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ASHBURY COLLEGE 

OTTAWA 



VOLUME 55 



1971 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Ashbury College 



http://www.archive.org/details/ashburian197155ashb 



THE ASHBURIAN 





Photo by Jane Ember 



ASHBURY COLLEGE 

OTTAWA 



VOLUME 55 



1971 



ASHBURY COLLEGE 

Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Canada 

The Board of Governors 

Ian A. Barclay, Esq. Vancouver 

*L. W. C. S. Barnes, Esq., M.A.(Cantab.), F.R.Econ.S Ottawa 

*Charles K. Brown, Esq., Chairman Montreal 

*J. M. Coyne, Esq., Q.C Ottawa 

*J. A. Farquhar, Esq., B.A Ottawa 

*James D. Fisher, Esq Ottawa 

R. E. L. Gill, Esq Ottawa 

M. E. Grant, Esq., A.F.C., Past Chairman Ottawa 

W. A. Grant, Esq Montreal 

G. F. Henderson, Esq., Q.C Ottawa 

*J. G. M. Hooper, Esq., Secretary Ottawa 

The Hon. A. B. R. Lawrence, Q.C, M.P.P Ottawa 

David Loeb, Esq Ottawa 

* Donald Maclaren, Esq., B.Sc, P.Eng Buckingham, Que. 

*Wm. J. Mulock, Esq., B.A Ottawa 

J. S. B. Pemberton, Esq Montreal 

* Robert H. Pitfield, Esq Ottawa 

Harold W. Price, Esq Montreal 

*E. N. Rhodes Jr., Esq., Vice-Chairman Ottawa 

Commodore W. G. Ross, CD., R.C.N. (Ret'd) Merrickville, Ont. 

*John C. Scarth, Esq., B.Sc Ottawa 

*David W. Scott, Esq., B.A., LL.B Ottawa 

D. Cargill Southam, Esq Ottawa 

David M. Stewart, Esq Montreal 

E. P. Taylor, Esq., C.M.G., B.Sc Willowdale, Ont. 

Captain V. J. Wilgress, R.C.N. (Ret'd) Ottawa 

W. J. R. Wilson, Esq Toronto 

*G. S. M. Woollcombe, Esq., M.A Ottawa 

*Denotes members of the Executive Committee 





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STAFF 

HEADMASTER 
W. A. Joyce, D.S.O., E.D.. B.Sc. (University of Manitoba) — Physics 

ASSISTANT HEADMASTER 

J. J. Marland, A.C.P. (Lond.), Cert.Ed. (Lond.) M.I.N .0. — 
Head of Department in Mathematics 

MASTER IN CHARGE, JUNIOR SCHOOL 

M. H. E. Sherwood, M.Ed. (University of Massachusetts), 
B.A. (Carleton) — English 

HOUSEMASTER OF CON NAUGHT HOUSE 

G. W. Thomson. A.R.C.O.. A.R.M.C. L.R.A.M.. L.T.C.L. — 
Director of Music; French. English 

HOUSEMASTER OF W00LLC0MBE HOUSE 

C. J. Inns. B.A. (University of Wales) — French. Mathematics 

CHAPLAIN 
The Rev. E. E. Green. B.A. (Toronto). B.D. 

R. J. Anderson, CD. — Director of Athletics 

Ut.Cdr. G. W. Babbitt. R.C.N. Ret'd. — English 

Mrs. G. W. Babbitt, 1st Class Teachers' Licence (N.B.) — Mathematics 

J. L. Beedell. B.Sc. (Carleton), Ottawa Teachers" College — Science 

V. J. Burczak, B.A. ( Carleton) — Physical Education, Geography 

W. W. Byford. B.Sc. (Lond.) — Head of Department in Science; Chemistry 

and Mathematics 
P. J. Flynn, Western Australia Teachers* Certificate — Geography, Mathematics 
Mrs. S. Giles — Art 

J. A. Glover, M.A. (Oxon.) — Head of Department in Moderns 
F. K. Graham, Mus.B. (Toronto), F.R.C.O., F.R.C.C.O.. A.R.C.T. — Music 
J. H. Humphreys — Oral French 

F. T. Jones. F.R.G.S.. A.C.P. (Lond.). B.Ed.. B.Sc. Cert. Ed. (Wales) — 

Head of Department in Geography 
P. H. Josselyn. B.A.. Dip.Ed. — Head of Department in English 
Mrs. J. R. Linn — Remedial Reading 

G. J. McGuire. B.A. (Queens) — Physics. Chemistry and Mathematics 
K. D. Niles, B.A. ( Carleton) — English. History 

M. H. Penton. B.A. (Carleton) — English. History 

D. L. Polk. B.A. ( Dartmouth ) — Latin. French. History, Geography 
H. J. Robertson, B.A. (South Africa) — History. Geography 

Dr. K. Spencer. D.Sc.O. — Remedial Reading 

T. C. Tottenham. Ottawa Teachers' College — Junior School Tutor 
B. Wallin. M.A. (Stanford University. California), B.A. (University of the 
Pacific. California) — Classics. History. Physical Education 

ADMINISTRATION 

K. G. Heed (Accounts) Airs. M. Bovce (Junior School Matron) 

Mrs. V. E. Gensej ( Secretary ) Mrs. M. M. Bury, R.N. (School Nurse) 

Mrs. \\ A. Pryde ( Bursar) Mrs. G. R. Gwv'nne-Timothy (Senior School 

Mrs. \\ . C. E. Loftus (Librarian) Matron) 

Mrs. O. Thurston ( I lead muster's Secretary) 

F. Fayc ( Maintenance ) Physicians 

E. Marshall (Steward) C. K. Rowan-Legg, M.D., D.C.H., F.A.A.P. 
M. Taticek ( Chef) C. B. Petrie. M.D. 




THE STAFF 

Back Row: D. L. Polk, V. J. Burczak, P. J. Flynn, Rev. E. E. Green, J. L. Beedell, 
J. H. Humphreys, B. Wallin, G. J. McGuire. 

Middle Row: H. J. Robertson, P. H. Josselyn, F. T. Jones, K. D. Niles, H. Penton, 
W. W. Byford, J. A. Glover, G. W. Babbitt. 

Front Row: Dr. K. Spencer, G. W. Thomson, Housemaster of Connaught House, 
J. J. Marland, Assistant Headmaster, W. A. Joyce, Headmaster, 
M. H. E. Sherwood, Master in Charge of the Junior School, 
C. J. Inns, Housemaster of Woollcombe House, Mrs. G. W. Babbitt. 



THE PREFECTS 

Back Row: G. Harllev, P. J. S. Graham, M. P. Kelly, M. Duguay, A. J. Stiles, 

H. S. Went. 
Front Row: D. A. McNeil, D. R. Hallett, Captain of the School, W. A. Joyce, Esq. 

C. H. Maclaren, Captain of Woollcombe House, B. A. Boyd. 




SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Captain of the School and Connaught House 
D. R. HALLETT 

Captain of W oollcombe House 
C. H. MACLAREN 

Prefects 

B. A. BOYD M. P. KELLY 

M. DUGUAY D. A. McNEIL 

P. J. S. GRAHAM A. J. STILES 

G. HARLLEY H. S. WENT 

Captain of Football Captain of Soccer 

M. P. KELLY D. R. HALLETT 

Captain of Hockey Captain of Curling 

D. R. HALLETT C. A. SCHOFIELD 

Captains of Skiing 
C. H. MACLAREN. \Y. W. STRATTON 

CADET CORPS 

Officer Commanding O. C. !\o. 2 Platoon 

Cadet Major D. R. HALLETT Cadet Lieutenant A. J. STILES 

Second-in.-Comm.and 

Cadet Captain P. J. S. GRAHAM O. C. No. 3 Platoon 

O. C. No. 1 Platoon Cadet Lieutenant J. K. BEQAJ 

Cadet Lieutenant D. J. MORRISON 

Company Sergeant Major Quartermaster Sergeant 

Cadet W.O. 2 A. LUCIAM Cadet Sergeant S. M. WILANSKY 

Drum Major 
Cadet Sergeant M. P. KELLY 

Colour Party 

Cadet Lieutenant B. H. WEINER, Cadet Corporal R. H. D. HALUPKA 

Cadet Corporal J. G. MACDONALD 

THE GUARD OF HONOUR 

Guard Commander 
Cadet Lieutenant C. H. MACLAREN 

Cade! Sergeant H. S. WENT Cadet Corporal D. W. LACKIE 

Cadet Corporal R. S. CHILDERS Cadet Corporal J. S. McEACHRW 

Cadet Corporal P. G. COPESTAKE Cadet Corporal G. A. McTAGGART 

Cadet Corporal P. S. T. CROAL Cadet Corporal D. C. PATERN UN 

Cadet Corporal T. A. DICKSON Cadet Corporal W. R. PLl'MMER 

Cadet Corporal M. S. JELEN1CK Cadet Corporal D. J. H. ROSS 

(Absent: Cadet Corporal P. PARDO) 

INSTRUCTORS 

Captain J. H. HUMPHREYS, Cadet Services of Canada 

(Commanding Officer) 

Lieutenant K. D. NILES, Cadet Services of Canada 

( Training Officer ) 

Lieutenant J. L. BEEDELL, Cadet Services of Canada 

( Orienteering) 

2/Lieutenant H. J. ROBERTSON. Cadet Services of Canada 

( Royal Life-Saving) 

2/Lieutenanl T. C. TOTTENH Wl. Cadet Services of Canada 

l Adjutant) 

IX >l GLAS J. BROOKES. Esq.. The National Band. Dept. of National Defence 

( Band I 

If filiated Unit 
I 111 G0\ ERNOR-GENERAL'S FOOT Gl \RDS 

Com m a n d in g Officer 
Lieutenant Colonel II. R. HILL, CD.. \.D.C. 






NOTES 



The School closed on Saturday, June 12th. The Closing Ceremonies took 
a somewhat different form from that followed in previous years in that the 
Leaving Service and the Prize Giving were preceded, in the morning, by the 
Ceremonial Cadet Parade, the cadets having returned the previous day from 
Camp Petawawa. Details of the ceremonies and an account of the activities 
at Camp Petawawa appear later in this journal. 

At the Prize Giving the Headmaster announced the award of Ontario 
Scholarships to Steven Whitwill, Stephen Went, Robert Halupka and Charles 
Schofield. All members of Grade 13 had received their Secondary School 
Honour Graduation Diploma. 

The Stephen Clifford Memorial Prize was presented for the first time by 
Mr. John Clifford to the boy in the Junior School who had won most points 
for his house. This prize has been given by Mr. and Mrs. John Clifford in 
memory of their son. Stephen, who was a Monitor in Grade 8 in 1969-70. 

We are grateful to the E. R. Fisher Co. Ltd. for the donation of a Bursary. 

There have been several developments on the academic side. The academic 
Staff has inaugurated a Scholarship. The decision of the provincial Depart- 
ment of Education to change the requirements for Grade 13 as of September 
1971 gave the School the opportunity to remodel its curriculum. The range 
of subjects for Grade 13 has been increased and these subjects set in such a 
way that almost any combination of them can be accommodated. Furthermore, 
the curricula for Grades 9 to 12 have been broadened, and the School now 
offers, in addition to all the previous subjects, courses in German, the three 
Sciences ( on a much wider scale). Geology and Commerce, with several 
alternatives in each grade, so that the boys may take courses suited to both 
their future needs and present intellectual interests and abilities. 

Owing to increased numbers of students and new course requirements, two 
temporary classrooms are being added for use until new plans permit more 
permanent arrangements. 

In September Mr. Marland and Mr. Josselyn took a party of over thirty 
boys from both the Senior and Junior Schools on a highly successful visit to 
Upper Canada Village. 

On 24th September Mr. George Vincent visited the School to give an 
illustrated lecture on South America. Mr. Vincent was wartime Head of the 
Canadian section of the British Ministry of Information and. later, Informa- 
tion Adviser to the British High Commissioner in Canada. 

As part of the History programme for Grades 12 and 13, speakers from 
embassies in Ottawa were invited to address the classes and answer questions. 
Many interesting and often heated discussions followed. The following em- 
bassies sent representatives: the People's Republic of China. West Germany. 
India. South Africa, the United Arab Republic, the U.S.A. and the U.S.S.R. 
In addition we also entertained speakers from Carleton University, the United 
Nations Association, the Department of Indian Affairs and the Department 
of External Affairs. 



The School received a brief but welcome visit from the Canadian Centen- 
nial Choir under the direction of Mr. Nicholas Goldschmidt; Mr. Geoffrey 
Thomson was the accompanist. 

On the last Sunday and Monday of the Fall term the two traditional Carol 
Services were held — one for the School and one for visitors: both were very 
well attended. Members of the College community read the nine lessons and 
the Choir gave a good account of itself under the direction of Mr. Geoffrey 
Thomson. 

On the last day of the Winter term we repeated the Winter Sports Day 
introduced two years ago. Some four bus-loads of boys went to various loca- 
tions: Camp Fortune and Mont Ste. Marie for skiing and to the Y.M.C.A. 
centre for tobogganing. The day concluded with the Annual Sports Dinner 
held at the School, at which the guest speaker was Mr. Harry Kerrison, 
executive director of the Canadian Track and Field Association. A list of 
Athletic Awards appears in the Sports section of the Ashburian. 

On 12th May Ashbury held a Visitor's Day. Parents and other guests were 
able to see the School in action, both in the classroom and on the games field. 
This was well attended and can be accounted a great success. 

After the final performance of the Ashbury-Elmwood production of "The 
Pirates of Penzance" the cast, musical and stage staff were entertained by 
Dr. and Mrs. Conway, whom we thank for their hospitality. 

During the year several visits were made to the Theatre of the National 
Arts Centre; an account of these visits appears later in these pages. 

Mr. V. J. Burczak, Mr. C. J. Inns, Mr. F. T. Jones, Mr. G. J. McGuire and 
Mr. B. Wallin joined the academic staff in September. Mr. F. K. Graham has 
been assisting with the Chapel music and giving individual music tuition. 

In September 1971 Mr. G. W. Thomson relinquishes the Chapel and Class 
Music to Mr. Graham; Mr. Thomson will continue as Housemaster of Con- 
naught House; he will also continue to teach French and will take on the 
additional commitments of Music and Drama at Elmwood. 

For the Winter and Spring terms Simon Peacock, late of Tonbridge School. 
England, was attached to the School as tutor in the Science and Mathematics 
Departments. We hope that he enjoyed his stay with us, thank him for his 
effective help and wish him well in the future. 

No member of the academic staff is leaving this summer, but regretfully 
we lose Mrs. D. Gwynne-Timothy, Senior School Matron since September 
1968, who leaves us with our best wishes for her happiness on the occasion 
of her marriage to Mr. William Thompson. An appreciation of Mrs. Gwynne- 
Timothy appears on a later page. 

Ashbury College is now clearly identified by a sign hanging in front of the 
School on Mariposa Avenue. This sign is the gift of the Graduating Class of 
1970. 



MRS D. GWYNNE-TIMOTHY 

"She's as Canadian as maple syrup!" 

This was the description given of Mrs. Gwynne-Timothy in reply to one of 
several questions asked by a very interested party when her appointment as 
Senior School Matron was announced just over three years ago. The description 
was entirely accurate, despite her long and happy marriage to an Englishman! 

She came to us thoroughly well versed in the complex pattern of boarding- 
school life, her late husband having been a member of the staff of T.C.S. for 
a great many years. The knowledge and wisdom she gained with him there 
meant that she knew better than to rush her fences, and she eased herself into 
the job here with tact and reticence. As a result of this, it may have taken 
some of us a little while to get to know her and appreciate her full worth — 
but it was only a very little while. 

The personal needs of boys and resident staff were her constant concern, 
and nothing was too much trouble for her — provided (and rightly so) she 
was approached with due courtesy and consideration. She never seemed to 
need rest or sleep: she might have been up half the night taking a boy to 
hospital or tending a sick housemaster, and yet be at the routine chores of 
linen room supervision at 7.30 a.m., as fresh as if she'd had the statutory 
eight hours. She chose her staff well — and, having chosen them, she kept 
them: they showed no inclination to leave — what they did show (and hope- 
fully will go on showing) was loyalty and zeal comparable with Mrs. G-T's 
own. 

Now. after three years of selfless service, she leaves us to marry again. 
When the news was made public, we were unanimous in our joy and happiness 
for her — but we suddenly realised just how much she had done for us in her 
unassuming way. and how much we were going to miss her. 

By the time these words appear in print, she will have been Mrs. Bill 
Thompson for some time, and perhaps the most fitting way of ending this 
little tribute would be to repeat what a namesake of Bill's said at the Con- 
naught House dinner in June: "If she looks after him as well as she's looked 
after us. hell be spoilt to death!" 

G.W.T. 



CONNAUGHT HOUSE NOTES 

What a fast year the 1970-71 school year was! In fact I wouldn't be 
surprised if we'd skipped a few months somewhere. I guess the fact that it 
did go by so quickly was an indication that it was a good year. 

Never before have competitions been so hard fought and so evenly matched. 
In fact whenever the houses locked heads, the margin of victory proved to be 
very slim indeed. 

Two excellent examples of this great competitive spirit were the swim meet 
where Woollcombe beat us by a very small margin (a mere two points), and 
a house softball game where our last innings come-back was too much for 
Woollcombe to handle (final score 14-13). 

On the School sports field Connaught House boys were very active. We 
were well represented on the 1st Football by Anapolsky I. Wilansky. Luciani 
I. Smith I. Graham. Stiles. Boyd. Charron. Clubb. Heaney. Macdonald. 
Morrison and Schofield. with Stratton as manager. Webster. Cunningham, 
Croal. Pimm. Pryde. Scott. Tanos and Ross played 2nd Football. 



The School's very successful 1st Soccer Team consisted mainly of Con- 
naught talent — Hallett (captain), Harlley (vice-captain), Went, Jokinen, 
Halupka, Barnes, Luciani II, Schwarzmann, Bennett, Macleod II and Yaxley 
II, with McLellan as the reliable manager. Lackie (captain), Anapolsky II, 
Mangifesta, Dickson, Cahn, Jelenick, Johnston and Wilson made up most of 
the second team. 

In the winter it was hockey, with Hallett (captain), Smith I, Graham. 
Boyd, Morrison, Pimm, Pryde and Yaxley II representing Connaught on the 
1st team. On the seconds we had the Anapolsky brothers, Luciani II, 
(captain), Webster, Veilleux, Mangifesta, Cahn, Croal, Jelenick, Johnston, 
Scott — and the worthy manager, Bonneau. 

We provided the Ski Team with Stratton (captain), Lackie and Hart, 
while three-quarters of the Curling Team was from Connaught — Schofield 
(captain), Kenny (vice-captain) and Yaxley I. 

The Swimming Team had five Connaught members — Wilansky, Whitwill. 
Dickson, Schwarzmann and Harcourt. 

In the Spring Term the only activity was the track and field ( inter-school ) 
in which Connaught members did very well. Harlley was captain, and the 
others were Kenny, Morrison, Wilansky, Luciani I, Hallett, Barnes, 
McTaggart, Kerr, Pimm and Scott. 

Off the sports field Connaught was also tops. The Gilbert and Sullivan 
company which put on "The Pirates of Penzance" was recruited almost solely 
from Connaught House. The five leads were all Connaught — Hallett. 
Graham, Macdonald, Stratton and Power. We provided most of the pirate- 
like fellows in the chorus — Stiles, Kenny, MacDermot, Haythornthwaite, 
Pearce and Jelenick. The back-stage crew was Wilansky, Luciani II, Power 
and Stoddard. As usual, the whole venture was under the direction of our 
Housemaster. 

The strong voice of Aboud was heard no more in the Choir after Christ- 
mas, and was sorely missed by the other members — Hallett, Harlley. Stratton, 
Dickson, Macdonald, Haythornthwaite and MacDermot. The Chapel Com- 
mittee contained Stiles (president), Hallett, Harlley and Stratton. Stratton 
was also head of the Servers' Guild, ably abetted by Cahn. 

Our representatives on the Dance Committee at the beginning of the year 
were Hallett, Harlley and Wilansky. However, the most honourable mention 
goes to Connell, who single-handedly organized the best Graduation Dance 
Ashbury has ever had. 

Connaught House boys monopolized the Cadet officer and N.C.O. positions, 
with Hallett as Major, Graham as Captain and Luciani I as C.S.M. The 
lieutenants were Stiles and Morrison, and the sergeants were Wilansky (staff- 
sergeant), Halupka, Boyd and Clubb. Went was sergeant of the Honour 
Guard, and the Guard corporals included McTaggart, Lackie, Croal, Jelenick 
and Ross. Our representatives in the Band were Harlley (who received the 
award for the best bandsman), Power (lead drummer), Anapolsky I, 
MacDermot, Wright and Bennett. 

The Public Speaking contest was won by Graham, and Boyd came second. 
Tanos took second place for the intermediates. 

A semi-quiet atmosphere was sometimes achieved by Hallett ( Head ol 
House) and the other prefects — Graham, Stiles, Went and Harlley. The 
Room Captains were Halupka (senior), Stratton. Kenny, Jokinen. Luciani I 
and Wilansky. Things were usually more quiet under the all-seeing eye of 
Mr. Thomson, our Housemaster! We welcomed Mr. McGuire as Boarder 
House Tutor, and Mr. Niles continued to look after the Day Boys. 



10 



Well, this year will always be remembered by all members of the House. 
Certainly it was a very tumultuous year, but Connaught has weathered the 
storm and, if anything, come out stronger. It was a young house and its youth 
and vitality showed up time and time again. The atmosphere which existed 
was really something else, mainly because the House was so much closer than 
it had ever been before. There was much more rapport between those on top 
and those lower down the ladder, and this continually showed through. 

At the end of the first school year of this new decade, Connaught House 
looks in great shape. If it can continue on its present path of tremendously 
spirited participation in all activities, its future is assured. 

Sincerest thanks. I think from everybody, go to Mr. Thomson for a lead 
and for participation and interest in so many aspects of school life. 

A final word of encouragement — "Good Luck! 1 ' 

D. R. Hallett 

Closing Day this year was more than usually poignant for Connaught (or 
at least for its Housemaster! ) because we said farewell to so many fine people 
who have been with the House since its inception four years ago. Next year 
there will only be two (or, at most, three) of these "' founder-members" left. 
To Dell Hallett, and all other leavers who have stayed the four-year course, 
my very warmest thanks for all they have done and especially for the stan- 
dards they have bequeathed us, which have resulted in the House's present 
healthy condition. Fortunately those who will lead us next year are well 
versed in these standards, and we face the future with confidence. 

G.W.T. 



EDITOR'S NOTE 

The Housemaster of Connaught continued to act as music critic for The 
Ottawa Journal. He conducted the Canadian Centennial Choir in its Christmas 
concert at the National Arts Centre, and the Ottawa Civic Symphony Orchestra 
in its winter concert at the High School of Commerce. He has also appeared 
on radio (as a member of a panel of music critics in CBO's "The Music 
Scene" ) and on television ( in a service relayed from Trinity Anglican Church, 
where he is Organist and Choir Director). 

WOOLLCOMBE HOUSE NOTES 

Woollcombe House began the year under the direction of Mr. Joyce. Mr. 
C. J. Inns, who came to Ashbury this year from England, was appointed 
House Master at the beginning of the Winter term. Mr. H. Penton once again 
filled the post of Master in Charge of Woollcombe House Day Boys. The 
prefects were Charles Maclaren — Head of House — Mike Kelly, Marc Duguay 
and Dave McNeil. Head of Day Boys. The Room Captains were Lennie 
Rosenhek, Roger Ramsay, Kostas Rimsa. Jay Ronalds and Ken Hansen. 

This year in the inter-house games we greatly improved our record. In 
soccer, hockey and curling we shared the honours in each sport, each House 
winning one game. In a very close and exciting swimming competition 
Woollcombe defeated Connaught in the last event. 

At the Sports Dinner in March. Bruce Weiner was presented with the 
trophy for the Best Linesman in the football team and Mike Kelly was judged 
the Most Valuable Player. In skiing. Jim Cuttle was the Most Valuable Skier 
and Tony Seay was the best Cross-Country Skier. Mike Kell) was also the 
Most Valuable Plaver in the Hockey. 



11 



For the Cadet Inspection this year Jim Beqaj was Lieutenant Number 3 
platoon; Mike Kelly was Band Major and Charles Maclaren was Lieutenant 
of the Guard of Honour. 

As the term draws to a close the last gathering of "the House" will be on 
June 11th at the Chateau Laurier Hotel for the House Dinner. To show our 
appreciation for a most rewarding year under the direction of Mr. Inns, one 
final Woollcombe House cheer: 

Give me an "I"! 

Give me an "N"! 

Give me an "N"! 

Give me an "S"! 

What have we got? "INNS". 

C. H. Maclaren 
M. P. Kelly 



CHAPEL NOTES 

Because in a small way this year's Chapel life was a little less Chaplain- 
dominated and a little more student-oriented I have asked students to con- 
tribute to this year's account of Chapel activities. Sandy Stiles, who headed 
our Chapel Committee, and Bill Stratton, our Chief Server, each have some- 
thing to say. And so do I — Thank you, Sandy and Bill, for the excellent 
way you each efficiently and cheerfully filled the important positions entrusted 
to you. We had a great Confirmation group this year about which Adrian 
Haythornthwaite reports. 

My own comments are mainly by way of expressing gratitude. The Head- 
master deserves thanks for his support of the Chapel. An example of this 
support is reflected in the $610.00 we were able to give away. By making 
other arrangements for the maintenance of the Chapel, Mr. Joyce has made 
it possible for every cent of money put on the Chapel collection plate to be 
used for charitable purposes. 

As ever Mr. Thomson rightly receives our appreciation for the skilful way 
he gets the best out of our organ and our choir. The congregational singing 
was greatly improved by the end of the year and that is a real accomplishment. 

Prefects, your dependability in the reading of lessons and other duties does 
not go unnoticed. We thank you as we thank the Servers and Committee 
members. 

There are many individuals who deserve bouquets. For example there is 
Mrs. Gwynne-Timothy, who took such good care of the Chapel, and Mr. 
Humphreys, who produced the words for "Jesus Christ - Superstar". Would 
the many persons who worked so hard in the Chapel please accept the thanks 
of the entire College. 

The biggest thanks of all is my personal thanks to the students for letting 
me be Chaplain. I very much treasure your friendship and am grateful that 
you treat me as a person — with all the ups and downs involved. I believe 
that Ashbury College has grown a little as a community of persons who 
respect each other and I'm glad to be part of it. 

Here's something to think about: "One's friends are that part of the human 
race with which one can be human" — George Santayana. 

And don't forget what Jesus said — "I call you my friends". 

E.E.G. 



12 




THE SERVERS 

Back Row: K. Rimsa, E. W. Cahn, C. N. Teron, S. M. Power. 

Front Row: J. G. Macdonald, F. Chu, Rev. E. E. Green, W. W. Stratton, 
G. C. Davies. 

SERVERS' GUILD 

This year has hecn one of the most active for the Ashhury College Servers" 
Guild. Our duties varied from taking part in pre-service seminars to helping 
to put up loudspeakers in the Chapel for recordings. 

This was the first year that a 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist was held every 
Sundav. A thirty-minute seminar was held before each service during the 
first two terms. During one service, Mr. Green arranged a re-enactment of the 
Last Supper for the benefit of the Confirmation Class. On another occasion, 
during Easter, a large cross was suspended from the ceiling to help us all 
understand more fully the meaning of Christ's Crucifixion. Each service was 
conducted with a modern version of the Liturgy, which shortened the service 
considerably. 

Evensong was held each Sunday at 7.15 p.m. Lessons were read by the 
Headmaster and Prefects. We had many interesting speakers during the 
course of the year, their topics ranging from world affairs to responsibility. 
Two services were devoted entirely to the recording of "Jesus Christ - Super- 
star*", and there were several folk services, all of which offered a welcome 
change from the format of the regular services. 

Two morning services were held every Tuesday. Wednesday and Thursday 
at 8.30 and 8.45. Lessons were read by the Prefects and Monitors. Mr. Green 
put us in the mood of the day with a prayer and a word of wisdom. The Friday 
morning services were devoted to the improvement of the student voice and 
an increased knowledge of hymns. The so-called sing-alongs were directed b\ 
Mr. Thomson, who by the end of the year had us all singing several new 
hymns. 

I would like to take this opportunity personally to thank all those who 
helped me serve throughout the year. Special thanks to Mrs. Gwynne-Timothy. 
who arranged the sacred vessels and other furnishings for the services. I 
sincerely hope that those members of the student body who have helped in the 
Chapel this year will continue to do so in the future and keep the Ashbury 
College Servers" Guild well-organized and active. 

B W. W. Stratton 



13 



THE CHAPEL COMMITTEE 

The Chaplain, the Reverend E. E. Green, has this year done much to 
improve our Sunday services, which have until recently been somewhat 
routine. He has changed the order of service occasionally and invited interest- 
ing speakers, who were more often than not short and to the point, affecting 
us more. 

Sometimes seven or eight boys participated in the service by reading short 
dialogues, so furthering our interest and involvement. Towards the end of the 
last term the recording of "Jesus Christ - Superstar" was played; this, I feel, 
was most successful in terms of holding the congregation's attention and I 
would like to thank the Chaplain for making that possible. Also, Mr. Thomson 
has added some new hymns, which again has helped the service to become 
more enjoyable. 

This year the School has been successful in raising funds for various good 
causes. Over S600 were given as follows: 

to Ottawa-Carleton United Appeal $ 50.00 

for refugee work in Vietnam 30.00 

for flood relief in Pakistan 100.00 

to St. Michael's Mission, South Africa 200.00 

to Ottawa Miles for Millions 80.00 

to the Bishop of Ottawa for local charity 100.00 

to the Ontario Older Boys' Parliament 50.00 

The Chaplain organized a "Grub Day" for the School. The "grubbiest" 
student received a money prize; the 250 entrance fees went to the Kwashiorkor 
Home in South Africa. 

Mr. Green has always been friendly and helpful, which I'm sure has been 
much appreciated. My hearty thanks to him, and special thanks to my col- 
leagues of the Chapel Committee who have assisted me in my position as 
president. Thanks also to you out there in the congregation for your partici- 
pation on those Sunday evenings. Best luck to all. 

A. J. Stiles 



THE CONFIRMATION 

The Confirmation Service was held in the Ashbury College Chapel on the 
21st of February, 1971. The Chaplain presented 15 of us to Bishop Robinson 
of the Diocese of Ottawa. There were nine from Ashbury and six from Elm- 
wood. Our First Communion involved three successive Sundays in March. 

We all sincerely thank Mr. Green for preparing and presenting us for the 
"Laying on of Hands". 

J. A. E. Haythornthwaite 



14 



ASHBURY COLLEGE LADIES' GUILD 
PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



It is a privilege for one to outline for you the activities and achievements 
of the Ladies' Guild for 1970/71. 

From the Treasurer's Report we have learned that financially it has been 
a very successful year. A large percentage of Mothers are paid up members 
and the receipts from our two major projects, the Clothing Sale and the 
Pyramid Luncheons, are in excess of One Thousand dollars (SI, 000). We 
were the recipients of some generous donations for which we are sincerely 
grateful. Seventy-eight packages of Hasti-Notes were sold, a large percentage 
being purchased by out-of-town Mothers. 

The usual two meetings were held. Mr. Joyce and Mr. Sherwood addressed 
our Fall Meeting, and at the Spring Meeting Mr. Byford and Mr. Beedell 
spoke to us on the Science Programme at Ashbury. Both Meetings were well 
attended with some eighty members present at each meeting. Following the 
meetings luncheon was served, courtesy of the College. 

At the June Closing, the Guild donated Book Prizes in the amount of 
Nineteen dollars and ten cents ($19.10), and Merit Prizes of Fifty dollars 
(S50) each for Grades 9 to 13 inclusive. The latter prizes, which replace the 
Bursary formerly given, are awarded on the basis of all-round effort and have 
been most enthusiastically received by both Students and Staff. 

Six cottas and a red cassock were purchased for the Choir and Mr. Thomson 
was given Fifty dollars ($50) to take the Choir on an Outing. The Christmas 
Carol Service is surely one of the highlights of the school year and the Guild 
was honoured as your President was asked to take part in it. 

At the Fall Meeting, the members voted to cash a Bond for Five Hundred 
dollars ( S500 ) when it matured in January and to use the money to redecorate 
and furnish the Infirmary Sitting Room. The room doubles as a sitting room 
where Parents may meet privately with their son(s) when visiting them at 
School. The work was completed in time for the Spring Meeting and the 
members were delighted with the results. The Infirmary itself was brightened 
with new bedspreads and curtains and new furniture was purchased for the 
Prefects* Common Room. 

The television set in the Junior Common Room was repaired and games 
were purchased for the Junior boarders. The Junior boys having the tidiest 
room were taken to a movie at our expense. 

At the request of Mr. Joyce that we discontinue our support in furnishing 
the Common Rooms, because of wilful damage to newly purchased furniture 
and the added responsibility it places on the Boys and the Staff, the members 
at the Spring Meeting voted to abolish the Common Rooms" Fund and to 
establish in its place the Project Fund. In accordance with this, instead of 
furnishing the Commons Rooms, the Meeting voted to purchase much needed 
equipment for the Science Department. A cheque for Twelve Hundred dollars 
(SI, 200) was presented to Mr. Joyce to purchase equipment that is required 
to update the Science Programme, namely. Microscopes and Specimens for 
the Biology Department, nine Optical Benches and other pieces of electrical 
equipment for the Physics Department and a Ph Meter for the Chemistry 
Department. 



Lastly the Guild Executive was delighted and thoroughly enjoyed co-oper- 
ating with the Old Boys' Association at the time of their Reunion in October. 

My Executive consisted of: — 

Honorary President — Mrs. W. A. Joyce 

Past President — Mrs. B. H. Chick 

Vice-President — Mrs. D. G. Harcourt 

Secretary — Mrs. W. A. Scott 

Treasurer — Mrs. T. L. Bates 

Assistant Treasurer — Mrs. E. D. Boyd 

Ways & Means — Mrs. L. M. Johnston 

Hasti-Notes — Mrs. T. C. Assaly 

Members — Mrs. D. D. Hogarth 

— Mrs. W. J. Mulock 

— Mrs. C. Don 

— Mrs. D. K. Stilborn 

— Mrs. G. K. Ellacott 
Montreal Representative — Mrs. P. H. Davies 

In closing I would like you to know how much I have enjoyed being your 
President for the past year. It has been a pleasure and an honour to serve 
this fine School. My most sincere thanks to all the Executive for their co- 
operation and for fulfilling their duties so capably. I would also like to thank 
Mr. Joyce and Mr. Sherwood who have assisted us in every possible way. Our 
gratitude is also extended to all the members of the Staff, with special thanks 
to the Office Staff. 

My sincere best wishes to my successor, Mrs. Harcourt, and her Executive. 
I am sure that they will enjoy the same co-operation and enthusiasm that I 
have experienced. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOAN HENDERSON. 

Mrs. Gordon F. Henderson. 

President, 

Ashbury College Ladies' Guild. 



THE SOUTHAM LIBRARY 

The Library has had a good year, perhaps its best so far, with all kinds of 
activities taking place. It is a far cry from the sepulchral atmosphere of the 
average public library, but wc are fortunate in that our small number permits 
us to indulge in a freer, less restrained atmosphere than that which is neces- 
sary when larger groups are involved. Nevertheless, in spite of the relaxed 
appearance, consideration is given to those desiring quiet and, with few 
exceptions, it has been possible to revert lo subdued tones whenever requested. 
This highlights tolerance, and a willingness amongst the more exuberant to 
co-operate with their fellow students. 



16 



Perhaps because of a less rigid attitude, the Library has become more pop- 
ular. More people are finding their way there and certainly much greater 
use is being made of the books, and the variety of magazines must surely 
satisfy most tastes! 

Mention should be made of the successful stamp club held in the Library 
each Thursday throughout the Fall and Winter terms. A tremendous enthu- 
siasm was evident, and more than one onlooker became an avid collector long 
before the Spring term and the better weather saw other activities replace 
this indoor attraction. 

The Junior School newspaper found the Library tables useful when finally 
putting the paper together, and this was done in a very business-like fashion, 
with an efficiency which did them credit. 

A large stock of magazines has accumulated, and these, mostly, are reserved 
for those wishing to "cut out"" for various projects — very popular with 
Junior School! 

Once again many fine donations have been received, and we extend our 
thanks to all those listed below. Mr. W. J. R. Wilson deserves special mention 
and thanks for his continued support with regular monthly donations of books. 

An organization of Old Boys and Friends of Ashbury College in the United 
States contributed funds to the Library, and a set of Colliers Student Encyclo- 
paedia was purchased as a lasting reminder of a very generous gift. We would 
like to take this opportunity to express our gratitude and thanks to the 
members. 

The librarians have worked willingly and well throughout the year, and I 
extend my grateful thanks to them all. 

Mary Loftus 
Librarian. 

Donations to the Library have been received from the following :- 



Montague Anderson, Esq. 
Ashbury College Fund Inc. 

(Old Boys and Friends in the U.S.A.) 
Adrian Brookes 
Mrs. P. H. Davies 
Hugh Heaton 
J. G. M. Hooper, Esq. 
H. M. Jaquays, Esq. 
W. A. Joyce. Esq. 
Cdr. C. H. Little 
W. C. E. Loftus, Esq. 



Shawn McNulty 

Mrs. W. A. Plummer 

Mrs. Charles Southgate 

Scott Stilborn 

Mrs. F. R. Thurston 

Peter Thurston 

Michael Torontow 

Mr. & Mrs. C. J. Tottenham 

Philippe Wiener 

W. J. R. Wilson. Esq. 

B. Wallin, Esq. 





SENIOR LIBRARIANS 






Schwarzmann 






Cahn 






Pearce 






Pardo 






Rimsa 






JUNIOR LIBRARIANS 




Pelcis 




Wiener 


Harrower 




Pimm II 


Assaly I 




Wilson III 


Anfossie 




Robertson 


Teron 




Stilborn 



Kemper 



17 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 



"This I believe . . ." was the 1971 theme of the Optimist International 
Oratorical Contest. Ashbury entered Hugh Christie, Robert Pimm and Mat- 
thew Rowlinson in the local contest sponsored by the Ottawa Optimist Club. 
Each of the boys did exceedingly well with Matthew winning the second 
place trophy. The 1972 theme is "Our Challenge — Involvement". Ashbury 
might well consider involvement in public speaking contests as a challenge 
for next year. The Optimist sponsored venture starts with local district com- 
petitions and ends with North American finals. 

David Heaney and Stephen Stirling entered the Ottawa district public 
speaking contest sponsored by the Ontario Public School Trustee Association 
and the Ontario Hydro. In the prepared speech section David came second 
and in the impromptu section Stephen came first. Stephen went on to win the 
zone final. In Toronto at the Ontario finals he competed with high school 
students from all over the province. Hydro arranged a tour at Niagara Falls 
and a banquet at Toronto's King Edward Hotel for all contestants. It was an 
enjoyable and worthwhile effort. 

In the School itself we had one of our best Public Speaking contests ever. 
In the Senior competition Jeffrey Graham won the Gary Horning Memorial 
Prize over Brian Boyd, Norman Clubb and Sean Power. Intermediate con- 
testants were Hugh Christie, Stuart Jelenick, Nicholas Polk, Matthew 
Rowlinson and Stephen Tanos. Matthew emerged as winner of the Ross 
McMaster Prize. Judges Leslie Barnes, James Barnett and John Charnell were 
very impressed by the high standards exhibited by all participants. 

The senior contestants mainly focused on life at Ashbury for their speeches. 
A good deal of sensitive awareness and mature judgement was shown in the 
constructive criticism they offered. Jeff Graham brought the assembly to its 
feet in thunderous applause. Nothing could have better demonstrated the 
power of the orator and the validity of stressing public speaking in Ashbury. 

E.E.G. 



THE THEATRE 



The School in large and small numbers made a total of twelve trips to the 
theatre, eleven of those to the National Arts Centre. The musical, "Half a 
Sixpence", staged at Lasalle Academy by The Ottawa Little Theatre, was 
atended by a small group in the latter half of the Winter term. A light 
musical comedy which enjoyed some success on Broadway, "Half a Sixpence" 
amused and entertained those who went. A larger group was organized to 
attend The Ottawa Little Theatre's production of Noel Coward's "Hay Fever" 
presented in the Theatre of the NAC. Both the lyrics and action of this forty 
year old comedy delighted the youthful but not undemanding audience of 
Ashbury students. This particular production served to raise funds for the 
Ottawa Little Theatre, which was experiencing financial difficulties as the 
result of the destruction by fire of its long-time stamping grounds on King 
Edward Avenue. 



18 



The Theatre of the NAC was where the majority of the School's excursions 
headed. The Stratford National Theatre of Canada presented "Tartuffe" and 
"Cymbeline" in the Fall, and "The Duchess of Main" and ""Much Ado About 
Nothing" in the Winter. Both "Cymbeline" and "The Duchess of Malfi" 
strained, at times, the credulity of a generation used to the exposition of 
stark realism on film and to relying on the subtleties of expression which can 
be caught only by the camera. The Elizabethans relied almost exclusively on 
words to communicate feeling, and one's involvement with what was happen- 
ing on stage decreased as the evening lengthened. In fact both productions 
were close to three and a half hours long and, if drowsiness was not experienced 
close to the end of each, certainly one's powers of concentration had suffered 
a significant decline. Nevertheless, a large group witnessed both productions 
and were unanimous in realizing the importance of experiencing Elizabethan 
theatre even though it wasn't at its best. I understand that "Tartuffe" and 
"Much Ado About Nothing" were more successful. 

The rendering of Ibsen's "Enemy of the People" by the St. Lawrence 
Centre of the Arts was an unqualified success; not only because it dealt with 
the current issue of pollution, but also because of superb acting and direction. 
The setting was a small town in Saskatchewan and the time was 'now'. Even 
so the essence of Ibsen's insight remained intact. A man who holds views that 
run contrary to the mainstream of opinion struggles to express these views 
and have them acted upon, because he strongly believes he is right. But he 
and his views are unacceptable to the community because both assault the 
self-interests of too many factions. The presentation of this theme was 
dramatically persuasive. 

The bilingual members of the School went to see productions of Moliere's 
"Le Misanthrope" and Camus" "Caligula". Mr. Glover and Mr. Inns of the 
French Department reported that both were received with enthusiasm and 
interest by those attending. It is heartening to think that the School is in a 
position to take advantage of these NAC French-language productions. 

The Charlottetown Festival Company arrived at the NAC Opera House in 
the Fall to perform "Anne of Green Gables" and "Private Turvey's War". 
The Junior School and grade Nines went to the former and discovered first 
hand why it was a "hit'. Most of the remainder of the School saw "Private 
Turvey's War". It moved quickly and was frequently amusing, though I was 
disappointed that I didn't opt to see "Anne of Green Gables". The general 
opinion suggests that it was the better of the two. 

Last, but not least by any means, a large group enjoyed the 1970 production 
of "Love and Maple Syrup". A gathering of songs and poems by Canadians 
was performed with gusto by a talented group of six. I was delighted to see 
that a poem by an old school friend of mine, Pierre Coupey, was included in 
the program. No doubt one or two members of the Ashbury audiences will 
receive credits one day for a similar achievement. If the majority of them 
don't reach such a pinnacle of artistic success, after this year's exposure to 
the theatre, thev will unquestionably form knowledgeable and interested 
audiences of the future. Thanks for this is entirely due to Mr. Peter Josselyn, 
Head of the English Department. His enthusiasm for the theatre has commun- 
icated itself to the whole of the student body. I speak for staff and students 
when I extend thanks for his untiring organizational efforts and his inspi- 



ration. 



M.H.P. 



19 



THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE AT ELMWOOD 

For the fifth year in succession Ashbury joined forces with Elmwood to 
present a Gilbert and Sullivan opera — this time "The Pirates of Penzance". 

Although this is one of the shorter Savoy operas, it poses problems to an 
amateur company. There is very little spoken dialogue; much of the story is 
told through recitative and arioso, and it is essential that every point should 
get across clearly. It is also one of the best known and frequently performed 
of all comic operas; consequently every production runs far more risk of 
comparison with other productions. 

It is pleasant to be able to report that the Ashbury-Elmwood team solved 
these problems successfully. We were able to follow the story with no trouble, 
and the production did not have to fear comparison with others. Indeed, one 
member of the audience, who has had much to do with both amateur and 
professional theatre, was heard to say that this was the best school presentation 
of Gilbert and Sullivan she had ever seen. 

It was certainly far and away the best of the five which this company has 
mounted. It had pace, clarity, good movement and grouping, and mainly 
excellent performances in the leading roles. It is, however, time that Mr. 
Geoffrey Thomson discovered some new dance steps, or looked for a profes- 
sional choreographer! 

Of the principals, pride of place must be given to the hero and heroine — 
Dell Hallett and Jacqueline Hurd. They have both had plenty of experience 
in past productions, and this obviously paid dividends. There was no gauche- 
ness or embarrassment in their love scenes, and they both acted with 
sincerity, conviction and assurance. Jacqueline Hurd's singing voice is small, 
but she uses it musically and intelligently, and she shows a promising com- 
mand of coloratura technique — a technique which is called for pretty often 
in this part. 

Dell Hallett showed that he is a rare phenomenon among teen-agers (or 
adults, for that matter) — a natural tenor. He encompassed his high notes 
easily and with no sign of strain or effort, his enunciation was excellent, and 
he caught to perfection all the many and varied moods of his immensely 
long part. 

Both these two show very real promise. We regret that this was their fare- 
well appearance in Rockcliffe Park, and it is to be hoped that they will lose 
no opportunity of gaining further musical and dramatic experience; indeed, 
they ought to study singing seriously. 

But perhaps the finest all-round performance of the evening came from 
Jennifer Chance as Ruth — Gilbert's usual old maid, unloved and on the 
shelf. Her facial expressions and sense of timing were superb, particularly in 
the long duet with Frederick, when he accuses her of deception. Jennifer 
Chance is another who will be a great loss to the company, and who should 
not let her talents go to waste. 

There were two very promising debuts. The first was Sean Power as the 
Sergeant of Police. He is a natural clown; he tended to overdo the buffoonery 
at times, but it is far easier for a producer to curb excesses than to get blood 
out of a stone! Sean Power is no stone, and we look forward to further 
manifestations of his great gift for comedy. 



20 



The other auspicious debut was Jeffrey Graham's Pirate King. He had good 
presence, and was highly successful in striking the necessary balance between 
the character's sham blustering and innate pleasantness. He sang vigorously 
(although alarmingly sharp at times!), and infected everyone with his own 
huge enjoyment of the whole thing. 

It was a pity that John Macdonald, another seasoned veteran of these 
affairs, should have found himself miscast in his final appearance. He has 
done excellent work in past productions in the "nice boy'" type of part, but 
the "nice boy"' characteristic won't do for the Major-General, and he seemed 
nervous and ill at ease — particularlv in the famous (and extremely difficult ) 
patter song. Even so, his past achievements mean that he is another who will 
be much missed in the future. 

In smaller parts Jane Ginsberg, Jane Hampson, Ingrid Sorensen and Bill 
Stratton all acquitted themselves well. 

The three factions of the chorus were all good in their various ways. The 
Ashbury boys made splendid pirates, and some of the lecherous glee displayed 
by the younger ones, when told that they could help themselves to the Major- 
General's daughters, was so convincingly natural that one wonders if the 
Grade Nine curriculum needs careful scrutiny! The policemen were por- 
trayed ably (and aptly!) by Ashbury masters. The girls looked as charming 
as always, but seemed just a little more inhibited than some of their prede- 
cessors; they were less successful than the boys in the vital job of reacting to 
dramatic situations and staying in character, and their singing, although 
pretty and accurate, was somewhat muted. 

The sets were adequate, but the lighting was poor. Costumes were good, 
and make-up was better than ever before. 

Mrs. Lorna Harwood-Jones was a tower of strength at the piano, and was 
always ready to save musical situations on the stage which threatened to 
become critical; fortunately she did not have to render this all-important 
service very often. 

Mr. Geoffrey Thomson. Producer and Musical Director, is to be congrat- 
ulated on his firm musical and dramatic command, without which this 
production could not have reached so high a standard. 

The Critic 




21 




22 



CADETS 

The Cadet Corps took on a new look this year with the emphasis heing 
taken off drill and placed on a varied program of activities. During the winter 
term cadets were able to choose from a number of groups, including orien- 
teering, first aid and canoe-building. This change from the regular routine 
was well received. 

During the first term two groups of 20 and then 50 students, composed 
partly of girls from Elm wood, went on week-end camping trips to the wilds 
of the Gatineau. This was just a prelude to the major cadet activity of the 
year: an excursion of the whole School, including Mr. Joyce, to Camp 
Petawawa during the last three days of the year. The trip was designed to 
introduce the School to outdoor camping, and it was highlighted by orien- 
teering competitions, rides in tanks, and combat rations. In spite of the 
inevitable grumbles, there is no doubt that this was a worthwhile experience. 

On Closing Day the Corps was inspected by Major-General G. H. Spencer, 
O.B.E., CD. The inspection was much shorter than in previous years, in 
keeping with the shift away from drill. Awards were presented as follows: 

Most Promising Recruit — Cadet Corporal G. A. McTaggart. 
Most Conscientious N.C.O. — Cadet Sergeant S. M. Wilansky. 
Best Bandsman — Cadet G. Harlley. 
Best Officer — Cadet Lieutenant C. H. Maclaren. 
C.O.*s Award — Cadet Major D. R. Hallett. 

Best Platoon — No. 1 Platoon. Cadet Lieutenant D. J. Morrison. 
Master Cadet Award — Cadet Captain P. J. S. Graham. 

Cadet Sergeant S. M. Wilansky. 

Special thanks are due to Mr. Humphreys for his many efforts in this his 
first year in command of the corps; also to Wilansky. Grills and Stoddard II 
for their help in returning uniforms. 

B. A. Boyd 



PETAWAWA TRIP 

As Mr. Joyce remarked in his speech on Closing Day. the Petawawa trip 
was plagued with a host of poorly planned minor details that perhaps, had the 
weather not been as perfect as it was, would have demoralized as well as in- 
furiated us. 

One of the highlights of the trip was the night orienteering course in which 
the corps, in its respective sections, dispersed in different directions, more or 
less under control of their orienteerers, to find, record and report back with 
some unknown letter at a given point. This was a timed exercise made all the 
more interesting by having the groups elude a hidden interceptor on the 
return journey. 

The following day we embarked upon what was the core of the trip. All 
sections were given maps and instructions on radio communication and told 
to disappear until the following morning. The day was spent walking from 
point to point, recording letters previously placed at x. y coordinates around 
the country-side. Each group had about 12 points to find and each camped at 
the last point they had to go to. The day was saved through constant conver- 



23 



sation and attempts (among groups) to get un-lost. Some groups, the smarter 
ones I think, went to their last points first and disposed of their back packs, 
which, particularly for the smaller boys, was a good idea. 

Entertainment that night was supplied by constant exchange over the radios 
in spite of repeated pleas from base camp for radio silence. Apparently singing 
beer-hall songs, protesting about the pine bugs, mosquitoes and other assorted 
insects in off-colour language, is frowned upon even by the army. 

The last day was spent lazing around, bathing and fishing in the lake, 
handing-in equipment, packing, and taking rides in army half-trucks and 
jeeps. On the morning of our departure, we were up at five and had breakfast 
at the army mess hall at Camp Petawawa. We finally left and arrived at 
Ottawa at 12:00 noon. 

So much for the highlights; the low points were of course the unmention- 
able food (adequate quantity, but who wanted it), the housing (general 
opinion on the lean-tos: "If it had rained one drop, I would have been hitch- 
hiking back to Ottawa."), and last but by no means least, the hoards of 
hungry insects. 

I think that the overall impression of the trip was favourable, and everyone 
could say they enjoyed at least one aspect of the expedition even if it was only 
the return journey. Perhaps next year more attention to the minor details and 
the experience gained from this trip will result in an even more successful 
and enjoyable time for all. 

S. Went 




24 







25 



THE PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 

Owing, perhaps, to the shortage of free time and the disproportionate 
amount of the same needed to pursue this particular hobby, enthusiasm was 
not unbounded. And, consequently, photographic expression was restricted 
(except of course amongst the die-hards) to Thursday afternoons and even 
then under some duress. However, all was not lost as several new members 
were introduced to the "inner sanctum" from where it is hoped that they will 
continue next year. 

Passport-sized individual photographs of all the students, a photography 
course for a cadet activity, and coverage of major games and cultural events 
during the school year, were included amongst the club's other spheres of 
interest this year. 

H. S. Went 





26 




Photo by Michael Barnes 



27 




Photos by Stephen Went 



ASHBURY 

in winter 








SCIENCE CLUB 



Our Science Club this year consisted of the following members: Wong, 
Stoddard. Hodgins. Hamilton, Nadeau, Bonneau, and myself as secretary. 

Hodgins tried to extract nicotine from tobacco. His experiment involved 
mixing tobacco with water, and distilling to obtain nicotine and water. He 
acidified the solution to obtain a hydrochloride of nicotine. Boiling then 
removes water and concentrates the nicotine. When alkali is added to neu- 
tralize the acid, nicotine can be separated by using salt and ether. The result 
was verj good and had no ill effect on him. 

Nadeau's experiment involved identification of the metal in a piece of 
unknown mineral rock. Chemical tests showed the presence of iron in the 
solution obtained with the rock and acid. Zinc dust displaced iron metal from 
this solution and it was picked up by a magnet. Magnesium and aluminium 
were also detected. He was satisfied with the results. 

Bonneau tried to prove that sugar contains carbon. He did it by adding 
concentrated sulphuric acid to sugar. After filtering and washing again and 
again, a big black mass of carbon was obtained which satisfied his curiosity. 

Hamilton was growing crystals with several different salts. 

Stoddard used lead nitrate and sodium chloride to obtain sodium nitrate 
and lead chloride. He tested his pure products for metals and acid radicles 
and then confirmed their identity. 

Wong and I did experiments on the principles of the electric current, its 
motions and the magnetic field. We have quite a lot of experience in this 
field. We are now making an apparatus for the school. The apparatus is for 
an experiment concerned with the motion of a conductor in a magnetic field. 

F. Chu 




29 



VALEDICTORY 

by the Captain of the School 
DEL HALLETT 

Mr. Chairman, members of the Board, Mr. Joyce, members of the Staff, 
ladies and gentlemen and distinguished members of Ashbury College student 
body. 

This has been a very fast year. The fact that it did go by so quickly is an 
indication that it was a good year — certainly a very tumultuous one. 

Trying to pick out highlights of the whole year is sometimes very difficult, 
since events, while remembered by some, might not be remembered by others. 
However, I'll start with something everyone must remember — cadets. Cadets 
took on a new look this year, with much less drill, as you probably guessed 
this morning. Instead of hours of marching, a more practical approach to 
cadets was devised. Last Tuesday we all went to Camp Petawawa and came 
back yesterday, except for a few hoarse throats and a few more mosquito 
bites no worse off than when we had left. 

Our formal this year took us and our sister school, Elmwood. to the Royal 
Ottawa Golf Club. It was the best dance in a number of years and I'm sure 
that those who did go will remember it for a long time. 

Chapel this year also changed, with a much more modern approach to 
religion. The rock opera "Jesus Christ - Superstar" was played on two Sundays 
in a row and the grand finale was last week's service in the Library. 

And who will forget the 7-1 win over Bishop's in football or the 1-0 loss in 
the soccer semi-finals to Glebe? The hockey team will surely remember the 
9-2 win over the Old Boys, and the skiers, I imagine, will never forget Owl's 
Head. 

There was much more cohesion within the School this year. However, the 
spirit of the School was the spirit of the boarders — when the boarders were 
up, so was the School, and when the boarders were down, so was the School. 

There were still quite a few four o'clock schoolboys this year who contri- 
buted nothing after classes - mostly day boys. In a school of the size of 
Ashbury it is difficult to have two boarder houses, and distinctions should not 
be between two houses under the same roof; if distinctions must be made, 
they should be between day boys and boarders, with one day boy house and 
one boarder house. 

House competitions were very close this year. Woollcombe won the swim 
meet and hockey, while Connaught took the soccer and rugger games. 

Hull, again this year, remained strictly out of bounds, but I am almost 
certain that there were some weekend expeditions over to the forbidden city. 

Ashbury College is built on a strong foundation of friendship and an even 
stronger foundation of tradition. We must strive in the future for the better- 
ment of the school by keeping up with the times by means of modification, 
change and even abolition. 

This betterment must come from within the School itself and can only be 
achieved through a much closer relationship between staff and students. 
Striving must be sincere, not a chain of superfluous and meaningless gestures. 

I have been at Ashbury for five years and my feelings about leaving are 
very mixed indeed. However, I am able to look back on my schooldays with 
fond memories and, believe me, they are many. 

Ashbury College has so much potential — let's use more of it. 



30 



PRIZE LIST 1971 



ACADEMIC PRIZES 



FORM PRIZES FOR GENERAL PROFICIENCY 

Presented by Mrs. J. C. Whitwill, Headmistress, Elmwood Girls' School: 



Grade 5: 
Grade 6: 
Grade 7: 
Grade 7A: 
Grade 8: 
Grade 8A: 



Blair Stewart 
Paul Deepan 
Joel Zagerman 
Hric Wilson 
Stephen Collins 
Mark Josselyn 



JUNIOR SCHOOL AWARDS OF MERIT 

Grade 5: 
Grade 6: 
Grade 7: 
Grade 7A: 
Grade 8: 

THE WOODBURN MUSIC PRIZE (Junior School) 

Jonathan Heaton 

THE POLK PRIZE FOR POETRY READING (Junior School) 

David Babbitt 

THE JUNIOR SCHOOL ART PRIZE 

Richard Motta 

ASH BURY COLLEGE LADIES' GUILD PRIZES 



Grade 9B 


Leslie Zunenshine 


9A 


Hugh Christie 


10B 


Nigel Spencer 


10A 


Frederick Stoddard 


1 IB 


Dan Lackie 


11A 


Mark Joyce 


12B 


Duncan McLeod 


12A 


Bryan Boyd 


13 


Steven Whitwill 


Richard Harwood 




Matthew Flynn 




Andrew Moore 




Iain Johnston 




Shaun Belding 





Junior School 


Improvement in 


French: 


Richard Motta 


Middle School 


History: 




Frederick Stoddard 


Middle School 


Geography: 




Frederick Stoddard 


Middle School 


English: 




Matthew Rowlinson 


Grade 9 


Merit Award: 




Louis Charron 
Michael Moore 


10 


Merit Award: 




Donald Paterson 


11 


Merit Award: 




Donald Morrison 


12 


Merit Award: 




Kostas Rimsa 
William Stratton 


13 


Merit Award: 




Jeffrey Graham 



THE PUBLIC SPEAKING PRIZES 



Junior: 
Intermediate: 



The Charles Gale: 
The Ross McMaster: 



THE THOMSON CHOIR PRIZES 

Junior: 
Senior: 



Iain Johnston 
Matthew Rowlinson 



Matthew Marion 
John Macdonald 



PRESENTED BY MR. JOHN CLIFFORD: 

THE STEPHEN CLIFFORD MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR THE BOY IN THE 

JUNIOR SCHOOL WHO WINS THE MOST POINTS FOR HIS HOUSES 

Mark Josselyn 

PRESENTED BY MR. MICHAEL SHERWOOD: 

THE WOODS SHIELD (Junior School Academics, Sports, Character): 

Chris Teron 

PRESENTED BY MRS. EDITH MOORE: 

THE ROBERT GERALD MOORE MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR ENGLISH: 

Stephen Stirling 



31 



THE GARY HORNING MEMORIAL SHIELD FOR PUBLIC SPEAKING (Senior): 

Jeffrey Graham 

THE JOHN MICHAEL HILLIARD MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR MERIT — 8A: 

Jeffrey Beedell 

THE SNELGROVE MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR MATHEMATICS: 

Frederick Stoddard 

THE ADAM PODHRADSKY MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR MODERN HISTORY: 

Stephen Stirling 

THE FIORENZA DREW MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR FRENCH: 

Bryan Boyd 

THE EKES MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR PHYSICS: 

Steven Whitwill 

THE C. ROWLEY BOOTH MEMORIAL TROPHY FOR ALL-ROUND 
ACHIEVEMENT IN GRADE 12:) 

George Harlley 

PRESENTED BY MRS. C. K. BROWN: 

MOST VALUABLE MEMBER OF THE TRACK AND FIELD TEAM 

THE PROFESSOR J. B. EWING CUPs 

George Harlley 

THE AWARD OF EXCELLENCE — CANADA FITNESS: 

Peter Bowley 
THE SPECIAL ACADEMIC PRIZES 
MIDDLE SCHOOL 

School Prize for Science: Frederick Stoddard 

Devine Prize for Latin: Stuart Jelenick 

Jobling Prize for French: Matthew Rowlinson 

JUNIOR MATRICULATION CLASSES 

Brain Prize for History: Stephen Stirling 

Pemberton Prize for Geography: Richard Bennett 

Dr. O. J. Firestone Prize for Mathematics: Bryan Boyd 

Joyce Prize for Physics: Paul Hope 

Byford Prize for Chemistry: Bryan Boyd 

F. E. B. Whitfield Prize for Latin: Ike Stoddard 

SENIOR MATRICULATION CLASSES 

Hon. George Drew Prize for English: Robert Halupka 

H. J. Robertson Prize for History: Jeffrey Graham 

F. T. Jones Prize for Geography: Jeffrey Graham 

J. J. Marland Prize for Mathematics: Steven Whitwill 

W. W. Byford Prize for Chemistry: Steven Whitwill 

Angus Prize for French: Stephen Went 

SPECIAL AWARDS 

THE PITFIELD SHIELD (Junior School House Competition): 

Hobbits — Mark Josselyn, Captain 

THE SOUTHAM CUP (Best Record in Scholarship and Sports): 

Del Hallett 

THE NELSON SHIELD (Best Influence in the School): 

Del Hallett 

THE GOVERNOR GENERALS MEDAL: 

Steven Whitwill 
THE HEADMASTER'S CUPS 

Drew Ashton 
Charles Schofield 



32 



ASHBURY COLLEGE 

Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Canada 

Eightieth Year 




L^lodina C^ 



odina 



eremonies 



CEREMONIAL CADET PARADE 

LEAVING SERVICE 

PRIZE GIVING 



<x3x> 



Saturday, June 12th, 1971 



33 



Ceremonial Cadet Parade 

Inspecting Officer: 
MAJOR GENERAL G. H. SPENCER 

O.B.E., CD. 

INSPECTION OF THE GUARD OF HONOUR 

INSPECTION OF THE CADET CORPS 

MARCH PAST IN COLUMN OF ROUTE 

ADVANCE IN REVIEW ORDER — GENERAL SALUTE 

GUARD OF HONOUR — PRECISION DRILL 

PRESENTATION OF AWARDS 

DISMISSAL 

CADET OFFICERS 

Cadet Major D. R. HALLETT, Officer Commanding 

Cadet Captain P. J. S. GRAHAM, Second in Command 

Cadet Lieutenant D. J. MORRISON, O. C. No. 1 Platoon 

Cadet Lieutenant A. J. STILES, 0. C. No. 2 Platoon 

Cadet Lieutenant J. K. BEQAJ, 0. C. No. 3 Platoon 

Cadet Lieutenant C. H. MACLAREN, Honour Guard 

Company Sergeant Major 
Cadet WO 2 A. LUCIANI 

Quartermaster Sergeant 
S. M. WILANSKY 

Drum Major 
Cadet Sergeant M. P. KELLY 

Colour Party 

Cadet Lieutenant B. H. WEINER 

Cadet Corporal R. H. D. HALUPKA 

Cadet Corporal J. G. MACDONALD 



34 



Closing Service 

For the students, their parents and friends 

at 2:30 p.m. 

Conducted by the School Chaplain 

THE REV. E. E. GREEN, B.A., B.D. 

in the 

ASHBURY COLLEGE CHAPEL 

HYMN 427 — The School Hymn — "He ivho would valiant be" 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM 

OPENING SENTENCES 

PRAYERS 

THE LORD'S PRAYER 

HYMN 656 — "Rise up O Men of God" 

LESSON — The Headmaster 

PRAYERS AND BENEDICTION 

HYMN 469 — ( Part 2 ) — "Lord dismiss us with Thy blessing" 

35 



PROGRAMME 

Prize Giving 3:15 p.m. 

OPENING REMARKS 

CHARLES K. BROWN 

(Ashbury 1945-1946) 
Chairman of the Board of Governors 

THE HEADMASTER 

VALEDICTORY 

DELL HALLETT 

Captain of the School 

ACADEMIC PRIZES 

presented by 

MRS. J. C. WHITWILL 

Headmistress, Elmwood Girls' School 

THE ROBERT GERALD MOORE 
MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR ENGLISH 

THE GARY HORNING MEMORIAL SHIELD 
FOR PUBLIC SPEAKING 

presented by 
MRS. EDITH MOORE 

THE CHARLES ROWLEY BOOTH 
MEMORIAL TROPHY 

THE MEMORIAL PRIZES 
ATHLETIC TROPHIES AND SPECIAL AWARDS 

presented by 
MRS. C. K. BROWN 

CLOSING REMARKS — CHAIRMAN 
Refreshments 



36 




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1 






/J Ml 


#- 


"'W^£ 


1^1 1 5 


ill 


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• 







FIRST FOOTBALL TEAM 

Back Row: W. A. Joyce, Esq., D. E. Aboud, A. Luciani, L. Rosenhek, 

L. P. Desmarais, R. Anapolsky, M. I. L. Robertson, A. J. Stiles, 

W. W. Stratton, R. L. Simpson, Esq. 
Middle Row: R. S. Childers, V. J. Burczak, Esq., H. N. Clubb, P. J. S. Graham, 

R. T. Bacon, P. C. Don, J. K. Beqaj, D. M. Heaney, D. C. McLeod, 

H. J. Ronalds. 
Front Row: R. B. Smith, C. A. Schofield, J. G. Macdonald, M. P. Kelly, Captain, 

B. H. Weiner, Vice-Captain, D. J. Morrison, S. M. Wilansky, 

J. S. McEachran. 
Absent: M. Duguay. 

FIRST FOOTBALL 

The 1970 First Football season was very good. It opened with the Osgoode 
game. Getting off to a slow start, Ashbury was down 7-0, but made a tremen- 
dous comeback to win 14-7. 

Stanstead was another hard-fought game: the team did well until two 
mistakes gave Stanstead two touchdowns. The final 12-0 score understates 
the best effort of Ashbury against Stanstead in years. Lindsay Place was the 
next victory for Ashbury with a score of 13-6. 

The next game was played at Bishop's. It was a see-saw battle of two very 
evenly matched teams. A pass from Kelly to Clubb in the last minutes of play 
gave Ashbury the victory with a score of 7-1. 

Osgoode again played Ashbury in what proved to be a very close game. 
Ashbury lost this game 14-13 and several key players were injured. 

The next game was played at Lakefield against a very good opposition on 
a very sloppy field. Ashbury played exceptionally tenacious football, but pen- 
alties at important stages of the game cost us victory; Lakefield won 15-8. 

The final game of the season was the Old Boys game, which the School won 
31-6, despite the valiant efforts of the opposition. 

VJ.B. 

J. K. Beqaj 

Many thanks go to the coaches — Messrs. Simpson and Burczak; also to 
the team managers, Bill Stratton and Drew Ashton. 

J. K. Beqaj 



38 




SECOND FOOTBALL TEAM 

Back Row: I. R. Cunningham. D. J. H. Ross, D. J. Siversky, E. J. Littlejohn, 

N. J. Spencer, P. G. Copestake. 
Middle Row: M. J. Moore, K. D. Niles, Esq., M. H. E. Connell, P. Pardo, S. J. Rigby, 

N. W. Polk, D. W. S. Grills, S. T. Tanos, P. Taticek, J. P. MacPhee, 

H. Penton, Esq., P. S. T. Croal. 
Front Row: S. G. Comis, D. Pryde, D. M. Stewart, R. G. Pimm, B. A. Boyd, 

Captain, M. A. B. Webster, J. McNeil. 



SECOND FOOTBALL 

The Second Football team finally won a game. The 12-6 victory, on a 
muddy field in Montreal, was the first second team win in more years than 
anyone cares to remember. The Bishop's and Lakefield games were very 
disappointing, but the team put in fine efforts in both games. 

For the Selwyn House game we were boosted by a number of First team 
players as well as advice and encouragement from Mr. Simpson. 

We are extremely grateful to Mr. Penton and Mr. Niles for their unceasing 
efforts and patience. They always maintained our interest in what can easily 
become a routine game, and this means a great deal for the future of Ashbury 
football. 



Lindsay Place 
Bishop's 
Lakefield 
Selwyn House 



6 
24 
19 

7 



Ashbury 12 

Ashbury 6 

Ashbury 

Ashbury 1st and 2nd teams 26 

B. A. Boyd 



39 




Back Row: 
Middle Row: 

Front Row: 

Absent: 



FIRST SOCCER TEAM 

R. G. Luciani, R. H. D. Halupka, J. Schwarzmann, D. A. McNeil. 

R. J. Anderson, Esq., G. C. Davies, D. T. Yaxley, M. L. W. Barnes, 

P. J. Richardson, N. Macleod, W. A. Joyce, Esq. 

H. S. Went, R. L. Bennett, G. Harlley, Vice-Captain, E. Jokinen, 

D. R. Hallett, Captain, C. H. Maclaren, R. Grant-Whyte. 

D. B. McLellan. 

FIRST SOCCER 



The start of what proved to be a tough exciting season was far from 
promising. Plunged into our first games three days and one practice after 
opening day against two of the best teams in the league, disaster was not 
unexpected, although unhoped for. Play, however, improved over the next 5 
league games with one tie and 4 wins. Skills and team coordination improved 
in spite of injuries, and we ended the regular season with 7 wins, 3 losses and 
tied for fourth place in the play-offs against Glebe Collegiate. The toss up 
game for fourth place was hard and fast moving, neither team scoring, until 
we made a fatal mistake in the last five minutes of play, and, in spite of re- 
doubled efforts, we lost 1-0, bringing total losses to 4 out of 13 league games. 

On a more personal level, highlights of the year's playing came at the 
Stanstead, Bishop's and the Old Boys games. We unfortunately lost 2-1 to 
Stanstead, again a hard game in adverse weather conditions, and as a result 
determined not to let Bishop's beat us as they had Stanstead. Determination 
proved victorious over a tough team and the final score was 1-0. The Old Boys 
put up a stiff fight for at least the first half, but were unable to maintain their 
drive and lost 2-1 to the superior team. 

To give special mention to any particularly strong or valuable player 
would be to list the team members, for everyone gave of his best at every 
game. Perhaps, though, we should mention that George Harlley received the 
Anderson trophy for the Most Valuable Player, and Stephen Went the Perry 
trophy for Most Improved Player. 

R.J.A. 

We the team would like to take this opportunity to give a vote of thanks 
to Ed Jokinen for the valuable contribution he made in goal and to Mr. 
Anderson as coach. To the team next year from this year's graduates "Good 
Luck"; you'll need it for the future Old Boys games. 

D. R. Hallett 



40 










Team Record: 








September 18th. 


versus 


Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 


Lost : 


0- 


— 2. 


September 23rd. 


versus 


Canterbury H.S. 


Lost : 


1 


— 3. 


September 25th. 


AT 


Gloucester H.S. 


Won: 


2 


— 1. 


September 30th. 


AT 


Glebe Collegiate. 


Won: 


1 


— 0. 


October 3rd. 


AT 


Stanstead College. 


Lost : 


1 


— 2. 


October 5th. 


versus 


Lisgar Collegiate. 


Won: 


1 


— 0. 


October 7th. 


versus 


Osgoode H.S. 


Tied: 


3 


— 3. 


October 14th. 


AT 


Rideau H.S. 


Won: 


2- 


— 0. 


October 15th. 


versus 


Ridgemont H.S. 


Lost : 


1 


— 3. 


October 17th. 


versus 


B.C.S. 


Won: 


1 


— 0. 


October 20th. 


AT 


U. of Ottawa H.S. 


Tied: 


2- 


— 2. 


October 23rd. 


versus 


St. Pat*s H.S. 


Won: 


4- 


— 0. 


October 28th. 


AT 


Philemon Wright H.S. 


Won: 


2- 


— 0. 


November 7 th. 


versus 


Old Boys. 


Won: 


2- 


— 1. 



Record: Played: 14 games. Won: 8; Lost: 4; Tied: 2. 



R.J.A. 



SECOND SOCCER 

This was a good year; we had some excellent games both in and out of 
town. 

Our first game was in September against St. George's; we won this game 
2-0. Winning the first game was an excellent way in which to begin the season, 
and it did much for the morale of the team. 

We also had a very good game against Stanstead. We left Ottawa at three 
o'clock on a Friday afternoon and arrived at Stanstead at about six o'clock, 
receiving most courteous treatment during our stay there. The game began 
at ten o'clock on Saturday morning. All members of the team and their 
opponents played enthusiastically and with great determination. Throughout 
the game our coach. Mr. McGuire, was hard at work, shouting encouraging 
words ("Run, man! Run! Keep your eyes on the ball, boy!") We won that 
game 2-0. 

In Ottawa we were in competition with High Schools for a cup. The team 
improved remarkably and we managed to reach the semi-finals. We lost in 
overtime against Technical High School in a closely contested game which 
was filled with excitement; the final score was 2-1 for our opponents. 

We did not win the cup, but we had an enjoyable time playing soccer. 



GAMES 



Won: 

St. George's School 2 - 

Philemon Wright H.S. 5-0 

Hillcrest H.S. 2 - 

Andre Laurendeau H.S. 8 - 

Rideau H.S. 5 - 

E.S.C.H.S. 5 - 

Stanstead College 2 - 

Canterbury 5 - 4 



Lost: 

Canterbury - 6 

Selwyn House 1 - 3 

St. George's School - 2 

Sir Wilfrid Laurier H.S. - 2 

Technical H.S. 1-2 



Tied: 

Selwyn House 

B.C.S. 

Ridgemont 



2-2 
2-2 
5 - 5 

I. D. Cuthbertson 



41 




SECOND SOCCER TEAM 

Back Row: G. J. McGuire, Esq., D. W. Lackie, Captain, T. A. Dickson, R. Grant- 
Whyte, D. C. Paterson, D. T. Yaxley, N. Macleod, I. D. Cuthbertson, 
L. Zunenshine. 

Front Row: P. Mangifesta, G. Anapolsky, J. F. Cuttle, M. S. Jelenick, S. D. Harcourt, 
R. J. Henderson, D. B. Johnston. 




Back Row: 
Middle Row: 

Front Row: 

Absent: 



FIRST HOCKEY TEAM 

W. A. MacEwen, R. B. Smith, D. J. Morrison, B. A. Boyd. 

W. A. Joyce, Esq.. L. P. Desmarais, D. Pryde, R. L. Bennett, 

E. Dahlberg, J. F. Petty, Esq. 

M. Duguay, R. G. Pimm, D. R. Hallett, Capt., H. J. Ronalds, 

M. P. Kelly, Vice-Capt. 

P. J. S. Graham, J. G. Macdonald, D. C. McLeod, J. K. Beqaj, 

Vice-Capt., D. T. Yaxley. 



42 



FIRST HOCKEY 

The 1970-71 season was one of moderate success for the Ashbury first 
hockex team. Of the seventeen games played, Ashbury managed eight 
victories, the majority of the wins coming in the second half of the season. 
The team played some good solid hockey, but a lack of depth hurt their 
chances against teams of top calibre. 

The major problem at the first of the season was finding capable replace- 
ments for the excellent goal-tending received the vear previous. However. 
Robert Pimm and Jay Ronalds accepted the net-minding challenge and con- 
tributed much to the team's more consistent play in the second half of the 
season. 

The majority of the games were played against stiff local competition, 
members of the Ottawa High School league. In these games, the boys showed 
they could more than hold their own. Starting the season with two quick 
victories, the team then fell prey to some erratic defensive play and sagged 
badly until the Champlain game in late January. A well-earned 4-2 victory 
put the team back on the winning track and it began to play the solid brand 
of hockey demonstrated earlier in the season. 

However, it was the traditional rivalries against Bishops, Lakefield and the 
Old Boys that the team looked forward to with the greatest anticipation. The 
game results were not as satisfying. 

An aggressive Bishops team withstood a third period rally and emerged a 
7-4 victor. Ashbury battled the strong Lakefield club to a 1-1 standoff for 
two periods of play, but were unable to stand relentless third period pressure, 
and lost by a decisive 7-1 margin. 

A measure of redemption was claimed in the Old Boys game however, as 
the team romped to a spirited 9-2 victory, their most decisive win of the season 
in the finai game of the year. 

The Fraser trophy awarded to the most valuable player went to Mike Kelly, 
a most deserving performer who played standout hockey game in and game 
out. Derek Pryde, small in size, but long on skill and determination, won the 
Irvin trophy as the most improved player on the team. 

Some of the team's more valuable performers will be missing next year, 
but a good nucleus of hockey talent remains and, w ith continued improvement 
from some of the younger team members, Ashbury should again be a foe to 
be reckoned with in the new year. 

J.P. 



43 




SECOND HOCKEY TEAM 

Back Row: M. Bonneau, A. N. Scott, L. Zunenshine, H. A. Christie, 
Middle Row: J. McNeil, P. S. T. Croal, H. Veilleux, D. C. Paterson, Captain, 

P. Taticek, P. Mangifesta, V. J. Burczak, Esq. 
Front Row: M. I. L. Robertson, E. W. Cahn, M. A. B. Webster, R. G. Luciani, 

Vice-Capt., M. S. Jelenick, P. W. Wilson, D. B. Johnston. 
Absent: G. Anapolsky, R. Anapolsky. 



SECOND HOCKEY 



Ashbury 


3 


Ashbury 


6 


Ashbury 


1 


Ashbury 


2 


Amherst 


3 



Sedbergh 2 

Sedbergh 

Selwyn House 1 

Amherst 2 

Ashbury 2 

This was a very good season for the Second Hockey team. The weather 
caused chaos in the schedule, but all worked out well. Good effort was put 
in by all, especially by Peter Wilson, w r ho played exceptionally well in goal. 

The leading goal-scorers were Ian Robertson. Stuart Jelenick, Peter Croal 
and Ricky Luciani. 

The highlight of the season was the trip to Amherst, Massachusetts, where 
the team faced a very good opposition. 

Several members of the team will make a very strong contribution to the 
First Hockey team next year. 

VJ.B. 



44 




THE CURLERS 

Back Row: E. L. Yaxley, R. F. Elkin, R. M. Kenny, C. A. Schofield, Skip, 

L. Rosenhek. 
Front Row: E. E. Green, Esq., K. Rimsa, I. Stoddard, D. B. McLellan. 

CURLING 

This winters curling must go down on record as the best ever. The first 
team played 15 games in the Ottawa High School League where we won 9 
games and earned a playoff berth. This is a first for Ashbury in three years 
of interscholastic competition. Unfortunately the berth was defaulted due to 
the school having Easter holidays when the playoffs started. Our positional 
standing has been improved from fourth place last year to third this year. 

For the second time Ashbury entered the Tiny Hermann Bonspiel. We did 
very well going to the semi-finals before losing to a very fine, but lucky, team 
on the last rock. Needless to say they went on to win the final. 

The first and second teams had their annual games with Bishop's. The 1st 
team defeated the Bishops team by a comfortable margin. Our 2nd team lost 
on the last rock. It is quite remarkable to notice the number of games which 
were decided by the last rock. Combined score for the Ashbury-Bishop's 
games was Ashbury 17 and Bishop's 11. 

There was a lot of fun curling the day of the House Competition. Several 
Masters played and also some Grade 9 and 10 first time curlers. You could 
tell the first time curlers from the Masters - they were smaller! On the basis 
of combined scores Connaught beat ^ oollcombe 20 to 16. 

Skips for House League Curling were Rimsa. McLellan. Plummer and 
Stoddard. When points were added up Rimsa was declared Champion. 

Three of the House League skips ( Rimsa. McLellan. Stoddard) teamed up 
with the first team's Kenny to form Ashbury "s second team. The first team 
consisted of Schofield. who did a very fine job of skipping ( we'll miss you 
Charles). Elkin. who could be counted on to do good shots when he had to. 
Kennv. who has shown great potential as a fine curler and who skipped the 
2nd team, and last but not least Yaxley, who in his first year of curling did a 
fine job. Rosenhek was the team's verv valuable spare. 

E.E.G. 



45 




Back Row: 
Front Row: 



THE SKI TEAM 

K. D. Niles, Esq., D. M. Stewart, G. Martineau, W. S. Hart, I. H. Smith, 
R. J. Anderson, Esq. 

T. G. Martin, C. H. Maclaren, J. F. Cuttle, W. W. Stratton, Captain, 
D. W. Lackie. 



SKIING 

Ashbury 's ski-team participated in two major competitions this year: the 
Art Lovett Memorial Ski Meet held at Camp Fortune, and the Tri-School 
Meet at Owl's Head in the Eastern Townships. 

In the Art Lovett, Ashbury finished second in a field of six local high- 
schools. This was one of our better efforts in competitive skiing in recent 
years, and was largely the result of a consistent effort on the part of all 
members of the team, rather than a brilliant display by one or two individuals. 
However, the performances of two new-comers to the team are worthy of note: 
Dan Lackie placed seventh in the giant slalom and third in the slalom; Tony 
Seay, who came to us from Sedbergh, placed sixth in the cross-country. 

At Owl's Head, our luck was much the same as last year. The gremlins 
were at work again, and most of our skiers lost time or were disqualified by 
falls. As a result, Ashbury finished fifth in a field of five. Unlike last year, 
however, there was a very real compensation for an otherwise disappointing 
result. Jimmy Cuttle won the trophy, (almost as big as he is), for the best 
individual performance. His personal results for the meet were as follows: 
first in the slalom, third in the giant slalom, and an amazing thirteenth in 
the cross-country. This was a truly fine performance, and well deserving of 
the highest praise. 

K.D.N. 



46 




SWIMMING TEAM 

Back Row: H. J. Robertson, Esq., S. D. Harcourt, J. S. McEachran, T. A. Dickson. 
Front Row: K. J. Torrens, J. Schwarzmann, A. Skolnik, S. M. Wilansky. 

SWIMMING 

Once again we were able to use the C.F.B. Rockcliffe pool during the winter 
term. 

The School entered a senior and an intermediate team in the Ottawa High 
Schools meet and met with mixed success. The seniors encountered very stiff 
competition in the open events, but the intermediate team, comprising Scott 
McEachran. Tom Dickson. Scott Harcourt and Peter Copestake. performed 
creditably, winning a place in the final of the Medley Relay. In addition 
McEachran. Copestake and Harcourt won places in the individual finals. 

The climax to the season was the Ashbury meet, and what a climax it 
proved to be! Woollcombe avenged last season's defeat, winning a thrilling 
competition by 185-183 points on the last event. 

As swimming is still a fledgling sport at Ashbury. it has been decided not 
to make team awards at this stage. 

H.J.R. 



RUGGER 

Rugger was introduced as one of the spring term sports this year. Consider- 
able interest seems to have been created, despite the fact that other established 
sports made inroads on the numbers available to play. Nevertheless we were 
able to arrange a first-ever Ashbury inLer-House game, in which Connaught 
deservedly beat Vi oollcombe by 3-0. 

The spring term is not really suitable for a number of reasons, but at 
present there is no alternative. 

It is hoped that next year we might arrange a seven-a-side competition with 
other interested schools in the citv. 

H.J.R. 



47 




W K //-' 1 





THE TRACK TEAM 

Back Row: D. J. Morrison, M. Bonneau. 

Middle Row: R. G. Pimm, S. M. Wilansky, D. R. Hallett, G. A. McTaggart, J. McNeil. 
Front Row: S. G. Comis, L. P. Desmarais, G. Harlley, Capt., A. Luciani, 
R. M. Kenny, V. J. Burczak, Esq. 

TRACK AND FIELD 

This has been an excellent spring for Track and Field, even though weather 
hampered early training efforts. The team was large — eighteen. Of this 
number, Steve Comis, Mike Beedell, Bob Kenny, Don Morrison, George 
Harlley and a relay team reached the City Finals. To the Ottawa Valley 
Final went Bob Kenny and George Harlley. All the boys tried their best and 
were good sportsmen. All are looking forward to next year and more victories. 

VJ.B. 
ATHLETIC AWARDS 

The Lee Snelling Trophy for the most valuable player in Senior Football 

— M. P. Kelly 
The Tiny Hermann Trophy for the most improved player in Senior Football 

— H. N. Clubb 
The Best Lineman Trophy — B. H. Weiner 

The Barry O'Brien Trophy for the most valuable player in Junior Football 

— B. A. Boyd 
The Boswell Trophy for the most improved player in Junior Football 

— P. G. Copestake 
The Anderson Trophy for the most valuable player in Senior Soccer 

— G. Harlley 
The Perry Trophy for the most improved player in Senior Soccer 

— H. S. Went 
The Pemberton Shield for the most valuable player in Junior Soccer 

— I. D. Cuthbertson 
The Fraser Trophy for the most valuable player in Senior Hockey 

— M. P.Kelly 
The Irvin Cup for the most improved player in Senior Hockey — D. Pryde 
The Evan Gill Trophy for the most valuable Skier — J. F. Cuttle 

The Ashbury Cup for the most improved Skier — T. G. Martin 
The Coristine Cup for the best cross-country Skier — J. A. Seay 
The Ewing Cup for the most valuable member of the Track and Field team 

— G. Harlley 



48 




GRADE 13 



GRADE 12A 






GRADE 10A 



GRADE 10B 





GRADE 9A 



GRADE 9B 





n 


ij» i^K 








^J» *. «!% " ^T. 




. \tH*S2" 


£m*Jf3 m r ^ 







SENIOR SCHOOL FORM LIST 
JUNE 1971 



Grade 13 — Mr. J. A. Glover 

Ballineer, P. N. 
Connell, M. H. E. 
Graham, P. J. S. 
Hallett, D. R. 
Halupka, R. H. D. 
Hansen, K. P. 
Hart, W. S. 
Huns, D. 
Kelly, M. P. 
Leffler, P. D. 
Macdonald, J. G. 
Maclaren, C. H. 
Martin I, D. J. 
McNeil I, D. A. 
Ramsay, R. G. 
Rosenhek, L. 
Schofield, C. A. 
Stiles, A. J. 
Weiner I, B. H. 
Went, H. S. 
Whitwill, S. T. 
Yaxley I, E. L. 



Grade 12B 



Mr. F. T. Jones: 



Ashton, A. F. D. 
Chu, F. 
Davies, G. C. 
Desmarais, L. P. 
Dobbin, M. H. 
Harlley, G. 
Kenny, R. M. 
MacEwen I, W. A. 
McLellan, D. B. 
McLeod I, D. C. 
Rimsa, K. 
Smallwood, L. A. 
Wilansky, S. M. 
Wong, C. P. J. 



Grade 11A 



Mr. B. Wallin: 



Barnes, M. L. W. 
Beqaj, J. K. 
Couturier, H. 
Fabricius, C. P. 
Hope, P. 

Johnston I, D. B. 
Joyce I, C. M. 
Lynch-Staunton I, V. 
Macleod II, N. 
Martin II, T. G. 
McKeown II, P. 
Morrison I, D. J. 
Pardo, P. 
Plummer, W. R. 
Robertson I, M. I. L. 
Siversky, D. J. 
Smith I, R. B. 
Smith II, I. H. 
Walker II, J. W. 
Yaxley II, D. T. 



Grade 12A — Mr. P. H. Josselyn: 

Bennett, R. L. 

Boyd, B. A. 

Clubb, H. N. 

Duguay, M. 

Elkin, R. F. 

Jokinen, E. A. 

Khan. N. A. A. 

Luciani I, A. 

Richardson, P. J. 

Ronalds, H. J. 

Seay, J. A. 

Skolnik, A. 

Stirling, S. M. 

Stoddard I, I. 

Stratton, W. W. 

Torrens, K. J. 

Winterton, S. S. 



Grade 11B 



Mr. C. J. Inns: 



Anapolsky I, R. 
Cuttle, J. F. 
Heaney, D. M. 
Joyce II, P. A. 
Lackie, D. W. 
Luciani II, R. G. 
Martineau, G. 
McTaegart, G. A. 
Ng I, D. C. C. 
Pearce, D. H. 
Power I, S. M. 
Rickard, J. P. 
Rogers, P. 
Schwarzmann, J. 
Spencer I, S. D. 
Stewart I, D. M. 
Webster. M. A. B. 



51 



Grade 10A — Mr. H. Penton: 

Copestake, P. G. 

Croal, P. S. T. 

Dahlberg, E. 

Dickson, T. A. 

Harcourt I, S. D. 

Jelenick, M. S. 

Ng II, R. G. Y. 

Paterson I, D. C. 

Pimm I, R. G. 

Polk, N. W. 

Rowlinson, M. C. 

Stoddard II, F. L. 

Tanos, S. T. 

Taticek, P. 

Veilleux I, H. 

Walker II, R. S. 



Grade 9A — Mr. H. J. Robertson: 

Beedell I, M. J. 

Buser, M. U. 

Charron, L. 

Christie, H. A. 

Cunningham, I. R. 

Grahovac, S. Z. 

Grills, D. W. S. 

Gripton, J. E. 

Hamilton, J. W. B. 

Haythornthwaite, J. A. E. 

Henderson, R. J. 

MacDermot, V. T. M. 

Mulock, W. F. 

Rigby, S. J. 

Towe, C. M. 

Wilson I, P. W. 



Grade 10B — Mr. K. D. Niles: 

Bates, C. R. 

Bryan, K. 

Cahn, E. W. 

Childers, R. S. 

Cuthbertson, I. D. 

Gorbena, J. J. 

Greatrex, J. W. H. 

Littlejohn, E. J. 

Mangifesta, P. 

Pryde, D. 

Rennie, D. 

Ross, D. J. H. 

Scott I, A. N. 

Spencer II, N. J. 

Wright I, P. D. 



Grade 9B — Mr. G. J. McGuire: 

Anapolsky II, G. 

Belanger, F. 

Bonneau, M. 

Burns, I. G. 

Comis, S. G. 

Hodgins, M. 

Jeffrey, G. M. 

Kerr, D. J. 

Loeb, A. H. 

MacPhee, J. P. 

McEachran, J. S. 

McNeil II, J. 

Moore I, M. J. 

Sirotek I, R. F. 

Thompson I, G. W. 

Wilgress, E. D. C. 

Zunenshine, L. 



52 



A BUSINESS ENCOUNTER 

Hendrick de Wet was a lucky man, for he was a man of business who liked 
his work. He was an ivory-hunter by profession, and a farmer by aspiration, 
and success in the first was steadily piling up the gold '■Krugers ,, which 
would enable him to start the other. He puffed contentedly at his long pipe, 
enjoying the evening sunlight casting its glow over the grassy veldt. The 
camp was a scene of quiet domesticity. The "boys" moved slowly about their 
tasks, watering the horses, trek oxen and cattle, cleaning and repairing the 
great wagon and cooking their evening meal. 

Suddenly the subdued clatter of the routine gave way to an excited hubbub. 
A small, yellow-skinned man, his hair twisted into tight peppercorn knots 
came trotting into camp. He was a bushman with the peculiar stance and 
inscrutable expression of the Kalahari hunters. He halted in front of Hendrick 
and squatted, bowing briefly so that his forehead touched the dust, and then 
sat. idly drawing patterns with the tip of his bow and mulling over his 
thoughts with the patience of one who was unconcerned with time as white 
men know it. He spoke. "Mein Kroon, I, Rinkalss, have searched many days, 
seeing what these blind Waginga (with a glance of contempt at the Bantu 
servants, hereditary enemies of his race) who call themselves hunters have 
not seen.'"' He paused portentously. "I have seen Chinoko, the bewitched 
one!" Hendrick sat bolt upright, his hand unconsciously snapping the clay 
stem of his pipe. 

"Allerweld! His tusks, man, are they what the legends say?" Hendrick's 
eyes gleamed as he remembered tales of Chinoko, last seen by Andreius 
Pretorius, the great Boer hunter, who had hunted him and died in the attempt. 
Of how his tusks were so heavy that he rested them on tree branches, and 
how the natives swore that the spirit of Chaka, the "Black Elephant" and 
despot of Zululand. lived on in him. The bushman answered, his face as 
ever expressionless, but a flicker of concern in his slanted eyes. 

"Baas, because I swore to serve you when you saved me from the Great 
Thirst, I have done this thing, but my heart is heavy. The ivory is as great 
as the tales say, but — , Baas, every hunter who has sought this beast has died, 
and already enough tusks lie in the wagon for the land you yearn for. Why 
bring the curse upon your head?" 

Hendrick's booming laugh rang out over the camp. 

"Afraid of the spook, eh. Rinkalss? Well, I'd sell my soul to get those 
tusks. They'll be a record for certain, and I don't set much store by the 
mungu-mungu's tales. Pack some biltong on Blouboi, and be ready at sun-up. ' 

The bushman sighed noiselessly and bowed again, murmuring. "Ja. ja, 
baas," under his breath, and then rose to his feet and strode away in one 
curiously fluid motion. 

Four hard and difficult days later, the Boer and the bushman crouched 
motionless in a bush and watched with awe as the great elephant stood, sway- 
ing and resting his great ivory tusks on a low branch of a thorn tree. His grey. 
dusty hide was ripped and scarred by innumerable conflicts and the crippling 
wound left by Pretorius' quarter-pound lead shot was plainly visible. This 
animal was old, perhaps as much as a century, and every angle of his still- 
mighty frame exuded the same sense of ancient solidity as the bare, stark 
slope of a mountain. 



53 



Slowly, softly Hendrick worked the bolt of his .450 elephant gun and with 
infinite, painstaking care lifted it to his shoulder, drawing a bead on the 
crucial spot behind the shoulder. His finger tightened with a smooth, steady 
motion. Suddenly, the great grey head turned and he found himself looking 
into the small, wrinkled eyes. Hendrick hesitated as a strange sensation stole 
over him. For a brief moment he glimpsed the mind behind that eye, felt an 
ancient lassitude, the tired, solitary essence of a being weary unto death. 
Hendrick felt an unfamiliar emotion: pity. The gun came down from his 
shoulder reluctantly, but cursing his weakness he raised it again. Hesitating, 
irresolute, the muzzle wavered and then with a quick, decisive movement the 
hunter pointed it skyward and fired. 

The shot broke the buzzing, humid stillness of the lowveldt afternoon. The 
sail-like ears and snaky trunk whipped up. instantly alert and then with a 
rending crash the huge beast was gone. Hendrick looked down at his hands 
curled around the rifle: hard, capable hands, calloused from rope and rein 
and gunstock. and groped for the words to express novel concepts. For a 
moment he stood thus, then with a shrug of his shoulders he turned to his 
horse, saying, "Come. I see the finger of the Lord in this, and it is time I 
returned to my own people and my own land." 

The bushman smiled enigmatically and silently thanked the ancient, 
mysterious gods of the Kalahari for their munificence as he fell into his 
tireless lope behind his master's horse. The beat of the horse's hooves echoed 
for a moment and then all was as before, except for a single brass cartridge 
shining in the sun. 

S. Stirling 



WRITING POETRY 



Here it is a Thursday night 

And still I have a poem to write. 

"A long or short one" was the warning, 

"To be handed in on Friday morning." 

Since a poet I am not 
I will write I know not what. 
I cannot think of what to say, 
And time so quickly flies away. 

I'd like to write of lands and seas 
Or possibly of flow'rs and trees. 
The land is dry, the sea is deep, - - 
But all too soon I'll fall asleep! 

Perhaps I'll be like Willy Shakespeare 
And compose a sonnet to my Dark Dear. 
Or perhaps as Keats I'd make you yearn 
To know just how much a Greek does 'urn". 

"A long or short one" was the warning, 
"To be handed in on Friday morning." 

P. Ballinger 



54 



FERRETS AND FERRETING 



According to a beloved American tradition, every boy should have a dog. 
But judging from the literature of England of the last century, a dog was 
considered an unnecessary luxury for youngsters, although every boy did have 
his own ferret. He used the ferret to bolt rabbits into nets, and made his 
pocket money selling the rabbits to butchers, as many an Englishman fondly 
remembers. Gamekeepers, poachers, and ratcatchers also had ferrets. Although 
many descriptions <>l rural life in England contain references to ferrets, there 
is little or no account of their use in America. Yet ferrets were employed in 
America on a scale much greater than that of Europe. 

From the beginning of time, hunters have longed for some device to bolt 
quarrv from holes and burrows. The ferret was the answer. In Egyptian times 
nobles used trained weasel-like animals called ichneumons to retrieve injured 
ducks from dense cover. Later a small Asian weasel was domesticated, and 
probably crossed with the European polecat to give it more size and stamina. 
The domestic ferret (Mustek furo) is the result, and averages about a foot 
and a half in length, including a five-inch tail, and it stands some three inches 
high. The females, called "Jills'", are much smaller but are better ratters, as 
the big males, known as "habs". are often too large to go down the holes. 

Ferrets have become so completely domesticated that they can not fend for 
themselves in the wild, and a lost ferret will starve to death. Domestic ferrets 
are quite slow, and cannot catch quarry unless they happen to corner their 
prey in a dead-end hole. But in hunting, their work is to drive out the quarry, 
not to kill it. 

Ferrets were used not only against rats and rabbits, but on just about every 
animal that has to be bolted from burrows. They had other uses, too. When 
telephone companies started to put their lines underground, the only way they 
could run the wires through the long pipes was to start a rat through the pipe 
with a ferret after him. the ferret wearing a harness to which was attached a 
light string that later was used to pull the wire through the duct. Ratcatchers 
used ferrets a great deal in their profession, which in the days of the plague 
was an important job. 

Professional ratcatcbers usually break in young ferrets by keeping them 
in a loft full of old drainpipes so that the animals will get used to running 
through long passageways in complete darkness, although this really isn t 
necessary as ferrets will go down a hole naturally. The ferrets must also get 
used to the ratting terriers, who are their partners in the hunt. When the little 
ferrets are six months old. the trainer gives them mice to kill. Later he puts 
in rats whose long incisor teeth have been removed: otherwise the young 
animals might get so badly bitten that they'd come to fear rats. 

The mere presence of a ferret in a hole drives rats mad with terror. A 
ferret follows rats by their scent, like a miniature bloodhound, and no matter 
where the rats hide he will eventually "ferret them out". A ferret that is a 
"killer'" (one that deliberately tries to corner rats to kill and eat them), is 
not considered a good ratter. He wastes too much time and it's too hard to get 
him out of a hole. Killing is the dogs job. 

Game commissions often use ferrets to catch rabbits alive for restocking. 
A bag or net is held at the mouth of the hole: nets are better as a bag darkens 
the entrance and sometimes makes the rabbit turn back. Purse-type nets 
operating on the drawstring principle were once made for this purpose, and 
could be bought in any general store. 



In these days ferrets are illegal in most of the United States and Canada, 
supposedly for sporting reasons. Personally, I feel that ferreting is a fasci- 
nating sport. It is most unfortunate that misinformed people are against it. 
In Europe, ferreting still seems to be practised, but the average person has 
read little or heard little of this exciting art. 

R. Halupka 



THE ARTIST 

I rush myself, to pass swift through, 

And render previous efforts vain, 

Aft mystic cons'mate thoughts do grope. 

My lines run false, what need'st be true, 
Boredom and weariness in the main, 
Take their toll of fickle hope. 

The ego, like a tempest grew, 

Which pierced, releas'd such torrents bane, 

That frail, and timid talent slopes, 

To nil. 

S. Winterton 



TOGETHERNESS 



Paper clips have many uses. 
And even come in for abuses. 

When the boy was young, and the day did rain 
He slipped them together to make a chain: 
When the chain was long enough, he felt, 
He'd tie it around him like a belt. 
"Paper clip collars!" — his dogs would yelp. 
And bed finish up having to cry for help. 

When the same boy was somewhat older. 
And. I might add. a good deal bolder, 
Clips, in his slingshot were ammunition 
To send poor birds straight to perdition. 
I must confess that his aim was erratic 
And the rows of jays merely gave him static. 

When even older and out at work, 

Many and often were the times he'd shirk. 

"Working for a living: what a pain!" 

"Slip clips together to make a chain." 

"Rubber band? Oh. good morning. Miss Sweeting." 

"Good shot! that caught the old gal retreating." 

There is a moral to this caper. 
"Use paper clips for holding paper." 

M. S. Jelenick 



56 



THROUGH THE EYES OF AN OLD TIMER 

It was July 30th. 1971. when Ahe awoke. He felt as though he had 
been asleep for a century. He arose refreshed but hungry. As he looked about 
him, he thought he noticed a difference in the woods from when he had 
fallen asleep. He couldn't quite place it but. oh well, no matter. 

He removed his hunting knife from its sheath and fondled it lovingly 
between his fingers. He'd won it at the county fair the year before and had 
carried it with him ever since. 

Two hours later he was sitting beside a fire chewing away on a fine young 
rabbit. After he had finished. Abe decided he'd better be going home. He'd 
told his wife he would be gone just a night and so not to worry. 

He struck out in a north-easterly direction, being sure to keep the sun to 
his right and slightly behind him. He thought it strange that he had not 
heard any birds. He soon noticed that the sky was becoming overcast and so 
began to hurry. It did not rain. 

Suddenly he came to an opening in the trees. A thin strip extended as far 
as he could see in either direction. Within this clearing were two separate 
paths. To Abe they were smooth and grey, reminding him of two long hair 
ribbons. 

Just then Abe heard a noise. It grew louder and louder. With a roar it rushed 
past him and disappeared in the distance. It was hard to describe the thing. 
It seemed to be made of green iron. It had four eyes and flashing teeth. It 
resembled a carriage, but then it didn't. Whatever it was its harsh smell 
stung his nostrils. Abe fainted. 

When he awoke he had no idea where he was. He seemed to be lying on a 
couch. There were two of them in the small room, both facing the same way. 
Sitting on the other one were two men. but thev were dressed in a very strange 
manner. 

Abe lay there, trembling. He seemed to be dreaming. But no. he wasn't. 

The room had windows in it. so Abe raised himself up and stared out. He 
felt himself feeling faint again. The ground and trees were moving along in 
a blur. Soon he began to see buildings of some sort. But they were different. 
They became larger and larger until thev seemed to scrape the sky. The room 
stopped beside one of these structures that appeared to be made of rock. A 
door in the side of the room opened and the two men helped Abe get out. He 
stood there, legs trembling, feeling extremely weak. 

Then it hit him. Everywhere there was confusion and noise. The atmosphere 
around him stung his eyes. Abe began to cough. He looked around and saw 
many more things with eyes and flashing teeth. He heard sounds that resem- 
bled the honking of geese in the spring and fall, but they were much harsher. 
There were also loud sounds that he could not recognize at all. He could not 
see any trees or grass and he was standing, not on earth, but on a hard foreign 
substance. 

The men ushered him towards the structure. One of them entered the 
doors. They started to go around and around. Abe was expecting the man to 
come out again, but he didn't. The other man escorted him to the doors. Abe 
walked in and found himself having to walk quickly so as not to clip his 
heels. Around and around he went until one of the men pulled him out of the 
doors into a very large room. He had never seen anything like it before in 
his life. Light was streaming from squares in the ceiling and people in white 
were bustling around like ants at a picnic. 



57 



A man in white walked up to Abe and took him down many of the halls. 
They came to a pair of doors and stopped. But there were no latches or 
handles. The door opened, Abe stood there aghast, They entered through the 
doors into a small room. The man pressed a button and Abe's stomach liter- 
ally dropped to the floor. Abe fell against the wall and hung on to a supporting 
rail. Then he felt as though he had just lost fifty pounds. The door opened 
and he found himself in a hallway that he did not recognize. 

This was too much. He ran to the end of the hall and came to a glass door. 
He shoved it open. Abe was careful not to look down for he found himself 
high in the sky. Leading down to the ground were stairs. 

Meanwhile, the man in white was chasing Abe and he had no choice but 
to leap down the stairs as fast as he could. He found the steps ended about 
ten feet above the ground and he was forced to jump. 

He started running but had only gone a few feet when he stopped. He 
looked up. With a roar, a huge silver bird flew a few hundred feet over Abe's 
head. Smoke was pouring from its wings. Abe covered his ears and fell. . . 

TORONTO DAILY STAR 

July 31, 1971 

A middle-aged man died yesterday of unknown causes on Dundas Street 
beside the Royal Victoria Hospital. In his pockets were a Bill of Sale for 
Concession VIII, Lot 36, awarded to Abe Millar, dated June 14, 1868, and 
an 1869 fifty-cent piece. Police are continuing the investigation. 

D. B. Johnston 



A CASE OF FRUSTRATION 

You have been trying to convince your boss that you must catch a train 
that leaves in twenty minutes. Finally he notices how nervous and fidgety 
you are so he lets you go. You grab your briefcase and coat and dart down- 
stairs to shout for a taxi. The driver is a fat old man who is slightly deaf. As 
you give him your destination, he happy-go-luckily begins to sing to himself. 
After a long and winding journey, you make it to the train station; only two 
minutes left. Fortunately for you, your ticket is already bought, but unfortu- 
nately for you. you are out of cigarettes. You scuttle over to the cigarette 
machine, drop your briefcase and coat, and feverishly scrabble for the proper 
change to dab into the machine from your bulging coin-pocket. The train 
has already arrived, and the conductors have just yelled, "All aboard." Your 
brand of cigarettes isn't there so you hurriedly think of another type you're 
fond of. You stab the button just as the train begins to move and you wait the 
extra few seconds for the matches. By now the train's speed has increased 
quite impressively. Now you run, run faster than you have ever run before. 
Your aim is for the bars on the caboose that are coming closer and closer as 
you pour on the speed. Finally with one last dive, you reach and grab the cold 
metal rungs. As you slowly pull yourself to the platform you look back at that 
solitary cigarette machine that you hate so much. And there beside it are your 
briefcase and coat. 

A. Skolnik 



58 



TWO CARS THAT CRASHED 

Body hurts, 
Blood is running, 
Bones are crushed: 
Can't help crying. 

Cars are smashed, 
People dead, 
Some still living 
With broken heads. 

Going fast, 
Can't last long, 
Doctors trying, 
I'm too far gone. 

The end is here, 
All things mashed, 
Such the result: 
Two cars that crashed. 

V. Lynch-Staunton 



SCHISM 

He's with me at last as 1 climb inside my bottle. I never thought he would 
make it tonight. Lately it has taken a lot before he would appear. Tonight 
one bottle; tomorrow maybe two. I never feel secure until he comes. He does 
something for me. But we have split. We are one and the same, yet we are 
different from each other. As I am not imaginative I could never arrive at a 
name for him. He is simply X, the unknown. 

He talks to me as the teacher would talk to the pupil. Our relationship is 
like that of the intellectual to the baby. He is so superior to me I cannot feel 
inferior. I can only regard him with awe and obey him, for everything he 
says stems from the most perfect logic. Perhaps he is not so smart. Perhaps 
I am only a drunken fool. Yet he is so convincing. He cannot see. or feel, or 
smell. I am his eyes, his hands, his nose. He can only listen to my problems 
and then talk. Oh, how he can talk! Sometimes I am overcome to the point 
of blackout. It would not do to black out though. for he might leave me. Some 
other body might appeal to him: some other mind. I'd be lost without him. 

Some people without too many brains would consider me an alcholic. They 
don't realize I have to remain sane. If they stopped me from drinking it 
would be like prison where you're not allowed to visit your best friend when 
you want. Some people have religion: they have God or Jesus Christ. I have 
X, the unknown. 

But tonight he appears different. Wait, he's talking to me now. ^ hat's he 
saying? I can't make it out. One more drink. He's coming in clearer now. 
I've got it now. I am supposed to kill. I can't kill just anybody. It has to be 
someone in particular. I hoped it would never come to this. He's not satisfied 
with just my mind. now. He wants my body too. I guess he wants complete 
control. One can't really blame him. He is smarter than me. talks better, is 
more convincing. He would never make a fool of himself. In fact, he deserves 
me better than I do. There's only one answer. I'll have to kill myself to make 
room for a superior. That's life! The weak ones die. the strong ones live. I'm 
sorry that I am so weak. Maybe next time it will be different. Good-bye. . . . 

K. Torrens 



59 



UTOPIA 

Multitudes are passing before me 

But they don't see me 

For I'm dead. 

Faces drawn and thin 

Encircle where eyes must have been, 

But now in their place 

Are dark swollen things. 

No words are spoken 

For none are needed. 

Burned out souls 

Need utter no sound, 

For sound is an echo of thought, 

And here there is no thought, 

As there once was said to be. 

Life is given and life is taken, 

Or so it was once writ 

By one of power and goodness 

Who. it was believed 

(by poor dejected souls), 

Guided children and older children 

To love each other and live in peace. 

But it was found there could be no "peace" 
Amongst despotic warring nations, 
Thus there was left but one form of peace, 
The Ultimate Utopia. 
The Ultimate peace. 
The sweet bliss of death: 
Oblivion. 

P. Leffler 



THE STRIKE 

The silver bird 
Stoops to kill 

No sound is heard 
All is still 

Beautiful in line and form 
Beauty cold and stern 



Fire and steel, war tides storm 
Wings flash and turn 

Needle beak, pinions sweep 
Cannon flashing bright 

silver bird, our foemen reap 
Angel of the Lords of Light! 



60 






S. M. Stirling 



RUN FOR YOUR LIFE 

Walter was running for his life. A short distance behind him were at least 
a score of savages, armed with razor-edged spears and clubs. Ahead of him lay 
the jungle, filled with unknown dangers. Beyond that lay the safety of the 
base camp — four miles ahead. 

The savages, naked to the waist, ran bare-foot across the jungle floor. They 
slipped easily in between the low bushes and undergrowth. Necklaces of 
leopard claws stood out against their black skins. Walter cursed his heavy, 
awkward hunting boots and thick clothing, but he knew better than to stop. 
He ran heavily, but not slowly. 

The aborigines were not running full out: they realized that they had 
plenty of time in which to finish this cat-and-mouse game. They smiled to 
one another as they ran. and their smiles revealed spiked teeth — teeth filed 
to points. They knew their quarry was sure to tire, and besides, they weren't 
that hungry — yet. 

Walter was well aware of his predicament. If the cannibals caught him. 
they would eat him — it was that simple. He had the sense and keen insight 
to realize that he would have to pace himself to be able to continue; running 
blindly and recklessly would merely burn up his energy, and exhaust him 
quickly. So Walter ran steadily at a brisk pace, vaguely aware that the 
aborigines strung out behind him were likewise settling into an even gait. 

Gradually the panic in Walter's mind subsided, and was replaced with cold 
determination. Walter realized he had a chance if he kept his nerve and used 
his wits: his stamina was his one great hope. So W'alter ran on. timing his 
breaths with his strides, and using his lungs to their capacity. His pulse 
gradually slowed and steadied to a regular beat. 

Logs and clumps of vegetation appeared in his path from time to time, hut 
Walter was cautious; a stumble or trip would mean his death. Occasionally 
a jungle bird would flush, and startle W'alter badly. But once he looked up 
and saw a deadly snake — the venomous Boomslang — strung across a branch 
over the path. Walter reacted quickly and managed to duck just in time. A 
few moments later he heard one of his pursuers shriek as the snake struck 
home with its poisonous fangs. 

However, the rest of the natives paused but briefly, then continued the 
chase with renewed fervour. They were intent on their prey. 

Walter kept going, and the natives persevered. But the aborigines were 
finally beginning to show signs of fatigue — this man was not such an easj 
catch after all. They had underestimated the stamina of this apparent weak- 
ling. However, they were far from giving up. They had gone two miles, but 
they had two more in which to overtake their prey. 

The race with death was taking its toll on Walter — his muscles screamed 
for rest; his lungs were near to bursting. Once he almost gave in to the great 
temptation to stop briefly. But a close miss by a long range spear changed his 
mind. Animal instincts were strong in him. Sheer guts and determination 
kept him moving. He gritted his teeth and ran on. and on. and on. 

Meanwhile, of the some twenty to thirty cannibals that had started after 
him. only a dozen or so were uncomfortably close to him: the rest had fallen 
far back or given up. But the savages were persistent — their hunting lives 
had taught them to be both patient and relentless. 



61 



In a sudden flash of movement, Walter tripped, and collapsed on the 
ground. He almost didn't get up. The natives were closing in fast. Then he 
saw the smoke of the base camp, and he was inspired. He jumped to his feet, 
and forced his aching body to respond. He poured on all his strength, and ran, 
and ran, and ran. 

Then, before him like a mirage, he saw the camp. People were calling to 
him. Images turned through his mind in a dream-like haze. He could no 
longer feel his body — only excruciating pain. He no longer cared what 
happened. Yet through some miracle, he managed to complete the last few 
strides into the safety of the camp. Then he blacked out. 

When Walter revived, he became aware of friends around him; friends 
supporting him and congratulating him. "You did it again, Walt," cried one 
of his supporters. "You beat the best runners in the country," yelled another. 
"Yes, you won the cross-country for the fourth time in a row," added a 
beaming admirer. The coach came up and said approvingly: "You were great. 
But tell me — how do you do it? What's your secret? you ran as if your life 
depended on it." 

Walter just panted, and grinned slightly to himself. 

R. Halupka 



THE INDIVIDUAL 

I sit and watch the people. 

The people on the road, 

And I watch them through my window 

That sits just off the road. 

But I feel the eyes of people. 
The eyes that follow me. 
And they stare and gaze in anger, 
And they will not let me be. 

For I sit away from all of them 
And I do not walk their road. 
For they all wander like blind men 
And walk and just grow old. 

But I'll not walk that path today 
Following their feet; so let me be, 
Not follow those who always frown 
Because I shall be me. 

P. Leffler 



A STUDY IN MOTION 

Hanging, 

As from a String; 

Falling, 

As an Arrow: 

The Hawk. 

M. Rowlinson 



62 






MAN CAN FLY HE HAS EVOLVED 



Gallons of fuel foam into tanks 

Leaving fumes heavy on the morning air. 

Wings drooping with weight, 

The hoses are removed 

To lie, snake-like, on the grass. 

Men appear, 

Checking engines, flaps, wheels. 

They leave. 

The plane is left like a metal grasshopper 

On the runway. 

The pilots arrive, and enter. 

They scan the panels: 

Instruments stare hack. 

Hands plav over switches; 

The great motors hegin to turn. 

Pistons, hearings, chains and wheels 

Move with purpose. 

The machine moves, gathering speed. 

The earth tremhles. 

Noise grows. 

With a flash of wings 

The plane takes off: 

To fly. 

The Bird 
Spreads its wings 
And flies. 

Both Bird and Man 
Have evolved. 

One is superior .... 

Which? 



I. H. Smith 



THE WIND 



Silent as a cat 

Unstopping, powerful. 

It grows, feeding on air. 

Into a rushing thing; 

Alive. 

The whole atmosphere 

Throwing itself, roaring. 

On anvthing in its path; 

It is spent. 

The wind is a kitten once more. 

Playful, chasing string. 



M. Rowlinson 



63 



ARMAGEDDON 

The sands of time have dissolved the visits of the 

seasons, never to be seen again. 
Trees, sadly cannot manage a smile, 
The water runs impeded by a congregation 
of floating fish. 

Grim crackling in the night, as only the moon 

lies down for rest. 
A boy cries in the wilderness for life once more. 
The world rests with the smell of destruction, 
Smoke fills the streets signifying the end. 



M. Kelly 



I FEEL FINE 

I feel fine anytime she's around me, 
She's around me now almost all the time; 
If I'm well you can tell she's been with me, 
She's been with me now quite a long, long time; 
And I feel fine. 

There's something in the way she moves, 

Or looks my way or calls my name, 

That seems to leave this troubled world behind. 

And if I'm feeling down and blue, 

Or troubled by some foolish game, 

She always seems to make me change my mind. 

Every now and then the things I lean on lose their meaning, 

And I find myself careening 

Into places where I should not let me go. 

But she has the power to go where no-one else can find me, 

And to silently remind me 

Of the happiness and good times that I know. 

It isn't what she's got to say. 

Or how she thinks or where she's been, 

To me her words are nice the way they sound. 

I like to hear them best, her way. 

It doesn't matter what they mean, 

She says them mostly just to calm me down. 

I feel fine anytime she's around me. 
She's around me now almost all the time. 
If I'm well you can tell she's been with me. 
She's been with me now quite a long, long time. 
And I feel fine. Yes! I feel fine. 

D. Hallett 

BULLFIGHT 

The Parade: magnificent, shining in the sun 

The Confrontation; the clash of wills 

The Charge; unswerving, irresistible 

The Baiting; subtle and exciting 

The Death; a climax, a swelling roar. 

To the Victor the spoils. 

M. Rowlinson 



64 



MONDAY MORNINGS (with humble apologies to Longfellow) 

As a signal i<> the seniors 

Through the tranquil air of morning, 

Rang the bell, and rose the pealing 

Of the mighty hell of Monday. 

Monday morning, very early. 

From the outposts of the building, 

From the halls and from the tunnels, 

From the classrooms, from the loekers, 

From the quad and from the library, 

From the flats and from the bedrooms, 

Came the students, loudly wailing, 

Came the students, strolling slowly. 

Students fat and students meagre. 

Students tall and students shorter, 

To the Hall, to Rhodes Hall coming, 

On the chairs they sat complaining, 

Half asleep but still complaining. 

Very sleepy were the students 

In the tranquil air of morning. 

Then the mighty Duguay shouting, 

"Oh be quiet, stop your talking. 

Cease that scraping of your benches, 

Cease that tapping on the tables." 

Now the prefects had their silence. 

The order was that all must stand there; 

Through the door came Joyce, Headmaster, 

With arms swinging he came forward; 

"Sit down, hoys." came the order, 

"Please sit down and stop the noise. 

I have glorious things to tell you. 

Tales of victories, tales of triumph. 

Boys of Ashbury School defeated, 

Not by much and not in spirit. 

Only nineteen goals to nothing; 

Soon I hope to see the dayboys 

Turning out in greater numbers, 

Let us see you out there shouting, 

Let us see some more school spirit. 

Stand please, boys, and say the Lord's Prayer." 

So they did and mumbled, "Amen.'" 

So Mr. Joyce slowly left them 

Head in air and keen eyes flashing. 

See the boys, hurry, hurry, 

Glad indeed to get to classes 

And to leave the Hall behind them. 

S. Whitwill 



65 



THE WILD HUNT 

To thunder's flash the wild hunt rides 
Stark against the moon , 
Hell hounds bay at their tattered sides 
Moaning, while hunters croon. 

Despair! Despair! The hern-horn cries, 
The damned ones lash their steeds, 
No mortal knows the harsh, keening sighs 
— Except when the wild hunt feeds! 



PEACE 

Peace is a word 

Of the sea and the wind. 

Peace is the love 

Of a foe as a friend. 

Peace is a dawn 

On a day without end. 

Peace is the joy 

Bringing war to an end. 



A PERSON 

Unimportant, 

Like a word in the news. 

So all alone. 

With three billion others. 

God, take his hand. 

And show him where to go. 

Don't you know him? 

He's the little stranger. 



S. M. Stirling 



D. Hallett 



D. Hallett 




66 



JUNIOR 
ASHBURIAN 




ASHBURY COLLEGE 
OTTAWA 



VOLUME XVI 



1971 



EDITOR OF THE JUNIOR ASHBURIAN — M. JOSSELYN 
FACULTY ADVISOR — D. L. POLK, Esq. 



Day Boy Monitors 

JOHN ARNOLD 
DAVID BABBITT 
RONALD CARSON 
BLAINE JOHNSON 
MARK JOSSELYN 
CHRISTOPHER TERON 



Boarder Monitors 

SHAUN BELDING 
IAN BURKE-ROBERTSON 
ROD DOWLING 
COLIN PATERSON 
IAN SCARTH 



Choir Monitor 

M. JOSSELYN 



Captain of Soccer - 
Captain of Hockey 



B. JOHNSON Captain of Volleyball — M. JOSSELYN 

- B. JOHNSON Captain of Cricket — B. JOHNSON 



HOUSE CAPTAINS 



Senior Dragons 
Senior Goblins 
Senior Hobbits 
Senior Wizards 


— P. FARQUHAR 

— C. TERON 

— M. JOSSELYN 

— S. BELDING 


Junior Dragons — M. PIMM 
Junior Goblins — G. SPENCER 
Junior Hobbits — D. JOSSELYN 
Junior Wizards — M. TKACHUK 




Top House-point Winners 


M. JOSSELYN 
I. JOHNSTON 


— 87 C. TERON 

— 76 S. BELDING 

R. CARSON 


— 67 J. BEEDELL — 61 

— 63 P. DEEPAN — 61 

— 60 


Boys whose 


M.L.T.S. standing was 80% or 


better - excused final examinations 


FORM I 


FORM II FORM IIIA 


TRANSITUS TRANSITUS A 


Blake 

Marshall 

Puttick 

Stuart 


Ablack Assaly 
Deepan Hogarth 
Flynn Johnston 
Heaton Jones 
Johnston Marsden 
Jones Parkin 
Josselyn Power 
Wilson 


Belding Beedell 
Collins Carson 
Conway 
Josselyn 
Teron 



LIBRARIANS 



Anfossie 
Robertson 



FORM I 

Bell 

Blake 

Hall II 

Harwood 

Marshall 

Stuart 

FORM IIIA 

Assaly 

Johnston 

Marsden 

Parkin 

Wilson 



Assaly I 
Stilborn 


Harrower 
Teron 




Pelcis 
Wiener 


Pimm 
Wilson II 




GOLDEN BOYS 






FORM II 






FORM III 


- 5/5 
-. 7/9 

- 5/6 

- 8/9 

- 6/9 

- 8/9 


Ablack 

Deepan 

Johnston 

Jones 

Magner 

TRANSITUS 


— 


6/9 
9/9 
8/9 
6/9 
8/9 


Brodie — 6/9 
Moore — 7/9 
Veilleux — 6/9 

TRANSITUS A 


- 7/9 

- 9/9 

- 7/9 
-9/9 

- 8/9 


Belding 
Collins 
Scarth 
Stenger 


— 


7/9 
6/9 
6/9 
7/7 


Beedell — 8/9 
Josselyn — 8/9 
Teron — 8/9 



68 




JUNIOR SCHOOL MONITORS 

Back Row: M. Josselyn, D. I. W. Burke-Robertson, C. Paterson, C. N. Teron, 
K. S. Belding, G. B. P. Johnson, R. W. Dowling. 

Front Row: R. J. Carson, J. J. Arnold, M. H. E. Sherwood, Esq.. I. C. Scarth, 
D. F. J. Babbitt. 



EDITORIAL 

This year has left many happy memories with all of us who are leaving 
the Junior School to seek our fortunes elsewhere. 

I will always remember the all too familiar call of "Strike Three!" ringing 
in my ears as I sadly left the batter's box: the echoing of Mr. Sherwood's voice 
as he shouted, "Don't run in the halls!'"; the shrill blast of the refs whistle 
as he pointed to the penalty spot; the metallic clink of another high jump 
"flub'"; the roar as another Johnson slapshot ripped the net; and last and 
most certainly least, the deadly hush that greeted the "punch line" of another 
Sherwood joke. 

The year's athletic and academic competitions have been very close and no 
House need be ashamed that it did not come first. 

Of all the days in the year, the one that gives the greatest number of boys 
the opportunity to do their "thing" is probably Sports Day. The Day this 
year was very dramatic and all over the fields boys were breaking their backs 
achieving personal bests in order to give their houses precious points. The 
feeling of pride among our particular House when our Senior Relay Team 
won was so great that you could almost reach out and touch it. Wonderful 
moments such as these make up an experience that I will cherish always. 

Whether the boys that leave go on to other schools or to the Senior School, 
I know that they will always remember with happiness the Junior School and 
the way of life and learning that we are leaving behind us. 

Mark Josselyn 



69 



SCHOOL NOTES 

The Junior School is divided into four Houses, and the healthy rivalry 
which results is one of the most important factors contributing to that vague 
term, "School Spirit". 

I am introducing this topic into the Notes as I possibly have a certain 
perspective which permits me to be a judge of the matter. After a close 
association with the Junior School for many years. I moved to other work. 
Only this year did I return to full time participation. 

Perhaps this will allow me to give our School a hearty pat on the back, as 
I think I retain a dispassionate point of view. 

In his closing address to the boys, Mr. Sherwood spoke of the year as having 
been a good one. He mentioned that there had been better - and worse. If this 
is the case, we have a high standard. 

The House rivalry mentioned in the opening paragraph is only one instance 
of the high morale of the School. The fact that a boy is popular because he 
works hard, not despite this fact, is another. The genuine interest which the 
Colour Board attracts is another factor, equally important to House rivalry. 

The staff have been able to arouse whole-hearted support for such varied 
group activities as cross country running, and poetry reading. As mentioned 
in the article about the Chess Tournament, 75^0 of the boys entered. 

Perhaps the prime example of School Spirit was shown when practically the 
whole Junior School gave up a Saturday to raise money for the Canadian 
Save The Children Fund. The specific purpose was to increase our support of 
Rosaria, Ashbury's "sister" who lives in the slums of Rome. Each House 
produced five teams, and Rockcliffe Park was divided among the groups who 
went from home to home spring cleaning. Cars were washed, lawns were 
raked, rubbish was disposed of. By the end of a cheerless, rainy day $536 had 
been raised. 

The boys are happy at Ashbury because they work hard. After careful 
screening we have accepted many an unhappy "problem child" whose be- 
haviour was the despair of his parents and teachers in a previous school. 
Almost without exception these boys, under friendly discipline, have fitted 
happily into the Junior School, and in many cases have made a considerable 
contribution. 

The year has of course had its problems. At many a Monday Assembly the 
boys have sat in frightened silence while Mr. Sherwood has forcefullv pointed 
out misdemeanors. Problems yes. but no outrages. A happy family has similar 
situations to contend with. 

'"Just one big, happy family", is a trite phrase, but I do feel that Ashbury's 
Junior School can lay claim to the expression. 

D.L.P. 



70 



JUNIOR SCHOOL HOUSE COMPETITION 

A most enthusiastic competition this year kept the lead changing from 
House to House right up until the day before Closing. The result was very 
much in doubt until the last game in the House Softball Competition which 
was clearly won in both divisions by the bottom House, the Goblins, from the 
Hobbits and Wizards in that order. 

The year's final points were: 

HOBBITS 972 M. Josselyn, Captain of House. 

WIZARDS 952 S. Belding, Captain of House. 

DRAGONS 940 P. Farquhar. Captain of House. 

GOBLINS 889 C. Teron, Captain of House. 

Houses competed in every aspect of school endeavour, points being awarded 
for academics, colour board, choir membership, librarian appointments, sports, 
and a dozen other activities from the pancake toss to snow sculpturing. Points 
were awarded both individually and for team results. 

Each of the Houses met with success in some field of endeavour. Below are 
mentioned the various House Winners of team events. 



1st Term: 


Soccer 


Senior 


— Goblins 






Junior 


— Wizards 




Tug o" War 


Senior 


— Goblins 






Junior 


— Dragons 


2nd Term: 


Swimming 


First 


— Dragons 






Second 


— Goblins 




Hockey 


Senior 


— Dragons 






Junior 


— Wizards 




Skiing 


Senior 


— Wizards 






Junior 


— Wizards 


3rd Term: 


Cross Country 


First 


— Dragons 






Second 


— Hobbits 
W izards 




Crab Soccer 


Junior 


— Hobbits 




Volley Ball 


Senior 


— Hobbits 




Track Meet 


First 


— Hobbits 






Second 


— Dragons 




Softball 


Senior 


— Goblins 






Junior 


— Goblins 


Congratulations to this 


year's winner. 


The Hobbits. and to their coach, 


Mr. Babbitt. 










GRUB DAY 





Grub Day has now become an annual event at Ashbury. It would seem 
that we enjoy being as dirty and shabbily dressed as possible. Every boy had to 
pay 250 admission and the money was sent to St. Michael's Mission in South 
Africa to help fight cholera. 

The vast majority of the Junior School entered. Some came in torn-up 
shirts and hacked jeans, others in scuffed clothes with mud and paint over 
them. Some took this opportunity to get away from school dress and came in 
casual clothing. 

There was a grand prize of S5.00 offered to the grubbiest person and Rod 
Dowling won. 

Richard Robertson 



71 



JUNIOR SCHOOL AWARDS 

The two most important awards in the Junior School are The Woods Shield, 
established in 1941; and the Stephen Clifford Memorial Cup, established this 
year. Winners of the cups are the two most outstanding boys in the Junior 
School. 

Shirley E. Woods, a distinguished Old Boy of Ashbury, was appointed 
Chairman of the Board of Governors in 1938, remaining in this position until 
1945. At the time he donated the Woods Shield three of his sons were attend- 
ing Ashbury in the Junior School. The first winner of the Shield was John 
Turner, presently Minister of Justice. This year's winner is Chris Teron. 

Stephen Clifford came to Ashbury in April, 1969 to complete Grade 7. He 
fitted so admirably into our school life that he was appointed a Monitor the 
following year. Stephen was killed in a tragic accident just before his return 
to Ashbury in September, 1970. The Memorial Cup is awarded to the boy 
who has made the greatest contribution to his House, and is a fitting memorial 
to one who himself made such a fine contribution to Ashbury. The first 
winner of the Cup is Mark Josselyn, Captain of the Hobbits. 

THE POETRY READING CONTEST 

As with the Public Speaking contest, interest was so wide spread among 
our poetry readers that class eliminations had to be held to reduce the finalists 
to a manageable number. On the day of the event our judges, Dr. Spencer and 
Mr. Babbitt were presented with the following slate of contestants: Blake and 
Hall II from Form I; Ablack and Tkachuk from Form II; Scott and 
McKenna from Form III; Rosen and Pimm from Form III A; Belding and 
Stenger from Transitus; Babbitt and Josselyn from Transitus A. 

The final decision was a difficult one to make as one of the judges had a 
natural reluctance to give his son the top marks which were obviously merited. 
A third opinion was provided and the judges were persuaded to give unani- 
mous approval to Babbitt as the winner. 

Honourable mention went to Rosen, last year's winner, and to Hall II and 
Belding. 

THE M.L.T.S. TRIPS 

Relaxation. That was what made the exam week so pleasant for those of 
us who were fortunate enough to have reached an M.L.T.S. of 80%. While 
the other poor juniors were sweating away in Argyle writing exams during 
the day and sweating away in the evenings preparing for the next day's exams 
we were relaxing. 

On the first day Mr. Beedell took us to the Dustbane Company for an 
interesting look at their many operations. In the afternoon we were going to 
go to Parliament, but we never did quite make it in a group. Several boys did 
attend the sessions on their own. 

The following exam day we did this: In the morning, a two and a half 
hour game of softball; in the afternoon Mr. Humphreys took us to the Air 
Museum. 

On the third day of exams we went to play miniature golf. Mr. Tottenham 
took us on that trip. 

On the last day Mrs. Teron had invited us to her cottage. We were all 
looking forward to the trip and certainly had a lot of fun. 

I hanks to many cooperative masters we had a really great time during 
exam week. 



72 



THE PUBLIC SPEAKING CONTEST 

A great deal of interest was aroused when this competition was announced 
and it was found necessary to have Form eliminations to come up with a 
final slate of 6 contestants. 

The finalists were Belding. Brodie, Brookes, Carson, Johnston and Spencer. 

Belding presented a relaxed and amusing account of the danger from 
pickpockets, particularly in Columbia. 

Brodie gave an interesting talk on E.S.P. with specific examples of this 
phenomenon. 

Brookes told of the ways of keeping healthy. His talk was amusing, and 
showed careful research. 

Carson talked on humour, and his several examples of the subject brought 
many laughs. 

Johnston told of a personal experience with a friend whose interest was 
chemistry. Judging from this account we are fortunate to have him still 
with us. 

Spencer's talk covered the sweep of Ancient Greece, its history and culture. 

In the opinion of the judges Johnston won the competition, although all 
contestants were congratulated on their high standard of speaking. 

Johnston went on to further honours, as he entered the city competition 
and won third place in a group of about 40 other finalists. 

Mark Josselyn 

THE TRIP TO AMHERST 

On Friday, March 12. three Ashbury hockey teams set out by bus for 
Amherst. Mass., U.S.A. 

We started just after noon and stopped for a hurried dinner in Albany. 
We arrived in Amherst at about 9:30 that evening. 

We were then paired off and went to sleep at the houses of the boys on the 
opposing teams. Our hosts were very kind. 

Next morning most of the boys went around the town of Amherst looking 
at universities, stores, schools, etc. 

Then in the afternoon we went to play hockey. The Ashbury under 12 
team played first and were defeated. The under 14 team played next and the 
game ended up tied. The senior team then played and that game also ended 
in a tie. 

After the hockey games we were treated to a glorious banquet dinner and 
we were also given life memberships in the Amherst Hockey Association. 

The next morning we played again. This time our under 14 team won its 
game, but the under 12 team was defeated. 

Our hosts provided us with lunches and we set out for home. En route we 
had dinner at a Howard Johnsons and got back to Ashbury quite late. 

I think everyone had a terrific time. Apart from the thrill of playing 
unknown teams, we were exposed to a wonderful group of people, increased 
our knowledge of the U.S.A., and learned just a little bit more about how to 
handle new situations. 

The trip was a success. 

George Marsden 



73 



THE WASHINGTON TRIP — May 18-21 

The Washington trip was the fifth annual excursion the Junior School has 
made. Montreal, Quebec, New York and Toronto have been the cities visited 
in other years. All of the school trips have been complete successes. Here is 
my account of the visit to Washington. 

We left Ashbury at about 10:00 a.m. on May 18. We stopped at a side rest 
area for box lunches, then continued down through the coal country to 
Harrisburg, Pa. where we stopped for dinner. We arrived at the Ambassador 
Hotel in Washington that evening just in time to watch the last period of the 
final game of the Stanley Cup. 

At 8 o'clock on the morning of our first day in Washington we arrived at 
the side entrance of the White House. A special tour had been arranged for 
this early hour. To give you an idea of the age of the White House, it wasn't 
finished at the time of the inauguration of George Washington as the first 
president of the United States, but it was completed by the time John Adams, 
the second president, was sworn in. 

On our tour of the White House we started in the East Wing, which is the 
most recent addition to the White House. First we entered an oval shaped 
room looking out on the south side where the President usually greets his 
guests. Next was the Green Room, used as a sitting room. It had a beautiful 
marble mantle, a nice clock and a big impressive chandelier. Then we went 
into the Red Room. Here are many portraits of the presidents. Here also are 
pictures of Dolly Madison and Mrs. Kennedy. Then we walked into the state 
dining room where formal dinners are held and the President holds his press 
conferences. 

What I saw of the White House impressed me very much. 

After the White House we walked to the Aquarium. There we found many 
interesting things. None of the fish were very new to me because I had already 
seen most of them before in other Aquariums, including killer whales. 

After this we went to the Washington Monument. We went up in an 
elevator, and most of us walked down the approximately 450 steps. 

After we were all assembled in our groups again we walked to the Museum 
of History and Technology. We saw lots of very interesting things. One was 
a large steel ball attached to a long thin wire. The ball swayed from side to 
side and every hour would knock over 8 little blocks placed on a large 
circumference around the ball. 

Our next visit was to the Museum of Natural History which was next door. 
These two museums are part of the Smithsonian complex. Here we saw some 
very interesting exhibits, including the famous jewels "The Star of India*' 
and the "Hope Diamond". 

We had lunch in the Museum cafeteria and were joined by our guides. 
Then we walked to the Capitol. It was very hot that day and everyone found 
it a long and tiring walk. We went into the rotunda. Then we went through 
a long corridor which had beautiful paintings on the ceiling and on the walls. 
We were able to see the Senate in session. Hubert Humphrey was there but 
unfortunately Mr. Agnew was not presiding that day. One of the page boys 
was a page girl. 

After the Capitol we got into our buses and drove to Arlington Cemetery. 
On our way we stopped at the Lincoln Memorial, and passed close to the 
Jefferson Memorial. Both of them I had already seen. In the cemetery we 
saw John Kennedy's grave and the site for Robert Kennedy's future grave, 
which is now marked only with a white cross. Then we saw the tombs of the 



74 



three Unknown Soldiers, one from the 1st World War, one from the 2nd 
World War. and the third from the Korean War. 

After this the buses drove us back to the hotel for a swim and relaxation. 
Later the buses drove us to Maryland for a good steak dinner. We went to 
bed after that. 

On the morning of the second day we got up later mainly because we had 
more time on our hands. 

We walked to the National Geographic Society where we heard interesting 
things through microphones. Most of these were concerned with expeditions 
which the Society had sponsored, for example Scott's adventures in the 
Antarctic. 

After this we were driven to the Department of Engraving and Printing 
where all the bank notes are made. Everyone's eyes were bulging just watch- 
ing those sheets of notes being printed. 

Then we walked to the Smithsonian Institute to see the different kinds of 
aeroplanes, space craft and other things. It was most interesting and exciting. 
After this we had lunch at Russler's Steak House. 

After lunch we went on an F.B.I, tour which had been arranged for us 
by Marion's father. We saw laboratories, pictures of different criminals and 
the scenes of their crimes. Finally we had a demonstration with a revolver 
and a sub-machine gun. 

At the end of that tour we had free time for two hours. 

We went to dinner at a very nice restaurant called the ''Bull 'n Bear '. 
From there we walked to Fords Theatre where Lincoln was killed by John 
Wilkes Booth. We saw the play, "You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown''. Then 
we drove in the bus all night to get to Ottawa. 

As soon as I got home my mother and I went up to our summer cottage for 
the long weekend. As soon as we got there I slept for about five hours because 
I was so exhausted. 

John Coyne 




75 



'Hi 






f ■ ~mm^^^'. 



' m | 



-** 








B : 









■ I 



THE CHESS TOURNAMENT 

The 12th Annual Junior School Chest Tournament (as Mr. Polk insisted 
on calling it) attracted a great deal of interest. Almost three-quarters of the 
Junior School entered the tournament, which must surely be a record. To 
give added interest this year an Ashbury chess team from Grades 5 and 6 
competed against those Grades at Rockcliffe Park Public School. We had 
several individual triumphs but were defeated as a team. Wait till next year! 

Here are the results of all the games played. 



TRANSITUS A 




Arnold 
Tross 


} 


Josselyn 
Tross 


Assaly 
Steacy 


} 


Assaly 


Babbitt 
Ray 


> 


Babbitt 


Beedell 
McKenna 


> 


Beedell 


Bowley 
L. Staunton 


> 


Bowley 


B. Robertson^ 




Johnson 


/ 


B. Rober 



Carson 
Conway 

TRANSITUS 

Belding i 

Wright J 



Collins 
Sanderson 


> 


III A 




Assaly 
Thompson 


> 


Brookes 
Rosen 


> 


Har rower 
Puttick 


} 


Ingold 
Pitfield 


} 


Johnston 
Parkin 


> 


Kasper 
Morrison 


> 



Carson 



Belding i 

Farquhar / 

Har court ) 

Perley R. J 

Kemper l 

Newbergher / 

McNulty \ 

Sanderson I 



Pimm 
Assaly 

Rosen 

Puttick 

Pitfield 

Parkin 

Morrison 
Wilson 



Josselyn 
Assaly 

Beedell 

Carson 

Farquhar 
Harcourt 
Kemper 
Sanderson 

Assaly 
Rosen 

Parkin 
Wilson 



Josselyn 



Josselyn 



Beedell 



Harcourt 



Kemper 



Kemper 



Assaly 



Assaly 



Wilson 



78 



Ill 



Arnold 
Wilson 

Bisiker 
Veilleux 

Brodie 
Scott 

Byford 
Robertson 

Cuzner 
Motta 



Ablack 
Walker 

Carre 
Torontow 

Deepan 
Smith III 

Dip lock 
Mierins 

Ellacott 
Major 

Flynn 

Magner 

Hambleton 
Josselyn 

Heaton 
Ligthart 

I 

Blake 
Zwirewich 

Byford 
Sirotek 

Hall I 

Richter 

Hall II 
Puttick 



FORM IIIA 
FORM III 

FORM II 
FORM I 



Wilson 

Bisiker 

Brodie 

Byford 

Cuzner 

Elias 

Heaton 

Moore 

Ablack 

Carre 

Deepan 

Mierins 

Ellacott 

Flynn 

Josselyn 

Heaton 

Blake 
Sirotek 
Hall I 

Puttick 



IIIA (Assaly) 

1 (Puttick) 

Transitus A 
Transitus 



Wilson 



Brodie 



Cuzner 



Moore 



Ablack 



Deepan 



Ellacott 



Heaton 



Sirotek 



Puttick 



FINALS 



Brodie 



Brodie 



Cuzner 



Deepan 



Deepan 



Heaton 



Puttick 



IIIA (Assaly) 
Trans A (Josselyn) 



Trans A (Josselyn) 
THE WINNAH! 



79 



THE CAMPING TRIP 

The day before the trip we spent one and a half hours just putting our 
sleeping bags together. I had to turn my sleeping bag inside out, attach a 
piece of cord and turn it back rightside in. 

The next day I was driven to school by my Dad. I gathered all my gear 
together and entered one of the two buses. We were dropped off at a little 
dirt road after a short drive. Shouldering our packs we started our hike. 
After about a mile of walking up hill my back began to get sore and my 
pack to get heavy. Adding to the agony, my socks had fallen down and there 
was some water in my boots. After crossing a field we entered a forest. Then 
we came to a low area filled with water. The water was about two feet deep, 
and a lot of it was added to my boots. Next we started an exhausting climb 
up rugged hills. Some hills were so steep you could, with heavy packs, walk 
straight up, but still touch the ground with your hands. Finally we reached 
camp. There was no time to rest for meals had to be cooked and tents put up. 
We split up in groups, Seniors, Juniors, and the girls from Elmwood. Our 
sector, the Juniors, soon got a fire going and then we started to cook our 
meals. We were given packets of meat, dehydrated beans, corn and mashed 
potatoes. Newbergher was carefully putting his stuff into separate pots when 
Mr. Humphreys came along and dumped everything into one pot. Almost 
everyone was watching his meal cook with anticipation. I was looking at it 
with apprehension. I managed to wash away the taste of this mixture with 
water from the nearby lake. The rest of the evening was spent washing pots 
and pans. 

Sgt. Evans, one of the army men at the camp told us that our sleeping bags 
would keep us warm for 7 hours in -70° weather. My feet were cold all night. 
Next morning there was ice on the lake. 

For breakfast we had dehydrated scrambled eggs and bacon. After cleaning 
up we started on our last lap. This walking was not as tough because I didn't 
have to carry a 20-pound sleeping bag. We ate lunch prepared by the Elmwood 
girls. Eventually we got to a dirt road. Just a mile down the road was the 
spot where the buses would pick us up. When I arrived at the spot I fell on 
what felt like rubber legs. So ended the camping trip. 

It was a good experience and I learned a lot about living in the bush, even 
if it was a tough trip. In two days the group covered 22 miles of rugged bush 
in snow, sleet, wind, rain and fog. Perhaps I am destined to be a post man 
when I grow up! 

Iain Johnston 

JUNIOR SCHOOL SAILING 

Again this year the Ashbury sailors arrived at Lakefield feeling extremely 
confident of a successful day of sailing ahead. On Saturday morning we 
awoke to a beautiful cloudless day, but there was no wisp of wind. Undaunted, 
the sailing races, or should I say the drifting races, started against such notable 
schools as Ridley, Hillfield, Crescent and of course our host Lakefield. 

The lack of wind was against us and in the morning we had sailed only 
two out of the four races. In the afternoon we managed to complete the full 
slate of races but unfortunately we came last. 

My hat comes off to Mike Kemper (skipper), Bruce Anfossie (crew) and 
Bill Fuller (crew). They all did a tremendous job considering the conditions. 
Despite our lowly position we all had a most enjoyable trip. 

T. C. Tottenham 



80 



JUNIOR SCHOOL SPORTS 



SOCCER 

The Soccer Team this year played very well. We went on several excursions 
out of town in addition to playing quite a few games at home. The success 
of the team was a result of the combined efforts of all the players, but special 
mention should be made of Mark Josselyn's consistent goal keeping and 
Blaine Johnsons scoring ability. The overall standings show that this year 
was one of our better ones. 

Wins Losses Ties Points 

6 1 1 13 

As we were able to win 13 points out of a possible 16 everyone was content 
with the season as a whole. 

Ron Carson 




THE JUNIOR SOCCER TEAM 

Back Row: M. H. E. Sherwood, Esq.. G. F. R. Marsden, J. P. Sanderson, 

K. S. Belding. I. C. Scarth, P. J. Bowley. J. W. Beedell. A. I. Johnston. 

Front Row: P. J. Harcourt. M. B. Kemper, M. A. Marion, M. Josselyn, 
G. B. P. Johnson, D. F. J. Babbitt, J. J. Arnold. 



81 




THE UNDER 13 SOCCER TEAM 

Back Row: M. H. E. Sherwood, Esq., P. A. Farquhar, J. W. Pitfield, P. J. Bowley, 
C. M. Paterson, G. F. R. Marsden, G. R. McKenna. 

Front Row: P. J. Harcourt, A. I. Johnston, R. J. Carson, R. A. Brodie, 

R. N. Newbergher, B. D. Bisiker, D. F. J. Babbitt, J. W. Beedell. 







Back Row: 
Front Row: 



THE JUNIOR B SOCCER TEAM 

R. T. Ligthart, N. A. Sirotek, M. D. Magner, M. P. Fuller, 
W. E. Johnston, M. D. Jones. 

P. J. Flynn, Esq., M. J. Flynn, D. G. Arnold, M. W. Tkachuk, 
D. Josselyn, R. H. Smith, D. L. Ablack. 



82 



CROSS COUNTRY 

As in other years, the grueling cross country running took place at Ashbury 
with Farquhar leading the pack. Although Dowling ran the fastest time 
recorded for the 2-1/2 mile course, 14 , 49 , \ Farquhar won the cross country 
championship and rightly earned his title "The Flying Ferd". 

In an inter-school meet at Greenbank Public School, our senior runners 
came in third out of ten schools which is excellent for such a small school 
with no girls. Mr. Flynn reckons that if Ashbury ran with Elmwood in outside 
competition we would do even better. 

In our own Meet, the results were as follows: 

AGE 1st 2nd 3rd 

13 yrs. Farquhar Dowling Carson 

12 yrs. Beedell Babbitt Thompson 

10 yrs. Flynn Blake Puttick 

As a whole the school did very well, and I am proud to say that "Fearless 
Fred" almost broke 20 minutes on the 2-1/2 mile run. 

Jeff Beedell 

VOLLEYBALL 

During the Winter Term a volleyball team was formed under the direction 
of Mr. Babbitt. The boys were very enthusiastic and after many practices the 
team entered a local tournament. They won their first game, making them 
eligible for the Cup, but were eliminated on the second round. 

The boys returned to Ashbury quite happy with their performance. The 
short season proved to be most enjoyable for all including Mr. Babbitt, whose 
enthusiasm spurred the team to quite good efforts. 

Mark Josselyn 



P T 




JUNIOR VOLLEYBALL TEAM 

Back Row: G. W. Babbitt, Esq., R. N. Newbergher, J. G. R. Lafortune, 

M. B. Kemper, P. A. Farquhar, P. J. Bowley. 
Front Row: R. J. Helmer, J. J. Arnold, G. B. P. Johnson, M. Josselyn, Captain, 

M. A. Marion, K. S. Belding, C. N. Teron. 



83 







JUNIOR HOCKEY TEAM 

Back Row: M. H. E. Sherwood, Esq., J. W. Beedell, J. G. Lafortune, J. P. Sanderson, 
C. N. Power, B. H. Chick, R. J. J. Carson, P. J. Bowley, M. Josselyn! 

Front Row: R. T. Ligthart, R. S. Robertson, M. B. Kemper, G. B. P. Johnson, Capt., 
C. M. Paterson, P. A. Farquhar, C. J. Veilleux. 

Absent: P. J. Harcourt, A. I. Johnston. 




UNDER 12 HOCKEY TEAM 

Back Row: J. L. Beedell, Esq., P. H. H. Bell, S. H. Marshall, J. W. Pitfield, Asst- 
Capt., W. E. Johnston, R. H. Smith, F. J. Ellacott, M. W. O'Meara, 
D. F. J. Babbitt. 

Front Row: M. P. Fuller, Captain, G. C. Spencer, A. Mierins, R. T. Ligthart, 
J. D. Coyne, D. Josselyn, D. L. Ablack. 



84 



HOCKEY 

Overall we had a fairly good season. The highlight was probably our trip 
to Amherst. Mass. Our senior team won one and tied one. The junior team« 
lost both their games. What made the trip so pleasant was the fantastic 
hospitality. 

Another trip was to Lakefield with both teams, and this time we made a 
clean sweep. 

We also won at Sedbergh and we came back to have hot chocolate and 
doughnuts. 

We ended the season quite well because we were playing much better. 

David Babbitt 

SOFTBALL 

This year has been really great for softball. The draft "Dodger" called Red 
proved quite valuable to the team. The batting of the team was fairly good 
at the start, and we all improved as the season went on. 

I think our happiest win was against the teachers. For once we could put 
"them" in their place! I myself had a great time playing the games and going 
to L.C.C.. and I know everyone else on the team felt as I did. The people at 
L.C.C. were very nice to us even though we won. 

It is too bad the season had to end so soon: everyone wishes he could have 
played more. 

Ron Carson 




JUNIOR SOFTBALL TEAM 

Back Row: M. H. E. Sherwood. Esq., C. J. Veilleux, P. J. Bowley, K. S. Belding. 

J. P. Sanderson, R. T. Ligthart, J. W. Beedell, D. F. J. Babbitt. 
Front Row: R. J. Carson, M. Josselyn, J. G. R. Lafortune, G. B. P. Johnson, Capt. 

M. A. Marion, M. B. Kemper, P. A. Farquhar. 



85 



CRICKET 

The team started off very late this year because of the weather. We had 
only one practice before our first game which was against Sedbergh. In spite 
ftf the excellent job of organizing that Mr. Flynn did we lost by a score of 
84-22. Our best player, Johnson, was missing for the game. 

Three days later we played a return match with Sedbergh on our home 
grounds. Bad luck was with us and the final score was 76-37. 

On our trip to Lakefield we were missing Kemper and Sanderson. Here 
the score was 119-28. 

It is too bad we didn't win a game; however the team had great fun this 
year. 

The top scorers were Johnson and Harcourt, and our bowlers were Johnson, 
Belding and Paterson. 

Chris Teron 




JUNIOR CRICKET TEAM 

Back Row: M. B. Kemper, P. J. Bowley, C. N. Power, K. S. Belding, C. N. Teron, 

C. M. Paterson, M. Josselyn, P. J. Flynn, Esq. 
Front Row: F. B. Anfossie, R. J. Carson, R. N. N. Newbergher, G. B. P. Johnson, 

Capt., J. P. Sanderson, P. J. Harcourt, P. A. Farquhar. 

THE TRACK MEET 

A glorious sun was smiling on the Ashbury grounds on the day of our 
annual Junior School Track Meet. Every boy in the school had entered his 
name for at least one of the events except for those few whose broken legs 
were still knitting after the ski season. Every member of the staff was pressed 
into willing service as starter, timer, judge or recorder. There was full Junior 
School participation and the day provided a most happy break during exam- 
ination week. The morning and afternoon events were run off with the 
precision always provided by Mr. Anderson's organization. 

At the end of the Meet, ribbons for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners were 
graciously presented by three Junioi parents, Mrs. Belding. Mrs. Farquhar 
and Mrs. Josselyn. 



86 



Here are the results: 



EVENT 




10 yrs. 


11 yrs. 


12 yrs. 


13 yrs. 


60 yards 


1. 
2. 
3. 


Mierins 

Stuart 

Magner 








100 yards 


1. 
2. 
3. 




Pitfield 
Hogarth 
Jones 


Green 
Power 
Smith \ 
Byford 


Bowley 

Paterson 

Burke-Robertson 


220 yards 


1. 
2. 
3. 


Mierins 

Byford 

Richter 


Pitfield 

Marshall 

Parkin 


Green 
Smith 
Byford 


Bowley 

Teron 

Burke-Robertson 


440 yards 


1. 
2. 
3. 


Blake 
Meyers 


Jones 

Wright 

Deepan 


Babbitt 
Beedell 
Thompson 


Dowling 
Paterson 
Farquhar 


880 yards 


1. 

2. 
3. 


Blake 

Zwirewich 

Meyers 


Bell 

Flynn 

Heaton 






The Mile 


1. 
2. 
3. 






Babbitt 
Beedell 
Thompson 


Farquhar 

Carson 

Newbergher 


High Jump 


1. 

2. 
3. 


Magner 
Mierins 


Ligthart 
Josselyn 
Bell 


Power 

Beedell 

Rosen 


Helmer 
Kemper 
Paterson 


Long Jump 


1. 
2. 
3. 


Magner 

Blake 

Richter 


Pitfield 
Hogarth 
Wright 


Green 

Babbitt 

Beedell 


Bowley 

Newbergher 

Chick 


Softball Throw 


1. 
2. 
3. 


Mierins 
Hall I 
Zwirewich 


Ligthart 
Mitchell 
Josselyn 






Shot Put 


1. 
2. 
3. 






Power 

Babbitt 

Rosen 


Paterson 

Teron 

Sanderson 


Senior Relay 


1. 
2. 
3. 


Hobbits 
Dragons 
Goblins 








Junior Relay 


1. 

2. 
3. 


Wizards 
Hobbits 
Goblins 









In addition to ribbons for individual events, the overall winners in each 
age group were presented with trophies. Our track stars were: 

10 yrs. — Mierins; 11 yrs. — Pitfield; 12 yrs. — Babbitt; 13 yrs. — Bowley. 



87 



LITERARY SECTION 



ON THE FARM 

The sounds of Dad chopping wood for the pot-bellied stove, along with the 
cheerful chirps of robins quickly woke me. I dressed hurriedly, jumped 
through the window, grabbed hold of a branch, swung onto a platform I had 
built for this purpose, then slid down the trunk. Telling my Father I was 
going, and calling my dog, I set off towards the pond. 

Amber, my dog, and I raced through the dew drenched clover which 
covered the trail to the spring-fed pond. After a refreshing dip I returned to 
a delicious breakfast of porridge, pancakes and maple syrup. The syrup had 
the added flavour of my hard work, as I had collected the sap from our bush 
and had helped Mother many nights over the black pots of boiling, bubbling 
sap. 

Breakfast finished, I loaded my musket and went off hunting with Amber. 
By noon I had reached the quota for our larder of three rabbits, two geese 
and one duck. This would have been completed earlier if Amber had not 
announced our presence with his loud, excited barks. After a lunch of cold 
turkey. I headed for home. 

Rounding a boulder I realized I had gone in a circle and was now on the 
crest of a hill high above the farm. I could see Father plowing the garden, 
holding tightly to the ploughs handles, as Jimmy, our reliable work horse, 
stepped gingerly around the stumps and rocks. Mother, I could see, was 
scrubbing the clothes over the washboard in the large wooden tub. My sister 
was sitting on the rail fence cleaning lamps. 

I picked my way carefully down the hill. Dad told me to chop firewood, 
while he skinned the catch. We had a tasty rabbit stew for supper, and for 
dessert we had roasted acorns. 

After supper, as Dad read to us from Pilgrim's Progress, Mother patched 
my torn breeches, Jennie, my sister, listened sleepily by the fire with her cat. 
and I made round shot for my musket. The dying embers signalled bedtime. 

I climbed the ladder to the loft and crawled sleepily under my eider down, 
filled with goose feathers. As I snuggled down I wondered if the feathers in 
my quilt were from the geese I had shot last year. 

Just before I fell asleep I dreamily asked myself what boys would be doing 
one hundred years from now, in 1971. I didn't suppose there would be much 
change. 

W. Johnston 



THE FUNNY CLOWN 

There was a funny clown, 
Whose face was very brown. 
And his hair was white. 
And his eyes were bright. 
And his hat was blue. 
Stuck on with glue. 
And his nose was green, 
Like you've never seen. 
That funny brown clown. 



Mark Richter 
Form I 



88 



LIFE S EMBARRASSING MOMENTS 

Because we are all human, we are all subject to making mistakes, and 
often find ourselves in embarrassing situations. I, too, am fallible, and in the 
following paragraphs are some events which made me turn quite red at the 
time. 

Arriving home after a very muddy game of soccer, I went upstairs to have 
a bath. After I had thoroughly cleaned myself, I got out of the tub, dried, 
and went to my bedroom. As it was late I decided to put on my pyjamas then. 
After searching for all of 20 seconds I decided that I couldn't find them, so 
I ran down naked to the sitting room to ask my mother where they were. On 
entering I got quite a shock — and from the look on her face, so did Mrs. 
Joyce. 

On another occasion I was walking the dog with a couple of friends. Toby 
was not on a leash and felt the need to attend to a natural urge. Before I 
could stop him. he had used someone's front lawn for his purposes. The owner 
of the house stepped outside, and I was extremely nervous. The man said, 
"Thank you. but we don't need any today!" and with that he handed me a 
shovel much to the amusement of my friends. 

The last school at which my father taught had a firing range, which was 
nearly always in use, for I saw boys going to and from it all the time. One 
day I decided to go inside for surely no boys would object to a four year old 
taking a look around their shooting range. I ran in yelling, "Hold it, hold it! 
Don"t shoot!" and then ran straight out for who was inside but the Head- 
master showing a few guests around the school. 

Another very embarrassing moment for me was when a teacher told me to 
go and fetch some chalk from Mr. Sherwood's office. I went out to get it, but 
when I knocked there was no answer. I returned to class empty handed. The 
teacher told me to just barge into the office and pick up the chalk. When I 
knocked on the door a second time there was still no answer, so in I walked. 
What do you suppose I saw? Mr. Sherwood was standing over a boy bran- 
dishing a cane! I grabbed the chalk and exited fast, only to be asked what 
had taken me so long. 

These are just a few of my life's embarrassing moments, but I'll bet that 
any one of us unfortunately has had enough to fill a book, and by the time 
we die a second volume would be well filled. 

No matter how hard we try to guard against these situations, they frequently 
occur and we must make an effort not to be too sensitive at these times. 

M. Josselyn 



FANTASY 

Out in the Wilderness. 

Out in the trees. 

Out comes a rabbit 

Running on its knees. 

Out in the meadow, 

Out in the stream. 

Out jumps a fish 

In the middle of a dream. 

Ted Ligthart 
Form II 



89 



IF ONLY I WERE A TYPHOON PILOT 

It was midsummer 1943 and all was going well for the Allies. Another 
plane and I were winging our way over the choppy Channel on a night patrol. 
Suddenly I spotted a German E-boat nosing its way out of a bay on the French 
coast. 

The bright moonlight illuminated the E-boat and I could see that they had 
spotted us already. 

I cried out, "Talley-ho! , \ and flung the Typhoon into a vicious dive. My 
plane plummeted downwards and the E-boat was right in my sights when I 
let loose a salvo of 3-inch rockets at it. There was a huge explosion as the 
rockets slammed home. When the smoke cleared we saw that the E-boat had 
capsized. My partner lobbed his missies into the flaming wreck and we 
notified the sea rescue chaps to pick up any survivors. We turned around and 
headed for home before the whole Luftwaffe got on our tails. 

When we got back to our base we agreed to share our kill and when we 
made our report to the C. 0., we were credited with half a boat each. 

I went to my room and caught a few hours sleep. In the morning we were 
called to the briefing room. I grabbed a piece of toast on the way. In the 
briefing room we were told we were going to escort some American bombers 
on a raid against St. Nazaire in France. 

When the briefing was over I walked to my Typhoon, "Tiger Tiffie". The 
armourers were standing in line waiting to put the belts of ammunition into 
the 4 20 m.m. cannon. I got onto the wing and climbed into the cockpit. I sat 
down and admired the sleek way the plane was put together. 

All around the airfield, engines were sputtering into life. A few minutes 
later we were in the air. Half way across the Channel we met up with the 
Yanks. They were thundering majesticly across the sky in grand procession 
leaving their white streaming contrails behind them. 

We got into escort formation above and behind. It was hard to keep at the 
same speed as the bombers as they were flying so slowly. 

As we crossed the French coast I suddenly noticed enemy fighters coming 
up to intercept us. They came closer and we were ordered to take up battle 
formation. Then the Folke-Wulfs attacked. 

We scattered, picking out our victims. I dived on the one with the yellow 
spinner. The crosshairs on my gunsight slid onto the fusilage of his plane. 
I pulled the trigger and held it back for five gruelling seconds. Suddenly the 
plane turned into a flaming mass of metal. It blew up in mid air. 

Mr. Babbitt repeated, "Where's your prep?" 

My dream shattered. I returned to the reality of an English class at 
Ashbury, but it was many minutes before I was really able to unscramble the 
Germans from the Grammar. 

Simon Jones 
Form IIIA 



A WINTER HOME 

When a bunny finds a passage in a lumber stack. 

He hides there for warmth against the snow. 

But in summer when the work men all come back. 

He has to pack his bag and quickly go. 

Michael O'Meara 
Form II 



90 



SMAUG THE DRAGON 

The lonely mountain of the dell; 

The lifeless city in the dell, 

Mark the home of the dragon bold, 

The stories of which have often been told. 

And down there on the lake, 

A merry city lies at stake, 

Because of the dragon 

This terrible dragon 
Who killed their ancestors years ago. 

Then one happy night of the feast. 

Through the sky came the terrible beast. 

"It's SmaugP* they screamed in terror, "The dragon!" 

And every guard, he dropped his flagon, 

And picked up his weapon to fight. 

No words can describe that terrible night 

Against the dragon 

This terrible dragon 
Who killed their ancestors years ago. 

Then, when all seemed at a loss, 

Bard, their leader and fighting boss 

Saw the patch that was unsealed. 

And shot an arrow, while people quailed. 

And from the sky the dragon fell. 

To go and pay his debt in Hell. 

Smaug the dragon 

This terrible dragon 
Who killed their ancestors years ago. 

Hugh Heaton 
Form III 



CROWS 

I think crows are one of the nicest birds. They are big and black. Farmers 
hate them because they go into their fields and eat the corn. This makes the 
farmers very mad at them. Then the farmers shoot them. 

I became very interested in catching a crow. I knew where they were 
nesting. That gave me a head start on them. I made many trips to the woods 
where they were nesting and I kept finding feathers. 

One night my Dad and I were walking through a big clump of trees. It 
was such a big clump that it was easier for us to split up to look for the baby 
crows. About five minutes later my Dad called me over. He had found a 
baby crow sitting on a branch high up in the tree. I ran home and got my 
brother to help us. My brother could not climb the tree because the branches 
were too weak, so I climbed up and tried to catch the baby crow. It was very 
hard but I caught him. 

I brought him home and put him in a cage and left him alone for the 
night. The next day he was calm. That is my story. 

Richard Harwood 
Form I 



91 



A LOOK INTO THE FUTURE 

The year is 1981. The day is Tuesday, January 21st, and all is not well. 

Is the world perfect with no wars, no pollution, no population problem? 
No way! 

The world is all war, and nothing but. 

How it started, few people know, and nobody really cares. But whatever 
did cause the war set all the continents on fire. 

For some strange reason the struggle is between the continents of Africa 
and the Americas on one side, against Australia and Europe. There is bitter 
civil war in Asia. Antarctica alone seems to have avoided the conflict. 

There is a long story leading up to the blood bath, and I do not have the 
space to give you the details, but I will tell you this: War has cut the growing 
population from 7 billion to 3 billion in two years. 

No more is science devoted to solving the mysteries of earth and space; 
now every experiment is devoted to war; constant, bloody, merciless war. 

In 1981 binoculars are not used for watching nature, as once was the case. 
They are now used only in sighting the enemy. 

School has changed, too. Instead of learning that one apple plus one apple 
equals two apples, students are taught that one H-bomb plus one H-bomb 
equals fallout. The war has affected everything. 

Instead of, say, the Orr- Walton hockey camp, youngsters now attend the 
Agnew-Nixon war camp. Nothing is untouched by this inter-continental war. 

Nobody lives in houses any more. Everybody inhabits bomb shelters instead. 
Because of the war there are very few trees and plants left. 

To someone who remembers the ways of peace, this war is extremely 
sickening. 

However we are really in 1971 and all these events will not take place for 
10 years, so live it up while you can. 

Shaun Belding 
Transitus 

IF ONLY 

The highwaymen had taken him into their hideout and had taught him 
the bad ways of life. He was a good boy at heart though, always oking on 
the bright side of things, even when his band was in trouble. 

Then one day, his good intentions went too far and misled him to Doom. 
He met a girl on his rovings (a habit of his, roving) and she told him she was 
taking the noon stage to Dover, which was carrying twenty thousand pounds 
worth of gold and silver. 

The boy soon saw that his duty to God was great, and that he wouldn't tell 
the thieves of his discovery. This was a sound decision, but unfortunately a 
thief had overheard the conversation and he scuttled off to tell the chief of 
the thieves. 

Because of this, not only was the noon stage robbed, but every man, woman 
and child aboard it was killed. The coach was burned and the horses were 
captured by the thieves for future use. 

The thieves soon revealed to the lad what they knew, and said he would 
die. "Leave it until dawn," said he. He pleaded so hard that the pirates 
finally consented to kill him on the morrow at dawn. 



92 



That night the poor lad couldn't sleep. He lay awake, listening to the 
sounds of night, — to the sound of mice's feet on the wainscot, of the tired 
twittering of the birds as they bedded down for the night, in their nests on 
the eaves. 

The air smelled fresh and purifying to the body, the body which lay half 
afraid, half sad. 

All too soon it was dawn. Then it hit that simple minded boy. that this was 
God's show, His festival. His parade, His ceremony, His celebration. 

The light came pouring through the air, causing birds to twitter and sing 
and triggering bees to hum and to suck sweet nectar artfully, cheekily from 
the flowers. The trees seemed greener than usual, the air fresher. It was too 
good a morning to die. 

He ate his porridge for breakfast, his last and most delicious meal, the oats 
and salt going splendidly with the milk and sugar. Afterwards a black cloth 
was tied around his eyes, his hands were bound, and he was ready, ready to 
die. "If only I didn't have to die, if only I could live longer, if only . . . ." 
he thought. 

"Bang!!" The echo carried and died away. Everything started swimming 
wildly, he could hear a cry of pain, perhaps it belonged to him. Finally every- 
thing faded and then went black. 

The next things he saw were the golden gates of heaven, waiting as it 
seemed, with outstretched arms, and with a promise of a blessed contentment 
that he had so seldom known in life. 

P. Deepan 

TEN YEARS FROM NOW 

This is the year 1981. I am still attending the University of Stockholm for 
personal reasons. I spent last summer in Ottawa and the changes were remark- 
able. 

Jacques Rose is now Prime Minister of Canada. Right now Mr. Rose is on 
a tour of Communist countries and is presently in the United States. During 
the absence of Mr. Rose, Mr. Hughy Newton, late of the Black Panthers, is 
acting Prime Minister. 

I took a trip to Ashbury College but was unable to get in. A National 
Guardsman told me the students were rioting, and the Guardsmen were 
surrounding the school. 

After that I looked up some old friends. Babbitt had had an operation on 
his ears and looked quite good. He is married to Sarah Farquhar with two 
sons. Blaine Johnson has arthritis and is unable to walk. I was surprised to 
see Josselyn on Welfare — he was so promising at school. He told me Ray 
was running for Prime Minister of India. 

I found the population had increased enormously. Ottawa is practically on 
the outskirts of Montreal. The hippies are gone with all their beads and hair. 
Drugs are also gone, since they've been legalized. I was happy to see there 
was no pollution (since there was nothing else to pollute). 

I went to see "Oh Bombay" at the Arts Centre and had a frightful 
experience. The whole cast was fully clothed. Shocking way to act. 

All the good old movies are back this time on television ( Candy, Fanny 
Hill and the rest). I went to see the movie "Jumbo the Flying Elephant". 
This movie was banned in Sweden. 

I suppose there will be a few more changes in the next ten years. 

Richard Robertson 
Transitus A 



93 



MY ADVENTURE 

Hello, my name is Tiny and I am going to tell you about one of my 
adventures. Of course, I was a stupid little puppy at that time and didn't 
know better than to get lost. This is how it happened. 

It was a bright and sunny day and I decided to explore the land around 
me. I headed toward a path which was well known to my friends to be very 
adventurous. This proved to be true as you will see. 

I was walking along the path very quietly. All was still except for birds 
twittering and the usual small noises that you hear in the forest. Suddenly I 
smelt something unusual and I decided to find out about it. 

I dived into the forest with a feeling of curiosity. To my amazement I 
found nothing. It took me nearly an hour to find the path again. When I 
found the path again, I promised myself not to leave it. 

I had been walking steadily for an hour when out jumped a rabbit and I 
took off after it. It was a long chase and I was the one to give up first. When 
I was chasing the rabbit, I did not think where I was going. I was deep in the 
forest and it was getting late. I wished I had never decided to explore, but it 
was too late now. I learned later that my master, Norman Wilcher, had 
become very worried. He got ready to take a trip to the O.H.S. When he got 
there he asked if there were any reports of a black and white beagle. When 
they said no, he asked if they would organize a search for him. They very 
graciously said yes and started right away. 

It was a long time before I got up and started to find the path. I went in 
three directions and then headed west. I was on a path I didn't recognize 
when suddenly something came running noisily behind me. I didn't wait to 
see what it was but jumped off the path down a slope and landed on a pile of 
leaves. Luckily the unknown animal could not get down the slope. I ran as 
fast as I could until I reached a cleared area and flopped down. 

The O.H.S. had now found some clues as to where I had gone. They had 
found the path which I had travelled on. 

I got up and started to walk, when through the trees I recognized the path 
which I had travelled at the beginning. I now knew that I had gone around 
in a circle. I started to run because I knew this would lead me home. When I 
was too exhausted to run any more, I lay down and rested. Then, around the 
corner came two men. They saw me and picked me up. They were taking 
me home. 

When we got home my master thanked them very much. I was never going 
on an adventure again. 

MR POLK 

Mr. Polk teaches folk, 

And he also likes to smoke. 

But when the smoke 

Goes down his throat, 

It makes him choke, 

And that's no joke. 

It could be the end of Mr. Polk. 

Ken Carre 
Form II 



94 



THE UNDERSEA WORLD 

Oh, the splendour of it all, 

Oh, the glory of it all. 

Oh, the majesty and bubbling waste of it all. 

The corals, the reefs 

Perfect as the sweep 
Of the sea. 

The oysters, the pearls, 

The clams and the swirls 
Of the sea. 
An eternity of sand 
Made by God's own hand. 
Touch the wet miracle 
Of the sea. 
And yet as it flows 
In its underwater shoals 

In its nooks and crannies all. 
A single sprinkled light 
From an oyster's shimmery white 

Glows in the inky fluid 
Of the sea. 

And the pearl's glowing white 
Brightens darkest night 

The radiance will call. 

And I again recall 

A vision 
Of the sea. 

Jeff Rosen 
IIIA 

MY LOST PET 

One day I was at a football game, that is my dog and I. I take my dog 
with me everywhere I go. We were at the Grey Cup in Toronto. When the 
game ended everybody rushed out the doors. My dog was not on a leash and 
I lost sight of him. I looked everywhere but I just couldn't find him. 

I hailed a taxi to drive around the city in search of my lost doggie. After a 
couple of hours of no luck I paid the driver, bought some candy, and took an 
O.T.C. bus home. As I looked out the window I ... I saw my lost doggie. 
I asked the driver to stop, but it was right in the middle of the highway. 
When I got off all I could see was a bunch of cars. 

I walked 14 miles, after which I headed for home, which was 6 miles away. 

The next morning I phoned the Toronto pound. They said that they did 
not have a dog that matched the description I gave. 

I went through the same routine as I had the day before. Just to make sure. 
I hailed a taxi and drove a little bit out of the city because you never know 
where dogs can go. 

Suddenly I said. "There he is! Stop the cab!" 

The first thing I saw when I got out of the car was the dog catcher and 
his net. He scooped up doggie and put him into the truck. I followed the 
truck to the pound, picked up doggie, and drove happily home. 

Blair Stuart 
Form I 



95 



FORM NOTES 



TRANSITUS A 



My best friend stands first in his class. 

He has ninety percent; whilst, alas, 

With my feeble brain, 

All I can attain 

Is a mark or two better than pass. 

There's an unco-ordinated boy named Tom 

Who went to the Senior Prom. 

He tried to dance, 

But tripped on his pants; 

Out the door he went like a bomb. 

There once was a boy named Dave 

Who did not like to behave. 

Though he improved a little, 

He still was too fickle, 

And dirty looks to the teachers he gave. 

There was a boy named the Beetle, 

Who was savagely pricked by a needle. 

He cried out in anguish 

For a band-aid and sandwich. 

Now the Beetle is in fine feetle. 

I am a boy named Pete. 

I sit in the very last seat. 

I sleep all the day; 

No work and all play. 

To get to Grade 9 will be sweet. 

There once was a boy in 8A, 
Who decided to work one fine day. 
Though he found it depressing, 
It soon was obsessing, 
And now that boy's in 9A. 

There was a young laddie named Ron, 

Whose hair grew consistently long. 

Though he liked it that way 

Mr. Sherwood did say 

His attitude completely wrong. 

I'm a young lad in Trans A, 

Who tends to day-dream all the day. 

I sit quietly snoring, 

The teachers imploring, 

For a little more work and less play. 



John Arnold 



Tom Assaly 



Dave Babbitt 



Jeff Beedell 



Peter Bowley 



Ian Burke-Robertson 



Ron Carson 



Bruce Chick 



96 




There was a young boy from down under, 

Who made all geologists wonder. 

He dug a deep hole, 

With a very short pole, 

And journeyed from winter to summer. 

There once was a boy named The Cake, 

Who wished only to swim in the lake. 

But there came by one day 

A dismaying relay, 

And so his exams he must take. 



There is a boy named Mark, 
To Ridley next year will embark. 
HeTl no longer be here. 
There'll go up a great cheer, 
Because he became quite a Narc. 

There once was a boy in Grade 8. 

Whose brother he tended to hate. 

The next thing I know. 

He'll still be my foe, 

For Grade 9'ers the seniors will bait. 



Adrian Conway 



Blaine Johnson 



Mark Josselyn 



Michael Lynch-Staunton 



There once was a school boy named Matt, 

Who wasn't too bad with a bat. 

When it came to his books. 

He got curious looks. 

For doing his prep on a hat. 



Matthew Marion 



97 



There was a lad from the Park, 

Who arrived in the town via Carp, 

He said, "T am sure, 

Mr. Trudeau is pure, 

But I'm not quite so sure about Sharp." 

George McKenna 

There once was a boy named Ten-Ton, 

Who never quite got his work done. 

He said in dismay, 

As he munched away, 

To eat is more fun than to run. 

Robert Pelcis 

There once was a youngster named Ray, 

Who did nothing all day but play, 

When it came to his test, 

He did not do his best, 

And so now he studies all day. 

Arindam Ray 

Robertson would like to pass math, 
But he causes his teachers great wrath, 
It seems he can't win, 
First Mrs. Babbitt, then Flynn, 
From both he has taken a bath. 

Richard Robertson 

It's true that prep I ignore, 

I find the whole matter a bore. 

Like to enjoy myself, 

Not to destroy myself. 

It'll never be "Prep I adore.'" 

Peter Steacy 

I'm a boy in the Junior School, 

Where nothing is really too cruel. 

At first I was dumb, 

Then things started to come. 

I'll be first in the Senior School. (Maybe!) 

Chris Teron 

This crazy 8th grader named Tross 
Remarked, "I'll show them who's boss." 
Over moguls and snow bumps, 
Skied backwards down ski jumps, 
So Tross ended up a dead loss. 

Anthony Tross 



TRANSITUS 

BRUCE ANFOSSIE likes his nick-name (pretty pink party juice). Some- 
times he plays about in class and does not pay much attention. All in all, 
though, I think he has had a pretty good year. 

SHAUN BELDING has finished his first year at Ashbury. He was the only 
new boy who was elected a Monitor. He was chosen Captain of the Senior 
Wizards, and got an M.L.T.S. Shaun comes from Texas. I think he has 
enjoyed his first year at Ashbury. 



98 






STEPHEN COLLINS said that he hated Ashhury, but I think he had a 
pretty good year. He came first in class and we were proud of him. He 
knows a lot about science and was the monitor of the fish tanks and things 
in the science room. 
ROD DOWLING is a pretty good guy. I guess he has had a pretty good year. 
His hobby is girls. His girl friend's name is Linda Nellan. His ambition is 
to set up a craft shop and to marry early. He has decided to be a millionaire 
by the time he is 25 and then to retire. 
PAUL FARQUHAR has been here for a couple of years. He works very hard 
and is a very good athlete, particularly as a runner. He won his event in 
the cross country. Everybody likes him even if he is sometimes very serious. 
PETE HARCOURT is a nice guy. Sometimes he came late to school but this 
is because he lives so far away. He had to start for school about a quarter 
to eight. He works very hard and has had a pretty good year. 
ROBIN HELMER is a pretty good guy. He is a good friend of mine although 
sometimes he loses his work. He had a slow start this vear but gradually 
has become a hard worker. He is coming back next year. 
MIKE KEMPER gave his teachers trouble last year at his other school but 
has been pretty well behaved this year. He was vice-captain of the Wizards 
and was one of the stars on the hockey team. At a matter of fact he is a 
good athlete all around. He works pretty hard. 
SHAWN MCNULTY has been here two years. He was not nearly so much a 
bother this year as he was last year. It was a good year. He likes stamps 
and has one of the best collections in the Junior School. He likes pets. 
RICK NEWBERGHER has finished his first year at Ashbury. His nickname 
is Egbert or Norm. He made the soccer and cricket teams. He is an O.K. 
guy most of the time. Rick's best subject is spelling. He smokes Export A. 
COLIN PATERSON has had three years at Ashbury. He likes Grade 8 girls. 
He also likes soccer, cricket and hockey. Colin has a good sense of humour. 
He also likes spelling because he gets them all wrong. He works harder 
than he lets on. He was a Monitor this year. 
TIMOTHY PERLEY-ROBERTSON (Tip a canoe and Perley too) has 
finished his second year at Ashbury. He is pretty good in sports. He is good 
in school. He is not returning next year. 
PAUL SANDERSON was a very quiet boy in class and well liked by all. He 
worked a lot harder than some of the teachers thought. He was a good 
friend of mine and I wish him a lot of good luck. 
IAN SCARTH was a Monitor and one of the class leaders. He worked very 
hard and was one of the Golds most of the time. He broke his leg but was 
a good athlete before this. He was popular. 
PETER STENGER got a 78 °o average at the beginning of the final exams. 
His hobby is stamp collecting. He talks German. His favourite sports are 
baseball and basketball. His best subjects are English, history and geogra- 
phy. His favourite teachers are Mr. Babbitt and Mr. Polk. 
DOUGLAS KEITH SCOTT STILBORN (Stillers) has been at Ashbury for 
8 years. He is not returning next year. His hobby is war. He wants to be 
an army architect. He is a very intelligent boy but thinks too much about 
war. His average at the end of the year might be about 71.3^0. He is 13 
years of age. 
JIM WRIGHT is a pretty nice guy. He has a lot of friends and is very smart, 
but pretends to be lazy. He is very good in science and knows a lot about 
cars. 
MARK ZAGERMAN has been at Ashbury for a couple of years. He is very 
good in spelling and pretty good in the rest of his subjects. He is popular 
and one of the tallest boys in the Junior School. 



99 







FORM IIIA 

MICHAEL ADJELEIAN. My favourite subjects are math, geography and 
French. This is my first year at Ashbury and I found it quite a change 
from the public schools. When I come back next year for Grade 8 I hope 
to get an M.L.T.S. I was able to get onto the school's 2nd hockey team and 
not too long ago we went on a trip to Amherst, Mass. to play two hockey 
games against them. We lost both games but we played well. My best friends 
are David Macleod. Iain Johnston, Robert Assaly and Miles Magner. 

ROBERT C. ASSALY. I enjoyed Ashbury for my first year and I wish I 
could come back again. I liked all sports. My best friends were Adjeleian, 
Johnston and Macleod. All the teachers were nice and they made my year 
a good one. 

ADRIAN BROOKES. I've been going to Ashbury for two years and I hope 
to come back. My favourite subjects are science, math and literature. My 
hobbies are model rockets and stamps. My best friends are Major-General 
Stilborn, commander of the 4th Reich, Coyne, who is 2/1. C, Hogwart 
(Hogarth), Pitfield, Puttick, Smoothy (Kasper), Ingold and Pimm. I hope 
to go into medical research. 

JOHN COYNE. This is my first year at Ashbury and I hope it will not be 
my last. My best friends are Johnston, Marsden, Hogarth, Power and 
Parkin. I think that next year will be even more fun. 

DAVID GREEN. This is my first year at Ashbury. It was a very successful 
year too. I have many good friends. My father is a teacher here and also 
the chaplain. Ashbury is a great school and I am coming back next year. 

STEPHEN HARROWER. 

DAVID HOGARTH. I am 11 years old. I am coming back next year. My 
favourite teachers are Mr. Flynn, Mr. Glover and Mr. Green. My favourite 
subjects are geography, history, Latin and math. My best friends are 
Harrower. Marsden. Parkin. Pitfield. Jones and Johnston. 



100 



CHRIS INGOLD. My favourite subjects are science and math. My favourite 

sport is water skiing. Unfortunately I will not be staying next year because 

we are going to Europe. My friends are Green, Wilson, Thompson, 

Johnston, Macleod, Power and Morrison. 
IAIN JOHNSTON. My favourite subjects are Latin and geography. My best 

friends are David Babbitt, Mark Josselyn, David Macleod and all my class. 
SIMON JONES. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it a lot. My father 

also teaches in the Senior School. Ashbury has nice teachers. There are nice 

boys at Ashbury, too. I hope to come back next year. 
MARK KASPER. 
DAVID MACLEOD. My best friends are Iain Johnston and Michael 

Adjeleian. My ambition is to be an aeroplane pilot. 
GEORGE MARSDEN. This is my second year at Ashbury. I liked it very 

much. I regret to say I will not be here next year. My best friends are 

Parkin, Hogarth, Pitfield and the rest of the class. I hope to be a general 

surgeon. 
BOB MORRISON. I had a tough time this year, but I managed to pull 

through. My favourite subject is Latin and my favourite sport is hockey. 

I enjoy building model aeroplanes. Next year I will try harder. 
VINCENT PARKIN. At the beginning of the year I was a boarder and did 

not like it very much. After Christmas I became a day boy and enjoyed it. 

I do not think- I will be back next year. My best subjects are math and 

history. 
MATTHEW PIMM. This is my third year at Ashbury and I have enjoyed 

them very much. I am an editor of a school paper called the Fama II. My 

friends are C. Byford. R. Wilson, P. L'Arrivee, C. Power, J. Pitfield, 

S. Stilborn and M. Kasper. Quite a few, but my favourites are C. Byford 

and R. Wilson. 
JAIME PITFIELD. My favourite subjects are math, science, history and 

English. I like everyone in my class. My sports are hockey, soccer, softball 

and track. 




101 



CHRIS POWER. This is my third year at Ashbury. I think it is my best year 

for I had the best teachers. I was on the hockey and cricket teams. I hope 

to have another enjoyable year at Ashbury. 
STEPHEN PUTTICK. This is my first year here and I am enjoying it very 

much. My favourite masters are Mr. Sherwood, Mr. Beedell and Mr. Flynn. 

My favourite subjects are Latin and science. My best friends are Green. 

Wilson II, Wilson III, Iain Johnston and Macleod. When I come back next 

year I hope to be in 8A. 

JEFF ROSEN. This is my third and final year at Ashbury. I have enjoyed 
the teachers and sport. I think this school system is better than the public 
school system. My favourite sports are high jumping and shot put. I like 
everyone in my class. I hope I pass my Latin. 

GREG SPENCER. I have enjoyed my second year at Ashbury and hope to 
return. 1 am 11 years old. My ambition is to be an architect. I may not 
return. 

JIM THOMPSON. This has been a fairly successful year, although I did not 
get an M.L.T.S. My favourite subjects are Latin, math and science. I am 
not coming back next year. 

ERIC WILSON. This is my third and most successful year at Ashbury. I hope 
to return next year. I would like to have many more happy years at 
Ashbury. 

FORM III 

DANIEL ARNOLD. This is my second year at Ashbury, and I have enjoyed 
it very much. My favourite hobbies are stamp collecting and spending 
money. I enjoyed the Washington trip very much. My best friends are 
Scott, Wiener and Zagerman who is nick-named tea bags. My ambition is 
to be a lawyer or a doctor. 

BRIAN BISIKER. This is my first year here and I like it very much. I made 
the soccer team and I did not do too well in school. I am a boarder here 
and I think it is O.K. I also went on the Washington trip and it was a lot 
of fun. Mr. Babbitt is my form room teacher; he is also my favourite master. 
My best friends are Babbitt. Dowling, Scott Robertson and the two Fullers. 
I hope I come back next year. When I grow up I want to be a professional 
skier. My hobbies are skiing, sailing and stamp collecting. 
BOB BRODIE. This is my first year at Ashbury and I am working harder 
this year than I have ever before. I live in Ottawa. My favourite subjects 
are grammar, French and history, and my worst is geography. I like 
Ashbury because of the sports and the teachers. I did not get an M.L.T.S. 
this year, but I will next year I think. My best friends are Joel Zagerman, 
Richard Wilson and the dog across from the school. My favourite sports 
are hockey, soccer and baseball. 
COLIN BYFORD. This is my fifth year at Ashbury. I am 12 years old. I 
enjoyed the canoe trip. My favourite teachers are Mr. Babbitt, Mrs. 
Babbitt and Mr. Humphreys. I will be coming back next year. My ambition 
is to be an artist. My best friends are Pimm, Heaton, Wilson and L'Arrivee. 
GUY CUZNER. This is my third year and my best friends are Wright. 
Haythornthwaite, Bisiker. Dowling, Wiener and Babbitt. I hope to go to 
U.B.C. I'll be a boarder next year. My favourite sports are skiing, ski 
jumping, swimming and diving. 
JIM DRON. This is my first year at Ashbury. I hope to come back next year. 
I like the school trips. My ambition is to be an engineer. I like the school 
sports very much. My favourite sports are softball and hockey. 



102 




RON ELIAS. This is my second and last year at Ashbury. My favourite sports 
are swimming, softball and soccer. My nickname is Eli or Bulldog. My 
favourite classes are spelling and French. My ambition is to be an 
astronomer. 

BILL FULLER. This is my second year at Ashbury. I like it here. My best 
friends are Veilleux. Andy and Limey. I hope to do better next year and 
get an M.L.T.S. My favourite sports are baseball, hockey and sailing. I 
hope to be an architect like my father. 

HUGH HEATON. This is my third year at Ashbury. My nicknames are Heat. 
Smiley, and Heaton the Beaton. Mv favourite teacher is Mrs. Babbitt and 
my favourite sports are figure skating and baseball. I hope to come back 
next year. I have lots of friends, but one of my favourites is Shawn 
McNulty. I hope to be a doctor as my father is. 

JOHN LAFORTUNE. This is my first year at Ashbury. My best friends are 
Babbitt. Johnson. Paterson and Wiener. My best sports are hockey and 
baseball. My favourite masters are Mr. and Mrs. Babbitt, Mr. Sherwood. 
Mr. Humphreys and Mr. Tottenham. I hope to own my grandfather's 
business as construction engineer. I will be coming back next year. 

PAUL L'ARRIVEE. I've been here for one month and two weeks and have 
found it a fabulouslv amazing school. The boys here are very friendly, not 
to mention the girls because there are none since it s a private boy s 
school. We have many sports such as cricket, baseball, soccer, and track 
and field. I have most everybody as a friend, especially Bill Fuller. 
Clermont Veilleux. Joel Zagerman. Richard Wilson, Andv Moore and Colin 
Byford. 

GRAEME MCKENNA. When I first came to Ashbury my marks were bad. 
then they became good. My French, math and all my sports improved. I 
want very much to come back. I find that the trips we take are exciting. 
I hope to be a lawyer some day with the help of Ashbury. 



103 



ANDREW MOORE. I am from Brooklyn, New York. My favourite subjects 
are geography, science and grammar. This year I tried on my pair of ice 
skates and 1 got sore ankles. My best friends here are Joel Zagerman, I call 
him "Veg" for short, and Fuller I, Wilson and Richard Motta. I call him 
for short "Jake the Snake". I really don't know if I should come back here 
next year or not. I think I'll think it over on the weekend. My ambition is 
to become a doctor - pediatrician. This is my first year. The masters that I 
like the best are Mr. Flynn, Mr. Babbitt and Mr. Beedell. My sports are 
basketball, baseball and soccer. 

RICHARD MOTTA. This is my first year at Ashbury. I didn't quite make 
an M.L.T.S. Near the end of the year I broke my finger. My favourite 
sport is baseball even though I didn't make the team. I liked the Washing- 
ton trip very much and I hope to come back next year. 

SCOTT ROBERTSON. This is my first year at Ashbury and I enjoyed it 
very much. My favourite sports are hockey, baseball and soccer. I am glad 
I came to Ashbury because we get to go on trips. We went to Washington 
about 3 weeks ago and that was lots of fun. 

CHRIS SCOTT. This is my third year at Ashbury. I like it very much. I 
hope to return next year. 

CLERMONT VEILLEUX. It is my first year at Ashbury. My best friends 
are Fuller I, Zagerman II and Moore II. I made the hockey and softball 
teams. I enjoyed the Washington trip. I hope to come back next year. 

PHILIPPE WIENER. This is my fourth year at Ashbury. I hope to come 
back here next year. My best friends are Brodie, Babbitt, Paterson, Sand- 
erson, Newbergher, Belding and Lafortune. My best subjects are history 
and geography. My favourite teacher is G. W. Babbitt. My best sports are 
hockey and soccer. I would like to be a lawyer when I grow up. I enjoyed 
this year very much and am looking forward to coming back. 

RICHARD WILSON. This is my third year at Ashbury College. I enjoy all 
the sports here. My friends are all of forms III and IIIA. The Washington 
trip was great. I like all the teachers. My nickname is Wee Willie. 

JOEL ZAGERMAN. This is my first year at Ashbury and I like it very much. 
My friends are Moore, Fuller, Weiner and Paterson and the rest of my 
form. My nickname is Tea-bags. I like geography and math. I would like 
to come back to Ashbury next year. 




104 



FORM II 

DAVID ABLACK. This is my second year at Ashbury. I am coming back 
next year. My favourite classes are math and French. My best friends are 
Deepan. Flynn and Heaton. My favourite hobbies are fishing and swim- 
ming. 

KEN CARRE. This is my first year at Ashbury. My favourite subjects are 
science and games. My best friends at Ashbury are Andy Man, Fearless 
Fred and Major. 

PAUL DEEPAN. I am very pleased with my success this year. I received a 
third place ribbon at the Track Meet and received an M.L.T.S. of 92.6 a o. 
I like all of my classmates. I like all of my teachers and I think Ashbury 
is a very good school. 

SCOTT DIPLOCK. This is my first year at Ashbury. It has been very 
enjoyable. Mr. Humphreys is my favourite teacher. Although he can lose 
his temper, he's a really good guy. He very often sticks up for jokes, or 
makes one. The game I like best here is softball. Myles Magner is my 
best friend here. 

FRED ELLACOTT. This is my second year at Ashbury and I still like it 
more than any school I have attended. My friends are Jacques Major and 
Michael Tkachuk. 

MATTHEW FLYNN. This is my second year at Ashbury. I like it here. This 
year I got my M.L.T.S. I also won one ribbon at the Track Meet. 

MARK FULLER. I have enjoyed my second year at Ashbury. I enjoy the 
sports very much. My friends are Bill, my brother, Harwood, Magner. 
Bisiker. Diplock, Deepan. Ablack, Josselyn, Johnston. Smith IV. Jones. 
Arnold II. Mierins. and all the masters. 

RICARDO HAMBLETON. This is my second year at Ashbury. I like it 
because vou learn a lot of new things. My favourite hobbies are stamp 
collecting and model building. My favourite teacher is Mr. Babbitt. 

JONATHAN HEATON. This is the first year that I have received an 
M.L.T.S. My favourite teachers are Mr. Flynn and Mr. Babbitt. My best 
friends are diaper man and the miniature one. 

BILLY JOHNSTON. This is my second year at Ashbury. I got a 90^0 
average this term. My best friends are Josselyn. Deepan. Flynn and Heaton. 
I enjoyed the canoe trip very much. 

MARTYN JONES. This is my first year at Ashbury and I have made a lot 
of friends. I enjoyed this year very much. We played a lot of sports. My 
favourite sport is soccer. My father is a teacher in the Senior School. There 
are a lot of nice teachers at Ashbury. My favourite subjects are geography 
and science. I got my M.L.T.S. this year with an average of 80.9^b. I moved 
to Ottawa from Vancouver last September. I am coming back next year. 

DAVID JOSSELYN. This is my second year at Ashbury. I am coming back 
next year. I made the choir and all the junior soccer teams. My favourite 
teacher is Mr. Babbitt. My best friends are Tkachuk and Deepan. 

TED LIGTHART. I think Ashbury is a fine school. I hope to go to it for a 
long while. My friends are Scott Marshall. David Josselyn. Myles Magner. 
Peter Bell. Brent Mitchell and Mark Fuller. I think Mr. Sherwood is a 
fine teacher and principal. 

MYLES MAGNER. This is my first year at Ashbury. My favourite teacher is 
Mr. Babbitt. My hobbies are sports, chess and stamps. My favourite sport 
is hockey. My best friends are Flynn, Deepan and Ablack. My best subject 
is literature. 



105 



JACQUES MAJOR. This is my first year at Ashbury. I hope to come back 
next year. My best friends are John Macdonald, Fred Ellacott and Vince 
MacDermot. My favourite teachers are Mr. Green, Mr. Flynn and Mr. 
Sherwood. My favourite classes are geography and science. My hobby is 
stamp collecting. My favourite sport is football. 

ARNIE MIERINS. This is my first year at Ashbury. My favourite teachers 
are Mr. Babbitt and Mr. Polk, and my favourite subjects are literature and 
science. My favourite sports are swimming and football. 

MICHAEL O'MEARA. This is my second year at Ashbury. My best friend 
is Robin Smith. My favourite teachers are Mr. Babbitt and Mr. Polk. 

ROBIN SMITH. This is my second year at Ashbury. I like it very much. I 
am not coming back for two years because I am going to Greece. My favour- 
ite sports at Ashbury are hockey, soccer and cricket. My favourite teachers 
are Mr. Polk and Mr. Flynn. 

ROBERT SMITH. This is my first year at Ashbury. My best friends are 
Mark Fuller and Robin Smith. I really enjoyed the canoe trip. 

MICHAEL TKACHUK. This is my third year at Ashbury. I like all my 
masters. I hope to come back next year. I think everybody enjoyed 
Ashbury except for some people. My best subject is French. 

MICHAEL TORONTOW. This is my second year here at Ashbury. My best 
friends are Matthew Flynn and Paul Deepan. My favourite sports are crab 
soccer and running. 

IAN WALKER. My nickname is Baby Walk. This is my first year here and 
I like it very much. My best friend is Hambleton. My favourite teacher is 
Mr. Flynn. 



FORM I 

PETER BELL. This is my first year at Ashbury and I wish I could come 

back. I like all the sports that we play. My favourite teachers are Mr. and 

Mrs. Babbitt and Mr. Sherwood. My favourite friends are Stuart, Hall I, 

Harwood and Blake. 
JONATHAN BLAKE. This is my first year at Ashbury. My favourite teachers 

are Mr. Flynn, Mr. Humphreys and Mr. Penton. I am a boarder. My 

favourite friends are Stuart and Harwood. 
ROBERT BYFORD. My friends are Richter, Blake, Harwood and Wright. 

My favourite sports are soccer and track. My favourite teacher is Mrs. 

Babbitt. 
BENEDICT HALL. This is my first year at Ashbury and I like it very much. 

My best teacher is Mr. Flynn and my best friend is T. M. Warren. 
TED HALL. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it very much. My 

favourite teachers are Mr. Flynn and Mr. and Mrs. Babbitt. My favourite 

sports are soccer, rugger, shot put, baseball and basketball. My best friends 

are Stuart, Bell, Harwood, Palmer, Meyers and Bob Murray. I am 10. 
RICHARD HARWOOD. This is my first year at Ashbury. My best friends 

are Fuller I, Hall I, Stuart, Blake and Bell. The food is O.K. 
SCOTT MARSHALL. My favourite sports are soccer, hockey and softball. 

My favourite teachers are Mrs. Babbitt, Mr. Flynn and Mr. Penton. My 

best friends are Blake, Stuart, Hall I, Puttick and Meyers. My favourite 

subjects are math, science, geography and literature. I got my M.L.T.S. and 

I am coming back next year. 
DAVID MEYERS. This is my first year at Ashbury and I would like to come 

back next year. My best friends are Stuart, Hall I, Warren and Bell. My 

best teachers are Mrs. Babbitt and Mr. Flynn. 
BRENT MITCHELL. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like most of the 

sports and the food is pretty good. 




BOB MURRAY. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it but not much. 
I'm not very good here because I skipped Grade 4, but I'll catch up again. 
My form master is Mrs. Babbitt. I'm in Form I. I'm a weekly boarder. I 
go home on the weekend. I'm coming here next year. I hope I get good 
marks in Grade 6. My Form Room is Room J. We are writing exams now. 

MICHAEL PUTTICK. I am 9 years old. My favourite friends are Stuart, 
Ted Hall, and Meyers the Comedian. My favourite sports are fishing, 
hockey and soccer. My favourite teachers are Mr. Flynn, Mrs. Babbitt and 
Mr. Humphreys. I got my M.L.T.S. this year. 

MARK RICHTER. I am 9 years old and this is my first year in Grade 5 at 
Ashbury. My favourite teachers are Mrs. Babbitt and Mr. Flynn. My 
favourite sport is soccer. I am a boarder and I like it quite a lot. I like 
history and science because they are fun. My best friends are Marshall. 
Meyers and Harwood. 

NORMAN SIROTEK. I like this school and I hope to come back next year. 
My favourite teachers are Mr. Flynn and Mrs. Babbitt. My favourite sports 
are running and baseball. 

BLAIR STUART. My best friends are Ted Hall, Peter Bell, Richard Harwood 
and Jimmy Dron. I just came to Ottawa last August from Toronto. I like 
all sports but I especially like hockey and softball. I am not coming back 
to Ashbury next vear, but I hope to come back the year after. 

TIMOTHY WARREN. This is my first year at Ashbury College. I like it 
here very much. I like all the teachers and what they teach us. I have 
learned a lot of new things this year and will learn more next year. My 
favourite subjects are science, math, literature, geography. French and 
history. My best friends are Charles V. Zwirewich and Benedict J. C. Hall. 

PALMER WRIGHT. This is my first year at Ashbury. I am 11 years old. My 
favourite teachers are Mr. Flynn and Mr. Penton and Mrs. Babbitt. My 
favourite sports are skiing, softball and swimming. My best friends are 
Hall II and Bvford. I hope to stay at Ashburv until Grade 13. 

CHARLES ZWIREWICH. This is my first year at Ashbury. My favourite 
sport is softball. I hope to stay in Ashbury for a few more years. I like it 
a lot. 



107 



School Register — 1970-71 



Ablack, David Lennox 
Aboud, Douglas Edward 

Adjeleian, Michael John 

Anapolsky I, Ronnie 
Anapolsky II, Gerry 
Anfossie, Frederick Bruce 
Arnold I, John James II 

Arnold II, Daniel George 

Ashton, Andrew Frederick 

Assaly I, Tommy Gregory 
Assaly II, Robert Christopher 

Babbitt, David Frederick John 

Bacon, Robert Thomas 
Ballinger, Peter Nelson 
Barnes, Michael Leslie William 
Bates, Christopher Robert 
Beedell I, Michael John 
Beedell II, Jeffrey William 
Belanger, Francois 
Belding, Kirk Shaun 

Bell, Peter Henry H. 
Bennett, Richard Lloyd 
Beqaj, Jimmy Kujtim 
Bisiker, Brian Douglas 
Blake, Jonathan James Moffatt 

Bonneau, Michel 
Bowley, Peter Jon 

Boyd, Bryan Alexander 

Brodie, Robert Alan 

Brookes, Adrian Martin 

Bryan, Kim 

Burke-Robertson, David Ian William 

Burns, Ian George 

Buser, Martin Ulrich 

Byford I, Colin William 

Byford II, Robert James 



Cahn, Edward Walter 
Carre, Kenneth Norman 
Carson, Ronald John 
Charron, Louis 
Chick, Bruce Hamilton III 
Childers, Richard Spencer 
Christie, Hugh Alexander 
Chu, Kwong-Kie Frankie 

Clubb, Harry Norman 

Collins, Stephen George 

Comis, Stephen Gregory 
Connell, Martin Harold Earl 



737a Springland Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1V 6L9. 
615 Walpole Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, 

Montreal 305, P.Q. 
1495 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 

K2C 1N8. 
1 12 Finchley Road, Hampstead, Montreal 254, P.Q. 
112 Finchley Road, Hampstead, Montreal 254, P.Q. 
3232 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 5A7. 
290 Mariposa Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0T2. 
290 Mariposa Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0T2. 
The Regency, Apt. 1909, 3555 Cote des Neiges 

Road, Montreal 109, P.Q. 
301 Faircrest Road, Ottawa, Ont. K1H 5E2. 
301 Faircrest Road, Ottawa, Ont. K1H 5E2. 

60 Mariposa Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0V1. 
310 Strathearn Avenue, Montreal West 263, P.Q. 

9 Qualicum Street, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 7G9. 
7 Starwood Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2G 1Y7. 
82 Marlowe Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K1S Ul. 
3 Radisson Street, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 6C5. 

3 Radisson Street, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 6C5. 

529 rue Lachapelle, Hemmingford, P.Q. 

342 Wilchester Blvd., Houston, Texas 77024, 

U.S.A. 
26 Wick Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 7H2. 
Main Street, Avonmore, Ont. 
928 Inswood Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K2A 3S1. 
465 Oakhill Road, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 1J5. 
Quarterbell Farm, Fishatchery Road, Petawawa, 

Ont. 
Saint-Simon (Bagot), P.Q. 
2240 Halifax Drive, Apt. 802, Ottawa, Ont. 

K1G 2W8. 
Box 123, R.R. No. 1, Hull, P.Q. 
69 Geneva Street, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 3N6. 
100 McLeod Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K1K 2J2. 
39 Wallford Way, Ottawa, Ont. K2E 6B1. 
Marchmont, Dunrobin, Ont. 
14 Tennyson Street, Ottawa Ont. K2E 5W6. 
303 Fairmont Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 1Y5. 
250 Springfield Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0K9. 
250 Springfield Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0K9. 

6825 LaSalle Blvd., Montreal 204, P.Q. 

2205 Alta Vista Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1H 7L9. 

7 Greenwich Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2E 5E7. 

163 Thomas Street, Gatineau, P.Q. 

13 Esquimault Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 6Z2. 

232 Remic Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1Z 5W5. 

2250D Halifax Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1G 2W8. 

10 Man Fuk Road, Beauty Court, 14th Fir., 
Flat-B, Waterloo Hill, Kowloon, Hong Kong. 

Apt. 904, 124 Springfield Road, Ottawa, Ont. 

KIM 2C8. 
31 Perseverance Road, Port-of -Spain, Trinidad, 

W.I. 
4575 Circle Road, Montreal 248, P.Q. 
Connell Homestead, Spencerville, Ont. 



109 



Conway, Adrian Janis Evans 

Copestake, Peter Goodall 

Couturier, Humberto 
Coyne, John Daniels, 

Croal, Peter Sean Taylor 
Cunningham, Ian Robert 

Cuthbertson, Ian Dorland 

Cuttle, James Francis 
Cuzner, Donald Guy 

Dahlberg, Eric 

Davies, Gregory Charles 

Deepan, Paul Dhananjaya 
Desmarais, Louis Pierre 

Dickson, Thomas Adamson 
Diplock, Donald Ian Scott 
Dobbin, Michael Hamilton 

Don, Paul Conway 
Dowling, Rodrium Walter 
Draper, Richard Foster 
Dron, James 
Duguay, Mark 

Elkin, Robert Frederick 
Elias, Ronald Michael 
Ellacott, Frederick James 



Fabricius, Christian Paulus 
Farquhar, Paul Anderson 
Flynn, Matthew John 
Fuller I, William Norman 

Fuller II, Mark Patrick 



Gorbena, Jose Jaime 
Graham, Peter Jeffrey Stuart 
Grahovac, Stephen Zvonimir 

Grant-Whyte, Robert 

Greatrex, Jonathan William Hugh 

Green, David E. C. 

Grills, Dana William Sanford 

Gripton, James Edward 

Hall I, Edward Norman 

Hall II, Benedict James Christian 

Repesse 
Hallett, Dell Robert 
Halupka, Robert Herman Douglas 

Hambleton, Ricardo 
Hamilton, John William Beresford 
Hansen, Kenneth Peter 
Harcourt I, Scott Douglas 
Harcourt II, Peter James 



757 Acacia Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0M9. 
60 Placel Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

K1L 5C1. 
17 Ste. Geneviere Avenue, Quebec City, P.Q. 
235 Mariposa Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0T4. 
1239 Evans Blvd., Ottawa, Ont. K1H 7T7. 
Apt No. 1214, Champlain Towers 200 Rideau 

Terrace, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 0Z3. 
Apt. 604, Champlain Towers, 200 Rideau 

Terrace, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 0Z3. 
Mont Tremblant, P.Q. 
Kingsmere, P.Q. 

35 Mohawk Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 7G7. 
The Gleneagles, Apt. C-31, 3940 Cote des Neiges 

Road, Montreal 109, P.Q. 
Apt. 9, 400 Friel Street, Ottawa, Ont. KIN 7W6. 
635 Algonquin Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, 

Montreal 305, P.Q. 
Apt. 3, 890 McMillan Avenue, Winnipeg 9, Man. 
30 Woodlawn Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1S 2S9. 
Apt. 911, 1525 Alta Vista Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 

K1G 0G1. 
12 Rothwell Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 7G4. 
Bay Colony Estates, R.R. No. 3, Stayner, Ont. 
804 Provost Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 
2763 Moncton Road, Ottawa, Ont. K2B 7V9. 
800 Maloney Blvd., Templeton, P.Q. 

50 Lome Avenue, St. John, N.B. 
1961 Dorval Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1G 2N5. 
Box 356, Prescott Highway, R.R. No. 2, Ottawa, 
Ont. 

240 Sandridge Road, Ottawa, Ont. K1L 5A2. 
403 Wood Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 1J8. 
39 Birch Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1K 3G5. 
"The Moorings", 2780 Cassels Street, Ottawa, 

Ont. K2B 6N8. 
"The Moorings", 2780 Cassels Street, Ottawa, 

Ont. K2B 6N8. 

Avenida 9 No. 2220, Cordoba, Vera Cruz, Mexico. 
45 Apple Hill Road, Baie d'Urfe, P.Q. 
Apt. 909, 200 Rideau Terrace, Ottawa, Ont. 

KIM 0Z3. 
4865 Cedar Crescent, Montreal 247, P.Q. 
32 Sunset Blvd., Ottawa, Ont. K1S 3G9. 
577 Windermere Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2A 2W4. 
Apt. 905, Champlain Towers, 200 Rideau 

Terrace, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 0Z3. 
719 Island Park Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 0B8. 

535 Fairview Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 
Ont. KIM 0X4. 

582 Lisgar Street, Ottawa, Ont. KIR 5H7. 

250 Main Street, Maniwaki, P.Q. 

c/o The Marcona Mining Company, Apartado 

1 229, Lima, Peru, South America. 
59 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 4A8. 
26 Madawaska Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1S 3G6. 
168 Evangeline Avenue, Sept-Iles, P.Q. 
22 Mohawk Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 7G6. 
22 Mohawk Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 7G6. 



110 



Hartley, George 
Harrower, Stephen Nicholas 
Hart, William Street 
Harwood, Richard William 
Haythornthwaite, James Adrian 

Edward 
Heaney, David Macdonald 
Heaton I, Hugh Alexander 
Heaton II, Anthony Jonathan 

Helmer, Robin John 
Henderson, Robert John 

Hodgins, Michael 
Hogarth, David Andrew 
Hope, Paul 
Hung, Chi Ho David 



Ingold, Christopher Frank 

Jeffrey, George MacKinnon 
Jelenick, Michael Stuart 
Johnson, Geoffrey Blaine Phipps 
Johnston I, David Bruce 
Johnston II, Alastair Iain 
Johnston III, William Erskine 
Jokinen, Edward Alexander 

Jones I, Simon Frederick 

Jones II, Martyn Daniel 

Josselyn I, Mark 

Josselyn II, David 

Joyce I, Charles Mark 

Joyce II, Paul Andrew 



Kasper, Mark Christopher 
Kelly, Michael Patrick 

Kemper, Michael 

Kenny, Robert Maclaren 

Kerr, Douglas J. 

Khan, Naseet Ahmad Ackbar 



Lackie, Daniel Wallace 
Lafortune, John 
Latimer, James Christopher 
Leffler, Peter Derek 

Ligthart, Robert Theodore 
L'Arrivee, Paul Emil 
Lawley, Scott 

Littlejohn, Edward James 

Loeb, Arthur Henry 

Luciani I, Anthony 
Luciani II, Richard Grant 
Luciani III, James Gordon 



P.O. 6559, Accra, Ghana. 

Box 250, R.R. No. 2, Ottawa, Ont. 

Box 111. R.R. No. I, Hull, P.Q. 

57 Cherry wood Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 6H1. 

Box 370, Kemptville, Ont. 
2383 Baseline Road, Ottawa, Ont. K2C 0E2. 
23 Larchwood Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 2E3. 
95 MacKinnon Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0G4. 
38 Davidson Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 6L8. 
190 Acacia Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0L5. 
52 Queensline Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 7J2. 
425 Maple Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 
748 Fleming Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1G 2Y9. 
19 Tai Hang Road, Ground Fir., Causeway Bay, 

Hong Kong. 

P.O. Box 712, R.R. No. 5, Ottawa, Ont. 

1448 Kilborn Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1H 6L9. 

319 Clemow Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1S 2B7. 

100 Iona Street, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 3L8. 

Box 121, R.R. No. 1, Hull, P.Q. 

Box 121, R.R. No. 1, Hull, P.Q. 

Maplewood Farm, R.R. No. 3, Richmond, Ont. 

Apt. No. 103, 101 Angora Place, Dollard des 

Ormeaux, P.Q. 
22 Bearbrook Road, Blackburn Hamlet, Ottawa, 

Ont. K1B 3H9. 
22 Bearbrook Road, Blackburn Hamlet, Ottawa, 

Ont. K1B 3H9. 
224 Springfield Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0K9. 
224 Springfield Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0K9. 
Apt. No. 704, The Rockcliffe Arms, 

124 Springfield Road, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 0K9. 
Apt. No. 516, 2045 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, 

Ont. K2A 1G5. 

I Harrogate Place, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 5L6. 
Apt. No. 1106, 355 St. Clair Ave. West. 

Toronto 10, Ont. 

II Briarcliffe Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 6E3. 
614 George Street, Box 569, Buckingham, P.Q. 
843 Rozel Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K2A 1H8. 
Apt. No. 85, 80 Rideau Terrace, Ottawa, Ont. 

KIM 2A1. 

167 Tennyson Place, Waterloo, Ont. 
467 MacLaren Street, Ottawa, Ont. KIR 5K5. 
1215 Amesbrooke Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K2C 2E7. 
125 Juliana Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 1J2. 
P.O. Box 482, Manotick, Ont. 
37 Overlake Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K2E 5V4. 
7216 Interlaaken Drive S. W., Tacoma, 

Washington 98499, U.S.A. 
61 Park Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

KIM 0C1. 
225 Minto Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0B5. 
Havre St. Pierre, Duplessis County, P.Q. 
Havre St. Pierre, Duplessis County, P.Q. 
Havre St. Pierre, Duplessis County, P.Q. 



Ill 



Lynch-Staunton I, Victor 
Lynch-Staunton II, Michael 

MacDermot, Vincent 

Macdonald, John Gillmor 

MacEwen I, William Allan 
Maclaren, Charles Henry 
Macleod II, Nigel 
Macleod III, David John 
MacPhee, James Peter 
Magner, Myles 
Major, Jacques 

Mangifesta, Pierre 
Marion, Matthew Anderson 
Marsden, George Francisco Ramon 
Marshall, Scott Hamilton 
Martin I, Douglas James 
Martin II, Thomas George 
Martineau, Guy 
McEachran, John Scott 
McKenna I, George R. 
McKenna II, Graeme Norman 
McKeown II, Peter 
McLellan, Donald Bruce 
McLeod I, Duncan Clark 
McNeil I, David Alexander 
McNeil II, Jeffrey 
McNulty, Larivee Shawn 
McTaggart, Gordon 
Meyers, David George 
Mierins, Amis E. 
Mitchell, Brenton Ellwood 
Moore I, Michael James 
Moore II, Andrew Grover 
Morrison I, Donald James 
Morrison II, Robert Sinclair 
Motta, Richard Alan 
Mulock, William Francis 

Murray, Robert William Justin 

Nadeau, Joseph Jean Marc 
Newbergher, Richard Nelson 
Ng I, Chung Chi Douglas 
Ng II, Chung Yu Raymond 

O'Meara, Michael William 

Pardo, Phillippe 

Parkin, Vincent Nicholas 

Paterson I, Donald Cameron 

Paterson II, Colin 

Pearce, Douglas Howard 

Pelcis, Robert 

Perley-Robertson I, Michael Bethune 

Perley-Robertson II, Timothy 

Pimm I, Robert Gordon 

Pimm II, Matthew Everett 



Apt. No. 304, 2240 Halifax Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 

K1G 2W8. 
Apt. No. 304, 2240 Halifax Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 

K1G 2W8. 

161 Forest Avenue, Staten Island, New York 

10301, N. Y., U.S.A. 
Apt. No. 203, Champlain Towers, 200 Rideau 

Terrace, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 0Z3. 
Box No. 100, Maxville, Ont. 
180 John Street, Buckingham, P.Q. 
218 Boul. Mont-Bleu, No. 5, Hull, P.Q. 
218 Boul. Mont-Bleu, No. 5, Hull, P.Q. 
2455 Rosewood Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2B 7L3. 
231 Clemow Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1S 2B5. 
383 Chester Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, 

Montreal 305, P.Q. 
64 East Avenue, Brantford, Ont. 
955 Mooney Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 3A3. 
197 Sunnyside Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1S 0R4. 
47 Island Park Drive, Manotick, Ont. 
169 Holmwood Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1S 2P3. 

22 Rothwell Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 7G4. 
38 Range Road, Ottawa, Ont. KIN 8J4. 
1756 Lakeshore Road, Sarnia, Ont. 

2 Coltrin Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa 2, Ont. 
21 Glenridge Road, Ottawa, Ont. K2G 2Z3. 
473 Mayfair Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 0K6. 
9 Closse, Baie Comeau, P.Q. 

60 Dibgate Blvd., Agincourt, Ont. 

51 Forest Hill Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2C 1P7. 
51 Forest Hill Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2C 1P7. 
Highway 17 East, Sturgeon Falls, Ont. 
345 Archibald Street, Renfrew, Ont. 
818 Norton Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2B 5P6. 
6 Amberley Place, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 7J8. 
72c Chesterton Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K2E 5S9. 
603 Chester Street, Brooklyn, New York, U.SA. 
603 Chester Street, Brooklyn, New York, U.S.A. 

61 Burnside Avenue, Wakefield, P.Q. 

169 Clemow Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1S 2B3. 
2108 Grafton Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 6K8. 
387 Maple Lane, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

KIM 1H7. 
24 Clemow Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1S 2B2. 

2531 Labelle, Chomedey, Laval, P.Q. 
6 Hazel Street, Ottawa, Ont. K1S 0E8. 
1 1 1 Robinson Road, 3rd Fir., Hong Kong. 
1 1 1 Robinson Road, 3rd Fir., Hong Kong. 

23 Linden Terrace, Ottawa, Ont. K1S 1Z1. 

201 Metcalfe Avenue, Westmount, Montreal 215, 

P.Q. 
80 Park Avenue. Ottawa, Ont. K2P 1B2. 
Station "F\ P.O. Box 664, Thunder Bay, Ont. 
Apt. 803, 45 Balliol Street, Toronto 295, Ont. 
4394 Gilles Street. Pierrefonds, P.Q. 
149 Crichton Street, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 1W1. 
275 Cloverdale Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0Y3. 
275 Cloverdale Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0Y3. 
251 Park Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

KIM 0C9. 
251 Park Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

KIM 0C9. 



112 



Pitfield, Jaime Weldon 

Plummer, William Richard 
Polk, Nicholas 
Power I, Sean Michael 
Power II, Christopher Noble 
Pryde, Derek 

Puttick I, Stephen Richard 
Puttick II, Michael Paul Ernest 

Ramsay, Roger Gordon 



Ray, Arindam 
Rennie, Donald 
Richardson, Peter John 



Richter, Mark Andrew 

Rickard, John Paul 

Rigby, Stephen James 

Rimsa, Kostas 

Robertson I, Magnus Ian Leslie 

Robertson II, Richard Scot 

Robertson III, Robert Scott 
Ronalds, H. Jay 

Rogers, Paul 

Rosen, Jeffrey Stephen 

Rosenhek, Lenny 

Ross, Douglas John H. 
Rowlinson, Matthew Charles 

Sanderson, James Paul 
Scarth, Ian Campbell 
Schofield, Charles Andrew 

Schwarzmann, Juan 
Scott I, Andrew Nicholas 
Scott II, Christopher Blair 

Seay, James Anthony 
Sherman, Gary Neil 
Sirotek I, Robert Frederick 

Sirotek II, Norman Allan 

Siversky, David Jonathan 
Skolnik, Arthur 
Smallwood, Leo Alexander 
Smith I, Robert Bruce 
Smith II, Ian Henderson 

Smith III, Robin Hayeur 
Smith IV, Robert George 
Spencer I, Stephen Derek 
Spencer II, Nigel John 
Srencer III, Gregory Charles 
Steacy, Harold Peter 
Stenger, Peter 

Stewart I, David Macdonald 



100 Park Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

KIM 0C2. 
1077 Pinewood Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K2B 5Y3. 

34 Union Street, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 1R4. 

P.O. Box 166, 36 Queen Street, Nassau, Bahamas. 

Basswoodhill, R.R. No. 1, Dunrobin, Ont. 

2126 Casey Avenue, Beacon Hill North, Ottawa, 

Ont. K1J 6E8. 
473 Brierwood Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2A 2H2. 
473 Brierwood Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2A 2H2. 

c/o Canadian Consulate General, One Maritime 

Plaza, Golden Gateway Centre, San Francisco, 

California 94111, U.S.A. 
1312 Stanton Road, Ottawa, Ont. K2C 3E1. 
318 Bayswater Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 2H3. 
c/o Pan American Health Organization, P.A.S.B., 

Medical Dept., P.O. Box 430, Belize, 

British Honduras. 
322 Mildred Street, Midland, Ont. 
1102 Lynbrook Road, Oakville, Ont. 

35 Lambton Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 0Z8. 
267 de Chateauguay, Longueuil, P.Q. 

344 Manor Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0H8. 
83 Woodridge Crescent, Apt. No. 11, Ottawa, 

Ont. K2B 7T2. 
17 Rothwell Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 7G5. 
Apt. No. 907, 1212 Pine Avenue West, Montreal 

112, P.Q. 
2196E Halifax Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1G 2W6. 
2368 Renfield Road, Ottawa, Ont. K1H 7W2. 
Apt. 1402, 5500 MacDonald Avenue, Cote St. Luc, 

Montreal 254, P.Q. 
38 Sioux Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 7E5. 
434 Fortier Street, St. Hilaire, P.Q. 

66 Marina Drive, R.R. No. 3, Manotick, Ont. 
8 Qualicum Street, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 7G8. 
778 Eastbourne Avenue, Manor Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. K1K 0H7. 
Paseo Reding 31, Malaga, Spain. 
455 Holland Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 0Z4. 
470 Acacia Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0M2. 
Marsa El Brega, P.O. Box 385, Tripoli, Libya. 
6571 Norwood Street, Halifax, N.S. 
1485 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 

K2C IN 8. 
1485 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 

K2C 1N8. 
514 Stanley Street, Hawkesbury, Ont. 
1331 Duquet Avenue, Sillery 6, P.Q. 
944 Walkley Road. Ottawa, Ont. K1V 6R5. 
42 Moorecroft Road, Ottawa, Ont. K2G 0M7. 
62 Jasper Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, 

Montreal 304, P.Q. 
10 Cherry wood Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K2H 6G6. 
20 Range Road, Ottawa, Ont. KIN 8J3. 
Athol Doune Drive, R.R. No. 2, Aylmer East, P.Q. 
Athol Doune Drive, R.R. No. 2, Aylmer East, P.Q. 
3014 Southmore Drive E., Ottawa, Ont. K1V 6Z4. 
328 Island Park Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 0A7. 
1631 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa, Ont. 

K2C 1P2. 
Le Cartier, Apt. 2501, 1115 Sherbrooke St. West, 

Montreal 110, P.Q. 



113 



Stilborn, Douglas Keith Scott 

Stiles, Alexander John 

Stirling, Stephen Michael 
Stoddard I, Isaac Allerton 

Stoddard II, Frederick Lothrop 

Stratton, Walter William 

Stuart II, Blair Duff 

Tanos, Stephen Thomas 

Taticek, Peter 

Teron, Christopher Noel 

Thompson I, Grant William 
Thompson II, James Cameron 
Tkachuk, Michael Wilson 
Torontow, Michael 
Torrens, Kenneth James 
Towe, Christopher Milburn 

Tross, Anthony Squire 

Valera (Carreno), Jose Gregorio 

Veilleux I, Hugues 
Veilleux II, Clermont 

Walker I, Jeffrey Ward 
Walker III, Ian Michael 
Walker II, Robert Scott 

Warren, Timothy Michael 
Webster, Mark Allan Bryan 
Weiner I, Bruce Howard 
Went, Harold Stephen 

Whitwill, Stephen Thomas 

Wiener II, Philippe-Marc 

Wilansky, Sydney Melvin 
Wilgress, Edward Dana Cameron 

Wilson I, Peter William 

Wilson II, Eric Chester 

Wilson III, Richard McClain 
Winterton, Stephen Scott 
Wong, Cheung Pei Jackson 

Wright I, Philemon David 

Wright II, James 

Wright III, Palmer Howard 



Yaxley I, Eric Lindsay 
Yaxley II, David Thomas 

Zagerman I, Mark David 
Zagerman II, Joel Wolf 
Zunenshine, Leslie 
Zwirewich, Charles Vincent 



40 Westward Way, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. K1L 5A7. 
c/o Canadian High Commission, P.O. Box 660, 

Georgetown, Guyana, South America. 
154 McLeod Street, Ottawa, Ont. K2P 0Z7. 
180 Acacia Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0R3. 
180 Acacia Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0R3. 
25 Southern Parkway, Rochester, New York, 

14618, N.Y., U.S.A. 
831 Edgeworth Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2B 7Y3. 

2172 Benjamin Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K2A 1P4. 

94 Maple Lane, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 1H5. 

7 Crescent Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

KIM ONI. 
24 Canter Blvd., Ottawa, Ont. K2G 2M2. 
22 Canter Blvd., Ottawa, Ont. K2G 2M2. 
R.R. No. 3, Brampton, Ont. 
1969 Bromley Road, Ottawa, Ont. K2A 1C3. 
79 Oakland Road, Beaconsfield, P.Q. 
3550 Tilden Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 

20008, U.S.A. 
64 The Driveway, Ottawa, Ont. K2P 1E3. 

Box No. 14427, Candelaria, Caracas, D.F., 

Venezuela. 
74 Gall Blvd., Drummondville, P.Q. 
74 Gall Blvd., Drummondville, P.Q. 

9 Rebecca Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 6B7. 
9 Rebecca Crescent, Ottawa, Ont. K1J 6B7. 
Apt. No. 1205, Champlain Towers, 200 Rideau 

Terrace, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 0Z3. 
7 Eleanor Drive E., Ottawa, Ont. K2E 6A3. 
Cotnam Island, R.R. No. 1, Pembroke, Ont. 
418 Roger Road, Ottawa, Ont. K1H 5C4. 
"Wanstead House", Cave Hill, St. Michael, 

Barbados, W.I. 
231 Buena Vista Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0V8. 
Apt. No. 909A, 4850 Cote des Neiges, Montreal 

247, P.Q. 
15 Chestnut Place, St. John's Nfld. 
230 Manor Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ont. KIM 0H4 
161 Carleton Street, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa. 

Ont. KIM 0G6. 
161 Carleton Street, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa. 

Ont. KIM 0G6. 
14 Maple Lane, Ottawa, Ont. KIM 1G7. 
59 Kingsford Court, P.O. Box 59, Kanata, Ont. 
1 1 Observatory Road, 6th Fir., Kowloon, 

Hong Kong. 
Meach Lake, P.Q. 
Meach Lake, P.Q. 
147 Kinzua Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ont. 

KIM 0C7. 

Island Park Drive, Long Island, Manotick, Ont. 
Island Park Drive, Long Island, Manotick, Ont. 

208 Island Park Drive, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 0A4. 
208 Island Park Drive, Ottawa. Ont. K1Y 0A4. 
27 Belsize Road, Hampstead, Montreal 254, P.Q. 
234 Irving Place, Ottawa, Ont. K1Y 1Z8. 



114 



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mUm 



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BILLINGS BRIDGE SHOPPING PLAZA 



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BANQUET FACILITIES FOR 45 PERSONS 
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PLUMBING— HEATING 

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749-2886 



MORRISON-LAMOTHE FOODS LTD. 

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Subsidiary Galla Bakery Limited — Institutional Division 



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Phone 729-5111 



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Halifax, Saint John, Quebec, Montreal, 
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Branch Offices: 




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233-1132 180- A Metcalfe St. - 


232-7470 




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234-3425 




St. Laurent Shopping 






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746-6418 




Geo. H. Nelms Ltd. 






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33 "BEECHWOOD AVE. (COR. MACKAYI 
OTTAWA 2, t)NT. 



3 Conveniently Located 
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185-187 SPARKS ST. 
235-1481 




262 RIDEAU ST. 

235-4466 

356 RICHMOND RD. 

722-4523 



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Billings Bridge Plaza 101 Sparks St. St. Laurent Shopping Centre 
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P^Jrmstrong and 




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COMPLIMENTS OF 



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Compliments of 
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CAMP FORTUNE 

MONT STE-MARIE 

CARLINGTON PARK 

JOHN CLIFFORD SKI TOWS LIMITED 



Old Chelsea, Quebec 



827-1594 




LET "Qeorge " DO IT! 
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PRESIDENT 



INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY • REPAIRS 
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Sav&Jbr 
tfieFPun 



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TELEPHONE (613) 237-3598 



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^M 



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FUEL OIL - AIR CONDITIONERS 
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METCALFE REALTY COMPANY LIMITED 



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