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Full text of "The art of dancing explained by reading and figures; whereby the manner of performing the steps is made easy by a new and familiar method:"

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READING and FIGURES; 

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Manner of Performing the S T E V S 

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By a New and Familiar M E T H ODj 

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O RIG I N A L W O R K 



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Firft Defign'd in the Yia* 1714, .. 

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And now Publilhed bf ~ 

KELLOMTOMLINSON, Dancing-Mafter. 



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In Two BOOKS. 



•7W/V alter Hotnres. 



LONDON. 

Printed for the AUTHOR: 

, at the Red and G«W Plewtr Pet next Door 
ift the Bull and G«/*, in Hi^b-Holbmrm. 
MDCCXXXV. 



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AUTHOR of the Original 'A'Jffof DANCING, CompofiTiTVritCTofjBjjWaB 
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The First Book treats of the beautiful Attitudes or Poftures of Standing, the 
different Pofitions from whence the Steps of Dancing are to betaken and performed t 
and like wife of the Manner of Walking, gracefully. The fcveral Sorts- of Bows and 
Courtesies arealfo foUy defcribed, and all or mpft of the: Steps ufed in Genteel 
Dancing, as weH as many of t&ofe properly belonging to the Stags : Illuftrated with 
fixteen Copper Plates containing twenty, nine Figyres. 

The Second Book contains fourteen Plates, confuting of twenty eight Figures of 
Gentlemen and Ladies,- oneof each in a Plate* as dancing a Minuet i begimmg 
from the RtrsRENCEor Bow/and proceeding regularly on 'till the whole is finifh'di 
Jhewing the beautiful Attitudes, ^nd graceful Deportments of the Performers, in the dif- 
ferent Figures and Circles of that celebrated Dance ; together with the Inftruftions for 
underftanding and keeping Time, and Directions for the Elevation, Movement, and 
graceful Fall of the Arms m Da no no. To which are added at the Requeftof {bme par- 
ticular Perfons of Quality, fome Inftruftions concerning Country Dances. 

• * 

The whole Work is adorned with thirty Copper Plates, confiding of fifty feven Fi- 
gures ; with five other additional Plates, marked A. E. I. O. U. containing all. the 
Steps defcribed in this Txratife, written in Characters; for the Amufcmcnt of the 
Curious, the farther Illuftration of this Work, and the lnftru&ion of fuch as are defirou* 
to underftand the Characters of Dancing*. 



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THESE are to certify, That the following Work, entitled, thi 
Art op Dancing explain'd, was defigtd and compofed 
by Mr, Kellom Tomlinfon in the Tear 1726 in the fame Manner in 
which h now aft fears, we having feen the /aid Work in theYear above 
mentioned, wbtcb be told us he intended for the Prefsasfbon as his Sub- 
fcription was full', in Witnefs whereof and in Jufiice to the Author we 
have hereunto fei our Hands this twelfth Day of February 1728* 

Joseph Sandys, Gent, . 
Henry Carey, Mafier of Muftc. 



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To the Right HoKO'bki'ht .•■-■ 



C A i H E R 1 N E 

Vifcountefs FAUCONBERG. 



MaDAMj 

^^p.HE Work I here prefume to offer 

11^11 your Ladyjbip, treating of a Subject 
iSssS&i .... i it 

in which you are not only well ver- 

fed, but even excel; it was natural and obvi- 
ous 



DEDICATION. 

ous for me to dedicate it to you, confiding 



that, under fo honourable a Prote&ion, it 



may at lead be skreen a from fuch unjuft Cen- 
fures as Malice or Envy ordinarily produce. 

It may perhaps be expe&ed that I fliould fay 
fomething of the Nobility and great Endow- 
ments of your Anceftors, as is ufually done 
in Dedicatory Epiftlesi but the World is fo well 
acquainted with your Ladts hip's illuftrious 
Families, botlf that from which you came as 
well as that td which you are happily ally'd, 
that to mention any thing of them would ra- 
ther be derogating from their Praife, feeing all 
I could relate would be inferior, both to 
their Merit and to the Opinion of all thofe 
who know them. All that I will venture to lay 
is, that your Candour, Affability, Sweetnefs 
and Charity, joind to all your other great 
Qualities, give as great a Luftre to your Fami- 
ly, as what you receive from it. . 

BtfT 



DEDTCZTiaa 






: :B tf.T o£ : all: your Perfefffofl^ whit' tdtttKQ 
Viie tl^fce tnoft; isyooc greats Taleiftitf tlftfA'ii 
of Da n c 1 n g, which I can fpeak the more free- 
ly of, as I was not only a Spedator, but had 
the Honour to contribute to/for fome Time: 
Not that I pretend to arrogate to myfelf the 
Glory of the great Proficiency you made (for 
that was wholly due to your natural Genius 
for that Science) but only think myfelf hap- 
py in having had the good Fortune to give Let 
ions to a L a d y that perform'd in a Manner no 
lefs elegant than uncommon. 



N o r do I fo much wonder at the Progrefs 
your Ladt ship made in this Science/ when 
I coniider your wonderful Genius and ex- 
quifite Taffe for Mujic, which is one of the 
greateft Helps to a perfed Performance in 
Dahcikq. All thefe rare Talents give me a 

greater 



DEDICATION. 

greater Title to your Lad r ship's gracious Ac- 
ceptance of this Works at leaft it gives me an 
Occafion of affuririg you how much I am, with 
all Refpe# aad: Efteem, , / .; t i 

o:„.t jja ,:..». ■£..,• j t a +j ..i«.^ 

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mvj? obedient} and ;• 



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tnofi bumble Servant^ 



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KELLOM TOMtlNSON. 



LIST 

OF T H E 

SUBSCRIBERS NAMES. 



N. "R fhit + Mark Jbews that the Subfcriber, he/ore -wboft Name it is placed, 
ated while this Work bat been carrying on. 



A. . Mr. Jonath. Aylcworth Dartcing-Majer. 

THE Right Honourable the B. 
Lord Alton. 

The Hon. Edward AAon, Efq\ Sir Edward Blount, of Soddington in 

'the Hon. Mrs. Catherine Afton. tie County of Worcefter, Bart. 

Sir Francis Andrews, Bart. 'the Lady Blount. 

Sir John Aftley gfPatfliuUm Stafford- f Sir William Blacket, of Newcaftle, 

fliire Bart. Barf. 

William Andrews Efq; John Bafker, Efq; three Setts, 

■f Mrs. Eleanor Andrews. B. Bagfhaw of Wigwell in Derby Shire 

Mr. A. LabW, Dancing-Majterto their Efq-, 

Royal Higbnejfes the young Prineejfei. Edward Brett: Eainbrigg of Derby Efq\ 

B EJ. 






* VN 



Subscribers N A MES. 

Ed. Bigland of Long W— n near Lough-. John Clark Engraver* ." * ^ 
borough I§/ip -: Afr. Henry Carey Af*/fer g/* Mufic, 

•f- William Bourke, Gtorf. Mr. Ben. Cole, Engravers f 

JtfiTr Bullar. ;' # * Afr. Thomas Gobi* ■. '".':'. 

Mrs. Grace Brown, g^BentleywParr \., '• •""*>' , ' 

bythire. * •. -.V - • .; : : \\ ! ••',."' "V~~ \- • 

iWri.Deborah Bowdlere/QueenViquarc.' - / " . • 

Mrr. Catharine Bird. Jfrr Excellency the Marquefs D'aix, LtfdJjr 

Richard Boftock, M. D. * of Honour to the late Qpccn of Sardinia. 

Ctyf. William* Brooks, of Derby E#; F. D^r^ll £#< ' ' 

Mrs. Margaret Butler, of Maryland. Kenelm Digby, of North- Luffinghaox 

Mrs. Booth the celebrated Dancer. in the County *f Rutland, Efo 

Mrs. M. Boftock, Paintrcfs. Mrs. Ann Darnall, of Maryland. 

Mr. John Brograve, ^Rudglcy, Dan* John Dalton, Gent. 

cing-Mafer. Mr. J. Dupree, Dancing- Mafier at the 
Mrs. Bullock, Dancer^ at the Theatre Theatre Royal in Covent Garden. 

in GoodmanVFields. Mr. Lewis Duplefly Dancing-Mafier. 
Samuel Buck, Engraver, for two Setts. 
Mr. Geo. Bickham junior, Engraver. 



_..»« 



C The Right Hon. Hannah- Sophia, Coun+ 

tefs of Exeter. 

The Right Honourable James, Earl of The Right Hon. the Lady Maty E . 

Caftlehaven. Henry Every of Egginton in tit Count} 
The right Honourable Elizabeth, Cgun» of Derby JEJy;. .. , ^-_ 

. tefs of Caftlehaven. Charles Edmonds Efy\ 

•}- The Right Honourable Ann, Countefs Mr. John Eflex Dancing-MafUr* 

Dowager of Clanrickard. Mifs Evcret. 
\Tbe right Honourable the Lady Frances. . M - - '.• •' -'" 

Clifton* 4$* 

Sir Richard C/bet, Bart - ' 

The Lady Curzon gjf Kcdlcfton in Der- The Right Hon. Thomas, Vifcount Fau* 

byfture. conberg. 

Mrs. Anna-Maria Calmady, of Devon. The Right Hon. Catherine, Vifcoun- 
•f- Francis Cottington, of Founthill-Gif- tefs Fauconberg. 

fard, Efji fT^Ltf^Fuft^Hill^MrGloucefter. 

W C , Efp C. Fleetwood, # Gerard s-Bromlcy i*< 

Mrs. Elizabeth Cannon Daughter to the Staffordshire, Efp 

late Dean of Lincoln. Mrs; Mary Fairbrother. 
Richard Crcffwell, of Bridgnorth in 

Shropfliire Efq\ G. 

Rowland Cotton of Etwall in the Coun- 

// of Derby EJf, Mrs. Giffard, */* Chilling ton. 

Mr. Thomas Caverley, ^Queen-Square H. Gaylor, M. D. 

Dancing-Afafier. Mr. Leech Glover, Dancing- Mafier. 

+ Tht 



i. 



SI .- - - 

UBSCRIfigRS NAMES.. 

- «. ' Rl ^>*rf Langley, of Grim/ton 

1 J Howard- £ Workfop. r ' *:' r • "* fc>k L«ScS»£& - ' - • 

the Hon. Mn. Winifrede 1 Howard, i/ ^ Mary Lewi yTtrra^/, ^ 
-%"•:; „ : ■" ,1 V marthenflure South Wales. , ^ 

Tbe^iitnJ^ ° f MacclesfielA ^..Daniel Lewis ,/ Br^lS^ 
iDeiaaay Hanmer. % . , Matter • <• '. - -. • * 

Leicefterfliire, Btfrf. j/ r . Edward j^ J Dancing Mafier 




• > * ... • r nil* • *• ti. 



William Herbert, Gent, w:ii;-«. »#„„ :*• »>"T WC, .^I' 



George Hills, G«tf, „ rey,££. ^^, . 

^n *^J*?V g "' °f Ncwark » ^ JaS Mechel >^/m : ; I 7 : - 
Da«ctng-tfafter r . ; ^- A. Morczu Dancing-MaJIer *t tie' 

Theatre in Dublin. 



J. • r - 



■- » » . . . » • A *\. 



fbeRigbtHon.Sir*. J— -Jr. A ;",'.'. ; .'. 

^^o^jaWo, ■"." ■'.-:: f*<^-*^'w^vite 

^l!icSii ennenS 8/G ° pflMU «'^ Edward I^grNorfoll,. 
Mr. jofcph Jackfon, DmS*U*r. ^fig^r*** f*"*"* 

v • " • >ir . ^ J ane . Needier, ef Hollyland in 

Surrey. •: 

t J* V »* * ^ Franc ^IfSJiSlK • /BUt,0B *" 
Keightlcy. 

Mr. Afcough Kirk, vf Stamford, Dan- ; q 

cing-Mafter. . / • • • 

Jl/#«r, Knapton Bm|^x Jofcph offlcyf fl/ n^^, ^. 

** t Thomas O'Brien, Efo 

S/r William Lemon, gf North-hidl, . 

Hertfordihire^ Bart, 



Subscribers NAMES- 

-\- William Somerfet, Gent* 
P. Richard Stanley, Gent. 

WUliam Stukefcy, M.D. 
His Grace William Duke of Fowls. Mr. P. Siris, Dondng-Majltr. 
Her Grace Margaret Dafltyf^Pordand* Mr. William Sawyer, of Rudgkf m 
f J. Pcarfon, M. D. Staffordlhire, £>anciug-Ma/Ur. 

Mr. P. P. *f T,kchfidd. Mr. Robert Smith, Dancing-Major* 

Mrs. Parkhurft. 

Mrs. Mary Peacock. Y. . . 

Mrs. Charlott Pigott. 

*f* Mr. Edmond Pemberton Dancing- the Hon. Mrs. Talbot, of Longford. . 
Majer. Tie Hon. Mrs Ann Thompson, 

Wilbraham Tufton, Efo\ . 
R. + John Tufton, Efe 

Mr. James Tutty, Dancing-Ma/ler. 
AymorRich,o/'Bullhoufe,York{hireE J /J; Mr. John Topham, Dancing-Mafia** 
Mrs. Catherine Rolf, sf Lynn. John Tayleur of Roddingtoa «» tbt 

John Rich, Efp Mafier of the theatres County of Salop Efo 
Royal m LincotnVInn-Fklds , and Mr. W. H. Toms Engraver. 
Covent-Garden. y ■■ 
Mrs. Mary Ricardv* W*- * • 

Richard RuffeJ (Sent. • ... ,..--.-.- 

f& Him. Lady Webb, «/ Canfbrd. 

S. JM».Webb, of Hidtharp. 

Mrs. Mary WingfieB 

f TberigUHon. William EarlofSuffatd. William Wool fe, $f QueenWquare, igfc 

Tbertgb't Hon. Ann C»untefs of Snfford. Edward Walpolc, cfDunftoo in Oft 

be Btgbt Hon. Mary , Omntefs of County of Lincoln, Effr. 

Shrewibury. Mrs. Alcthea Walpok. 

fix Right Hon. the Lady Frances Shirley, «f» Mrs. Mary Walpok. 

The Right Hon. the Lady Ann Shirley. Ernie Wambourne, of Waihbourne* 

The Hon. John Stafford, Ffq; in Worcefterfhire, Efo ' 

Sir Thomas Sam well, of Upton ms Nor- Thomas Wollefcot, of Gray's-Inn, GmT. 

thamptonfhire, Bart. John Walkinihaw, Gm& 

Robert Sutton, Efq\ Aylifie White, Gent. 

Samuel Sanders of Caldwell In the Court- Edward Wright, Gent. 

ty of Derby Efq\ Afrj. Jane Williams. - 



ty In- the County of 

Sir Edward Stanley, " Bart. ' Derby Efk 

f* Mrs. Elizabeth Smith of Great Mr. John Weaver Dancing-mafia^: 

James Street. 
Thomas Southcote, Efq\ Y. 

John Southcote, of Blyboroogb In 

Lincolnflure, Efqy Charles Young of the Friers/* Shrews- 

J. Strickland, Gent. ' bury Gent. 






v. '. 



THE 









FACE. 



IAfow at tafl have the Pleafure ofprefenting to- tbt World a WorK 
which has been long promt fed; tut which, through the Difficulty 
of the Undertaking itfelj ] and the many Ob flack* to the Execution 
of it, J was not able to finifb before. • •- * i 

This Undertaking muft needs have been attended with great Diffi- 
culty, becaufe it was really the firjk of the Kind. For tbo* Mow* 
yfrtfrBeauchamp lay d the firfi * Foundation, upon which MonfieurFcn* 
illet built, (asfome more ingenious Per/on may perhaps improve upon 
mine); yet the Works of both relate only to the CharaBers of 
Dancing', which, like the Notes ofMufic, can be only ufiful to Met* 
fiers, and cannot be under flood by any other without their particular 
InftruB'tom. But the Piece which there offer to the World will hi 
of generalise to alt, who either have learned, or are learning to dance: 
the Words describing the Manner in which the Steps are to be taken s 
and the Figures repreftntin& Perfons as oBually taking them; both 
which together will make the Learning more pleafant to the one, and 
ferve as a continual Remembrancer to the otter. 

As mofi other Arts and Sciences,, reduced to certain. Rules, have 
been now long fince taught in Books, I have often wondered no one 
fhouldhave hitherto paid the fame Regard to the Art of Dancing. 
This is what I have endeavoured to do* in the following Work*, 
wherein / have not pretended to advance any new Laws for Dancing 
unknown before; but only to colleB andfubmit to view thofe Princi- 
ples and Rules, which I bad. feen taught with ths greatefi Succefs 

b 




THE PREFACE. 

Try the moft eminent Majiers in the genteel Way. As the Notes of 
the Mupc are placed on the Top of every Plate, the Char afters of 
the Steps marked below, and the Figures rebrefent two Perfons in the 
very.Jfffion of Dancing; whoever has made any Progrefs- in the 
Knowledge of mufical Notes and of the Char aft eri of Dancing will he 
able by intently viewing one oftheje Plates, at one and the fame T$me t 
to call to Mind the Tune, to know the Order of the Steps, and to put 
the Body into the proper Attitude to take them. And tho* this Book, 
like all others which treat of any Art or Science, cannot be perfeBly 
underflood without fome Study and Application ; yet by a little 

^fiance from the Author, or others of the P r of effion properly qualt- 

f, all the Difficulties will be foon fur mounted. The figures in each 
Plate are defigned only tojhew the Poftures proper in Dancing, but 
not to bear the leafl Refemblance to any Perfon to whom the Plate 
is infer ibed; which it had been ridiculous to have attempted: The fole 
Intent of the Infcription being to do Honour to myfelf, by thisfmali 
Teftimony of my Gratitude to fome honourable Perfons. The con- 
tinual Change of the Fafkion will afford, 1 pre fume, afufficient Ex- 
cufefor the Drapeiy of the Ftgures: and Gloves were dejsgnedly o- 
mitted, on Purpofe to fbew the beautiful Shape of the Hands. The 
Faults, which may have happened in the Execution, either of the 
Printing, or Jngraving, wilt, I hope, be the more eafsly excufed, if 
the Nicety of the Subject be conftdered, together with the Difficulty of 
the Performance, and the many Hands through which it has paffed: 
efpecially if it be remembered, that this is not only my firfi Attempt* 
but Tike-wife the fir Jl that has been made of the Kind. 

It mayfeem a little Jlrange, that Ifhouldclaim the Honour of having 
firfl treated of the Art of Dancing; when a Book upon the fame Sub- 
jeft was publifhed in France as long ago as in 171^. But the fol- 
lowing Account will, I hope, clear up all Doubt in Relation to the Juf- 
tice of my Pretenfions. 

Jn Mift's Journal Sat. Jan. 1 3 1718, appeared this Advertifement, 
« Next Week will be publifhed The Dancing- Matter or The Art of 
" Dancing explain'd hy Morifieur Rameau '% Thh gave me no fmall 
Surprize, hazing never before heard of either any fitch Book, or Au- 
thor,. 



THE PREFACE. 

thor. Hdd'it been my Fortme to have known, either before, or after 
1 undertook to write on this Art, thatfuch a Book was extant, myCfa 
riofity would certainly have led me to have .conftdted it • and had 1. 
approved it, */« highly probable I /hould have given the World a ^ 
Tranfiation of it, with fame additional Obfervations of my own. Tbtt 
had been a much eafter Tajk, than to compofe a Work entirely new 
upon the fame Subje ft : which 1 had aft u ally finifhedin 1714 ready 
for tie Prefs, as it is now publifhed, without any material Altera* 
tion, a full Tear before the Publication of Monfieur Rameau'x Booli 
and near four Tears before this Advertifement appeared, the Truth- 
whereof feveral credible Wttneffes have teftified under their own 
Hands. 

/ advertifed this Work of mine the firfl Time, as ready for the 
Prefs, and that it only waited for a fufficient Number of Subscriber r 
to defray the Expence, in Berington's Evening Poft, Oft. iy,\ 
17KS, and again in the- fame Paper 0&. n. This Advertifement 
was repeated in The White-Hall. Evening Poft, Nov. 1 2 . and, m; 
The London Journal, Dec. 3. In Mift's Journal of March 4; 1717,/ 
gave Notice of the Publication of my Propofals, together with fome 
Plates done by Way of Specimen; and renewed that Notice on iZth; 
bt Berington's Evening Poft, and again on Ode. iZ.in the fame Pa* 
per. From this particular Account it appears, that I bad publifhed 
/even Advertifements concerning my Work; the fit ft of which war 
two Tears and three Months, before ever the Translation of Mon- 
fieur Rameau*s Book was advertifed in Mift's Journal Jan. 13. 1718.. 
To fecure my felf in fome Meafure from the Damage I might re* 
ceive by this Advertifement; I thought it neceffary topublijh one my . 
felf a few Days after, in Mift's Journal Jan. 17. To which I pre- 
fixed this Motto from Virgil, Tulit alter Honores; intimat- 
ing, that another Perfon had attempted to bear away the Honour of 
my Invention', and I may jufily add, the Profit of it too. That 
this was his Intention is very plain from two Circumftances: the Ad- 
dition to the Title; and the Alteration of the Form of Monfieur THa.- 
meau's Book, The Title of his in the original is onely The Dancing 
Mafter; to which the ingeniousTranfiator, or perhaps Bookfeller, thought 

proper: , 



THEPR EFAC B. 

proper to add thai of mine, The Art of Dancing cxplain'd : The m 
French Original was publifbed in Octavo; but tbeTt (inflation was mag- 
nified to a Quarto, almoft the Size of mine, and yet propofedtobe fold 
at half the Price. Tbeaffuming thus the veryTttle and Form of the Book 
propofedto the Publick by me, feems to nave been done with no bet- 
ter View', than to- raife an Advantage by anticipating my Defign ; 
and to obfiruB the Succefs of it, by making hfeem to be onpy afervile 
Imitation of the original Invention of Monfieur Rameau. This' Con- 
trivance was the more likely to have the defired EffcB, from the un-. 
favourable Situation in which the Propo&ls/or the Subf caption to my 
Book might at that Time appear. It was above two Tears fince it 
bad been advertifed as ready for the Prefs: and this delay in the 
Publication, the not fixing any certain Time for it, and the Diffi- 
culty in procuring Subfcriptions, upon the Number of which the Pub- 
lication mufi depend, might probably induce many Perfons to fufpeB 
that it would never be publi/bed at all. And this Difficulty would 
be much htcreajed, by offering to the Public a Book on the fame 
SubjeB, with the fame Title, and of almofi the fame Size, winch 
yet fhould cofl no more than half the Price of mine. To make 
which Book appear Jlill more perfeB and complete, and mine lefs ne- 
ceffary, or ufcful, the Gentleman who publifbed ft was not fatisfied 
to prefent it to the IVorld merely as a Tranflation of Monfieur Ra- 
meau*; IVork, approved by Monfieur Pecour, the great eft Mafter in 
France; but was prompted by his Ingenuity andGenerofity to make 
fuch furprizing Improvements in the figures, as will be a lofting Mo- 
nument of his great Abilities in the Art of Dancing. 

Before I conclude this Preface, // feems neceffary to fay fome- 
th'mg more particularly of my felf for the SatisfaBion of thofe to 
whom I may not have the Honour to be known ; who will naturally 
expeB, before they encourage a Piece of fuch an extraordinary Na- 
ture > to receive fome Evidence, that the Perfon who undertakes it is 
in fome meafure qualified for the Performance. 

In April 1707. / was placed as an Apprentice with Mr. Thomas 
Caverley, now living in Queen VSquare, St. George the Martyr , 
with whom I continued till the Tear 17x4. During which Ttme, I 

bad 



THE PRE FACE. 

hadlikewi/e the good Fortune to be further inflrutledin the Theatric*? 
Way, by that great Performer Mr, Chcrrcir, once contemporary 
with the inimitable Mr. L' Abbe, with whom alfo I have bad the 
Happ'tnefs of a perfonal Acquaintance, Mr, Chcrrcir s great Merit, 
after he quitted the Stage, was fupported a long Time by the late 
Mr. John Shaw, who was juftly efieemed not only one of the fine ft 
Theatrical Dancers, but one of the mofi beautiful Performers in the 
Gentleman-like Way : the Acquifition of both which Excellencies in 
PraBice, mufi be chiefly owing to tbofe admirable InflruBions in the 
Theory, which he received from Mr. Caverley, when He and I were 
fellow Apprentices to that great Mafier % 

I beg Leave to mention in the next Place two of my Scholars, who 
have appeared upon the Stage with no /mall Applaufe, The one 
was Mr. John Topham, who danced upon both Theatres under the 
Name of Mr. KellomV Scholar, when he had been with me no lon- 
ger than betwixt two and three Tears. The other was Mifs Frances, 
who, on the Theatre Royal in Little Lincoln VInn-Fields, performed 
the Paflacaille de Scilla, confifling of above a thou/and Meafures or 
Steps, without matin'' the leafl Miftake; but/he left me in the midft 
of her Improvement. 

To this I hope it will not be thought improper to fubjoin afbort Ac- 
count of fome of my Compofttions, which have been well recei- 
ved by the I For Id. The Paflepied Round O in 1 j i y dedicated U 
Mr. Caverley; the Shepherdess in 17161 the Submiffion in 1717, 
which, by the Name of Mr. Kellom's New Dance, was performed 
by Monfteur and Mademoifelle Salle, the two French Children, on 
the Theatre in Lincoln's- Inn-Fields, to very conjiderable Audiences, 
every Night, for a whole Week together. To which I beg Leave 
to add the Prince Fugene in 1 7 18 ; the Addrefs the next Year\ the 
Gavot in 1720; and the Paflacaille Diana the Tear following, de- 
dicated to Mr. L' Abbe. All which I compo/ed y wrote in Charact- 
ers y and puhlijhedy for the Improvement of the Art of Dancing. 

/ might here add a long Account of the Honour done me by many, 
of the Nobility and Gentry in employing me to teach their Children ; 
and in permitting me to publifh it to the World by the Ded/cation of 

b my 



THE PREFACE. 

my Plates. But I have perhaps dwelt too long upon this Subject al- 
ready, which I hope the candid Reader will excufe; and not impute 
this Account of my /elf to Vanity or Conceit , hut to an earner! De- 
Jire in me to give the utmost Satisfaction to my Sub/bribers, and to 
remwe all Su/picion of my Want of Talents proper for the Execu- 
tion of this new Undertaking. And this was the more neceffary to he 
done, hecaufe of the Difadvantage to which I have been expnfed by 
gring accidentally under two different Names, Kellom and Tomlirr 
fon ; being known formerly by tbefir/l, but of late only by the last j 
the Occafton of which it may not be thought improper to relate. 

During the Time of my Apprentice/hip I went generally by the 
Name of Kellom, a Corruption <?/Kenclm my true Ch rift tan Name; 
as it is very common for young Perfons to be called Mr. John, Mr. 
William, and the like, without the Addition of their Sur-name. 
At the Expiration of my Apprentice/hip, fever al of my Friends out 
of Refpett called me by my Sur-name of Tomlinibn ; but, being un- 
willing to decline the Advantage I might probably receive from the 
Reputation of having learned the Art of Dancing under fo great a 
Matter as Mr. Caverley, / cbofe rather to retain the Name of Kellom, 
by which I had been fo untverfally known to have been under his In- 
flru&ion. This Duplicity of Appellation turned afterwards to my 
great Difadvantage: many of the Nobility and Gentry, who would 
have had their Children taught by Mr. Kellom, refufmg to employ 
Mr. Tomlinfon tbo recommended to them; and many t who would 
have employed Mr. Tomlinfon, rejecting Mr* Kellom. To pre- 
vent which Gmfufionfor the future, I /hall acknowledge my felf obli- 
ged to thofe, who, in/lead of either fingly, Jball be pleafed to call 
me by both conjunctly, Kellom Tomlinfon. 



T H B 




ONTENTS- 



+***—+*•)*' ■ * *' '■ 



•* . % »*■ « . * 



B O O K I 

III. 0/ Bowing, or the different Setts of Honours. 7 

IV. 0/ /& Dancing-Room. IS 

V. Of the Coupee of one Step or Half Coupee. 

VI. Of /i* Coupee. 
VIL 0/ /& Coupee tw/i two Movements. 

vra. 




?//2 



•7 



TX. Of the lk>urcc with two Movements. 3* 



33 

It 



March. 

XI. 6/ riv Point <mi March, J, 

XII. 0//Ar Spring or Bound. • jt 

XIII. Of the Clofe or Tump. 37 

XIV. Of the Spring «r Leap. 30 

XV. 0/" r& Rigadoon-Step 0/ 0** S/mrg-, o/*» in the fame Place and dole. 41 

XVI. 0/ fir Rigadoon-Stcp of two Springs or Siflbnne, 44 

XVII. 0//^ Gall iard^ni Falling Step. 48 

XVIII. O/*^ Bouree wVA a Bound. p 

XIX. Of the Slip J«/or# and then behind, or Slip behind and afterwards before, 
and Half Coupee Jideways. 54 

XX. Of the Hop or Contretemp. #8 

XXI. Of the Chaflee or Driving Step. 64 

XXII. Oft be Chaffee or Driving Step of two Movements or Bounding Coupees. 71 

XXIII. Of the Beaten Coupee or Hop. 74 

XXIV. Of the Chaflee or Driving Step, of three Springs in the fame Place, from 
the third Pofition. 77 

XXV. Of the Flying Chaflee or Driving Step backwards, with a Clofe and Cou- 
pee to a Meajure. 70 

XXVI. Of fir Hop gf /tw Movements, from the fifth Pofition round in two half 
furns. 81 

XXVII. Of the Chaconne or Paflacaille Step. 83 

XXVIII. Of the Hop and two Chaffee* or Drives round in the fame Place. 84 

ha XXIX. 



The CONTENTS. 

Chap. XXIX. OftbeTatt, Spring witb both Feet at tbefame Time, <W Coupee 
toaMeafitre. page 86 

XXX. Of tbe Clok beating before and falling behind* in the third Toftion, upright 
Spring changing to tbefame before^ and Coupee /• a Meafure. 88 

XXXI. Of the Pirouette. * ( oo 
XXXIL Of the Pirouette introduced by a Coupee. 96 
XXXIH. Of the Bouree before and behind, and behind and before, advancing in 

a whole Turn, 98 

B O OK. II. 

Chap. I. f~\Ftbe Minuet S&f. *J*/&3 

\^J II. Of the Hop tn /A? Minuet, 113 

IIL Of the Double Bouree upon tbefame Pisa. 115 

IV. Of the Balance. 1 18 

V. Of the two Coulees or Marches. no 

VI. Of the Slip behind and Half Coupee forwards to the right and left Hands,, each 
- to a Minuet Step. rao 
And of Dancing the Minuet in general 124 

VII. Of the Figure of$ reverfed or fecund Dtvifon. 1 26 

VIII. Of Prefcming //* right Arm or third Part. 128 

IX. Of the fourth Divifon or Presenting of the left Arm. 13 1 

X. OftbefjfibDivifionorfecond$. 133 
XL Of tbe fxtb Dhifion for Prcfcming of both Arms and Conclujum. 135 * 

XII. Of tbe Miftakes in Dancing of a Minuet, witb their Ocafions and Rules 
to prevent them. 137 

XIII. Of Time, orfome Account what Time 1/; witb Rules to be obferved in Keep- 
to st. 141 

XIV. Of the Movement of tbe Arms in Dancing* 152 

XV. Of Country Dancing. ifit 



An Ex* 



w 

i Explanation of the CbaraBers or Steps contained in the Tablet 
of Plate E, in the exact Order they are treated of in this Work, 
(hewing the different Ways in which the (aid Steps are performed 
whether forwards, backwards, tideways, or round, &c in 
which you will fee the Steps treated of in fVirds written down 
in Char afters and Figures, which will not only convey a ftronger 
Idea of the Steps, but aUb be very entertaining to die curious 

Reader. 

.•.-■-••- 

The Steps treated of in BOOK L . 



Table t The HALF COUPEE. 

Fig. i. Forwards w ; tb ettk* Foot. 

Fig. 2. Backwards with either Foot. 

Fig. 3. Sideways to the right, andjide- 
ways to the left. 

Table 1L The COUPEE. 

Fig. i. The Coufee forwards withes- * 
t her Foot. 

Fig. 2. The fame backwards with ei- 
ther Fcot tn two Movements, or plain, 
as Fig. i. 

Fig. 3. Sideways before in two Move- 
ments with either Foot, or plain, as Fig. 4. 

Fig. 4. Sideways behind with either 
Foot. 
Table III. The BOUREK 

Fig. 1. Forwards with either Foot. 

Fig. 2. Backwards with either Foot. 

Fig. 3. Sideways before with either Foot. 

Fig. 4. Sideways behind with either Foot. 

Fig. c. Sideways before and behind with 
either Foot. 

Fig. 6. Sideways behind and before with 
either Foot. 

Fig. 7. Twice behind and the third Step 
forwards with either Foot. 

Fig. 8. Bouree and Bound with either 
Foot forwards. 

Table IV. The MARCH and POINT 
and MARCH. 

FiGt it Forwards with either Foot. 



Fig. 2. Point fdeways with either Rot. 
Fig. 3. Forwards wtth either Rot. - 

Table V. The BOUND. 
Fig. 1. Forwards with either JFW. - 
Fig. 2. Backwards with either Foot. 
Fig. 3. Sideways before with either 

Foot. 
Fig. 4. Sideways behind with either F00G 
Fig 5 Twice to a Meafitre. 
Fig. 6. Thrice to a Meafitre. 

Table VL The CLOSE. 
Fig. i. With either Foot into the firft 

Pofition forwards. 
Fig 2. frith either Foot backwards ssh 

to the firfi Pofition. 
Fig. 3. Forwards with either Foot into 

the third Pofition inclofd before. 
Fig 4. The fame backwards with either* 

Foot inclofed behind, and a Walk for* 

wards to a Meafure. 
Table VII. The LEAP or JUMP. 
Fig. 1. Forwards. 
Fig. 2. Backwards. 
Fig. 3. Sideways to the right Hand. 
Fjg. 4. Sideways to the left Hand. 1 
Fig. 5. The upright Sprit*, 
Fig. 6. Round in an upright Spring. 
Fig. 7. 'Two Springs and a plain fir aight 

Step forwards to a Meafure. 
F10. 8. Three Spring* to a Meafure for- 
wards. 

Fig. 9. 



Fig. 9. The upright Spring and plain 

Step Jorward* to a Meafkre. 
Fig. 10. Two Spring* to a Meafurejor- 

Table VIII. The RIG ADOON STEP 
ofom Spring open in the fame Place. 

Fig. 1. Upon the fame Place with either 
Foot in tbefbrfi Pofition. 

Fig. 2. Upon the fame Place with either 
Foot incofing into the third Pofi- 
fion forwards. 

Fie. 3. The fame inckfng into the 
third Pofition, backward*. 

Fig. 4. Upon the fame Place inchfing 
into the third Poftion, firfi before and 
then behind^ upright Springy and Change 
of the bind Feet firjt with either Foot. 

Tig. $. the fame with either Fbot w frJl 
behnd and then before, upright Spring 
into the Jirft Po/ition, and plain Step 
forward* to a Meafitre. 



Fio. 6. The fame in the JSrlf Pofition. 
1 able IX. The RIGADOONSXEP 

of two Spring*. 
Fig. 1 . Forward* with either Foot. 
Fig. 2. Backward* with either Foot. 
Fig. 3. Sideways croffmg before with 

either Foot. 
Fig, 4. Sideways crofjing behind with 

either Foot. 
Ta*le X. The GALLIARD and 

FALLING STEP. 
Fig. i. Forward* with either Foot. 
Fig. 2. Backward* with either Foot. 
Fig. \. Sideways to the Prefenee with 

either Foot. 
Fig. 4. Sideways with either Foot in a 
' quarter if urn facing the Side* of the 

Fig. jc. Sideways with either Foot in a 
half Turn to the Bottom of the Room. 



An Explanation of the Char after* or Step* contained in the Ta- 
bles of the Plate marked I. as firft Supping before^ and then 
flipping behind^ &c. 

Table XL The SLIP BEFORE, the third Pofition. 

SLIT BEHIND, and HALF Fig. 2. f be fame backward* witb either 



COUPEE. 
Fig. 1. Sideways with either Foot before 

and behind to the Prejence. 
Fig. 2. The fame with a Bound behind 

and before with either Foot. 
Fig. 3. Sideways with eitier Foot before 

ana behind in a quarter Turn to each 

ether. 
Fig. 4. The fame behind and before in 

a half Turn to the Bottom. 
Fig 5. Sideways with either Foot twice 

flipping behind. 
Fig 6. The fame flipping twice before. 
Table XII. The HOP or CON- 
TRET EM P. 
Fig. i. Forward* with either Foot from 



Foot. 
Fig. 3. With either Foot advancing to 

the Side* of the Room in a quarter 

Turn. 
Fig. 4. The fame with either Foot to the 

Bottom in a half Turn. 
Fig. 5. Sideways cro/fing before with eU 

tber Foot to the Prejence. 
Fig. 6. The fame with either Foot in a 

quarter Turn facing the Sides. 
F:c. 7 The fame in a half Turn with 

either Foot to the Bottom. 
Fig. 8. With either Foot Jepping Jide- 

way* and a Draw behind 
Fig. 9. The fame in a quarter Turn to 

the Side*. 

Fig. jo. 



Fig. xo. Sidewqft crojbg before with 
either Foot from the fourth Pofition. 

Fig. ii. The fame with a Bound. 

Fio. 12. From the fourth Pofition ad- 
vancing up the Room with either Foot. 

Fig. 13. The fame with a Bound. 

Fig. 14. Backwards from the fourth 
Pofition with either Foot 

Fig. 15 The fame with a Bound. 

Table XIII. The C HAS SEE or 
DRIVING STEP. 

Fig. 1. Of three with either Foot from 
the fourth P of J ion to the Prefence. 

Fig. 2. The fame fideways. 

Fig. 3. Of four to the Prefence with ei+ 
ther Foot from the fourth Pofition. 

Fig. 4. The fame fideways croffing the 
third of the four Steps before. 

Fig. 5* The fame in a quarter Turn to 
the Sides with either Foot. 

Fig 6. The fame in a quarter Turn 
more to the Bottom. 

Fig. 7. The fame advancing, turning to 
each other upon the Half Coupee, or 
lafi Step of the four. 

Table XIV. The BEATEN COU- 
PEE, or HOP and DRIVING 
STEP of two Movements. 

Fig. x. The Beaten Coupee forwards 
with either Foit. 

Fig. 2. Driving Step of two Springs 
backwards with either Foot. 

Fig. 3. Beaten Hop forwards with ei- 
ther Foot. 

Fig. 4. Driving Step of two Springs 
with either Foot fideways. 

Fig. 5. The Jame of three Springs. 

Fig. 6. The fame of two Springs and a 
Clofe orjoin. 

Fig. 7. lot fame of one Spring and 
a Clofe. 

Table XV. The C HAS SEE or 
DRIVING STEP of three 
Springs upon the fame Place. 

Fig. x. Of three Springs to the Prefence 



with either Foot. 
Fio. a. The Jama to the Sides of tU 

Room. 
Fig. 3. The fame of two Springs to the 

Prefence. 
Table XVI. Fig. i. The FLYING 

CHASSEE or DklFING 

STEP retiring backwards, CL OSE 

and COUPEE to aMeafurewitb 

either Foot, and HAL F COUPE B. 
Table XVII. Fig. i. The HOP of 

two Movements with either Foot from 

the fifth Pofition upon the fame Place. 
Table XVIII. Fig. x. The PASS A- 

CAILLE STEP with either Rat 

to the Prefence. 
Table XIX. Fig. i. The HOP ami 

two CHASSEES or DRIVES 

round upon the fame Place with either 

Foot. 
Table XX. Fig. i. The FA LLan^ 

SPRING with hth Feet at the fame 

Time, &c. with either Poet. 
Table XXL Fig. i. The CLOSE 

heating before and falling behind, up- 

right SPRING, and COUPEE 

&c. with either Foot. 
Table XXIL Fig. i. TU fame beat* 

iw before and f alii w behind in a whale 

Turn, &c with either Foot. 
Table XXIII. Fig. i. The BA* 

LONNE with either Foot. 
Table XXIV. T/r TURN upon a whole 

Pofition, a quarter, half, three quar* 

ter, Sec. 
Fig. 1. A quarter Turn with either 

Foot to the Sides of the Room. 

Fig. 2. A half Turn to the Bottom with 

either Foot. 
Fig. 3. A three quarter Turn to the 

Sides with either Foot. 

Fig. 4. The Jame with either Foot and a 
whole Turn. 



Table 



Table XXV.Tht PIROU Eft E 

crofjirig behind. 

Fig. i. A quarter Turn with either 
Foot to the Sides. 

Fig. 2. A half Turn to the lower End 
with either Foot. 

Fig. 3. A three quarter Turn with ei- 
ther Foot to the Sides. 

Fig. 4. 7 be fame with either Foot quite 
round. 
The PIR OUETTE croffmg befcre. 

Fig. 1. A quarter Turn with either 
Foot to the Sides. 

Fig. 2. A half Turn with either Foot 
to the Bottom. 

Fig. 3. A Three quarter Turn with ei- 
ther Foot to the Sides. 

Fig, 4. The fame with either Foot quite 

round. 
Table XXVI. The PIROUETTE 

introduced by a COUPEE. 
Fig. 1. The Coupee with either Foot 



Fig. 2. The Pirouette with either Footl 

Table XXVrtl. The BOUREE before 
and behind \ and behind and before 9 ad- 
vancing in a whole Turn. 

Fig. i. Before and behind with either 
Foot in a half Turn. 

Fig. 2. Behind and before with either 
Foot in a half Turn more to tbePrefence. 

Table XXVIH. The fame before and 
behind^ and the COUPEE introdu- 
cing a HOP or C HAS SEE. 

Fig. 1. Before and behind in a half Turn 
with either Foot. 

Fig. 2. The Coupee in a quarter Turn 
to the Sides with either Foot. 

Fig. 3. The fame bef ere and behind in a 
half Turn with, either Foot. 

Fig. 4. The Half Coupee opening the 
dif engaged Foot in the Airfetting down 
incloid behind the Foot on which the 
Weight is, with either Foot. 



An Explanation of the Characters or Steps contained in Plate O, in 

the regular Order treated on in B O O K II. 



Table II. Fig. i. The MINUET 

STEP of two Movements or ONE 

andaFLEURET. 
Fig. 2. The fame open offfideways to the 

right Hand. 
Fig. 3. The fame croffing behind to the 

left fdeways. 
Fig. 4 The fame of three Movements 

croffing behind to the left. 
Fig. 5. The fame of three Movements 

be j ore and behind to the left. 

Table III. Steps by Way of GRACE. 
Fig. 1. The Hop or Contretemp in the 

Minuet forwards. 
Fig. 2. The fame backwards. 
Fig. 3. The Double Bouree upon the 

fame Place, tbefr/l, Fig. 1. the fe- 



cond* Fig. a. forwards. 

Fig. 4. The Double Bouree forwards 
tbefr/l Fig. 1. and the fecond Fig. 2* 

Fig. c. The Balance, tbefirfl Fig. 1. 
end the fecond Fig. 2. 

Fig. 6. The two Marches, thefirfi Fig. 1. 
and the fecond Fig. 2. 

Fig. 7. the Slip behind and Step for- 
wards to either Hand. 

The Slip behind to the right* Fig. I. 

The Step forwards* Fig. 2. Slip behind 
to the left* Fig. 3. 

The Step forwards* Fig. 4. 

Fig. 8. The fame in two Meafures. 

Plate U. contains the whole Form of 
the Minuet in the exaft Order treated 
on in BOOKIL 

THE 



THE 

ART of DANCING 

E X P L A I N'D. 

BOOK the FIRST. 

CHAP, t 
Of STANDING. 

■. I proceed to treat on Motitn, I apprehend it 
« neceflary to confider that Grace and Air fo 
ily requisite in oar Pofition, when we flmi 
lompany; for, having formed a true Notion of 
, there remains nothing farther to be obferved, 
wucn we enter upon the Stage of Life, either in 
Walking or Dancing, than to preferve the fame. 

And, for the better understanding of this important Point, let 

us imagine ourfelves, as fo many living Pictures drawn by the 

mod excellent Matters, exquifitely defigned to afford the utmoft 

Pleafure to the Beholden : And, indeed, we ought to fet our 

A i Bodies 



4 The Art of Dancing exphhti. r 

Bodics in fuch a Difpofition, when we (land in Converfation, that, 
were our A&ions or Poffcures delineated, they might bear the 
(IricYeft Examination of the mod critical Judges. 

Let us, therefore, to draw nearer to the Subjeft in hand, inquire 
into the Nature of thofe Portions that mull be obferved, in order 
to attain this fine and becoming Prefence : And that our Readtrt 
raay be furnifhed with proper Directions to arrive at the fame, tho* 
perhaps, our Rules may not be fo perfeft as could have been wtfheby 
we flatter ourfelves they win* be of no fmall Ufe and Advantage; 
wherefore, without farther Apology, I (hall enter upon the De- 
fcription of Pofiio* in general 

Pofeion, then, is the different Placing or Setting our Feet on 
the Floor, whether in Converfation or Dancing; and thofe for 
Converfation, or when vrtjlani in Company, are when the Weight 
refts as much on one Foot as the other, the Feet being confider- 
ably feparated or open, the Knees (height, the Hands placed by 
the Side in a genteel Fall or natural Bend of the Wrifts, and 
being in an agreeable Fafhion or Shape about the Joint or Bend of 
the Hip, with the Head gracefully turning to the Right or Left, 
which compleats a moft Heroic Pofture; and, tho' it may be impro- 
per, in the Prefence of Superiors, among Familiars, it is a bold and 
graceful Attitude, called the Second Pofitionf: Or, when the 
Heel of the right or left Foot is inclofed or placed, without 
Weight, before the Ancle of that Foot by which the Poife is fup- 
ported, the Hands being put between the Folds or Flaps of the 
Coat, or Waifle-coat, if the Coat is unbuttoned, with a natural and 
eafy Fall of the Arms from the Shoulders, this produces a very 
modeft and agreeable Pofture, named the Third Pofition inclofed ft: 
Or, if the inclofed Foot be moved open from the other, fideways, 
to the Right or Left, about the Pittance of half a Foot, or as 
far as, in fetting it down to the Floor, the Weight of the Body, 
reding on the contrary Foot is not cufordered by it, with the 
Toes handfomely turning out, the Hat under one Arm, and the 

t Sec Plate III. g S« the Feet in Place IV* 

other 



The Art of Dancing expkittJL i, 

other in fame agreeable Adion, the Head alfo turning a little from, 
the Foot on which the Poife refts, this we (tile the Fourth PouV 
tion open, and it may be very juftly efteemed a mod genteel and. 
becoming Pofture *. , 

The Pofitions, from which Dancing dates its Original, confift. 
of five Principles : As, firft, when the Toes turning outwards, 
the two Heels are equally placed together (a). Secondly, when 
both Heels are confidently feparated or open (b). Thirdly, when 
the Poife refts upon one Foot, the other being indofed or placed 
before the Ancle of that Foot by which the Weight is fapported(c)u 
Fourthly, when the indofed Foot is advanced upon a right line^, 
about the Length of a Step in Walking (d). And, Fifthly, when, 
the Heel of the advanced Foot is fo eroded and placed before the 
Toe of that Foot on which the Body refts, as that the Turning 
may be made, and yet one Foot not. in the lead, interrupt the 
other (e). Having briefly defcribed the moil agreeable Poftures o£ 
Standing in Converfation, and laid down the Rudiments of the 
whole A r t of D a n c i n g, I (hall now proceed to treat on Mfftim r 
the Refult of Pofition, and firft begin with fPalhtg. 



m 
• • m 

CHAP. n. 

Of W A L KING. 

"VV7ALKING confifts of Motion and a Change of Place, by trans* 
** ferring the Weight or Poife of the Body from one Foot to the 
other, by ftepping or advancing the difengaged Foot (whichsoever it 
be) from the firft Pofition f to the fourth advanced ||, and fo alter- 
nately, concluding as at firft f, but always on the contrary FootTIn^ 
order to "walk gracefjliy, it is to be obferved, that, during the 
Step or Motion made by the difengaged Foot, as above ||, the- 

* Sec Plate VIII. (a) See Plate II. (b) See Plate III. (c) Sec Plate IV. (d)See 
Plate IX. (e) Sec Plate XI. t Sec Plate I. I See Plate IX. 

B a whole* 



6 The Art of Dancing explain' J. 

-whole Weight of the Body mail reft on the fame Foot as at com- 
mencing it f, until the ftepping Foot is advanced its due Length 
of Step ||; and, on its receiving the Poife or Weight on the Ball 
or full Part of the Heel, upon fetting it to the Ground or Floor, 
the now difengaged Foot, which at firft fupported the Weight, 
becoming by this means releafed, attends the Poife in a gentle and 
eafy Motion, until it arrive in its former Pofition f; but on the 
contrary Foot for the Step next enfuing, which is made in like 
Manner, and fo on; for if, inftead of the Body's waiting or attend- 
ing the Motion of the ftepping Foot, as above delcribed ||, it 
fliould either go before or along with it, the Grace that ought 
to accompany our Steps, in JVtdlang, is loft, becaufe the Foot 
mud conftantly go before the Body ||, to receive it, other wife it 
will always reprefent the Body in a falling Pofture. 

And it is farther to be noted, that, in Walhng with a good 
Grace, Time and Harmony muft be obferved, as well as in Danc- 
ing: For Example, the fetting down or receiving the Poife, at 
the End of the Step, is upon One; the taking up the difengaged 
Foot, by a gentle and eafy raifing the Heel and pointing the 
Toe, in one intire Motion, which is the Manner of taking up 
the Foot to ftep, is upon Three \; and TW is in the coming up 
of the difengaged Foot, after the Step has been made f , which 
may be continued fader or ilower, but muft always be in one 
certain Time, counting One, Two, and Three, as in Mufic. And, 
by this Method, the Body with a good Grace refting or (land- 
ing, 'till two Thirds of the Three we count, muft neceflarily add 
great Beauty to our JFaHdng, which is the Cafe under Confedera- 
tion; ibr the Step is made upon One\\, the Preparation or Taking 
up the Foot, to make the Step, Three j*, and Tow is in the coming 
up of the releafed Foot, to continue our JVafling. 

And, as to the Motion of the Arms in fPalHng, they will na- 
turally have their due Courfeor Swing, in a continual Contraft or 
Oppofition to the Feet; for, whan the right Foot fteps for- 

f Sec Plate I. | Sec Plate IX. 

wards % 



The Art rf Dancing expkuti. 7 

wards (f), the left Arm advances, in Contradi&ion, as the right 
Ann does, when the left Foot ileps forwards (g), and fo alter* 
nately; and the like in Walking backwards, in Relation to the 
Contrail, but not with Refpe& to the Arms, beeaufe, in Waiting 
backwards, the Contradi&on is between the fame Arm and Foot; 
for, when the right Foot ileps back (h), the right Arm advances 
in Oppofitioh, as, when the left Foot ileps backwards (i), the 
left Arm advances, as aforefaid, and fo on, if continued. Having, 
I hope, offered what will prove fatisfa&ory, on this Head, I (hall 
next inquire into the different Sorts of Bows and Cottrtefcs in. 
Convention. 

m 

C H A P. Ill 

Of BOWING, or the different Sorts of 

HONOURS. 

TD OWS ot Comefics are the outward Marks of Refped we pay 
•■-' to others, which, in one Sex, are fhewed by bowing the- 
Body, but, in the other, by bending the Knees ; and, if made in- 
a. regular Manner, they are, indeed, very grand, noble, and highly 
ornamental. They accompany our Converfation, as well in Stand- 
ing as Walking', in the former, on breaking off a Converfation, as 
in taking Leave, or by way of Acknowledgment for fome Favour 
or obliging thing fpoken in our Praife; and in the latter, when-, 
we enter a Room, or meet a Perfon parting either on the Right 
or Left. Thefe are the two different Clafles or Sorts of Bows and- 
Courtepes y which are, as it were, . founded on the two preceding 
Chapters of Standing and Walking; and, to begin with leaving a 
Room, which relates to the fir ft of the faid Orders, I (hall ob* 

(f ) See the fecond Figure or Woman's Stfe in Plate IX. (g) & e the firft Figure 
in Plate IX. (h) See the firft Figure in Plate IX. (i) See alio the fecond Figure in. 
Plate IX. 

ferve^ 



8 The Art ^Dancing explabfd. 

lerve, that Taking Leave in Converfation confifts in {lepping 
afide, bowing, and leaving the difengaged Foot pointed, fide- 
ways, in one intire Motion to the firft Divifion -of the Bow or 
counting of 0»cf, during which it remains the Refpe& or count- 
ing of Twof; and, in the graceful Railing of the Body upon 
Three y it is drawn pointed, with the Knees {freight 'till it erodes 
behind the Foot on which the Poife reds, and (lands erect- on the 
Foot that it crofles behind ||, to be repeated as. often as Occafion 
requires; and it is to be noted, that the Refpe&, if repeated, is 
always made to the fame Hand ; if the Leave be taken to the 
Right, the Stepping afide is always with the right Foot $, as it 
is always to the Left, if taken the contrary Way (k). 

In Converfation with a Gentleman or Lady {landing, the very 
lame Bow is made, as in leaving a Room, the receiving the Poife 
on the Foot drawn behind excepted ||; but, inftead thereof, it 
remains, on Conclufion of the Bow, in the Third Pofition, upon 
the Point, without Weight, behind the foremoft Foot which here 
fupports the Poife, in readinefs to repeat the Refpe&, if necef- 
fary (1), becaufe, in this Bow of Repetition, it always (leps firft 
to one Handf, and then to the other f, in order to preferve the 
fame Ground; otherwife, if made as leaving a Room(m), it 
would have the contrary Effect and caufe the Perfons to retire^ 
inftead of retting in the fame Place; and it is a very genteel and 
becoming Bow, if the Stepping afide, Bow, and Point of the dif- 
engaged Foot, be made, at oncef, and a Paufe or Counting 
of Two is obferved between the Stepping afide and Bowing f, 
and the graceful Rifing up again from thence, in drawing of the 
pointed Foot up, at the fame Time, into the abovementioned 
Pofition*, be alfo in one intire Motion. As to the Reverence 
or Courtefy of a Lady, on the prefent Occafion, with Regard to 
the Feet, it is much the fame, but not fo, in Relation to the 
Body ; becaufe, as I have already faid, the Refped the former 

t See the 2d and 4th PLites in the 2d Book. B See the 3d Plate in Book the ad. 
$ See the 2d Plate in Book the 2d. (k) See Plate 4 in Book the 2 J. (1) See the Feet 
in Plate 5. (m) Ssc Plate 3, Book the sd. ♦ See the Feet in Piate 5. 

(hews 



The Art o^ Dancing exphhfd. 9 

(hews to any is by bending the Body, bat the Courtefy or Refpect, 
which a Lady pays to thofc of either Sex, is by a graceful Bend- 
ing of the Knees f, accompanied with a becoming and fuitable 
Difpofition of the different Parts of the Body: As, haying the 
Hands before them, in fome agreeable Pofture fupporting, as it 
were, the flanting or falling Shoulders, which, at toe fame Time, 
lengthen and more gracefully expofe a fine Neck, as well as a 
beautiful Face compofed of fo many delicate and charming Fea- 
tures, with which they are ufually adorned by the Bounty of 
Nature; and, tho' it may be, in fome Meafure, prefumpjtuous to 
attempt any Addition to the natural Charms of the Fair Sex, I 
flatter myfelf they will forgive me, if I acquaint them, that a 
modeft Look or Direction of the Eye, an agreeable Smile or a 
lively and pleafant Afpett, with a Chin neither poked out nor 
curbed in, but the u hole Countenance erect and graceful, will add 
a Luflre to the whole, where any of thefe are wanting, whether 
in one Sex or the other ; and, together with the eafy Situation 
or Pofture of the whole Head, Neck, and Arms, with the hand- 
fome Turn of the Feet, they compleat the intire Fafhion or 
agreeable Difpofition of a fine accomplifhed Lady, as well in 
Converfation in general, as the Courtefy j, or WaJhng y from its 
being thus difpofed, from Top to Toe, is only to preferve the 
graceful Pofition of the Body, as above defcribed. 

It only now remains to inquire, whether a Lady Heps afide and 
makes her Honour, in the Manner we have (hewn a Gentleman' 
leaves a Room, after flepping afide $, by drawing the dilen- 
gaged or pointed Foot f into the firft Pofition, equal to the . 
Foot, which flepped afide||, inftead of drawing it crofting be- 
hind, as aforefaid(n); or that Courtefying, without ilepping afide 
at all ||, as fome do, is only to let the Weight or graceful Fafhi^- 
of the Body, as jufl defcribed, fall, or rather feat itfelf, as on 



t See Plates 2d and 4th in Book th : 2 J. $ See Pb e t' e 2d :n Book th: 2d. ( See 
Plate the 2d. (n) Sec the 4th and 1 1 -h Plates. 

B Chair 



io The Art of Dancing txpkhfi, 

Chair or Sterol, 'without Diforder, upon that Foot which is 
drawn or crofted behind (n), as m leaving Company, or on both 
Legs equally alike ||, if the pointed Foot be drawn into the firft 
Portion |[; and the like, if made on both Legs, "without moving 
from the fame Place ||, only with this Difference, in Relation to 
the Weight's coming upon the pointed Foot f or that which 
is crofted behind (n), after touching the Heel of the Foot on 
which the Poife Tefts*, in like Manner as when the Gentleman 
takes Leave f , and retires back, as it were a Seat for the Weight 
to reft upon(n), whilft the Cmrtejy or Lady's Refpe& is paid, 
upon the Beginning or firft Divifion; whereas, in a Bow for the 
Man, it does not receive the Weight, 'till the third Divifionf, 
refting the Counting of Two for the Refpe&, as we have ob~ 
ferved, in the Contrary Sex; and, upon counting of Three at com- 
pleating the Courtefy, it rifes in the fame flow, graceful, and de- 
liberate Manner, 'till it (lands upright on the crofting behind 
Foot **, as at firft it feated itfeff thereon, in the Courtefy or 
Bending of the Knees f, compleating the Refpeft or Courtefy^ 
on a Lady's, leaving a Room, in the difen gaged or foremoft 
Foot's being at Liberty to renew the Refpe&, ' as Occasion 
squires**. 

As to 'which Foot the Stepping afide 'begins with, in Rela- 
tion to taking of Leave, it is altogether the fame, as was 
defcribed for the other Sex; but, as this Courtefy or Refpeft has 
the like ErTe£t, as I obferved, in treating of the Bow in Con- 
vention with another; viz. Retiring from each other, it is to 
be evaded in riling, by transferring the Poife from the hindmoft 
Foot to the foremoft, which, being then at Liberty, is ready to 
repeat the Complaifance on the contrary Side, and fo to pre* 
ferve the fame Ground. And the like may be faid, in Rela- 
tion to concluding the Courtefy on the ftepping afide Foot, 



(n) See the 4th and nth Plates. See Plate the 2d. f See Plates die 2d and 
4th in Book the 2d. * See the Feet in Plate 5. ** See Plate the 3d in Book the 
ad. 

when 



The Art ^Dancing explain I u 

when the pointed Foot is drawn into the firft Pofition*; or the like* 
without ftepping at all, by fwaying or waving the principal 
Fart of the Body, as Occanon offers, either upon the right (o) 
or left Foot (p), as will be moil to Advantage, in the graceful 
bending or finking down upon the Knees || ; which Wave or 
Sway of the Body not a little contributes to the Beauty of the 
Courtefy, as does alfo the handfome Pofition of the Waifte, 
neither too much forwards nor backwards, the whole Poife of 
the Body being beautiful and upright, as before defcribed, 
directly perpendicular or right down over the Heel or Heels, 
on which the Poife reds (q); and this, I think, concludes all that 
is neceflary to be {aid, concerning the Reverence or Cmtftcfi 
made by Perfons of either Sex, according to the firft Oafs, 
relating to Pofiion or Standing, at leaving a Room, or in Con- 
verfation with others. 

I now proceed to the Second Sort of Honours, viz. thofp which 
are introduced by Motion, as in Walking, &c. and I (hall, firfl, &mfb 
what concerns the Ladies, before I return to the Gentlemen, who 
are to obferve, that, at the End of the laft Step, after, their 
Entrance into a Room, before they pay their Refpe£t or Hm*r f 
they are to make a graceful Paufe or Stand upon the Foot 
that made the laft Step, which, as has been already {aid. m 
Walking, is compleated upon counting of One, fo that the whole 
Perfon refts the counting of 7W, in the coming up of the 
difengaged Foot into the firft Pofhion, equal to the Foo£ wftqh 
made the laft Step preparatory for the Courtejy (r) ; and Three 
is the Reft it makes, when thus joined in the graceful Disposi- 
tion of the whole Faftiion, or upon taking it up, if afterwards 
flapping afide (s), and thus ere& from Head to Foot , it is 
duly prepared to make the Courtefy in that fmooth Manner of 
bending the Knees we have defcribed, directing the Eye* as Occa- 



mp*m** ■ ». ■ j. i ... mj 



*^^ 



• See Hate the 2d. (o) See the 2d Figure or Woman's Side in Plate 1. (p) See 

the ill Figure in Plate 1. fl See the 2d and 4th Plates in the 2d Book, (q) Stc 
Plate 2d in the 2d Book, (r) See the 1ft and 2d Plates, (s) See Place 1. 

B 1 fion 



12 The Art of Dancing explantJL 

(ion requires; or the like, if the Court ejy be made in ftepping 
afide, as in taking Leave f, for there is no other Difference be- 
tween the Honour or Refpett, on leaving Company and coming 
up to them, than that, as I have obferved, the former proceeds 
from Pojhim or Standing || , and the latter is introduced by Mo- 
tion or fralksng^; but, having (hewn, what that Preparation is, there 
is no Occasion for any farther Enlargement.' 

If a Lady makes an Honour Pajpng, either on the Right or 
Left, or in meeting any One, in Convcrfiuon, Waiting, or the 

of th 



like, at the End of the Step preceding the Comphifance or 
Refped, (he turns about half way towards the Perfon, upon Con- 
clufion of the faid preparatory Step or Counting of One ; and, 
upon Counting of 7w, (he lets the difengaged or coming up Foot 
touch the Heel of that Foot which (lepped, crofsways, Tbefore 
the faid coming up Footff, which now attends the Poife, in 
order to make the Honour ; and, upon Three , (he fets it down, 
fomewhat obliquely or flanting off from the Perfon to whom 
the Refoe£fc is paid, without Weight**, and thus becomes duly 
prepared to make the Courtejy*; I mean, when the Head is 
beautifully turned to the Right or Left, according to the Side 
on which the Refpeft is made, in a graceful Contraft of the 
whole Fafhion; and, being fo difpofed, (he makes the Honour 
by a fmooth and eafy Bending of the Knees. The whole Poife 
of the Body, during the Counting of One or Bending, as' afore- 
faid, reds the Counting of 7W*, or, as we have already faid, 
the Refpe& in a fine Contraft; and, upon the third Divifim or corn- 
pleating the Courtefi, it rifes gracefully from the Foot on which 
k refted, all the while, in this becoming Twifl, palling on, 'till 
it (lands erecV upon the Foot which was placed or advanced for 
that Purpofe **, by transferring the Poife from the Foot that 
made the preparatory Step for this Refpe&, which, being now at 

. t See Plates 2d and 4th in Book the 2d. p See the 4th, 5th and 8th Plates. 
$See Plate 1. ftSee the Feet inPlate 5. •• See the Feet in Plate 10. * See Piatet 
2d and 4th in Book the ad. 

Liberty,, 



The Art gf Dakcing explaUtJb: ij 

Liberty, is ready to repeat the fame, as often as Occafion requires $£ 
and from hence it becomes a Kind of fPalfctv Court ejy y chang- 
ing the Poife from one Foot to the other. And it is to be notea^ 
that it muft always be the Foot next the Perfon, which make* 
the laft Step in Wdfaig, before the Refpe£t : For Inftance, if 
the Perfon be on the Right, the right Foot makes' the Step; and 
the left, if the Honour be paid to the other Side, turning, as 
before defcribed, towards the Perfon or Foot which made the 
Step in Preparation for the Court:Jjr 9 and directing the Eye, fide* 
ways, upon the Perfon to whom the Refpe& is paid, inftead oC 
right forwards, as when entering a Room, or meeting One, which 
is the only Difference. And it is to be farther obferved, that, 
tho' this Comphifance may be repeated, once. or more, after paf- 
fing a Perfon, it mud never be made, before we come " parallel 
to the Perfon to whom we pay this Refpeft ; and if Occafion 
requires its being transferred to the other Side, whicfi often 
falls out, as when Company are feated or Handing, on both Sides, 
of a Room or Gallery, &c. we continue walking on. till we arrive- 
at the next Occafion of paying this Refped, as when Cempany 
are fcattered, at fome Diflance, and then make the Paufe or 
Stand, at the End of the Step next the Perfon or Perfons,, 
by turning, &Pc. as before; or if the Change or Transferring. ma v 
be fooneft performed,- as when Company are thick on. both Sides^. 
it muft be divided by two Steps made between the preceding 
Court cfies, the fecond Step preparing to pay the Refpe&, as i 
have already (hewn, which will be the left Foot, the foregoing 
Honour being fuppofed to the Right; and the right Foot, if the 
Complaifance be firft paid to the Left. And, in thefe Poflbm 
Honours, it muft be noted, that no Regard is to be obferved, 
with Refpect to the Quality of »the Perfon, but only Conveniency, 
in Relation to the Right or Left, as the. Company firft prefent 
themfelves, as we pafs along; nor, indeed, can it well be otherwife, 



§ See Plate i. 

becauie 



14 The Art of Dancing explained. 

beeaufe they are all ta receive it, in their Turns. As what ha* 
been faid is all that I apprehend to be material, relating to 
the Ladies, I flatter myfelf, that they -will not he wanting in 
putting thefe Rules into Practice, fince I have been at fo great 
Pains in compofing them for their Service. ' 

I (hall now proceed to the Conclusion of what I have to offer 
to the Gentlemen, on this Head, which is much to the like Effeft 
with what was obferved to the Ladies; for, when a Gentlemen 
enters a Rodm, the graceful Stand or Reft he makes, as already 
clefcribed, in the Courtcjy for a Lady on this Occasion, mull be 
always made on the laft Step before Bowing, which may be oh 
the left Foot; whilft the right, in coming up, as aforefaid. in its 
Attendance on the Poife, inftead of ending in the firft Poutionf, 
as in Walking, is placed considerably more open> fideways, without 
Weight, the Heel being fomewhat raifed, the Ball or Ififtep point* 
ed or preffing lightly on the Floor, the Knee ilreight, and the 
whole Weight of the Body, in a Gentleman-like Manner, retting 
on the left Foot||, bows, as Occafion requires, by bending the 
Body and (craping the open Foot, at the fame Time, in one 
mtitt Motion forwards; upon the Counting of One**, remains the 
Refpeft or Counting of 7w, in this refpe&ful Pofture, with 
the Knee on which the Body reds bended, to prevent its being 
awry, which otherwife would be the Confequence, and the Arms 
naturally hanging under the Shoulders; and, upon three, it rife* 
from this humble Pofture in one intire (low motion, 'till it ftands 
ered on the right or (craping Foot; and the left, at the fame 'Time, 
being releafed from the Weight of the Body, falls into the firft 
P option, as in Wdhng *, to repeat it, if it be necefiary. 

The Bow Paffmg differs, in no Refpe&, from that advancing or 
coming into a Room, except in the Situation of the Perfon : For 
Inilance, in entering a Room, the Perfon is before us, but only 



t See Plate i. | See the Feet in the ad Figure or Woman's Side of Plate 6. 
** See the Feet of the 2d Figure in Plate 9. * See the 2d Figure in Plate 1. 

upon 



The Art gf Dancing explahfJi t$ 

upon one Side, on the prefent Occauon. From hence it appears, 
that, after the Step preceding the Bow and Paufe, placing the 
contrary Foot or reparative^ is made f, the Refpeft is paid int 
the very fame Method, as forwards, only that the' $ody is. tnrneo 
in -a beautiful and agreeable Twift or Contrail, tideways, tookinop 
upon the Perfpn to whom we pay the Refpeft; if the Bow be 
made upon the Right, tlie antecedent Step is made with .the 



left Foot, and the right, daring the Paufe ? is placed for the 
Scrape in Bowing f; as, if. it be 'made on the contrary Side, the 
right Foot makes the preparatory Step, and the left wiE be 
placed, as aforefaid, to pay the Refpeft*; and, if repeated, it 
will always begin and end with the fame Foot, 'till changed 
by adding a fecond Step, which transfers die Bow to the other 
Side, as Occafion* offers. This Bow is alfo made, in waflting 
with a Gentleman or Lady y upon fome obliging Exprefliqn in 
Converfation, once or oftener, as Neceflity requires,' with the 
right 'Foot fcrapirig, if the Perfon be on the Right, out the 
contrary Foot, if the Perfon be on the Left. It muitatfbbe 
noted, that the Step made, before placing the Foot for thtBow r 
is to be made with the contrary Foojt^ to the Side the Perfon i$» 
on, to -whom the Refpejft is paid, and the placed Foot is that 
next the Perfon; tho it is the Reverfe in the Ladies, becaufe 
the Step preparatory for this Refpe& is made with the Foot 
next the Perfon, and the contrary is the placed Foot. 

It will not be improper, before I conclude with the Gcntlcmc*^ 
to take fome farther Notice of a Difficulty that may arife, Hi the 
Application of the Bow F offing \ I mean, the Changing or Tranf- 
ferring it from one Side to the other, becaufe, in parting through 
a Lane or Room full of Company, we cannot, as I have already 
obferved to the Ladies , bow on both Sides, at once ; and therefore 
the Rule is, to pay this RefpeA to thofe that firft fall in our Way, 



t See the Feet of the ad Figure in Plate 6. • See the Feet of the lA Figorc at 
Plate 6* 

• * 

and 



i4 The Art ^Dancing, explaktd, 

and, if poffible, conclude on that Side, and then, by walking two 
Steps or more,, to make -the like Compliments on the other; 
which will be, by bowing and fcraping the left Foot£, if the 
firft Refpecl.be paid to the Right, and the contrary Foot, if it be 
firft paid to the Left *. And if it fhould fall out, as in St. y<xmes\ 
Parky or other publick Places, where you may walk, perhaps, a 
confiderable Way, before you find an Occafion for paying this 
Refpeft, you are to note, that thefe Bows, as we faia, in Rela- 
tion to the Ladies Courtepes, are never made, before you come 
equal to thofe you falute; and, if it be a Perfon of Nobility or 
extraordinary Fafhion, an additional Bow, fideways, as when 
leaving a Room, may be added, with the contrary Foot to that 
which made the Scrape, turning full to the Perfon to whom you 
pay this uncommon Refpe&, in $<$>% ; nor . muft you forget, 
that, in entering a Room, or meeting any one, it is always to 
be added to the Bow Forwards, as being of lingular Ufe, in paying 
Refpe& to the Company in general, as the former is to the 
Perfon we falute in particular, by a Call of our Eye round the 
Company, omitting none, for an Omiffion may, many Times, 
be e (teemed an Affront and ill Manners. It will be like wife 
expedient to obferve, that fome Ladies make the Paffhig Honour 
the very fame, as that I have defcribed for the Gentlemen; the 
only Difference is, that, after placing the Foot f , inftead of lowing, 
in the Scrape of the Foot ||, they courtcjy to the Right** or 
Left ff , as Occafion requires, in the graceful Contrail defcribed 
for the other Sex's Bowing y concluding on the fcraping Foot||; 
which, if on the Right, will be the right Foot ^, and left at 
Liberty to ftep and place the preparatory Foot ; as, on the con- 
trary Side, it will conclude on the left Foot =, and the right will 



$ See the Feet of die i ft Figure in Plate 6. * See the Feet of the 2d Figure in 
Plate 6. f See Plate 6. flSte the Feet in Plate 9. •* See the Feet of the 2d Figure 
in Plate 6. ft See the Feet of the ift Figure in the fame Plate. $$ See the 2d 
Figure in Plate 9, and 2d of Plate 1. «" See the ift Figure in Plate 9, and ift of 
Plate 1. 

then 



The Art of Dancing explain d. 17 

then be in Readinefs to make the Step, and place the Foot, in 
order to its being repeated, according to the various Occasion,* 
• before mentioned. Some alfo ufe this Method of Courtcjyiqg, 
when they enter a Room, or meet a Peribn, which is, in all 
Re(pe&s, agreeable to the Gentleman s Bow, as above deferibed, 
except in the Scrape or Sliding of the prepared Foot forwards f, 
viz. to bend both Knees, at the Cunt Time, and to let the Poife 
fall gracefully upon the hind Foot, during the firft and fcccnd 
Divifions; and afterwards the Body riles beautifully, as aforefoid, 
'till it ftands on the advanced Foot f, by transferring the Weight 
from the hind Foot, which, being releafed, is ready to«tu/%(t), and 
place the contrary Foot, in order to repeat it, in like Manner, if 
necefiary : Or, if the Ccurtejy ufed, at leaving a Room, be 
added *, it will then, in all Reipe&s, be anfwerable to the Gen- 
tleman's Bow, at coming into a Room. But in Fine, let the 
Bow or Court eft, notwithstanding all the various Methods, and 
the feveral Occasions, here deferibed, be made in which of thofe 
Forms we pleafe, they cannot fail of being performed to Ad* 
vantage, but mult neceflarily produce a good EfTeft, provided 
they be made in the Manner already (hewn, upon Counting of 
One *, the Paufe or Reft Two*, ana the Riling upon Three (uY. 
Having, therefore, in this Difcourfe upon Honours in genera],. 
endeavoured to take Notice of every Particular, that might prove 
ufeful or inftru&ive, fo as to omit nothing material, I natter 
my felf, that, if it be not, in all Refpe&s, accompliihed, . accord- 
ing to my Intentions, the Difficulty of the Subject will plead 
my Excufe; and, as I have, in the preceding Chapters, regularly 
gone thrcugh what I apprehended neceflary, upon Standing, 
Waling, and Honours in general, under the laft of which Heads, 
as the Reader will eafily perceive, it was fcarce poflfible to avoid 
fome Repetitions, in my treating di ft i nelly on Bowt and Cour- 
tcjies, I {hall now proceed to the various Steps of Darning, 

— ■ — ■ — II — -^— — — — ^— — — , , II ■— — ^ M ■ !«■■■ ■■ lmm 

t Sec the Feet in Plate o. (t)Sx Plate 1. * See PUtes die 2d and 4:11 ia Book 
the 2d. (u) Sec Plate 3d in BaSk the ad. 

c CHAP. 



i8 The Art of Dancing expbm'J. 




CHAP. IV. 
OftbePJNCING-ROOM* 

BEfore I enter upon the various Stefs of Dancing, it will be 
neceflary to defcribe the Room in which the Dancing or Stefs 
are to be performed; which indeed feems to claim our more 
immediate Notice, fince it will greatly affift us, in forming clear 
and di(lin£t Notions of the enfuing Work. 

Firft then, you are to obferve, that the Shape and Figure of 
Rooms differ exceedingly; for fome are of a. direct Square, others 
not fquare but oblong or longifh, namely, when the two Sides 
are ibmewhat longer than the Top or Bottom, and various others 
that, in Reality, are of no Form at all; which renders Dancing 
extremely difficult and confufed to thofe, who have not a jufl 
and true Idea of the Room, in its different Situations; becaufe, 
if this be wanting, altho' they may perform very handfomely, 
at their own HouJes y or in School with a Mailer, yet, in Affem- 
tiies or Rooms Jbroad. they are as much difordered and at a 
Stand, as if in an Uninhabited IJland. I therefore conclude, that the 
Crime, if it (hould by any be efleemed fuch, of dwelling fome- 
what longer than I intended on this Subject, will the more 
eafily be pardoned by the Ladies and Gentlemen, when I acquaint 
them, that it intirely proceeded from the earned Defire I have 
of rendering them Service, by endeavouring to remove the above 
mentioned Caufes of Diforder and Confufion; which I cannot but 
perfuade myfelf will meet with a favourable Reception, efpecially 
from the Hands of thofe who, by this Means, (hall receive Improve- 
ment. 

Encou- 



The Art of Dancing explaittd. 19 

' Encouraged by fuch a pleating Profped, I proceed to inform, 
the Gentlemen and Ladies y that, when they are about to dame 
in a Room of the firft Sort, viz. a direct Square (a), the dame 
may be begun, at any of the four Sides or Parts of the Square 
or Room; but then they are to note, that the Side or Part, 
on which the Dance begins, is always called the Bottom or Lower 
End (b); the Side or Part which they face, the Preface ot Utter 
End (c); and the two remaining Parts or Sides of the Room 
receive their Names, according to the Hand they are on: For 
Inftance, the Side, to which the right Shoulder points, is calTd 
the right Side (d) y and the other the k/f(e); from whence it it 
to be understood, that the Back is to the Lower End of the 
Room, and the Face to the Upper, (b that, if, inflcad of Begin- 
ning, as aforefaid, you was to commence, either upon the right 
or left Sides, they would not be then Sides y as before, but the 
Uffer and Lower Ends of the Room; that is to lay, if upon 
the right Side (f) the left would be the Preface or Ufper End(g) f 
and if upon the left (h) the right (i), and confequently the Parts 
or Sides, which at firft were the Lower (k) and Uffer Ends (IV 
now are the Sides ; but all this is fubfement to, and depends 
upon the Company, who muft always be feated at the Preface 
or lifter End. 

As to the longtjb or fecond Sort of Rooms , they differ from the 

/pare; in the Sides being longer than the Ends(m); and it of 

Courfe follows, that the Dance muft begin, at one of the faid 

Ends(n), which is like wife decided by the Company; or, if the 

Door be hung near the End of one of the Sides, as ufually it is, 



(a) See the Square or Room, marked i, in the ift Plate diftinguifh'd by the Let- 
ter A. (b) See the Letters A B in the faid Square. (c) See the Letters C D. 
(d) See the Lettei. E F. (e) See the Letters G H. (f) See the Letters A B in 
the Squat e mark'd 2. (g) See the Letters CD in the laid Square, (h) See the 
Letters A B in the Room or Square marked 3. (i) See the Letters C D in the 
faid Square, (k) See the Letters A B in the Square marked 1. (I) See the Letters 
C D in the fame Square. Cm) See the Letters E F G H in the Rooms marked 
4> 5» o. (n) See the Letters A B in the Rooms marked 4, 5, 6. 

C a the 



20 The Art of Dancing cxplahtd. 

the Dance commonly begins, at the End next the Door(o). 
However that be, the Dancers mail have a particular Regard to 
the Prefince and Bottom of the Room, where they began, other- 
wife it is no Wonder that thole, who are of a timorous and balh- 
ful Nature, with the Fears of being out together with the 
various Turnings and Windings of fome Dances y fnould be per- 
plex'd and nonplufs'd ; and this I have perceived to be the 
Cafe, when I have (een a Minuet begun at the Bottom of the Room, 
and ended at the Upper End; which could not poflibly have 
happened, had they obferved the preceding Rules. . 

I (hall, for the more fully Clearing of this Point, add an Obfer- 
vation or two more that may be of Service: Suppofing one Page 
or Leaf of the Book you now read, or any other, to be the 
Room or Floor in which the Dances or Pra&ife of the Steps 
contained in the following. Work are to be perform'd, lay it flat 
and open upon a Window or Table, at the Upper End of the 
Room ; and if, when the Book is open, the two Pages make 
a Square, it will be agreeable to the firft Room, and the one 
half or (ingle Page to the longifb or Jecond; but you are to 
take fpecial Notice, as to the Part or End of the Room intended 
for the Prcjince, that the Title or Page of the Book be fo placed 
or laid upon the Table or Ground, as that, when you (bind at 
the Bottom facing the Upper Part of the Room, to perform 
the forefaid Steps or Dances y you can read the laid Book : Or, 
fuppofing the whole Floor to be the lame Book, and to contain 
the Matter written in the Page or half Page, the Book lying 
nVd and immoveable upon the Table or Ground, let the Turn be 
made to the Right or Left, in a Quarter, Half, or Three-quarter 
Turn, and you cannot poflibly make the lead Miflake ; for tho* 
the Book, by which you are directed in Compliance therewith, 
turns along with you, yet any other you fhall lay upon the 
Ground will remain fix cl; fo that from what has been laid upon 



f o) See the following Mark f in the Rooms aforeiatd. 

this 



The Art of Dancing explahtd. 21 

this Head, I think it plainly appears, that the Lower End of the 
Page or -Leaf is the Bottom of the Room, and the Title above 
the Pretence or Upper End ;' the Beginning .of the Lines, as 
you read thefe in Dancing, is the left Side, and the' Breaking 
off of the Lines the right (p), tho' the Sides of the Book are 
not fo term'd; The Reafon of this may be underftood, by plac- 
ing a Perfon at the Upper End of the Room facing the Bottom-, - 
holding a printed Book or written Paper perpendicular in his 
Hands, fo as that you can read it ; for you will find it the Re- 
verie to Dancing, in that the right Hand will hold the Part of - 
the Paper from whence the Lines begin, and the left that where- 
they break off. It is farther to be noted, that, iuppofing the 
Dance for one Perfon alone in the fquare Room or two Paget- 
of the Book, as juft mentioned, the Dancer places him or her- 
felf in the Center, or upon the Joining of the two Pages, which, 
when open, is dire&ly in the Middle (q); or, to pra&ife any Step* 
of this Book, the Cafe is the lame; but, if the Dance be of Muol 
the Lady takes the right Side of the laid Center or Line (r), ana 
the Gentleman the left (s) , fo that the joining or prefenting of 
Hands, if neceflary, would fall upon the Line or Center upon 
which the {ingle Dancer begun (q) ; in which it is to be noted, 
as on other Occasions, that the Lady takes the Right of the 
Gentleman: 

And as I have now faid what, I hope, will prove fufficient 
to remove all the Difficulties that may arile, in Dancing, on Ac- 
count of the Room, or in Relation to the Steps I am about 
to explain, I fhall no longer detain thofe who are ambitious of 
attaining to Perfection in a Science, of which I have the Ho- 
nour of being a Profeflbr ; but, having prepared and made them 
thoroughly acquainted with the Room, in which the Steps of Danc~~ 



(p) See the 7th Example of the Book in the Plate of the Room. (q) See the 
Letter S in the {kid 7th Example, (r) See the Letter W in the Example afore&id.. 
Xs) See the Letter M in the before mentioned Example. 

•St 



32 The Art of Dancing ext>kut4* 

ing are to be performed, I (hall invite them into the lame; but, 
before I defcribe the various Steps of Dancing, I (hall, in a few 
Words, endeavour to prepare their Minds to form a clearer and 
more diftin& Idea of the following Deferiptions. 

As the Human Strufiure is compofed of different Parts, vk.. 
Head, Neck, Body, Arms, Legs, Feet, &c. fo likewife is 
Dancing of Portions, Steps, Sinking, Ruing, Springing, Caper* 
ing, Falling, Sliding, Turning, Figures, Cadence or Time, tfc. 
And as the Head confifts of Eyes, Ears, Nofe, Month, &c. the 
Arms, of the Shoulders, Elbows, Wrifts, Hands, Fingers, and 
Joints of the Fingers, the Body, as it were, remaining in the 
Center or Middle of the Human Frame, fupporting the (aid Arms, 
as the Legs, which fupport them both, are compofed of the 
Hips. Knees, Ancles, Feet, Toes, and Joints f of the laid Toes, 
on the firfl of which the Riling upon the Inftep is always made; 
and as all thefe different Parts have their peculiar Excellencies, 
to adorn the Whole, lb the Eyes give Life to the Face, as well 
as direct the Steps; the Ears mark Time to the Tune; the 
Nofe, as it were, points out the graceful Twills or Turns the 
Head makes, in Oppofition to the other Parts of the Body, 
whilft the Mouth, at the lame Time, adds thole becoming Smiles, 
which, together with the Brightnefs and Luflre of the Eyes, 
compleat a mod agreeable and pleafing Countenance. The Neck 
too, in its graceful Compliance with the Turn of the Head; the 
Shoulders, in their natural Riling, Falling, or Hanging down(v); 
the Elbows, in their eafy Ben dings, according to the Occafion(w); 
the Wrifts, in their pliable Correfpondence with the Elbows and 
Shoulders, as the handfome Shaping or Bending of the Thumbs 
and Fingers produces beautiful Hands compleating the Arms(x); 
which, in their refpe&ive Oppofing the Head, in Conjunction 



-)- See the Figure in Plate III. (v) See the different Pans, as above deJcribed, in the 
Ladies Figures contained in the 2d Book. (w)Sce the Figures in Plate 10. (x) See 
the Ports above mentioned in the Arms and Fingers contained in Plate 13. 

with 



• f J - • • 

The Art 0/ Dancing exphutJL 23 

with the Body, is a farther and large Addition to the Whole (y); 
the Legs, in the gracefully fupporting the Frame of the Body, 
Head, Neck, and Arms (z); and the Hips or Joints, which unite 
the Legs and Body, agree with the various Movements or Bend- 
ings and Rifings of the Knees or Inftcpsf, the Pofitions or 
handfome Turn of the Feet coinpleating the Beauty of the Legs> 
on the neat Management of which the Perfection of Dancing 
(6 much depends * ; and thefe together, in Confederacy with 
the Head, Oppofe the Body and Arms, rendering the whole- 
Body compleat and capable of Dancing, in all its various Attl* 
tudes or Poftures **. 

Having, by the foregoing Simile or Companion, given an Ac* 
count of the outward Form of the Human StruBure, fo far as* 
it relates to, or correfponds with Dancing, or may, in any Re(pe&, 
conduce to the better Underftanding of the enfuing Subject, by 
running over the different Parts of the Body, from the Head! 
to the Feet, which compofe the Pofitions, with a fhort Exphr 
nation of the faid Parts, (hewing how they agree in forming, 
the moil pleafing Obje&, to grace the Art of Dancing ff, 
before I proceed to treat on its various Steps, I (hall, by the way, 
obferve, that the foresaid Particulars, from whence the whole 
Body or Art of Dancing is produced, namely, P option, Ssnke 
ing, Stepping, Rifi/tg, Springing, 4?c. are of the very fame Ufe, in: 
Dancing, as the Aphafat, in the Compojhim of Words ; for as 
Words vary and are produced, according to the different placing; 
of the Letters; and different Subje£b, Languages, &c. accord* 
ing to the different Compofition of Words; or, as in Muflc, 
by the different placing of the Notes, that compofe the Gamut 
upon the Scale or Spaces between the Lines, are produced dif- 



(y) Seethe Turn of the Head, Body, and Arms, of the Figures in Plate 6, or in the 
4th, 5th, 7th, 9th, nth, 1 ith, and 14th Plates, (z) Su-e the Figures contained in the 
3d, 6th, and 8th Plates. f Sue the Figures in the 3d and 10th Plates. * See 
the Feet of the Figures in general. ** See the Figures in the 4th, 6th, otb,, 
nth, 1 2th, and 14th Plates. ft See the Figures in Plate 13, tec. 

ferent 



24 Thc-ART of Dancing explain^ 

• ». 

ferent Sounds, which, as they afcend or defcend, compofe various 
Bars or Meafures, that may be compared to Words, and the 
various Bars and Measures compofe the various jriecei of M"/jf> 
in different Keys and Movements; fo the different Siefs o£ Dotting 
are produced, according to the various Placing* of the Sinkr, 
Rifiigr, Bounds , &c. upon the Step, whether confiding of one, 
two, three or more Steps to the Meafure, and . the different 
Steps produce Variety of Dances, according to the Compofef** 
Fancy, upon all Sorts of Movements in Mupc, whether grave 
or brisk. 

We are, next, to (hew, how thefe Actions or Motions of 
the Body, which, as we laid above, compofe the whole Art 
of Dincing, correfpond with the Portions and. various Mo- 
tions and Steppings of the Feet, in composing the following 
Steps and Movements ; and the Manner, in which they are 
made, will fully appear from the Defcription I am .about to 
give of the laid Steps, beginning with the Half Coupe e, 
the Movement that fir ft occurs in Dancing. . 



\. 



** 



• - • 



V 

ft ■* 



CHAP. 



- r 



The Art of Dancing exfUmfJL 2$ 



'». ' m - I * 1 r » 1 r *. ', '«! '"< r «i T »i f • ' •"•<!■ ■*»' '»• '■' ' k '« '■•• ' » ' '«• *»• ••' •• ^» — • 



C H A t. l -V£ 

0/ ri&e CO VP E £ of che Step," or HALF 

COUP E E. 



• # 



, • . f * * ..■•• * > g 

t , » » I ' ♦ - 



Eis, firft of all, to be obferved, that the Half Coupe y tHo* 
1 very agreeable Step in Dancings as well as one of the molt' 
:ult to be performed well, by Reafbn of its Ptainndi, 
is originally nothing more than a '{ingle Step, made with either 
Foot, from one Place to another with the additional Oraa- 
ment of a Movement or Bending or Rifing of the Knees in 
Time to Mufc ; and it is moil amiable, when executed in- that 
gentle and graceful Manner it ought to be, whether upon the 
Toe or Heel "; : •••- - 

The Half Coupee may be performed various *• Ways, as 
by Sinking, Rifing, and Stepping forwards ; and the like back* 
wards, tideways, to either Hand, or in turning a quarter or half 
Turn (a), Vc. It ufually takes up a Time or Meafure of the 
Tune, and, being continued, transfers the Weight, as in Walk- 
•% from one Foot to the other; and, in Diftin&ion from 
the reft, the Dmctng-Ma/lers have named it a Half Coufee, 
tho' I think it may rather be called a Coupee of one Step, as the 
Title above Ipeeifies : But, as I (hall have Occafion to give a 
farther Account of this Step, when, in treating of the Bouree or 
Fttttrety I carry on a Companion between that Step and the 
lid' ' Confee y I (hall, in the mean Time, proceed to the Cmfee, 
the Movement that next occurs in Danzig. 



(a) Sec the Explanation and Tcbfe of this Step in tie Hue na k*d E. 

D CHAP. 






* 



XBfr.N%ftx> tf ;D a #<ai ^Oi-«#WrfSK 



♦ \i/»>^»»^ 









iV» 



'lO -i.'> r, 5,-» 






• I 






.3. a r ii'oo 



r\ 






>o 




HE Coupee, on the other Hand, is a compound Step; 
thftt isto fay > it is formed of two Steps, joined together, 
wmcn, however, are to be accounted but as a tingle. Step: The firft 
Movement of which begins in . * Sink and Rife. If the Tune,' to 
which, \t hf performM,; be. of triple Time (as a Saraband, i pr ln~ 
ftance, which admits only of three Notes in a Bar) then the 
firft Step takes up one of the three Notes, and the other two* 
Notes, arfe counted in the remaining Step. ! The Weight of the 
Body mqft , always reft .on the contrary Foot to that r on which 
you begin; fo that, if you begin your Coupee with thei right 
Foot r the Poife mud be on the left f , and continue fa to be, 
'till you have cpmpkated the firft Step of the two, which, 
as I (aid, compofe the Coupee. The firft Part being finiihed^ the 
right Foot immediately receives the Weight, * in the rifing from 
the Sink which is made, at commencing the Step, and in the 
fame Inftant beats Time, as we call it, to the firft of the three 
Notes contained in the Bar; fupporting the Body ||, whilft the 
left Foot, to compleat this compound Step, Hides with a flow 
and gentle Motion, filling up the remaining two Notes of the 
Bar or Meafure ** , and the whole Step is compleated, at the In- 
ftant when the left Foot a fecond time receives the Weight ff. 
This Step, like the Half Coupee , admits of being varioufly per- 



i-See the i ft Figure or Man's Side of Plate I. * See the fecond Figure or 
Woman's Side in Plate 9. tf See the 2d Figure or Woman's Side of Plate I. 
** See the ift Figure or Man's Side in Pure o. +t See the 1 ft Figure of 
Plate I. 

formed, 



The An t of D a K c i : n g explain J. 37 

formed, as forwards, back wards j fideways, and circularly (b). It 
differs, indeed, from the Half Coupee^ in the Continuance of* per- 
forming it; for whereas the Half Coupee y at in flatting, transfco 
the Weight, every Time, from one Foot to the other, the OcitPee 
does the very Reverie, in that it always begins with the " fame 
Foot : For, if you Begin it with the left Foot, it will end with the 
right; and, if with the right, it concludes cui the left (c); Jsuafl 
fo mutually, as often as ever it is repeated, and until it is changed 
hy fome other Step. It is called a Coupe , from its containing two 
Steps inflead of one, which is all that the Half Coulee employs* t 



' » \ « „ #« • •*..* .• i » _ 



:-./::'.; . i :,..!; :. :V ." iA *> : .^ ;> Y}M* , •; on:.?' srl; ?"; 3; t£ : i 

:, b/ Ik 'cpupEzm : t^)m^tt^ 

H £ Coupee with two Movements is comp&eb^rqurritfM 



Cw^pftf I have already explain'd, of two Steps ; but it dif- 
this, that whereas the Coupee treated of before confifls 



T 

ters m 

only of one Movement, that is to fay, of one Sink and Rife, 
which is what we call a Movement y and made to the firft Step;* 
fo it confequently follows, that there muft be another Movement 
added to the fecond, tho' different from the firft:; for in that 
the Sink is made, before the Foot moves; and the Rife, after; 
the Foot has moved, that is to fay, when you have made a 
Step, as I have already obferved, as in walking either forwards, 
backwards, or fideways, &c. but, in this additional Movement, 
the Sink and Rife are together in the Midft of the Motion the 

I'i J ' 



» 

* A m 



(b) Sec the Explanation a: d Table of the Couple in the Plate mark'd -with the 
Letter E. (c) Sec the Tabic and Explanation, as aforefaid, of the Plate of Tables 
mark'd E. 

D a Leg 




/ 



# 

28 The Art of Dancing explain' i. 

Leg makes, in (tepping, as in the preceding; andfuppofing the 
Step is to a Louvre, or fuch like (low Air, it is performed in the 
Manner following, viz. to make the firft Step which is to fink, 
before the Foot moves f , and rife in moving, or immediately after 
it has moved || ; which faid Rifing and Receiving of the Weight 
upon the Foot, that made the firft Stepf , marks Time to the 
firft Note of the three, which each Bar or Meafure contains. 
The fecond Note is taken up with the Sink of the fecond Move- 
ment; and the Rife from it takes up the third Note of the 
fame Meafure, and compleats the Step ; fo that the firft Move- 
ment and Step are made to the firft Note of the three, and the 
fecond to the remaining two, and may be performed the dif- 
ferent Ways aforefaid, as forwards, backwards, fideways before, 
or fideways behind, &rV. (d) and, as to its Continuance in Dane- 
ing y it is the fame as the Coupee of one Movement , that is, always 
beginning with the fame Foot, whether right or left : It h 
named a Coupee of two Movements, from its having the Addition, 
of a fecond added to the former ; which fecond Movement is 
made fometimes fmooth upon the Floor, and fometimes by 
bounding off. :: . .." i-:: "' " ' 



Mi » v «• 



t See Plate i. | See Plate $. (d) See die Explanation and Table of this Step in 
the Plaie mark'd E. .... 









* 



» . 



CHAP. 



» 

The Art e/" Dancing explahfi. 29 




CHAP. VIE. 
Of the BOUREE-STEP or FLEURET. 

TH E Bottree is compofed of three plain (height Steps 
or Walks, except the firft, -which begins in a Move- 
ment, and is to be performed in the fame Method, as the 
Half Coupee, or Coupee with two Movements, that is to fay, mud 
always fink, at the Beginning of the Step or Walk, and rife 
at, or gradually before the End of it ; which is the Manner 
in which the firft Step is ufually taken,' in the Performance of all 
Steps, except Springs, Bounds, Hops, or Cbaffecs,j&c. wherefore, 
for the Future, I need not fay any more of the Method of be- 
ginning thefe Sorts of Steps, in Dancing, otherwife than to make 
a Movement, without mentioning how* the Sink and Rife are to 
be made, fince they have been already explained. 

A Bouree or Fleuret, as I have obferved, confifb only of three 
plain (height Steps ; but a Movement is added to the firft of 
them, the Rife of which Movement, as has been faid, always 
ftrikes the Cadence or Time; and, if this Step is done to a Tune, 
of three Notes in a Meafure, the firft Step anfwers to the firft 
Note, the fecond Step to the fame Note, and the third Step 
to the lad Note of the Meafure, concluding together. 

You are alfo to note, that tho' in the Bottree there are three 
diftinft Walks or Steps, yet neverthelefs, thefe three Steps are 
to be efteem'd but as one Step, in Regard of its being a com- 
pofed Step; as will appear by the Half Coupee, which, tho' no 
more than a (ingle Step, is, however, a Step, becaufe it generally 
takes up a Meafure, but more efpecially in Tunes of triple Time; 
and it is made by a fmooth and eafy Bending of toe Knees, 
fifing in a flow and gentle Motion from thence; which Rifing, 
as I have faid, is upon the firft Note of the Meafure, the Weight 

of 



3q The Art of Dancing. explaittj. 

of the Body being fupported by the Foot that nude the Step, 
during the Counting of the fecondand third Notes of the Bar. 

The graceful Pofture of the Dancers Standing adds not a little 
to the Beauty of this Step, who, 'till the Time be expired, 
is to wait or reft ; by which it is evident, that the HalfCoufve, 
tho' a {ingle Step, is equal, in Value, to any compound Step 
whatfoever, whether of two, three, Four, or more Steps in a 
Meafure. . 

But to return, the Bouree-Step may be performed various Ways, 
as forwards, backwards, tideways, eroding before, the fame 
behind, before and behind, behind and before, ^rc(e), the 
Explanation of which, I think, may not be improper, in this 
Place; and therefore I (hall proceed to (hew the Method of 
their Performance, one after the other, in the Order above fet 
down, except the Fleurets forwards and backwards; which being 
fo intelligible of themfelves, and having Occafion hereafter to 
fpeak of this Step, by way of Grace to the Minuet , inftead of 
laying any thing farther of them here, I (hall begin with - the 
Bourcc-Stef cr offing bcfirc^jidtw.iys; which is to be performed, as 
follows, either with the right or left Foot : For Inftance, pro- 
vided you begin with the Latter, the Weight mufl be on the 
right ( f); and the left Foot, which is at Liberty, commences by 
making a Movement and Step, to the right Side of the Room, 
eroding before the Foot on which the Body refts jr , . the Face 
being to the Upper Part of the Boom, and it receives the Weight II. 
The fecond is the right Foot, which Heps the fame Way*; and the 
third and laft, which is with the left, erodes before, as at firft f, 
only without a Movement ||. The Bource croffmg Icbind^ fdeways. 
differs from the Former in this, that whereas that was before, 
this is behind ; that is to fay, the Weight being, as aforefaid (f ), 



(c) See the Explanation and Table of the Bouree in the Plate mark'd E. (f ) See 
the ad Figure or Woman's Side of Plate I. f Sec the firft Figure in Plate 4, and 
the id Figure or Woman's Side of Plate XL J Sec the firft Figure or Man's Side of 
Plate 5. • See the 2d Figure in Plate 6. 

the 



1 * \ « 



The &KTdfD A fcei na exphittA. %t 

the left Foot, inftead of making the Movement and firft Step 
crofting before the right, it now ts made cro fling behind it;' 
and the next Step, which is with the right Foot, moves the 
fame Way, after which the third and kft Step with the left Foot 
is drawn behind the right, and concludes. The Bouree before and 
behind is, when the firft Movement and Step are made eroding 
before the Foot' on which the Weight is, whether right or left, 
the fecond Step moving tideways, the fame Way, and the third 
drawn behind it, facing upwards, as before. The Bouree behind 
and before is done in the like Manner, only the firft Step is not 
crofs a before but behind, the fecond ftepping fideways, and 
the third drawn eroding before. The Bouree, which I call two: 
behind, is made as follows: Suppofe, for Example, you make fc 
Movement, ftepping backwards with the right Foot (g), into 
the third Pofition inelos'd behind the left on which the Weight- 
is, and releafing it (h) ; upon which it makes the fecond Step 
of the Bouree, in a plain Step backwards, receiving the Weight* 
inelos'd in the third Pofition behind the right ( i ) , which then; 
performs the third Step of the Bouree, in a plain Step for- 
wards f. 

There are many other Ways of performing this Step, which* 
would be too tedious to be mention d here; and, as they are not: 
to my prefent Purpofe, omitting them, I ihall only obferve, that, 
this Step, continued feveral Meafures, changes the Foot^ every 
"Step, as has been taken Notice of in the HalfCmfee; but witn« 
this Difference, that whereas the Half Coupee changes the Weight, 
every fingle Step, as in Walking, the Bouree or Ftcuret only changes, 
it, at the End of every third Step. 



(g) See the i ft Figure of the ift Plate, (h) See the ift Figure of the 4?h Plate;. 
( i ) See the 2d Figure of the 4th Plate, f See the 2d Figure in flatc 9. . 



C H A.R. 



32 The Art of Dancing explatfcL 



JKESCSKSftS^^ 




i.-V^i -< ¥ -.r» 'i/"> 'jP , .^ "iP .P ~ .^ '. ,~» ^.-) ^ ~r- ,> > -< 



CHAP. DL 



i ~ 



0/ d* B 0U R E E with two Mwments. 

_ • 

THE Bowree with two Movements confifts of the lame Nam- • 
ber of Steps, as the former; but as that was of one Move- 
ment y this is of two; which fecond Movement is added to the lad 
of the three Steps of which the Bowree is compos'd. This Step, in 
EfTe&, contains in itfelf two diftin& Steps, namely, the Whole and . 
Half Coulee; only it is not the lame, in the Manner of its Perfor- 
mance; for they, as was already obferved, in treating of them, 
are both equal to a Meafure of themfelves, but, in this Step, they 
are both to be performed to a Time or Meafure, and mull be ac- 
counted only as one Step: For Example, to a Tune of three Notes 
in a Bar, aamiting it begins with the right Foot (k),, it is to be 
like wife granted, that the Weight mull be on the left (k) , which 
fupports the Body, 'till tbe firfl Step and Movement are made*; 
the Rife of which Step is to the firfl of the three Notes belong- 
ing to the Meafure, on which the Weight refts, until the fecond 
Step is performed, that anfwers the fame Notef and ends the 
Coupee ; whereas the fecond Step of the Coupee to a Mea- 
fure takes up the fecond and third Notes, and confequently is as 
{low again, in its Performance, as this; which third Note of 
the Coupee to a Meafure is taken up in this Step with the Rife 
from tbe Half Coulee, and is the third and laft Step on which 
the fecond Movement falls*, from whence this Step derives its 
Name. 



flO See the lft Figure of Plate the fiift. * See the 2d Figure in Plate 9. 
f Sec the ift Figure in Plate 9. 

From 



Tin Art ^Dancing explained. 33 

From what has been obferved we may fee, in what this Step 
differs from the two (aid Steps before defcribed. In the Conti- 
nuance of this Step the Weight changes (1), as in the Bottree with 
one Movement^ and may be perform'd forwards, backwards, fide- 
ways, circularly, &c. Note, this Step may be done with z Bound, 
that is to fay, on the laft Step upon which die fecond Movement 
is made, with a Spring from the Ground, which is what we call a 
Bound-, and of this I (hall take Occafion to fay fomething in its pro- 
per Place, and give it the Name of Bottree with a Bound, as not be- 
ing made on the Floor, as the Bottree with two Movements, 

CHAP. I 
Of the PASGRAVE or MARCH. 

THE March is originally a fingle or plain Step, as the Half 
Coupee, but different in the Manner of its Performance, in 
that the Half Coupee bends or finks, before the Step is performed, 
and rifes, after it has been made ; whereas, on the contrary, in 
this Step, the Movement or bending and rifing are made together, 
as in the fecond Movement of the Coupee with two Movement!, 
after which commences a Slide; and the Sink, Rife, and Slide 
compofe this Step, which, in its Performance, is as follows: For 
Example, if forwards, the Foot, you defign to begin with, is to be 
intirely difengaged from the Weight behind the Foot on which the 
Body refts in the third Pofition, that is to fay, the Ancle of the be- 
ginning Foot muft touch the Heel of the Foot that fupports the 
Weight (m) ; from which Pofition this Step always begins and is per- 
Jbrmed by making a Sink and Rife; but inftead of flepping for- 
wards, as in the Half Coupee, you rife and point the right' or left 
Toe, tideways, according to the Foot you commence with, about 

(1) Sec the 2d Figure in Plate I. (m) Seethe ill and 2d Figures in PUtc V. 

E the 



34 The Art of Dakcimq explain d. 

the Diftance from the Foot the Body is upon, as half the Step you 
take in Walking (n). ^ 

After this the Foot moves flowly forwards +, prefling the Floor, 
as it paffcs along, about the Length of a Step in Waiting t; which' 
Prefling of the Toe or Inftep to the Ground, as it moves +, is what 
we call a Slide in Dancing, And as to its Agreement with the Notes 
of triple Time, as mentioned before, you are to obferve, that the 
Rife or Point || marks Time to the firft Note j the March or flidV 
ing forwards of the Foot + takes up the fecond and third Notes, 
on the Expiration of which it receives the Weight, concluding in 
the third Pofition, as at firft, but on the contrary Foot *. This is 
one of the mod agreeable Steps in Dancings and it may be perfor- 
med either forwards, backwards, or tideways, &c, and in Perfor- 
mance, when continued, it transfers the Weight from one Foot to 
another, as in the Half Coupee. 



CHAP. XL 
Of the POINT ani MARCH: 

TH £ Point and March is Co call'd from having a Point more 
added to the March, which Point is equal, as to its Time, 
with a March,, and in its Performance, the fame, except that, in-* 
(lead of the fecond and third Notes being taken up in the marching 
or Aiding of the Foot forwards or backwards + &c. they are 
counted, during the Time you (land or reft, in the graceful Man- 
ner before obferved in the Half Coupee; only with this Difference, 
that the difengaged Foot, inflead of being in the firft Pofition, as- 
in that, is upon the Point here, as may be feen- by the Beginning or 
firftMovcment of the forefaidA/*ra& |L The Point is made with either 



(n) See the firtt and. fecond Figures in Plate VL t See Plate IX. I See Plate VI* 
See Plate V.. 

4 

Foot* 



The Art of Dancing explained. 35 

as has been obferved in the March (o), which Point is per- 
formed with a Toft eafy riling from the foregoing Sinkf, made to 
the firft Note (o) ; in which Pofture it remains the counting of the 
fecond and third Notes of the Meafure, concluding what we call 
the Point (o), the Body all the while refling upon the fame Foot at 
at commencing; after which follows the Marat H.; as it has been be* 
fore defcribed, and the Point (o) and March il, generally fill up two 
Meafures of die Tune, tho* fometimes they are both performed to 
a Meafure. 

It will not, I think, be here improper to take fome Notice, how 
the Point (o) and March H agree with the Notes of the Meafure : 
For Inftance, if you make a Movement and Point, fideways, the 
Rife of the Point anfwers to the firft Note (o); the Rife of the fecond 
Point or Movement, which immediately enfues upon die fame 
Place, on which the firft Point was made, marks die fecond Note(o), 
and the third is counted in the March or Progrefs of the Foot, ei- 
ther forwards or backwards from thence || ; which are the two Me- 
thods, in which this Step is ufually perform'd. But when this Step 
is perform'd to two Meafures of die Tune, die Point (o) and Time 
you reft upon it, that is to fay, the counting of the fecond and third 
Notes, whilft you are beautifully ftanding (o), takes up the firft 
Meafure. The fecond is in the March or Slide II, and, if continued, 
transfers the Weight every other Step, as in the Half Coupee; and 
in fine, as to the Manner of performing this Step, it is fully fhewn 
in the March, fince it is no more than the firft Movement, or Sink 
and Rife thereof, on which Rifing and Pointing of the Toe or In- 
ftep (o), you paufe or reft, until the Meafure is expired *. 



(o) See the Figures in Place VI. f See Plate V. See Plate IX. 
• See the Explanation and Table of this Seep in the Plate madtedJS. 



E » Of 



36 The Art of Dancing explained. 



■ 

t 

f 

I 



5f 




CHAP. XII. 
I 0/ ffo SPRING or BOUND. 

i .""■ 'HE Spring or Bound is produced from a plain and {ingle Step, 

JL as the Half Coupee, or March, but it very much differs from 
t them in Performance ; for, as they are both made on the Ground, 

1 the Bound (prings off from thence. For Example, fuppofe you was 

e • about to perform a March, then, inftead of unking and ruing on 

the Floor, you are to fink, and, in the Spring or Rife from the 
(aid Sink, throw the Body into the Air, off from the Foot on which 
the Weight was, when you begun, and light upon the contrary 
Foot; that is to fay, if the Bound is on the right, the Weight is to 
come from the left (p), where it was upon commencing this Step. 
And in like Manner, if performed with the left Foot f. One Bound 
alone rarely, if ever, anf vers to a Meafure ; but, in Tunes of com- 
mon Time, or of four in a Meafure, as in Rigadoons, Marches, &c. 
two Bounds anfwer a Time; and, in Sarabands or flow Tunes of tri- 
ple Time, three of them may be done in one Bar. . 

This Step may be performed various Ways, as forwards, back- 
wards, fideways before, or fideways behind, as alio in turning ei- 
ther to the right or left, &c. (q). And it is farther to be noted, 
that the Foot, on which the Bound is to be made, commences from. 
the third Pofition behind the Foot upon which the Weight refts, as 
in the March, and advances, much in the fame Manner, from the 
third to the third Pofition ; only that it bounds off from the Ground, 
and if continued to a Tune of common Time, as above, changes 
the Weight twice, in every Meafure, and in triple thrice. 

(p) See the firft and fecond Figures in Plate V. t See the fecond and firft Figure* 
of the forefkid Plate. (q) See the Explanation and Table of this Step in the Plate mar- 
. kedE. 

. . CHAP. 



J&*Art of Dancing explained. yj 

t 

gg§§33B§§83§3S828288§g§§8§§8iSS§B8S5S§§§8§§88§88§^S88 

CHAP. XIII.' 
Of the CLOSE or JUMP. 

WHAT we call a Clofe in Dancing is, when, the Weight 
being upon one Foot, we fink, and in the Rikjumj) or 
clofe both Feet equal one to the other, in the firft Portion (r), or 
the Feet areinclofed either before or behind, in the third Pofition f; 
and this Step generally concludes in the (aid Pofitions or Poftures. 
It may be performed two different Ways, viz. on the Ground, and 
off from the Ground, as in the Bound; but it differs in its Method 
of Performance, for as that advances forwards or backwards, about 
the Length of the Half Coupee, or March, this never proceeds far- 
ther than from behind the Foot which fupports the Body, either to 
the firft Pofition even, or to the third inclofed before or behind, as 
aforefaid. 

I fhall, in the firft Place, begin with the Defcription of the Clofe 
in the firft Pofition, which is as follows : For Inftance, the Foot 
that is free from Weight begins whether it be the right or left, in 
making a Movement, or Sink and Rife from the third Pofition behind 
(s), as when you begin the March ; that is to fay, fb far as the 
Point || ; but, inftead of pointing the Toe to the Ground as in that 
here , in rifing from the Sink aforefaid, preparing for the Clofe en- 
fuing, you give a Kind of a Spring upon the Toe or Inftep of the 
Foot the Weight is on, and the fame Time or Inftant botn Heels 
come to the Floor together, and receive the Weight equal alike (t); 
but you are to obferve, that the Body is' thus thrown into the Air 
by the Spring of the Inftep, I mean no higher than you can rife 



(r) Sue the Figures" in the firft and fecond Plates. + See the Figures of Plate IV. 
(s) Sec the Figures of Plate V. fl See Plate VI. (t) See Plate the |cond. 

without 



* t 



38 The Art of Dancing explain d. 

without quitting the Ground with your Inftcp or Toe, and from 
hence it is call'd a Clo/e on the Ground. 

To clo/e in the third Pofition is performed intirely in the fame 
Manner, except that, in lighting on both Feet in the firft Pofition 
as before (t), the Fall or coming down is in the third; that is to fay, 
the Feet are inclofed one before the other, the Heel of the foremoft 
Foot touching the Ancle of the hind Foot (u). In the Performance 
of this Step backwards it :s the very fame, only, inftead of begin- 
ning from behind the Foot on which the Weight is, it commences 
from before the fame, or fourth Pofition open in the Air "f; fo 
that what we have defcrib'd forwards is to be accomplifhed back- 
wards in the fame Method: For Example to clo/e backwards in the 
firft Pofition H, or tncUfi backwards into die third (u), when this 
Step is performed off from the Ground, the Difference is only in 
this, that you fink, in order to fpring, as before; but,.inftead of 
rifing to the Extremity or Point of the Toe, you only fpring quite 
off from the Floor, lighting on both Feet in any of the before men- 
tioned Portions, whether forwards or backwards, and it is called a 
Clo/e or Jump. 

You are alfb to obferve, that this Step never advances either for- 
wards, backwards, or fide ways, as is utual in others, but is always 
perform*d upon the fame Place; for, altho* the difengaged Foot 
moves from behind or before that on which you (land, the Weight 
always comes down in the fame Place : For Jnftance, fuppofe you 
was to be in the third Pofition on the left Foot (v) and to perform 
this Step to the firft Pofition even from behind, die right Foot it 
brought .equal to that on which the Weight is, the very Inflant the 
Clo/e or Jump is made (w),- and, if the Fall or coming down be in- 
clofed in the third Pofition before the Foot (x ) y inftead of joining 
,cven to the Foot on which the Weight is (w, 1 , the Heel of the right 



(u) See the Figures in Plate IV. f See the Figures of Plates the IVth, IXth, Xlth, 
XlVth, or X Vth. H See the Figures in the firft and fecond Plates, (v) See the firft Fi- 
gure or Man's Side of Plate V. (w) See the firft Figure or kft Side of Plate J. (x) See 
(he fecond Figure or Woman's Side of Plate IV, 

Foot 



\ 



The Art cf Da n c i n <* explain d. $9 

Foot is inclofed or joined before the Ancle of the left (x), and the 
fame backwards from before. 

This Step in Dancing much refembles a Period or full Stop in 
Letters ; for, as that clofes or (huts up a Sentence, the Clofe in Dan- 
cing does the very fame in MupCy nnce nothing is more frequent 
than, at the End of a Strain in the Tune, to find the Strain or Cou- 
plet of the Dance to conclude in this Step, as alio at other remar- 
kable Places of the Mufic, Befides, this Clofe gives great Life and 
Variety in the Compofition of Dances ; for whereas mod other Steps 
lead the Dancers a regular Figure, and confequently render a- 
Change thereof more difficult, in this Step, the Body being as 
much upon one Foot as the other, the Change is more familiar^, 
fincc it is as eafy to take up one Foot as the other. This Step ge- 
nerally takes up a Meafure, that is to fay, with the Time you reft 
or ftand ftill : For Inftance, to a Tune of triple Time the Clofe is per- 
formed to the firft of the three Notes, and the fecond and third are-' 
counted, during the Time you reft; but to Tunes of common 
Time, as Marches, Gavots, Rtgadoom y &c. this Step and Time fc> 
is to reft (bmetimes are a Meafure, and at others not, as having 
a plain Step or Walk added thereto, which (aid Clofe and Step to* 
gether fill up the Time* 



C HAP. XIV. 
Of the SPRING or LEAF: 

r TP HE Spring or Leap is the fame as the latter End of the fore- 

-1: going Clofe or Spring from one Foofupon both, except that 

the Clofe or Jump always begins from. one Foot +,'the Weight 

conftantly coming down in the fame Place *, whereas this Step be* 



f See the Figures of Plate V. * See the Figures in Plate L 

gins 



40 Tbehur of Dancing explain d> 

gins and ends upon both Feet %> whether in the firft or third Por- 
tion f* and may be performed feveral Ways, viz. forwards, back- 
wards, tideways, to the right or left, upright and circularly $*; 
but, when it is performed either of the two latter Ways, the Weight 
comes down in the Place from whence the Spring was made, as in 
the Clofe aforefaid, tho' in any of the former, as forwards, back- 
wards, &c. they fpring or leap, about the Length of the Half 
Coupee or Afarcb, and light on both Feet, as in Leaping. 

As to the Agreement of this Step with the Notes of the Tune, it 
is uncertain ; for to a Tune of three it fometimes takes up a Mea- 
fure, and at others not: For Example, if you fpring upright in this 
Step, the Fall marks what we call the Time or Cadence upon the 
firft Note, whilft the other two are counted during the Time you 
reft; and in the like Manner, when it is performed circularly up- 
on the' fame Place. Upright and circularly are the two Ways in 
which this Step is performed, when it ftngly anfwers to a Bar, as it 
frequently happens on the ending of a Strain or other remarkable 
Part of the Tune ; and when it does not, as it rarely, if ever, does in the 
otherWays of performing it, we often meet, inftead thereof, twoLeaps 
and aplain ftraight Step in a Meafure, which together with the two 
Springs agree with the Notes of the Mufic $ and manyTimes we find a 
third Spring added , inftead of the plain ftraight Step ; which three 
Springs agree with the Notes, as before, tho* they are (eldom ufed 
except in Comic Dancing and Tunes of common Time, that is to 
fay, of four in the Bar, as in Gavots, Marches^ Rjgadoons^ &c, in 
which this Spring or Leap on both Feet is the fame, in its anfwering 
with the Notes of the Tune, except that, inftead of two Springs and 
the plain ftraight Step to a Meafure, or the three Springs, as in 
triple Time, in thefe of common there is but one Clofe and the 
ftraight Step; and alfo, inftead of three Springs or Leaps, here are 
but two, which Steps agree with the Notes, as follows : The Fall or 

X See the Figure in Plate II. +* See the Figures of Plate IV. j* See the Step* 
in the fecond Plate and the Explanation and Table of this Step in the Plate of Tables mar- 
ked E." 

Coming 



The Ait if Dancing explained. 41 

Coming down of the Weight from the firft Spring beats Time to 
the firft Note of the Bar ; and the fecond and third Notes are 'count- 
ed , during the Performing of the plain Step. 'Hie fourth Note it 
always taken up with the Sink which prepares for the nicceeding 
Step; and consequently it is very neceflary to take Notice, that the 
two Leaps are performed in the fame Method. The Coming down 
of the firft Spring, as I (aid befoie, marks the Time or firft Note; 
the Sinking or Bending of the Knees, in order for the fecond Rife 
or Spring, anfwers the fame Note ; and the third is in the Coming down 
of die Weight in the Sink, &c. as was juft obferved, which Step, if 
continued, is a fort of an harmonious Leaping to Mufic either for- 
wards or backwards, &c. (y). It is to be likewife noted, that die 
upright Spring or Clofe affords the Dancer the like Opportunity of 
changing the Foot, during the Time of refting as in the foregoing 
Clofe, the Difference being only in its beginning and ending on 
both Feet ; and, if performed on the Ground, it is intirely in the 
lame Manner, as we have already defcribed it in the Jump or Qofe 
from one Foot. . 




CHU XV. 

4 

Of the RIG A BOON STEP of one Spring open 

in the fame Place and Qofe. 

" 1 'HE Rigadoon Step of one Spring open upon the lame Place is 
-I- compofed of two plain Steps or Motions of the Feet, except 
that the firft commences with a Spring or Hop\ which faid Spring 
and plain Step is to aMeafure, and introduces the upright Sprmgoc 
Clofe on both Feet, before treated of, to another Meafure in its At- 
tendance on the former, from which it is almoft infeparable; info- 

(y) Sec the Table of the Leap or Jump, in the Plate marked E or fecond Plate. 

much 



41 ™* AtT °f. P*»«m« explain' J. 

%?££?%* V ^ *»«*■«** G«ce and Beauty thereto, 
and being from ^thence fc firifily united that, akho* in iemfelvw 

tfeT tW °. d ^ *Jft «* *« "ever appear* but concluded 

W r ZSffi 'SteS W^ ~ TT"?* 

ronnon, or the Feet join d even one with the other, 

1rom wm.~. thc &nk "*"*«**" for **&** taken, and 
may be done with either t£* H ™ever, for the better Undcr- 
ftanding thereof I (hall defcribe it, wi£.™ «#* Foot: Therefore* 
as has been already obferved, the Weight being On i&& Feet inthe 
firft Pofition (z), you fink and give a Rife or Spring, either off from 
the Grounds or upon it, as you {hall think moft agreeafcte, finer 
it may be perfbrm'd both Ways t which laid- Spring is mad* u poa 
the left Foot, in riilns from the aforefaid' Sink bv taltib* the 




leRoonr 

the Length of a Step 



gaged, moves open tideways in the like Manner (b), ahdj in 
turning, receives one half of the Weight- in the fame Pofition as at 
firft {z) j after which comes tfce£lofe on both Feet JcJ which fome- 
times is to a Meafure, and at others, not, in that there often follows 
in Rtgadoon Movements,- a, plain Step or Walk in the Time or Mea- 
fure, as for Example, you'll find' in this Movement of the Brctagnty 
that is to fay, the Beginning of the fecond Partis the. very fame Step 
I have here defcribecL 

As to the Agreement of this Step with the Notes of the Tune;. 
which is of four in the Meafure, the Serine or Hod. that is made 



(z)Sec the Figure in Plate I!, only inftead of facing down the R6om : yp»nuy fup- 
pofe it looking to the Prefence. (a) See in fome Meafure the Feet in die fecond Fi- 

gure of Plate XV. (b) See the Feet in the firft Figure of Plate XV. (c) See Plate II. 

upon 
S 



The At t of Dancing explain*^ 4^ 

upon the left Foot, on the taking up of the right, marks the Time 
or firft Note; the letting of it down the fecond ; the third is in the/ 
letting down of the left Foot; and the fourth and* laft Note, in the 
Sink tor the enfuing Clofe that attends this Step, which together 
compofe one of the moft agreeable Steps in Dancing. • ' •* y 

There are, befidcs thele already defcribed, many other Ways of 
performing this Step, as in the third Pofition forwards, and the fame 
backwards; but, for the better Understanding of this, fuppofeyou, 
are (landing in the firft Pofition, or the Feet are joined even to each 
other (d), you perform this Step into the third Pofition, that is> 
you make the firft Step which is with a Spring, and inclofe it before' 
the Foot on which the Weight refts(e), and the fecond before that 
(f ) in the like Manner. 

To perform this Step backwards differs in this, that as the fore- 
going was inclofed before, after the Spring, this is inclofed behind the 
Foot that fupports the Weight(g), and the fecond Step behind that (h); 
or elfc the firft of die faid two Steps, namely, the Spring, may be* 
done in the third Pofition before (i), and the fecond behind (j) j or 
the firft with a Spring behind (k), and the fecond Step before (1), 
and are to be performed from either of the faid Pofitions, whether 1 
the firft or third, as is alfo the Spring or Clofe that follows them, 
whether upright or changing of the Pofition ; that is, inftead of co- 
ming down in the firft, or in the third, as at Beginning, the Feet 
are changed, for Inftance , the firft laft, and the laft firft (m). ' 



mmm 



(d) See the Figure in Plate II, fuppofed to be looking up the Room. (c) Se:the fe- 

cond Figure of Plate IV. (f) See the firft Figure of Plate IV. (g) See the 

firft Figure of the faid Plate IV. (h) See the fecond Figure of Plate IV. (i) Ste 

the two firft or inclofed Feet of Plate IV. ( i ) See the two bind Feet of Pit :e IV. 

(k) See the hindmoft Feet in Plate IV. (1) See the inclofed Feet in Plat: IV. . 

^m) See the. Table and Explanation of this Step in the Plate of Tal les m irked E. 



Fi chap; 



44 The Art of Dancing explain*!. 



U. *.a. „» 



CHAP. XVI 

Of the RIG A DO ON Step of two Springs 

or SISSONNE. • 

• 

TH £ Rigadoon Step with two Springs differs from the former 
of one in this, that whereas the aforefaid is performed in the 
lame Place, and only with one Spring, this is of two; the firft of 
which advances or retires, about the Length of a March* whilft 
the fecond Spring is in the fame Place upon one Foot. 

This Step may alfo be perfbrm'd tideways eroding before, or 
tideways eroding behind, either to the right or left, or turning f > 
&c. the Difference of which, in the Manner of Performance , I 
{hall defcribe in their Order. . For Example, Mi forwards, which 
may be done with one Foot as well as the other ; yet, for the more 
eafy comprehending thereof, I intend to explain it, beginning with 
the right Foot, which is as follows, viz. the Weight is on the left 
in the third Pofition, and the right behind ; that is to fay, the An- 
cle of the right Foot refts againft the Heel of the left, but is intirely 
free from any Weight of the Body (n),« from whence you make the 
firft Spring which is upon the left Foot, whilft the right, at die 
feme Inftant , moves diredly the fame Way, as in the March* ex- 
cept that the March is performed on the Ground from a Bend and 
Rife only, but this off from thence, by an upright Spring into the 
Air from the Sink you make upon your left Foot, on which the 
Weight falls in the fame Place, the right advancing, as has been al- 
ready obferved, about the Length of a March ; but it does not re- 
ceive the whole Weight of the Body, as in that, by Reafcn of its 
continuing principally on the fame Foot on which it was, at com- 

t Sec the Explanation and Table of this Step in the Plate of Tables marked E. (n) See 
the firft Figwre of Plate V. 

mencing j 



The Art of Davciixg explaiffd.- 45 



mencing; fo that, altho* the right Foot is advanced before the 
ther, it receives no more than its own Weight, the whole being to 
follow on making the fecond Spring (o). Having thus far only 
concluded the firft Spring or Movement, the fecond is made from 
the aforefaid Pofition divided ; that is to fay, the right Foot is, near 
the Length of a Step in Dancing, before the left ; in which Posi- 
tion or Pofture both Knees bend, the right to receive the Body, and 
the left to be difengaged from it, as it intirely is on giving the 
Hop or Spring ; for, at the Inftant the Foot on which the Weight 
was, is taken from the Floor, the other receives it, ending the Step 
in the third Pofition upon the right Foot , the left being behind 
but free from any Weight; the Ancle of which refts againftthe 
Heel of the Foot that fupports the Body, in the fame Pofition in 
which it begun, only with the contrary Foot (p), and may be con- 
tinued from one Foot to the other, as in the Marchy &c. . 

This Step backwards is performed in the like Manner as forwards 
except that forwards it is taken from the third Pofition behind, but 
in this begins from the fame Pofition before; that is, the Heel of 
the right Foot .touches the Ancle of the left on which the Body 
refts (q), from whence you make the Spring in the fame Method 
already defcribed in this Step forwards y viz, the right and fore* 
moft Foot, at the fame Moment the Spring is given upon the 
left , moves backwards, as in the March , much about the like 
Diftance, and receives half the Weight, at the fame Time the other 
half comes down upon the left, leaving the Weight divided to the 
flrft Spring or Hop (r) ; and the fecond is made on the right Foot, 
in the taking up of the left, which falls inclofed in the third Pofi- 
tion as at beginning except that the contrary Foot is foremoft (s), 
and the left is ready to commence , as before. This Step Side- 
ways croffmg before is fo called , from its being eroded before the 
Foot on which the Weight of the Body refts, and it chiefly differs 
from the two Ways already defcribed namely, forwards and back- 



(o) See the fecond Figure in Plate IX. (p) See the fecond Figure, of Plate V. 
(q) See the fecond Figure of Plate IV. (r) See in fonoe Meafure the firft Figure in 
Plate IX, or fecond Figure in Plate XI. (s)Sec the firft Figure in Plate IV. 

wards 



J 



4<5 The A*t qf Dancing explain d. 

wards, in that it begins from the third Pofition behind, as aforefaid(t), 
but inftead of the right Foot's moving, as in them, you in this give 
the Spring and Fall in the fifth Pofition, the right or beginning 
Foot eroding before the left, the Weight being divided, as before; 
that is, the Heel of the right Foot is equal to the Toe of the left (u), 
which Manner of placing the Feet we call the fifth Pofition, The 
fecond Spring or Hop is made upon the right Foot on the taking 
up the left, which is then brought into the third Pofition behind, 
and the right Foot into the fame Pofition as the beginning but con- 
trary Foot (v); which faid Foot is ready to perform the fame Thing 
cither fideways crojjing before the right on which the Body is, or 
fideways crojjing behind, the latter of which I fhall explain, in the 
next Place, and it is as follows. 

Sideways crojjing behind varies from the former only in this, that, 
inftead of commencing from the third Pofition behind, it begins 
from before: For Example, the Weight being upon the left Foot (w) 
you fink and make the nrft Spring with the right, falling in the fifth 
Pofition crcfUng behind ; that is, die Toe of the right Foot is equal 
to the Heel of the left, the Weight being divided, as has been al- 
ready explained (x). The fecond Spring is performed upon the 
right, on the lefts being taken up from the Ground, as aforefaid, 
which falls inclofed in the third Pofition before ; that is, the Heel of 
the left Foot is joined to the Ancle of the right, and, being difen- 
gaged from Weight, is at Liberty to perform the fame with the left 
Foot, as we have defcribed with the right (y). 

Having now fhewn, how this Step is performed fideways croj^ 
fing before, as alfo the fame behind, it is unneceflary here to take 
any farther Notice of this Step fideways to the right, than that it dif- 
fers in Nothing from what we have defcribed to the left but in the con- 
trary Foot ; nor likewife of the Manner of its Performance in turn- 



» 



(t) See the firft Figure of Plate V. (u) See the Feet of the firft Figure in Plate X I. 

(v) Sc? the fecond Figure of Plate V. (w) See the fecond Figure in Plate IV. 

x; Sec the Feet in the fecond Figure of Plate XL (y) See firft Figure of Plate IV. 

m 

i. 

• * ■ 

•■■■■■•• sng, 



"» » • » « » 



the A*t tf D/rfci** explaiti #* . 4V 

mg> otherwise than that it may be performed fcveral Ways, as to 
the right or left, in a quarter Turn, half Turn, or three quarter 
Turn, 6rV. fince I fliaJl take. Occafion hereafter, in the enfuing: 
Steps, to treat more particularly on that Head. I (hall only 08-^ 
ferve at prefent, that thofe who learn to dance, and are acquainted 
with the R'tgadoon of the late Mr. Ifaac, will meet with out Step, 
tmn'mg in all or moil of the Ways above mentioned, in air 
different farts thereof; and it is here, for Diftih&ibn fake, named 
ot two Sprints. . ',...—•« 

There is (till another Way in which this Step is often made, and 
not as yet obferved, which is the Reverfe in the fecond Spring, 
to the foregoing ; for, inftead of taking up, in the fecond Spring,, 
the Foot on which the Body was, when you begun, the contrary 
Foot of that Foot which advances or retires is taken up: For In-- 
fiance, admitting this Step to begin with the right Foot, of Conse- 
quence the Weight muft then be upon the left, from whence yott 
make the firft Spring, as is ufual, upon both Feet ; but, inflead of 
the left Foot's being taken from the Floor, as in die aforefaid, the 
right or beginning Foot is taken up on making the fecond Spring; 
l Choice of Feet in this Step renders it of equal Ufe, in the 



^PJDpoSaou r oi Dances, as. the Gofe, in that the Change of Figure 
is to be effected in this, as well as in the aforefaid. : ., 




this Step in uanctng^ I mall proceed to lhcw its Agreement with 
the Notes of this Movement, which, as we have already faid, is of 
four in the Bar, and it agrees as follows: The nrft Spring is made 
upon the Time or firft Note; the Sink for the fecond is in 
the fecond Note, which fecond Spring, is performed to the 
third Note j and the fourth is in the Sink preparing for thefuc- 
ceeding Step. And, when it is done to a Saraband or Time of 
triple Time, it is in aU Refpecls the fame, except that, inflead of 
four Notes in a Bar, in this you have only three, which are, in 
their Performance, much flower than the before mentioned of four 
to the Meafure ; and it is farther to be obferved, that one half of. 
the third Note.is borrowed for the Sink that prepares for the enfuing 

Ste£> 



48 The Ab t of Dancing explain d. 

Step, in which it chiefly differs from the foregoing of common 
Time, but that it is not fo bride 

AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA ASA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA Ala AAA AAA, AAA AAA> 

^m w ■•■ *■• ^w» »■* ^Bw »■▼ ^A" »A* ^W* •■* *A^ ^A* »A» WW» *m* ▼■* ^A* *■▼ ▼■▼ *A» *A» VAV VAV IA Ifr VAV ^^ V|V AAV ^V* *W A^» 

CHAP. XVII. 
Of the GALLIARD and FALLING Step. 

THE Gall'tard Step is in a Manner the fame, as the befbr de- 
scribed Clofe from one Foot to both, except that in dps the 
Weight of the Body, after making the Spring or Movement for the 
Clofe, remains oh the fame Foot upon which it was at the Beginr 
ning; from whence it follows, that the Foot which, in the fore- 
going CIofe y received one half of the Weight, is here to be difen- 
gaged, and at Liberty to perform the fucceeding one which is a 
plain ftraight Step or Walk; which Step could not have been per- 
formed with the commencing Foot, had it received one half of the 
Weight, as in the Clofe from one Foot. And you are to note, that 
this Step always ends with the fame Foot it begins, whether it be 
the right or left, and is various, as to its Performance 'i^JJancing. 
'I (hall defcribe the moll ufual of thefe Ways, which are as follow 
viz. forwards, backwards, fideways to the right or left, and alfb 
in turning a quarter Turn, half Turn, &c. (z) and, ' in all the a- 
forefaid Methods of performing the Gall'tard Step, the Falling Step 
rarely, if ever, fails to accompany it, in that they are infeparable, 
in their Performance, as the Rigadoon Step open in the fame 
Place of one Spring and upright Clofe upon both Feet we have be- . 
fore defcribed, tho' they are two dininct Steps in themfelves. 
However, fometimes, inftead of the Gall'tard Step, we find the 
Coupee eroding before fide ways introducing the Falling Step; 
which it does very naturally, their Endings being directly alike. 

AAAAaa^WH^BMMMMM* «^ ^^ M^WMSaMMMMMMa AHASMHK^M^ ^>AM"«B AHBi^i^«iB^M«^aMaa*A«MAlAAAMAMA| 

(z) See the Explanation and Table of this Step in the Plate of Tables 'marked E. and 
Plate VII. 

Now 



I 



The Ait qf Damcimg explained. 4.9 

Now, as to the Method of performing the GaUtard Step which* 
as I have laid in the Defcriptkm thereof, is compounded of a Cl+Je 
and plain ftraight Step or Walk, I /hall begin with the right FooC 
advancing forwards, in the following Manner, viz. the Weight of 
die Body is upon the left Foot in the third Pofition, and die right 
difengaged behind (a) ; from whence you fink and give an upright 
Spring upon the left Foot, clofing the right or hindmoft Foot equal 
to it direcUy the fame Way as has been described in the CUJe from 
one Foot to both, except with this Difference that, as I have (aid, 
the before mentioned lights on both Feet, but this comes down on- 1 . 
ly upon one, namely the left; and it varies from die aforefaid, die 
right Foot being in die firft Pofition, joined even with the left, and 
at Liberty to perform the following plain ftraight Step (b), which 
together with the foregoing Cloft compleats the GaUtard Step\ 
that is to %, after the plain ftraight Step has been made forwards 
with the right Foot, about the Length of a Step in WaVanfy it 
does not bring up the left equal to it, as in that, but leaves it in 
the fame Place, whilft the Weight of the Body advances forwards 
with the ftepping of the right Foot, the End or letting to the Floor 
of which receives the Weight ; fo that, qs 1 have juft obferved, the • 
left Foot is upon the Point behind, the like Diftance, and the right 
advanced from it, in which Pofture the GaUtard Step concludes (c\ 
Upon this commences the FaUtngStcp, which is performed in the 
following Manner, viz. the Weight of the Body ending in the 
GaUtard Step upon the right, the left Foot is pointed behind; at 
the fame Time the Body bends or bows forwards, in order to the 
enfuing Fall which is backwards, but is prevented in it by the left 
Foot, which was planted for that Purpolc upon the Point behind ; 
and, at the very Inftant the Weight of the Body inclines forwards 
preparing for the Fall, the left is advancing up to prevent it; 
which it does by receiving the falling Weight in a Sfftk or Bend 
of the Knee , in the third Pofition inclofed behind, releafing the 



(a) Sec the firft Figure of Plate V. (b) See the firft Figureof Plate I. (c) See the 
fecond Figure in Plate VIL 

right 



J 



5o The Ait of Dancing explain d. 

right Foot (d), which is then ready to receive the Weight, on the 
Spring that is given from the left, immediately after its receiving 
the afprefaid falling Weight, and comes down upon the right Foot 
again, in the Nature of a latter Part of the Balonne* of which more 
hereafter; concluding in the fame Pofition from whence the fore- 
going Galliard Step was taken, with the contrary Foot (e) and, in 
continuance together with the Galliard Step, it changes the Foot, 
as in the HalfCoupe* y or Marcb> gfc. 

In performing this Step Jtdeways, either to the right or left, it 
oojy differs from the former in the plain Step, which, inftead of 
being made, as in the aforefaid forwards, is here performed fide- 
ways ' y and it may eafily be understood by comparing it with the 
foregoing defcribed, advancing to the upper Part of the Room: 
for Inftance, fuppofing the Clofe to be made in the firft Pofition, 
as before, the right Foot, inftead of making the plain ftraight Step 
as in that, here makes it Jideways to the right Hand, in like Man- 
ner as forwards. That; is, the End or Setting down of the plain, 
ftraight Step receives the Body; leaving the left Toe upon the Point 
fideways the like Diftance from the right on which the Weight is, 
as has been fhewn in this. Step forwards , when the {aid Toe was 
left pointed behind, as it now is fideways ; from whence commen- 
ces the tailing Step, which, inftead of forwards, as before, is made 
as follows, viz. . the Weight being on the right Foot, and the 
left Toe upon the Point (f ), as was already obferved, the Weight 
of the Body falls to the right. Hand, but, as I have laid, is preven- 
ted ; for, at the fame Time the Weight falls, the left Foot which 
was upon the Point is Jbrought with a. fwift Motion to its Relief, 
crofling behind the right on which the falling Weight is in the 
fifth Pofition, receiving the Body (g) which muft otherwife have 
fallen, and xeleafes the right Foot (h) which immediately receives 
the Weight again, in a Bound 'or Balonne fideways to the Hand the 



I* 



Cd) See the fecond Figure in Plate* IV and XIV. (e) Sec the fccond Figure 
m Plate V. (0 See the firft Figure in Plate VI. or Plate XV. (g) See the firft 

i'iguK in Plate XI. {h) See the fccond Figure in Plats XIV. 

Fall 



Tbc A*r cf Dancing explain'd. 51 

Fall was on, in that the left no (boner receives the falling Weight 
in a Sink or bended Knee, than it gives a Spring, in rmng, and 
throws the Body, as in bounding back, upon the right Foot* con- 
cluding the Falling Step in the third Pofition, with the left upon 
the Point behind, inftead of the right, as at firft i); from whence 
the faid Galliard and Fatting Step may be performed to the left 
Hand, in like Manner as the foregoing to the right,' the Difference 
being only in the contrary Foot, Examples of which with both' 
Feet begin the fecond Strain of the Rigadom Part of a Dance* 
med the Bretagne, the firft Time of its playing over, for they 
the very fame Steps here treated of. 

Thefe Steps may alfo be made with a quarter Turn, or a half 
Turn, &c. which, to give a more perfed Idea thereof, I (hall ex- 
plain with the left Foot, as follows, viz. the Weight being upon 
the right in the third Pofition, the left upon the Point behind (i) 
begins, in making the Spring or Gofe in the firft Pofition asafbrc- 
faid only, inftead of the Pretence looking up the Room after the 
Gofe, it now faces to the right Side, which is a quarter of a Turn, 
and in this it differs from the two Wayslaft defcribed; but the re- 
maining Part of the Step is intirely the feme, ftepping the begin- 
ning Foot tideways to the left Hand, and facing to the right Side of 
the Room, as before to the upper. The Falling Step is alfo the fame 
as before except, as I have laid, in not facing to the fame Part of 
the Room ; and turning a half Turn only differs in this, that the firft 
Spring or Clofe, inftead of ending in a quarter of a Turn to the 
right, as before, continues a quarter Turn more, facing to the Bot% 
torn of the Room, the left Foot ftepping tideways to die same 
Hand, asaforefaid, &c. . 

As to the Agreement of thefe Steps with the Notes of the Aiufic, 
it is much the fame as in the others: For Example, in the follow- 
ing Tunes, as Forlanes, Jigs, &c. the Clofe is made to the firft 
Note; the fecond and third are counted in the ftraight Step of 
the GaUiard, that is to fay, the fecond Note, at the Beginning of 



(i) See the fecond Figure in Plate V. 

G i • * the 



I 



5a The Art of Dancing explaitfcl. 

laid Step, and the third, at its ending or receiving the Weight of 
the Body. And, fuppofe inftead of performing this Step with a 
plain ftraight Step, as in Walking, you add thereto a Sink and a 
Rife, the Sink then anfwers the fecond Note, and the Rile the 
third ; and in the fucceeding Step the Fall of the Body marks the 
firft Note, the Paufe or Reft the Weight makes upon the Knees 
bent the fecond, and the third is in the contrary Foot's receiving 
the Body upon the Spring or Bound given from the Foot which 
preferred the Weight from falling, where ends the fecond Meafure 
or Time. When thefe Steps are performed to Tunes of common 
Time, as they for the moft Part are in Galliards , Bourees, Riga- 
doom, 6fc. they are intirely the fame as in triple, only, inftead of 
borrowing half the third Note for the Sink in common Time, the 
Sink or Preparative for beating the Time is upon the fourth Note, 
as has been {hewn in the Rtgadoon Step of two Springs; and the moft 
ufual Manner of performing this Step is in a foft and gentle Move- 
ment upon the Floor, tho' it may be done to Advantage either Way, 
viz, off from the Ground, or upon it. 



CHAP. XVIIL 
Of the BOUREE tvitb a BOUND. 

THE Bottree whh a Bound, fo called from its having a Bound 
added to the Boutee, is a compound Step confifting of four 
plain Steps and two Movements, the firft whereof is made upon 
the Ground, but the other not : For Inftance, you make a Move-, 
ment or Sink and Rife to the firft of the four Steps, the fecond and 
third compleating the Bcuree or Flturet\ and the fourth and laft vt 
a Bound which is always performed off from the Floor, as we have 
already (hewn, in treating of that Step. 

I (hall now proceed to (hew, how thefe four Steps are to be re- 
duced to agree with the Notes of triple Time or of three in the 

Meaning 




The Aet of DAXcixaexplain'd. S3 

Mcafurc, which may be accompliflied, as follows, viz. the left 
Foot, with which we (hall for Example begin, and die right are to 
be performed in a Motion as fwift again, as the remaining two Step*, 
by rcafon they are both to be accounted but as one Note, and are 
made to the firft of the Mcafurc. The third Step, .which is with 
the left Foot, is to thefecond Note, upon which the Bouree coif- 
eludes; and the fourth Step is a Bound with the right Foot to 
the third Note, and compleats the Bouree whb a Bound* This 
Step continued in Dancing, whether it be the right or the left, al- 
ways begins with the fame Foot, as has been already obferved in 
Coupee y and may be performed forwards, backwards, fideways 
either Hand, eroding before, croifing behind, or eroding before 
and behind in die fame Meafure, or twice behind; and they are 
all of them diredly the fame, in their Manner of Performance, as 
was (hewn in the Bouree of one Movement y only, as that was but 
of three Steps and one Movement to a Bar, this is of four and 
two Movements ; and confequendy, inftead of performing the firft 
two Steps equally flow, as in them, they muft be quick here, in 
that they are both to be accounted as no more than one Step, as I 
have (aid ; and as the Bouree or Fleuret breaks off, at the End of the 
third Step which is upon the left Foot, the Bound muft be added 
thereto with the right, which is the only Difference from the Bou- 
ree aforefaid. It is unneceflary to fay any thing farther of thefe 
Steps, in this Place, fince they will be underftood by what has been 
{aid in the Bouree or Fleuret of one Movement^ having in that dc- 
fcribed all the different Ways mentioned here; but only to obferve^ 
that the firft two Steps, as above, and the Bounds muft be added; - 



CHAR 



54 



The Art of Dancing explain d. 






t r 



S '.vv.i^.'.vCr, 



^.^• V >L 



CHAP. XIX. 

Of the SLIP before and then behind, or SLIP 
behind and afterwards before , and HALF 
GOUPEE fideways. 

THE SUp before and then behind is a Step compofed of four 
plain Steps, in a Meafure, and two Movements ; which 
(aid Movements may be done upon the Ground, or off from thence; 
but it differs from the Bouree with a Bound in this, that, whereas, 
in the Bouree aforefaid, the fir ft Move mentis always to be made 
on the Floor, and the fecond off, in this Step both are performed 
alike, either fpringing from the Ground, or upon it $ and it is aho 
to be noted, mat thefe Steps feldom, if ever, are performed any o- 
therwife than fideways to the right or left Hand, or with a quarter 
Turn, half Turn, &c. 

Thefe are the Ways this Step is ufually made, as either flipping 
before and afterwards behind y ot flipping behind and then before*, 
the fir ft of which I fhall defcribe, beginning with the right Foot 
For Example, the Weight of the Body is upon the left Foot in the 
third Pofition, the right being intirely difengaged from the Weight, 
fo that it may be at Liberty to begin (k) ; which it does by making 
the firft Movement or Bend and Rife from behind the left Foot to 
the firft of the four Steps, fteppingopen off fideways to the right 
Hand (1), and the fecond Step, which is with the left Foot, is 
drawn crofting before it, (m) after which the right Foot makes 



(k) See the firft Figure in Plate V. (!) See the Point or fecond Figure of Plate 
YJ. (m) See the Point or firft Figure in Plate VI. and fecond Figure of Plate XL 



the 



TIm Aet ^f Dahcing explain d. 55 

the fccond Movement the fame Way, which is the third Step; 
but, inftead of the left and lad Foot's being drawn before, as in 
the firft Slip (n), it mud now be drawn behind where it concludes 
receiving tit Weight in the fifth Pofitrorr (o\ 

To Slip behind and then before is, when die right Foot has msfccfe 
the firft Movement and Step tideways in the Manner juft defcribcd £ 
and the fccond Step, which is with the left Foot, (p) inftead of be- 
ing drawn eroding before, as in the former, is drawn behind fq). 
The fecond Movement is alfo with the right Foot, flapping to the 
fame Side (r), which is the third Step; and the fourth and lalf^ 
which is with the left Foot (s), is drawn crofling before the right in- 
to the Pofition aforefaid (t). 

To perform this Step with a quarter of a Turn, either to tie right 
or left Hand, is only turning a quarter Turn to one of the raid 
Hands, as it (hall fall out; in Dancing however, as an Example, I 
fhall explain it tideways to the right Hand, facing to the. left Side 
of the Room, viz, before and behind, and behind and Before^ which 
are both to be performed, as follows: For Inftance, thefe SRps> at> 
before defcribed, were tideways, facing the upper End of the Room 
to the right Hand $ whereas, in a quarter Turn to the left Side of 
the Room, in the Sink of die firft Movement, you prepare for die 
Rife or Beating Time,* but, inftead of performing it, facing to 
the upper End of the Room, as in the foregoing, in the riling; it 
makes a quarter of a Turn to the left Hand, which then will face 
to the left Side of die Room ; yet in the Performance of the reft of 
die Step to the right, it is intirdy in the fame Manner as I have ex-» 
plained it, to the upper Fart of the Room, there being no Diffe- 
rence except in the Turn. 

A half Turn is the fame as the quarter; only that, in the Rife of 
the firft Movement, which is made with die right Foot, inftead of 



(n) See the fecond Figure in Plate XL (o) See the firft Figure in Plate Xt (p) See 
the firft Figure in Plate VI. - (q) See the firft Figure of Plate XL (r) See the fe- 
cond Figure in Plate VI. (s) See the firft Figure in Plate VL. (t) See the fecond 
Figure in Plate XL 

turning, 



»w 



$6 The Art cf Dancing explain d. 

turning a quarter Turn as before, that is, facing die left Side of the 
Room, in this you make a half Turn, which then faces the Bot- 
tom of the Room, performing the reft of the Step to the right 
Hand, in the lame Manner we have defcribed it to die upper 
End. ^ 

Thefe Steps may likewife be done, hoth flipping beb'mdy or both 
flipping before \ the former is, when, in making the Movement to 
the right or left Side, the fecond Step, which is the Slip* is drawn 
eroding behind the fir ft or beginning Foot; and the fecond Move- 
ment and Slip are performed in the like Manner. 

"Both flipping before is, when, in performing the (aid Movements, 
the Foot, which makes the Slips-, is both Times drawn eroding be* 
fore the Foot which begun, that is, the fecond and fourth Steps; 
and the firfl of thefe Steps, namely, twice flipping behind^ is in the 
Rigadoon of the late Mr /faac y where, in the Beginning of the Tune, 
the fecond Time of playing over, it forms a perfed Square, which 
is no fmall Addition to the Beauty of the faid Dance; and this Step 
flipping before is no lefs remarkable, in that it is frequendy met 
with in Dancing. 

This Step, in all the different Ways of performing it, as above 
defcribed, is feldom, if ever, without the Half Coupee fideways 
following it, on the fame Hand to which the Slips were made, 
which feem not to have received their utmoft Perfection, without 
this Step attending them; and as the Slips, before explained, were 
to the right Hand, this muft be Co likewife , and confifts of one 
plain Step, as has been obferved, in treating of the Half Coupee j 
to which is added a Movement or Sink and Rife, made with the 
right Foot ftepping open off, fideways, from the Pofition in which 
the foregoing Slips ended, receiving die Weight on the fetting of 
the Toe or Heel to the Floor (u); after which the left Foot makes 
a Motion in the Air, in the Form of a half Circle, before the An- 



/ 



(u) See the fecond Figure in Plate VL 



cle 




The A&t gf Dancing explain'd. 

cleof the right Foot, opening to the left Hand, and a 

the Time or Meafure (v). . • ?. . 

It ftill remains to £hcw, how thefe Steps agree with the Notes o£ 
common or triple Time ; for they are very different in their Man- 
ner of Performance, which we (hall proceed to explain, and chiefly in 
this, that in Tunes of triple Time either the firft or fecond Slip, 
inftead of being made quick as in Tunes of common. Time, are as 
(low again; yet, for the farther Illuftration of this Point, I (hall 
obferve, how thefe Steps agree with the Notes both of common'and 
triple Time; which is as follows: To common Time or of four in 
the Bar, as in Rigadoom, Bourees, &c. But having already defcri- 
bed the Motion or Stepping of the Feet, I (hall wave the laying 
any Thing farther of it here, and only {hew, that thefirftX///> or firft 
and fecond Steps are to be performed in the fame fwift Manner 
we have (hewn, in the Beginning or two firft Steps of the Bouree 
and a Bounds and are both to be made upon the firft of the four 
'Notes. The fecond Note is counted in the Sink which prepares 
for the fecond Slip, which is the third and fourth Steps ; the Rife 
which is made on the letting down of the third Step, or Beginning 
of the laft Slip, beats Time to. the third Note, which (aid Slip is 
compleated in the Sound of the third Note, in the fame Manner as 
the firft Movement to the firft Note ,• and the fourth and laft Note 
is counted in the Sink which prepares for the enfuing Step* 

When this Step is performed to a Tune of triple Time or of 
three Notes in the Meafure, as in Sarabands, Louvres, PaJfacailUs, 
&c. fometimes the firft Slip is quick, as in the aforefaid, and the 
fecond not; and at other Times the firft is flow, and the fecond fwift. 
When the Movement is made quick, it is performed, as above, to 
the firft of the three Notes; the fecond, which is flow, takes up 
the fecond and third Notes. For Inftance, as was already (aid, the 
firft Slip or Coupee being made with the firft and fecond Steps to 
the firft Note, the fccondSlip, which begins with the third Step, is to 
the fecond Note; and the third is taken up in the gentle Aiding or 
drawing of the fourth and laft Step, whether before or behind. 



(v; Sec the firft Figure in Plates XIV. and XV. 



• r 

: l 



• - «• • 



J 



$$ The Ait cf Dancing exphririd. 

Half the third Note is borrowed, tomark the Sink which is for 

thenext Step, as has been obferved before; and, if the firft Sfiph 

1 flow, the beginning Step is to the firft Note, the Slip or eafy drawing 

* of the fecond Step behind or before to the fecond Note, and die re- 

1 maamngSRp is fwift to the third Note. 

: As to the Half Coupee, the firft Movement or ftepping fideways 

1 marks Time to the firft Note; the fecond and third are counted in 

the half Circle the Foot makes in the Air ; and the fourth in the 
Sink, provided it be common Time ; but, if triple, half the third 
Note is borrowed, as I have laid. 



^■■'Z(-V'<* 



CHAP. XX. 
Of the HOP or CONTRETEMR 

THE Hop or Contretemp is a compound Step confiding of two 
Walks or Steppings of the Feet, as the Coupee; and it maybe 
performed various Ways, as advancing, retiring, fideways to the 
right or left, turning, &c. There are alfotwo different Pofitions from 
'whence this Step is taken and. performed, namely, the third and 
fourth ; the .firft: of which we (hall explain forwards , beginning 
with the left Foot, which is behind the right in the third Pofition(w), 
but fo difengaged from the Weight of the Body as to be ready to 
a& ; which it does in the Sink that prepares for the Spring or Hop 
which is made upon the right Foot, lighting in the fame Place; and 
at the Inftant the Hop or Rife from the Ground is given, it leaves 
the aforefaid Pofition where it refted, during the Sink, and 
ftraightens the Knee, pointing the Toe dire&ly fideways, as in the 
March (x); but it does not prefs upon the Floor, as in that, by Rea- 
fbn the March is performed upon the Ground, and this off from 
thence which is the principal Difference; for, inftead of the Pro- 
gress made by the difengaged Foot, as in the March, in this it 



»m 



(w) See the fecond Figure in Plate V. (x) See the firft Figure in Plate VI, or firft 
Figureof Plate XV. 

1 muft 



The A at of Dancikg ixptetti- 59 

muft be performed in like Manner off from thence in the Air, the 
Weight all the while continuing on the lame Foot upon which 
it was at commencing, 'till the left has advanced the Length of * 
March or Step in Walking (y) ; after which it receives the. Body, 
and releafes the right Foot that fupported it, during its Proceflion, 
as aforefaid, which then makes a plain Step or Walk forwards +>, 
which is the fecond Step of the Contretemp, and is compleated on 
the fetting down or receiving of the Weight upon the faid Foot in 
the Pofition as at firft (z), being a Sort of Hopping Coupee. 

To perform this Step backwards is intirely the fame as forwards, 
only, inftead of the left Foot's being in the third Pofition behind, 
the right is now inclofed before in the fame or fourth Pofition (a), 
from whence it makes the Spring or Hop backwards, in the fame 
Manner as was dekribed forwards (b) ; after which the right Foot^ 
inftead of ftepping forwards, as before, in this makes the fecond 
Step backwards (c). 

When this Step is done with a quarter or half Turn, cjfr. the 
Weight of the Body, as has been obferved, being on the right Foot, 
the Hop or Contretemp is performed, as we have already explain- 
ed, but not to the upper End of the Room, inftead of which it 
turns a Quarter of a Turn to the right Hand ; but the reft is the 
fame, as in the foregoing, only you are to obferve, that it is ' 
facing to the right Side of the Room to which it advances. 

The half Turn in no Refped differs from the former, except in 
its not flopping at the right Side of the Room ; ..but, inftead of 
that, it adds a Quarter more facing to the lower End of the Room, 
to which it is performed in like Manner, as above, to the upper; 
and if, inftead of the right Hand, it be performed to the left, as it 
equally is in turning , as aforefaid, it is much the lame, except 
that the quarter or half Turn, inftead of being made to the right 

(y) See the firft Figure in Plate IX. f See the fecond Figure in Plate IX. (z) See the 
fecond Figure in Plate V, as aforefaid. (a) See the firft Figure in Plate IV, or firft Fi- 
gure in Plate IX. (b) See the firft Figure in Plate VI, or firft Figure ofPlate XV 
aforefaid. (c) See the fecond Figure of Plate IX, and for the fecond Step of the C**tre- 
temp the firft Figure in the fame Plate concluding as at firft. See the firft Figure in Plate I V # 

H 2 Hand, 



60 The Art of Dancing explaittd. 

Hand, as in the foregoing, are now advancing to the left Side or 
Bottom of the Room ; of which the Royal George affords us an Ex- 
ample, in that the (aid Dance begins with this Step, both to the 
right and left Hands, viz. the Gentleman performs it to the left 
Hand here fpoken of, whilft the Laay does the fame to the right. 

There are, befides, other Ways of performing this Step from 
the faid third Pofition, as fideways crofnng to the right Hand, and 
in a Hop, Step, and Draw behind fideways to the left; which 
Steps differ from the foregoing in this, that whereas they were 
made either forwards or backwards, facing to the upper Part of the 
Room, or the fame turning to the Sides or lower End of it, thefc, 
on the contrary, are always fideways, tho'they are performed tun*- 
ing all the Ways aforefaid : For Inflance, to the right Hand fide- 
ways, the Face or Pretence being to the upper End of the Room, 
and the Weight in the Pofition already explained (d) , the Hop 
is performed in like Manner excepting that, infteadof the left Foot?* 
advancing as in that, or retiring from the Hop or Sprint which 
is made on the right, it is here caft croflways before the right 
upon which the Body refts, about the Length of a March, and 
then .receives the Weight (e) ; after which the right Foot makes the 
fccond Step of the Contretemp open off fideways, in the Manner 
above defcribed in forwards (f). 

When it is performed turning with a quarter Turn, or a half 
Turn, &c. it only varies in its not advancing to the Sides or low- 
er End of the Room, as in the other, but, inftead of that, it is 
made fideways to the right Hand, facing to the right Side of 
the Room in a quarter Turn, in the fame Manner as to the upper 
End ; the half Turn the like, only not facing to the right Side of 
Room, but inftead thereof to the lower Part of it, which is a 
quarter of a Turn more. • 

The fecond of the Ways aforefaid is the Hop, Step, and Draw 
behind fideways, which is as follows, viz. to the right or left Hand, 



(d) See the fecond Figure of Plate V. (e) See the fecond Figure of Plate XL (QSee 
in fonw Degree the fecond Figure in Plate VL 

1 the 



Thlkir of Dancing explain*^ 7 6i 

die laft of which begins from the fame Pofition treated of in this 
Step , namely , the third, the difengaged Foot being upon, the 
Point behind die right (g), from whence this Step commences or 
making a Sink and upright Spring or Hop, falling in the fame Place 
and Pofture, as at firft, only the Knees are bent ; after which die 
left Foot upon the Point fteps open off fideways to the fame Hand, 
and receives the Weight of the Body from the right, either placing 
the Heel to the Ground or upon the Toe (h); and the right Foot* 
being then releafed, after die Hop and Step are made, as aforefaid, it 
drawn behind the left, the Toe preffing the Floor (i)$ as it is brought 
behind, and receives the Weight of the Body, as at commencing 
in the third Pofition, except that, inftead of the left Foot's being 
pointed behind, it is now inclos'd before and concludes (j). ' 

This Step with a quarter Turn differs from the Hoc croflways 
to the right, only in the latter's not being made to the lame Hand; 
for the quarter Turn, inftead thereof, is performed, as above dc- 
fcribed, ftepping to the left Hand, facing full to the right Side of 
Room, as in the other, and the half Turn, facing die lower Part 
of the Room, is, in its Performance to the left Hand, the fame as 
die quarter to the right. 

Having explained the foregoing Hop\ Beginning with the left 
Foot from the third Pofition, I fhall now defcribe it fideways with 
the fame Foot, from what I call the fourth Pofition\ that is to fay, 
the Weight of the Body is upon the right, the left being diredly 
the fame fideways as the Beginning or firft Movement in a March 
only the Toe is not pointed to the Ground, as in that, but the Heel 
placed without any Weight (k); from which Pofture of Standing 
this Step is taken and performed: Forlnftance, the Weight being 
upon the right Foot, and the left Heel placed, as aforefaid, about 
the Length of a Step in Walking you make the Sink or Prepara- 
tion for the Spring or Hop (1) by transferring the Weight from the 

» 

(g) See the fecond Figure in Plate V. (h) See the firft Figure in Plate VI. (t) See 
the fecond Figure in Plate VI. (j) See the firft Figure in Piatt IV, or fecond of Plate 
XI. (k) See the firft Figure in Plate V I. (1) See the firft Figure in Plate X.- 

right 



«■ 



6% Tbe Art <?/ Dancing explditi<L . 

right to the left Foot, the very Moment before the Spring it 
made, in taking up the right Foot from the Ground, the left at 
the fame Inftant receiving the Body, upon which the Hop is -be- 
gun and compleated, as follows: The right Foot, being then 
at Liberty (m), makes a plain Step or Walk fideways eroding before 
the left, that (imports the Weight, to the fame Hand (n) $" after 
which the left Foot fteps out the fame Way and places the Heel, 
being ready to make the Spring, as before (oj* by Reafon you are 
now in the fame Pofition, as at commencing, and concludes the 

Step. ' r 

This Hop, as juft defcribed, is to be found in the fecond Strain 
of the Rigadoon of the Jate Mr. Ifaac, the firft Time of playing over, 
at the End of the third Bouree of the Womart% Side: where the La- 
dy {rands upon the fecond Step of the faid Bouree, viz, the right 
Foot, whilft the, left, inftead of receiving the Body asit. would other- 
wife have done, only fets down the Heel to the Ground. - From 
this Pofture proceeds the Hop or Contretemp we are now treating 
of, which takes up the fourth Bar or Meafure; and, as I have re- 
ferred to this Place for an Example, I think it will not be improper 
to fay fomething here of ihsfflop that follows the foregoing: Which 
differs in this, that whereas in the former the Heel is to be placed 
to the Ground upon the laft Step, in this a Bound is made inftead 
thereof, which is the only Difference, and the Reafon of its being 
called a Hop, Step, and Bound; and it alfo remarkably varies from 
the aforefaid, in that it again conducts the Dancer into the Bou- 
rees, Coupees, and Half Coupees, &c. as the other leads him out of 
thefe Steps. To perform this Contretemp or Hop from the fourth 
Pofition forwards, the left or beginning Foot inftead of being open 
fideways, as before, muft be advanced, about the like Diftance be- 
fore the right, as the other was upon one'Side of it; which Man- 
ner of Standing is what we call the fourth Pofition, from whence 
the Hop is to be made, being, in all Refpe&s, the fame as fideways 



q—wm 



(m) See the fecond Figure in Plates VI and XV. (n) See the firft Figure in Plate XI. 
(o) See the firft Figure in Plate X. 



to 



•• 



I 



-• . 

Tht Air <f Da k ci kg explain J. . 6% 

to the left Hand only, as I have faid, the left Foot muft be advan- 
ced up the Room, which is done as follows: The Weight of .the 
Body being upon the right Foot, and the Heel of the left to the 
Ground, as, aforefaid (p/, the Contretemp is made forwards, upon 
the left Foot, the right being taken up from the Floor; which, 
faid right Foot then makes a plain Walk or Step forwards (q), that 
in the foregoing was made fideways cro/fing before the, left; aftet, • 
which the left Foot is advanced; the Length of a Step / and the 
Heel placed in the fourth Pofition, as at commencing this Step, in 
Readinefi to repeat the fame (r). But, inftead of that, Khali pro- 
ceed to fhew, how this Step is performed from the faid Pofition. 
backwards* viz, by the Weight's not advancing forwards to the left 
Foot, as before, but on the contrary the Hop is made on the right 
Foot backwards by taking up the left Foot, in like Manner as. die 
other forwards in taking up of the right, except that the Weight is 
not transferred, as in the former, and then it makes the Step 6^ 
or Walk backwards the feme as before forwdrds\s)i after which me 
right Foot makes the fecond and laft Step backwards alio and re- 
ceives the Body, leaving the left Heel to the Floor, as at firft, ei- 
ther to advance or retire (t); and thefe are the moft ufual Ways of 
performing this Step from the fourth Pofition.' ' '. .' ■ ."/•. 

The -Method of performing the Hop or Contretemps both from 
the third and fourth Pofition, being now explained, I fhajl take 
fome Notice, how they agree with the Notes of Mufic, either of 
common or triple Time, &c . as for Example, from die third Pofi- 
tion forwards, beginning with the left or advancing Foot to a Tune • 
of common Time; which being accomplished will fhew the Man- 
ner of the reft, whether backwards , fideways, or round, in that the 
fame Method of counting will bear in them all, fince the Hop ' 
certainly marks the firft Note or what we call Ttme, tho' it be 
upon the right Foot, as in the third* Pofition, or on the left in die 



(p) See the firft Figure in Plate IX. (q) See the fecond Figure in Plate IX. (r) See 
the firft Figure in Plate IX. (s) See the fecond Figure in Plate IX. <t) See the 
firft Figure in Plate IX. 

fourth 



64 The As t of D ahci*g explairid. 

fourth as follows, viz, the Springot Hop, that is made upon the right 
Foot, beatsTime to the firft of the four Notes; the fecondNote is count- 
ed in the letting down or receiving the Weight of the Body upon 
the eft Foot, after its having advanced the Length of a Step for- 
wards; and the third Note is counted, when the right Foot re- 
ceives the Body, as before, and finifhes. The remaining fourth 
Note, as has been (aid, is in the Sink which prepares for the fuc- 
ceeding Step; and, to triple Time or of the Notes in three Bar or 
Mcafure, it is the very fame, except that, as- there are only three 
Notes, half the third muft be borrowed for the Sink that prepares 
to mark die Cadence of the fucceeding Step. 






»» • • J 



»' - J ,. . J * •» - 



CHAR XXL 



Of the GHASSEE or DRIVING STEP. 

« 

THE Hop or Contretemf laft explained having introduced us to 
the Pofition from whence the Chaffee or Driving Step is per- 
formed, namely, the fourth, fince in that we took no farther No- 
tice than of its being Jideways, or forwards, in the (aid Pofition, 
without explaining the particular Manner in which the laft Step, 
whether of a Bouree, Coupee, Half Coupee, or March is to be per- 
formed, when introducing any of the aforefaid Hops or Driving 
Steps', and as this Step confidently varies, in its Method of Per- 
formance, from the Way in which it would otherwife have been done, 
had a Bouree, ot Coupee, &c. followed, I fhall obferve, that it is 
much the fame as when, in Fencing^ we put ourielves in a Pofture 
of Defence ; but, this Pofture being probably unknown to the La- 
dies, I (hall endeavour to give an Explanation of it, which take as 
follows: The Pofture of Defence moft ufually is to the right Hand, 
the whole Weight of the Body being upon the left Foot, and the 
right ftepped out fide ways to the fame Side of the Room, about 

the 



The A*t of Dancing explained. ' 65 

die Length of a Step, as in fPalkhtg$ the full Part of die Heel 
firft comes to the Ground, but afterwards the Foot is flat, only 
free from Weight, both die Knees being bent (u); from which 
Portion or Pofture the Hop before treated of is taken, as well as 
the Chaffee we are now about to defcribe, or from whence the 
Longe or Pa/s is made in Fencing. 

However it ftill remains to fnew the Method, how the above- 
mentioned Step is to be performed, when we put ourfelvesin the laid 
Pofition or Pofture, in which confifts the Perfection of it; and, 
for the greater Variety, in defcribing the fame we fhall begin to 
the right Hand, having already obferved it to the left, in die 
Hop aforefaid. But, for the better underftanding of this, we muft 
take Notice, that in a Bouree we are to make a Stop or Reft upon - 
the fecond Step, when any of this Sort of Steps follow; in the 
Coupee upon the firft, and in a Half Coupee or March, &c. we 
(land in one of the Portions from whence it is to be taken, which 
differ according to the foregoing Step's being performed forwards, 
backwards, or tideways; but, in all of them, it is generally taken 
from the firft or third Pofition either before or behind (v). We. fhall 
begin with the laft: For Example, the Weight of the Body being 
upon the left Foot, the right at Liberty behind it prepares for die 
Kick or foft Stamp fideways, for (o I muft name it, as not knowing 
what more properly to call it, by raifing the Heel of the hindmoft 
Foot, whether right or left, with a gende and eafy Motion, the 
Toe or Ball of the Inftep pointing down to the dound, but not fo 
as to bear upon it, by Realbn it will not be ready to perform the 
Step afore/aid ; which is exceeding fwift, becaufe, as I have faid, 
the Dancer makes a Paufe or Reft, until the fourth Note in com- 
mon Time is almoft (pent, and in triple the third ; but, before ei- 
ther of them expire, the eafy Stamp or Kick is given, and inftead of 
the Foot's being flat to the Ground, as in Fencings in Dancing the 
Heel muft firft be placed thereto in order to receive the Chaffee 

(u) See the fecond Figure in Plate X. (v) See the firft Figure in Plate L fecond 
Figure in Plate IV. or firft Figure in Plate V. 

I or 




66 The Art qf Dancing ex\ 

or Hop that fuccceds (w). How the latter of them is to be exe- 
cuted, we have (hewn in the Hops-, and, having juft before obfer- 
ved the railing of the Heel and pointing of the Toe, I (hall alfo 
take Notice , that, juft as. the Kick or Stamp is about to be made, 
the Toe, inftead of pointing to the Floor, as at commencing, rifts 
from thence; and the Heel comes down, but does not receive the 
Weight, 'till the Hop or Chaffee is made, which, in Dancing, is 
always immediately after this Step, it being a Preparation to that 
Purpofe; for, as I have faid, the Knees being bent, at the Inftant 
the right Heel is (truck againft the Floor, it only remains to per- 
form the Steps treated on; and whether forwards, or backwards, 
the Method is the fame, as Jideways above explained to the right 
Hand. 

Having now given fbme Hints, as to the Manner how the Step, 
that introduces a Hop or Chaffee, is to be performed, I fhall proceed 
to the Explanation of the latter, which is a Step compofed fomerimes 
of three, and at other Times of four Steps to the Meafure or Bar; 
and the mod ufiial Way of their Performance i&fewards and fide" 
ways, I mall begin with the former of thefe, namely, the Chaffee 
or Driving-Step of three Steps in a Meamre, advancing to the upper 
Part of the Room, which is as follows, viz. the Weight of the 
Body being upon the left Foot, and the right ftepped forwards, as 
juft explained, into the fourth Portion (x) with the Knees bent, in 
order to the Performance of the Chaffee , it begins by transfer- 
ring the Weight; that is to fay, before the rifing from the faid Sink, 
the Body, that was on the left Foot, is conveyed upon the right 
and foremoft Foot, which then {imports it, whilft the left, difen- 
gaged from the Weight, advances the Length of a Step, in rifing 
from the abovefaid Sink into the third Pofition inclofed behind the 
right, and again receives the Body. The faid Rifing beats Time to 
the firft Note of the Meafure (y), upon which the right, being at 



M 



(w) See the- fecond Figure in Plate X. (x) See the fecond Figure in Plate IX. 
(7) See the fecond Figure in Plate IV. or firft of Plate XI. 

Liberty, 



The Art cf Dancing explained. 6y 

Liberty, makes the fccond of the three Steps (z); but it dific 
fbmewhat from that of the Bouree, in its being ftepped more open 
off to the right Hand, whereas the Bouree is dire&ry advancing 
forwards upon which is counted the fccond Note; and the laft is 
reckoned in the Kick or light Stamp that prepares for the Chaffee 
following, which is the laft of the three Steps, and made with the 
left Foot ; for, as I have laid, the Body, being on the right, refts 
thereon, whilft the left moves flowly forwards, the Toe preflirig to 
the Floor, as in the March ; but not much above half its Length, 
in that the remaining Part is allowed to the light Stamp theleft 
Foot gives forwards, on the Expiration of the laft Note; upon 
which it is then in readinefs to perform the fame thing over again, 
as in the Bouree (a); for this Step, in Continuance, changes the 
Foot, every three Steps, the fame as a Bouree, This Step with 
the contrary Foot diners only in the Weight's being upon the 
right Foot, inftead of the left, as in the former; and the left, at 
the End of the fecond Step of the foregoing Chaffee, being advan- 
ced into the fourth Portion, in the Manner we nave juft oblcrved, 
begins by transferring the Weight, and taking up the right Foot, 
as the other did by the left (b), and fb on if continued. 

This Step fideways is the fame as above explain d, except' that, 
inftead of forwards, it is made fideways, which is the principal 
Difference; however, for the more eafy comprehending of the fame, 
I fhall obferve, that it begins from the fourth Pofition fideways to 
the right Side of the Room, the Face or Pretence of the Body be- 
ing to the upper End of the Room, the Weight upon theleft Foot as 
before, with the right placed, as deicribed by the Pofture of Defence, 
or Step which introduces this Sort of Steps (c). The Weight is trans- 
ferred , as before ; and, in riling, the left Foot is taken from the 
Ground, but, inftead of advancing up the Room, is now brought 

(z) See the fccond Figure in Plate IX. only the right or advanced Foot is more open. 
(a) See the firft Figure in Plate IX. (b) See the firft Figure in Plate IV. or fecond of- 
Plate XI. For the fecond Step only more open, as has been laid, fee the firft Figure in 
Piatt IX. and for the laft Step, fee the fecond Figure in die fame Plate. (c) See die 
fecondFigure in Plate X. 

I i fideways 



!. 



• 68 The Art of Dancing explain* d. 

I fideways into the third Pofition inclofed behind the right, and re- 

i ceives the Weight in Time to the Mufic (d). The fecond Step, 

i with the right Foot, is tideways, the fame Way, and receives the 

Body (c), which it Supports, 'till the third or fourth Note is expir- 
ed (f), according to the Time in which it is done, that is, whe- 
ther it be of triple or common; upon which the laft Step or light . 
Stamp is made, the fame Way eroding before the right (g), with ' 
the Knees bent in readinefs to proceed to the Chaffee following, 
which is performed in like Manner, but on the contrary Foot. 

As we are now come to the Chaffee of four Steps in a Meafure, 
the foregoing of three having been defcribed commencing with 
the left Foot, both forwards fideways and to the right Hand, I 
fhall, on the contrary, explain this beginning with the right Foot, 
to the left Hand-, but, in the firft Place, I (hall defcribe it, advan- 
cing up the Room, which is as follows : The Weight being upon 
the right Foot, the left advanced into the fourth Pofition (h), in 
the Method already explain'd, begins, as before, by transferring the 
Weight, but, as I have faid, with the other Foot; for, as the Chaf- 
fee of three in the Bar transferred the Weight from the left to the 
right, this does it from the right to the left, the right and hindmoft 
Foot advancing into the third Pofition inclofed behind the left (i), 
dire&ly the fame Way as in that of three, except with this Diffe- 
rence, that as the firft Note in that was counted in the riling and 
bringing of the Foot into the third Pofition, in this the two firft 
Steps of the four muft be performed fwift to the firft Note, as has 
been noted in the Bouree and Bound; and the fecond Note is in 
the ftepping forwards of the third Step (j), only, as I have obferved, 
a little open; upon which the Weight refts, 'till the third Note 

(d) Sec the fecond Figure in Plate IV. or firft Figure in Plate XL (e) firft upon 
the Toe and afterwards upon the Heel. See in fome Meafure the fecond Figure in Plate 
VI. and fecond Figure in Plate X. (f) See the Point or firft Figure in Plate VL 
(g) See the fecond Figure in Plate XI. (h) See the firft Figure in Plate IX. 

(i) See the firft Figure in Plate IV. or fecond of Plate XL and, for the fecond Step which 
is made quick at the ftme Time, fee the firft Figure in Plate IX. (j) See the fecond 
F-gurc in Plate IX. 

in 



The Ait of Davciko explaitt'd. 69 

in triple Time is (pent, or in common the fourth, in like Manner 
as, in the Driving-Step of three, it reded on the fecond, waiting 
for the Expiration of the third or fourth laft Notes, at which In- 
fant the Step or Preparative for the next enfuing is made, and con- 
cludes (k> 

In performing the Chaffee of four Steps in a Meafure, above ex-' 
plained forwards, to the left Hand fideways, the left Foot, inftead 
of being advanced, is open fideways in the fourth Pofition, the 
like Diftance to the left Hand, as in the Point or Beginning of a 
March, only the Heel and Foot are flat, as has been (hewn, in the 
Hop or Contretemp, to this Side of the Room (1) and it commences 
by changing, as above, forwards, only the right Foot, inftead of 
advancing as in that, moves fideways and is brought, in the riling 
behind the left, into the third Pofition (m), at which Inftant the 
left Foot, which is the fecond of the four Steps, is ftepp'd with a 
fwift Motion, the fame Way, and marks Time to the firft Note (n). 
Note The fecond is in the ftepping and eroding of the right Foot 
before the left (o), which is the third Step ; and the third is in the 
fetting of the left Heel down, in order to perform it again, as was 
illuftrated by the Pofture in Fencing, or in common Time upon 
the fourth as has been faid (p). 

This Step may alio be performed with a quarter Turn, which 
only differs in this, that, after the Rife or Movement is made to 
the firft two Steps that mark Time to the firft Note, the third Step, 
which is with the right Foot, inftead of eroding before the left, at 
before, in the ftepping of it, turns a quarter Turn, which then 
faces full to the left Side of the Room to the Mulic as above; the 
fourth and laft Step, which is with the left Foot, fteps fideways to 
the left Hand, the fame Way as the foregoing to the Pretence, and, 
if continued one Step farther, the firft two Steps face to the left Side 

(It) See the firft Figure in Plate IX. (I) See the firft Figure in Plate X. (m) See 
the firft Figure in Plate IV. or fecond Figure of Plate XI. (nj See ia (bene Meafure 
the firft Figure in Plate VI. (o) See the fecond Figure in the fame Plate, sod. 
firft Figure ia Plate XI. (p\ See the firft Figure ill Plate X. 



M 



70 The Art of Dancing explain d. 

of the Room, as the foregoing did to the upper Part; and the 
third Step, in which you turn the quarter, inftead of ftepping to 
the left Side of the Room, now faces to die lower End or it; the 
fourth Step, • with the left Foot, fteps £deways to the fame Hand, 
and fo on, if you pleafe, 'till arrived to the Prefence as at firft. It 
is to be noted, that this Step does not, in Continuance, change the 
Foot, as the Cbaffee of three in the Meafure, or Bouree, but al- 
ways begins with the fame Foot, as in the Bouree with a Bound, • 

There is another Way of performing this Step, of which I fhall 
take fome Notice, viz. two Movements and Steps to the Meafure, 
that is to fay, the Chaffee of three Steps in a Bar already explain d, 
to which is added a Sort of a HalfCoupee> in the Nature of &Drk 
ving-Step ' y which faid Step is the fourth of the laft defcribed Chaf- 
fee > except that it is made plain here with a Movement or Rife from 
the fourth Pofition from whence it begun, and the releafed Foot 
opens in the Air, forming a quarter of a Circle, or a half Cir- 
cle, Gfo 

As to the Performance of this Cbaffee or Driving Step of two 
Movements, .the moft ufual Way is forwards, turning a quarter, 
half, three quarter, or a whole Turn, the firft of which is as follows, 
viz. beginning, as we will fuppofe, with the right Foot, upon 
which the Weight ftands in the fourth Pofition, and the left ad- 
vanced, but without any Weight (q), as has been faid, except its 
own, commences by transferring the Weight in the fame Man- 
ner as defcribed in the Chaffee of four Steps with one Movement 
forwards to the upper Part of the Room, that is, the firft two Steps, 
namely, with the right Foot and the left (r); but not the third Step 
with the right, for, altho* it fteps a little open, as in the afore&id, 
it does not receive any Weight, by reafbn it prepares for the Half 
Coupee y which is to be made in the Manner of the Chaffee before 
mentioned. This Step is made upon the fecond Note of the three, 
as was explained by the Pofture in Fencing, only inftead ofjideways 

(q) See the firft Figure in Plate IX. (r) See the firft Figure in Plate IVi For the 
fccoodStep which is made quick at the fame Time, ice the firft in Plate IX. 

» It 



The Art of Dancing explain d. 

it is forwards (s); and, as was already (hewn, the Knees 
and Weight upon the left Foot, the Half Coiipee, the feet 
ment of the Chaffee, begins by conveying or transferri 
dy from the left to tie right andfbremoft Foot, immedia 
riling, on which the left or hindmoft Foot advances, 
Ball or Inflep flat to the Ground into the third Pofition 
right (t), which it releafes; and, in its being taken uj 
Floor, it makes a quarter of a Circle in the Air, opei 
right Side (u), facing the upper Part of the Room, or 
Turn to the right Side; or a half Turn to the Bottoc 
quarter Turn to the left Side, or a whole Turn;^ 
Coupee is performed to the third Note, if to triple Tin 
common to the fourth. 

CHAP. XXII. 

Of the GHJSSEE, or DRIVING 

of two Movements or Bounding GOUi 

THIS Step is performed two different Ways, viz. aa\ 
retiring) the former of which begins by transferring 
refting on the right or left Leg in the fourth Pofition , s 
ter by a Sway or Wave of the Poife of the Body, eit 
right or left Leg from the fecond Pofition, which is the 
Method of performing this Step; for, being in the fecor 
and the Weight as much on one Foot as the other, it 
ving or. fwaying the Body, whether upon the right 01 
during the Sink, preparing for the Chaffee or Driving I 
made by the difengaged and pointed Foot, whichfbeve 



(s) See the fecond Figure in PUte IX. (t) Set tht fecond Figui 
(u) Sec the fecond Figure in Hates XIV and XV. 



72 The Abt of Dancing explain d. 

ways retiring to the right or left, or backwards. But, if it begin from 
the Weight retting on the right or left Foot, as advancing to make 
the Contretemp , Chaff ees t or the like, it begins by changing, other- 
wife directly , without changing, being duly prepared ; tho' in its 
Performance advancing, it much refembles the Chajfee to die left 
Hand, of oneMovement to four Steps, except that, inflead of oneMove- 
ment made upon the Ground, here are two Movements or Coupees off 
from thence; and it is a Step frequently found in Tunes of com- 
mon Time, not much unlike what we often fee Boys perform in 
Play, when they run along, and, in rifing from a Sink, knock or 
beat oneHeel againft the other, lighting in the fourth Pofition, 
with the Knees bent, continuing the fame, perhaps, the Length 
of a Stret or Field. 

The Driving Step or Chajfee of two Movements or Bounding 
Coupees is ufually perform'd fideways, tho' fbmetimes to one Part 
of the Room, and fometimes to another, as it falls out, which is 
according as the foregoing Step ended to the right or left Sides, 
or upper or lower Ends of die Room; for the better understanding 
whereof I fhall give an Example of it to die left Hand, facing up 
the Room as follows, viz. the Weight of the Body being upon die 
right Foot, the left in the fourth Pofition fideways, as in die forego- 
ing Chaffee or Driving Step of four Steps, to the fame Side of the 
Room, the Knees bent (v), &V. it begins by transferring the 
Weight to the left Foot, as in that, only in the. rifing, inflead of 
the right Foot's being brought behind the left in the third Pofition 
as in that upon the Ground, it is here made off from thence, in 
a fort of Springing or Bounding fideways, in which the right and 
commencing Foot, in a Manner, drives the left and fecond Step 
of the Coupee before it ; for the Spring or Bound no fboner is given 
and the right Foot brought into the firft Pofition even, or the third 
Pofition behind the left (w), than the left being at Liberty is driven 
the Length of a Step fideways (x) and then fet down in the fourth 



(v; See the firft Figure in Plate X. (w) See the fecond Figure in Plate I. or firft Figure 
in Plate IV. (x) See in fotnc Meafure the firft Figure in Plate VL 

Pofi- 



78*A*t qfDxsciHaexplain'd. 7$ 

Pofition, the Knees being bent, at in the Pofture of Defence. 
This fecond Step concludes the firft of the two Movements or Cou- 
pee (y)> the Bound or Beginning of which is made upon the firft 
of the four Notes, in that they are both counted as no more than 
one Step, as has been already (hewn, not only in the Boureeaai 
Bound but alfo in the Chaffee of four Steps; the fecond of the four 
Notes is reckoned in the Reft or Paufe the Weight makes upon 
the Sink that prepares for the fecond Movement, viz. the third and 
fourth Steps, perform'd in the fame Method as the firft, by trant 
ferring the Weight, as aforefaid, and being made upon the third 
Note concludes the Step,- and the fourth, as I have faid, is in 
the Sink or Preparation for the fucceeding Step, whether it be of 
the fame, or any other Sort. 

To perform this Step to the right Hand is only to transfer the 
Weight : For Example, inftead of the Body's refting upon the right 
Foot, as before, it muft be placed on the left, with the right dif- 
engaged from any Weight, except its own, as has been (hewn by 
the foregoing (z); the reft intirely, in the like Manner, advancing 
tideways to the right Side of the Room, as the other to the left. 

Having explained this Step advancing, I will proceed to its Me- 
thod of retiring; and the Difference between this and the former 
principally conlifts in the Weight of the Body's not being changed 
on its beginning now, as in the foregoing; but inftead thereof it 
directly commences from the fourth Pofition in which we ftand: 
For Inftance, fuppofe you would perform it retiring, the fame Way 
we have defcribed it advancing, viz. tideways to the left, then, 
inftead of the Body's refting upon the right Foot, as in the afore- 
faid, it muft now reft on the left, the right being in the fourth 
Pofition fideways flat to the Ground, without any other Weight 
than its own, except the Toe a little pointed or preffing to the 
Floor, from whence it begins. 

However, before I proceed in that, I (hall explain it rein'mi 
down the Room; which is from the fame Pofition, only the right 



(rtSecthefirft Figure in Plate X. (z) Sec the fecond Figure in Plate X. 

K Foot 



L 



74 The Art of Dancing explain d. 

* Foot is advanced, and not tideways, as here ; and becaufe a Bea- 

'*. ten Coupee or Hop, either forwards or tideways, generally introdu- 

k ces this Step, it may likewife not be improper to take tome Notice 

*: of it, which I fhall do, in the Explanation of the (aid Step's advan- 

5 dng up the Room* tince that will be fufficient for the compre- 

t: hending of it both Ways, in that the fame Manner of Performance 

3 is to be obferved in the one as in the other, only in the former the 

!: Beat is made tideways, inftead of backwards, as in the pre- 

x fent 






ii 



CHAP. XXIII. 
Of the BEATEN COUPEE of HOP. 

THE Beaten Coupee or Hop forwards, beginning from the firft 
. Pofition, the Weight of the Body being upon the left Foot (a), 
makes a Movement or Sink and Rife, as was (hewn in the Half 
Coupee up the Roomib) and receives the Weight, as in that, upon 
the firft Note, iupporting the Body, whilft the left Foot Jtrikes or 
beats againft the Heel of the right (c), which Beat is upon the fe- 
cond Note; and then it fteps back to the Place from whence it 
came, in order to receive the Weight again, which after the Beat 
retires off from the Foot upon which it was, in a flow Motion, 
waiting for the Expiration of the third Note; upon which it comes * 
down on the left Foot, in the fourth Pofition, much in the fwift 
Manner defcribed in the Preparation for a Hop or Chaffee (d). 

If you would perform this Step with a Hop you only need, in- 
(lead of the Movement as above, make a Spring or Hop upon the 
left Foot, whilft the right advances, as was explained in the firft 
Spring of the Rigadoon Step of two; but tho' the Weight there does 



(a) See the firft Figure in Plate L (b) See in fome Meafure the fecond Figure in 
Plate IX. (c) See the fecond Figure in Plate V. (d) See the fecond Figure in Plate IX. 

not 



Tbe'AkT of Dancing explained* 75 

not come upon the advancing Foot, by Rca(bn a fccond Spring U 
to be given firft, here it mud, as in the ending of a March, after 
which receiving of the Body the Beat is given, as above. 

Having explained the Beaten Coupee or Hop, which conduces us 
to the Step we are treating of, and being in the Pofition from whence 
it is taken, that is to fay, in the fourth, with the Weight upon the 
left Foot, and the right advanced, or more properly fpeaking, 
where it was left, in finishing of the Beaten Hop or Coupee; being 
I fay in the fourth Pofition, with the Knees bent, the Hying Chaf- 
fee or Driving Step of two Movements commences backwards, by 
bringing the right and foremoft pointed Foot, in the Nature of a 
Spring or low Bound in rifing from the Sink or Bending aforeiaid 
into the third Pofition inclos*d before the left (e) ; which Bound or 
coming down of the right Foot marks Time to the firft Note and 
relieves the left, which it drives backwards, the Length of a Step, 
receiving the Weight in the fourth Pofition (f j, with the Knees bent 
as at commencing, upon which the firft Movement is ended. The 
Bound and Step are both reckoned, on account of their Swiftnefi, 
but as onej and the fecond Movement is made to the third and 
fourth Steps, which are, in their Performance, intirely the fame as 
the firft. The fecond Note is in the Bending of the Knees, after 
finifhing of the firft Spring or Coupee \ the third in the Bound upon 
the right Foot, which begins the fecond Movement; and the 
fourth is in the Bending of the Knees, as aforefaid. 

As the Method, in which this Step is perform* d retiring, is now 
(hewn, I fhall return to the Place where I left off, and proceed in 
explaining it, as retiring fideways to the left Side of the Room and 
conclude what I fhall farther fay, on that Head ; and firft of all 
it muft be noted, that it is the Reverfe to the foregoing advancing, 
for as in that the Foot, on which the Body reds at beginning, pu% 
fues or drives before it the Foot without Weight, in this the difen- 
gaged Foot drives or purfues the retiring Foot that fupports the 
Body, much like retiring in Fencing, as the firft explain'd is a Sort 

1 

(e) See the fecond Figure of Plate IV. (Q See the fecond Figure of PlatelX. 

K x of 



*m *+m 



76 The A&? of Daxcivq explaiitd. 

I of advancm^ which I think plainly appears from what hat bees 

i (aid inthe D cfcription of them. 

The latter of the faid Steps being now fully described, it only 

i remains to add that, inftead of backwards, it muft be maderift- 

ring diredly tideways, eroding the Room to the left Hand, in the 
fame Manner as retiring down it, which is all the Difference; 
and confequently it is unneceflary to make a farther Repetition > 
except that, as where I left off (g), it commences from the fourth 
Position; and if performed retiring crofs the Room to the right Side, 
it is taken from the fame Pofltion as when advancing to the left, on* 
ly as I have obferved, it begins without transferring the Weight; 
but, when taken from the 'fecond Pofition, it is only fwaying or 
waving the Body to the Side you would perform it, whether right 
or left 

It is to be noted, that the foregoing Chaffee or Driving Step of 
two fpringing Movements, when perform'd in triple Time, muft 
have a Springing Coupee more added, to fill up the Bar or Meafure; 
or inftead thereof a Clofe, which is nothing more than that inftead of 
finiwing the additional Coupee, or in the Bound's lighting upon one 
Foot, as in that I defcribed, it comes down upon both Feet, at 
thef ame Time, to the third Note in triple Time, compleating the 
Meafure, as if die Coupee had been finifhed. Examples of the lat- 
ter are to be found in the Chaconne de Phaeton of Monneur Peeour y 
twenty Bars before the End ; and the foregoing of two Springs and 
a Clofe is to be met with in the Paffacaille de Scilla by the lame 
Mafter, twenty {even Meamres before die End, and in Tunes of 
common Time, as Allemaignes, Rigadoons f Bourees, &c. but, in- 
ftead of the Chaffee or Driving Step of two Springs, we frequent- 
ly meet with one of them put with the aforefaid Clofe to a Mea- 
fure (h). 

m _ 

(g)See m tome Meafure the fecond Figure in Plate VI. (h) See the Table of this 
Step in the Plate of Tablet mark'd L 

CHAP. 



yS The Art of Dancing explain d. 

by bending both Knees, as before; and, in the Spring or Ruing 
from thence, the right Foot in the Air bounds into the third Pofi- 
tionbefore the left f which it releafes, tho' it is not driven, as 
in the others, but inftead thereof remains in the third Pofition be- 
hind the right on which the whole Weight refts, concluding the 
Step on the contrary Foot (o), in Readinefs to perform die fame 
Step over again, and commencing with the left Foot 

The fecond Strain of the Louvre begins with this Step, the laft 
Time of its playing over, with the fame Foot as here, that is to 
fay, on the Mans Side, but with the contrary on the Woman's; 
and in the Dance it is performed facing to the right Side of die 
Room or Lady, and not to the upper End of it, as here described. 

In triple Time this Step transfers the Weight and Foot, every 
Meafure as in the Half Coupee, March, or Bouree % but, when 
done to Tunes of common Time, inflead of three Drives ox Springs 
in a Meafure, as in triple afbrefaid, there muft be only two j and 
confequendy, if continued, they will always commence with die 
fame Foot as the Bouree and a Bound, or Coupee, &c. unlefs Steps 
of a contrary Nature, as the Bouree, Half Coupee, or March be 
made between them. 

The Driving Step of two Springs agrees with the Notes of 
common Time, in die fame Manner as was defcribed in the Flying 
or Driving Step of two Movements; and it makes no fmall Figure, 
either in common or triple Time, fince in the latter it is rare to meet 
with a Paffacaille, or Chaconne, without it; but, on the contrary 
it is fbmetimes found in three or four Places of one Dance, whicn 
demonftrates, how greatly it is valued and efleemed by M aft en (p). 



t See the fecond Figure in Plate IV. (o) See the fecond Figure io Plate V. 
(p) See th: Table of this Step in the Plate of Tables mark'd L 

CHAP. 



The Art ^Dancing explain d. 79 



a *;-m -)7s^ >;-ca >x*vi 



CHAP. XXV. 

OftbeFLTING GHASSEE or DRIVING 

STEP lackwdrds, with a CLOSE and 
COUPEE to a Meafurc 

THE Step, which I am now about to explain, begins from the 
fourth Pofition, as well as the Hop or Chaffee \ but, before I 
proceed, it muft be obferved, that it is composed of three diflereat 
Steps, and commences with the firft Movement of the Hying Chaf- 
fee or Driving Step retiring down the Room exa&ly in the fame 
Manner as was explained, in treating of that Step f, ending in the 
fourth Pofition to the firft Note, the Weight being upon the left 
Foot, and the right advanced, or rather, as I have (aid, left with- 
out Weight, in Readinefs to begin the fecond Movement of the 
laid Step (q) ; which Movement is made upon the fecond Note of 
the Saraband or Pajffacaille, to which it is done by making a* 
Clofe from the Pofition above mentioned, in rifing from the Sink or 
Bending of the Knees in which the Chaffee to die firft Note end- 
ed; which Spring or Clofe is made, in turning a quarter Turn Id 
the right Side of the Room, from the upper Part thereof, into- the 
third Pofition, by taking, up the right or advanced Foot, at the 
Inftant the Clofe is made upon the left, before which the right it 
inclofed (r). The third Note is in the Coupee, which is the third 
Movement and concludes the Step; and the (aid Coupee, which 
muft be performed fwift to the laft Note, commences,, oy the right 



f See Page 75. (q) See the fecond FigQre in Plate IXT. (r) See the fecond 
Figure in. Plate IV, only it muft be fuppofed facing to the right Side of the Room. 



or 



I 



So Thckt* iff Dahgikq explamd. 

or inclofed Foot's making a Movement or Sink and Rife, ftepping 
open off tideways to the right Hand (s), . feeing, as aforefaid, to the 
right Side of the Room, rather inclining backwards than directly 
£deways» by Reafon of its making Way for die left or hind Foot s 
more eafy and natural crofling before the right fideways into the 
fifth Pofition, in the Method (hewn' in treating of the Sbp before 
end then behind* ending, as I have laid, upon the third Note, 
with the Knees bent preparing for the following Step, which moft 
ufiially is a Half Coupee (t); and it begins by taking of the right 
or hind Foot up, in riling from the aforefaid Bending of the Knees, 
whkh is brought behind die left into the third Pofition (u), turn- 
ing a quarter Turn back again, from the right Side of the Room 
to the upper End, -upon the firft Note of the Meafure. The 4e- 
cond and third Notes are in the half Circle or Motion the left Foot 
makes in the Air, in its being taken from the Floor, (v) which, as 
I have laid, is upon the right Foot's receiving the Weight in the 
Rife from the firft Step ; and the left Foot, being in the Air, is 
ready to perform a Pirouette* or any fiich like Step. 

If, inftead of the right Side of the Room, you would perform it 
to the other Hand, the left Foot muft be in die fourth Pofition ad- 
vanced before the right on which the Body refts, in Hke Man- 
ner as the right was before, without any Weight except its own (w), 
from whence it commences to the left Side of the Room, directly 
as the foregoing to die right; and the Step here treated on is to hie 
found in the Pajfacatllc Darmid for a Woman* compofed by 
Monfieur UAbbee, in the fixth Meafure, beginning with the right 
Foot, as above explained (x). 



<$) See in feme RefpeAs the fecond Figure in Plate VI, only it muft be fuppofed to 
the right Side of the Room. (t) See the fclond Figure in Plate XI. and it alio muft 
be facingas aforefaid. (u) See the firft Figure in Plate IV. (v) See the firft Fi- 
gure in Plate XV. (w) See the firft Figure in Plate IX. (x) See the Table of 
this Step in the Plate of Tables marked L 

CHAP. 



T&e Ait of Dancihg explain'a. St 






CHA P. XXVI. 

4 

* • 

Of the HOP of two Movements, from the fifth 

Pofitton round in two half Turns. 

THIS Step ismuchufcd in Stage Dancing to which,, indeed it. 
properly belongs, as well as the foregoing ; but as there are 
Ladies, who frequently arrive at fuch a Perfection as to be capable of 
performing this Sort of Steps, it may not be improper here to give an. 
Explanation of fome of the moft remarkable of them , of which 
Number that under Confederation is one; which is often found in 
Tunes of triple Time, and fometimes in thofe of common, confift-. 
ing of two Movements, viz. a Hop and a Bound both made in 
turning, the firft commencing either from the fourth or fifth Por- 
tion ; from which laft we (hall explain it, beginning with the right 
Foot that fupports the Body, as in the Chaffee or Driving Step, 
only the left, inftead of being either open fideways or advanced in 
the fourth Pofition, from whence the aforefaid Steps are taken, muft 
be a little more eroded, that is to fay, the left Heel towards the Toe 
of the right Foot, without the leaft Weight bearing upon it, by 
Reafon the Step begins by transferring the Weight (y), which is 
accomplished in this Manner: The Body, as has been obferved, 
being on the right Foot, immediately before the Hop or firft 
Movement is made, is conveyed upon the left and foremoft' 
Foot, by transferring the Weight, upon which the Hop is given 
on the left Foot, in the right's being taken up from the Ground 
turning a half Turn from the upper Part of the Room to the lower 
End thereof, to the right Hand, making a half Circle in the Air 
the fame Way behind the left Foot where it arrives. At the fame 

(y) See the fecond Figure in Plate XL 

L Inftant, 



Sx 



The Abt of Danciko explain d. 



Inftant, the Hop is made upon the firft Note of the Meafiire; the 
fecond is in letting down the laid right Foot in the fourth Pofitiotf 
advanced before the left, on. which the Weight reds, in its being 
brought from behind the left Foot, where it mark'd the firft Note (z\ 
The third Note is in the coming down of the Bound, which is 
made, as aforeiaid, in transferring the Weight from die left to the 
right, the very Moment before the Spring or Bound is made, by 
riling from the Sink or Bending of the Knees, which was on the 
letting down of the right Foot to the fecond Note, and bringing 
die left Foot on which the Body refted in a low Bound or Spring 
Into the third Pofition behind the right; which being then releafed 
makes the remaining half Circle in the Air, by turning a half Turn 
more to the lame Hand, as in the Hop or firft Movement from the 
lower End of the Room to the upper Part, and finifhes the Step 
with the right Foot in the Air fideways (a). To perform the fame 
Step with, the other Foot, we are only to let down the right 
Foot into the fifth Pofition, before the left, on which the whole 
Weight refts, which begins, as afore&i<£> by tiansferring theWeight (b); 
and the Hop turns a half Turn to the left, exactly as the foregoing 
was defcribed to the right (c)> ©*c. This. Step is to the third Mca- 
fure of the Paffacaille Diana, beginning with the fame Foot, as 
above defcribed (d^ 



(z) See the firft Figure in Plate XII. (a) See the fecond Figure in Plate XV. 
(b) See the firft Figure in Plate XI. (c) See the fecond Figure in Plate XII. 

concluding &V. as in the firft Figure of Plate XV. (d) See the Tables of this Step in, 
the Plate of Tables mark'd L 



CHAP. 



The AftT of Dancing expldirid. 6$ 



' vr )m Cf ilr if ' i'^ 1 ! r )}'" >""">♦»' 

, t . 4W ' - '^ - ' - ' - ' - - ' - - i - - ' - " 



CHAP. XXVIL , ' ■; 

0/ ftfc CHACONNE or PASSACAILLE 

STEP. 

i * • 

TH £ Cbaconne or PaJfacaiUe Step is compofed of three Move- 
ments, viz. firft a Bound, fecondly a /7<^, and laftly a B<mmd 9 
or Baloney and it is mod ufually taken from the third Pofition. 
I {hall, as an Example, defcribe it commencing with the left Foot 
which in its Performance is as follows ; that is to fay, .the left Foot 
difengaged and at Liberty behind the right, in the Pofition aforc- 
faid (e), begins die firft Movement by making a Bound, in the 
Manner already {hewn in treating of that Step, which, as I have 
there faid, is acconiplifhed by a Sink or Bending of the Knees ; 
from whence the Body is thrown into the Air, in the Spring from 
the Sink or Bending aforefaid, only turning a half Turn to the 
right Hand, and comes down upon the Toe of the left Foot to the 
firft Note j at which Inftant the right, on which the Weight refted 
before the Change was made, follows or rather attends the fcft 
Foot, in the fame fwift Manner as explained in the Bouree and a 
Bound) remaining behind the left up in the Air, in order to per- 
form the Movement that next fucceeds, facing to the lower End of 
the Room (0; from which Pofture the Hop of fecond Movement is 
taken, and marks the fecond Note, by finking and making a 
Spring or Hop upon the left Foot which fupports the Body, turn- 
ing half a Turn to the right Hand, from the Bottom to die upper 
Part of the Room. The right Foot, which at the End of the 
Bound was behind the left, about the Length of a Step in the Air, 
is now the like Diftance before it (g),. ready to make the Bound 



(e) See the fecond Figure in Plate V. (f) See the fecond Figure in Plate XIII. 
Tg) See the fecond Figure in Plate XIV. 1 

I* * or / 



>l 






I 



84 The Art of Dakciho explaiifd. 

or Balone y as the French call it, to the third Note of the Meafure, 
which is in bending both Knees ; and, in Springing from thence, 
the Weight is transferred from die left Foot, and lights upon the 
Inflep or Toe of the right which was in the Air, concluding in the 
third Pofition, as at commencing (h). 

This Step, if continued, always begins with the fame Foot, as 
the Coupee or Bouree with a Bound \ and to perform it with the 
contrary Foot only differs in this, that, "inftead of being in the third 
Pofition juft defcribed, the Weight muft be upon the left Foot, 
with the right at Liberty behind (i); and, inftead of turning to the 
right Hand, it now turns to the left, beginning with the right 
Foot, &c. (j) as the foregoing with the left. . 

This Step, as above explained, is to the flfhMeafure of the Pajfa- 
ca'dle Diana aforefaid, and alfo in the fame Meafure of the Pajfa- 
ca'ilk deScilla mentioned before, commencing with the right Foot; 
and it is a moft agreeable Step in Dancing, rarely miffing to be 
found more than once in one of thefe Sorts of Dances (k). 

as® 




CHAP. XXVIII. 

Of the HOP and two GHJSSEES or DRIVES 

round in the fame Place. 

• « 

THE Hop and two Drives or Cbaffees is likewife a Step com- 
pofed of three Movements, as the Title above ipecifics, and is 
performed from the fourth Pofition, in the Manner defcribed in the 
foregoing Hop of two Movements from the fifth Pofition \ which 



(h) See the fecond Figure in Plate V. (i) See the firft Figure in Plate V. 
(i) See the firft Figure in Plate XIII. the firft in Plate XIV. and the firft in Plate V. 
(k) See the Table of this Step in the Plate of Tables mark'd I, and alfo the Lift or 
Explanation. 

faid 



• • « • 



72feAtT of Dancing explained: . $5 

{aid Step begins by transferring the Weight in the like Method as 
die prefent. Having explained the former, beginning with the 
right Foot, I (hall explain this with the contrary, and it is' perform- 
ed as follows, viz. the Weight being upon the left Foot, die right 
in the fourth Pofition advanced and at Liberty is prepared to re- 
ceive the Body (1); which it does, the very Inflant before the Hop 
or firft Movement is made to the firft Note, and from thence, I 
fay, begins by finking or bending of the Knees, in order for tBc 
following Spring or Hop, which is made upon the right Foot^ ins 
the left's being taken up from the Floor, and marks Time to the' 
firft Note, as was before obferved, turning a half Turn from, the 
upper .End of the Room to the left Hand and leaving the-left Foot 
without Weight, in the third. Pofition behind the right, facing the 
lower End (m) ; from whence the firft of the two Drives begins 



in bending of the Knees, as already fhewn in the Chajfeeot Driving 
Step of three Movements, upon the fame Place,; in Preparatkm 
for the Spring or Bound made in ftraighteriing of the Knees^ turning 
a quarter Turn farther to the left Hand, facing full to the right 
Side of the Room, and lighting upon the left Foot, on its being 
brought into the third Pofition before the right, which is drove 
by it backwards, the Length of a Step in the Air; which faid 
coming down of the left Foot is to the fecond Note, and the third 
is in the Spring or Bound made upon the right ; and, in the Rife or 
Spring from the finking or bending of the Knees, as aforefaid, 
the right Foot advances into the third Pofition behind the left, 
which being then releafed is drove, the Length of a Step in the 
Air, turning a quarter Turn more, opening to the left from, die 
right Side of the Room to the upper End, and concluding in the 
Air(n). l ... 

To perform this Step with the other Foot only differs in this, 
that, inftead of the right Foot, the left Foot muft be advanced (o) 

(1) See the fecond Figure in Plate IX. (m) See the firft Figure in Plate XHT ft 
only the left Foot* inftead of being in the Air, muft be fuppofed to reft againft the Heel 
of the right (n) See the firft Figure in Plate XV. (o) See the firft Figure in Plate DL 

and| 



$6 The Art of Dancing explahid. 

and, inftead of turning the half Turn to the left Hand, as before 
defcribed, it turns to the right, directly in the lame Manner as 
the aforekid (p); Examples of both which are to be found in the 
Cbaconne de Phaeton of Monfieur Pecours, in the eighty fevcndi 
Meafure beginning with the right Foot, and in the ninety firft of 
the fame Dance with the left, as above defcribed (q). 



* «■» 




C HAP. XXIX. 

Of the FALL, SPRING witb loth Feet at the 

fame Time, and GO V PEE to a Meafure. 

. - ' - ■ ■ - 

• . * * * 

TH £ foregoing Step, ending in the Air with the left Foot, na- 
turally introduces us to the prefent, which is of three Move- 
ments, and taken from thence mfal&ng> Springing with both Feet 
at the fame Time, and a Coupee ; all which Steps are to be perform- 
ed to a Meafure, and comequently accounted but as one Step, 
which, in its Performance, is as follows, viz. the Face or Prefence 
of the Body being, as in the foregoing, fuppofed with the Weight 
upon die right Foot (r), the Step begins by falling much in the 
fame Manner, as explained in treating of this Step, when intro- 
duced by the GalTtard fldeways to the right Hand, only this as 
backwards in a flow and eafy Motion, the very fame as if you intend- 
ed to^faB quite to the Floor; but, as I (aid before, it is prevented 
from that by the left Foot which is in the Air, with the Toe point- 
ed towards the Ground, attending and watching the falling Body 
fo narrowly that, the very Inftant it is in a manner paft Recovery, 



• % 



(p) See the fccond Figure as tfbreftid in Plate XIII, and the fccond Figure of 
Plate XV. (q) See the Table of this Step in the Plate of Tables marked L and alfo 
the Lift or Explanation. (r> See the firft Figure in Plate XV, or firft Figure of Plate XIV. 



• • - 



it 



L 



The Art of Dancing : explain (f. "■ 87 

it flies fwift to its Relief, to fave it from falling, by receiving half 
the Weight in the fourth Pofition behind the right Foot (•), witE 
the Knees bent upon the firft Note; from whence the Spring is im- 
mediately made with both Feet) acting at theYame Jundure upon 
the fecond Note, that is, by changing the right Foot backwards 
and the left forwards (t), • the Knees being bent, "as. afbrefaicl, • for 
Readiriefi to make the fucceeding Coupetr\ 'which is 'done by tals/ng 
up the left or fbremoft Foot from the Floor and .from the. Bending 
aforeiaid rifing upon the Toe or Inflep, making an open Step to 
the left Side of the Room to the third Note, neither dire&ly free- 
ways nor forwards, but between both. The fecond Step of the 
Coupee, which is with the right Foot, follows it, fteppxng the? 
fame Way in the like fwift Manner, as the Beginning of the B&m- ' 
ree with a Bound) into the fourth Pofition before the left (u), wk& 
the Knees bent as above. ', -, ~ ",-:!•»!• .... r 

r 

In order to make the Half Coupee, that ufiiauy follows this Stepv 
which is very flow in that, of itielf, itanfwers to a Bar, Kke the" -' 
foregoing of three Movements, upon the Weight's being changed, 
the left Foot, which before fupported the Body, being at Liberty, 
advances, in rifing from the Sink or Bending aforeiaid into the 
third Pofition behind the right (y\ which then is rclcafed, and 
makes a Circle in the Air to the fecond and third Notes, the 
firft being upon the left's receiving of the Weight as aforeiaid; and 
the Half Coupee i concluding thus with the right Foot in the Air, » 
ready to perform either a Pirouette, or the fame Step over again- 
with the contrary Foot(w); which only differs from the foregoing, ■ 
in its beginning with the right Foot, and is found in the Paffa- 
ca'tlle de Scilla, twelve Bars before the End, beginning with the 
laft mentioned Foot, and in other Places of the fame Dance (x), 



(s) See the fecond Figure in Plate IX, only the Weight muft be equally upon one Foot 
as the other. (t) See the firft Figure in Plate IX. (u) See the fecond Figure in 
Plate IX. (v) See the fecond Figure in Plate IV. (w)See the fecond Figure m 
Plate XV. (x) See the Table of this Step in the Plate of Tables marked I, and alfe 
the Lift or Explanation. 

CHAR 



J 



88 The Art of Dakcihq explaind. 

CHAP XXX. 

• m 

m ■ 

Qf ffe CLOSE hating hefore and falling lehind 
in the third Pofition, upright Spring changing to 
the fame tefore, and CO UPEE to a Mea- 
fure. 



— " • »•• -; - 



r 

TH E Clofe beating before 8fc which we are now about to explain, 
differs from the before defcribed Step of this Name, in its be- 
ing done to the firft Note of the Meafure, and, inflead of refting 
the remaining two Notes, as in the aforefaid to the fecond, there 
are the upright Spring and Coupee to the third ; and, inflead of the 
Cloft% ending either in the firft or third Pofition with the Knees 
ftraight, as in the former, it here comes down behind with the 
Knees bent, after its beating before. This Step is to be performed 
as follows, ' viz* commencing either with the right or left Foot 
from the third Pofition (y), by finking or bending not only the 
foremoft Foot on which the Body refts, but likewife the hind Foot 
without Weight; or from thence it begins, by making the Clofe 
in the like Manner, as aforefaid, in treating of this Step in die Rife 
or Spring from the above named Sink ; but,' inflead of the Clo/ft 
lighting in the firft or third Pofition, as in the foregoing, the be' 
ginning Leg beats before againfl that on which the Body refted 
at firft (z), and comes down in the third Pofition, as at commen- 
cing, only the Weight is equally upon both Feet (a), and the Knees 
are bent, marking the firft Note. The fecond, as 1 have obferved, 



(y) See the firft and fecond Figures in Plate V. (z) See the firft or inclofed 
Feet of the firft and fecond Figures in Plate IV. (a) See the hind Feet of the two 
kid Figures in Plate IV. 



IS 
t 



TheknofDABcmaexplaiitd:- 89 

it in coming down after the Rife or upright Spring from thcacc 
into the Air, in which the Feet are changed, viz the firft laft 
and the laft firft (b), the Knees being bent, as aforefaid, upon the 
firft Note in Preparation to make the following Coupee, which is 
fwift upon the third and laft Note of the Meafurc, whether of a Sa- 
raband at PaJfaca'iUe, SrV. by riling in the Step the firft Foot 
makes forwards, opening either to the right or left Hand and re- 
ceiving the Weight (c); after which the hind Foot and fecond Strep 
of the Coupee more fwift, the fame Way, into the fourth Pofition 
before (dj it, with the Knees bent, concluding in Readinefs for the 
Coupee that ufually attends thefe Steps ; which is, as I hare faid, 
in the laft defcribed Step, as exceeding flow as the foregoing or 
its Introducer was quick, and made in rifing from the aforefaid 
after transferring the Weight, and bringing the hind Foot into 
the third Pofition behind the foremoft (e), which being rcleafect 
makes a Circle in the Air, as aforefaid, either to the right or left 
Hand, according to which Foot the Step begun with (f), and i* 
ready to perform the Step over again with the contrary Foot to that 
with which you commence. 

You are to take Notice, that thefe two Steps are in a Manner 
infeparable, as I hare already obferred of fome others in the 
Beginning of this Difcourfe, and are to the laft Meafurc excepting 
two and a half of the Spatiijb Entree for two Men, compofed by 
Monfieur Pecour, belonging to the Opera de I Europ Galantc; and 
alfo in the Entree Efpagnole for a Man and a Woman, in the afore- 
faid Opera, compofed by the fame Matter (g). 

The above defcribed Step is fometimes performed, turning a 
. whole Turn round, that is to fay, half a Turn upon the Clofe beat- 
ing before and coming down behind in the third Pofition, the o- 

(b) See the Change in the firft and fecond and fecond and firft Figures in Plate IV. 
(c) See the two firft or advanced Feet in the Figures of Plate IX. (3) See the right or 
advanced Foot in the fecond Figure of Plate IX. and the left or advanced Foot of the 
firft Figure in die fame Plate. (e) See the fecond and firft Figures in Plate IV. 
(f) See the Figures in Plate XV. (g) See the twenty firft Table in the Plate of Ta- 
blci marked I, and the Lift or Explanation oi the laid Table. 



L 



M ther 



90 The Art of Dancing explain d. 

thcr half being in the upright Springs and inftead of the Beafs be- 
ing made againft the Foot on which the Weight refted, when fa- 
cing the upper End of the Room, it is here made to the lower 
Part in a half Turn, either to the right or left Hand, lighting in 
the third Pofition behind; from whence the upright Spring is ta- 
ken, in ruing or fpringing from the Floor, as aibrefaid, only, in- 
ftead of the Feet being changed facing the Bottom of the Room, 
the remaining half Turn is made to the fame Hand up it: For Ex- 
ample, fuppofe it commences with the right Foot from behind (h), 
then the Turn muft be to the left, the Clofe ending to the lower 
End in the third Pofition, with the right Foot behind (i); but, 
in the half Turn belonging to the upright Spring, it is changed in 
the Air, and comes down in the third Pofition before the left, on 
which the Body refted at firft (j). 

The Coupee is intirely the fame, as defcribed in the foregoing, 
beginning from the firft or inclofcd Foot ; and, if with the left 
Foot, it begins in the fame Manner, by making a Spring or Clofc y 
&c. turning to the right, as above (k). 



C HAP. XXXL 
Qjf the PTROUETtE 

" * . •• • ■ w 

t 

TH E Pirouette is a Step that altogether connfts of Motion and 
Turning. There are two different Ways of performing it ; 
cither from a whole Pofition, the Weight refting on both Feet ; or 
a half Pofition, when the Weight only refts upon one Foot, the o- 
ther being in the Air, from whence it begins, as will appear: For 

» 

(hj Sec the firft Figure in Plate V. (i) See the firft Figure in Hate IV. and for 
the Beat before fee the fecond Figure in the fame PJate, only the Feet muft be fuppofed 
in the third Pofition down the Room. (j) See the fecond Figure in Plate IV. 

(k) See the twenty fecond Table in the Plate of Tables raarkM £ and the Lift or Expla- 
nation of the laid Table. 

inftead 



The Ait of Dancing explain 9 ^ 91 

inftead of performing it from the fifth Portion, directly ms we 
ftand, as in the former, in the latter it is made by adding a Step 
with the Foot in the Air backwards into die abovementioned Pofi- 
tion behind, from whence they turn equally alike to either Hand 
upon the fame Place, the Weight of the Body retting moftly upon 
mat Foot which at firft (imported the Weight, the Di fferen ce be- 
ing only in the ftepping of the Foot which may as well be made 
forwards as backwards* 

I (hall now proceed to explain the Method of performing till* 
Step, both thefe Ways, beginning in the firft Place with the whole 
Pofition, which is as follows, viz. being, as was already obferved, 
in the fifth Pofition, that is to fay, when the Heel of either the 
right or left Foot, inftead of being advanced right forwards, .as in 
the fourth Pofition, is, as 1 have before fhewn in . the Hop of two 
Movements, round in two half Turns from the Pofition now treat' 
ed on, and about the Length of half a Foot more crofs*d before die 
hindmoft Foot;- fb as that the Heel of the firft in a Manner touches 
the Toe of the hind Foot, the Weight of the Body bearing as much 
upon one Foot, as the other, inftead of the whole Weight's being 
upon the Foot which is behind, as in the Hop of two Movements (1). 

Having fhewn the Pofition or Pofture of (landing, from whence 
this Step is taken, I will continue its Explanation, turning to either 
Side of the Room; and it is no more than making a Sink or Bend- 
ing of the Knees in the above explain'd Pofition, the Rife whereof 
is made upon both Infteps to the firft Note, in binding or pref- 
fing them ftrong to the Floor and raifing the Body into the Air, 
during the Turning or Meafure to which it is made : For Tnftance, 
if to the right, the left Foot is foremoft (m), if to the left the 
right (n) From thelaft of thefe we (hall defcribe it, as follows: 
The Sink and Rife being made, as aforefaid, to the firft Note, 
the fecond and third, if to triple Time, are in the flow Turning of 
the quarter Turn, which is to the left Side of the Room, in which 



»V» toMNam*Mtfka 



(i; See the firft and fecond Figures of Plate XI. (m) See the fecond Figure in 
Plate XI. (n) See the firft Figure in the fame Plate, 

Mi the 



^*m* 



92 The Art if Dancing explained. 

the Feet are changed $ namely, the right, which at commencing 
was firft, is now laft, and the left firft, facing full the Side of 
the Room to which the Turn was made ; and, if a half Turn, it is 
only adding a quarter Turn more, which then will be full to the 
Bottom of the Room ; and, if a three quarter Turn, it continues 
on to the right Side of the Room a quarter Turn further. • 

It is alfo to be observed, that, if a quarter Turn be to a Meafure, 
the fecond and third Notes are counted, ^during the Turning or 
Pirouette; the fame, if a half or three quarter Turn ; or, if to 
common Time, * the fame as already (hewn in many Places of 
this Difcourfe. And, if it be a whole Turn, it is intirely the like 
in Relation to the Notes, but not in its Method of Performance ; 
for, inftead of the Body's bearing equally upon both Toes, as above, 
it now bears, in riling from the Sink or Preparative for the whole 
Turn, "upon the Heel of one Foot and Toe of the other: For In» 
(tance, in the rifing, as aforefaid, or marking the Time, the 
Weight bears half upon the Heel of the right or foremoft Foot and 
the Toe of the Foot that is behind, in which Manner it turns to 
the left, as before, as far as the Bottom or lower End of the Room; 
at which Time the Toe of the fore Foot and Heel of the hind 
come to die Floor* continuing the Turn, 'till you arrive to the up- 
per End of the Room or Place of fetting oat, and finim in a 
Readinefs to perform the fame to the other Hand if Occafion re- 
quires, by Reafon of the Feet being changed,, as I have (aid, ia 
the middle of the Turn or fetting down the Heel of the hind Foot 
and Toe. of the foremoft (o). Both the Ways of performing this 
Step, as above explained, turning a whole Round, are to be found 
in the fourth Bar of the Saraband belonging the Royal Galtard, 
compofed by the late Mr. I/aac, and. written by Mr. De la Gard y 
the fecond Time of its playing.; the foregoing three quarter Turn,, 
in the fhort Saraband foe a Man, compofed by Mr. Pecoury. in his 
Collection of Dances publifhed at Parts* in the Year 1704, by 



(o) See the contrary Figures in Plate XL that ia to lay, for the firft fee the fecond, 
ana for the fecond fee the n rft Figjirc. 

Ms. 



The Art of Dancing explained. 93 

Mr. Feuittet, the thirteenth and fifteenth Bars before the End of 
the faid Dance ; and the quarter and half Turns are to be met 
with in moft Dawes (p). . I (hall now proceed to defcribe the fe- 
cond Way in which this Pirouette is taken and performed, viz, 
from a half Pofition inftead of a whole, as was, for Example, the 
foregoing; that is to fay, when the Weight of the Body it either 
upon the right or left Foot, and the other open in the Air pointed 
fideways, as in the March, or about an Inch or two more for- 
wards, only it does not touch the Floor, as in that, by Reafbn of 
its being the commencing Foot; from whence it begins, by ma- 
king a Step backwards into the fourth Pofition, if it be a quarter 
or half Turn ; but, if a three quarter or whole Turn, it muft be 
made into the fifth, as aforefaid, all of which are performed di- 
rectly in the fame Manner, as the foregoing or whole Pofition, by 
dividing the Weight, at the End of the flepping backwards of the 
Foot that was in the Air, which, upon fctting it to die Ground, 
receives 10 much of the Weight as only ferves to direct and aflifr the 
Body in turning, as well as marking the Time, as aforefaid, in 
rifing from the Sink made for that Purpofe, on the flepping of die 
Foot backwards upon both Toes, and turning either to the right or 
left Hand, which is according to the Foot that is in the Air, for 
the Turn muft be made to the fame Side ; for Example, if the right . 
Foot be in the Air, the Turn is to that Side (q).; and if the left, it 
is to the left (r). 

Having explained the foregoing or whole Pofition, turning to 
the left Hand, the taking fome Notice of it to the right may not 
be improper, in this Place, beginning with the quarter Turn: 
For Inftance, the Weight being upon the half Pofition or left Foo^ 
the right, extended as aforefaid (s), begins in making a Sink or 
Bending of the Knee of the left Leg on which the Body refts; at 
which Inftant the right is caft back, as was faid above, into the 

(p) See the twenty fourth Table in the Plate of Tablet mark'd I. and alio die Lift or 
E<l lanation of the faid Table. (q) See the fecond Figure in Plate XV. (r) See 
the firft Figure in Plate XV. (s) See the fecond Figure in the fiune Plate. 

fourth 



94 Tb e Art of Dancing explain d. 

fourth Portion behind the left (t), and preparing for the Rife 
marks the firft Note, which is made on letting down or receiving 
a Part of the Poife of the Body upon the Foot that was in the Air; 
from whence the Turn takes its Rife, turning in a flow and gen- 
tle Turn to the right Side of the Room, and bearing or preffing the 
Toes to the Floor, as we have already {hewn in the foregoing, in 
which Turning the fecond and third Notes are fpent; that is to 
fay, the fecond Note is counted in changing of the Feet, which is 
in the Turning, as I have fat*], for the right Foot, which was in 
the fourth Pofition behind, is about the fecond Note in the fame 
Pofition before the left, facing full the right Side of the Room ; 
and the third Note is upon fetting down the Heel of the left Foot, 
and taking up the right, which is extended open tideways, as at 
firft, and concludes. 

A Pirouette with a half or three quarter Turn only differs 
from the Pirouette juft explained, in not ending to the right Side 
as in that; but, inftead thereof, the half Turn finishes to the 
lower Part of the Room, half a Turn from the upper End (u). 
And the three quarter Turn continues on, 'till it face full the left 
Side ; but the whole Turn, as I have faid in the Pirouette, be- 
ginning from a whole or half Pofition, on which the Weight is 
equally divided, inftead of rifing upon both Toes alike, at the 
End of the Step made with the right Foot, by finking and ftepping 
backwards, as before obferved, into the fifth Pofition behind the 
left Foot (v\ in the Rife or Beginning of the Turn the right Toe 
or Inftep, being fet down to the Ground in the Pofition juft men- 
tioned, receives one half of the Weight* the other remaining 
upon the Heel of the left on which the Body reftcd at firft. In the 
faid Manner half the Turn is made to the Bottom of the Room, 
bearing equally upon the Heel and Toe ; and, when it arrives 
there, the remaining half is continued, by putting down the right 
Heel and Toe of the left Foot, which at firft begun upon the 



(t) Sec the firft Figure in Plate IX. (u) Sec the firft Figare in Plate XII. (v) See 
the fecond Figure in Plate XI. 

Heel 



The A* 

Heel, as the right die 
are changed, as we h 
flepp'd or caft into tl 
left laft, concluding 
of the Body being to 
cing(w). 

As to the Agreeme 
triple Time, it is the 
beginning from the \ 
the Weight in that, 1 
by making a Sink an 
firft Note of the Tune, 
the Body, being fupp 
as in the whole Politic 
be caft or fet down in 
this Step is ufually tak< 
as the Step is to be ma 
of theMeafure, if to trij 
a whole Round; or, i 
as has been obferved. 

This Step, in itsP 
fame as the laft defcri! 
Notes, or its Riling, ' 
the two foregoing Pir 
Turn is not the fame : 
in this the whole Turn 
ceptthat the Step is ma 
inftead of backwards as 
obferved in the foregc 
half Turn, it commenc 

(w) See the firft Figure in 
firft Figure in Plate XV, and 
cond Figure in Plate IX, bej 
the contrary, fee the firft Figui 



5 



96 The Art of Dancing explain d. 

quarter or whole Turn the fifth (y). This Step forwards farther 
varies from the foregoing backwards^ in that, altho* it commences 
with the fame Foot, inftead of turning to the right Hand, as in 
the former) in this it turns to the left, as in the whole Pofition; 
fo that, comparing this with the Pirouette firft described, it will be 
eafily underftood, in that it is the fame, except in not beginning 
diredly, as in that; but if you fuppofe the ftepping of the Foot 
forwards to be made, and place your Feet in the fourth or fifth 
Pofition, as before observed from a whole Pofition, there is then 
no other Difference, except that the whole Turn is performed in 
the fame Method as the other (z). 




CHAP. XXXII. 

Of the PIROUETTE introduced ly a COU- 
PEE 

m a - 

THIS Step is taken from a half Pofition, as well as the two 
laft delcribed backwards and forwards ; but, inftead of the 
Foot's being extended fideways in the Air, as in them, the Toe 
muft here be pointed to the Floor, as in the Point or Beginning 
of the March, from which Pofition it commences. 

However, before I proceed to a farther Explanation of this Step, 
I /hail take fome Notice of the Coupee that introduces it, which is 
composed of a Half Coupee with one Foot and a circular Motion 
made in the Air with the other, before its making the Point; 
which Step may be performed as follows, beginning with either 

(y) See the firft Figure in Plate XL commencing from the fecond Figure in Plate X V» 
and, if with the other Foot, fee the firft Figure in the afbrefaid Plate XV, and it con- 
cludes in the fecond Figure of the aforefaid Plate XI. (z) See the twenty fifth Table 
in the Plate of Tables mark'd E, the Lift or Explanation of the laid Table, and alio die 
Steps contained in Plate XV. 

Foot 



The Ait of Dancing explained. 97 

Foot, by finking and making- a Half Coupee or . Step forwards, 
marking Time to the firft Note, in rifingfrom thence. •'• » c- '• 
If we fuppofe this Step to be made with the right Foot (a), the 
circular Step or Motion with the left muft then be made inwards * 
to the fecond and third Notes, or the fourth, if common Time; 
that is to fay, the Half Coupee being made with the right Foot, 
as aforefaid, the whole quarter of the left Leg moving in the Air, 
with the Knee ftiff and Toe pointed, makes a circular Motion, by 
moving directly off tideways, as in the Point for a March (b£ 
only more round continuing on forwards, about that Distance from 
the other, forming a Sort of a Circle in the Air before the right 
Foot on which the Body refts all this Time, in bringing the left 
Leg, as above directed, that is to fay, die Toe pointed and Knee 
ftiff into the third Pofition, fo as to touch the Ancle of the right 
Foot (cj; and then it paffes on directly tideways to the left Hand 
making a Pointy about the like Diftance from the Foot you (land 
upon as the March (d) ; from whence proceeds the Pirouette we 
are about to treat of, which is performed by making an eafy Sink 
or Bending of both Knees preparing for the Rile or Straightening 
of them, which refembles a Spring, only it is not from the Ground; 
for, in the Rife or Spring from the Sink aforelaid preparing for the 
whole Round, the left Foot which was upon the Point is taken 
up from the Ground, turning quite round to the left Hand in 
the Air, with the Leg or whole Quarter extended in the Air, 
the Toe pointed, and Knee ftiff, as in the circular Motion, about 
half a Foot from the Floor (e). The Body, at the very Juncture 
the Rife or Spring is given, rifes upon the Toe or Inftep, as erect 
as a Pyramid, and turns round along with it, finifliing to the up- 
per Part of the Room as at firft, only with the Toe in the Air; 



(a) See the firft Figure in Plate I. (b) See the firft Figure in Plate XV. (c) See 
the firft Figure in Plate IV. (d) See the firft Figure in Plate VI. ' (e) See the firft 
Figure in Plate XV. If with the other Foot* fee the fecond Figure in Plate I, the 
fecond Figure in Plate XV, the fecond Figure in Plates IV and VI, and laftly the 
fecond Figure in the aforefiud Plate XV. 

N from 



98 The Art of Dancing explairid. 

from whence it may be continued as the Half Coupee, or Bou* 

ree, &c. 

This Step ufually takes up a Meafure, whether of three or four 
Notes to the Bar; the Rife or Spring to the Pirouette marks the 
firft Note, and the reft are in the Turning ; but the Coupee and 
Pirouette, tho' frequently found together, are in themfelves di- 

ftina Steps (f ). 

There are various other Ways of performing this Step, betides 
the described, as twice round, three Times round, round in an up- 
right Spring beating before and behind during the Turning, and 
many more ; which, as they are foreign to my prefent Purpofe, I 
(hall omit, and fay fomething of the Bouree before and behind, turn- 
ing? &V» . 




CHAP. XXXIIL 

Of the BOUREE fefore and hehind, and behind, 
and hefore, advancing in a whole Turn* 

THIS Step is compofed of two Bourees; but, tho' in Dancing 
it maybe performed to all Parts of the Room, or upon a Cir- 
clej an Explanation of it, commencing with the right Foot ad- 
vancing to the Prefence or upper Part of the Room, (hall fuffice, 
in that the reft will be comprehended thereby, fince the Difference 
h only inftead of facing, as aforefaid. The Prefence or Body, for 
Example, muft be directed to the Part or Side of the Room, to 
u-hich the Step is made ; ' whether to the right or left Hand, low- 
ex. End, or on a circular Figure, it will be the very fame, except 
that, advancing to the faid' Parts, as before, upon a right or 
ftraight Line, you muft perform the faid Step circularly or round, 

(f) See the twenty feventh Table in the PJate of Tables marked I, and the Lift or Ex* 
gkoation of the faid Table. 

commen- 



Use Arr of Dancing explained* 99 

commencing either with the right or left Foot, as it {hall fall "out, 
from any of the aforefaid Parts of the Room. This will appear 
from the following, which, as I have above obfcrved, is advancing 
to the upper End of the Room with the right Foot, in order to 
which the Weight muft be upon the left, with the right disenga- 
ged and at Liberty in the firft Pofition (g), which begins in making 
a Movement or Bending of the Knees; from whence the right 
makes the firft Step of the three that compofe the firft of the two 
Bourees Mptht Room (h), in ftepping crofTways before die left, on 
which the Body turns a quarter Turn to the right Side of the Room, 
the Riie of which, whether upon the Toe or Heel, marks the 
Time or firft Note. The fecond Note is in the next Step with 
the left Foot, on its receiving the Weight, which it does, after ma- 
king a Step circularly before the right, in a quarter Turn more, 
now facing fall to the Bottom of the Room (i); and the third and 
laft Step with the right, which is now upon the Point in the fourth 
Pofition before the left, concludes the firft Bouree* in prefCng or 
Aiding the Toe againft the Floor into the fame Pofition behind the 
left, receiving the Weight upon the third Note of the Meafure, 
and leaving the left Foot upon the Point in the like Manner (j). 

The firft Bouree being thus ended, the fecond alfb begins with 
a Movement or Bending of the Knees, as aforefaid ; from whence 
the left is ftepped or caft behind the right, in turning a quarter 
Turn farther, which will then be to the left Side of the Room, the 
of which is to the firft Note or Time to a fecond Meafure ; 
and the fecond Step of this Bouree is with the right Foot, turning 
the fourth or laft quarter Turn from the left Side of the Room to 
the upper Part or Prefence thereof, the letting down or receiving 
of the Body upon which is to the fecond Note. The third Note is 
in the laft Step of the Bouree made with the left, diredly up the 




(g) See the firft Figure in Plate J. (h) See in fome Meafure the fecond Figure in 
Plate IX, only it is to turn as directed, (i) See in fome Refpe&s the firft Figure in 
Plate VIII, only the right Toe muft be, as directed, upon the Point. (j) See the fe- 
cond Figure in Plate XII, except that the left Toe muft be pointed as directed. 

Ni Room: 



^ 



ioo The Art of Dancing explained. 

Room; and upon its receiving the Weight the fecond Bottree is 
ended, concluding in the fir ft Pofition, as at commencing. 

The foregoing Step, as above de (bribed, confifts of two plain Bou- 
rses or Flenrets of one Movement only, whereas it frequently is per- 
formed with two; and if ft>, the fecond muft be made upon the 
third Step, whether on the Ground or off from thence as in* a 
Bound, as has already been explained in treating of thefe Steps. 

But fometimes in Dancing inftead of the fecond B'ouree y a 
Coupee is found, commencing with either Foot, as it mall happen* 
but here it is with the left crofling before the right Foot on which 
the Body refts (k), in a quarter Turn from the lower End of the 
Room to the left Side, or in a half Turn to the Prefence, the right 
Foot or fecond Step of which is fet to the Ground, in the Method 
as when introducing a Hop (1), or, inftead of the Coupee afbrefaib\ 
as in the feventh. and eighth Meafures of the firft Couplet of a Dance 
of my own Compofition, named the SubmiJJion, that is to fay, on 
the Woman** Side. The left Foot not coupeeing before the right, 
as above, inftead thereof, in turning a naif Turn, receives the 
Weight, in riling from the Sink- or Bending of the Knees in the 
third Pofition behind the right (m), which then is taken from the 
Floor, making a circular Motion in the Air opening to the right (n) 
and inclofed in the third Pofition behind the left (o), as in the two 
firft Meafures o£ the fecond Couplet of the aforefaid Dance on the 
Man's Side ;. and if the faid Steps are with the other Foot, as on 
the Woman\ the fame Method of Performance is to be obferved 
to the left Side of the Room, as> in the foregoing to the right {pj. I . 



(k; See the fecond Figure in Plate XII. (1) See the fecond Figure in Plate X. 
(m) See the fecond Figure in Plate IV. (n) See the fecond Figure in Phftc XV. 
(o) See the fixft Figure in Plate IV. . (p) See the fecond Figure in Plate I. Sfce 
la fome Meafu're the firft Figure in Plate IX, only turning to the left. See in fome 
Refpc&s the fecond Figure in Plate VIII, only the left Toe is pointed. See the firft 
Figure in Plate XII, the firft Figure in Plate X, the firft Figure in Plate IV,. the 
firft Figure in Plate XV, and the fecond Figure in Plate IV. See the twenty ninth 
Table io the Plate of Tables roark'd I, and alfo the Lift, or Explanation of the Cha- 
rafters of this Step. 



* H 



Have. 



The Art of D ahcwo explain'd. ior 

have been the more particular in describing thele Steps becaufc 
they are of more than ordinary Grace and Variety to Danc'mg\ 
but I mall now proceed to the Minuet, the Subject of the ficmd 
Book of this Work. 



The End of the Fi ks t B 



OOK. 



* • 



» - » 



* » 



-» 



t • 



» r » • 



.t\ir 



VT- 



THESE are to certify, that 'the foregoing Book, inthled the 
Art op Dancing bxplain'd, was defignedand compo- 
fid long before the Book, inthled the Dancing Master, appear- 
ed, as we belseve; and that we have carefully examined toe /aid 
Book, and found it compofed and written, in the fame Manner it now 
is, on the twenty feventb Day of January, 1717-8. 



Witnew our Hands, 



Alex. Jackson, 7 — w A 

Jo«,H jAC«ON,£ DanCU, 8- Maften - 




( i°3 ) 



THE 

ARTofDANCING 

EXP LAIN' D. 

BOOK the SECOND. 

CHAR L 
Of the MINUET STEP. 



Jjj HE Minuet Step is compofed of four plain ftraight 

Jlsvl Steps or Walks, and may be performed forwards, 

I^BSyi backwards, fideways, ©V. four different Ways, to which 

8ftfl||lf|;j there are the like Number of Names annexed, todi- 



ftinguiih them from one another, arifing, not impro- 
perly fpeaking, from the Placing of the Marks upon them: For Ex- 
ample, a Movement or 'Sink and Rife, being added to the firft Step 
ol the three belonging to the Minuet Step, produces a Bouree; ana 

the 



104 TbeAtir of Dancing explairid. 

the like to the fourth and laft a Half Coupee, which together com- 
pole what is commonly called the Englijh Minuet Step, 

The fecond Method of its Performance is with a Bound; that is 
to fay, inftcad of the Half Coupee or Movement to the laft Step 
made upon the Floor, as in the aforefaid, you loundinficsid there- 
of, which is the only Variation from the foregoing. 

The third Method is quite the Reverie, bccaufe, inftead of the 
Boureey.the Half Coupee is made firft and afterwards the Bouree, or 
as the French term it, One and a Fleurety which is ufually called 
the French Step. 

The fourth Way of performing this Step is, by adding another 
Movement to the third Step of the aforefaid Fleurety or the fourth 
of the Minuet Step ; and it will then be notwithstanding the fame 
Step, only of three Movements. As to the two firft foregoing Steps 
I mall fay little concerning them, for die following Reafons : In 
the firft Place, bccaufe they are now rarely, if ever, practifed a- 
mongft Perfons of the firft Rank, and feem to be, for the prefent, 
intirely laid afide; hot as being ungraceful, or that the Dancer 
could not give Pleafure to the Beholders, or raife to himfelf a Re- 
putation, in their Performance, but merely through Alteration of 
Fafhion, which varies in this Refped, as in Dreffing, &c. 

Secondly, bccaufe they have been, in fomc Meafure, already ex- 
plained in the Beginning of this Book by the Bouree and a Bound, 
which, from what I then obferved, appears to be the fame as the 
Minuet Step here treated on, except that it there anfwers to a Meafure 
or Bar, but here to two, as the Time is much brifker than in the 
aforefaid flow Movements; and, as to their Agreement with the 
Notes, it is very different from what I have to fay, upon that 
Head, to the two laft Steps following; the firft of which is the third 
of the aforefaid, namely One and a Fleurety or a Half Coupee and 
Bouree, ufually called the New Minuet Step y and the fame that is 
now danced in all polite Aftemblies (q). As it is become the fa- 
vourite Step, my being fbmewhat more particular in its Defcription, 



(<j) See the Characters of this Step in chefPlate marked O, Number 1. Table the fecond. 

than 



m ' » • • • 

. The Art qf Dancing explained. 105 

than of the foregoing, may not be loft Time; for the Minuet is 
one of the moft graceful as well as difficult Dances to arrive at a 
Mattery of, through the Plainncfs of the Step and the Air and Ad* 
drefs of the Body that are requifite to its Embelliflunent, as will 
farther appear from the Sequel. . . 

But to return to the Subject in Hand; having, I {ay, already ob- 
ferved, that the Minuet Step is compofed of four plain Steps, with- 
out {hewing the Method or their Performance, or their Agreement 
with the Notes of the Tune, I {hall now proceed to defcribe both 
of thefe, which are to be accomplifhed in the following Manner : 
The Weight of the Body being upon the left Foot in the firft Po- 
fition the right, which is at Liberty (r), begins the Mtnuet Step* 
by making the Half Coupee or firft of the four Step belonging to - 
the Mtnuet, in a Movement or Sink and Stepping of the right Foot 
forwards (s), the gentle or eafy Riling of which, either upon die' 
Toe or Heel, marks what is called Time to the firft Note of the 
three in the firft of the two Meafures, which is of triple Time or of 
three Notes to a Bar; the fecond Note is in the coming down of 
the Heel to the Floor (t), if the Rife was made upon the Toe, but 
if upon the Heel or flat Foot, in the tight Holding of the Knees - 
before the Sink is made that prepares for the Fleuret or Beuree fol- J 

lowing, in which is counted the third and laft Note of the Meafure 
aforefaid; and the (aid Bouree or fecond Fan of the Minuet Step, 
if I may fo fay, is made upon the fecond Meafure of the Tune, as 
the Half Coupee was to the firft, fo that it is vifible, from what 
has been {aid before, that one Mtnuet Step is of equal Value to two 
Meafures or Bars of the Tune. 

The Sink or Beginning of the Movement, that- prepares for the 
Fleuret or fecond Part of the Mtnuet Step, for fo I {hall for the fu- 
ture call it, being made, there only remains to rife from die 
Sink aforefaid in the ftepping forwards of the left Foot (u) to the 



(ri See the firft Figure io Plate I, Book I. (s) See the fecond Figure in Plate IX, 
Book I. (t) See the fecond Figure in Plate I, Book I. (u) See the firft Figure 
in Plate IX, Book L . , 

O firft 



I 



• • 



* — A 

106 The Ait of Dancing expldrid. 

firft Note of the fecond Meafure, and firft of the /fo/r<f* or three 
lad Steps of the four that compofe the Minuet Stepi the fecond 
Step of the faid Bouree or Fieuret is made, fwift forwards with the 
right Foot (v), to the fame Note; and the third and kft Step of 
the Bouree, or fecond Part of the Minuet Step with the left Foot 
(w), is to the third and laftNote of the fame Meafure of the Tune, 
concluding the Minuet Step with the Weight upon the faid Foot, 
as at firft (x). It is to be noted, that it always begins with the 
right and ends with the left Foot; and it is performed falter or 
flower, according to the Tune that is played, which the Dancer is 
obliged to follow. 

Having defcribed the foregoing Step forwards, I {hall now pro- 
ceed in it fideways to either Hand; and, in the firft Place, to- 
the right Side of the Room, or rather obliquely, that is to fay, 
from the upper left Corner of the Room to the right lower facing to 
the upper right Corner of it, or rather in the Middle between di- 
rectly udeways facing the upper End of the Room and, as faid a- 
bove, from Corner to Corner: For Example, inftead of the left 
Side to the upper Corner and the right to the lower, the left Side or 
Shoulder points about the Middle of the upper left Corner and 
fideways directly crofs the Room; which will be eafily understood, 
by a fuppofed Line acrofs the Room, for the right Shoulder cohfe- 
quently pointing the fame Way below the Line, inftead of facing 
the right upper Corner, as before, is now to the Middle or Space 
between the faid Corner and directly up the Room j which will 
like wife be comprehended, by fuppofing a right Line up the Floor,, 
and the Face a little turn'd looking towards the left Shoulder, or, 
more properly fpeaking, upon the Gentleman or Lady with whom 
we dance; and the faid Turn, or rather Complaifance gives a moft 
agreeable Twift or Contraft to the Fafhion of the Body in this Step, 
and not a little Beauty to that Part of the Mtnuet Dance upon which, 
it falls f : but of that more hereafter* 



■ ■ "Mil l 



(v) Sec the fecond Figure in Plate IX, Bo6k I. (w) Sec the firft Figure in the ftmfc 
' Plate* (x) See the firft Figure in Plate I, Book I. t See theGcntlcman anaLadj in Plate VI. 



Having 



Jbt-'hwf of Dancing explain' d. 107 

Having defcribed the Adion or Pofturc of the Body in 
which this Step muft be performed, if to Advantage, I (hall pro- 
ceed in explaining the Motion or Stepping of the Feet upon the 
aforcfaid Tract or Line; which is/ideways to the right Hand, in-- 
{lead of forwards, as in the foregoing, which |s the principal Dif- 
ference (y). However, as it may not in all Probability be fo fully 
comprehended by what has been (aid in the foregoing Step, k 
may not be improper to take fome farther Notice of it in this Place. 
viz. That it is to be taken from the firft Pofition, that is to fay, 
the Weight being upon the left Foot the right, which is at Liber- 
ty (z), commences by making a Sink and Step, open off from the . 
left Foot, on which the Body refts, Jideways to the right (aj. 
The Rife of the Sink marks Time to die firft of the three Notes; 
and the reft are the fame, as when done forwards, the Half Cou-. 
pee or firft Part of the Minuet Step being made to the nrft Mea- 
fure of the Tune, as aforefaid, ending in the fame Pofition upon 
the right Foot, with the left difengaged (b) to perform the Aw- 
ree or fecond Part of the faid Step Jideways, in like Manner as in 
the foregoing forwards; which it does in making a Sink and Step 
to the right Hand fideways crofting behind the right on which 
the Body refts (c), the Rife of which is to the firft Note of the fe- 
cond Meamre. The right Foot then- makes a plain open Step, 
ftdeways to the fame Hand (d), upon the fecond Note, leaving die 
left upon the Point, in the very Place the Body refted before, in 
Readineft to make the fecond Step, and is about the Diftance of 
a Point in the March (e); upon which the third andlaft Step of the 
Bouree and Minuet Step is made to the third Note of the fecond 
Meafure of the Tune, by drawing the left Foot, pointed as it is 
firm to the Floor into the fifth Pofition behind the right (f), re- 

(y) See the Characters of this Step in the fecond Table of the Plate marked O, Num- 
ber II. (z) See the firft Figure in Plate I, Book I. For the Aftion or Pofturc of die 
Body fee the Gentleman and Lady in Plate VI. (a) See in fome Meafure the fecond 
Figure in Plate VI, Book I. (b) See the fecond Figure in Plate I, Book aforefaid. Ac- 
tion as at beginning. (c) See die firft Figure in Plate XI, Book I. Aftion the fame. 
(d) Sec the fecond Figure in Plate VI. Book h (t) See the firft Figure in the lame 
Plate. (0 See the firft Figure in Plate XI, Book L 

O x cei?ing 



io8 The Art of Dancing explain 9 *!. 

cciving the Body, and concludes in the firft Pofition, as at firft (g); 
and it may be continued, as long as die Dancer pleafes. 

The third and lad Method of performing this Step is as follows: 
Inftead of obliquely, as in the laft explained to the right Hand, it 
is here diametrically or tideways crofting the Room directly to the 
left Hand, facing, not as in the afbrefaid, but inftead thereof full 
either up or down the Room, as it (hall happen f. 

This Step, in Performance, differs from the laft described in 
this, that die right or beginning Foot, which before made the 
Half Coupee off to the right, now inftead thereof makes a Sink and 
Step tideways to the left Hand, crofling behind the left Foot (h),. 
which fupports the Body, marking Time to the firft Note of the 
fame Meafure, and filling up the remaining fecond and third Notes, 
intirely the like as in the foregoing, except that, inftead of the 
firft Pofition as in them, it here ends in the third with the left Foot 
foremoft or inclofed at Liberty to perform the Bouree, in the fame 
Manner to the left Side of the Room, as before to the right (i). 
The faid Bouree or fecond Part of the Minuet Step begins, by ma- 
king a Sink and open Step, ofTfideways from the right on which 
the Weight refts to the left Hand (k), the Rife or Receiving of the 
Body upon which marks Time to the firft Note of the fecond Mea- 
fure, and the right Foot makes the fecond Step of the Bouree to 
the fecond Note, in drawing it pointed (1) crofling behind the left 
(m), from the Place where it lupported the Weight, before die 
firft Step of the Fleuret was made ; and the third and laft Step of 
the Bouree and fourth of the Minuet Step is made, by ftepping the 
left Foot open off from the right (n), in like Manner as the com- 
mencing of the fleuret, only without a Sink, ending in the firft 
Pofition, as at the Beginning of the Step, upon the left Foot (o), 



(g) See the firft Figure in Plate I, Book I. f See the Characters of this Step in the 
fecond Table of the Plate marked O, Number III. (h) See the fecond Figure in Plate XI. 
Book afbrefaid. (i) See the firft Figure in Plate IV, Book I. (k) See in fome De- 
gree the firft Figure in Plate VI, Book I. (1) See the fecond Figure in Plate VI, 
Book afbrefaid. (m) See the fecond Figure in Plate XI, Book I. (n) See in fomeMeafure 
the firft Figure in Plate VI, the fame Book, (o) See the firft Figure in Plate I, Book L 

which 



The Art cf Dancing explain' d. 109 

which Step may be continued either diametrically or circularly, as 
Occafion offer*. 

We are now arrived at the fourth and laft of the before men- 
tioned Steps, namely, that of three Movements or Bendings and 
Rifings; which is alfo commonly called die New Step, from its 
being ufed now 'as much, or very little lefs than the Ian explained 
of two Movements only, and more especially when performed to the 
left Hand (ideways before and behind, in that it compofcs a Part of 
the Minuet Dance, as now pra&ifed, of which I (hall have Occa- 
fion to (peak more particularly hereafter. 

In the Interim I (hall proceed in defcribing the prefent Minuet 
Step of three Movements, which, as I have already (aid, is only die 
Addition of a Movement or a Sink and Rife more to the laft Step 
of the Bouree or (econd Part of the Minuet Step; yet it will require 
a farther Explanation, by Reafon that it differs very much from the 
laft explained, in its Agreement with the Notes of the Tune^ for, 
tho' that may properly be divided into two Parts or Dmfions 
through the naif Coupee, in that it, together with the Sink which 
prepares for the fucceeding Bouree \ anfwers to the firff Meafurc of 
the Tune, and the Fleuret or (econd Part of the Minuet Step to the 
fecond, and confequently is of equal Value,, tho* no more than a 
(ingle Step, with the other three remaining, ft is not the like here, 
becaufe the four Steps that compofe the Minuet Step are partly of 
an equal Space or Diftance one from the other,, as in counting of 
one, two, three, four, and cannot fo juftly be divided into two 
Parts as the foregoing, which notwithstanding is but one Mtnuet 
Step, as I have faid before, feparated for the more familiar and 
eafy comprehending thereof; which faid Advantage we muft lofe 
in this Step, it being (b in ti rely of a Piece that a Di virion here 
would be as unnatural, as the aforefaid is natural, as will appear 
by the Defcription I am about to give of it, which in the firft Place 
(hall be forwards (p); and it is to be performed in this Manner. 

(p) See the Chara&ers of this Step in the fecond Table of the Plate marked CYNunv 
ber I. A Sink and Rife muft be fuppofed. 



no The A»t ^"Dancing explain d.^ 

For Example, the Weight of the Body being upon the left Foot 
in the firft Pofition, the right difengaged and free (q) begins, as a- 
forefaid, in making a Sink and Step forwards diredly up the Room 
(r). The Rifing or Receiving theWeight upon the Toe or Lift ep marks 
the Time to the firft Note of the three belonging to the firft Mea- 
fure; the fecond is in the Fall of the Heel (s) and Sink which pre- 
pares for the fecond Step of the four belonging to the Minuet Step, 
which is made by ftepping of the left Foot forwards, in the fame 
Manner as the firft (t) ; and the Rifing or Receiving of the Body 
upon the Inftep is to the third and laft Note of the firft Meafure. 
The third Step of the faid four is made with the right Foot ftep- 
ping a plain ftraight Step forwards (u) upon the Toe to the firft 
Note or the three in the fecond Meafure; the fecond is in the co- 
ming down of the Heel of the faid right Foot (v) and Sink that 
prepares for the fourth and laft Step which is with the left Foot, 
in ftepping forwards from the Sink aforefaid (w) ; and the Rifing or 
Receiving of the Weight upon the Toe is to die third Note of the 
fecond Meafure of the Tune, concluding in the fame Pofition from 
whence it begun (x), in Order for a Continuance, which may be 
either more or left, according to the Largenefs or Smallnefs of the 
Room in which the Dance is performed. 

The two other Ways in which this Step is performed are diame- 
trically or fideways-, the firft of which (y) is in the like Manner as 
the Minuet Step of two Movements, or One and a Fleuret % to the 
left Side of the Room, that is to fay, the right Foot always crof- 
fing behind the left ,• but as I have already in that Step defcribed 
the Method in which the Feet are to be ftepped, it will be need- 
left at prefent to fay any more than to fhew its. Difference in count- 
ing to the Notes, from the former, which from what I have faid 



**i 



(q) See the firft Figure in Plate I. (r) See the fecond Figure in Plate IX. in 
fome Meafare. (s) See die fecond Figure in Plate I. (t) See the firft Figure in 
Plate IX. (u) See the fecond Figure in Piatt IX. (v) See the fecond Figure in 
Plate I. (w) See the firft Figure in Plate IX. (x) See the firft Figure in Plate I 
(y) See die Characters of this Step in the fecond Table of the Plate jmarked O, Num- 
ber IV. 

above 



The A*t ^Dancing explain d: in 

above appears to be very different from the Step now treated: on 9 as 
I (hall endeavour to demonstrate by the following Particulars. " - 

In the firft Place, we are to fuppofe a Movement added to the 
lad Step of the Bouree, or fecond Part of the Minuet Step) and the 
firft Step with the right Foot (z) to be made upon die Toe to the 
firft Note; the fecond is in the coming down of the Heel (a) and 
Sink upon the right Foot, which prepares for the fecond Step made 
with the left (b), as was explained in the aforefaid, the Riling or 
Receiving of the Weight upon which marks the third Note of the 
firft Meafure, leaving the right Foot, as in the aforefaid, upon 
the Point (c). The Drawing or Bringing of the right Foot point- . 
ed, as it croftes behind the left (dj, is the third Step, and marks. 
Time to the firft Note of the fecond Meafure; and the fecond Note 
is in the Sink upon the faid right Foot, preparing for the fourth 
and laft Step that is made, in rifing a nd ftepping fideways from 
the faid Sink upon the left Foot (e), to the third Note, concluding 
in the firft Pofition (f) as at commencing. 

The next Way of performing this Step only differs from the fore- 
going, in that, inftead of the right or beginning Foofs making . 
die firft Step behind, as in the laft, it is here made before (g>, from 
whence it is called before and behind -, and this -crofHng or ftepping 
of the Foot before renders the Step much more agreeable and (id- 
ler of Variety than the aforefaid, arifing by Reafon of the * 
Twifts and Turns the Body naturally gives and receives in die 
Performance thereof. 

But fince this Step is much more ufed, in the Dancing of a 
Minuet, than the aforefaid, I (hall endeavour to give as plain a. 
Defcription of it as poflible; in order to which I fhaU not only re- 
peat the Stepping or Motion of the Feet, but alfo fuppofe, inftead 
of two Bars or Meafures to a Step in the Minuet, as in die aforefaid 

(z) See in Tome Meafure the fecond Figure in Plate XI. (aj See the firft Figure in 
Plate VI. (b) See in fome Meafure the firft Figure of Plate VL (c) See die fecond 
Figure in Plate IV. (d) See the fecond Figure in Plate XI. (?) See in fome De- 
gree the firft Figure in Plate VI. (f) See the firft Figure in Plate L /g) See the 
Chara&cn of this Step in the fecond Tabic of die Plate: marked Q> Number yl 

* only 



ii2 The Abt of Dakcing explairid. 

only one' Bar or Meafure, which in Effect is the fame Thing; for 
what matters it, whether we count three twice over, or fix but 
once; or whether the half Time is beat to one, two, three, or to 
four, five, fix, which lad Method, in my humble Opinion, I take 
to be much more familiar and eafy to be comprehended than the 
other, in that there is not any Repetition of the firft or fecond 
Meafure; but, however that be, I am fure, it will afford a greater 
Variety, and poffibly may inform fbme of what, perhaps, they 
were ignorant of before. 

But to proceed in the Defcription of die Step now treated on: 
For Inftance, the Weight and Pofition, as aforefaid (h), facing 
either to the upper or lower End of the Room, it begins in making 
a Sink and Step fideways, with the right Foot croffing directly be- 
fore the left (i) to the fame Side of the Room, and producing a 
Twift or Turn of the Body towards the faid Step (j) which receives 
the Weight upon die Toe, marking Time to the firft of the above- 
mentioned Notes. The fecond is in the coming down of die right 
Heel, in the third Pofition before the left (k) and Sink for the fuc- 
ceeding Step, which is made by ftepping die left Foot, • open off 
fideways from the right on which the Body is, to die left Side of 
the Room (1); the Riling or Receiving of the Body either upon the 
Toe or Heel marks the third Note, leaving the Toe of the right 
Foot upon the Point (m), in the fame Place the Body was before 
the fecond Step was made. In the Stepping of the left Foot laft 
mentioned it is to be obferved, that the Body is convey 'd or ra- 
ther, more properly fpeaking, makes a becoming Feint in the Air 
not much unlike that made in xht Minuet Step of One, and a Fleu- 
ret to the right, only there the Bend or Sway the Body makes in 
the Air was to the right (n) upon the Half Coupee, or firft of the 
four Steps which compote the Minuet Step\ but here it is upon the 



>mmm 



(h) See the firft Figure in Plate I, Book I. (i) See" the firft Figure in Plate X£ 



I. (1) See the firft Figure in Plate VI, 
Book the fane. (in) See the fecond Figure in PlateVI, Book I. (n) See in fotne 
Meafure the Sway or Twift of the Body in the firft Figure of Plate XI, Book I 

fecond 







- * • I 



Ibe Art of Dahcikg explained. 113 

to the left, and the Look or Turn of die Head, which *n 
the former was to the left, is in this to die right (o): The Toe, 1 
iay, being left pointed, as aforeJaid, makes the third Step in die 
Minuet, by being drawn pointed crofting behind the left Pool* 
and receives die Body in a Twift upon die fourth Note or hadf 
Time, as above (p). The fifth Note is in the Sink that prepares 
for the laft Step of the four which compofe the -Step we now treat 
of, and is made in like Manner as the fecond Step with the Jeft 
Foot to the third Note, in riling and ftepping open ofFfideways (q) 
from the Sink afore/aid upon the left Toe to the ftxth and laft Note, 
except that the right Toe is not left pointed as in the former, bat 
ends in the firft Pofition as at Beginning (r); and the laftMcthod 
of counting the Notes or Time to die Step will bear, as weU 
throughout all the Minuet Steps before deformed as the prefont. 

Having explained the Minuet Steps which form the Circle of this 
Dance, I ihall next take Notice of fome of the moft remarkable 
Steps ufed, by Way of Embroidery or farther Grace thereto, as the 
Hop, Double Bouree, or Fleuret advancing or in the lame Place, 
Balance, &c. 



CHAP. IL 

Of the HOP in the MINUET. 

THE Hop in the Minuet needs little farther Explanation, fince 
it has been already deforibed in the Rigadoon Hop of two 
Springs; I /hall therefore refer to that, becaufo it is the very 
fame as the Hop under Confederation, only, when performed in 

(o) See alfo in fome Degree the Twift or Sway of the Body in the fecond Figure of 
Plate XI.Book I. (p) See the fecond Figure in Plate XI, Book I. (q) See in fome Mea- 
fure the firft Figure in Plate VI, Book aiorefaid. (r) See the firft Figure in Place I, 
Book I. 

P zMmuet* 



ii4 The Art of Dancing explain d. 

a Minuet) there muft be a hound added and a different Method in 
counting of the Notes ; for, inftead of performing die firft and fe- 
eond Springs to one Bar or Meafure, as in the aforefaid, they are 
divided, that is to lay, the firft Spring or Hop is to the firft Bar of 
the Minuet Tune, and the' next Spring and the Bound which is ad- 
ded are to the fecond. They are ail here to be reckoned but as one 
Step t, which is in its Performance thus: For Example, the Weight 
and Pofition being as aforefaid (s), the Spring is made in like Man- 
ner upon the firft Note; but, inftead of the right or advanced 
Foot's being fet down upon the fecond Note, it is now put down to 
the third (t), the fecond being counted in the Progrcfs the right 
Foot made in the Air, concluding one half of the Hop in the Sink 
upon the aforefaid third Note, that prepares for the fecond Spring, 
which is made, as in the aforefaid, to the fourth or beginning 
Note of the fecond Meafure by taking of the left Foot up from the 
Floor into the third Pofition behind the right and advanced Foot 
upon which the Weight of the Body now is (u). The left being upon 
the Point and at Liberty makes the Bound, as was {hewn in treating 
of that Step, the Sink or Preparative for which marks the fifth' 
Note ; and the fixth is in the Spring or Bound upon the left Foot, 
by rifing or fpringtng off from the right on which the Weight reft- 
ed before the faid Spring was made, concluding as at firft (v). 

This Hop in the Mtnnet may be performed backwards, in the 
fame Manner as defcribed forwards, except that, inftead of com- 
mencing with the right Foot from the third Pofition behind, it 
muft befrom the fame Pofition before (w); but the reft being intirely 
the fame there needs nothing more to be faid of it here, trace 
it has been fully explained in the Rigadoon Step of two Springs for- 
wards, by which it may be eafily tmderftood how it is performed: 
backwards (*).. 



t See the Characters of thb Step in the third Table of the Plate marked O, Number- 1., 
(s) See the firft Figure in Plate V, Book I. (t) See the fecond Figure in Plate IX, 
Book I. (u) See the fecond Figure in Plate V, Book aforefaid. (v) See the 
firft Figure in Plate V. Book J.. (w) See the fecond Figure in Plate IV, Book L 
(x) See the Characters of this Step in the third Table of the Plate marked O, Number II. 

e h a p. 



The Ait of Dancing explained* 115 




CHAP. III. 

Of the Double BOUREE upon the fame Place. 

* 

THIS Step is taken from the third Pofition before and ends 
in the fame behind, anfwering to two Meafures of the 
Tune, the fame as the Minuet Step, and is here efteemed but as 
one Step ; tho' it is otherwife when it is performed in a Saraband, 
or fuch like flow Movement, for then one of them alone is to a 
Meafure without any Dependence -on die other, beginning 
with either the right or left Foot, as Occasion offers. But it is 
not fo in the Minuet, for the firft Bouree or Fleuret muft com- 
mence with the right Foot, as an Equivalent to the Half Coupee i 
and the fecond Bouree to the remaining Fleuret or fecond Part of 
the Minuet Step, as ufual, with the left Foot, compleating .fix 
Steps in the fame Space of Time as the foregoing Minuet Step of 
four, and confequently much fwifter in its Performance f, which 
<is thus: The Weight of the Body being upon the left Foot in 
the third Pofition, the right inclofed before it and difengaged 
(y) begins in making a Sink or Bend of both Knees, from 
whence the right in riling fteps directly open off fideways, either 
more or lefs according to the Tune: For Example, if to the above- 
faid.flow Time, ft may then be the Length ofa Step in Walking, 
or of a Point in the March (z); but not fo now, by Reaibn of die 
Quicknefs of the Tune. Therefore, about half the Length of the 
-faid Step, receiving the Weight of the Body upon the Inftep 
or Toe of the right Foot to the firft Note, the left on which the 



*^ta 



' f See the Characters of this Step in the third Table of the Plate marked O, Num- 
ber III. (y) See the fecond Figure in Plate IV, Book I. (z) See the fecond Figure 
in Plate VI, BookaJbrdaid. . 

P i Weight 



116 The Art of Dancing explained. 

Weight was remains in the fame Place, only the Tee is pointed (a); 
the fecond Note is in the Railing of the (aid left Toe and letting 
down or receiving of the Weight upon the left Heel, and alfo leaving: 
the right Foot upon the Point where it marked the firft Note (b) ; 
from whence it is drawn fvvift into the third Pofition behind the left 
(c), at the fame Time preffing the Toe ftrongto the Floors die recei- 
ving of the Weight upon which is to the third Note, concluding the 
firft Source and Meaiure in a fmooth eafy Sink upon the right Foot, 
and bending the left the fame Inftant the right, receives the Body 
in order to begin the fecond Bouree, 

The fecond Bouree is like the aforefaid, in ruing from the Sink 
by ftepping of the left Foot off fideways to the fame Hand (d), re- 
ceiving the Weight upon the Toe or Inftep to the fourth Note and 
Beginning of the fecond Meafure of the Tune, and leaving the right 
Toe upon, the Point as aforefaid (e) ; the fifth is in the Railing tha 
faid Toe and fetting down or receiving the Weight upon the right. 
Heel, leaving the left Toe pointed, as in the firft Bouree, or where 
it marked the fourth Note if)# &om whence it is drawn fwift into 
the third Pofition behind the right Foot (g), preffing the Toe 
ftrong to the Floor at the.fame Inftant; the. receiving of the Weight 
upon which is. to the fixth Note, and. concludes the fecond Mea- 
fure of the Tune in the fame. Step of the Dance, in the Pofitioaas, 
at commencing. 

It mult be. obferved, that if. this Step is performed twice- over, 
as in that . under Confideration, the Sink falls upoa-the fixth Note, 
of the fecond Bouree, the.fame as upon the third in the firft. 

Having . defcribed the foregoing Step upon .the fame Place, it 
may perhaps be acceptable to the Reader, if J add thereto the faid 
Bouree rtwriing oifiytng along the Room -(h), it being often ufed in 



WWMri*MHHMn««MMMMH*P«aW 



(a) See the firft Figure in Plate VI, Book!, (b) See the fecond Figure in Plate the afore* 
find, (c) See the firft Figure in Plate IV, Rook I. (d) See in tome Refpeds the£rft 
Figure in Plate VI, Book I. (e) See the- fecond Figure in the fame Plate. (f)' See 
the firft Figure in the lame Plate. (g) See -the fecond Figure in Plate IV, 

Book I. (h) See the Ouratf en of this Step in the third Tabletf the Pfcme marked O; 
lfeimbcrJV. . 

Dancing 



7fte Art of Dahcixg explain'd. X17 



Dancing of a Minuet by thole who have attained to fuch a 
lection in this Art, as to- render them capable of judging the molt 
proper Places of making ufe of it ; and it only diners from the 
former by advancing, inftcad of being upon the lame Spot of. 
Ground. 

The runntng Bource may be performed either from the Pofitfor* 
treated on in die foregoing Step, or from the firft as Occafion of- 
fers; but 1 fhall at prcfent only explain- it from* the latter, that: is 
to fay, the firft Pofition : The Weight being upon the left Foot, as - 
in die aforefaid (i), it begins by making a Sink and Step with die . 
right Foot forwards (j). The Rife or Receiving of the Body uponr 
the Toe marks the Time or firft Note; the fecond Step, made with 
the left Foot (k) plain upon die Toe, marks the fame Note; 
and the third Step, with the right Foot (1) plain in the like Manner 
upon the Toe, marks the third and Jaft Note, concluding die firft 
Bouree in the fame Pofition upon the right Foot (m), in a Readi* 
nefs to begin the fecond Bouree. The latter Bouree commences by 
finking upon the third Note and Step of the former, from whence 
it fteps forwards, as the aforefaid (n), the Rife of which upon the 
left Toe is to the. fourth Note; the fecond Step plain with* the right 
Foot(o) marks, die fifth in the like Manner, and the third Step plain 
with the left/Foot (p) the fixth; and it concludes in the firft Pofiti* 
on as at firft (q),from whence it may be continued. 



(i)" See the firft Figure in Plate I, Book l? ( j) See in feme Meafure die fecond Figure in 
Plate JX, Book I. (k) See the firft Figure in the fame Plate.. (I) See the fe- 
cond Figure in the fame Plate. (m> See the fecond Figure in Plate I, Book L 
(n) See in feme Meafure the firft Figure in Plate IX, Book I. (o) See the fecond 
Figure in the fame Plate. (p) See the firft Figure in PJatcIX r « aforefaid (qlSed' 
the firft Figure in Plate I, Book I. 

G H A.Pi 



* 



n$ The A&T of Dancing explain d. 



• 



K3S8I 



Y^ '^V\ '/"<: 



CHAP. IV. 

« 

0//&* BALANCE- 

THE Balance is composed of two plain Steps, to which are ad- 
ded two Movements or Sinkings and Rifings commencing 
from two different Portions, namely, the firft and fecond Pofition 
or Point, as in the Beginning of a March; and the laid Steps and 
Movements are equal in Value to one Minuet Step, and fill up two 
Meafures of the Tune the fame as in that (r). 

The Balance is performed thus: For Inftance, the Weight of 
the Body being in the firft Pofition, as above, upon the left Foot 
(s), the right difengaged makes the firft Movement and Step by 
finking or Bending of the Knees, and ftepping with the right Foot 
dire&ly opening off tideways (t), facing either to the upper or low- 
er Part of the Room, as it mall happen. The Riling or Receiving 
of the Weight upon the Toe or Heel marks Time to me firft Note; 
and, if upon the Toe, the fecond is in the Coming down of the 
Heel (uj; or, if made upon the Heel, it is in the tight Holding of 
the Knee after the Rife to the firft Note is made, leaving the left 
Toe upon the Point (v), on the very fame Place the Body was at 
the Beginning of the Step (w). The third Note, which concludes 
the firft Meafure and Part of the Step, is in the Sink that prepares 
for the fecond Step of the Balance, namely, with the left Foot 
from the Point aforefaid, in which it touches the Heel of the right 
Foot (x) and then fteps open off fideways (y), receiving the Weight 

• 

(r) See the Characters of this Step in the third Table of the Plate marked O, Number V. 
(s) See the firft Figure in Plate 1, Book 1. (t) See in fome Degree the fecond Fi- 
gure in Plate VI, Book I. (a) See the firft Figure in the fame Plate. (y) See the 
fame Figure in Plate VI, Book I. (w) See the fecond Figure in Plate VI. (x) See 
the fecond Figure in Plate I, Book I (y) See the fecond Figure in Plate VJ, 

BookL 

«f 



Tf)$ Art <?f Dancing explain d. 119 

of the Body, either upon the Toe or Heel to the fourth Note, in 
the feme Place from whence it was brought from the Point, • The. 
Coming down or Fall of the left Heel is to the fifth Note, if the 
Rife be made upon the Toe j if not, in the tight Holding of the 
Knee, as aforefaid, ending in the firft Pofition, as at Beginning (z). 
The fifth Note is in the Sink or Preparation for the fucccediog Step, 
whether it be the feme or any other; and, when this Step is per* 
formed with a quarter or half Turn, as it frequently is, it muff al- 
ways be turning to the left Hand, if commencing with the right 
Foot, as it does in the prefent. 








CHAP. V. 
Qf the two COULEES or MARCHES. 

TO perform two. Marches, inftead of a Minuet Step* in a 
Writable and proper Piace in Dancing of a Minuet, I take to- 
be an agreeable Variation or Change; but, as the Manner of per- 
forming a March has been already {hewn, I (hall refer to what has 
been before obferved upon mat Step, and only take Notice, that it 
muft begin with the right Foot to the firft Meafure, and with the 
left to the iecond. The firft of thefe is to be made upon One, 
Two, and Three; and the fecond upon Four,' Five, and ux, in the 
like Method as already explained in the Step of this Name (a). 



(z) See the firft Figure in Plate I, Book I. (a) Sec the Chara&r* of 
the third Table of the Plate marked O, Number VI. . 



CHAP. 



120 The Art of Dancing explain d. 

m 

■k . • . » • 

• * • • . » 

« « • 

CHAP. VL 

0/ fifc 5L/P fcterf W HAL F C OUPEE 
forwards to the right and left Hands, each to a MI- 
NUET STEP. 

THIS Step is compoled of three plain Steps, as the Bowee, 
which are generally done to a Meafure, as that, in other 
Dances; but otherwise here, in that it is equal in Value to a Step 
in the Minuet > and confequently, like that, takes up two Meafures 
or Bars of the Tune (b). It is performed facing either, up or down 
the Room, as in Dancing «f the Minuet it wall fall out, but ufii- 
ally to our Partner^ and may be taken from the third or fixft Po- 
rtion: For Inftance, the Weight being upon the. left Foot, with 
the right at Liberty refting upon the Heel of the {aid left Foot, 
as in the March (cjj or, if irom the firft, inftead of behind, as we 
have obferved, it is equal to the Foot on which the Body, is, feeing 
to the upper End of the Room, which {hall here niffice as an Ex- 
ample (d), and begins the Slip, or firft and fecond Steps of the three 
that compofe this Step, by making a Sink and Step fideways open 
off to the right Side of the Room (e), riling upon the Toe or Heel 
to the firft .Note* and leaving the left Foot on which the Weight 
was (f J upon the Point in the fame Place (g). It refts there, during 
the counting .the fecond Note; and the third is in the fwift Draw? 
ing of the faid left Foot pointed crofs behind the right (h), conclu- 
ding the fecond Step of the three to the firft Meafure, in receiving 

(b) See the Characters of this Step in the third Table of the Plate marked O, Num- 
ber VII. (c) Seethe firft Figure in Plate V, Book I. (d) See the firft Figure in 
Plate I, Book I. (e) See the fecond Figure in Plate VI, Book I. (f ) See the firft 
Figure in Plate I, Book I. (g) See the firft Figure in Plate V(, Book L (h) See 
the firft Figure in Plate XI, Book L 

the 



The Akt gf Dancing explained, iai 

the Body in an agreeable Twift or Turn (i) with both Knees bent* 
that is to fay, in the eroding, as aforefaid, the left Shoulder, in 
bringing forward before the right, is more ratted by th e lowering 
or falling of the other. 

The firft Movement being thus ended, with the Knees bent up- 
on the third Note, in Order to the Performance of the Coupee* or 
fecond Part of this Step, which is made to the fecond Meafure by 
riling from the Sink aforefaid and ftepping of the right Foot for- 
wards (j), the Riling or Receiving of the Body on the Toe or Heel 
marks the fourth or beginning Note of the fecond Meafure; 
and the fifth is in the Coming down of the laid Heel 
to the Floor, if the Rife was upon the Inftep in the firft (k) or third 
Pofition (1), with the left Foot at Liberty the fame as the right at 
commencing. The fixth Note is in the Sink which prepares for the 
fame Step with the other Foot; and you are likewife to obferve 
that, in the Performance of the Half Coupee or fecond Part of the 
foregoing Step, the Body returns from the faid Twift in bringing 
the right Shoulder, which was behind and fbmewhat inclined 
downwards, to be equally forwards to the left and the fame in Height: 
For Example, when we ftand in a natural and erect Pofture. 

But to return to the Slip to the left Hand, which is the very fame 
as to the right already explained, it begins in riling from the Sink 
aforefaid, ftepping open off fideways to the left Hand(m); and 
the riling upon the Toe or Heel of the left Foot marks the firft 
Note, leaving the right Toe upon the Point (n), as the foregoing 
did the left, making a Patife or Reft whilft the fecond Note is count- 
ed. The third Note is in the drawing or crofting of the right 
Foot behind the left (o), receiving the Body in the aforefaid Twift 
(p) and bending of both the Knees, in which the right Shoulder is 

(i) See the Contrail or Sway in the firft Figure of Plate XI, Book L (j) See m 
fome Meafure the fecond Figure in Plate IX, Book L (k) See the fecond figure m 
Plate I, Book aforeiaid. (1) See the fecond Figure in Plate V, Book I. (m)See 
in fome Meafure the firft Figure in Plate VI, Book L (n) See the fecond Figure in the 
fame Plate. (o) See the fecond Figure in Plate XI, Book L (p) See the Sway or 
Twift in the fecond Figure of Plate XI, aforeiaid. 

Q ratted 



122 the Art of Dancing explain d. 

raifed in advancing, as in the foregoing, to the right Hand the left 
Shoulder (q) was on concluding one half of the Step to thefirft Mea- 
fure of the two ; and the fecond is in the Half Coupee that is made 
as in the aforefaid, by rifing from the Sink which fell upon the 
third Note and ftepping of the left Foot forwards (r). The Rife 
Receiving of the Weight upon die Toe is to the fourth Note of the 
next Meafure; the fifth is in the Falling of the Heel (s), and the 
fixth in the Sink for the fucceeding Step, concluding upon the left: 
Foot, as at beginning, in one of the {aid Pofitions (t). 

Having now {hewn the Method of performing this Step in Dan- 
cing of a Minuet, both to the right and left Hands (as indeed it can- 
not be done to one without the other by. Reafon they both change 
the Feet, but as one Minuet Step-, two Bturees, or two M arches)* 
fince this Step is much u fed in Tunes of common and triple Time, 
as RigadomSy Bourees, Sarabands, and PaJptcaiUes, &c. and alio*, 
inftead of being performed, to two Meatuses, as in this Dance, is bfc 
ten found to one. Bar only (u) and of Confequcnce varies in the Me- 
thod of counting from the aforefaid, it will not be improper to fay 
fomething. of it here* especially as it has hitherto been' omitted t 
For Example, in Bourees and Rigadeons the. Rife of the- firft Move- 
ment marks Time to the firft Note* as in the foregoing ; but the 
fecond differs in this that, inftead of the Toe's being pointed dur- 
ing the counting of the fecond Note, it is drawn fwift behind the 
Foot on which the Weight is full upon the {aid Note, receiving the 
Body in the Twift (v) and Bending of the Knees, as aforefaid. The 
Rife of the Half Coupee* which in the foregoing was to the fecond 
Meafure, is now to the third Note, and the fourth Note falls in the 
Sink for the fucceeding Step; or if done to. two Meanires here, at 
in the. Minuet, then, inftead of counting . only upon the Pointy 
the fecond Note before its drawing behind the third muft alfo be 



(q) See the firft Figure in the Plate XI, Book I: (r) See the firft Figure in Plate IX, 
Book L (s) See thefirft Figure in Phte I, Book I: (t) See the firft Figure in Plate I, or 
firft Figure of Plate V, Book I., (u) See the Characters of this Step in the third Table of. 
the Plate marked O, Number VUI. (v) See the firft and fecond Figures in Plate XI*. 
Book I. 

reckoned*. 



The Art of Dancing explained. ia$ 

reckoned, immediately upon which the Slip is made, as in the 
foregoing, to the fourth and laft Note. The Rile to the Hdf. 
Coupee marks Time to the firft Note of the fecond Meafure; die 
. fecond is in the Fall of the Heel, the third in the Reft the Body 
makes upon it, and the fourth in the Sink for the fuccceding 
Step. 

But if to the above Tunes of triple Time it be performed to two 
Bars, it is much the fame, as in the Minuet^ only more fblemi 
and grave, and the Foot that is upon the Point follows the Rife in' 
a flow Progrefs, preffing the Floor upon the fecond Note and Be- 
ginning of the third ; but before the Expiration thereof it is brought 
fwift behind the Foot on which the Weight is, concluding the firft 
Meafure as in the Minuet \ and the Half Coupee is to the fecond 
Meafure the fame only, as I have faid, more grave and flow. 

When this Step is performed to one Meafure, as in the afore- 
faid Tunes of triple Time, the eafy Rife from the firft Step made • 
open off fideways is upon the firft Note; and the Point or fecond 
Step attends the faid Rife in a flow Progrefs, during the counting of 
the fecond Note, and then is drawn fwift behind, before the Expi- 
ring of the faid Note in a full Sink or Bending of the Knees; and 
the third is in the Rife of the Half Coupee made from thence by 
ftepping forwards, as aforefaid, half of which is borrowed in the 
Sink for the next Step in the Movements laft mentioned. This 
Step is fometimes done to both Hands, as in the Minuet ; but it it 
often found fingle. 



Q * CHAP. 



i: 



124 The Art ^Dancing explain T d. 

* - # - 

CHAP. VI 

• * 

Qf DANCING the MINUET In getter at 

HAving explained the different Ways in which the Steps of & 
Minuet are to be perform'd, I (hall now fay Something of 
that Dance in general and proceed to (hew, how the faid Steps 
form the Circle or Figure thereof by linking them one to another 
in Order as they fall ; and in the firft Place obferve, that the 
Minuet now in Ufe is compos'd of three different Steps that form 
the Figure of it, which is moftly circular or in the Shape of an g. 
reversed or an 2 (w), upon which faid § or 2 the abovenamed 
Steps prefent themfelves, as follows:- That is to fay, after making, 
our Honour or Courtefy to the Prefence (x) or upper Part of the 
Room in which we dame-, and afterwards to- our Partner (y), the 
Dance begins directly. Inftead of ftepping back again into your 
Place, as the Cuftom was formerly, and alfb inftead of (landing to 
wait die Clofe or Ending of a Strain of the Tune, begin upon the 
firft Time that offers, in that it is much more genteel and (hews 
the Dancer's Capacity and Ear in distinguishing of the Time, and. 
from thence begets himfelf a good Opinion from the Beholders,, 
who are apt to judge favourably of the following Part of his Per- 
formance; whereas the attending the. concluding or finifhing of. 
a Strain has the contrary Effect. 

However the latter is by much the fafer Way for thofe whofe- 
Ear is not very good, the concluding of a Strain of the Tune be- 
ing much more remarkable than the middle Part; for, if they 
Should happen to begin out of Time, it is a thoufand to one if they 



(w)Sec the fccond and fifth Divifions or the Plate marked U. (x) See the Gentle- 
hm» and Lady in Plate II. (y) See the Gentleman and Lady in Plate IV. 



recover 



The Art of Dancing explain d. 125 

recover it throughout the Dame. But on the other Hand, had 
they waited a remarkable Place of the Tune, and taken the Time 
at Beginning, they might have come off with Reputation and Ap- 
plaufe ; for many dance the Minuet Step in true and regular Time, 
tho' out of Time to the Afufic, which is occasioned by not hitting 
with it right at firft; and not being able to recover it afterward v 
they dance the whole Minuet out of Time. Their dancing on this 
Account lofes its Effect upon the Beholden; for, if the Steps and 
the Notes do not perfectly agree, in their performing, one with 
another, they can produce no Harmony, and if no Harmony, no- 
Plealure to thofe they defign to entertain. 

But to the Step and Figure, as afore&id, the Honour or Cour- 
tefy being made as above, the Lady faces the Gentleman, who, juft 
before the Dance commences, prefentshis right Hand, or makes a 
Motion as tho* he would if he was not at too far a Diftance, and be- 
gins the Dance in making the Half Coupee and Fleuret (and reft of 
the Steps leading to what I call the Introduction) open off fideways 
to the right Hand in the Manner already defcribed, facing the La- 
dy or right Side of the Room, who performs the fame to die left 
(1); and in the following Step they return again in two Minuet 
Steps of three Movements to the left, all behind, the laft of which 
ends to the upper Part of the Room (1) to which both advance in 
One and a Fleuret (3). About this Time the Gentleman prefents hit 
right Hand to the Lady (z) and performs four more of the faid Steps 
(4); the flrft whereof is either advancing, as the foregoing, or fide* 
ways open off to the right Hand facing the Prefence or upper End, 
as aforefaid, the reft turning gradually the fame Way, 'till he arrives 
at the left upper Corner of the Room facing the Bottom thereof (a). 
During this he hands or introduces the Lady into the Dance in the 



^Mi 



( 1 j See the Characters or Steps marked 1 in Plate IV, or firft Division of this Dance in the 
Plate diftinguilhed by the Letter U, Book II. (2) See in Plate IV, or firft Divifion of 
the Plate diftinguilhed by the Letter U, the Steps or Characters marked 2 f and %• 
(3) See the Characters or Steps marked 4 in Plate IV. or firft Divifion of the Plate mar- 
ked U. (z) See the Gentleman and Lady in Plate V. (4) See the CharaacrsorStfp* 
marked with the Figures 5, 6, 7, 8, in Plate V, or in the firft Divifion of the Piatt 
marked U on the Man's Side, (a; See the Gentleman or firft Figure in Plate VI. 

mod 



126 The Art of Dancing explain d. 

moft agreeable Manner he potiibly can, by leading or conducting 
her indie Circle round him in her Performance of the like Number of 
Steps (j), that is to fay, of (9 wand a Fleuret forwards; and, about 
the End of the fecond or third Step after giving Hands, he breaks 
off or lets go the (o) Lady who continues on a Step more to die 
lower right Corner of the Room, and then makes a Half Coupee 
and Bouree to the fame Hand tideways to the upper End of it (7), 
provided the Break or Letting go of the Hands was upon the fecond 
Step (8), as I have obferved ; but, if on the third (0), the Half 
Coupee and Bouree or fourth of the Steps aforefaid is made directly fa- 
cing the upper Part of the Room (10), as I have faid(b), concluding 
the firft Divifion or Part of theA//»»*/.D<7/ft* in the Hat's being put on 
in a graceful Manner. 

There is no general Rule in the Performance of this Dance, as 
to its Length or Shortnefs ; however I fhall reduce and divide it into 
fix Parts or Divifions (c), by Way of Diftin&ion one from another, 
each confining of eight Minuet Steps, which to a Minuet Tune 
of the like Numbers of Bars will anfwer the firft Strain played 
twice over t. 



CHAP. VII. 

Of the figure of s reverfed or fecond Divifion. 



H 



Aving explained the Introduction or firft Part of this Dattce, 
I fhall now proceed to the fecond j which in Figure is circu- 



(5) Sec the Steps upon the Lad/s Traft marked 5, 6, 7, 8, in Plate V f or in the 
firft Divifion of the Chara&ers or Steps contained in the Plate marked U. (6) See 
the Chara&ers or Steps marked 6 and 7 in Plate V, and firft Divifion in Plate marked U. 
(7) See the Character or Step marked 8 in Plate V, and Divifion aforefaid, (8) See 
the Character or Step marked 6 upon the Lad/%Tn£k or Figure in Plate V, (9) See 
the Character or Step marked 7 in Plate V. (10^ See the Step marked 8. (b) See 
the Lady in Plate VI. (c) See the whole Dance included in the Plate marked U. 
(f) See the Mufic contained in the fourth and fifth Plates or firft Divifion in the Plate 
marked U. 

lar 



The Art ^Dancing explain d. 127 

lar or, as I have faid, in the Form of an $ reverfed,- or 2, u P° n 
which fall the Steps that adorn this Part of the Dance, and are per- . 
formed as follows: For Inftance, the Gentleman at die upper left 
Corner of the Room faces the Lady who is at the lower right in the 
third Pofirion, where the foregoing ended with the right Foot d1£ 
engaged and inclofed before the left (d J, and they commence in per- 
forming about four of the Minuet Steps of three Movements before 
and behind fide ways eroding the Room to the left Hand ; that is to 
fay, the Gentleman performs to the right Side of the Room and the 
Lady to the left (i), who by turning a finall Matter gradually upon 
the third and fourth of the faid Steps meet in the Middle of the 
Room facing one another (e), and pais obliquely upon the right 
Hand of each other; that is, the Lady to the uppermoft right Cor- 
ner, and the Gentleman to the lower left t, continuing on the re- 
maining half Circle or Figure in four Minuet Steps of Off rand * 
Fleuret forwards (2). The Lady, as I have faid, pafles on round 
by the right upper Corner 'till (he arrives at the left, looking full 
to the Bottom of the Room (f), 

The laft of the forefaid Steps (3) may alio be made open off fide- 
ways to the right Hand, turning a quarter of a Turn the fame Way; 
that is, the Lady from facing the left Side of the Room (g) turns 
down it; concluding in the third Pofition as above. The Gentle- 
man does the fame, paffing by the lower left Side in his Way to 
the right, and concludes as aforefaid, only up the Room (h). 

But, inftead of either of the former Ways, this Part of the Dance 
is frequently performed in making the firft of the four Steps* for- 
wards, after paffing each other, and then not continuing the remain.- 
ing Circle on forwards, or to the laft One and a-/3cwe? open off 
to the right Hand fideways, as before; but inftead thereof three. 

(d) See the Gentleman and Lady in Plate VL ( i ) See the Characters or Steps marked 
i t 2, 3, 4, in Plate VI. (e) See the GentlemanmA Lady in Plate VII. f See the 
Trait or Figure in Plate VII, or fecond Divifion in Plate U. (2) See the Charafters or 
Steps marked 5, 6, 7, 8, in Plate VII, or fecond Divifion or the Plate marked U. 
(f) See the Lady in Plate VIII. (3) See the Char after or Step in Plate XIII, mark- 
ed 8. fg) See the Lady and Gentleman in Plate XIII. (h) See the Gtutkmm 
ia Plates Vn and XIIL. 

Of 



i 12,8 Tbe&*T of Dancing explatrid; 

m 

% . of the faid Mmuct Steps are made diredly opening off tideways to 

Jt the right Hand, by making half a Turn upon the Half Coupee* or 

t Beginning of the hrft of them, from the upper End of the Room, 

5 the reft continuing on to the upper left Side facing the lower End. 

J The Gentleman performs the fame Way except that, after the half 

i Turn from the Bottom, he makes the faid three Steps to the lower 

i right Side of the Room facing the Lady, or up it, anfwering the 

I playing of the fecond Strain of the Tune twice over, +, which now 

i has been played once through, and concludes the fecond Divifionof 

i the Dance i and it is likewife to be obferved that, in the Performance 

• of thefe eight Minuet Steps, the Gentleman and Lady only alternate- 
ly change Places (k). 



c HAP. VIII. 

Upon PRESENTING the right Arm or third 

Part* 

THE fecond foregoing Step being explained we enter upon the 
third, which conftfts in the Ceremony ofprefenting or giving 
the right Hand ; and in it there is no fmall Beauty and Air, as to 
the graceful and eafy railing of it, in Order to take Hands, and 
alfb the gentle and natural Fall on Letting them go. As for the 
Trad or Figure it varies from the former, in its being circular 
but particularly towards the latter End, upon which Trad the Steps 
we now treat of are to be performed, as follows: For Example, 
the Gentleman at the lower Part of the Room on the right Side, and 
the Lady at the upper left Side, facing each other (1), begin the firft 



t See the Mufic contained in Plates VI and VII, or fccond Divifion in the Plate mark- 
ed U. (k) See the G«r//m <w» and LaJj in Plate VIII. (1) See the Plate afordaid. 



Step 



k.. 



The Art of D ak cihg explained. 12.9 

Step either obliquely open off fidcways to the right Hand, or.cl/e 
inflead thereof make four Minuet Steps of three Movements before 
and behind croffing the Room to the left Hand •> that is to Jay, 
the Gentleman to the left Side of the Room and the I^ady to the 
right (6), turning a little upon the third and fourth Minuet Steps* 
fo as to face each other near the Middle of the Room (m). Inflead 
of pafling forwards to the crofs Corners, as in the fecond Divifion, 
they turn a quarter off to the upper and lower Ends of the Room 
upon the laft Movement of the fourth Minuet Step : For Inftance, 
the Gentleman to the Prefence or upper .Part, ana the Lady to the 
lower (n), to which each advance purfuing their refpe&ive Traces in 
taking as large a Circumference, as the joining of Hands will ad- 
mit. 

In performing the four remaining Minuet Steps forwards (7)1 
which are of One and a Fleuret, the right Arm is to be railed in the 
Manner before obferved, about the turning off or ending of. the 
fourth Minuet .Step of three Movements (8), as a Sign or Warning 
to the Lady of the Gentleman's pre/en ting his Hand, which is given 
by an eafy Bending of the Elbow before it is prefented near the 
End of the fifth Minuet Step, continuing on round the fixth and 
feventh Minuet Steps until the Gentleman faces the upper right 
Corner of the Room and the Lady the lower left. . About this 
Time the Hands are let go and the Arm falls gently to the Side, 
whilft the eighth Step is perform'd obliquely off fide ways to the right 
Hand (o) and lower right Corner of the. Room, die Gentlemmit 
Head being a little turn'd looking upon the Lady who does the 
like to the upper left Corner, concluding in the third Pofitioh as at 
commencing this Divifion, only much nigher to each other, and the 
Shoulders pointing to the upper and lower right and left Corners of 
the Room, as was already (hewn in the Explanation of this Step. 

(6) See the Characters or Steps marked I, 2, 3, 4, in Plate VIII, or third Divifion 
of Plate U. (m) See the Gentleman and Lady in Plate XL (n) See the Gentlems* 
and Lady in Plate IX. (7) See the Characters or Steps in the (aid Plate IX marked 
5, 6 f 7, 8 f or third Divifion of Plate U. (8) Seethe laft Step in Plate VIII, marked 
4, and firft of Plate IX. (o) See the Gentleman and Lady in Plate VIIL 

R which 



130 The Art of Dancing explain d. 

which Part or Divifion of the Dance, as here treated on, falls 
upon the firft Strain of- the Tune, the (econd Time of playing, 
and anfwers to the Strain twice over {f\ 

As for theTaking off or Keeping on the Hat I (hall not take upon 
me to determine, leaving it to every one's Choice to aft as they 
(hall think mod agreeable , fince it intirely depends upon Fafhion 
and Fancy; but, as I have a Right as well as others humbly to of- 
fer my Thoughts on this Point, I (hall declare in Favour of the for- 
mer, in that it has the Appearance of much more Complaifance 
and Air than Keeping the Hat upon the Head, which in my hum- 
ble Opinion feems more flat and difrefpe&ful ; and the Taking off and 
Putting on of the Hat with a good Air likewifc giyes a Angular 
Grace to the Dance, which is all loft by its remaining upon the 

Head; 

But if it (hould be objected, that h is inconvenient and trouble- 
some to take off the Hat with the right Hand, by Reafon it muft 
be changed to the left before the right can be at Liberty to prefent 
to the Lady: I anfwer, it iseafy to be done; or it may be taken 
off with the left Hand as well as the right, and then once changing 
will ferve, which may be upon the letting go or breaking off Hands, 
that is to fay, in making One and a bleuret open off to the right 
Hand. The (aid Step finifhes the Part of the Dance now treated 
of; and theHat is to be taken off with the left Hand on giving the right 
felling naturally and (low down to the Side, and holding the Hat at 
Arms Length during the Time of changing, as was above, obferved. 



f. See the Mufic to the Steps in Plates VIII and IX. 



CHAP, 



Tbe Art ^f Dancing explained: r%\ 

* . 

* • • • 

C HAP. IX. 

Of the FOURTH DIVISION or PRE- 
SENTING of the left ARM " 

AS the laft explained treated of the prefenting or giving the' 
right Handy the prefent or fourth Druijion is upon prefenting 
of the left, which in its Performance is thus: For Inftancc, being 
upon the left of each other, the Hat in the right Hand, the Pofi- 
tion and Prefence of the Body the fame as at the Beginning of die 
third Part, only, as I have (aid on the Conclufion thereof, fome- 
thing nighr together, and the Body a little more turned to the 
right, the Gentleman who faces the upper Part will be to the fame 
Side of the Room, but the Lady, as me faces the lower Part, is 
to the left (p) ; to both of which each advance in eight Minuet Steps, 
returning upon the fame Circle or Trad that condu&ed them hi- 
ther, which is enlarged by the aforefaid turning (9) and making 
the firft Minuet Step which is of One and a Fleuret forwards; and 
on the commencing thereof the left Arm is raifed (q) in a flow and 
eafy Motion, in Order to be prefented or given, which is much 
upon the fecond Minuet Step by a gentle bending of the Elbow, 
as in die aforefaid. 

Fut, inftead of the fecond's being a Minuet Step of One and a 
fleuret, you may make the Minuet Hop, which, if well executed, 
is an agreeable Variation proceeding round in the Continuation of 
three Minuet Steps more of One and a Fleuret, at. the full Extent or 
Length of the Arms, 'till arrived very near the Place of fetting out, 



(p) See the Gentleman and Lady in the Plates VIII and X. (9) See die Steps in 
Plate X, marked 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, or the fourth Divifion of Plate U. 
(q) See the Gentleman and Lady in Plate X. 

R 2 that 



13* The Art of Dancing explained. 

that is to fey, whilft the Gentleman feces to the upper right Corner 
of the Room and the Lady the lower left(io); upon which Hands 
are broke off or let go, and, extended as they are, gently fall to 
their proper Places. The Mat is put on again with the right Hand, 
upon the Ceremony of the Arms being ended ; and the three re- 
in aining Minuet Steps are performed obliquely open off to the right 
Handfideways (n), as upon the laft Step of the preceding Divifi- 
on (r), or directly acrofs the Room to the right and left Sides, con- 
cluding in the Portion and Place from whence the third Divifion 
of three Movements to the left begun ; or, inftead of the eighth and 
laft's being made, as I juft obferved the Double Bouree was perform- 
ed, it would fall very naturally here and be no fmall Embellish- 
ment to this Part of the Dance > or any other Steps to fill up the Time 
(ii). I mean when performed by fuch as have arrived at a Capaci- 
ty of doing it perfectly, otherwife it is better omitted; but nothing 
can be more graceful than the former, as appears from what has 
been feid in the Explanation of that Step; and it affords a far- 
ther Variety, in that the Tune has now been twice played through 
-on the Conclufion of the Divifion or Part now treated of (s), which 
Was to the feco'nd Strain both Times over (t). 



(to) See the Steps marked 3, 4, 5, on the different Tracls in Plate X, or in the fourth. 
Divifion of Plate U. (11) See the Characters or Steps marked 6, 7, 8, in Place X, 
or fourth Divifion of Plate U. (r) See the Action of the Gentleman and Lady in 
Plate Vlll. ( 1 2) See the Characters of this Step in the third Table of the Plate mar- 
ked O, Number 3. (s) See the Mufic to the firft, fecond, third, and fourth Divifi- 
•ns in Plate U. (t).Sce the Mufic to the Part of the Dance contained in Plate X.. 



CHAP. 



gg 



t 

of 

th 

th 

a) 



D 

it 
T 
cc 
m 
H 
Si 
th 
xx 
fa 
af 
H 
ai 
C 



134 T& e Art of Dancing explain d. 

faid forwards (i), the Gentleman, as I have fa id, paffing on round 
by the right upper Corner until arrived at the left facing down 
the Room (w). 

The lad of the faid four Steps may alio be made open off fide- 
ways to the right Hand, turning a quarter of a Turn the fame 
Way as the Gentleman from facing the left Side of the Room (t) 
down it, and finifhing in the third Pofition (J) ; and the Lady the 
like, pafling by the lower left in her Way to the right Side and 
concluding, as aforefaid, only up the Room (*+)• 

But, inftead of either of the foregoing Ways, this Part of the 
Dance is ufually perform'd in making the firft of the four Steps 
forwards after paffing each other (4), and then not continuing the 
remaining on a Circle forwards, or to the laft One and a Fleuret o- 
pen off to the right Hand fide ways, as before (5), but inftead 
thereof three of the (aid Minuet Steps are performed directly open* 
ing off Tideways to the right Hand in making half a Turn upon the 
Half Coupee, or Beginning of the firft of them, from the upper 
End of the Room, the remaining continuing on to the upper 
left Side facing the lower End. The Lady does the fame, except 
that after the half Turn from the Bottom fhe performs the faid three 
Steps to the lower right Side of the Room, looking up it or to the 
Gentleman ; and, having again alternately changed Places as before, 
.the Gentleman is left at the upper left Corner or Side of the Room 
and the Lady at the lower right (*+), concluding to the firft Strain 
of the Tune twice over which is now begun a third Time.(*) 



(2) See the Characters or Steps mark'd 5, 6 t 7, and 8, in Plate XI, or the fifth Di- 
vifion of Plate U. (w) See Plate VI. f Sse the Action in- Plate XIV, and alfo 
the Character or Step marked t. (t) See in fome Meafure Plate VI. (*f) See 

the aforefaid Plates IV, and XIV. (4) See the Character or Step in Plate XIV, mar- 
ked *. (5) See the Steps or Characters in Plates XIII or XIV, mark'd 6, 7, and 8. 
(•t) See the Gentleman and Lady in Plate VI. (•) See the fifth Divifion of Plate U. 
or the under written Mufic to Plates VIII, and XI. 



CHAP. 



The Art ^Dancing explairid. 135 

C H A P. XL 

Of the fixth DIVISION or PRESENTING 

of loth ARMS and Conchtfiott. 



THE (ixth and concluding Part of the Minuet Dance printi- 
pally confifts in the Ceremony of prefentingot giving both 
Hands, as the third and fourth Parts did in giving' thejingle Arm* 
and they are much alike in Figure and Form: For Inftance, the 
Gentleman and Lady facing each other in the third Pofition, where 
we left them in the three laft explained (x) Minuet Steps, begin in 
the Performance of the like Number of Movements fideways each 
to the left Hand, the Gentleman to the right Side of the Room 
and the Lady to the left;* and, near the End or Fini/hing 
of the faid three Minuet Steps, both turn off to the lame Hand to 
which they were performed f, as in the fourth Minuet Step of three 
Movements belonging to the third Divifion, opening gracefully in 
Order to enlarge the Figure and prefent both Hands (1 J as the other 
was for One, only making the fourth Minuet Step which is of One 
and a Heuret forwards to that Part of the Room to which the Pre- 
fence of the Body is directed; that is to fay, the Gentleman to 
the lower and the Lady to the upper (y), upon the Beginning of 
which faid Step both Arms are raifed in the eaiy Gracefulnefs obser- 
ved in the fingle Arm, as the Sign or Warning of giving both Hands, 
(z) which is done upon the commencing of the fifth or fucceed- 
ing Step. 



(x) Sec the Gentleman and Lady in Plate VI purfiiing their different Trafts or Figures 
to the Steps marked i, 2, 3, and 4. + Sec the Cha rafter or Step in the fixth Dirifi- 
cn of Plate U marked 3. (i)See more particularly the Steps marked 1, 2, 3, and 4, 
in the lixth Divifion of Plate U. (y) See the Gentleman and Lady in Plate XII. 
(z) Sec the Aftion in the Figures of Plate XII. 

In 



136 The Art of Dahcihg explain d. 

In this Part of the Dance there may be a Minuet Hop, inftead of 
One and & Fleuret, continuing on round upon the right Side of each 
other, until the Gentleman faces the upper Part of die Room and 
the Lady the lower (a), which will be about the Conclufion of 
the fixth Minuet Step ; during which the Arms are railed near the 
Height of the Shoulder, and the Elbows a little elevated or railed 
forming a Circle or whole Round. 

In this Pofture the feventh and eighth Minuet Steps are alio per- 
formed, the Gentleman making One and a Fleuret backwards, or 
rather a fmall Matter to the right, whilft the Lady performs the 
fame Steps forwards (i), upon v/hich the Hands are let go; and the 
Gentleman, in making the Slip or Beginning of the eighth Minuet 
Step, takes off his Hat with the right Hand which falls gently down 
to the Side, as aforefaid, in Order to make the Reverence or Bow 
to the Prefence or upper End of the Room, which is upon die 
third and fourth Minuet Step, At the fame Inftant the Lady cou- 
pees to the Gentleman in a half Turn to the right from the lower 
Part of the Room facing up it, and leaves the right Foot upon the 
Point f finifhing the remaining half of the Step and Dance in the 
Reverence or Courtefy made in drawing the faid right Foot behind 
the left, on which the Body refts, into the third or fifth Pofition (+); 
after which the Honour or Refpect is made to each other and the 
Ceremony ended (b), as alfo the Tune which has now been play- 
ed diree Times over (*+). 

As to the Hat I mould rather approve of its hot being taken off 
here 'till the breaking off or letting go of both Hands - t however this 
is likewise fubmitted to the Dancer's Choice, as well as the Pre- 
senting of the fingle Arm, whether he takes it off, or keeps~it on, 
throughout the whole Dance. 



(a) Sec in Tome Meafure the Gentleman and Laiy in Plate IX. (2) See the Steps mar- 
ked 5, 6, 7, and 8, in Plate XII, or Steps with the fame Figures in the fixth Di vi li- 
on ol Plate U. (+) See the fecond Figure in Plate VI, Book I. (J) See the firft 
Figure in Plate IV, or fecond of Plate XI, Book I. (b) See the fecond, third, and fourth 
Plates. (•+) See the Mufic to the Steps of Plates VI and XII, or Lift Divifion of 
PlateU. 

CHAP. 



. The A«t ^Dancing explained. 137 

• * . • • . • • 

+ • • • • 

«0P ^V ^V* •■» *■» •■■ ^^^ ^B» ••» ^B» ^B* *W* ^^n> *•» ^B* ^B* *w* ^B* ^B* ^B* *B» *B» ^B* ••» ••» »■* V ■BF^BB' »B* IP Iff VBJP 






CHAP. XII; 



» .* 



Of the MISTAKES in DANCING <f a 
MINUET, with their OCCASIONS and 

RULES to prevent them. .2 

. . • • . ■ • ■.'■.. 

IN the foregoing Chapters I have (hewn the Method or Manner 
in which the Minuet Dance is to be performed, when reduced 
to a juft and regular Dance ; yet in Effect it is no more than a 
voluntary or extemporary Piece of Performance, as has already been 
hinted, in Regard there is no limited Rule, as to its Length or Short- 
nets, or in Relation to the Time of the Tune, fince it may begin upon 
any that offers, as well within a Strain . as upon the nrft Note or 
commencbg thereof. It is the very fame with Refped to its end- 
ing, for it matters not whether it breaks off upon the End of the 
flrft Strain of the Tune, the fecond, or in the Middle of either of 
them, provided it be in Time to the Mufic ; but neverthelefi mere 
are frequently Mifiakes y in the Performance of this Dance, anting 
from Want of a juft Notion of the Figure and fbme certain Rule 
in performing the Steps upon the faid Figure, and more particu- 
larly thofe Steps which are defigned by Way of Ornament or far- 
ther Grace, which inftead of that often prove its Difgrace. No- 
thing is more common than to fee the Gentleman or Lady de- 
tained in the Performance of fome Step, in Order to illuftrate the 
Dance \ and fo confequently not reaching that Part of the Room, 
on which the crofling is made, Time enough (c), inftead of per- 
forming One and a Fleuret open off fideways to die right Hand (d), 

(c) See the Gentleman and Lady in Plates VII, and XI. (d) See the Gentleman uA 
Udy in Plates VI, and VIII. 

S -or 



%$$ The Ait cf Dancing explain d. 

or fome fuch like Step, or making a Feint off to the right Hand 
in the fame Minuet Step quite round forwards falling into the Mi- 
nuet Step of three Movements all behind facing the right or left 
Side, as it (hall fall out, by which Time the former will be arrived at 
the Place of eroding which will then be in its due Time; where- 
as the running in either before or behind our Partner, as before, 
would havecaufed a Confufion. *.;..• . . , . . 

This Difbrder alfo frequently happens in performing the com- 
mon Mtnuet Step, as when one of the Dancers does not £H t>ut the 
Room and Figure in the Performance of an equal Number of Steps 
to the other j tor, if this be not obferved, it will produce the like Ef- 
fect as the former; or if, as I have obferved, in presenting thetigjht 
Hand or giving of both, a diffident Warning is not had by rat- 
ting of the Hand or Hands, as aforefaid, one Minuet Step before 
the Hands are given (f), the Dancers are often nonplus <1 and put 
out of the Figure, while on the contrary 4 Pretence of Mind with 
the Obfervation of thefe Rules will prevent all fuch Blunders and 
ConfuHons. 

There is yet one Obfervation more, with which I (hall conclude 
what I have to fay upon this Head, which may be of fome Service 
in preventing the faid Accidents, viz. The marking whether the 
Mtnuet Step of three Movements before and behind fideways to 
the left Hand, which introduces or leads to the giving the right 
Hand, was facing up or down the Room, becaufe in going the 
Circle or Figure iound to the right you certainly come to the fame 
Place (ej, whether it be facing to the upper or lower Part of the 
Room, ending the Divifion in the Mtnuet Step of One and a Fleuret 
obliquely off fideways to the right Hand and looking the fame Way 
as defcribed in that Step ; and alfo the like in the Performance of 
the Minuet Steps roun d to the left, in which the faid Hand is 
given {fy * 



-j- See the Dirifions or Chapters which treat of giving the Hands. (e) See For Ex- 
ample the Gentleman and Lady in Plate VIII. (f) See the Beginning in the GentUnan 
and Lady in Plate X, concluding in Plate VUL 

As 



The A*t of Dancing explained. 139 




' As the foregoing are the principal Places, in which young 
cers ufually miftake, I thought the making fome Observations ^ 
the Occafion, and the Rules or Methods to be obferved in preveet- 
ingthcm, might not be unacceptable; for, admitting that Ma/ief*^ 
may have frequently taught their Scholars the fame Leflon,- yet * 
according to the old Saying, IVordsfoon pops into Oh/him, hut &ba*~ 
is put down tn Prim remains more ftrongly fix d upon the Mind. - - f 

There is much more that might be (aid upon this Subject; but, - 
as the aforefaid is fufficient, to avoid being tedious I (hall only 
proceed to the making a few farther Obfervations, in Regard to ' 
the foregoing defcribed Steps, which as yet have not been introdu- r 
ced into the Donee above explained nor any Place affigned them 
therein: For Inftance, the March, Balance, Slip behind and- 
Step forwards being to the right Hand, and die fame to the left 
and a Double Bouree forwards, every one of which Steps, as was 7 
already obferved, depend upon Fancy, as there are fome Farts 
of the Dance much more proper than others, it may not be 
foreign to my prefent Purpofe to take Notice of them ; and in the ' 
firft Place introduce the March, which feems to claim three Places 
in the (aid Dance > the Choice of which refts in the Performer, for 
it is to be obferved that no Step of this Sort is ever performed 
more than once or twice in Dancing of a Mtnuet. For Example, 
mould the faid Dance be perform'd in one Aflembly or Compa- 
ny twice or thrice over, its Steps ought to be varied as much as poffi- 
ble, that is, provided the Dancer is capable thereof; otherwife, as I 
have already obferved, it is much better performed plain ; but to 
what 1 was faying the two Marches will be agreeably made advan- 
cing upon the kventhAfinuet Step of the fecond Divifion, the firfV 
of the three Ways there defcribed, that is, of One and a Fleuret 
continuing all round forwards. 

The eighth Mtnuct Step may be of One and a Fleuret open off 
fideways to the right Hand, as aforefaid, facing either to the up- 
per or lower End of the Room, as it happens; the next Place it 
challenges is the fecond Meafure of the fourth Divifion, inftead of 
the Hop which is then left out; and the third is upon the laft Step 

S z but 



140 The A&T-qf Dancing explama. 

but one of the fifth Divifion or fecond s, intirely in the fame Method 
defcribed in the fecond Divifion. •■*•:». « 

The Balance is alfo frequently made much about the lame Place 
or eighth Minuet Step, either tideways facing each other, or advan- 
cing and retiring; and the next is the Slip behind 'and Step forwards 
to the right and left Hands, each to a Minuet Step and Fall in their 
Performance upon the aforefaid fecond and fifth Divisions, only 
in the fecond of the three Methods explained in the fecond Part of 
the. Dance, by breaking off the Minuet Step of One and a Fleuret upon 
the Ending of the fixth Minuet Step, inftead of a feventh it makes 
the faid Slip to the right Hand turning to each other from the con- 
trary Sides of the Room, and the Slip to the left Hand is inftead of 
the eighth Minuet Step. 

This Step may alfo be performed with no fmall Advantage to 
the Dance, inftead of the feventh and eighth Minuet Steps of the 
fourth Divifion which are there obliquely ; and the Double Bouree 
forwards may be made upon the feventh Minuet Step of the fecond 
or fifth Divfion, concluding the eighth Mtnuet Step in One and a 
Fleuret to the right Hand, as aforefaid, or inftead of the fifth Mi- 
nuet Step, after which there maining are as defcribcd in the fecond 
Divifion or $. 

The third Way of this Step's Performance is by a half Turn upon 
the Half Coupee or Beginning of the fixth Mtnuet Step of One and 
a Fleuret, opening off fideways to the right, or in the fixth Divifi- 
on after the Hop inftead of the Mtnuet Step, 

The foregoing Graces or Steps being now united and brought in- 
to the aforefaid Dance ^ and having their proper Places affigned 
therein, I fhall conclude with one Obfervation more, viz. that it 
is in its Performance longer or fhorter, according to the Dancer* 
Pleafure. In Order to this inftead of performing the fecond Di- 
vifion but once, as in the Dance before defcribed prefenting the 
right Hand, it may be performed twice or thrice, only it muft be 
noted that the fifth Divifion upon breaking off the left Hand is per- 
formed the like Number of Times ; that is to fay if the fecond twice, 
the fifth the like, and if thrice the fame after giving the fingle Hand ; 

but 



The Art ^Dancing explained 141 

but the ftiorteft Way is once, as ddcribed in the foregoing Dance* 

The (aid Dance and its Steps, as I have already obfcrved, alto* 
gether depend on Fancy, and are in their Performance various 
and uncertain; for it is left to the Pleafure of every one to perform 
them in the Order here fet down, in any better Method of their 
own, or without any Steps. Indeed, it muft be confeflcd that the 
Steps well performed in a Minuet are great Ornaments to that 
Dance, in rilling it with Variety; yet at the fame Time it muft 
be owned the performing the plain Minuet Steps alone is- extreme- 
ly graceful, if well accomplifhed, and in Effect the moft Gentle- 
man-Hie, or at lead the fafer of the two. 



CHAP. XIII. 



* » 



• * 



* a 



Of TIME or fome Account of what TIME t§\ 
with Rules to he ohferved in Keeping it. 

• a * . * 

TIME is a large Space* or Diftance without Variation or 
Change ; and, as it has been from the Beginning of all things, 
it will remain 'till a Period be put thereto and it ceafes to be. This 
mighty Space the great Author thereof, in his exceeding Wifdom, 
has divided or meafured into equal Parts and Proportions, as Days 
into Hours, Months into Weeks, Quarters into Months, Years into 
Quarters, Sfr. which Divifions or Parts move or travel, round in a 
continual but juft and regular Motion or Pace, fucceeding each 
other without ceaiing until they arrive at the utmoft Limits or 
Confines of Time, which will then be no more. 

But leaving thefe fublime Thoughts to draw more clolely to the 
Point or Subject in Hand, I (hall endeavour to illuftrate it by one 
Day or Mealure of the foregoing Space or Ttme, in fuppoiing eve- 
ry Hour therein to be Bars or Meaiures of a Dance or Tune ; and 
that they are as-fhort in Length otTime, as Meafure in common.or 
triple Time. I (hall likewife {hew, that by one Hour may be 

comprc- 



\ 



142 The An of Dakcing explained. 

comprehended the Scale both of common and triple Time : For 
Inftance, the former thus. 

• • ■ 

COMMON TIME. 

i Semibreve, • /"i Hour. 

i Minims, — \i Half Hours. 

4 Crotchets ^4 Quarters of the Hour. 

% Quavers )& Half Quarters of the Hour. 

1 6 Semi-quavers. — \ x 6 Half half Quarters of the Hour. 

. • . 

The above is the whole Proportion of Common Time or of four 
to the Meafure, as ufually found in Books of Mufic\ yet we often 
mid in Pieces of Muftc the fixtecn Semi-quavers doubled two and 
thirty Demi-Jemi-quavers, and then the Hour will be divided into 
the like Number of Parts. 

In Triple Time the Hour muft be fuppos'd to be divided into three 
Thirds or Parts, by Reafbn it only corififts of three in a Bar or 
Meafure : The Example is as follows. . 

• * . 

TRIPLE TIME. 

t Priced Minim. — ( 1 Hour in three Thirds. 

3 Crotchets. J 3 Thirds or Parts of the Hour. 

6. Quavers. )6 Half Thirds or Parts of the Hour. 

ii Semi-quavers. — (ix Half half "Thirds or Parts oj the Hour. 

This is the Proportion of Triple Ttme or three in a Meafure, as 
ufually put down; yet fometimes it amounts to twenty four Dem't- 
femi-qtiavers 

Having now (hewn that the Hours of the Day may be efteem'd 
as fo many Meafures of a Tune ox Dance > it muft consequently be 
underftood that a Day of twelve Hours contains the like Number 

of 



• 

The A*t 0/ Dancing explain J. 143 

Meafures; and, admitting that the Tune or Dance confided of ie- 
venty two Bars, fix Divifions or Days would compleat it. Tljtis 
Comparifon may poflibly be thought byfome foreign to the Purpofe, 
tho* it is indeed very juft and (uitable; and I queftion not but up- 
on farther Confidcration it will appear fo to the judicious Reader, tor 
fince the Subject in Hand is Ttme and there is Nothing more cer- 
tain than the Day and its Hours, the latter will of Courle imprint 
in the Mind ftronger and jufter Ideas of the former. 

However, it may perhaps be objected and at firft View with great 
Show of Reafon, that the Time in Dancing is various and liable to be 
changed to fafter or flower, according to the Performer's Fancy; 
whereas the Day and Hours are immutable or without any Change. 
I anfwer, for this very Reafon, as I have juft obferved it will give 
them a truer Notion of the Juftnefs of Time, and be a Means to 
prevent their darting from or dragging behind it, which is pften 
done by fuch whofe Ears are pretty good, as well as by thole who 
have very bad Ears, tho' it is the natural Fruit of the Want of an - 
Ear which of all other Things is moft difficult to cure, it being 
more a Gift of Nature than Art This caufed the Ancients to 
fay, the Gods gave a Genius to Mufic and Dancing; and it is of that 
Importance in the latter as to render it impoflible to pleafe without 
Keeping Time, nor is it to be called Dancing without it. . 

From what has been faid it appears, that to have a juft and true 
Idea oiTtme is of no fmall Confequence in order to dance well, 
and that too much cannot be (aid upon this Head; which is, I 
think, a fufficient Motive for me to proceed in a few farther Ob- 
fervations upon it, which if dulyconfider'd, I am confident, will be 
found of remarkable Service. 

In the firft Place then, you are to take Notice, that of the fore- 
going Proportions of Ttme one is common and the other triple, from ' 
whence arife all the Times and Movements made ufe of in Dan- 
cing. From the former of thefe flow very flow Entrees containing 
two Steps in each Meafure call'd, Quadruple or of two Times on 
Account of their Slovvnefs or admitting of a fuppos*d Bar in theNfid- 
die of the faid Meafure; but the reft as Alkinatgies, Gavots, Gal- 
Hards* 



* 



»• 



1 






144 The A fir of Dancing explain d. 

» * 

bards, Bottrees, Rigadoons, &c. are only of one Time, as not al- 
lowing of more than one Seep to a Meafure by Rcafon they are much 
lighter Movements than the aforcfaid Quadruple, of which they 
are cfteem'd but as half a Meafure. The latter confifb of Louvres, 
or flow Jigs, Courants, Sarabands, Paffacailles, Cbaconnes, Minuets, 
Paffepieds, &?c . the firft of which namely Louvres or flow Jigs arc 
of two Times or Steps to a Meafure and agreeable with Quadruple, 
fo that in EfFed there are three Sorts of Times in Dancing viz, 
common, triple, and quadruple proceeding from the two former; 
yet they are all reckon'd but as common and triple TtmevcA only 
beat as fuch, except that fome are flower and otters quicker, which 
is the Subjed I am now about to explain. 

Common Time, for, Inftance, is of four Notes to the Bar or Mea- 
fure, as has already been obferved in the Explanation of the Steps 
upon that Time j and the Rife or Beginning of the Step, in Dan- 
cing, from a Sink always marks Time to the Tune, as well as the 
fourth or laft Note is in the Sink or Preparative for the Rife or beat- 
ing Time to the fucceeding Step, which no fooner is performed 
than the Dancer proceeds to the next, as in Walking; and fo on 
'till the Dance is compleated, keeping a juft and equal Diftance 
or Space between every Beginning and Ending of a Meafure of the 
Dance, as has been obferved by the Hours of a Day, which is call'd 
Time, the fame Way, as not making the Rife or marking of the 
Ttme, from a Sink v iipon the firft Note which in all Meafures is out 
of Ttme, and alfo performing the Steps of a Dance fometimes faft- 
cr or flower than at others; but this is as morally impoffible for 
one of a good Ear, as it wou'd be for a well timed Watch to go out 
©f Ttme, Dancing may juftly be confider'd as a Watch; for as, 
when the latter is fet a going by the Springs, the Wheels move round 
rrwafuring out the Hours or Divifions of a Day in certain and e- 
qual Spaces, during the Time it goes: So the Springs and Steps of 
a Dame ought to be continued after it is put in Motion by Muftc, 
'till the Whole is ended, which may eafily be accomplifh'd. But 
the Difficulty arifes here ; for Example, fuppofing a Perfon, would 
fet his IVatcb a going at Twelve at Noon, having no Rule nor any 

Thing 



The Abt ofDAHcinaexplam'd. 145 

to direct him in it but beholding of the Sun, is it not aThoufand t° 
One but he wou'd be either before orafter the Time? The Cafe is die 
very fame in Dancing, as to thofe who have not a Genius or Ear to 
Mafic; and tho' I durft engage to make fuch a One acquire the 
former, namely to dance in juft and regular Time, yet I wou'd not 
anfwer for his commencing upon the right Time by Reafon, as I 
have obferved in the Comparison of the Sun, it is a Point of a ve- 
ry nice Nature and in Reality not to be done with any Certainty, 
if the Ear is not firft helped and improved by a Knowledge of that 
Science; no more than the former without a Skill in Dialling. 

Having by the going of a IVatchQaem the true and exact Time 
in which the Steps of a Dance ought to be perform'd, and the Dif- ■ 
ficulty of fuiting the Movement of the Dame to that of the Tune, I 
(hall proceed to give the Rules to be obferved in beating or keeping 
Time to the foregoing Proportions of Time, which I take to be the 
firft Step in the Affair under Confederation ; and I (hall begin with 
the Gavtt, upon which Movement thcTime isfometimesbeat directly 
upon the firft of the four Notes belonging to the Meafure, but moft 
ufually after letting pals or flip half a Meafure, that is to fay, the 
third and fourth Notes. For the better Underftanding of this 1 lhall 
name two or three Dances of the latter Sort, viz. the Princeft Rtyat 
compos'd by Mr. I'Abbee, the Princefs Am by Mr. Siris, and the 
Gavot to the Dance, named the Prince Eugene, of my own Com- 
pofition, and they all begin with odd Notes to which in the Dance 
a plain Step or Walk is made, whilft the Pcrfon who beats Time 
raifes the Heel or Toe on playing the odd Notes of the Tune, in 
Order to ftrike full upon the Time or firft Note of the enfuing Mea- 
fure ; which is done in the Fall or Coming down of the Heel or 
Toe, either of which remains upon the Floor during the Counting 
of the firft and fecond Notes or half Meafure. While the third and 
fourth Notes, or concluding Half are counting the Heel or Toe is 
raifed to mark Time to the fucceeding Bar, as at firft, and fo on 
'till the whole Tune or Dance is ended, keeping an exact and e- 
qual Motion up and down neither fafter nor flower, and counting 
the faid firft, fecond, third, and fourth Notes fucceffively over and 

T over 



146 The A*t of Dakgimq explalrid., 

over during die feme ; lo that die Heel or Toe rifes upon the third 
Note, remains in the Air the fourth, conies down to the firft, and 
refts the fecond, 6fc. as before. 

The Galhard Movement is intirely the fame, as to the beating 
Part, but not as to the odd Notes, for inftead of two, as in the fore- 
going, there is only one here ; an Inftance whereof we have in 
Mr. I/aac's Galliard, upon which the Heel or Toe is railed to beat 
the Time upon the firft Note, as afbrefeid. Thefe two Movements 
are rather more folemn and grave than the following, namely, 
Attema'tgnes, Bourns, Rigadoom> &c. but with Regard to the Me- 
thod of beating Time the very feme, for they ufually begin with 
an odd Note; and if not, 'tis only borrowing the laft Note of the 
foregoing Meafure for railing the Heel or Toe, as aforefeid. 

It is here to be noted, that it can never be reckoned out cSTtme, 
whether the faid four Notes of the Meafure be counted fetter or 
flower, provided* they are continued through the Dance, as begun 
at firft ; for tho' the Fancy of Maflers often differs upon this Point, 
yet every Movement has its proper 77/w. 

From what has been faid it fully appears, that the firft Note or 
Beginning of a Bar is the Ttme or Mark the Dancer muft hit; and 
in Order thereto, as the Performer in Afujtc, in playing of the Tune, 
prepares for beating Time by taking up of the Toe or Heel, fo does 
the Dancer in making a Sink or Bending of the Knees to beat or 
mark Time to the Tune, as well as to perform the firft or introdu- 
cing Step of the Dance \ but whether it be done by a Rife upon the 
Toe, a Hop, or any other Step, it matters not, in that it is to be 
obferved, the Rife from a Sink beats Ttme in Dancing as the Fall 
of the Heel does in Afu/ic. 

Before I proceed to triple Ttme^ it will be neceffery to fay fame- 
thing farther of quadruple) which from its Gravenefs is reckoned as 
two Times, as was already obferved; and I know no more pro- 
per or fuitable Method of explaining it, fince in Time and Value it is 
equivalent to two Meafures of common Ttme t than the Counting e- 
very Note double as One One, Two Two, Three Three, Four Four, 
and fuppoung them, what in Effect they really are, four Minims, for 

1 in 



The Art of Dancing explained. 147 

in this Sort of Time the Crotchets are of equal Length to die Mhtims* 
and wou'd be as before obferved, if the Ttme was beat in the Mid- 
dle of the Meafure. For Inftance, on the commencing of the* third 
Mtnim it is no longer quadruple but common Ttmt\ from whetice 
it follows, that the Minimi muft be beat in their Timing, as one 
Meafure, the fame as the Crotchets, tho' in Length and Value dtiuble 
to them. 

Tunes of quadruple Time rarely, if ever, begin with odd tfotei, 
as the foregoing Tunes of common; and, for an Example, I fliall 
name a Tune or two of this Kind, as the Entree d* Apoton. But as 
that Dance may not probably be known to fuch as this Book Is prin- 
cipally defign'd for, I (hall name a fecond of the fame Soft, name- 
ly the Godolphirty compos'd by the late Mr. Ifaac, upon which may 
be pradifed the Time of this Movement; to which End the' Heel u 
raifed to mark the Time, as already explain'd, after which it remains 
on the Floor the playing of the firft and fecond Minims or half 
Meafure. The third and fourth Minims are in the two Motions 
the Heel or Toe makes in riling, in Order to mark the enfuing 
Meafure : For Inftance, the firft Rife is made ftrong and brifk up- 
on the Beginning of the latter half of the Meafure or third Note; 
the fecond Rife is made farther up into the Air, in the fame Manner 
as the firft, to the fourth and laft Note ; upon the Expiration where- 
of the Toe or Heel comes down marking the Time to the next Bkr, 
counting One One, Two Two, &c. as before, whilft the whole 
Tune is compleated. 

Having fhewn how the Dancer fuits his Steps to the Notes of 
the MuJtCj it will be of no Ufe to fay any thing farther of that here; 
and therefore I fhall only obferve, that as there are in this Sort of 
Tunes two Steps to each Meafure, the firft is beat, as ufual, down, 
but the fecond is marked up in the Air, on the Beginning of the 
third Minim, as above explained. . 

Being now arrived at triple Ttme or of three in a Meafure, I have' 
little to fay, having already in the foregoing Proportions of Tims 
defcribed the Manner of beating or marking Ttme - t for it is altoge- 
ther fuperihtous and uhneceflary to enlarge, fince it is intirely in' 

T i the 



^> 



148 The Art of Dancing explaitfd. 

the lame Method, except to make a few Objurations touching die 
moft material Difference in the Movements thereof; and firft obferve, 
that the Courante is a Sort of quadruple Movement which confifts of 
three Minims, inftead of the like Number of Crotchets, as in the 
reft following ; which Minims are ufually divided into double the 
Quantity oi pricK d Crotchets and Quavers, mix'd or blended pro* 
mifcuoufly together, according to the Compofers Fancy, produ- 
cing this Movement and play 'd as three Minims, which renders it 
very folemn and grave; and, in its counting or beating in Time 
it is the fame as the foregoing quadruple, only it is a Minim lefs and 
generally begins with an odd Quaver or half Note. Upon this the 
Heel or Toe is raifed, as aforefaid, to mark the Time or firft Note 
in the Coming down of the Toe or Heel, counting One One, Two 
Two, during which, two Thirds of the Meafure the Foot refts upon 
the Ground. In the third and remaining Minim or Part the 
Heel or Toe is raifed in Readinefs to mark the Meafure following, 
which is performed fucceffively on, in like Manner, keeping juft and 
regular Time, &c. as was fnewn before; but, for an Example, I 
{hall name the La Burgogte by Mr. Pecour and Brawl of Audenarde 
by Mr. Sir is. 

The next grave Movements are Sarabands, PaJ/acaiHes, andG&j- 
conncs, each of three Crotchets to a Meafure, and every one a De- 
gree lighter than the other : Neverthelefs the Method of beating Time 
is the fame as defcribed above in the. Courante Movement, only in- 
ftead of Minims to Crotchets and of the7//w*'s commencing after an 
odd Note, k is mark'd directly as in quadruple', that is to fay, ex- 
cepting Cbaconnes, which always begin with odd Notes. Exam- 
ples of the two former Sorts are the Prince/s Ann, the FolUe TyBf- 
paigncy and Paffacaille U at mid, all which Dances were compos'd 
by Mr. LAbbee\ and alfo of the latter the Prince/s Ann's Chaconneby 
the fame Author is an Inftance, where a whole Meafure is let flip 
beforethe Time commences. 

The next Minuets and Pajfepieds are Mill brifker, the firft being 
of three Crotchets to a Bar or Meafure, and the fecond of three 
Quavers ; and the firft ufually begins without odd Notes, but the fe- 
cond 



The Art of Dancing explain* d. 149 

cond never. The Time of thefe Movements, in Dancing, ought never 
to be beat after every Bar but every other Meafure, by Reafbn, as 
has been (aid, one Minuet Step takes two Meafures of thefe Move- 
ments; and it is to be noted that, as in quadruple * the Time is to 
be mark'd the firft Meafure down, and die fecond up, inftead of twice 
down. It muft be farther obfcrved that if the Strains of theAfhut- 
et or Paffepied confift of eight, as they moft frequently do, four 
Minuet Steps are equivalent to a Strain once over; from whence it 
follows, that the Beginning of a Strain, whether the firft or fecond 
it matters not, is always the Time the Dancer is to mark or hit, and 
from thence to proceed on from one fecond Bar to another upon 
the Time, neither varying to fader nor flower, than at firft fetting 
out, during the Performance of the whole Dance; and if the Minu- 
et or Paffep'ted 'is of more Meafures, it is neverthelefs performed; 
in the fame Manner. There is Plenty of Examples of the former' 
Kind, as is of the hitter the Royal George, that is, the Conclufion 
and Beginning of the Bretagne ; . the firft by Mr. VAbbee, the 
fecond by Mr. Pecour, to which I fhall add one more of my owtt 
Compofition, namely, the Paffepied Round, • 

As to Tunes of triple Time agreeing with quadruple, viz. Lot* 
vres or flow Jigs, they are of two Meafures, or of fix Crotchets iff 
the Bar, the firft three whereof are beat down and the remaining 
up, each anfwering to a Meafure of a Saraband, and a Movement 
ufually beginning in odd Notes. For Inftance, die Entree E/pagml 
zxAPafloral Dance, the latter by the late Mr. Ijaac\ and the Union 
by the fame Author is of this Nature, tho* it does not begin with 
odd Notes as the Dances aforefaid. As the foregoing Difcourfe 
fhews that Louvres or flow Jigs are agreeable to quadruple Time, I 
fhall next proceed to obferee, that Jigs and airy light Tunes of the 
like Number of Notes to the Meafures, as the aforefaid, agree with 
Rigadoons in common Ttme, and beat as fuch in marking the firft • 
three down, and the remaining up ; as for Example, in Jigs or For- 
lanes, the Princefi Amelia compos'd by Mr UAbbee, and die Dana 
of that Movement by Mr. Pecour; and the Shepberdefs compor d. 
by my felf is likewife an Example of this Sort- 

There. 



150 The Art of Dancing explain d. 

There is yet another Movement that occurs to my Memory, 
namely, the Canary, which is of a very brifk Nature, confiding on* 
ly of three or fix Quavers in a Meafure, but ufually the latter, 
flipping before the Ttme is beat three Quavers or half a Meafure, 
and marking the three firft down and the reft up; and the laft 
Movement of the Royal GaWtard by the late Mr. 1/aac it an 
Example of this Kind. 

There is dill a Movement unobserved, of the like Quantity of 
Notes to a Meafure, viz. the Hornpipe, which is of three Minims 
or fix Crotchets in die Bar, and, in marking or beating Time, agrees 
with a Tune of triple Ttme or of three , as for Inftance a Saraband, 
in which the Foot remains down, during the counting of One, Two, 
and upon the third rifes to mark the enfuing Meafure &c. The fe* 
cond Parts of the Union and Richmond sue both Dances of a Horn* 
pipe Movement, and of the late Mr I/aac*s Composition. 

Befides the foregoing Rules of beating Time it may be of Service 
to fuch as have but indifferent Ears, when they are about to dance 
in any Aflcmbly or private Room, or in their Dancing to hearken 
to the Tune, that they may know the Ttme in which the Dance is 
to be performed; which they may more eafily do by Rcaibn the 
Mufic rarely fail of beating Time to the Tune they are playing, or 
at leaft ought not, becaufe hearing the beating or ftriking of the 
Toe or Heel againft the Floor are vifible and certain Marks of the 
Dancers commencing. 

Moreover in Dancing, if the Partner with whom we dance be a 
good Performer, wefhould take Care to keep our Steps and Figure 
agreeable with theirs; and I am of Opinion, if a Perfon has the leaft 
Notion of the Steps he is performing, it will be very eafy for him to 
obferve, whether they begin and end together, which I believe may 
be ufeful in Dancing* 

However, as I have laid before, the moft fure Method I take to 
be, liftening to the Mu/icand Ttmebcsx thereto, tho 'h^t ltfelf is 
uncertain, nothing being more common than the hearing of a 
Tune begun in one Ttme, and, before it is ended, to be ueu as faft 
again; which renders it impofliblc for the beft Dancers whatfbever 

to 



The Ait of Dancing explain '</. 151 

to dance as they ought, forinfteadof their finding the Note upon 
which they (hould ftep, it is pufh'd or drove from under their Feet 
during every Step they take, and of Confequence caufes them to 
lofe that natural and carclefs Air lb agreeable in Dancing notwidj- 
(landing they keep up with the Tune, as being never certain of its 
Time. Indeed, it muftbeown'd to be the Dancer's Bufinefs to dance 
to the Tune ; yet it is neverthelefs the Mufic's Part to beat and keep 
conftant and true Time, as well at the latter Part of a Time as at 
firft. By this Means the Dancers, furc of the Time they dance to, , 
perform not only with Pleafureand Eafetothcmfelves, but alfo give*, 
double Satisfaction to the Spectators in beholding the Dancers; for 
altho' the latter are at a conliderable Diftance from each other, yet 
the former will obferve, that every Movement or Sink and Rife the 
Dancers make is exactly the fame in one as well as the other; 
the former in Order to mark Time, and the latter in marking of it. 
Moreover every Turn, Step, Spring or Bound fcen in one will be 
at the fame Inftant obferved in the other, in fuch an cxad Symme- 
try and Harmony of the Parts agreeing with the Notes of the Mi* 
fie, as to caufe the moft agreeable Surprize in the Beholders of the 
two Dancers; or admitting a Dozen or more in Number, by ob- 
ferving them all to move as only one Perfon. This is the natu- 
ral Efl'efi of good Dancing adorn d with all its Beauties, in that the 
Mufic Teems to infpire the Dancing, and the latter the former; and 
the Concurrence of both is fo requifite to charm thofe who beheld 
them, that each of them in fome Meafure fuffers by a Separation. 
For Example the Eye can receive no Pleafure in the Mujie any 
more than the Ear in Dancing; but in Conjunction there is at once 
an Attack upon both thefe Scnfcs. 

Tho' this is only an imperfect Draught of fine Dancing, yet it 
may ferve to (hew how frequently this Art fuffers by the UnjkilfuU 
ncjs of its Performers, whether it arife from the Want of a true 
Knowledge of the Steps, a bad Ear, or from any other Caufe; and 
this it was that gave Birth to my Treatife on Dancing, in which the 
principal and moft remarkable Steps in that Art are described and 
taken in Pieces, I have alfo {hewn how the Step sof each Meafure 

are 



152 The Abt 0/ Dancing explain d. 

are made to common or /r/p/<? 77/»f ; and in the Minuet I have given 
an Explanation of all the Steps of that Dance; and ftiewn, tho* in 
Effcd it is not fo, how it may be reduced into a regular Dance. 
In difcourfing upon Time, I have given Examples in the moft known 
Tunes of every Movement, upon which it may be pra&ifed or beat- 
en ; and in the Rules for the fame I have fully made appear, how 
the oteps of the foregoing Difcourfe, altho' in Pieces, are there uni- 
ted and fet together again, moving in juft Time to the Sound of Ma- 
fic, as the Watch is put in Motion by its Springs. Upon taking 
fome farther Notice or the Elevation, Movement, and graceful Fall 
of the Arms, together with fome Obfervations concerning Country 
Dancing, I (hall conclude this Work, in Hopes that, as the 
chief, nay only Motive of undertaking it was the Publick Good, 
it may anfwer the defired End ; the accomplishing whereof will be 
a fufficient Recompence for the great Pains, Trouble, andExpence 
I have been at in compleatingthe fame; and, as there never hither- 
to appeared in the World, at leaft in our Language, a Piece of this 
Nature, I flatter my (elf it will meet with the more Acceptance. 







c HAP. XIV. 
Of the Movement of the ARMS in DANCING. 

• - 

HAVING (hewn the Method in which the different Steps are 
to be taken and perform'd, I (hall now proceed to (hew how 
the Movements of the Arms ought to accompany the (aid Steps in 
Dancing j left this Work (hould be compared to the Legs and Bo- 
dy of a Man without Arms. 

However as on the one Hand, I (hall make it my Study to omit 
Nothing that can contribute to compleat this IVork, I (hall at the 
fame Time, on the other, only obferve what I apprehend to be ma- 

- tcrial 



• • 



.' The Ait ^Dancing explained. 153 

terial, without tiling the Reader's Patience on a Subject which can* 
not be compleated without the verjr bcft Mafters. The Correfpon- 
dence of the Legs and Arms in Dancing is a Point of fo nice a Na- 
ture that any Awkwardnefs or improper Movement* therein would 
deftroy the Beauty of the whole, fincc that Dancing cannot be good 
which is decrepid or lame in any of its Parts, any more than a Gentle- 
man or Laaycan be juftly efteem'd compleady genteel who are 
naturally and eafily difpofed in fbme Parts and difagreeable in 6- 
thers; fo that in fine it is the very Polifh and finifhing Stroke. •' 

For the better comprehending of this we muft firft take Notice 
that, in whatfbever Pofition we ftand before the Elevation or Rai- 
fmg of the Arms, the Palms or Infides of the Hands are to our Side 
in a genteel eafy Shape or Fafhibn, the whole Arms hanging from un- 
der the Shoulders without Force downwards, or too much Relaxati- 
on upwards, but natural and eafy inaReadinefsfbrthe Elevation +. 

The next Obfervation relates to the Pofition of the Hands after 
their Elevation or being raifed ; and we fliould find them with the 
Palms of the Hands to the Prefence or right forwards with the Arms 
both open or extended, in the like Manner we have defcribed them 
by the Sides, neither too much raifed nor too much funk beneath 
the Shoulders, but graceful and eafy, and being fo difpofed ready 
to perform the firft Motion, which in the Movement of die Arms 
above correfponds with the Sink or Bending of the Knees below %. 
This is done by moving or railing the whole Arms $ and, in die 
Fall of the (aid Arms to their firft Situation after their Elevation, 
the Palms of the Hands, inftead of right forwards as before, are 
now to the Floor j which is effected by a flow and eafy Turning of 
the faid Wrifts during the Motion of the (aid Arms downwards, 
compleating the Movement or Motion of the Arms, from whence 
all other Movements take their Rife or Beginning; fo that, if the 
graceful Raifing or Elevation of the Arms from the Sides to the 
Palms right forwards be by a flow and even Raifing of the Wrifts, 
turning outwards or backwards 'till they arrive at their proper 
Height as before defcribed £, their becoming Fall muft in like 

^— — - — — ^— — — ■ ■ ■--■■■ — ■ - ■- 

f See the Figures in Plate I, B. I. t See Plates II and XV in B. L 

U Manner 



iS4 Tbe Abt of Dauciho explain d. 

Manner * be in the Turn of the Wrifts and Palms of the Hands 
downwards in a flow and even Motion inwards, or forwards, 
whilft the Palms are to the Sides, as: at firft^, greatly refembiing 
the Fall of a Feather or the Coming down of a Bird, their Fall is fo 
fmooth and cafyj and it is a wonderful Grace to Datttitg when 
well performed. 

. To avoid being tedious, or overloading this Subject with tod ma- 
ny Obfervations I fball reduce the various Movements of the Arms 
to three or four, via. firft, die Movement of the Wrifts from the 
Elbows round upwards (a). Secondly, the Mcvtmtxt of the Arms 
inwards in their Motion upwards {b). Thirdly, the compleating 
the (aid Movement of the Arms inwards by the Movement of die 
Wrifts round upwards mentioned before (a). And fourthly, the ir- 
regular or contrary Movement 4p)* •- • : 

Now, as to the Method of Performance and Timing of die Move* 
mem of ihetPriJh xoudd upwards, it is by a flow and even Motion 
or Movement of the Knutkles or Forefingers and*. Thanhs upwards 
round from a fmall Bend of the Wr'tfls and JM&ows corresponding 
therewith (b). * The Commencing is. upon one, the Movement 
round backwards {b} finishing in a Flirt or carelefi Motion of the 
Wr'tjU and Arms in their Return to their former Situation, as in 
the Poiition of the Attns after their Elevation $ upon two fa) and 
three if to triple Time, in the Motion or Preparative for the Move*- 
merit of the Arms next enfuing, as it will conclude in like Manner 
upon four, if to €oinmonTmi& ': . r) 

The next Movement is made by the eafy Fall of die Elbows at 
the fame Time or Inftant ; and the Knuckles or Forefingers and 
Thumbs lead the Way in a fmooth and eafy Motion from helow up- 
wards forming a quarter or half Circle or Bow f. The Hands in a 
handfome FauSion may be fuppofed the Ends or Points of the faid 
half Circle or Bow; and it is to be noted that this Movement is on- 



• See the Plates XV, and II, B. I. J See the Figures in Plate I, B. L 

(a) See Plate XV, B. I. (b) See Plate X, B. I. (c) See Plates IV, V* VI, TX, 

XII, XIII, XIV. B. I. f See the Figures in Plates X, and XI* B. L 



The A*t of Dawciko explained. 155 

ly about the one Half of the aforefaid. But as that begun by form- 
ing the Circle round upwards above the Pofition of the Arms, the 
Elbows during the Movement of the fVrifts remaining elevated un- 
til the Flirt or Finishing is made, on the other Hand in this 
Movement of the Arms the half Circle,* or Motion the fVr'tfis 
make, is below the Pofition of the Arms\ and, inftead of the Elbows 
remaining elevated, as before, together with the whole Arms, they 
fall or fink down in a flow, fmooth, and eafy Motion, whiHV the Ab/r- 
fingert and Thumbs, as aibre&id, at the fame Time move up- 
wards in the like flow and deliberate Manner, fintfhing together 
with the Hands above and the Elhws below in Order to the throw- 
ing the Arms open oft again, as in Heps, Chaffee?) and the like, 
for which thefe are the proper Arms. The bringing them in on 
the Concluflon of the foregoing Step, as juft defcribed If, is in Order 
to the faid throwing them out on the Time or Beginning of die 
next Step t for which this is the Preparative, tho* t)\t Movement of die . 
Arms to the palms of the Hand* downwards rhuft always be firft 
made by Way of farther. Preparation, concluding open and exten- 
ded, 'till the Meafure is expired $ and from hence it appears, that 
thefe two Movements ufualry anfwer each (eparatety to a Meafure 
or Step, forming together much about a whole Circle. The for- 
mer Half, as I have faid, moves under the Pofition of die Arms, and 
the latter Half above in the Movement of the Arms round upwards 
in the Form and Manner above defcribed; and thefe are thefe*- 
cond and third Movements I propofed to explain. 

The nregular or fourth and loft Movementh produced from die 
two former, viz, by the Fall -of the tZUxrm of one Hand as the 
Knuckle moves upwards, whilft the other at the fame Time per- 
forms the Motion of the Arm round, upwards j which compote a 
fine Contrafl, concluding both at the fame Time (d) with one 
Hand bended and the other extended (d). This beautiful contraft- 
ed Movement changes, every Step alternately, firft one Hand and 
then the other, and is the proper Movement of die Ami in Half 

1 See the Figures in Plates X and XI, B I. f See Flaw XV, 6.L (d) See 
Plates IV, V, VI, IX, XII, XIII, XIV. B. I 

U i Coupees, 



i$6 The Art of Dakcino explatttd. 

Cnipees, Marches, Bourees, and the like ; only it muft be obfcr- 
ved that the bended Arm is the contrary Arm to the beginning 
Foot in any of the Steps (e) aforefaid, excepting backwards or tide- 
ways, becaufe then the Oppofition or Contrafi is between the fame 
Hand and Foot, as was already (hewn in treating of Walking (f). 
The Movement of the Arms round upwards t is made ufe of in 
Pirouettes, Bourees with a. Bound, and all fuch like Steps. 

Altho' there are various other Methods or Manners of moving the 
Arms in Dancing, yet asthefe, like the five Pofitions with Regard 
to the Feet, are as it were the principal, it is needlefs (nor indeed is 
it agreeable to my prefent Dengn). to enlarge, efpecially on a Sub- 
ject which, as I have already (aid, cannot be fufficiently described by 
Words but muft be compleatedby the very bc& Mafters ; and there- 
fore to avoid Trifling, as I have defcribed and given fomc Hints of the 
Method or Manner of moving the Arms which will agree with 
all the Steps made Ufe of in genteel Dancing, I /hall refer the reft 
to' the perfonal Inftrudions of a Mafter properly qualified, who 
muft compleat what is here wanting, not only in Relation to the 
Movements of the Arms but alio thole of the Feet between 
which there is, as I have already obferved, a . perfect Connexion 
and Harmony. The Fingers and Toes, fVrifts and Ancles, , El- 
bows and Knees, Shoulders and Hips, in Dancing muft move all of 
a Piece ; and in fine the Compleating of this is the End I had 
chiefly in View in compofing this Work. ;;.-..,." 



♦ 






CHAP. XV, 
Of COUNTRY DJNCING. 

00 ■ 



t * 



TH O* my original Defign was only to have fpoke of genteel 
Dancing, yet as Country Dances are at all Affemblies or Balls 
introduced as it were a Part of or belonging to the former, (and 

(e) See Plate IV, VI, IX, XII, XIV. B. L (f) See Plate XTO, B. L f See 
Plate XV, B.L .:.... 

indeed 



The Art of Dancing explained. 157 

indeed I think it may very properly be efteem'd as a luxuriant or 
carclefs Branch growing out from the other) and is become as it were 
the Darling or favourite Diverfionof all Ranks of People from the 
Court to the Cottage in their different Manners of Dancing and as 
the Beauty of this agreeable Exercife (I mean when perform'd in the 
genteel Chara&er) is very much eclipfed and deftroyed by certain 
Faults, or Omijpons, in the Performers not hitherto, if I remem- 
ber right, taken Notice of in any Books t I (hall, at the Requeft of 
fome Perfbns of Figure my Subfcribers, endeavour to point out 
thole Neglects which render this Diverfion, to fine Dancers, cither 
altogether dilagreeable, or much lefs pleafant, becaufe one or two 
Couples either through Carelefnejs, or Want of better InftruBiorts, 
will put the whole Set in Difbrdcr. 

This will always be occafioned by the Couples below thofe who 
lead up the Dance, when they omit moving up into the firft Couplet 
Places, on their calling off, and down again in their cafting up to 
their Places as at firft; or the like, if the firft or leading Couples 
crofs over and figure in. In a Word, whenever the leading Cow 
ples move downwards, the Couples coming up to lead the Dance 
mould move upwards and, when they move up again, the Out- 
pies who do not lead the Dance ought to move down again, 
attending the Motion of the Dancers going down with the Dance r 
who- in Return will attend them in like Manner, when they ar- 
rive at the upper End to dance in their Turns. The nice Obfer- 
vation of this prefents to the Beholders an agreeable Profped of the 
whole Company in Motion at once, inftead of the Confufion that 
happens when this is neglected ; as when in giving the right Hand 
and left in going round downwards from above, or upwards from 
below, inftead of continuing on and giving firft the right and then 
the left Hand to thofe you meet, you turn back, or if in Conver- 
fation with your Partner, or otherwife, you be not attentive and 
ready to begin at the Conclufion of any Part or Divifion of the 
Dance; which frequently falls out for, when the coming up Couples 
have concluded the Dance with thofe going down, they often, for- 
get that they are immediately to begin again- with- the next above 
• • - them* 






158 The Art of Dancimo explain d> 

them* and To for Want of Attention breed Confufion and at the 
fame Time expofe themfelvcs to the Spectators. 

Indeed good Breeding, in Regard to thofe with whom we dance, 
requires our not being car clefs; and yet my fair Readers and 0- 
thers I hope will excufe me, if I tell them I fear this is too often the 
Cafe, fince with due Circumfpe&ion and Care it is imponlble not 
to follow almoft any Country Dance, tho* I muft own when I was 
a Youth 1 thought it Conjuration. If we place ourfelves at the 
Bottom, and, inftead of Talking, take a Survey of the Dance, 
whatever it is in its Performance, over and over again, nrft with one 
Couple and then with another, it is impoffible, 1 fay, but we muft 
Jbe able to go down with it, when it comes to our Turns, as well 
as avoid Diforders in our gradual Afcent to the upper End; it be- 
ing only to obferve and diflinguifh one from another the Things of 
of which the different Parts of all Dances whatfoever are compofed 
whether Cafting off or up, Fsguring in, Hands acrofs or round, 
Right Hand and Left, Flying Purfuinfy Clapping of Hands,, Heys, 
Leading up or down, Back to Back, Changing of Places, Falling 
hack, Meeting again, or whatever it be, by dividing one Part of 
the above Catalogue from the other. And with a little Pra&ice 
you will foon be able not only to follow Country Dances but alio 
lead them up, tho* you never danced them before: Forlnftance, 
if a Gentleman or Lady at the upper End propofe a Dance to their 
Partner unknown to one of them, you need only aflc how it be- 
gins, and they will acquaint you, and whether it be Falling Back, 
Meeting again,, CroJJing over, or whatfoever elfe, you will readily 
perform it For this Reafon I would advife all young People and 
others who are not perfect in Right Hand and left, Figuring in y 
Heys, and the like, before they attempt to dance in Public, to 
make themfelves well acquainted with and able to perform all the 
different Parts or Divifions of Country Dancing; which they may 
privately learn amongft one another, if they don't care to pra&ifc 
in Public, and thereby not only render this Diversion more agree- 
able to themfelves, but alio mere pleating to thofe who accompany 
them in this Excrcifc* 

Befidet 



The Art ^Dancing explain J. 159 

Befides as I have before hinted, inftead of giving a confuted Idea 
to the Beholders it will afford an agreeable Landscape or Propped c£ 
fo many Pairs of fine Gentlemen and Ladies gracefully in Motion 
to the Sound of Mujic, and compleating each Part of the Dance in 
Time to the Meafure, or Strains of the Tune, as it were of one Ac- 
cord : As of even Rows longwife when falling back and meeting 
again ; half Circles, when calling off or up again ; Figures of Eight 
or Binding of a Hedge, as in Figuring in, or the Heys; irregular 
Figures, whenone flies and the other purines; found Codec; 
when Hands are joined; crofc Figures, when die right or left 
Hands are joined moving round; Beating Time inContraft, as when 
Hands are clapped firft in Time with their own, and next croflwife 
with their right Hand againfl their Partner**, or othe« aga\h clap 
their own Hands, and afterwards ftrike the left in Contraftj Lead- 
ing croflwife in Rows, in Order of marching op the Room and tie 
like down, with various other beanttful Circles «nd Figure* -' if t * 
fine Picture, beautiful Fields, cry ft al Streams, green tiw, and W 
broider*d Meadows inLandfcape or Nature itfetfTviflaffotd Iodide*- 
lightful Profpeds, how much more muft Co many well (hap'd 
Gentlemen and Ladies, richly drefs'd, in tfee'exacV Performance of 
this Exercife, pleafe the Beholders, who entertain them with fuch 
a Variety of living rVofpe&s. -•'-'. 

Having in the above Sketch, or Draught attempted to raife fome 
noble Ideas of Country Dancing, when performed in a proper Man- 
ner, and in the foregoing Inftruftions pointed out and removed 
all the moil material Faults and OmiJJions in die Performance 
of this ©ranch or our Jvt, which either ooftroct the PJeafbre'ijt 
the Dancers, or Beholders, 1 think I have finished what I defigned, 
viz. the Improvement and Pleafure of others. I (hall] therefore 
conclude this fVork, not in the leaft queftioning but my good Inten- 
tions will meet with a favourable Reception from the Public, ef- 
pecially from thole who receive Benefit or Profit thereby, 

FINIS, 



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frAdj £avrac»^u me Mu-guifs rf Aa£n ivy J£jr&H4>rt£wt*M /h>m a KINO ur" SARDINIA * 

A* fyrt-tfsfaxr-B/l/rXfArine'U, fax* t 7 «6, #*&»?**. fK* fiCUT&um* 

Wy fiutrrt-rf. *y. 7&ur mate <>tHt<?**tJcrt>ati£ ' ' ''/yz//^— **1— *>.•-..- 



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To Edward Blount t y \/h<&6'thfttm in Ms /2mnfy0f#firrftftr]f^;j0n-&tfr#r'6ff 
y/*fe4war4Blo\int-<5/r/'.' r ^A' ffla.*&f Walter Aw 3rt>/6tr.7?iit PZ4TE & matffamj/y 




a mi/o- '//Aufcr Thomas Aif'/fatfar Mtt PLATE u mattmrm/A^ eiwrifinfifytfnr maM r«^tv^«rM' ( 



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'^Jemy rvrr rAt/tfrffi/*JMf/<nr Thomas Gt«P«y fitfi\f<m an//*%ers Sv •J/rThami* GmtitJ 
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utx-rtieJfy tfar m*M otfyet/, frrtvmr. JIMbm, &w/fam <- 



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To mym/tiA rf.*i*frt*'.tJrAt/fayZ*xae* Myrton (rfGn-A* anJ Ponti*eournt «*— 
MWTGOMEllYSUIltE Xjf?a-»*(~4totr.rTfah*r&A&J!lr0t6f*:'/fc PLATE 




.7^ Corbet Owni./ Tuylmain^ine :v»^W^Tff J#//U?, *«y RiwIUTcM MOXMsMEIirsBJ/US Hu'.k^ 



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M-Afamt. V.f'<HH*. V.UprifAf. V..RomJ. 



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Whilft Tuneful Jtfyfic gives the Ear Delight, 
And Graceful Dancing charms^ ravifhd Sight, 
They give a double Force to Cupids Dart; 

Which through^Eye, makes Faflage to^ Heart 



BOOKE. 

3%&fi&rvmf Ci/TS re/trefenf tAe Figures ^"Gendemen and Ladies 
vne efeaM, in a, Flate, oj Dancing a Minuet, Aepintunf^vnvtf Reverem 
7r Bow and/irvcctdena rtptdatw an 'ed/t/u wAa/t u^n£neds/n\en?in\ 
(A* A&utfrfU eZaVXtdu and&raA^/@f^rtnien&j^£Ae y^rfermem in & 
de/ferent fr%furat andGreAe* aftAa£ CeAcA^raSed Dance, tney Aeinf cf~ 
tfundeAtw an, tsuzrt and ' *nat&endan£ < ffihiL. 

UAgft Prints are aA£ ddpn'a as firc/ur- Furniture /£/* a- Room , oj ntACa* 
/vreAt l^ter Explanation gftAe fecond Book en/rffod. The ART of DANCTJ 
ixplai n'd by READING and FlGt/RES; andwAen Aunp ufi in ifcir r*yta/ar t 
der in SPram&f nx/A J//a/&y , tAsy wti/At a faaad/SU 'and ' in/2ruc£uK> tfUpr 
finat&eneftAs. ri/A#A?jj*i\cc at anc^'tenr. 

2A%e,J 3 ZATE ?nar£ed Oisa Specimen ^Explanation aftAe Characters . 
Dancing: andtAat marked U caztfninj tAe n/Aa/t Sbrm efiAe, Minuet nn 
ten. in Characters in fit* Order de/rriAtd in £4* fecond Book under- ife* 
SZde a/irre/atd. 

2\S. 6B<>£A de& qfCutU were invt/ited and cag/ed £a Ac de/tn.ea£ed/9mn. 
fiAeJtye AyKELLOM 7 T OVZ/yxc>;rDancing-Mafter. 



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'Je my ettrrrjpfe/i'itecfolato SJC/'SiiiionEvfTY^E^iisron in //u /huttfy efDEJtBV. Jen. to At 
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t'.Ta M! Cotton, Jen & Howknd Cuaon </'Kn«ili <w «»*/• &#M? o/ ll JMKSf 'Gyfamd 'at my m*M r&»fctint>— 



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ffg fa, m&VtUHt kT^MtfiantZard George Talbot,Earl ^SWcwIbury^-Ai^wrTil^f 
Etf&Ljf7ri>,k £art ^Watrrford.fc Wexford r'» JBUSZJJVJ?;& e> mymmA JTt>twurr4JrJu<l*p 




Qpi Corbet Owen e/Ynyfonm$yimc MERIOKETHSHIKE ^lu/iimfuba MONTGOtmmxaKk 
and my ever rej/icrSsd<JcAr6ir Mifi Elizabeth Owen A J Jit/er. rti.t JPLA7X ujr*jyittfy mM* 



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The NOBIUTY and GENTRY, who uc dWiroui tlieir Childmi fhoukl Irani die CixMtrr, of DANCING, of vbj<± 
the above it ■ Specimen, and willing to honour die .■fv/A>r in learning ot him.ln.dl pay no more than y ufual Pnx* 
lor Dancing only. w.« (heir own node* one 6mi»m and an Lt/f\i LHlons: and in Proportion, if tbry ire pletfi" 
to come to him. for in his humble Opinion teaching to ^/ijr 6y £ar and mliamv ridxwtfiooA are equally wingi! 
(Right tobediicontinucd. Young Dunrmg Afy&AI alibiing be inftrudnJ in &w.1r{ oC/bwmg i-H'rra^g W Tintn^- 



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firm e/tfie Minuet. 



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naAtfirm,. 



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Zmc S rcveeveder omnium, 
firm e/mU Minuet. 



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2/%e afa&e u fa n'Aek ?/orm and read/ar (?rder ofime Minuet 
Nmttett m Characters k Figures,^./ dejerd''dm SooAlf. 



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