earl Snellen- 
berger, Dennis Worrell, Nicki L. Farley, 
Donald Erman, John S. Drake. Third 
Row: Keith Johnson, Harold Boyd, Ted 
Wiese, Milton D. Cox, Raymond 
Kriese, James E. Burks. Fourth Row: 
Mr. Karl Kalp, sponsor, Martin E. 
Biemer, Andrejs Strikis, Michael Sites, 
Meredith Wiley, Preston Judson, Mor- 
tin Joochim. Top Row: R. Keith Shields, 
David Dagwell, James Hirschy, Rich- 
ard Reid, Dale May, John Trimpe, 
Walter Greskamp, Keith Bailey. 



45 




YEARBOOK STAFF — In Front: Earl Snellenberger, editor-in-chief and artist. In rear: Marjorie Combs, associate 
editor; Mary Ellen Wright, typist; Miss Ella Sengenberger, advisor; Judith Michelfelder, associate editor. 



DEADLINES ARE THE BUGABOO OF CANNON STAFFITES 



We students who are journalistically 
minded are given the opportunity 
to write for our nationally-known 
newspaper and yearbook, to edit our 
student handbook, and to report for 
local newspapers. Our weekly news- 
paper, the Arsenal Cannon, has won 
its fourth editorial award in Freedoms 
Foundation and its tenth Quill and 
Scroll International honor rating and 
George H. Gallup Award. Our 1955 
yearbook received C.S.P.A. Medalist 
rating, N.S.P.A. All-American Honor 
rating, and first place at the Wabash 
Valley Conference. Surely our train- 
ing will help us in many lines of work. 



46 



A GREAT event in the school year is autograph day when 
the Arsenal Cannon Yearbook is distributed to subscribers. 





NEWSPAPER STAFF — In Front (left to right): Nancy Dillon, assistant page 2 editor; Judith Pruitt, reporter; 
Jacquelyn Bryant, page 3 co-editor; Allen Maxwell, copy desk; Martin Joachim, page 3 co-editor. Rear Row: 
Diane Bowman, page 4 editor; Ross Meyer, reporter; Norman Barnes, sports; Barbara French, Roberta Russell, 
Judith Coffey, reporters; Judith McClain, circulation assistant. Standing: Marie Greer, reporter. 



NEWSPAPER STAFF— Seated (left to right): Norma McCallip, page I co-editor; Jane Kraus, page 2 
editor; Helen Brooks, page I co-editor; Janet Waggoner, editor-in-chief. Standing: James Hirschy, 
sports columnist and writer; James Boles, school editor; Carol Frisbie, features. 




m 



!Y 



i 



* 




.v 





MAHLON Carlock, business advisor, Mrs. 
Esther McCleerey, assistant, Ella Sengen- 
berger, director and publications sponsor. 



BUSINESS STAFF (left to right) — Robert Lynch, circulation manager; Danny Lunsford, 
business manager; Kaye Noble, typist; Ann Harger, assistant; Diane Zvejnieks, typist; 
Steven May, business. Not Shown: Barbara Waddell, typist; Sally Thiesing, scrapbooL 



BEHIND THE SCENES THEY DO THEIR SHARE 

The story of our publications does not end with the reporters and editors. 
Besides the writing staff many other groups cooperate. Behind the 
scenes our technical workers, our business staff, our typists, and our 
printers, are constantly at work doing their indispensable jobs. They 
keep books, order supplies, do all the typing, mail Cannons, set type, and 
keep the presses rolling. Our 160 agents sell subscriptions to the news- 
paper and yearbook and deliver the papers once a week to their roll rooms. 



SALESMEN who helped sell yearbook ads — Susie Hartz- 
ler, Betty Warren, Tom Low, and Judith Michelfelder. 



PRINT SHOP Instructors — Floyd Billington, weekly press-binding; 
Ralph Clark, weekly linotype-make-up; George R. Barrett, weekly 
printing advisor; Clyde Armel, yearbook ads — senior names. 




48 



NOT a sound is heard as staffites read 
their very own paper, "The Popgun, at 
the annual Cannon May Day luncheon. 




WHILE SEVERAL decorate the 
tree, others arrange toys which 
the Cannon staff collected to 
give to underprivileged school 
families in the neighborhood. 



ARSENAL CANNON HIGH-POINT SAL ESM EN — First Row (left to 
right): Don Skillman, Max Wilson, Norma McCallip, Rosella King, Scott 
McCoy, Martin Joachim, Renee Wise, Richard McMath, Jane Patterson. 
Second Row: Judith Lakin, Carol Sulgrove, Nancy Dillon, Nancy Foster, 
Marjone Klepper, Barbara Reed, Sandra Huebner, Raymond Parsons, 
Robert Lee Bruce. Third Row: Carl Striebeck, Barbara French, Sharon 
Bergdoll, Joan Epperson, Judith Enyart, Judith Ozman, Sally Sore, Myrna 



Bolinger, Joyce DeCoursey. Fourth Row: Lee Hays, Ausma Korlovs, 
Brenda Weaver, Barbara Baker, Ida Rae uearr y. LaVonne Finley, 
Juanita Smith, Gretchen Gutknecht, Marie Greer, Bonnie Jean Burns, 
Susan Manning, William Breedlove. Top Row: Michael Reyman, Judith 
Castle, Sharron Duncan, Ronald Ray, Patty Mitchell, Dorothy Terry, 
Carol Fleener, Donna Massingale, Connie Moore, Ann Emmons, Bonnie 
Harrod, Lester Gordon. Second Row, left : Lee Hayes. 







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49 



OUR SCHOOL HAS TWO NATIONAL HONOR GROUPS, 




THESPIAN TROUPE 1240 INITIATION — First Row (left to right): Con- 
chita Howell, Paul Mathewson, Raymond Kriese, Marilyn Reynolds, Phillip 
Sh rig ley, and Schorling Schneider, initiates. Second Row: Ronald David- 



son, Dennis Fulk, Robert Richards, Mr. Gaylord Allen, sponsor. Top Row: 
Scott McCoy, Royce Bourne, scribe, Richard Allen, president, Jo Dol- 
lingor, secretary, and James Simmons, vice president. 



THESPIANS AND QUILL AND SCROLL 



Blowing out their candles as they are initiated into Quill and Scroll, National Honor 
Society for High School Journalists at the Cannon's May Day luncheon are James 
Hirschy, Earl Snellenberger, Carol Frisbie, Norma McCallip and Helen Brooks. 
Judith Griggs, alumnae, and Janet Waggoner, president, are initiating them. 





ORGANIZATION PARTICIPATION MAKES BETTER CITIZENS 




STUDENT AFFAIRS ORGANIZATION EXECUTIVE BOARD — Standing circle): Mrs. Martha Turpm, sponsor, Philip Jones, Vernon Brugger, John 

at left: Richard Davis, president. Seated in Front: Barbara Duke. First Drake, Earl Snellenberger, Terry Kinley, Dennis Worrell, Jerry Steinker, 

Row (left to right): Sharon Rice, Keith Johnson, Margie Gabbert, Su- Marvis Johnson, Connie Moore, Wanda Ponsler, Nancy Dillon, 

sanne Sweeney, Linda Pentecost, David Dagwell. Second Row (around Susonne Esber. 

We find enjoyment in taking part in our many school organizations. 
Our wide variety of clubs provides us with the opportunity to 
further our knowledge in nearly any field. The eighteen extra- 
curricular organizations available help us to know the school 
and to let the school know us. They teach us leadership 
and resourcefulness, part of growing up to be good citizens. We 
learn to accept responsibility, to do our share. Yes, we 
find it fun working together through varied activities 
for the betterment of our school, our community, and ourselves. 



SINGING FOR the Service Club Christmas party are Elmer 
Bunce, Judith Frasler, Sally Sare, Jerry Steinker, Sue Cory. 

"WHAT DO you want for Christmas, young man?" is the 
question put to Terry Kinley by Santa Claus (Sgt. Arthur Lar- 
don) as Barbara Duke looks on at the S.A.O. Christmas party. 





SERVICE CLUB — First Row (left to right): Ausma Karlovs, Barbara 
French, Jo Anne Hornberger, David Alger, Charles Parrish, Judith Ann 
Gray, Nancy Jane Huskisson, Dorothy Reuter, Robert Taylor, Nancy 
Taylor, Kay Noblitt, Maria Laakman, Mary E. Preston, Shanette Sperry, 
Carolyn Parsons, Judith Whitseh. Second Row: Gene Bayless, Joyce Lee, 
Madonna Harrington, Evelyn Smith, Janice Carr, Lillian Cook, Donna 
Tuder, Bonnie Westerfield, Anna DeFrees, Hollie Suggs, Connie Moore, 
Linda Johnson, Jeannie McFarland, Mary Robertson, Judith Nichols, Rob- 
ert Church, Nancy Clappell. Third Row: Judith Frazier, Robert Hughes, 



Rita Gatlin, Karen Belles, Sandra Condra, Brendo Weaver, Dianne Hess- 
man, Shirley Mootz, Mary L. Wagner, Connie Jo Kladden, Marcia Johns- 
ton, Kathleen DeFrees, Eda Rae Quearry, Diane Distel, Janet Porter, 
Dolores Thompson, Paul Owen, Linda Laukman, Sylvia Green, Ann Em- 
mons. Top Row: Marie Greer, Richard Hillman, Jerry Foley, Donna King, 
Camilla Rugsdale, Gene A. Stern, Ronald L. Marshall, Linda Kiplinger, 
Judith Ray, Barbara Waddell, Diane Bowman, Deanna Bartram, Karen 
Edwards, Natalie Krueckeberg, Faith Garvin, David Smith, Royce Bourne, 
John Hook. 




FUTURE NURSES CLUB— First Row (left to right): Rebecca Wilson, 
Sandra Pollard, Alice McCutchan, Josephine De Cenzo, Patricia Rush, 
Myra Wort, Sue Ann Asher, Alice Ann Woodrum. Rear Row: Nancy 



Miller, Pamela Powell, Mary Teegarden, Jane Kraus, Margaret Benson, 
Mrs. Rowena Graub, R.N., sponsor, Mono Brown, Judith Ogle, Susan 
Russell, Gearline Kessinger, Carolyn Miller. 



52 





SERVICE CLUB— First Row (left to right): John Drake, Marvls Johnson, 
Keith Johnson, Jerry Stemker. Second Row: Sally Sare, Barbara Purcell, 
Joyce E. Hammond, Linda Pentecost, Susanne Esber, Sue Cory, Mrs. 
Martha A. Turpin, sponsor. Third Row: Wayne Cothron, Norma Jackson, 
Judith Ogle, Elmer Bunce. Fourth Row: Jacqueline Bradley, Sharon Stew- 
art, Susan Sliger, Janet Bohenkamp, Jerry Gatlin. Top Row: Thomas 
Durham, Judith Kempe, George Elliott, Jo Ann Hatcher, Jerre West, 
James Lloyd 



CHEMISTRY CLUB— First Row (left to right) : Suzanne Sweeney, 
Patricia Miller, Carolyn Hedrick, Helen Flake, Mr. William 
Graney, sponsor. Second Row: Michael Sites, Allen Maxwell, Joe 
Kurz, Carl Niermann. Third Row: Robert Hudson, Jack Huey, 
James Trulack, Charles Anderson. Top Row: James Yost, Fred 
Schowengerdt, James Hirschy, Larry Myers. 




MUSIC CLUB— First Row (left to right): Mr. Raymond Brandts, Lyle 
Scifres, Sally Sare, Sandra DeVore, Mar|orie Gabbert, Susanne Esber, 
Jonita DeVore, Joyce DeCoursey, Mr. John M. White, sponsor. Second 
Row: Natalie Krueckeberg, Judith Hoyt, Judith Stahlhut, Roberta Russell, 
Sandra Huebner, Cherry McCormock, Judith Ozman. Third Row: Larry 



Gaston, Janet Scrivner, Diane Distel, Myron Koehring, Marilyn Hawkins, 
Jacquelyn Bryant, Sharon Hoy. Top Row: John Bailey, Lester Gordon, 
Susan Manning, Martin Biemer, Sandra Major, James Sullivan, Barbara 
Klepfer, Judith Sluss, Herbert Lindsey. 



53 




NATURE STUDY CLUB— First Row (left to right): Marian Gruenhalz, 
Patricia Downey, Bonnie Priest, Patricia Weimer, Mary Alice Roberson. 
Donna Tucker. Second Row: Milton Cox, Eda Rae Quearry, Billy Randel, 
Glenda Britt, James Swain, Charles Keller, Jane Thiry. Third Row: Eliza- 
beth Eicks, Wanda Wright, Mary Peters, Deanna Dunigan, Edith May, 
Virginia Hoopengarner, Mrs. Joan Persell, sponsor. Fourth Row: Ivery 
Ann White, Willie May Brown, Robert Moriarity, Ronald Marshall, Mil- 
dred Giles, Martha Johnson, Lillian Thompson, Rose Marie Scheffler. Top 
Row: Joe Dudding, Meredith Wiley, Ray Dillinger, Patricia A. Jackson, 
Patricio Dryburg, Margaret Benson, James Merrell, Scott McCoy. 



THE CAMPUS with its great variety of trees is 
ideal for the Nature Study Club to collect leaves. 



DRAMA CLUB— First Row (left to right): Ronald L. Davidson, Marilyn 
Reynolds, Carol Frisbie, James Simmons, Royce Bourne, Richard Allen, 
Jo Dollinger, Robert Adams, Schorling Schneider. Second Row: Conchita 
Howell, Dennis Fulk, Philip Shrigley, Robert E. Richards, John Wampner, 
Raymond Kriese, Paul Mathewson, Mr. Robert Maloy, sponsor. Third 



Row: Mr. Gaylord Allen, sponsor, Thomas Deal, Henry Werking, Claire 
Arment, Patricia Ann Copas, Rebecca Shrigley, Mary Robertson, David 
Alger. Fourth Row: Joyce Cooper, James Kriese, Fred Albert, John 
Bailey, Courtland Ricketts, Paul Downer, Henry Townes. 





FUTURE TEACHERS OF AMERICA CLUB— First Row (left to right) : Ted Slack, Elmer Bunce, 
Sue Thompson, Roberto Russell, Eileen Brethauer. Second Row: Sandra Major, Deanna Bar- 
tram, Janet Sue Porter, Tobie Ann Bess, Marilyn Hawkins, Mary Ruth Morgan. Third Row: 
Nancy Kingery, Diane Bowman, Kay Clore, Vija Bolsteins, Judith Bailie, Helen Flake. Top Row: 
John McCray, Cherry McCormack, Sylvia Horrell, Karen Edwards, Miss Jane Strain, sponsor. 



PLENTY of delicious food was brought to the 
Radio Club Christmas party in the "Ham Shack." 



RADIO CLUB— First Row (left to right): Edmond Mulhol- 
land, Helen Flake, Kitty Leslie, Patricia Price, Ronald David- 
son, Roger Taylor, Gerald Hinchman. Second Row: Terry 
Mueller, Daniel Hopping, Donald Goodwin, Chester Crump, 
John L. Smith, Kenneth Miller. Third Row: Robert Grove, Don- 
ald Weiss, Leonard Petty, Odell White, Larry Lindley, Hollie 
Suggs, Bruce Eastmond, Mr. Garold Bramblett, sponsor. Top 
Row: David Charpie, Joe Dudding, Charles Matheny, Rich- 
ard Hillman, Janis Liepnieks, Billy Randel, William Sconce. 
Carl Mitchell. 




55 




SQUARE DANCE CLUB— First Row (left to right): Charles Stinson, Sandra Potts. 
Denver Veteto, Janis Shirley, Clinton Perry. Second Row: Paul Huser, Steven May, 
David Alger, Lydia Perry, Rebecca Shrigley, Miss Helen Caffyn, sponsor. Third Row: 
Sally Thiesing, Nancy Bodenheimer, Portia Thompson, Mary Jane Chappell, Kath- 
erine Cochran, Marie Greer. Top Row: Gerald Chappell, Richard McMath, Dale 
Cissna, Albert Wagner, Janice Carr. Kitty Leslie. 



GERMAN CLUB — First Row (left to right) : Donna Sue Stoelting, Ausma 
Karlovs. Second Row: Gunta Pimanis, Anna Liepnieks, Mary Elizabeth 
Taylor, Lidija Liepnieks. Third Row: Martha Kastner, Ann Bockstahler, 
Daine Zvejnieks, Vija Bolsteins. Top Row: Janis Liepnieks, Jo Anne Walsh, 
Mr. Heinrich Veltrup, sponsor, William Huff, Larry Bland. 



■iih& I 




ART CLUB— First Row (left to right): Harold Rommger, Mary Ann Ward, 
Evelyn Weaver, Mary Alice Roberson, Herbert Lindsey, Walter Dering, 
Marilyn Reynolds, Glenn Beach, Joyce Garringer, Janice Garringer. 
Second Row: Suzanne demons, Susan Sliger, Jane Thiry, Beth Koonce, 
Glendo Bledsoe, Barbara Purcell, Donald Toney, Michael Bodenhamer. 



Third Row: Josephine Garland, Cecilia Bernard, Cevia Greenberg, Phyllis 
Anderson, Lida Jacobs, Karen Belles, Joyce Ficklin, Judith Pierson, Jerry 
Foley. Top Row: Russell Coleman, Linda Hale, Sylvia Herndon, Michael 
Sanders, Frances Walden, Linda Lea Smith, Vija Celmins, Russell Duffy, 
Mr. Richard Peeler, sponsor. 





HOME ECONOMICS CLUB— Seated (left to right): Judith Cone, Sandra Condra, Shirley Mootz, Carol Erman, Suzanne 
demons. Standing: Miss Ann Abbott, sponsor, Mrs. Mary Lou Little, sponsor, Nancy Bodenheimer, Barbara Purcell, Eda Roe 
Ouearry, Irmgard Hopsommer, Judith McViclcer, Nancy Jo Acree, Betty Hawkins, Melba Butler, Thelma Flowers, Janet Vint, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Holtsclaw, sponsor. 



XYZ CLUB— First Row (left to right): Rosella King, Judith Brown, Darla 
Reno, Judith Gruber, Faith Garvin, Sharon Coffee, Joy Buckner, Margrit 
Steinemann, Mary Evelyn Preston, Judith Ogle, Janet Bohnenkamp. Sec- 
ond Row: Constance Moore, Walter Dearing, Martin Joachim, Thomas 
Bolinger, Michael Sites, James Bishop, Mary Jackson, Darlene Cole, 
Martha Hughes, Sue Thompson, Doris Ball, Barbara H ol I in in, Warren 
Schwomeyer, Sandra Potts, Albert Wagner, Dennis Fulk. Third Row: Su- 
sanne Esber, Wayne Cothron, Ronald Veller, Lyle Scifres, Martin Biemer, 
Gerald Steinker, Sharon Hoy, Mary Peters, Anna Liepnieks, Ann Bock- 



stahler, Era Young, Larry Boyer, David Girt, George Howe, Charles 
Matheny, Miss Helen Noffke, sponsor. Fourth Row: Ann Harger, Sara 
Main, Gretchen Gutknecht, Larry Chaney, William Sare, David Charpie, 
William Doherty, Theodore Wiese, Kathenne Holle, Lidija Liepnieks, Wil- 
lie Ray, Michael Reyman, James Currens, John Currens, Dale May. Top 
Row: Charles Stinson, Sandra Major, Charles Elliott, William Johnson, 
Ted Slack, Roger Taylor, Philip Shrigley, Paul Downer, Larry Horton, 
George Horton, David Alger, James Yost, Gregory Andrews, Charles 
Rippy, Ronald Oberle, Allen Maxwell. 




57 




PREPARING to show the Browning Automatic Rifle at Open House are 
M Sgt. Claude Dixon, M Sgt. Arthur Lardon, and S.F.C. Louis Wade. 



OUR R.O.T.C. STRIVES TO BUILD BETTER MEN BOTH MENTALLY 



The R.O.T.C, organized during the 
spring of 1919, was preceded by 
the Cadet Corps in 1918, and the 
Arsenal Guards. Today it is a full 
six-company regiment of 450 cadets 
with a drill platoon and 17 spon- 
sors and a staff of three instruc- 
tors. Its headquarters are in 
the same Barracks which housed the 
soldiers when these grounds were 
an arsenal. Its drill field 
is south of the West Residence. 



RIFLE TEAM— First Row ( left to right) : 
Corporal Charles O'Connor, First Lieu- 
tenant Scott Phillips, Major David 
Wall. Second Row: Lieutenant Colonels 
Charles L. Rippy, Keith Johnson, John 
Tnmpe; First Lieutenant Oliver Mabry. 




58 



R.O.T.C. SPONSORS — Extreme 
Right: Lt. Col. Barbara Duke. First 
Row (left to right): 1st Lt. Barbara 
French, 2nd Lt. Susanne Esber, 1st 
Lts. Barbara Rodocker, Sharon Rice, 
and Marilyn Farmer. Second Row: 
1st Lt. Sharon Bergdoll, 2nd Lt. Linda 
Pentecost, 1st Lts. Judith Gilstrap, 
Kaye Noble, and Sally Sare. Top 
Row: 1st Lts. Marvis Johnson, Kitty 
Leslie, Sandra Major, Karen Ed- 
wards, and Sue Cory. 




AND PHYSICALLY 




CADET REGIMENTAL STAFF— First Row 
(left to right) : Cadet Lieutenant Colonels 
Charles L. Rippy, Robert K. Johnson, John 
Trimpe. Second Row: Cadet Majors Je- 
rome Rodenbarger, David Wall, Scott 
McCoy. Third Row: Cadet Major John S. 
Drake, Cadet First Lieutenant Scott Phil- 
lips. Top Row: M/Sgt. Arthur E. Lardon, 
Commandant, Cadet Second Lieutenant 
Carl W. Mitchell, Cadet SFC John 
Lee Foster. 




59 




3L— r- 1 

CADET Lt. James Merchant and Cadet Major Larry Engle check cadets' appearance during monthly inspection. 



INSPECTIONS KEEP THE CADETS ON THEIR TOES 



CADET MAJOR Vernon Brugger, Lt. Col. Duke A. Bryant, 
Inspector General's Corps, 5th Army, Honorary Lt. Col. 
Barbara Duke, and Cadet Major Scott McCoy at the chart 
which is a training aid for map reading, during the annual se- 
mester inspection by several officers of the 5th Army Corps. 




Lost year for the 34th time the R.O.T.C. re- 
ceived the academic honor rating for the 
year 1954-55. Tech is the only school in 
the country to be the recipient of this award 
this many times. As in all groups at Tech, 
each cadet is given a chance to progress 
on his own merit. If he maintains a 
high academic standard he is awarded 
the Academic Ribbon. This training 
furnishes excellent mental and physical 
discipline and inculcates ideals of service. 



OUR 1955 FEDERAL INSPECTION 



FIFTH CORPS Army officers and special guests were 
m the reviewing stand at the 1955 Federal Inspection. 



OUR HONOR Guard aroused pride within us because of 
their very skillful performance in following commands. 



MRS. Houser pinned the American War Mother Medal on Ca- 
det 2nd Lt. Scott McCoy as M Sgt. R. E. Johnson watched. 




M SGT. JOHNSON and Principal Hanson Anderson pinned 
the thirty-fourth consecutive star on the ROTC banner. 



AS THE COLOR guard marched briskly past the grand- 
stand, people stood at attention in reverent silence 
and respect for their school and their country flags. 




WE ARE PROUD OF OUR SUPERIOR MUSIC DEPARTMENT 




62 




TECH CHOIR— First Row (left to right) : Lynda Foster, Conchita Howell, 
Judith Hunt, Bonnie Bryson, Geneva Warren, Martha Anne Bobo, Mari- 
lyn Dravis, Barbara Coleman, Judith Bohannon, Mr. William F. Moon, 
director, Judith Gilstrap, Patricia Rush, Velma Schakel, Rosalynn Hasseld, 
Helen Knorr, Karen Rousch, Margie Gabbert, Sharon Rice. Second Row: 
Sandra Major, Sue Schoenewey, Marceita May, Karen Nichols, Alice 
Jenkins, Juanita Smith, Kaye Noble, Sara Mam, Gretchen Gutknecht, 
Patricia Myers, Sally Sare, Suzanne Dearinger, Natalie Krueckeberg, 
Judith Dillinger, Barbara Castetter, Sue Cory, Helen Brooks, Marilyn 



Hawkins, Judith Jones. Third Row: Donald Floyd, Jerome Currin, Richard 
Allen, Ray Parsons, James Alford, Charles Woodard, Charles Croomes, 
James Sullivan, John Brattain, Larry Gray, Lester Cavanaugh, William 
Silcox, Milton Cox, Gerald Steinker, Thomas Wooten, Richard Davis, Ron- 
ald Hege. Top Row: Harold Seslar, David Williams, Jack Parker, James 
McQuinn, Ronald Smith, David Woempner, Murth Ramsey, Nicki Farley, 
Richard Byrd, Wallace Moon, Max Wilson, James Cast, John Wampner, 
Dennis Worrell, Donald Erman, Harry Neer, David Hutton. 



We students who are musically inclined may distinguish ourselves in either instru- 
mental or vocal groups. We may advance according to our ability. Our Band, 
Choir, and Orchestra, and the smaller groups derived from them have won many 
first and superior ratings in district and state contests. Our Band plays at 
athletic contests, in parades, and at ROTC Inspection. Our music groups 
give entertaining performances at assemblies, and for local, civic, 
and church groups. This spring the Music deportment sponsored the appearance 
of the Crew-Cuts at Cadle Tabernacle to raise funds for new uniforms. 



MADRIGAL SINGERS— Clock- 
wise Around Table: David Wil- 
liams, Alice Jenkins, Margie 
Gabbert, Nicki Farley, Sandra 
Ma|or, Dennis Worrell, Thomas 
Low, Judith Dillinger, Marcieta 
May, James Cast. Miss Louise 
Swon is director. 



STRING QUINTET— (left to 
right): Charles Welsh, Deanna 
Allen, Ann Bobo, Judith Michel- 
felder, and Russell Smith. Mr. 
Walter Shaw is director. 





CONCERT BAND— In Front (left to right) : Majorettes and Flag Twirlers 
Suzanne Dearinger, Rosalyn Hasseld, Judith Ozman, Mary Jane Hart- 
wick, Linda Johnson. First Row: Judith Smale, Daniel Deputy, David Wil- 
mer, Marcia Edwards, John Lee Foster, Drum Major Frederick Hubbard, 
James Foy, Lester Gordon. Second Row: Judith Ann Hoyt, Harold Ro- 
minger, Ruby Dodge, Renotta Trainer, David Kingsbury, David Duree, 



Ronald Taylor, Richard Stoelk, Brent Ryan, William Breedlove, John 
Joseph, Richard Borelly, Thomas Miller. Top Row: Robert Eubank, James 
Powell, James Williams, Stanley Stuart, Bruce Blakemore, Herbert Lindsey, 
Nancy Dillon, Mary Jane Owen, Kenneth King, Philip Breimeir, Doyle 
West, David Flannery, Nathaniel Madden, Edmund Sears, Edward Sears. 



OUR MANY INSTRUMENTAL GROUPS PROVIDE US 



DANCE BAND — First Row (left to right): Sam Canary, Stephen Behlmer, Myron Koehring, Larry Gaston. Second 
Row: Mr. Walter Shaw, director, Richard Byrd, Daniel Deputy, Lester Cavanaugh. Top Row: Vernon Alexander, Rich- 
ard Borelly, Donald Davis, Lester Gordon, Dale Cissna. At Right: Bonnie Cook, Max Wilson, Phyllis Talley. Not 
pictured: Frank Furman, Robert Henderson. 




64 




CONCERT BAND— In Front (left to right) : Majorettes and Flag Twirlers 
Beverly Schrowe, Sue Burton, Frances Bivms, Judith Barnes, Patricia Rush. 
First Row: Donald Lee Davis, Ronald Cauble, Mono Toliver, Chorlene 
Davis, Lawrence Gaston, Richard Allen, Judith Sluss, Kay Klepfer, Cherry 
McCormack. Second Row: Julio Hudson, Samuel Stroud, Donald Knight, 
Elmer Bunce, Sharon Hoy, Robert Richards, George Alcorn, Frank Tur- 



man, Lester Cavanaugh, Jack Brankle, Stephen Behlmer, Myron Koehring. 
Top Row: Vernon Alexander, Delmar Beight, Daniel Young, Sherman Se 
graves, Ann Bockstahler, Richard Baughn, Carole Funk, Janice Cartmell 
Arleen Baudendistel, Phillip Ranelin, Robert Henderson, David Aldrich. 
John M. White is director. 



WITH LIVELY MUSIC 



BRASS ENSEMBLE— First Row (left to right): Suzanne 
Dearinger, Rebecca Shrigley, Sharon Hoy, Fred Hub- 
ard Second Row: James Foy, Nathan Meoden, Robert 
Richards, David Aldrich, James Roustic, Thomas Jock- 
son. Standing: Robert Eubanks. 




DR. SHIBLER and his staff were fasci- 
nated by the |oyous singing of Christmas 
carols as the Tech Choir serenaded them. 




CONCERT ORCHESTRA— First Row (left to right): Ann Bobo, concert- 
mistress, Deanna Allen, Drucilla Johnson, Donna Black, Judith Michel- 
felder, Norma Watkms, Mr. Walter Shaw, director. Second Row: Richard 
Catt, Charles Welsh, Thelma Flowers, Pauline Woods, Sandra Pflug, Elinor 
Myers, Evelyn Walters, Rosemary Bailey, Georgia Flowers. Third Row: 
Nancy Kingery, Patrick Markich, Phillip Rankin, Barbara Madden, Jo Ann 
Hatcher, Gail Hockett, Cherry McCormack, Kay Klepfer, Kenneth Jolly, 
William Humphries, Janice Slaughter, Beverly Rivers. Fourth Row: Judith 
Stahlhut, Cynthia Edwards, Mary Garrison, Beverly Blough, Jennie Hig- 



don, Judith Smale, Daniel Deputy, Mono Tolliver, Larry Gaston, Arleen 
Eaudendistel, Myron Koehring, Roberta Russell. Top Row: Dale Cissna, 
Suzanne Sweeney, Lomax Mahone, Constance Smith, James Foy, Fred 
Hubbard, Sharon Hoy, Robert Richards, Donald Davis, Lester Gordon, 
Richard Borelly, Robert Henderson, David Aldrich, Daniel Young, Jane 
Owen. Not pictured: Norma Bohnenkamp, John Fish, Harold Frame, 
Patricia Harvey, Delilah Hollis, Cleo Means, Karen Smith, Amelia Foops, 
Joan Weddle, Kay Willis, Margaret Wittem, Janice Cortmell, Philip 
Ranelin, Rebecca Shrigley, Judith Sluss, Peter Waeger. 



OUR PRIZE VOCAL GROUPS GIVE MANY DELIGHTFUL 




GIRLS ENSEMBLE (left to 
right) : Judith Hunt, Rosalyn 
Hasseld, Bonnie Bryson, Sara 
Main, Miss Marilyn Thomas, 
director, Patricia Myers, Jua- 
nita Smith, Sharon Rice, Mari- 
lyn Dravis, Karen Rousch. 





CONCERT ORCHESTRA— First Row (left to right) : 
Russell H. C. Smith, Patricia Myers. Second Row: 
Charlene Flynn, Judith Ridenour, Margaret Moir. 
Third Row: Susan Manning, Sondra Condra. Fourth 
Row: Marilyn Hawkins, Colette Bauerle, Judith Pru- 
itt. Top Row: Nancy Dillon, Herbert Lindsay, 
James Williams. 



BOYS OCTETTE— First Row (left to right): James R. Alford, James McO"'™, Gretchen 
Gutknecht, James Sullivan, Ronald Hege. Second Row: Larry Gray, John Wampner, David 
Woempner, Richard Davis. 



PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL, CIVIC, AND CHURCH GROUPS 



WOODWIND ENSEMBLE— (left to right): Cherry McCormack, David 
Wilmer. Renatta Trainer, Janice Cartmell, Myron Koehring, John Joseph, 



Arleen Baudendistel, David Duree, Judith Smale, Kay Klepfer. Standing: 
Director Raymond Brandes. 



67 



AS FOR ATHLETICS OUR MANY TEAMS ARE TOPS 




TECH CENTER, Harold Boyd, bats in a rebound during the Tech-Frankfort game as a defender stretches vainly to stop him. 



68 




VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM— First Row (left to right): Henry Woods, 
Edward Hannon, Ronald Bryant, Lee Hays, David Dagwell, Fred McCoy. 
Second Row: Lawrence Deer, Harold Boyd, Rein Leetmae, James Stone 
broker, Ronald McCauley, Jon Sexson. Third Row: Student Manager Wil- 



liam Huff, Assistant Coach Robert Mehl, Coach Charles Maas, Assistant 
Coach Jack Bradford, Trainer Howard Catt, Athletic Director Charles P. 
Dagwell, Student Manager John Umbanhowar. 



VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM 
ENJOYS FINE SEASON 

Tech's varsity basketball squad enjoyed a fine 
season during 1955-56 as it compiled a 
record of 14 wins and only seven defeats. The 
netmen, sparked by Captain Jon Sexson and sopho- 
more Eddie Hannon, placed second in city stand- 
ings and tied for third in the North Central 
Conference. Despite their good season the Green- 
dads fell to Shortridge in the opening game 
of the Sectionals, suffering this loss for the 
second straight year. Only team to whip the 
Green Wave twice was Crispus Attucks; the 
Tigers won both times by seven-point margins. 

TECH and Warren Central centers jump high for the tip-off 
in the opening varsity game of the 1955 basketball season. 









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69 




RESERVE BASKETBALL TEAM— Kneeling (left to right) : William Brown, Coach Jack Bradford, Ronald McCauley, 
Ronald Bryant, David Knight, Robert Walker, Gene Healton. Standing: Student Manager Wayne Stotts, Roscoe 
Fields, William Dunlop, Charles Umbanhowar, Donald Erman, Robert Stone, Michael Alexander, Larry Williams, 
Richard Johnson, Ronald Smith, Student Manager Edward Crispin. 



VARSITY BASKETBALL 
SCHEDULE 



RESERVE BASKETBALL 
SCHEDULE 



Nov. 23 


Tech 63 


Warren Centra 


55 


26 




63 


Southport 


62 


Dec. 2 




45 


Frankfort 


51 


9 




70 


New Castle 


68 


15 




37 


Crispus Attucks 


44 


16 




67 


Hammond 


92 


28,29 


C 


ty Tourney 








50 


Broad Ripple 


48 






74 


Howe 


57 






39 


Crispus Attucks 


46 


Jan. 6 




53 


Anderson 


72 


7 




62 


Washington 


60 


13 




57 


Lafayette 


49 


14 




50 


Manual 


52 


20 




63 


Muncie 


44 


21 




74 


Howe 


58 


27 




68 


Marion 


53 


28 




76 


Cothedral 


49 


Feb. 3 




57 


Richmond 


46 


4 




63 


Broad Ripple 


50 


10 




53 


Kokomo 


56 


17 




72 


Logansport 


70 


22 


Sectional 










47 


Shortridge 


49 



Nov. 23 


Tech 46 


Warren Centra 


22 


26 


45 


Southport 


39 


Dec. 2 


27 


Frankfort 


35 


9 


42 


New Castle 


33 


15 


38 


Crispus Attucks 


33 


28,29 


City Tourney 






52 


Broad Ripple 


36 




40 


Howe 


35 




33 


Crispus Attucks 
(City Champs) 


31 


Jan. 6 


40 


Anderson 
(Overtime) 


42 


7 


47 


Washington 


32 


13 


40 


Lafayette 


45 


14 


55 


Manual 


30 


20 


39 


Muncie 


35 


21 


46 


Howe 


36 


27 


48 


Marion 


35 


28 


42 


Cathedral 


23 


Feb. 3 


53 


Richmond 


34 


4 


62 


Broad Ripple 


32 


10 


39 


Kokomo 


37 


17 


48 


Logansport 


35 


17 


WINS 


3 LOSSES 





FRESHMAN 


BASKETBALL 






SCHEDULE 




Dec. 1 


Tech 56 


Warren Centra 


36 


6 


56 


Sacred Heart 


20 


13 


41 


Ben Davis 


34 


Jan. 3 


42 


Harry Wood 


28 


7 


38 


Washington 


14 


12 


65 


Broad Ripple 


35 


14 


37 


Manual 


31 


17 


60 


Howe 


29 


21 


36 


Anderson 


51 


23, 24, 26 


City Tourney 






43 


Horry Wood 


25 




46 


Crispus Attucks 


41 




43 


Shortridge 


30 


28 


57 


Cathedral 


29 


Feb. 2 


60 


Shortridge 


33 


4 


54 


Broad Ripple 


45 


7 


54 


Washington 


38 


9 


55 


Southport 


33 


14 


56 


Howe 


44 


16 


58 


Shortridge 
Double overtime) 


56 



WON 



LOST 



70 





AFTER HARD practice nothing is as soothing 
as a whirlpool bath, say Ronald McCauley, 
Larry Deer, Harold Boyd, and James Stonebraker. 



TECH FORWARD, Rein Leetmae, lays-in a two-pointer 
during the Tech-Marion game as Tech's Fred McCoy (R.) 
and helpless Marion defenders look on in amazement. 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALLMEN COULD BOAST A GOOD RECORD 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALL TEAM — 
First Row (left to right): Fred Belser, 
Raymond Carter, James Bryant, Ray- 
mond Alcers, Robert McDaniels. Sec- 
ond Row: Student Manager Charles 
Majors, Gerald Allee, John Morns, 
Ronald Boyd, Charles Peterson, Stu- 
dent Manager Jesse Lynch. Top Row: 
Coach Robert Mehl, Donald Amos, 
Lawrence Bemis, Indulis Breclcmanis, 
James Spaulding. 




-H r 













VARSITY FOOTBALL TEAM— First Row (left to right) : Don Erman, Don- 
ald Seclom, Kent Thomas, Fred McCoy, Paul Renfro, Gerald Glaze, Larry 
Williams, Robert Souders. Second Row: Student Manager Donald Skill- 
man, Richard Johnson, Richard Mace, Robert Pritchett, Jack McKeel, 
Robert Crist, Lowell Ensinger, Ronald McCauley, James Ramsey, Ronald 
McCurry, James Currens, Wilbur Sudbrack. Third Row: Assistant Coach 



Wallace Potter, Head Coach Howard Longshore, William Payne, James 
Roustic, Charles Woodard, Ernest DeMott, Ronald Heaton, Joseph Etchi- 
son, Bennie DeLuca, William Ashcraft, Assistant Coach George Mihal, 
Trainer Howard Catt. Top Row: Wallace Moon, Ronald Rushton, William 
Settles, William Dunlap, Rein Leetmae, James Stonebraker, John Walton, 
John Hunter, Telson Bowman, William Brown. 



GREENCLAD SPIRIT PRODUCES BALANCED FOOTBALL TEAMS 



For the first time in years the Greenclads didn't 

have what is commonly referred to as a 

"one-man team." With the excellent blocking 

and tackling of such sturdy linemen as Bill 

Payne, John Hunter, and Jim Stonebraker, and such 

speedy backfield men as Dick Mace, Fred 

McCoy, and Jack McKeel, the team, under the able 

coaching of Howard Longshore and Line 

Coach Wallace Potter, finished sixth in the 

North Central Conference and ninth in city 

standings. Aiding in the team spirit, 

playing the linebacker spot, Lowell Ensinger kept 

the defensive platoon perking. Although 

ridden by injuries, the first part of 

the fall semester, the boys played hard, 

trying with all they had and enjoying the sport. 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 






FALL 1955 






Jamboree 


Tech 





Manual 


Tech 


6 


Howe 14 


Tech 


6 


Broad Ripple 7 


Tech 


12 


Anderson 20 


Tech 


6 


Muncie Central 


Tech 


6 


Logansport 6 


Tech 


13 


New Castle 


Tech 


7 


Shortridge 20 


Tech 


7 


Washington 6 


Tech 


27 


Lafayette Jeff. 34 



72 




RESERVE FOOTBALL TEAM— First Row (left to right): Michael Daven- 
port, Frank Wolf, Robert Wegener, Frank McKeel, William Crist, Michael 
Baugh, David Williams. Second Row: Robert Woodard, Lawrence Agnew, 
James Polovich, Robert Parsons, Robert Walker, Gerald Sharp, Richard 
Miller, Phillip Patrick, Robert Hoke. Third Row: Student Manager James 



Britton, Robert Beck, Fred McNorton, Maurice Paul, Thomas Davis, 
Dwayne Turner, Donald Bolton, Carl Schmidt, Richard Brown, David 
Pierce, Coach Carlos Bell. Top Row: Harold Gwynn, Leslie Moir, Wayne 
Bowins, William Thomas, Walter Lyons, Terry Jackson, Charles Wenzen- 
read, Charles Senteney, William Hatton, Edward Vaughn. 



RESERVE FOOTBALL 






FALL 1955 




Tech 6 


Broad Ripple 





Tech 


Anderson 


6 


Tech 20 


Southport 





Tech 6 


Crispus Attucks 


6 


Tech 6 


Shortridge 





Tech 12 


Washington 






The 1955 reserve football eleven finished 
tossing the pigskin early in November 
and wound up with an impressive record. 
Only one defeat marred the Greenclads' 
record, a 6-to-0 loss to Anderson. A 
strong Crispus Attucks team tied 
the reserves, 6 to 6. Coaching reserve 
city champions was George Mihal. 



TENSION surely mounts in a football game as a substi- 
tute kneels, ready to enter the game, unidentified play- 
ers on the Tech bench also await their turn to see action. 




"HEADS YOU WIN" the referee seems to say to cap- 
tains of the Tech and Howe football teams as both city 
teams start their initial contest of the fall season. 




T" 






U. . f% 




."I* ~m m," one 




FRESHMAN FOOTBALL TEAM— First Row (left to right) : Jerry O'Brien, 
Bruce Pleok, Milstead Hendricks, Richard Parnell, Willard Finney, Ronald 
Harris, Donald Cox, Ronald Boyd, Michael Crowley, Forest Tolliver. Sec- 
ond Row: Nicholas Gibson, George Howe, Stephen Hair, Assistant Coach 
James Stewart, Minaoff Boacika, Chester Hallinin, William Fields, Noel 
Sandy, Robert Cook, Jerome Perry, Paul Wright, Richard Proffett, William 
Barnes, Phillip Hampton, Byron Gettle, Coach Ernest Medcalfe. Third 



Row: Student Manager Charles Wilson, Paul Ruskoup, Paul McRay, Ken- 
neth Brooks, Homer Jones, James Wade, Frank Rushton, John Dalton, 
Raymond Akers, Richard Lee, Edward Heid, Kenneth Stierwalt, Student 
Manager Phillip Renforth. Top Row: Wendell Turner, Richard Richey, 
John Weliever, John Morris, Jesse Lynch, James Howell, Ronald Hand, 
Howard Kellams, Fred Tingle, John Rogers. 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 
FALL 1955 

Tech 37 Scecina Memorial 6 

Tech 13 Crispus Attucks 

Tech 1 3 Shortridge 

Tech 3 I Washington 7 

Tech 21 Broad Ripple 



If records are any indication as to what the 
future holds, Tech has a bright football 
future. The frosh rolled up I 15 points to 
opponents' 13 in five games. The team, finish- 
ing the season undefeated, was city co- 
champion with Cathedral's undefeated freshmen. 



IT'S A real-for-sure scrimmage 
practice field on the northeast 



taking place on the 
side of the campus. 



JUNIOR HIGH FOOTBALL TEAM— First Row (left to right): Robert Duna- 
way, Michael Cutshaw, Robert Ruddell, David Nickols, Clyde Lucas, Robert 
Munday, Daniel Koehler, William Jordan, David Johnson. Second Row: Ken- 
neth Adams, James Hunt, Myron Shapiro, Larry Corpuz, Ronald Craig, Rob- 
ert Lynn, Darrell Britt, Kenneth Vance, Coach Ivan Moreman. Top Row: 
Joseph Ball, Charles Hedrick, John Byus, Frank Craig, Ronald Moore, Ronald 
Alexander, Russell Hirschy, Duane Mattier. 




74 




WRESTLING TEAM— First Row (left to right): Randall Small, Wendell 
Baker, Ronald Ward, Don Hill, James Ramsey, John Easley, Richard Essel- 
born, James Milton, Bruce Pleak, James DeMott. Second Row: Gerald 
Glaze, Edward Vaughn, Ronald Rushton, Lowell Ensinger, John Hunter, 
Charles Woodard, Homer Jones, Jomes Reeves, Thomas Pollard, James 
Doran, Harvard Gordon, Wilfred Poxton. Third Row: Student Manager 



William Taylor, Gene Bayless, Charles Elliott, Maurice Paul, John Klein, 
John Dalton, Larry Smith, John Weliever, Joe Matricio, James Glaze, 
Student Manager Robert Perry. Top Row: Assistant Coach G. L. Mihol, 
Jerry Spickler, prank Rushton, Thomas Moir, Dwayne Turner, Gary Mc- 
Guire, Bill Dickey, Richard Lee, John Bushfield, Allen Hatton, Head 
Coach William J. Treichler. 



THE WRESTLING TEAM PILED UP CHAMPIONSHIPS GALORE 



Nov. 


22 


Tech 21 






Broad Ripple 


25 


Dec. 


2 


Tech 19 






Shortridge 


21 


Dec. 


6 


Tech 52 






New Castle 





Dec. 


7 


Tech 27 






Anderson 


18 


Dec. 


15-17 


Marion Count') 


Tournament 








Tech 76 






Southport 


67 


Jan. 


3 


Tech 10 






Richmond 


34 


Jan. 


6 


Tech 33 






Muncie 


14 


Jan. 


12 


Tech 25 






Manual 


19 


Jan. 


14 


Four-Way 


Mee 


t 










Crawfords 


v.lle 


91 


Tech 


87 






Kokomo 




75 


Richmond 


65 



VARSITY WRESTLING 



Feb. 4 



Feb. I I 



Feb. 18 



North Central Conference 

Championships 

Tech 78 Lafayette 70 

Champions: Don Hill, 103 lbs.; 
Ronnie Ward, 127 lbs.: Edward 
Vaughn; John Hunter, H. Wt. 



Sectionals 
Tech I 10 (first) 



Shortridge 104 



State Finals 

So. Bend Central 57 Tech 50 (2nd) 
Champions: Don Hill, 103 lbs.; 
Ronnie Ward, 127 lbs.; John 
Hunter, H. Wt. (2nd); Harvard 
Gordon, 175 lbs. (3rd); Wendell 
Baker, 120 lbs. (4th). 



VARSITY BASEBALL 
SCHEDULE 

April 4 Tech 12 Southport 2 

5 4 Ben Davis 3 

10 8 Washington 2 

12 19 Muncie Central 3 

I 7 Cancelled Crispus Attucks 

19 I At Laf. Jeff. 2 

24 4 Richmond I 

26 5 New Castle I 

May I 4 Marion I 

( Press Deadline) 



BASEBALL TEAM— First Row (left to right): Richard Frost, James Gait, 
Lee Hayes, Jon McKeel, Robert Nieman, Frank McKeel. Second Row: 
Student Manager Phillip Renforth, Henry Werking, Keith Pritchard, Ron- 
ald McCouley, Larry Deer, Terry Kinley, Student Manager Thomas 



Pollard. Top Row: Coach Charles Moos, Albert Kramer, Joe Etchison, 
Larry Bemis, Jerry Whitaker, Kenneth Schriener, Donald Ermon, Coach 
Jack Brodford. 




75 




VARSITY TRACK TEAM— In Front: Student Manager Scott Teets. First 
Row (left to right): Fred Hubbard, Robert Walker, Richard Mace, 
Fred McCoy, Donald Engle, Raymond Carter, Melvin McGuire, William 
Bradford, Larry Paxton, Richard Johnson, Robert Woodard. Second Row: 
Robert Bruce, Larry Williams, Robert Pritchett, Rein Leetmae, Floyd 



Romack, Eddie Hannon, James Bledsoe, Roscoe Fields, David Pierce, 
Donald Hubbard. Top Row: Assistant Coach Wallace Potter, Arnold 
Gilliam, James Stonebraker, Robert Bullock, Ronnie Ruston, Clarence 
Robinson, William Dunlop, James Toler, Thomas Harris, Wade Walton, 
Head Coach James E. Stewart. 



OUR ENERGETIC TRACK TEAMS ARE WINNERS! 



Boasting a powerfully balanced team was 
Tech's varsity track squad. Under the 
tutelage of Coach James Stewart, the cinder- 
men were undefeated in dual meets all 
season. Individually the thinly dads, led 
by seniors Fred McCoy, Dick Mace, and Jim 
Stonebraker, were undefeated in their 
respective events in dual meets. 



VARSITY TRACK SCHEDULE 



Apr. 3 










Tech 


84 


Washington 


32 


5 












84 


Warren Central 


31 


13 












blYz 


Shortridge 


48% 


17 












5bV 2 


At Anderson 


52^2 


20 


Shor 


tridc 


e 


77, 


Tech 


55 


Indianapolis Relays 




24 












86j/ 2 


Kokomo 


22H 


27 


Tech, 


67, 


Sr 


or! 


ridge 


48 


City 




May 5 


(Press 


dec 


idl 


ne 


) 




Conference 





76 




•# ' ' •# i . 'J .# X 








RESERVE TRACK TEAM— In Front: Student Manager Phillip Meyer. 
First Row (left to right): Thomas Ramsey, Ernest DeMott, Gilbert 
Sprecker, Roger Scrivener, Ernest Vaughn, David Williams, David Wilson, 
Edward McFarland. Second Row: William Hatton, Karl Schmidt, Larry 



Horton, Melvin Stafford, Richard L. Brown, Michael Baugh, Larry Smith. 
Top Row: Coach Wallace Potter, Charles Hart, Grady Jackson, Felson 
Bowman, Thomas Davis, James Perry, Dwight Turner, Havard Gordon. 



FRESHMAN TRACK SCHEDULE 

Apr. 13 Tech 39 Shortridge 6S 



18 82 Washington 

May I Attucks 

3 Howe 

9 C.ty 

( Press Deadline) 



35 



FRESHMAN TRACK— First Row (left to right): Kenneth Brown, Woodrow Ano, Paul Scates, 
Franklin Boyless, Wendell Turner, Donald Nei II, Robert McKinsey, Phillip Whiteman, William 
Dickey, Richard Esselborn. Second Row: Ronald Harris, Richard Parnell, John Dalton, Frank 
Rushton, Indulis Brikmanis, Steven Steinbuck, George Howe, Frank Lotz, Melvin Bradford. 
Top Row: Coach Howard Longshore, John Weliever, Charles Hess. William Crowley, Noel Sandy, 
Charles Howard, Bruce Pleak, David Maxwell, James Howell, Coach Carlos Bell. 




77 




TENNIS TEAM — Kneeling (left to right): Tom Strain, Larry Deuser, Ross Helft, Charles Anderson, Ronald White, James Glaze. Standing: David 
Butcher, Kenneth King, John Miller, Kenneth Carson, William Green, Coach Rowland Leverenz, Alan Summers, William Randall, William Dollinger. 



OUR GOLF AND TENNIS TEAMS ARE DEVELOPING POWER 



Golf and tennis teams, though they had 
mediocre records when the Cannon went to 
press, are looking forward to greener 
pastures next year. Both Ernest Medcalfe 
and Rowland Leverenz, golf and tennis 
coaches respectively, lost nearly all of 
their lettermen through graduation, last 
spring. A building year, both coaches 
are developing a nucleus for next season. 



VARSITY TENNIS SCHEDULE 





April 10 Tec 


h 3 Pork 2 






17 


1 Cathedral 6 






23 


Shortridge 7 






19 


7 C.A. 






26 2 


Lafayette Jeff. 5 






VARSITY GOLF SCHEDULE 




April 12 




April 21 




Cathedral 


326 Shortridge 329 


Shortridge 320 


Martinsville 339 


Howe 351 


Tech 360 


Washington 343 


Tech 354 


April 13 




April 23 




Tech 3I/2 


Broad Ripple l4l/ 2 


Broad Ripple 344 


Tech 346 


April 18 




Bloomington 365 


Wiley (T.H.) 366 


Tech 31/2 


Anderson 8'/2 


April 26 




April 19 




Tech 3 


Logansport 12 


Tech 4I/2 


Kokomo lO 1 ,^ 


(Press D 


eadline ) 



GOLF TEAM — Kneeling (left to right): Richard Anderson, Thomas Farson, Coach Ernest Medcalfe. 
Standing: Louis Bluhm, Joe Teets, Cortland Carrington, Jerry Miller, David Bowman, Robert Blume. 



78 





CROSS COUNTRY TEAM— Front Row (left to right): Mel Stafford, Ray- 
mond Hand, Clarence Robinson, William Paxton, Don Hubbard, Ray 
Schroder, Paul Harden, Floyd Romack, David Wilson, Robert Bruce, Joe 



Timbs, James Holder. Rear Row: David Thatcher, Gilbert Sprecker, Ron- 
nie Perry, Norman Howe, Larry Horton, James Perry, James Bledsoe, 
Robert Sterrett. Paul E. Myers is coach. 



During the fall weather, a strong October wind blows fresh air into young 
athletes' lungs while boys keep a steady pace over Tech paths covered by 
leaves in a sport called cross country. Running two miles over irregular 
ground strengthens the indurance that the cross country sguad needs for 
interscholastic competition. Last fall Tech runners had a difficult schedule 
running against teams which ranked in the state's top ten. With six of the 
seven top boys on the varsity sguad returning, the future holds a shining star. 



VARSITY CROSS COUNTRY 

1955 



Washington 25 


Tech 


31 


Marion 20 


Tech 


3^ 


Muncie Central 19 


Tech 


V- 


Anderson 19 


Tech 


39 


Tech 27 


Muncie Burns 


28 


Tech 19 


Richmond 


36 


Shortridge Invitational 






Anderson, first: Tech, 


fourteenth. 





City Meet 

Shortridge, first; Tech, second. 

North Central Conference Meet 
Anderson, first; Tech, fourth. 

Sectionals 

Shortridge, first: Tech, second. 

State Meet 

Anderson, first: Tech, twelfth. 



PRACTICING on the cross country course on the campus ore David Wilson, 
James Holder, Robert Bruce, Raymond Hand, Raymond Schroder, Don 
Hubbard, and Floyd Romack, who proved that practice does make perfect. 




79 




CHEER LEADERS — Kneeling (left to right) : Jo Decenzo, Norma Worth, Barbara Coleman, Maureen Schmidt. Standing: 
Jerry Griffin, Sharon Rice, Marilyn Farmer, Max Wilson, Sandra Pollard, Janice Hankins, Elmer Bunce. Sponsors: Misses 
Sharon and Shirley Farrett. 




UP AND AWAY go members of a Physico 
Education class during the rope climb. The 
boys take their slips and slides learning the 
fine points of the task under Instructor Wil- 
liam Treichler. 

MR. WILLIAM Lampert, Tech shop teacher, 
who issues athletic equipment to athletes, is 
issuing uniforms to candidates of the footba 
and cross country squads for their respective 
sports. 



80 



WE BUILD STRONG BODIES 
TO HAVE HAPPY TEEN-AGERS 

All types of activities make up a well- 
rounded Health and Physical Education pro- 
gram. Boys and girls build healthy 
bodies by taking Physical Education and 
Physical Fitness, one credit in each course 
being required for graduation. They be- 
come well adjusted both mentally and phys- 
ically to fit into the pattern of their com- 
munity by enrolling in courses in Posture, 
Physiology, Narcotics, Nursing, Family Living, 
Child Care, and Driver Training. The phi- 
losophy of the school is that youth must 
be strong physically as well as mentally. 




MEMBERS OF A Posture class, striving to develop good 
posture, balance books as they climb Stuart Hall steps. 



BLOCK T CLUB— First Row (left to right) : Larry Williams, James Milton, 
Don Hubbard, David Duerson, Richard Mace, Jerry Glaze, Wendell 
Baker, John Easley, James Ramsey, Don Hill. Second Row: Fred Metzger, 
Dan Logan, Bob Bruce, Ronnie McCauley, Fred McCoy, Kent Thomas, 
Wilfred Paxton, Robert Sauders, Eddie Hannon, Henry Woods. Third 



Row: Henry Werking, Ronnie McCurry, Robert Nieman, Terry Kinley, 
Joe Timbs, Bob Pritchett, Ray Schraeder, Ed Vaughn, Dave Wilson, 
Randall Small, William Payne. Top Row: Kenneth Schnener, David 
Dagwell, Lowell Ensinger, Ronnie Rushton, Jon McKeel, Rein Leetmae, 
Floyd Romack, John Hunter, William Dunlop, Harold Boyd, James Toler. 



TfcTlTiT T 

T 

: T T f 



AT THE HELM OF OUR SCHOOL IS A MAN WE ALL ADMIRE 




OUR PRINCIPAL, Mr. Hanson H. Anderson, is very popular with all of us because of his friendly cordiality. 



82 



WORKING WITH HIM ARE OUR SUPERINTENDENT AND COUNCIL 




THE SENIOR COUNCIL— First Row (left to right): Presidents Keith 
Bailey, James Hawkins, Phillip A. Jones, Ross Meyer, Charles Rippy, 
Charles Webb, David Dagwell. Second Row: Vice Presidents Barbara 
Coleman, Barbara Duke, Ruth Ann Loudermilk, Kaye Noble, Barbara 
Rodocker, Daine Zvejnieks, (not shown) Judith Gilstrap. Third Row: Sec- 
retaries Evonne Parker, Alice Kehling, Kathryn Dellinger, Ann Harger, 



James Burke, Patricia Rush, Linda Wainscott. Fourth Row: Treasurers Ann 
Bobo, Richard H. Davis, James Hirschy, Joseph Kurz, Thomas Reddick, 
Jerry Risk, John Trimpe. Top Row: Sergeants-at-arms Robert E. Berry, 
Nicki Farley, Donald E. Hill, Larry McManus, Bill K. Realey, Robert 
Souders, David Woempner. 



We, the people — we, the principal, the 
five vice-principals, the 248 faculty 
members, and the 35 senior council mem- 
bers who represent a class of 803 
industrious seniors — take the lead in 
sustaining a well-balanced educational 
and social program for 4,528 teen-agers, 
in furthering the freedoms we enjoy, 
and in cherishing our great American 
heritage. Working with us in this 
effort are a well-gualified office 
staff of 16 efficient members 
and 8 faculty assistants. We all 
work together in an effort to main- 
tain the American Way of Education. 



MR. ANDERSON and Dr. Herman L. Shibler, general 
superintendent of schools, must certainly be enjoying a 
good joke as they have a friendly chat in the office. 




83 




ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF (left to right): C. L. McClintock, vice principal; Herman T. Hinshaw, vice 
principal; Hanson H. Anderson, principal; Earl W. Ensinger, vice principal; Mrs. Martha A. Turpin, dean 
of girls; Fred R. Gorman, vice principal. 




BESIDE the Christmas tree at the White 
Christmas Hop are Mr. and Mrs. Anderson. 



MR. ANDERSON talks at the Rotary Club. 





DEPARTMENT HEADS AND DIRECTORS— First Row (left to right). De- 
partment Heads Charles C. Martin, Modern Language; Fred H. Gil- 
lespie, Commercial; Dr. Clare F. Cox, Biological Sciences; H. Floyd Fye, 
Electrical: Warren E. Cleveland, Drafting; James B. Rose, Physical Sci- 
ence; William R. Eddy, Metal Trades; Reuben Behlmer, Physical Education 
and Health. Second Row: Department Heads Helen Thornton, English; 
William F. Moon, Music: Oakley E. Richey, Art; George R. Barrett, Print- 
ing; Oka S. Flick, Social Studies; Hilda Kreft, Home Economics; George 



L. Lone, Auto Shop: Robert Belding, Mathematics; Noris Eckelberry, 
Junior High Chairman. Top Row: Mary Louise Mann, head librarian; Ivan 
A. Hanen, Building Trades head; Kenneth Barr, Visual Education Director: 
Ella Sengenberger, Publications Director; Fred N. Reeder, Assistant Pro- 
gram Director; Chelsea S. Stewart, Program Production Director; Paul W. 
Wetzel, Evening School Director; Charles P. Dagwell, Athletic Director; 
Herman Z. Denzler, Coordinator; Odus A. Landreth, Reclassification 
Director; John Paul Lahr, Distributive Education Coordinator. 



SCHOOL DAYS, busiest spots on the campus are teachers' workrooms. 



NO LOAD is seemingly too heavy for Mr. Kendrick 




85 



NO WONDER WE TEEN-AGERS ARE SO PROUD OF OUR SCHOOL 




FACULTY— First Row (left to right): Ralph E. Clark, Clyde Armel, Floyd 
Bill ington, H. E. Chenoweth, Mrs. Louise Camp, Mrs. Florence Boots, 
Olive Brown, Katherine Book, Mrs. Edith Berry, Helen Caffyn, Arete 
Covey, Howard Catt. Second Row: Carlos Bell, Dorothy Carey, Edith 
Allen, Emanuel Cruser, Harold Elliott, Sara Ewing, Mrs. Mildred Eccles- 
ton, Mrs. Alice D. Cook, Mrs. Jeanne Bose, Mildred Corrie, Jack Bradford, 
Frank Atherton. Third Row: Sam Dudkowski, Frances Buschmann, Pearl 



Apland, Ann Abbott, Constance Boldman, Edith Baker, Winifred Brill, 
Hortense Braden, Ruth Bozell, Lester Bolander, John R. Clark, Raymond 
Brandes. Top Row: Kenneth Coffin, James Butler, Garold Bramblett, Clif- 
ford Allen, Norman Bnnker, Mahlon Carlock, Harold Deem, Fred Ahle- 
meyer, Howard Cook, S. B. Essig, Forrest Caldwell, Louis Allen, Betty 
Alice Bayfield. Not Pictured: Gaylord Allen, Frieda Ann Bach, William 
Breedlove, Alice Brown, Mrs. Barbara Dearing. 




86 



OFFICE STAFF— Seated (left to right): Mrs. Ruth Smith, attend- 
ance; Mrs. Ruth Berryman; Miriam Howe, school secretary; Mrs. Elsie 
Wilcox, attendance; Barbara Cleverly; Damor Eubanks. Standing: 
Mrs. Hermanda Metzger, registrar; Norma Rodewald, assistant reg- 
istrar; Mrs. Edna Ayres; Patricia Littell; Mrs. Helen Cloud; Mrs. 
Dorothy Armel; Mrs. Rosalynne Yarnell; Louisa Steeg, guidance; Mrs. 
Adah Wallace; Mrs. Margaret Barrett, P.B.X. operator. 



FACULTY ASSISTANTS — Seated (left to right): Mrs. Josephine 
Schlenck, Mrs. Olga Geisler, Mrs. Bertha Brooks, Patricio Mayer. 
Standing: Linzie Cox, Mrs. Evelyn Mottingly, Mrs. Mary Van Buskirk, 
Mrs. Esther McCleerey. 




OUR FACULTY AND SCHOOL PERSONNEL ARE SECOND TO NONE 



Although our faculty is large and 
has diversified interests, it is 
a friendly group. Mornings mem- 
bers can be seen talking and 
laughing together as they empty 
their office boxes. When we 
students see the beautifully decor- 
ated tables in Stuart Hall tower 
or the Student Center we often wish 
that we, too, could attend the 
colorful teas and coffee hours. 
Our faculty is the guiding force 
of our school; it is molding young 
America into typical Americans. 




OUR OFFICE STAFF has the happy faculty of planning 
Coffee Hours for the teachers the afternoon before the 
Christmas holidays and at the close of the fall semester. 




FACULTY— First Row (left to right): Mrs. Avo Hadley, Mrs. Eva Lycan, 
Mrs. Ressie Fix, Gertrude Insley, Mrs. Rowena Graub, R.N., Mrs. Mildred 
Johnston, R.N., Sarah Hope, Marjorie Lawson, Social Service, Mrs. Mari- 
lyn Hardwick, Mrs. Conna Hawkins, Mrs. Clarena Huffington, Mrs. Betty 
Hungerford, Mrs. Jean Ann Graves, Social Service, John Golish. Second 
Row: Mrs. Mary Furry, Elsie Heavilin, Frances Longshore, Edward Howe, 
Warren Haas, Stewart Joyce, Rowland Leverenz, Wilmer Lawrence, 
Newell Hall, Raymond Hornaday, William Herbst, Frances Lyons. Thi"d 



Row: Mrs. Hazel Kuetemeier, Mrs. Marian Holly, Marguerite Hardy, Mrs. 
Vera Kilborn, Anna Kellum, Mrs. Elizabeth Holtsclow, Mrs. Lois Laing, 
Mrs. Mary Lou Little, John Farley. Maurice Kriese, William Graney, 
Frances Kinsley, Mrs. Marilyn Gilbert. Top Row: Howard Longshore, Karl 
Kolp, William Lampert, William Hawley, Cyrus Lancaster, Scott McCoy, 
Josephine Graf, Beldon Leonard, John Kendrick, Charles Glore, J. C. 
Harger, Fred Henke. Not Pictured: Vance Garner, Mrs. Marysue Gray, 
William Kimberlin, Mrs. Dorothy Lyon. 



87 




FACULTY — First Row (left to right): Halcyon Mendenhall, Margaret 
Remy, Frances Potter, Helen Noffke, Louise Padou, Jennie Dea Moton, 
Mrs. Marilyn Moneyhun, Mrs. Marcia Miles, Sharon Parrett, Shirley Par- 
rett, Rosemary McGuire, Mrs. Effie McDougall, Mrs. Ethel Mcintosh. 
Second Row: Marion Overman, Ralph Minnick, Robert Maloy, Irene Mc- 
Lean, Mary Elizabeth Moore, Lorena Phemister, Mary Marshall, Edna 
Maley, Anna Parker, Margaret Peterson, Edward Madinger, Houston 



Meyer. Third Row: Walter Reagan, Joseph Powderly, Clarence Rosell, 
Don Patterson, Wallace Potter, Helen Pearson, Robert Offutt, Mable 
McHugh, Mrs. Joan Persell, Donald Miller, Ernest Medcalfe, E. V. Ruther- 
ford, Russell Sands. Top Row: Paul Myers, Burton Malott, Charles Maas, 
Lewis Pence, Richard Peeler, Robert Mehl, Ivan Moreman, George Mihal, 
Sy Perszyk, Mrs. Ermal Monninger, Werner Monninger, Richard Orton. 
Not Shown: Betty Mansfield, Mary Maillard, Irene Rhodes. 




FOR THE annual fall tea in Stuart Hall Tower, honor- 
ing new members on the faculty, the gorgeous centerpiece 
for the table was a horn of plenty and orange candles. 



RETIRED TEACHERS ASSOCIATION— First Row (left to right): Irma 
Bachman, Mrs. Edwin Baker, Helen Murray, Emily McCullough, Olive 
Beckington, Lucille Hubbs, Grace Bryan, Lyle Harter. Second Row: Clara 
Ryan, Edna Nowland, Louise Sturdevant, James Shannon, Mrs. Lillian 
Harrison, Edwin Baker, Adeline Barnett, Nettie Gilmore, Olive Traylor, 
Mrs. Arthur Hoffman. Third Row: Mrs. Jacob Jones, Arthur Hoffman, 
Mrs. Geraldine Moorman, Zila Robbins, Mrs. Milo H. Stuart, Mrs. Ann 
Smith Kessel, Clarrisa Morrow. Top Row: A. C. Boren, Jacob Jones, 
Charles Brosey, Roy Matthews, Herbert Kessel, Al Lagemann, Mrs. 
H. H. Anderson. 




THE FACULTY HONORS 
OUR EXCHANGE TEACHER 




\ i 1 •■kI 




IN THE receiving line at the Coffee Hour which the 
Language department gave for Mr. and Mrs. Hein- 
rich Veltrup are Mr. Anderson, Mrs. Anderson, Mrs. 
Veltrup, Mr. Veltrup, exchange teacher from Ger- 
many, Mr. Charles Martin. 



MISS ADALINE BARNETT, formerly a language 
teacher, pours at the Coffee Hour which honors 
the Veltrups. 



FACULTY— First Row (left to right): Mrs. Gladys Tyndall, Mrs. Wilhel- 
mina Smitha, Jeanette Tobey, Jane Strain, Marjorie Schoch, Marilyn 
Thomas, Mrs. Mary Smuck, Edith Silver, Mrs. Dorothy Van Brunt, Mrs. 
Muriel Tucker, Lois Sink, LaVon Whitmire, Elma Sullivan, Mabelle 
Sprague. Second Row: Merrill Wilson, Floyd Tobrocke, Dorothy Steele, 
Evelyn Truedson, Louise Swan, Frances Shaw, Mrs. Elizabeth Stephenson, 
Jean Wells, Alto Welch, Mona Woodward, Mrs. Carol Wilson, Margaret 
Waters, Walter Shaw, Blanche Williams, R.N. Third Row: SFC Louis 



Wade, M/Sgt. Arthur Lardon, Heinrich Veltrup, M/Sgt. Claude Dixon, 
Harry Sullivan, John M. White, William Treichler, John Stoeckinger, John 
Wythe, Earl Terry, Fred L. Wilson, Kermit Swenson, Dale Sore. Top Row: 
V. D. Whetstine, Ithel Shoemaker, Paul Vogt, Harry Stone, Morris Woods, 
Ralph Wolverton, Harold Stewart, A. C. Van Arendonk, James Stewart, 
Paul Wadleigh, Samuel Skomp, Jules Zinter, Harold Wilfong, Delbert 
West, Norman Schneider. Not Pictured: Edmund Schildknecht, Mrs. Ruth 
Stafford, Ellen Louise Stoy. 




89 



WE INTRODUCE TO YOU OUR 35 SENIOR OFFICERS, OUR 
SEVEN SPONSORS, AND OUR 808 CLASS MEMBERS 



SPONSOR 

ROOM 

190 



SPONSOR 

ROOM 

153 



SPONSOR 

ROOM 

195 



SPONSOR 

ROOM 
5 



SPONSOR 

ROOM 

300 




KEITH B. BAILEY BARBARA A. COLEMAN M. ANN BOBO 

President Vice-President Treasurer 



JAMES E. BURKS 
Secretary 



ROBERT E. BERRY MISS MONA WOODWARD 
Sergeant-at-Arms Sponsor 




^y 



DAVID D. DAGWELL BARBARA E. DUKE RICHARD H. DAVIS KATHRYN DELLINGER NICKI L FARLEY MISS FRANCES KINSLEY 



Secretary 



Sergeant-at-Arms 



Sponsor 




JAMES L HAWKINS JUDITH E. GILSTRAP JAMES C HIRSCHY ANN HARGER 

President Vice-President Treasurer Secretary 



DONALD E. HILL MISS EDITH ALLEN 

Sergeant-at-Arms Sponsor 




DUH^H m 



PHILLIP A. JONES RUTH ANN LOUDERMILK JOSEPH C. KURZ ALICE J. KEHLING LARRY G. MC MANUS MISS LOIS SINK 

President Vice-Prestdent Treasurer Secretary Sergeant-at-Arms Sponsor 




ROSS E. MEYEF 
President 



KAYE E. NOBLE 
Vice-President 



THOMAS E. REDICK 
Treasurer 



EVONNE J. PARKER 
Secretary 



BILL K. REALEY MISS ALTA WELCH 

Sergeant-at-Arms Sponsor 



90 



SPONSOR 

ROOM 

7 







CHARLES L RIPPY BARBARA RODOCKU-; JERRY C RISK H PATRICIA RUSH H. ROBERT SOUDCHS MISS IRENE RHODES 

President Vice-Presidenl Trad Seci- it Head Sponsor 



SPONSOR 

ROOM 
6 




HARLES C WEBB DAINE A. ZVEJNIEKS JOHN R. TRIMPE l.INDA H WA1NSCOTT DAVID W. WOEMPNER MISS JEAN .'. 

Presidonl Vice President Treasurer Secret. uy Sergeant at Arm 1 . Sponsor 



MEMORIES OF OUR SENIOR YEAR 










NANCY A ALBRIGHT 

■VI 







DAVID D. ALDRICH PATRIC 



r 

N I ALEXANDER JAJ RONALD T. ALSTOTT CHA1" EHSON HELEf 






II ROBERT E BACON AN JUDITH J 




MABEL E BAKER NANCY A BALAY DONALD R BAIXAHD CAROLYN S BARNARD JUDITH A BARNES V ARNES 



91 



ARLEEN BAUDEND1STEL JOSEPH W. BAUER KAREN L BAUER DONALD BEASLEY PHYLLIS J. BECKLEY STEPHEN R BEHLMER BARBARA L BELL 





SHARON L BERGDOL.1. LA VONNE BERGMAN PHYLLIS J. BERRY ROY A. BERRY TOBIE ANN BE£ JERI BOYD I. BIDDLECOMBE 



mm, 





f~\ jp ,* n WE REMEMBER . . . THE SOUND OF THE GAVEL 

v- ( 1 I __ 

mm t\, f\ \ Vv 

DONNA : BISHOP EUNICE M BISHOP AMI MOP JERRY L BIVENS 

MARLI... GLENDA E. BLEDSOE JAMES M. BLEDSOE JUDITH C. BOHANNON JAMES E, BOLES VIJA G. BOtSTEINS JANICE K. BONNET 





MARTIN E. BIEMER 



/KNS UNA B. BLACK L 






)STIC 'HAEL R, BOYLAN ELVIN E. BRANHAM JACK A. BRANKLE KAREN K. ! RBARA BRAUGHTON 




NORMAN J BRENNER G BREWEB LAWRENCE W. BREWER DORIS M BRONSON HELEN M BROOKS ALFRED C. BROWN DORIS J. BROWN 



92 



K*$my*. 



hi'. IWN It: M. BROWN 



;GER ROBERT BUCH 



. M KUCY 




LOUISE BURGESS Hi *N HA( • DOr; ' 

HOW PROUD WE WERE OF OUR SENIOR COLORS 




NANCY L 



tt» Km* . 

:NS JAMES A. CANATSEY JUDITH A CANGANY WILLIAM E CARLOCK 






11 



T"3J%*£ 



▲wa 




4k mM*it 



t Jil 





v 






r 

• T 







PATRICIA M CLARK iST 



93 










' Ml I. I NAHUE 




ESPEC 



'I p; S IMMOND DAVID I lUERSON WAI.TIJ; i DUIT BPRTHA J DUFFY 



94 



'NN IN MA) 













THOSE MORNING RIDES TO SCHOOL 



fei tanfaDCDQiQ 




N 






&1fctittfc 



[( >B1 RT H 



ROMONA M HNNELL JA 



lit <tfk 



R SHIRLEY A PISIIER DAVID i 




SHIRLEY FITZGERALD HELENA ; DONALD TLOYD CHAI- ■ NN LORLTTA M FODDRILI 



95 




V/.£ 



SB1RE 



JAMES W FOSGATE BEVERLY DIANE M. FOSTER JO ANN 



YNDA A FOSTER BARBARA E FOUST GENE W. FOUTS 




M 



m mm^^h * ■■■■ ■ Hi i Jt. l 

HOWARD T FRANKE PHYLLIS FRANKHOUSE WALTER D. FRANZ ANNA B. FREDERICK ROBERT L. FREE GEORGE E. FREEBERG DONALD L FRE 




LYN J FRENCH JAMES S FREY PATRICIA J FULLER SAROLI 



MARGIE A. GARBERT RONALD C. GAERTNER JANICE L. GALLION 




W f5 




********* 

PHILLIP C. GARRETT EUGENE GARRISON MARY E. GARRISON SHIRLEY L. GATES GEORGIA M GFIS YVONNE C. GIFF< 

i ^ 



THE IMPRESSIVE "PASSING OF THE TORCH" 







ELLOIS1 



*Y ANN GILLIAM G. RAY GINN ROSEMARY GLASS CYNTHIA J GLOVER ENOS E. GODWIN DAVID L GOLAY 




IE 

JOHN W GOFDY LORETTA M. GOULD BETTY LOU GRADY ROBERT C GRAMSE THOMAS W GRANNIS CAI 




KAY D GRAY 



96 



RICHARD D GREEN MICHAEL J GRIFFIN JERRY N GRIP JANICE I • ROBERT J. GROVE 




ELIZABETH L HARRIS J 



m: V 

1ARRIS KENNETH D. HARRISON WILLIAM L. HARRISON DON L HART 



THOSE BRAIN-TEASING SCHOLARSHIP TESTS 





JOYCE L. HAWKINS MARILYN R HAWKINS WILLIAM H HAWKINS THOMAS W HAYES 










MiM i 




ROBERT A HENDERSON 'IFINDRICKS GEORGE E HENRY JULIA A. HERMAN GLEN!. 'KAY! 



97 



4NCY B HICKEY GRACE ELLEN HINES JOHN L. HOARD JAMES R HOBES WILLIAM H. HODNETT JAMES E. HOLDER 









£m» 'flk 



>► ■*>" % T>. 






BERNELL E. HOLLAND HELEN J. HOLMES RICHARD A HOLMES JERRY SUE HOOVER PAUL K. HOOVER SHARON D. HOPP ROBERT R. HOPWOOD 






Li \ f 



cr * 

H 



i 



( 



SUSANNE E. HORNING MARILYN HOUGHLAND SHIRLEY A. HOUSTON CONCHITA K HOWELL CAROLYN M HUBBARD, FREDERICK D HUBBARD JULIA A, HUDSON 



^ ft* 

'&)),-,& 



1ft& 




CHEERING AT OUR EXCITING GAMES 









ROBERT N. HUDSON JACK N. HUEY WILLIAM LEONARD HUFF WILLIAM LOUIS HUFF ALICE J. HI 



MARTHA M HUGHES DONNA J. HUMPHREY 








JOHN W. HUNTER JAMES E HURLEY BARBARA L Hi. JERRY L HUSER JANET L, HUTSON DAVID E HUTTON JOHN E. HUYBERS 



JOHN W. HUN JAMES E HURLEY 




t 




JAMES P HYNDS JANET L. ILLY WILLIAM R IMEL LINDA LOU IMLAY C. SUE INMAN SANDRA S. IRELAND DONN R. JACKSON 



98 




LORETTA A JENKINS BETTY MAE JOHNSON BEVERLY A JOHNSON LINDA J 



HNSON MARTHA A JOHNSON MARVIS 




RANDALL W JOHNSON SHIRLEY A. JOHNSON MARCIA A JOHNSTON BARBARA A JONES DONALD R JONES JUDITH D. JONES M ROBERT JONES 



SAYING "CHEESE" FOR SENIOR PICTURES 







HDSON 



JOHN 



CAROLYN J KLARBY DANIEL C 




a**^ 




REX I 



MAI i 





NNA K LINDA I. KIPLIN I ,NNA J KIRKMON JAMES KIRKPATRICK JUT \M CONNIE IO 



99 



'T® C ^"^ W 





RAIMONDS 1 KLAGISS BARBARA K KLEPFER 



KNORR MYRON C. KOEHRING CARL W KOPP JOHN S. KOT JANE E. KRAUS 



*^mf 




T^fi"' 



i } k 



DONNA D. KREIMER DONNA C. KR1BBS RAYMOND E. KRIESE LORRETTA A KUHLER JAMES V LACEY BARBARA E. LAKIN D. IRAD LANE 



V 











\ 



SPORTING OUR NEW SENIOR RINGS 








DONA MARIS J. LEIKARTS KITTY 




.EROY D LEVERSEN ROSALIE J. LEWIS JANIS I.IEPNIEKS NANCY C LIGHT 




JAM' 



OGAN BOBBIE J LONG CHARLES E. LONG MARY JANE I.OUDERMILK THOMAS A. LOW 







CAROLE J. LOV. MARTHA L LOYD JUDITH A LUCAS NORMA F. LUCAS HELEN L. LUKE DANNY L LUNSFORD JOHN C LUTZ 



100 



WILLIAM R LYNCH JIMMY J LYNN JAMI 



JOHN R MCALLISTER DONALD I! MC AULLY JUDY C MCAUI.EY NORMA J MCCALUP 







DANIEL MCCALLLSTEH PAULA MCCAMMON JUDITH C MCCLAIN CAROL MCCLARREN STANLEY A MC CLIMON CHERRY MCCORMACK FRED D MCCOY 



THE FUN OF TRADING SENIOR PICTURES 





JOHN MCCRAY MAI- A • ANIEL MARGARET MC DANIEL JUDITH MC FARI.AND MI 



GUIRE JON S M< 




KENNETH I MAI ERED MASUCCIO CHARLES T MA 1 1 AN MATTHEWS MORTON MATTING!'.' 



101 




CHARLES I MOODY ALBERT MOORF JACK L MOORE 



lOORE MARY R MORGAN RALPH r MORRIS DAPRH.L MORRISON 



OUR DAZZLING, COLORFUL SKETCHBOOK 




■■1 — m — 

SHARON K MURRAY LAWRENCE W MYERS RALPH NEFELE SAMUEL FvTUERMAN ANNA NFIJMEISTER MARY L NEWSON 




1 I 




NICELY KAREN L NICHOLS ROBERT A NIEMAN THOMAS I. NIEMAN CARL NIFRMANN SARAH R. NIX REX E NORI F 



(02 



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I'M 




INC JERALD H NUNN MAUREEN D OBRIEN WILIAPEAN OLIV! 

IB 



GEORC' 

■1 




\l«4 

bennii c page 



ON PA1CELY PARISHO RO: N ROBEh ! A. PARSONS PATERSON 




WILLIAM A. PAYNE MAH ; I I NCE 111. I I IROSE I PER I iNS ; RY KENN! I I RMAfv 



BEING MEASURED FOR OUR CAPS AND GOWNS 




Mill v^EY 



103 







ES MARY ■/. REEVES RIC 



RUTH M. RETTIG CARL G. RICE ROBERT E. RICHARDS 

r 




PATTY L ROSS BA 



KENNETH R. ROWE NORMAN P. ROWE MARTHA M. ROWLAND ROl 



GEORGE I. RUDBECK 




THE BULL SESSION FOR THE BOYS 




■i 



* *- 



jg* •%., 




t 




LLY B. RUSSELL PA' 




m\ "0k 





- 




LEE PAULINE SANDERS VIRGINIA H SARVER REBECCA SCARBOROUGH VELMA L. SCHAKEL 






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^ 



4* 



EMMA L. SCHEFFLER A. LI IRER MAURFEN SCHMIDT FRED SCHOWENGERE 



SCHRADER Ki 



HRL'INER DON G SCHWIND 



104 






GERALP E SCOTT ROBERT L SCOTT WA: .DAM WILLIAM T SETTLES JON t> 




i*^ 



IMON KATHEI.EEN SIMS NC A 



II r:TON RUTH F. S1NNETT HENI 






THE COLLEGE TEA FOR THE GIRLS 







j 






105 




L DAVID SMITH LINDA LEA SMITH LINDA LEE SMITH MARY A. SMITH 




MITH PATRICIA C SMITH RONAI \) D. SMITH 






L^A^i V m * 




SHIRLEY R. SMITH EA1 ERGER EEVERLY SNODGRASS JACQULYN S. SPARKS DONALD E SPEARS PATRICIA A. SPEITEL EDWARD SPRINGER 




DENNIS R SQUIER KEITH W. STACKHOUSE NEI SON 



■V<ER GEN 



4&>yft**^ 



L*J 




THE GOOD FOOD AT OUR CLASS PICNIC 



JUi 



I 



Alt 



:■:.. TING JAI ftKER JUDITH : TON DELC 





JAN 



" ' AILS JAM! A IN I '■! HA: . NEY 



106 





KAREN A TAYLOR RICHARD L TAYLOR ROCER H TAYLOR 



IE 



■' HRY ALBERTEKN THOMAS CA 




. 



N LOIS 






ON <': : ■ 



MONA M TOI.IVER HENRY C TOWNES V RXNOTTA TRAINER ROBERT D TBAPANI MARTHA J. TRENT < SLEB STANLEY R TROUT 



THE EXCITEMENT OF HONOR DAY 




JAMES A TRULOCK NANCY L TULL NORMA J TURNER ROBERT H TURNER PAULINE L ULREY JOHN UMBANHOWAR 

^ ^ f? JEST 5W& ^P 1 ' 



C DAVID VACHET DOROTHEA VANCE ELIZABETH A VERNON NORITA J VEST ANDREW VISKER CRETCHEN von SPRECKELSEN MARILYN VUNKANNON 




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BEVERLY J WADE ELIZABETH WAGGONER JANET M WACCONER PATRICIA A WAGNER ERVIN ELORENCE E WALKER H GILBERT t 



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JAMES P WALKER RONALD F WALKER PHILLIP E WALSH CHARLES G. WALTER GLORIA 





THOMAS E- WAMSLEY NANCY E WARD RONALD K. WARD LINDA L WARNER BETTY R WARREN RONALD E. WARWEG PINKIE P. WATERS 




SIGNING THOSE "STACKS" OF YEARBOOKS 



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INIS D WATKINS NORMA 



RONALD E. WATKINS JAN WEAKLEY VAL J. WEAKLEY KENNETH B WELTY HENRY A. WERK1NG 




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CAROLYN WEYBETER CHARLES F WHITE EITEL R. WHITE JERRELL R. WHITE 







DONALD W WHITE KENNETH R WHITNEY SANDRA L WICKES 



THEODORE O. WIESE JERRY G. WILDMAN E. JOHN WILLEM JAMES S. WILLIAMS SHARON S. WILLIAMS WARREN P. WILLIAMS 

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RUSSELL L WILLIS BRUCE H WILSON DORA M WILSON HUBERT E. WILSON LARRY DAVID WILSON MARJORIE R WILSON MAX GERALD WILSON 



108 







SAl.l.li: WINEKARGEK STEPHANNIE WISSKN CAROL L WOOD CHARLES F WOOD FRANK 1' WOODS THOMAS M WOOTFN DENNIS L WORRELL 



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MYRA L WORT NORMA L WORTH 



1H A WRIGHT MARY E WRIGHT MERLENE R. WRIGHT MARGIE YARBRO JAMES W. YOST 

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THESE ARE OUR 



O. DANIEL YOUNG SHIRLEY A. YOUNG KARLIS R ZOBS 



DANCING UNDER THE STARS AT OUR PROM 



AUGUST SENIORS 

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MARZELLA GROSS NANCY HASTY FRANK A. HILL ADDIE M JENKINS DONALD L KITTS RICHARD C. KLEIFGEN RICHARD H KRUSE 



109 







JUDITH A. LOCKETT CAROLYN A. MARKER HARRY NEER THOMAS C NELMS JORDON L PETCOFF ROBERT POLAND CAROLYN S. PLUMMER 




11*41* 



JOAN TWYMAN CHRISTINE WALKER BETTY JEAN WHALIN JAMES J. WHITAKER JOHN R. WHITNEY ROBERT R. WHITNEY CHARLES T. WOLFLA 



CLASS DAY COMMITTEES— First Row (left to right) : Deann Haiselup, Joan Epperson, Robert Rowls, Frank 
Guidone, Patricia Wagner. Second Row: Hazel Tamney, Margie Gabbert, Margaret Moir, Walter Gres- 
kamp. Third Row: Willadean Oliver, Helen Peters, Helen Brooks, Thomas Farson. Fourth Row: Donna Stoelt- 
ing, Dennis Worrell, Judith Bailie, Katherine Babarogich. Top Row: Leroy Leverson, Tom Low, John McCray. 




I 10 





PHILLIP Jones awaits his turn as Ann Harger tries out for sen- 
ior Commencement speaker, a coveted honor which Ann won. 



IT WAS A PROUD day for seniors when they received their 
class colors, and it was surely a proud day for Barbara Huser 
when she was chosen to pin the colors on Principal Anderson. 



SENIOR COMMITTEES— First Row (left to right): Ronald Meek, Karen 
Nichois, Linda Warner, Anna Neumeister, Stephen Behlmer, James Miles, 
Charles Moody. Second Row: Preston Judson, Helen Flake, Linda Wain- 
scott, Julia Herman, Carrolle Thomas, Keith Stackhouse. Third Row: Theo- 
dore Wiese, James Cast, Barbara Huser, Jack Huey, Judith Enyart, 



Judith Haegerly, William DeMichieli. Fourth Row: Kitty Leslie, Rosolyn 
Hassel, Carolyn Shook, Cathleen Kelly, Wanda Barnes, Beverly Wade, 
Donna King. Fifth Row: Beverly Foster, Norma Lucas, Sue Asher, Juanita 
Smith, Janice Bonnet, Alice Hughes. Top Row: Wanda Ponsler, Maureen 
Schmidt, Norman Rowe, Larry Risk. 




Ill 



MEMBERS OF THE TECH LEGION ARE PROUD TO 




TECH LEGION — First Row (left to right): Captains Kitty Leslie, Dennis 
Worrell, Martha Hughes, David Dagwell, Ann Harger, Richard Davis; 
Co-commanders Margie Gabbert, Keith Johnson; Captains Sandra Lee 
Major, Gerald Steinker, Gretchen Gutknecht, Anna Neumeister, Theodore 
Wiese, Daine Zvejnieks. Second Row: Mr. Charles Martin, founder and 
sponsor; Donna Stoelting, Jerry Peity, Judith Stratton, Thomas Redick, 



Carol Sulgrove, Richard Reid, Hazel Tamney, John Smith, Lois Thompson, 
Earl Snellenberger, Elizabeth Vernon, Janet Waggoner, John Trimpe, Inis 
Watkins, Jerrell White, Mary Ellen Wright, David Aldrich, James Hirschy, 
Miss Mildred Corrie. Third Row: Principal H. H. Anderson, Alice Kehling, 
James Holder, Jane Kraus, Jack Huey, Martha Lou Loyd, Phillip Jones, 
Norma Lucas, Preston Judson, Norma McCalhp, Raymond Kriese, Linda 



THE RECENTLY named members of the Tech Legion be- 
came acquainted as they chatted "over the teacups" 
at a reception on October 25 in the Student Center. 




We remember how thrilled 83 members of the 
senior class were when, on October 10, 
they were introduced to the school as mem- 
bers of the Tech Legion, our honor 
society for those with the highest number 
of merit citations received during their 
three underclass years. Only 10 per 
cent of the boys and 10 per cent of the 
girls in the senior class may wear the 
green and white bar which marks a 
person as a teen who has possessed 
attributes of good citizenship and 
qualities of personal worth which 
have been recognized by his teachers. 



BELONG TO OUR MOST COVETED HONOR SOCIETY 




Johnson, James Lacey, Kaye Noble, Leroy Leverson, Sara Main, Janis 
Liepmclts, Wanda Ponsler, Danny Lunsford, Barbara Rodocker, John Lutz, 
Janice Shipman, Fred Masuccio, Judith Smith, Robert Richards, Mrs. 
Mary Sue Gray. Top Row: Robert Berry, Nancy Albright, John Brattam, 
Katherine Babarogich, James Burks, Judith Bailie, Donald Bush, Martha 



Ann Bobo, Warren Byerly, Vija Bolsteins, James Cast, Gloria Brewer, 
James Dew, Barbara Coleman, Samuel Eubanks, Gail Etherington, Nicki 
Farley, Helen Flake, Gene Fouts, Rosalynn Hasseld, Walter Greskamp, 
Marilyn Hawkins, Frank Guidone, Barbara Huser, William Hawkins, 
Marvis Johnson, Miss Marilyn Thomas, Mr. Charles Glore. 



SENIORS and their parents are served refreshments in Stuart Hall 
tower with the P-TA members as hosts, the evening of October 13, 
following a "going to college" guidance conference in the Gym. 



DR. SHIBLER congratulates James W. 
Yost, first Tech pupil to win a scholarship in 
the VVestinghouse Science Talent Search. 




S&tfC* 













SPRING 

1955 



FOR THE first time since Commencements have been in the sta- 
dium at sunset the heavens wept so 1955 exercises were in the Gym- 
nasium with Joseph Guidone presenting diplomas to 697 graduates. 




DR. HENRY G. White had the sermon for 
Vespers Sunday afternoon in the Gymnasium 
with the Tech Choir furnishing the music. 

ONE OF the really funny stunts at the 
Senior Day program last spring was the 
chorus line of boys in ballet dresses. 



I 14 




THESE BUSY WORKERS ARE 
THE BACKBONE OF TECH 



To comprise the backbone of our Tech 
are three little-known, little-praised, 
but most necessary groups: the cafeteria, 
the custodial, and the Bookstore staffs, 
who make it possible for our school to 
operate so efficiently and effectively. 





When we enjoy the beauty of a well-kept 
campus, when we sit in an orderly 
classroom, when we eat our lunch each 
day in the lunchrooms, and when we pur- 
chase supplies at our Bookstore, we 
are enjoying the services of these people. 



TWO OF our forty-eight member cafeteria 
staff with Mrs. Elizabeth Ross, manager, are 
Mrs. Esta Parsley and Mrs. Angle Clearwater. 



MR. OLIVER Clark (left) is our efficient Book- 
store manager who has as assistants Mrs. 
VVilma Durham and Mrs. Laverne Stewart. 



REPRESENTING our custodial staff of 47 
members and our seven engineers are (left 
to right) Carl Schooley, carpenter; Emerson 
Emery, head engineer; Edward Hamilton, head 
custodian; William Sowers and James Moylan, 
campus caretakers; and Sgt. Forrest Allison. 




115 



We Statute Lyur ^rdvertitersl 




Through the Southwest Entrance Window of Treadwell Hall. 



Four thousand seven hundred teen-agers salute the firms whose advertisements helped make 

this yearbook a reality. 




Norman Barmes and Virginia Sarver enjoy looking at the display of photographs as they wait to have their pictures taken. 

If it's casual or formal — 
Whatever your style, 
Come to Dexheimer-Carlon — 
Watch the birdie and smile. 

* * * 

• * * 





STUDIO ODD FELLOW BUILDING 









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He /?os o r/ng on n/'s finger, 
And belles at his toes. 
He's proud of his jewelry, 
Wherever he goes! 

* * * * 

Charles B. Dyer Co, Inc. 

234 Massachusetts Ave. 
Me 4-5734 

"How's this?" Steven Beeker asks, as he and Betty Warren select their 
senior rings. 




Your suedes will look fine 

When you take them to Sportsman's 

For the speediest service, 

It's the best in our town. 



SPORTSMAN'S 
CLEANER 

DRIVE-IN-SERVICE 
15 NORTH STATE STREET ME 1-8232 

"Can you remove that spot?" asks Larry Deuser as he points to an ink 
spot on his suede jacket. 



For that dish of ice cream 
That's filled to the brim, 
Stop at Kruger's Korner, 
With that very special him. 

KRUGER'S KORNER 

E. 20th (Brookside) at Dearborn St. 
One-Stop Shopping Center 
Complete Prescription Service 
Me 8-3261 

After a long day at school Judith Ann Cone and Suzanne Clemons stop 
at Kruger's for a refreshing soft drink, served by James Colbert. 




// you're Toothpick Tim, 
Or Sixteen Tons, 
You'll get a perfect fit 
At Skeffington's. 

For Your Senior Prom Suit 
Go To 

Skeffington's 
Tuxedo Rental Inc. 

245 N. Pennsylvania Street Me 4-1583 

When Junior and Senior Proms are in the offing, it is time to be fitted 
for formal wear, as Stanley Stuart and David Wilmer well know. 




FOR THAT SPECIAL PARTY 
WHEN THINGS MUST LOOK RIGHT 
CHOOSE FLOWERS FROM GRANDE 
FOR A TOUCH THAT IS RIGHT 



U*$&^ 



240 



1 W. WASHINGTON ST. 
ME. 7-3525 



Janet Scrivner knows that her flower arrangement will be just 
right because it came from Grande's. 





Seven up for "7 UP!" 

Drink it from the bottle, 
Or from the paper cup, 
You'll agree that it's the best; 
It's refreshing 7 Up! 



YOU LIKE IT-IT LIKES YOU 

Seven Up Bottlers & Distributors 

651 East Twentieth Street 

Seven up for 7 Up are Darlene Barnett, Phillip Biemer. Norma Worth, 
David Carli, Katherine Wright, James Cox, James Currens. 




Piggy's full of pennies 
And heavy as a tank 
Take it to Shelby Savings, 
It's the finest place to bank. 

* * * 

^neiDu street ^jreaeral 

wJncf'iifiJ ana oLoun sQiiociation 

~-Jheu make Saving easii — ~Jltvit mane Sitrinti sale. 

1447 Shelby Street 
Indianapolis 3 Me 5-1503 

Luann Mottier, Janice Pedigo, Wanda Fleming, and Renee 
Wise are ready to rob their piggy banks to deposit their 
savings in a safer place. 



FDH TROPHIES OF DISTINCTION 

iu, riot Cait 
HERFF-JOIVES 



• • • • 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

High School and College Jewelry 

Graduation Announcements 

Medals, Cups, and Trophies 

* * * * 

1411 N. Capitol Avenue 

Indianapolis, Indiana 

ME 5-5514 



The INDIANAPOLIS 



BLUE PRINT & LITHOGRAPH CO., INC 




600 E. OHIO ST -INDIANAPOLIS 
DRAWING MATERIALS 

TEE SQUARES DRAWING BOARDS 

TRI-ANGLES DRAWING PENCILS 

DRAWING INSTRUMENTS 
DRAWING, TRACING & CROSS SECTION PAPERS 
BLUE PRINTS, PHOTOSTATS 

REPRODUCTION PROCESSES 
PHOTO-OFFSET LITHOGRAPHY 




"It is lovely," exclaims Janet McLaughlin as she looks at 
her delicate pink camelia corsage which Tom Low has 
selected at the Delaware Flower Shop. 



esDelawure ^jr lower ^_)ho 

* * * 



T 



Roses are red, 

Violets are blue; 

When flowers come from Delaware, 

She'll be ail for you! 

FLOWERS THAT LIKE TO BE COMPARED 

2922 N. DELAWARE STREET 
WA 4-2616 



FORYOURCAREER 

"Come to Life" 

// you are tired of toil and strife, 
And want a better chance 
For your career, just come to "LIFE,' 
In a new job you'll advance. 



LIFE 



Employment Service 



129 East Market Street, Suite 1217 
Indianapolis 4, Indiana 

Ann Harger discusses career opportunities with Mrs. Forman. 








Sing o song o/ perfumes, 
Of candy and of gum. 
Stop in at Heid's drugstore 
Where business really hums. 

* * * 

lliml Cut Hate Drug Sture 

4001 E. Tenth St. • FL 9-2382 



There's never a dull moment ior Ralph Heid who enjoys arranging 
displays in his father's drugstore. 




The next dance will be lovely, 
They know what to wear 
For at Crown their formals 
Will receive extra care. 



CROWN 

Laundry and Dry Cleaning 



Prompt Pick-up and Delivery Service 
Convenient Drive-ins 



2901 E. Washington Street 
6122 E. Washington Street 



ME 7-3331 
FL 7-1398 



Ann Helen and Kathleen DeFrees know that they can depend on 
Crown to clean their formals so that they will look like new. 




To plan lor the iuture 

Can be loads ot tun 
It when you buy a house 

Almost all the work is done. 



BRUCE SAVAGE COMPANY 
REALTORS 

625 Circle Tower 

Main Office— ME 2-8571 
East Side Office— FL 6-7254 

Sue Ann Thompson and Judith Bohannon enjoy looking at room plans 
for homes they may some day own. 



RICH OR POOR 
IN RAGS OR SILK 
YOU NEVER OUTGROW 
YOUR NEED FOR MILK. 

* * * 

MILK FOUNDATION OF 
INDIANAPOLIS 

805 Union Title Bldg. • ME 2-8045 




Michael Reyman and Albert Kremilles know that milk is tops for that snack at the 

Tech Breakfast Club. 



To market, to market 
To buy a new bike 
Home again, home again 
No more to hike. 

* * * 

EAST SIDE BICYCLE STORE 

4232 E. Michigan Street ■ FL 6-0212 



Like all boys Michael Alexander and Donald Curtis can't resist wishing 
for bicycles at Bob Gray's. 

Kiddies always do their best. 
They really make things boom 
When cooking or when serving 
In a well lighted room. 

Gardner Electric Co., Inc. 

Industrial • Commercial and Domestic Wiring 
First Class Workmanship • Quality Material 
2313 E. MICHIGAN STREET 
Indianapolis 1, Indiana ME 8-5532 




HOURS 



closed w ER 



Tech pupils enjoy working in a well lighted sewing laboratory. 





Ue you. Pouter Of & 



easonina 

1. No reputable merchant can afford to misrepresent 
his product in any way. 

2. Cash prices are much lower than credit prices. 
Likewise short term credit is much more economi- 
cal than long term accounts. 

3. An old firm with a known reputation for quality is 
100% safe to deal with. Why take any chances? 

4. In a reputable store you are always welcome to 
look without any pressure to buy. After all — there 
is nothing to cover up. 

Sipe's Supreme Quality Diamond Rings $40.00 Up 

Since 1884 

Charles B. Sipe ATHS Class of 1918 

MONUMENT CIRCLE • NEAR COLUMBIA CLUB 

INDIANAPOLIS 

Nancy Coffin agrees with Mr. Eric Townsend that it pays to have a 
guarantee of weight, color, and exact degree of perfection when 
purchasing a diamond. 



EDUCATION FOR BUSINESS CAREERS 



The courses offered here are definite, specific, effective. They prepare thoroughly 

and quickly for the higher-level business positions. 

For Bulletin, visit the school or phone — MElrose 4-8337. 

CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE 

Indiana Business College Building 802 N. Meridian Street, Indianapolis 



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\ HUM 


Earl Hopping's 

flegai Market 

2720 East Michigan Street 
ME 6-0322 


Yager Pharmacy 

Marvin L. Yager '49 

1702 East Washington Street 
ME 8-7455 


Bell's Pharmacy 

Store of Personal Service 
Self-Service • We Deliver 

2726 East New York Street 
ME 1-7877 




There are many different products, 
And all of them are fine. 
We kids who know the very best, 
Know the Borden good-food line! 





Carolyn Hubbard and Susie Hartzler listen with interest as 
Miss Alberta Vail explains one of Borden's newer products. 



"If It's BORDEN'S It'sGot To Be Good'' 



it o ic e» i<; \ * s 



We Salute Our Alumni! — The Arsenal Cannon Staff. 




Meeting in the principal's office to select the winners of the Alumni awards are Mr. Charles B. Sipe, Mr. Bruce 
C. Savage, Mrs. F. E. Thornburgh, Mrs. David Pearson, and Mrs. W. F. Riggs. 

No matter what the project, 
No matter what the cost, 
We can count on our alumni— 
For them no time is lost 



Meet Our Staff Photographers 

Last, but not least, 
Are our trusty photogs. 
In our publishing game 
They're indispensible cogs. 



Our two Jerrys, Jerry Smith and Jerry Huser, leave Stuart 
Hall on assignments for the Arsenal Cannon weekly and 
Yearbook. 







ALL WINTEB LONG THEY HAVE WORKED WITH IS 




EACH HAS COME TO THE PUBLICATIONS OFFICE THROUGH THE EAST MICHIGAN STREET GATE. 



Our Engravers 

NDECO 

and 

Fred Noer 

Frank Persell 

Margaret Carey 



INDIANAPOLIS ENGRAVING CO. 
611 North Park Avenue ME 5-5461 



Our Printer 



The HOLLENBECK PRESS 



and 

Robert E. Darnaby III 

Glenn Munshower 



PRINTERS AND BINDERS 
122-36 North College Avenue ME 2-8478 



Our Cover Makers 

SMITH CRAFT 

and 
Jack K. Bundy 

THE S. K. SMITH COMPANY 

2857 North Western Avenue 

Chicago 18, Illinois 



Our Student Ad Setter 
• GUNTIS KALNAJS 




Our Photographers 

Russell Benson 

Duncan Scheidt 

Gerald Carlon 

Jones Photos 

Dexheimer-Carlon 

Bass Photos 

STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Leroy Leverson — several sports shots 

Staff Photographers 
Jerry Huser and Jerry Smith 



TD PUBLISH A BOOK OF WOIEO WE \BE PBOUD. //,„X„/, Si..//