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Full text of "The Ashburian 1972"

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ASHBURY COLLEGE 

OTTAWA 



VOLUME 56 



1972 



THE ASHBURIAN 





Photo by Jane Ember 



ASHBURY COLLEGE 

OTTAWA 



VOLUME 56 



1972 



ASHBURY COLLEGE 

Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Canada 

The Board of Governors 

Ian A. Barclay, Esq. ..: - Vancouver 

*L. W. C. S. Barnes, Esq., M.A. (Cantab.), F.R.Econ.S Ottawa 

*Charles K. Brown, Esq., Chairman Montreal 

*J. M. Coyne, Esq., Q.C _ Ottawa 

*J. A. Farquhar, Esq., B.A _ Ottawa 

*James D. Fisher, Esq - Ottawa 

M. E. Grant, Esq., A.F.C., Past Chairman Ottawa 

W. A. Grant, Esq., Q.C Montreal 

G. F. Henderson, Esq., Q.C. - Ottawa 

*J. G. M. Hooper, Esq - Ottawa 

The Hon. A. B. R. Lawrence, Q.C, M.P.P Ottawa 

David Loeb, Esq - - Ottawa 

*Donald Maclaren, Esq., B.Sc, P.Eng Buckingham, P.Q. 

:,: W. J. Mulock, Esq., B.A Ottawa 

* Robert H. Pitfield, Esq Ottawa 

Harold W. Price, Esq Montreal 

*E. N. Rhodes, Esq., Jr., Vice-Chairman _ Ottawa 

The Right Reverend W. J. Robinson, B.A Ottawa 

Commodore W. G. Ross, CD., R.C.N. (Ret'd.) Merrickville, Ont. 

*John C. Scarth, Esq., B.Sc Ottawa 

*David W. Scott, Esq., B.A.. LL.B Ottawa 

D. Cargill Southam, Esq - Montreal 

David M. Stewart, Esq - Montreal 

E. P. Taylor, Esq., C.M.G., B.Sc The Bahama Islands 

♦Captain V. J. Wilgress, R.C.N. (Ret'd.) Ottawa 

W. J. R. Wilson, Esq = Toronto 

*G. S. M. Woollcombe, Esq., M.A Ottawa 

"Denotes members of the Executive Committee 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Board of Governors 2 

Staff 4 

School Officers 6 

Notes 7 

Programme of Closing Ceremonies 9 

Prize List 13 

Mr. V. J. Burczak 15 

Mr. W. W. Byford 15 

Mr. F. T. Jones 16 

Mr. G. W. Thomson 17 

New Members of the Academic Staff 18 

Building Programme 18 

Connaught House Notes 19 

Woollcombe House Notes 19 

Chapel Notes 20 

Ladies' Guild 23 

Southam Library 24 

Cadets 25 

Canadian Studies Programme 26 

Public Speaking 27 

Science Club 27 

The Mikado 28 

Sports Section 29 

Senior School Form List 39 

Literary Contributions 43 

Junior Ashburian 67 

.School Register Ill 



STAFF 



HEADMASTER 
W. A. Joyce, D.S.O., E.D.. B.Sc. (University of Manitoba) — Physics 

ASSISTANT HEADMASTER 
J. J. Marland, A.C.P. (Lond.), Cert.Ed.(Lond.) M.I.N .0.— 
Head of Department in Mathematics 

MASTER IN CHARGE, JUNIOR SCHOOL 
M. H. E. Sherwood, M.Ed. (University of Massachusetts). 
B.A. (Carleton) — English, Latin 

HOUSEMASTER OF CON NAUGHT HOUSE 
G. W. Thomson. A.R.C.O., A.R.C.M., L.R.A.M., L.T. C. L. — French 

HOUSEMASTER OF W00LLC0MBE HOUSE 
C. J. Inns, B.A. (University of Wales) — French 

CHAPLAIN 
The Rev. E. E. Green. B.A. (Toronto), B.D. 

R. J. Anderson, CD. — Director of Athletics 

G. R. Armstrong — Typing 

Lt.Cdr. G. W. Babbitt. R.C.N.( Ret'd.) — English 

Mrs. G. W. Babbitt, 1st Class Teachers' Licence (N.B.) — Mathematics 

J. L. Beedell. B.Sc. (Carleton), Ottawa Teachers' College — Science 

B. W. Bellamy, B.Sc. (Carleton) — Science, Mathematics 

V. J. Burczak, B.A. (Carleton) — Physical Education, Geography 

W. W. Bvford, B.Sc. (Lond.) — Head of Department in Science; 

Chemistry and Mathematics 
P. J. Flynn, Western Australia Teachers" Certificate — 

Geography, Mathematics 
J. A. Glover, M.A. (Oxon.) — Head of Department in Moderns; 

French and German 
F. K. Graham, Mus.B. (Toronto), F.R.C.O., F.R.C.C.O., A.R.C.T.— 

Music 
J. H. Humphreys — Oral French 

F. T. Jones, F.R.G.S., A.C.P. (Lond.), B.Ed.. B.Sc. Cert.Ed.( Wales) — 

Head of Department in Geography 
P. H. Josselyn. B.A., Dip.Ed. — Head of Department in English 
Mrs. J. R. Linn — Remedial Reading 

G. J. McGuire, B.A. (Queen's) — Physics. Chemistry and Mathematics 
K. D. Niles, B.A. ( Carleton ) — English, History 

M. H. Penton, B.A. (Carleton) — English. History 
D. L. Polk, B.A. (Dartmouth) — Latin. French, History 
H. J. Robertson, B.A. (South Africa) — History, Geography 
T. C. Tottenham, Ottawa Teachers* College — History, Science 
B. Wallin, M.A. (Stanford University) — Latin. English 



ADMINISTRATION 



Mrs. W. S. Pryde (Bursar) 

K. G. Heed (Accountant) 

Mrs. 0. Thurston (Headmaster's 

Secretary ) 
Mrs. V. E. Gensey (Secretary) 
Mrs. W. C. E. Loftus (Librarian) 
M. Taticek (Chef) 

E. Marshall (Steward) 

F. Faye (Maintenance) 



D.C.H., 



Physicians: 
C. K. Rowan-Legg, M.D. 

F.A.A.P. 
C. B. Petrie, M.D. 

Mrs. M. M. Bury, R.N. (School Nurse) 
Mrs. M. Boyce (Junior School 

Matron ) 
Mrs. E. Hamilton (Senior School 

Matron ) 







THE STAFF 

Back Row: V. J. Burczak, P. H. Josselyn, H. J. Robertson, B. Wallin, G. J. McGuire, 

F. T. Jones, J. L. Beedell, B. Bellamy, D. L. Polk. 
Middle Row: P. J. Flynn, G. W. Babbitt, G. Armstrong, T. C. Tottenham, J. H. 

Humphreys, W. W. Byford, J. A. Glover, E. E. Green, R. J. Anderson. 
Front Row: Mrs. G. W. Babbitt, H. Penton, C. J. Inns, Housemaster of Woollcombe 

House; J. J. Marland, Assistant Headmaster; W. A. Joyce, Headmaster; 

M. H. E. Sherwood, Headmaster of the Junior School; G. W. Thomson, 

Housemaster of Connaught House; K. D. Niles, Mrs. J. R. Linn. 



THE PREFECTS 

Back Row: E. A. Jokinen, N. Macleod, R. M. Kenny. D. J. Morrison, K. Rimsa, 

R. L. Bennett. 
Front Row: M. Duguay, Captain of Woollcombe House: B. A. Boyd, Captain of 

the School; W. A. Joyce, Esq.; W. W. Stratton, Captain of Connaught 

House, J. K. Beqaj. 




~s*> ""/■ 




SCHOOL OFFICERS 



Captain of the School 
B. A. BOYD 

Captain of Connaught House 
W. W. STRATTON 

Captain of Woollcombe House 
M. DUGUAY 



Prefects 
R. L. BENNETT 
J. K. BEQAJ 
E. A. JOKINEN 
R. M. KENNY 
N. MACLEOD 
D. J. MORRISON 
K. RIMSA 
Captains of Football 
J. K. BEQAJ 
B. A. BOYD 



Captain of Soccer 

N. MACLEOD 

Vice-Captain of Soccer 

R. L. BENNETT 

Captain of Curling 

R. M. KENNY 
Captain of Hockey 

M. DUGUAY 

Captain of Skiing 

W. W. STRATTON 



CADET OFFICERS 

Cadet Major J. K. BEQAJ, Officer Commanding 
Cadet Captain D. J. MORRISON, Second in Command 
Cadet Lieutenant M. DUGUAY, O.C. No. 1 Platoon 
Cadet Lieutenant W. W. STRATTON, O.C. No. 2 Platoon 
Cadet Lieutenant B. A. BOYD, O.C. No. 3 Platoon 
Cadet Lieutenant D. W. LACKIE, Honour Guard 

Company Sergeant Major 
Cadet WO 2 A. LUCIANI 

Drum Major 
Cadet Sergeant S. M. POWER 

Colour Party 

Cadet Lieutenant K. RIMSA 

Cadet Corporal P. PARDO 

Cadet Corporal I. STODDARD 

THE GUARD OF HONOUR 

Guard Commander 
Cadet Lieutenant D. W. LACKIE 



Cadet Sergeant G. A. McTAGGART 
Cadet Corporal R. S. CHILDERS 
Cadet Corporal P. G. COPESTAKE 
Cadet Corporal P. S. T. CROAL 
Cadet Corporal T. A. DICKSON 
Cadet Corporal M. S. JELENICK 



Cadet Corporal N. MACLEOD 
Cadet Corporal D. C. PATERSON 
Cadet Corporal R. G. PIMM 
Cadet Corporal D. J. H. ROSS 
Cadet Corporal I. C. SCARTH 



INSTRUCTORS 

Captain J. H. HUMPHREYS, Cadet Services of Canada, 

Commanding Officer 

Lieutenant K. D. NILES, Cadet Services of Canada, 

Training Officer 

Affiliated Unit 

GOVERNOR GENERAL'S FOOT GUARDS 

Lieutenant Colonel H. R. HILL, CD., 

Commanding Officer 



NOTES 



The School closed on Saturday- June 10th — in remarkably unseasonable 
weather. Details of the ceremonies follow these notes. On the previous evening 
a barbecue was held at the School under the auspices of the Ladies' Guild; 
this was well-attended and proved highly successful, despite inclement 
weather. 

The Ontario Scholars are Bryan Boyd, Ike Stoddard, Willy Liang. Richard 
Bennett. Frankie Chu. Anthony Leung. Charles Yap and Andrew Chan. 
All members of Grade 13 qualified for their Secondary School Honour 
Graduation Diploma. 

We gratefully acknowledge substantial bequests by the late Mrs. Harold 
Lewis and the late Mr. Eric Beardmore. which will be used for some 
specific purpose as yet undetermined; also a generous donation by Mr. W. H. 
Connell — sufficient to allow for the construction of the Connell Laboratory 
alongside the Cargill Southam Laboratory. We are also very grateful for 
sundrv gifts by many friends to the Annual Giving Programme, which is 
designed to supplement the budget at Ashbury College in the general field 
of academics. 

We thank the Graduating Class of 1972 for their gift of an automatic bell- 
ringing system. 

A few days before the provincial elections in the fall, members of three 
political parties spoke to students of Ashbury and Elmwood. Speaking as a 
Conservative was the Hon. A. B. R. Lawrence, member for Carleton East 
and Minister of Health. The New Democratic Party was represented by Mr. 
Denis Deneau. candidate for Ottawa East, and the Liberal Party by Mr. Ian 
Kimmerley. candidate for Ottawa South. A lively period of questions and 
answers ensued. 

In February the Hon. John N. Turner. Minister of Finance, addressed the 
senior school, convincingly pointing out to the students their need for in- 
volvement in present-day affairs. 

Welcome visits were also received from Mr. Ray Jones. President of the 
E. B. Eddy Co.. Mr. John Brow, who spoke on Insurance, and Mr. Paul 
Leblond. Director of the Student Exchange Programme, Canada Committee, 
whose subject was "The Future of English Canada". 

The Hon. Paul Hellyer. spent a morning at the School during May, dis- 
cussing with senior students the policies of Action Canada. 

The traditional carol services w-ere held at the end of the fall term under 
the able direction of Mr. F. K. Graham. The usual Christmas Dinner was 
not held, the money thus saved being sent to the Christmas Exchange — a 
measure strongly supported by the boys. 

The Winter Sports Day was followed by the Annual Sports Dinner, held at 
the School. On this occasion we were honoured by the presence as Guest 
Speaker of His Excellency The Governor-General of Canada, who presented 
the School with a picture of himself in what His Excellency described as his 
"working clothes". A list of the awards appears in the Sports section of 
The Ashburian. 

Under the leadership of the Chaplain a number of Ashbury students cruised 
in the Mediterranean during the Easter holidays. 

Once more we thank Dr. and Mrs. Conway for their kind hospitality after 
the final performance of the Ashbury-Elmwood production of "The Mikado", 
a notice of which appears on a later page. 

On 10th May Ashbury held an Open Day. for the second successive year; 
visitors were once more able to see the School in action in the classroom and 
on the games field. 



This year Ashbury Fitness Awards were introduced to provide a challenge 
for students wishing to attain a high standard of physical fitness. Only two 
students, M. J. Beedell and G. C. Davies, were able to attain the gold 
standard. 

Grade 9A decided to practice, rather than preach, anti-pollution measures 
and spent an afternoon cleaning a stretch of the Ottawa River shore-line. The 
variety of refuse collected was beyond belief. Another expedition to the shores 
of the Ottawa River was organized by the Captain of the School after the 
Final Examinations. 

This year Mr. B. W. Bellamy (Science and Mathematics) and Mr. G. R. 
Armstrong (Typing) joined the academic staff. Mrs. E. Hamilton assumed 
the position of Senior School Matron. Mr. W. W. Byford retires, while Mr. 
G. W. Thomson, Mr. V. J. Burczak and Mr. F. T. Jones leave us for other 
appointments. Notes on these members of the academic staff and on those 
who join the staff in September appear on later pages. 





PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CANADIAN PRESS 



ASHBURY COLLEGE 

Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Canada 

Eighty-First Year 




K^lodina C^ 



>Jm« 



eremonieS 



LEAVING SERVICE 
PRIZE GIVING 



0€5*> 



Saturday, June 10th, 1972 



Closing Service 

For the students, their parents and friends 

at 10:15 a.m. 

Conducted by the School Chaplain 

THE REV. E. E. GREEN, B.A., B.D. 

in the 

ASUBURY COLLEGE CHAPEL 

HYMN 427 — The School Hymn — l He who would valiant be" 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM 

OPENING SENTENCES 

PRAYERS 

THE LORD'S PRAYER 

HYMN 268 — -Lord. Speak to me. That I May Speak" 

LESSON — The Headmaster 

PRAYERS AND BENEDICTION 

HYMN 469 — ( Part 2 ) — "Lord dismiss us with Thy blessing" 



10 



PROGRAMME 

Prize Giving 11:00 a.m. 
OPENING REMARKS 

CHARLES K. BROWN 

(Ashbury 1945-1946) 

Chairman of the Board of Governors 

VALEDICTORY 

BRYAN BOYD 

Captain of the School 

THE HEADMASTER 

ADDRESS 

DR. J. J. DEUTSCH 

C.C., B.Com., LL.D., D.Soc.Sc. F.R.C.S. 

Principal and V ice-Chancellor of Queen s University 

ACADEMIC PRIZES 

presented by 
MRS. J. J. DEUTSCH 

THE ROBERT GERALD MOORE 
MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR ENGLISH 

THE GARY HORNING MEMORIAL SHIELD 
FOR PUBLIC SPEAKING 

THE CHARLES ROWLEY BOOTH 
MEMORIAL TROPHY 

THE MEMORIAL PRIZES 
ATHLETIC TROPHIES AND SPECIAL AWARDS 

presented by 
DR. J. J. DEUTSCH 

CLOSING REMARKS — CHAIRMAN 

Refreshments 



11 





PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CANADIAN PRESS 



12 



PRIZE LIST 1972 

ACADEMIC PRIZES 

FORM PRIZES FOR GENERAL PROFICIENCY. 

PRESENTED BY MRS. J. J. DEUTSCH: 

Form 1 (grade 5) David Beedell 

2 (grade 6) Stephen Puttick 

3b (grade 7b) James Lay 

3a (grade 7a) Paul Deepan 

Trans b (grade 8b) Andrew Moore 

Trans a (grade 8a) lain Johnston 

JUNIOR SCHOOL AWARDS OF MERIT 

Form 1 (grade 5) Peter Martin 

2 (grade 6) David Welch 

3b (grade 7b) David Irving 

3a (grade 7a) Keith McDonald 

Trans b (grade 8b) Clermont Veilleux 

FORM PRIZES FOR GENERAL PROFICIENCY (Senior School) 

Grade 9b Daniel Lurtz 

9a Christopher Teron 

10b George Jeffrey 

10a Hugh Christie 

lib Richard Childers 

11a Frederick Stoddard 

12b Douglas Pearce 

12a Paul Hope 

13 Bryan Boyd 

THE WOODBURN MUSIC PRIZE (Junior School) 

Jonathan Heaton 

THE POLK PRIZE FOR POETRY READING (Junior School) 

Keith Macdonald 

THE PUBLIC SPEAKING PRIZES 

Junior: Iain Johnston 

Intermediate: Hugh Christie 

THE GARY HORNING MEMORIAL SHIELD FOR PUBLIC SPEAKING (Senior) 

Matthew Rowlinson 

THE GRAHAM CHOIR PRIZE (Junior School) 

Iain Johnston 

ACADEMIC PRIZES (Senior School) 

English (9-10) Ian Bleacklev 

History (9-10) Hugh Christie 

Geography (9-10) Peter Wilson 

Science (9-10) Stephen Grahovac 

Devine Prize for Latin (9-10) Bob Henderson 

Jobling Prize for French (9-10) Stephen Grahovac 

Junior Matriculation Classes: 

Brain Prize lor History Nigel Macleod 

Pemberton Prize for Geography Peter Johnston 

Dr. O. J. Firestone Prize for Mathematics Paul Hope 

F. E. B. Whitfield Prize for Latin Christian Fabricius 

Byford Prize for Chemistry Victor Lynch-Staunton 

Senior Matriculation Classes: 

Hon. George Drew Prize for English Stephen Stirling 

H. J. Robertson Prize for History Stephen Stirling 

F. T. Jones Prize for Geography Stephen Stirling 

J. J. Marland Prize for Mathematics Bryan Boyd 

W. W. Byford Prize for Chemistry Bryan Boyd 

Angus Prize for French Marc Duguay 



13 



SPECIAL PRIZES. Presented by Mr. M. H. E. Sherwood: 
THE ALWYN CUP (Junior Track and Field) 

Philippe Wiener 
THE JOHN MICHAEL HILLIARD MEMORIAL PRIZE (Trans A) 

Eric Wilson 

THE STEPHEN CLIFFORD MEMORIAL PRIZE for the Boy in the Junior School 
who wins the Most Points for his House 

Ian Rhodes 
THE WOODS SHIELD (Junior School: Academics, Sports, Character): 

Iain Johnston 
THE LADIES' GUILD MERIT AWARDS. Presented by Mrs. T. L. Bates 



Grade 9 


George McKenna 


10 


Stephen Grahovac 


11 


Richard Childers 


12 


Peter Johnston 


13 


Ike Stoddard 


THE GENERAL KNOWLEDGE PRIZES 




Grade 9b 


Shawn McNulty 


9a 


Peter Steacy 


10b 


(1) Arthur Loeb; (2) Michael Moore 


10a 


Stephen Rigby 


lib 


Jules Chatel 


11a 


Frederick Stoddard 


12b 


Douglas Pearce 


12a 


Ian Smith 


13 


Ike Stoddard 


13 


Stephen Stirling 



THE MEMORIAL PRIZES. Presented by Dr. J. J. Deutsch 
THE ROBERT GERALD MOORE PRIZE FOR ENGLISH (12) 

David Yaxley 
THE SNELGROVE PRIZE FOR MATHEMATICS (9-10) 

Stephen Rigby 
THE ADAM PODHRADSKY MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR MODERN HISTORY (12) 

Nigel Macleod 
THE FIORENZA DREW MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR FRENCH (12) 

Philippe Pardo 
THE EKES MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR PHYSICS (13) 

Bryan Boyd 

THE C. ROWLEY BOOTH MEMORIAL TROPHY (All-round Achievement in 

Grade 12) 

Donald Morrison 

SPECIAL AWARDS 

THE ASHBURY FITNESS AWARDS 

Mike Beedell 
Greg Davies 

THE PITFIELD SHIELD (Junior House Competition) 

Dragons: Captains — Bob Morrison and Michael O'Meara 

THE SOUTHAM CUP (Best Record in Scholarship and Sports) 

Richard Bennett 

THE NELSON SHIELD (Head Boy) 

Bryan Boyd 

THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S MEDAL 

Bryan Boyd 



14 



MR. V J BURCZAK 

Mr. Vic Burczak joined the Staff in September 1970 to teach Physical 
Education and Geography, but his activities have ranged far beyond the 
gymnasium and the classroom. He has been assistant coach of 1st Football, 
coach of 2nd Hockey and of Track and Field; in addition he founded and 
ran the Archery Club and took on the task of advertising manager for the 
Ashburian. 

To Mr. Burczak belongs the distinction of having devised an equitable 
form of roster for day duty masters whereby no one member of the Staff was 
stuck with a fixed and possibly distasteful day of the week. 

We thank Mr. Burczak for his contribution to the life of Ashbury and we 
give him and Mrs. Burczak our best wishes for the future. 

J. A. G. 



MR W W BYFORD 

It is not often on these pages that we can record the happy conclusion of a 
lifelong teaching career. This year, such an occurrence has taken place in 
the case of Mr. W. W. Byford. affectionately known to his colleagues as "Bill". 

Bill Byford taught his first class in London, England, in 1929. From that 
day to this he has practised his profession all over the world and can speak 
with equal ease of classrooms in Singapore, Africa, The United Kingdom or 
America. He raised his teaching skills to the highest level and those students 
passing through his Chemistry and Mathematics classes will remember his 
lessons as they remember few others. Indeed, they have been most privileged; 
there are few of us today that can match Bill's ability to combine the strictest 
of class discipline with an acceptable learning situation. Behind Bill's some- 
times fierce countenance there was always a heart-felt willingness to help a 
student achieve his fullest potential. Very few boys did not discover this, as 
the numbers of boys who beat a path to the Byford door at any hour of the 
night or day bear witness. 

Happily the Byford family are not moving too far away. We hope that we 
shall continue to see them on social and other occasions of the School. It will 
be hard for us to think of the teaching profession without Bill being part of it; 
somewhere, somehow . Perhaps if we hope hard enough we won't have to! 

W.AJ. 




PHOTO BY JANE EMBER 



15 



MR. F. T. JONES 

It was lunch-time. One of the new masters (a quiet and unobtrusive 
gentleman from Wales) was on duty for the first time. The boys were in 
their places, and there was the usual slight shuffling and muttering which 
always precedes the silence for grace. Suddenly the air was shattered by two 
deafening staccato bellows: 

"SHUDDUP! STANDSTILL!" 

Fred Jones had arrived — in every sense of the word! 

The effect was electrifying and there can't have been a boy who wasn't 
wondering what had hit him. But this formidable voice was the voice of 
experience. How many teachers still make the fatal mistake of trying to be 
"palsie-walsie" (to quote one of Mr. Marland's favourite phrases!) from 
the start, and then wonder why they can't maintain any sort of discipline? 

Mr. Jones was too old a hand to fall into that particular trap. He left 
nobody in any doubt as to who was going to be the boss; having established 
that, he was able to relax gradually and methodically, and soon to become 
one of the most kindly and popular masters Ashbury can ever have known. 
This popularity was exemplified by some writing on a wall; under the name 
"F. JONES" on his parking space, somebody added "... is a nice guy." 
Rather different from most of the statements expressed in mural adornments 
at Ashbury — or any other school, for that matter! 

The writer of those words summed up the general view. However rebel- 
lious the present-day student may seem, he still respects (and prefers) a 
master who will keep him in order and demand high standards from him. 
Fred Jones did just that — but he did it with a warm humanity and a 
glorious sense of humour. 

He was also a steadying influence on the Masters' Common Room, where 
tempers occasionally fly as high as thev do anywhere else in the school. The 
first time Mr. Jones was witness to su it, he stared at the offender in 

blank disbelief and then, with withering ~n, uttered the immortal phrase 
"OH, PICKY PICKY!" — which may look meaningless on paper but which 
had a devastating effect at the time! 

He came to us from St. George's School in Vancouver, where he now 
returns — partly to escape the Ottawa winter, but principally to accept 
vastly increased responsibility as Administrative Assistant to the Headmaster. 
One can only hope that a teacher of his calibre will not be totally lost to 
the classroom — but whatever he does will be characterized by zeal, efficiency 
and almost overpowering enthusiasm. And if, in a few months' time, we 
learn of a beer famine in B.C., we shall know that Fred still maintains an 
unchallengeable supremacy in yet another of his many and varied talents! 

He leaves Ashbury a better place for his two-year sojourn among us, and 
he will be greatly missed by staff and boys alike. We thank him for what he 
has done (and, far more, for what he has been), and we wish him, Carol, 
Simon and Martyn a safe trip to the Far West (characteristically they're 
going via the Maritimes — how did he ever become a geography teacher! ), 
and a full, happy and successful life when they get there. 

G.W.T. 




16 



PHOTO BY M. 1_ W. BARNES 



MR G W THOMSON 

Mr. Geoffrey Thomson came to Ashbury in 1967 after considerable ex- 
perience in England as a director of school music, also finding time to make 
appearances as pianist, organist, solo bass singer and actor. 

Mr. Thomson found further scope for his versatility in Canada. As the 
first Housemaster of New House, later renamed Connaught House, he brought 
firmness and understanding to his dealings with the boys under his care. His 
teaching activities have by no means been limited to his position as Director 
of Music: at various times he has been active in the classroom as a teacher 
of Public Speaking, English and French. For his last year he exchanged 
Music at Ashbury for Music and Drama at Elmwood. mounting a highly 
successful production by the Drama Class of "Ladies in Retirement" by 
Edward Percy and Reginald Denham, he himself giving a most convincing 
performance in the one male role. 

A noteworthy feature of Mr. Thomson's musical and stage activity has 
been the annual Ashbury-Elmwood Gilbert and Sullivan production: over 
the years his roles in this event have included musical director, stage director, 
and leading soloist — at least one of these per production. Perhaps his tour 
de force in this respect was achieved in the recent production of "The 
Mikado", when a figure robed as a Japanese nobleman was seen and heard at 
the piano; this figure then rose and walked up on to the stage — a move to 
be repeated frequently during the evening — to reveal himself as a resonant 
Pooh-Bah. 

Gradually Geoffrey Thomson became a notable figure on the musical scene 
of Ottawa. His literate and knowledgeable writing as a music critic for the 
Ottawa Journal commended him to a wide circle of readers. He has been 
organist and choirmaster of St. Alban's Church and subsequently of Trinity 
Anglican Church, and he has appeared as guest conductor of both the 
Canadian Centennial Choir and the Ottawa Civic Symphony Orchestra. 

Mr. Thomson now goes to Lakefield College School as Director of Music. 
He takes with him our best wishes for his future career and we hope that he 
and Mrs. Thomson will enjoy life in their new surroundings. 

J.A.G. 




PHOTO COURTESY OF U.P.I. 



17 



NEW MEMBERS OF THE ACADEMIC STAFF — SEPTEMBER 1972 

Mr. G. B. Bacon joins the staff to teach Biology. Educated at Cornwall 
Collegiate and Vocational School and the University of New Brunswick, 
where he majored in Biology, Mr. Bacon has had experience as Laboratory 
Instructor and Head Demonstrator in Biology at U.N.B. He has been on the 
staff of U.N.B. Graduate School and has coached the Biology Department 
Hockey team. His other interests include Canoeing, Drama and Cadets. 

Mr. J. C. Boone returns to Ashbury, where he was educated, to teach 
Geography. Mr. Boone majored in Geography at Sir George Williams Univer- 
sity and received his Master's degree in the Teaching of Social Studies in 
Secondary Schools from the State University of New York. He comes to us 
from Lakeshore Regional School Board, and he has had experience in coach- 
ing Curling, Hockey, Soccer and Canoeing. Mr. Boone, who is married, with 
one son, is residing at 250, Springfield Road. 

Mr. G. E. Hyatt was educated at Sunnyside High School, Stanstead, 
Stanstead College and Bishop's University, where he graduated in Chemistry. 
He joins the staff to teach Chemistry and Mathematics. Mr. Hyatt's interests 
include Football, Basketball, Riding, Skating, Hunting, Fishing, Photography 
and Music. 

Mr. K. B. Parks joins the Junior School staff to teach Physical Education 
and General Subjects. Mr. Parks is a Bachelor of Physical Education of the 
University of New Brunswick, where he received a distinction award in 
Hockey and has been conductor of Freshman Class activities. 



THE BUILDING PROGRAM 

Several years of hoping and planning will soon culminate in a major 
expansion and upgrading of the school plant. Hardly a facet of Ashbury 's 
day-to-day operation will be left untouched in a program which will feature 
the refurbishing and rearrangement of many existing facilities as well as new 
construction. Acting on the combined suggestions of "Task Force-Planning" 
(the Staff), the Architects, Murray and Murray, and Mr. William Teron, 
the well-known Planner and Builder and a key member of the School 
Building Committee, a plan has been developed which incorporates the 
following: 

1 — Continuation of current efforts to upgrade boarding accomodations 

and the electrical and essential services. 

2 — Immediate construction of an extension to the science wing which will 

contain the Connell Biology Laboratory on the second level and a 
workshop for boys on the ground level. 

3 — Construction in the early fall of a three-level link between the Argyle 

Wing and the Main Building which will contain new boarding 
accommodations on the upper level, five new classrooms on the main 
level, and a complex of common rooms for staff, juniors, and seniors 
on the lower level. Construction will begin simultaneously on an 
extension to the dining hall in the corner area formed by Rhodes Hall, 
the present dining hall, and the eastward projection of the kitchen. 

4 — Extensive rearrangement and refurbishing of office and reception 

facilities in the area of classrooms C and D — thus freeing the annex 
area for use as a married housemaster's home. The present main 
north doorway will be enlarged to serve as the school's formal en- 
trance. An excavated stairwell at the main entrance will give im- 
mediate access to common rooms and locker areas below to arriving 
students. 



18 



The Ashbury Spirit will soon have new surroundings. The one, enhanced 
by the other, gives promise of a great future for the School. Thanks are 
owed to the Board of Governors, Mr. Joyce. Mr. Connell, Mr. Teron, and 
interested staff members who have brought the long-awaited building program 

to the brink of rcalitv. 

B.W. 

CONNAUGHT HOUSE NOTES 

I have taken the liberty of changing the format of the House Notes this 
year, for two reasons. First. I feel, as do many of you, that the usual "who 
did what where" format becomes rather boring after a time, and our House 
Notes have been laid out this way for five years. Secondly, owing to my 
ever-failing memory. I did not compile a list of "who did what where" and 
therefore 1 am unable to pursue this format. I ask you to please accept what 
follows as a reasonable substitute for the past five years of Connaught House 
tradition. 

The most obvious change in the House this year was the atmosphere. I 
cannot remember a year as relaxed as this one, yet, to the surprise of the 
administration, it was one of the best ever. The knowledge that one was 
not being constantly policed put one at ease r.nd, as a result of this, relations 
within the House reached an all-time high. 

Spirit in the House also reached an all-time high. This was evident when 
Connaught met Woollcombe in the various House competitions. We were 
able to secure the titles in the Inter-House Soccer, Swimming, and Track 
and Field meets, while Woollcombe took the Hockey and Curling. The 
Connaught House turn-out was greater than that of Woollcombe House in all 
activities, particularly at the swim meet, where we were able to win back the 
title we had given up the year before. 

The House Dinner was the final indication of an overwhelming House 
spirit. All boarders and 75% of the day boys (a new record for any activity) 
met at the Skyline Hotel June 8th for what turned out to be the best House 
Dinner in Connaught's history. It was a fitting end to a great year. 

It is with deep regret that Connaught House says good-bye to Mr. G. W. 
Thomson, as he leaves Ashbury for Lakefield College School. He has been 
Housemaster of Connaught House for five years and deserves most of the 
credit for its creation in 1967. He has been more than a friend to all of us in 
the House. We cannot adequately express our thanks for all that he has 
done for the House during the past five years. We can only wish him well 
in his new position at Lakefield and hope thai his time there will be as 
enjoyable for him as his time here has been for us. 

I would like to extend a personal word of grateful thanks to Mr. Thomson, 
Mr. Niles. Mr. McGuire and the guys in the House for making my last year 
at Ashbury my most memorable. Good luck next year and keep plugging. 

W. W. Stratton 

WOOLLCOMBE HOUSE NOTES 

Head of House: Marc Duguay. 
Prefects: Richard Bennett: Kostas Rimsa. 

Room Captains: Gordon McTaggart: Allan MacEwen: Tony Seay: Arthur 
Skolnik; Dave Siversky; Peter Richardson; Mark Henderson. 
Not a bad year on the whole! The upper flat has managed to a very large 
extent to remain a fairly content and trouble-free unit; the reason for this 
escapes me, but I have a sneaking feeling that it had something to do with 
the very commendable way in which the seniors maintained order whilst at 
the same time taking a genuine interest in the welfare of the juniors. Typical 
of this was the way in which the room captains would, at my request, hustle 



19 



grades nine to twelve to bed on time, and then be prepared to linger in rooms 
talking and chatting about whatever the current talking point happened to 
be. I appreciated equally the readiness of "the guys" to drop into my room 
whenever they felt like it and discuss their interests and problems. Long 
may they do so! 

Perhaps the overall picture was one of a discipline that was acceptable 
because it was never abused, and full marks here to the prefects and room 
captains. I myself occasionally had to reprimand, and full marks here to the 
"victims" who not once tried to argue the point, but always accepted the 
reason for my doing so. 

In inter-house competition, we just came off best. Next year we intend 
"wiping the floor" with Connaught. 

The most enjoyable event perhaps was the end of year house dinner, 
partly because it was the end of year, and partly because we innovated by 
inviting girl friends along for the first time. This was successful and well 
probably try it again this coming year. 

No individuals to be mentioned here, because if I were to mention one or 
two I would feel compelled to mention so many more. The House was 
crammed with characters, likeable and notorious. 

Most will be back next year, and I look forward to seeing them again. On 
paper, it should prove to be a fine year, but it will be up to you, Woollcombe 
students, again to make it a reality. Go to it! 

C.J.I. 

CHAPEL NOTES 

"Why is Chapel compulsory?" This was at one time a very common 
question. Now, however, there seems to be a new attitude towards Chapel; very 
seldom is that question asked. Even on Sunday nights, when the boys must 
cut their weekends short, very few complain. 

Why? It is probably because the students feel part of the Chapel services. 
The students are more involved, which results in a wonderful atmosphere; 
they feel more than ever that they can contribute to the services and con- 
sequently are able to get more out of them. It is all this, and more, which has 
made the Chapel services the best ever. 

Various people from Grades Nine to Thirteen played an active role in the 
services; hence there has been a greater personal involvement in a Chapel 
situation which has now become a meaningful experience rather than a tire- 
some obligation. 

The impact of these accomplishments on the students of Ashbury and the 
profound effect which Mr. Green has had on us as individuals emerged in the 
singing of "Glory, Glory, Halleluia!" on "Mr. Green Day". 

W. W. Stratton 
M. Duguay 

I must add a word of appreciation. Kostas Rimsa and the Servers'' Guild 
were just about the most cheerful and efficient Servers any priest could ever 
want; the Prefects were most helpful and co-operative; Mrs. Hamilton, Mrs. 
Brunet and Mrs. Ryan were always there assisting in so many ways; Mr. 
Fred Graham and the Choir rendered beautiful and valuable service; Mr. 
Joyce and all others who read lessons were most faithful in their duties. To 
all of you — we are grateful for your contributions to College life through 
your Chapel work. 

Words fail me still when I think of "Mr. Green Day". On that day — and, 
indeed, throughout the year — the students of Ashbury accorded me such 
a measure of friendship and support that I shall never cease to be grateful. 
Thank you so much. 

E.E.G. 



20 




Back Row: 
From Row: 



CONFIRMATION 

R. A. Dunlop, G. P. Harvey. J. K. Longsworth, R. H. F. Huston, 
M. J. Moore, P. G. Tapp, A. G. Moore, C. W. Byford. 
D. A. Hogarth, S. R. Puttick, D. E. C. Green, Rev. E. E. Green, A. J. 
Rowlinson, G. C. Warwick, A. M. Brookes. 




Back Row: 
Front Row: 



THE SERVERS 

K. K. Chu, G. C. Davies, F. K. K. Chu. 
K. Rimsa, Rev. E. E. Green, E. W. Cahn. 




THE CHOIR 

Back Row: Rev. E. E. Green, R. H. F. Huston, P. G. Tapp, K. N. Carre, F. K. 

Graham, Esq. 
Third Row: J. D. Coyne, R. V. E. Van Veen, S. G. Verhey, F. MacNicol, 

A. B. Marchant, I. N. Rhodes, I. M. Walker, P. M. MacLaurin. 
Second Row: M. W. Tkachuk, G. N. McKenna, S. P. Wilson, H. A. Heaton, J. F. 

Biewald, A. I. Johnston, D. Josselyn, J. G. Pilaar, A. J. Heaton. 
Front Row: R. J. Feldman, J. W. Downing, N. L. Fonay, M. K. Litvak, P. D. 

Deepan, I. F. Wilson, P. C. B. Martin, M. A. Richter, B. E. Mitchell. 



Chapel Events 

Installation of Prefects 

Installation of Servers 

Guest Preacher — Former Chaplain, the Reverend William Belford. 

A few Old Boys attended. 
Founders' 1 Service — Guest Preacher, the Reverend David Thomson. 
Guest Choir, the Choir of All Saints, Sandy Hill. 
Members of the Woollcombe family were present. 
Baptism of son of Stuart Chandler. 
Marriage of John Rogan to Sandra Booth. 
Marriage of Peter Vineberg to Margaret Dupuis. 
Chancel Drama in Advent. 
Two Christmas Carol Services. 

Confirmation — 16 Confirmed. Bishop William Robinson officiated. 
Taped musical service arranged by Tony Seay and others. 
Remembrance Day Service. 
Closing Day Service. 
Guest Officiants — 

The Reverend E. K. Lackey, 
The Reverend Philip Rowswell, 
The Reverend Canon William Wright, 
The Reverend Gordon Light. 
Service in the Quad with Sir Robert Borden High School Band. 
Services with Guitar Group. 
Services with Elmwood Choir. 

Guest Choir — The Choir of the Viscount Montgomery Public School, 
Hamilton. 
As you see we had a busy year, but not all the action was in the Chapel: 
the involvement of Ashbury in the blitz for Pakistani Relief was magnificent; 
the Grub Day to raise money for Third World Development was something 
else. In fact the whole enterprise of reaching out to help others took on a 
new dimension this year. Money-wise this is what happened. 

To Pakistani Relief from Chapel Collections — S25.00 
To Pakistani Relief from Elmwood — Ashbury — $1,400.00 
To Pollution Probe from Chapel Collections — $25.00 

To St. Michael's Mission from Chapel Collections — $100.00 
To United Appeal from Chapel Collections — $50.00 

To Pakistani Relief from Chapel Collections — $50.00 
To Christmas Exchange from carol singing, 
canned goods, and going without Christmas 
Dinner — $425.00 

To Bishop for local charity from 

Chapel Collections — $100.00 

To Third World Development from 

Grub Day and student gifts. — $200.00 

The student body did a tremendous job: I will long remember the morning 
I walKed into the School about 8.00 a.m. and was handed nearly $50.00 
which had been gathered up that morning for the Development Fund. 
Thank you. 

E.E.G. 



22 



ASHBUKY COLLEGE LADIES' GUILD 
PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

During the 1971-72 school year the Ashhury College Ladies' Guild spon- 
sored numerous interesting activities. This report outlines our many events 
and achievements. 

In the early fall our Annual Clothing Sale was held under the able direc- 
tion of Mrs. G. F. Henderson. We realized a profit of $511.80 for our Project 
Fund. 

In late September our Honorary President. Mrs. W. A. Joyce, with the 
help of the Ladies' Guild executive, had a coffee party for the new mothers 
at Ashbury House. It was well attended and enjoyed by all and provided an 
excellent opportunitv to meet and welcome the new mothers. This promises 
to be an annual event. 

Mrs. T. L. Bates convened the Raffle. Prizes were donated by Mr. & Mrs. 
G. K. Ellacott. Mr. & Mrs. M. E. Grant, Mr. & Mrs. R. M. Hodgins, and Mr. 
& Mrs. R. Ross. 

The draw was held at the Old Boy's Dance in November. With the co- 
operation of the Masters, the aid of the senior school boys and the outstanding 
salesmanship of the junior school boys, this was a very successful venture, 
profits amounting to S803.50. 

Our Fall Meeting and Luncheon was held on Wednesday. November 3. At 
this meeting. Mr. Joyce presented the Ladies' Guild with a cheque for 
S242.07. the proceeds of the book sale organized by Mr. Joyce and the staff. 
Mr. Hugh Robertson spoke to us on the Ashbury College Canadian Studies 
Programme. Following his address the Guild presented him with a cheque 
for $1,200.00 to further this project. A cheque for $500.00 was presented 
to Mr. Sherwood for the Junior School. 

Under the convenorship of Mrs. L. M. Johnston, a number of Pyramid 
Luncheons was held with proceeds amounting to $162.00. 

The sale of Hasti Notes was directed by Mrs. D. J. Heaton and 52 packages 
were sold this year. 

Our Annual Meeting and Luncheon was held on Friday. March 3. and 
was once again well attended. Membership stands at 145 paid-up members. 
Mr. Joyce was presented with a cheque for $500.00 to purchase much-needed 
equipment for the Physics laboratory. The luncheons for both meetings were 
provided as a courtesy of the school with the aid of Mrs. W. A. Joyce and 
the wives of the teaching staff. 

Six cottas were purchased for the choir and $50.00 was provided for their 
annual outing. 

At school closing in June, the presentation of the $50.00 Merit Prizes was 
made by the Ladies' Guild. These are annual awards to the student in each 
year, grades 9-13 inclusive, who has shown the best all-round effort. 

My executive consisted of: — 



Honorary President 


— Mrs. 


W. A. Joyce 


Past President 


— Mrs. 


G. F. Henderson 


Vice President 


— Mrs. 


T. L. Bates 


Secretary 


— Mrs. 


W. A. Scott 


Treasurer 


— Mrs. 


R. D. Bovd 


Assistant Treasurer 


— Mrs. 


G. K. Ellacott 


Members 


— Mrs. 


D. J. Heaton 




— Mrs. 


L. M. Johnston 




— Mrs. 


P. H. Davies 




— Mrs. 


D. D. Hogarth 




— Mrs. 


F. W. Buser 




— Mrs. 


H. P. W r ri<rht 




— Mrs. 


R. M. Hodgins 



23 



The executive has made my term as president a pleasure and through 
diligence in their respective responsibilities each project has met with success. 
I wish to thank sincerely every member. I also wish to express my apprecia- 
tion to Mr. Joyce, Mr. Sherwood and the teaching staff for their assistance 
and cooperation. The help of the office staff is gratefully acknowledged. 

May I extend to our new president, Mrs. Bates, and the new executive, my 
best wishes for a happy and successful year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Babs Harcourt 

Mrs. D. G. Harcourt 

President 

Ashbury College Ladies' Guild 



THE SOUTHAM LIBRARY 
IMPRESSIONS 



Books, magazines on the floor, 
"Look out lads, this is war!" 

Librarian's role, to lend an ear, 
"What's all this, whom do you fear?" 

"Miss, where can I find something on Rome? 
Seems to me I'd rather go home!" 

"Use the index", comes the cry 
"It will serve you by and by". 

Legs outstretched on table tops, 
"Can I play you all some Pops?" 

"All your books are overdue, 
How can I ever get to you?" 

Posters, notes, lists and orders, 

Let's give the posters to the boarders! 

Building plans are everywhere 

"What's this, Miss, explain that square!" 

Danger lurks, do not doubt it, 
"Tools of War" is Juniors' favourite. 

"What do you know of the isosceles? 
Put me out of my misery, please!" 

"Words are Important", that's for sure, 
"Help me Miss, just once more!" 

"Is it stationery? I need a book, 

Do you have a pencil, may I have a look?" 

"Sorry, Stamp Club is on Tuesday" 
"You must look at my trades today!" 

Chess, yes, and Monopoly 

but, "don't play Poker in the Library!" 

"Sorry, Library closed for meeting, 
Governors will .discuss the heating." 



M.L. 



24 



We are indebted to Mr. & Mrs. John Clifford for their presentation of 
Stephen's library of books to Ashbury, and extend our sincere thanks to them. 
This wide variety of books will remain a lasting memorial to a fine young 
man. 

Our warmest thanks and appreciation are extended to those who have been 
kind enough to donate books to the library. Mr. W. J. R. Wilson and Cdr. 
C. H. Little are two supporters whose regular donations have done much 
to increase the volume of books on the shelves, and we especially thank them 
for their continued interest. 

The librarians have done a great job this year, working hard to keep the 
library tidy, an awesome task sometimes. I really have appreciated their help, 
and cheerful, willing attitude to their duties in the library. Thank you, boys! 

Mary Loftus. 

Donations have been received from the following: 



Mrs. M. Baker 
Mr. and Mrs. John Clifford 
Mrs. D. F. Downing 
The Danish Embassy 
W. F. Hadley, Esq. 
The Hon. P. Hellyer 
Jonathan Heaton 
Dr. G. Hooper 
Lansing Lamont, Esq. 
Cdr. C. H. Little 



J. C. MacLaurin, Esq. 
Fraser MacNicol 
Jacques Major 
Mrs. D. Polk 
Mrs. P. Schoeler 
Michael Torontow 
B. Wallin, Esq. 
Guy Warwick 
W. J. R. Wilson, Esq. 
Charles Zwirewich 



LIBRARIANS 



Senior 
Cahn 
Hogarth 
Paterson I 
McTaggart 
Reid 

Bleackley 
Towe 



Junior 
Pimm II. 
MacDonald 
Cuzner 
Warwick 
Torontow 
Flynn I 
Coyne 
Major 
Campbell 
Brookes 



CADETS 

The Cadets took part in the Military Tattoo at the Civic Centre in com- 
memoration of the 100th anniversary of the Governor-General's Foot Guards. 
This was the only theatrical skit in the pageant, depicting the war in the 
trenches (1914-1918) and the humour of the times. This demonstration was 
repeated at the Annual Ceremonial Inspection, at which the Inspecting 
Officer was Colonel Strome Galloway. E.D.. CD. 

After the inspection the following awards were presented: 
Most Conscientious N.C.O.: C/Sgt. W. A. MacEwen 
Best Bandsman: L/Cpl. P. A. S. Johnston 
Best Platoon: No. 2— C/Lt. W. W. Stratton 
Best Officer: C/Capt. D. J. Morrison 
C.O.'s Award: C/Maj. J. K. Beqaj 

J.H.H. 



25 



CANADIAN STUDIES PROGRAMME 

This programme involves an interdisciplinary approach to the study of 
Canada, and is being introduced in grades 5, 6, 9. 10, 11 and 13. 

Various projects are being carried out as part of the programme and brief 
descriptions of the various projects follow: 
The Ashbury Journal 

This publication was launched with the aim of establishing a forum for 
the exchange of student views across the country at the lowest possible price. 
The idea was prompted both by the lack of a national student-level journal 
devoted to Canadian affairs and by the fact that so many interesting projects 
are being carried out today which do not receive the publicity they deserve. 
The Journal invites contributions from students across Canada and provides 
those published with a country-wide circulation. 

The response has been very encouraging and after its first year the Journal 
boasts a subscription list which includes high schools in every province of 
the country as well as the North West Territories. 

S. M. Stirling 

Canadian Stamp Collection 

As part of the Canadian Studies Programme and with the generous help 
of the Ladies' Guild, a School stamp collection has been started. Two Minkus 
albums were purchased, one for mint stamps and the other for used stamps. 

Special thanks are extended to Mrs. Loftus and Mr. Joyce for their assist- 
ance and interest. Mrs. Loftus spent many tedious hours organizing the 
stamp sale, the proceeds of which were put towards the collection. Mr. 
Joyce has donated innumerable stamps which were used both for the collec- 
tion and for the sale. 

Thanks are extended to the following who have made donations of stamps 
to the collection: 

Mrs. Loftus, Mr. Joyce, P. Campbell, R. Robertson, S. Belding, J. Beedell, 
R. Newbergher, J. Longsworth, J. Heaton, P. Stenger, C. Teron. 

C. N. Teron 

H.M.C.S. Iroquois 

Form II has "adopted" HMCS Iroquois, one of the new DDH 280 class 
destroyers being built at Sorel, Quebec. The Iroquois is one of the most 
modern warships in the world and she will be commissioned in July, 1972. 

Her captain is Commander Duncan Macgillivray and he visited us one 
afternoon and told us about his ship. He also gave us many pictures and 
photographs for our classroom display. 

We shall be visiting the ship in August before she sails for Halifax, where 
she will be based. 

Next year the new Form II will take over and maintain contact with 
Commander Macgillivray and his crew on the Iroquois. 

D. G. Meyers 

Gallery of Great Canadians 

Our special project was to write to famous Canadians and ask them if they 
would send us an autographed photograph to hang in our gallery. 

By the end of the year we had received photographs and letters from Chief 
Dan George, Dr. Herzberg, Mr. Diefenbaker and Gordie Howe. 

We hope that next year's Form I will add more famous people to the 
gallery. 

D. C. Beedell 



26 



The following projects are in the planning stage for next year: 

As there will be two grade six classes, one will maintain contact with 
HMCS Iroquois, while it is hoped to twin the other class with an Eskimo 
class in the far north. 

In conjunction with this project a collection of Eskimo crafts will be built 
up and will be on permanent display. 

A student-run company is to be established, to be followed later by a Stock 
Exchange. 

Grateful thanks are extended to the following for generous donations to 
the Canadian Studies Programme: 

The Ladies" Guild, Mrs. M. Wright, Mrs. Schoeler, Mrs. Sellers, and Mr. 
Wilson. 

H.J.R. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

This year we held our annual Public Speaking contest in the usual style 
in Argyle Hall. Grade 9 and 10 contestants vied for the Ross McMaster 
Prize. Hugh Christie emerged as the winner. In the Senior section the Gary 
Horning Memorial Prize was won by Matthew Rowlinson. There was stiff 
competition in both sections of the contest. Many and varied were the topics 
and styles of delivery. Judges were Archdeacon Douglas Christie, Mr. Les 
Lye and Mr. Charles Schofield. 

Matthew Rowlinson and Graham Sellers represented Ashbury in the 
Ottawa district public speaking contest under the auspices of the Ontario 
Public School Trustees Association. Neither won, but both did extremely 
well. 

Rob Huston and Shaun Belding both spoke in a contest at the Chateau 
Laurier and Matthew Rowlinson in a contest at the Miss Westgate Restaurant. 
These contests were sponsored by Optimist International and had as their 
theme "'Our Challenge — Involvement." 

Many — in fact almost all — students of the School delivered one or more 
speeches during the year. It is marvellous to see the growth in self-confidence 
and ability to express ideas which many of the boys experienced. Person to 
person communication is crucial for healthy, happy life. We are grateful for 
a public speaking programme that tries to foster such communication. 

E.E.G. 



SCIENCE CLUB 

This year the science club had what I feel to be a most successful year. 
There were eleven members in the club, each carrying on numerous 
experiments. 

Among the many interesting experiments carried out, most of them were 
experiments on remote control, electronic amplifiers, stroboscopic lighting 
and chemical tests. 

A group of members successfully completed a remote control unit which, 
when put to the tests, refused to work as a remote control unit but success- 
fully worked as a radio with a frequency of twenty-five to thirty-two 
megacycles. 

This year's science club was very productive and I feel that next year's 
club will surely miss Mr. Byford's helpful instructions. 

F. Chu 



27 



"THE MIKADO" AT ELMWOOD 

The Ashbury-Elmwood combined dramatic societies presented the Gilbert 
and Sullivan favourite, "The Mikado; or The Town of Titipu", in the 
gymnasium of Elmwood School on April 7 and 8 with a most impressive 
array of youthful talent. It is fair to say that a fine tradition has been 
established since the first tentative revival of "Trial By Jury" was presented 
in 1967. 

Students were cast in a majority of the principal roles and they carried off 
their responsibilities with ease and charm. Willy Liang brought a special 
quality of youthful credibility to the role of Nanki-Poo, the Wandering 
Minstrel. Playing opposite him as the lovely Yum-Yum, Patricia Lynch- 
Staunton delighted both eye and ear, and the affecting duet, "Were you not 
to Ko-Ko Plighted" stood out as the highlight of the production. 

Sean Power was vocally and dramatically at home in the role of Ko-Ko, 
in which his stage presence and sense of comedy were great assets. Doug 
Pearce made a promising first appearance as Pish-Tush. 

"The Mikado", in spite of its exposure by all levels of production over 
its nearly ninety-year history, still has the magic to come across as fresh and 
topical to succeeding generations and is greeted like a cherished old friend 
by those of us who have seen it many times. The production by the Ashbury- 
Elmwood group certainly was up to the best standards of school productions. 
Your reviewer has by now lost track of the number of performances seen 
over a lifetime, but can say that none ever pleased more than this one. The 
members of the cast brought their own fresh approach to the operetta, which 
was warmly received by the enthusiastic audience of students, parents, faculty 
members and friends. 

To Mr. Geoffrey Thomson is due a large measure of the success of the 
annual Gilbert and Sullivan productions since 1968. 

His own love of the operettas creates a climate of enthusiasm that obviously 
carries over to the cast and stage crews. His portrayal of Pooh-Bah was a 
triumph. As well as setting a standard of professionalism to inspire the youth- 
ful participants, his sure hand in the direction and at the piano made him 
indeed Lord High Everything Else! 

Your reviewer never ceases to be amazed that so many people can occupy 
the minute stage in the Elmwood gymnasium. The groupings of chorus 
and principals was accomplished with ease and good effect. The sets, con- 
structed under the supervision of Mr. Inns, were most attractive and were 
made even more effective by the skilful use of lighting. 

The costumes were colourful and traditional; make-up was well applied, 
and the stage crew performed their many chores smoothly and well. Thanks 
are also due to the faculty members, Mr. Peter Josselyn and Mrs. Janice 
McRae, who added the needed depth to the roles of The Mikado and Katisha. 
Not only were their voices needed for balance but their portrayals were in 
the best tradition of the melodramatic characters. 

"The Mikado" may mark the end of the "Gilbert and Sullivan Series" that 
we have enjoyed for the last five years. Mr. Thomson is leaving Ottawa at 
the end of the school year for a more bucolic setting. To quote an old show- 
business cliche: "he will be a hard act to follow". 

E.P. 



28 





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FIRST FOOTBALL TEAM 

Winners of the B.C.S. Old Boys' Trophy 

Back Row: M. S. Jelenick. A. N. Scott, M. I. L. Robertson, M. A. B. Webster, 

R. Anapolsky, D. J. Siversky, R. G. Pimm. 
Middle Row: R. L. Simpson, Esq., D. M. Heaney, P. Pardo, P. G. Copestake, C. R. 

Bates, J. A. Ellis, D. J. H. Ross, P. S. T. Croal, S. G. Comis, G. M. 

Henderson, V. J. Burczak, Esq. 
Front Row: A. Luciani, D. J. Morrison, M. Duguay, W. W. Stratton, J. K. Beqaj, 

Co-Capt., B. A. Boyd, Co-Capt., R. B. Smith, R. S. Childers, G. A. 

McTaggart. 



FIRST FOOTBALL 

Coach Bobby Simpson had a tougher job than usual this year. His players 
were relatively small, and through most of the season we suffered from a 
marked inability to put points on the scoreboard. Fortunately, the consistently 
strong performance by our defence made up for the lack of offence with the 
result that every game but one was close. 

During the first three games we did actually score three touchdowns, but 
they were all nullified by penalties. 

In the Bishop's game we finally managed to score a touchdown that 
counted, and we held this lead to beat Bishop's for the third year in a row. 
The Old Boys narrowly managed a victory by scoring in the dying minutes 
of the game. 

Lakefield was our best effort of the season, and those watching called it 
one of the most exciting games an Ashbury team has ever played. The three 
practices preceding the game made a permanent mark on all of us: we 
didn't believe that such productive, meaningful practices were possible. Our 
passing game finally clicked, and the line settled down to a strong, con- 
sistent performance. To our bitter disappointment, though, Lakefield won 
again in the last few minutes of play. 

John Ellis won the team's most valuable player award; Richard Childers 
was the most improved player and Ronnie Anapolsky the best lineman. 

This was Coach Simpson's last year of coaching, and we are all dismayed 
at the thought of an Ashbury team without him. He taught us football like 
nobody else could and has become an invaluable part of Ashbury life; but 
to those of us who played on his football team he is even more. He taught us 
the meaning of determination, and he has given us strength to help us 
through anything else we may ever do. For this we give him our deepest 
thanks, and we hope that he will carry with him good memories of Ashbury. 

Results 
Hudson Heights 

Stanstead 

Osgoode 

Bishop's 7 

Osgoode 6 

Selwyn House 8 

Lakefield 17 

Old Boys 8 

B. Boyd 



12 


Lost 


39 


Lost 


6 


Lost 





Won 


13 


Lost 


7 


Won 


21 


Lost 


9 


Lost 




SECOND FOOTBALL TEAM 

Back Row: J. G. Reesor, D. A. George, W. R. Plummer, R. Pelcis, K. S. Belding, 

M. D. C. Evans. 
Middle Row: K. D. Niles, Esq., W. A. Price, S. T. Tanos, G. B. P. Johnson, J. W. 

Reid, S. A. Gray, I. K. Bleackley, C. Paterson, H. Penton, Esq. 
Front Row: R. F. Sirotek, R. N. Newbexgher, N. W. Polk, Co.-Capt., S. J. Rigby, 

Co.-Capt., H. A. Christie, M. Lynch-Staunton. 



SECOND FOOTBALL 

While we didn't accomplish our goal of a winning season wc came as close 
to that goal as possible. In a three-game season we had one win and two losses. 
One of the losses was by only one point. The other we'd sooner forget. 

Next year, I believe, there is every chance of a winning season. This is not 
the usual 'wait until next year' statement, but an observation based on the 
fact that we had a young team (there was a preponderance of Grade Nine 
boys) and we had a good 'esprit de corps'. Add last year's experience to this 
'esprit de corps' and you come up with a winning combination. 

I'd like to extend our thanks to the coaches, Mr. Penton and Mr. Niles, 
for their time, work and patience. 

Coach Simpson is leaving Ashbury. Although he was more involved with 
the First Team than with us, I can say that there's not a football player at 
Ashbury who does not have a deep feeling of loss. Our thanks and best wishes 
to Coach Simpson. 

N. W. Polk 




LEAGUE ALL STARS 

Back Row: P. H. Josselyn, Esq., J. F. Cuttle, C. J. M. K. Yap, Vice-Capt., R. C. Y. 

Ng, J. A. Seay, Capt., D. C. C. Ng, D. H. Pearce. 
Front Row: G. M. Jeffrey, L. Zunenshine, M. Garcia Ramos, A. Y. H. Chan, A. P. 

Leung. 




FIRST SOCCER TEAM 

Back Row: R. J. Anderson, Esq., D. Pryde, R. E. Hogarth, W. A. MacEwen, P. J. 

Richardson, T. A. Dickson, D. W. Lackie, P. Mangifesta. 
Front Row: E. W. Cahn, M. L. W. Barnes, R. G. Luciani, R. L. Bennett, Vice-Capt., 

E. A. Jckinen, N. Macleod, Capt., R. Grant-Whyte, D. C. Paterson, 

A. Skolnik. 



FIRST SOCCER 

This year's team was one of the best at Ashbury in recent years. In league 
play we. for the first time, came first in our division, finally beating our main 
rivals. Sir Wilfrid Laurier High School. With this behind us we entered the 
playoffs confident of our ability, but were quickly knocked out by a team 
which we should have beaten. That game was a let-down to a good season. 

In exhibition play we fared badly, failing to win any exhibition games. We 
lost to both Bishop's and Stanstead and could not even muster up enough 
energy to beat the Old Boys. 

The team, though, was still relatively young and a good nucleus will return 
next year. We are losing about four starters, but the rest of the team will 
be back next year with one more year's experience and growth. The only 
spot which will be hard to fill will be that of goalie, which Ed Jokinen has 
amply filled for the past two years. Even so we have great expectations for 
next year's team. It should be a good season. 

As a player I would just like to impress on the readers the importance of 
team work in a game such as soccer. I feel I can safely say that this year's 
team, although it had no superstars, was the best team which I have played 
on in five years of Ashbury soccer. I would also like to thank our spectators 
for their support and our coach for the help and guidance which we received 
this year. 

To the team good luck for next year and I hope you bring home the 
silverware! 

Andre Laurendeau H.S. 
Sir Wilfrid Laurier H.S 
Colonel By H.S. 
Rideau H.S. 
Gloucester H.S. 
Andre Laurendeau H.S. 
Sir Wilfrid Laurier H.S. 





Results: 




Won 


5-0 


Gloucester H.S. 


Won 2-1 


Tied 


1-1 


Rideau H.S. 


Won 4-0 


Won 


2-1 


Colonel By H.S. 


Won 6-0 


Won 


3-1 


Stanstead 


Lost 1-4 


Won 


3-0 


Bishop's 


Lost 0-4 


Won 


10-1 


Old Boys 


Lost 2-4 


Won 


1-0 


Ridgemont H.S. 


Lost 0-2 
R. L. Bennett 



31 




SECOND SOCCER TEAM 

Back Row: G. J. McGuire, Esq., I. C. Scarth, H. Veilleux, N. J. Spencer, M. 

Hodgins, L. H. Benfell, P. Taticek, V. Lynch-Staunton, D. A. Gilmore, 

D. J. Lurtz. 
Front Row: G. D. Cushing, G. Anapolsky, K. Bidner, J. McNeil, Capt., I. Stoddard, 

Vice-Capt., M. Kemper, M. A. Marion. 
In Front: J. W. Beedell. 



SECOND SOCCER 

Our season started with only one player returning from last year's team. 
The first game of our schedule was played at Gloucester High School after 
less than a week's practice. We tied it 1-1 and it gave us a reasonable idea 
of our weak spots. 

The next game was an exhibition one against Selwyn House, played at 
Ashbury. We scored our first victory of the season, shutting them out 3-0. 
We subsequently won all but one of our exhibition games, the exception being 
a scoreless draw against Stanstead on Ashbury turf. 

We did not do as well in the league, but our players gained some valuable 
experience. 



Results: 



Won: 

Selwyn House 
Canterbury H.S. 
Gloucester H.S. 
B.C.S. 

St. George's 





Tied: 


3-0 


Gloucester H.S. 


3-2 


Stanstead 


5-0 


Hillcrest H.S. 


7-4 


Canterbury H.S 


3-1 




4-2 


Lost: 




Brookfield H.S. 




Hillcrest H.S. 



1-1 

0-0 

1-1 

3-3 



0-5 
0-6 
1-6 



I. Stoddard 



32 




FIRST HOCKEY TEAM 

Back Row: B. Johnson, P. S. T. Croal, R. Anapolsky, G. Anapolsky, R. G. 

Luciani. 
Middle Row: W. A. Jovce, Esq., J. A. Ellis, R. L. Bennett, J. K. Beqaj, R. B. Smith, 

I. Bleackley, B. Bellamy, Esq. 
Front Row: E. W. Cahn, B. A. Boyd, Vice-Capt., M. Duguay, Capt., D. J. 

Morrison, Vice-Capt., R. G. Pimm. 
Absent: D. Pryde, S. Power, Manager. 

FIRST HOCKEY 

The senior hockey team had a frustrating season this year. Along with a 
shortage of games and practices, we had more than our share of narrow 
losses. 

We only played 12 games, with one tie and five wins. Owing to this small 
number of games and practices the team had difficulty in molding together, 
and the younger players were unable to gain necessary experience. 

These problems, however, should not be allowed to overshadow a basically 
good year in many respects. Congratulations are in order to the whole team 
for the effort and guts seen all year long. 

The results of the games with our three toughest private school rivals 
were very disappointing. We lost to Stanstead 8-2, and the following week 
to Bishop's on their home ice. Lakefield was leading 7-1 at one point in their 
game and won the game by two goals in spite of one of Ashburys strongest 
third period rallies ever. 

Again this year the Old Boys* game was an excellent show, notwithstanding 
the one-sided score for the school. 

The last game of the season (tourney in Maxville) proved to be the high 
point performance-wise. We were placed against a Fisher Park team that was 
composed largely of players from the Ottawa Junior Leagues. They were by 
far the best team we played all vear. yet neither team was more than a goal 
ahead until they scored three quick ones in the last five minutes. 

The Fraser Trophy for the most valuable player was awarded to Richard 
Bennett. The Irvin Cup for the most improved player was given to Rickie 
Luciani. The winner of the "team spirit"* trophy, created by the players and 
awarded for the first time this year, was presented to our affable manager, 
Sean Power. 

The captains this year were Marc Duguay. Bryan Boyd and Don Morrison. 

I take this opportunity to give well deserved thanks to Mr. Bellamy, for 
his coaching made this season in total a success. We wish Mr. Bellamy and 
all those who will be back next vear the best of luck. 

A note of special thanks to Bryan Boyd and Jim Beqaj. for their work 
this year was more than appreciated. M. Duguay 

33 




SECOND HOCKEY TEAM 

Back Row: M. Kemper, P. Taticek, P. W. Wilson, D. J. Ross, P. Mangifesta. 

Middle Row: G. D. Cushing, J. McNeil. L. Desmarais, M. A. B. Webster, H. 

Veilleux, C. Paterson, V. J. Burczak, Esq. 
Front Row: G. M. Jeffrey, M. I. L. Robertson, D. B. Johnston, Capt., K. S. Belding, 

S. T. Tanos. 

SECOND HOCKEY 

This year's team had speed, hard hitting, finesse, shooting and, above all, 
perseverance. From the good results of our first few practices we realized it 
was going to be a good season. However, we didn't realize it was going to be 
near perfect. 

Our captain was Dave Johnston, with Stuart Jelenick and Mark Webster 
as vice-captains. 

In our first game against Sedbergh, Luc Desmarais, Leslie Zunenshine and 
Dave Johnston all collected hat-tricks, with Doug Ross on our defensive squad 
collecting a pair. The first game against St. George's was a tight one, but 
our shooting and penalty-killing were better than theirs. At one time we had 
two men in the penalty box for six minutes. 

For our second game against Sedbergh we had only about seven members 
of the regular second team playing. We also formed the "Kid Line", which, 
although it didn't produce in this game, was going to be of great help against 
Amherst. 

The second game against St. George's started out a tight one. Halfway 
through the second period the score was 2-1 for us, with St. George's 
threatening. However, our goal-tending met the test and we broke for four 
quick ones. Our goal-tending throughout the season was outstanding, with 
George Jeffrey, Peter Wilson and Steve Tanos carrying the burden. 

The first of the two games against Amherst was a tight one, but they out- 
muscled us. The second game was the one in which the "Kid Line" of Geoff 
Cushing, Colin Paterson and John Lafortune saved the day for us. Each of 
them scored a goal, tying the game and then putting it out of reach for the 
boys from Amherst. 

This was a team: there was great spirit, determination and teamwork. Next 
season should be even more successful than this one. 

Results: 
Sedbergh at Vanier Arena Won 

St. George's at Ashbury Won 

Sedbergh at Sedbergh Tied 

St. George's at McGill Arena Won 

Amherst, Mass. at Rockcliffe Arena Lost 

Amherst, Mass. at Hull Arena Won 



11-2 

3-2 

6-6 

6-3 

3-4 

6-2 
M. S. Jelenick 



34 







THE CURLERS 

Back Row: L. H. Benfell, F. K. K. Chu, P. A. S. Johnston, E. E. Green, Esq. 
Front Row: V. Lynch-Staunton, I. A. Stoddard. R. M. Kenny, Skip, G. McTaggart, 

K. Rimsa. 
Absent: J. W. Walker. 



CURLING 

High Schools in the Ottawa district are grouped into three leagues for 
inter-school curling. Ashbury had a very successful year in its league, 
finishing first. Unfortunately we did not do well in the city finals. 

Again Ashbury entered the Tiny Hermann Bonspiel and again we did well, 
but not well enough to win. Over the Christmas holidays we entered teams in 
two Ottawa Valley bonspiels. 

A highlight of the curling season was our trip to Bishop's. The second 
team, skipped by Victor Lynch-Staunton, was instrumental in gaining a total 
points victory. 

The new school van and the taxi company saw lots of the curlers this year, 
as we were able to have ice at the R.C.M.P. Curling Club three times a week. 
It was a treat to watch some of the students "discover' curling and really 
enjoy it. 

Bob Kenny says; "Generally throughout the year the team played with 
spirit and cohesiveness. This was obviously one of the major reasons why we 
won games." I would like to add that the spirit, cohesiveness and skill of the 
school team were largely due to Ashbury *s Curling Captain. Bob Kenny. 

E.E.G. 



35 





J 3 irJer^mJ 




«Kr 




THE SKI TEAM 



Back Row: 
Front Row: 
Absent: 



K. D. Niles, Esq., D. J. Siversky, J. A. Seay, D. C. Paterson, 

Smith, R. J. Anderson, Esq. 

G. Martineau, T. G. Martin, R. Grant-Whyte, W. W. Stratton, 

D. W. Lackie. 

J. F. Cuttle. 

SKIING 



I. H. 

Capt., 



Our ski team participated in two major competitions this year: The Art 
Lovett Memorial Ski Meet, which we "won" but didn't win, and the Tri- 
School Ski Meet at Owl's Head in the Eastern Townships, which was some- 
what spoiled this year when the school van was able to make it up all the 
hills. 

In the Art Lovett, Ashbury eventually finished third in a field of thirteen 
local High Schools. The School was placed first in the slalom and third in the 
cross-country. Special mention should go to Tony Seay and Guy Martineau. 
Tony placed third in the individual cross-country results while Guy placed 
fourth in the slalom and sixth in the giant slalom. A miscalculation in adding 
the total points added an extra touch of excitement to the meet. Initially 
Ashbury was adjudged first and so was presented with the Art Lovett Memorial 
Trophy. However, a review of the totals the next day had the trophy and the 
glory transferred to a well-deserving Canterbury High School, much to the 
natural disappointment of the members of the team. 

Again, at Owl's Head, the results were not quite what we had hoped for. 
In a field of five schools. Ashbury placed fourth overall, one place better, 
however, than last year. Our usual bad luck was with us as several disqualifi- 
cations and a few untimely falls destroyed our chances for a second or third 
place. The School placed first in the giant slalom and third in both the slalom 
and cross-country. Jimmy Cuttle managed to secure first place in the indivi- 
dual results of the giant slalom, seventh place in the slalom and a surprisingly 
early ninth in the cross-country. Despite the results of the meet spirits were 
quite high and a good time was had by all, including Jimmy, even though 
he was the butt of some playful bullying. 

The new school van, while adding much to travelling comfort, suspended 
much of the excitement of the trip when it did not have to be pushed up any 
of the icy hills in the Townships. This has always been considered the high 
point of the trip. 

I'd like to thank members of the team, coach Mr. Niles and Mr. Anderson 
for making my last year with the team a most enjoyable one. I wish the team 
good luck in the coming seasons. „, _ „ 

e W. W. Stratton 



36 




THE SWIMMING TEAM 

Back Row: H. Christie, D. George, T. A. Dickson, M. A. Marion. 

Front Row: C. Teron, R. Hogarth, H. J. Robertson, Esq., A. Skolnik, S. A. Gray. 

Absent: P. G. Copestake, J. W. Beedell. 



SWIMMING 

In the past, participation in our swimming programme has been limited 
to competitive swimmers. This year, however, it was decided to divide the 
pool in half to allow for the participation of recreational swimmers as well. 
The experiment appears to have been a great success, as upwards of forty 
students took part. 

In the competitive sphere Ashbury enjoyed mixed success. For the first 
time in three years we failed to reach the junior relay finals of the Ottawa 
Inter-High School Swim Meet, but in the individual events three swimmers 
reached final events: Hogarth, Gray and Marion. 

During February Ashbury organized an inter-school meet at Rockcliffe 
C.F.B. pool to which four Eastern Ottawa schools were invited. Ashbury 
swimmers performed creditably to finish a close third to St. Pat's and Sir 
Wilfrid Laurier, both among the strongest schools in the city. 

The climax of the swimming was the Ashbury Inter-House Swim Meet 
held in March at Rockcliffe. Good organisation and house spirit saw Con- 
naught avenge last year's defeat and win a close victory by 197 points to 182. 
A total of ten new records was set during the meet. 

H.J.R. 



37 



Ix 



L 



wmm 


IP# 




^ 


* it J^m 


"~M .' 




-4M ^^jfeTJ 


^P#, #VWHI 



THE TRACK TEAM 

Back Row: V. J. Burczak, Esq., R. Ng, D. C. Paterson, R. Pelcis, B. Wallin, Esq. 
Middle Row: G. McTaggart, R. M. Kenny, S. G. Comis, S. J. Rigby. 
Front Row: J. W. Beedell, G. D. Cushing, D. J. Morrison, M. D. C. Evans, K. S. 
Belding. 

TRACK AND FIELD 

The Track and Field team this year was large — 18 full and part-time 
members. However, many of the boys were new and inexperienced and this 
year was used as a training period. Doubtless, in years to come some fine 
performances can be expected of them. 

This year, for the first time, early track practice, together with a few 
field events, was made possible by the use of the new indoor track and field 
facilities at the Coliseum at Lansdowne Park. Our fields were again under 
snow quite late into the spring. 

A fairly large contingent of boys went to the Ottawa Regional Track and 
Field Meet. Of these, four boys — R. Luciani, M. Barnes, R. Kenny and G. 
McTaggart — proceeded to the Ottawa City Meet. R. Kenny then went on to 
the Ottawa Valley Meet as our only representative. He placed third there. 

It was a fairly good season and I expect that the boys will improve over 
the next year to produce a very fine team for 1973. 

VJ.B. 



SPORTS AWARDS — 1971-1972 



Senior Football: 
The Lee Snelling Trophy 
The Tiny Hermann Trophy 
The Mike Stratton Memorial Trophy 

( Best Lineman 
Junior Football: 
The Barry O'Brien Trophy 
The Boswell Trophy 

Senior Soccer: 
The Anderson Trophy 
The Perry Trophy 

Junior Soccer: 
The Pemberton Shield 

Senior Hockey: 
The Fraser Trophy 
The Irvin Cup 

Senior Skiing: 
The Evan Gill Trophy 
The Ashbury Cup 
The Coristine Cup (Best Cross-country) 

SPECIAL AWARD 

Ottawa-St. Lawrence Trophy 

Division Champions High School Soccer 

Nigel Macleod 

Captain, 1st Soccer 



(M.V.P. 
(M.I.P. 



(M.V.P. 
(M.I.P. 

(M.V.P. 
(M.I.P. 

(M.V.P. 

(M.V.P. 
(M.I.P. 

(M.V.S. 
(M.I.S. 



— John Ellis. 

— Richard Childers. 

— Ronnie Anapolsky. 

— Nicholas Polk. 

— Stephen Rigby. 

— Nigel Macleod. 

— Michael Barnes. 

— Gerry Anapolsky. 

— Richard Bennett. 

— Rickie Luciani. 

— Jim Cuttle. 

— Guy Martineau. 

— Tony Seay. 



SENIOR SCHOOL FORM LIST 



JUNE 1972 



Grade 13 — Mr. P. H. Josselyn: 

Bennett, R. L. 13. 4.54 C+ 

Boyd, B. A. 28.11.54 C+ 

Chan, Y. H. A. 22.10.52 C+ 

Childs, P. A. 8.11.53 W+ 

Chu I, F. 15. 4.54 W+ 

Chu II, K. K. K. 15. 2.53 W+ 

Davies, G. C. 31.10.52 W+ 

Duguay, M. 28.12.52 W+ 

Jokinen, E. A. 15. 4.54 C+ 

Kenny, R. M. 13. 9.54 C+ 

Leung, P. C. A. 13. 9.54 

Liang, W. S. W. 7. 5.53 

Luciani I, A. 24.12.53 

MacEwen I, W. A. 17. 8.53 W+ 

Richardson, P. J. 5. 4.54 W+ 

Rimsa, K. 31. 8.54 W+ 

Seay, J. A. 15.10.53 W+ 

Skolnik, A. 18.10.53 W+ 

Stirling, S. M. 30. 9.53 W 

Stoddard I, I. 21.10.55 C 

Stratton, W. W. 3. 6.53 C+ 

Wong, C. P. J. 24. 1.51 W+ 

Yap, C. J. M. K. 26.12.53 C+ 



c+ 
c 



Grade 12B — Mr. C. J. Inns: 

Anapolsky I, R. 23. 3.55 C+ 

Cuttle, J. F. 20. 8.55 W+ 

Ellis, J. A. 13.11.54 W 

Heaney, D. M. 17. 1.54 C 

Hogarth I, R. E. 15.11.52 W+ 

Lackie, D. W. 26. 3.54 C+ 

Luciani II, R. G. 23.12.55 C+ 

Martineau, G. 10.11.53 W 

Ng I, D. C. C. 17. 3.54 W+ 

Pearce, D. H. 22. 1.55 C+ 

Power, S. M. 25. 5.53 W+ 

Robertson I, M. I. L. 23. 1.54 C 

Rogers, P. 4. 8.53 W 

Spencer I, S. D. 1. 1.53 W 

Webster, M. A. B. 1.12.55 C+ 



Grade 12A — Mr. K. D. NUes: 

Barnes, M. L. W. 18. 5.54 C+ 

Beqaj, J. K. 19. 8.54 W 

Couturier, H. 9.10.52 C+ 

Fabricius, C. P. 6. 6.54 W 

Hope, P. 11. 9.55 C 

Johnston I, P. A. S. 10. 2.53 C 

Johnston II, D. B. 30. 7.55 C 

Jones I, B. W. 27. 1.55 W 

Joyce. C. M. 11. 6.54 W 

Lynch-Staunton I, V. 24. 1.56 C 

Macleod I, N. 9.10.54 C 

Martin I, T. G. 16. 6.54 W 

McKeown II. P. L. 9. 5.55 W 

McTaggart, G. A. 7.11.53 W+ 

Morrison I, D. J. 20. 2.54 C 

Ostiguy, P. 21.11.55 W 

Pardo, P. 13. 8.56 W+ 

Plummer, W. R. 24. 3.53 W+ 

Siversky, D. J. 27.12.54 W+ 

Smith I, R. B. 13.11.54 C+ 

Smith II, I. H. 21. 6.55 W+ 

Walker I, J. W. 4.12.54 C 

Yaxley, D. T. 14. 3.55 C 



Grade 11 A — Mr. H. 


Penton: 


Benfell, L. H. 


11. 9.56 W 


Copestake, P. G. 


22. 2.55 W 


Croal, P. S. T. 


27. 8.55 C 


Dickson, T. A. 


29. 1.55 C+ 


Grant-Whyte, R. 


15. 2.55 C+ 


Jelenick, M. S. 


26. 7.56 C 


MacLaine, D. E. 


2. 5.56 C+ 


Ng II, R. C. Y. 


1.10.55 W+ 


Paterson I, D. C. 


21.12.54 W+ 


Pimm I, R. G. 


11. 5.55 C 


Polk, N. W. 


5.10.54 W 


Rowlinson I, M. C. 


9.12.56 W+ 


Sellers I, G. 


19. 3.56 C 


Spencer II, N. J. 


3. 4.56 W 


Stoddard II, F. L. 


2. 1.58 C 


Tanos, S. T. 


17.12.55 C 


Taticek, P. 


12. 9.56 W 


Veilleux I, H. 


11. 4.56 C+ 


Walker II, R. S. 


26.10.56 C 



39 



Grade 1 IB — Mr. G. J. 

Bates, C. R. 
Bidner I, K. 
Cahn, E. W. 
Chatel, J. 
Childers, R. S. 
George, D. A. 
Mangifesta, P. 
Pryde, D. 
Ross, D. J. H. 
Scott I, A. N. 
Tutton, J. C. 



McGuire: 

5.10.55 W 
13. 6.56 C 

17. 4.54 C+ 

18. 4.55 C+ 
24. 7.54 W 
21. 1.56 C+ 
20.12.54 
29.12.54 

5. 5.55 

7. 7.55 

23. 7.56 



C+ 

c 
c 
c 
c 



Grade 10A — Mr. B. 
Beedell I, M. J. 
Bleackley, I. K. 
Buser, M. U. 
Charron, L. 
Christie, H. A. 
Garcia Ramos, M. 
Grahovac, S. Z. 
Henderson II, R. J. 
Mulock, W. F. 
Rigby, S. J. 
Towe, C. M. 
Wilson I, P. W. 



Wallin: 

14. 8.56 W 
21. 6.57 C+ 

1. 5.56 C 

15. 9.53 C 
26. 5.57 W 

2.11.54 W+ 

16. 9.57 W 
24. 7.56 W 
19. 1.58 W 
10. 9.56 W 

17. 7.57 C+ 
29. 5.57 C 



Grade 9A — Mr. H 

Ashley, W. S. J. 
Beedell II, J. W. 
Belding, K. S. 
Burke-Robertson, D 
Cushing, G. D. 
Evans, M. D. C. 
Huston, R. H. F. 
Johnson, G. B. P. 
Longsworth, J. K. 
Lynch-Staunton II, 
Marion, M. A. 
McKenna I, G. R. 
Pelcis, R. 
Reesor, J. G. 
Robertson II, R. S. 
Singh, D. 
Steacy, H. P. H. 
Stenger, P. 
Teron, C. N. 
Warren I, D. R. 



. J. Robertson: 

14. 6.58 C 
30.12.58 W 
27. 3.57 C+ 
I.W. 26. 7.57 W+ 
13. 7.57 C+ 

4. 8.58 C 
3.10.57 C+ 
2. 2.58 W+ 

19. 3.59 W 
M. 28. 3.58 C 

22.11.57 C 
13. 2.57 W 

6. 4.58 W 
1. 2.57 C 

7. 3.57 C 
23. 6.58 W 

19.11.58 W 

5. 8.57 C 
26.12.57 C 
14.10.57 W 



Grade 10B — Mr. 
Anapolsky II, G. 
Belanger, F. 
Bonneau, M. 
Comis, S. G. 
Desmarais, L. 
Gray, S. A. 
Hodgins, M. 
Jeffrey, G. M. 
Loeb, A. H. 
MacPhee, J. P. 
McNeil, J. 
Moore I, M. J. 
Reid, J. 

Sirotek I, R. F. 
Wilgress, E. D. C. 
Zunenshine, L. 



F. T. Jones: 

13. 9.56 W+ 

16. 4.56 W+ 

22. 3.55 C+ 
4.10.55 W+ 
8. 2.54 W+ 

17.11.56 C 

11. 4.56 W+ 

3. 5.56 W 

29. 9.56 C 

17. 3.56 C 
13.12.55 W 

23. 5.56 W+ 
29. 7.56 C+ 
26. 9.56 W 
15. 7.54 W 
27.12.54 W+ 



Grade 9B — Mr. V. 

Dowling, R. W. 
Helmer, R. J. 
Kemper, M. 
Lurtz, D. J. 
McNulty, L. S. 
Newbergher, R. N. 
Paterson II, C. 
Price, W. A. 
Scarth, I. C. 
Tapp, P. G. 
Wright I, J. 
Zagerman I, M. D. 



J. Burczak: 

10. 7.57 C+ 

11. 1.57 C 

27. 9.56 C 
8. 3.57 W 

17. 8.57 W+ 

10. 8.56 C+ 

22. 4.57 W+ 

21. 8.57 C+- 

26.10.56 W 

28. 8.57 C+ 
7. 9.57 C+ 

16. 6.57 C 



W — Woollcombe House. 



Connaught House. + Denotes student is a Boarder. 



40 





PHOTOS BY JANE EMBER 



41 





BREAKFAST BELL 





SCHOOL 



CHAPEL 



ASHBURY'S 
DAY 

* s 




e«B 




BREAK 



SPORTS 



LOVE THEM OR LEAVE THEM 

During my life I have had experience with many types of pet, such as 
dogs, cats, snakes, turtles, hamsters, and the like. But the most interesting 
animal I have found to he the horse, and although I have not had one as a 
pet, I have had some unique experiences with them. 

To be blunt. I find horses about as personable as crows, more delicate than 
humming birds, less efficient than bicycles, and more expensive than floozies. 

A horse is an animal who. left in front of an oat bin, will eat himself to 
death. A hot horse will drink water until his hooves fall off. Horses are very 
good at poisoning themselves; they have a fine instinct for finding, and an 
insatiable appetite for eating toxic herbs that brighter animals avoid. 

Horses also have weak nerves; they are the most hysterical of all domestic 
animals. They will not only stay in a burning barn, but if led out will break 
away and go back to be broiled alive. Mere bits of paper blowing about, a 
flapping leather strap, oddly shaped rocks, wheelbarrows, beer cans, or simply 
reflected light, will give a horse the screaming meemies. However, the same 
enormous, towering beast that rears at a gum-wrapper will, in a savage fit 
of paranoia, turn on a man and bite or stomp on him. 

Besides the affllictions they bring on themselves out of sheer stupidity or 
cowardice, horses are prone to a really spectacular number of diseases. A few 
of these troubles are: ringbone, spavin, corns, seedy toes, thrush, colic, 
heaves, constipation, coughs, colds, hives, boils and last but not least, sleeping 
sickness. If, perchance, you happen to get a horse, a veterinarian will translate 
these ailments into common English, for a common twenty-five medical bill. 

So far as I know, horses are the only animals who catch madness, the way 
other animals catch colds. For example, there are "weavers" — animals who 
sway from side to side in their stall, hour after hour, day after day. Weavers, 
because they are weavers, have prodigious appetites but are seldom fit for 
riding — their energy having been expended in pursuit of their mania. And 
weaving is contagious. If one horse in a barn is a weaver, soon every other 
horse will pick up the habit, and the stable will resemble the rehearsal hall 
of the Bolshoi Ballet! 

There are also the "cribbers" — horses who suck, chew, and mouth end- 
lessly on the edges of stall doors, mangers or other pieces of wood. Cribbers 
grind down their teeth, and fill their stomachs with slivers. And there are the 
"wind suckers". They repeatedly throw back their foolish heads and swallow 
great gulps of air, which gives them colic and ulcers. 

Finally there are many horses whose difficulties are individual and bizarre. 
Some will fly into a tantrum if, when being curried, the right side is not 
brushed before the left. There are horses who detest women; a horse I know 
must have a duck in his stall, and another will drink from a bucket only if 
the handle is turned towards him. 

In view of what can and usually does go wrong with a horse, it is not 
surprising that the first consideration in buying one is finding a "sound"' 
animal. This is not easy because ( 1 ) horses are, as indicated above, naturally 
unsound, and (2) horse sellers have as many ways of camouflaging horse 
defects as horses have defects. 

Aside from this, a horse will always blow up his stomach when being 
saddled, so he can later slip his girth. Many detest being mounted from the 
right side and will show their unique disapproval in many original ways 
such as biting, kicking, or running off. Once on this beast, don't be alarmed 
if you never move an inch, or you go screaming across the pasture trying 
to break a new record for the mile. Or if you like a leisurely stroll through 
the manure pile then this might be the order of the day. 

In conclusion, horses are stubborn, but when we think of what horses can 
be, these findings seem hardly worth mentioning, even if it means standing 
on the top of the manure pile. 

It happened to me! P. Croal 

43 



FUTURISTIC LOOK AT MY CAREER AS A GIRL WATCHER! 

(Age 46 and feeling it!) 

Ever since I read somewhere that men were never meant to be tied to one 
woman all their adult life, I have felt better about looking around! Consider 
the situation on an airplane. Most passengers like a window seat where they 
can gaze at the scenery. I like an aisle seat where I can gaze at the 
stewardesses. 

Clouds are pretty, but stewardesses are prettier. Unlike clouds they don't 
keep changing their shape every few minutes, and with the shapes they 
start with, why should they? 

So I sit in an aisle seat and look at the scenery I like best. And the scenery, 
which knows I am looking at it, looks back and smiles at me. Maybe laughs 
at me, considering my age and all that, but I prefer to think not. Perhaps 
it's the altitude, but when I'm in the air, I forget about having almost no hair 
on top of my head and having a perfectly good wife at home (or sometimes 
with me). 

I love the attention I get from stewardesses. The way they bring me a box 
of gum and hold it in front of me and trust me to take one piece. Or the 
way they look to see if my seat belt is fastened, as if they really care. My 
biggest thrill is when a pretty stewardess stops beside me, looks straight into 
my eyes, and says something very intimate and personal, such as, "Could I 
get you a magazine?" or, "Wouldn't you like a pillow?" 

A woman who wants to please a man — either to get him, or keep him — 
should take a plane trip now and then and observe the stewardesses. Or a 
man can observe the stewardesses and make some helpful notes for his wife. 
The notes might include such things as: "Take off about 15 pounds," "Take 
off about 15 years," and "Bring me food and drink every few minutes." 
You know your own wife, but some husbands may find it advisable to use a 
suggestion box in their homes and not sign their names. 

The airlines do a marvelous job of selecting attractive stewardesses with 
an appealing seatside manner. But they could do a little more. What I want 
in the little pocket in front of me, where they have all the flight charts and 
escape instructions and in-flight movie programs, is something really helpful, 
like; 

"Miss Sally Wentworth, 36-24-35, graduate of Wellesley, spent junior year 
in Paris, interested in modern art and music, designs her own dresses, has 
read all the latest books, cooks divinely, and has no steady boy friend." 

You see, I am not just an old ogler. I am looking for a wife for my son. 
While he is casing the college campuses, I am scouting the airlines. Even if I 
don't find someone for him, I will have done my parental duty. Somehow, 
feeling that I am doing something worthwhile, the trip seems shorter. 

This brings me to the subject of jealousy. I have had dozens of attractive 
women colleagues, quite considerably younger than my wife. I have had 
hundreds of lovely students, several of them beauty queens. I have been 
alone with them far into the night. I have been with them in the remote 
corners of the library stacks, ostensibly looking for a book. My wife has never 
shown the slightest jealousy. Never a word of suspicion or complaint. Indeed, 
if I did receive a perfumed letter, addressed to me in a feminine hand, with 
"I love you" written along the back flap of the envelope, she would place it on 
my desk unopened, and not even ask me about it. 

It's a little discouraging. 

As a matter of fact, my wife doesn't mind my looking at beautiful women, 
she points them out to me. 

"Don't look now," she tells me in a restaurant, causing me to whirl around 
immediately, "but there is a beautiful woman behind you. My, I wish I had 
a figure like that." 



44 



After I have stared at this luscious creature about as long as I dare without 
getting punched in the eye by her escort, my wife finds me another one. 

"Look over there, next to the man in the light suit. Isn't she gorgeous?" 

I look, and she is. Mv wife has impeccable taste in picking out the dolls. 
We make a fine team. She picking them out and I looking. 

I always listen with awe and envy to married men who tell me of their 
conquests. I don't care whether these men do all the things they say they do. 
I just like to listen. 

"There was this dame, see, I met in the supermarket," they begin. "Boy, 
what a looker! Well, we got talking, see, standing at the meat counter and 
would you believe it . . ." 

I lean forward. My eyes bulge slightly. I try not to miss a word. Another 
time I am fascinated is when a man who has been divorced a few times tells 
me about his previous wives. It's hard for me to imagine having been married 
more than once. 

I have a friend who has been married four times and is very generous with 
his tales about each of his wives. It seems a little unfair though. This man 
has to pay alimony while I get the benefit of his wisdom free. I am learning 
so much about women from him, without running any risk myself, that I 
really should pay tuition. 

But when you've had only one wife, and never expect to have another, 
this is about the only way to enlarge your experience of the fair sex and 
matrimony (I hope!) 

P. Croal 



A SINGLE ROSE 

'Tis not the winner, 

But the loser, 

Who gets celebrated. 

For in the darkness 

And the sand 

Stretches the ever groping hand. 

As those who know 

And those who see 

Go on winning endlessly, 

The hand goes on and fights its way. 

A single rose will wither 

Without the water of wishing wells. 

No coin in pocket, but lots to say 

So many people along the way; 

Upon a plateau you may stand 

To watch the wind and changing sand, 

Upon the water you may lie, 

To stay above you've got to try 

The radiant warmth from the burning coal. 

But of the loser, what of his soul? 

A single rose — 

For winners are losers on death's dark day. 

P. Childs 



45 



SOUTHERN RUN 



You lie there 

Motionless on the track, 
Like an ancient beast about to pounce, 
Your valves and pistons ejecting 

Mounds of steam, 
While they feed you 

more and 

more and 



more. 



Then as your great drivers 

Start to turn, 
And the noise of steel on steel increases, 
You're off to London 
Gathering speed, 
While they feed you 

more and 

more and 



more. 



Across a country 

Of patchwork fields, 
A land where people who work each day, 
Watch you thunder by 

Streaming smoke and ashes, 
While they feed you 

more and 

more and 



Then across a sea 

Of bungalows, 
You steam your way toward the city — 
A mass of buildings 

large and small, 
While they feed you 

less and 

less and 



less. 



You lie there 

Motionless on the track, 
Like an ancient beast about to pounce, 
Your valves and pistons ejecting 

Mounds of steam, 
While they feed you 

less and 

less and 



less. 



D. Johnston 



46 



THE SORCERER 

The night is dark and lonely; 
The cloud-chased moon 
Seems to rush in headlong flight 
Across the starless sky. 

High on the rocky, windswept crag 

Devoid of life save for the few withered bushes, 

Howling, as if tormented, 

The faintest flickering glow 

Dives and catches . . . 

The black shadow crouches. 
An all-concealing cloak around, 
And naught but gloom inside . . . 
He feeds the growing light. 
And casts some pagan herbs 
Upon the flame. 

A cloud rises, dark and all-consuming, 

Leaving naught to sight 

Save the Sorcerer: 

"Annon ed Hellen, edrohi Ammon! 

Fennas nogothrim; 

Lasto beth Lammon!" 
The clear voice echoes forth, 
Across the never-ending plain. 
The cloud whirls and grows; 
The Demons are Coming! 

The aeon-long sleep is ended: 

A One has arisen as mighty as the Ancients 

And has called them forth in the Forgotten Tongue. 

The cloud boils and writhes in torment, 

The agents of Mephistopheles are growing, 

Feeding. 

And above all stands the Sorcerer, 

Arms outstretched, face yet unseen 

Sunken in the depths of the cloak. 

The Demons are sated. 

Suddenly, the plain is flooded with a burning light 

And a voice rings out 

Like an infinity of bells; 

And the very roots of the earth shudder 

In knowledge of the Battle to come. 

The Sorcerer is revealed: 

The cloak is gone; he is all in white: 

"Evil ones! 

Begone! Into the furnace whence you came; 

Never to curse this place again!" 

The flames leap up, 
And a rending stream of dying souls 
Dies away as the smoke is consumed. 
And the White Sorcerer stands, 
Gazing at the dimly glowing embers. 

The night is dark and lonely, 

But in the East the sky is greying. 

All is calm . . . 

The moon, now serene, 

Floats to her ever-present, unattainable lair: 

And the Sorcerer goes forth alone 

Into the new Dawn . . . 

M. C. Rowlinson 

47 



TIRED, LORD 

Lord, I'm tired of this world; 
Not because it's bad, oh no! 
That I don't really mind, after all, 
That's the way things always were. 

But it's dull, Lord, and squalid; 

Even villainy lacks style. 

No colour and artistry — Who would have thought, 

To destroy could become as boring as terrible? 

Not all bad, but getting worse; 

Ten Westmorelands for each Dayan, 

At least ol' Jack the Rip was picturesque, 

Modern muggings are a bore. 

Lord, couldn't we have a little fun? 
Or even fear then, since it helps to show 
That we're alive? I mean, Bluebeard 
Was better than cancer, no? 

Give us a few old-style monsters, 
A Caligula or two, or Nero maybe. 
Don't forget Attila, Genghis, Timur too. 
Competent at least, weren't they? 

Because, y'know, as villains, Mao 

Or Nasser just aren't much fun! 

And while you're at it, you might throw in 

Some purple palaces, some swords, 

The odd hero, damsels in distress 

(or distressing damsels, to ensure equality), 

Epic orgies in high form, adventure, 

( In reasonable quantities — no less! ) 

In short, a modest prayer, O Lord! 
Not for more security ( anymore of that 
And I'm for the padded cell, by God! ) 
Just for more novel means of being terrified. 

Something to do, is that too much to ask? 

In the meantime I've a date — Pardon, Lord, 

With Carter (John) on Mars (courtesy of Burroughs) 

And Conan, Tarzan, some buddies of that ilk. 

By the walls of Ilium, o'er the wine-dark sea — 
Think it over while I'm gone, so 
Maybe You can see your way to take 
A hint from fiction, to enliven life. 



S. Stirling 






48 



ECHO FROM A TWISTED LADDER 

"Hev. sonny — tired of wine and beer? 

Buy some hashish, there's nothing to fear. 

As you ean see its really a joke 

C'mon and have another toke. 

But if you want something that'll reallv 

make you flip 

There's nothing quite like an acid trip. 

Wow! It's a gas. it's so cool. 

Do a tab — don't go to school! 

If something heavier is what you need. 

Pop some of this, thev call it — Speed. 

It's about right now that you shoidd start hitting, 

To get a strong rush — a needle is fitting. 

Now sonny, if you really want to touch the sky, 

The answer is heroin — the ultimate high! 

The Big H. smack, horse or junk. 

No one gets hooked, that's a lot of bunk.*' 

But after a few fixes he just can't quit 

He starts everyday with a heavier hit. 

"Listen, sonny, you bought the stuff. 

Come across with the bread or my friends'll get rough. " 

This nightmare of narcotics becomes unreal 

When the kid's gotta go out and start to steal. 

He rips off people and the liquor store, 

No two ways about it. he has to have more. 

He's too strung out to go to the clinic, 

He lives and lives only for the hypodermic. 

He screams out for God. as withdrawal sets in, 

To stop all his pain and free him from sin. 

His body is rotting — he just can't stand it, 

He needs and he gets a very big hit. 

Towards his shattered shell he brings the needle close — 

The one that turns out to be an overdose. 

The needle is found still pierced into the veins 

Of this "human being' that died in chains. 

An echo is heard 'round the wretched wayward youth', 

That reeks of injustice and social truth. 

'"Hey. sonny, tired of beer and wine? 

Dope can be yours, but your soul will be mine!" 

N. Macleod 

The needle lies — 

Broken, on the floor. 

Beside it. a young man. 

Dying. 

Now. questions of why? are as 

Meaningless as advice. 

Useless as sympathy. 

What can we do? 

Nothing. 

The decision rests 

Elsewhere: into God's hands. 

We commend 

His spirit. 

I. Smith 



49 



THE DEATH OF A WORLD 

Terok sat silently on the stool gazing wistfully upwards. How beautiful 
the day was, with the sun shining through a slightly scented mist and the 
sweet chirping of the birds. Terok was a prime specimen created by Tod. He 
walked along the soft grass and picked some fruit from one of the laden trees. 
He shared some of his fruit with another man near him who acknowledged it 
with a smile. Terok was at peace with himself in this living paradise. 

A cluster of people formed around him, and he knew it was again time to 
visit Tod. They took their gifts of food and pretty stones and headed into the 
forest. When they reached the cave, they ceremoniously placed their offerings 
on the golden altar that had been salvaged from the Old Ones' pointed build- 
ings before the virus had spread. 

A brilliant beam of light flashed from the dark cave, and their gifts were 
gone as they always went. The fur-clad people tramped off towards their huts, 
happy that their provider and protector had accepted their gifts. As they 
entered the village, they met the two outcasts of the tribe they had thought 
gone. They were imperfects who were emotionally different. The man and 
woman gained pleasure from touching each other and enjoyed travelling 
together. Tod had almost destroyed them because they had wandered out of 
the forest boundaries. Again the couple had the incriminating evidence that 
they had been to the Old Ones' shelters — for they had mirrors, combs, 
glass, clothes and a small sculpture taken from a museum. 

The man gave an account of his journey into the Old Ones' city that has 
buildings reaching to the sky. He explained that the crippling virus that had 
so mysteriously wiped out their ancestors many suns ago had now faded away. 

Some of the younger people of the tribe rallied to his side. He insinuated 
that the remaining elders were weaklings and cowards to be led and fed by 
Tod. The elders faltered with indecision, for they had witnessed Tod's un- 
earthly powers, although they had never seen him. However, they began to 
feel foolish for thinking that these humble huts were to be equal to the 
massive, shining buildings that were now at their disposal. They felt Tod 
had tricked them into an unrewarding life. 

In a frenzy of anger they trampled through the forest, stooping to pick 
up rocks or branches in hopes of destroying their Tod. As the first group 
pushed the altar aside and entered the cave, a burst of light struck them 
down into wisps of smoke. The others were more careful and slipped through 
cracks in the side of the cave avoiding the centre and hugging the shadows. 

A beam of illumination from the top of the cave shone down on a shiny, 
box-like contraption. It was Tod. Terok recognized it as a vast network of 
machinery quite advanced to any he had seen in the Old Ones' city. A boom- 
ing voice echoed in the cave: "I am your saviour, for it was I who saved you 
from the virus. It was with this virus that the Old Ones foolishly caused their 
own doom after they had made me. But you have failed me and I must 
dispose of you." Tod's intricate gears began to hum and his death-dealing 
beam shot out for the final time. J Beedell 

MY FRIEND 

I sit and glare, hating all mankind, 

I run, happy, rejoicing in the sun; 

And she sits and glares, 

Or runs, playful, radiating joy. 

She reflects my every mood; 

Her brown eyes show wisdom, or child-like glee. 

She is of mixed ancestry; 

But I am told that she is mostly collie. 

M. C. Rowlinson 



50 



FREDDY 

"Hi, there! I'm Fred, the Fire Extinguisher! Don't look at me like that! 
What'sa matter, man, you prejudiced? Oh, I see! Some of your best friends 
are fire extinguishers. Glad to know that. And your favorite personality is the 
president of the Kiddee Fire Extinguisher Company. That's a relief. For a 
minute there. I thought you were one of those racist types. No, I'm not 
neurotic. I'm your average run of the mill fire extinguisher. You'll find one 
on most walls near any Hot Spoil Yuck. yuck. get it? Hot Spot, yuck, yuck! 
I've got a great sense of humour, you know. Oh. yeah! All my friends call 
me fun-loving Freddy. They see me on the street and they say, "There goes 
fun-loving Freddy!" Yes. that's true, every race has their problems and we 
are no exception, we have many Hang-Upsl Oh there I go again! But I 
couldn't resist it. I'm just so funny! Oh? You would like to know about my 
background? Well, I come from a long line of great fire extinguishers. My 
grandfather was a pressurized water extinguisher, my mom and dad were 
dry chemical fire extinguishers. Huh? Oh. I put them away! No, not that 
kind! They're spending their retirement in comfort at the Cedar Ridge 
Water Works. Of course I love them. They just didn't understand me. You 
see, I'm of a new generation; C0 L > fire extinguishers. Man, we're a real COOL 
bunch. Ho, ho! Almost missed that one. didn't you? You have to watch me, 
I'm quick! What do you mean, you don't get it? COj, Cool, see the connec- 
tion? Good! No!! Of course not! I hate fires!!! Why? Oh. I'm not sure but 
it's some sort of disease that effects fire extinguishers and humans. First the 
disease hits humans and as a side effect it harms us. I'll explain. Say a fire 
starts; well, the humans go rank. They start to rush around for a while and 
then the disease gets them. They run up to us, and we're just hanging around, 
get it? and they grab us so hard, that they pull our bodies right off our legs. 
This causes quite a bit of nausea, to say the least. Then they stick their 
fingers in our ears and pull our ear off. This makes the sickness worse. After 
this we're pretty far gone, but the last straw is when they squeeze our heads. 
As soon as they have done this we barf furiously. For some peculiar reason 
the sight of our vomit seems to cure them of the disease. They take us to the 
hospital, feed us a good meal until we are full, give us a new ear, and attach 
our bodies onto our legs again. I hate the feeling but feel good once I'm 
back on my own two feetl Yuck! Yuck! Caught you again! What do you 
mean, that's the last straw? It wasn't that bad! What are you doing with that 
match? No! Don't light that wood, you know I'll get hurt by the humans. 
Don't go!!! Stop!!! Boy, some people have no sense of humour! Guys like 
him really burn me upl He, He, He. Ho, Ho, I'm really hot today! Yuck! 
Yuck! I must be going mad, I'm foaming at the mouth! Ha. Ha, Ho. He, He, 

Yuck. Yuck D MacLaine 

PROGRESS? 

I like to lie in the grass 

In the meadow, 

In the warm rays of the Sun, 

While the cool fragrance 

Of wintergreen 

Permeates the glade in the forest, 

And the soft calling 

Of a doe to her fawn 

In the thicket beyond 

Can be just barely heard. 

BUT ONE DAY A HERD OF 

BULLDOZERS ATE THE 
MEADOW. 

H. Christie 



51 



THE SILENT CITY OR A TRIP FOR TWO 

Along filled streets 

I walk alone, 

With only the one who is with me. 

We talk and we laugh, 

But they do not hear, 

They would have spoken, 

If not for fear. 

About their business and on their way, 

Don't ask them "why" 

'Cause they've got nothing to say. 

It's on a bus, 
and off again. 
Up some stairs, 
and down again. 
Down a road, 
and back again. 
And then the cycle, 
starts again. 

In silent valleys you hear the screams, 
Of someone running to catch his dreams. 
A lot of things get in his way, 
But what they are he cannot say. 

And if you wonder where it's at, 
It's up and down — enough of that. 
The only reason I found out, 
Is I can cry instead of shout. 

P. Childs 



LAUGHTER 

One who can laugh at himself can laugh at the World 

Laughter's such a jolly trait; 
For happy people it can make 
Of boring folk who never smile 
But sneer and grimace all the while. 

Some people laugh so loud and clear 
Their breath and voice burn off your ear; 
Their loud guffaws will split the air 
And send things flying everywhere, 

While others make a wretched sound 
Which sounds like bayings of a hound; 
They gurgle, cough and spit, and soon 
Everyone else has left the room. 

But take a person just like me 
Who laughs his laugh just perfectly, 
A laugh which rings clear as a bell 
Just like a voice straight out of heaven. 

K. S. Belding 



52 







PHOTOS BY M. L. W. BARNES 



IN MEMORIAM MEI 

. . . And the bittersweet taste of time passing 

Lingers, as the ghost of an unwelcome flavour: 

Grey and untextured, 

As memories 

Of long-decayed hosts, 

Somewhere still marching on. 

They tell us that war is a curse, 

And I do not deny it. 

Would that they had been there that summer. 

Rank on well-scrubbed rank we stood, 

Hearing the speeches, 

But listening to the bugles sounding 6000 miles away. 

God, but we suffered! 

The bugles sounded little else but "Taps". 

We had no friends, 

But many close acquaintances; 

And so the pain was deadened. 

I remember Paris as an interlude, 

Seen but darkly through an alcoholic haze. 

I am told we won; 

Though in what I cannot see. 

I am a hero now, they say, 
And all my wants are cared for: 
I have naught to do but grow old, 
Although in the very best of company. 

There is John, who died of fever 

In '41 or '42; 

The Germans got Barry and Dave; 

The medic said Anne died of "natural causes". 

They never age or go blind, 

And nor do I, with them, 

For I was dead in '45 

'Though it doesn't really show, 

And only the old are deaf enough to hear me 

When I tell them . . . 



M. C. Rowlinson 



LOVE 

After so much 
sorrow . . . O, now 
I understand 
that love is 
a gathering 
of love ... a 
harvest of laughter 
and smiles. 



S. Spencer 



54 



Behind the 


stars? 




Behind the 


ever-changing panorama? 


A wall? 






Before the 


stars? 




Us? 






Before us? 






Him? 






Him? 






Us? 






1, 2, 3, . . 


. end 





Bomb? 

Die? 

Faith! 

Love! 

Him! 



J. W. Walker 



THE GLORY ROAD 



And I will again set my feet upon that path 

And tread the Glory Road 

To fame, to fortune, or perhaps to death, 

Because I am a Man 

Driven by the common goad of all my folk, 

Our precious outward urge 

That sets our feet to wandering far 

And uplifts our gaze; 

Has set our paths to roaming, and souls to wandering 

In fair-sailed Argosy 

Away from hearth, to lie in restless graves 

Divorced from kin. 

Unsatisfied with peaceful fields our fathers won 

And well-worn ways, 

To barter with the stranger-folk, for silk, 

Ivory, apes, and spices, 

And perhaps for gold won with sword or pick. 

Yet not alone for gain 

Do they lie on the far-flung beaches, 

Merchant and Conquistador. 

More lead them from their homes to die 

Than wealth's prospect. 

The heart sustains, in storm and bloody field, 

To walk new ways, 

Hear strange speech, see the new lands, 

Where the very air is new 

And dream of home leagues distant; 

Later to flee 

Before the wind laden with strange, exotic plunder, 

Knowledge, tales and brags 

And to know, more fully than the dead-souled ones, 

That they have lived, and are Men! 

S. Stirling 



55 



THE THORN OF SPRING 

It was spring and the torrential rain in its ferocity was flattening the great 
elephant grass, cleansing my face and my punished body and those of my 
friends . . . friends . . . friends 

Tomorrow was that long awaited day when the 68th Special Forces Group 
was taking the great "Freedom Bird" to far-off islands, then home, away from 
the suffering hardships and roses of Vietnam. A great day indeed, so I 
thought, walking through the damp darkness to an inner perimeter bunker. 

I stopped, stood there, looked back and there before my eyes, light! A 
blinding light. I hit the ground or rather it hit me. Explosions, fire, destruc- 
tion, hundreds screaming, shooting, sacrificing themselves for those following. 
I scrambled towards the bunker. Barred! V.C. pointing his AK-47 at me. 
God! This is my death! Flash! Death, death, darkness 

Pain! Body-wracking pain! A scream burst from the caverns of my throat. 
Death did not favour me, not yet. 

Another spasm of pain. Then, warmth? A relaxation of tense muscles. 
With fear of the unknown I dared to open my eyes. Sunshine, joy, life! 

It was only with what seemed to be an unbelievable burst of willpower 
that I managed to raise my head, to see a mind-shattering scene. 

Pain rose in my body once again and stared at the severed limb on my 
legs. No, no, NO! Darkness. 

Waking I realized it was a new day. I'm going home today. The fight! 
Arm! The arm, God no, not my arm. Fingers tearing at my eyes? Fingers, 
ten fingers. Relief. 

The sun was directly above, beating down in all its fury. I must have lain 
there for hours before I tried to raise myself. I turned on my side; there, five 
feet away, lay a charred body, a body with a gaping wound where a limb had 
once been. It was only on my fourth attempt that I succeeded in rising to my 
feet completely, only to reel backwards into a pit behind me. A shell hole. 

I clambered out. Pain was racing up and down my leg. It was then I 
noticed a gaping wound, a silver object protruding from the bone of my 
knee. A shell shrapnel. 

Now I understood fully my unsuccessful attempts to rise from my grave. 

There I sat at the edge of a hole, on charred soil, smelling the stink of 
cordite and burning flesh. 

The war was ending for the Americans in Vietnam. So said the politicians. 
There is going to be no Jet offensive in '72, Nixon's left for China. Sure, 
peace for this spring. 

There I sat among carcasses of friend and foe alike, the solitary survivor. 
It started to rain. 

It was spring and the torrential rain in its ferocity was flattening the great 
elephant grass, cleansing my face and body and those of my friends . . . 

friends . . . friends 

K. Rimsa 



THERE 

There is a place I go 

Alone 

To wander in the lonely corridors 

Of the mind. 

I listen to the crowd around me 

And retreat 

Surrounded 

And yet alone. 

M. C. Rowlinson 



56 



STREETLIGHT REVELATION 

I went for a walk along that long road last night. It had only two street- 
lights that worked. One of them shone at the end of a clean erect post. The 
other light didn't shine as brightly as the first: it sort of emitted a dull 
glow that came from the top of a crooked and battered post. 

By some coincidence, these two streetlights stood very close together. As I 
walked past them, they cast two shadows on the road beside me. I continued 
walking but at the same time remained intrigued at the two dark me's, 
simultaneously moving on the asphalt. The shadows appeared to be two 
completely detached bodies that were joined only at the feet: like two 
people stemming from the same body. One shadow was tall, dark and clean 
looking. The other one was faint. It hunched forward and had an evil smile 
on its face. Its hand seemed to hold a knife. I thought I heard a scream: the 
feel of warm blood, the eternal gaze of her eyes. I broke out into a cold sweat. 
Realization. I looked at the two shadows on the road beside me. It seemed as 
though the evil one was moving closer and closer toward the tall clean one. 
The faster I walked, the faster the hunched shadow moved. No. Not again. 
Suddenly one of the streetlights went out. It took a few seconds for me to 
realize that there was only one shadow left. The shadow was the one I really 
wanted. 

A. Skolnik 



THE NIGHT AFTER HALLOWE'EN 

The w ind blows 

Cavorting amidst the fallen leaves, 

Sometimes whistling softly 

Through the trees. 

A car flashes by 

As if followed by the hounds of Hell: 

And still the wind blows. 

The clouds streak past. 

For all the world like racehorses 

In the final stretch. 

And the occasional leftover pumpkin 

Stares balefully from a door step. 

A candywrapper blows past. 

And from somewhere 

The studiously neutral tones 

Of a radio announcer 

Are informing us that 

56 children have been treated 

For razorblade cuts in the mouth . . . 

M. C. Rowlinson 



FORGETTING BOOKS 

Sometimes — although not very often, 

Say once every blue moon (perhaps longer) — 

m e re allowed to read in English class. 

This is a very special occasion — 

It's very rare — and we are always 

Pleased when we are awarded such a day. 

In fact — I get so excited — 

That I forget my book! 

Anonymous 



57 



WESTWARD HO 

It was a beautiful spring day, perfect for a stroll along the river, throwing 
stones, looking at the ducks through the binoculars. I had gotten down past 
the water purification plant and I spied an island, about 15 feet from shore 
across a narrow, shallow channel. Ah, I thought, a perfect place to sit down, 
rest my feet, and stare at undisturbed wildlife. 

Eh? What was that? I wheeled around on a wet rock, more fool I, and my 
feet went out from under me. My head hit a rock. It didn't knock me out, 
but I was dazed. I looked around. Hell. Whatever it was was gone. I looked 
again. What had happened to the sub-development across the river? It was 
gone! I surveyed the situation around me. The landforms were the same as 
before, but something was missing. All signs of human habitation. 

I sat down and thought. Could it be that I had knocked myself out and this 
was a dream? I pinched myself. No luck. I kicked a stone. I hurt my foot 
but I didn't wake up. 

So it was real. What to do now? Walk until I found some human habita- 
tion? I might have to walk across the Atlantic. If I waited, I might wait 
forever. I picked up my lunch and ate a sandwich — a little food might do 
me good. 

It was quiet. Some birds chattered. All of a sudden I caught a movement 
out of the corner of my eye. A flight of doves startled by something. Then I 
heard something. The strains of a song reached me. And around the bend in 
the river came ... a canoe, of the type the voyageurs used. 

I didn't know what to do. Probably this was still an uninhabited land, and 
if they picked me up I would be thoroughly interrogated. Or I could say I 
was a private explorer and my boat had been wrecked in the rapids and all 
I'd been able to save was my lunch. I'd banged my head and somehow for- 
gotten the year. They would laugh at how this poor English fool didn't know 
enough to portage around rapids and how the French knew better. 

When the voyageurs drew within shouting range I hailed them. That gave 
them a start! What was a white man doing out here in the wilderness? How- 
ever, they paddled over for a closer look, and seeing that I was pure Caucasian, 
they landed, surrounded me and asked questions. All at once. In French. 
And if my French wasn't too hot they'd know I was from across the Channel. 

Suddenly 1 was aware of a shock of red hair pushing its way through the 
circle. The red hair belonged to an enormous Scot, a whale of a man, muscu- 
lar, with a large red walrus mustache. Thank God, I thought, somebody who 
can speak English. If there was a Scot among them, I was in the early nine- 
teenth century. At a signal from him, the Frenchmen moved away from me. 
He had a fire lit and we sat down next to it. 

"And where aire ye from, milad?" I distinguished from the thick burr and 
the muffling mustache. 

I thought a moment. If I said Halifax . . . no, that was the wrong place. 
I put on my best New England broad "a" and said, "Boston. My parents were 
loyal to the King during the Revolution and they went to Halifax.*' 

"Aye," he said, "aye." He pondered a moment and said, "But what com- 
pany hired ye?" 

I thought again. There were two rival fur-trading companies in the early 
nineteenth century, so I know I was treading on thin ice. "The Hudson's Bay 
Company. What's the latest on the Nor'Westers?" 

"Ach!" he said. "Haven't ye heard? We merged last month!" So I was in 
1821. A cute fate. I'd only have to live another 150 years to get back where 
I came from. 

"Aye, that's a funny suit ye're wearin'!" The Bermuda shorts — it had 
been hot — and my shirt had attracted his attention. "Don't the bugs bother 
ye this time 6' the year?" 



58 



I was glad that I wasn't in the era of magic. 

"I developed an ointment which the insects find distasteful, so they stay 
away. But the ingredients are too expensive to produce to sell." This averted 
the all-too-ohvious question of marketing. 

"Aye,"" 1 he nodded. "Aye. And what're ye doing way hack here?*' 

For this one I was ready. "The Bay hired me to look around for a good 
place for a post up-river, hut yesterday my hoat got wrecked on the rapids 
above here. 1 was travelling with an Indian, hut — God rest his soul — it was 
all I could do to save myself, and he couldn't swim. You'd better keep an 
eye out for those rapids — they're vicious." 

"Would ye like to travel with us? We're going up-river to tell the posts o' 
the merger." I said that that was agreeable. "Aye. but that's a nasty egg on 
your head. We'd better take care o' that before we go." 

We put the fire out and. shouldering the canoe, marched off along the 
shore, past the rapids, a distance of about a mile, and finally we shoved off. 
The Scot, whose name was Duncan, and I sat in the canoe talking, until I said 
that I felt like paddling a little. Duncan told the smallest Frenchman, a boy 
of not more than eighteen, to take a break, and I took his place. To try me 
out. the voyageurs burst into song. Fortunately I knew it. 

"En roulant. ma boule roulant," as we paddled on. "En roulant ma 
bou-oule." 

We heard a crash which sounded like a frightened animal running away. 
An explosion beside, and a paddle of ducks rose up. 

Suddenly there was a gun shot, and paradise disappeared. An Indian was 
standing on the river bank pointing his gun and shouting in broken English 
and French. 

"Pourquoi doan" you go back ou you come from?" Bang. Splash. "Vous 
etes taking away notre land, an 1 ver' soon we doan goin' to have rien! Go 
chez vous!" Bang. Splash. Bang . . . thunk. Bang . . . splat, crunch. A 
bullet grazed my head where I'd banged it earlier that day. 

Duncan had picked up his gun and was blasting away at the Indian. The 
boat almost capsized with each shot. We righted ourselves after one of these 
shots and. lo and behold, the Indian had slumped to the ground. 

We paddled ashore. I was getting weak from loss of blood and collapsed as 
I crawled out of the canoe. 

"I think he's going." I heard the incredulous Scot say. "He . . . he's 
disappearing!" I blacked out. 

I woke up almost immediately. They were gone. I was alone. Somehow I 
was several miles up-river from where I'd fallen. I felt the egg on my head. 
It hurt. It was going to be a long walk, and my watch said 5 o'clock. I'd 
have to hurry or the RCMP. OPP and Ottawa city police would be looking 
for me. What could I tell them? I'd be put away if I told them the truth . . . 
No, I'd tell them nothing. I wasn't a criminal, I wasn't going to be interro- 
gated. 

Some time later I found a journal of a Scot of the 1820's. 

"July 23, 1821. Picked up a peculiar-looking stranger this morning. 
Said he was from Halifax. Were shot at by a fanatical Indian. 
Stranger was killed, buried, with due ceremony." 

F. Stoddard 



59 



THE CURSE 

For three hundred years, while its fame spread across the world, the little 
town had stood here at the river's bend. Time and change had touched it 
slightly; it had heard from afar both the coming of the Armada and the fall 
of the Third Reich, but all of Man's wars had passed it by. 

Now it was gone, as though it had never been. In a moment of time the 
talk and treasure of centuries had been swept away. The vanished streets 
could still be traced as faint marks in the vitrified ground, but of the houses, 
nothing remained. Steel and concrete, plastic and ancient oak — it had 
mattered little in the end. In the moment of death they had stood together, 
transfixed by the glare of the detonating bomb. Then, even before they could 
flash into fire, the blast waves had reached them and they had ceased to be. 
Mile upon mile the ravening hemisphere of flame had expanded over the 
level farmlands, and from its heart had risen the twisting totem-pole that had 
haunted the minds of men for so long, and to such little purpose. 

The rocket had been a stray, one of the last ever to be fired. It was hard 
to say for what target it had been intended. Certainly not London, for London 
was no longer a military objective. London, indeed, was no longer anything at 
all. Long ago the men whose duty it was, had calculated that three of the 
hydrogen bombs would be sufficient for that rather small target. In sending 
twenty, they had been perhaps a little overzealous. 

This was not one of the twenty that had done their work so well. Both its 
destination and its origin were unknown: whether it had come across the 
lonely wastes or from above the waters of the Atlantic, no one could tell and 
there were few now who cared. Once there had been men who had known such 
things, who had watched from afar the flight of the great projectiles and sent 
their own missiles to meet them. After that appointment had been kept, high 
above the Earth where the sky was black and sun and stars shared the 
heavens together, there had bloomed for a moment that indescribable flame, 
sending out into space a message that in centuries to come other eyes than 
Man's would see and understand. 

But that had been days ago, at the beginning of the War. The defenders 
had long since been brushed aside, as they had known they must be. They 
had held on to life long enough to discharge their duty; too late, the enemy 
had learned his mistake. He would launch no further rockets; those still 
falling he had dispatched hours ago on secret trajectories that had taken 
them far out into space. They were returning now unguided and inert, waiting 
in vain for the signals that should lead them to their destinies. One by one 
they were falling at random upon a world which they could harm no more. 

The river had already overflowed its banks; somewhere down its course the 
land had twisted beneath that colossal hammerblow and the way to the sea 
was no longer open. Dust was still falling in a fine rain, as it would for days 
as Man's cities and treasures returned to the world that had given them birth. 
But the sky was no longer wholly darkened, and in the west the sun was 
settling through banks of angry cloud. 

A church had stood here by the river's edge, and though no trace of the 
building remained, the gravestones that the years had gathered around it 
still marked its place. Now the stone slabs lay in parallel rows snapped off at 
their bases and pointing mutely along the lines of the blast. Some were half- 
flattened into the ground, others had been cracked and blistered by terrific 
heat, but many still bore the messages they had carried down the centuries 
in vain. 

The light died in the west and the unnatural crimson faded from the sky. 
Yet still the graven words could be clearly read, lit by a steady, unwavering 
radiance, too faint to be seen by day but strong enough to banish night. The 
land was burning: for miles the glow of its radio-activity was reflected from 



60 



the clouds. Through the glimmering landscape wound the dark ribbon of the 
steadily widening river, and as the waters submerged the land that deadly 
glow continued unchanging in the depths. In a generation, perhaps, it would 
have faded from sight, but a hundred years might pass before life could 
safely come this way again. 

Timidly the waters touched the worn gravestone that for more than three 
hundred years had lain before the vanished altar — the church that had 
sheltered it so long had given it some protection at the last, and only a slight 
discoloration of the rock told of the fires that had passed this way. In the 
phantom light of the dving land, the archaic words could still be traced as 
the water rose around them, brushing at last in tiny ripples across the stone. 
Line by line the epitaph upon which so many millions had gazed slipped 
beneath the conquering waters. For a little while the letters could still be 
faintly seen: then they were gone forever. 

Good frend for Iesus sake forbeare, 

To digg the dust encloased heare 

Blest be ye man yt spares thes stones, 

And curst be he yt moves my bones. 
Undisturbed through all eternity the poet could sleep in safety now: in the 
silence and darkness above his head, the Avon was seeking its new outlet to 
the sea. 

P. Pardo 



UNTAMED LANDS (BACK TO NATURE) 

The lawns recede. 

Dotted with the occasional bench 

Criss-crossed by neatly gravelled walks. 

Scrupulously clean and natural. 

Well-groomed trees; 

Garbage cans peep coyly around the trunks: 

Keep our city clean, they cry. 

The faint and unfocused noises of the metal denizens 

Of the outside world. 

Scarcelv penetrate. 

And the carefully cultivated silence 

Is occasionally broken by the muted tinkle 

Of a bicycle bell. 

A street-cleaner passes by, 

Cleaning the spotless, 

Unnoticed and unremembered. 

The fish pond. 

Full of clean 

( Guaranteed by aqua-cycle aerators ) 

Water 

And sickly goldfish. 

A squalling baby. 

In his pram 

Disturbs the noonday peace. 

And an elderly gentleman glares. 

All is well 

In the park. 

M. C. Rowlinson 



61 



SUMMERTIME 

A stray newspaper blows in the summer breeze 

Wraps itself around a tree 

Like a lost child. 

A drunk lolls over 

And subsides 

On a bench. 

The leaves 

Chase themselves 

In an unending game 

Eddying, whispering to the wind. 

No children playing 

And laughing. 

Only a drunk and the silence 

Alone with the sky. 



M. C. Rowlinson 



LASTING MEMORIES 

My love was beauty and innocence, 

Ignorant of the pleasures and dangers of love. 

I touched her but once, 

I the lover of a goddess. 

I went to her. 

The wind blew freedom! 

Only I could touch her. 

Must man hold so much confidence? 

She hid in my blindness 

Lying there in innocence. 

How could I have been so blind? 

I heard broken whispers; 

He loved her and she? . . . 

I loved her. 

Why? Why? 

I was possessed with fear. 

A. Luciani 



NAMES 

How does it feel 

To spend your whole life trying 

To make yourself visible, 

And your presence felt, 

By the way you obey the rules 

And how you fit in our little group, 

And emerge as a star-lit success; 

So how do you feel 

When your short life ends 

And even memories fade away, 

Until your presence is felt 

Only by a lonely old gardener 

Who takes care of the flowers 

Round the name that was you? 

R. Bennett 



62 



THE POND 

As I look into a pond, 
I see life: 
Trees. 
Birds. 
The sun. 
Its surface, a shimmering, opaque-yet-transparent mirror, 
reflects me back to me. 
There is light. 
Shade. 
Silver. 
Within me, I feel a stirring of primeval elements; 
something is awakened. 
It is shapeless. 

Soundless. 
Is it harmless? 
Suddenly. I feel that I must enter the pond. 
Merging with it will open new horizons. 
Depth. 
Coolness. 
We become One. 
I feel its being and its ancient memory 
reaching into the very backwoods of my mind. 
I know Death. 
Birth. 
Age. 
Youth. 
I will never ever be the same as I was, 
for I am constantly changing. 
Tranquility 
The chain of Life, 
And the link called Death. 
I search into my new self for my purpose, 
but it is hidden from me. 
My age is now beyond all reckoning, 
and I fear no drought. 



I. Stoddard 



FREEWILL 

When you wake up in the morning 

Friendly greet the new-born day, 

Use all you have been given 

And let nothing be taken away, 

For everything comes from within you, 

I think you know what I mean, 

Then you could be the greatest person 

That the world has ever seen; 

Now I don't want to hear any excuses, 

Don't want to hear no lies, 

You can do just what you want to, 

If you open up your eyes, 

For the world can be your footstool, 

And the universe will be 

Exactly what you want it, 

If you use your mind to see. 



R. Bennett 



63 



MODERN TIMES 

Vietnam 
Bloodshed 
Violence 
Murder 
Rape 
ME 
God 
Peace 
Contentment 
Jesus Christ 
True Happiness 

R. Smith 



A CASE FOR SWEARING 

Most sensible humanity 
Quite often use profanity, 
It keeps you from insanity 
By letting off your steam. 

However, used too frequently 
It tends to lose its potency, 
And then, to keep your sanity, 
Instead you have to scream. 

And so, you choose your kind of noise, 
To swear or merely raise your voice; 
But this is not the easy choice 
That it at first may seem. 

For just to gain the reputation 
Of being a guy whose exclamations 
Are always so loud they cause sensations 
Makes demands upon your spleen. 

But, if you indulge with moderation, 
I guarantee that liberation 
Of heart and voice is more sensation — 
— Al than yelling till you're green. 

R. Huston 



We are ships 

In a cruel sea, 

Sailing our lives 

To nowhere 

But the reef 

Where we shall sink. 

P. McKeown 



64 



WHAT IF . . . 

What if 

God is up there 

Laughing at us? 

R. Smith 



THE SEARCH 

A new page 

and another 

strangely familiar 

face 

enters my book 

who knows 

if this is just another chapter 

or actually the beginning of the story 

but whatever 

we all must agree 

that this is not a used cigarette 

to be crushed with the 

salt and peanuts 

in the old broken can 

Nor is this 

a puff of smoke 

to be dispersed 

by the chilly drafts 

sweeping in the cracked window 

because now 

it is no longer cold outside 

but rather 

the sun is rising 

casting the first streaks of warmth 

upon the shattered wasteland 

and it is time 

to open the door 

and begin searching 

amidst the rubble 

for the missing 

torch 

Maybe she'll stay 

to help in the hunt 

and maybe 

I'll stay 

because she has lost something 

too. 

A. Seay 



65 




SECOND AND THIRD GENERATIONS 

R. M. Kenny, W. A. Joyce, Esq., C. R. Bates, 
W. A. Price, P. A. Grant, I. N. Rhodes, M. R. Viets, E. D. C. Wilgress 




Ashbury starts its third generation: the Rhodes family with the Headmaster. 

E. N. Rhodes, Esq., Jr. (1946-55), W. A. Joyce, Esq., I. N. Rhodes (1971-), 

E. N. Rhodes, Esq., Sr. (1916-25). Ian Rhodes was awarded the Stephen Clifford 
Memorial Prize for the year 1971-72 . 



66 



JUNIOR 




ASHBURY COLLEGE 
OTTAWA 



VOLUME XVII 



1972 






EDITOR OF THE JUNIOR ASHBURIAN — M. PIMM 
FACULTY ADVISOR — D. L. POLK, Esq. 



Day Boy Monitors 

BOB BRODIE 
DAVID HOGARTH 
IAIN JOHNSTON 
BOB MORRISON 



Boarder Monitors 

GUY CUZNER 
BILL FULLER 
PHIL GRANT 
ANDY MOORE 
CLERMONT VEILLEUX 



Choir Monitor 

IAIN JOHNSTON 



HOUSE CAPTAINS 



Senior Dragons — R. MORRISON 
Senior Goblins — I. JOHNSTON 
Senior Hobbits — R. BRODIE r 
Senior Wizards — W. FULLER 
— C. VEILLEUX 



Junior Dragons 
Junior Goblins 
Junior Hobbits 
Junior Wizards 



M. O'MEARA 
N. SIROTEK 

E. HALL 

F. ELLACOTT 



Top House.point Winners 



I. JOHNSTON 


— 84 


W 


FULLER 


— 63 




P. DEEPAN —52 


I. RHODES 


— 67 


A. 


MOORE 


— 58 




D. JOSSELYN — 52 


D. BEEDELL 


— 66 


R. 


MORRISON 


— 57 




P. MARTIN — 50 


Boys whose M.L.T.S. 


standing was 80% or 


better - excused final examinations 


TRANSITUS A 


TRANSITUS 


FORM IIIA 


FORM 


III 


FORM II FORM I 


Hogarth 


Moore 




Ablack 


Lay 




Abrahamsen Beedell 


Johnston 






Deepan 






Puttick Fonay 


Jones 






Heaton 






Welch Lamont 


Wilson II 






Johnston 

Josselyn 

MacDonald 

Magner 

Rhodes 

Van Veen 






Zwirewich Maclaren 
Martin 





Brookes 


Deepan 




Campbell 


Flynn 




Cuzner 


Johnston III 


TRANSITUS A 




GOLDEI 
FORM IIIA 


Beesack 




— 7/9 


Ablack 


Johnston 




— 9/9 


Deepan 


Mierins 




— 6/9 


MacDonald 


Welch 




— 2/3 


Rhodes 


Wilson II 




— 9/9 


Litvak 


TRANSITUS 






FORM III 


Brodie 




— 8/9 


Irving 


Fuller 




— 9/9 


Lay 


Moore 




— 9/9 


Sellers 


Motta 




— 9/9 




Veilleux 




— 7/9 





LIBRARIANS 

Johnston IV 

MacDonald 

Major 



IV 


Pimm 


aid 


Torontow 




Warwick 




FORM II 


6/9 


Abrahamsen 


8/9 


Puttick 


8/9 


Welch 


9/9 


Zwirewich 


5/5 






FORM I 


7/9 


Beedell 


9/9 


Cuhaci 


6/9 


Fonay 




Kadziora 




Lamont 




Maclaren 




Martin 




Viets 



8/9 
9/9 
5/8 
8/9 



9/9 
8/9 
8/9 
6/9 
6/9 
8/9 
8/9 
6/9 



68 




JUNIOR MONITORS 

Back Row: R. A. Brodie, G. Cuzner, A. G. Moore, P. A. Grant, D. E. A. Hogarth. 
Front Row: W. N. Fuller, A. 1. Johnston, M. H. E. Sherwood, Esq., C. P. Veilleux, 
R. S. Morrison. 



EDITORIAL 

As editor of the Junior Ashburian I feel I am in a position to say that this 
year has been a good one. 

Looking back on my time in the Junior School, I would further like to 
say that I have enjoyed my years here very much. I will be very interested 
to compare the Senior School with its more grown-up altitudes with the 
atmosphere which I have found in the Junior School. 

Of all the schools I have attended, this has been the best by far, and for 
once, all the teachers are good — far above the public school level. 

As Mr. Sherwood says, it is the boys that make tbe school, and he is right. 

The boys live up to the high standards remarkably well. In addition to 
learning from their text books, they learn how to work and study on their 
own; how to take responsibility; and most important, they learn to follow 
the golden rule, which we interpret as respect for other people's feelings and 
property. 

I think that everybody who goes to this school will have fond memories, 
and will thank their lucky stars that they were privileged to attend. 

In my opinion this is the best school in Ottawa and in the surrounding 
area. 

Matthew Pimm 

Editor's Note: Special thanks to those who contributed to this edition of the 
Ashburian; a great job! 



69 



SCHOOL NOTES 

It is trite to say that everything is relative. However such sayings are trite, 
mainly because they are true. The success of any one school year is relative. 
Perhaps there are three relationships when we consider the Junior school 
year at Ashbury. One would be in relation to the public schools in the Ottawa 
area; another would be in relation to junior schools in other independent 
schools; the third would be a comparison with other junior school years at 
Ashbury. It is this third relationship which we will consider briefly. 

In his closing remarks to the assembled Junior School just before the boys 
were marched off to their places at the closing ceremonies, Mr. Sherwood 
said this had been a good year. He pointed out that his judgements on these 
occasions were considered ones, and reminded the boys that at the end of the 
previous year his summation had been "fair". He expanded his judgement 
by saying that this had been one of the best since he became headmaster in 
1967. I can further expand this by stating the school year just ended was 
one of the best, if not the best, since the Junior School became a separate 
unit in 1954. 

Now as to this question of relativity. I believe that our standard is high. 
Our teaching, our games coaching, and perhaps most important the cheerful 
atmosphere of the school has kept this standard high. When we have a "fair" 
year, we are not disappointed; when the year is "good" we are proud. When 
the four minute miler runs his race in 4 minutes and one second, he has 
still run a very fast mile. 

This year has had its full share of extra-curricular activities. Many are 
mentioned in the following pages. To complete the picture we record visits to 
the theatre (Treasure Island, Life with Father, Swiss Family Robinson); 
frequent ski trips to Fortune and Mr. Tremblant; a very healthly turn-out 
to watch the '67's wallop Hamilton 4-0; the Elmwood junior dance; the 
circus. Guitar and art lessons, held after school, have been popular. 

It will be difficult to improve in 1972-73; but we are far from being 
complacent! The difficult always presents a challenge. 

DLP 



JUNIOR SCHOOL HOUSE COMPETITION 

Again this year House competitions provided zest. From the outset it 
seemed apparent that it would be difficult to overcome the golden Dragons, 
and they maintained the lead throughout. A hotly contested race for the 
second position was won by the Hobbits, who alternated with the Goblins all 
year. The Wizards kept everyone honest, and members of that house scored 
very well in individual standings. 

The House competition stimulates a strong drive not only on the games 
fields, but in the classroom as well. It does the masters' hearts good to over- 
hear one of the House captains giving a blast to a young miscreant who has 
been put on detention, thereby losing points for his House. 

Congratulations to this year's winning House, the Dragons, and to their 
coach, Mr. Beedell. 



70 



PUBLIC SPEAKING "72" 

This year's public speaking contest saw eight contestants. 

GRAEME MCKENNA spoke on spirits and ghosts. Yeach! But a very 
convincing speech. 

TIM MAHONEY's topic was snowmobiles. The amusing speech told of all 
the hazards and enjoyment in snowmobiling. 

FRASER MACNICOL gave us a very serious talk on drugs and drug 
abuse. 

ANDY MOORE's hilarious speech on early experiences in Brooklyn left 
everyone rolling on the floor with laughter. 

ADRIAN BROOKES spoke to us on obesity. His speech must have made 
a few people more conscious of themselves. 

ROBERT SMITH's talk honoured and revealed much of J. F. Kennedy's 
life. 

KEITH MACDONALD told us about all the modern and ancient methods 
of communication. 

The other contestant was IAIN JOHNSTON. He gave an amusing talk on 
today's movies. 

The judges were Mr. Josselyn and Mr. Green. An innovation this year 
was that the speakers had to give impromptu answers to questions asked by 
the judges following each speech. 

All the contestants spoke excellently and congratulations to them all. but 
alas, every competition has only one winner. After a lengthy conference the 
judges emerged with a winner. It was Iain Johnston, with Graeme McKenna 
as runner-up. 

Iain Johnston 

Editors Note: Iain does not mention that he went on to win the city-wide 
public speaking competition and was sent to the Eastern Ontario finals. 
Ashbury is proud of his accomplishment. 



GRUB DAY 

This year grub day was a success with about 90^0 of the school coming 
in either very tattered, dirty clothes, or just in casual wear. Some of the 
more amusing costumes belonged to Byford. who came as a mummy; 
Marchant. looking like something left over from Biafra: Campbell Keith, 
who like Beesack, tried to pass himself off as a human mud sculpture. Every 
person who wanted to wear non-school clothes had to pay 25c which went to 
St. Michael's Mission in South Africa. The $5.00 prize for the grubbiest 
grub went to Campbell Keith from Form II. 

J. P. Campbell 



JUNIOR SCHOOL AWARDS 

On Saturday. June 10, 1972. the School Closing was held. In addition to 
the Form and Merit Prizes, there are a number of special awards which boys 
in the Junior School can compete for. These are The Woods Shield, for the 
all-round boy who was kind and good in marks and sports; The Clifford 
Memorial Trophy for the boy with the highest amount of house points: the 
Woodburn Music Prize: the Polk Prize for poetrv reading; The Charles Gale 
Trophy for public speaking: The John Michael Hilliard Memorial Prize for 
Merit: and the Pitfield Shield for the winners of the House competition. 

J. P. Campbell 
P. Beesack 



71 



OPEN HOUSE 

At Ashbury there is an annual Open House. This is designed so that parents 
and other people in Ottawa who are interested in Ashbury can see the school 
in action and can find out exactly what kind of school this is. 

Many parents came and watched while classes were going on, while others 
saw the art exhibit in Argyle. This exhibit was under the direction of Mr. 
Claude Depuis, the art teacher. 

The parents discovered how their sons were doing in the class room, and I 
think that Open House was a complete success. 

John Beesack 

POETRY READING 

As usual there was a strong interest in this contest and class eliminations 
had to be held. Three boys were chosen from each form. These were the 
finalists: Ablack, Beedell, Bidner, Fonay, Hall II, Heaton I, Ligthart, Mac- 
Donald, McKenna, Morrison, Puttick II, Scott, Spencer, Tkachuk and 
Wilson III. 

This year's judges, Mr. Polk, Mr. Babbitt and Sean Power, were faced 
with a formidable task in picking a winner. 

As it was my first year I started off with an idea that poetry reading was a 
bore. After a few poems I began to realize that poetry reading was not such a 
bore, and I began to like the way some of the boys read. 

The poems were of all varieties, modern, prose and traditional. All in all, 
it changed my mind completely about poetry reading. 

MacDonald was the winner with Morrison the runner-up. 

Guy Warwick 

PARENTS NIGHT 

Junior School parents were out in full force on the night of October 29th. 
In some respects the Reception was different from those held in earlier years. 
Because the number of students has increased considerably, the parents were 
divided alphabetically into two shifts, one group discussing problems, or 
swelling with pride from the praise given their son, attended from 4:30 to 
6:30; the second group attended from 8 till 10 p.m. 

As in the past the boys helped direct parents to classrooms, and handed 
out sandwiches and coffee. Some of us helped on both shifts and by the time 
we got home we were pretty tired. All in all it was a pleasant experience. 

M. Pimm 

THE POLITICAL SCENE 

October was a busy month, and during that time Ashbury was host to three 
candidates in the provincial election. Each man represented one of the main 
political parties. They were Mr. I. Kimmerly, Liberal; Mr. D. Deneau, 
N.D.P.; and the Hon. Bert Lawrence, Conservative. Mr. Lawrence is a 
former Ashbury boy, and he seemed to be the favourite of the audience, 
which included some Elmwood girls. 

Mr. Deneau was swamped with questions, but handled them well. Mr. 
Kimmerly's speech was full of humour, and he was very active in the 
rebuttals which followed. All in all the meeting went smoothly and Mr. 
Joyce was the Chairman. 

The debates were lively, and everyone was satisfied, especially Mr. 
Kimmerly who grabbed a roast beef sandwich before he hurried on to 
another meeting. 

J. P. Campbell 



72 



JOSEPH AND HIS COAT 

On April 27 and 28 the Junior School presented "'Joseph and the Amazing 
Technicolor Dreamcoat" — a cantata, oratorio, operetta ( call it what you 
will) by the composer and librettist of "Jesus Christ. Superstar, " Andrew 
Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. 

The present writer was amazed to find that the piece had nostalgic con- 
nections with his own youth! It was written for Colet Court School in 
London, where he spent five reasonably formative years as a boy; and its 
composer is the son of Dr. W. S. Lloyd Webber, one of many teachers who 
tried unsuccessfully to steer him through examinations in harmony and 
counterpoint! 

The work tells the story of Joseph in full, but with a refreshing lack of 
piety and reverence. The music is vaguely rock, but of a less uncomprising 
kind than that used in the later and better-known work. It has been recorded, 
but the recording utilises elderlv teen-agers in the leading roles, and has little 
of the freshness and spontaneity which the younger boys of Ashbury brought 
to it. 

The singing was quite first-rate, and Mr. Fred Graham is to be warmly 
congratulated on the amazing improvement he has achieved in the school's 
singing in such a short time. The whole Junior School took part: the musical 
elite were on the stage, and all the others were stationed to left and right of 
the audience. 

In a narrative composition, the words are obviously all-important. Copies 
were provided for the audience, but they couldn't be read once the lights went 
down. No matter: such was the clarity of the enunciation that every word 
came over clearly and unmistakeably, so the printed text was not really 
needed. However, it was nice to have it as a souvenir. 

Mr. Peter Josselyn. as producer, kept the visual aspect simple but effective. 
Groupings and movement were good, and most of the costumes were colour- 
ful: Joseph's coat, however, did seem a bit pallid after the vivid build-up 
which preceded its appearance! 

Joseph was played by Iain Johnston. This "diminutive youngster*' (as he 
was recently described in another publication with which your scribe has 
been associated! ) sang clearly and confidently. His pathetic little number in 
the jail scene, and his smile (which was. thankfully, very much in evidence) 
would have melted the stoniest of hearts. Here is a talent which future 
custodians of Ashbury "s Gilbert and Sullivan tradition should watch with 
care and interest. 

Other good solo performances came from Brady Bidner as Pharoah and 
Sean Wilson as Asher. Bob Morrison was an impressively dignified Jacob, 
whose affection for his favourite son came over most convincingly. 

Altogether a most enjoyable and worthwhile undertaking. Our only regret 
about the show was its brevity, but it's always a good thing to get up from the 
table wanting more! 

G.W.T. 



THE CHOIR MOVIE 

This year the Choir went to a movie. The movie was "Diamonds are 
Forever". Even though the bus was late in arriving at the school we managed 
to see the whole show. On our way to the movie house we sang a few songs. 
They were not hymns. When we arrived at the theatre we were given extra 
money to buy food to eat during the show. In all we had a good time. 



Robert Byford 



73 






, 


















II II 



**T^ 



%» 



#lt 






* » r / 




THE QUEBEC TRIP 

On the whole, I think that everyone enjoyed the School Trip very much. 

This is my account. 

We left Ashbury at about 9:00 on the morning of the 17th of May. We 
stopped on the way to eat box lunches provided by Ashbury and arrived at 
the Chateau Frontenac at 3 o'clock or so in the afternoon. Then we were 
split into two groups, one going to the wax museum and the other going to 
the Musee du Fort. The Musee du Fort contained a diorama of the Battle 
of the Plains of Abraham and after. 

When both groups had visited both exhibits we went on a walking tour of 
Old Quebec, which was very scenic indeed. We were all given maps, and we 
set out either on our own or in little groups. After this we had dinner at a 
place called L'Esplanade. Lights Out was approximately 10:00 p.m. 

The next morning we rose at about 7:30 and had breakfast at 8:00. once 
again at L'Esplanade. Returning to the hotel, we cleaned up. 

Our first visit was to the Citadel. It was very interesting to see all the 
old guns and battlements. Following this tour we walked to the parliament 
buildings. It was extremely interesting and historical. Then we toured the 
Audio-Visual Centre where we saw many species of Canadian birds and a lot 
of other things. Following this visit we went to the Aquarium which was 
very colourful and exciting. We also remained there for lunch. 

After lunch, we drove to the zoo which was very exciting. Following the 
visit to the zoo we travelled along the north shore drive to Montmorency 
Falls, which were beautiful. Arriving back at the hotel we had free time 
until The Big Dinner at 7:00. 

Following dinner we had free time and lights out was about 10.00. 

The next morning found us on the return journey, and we arrived back 
at Ashbury at about 2:30. 

In my opinion the trip was a great success. 

J. Coyne 



THE SKI MEET 

The Junior School does not have a ski team, but for the past four years 
the skiers of the Junior School have held an inter-house competition. About 
50 boys have taken part in the Meet which is usually held at Camp 
Fortune. Non-skiers have spent the day at the Y camp with toboggans. 

This year the school went to Calabogie Peaks where we were the guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Ellacott, and of Mr. Biewald. 

In the Senior Division the winner was James Lay. Second place went to 
Brian Bisiker, and third to Ian Rhodes. The Ellacott brothers came first 
and second in the Junior Division. Gordie Luciani was third. I think that 
everyone, tobogganers and skiers, enjoyed themselves. 

Chris Scott 



75 



THE M.L.T.S. TRIPS 

On Monday. June 5th of this year the examinations started, hut those of 
us who were lucky enough not to have to write these exams had a series of 
trips arranged for us. Here is what we did. On the first day we went to the 
Rhodes cottage. There we had lunch which consisted of hot dogs, potato chips, 
canned drinks, popsicies and doughnuts. Some boys went fishing, while 
others went hiking and boating. In the late afternoon we all went for a swim 

in the lake. .mi 

The next day Mr. Humphreys took us to the Science and Technology 
Museum in the morning, and to the Art Gallery and the Dairy Queen in the 
afternoon. At the Gallery we saw a lot of interesting things; at the Dairy 
Queen we bought 15c ice cream cones. Later we went to Keith MacDonald's 
swimming pool where we had lots of fun. 

On Wednesday Mr. Beedell took us to see the Rideau Canal and explained 
how the locks worked, and gave us some history on the canal itself. Next 
we went to Long Island Locks, where we watched a boat going through. We 
saw a couple of more falls, and then drove to Smiths Falls to eat lunch. After 
lunch we played a few games, then headed for the Hershy (Hershey?) 
Chocolate Factory. There we saw a film on the process of making chocolate, 
and went through the factory itself. When we left we received a souvenir 
from the factory and started for Billy Johnston's house where we went swim- 
ming and had some refreshments. 

Finally on Thursday, the last day of trips, we went to the cross country 
track meet in which Ashbury placed 2nd. We came back for lunch, and then 
left with Mr. Flynn to play minnie golf. After everybody had finished, Mr. 
Flynn gave an ice cream cone to the boys who got a hole in one. Since most 
people got a hole in one, Mr. Flynn ended up buying everybody an ice cream 
cone. We then boarded the van and set out for Ashbury. Our thanks to the 
masters and parents who made these trips so pleasant. 

LIBRARY NOTES 

In these times when the younger generation is screaming for peace it 
seems ironical that the most read book in the school library is "The Tools of 
War", a pictorial description of World War II weaponry. The book only 
remained in the library long enough to be checked out again! 

This year the library has been the scene of the stamp club, and the stamp 
sale, a successful scheme to collect money for a school stamp collection. 

The library was very popular all year and gave a good job to the librarians, 
who managed with a lot of hard work to keep it in pretty good shape. 

It's a hard job, but well worth it. We are thankful to the boss librarian, 
Mrs. Loftus, for her cheerful help all year. 

M. Pimm 





"l ' : 1 1 " Vi Jl i -flf WW jl 

•""..^•"in^rt/fl" 7TF7 

• > ^■MM^r^-i ^Hamar jmibbtv 


ft Iki ^J 


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77 



CHESS 



Wilson 



The 13th Annual Junior School Chest Tournament attracted the usual interest with about three-quarters of 
the school entering the competition. The results are listed below. One interesting post championship game should 
be mentioned. Leslie Zunenshine was the winner of the Senior School competition and he was challenged by our 
winner Eric Wilson. The game was won by Willy, who can therefore consider himself the chest champion of Ashbury 
College. Congratulations. 

TRANSITUS A 

Wilson 

Beesack 

Brookes 

Campbell 

Pitfield 

Mierins 

Nicol 

Johnston 

Morrison 

Rowlinson 

Spencer 

Warwick 

Puttick 

Welch 

Marchant 

Pimm 

TRANSITUS 

Adjeleian 

Zagerman 



Wilson 
Brookes 

Mierins 
Nicol 

Morrison 
Warwick 

Puttick 



Adjeleian 



Scott 

Veilleux 
MIA 
Ablack 
Litvak 



Ablack 



Wilson 
Mierins 
Morrison 
Puttick 

Brodie 

Dron 

Fuller 
Wilson 

McKenna 
Motta 

Macleod 
Veilleux 

Ablack 






Puttick 



Bidner ' 




Breen } 
Diplock ( 


Breen 


Flynn ) 


Flynn 


Verhey j 




Gall ) 


Josselyn 


Josselyn ) 




Heaton I 


Heaton 


Rushforth ) 




Jones ) 


Jones 


Pilaar / 




Hambleton I 


Hambleton 


Macdonald J 




Magner 1 


Deepan 


Deepan ' 





Dron 



Fuller 



Dron 



Dron 



McKenna 



Veilleux 



Veilleux 



Ablack 



Josselyn 



Josselyn 



Deepan 



Lay 

Boucher 

Sirotek 

Ligthart 

Major 

Torontow 

Walker 

Sellers 



Puttick ) 

Farquhar J 
Abrahamsen I 
Watson 



Maclaunn 
Hall I 



Martin 

Bystram 

Downing 

Feldman 

Flynn 

Lamont 

Lay 

Schoeler 

Sourial 

Viets 



IMA 
III 



Carre 
Irving 

Lay 

Ligthart 

Torontow 

Walker 

Biewald 
Ellacott 



Farquhar 
Abrahamsen 

R ichter 
Wright 
Welch 
Keith 
Hall II 
Hall I 



Beedell 
Bystram 

Downing 



Schoeler 



Sourial 



Wilson V 
Wilson VI 



IMA 



Transitus A 
Transitus 



Carre 



Lay 



Walker III 



Biewald 



Farquhar 

Wright 
Welch 
Hall 



Lamont 



Schoeler 



FINALS 



IMA 



Trans A 



Lay 



Walker 



Walker III 



Farquhar 



Farquhar 



Schoeler 



Trans A (Eric Wilson) 
THE CHAMP! 



79 



SAILING 

This year I found it hard to make the sailing team. 

Robert Pimm from the Senior School made up a test and asked any boys 
with sailing knowledge to try out for the team by writing the test. Matthew 
Pimm, Rowlinson and I were picked to represent Ashbury. 

On June 2 we drove off in Mr. Tottenham's car. We arrived at Lakefield 
after a three hour drive and were glad to get back on our feet again. We were 
greeted at the school, then drove off to check into a hotel for the night. Once 
we were in bed we found it difficult to get to sleep. I guess we were nervous. 

When we got up next morning we were eager to sail and we hoped we 
would win. 

After a hearty breakfast we rigged our boats and went off for a practice 
sail. When we were all assembled the director of the events told us that there 
would be five races, two in the morning and three to be held in the afternoon. 

In the first race we ended third, and in the second race we came in fifth. 
This was mainly because there were only five boats racing. 

However we had the afternoon ahead of us and we were confident we would 
do much better. Unfortunately in the third race we came fifth, in the fourth, 
fourth, and in the last race we came last. 

When the totals were announced we had 43.6 points and ended up in last 
place, but I enjoyed the racing anyway, and I am sure Pimm and Rowlinson 
did too. 

Bill Fuller 

TOBOGANNING 

As Fred Ellacott crossed the finish line of the cross-country run in under 
30 minutes, Mr. Sherwood proudly declared that we would have a half- 
holiday for toboganning at the Y centre in the coming winter. 

At long last came the winter and the Ashbury Juniors boarded busses, paid 
their 25c toll and were soon on their way to the Y centre. Upon our arrival 
we trooped inside the lodge, got our tags and ran outside for half a day of 
toboganning. There were several hills to slide down and all were extremely 
steep. Soon our toes began to freeze, so we went back inside the lodge where 
most of us ordered hot dogs or hot chocolate. After our lunch we returned to 
the hills or went sleigh riding, pulled by two white horses. All too soon the 
half day ended and sadly we trooped onto the busses to go back to Ashbury 
College. 

Later that winter some of us went toboganning again because we were not 
involved in the House Skiing competition. I'm sure that everyone enjoyed 
toboganning last winter and we are very grateful to Mr. Sherwood for allow- 
ing us to go to the Y centre for that wonderful half day holiday. 

J. Beesack 

RIDING 

On Saturday mornings at around 9:15 we head for the Triple L Ranch. 
It's about a half-hour's drive from the school. Mr. Humphreys, who is 
in charge, usually drives us up in his car. This is a lot of fun. 

Shortly after we arrive we are mounted and away. The horses are always 
in good condition. The horses which we got most familiar with are Red, 
ridden by Mr. Humphreys; Lucky, ridden by Luciani, and Captain who 
was mine. 

After a good ride we leave for Ashbury and arrive just in time for 
lunch. 

P. Grant 



80 



JUNIOR SCHOOL SPORTS 

SOCCER 

Our soccer team has had a great year. Our record was very impressive and 
we managed to get into the city finals against the Ottawa Tigers. We lost the 
game by one goal scored in the last five minutes. 

Our season's record of 9 wins, three ties and only 2 losses speaks for itself. 
I'd like to thank Mr. Sherwood for his great coaching. 

J. W. Pitfield 




JUNIOR SOCCER TEAM 

Back Row: M. H. E. Sherwood, Esq., M. Parra, A. G. Moore, R. A. Motta, R. S. 

Morrison, S. F. B. Wallick, P. A. Grant, D. Josselyn. 
Front Row: H. F. Hermosillo, M. W. Tkachuk, D. E. C. Green, P. M. Wiener, W. 

N. Fuller, J. G. R. Lafortune, J. W. Pitfield, A. I. Johnston, C. J. 

Veilleux. 



FATHER-SON SOCCER GAME 

After a fantastic season, the Soccer team, at the suggestion of Mr. 
Sherwood challenged their fathers to a game. 

There was a fairly big turn-out with lots of fathers participating. 

It was a really hard game and both teams played well, but the game was 
scoreless. 

Although the fathers played well. I think that we played better! 

Among the fathers who played were Messrs Johnston. Josselyn. Pitfield, 
Motta. Abrahamsen. Flynn. Zwirewich. Sirotek. Rushforth. Heaton. Fonay, 
Gall. Rhodes. Biewald. Robertson and Beedell. 

Mr. Jovce and Mr. Sherwood were the referees of the two games plaved. 

J. W. Pitfield 



81 




f *%{*& t 



SECOND SOCCER TEAM 

Back Row: J. D. Coyne, J. F. Biewald, I. N. Rhodes, M. Van Leeuwen, W. E. 

Johnston, J. M. C. Lay, J. H. Humphreys, Esq. 
Front Row: J. G. Pilaar, J. D. Beesack, G. J. Luciani, R. T. Ligthart, T. G. 

Farquhar, A. J. Rowlinson, A. E. Mierins. 
Absent: B. D. Bisiker, Capt. 




THIRD SOCCER TEAM 

Back Row: T. C. Tottenham, Esq., M. M. Sourial, B. C. Flynn, K. D. Eliacolt, 
C. I. Lay, N. L. Fonay, R. J. Feldman, G. C. Maclaren, P. C. B. Martin. 

Front Row: 1. F. Wilson, P. N. Kadziora, H. A. V. Cuhaci, L. A. Dunlop, Co- 
Capt., T. S. Lamont, Co-Capt., R. A. Schoeler, T. E. Wilson. 

82 



THE SECOND SOCCER TEAM 

This was a relatively good year for the Second Soccer Team. We played 
six games, but unfortunately we only won two of them. Nevertheless the 
team spirit was high and everyone enjoyed himself. 

On our last scheduled game St. George's did not bring a complete team, 
so we only played a pick-up game. And also I think that Mr. Humphreys 
was a really good coach. 

John Coyne 

THE FALL TERM CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

On October 15 at Greenbank School 12 teams competed in the cross 
country event. The Senior Team for Ashbury consisted of Nicol, Fuller, 
Boucher, Ambery and Beesack. Nicol had a very good run coming in 4th 
out of 60 runners. 

The Junior Team consisted of Schoeler, Farquhar, Beedell, Feldman, 
Sirotek and Torontow. 

The course was a rugged one with many obstacles, but the weather was 
perfect. 

All the Ashbury runners did fairly well. 

John Beesack 




JUNIOR CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 

Back Row: T. S. Lamont, J. D. Beesack, M. Torontow, J. L. Beedell, Esq., W. N. 

Fuller, W. B. Nicol, R. A. Schoeler. 
Front Row: C. Boucher, N. A. Sirotek, T. G. Farquhar, R. J. Feldman, J. D. 

Ambery, P. H. Wright. 
Absent: D. C. Beedell. 



83 



THE FIRST HOCKEY TEAM 

This year's hockey team I think was a good one. The line that seemed 
to provide most of the action and punch was Lafortune's. His line included 
Fuller and Bisiker. Our best game was against B.C.S. We tied at 3-3 in 
their own rink. 

This year against Amherst we tied one and won one. One of the reasons 
for our success was the goal keeping of Clermont Veilleux. He made saves 
that were sometimes unbelievable. In addition the constant scoring of 
Lafortune and Bisiker along with the swift skating and passing of Fuller 
kept Ashbury a winner. 



Names 

Lafortune 
Bisiker 
Fuller 
Robertson 
Johnston 
Wiener 
Pitfield 
Farquhar 
Lay 
Dunlop 
Morrison 
Won - 



Goals 

16 
12 
11 

8 

2 



2 

2 



2 

1 
Lost — 



Assists 



Points 



6 


22 


5 


17 


4 


15 


3 


11 


4 


6 


6 


6 


4 


6 


2 


4 


3 


3 


1 


3 


2 


3 


Tied - 


- 2 




Andy Moore 




JUNIOR HOCKEY TEAM 

Back Row: M. H. E. Sherwood, Esq., A. I. Johnston, J. F. Biewald, R. A. Brodie, 

J. W. Pitfield, P. M. Wiener, R. A. Dunlop, J. M. Lay, T. G. Farquhar, 
A. G. Moore, Manager. 

Front Row: R. T. Ligtharl, B. D. Bisiker, J. G. R. Lafortune, R. S. Morrison, W. 
N. Fuller, R. S. Robertson, C. P. Veilleux. 



84 



THE SECOND HOCKEY TEAM 

The Second Hockey Team was coached hy Mr. Tottenham. Although we 
lost all our games we tried very hard. We went to Lakefield and Lakefield 
came to Ashhury to play. We also went to Sedbergh; they too came to 
Ashbury to play. 

Jeff Ambery. David Irving and Jim Pilaar scored our only goals. They 
were the stars. When we went to Lakefield we went on a nice Voyageur bus 
with air conditioning. We travelled with Mr. Sherwood's team. 

Laird Dunlop 



Back Row: 
Front Row: 
Absent: 




UNDER 13 HOCKEY TEAM 

T. C. Tottenham, Esq., J. S. Harris, I. N. Rhodes, J. G. Mierins, M. D. 
Magner, J. D. Coyne, J. D. Ambery, D. Josselyn, G. C. Spencer. 
L. A. Dunlop, F. Gall, J. G. Pilaar, F. M. MacNicol, J. W. Zagerman, 
D. A. Irvine, M. J. Adjeleian, M. W. Tkachuk, J. G. Luciani. 
D. C. Beedell. 

VOLLEYBALL 



Our Volleyball Team this year did not do too well. We nearly lost all 
the games we played. Henry Munro, Viscount Alexander and Glen Ogilvie 
all had training from experts, which partly accounted for our losses. How- 
ever, because of great coaching and the solid determination of every player 
on the team, we were able to redeem ourselves by defeating Elmwood. 

R.S.M. 



Back Row: 
Front Row: 




JUNIOR VOLLEYBALL TEAM 

G. W. Babbitt, Esq., W. N. Fuller, S. B. Wallick, J. G. R. Lafortune, 
J. W. Zagerman, R. M. Wilson, J. D. Beesack. 

R. A. Brodie, P. M. Wiener, R. S. Morrison, R. A. Motta, A. G. Moore, 
G. P. Harvey. 



85 




JUNIOR SOFTBALL — A Squad 

Back Row: R. S. Nicol, J. W. Pitfield, C. P. Veilleux, R. A. Dunlop, P. M. Wiener, 
A. G. Moore, P. A. Grant, D. Josselyn, I. N. Rhodes. 

Front Row: R. S. Morrison, W. N. Fuller, J. W. Zagerman, T. G. Farquhar, M. H. 
E. Sherwood, Esq., A. I. Johnston, R. T. Ligthart, J. G. R. Lafortune. 




JUNIOR SOFTBALL — B Squad 

Back Row: T. S. Lamont, G. J. Luciani, N. L. Fonay, T. C. Tottenham, Esq., 

B. E. Mitchell, B. C. Flynn, P. C. B. Martin. 

Front Row: L. A. Dunlop, R. J. A. Schoeler, I. F. Wilson, H. A. V. Cuhaci. 

C. I. Lay, D. C. Beedell, E. N. Hall. 
Absent: J. S. Abrahamsen 



86 



SOFTBALL 

This year the haseball team did fairly well. We won one and lost two. We 
had several games against the seniors as warm-ups. The Ashbury stars were 
Iain Johnston, center field; and John Lafortune, short stop and clean-up 
batter. 

The positions were as follows: 

Catcher — Zagerman and Ligthart 

Pitcher — Ligthart and Fuller 

1st Base — Wiener 

2nd Base — Veilleux 

Short Stop — Lafortune 

3rd Base — Morrison 

Left Field — Farquhar and Moore 

Center Field — Johnston 

Right Field — Lunlop 

Spares — Rhodes and Josselyn 

MASTERS VS THE SOFTBALL TEAM 

Every year the team challenges the staff to a Softball game. The game this 
year was very exciting. The teachers won the toss and batted first. The first 
two innings were scoreless, but in the third inning the masters scored nine 
runs. The boys scored four. It went on the same way until the end of the 
game, or at least until Mr. Sherwood called the game when the score was 26 
to 24 with the masters ahead. 

Many thanks to the teachers for a good game. 

Reid Dunlop 
John Lafortune 

THE TRACK MEET 

The Carleton Public Schools Track Meet was held at Uplands this year. 
There were three groups, Bantam (12 and under), Intermediate (13), 
and Senior (14 and over). Ashbury sent representatives to all three 
divisions. 

The Meet was a fairly good one. Many people won ribbons, at least. 
Wiener did very well in the 100 yard dash, coming in 2nd in this event, 
and in the 220 he came in 3rd. Biewald won the long jump in his division. 
Motta did well in high jump, but went out at 4' 2". Fuller came 2nd in 
the 880, and MacLeod was 4th in the Shot Put. At the very end we were 
rained out so we could not have the relay and the open mile. This was 
disappointing for we were strong in these events. 

Ashbury had a lot of cheer leaders from the M.L.T.S. group. Most of 
the races ended very closely. 

Ted Ligthart 
Editor's Note: Ligthart is too modest. He neglected to mention that he 

placed first in the high jump. 

THE CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

On the day of the run the examination time table called for a study period 
in the morning. This allowed Ashbury to enter 5 boys for the Carleton 
County Invitational championships. Mr. Sherwood also brought along the 
M.L.T.S. group to cheer us on. 

When we got to Meadowview Public School at Navan we were shown 
around the course. It went along the highway, through fields, up and down 
hills, over barbed wire fences and through mud! This was no ordinary cross 
country run. 

Bill Fuller did very well coming in second with a time of 12.14, just 6 
seconds behind the winner. Bruce Nicol came in 6th. Our team effort was 
good enough to give us second place in the boys competition, in which 15 
schools competed. It was a day to remember and one in which we enjoyed 
ourselves. 

Arnie Mierins 



SPORTS DAY 

As has been the custom for several years, a day was taken during 
examination week to hold our annual track and field championships. All 
the staff acted as officials, and practically every boy in the junior school had 
entered at least one event. The weather was kind to us and Sports Day was 



a success. 

Here are the 


results: 








EVENT 




10 yrs. 


11 yrs. 


12 yrs. 


13 yrs. 


60 yards 


1. 
2. 
3. 


Wilson V 
Wilson VI 
Dunlop 








100 yards 


1. 
2. 
3. 


Lamont 
Wilson V 
Wilson VI 


Luciani 

Schoeler 

Cuhaci 


Biewald 
Pitfield 
Hogarth 


Wiener 

Smith 

Johnston 


220 yards 


1. 

2. 
3. 




Mierins II 

Lay 

Van Veen 


Pitfield 
Mierins I 
Jones 


Wiener 

Smith 

Morrison 


440 yards 


1. 

2. 
3. 


Lamont 
Beedell 
Puttick 


Mierins II 

Feldman 

Meyers 






880 yards 


1. 
2. 
3. 




Mierins II 

Feldman 

Beedell 


Mierins I 

Wright 

Flynn 


Nicol 

Campbell 

Beesack 


The Mile 


1. 
2. 
3. 








Fuller 

Nicol 

Wiener 


High Jump 


1. 
2. 
3. 




Abrahamsen 
Luciani 


Mierins I 

Biewald 

Ligthart 


Fuller 

Lafortune 

Moore 


Long Jump 


1. 
2. 
3. 


Dunlop 
Richter 
Bystram 


Schoeler 

Flynn 

Feldman 


Biewald 

Pilaar 

Pitfield 


Morrison 

Beesack 

Cuzner 


Ball Throw 


1. 
2. 
3. 


Puttick 
Dunlop 
Lamont 


Luciani 
Mierins II 
MacNicol 






Shot Put 


1 

2. 
3 






Macleod 
Hogarth 
Ligthart 


Moore 

Lafortune 

Morrison 



In addition to ribbons for individual events, the overall winners in each 
age group were presented with trophies. Our track stars were: 

10 yrs. — Lamont; 11 yrs. — Mierins II: 12 yrs. — Biewald, Mierins I; 

13 yrs. — Wiener. 



88 






tiw 



H n- 



\.\ 




LITERARY SECTION 



THREE DESCRIPTIONS 

Grandfather's Work Shop 

The work bench had nails and screws strewn across its surface. It was 
made from a thick, rough, grey wood. 

The walls of the old work shop were brown and smelled of the creosote 
which stained them. 

I can remember how my brother and Grandfather would pop corn on the 
floor of the work shop with a bunsen burner; our dog Suki caught each 
piece as it went flying through the air. 

The work shop had a window facing on to the garden. The window was 
cracked, and had remains of old spider's webs hanging on it. 

The Old Man 

As the old man bent to place another log on the now dwindling fire, he 
started whistling an old folk tune. 

The room in which he sat was furnished with a piano, a sofa, and two 
rocking chairs. One had been his wife's. 

The ceiling paper was ripped, and in places on the ceiling the dirty white 
plaster could be seen hanging. 

Since his wife's death the old man's life had been spent hunting, pre- 
paring his food, rocking, and putting more logs on the fire. 

The cabin in which he lived was situated in the Barrens of Canada. 

The old man often peered out the window to watch the snow fall on the 
valley below, or just to watch the sun go down. 

He loved to watch animals outside his window. To him animals were his 
children, even though he hunted them. 

Hallowe'en 

The Jack o'Lantern sits on the window sill. Its eyes are like those of a 
demon; its mouth seems ready to chomp you to pieces; its nose like that of a 
bloodhound ready to sniff you down. 

The night air is filled with whispers, clouds and ghosts. 

Behind the clouds creeps the moon, waiting to shine her beams of light 
upon some lonely field or mountain top. 

In the cities, children are laughing and shouting, their bags filled with 
lovely candies. Their dream seems never ending. The magic words are, 
"Trick or Treat!" 

In some small hamlet a child is weeping. He's all alone; he has no 
costume; he's only five; he does not know the joy and splendor of Hallowe'en. 
Does anybody care for him? He has no Jack o'Lanterns awaiting him on 
doorsteps. 

Colin Byford 

THE CHAIR 

The easy chair by our fireside 
Holds its arms to me, 
As if to say, "Sit by my side, 
And stay alone with me." 

B. Hall 



90 



MY MOST UNFORGETABLE CHARACTER 

Mv most unforgetable character is Herman. Herman is a crawfish. 

It all started when I was walking in the water amone the rocks at our 
cottage. Out darted a crawfish. I grabbed him at once. To my surprise, he 
said, "Don't grab me; I will come with you.*' 

I went to the cottage where I introduced him to my family. 

Herman was a very poliie rrawfish. He shook Laird's paw with his claw. 
I was delighted to see he had made a friend. Suddenly he started gasping 
for breath. 

"Water, water", he gasped. 

I immediately filled a pail with water from the lake, put Herman into it, 
and he was happy. 

Sometime later my mom suggested that I have a swim before supper. I 
took Herman with me. It was great fun diving and swimming together. He 
soon learned the front crawl. Herman tried to teach me the back dart (which 
is the crawfish's best manoeuvre under water), but I ended up bumping my 
head on rocks. 

As soon as my swim was over, it was time for supper. First I put Herman 
into a pail with water and a few rocks. Then I carried him to the cottage, set 
him on the table, and I was ready to eat. 

I asked my mom what we were having for supper. She said. "Poison. . .", 
but nothing was unusual about that, because she says that every night. It 
turned out to be broccoli and ham. Eeech! Maybe she was right about it 
being poison. 

Just then Herman whispered to me, "Hey, Dave, I love ham and broccoli. 
Just give it to me and I'll eat it." 

Well that was a relief. I said. "Here's the food. Herman. Eat quick. Here 
comes my Dad". 

Since I hadn't eaten much I was huniirv. I put Herman in a transparent 
bucket. This was so that he could be my look-out. In case anyone came he 
could warn me and I would get the cookies put away. Soon all the David 
cookies were gone. 

That night Herman slept on a shelf next to my bed. 

The next morning, after I woke I was in a panic. I couldn't find Herman's 
jar. When I told my family, they laughed. 

I was told. "JefT used the jar for other crawfish, too. He's taken them to 
go bass fishing down the lake. You and your new ventriloquist act!" They 
forgot about Herman shaking Laird's paw with his claw. 

I ran down to the lake as fast as I could. As soon as I got there out darted 
a crawfish. 1 quicklv grabbed it. He said. "Don't grab me. I'Hcome with you." 
I remembered poor Herman's fate, and threw him back into the water. 

David Beedell 

THE OLD MAN FROM NEW YORK WHAT IS PEACE? 

There was an Old Man from New York, Is Peace a Christmas present? 

Who had always wanted a stork. Can you see or touch it? 

He put on his hat. Will we ever really win out. 

And muttered, "That's that". If we keep fighting about'.'' 

And he never acquired a stork. By the time I am twenty. 

Mark Richter l sure ho P e vve have P 1 ™'^ 

David Beedell 



91 



AFTER THE JOURNEY 

The little Hobbit raised his head 
From his pillow on the bed. 
He made himself a cup of tea, 
And sat at ease to watch T.V. 

The birds chirped from the trees above; 
The robin, the sparrow and the little dove. 
The breeze was soft as soft could be, 
As the squirrel climbed the old oak tree. 

Oh, somewhere it is snowing, 
And somewhere there is rain, 
But the sun is shining brightly 
On the distant hills of Dain. 
The journey now is over, 
And we won't return again. 

It all began on a day that was bold. 
Dwarfs came to visit the tidy hobbit-hole 
They planned to rebuild the city of Dale 
With its golden treasures and fine coats of mail. 

But there in the mountain 
Waited mighty dragon Smaug. 
He guarded the treasure 
Like a giant watch-dog. 

They were captured by the Goblins, 
And the spiders and the elves. 
If it wasn't for the Hobbit, 
They might have lost themselves! 

The Hobbit found a ring, 
That when you put it on, 
Was just like disappearing. 
You suddenly were gone! 

Their predicaments were great, 
But they always did escape. 
If you want to know the end, 
I'd surely recommend 
That you go and buy the book, 
So you, yourself can look. 
Read, "The Hobbit". 



David A. Welch 



WINTER 

Winter comes but once a year, Children sledge, and children skate 

And there are lots of things to do, Across the icy frozen lake. 

So we should not just disappear, Down from the hills the skiers fly, 

And let this season pass right through; Like golden jets across the sky. 

Because coming down through all the ages Winter carnival's king and queen 

We have been given lots of reasons, With laughter rule this happy scene. 

In not just one but many pages, Snowmen! Snowballs! join the fun, 

Of why there is a winter season. 'Cause winter now has just begun. 

David Ablack 



92 



THE DREAM 

Part I 

Finally I am able to relax, as I lean back in the bath tub to let the water 
caress my aching body. This is the first time today that I feel superior to 
something. As I lie there I realize how every joint in my body is creaking in 
raw, rusty movements. 

I sit up to grasp the shower controls and the warm water beats on my sore 
body. I lean back again with a great sigh of relief, squirming to let the water 
soak into every pore. I stare aimlessly into my water-filled navel and slowly 
sink into a subconscious slumber. 

Deep in this other dream world I found myself fondling the bath tub with 
my toes. I realized that I had successfully removed the plug and was being 
towed closer to the whirlpool of the sucking drain. Gradually my body took 
the form of oil and was easily pulled down into the drainage pipes: then into 
larger pipes, and soon I reached the great sea. 

Part II 

I found myself swimming the backstroke lazily across the Atlantic. My 
mind was pleasantly occupied with thoughts of friends and sex. Although I 
was in the middle of the Atlantic, the swim was as soothing as a bath. 

Soon I reached the beaches of Lisbon. While kicking up the hot, white 
sand, I found a pail full of raw sewage and a putrid sea gull, which I decided 
to devour. After this most satisfying meal, I realized I was tired. 

I climbed up on the sea cliffs and peered into a valley full of water beds. 
Happily I ran across the beds relishing the thin flesh of them as I bounced 
across. When I reached the centre bed I flopped upon it and went directly to 
sleep. 

Part III 

I woke and was shocked to realize where I was. Instinct told me to return 
to the point of departure. I did the crawl back across the Atlantic, straining 
every muscle. I had to fight my way up the sewage pipes. I was pushing, 
squirming, squeezing myself up the pipes. Smaller and smaller they grew in 
size, until 1 reached my bath tub. My deformed body of oil and slime 
materialized into human shape. 

I regained consciousness to the distressed cries of my little sister. After 
considering her problem, I hurriedly removed myself from the bathroom. 

R.S.M. 

THE ASHBURY GHOST 

Tom ("Cricket Bat") Jackson graduated from Ashbury in 1921. He had 
become an important figure in the world, and so the school was told about it 
when he died. We were also told that he had won two of the cricket trophies 
four years in a row while he had been at Ashbury. 

That night as I was leaving the dining room I noticed that the bat and 
ball were missing from the trophies which had hung on the wall for the past 
fifty years. No one else noticed this and I did not say anything. I assumed 
they had been removed to be cleaned or repaired. 

That night I was awakened out of a deep sleep by a sharp crack. Climbing 
down from my bunk I went to my window. To my amazement I saw a 
wraith-like team of cricketers on the moon lit cricket field. The batter had 
a silver bat. and the bowler a silver ball. 1 watched the game for a few 
minutes, then a dark cloud covered the moon, darkening the field. When 
the moon came out again the cricketers had disappeared. I climbed back 
into bed and soon fell asleep. 

In the morning when I went to breakfast and walked past the trophies, the 
bat and ball were back in place. 

I wonder. Was it my imagination, or had '"Cricket Bat Jack" returned to 
play one last game at Ashbury? 

R. Harwood 

93 



I was in Haiti when Fred Dickson discovered the remains of Columbus' 
sunken flagship, the Santa Maria. One of the interesting things brought to 
the surface was the log book, wrapped in a rubber-like cloth and enclosed in 
a steel box. Here are some of the entries. 



CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS' LOG 

January 3, 1492. No help! King Ferdinand is still fighting the Moors. 
Queen Isabella is far more interested in religion than exploration. I wish 
I could make her understand that to find a new route to Cathay would 
bring riches to Spain. 

January 5. Help at last! A royal rider brought me to the queen. She granted 
me three ships. I was so filled with emotion that I could hardly thank her. 

January 23. I haven't written lately as 1 have been too anxious to see my 
ships. Tomorrow is the day. 

January 24. Saw the ships. The Nina and the Pinta are caravals. The 
Pinta is lateen rigged; the Nina can hold 60 tuns of wine and is square 
rigged. The flagship Santa Maria is somewhat larger. She is unsuited for 
voyages of discovery as her cargo space is too small. But since I have my 
heart set on this voyage, a little less cargo space won't stop me now. 

February 10. Time has passed quickly, and there are still many things to 
attend to before we set sail. 

March 2. Signed on a group of ruffians as crew. Am still waiting for maps 
from the advisors. Captain of Pinta is Martin Pinzon. His brother Vincente 
is Captain of the Nina. They are both good men and I think will with- 
stand the hardships of the journey. 

July 1. Have bought and stowed all equipment and food supplies. Have 
been too busy to write in this log for the last months. I hope we have 
enough food and water. 

August 1. Plan to sail two days from now. So many people think I will 
never reach the Indies, but in my heart I am convinced I'll succeed. 

August 2. I can hardly believe we are about to set sail. I still have no mis- 
giving about the voyage. I must prove to the people of Spain that there is 
an easier route to Cathay. 

August 3. We are under way! I was surprised that Queen Isabella came 
to see us off. A good start. 

August 10. We headed south to the Canaries, then turned to the west. 

August 20. We sail ever westward. 

August 28. We have been at sea for 25 days. There seems nothing ahead 
of us but endless ocean. 

August 29. I let them set all sail. The main courses with two bonnets; the 
courses; the spiritsail; the mizzen; the topsail; the boatsail on half deck. 

September 1. We have been sailing for 29 days. I fear mutiny if there is 
no sight of land soon. 

September 2. Crew's tempers rising. I hope I will be able to pacify them 
with the thought of coming riches. 

September 11. We sighted three whales. At least we are not the only living 
creatures out here. 

September 21. Land must come soon because food supplies and water are 
scarce. 

October 5. The crew are fighting among themselves. Serious trouble may 
soon break out. There is no change in the horizon. We sail on. 

October 10. This is a momentous day. We picked up a fresh branch with 
green leaves on it. Land must be very near. Some of the crew attempted to 
eat the branch, they were so happy. At eventide we sighted land birds. 
Tomorrow will be the day. 

October 11. 3 AM. LAND AHOY!!! My prayers have been answered. 



94 



October 12. We went ashore and kissed the ground in our happiness. 
October 21. During the last days I have been exploring the island. The 

crew are happy. We have fresh fruit which is unlike anything in Spain. 

So far we have seen only a few natives. I am still waiting for the traders 

with their silks. I haven't said anything to the men. but I am wondering 

whether we are really near Cathay. Is it possible we have stumbled upon 

a new world? 
October 30. I am convinced we have discovered a new part of the Indies 

for Spain. I shall claim this land for Spain and call it San Salvador. 
October 31. Some of the men have made contact with the natives and have 

learned that there is a larger island to the north. I have decided to sail 

tomorrow to find it. 
November 1. We set sail. A storm seems to be . . . 
The remaining pages of the log are undecipherable. 

W. Johnston 



PARENTS NIGHT 

"Excuse me. Do you know where the Rockcliffe Planning Council is 
meeting?" 

"Oh, yes. It's at R.P.P.S. That's the school just off Springfield." 

Fifteen minutes later Mr. Hopkins, an engineer from New York who had 
come to Canada to help build a new sewage system for Rockcliffe Park, still 
had not found Rockcliffe Park Public School where he was to meet the 
Planning Council. 

Turning a corner, he saw many cars parked on both sides of the street. 
Imagining this to be the place, he hurried into a school building. He was 
late for the meeting and did not notice the sign saying "Ashbury College". 

Mr. Hopkins was greeted at the door by a monitor who took his coat and 
ushered him to the Junior School. 

"This way, please", and he found himself in a line to see Mr. Polk. 

When he reached the front of the line Mr. Polk said. "Name, please". 

"Ah — er — Hopkins." 

"Oh, yes, let's see now. Ah — here it is. Yes. Your son is doing fine in 
Latin, but his French leaves much to be desired." 

"You don't understand. I'm here about the sewage system." 

"Sewage system? Oh, yes. Your son wrote an excellent history paper on the 
sewage system at Rome. Did you know that they all worked on the principle 
of gravity, and that . . . ." 

Ten minutes later. "Yes. that's very interesting, but . . ." 

"I know you want to see the next teacher. Johnston here will take you to 
Mr. Beedell." 

"This way, please". 

"But, but . ." 

When he finally confronted Mr. Beedell, Mr. Hopkins said. "Please, you 
must understand. I'm here about the sewage system." 

"Oh. yes. It's a big subject. Pollution and ecology. Some ancient civiliza- 
tions had very efficient systems. Did you know that the Romans had . . . ." 

After about thirty minutes, poor Mr. Hopkins saw his chance to get away. 

Just as he was leaving, a monitor came running up. 

"Sir! Sir! Watch out for the open sewer!" 

Too bad Mr. Hopkins was a little hard of hearing! 

M. Pimm 



95 



THE SURPRISE 

Father Field Mouse trudged in from the bleak, cold and grey fields. 
Egbert, who was his oldest son. followed closely at his heels. They carried 
all their personal belongings. 

"Where are we going?" squeaked Egbert, who was cold and tired. 

"Just follow me, son, and you'll be all right", answered Egbert's father. 

"The pavement hurts my toes", whimpered Egbert. He started limping 
behind his father. 

Father noticed Egbert's pain. He said, "Be patient a little longer. We will 
soon arrive at our destination." 

A few moments later they slipped through a basement window. 

"Here's our winter home. See that hole? It leads to the kitchen cupboard 
and the backs of the cereal packages. This hole leads to the cheese." 

Egbert suddenlv felt much more cheerful. 

M. Puttick 

WHY I DETEST TEACHERS 

I detest most teachers because they are sly schemers who plot to deteriorate 
the student's brain. The ways they go about this secret operation vary, 
according to the character of the teacher. 

Some decide to work the student to such a degree that he drowns in his 
own perspiration. 

Others choose the detention method. These teachers are the tyrant type 
who enjoy watching the innocent suffer, waiting the finish of the seemingly 
endless detention period. 

Other teachers think that knuckle rapping is a far better means. These 
are the sadistic types and they go about their daily torturing with gusto. 
While a pupil is happily sleeping during a math class, the teacher creeps, 
noiselessly, up behind him, and still droning on as boringly as before, his 
ruler speeds down and whacks its victim a painful blow across the now 
mutilated fingers. 

Others use the lecture punishment. In my opinion this is the worst. For 
such a small crime as hitting someone with a snowball, the culprit is forced 
to listen for what seems like hours to an exaggerated account of the serious- 
ness of his crime. 

Some teachers use the embarrassement or insulting approach. Of these, 
the least said the better. 

Here is an example of a punishment which shows the ingenuity of some 
really wicked teachers. This is called The Reign of Terror. The victim is 
hanged by his thumbs and used as a tackling dummy until his thumbs are 
torn off from the strain. 

Happily at Ashbury most of the teachers seem to have a control over their 
basic natures and are really pretty decent types. 

John Beesack 

DEATH IN THE EVENING 

The man sauntered down the cold, dank street. His footsteps echoed 
eerily on the deserted pavements. He wandered aimlessly across the inter- 
section. 

There was a sudden squeal of brakes, and the man turned in time to see 
a small car crash into a lamp post and erupt in a tower of flame. A shrieking 
figure of fire stumbled from the burning wreckage, and collapsed on the 
cold pavement never to rise again. 

The man woke to pleasant and familiar surroundings. For a moment he 
had forgotten the horrible accident he had caused the previous night. And 
then he remembered. 

At the breakfast table his newspaper carried a picture which struck terror 
to his heart. It was of the girl in the car. and she was the image of his young 
daughter. 

He screamed, "I've killed her! I've killed her!" 

Then he looked up and saw his daughter at the head of the stairs. 

"Get out of this house! Get out! Get out! Get out!" 

But the girl did not move. 

After this he became cold and silent. He realized he was as dead as she 
was. 

M. Pimm 




OFF YOU GO TO THE BUSHES! 




A ROSE BETWEEN TWO THORNS? 








I'LL SEE YOU OUTSIDE MY 
OFFICE AFTER SCHOOL 




THE FOUR HORSEMEN 



THE LONG AND THE SHORT OF IT 



FORM NOTES 



TRANSITUS A 

John the Beserk is my name; 

I find all schoolwork the same. 

I would much rather play 

At croquet all day, 

And let my books burn in a flame. 

John Beesack 
There was a young fellow named Brookes 
Who was mischievous in his good looks. 
Although not called a fool 
At the ending of school, 
He went and burned all of his books. 

Adrian Brookes 

This was my first year here, and for the most part it was a very enjoyable 
one! The kids here are the school's greatest asset, and the sports are great, 
although I would like to see basketball introduced. 

Paul Campbell 

This is my second year at Ashbury, and it has been lots of fun. It wasn't 
a very successful year for me, but I enjoyed myself thoroughly. The sports 
were very exciting, although the Wizards did not do too well! The teams' 
trips, and the Quebec trip were also very enjoyable. 

John Coyne 

This is my first year at Ashbury. I don't think I will be coming back next 
year. I think the Junior School is great, and I only wish I had come here 
earlier. Ashbury is much more challenging than any of the public schools I 
have been to. It has prepared me for high school much better than most 
public schools could. 

Reid Dunlop 
Last year was really quite fine, 
And my marks shot up like a vine. 
Haircuts I did get, 
And this made me fret, 
But in general the year was divine. 

David Green 
Who's that twirp in center field? 
Why it's L'le Iain! Watch him catch the ball. 
He's pretty smart in school as well. 
Anyway, "Play Ball!" 
Who's that shrimpy right winger? 
Why it's L'le Iain! Watch him pass the puck. 
He got his M.L.T.S., cool! 
Anyway, "Face Off!" 

Iain Johnston 
I here was a red head of Trans A 
Who fiddled and twiddled all day, 
But it's understood. 
His marks were quite good. 
Which left him no cause for dismay. 

Simon Jones 



98 




That skinny young bloke, it is me. 

I just love it when classes are free. 

Math is a bore; 

French is a chore: 

But I have a good friend named Rowlev. 



Andrew Marchant 



This is my first year at Ashbury and I have found it very enjoyable and 
challenging. The large sports programme which consists of hockey and 
soccer (my favourite sports) is as good as any I've found. I like almost all 
of my classes (especiallv the ones I do well in!). Most of the people who 
surround me are my friends. 

John Mierins 

There was once a young boy in II1A. 

Who started out in a poor way, 

Until he found knowledge 

From Ashbury College. 

Which helped him do well in Trans A. 

Bob Morrison 

This is my first year at Ashbury, and I think it was a fair year. My friends 
are David Hogarth. Reid Dunlop. Iain Johnston and Jaime Pitfield. My 
favourite masters are Mr. Sherwood and Mr. Flynn. I am returning next year. 

Bruce Nicol 

This is my last year in the Junior School. I have been here since Grade 
V. and I am now going into Grade IX. This year I am honoured to be the 
editor of the Junior Ashburian. It's a hard job. but it's fun. 

Matthew Pimm 

This was my best year, but unfortunately it will be my last as I go off 
to Lisgar next year. I liked the sports programme, and the school subjects. 
I liked all my friends, and I like all the staff. 

Jaime Pitfield 

This year has been a good year for me. but I did not get as high averages 
as I did last year. This was my second vear at Ashbury. and I am returning in 
the fall, hopefully to 9 A. 

Stephen Puttick 
99 



The Rowl is a boy in Trans A, 

Who would honestly much rather stay, 

But as he must. 

He will without fuss, 

Move up in the fall to 9 A. 



Andrew Rowlinson 



This has been my third and best year. Unfortunately it is my last as next 
year I will leave to go to a high school in my district. I believe that the 
success of my year has been due to the fact that I made many friends. Also 
this year has been my first to get a gold on the colour board, and I ended 
up with five. 

Greg Spencer 



There was once a mixture named Guy, 

Who couldn't decide what to be. 

It was either a crumpet, 

Or a skinny French trumpet, 

He decided to be a French pea. 



Guy Warwick 



The best way to pass to Grade 9, 
Is to stay home sick all the time, 
I get all straight A's 
ABSENT starts that way 
A "C" next vear would be fine. 



Douglas Welch 



This is my fourth year at Ashbury and I have enjoyed it very much. My 
favourite sport this year was soccer. I am returning next year, and I hope it 
will be another very successful one. 

Eric Wilson 

This year was my first at Ashbury, but I am already very impressed. I 
worked a lot harder this year than I have for a long time. I hope that I will 
be able to return next year. 

Patrick Wilson 




100 



TRANSITUS 

MICHAEL ADJELEIAN. AJ had a pretty good year. He played in all the 
sports and came close to the top in the class. He was well liked by all the 
boys and the teachers. 

BRIAN BISIKER. He sometimes got into trouble, but he had a fun year. 
He did not work very hard. He was popular and likes pretty girls. 

BOB BRODIE. Brodie has had a good year. He made the hockey and 
volleyball teams, and was elected a Monitor. A broken leg has slowed him 
down now. He was Captain of his House and made a good effort academi- 
cally. 

COLIN BYFORD. Colin is a nice guy. He tries very hard at sports and he 
gets rewarded by scoring goals, or coming home. Colin is good in class and 
I like him. He gets average marks. 

GUY CUZNER. He enjoys the cricket at Ashbury. His best subject is spelling. 
He enjoys being a ten-speed bicycle freak, and he enjoys sleeping. His 
favourite hobby is working hard, and studying here at Ashbury. He enjoys 
the work here and gets good marks. 

JIM DRON. He wants to go into the senior school, and he is developing a 
sort of growing sense of humour. His best friend is Motta. 

BILL FULLER. Bill is Ashbury 's head boarder monitor, everybody's friend, 
and a good athlete. What else could you want? He's been here for four 
years, and will be coming back for the next. He hopes to become an 
architect. 

PHILIP GRANT. He is a very nice guy. It was his first year here. He is a 
pretty good athlete and was on most of the teams. He was also a monitor. 
He lives in the town of Mount Royal and will be returning next year. 

GREG HARVEY. This is Greg's first year at Ashbury. Although he is more 
interested in sports than in his studies, he always manages a good passing 
average. His favourite sports are football and skiing, and he was also a 
member of the volleyball team coached by Mr. Babbitt. Some of his best 
friends are Brian Bisiker, Steve Wallick and Phil Wiener. Greg will be 
coming back next year. 

HUGH HEATON. This is his fourth year at Ashbury. He likes to figure 
skate, and he made the choir. He works quite hard and is pretty good at 
most of his subjects. He has had a good year. 

JOHN LAFORTUNE. He has been at Ashbury for two years, and should I 
say at Elmwood also. Everyone in our classroom has a nickname appointed 
to him by our form master Mr. Polk, even he has a nickname, Mr. Pork. 
However, due to unfortunate circumstances John's nickname will not be 
mentioned. 

DAVID MACLEOD. His nicknames are Boold, Duncan, Cloud. Mac and 
Marbles. His favourite sport is hardball. He wants to be a doctor or a full- 
fledged BOZO when he gets older. He's returning next year. 

GRAEME MCKENNA. Graeme had an average year with about a 60^0 all 
through the year. He enjoys Ashbury and says it"s improved his marks. 
He hopes to be a lawyer, and his hobby is magic. 
ANDY MOORE. He is 14 years old. He lives in Brooklyn, N.Y. He goes to 
school at Ashbury. It is a college in Ottawa. He has been at this school 
for only two years now in Grades 7 & 8. Last year he missed what we call 
an M.L.T.S. It means you get an 80 ^o or over average for the whole year 
and you don't write your final exams. Last year his average was 78.970, 
but this year he made it. He was on the soccer, softball and volleyball 
teams. He was a monitor and he got all gold on the colour board. He got 
50 house points. 



101 



RICHARD MOTTA. Also known as Jake. This is his second year at Ashbury. 
He's an all-round nice guy and very athletic. He was on the school's soft- 
ball and volleyball teams. 

SCOTT ROBERTSON. This is Scott's second year. He likes sports and 
enjoys going over to Elmwood. He is a very good hockey player and skier. 
His best friends are Bisiker, Wallick and Scott. 

CHRIS SCOTT. Chris likes horses and goes over to Elmwood all the time. 
He's a bit uncoordinated and has a lousy taste in girls. 

CLERMONT VEILLEUX. This is his second year at Ashbury. He makes 
most of the teams. He made softball, hockey, soccer and track and field. 
His best friends are Reid Dunlop, Iain Johnston, Ian Rhodes, John 
Biewald and Bill Fuller. During class he is an OK guy. He has many 
different names at Ashbury. He is coming back next year. 

STEVE WALLICK. This was his first year at Ashbury. He was very popular 
and was a very good photographer. He spent a lot of time with Guy 
Cuzner and was with him when he broke his leg in spring skiing. He 
spent this term in a cast. He is a good talker. 

PHILIPPE WIENER. Phil has been here five years now. His nickname is 
Narc. He has made every school team. He had a bad second half term. He 
has a lot of friends. His favourite brand is Export A. He boards at school. 
His girl friend's name is Mary. He likes her very much. He is 14 years 
old. He almost made monitor. 

RICHARD WILSON. This is Wilson's third year at Ashbury. He is 13. and 
gets on well with his masters. The boys in his class like him too. Before 
coming to Ashbury he went to Rockcliffe. He missed his exams because he 
had infectious mono-nucleosis. 

JOEL ZAGERMAN. He is a very good kid and has a fantastic personality. 
His favourite subjects are reading, geography and French. His favourite 
masters are Mr. Babbitt, Mr. Humphreys and Mrs. Babbitt. His nicknames 
are J-Bagg, Haaaaych, Bagel and Coco. His favourite sports are softball, 
hockey and vegetating. He made the softball, volleyball and 2nd hockey 
teams. He will be back at Ashbury next year. 




FORM III A 



102 



FORM HI 

JEFF AMBER Y. I think Ashbury is a very good school because of its 
educational values. Ashbury compared to another public school to me was 
quite a change. 1 have made a lot of friends. The sports program is very 
good here. 1 am coming back to Ashbury next year. 

JOHN BIEWALD. This is my first year at Ashbury. My best friends are 
David Hogarth. Reid Dunlop and Clermont Veilleux. My favourite sport 
this year was Track & Field, and I made the first hockey team. When I 
grow up I would like to be a doctor. 

CLAUDE BOUCHER. This is my first year at Ashbury and I like it very 
much. Compared with all the other schools I prefer Ashbury because of its 
activities. I like every one in my class. My favourite sports are baseball, 
hockey and track. I would like to come back next year. 

KEN CARRE. This is my last year at Ashbury and it has been a good one. 
I'm going to miss it. The subjects that I like the most are history and 
English; and the teachers who teach them. Mr. Polk and Mr. Babbitt are 
my favourite teachers. Last but not least the friends that I had a lot of 
fun with were Biewald and Fuller. 

FRED ELLACOTT. This is my third year at Ashbury. I think this is a good 
school. My friends are John Biewald, Richard Harwood and David Van 
Leeuwen. Right now I don't have any idea of what my job will be when 
I grow up. 

RICHARD HARWOOD. I hope to come back next year. My best friends are 
Claude Boucher and David Irving. My favourite sports are hockey and 
baseball. The food is O.K. and the teachers are all great. 

HECTOR HERMOSILLO. This is my first year in Ashbury and for me it is 
really good experience because I learned English and a lot of new things. 
My best friends here are Wiener, Andy. Biewald and Fuller. I really 
enjoyed this year in Ashbury and I wish to come back. 

DAVID IRVING. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it quite a bit. I 
have many good friends but my best ones are Jim Pilaar, James Lay, Iain 
Johnston and Richard Harwood. I have had a very good year and I'm 
happy with my marks. I hope to come back next year. 

JAMES LAY. This is my first year at Ashbury. When I first came from my 
public school I was a little scared of the strictness, but it didn't turn out 
too bad. I guess the thing I like almost best is how the school lets you know 
how you're doing. At my other school I had no clue as to how well I was 
doing or if I was progressing. I also like the sports program especially when 
we go on trips to other schools. The classes are more intense — I mean I 
learned more here than at the other school. 

TED LIGTHART. This is my second year at Ashbury College. It was my 
best year here. I had a lot of friends. In sports I did quite well. My average 
was about 70%. My favourite teacher is Mr. Babbitt. I hope very much to 
pass. 

TIM MAHONEY. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it very much. 
My best friends are Hardhead. Claudet, Andy, Brain and Irving. The 
food is OK??? 

JACQUES MAJOR. I like Ashbury. I have lots of friends. My favourite 
teacher is Mr. Flynn. I am coming back next year (I hope). I will be in 
Transitus. My future is quite complicated. I hope to do well next year. I 
don't want to sleep in most classes. My best friends are Phil Wiener. Jim 
Pilaar, John Biewald, Hector Hermosillo, Tim Mahoney. Phil Grant, 
Claude Boucher and Norman Sirotek. I like the new school building 
project. 

MICHAEL O'MEARA. This is now my third year at Ashbury. Next year 
there will be a big difference in the school. The staff have organized 
everything very well. The boys at the school are all good. I like grammar, 
history, geography and science. I will be back next year. 

103 



PHILIP SELLERS. I like Ashbury very much and I hope to come back next 
year. My favourite sport is hockey, but I like all sports. My best friends are 
Jeff Ambery, David Irving and Jamie Lay. I like all the teachers here so I 
have no favourite teacher. I like all the subjects, but my favourites are 
history, math and literature. 

NORMAN SIROTEK. I like this school and I hope I can come back. I 
would like to be a monitor. My best sports are baseball and cross-country 
running. I have been here for two years. 

ROBERT SMITH. One of my favourite teachers is Mr. Humphreys for 
French. I enjoyed Ashbury this year because my average went up ll.S^o 
in December. I thank all the teachers for helping me this year. My 
favourite friends are the Van Leeuwens and Arnie Mierins. 

MICHAEL TKACHUK. This is my fourth year at Ashbury. I hope to come 
back next year. I like everybody in my class. My favourite teachers are 
Mr. Babbitt, Mr. Humphreys and Mrs. Babbitt. I do not know what I am 
going to be when I grow up. 

MICHAEL TORONTOW. This is my third year at Ashbury. My favourite 
subjects are grammar, math and literature. My favourite friends are Keith 
MacDonald, Matthew Flynn, Steven Harris and Myles Magner. I think 
swimming is the best sport here. 

HECTOR URDANETTA. I am from Mexico and am in Grade 7, Form III. 
I like Ashbury very much. The food is good. Most of the boys in my class 
are very nice. We have lots of sports. The teachers are very nice and the 
teaching method is very good. My favourite subjects are science, geography 
and history. We have many holidays and much work. I think this is a good 
combination. 

DAVID VAN LEEUWEN. This is my first year at a private school. I like it 
quite a lot because of the rotating of classes during the day instead of stay- 
ing in your home room getting bored. And I also like the breaks we have, 
such as games period; we run and play many exciting sports and this gets 
you all pepped up for the remaining classes of the day. My friends are 
Robert Smith (even if he enjoys fooling in the class a bit) and I like 
O'Meara, too. P.S. I do hope I come back next year. 

MATTHEW VAN LEEUWEN. I think this school is all right. I like it much 
better than a public school. It is a good school for friends. My friends are 
Robert Smith and O'Meara. My best teacher is Mr. Babbitt. It has been a 
year of hard work. I will be coming back next year, and Til try harder to 
get an M.L.T.S. 
IAN WALKER. I like this school very much for all reasons; the sport and 
the teaching and all kinds of similar things. My nickname is Walk and my 
favourite teacher is Mr. Flynn. When I started the year here I was at the 
bottom of the class, now I am near the top. 




104 



JAY ABRAHAMSEN. This was my first year at Ashbury and I was lucky 
enough to get my M.L.T.S. I think Ashbury is a nice place, and I like all 
the sports, and I like all the teachers, too. 

ROBERT BYFORD. This is my last year at Ashbury. I have been here for 
two years and enjoyed the school very much. I am going to school in 
England next year. Mv favourite teachers are Mr. and Mrs. Babbitt and 
Mr. Polk. 

TIM FARQUHAR. I am in Grade 6. I think Ashbury is a good school. The 
teaching is good and the sports are excellent. My friends are Jeff Ambery, 
James Lay, Iain Johnston, Reid Dunlop, Clermont Veilleux, David 
Hogarth, Ian Rhodes, Brian Bisiker, Phil Wiener, Jaime Pitfield, Bagel, 
Andy Moore, Harvey. Biewald, Matthew Litvak, David Irving. I like 
Ashbury a lot. My favourite teachers are Mr. Humphreys, Mr. Babbitt and 
Mr. Tottenham. 

TED HALL. This is my second year at Ashbury. The food is very good 
(including tuck). My favourite sports are hockey, softball, soccer and 
football. My best friends are Abrahamsen, Farquhar, Harris and Harwood. 

BENEDICT HALL. I am very pleased with this year, which is my second 
at Ashbury. My favourite friend is Timothy M. Warren, and my favourite 
masters are Mr. Humphreys and Mr. Robertson. I still like Ashbury very 
much. 

CAMPBELL KEITH. This is my first year at Ashbury and I liked it a lot. 
My favourite subject is literature, although I do not do very well in it. 
My best friends are Watson, Welch, Wright and Byford. The only person 
I dislike is No matter how hard I try, I always end up burning mad. 

MALCOLM MACLAURIN. My favourite sport is baseball, and my favourite 
subjects are geography and math. My best friends are Ted and Benedict 
Hall, Mitchell and T. M. Warren. Most of the food is O.K., but the potatoes 
taste like glue. 

DAVID MEYERS. This is my second year at Ashbury. I like it very much. 
My favourite teachers are Mrs. Babbitt, Mr. Babbitt, Mr. Flynn and Mr. 
Robertson. 

BRENT MITCHELL. The trip was nice, but they work you a little too hard, 
and the food's all right, but it makes you too fat. The rules and the school 
are both too old fashioned, and some of the teachers are fair. I think the 
holidays are fair, because you sure work hard enough to get them a little 
longer. And I really do hope that they modernize the school a lot with the 
$400,000 they are going to improve the school with. My friends are 
Benedict Hall and Timothy Warren. 

BOB MURRAY. I've been here two years. My best subjects are math and 
literature. My best friends are Mitchell, Richter and Hall I. My best 
teacher is Mr. Babbitt. 

MICHAEL PUTTICK. This is my second year at Ashbury and I have 
enjoyed it very much. My favourite sports are fishing, hockey and baseball. 
My best friends are Welch II. Farquhar and Meyers. 

MARK RICHTER. This is my second year at Ashbury. It gets easier as I 
get along. My favourite friends are Puttick, Hall I, Abrahamsen and 
Lamont. My favourite subjects are history and geography. I get low marks 
in those subjects but I like them just the same. My favourite teachers are 
Mr. Humphreys, Mr. Flynn. Mr. Babbitt and Mr. Robertson. 

T. M. WARREN. I like Ashbury very much and I hope to be going into 
Grade 7 next year. I have enjoyed my year and have learned many new 
things. My best friend is Benedict Hall. I like all the teachers. Our Form 
Master was Mr. Humphreys. The food is O.K. but could be a little nicer. 
My favourite subjects are science and literature. My favourite sport is 
cricket. 



105 




STEPHEN WATSON. This is my first year at Ashbury. I think I will be 
back next year. When I am older I want to be a lawyer like my father. 
My favourite teachers are Mr. Babbitt, Mr. Tottenham and Mr. Humphreys. 
My best friends are David Welch, Tim Farquhar and John Biewald. 

DAVID WELCH. This is my first year at Ashbury. Next year I will head for 
form IIIA. I would like to say that I enjoyed this year very much, despite 
long absences. This year I attained a high enough average for an MLTS. 
My favourite subjects are science, grammar, literature, and poetry. I also 
like math, French, and history. My best friends are Watson, Biewald, 
Hall I, and Abrahamsen. I like hockey, softball, and soccer. This was the 
best school year I've ever had. 

PALMER WRIGHT. I like Ashbury very much and I hope I will come 
here for many years. My favourite sports are skiing and soccer. My best 
friends are Hall I, Watson, Lamont and Schoeler. My favourite subjects 
are math, science, grammar and history. 

CHARLES ZWIREWICH. This is my second year at Ashbury. I got my 
M.L.T.S. this year. My favourite friends are Timothy Warren and Benedict 
Hall. I hope to be at Ashbury for a few more years. 



106 




VP M 1* ™ 




FORM I 

DAVID BEEDELL This is my first year at Ashbury. I think Ashbury is a 
good school. I like all the teachers and my favourite teacher is Mr. 
Beedell. I got an M.L.T.S. this year. My best friends are T-May, Critter, 
Cuchi, Lucy, Lamont. Flynn, Feldman. Fonay. Martin. Mahoney and 
Schoeler. I like the sports programme and the long holidays. 
ALEXANDER BYSTRAM. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it a lot. 
I am ten years old. I am a monthly boarder. My best friends are Mahoney 
and Richter. My favourite teachers are Mr. Tottenham. Mr. and Mrs. 
Babbitt and Mr. Humphreys. My favourite subjects are French and 
grammar. My favourite sport is Softball. 
HAYG CUHACI. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like all the teachers, 
especially Tottenham. My favourite sports are hockey and softball. I missed 
my M.L.T.S. by .2°o. My favourite friends are Dunlop. Tim Wilson and 
Schoeler. 
JONATHAN DOWNING. I am near the end of my first year and everyone 
is studying like anything. The people I like in our class are D. Beedle and 
B. C. Flynn. My favourite teachers are Mr. Tottenham and Mrs. Babbitt. 
Math, French and history are my favourite subjects. 
LAIRD DUNLOP. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it very much. My 
friends are Schoeler. Cuhaci. Wilson V. Flynn and Wilson VI. My 
favourite sports are hockey, soccer, softball and tennis. I hope to come 
back next year. 
KEN ELLACOTT. This is my first year at Ashbury and I like it a lot. My 
favourite sports are hockey and baseball. My favourite friends are Fonay 
and Flynn and my favourite teachers are Mr. and Mrs. Babbitt. Mr. 
Tottenham and Mr. Humphreys. 
ROLF FELDMAN. This is my first year at Ashbury and I like it very much. 
My favourite sports are swimming and track. My favourite teachers are 
Mr. Beedell, Mr. Humphreys. Mr. Tottenham and Mr. Sherwood. My 
favourite friends are Luciani. Cuhaci. Beedell. Martin and Fonay. 
BRENDAN FLYNN. My best friends are Timmy Wilson. David Beedell, 
Tom Lamont. EllacotL My favourite teachers are Mr. Flynn. Mr. Totten- 
ham. Mr. Green and Mr. Sherwood. This is my first year and I like it very 
much, especially the sports. 
NICHOLAS FONAY. This is my first year at Ashbury. I am in Grade 5 and 
I like the school. My favourite teachers are Mr. Tottenham and Mr. and 
Mrs. Babbitt. Also my favourite sports are hockey, soccer and softball. This 
year I have earned an M.L.T.S. 

107 



PAUL KADZIORA. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it very much. 
My best friends are Tom Lamont and Peter Martin. My favourite teachers 
are Mr. Tottenham, Mr. Sherwood, Mr. Humphreys and Mrs. Babbitt. 

TOM LAMONT. This is my first year and I am ten years old. I hope I come 
back next year. I like hockey, baseball and track and my favourite friends 
are Flynn, Tim Wilson and Martin. My favourite teachers are Mr. Sher- 
wood and our form teacher, Mr. Tottenham. 

CHARLES LAY. This is my first year at Ashbury. My favourite friends are 
Mark Viets, Kelly Mahoney, Mark Richter, Brendan Flynn. My favourite 
teacher is Mr. Sherwood. My best sport is hockey. 

GORDON LUCIANI. Hello! This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it very 
much. I'm 11 years old. My favourite subjects are math, French and 
science. My best sports are hockey and softball. 

GORDON MACLAREN. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it very 
much. My favourite sports are soccer, hockey and softball. I like every 
subject and have learned a lot. My favourite teachers are Mr. Humphreys, 
Mr. Tottenham, Mr. Robertson, Mr. Sherwood, Mrs. Babbitt and Mr. 
Beedell. My friends are Cuhaci, Martin. Beedell, Lamont, Schoeler, 
Dunlop, Wilson V, Wilson VI and Flynn. 

KELLY MAHONEY. This is my first year at Ashbury. I am going to come 
back next year. My favourite teachers are Mr. Tottenham and Mr. and 
Mrs. Babbitt. My favourite friends are Fonay, Lay and Richter. I like 
hockey, but I can't skate very well. 

PETER MARTIN. This is my first year at Ashbury and I am ten years old. 
I like all the subjects and sports. All the teachers are very good, and I like 
all of them. I like practically all the boys in my form and a few in other 
forms. My favourite sports are soccer, hockey and softball. and I made a 
few teams. The food here is pretty good. My best friends are Pitfield, 
Lamont, Dunlop, Schoeler, Cuhaci, and a few others. I received my 
M.L.T.S. and will most likelv be coming back next year. 

JEFF MITCHELL. This is my first year in Ashbury. I like it, sometimes. My 
favourite teachers are Mrs. Babbitt, Mr. Tottenham and Mr. Flynn. My 
friends are Richter, Flynn and Downing. 

BOB SCHOELER. My favourite sports are soccer, hockey and softball, and 
my favourite teachers are Mr. Babbitt, Mr. Flynn, Mr. Humphreys. Mr. 
Tottenham and Mr. Sherwood. My best friends are Laird Dunlop. Hayg 
Cuhaci, Peter Martin, Tim Wilson. Tom Lamont. Brendan Flynn. Tim 
Farquhar and David Beedell. My favourite subjects are grammar, French 
and math. I am 11 years old. 

MICHAEL SOURIAL. This is my first year at Ashbury and I like it very 
much. My favourite teachers are Mr. Tottenham, Mr. Robertson, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Babbitt. My favourite class mates are Jeff Mitchell and Alexander 
Bystram. The food is excellent. 1 like all sports. My favourite subjects are 
history, French and science. I did not get my M.L.T.S. but I still hope to 
get it next year. I really enjoved the school trip to Quebec City. I really 
hope to come back next year. I have enjoyed it here. 

MARK VIETS. This is my first year at Ashbury. My favourite teachers are 
Mr. Tottenham and Mr. Humphreys. My favourite sports are softball and 
hockey. My favourite friends are Peter, Cuhaci, Gordon. Ellacott and 
Brendan. My favourite subjects are history and English. 
TIM WILSON. This is my first year at Ashbury and I like it very much. 
I hope I get an M.L.T.S. next year. The sports are very good. My best 
friends are Flynn II, Wilson VI, Dunlop II and Lamont. I also like 
Martin, Beedell III and Cuhaci. 
IAIN WILSON. This is my first year at Ashbury. I like it very much. My 
best teachers are Mrs. Babbitt, Mr. Tottenham and Mr. Humphreys. My 
best friends are T. Wilson, L. Dunlop, D. Beedell, T. Lamont. B. Schoeler 
and H. Cuhaci, and most of Grade 6 and 7 and some of Grade 8. 



108 




ERIC ("Bobby Fischer") WILSON 
outmanoeuvers the 
r Senior School Champ 

^jf' Leslie Zunenshine 



OUR 

CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPS 

Bill Fuller, Laird Dunlop, 

Arnie Mierins 




110 



School Register — 1971-72 



Ablack, David Lennox 
Abrahamsen, Jorgen Sven 

Adjeleian, Michael John 

Ambery, Jeffrey Dewar 

Anapolsky, Ronnie 

Anapolsky, Gerry 

Ashley, Warwick Stuart James 

Barnes, Michael Leslie William 
Bates, Christopher Robert 
Beedell, Michael John 
Beedell, Jeffrey William 
Beedell, David Charles 
Beesack, John David 
Belanger, Francois 
Belding, Kirk Shaun 

Benfell, Leonard H. Ill 

Bennett, Richard Lloyd 
Beqaj, Jimmy Kujtim 
Bidner, Kevin 
Bidner, Brady 
Biewald, John Felix 
Bisiker, Brian Douglas 

Bleackley, Ian Kerr 
Bonneau, Michel 
Boucher, Claude 
Boyd, Bryan Alexander 

Breen, David Hart 

Brodie, Robert Alan 
Brookes. Adrian Martin 

Burke-Robertson, David Ian William 
Buser, Martin Ulrich 
Byford, Colin William 

Byford, Robert James 

Bystram, Alexander Stephen 

Cahn. Edward Walter 
Campbell, John Paul 

Carre, Kenneth Norman 

Chan, Yee Hee Andrew 

Charron, Louis 

Chatel, Jules 

Childers, Richard Spencer 

Childs, Peter Adrian 

Christie, Hugh Alexander 

Chu, Kwong-Kie Frankie 

Chu, Kwong-Kin Kenny 

Comis, Stephen Gregory 
Copestake, Peter Goodall 



1468 Randall Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1H 7R7. 
294 Manor Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0H5. 
1495 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K2C 1N8. 
406 Wood Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 1J9. 
112 Finchley Road, Hampstead, Montreal 254, 

P.Q. 
112 Finchley Road, Hampstead, Montreal 254, 

P.Q. 
244 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario. K1H 5A2. 

7 Starwood Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K2G 1Y7. 

82 Marlowe Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K1S Ul. 

R.R. #1, Sarsfield, Ontario. 

R.R. #1, Sarsfield, Ontario. 

R.R. #1, Sarsfield, Ontario. 

4 Greenwich Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K2E 5E6. 

529 rue Lachapelle, Hemmingford, P.Q. 

342 Wilchester Blvd., Houston, Texas 77024, 

U.S.A. 
89 Grandview Road, R.R. #8, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K2H 7V3. 
Main Street, Avonmore, Ontario. 
928 Inswood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K2A 3S1. 
Mountain Road, Lucerne, P.Q. 
Mountain Road, Lucerne, P.Q. 
207 Crocus Avenue. Ottawa, Ontario. K1H 6E7. 
112 Lisgar Road. Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0E6. 
57- 10th Street, Roxboro 900, P.Q. 
Saint. Simon (Bagol), P.Q. 
303 St. Joseph Boulevard, Wrightville, P.Q. 
131 Manor Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0H1. 
19 Larch wood Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K1Y 2E3. 
69 Geneva Street, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 3N6. 
100 McLeod Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K1K 2J2. 
Marchmont, Dunrobin P.O., Ontario. 
303 Fairmont Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 1Y5. 
250 Sprinefield Road. Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0K9. 
250 Springfield Road. Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0K9. 
Carrera la., #70A-45, Apt. 101, Bogota, D.E. 

6825 LaSalle Blvd., Montreal 204, P.Q. 
1229 Rideout Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K2C 2X9. 
2205 Alta Vista Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K1H 7L9. 
6 Shatin View Terrace, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong. 
163 Thomas Street. Gatineau, P.Q. 

9 Terrasse Louise, Valleyfield, P.Q. 

232 Remic Avenue. Ottawa, Ontario. K1Z 5W5. 

R.R. #5, Kemptville, Ontario. 

2250D Halifax Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1G 2W8. 

10 Man Fuk Road, Beauty Court, 14th Fir., 
Flat B, Waterloo Hill, Kowloon, Hong Kong. 

10 Man Fuk Road, Beauty Court. 14th Fir., 
Flat B, Waterloo Hill, Kowloon, Hong Kong. 

5675 Cote St. Antoine, Montreal 260, P.Q. 

60 Placel Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 
Ontario. K1L 5C1. 



Ill 



Couturier, Humberto 
Coyne, John Daniels 

Cox, Timothy David 

Cox, Kelly Clark 

Croal, Peter Sean Taylor 
Cuhaci, Hayg A. V. 
Cushing, Geoffrey Derek 
Cuttle, James Francis 
Cuzner, Donald Guy 

Davies, Gregory Charles 

Deepan, Paul Dhananjaya 
Desmarais, Luc 

Dickson, Thomas Adamson 

Diplock, Donald Ian Scott 
Dowling, Rodrium Walter 
Downing, Jonathan William 

Dron, James 
Duguay, Mark 
Dunlop, Reid Alexander 

Dunlop, Laird Andrew 



Ellacott, Frederick James 

Ellacott, Kenneth David 

Ellis, Jonathan Andrew 

Evans, Michael Dennis Constable 



17 Ste. Geneviere Avenue, Quebec City, P.Q. 
235 Mariposa Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0T4. 
Island Park Towers, Apt. 2310, 195 Clearview 

Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Z 6S1. 
Island Park Towers, Apt. 2310, 195 Clearview 

Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Z 6S1. 
1239 Evans Blvd., Ottawa, Ontario. K1H 7T7. 
157 Riverdale Avenue, Ottawa. Ontario. K1S 1R1. 
4139 Hampton Avenue, Montreal 261, P.Q. 
Mont Tremblant, P.Q. 
Kingsmere, P.Q. 

The Gleneagles, Apt. C-31, 3940 Cote des Neiges 

Road, Montreal 109, P.Q. 
127 First St. E., Cornwall, Ontario. 
3875 Ramezay Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, 

Montreal 218, P.Q. 
Apt. 3, 890 McMillan Avenue, Winnipeg 9, 

Manitoba. 
30 Woodlawn Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1S 2S9. 
Bay Colony Estates, R.R. #3, Stayner, Ontario. 
110 Lakeway Drive, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. K1L 5B2. 
2763 Moncton Road, Ottawa, Ontario. K2B 7V9. 
800 Maloney Blvd., Templeton, P.Q. 
125 Lakeway Drive, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. K1L 5A9. 
125 Lakeway Drive, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. K1L 5A9. 

Box 356, R.R. #2, Ottawa, Ontario. K2C 3H1. 
Box 356, R.R. #2, Ottawa, Ontario. K2C 3H1. 
2279 Prescott Highway 16, Ottawa, Ontario. 
781 Hemlock Road, Manor Park, Ottawa, Ontario. 
K1K 0K6. 



Fabricius, Christian Paulus 
Farquhar, Timothy Gordon 
Feldman, Rolf Julian Gustav 
Flynn, Matthew John 
Flynn, Brendan Charles 
Fonay, Nicholas Lawrence 

Fuller, William Norman 



Gall, Frederick Eric 

Garcia Ramos L. Mario 

George, David Andrew 
Gilmore, Daniel Alexander 

Grahovac, Stephen Zvonimir 

Grant, Philip Allen 

Grant-Whyte, Robert 
Gray, Stewart Alexander 
Green, David E. C. 

Hall, Edward Norman 

Hall, Benedict James Christian 

Repesse 
Hambleton, Ricardo 
Hamilton, John William Beresford 
Harris, John Steven 



240 Sandridge Road, Ottawa, Ontario. K1L 5A2. 
403 Wood Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. KIM 1J8. 
34 Delong Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1J 7E6. 
857 Glasgow Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K1K 0J5. 
857 Glasgow Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K1K 0J5. 
2240 Halifax Drive, Apt. 608, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K1G 2W8. 
"The Moorings', 2780 Cassels Street, Ottawa, 

Ontario, K2B 6N8. 

516 Kenwood Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K2A 0L6. 
E. Rebsamen Num. 626, Col. Narvarte, Mexico 

12, D.F. 
781 Highway #40, Corunna, Ontario. 
112 Lisgar Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0E6. 
Apt. 909, 200 Rideau Terrace, Ottawa, Ontario. 

KIM 0Z3. 
346 Ellerton Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, 

Montreal 304, P.Q. 
394 Lakeshore Road, Beaconsfield, P.Q. 
1895 Savoy Place, Ottawa, Ontario. K2C 0W2. 
577 Windermere Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K2A 2W4. 
535 Fairview Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0X4. 

582 Lisgar Street, Ottawa, Ontario. KIR 5H7. 
59 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 4A8. 
26 Madawaska Drive, Ottawa. Ontario. K1S 3G6. 
190 Minto Place, Rockcliffe Park. Ottawa, Ontario. 
KIM 0B7. 



112 



Harvey, Graham Paul 
Harwood, Richard William 
Heaney, David Macdonald 
Heaton, Hugh Alexander 
Heaton, Anthony Jonathan 

Helmer, Robin John 
Henderson, George Mark 
Henderson, Robert John 

Hermosillo, Hector F. 
Hodgins, Michael 
Hogarth, Robert Ernest 
Hogarth, David Andrew 

Hope, Paul 

Huston, Robert Hugh Francis 



Irving, David Alexander 

Jeffrey, George MacKinnon 
Jelenick, Michael Stuart 
Johnson, Geoffrey Blaine Phipps 
Johnston, Peter Alan Simon 
Johnston, David Bruce 
Johnston, Alastair Iain 
Johnston. William Erskine 
Jokinen, Edward Alexander 

Jones, Bryce Wylie 
Jones, Simon Frederick 
Jones, Martyn Daniel 
Josselyn, David 

Joyce, Charles Mark 



Kadziora, Paul Michael 
Keith, John Brian Campbell 
Kemper, Michael 
Kenny, Robert Maclaren 

Lackie, Daniel Wallace 

Lafortune, John 

Lamont, Thomas Stilwell I 

Lay, James M. C. 

Lay, Charles Ian 

Leung, Po-Cheung Anthony 

Liang, Sun-Wah Willy 

Ligthart, Robert Theodore 
Litvak, Matthew Kenneth 

Loeb, Arthur Henry 

Longsworth, Julian Kim 

Luciani, Anthony 
Luciani, Richard Grant 
Luciani, James Gordon 
Lurtz, Daniel John 
Lynch-Staunton, Victor 

Lynch-Staunton, Michael 



2278 Bowman Road, Ottawa, Ontario. K1H 6V6. 
57 Cherry wood Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K2H 6H1. 
2383 Base Line Road, Ottawa, Ontario. K2C 0E2. 
23 Larchwood Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 2E3. 
95 MacKinnon Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0G4. 
38 Davidson Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K1J 6L8. 
564 Lindsay Street, Winnipeg 9, Manitoba. 
190 Acacia Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0L5. 
Calle Francia 191, Mexico City 20, D.F. 
52 Queensline Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K2H 7J2. 
Norway Bay, P.Q. 
425 Maple Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. 
748 Fleming Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1G 2Y9. 
138 Royal Road, Lord Byron Place, Edmonton 

73, Alberta. 

Box 112, R.R. #1, Kingsmere, P.Q. 

1448 Kilborn Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1H 6L9. 
319 Clemow Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1S 2B7. 
100 Iona Street, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 3L8. 
64 Dufferin Road, Ottawa, Ontario. KIM 2A7. 
Box 121, R.R. #1, Hull, P.Q. 
Box 121, R.R. #1, Hull, P.Q. 
Maplewood Farm, R.R. #3, Richmond, Ontario. 
Apt. #103, 101 Angora Place, Dollard des 

Ormeaux, P.Q. 
950 Garwood Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1V 6W9. 
869 Glasgow Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K1K 0J5. 
869 Glasgow Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K1K 0J5. 

224 Springfield Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 
Ontario. KIM 0K9. 

Apt. #704, The Rockcliffe Arms, 124 Springfield 
Road, Ottawa, Ontario. KIM 0K9. 

36 Bayswater Place, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 2E2. 
54 Evergreen Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K2H 6C9. 
11 Briarcliffe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1J 6E3. 
614 George Street, Box 569, Buckingham, P.Q. 

167 Tennyson Place, Waterloo, Ontario. 

1510 Orchard Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1H 7C7. 

275 Springfield Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0K8. 
459 Buena Vista Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0W2. 
459 Buena Vista Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0W2. 
7 Vista Del Mar, IP/2 miles Castle Peak Road, 

New Territories, Hong Kong. 
237A Prince Edward Road, 6th Fir., Kowloon, 

Hong Kong. 
P.O. Box 482, Manotick, Ontario. 
865 Glasgow Crescent, Manor Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. K1K 0J5. 

225 Minto Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 
Ontario. KIM 0B5. 

Apt. #1, 1216 Bank Street, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K1S 3Y1. 
Havre St. Pierre, Duplessis County, P.Q. 
Havre St. Pierre, Duplessis County. P.Q. 
Havre St. Pierre, Duplessis County. P.Q. 
41 Aylmer Road, Lucerne, P.Q. 
Apt. #304, 2240 Halifax Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K1G 2W8. 
Apt. #304, 2240 Halifax Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K1G 2W8. 



113 



MacDonald, Keith James 

MacEwen, William Allan 
Maclaren, Gordon Chisholm 

MacLaine, Douglas Edward 
MacLaurin, Philip Malcolm 

Macleod, Nigel 
Macleod, David John 
MacNicol, Fraser 
MacPhee, James Peter 

Magner, Myles 
Major, Jacques 

Mangifesta, Pierre 
Marchant, Andrew Bertram 
Marion, Matthew Anderson 

Marshall, Scott Hamilton 
Martin, Thomas George 
Martin, Peter Charles Blackburn 
Martineau, Guy 
McKenna, George R. 

McKenna, Graeme Norman 
McKeown, Peter 
McNeil, Jeffrey 
McNulty, Larivee Shawn 
McTaggart, Gordon 
Meyers, David George 
Mierins, John Gordon 
Mierins, Amis E. 
Mitchell, Brenton Ellwood 
Mitchell, Jeffrey Martin 
Moore, Michael James 
Moore, Andrew Grover 
Morrison, Donald James 
Morrison, Robert Sinclair 
Motta, Richard Alan 
Mulock, William Francis 

Murray, Robert William Justin 

Newbergher, Richard Nelson 
Nicol, Bruce 
Ng, Chung Chi Douglas 
Ng, Chung Yu Raymond 

O'Meara, Michael William 
Ostiguy, Philippe 

Pardo, Phillippe 

Parra, F. Mariano 

Paterson, Donald Cameron 

Paterson, Colin 

Pearce, Douglas Howard 

Pelcis, Robert 

Pilaar, James Gray 

Pimm, Robert Gordon 

Pimm, Matthew Everett 

Pitfield, Jaime Weldon 

Plummer, William Richard 



22 Birch Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K1K 3G6. 
Box #100, Maxville, Ontario. 

20 Glenwood Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 
Ontario. KIM 0W6. 

406 Lakeshore Road, Beaconsfield 870, P.Q. 
34 Cote des Neiges Road, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K2G 2C4. 
2983 Otterson Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1V 7B5. 
2983 Otterson Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1V 7B5. 

63 Costello Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K2H 7C3. 
2455 Rosewood Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K2B 7L3. 
231 Clemow Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1S 2B5. 
383 Chester Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, 

Montreal 305, P.Q. 

64 East Avenue, Brantford, Ontario. 

51 Norice Street, Ottawa, Ontario. K2G 2X7. 
161 Howick Street, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0G9. 
47 Island Park Drive, Manotick, Ontario. 
22 Rothwell Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1J 7G4. 
Aylmer Road, R.R. #2, Aylmer E., P.Q. 
38 Range Road, Ottawa, Ontario. KIN 8J4. 
2 Coltrin Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ontario. 

KIM 0A5. 

21 Glenridge Road, Ottawa, Ontario. K2G 2Z3. 
473 Mayfair Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 0K6. 
51 Forest Hill Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K2C 1P7. 
Highway 17 East, Sturgeon Falls, Ontario. 

345 Archibald Street, Renfrew, Ontario. 
818 Norton Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K2B 5P6. 
42 Whippoorwill Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1J 7H9. 
6 Amberley Place, Ottawa, Ontario. K1J 7J8. 
460 Wilbrod Street, Ottawa, Ontario. KIN 6M8. 
460 Wilbrod Street, Ottawa, Ontario. KIN 6M8. 
603 Chester Street, Brooklyn, New York, U.S.A. 
603 Chester Street, Brooklyn, New York, U.S.A. 
61 Burnside Avenue, Wakefield, P.Q. 
169 Clemow Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1S 2B3. 
2108 Grafton Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K1J 6K8. 
387 Maple Lane, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 1H7. 
24 Clemow Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1S 2B2. 

910 Walkley Road, Ottawa, Ontario. K1V 6R5. 
165 Clemow Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1S 2B3. 
Ill Robinson Road, 3rd Fir., Hong Kong. 
Ill Robinson Road, 3rd Fir., Hong Kong. 

1374 Base Line Road, Ottawa, Ontario. K2C 0A9. 
260 Cloverdale Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0X2. 
201 Metcalfe Avenue, Westmount, Montreal 215, 

P.Q. 
Paseo de las Palmas 2005, Lomas de Chapultepec, 

Mexico 10, D.F. 
Station "F", P.O. Box 664, Thunderbay, Ontario. 
59 Three Valleys Drive, Don Mills 404, Ontario. 
4394 Gilles Street, Pierrefonds, P.Q. 
149 Crichton Street, Ottawa, Ontario. KIM 1W1. 
St-Sauveur des Monts, P.Q. 
251 Park Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ontario. 

KIM 0C9. 
251 Park Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ontario. 

KIM 0C9. 
100 Park Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, Ontario. 

KIM 0C2. 
56 Cobblestone Drive, Crestview, Willowdale, 

Ontario. 



114 



Polk, Nicholas 
Power, Sean Michael 

Price, William Andrew 

Pryde, Derek 

Puttick, Stephen Richard 

Puttick, Michael Paul Ernest 



34 Union Street, Ottawa, Ontario. KIM 1R4. 
P.O. Box 166, 30 Harbour Mews, Cable Beach, 

Nassau, Bahamas. 
33 Holton Avenue, Westmount, Montreal 217 

P.Q. 
2126 Casey Avenue, Beacon Hill North, Ottawa, 

Ontario. K1J 6E8. 
473 Brierwood Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario 

K2A 2H2. 
473 Brierwood Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario 

K2A 2H2. 



Reesor, John Gordon 
Reid, James W. 
Rhodes, Ian Nelson 

Richardson, Peter John 
Richter, Mark Andrew 
Rigby, Stephen James 
Rimsa Kostas 
Robertson, Magnus Ian Leslie 

Robertson, Richard Scot 

Robertson, Ronald Scott 
Rogers, Paul 
Ross, Douglas John H. 
Rowlinson, Matthew Charles 
Rowlinson, Andrew John 
Rushforth, Peter 



Scarth, Ian Campbell 
Schoeler, Robert John Andrew 
Scott, Andrew Nicholas 
Scott, Christopher Blair 

Seay, James Anthony 
Sellers, Graham 

Sellers, Philip 

Seymour, Stewart 

Singh, David 

Sirotek, Robert Frederick 

Sirotek, Norman Allan 

Siversky, David Jonathan 
Skolnik, Arthur 
Smith, Robert Bruce 
Smith, Ian Henderson 
Smith, Robert George 
Sourial, Michael 
Spencer, Stephen Derek 
Spencer, Nigel John 
Spencer, Gregory Charles 

Steacy, Harold Peter 
Stenger, Peter 

Stirling, Stephen Michael 
Stoddard, Isaac Allerton 

Stoddard, Frederick Lothrop 

Stratton, Walter William 



1166 Bonnie Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K2C 1Z5. 

227 John Street, Arnprior, Ontario. 

786 Dunloe Avenue, Manor Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. K1K 0K4. 
P.O. Box 430, Belize, British Honduras. 
322 Mildred Street, Midland, Ontario. 
35 Lambton Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. KIM 0Z8. 
267 de Chateauguay, Longueuil, P.Q. 
344 Manor Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0H8. 
83 Woodridge Crescent, Apt. #11, Ottawa, 

Ontario. K2B 7T2. 
17 Rothwell Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1J 7G5. 
2196E Halifax Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1G 2W6. 
38 Sioux Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K2H 7E5. 
434 Fortier Street, St. Hilaire, P.Q. 
434 Fortier Street, St. Hilaire, P.Q. 
782 Eastbourne Avenue, Manor Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. K1K 0H8. 

8 Qualicum Street, Ottawa, Ontario. K2H 7G8. 
177 Stewart Street, Ottawa, Ontario. KIN 6J8. 
455 Holland Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 0Z4. 
470 Acacia Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0M2. 
Marsa El Brega, P.O. Box 385, Tripoli, Libya. 
457 Oakhill Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 1J5. 
457 Oakhill Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 1J5. 

41 Holton Avenue, Westmount, Montreal 217, 
P.Q. 

245 Clemow Avenue. Ottawa, Ontario. K1S 2B5. 
1485 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K2C 1N8. 
1485 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K2C 1N8. 
514 Stanley Street, Hawkesbury, Ontario. 
1331 Duquet Avenue, Sillery 6, P.Q. 

42 Moorecroft Road, Ottawa, Ontario. K2G 0M7. 
418 Dublin Road, Beaconsfield 880, P.Q. 

20 Range Road, Ottawa, Ontario. KIN 8J3. 
7 Belvedere Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. KIM 0E5. 
Athol Doune Drive, R.R. #2, Aylmer East, P.Q. 
Athol Doune Drive, R.R. #2, Aylmer East, P.Q. 
3014 Southmore Drive East, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K1V 6Z4. 
328 Island Park Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 0A7. 
1631 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K2C 1P2. 
P.O. Box 49, Greely, Ontario. 
180 Acacia Avenue. Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0R3. 
180 Acacia Avenue. Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0R3. 
25 Southern Parkway, Rochester, New York 

14618, New York. U.S.A. 



115 



Tanos, Stephen Thomas 

Tapp, Peter Gordon 

Taticek, Peter 

Teron, Christopher Noel 

Tkachuk, Michael Wilson 

Torontow, Michael 

Towe, Christopher Milburn 

Tutton, John Charles 

Urdaneta, Hector 

Van Leeuwen, David 

Van Leeuwen, Matthew 

Van Veen, Robert Vincent Eden 

Veilleux, Hugues 

Veilleux, Clermont 

Verhey, Shawn Gordon 

Viets, Mark Robert 



2172 Benjamin Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K2A 1P4. 
River Road, R.R. #1, Manotick, Ontario. 
94 Maple Lane, Ottawa, Ontario, KIM 1H5. 
7 Crescent Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM ONI. 
R.R. #3, Brampton, Ontario. 

1969 Bromley Road, Ottawa, Ontario. K2A 1C3. 
3550 Tilden Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 

20008, U.S.A. 
Basswood Lane, R.R. #2, Lucerne, P.Q. 

470 Island Park Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 0B3. 

21 Linden Terrace, Ottawa, Ontario. K1S 1Z1. 
21 Linden Terrace, Ottawa, Ontario. K1S 1Z1. 
P.O. Box 1164, Ottawa, Ontario. KIP 5R2. 
74 Gall Blvd., Drummondville, P.Q. 
74 Gall Blvd., Drummondville, P.Q. 
32 Chinook Crescent. Ottawa, Ontario. K2H 7E1. 
305 Thorold Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 
Ontario. KIM OKI. 



Walker, Jeffrey Ward 
Walker, Ian Michael 
Walker, Robert Scott 

Wallick, Stephen 
Warren, Donald Ross 
Warren, Timothy Michael 
Warwick, Guy Conrad 
Watson, Stephen Noel 
Webster, Mark Allan Bryan 
Welch, Douglas Lindsay 
Welch, David Andrew 
Whitmore, Michael Wayne 

Wiener, Philippe-Marc 

Wilgress, Edward Dana Cameron 

Wilson, Peter William 

Wilson, Eric Chester 

Wilson, Timothy Everton 

Wilson, Shawn Patrick 
Wilson, Richard McClain 
Wilson, Ian Fraser 
Wong, Cheung Pei Jackson 

Wright, James 

Wright, Palmer Howard 

Yap, Ming Kui Charles John 

Yaxley, David Thomas 

Zagerman, Mark David 
Zagerman, Joel Wolf 
Zunenshine, Leslie 
Zwirewich, Charles Vincent 



9 Rebecca Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K1J 6B7. 
9 Rebecca Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K1J 6B7. 
Apt. #1205, Champlain Towers, 200 Rideau 

Terrace, Ottawa, Ontario. KIM 0Z3. 
Basswoodhill, R.R. #1, Dunrobin, Ontario. 
45 Rockfield Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K2E 5L6. 
7 Eleanor Drive E., Ottawa, Ontario. K2E 6A3. 
54 Frontenac Drive, Lucerne, P.Q. 
2088 Thistle Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K1H 5P5. 
Cotnam Island, R.R. 31, Pembroke, Ontario. 
35 Mohawk Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K2H 7G7. 
35 Mohawk Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K2H 7G7. 
Apt. #2, 423 Third Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. 

K1S 2K6. 
Apt. #1606, 1455 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal 

109, P.Q. 
230 Manor Avenue, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0H4. 
161 Carleton Street, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0G6. 
161 Carleton Street, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0G6. 
161 Carleton Street, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0G6. 
965 Dresden Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario. K2B 5H9. 
14 Maple Lane, Ottawa, Ontario. KIM 1G7. 
14 Maple Lane, Ottawa, Ontario. KIM 1G7. 
1 1 Observatory Road, 6th Fir., Kowloon, Hong 

Kong. 
Meach Lake, P.Q. 
147 Kinzua Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, 

Ontario. KIM 0C7. 

89 Waterloo Road, 3rd Fir., Kowloon, Hong 

Kong. 
Island Park Drive, Long Island, Manotick, Ontario. 

208 Island Park Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 0A4. 
208 Island Park Drive, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 0A4. 
27 Belsize Road, Hampstead, Montreal 254, P.Q. 
234 Irving Place, Ottawa, Ontario. K1Y 1Z8. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

Exchange Editors may care to know that their publications are regularly 
placed in our Southam Library. We ask them to accept our best wishes. 



116 



MORRISON LAMOTHE BAKERY 

a subsidiary of 

MORRISON LAMOTHE FOODS LIMITED 

Manufacturers and Distributors of 
Donald Duck Bread — Pan Dandy Bread 

SUNIBAKE 

Fresh Baked Goods 



=• if .t, m b 



1 3 



DRY WALL LTD 

INDUSTRIAL - COMMERCIAL - RESIDENTIAL 

DRY WALL ON STEEL STUDS - SUSPENDED CEILINGS 
SOLID & SEMI-SOLID PARTITIONS 

MOVABLE PARTITIONS 
SPRAY STIPPLED & SWIRL CEILINGS 



34 BENTLEY 



KING SLUMBER MOTEL 

"WE'RE FRIENDLY HERE" 



2279 Prescott Hwy. # 16 



Ottawa, Ontario. K2E 6Z8 



CHAS. McKINLEY CO. 

PLUMBING— HEATING 

City Wide Repairs — Installations 
Hot Water Tanks 



G. T. Higginbottom, Prop. 



209 Ann St., Vanier 



749-2886 



It's the 
real thing. 

Coke. 




Trade MarK Reg 
BOTH COCA-COLA AND COKE ARE REGISTERED TRADE MARKS WHICH IDENTIFY ONLY THE PRODUCT OF COCA-COLA LTD 



THE BORDEN COMPANY LIMITED 


2370 LANCASTER ROAD 


OTTAWA 731-2430 


• DAIRY PRODUCTS • ICE CREAM • 



Compliments of 

M. ZAGERMAN & CO. LTD. 



LUMBER — PLYWOOD — STEEL 



100 Bayview Road 



Phone 729-5111 



GREENSHIELDS INCORPORATED 
Investment Dealers 



Suite 1112, 
151 Sparks St., 
Ottawa KIP 5E3. 



Tel: 238-2626 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



CAPITAL COACH LINES CO., LTD 




Adjeleian and Associates Limited, Consulting Engineers 
75 Albert Street, Ottawa4, Ontario, Telephone (613)232 5786 



Best Wishes to all 
The Students and Faculty of Ashbury College 

William Teron & Associates 



The congratulations and best wishes of our 
entire organization are extended to the 
Students and Staff of Ashbury College. 



Dibblee Construction Company Limited 

Highway 31 Ottawa, Canada 



Compliments 
of 

IRVING CONTRACTING 
LTD. 



£*f§* 



m 



°#0**j 



V 



LET yeor 9 e DO IT! 
ROGER ST. LOUIS 

PRESIDENT 



INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY • REPAIRS • 
• WIRING • ELECTRIC HEAT • 



1181 CECIL AVENUE, OTTAWA 8 Telephone 731-7842 



P£j^j|rmstrong and 




■Richardson Ltd. 


"Family Shoe Fitting Specialists" 




• Sparks Street Mall 




• Carlingwood 




• Billings Bridge 




• St. Laurent 




• Exclusive Shop for Men - 


- 87 Sparks St 



Compliments 
of a 

FRIEND 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



PURE SPRING (CANADA) LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF CANADA'S FINEST SOFT DRINKS 



DURAL PRODUCTS LIMITED 

Manufacturers of resins, adhesives, coatings, paints, lacquers, etc., 
for industrial and home use. 

Head Office: Dorval, P. Quebec. 

Branches: Halifax, Toronto, Winnipeg & Vancouver. 



FISHER AND WEXLER LIMITED 

INDUSTRIAL AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS CONSULTANTS 
SUITE 505. 151 SLATER STREET 

OTTAWA 4. CANADA 



PRESIDENT 
JAMES D. FISHER 



TELEPHONE (613) 237-3598 



Tel. : 233-7744 



MARCHAND ELECTRICAL COMPANY 

LIMITED 

WHOLESALE ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

LIGHTING FIXTURES 



143-5 Besserer Street 



Ottawa, Ont. KIN 6A7 







G. 


T. Green Ltd. 

DECORATORS 




750 Bank St 


— Ottawa, Ont. 


236-2338 



WITH 



&?k 5chheiderS 



® 



FOODS 

YOU CAN 

"TASTE THE DIFFERENCE QUALITY MAKES" 

J. M. SCHNEIDER LIMITED KITCHENER, ONTARIO 



When You Think of Travels Think 



Lorsque vous pensez voyages, pensez 



VOYAGEUR 

COLONIAL LIMITED 

Organized Tours year round Voyages organises toute J'annee 

Charter coaches anywhere, anytime Autobus nolises en tout temps et pour tout endroit 

Express trips to suit your needs Voyages express eonvenant a vos besoins 

7 days a week parcel express Service de messageries rapide tous les jours 



For Information Contact: 
Pour plus de renseignements, eomposez: 

Ottawa Montreal 



Charters and Tours: 

Excursions et location d'autobus: 

Schedules and Fares: 
Horaires et prix: 

Parcel Express: 
Messageries: 



233-5611 
236-9681 
236-7451 



843-4231 
842-2281 
843-4231 



Toronto 
368-4272 

487-5111 

362-1186 



Sav&Jbr 




Start today— saving for some fun. 
Open a 'Blue Chip' Savings 
Account. At our big interest 
rate, you'll get there faster. 
Come and see us. 

The Bank of Nova Scotia 



Head Office: 
67 Sparks St. 



233-1132 



Branch Offices: 

180A Metcalfe St. - 232-7470 

440 Hinton Ave. - 729-5845 



St. Laurent 
Shopping Centre 

Lincoln Fields 
Shopping Centre 



Geo. H. Nelms Ltd. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 



746-6418 
828-5042 




A GOOD NAME TO KNOW... IN EASTERN ONTARIO., 



HODGINS 

LUmEIERHHflUmiTED 



'QUALITY LUMBER AND BUILDING SUPPLIES' 

OTTAWA - CORNWALL - BROCKVILLE 
PEMBROKE - MORRISBURG - ARNPRIOR 




(§M9[|W» 




The Family Department Store 

Three Stores to Serve You 
Rideau St. at Nicholas — Billings Bridge Plaza 
Lincoln Fields 
Dial 236-4511 




Compliments of 






John Clifford and Three Ski 


Areas 




• MONT STE-MARIE • CARLINGTON PARK 


• MONT CASCADE 


VISIT 






Clifford's Ski Centre 






1476 MERIVALE ROAD THE COMPLETE SKI SHOP 


JOHN CLIFFORD ENTERPRISES 




OLD CHELSEA QUEBEC 




827-1550 



RIGGING AND MILLWRIGHTING CONTRACTORS 
MOBILE CRANK a N D FLOAT SERVICE 

10 CENTENNIAL ROAD, WATERLOO TOWNSHIP 

P.O. BOX 1238 KITCHENER, ONTARIO 



Compliments 
of 




SUPPLY CO. LIMITED 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS - BUILDING MATERIALS 
HAWKESBURY - (ONTARIO) - VANKLEEK HILL 




FORD 



MERCURY 



MacEWEN FORD SALES LTD. 

CDMPLETE LINE OF FDRD & 
MERCURY CARS & TRUCKS 



PHONE 527-21DD — MAXVILLE, DNT. 




^ann fleetmweim DpcrDdDimiilksiDTmip 

QttdL 



C/reetinpd to the gentlemen of \>4dkL 







CHARTERED 






ACCOUNTANTS 


TOUCHE, 


ROSS & Co. 


Sydney, Halifax, Saint John, Quebec, 

Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, 

Kitchener, London, Windsor, 


Resident Partners - 


Charles G. Gale, F.C.A. 
Thomas C. Dawson, C.A. 


Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, 

North Battleford, Calgary, 

Edmonton, New Westminster, 

Burnaby, Vancouver, Victoria, 

Bermuda, Nassau and Freeport 

Bahama Islands, Grand Cayman 



CUTTLES 




MONT TREMBLANT, 

QUEBEC. CANADA. 




Fish mongers on 
By Ward Market 
since 1867 



«LAP0INn< 

FISH (OTTAWA? LIMITED EST. 1867 



TELEPHONE ANSWERING BUREAU 

722-6541 

3 Branches Serving All Exchanges Ottawa and Area 

24 HOURS A DAY 

Makes Appointments — Quotes Prices — Accepts Orders 
DOES EVERYTHING A SECRETARY CAN DO BY TELEPHONE 

150 Metcalfe 508 Dawson 1568 Merivale 



Bank of Montreal 

The First Canadian Bank 

Money should do something. It 
should open up your life. 

That doesn't mean you must go out 
and get a whole lot of money. It sim- 
ply means that somebody who knows 
how to make his money work is going 
to find a lot more opportunities in life 
than somebody who doesn't. The 
Bank of Montreal is in the money bu- 
siness. We can show you how to 
make it work. 

All you have to do is come in to 
any branch of the Bank of Montreal. 
Ask what a savings account or a 
chequing account can do for you. 
Ask any questions you have about 
money. We want your life to be filled 
with opportunities. We want you to 
get your money's worth. 

Bread. 

It shouldn't 

loaf. 




£ji*to 



HUNG&RM 

village: 



NOTHING LIKE IT 
IN OTTAWA 



• Introducing special Hungarian 
wines and cocktails 

• Luncheon Specials 

• Fiaming Hungarian 
Specialties 

• The YOSHKAS, gypsy 
musicians from Budapest 
entertain you in our relaxing, 
romantic atmosphere 

owned and operated by 
Mr. & Mrs. Niklos Fonay 

164 Laurier Ave. W. 
at Metcalfe 

238-2827 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



HARRIS FUELS 






Compliments 
of 

THOMAS FULLER CONSTRUCTION 
CO. (1958) LIMITED 

METCALFE REALTY COMPANY LIMITED 






H. A. HART, Phm.B. fcJ 



innro 






ttfcau'i — nrmrmr 






■at :; 




J. B. HART, Phm.B. 



HART'S PHARMACY LIMITED 

33 "BEECHWOOD AVE. (COR. MACKAYI 
OTTAWA 2, ONT. 



3 Conveniently Located 
Stores in Ottawa 

185-187 SPARKS ST. 
235-1481 




262 RIDEAU ST. 
235-4466 

356 RICHMOND RD. 

722-4523 



Our Name is Your Guarantee 



SILVERSMITHS ^SB/V GOLDSMITHS 




B IRK S 




OTTAWA 




Gifts of Quality and Distinction 




HENRY BIRKS & SONS LTD. 


Billings Br 
737-4600 


dge Plaza 101 Sparks St. St. Laurent Shopping Centre 
236-3641 745-7186 



d> 



E. T. WILSON TYPEWRITER 
LIMITED 

• TYPEWRITERS • ADDING MACHINES • 
• OFFICE FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES • 

25 MONTREAL ROAD 745-7156 OTTAWA 7, ONT. 




OPEN DAILY 7 AM TO 1 AM 

BANQUET FACILITIES FOR 45 PERSONS 
TAKE OUT ORDERS Italian spaghetti & pizza 



Best Wishes 

from 

H. FINE & SONS LIMITED 

Wholesale Supplier of Food Products 



McNEIL PHARMACY 



PARKDALE MEDICAL 
TOWERS 

1077 CARLING AVENUE 



722-7679 



CENTRAL MEDICAL 
BUILDING 

444 HINTON AVENUE 



722-3419 



Alex McNeil, Phm.B. 

Prescriptions 



Mobil 

DISTRIBUTOR 



PAINTS 



QUINCAILLERIE 



JOLICOEUR LTD. hardware 



PEINTURE - PAINT 
ACCESSOIRES DE MAISON - HOUSEWARE 



19-21 Beechwood 



749-5959 



Compliments 
°f 

CONTINENTAL SKI IMPORTS LIMITED 

IMPORTERS AND DISTRIBUTORS 

OF 

QUALITY SKI EQUIPMENT 

825-2497 



85 MACFARLANE ROAD 



OTTAWA, ONTARIO 



jamesbury canada ltd. 



Ottawa, Ontario 



'Double-Seal' 
Ball Valves 



"Wafer-Sphere" 
Butterfly Valves 



Pneumatic Gr Electric Actuators 



Electronic Positioners 




"The^ShburySpooti 

Engraving is always a mark of distinct ion . . 

it stands alone in Beauty and Elegance. Our 

spoons are created by one of the world's 

most outstanding portrait engravers. 

These spoons are made by 

Canadians with pride in their 

art and craftsmanship. A 

perfect gift, a year 

round prized 

Collector's 

Item. 



We 

produce 
crested 
spoons in silver 
or goldplate for 
Colleges, Fraternities 
and Sororities in Canada 
and the United States. It is 
our pleasure to have created 
the A s h b u r y Spoon 



COMMEMORATIVE PRODUCTS LIMITED 

425 GLOUCESTER ST.. OTTAWA. ONT.. KIR 5E9 



SJt has been our pleasure 


to print . . . 


^\\t Aafjbxtrfan 


• COMMERCIAL PRINTING • LETTERHEADS 


• LETTERPRESS • OFFICE FORMS 


• LITHOGRAPHY • BROCHURES 


• DESIGN 


• INVITATIONS 


ILO-MO 


R PRINTERS* 




WKt LIMITED 


86 GLOUCESTER STREET 236-3608 



<y[utographs