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Full text of "The art of planting, growing, curing and handling fine tobacco"

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PLANTING, GROWING, 



CURING AND HANDLING 



FINE TOBACCO, 



-B-^*- 



DUKHAM, N. C. 

H. E. SEEMAN's steam PRESSES., 

1886. 



AN 7 !' ^ 



Bntei^ed according to Act of Congress, in the year 1886, by K. B. Harper, in the Office of the Libra- 
rian of Congress at "Washington. 

THE AUTHOR'S CARD. 

^^'^ °vvith call your attention to the fact that heretofore having had 
his book ij,,. gj^ig^ J j^jjj j^jQ^^ enabled to present you with it through and 
)y the aid of tr.^ Business Houses advertised herein. The only favor 
ask in return fot ..,^;g ^^^^j^ jg^ ^.^ g^^^ jj^g Houses herein advertised a call 
vhen you wish any go.^^g j^^ ^l^^j^. jj^^^^ provided you can conveniently do 
io before purchasing else\> i 



J. B. WARREN & CO.'S 

GLOBE WAREHOUSE, 

DURHAM, N.C., 

Is the largest in the State. This Mammoth Warehouse has 

iriNETY-SIX SOLID SKY-LIGHTS, 

Which makes it the best lighted in North Carolina or Virginia, 
and is conceded by everybodj^ to be the best arranged for 
the convenience and comfort of farmers of any Ware- 
house in this country. Has 

UNLIMITED DEMANDS 

For all grades of Tobacco. Buys more largely than any Ware- 
house firm in Durham. If you have Bright Wrappers, Cut- 
ters, Waxy Fillers and Bright Smokers, you ought by 
all means to sell at the 

O- Xj O B E , 

A.S their demands alone calls for a large proportion of those 

grades. 

MR. C. A. W. BARHAM 



Whom you all know to be the finest Tobacco Auctioneer upon 
the ''American Continent,'' sells exclusively for this 

house. 
Your friends, 

J. B. WARREN & CO. 



J 



TH E ART OF PLANTING, GROW- 
ING, CURING AND HAND- 
LING FINE TOBACCO. 



SITUATION OF PLANT BELS. 

The growth of the plants depends a great deal on the situation of tlie 
beds, A plant bed should be located on the south or south west side of 
a stream, say a branch or creek, but far enough oft' the stream to prevent 
any overflow in case of a wet spell. 
BURNING, MANURING AND CULTIVATING PLANT BEDS. 

Plant lands should never be burned when the ground is too wet. But 
always burn when in good order. The best time to burn beds and sow 
seed is from the middle of January or the first of February until the first 
of March; but there has been very good tobacco raised from plants that 
were sown as late as the middle of March. The manuring of plant beds 
is of very much importance. Stable manure, beat up very fine with 
some kind of good guano, thoroughly mixed, is a very good fertilizer for 
plant beds. Sow the same evenlj' over the bed, after you have raked 
the coals, &c., off thoroughly; then hoe your bed thoroughly, turning up 
as little of the soil as possible. After you have prepared the bed, rak- 
ing off all the clods, sticks, &c., the bed is ready for the seed, which 
should be sown one or one and a half table spoonfuls to every one hun- 
dred square yards. Mix the seed well with about six quarts of drj- sifted 
ashes. After the seed is sown trample your bed with a weeding hoe or 
your feet. Tobacco seed requires but little covering, and when covered 
deep they will not be likely to ccme up. Drain your bed well and put on 
fine brush or canvass, (the canvass is a good deal the best,) which you 
can remove from the hed as soon as the plants are safe from frost and 
the fties. Any one can give a very good idea as to when to relieve the 
bed of its cover, but as a general thing you can take the cover from the 
bed about the first or the middle of April. You should by all means 
keep the grass and the weeds out of the bed as ihey are very injurious to 
the young jjlants. 

THE KIND OF LAND AND ITS PR/ilPARATION. 

The best land for growing fine yellow tobacco i^ of a sandy soil, with 
a deep, yellowish subsoil. In selecting land for fine tobacco always se- 
lect land free from wet, spouty places. Remember tobacco of all kinds 
requires a thorough preparation of the soil and the verj' best cultivation is 



ab.solnfely esseutral to saocesp. If you work bottom laiul break in the 
fall with a two horse plow, luriung ap as little of the subsoil as possible- 
Ff fresh land, break early in spring with a single plow. If you have: 
much vegetation plow as deep as tlie land wtU admit, turning under all 
the vegetation possible. If your land is clear of vegetation use a small 
plow as deep as the nature of ths land will admit. If there should be a 
drought repeat the plowing as often as necessary until the land is in good 
order. If new ground clean oil" all litter, trash, &c., and break with a 
cultivator or some other kind of small plovr that will turn up as little of 
the under soil as possible. Cross plow and get out all the roots, turf. 
&c. and get the laud clean and as clear of roots, trash, &c., as you pos- 
sibly can. Be sure and get your land in good condition before you set 
your plants in it. Kmi the rows three feet three inches to three feet six 
inches J You may check near or the same distance the first rows are 
apart. Any one may give a very good idea as to the width to have their 
rows, judging from the strength of their lauds. In this case tobacco is 
lik) most any other plant, the better the laud the further apart you may 
put the rows or the plants. Farm manure beat up very fine and mixed 
thoroughly w'ith Seventy-five to one hundred pounds of some good kind 
of guano to every one thousand tobacco hills is as good manure as you 
can use. Of course if the land is very poor you can use more of the guano 
and use a good quantity of the farm manure. The fertilizer should be 
covered immediately after it is put in the drill, by running two fiuTOWs 
together. Hun your plow very shallow in order to keep the lulls from 
being too high, then throw out the middles in like manner. Now if your 
beds are too hiirh make a sweep and drag them down. You can tell how 
long to have your sweep, judging from the distance your rows are apart. 
Then put the hills in order with hoes. 

PLANTING TOBACCO. 

This is a mailer of ver}' much importance and should by all means 
have strict attention. If the plants ar&iiot well planted the growth will 
be very irregular. Be very careful not to break or bruise the plants 
while drawing from the bed or putting in baskets. Never set out a plant 
that is bruised. It is a verj- important matter that you should not make 
the holes deeper than the plants are long, and be sure that the dirt is 
well put to the roots. But don't pack the dirt very hard as it will prevent 
the growth of the plants in case the weather should turn off dry. &c. 
THE CULTIVATION OF TOBACCO. 

As soon as the plants have taken root so there is no danger in killing 
or injuring in any way by working, you must commence cultivatujg it. 
The cultivation is es-ential,and must be done as early as the plants will 
admit, whether you lave auy grass or not. Plow deep enough to lo(»sen 



k 



3. 

the soil beneath ilie plants, you can also follow wi,th hoes, but be very 
careful not to work too deep near the plants. You continue wor^dng 
the tobacco with suitable plows and hoes until the tobacco gets too h rge 
to use a plow, then you continue with hoes working among it. Be very 
careful all the time from the beginning of the cultivation until laid by, 
using every precaution possible to prevent breaking or bruising the leaves. 
Xever work tobacco deep after the fi'-st plants begin to come in top. 
PRIMING TOBACCO. 
As soon as the plants are large enough to bear priming without injur- 
ing the stalk, the bottom leaves jnust be taken from the stalk. This will 
supply the plant with food and will also give the upper leaves a better 
growth. Keep up the priming until the bottom leaves are clear of the 
ground. By keeping up this treatment the tobacco will not be as trashy 
as it would be provided you failed to do so. 

TOPPING TOBACCO. 

There has been a great deal of tobacco ruined or damaged by not know- 
ing how or when to top it. Never permit it to run up or bloom before 
topping, as soon as a button appears it should be topped. Yet it is not 
necessary to wait until a button appears before topping, if the tobacco is 
of good size. If the tobacco is topped too high the bottom leaves will, 
as a general thing, burn or fire up before the top leaves get any ways 
ripe, and of course, under these circumstances, it would be a matter of 
impossibility to get much, if iiuy, good tobacco. If your tobacco i*- very 
fair the first topping will bear ten to twelve leaves, and in some cases 
where it is extra large, you may leave 14 to 16 leaves. But the later 
the season the lower you must top, in order that it may ripen before frost 
SUCKERING TOBACCO. 

Suckering tobacco should be looked after very carefully, as it is of too 
much importance to neglect. Never let the suckers get more than 
three or four inches in heighth, the older they get the tougher they be- 
come of course, and after they become old and tough it is almost a mat- 
ter of impossibility to relieve the plant of them without an injury to 
the plant in some.way, either by breakmg loose the leaves or damaging 
the stalk. 

WORMING TOBACCO. 

The importance that is attached to this part of tobacco raising is hardly 
imaginable. Common sense should teach any one that they can not 
make a crop of tobacco unless they keep the worms ofi" of it, and besides 
worm-cut tobacco will not sell for u good price on the market. Some 
people will tell you to worm your tobacco two or thiee times a week. 
But you should by all means worm yoiu- tobacco every day, provided it 



he&h it. The best time to worm tobacco is soon fn the monu'ng or lau 
in tlie afternoon, as the worms will try to hide during tiie middle of tin 
day, either bj going in the gromul or secreting themselves soniewher( 
?ibout the stalk which njalces them troublesome to find. 

CTTTiNG AND PLACING TOBACCO IX THE BARX. 
In cutting, go over the patch and ctit the plant.^ that are a.'^ near tht 
>amo siz<3 and color as possible, in order that it may cure as uniform n» 
possible, using all precaution possible to prevent breaking the leaves oi,'' 
bruising the tobacco, as bruised tobacco will be black when cored. Put 
the tobacco on sticks as you cut it; have the sticks four to four and a half 
feet li*ng. You can tell the length to hare sticks, judging from the size 
ofthabarn. Let tobacco lie on the ground long enough to prevent the. 
leaves from breaking while hauling to the barn. Put six to eight stalks 
on a stick, and place the sticks from eight to ten inches apart in the barn. 
You can put it nearer together as the weather gets cooler. It depend^^ 
somewhat on the size of tobacco as to the distance you put it. Bear in 
mind that you can not use too much care in handling tobacco while in a 
green state. 

HOW TO ARRANGE WAGON FOR CONVEYING TOBACCO 
FROM THE FIELD TO THE BARN. 

Malie a frame about twelve feet long, put four standards on each side, 
the same distance apart. Have a smooth- plank floor, lap and relap the 
tobacco, letting the sticks rest against the standards on each side. Any 
one may be their own judge as to the quantity to put on for a load. 
THE SIZE AND HOW TO BUILD TOBACCO BARNS. 

People difler a little as to the size to build barns, but 70u~ cannot select 
a better size than eighteen feet square. Select logs as straight as possi- 
ble, from six to eighi inches in diameter. It will take from eighty to 
eighty-four logs to make a barn the proper heighth. Cover with boards 
'>r shingles, of course shingles make the best co\^r, but board roofs will 
lure the best in warm weather. Chink the cracks thoroughly with wood 
and mortar. Make barn as near air tight as possible. Put the first set 
of tiers five or six feet from the ground. If the logs aijs large putin tiers 
for every three logs, if small skip four, nail on to the rafters until you 
reach the top. Put door in south side, you may put a window in both or 
one of the gable ends. Put two arches in one end, make them of rock oi 
brick, brick is the best. Extend arches about eight feet inside, one oi 
1wo feet on the outside. Ten inch piping is as good size as you can ust 
CURING TOBACCO. 

Curing tobacco is a very important matter and should by all meai: 
have the most strict attention. There is no one that can tell anotiu 



"C'XnctVy liow his tx)bacco should be cured. It makes nt> dlffereuce hov\ 
%vell his experience might have been in curing tobacco, as it depends a 
jrreat deal on tlie nature of the land, and also the condition of tobacco 
vvlien cut. as to how it will cure. xVny one in curing tobacco muse use 
tlieir own judgment to a great extent. I will give some receipts and in- 
formation that might aid any one a good deal in curing tobacco, provided 
they us« their own judgment and take all the interest in the business that 
is possible, 

FIRST RECEIPT— CURING RIPE THIM TOBACCO. 
95 degrees for 7 hours, 100 for 8 hours, 105 for 12 hours, 110 for 6 
3iours, 115 for 6 hours, 120 for 5 hours, 125 for 4 hours, 130 for 8 hours. 
135 for 6 hours, 140 for IJ hours, 145 for 1^ hours, 150 for 1^ hours, 155 
for l^v hours, 160 for 3 hours, 165 for IJ hours, 170 fo^ 1^ hours, 175 for 
1 hour, 180 to 190 until stalk and stem is thoroughly killed. 

SECOND RECEIPT— CURING RIPE THICK OR HEAVY 
TOBACCO. 

95 degrees for 7 or 8 hours, 100 for 9 or 10 hours, 105 for 13 or 14 
hours, lie for 8 hours, 115 for 6 hours, 120 for 7 hours, 125 for 5 hours. 
130 for or 8 hours, 135 for 6 hours. Proceed as in first receipt. 
THIRD RECEIPT— CURING TOBACCO THAT IS NOT 
THOROUGHLY RIPE. 

95 degrees for 9 hours, 100 for 13 hom's, 105 for 12 hours, 110 for 7 
hours, 115 for 4 hours, 120 for 6 hours, 125 for 3 hours, 130 for 6 or 8 
hours, 135 for 3 hours. Proceed as in first receipt. 
FOURTH RECEIPT— CURING TOBACCO THAT IS GREEN. 

90 degrees for 5 to 6 hours, 95 for 6 to 8 hours, 100 for 14 to 16 hours, 
remain here until the lugs begin to cure. Then move up to 110 or 115 
and remahi until the leaf yellows. Proceed as in first receipt. 
riFTH— GENERAL RECEIPT. 

Go to 95 degrees after putting fire in the barn in about two or three 
hours. Don't begin to count time until you reach 95 degrees. It is best 
to put fire iu as soon as you get the tobacco in the barn, as fermenta- 
tion takes place as soon as tobacco is cut, and the sooner it is cured ^the 
better. Tobacco will not cure well that hangs in the barn long enough 
to begin to yellow before the fire is put under it. In ciu'ing tobacco, if 
you are going too fast, the face side of the leaf will sploch, in this case 
drop back four or five degrees and remain an hour or two. Then pro- 
ceed as you first intended. If your tobacco is thoroughly ripe before you 
leave 110, see that the lugs are dry, but not cured, the middle leaves yel- 
low and the tips nearly yellow. If the tobacco is not thoroughly ripe 
the tips should be only part yellow. Y'ou can not make yellow tobacco 



6'. 

oat ofgreen tips if 3-00 cure the leaves bright. One iinportant iiiatler ii 
curing tobacco is to j'ellow the tobacco liigh euougli to expell tlie smj 
^vliile yellowing. If you are going too slow the face side of Ihf leaf wil' 
sponge or redden. If tobac-co sliould get to sweating wlfde yellowuig 
give it ventilation by opening the d«<or or making holes under the barn 
about the size of your arm or both until the sweat hag passed off. ther 
close the door and the holes and proceed as before. In exarniiiing tobai 
CO it is best to use a smooth stick. By handling it with your liands ii 
will blacken wherever you touch it. You can put tobacco nearer together 
in cool than in hot weather. Tobacco that is yellowed too low will not 
be very tough, a* a general thing wlien cured, and by going too fast thi 
oil is killed in the tobacco and it will be of les.s value. 

HANDING TOBACCO AFTER IT IS CURED. 

As soon as tobacco is cured, stem and stalk thoroughly killed, put out 
the fire. Let the tobacco remain as it is until it becomes in order so you 
can handle it without teaiing or breaking the leaves. Then move it to 
another house and bulk it down. Be careful to lay it straiglit a& it will 
look better on the market. After the tobacco has lain in bulk six or 
eight days you may hang it up very close together. Some say it is be- 
to hang up. others say let it remain as it is until you are ready to strip i; 
STRIPPING TOBACCO. 

Stripping tobacco should be performed with a great deal of care and 
jiains. as it is so very important that tobacco >sliould be nicely handled 
and well assorted. When ready to strip take as much tobacco as v 
want to strip, hang it up in a damp place, the curing barn is a good place 
to hang it until it becomes in order, so you maj handle it without break- 
ing or shattering otf. Select leaves as near the same size and color as 
possible, making from four to seven diflerent grades. Never tie mor(> 
than six leaves in a bundle unless it is common lugs or very small leave- 
In this case you may put more leaves to the Jjundle and they will lo(»k 
just as wel| or better. Then put it on well dressed sticks. Dres.<r(' 
sticks will pi'event it from tearing while puttuig on and taking olf. Vi 
may put from twenty to thiriy bundles on a stick. After the bundles ai. 
, put on the sticks you may bulk it down a day or two, being very careful 
to lay it straight, then hang it up and let it dry. Never let it lie long 
when in very high order. Don't carry your tobacco to market when in fi 
very high order unless you arc compelled to do so. If you have handled 
your tobacco nicely and assorted it well you will be more than apt to gel 
a good price for it. 



C 

I bought one of Mr. Harper's books this year aiul I cured my tobacco 
xvith his receipt<J. I am well pleased with tlie l-esult. 

W. M. BARBEE. 
Williams Mill, Chatham Co.. N. C, November 15th, 1886. 



I bought one of Mr. Harper's books and I cured the best tobacco with 
his receipts that I ever cured. I have been growing tobacco eighL years. 
I would not be without his book for $25. 

S. A. COLE. 

Hillsboro, Orange Co., N. C. 



I bought one of Mr. Harper's books this year. I cured three barns of 
iobacco with his receipts and they are the best I ever cured. I cured one 
without his receipts and it is as poor as I ever cured. 

RICHARD COTHRAN. 

Harris' Mill, Person Co., N". C. 



I bought one of Mr. Harper's books aiid cured tobacco with his receipts. 
I think they are all they are recommended to be. W. J. MAY. 

Dayton, Durham Co., N. C, Nov. 23rd, 1886. 



I bought one of Mr. Harper's books this year. I am pleased with the 
results of his receipts. BAXTER KING. 

Chapel Hill, N. C, Nov. 23rd, 1886. 



I have examined Mr. Harper's directions and receipts for curing the 
various kinds of tobacco. Having had 40 or 45 years experience in 
growing and curing tobacco, I believe this theory, is as reliable as could 
be given for curing tobacco. J. L. BLACWELL. 

Durham, N, C. 



This is to certify that I have examined Mr. R. B. Harper's treatise on 
tobacco, having had twenty-five or thirty years experience in the culti- 
vation of tobacco. I think they are as good as could be given. 

R. M, JONES, Durham, N C. 



Having had twenty-five or thirty ^^ears experience in the cultivation of 
tobacco and also in the curing and handling the same, and I further say 
that I have raised as fine tobacco as was ever raised in the State of North 
Carolina, and havhig examined R. B. Harper's treatise on tobacco, I 
sav they are as good as could be given. S. BROWNING. 

Durham, N. C, Feb. 15th, 1886. 



Having examined R. B, Harper's treatise on the culture, curing and 
handling of tobacco, I am decidedly ol opinion that new beginners and 
even those that have experience in tobacco raising will derive great ben- 
efit by following these general directions. Havmg had fifty years expe- 
rience in the cultiu'e, curing and handling tobacco. 

T. B. LYON, Jr., Durham, N. C. 



8. 

This is to certify that I have examined Jlr. R. B. Harper's treatise oi. 
rlie cultivation of tobacco, liaving hadsonie ox\>ericn.:e in raisiiiir tobiicco, 
f raised in the year of 1885, on two acres of land, live liundred and twen- 
ty dollars and eirrhty-tliree cents wortli of tobacco. One of my adjoin- 
ing neighbors raised on 2G acres of land tlie samw year cotton and it onlv 
:«oJd for $250. His treatise isundoubtedlv good. 

J. S. WILLIAMS, Ehn Grove, N. C. 

This is to certify tliat I have examined the treatise of R. 13. Harper on 
the culture, curing and management of tobacco and take pleasure in re- 
'•ommending the same as e-ntirely practicable and safe in procuring a good 
niarketnbls crop of tobacco, having had considerable e:iperiencein the 
management of tobacco in evei"y way from the planting f)f the seed to 
preparing it for the manufacturer, and being fiimiliar with tlie curing in 
particular, I can safoly say I believe his receipts are as reliable as could 
he given for the curing of tlie various kinds of tobacco. 

E. H. LYON. Durham, N. C, Feb. lOth, 188G. 

I liave exaniined Mr. R. E. Harper's trenlise on the cultivation a:i(( 
ruring of tobacco, and I consider it very well gotten up. and believe it to 
be of service to all inexperienced persons v\-ish'ing to eng;ige in the culti- 
s'ation of tobacco. Respectfully, 11. A. REAMS. 

Durliam, X. C, Feb. 17th. 188G.' 

Knowing the within named gentlemen and knowing them to be men of 
ureat experience in the culture and handling of tobacco and judging from 
their certificates I believe tliis treatise on tobacco correct. 

W. T. REDMOND, J. P., Durham. N.. C, Feb. 13th, 1886. 

Knowing the within named gentlemen and knowing then) to be expe- 
rienced m the culture of to])acco, and also perfectly reliable for what they 
say. I believe Mr. 1^. B. Harper's treatise on, tobacco of benefit to any 
one that is not thoroughly experienced in raising tobacco. 

W. A. LEA, 
Pi'opiietor of tlie Globe Warehouse, Durham. X. C. 

W. DUKE, 
The original founder of the great world renowned Duke of Durham 
Smoking Tobacco and Cigarettes. 



B. L. DUKE. 



One of the firm of Duke, .Sons & Co.. Durham. X. C. 



We know several of the parties whose certificates arc given above as 
recommending Mr. Harper's book and believe them to be reliable. 

BLACKWELL'S DURHAM TOBACCO CO. 

I know the gentlemen who have given above certificates and am sun- 
ihey not only know what is a good process for curing tobacco, and would 
not give a certificate to any treatise unless they believe it to "be a good 
one. ' * E. J. PARRIsil. 



9. 

J". Tt. C3-J^TTIS, 

Will pay in cash the highest market price for your Green and 

Dry Hides, Sheep Skin, Wool, Furs, Old Copper, Brass, 

Bones, Rags, &c., 

(SUCCESSORS TO C. M. HERNDON.) 
MARKET HOUSE, DURHAM, N. C, 

Dealers in all kinds of Fresh Meats. Highest prices paid for 

Beef, Pork, Mutton, &c. 

If you have cattle of any kind for sale you would do well to give 

us a call before disposing of them. 

Opposite E. J. Parrish's Wagon Yard, 

IS THE PLACE TO BUY YOUR GROCERIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

At Rock Bottom Prices. Call and see us before you purchase 

elsewhere. 

W. H. PROCTOR & CO. 
W. H. Proctor, formerly with A. M. Rigsbee. 

o^o xo — 

For Cheap Drj?^ Goods, Clothing, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Notions, 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, &c. 

Of Chatham, would be pleased to see all of his friends. They 
will receive polite attention. 
Respectfully, 

CHARLES ROBBINS. 
Between Railroad and Main Streets, Durham, N". C. 



10. 




Tliis is our NEW BRAND, put upon the market for the first 

time in 1886, but wherever introduced it has taken the 

FRONT RANK i.moug TOBACCO FF.R ITLIZERS. 

1st. It is made only of the VERY BEST MATERIALS known 

to the Fertilizer trade. 
2nd. It is put together with the GREATEST POSSIBLE CARE. 
8rd. It is HIGHER IN ANALYSIS Ihan any Fertilizer on the 

market, witli one or two exceptions. 
The following is the OFFICIAL Analysis of the Virginia De- 
partment of Agriculture, copied from the Official Bulletin of 
the Department, May, 1886 : 

OFFICIAL SAMPLE, NO. 1162, "CAPITAL" TOBACCO FERTILIZER. 

.Available Phosphate Acid, 9.44 per ct. 

Insoluble " " 51 per ct. 

Pota.sh, (K20.) .3.86 per ct. 

Ammonia, 3.61 per ct. 

We confidently recommend the "CAPITAL" for Tobacco, or 
wherever a strong and pushing Fertilizer is desired. Give it a 
trial. Sold for cash or on time, and laid down at the farmers 
depot, freight prepaid. S. W. TRAVERS & CO.. 

Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 



n. 



1865. 



1887. 



^Y\\S®B ^ F(^%@^g 




-6 



Continues to hold the Front Rank in the Line of Commercial 

Fertilizers, 

FOR CR0W8NC FINE BRIGHT TCBACCO. 

The constantly increasing demand for this High Grade; Standard 
Fertilizer is the best evidence of its value. 

BVEltY BAG IS GUARANTEED TO BE OF STANDARD QUALITY. 

ALLISON & ADDISON, 
Manufacturers, Richmond, Va. 



12. 

1869. ESTABLISHED 1869. 

PIEDMONT CUANO 

— F*OR — 

TOBJLGOO- 



Eighteen years experience of many of the most successful plant- 
ers in Virginia and North Carolina show conclusiv'^ely 
that for 

FINE YELLOW TOBACCO 

Nothing equals these goods. Being made expressly for this 

crop, they supply whatever is requisite to the plant in 

every stage of its 

GROWTH s MATURING. 

TH PIEDMONT GUANO AND MANUFACTURING CO. 

Office, No. 109, South Street, Baltimore, Md. 

For Sale by our gents Throughout North Carolina and Virginia. 



13. 

H. S. ZELL, President. 0. CARROLL ZELL, Vice Pres't. 

P. B. HOGE, Sec'y & Treas. 

THE ZELL GUANO COMPANY, 

OF BALTIMORE CITY, 

ZELL HIGH GRADE FERTILIZERS, 

30, Fourth Street, 



The best goods on the market for Tobacco or Cotton Crop. For 
sale at Durham, Oxford and other prominent points in North 

Carolina. 

SEE A FEW CERTIFICATES BELOW: 

Flat River, Durham Co., N. C, Nov. 27, 1885. 
Mr. C. J. Rogers. 

Dear Sir. — I take pleasure in stating that I have, for the past 
two years, used Zell's Fertilizer by the side of other standard 
grades, and find it better than any of them. LEE MANGUM. 



Brooklyn, Va., Oct. 19, 1885. 
Zell Guano Co., Baltimore, Md. 

Sirs. — Yours to hand, and in reply I consider your Guano the 
best in market; for this reason, I used two hundred and twenty 
odd sacks. Yours very truly, J. A. OSBORN. 



Madison, N. C, Oct. 23, 1885. 
The Zell Guano Co. 

• Dear Sirs. — I used your goods with two other brands, and can 
say the tobacco ripened yellow and better with j^our goods than 
any others, and I like it very much. JAMES OLIVER. 

Kentuck P. O., Pittsylvania Co., Va., Oct. 14, 1885. 
The Zell Guano Co.. Baltimore, Md. 

Gentlemen. — I ha\e used j^our Tobacco Fertilizer for several 
years, and consider it superior to any for tobacco. 

Yours, &c., W. J. BROWN. 



Brooklyn, Va., Oct. 26, 1885. 
The Zell Guano Co. 

Q-ents. — I used your Guano last season, and am so well pleased 
with it that I expect to use it again the coming season. 

Yours truly, E. COLLEY. 



u. 

STOUT, GOODWIN & CO., 

MACHINISTS AND FOUNDERS, 

Railroad Street, Near Passenger Depot, 



Machine and Foundry Work of every description. Piping and 

Plumbing a specialty. Machinists Supplier. Shafting, 

Valves, Pulleys, etc., always on hand. 

has had 17 years experience in repairing Cotton and Mill Ma- 
chinery, and we are well prepared to do that class of work, 
whether large or small. Entire satisfaction guaranteed. 

PRICES AS LOW AS WORK CAN BE DONE. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL GROCER, 

AND AGENT FOR 

TINSLEY'S SPECIAL TOBACCO FERTILIZER. 



Has always on hand a large stock of Farmer's Supplies, Boots, 

Shoes, Dry Goods, &c. 

Opposite Cariington's corner, near the Railroad. Give me a call 

when you come to Durham. 

J. ^y. MAKKHAM, 

Durham, N. C. 

\V. T. BLACK WELL, V. A. WILEY, 

President. Cashier. 



Offers facilities to the public equal to any Bank in Nortit 

Carolina. 



15. 



Durham eacketstorE 

Offered b}^ no other house ia town. We have frequently been 

U3ked, by the most careful buyers, how we could sell goods 

so remarkably low. 

To this inquiry is this : We have established in New York city 

a purchaser, with cash in hand, whose business it is to look 

after everj'^ house on the verge of bankruptcy and ruin, to 

buy the lump, or in lots, every class of merchandise 

which we can get at less than i1 s value. 

Hence the astonishingly low prices at which we sell. Call and 

examine our stock before buying elsewhere. 

Respectfully, 

PAGE, WHEELER & CO. 



MEALS, FIFTY CENTS EACH. 



Convenient to all Warehouses. 

W. J. POGUE, Proprietor. 

TERRY ^ PLEASAITT'S ~ 

PARRISH STREET, 
ID XT 2^ H -A. 3^ , 3Sr. O. 



They carry the largest, purest and best stock of Whiskey, Bran- 
dy, Beer, Ale, Wines, Cigars, Tobacco, &c., to be found in 

the State. 



16. 



THAT EVERY GROWER OF FINE YELLOW TOBACCO 
SHOULD CAREFULLY READ. 



Fine Yellow Tobacco ia too valuable a crop for any planter to take risks on, and 
he is not -wise to iuvest in a fertilizer that time has not thoroughly tested, and 
proved. It is not enough for such a fertilizer to "analyze" -well (for the most indif- 
ferent materials "analyze" as well as the best); its elements must be of the right 
sort, and put together in the right way, to produce the best resuits in the field. 
Two things must be specially provided for in such a fertilizer : First, it must 
feed the plant with regularity from the beginning to the end of the crop, (not 
start off with a flirt and wind up with a poor, chaffy leaf); anJ second, it must 
burn the plant as little as possible in dry weather. Now all thi.s is secured by 
the use of the 

"ANCHOR m. BRAND" 
TOBACCO FERTILIZER! 

It has had twenty years of successful use, is the most complex 
article ever made for tobacco, furnishing the food needed as 
called for, and the universal judgment on it is that it stands a 
DROUGHT BETTER than any other fertilizer ever oflTered for this 
crop. The crop of 1886 encountered the contrarj^ namely, a 
very wet season, but the reports on the "ANCHOR BRAND" 
continue good in spite of this drawback. Both warehousemen 
and manufacturers commend the tobacco grown b}' this fertili- 
zer for its special excellence in color, size, weight and tex- 
ture ; in few words, it always brings "the top of the market." 
Let no one prevail on you to use anything else on this crop ; you 
can^t afford to incur the peril. The "ANCHOR BRAND" is 
furnished in lots to suit by 

JOHN L. MARKHAM, 

DURHAM, N. C. 
SOUTHERN FERTILIZING COMPANY, 
Richmond, Va. 



CALL AND BUY YOUR GOODS OF 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 



He always guarantees the best goods at the lowest prices and 
keeps a large and j&rst-class line of almost everything. 

J". T. "V^OIMZBLE, 

DURHAM, N. C, 

GENERAL HARDWARE. 

STOVES, PAINTS, OILS, CROCKERY, WOOD AND 
WILLOW WARE. 

OALIi AIB EIAMIHE MY STOeK, 

E. M^MURRV 

TIN SMITH, I, 

Is prepared to do all kinds of Tin, Sheet Iron and Copper work. 

Tin Roofing and Guttering a specialty. Tobacco Flues in 

Season. Work solicited from all parts of the country. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

-VvT. HI. SIOXjIjO^V^^^^, 

Green Street, near the Old Academy, 

GENERAL BLACKSMITH. 

Horse Shoeing a Specialty. Thirty years experience warrants 

me in saying that I understand mj^ business. When you 

wish any work in my line I would be pleased to have 

you call to see me. 





LIBRftRY OF CONGRESS 




002 763 726 7 



Dr. N. M. JOHNSON & CO. 

GUARAITTEE TO SELL 



11 



As Pure and Cheap Meilicines? as any House in the State. Also Heavy 

Drugs, such as 

Soda, Salts, Oils, Tobacco, Cigars, Cigarettes, &c. 

MANGUM STREET, NEAR MAIN. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



IS. A. inrHITiiKISR, 

idtje^h-A-im:, zsr. o., 

[Two doors below Morehead's Bank,] 

Dealer in Pianos, Organs, Guitars, Violins, Flutes, Accordeons, 
Sewing Machines. &c. 

Instalment Plan, $1.25 a Week will Buy You an Organ. 

THE DURHAM FURNITURE WFO COMPANY, 

DURHAM, N. C, 

AV'holesale and Retail 

Dealers in all kind of 

PARLOR, CHAMBER, 

DINING ROOM AND 
KITCHEN FURNITURE, 
AND WINDOW 
V SHADES. 

Clocks, Pictures and Mattresses a Specialty. 
Metalic Caskets, Burial Cases and Cofl&ns. 

ALL GOODS SOLI) FOR CASH OR ON INSTALMENTS.