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Full text of "The Ashburian 1962"

THE 

ASHBURIAN 




ASHBURY COLLEGE 
OTTAWA 



VOLUME XL VI 



1962 



THE 
ASHBURIAN 




ASHBURY COLLEGE 
OTTAWA 



VOLUME XLYI 



1962 



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THE ASH BU RI AN 



THE MEMORIAL WINDOW 

In Memory of Canon G. P. Woollcombe, M.A., LL.D. 

Founder, and Headmaster of Ashbury College from 1S91 to 1933 

Unveiled and Dedicated October 29th, 1961 

by the Venerable Archdeacon C. G. Hepburn, B.A., B.D., D.C.L., M.C., E.D., C.B.1 . 



An Explanation of the Design 

At the top of the upper windows there are seven symbolic designs. 
From left to right they consist of: the Crown and Palm, for Wisdom; 
Ivy for Fidelity; a Vine symbolizing the Blood of Christ; a Sheaf of 
Wheat symbolizing the Body of Christ; Oak leaves for Strength; A 
Cross and Wreath signifying Peace. 

The four crests refer to Canon Woollcombe's academic affiliations 
— Bishop's University, Oxford, McGill and Ashbury. 

The three large windows illustrate Canon Woollcombe's lifelong 
activities as Teacher, Preacher and Counsellor. 

In addition to the pictorial representations of Canon Woollcombe, 
the large left hand window includes the Torch of Light; the top of the 
Centre window shows a Spiritual Flame, with the School Motto in the 
Circle surrounding Canon Woollcombe, and the present Ashbury 
bu Idmgs in the background. 

The Lamp of learning is shown at the top of the right hand 
window. 

All symbols described above are indicative of the Character and 
lifelong activities of the Founder. 

The Memorial Window is a gift of the School. 

Artist — Leonard Pike, Ottawa. 

The following members of the Woollcombe family were present 
at the Unveiling: Mr. and Mrs. Philip Woollcombe, and their daughters 
from Montreal; Captain George A. Woollcombe and Mrs. Woollcombe 
from Montreal; Mrs. Abbott-Smith, a daughter, and her son, Ottawa, 
Mrs. W. H. Brodie, a daughter, accompanied by Mr. Brodie and their 
ron from Toronto. 



4 THE ASHBURI AN 

ASHBURV COLLEGE 

Rockci.iffe Park, Ottawa, Canada 

Visitor 
Field Marshal, the Right Honourable Earl Alexander of Tunis, K.G. 

The Board of Governors 

S. C. Evans. M.D. .__.. Ottawa 

Colonel J. D. Fraser, V.D . Pembroke 

S. G. Gamble, Esq., B.Eng _ _ Ottawa 

E. W. T. Gill, Esq., B.Sc - __ - _ Ottawa 

R. E. L. Gill, Esq. - Ottawa 

R. O. MacFarlane, Esq., M.A., Ph.D Ottawa 

Donald Mclnnes, Esq., B.A, LL.B., Q.C Halifax 

J. Campbell Merrett, B.Arch., M.R.A.I.C, M.T.P.I.C Ste. Anne de Bellevue 

Professor D. C. Munroe, M.A - _ Ste. Anne de Bellevue 

E. P. Newcombe, Esq., B.A., Q.C _ Ottawa 

A. J. Perlev-Robertson, Esq., B.A Ottawa 

The Right Reverend E. S. Reed, M.A., D.D., D.C.L. ..... Ottawa 

D C. Southam, Esq _ _ _ Montreal 

G. T. Southam, Esq..... Vancouver 

E. P. Taylor, Esq., B.A Toronto 

Executive Committee 

C. G. Gale, Esq., B.Com., C.A .Ottawa 

\1. E. Grant, Esq., A.F.C. Ottawa 

W. A. Grant, Esq _ _ Montreal 

G. D. Hughson, Esq., B.Sc.E., P.Eng., Vice-Chairman ...Ottawa 

R. M. Johnson, Esq., B.Eng., P.Eng., M.E.I.C Ottawa 

A. B. R. Lawrence, Esq., M.C., B.C.L., Q.C, Chairman Ottawa 

Donald Maclaren, Esq., B.Sc, P.Eng., Secretary _ Buckingham 

1). K. Mac lavish, Esq., O.B.E., Q.C Ottawa 

I C. D. Palmer, Esq. Ottawa 

Commodore \\ . G. Ross, CD., R.C.N. (Retired) .„ Ottawa 

R. \Y. Southam, Esq., B.A., M.S. Ottawa 

Captain G. A. Woollcombe, CD., R.C.N. (Retired) Montreal 

S. F. \1. Wotherspoon, Esq., 15. A., Q.C Ottawa 



B*^*"? 3 



J K*W#ji 



S I AFF 
Back Row. M. Gerrie, II. S. Dalton, R. L. Lancaster, A. deK. Varent, \1. P>. Wans- 

brough, J. L. Black, I.. I. H. Spencer, S. M. Daratha, J. C. Hughes, M. Beique. 
Front Ron-: Miss I. Woodburn, R. J. Anderson, Rev. K. B. Monks, J. J. Marland, 

Sr. Master, A. B. Belcher, Sr. Housemaster, A. I). Brain, Asst. Headmaster, R. H. 
Perry, Headmaster, L. H. Siblev, Director of Studies. I). I.. Polk, Jr. Housemaster, 
A. H. N. Snelsjrove, I. C. Pemberton. Mrs. F. Hunter, Mrs. H. S. Dalton. 



PREFECTS 

Back Ron-. S. M. O. Parker, D. A. Steven, K. G. Woollev, T. N. Coristine, J. I. Bethune, 
G. P. G. Haslam, I. M. Ewing. 

Front Row. X. M. Lynn, P. M. Gillean, Capt. of the Boarders, S. G. R. Pottinger, 
Co-Capt. of the School, R. H. Perry, Esq., Headmaster, A. F. Gill, Co-Capt. of the 
School, C. A. Flood, Capt. of the Day Boys, X. R. Blackburn. 

Absent: J. R. Booth. 




THE ASHBURI AN 



ASHBURIAN STAFF 




Editor 
G. Haslam 




Editor in Chief 
A. B. Belcher, Esq. 




Literary Editor 
I. Ewing 




Photographic Editor Asst. Photo. Editor 
D. A. Steven J. Smethurst 



Sports Editors 
J. Bethune, J. Levitz 




Business Manager 
J. S. Irvin, Esq. 



Clerical Assistants: T. Fi.ynn; K. Roberts; M. Whipps 



THE ASHIiL'RIAN 



TABLE OF CON 1 I N I s 



I' u.i 

Board of Governors .... 4 

Ashburian Staff 6 

Staff S 

School Officers 9 

Editorial 10 

School Notes 1 ! 

Mothers' Guild 14 

Chapel Notes 15 

In Memoriam 21 

Science Tours 22 

Commonwealth Youth 

Movement 25 

Debating 27 

Public Speaking 29 

Poetry Reading 30 

Conferences 31 

School Play 34 

School Dance 37 

Cadet Inspection 38 

Sports 

First Football 43 

Second Football 47 

First Soccer 48 

Under 15 Soccer 51 



I'M. I. 

First I locke) 53 

Second Hockey 57 

Skiing 59 

Basketball 61 

Cross-Country 63 

Tennis 64 

First XI Cricket 65 

Under 16 Cricket 67 

Track 68 

House Competitions .... 69 

Old Boys' Section 71 

Prefects 79 

Form Photographs 83 

Among the Graduates .... 85 

Readover 89 

Sports Day 89 

Prize List 90 

Colours 95 

Closing Day Exercises .... 98 

Valedictory 99 

Literary Section 103 

Junior Ashburian 121 

Her Majesty, the Queen Mother 167 

School Roll 168 

Exchanges 1 "4 



THE ASHBURIAN 



STAFF 

Headmaster 
R. H. Perry, B.A., Toronto, M.A., Columbia 

Assistant Headmaster 

A. D. Brain, B.A., Toronto 

Exeter College, Oxford 

Director of Studies 

L. H. Sibley, B.Sc, .McGill 

M.C.I. C, F.C.S. 

Senior School Housemaster 
A. B. Belcher, R..Y1.C, Kingston 

Senior Master 

J. J. Marland, A.C.P., Dip.Ed., London 

English Teaching Certificate 



SENIOR SCHOOL 



R. J. Anderson, 

Army P. T. College 
J. L. Black, B.A., 

Mount Allison, ALA., Boston 
H. S. Dalton, 

University of King's College 
Rev. K. B. Monks, B.Sc, 

Agr., AicGill, S.Th., University 

of Toronto 



I. C. Pemberton, B.A., 

Bishop's University, University 

of Toronto 
A. H. N. Snelgrove, Mount Allison, 

Newfoundland Teaching Certificate 
Arnaud de Kerckhove Varent, B.A., 

Brussells, B.Ed., Ottawa 
M. B. Wansbrough, B.A., 

Bishop's University 



MIDDLE AND JUNIOR SCHOOL 

M. Beique, B.A., McGill 

M. Gerrie, B.Sc, Dubuque, Iowa 

R. L. Lancaster, B.Sc, Wittenberg, Ohio 

JUNIOR SCHOOL 

Housemaster 
D. L. Polk, B.A., Dartmouth 

Associate Housemaster 

L. I. H. Spencer, B.A., Sydney, Australia 

State Teacher's Certificate (Hon.), 

Victoria 



\Iks. H. S. Dalton, 

University of Toronto 
S. M. Daratha, 

Saskatoon Teachers' College, 

First Class Certificate 

Music 

Irene Woodburn Wright 

Mus. Bac, Bishop's, A.R.C.T., R.M.T. 

Godfrey Hewitt, F.R.C.O. 



J. C. Hughes, B.A., 

Western, Ontario Teacher's 

Certificate 
Mrs. E. B. Hunter, 

Ottawa Normal School 

Nurse-Matrons 

Miss E. M. Bray, Reg.N. 

Miss M. J. Lewington 



Physicians 

C. K. Rowan-Legg, M.D., McGill, D.C.H., England, F.A.A.P. 

C. B. Petrie, M.D. 

Remedial Readifig 
Miss S. Solomon, M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tenn. 

Executive Assista?it 
J. S. Irvin, R.M.C. 

Bursar 

Mrs. W. S. Prm.i 



Accountant 
Robert Hols 



Headmaster's Secretary 
Miss P. A. Caldwell 

School Secretary 
\1ks. V. E. Gensey 



THE ASH H U Rl AN 



SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Co-Captains of the School 

S. G. R. I'm unci k 
\. F. Gill 



Captain o\ the Hoarders 
P. \\. (inn \s 



Captain <>\ the Day Boys 
C. \. Flood 



J. I. Bethune 
N. R. Blackburn 

J. R. Booth 



Prefects 
T. N. Coristini 

I. VI. I WING 

G. P. G. Haslam 
\. \I. Lynn 



S. \l. (). I J \KK.H 

I). A. Steven 
K. G. Wool 1 1 i 



Woollcombe 
A. F. Gill 



House Captains 

Comumght 

S. G. R. PoniNGER 



Alexander 

T. N. CORISTINF. 



P. M. GlI.LEAN 



Vice-Captains 
C. A. Flood 



T. \1. I U IM. 



Football 
R. V. Berry 

Hockey 
R. B. Logie 



Games Captains 

Skiing 
T. N. Coristine 

Cricket 
S. G. R. Pottinger 

Tennis 
R. V. Berry 

CADET CORPS 

Officer Commanding 
C/Maj. F. G. Oxley 

Second in Command 
C/Capt. G. I. Speedie 

Guard Commander 
C/Lt. A. J. Anderson 

Adjutant 
C/C\pt. A. Y. Gill 



Basketball 
J. D. O. Henry 

Soccer 
C. R. Davidson 



Platoon Commanders 
C/Liei is. K. (i. Woolley, J. I. Bethune, R. B. I ogii 



Company Sergeant Major 

C/W02 P. M. CilM I NN 

Quartermaster Sergeant 
C/S/Sgt. J. A. Tyihr 



Drum Major 
C/S/Sgt. H. P. Flam 

G.C. Flax I' arty 
C/Lt. J. M. Letch 



10 



THE ASHBURIAN 



EDITORIAL 

Among the many sunny statements made from the platform on Closing 
Day (announcements of accomplishments in the year just past, and favour- 
able auguries of things to come), one of the most warming was implicit in 
the remarks of the Chairman of the Board of Governors, Mr. A. B. R. 
Lawrence. 

Mr. Lawrence announced that the building programme was again afoot 
— an extension to the physics laboratory. This is good news indeed, as our 
present lab, though one of the most modern and best equipped school labs 
in Ontario, has been pronounced inadequate in space for the demands that 
are likely to be made on its capacity. Plans are already in blueprint for its 
extension to twice the present size, and we have every hope that it will be 
ready to function at the beginning of the Fall term. 

These are times of copious expansion and lavish expenditures. A 
number of the Independent Schools of Ontario have recently succeeded in 
raising substantial sums for additions to their plants, and it is gratifying to 
feel that we, too, are on the springboard. It is perhaps indicated that this 
enterprise marks only the first of many progressive vaults. 

We learn, for instance, that another project under consideration is the 
acquisition of an artificial ice rink. Hockey practices in rented rinks at 
some distance from the school are expensive in transportation and wasteful 
in time. It would be of tremendous advantage to our hockey players did 
we own, in whole or in part, a rink that was conveniently accessible for our 
daily use. 

Our present library represents another deciency which will, we feel 
sure, be presently remedied. As it stands it is completely inadequate, but 
Stage 3 of Argyle Building Plans will include space for a replacement in this 
vital department of educational development. 

In speaking of Argyle, it is interesting to reflect that as a result of the 
enterprise and confidence of the Headmaster and Board of Governors this 
building was one of the first post war constructions added in any of the 
Ontario Independant Schools, and was erected at a time when contribution 
funds were particularly hard to come by. Nevertheless, it must be admitted 
that in the intervening years tremendous sums (about 8 million dollars) have 
been collected by these other schols and have been mainly applied to build- 
ing projects. That is why we say, with gratitude to those responsible, we 
are delighted to surmise that we are once more on the march toward badly 
needed additions and improvements to the plant. 

But— the old and ugh' question rears its head: Where is the money 
coining from? In answer to this question we feel confident that when the 
Master Plan of building and improvement is developed and presented to 
Old Boys, friends and parents of Ashburv, the necessary funds will be 
forthcoming. 

The years 1966 will mark the 75th anniversary of Ashburv. Let us 
work toward making it a tremendous year in the history of our school. 



THE ASHBURIAN 11 

SCHOOL NOTES 

OPENING DAY 
September 7th, 1961 marked the beginning of Ashbury's seventy- 
first year. About two hundred and seventy boys were present for the 

Headmaster's opening remarks. Mr. Perry welcomed old and new 
hoys to the school, and remarked on the beaming health of all. He 
went on to remind us that Ashburv, representing a very important stage 
in our lives, was certainly fun most of the time, but was primarily in 
existence to prepare us for university. During the year, Mr. Perry said, 
we should always keep our goals clearly in sight, and work diligently 
toward them. 

On Friday, September 9th, Mr. A. B. R. Lawrence, Chairman of the 
Board of Governors, visited the school, and addressed us in Argyle. 
Air. Lawrence, by means of his easy and friendly manner, immediately 
established himself as a popular chairman. His popularity was enhanced 
still more when he asked Mr. Perry to grant us a half holiday. 

With the opening proceedings completed, books were amassed, 
classes settled, and the year began. 

STAFF CHANGES 

At the beginning of the school year, the following new members 
joined the staff: Messrs. J. L. Black, M.A.; M. Gerrie, B.Sc.; S. M. 
Daratha, Saskatoon Teachers' College; A. de K. Varent, B.A., B.Ed.; 
M. Beique, B.A.; R. L. Lancaster, B.Sc.; M. B. Wansborough, B.A. 

At the end of the school year, we shall be losing the services of 
Mr. M. Gerrie, who is planning to study for the profession of medicine 
at McGill, and Mr. J. C. Hughes, who will be teaching at Smith's Falls. 
We wish them both 'all the best'. 

HEALTH 

This year there were no epidemics at the school, thanks to the work 
of Dr. Rowan-Leoror School Physician and Miss M. Bray, School Nurse. 
Although there were periodic minor illnesses and several unfortunate 
sports injuries, it is safe to say that 1961-r>2 was an excellent year in the 
way of health. 

WEDDINGS 

On Saturday, September 2nd at City View United Church, the 
wedding was solemnized between Irene Woodburn .\nd Charles Porter 
Wright. 

Miss Woodburn has been teaching piano and music appreciation at 
Ashburv for eighteen years and is one of Ottawa's most accomplished 
concert pianists. Mr. Wright holds an executive position with the 
C. B. C. 



12 



THE ASH BU Rl AN 




SENIOR COMMON ROOM 

This school year, 1961-1962, has been one of marked improvement 
in the facilities and organization of the Upper School Common Room. 
In September, it appeared that the Common Room would carry on, as in 
the past, in a state of smokey chaos. This however, was not the case. 

Early in the year, Mr. Snelgrove stepped in as staff advisor to the 
members, and the astounding change in the Common Room's layout 
since then has been a continual source of amazement to all visiting Old 
Boys. Through the co-operation of the school and its organizations, 
particularly the Mother's Guild, which made a generous donation, the 
Common Room Committee has been able to obtain a console T.Y., a 
large handsome rug, an easy chair, and a large couch. Besides these, 
many other sundries such as a clock, lamps and modern ashtrays have 
been added. With careful arrangement and the addition of many 
colourful pennants, we have been able to reside quite comfortably this 
vear. 

However, we hope that this is just the beginning. A handsome, 
modern Upper School Common Room, one in which comfort is no 
problem, could do a great deal to stimulate the student attitude towards 
school. Classrooms are places for work and not relaxation, but a 
Common Room is specifically for relaxation. It is hoped that, with this 
year's improvements as a beginning on which to work, the student 
members of the Ashbury College Upper School Common Room will be 
able to carry on the refinements. Such things as wall panelling and a 
proper notice board are example objectives for the future. 



THE ASH HU RI AN B 

GIFTS 

The school acknowledges with gratitude the following gifts: 

Two framed drawings from the graduating class of 1961. The 
drawings are by the artist, Hawston— one representing "an Iceberg" and 
the other a group of Eskimo figures. 

A rose bowl and two candle-sticks in memory of Florence Bain- 
bridge, from her daughter, Mrs. Audrey luster. 

A number of library books donated by the Carr-I Iarris boys. 

An annual prize in memory of Robert Gerald Moore, to be awarded 
for Grade 12 English, arranged through the Mothers' Guild. 

A portrait of the I leadmaster, painted by Robert I [yndman, a gift 
from the artist. 

The H. S. Southam Scholarship— a gift of Mrs. I). K. MacTavish. 
Mrs. F. H. Toller, Mr. G. T. Southam and Mrs. R. \V. Southam in 
memory of their father. 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The following organizations haye expressed their thanks for the 
use of Ashbury College and its facilities for a variety of functions during 
the past year. 

The Royal Commonwealth Society. 

The Ottawa Humane Society. 

The English-speaking Union 

The External Affairs Wiyes' Association 

The Canadian Save the Children Fund. 

The Public School Athletic Association. 

THE RETROSPECTS 

In addition to the usual fare of movies and parties this year, we 
were treated to unusual entertainment in the harmonious arts through 
the formation of a new singing group. On March 2, G. P. Haslam. 
D. A. Steven and E. H. Stewart were in a taxi on their way to an ex- 
ternal examination in Ottawa. To raise their flagging spirits, Steven 
struck up a few chords on a guitar with which he happened to be 
equipped at the time, three voices were raised in harmony, and The 
Retrospects were born. 

Three weeks later B. J. Merrett replaced Stewart, as the former 
provided a welcome banjo accompaniment to supplement Steven's 
cru'tar and Haslam's bongos. 

On the 27th of the month the group played in the Argyle Auditor- 
ium before an enthusiastic and appreciative audience of their school- 
fellows. This reception was most encouraging as such an audience 
might well have been critical and derisiye. It was just the opposite. 

On Easter Day the group, whose members live in Montreal, played 
over CKYL radio from the Veterans' Hospital, later at a Parents' Re- 



14 



THE ASHBU RI AN 




ception here at the school, and again at another "end of term get- 
together" on June 5th. 

The summer holds great prospects for The Retrospects; an audition 
tape at CKOY on June 30th seems the most important at the moment. 

We would like to express our appreciation and good wishes to a 
venture that is interesting, entertaining and worthwhile. 



MOTHERS' GUILD 

Hon. President, Mrs. R. H. Perry; President, Mrs. D. G. Partridge; 1st Vice- 
President, Mrs. K. G. Thorne; 2nd Vice-President, Mrs. J. E. Copeland; Secretary, 
Mrs. J. W. Roche; Treasurer, Mrs. A. L.Thurlow; Convenors: Social, Mrs. E. A. Flood; 
Sewing, Mrs. E. L. Deacon; Membership, Mrs. F. R. Thurston; Telephone, Mrs. S. G. 
Gamble. 



The Mothers' Guild has had an energetic and successful year. 
Eight meetings were held altogether, two of these being in the evening; 
these last proved to be popular with members unable to come in the 
afternoon. Mr. Perry, Mr. Polk, and Mr. Anderson each gave the 
Guild interesting talks on various aspects of Ashbury life. 

Amongst the Guild's activities were the Annual Clothing Sale, the 
circling for the Old Boys 1 Luncheon in the fall term, and the Spring Tea 
and Bike Sale held early in May. The resulting increase in funds made 
it possible for the Guild to give to the Junior School a ping-pong table, 
to the Senior Common Room furnishings, to the Library a donation for 
new books, and to the School Bursary Fund a sizeable sum. 

The School wishes to express its grateful thanks to these ladies for 
their strenuous and successful labours in the interests of the School. 



T H E A S H B V R I A N 



15 




CHAPEL NOTES 

The chapel has again been a source of inspiration and an uplifting 
influence for the whole school. It's daily prayer and regular services 
are one of the many things that make Ashburv a better school. A num- 
ber of distinguished clergy have been our guests. 



Sept. 17 Rev. Frank Lawler 

Oct. 1 Rev. L. S. Baird 

Oct. 22 Rev. F. Q. McGregor 

Oct. 29 Archdeacon G. G. Hepburn 

Nov. 19 Rev. A. Brewer 

Nov. 26 Rev. J. Plante 

Jan. 21 Rev. R. Bodger 

Jan. 28 Rev. Malcolm Hughes 

Feb. 25 Rev. Group Captain E. S. Light 

Mar. 11 Rev. Kent Clarke 

April 30 Rt. Rev. E. S. Reed 

May 6 Rev. James Winters 

May 10 Archdeacon G. G. Hepburn 

May 13 Rev. Malcolm Peers 

May 27 Rev. John Fowler 



St. Margaret's, Ottawa 

St. George's, Ottawa 

St. Martin's 

Retired 

St. John's Church 

St. Luke's, Ottawa 

Beaurepaire, P.O. 

St. Matthias, Ottawa 

Director of Religious Administration 

(P) R.C.A.F. 
Diocesan Director of ReUgious Education 
The Bishop of Ottawa 
Diocesan Hospital Chaplain 
Retired 

Diocesan University Chaplain 
St. Thomas' Church, Ottawa 







CHOIR 

The Chapel Choir has again been a credit to the Chapel and the 
School. Our congratulations to Mr. Godfrey Hewitt and Airs. H. S. 
Dalton for what they have accomplished. 

Sunday by Sunday and day bv day the choir has sung to the glory 
of God, helping make their services beautiful and inspiring. 

The highlight of the year was their visit to Government House 
where they sang several selections for their Excellencies, the Governor 
General and Lady Vanier. 

The visit included a tour of the house and grounds, a half hour in- 
formal v'sit with their Excellencies and refreshments. 

The Choir also sang at Christ Church Cathedral and at St. Barthol- 
omew's Church. 




T HE ASH B U Rl A N 



11 




CONFIRMATION CLASS 
Back Ran-. B. Davies, P. C. Stein, G. E. Sigvaldason, G. R. Y. Benskin, A. J. Sark, 

D. H. Nettleton, G. D. Barber, A. VV. Currie, A. G. E. C. Patton. 
Third Row. R. D. Johnson, C. E. D. Groos, J. R. Smethurst, D. A. Shaw, C. A. G. Lodge. 

J. F. D. Fisher, B. G. Dean, D. A. Havlev, T. W. L Cumming. 
Second Row. D. H. Maclaren, H. J. R. Pyefinch, B. D. G. Speedie, J. D. Mulaner, 

J. V. P. Hearne, J. S. Coristine, T. G. P. Cann, R. P. Rossv. 
Front Row. .Miss D. M. Ellis, Miss A. A. Laidler, Rev. K. B. Monks, Rt. Rev. E. S. Reed, 

Miss P. J. Pratlev, Miss E. A. Chaplin, Miss B. A. Fletcher. 



CONFIRMATION 

The Rite of Confirmation or ''laying on of hands" took place on 
April 30th at eight P.M. The Right Rev.^. S. Reed, M.A., D.D., Lord 
Bishop of Ottawa, and a governor of the School, confirmed twenty-five 
Ashbury boys and five Elm wood girls. So many friends and parents 
were present, many from out of town and as far away as Bermuda and 
the Southern States, that the chapel was filled to overflowing; with 
visitors alone. 

The Bishop also presented Servers' Medallions to Ian Andrew and 
Brian Merrett for meritorious service. 

The Candidates who had received weekly instruction throughout 
the year were presented to the Bishop by the School Chaplain. 

Following the Service, refreshments were served in the School 
Dn'ng Room. 

The adult Baptism of St. Adrian John S.irk rook place during 
morning prayer on Sundav, March eighteenth in the Chapel. 



18 



THE ASHBURIAN 




SERVERS 

Back Row. J. M. Letch, E. F. Burritt, A. P. D. Gamble, D. J. Mulaner, F. C. Stewart, 
A. W. Anderson, N. M. Lynn, D. G. Love, T. G. P. Cann, N. R. Blackburn. 

Front Row. D. S. Hanna, I. R. Andrew, R. T. Dickson, Rev. K. B. Monks, B. J. Merrett, 
T. B. Johnston, S. G. R. Pottinger. 

Absent: P. M. Gillean. 



PLAQUES DEDICATED 

On Sunday, Feb. 25 The Rev. Group Capt. E. S. Light, R.C.A.F., 
dedicated the following wall plaques: 

To the Glory of God and in loving memory of 

MICHAEL JAN DENNIS 

July 11, 1952 - March 13, 1961 
Erected bv his parents and the staff and students 

To the Glory of God and in loving memory of 

FREDERICK OLIVER 

Dec. 3rd, 1887 - April 20th, 1961 

A devoted employee of Ashbury for fortv years. 

Erected by the School 

The New Hymn Board was also dedicated. 

In Loving Memory 

LIEUT. HUGH MASSEY BAKER, R.C.E. 

Born Oct. 22, 1920, Killed on Active Service March 5th, 1942. 
A gift to Ashbury from his parents. 

The School was represented by many boys and staff at the funeral 
of Robert Moore. 



The School Chaplain conducted the service. 



TH E ASH B V R I AN J9 

DEDICATION OF THE MACE 

The new Mace tor rhc Cadet Corps Band was dedicated in the 
Chapel on Inspection Day, May tenth, by rhc Ven. Col. G. G. 1 [epburn, 

Archdeacon of Otraw a. 

The Mace was brought in by Band Sergeant Flam who was pre- 
ceeded by the colour party consisting of C Lt. J. M. Letch, C Cpl \1. 
Copeland and C L/C R. Davidson. The Mace is to be kept in the 
Sanctuary with the colours. 

ELMWOOD 

During the past few years we have been honoured with an increas- 
ing attendance of the young ladies from Elmwood at the Sunday morn- 
ing Services. We sincerely hope this will continue. Main thanks to 
the Headmistress, Mrs. Bruce and Mrs. Blythe for permitting this very 
pleasant arrangement. 

CANDLELIGHT SERVICE 

The annual candlelight service just before the Christmas holidays 
was better than ever. 

On Sunday, February eleventh, the School went to Christ Church 
Cathedral for morning service and the Chapel Choir was integrated into 
the Cathedral Choir. 

The Service was sung bv our head server, Peter Gillean. The les- 
sons were read by Lynn and Pottinger; Mulaner was the Crucifer. 

SERVERS 

The Servers' Guild have continued their tradition of loyal and 
devoted service. Almost every form in the Senior School was repre- 
sented and one from the Junior School. 

There were two Servers' services at which the Servers conducted 
the entire service of .Matins with the exception of the Absolution and 
Benediction, which were pronounced by the Chaplain. 

At the first service Dickson preached about "Growing up". 

At the second service Pottinger preached. His topic was "Two 
Kinds of People." 

Some of the Servers have also assisted at the churches in Ottawa. 
Giilean, Pottinger, and Snelgrove accompanied the Chaplain to St. 
George's Church. 

Pottinger preached at St. Bartholomew's Church and at St. Mar- 
garet's in E istview. 

All have done well on all occasions. 

The Chapel Offerings are now being^ used to maintain two Zulu 
boys ;it St. Christopher's School in Swaziland. South Africa. 



20 THEASHBURIAN 

This is a church-school dedicated to giving Zulu boys the oppor- 
tunity to have a modern education. Promising boys are seen on to 
University. 

Hundreds of African boys anxiously hope to get in to St. Christo- 
pher's, and the Swaze and British Governments are offering to match 
the Church dollar for dollar in carrying on the School. 

The students at St. Christopher's and their families are unbelievably 
poor by Canadian standards. With help from the outside world this 
school can bridge the gulf between the primitive background of their 
young people and the modern civilisation inevitably opening to them. 

We hope to keep in touch with the two boys we are sponsoring. 



GENERAL 

A large number of boys and staff assist in one way or another in the 
chapel programme. Special mention should be made to the faithful 
service of the organists, Airs. H. S. Dalton, Mr. Sibley, and Air. Snel- 
grove. 

The choir mothers, Airs. Thurston, Airs. Reed and Airs. Neatby 
have done an outstanding job of keeping the choir neat, clean, and pre- 
sentable. 

The Chapel Clerks, Letch, Lynn, and Blackburn have been loyal 
and efficient "doorkeepers' 1 in the House of the Lord. 

"Well done thou good and faithful servants." 
"We love the place O Lord 
Wherein Thine honour dwells 
The joy of Thine abode 
All earthly joy excells." 



THE A S H li V Ri AN 



21 



3n jWemoriam 



FLORENCE BAINBRIDGE 

Many Old Boys, Parents and Friends of the School will be 
sorry to hear that, after an illness of approximately four months, 
.Mrs. Florence Bainbridge, our Dining Room Manager, passed 
away on March 2nd. 

In her death, the School has lost a most loyal and devoted 
member of the Staff and one whose human relations might well 
serve as an outstanding example to those who knew and worked 
with her. 

Florence was extremely fond of her "boys" and was largely 
responsible for the good food and cheery atmosphere that was 
always evident in the Dining Room. .Many Parents and Friends 
of trie School will remember her extreme interest and helpfulness 
at Mothers' Guild Teas and Parents' Receptions. Her loss will 
be keenly felt by all those who knew her. 

ROBERT GERALD MOORE 

In January of this year the school was shocked and saddened 
to learn of the tragic death of Robert Moore, aged 22 years. 
Bob was with us at Ashburv from 1952 to 1959, when he gradu- 
ated from Grade XIII to the Faculty of Arts at McGill Univers- 
ity. 

At School, his quiet, unassuming manner endeared him to 
all. He was conscientious without being smug, efficient but 
never officious, grave but not solemn, artistic without affectation. 
In his final year he conceived a keen interest in the theatre, where 
he not only performed on stage, but wrote a one-act play which 
showed considerable promise. He graduated with the rank of 
prefect. 

By his third year in Honours English at McGill he had pur- 
sued and developed his interest in the drama and in creative 
writing and according to the McGill Daily, gave a stellar per- 
formance in "The Red and White Revue', to which he also con- 
tributed some of the lyrics as well as publishing some prose works 
in "The Forge". 

The success of his academic career at University amply ful- 
filled the promise of his days at School, and his untimely death 
was a great loss— not only to family and friends, but to the cul- 
tural potential of Canada. 

We extend our heartfelt sympathy to his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. R. Moore of Ottawa, and to his brother, Grant. 



22 



THE ASHBU RI AN 



SCIENCE TOURS 

/. National Research Council Tour 

On March 5th, a group of Students left Ashbury in taxis and a 
few minutes later arrived at the N. R. C. Laboratories on the Montreal 
Road. We were met at the gate by Mr. M. K. Ward, who gave us 
each a programme of the things we would see. 

Our first visit was to the Division of Building Research, where we 
were shown around by Mr. C. R. Crocker. He first explained what this 
division does and then proceeded to show us some of the many projects 
be.'ng undertaken. These included work on soil problems in the 
Arctic and those specific to Ottawa, the testing of structures in an im- 
mense laboratory, capable of containing a full size two storey house, 
and the observation of frost on windows in rooms where temperature 
and humidity could be completely controlled. 

We then went to the Low Speed Aerodynamics Laboratory under 
the direction of Mr. P. Pocock. This gentleman showed us the hori- 
zontal and vertical wind tunnels used for testing conventional and verti- 
cal take-off and landing aircraft at sub-sonic speeds. Of particular in- 
terest was a fascinating tunnel in which water was used instead of air. 

Our next stop was the Division of Applied Chemistry where Mr. 
G. A. Young took us around. Many interesting experiments were seen 
here. These were: the separation of solutions by filtering through 
membranes, bubbling a gas through a solid to make it behave like a 
liquid; the settling of slurries, or mixtures of a solid and a liquid, speeded 
up by tilting and analysis of substances by their spectra. 

Our Tour of the Montreal Road Laboratories over, we were trans- 
ferred to the Sussex Drive Building by N. R. C. vehicle. Dr. John R. 
Kohr met us on arrival and we were shown the extensive library of the 
Council. After this a most excellent lunch was provided for us. 

After lunch, and a period to rest our legs, we started off again. 
Dr. S. F. Henderson talked to us about new standards for weights and 
measures. He then showed us some of the complicated and ingenious 
apparatus used by the N. R. C. in establishing and employing these 
standards. Of a less scientific, but no less interesting nature, was a 
we.gh scale for use on the rolling pitching deck of a ship. 

We moved on to the Division of Pure Physics and Dr. C. B. 
McDiarmid. He showed us devices for measuring cosmic rays and 
other particles which strike the earth's atmosphere. This equipment 
was part of that to be sent up in an all Canadian Satellite and was fan- 
tastically small to enable it to fit in a confined space. Much bigger but 
equally complex, were the devices used to compute and tabulate the 
information relayed from the instruments as they orbited the earth. 



THE ASHBURIAN 

The last Division visited was that of Applied Biology, where Dr. 
D. C. .Mortimer explained to us the use of radio-activity in tracing the 
movement of substances in plants. We were also shown the green- 
house where plants are raised for the experiments. The principal 
feature of this green-house was a room where temperature, light and 
humidity are automatically controlled. 

The Tour over, we returned to Ashburv 1>\ taxi, completing a 
most educational and interesting day. 

Those on the trip were Bow, Ekes, Greenstone, Lynn I, Martin, 
Alenzies, Millard, Parker I, Tvler and your scribe, Brown I. 

Our thanks goes out to Mr. Siblev, who was responsible for this 
excellent visit. 

//. Biology Trip To The Department of Agriculture 

On the morning of .March 2nd, Gill Pottinger, Flood, Steven, 
Haslam and .Mr. Siblev, in short the Upper Vlth Biology Class, "sallied 
forth" to the K. W. Neatby Building on Carling Avenue to view the 
proceedings at the Department of Agriculture. Having arrived in two 
groups, and at two different doors, we were reunited and began the 
Tour under the guidance of Mr. Belletieur. 

First stop was the Scientific .Modelling Department, where scale- 
models of animals, insects and plants are made for public display. Par- 
ticularly interesting to us was a model of the life cycle of a June bug, 
which incited memories of the Fall Term and wishes like "if only we 
had one of those". 

From Scientific Modelling, the Tour moved to Plant Pathology, 
where we were lectured on various experiments concerning plant 
diseases and inspected same through complicated high quality- micro- 
scopes. So that we should not go away empty-handed, the Information 
Department provided each of us with booklets about farming and plant 
diseases, notably apple scab and wheat rust. After seeing the printing 
and mailing rooms, we adjourned upstairs to the Entomology Depart- 
ment, and cabinet upon cabinet full of insects. There, we were shown 
numerous tvpes of Diptera, Coleoptera and Lepidoptera and told met- 
hods of identification, habits and other salient facts. This ended an 
interesting Tour and a full morning. 

Our thanks to the Personnel at the Department of Agriculture, 
Messrs. Gill and Pottinger, the chauffeurs and Mr. Sibley, who made 
the Trip possible. 

///. The Chalk River Science Tour 

On Fridav, May 11th, ten students, accompanied by Mr. Sibley 
and .Mr. Marland, left for the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited estab- 



24 THE ASHBURl AN 

lishment at Chalk River. Upon arriving at about ten-thirty, we were 
immediately rushed to the Lecture Room to meet Dr. David A. Keys, 
the Scientific Advisor to the President. Here we heard a fascinating 
lecture with slides and demonstrations. We emerged from the building 
an hour later thoroughlv enlightened on the subjects of nuclear fission, 
radioactive substances, and atomic research with all its peace time uses. 

Our next stops were the models room, where we were shown cut- 
away scale models of both NRX and NRU reactors; and the testing 
centre, where radioactive materials are examined through lead boro- 
silicate glass thirty-six inches thick, and handled with mechanical arms. 

After lunch we visited the huge NRX reactor. This amazing 
structure was built in 1949, and at that time was the only one of its 
kind in the world. Although it has a potential of 40,000 kilowatts, it 
is used solely for research by supplying the neutron bombardment 
necessary to produce radioactive isotopes. It is powered by a large 
number of long uranium rods sheathed in aluminum and immersed in 
heavy water. Ordinary river water is passed through the rods to keep 
the temperature at a safe level. 

The newer and more powerful NRU reactor, built in 1958, and 
having a potential of 200,000 kilowatts, was our final stop. It differs 
from the NRX reactor in that a closed heavy water circuit is used to 
cool the fuel rods, thus eliminating the danger of polluting the river 
water with radioactivity. Also, the exhausted fuel rods can be re- 
placed without shutting down the reactor, saving both time and money. 

In closing, a special word of thanks should be extended to our 
guide, the unflinching target of our numerous queries throughout the 
day, Dr. Keys for his inspirational lecture, and to Mr. Sibley who made 
the enjoyable and instructive trip possible. Those taking the tour 
were: Ewing, Parker I, Tyler I, Brown I, Bow, Millard, Chaplin, Mar- 
tin, Whipps, and your reporter, Coristine I. 

IV. Miscellaneous 

Beside the above trips, a group of students from Grades 1 2 and 1 3 
attended the Chemical Institute of Canada Student night in November, 
where Dr. K. J. Laidler gave a lecture on "Molecules and Living 
Things". His talk was concerned with what may be called physical 
biochemistry, and was well illustrated by fine demonstrations. A 
number of students also attended the series of Science Lectures given ar 
the Universitv of Ottawa during the Winter Term. 

We have just had word that two of our students, Brown I and Bow, 
have won Student Assistantships at Ottawa University this summer. 
We are pleased. 



TH E ASHBU Rl AN 25 

COMMONWEALTH YOUTH MOVEMENT 

A deafening blast from the steam whistle resounded in my ears. 
Far below, in the bowels of the ship, the massive engines grumbled 
into motion. With a mounting sense of excitement I realized our de- 
parture was imminent. The passengers, trying vainly not to betray 
their excitement, crammed the dockside rail three deep, and waved 
frantically to friends on the quay. Out of nowhere streamers appeared, 
and soon a jungle-like tangle, red, blue, yellow, every colour of the 
rainbow, festooned the ship's side. Two squat, snub-nosed tugs 
churned and butted the huge ship into the swift-running channel. 
Friends on the quay grew smaller and smaller, and faded into an in- 
distinct line of waving hands. Our holiday had started. 

However, I was not sailing for a standard guide book tour of 
Europe. I was fortunate enough to be selected a member of the Can- 
adian contingent of the Commonwealth Youth .Movement "Quest" of 
1961. The C. Y. M. is dedicated to the ideals of peace, brotherhood, 
and understanding. Through its annual Quest, students from the far- 
rlung lands of the Commonwealth are brought together for a summer, 
and by sharing the common experience of seeing Europe together, they 
forge a bond of brotherhood and understanding. 

Last summer I lived with boys and girls whose skin was not the 
same colour as mine, whose religions were unknown to me, whose homes 
were foreign to me. I came to know, understand, and respect the hopes 
and ideals of people so different from me. I returned home with many 
of my preconceived ideas and prejudices washed from my mind. 

Our group hailed from fourteen Commonwealth and two non- 
Commonwealth countries: Aden, Basutoland, Bechuanaland, Belgium, 
Canada, the Falkland Islands, Fiji, Germany, Gibralter, India, Malaya, 
Mauritius, Northern Rhodesia, Swaziland, the United Kingdom, and 
Pakistan. 

The Canadian contingent had gathered in Ottawa on July 4th. 
We were entertained at a reception at Government House, and it was 
a real pleasure to have the opportunity of meeting so gracious a couple 
as Governor-General Yanier and his wife. We also spent a very con- 
vivial afternoon with Sir Saville and Ladv Garner at the British High 
Commissioner's residence, EarnsclifTe. While touring the Parliament 
Buildings, we were introduced to Prime .Minister Diefenbakcr, Canada 
certainly accorded us a tremendous send-off to a memorable summer! 

We sailed on July 6th from .Montreal, aboard the "Empress of 
Canada". I had no idea of the incredible vastness of the St. Lawrence 
River until we sailed down it for two days. On the third morning, I 
awoke at sea. What an exhilarating sensation it is to stand at the stern 
of the ship on the gently rolling deck and breathe the salty ocean air! 



26 THE ASHBUR1AN 

The frothing wake of the ship curled through the blue water like a 
writhing white snake, all the way to the horizon, hazy in the distance. 
I leaned over the rail and saw the water slipping swiftly by the ship's 
sides, like dark green marble mottled with flecks of white foam. Be- 
hind is Canada, ahead is England. 

We docked at Liverpool at 10.30 p.m. The next morning, after 
the excited confusion of identifying our luggage in the noisy custom's 
shed, we met the rest of our group. A bus was waiting for us and we 
set off to Worcester via the lovely old town of Chester, with its gabled 
and half-timbered Tudor houses and its Roman wall. In Worcester, we 
stayed in private homes, and this unique feature of the C. Y. M. was 
followed in all the other cities we visited. Personally, I found this 
feature one of the most rewarding aspects of the trip, because it gave me 
the opportunity of meeting families which, as a tourist, I would never 
have met. King John is buried in Worcester Cathedral, and we visited 
his tomb. When he died, he ordered that he be buried between the two 
saints whose bones lie beneath the floor of the Cathedral. In this way, 
he hoped to slip into heaven between the two saints when St. Peter 
wasn't looking. 

London was next on our itinerary. Our bus sped along the M. 1, 
and London was waiting for us that night with all its lights ablaze. 
During our week here, few of the famous and historic landmarks es- 
caped our scrutiny. The Tower of London, St. Paul's, the Houses of 
Parliament, and the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace were 
all carefully inspected. 

The day we took the boat train for Paris, the sun was shining, and 
the cliffs of Dover sparkled white as we crossed the Channel. The 
"City of Light" was, for me, the high point of the trip. Like all the 
tourists who come to Paris, I rode to the top of the Eiffel Tower, and 
stood spellbound before the breathtaking panorama of the most beauti- 
ful city in the world, spread out at my feet. The Seine glided white 
and blue under its bridges, and there, on an island of green, were the 
twin, square-topped towers of Notre Dame. To the left of the river 
the Arc de Triomphe, looking like the hub of a wheel which had as 
spokes, broad tree-lined boulevards. And off in the distance, on a hill 
behind Montmartre, stood Sacre Coeur, white like a jewel in the sun- 
light. Our four days in Paris were all to short. 

From Paris to Brussels, where I stayed at the home of the Belgian 
boy on our trip. The two things I remember best are the Grand Place 
de Brusselles, with its medieval Guild Halls, and the famous statue of 
the little boy. After four days in Brussels, we spent three days in 
Ypres, the site of one of the bloodiest battles of the First World War. 
Here, in St. George's Memorial Chapel, the Quest held its annual vigil. 

From ^ pres, we drove through the picturesque Belgian country- 
side to Ostend, crossed the Channel, and headed for Scotland. Our 



THE ASHBURI AN 

final two weeks were spent in private homes throughout Scotland. I 
shall never forget the magnificent hospitality of the people who made 
our visit so enjoyable. In Dundee, Inverness. Edinburgh, and on a 
g'gantdc sheep farm in Galloway, I was entertained royally. The last 
night of our trip, we saw the Tatoo in Edinburgh Castle. I he next 
daw with the skirl of the bagpipes in our ears, we sailed for home. 

I. Ewing - TV I 



DEBATING 

A renewed interest in debating this year resulted in a record 
twenty-two debates for the team, of which 14 were won, and H lost. 
It is interesting to note that the Debating Team had more fixtures than 
any other school team, a fact which bv itself points to a Renaissance in 
what debators call "The Superior Sport". 

The season opened in October, when Steven and Haslam journeyed 
to Perth and argued the negative of the topic, "Resolved: That the 
West should abandon Berlin". Ashburv won bv the score of 85-72. 

For the first time, Ashburv sent four debators. Haslam, Ewing, 
Greenstone and Lash, to the .McGill High School Debating Tourna- 
ment, from which we emerged a creditable fifth, with five wins and 
three losses. Haslam was third out of ninety-six debators in the in- 
dividual rankings. 

Greenstone and Lash defeated Perth, this time at Ashburv, as a 
warm-up for the International Speech Festival. At the Festival, held 
in Toronto, stiff competition and hard luck rent us asunder, and we 
returned home with onlv one win to show for six starts. 

In the English Schools Debating Tournament at Ottawa University, 
however, it was a different story. The team, this time consisting of 
Haslam, Ewing, Steven and Menzies, emerged in fourth place with four 
wins and no losses. 

The final fixtures of the vear were part of the Independent Schools 
Debating Tournament, contested annually between L.C.C., B.C.S., 
Stanstead and Ashburv. Haslam and Ewing narrowly defeated L.C.C., 
and the team, this time consisting of Haslam and Menzies, journeyed 
to L.C.C. to take on Stanstead College. After an exciting debate, we 
emerged the happv victors. 

This vear's team, the most successful on record, wishes to thank 
the person who made it all possible, Mr. I. H. Spencer. 



DEBATING TEAM 
Back Row. K. S. Menzies, R. A. Lash, L. I. H. Spencer, Esq., B. K. MacKay, G. C. 

Greenstone. 
Front Row. I. M. Ewing, G. P. G., Haslam (Capt.), D. A. Steven. 



Name 

Steven, Donald 
Menzies, Kenneth 
Haslam, Gerald (Capt.) 
Ewing, Iain 
Lash, Bob 

Greenstone, Gerrard 
McKay, Brian 



TEAM MEMBERS 




Debates 


Won 


Lost 


3 


3 





3 


3 





) 12 


8 


4 


10 


6 


4 


5 


3 


2 


8 


4 


4 


3 


1 


2 



Pet. 

1.000 
1.000 
.666 
.600 
.600 
.500 
.333 



LIST OF DEBATES AND TOPICS 



I Perth District and Collegiate Institute 

2-9 McGill Debating Tournament 

10 Perth District and Collegiate Institute 

11-16 International Speech Festival 

17-20 English Schools Debating Tournament 

21 Lower Canada College 

22 Stanstcad College 



Haslam and Steven WON 

Haslam and Ewing W 3 L 1 

Greenstone and Lash W 2 L 2 

Greenstone and Lash WON 

Haslam and Ewing W L 3 

Greenstone and McKay W 1 L 2 

Haslam and Ewing W 2 L 

Steven and Menzies W 2 1,0 

Haslam and Ewing WON 

Haslam and Menzies WON 



1 


Resolved: 


2-9 


Resolved: 


10-16 


Resoh ed: 


17-20 


Resolved: 


21 


Resolved: 


22 


Resolved: 



TOPICS 
That the West should abandon Berlin. 

That the West should surrender to the Communist bloc rather than 
face the threat of nuclear war. 

I hat North American Labour Unions are not fulfilling their res- 
ponsibilities to our society. 

That Britain's entry into the E.C.M. is contrary to the ideals of the 
Commonwealth. 

- see 10-16 - 

- see 17-20 - 



/ // /•; ASH B V R / A .V 29 



PUBLIC SPEAKING CONTEST 

With only two curries in the Intermediate Public Speaking, this 
year's conrest could hardly he called successful. Barber, speaking mi 
rhe "Battle on the Plains of Abraham" in an intimate, appealing sryle, 
made ir obvious rhar he had spent considerable rime on research for his 
topic. Ir was unfortunate that his nervous gestures and the inadequate 
handling of his notes detracted from his speech bur these faults will 
doubtless be cured by experience. His use of a little humour, cleverly 
introduced into such a serious topic, was most effective and he was 
given the award over the only other contestant in the class — Lash. 

Lash, speaking extemporaneously, was the other contestant. He 
chose a difficult, prejudical topic, "Problems of the .Modern Jew in 
North America". 

Gerry Haslam opened the senior section with an inspired attack 
on jingoists. Bellicose patriots who preach peace while preparing for 
war at excessive speed were the particular target of Gerry's remarks. 
His criticism of the C. B. C. series "Canada at War", and the thought- 
less acceptance of many viewers of these programmes, was handled in 
a particularly masterly manner, and the long applause at the end was 
indicative of the impression the speaker had made on his audience. 

Alenzies' question/answer style showed evidence of intensive pre- 
paration. His topic; "Political Objections to Britain's Entry into the 
Common Market". One could not help feeling that the Common- 
wealth was in jeopardy after listening to this speaker. 

In a difficult decision, the judge, Mr. Ian Spencer, gave the award 
to Haslam. 

An account of the Junior contest appears in "The Junior Ash- 
burian". 

W timers 

Senior Haslam 

Intermediate .. Barber 

Junior - Stein 



'G=^0 



30 THE ASHBURI AN 

POETRY READING CONTEST 

For this contest, held in the Chapel on Sunday, April 29th, after a 
series of elimination preliminaries among Junior School candidates, a 
total of eleven competitors turned out. 

Again we were fortunate in securing the services of Professor 
George B. Johnston of the English Department of Carleton University 
to adjudicate the readings and we thank him for so often giving us the 
benefit of his talent and experience on these occasions. 

As is customary, the contestants were divided into three categories 
— Junior, Intermediate, and Senior Schools. Each was required to read 
three pieces — a 'set', a 'sight', and a passage of the individuals own 
choosing. 

The passages read were: 
'Set' pieces — 

Juniors: "The Road Not Taken" — Frost 
Intermediates: Selection from "The Rime of the Ancient 

Mariner" — Coleridge 
Seniors: Selection from "Seascape" — Young 

'Sight' pieces — 

juniors: "Fear No More the Heat o' the Sun" — Shakespeare 

Intermediates: "The Fog" — W. Davies 

Seniors: "Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth" — Clough 

The winners — 

Juniors: Read 

Intermediates: Burritt 

Seniors: Stewart I 
Before selecting the winners Professor Johnston carefully and most 
informatively analysed the performance of each reader as well as express- 
ing in general terms his own views on the reading of verse. He, how- 
ever, prefaced this last by the warning that there were of course, many 
different critical schools of thought on the subject. 

I [e was particularly interested in the various selections made by 
the individual readers as significant of taste and attitude. Having named 
the winners and given detailed reasons for his nominations, he par- 
ticularly commended Menzies for his reading of G. K. Chesterton's 
"The Donkey". This he characterized as probably the most moving 
performance of the afternoon. 

The competitors were as follows: 

juniors: McNair II, Cook, McAuley, Read, Deacon 

Inter mediates: Burritt, Lash 

Seniors: Stewart [, Campbell I, Ewing, Menzies 



rH E ASHBURI AN 31 

HEADMASTERS' CONFERENCE 

For the first time in its history the Headmasters' Annual Conference 
was held in Vancouver, at St. George's School. President John Marker, 
the Headmaster, was host during the .Meetings. 

Headmasters from the East flew to Vancouver in early April to be 
greeted by bright sunshine and gardens in early flower. Even the 
"natives" were amazed at the perfect weather, bur pretended that this 
was normal for British Columbia. 

In addition to a number of business meetings the Headmasters spent 
a day at the University of B. C, where Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie, Presi- 
dent of the University, entertained us in the new Faculty Club. We 
toured the campus and were much impressed by the magnificence of the 
site, the very modern architecture and the stupendous growth of the 
student population — now numbering 14,700. In the afternoon the 
University arranged a series of lectures featuring prominent speakers 
both from the University and City. 

Mr. Harker had arranged with the Canadian Navy to take us to 
Victoria Island on H. M. C. S. Skeena. This was a delightful experi- 
ence for all of us. The day was perfect and the weather calm. The 
Captain and his staff virtually ^ave us the freedom of the ship, and 
enabled us to see the electronic intricacies of one of the world's great 
naval vessels. 

On landing at Esquimalt we visited Royal Roads en route to Uni- 
versity School where we attended a dinner for Old Bovs from all 
Private Schools across Canada. Ashburv had one of the largest number 
of representatives, including: Messrs. Vyner Brooke, Barnett Carswell, 
Commodore Valentine Godfrey, John Magor, Brigadier YY. C. Thack- 
ray and Peter Redpath. Gordon Southam, also present, organized the 
Old Boys' gathering. 

The following day we visited Shawnigan Lake School, probably 
the most beautifully located of all, and Brentwood — the old Island 
School now reorganized after a disastrous fire some years ago, and lo- 
cated at Mill Bay on an inlet of the Pacific. 

Our visit to the West Coast was not only a most pleasant affair but 
gave us the feeling that Private Schools in British Columbia were thriv- 
ing vigorously. All of them are in great demand and have established 
an excellent reputation in the Province. 

This Conference was the final for both .Mr. Harker and for Dr. 
P. A. C. Ketchum of Trinity College School, both of whom are retiring. 

Eastern Headmasters left Vancouver most appreciative of the 
splendid Conference arrangements made by Mr. Marker and for the 
hospitality expressed in true Western style. 



52 TH E ASHBU RI AN 

Officers of the Headmasters' Association for next year are Harry 
Beer, President, Pickering College; Robert Coulter, Vice-President, 
St. Andrew's College and R. H. Perry, Secretary-Treasurer, Ashbury 
College. 



ONTARIO MATHEMATICS CONFERENCE 
Trinity College, Port Hope 

The Conference was preceded by a General Meeting for the elec- 
tion of Officers and a discussion of the primary aims of the Commission. 
Following this Professor Lister of Toronto University, gave us a lecture 
on the teaching of Chemistry in High Schools. He asserted that teach- 
ing should be given three aims, 

(1) The chemical experiment with its associated mathematical 
calculations, 

(2) Results discussed, 

(3) Theory development. 

He emphasized that students would appreciate chemistry if the lessons 
were interesting, enjoyable and practical. He thought that facts should 
be taught, and that it was not for the teacher to try to make students 
become chemists. As far as the history of chemistry was concerned 
he felt that this was in the field of historians rather than Science teachers, 
mainly because of the lack of time. 

The second lecture was given by Mr. Zimmerman, O.B.E., Vice 
Chairman of the Defence Regional Board, Ottawa, who gave as his sub- 
ject "Some aspects in Science in Education bearing in mind the cold 
war". 

For the past fifteen years 800 scientists and 3000 other personel 
have been working on a budget of $32,000,000 for research into the 
problems of the cold war. The Defense Board maintains a close rela- 
tionship with the Research Council, Universities, Navy, Air Force and 
the Army. 

There are many research problems:— Air defence of North America 
—Maintaining a defence against submarine attack— Tactics, ground and 
a. r— National survival— Space experiments, radio signals and problems- 
rockets and balloons— satellites for extended periods with measuring in- 
struments for use above the ionisphere and in orbit— analysis of complete 
conditions at altitude of 650 miles. 

There are signs of an intensification in the cold war— politically, 
economically, and on the military and scientific fronts. 

The West is forced to seek methods of survival scientifically. This 
spans from the fact that many men of scientific background have high 
commands in Russia today, and the only frontier the West has against 
a possible attack is its scholars, teachers, scientists and engineers. 



THE ASH BU Rl AN 3> 

Mr. Zimmerman advocated Fall Our Shelters, though he doesn't 
have one. It has been determined that survivors of a Bomb attack 
could emerge after a period of 48 hours. 

Shortly after lunch we were introduced to Mr. J. Brown, teacher at 
Lower Canada College, who was to criticise text books. 

Speaking of algebra he felt that slower pupils should do problems 
suitable to their ability whilst better pupils proceed at their own speed. 

Books, in his opinion, were not difficult enough, and he thought 
that students should be given a chance to prove that they could succeed 
in work previouslv considered too difficult. 

Air. Brown then proceeded to illustrate his own methods of teach- 
ing Grade 9 Algebra. These methods were novel— he mentioned bars 
and snakes— but followed the modern trend of belittling what he called 
old fashioned methods. 

Many of the delegates heartily disapproved of these new ideas 
whilst a few considered that he was doing a great job. However this 
new aspect of teaching Mathematics is fast gaining ground and will 
supersede the older methods so that we shall have to accept new sug- 
gestions and go along with them. 

J. J. Marland and H. Dalton 



ENGLISH TEACHERS' CONFERENCE 

Over sixty English Teachers from fifteen independent schools 
gathered during the Easter vacation to discuss and exchange ideas of 
common interest. Ashbury College was represented by Messrs Spencer 
and Wansbrough. This year Ridley College hosted the conference, 
and .Mr. John Saxton and' his colleagues provided a most aimiable and 
stimulating environment. 

There were two innovations this year; first that, in keeping with 
universal emancipation, our female colleagues were welcomed, and 
secondly, that the constitutionally garrulous were spared from lengthy 
speeches. Instead, a series of discussion groups were held at the Senior, 
Middle, and Lower School levels. All seemed to welcome both changes. 

The major achievement of the conference was to set up a co- 
ordinator (from St. Andrew's) to receive, edit, and distribute meritori- 
ous and stimulating works of English literature not available in text- 
books. This could be a significant step in continuous exchange of ma- 
terial and ideas apart from the annual conference, and was unanimously 
welcomed. 

In all, the conference was a great success and those present look for- 
ward to an equally profitable meeting next year. 



34 THE ASHBURIAN 

SCHOOL PLAY 

In "The Caine Mutiny", produced by Messrs. I. C. Pemberton and 
M. I). Wansbrough, we welcomed the return of the three-act play to 
Ashbury. The full-length production had been a traditional school 
feature, and from the middle forties to the middle fifties was presented 
jointly by the Ashbury-Elmwood Dramatic Societies, usually at the 
Ottawa Little Theatre, under the direction of Mr. A. B. Belcher and 
Mr. R. G. Devine. After the addition of Argyle, with its own little 
stage, it was found expedient to present several one-act plays with small 
casts and simple settings. Last year, however, marked an innovation 
with the performance by the Junior School, again in the Little Theatre, 
of a good, old fashioned pantomime, "Cinderella", written, produced and 
directed by Air. B. R. Beetensen and sponsored by the Mothers' Guild. 
This ambitious effort was a hilarious success and rewarded with well 
deserved acclaim. 

And now, on March 8th, came "The Caine Mutiny", under the 
direction of Messrs. Pemberton and Wansbrough, on the Argyle stage 
and again sponsored by the Mothers' Guild. This piece was a fine 
choice, as it not only provided excellent entertainment potential but 
required a large all-male cast, a relatively small group of actors on stage 
at any one time, a simple setting, and a minimum of stage movement. 

The performance was admirable, Bethune, as prosecutor, Lash as 
defense counsel, and Logie as chief witness for the prosecution, carried 
impressively (and almost unhesitatingly) their long and exacting roles; 
Dickson, as defendant, was adequately phlegmatic, Harvey Stewart, as 
the officer presiding, stern and uncompromisingly judicial; Campbell, as 
a senior naval officer on the stand, was appropriately testy, while Brady 
and Smethurst as medical officers gave convincingly cryptic evidence. 
As an ill-educated but unabashed signalman, Gillean II put over some of 
the best laugh lines in the piece, while Martin, as a junior officer on the 
witness stand, contributed a brief but really excellent performance in 
both vocal and facial expression. 

The four members of the court — Davis, Heggtveit, McGaughey 
and Mosher — constituted a dignified and magisterial group, and Boyd 
II, the orderly stationed at the door was truly statuesque, and due to 
Snelgrove's clever light effects, threw a classic silhouette upon the wall 
at his back. 

The play was full of the human interest and dramatic value that one 
associates with most well written courtroom situations. The story was 
that of the court-martial of a junior naval reserve officer who formally 
and forcibly assumes command of the U.S.S. Caine while that destroyer- 
minesweeper is engaged in operations during a storm in the Pacific. 
This he did on the grounds that his commander was needlessly jeopardiz- 



T H E A S H li V K / A N 



n 




ing the life of the vessel by holding course. The verdict hung on 
evidence which would show whether or not his action was justified bv 
the situation, and was given in favour of the defendent. 

The major dramatic interest lay in the inner conflict of the officer 
who had been appointed as defense council while ethically obliged to do 
his utmost to secure an acquittal for his client, he felt morally guilty in 
attempting to condemn (bv implication) a type of permanent naval 
officer who has so loyally and capablv buttressed the United States in 
the earlv stages of the Mar. 

The production was a most enjovable piece of entertainment, and 
to all those responsible go our appreciation and thanks. 




36 



THE ASHBURIAN 



CAST 

( In Order of Appearance) 

LT. STEP! [PEN MARYK ..Robert Dickson 

LT. BARNEY GREEN WALD ... Robert Lash 

LT. COM. JOHN CHALLEE .John Bethune 

CAPTAIN BLAKELY ...Harvey Stewart 

LT. COM. PHILIP FRANCIS QUEEG _ Richard Logie 

LT. THOMAS KEEKER .... .Bruce McNair 

SIGNALMAN THIRD CLASS JUNIUS URBAN... Andrew Gillean 
LT. (Junior Grade) WILLIS SEWARD KEITH _ Peter Martin 

CAPT. RANDOLPH SOUTHARD _ Hugh Campbell 

DR. FORREST LUNDEEN John Smethurst 

DR. BIRD John Brady 

STENOGRAPHER ..Michael Copeland 

ORDERLY Boyd 

FOUR MEMBERS OF THE COURT: Morton Davis 

Gilbert Heggtveit 

Daniel McGaughey 

jMurray Mosher 
STAGE HANDS: Coristine II, Mulaner I, Gillean II, Campbell II, 

Southam I, Gamble I, Sark, Speedie II, Taschereau, 

Davies II 
LIGHTING: Snelgrove 
A4USIC: Van Schalkwyk 



/ G^O 



THE ASHBURIAN 



57 



lf , " , ll 




I ■ r - **f3S> f^-%. 1 




Ki. %^« m| 


%p^- / ****^«Byi v ' :: " £. "' ; *9bV 
I ' Hn- " bv ^k 

j r Hap ' s *'wjpr : -3b& 











L. /o R.— R. H. Perry, Esq., Miss Joanne Edwards, Mrs. Perrv, 
Ian Speedie. 



SCHOOL DANCE 



On April 14th a record crowd of students and friends attended 
the largest school function of the year. The guests were met by Mr. 
2nd Mrs. Perry, Allan Gill, Nancy Smallian, Ian Speedie, and Joanne 
Edwards. For the past years the Prefects have chosen to hold the 
annual dance at some centre completely separate from the school; how- 
ever, this year the Dance Committee decided to take advantage of Ash- 
bury 's own facilities by converting the Argyle recreation hall into a 
beautifully decorated Parisian ballroom. The theme, naturally enough, 
was 'April in Paris'. 

Ian Speedie, the convener and master-of-ceremonies of the dance, 
was responsible for engaging the "Beau-Marks", the fabulous band 
which enabled all those present to twist until the wee hours of the morn- 
ing. For the first time in the school's dance history, a committee was 
formed to take care of all the arrangements from entertainment to decor- 
ations. This group of six boys, Ian Speedie, Bob Dickson, Mike Cope- 
land, Tim Coristine, John Booth, and Peter Gillean were the backbone 
behind the tremendous success the affair proved to be for young and old 
alike. It was indeed a sad moment when the band packed up and the 
students departed for the traditional breakfast parties, ending an evening 
which will be remembered by all for some time to come. 




OFFICERS AND N.C.O.'s 
Back Row. A/C/L/Cpl. I. H. Parker, A/C/L/Cpl. B. M. Chadderton, C/Cpl. D. A. Sprv, 

C/Cpl. W. J. Booth, C/Cpl. L. B. Gallinger, C/Cpl. G. Heggtveit, C/L/Cpl. P. W. 

J. iMartin, C/Cpl. G. B. Keffer, C/L/Cpl. G. C. Greenstone. 
Middle Row. B. J. Merrett, C/Sgt. A. G. Podhradskv, C/Sgt. H. P. Flam, C/Sgt. M. J. 

Copeland, C/Lt. J. M. Letch, C/Sgt. C. R. Davidson, C/Sgt. I. R. Andrew, C/Sgt. 

N. R. Blackburn, C/L/Cpl. C. P. Roberts. 
Front Row. C/Sgt. D. E. Chaplin, C/CSM. P. M. Gil'ean, C/Lt. K. G. Woolley, C/Capt. 

A. F. Gill, C/Major F. G. Oxley, Lt. J. C. Hughes, C/Capt. G. I. M. Speedie, 

C/Lt. R. B. Logie, C/Lt. J. I. Bethune, C/Lt. A. W. Anderson, C/S.Sgt. J. G. 

A. Tyler. 
Absent: C/Cpl. P. R. Davidson, C/Cpl. J. D. H. Partridge. 



CADET INSPECTION 

Each year as Inspection time rolls around we fervently hope that 
the weather will stay fine for us. This year it really excelled itself, 
for not only was the sun shining brightly but a cooling breeze allowed 
the cadets to stay relaxed during their ordeal. This fact was evident 
when not one cadet collapsed from heat or strain and this in itself is 
unusual. 

The Inspecting Officer this vear was Maj. -General Sparling, an old 
friend of the school. After inspecting the Honour Guard and being 
introduced to the Instructional Staff he inspected the corps. He quick- 
ly put the Officers and Cadets at ease with his friendly comments during 
the inspection. The inspection over, Cadet Major Oxley took the corps 
through the ceremonial drill as they marched past in column of platoons 
and then in column of route. This was followed bv the advance in 
review order and the General Salute. After marching off the flag the 
corps moved to the lower field to prepare for squad demonstrations. 

The first demonstration was by the school band led by C/Sgt. Flam 
and instructed by Air. M. B. Wansbrough. They played lively and 



40 



THE ASHBU Rl AN 




BAND 
Back Row. R. W. Horner, B. K. MacKay, R. P. Wennberg, D. J. Mulaner, D. A. J. 

Bovd, R. S. Atkins, W. A. Emmons, f . L. MacDonald. 
Front Row. T. S. Leadman, I. H. Parker, G. B. Keffer, C/Sgt. H. P. Flam, B. J. Merrett, 

B. M. Chadderton, R. B. Southam. 
Absent: J. I). H. Partridge. 



amusing tunes which were greatly enjoyed by the spectators. Next 
came the Mock Battle which took place beside RockclifTe Park Public 
School and incorporated the skills of Rifle, First Aid and Signals squads 
learned during the cadet training. Following the Mock Battle a pre- 
cision drill squad under C/Capt. Speedie gave a fine display of timing 
with intricate drill movements. Finally-, the Senior Gym team, in- 
structed by Lt. R. J. Anderson, put on their usual skillful performance 
of Box-work and Parallel Bars. The Junior School also gave an assist 
to the proceedings with a midget March Past and Junior Gym Squad 
under the direction of Mr. M. Gerrie. These were both extremely 
well carried out. 

At the end of the day's proceedings Gen. Sparling complimented 
the cadets on their line showing and presented the awards for outstand- 
ing contribution in the various phases of cadet work. 



T HE ASH H V R I I N 



41 



Awards 
Commanding Officer — C/Major Oxley 
Most Valuable Officer - C Captain (.ill 
Most Valuable N.C.O. - C/CS.M. Gillean 

Most Promising Recruit — Cadet Cowan 

Best Platoon — No. 2 Platoon (C Lt. Bethiine). 

LETTER FROM INSPECTING OFFICER 

Major-General 1 1. A. Sparling, C.B.E., D.S.O., CD., who inspected 
the Corps wrote as follows: 

"Both Mrs. Sparling and myself most thoroughly enjoyed our visit 
to Ashbury and, as I said at the time, I was very impressed with the 
great effort put into the parade by the cadets and by the standard they 
achieved. I should like to congratulate you, your cadet staff and all 
cadets for their very good work". 




GYM TEAM 
Back Ron-. 1). S. Cow. ui. P. R. Davidson. J. B. Draper. R. B. Logie, I. R. Vndrew. 
Front Ron-. M. S. Folk. I. \I. I wing, R. J. Anderson, Esq., I . B. Johnston, I 
Gallinger. 



.. H. 



T H E A S H B U Rl AN 



43 



PORT 



FOOTBALL 

FIRST TEAM 

This year's edition of First Football team was composed of thirteen 
veterans from teams past, seven players up from last year's seconds, and 
seven new boys. As such, it was felt by the "experts" that the team 
would have a fair season. For once, these experts were right, as the 
team won two, lost three and tied one. 

The opening game of the season, against Arnprior High School, 
saw us in fine spirits, but these spirits were soon dampened when Bob 
Berry w,.s ousted from the game on a penalty, and the opposition pulled 
ahead. Final score: 33-1. 



Winners of the G.P. Cup 
Back Ron-. I. R. Andrew, R. W. Horner, E. H. Stewart, P. M. Gillean, D. \I. Boyd, 

D. A. J. Boyd, P. R. Davidson, G. B. KefTer, P. C. Hunt. 
Third Ron-. Tiny Hermann, Esq., M. B. Wansbrough, Esq., F. G. Oxlev, D. A. Havlev. 

G. S. Alil'ard, E. D. Armour, R. P. Wennberg, P. E. Barakett, I. R. Sinclair, H. B. 

Gal'inger, R. H. Perry, Esq., J. L. Black, Esq. 
Second Row. M. J. Copeland, G. I. M. Speedie, C. A. Flood, I. M. Ewing, R. V. Berry. 

Capt., A. F. Gill, Vice-Capt., P. H. Rowntree, J. I. Bethune, K. T. Iverson. 
Front Row. J. D. Fisher, R. B. Logie, S. M. Parker, S. J. Levitz, H. P. Flam, R. T. 

Dickson, K. G. Woollev, W. D. Larlamme. 



\ct> 



o 



T2*p A 



■Q- 5^ W** 



9 —20 c„-£4-: r :30 



44 



THE ASH BU Rl AN 







The first game on home ground was played against John Rennie 
High School. The game, made more interesting by the presence of 
cheerleaders supplied by both sides, was close for the first three quarters, 
then John Rennie scored two quick TD's to "put the lid on". Another 
touchdown by our opponents wrapped up a victory in their favour, 
and the record still showed no wins for the "green machine". 

Stanstead, however, represented the flip-side of the coin. In a 
game played at L. C. C, Ashbury had three TD's called back, but still 
rolled to a 39-0 victory over a spirited but ineffective Stanstead squad. 
All waited for Bishops, looking forward to winning "that" trophy for 
the ninth consecutive year. 




THE ASH R V R I A N 



4S 



We did not win. We were beaten 7-6, and the score indicates the 
type of game played. No excuses are offered, so let no more he said. 

Northwood and Ashburv tangled M^\\\\ y with the score again 
exactly indicative of the play. We were dead tired after tying a great 
Northwood team, on and off the held. 

The final fixture of the year featured those redoubtable Old Boys, 
reinforced by certain members of the starf. The results were intrest- 
ing, to say the least. The school managed to win, 21-14, capping a 
"different" season. 

The team, though lacking polish on several occasions, and failing 
slightly in the spirit department when the chips were down, was a good 
one. The fact that we lost to Bishop's indicates that we were perhaps 
not as good as teams in previous years, but the fact that we tied North- 
wood points out that Ashbury can, and does, rise to the occasion. 

Our sincere thanks to C. B. "Tiny" Hermann, J. L. Black, and 
\1. B. Wansboroucjh for their helpful and spirited coaching, without 
it there could have been no team. 

GAMES PLAYED 









Score 




Place 




W/L 


1. 


vs. 


Arnprior H.S. 


1-33 




Away 




Lost 


2. 


vs. 


John Rcnnie H.S. 


13-33 




Home 




Lost 


3. 


vs. 


Stanstead 


39-0 




Away 




Won 


4. 


vs. 


Bishop's 


6-7 




Home 




Lost 


5. 


vs. 


Northwood 


19-19 




Home 




Tied 


6. 


vs. 


Old Boys 


21-14 




Home 




Won 






Points For — 99 




Points 


Against 


- 106 








Average — 16.5 




Av 


erage — 


17.6 






46 THEASHBURIAN 

TEAM 

Berry I (Capt.)-FB-When the going gets tough, the tough get going. 

Gill (Vice-Capt.)— E— In spite of separated shoulder he played and was 
a most valuable asset to the team. 

Barakett— G— Massive, aggressive, impressive. 

Logie— QB— Best described as "Hard as nails", had a great season. 

Bethune— HB— Had a fine year - should be backbone of next year's 

team. 
Ewin'g— H— Four speeds, all fast. 
Levitz—HB— Small, but size isn't everything. 
Flood— G—E— Another fine season of this old veteran even though he 

complained about playing "End". 

Davidson— HB— Small but mighty — should prove to be a star next year. 

Armour— FB—O well, he had good parties after the game. 

Dickson— C— In spite of injured finger, did a good job. 

Ellis— G— Sometimes at school, sometimes at practice, now neither. 

Rown tree— T— Solid as the rock of Gibralter. 

Sinclair— T— He hit so hard he dislocated his shoulder (on a tackling 
dummy). 

Speedie— HB— You don't have to be a football hero to get along with 
girls. 

Horner— E— Could he tackle ! 

Wennberg— T— Very young; very impressive, should improve with age. 

Millard— T— A rookie with the team, did a fine job and should do better 
next year. 

Flam— T— It's not the size of the dog in the fight but the size of the 
fight in the dog. 

Stewart— E— A good player but unfortunately injured kidney and had 
it removed, thus ending his football. 

Iverson—E— Without effort, ability means nothing. 

Woolley— C— Hey, I thought you said on two. 

Oxi.ey— QB— Running, tackling, throwing (?) he was excellent. 

Copei and— QB— Just call me Sam Etchevery. 

Gallinger—FB— Being understudy of Berry, didn't have much of a 

chance — but his size and power should show next year. 

LaFlamme, Fisher— Managers— Despite constant yelling they managed. 



THE ASH EL R I A N 



41 



SECOND TEAM 

It is not the intention of this article to provide an excuse for losing 
five games while winning only one. The fact that the team "might" 
or "should" have won any or all of its games is irrelevant. The reason 
must be analyzed as it happened. 

Arnprior, traditional opening opponents of any Ashbury football 
team, proved themselves again this year, beating us 23-6. The game 
was hard fought, but we showed a marked inability to score or prevent 
scores, with obvious results. Peter Hunt and George Keffer were our 
only shining lights, but two people can't win a football game. The 
remainder of the team was spirited, and carried out our few plays well; 




Back Ron-. D. S. Cowan, G. R. Garton, G. W. Kudynowski, B. G. Dean. B. J. Bcrrv, 

M. Mosher, J. P. O. Henry, J. P. Dawson, I. R. Andreu . 
Third Row. M. D. Gerrie, Esq., D. A. Steven, P. M. Bow. D. J. Mulaner, D. S. Hanna. 

I). A. Havlev. J. B. Draper, G. P. Haslam, G. D. Hes^tveir. A. W. Anderson. 
Second Row.T.B. Johnston, N. V. Archipov, D. M. Boyd, G. 15. keffer, Capt., P. C. 

Hunt, yice-Gipt., A. D. Ivev. D. A. J. Boyd. 
Front Ron-. A. P. D. Gamble, S. E. W'oolcs, B. M. Chadderton, R. S. Southam, T. L. 

MacDonald, I. H. Parker. 



48 



THE ASHBURIAN 



however, a complete dearth of blocking helped the opposition con- 
siderably, and, although we were often quite close to the goal line, we 
were only able to cross it once; George KefTer getting the TD. 

Touchdowns were our stumbling block in the next three games, 
where we failed to score a point. Try as we might, the effort was 
insufficient and the scores showed. The blocking was better, but not 
yet good enough to enable the backfielders to navigate round the ends 
successfully. 

In the game against B.C.S., it was quite a different story. Keffer, 
I hint and Cowan, supported by fine blocking, for a change, ran rampant 
over a spirited Bishop's team. The score, 26-1, fully indicates the extent 
of the renaissance. 

But, alas, it did not last. Against St. Pius X for the second time, 
we came close, but could not score a touchdown. The season was over, 
and the team could claim but one ray of light in a field of darkness. We 
made the most of that one win, you can be sure. 

The team expresses its thanks to Mr. Gerrie and Alike Spencer for 
their painstaking efforts to make the second football team play as a 
team. In the one game when we played as a unit, their work, we hope, 
was rewarded. 

RECORD 
1. vs. Arnprior Lost 23-6 4. 



vs. 



vs. 



St. Pius X 


Lost 19-0 


B.C.S. 


Won 26-1 


St. Pius X 


Lost 6-2 



Hillcrest Lost 9-0 5. vs. 

3. vs. Woodroffe Lost 27-0 6. vs. 



SOCCER 

FIRST TEAM 

Returning to play for the first team were six members of last years 
squad, and they were the backbone of the First XI this season. 

We had quite a good record this year, winning six games, drawing 
two, and losing two, both losses being to our old rival, Northwood. 

A great many thanks go to our coach, iMr. Anderson, who made us 
into a high-spirited well-oiled "Big Green Machine^'. 

At the Football Dinner in November, awards were given to several 
members of the team. The Most Valuable Player award was presented 
to Rusty Davidson, while the Most Improved Player award was received 
by Doug Finlay and Christopher O'Brien. First colours were awarded 
to Davidson (Capt.), McGaughey, Pottinger (Vice-Capt.) and Tyler. 

Games 
1. We went into our first game of a double-header at home, against 
Northwood, having been told that they would be a hard team to bear. 
Ar the half we were leading 3-1 and felt that the game was ours, but 
much to our dismay, Northwood launched a tremendous offensive, 




Back Roiv: J. D. H. Partridge, J. G. A. Tyler, J. R. Smethurst, A. Zaporski, D. L. Finlay, 

B. J. Cooper. 
Front Ron-. X. R. Blackburn, S. G. R. Pottinger, Vice-Capt., C. R. Davidson, Capt., D. 

B. McGaughev, J. J. Letch, R. J. Anderson, Esq. 
In Front: C. J. O'Brien. 



scoring three rimes as many goals as we did in the second half to make 
the final score 9-6. Doug Finlay scored three goals, and Davidson, 
Pottinger and O'Brien scored one each. 

2. We were not over-confident in our second of two games against 
Xorthwood, and although we tried our best, we just couldn't seem to 
oet 9;oing, and the opposing team overpowered us by a score of 6-0. 
Although there were many close shots, it is indicated by the score that 
nobody on our team was able to put the ball past the goalie. 

3. Our next g^nie was played against Stanstead, in Montreal, on ,\ 
slippery, rain-soaked field, and since we had to wear running shoes, it 
made ball handling difficult. But even under such conditions we man- 
aged to bring about a 3-0 win. Finlay, Pottinger and Davidson each 
scored once to give us the victors'. 

4. We then moved down to B.C.S. to play a hard fought game against 
a much underrated team, and only were able to draw the match 1-1. 
D.nnv McGaughey scored our only goal. 



50 



THE ASHBURI AN 



5. Almonte High School was our next opponent, and since this was 
Almont's first year in the "big leagues", we expected to win. The final 
score was 14-0 in our favour, and the scorers were Davidson with 8, 
Finlay with 3, Blackburn with 2, and Pottinger with 1. 

6. We played at home the next week against Ridgemont High School, 
and although they were a tough team to beat, Rusty Davidson blasted 
one goal to win the game 1-0. 

7. We visited Lachute High School for our annual game with them, 
and although we tried our hardest we could not seem to get our attack 
moving in the first half. However, we picked up in the second half 
with the wind at our backs, and ended the game in a 2-2 tie. Our two 
scorers were Davidson and Finlay. 

8. After mediocre results in our first game against Ridgemont, we 
looked for better scoring on our part in the second one. We found 
ourselves in much better form than we had been in the first game, and 
went on to win by a more convincing margin of 4-2. Davidson kicked 
in 3 goals while Finlay sneaked one by the goalie to give us the victory. 

9. We looked forward with glee to our game against the Staff. Now 
we were on even terms with the masters, and an occasional hard check 
or a little tentative tripping could not be avoided, much to the boys' 
amusement and the master s injured dignity. I am sure that we all, 
Staff included, had great fun in this game, and the final score was 2-1, 
in favour of the First Team naturally. Our two goals were scored by 
Davidson and Tyler, and M. Varent tallied up for the Staff. 

10. Our last game of the season was played against the Old Boys of 
Ashbury, come to haunt the playing fields once again. It was a very 
enjoyable game for everyone, and since most of us, first team and Old 
Boys, learned soccer from the same coach, the caliber of play was high. 
By the end of the game the score was 3-2 in our favour, indicating the 
closeness of play. Finlay scored two goals while Davidson scored one. 
The two Old Boy's goals were scored by Mike Farrugia, last year's 
Most Valuable Player. 



SCORING STATISTICS 






The Team Yrs. on Team Age 


Pos. 


Goals 


R. Davidson (Capt.) 3 16 


C.F. 


17 


(J. Pottinger (Vice-Capt.) 3 17 


I.R. 


3 


J. Letch 2 18 


R.D. 





J. Tyler 2 


L.D. 


1 


J. Sinethurst 1 16 


R.H. 





T. Coristine 1 17 


R.H. 





1). McGaughey 2 16 


C.H. 


1 


J. Cooper 1 14 


L.H. 





A. Zaporski 1 


L.H. 





C. O'Brien 1 16 


R.W. 


1 


R. Blackburn 2 18 


I.L. 


2 


1). 1 inlay 1 15 


L.W. 


11 


J. Partridge l H 


Goal 


— 


P. Martin 1 17 


R.H. 





P. 1 [ampshire l 16 


C.H. 






THE ASHBURIAX 



n 



Scorers 

Davidson 

Finlay 

Pottinger 

Blackburn 

Tyler 

McGaughey 

O'Brien 



Goals 

17 
11 

3 
2 
1 
1 
1 



Games I'M. 
10 
10 

8 

8 
10 
10 
10 



Average 
1.7 
1.1 

.375 

.25 

.1 

.1 

.1 



UNDER 15 TEAM 

The second soccer team had an extremely successful season this 
year, winning all five of its matches decisively. ' The under fifteen boys 
played two games with Sehvyn House, defeating the black and yellow 
2 to in each contest. 

The slightly older members of the 2nd team played a three game 
scries with Sedburgh. For the first match Ashbury visited Sedburgh 
and everyone spent a most enjoyable afternoon (especially since Ash- 
bury triumphed 8 to 2). The other two games, which were played at 
Ashbury, were won 3 to 2 and 5 to 1. (the success of the last game 
should be attributed to Doug Finlay who, on seeing his girl friend 
watching, was inspired to new heights, scoring; four of the five goals). 
In general, everyone had an exciting season and many are already- look- 
ing forward eagerly to an equally successful term next year. 

Rear Row: R. J. \ddleman, J. E. F. Bryan, I. C. B. Pemberton, Esq., P. W I Martin 
J. I . Brady. 

Middle Row: J D Shepherd, M. C. Polk, C. P. Roberts, D. A. Spry, M. A. Taschereau, 

A. G. Podhradsky. 
Front Row. J. S. Evans, J. S. Coristine, G. C. Greenstone, B. A. J. Hampshire G \1 

Samples, C. L. Collyer. 




THE ASH BU RI AN 




Front Row: C. J. O'Brien, P. D. Hunt, G. B. Keffer. 

Back Ron-. S. \1. Parker, R. Berrv, D. L. Finlav, C. Davidson. 



FOOTBALL AND SOCCER DINNER 

This pleasant event was held as usual in Symington Hall on Wed- 
nesday, November 22nd, at 7: 30 p.m. The Headmaster (as Chairman), 
a number of distinguished guests, and the coaches and players of the 
football and soccer teams were in attendance. 

After a short speech of welcome by the chairman and grace by the 
Chaplain, the gathering set to on a feast which in quality and quantity 
of viands did full justice to the occasion. 

At the conclusion of the meal the toast to Her .Majesty the Queen 
was proposed by the chairman, Mr. Perry, who then proceeded in his 
inimitable manner to introduce the guests and to call upon those who 
were to propose the toasts. 

Mr. Brain in toasting the School created a humorous and original 
precedent by pronouncing it in Latin. The response was made by 
S. ( i. Pottinger, co-captain of the School. Pottinger's short speech was 



THEASHBURIAN 53 

perhaps nor quite so erudite as was the roast, but ar least equally 
intelligible ro myst of the gathering. 

Next came the toast to teams by Mr. Belcher and the response bv 
R. Berry, Captain of the football team. 

The toast to the coaches was proposed by Mr. A. B. R. Lawrence, 
Chairman of the Board of Governors, with the reply by 'Tiny' 1 ler- 
mmn, for many successful years First Team coach. 

We then had a word on football generally, from Mr. Ron Lan- 
caster, Ashbury's Rough Rider, and from A. F. Gill, Co-Captain of the 
School and Vice-Captain of Football. 

All speeches were expressed with a strong vein of humour and in 
view of the limited time before the TV showing of a drey Cup playoff, 
were mercifully brief. 

The evening came to a close with the presentation of colours and 
awards by members of the Board of Governors, and with presentations 
to the coaches by the members of the teams. 

The awards included: 

Most Valuable Player Trophy — First Football — R. Berry 

Second Football — P. Hunt 
First Soccer — C. Davidson 

.Most Improved Player Trophy — First Football — S. M. (). Parker 

Second Football — G. KefTer 
First Soccer — C. O'Brien and 
D. Finlay 



HOCKEY 

FIRST TEAM 

1961-2 marked the first year of operation of the Ottawa High 
School Hockey League. Ashbury finished in first place, winning five 
and tying one! In addition, ten exhibition games were played during 
the season. 

The year opened against our customary starting rivals, Currie 
Electric. The result was pleasing, as we won 8-6. Thence to a League 
game, against powerful Tech, and a 3-3 tie. A victory over Kemptville 
prepared the team for the Northwood double-header, which we split 
by scores of 10-3 and 7-8. Returning to League play, the team initiated 
a six-game winning streak that extended through the semi-finals. The 
victims were St. Pius X (5-2), St. Pats (9-1), Ottawa U. (4-3), St. 
Joseph's (9-4), F.astview (3-2), and in the 'semis', Ottawa U. (7-3). 
In this time also were the important games against B.C.S. and L.C.C., 
which we lost, a tie with Stanstead, and a victory over k.A.S. 



m t 



Back Row. M. J. Copeland, D. S. Cowan, G. B. Keffer, B. J. Berry. 

Middle Row. M. Gerrie, Esq., P. R. Davidson, A. P. D. Gamble, C. R. Davidson, C. A. 

Flood, S. M. Parker, R. H. Perry, Esq., I. R. Andrew. 
Front Row. R. B. Southam, S. J. Levitz, Vice-Capt., R. B. Logie, Capt., J. I. Bethune, 

I. R. Sinclair. 



The league finals against Tech saw us without the services of two 
players, through unfortunate circumstances, and the loss was sorely 
evident. However, the team played as a team, with the result that our 
two losses to Tech were taken with no gripes or excuses. 

The final fixture of the season was the traditional match versus the 
Old Boys. Fortunately for the School, the alumni had previous engage- 
ments in several cases, and we won 7-5, thus closing off a very successful 
nineteen games. 

Mr. Gerrie, the coach, had this to say; "We had a young team, 
filled with determination and desire, and I was very much pleased with 
their performance". 

Richard Logie won the scoring title with 65 points, with Jamie 
Levitz second with 59. Also, the fact that there were fourteen goal- 
scorcrs indicates that this was no individualistic year. 

In closing, the team would like to thank Mr. Gerrie for his coaching 
on the ice, and his witty comments elsewhere. 



r H E A S HliURl AN 



55 





$ rf.» \^ 











GAMES PLAYED 










1. 


vs. Currie Elecrric 




8-6 


W 






2 


vs. Tech H.S. 




3-3 


T 






3. 


vs. Kemptville A.S. 




8-3 


w 






4. 


vs. Northwood 




10-3 


w 






5. 


vs. Northwood 




7-8 


L 






6. 


vs. St. Pius X H.S. 




5-2 


W 






7. 


vs. St. Pats H.S. 




9-1 


W 






8. 


vs. Kemptville A.S. 




6-5 


w 






9. 


vs. L.C.C. 




3-7 


L 






10. 


vs. Stanstead 




4-4 


T 






11. 


vs. Ottawa U. H.S. 




4-3 


W 






12. 


vs. Eastview H.S. 




3-2 


W 






13. 


vs. B.C.S. 




3-9 


L 






14. 


vs. Ottawa U. H.S. 




7-3 


w 






15. 


vs. Kemptville A.S. 




9-1 


w 






16. 


vs. Tech H.S. 




4-12 


L 






17. 


vs. Tech H.S. 




1-4 


L 






18. 


vs. Old Boys 




7-5 


\\ 








Won 12 Goals for 


- 110 










Lost 5 Goa 


s against 


- 85 










Tied 2 














SCORING STATISTICS 










Goals Assists 


Points 


Min. 


in 1\ 


nalties 


Logie 




34 31 


65 




19 




Levitz 




30 29 


59 




10 




Cowan 




16 20 


36 




4 




Berry I 




14 13 


27 




31 




Bethunc 




5 8 


13 




14 




Iverson 




4 6 


10 




- 




Berry II 




3 5 


8 




4 




Parker 




3 2 


5 




14 




Davidson II 




2 


2 




6 




Keffcr 




1 2 


3 




- 




Steven 




1 


I 




— 




Gamble 




1 


1 




8 




Davidson I 




1 


1 




- 




Flood 




2 


2 




18 





S 6 TH E ASHBURI AN 

TEAM 

Logie, Richard (Capt.) — Determination and the will to win led Rich 
to the scoring title. When called upon to share the goal-tending 
job, he led us to our important league victory. 

I.i \ii/, Jamie (Vice Capt.) — Second only to Logie in the league 
scoring battle, Jamie was on the power plav and killed penalties. 
He is capable of fulfilling his wish, to play college hockey. 

Bethune, John — The teams "Work Horse", was seldom relieved of his 
duties, and seldom complained. 

Cowan, Doug — Quiet and shy, and consequently called "Dirtv Doug", 
he was a fine playmaker and valuable back-checker. 

Flood, Chris — Although only able to play a few games this year, Chris 
was a great asset to the team. 

Davidson, Rusty — As center of the second line, Rusty played steady 
hockey, but prefers the larger soccer nets. 

Parker, Stu — Stu likes to remember the second Northwood game. A 
steady player who back checks well, he violates the rules occasion- 
ally, but never intentionally. 

Kefeer, George — George had a slow start but never stopped trying. 
His persistent attitude payed off toward the end of the season. 

Berry, Bruce — Bruce doesn't have the hardest shot on the team, but he 
shows great potential for future seasons. 

Davidson, Pete — Defence was a new role for Pete, and as the season 
progressed he showed great improvement. 

Gamble, Dave — As he is following in the family tradition, we expect 
great things of this young fellow. 

Copeland, Mike — .Mike was a hard worker until he missed the bus to 
Montreal, and was injured while playing with the second team. 

Southam, Rick — He shows great promise as a goalie, and should be an 
asset to the team in future seasons. 

Sinclair, Sandy -- Sandy had more stitches than shutouts but played 
several fine games. Against Stanstead, for some reason, he was 
brilliant. 

Andrew, [an — Our manager received little praise for a job well done. 
Th inks. Andy. 



T HE ASH B U Rl AN 



51 



SECOND TEAM 

This past year has been a very successful one for our second hockey 
team as we enjoyed a healthy season of six wins and two losses. Our 
sincere thanks go to Mr. Wansbrough for not only an excellent coach- 
ing job on the ice, but also for the helpful hints he gave us at the I Iill- 
field dance. Everyone on the team realizes the importance of the coach 
and the fine work that Mr. Wansbrough has done this year. 

We would also like briefly to extend our greetings to i Iomer\ 
\Spaz\ Earl, and the other I lillfield players who made our weekend and 
our dance such a success. We are looking forward to our visit to 
I Iamilton next year and we hope to be able finally to beat them. Thanks 
also go to Sandy Sinclair who helped us out early in the season by turn- 
ing in two stellar games between the pipes (in the Gatineau game, 
Sandy got a well-deserved shutout), and also to Mike Copeland, Pete 
Bnrakett, Dave Gamble, and Ken Iverson, who made brief appearances 
with the team during the season. 

GAMES PLAYED 



Avlmer 
Gatineau 
Gatineau 
Sedbergh 


Home 
Home 
Away 
Home 




Won 
Won 
Won 

Won 


3-2 
8-0 
8-3 
8-1 


Lakefield 
Sedbergh 
Hillfield 
Pope Pius X 


Away 
A way 
Home 
Home 




Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Won 


4-6 
11-7 

2-4 

7-3 






SECOND HOCKEY STATISTICS 










Goals A 


ssists 


Pts. 


VIM 




Goals A 


ssists 


Vts. 


VIM 


Steven 
Boyd I 

Flam 

Chadderton 
Shepherd 
Partridge 


19 
11 

4 
3 

5 
3 


10 
10 
12 
6 
2 

4 


29 

21 

16 

9 

7 
7 


2 
2 
2 

? 




Garton 

Boyd II 

Parker II 

Finlay 

Copeland 

Barakett 

Wennberg 


3 
1 

1 
1 




1 
2 

•> 


1 



4 
3 

2 

1 
1 

1 



2 

19 




2 




Games 


\\ 


'on 


Lost 


Tied For 


Against 










8 




6 


2 


51 


^25 









SECOND HOCKEY TEAM 

Dawson, Phil — Goaler — The most improved player on the team — 

Phil pulled off some key saves when we needed them most. 
Mosher, Murray - Goaler — Although not a regular, Murray helped a 

great deal in practices and on the road. 
Boyd, Dwaine (Asst. Capt.) - Defense - Our dirty boy (d) - keep the 

enemy coming and Dwaine'll keep them flying. 
Garton, Graham (Asst. Capt.) - Defense - Graham was the second 

half of our stalward defensive pair — too busy swinging — Kay? 
Taschfrfau, Michael — Defense — A good thinker who always kept a 

cool head no matter what the situation. 



I 



f f I 



Back Row. B. M. Chadderton, R. P. Wennberg, B. J. Cooper, I. H. Parker, J. D. H. 

Partridge. 
Middle Ron-. M. B. Wansbrough, Esq., E. L. Lynn, D. J. Shepherd, M. A. Taschereau, 

N. V. Archipov, H. P. Flam, M. Mosher. 
Front Row. D. A. J. Boyd, Co-Vice Capt., D. M. Boyd, Capt., J. P. Dawson, G. R. 

Garton, Co-Vice Capt., D. A. Steven. 



Wknnberg, Ricky — Defense — The weight really heluped Ricky — a 
hard shooter with good hockey sense. 

Boyd, Don (Captain) — L. Wing — One of the mainstays of the team — 
a hard worker with a good shot and a most capable captain. 

Steven, Don — Centre — Lucky around the net and from the blue line, 

but combined effectively with Boyd and Flam. 
Flam, Harry — R. Wing — A fine playmaker and the only backchecker 

on the first line (oops! ) Harry's going to try to teach the 

Chandler natives how to play. 

Partridge, John — L. Wing — 'Rover' played hard and fast — should be 
a mainstay of next year's team. 

Shepherd, David — Centre — A player who always gave his best — a 
good stickhandler, but his effectiveness would increase if he shot 
more often. 

Chadderton, Brian — R. Wing — The guy with the most 'give' — Brian 
never stopped trying, and was often rewarded with important goals. 

Parker, Ian — I,. Wing — Should improve as time progresses, but a little 
more weight will help. 



T HE ASH li U K I A N 59 

Finlay, Doug — Centre — Gave his best while on the ice — gave his best 

while at the dance — Doug has returned r<> Venezuela — best of luck 

and thanks! 
ArchipoVj Nicky — R. Wing — The possessor of a good shot — the 

more he skates, the more he'll get to use that shot. 
Coop] r, Barry — Centre — A late season import who filled the empty 

slot admirably. 
Lynn, Evan — Manager — A good manager who usually saw to the 

team's every need. 

SKIING 

This year most of the emphasis was put on cross-country and dur- 
ing most of the games periods one could find the members of the team 
running a set course around Rockcliffe. This form of training was not 
particularly popular, but it must be admitted that our actual cross- 
country races benefited greatly from it. 

Throughout most of the winter weekends, Ashbury boys could be 
found racing in different cross-country events, whether at Camp 
Fortune or, occasionally, at the Viking Ski Club at Morin Heights. As 
most of our time was filled up with the former nordic event, we did not 
give as much time to the Downhill and Slalom as we would have liked. 

The team had only one group competition between the L.C.C. and 
B.C.S. teams. This was held as usual at .Mont Orford in the Eastern 
Townships. Unfortunately the Dalton Wood competition fell on the 
same date as the Mont Orford event. In spite of all our efforts we only 
managed to place third, losing to Bishops by about 30 points out of 
1,500. Although we missed our coach, Dave Rhodes, who was heading 
for a skiing holiday in Austria and Switzerland, the trip was very enjoy- 
able. Mr7 Anderson accompanied us and Mr. John Irvine went along 
to coach us in Dave's place. 

Next year Dave has great plans for the team where competitions 
are concerned and we hope that we shall do a little more of the Alpine 
side of skiing. 

Awards presented at the Easter Readover were as follows: The 
Evan Gill Trophy for the best individual skier went to Tim Coristine 
and the Ashbury College Cup for the most improved skier to Chris 
Grant. Colours were awarded to Grant and Coristine. 

Lastly, the Chris Coristine Memorial Trophy for the best cross- 
country skier in the school went to Chris Grant. 

In closing I should like to express on behalf of all the team, our 
thanks to Mr. David Rhodes, who came down most days for our practice 
runs and weekend skiing. Also the boys who tried and did not quite 
make the first eight deserve credit. We have great hopes for their 
future success. 






Back Row. B. J. Merrett, W. Armour, J. G. A. Tyler, R. W. Horner, D. F. Rhodes, Esq. 
Front Row. C. J. O'Brien, A. W. Anderson, T. N. Coristine, Capt., C. H. C. Grant, 
C. L. Collyer. 




L. to W.— Grant, Anderson, 
Coristine II. 




"1 



Back Ron-. P. J. Heenev, M. S. Polk, A. D. Wood, K. G. Woollcy, P. W. J. Martin, 

R. L. Lancaster, Esq. 
Front Roiv: P. C. Hunt, A. J. Podhradskv, R. J. Addleman, Co-Capt., L. B. Gallinger, 

D. J. Mulaner. 
Absent: J. P. O. Henrv, Co-Gapt., J. B. Draper. 



BASKETBALL 

FIRST TEAM 

Basketball at Ashburv went fairly well this season. Although it 
certainly was not the year for winning games, it was a year of real 
experience for all who took part. The team played eight games; two at 
home in the RockclifTe Park Public School Gym and six games away. 
The last game was the only winning tally. It was played against the 
Jewish Community Centre junior team, and in that encounter we man- 
aged to run up a 40-31 score in our favour. 

Examining the games record one can easily see where more 
experience could possibly have helped the team on several occasions. 
However, all members of the team showed considerable improvement 
at the end of the season, and sportsmanship, good conduct and fair play 
were characteristic of all games. 



62 TH E ASHBUR1 AN 

Richard Addleman, a member of last year's team and co-captain 
this year, was the top scorer with a 7.7 average per game. He suffered 
a broken ringer early in the season but returned to spark the team both 
on offense and defense. Dave Mulaner was second highest scorer with 
a 7.1 average. He also played well on defense. Peter Hunt and Paul 
Henry are to be congratulated for their stalwart work throughout the 
season; Hunt especially for his showing in the final game, and Henry 
for a job continuously well done. Draper, Gallinger, Martin, Podhrad- 
sky, Polk I, Wood I, and Woolley played their parts fully in a losing 
and once in a winning cause. 

Special hearty thanks are extended by the team to the coach, Mr. 
Ron Lancaster, who did a great deal for our boys, combining his skill, 
experience and good humour to show old and new ideas of the 
fundamentals of basketball. Mr. Anderson, Mr. Snelgrove, Mr. Gerrie, 
Mr. Black and Pat Heeney, the manager, should also be thanked for 
making the season and games possible. 

Eyes are cast toward next season and the seasons following. If the 
team can stay more or less together, playing together and gaining more 
experience playing, then next year and the years after it will probably 
prove to be more profitable ones. However, we may be certain to see 
the Ashbury First Basketball Team playing and learning, winning and 
losing. 

RECORD OF GAMES 

1. vs. Kemptville Agricultural School 

2. vs. Kemptville Agricultural School 

3. vs. Stanstead 

4. vs. Lower Canada College 

5. vs. Ottawa Boys Club 

6. vs. Lower Canada College 

7. vs. Ottawa Boys Club 

8. vs. Jewish Community Centre 



away 


Lost 


58-15 


home 


Lost 


52-16 


away 


Lost 


45-37 


home 


Lost 


61-17 


away 


Lost 


31-29 


away 


Lost 


76-36 


away 


Lost 


29-26 


away 


Won 


40-31 



THE ASH BU Rl A S 



63 



CROSS-COUNTRY WINNERS 

Front Row. Loftus, Rossy. 
Back Row: Keffer, Gallinger. 




cross-country 

The annual cross-country races this year were held on April 28th 
under rather poor running conditions. Ottawa was having a spell of 
hot, humid weather which made things difficult for the contestants. In 
spite of the heat, however, 213 bovs participated making this the largest 
entry in the school's historv. Some changes were made in the courses 
run this year which rules out the possibility of records but nevertheless 
all four categories were run in fast times. 



1st 

2nd 

3rd 



TABULATED RESULTS 



Under 11 



Intermediate 



Loftus 
Barnes 
Tvler III 



junior 
1 st Rossy 
2nd Hampshire II 
3rd MacCarthv 



Under 1 1 
Junior 
Intermediate 
Senior 



10:00 



11:15 



1st 

2nd 

3rd 



Keffer 

Mackenzie II 
Boyd II 



Senior 



1st Gallinger 
2nd Coristine I 
3rd Cowan 

HOUSE POINTS 

Alexander Woollcombe 

5i 

8 8 

15 1 

17 15 



20:01 



25:30 



Connaught 

5 



TOTAL 



-KH 



29' 






i 



M. Gerrie, Esq., D. B. McGaughey, J. R. Smethurst, R. V. Berrv, Capt., J. P. O. Henrv, 
B. J. Berry. 



TENNIS 

A handicap of cadets and cross-country did not prevent coach 
Gerrie from producing a satisfactory tennis team this season. Although 
the annual pilgrimage to Northwood School in Lake Placid resulted in 
defeat, everybody took it with a grin. 

In singles, number one man Bob Berry went down to defeat to the 
tune of 6-1, 6-3. Number two, Paul Henry, played excellent tennis and 
took his opponent 6-1, 6-4. John Smethurst, number three, retired at 
6-3, 6-4. Next man, Danny A4cGaughey, after losing the first set 6-1, 
nearly pulled an upset in the second but his opponent eeked out a 7-5 
victory. Bruce Berry, the "kid" of the team, found it possible to defeat 
his tall adversary in one game only. In doubles, after hard fought 
contests, both pairs bowed before their opponents. 

The trip itself was quite a success and next year with all hoping to 
return except Bob Berry, Ashbury has hopes of taking Northwood. 






Back Row. J. I). H. Partridge, G. P. Haslam, A. D. Ivey, C. A. G. Lodge, R. J. 

Addleman. 
Front Row. J. T. Brady, N. M. Lynn, R. B. Logic, Vice-Cant., S. G. R. Pottinger, 

Capt. C. J. O'Brien, C. L. Collyer. 
hi Front: P. A. J. Hampshire. 



CRICKET 



FIRST XI 

Although the over-all season in cricket presented a fairly healthy 
picture, the First XIs season was, let's face it, far below average. 
Missing many of last year's stalwarts, the team, in spite of some sturdy 
individual efforts, wound up with an almost unbroken record of rever- 
sals, and perhaps the less recorded here, the better. Sufficient to say 
that out of some five regular fixtures of the First XI proper, the score 
sheets showed no victories. 

The season opened April 21st with the Staff game. Here the 
Staff scored 145 against 75 by First XL An outstanding feature here 
was the Headmaster's 14 runs a fine vestigeal remnant of former prowess. 

In the first game against Bishops', played on May 12th (away), 
we lost by a score of 29-247, with Khazzam batting 100 of our hosts' 
total. In the second game against the same adversaries, played on May 
26th (at home), the score was 30-2SO, against, with the same redoubtable 



66 TH E ASHBUR1 AN 

Khazzam batting 103. Our congratulations go to this remarkably fine 
bat. 

The Old Boys' match was played on June 2nd, with the visitors' 
sides supplemented by Mr. Wansbrough and Mr. Lancaster of our 
Teaching Staff. In this game the Old Boys emerged victors by 120-64, 
with Air. Wansbrough knocking up 36, Greg Grant 16, Ned Rhodes, 
David Rhodes and Doug Heeney 13 each. Mr. Lancaster, of Rough 
Rider fame, also scored 13 runs, Not Out, and is reported as thinking 
quite highly of the game of cricket, which hitherto had failed to engage 
his attention. In the bowling department, David Rhodes took four 
wickets. 

While no awards were made to any First XI players by the coach, 
Mr. M. B. Wansbrough, Logie and Pottinger were the best of our bats 
(in the Staff game Pottinger batted 30 and in a post season game against 
O.V.C.C. Logie scored 51), while Collyer and Addleman, two quite 
young additions, took virtually all the wickets in the season's play. 

In House cricket, Woollcombe fell before Connaught, which was 
in turn defeated by Alexander, ultimate winner of inter-house competi- 
tion in all sports. 

As has been freely admitted, the season was somewhat dismal for 
our First XI; however, let us comfort ourselves with the thought that 
next year we have some promising material coming up. 



^^3 




Back Row. M. A. Taschereau, A. P. D. Gamble, R. P. Wennberg, I. R. Andrew, 

D. A. Spry, C. R. Roberts. 
Front Row. B. J. Cooper, J. P. Dawson, R. B. Southam, J. D. Shepherd, Capt., 

G. Samples, B. D. Speedie. 



UNDER SIXTEEN 

The Seconds, ably coached by Messrs. Dalton and Marshal, enjoyed 
a good season this year, defeating the Governor-General's XI, Sedbergh, 
and losing only to our arch-rivals, Bishop's College School. Even our 
own Firsts were given a hard time in a practice match! 

Our batting backbone was made up of Roberts, (17.8), Wennberg, 
(11.25), and Andrew, (8.0), with Samples and Shepherd forming the 
bowling end of things. The team in general was very good; however, 
if some of the weaker members had been as good batsmen as they were 
fielders, an undefeated season might have resulted. 

Trusting that the Firsts don't steal too many players next year, there 
is no reason that with a lot of work on the batting, we should not make 
"crumpets and tea" out of our rivals from the Eastern Townships, B.C.S. 

SCORING STATISTICS 

Governor-General's XI 19 Ashbury 88 

Sedbergh School 2} Ashbury 30 

Sedbergh School 73 Ashbury 86 

Bishop's C.S. 117 Ashbury 83 

Bishop's C.S. 88 Ashbury 81 

Won: 3; Lost 2; Runs for Ashbury 368; Against 320. 



68 



THE ASHBURIAN 




Back Row. D. J. Mulaner, D. A. J. Boyd, R. S. Atkins. 

Front Row. M. S. Polk, G. B. Kcffer,'l. M. Ewing, Capt., P. C. Hunt, L. B. Gallinger. 



TRACK 

This season under the coaching of Mr. Anderson and Mr. Black, 
the track team competed successfully in three track meets. 

OTTAWA VALLEY MEET 
The OVHSAA meet was held in R. D. Campbell stadium. This 
was the first competition of the season, and our team did not do as well 
as had been hoped. Iain Ewing, the captain of the team, placed second 
in the Intermediate 220, losing out by inches only, and finished third in 
the 100-yd. dash. Alike Polk set a junior record in winning the broad 
jump with a leap of 18' 71". 

ONTARIO CHAMPIONSHIPS 
Ewing and Polk were the two Ashbury boys among 27 selected 
from the Ottawa area to compete in the provincial championships. Un- 
fortunately, neither boy placed in the top four in their events, but both 
gained valuable experience in such stiff competition. 



THE ASHBURI AN 



69 



MONTREAL Ml I I 

The GMIAA was the most successful competition of the year for 
the seven-man Ashhury ream. Each one of the boys finished in the 

top six of his event, which is quite a credit to the coaches and the team. 

Ewing picked up the most points of the day for the Ashhury 
team. In the class 4. 100-yd. dash the final was practically a dead heat, 
and Iain was given second place, tying the meet record of 10.3 sec. 
He also placed third in the broad jump with a leap of 19' 4", and fifth 
in the 220 with a time of 24 Hat. 

In class 2, Mulaner took 4th place in the javelin; Boyd fifth place 
in the shot put; KerTer fifth in the 880 and Polk fourth in the ho}), step 
and jump. 

In class 3, Pete Hunt placed 3rd in the broad jump. 

In class 5, Gallinger ran fifth in the 220. 

At the close of the season, Iain Ewing was presented with the Dr. 
J. B. Ewing Trophy for the Most Valuable Member of the Track Team, 
for the second consecutive year. 

The track season must be considered a successful one from all 
angles, and the coaches are looking forward to another good one next 
spring. 



HOUSE COMPETITION 

This year, the House Competition was the closest it has been in a 
long time, as the outcome was not decided until the final event. In 
spite of a bad start, Alexander House came on strong in the spring 
term to win the cross-country, cricket, and track, edging out Connaught 
House for the Wilson Shield. The results of the individual events 
were as follows: 



Sport 

Senior Soccer 
Intermediate Soccer 
Junior Soccer 
Senior Hockey 
Intermediate Hockey 
Junior 1 lockev 
Cross-Country 
Senior Cricket 
Junior Cricket 
Sports Day, Senior 
Junior 



Winner 

Woollcombe 

Woollcombe 

Connaught 

Connaught 

Alexander 

Connaught 

Alexander 

Alexander 

Connaught 

Alexander 

Connaught 



THE ASHBURIAN 



7J 



OLD BOYS' SECTION 

Ottawa: 

The Annual Old Boys' Reunion was held on the week end of 
October 28th, 1961. The Programme of events included: 

First Football against Northwood; Luncheon served by the Moth- 
ers' Guild; 1st Soccer against Lachute High School; followed by a 
Supper Dance in Argyle on the Saturday evening. This was well 
attended, and a good time was enjoyed by all. 

On Sundav, October 29th, a special service was held in the Chapel 
to unveil and dedicate the Woollcombe Memorial Window. This 
dedication was performed bv Archdeacon C. ( i. I lepburn, B.A., D.C.L.. 
M.C., C.B.E., and is reported elsewhere in this magazine. After the 
Service, a reception was held at the home of the Chairman, for Old 
Boys and their wives. 

Montreal: 

The Old Boys Reunion this year was held at the University Club 
on December 9th, 1961. Those signing the Register included: 



M. B. H. Bishop 
A. B. R. Lawrence 
R. W. Coristine 
G. K. dishing 
P. D. Brodhead 
T. R. Brodhead 
D. Ross 
D. R. Wilson 
H. F. Stanfield 
W. A. Weeks 
H. J. Ronalds 
P. Blakenev 
J. B. Wedd 

D. Flam 
H. S. Price 

E. H. Van der Kaay 
G. F. H. Wallis 
W. A. Grant 

P. Foulkes 



G. A. Woollcombe 

H. N. Blakeney 

R. H. Craig 

M. Farrugia 

|. C. Merrett 

C. W. G. Gale 

J. G. M. Lemoine 

L. F. C. Hart 

L. H. Sibley 

J. K. Jobling 

A. C. Dunning 

F. W. Baer 

F. Pretula 

C. Flam 

H. W. Price 

ML Birchwood 

P. H. P. Wollcombe 

R. H. Perrv 



The Luncheon was addressed briefly by the Chairman and also by 
the Headmaster. 

Toronto: 

An Old Boys' Reunion was held at the Park Plaza Hotel in Toronto 
on February 2nd, 1962. Among those signing the register were: 



77 THE ASHBURIAN 

M. Widdrington L. A I. Killaly 

H. W. Biggar R. G. R. Lawrence 

Charles Tupper E. T. C. Orde 

D. Gamble T. M. Devine 

It is interesting to note that Charles Tupper is one of the Oldest 
living graduates of Ashbury, having been a student in 1891 when Ash- 
bury was founded. The School has a copy of the report issued to Mr. 
Tupper in 1891. At that time, Tupper was in Form II where there 
were 17 boys. The founder, Canon Woollcombe taught everything 
except French which was taught by a Mr. J. Fleury. Tupper evidently 
was a good student. Mr. Tupper is also a descendant of Sir Charles 
Tupper, one of the Fathers of Confederation. 

The Headmaster spoke at this gathering and was enthusiastic about 
the future of the School. 

Ottawa: 

Another gathering of the Old Boys' of Ottawa was held on June 
11th, after the meeting of the Corporation in the School Dining Hall. 
Among those signing the Register were: 

Bishop E. S. Reed L. M. Killaly 

E. K. Davidson R. R. Drake 

V. B. Rivers A. J. Perley-Robertson 

H. Borbridge A. G. U. Mordy 

S. F. M. Wotherspoon C. S. McLaren 

F. T. Gill J. H. Gill 

R. H. Perry G. H. Whitcher 

Col. J. O. Fraser R. S. Hyndman 

R. L. Wilson W. G. Ross 

|. S. Rowan-Legg C. G. Gale 

L. R. Gisborne C. W. G. Gale 

R. M. Johnson R. E. L. Gill 

S. C. Evans A. B. R. Lawrence 

L. H. Sibley J. J. Marland 

J. C. Merrett L. C. D. Palmer 
J. S. Irvin 

The Chairman and the Headmaster spoke at this gathering and botk 
were pleased with the development of the School. 

Amonc I nosi A i n.NDiNG University During The Past Year: 

David Flam reports that there are now nineteen Old Boys attending 
McGill this year, seven of whom received degrees. The following is a 
list of our representatives in various phases of McGill life: 



THE ASHBURIAN 



11 



M. Hicks 
W. Lawson 
M. Bishop 
T. Brodhead 
A. L. Lackey 
J. Bogue 
A I. Farrugia 
G. Gale 
D. Flam 



L. Fattal 
|. Yates 
I). R. Wilson 
G Flam 
T. Fattal 
H. Short 
V. Fascio 
I). Ross 
D. Brodhead 



Carle ion University: 

J. Springer 

C. Mussel Is 
J. Tucker 

D. Dunn 

R. C Monks 



P. Rowan-Legg 

S. Gamble 
F. Reid 

]. Rowan-Legg 
P. Wilson 



University of Toronto: 

J. Cooper 
I. dimming 



P. Noel-Bentley 
M. Mclnnes 



University of Manitoba: 
C. Cantlie 



University of Ottawa: 

R. Conway 
R. Lackey 
C. B. Saxe 



S. R. Mirskv 
L. Whitmarsh 
P. Beavers 



Laval University: 

G. R. MacLaren 

Mount Allison University 
C. Pontbriand 



L T NIVERSITY OF NEW BRUNSWICK: 

B. Jacobsen M. Kirkbride 



R.R. Mambert 



Cornell University: 

J. Sarkis Lindell 



74 T H E ASHBUR1 AN 

Teachers' College, Ottawa: 

J. Kerruish A. MacKinnon 

University of Mexico: 
T. Sugden 

Bishops' University: 

P. Geggie E. Detchon 

University of Saskatchewan: 
J. Chamard 

MacDonald College: Institute of Education: 
L. F. C Hart 

University of British Columbia: 

R. Southam G. Robinson M. Butcher 

Dalhousie University: 

R. R. Mclnnes S. Mclnnes 

University of Maine: 
H. K. Pickens 

Washington and Lee University: 
J. D. MacLaurin 

University of Brussells: 
G. Verhaegen 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute: 
V. Rivers 

Osgoode Hall: <, 

L. M. Killaly 

Sir George Williams' University: 

B. N. Goodis D. Flam 

Colgate University: 

B. A. Zaporski 

GENERAL NOTES 

Geoff Birkett (1915)— now residing in Vancouver writes of a visit to 
Mr. D. E. C. Wood, who taught French at Ashbury before World 
War I. "I had not seen Baisey since 1914 when he joined 
Kitchener's Army as a buck private. He is still teaching School at 
Sussex and is still interested to know everything connected with 
Ashbury". 

F. B. Pilgrim (1948)— has been appointed Headmaster of Ridley 
College, St. Catharines. "Ted", as he is known to many of his 



THE ASHBURIAN is 

friends, was I lead Boy at Ashbury in 1945. He has his B.A. and 
M.A. from Bishops' University, taught ar B.C.S. until this year. 

May we wish him every success in his new post. 

E. W. T. Gill (1919)— has been appointed High Commissioner to 

Australia. He has been a member of the Board of Governors at 
the School. Mr. Gill is an active friend of the School, and we wish 

him well in Australia. 

G. P. Jackson— Head Boy in 1954 is working for his Master of Educa- 
tion degree at Bishops' University. At present he is teaching in 
Quebec City. 

Blair Gilmour— recently named Sales Manager of National Printers 
Limited. 

Peter B. Smellie— has been appointed General Manager of R. L. Grain 
Limited. 

W. F. Hadley— has been named a Queen's Counsel by the Attorney- 
General of Quebec. 

E. P. Xewcombe— has been named a Queen's Counsel by the Attorney- 
General of Ontario. 

J. X. Hodgson— has his M.B.A. from Stanford College, and is in the 
U.S. Army. 

J. H. R. D. Van Roijen— a graduate of the L'niversity of L'trecht in 
Law. now in the Netherlands Army for two years. 

P. Ince— working in Radio in Jamaica. 

P. Carver— has been teaching in England, now returned to Canada, and 
will be teaching in Almonte next year. 

J. S. Irvin Jr.— now working in the Canadian Bank Note Office in 
Montreal. 

Rodney Moore— now reading Law at Keble College, Oxford. 

A. Yankatachar— studying Science at the University of Mysore. 

Graduating this year arc: 

Allison Lackey, B.A. (Bishops')— who now has his M.D.C.M. from 
McGill, who will be doing his internship at Kingston General 
Hospital. 

Michael Hicks, B.Sc. (McGill)— received his Master of Science degree 
from McGill in Animal Physiology. 

Victor Rivers— received his Bachelor of Aeronautical I'nirincerincr from 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He graduated with honours, this 
Spring and won a special prize for airplane design on a project 
which took him over 150 hours. He is now working at Canadair, 
and hopes to continue with his studies for his Master's decree. 



76 THEASHBUR1AN 

Victor Fascio— received his Bachelor of Arts degree with First Class 

Honours in English from McGill. He has also been a University 

Scholar, and acted in several Players' Club Productions during the 

year. 
Leon Fattal— also a University Scholar, received his Bachelor of 

Electrical Engineering Degree at McGill with Honours. He has 

also received a Scholarship to continue work for his Master's degree. 
George Verhaegen— graduates this year with his Ph.D. in Physical 

Chemistry from the University of Brussells. 
David Flam— has his Bachelor of Science degree from McGill and hopes 

to study Dentistry. He also played Hockey and Golf. 
William Lawson— received his Bachelor of Science degree from 

McGill. 
John Bogue and Tony Fattal received Bachelor of Commerce degrees 

from McGill. 
Chris Nowakowski— hopes to graduate from the University of the 

Sorbonne this Spring, and is interested in Foreign Affairs. 
W. G. Ross, M.A. (McGill)— has been appointed the first Lecturer in 

Geography at Bishops' University. He is now in Peru studying 

the Geography and development of that country. 
David Rhodes— has been appointed a Director of Rhodes' Real Estate, 

and hopes to be married soon. 



Stephen Woollcombe writes, from "on top of a Himalayan Peak" 
on April 26th: "Here in India I am teaching English to boys and girls 
between the ages of eleven and fifteen, in a modern school on the out- 
skirts of a fair sized city. I came with fourteen other young Canadian 
graduates, three of whom are in Ceylon, two in Sarawak, and the rest 
in India. 

"I have met all kinds of people, from peasants to Maharajas; I have 
met dancers, College Professors, farmers, fishermen and teachers; I have 
met Muslims, Sikhs, Parsees, Christians, and devotees of assorted Hindu 
Gods." 

We shall look forward to a visit from you, Steve, when you return, 
and to hearing much more about this. 

Many Old Boys have dropped into the School during the past year, 
and we arc always pleased to welcome them and show them around. 
Many of these have signed the Visitor's book, some signatures as usual 
cannot be read; others included:— Bruce Hillary; Mike Bishop; John 
Sarkis; David Flam; Dudley Phillips, a Master here in 1929; N. G. 
Guthrie; George MacLaren; Colin Cantlie; David Ross; Bob Lackey; 
Allison Lackey; Cam Tucker; Mervin Sutherland; Mike Berridge; Peter 
Rowan-Legg. 



THE ASH li U R I A K 77 

Mike Berridge — is now working in Montreal — studying to be a 
Tea-Buyer — also has visited Ceylon and other tea growing countries. 

Mervin Sutherland — is working- in .Montreal for the Bell 1 elephone 
Company of Canada. 

A tribute should be paid here to James W'edd, who very rarely has 
missed a First Team Hockey Match since he left the school in 1955. 
I le still helps to Coach teams whenever he can. 

Brian Seed — (also) writes from inside the Arctic Circle our 
most northerly correspondent. He spends six months out of every year 
with the Geological Survey up North. "I [ere there is no ink, and it 
gets as warm as 30 degrees below zero". 

Brill Draper dropped in to the School recently with his new wife 
— and said hello. We also hear that Robert Bruce is at the University 
of Western Ontario studying Theology. 

E. P. Taylor's "Flaming Page" won the Queen's Plate at the 
Woodbine .Meet in Toronto on June 16th. 



SOME VITAL STATISTICS 

Marriages 

Hodgson-McGregor— On November 25th, 1961 in St. Christopher's 

Episcopal Church, .Milwaukee, Barbara to Jack Norwood Hodgson. 
Kamcke-Kenxedy— In January, 1962, at St. Matthias Church, Wset- 

mount, Leslie Day to Craig Kamcke. 
Killaly-Pearson— On July 22nd, 1961, in Trinity College Chapel, 

Toronto, Patricia Joan to Laurence Killaly. 
Wedd-Kingsbury— On February 9th, 1962, in Ottawa — Denise Marie 

to James B. Wedd. 
Widdrington-Lundy— On January 5th, 1962, in Grace Church On- 

The-Hill, Toronto, Judith Ann to Michael Widdrington. 

We also hear that Murray Hogben and Richard Elmer have recent 
additions to their families. 

Deaths 

Dwyer— On May 29th, 1960, Michael, in Toronto. 

McMaster— On January 4th, 1962, in Montreal, Ross Huntingdon, the 

donor of the Public Speaking Prizes, and a former member of the 

Board of Governors, and father of D. Ross McMaster, Q.C., a 

prominent Old Boy. 
Moore— On January 2nd, 1962, in Montreal, Robert Gerald, son of Mr. 

and Mrs. Robert Moore, in his 22nd year. 
Reid— On May 3rd, 1962, in Victoria, B.C., Vice-Admiral Howard, 

former Chief of the Naval Staff, in his 65th year. 




HM's HOUSE 



THE ASHBURIA \ 



19 



PREFECTS 



POTTINGER, GRAHAM-Co. Head Boy: "To eat is hitman; 
to digest divine". 

Last fall, his fifth at Ashbury, Pot attained the ultimate goal of CO-head 
boy. Faced with these new duties and responsibilities, he has nevei 
faltered, and has contributed a great deal to the success of this school 
year, both athletically and academically. In addition to his domestic- 
duties, he has found time to participate most successfully in sports .is 
Vice-Captain of the First Soccer Team, and Captain of the First Cm kit 
XI, in addition to keeping up a passing average iii his Grade 15 General 
Arts course. He is also a member of the Senior Choir, and the Servers' 
Guild, distinguishing himself in the latter capacity when he was asked 
to preach at St. Bartholomew's and St. Margaret's, as well as in our 
own chapel. Socially, Pot managed to compile the second highest total 
telephone time m the school, and rarely missed a dance, although he was 
seldom seen on the dance floor. Next year he plans to attend Bishops' 
University for a Theology course, and we all wish him the best of luck. 




\ v 



r 



GILL, ALAN— Co. Head Boy: "Whence is thy learning? 
Hath thy toil O'er books consumed the midnight oil?" 

During his six year sojourn at Ashbury, Al Gill has established himself 
as a hard-working, conscientious and amiable young man. The com- 
bination of all these qualities in any one person is quite remarkable. 
Those six years have also seen a noisy and rambunctious junior trans- 
formed into a serious minded, but sometimes still noisy, co-head boy. 
When not toiling over the books or thrilling to the deep sound of his 
raucous voice, Al may be found on the playing fields. This year found 
him indulging in First Football and swimming. Although elected 
Captain of Basketball he cordially declined the offer in favour of obtain- 
ing his 'Y' card in swimming. Unfortunately Al's activities (at school) 
were hampered by a dislocated shoulder. This did not prevent his 
'mean' finger from publishing masterly cadet notices and scrupulous 
paper work, which won for him the 'Best Officer Award'. Next year, if he 
survives up to and including June 22nd, Al will uphold Gill tradition 
and enter U of T and with his "articulate" manner, emerge as a 
successful lawyer. 




GILLEAN, PETER: "The elephant is a dainty bird; It flits 
from tree to tree." 

To no one's surprise, Peter became a prefect in September, and since 
then has made his presence felt in all quarters.. Being of stout mind and 
body he participated in the healthy sport of Football, (as a lineman), and 
in the equally healthy sport of Hockey, (as the coach of an eminently 
successful league team). Peter's social life, rather vast in extent, con- 
tinued to march onward this year, as he attended (nearly) all the house 
dances and spread the fame of his graceful ballroom waltzing. As a 
prefect, he excelled in making tea, arguing, and co-ordinating the 
activities of his fellow boarder prefects after eleven p.m. An avid 
disciplinarian, the Big One "bestrode the narrow world like a Colossus", 
exercising his stentorian voice at all possible moments. 
No biographer could neglect to add that he is a fastidious dresser, an 
example of advancement in the Cadet Corps, and the recognized heavy- 
weight of the school. 

Peter feels that his call is to the Church, and, judging by his devotion in 
that area, we ag:ee with him. He intends to pursue his theological studies 
at King's College, Halifax, where his happy smile and ready wit will no 
doubt be very welcome. 



JP^fl 




FLOOD, CHRIS-Captain of the Day Boys: "As the life is, 
so is the speech". 

Chris came to Ashbury five years ago after previous educational stints at 
Elmwood (a well kept secret) and R.P.P.S. This year, his second as a 
Prefect, he was appointed Captain of the Day Boys and spent much of his 
time extolling the virtues of this hard working group. This year also 
marked his emergence into the esoteric circles of the common room 
where he gained the reputation of being one who would never duck an 
issue. Athletically, Flash, under the coaching of his "cool cousin", was 
re-awarded his First Team Football colon- s last autumn. Although elected 
Vice-Captain of Hockey, Ankles decided that he enjoyed belting the 
books better than opponents and so limited his participation to games 
that were expected to draw large trowels. During the spring term Chris 
jo.ned the energetic few that hit the school each day with a great deal 
of fanfare "for a little running" and who always returned in a remark- 
ably fresh condition. Next year the medical profession receives a severe 
setback when Chris heads down east in quest of a degree. However, if 
his attitude in zoology class is indicative, we can be sure that Chris will 
have very little trouble in succeeding. 




80 



THE ASHBURI AN 




BETHUNE, JOHN: "Not to worry! Troubles will soon re- 
solve themselves.'''' 

John, as one of the members of the Prefect body, is continually in need 
of a haircut. This year he was a fullback on the First Football Team, 
Vice-Captain (captain of vice) of the First Hockey Team, mainly playing 
in the defensive spot (although he managed to wander around quite a 
bit out there), he won his first team colours for hockey this year. John 
started the spring term by playing on the First Cricket XI, but after 
loosing an argument with Mr. Wansbrough found himself playing either 
golf or tennis (no one is quite sure which). John was form monitor for 
VIA and was also the Lt. of number two platoon, which copped the 
Best Platoon Award. Among his extra curricular activities we find two 
appearances on High Time, the prosecuting attorney in The Caine 
Mutiny Trial Scene, his Austin A-40, golf, and bowling. He is a 
member of that distinguished society of non-smokers which is fast 
diminishing. 

John will be back with us next year, to try for his senior matriculation. 
He hopes eventually to get into Western for a Business Administration 
Degree. In any case we wish him the best of luck in any endeavour he 
should undertake. 




BLACKBURN, ROSS: "Fools rush in where Angels fear to 
tread". 

Ross, or "Molecule" as he is affectionately labelled by his better friends, 
hails from the "thriving Metropolis" of Rosemere, unmarked on any map. 
He regales the common room with the brilliant patter of the budding 
intellect, and sends us into gales of side-splitting laughter while recount- 
ing his various conquests against the fairer sex. "Normie", has performed 
his duties as a Prefect admirably, and has stuck to the letter of the law 
many times in the face of danger on the flats. He was sergeant of number 
two platoon, and did an excellent job in that capacity His favourite 
sport is soccer, and during the season, this is all he talks about. During 
the winter, his greatest concern was for his car, which sat at home 
buried deepe. - and deeper with each snowfall. Ross's plans for the future 
are as yet uncertain, and who knows, he may yet return to another 
glorious year at Ashbury. Whichever it may be Ross, good luck and 
happy motoring. 



BOOTH, JOHN: "Absence makes the heart grow fonder". 

John is completing his eighth year at Ashbury, and certainly seems the 
better for wear. During the year he contributed to the much needed 
bench strength of the First Football Team, having graduated from last 
year's seconds, and was well on the way to the ski team before suffer- 
ing an unfortunate accident. In the spring term John met up with another 
misfortune; an acute case of mononeucleosis the day after the formal. 
Since John missed so much valuable time he did not think it wise to 
wiite his final exams and will be returning to these hallowed walls 
next year. 




CORISTINE, TIMOTHY NEWELL: "O what a tangled web 
we weave when first we practise to . . ." 

\l(( i spending a number of years at Selwyn House School in Montreal, 
Tim saw the light and came to Ashbury in 1959. He showed his athletic 
prowess in skiing by captaining this year's First Ski Team; in long 
distance running hy a first place in the Cross Country last year and a 
second this year; and by distinguished v>e formances in the broad jump. 
Tim is a firm believer of "Much Work is a Weariness of the Flesh". 
Being well-known for his procrastination at 7:15 p.m., he came under the 
influence of Mr. Sibley's Department of Labour. (It seems he was 
perpetually under the threat of, "Coristine if you're not working in two 
minutes, I'll crucify you.") 

The most outstanding feature of Tim is his social life. He is an avid 
"chcrchcz les femmes" fan and being a romancer of sorts, he uses 
Alexander Graham Bell's invention to great advantage. ("Where's 
Coristine"? "Where else but his telephone". ) Tim. however, is not 
satisfied with one "femme", he likes to play both ends against the 
middle, or at least he did up to the 20th of May this year. "Both ends" 
happened to live in Ottawa, and no doubt there is a third end in 
Montreal. 



THE ASH BU Rl AN 



81 



I WING, IAIN: "Count up the men in this world who let 
success slip away because they ivere modest, and you will 
find their ranks too swelled to join". 

lain, or "Frenchy", as he has been called, is good at virtually everything 

he attempts. If proof is desired of his phen ma] ability, • 'ill to his 

house will bring Immediate confirmation. Besides being Literary Editor 
ot this Magazine, lain (with an "I"), was a member of tin- First Football 
Team, gym team, track team, debating team. High Time team and prob- 
ably several more I have forgotten about. It is rumoured that he also 
succeeds by himself with the fair sex, having escorted i number oi 
Ottawa's leading young socialites to gala evenings on Cloud Nine. 
Although he takes no pride in his car, it may be said, with some 
accuracy, that he uses it for all it is worth, and sees that DO paint is lost 
in the process. In his spare time, Iain may occasionally "crack a book", 
and expose the hapless print to his retentive memory. However, though 
much has been said concerning his achievements, words to describe Iain's 
character are almost inadequate, or, at the least, extremely esoteric. So, 
without further confusing the reader, we conclude by wishing Mr 
Ewing all the best at U of T next year. 




Hi?:. 



HASLAM, GERALD: ''Almost all absurdity of conduct arises 

from the imitation of those whom we cm not resemble". 

Fighting his way back from potential failure, Gerry was most deservedly 
promoted to the Prefect body at Easter. Our red-headed friend is cer- 
tainly a man of no mean achievement: he was the only 'snap' in Football 
history ever to hike the ball over the goal posts, but enough said about 
a touchy subject. Gerry applies his 'gift of the gab' as Captain of the 
Debating Team and hopes to become Prime Minister of our great 
country (for comment, viz. above). Besides being the idol of many 
colour-conscious Toronto girls, a member of the 'High Time' team, he is 
lead singer and skinflint of the Retrospects. Last year, after an out- 
standing (?) season as goaler of Second Hockey, he made the quarter- 
finals of the Optimist Inter-nation Xorth American Public Speaking 
Contest! The spring term brings Gerry a rest from the hard labours of the 
winter study squad (he now skips cricket to study because of the lost 
time of winter) and enlightens us all with his eloquent 'stories' of 
adventures past. If he can spare a moment from drooling over a picture 
of Maurice 'The Angel' Tillet, he may finish the book that he is in the 
process of writing. This fall he's off to McGill and an as yet unnamed 
fraternity. (For life history' read 'Biography of a Schoolboy'). 




LYNN, XEIL: "Who can number the sand of the sea. and the 

drops of rain and the days of eternity." 

Xeil has successfully served a five year sentence at Ashbury and rumour 
reports that he will be transferred to the McGill minimum security 
institution next year. Queen's was considered and rejected on the 
grounds that all play and no work makes Neil a dull boy While on the 
subject of activities, Xeil was a stand-out with the First Soccer field, 
the Second Toboggan field and the Cricket XI. His athletic prowess is 
equalled by none and is a constant source of inspiration to any aspiring 
novice. His devotion to sport in no way detracted from the efficiency of 
his Q.M. stores, where he served in the capacity of Officer in Charge of 
Discipline and in spite of this full schedule, he still found time to 
perform his duties as a Prefect. He tells us he collected a total of fifty 
lines during the year, but Xeil is naturally' modest and we estimate the 
figure to be more in the neighbourhood of fifty-five. Undismayed by his 
rejection by the choir, Xeil as assistant head server in the chapel 
effectively stood and waited and served. His aimiable and conscientious 
manner should make him a success in his summer Civil Service job and 
on the McGill campus in the fall. Good luck Xeil — you may need it. 




PARKER, STUART: ''A young man that blushes is better than 

a young man who turns pale?" 

In his second and final year as Ashbury, S.M.O. (Stu) has been a 
leading academic, sporting and social figure in Upper Sixth Society. In 
athletics, he proved a valuable asset to the First Football (colours) and 
First Hockey. A brief, limping, foray into cricket concluded Stu's sport- 
ing season. In the spring, as a non-participating member of the Sibley 
Study Field, he viewed the Cadet Inspection as a knowledgeable outsider. 
In academics, it seemed that "new robes" of excellence sat just as 
easily as the "old". But how Stu managed to sustain a high scholastic- 
standard and participate in all those "extra-curricular activities", 
(definitely not on campus) is a wonder and amazement to all. Three 
sin cessful appearances on High Time stand to Stu's credit. Off the 
record, jail stories and accounts of former lesser schools scattered the 
world over keep Stu busy talking (when he gets the chance). Anyway, 
next year Stu plans on entering U of T for science. We wish him luck. 
Perhaps there, he can peddle some more of his photographs, stories 
and blushes! 




82 



THE ASHBURI AN 




STEVEN, DONALD: "Becoming a dinner, from day to day, 
is undoubtedly the result of a quick eye and a well cut 

coat". 

Don, as most people call him, was elevated at Easter, at which time he 
was seen to be using the quick eye and wearing the well cut coat men- 
tioned above. Anyway, he has settled comfortably into the groove of 
Prefectorial life, becoming an avid smoker in the process, and leaving his 
room in a constant state of organized confusion. Looking back, we see he 
was quarterback of the Second Football Team, (calling passes in c third 
and six situation), high scorer on the Second Hocky Team, and a 
Charter Member of the Spring Term Study Squad. He is also a member 
of the Debating Team, lead guitarist of the Retrospects and a fan of 
glossy paper-backed novels, which he reads by the dozen. A person of 
no mean social achievements either. Don attended several dances, being 
a happy recipient of one of Pottinger's Dial-a-Date's. It is said that 
Saturday afternoons see him at a local theatre with a friend from 
Wakefield, but this is so far mere rumour. Next year this smiling, singing 
Duck-Lover plans to attend McCill University, to which he will no doubt 
hitch-hike, and we wish him, and his guitar, all the best. 




WOOLLEY, KENNETH: "A close mouth catches no flies". 

Ken is one of the more reserved members of the Prefect Body. One 
thing, however, will bring out a tremendous show of wrath from "the 
cobra": that is someone fiddling around with his little red T.C. sports 
car. This angers Ken beyond all imagination. He will stride up to the 
culprit and bellow some awe-inspiring phrase such as, "Please leave my 
car alone". Such uncontrolled shows of temper, however, are few and 
far between and because of this Ken is very popular with his associates. 
When not riding around in the sports car, Ken found time to play centre 
on the First Football Team, guard on First Basketball Team (winning 
the Snelgrove Trophy) and many and varied positions on the First 
Cricket XI. 

Despite this heavy schedule, Ken still finds time to take his car apart 
every so often, smoke a few ? cigarettes a day and date Jo. Amazingly 
enough he even did a little school work on the side. 



'G^O 



FORM PHOTOGRAPHS 




U VI 



VI A 





VI B 



VI C 



T 






W 





V A 



VI D 





V 



IV A 





IV 



AMONG THE GRADUATES 



Name:— Robert Berry. 

Nickname:— "Chach". 

Quote:— If wine, women and song spell ruin, this boy is 

doomed. 
Expression:— Hey Pete, isl< me how much weight I lost. 
Pastime: Phoning a certain "Elmwood Lovely". 
Pet Peeve:— People who don't believe he's really studying. 
Ambition:— Still to play pro hockey. 
Destination:— Sweeping eggs off the ice in Chicago. 
Theme Song:— 'If Dreams Came True'. 
Teams: -First Football (MVP Colours), First Hockey 

(briefly), First Tennis. 
Activities:— Losing weight, wearing shorts, Woollcombe House 

Cricket Team, driving from Montreal, etc. 
Prototype:— B. Hull. 

Name:— John Brady. 

Ambition:— Officer in the Navy. 

Probable Destination:— Ordinary seaman, 3rd class. 

Quote: -I like chips in brown gravy. 

Pet Peeve:— Annoying impositions for so-called minor infrac- 
tions. 

Prototype:— The "Mad Hatter" in "Alice in Wonderland". 

Theme Song:— I'm a bum. 

Teams:— Second Soccer, First Cricket. 

Activities:— Acted in the school play "Caine Mutiny" as 
Doctor Bird. 

Immediate Destination:— Turkey. 

Name:— David Chaplin. 

Nickname : —"Charlie". 

Quote:— Thank God shoes were invented. 

Expression:— Not to worry. 

Pastime : — Gunsmithing. 

Pet Peeve:— Religion. 

Ambition:— To travel. 

Destination:— Bus driver. 

Theme Song:— Annie Get your Gun. 

Teams:— First Soccer, Second Hockey, 2B Tennis. 

Activities:— Talking, thinking. 

Prototype:— Hugh Hefner. 

Name:— Michael Copeland. 

Nickname:— Fat one. 

Quote:— Sweet womankind, O, sweet womankind. 

Expression:— Hi, L T ncle Jim, is Betsy here? 

Pastime:— Wearing suede shoes and white socks. 

Pet Peeve:— Here, Michael. 

Ambition:— Ben Casey type doctor. 

Destination:— Running a health (y) bar at Burleigh Falls. 

Theme Song:— Summer Place. 

Teams:— First Football, First Hockey. 

Activities:— Dance Committee, Dav Boy Monitor, Colour 

Party, Twisting. 
Prototype:— Danny Kavc. 

Name . —Rusty Davids* in. 

Nickname:— The Prof. 

Quote:— Caesar is dead, but his spirit lingers on. 

Expression:— Look here, feller. 

Pastime : — ( Censored ) . 

Pet Peeve:— Red-headed Indians. 

Ambition:— To own a steamship line. 

Destination:— Wharf Rat. 

Theme Song:— Runaround Sue. 

Teams:— First Soccer (Capt.), First Hockey. 

Activities:— Dancing at Burleigh Falls Midnight Canoe Club. 

Prototype:— Red Buttons. 












Name:— Robert Dickson. 

Nickname:— Judge. 

Quote:— Oh, that Belgian. 

Expression:— She loves me or I love her. 

Pet Peeve:— Girls Boarding Schools (Toronto). 

Ambition : —Executive. 

Destination:— Secretary in a Girl's Boarding School. 

Theme Song:— Lover Please, Please Come Back. 

Teams:— First Football, Social Skiing, Tennis. 

Activities:— Senior Server, Chair, Dance Committee, School 

Play. 
Prototype:— Tommy Manville. 

Name:— Harold Flam. 

Nickname:— Shugaroo. 

Quote:— Why take life seriously? You can't get out of it alive. 

Favourite Expression:— He's O.T.L. (out to lunch). 

Favourite Pastime:— Getting dates, going on dates, breaking 

dates. 
Pet Peeve:— Pottinger. 
Ambition:— Dentist. 

Probable Destination:— Alining metal used to fill cavities. 
Theme Song:— Where the "Girls" Are. 
Activities:— Girls-drum major-girls-of cadet band-and more 

girls. 
Prototype:— Sammy Davis Jr. 

Name:— Donald Hanna. 

Nickname:— D.S. 

Qnote:— Keep quiet and people think you are a philosopher. 

Expression:— Aw, come-on! 

Pastime:— Sailing upturned sail boats. 

Pet Peeve:— People who tell him to shave. 

Ambition:— Chartered Accountant. 

Destination : —Bookie. 

Theme Song:— I get tongue tied over you. 

Teams:— Second Footba'l, Social Skiing. 

Activities:— Serving, sailing, Philosophizing. 

Prototype:— UfTa Fax. 

Name:— John Letch. 

Nickname : —Deacon. 

Quote:— An expert is one who knows more and more about 
less and less. 

Expression:— Heh, you know what. 

Pastime:— Going home during exams. 

Pet Peeve:— The person who put the tax on cigarettes. 

Ambition:— Lumber magnate. 

Destination:— Lumber-jack of ill repute. 

Theme Song:— Alouette. 

Teams:— First Soccer, Third Hockey Ref. 

Activities:— Chapel Clerk, Tuck Shop, Rtd. President of Com- 
mon Room. 

Prototype:— Rudolph Valentino. 

Name:— Jamie Levitz. 

Quote:—! reject the monstrous theory that while a man may 

redeem the past, a women never can. 
Favourite Expression:— Who can I take out this weekend? 
Ambition:— Dentist. 

Probable Destination:— Working on a kibbutz. 
Theme Song:— Your other love. 
Prototype: \!ex Faulkner. 
Favourite Pastime:— Slashing lis own clothes. 
Activities: Sports, skipping cadets. 
Teams:— First Hockey, First Football. 
Pet Peeve: Pottinger. 



Name:— Richard Brian Logic. 
Nickname:— Ziggy. 

Quote:— Drinka Pinta Milka Day. 

Favourite Expression:— Cease and Desist. 

Favourite Pastime:— Prefect Bating. 

Pet Peeve. Prefects, etc. . . . 

Future Ambition:— Chemical Engineer. 

Probable Destination: Ancient Chinese tea-taster. 

Theme Song:— Teddy Bear's Picnic. 

Teams:— First Football, First Hockey, First Cricket. 

Activities:— Play, #3 Platoon. 

Prototype:— Bulldog Brower. 




Name:— Pete .Martin. 

Sports:— Soccer, Basketball, Tennis. 

Activities:— Room captain, honour guard, committee member, 

dramatic society, social skier. 
Ambition : —Doctor. 
Probable Destination:— Quack. 
Theme Song:— Ode to Newfoundland. 
Favourite Expression:— Got anv food? 
Quote:— Woe to the hand that shed this costly hair. 
Pet Peeve:— Draughts that destrov smoke rings. 
Prototype:— Jimmv Durante. 



3*s 


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f 



Name:— Peter McLaren. 

Nickname : —McGoo. 

Quote:— 'Tis the hair, not the clothes that make the man. 

Favourite Pastime:— You know who. 

Pet Peeve:— Shaving around square corners. 

Ambition : —Surgeon. 

Probable Destination:— Polishing Scalpels at the Toronto 

General. 
Theme Song:— Smoke gets in vour eves. 
Activities:— Social Skiing, Soccer, Room Captain and Kool 

Cigarettes. 
Prototype:— Dick Tracy. 



Name:— Rod Mundv. 

Nickname:— Hot Rod. 

Quote:— Academic prowess is no measure of a man's success. 

Pastime : — Hot-rodding. 

Pet Peeve:— Porringer and Belgians. 

Ambition:— Business man. 

Destination:— Business man. 



Name:— F. Gregg Oxley. 

Nickname:— F.G. 

Quote:— Our best examples of real men are in the Annv. 

Expression : — Yubba-Dubba-Doo. 

Pastime:— Checking baggage. 

Pet Peeve:— Maggie (or letter writing period). 

Ambition:— Officer in the Infantrv. 

Destination:— Barman in the Officers' Mess. 

Theme Song:— Stick Shift. 

Teams:— First Football, Gvm Team. 

Activities:— CO of Cadets, Dav-Bov Monitor, Borrowing 

T-Birds. 
Prototype: -Phil Hill. 




*• 


m 











Name:— Pat Rowntree. 

Nickname: — (Snoopy, Droopy and) L'il Egypt. 

Quote:— A woman cries before, a man after the wedding. 

Expression:— What? That! 

Pastime:— Getting stuck in cemetaries. 

Pet Peeve:— Belgians (who call him Droopy). 

Ambition:— Commercial Pilot. 

Destination:— Flying High. 

Theme Song:— Wanderer. 

Teams:— First Football (colours), Second Hockey, Track. 

Activities:— Drooping, and losing weight. 

Prototype:— King Farouk. 

Name:— Tim Snelgrove. 

Nickname:— Snellers. 

Quote:— The world's great men have not commonly been 

great scholars, nor its scholars great men.— Holmes. 
Favourite Pastime:— Practising Hedonism. 
Ambition:— Chartered Accountant. 

Probable Destination:— Pounding a cash register for Loblaws. 
Theme Song:— Roll Out the Barrel. 
Prototype:— Ali Khan. 
Favourite Expression:— If you can get away with it, more power 

to you! 
Activities:— Room Captain, Head of cadet signals, cribbage 

addict, instigator. 
Teams:— Soccer (?) 

Name:— Ian Speedie. 

Nickname:— The Colonel. 

Quote:— Better to reign in Hell than serve in Heaven. 

Favourite Expression:— I think I'm going to crack up! 

Favourite Pastime:— Hiring bands for school dances — 

especially The Beau-Marks. 
Pet Peeve:— Chief Cadet Instructors. 
Ambition: Cosmetic A4agnate. 
Probable Destination:— Beauty Counselor. 
Activities:— 2 I/C of Cadet Corps; Room Captain; Organizer 

and A1C of dances. 
Teams:— First Football. 

Theme Song:— I've Got a Pocketful of .Miracles. 
Prototype:— Field-Marshall Erwin Rommel. 

Name:— E. Harvey Stewart. 

Nickname:— Out to Lunch (OTL). 

Favourite Saying:— No sweat, no sweat. 

Favourite Pastime:— Listening to (OTL) Jazz. 

Pet Peeve:— Barbaric Infidels. 

Pet Please:— Poetry (his own). 

Ambition:— Freelance Writer/Photographer. 

Probable Destination:— Selling Poems on Street Corners. 

Theme Song:— Poetry in Motion. 

Activities:— President Senior Common Room, First Football 

Team, Poetry Reading Contest (winner), Plav. 
Prototype:— Kerouac. 



Name:— Richard Wood. 
Nickname:— Dickey. 

Favourite Expression:—! bet I did more work than anyone else. 
Pet Peeve:— Cadets. 

Quote: -To be, or not to be, that is the question. 
I earns:— Tennis, Soccer. 

Theme Song:— Brylcream, a little dab will do va. 
Prototype: -Neville Chamberlain. 



TH E ASH BU R I AN W 

READOVER 

The school assembled in Argvle on June 6th for Mr. Perry's 36th 
end of term Readover in twelve years. The I [eadmaster began by 
saying that the closing of a school year is a happy occasion, but that there 
were "some regrets", the loss of Florence notable among them. 

Mr. Perry said that there had been a measure of academic progress 
during the year, and that, on the whole, the school had done very well. 
Athletics, he said, had an average year; there were disappointments, and 
successes; the Junior Cricket Cup and the record of the Track I earn 
were most gratifying. The Head mentioned the Chapel and its effect 
on our life, the Choir, the excellence of the Cadet Corps, the show made 
by the "Quiz Kids" and the Debating Team, and the high standards 
maintained by the Prefects and other officers. 

After bidding farewell to departing members of the staff, awarding 
Colours and making several presentations, Mr. Perry announced plans 
for a laboratory extension, and interest in an artificial ice-rink. 

Mr. Belcher then announced the winners of the Ashburian con- 
tests, before the Headmaster, in closing, wished us all a happy summer, 
remarking that we were all 'Ambassadors of Ashbury 1 and that we would 
do well to live by the school motto: 'Probitas, Virtus, Comitas'. 



SPORTS DAY 

Iain Ewing, George Keffer and Chris Collyer were top winners in 
the three classes of events on Sports Day, June 7 th. Ewing won the 
100-yd. dash, the 120-yd. hurdles, the 220-yd. dash and the hop, step 
and jump in the senior division. Gallinger was a close second in that 
class, placing first in the Cross Country, mile, broad jump, high jump 
and 440-yd. dash. 

In the Intermediate division, George Keffer was best athlete. He 
won the 440-yds, 880-yds., and Intermediate Cross Country, and was 
second in the open mile. 

Chris Collyer captured Junior honours by winning the 100-yd. 
dash, 80-yd. hurdles and the broad jump. Rick Southam was second, 
capping the high jump and shot put. 

Rossy won the Irvine Cup for the Junior Cross Country and also 
won the mile. 

In the Midget classification Harry Espinola won the high jump, 
cricket ball throw\ broad jump and 75-yd. dash. 

The Professor J. Burke Ewing Trophy for the Most Valuable 
Member of the Track Team was presented to Iain M. Ewing. 



90 TH E ASHBURI AN 

MORNING PRIZES 
A. TRACK AND FIELD SPORTS 

1. HIGH JUAIP-SENIOR-The Read Trophy-L. B. Gallinger-5'3" 

Junior— R. Southam— 4'5" 
Alidget-H. EspinoIa-4'4" 

2. THE MILE-THE GORDON FISCHEL TROPHY 

First-L. B. Gallinger-5'5.2" 
Second-G. B. Keffer 

3. THE JUNIOR A1ILE-R. Rossy-6'23" 

4. THROWING THE CRICKET BALL 

Senior-R. V. Berry-90 yds. 27" 
Intermediate-J. P. O. Henry-76 yds. O'l" 
Junior-J. P. E. Anderson-77 yds. 0'5" 
Midget-H. Espinola-58 yds. l'lO" 
Banram-W. B. Ducharme-40 yds. 0'8" (record) 

5. BROAD JUMP-SENIOR-L. B. Gallinger-19'6" 

Intermediate-M. S. Polk-18' 
Junior-C. L. Collyer-15'5" 
Alidget-H. Espinola-11'11" 
Bantam— J. Espinola— 12'1(H" (record) 

6. 120 YARD HURDLES-THE E. R. FISHER TROPHY 

Senior— I. Al. Ewing— 16.6 
Intermediate-Al. S. Polk-17.2 

7. 80 YARD HURDLES-JUNIOR-C. L. Collyer-13.6 

8. DISCUS-Senior-D. Al. Boyd-122'7" (record) 

Intermediate— D. J. Mulaner— 102'10" 

9. JAVELIN-Senior-R. V. Berry-112'3" 

Intermediate— D. J. Mulaner— 11 7'5" 

10. HOP-STEP-JUAIP-Senior-I. M. Ewing-38'9" 

Intermediate-M. S. Polk-35'10" 
Junior-R. Scheel-29'3i" 

11. SHOT PUT-SENIOR-S. G. R. Pottinger-34'2" 

Intermediate— D. A. J. Boyd— 40'42" 
Junior— R. Southam— 3 1'2" 

12. 100 YARDS-SENIOR-MRS. M. FAUQUIER TROPHY-I. M. Ewing-10.6 

Intermediate— D. A. J. Boyd— 11 
Junior-C. A. Collyer-12.1 

13. 75 YARDS A1IDGET-H. Espinola-10.3 

14. 60 YARDS BANTAM-J. MacDonald-9.9 

15. 220 YARDS-DR. C. K. ROWAN-LEGG TROPHY- 

Senior— I. W. Ewing 23.8 
Intermediate— D. A. J. Boyd— 25.0 
Junior-D. C. Polk-29.0 

16. 440 VARDS-THE OLD BOYS' CUP 

Senior-L. B. Gallinger-58.0" 
Intermediate-G. B. Keffer-59.5" 
Junior-M. MacCarthy— 1'17" 



THE ASHBURIAN 



n 



17. 880 YARDS-THE BEARDMORE TROP1 IV J. B. Draper-2'26" 

Intermediate— G. B. KerTcr— 2'17" 

18. THF. SACK RACE-Midget-P. Anketell-Jones-12.00 sees. 

Bantam— J. MacDonald— 9.9 sees. 

iv. THE INTERHOUSE RELAY RACFS 

Senior— Alexander House 
Junior— Woollcombe House 



B. THE CROSS COUNTRY RACES 

SENIOR-THE ROBERTS ALLAN CUP 
First— L. B. Gallinger 
Second— T. N. Coristine 
Third— D. S. Cowan 

INTERA1EDIATE-THE IRVINE CUP 
First— G. B. Keffer 
Second— D. C. Mackenzie 

JUNIOR-R. Rossy 

UNDER 11— P. G. Loftus 



C. THE PROFESSOR J. B. EWING TROPHY FOR THE MOST 
VALUABLE MEMBER OF THE TRACK TEAM 

I. M. Ewing 




Grant 



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THE ASH B V R / -J N 93 

AFTERNOON PRIZES 

A. FORM PRIZES FOR GENERAL PROFICIENCY 

IC P. TATICEK 

IB _ _ I). W. HATCH 

IA R. I.. WILSON 

IIB N F. DAY 

IIA C. E. S. BARN1 S 

1MB S. H. ADAMSON 

III A C. CHO\VN 

TRANSITUS B T. F. HURDMAN 
TRANSITUS A J. J. I). READ 

B. AWARDS OF MERIT 

IC-D ALTON PRIZE A. G. WOOD 

IB-DALTON PRIZE D. PETERSON 

IA-DALTOX PRIZI S. I. H. BASINSK] 

I-DALTOX PRIZE A. EDGAR 

II-HUNTER PRIZE (History & Geography- D. B. DOLLIX 

II-HUXTER PRIZE (Arithmetic)—. J. S. BARkl R 

II-HUNTER PRPIZE (For Merit) M. H. ELLIS 

IIIB-DARATHA PRIZE D. R. MOULDS 

IIIA-SPEXCER PRIZE P. AXKETELL-JOXES 

TRANSITUS B-HUGHES PRIZE _ L. K. MCNAIR 

TRANSITUS A-POLK PRIZE K. M. COOK 

JUNIOR SCHOOL-MOTHER'S GUILD PRIZE (For Improvement in French) 

D. H. MACLAREN 

IV-MONKS PRIZE D. A. HAYLEY 

IVA-WANSBROUGH PRIZE T. S. FULLER 

Y-BLACK PRIZE G. B. LIVINGSTONE 

YA-de VAREXT PRIZE T. X. DRIEDGER 

MIDDLE SCHOOL-MOTHERS' GUILD PRIZE (For Improvement in English) 

T. L. MACDONALD 

VID-PEMBERTON PRIZE M. W. MOSHER 

YIC-SNELGROVE PRIZE G. R. GARTON 

YIB-MARLAND PRIZE P. M. GILLEAN 

YIA-SIBLEY PRIZE A. D. WOOD 

UPPER YI-BRAIN PRIZE C. A. FLOOD 

C. THE HONOUR ACADEMIC PRIZES 
MIDDLE SCHOOL CLASSES 

THE SXELGROYE PRIZE FOR MATHS & SCIENCE— . G. B. KEFFER 

THE DEYINE PRIZE FOR LATIN T. R. FLYNN 

THE JOBLING PRIZES FOR FRENCH __ _T. R. FLYNN 

I. H. PARKER 

D. THE ROBERT MOORE MEMORIAL PRIZE 

FOR JUNIOR MATRICULATION ENGLISH.. J. I. BETHUNI 

V. JUNIOR MATRICULATION CLASSES 

THE BELCHER PRIZI FOR ENGLISH K S. Ml NZD S 

THE PEMBERTON PRIZE FOR MODERN HISTORY ...J. S. II \ I 1 / 

THE BLACK PRIZI FOR MODERN HISTORY K. S. Ml \/ll S 

THE BRAIN PRIZES FOR ANCIENT HISTORY ( I. R. GARTON 

D. S. COW AN 



94 THE ASHBURl AN 

THE PROF. J. B. EWING PRIZE FOR ALGEBRA-.... P. G. EKES 

THE AIARLAND PRIZE FOR ALGEBRA— K. S. MENZIES 

THE AIARLAND PRIZE FOR GEOAIETRY... G. R. GARTON 

THE MONKS PRIZE FOR GEOAIETRY... D. S. COWAN 

THE SNELGROVE PRIZE FOR PHYSICS....- _ G. R. GARTON 

THE SIBLEY PRIZE FOR PHYSICS D. S. COWAN 

I 1 1 1 SIBLEY PRIZE FOR CHEMISTRY... _ J. S. LEVITZ 

THE SNELGROVE PRIZE FOR CHEA1ISTRY _ J. S. MENZIES 

THE F. E. B. WHITFIELD PRIZE FOR LATIN G. GREENSTONE 

THE FIORENZA DREW PRIZE FOR FRENCH_ P. M. BOW 

THE PEAIBERTON PRIZE FOR GEOGRAPHY J. S. LEVITZ 

SENIOR MATRICULATION PRIZES 

THE HON. GEORGE DREW PRIZE FOR ENGLISH I. M. EWING 

THE I. C. PEAIBERTON PRIZE FOR HISTORY A. F. GILL 

THE ASHBURY PRIZE FOR MATHEMATICS S. M. O. PARKER 

THE L. H. SIBLEY PRIZE FOR SCIENCE ......S. AL O. PARKER 

THE L. H. SIBLEY PRIZE FOR BIOLOGY A. F. GILL 

THE READ LATIN PRIZE A. F. GILL 

THE ANGUS FRENCH PRIZE. S. M. O. PARKER 

F. THE WOODBURN MUSIC PRIZES 

FORAI I _G. HAYLEY 

FORM II C. E. S. BARNES 

FORAI IIIB W. SHENKMAN 

FORAI IIIA A _ R. ROSSY 

FORM TRANSITUS B ... H. J. PYEFINCH 

FORM TRANSITUS A B. L. DEACON 

G. THE CHOIR PRIZES 

THE L. H. SIBLEY PRIZES J. V. HEARNE 

J. J. D. READ 

H. THE GORDON FISCHEL PRIZE FOR DRAMATICS 

P. M. J. MARTIN 

I. THE PUBLIC SPEAKING PRIZES 

THE CHARLES GALE PRIZE-JUNIOR _..H. STEIN 

THE ROSS MCAIASTER PRIZE-INTERA1EDIATE. G. D. BARBER 

THE ROSS MCMASTER PRIZE-SENIOR _ G. P. HASLAA1 

J. THE POETRY READING PRIZES 

THE C. G. DRAYTON PRIZE-JUNIOR J. J. D. READ 

THE C. G. DRAYTON PRIZE-INTERMEDIATE... E. F. BURRITT 

THE A. B. BELCHER PRIZE-SENIOR.. .E. H. STEWART 

K. THE CADET PRIZES 

THE COMMANDING OFFICER'S PRIZE C/MAJOR F. G. OXLEY 

I I II MOST VALUABLE OFFICER'S PRIZE C/LT. A. F. GILL 

l I II BEST N. C. O WOl P. M. GILLIAN 

THE AIOST PROMISING RECRUIT _ D. S. COWAN 

L. THE ATHLETIC PRIZES 

THE TRACK & FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS 

JUNIOR-THE ALWYN CUP C. L. COLLYER 

INTERMEDIATE-THE STANLEY WRIGHT CUP G. B. KEFFER 

SENIOR-THE FLEMING CUP _ I. A I. EWING 

L. B. GALLINGER 



TH E ASHBUR1 AN 95 

THE MACCORDICK CUP (Greatest Contribution to School Games) 

R. 15. LOGH 
THE CONNAUGHT CUP FOR GYM I \1 I WING 

THE E. B. PILGRIM TROPHY (For Long Distance Running) 

L. B. GALLING! K 
THE OLD BOYS' RACE R. V. IIOWLAND 

THE MOTHERS' RACE MRS. J. B. EWING 

THE WILSON SHIELD LOR INTERHOUSE COMPETITION 

\l I \ WDLR HOUSE 

M. SPECIAL AWARDS 

THE WOODS JUNIOR SCHOOL AWARD OF MERIT. ... J. |. I). READ 

THE SOUTH A.M CUP FOR THE BEST RECORD IN 

SCHOLARSHIP & SPORTS (Senior Matriculation I I. M. EWING 

THE NELSON SHIELD _ _ \. I'. GILL 

G. S. POTTINGER 

N. THE HEADMASTERS TROPHIES 

JUNIOR _____ _ ...G. S. GAMBLE 

INTERMEDIATE C. H. C. GRANT 

SENIOR M. E. WHIPPS 

O. THE C. ROW LEY BOOTH MEMORIAL TROPHY 

(FOR GENERAL PROFICIENCY IN GRADE XII) ... _.. G. GREENSTONE 

P. THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S MEDAL 

S. M. O. PARKER 



COLOURS 1962 

FIRST FOOTBALL 

New Colours— Ewing, Parker I, Logie. 
Previously Awarded 

Berry I, Flood, Gill, Oxley, Rowntree. 

See Snelling Trophy M.V.P.— Berry I. 

"Tiny" Hermann Trophy M. LP.— Parker I. 

SECOND COLOURS 

New Colours— Keffer, Andrew, Boyd I, Boyd II. 
Previously Awarded 

Hunt. 

Barry O'Brien Trophy (M.V.P.)-Hunt. 

Boswell Trophy (M. LP.) -Keffer. 

SOCCER 

1st Team Colours 

New Colours— Tyler, Pottinger. 

Previously Awarded 

Davidson I, McGaughey. 

R. J. Anderson Trophy (M.V.P.)— Davidson. 
2nd Colours (members of first team) 

Finlay. 
Previously Awarded 

Blackburn. 



96 TH E ASHBUR1 AN 

II \IOR SCHOOL SOCCER COLOURS 
New Colours— Moulds, Benskin. 

FIRST HOCKEY 

New Colours— Bethune, Levitz, Cowan. 
Previously Awarded 

Logic 

Fraser Trophy (M.V.P.)- Logic 

Irvin Tropin- (Outstanding)— Levitz. 

SECOND HOCKEY 

New Colours— Boyd I, Boyd II, Steven, Garton, Partridge, Shepherd, Chadderton. 

SKIING 

New Colours— Grant. 
Previously Awarded 

Coristine I. 

Evan Gill Trophy (M.V.P.)— Coristine I. 

.Most Improved Player— Grant. 

Coristine Trophy (Cross Country)— Grant. 

BASKETBALL 

.MA'. P. McA'Xulty Trophy— Addleman. 

Snelgrove Trophy (Determination and Co-operation) 

CRICKET 

No Colours Awarded 
Batting Trophy Not Awarded 
Bowling Trophy Not Awarded 

.M.C.C. Trophy, (.Most Improved Batsman)— Roberts. 

UNDER 16 

Colours— Roberts, Shepherd. 
Previously Awarde d— Samples. 

JUNIOR CRICKET 

Colours— Read, Gamble II. 

Junior .M.C.C. Batting Trophy— Scheel. 

TRACK 

Colours Previously Awarded— Ewing. 
Special Track Awards 

Hunt, Keffer, Gallinger. 

TENNIS 

New Colours— Henry. 

Previously Awarded 
Berry I. 

HOUSE COLOURS 

CONNAUGHT 

New Colours— Bethune; Boyd II; Pottinger; Flood; Boyd I; Haslam. Re-awarded; 
Partridge; lyler. 

WOOLLCOMBE HOUSE 

New Colours— Blackburn; Gillean; Gallinger; Steven; Woolley; Logic; Gill; 

Berry I; Copeland I, Re-awarded; Davidson I; McGaughey. 
Alex vnder 

New Colours \ildlcman; Cowan; Hunt; Keffer; Levitz; Wennberg; Coristine I; 

I'.w ing, Re-av arded; ( Kiev. 




S. \1. (). Parker Governor-General's 
Medal - from Dr. J. O. Proulx. 



P. M. Gillean - VIB Merit Prize - from 
.Mr. Donald Maclarcn. 





Guest Speaker- -C. L. Ogden Glass, 

Esq., charting with Miss Woodburn 

and Headmaster. 



Chairman— A. B. R. Lawrence, Esq. 




Read— Mood Trophv from 
E. B. Pilgrim, Esq. 



L. to R.—S. M. O. Parker— Governor- 
General's Medal; M. E. W'hipps— Head- 
master's Cup Senior; C. H. C. Grant- 
Headmaster's Cup Intermediate; G. 
Greenstone— Rowlev Booth Memorial 
Trophv; G. S. Gamble — Headmaster's 
Cup Junior. 




98 



THE ASHBURIAN 



CLOSING DAY EXERCISES 

The ceremonies began with a Leaving Service at 2:45 p.m. in the 
School Chapel, for those\vho were graduating and for their parents and 
friends. Here the Headmaster bade farewell to those who were leaving 
the school. He said, in part: 

'Although boys are not thought to be sentimental, I suspect that a 
few of you will look around and say goodbye with some regrets . . . 
I want you to know that I am grateful to you for the many contributions 
which you have made to the School's success. It is a stronger place 
because you were here and have all left your names inscribed on the 
School records ... In the words of Henry Newbolt, 'Henceforth the 
School and you are one, and what you are the race shall be.' ' 

At 3: 30 p.m. the Prize Giving took place and this year fine weather 
returned to us for the occasion — blue skies and a moderate temperature. 
The Air Force rehearsing for their 'show' on the following Saturday, 
and usually in full flight during the two preceding days, tempered ex- 
pediency with consideration and made only a few runs over our heads. 
The Headmaster explained that he had attempted to time the speeches 
so that thev might punctuate the roar of the jets. 

The chairman, Mr. A. B. R. Lawrence, M.C., B.C.L., Q.C., opened 
the proceedings by welcoming the visitors and calling upon the Head- 
master to make his report on the activities and attainments during the 
school year. 

Mr. Perry spoke of the high academic success achieved by last 
year's Senior Matric Class and by those who had written internal exams 
this year; he referred to bursaries and scholarships now available, and to 
distinctions of Old Boys graduating from universities. He spoke of the 
valuable contribution of the Mothers' Guild in providing various bene- 
fits to the School, and of additions and improvements contemplated in 
the School's physical structure; of athletics he said, "In looking back I 
think we overdid our hospitality in sportsmanship by allowing our guest 
speaker's old school (Bishops') to defeat us on all fronts. We propose 
to change this next year." 

At the conclusion of the Valedictory Address by the co-captains of 
the School, S. G. Pottinger and A. F. Gill, flowers were presented to 
.Mrs. Glass, in absentia. The presentation was made by one of the 
School's youngest boys— J. S. Barker. This was followed by a presenta- 
tion to the Headmaster of three fine Bartlett prints, from the graduating 
class in recognition of "all you have done for us," and to Mrs. Perry of 
a bouquet of yellow roses. 

The guest speaker, Dr. C. L. Ogden Glass, a former headmaster of 
Ashbury from 1945 to 1950, and presently Principal and Yice-Chancel- 
lor of Bishops' University, gave a most interesting address in which he 



THE ASH B U R I A N 99 

reminisced on his years at the School, made some penetrating observa- 
tions on present trends in education, and warned against the current 
tendency to pessimism on world a flairs. 

"It is my opinion", he said, "that no student should undertake i 
career in science, even at the undergraduate level, unless his mathematics 
are in the first class, or exceedingly close to it, and his physics at nearly 
the same level. The impact of romantic space flight and the general 
romance of science may be running us into the grave danger of 'driving 
square pegs into round holes'." 

On the score of pessimistic tendencies. Dr. Glass said. "The world 
is fraught with danger, but 1 wonder if it has not always been so." He 
quoted famous men from as far back as 1849 who felt then that the 
world was headed for disaster, 

Academic prizes were presented by: W. Dirkse van-Schalkwvck, 
Ambassador of the Republic of South Africa to Canada; Commodore 
J. C. O'Brien, R.C.X., CD., Canadian Naval Attache to Washington; 
H. Pullen, Esq., B.A., B.Paed., D.Ed., Assistant Superintendent of Sec- 
ondary Schools; Donald Maclaren, Esq., B.Sc, P.Eng. (1930-1939), 
Secretarv, Board of Governors; E. B. Pilgrim, Esq., M.A. (1939-1946), 
Headmaster-elect of Ridlev College; J. O. Proulx, Esq., M.A., Ph.D., 
District Inspector— Ottawa-St. Lawrence Number One. 

Also, two memorial trophies, the Charles Rowley Booth .Memorial 
Trophy, for General Proficiency in Grade 12, and The Robert Gerald 
Moore .Memorial Prize in English were presented by .Mrs. S. A. MacKay 
Smith and .Mrs. Robert Moore, respectively. 

After the awarding of the prizes and the closing remarks of the 
Chairman, the gathering moved to the front lawn where refreshments 
were served to the accompaniment of the music of the Band of the 
Governor General's Foot Guards. 



VALEDICTORY 

Delivered by G. Pottinger and A. Gill— Head Boys 
Gill: 

Mr. Chairman, Mr. Headmaster, Ladies and Gentlemen: 
Again this year the School decided to continue its policy of appoint- 
ing two head boys. The "pros and cons" of this arrangement are ir- 
relevant. What is relevant is that it once again complicates the question 
of the Valedictory. As both Graham and I are standing here, and as 
neither of us intends to assume the role of the silent partner, it is obvious 
that we hive decided to follow, borrow, or steal the system adopted by 
the last two, or should I say four. Valedictorians. According- to the 



100 



THE ASH BUR1 AN 



format laid down in previous years, the speech is divided into two parts, 
the first of which belongs to Graham. . . 

Pottinger: Thank you, Alan. 

Before I begin I would like to mention that this has certainly been 
a irreat year for Ashbury. For the first time in the history of the School, 
one of the Head Boys has come from a thriving industrial metropolis 
about sixty-five miles northwest from here, called Renfrew. It also 
may be noted that in Ashbury 's life, so far only three people from Ren- 
frew have ever come here. I guess this proves the saying, "Third time's 
lucky" because I'm number three. 

As you know, it is the function of the Valedictorian, and this year's 
Valedictorians, to bid farewell on behalf of the graduating class. This 
is indeed an honour although not entirely a happy one. I feel rather 
like Cerberus, the three-headed dog, who guarded the realms of Pluto 
and who, with his three heads was able to look in three directions, the 
past, the present and the future. 

The past is filled with many happy memories of what we have 
learned and accomplished. Memories such as the first time we were 
caned for smoking without permission, or the hour we spent at the wall 
for the "spitball" fight in prep, and the friendships we formed in class 
and on the sports' fields. 

The present is now, these Closing Ceremonies. Our minds and 
spirits are filled with the excitement of the coming holiday, the relief 
that exams are over, the joy of being reunited with our parents. 

Now is a time of mixed emotions for those of us who are leaving. 
The future will be a different world. We shall be introduced into a 
new way of life. No bell will ring at 7: 15 every morning. No Prefect or 
Master will come around to haul us out of bed. We will be on our own. 

We all feel the sorrow of departing from a life which has become, 
although some won't admit it, very near and dear to us. At the same 
time, we arc also filled with the anticipation of what is to come. What 
will this new way of life be like? It will be filled with the trials and the 
difficulties which are common to all boys who have just left school. 

And yet, I feel that we Ashburians shall not find the new way of 
life hard to adapt to. Life at Ashbury does more for us than we 
realize. Her most important work is the moulding of the characters 
of her offspring. For without a sure and strong character, we, the 
youth of today, tomorrow's threat men, have not much hope. Ashbury 
helps us develop our characters so that we may become the great men 
of tomorrow. 

As of today, we, the graduating class, join the ranks of that famed 
society known as "Old Boys". I am sure that we all hope in our future 
life we shall be able to afford the time to return to the School and see 
all that we have been happily associated with, and what alterations and 
additions have taken place. And now, back to Alan. 



THE ASHBURIAN 101 

Gill: 

Thanks Graham. I, unfortunately, never had the advantage of 
such a colourful home town, having lived most of my life in the Village 
of Rockcliffe Park. I low ever, as a near neighbour, I have had a long 
association with Ashburv. Many were the Saturday mornings that I 
and mv cohorts from my alma mater across the way would sally forth 
to watch the local heroes do battle on the Ashburv football field and, 
almost inevitably, would we incur the wrath of a certain gentleman who 
could never quite see eve to eve with our manner of watching football 
games. Despite this inauspicious background, I followed a family tra- 
dition and entered Ashburv where, on my first daw that same gentle- 
man, whom I had since learned as the Mr. Brain, informed me that I had 
a great reputation to keep up. Knowing mv relatives, I was newer 
quite sure of the significance behind the remark nor what policy should 
be followed to live up to that reputation. 

Be that as it may, I am sure that it was a great stimulus in my 
Ashburv career. 

However, this word "reputation' 1 bears dwelling upon. Through- 
out life, we are always striving to follow, to live up to, to build a repu- 
tation. At Ashburv, we have had the reputation of our predecessors 
at the School and of the School itself, to uphold. At the same time, all 
of us have acquired for ourselves a reputation of one sort or another. 
But we are leaving Ashbury and the reputations that we established 
here, and we are setting out for places unknown where we will be 
forced to make our presence felt once again. In this task we will be 
greatlv aided by one factor— the reputation of the school we have just 
left. If we combine this advantage with a determination to live up to 
the examples set by former Ashbury graduates, we cannot go far wrong. 

My reputation, be what it may, has been achieved during years at 
the School which have been both extremely interesting and gratifying. 
To say that they have all been pleasant, however, would indeed be 
hypocritical, but I know that, no matter how hard I and my fellow- 
students have tried to find fault, we have developed a certain respect, a 
certain feeling for the school. What Ashbury has done for us may at 
the present be a little nebulous to some, but I believe that in the future 
it will be fully appreciated by all. 

But enough of reminiscence and speculation. I would like now. 
on behalf of the graduating class, to thank the members of the staff for 
all their assistance during our school careers. Also, both Graham and 
I would like to thank our fellow prefects, the room captains, the monit- 
ors and, indeed, anyone who did his bit to keep the number of "nuts 
loose in the school" to a minimum. 

Now. for a closing there will be no school motto, no Tennyson's 
Ulvsses, but a wish for the best of luck to those returnino-, a sincere 
hope for success to those leaving and, finally, just one reminder to the 
graduating class — you have a great reputation to keep up. 



^2 •S*^* 1 ^ *^ 





SMETHURST 




LITERARY 
SECTION 



"THE ASHBURIAN" COMPETITIONS AND AWARDS 

Photography 

This contest was judged by an external, professional authority who 
decided that, among many fine entries two were, in their different ways, 
of equal merit. One was a photograph of the bare branches of a tree, 
against a cloudy sky. This was judged as best in terms of imagination 
and artistic merit. The other (a picture of the burning of Chalmers 
United Church) as best in terms of dramatic reporting and of proficient 
photography. 

A number of other entries were regarded as of outstanding merit 
and several of these, as well as the winning entries appear here with the 
Editor's wish to thank all those who submitted photographs, whether in 
competition or merely for the sake of a contribution to the interest of 
"The Ashburian". 

The winner — Smethurst. 




104 



Verse 



THE ASHBURI AN 



Among an unusually large number of entries, there were two or 
three which, in the opinion of the adjudicators, stood out conspicuously 
in poetic merit. The first of those selected was a very brief lyric 
entitled "Camouflage". This little poem succeeded in communicating 
in highly condensed but thoroughly lyrical style, a mood which is 
experienced by almost everyone, recognized by few, and expressed by 
still fewer. Its author — Snelgrove. 



CAMOUFLAGE 

Sometimes I do not want the world to know 

That I exist, 

I want to see but not be seen, 

Like gulls in mist. 

I envy arctic things upon the snow, 

White bear, white fox. 

In jungles I would be pure green. 

And gray on rocks. 

Snelgrove— VIA 



The second poem, also a lyric, was, "Lord of the Mansion". It too, 
quite subtly and delicately expressed a human experience in terms of 
condensed and evocative words, imagery and rhythms, and, in the 
opinion of the judges, does great credit to the skill and imagination of 
its author — Ewing. 



THE LORD OF THE MANSION 

The lord of the mansion The sun warm on his face, 

How happy is he And sniffed the perfumed breeze, 

Master of all he surveys! And sighed "How sweet" 

He stepped from the mansion, To the girl who walked beside. 

Cool and white, The lord of the mansion heard, 

Into the summer sun, And felt like a stick, 

Where his grass lay green before his feet, Stripped of its protecting bark. 

And the wind played softly in his trees, Then fear came on him — 

And drifted the scent of lilac, Sudden as a summer shadow, 

And his heart was light. And from his trees 

A boy passed by, He heard the caw of many crows. 

Ewing — U VI 



THE ASHBURI AN 1W 

Prose 

The winner of this Contest is the narrative, "The Dumb Cadet". 

Ir was felt that the short narrative is an exceedingly difficult form to 
handle in an interesting and convincing manner and that the author of 
this piece had shown considerable skill and imagination in writing, in a 
necessarily restricted space, a story which was high in reader interest. 
The author — Smethursr. 



THE DUMB CADET 

Jonah didn't want to make any mistake over this. It was the first 
time he had been to a cadet camp, and he was eager to prove himself. 
"Are you sure that's right?", he repeated, his flat ebony face solemn. 
"Sure, I'm sure", Hank said, "I heard it myself". 

For a moment Jonah could only stand there. Then a gap as wide 
as the space between a rabbit and fox revealed his white teeth, as he- 
smiled; he shook his head. "Well I'll be doggoned!" 

His third day at camp and he was being promoted to Coffee 
Sergeant. The sheer pride of it made his face glow. And all the time 
back there in Georgia, his mother was worried over him. He remem- 
bered how she had written to him, telling him she was praying that he'd 
make a good soldier, and that he'd come back safe and sound. 

The Lord must have answered his mother's prayers all right. He 
had been told that all a coffee sergeant had to do was to taste the coffee 
each morning and then give permission for it to be served. 

The next morning, Jonah proud as a peacock, marched into the 
mess room. Every man in the crowded mess hall jumped to his feet, his 
eyes straight ahead at attention. Quickly he waved his hand, and as he 
had heard his officers saw he said "Rest". 

Oblivious of the subdued chuckles of mirth, Jonah tested the coffee 
handed him by a cook, who was doing his best to keep a straight face. 
"No, a man couldn't rightly say that was good coffee, we'll have to 
throw it out". "At-a-boy, Jonah!" someone called, and the room rang 
with cheers and handclapping. 

Finally someone said, "Fetch the mess sergeant, tell him to throw it 
out". "Where is the mess sergeant?" Jonah asked. "lie's sleeping", 
1 lank replied, "Shall 1 get him?" "You'd better" said Jonah, not too 
sure of himself at this point. 

Old Jelly Belly, as the men called him shuffled in, rubbing the sleep 
out of his eyes. "Where's this inspecting officer who wants to see 
me?" Hank pointed at Jonah, "There, sir". 



106 TH E ASHBUR1 AN 

"That's right, sergeant," Jonah nodded, "I'm the new coffee ser- 
geant round here and this coffee is not fit to drink." 

The answering roar to this statement was talked about for weeks 
afterwards. Some say that even windows a block away were cracked. 

Jonah turned around to the men for assurance, only to find that 
they were laughing at him. Then he realised he'd been made a fool of. 

A week later, having lived in ridicule throughout it, Jonah was 
resting with the Companv while they took a break. He saw that they 
sat in small groups, talking. And he hesitated, for he had no group to 
go to. Slowly he walked to one side and squatted on his heels. 

It was then Hank had an idea, for he'd seen the box of dummy 
hand grenades brought out for the next training period, and whispered 
to himself "yeah". He made his way over to the box and picked up a 
dummy grenade. Then he winked. "Yes, suh" he said, "I sure is glad 
they're going to give us a chance to shoot off some grenades this morn- 
ing." Casually he walked over to Jonah. Jonah turned his head, then 
alarm swept across his face, for Hank was tossing the grenade in the air 
and catching it. Hank gave the grenade another toss. "Yes, suh, if — " 
he purposely missed it, grabbed for it, then yelled, "look out!" 

Jonah jumped to his feet. Wildly he glanced around, seeking 
cover. Then he realised that many of the cadets would not be able to 
get away in time. For an instant he looked at the grenade, then he ran 
to it and threw his small body flat on the ground. 

The smiles were gone in the company now. The men looked at 
one another, not knowing what they should do, and remained there 
frozen. 

"Get back!" Jonah shouted again, and saw that they wouldn't 
move. He pressed his body hard against the grenade then, as if trying 
to cover the explosion. 

The Platoon Sergeant then broke in softly, "Jonah," he said, taking 
his arm. "It's a dummy grenade." 

Jonah understood then. They had tricked him again, and now 
he'd gone and made a fool of himself before the whole company. He 
fully expected to hear a roar of laughter. Yet there was no laughter, 
and Jonah glanced up puzzled. The faces of the men were solemn, and 
each man seemed to be thinking of someday when the grenades might 
not be dummy. 

"Yeah" I lank was saying. "Yeah. A Russian might have thrown 
that huh?" He walked forward. "Let me brush the dust off you, 
friend," he said and there was no mockery in his voice. 

Smethurst — VTB 



THE ASHBURI AN Iffl 

MY MALTREATMENT 

Hello! My name is Laurence I [arvey. I live at Ashbury College 

in Rockclirfe Park, Ottawa ~ perhaps some of you have heard oi it. 
Well, anyway, that is where I am maltreated. 

No matter how efficiently I am working, I am still yelled at and 
brutally knocked about. Every day I am prodded with a sharp, steel 
weapon by a boy whose name 1 shall not mention here. Every day this 
I >i LT boy shoves his hand in my face and twists me about. Often he 
kicks me in the shins so hard that I am always bruised and battered. It 
my mouth is open, he slams is shut so violently that I shake all over. I 
thus s^et no chance to speak to any of my friends or neighbours. 

Well, as you have been so kind as to listen to my troubles, 1 think 
you deserve to hear more of my identity. 

I am a locker door. MacDonald— VA 

SINKING OF THE TITANIC 

The sea was calm, the air was cold and in the star-filled night. 
Hundreds of souls were praying they'd be rescued from their plight. 
There like sagging birthday cake, trie Titanic's bow swung down; 
Her passenger list was large enough to fill a small sized town. 
Many thought of the iceberg that struck Titanic's bow. 
And of all the events that had taken place from that time up till now. 
In all the passengers' hearts and minds there lurked the awful fear. 
Of how they might never see again those whom they loved so dear. 
By now the stem had risen high; all knew it was too late; 
Only a shining miracle could save them from their fate. 
Higher and higher rose the stem, 'mid screams and faces pale; 
Till suddenly she plummets down, to never again set sail. 

Browning — VIC 

ODE TO MY SISTERS 

Such lovely creatures, kind and sweet, 
The men all want to kiss their feet; 
There is a constant crowd of misters, 
At the door to see my sisters. 
Their fame has spread both far and wide. 
And I am always filled with pride; 
I want the whole wide world to see, 
These goddesses belong to me. 
Before I end this little rhyme, 
I think I have a little time, 
To say I write to save my life. 
They're standing by me with a knife! 

MacTavish — IV 



208 THE ASHBURIAN 

A DAY ON THE COAST 

The Atlantic sun rose from beneath the horizon and its yellow 
brilliance dispersed the last wisps of night. The ocean shone like a 
golden carpet and a few puffs of white cloud speckled the sky. At the 
foot of the cliff, the waves splattered against the rocks and broke into a 
fine spray which gleamed like a string of luminous beads. On the cliff 
itself, the soft rustling of the foliage was in sharp contrast to the bitter 
cry of the sea gull as it pierced the morning mist. 

The sun climbed higher, as dawn brightened into morning, and 
from the tall cliff, the tiny village of Perce could be seen awakening 
with its quaint, French-Canadian homes. The fishing boats set out for 
the day's haul and the steady churning of their propellers could be heard 
until distance had long eclipsed the sturdy craft from sight. The golden 
beach soaked in the heat from the sun and a lone swimmer bobbed up 
and down in the vast blue of the ocean. Out of the ocean, Perce Rock 
rose majestically with its pinnacle hidden by a grey cloud of sea gulls 
perching upon it as the rich green of Bonaventure Island created a vivid 
contrast with the red-roofed houses of the village. 

Far out to sea, the ocean faded into oblivion, losing itself in a white 
haze that hung above the perfect curve of the horizon. In the midst of 
the late morning, now evaporating into afternoon, a solitary trawler 
knifed its way through a dazzling sheen of blue, agitating the water with 
foam-crested ripples that soiled a flawless ocean. 

Closer and closer it came, while its shadows danced carelessly along 
the waves and, as it neared the dock, a few last stuttering efforts 
throbbed from the dying moter and stained the water with a whirlpool 
of green oil. 

At the dock, the boat glided in smoothly till its starboard side 
nestled snugly against the quay. The fishermen worked quickly, their 
gnarled hands illustrating the delicate finesse of their art. The waste 
part of the fish were hurled into the ocean to the great delight of the 
seagulls, who, in a flurry of shaking wings and sputtering water, clasped 
the precious gift in their beaks and darted away in precipitated flight. 

Gradually, as the day aged and afternoon waned into evening, a 
blanket of darkness engulfed Perce and the light of day was replaced by 
the murky reaches of dusk. The pale orb of the moon arched upwards 
in a slow, deliberate climb that revealed all its spherical beauty, and the 
bright sun of afternoon became the fiery globe of sunset; it dipped 
toward the horizon and painted the sky with vivid shades of red, orange, 
and purple, while, at the same time, emitted a deep glow which split the 
gloaming and lingered a few more seconds after the fading sun had been 
swallowed by the sea. 

Night, now firmly entrenched, spanned Perce like an intangible 
tarpaulin with its dusty edges locked to the ground. 

Grenstone — VIA 



THE ASH li U RI AN 



109 



BIOGRAPHY OF A SCHOOL BOY 



I le arrived 

Some years ago. 

And contrived 

To attempt the heights. 

1 [e resolved, 

He advanced 

Went up one notch. 

And enhanced 

His good repute. 

He staggered, 

He shattered 

All his dreams, 

Tried hard to run. 

He staved, 

He regained 

What had been lost. 



And attained 
A slight reward. 
I le worked, 
1 le achieved 
I lis long sought goal. 
And received 
Some fair acclaim 
Now he goes, 
To seek again 
What he had sought 
Some years ago; 
To try, to fail, 
To try once more, 
To face the strife, 
For this is life. 

Hasi.am — L VI 



CARGOES (year 2372) 

Clipper ships of England from darkest Africa, 

Sailing home to harbours in far off London town, 

With a cargo of diamonds, 

And gold and spices, 

Cocoanuts, mahogany, and ostrich down. 

Sleek, swift freighters, coming from the Orient, 

Crossing the Pacific to the bright rich land, 

\\ ith a cargo of silk cloth, 

Jade and jasmine, 

Trinkets and ornaments and contraband. 

Ancient battered space ship with broken tail fin 

Piloting from Venus to the asteroids, 

With a cargo of water, 

Mining tools and oxygen. 

Tin buts, hammers, and cheap kids' toys. 

Brown [-VIA 



CRICKET 

The grass is spotless and bright, 

The small boys are all dressed in white. 

The bowler rears back; 

With a resounding CRACK! 
A little red ball is in flight. 



Bow - VIA 



UO THE ASHBVRl AN 

THE CAMOUFLAGE OF WINTER 

To me there is nothing more invigorating than a walk taken during 
the Christmas season. The ideal time is after the first heavy snowfall, 
when all the countrvside is clad in her glittering white attire. 

It is a cold, sunny day when I leave the house, and the crisp, new 
snow crunches under my boots with a metallic ring. Indeed, it is so 
frosty that at first my breath is cut short and my nostrils have a tendency 
to cling together. My breath hangs in a silvery cloud, and from time to 
time a shower of snow-flakes whirls round my head, disturbed from 
their nesting place by a sudden gust. 

On either side of the road lies the forest. Here and there on the 
almost unblemished surface of the snow are traces of the timid inhab- 
itants. The boughs of the trees bend beneath their burden and once in 
a while, amid a shoew and a roar, small avalanches cascade down in 
crazy abandon. The complete outline of the wood has been changed, 
the trees are festooned gaily with cobwebs of snow, woven in intricate 
designs by the talented hand of Jack Frost. 

Suddenly the solitude of the wilderness is broken by a bone-chilling 
screech as a blurred image flits across a clearing. It is the snowy owl, a 
handsome despot who ruled his forest kingdom with a ruthless hand. 
The great bird settles upon a stump, and in his camouflage of white, 
awaits his victim. 

Fascinated by this game of death, I sit unmoving upon a nearby 
jutting rock, hoping to glimpse the actors of the forbidden wilderness 
in their frightening roles. I do not have long to wait, for soon a frolic- 
some rabbit, in his winter garb, gambols into the clearing, and proceeds 
to wash himself with great care. The owl, a hillock of snow, except for 
the unblinking, yellow spheres watches with deadly intensity. 

In the middle of preparing his toilet the rabbit stiffens, and rises up 
on his hind legs, his little pink nose sniffing and his large ears cocked. 
True to the instinct of animals, he feels the presence of danger, and with 
a resounding thump of his hind-paws he streaks for the cover of the 
underbrush. The hitherto motionless owl exploded into action and 
hurtled down on the fleeing creature with talons extended. Once again 
the silence is broken, shattered by a ferocious war cry mingled with the 
choking scream of death. 

Now, as I make my way slowly homeward, I am no longer deceived 
by quiet beauty of the frozen world around me, for an area of frozen 
redness bears the testimony of the struggle for life, which lies behind this 
winter scene. Martin - VIA 



THE ASHBURIAN HI 

THE KEY TO THE DEEP 

The mysterious deep has always fascinated man. If ever this state- 
ment \\ p as true, ir is so to-day; for one of the nation's sports most rapidly 
gaining in popularity is Scuba diving. Scuba — self-contained under- 
water breathing apparatus is the key to life underwater — its beauties, 
its mysteries and its dangers. 

The invention of Scuba equipment came about as the result of the 
rather natural revolt against the heavy, cumbersome diving suit with 
helmet. Not only was movement awkward in the attire but the diver, 
receiving his air supply from the surface, was limited in his movements. 
With the breathing apparatus designed by the Frenchmen, Cousteau and 
Gagnon, however, the diver carried his air supply in tanks strapped to 
his back and, with the aid of flippers and goggles, was able to swim and 
explore underwater. This equipment proved to be of great value in 
demolition work during the Second World War and, since then, has 
been made available to the public. 

The equipment needed to enjoy this sport ranges from the relatively 
simple to the exorbitantly expensive. The bare necessities are the 
compressed air tank, a "regulator" which controls the flow of air from 
the tank to the mouth, flippers and goggles. Various extras range from 
a rubber suit, necessary for colder waters, and spear guns for fishing, to 
underwater cameras for photography and "scooters" for mechanical 
transportation beneath the surface. These accessories, whether neces- 
sary or not, are indicative of the advanced state of Scuba diving to-day. 

Once equipped and properly trained, the Scuba diver is ready to 
explore a completely new world. However, I say properly trained, 
for the dangers to the uninitiated are manifold. After the first natural 
feeling of claustrophobia has been conquered, the beginner must be 
taught how to prevent or deal with anything from nitrogen narcosis 
(the bends) to choking — both of which can have fatal consequences. 
He must be taught when, where and how to dive. Above all, he must 
be taught to recognize his own limitations, either physical or mental, 
as a diver. 

When the lessons are learned, the rewards are great. Nor is the 
first dive quick to wear off; for each successive trip beneath the surface, 
unfolds a new scenery which is, itself, constantly changing. The 
fascination of discovering, and moving among, new forms of life is one 
which is hard to parallel. In short, those who are drawn to this spore 
are rarely disappointed. 

What does draw man underwater? It is that part of the human 
mind that strives to answer the challenge of the unexplored or is it the 
thrill of existing in an environment for which he was not ordained? 
Whatever the reason, more and more people are attempting to unlock 
the beauties, mysteries and dangers of the subterranean world. Scuba 
diving is the modern way! Gill — U VI 



m TH E ASHBURI AN 

HISTORY OF THE DOMESTIC CAT 

The origin of the domestic cat is hidden in the midst of antiquity. 
The first definite evidence of the existence of the domestic cat comes 
from ancient Egvpt over three thousand years ago, although it may have 
been known long before this time. 

In Egypt the cat was held in great esteem. It was worshiped in the 
temples, protected from injury, loved, during life and elaborately 
preserved after death. The Egyptians realized the cat's immense value 
in protecting their granaries from rats and mice. Statues, ornaments, 
and decorations of precious material were made in the shape of cats. 
From these ancient statues, it can be seen that the shape of the cat has 
changed little up to to-day. 

In India cats were mentioned in Sanskrit writings over two thousand 
years ago, while in China about 500 BC Confuscius was known to have 
a favourite cat. In Scandinavia the Godess Freya is depicted on a 
chariot drawn by two cats. About 600 AD Mohammad is said to have 
preached with a cat in his arms. The Romans brought the first domestic 
cats to Britain, where they were highly prized. There were severe 
penalties to anyone who stole or killed an adult cat. In Saxony, Henry 
the Towler imposed a fine of 60 bushels of corn for the wilful murder 
of an adult mouser. 

With the Middle Ages the cat became the symbol of black magic 
and many cats were burned at the stake together with their owners who 
were condemned as witches. This was the dark era for cats and in 
France cats were burned as sacrifices until the practice was forbidden 
by Louis XIII. Gradually throughout Europe, this persecution died out 
and many famous people kept cats as pets. Dr. Johnson and Victor 
I Ingo were devoted to their cats. In the Victorian era the cat was again 
coming into its own. Cat shows were begun and different and new 
breeds established; there was a great demand for cat pictures and statues 
and ornaments made in their likeness. 

I o-day the cat is very much in the public eye, and we are once 
again becoming a nation of cat lovers. Cat, nowdays have become a 
profitable business, and source of employment. There arc thousands 
of factories turning out millions of tins of food, baskets, collars, brushes, 
combs, blankets, toys and medicens — all for cats. In fact some of us 
almost worship, \md pay as much attention to, the domestic cat as did the 
ancient Egyptians. 

Tyler — U VI 



THE ASHBURIAX IB 

LOST KITTY 

Kitty, kitty, out of sight, 

Won't you please come out tonight, 

Please come out and show us all 

"La Belle Dame" hath not thee in thrall. 

Oh pretty Kitty come from rest. 

Through all the land thou art the best, 

Twilight and after that the dark. 

Yet still no Kitty, in ye wide park. 

To feel the grit in my sighs 

The mist in mine eyes! 

My labour and my work is vain 

As things have been they remain. 

Oh there thou art my Kitty fair! 

Where hast thou been? I did despair. 

.My poor body worked busily a day, 

And now at last I see thee lay. 

By John Keats 

Sir Walter Scott 
Alfred Lord Tennyson 
Robert Browning 
Arthur Hugh Clough 
Greg Stephen Millard 

Compiled by Greg Stephen Millard — VIA 



PERSONNEL 

The prefects, the prefects, my what a group, 

To skip out of work, to nothing they'd stoop. 

Bed fags, shoe fags, and then there's the rest, 

It isn't slave labour, but it sure is a test. 

The masters, the masters, another good crowd, 

The noise that they make is often and loud. 

Sit straight!. Don't be stupid!. What a question to ask!. 

Living with them is always a task. 

The pupils, the pupils, by far we're the best; 

Were pushed and we're hurried without any rest. 

But all of these evils we take with a smile. 

We're ahead of the others at least by a mile. 

I [igginson — IV 



114 THE ASHBUR1AN 

PREFECTS 

If only I were a Prefect. . . . How many boys have expressed this 
desire? It is impossible to tell. The dream of every student is to 
become a Prefect. Then they will have power, privileges, and com- 
parative freedom from chastisement. 

That's what you think! The title of Prefect carries with it the 
burden of being the example at all times, injaundiced in judgment, and 
impartial towards all. These are just a few of the connotations of 
that name. Granted, there are privileges, and there is comparative free- 
dom. However, the responsibility that is placed on your shoulders, at 
times becomes a burden indeed. 

You become weary of always being an example, of always ordering 
people around, and above all of the lack of friends. When you become 
a Prefect, you must place yourself above the main student body and 
obey the rules yourself to the strictest letter of the law. No, the task 
is not an easy one, and it is very seldom a rewarding one either. 

On the other hand, what the position does for you far outweighs 
the small inconveniences. Pride in yourself, a sense of responsibility, 
good judgment, and a sense of fair play. The things are gained 
inwardly; they do not show, but they are there to help and guide you 
for the rest of your life. 

To you who have aspirations of being Prefects, remember this one 
thing, you must be prepared to take orders, and strong criticism from 
the staff and boys, and be able to face the task before you with the 
knowledge that you are not winning a popularity contest, and that your 
responsibility to the school, or any other organisation in later life, comes 
first. 

To be a Prefect is a small thing in life, but it is the small things that 
unite, and determine the type of life you will lead in the future. 

GlLLEAN I-VIb 

RISING TIME 

Prefects, prefects, burning bright 

At this early morning hour, 

Trying to get you out of bed 

With those cries, both harsh and sour. 

"Seven fifteen, it's rising time." 

How I dread to hear that cry; 

And it's considered such a crime 

If on your bed you sleepy lie. 

"Thirty lines will pay your crime." 

Says the prefect at the door, 

"And maybe when I check next time 

You'll be ready to hit the floor". 

Flam-VIA 



THE ASHBURIAN 111 

WINTER 

Cold blues, harsh, dazzling whites. 

Dull greys — the northern winter. 

A watery sun listlessly chills 

The frozen earth, 

Frozen and rigid under a crusted shroud; 

Rigid as death. 

The rigor mortis of the north 

Clamps the land in a vise. 

Stretching sharply to the horizon, 

Stretching into a bleak eternity, 

A naked plain, 

Dead, 

Save for the blinding snow. 

Phantomwise, 

A lone ptarmigan tiptoes across the arctic dunes, 

Idly pecking for food, 

Unaware of death, circling, 

A thousand feet up, 

A speck in a cloudless sky, 

A black speck, hanging motionless, 

Free in the icy air. 

A gyrfalcon 

Plummets abruptly down, 

Down, and faster down, 

To bind 

The oblivious prey. 

A scarce audible cry, 

A flutter of feathers, 

And the snow 

Is naked once again. 

Ewing — U VI 

IS READING A LOST ART? 

Is reading a lost art? This is a controversial question that seems to 
crop up quite often nowadays. It is discussed along with such other 
favourite topics as the weather and politics at parties, luncheons, and 
everywhere else that people congregate for idle chatter. 

It is a generally accepted fact that reading is on the decline in some 
ways. Reading had its best days around the last half of the nineteenth 
century. The main reason for this is that there weren't other mediums 
of entertainment such as movies, radio and television. The first few 
decades of the twentieth century brought movies and radio into the 
picture. These, however, did not have a very marked effect on reading 



116 



THE ASH BURI AN 



popularity. By far the biggest enemy of reading has been television. 
Since its advent about two decades ago, television has become so popular 
that now practically every North American family has a television set 
and spends an average of four hours a day watching it. Naturally this 
has seriously cut into reading popularity, in North America at least. 

Reading has not declined quite so much in England, for two 
reasons. First, television is not quite so much of a time consuming 
pastime, and secondly the British are more avid readers by nature. 

As far as Continental Europe, Africa and Asia go television has had 
practically no effect on them. However a great number of these people, 
especially in Africa and Asia, are illiterate and can't read anyway. 

So it appears that reading has had its greatest loss of popularity in 
North America. However it might be worth pointing out that news- 
papers and magazines have bigger circulations than ever before through- 
out the North American continent. Although this is not reading in 
the usual way we think of it, it is a form of reading, and television has 
certainly not cut into its popularity. 

Finally it might be worth pointing out that as far as the different 
types of literature go, the only one to retain popularity is the novel. 
Other forms of literature such as poetry are still read by the conoisseurs 
of fine literature, but are generally disregarded by the average man. 

To sum up then, reading has lost some popularity, especially on this 
continent of ours, but to say that it is a lost art would be being narrow- 
minded and ridiculous. Reading has always been a popular pastime and 
as long as there are good authors to write interesting books, reading will 
never be a lost art. Troop — VIC 

THE SILENT WITNESS 

The tree . . . 

Is a timeless soldier, 

Standing guard for ages untold; 

Over the fields and over the pastures, 

Over the waters, over the world. 

The tree . . . 

Is a silent watcher. 

Knowing the things 'ncath his feet. 

Withholding knowledge in his structure. 

A sentinel through cold and heat. 

The tree, . . 

With gnarled trunk and stem uplifted, 

Or slender fingered, supple boughed, 

Through its branches time has sifted 

As secret witnesses, then and now. 

McXair - IV 



THE ASH KIR I. IX 111 

JUST AS THE SUN WAS RISING 

[f you listen carefully, you'll hear a rusrcl in the bunk house as four 
swarthy young ranchhands prepare for their five-thirty rounds. Each, 

through years of service, is automatically directed to his own particular 
task. A tall, dark haired chap is seen carrying six huge milk pails. 
gleaming in the rising rays of the sun to the large green, aluminum 
roofed barn. 

As the tall chap slides back the broad door, the timid holsteins rustle- 
in their places, and Prince, the old work horse, lifts his weary head to 
give a gruff greeting, for he knows only too well that soon he will leave 
his cozy stall, and be led into the fields to work. 

When the ranch hand's milking is completed he brings the milk to 
be separated. Then as he heads across the farm yard to help little Pedro 
with a grain sack he notices the white smoke curling from the chimney 
of the farmhouse, which is his signal for him and his fellow ranchhands 
to head over for a healthy breakfast before a long day's work. 

MacLarex II — Y 



CADETS 

Cadets is a wild and lengthy pastime 

Which consists of recruits who remembered the last time 

They turned out in ranks to be ordered and vexed 

And certainly don't wish to think of the next. 

Blunders and more are part of the game 

To make different ones each time results in the same 

Hurry, scurry, march up and down 

Each boy decked out in apparel of brown. 

Trumpets blare here, trumpets blare there, 

Trumpets, in fact, blare everywhere! 

But where would the corps be, where, I say? 

Without trumpets lending life to the day. 

The Guard of Honor, fur hats a-waving 

Covered in that which a bear had tried saving 

Red coats flashing, officers stern. 

Quite truly worth a bear's concern. 

Cadets, some may gripe, is for the birds, 

But there will always be seconds and thirds 

Who burn midnight candles, thinking it fine 

To give this and that a well-needed shine. 

Keffkr — YA 



118 THE ASHBUR1 AN 

VIB '62 

One Mundy morning of 1926, Dick's son met David's son while 
riding on a big Ox (-lev) on a tour of northern Copeland. They left 
the tour and under the shade of a Rowntree discussed the idea of Berry- 
ing Chicago's crook's protective Armour. 

At the same time Chaplin Gillean met Prime Minister Menzies of 
Malaya. They discussed human agression. 

In another part of the world, a fat man called Smethurst was in deep 
pain with a Blackburn on his nose. He had been bitten by a Le(e)tch. 
Dr. Magoo (McGaughey), a short-sighted man, smeared a ban-Hanna 
on the wound by mistake. 

Today, in the vear 1962, the names below make up Form VIB. 

Armour Dickson Mundy 

Berry I Gillean I Oxley 

Blackburn Hanna Rowntree 

Chaplin Letch Smethurst 

Copeland 1 McGaughey 

Davidson I Menzies Rowntree — VIb 



Elements of the Classic Tragedy in 
"THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA" 

Although written in the form of a novel, "The Old Man and the 
Sea" exhibits many characteristics of the original Classic Tragedy. The 
specific incidents in this novel can be given a universal significance in 
life itself. The old man is mankind in general. The marlin is not his 
enemy, but an aspiration or a goal towards which he strives, and which 
is often beyond attainment. The sea is life, or fate and it is with fate 
that man must struggle. The sharks are merely the instruments of fate 
that bring man to his inevitable defeat. In the tragedy, defeat is inevit- 
able, and it is in the way that man accepts this defeat that the true 
victory lies. 

In "The Old Man and the Sea", after the old man has won the first 
round of the fight in finally conquering and killing the great marlin, the 
inevitability of his defeat is shown in the abrupt but significant sentence 
"It was an hour before the first shark hit him". From this point on, the 
old man's defeat is inevitable, and the rest of the story serves only to 
show how he accepts this defeat. However, it is in this part of the 
story that the true significance lies. From the moment he sees the first 
shark, the old man knows he is beaten, but he refuses to accept this 
defeat. In his battle with the first shark, even when he is attacking the 
shark with the harpoon, he knows that it is useless. "He hit it without 
hope, but with resolution and complete malignancy". 



THE ASHBUR1AN 119 

The old man's chances become even slimmer as his fish has been 
partially mutilated, and as a result, it leaves a stronger scent for more 
sharks. Still the old man is determined and resolute. Me says "But 
man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed, but not defeated". 

As shark after shark comes, the old man never gives up, but fighrs 
back with everything he has. When the blade breaks on the knife 
that he has lashed to an oar, he fights the sharks off with a club. "Fight 
them", he said. 'Til fight them until I die". It is not until the carcass 
is stripped clean that the old man accepts the fact that he has been 
defeated. 

When he arrives back at the village, completely exhausted and 
almost in a daze, he moors his boat as usual, and carries his mast to his 
shack. He knows that no-one would steal the mast, but goes through 
the agony of carrying it home for the simple reason that he always did it 
before, and although he has been beaten in one battle, he has not been 
conquered. He refuses to admit that this return from fishing was any 
different from any other, and just as before, he would venture forth 
again and challenge the sea. The old man has been badly beaten, but is 
still unconquered, and it is in this indomitability of human character that 
the essence of true tragedy lies. Coristine I— LYI 



CT^§, 



JUNIOR 
ASHBURIAN 




ASHBURY COLLEGE 
OTTAWA 



VOLUME VII 



1962 



122 



THE ASHBURl AN 



JUNIOR ASHBURIAN STAFF 



Editor 

Sports' Editor 

Photographs 

Librarian 

Staff Advisor 
Form Notes 



Bruce Deacon 

Duncan Maclaren 

Ken Cook 

Allan Ewart 

Ian Cumming, Assistant 

L. I. H. Spencer Esq. 

Transitus — Ken Cook 
IIIA — Ian Mackenzie 

IIIB — Tony Farrugia 



Junior School Officers 



Day Boy Monitors Boarder Wing Monitors 
Tim Bell Sandy Patton (Wing Cmdr.) 
Gil Gamble Ian Cumming 
David Polk Tom Hurdman 
John Read Duncan Maclaren 
Chris Stone (Tuck Shop) John Schofield 

Peter Tewsley 


Chapel Monitor — Jamie MacAulay 




Form Monitors 




Transitus A 


Transitus B 


IIIA 


Chris Roche 
Ian Cumming 


Sandy Patton 
Wilson Southam 


John Anderson 
Gerry Banskin 


IIIB 


// 


/ 


Tony Farruiga 
Jim Tyas 


Mark Ellis 
David Dollin 

Games Captains 


Robert Wilson 
Greg Hayley 


Soccer 
Chris Chown 
Tony Farrugia (Und 


er 11) 

Cricket — John Read 


Hockey 

Gerry Benskin 
Brian Scott 



THE ASHBUR1 AN 123 

FOREWORD 

With Volume VII, the work of the Faculty Advisor has been made 

easy, thanks to a most efficient Editor, Bruce Deacon. Bruce has been 
after everybody with any interest, voluntary or obligatory, ever since 
the beginning of the Spring Term. 1 lis quiet manner was rather 
deceiving, as those who failed to meet his deadline discovered. Do not 
be surprised if one day he is editor of the "Citizen" or the "Journal"! 

To those who enquire why they have to write this or that, the 
Editor had a ready answer. It is surely enough reason that you will see 
your name in print? What has happened to boys that it is no longer an 
honour to be coveted to see your name as the author of some cultural 
achievement, or the captain of some winning team? Bruce made no 
apology to any Junior who was required to submit any item. 

On the other hand there are those who do try, but do not have their 
work published. To those, might we offer an encouraging word, and 
suggest that they keep on trying. One day their work must meet the 
requirements of the Editor-in-Chief. 

L. I. H. S. 



EDITORIAL 

In writing this Editorial, I would like to thank all those responsible 
for the eventual publication of this, the seventh issue, of "The Junior 
Ashburian." It is easily understood, that there could be no magazine 
without co-operation, and even if the "co-operation" was forced some- 
times, we did manage to finish the job before the announcement of the 
.M.L.T.S. boys. To these fellows (including myself) the Editorial Staff 
offer congratulations. With such wonderful weather, it will not be 
hard to find things to do while those other poor guys write their exams. 

One thing should be pointed out to our readers. Nearly every 
boy has had something to do with the magazine. Those who were not 
able to write poems or stories, or those who did not have the honour of 
being the captain of a team, were collecting pictures. With everyone 
"bearing the yoke", as the saying goes, this has been a reasonably good 
"Junior Ashburian". 

Bruci Deacon— Editor 



124 TH E ASHBURI AN 

JUNIOR HOUSEMASTER'S NOTES 

The Juniors have another school year behind them. To a ten year 
old this is a long step forward. 

For teachers, indeed for most of us in the adult world, the years 
offer little change as they pass. Not that they are dull; certainly it is 
quite the opposite in the teaching world! 

Each year, however, is a full unit in a boy's life, and the school year 
ahead always offers much to look forward to. There are many mile- 
stones during the course of a Junior School career. It may be the 
expectation of moving from the Track to the National Hockey League, 
of moving from Mrs. Dalton to Mrs. Hunter, or from Mrs. Hunter up 
to the harsh world of masculine teaching. The privilege of going to the 
Tuck Shop in the morning comes about half way along the course. The 
responsibility of being a Monitor, or playing on one of the first teams 
comes toward the end. Each step looms large in the mind of a boy. 

Two new school ties were introduced this year, the Junior 
Monitor's tie, and the Chapel tie. Both are quite handsome. 

There is a program of outside reading in the Junior School which 
has perhaps shifted a few vacant eyes from the television screen. The 
books are chosen mainly for excitement: Sherlock Holmes, John Buchan, 
the Hornblower series, even Eric Ambler. 

Saturday excursions were arranged for those boarders who stayed 
at school on weekends. 

The general tidiness of the boys' room was maintained at quite a 
high level throughout the year, with particular praise ^oin^ to Rooms 
3-10-11. 

D. L. Polk 



MEMORIAL WING NOTES 

This year has been a better year than last. Mr. Beique and Air. 
Daratha have kept an eye on things. We have again used the Island in 
the big 1 louse which is a room in the senior school. 

Every year Mr. Polk and the other masters get together and pick 
the best room in the wing for the room prize. The room that wins is 
sent to a movie and supper. The six monitors this year have helped the 
masters to rule the wing. This way worked very well, and everything 
ran smoothly. 

We will all be glad to see Mr. Beique and Mr. Daratha back next 
year and all hope that everything will run smoothly again. 
Mr. Polk was very kind to us all and we all thank him. 

The Wing Commander, Sandy Patton 



THE ASH BUR! AN 125 

CHAPEL NOTES 

In a Christian community, the centre of all activity must he the 
house of worship. Therefore it is not surprising that the Choir, under 
the direction of .Mr. Godfrey 1 [ewitt, has made the Chapel services 

memorable. The Candlelight Carol Service, the singing on Palm Sun- 
day, and the Easter Festival of the Nine Lessons and Carols are three 
outstanding events, not likely to be forgotten by those raking parr, nor 
by the congregations present. One wonders how Mr. 1 lew irr rinds 
time to do so much, and it was not surprising to hear of his illness. 1 
am happv to report that he has made a complete recovery. 

Our amiable Chaplain, Rev. Bevan .Monks, on his weekly visits to 
the Junior School for Religious Knowledge periods has continued to 
be a popular person among the Juniors. We would like him to know 
that we appreciate the daily Morning Chapel. What better way could 
we start our day than that? 

The Row Monitors have been a great help in checking on attend- 
ances. The number of "late boys" became less and less, thanks to these 
Monitors. God bless you all. 

Jamie Mc Allay, Chapel Monitor 

JUNIOR POETRY READING CONTEST 

This year, following last year's example, so many boys signed for 
the contest that preliminary readings had to be heard. With "The 
Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost as the set piece, approximately 
twenty boys entered. It took courage for Barnes in Form II to match 
himself against Transitus boys, and for other "non-intellectuals" to 
join the ranks. The contest was so close that five boys were sent to 
the finals. 

Professor Johnson from Carleton University again consented to 
judge this close contest, and, after many stimulating pieces of poetry 
had been read by the contestants, the nod was given to John Read. \\ e 
look forward to as much keen competition next year as we had this year. 

John Read — Trans. A 

JUNIOR PUBLIC SPEAKING CONTEST 

With five entries in the annual Public Speaking Contest, the Junior 
School had the largest contribution to make to this event. Bruce Deacon 
spoke first on "Science in the Bible". It was a learned topic, full of 
traps, particularly on pronounciations, but so much prior thought had 
gone into the topic, Bruce managed to sustain the interest of the 
audience. I have one criticism to make — he handled his notes badly. 

Next speaker was Jamie McAulay, whose unfortunate habit of not 
holding his head up spoiled his well-prepared, interesting, topical dis- 



126 TH E ASHBURI AN 

cussion on habits and customs of the contemporary people of the 
U.S.S.R. To follow Jamie, we had Harris Stein. This contestant 
made a great impact on the fellow contestants and the audience, speaking 
on "The Conquest of the Air". Although his speech was learned by 
heart, this did not detract from its forcefulness. His ability to include 
every member of the audience, and his cultivated use of hand gestures 
made his speech an obvious winner. 

David Hay's discussion of Sport in Australia was most interesting 
and effective. David had spent some time research, and had prepared 
his notes well. His particularly dramatic conclusion earned the admira- 
tion of the judge. Concluding the section was Keith McNair's vibrant 
appeal for better understanding between Canadians and our neighbours 
to the South. His comparison of our mutual needs in the matter of 
defence was well handled, and he is to be congratulated on attempting 
such a difficult subject for a Grade VIII boy. L. I. H. S. — Judge 



HUMANE SOCIETY ESSAYS 

For a number of year now our English teacher, Air. Spencer, has 
been urging us to put more effort into our annual essays for the Rock- 
cliffe Auxiliary's awards. Again this year we made him happy, for 
more by good luck than clever management I was awarded this most 
prized trophy, and as well as the large silver horse coming to Ashbury 
for the year, I have a smaller model to remind me of my success. 
Douglas MacKenzie received second prize and John Read honourable 
mention. At an assembly for the Junior School, Mr. Spencer, our 
English iMaster spoke to us and then presented the prizes. Other 
Awards were: 

Form II Form III A Form IIIB 

Nicolas Day David Berger Simon Adamson 

Michael Dollin Stockwell Day Duncan Gow 

Mark Ellis Chris Chown John Nelms 



THE ROYAL COMMONWEALTH SOCIETY 

For quite a while now the boys from Grade 6 and 7 have been 
writing an essay for the Royal Commonwealth Society. These essays 
compete with essays from all the other schools in Ottawa. In previous 
years we have done very well and this year was no exception. Out of 
the six finalists three were from Ashbury, and although we didn't win 
first prize, John Read did place second. The other two finalists from 
Ashbury were Bruce Deacon and Douglas MacKenzie. 



THE ASHBURIAN 



12- 



THE CHESS TOURNAMENT 

As in many years past, during the Winter Term, the chess fever hit 
the Junior School. As usual, just about everybody took part. It was 
enjoyed by all the Juniors. Ian dimming emerged as the champion. 
The results were as follows: I w Gumming 

TRANSITUS A 



Mackenzie 
Hay 



JHav 
J Polk 

Gamble II 

Maclaren III 

Thurston 

Read 

Cumming 

Hearne 

Roche 

Robertson 

Cook 

Stone 

McAulav 

Ewart 

MacCarthy 

Deacon 




Gamble 



Cumming 



Roche 



Deacon 



Cumming 



> Cumming 



Roche 



TRANSITUS B 



Southam 

McNair 

Patton 

Stein 

Currie 

Singer 

Gillean 

Neatbv 




Patton 



Singer 



► Patton 



IIIA 



Souch 

Chown 

Mulaner 

Gamble 

Day 

Berger 

Shipman 

Cann 

Anketell-Jones 

Scott 

Johnston 

Shanghai 




Souch 



Dav 



Shanghai 



Dav 



12i 



THE ASH BUR I AN 



IIIB 



Shenkman 


} 
} 
} 




1 






Nelms 


Shenkman 






Ncttleton 
Espaillat 


Nettleton 


J 


Shenkman 




Tyas 

Moulds 


Moulds 


1 




» Moulds 


Dean 
Mirsky 


} 


Marsky 

Gow 


1 
} 


Moulds 

TT 1 








Howes 


Howes 








Farrugia 
Espinola 


} 




y Howes 






Farrugia 





r H( 



II 



Knox 

MacDonald II 

Gosse 

Day 

Ducharme 

I.aflamme 

Dollin 

Palmer 

Ellis 

McAulav 

MacDonald III 

Hearne 

Espaillat 

Espinola 



Knox 

Gosse 

Ducharme 

Palmer 

Ellis 

Hearne 

Espinola 

Eaidler 



Knox 



Ducharme 



Hearne 



Espinola 



Ducharme 



Espinola 



> Espinola 



Espinola 

Howes 



Howes 
Patton 



FINALS 



Patton 



Cumming *j 

Shanghai / Cumming 



Cumming 



CT^g, 



THE ASH BUR! AN 129 

musk; appreciation classes 

"Music is never about anything, it just is", or "The meaning of 
Music is the way it makes you feel when you hear it - it makes you 
change inside". 

These are quotes from Leonard Bernstein at a Youth Concert of the 
New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra. In the Music Apprecia- 
tion classes of the Junior School at Ashbury our aim is to develop a love 
and understanding of music. In the early grades, self-expression, by 
means of rhythmic creative experience, is encouraged. In the advanced 
Forms, the "listening lesson" forms the greater part of the course. 1 he- 
stress is on the music itself, but in order to create interest throughout the 
year, projects on the lives of the composers, and the correlation, when 
possible, of the art-history of the period has been an additional part of 
the course. 

In some Forms the fundamentals of staff notation have been intro- 
duced by the playing of tonettes. 

Piano students who have been successful in passing the examinations 
of the Royal Conservatory of Music are: — 

Doxald Stevens — Grade VIII piano (honours) 

Grade II theory (1st class honours) 

Geoff Gray — Grade VIII piano (honours) 

Grade II theory (1st class honours) 

Duncan Mclaren — Grade II piano 

Grade I piano (honours) 

Gerald Benskin — Grade I piano 

Irene Woodburn 

THE ASHBURY WRITERS' CLUB 

Late in 1961 the Ashbury Writers' Club was formed by Mr. J. C. 
Hughes. The object of this club was to give students a chance to 
express their ideas, the other members commenting. In this way, and 
with a few suggestions from Mr. Hughes it was hoped that perhaps some 
student's talent in writing be discovered and developed. 

Members wrote poems, compositions, stories, etc., in their spare 
time, read these to the other club members, and then joined in a general 
discussion on the subject. Of course the main object of the club sessions 
was to have those students, who were sincerely interested in writing 
enjoy the intrinsic values of writing for its own sake and thus perhaps 
nurture a natural delight in and enthusiasm for language use in its 
own right. 

Suitable Junior School members were selected by Mr. Hughes. 
The club membership totalled about twelve boys originally and those 



130 



THE ASHBURIAN 



attending the first meeting enjoyed refreshments provided by Mr. 
Hughes." However, as the club settled down to "serious work" and the 
food and drink disappeared from the programme, the membership 
dwindled to a solid club core of about six boys who were seriously 
interested in the enjoyment of apt writing and expression. 

During the meetings which have been held, many subjects have 
been discussed, such as:— Mad Magazine, individual compositions, and 
famous poems. At one time a "Writer's Test", from a Writers' School 
in Connecticut, was tried by some of the boys — with somewhat hilarious 
results. 

At the last meeting held, about five boys attended, something that 
many might consider "a disgraceful performance", as far as evidence of 
interest is concerned, but rather we felt that, having winnowed away the 
chaff, the worthwhile seeds of interest in those remaining might better 
be brought to proper development in the intimate atmosphere of a select 
seminar group. S. H. Adamson 

FORM IIIA CLASS TOUR 

Saturday, May 10th was a great day for our Form. Together with 
the Boarders in the Junior School, we were going to the St. Lawrence 
Seaway and Upper Canada Village. We had been assured by our Form 
Master, Mr. Spencer, that the trip had been well planned — but who 
should be five minutes late for the bus but You-Know-Who! 

It was quite dull when we started out, and an ideal day for such a 
long trip. When we arrived at the Seaway, we found we were ex- 
pected, and we received the V. I. P. treatment. After a specially 
conducted tour, we saw an hour-long movie on the planning and con- 
struction of the seaway. This was very informative, and had been made 
interesting by the producers. After thanking the guides who had been 
so good to us, we set out for Long Sault Park, where we had lunch. 
By this time the sun was shining, and we had a pleasant hour there. 

Next on the programme was Upper Canada Village. Imagine our 
thrill when travelling along the roadway we heard an Ontario Provincial 
Police Car's siren screaming along behind us. But what a shock when 
he signalled our Bus driver into the edge of the road. Some silly 
clot had thrown a bottle out the window of the bus. Anyone who 
knows Mr. Spencer will appreciate that he was livid with rage when he 
discovered the reason for the stop. The nameless character who was 
responsible was not very popular because he had spoiled a wonderful 
day. When the atmosphere cleared, we breathed a sigh when told 
that we would continue to Upper Canada Village, which was not yet 
officially opened to the public. And they had heard about the bottle 
incident. W T e really thought that the Supervisor meant it when he said 
that he would not let us in. 



TH E ASHBURl AN 131 

What an interesting place it is, too. The guides divided the boys 
into two groups, and although we were not allowed inside any of the 
buildings there, it was interesting enough to make every boy want to 
return there when the place is open to the public. 

We arrived back at School at 5 p.m., after a very full day. We 
were all tired, but not too tired to express our gratitude to our Form 
.Master. Thank you once again, .Mr. Spencer. 

Ian Mackenzie, Form III A 



IIIB CLASS TRIP 

On April 13th our class went to the Pure Spring factory. We left 
school at one o'clock and when we got to the Pure Spring factors- we 
were met by Hob .Martin who took us to see the laboratory. 

He showed all the chemicals which are put together to make the 
syrup. We watched the bottles being cleaned by great machines. The 
syrup was put into the bottom of the bottles and then the water was 
put into the bottles. The water is purified once again after the gov- 
ernment has purified it. .Men look through the bottles to make sure the 
syrup and water are clean of any dust. Next the bottles have caps put 
on them and the bigger bottles have paper labels pasted on them. After 
the bottles have their labels and bottle caps put on they are placed in 
cartons which are taken up by a kind of elevator to the next floor. After 
a little while they are loaded onto trucks and taken to stores. 

After we had been shown the manufacture of Pure Spring soft 
drinks we were taken upstairs where Bob .Martin gave us all a drink, 
and we returned to school. Douglas Gow — IIIB 



JUNIOR SCHOOL LIBRARY 

Thanks to the generosity of Mr. Perry, the Headmaster, and the 
Life Magazine, Ashbury now has a set of scientific books worthy of any 
Library. The books have been in constant demand, and great care has 
to be taken to ensure that no damage is done to them by careless little 
guvs who haven't the urge to look after other people's property. 

The most ardent borrower from the Library has been your Librar- 
ian! Sometimes my keen desire to acquire knowledge has received the 
full benefit of the wrath of some of the teachers. Why don't more of 
you fellows in Transitus, especially Transitus B, spend some of your 
spare time — and you have lots of it — coming more regularlv to the 
Library? The collection of books there now covers a wide field, and 
we are sure to have something to your taste. 

To my successor I offer best wishes for a good library year. 

Allan Ewart 



in 



THE ASHBUR1AN 




Rear Row. H. A. Barends, J. E. Anderson, L. H. Moquette, B. L. Deacon. 

Middle Row. S. B. Day, R. J. Millar, L. I. H. Spencer, Esq., S. G. Gamble, D. C. Polk. 

Front Row. J. M. Mulaner, D. R. Moulds, C. T-. Cgfewn, Capt., G. R. V. Benskin, H. J. 

Pyefinch. 
Absent: J. V. Hearne. 



JUNIOR SOCCER TEAM 

With the usual schedule of games against Selwyn House School and 
Sedbergh School, plus the Junior Hockey League we were kept very 
busy during the season. The most memorable game was that played in 
Montreal against Selwyn House, when the entire game was played in 
the rain, and the referee and the two coaches finished up as wet and 
miserable as the players. Because it had been such a hard day, the bus 
made a stop on the return trip to give all the players of both teams a 
treat. 

The Team would like the coach to accept the thanks of all those 
who participated. It was not his most successful season of his career, 
but we did the best we could to repay him for his hard work. 

Chris Chown— Captain 



THE ASH BU Rl AN 



133 




Back Ron-. J. Espinola, M. L. Peterson, P. M. Ankerell-Jones, L. I. H. Spencer, Esq., 

S. D. Day, A. C. Gamble, S. A. J. Hampshire. 
Front Ron-. W. B. Ducharme, S. C. Dean, A. Farrugia, Capt., W. J. Shenkman, A. D. 

Gow, P. H. Espinola. 



UNDER 1 1 SOCCER 

The members of the "babv" school soccer team are very grateful to 
Sedberoh School for giving us two games each season to which we can 
look forward. It has been said that these are the most exciting games 
in the whole school. We thank the coach, Mr. Spencer, and want him 
to know how much we enjoyed playing for the school. 

Tony Farrugia— Captain 



134 



THE ASHBURI AN 




PUBLIC SCHOOL SOCCER LEAGUE 

Rear Row. F. Shanghai, W. M. Southam, J. C. Schofield, T. W. I. Cumming, B. C. 

Marshal!. 
Middle Row. I. D. Mackenzie, D. H. Maclaren, L. I. H. Spencer, Esq., P. A. Tewslev, 

R. S. Scheel. 
front Row. I). R. Moulds. I). \V. P. May, C. T. Chow n. Capt., J. J. D. Read, G. R. 

Y. Benskin. 



T H E A S H HU Rl A N 



13$ 




UNDER 15 HOCKEY TEAM 

Back Row: S. \1. Daratha, Esq., C. J. Sharp, I. D. Mackenzie, F. Shanghai, R. S. Scheel, 

C. J. Roche, T. G. Bell. 
Front Rov. H. J. Pyefinch, J. E. P. Anderson, G. R. V. Benskin, Capt., P. A. Tewsley. 

Yice-Capt., W. J. Shenkman. 



136 



THE ASHBUR1AN 




UNDER 13 HOCKEY TEAM 

Back Row. M. L. Peterson, D. R. M. Moulds, S. M. Daratha, Esq., L. H. Moquette, 

P. R. Rossy, J. V. P. Hearne. 
Front Row. H. J. Pyefinch, C. T. Chown, I. D. Mackenzie, Vice-Capt., B. J. Scott, Capt., 

H. H. Johnson, W. J. Shenkman. 



UNDER 13 HOCKEY 

This h:s not been a very good team, winning-wise, but we have 
had a lot of fun. This is probably more important, anyway. We have 
played Lower Canada College and Sedbergh. The best game we 
played was the trip to L. C. C. We had a good trip, and a warm wel- 
come from the opposing team. Their rink is excellent, and it was a 
pleasure to play on it. Coming home we were allowed to stop at a 
restaurant, which meant that it was nearly eleven p.m. when we arrived 
back at school. 

Our thanks to our coach, Mr. Daratha. 

Brain Scott— Captain 





JUNIOR CRICKET TEAM 

Back Row. A. S. Robertson, H. J. Pvefinch, J. E. P. Anderson, L. H. Moquette, 

G. R. V. Benskin, C. J. Roche, J. P. Tyler. 
Front Row. D. H. MacLaren, S. G. Gamble, D. W. P. Hay, J. |. D. Read, Capt.; 

D. C. Polk, T. W. I. Cumming, R. W. Scheel. 
Scorer: K. M. Cook. Absent: F. Shanghai. 



J UNIOR CRICKET XI 

This year, in contrast to last year's rains, we missed very few of 
our available practices. We will remember this year by the fact that 
all of our matches had very small differences in the scores. 

Our first match against Bishops was tense. Could we repeat last 
year's victory? Happily for all, it turned out to be a perfect game, the 
score being tied. The second game, our luck was better, the victory 
coming to us. At the conclusion of the match we were presented with 
the "B. C. S. Junior School Cricket Cup", which we proudly brought 
home for the first time in over five years. 

Against Sedbergh our luck was not so good. Our first match we 
lost, this game showing how many holes could be found in our fielding;. 
The second match, however, we managed to sneak past them by a score 
of only four runs! This was a very exciting game, spiced up by Mr. 
Spencer's "advice" to our players. 

I would like to express the team's thanks to Mr. Spencer, who 
coached us to this fine showing (no small job), and gave Colours to 
Gamble and Read for their bowling ability. Bobby Scheel was awarded 
the M. C. C. bat for the most in! proved player. 

Re u>— Captain 



138 



THE ASHBURIAN 



HOUSE AND LEAGUE GAMES 

The usual soccer league was formed this year. Happily, the six 
teams were almost equal in strength. In the play-offs, Bolton, Luton, 
Arsenal and Wolverhampton battled it out. The final game saw Bolton 
(Hurdman-captain) edging out Luton (Pyefinch-captain) by a score 
of 2-1. In the House Matches, Connaught added points toward the 
Wilson Shield by defeating Woollcombe 5-0. 

Our National Hocky League saw a close struggle right to the 
closing rounds when Chicago (Anderson— captain) and Montreal (Pye- 
finch-captain) tied for the Saxe Cup. Connaught slipped an extra goal 
past Woollcombe in the House Matches, winning 3-2. 

The House Cricket Aiatches found Connaught House the champion 
after an exciting finish. 

BOXING 

After an absence of several years, boxing was re-introduced in the 
Junior School. Mr. Polk refereed the matches, and was assisted by Mr. 
Daratha, Mr. Lancaster and Mr. Beigue who acted as judges. There 
was always great excitement during the boxing season. The rounds 
varied in length according to the age and weight of the boxers. The 
managers were Patton, Benskin, dimming and Marshall. There were 
elimination bouts which led up to the big day of the Finals. We hope 
that the Juniors will have boxing every year. The results were as 
follows: 

Richard Rossy 



JUNIOR MIDDLEWEIGHT 



J 



Farrugia 
Gamble III 



Gamble III 



Johnson 
Farrugia 
Knox 
Gamble III 

MacDonald III j MacDonald III I ^ } 

Espmola I 1 

Day I 



> Gamble 111 



r Espinola I 

JUNIOR LIGHTHEAVYWEIGHT 



Moulds 
Mr \ulav I 



Moulds 

Maclaren J 

Cann \ 

McAuley I j 

Rossy 1 D 

Neatbj / Ross > 

S< nil 



Moulds 



Rossy 



), Rossv 



T HE ASHBURIA N 

EXHIBITION HEAVYWEIGHT BOUT 

No decision 



Read 
Stone 



B9 



Lawrence 
Vrmitage 

Hatch 
Pryde 



JUNIOR FLYWEIGHT 



Lawrence 
Prvde 



Pryde 



JUNIOR BANTAMWEIGHT 



Gosse 

MacDonald II 
.McAulay II 
Barker 
Espaillat II 
Baxter 



Gosse 



Barkc 



Espaillat II 

Dean 



Barker 



Espaillat II 



Barkc 



Day 
Shortreed 



JUNIOR FEATHERWEIGHT 



> Shortreed 
Howes 
Copeland 
Espinola II 
Hay ley 
Ducharme 
Hampshire 
Espaillat II / Espaillat II 



Howes 
Espinola II 
Hayley 



Espinola II 



Havlev 



^ Espinola II 



JUNIOR LIGHTWEIGHT 



Shenkman "I 

Anketell-Jones j Ank «cll-J<»nes 



O^^ 



140 



THE ASH BU RI AN 



FORM NOTES 




TRANSITUS A 

Cook, Ken — Ken is thirteen years old and is in his third year at Ash- 
bury. He is one of the two lost and found monitors and is also the 
class secretary. H~ enjoys most all subjects but his favourites are 
Arithmetic and History. 

Cumming, Ian — Ian likes all sports very much. He is hoping to make 
the cricket team and was on the soccer and hockey teams. He likes 
most of the teachers, kin's parents live in London England. He 
is going to spend his summer holidays there. 

Deacon, Bruce — Bruce is a great worrier and always getting us extra 
homework. He is a very hard worker and that is why he is second 
in the class. Bruce was on the soccer team and is improving in 
cricket. He hopes to be better at cricket next year. 

EwarTj Allen — Allen was a member of the hockey and soccer team.^ 
for a short while and is an active member of the two fields in 
cricket. Allen reads a lot and is one of the most popular boys in 
our form. 

( i vmble, Gil — Gil is an average student and a friend of all the masters. 
He is also a monitor and a very efficient one at that. Gil made the 
soccer team and is one of the best bowlers on the cricket team. He 
is also on the Gym team. 

Hearne, John — This is his sixth year at Ashbury and he enjoys it very 
much. He was on the under 14 soccer team and on the under 13 
hockev team. He sings in the choir and that is one of his hobbies. 

JO 

Next year he intends to come back and will be in grade nine. 
Hay, David — David, our Australian friend, was a late comer last year 
and has pulled ami struggled to become one of the top members of 
our form. Although only twelve he is vice captain ot the cricket 
team and was also a member on the soccer team. 



THE ASHBURIAN Hi 

MacCarthy, Mar tin — Martin has been at Ashbury for three years 
and he likes it very much. I le has been in the choir for three years 
and he came third in the cross-country runs. Martin has been on 
the winning hockey for three years. I lis favourite sport is cricket. 
Some day lie hopes to become a doctor and persue his hobby which 
is botany. 

Mackenzie, Douglas — Doug-las has been at Ashbury two years. I le 
came second in the intermediate cross country race. He enjoys 
Mr. Spencer's subjects very much. Ths summer he will be going 
to camp at Golden Lake. 

MacLaren, Duncan — Duncan is a junior boarder monitor. I le was 
an active member of the soccer team and also played hockey. This 
year he made the first held in cricket and hopes to make the team 
next year. 

McAulay, James — James is the Chapel monitor this year. James was 
a contestant in the poetry reading contest and the public speaking. 
He likes sports and is a very active member of the form. 

Polk, David — David is nearing the end of his eighth year at Ashbury. 
He was made a monitor at the beginning of our school year. He 
participated with much enthusiasm in both soccer and cricket. 

Read, John — John is top student of our form. He played defence on 
the soccer team and is captain of the cricket team. John stood 
second in the Royal Commonwealth Society essay competition, 
also won the Poetry Reading Contest. 

Robertson, Alexander — Sandy is an old boy this year and was lucky 
enough to make the first field in cricket. He likes all sports. 

Roche, Christopher — Christopher or C. R. as he is more commonly 
known was a member of the junior hockey and cricket teams, and 
also played soccer. Chris won't be with us next year as he is 
going to attend school in Kingston. 

Stone, Christopher — Chris likes all subjects and sports. He is an 
active member of the choir and likes it very much. He is tuck 
shop monitor and assistant Chapel monitor. He is also a member 
of the semi chorus in the choir. 

Thurston, Peter — Peter likes sports and especially cricket. AYe wants 
to be a politician as Mr. Spencer thinks he is full of hot air. He is 
a member of the Junior Choir and one of the most popular boys 
in the form. 

Mr. Polk — This being our last year in Elementary School it took a 
teacher of high caliber to get us through, and to teach us the vitals 
of what next year's triumph or defeat is based on. Without such 
a teacher all would have been lost. To Mr. Polk, our Form Master 
we would like to say thank you for the academic training, the good 
class trips which we all enjoyed and also for tolerating us during 
the past year. 



142 



THE ASHBUR1 AN 




TRANSITUS B 

Atack, John — Although this is John's first year here at Ashbury he 
is enjoying it very much. John's most outstanding feat during the 
year was doing more chin-ups than anyone in the class. 

Borends, Howard — Howie, as known by his classmates is one of our 
old boys. He has no favourite subject as he is good in all of them. 
He is looking forward to another year here at Ashbury. 

Bell, Tim - An "Old Soldier" as termed by some. Tim is undoubted- 
ly the finest athlete in the class. His favourite sport is football. 
Tim is also very good in all academic subjects and thus is an all- 
around good student. 

Currie, Arthur — Arthur being another old boy is well acquainted 
with the school, its customs and events. This is probably one of 
the reasons why he scores such a high place in the annual runs. 

Gillean, Geoffrey — Geoff enjoys flying as was seen at the beginning 
of the year on a short flight with our Form Master. This is not too 
unusual as Geoff's father is in the air force. 

Hampson, David — Although this is David's first year at Ashbury it 
didn't stop him from excelling in many subjects among which 
English Composition was outstanding. His Form Master says, 
"David has the makings of a great writer," therefore his future 
looks quite promising. 

Hazen, King — Another new boy whose first name brought forth a 
certain amount of mirth at the beginning of the year. King en- 
joys skiing and belongs to a local ski club. 

Hurdman, Tom — Tom is another of our old boys. He is very active 
in sports and was chosen captain of one of the Junior School's 
I lockey Teams. His father is a local business man and Tom says 
"he will step into his father's shoes". 

\\ \ksh ail, Bruce — This is one new boy who was rather unfortunate 
this year, having several serious accidents but recovering from all 



THE ASHBURIAN 14> 

without any permanent effects. I le was rather Lucky as one of the 
.Masters, Air. I lughes, took a special interest and helped him out 
with some tougher subjects. 

MacNaiRj Keith — Another new boy returning from abroad full of ex- 
periences, which when retold, were rather interesting. Keith, when 
(jiven some small task in a class project quickly relieves others of 
their positions and completely takes over doing the job slowly but 
well, thus making himself a favourite with all the masters. 

Neatby, Andy — Andy can be proud of himself for the year he has 
put in. He not only has a high average but excels the rest of his 
classmates in two subjects. As a result of his extreme skill in the 
field of languages Andy was promoted early in the year to a much 
higher group in Latin and French. His future is very promising. 

Pattox, Alexander — Sandy, a native of glorious Bermuda, turned out 
to be a class leader. He accepts responsibility, therefore he be- 
came an efficient class monitor. His favourite sport is basketball. 

Pyefinch, Harry — Harry is one of the classe's most likeable charac- 
ters. He is always considerate of others, honest and polite. He 
is a real pillar of strength for others in trouble to lean on. How- 
ever he never takes advantage of this and is always improving. 

Sayers, Macky — Here is one young man destined for a literary career. 
His talents have shown up in some poems he has written— "promis- 
ing" as one teacher put it. 

Scheel, Bobby — If class notes were written in order of merit here is 
one young man who would certainly come at the head of the list. 
A star athlete who received an award for his undaunted efforts to 
help his team go on to victory. He is never out of the limelight 
in the world of sports and academic subjects as well. 

Schofield, John — This is one classmate for whom I have deep respect. 
He is a real Spartan and believer of right even in the face of severe 
punishment. He stood up for his rights and it was found out later 
that he was totally free of blame. 

Singer, Ronald — Another new boy who has a surprising interest in 
military history and armament. This is his main interest and his 
enthusiasm is shared by his "buddy" previously mentioned. Who 
knows where this interest will lead to in the course of Ron's life. 

Southam, Wilson — Wilson's nickname by which he was known 
throughout the year was "Willy". He became a class monitor 
early in the year because of his outstanding talents with people. 
He shows promise for the future if he continues on his present 
course. 

Stein, Harris — At the bottom of the list alphabetically but not aca- 
demically. Harris turned out to be rather good in some of his 
subjects and showed interest in them all year. 



144 



THE ASHBUR1AN 



Mr. Hughes — Mr. Hughes is a new comer to the Junior School at Ash- 
bury. He taught in the Senior school before coming to us. He 
teaches mathematics to grades six, seven and eight. He took 
several boys flying this year also on several very exciting form 
trips. This year he is the Commander-in-Chief of the Cadet 
Corps. We all wish him every happiness on the occasion of his 
approaching marriage. 




FORM IIIA 

Anderson, John — John is enjoying his second year at Ashbury. His 
favourite sport is hockey for which he won a colour. He doesn't 
quite know what he wants to be yet. He was on Junior school 
gym team. He doesn't know yet whether he will be at Ashbury 
next year. 

Anketell-Jones, Patrick — This is Patrick's third year at Ashbury 
and he enjoys it very much. He enjoys all the games at Ashbury 
and he made the under twelve soccer and the gym teams. In the 
future he hopes to go into the Merchant navy. 

Benskin, George — George has been at Ashbury for three years and 
has liked it very much. This year he was on the Soccer, Cricket, 
and was captain of the Hockey Team. He won colours in Soccer. 
He hopes to be a Pro Hockey Player and then travel in his main 
work. 

Berger, David — This is David's fifth year at Ashbury. His favourite 
subjects are History, Latin and French. He likes Cricket, Hockey 
and Football. His hobbies are making model planes, stamps and 
coins. He wishes to be a lawyer. 

Chown, Christopher — Chris was on the soccer and hockey teams. 
His hobby is model railroading. He lives in Toronto and has been 
coming to Ashbury for three years. He plans to be an aircraft 
engineer. 



THEASHBURIAN 145 

Day, Stocky — He was on the under eleven soccer team. I lis first 
year at Ashbury and he likes it very much. I lis hobbies are stamps 
and coins. lie hopes he will be back next year. 

Cann, Peter — This is his first year at Ashbury. At the beginning of 
the year he had a rough time but as the year went he got into the 
swing of things. lie likes playing cricket very much. I Ic hopes 
to be a doctor when he grows up. 

Gamble, Andrew — He likes to swim, play soccer and cricket. I lis 
hobby is collecting stamps. .Mr. Spencer, 1 1 1 A Form Teacher, 
just got after Andy for not doing his prep. Although he lias lots 
of friends and plays around in class, he is quite smart. 

Hampshire, Stephen This is Stephen's first year at Ashbury. His 
favourite sport is Soccer. He likes most subjects and hopes to 
join the air force some day. 

Johnson, Hugh — Ths is Hugh's third year at Ashbury and he has en- 
joyed it verv much. I lis favourite sports are baseball, football 
and hockey. His favourite subjects are Latin and French. He 
hopes to be a Commander in the Navy some day. 

MacKenzie, Ian — Ian is in his second year at Ashbury. He likes 
soccer, hockey, baseball and swimming. His hobby is making 
models. He hopes to be a pilot when he grows up. 

.Millar, Bob — It is his first year at Ashbury. His favourite sports are 
soccer and cricket. He hopes to be a Surgeon like his dad. 
He wants to train to be a Doctor in Glasgow, Scotland. 

Moquette, Larry — Larry's nickname is Moky. He is in his second 
year at Ashbury and his hobbies are swimming and boating. His 
most liked master is Mr. Spencer. 

Mi laner, John — John lives in Venezuela and has been coming to Ash- 
bury for three years and likes it very much. He likes to play 
hockey, soccer and cricket. His hobbies are golfing and swim- 
ming. 

Peterson, Michael — Michael has attended Ashbury for six years. He 
was on the Soccer and Hockey team this year. 

Rossy, Richard — His favourite hobby is chemistry. He also likes 
annoying a few teachers like Mr. Spencer. He enjoys boxing and 
hockey. Two of his best teachers are Mr. Spencer and Mr. 
Daratha. 

Scott, Brian — Brian has been at Ashbury for three years. His favour- 
ite sports are football and hockey. He was captain of the under 
thirteen hockey. He would like to study Law when he graduates. 

Shanghai, Farrokh — This is his first year at Ashbury and he is en- 
joying it very much. His favourite sports are soccer, hockey and 
cricket. He hopes to attend Ashbury next year where he has 
made many friends. 



146 TH E ASHBURI AN 

Shipman, John — John has been attending Ashbury for four years. 
His hobbies are boats and swimming. He wants to be the operator 
of a Boat store in the Ottawa area. He has done reasonably well 
after being promoted from Form IIB to IIIA. 

Sims, Nigel — This is Nigel's first y ear ar - Ashbury. He likes cricket 
and is in the choir. He is English and his ambition is to get a 
University degree as a designing engineer. 

Skead, Brian — Quiet with a touch of mischief, Brian enjoys himself in 
his own way. 

Souch, Boh — Bob has been here for six years. He comes from Mont- 
real and his favourite sports are swimming and cricket. His hobby 
is A4odel Railroading. Favourite subjects are English and French. 
His preferred masters are Mr. Spencer and Mr. Polk. 

Thackray, David — David is a quiet boy. He likes cricket and sailing. 
His hobby is making models. He thinks Mr. Spencer is quite nice. 

Tyler, John — This is John's first term. He comes from England but 
came here two years ago. His hobby is making models and his 
favourite sport is cricket. He wants to be in the army when he 
grows up. 

Vigder, Micheal David — He likes Ashbury very much. He likes to 
write exams. When he grows up he wants to be a doctor. 

Form IIIA Form Master — The Form Master is very much part of the 
Form so we must include Mr. Spencer. This year has been a hard 
one, thanks to a couple of unnamed adversaries who were always 
trying to "beat the rap". A4aybe next year's crop will be better! 




FORM IIIB 

Adamson, Simon — This is Simon's first year at Ashbury. Before com- 
ing to Ashbury he went to Len Park Public School in Toronto. 
His favourite subjects are Art and Latin. This has been a very 
successful year for Simon. 



THEASHBUR1AN 141 

Bergf.r, Robert — This is Robert's first year at Ashburv. Before com- 
ing to Ashburv he went to Rockcliffe Park Public School. 1 lis 
favourite subjects arc Arithmetic and Latin. 1 lis favourite sports 
are Hockey and Football. I [e intends to be a lawyer. I his has 
been a verv prosperous year for Bobby as he moved from grade 
five to six. 

Dean, Stuart — This is Stuart's first year at Ashburv. Before coining 
to Ashbury he attended Bessborough Public School in Toronto. 
His favourite subjects are Arithmetic and Geography. I lis fav- 
ourite sport is Hockey. I le would like to be a N. II. I., hockej 
plaver in his future. This has been a very exciting year for Stuart. 

Espaillot, Arturo — This is Arturo's first year at Ashburv. Before 
he came to Ashburv he went to San Suis Gonsala School in Domin- 
ican Republic. His favourite subjects are English and Arithmetic. 
His favourite sports are Basketball, Baseball, Volleyball and swim- 
ming. In the future he would like to be an Astronaut. This has 
been a good year for Arturo. 

Espinola, Hernan — This is Flernan's first year at Ashbury. Before 
he came to Ashbury he attended school in the Dominican Republic. 
His favourite subject is Arithmetic. His favourite sport is Baseball. 
In the future he would like to be an engineer. 

Farrugia, Anthony — Anthony has given up much of his time to pre- 
pare the form notes for IIIB. I know what a job it is and I think 
he deserves hearty congratulations. Anthony was on the Junior 
Soccer team and likes cricket verv much. 

Firestone, Bruce — This is the end of Bruce's second vear at Ashbury. 
His favourite subjects are Latin and Arithmetic. His favourite 
sports are Gym and Softball. In the future he would like to be an 
Engineer. This has been a verv successful vear for Bruce. 

Gow, Duncan — This is Duncan's third vear at Ashburv. His fav- 
ourite subject is Historv. His favourite sport is Soccer. He was 
on the under eleven soccer team. He was the assistant monitor 
in IIIB in the first term. In the future he would like to be a Doc- 
tor. 

Howes, Michael — This is .Michael's sixth vear at Ashburv. His fav- 
ourite subjects are Latin and Arithmetic. His favourite sports are 
Hockey and soccer. In the future he would like to be a Lawver. 
He is the secretarv of Form IIIB, and this has been a good vear for 
Micheal. 

Loftus, Philip — This is Philip's fourth year at Ashburv. I lis favourite 
subject is History. His favourite sports are soccer and cricket. 

Mirsky, Micheal — Micheal has been at Ashburv for three vears. His 
favourite subject is Art. His favourite sport is cricket. In the 
future he would like to be in the Canadian Air Force. 



148 



THE ASHBURl AN 



Moulds, Donald - This is Donald's second year at Ashbury. His 
favourite subjects are Art and History. His favourite sports are 
Soccer and Cricket. He also was on the under 1 5 soccer team and 
won first colours. This has been an exciting year for Donald. 

Nelms, John - This is John's third year at Ashbury. His favourite 
subjects are Latin and French. His favourite sports are Soccer 
and Baseball. He was Monitor in the first term. In the future 
he would like to be an Optician. 

Nettleton, Harold — This is Harold's third year at Ashbury. His 
favourite subject is Arithmetic. His favourite sport is baseball. 
In the future he would like to be in the Jewellery business. 

Newsome, Graham — This is Graham's first year at Ashbury. Before 
he came to Ashbury he went to Aumour Heights Public School in 
Torotno. His favourite subjects are Latin and French. His fav- 
ourite sports are Baseball and cricket. In the future he would like 
to be an electrical engineer or Physicist. 

Nixon, Terry — This is the second year that Terry has been at Ash- 
bury. His favourite subjects are Geography and History. His 
favourite sports are Football and Swimming. In the future he 
would like to be an Explorer. 

Sharp, Chris — This is his fourth year at Ashbury. His favourite 
subject is arithmetic. His favourite sport is Football. In the 
future he would like to be a Lawyer or an Air Force Pilot. This 
has been a regular year for Chris. 

Shenkman, Billy — This is his fourth vear at Ashbury. His favourite 
subjects are Music and Spelling. His favourite sports are Hockey 
and Soccer. In the future he would like to be an Engineer. 

Turner, Donald — This is Donald's first year at Ashbury. Before 
coming to Ashbury he attended Woodroffe Public School. His 
favourite subject is Art. His favourite sport is go-carting. In the 
future he would like to be a Salesman. 

Tyas, James — This is his fourth year at Ashburv. His favourite sub- 
ject is Arithmetic. His favourite sport is Cricket. In the future 
he would like to be a lawyer. 

\\ i i i), William — This is his first vear at Ashburv. His favourite sub- 
jects are Geography and Latin. His favourite sport is skating. In 
the future he would like to be an engineer. 

Wright, David — This is his first year at Ashbury. Before he came to 
Ashburv he attended Rosemere High. His favourite subject is 
Latin. I lis favourite sports are Hockey and Soccer. In the future 
he would like to be a Scientist. 



THE ASH BU R I A N 



149 



Mr. Daratha — .Mr. Daratha is a new comer to Ashburv. He, as well 
as being Form Master of IIIB, teaches Forms III A and TRANS. 
A & B. This year the new subject of "ART" was introduced by 
Mr. Daratha. He took us, his Form, on some Form trips. Many 
interesting and enjoyable afternoons have been spent listening ro 
speakers which Mr. Daratha has secured for us. The success of 
our Junior Hockey this year is credited to the coaching received 
from Mr. Daratha. We hope every year at Ashbury will be as 
successful for him as this one has been. 




FORM II NOTES 

Barker, Jeremy — This is my first year at Ashbury. Last year 1 at- 
tended Vincent Masse v Public School. My favourite subject is 
arithmetic. The game I enjoy most is cricket. I want to be a 
doctor. 

Barnes, Charles — I am attending Ashbury for the second year. My 
former school was City View Public. Soccer and cricket are my 
favourite sports. I like to read. My summer holiday is not yet 
planned. 

Cochrane, Terry — Last year I went to Hillson Avenue Public School. 
History and arithmetic are the studies I like best. Some dav 1 
hope to be a doctor. 

Colbert, Bruce — I am finishing my first year in the College. My 

former school was Broadview Public. I like arithmetic but found 
French difficult. My ambition is to be a carpenter. Wc are go- 
ing to our cottage this summer. 

Copeland, Stephen — For three years I have been attending Ashbury 
where I enjoy French and spelling. I play cricket and football. 
I want to be a detective. Part of the holiday will be spent at a 
summer school. 



150 



THE ASH BUR1 AN 



Day, Nicky — I am enjoying my first year at Ashbury. My best sub- 
ject is spelling and my worst is arithmetic. Cricket is my favourite 
game. To be a lawyer is my ambition. We are going to Tadous- 
sac for our holidays. 

Dent, John - This is my first year in this school. Arithmetic and 
spelling are my best subjects. I like to play soccer and cricket. 
Some day I hope to be a scientist. 

Deutsch, Andreas — For two years I have been at Ashbury. I enjoy 
all the classes and games. This year I got into the school Choir. 
In the holidays we plan to go to British Columbia. 

Dollin, David — I am finishing my second year here. The subjects 
I like best are arithmetic and history. Favourite games are hockey 
football, and cricket. This year I am the Form Monitor. Part of 
the holiday I'll be at summer school. Later, I'll go to the United 
States. 

Ducharme, Wallace — This is my third year in the College. I like 
all subjects and most games. I want to be an electrical engineer. 
We go to our farm in the summer. 

Ellis, Mark — I have been at Ashbury for four years. My favourite 
subjects are geography, history and spelling. In sports I like soc- 
cer and baseball. Last fall I was chosen as a class monitor. In the 
summer we go to our cottage on Grand Lake. I shall look after 
patents when I grow up. 

Espaillat, Rafael — Last fall I came to Ashbury and am trying to 
learn English. Geography and history I find difficult. I like 
cricket best of all our games. This will be my happiest summer. 

Espinola, Jorge — This year I am learning to speak English. Spanish 
is my language. The subjects I don't like are history and geogra- 
phy. French and spelling are easy. I think cricket and baseball 
are good fun. I want to be an engineer and build bridges and 
dams. 

Gosse, Billy — For the last three years I have been here. I like read- 
ing and writing, but am slow in arithmetic and grammar. Soccer 
is my best sport. I want to be a doctor later on. 

I IearnEj Victor — I have enjoyed Ashbury life for five years. Gram- 
mar and French are my favourite classes, while in games I like 
cricket and soccer. I sing in the school choir and have been pro- 
moted to the semi-chorus. 

Knox, John — My home was in Denmark but I have been in Canada 
for some rime. My family travels a lot but this summer we are 
goin^ to have a cottage. I like all sports bur enjoy skiing most of 
all. 



T H F. A S H li L R I A N 



151 



Laflamme, David — After three years at Corpus Christie I came to 
Ashbury, and am in Grade Four. I lere, I enjoy spelling, French, 
baseball and football. To be a doctor is mv ambition. 

Laidler, James — Four years ago I entered the College, and am now in 
Grade V. I like to spell and to play cricket. I want to be a 
chemist. In the holidays we are going to Murray Bay. 

MacDonald, Douglas — Last year I went to Bell's Corners Public- 
School. History, geography and arithmetic are easy, but I rind 
French very hard. I sing in the school choir and play football and 
baseball. I hope to be the pilot of a jet plane. 

MacDoxald, John — This is my second year at Ashbury. I like swim- 
ming, tennis, and soccer, and I like Air. Polk and Mr. Beique. 

McAulay, Keith — Three years ago I came here from Hopewell Public- 
School. I like arithmetic and cricket. I want to be a doctor some 
day. 

Palmer, Michael — Last year I went to the D. Roy Kennedy School. 
The best time of the day for me is games time. I don't like French. 
Sometime I'll join the Navy. This summer I am going to Chicago. 




FORM 1 

Arm 1 1 age — Mark wants to be a carpenter for he likes creating things. 

Basixski I — Stefan wants to be a traveller around the world. 

Basixski II — Toni keeps us well informed on things at home and 
abroad. 

Boxd — John is our speech maker. 

Edgar — Anthony wants to be a Doctor. 

Hatch — Donald wants to be a Royal Canadian Mounted Policeman. 

Hayley II — Gregory is Captain of the Fifth Cricket Field. 



1S2 TH E ASHBURI AN 

La Ferme — Leo hopes to play in Carnegie Hall some day. 

Laurence — Michael is our artist and has recently returned to England. 

Peterson II — David hopes to be a lawyer. 

Pryde — Derek wants to be a City Traffic Policeman. 

Taticek — Peter wants to be a Policeman also. 

Wilson — Rob hopes to be in the Navy some day. 

Wood — Anthony wants to visit Jelly Stone Park with Yogi Bear. 

Shortreed — Ian aspires for the R.C.A.F. 

Stoddard-Stones — Rupert wants to be in the R.C.M.P. and already has 
his uniform. 

Baxter — Geoffrey hopes to be a news reporter. He'll make a good 
one. 

Kronick — Ricky hopes to be a Doctor. 



C^^ 



THE ASHBURIAN 153 

LITERARY SECTION 

WATER SAFETY 

With the summer here, a little advice on water safety seems like a 
good idea. Canadians enjoy a wide variety of water sports such as 
water-skiing, boating, skin diving, and most important of all, swimming. 
Many serious accidents are caused by careless and misinformed people. 
You have heard before, and I repeat again, the most serious hazzard in 
the water is panic. Panic can cause the death not only of the one in 
trouble, but also of the would-be rescuer. It is slowly becoming apparent 
that people must have some knowledge of first aid, especially for the 
treatment of shock, which is a combination of panic and the violent 
exertion of trving to stay afloat. 

Here are some handy hints to remember: — 
i. The brain and heart, when suffering from shock, lack circulating 

blood, 
ii. There has been a rapid loss of body heat, 
iii. The first action should be to keep the victim lying still, with the 

head about twelve inches higher than the feet, 
iv. Remove wet clothing, even if vou have to cut it away, and rapidly 
dry the person's body in order to conserve body-heat. Remember, 
you may be saving a life, which is much more important than the 
victim's clothes, 
v. If shelter is near, and vou have help, try to make for this shelter. 

Improvise a stretcher, 
vi. Apply artificial heat in any way possible. If none is readily avail- 
able, use your imagination to improvise. 
vii. If necessary, try your hand at artificial respiration, 
viii. Never make the mistake of giving the victim alcohol. Hot tea or 
coffee, if available, but never the "strong stuff". 

Happy summer kids. Remember 

THE LIFE YOU SAVE MAY BE YOUR OWN. 

Andy Gamble— IIIA 



THE MOON 

The moon has a funny face 
It shines in my face too 
It is very bright 
It shines for me and you too. 

Mark Ar.mitage — Form I 



154 T H E ASH BUR1 AN 

KEEPING A HORSE 

A lot of boys and girls would like to have their own pony or horse 
that they can ride whenever they want. Well, there is a lot more than 
just riding the horse. You must have a place to exercise the horse, a 
place for it to graze and a place for shelter (namely a barn). 

A space of three acres or more is advisable. In this space one can 
have his barn and an exercising ring. Around the field you need a fence 
about four and a half feet high. The best fencing to use is a fence that 
has rectangles which nailed to posts about ten to fifteen feet wide and 
nailed to the top of the posts a single strand of barbed wire to keep the 
horse from rubbing and breaking the fence. The exercising ring called 
the paddock should be fenced separately usually with bars and posts. 
You should have your barn near the paddock. 

One can't always get some land or a barn but he can keep his horse 
at a boarding barn, where he pays rent. 

After you have got a place for your horse to stay you have to look 
after it; by this I mean grooming, feeding and keeping the horse in 
health. Grooming means brushing the horse every day and cleaning the 
dirt off the horse. A lot of people think that just giving the horse any 
old hay is good enough but it isn't. The horse must be given good hay 
or in summer fed good green grass and not green weeds. Then the 
horse should be fed grain once a day ( good time to do this is when you 
are grooming the horse). Another thing which I have forgotten to 
mention is to make sure that the horse has plenty of fresh water. 

Then after one has looked after the horse he has to have a saddle, 
bridle and halter. You have to keep these pieces of tack in condition 
by soaking them with saddle soap. Now that you know a bit about 
horses, you will think twice about asking for a pony. 

Maclaren III — Trans. A 



JUST DREAMING 

I sometimes sit and wonder 

About what causes thunder, 

And about all those things 

Of which a boy can dream. 

Of soccer in the Fall, 

And hockey in the winter, 

Of running in the spring 

And which bat has the better swing 

And when my rapture's broken, 

By the clanging of a bell, 

I go into class, and another day begins. 

Allan Ewart— Trans. A 



TH E ASHBURl AN 155 

PROJECT MERCURY 

Malcolm Scott Carpenter lived to tell a stranger-than-fiction story 

of how he orbited the earth three times, overshot his landing b) 2 50 
miles and vanished for 41 minutes. 

This was another great achievement in man's conquest oi outer- 
space. The mission brought to light new dangers — the hazards of 
missing landing target areas — and pointed toward solutions of some 
problems of man in space. 

It opened up, too, new vistas of voyage bv satellite and may have 
even advanced the U.S. manned spaceship programme beyond the phase 
of three, rive or even seven orbit flights and on to the held of L8-orbit, 
all day missions. 

The launching of Carpenter's Aurora 7 spacecraft at 8:45 a.m. 
E.D.T. was a perfect one. He completed the first orbit at 10:19 a.m. 
going at a speed of 17,532 miles an hour. Each orbit took approx- 
imately 1 hour and 50 minutes. 

On the second orbit he (Carpenter) released a balloon divided into 
five sections of different colours. Carpenter took pictures of it, to 
determine which colours man can best perceive in outer space. Rapid 
fuel consumption in his Aurora 7 spaceship caused great concern during 
his second orbit. But after careful consultation with the pilot, the 
Mercury Control centre reported: "We see no reason whv he shouldn't 
continue into the third orbit, but we emphasize that he limit his fuel 
consumption." 

Near the end of the third orbit, the really alarming news came 
when Carpenter fired the retro-rockets that would retard his speed 
sufficiently to make the capsule drop out of orbit and descend through 
the atmosphere. Normally the heat of re-entrv cuts off radio 
communication for a minute or two, but Aurora 7, silent at 1:30 p.m. 
E.D.T., never regained its voice. It overshot its destined landing point 
(800 miles south-east of Cape Canaveral) and plunged into the ocean 
1,000 miles south-east of the Cape. It simply disappeared. Carpenter 
climbed out of his space craft and got into a rubber dinghy. It took 41 
minutes before a helicopter from the carrier Intrepid sighted him and 
two more hours till his rescue at approximately 4:30 p.m. E.D.T. At 
that time he had been gone from the Cape for seven hours and 45 
minutes. The capsule was recovered successfully several hours after- 
ward. He was then taken to Grand Turk Island, where he was put 
under observation for a few days. 

There was relief and gladness in the successful completion of this 
important mission which confirmed the conclusions arrived at when 
John Glenn's first American orbital flight took place, Februarv 20th 
1962. David Beroer - III A 



1S6 TH E ASHBURIAN 

CORTEZ AND THE AZTECS 

First Scene 

In a little town in the South West of Portugal there lived a boy- 
named Hernando who was born in the year 1485. He was to become 
the greatest conquerer in all Mexico. We open our play as we see 
Hernando and h's friend Juan talking on the docks. 

Juan— "Come on Hernando, we'll be late for the bullfight". 

Hernanda— "Oh, I don't care, but just look at that ship, I expect 
it's going to Africa or India or even China". 

Juan— "Well, maybe it's off to Italy or . . . 

Hernando— "or it might be going to explore an island and find some 
treasure . . . 

Juan (warming to the subject)— "or to have a battle with some 
pirates". 

Hernando— "Oh, I would give everything to be able to lead my soldier's 
against some brown-skinned nation, plunder and burn citys like kindling 
wood, be made an emporer and have a treasure of diamonds, rubies, 
emeralds, saphires, gold and silver". 

Juan— "Yes, but we don't have a chance of ever getting out of 
iMedellin". 

Hernando— "I suppose your right, but it's fun to dream". 

Second Scene 

Several years later Cortez asked the governor of Cuba "Velasquez" 
for a party of soldiers, so that he could explore the mainland. . . . 
Cortez— "But governor, a voyage to the mainland would be a boon to 
Spain". 

Velasquez— "I know senor, but an exploration on that scale would 
cost thousands of pesos, but for your sake I will let you go with 600 men 
instead of 1,200, and also 6 ships instead of 14". 

Cortez— "Thank you Sir, you are most kind, Adios Amigo". 

Third Scene 

So, Cortez a brave adventurer, has now got his ship, sailors and 
soldiers, and we now see him on board ship landing in the Aztec country, 
"Mexico". 

First Mate— "Land Ho". 

Second Mate — "Land ho, Sir". 

Cortez— "Thank you Mr. Bandle. Ah, this is the day I've been wait- 
ing for, to finally reach the Mainland". 

Second Mate— "Sir look, a group of natives on the beach". 

Cortez— "And look at that girl on the beach. She sure is pretty". 

Second Mate— "Lower those lifeboats!" 

Cortez— "Yes, yes, to the shore!" 



THEASHBUR1AN 151 

On the beach Cortez meets the native girl and loves her so much 
he marries her. She, acting as a guide and interpreter, leads this party 
to Montezuma, the king of the Aztecs. In Montezuma's chamber:— 

Cortez (seizing Montezuma)— "Tell your guards to drop their 
weapons. Now, this is to insure my safety, but I also want a room full 
of gold, silver and jew els". 

Montezuma— (contemptuously)— "Get him his jewels". 

Cortez— "Ah, that's better! Now, we want . . . 

And so as Cortez fortifies the palace, the governor has informed a 
man named Narvez to bring Cortez back. Cortez hears of this and 
takes 400 men to attack Narvez. 

Fourth Scene 

Under the cover of night Cortez and his 400 men advanced on 
Narvez and after a brief skirmish successfully vanquished the king's 
emissary. Then, upon hearing of a planned uprising of Montezuma 
he has to return to the Capitol. Finally in Montezuma's chamber: — 

Cortez— "Sir, quell this uprising or I will detach your head from 
your body". 

.Montezuma— "Mercy, mercy!" 

Cortez— "Will you do as I say?" 

Montezuma— "Mercy, please mercy!!" 

Cortez (pushing the emporer aside)— "Ah, the old fool!" 

Soldier— "Sir, the mob is smashing the gates". 

Cortez— "Take our three cannons, position them in front of the 
gates. Then take one barrel of gun powder and wedge it under the 
gate . . . 

Soldier— "Yes, I see Sir". 

Five minutes pass, during which an explosion is heard. Then . . . 

Soldier— "They've broken through, Sir. Some have been killed but 
many are unhurt". 

Cortez (running out)— "To Arms!!" 

Then a short battle ensues during which Cortez is killed. The 
Spaniards defeat the Aztecs. For his bravery Cortez was awarded the 
Order of Gallantry. P. Thurstox— Trans. A 



TRICK OR TREAT 

Witches and Goblins 
Run down the street 
Knocking on doors everywhere 
Looking for a trick or a treat. 

Peter Taticek — Form I 



158 THE ASHBURI AN 

MODEL RAILROADING 

.Model Railroading is a very interesting hobby. You can start a 
layout with any guage (size) HO guage is most preferred as a hobby. 
O guage (Lionel) trains are really a little too big for a basement layout 
as HO are nearly half the size of O. 

There are many companies that make HO equipment. These 
companies use the same track and the same couplers. 

When vou start a layout you should first purchase a piece of ply- 
wood, 4' x 8' is a good size. You then should plan a layout of the 
track or build it up on a roadbed. Then scenery or terrain should be 
planned. It is very simple to make. A piece of screen with plaster 
over it. Before it dries pieces of cork look very much like rock. 
Ordinary household paint is suitable for painting the mountains. Lichen 
is very effective for trees and shrubs. 

The next step is to plan a town. You can either buy plastic models 
of buildings or make your own out of balsa wood. 

With a little work you can produce a very nice layout. Model 
Railroading is a lot of fun, you should try it some day! 

Chown— IIIA 



THE BIG MATCH 

It was May 19, a very fine day, 

Bishop's came to Ashbury, cricket to play, 

Some treated the game with great exultation, 

Others sat apart, in mild resignation. 

At the toss of the coin, Ashbury won, 

We decided to field, and have some fun, 

They sent out their batsmen, full of defiance, 

We looked to our bowlers, on whom we placed our reliance. 

We put them out slowly, and very expensively, 

And then settled down, to play defensively, 

Our wickets fell, our hopes diminished, 

One man left, and we would soon be finished. 

Fifty runs on the board, nine to make, 

In came our last batsman, willing to take 

Chances to win, to take the match, 

All we could do was sit and watch. 

The ball was bowled, he took a fix 

On the fast moving object, and hit it for six, 

The next ball came, hugging the floor, 

And then it was over, he had hit it for four. 

John Read— Trans. A 



THE ASHBURIAN 159 

THE GANG OF YULE 

When I was just a Little bum, 
Before I went to school, 
I had a crowd of forty toughs 
I called the Gang of Yule. 

Of every si/.e, from great hi<j: guys 
And little half-pint slobs. 
To renegades and kicked out lumps 
From many other mobs. 

They used to go on raiding trips 
Around the stores for me, 
I always stayed at the H.Q., 
(The safest place to be). 

They stopped at every single shop 
From Downtown to Eastview, 
To half-inch all the costly things 
To fill up our H.Q. 

With candy-floss and chocolate bars 
Whipped from the candy stores, 
And chips and nuts and ice-cream cones 
They picked up at Loblaws. 

With lectric trains and cycle lamps 
And all that kind of jazz, 
And great big ri\e lb. hunks of cheese 
That Simpson-Sears has. 

With gloyes and fags from unlocked cars, 

And coke from A & P, 

And bubble-gum tapped machines, 

A lovely sight to see. 

And e\en after I was big, 
And had to go to school, 
I'd think about the layabouts 
That formed the Gang of Yule. 

S. H. Adamson — Form MB 



SPRING FLOWERS 

Daffodils are gay 
Tulips bloom in .May. 

Rupert Stoddard-Stones — Form I 



160 TH E ASHBUR1 AN 

IRAN - LAND OF RUGGED MOUNTAINS AND DESERT 

Has Ashburv ever had a boy from Persia enrolled before? Perhaps 
you would like to know something about my country, other than that 
we have a Shah who has been married several times. 

People sometimes do not realise that our country is nearly 900 miles, 
north to south and 1,400 miles east to west. Included in our population 
of sixteen million are more than three million nomads, that is, people who 
do not have a permanent home, and just wander from year to year, going 
to places where thev hope to find work. Salty, sandv deserts cover two 
thirds of the plateau, and this plateau is frequently 5,000 feet high, a 
fact often neglected by those who criticise our country. Have you 
seen the great inland sea on the map? It is the salty Caspian Sea on the 
northern end of the country. Unfortunately we onlv have one river 
of navigable size — the Karun. 

You will appreciate the difficulty I had when I came to this country 
of Canada because we have a different alphabet to yours. You have 
heard .Mr. Spencer talking about Arabaic (when he gets "wound up" 
about the war years!). That is the language we speak and write. 
Among the better educated people, French is the language of com- 
munication, which made it all the more difficult for me. 

Iran produces a wide variety of produce: dates, figs, barley, cotton 
and tobacco. In fact, most of the dates that go into the date squares 
Mark makes in the kitchen come from my country. Salt is another 
source of income, and petroleum, from which you get the gas to drive 
your cars, comes from Persia, too. 

Tehran, the capital, has a population of 650,000. You can see that 
we are not people who live in crowded cities. This could be because 
we are not industrialised. The only other large city is Tabriz, about 
the same size as Ottawa. 

The "Land of the Lion and the Sun" has a long historv as you will 
discover when you do history in Transitus A. Persian carpets were 
once the pride and joy of Canadian house-proud hostesses, and even 
around Ashbury there are still some Persian carpets, relics of a former, 
pre-war glory. Did you know that Persian people were the mediums 
through which lend-lease goods were delivered to Russia during the last 
war? It was the x\merican army which helped to modernise some of 
our small industry. 

Persians have always been called talkative, witty people. We are 
instinctively polite, quick to observe, and fast to learn. Perhaps my 
Form Master won't agree with this, but that is the reputation we have! ! 

My year at Ashbury has been a verv happy one, and as I prepare to 
go home for the summer, I say "happy times" to my friends in Ottawa. 

Farrokh Shanghai— IIIA 



THE ASHBURIAS 161 

OTHER SI I LLP 

While I am but a boy, I know, 
I've read some thrilling books 

'Bout darkest Africa — and so, 
I'll tell you how it looks. 

I simply read, as most boys do — 
from adventurous disposition — 

But of the boys who read, how few, 
think of a foreign mission? 

And yet these books Ye been known to make- 
men leave their homes for fame! 
But how many leave home for Jesus' sake, 
to preach His Holy Name? 

RALLY! 

And why of sons of Christian birth, 

should God cry out in vain? 
He, too, needs soldiers, men of worth. 

who'll bear a little pain. 
Do we not hear the heaven cry, 

as Christ died on the tree, 
With His last breath, "My God, O why, 

has Thou forsaken me?" 
Then rally ye sons of Christian birth. 

unite in one grand prayer. 
To make God known throughout the earth, 

loved, worshipped everywhere. 

T. H. - Trans. B 

THESE I HAVE LOVED 

The murmur of the trees sighing in the breeze, 
The early morning sun shining on a lake, 
Watching the sunset and the birds that sing. 
Models and drawings that I like to make. 
Colour in autumn is another wonderful thing, 
Sports cars roaring down a dusty track. 
The country church and the bells that ring, 
Lazing in the sun upon my back, 
Palm trees swaying 'long a sandy shore, 
.Maple sugar in the spring that'll come no more. 
All these things I love the most. 
So to them all I'll raise a toast! 

Bruce Marshall— Trans. B 



162 THEASHBUR1AN 



MY VISIT TO THE TOWER OF LONDON 

The most enjoyable day I had in England was when we visited the 
Tower of London. First we went to the courtyard and found a guide 
who took us around for some time. Then we went to see the old guns. 
Among them were some cannons from ships. After that we went to 
see the man who was in charge of the Beefeaters in the tower. They 
were dressed in scarlet and gold and looked very smart. 

The most interesting place was the White Tower. In it were suits 
of armour from very long ago. It also had a good collection of pistols 
and muskets. There were models of knights in their real armour. Next 
we went to see the collection of swords and shields. After that we 
went home for it was quite a tiring day. Barnes—// 



MY TRAVELS 

Of all the places I have been, 

Stayed in, and have seen, 

My heart is at a dreadful loss 

To choose the most magnificent thing 

My eyes have ever come across. 

Britain has a lot of interesting places, 
Historic sights, and glamorous faces. 
Your ambition, we hope, would be, 
To pay a visit to Buckingham Palace 
And sight the ruling monarchy. 

One of the most fascinating I have seen 

Is the country of Thailand, its King and Queen. 

The Grand Palace do see if you are able, 

And the gold on the Royal Barge, too, 

Are some of the sights on your timetable. 

Canada, the land of the Maple Leaf, 
The Mountie, the Eskimo, and Mr. Dief. 
My poor old heart has begun to wonder 
Which is the more spectacular— 
The lovely lakes or the mountain splendour. 

My homeland is where my fond gaze will fall. 
For I think 'tis the best of them all. 
When e'er you happen to hear people say 
That Australia is the land o' their dreams, 
^ <>u have to believe them in every way. 

David Hay— Trans. A 






r HE ASH B V R I A N 163 

A STRANGE HOBBY 
I am sure you have heard about a lot of weird hobbies bur I read 
just recently about a very strange hobby. I won't blame you if you 

don't believe it because 1 didn't believe it at first either. 

The rookie pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals rinds this a wonder- 
ful sport. In the swamp behind his cottage there are some crocodiles. 
In his spare time he goes out in a boat in the middle of the swamp and 
puts his arm into a metal cylinder that is wider at one end and on this 
part he puts the bait. With his free hand he holds onto a railing in the 
boat. Then he lowers his arm with the cylinder and waits tor Mr. 
Crocodile to bite. When it bites the widened part of the cylinder it 
can't open its mouth wide enough to let go. Then all the man has to 
do is hold the crocodile under water long enough so that the water will 
rush in and crocodile being unable to shut his mouth will soon drown. 

The purpose of the railing is so that the person won't be pulled 
off the boat, for one slap of the crocodile's tail could easily break the 
man's back. 

I think this is both a strange and cruel sport. What do you think? 

Stockie Day I - UlA 

COLONEL GLENN'S FLIGHT 

On the day that the Western World made history by the launching 
of the first man into space, the entire Junior School stopped work to see 
the take-off. Even though we were sent back to class at the end of the 
first period, nobody (and I think that includes the teachers) was 
interested in anything except Colonel Glenn's flight. We who were 
privileged to hear it feel as though we were "on the spot" when history 
was made. There were several remarks about Polk II being an 
American, and claims that only he should be beaming that day, and 
when the announcer said the the people of Perth, Western Australia, had 
left on their lights for the Astronaut, there were mild cheers for You- 
know-who. 

The excitement after Glenn's return to the earth's atmosphere was 
almost too much for us. Will you ever forget the wait while the 
helicopter searched the ocean? I would not like too much of such 
suspense. 

Once again may we say "thank you" to the school for providing the 
television and radio coverage that day. Don Moulds— IIIB 

THE SWAN 

His long white neck curves 
As he holds his wings at his side; 
His snow white feathers are nice 
As he floats in a long rippling glide. 

Leo La Fer.me — Form I 



164 



THE ASHBURIAN 



THE FISHING CONTEST 

It was the second day that we were at our cottage and that was 
when we heard about the contest. Since the prize was $10.00 my father 
and I agreed to enter. 

The next day we were out in the boat fishing. But all we caught 
was an averaged sized pickerel and a few sunfish. 

For the next few days we didn't catch anything very big. 

One day I was sitting lazily in the boat when suddently a jerk 
nearly pulled the rod out of my hands. Then when I looked, a big bass 
jumped two feet out of the water. Boy, what a beauty. I though for 
sure I had won the contest. For half an hour I struggled with that 
monstrous fish. Finally he came alongside the boat. Just as I was about 
to net him off he went pulling and jerking, and after ten minutes he was 
alongside the boat. Again this time he was too tired to run off. 

The next day we entered our fish at the contest and then stood 
waiting anxiously for the results. 

Ten minutes later all the contestants were told to line up and the 
announcer said the biggest fish was 1 1 pounds caught by Stephen 
Robertson. 

Ha! You thought I was going to win, didn't you? 

P. Ankatell-Jones— IIIA 



MY FIRST CAMPING TRIP 

-s - 

On the way to the place we had chosen for our camping site the 
back of the car was so full that it affected the steering but we got there 
in one piece. 

We got there about six o'clock and we unloaded everything and 
put up the tents and had supper. Then we went to bed. 

The next morning my mother told us she had heard some clattering 
in the night and we found a paw print in one of our saucepans. We 
thought it was the paw print of a raccoon but we are not sure. \\ hen 
my mother came to look she said there had been some bananas in it. 
Later we found some banana peel behind a tree not far away. 

That night it rained very hard and my mother saw a pair of shoes 
going out the door of her tent on a stream of water which was going 
through the tent. 

The next day we could not get a fire started because everything 
was very wet so we went home. That was the end of our first camp 
but we hope it won't be our last. S. I Iampshire — IIIA 



TH E ASH BU Rl AN 165 

OCR HOLIDAY 

Last year I went on ;i trip with my family to a deserted island, where 
there was an old abandoned lighthouse. As soon as we got there im 
brother and I explored all of the island except the lighthouse. When 
we got back supper had already started, so we sat down and ate. 

The next morning our boat was gone. The rope which had held 
it was cut! 

Then we saw two men running toward the bay. Who were they? 
What were they doing here? There were no other boats on the island 
that we saw. But what about the lighthouse? We had explored it. 
We decided to look through it. There we found a short-wave radio. 
We radioed for the coast guard. They soon came and we discovered 
there was a smuggling gang around. They were soon caught and we 
had no more trouble. However, it was not a very nice holiday, so we 
shall not go there again. M \rk Ellis—// 

A SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOOL 

The Christian Brothers School in Cape Town is Catholic, and is 
run by the Irish Christian Brothers, who are sent from Ireland to any 
country in the world, where they work in schools and Churches. They 
receive no pay, only food and board. 

The school had a marvelous view over Table Bay, and had its own 
clock tower and tuck shop. There were seventeen classrooms in the 
school, with seven classes. There was also a quad, a 'tarmac', a grass 
cricket field, terraces, cricket nets, and a rifle range. 

In South Africa, coloured and white children are not allowed to go 
to the same school, so our schooHn Cape Town supported a coloured 
school in Kimberley. 

Although some people in South Africa support "Apartheid", there 
are many who are not in favour of it and do all they can to help those 
not so fortunate as themselves. Nigel Sims — IIIA 

FUN IX AX ATTIC 

One day I discovered something interesting when I was up in our 
attic. There I found a trunk with the top closed and locked. I began 
wondering what was in it and how I could open it. Suddenly I re- 
membered about some keys I had found a few days before. I ran down 
stairs to get them and took them up to the attic. The second one I 
tried worked. When I opened the trunk I saw some papers. Among 
them was a report card. When I opened it I saw that it was Dad's re- 
port card. I examined the marks and they were very poor. I am going 
to save it until I get my report card. If my marks are low, I shall hand 
him his card alone with mine. B. Gosse— // 



166 



THE ASHBUR1 AN 

A TV STORY 

Bronco Lane had a pain 
So they sent for Wagon Train. 
Wagon Train was not so good 
So they sent for Robin Hood. 
Robin Hood had lost his bow 
So thev sent for Ivanhoe. 
Ivanhoe was feeling sick, 
So they sent for Maverick. 
Maverick was in the "can 1 ' 
So they sent for Big Cheyenne. 
Big Cheyenne and the Deputy 
W r ere along the trail to Laramie. 
In Laramie they found a twerp 
So they sent for Wyatt Earp. 
Wyatt Earp was much too classy 
So they sent a wire to Lassie. 
Lassie was sleeping in the shade 
So they sent for Shotgun Slade. 
Shotgun Slade made too much noise 
So they sent for the Real McCoys. 
The Real McCoys were on a trip, 
To Seventy Seven Sunset Strip. 
Sunset Strip was much too far 
So they went to see Jack Paar. 
And Jack Paar was too late to see 
So they switched off their TV. 

Simon Adamson— IIIB 



^^O 




HER MAJESTY 
THE QUEEN MOTHER 

On June 14th, after the School closing, we were honoured with a 
brief glimpse of Her .Majesty, the Queen Mother. At that time The 
Canadian Save the Children Fund Dog Show and Bazaar was being held 
on the School grounds and was visited bv Her Majesty. We were 
happy to welcome her to Ashbury. 




168 



THE ASHBU RI AN 



SCHOOL ROLL 



Adamson, Simon Henzell 

The Rockcliffe Arms, 124 Springfield Ave., 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Addleman, Richard John 

20 Marlborough Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 

Anderson, Tony Waddell 

Royal Military College, Kingston, Ont. 
Anderson, John Paine 

73 St. Louis Ave., Dorval, P.Q. 

Andrew, Ian Richard 

23 Inverness Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 

Anketell-Jones, Patrick 

"Ajays", Eardley Road, Aylmer, P.Q. 
Archipov, Niki 

The Director of Personnel and Training, 
Cerro De Pasco Corp., Cerro De Pasco, Peru, 
S.A. 
Armitage, Mark Hugh 

159 Laval Street, Eastview, Ont. 

Armour, Elwood 

3757 Revelstoke Drive, R.R. 5, Ottawa, Ont. 
Atack, David Michael 

882 Killeen Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 
Atack, John Frederick 

882 Killeen Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 
Atkins, Reginald Stuart 

637 Malartic Ave., Ottawa 2, Ont. 
Barakett, Peter Edward 

2186 Sunset Blvd., Town of Mount Royal, P.Q. 

Barber, Geoffrey David 

4866 Cote Des Neiges No. 8, Montreal, P.Q. 
Barends, Howard Arthur 

303 Fairmont Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 
Barker, Jeremy Sach 

627 Shelly Drive, Ottawa 1, Ont. 

Barnes, Charles Edwin 

7 Starwood Ave., Ottawa 5, Ont. 

Basinski, Stefan 

108 Delong Drive, R.R. 1, Rothwell Heights, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Basinski, Antoni 

108 Delong Drive, R.R. 1, Rothwell Heights, 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Bell, Timothy Gerald 

10 Wick Crescent, Rothwell Heights, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Benskin, Gerry 

109 Regent Road, St. Lambert, P.Q. 
Berger, David 

524 Acacia Ave., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 
Berger, Robert 

524 Acacia Ave., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 



Berry, Robert 

2253 Canora Road, Montreal, P.Q. 
Berry, Bruce .2253 Canora Road, .Montreal, P.Q. 
Bethune, John Irvin 

360 Roxborough Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Blackburn, Ross Norman 

193 Maplecrest, Rosemere, P.Q. 
Bond, John Mavesyn 

62 Rideau Terrace, Ottawa, Ont. 
Booth, John Rowley 

711 Manor Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Booth, Billy Jackson 

711 Manor Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Bow, Paul Malcolm 

161 Manor Ave., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. 

Boyd, Donald Mann 

Box 158, R.R. 5, Ottawa, Ont. 

Boyd, Dwaine Box 158, R.R. 5, Ottawa, Ont. 

Brady, John Theodore 

10 Sandridge Road, Manor Park, Ottawa 2, 
Ontario 
Brown, John Houston 

135 Rideau Terrace, Ottawa 2, Ont. 

Brown, Peter 

75 Blackburn Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

Browning, David 

179 Springfield Road, Ottawa 2, Ont. 

Bryan, John Edwin Francis 

380 Island Park Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 

Buckler, Jimmy 

3437 Beaconsfield Ave., Montreal 28, Que. 
Burrit, Ned Edmund Foster 

190 Acacia Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

Campbell, Hugh Ross 

39 Central Street, Aylmer, P.Q. 

Campbell, Timothy 

39 Central Street, Aylmer, P.Q. 

Chadderton, Brian Mitchell 

381 Main Street, Ottawa, Ont. 

Cann, Pete Townsend George, Peters 

32 Rockland Avenue, Yonkers 5, N.Y., U.S.A. 

Cartman, Saul Charles 

59 Wolfe Avenue, Val D'Or, P.Q. 

Chaplin, David Eric Box 191, Manotick, Ont. 

Chown, Christopher 

195 PoyntZ Avenue, Willowda'e, Ont. 

Cochran, Terry James 

376 Island Park Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 



TH E ASH BUR I AN H9 

Colbert, Bruce Ernest Dickson, Robeki Turrii 

614 Golden Avenue, Ottawa, Out. 751 Eastbourne Vvenue, Vlanor Park, Ottawa, 

CoiXYER, Christopher Lance Ont. 

328 Perrault St., Rosemere, Quebec. Dollin, David Bertram 

Cook, Kenneth Murray 391 Peach Tree Lane, Ottawa, Ont. 

4 Dunvegan Road, Ottawa, Ont. Draper, James Bki i i 

Cooper, Barry Joseph 73 Eastbourne Avenue, Toronto 7, Ont. 

20 Fairhill Crescent, Box 948, R.R. No. 3, Drieuger, Tiiom vs Norman 

.Manordale, Ottawa, Ont. 129 Helena Street, Ottawa, Ont. 

Copeland, Michael John Ducharme, Wallace Burton 

489 Acacia Avenue, Rockcliffc Park, Ottawa, 1880 Broadmoor Avenue. Alta \"ista, Ottawa, 

Ont. Ont. 

Copeland, Steven Earnshaw, John Eric 

489 Acacia Avenue, Rockcliffc Park, Ottawa, ILM.C.S. Stadacona, Halifax, N.S. 

Ont. Edgar, Anthony 

Coristine, Timothy Newell 2002 Rideau River Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 

4345 Montrose Avenue, Westmount, P.Q. Ekes, Peter Gabriel 

Coristine, James Newell 560 Maple Lane, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

4345 Montrose Avenue, Westmount, P.Q. Ellis, Mark Harris 

Cowan, Douglas Stewart 38 Charles Street, Ottawa, Ont. 

33 Rigel Road, Ottawa 2, Ont. Emmons, Wayne Alexander 

Cowley, Robert Henry Shawville, Que. 638 Chapel Street, Ottawa, Ont. 

Gumming, Ian Thomas William Espaillat, Arturo J. 

38 Grosvenor Street, London, W.l, England P.O. Box 864, Nassau, Bahamas 

Currie, Arthur William Espaillat, Rafael A. 

73 MacKay Street, Ottawa, Ont. P.O. Box 864, Nassau, Bahamas 

Davidson, Charles Rusty Espinola, Hernan 

34 Lambton Road, Ottawa, Ont. Jose Maria Bonetti No. 13, Trujillo City, 

Davidson, Peter Russell Dominican Republic 

34 Lambton Road, Ottawa, Ont. Espinola, Jorge 

Davies, Victor Skinner J ose Maria Bonetti No. 13, Trujillo City, 

49 Rebecca Crescent, R.R. No. 1, Ottawa, Ont. Dominican Republic 

Davies, Bryn Evans J ohn Stuart 

30 Birch Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 2 ° Clemow Avenue, Ottawa 1, Ont. 

Ont. Ewart, Allan Charles 

Davis Morton General Delivery, Port Hawkesburv, N.S. 

Brisa No. 385, Pedregal de San Angel, Zona 20, Ewing, Iain Mackenzie 

Mexico 20, D.F. 368 Lisgar Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Dawson, Philip John Ont. 

27 Ilkey Crescent, Manordale, R.R. No. 3, Farrugia, Anthony 

Ottawa, Ont. Compania Shell de Venezuela, Stocks and 

Day, Stockwell Bert Shipping Dept., Apartado 19, Maracaibo, 

2 Ellcsmere Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Venezuela 

Ont. Finlay, Douglas 

Day, Nicholas Frederick Apartado Del Este 4652, Caracas, Venezuela 

2 Ellesmere Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Firestone, Bruce Murray 

Ont. 375 Minto Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Deacon, Bruce Lyman Ont. 

31 Russell Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. Fisher John David 

Dean, Brian George 399 Riverside Drive, Riverside Hotel, Ottawa, 

261 Bessborough Drive, Toronto 17, Ont. Ont. 

Dean, Stuart Cadman Flam, Harold Chandler, P.Q. 

261 Bessborough Drive, Toronto 1", Ont. Flood, Christopher Alison 

Deutsch, Andy Andres 451 Roxborough. Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

6509 Bailev Road, Montreal, Que. Ont. 



110 



THE ASHBUR1 AN 



I'i.vnx, Ti-M Timothy Ronald 

50 Queen .Mary Road, Ottawa, Ont. 

Fuller, Thomas Sherwood 

313 Acacia Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Gallinger, Lloyd Byron 

2 Crescent View Drive, Cornwall Ont. 

Gamble, David Arthur 

97 First Street, Kirkland Lake, Ont. 

Gamble, Gill Samuel 

244 Irving Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

Gamble, Andy Corcoran 

244 Irving Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

Garton, Graham Richard 

Room 1010, Commonwealth Bldg., 77 Metcalfe 

St., Ottawa, Ont. 
Gill, Alan Fauquier 

170 Lansdowne Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Gillean, Peter Meade 

R.C.A.F. Station Clinton, Ont. 

Gillean, Andrew Shearer 

R.C.A.F. Station Clinton, Ont. 

Gillean, Geoffery, Ian 

RCAF Station, Clinton, Ont. 

Goodwin, Duncan John 

32 Arundel Ave., Ottawa 2, Ont. 

Gosse, William Bill 

437 Cooper St., Ottawa 4, Ont. 

Gow, Duncan Andrew 

82 Kenilworth St., Ottawa, Ont. 

Grant, Christopher 

152 Minto Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Greenstone, Gerrard 

33 Merton Crescent, Hampstead, P.Q. 

Groos, Charles Everard 

16 Birch Ave., Manor Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

Hampshire, Peter, A. J. 

289 Fairmont Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 

Hampshire, Stephan Alistair 

289 Fairmont Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 

IIampson, Brian David 

1218 Major St., Ottawa, Ont. 

Hanna, Donald Spencer 

580 Lakeshore Drive, Beaurepaire, P.Q. 

Haslam, Gerald Peter 

Gentilly Aprs. 800 Lakeshore Road, Montreal, 

P.Q. 
1 1 vtch, Donald W mou n 

165 Camelia Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 
I I \v, David William 

407 Wilbrod St., Ottawa, Ont. 
Hayi.ey, David ALEXANDER 

67 Geneva St.. Ottawa 2, Ont. 



Hayley, GREGORY— 67 Geneva St., Ottawa 2, Ont. 
Hazen, James King 

21 Kippewa Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 
Hearne, John V. 

745 Hemlock Road, Manor Park, Ottawa 2, 

Ont. 
Hearne, Victor Paul 

745 Hemlock Road, Manor Park, Ottawa 2, 

Ont. 
Heeney, Patrick James 

99 Lyttleton Gardens, Rockcliffe Park, 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Heggtveit, Gilbert R.R. No. 5, Ottawa, Ont. 

Henry, James Paul 

The Rockcliffe Arms, 124 Springfield Rd., 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Higginson, George Owen 

P. O. Box 1030, Hawkesbury, Ontario 
Horner, Robert 

Box 236, 257 Kipawa Road, Temiskaming, P.Q. 
Howes, Michael Philip 

1248 Evans Blvd., Alta Vista, Ottawa, Ontario 
Hunt, Peter Charles 

c/o UNTAB— Laos, United Nations, New 

York, N.Y., U.S.A. 

Hurdman, Thomas Fraser, 

R.R. No. 5, Ottawa, Ontario 

Ivey, Antony Desmond 

716 Wellington Street, Sarnia, Ontario 

Johnson, Ralph David 

P. O. Box 390, 9 Davidson Drive, R. R. No. 1, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Johnson, Hugh H. 

P. O. Box 390, 9 Davidson Drive, R. R. No. 1, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Johnston, Brian Thomas 

Rua Inglatcrra 585, Jardim Europa, Sao Paulo, 

Brazil 
Keffer, George Boland 

82 Ethel Street, Sioux Lookout, Ontario 

Keyes, Paul Allan 

645 Borthwick Street, Ottawa, Ontario 

Knox, John, 451 Daly Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario 

KudynowskIj George 

749 Chapman Blvd., Ottawa, Ontario 

Laff.rme, Leo, 287 Senneville Rd., Sennevillc, P.Q. 

Laflamme, Dale, 266 Clcmow Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 

Laflamme, David, 266 Clcmow Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 

Laidler, James Rii d 

39 Lampton Ave., Ottawa, Ont. 

Lash, Robert Allan (Bob) 

6709 Conklin Road, Cote St. Luke. P.Q. 

Lawrence, Michael 

138 Foliette Street. Eastview, Ont. 



THE ASH BU Rl AN 



111 



Leadman, Tony Stephen' 

66 Fentiman Ave., Ottawa, Ontario 
Letch, John (Jack) 

1232 Des Chenaux Rd., Three Rivers, P.Q. 
Levitz, Jamie Sydney 

20 I Iswick Road, Corner Brook, Nfld. 
Livingstone, Grant B. 

Manitou — Barvue Mines Ltd., P. O. Box 1500, 
Val d'Or, P.Q. 

Lodge, Christopher 

The Riddell's Bay Golf and Country Club, 
Riddell's Bay, Warwick, Bermuda. 

Loftus, Philip Grahame 

1 Ashbury Place, Ottawa, Ontario 

Logie, Richard Brian 

244 Irving Ave., Ottawa, Ontario 

Love, Donald Greig 

360 Ste. Rose Blvd., Ste. Rose, P.Q. 

Lynn, Xeil MacKinlay 

452 Roxborough Rd., Rockcliffe Park. Ottawa, 

Ontario 
Lynn, Evan 

452 Roxborough Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario 

MacCarthy, Martin Dents 

15 Elmdale Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

MacDonald, Tommy L. 

377 Maple Lane, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

MacDonald, Douglas Bennett 

R.R. No. 3 Manotick, Ont. 

MacDonald, John 

906 Glasgow Crescent, Manor Park, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

MacKenzie, David J. A. 

60 Mackinnon Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
MacKenzie, Douglas Charles 

509 Brennan Avenue, Ottawa 3, Ont. 

MacKenzie, Ian D. 

181 Morrison Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, 

P.Q. 
MacKay, Bryan Kenneth 

31 Pine Ridge Drive, Scarborough, Ont. 

MacLaren, James G. 

530 George Street, Buckingham, P.Q. 

MacLaren, Duncan H. 

P.O. Box 30, Buckingham, P.Q. 

MacTavish, Duncan K. 

280 Thorold Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa. 
Ont. 

Marshall, Bruce Clifford 

19 Strathmore Blvd.. Dorval, P.Q. 
\I aritn, Peter William John 

6 Carpasian Road, St. John's Nfld. 



\1< \i i \i . J \mi s Rom rick 

46 Fentiman Vvenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

\l( VULAY, Kl I III I .HUM 

1885 Haig Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 

\l( I. \ki \, l J i ii i< Don \ii) 

76 Kiinli.irk Blvd., Toronto, Ont. 

\1 \< ' \ I II l \\, Doi Gl \s RoBl Rl 

13 Rigel Road, R.C.A.F. Station, Rockcliffe, 
Ont. 

McN ur 3 Rom ri 15k i < i 

Box 100, St. Huberts, P.Q. 
McNair, Lawrence Keith 

BOX 100, St. Huberts, P.Q, 
Men/u s, Kenneth Skelton 

445 Maple Lane, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Merki.it, Brian Jackson 

232 Sennevillc Road, R.R. No. 1, Ste. Anne de 

Bellevue, P.Q. 
Millar, Robert John 

82 Front Street, Sioux Lookout, Ont. 
Millard, Gregory Stephen Truscott 

3 Rigel Road, R.C.A.F. Station, Rockcliffe, 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Mirsky, Peter Shawn 

"Marchmont", Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 
Mirsky, Phillip Guy 

"Marchmont", Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 
Mirsky, Michael Richard 

"Marchmont", Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 
Moquette, Lawrence Henri 

6 Sunnvside Avenue, Westmount, Montreal 
6, P.Q. ' 

Mosher, Murray W. 

4 Putman Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 
Moulds, Donald Richard 

296 Sherwood Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 
MuLANER, David... Puerto Cabello, Venezuela, S.A. 
Mulaner, John Marshall 

Puerto Cabello, Venezuela, S.A. 
Mundy, Roderick David 

771 Acacia Lane, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 
Ont. 
Neatby, Andrew Mills 

609 Parkdale Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 
Xelms, John Henry 

280 Sherwood Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 
Xettleton, Harold David 

29 Fairburn Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 
Xewsome, Graham George Lawrence 

228 Rideau Terrace, Ottawa, Ont. 
Nixon, William Terence 

105 Lyttleton Gardens. Rockcliffe Park, 
Ottawa. Ont. 



112 



THE ASHBURI AN 



Noel-Bentley, Robert James 

Village Park, Suite 815, 515 Chaplin Street, 
Toronto 12, Ont. 

O'Brien, Christopher John 

The Shoreham Motel, Connecticut Avenue at 
Calvert, Washington 8, D.C. 

Oxley, Frederick Gregg 

332 Summit Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

Palmer, Michael John 

963 Mooney Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

Parker, Stuart Mulock 

120 Acacia Avenue, RockclirTe Park, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Parker, Ian Harry 

120 Acacia Avenue, RockclirTe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Partridge, John David Harpham 

500 Roxborough Avenue, RockclirTe Park, 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Patton, Alexander Sandy George 

"Carberryhill", Warwick, Bermuda 

Peterson, Michael 

801 Eastbourne Ave., Manor Park, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Peterson, David 

801 Eastbourne Ave., Manor Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Podhradsky, Adam George Steven 

283 Metcalfe Street, Ottawa, Ont. 

Polk, Michael Stevens 

34 Union Street, Ottawa, Ont. 

Polk, David Campbell 

34 Union Street, Ottawa, Ont. 

Pottinger, Graham Sydney 

609 Raglan Street S., Renfrew, Ont. 

Pryde, Derek 

237 Camelia Avenue, Manor Park, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Pyfinch, Harry James 

61 Langevin Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

Read, John J. D. 

412 Lisgar Rd., RockclirTe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

Roberts, Kit Christopher Paul 

934 - 48th Avenue, Lachine, Que. 

Robertson, John Gordon 

Brucklay Farm, R.R. No. 3, Ottawa, Ont. 

Robertson, Sandy Alexander 

Brucklay Farm, R.R. No. 3, Ottawa, Ont. 

Roche, Christopher James 

673 Ellen Avenue, Urbandale Acres, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Rossy, Richard 

2325 Fleming Road, Town of Mount Royal, 

Montreal 16, Quebec. 



Rowntree, Patrick Harold 

391 Plum Tree Lane, Manor Park Hill, 
Ottawa 2, Ont. 

Samples, Graeme McCartney 

136 Acacia Avenue, RockclirTe Park, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

Sark, Adrian John 

47 Mallard Drive, Greenwich, Conn., U.S.A. 

Sayers, Leonard Joseph McIntosh Macky 

1003 Stormont Street, Ottawa, Ont. 

Scheel, Robert William Bobby 

28 Riverview Drive, Arnprior, Ont. 

Schofild, John Charles 

113 Oak Ridge Drive, Baie D'Urfe, Que. 

Shanghai, Farrokh 

Imperial Embassy of Iran, 5 Crescent Road, 
RockclirTe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

Scott, Brian James 

470 Acacia Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

Sharp, Christopher James 

21 Bellevue Crescent, Aylmer East, Hull, P.Q. 

Shaw, David Allan 

659 Wilson Street, Ottawa 2, Ont. 

Shenkman, William Billy 

151 Mariposa Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

Shepherd, David John Cumberland, Ont. 

Shipman, John Thomas 

2090 Chalmers Road, Ottawa, Ont. 

Shortreed, Ian 

124 Springfield Road, Ottawa, Ont. 

Sigvaldason, George Einar 

c/o Dept. of External Affairs, Mail Room, 
East Block, Ottawa, Ont. 

Singer, Ronald Lawrence 

25 Robinwood Avenue, Toronto, Ont. 

Sinclair, Ian Robert 

306 Brock Avenue, Montreal West, P.Q. 

Skead, Brian James 

192 Rodney Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. 

Smethurst, John Russel 

Frontenac Drive, R.R. No. 2, Aylmer East, 
P.Q. 

Smith, Gregory Drummond 

31 McGill Street, Haukesbury, Ont. 

Snelgrove, Timothy Ralph 

23 Theresa Street, Barrie, Ont. 

Souch, Robert Kennedy 

690 Cardinal Street, St. Laurent, P.Q. 

Southam, Richard Brian Ricky 

550 Prospect Road, RockclirTe Park, Ottawa, 
Ont. 



THE ASH B U HI AN 



113 



Southam, Wilson Mills 

From Nov. to April — 85 Callc Primarosa, 

Tucson, Arizona. 

From April to Nov. — Apartment 92, 1227 

Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, Que. 
Speedie, Gordon Ian Murry 

San Carlos, 150 East 50th St.. New York, N.V., 

U.S.A. 
Speedie, Brian Douglas Gordon 

San Carlos, 150 East 50th St., New York, N.Y., 

U.S.A. 
Spence, Gordon Gerald 

4 Riordon Ave., Hawkesburv, Ont. 

Spry, Daniel Toby 

54 Park Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa 2, Ont. 
Stein, Peter Christopher 

3025 Cedar Avenue, Montreal 25, P.Q. 

Stein, Harris 404 Roger Rd., Ottawa, Ont. 

Steven, Donald A. 

549 Berwick Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, 

Que. 
Stewart, Harvey Edward 

497 Grosvenor, Westmount, Montreal 6, P.Q. 
Stewart, Ricky Frederick Charles 

10 George Street, Carleton Place, Ont. 

Stoddart-Stones Rupert 

22 Anna Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

Stone, Christopher Blair Harmer 

971 Richmond Road, Ottawa, Ont. 
Taschereau, Michael A. 

69 Kilbary Crescent, Manor Park, Ottawa, 
Ont. 
Taticek, Peter 179 Breezehill Road, Ottawa, Ont. 
Tewsly, Peter Arthur _ R.R. No. 5, Ottawa, Ont. 
Thorne, Duncan Scott 

690 Echo Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 

Thurlow, James Jim 

1451 McRobie Avenue, Ottawa 1, Ont. 
Thurston, Peter Russel 

793 Hemlock Road, Manor Park, Ottawa, Ont. 



Troop, (in Bl B i ( )wen 

211 Buena Vista Road, Rockcliffe Park, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Turner, I )o\ vld Gli n 

483 Richardson A.venue, Ottawa, Ont. 

I A \s. J \ \ii S Rl< il IRD M. 

1042 Riviera Drive, Manor Park, Ottawa, Ont. 
Tyler, Ji ri mi ( it v A. 

728 Lonsdale Road, Ottawa 2, Ont. 
Van-Schalkwvk, Wii.lf.m Bill 

5 Rideau Gate, Ottawa, Ont. 
Vigder, David Michael 

115 Raskin Street, Ottawa J, Ont. 
Walker, James Sandy 

98 Ruskin Avenue, Ottawa 3, Ont. 
Weld, William Hugh 

318 Fairmont Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 
Wennberg, Richard Pete 

128 Howick St., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 
Whipps, Murray Edwin 

3475 Ridgewood Ave., #402 Montreal, P.Q. 
Wilson, Robert Loring 

280 Park Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 
Wood, Dickson Andrew 

335 Fifth Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. 

Wood, Anthony G. M. 

428 Buena Vista Ave., Rockcliffe Park, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Wooles, Stewart Edwards 

580 Mariposa Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. 
Woolley, Kenneth Grant 

65 Rothw ell Heights, R o t h w e 1 1 Heights, 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Wright, David F. M. 

263 Maclaren Street, Ottawa, Ont. 
Zaporski, Andrew Marian 

Mrs. Halszka Maib, 83 Chesterfiield Ave., 

Montreal, P.Q. 



'G^O 



114 THE ASHBURIAN 

EXCHANGES 

The Editor acknowledges with thanks receipt of the following and 
apologizes for any inadvertent omissions. 

Acta Ridleiana, Ridley College, St. Catharines, Ont. 

The Malburian, Marlborough College, .Marlborough, Wilts, England. 

The Felstedian, Felsted School, Felsted, Essex, England. 

The Meteor, Rugby School, Rugby, England. 

South African College School Magazine, Orange St., Capetown. 

Trinity University Review, Trinity University, Toronto, Ont. 

The Mitre, Bishop's University, Lennoxville, P.Q. 

Lux Glebana, Glebe Collegiate, Ottawa. 

The Lower Canada College Magazine, Montreal. 

The Grove Chronicle, LakefTeld Preparatory School, Lakefield, Ont. 

The College Times, Upper Canada College, Toronto, Ont. 

Northwood School Magazine, Northwood School, Lake Placid Club, N.Y., U.S.A. 

The Blue and White, Rothesay Collegiate, Rothesay, N.B. 

The Bishop's College School Magazine, B.C.S., Lennoxville, P.Q. 

The Argus, Sauk Ste. Marie Collegiate, Sauk Ste. Marie, Ont. 

The Beaver Log, Miss Edgar's and Miss Cramp's School, Inc., Montreal. 

The Bishop Strachan School Magazine, Bishop Strachan School, Lonsdale Road, Toronto, 

Ont. 
Fi-Pa-Hi, Fisher Park High School, Ottawa. 
Lampada, Lachute High School, Lachute, P.Q. 
The School Magazine, Sedbergh School, Montebello, P.Q. 
The Boar, Hillfield School, Hamilton, Ont. 
The Spotlight, Trenton High School, Trenton, Ont. 
The School Magazine, Selwyn House School, Montreal. 
The Log, Royal Canadian Naval College, Victoria, B.C. 
The Cranbrookian, Cranbrook, Kent, England. 
Per Annos, King's Hall, Compton, P.Q. 
Appleby Calling, Appleby College, Oakville, Ont. 
The Voyageur, Pickering College, Newmarket, Ont. 
The Trinity Review, Trinity College, U. of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. 
The Trinity College Magazine, Trinity College, U. of T., Toronto, Ont. 
Trafalgar Echoes, Trafalgar School, Montreal. 

The Yardley Courtier, Yardley Court School, Tonbridge, Kent, England. 
The Tonbridgian, Tonbridge School, Tonbridge, Kent, England. 
St. Andrew's College Review, St. Andrew's College, Aurora, Ont. 
The Shawnigan Lake School Magazine, Shawnigan Lake, B.C. 
Samara, Elmwood School, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 
The R.M.C. Review, R.M.C., Kingston, Ont. 
The Record, Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ont. 
The Queen's Review, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont. 
The Patrician Herald, St. Patrick's College, Ottawa. 
Northland Echoes, North Bay Collegiate, North Bay, Ont. 
The Eagle, St. Johns-Ravencourt School, Fort Garrv, Man. 
The Branksome Slogan, Branksome Hall, Toronto, Ont. 
The Twig, University of Toronto Schools, Toronto, Ont. 
Hermes, Humberside Collegiate Institute, Toronto, Ont. 
The Old Decanian, Dear Close School, Cheltenham, England. 
The Grammarian, Karachi Grammar School, Karachi, Pakistan. 



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P.O. Box 484 
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Manufacturers of 

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FISH LIMITED 

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Custom Tailors and Outfitters to 
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WINDOWS & DOORS 



Quality Furniture at 
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G. H. Johnson's Furniture 

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111 Murray Street CE 5-5147 



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Since IS 75 



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